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Occupational Wage Survey

BUFFALO, NEW YORK
January 1952

Bulletin No. 108 5

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

Contents
Page
..........................................

1

TABLES: - Continued

THE BUFFALO METROPOLITAN A R E A ...........................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE.............................

1

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on
an industry basis* - Continued
B-35
Machinery industries
.....•••••..
B-40
Railroads .............................
B-5452 Milk dealers..........................
B-63
Insurance carriers ......

31
32
33
33

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction •••••••••••••••••••
C-205 Bakeries..............................
C-2082 Malt liquors...........................
C-2431 Millwork..............................
C-27
Printing..............................
C-41
Local transit operating employees .......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers........

34
34
35
3$
35
35
35

INTRODUCTION

TABLES:

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on
an area basis A-l
Office occupations................... . . . . . . ................
A-la Office occupations - Erie County ......................
A-lb
Office occupations - Niagara County.............
A-2
Professional and technical occupations......... .
A-2a
Professional and technical occupations Erie County . . . ................................ . ...........
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations•••••.
A-3a
Maintenance and power plant occupations Erie County
...................
A-3b
Maintenance and power plant occupations Niagara County........... ................... ••••••••••
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations.............
A-4a
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations - Erie County ••••••••••••••••••
A-4b
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations - Niagara County ........... .

27

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on
an industry basis* B-204 Grain B illin g .......................................................
B-28
Chemicals (selected branches) ................
B-336 Foundries, nonferrous ..........................................
B-3463 Stamped and pressed astal products ..................
B-3468 Electroplating, plating, and polishing•••••••

29
29
30
30
31




3
9
13
16
17
18
20
21
23
25

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant
workers....

36

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions •••••.....
E-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .................
E-3
Paid holidays..........................
E-4
Paid vacations............ ....
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ........................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans
.....••••••

37
38
38
39
40
41
41

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey

42

.................. .

INDEX .............................................

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for auto repair shops
(April 1951), ferrous foundries (June 1951), and
power laundries (April 1951)*

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents

June 2, 1952

44

Introduction

1/

The Buffalo area is 1 o f 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety o f
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods o f sampling were
thus u tiliz e d in compiling earnings data fo r the follow ing types
o f occupations:
(a) o f f i c e ; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) cu stodial, warehousing, and
shipping*
In presenting earnings information fo r such jobs
(tables A -l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible fo r individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations ch aracteristic o f particu lar, important,
lo c a l industries were studied on an industry b asis, within the
framework o f the community survey* 2 /
Earnings data fo r these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lie u o f (or supplementing)
occupational earnings fo r several industries or trades in which
the great majority o f the workers are employed under terms o f
collective-bargain in g agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative o f prevailing pay practices*
Data were co lle cte d and summarized on s h ift operations
and d iffe r e n tia ls , hours o f work, and supplementary benefits such
as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, nonpro­
duction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Buffalo Metropolitan A rea
The population o f the Buffalo Metropolitan Area (Erie
and Niagara Counties) was almost 1,100,000 in 1950* More than
h a lf th is to ta l lived in the c ity o f Buffalo*
The Buffalo area is one o f the Nation’ s important
manufacturing centers*
About 200,000 workers were employed in
the m ills and fa cto rie s that produce a wide variety o f goods*
1 / Prepared in the Bureau’ s regional o f f i c e in New York,
N. Y*, by Donald J. Blackmore under the d irection o f Frederick
W Mueller, Regional Wage an! Industrial Relations Analyst* The
*
planning and central d irection o f the program was carried on in
the Bureau’ s Division o f Wages and Industrial Relations*
2 / See appendix fo r discussion o f scope and method c£ survey*




Major products include flou r and feed , chemicals, iron
and s te e l, machinery, fabricated metals, a ir c ra ft, motor vehi­
cles and parts, and paper.
Nonmanufacturing a c tiv itie s also are v ita l in the
area’ s economy* The area is served by excellen t port f a c i l i t i e s
on Lake Erie and by major r a i l lin e s .
Approximately 34>000
workers were employed by the transportation, communication, and
other public u t i li t y industries in January 1952. Wholesale and
r e t a il trade establishments employed 45,000 workers*
Erie and Niagara Counties d iffe r markedly with respect
to industrial composition*
More than 90 percent o f the area’ s
nonmanufacturing employment is concentrated in Buffalo and other
parts o f Erie County; whereas Niagara County is devoted to
manufacturing industries, particularly chemicals, a ir c r a ft,
motor vehicles and equipment, pulp and paper, and primary metals*
Among the industry and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed, 8 o f 10 workers in nonoffice jobs were employed in es­
tablishments having written agreements with labor organizations.
The degree of unionization varied widely among d ifferen t industry
groups* In manufacturing and the transportation-public u t i l i ­
t ie s groups, p ra ctica lly a l l plant workers were employed in
firms having union contracts*
Among other groups, th is pro­
portion ranged from 76 percent in service industries to about
20 percent in r e t a il trade.
Unionization o f o f fic e workers was much less prevalent
than among plant workers; about 1 o f 6 were in o ffic e s with
union contracts*
The heaviest unionization was found in the
public u t i l i t i e s industries, where nearly three-fourths o f the
o ffic e workers were in firms with union contracts covering
o f f i c e workers; manufacturing was second highest with a sixth
o f the workers employed under the provisions of union contracts*

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries fo r most plant and o ffic e workers
were formally adjusted upward between January 1950 - the base
period fo r the Wage S ta bilization Board’ s 10-percent ’’catch-up”
wage increase formula - and the time o f the study* More than
80 percent o f the plant workers and 70 percent o f the o ffic e
workers received one or more general wage increases during the
2-year period.
V irtually a l l o f these increases f e l l within a
range o f 5 to 25 cents an hour with the greatest concentration
between 10 and 15 cents* In addition, approximately 12 percent

2

of the workers in establishments surveyed were awaiting further
wage increases pending approval of the Wage Stabilization Board*
Most of these pending increases were for amounts ranging from
4 to 12 oents an hour*
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing more than 85 percent of the
are a ,s plant workers* Structures providing single rates for
individual occupations and rate-range structures were about
equally prevalent* Salary progression through a formal range
of rates applied to nearly 60 percent of the office workers*
Salaries for practically all other office workers were deter­
mined individually©
Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers
with no previous work experience were almost universal*
Es­
tablishments with minimum entrance rates of more than $1*20 an
hour employed more than half the workers in the area; these
establishments were primarily the larger manufacturing concerns*
Minimum rates from $ 1 to $1*20 an hour were applicable in es­
tablishments employing an additional 20 percent of the plant
workers* Minima below 75 cents an hour were confined almost
exclusively to retail trade and service industries*
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing in­
dustries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing* In




30

28 of
office job classifications permitting comparison, sala­
ries of workers in manufacturing exceeded those of workers in
nonmanufacturing establishments* Average hourly earnings of
plant workers studied in all industries were higher in manu­
facturing for 25 of 28 comparable jobs*

More than a fourth of all plant workers in Buffalo
manufacturing plants were employed on late shifts in January
1952o Nearly all such workers received a shift differential,
usually expressed as a cents-per-hour premium< The most camion
>
differentials were 4 to 5 cents for second-shift and 5^ to 6
oents for third-shift work*
The predominant paid-vacation, policy for plant workers
was 1 week after 1 year of servioe and 2 weeks after 5 years*
Most office workers were eligible for 2 w e e k s 1 vacation after
1 year*

Almost 70 percent of the Buffalo area's office workers
and more than 75 percent of the plant workers were scheduled to
work a 40-hour week in January 1952* The principal variation
from this schedule was found in the transportation* communi­
cation, and other public utilities group, where a 37^-hour week
was established for more than half of the office workers*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations

Tabic A
-i:

O ^ ic e

O c c u p a tio n *.

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Buffalo, N Y., by industry division, January 1952)
.

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

Average
*$
s
$
$
$
W
eekly
W
eekly Under 27.50 130.00 32.50 35.00 37.50
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 27.50
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
j$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
j and
42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
|

Bookkeepers, hand ......
Manufacturing ...... ..
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods .
....
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities * . .
.

192
139
95
44
53
30

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
41.5

%
79.50
83.00
84.50
79.00
71.50
70.00

Clerks, accounting ......
Manufacturing ........
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ...
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities * . .
.
Wholesale trade ....
Retail trade ......
Finance ** ...... .

467
294
212
82
173
28
62
51
25

39,5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
39.5
38.0
40.0
39.0

66.00
69.50
70.00
68.50
60.00
53.00
57.50
65.50
63.50

Clerks, general ........
Manufacturing .......
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ...
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities * . .
.
Wholesale trade ....

. 319
229
170
59
90
62
23

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.5
40.5
40.0

67.00
67.50
64.00
78.00
66.00
66.00
65.00

Clerks, order .........
Manufacturing .......
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ...
Nonmanufacturing .....
Wholesale trade ....

230
88
70
18
142
121

39.5
39.5
40.0
37.5
39.5
39.5

64.00
70.00
71.00
65.00
60.00
58.50

Clerks, payroll ........
Manufacturing .......
Durable goods ......
Nondurable goods ... .

178
174
144
30

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

69.50
69.50
69.00
71.50

Office boys ............
Manufacturing ....... .
Durable goods ..... .
Nondurable goods . . .
...
Nonmanufacturing ......

87
53
20
33
34

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

39.00
41.50
39.00
43.00
35.00

Tabulating-machine operators
Manufacturing ........
Nonmanufacturing ......

44

30
14

39.5
40.0
38.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-)
J
-

-

-

-

5
2

1 .... .3
1

1
1

-

1

1

2
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

12
-

2
2
-

-

2

13
3
10

-

12
12

-

1

-

1

1

“

9
3
l
2
6
2
2

15
2
2

-

_

_

1

13
4
4

1
1

9

9
5

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

9
6

-

4
2

-

47
23
2
21
24

-

2
2

41
21
20
1
20
17

24
12
6
6
12
3
8

34
21
18
3
13
2
2

_

-

-

4
18
-

1
_

-

-

_

1

-

1

25
24
14
10
1
1

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7
7

17
17
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

_

-

1 ...
1

1

_

_

1
1

2
3
~

-

3
2

61.00
59.50
64.50

32
27
26
1
5

_

.

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

?2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

“

“

“

2
30
30

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

-

9
7
3
4

16
16
16
”

26
6
2
4
20

8
5
3
2

16
H
6
8

15
15

3

2

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“
5
if
3
1
1

_

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

7

.

-

5
5
2
3

“

-

_

3
3
3

-

-

-

2
2
1
1

-

15

20 ,
2!

1
9
17

-

17

2
18
18

-

9
9

31
29
22
7
2
1

5
4
31
17
14
3
14
14

-

-

9

5

1

-

29
29
29

30
20
20

44
14
14

-

17
17
14
3

10

-

30
18
7

13
9
8
1
4
4
“
34
12
7

_

16

-

8

-

12
12
1
11

_
_

-

_

57
37
29
8
20
14
6

-

48
4^
43
3
2
2

4
4

_

-

^9 2 / V7
30
39 r
22
38
8
1
_
i
7
3
-

23
20
3

-

_
_

_

LQ
2o
6
20
14
6

38
13
11
2
25

9
5
5

49
38
11
17
1
2
8
6

10

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s ,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

25

_

1

17
15
6
9
2
2
-

-

-

31
25
14
11
6
6
-

9
7
3
4
2
2
-

11
17
9 ----- 14
1
9
13
2
3
2
3
~

19
16
14
2
3
-

5
5
5

-

17
15
12
3
4
1

1
1

10
5
3
2

15
2
2
-

_

2
2

5
5

13
10

8
8

17
17

7
4
3
1
3
-

5
5
4
1

5
5
4
1

6
6
3
3

5

5
5
*
*

4
4
3
1

17
17
13
4

13
13
12
1

7
7
6
1

20
18
15 1
3j

3
3
3

52
52
50
2

9
9
6
3

7
7
1
6

2
1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

8

6

2
2

2

2

7
7

6

2

5

-

-

-

-

6

4

1
1

-

19
2
2
-

-

5

_

22
19

16
10

;

-

_

5
4
4
-

1

~
10
10

1
-

1

1

Occupational Wage Survey,

2

2

N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Buffalo,

h

G jffc c e

Table A -l:

Q cC 44fU tiiO H d> - G o + U iH 4 4 * d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in B uffalo, N. x ., by industry d ivision , January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Nme
ubr
o
f
wre s
ok r

V V&
I t
V M
l
O O
T
O V

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00
h u s erig ♦
or
anns
(tnad (tnad 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00
S adr) S a dr)
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 lo.oo
and
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women
*
45.50
50.00
50.50
49.50

Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods .............. .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonaanufacturing................
Wholesale trade ......... .....

317
144
77
67
173
91
13

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
40,0

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) . .
..
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing ................
Wholesale trade ............ .... .
Ratai1 trade TTTTtTTt1TT1TTTTTITtTTI,

173
33
140
42
48

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5

Bookkeepers, hand ..................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing................
WhnlaqaIm
Retail trade .................
Services ................... .

438
184
67
117
254
29
106
84

40.5
a .5

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A . .
..
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ....... ......
Nonmanufacturing ...... ..........
Who!eaale trAde T.T.T..TtTTTI.T-T f t
lT
Finance * * _TT.TT............ T

185
80
42
38
105
31
41

39.0

55.50

40.0

66.00
65.00
67.50
48.00
50.00
41.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B . . . .
Manufacturing .............................................
Durable goods ........................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................
Public utilities * ...............................
Wholesale trade ....................................
R t a 1 trade TTTTT..............
e.i
Finance ** ................. ._

441
97
36
61
344
17
67
24
234

39.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
39.5

40.0

42.00

40.50
39.oo
43.50
51.00
a . 50

_
-

45.50
36.00

40.0

55.50
57.50
58.00
57.50
54.00
67 .OO
53.00

39.5

49.50

39.0
43.0
40.0

18

40.0
40.0
38.5
39.5
38.5

40.0

39.0

a . 00
46.50
48.50
46.00
39.50
43.00
44.50
39.00
38.00

-

-

_

19
19
_

19
19
_

7

-

7
7
7

17

-

15

-

_

-

-

_
“

18
14
14
4
_
4

31
31
23

31
8
4
4
23
7

18
18
1
17

21
4
17
13

11
-

33
7
4
3
26
14
2

46
21

9

24

-

6
18
14

9
_

39
1

n
10
25
5
5

11

37
13
8
5
24
14

18
14
9
5
4
2

31
22
13
9
9
4

24
23
10
13
1
1

4
2
2
2
2

5
4
1

6
1
5

2
1
1

15
6
9

21
1
20
14

26
22

14
-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

1
38

11

_
11

_
-

21
17

11
-

4
“

14
10
2

-

-

22
4

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
-

8
-

8
-

9
-

23
-

-

-

-

12
1
1

-

-

-

1
1

8
2
6

8
1

9

23

11

7

72

V

21
-

-

_

_

-

21
1
2
18

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding ra ilroa ds), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
6
11
9
2

67
11
-

11
5
6
5
5
1

-

72
2
4
6
60

5
1
4
68
6
10
6
45

14

-

2
8

1

5

9

11

2

4?
26
17
9
17

?6

16
3
3

6

17

-

23
45
6
22
7
2
2
-

5

_
_
-

_
.
-

.
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
11
10
1
2

22
10
10
12

30
27
2
25
3

13

-

22
“

2

6
5

1
-

?
5

20
16
16
4

6
6
1
5
-

_
-

_
-

-

5
4
2
2
1
1

2
2
2
-

8
7
7
1
1

3

10
9
1

-

1
1
-

33
11
1
10
22

16
10
9
1
6

5
31

-

3

22
11
4
7
11
1
10

7
13

5
2
2
3

22
6
3
3
16
16

6
2
1
1
4

22
22
8
14
-

13
8
8

2
2
2

-

-

5

_

6
4
1
3
2

17
5
1
4
12
1
2

2
2

8
7
3
4
1

3
1
1

.

4
2
1
1
2

_

2

1

2

6
-

2
2
1
1
-

-

1

35
14
12
2
21
g
13
~

30
24
4
20
6

1
1
1
.
-

36
5
-

-

5
-

-

-

13
13

-

_

-

-

1
1
1
-

_
_
-

_

.
_
_
-

6
6
6
_

-

.
-

-

6

57
13
3
10
44
1
n
7
24

68
23

-

_
.
-

20
12
10
2
8
1

11

2
2

5

-

-

34

13
2
4

5

3
9

7

15
15
2
13

2

9

-

2

-

2

_
-

_
_

1
1
1
-

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

5

O ^ lc e . 0 cC 4 4 fu U iO * U “ G o 4 tti* U 4 * d

Table A -l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in B uffalo, N. Y ., by industry division , January 19$2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Nme
ubr
o
f
w res
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 ^0.00
erig $
anns
and
(tnad (tnad 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00
S adr) S adr)
42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
i

Women - Continued
j
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ...............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ...... ..........
Services ............ .......

694
279
195
84
415
128
191
30

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ......
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing ................

71
24
47

$

40.5

45.50
52.50
54.50
48.00
41.00
45.00
38.00
35.50

-

39.0
40.0
39.0

47.50
50.50
45.50

“

40.0
40.0

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

30
30
30
~

17

48

77
1
3
11
2
8
40
64
20
33 1 28
3! k

34

-

103
18
4
14
85
39
44

41
18 J
8
10 j
23
7
8

5
5
2^
7
21
6
28
H
14

4

2
2

6
3;
3

1

217
61
52
9
156

110
25 !
16 1
9!
85 !

81

34
2
16
12

17

4
9

|

1
56
24
20
4
32
7
12

2j
3
16 !
12 1
4!
7!
7

4 ' 12
2
4 ! 10

3
-j
3

74
40
22
18
34
28
2j

15
14
13
1
8
1
15 •
2i
1
-

44
4
3
42
1
1
1
-

30
29
22
7
1
1

6
4
4
2
2
-

6
5
5
1
1
-

-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

2
2

3
1
2

5
4
1

1
1

-

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

44
29
25
4
15
3
4
8

60
32
16
16
28
7
14
3

31
28
24
4
3
2
-

13
13
10
3
-

7
7
1
6
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

4

1
-

4
2
2
2
1
1

“

47
35
27
8
12
3
3
3
3

“

-

3
3
3

6
6
6

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
4
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
22
22

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

34

19
11

!
-1
“

2

5
5

13
7
6

2

4

1

-

6
3
3j

i
Clerks, accounting ................
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods ......... ....
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ..................
Services ...................
Clerks, file, class A ........................................
Manufacturing ..................................................
Durable goods ............................................
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing....... ........
Finance * * ........... ......
Clerks, file, class B ..............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ............................................
Nondurable goods ......................................
Nonmanufacturing................... ........................
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............

1.316
$68
407
161
748
60
199
196
228
65
118
6
3
35
28
5
5
16
30
637
312
265
47
325
11
87

46.50
50.50
50.00
51.00
44.00
50.00
46.00
41.50
42.50
42.50

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
38.5
40.5
39.5
41.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
38.0

47.50
51.00
56.00
45.00
44.00
38.00
43.00

37.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
JO 9\
J

1

40.50
48.00
50.50
36.00
33.00
42.50
34.00
0 0 An
JJ*w

! 14
- | H;
- ! 14
-

-

-

-

-

-

50
1
1
49
-

-

11
12
11
15

13
4
12
5

-

2
-

-

-

2

-

-

2 1

8

70
-

-

-

8

70

131

19
1

18
112

-

-

-

-

12
18

19
62

2

15
27

43
-

4

38
18
5!

1

-

15

; 13

-

-

85
42

35
48
72
1

17

4
7

- 1

143
49

26
23
94
13
17
31

9
9
66 : 14
1
19

125
82 1
61
21 S
43 |
2j
13 ;
17 1
11 !
“ :

93
29
24
5
64

7
37
13

4
3

67
38
27 |
11 !
29 i
27
1
1

61
48
38
10
13
9

1
2
1

-

-

-

S

-

-

i

_

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




92
14 !
11
!
3
78

5
1
17
17
34

8
3!
!

3
5
5

9
6
3
3
3
■
a
J 1
“

62
33
28 j
5
29 i

96
32
27
5
64

4

-

3

48

1 in

i ?

18
9
3
6
9
2
7
49
27
20
7
22
-

5
3

7
4

3
2

2
1
1
i7

1
3

g

12

7
4
1
3
3

2
-

1
1
1

-

-

2

-

6
1
5
5

2

-

3
3
3

-

10
10
9
1

_

2

11

4

1

2

-

10
45
32 — 524
4
8
2
4
13
-

5
i g

19

“

_

12

4

3

3
18
18
16
2

10
10
10

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

3
3

_
-

-

2
2
2

-

108
108
108

-

Office Occupation^ - Continued

Table A -l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Buffalo, N. I., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women

-

Number
of
workers

Weekly Under
earnings $
(Standard) (Standard) 27.50
Weekly

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

27.50 lo.OO 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 I 0.00
and

30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Continued
*

Clerks, general ..................
Manufacturing ............... .
Durable goods ............................................................
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ........ ....
Wholesale trade ......................................................
Retail trade ...............................................................
Finance * * .....................................................................
Services ..........................................................................
Clerks, order .............................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................
Durable goods ....................... .. ...... .
Nondurable goods ..... .. ................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................

1.041
573
450
123
468
68
69
65
213
5
3
211
171
109
62
40

39.5

54.50
55.50
50.50
48.00
54.00
49.50
46.00
47.00
45.50

40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0

39.5
38.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
40.0

49.50
50.50
52.50
47.00
45.50

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

_

8

1
5

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

“

“

8

6

5,

6
38
1
20
17
11
9
9
2

2
32
3

15
8
15
3

8
8
8
“

11

168
129
87
42
39
-

8
37
-

49

51.50

40.0

38
3^
28
8
2

9
7
4
3
2

56
56

2

45
3
3
42

1

64
18
5
13
46

1
2

10
21
12
22
22
17
5

78
-

95
63
52

65
34
28

76
4
36
24
10
2

32
7
8
12 !
5

31
15 I
- !
16 1
-

2

2

11

7 * 12
7
91
2
3
6
5
3
“

6

136

88

81
7
48

1
7

2
38

67
46
36

64

21

48
40

16

15
13

19

11
2
2
1

2
2

1

_
-

_
_
-

6

_

1

1

-

~

-

2
-

6
-

-

-

-

1

“

2
2
1!
1
-

4
4
4
-

3
3
2
1
-

11
8
5
3
3

7
7
7
-

1
1
1
-

3
3
3
-

-

20
18
13
5
2
2

10
10
7
3
-

9
8
6
2
1
1

2
2
1
1
-

4
4
4
-

11
-

-

-

11
11
-

1
1
_
1
-

“

“

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

4
-

9
9
5
4
-

20
20
17 1
3

4
4

1
2

-

-

11
11
7
4
~

3
3

4

7
5

26
14
11
3
12

92

86

9
1

8
16

9
2
10

4
2
1
1
2j

6
2

81
5

10
21

~

18

3

2
2

12

-

-

‘

Clerks, payroll ........................................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................
Durable goods ............................................................
Nondurable goods ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
Public utilities * ..............................................
Wholesale trade .......................................................
Retail trade ............... ..............................................
Services ..........................................................................

668
464
329
135
204
74
18
66
37

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5

Duplicating-machine operators ........
Manufacturing ............... .
Durable goods ............................................................
Nondurable goods ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
Wholesale trade .......................................................
Retail trade ...............................................................
Finance ** ........................................... .. ................... ..

127
71
58
1
3
56
11
12
15

39.5 43.50
40.5 42.00
40.5 41.00
40.0 46.50
38.0 45.00
39.0 S48.00
39.5 !37.00
36.5 45.50

Key-punch operators ............................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................
Durable goods ......................................................... ..
Nondurable goods ... ................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
Wholesale trade .......................................................
Finance ** .....................................................................

221
135
121
14
86
24
39

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0

50.00
50.50
51.00
49.00
48.50
54.50
49.00
44.00
45.50

47.50
48.50
48.50
47.50
46.00
42.50
46.00

_
-

16
14
14 I

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

14
2 j
-1

2

12
'

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

2

11
1

_

1

7

12

-

-

-

15
5
2
3
10
2
4
2

40
20
6
14
20
16
2
2

93
68
53
15
25
8
11
6

59 1
44
22
24
13
3
8

79
49
43
6
30
6
3
19
1

51
38
26
12
13
8
3
2

67
46
28
18
21
8
4
1
4

41 ^
34 !
21 j
13 !
7 ;
6
11

64
41
34
7
23

12
12
11
1

14
14
13
1

12
7
6
1
5
3
1

21

17
6
5
1
11

-

-

-

1

8
5
3
2
3
1
2
-

1

4
3
14

12
9
7
2
3

30
16
16

30
25
25

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

7

5

-

-

-

1
1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

“

4
3

4

-

”

-

-

-

5
5
5

12
1

10
2

-

-

4
4
4

-

2
8

-

16
10
8
2
6
5

_

l

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
11

-

-

-

7

-

1

1

4

-




4|
33
20
17
3
13
-

12
'

See footnotes at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t i l it i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

7

14
5
9

5
4

19

33
26
21
5

-

12
11
1
7
1
5
1

7

1

-

2
2
2

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

2
5
5

7

1

29
16
14
2
13
1
12

15 |
13 j
13
- 1
2!

8
6
6

4
2
2

-

-

2
2

2

6
3
2
1
3

-

-

9
-

7
7

17
10
8
2
7
-

-

-

-

-

2
1
i

-

-

2
2
1
1

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
'

7
7

7

QcCUfuUiOnl - Go4ttiH44md

T ab le A - l :

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
In Buffalo, N. I . , by imtaatry division, January 19$2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Nme
ubr
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
o
f
ky
e l
e y W e l Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 §0.00
wr e s Woks ee ig $
ok r
anns
r
hu
r
and
(tnad (tnad 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00
S adr) S adr)
42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 o r r
-a

Women - Continued
Office girls .....................
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............

219
147
72
75
72

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
39 0

*
36.00
36.50
37.50
35.50
34.50
3/1 s
n

Secretaries....... ..............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ..................
Services ...................

1.116
662
424
238
454
75
172
46
89
72

39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
40.0
38.0
39.0

59.50
62.00
64.00
58.50
55.50
64.50
52.50
53.00
55.00
55.50

Stenographers, general .............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance * * ... ...............
Services ...................

1,949
1,201
919
282
748
93
253
154
208
40

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.0
38.5

49.00
52.00
52.50
51.00
44.00
52.50
45.00
a.50
41.50
43.00

Stenographers, technical ............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ........... ....
Nondurable goods .............

103
62
31
31

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

56.00
57.50
54.50
61.00

Switchboard operators ..............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ..................
Services ...........................................

390
127
68
5
9
263
74
107
36

40.5
40.0
40.5
40.5
39.5
40.5
40.0

46.00
51.50
57.50
45.00
43.00
53.00
38.00
43.50

42

44.5

38.00

3

40.0

4
4

4
2
2
2
2

69
45
18
27
24

30
23
15
8
7

26
8
18
9

26
14
10
4
12

-j
-

-

-

“

9
9
9

_1

«

-!
-

-

13
1
1
12
1
10
1

19
9
7
2
10
5
1
4

-

~

-

“

5

11

-

15

_

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
1
4
4

2

5

-

-

2
-

-

47
— arl
-

5

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroa ds), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




20
27
4
19
3

1

19
6
6
13
g

12
11
9
2
1

17
17
11
6

-

-

5
1
24
24
27
9
7
5
6

43
22
22
21
9
7
2
3

77
33
9
24
44
23
5
9
7

75
21
11
10
54
24
1
18
11

67
20
6
14
47
3
6
33
5

148
5
5
37
18
93
34
14
45
-

325
110
67
43
215
6
71
75
5
3
10

193
94
79
15
99
12
5
3
5
24
5

235
143
111
32
92
2
26
28
3
1
5

129
94
66
28
35
13
11
6
5

_
“

1
“

2
-

4
2
2
“

16
11
9
2

35

5

24
-

24
12
3
9

26
26
29
71
- — r ---5-- 9"
2
2
1
7
4
3
21
66
17
29
12
2
4
11
40
14
5
7
7
4
6

19

1
1

_

1
1

-

1

1

,
2d
20 i
6
61
1
37
8
10
5

18
24
37
25
2
9
1

209
165
155
10
44
17
21
3
3

79
42

102
84
65
19
18
2
8
5
3

6
10
11
~
4 - 51---5
2
6
1
2
5
12
17
nr - T
9
4
6
3
2
5
2
4
-

-

r

_
-

1
1
1
-

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

.

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

89
45
32
13
44
8
19
5
11
1

96
77
67
10
19
4
5
1
3
6

92
79
59
20
13
4
5
3
1

75
51
37
14
24
7
1
11
4
1

66
27
20
7
39
2
3
6
4
4
2

69
55
36
19
14
6
6
2

92
70
61
9
22
3
3
5
11

61
4'
6
30
16
15
12
2
1
-

24
18
11
7
6
2
1
3

12
10
6
4
2
2
-

19
16
7
9
3
3

97
77
47
30
20
6
11
3

86
47
44
3
39
35
4
-

88
75
50
25
13
ll
2

127
125
117
8
2
1
1

41
33
22
11
8
8
-

27
26
22
4
1
1
-

23
23
14
9
-

-

-

12
12
5
7
-

7
7
5
2
-

1
1
1
-

4
-

12
8
1
7

12
8
5
3

9
1
1

6
6
1
5

2
2
1
1

6
6
3
3

2
2
2

_
-

-

_
~

36

5
4
4
1
-

21
i
1
20
18

20
19
16
3
1
-

4
4
3
1
-

1
1
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

22
19"
12
7
3
3

5
5
26
23

11
9
9
2
1

-

3

1

10

1

_
-

O ffice Occupation^ - Continued

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Buffale, N. Y., by industry division, January 1?£2)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

$
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00

$

$

$

37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 $0.00

C
'-

Under 27.50 30.00 32.50

O
«rv

Weekly
W
eeklyhours * earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

W
N

$

Q
O

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

and

9Yt£

W en - Continued
om
Switchboard operator-receptionists ..............
Manufacturing ................................................
Durable goods ..........................................
Nondurable goods ........................................
Nonmanufacturing......... .....................................

6M
267
182
85
376

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

Wholesale trade ..........................................

149

39 !o

Services ........... .............................................

40
66

38 n
39.0

$
43.50
45.50
45.50
45.00
42.00
49 00
42^50
41 00
43 5°
39.50

160
75
85
52

39.0
40.0
38.5
38.0

52.50
56.00
49.50
49.00

Transcribing-machine operators, general . . .
Manufacturing ................................................
Durable goods ..........................................
Nondurable goods ....................................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................................
Wholesale tra d e.....................................

230
144
73
71
86
67

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5

45.50
47.00
51.00
43.00
43.00
44.00

Typists, class A ................................................
Manufacturing ................................................
Durable goods ..........................................
Nondurable goods ....................................

511
404
351
53
107
XUf
16
14
i.r

39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0
IQ O
J 7 .u
39.0
40.0
oft c

49.50
50.50
50.50
52.00
46.OO
i.7 on
Hf »vA
J
51.00
1,0 no

10

40.0

45.50

Typists, class B ..................................................... 1.788
Manufacturing ....................................................
987
632
Durable goods ..........................................

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
18 O

a . 00
43.50
46.50
iq nn

35
-

39
-

-

-

38.00
46.00
40.00

35

39

17
18

Tabulating-machine operators ............................
Manufacturing ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................................
Finitnr.* * *

,

,

,

a4 1 Amu/Ia
V4«Sfiaa **

11

wa

m

m

Nonmanufacturing ..........................................
D»k14m it$414$4mm #
UUml mmal a $ w *<*
e 1
P4manma

‘
ICC

801
87
o(
OIO

18 K
■5°.?

87
ol
11, Q
JV 7

41.0
10 O

ic
■ c cn
s

1,0

37.00

46

V

_

6
6

4?
21
21
22

12
12

6

3
?

5
3

4
25

-

-

17

4

9

23
g
22
10

-

-

3
-

-

5
-

-

-

3

-

5
4

n?
25
20
5
88
i
67
15

10
3
7

_

-

-

4
1

5
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
3
2

2
3
1

4

3

-

-

*+

3

..

-

-

L

g
12
19

74
5
3
2
69
33
2
26
8

2
1

185
no
10
100
75
4
67

3

46
n ?
8
56
14
7j
1
42
38
63

45
11
6
5
34

3

8
3
4
13

77
29
27
2
48
6
15
21
3
3

5

9
1
8
2

7
4
3
1

8
5
3
3

13
2
11
11

13
1
1

32
22

35
16

21

-

22
10

23
21
7
14
2
2

64
50
43
7
14
8

12
9

-

“

n

5
19
18

?9
31
25
6
28

?4

3
18
13
13

60
47
42
5
13

32
28
27
1
4

70
48
38
10
22

10

10
8
6
2
2

12
1

1
1

7
2
1

242

199
88

177
98
67
31
79
9
52

37
23
20
3
14
4

2

301
112
56
56
189
4
26
9
139
n

167
92
75
75
8
36
7
20
4

54
34
111
16
29
16
33
17

18

213
171
159
12
42
11
8
20

21
3
6

22
14
9
5
8

24
16
12
4
8

5

1

5

3°

9
21
4

3




8
4
1
3
4

-

-

1
1
1
-

a
m
_
-

4
4
1
3
-

e*
-

m
m
..
-

m

•
-

4

3

.

_

-

-

•
-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
9
6

19
6
13
8

2?

?

34

10
9
1
15
15

7
5
2
2
2

13
12
1
1

38
36
34
2
2
2

6

6$
54
48
6
15
2
1
8

102
61
39
22

67
28
24
4

30
30

a

39
30

n

19
9
10
10

17
10
7
2

12
10
2

4
4

7
3
4

4
4

2
2

1
1

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
10
9
1
2
1

15
13
2
3
3

-

-

“

-

-

•

“

21
15
n

4

6

18

25
17
14
3
8

-

2 ____ k .
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
“

-

-

•
-

_

20
20
20
-

49
49
45
4

4
3

-

1
1

4
4

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

4

-

-

-

4

8
2
4

n

6
1
1

3
1
1

U5
115
U5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

2
2

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

.

19

9

3

Hours reflect tbs w
orkweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows: 27 at $90 to 100) 6 at $100 to 110) 3 at $110 to 120; and 1 at $120 to 130.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, m real estate.
xd

y

16
$
6
2
8
2

7
1

2
39

18
15
12
3
3

9

Table A-la:

O ffic e O cC U fu U l(U p L

(Average straight-tine weekly earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. Y., Fy industry division, January 19$2)

See fo otn otes at end o f ta b le .

210368 0 - 52 - 2




Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y . , January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

Table A -la:

Q fo ce OcCMfuUiO+U ~ C ^ n tiH U m
d

(Arerage straight-time weakly earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. T ., Ey industry division, January 1952)

See footnotes at end o f table.




11

O ffic e

Table A-la:

Q ce4 4 fU ztiO *U >

“

G o 4 § ti4 U 4 *J t

(Average straight-time weekly earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. Y., Ey industry division, January 1952)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
1$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
j$
$
W
eekly Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
W
eekly
earnings *
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
1

W en - Continued
om

1
$

Clerks, accounting . . . . . ............. . ................
Manufacturing .................. ..................
Durable goods............
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturiag

1,098
432
306
126
666

39.5
39.0
39.0
40.0
39.5

46.50
50.00
49.00
52.50
44.50

“

Clerks, f ile , class A . . . . . . . . . . . ............ ..
Manufacturing
Durable goods......................
Nondurable goods.............................
Nonmanufacturing ...•••••..........••....••

88
33
21
12
55

38.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.0

45.50
48.50
50.00
46.50
44.00

-

Clerks. f i l e , class B .....................................
Manufacturing ..................... .............
Durable goods ..••••................... .
Nondurable goods ............ .
N m ufa ctur i n g ..........
on an

456
143
111
32
313

39.5
40.0
40.0
iP.O
39.0

34.50
38.50
39.50
36.00
33.00

8
8

Clerks^gqaeral........................... ♦.« ......... .»•
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods................•••••••••••.
Nondurable goods . . . . ......................... .
Nonasnufacturing

911
506
410
96
405

39.5
40.0
40.0
4 0.0
39.0

52.50
56.00
57.00
51.50
49.00

- 1

Clerks, order . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . ........ « . . .
Manufacturing ................. . . . . . .......... •••
Durable goods........ •
Nondurable goods.............. •••••.«•••.
Nonmanufacturing.............. •••••••..........

174
136
91
45
38

39.5
39.0
39.0
39.5
40.0

48.50
49.00
52.00
43.00
46.00

~

- I
•

Clerks, pay roll........................................ ...
Manufacturing
.......... ••••••••
Durable goods..............
......
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing.................... •••••••••••

549
354
265
89
195

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5

49.50
50.00
51.00
46.50
48.50

-

- j
-

2

Duplicating-machine operators .................
Manufacturing
Durable goods ..............
.....
Nondurable goods ................................ ..
Nonmanufacturing ................................... . . .

117
63
52
11
54

39.5
40.5
40.5
40.0
38.0

43.00
41.00
40,00
45.00
45.50

_

_

7

-

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.




40
1
1
39

41
17 i
17
24

«
-

8
3
3
5

6
3 S
3 ^
3

68 i 121
~ i 14
*
1
13
68
107

56
27
25
2
29

93 |
29
27
2
64

14
14
14
-

2
2

_

_
-

-

«•
•
•i

8

-

15
9
9 1
6

1 1
16
ETi
14 |

-

63.
7
7!
56

39 1
6
6
33
11
9 —
9

! 2!

12
- !
- ;
12 !
!
11
7
7

-

-

7

4

77
3>
<
12
24
41
12
3 ;
3
9

37
20
16
4
17

%

34
8
r
8
“

!
12 i
2
2
10:

33
14
1
13
19

12
12
H
1

14
14
13
1

177
42
A
0
2
135

i
!
!
!

4
2 i
- i
2
2

38
25
17
8
13

!
j
!
i

136 ;
io 6
72
34
30
32
32
25
7

121
95 ! 122
10
33 | 78
17 1 59
7
3!
16 j
19 !
85 I 90 !
43
3-9
21
1 I
1 i
17
9'
5
3 |
2
4

6
3 '
3!
:
31

7
4 !
1
3
3:

14
14 !
13
1

7
7
1
7
!

A0
76 5
40
- r n h 1
-------2"!—
- 1
- \
- !
2 !
5
A0
3 5 1 74
8
6
4
2
2

21
21
17 :
4

63 !
49
14
25

35
24
8
16
11

69
40!
35 !
5|
29|

12 ;
7
6 1
l|
5

20
6
3
3
14

12
9
7
2
3

70
18
15
3!
52 |

55 !
26
17
9
29

2

1;
1
1
*
!

2
3!
i
3
80
!
45 1
11
24 !
W

50
38
30
8
12
7
2!
1
1
5

2 j------- “
i
—
1
2
2
_
-

62
125 j
— gr1
—
31 !
78 :
27 ;
4
3
31 | A4

7
7
2
5
“

7
4
2
2
3

4
2
1
1
2

21
9
9
12

38
28
17
11
10

57
37
22
15
20

27
20
17
3
7

59
37
32
5
22

6
3
2
1
3

15
A
3
1
n !

1
-

.

-

-

1

-

42
27
23 !
4!
15 1

54
26
10
16
28

5!
5
5
“
t

4
•
_
4

-

~

36
24
16
8
12

4
4
2
2j
“

20
17
13
4
3
1
1
1
-

8
8
6
2
-

•
•

«
•
_

7
7
1
6
-

2
2
_
2
-

.
_
-

_
-

•!
_
•

_

•
_

-

3
1
1
2

-

-

**

_
-

.
_

.
-

-

“

1
-

.
-

J
-

-

-

“

“

20
66
60
S F — o r ----- IfT
40
36
15
4
9
3
2
16

15
13
11
2
2

18
92
&— k \
2
81
4
5
12
6

4
4
2
2
•

1
1
1
~

3
3
3

2
2
2

-

-

-

16
16
14
2
“

17
10
10
7

30
23
20
3
7

12
10
9
1
2

6
1
1
5

1

.

-

21

?
3
3
•
•

_

_
-

8
5
5
- 1
3|

-

3
3
1
2
•

4
4
2
2
“

-

3
3
3
-

-

“

-

1

1
1
1
-

•
_
-

7
7
7

6 ____ 1 \
6
6
6
5
1
1
-

1 ____ 1
1
3
1
3
*
*

•

-

•
-

“
n
11

_
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

Table A-lat

O ffice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. T ., Ey industry division, January 1902)

See footnotes at end of table,




13

Table A-la:

O ^ lc e O c d if ia iU u ti “ G o *U iH 4 4 **l

(Average straight-time weekly earnings l / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. Y .,"“
by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OP­

Sax, occupation, and industry d iv is io n

Weekly
(Standard)

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

Onder
$

27.50

'S
$
27.50 3 0 .00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 1*2.50 45.oo 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

30.00

iljiO 35.00

37.50 Uo. 00

i»2.5Q I& .00

U7.5Q 50.00 52.~50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90,00

and
over

W en - Continued
om
Transcribing-machine operators, general . .
Manufacturing .......................... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing .....................................

203
117

Typists, class A . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . .
Durable goods ..,
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ..,

181

Typists, class B . . . . . .
Manufacturing.........
Durable goods ..<
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...

z/

86

281

249
32

102
1.545

T&
44
3
321
790

J2*5_

U
o.o
39.0

40.0
40.0

$
1*5.00
1*6.50
43.00

X

X _11__2
1
1
2
1
3

X ___ 1

1*9.00

39.5

39.50
41.00
43.00
38.50
38.50

40.0
40.0
39.0

_2k

1
*
2

___ 11
10
1

11
9
2

Ik

19

9
15

X __ 21

5£,

2Sl

. 1 XL
5

51

11

12

JL2.

43
39
4
13

24
24

33

41
39

29
28

1

22

2

4

14

2

186
75

162

192
150
141
9
42

_2k _1I

Jk

12

2

51.00

"4o7o

21
19

2
-

3

.48*50
49.00

38.5
39.0

XL
20
13

46.00

4

69

26

3

_176

39

15
14

1

10

290

101

101

95
75

50
51
189

6

26

2

10

146
76
70
75

JO

11

4
4
31

ill

2

26

7

43
38
5
14

A

6

4

2

6

11
3

12.

10
1
8

X

19
19

11

9
5

4

X

4
3

1

1 ___ 1
1
1
1

1

± ___ 1
1
1

1
1

5

2

Hours r e f l e c t the workweek fo r which employees re ce ive t h e ir regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s and the earnings correspond t o these weekly hours.
Workers were d istrib u te d as fo llo w s : $90 t o 95, 8 w orkers; $95 t o 100, 12 workers;: $100 t o 105, 3 workers* $105 t o 110, 1 worker; $110 t o 115, 2 workers*

Table A-lb 1

O ffic e

0 cC M f*a tiO M &

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Niagara County, N. Y . , by industry division, January 1952)

See footnote at end of table,




Occupational wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statist!os

1+
1

Table A-lb:

O ^ ic e

Q cC 44fuU i(M lA> - G o n tu U $ * d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Niagara County, N. Y ., by industry division, January 1952)

A verage

27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50

$

$

+ * 0 7.50
37.50 £0.00 £2.50 1 5 0 3+ 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50
l+o.oo 42.50 45.00

I 2.50

l o .o o

O

32.50 35.00

Q<
\*

$

V1
J
O

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

|
s
U der 27.50
n

O
O

Number
of
workers

O

Sex, occupation, and industry d iv is io n

$

$

67.50 70.00 75.00

$

$

80.00 85.00 90. 0c

O
47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.O 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

and

ovei

Women

$
1+
8.00
50.50

51
la

39.5

B ille r s , machine (bookkeeping machine) . . . .
Manufacturing

22
15

40.0 1+
7.50
1+ .0 1+
0
8.50

Bookkeepers, hand

50

39.5
39.5
39.5

B il l e r s , machine ( b il l i n g machine)

10

Bookkeeping-machine op era tors, cla s s B ••••
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••*••••
Nonmanufaoturing •••••••••••••••••••••••

Manufacturing •••<••••••<••••••••••«•••*
Nondurable goods

••••••••••
••••••••••

36
26
10

10
+ .0

34

Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods

38.5

32
16

39.5
39.5
39.5

16

218
136
101
3
5

Clerks, f i l e , c la ss A • • • • •
• • • • ..........
Manuf*cicbiu ing • * • • • • • • • • • • •
*
•• • • • • • • ♦ ♦ • • •
Durable goods • « • • • • • • • • • •
•• • • • • • • • • •

30
30
14
l6

Clerks, general
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • « •
• • • • • • • • • • •• •
DmIiIq goods • • • • • • • • • • • •
ul
•••••••••••

130
67
10
+

Nonmanufacturing

••••••••••••
•••••••••••

Manufacturing ••f*.

ITanufaotur ing ••••••••••••••••••*•••••••

Durable goods ••••*••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••••

3

2

2
2

59.00
61.50

_

1

“

l+l+.oo

_

_

50.50
37.50 ;

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

51.00
51.00
50.00

_
—

1
1

1
1

8
-

8

7
2
5

_
_

_

6
6

_

9

40
19
12

3

6
6

1

22
_
_
22




4

5

2

_

2
2
2

15
15
9
7 ! 6
21 |
ri

j

-

7
1
t.
+
1

1

3

3

7
6
5

1

2

32
23
15
3
9

5
3
3

2

24
1
3

12
12
10
2

1
1
10
8
2
4
1+

—

2

15

_

?

11

2

8

_

3

1
1

5

5

24
22

10

4

ll+

1

8

9

8

1

2

2
2

1

3
!

3

1
1

6
6
: 6 ,

11
11

! n
! 11
; ll

1
1

i

1
!

2
2

_
!

5

5
4

1

j 2

-

4

-

1

9
9

:

1
1

w
_

~

-

-

-

1
1
1

1

_

_

-

-

-

_
_
_

_

_
_

«
»

1
1

1

_

«.

w
m

m

12

5

1
1

“

_

_

23
11
9

9

5
4

_

-

4

6
4
3

2
2

4

_

-

4

1

-

_

-

4

5

1
+

4

2
2

2
2

_

-

9

5

2
2

-

4

20

u

5
5

-

-

16

2
2

6

-

5
—

13
10

5~

10

9

9
6

1

3

___
See footnote at end of table.

4

4

6

10
5
5

_

_

_
6
1
+
2 j

8
6
3
3

*
_
_
_

1
1

-

10 29
7
_ ! 1
+
_ ! 3
2
2
10

«
•

56.50

5
~

2

5

-

5

10

2
2

10

1

-

_

_
_

8
8

4

l

-

_

39.5
39.5
39.5

53.50

_

2

55.50

119
110
64
16
+

2

_

T
O
X
U

lll+.50
1+
6.00
1 1 1 .5
++ 0
39.0 I8.50
+
1+ 1 I 3.00
0.0 +
39.0
39.0

_

6
6

4

i
3

3

_
_
_

5I
+.00
51+.00

3
7
35

■

-

'

1+ .0 6I
0
+.50
+ *0
39.0 1 4 0

27
63

-

3

_

"

1

-

“

_

64.00
56.00
52.50

1 0 1+
+ .0
6.50
i+
0.0
51.00
10
+ .0 53.00
+
39.5 I 5.00
1+ .0 39.50
0
39.5
39.5

1
"

3

8

6
6

4

3

3
3
1

11
7

5
5

4

_

1
1

1
+
4

1

2

3
4
4

M
.

5

5

8
8

%
H+

5
4

4

if

10

2
2

4

4

2
2
2

; 2
2

j 2

1 _

6
6
6

m

1

w

1

*

—

1
_

_

5
5

1
1

1
1

3

8
8
4

2
2

3

1

3

1

1

1
2

4

_

1
1

2

1
3

1
1

_

3

if

_

4

—

3

2

_

1
1
1

1

1
1

_
_

1
1

1

Table A-lbt

O^lcm OoonfuMoHA - Continued

(Average straight-tiae weekly hours and earnings }J for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Niagara County, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—
*

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

$

$

%

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50

' 7 5 .00 J

Soaen - Continued
t

H a y - p u n c h o p e rators ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................

28
26

39.5
39.5

52.50
52.50

Office girls ..............................
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g ........................
Dur a b l e goods ......................
N o n d u r a b l e g o o d s ........ •
.........

37
37
15
22

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0

39,00
39.0b
41.00
37.50

Secretaries ...............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................
Dur a b l e goods ......................
N o n d u r a b l e goods ..................
N o n n a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................

234
210
154
56
24

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5

66.00
67.50 1
69.00
64.00
52.50

Stenographers, general ..................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................
Durable goods ......................
No n d u r a b l e goods ..................
M o n a a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................

363
342
228
114
a

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

53.50
54.00
54.50
53.00
45.00

Stenographers, t echnical ................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. .

15
15

39.5
39.5

S w itchboard operators ....................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....... ..................
Monnan u f a c t u r i n g ......................

55
28
27

S w itchboard operator-receptionists .....
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .................
Durable goods ......................
N ondurable goods ..................
M o n n a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................

“

"

"

-

-

2
2

1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

2

1

2

10

7
7
5
2

_
-

2
2

4
4

3
3
1
2

6
6
5
1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

6
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
5

1

•

-

-

i
-

•

“

1
1

60.50

~

~

*

39.5
40.0
39.5

52.50
61.00
44.50

■

1
1

2,

75
47
28
19
28

40.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
41.5

45.00
50.50
50.50
51.50
35.50

_
~

“

T r a n s c r i bing-nachine operators, general
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............
........
D urable goods .................... .
Nondu r a b l e goods ..................

27
27
10
17

39.0
48.50
39.0 | 48.50
4 0.0
54.50
45.50
38.5

~

Typists, class A ..........................
Manu f a c t u r i n g .................. .
D u r able goods ......................
No n d u r a b l e goods ...................

128
123
102
21

i/

k

2
2

-

-

4 0 .0
4 0.0
40.0
40.0

14

1
1

-

“

..7

•

44

5
5

*
2

3
3

1
1

1
1

_

-

-

~

1

1

13
9
8
1
4

?
3
3

5
2

-

2
3

17
U
4
7
6

14
13
9
4
1

11
ll
5
6

18
18
10
8

29
22
15
7
7

12
12
6
6

24
24
16
8
1 “

22
£2
11
11
•

22
22
4
18
*

18
l4
13
1
4

2

-

-

2
"

11
3

17
17
14
3
“

~

“

“

~

2
2

5
5

”

\

2

“

3
2

9
1
8

5
5

8
8

7
7

,4
4
4
“

14

8
8
4
4
“

*

1
1
1

2 !
2
2

“

1
1
1

5
5
5

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

12
8
6
2

4
4
3
1

H

29 !
24 ! 30
20
21
4
9
1
5

-

_

•

2

2
2

*

1
1

1

53.00
53.5b
54.00
53.50

_

_

6
6
6

i

7
7

2
2

3
3

_

«.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

28
2B
20
8

**

10
6
2
4
4

26
26
7
19

92
92
92
-

6
6
4
2

5
5
3
2

1
1

_

1
1

2
2

2
2

*

“

3
3

5

“

2

2
2
“

1
1
•

3
3

5
2
3

2
1
l

3
2
1
1
1

2
2
2
-

6
6
5
1

s
1
2

1
1
1

3
5
-

4
2
2

1
1
1

2
2
1
1

1
1
1
*

3
3
2
1

3
3
1

1
1
1

4
4
3
1

4

15
15
12
3

7
7
5
2

14
13
9
4

7
7
6
1

9
9
7
2

6
6
4
2

4
3
1

3

2

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight''tine salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,




I 8 5 . 0 0 90 . 0 0

&7.50 30.00
?2.50 35.00 |37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 5?.0p 57.50 60.00 62,50 65,00 67,50 70.00 75.00 80,00 85,00 9 0 .00

-

4

16
16
14
2

1
1

-

_
15
- T T

“

—

3
r

4

1
1
•
1

-

2
2
1
1

1
1

_

_

-

-

1

*

*

1
1
1

40
40
40

-

-

-

-

4
1
3

_

IT
47

43
4

21

~w
16
4

1

and
over

16

Pn&jj&LdAOstcU an d *]eclu U ca l O ccu pation*.
(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Buffalo, N. Y ., by indulTtry division, January 1952)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry d iv is io n

Draftsman, c h ie f . . . . . .
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Normanufacturing •••

Number

of

121
73
60
13
1+8

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
1+0.0

$
lQ[+.50
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1+7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 .oc 105 .0c 110.0c 115.00 120.0c 1 2 5 .0 0
and
L
i5
1+7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 57*50 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 .0c 105.0C 110 .0c 1 15 .0c 120.0C 1 2 5 .0C over

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
2

7
7
7

-

-

18
-

-

-

-

-

Draftsmen, ju n ior . . . . .
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods . . .
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufa ctu r i ng •••
P ublic u t i l i t i e s

850
lli
693
53

10k
7k

1+0.0
1+0*0
1+0.0
3 9 .5
39*5
1+0.0

8 6 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
8 2 .0 0

6 6 .5 0
6 7 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
71+.00
5 7 .5 0
5 6 .0 0

-

1
1
1

2
2
2

2
2
2

6
6
6

k
1
+
k

28
15
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

”

16
16
16

3

-

-

-

2
2

“

Traoers ..............................
Itemufa ct ur ing ...........
,

Draftsmen, j u n i o r .........................
Manufacturing ............................

k05
21
1+1
15

1+0*5
1+0*5
1+0*5
1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0

5

iiO.O

21
21

1+0.0

5 3 .0 0
5 3 .0 0

15
3+
1

1+0.0
1+0.0

5
5

5 8 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

3

5
5

1

19
18
1
12
7 !

2
2

20
16
15
1

l/
"*

232
2ll+
l6 l
53
18

1+0.0
1+0.0
1+0.0
3 9 .5
1+0.0

6 5 .0 0
6 6 .0 0
6 5 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
5 7 .50

1
+

15
ll+
12
2
1

'

%
lJU
11+
-

■

50
1+2
39

-

19
19
18
1

10
10
8
2

-

-

”

16
12
12

3
8

-

k

10
6

"

1+1
20
17
3
21
17

l+o
30
29
1
10
8

99 _ r j k
88
156
81+ ; 11+1
k\
15
11 1 18
H
+
5 ;

89
81
80
1
8
8

-

"

108
101
89
12
7
5

13
13
13

6
6
1
5

26
12
12
H+

’
61 — 6g_
59
55
52
57
2
3
2
H
+
2
13

19
9
8
1
10

10
5
5
5

31
31

2
2
2

-

Ilf
ll+
9
5
"

30
30
23
7

25
25
25
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

____ 2 L

-

*

6

-

1+2
1+2
1+1
1

57
57
55
2

31
31
27
k

6

•

-

-

-

-

7

2
2

?7
37
36
1

3+
f
3+
l
3+
1

-

6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
2
2

2
2

9?
83
83

-

5
5

3
3

'
Nurses, in d u s tria l (r e g is te r e d )
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ....................... *

13
2

9
9
7
2

"

1
1

*

“

1+67
2+26

1
1
1
-

18

'
Draftsmen . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods •••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •••
Services «••.••••

If
k
2

1
+

5

1
+

5

22
22
20
2

22
21
17
k

1
1

1
1

'

3

28
2l+
13

20
20
17

1

11

3

4

4

5

4

2
2

2
2

3
3

1
+

-

-

-

2

2

2

k

1

33

26
23

3

37
37
25
12

U+
11

9
9
7

3

2

3l+

20
20
15
5

7
3
1
+

2

-

1
1

1

7

Hours r e f l e c t the workweek fo r which employees re c e iv e t h e ir regular straigh t-tim e sala rie s and the earnings correspond t o these weekly hours*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y*, January 1952

U.S. DEPARTMEIT OF LABOR
Bureau of Later Statistics

17

Table A-2a:

P ^ed A ia *u U and ^ecJu u cal O ccu pation *

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Erie County, N. Y ., by industry division , January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E W E E KLY EARNINGS OF—

A vebaob

Number
of
workers

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*_
Weekly Rader U 7.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 .00 105.00 110 .00 115.00 120 .00 125.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
$
and
(Standard) (Standard)
U7.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 .00 105.00 110.00 115 .00 120.00 125 .00 o v e r

Men

D raftsm en, c h i e f .......................................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g ........................................................

113
US

503
uoi
378
23
102

D r a ft s m e n .......... ........................................................... ..
M anufacturin g ........................................................
D urable good s .................................................
Nondurable goods ..........................................
N onm anufacturing ................................................

D ra ftsm en , j u n i o r ................ .. ..................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g ........................................................
D urable g ood s ............................................ ..
N ondurable g ood s ............................ .............
N onm anufacturing .................................................

“

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
U o.o

$
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0

1*0.0
u o .o
U o.o
3 9 .5
1*0.0

296
iff—
21*1
1U
1*1

Uo.5
U0.5
U o.o
U o.o

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

100.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

2
2
2

2
2
2

6
6 M
6

-

-

-

-

-

“

8 0 .5 0
8 1 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
7 9 .5 0

~

”

“

~

-

! 6U .00
6 5 .o o
| 6U.00
! 7 9 .0 0
! 5 7 .5 0
1

i5
15
-

5
3
3
2

29
17
17
-

12

16
12
11
1
u

11
10
10
1

u
r
u
"

6
------6“
6
.
“

1

2
2

-

22
10 n
10 !
- I
12

U5
37
35 !
2
8

18
18
18

U
r
2
2
~

.

71
61
61
10

15
u

u

9
9
8
1 i
“ I

18

“

_

_

-

.

7
7

-

_

18

32
11
10
i
1
21

1
10
25
25 ! 10
! 10
2U
1 i
t
i

32
22
22
_

10

92
81
78
3
11

8
8
8

13
13
13

-

-

3
3

116
61
98
5U
U8
9U
6
U
18 1
7
1
j
21
21
17
U

1

13
13

-

21
19
17
2
2

5
- f

-

13

6
6
3
3
“

-

53
U5
uu !
1 j
8

_

1?
6
6
_

1
!

26
12
lU

3
3
3

11
11

18
6
10

9
~ t r

£

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

_

-

~

-

-

“

|

6 ;
6

-

|

_

_

6
I

1
T r a c e r s .............................................................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g ........................................................

19
19

U o.o
U o.o

5 1 .5 0
5 1 .5 0

“

5
T ;

5
5

2
2

1
1

1
1

5

t
!
1

!

Women

i

!
i

1

1
i
D ra ftsm en, l u n i o r .....................................................
M anufacturin g ........................................................

U*
13

U o.o
U o.o

5 8 .0 0
5 9 .0 0

1

3
3

”

2
2

u
u

U
U

-

~

■

~

1----- —
-

~

“
i

N urses, i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ......................
M anufacturin g ........................................................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods .....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................... .

160
1U3
108
35
17

U o.o
1*0.0
U o.o
3 9 .5
U o.5

6U.00
6 5 .0 0
6U.50
6 7 .0 0
5 7 .0 0

2

u
2

u
2

2

2

-

-

-

2

2

2

3
3

3
-

25
21
13

17
17
15

8
u

2

9
9

15 !
1U

7
2

ll

25
1$
17

21
21
15

3

2

6

1

6

|

11
11

6
6

13
13

8
3

5

9
U

1

5
5
1

U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

|
i_____
_
1/

Hours reflect the workweek for w h i c h employees receive their regular straight-time salaries a nd earnings correspond to these we e k l y hours.




NOTE:

There were insufficient data to w arrant presenta­
tion of separate information for Niagara County.

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y ., January 1952
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

18

Table A-3*

MGL U t t e + U Z + t C e G 4 t d P o W & l

Plant

OcCUpatiOHi

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
"basis in Buffalo"]* N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Num ber
of
w orkers

Occupation and industry d iv is io n

A verag e
h o u rly
earnings

$

$

Under 0 .9 5

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1 .0 0

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5 1 4 0

1*0 5

1*10

1*15 1 * 2 0

$

$

$

$

$

1 .4 5 1 . 5 0

$

$

1 .6 5 1 .7 0

1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 1 .8 5 1 . 9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

$
$
2 .3 0 2 .1 * 0 2 .5 0

1 . 7 0 1 .7 9

1 .8 0 1*85 1 . 9 P 2 * 0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .1 * 0 P .5 0

1

$

1 .5 5 1 . 6 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1

•95

1 *0 0

1 «2 5 1 . 5 0 1 .3 5 1 . 1 + 0

1 4 *5 1 . 5 0 3,*55 l t

$0

l t $5

and
over

$

Carpenters, maintenance ..................................

595
522

Nondurable goods ............................................................ ..
Nonmanufacturing ......................... .......................................
E le c tr ic ia n s , maintenance ............. ...........................................
Manufacturing .................................................... ..

11*3
73
55

............................................

Engineers, s t a t io n a r y ................................... .............. ..............
Manufacturing ............................ ........................ ....• « , • • • •
Nonmanufacturing ................................................. .... .............. ....

2 .0 2

. T f . T . n . r r - - * * * ___ T T - t - , - . * , .

S ervices

2 .0 1 ;

M a n u fa c tu r in g

a

, , . . , , . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . , . , . . . , . . . . . . .

Durable goods ......................................................................
Nondurable goods
................... ..
Nonmanufacturing » ao« . . .......................................................
P u b lic

u tilitie s

333
12 3
726
520
206

V s mi f a c t u c i n g

. . . . . . . . . . . . o .
___ i - r t i

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

6
6

5
5

-

-

-

-

2
2

li

-

-

li
1

1 .6 5
1 .2 3

1*6

1
3

-

2

3

10

2

2

-

10

“

2

9
7
7

1 -2 5
1 -0 7
1 .1 7

2

2

3

2h

U8

2 ,0 0 8

12

18

15
3

k

19

12

18

12

li

18

12

2

12

1
*

21

30
1

11

60

29

11

37
3
31*
23

10

2

1

2k

10

7

7

3

2k

10
9

21

k

9

3
2
2

1 .6 5
1 .1 * 2

k

9

1

6

20

2
2

10 6

7
7
7

1?

1*6

22

13

33
13

20

12

M n w ) i , . a V ,l o

............................................................................................................* ......................*

Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y ...........................................
Msnufacturing .. ............................... .............................. ........• • « • • • • • • • • «
H n r a h le

g r in d s

j -

2

5

Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • ..................... • • • • • .......... .....
Nonmanufacturing ....................................... .... ...............................
R e ta il

tra d e

___t t T t t t n t i n

S ervices

,....« « •

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing
. . o
D u r a b le

........................... ....

, ,. . ,
g o o d s ___________ T T r t t T ________

rati I e griruHs: t tr i i 1 i t i iii i i i i i i i i b i i i i i i i i
Ncnmanufacturing .................................................... ••••••••
Puhl i o. u t i 1i t . i e s
T» TTfttttfTfTTtTTTTTttTTrTITg
Wholesale trade
R eta il trade aa. . . aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. a. . . . . . . . . . . . .
M n n r iii

l l ;l

230

-

H i

1 .9 3
1 .5 1
1 .5 2

681

60

li fi
21

UO

22

2

26

21

12

30

2

li

li
16

20

16 1

27

1

lili
1*0

177
10 8

lU i
1 0 I*

38

86

2

22

89
15
ko
39

69
67

12 3
81
1;9
35
39
■J
J7
1

319

1 3 l|

290

13 2
10 9

2 1 *8

50
h 3h
56
17

17
3

5k
35
35 — f t
15
15
39
20

33
5" —
6

3

27

8

5" “

li

1*2

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1 .6 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

3




83

78

11;

13

10

6U
22

18

6

22

18

1

27
27

70
70
la

10

7

29

26

38
38
cO
12

-

9

H *l*
H U ;

289

3
3

5

19
19
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

67
77

21*3

2

2

1*6

1

27
27

1*5
1*5

66

59
59
58

130

k8

1
1

51
38

60

3li
3 li

20
20

6

17
3

29
29

8

lili
-

17
13

k

-

2

60

28

31
27

31

21;

U6

ll;
10

8

1*7

20

1

1

8

3
1

11

13

16

li;

k

li

k

9

10
7

63

22
2

31

52

158

61
2
2

58

1*

10 4

20

31

15

iO

16

3

9
6

-

-

39
3

13 1 0 1
13 1 0 1
23 1 9 6
23 1 9 6

H4O

lfe "

15
15

1

1

18 5

77

12 9

16 3

56

5
3

31
29

«•

77

26

X

71
17

170

39 2
0o p
poo
ccy

185

16
7

31
OT

01

72
72
k9

16 2

3
1

-

-

21;
2

23

2

-

“

11
99
n “ I T
5 18
5

k7

9

56
2

82
82

3
2

-

-

-

159

2

2

1

20

1

i in

1*2

20

kl
3

66

67

22
8

" T T
21

-

20

k

1

289

51
la

15 6

151;
2

o

59
1*5
13

9
89 ---------- 8
56
3
OO
5
JJ

15
15

1

81

2

81

j

|
See footn otes at end o f t a b le .
* Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ,
Finance, insurance, and re a l e s ta t e .

26

20

222

10 5

liO

1 . 5U

26

10 1*
01

8

290
2 70

23
2

2

1 .7 7
1 .6 7
1 .6 9

10 1*

6

86

3
2

T T

6

3
3

2

53
53
39

22

19 1
191

1 .8 8

520

57

-

3

3
3

li
■ ^

-

16
2

" lT B l;

11 1

-

-

—

H i
12

1 .7 1

20

*
1

8

1*8

li
2

29

1

-

-

39
39

2 /2 8

297
233
1 99

X tU i

lfi

1

26

3

6

32

2 .0 2
1

2

13 2

12

7
1

-

237
227

12 1;

16

38
32

1

51 21k
1*9 2 1 1
39 1 71
1C
1*0

71*

27

25
25
H i
11

10

1

10 6

82

I18

8

-

26

89

1*8

11

-

26

10

67

53
li9
23

11
11

-

10

10

59

2 li
22

2 .0 1

-

1

10

65

26

2 .0 1

“

k

29
29

83

38
k5

6U

1
1

1 .8 0

2
2

56

3 li
12

1 ,9 1
1 .9 2

1 .7 3
1 .7 5
1 .7 0

13
19

7
2

22

2 .0 1

226

11

6

10

783
381;
597
36 7

5

15

1

" l f l 57

* ....................................................................................................... ....

o

32

92
57

38
36
70

28

1 ,1 6 7

rhi

1+2

l l ;9

73

8
2

16

23
13

15 0

ou

23

50
50
kk

10
2

5k

32
9
9

88

Of
cC

51
23
on
c\J

1*
U

6
21
6

3

10

16

-

l .l t O

1

9
5

5

9

1

1

2

7

6

1 . 51*
1 . 61;

593

-

99
07
7l
77
J (

2£

11

2

k

H *

1 .6 0

1 ,7 0 9
1 ,2 7 6

7

19
1f
±7

28

3
2

10

10

31

10

-

2

-

58
C.O
5

-

~
-

9
9

3

-

1 .1 * 8

27

13

2
-

2

-

li;

262

H i
H i

2

2

*
•

1 .6 6

18 2

3

2

-

1 .6 8
1 .6 l

1 .5 5

606

,, ,. o

1 .8 3
1 .9 2
1 .6 2

286

13 3
299
225

-

2 .0 2

730
5U 8

. o

M achine-tool op era tors, toolroom

8
k

li

1 .9 1

.......................................................

*

1

2 .0 9

53

H elpers, tra d es, m aintenance .................................................................................

2

1

2 .0 3

1 ,1 8 3

91

F iru m e n

5

2 .1 5

1 ,3 0 6

20

Firemen, sta tion a ry b o ile r • • • • , . • • • • • «
Manufacturing ......................................................................... ..
Durable goods . . . . , ......... .............. ................
Nondurable goods .............................................. .............. ..
Nonmanufacturing ....................... ...................................
pilHl f 1 + 1 1+ ?OQ •>
* 1 .^ ■
*
T- ! ' | - - T | | | | f t t | | | | | | T T |
R etail trade ( . . , . . a . . . . a a o s ( . « a ( . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

8

1

1*93

850

Nondurable goods

2

1 .9 1
T T F ?
1 .8 8

Occupational Wage Survey, B u ffa lo , N. Y ., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT CF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

22
20

0

5
3
3

3
3
3

25

2

-

-

-

-

12

1

-

-

"

-

1X
-O
T
X

19

Table

a -3:

M a in ten a n ce an d Powml P la n t O ccu p a tion * • G ou tin u m
d

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Buffalo, N. Y., by industry division, January 1 9 5 2 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
•
$
s
s
Average
hourly
earnings nnder 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.50 1-35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 20*0
3
0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.50 1.55 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1,70 1*75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2,10
2 . 30 ?fl*o ?,f5°

$
2.50
and
over

~ W

*398
37

$
1.93
1.91*
i ,93
1,97
1.59

1x072...
1,01*8
61*6
1*02
21*

2.01
2.02
2.05
1.97
1.79

Occunation and industry d iv is io n

Number
of

Mechanics, maintenance ...............................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................................

1.51*6
1,509

Nonmanufacturing.....................................................................
M illw rights ......................................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Nondurable goods ...............................................................

O ilers ................................................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................................
Durable goods ...............- ____ ____ r........................f . T,
Nondurable goods ......................... T
...................TT. t , . t .
Nonmanufacturing .............................................. .................... ..

651*
599
1*20
179
$5

1.67
1.68
1.71
1.63
1.50

P ainters, maintenance .................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Durable goods ................................................ ...................
Nondurable goods ...............................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................................
S ervices ...............................................................................

1*03
31*7
166
179
56
20

1.79
1.81*
1.80
1.88
1.1*8
1.23

Pipe f i t t e r s , maintenance .........................................................
M anufacturing...........................................................................
Durable goods .....................................................................
Nondurable goods ...............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................... ...................... .........................

803
721*
344
380
79
11
**
23
21

1.6 7
1.8 6
1.1*7

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ......................................
M anufacturing....................... ...................................................
Durable goods .....................................................................
Nondurable goods ...............................................................

21*3
21*3
153
90

1.057
1,057

2.09
2.09

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

-

It

-

_

M a n ufacturing ...................................... .

1/
?/

_
-

_
-

_
-

26
9
Q
7

8
6
8

85
83
2

106
10I*
58
1*6
2

9i*

21*6

167 18?

21*9

121

*79

9k 21*8 167 185 "2S9 n r 179
111?
oj 166 1ilO uic 11*0 62 179
J.0 i no
11
82
18 *0 xuy

20
20

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

1
*

-

-

-

17

-

_
-

.
-

_
-

.
-

-

_
-

20
20

21*
11
7
f
1
*
13

l*i
ia
38
3

1*0
1*0

-

2
-

2

-

"

3

-

4

3

35
35
27
8

1*6
3l*
12

11
**
63
53 T
M
28
21
16
10

?
-

30
30
26
1
*
-

1?
13
9
1
*
6

21*
2l*
12
12
-

29
29
17
12
-

-

9
5

38

51*
2i*
18
6
30

1*3
1*3
39
1
*
~

21
21
15
6
“

6
-----6
-

2
1
1

2
2
"

2
2
-

8
6
2

3
3

-

2
2
2!

1
*
1
*
1
*

3*
1
31*
22
12

9
9
9
“

25
25
11*
11

83
83
68
15

6Q
60
20
1*0

4

12
6
6

22 122
22 122

139
139

353
353

195
195

8?
82

1
1

1
1

2
2
2

20
20
19

81* 137
27
23 ~ w 137
9
1*0
68
21*
11*
69
]*
20

1
*

10
_ 1 1 _

-

2
-

2
-

-

-

-

10
10

-

2
"

3
-

3
1

-

4

2

8

5
5
5

6
2

-

1
*
2
-

~

12
3
1
2
9
1
*

11
11
11

2

-

5
1
1

-

-

2

_

2

1
*

2

8

1
*

“

~

-

“

-

2

"

1
*

8

-

-

38

1

1

_

-

2

-

-

-

10
10
10

1
-

.

_
i

jj

6
U*
~ w — S'

1

.

T
i
9

10
10

6

17
17
17
If
«

1
*8
1*8

127
127
orv
jM
97

1*2 *2$ 374
1*2 121* 361*
28 79 OU
li* 1*5 111*
1ft
X
xv

29 137
29 137
19 137
in
1J
S

70
69
28
ia
1

93

7

-

_

_
131

1?
19
6
13

1*6

27
27

\L

-

1Q4
101*

14

on
4V

-

16

Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night work,
Workers were d istrib u te d as fo llo w s : 19 a t $2.60 to 2 ,7 0 ; and 9 a t $2,70 to 2.80,




32
32
32

8

2.02
2.02
1.99
2.06

Tool-and-die makers .....................................................................

-

1.91*
1.97
1.95
1.99
1.67

Plumbers, maintenance .................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................................

-

55

10

21
31*
-

1
7
2

2
2
„
2
-

33 100 311*
33 98 311*
13 71 121
20 27 193
2
-

109
107
31
76
2

*5
11*
13
1
1

2

2
2
-

1*6
r ife 31
1*2
15
-

k

69

69

22
1*7
-

66
66

„
*

_

2

4
4
-

6
_

.
•
-

_
_
.
-

-

.

-

-

~

-

6

_
.

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

iz
.
.

-

•

-

20

Table A-3*: Maintenance and Poweb Plant Occupation&
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis in Erie County, N. Y., by industxy division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R LY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

C a r o e n t e r s . maintenance .................................
Manufacturing ..........................................
Dur a b l e goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ...................................
Nonmanufa c t u r i n g .......................................
Electricians, m a i n t e n a n c e .............................. .
Manufacturing ..........................................
Durable g o o d s ............. .............. ..........
N ondurable goods ............. .................. .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ............................... ..

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.90
1.88
1.86

502
W 9
320
109
73

1.93
2.02

968
--- K G T
690
172
106

Engineers, s t a t i o n a r y ............................. .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ............................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................

...............

Helpers, trades, maintenance ........ ...................
Manufacturing .............. ...........................
Durable goods ...................................... .

-

-

-

173

-

-

-

-

2

_

-

-

-

-

"

10
•

24

7

18

»

-

i4
14

24

7

4

1< 49
1.62
1.62
l.,6l
1.24
1.60

Nonmanufacturing ..........................................................

1.694
1,399
1,118
281
295

Machine-tool operators, toolroom...................................
Manufacturing ............................................ ..................

488
475

1.92
1.93

Machinists, maintenance ..................................
Manufacturing............. ............................
Durable goods ...................... __ .........

833
833
5 95

2.00
2,00
2.01

Mnndurabl« goods t _____..... .. ..TtT1t1trtTTt(I ,,

238

5

6

2

-

«

-

1
1
1

4

3

14
i4 —

-

-

1
13

5

6

2

-

4

3

-

8
55
r ~5o
8
49
1
5
-

_

2

10
10

-

-

2
-

2
2
2
-

9
7
7
-

7
7
7
-

49

-

2
-

3

-

21
20
1

39
39
37
2
-

-

-

-

1.82
1.90
1.62

205

1

10

-

1.87

501
328
180
1 48

Nonmanufacturing.......................

2

2.03
2.04
2.05
2.02

650

Firemen, stationary b o i l e r ......... ....................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .................................
Durable goods ......................................
Hondurable goods t Tt t TT T T# f .,,»t t tT . tftttfttttt#

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
$
0.95
l t00 1.05 1.10 1.15 l f20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1,50 1.55 1,60 1.65 1,70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50

1
3

•
-

-

-

-

-

_

m 1 21

2

2

3

-

2

-

2

-

28

12

18

4

19
1
18

13

18

15
3
12

4

12

13

42
29
13

22
2
20

45

1
1
1

22
10
10

48
18
12
6

25
25
11
14

29
13
9

2

17
13
3
10

-

12

30

2

4

156

89
10

3

2

-

"

-

2

27

11
-

•
»
-

60

27

11

-

8
-

3
2
2

32
9
9

$2
16
10
6

8

1

23

36

-

_

10

-

4

37
3
34
23

4
4

23
21

19

4

_ r r r r ....tttTTTritirt
_

Maintenance men. general u t i l i t y ......... .........................
Manufacturing............................................................. .
D u r able goods .........._ r r i t t t t m n i t t t t i t t i
_
No n d u r a b l e goods ............ T r. . . r .ItI. I T. . 1IIJ#

Mechanics, automatic (maintenance) .....................
Manufacturing ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Mechanics, maintenance........ ......................... .
Manufacturing ..........................................
Durable goods «.. . .......................................... .
Nondurable goods ................ ................ ...... .
Nonmanufacturing .......... ........................... .

_

-

21

4

-

•
»

-

-

-

_

m
e

87
86

1

4

69

39

-

1
1

_

“

-

-

-

_

-

•
*

_

_

.

see footnotes at end of table.




692

— W T

29
_

-

33

26

»

-

450
218

36
34
28
6
2

65
65
49
16

21
21

10
10

29
21

27

7

54
i r
15

9

8

39

8

90
90
5
85

60

6

8
8

24

„

3

1.67

-

-

1.93
l.~9lT
1.93
1,98

•
»

m

-

-

-

-

-

m

6

1

8

47

20
-

3

1

8

47

20

4

7
7

22
18

7
f

n

8
_

_

_

_

-

4

_

_

_

2

23
14

20
10
10

~ W

8
6

61
2

31

51

124

59

23
6
6
-

8
8
8
•

83
83
83
_

74
72

17

-

-

4

24
11

32
32

7

29
3

_

32
32
32
_

-

-

-

_

_
-

_
'

_
-

4
4

4

17
17
15;

126
2

-

1.59

39
39

4
4

4

54
18
2
25
25
20
5

44
44

212

_

.
-

-

-

-

-

26

101
101
91
10

26
26
26

29

-

-

"

-

21
21

18

81
60
21

66
58
8

106
98
8

8
8
1

17
17
17

17
17
10

-

-

-

-

_

.
.

.
•

_

7

2
2
2

4
4
22
22

16
6

5

2
2
2

49
47

27
27
-

J~ !
T
2

37
37
29
8

3

1 S T
116

over

-

124
n 4
75
39
10

100
1 00

1

5
10

and

2/28

1 61
158
140
18

58
58

63
07
j

17
7
2

49
47
37
10
2

-

24
24

51

_

276
276
243
33

20
60

31

«
m
-

-

72 131
- i r 130
58
75
10
55
1
4

-

16

29
26
3

5
•
-

5

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

m

_

7

-

269 65
249 65
207 4 6
42 IQ

22
2
20

-

8

7

19
19
15
4

3

-

29
"25“

-

-

42
29

7

77
11
2

15
t r

1
1

_

i S r

39
r ^ r

29

39

15
n

8
~~6
6

14
12

1.70
0 2 -

2,04
2,05
2.06
2.02

115

90

-

113
91
22
2

5o
4o

'

Millwrights ................................................
Manufacturing ..................................... ................ .
Durable goods ................ ..............................
Nondurable goods .....................................................

1,285
1,066
219
37

65
59
6

313
284
246
38
29

6

„

h

4o
38
2

83

15
13
7
6
2

20

-

1.65
1.74

616

1.322

-

-

1.8 0

432
231
131
100

133
483

-

134
95
83
12

-

38

16

1.97

nondurable goods

i,^r
1.64
1.64
1.40

19
19
8
n

29
29
27
2

$
2.50

_

m

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
30

80
80

138
138

11
11

-

-

-

1 ?J|

277

124
104
20

277
160
117
J-Af

153
iff
118

58
58
58

-

-

a
m
-

29

_

•

_

35

13
n
8
■
a

53
"53

3

22
20

2

j

20

23

2

103
89
14

5

87

37

4

10
10

1
_

3
3

-

-

l

-

81

22

1

-

-

-

-

205 151
205 151

173

186
1 86

90

179
179
179
•

_

1
1
-

20

-

1

-

84
62
22
6

20
20
-

-

-

-

-

90 219
209

68
68

123
86

_
-

131
131
131

_
„
-

64

13
13
6
7

85
85
74
11

51

166
39

149
2

-

-

-

17
17
17

40

24

29
29
20

16

9

4
o

29
8

6

173
138
35
-

89
65
24

115
71

139
2

4

'

-

•

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. I., January 1952

U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F A O
Bureau of Labor Statistics

21

Table A-3 Maintenance and Poweb Plant Occupat ion* - Continued
ai
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Erie CounEy, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0 2.50
&
).95 1.00

♦
1.67

518

1.69

1*63
3li0

Manufacturing ..........................................

1,71

123

1.66
1.50

55
238
183
130

1.73
1.81

Pipe fitters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ........................................ .

5 56
256

1*2

21

1.67
1.88

21

Tool-and-die makers ......................................
Manufacturing ...................... ...................

1
1

1
-

2

-

3

-

h

-

-

-

10

9

2

2

1
*

2
2
2

1?

16

19
19

12
6
6

1

-

_

-

-

1
*

2

5
_

10

5
5

1
*
2
2

9

2

2

k

_

2

2

_

61
la

1*0
1
20
12
3
1
2
9

1.60
iai+

.

.

m
e

m

2

m

1
*

8

m

7

11
11
11

26
26
22
u

1+5
33
32
1
12

11

7

2
1
1

“

38

_ i L
22
16
6

2.07
2.07

36
36
32
1
*

•

5
5

_

_

1

6

10
10

26
26

1
*

25
1

6

21
21
15
6

33
33
22
11

2
2

2
2

“

-

-

-

_

_

_

22
18

26
26
11

10
8
1

2
2

k

15

7

2

23

2
2

-k - 41 1
*
25
k
22

13

_

6
6

5

80
78
60
18
2

_

7
7
7

3

5

ll*
ll*

19
19
6

-

4 1*8
1 -

-M 65

22
22

6

207
79
128

5i
36
15

113_ -ill.
U 3
113

_

_

_

.

_

1

62
60

-

«
.

“

25
35
2

“

1

43 —
i*3
6
37

269
269

“

6

-

_

_

:

L
___ 3_ ___ 2 ___ 2_
2
6
3
2
2

-§i25
li
11

-

“

_

2

207

-

“

:

:

~

•

_

_

8

;

2

“

2.1+0 2.50 over

_

12

5

1

_
_

12
12

1

6

1.97
2.09

137
137
137

2.30

1?
19
11
8

2

8

6
6
1

1.90 2 t00 2 f10 2.20

30

"

1
*

25
25
13
12

1.85

6

“

2

12
12

k

_

1
*

55
1*5
21*
21
10

12

2

2.02
2.02 -

856
856“

2?
25
18

56

2
.

1.65 1.70 1.75 1.8 0

101*
1*8

-

■

1.1*7

178
--- 178“
100
78

—

1
1

1
*
-

1.99
1.67

79

Sheet-metal workers, m a i n t e n a n c e ...................... .

3
-

1.92
1.96
I .93

221

Nonmanufacturing

-

1.1*9

— w r

Plumbers, maintenance ....................................

2
-

1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.J*o 1.1*5 1.50 1.55

1.77
I .90

53
5$

J+r^mnnii-fap+.n-nl ng ............

and

1.05 1.10

_

k _JL2.
12
1
*
6
u
6

_

_H2_ _Sg_
82
119

1 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows: 19 at $2.60 to 2.70j and 9 at $2.70 to 2.80.

2/

Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupation*

Tabia A-3 j
b

(Average hourly earnings i / for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis ir> ’Niagara County, N. X., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
U
nder 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 $
2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
0.95

Carpenters, maintenance .................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................

*

Nondurable goods ............................ ...........

93
93
59
34

Electricians, maintenance .................................
Manufacturing ............................ ......... ...........
Durable goods .............................................
Nondurable goods ............

338
321
160
161

2.04
2.03
2. 0$
2.02

-

1.96
1.96
1.97
1.93

Thm a M A g n t v i q

Tt t t i i T t T t r i i i i i » t f i i i » i T T T

.........
See footnote at end of table.




and

1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 I .40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 . 8$ 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.4O 2. 5Q over
4
4
4

_
-

_ _
-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1
1

3
3

J

1
1

2
2

1

2

2
2

4
4
4

1
11
11
7
4

2
2
1
1
i

9

9
9
41
a
1
40

19
19
1/
2

25
25
11
14

1
1

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

2 53 113
2 53 113
2 31 69
22 44

85
68
39
29

16
16
10
6

3
3

_
_

9
9

9 16
9 16
£
0
1 1

3

9
'

Occupational W Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
age
IT.S. DEPARTMENT O L B R
F AO
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22

Table k-3
bi Maintenance and Pawn* Plant Occupation*- Continued

2J

(Average hourly earnings
f°r asn in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Niagara County, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Oc c u p a t i o n and industry division

Number
of
workera

Average
hourly
earnings

$
«
$
s
s
*
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Jnder 0.95 1. 0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 . 7 0 1.75 1 . 3 0 1.85 1 . 9 0 2 .00 2.1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 .4 0
$
0.95
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1. 5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.8 0 1.85 1 .90 2 .00 2 . 1 0 2.2 0 2.3 0 2.4 0 2 .5 0

$
2 .5 0
and
over

~T~
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... ..................................
D u rable g e o d e ..... ........................... .
No n d u r a b l e go o d e ............. ............ •••••..

76
7 5 ..
16
59

4

1.98
-

1.99
2.02
1.98

114

1.63
1.70
1.72
1.69

3 14
310
158
152

1.33
1.79
1.88

M echanise, autom o t i v e (maintenance) ....... ...........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................

65
28

M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................
TVeNmkl a a a a i Ia
....... ...

224
224
45
179

1.95
1.95
1.91
1.96

Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ..................................

3 80
~ 330
196
184

1.96
l.%"
2.01
1.90

136
136
80
56

Painters, maint e n a n c e ...................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................

165
164

1.87
1 . 3 5 “^

Pipe fitters, mainte n a nce ..............................

247
“ 247
83

_

1.65

M a n u facturing ........................................
D u r able go o d s .....................................
Nondu r a b l e g o ods ..................................

_

2.05
2.05
2.01
2.09

165
136

_

1.88

Maintenance sen. g e n eral utility ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................
Durable goods ......... ...........................
Nond u r a b l e g o o d s ............................ .

_

1.38

334
334
183
146

_

-

F i r emen. s t ationary boiler .............................

Helpers, trades, m a i n t enance ...................... ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................
Durable goods ....................................................................................

Ma n u f a c t u r i n g .................. ..................... ..
m a in t e n a n c e

.............. .

Durable goods .....................................
N o n d urable goods .................. ................

Nondu r a b l e g o o d s ...... ...........................
Mil l w r i g h t s ....... .......................................
Muitiiiifirt1
irinj
■■■
■
lir---T r T -I- r- |
. .

229
“ 220—
106

95
41

159

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................

65
65

T o ol-aod-die make r s .....................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................

201
“ 201

She e t - n a t a l workers, m a i n t e n a n c e .............. .......

1.61

3

3
1

txsladea premium fay far overtime aad night work.




3
4,

•
a

16
l6

36
36
20
16

16
2

1

6
5“

-

6

“

-

21
21
-

10
9
6
3

21

23
23
16
7

34
34
9
25

3
3
o

1

6

5

10

-

_

8
8
3

-

-

-

3
3

19
19

21
21

19

13
8

Q
J

2

19
19
18

4

1

~ 6 ~

-

101
101
81
20

9

21
21
15
6

8
_

"

9

3
-

3

3

7
7

16
16
_

26
26
_

12
12
8

26

1
1
1

_
_

_
_

1
_

4

“

-

-

1

1
1

-

-

16

20
20
8
12

19
19
19

53
53
24
29

2
2

79
79
21
58

13
13

1
1

13

2

71
71

2
2

2
2

L

9
1

72

115

66
6

115
69
46

19
19
19

1

_

32
32
11
21

-

1

-

31

43
43
43
-

23
1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

6
6

8
<8

15

3
3

30
on

9

no

2

4

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

“

-

-

1

1
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
4

-

15
15
6

10
6
-

9

6

1.82

T .% .
3

3
2
1

±0
14
1

30

9
9
4
5

3
8
-

4

33
31
31

5
5
5

8

4

-

“

-

9
9
5
4

32

_

1

4

-

-

4

12
12

10
7

4

-

1
1

_

2
2

32
32
/

9
9
9

43

16
16

12
12

28

43

16

A
8

63
63
05
fc?
38

31
31

2

_

10
2
8

1
1

5
5

31

9
9
9

35

155

-

13
13
3
5

14
21

127
28

36
36
7
29

19
19
15

23
23
18

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

47
47
6

14
14
13
1

3

16

1
1

1.70
1.58

11
11

1

I X ? ..

4
-

-

15
up
ii
4

10
10

1
1
1

8
8
8

16
16

3
8

23
23
-

33
33
20

23

13

_

_

9
1

43

1
_
-

_
-

-

-

4

5

-

2
2

12
12

10
10

36
36

20
20

2JD0
2.00
2.02
2.(30

2
2

7
7

-

36
36

14
14
7
7

2.i30
2700.

5
5

1

-

-

-

-J i4

4

2

n
t

“
i

2.16
2.16

-

31
31

14
Jf
Ur

_

87
87
6
81

_

-

3

9

9
5
5

1

1/

4
4

_

1.65
T E T
1.65
1.66

118
118

-

“

l
1

UPP

7
7
6
1

47

3

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

"

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

13
13

-

-

-

13

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

~

■

~

-

-

-

■

-

-

14
-

29

20
20
11

107
107
42
65

9

a

32
32

9
9

1

29

47

2
2

”

-

_

_

17
17

26
26

34
34

-

~
76
76
1 ____ i
_

-

-

-

23

Table

A-k:

Gudtadial, WateliauAinyTand Shipping Occupation^

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Buffalo, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occu p a t i o n and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
Under 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0 .90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.3 0 1.35 1.4 0 1.45 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 C 2 .2 0 2.30

%

and

0.65

.70

_

.80

_

.85

.90

_

.75

_

.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 over

%

Crane operators, electric bridge (under
20 tons) ...............................................
M a n u f acturing ........................................

734
734

1.67
1.67

Guards ....................................................
Manufac t u r i n g ........................................
D u r able goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ................. ...............

982
958
756
202

1 .6 1
1 .6 1
1.59
1.69

-

2,973
1,924
1 ,1 9 8
726

1.25
1.39
1.39
1.39
.99
1,32
1 .1 6

/,3

/!
,

39

-

-

-

43

41

39

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men) ................
Manufac t u r i n g .........................................
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
N o n m a n ufacturing .....................................
Who] esal e trade ............... T--........... , , , 1
R e tail trade ......................................
F inance ** ........................................
Services ...................... T---r...... , _ _, T,,
Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (women) ..............
M a n ufacturing ........................................
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods .................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Public utilities * ...............................
Wholesale trade ..... .............................
Retail trade ......................................
Finance ** ........................................
Services ...........................................

1,049
121
70
496
163
197
1 .3 6 6

.93
1 .1 0
.80

_

_

-

_

88
17
17
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2
2
2

29
14

20
2
19

59

-

1,131
99
20
167
629
216

1.24
.93
1 .0 5
.82
.79
.99
.79

42
_
-

59

12
13
13

O r der fillers ............................................
M a n ufacturing ........................................
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods .................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Public utilities * ..............................
Wholesale trade ...................... .
Retail trade ......................................

700
338
193
145
362
72
183
105

1.42
1.50
1.59
1.39
1.35
1.52
1.27
1.38

Packers (men) ............................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................................... .
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods .................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Ratal 1 trade - ....... TT. T t t ..Tr T , .............. T

796
711
432
279
85
60

1.48
1.53
1.55
1.50
1.05
1.13

21

.90

Packers (women) ..........................................
Manufac t u r i n g ........................................
D u rable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Retail trade ......................................

480
423
99
324
57
29

1 .0 6
1 .0 8
1 .2 0
1 .0 4
.92
.84

-

44
154

_
-

5
5
58

5
1
39
2

34
10
xi

37
_

59
20
6

32
12
2

18
25
5
x

7
6
8

40
1

|

201

38
4
3
1

232
8
8
_

149
13
-

146
26
1

2
2
_

34
10
2

224
39
1

13
136

25
120
38

136

8
_
-

43

85

91

_

-

108
6
-

85

91

33
19
30

13
1

8
-

2
_
-

29
_
-

|

4
g

6
102
9
4

9
7

43

-

-

42

12
10

2
2

i

_

2

-

_
-

-

-

-

2
— in

10

]

-

4

15

-

-

8

5
5

10

4
2

4

6

2

4

46
44

11

-

-

50
45
1
44
5
2

11
11

4
4

28
28

54
54

153
153

208
208

89
89

163
163

5
5

6
6
6

21

26
26
26

60
60
60

244

X2 4
121
105
16

198
182
143
39

182
182
132
50

104
103
59
44

/,?8
421

18 4
184
59
125
_

53
53
12

8

24 4
203
41

8
8

_

15

17
17

73
19
12
7
54
8

66

70

14
10

49
24
25
21

I 15
15

15
14
14
-

1

4
52
3

233
189
157
32

201 155
140 102
117
87
23
15
61
53
x 26
18

229
175
88
87
54
43

210
177
71
106
33
33

273
265
185
80
8
x

13
13

-

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

15
3
12

3
8

_
_

_

_

7

7

16
16

41
38

9
7
_

25
13
3
3

13
13
11
2
_

27
24
11

85
42
16
26
43

33 4
87
7

a

4
-

44
3

_

4
4

_
_

_
_

4

_
_

2
2
2
_
_

1
1

-

_

_

_

1
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

95
42
26
16
53
QQ
Xl

28
16
16
-

87
69
55
14
18
O

25
22
19
3
3

2
2
2
_
_

_
_
.
_

_
_

12

10

9

4

3

15

3

-

-

3

-

-

42
42
27
15
-

119
119
78
41
-

62
62
47
15
_

10
10
2
8
_

53
53
21
32

18
18
18
_
_

3

69
2
67
_

19
19
17
2
-

10
10
10
_
_

10
10

33

33

33
31
2

33
6
27

_

_

_

_

_

_

2
2

1
1

_

_

-

_

-

_

2

1

40
2

3
11

2
_

17
17
14
3
_

40
40
32
8
_

27
21
14
7
6

26
_
-

11
_
-

6
2
2
-

16
2
2
_

120

4

39
39
2
37
_

14

91

77
58
34
24
19

X2
2

60

x

31

18

54 L13
41 LOO
13
95
28
5
13
13
13
13

85
79
77
2
6
5

69

6

_
_

-

8

-

26

11

43

26

4
6

4

29
15

_

43

2
6

-

2

44
2
2

30
154

21
1

-

i

-

25
99
5
q

2

-

-

15
15
2

-

5
-

144
45
20

17

_
2

2

-

i

45
6

6
191

2

8

5
5Tl

2
2

'in

4
3
1
197

75

I
-

7
7

82

39
16
16

102

4
100

50

4

35

15
15
114

71

63

29

42

24

16
16
7

198
44
-

129

3

.99
1.28
1.32

235
133
102

_

-

_

_

18
16
16
2

7
5
3
2
2

39
39
16
23
_

2

2

5
5

34
34
12
22

15
14
12

_

-

_

2

100
92
12
80
8
8

50
25
-

25
25
x

44
44
13
31

_

5

31
31
_

31

-

11
2
9

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

3

29
19
10

12

3

3

3
3
_

3
7
_

x

9 11
9
8
1

13
3

_
_
_

_
_
-

_

|
See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2k

Table A—I :
t

Custodial, WaAeUauHtuff and. SUipfUuf Occupation* - GotUUutmd
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Buffalo, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Receiving clerks .............................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................
Retail trade ..........................................................
Shipping clerks ...............................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................

$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
A
verage nder (f.65 (5.70 $.75 (5.80 6.35 8.90
1.6C 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
8.95 1.00 1.05 i .10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 $
h rly U
ou
ea in 1
rn gs
and
0.65
.70 .75 .80 .35 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.7C 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over
1
323 1.51
8
6
2
17
36 28
4
4
3
14 48 34 23 22 62 12
_
_
_
_
_
— 2z r l.b l
1
10 16 33 22 20 51 12
1
27 28
_
_
_
1
185 1.61
9 16 30 15 14 41 8
23 28
_
_
_
.
36 1.60
1
1
7 6 10 4
3
4
_ 16
_
_
_
_
102 1.30
8
2
6
2
4
1
1 2 11 _
4
4 32
9
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_ 13
_
_
_
_
_ _
26 1.27
1
2
2
6
1
1 _
2
2
71 1.32
6
7
2 24
1 11 4
3
9
"
*
_
_
_
_
_
_
_ 4 12 6 23 6
361 1.63
8 21 34 14 39 22 48
1
6
5
33 79
_
288 1.68
12 34 13 34 16 48
1
6
1
17 78
23
5
_ 12 16 13 29
_
220 1.66
1
11 67
6
7 34
1
23
_ 5
_
_
_
68 1.72
18
6 11
9 14
5
_
_
_
6
8
6
73 1.44
1 5
16
4 12
5
1
9
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
35 1.61
2
6 _
1 5
3
5
13
4.
5
6
2
30 1.29
5
V
Nm
u ber
of
w ere
ork

ShioDing-and-receiving clerks .......................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Uhnl
a t/rariA
, , , , , , .........T. . T, , , , , ,

319
270
190
80
49
29

1.52
1.53
1.55
1.50
1.43
1.52

Stock; handlers and truckers, hand ................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Wholesale trade .....................................................
Retail trade ..........................................................

6,227
A,696
1,482
1,531
640
589

1.46
1.49
1.48
1.52
1.34
1.39
1.25

Truck drivers, light (under 1 - tons) ..........................
-J
Manufacturing............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................
Retail trade .........................................................

260
— n r
84
27
149
57
33

1.49
1.56
1.55
1.60
1.43
1.59
1.14

2.194
479
135
344
1,715
1 141
*354
178

1.57
1.54
1.52
1.54
1.57
1.60
1.63
1.32

849
---- 165“
683
551
102
28

1.60
1.66
1.59
1.59
1.58
1.57

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
L tons) .........................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable goods ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................................................................................
D .'W 1 A

oa

«

Wholesale trade ....................................................
Retail trade .........................................................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
tvoe) .............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................................................................................
P a h 'l l A lltiUtlAA * T T ...........................................................................
g6 lL ° "tra'ia
, f T i r T . T . - _ .....................
pe t a i 1 t - r a r i p
................................. - ....................

3,21J,

-

_

-

_

-

-

.

_

_

7
-

6
_

10
10

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

7

6

10
_

1
.
1
1

-

16
16
16

30

20
20
4
16

95

12
12
_
8

58 138
20 90
46
20 44
38 48
28 21
9 23

43
18
2
16
25
19
6

22
-

3
-

_

3

-

-

_

_

_

3

-

-

14
1414

12

-

12

51
32
3
29
19

75 133
7 115
7
115
68 18

30
26

32 103
10 28
28
10
22 75
12 34
10 41
2

12

2
2

12

1
-

1
1

_

_

_

1

_

_

3

-

1

-

_

_

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

|-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

2

11
4
4
_
7
<
7

20
20
10
10
_

82 180
49 103
34 72
15 31
33 77
18 33
15 23

490
426
419
7
64
22
23

-

5
5

_

_

12

"

22
2
10

24

3?

3

-

30
29
25
4
1

18
_

13
7
7

18
16
2

6
_

6

' 3

2

24

33

_

-

_

_

2

4
20

_

-

3
-

_

-

33

3

-

6

13
6

39
29

18

4

14
14

63

-

63

_

3

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

63

|

1

/
i

33
28
23
5
5
C
?

57
56
36
20
1

35 77
32 69
22 61
10 8
3 8
i
2 4

1584 342 577 685 975
1432 312 241 402 855
1297 87 133 118 389
135 225 108 284 466
152 30 336 283 120
78 27 195 30 48
68
3
3 154 66

-

!

H
9
3
6
5
c

_

595
589
551
38
4
4
-

5
5
_
5
_

1
1
_
1
_

5
1
_
1
4
4

95
83
16
67
12
12
-

22
22
6
16
_
_
-

39
1
1
_
38
38
-

21
6
3 61 57 23
17 — r ~zr~
"23 — 5"
1
1
17
5 28 20
16
2 3
5
_
2 40 27 _
4
_
_
_
24 _
07
47 104 661 771 L
18 57 65 51 51
9 39 21 19 14
9 18 44 32 37
29 47 596 720 56
12 16 coo 581
17 12 23 102 56
19 9 33 4
4
4

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.




95
17
78

8
6
6
_
2
2

3 443 238
18 96
2 425 142
415 132
2
2 10
8

_
_
_
_

21
70

14
-

70
-

2

27
21
6

18
15
3

O

1
JL

3

91
21
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

2
2
2

6
6
6
_
_
_
-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

-

13
_
_
13
13

-

60
46
7
39
14

_
_
_
_

-

-

_

_

3
3
3
_
_

_

_

_
-

6
6
6
_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

31

1

_

_

1

_

_

31

O
J
1
X

25

Table A :
-k

GuAtoduU, 7)0'ateUotUUu}, and SlufLfiUu} OccupcUiOHA - Continued,
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Buffalo, N. Y ., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
$
$
$
$
hul
o r y Under 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.6C 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2, 1c 2.20 2.30
erig $
anns
0.65

Truck drivers, heavy, (over A tons, other than
Manufacturing .............................................................

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .............. ........
Mamifaff'hiiri ng
Nondurable goods ............................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
R +o"1
d 1
|
(
ii|- | (||-T*|--|-- ?
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ............

Dur&blc goods
Nondurable goods ........... ................
Nnrmmmifwnturi ng
ia
Tn+1 oo
... ..... .....
trade «••#•#••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

.70

.75

-

— and
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.6C 1.70 1.8C 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over

~

.80

.85

.90

%

238
45
193

1.60
1.63
1.58

974
“ 333
726
162
36
18

1.59
1,60
1.59
1.66
1.48
1.43

429
"420
350
70

1.62
1.62
1.60
1.70

921
605
316
289
316
13Q
51

1.27
1.35
1.35
1.35
1.12
1.15
1.03
1.26
1.04

66

39

“

-

2

_

2

_

4
4
4

2
2

_

-

7

5
-

7

25
10

-

-

10
15

5

3

1

_

2

7

-

-

-

23
23
23

13
7
6
1
6

90
20

7

20
70
42
14

22

3

4

7
15
16

2

2
25

54
50
42
8
4

-

3

4

_

8

1

27
2

15
7
7

6

6

3

38

3

7
2

8

3

36

24
12

_

15

4

21
8

23

16
6
2

14 -M _
4 44
/
39
5
10
10

3
3
3

38

23

5
2
29

5
5
2

3
3
3

45
39

7

12
12

-

2
2
2

6 142. 28
6
1 16
10
-L
c
141

13
13

-

8
8
8

-

-

2

_

53
30
18
12
23
23

38

234_ M L . 98 157 120
234 184 90 157 120
X70 137 85 120 n o
36 47
5 37 10
60
8

66
66
64

42
39
39

42

42

10
10
8

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

"

*

-

17
17

4
4
I

17

“

4

_

_

6

*
(7

oA
<O
c

16
16
11
5

69
44

26
26

3

-

-

-

-

-

6
25

35
35
14

26

8

-

-

-

-

-

74 153
68 153
61 127

50 134
48 122
32 57
16 65
2 12
2

87
45
27
18

83
72
37
35
11
11

40 _ 1 .
15
7
25

38

.
.

4 10
10

4

3
3
3

n
f

3

4

8

25

12

____ i
l/
"Z /

"*

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study lim ited to men workers except where otherwise in d ica te d .
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

Table A-l+a:

G u & to d io l,

W a te J u U U u U }, < U td

S U l p fU H f

O c C M fZ o tiO tU

(Average hourly earnings l / for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
b asis in Erie County,—N. Y ., by industry divisio n ^ January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number

Occupation and industry d iv isio n

of

workers

Average
hourly
earnings

0.65
Crane operators, e l e c t r ic bridge (under

20 tons) ........

Guards ..........................................................................................
Duribls goods

•• •• «•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •«•• •• •• •• *••

510
510

Nonmanufacturing ................ ................... .............................

See footnotes at end of table




$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

•75

.80

.85

.90

7

1.62

7

-

13
+

1+1

39

-

-

-

1+ 6 7

1.13
1»3U
1.35
1.33

980

•98

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

6
6
6

2
2

n
n

28
28

1+
1+
26 _
26
26

_ a

53
53

5 + 152 173
1
cl.
5b
■■5
*1

221 _
221
188
XX

.1+3

$

s

$

$

s

$

S

+
•95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1*15 1.20 1.2 5 1.30 1.35 1.1+0 1. 1 5 1.50 1.60 I.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over

$
1.62

-

$

$

0 i 75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 I.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1+0 1. 1+ 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2.30
5
and

.70

-

2,237
1,^57
790

$

$

1.59
1.59
1.57
1.69

697
673
551
122

Durable goods
Nondurable goods .................. .

$

$

(Jnder 0.65 0.70

-

ll
+

164
14+

_ . w+
140
39

86
17
17

129
15

50
-

139
15
+

68
ll+

20
1H+

50

7

_

15
69

37

25

37

9l+

7
51+

52 * 70 231
9
5 9 " 187
5
2 1 + 157
30
25
1+
1+3

21

11
++

I89

128
110

18
61

HiO
90

137
105

75
15
50

73

55

32

90
29

32

171+

121

i §

113
70
1+3

8

§i| 120
& 101+
XA
QO
2°
1 fl A1+
J.U

25

PR
<-0

135
135

1+
2
l.p

53
52
xx

1+
1+

15
15

101
xl.
5b

22
IQ
J>7

13
■■
*5

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

X
2

12

50

6
5

if

152 101
11 5 101
+
106 59

12

1+2

38

39
7

”

-

-

.

_

_

1+

1

50

-

-

_l

-

-1

______ 1

Occupational W
age Survey, Buffalo, N. Y ., January 1952
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
Bureau o f Labor Statistics

26

Tb A a Gu&todial, * 0
a le -4 :
1 'analtouLUufrand Sluppuup Occupation^ Goutinued
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Erie County, N. Y., by industry division” January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

•

N ber
um

Occupation and industry d ivisio n

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 0 .6 5 0 .7 0 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0 .9 5 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.3 5 1 .1+0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0
earn g:; |
in
and
0.65
.70 .79
.80 .89 .QO .Q9 1.0 0 1.09 1 .10 1.19 1 .20 1.29 1 .30 1.39 1 JiO 1 J|5 1.90 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 i.q o 2.0Q 2 ,10 2,20 2,30 over
%

J an ito rs, n o rters. end cleaners (women) ...................
Manufacturing .......................... ......................................... ..
Durable goods ...................... ..........................................
Nondurable goods ....................................... .
Nonmanufacturing .................... .................. ........................

1.21+1
155
92
63
1,086

0 .9 7
1.21+
1.3 1
1 .1 5
.93

Order f i l l e r s ............................................................................
Manufactur ing ................................* ....................................

61+1
281
178
103
360

1.1+1
1.1+9
1.58
1.32
1.35

558
1+81
258
223
77

1.39
1.1+4
1.1+6
1.1+3
1 .0 6

1+52
399
53

1.01+
1.0 5
.Q3
•7b

270
191+
172
22
76

1 .5 0
1 .6 0
1 .6 1
j-.pp
1.23

Nondurable goods ...........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................................................
Packers (men) ........................................................................
M u f actur ing ............................................... .......................
an
Durable goods ............ .............. .............................
Nondurable goods ...........................................................

Packers (women) ........................................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................................

Receiving clerks .......................................................................
J ..u - J-«
t _r
T

Nonmanufacturing .................................................................

59

38
38

29
29

61+
6
1+

91

106
6
6
100

_

-

_
-

2
-

8
-

_
-

-

2

8

-

10
_

5
1
1
i,.

1+

11

59
-

-

_
-

_
-

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

1.50
1 .5 1
1 .5 2
1.50
1.1+3

_
-

Stock handlers and tru ckers, hand .....................................
Manufacturing ................ .....................................................
Durable goods .................................................................

5,506

1.1+5
1.1+8
1.1+7
1.53
1.3 5

_

Nondurable goods .....................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing • • • • • .......................................................
Truck d r iv e r s , lig h t (under 1^- to n s )

216

...........................................

W

229
8
8
221

ll+9
13
-

17
15

_
-

_

11

-

15
2

-

15
15

22
16
13
3
6

10
10
6
1
+
-

23
22
22
1

4
4
3
1
-

13
13
9
4

2
2
2

16
2
2

77
58
34
24
19

63
20
12
8
43

89
36
26
10
53

28
16
16

H
+

116
25
19
6
91

113
100
95
5
13

65
59
57
2
6

63
63
2
61

7
7
5
2

31
31
17
14

1+7
1+5
2

u+
ll+

9
9

3
3

_
-

20
20

3?
33

17
2
2

7
7
6
1
X

33
32
29
3
1

22
21
15
6

29
29
11
xo

34
13
13

-

1+
3
-

26
-

11
-

_
8

100
92
8

1.
4

13
136

U,5
26
1
25
119

8
-

_
-

_
1+
3

26

11

4

18
16
16
2

7
5
3
2
2

36
36
13
23

5
5

3
1+
3l+

31
31

5

3

5

2

-

16

12

6

23
23
23

6
1
1

1+

6

5

1+

6

10
10

_
-

21
15
15
6
50
25
29

l+
i+
14+

2

_

1+

2

_

1+

7

2

-

-

2

-

_

_

7

_

_

_

_

_

1+

_

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

17
17
11+
3

7
-

-

9
9
8
1
-

6
2
2

38
38
2
36
-

"

-

-

-

30

16

-

-

16
-

30

20

_

1

7

-

76
1+
3
28
15
33

-

-

-

20

91

10

10
22 !

75

20
37

2

12

l

22

!
----------- 1---------- 1---------- ; ---------- :
-

-

-

!

9

l+3i H+74
375 "1334
375 1297
27
56 150

282
252
83
169
30

12

2

23

3
l
5

18

13

17

I

1I
x7

22

18

3

2

Hi

74
7

152
11 4

12
24
24
16
8

-

_
_
_

-

-

63
45
44
1
18

25
22
IQ
■ *7
•
3
3

2
2
2

15
15
6
9

7
7
2
5

—
_

i

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

"

_

_

_
_

_

_

2
2
2
_

3
3
3

_
_

_

-

“

3

49

6
r
6

1
1
1
-

t e ­—
ll

32

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

19 42
1ft 39
X
O
14 b°
4
3
1
3

11
1X
X1
7
1

20
20
20

28
O
Q
dD
Pft
C.O

_

-

-

-

30
25
Pi
£X
4
5

1?
7

37
37
32
5

31
15

68
68
66

3
P
3

18
16
10
6
2

57
49
45
4
8

5
5
-

5

50
49
29
20
1

5
-

J
.
1
1
-

5
1
-•
1
4

563
227
123
104
336

574
293
66
227
281

720
600
330
270
120

554
550
516
34

77
65

16
16

1
1

1+
2
2

53

19

PQ
£-7

-

_

IQ

1

28
23
23
-

£

7

-

1
1
1
-

_

1

9
26
25
25
1

l
2

1 k+y
+ liQ

3

-

-

21
12
ip

-

163
87
72
15
76

1+
8
16
16
32

38
ll+
2
12
21+

131
90
1+
6
J1
++
1+1

32
10

13
28

20
20
10
10

57
20

-

- j

10
-

b l

11
IT
i+
-

6

103
28
28

91

54

13

10
_

1
1

6
6
6
-

7

1*1+3

2,083
I r
116
303
1,661+

3
1
197

29
1
+
3
l
25

k

—

1J+8
1 .5 6

ll+O

1+ i
6
h iih

2

_

259
213
155
58
46

2 ,9 7 6
1,028
1.502

10

_

5
5

Shinning-and-receiving clerks ............................. ..............
Manufacturing ............ ........................................................
Durable goods ............................................. ..................
Nondurable goods ................................... ......................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ......................................................

k ,0 0 k

2
2

-

_

' g

-

-

1 .6 1
1.66
1.6 7
1.5 9
1.1+1+

N

201

12

-

302
231+
19 7
b1
68

Shinning clerks .........................................................................

91
-

40

4
3
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

4

5
16

-

-

65

16

_

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

"

-

3
3
3

39
1
1

_

-

2
4
2~ T
2
-

-

38

12

13
1b
x9

24

Truck d r iv e r s , medium (1^ t o and including
T vl Prt |^ L
itfi ~n
*

^

•

•

•

Nonmanufactur:ing ...................................................................

"

1.5 7
1.5 1
1.52
1.58

- ----------- j
----------- j ---------t

i




-

-

3

33

12

“

“
i

3

2 i S3

i

33

2

-

1+
6
On
C{
.

~

1
1
“

1

See footnotes at end of table.

-

_

i
1

“

3
! 21,
1 s
I

'
°7

114 1
18 !

33
18
Q
7
Q!
15

94
57
7Q

18
37

630 757
CZ
PP i d
1 ft 1-P
J3
38 28
577 716

101
45
14
31
56

41

07

86
16

-

-

-

0

16
25
14 1 70
!
1

~
!

|

-

Custodial, TlfandwUutp, and SUippUup Occupation* - GotUinuad

Table A-4a:

27

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Erie County, N. Y., by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of

Occupation and industry d iv is io n

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.65 0*70 0*75 0.80 0.85 0 .90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.2 5 I .30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0 2.0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0

and
0*65

Truck d r iv e r s , heavy f over 4 to n s , t r a i l e r typ e ) . * • •
Nonmanufacturing ................................

*
1 .5 9
1 .9 9

789
670

Truck d riv e r s, heavy (over 4 ton s, other than
t r a il e r t y p e ) ...................................
Itfemufaoturin g

216

................... ..................................

755
------- 569"
605
64

l/

Zj

.80

•85

-

"

•95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.2 5 1.30 1.35 lJ+C i*45 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1.7G 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 ?*3<? over

.90

"

-

-

-

-

-

63
63

14

1+

4

-

9

2
_

2
—

— 1-----------

4
j.
*4-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

“

-

“

6

-

1.22
710
1+21 “ 1728”
21+1
1.29
1.2 7
180
1 .1 2
289

_
-

16
10

5

j
.0

6

-

6

5

90
20

38
22
7

6

3
*

20
70

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

“

-

15

8

22
10

51+
50
1+
2
8
1
+

2

15
16

3

27
2

7

7

25

35
6
1

10
12

29

14 1

TO
Id

190
130
1U

74
00
63
3

8
8
8

17
17
14
3

56
50
45

5

44
21
15
5

ll+

62
55

23

37
37
23

14
12
12

7

92
80
49
31

29
4

26
26

2

55
25,
21
1.
4
30

37

1 ft
AO

12

1
1

-3.L31

-

|

_

18

6 lf
42
39 “ W l
39
64

23

5
3

3

100
100

1J
>

39
3

1*
1
'1

3
3
3

37
31
23
8
6

ft

6

6
6

32
7
25

l4 i

205
203
189

42

6

02

2
2
2

8
8
8

10

2
2

6
A
O

9
12

23
23

k

427 233
421 137

3
2

-

_

_

2

1*58
1 .5 5
1 .5 6
1*78

6
Watchmen .......................................................................................................................
Manuf acturi ng ......................... ............................................. ..
Durable goods
N ondllt*8.1)10 goo ds * * * * » * * * g * g a * g * * * e e a # a * e # o e * a #
Nonmanufacturing ................

-

“

1 .5 7
1.58
1 .5 7
1 .6 5

299
--------290“
258

Truckers. power (oth er than f o r k - l i f t )
Manufacturing * ............... .. ................ ..............................................................
Durable goods ..................................................... .. ...................... . . . *

•75

1 .5 9
1 .5 5 '
1 .5 8

I89

Truckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t )

*70

_

3

~
«e

“

**

*

74
do

8

“

“

"

“

”

81
81
63

3
3
3

3
3

3
3
3

_

_

-

3

8
8
5
3

“

_

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

1
4
25

95
95
87

-

-

-

-

-

-

do

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated*

Table A-lib:

Custodial, hOandtouiiup, and Skippin g Occupationl

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Niagara County, N. T ., by Industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Crane operator*, electric bridge (under 20 tone) ........
Manufacturing.......................................................................................................

22k
“ 525—

u

Guards ........................................................................................
Manufacturing........................................... ......................................
Durable goods ............................................ .
Nondurable goods ....................... .. .................................... ......................

285
“ 285~
205
80

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (sen) .............................
Manufacturing .......................................................................................................
Durable goods ......................................................... .
Nondurable goods ........................................................
Nonnanufacturi n g ........................... ...................................

736
6o7
508

Occupation and industry division

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (vcawn) .........................
Manufacturing.....................................................................
Durable goods ...............................................................
Nondurable goods ....................................................
Nonnanufacturing..............................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




259

69
‘

125
80“

51
39

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

♦

1.78

1.65
1.65“
1.62

6
6
6

_
-

7
7
7

1.6 9

1.55
1.59
1.58
1.51
1.19
1.20
1.36
1.33
1.50
.90

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

under O.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.50 l.* 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
t
and
0.65
.70 •7? .80 •8? .90 ♦9? 1.00 1*05 1.10 1 .1 5 1,20 1 .2 5 1,30 1.35 1,50 1,55 1.50 1 . 6 Q 1.70 1.90 1.90 2.00 2.19 2.29 2.39 ever

_

_

_

-

-

-

15

2

_

-

-

-

8
6
5

-

.

-

-

15

2

-

*

-

5
8

5

_

21

_

2

_

9

~

5

“

21

“

2

"

-

1

9

5

5
5
-

.
5

2

.

5

2
2
2

i

3

3

_

"

15
5
5
9

-

1

2
2

-

2

13
5

-

"

"

1

-

12
12
7
5
-

-

_

15
12
12
3

92
70
15
55
22

31
31
25
7

5
5
1
5

6
6
3
3

"

36

32
16
16

5
18
16

3
13
2

1
1

23
23

73
73

15
8

67

6

152 276
152

276

115 228
37 58

35 65 121
35 ~sr 121

1
1

2
2

-

-

78

_

_

_

_

51
51
26
25

57

78 *7
53 31
25 16
83
83

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_ _

_

_

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

3

5

-

-

-

-

-

_

83

k

_

_

_

“

9
9
8
1
*

15
11
2
9
3

i

_ _

“

"
1

L_

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, I. T., January 1952
U.S. DIPARTI®NT CP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

28

T A b Gu&todial, Tit' neluuUitufr and SU ipfU nf Occupation* - Continued
able -U:
a
(Average hourly earnings l/ far selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis In Niagara County, N. T . , by Industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aea e
vr g
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
h u ly Under O.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.0 5 1 .10 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1.3 0 1.35 l.ko l.k5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2.30
or
e r in s
an g
t
and
0.65
1,00 - 1±05 1,10 J -1 3 1,20 1-22. 1*30 1 ,3 5 l tko l,k 5 1,50 i f6o I .70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over
-7Q ...>75 r8o _a & _*20
$
22
2
1
k
6
2k
1.55
22
k
1
6
1.57
- 2k

N me
u br
o
f
wr e s
ok r

Occupation and industry division

Order fille r s ..................................................................... .
Manufacturing........................................................... .

59
57

Packers (men) ..........................................................................
Manufacturing......................................................... ..........

238

Receiving clerks ......................... ......................................
Manufacturing ...J .............................................................
Durable goods ..............................................................

Shinuin* olerks .................................. ...................................

_

_

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

1

_

.

_

1.60

53
27
13
lk
26

ffennanufacturlng.......................................................... .

_
-

1.67
1.70

230

8

_

_
-

2

_

_

3

_

_

-

-

20
20

6
6

12

3

7
3
3

_
-

1
1
1

1
1

k

-

-

_

1

1.66
1.61
-

1^53

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

1.7k

59
3k
23
31

1.63
1.88

8hippln«-aad-reeelvlag clerks ...........................................
Manufacturing ...................................... .............................

60

57
692

1.53
1.55

238

1.6 0

1
_
.

k5k
29

1.52
1.15

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

k

2

-

-

1

7

Truck drivers, llaht funder l i tons) ...............................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Durable goods ..............................................................
Nondurable goods ...................................

kk
35
13
22

k

-

1

-

1.61

721

-

1.60

Stock handlers and truckers, hand .....................................
Manufacturing........................................ ...........................
Durable goods .........................................................
Nondurable goods ........................................................
Nonoanufacturlng.......................................... ...................

-

1.5k
1.56
1.50

Durable goods ...............................................................
Nondurable goods .........................................................

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and Including
k tons) ..................................................
Mien rai 1III' 1ng .....r _ T . _ _ r___ -r..r(ti
, ,
,
Durable goods .................................. .
loDdur*.l1ii g a oda

...______r . . ( .

t

t

19

kl
51

,

_

_

_

_

_

_

*
_

_

_

_

„

_

_

2

V

_
_
.

_
.
.

_
„
_

_
_

_

2
.
•

k
_

_

1

.
.

6 * 17
5
k ~ T h ir
_
.
6
k
16
1
1
-

7

.
_

_

59 n o
51 iod
.
kk
7 108
2
8

k
56
-

.

_

1

„

_

1

_

1

_

_

.

1

5

lk

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

1.67
1.73

Truckers, power (fo rk -lift) ................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Durable goods ..................... ...................................... .
Nondurable goods ........................................................

219
219
121
98

1.67
1.67
1.67
1.66

1
1

Truckers, power (other than fo rk -lift) ................... .
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Durable goods ...............................................................
Nondurable goods.
. .. .
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..

130
130
92
. . 38 .
.

1.70
1.70
1.73
.
1.63.

.

211
75 .
109

.

.
1.5k.
l.k7

l / Excludes preeium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Study Halted to sen workers except where otherwise indicated.




lk

6

10

6

k

5

1
1

_

.

.

.

.

.

1
. .. - . ..
.

.

.

. -..
.

. .. - . ..
.

.

.

.

_

9
. - .
.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

_

1
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

_

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

1

2
.

.
.

.

.
.

. 2 .

.

.

.

.
.

2

.

.

. 8 .

.

1

.

8

.1 .

.

.

.
8

.

.

1
1
.

.

.
.

1

.
.

17

.

6.
lk

_
18

36
.
36

3
. 2

.2

16

k2

2
.

3k

.

_
_

_
_

_

_
.

-

-

-

-

5

2
2
2

.

_

_

f
C

y

13
13
8

.

2

5

1

-

8
.
■

8.

-

-

-

-

-

k
k
_
k

.
_
-

_
_

_

.

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_ _
.

8

-

-

o 8

.
2

_
_

2
2

2

0 3.

K
7

1
1

6k

k
8

-

-

23

ko

k

0
.

-

2

8

.

2
2
2

_

.
_
-

2

..

k
~k
k

_

lk

72

.
17

_

17
17
.
17

18
16

21

_
_

_

25
25

18

.

5

.

5

18 72

.

-

•

18

9
9
3
6

-

_

2
2
2 .

-

-

2
2
.
.

3

-

_
.

2.

5
K
y

6
6
6

19

2k 57
2k 57
22 k6
2 n

.

-

_

5k
5k
17
37

.

-

3
S
y

k
k

31
31
9
22

.

-

7
.

8
8

5

5

2
2
.
2

.

_
_

13
13

2
2
2
.

.
_

21
21

1

.

_
.

1
1

k
-

k

_
.
-

10
1
9

IQ
*7

6

12

.

1

-

6
6
1
5

-

6
k
k

k

l.k5
. . . - 1.50 . .
. .. . -

1

19

10

8
8

n

18
l8
16
2

k
k
k

16

lk

1

-

-

_

g

y

1

-

22
18

.

31
12
6

10

*
-

Truck drivers, heavy (over k tons, other than
trailer type) .............................. ............
Manufacturing...................... ...... ^ . ..........

.

k
1

_

*
y

k7

60

. . . H . B. . k . - . .

19
19
3
16

2

_

.

2
2

17 20
IS 20

7
7

_

.

2
2
1
1

lk i n 259 39
lk 109 255 39
52
10
59 35
k 57 196 k
2
-

60
60

1.72
1.77

Vatahaan......................... .........................................................
Manufacturing .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable goods .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Nondurable goods........................................................

5
5

k
_

5
5

Truck drivers, heavy (over k tons, trailer type) .....
Manufacturing................ .........................

..

9

8

5
5

-

7
3
k
9

n
n
2
9

9
0
7
3
6

9

3

12
12

_
.

16

12
5
7
I
8

2
1

5

k

1
1
1

k
k

3

20

-

5
J

1

1.58
l*g§
1*70
1.68
l!k5

5o —

Noneanufacturln g ................ .............................................

_

95 k7
95 k7

3
2

_
1

1.6 0

111
—

_

_

11
n

12

.

.
*

.

.

.
■

.
■

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
M illU t C f

Table B-20A*

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—
N u m b er
of
w orkers

Occupation 2/

A vera ge

$

earnings

1 .5 0

y

jJ E £

$

$

$

$

1 .5 5

and

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .6 5

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 5

$

1 .8 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 0

-iL 75

$

I$

$

1 .9 0

1 .9 0

$

$

2 .0 0

$

2 .0 5

1 .9 5

2 .0 5

2 .0 0

.1 .9 5

$

2 .1 0

$

2 .1 0

2 .1 5

$

$

2 .2 0

2 .2 0

2 .2 5

2 .2 5

2 .1 5

and
over

$
_

21

1 .8 3

66

1 .7 2

-

-

-

6

50

Bolters .......................
Grain-elevator operators .......
Millwrights ................... .
Oilers ........................ .
Packers, flour ................ .
Smutters ......................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand
Sweepers ......................
Watchmen ......................

2 .0 6

-

-

-

-

1 .5 9

-

!

6
52

61

!

1 .7 1 *

-

-

-

-

16

332

1 .5 9

1

222

166

1 .5 2

139

^27

109
-

-

_
_

!
|
!

1 .5 1 *

23

1
*

15

8
-

_
_

_

_

1
-

8
-

16

_

_

_

10
-

1
.

i*
-

-

.

31*
6

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

.

_

-

_

—

-

22

1
*2

6
_
-

2

-

-

3
6

6

1 .7 2

33
-

2
-

101

9
_

6
_

'

-

"

-

~

*
*

“

•

!
j

1*
__________

-

-

“

1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in milling flour or meal from grain (Group 201*1) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classi­
fication Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-28:

O

n

d

u

d

i^

ia

l

Q

U

e 4 9 U

C (U

i

if

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

y

--------------- ----- --‘ ---- V J
-‘
- --------- --------- --------------$
$
$
s
>
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
Under 1.35 1 .1*0 l.k5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1 .6 $ 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35 2 .1*0

1
L.35

and

1 .1*0 i . W l .$ 0 1.55 1 ,6 0 1»65 1.70 1.75 1,80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .1*0 over

Selected Plant Occupations - Men

Pa

we infers

a

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ . ..............

_______

_ _ __

Chemical operators, class A ..........................
Chemical operators, class B ..•••••••.............••••
Chemical operators' h e l p e r s ........................ .
Compressors .................. ••••••••••............ .
Cylinder fillers ............................. ........
Driers, class B ................... ................. .
D rum fillers ......... .......... .....................
Ileotrie-cell me n ....................................... .. .......................................................
Electric-cell repairmen and cleaners .................
Electricians, maintenance .........................................................• • • • • • •
VvanAW flf.AW m an
1 noa A
........ .
...
....
]E vnpnrat.nT *

r>^ana g

iiiiti riii iit

iitiitirtTrrtt

Filterers, class B ........................................................................................ ..
Janitors ............... ........................... .
Fo+.+ l o n o n

r* 1 a s s

Q

. _.

______

...................... .. _ _ ____ ____

Laboratory assistants ....... ................ ........
rAerf a na^ nfA nnnAA
\ .
......................
_ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _
M4 vaims

nl a o o

Pi na
PunntmAn

t)

mci nfsnflnAO

.......

.....

________ _____ _____________ ____________ ______________________ _

Stillmen, class A ................... .............. .
11 nan . r l aos R .
»

Stock clerks
Q+ a a V Vien/Jl a

.....

....... ............. ..

........................................................................ .. ...........
en/4 4 miia 1/av*o
*
Kon/4

See footnotes at end of table.




38
61*U
952
373

61
21*
56
70

180
151

120
51

28
76
90
161*

22
256
ll*7

28
262
17
96
j j

$
2 .0 l
*
1*98

-

-

1 .9 0

-

-

1.79
1.80

- .
-

-

1 .8 1
2 .0 2

-

1.89
2.03

-

1 .6 6
1.87

-

2
-

6
10
8

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

-

6
1
*

-

29

.

.

•

-

2
21*
8

2

35
11*3

60
10
1
*
1
*
20

-

«
•

3
-

-

-

-

11*

1

-

-

-

•
-

-

2
1

1 .8 5
1 .8 1
1.71*
1.77
1.63
1.91

1 .7 8
2 .01*

-

-

32
-

•
a
.

.
.

3

2
2

•
3

•

10

6
26

1

5
.

10

1*5
17
la
30

12
10
1
11
12
8
1
21*

•

51

16

8
21*
2
52

2 .0 0
1 .8 0
-

«

-

2
10

•

76

1.71*

1^66

2

-

1
22

-

-

12
6
1
2

12
20
2

11
**

-

7

6
16

7

2

2
10

2

2

3

36

1*
7

1*5

7

i

j

3

20
11*

3h

2
8
16

17

135
131
31*

1

2
120

35

35

k

k

6
1

lU
31
13

59
1
*

30
1*

51

h

2
22

-

l
-

1
*

-

-

•

-

25

k

-

-

-

-

11*

k
k

-

-

-

-

*
»

l

8
21*

-

-

5

1

5
17

76

26

3

9

21

25

10

it

-

6
3

•

•
-

•
-

it

•

1*

t
m

-

.
i
t

-

-

•

m

1

-

16
3

31
5

3

39

17

21

-

.

1

17

6

-

21

1

5
17

1
*
1*0

1
-

-

1*

i
t

3
2

2
•

-

5

o
29

k

it

k

1

8
-

-

25

6

1 .9 2

1/0
* 0t

2
-

7
•

31
27
109
-

17

2
19

•

51* 139
86 510
25 13
8
1
-

1

1 f7
X. 79

1.96

i

a
-

8
1

.

•

_

-

.

•

2

•

•

m

•

1

-

7
85

27

11

5
13

117

20

1*2

1

7

1

11

•

1
10
1*
1

it

.

it

1
1
13
•

•

16

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

H t t d u lt 'lia l C U em ioo l'L

T ab le B -2 8 :

30

1/

“

G antiH M & d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.35 l.liO 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35
$
1.35
l.bo l*b5_ 1.5o 1.55- 1.6Q ia65_ 1.70 1*15- 1.8Q. 1.85 1 - 9 0 [.1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15, 2.2Q 2.25 2 * 3 Q 2.35 _2JiQ

$
2. bO
and
-QY1X

S e l ected Plant Occupations - Men - Continued

15

$
1.75
1.79
1.79
1.78
1.82

57

1.6o

b5
30

1.65
1.U8

87
b8
97
82

T r uck drivers 3 / s T o t a l ............................*•••
M e d i u m trucks (1^ to and including b tons) ........

•
-

-

•

-

•
-

-

-

“

-

2
2
-

26

•

b

3b
•

-

28
28
38

3

26

i

30

b

u

17

12

3

-

7

5

-

-

-

-

•

-

17
17

-

■
*

-

-

*
•

b
b

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

•

•

•

-

-

-

5

5

1

5

1

-

8

1
13

1
•
•

13
9
2
2

1

8

Selected Plant Occupations - Woman
-

b

-

5

13

1

7

6

5 ! i
l

i

16
1

b

-

1

-

-

1

1/
The s tudy covered establishments wi t h more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of industrial chemicals (selected branches - Groups 2811, 2812, 2819, 2821, 2822, 2823* 2839,
and“ 2896) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19b5 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budget.
Data relate to an October 1 9 5 1 pay r o l l period.
2/ Excludes pr e m i u m p a y for overtime and night work.
All workers were paid on a time basis.
2/
Includes other types of trucks in addition to those shown separately.
Tablm B-336:

t y o u n d /U e l ,

A /a H ^ e V lO U &

1/

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2 /

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

y
Chippers and grinders k/b .........................................................
Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y b /a ..................................
Molders, hand, bench k/b .....................................................
Molders, machine b /b ...................................................................
Pourers, m etal b / b ............. ......................................... ..
Sand mixers k/b"........... ..................................................................
Shake-out men U/a .........................................................................
Watchmen h a ................................................................... ................
/.

93
8
b5
53
20
13
61
10

$
l .b b
1.67
1.73
1.67
1.52
i.m
1.29
1.25

s
$
1.00 1.05
and
under
,1 . 0? 1.10

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
l.bO

$
l .b 5

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
[1------- $
1.85 1.90 1.95

1*15, 1.20 L ia iS - 1.30

1.35

l.bO

I.b 5

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

12
2
b
_
2
2
*
*

1
.
_
6
_
_
_

_

_

1

b
1
_

15

1

_

_

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

and

9
1

3

~

16

1

11

3

20

-

2

9
l
2
"

-

-

b
b

7
_
1

1

1

2
3

1
-

7

5
_
_
b
b
l

3
b
bo
1

1

1

”

1

6
2
6
6

b
_
2
2b

9

1

3
1
6

_

_
_
_

~

-

_

The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except d ie -c a s tin g fou n dries) with 8 or more workers.
Data lim ited t o men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Table B-3A63:

S ta m p e d

a n d

P * ie 4 A e d

M




_

2.00
_
_

_
_
_

1

-

_

over
1
b
1
«.

_
-

______

Data re la te t o an August 1951 p a yroll p eriod .

e ta l

P r o d u c t*

^

1/
The study covered establishments w i t h more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonautomotive stamped and pressed metal products
cation Manual (19b5 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budget.
2/
Excludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) A l l or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.

1.95

-

l

•

______ 1
1/
2/
3/
11/

$
2.00

(Group 3b63) as defined i n the S tandard Industrial C l a ssifi­

Oc c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., J a n u a r y 1952
u.S. D E P ARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31
Table b -3 u

ZlecUaflaiu^, PlaU*tf,<uid P o J d ilu 1
/

,
68;

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STJR.AIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

2 /

$

Average
hourly
earnings

0.90 p.95 fL.OO [1.05 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1 . 1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5

3/

1*2
25
39
6

P laters .................................................
P la ters' helpers ...............................
Polishers and b u ffers, metal ........
Stock handlers and tru ck ers, hand

30

1.20 1.25

.05 1.10

$
1.5 5
1 .1 2
1.7 5
1.09

11.35.

1*5 1A5 ImSSL 1.55
0

$

$

1.65 1.70 1.7 5

l a 6 5 JLa65

Xa75

l a 75

1.80 1 . 8$ 1.90

1.95

2.00

1..8Q Xa55 1.90 1.95 2 .00 2.05

17

3

5

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in a l l types of e le c tr o p la tin g , p la tin g , and meMl polish in g (Group 31*68) as defined in the Standard In d u strial
C la s s if ic a t io n Manual (I9i*5 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data lim ite d to men workers. A ll workers were paid on a time b a s is .
5/ Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.

Table B-35 s

MGxUtUieMf,

OnduA&li&i V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARIylNGS OF—

Occupation 2/

of
workers

hourly
earnings
2/

T otal ..................................................
Tine ..............................................
Incen tive ....................................
Assemblers, cla ss B: Total ..................................................
Time ..............................................
Incen tive ....................................
Assemblers, c la s s C k/a ...........................................................
E le c tr ic ia n s , maintenance k a ..............................................
/.
In sp ectors, c la s s A k/a ...........................................................
J a n ito r s, p o rte rs , and clea n ers k a . . . ...........................
/.
Assemblers, c la s s A:

M achine-tool op erators, production,
cla ss A 5 / : Total ................................................................
“
Time .............................................................
Incen tive ..................................................
D r ill-p r e s s op era tors, ra d ia l,
cla s s A: T otal .................................................................
Time ............................................................
Incen tive ..................................................
Engine-lathe operators, c la s s A: Total ...................
Time ...............
Incen tive . . .
Grinding-machine operators,
c la s s Ar Total .................................................................
Time .............................................................
Incen tive ..................................................
Milling-m achine operators, cla s s A: Total .............
T im e .........
Incen tive
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss B 5 / : Total .................................................................
Time ............................................................
Incen tive ..................................................
D r ill-p r e s s op era tors, r a d ia l,
cla ss B k a .........................................................................
/.
D r ill-p res 's operators, s in g le - o r m u ltip lesp in d le, c la ss B k/a ......................................................
E ngine-lathe op era tors, c la s s B k/a. ...........................
Grinding-machine operators,
cla ss B: Total .................................................................
Time ............................................................
Incentive ..................................................
M illing-machine operators, cla ss B l*/b .....................

375
209
166
32k
?36
88

268
35
78
100

929
537
392

151*
69
85

230
15 0
80

$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
$
„ $
$
s ,
$ ,
K ™
$ , $
1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 . 6 0 1 .6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 .1 0 2 . 2 0 2 .3 0 2.1*0 2 , 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0
and
and
under
1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 l.iiO 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 . 7 0 1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2.1*0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 o v e r

$
1.71*

10
10

1.6 2
1 .9 0
1 .5 9
1 .5 5
1 .7 0
1.1*9
1 .8 0

1 .8 1
1.28

1 .8 1

-

-

-

5

1

“

_

_

.




-

-

-

6

2

29

.

23

_

18

_

21
20
1
53

1
*

.

1 .6 7
2 .0 0

1 .7 9
1 .5 9
1 .9 5
1 .8 1
1 .6 9
2 . Oil

_

_

_

_

111
101
5 10
37
k

19
li*

18

72
72

10
6

.

8
8
30
30

l*7l*
3i*l
133

1 .6 5
1 .5 9
1 .7 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

2
2

1
i

_

_

-

-

-

-

■

i

_
-

-

~

“

36
35
1

9
5
k

_
-

7

93

1 .6 3

21

1 .6 1
1.6 U

_

1 .5 3

-

i

9
9
“

78
52
26
61

I .lu

-

-

30

1
*

1

1

5

51*
10

30
5

k
-

1
-

1
-

-

1
-

-

-

5

10

5

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

11
17

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

121
25
96

89
9
80

61*
3
61

21
-

5
-

3
-

5
-

1
-

5
-

21

5

5

1

5

-

-

5

5

11*
13

3
11

1
*
10

35
32
3

77
69
8

52

91*
87
7

88
77
11

61*
1*2
22

71
1*2

58

29

30

18

26
18
8
17
-

1
*
6
26
13
13
8

1*7
5

25
21
k

3
3

6
6
-

13
13

6
_

-

15

10
10

1*2
1*0
2

6
17
13
1
*

-

-

7
7

-

12
12

-

9

6
6

29
29

111
101*
7

25
17
8

1?

1

1 .7 5
1 .8 0

60
6

h

5
l*
1

1

l? 5

18

-

53
1*6
7

23
9
11*

16
10
6

-

8

_
-

1
*
i*

52
1*5
7

_

1*8

3?
25
7

35
13

8

1
-

9

28

12

9

2

9
13
8

28

1?
25

9
13

2
3

1
1

3

1

1

3
1

25

13

3

1

3

1

1

1

7
6
1
1
*
1
*

1
*

3
2
1
_

1

_

_ !

_

-

-

-

1
-

-

~

1

_

15
3
12
6
2
1
*

1
*

_
-

36

_

_

_

-

-

35

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

_
-

8

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

_

_

_

16

15

“

2

~

~

-

-

-

9

3

1
*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

7

10

23

-

3

1

-

1

U
2
2
12

3
2
1

7
7

6

1

3

2

2

_ .

_

-

6
2

1?
6
6

1
17 !

3

2
8

2
8

-

-

1
*

-

_

56

3

-

-

1

-

-

15

2
-

_

-

16

1
*
6
6

1
1

2

_

25
6
19

39
20
19

_

21*
Ik
10

3

1
10
3
7

50
36
Hi

5

5

_

3

-

0

3

j
1 i

3
21
Hi
7

18

_

TC

16
10

26
26

28

8
_

1

3

11
6
5
22

1
-

18

22
22
16
6

3
21
-

!
1 .7 5
1 .9 5
1 .7 2
1 .6 7
2 .0 8

22
-

5
103
1
2

1.81*

1*2
22
20
102
90
12

10

92
90
2
21
10
11
17
2

1
*
29
26

2

1
*
h

20
18
2
13
8

3

1 ____
_

See footn otes a t end o f ta b le .

-

20
20

i

7

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

1
_____

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y«, January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

32

Table B-35:

M a cJ u H & u f U n d u U ^ U i

V-

G o * U i* u * * t

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R LY E A R N IN G S OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation 2 /

Average
hourly
earnings

$

$

$

$

$

1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20

$
$
1 .2 5 1 .3 0

1.35

$

$
140

$
$
1 *45 1 .5 0

I tilO

1 . 4*7

1 .3 0

$

1.55

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 I . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 J + 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2.70

undei
21

Machine-tool operators, production,
/tl o c s P

cl

ttttTrTTTTttrT___

Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C I j/a ................................. .............................. ..
Grinding-machine operators, class C 1/ a ..........................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 1 / a ...................................... ..
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) h/a •
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ij/a . . .
Truckers, hand U/a ......................................................................................

122
101
21

88

hand, class B jh/a .............................................

10

5
2

8
2

■

“

k

33

27

1 . 8U
2.02
1.96

1iiU
50
71
1*8
2 00

1.33

“

-

■

1. 5
*7

12
10
2

-

2

2

111
12
2

2

3

21

19

-

-

-

-

ii

15

Ik

28

6

“

“

-

-

12

"

1 .8 3 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 .1 f0 2 . 5 0 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0

6
6

1

2lj

2

30
16

13

ii

5

1

10

21
11

and
over

2

7

2

6
6

2

2

2

5
k

k

8

8

"

1*75 1.80

10

“

1 .6 0 1.6*7 1 .7 0

5

1.01
7J
1.87
0 #up
c
1.67

“

8
8

6

9

I.I48

1.51

7

1

1 .5 0

13

O
h
7U

**

1

l.5 l
1.51

19

1U2

W eld ers,

1 * 1 7 1.P0 1 * 2 1 * 3Q 1 . 3 7
*
*7
*

$

_

tlt

1*0*? 1 .1 0

13

“

15

27

k
■
»
j
i
3k

k
k

2
2

7

51

35

1I1
7

3
35
15

_

_

31 15
7 -

12

7

1

50

16

Q
/

5

16

Q
7

5
2

1
-

_
-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

7
1

_
-

0
c

hi
up
2

1 / The study covered establishm ents with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture o f n o n e le c tr ic a l machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard In d u s tria l C la s s ific a t io n Manual (19U5 e d itio n )
prepared by the Eureau o f the Budget; m achine-tool accessory establishm ents (Group 3513) with more than 7 workers in clu d ed . Data re la te to a November 1951 p a y r o ll p eriod .
Data lim ited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night work.
I n s u ffic ie n t data t o permit presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment.
(a ) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly in cen tiv e workers.
Includes data f o r operators o f other machine t o o ls in addition to those shown sepa ra tely.
s/




Table B - l0 :

R.ail'tocuid' y

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R LY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2 /

Carpenters, maintenance .................................. ........................ ..
E le c tr ic ia n s , maintenance .........................................................
Helpers, tra d e s, maintenance ..................................................
Jan itors and cleaners .................................................................
M achinists, maintenance ................................................ • •• ...
Mechanics, maintenance ...............................................................
Pipe f i t t e r s , maintenance .........................................................
Plumbers, m aintenance............. ....................................
Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ..........................................
Stock handlers and tru ck ers, hand ....................................

Number
of
workers

193
182
521
93
221
961
52
12
65
939

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Undei 1.35 1.U0 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
earnings
$
y
1.35
l.liO 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1*25 2.00
$
1.93
1.97
1.69
1.52
1.97
1.91
1.97
1.91
1.97
1.66

2
-

1
-

-

-

28
-

-

16
1?

11
63

73
543

315
8

133
-

2
313

28
-

34
-

-

-

-

-

629
ii
1

1

130

k 178
13
81
1
-

-

208
251
51
8
61
‘

1 / The study covered ra ilro a ds (Group 10) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard In d u s tria l C la s s ific a t io n Manual (19l"9
e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget.
2j Data lim ited to men workers.
3 / Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y ., January 1953
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
Bureau of Labor Statistics

33

Table B-5452*

M *lk jtM olsti. 1/
N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF-

Number

of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2

1 ----

-

1.25
and
under

1.30

J L t 2S L .

Occupation £/

J U 20L

/

|

|

|

|

1.35

_

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1 .4 P -

.

.

1

.I j
&L,

*

- l - i l1 l -

JU6£L
5

1 ----

1.60

.

1»?9.
.

.

1 ----

yilUng-wnMno tenders..................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Pasteurizers.............. .....................
Refrigerator m ..............................
en
Washers, bottle, machine................ .

15
6
9
14

1.35
1.48
1.35
1.34
1.35

10

14
1

9
13
10
N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2J

N ber
um
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings
A/

If

1—
$
4
%
$
4
4
4
4' '
4
4
4
4
55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00
and
and
under
65.00 70.00 .71*90 ,3P,*QQ,£1*92 ■ 2
90.90 .91*0f 420*00 101*02 110*00 111*00 129*00 -2Y9JZ .
l
6
9
*
0

%

Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail jj/
Routemen (driver-salesmen), wholesale

171
25

85.50
73.50

4
10

14

18
5

21
7

38
-

24
2

10
“

11
1

n
~

5
“

4
“

3
"

5
“

i/
fined
£/
jj/

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged primarily in retail distribution of milk and related products (Group 5452) as de­
in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to m workers.
en
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
$ / Routemen are predominantly on a 6-day workweek.

Table B-63 :

9nA*4A&4u>e G&Wiiestis 1/

1 / The study covered insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to their weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y ., January 1952
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rate 15 and M a ria n a * straight-tin® hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Bates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15s

T c-205* B gJm
able

Buildiwf GotUbutctfon
April 1, 1952

13.020
2.725
2.900
2.375
2.900
2.900
2.020

Bricklayers ....
Carpenters..... ,
Electricians ....
Painters.... .
Plasterers .....
Pltsibers.......
Building laborers

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week
A0
AO
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

July 1, 1951

Bread and cake - Semi-machine shops:
For«aen ...... ..... ........ ..........
Oven hands and mixers ..................
Bench hands ................. ..........
Checkers, wrapping-machine operators,
helpers, and pan greasers .............
Hand wrappers ....... ..................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement At
Bread department:
Working foremen ........... .
M i x e r s ...... .............. .
Traveling-oven men, assemblymen ...
Dividermen, bench hands ...... ••••
Machine and moldermen.... ..... ..
Doughnut-machine operators..... .
Oven feeders and drapers,
wrapping-machine operators.....
Checkers .........................
Bench he l p e r s.... ...............
Wrapping-and slicing-machine
helpers, flour handlers,
p a c kers.......... ............ .
Coolermen
.... .
Pan greasers, machine hand
helpers ••••••••................
Cake department:
Fo r e m e n..... ........... ........
M i x e r s ...........................
Assemblymen, traveling-oven men ...
Scalers ........................ .
Pie mixers ••••••.... .
Wrapping-machine operators.......
Oven helpers .................. .
Foreladles.................. .
Machine helpers ............. .
Pan greasers .....................
Pie-machine boys - after 6 months.•
Cake decorators - after 6 months
(women) ............ .




Claesificetlon

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Cake department: - Continued
leers, packers, wrappers
(women) ........................
Pie machine (women) ..............
Agreement B:
Bread department:
Working foramen ............ .

Mixers.... .................
Overmen .................... .....

B oA & U & l

Classification

Table C-205:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
psr
week

|1.650
1.600
1.5A0

AO
AO
AO

1*260
1.260

AO
AO

1.628
1.515
1.A90
1.AA5
1.A15
1.380

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.3AO
1.335
1.325

AO
AO
AO

1.300
1.300

AO
AO

1.275

AO

1.628
1.515
1.A90
1.A35
1.380
1.3A0
1.3A0
1.320
1.315
1.275
1.205

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
40
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.125

AO

Assemblymen........ .
Dividermen, bench hands ..........
Mixers' he l p e r s....... ..........
Assembly helpers ....... ......
Checkers ...................
Machine and moldermen ....... .
Oven feeders and drapers
Packers ........... .........
Coolermen ..................
Pan greasers, machine hand
helpers ...... .............
Bench helpers, wrapping-machine
operators .................
Wrapping-and alicing-nachine
helpers, flour handlers ..... .
Cake department:
Foremen ...........................
Mixers .....................
Overmen ................... .
Depositors ........ .... .....
Ingredient sealers.... .
Foreladies......... .............
Machine helpers ..................
Pan greasers ••••.... ...........
General helpers ................. .
Icing-machine operators (women) .
..
leers, packers, wrappers (women)...
Pie and pastry shops:
Agreement A:
Mixers ...............................
Ovenmen........ ........... .
Ingredient soalers.............. .
C ookies....... •••••......... .
Shop helpers .......... ••••... .
Crackers and oookies:
Agreement A:
Mixing department:
Head mixers ......... ........
Sponge mimsrs ...............
Flour drapers ................
Mixers' helpers ••••.••••... .
Baking department:
Machine captains ..••••••••.....
Oven firemen ......... .......
Cuttermen ........ ...........
Bakers, (traveling and reel
oven) ..... ....... .

B a M & U *l* G lU i m m d
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

U I - G in j i n u m
d

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

H.105
1.105

AO
AO

1.738
1.625
1.600
1.575
1.555
1.A75
1.450
1.AA5
1.425
1.350
1.415
1.410

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.385

AO

1.335

AO

1.310

AO

1.738
1.625
1.600
1.545
1.535
1.430
1.415
1.405
1.385
1.250
1.215

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.515
1.A95
1.490
1.380
1.325

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.700
1.605
1.A95
1.A95

AO
AO
AO
AO

1.605
1.530
1.505

AO
AO
AO

1.A95

Rate
Classification
he»
Crackers aad cookies: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Baking department: - Continued
Rollermen
Sponge rollermen ..................
Floorneaa (class A) ...............
Flocrmen (class B), pan feeders
pyj greeners •••••••••••••••••••*
yd
Spray-machine operators, and
inspectors, oven feeders and
taker#-out, dough feeders, pan
cleaners stvI feeders
Forming-machine operators...... .
Icing department:
Head mixers
Machine captains
Machine net-up m m , maehtaemeo,
Jelly and m j r i f u i W ram
Xoers (women), ether helpers
(women) .........................
Machine operators (women) ........
Packing department:
Working supervisors (women) •••••••
Sponge packers.............. •••••
Hand bundlere, fillimg-mnehime
operators
Sweet packers
Carton formers (machine), sealers
weighers
Agreement B:
Mixing department:
Head mixers
Sponge mixers ••••••..............
Sweet mixers
Flour dumpers ................ .
Baking deportment:
Machine captains ••••••.... •••••••
Cuttermen .........................
S p * M p rollermen
Pan feeders ead grraeere,
general helpers ................
Icing and cello-bag department:
Hoad mixers
I h n M i . art-up men .............. .
T*<w| mixers' helpers .............
General h elpers...... .
Forming'machine operators,
carton formers, (women) •••••••••
Sealers, weighers (women) ...... .
Packing department:
General helpers.............. .
Sponge packers
Hand handlers, end carton formers
(machine table), sweet packers,
carton formers (hand), "Q"
formers, cover stitchers, repack
girls, breakage girls ...... ••••

leers
psr
rak

11.430
1*405
1.395

AO
40
40

1.365

40

1.B65
1.090

AO
AO

1.665
1.665

AO
AO

1.495

AO

1.175
1.090

AO
AO

1.310
1.220

AO
40

1.200
1.190

AO
AO

1.175

AO

1.565
1.480
1*445
1.315

AO
40
AO
AO

1.550
1.455
1*445

ACT
AO
40

AO

1.315

40

1.460
1.420
1.370
1.315

AO
40
40
AO

1.150
1.110

40
AO

1*315
1.208

AO
40

1.150

AO

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, 1. T., Janwery 1952

cs department o labc*
..
r

Bureau of Labor Statistics

35

Table C-2082:

M td t Jldxftuosu

Table C-27:

Apprentices, First year .
Apprentices, Second year
Bottlers ..........................
Brewers ............................
Brewery coopers ..............
Elevator m ....................
en
Engineers .........................
Firemen ............................
Garage maintenance m ..
en
Gas pumpmen..............
General u tility m .......
en
General u tility helpers .
Greasers ..........................
Laborers ..........................
Maltsters .........................
Millwright.........................
Oiler..................................
Storehouse m ................
en
Warehousemen ....................
Washers ............................

Rate Hours
per per
week week
156.00

59.00
72.00
73.00
73.00
75.80
78.00
73.00
73.00
59.00
78.00
71.00
67.00
75.80
75.80
82.A
0
68.00

75.80
65.00
64.00

A0

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A0
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O

Table C-2A31: M ^ iL w O ^ k
January 1, 1952
Classification
MiIlmen ...............................................................
Shippers .............................................................
Yardmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Table C-42: A f& to b P u tc A

July 1, 1951

January 1, 1952
Classification

P/U*iti*Uf- GantiMMad

Classification
Book and job shops: - Continued
Photoengravers ........................................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder and job cylinder press . . . .
Rotary web press ................................
2-color press .....................................
Platen and multilith cress ..............
Offset press (over 23? inches) .......
Pressmen, cylinder:
Job cylinder press ............................
2-color press .....................................
Offset press (over 23* inches) .......
Rotary web press ................................
Pressmen, platen .....................................
Stereotypers - day work .........................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ................
Compositors, hand - night work .............
Machine operators - day work ................
Machine operators - night work .............
Machine tenders (machinists) - day

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per

#2.533

37*

1.960
2.120
2.050
1.700
2.160

37f
37*
37?
37*
37?

2.327
2.510
2.720
2.570
2.160
2.A79

37f
37?
37?
37?
37?
37i

2.571
2.677
2.571
2.677

„*
37?
37*
37?

2.632

37*

2.739
2.060
2.30A
2.837
2.971
2.A79
2.585
2.679
2.785
2.A79
2.585

37*
A0
37*
37?
37*
37?
37?
37*
37*
37*
37*

Machine tenders (machinists) - night
Rate Hours
per per
hour week
#1.90
1.26
1.60

A0
A
O
A0

Mailers - day work .................................
Mailers - night work ..............................
Photoengravers - day work..............
Photoengravers - night work ..................
Pressmen, web presses - day work .........
Pressmen, web presses - night work . . . .
Pressmen-in-charge - day work ..............
Pressmen-in-charge - night work . . . . . . .
Stereotypers - day work .........................
Stereotypers - night work .....................

Table C-27: P A 4 4 tti4 U f
Table C-Al: J l& c o l

July 1, 1951
Classification
Book and Job shops:
Bindery women.............. .
Bookbinders......... .................
Compositors, hand .................
Electrotypers ........................
Machine operators ................ .
Machine tenders (machinists)
Mailers ...................................




Rate Hours
per per

Qp&iati+uj CjHfUosftmA.
October 1, 1951
Classif! cation

#1.100
2.100
2.A07
2.330
2.A07
2.503
2.060

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
A0

Busses:
First 3 months............ ......... ..................
A - 12 months ............................................
After 1 year ..............................................

Rate
per
hour
#1.500
1.530
1.580

Classification

week

Hours
per
week
-

Beer:
Keg:
Brewery drivers ..........................
Helpers ..................................
Distributor drivers ...................
Bottle ...............................................
Drivers and helpers ...................
Building:
Construction:
Carry-ell or winch trucks . . . . . .
Concrete-mixer tru ck s....... .....
D p trucks .................................
um
General contractor drivers .......
Material ............................................
Helpers.......................................
Lumber ..........................................
C o a l........................................................
Flour, feed, and cereal:
Agreement A ........................... .........
Agreement B .................... .
Agreement C ................................... ..
Food service ..........................................
Furniture:
Agreement A - pick-up and delivery
Helpers ........................................
Agreement B .......................... ...........
Helpers ........................................
General - Freight:
L oca l........................................
Peddle run ........................................
Grocery - Chain store and wholesale:
Agreement A ......................................
Helpers:
Grocery...................
Produce ...................................
Agreement B .......................................
Helpers......... ..............................
Ice ..........................................................
Helpers ...................................
Laundry:
Linen supply.......................... .........
Wholesale ..................... ....................
Liquor .....................................................
Helpers .............................. ..............
Meat - Packing house:
Agreement A ......................................
Agreement B - sausage......... ..........
Milk - City (tractor and trailer) . . . .
Newspaper ...............................................
Package .................. ...............................
Railway express............................. .

Rate Hours
per per
hour week

#1.800
1.775
1.575
1.675
1.675

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

1.775
1.775
1.550
1.705
1.550
1.A00
1.650
1.A00

A0
A0
A0
A0
A
O
A0
A0
A0

1.650
1.6A5
1.625
1.620

A0
A0
A0
A
O

1.580
1.A30
1.650
1.500

A8
A8
45
A5

1.A10
1.A50

A5
45

1.5A0

48

1.375
1.A30
1.A00
1.350
1.A30
1.A30

48
48
A
O
A
O
48
A
O

1.A60
1.460
1.600
1.500

A
O
A
O
45
A5

1.560
1.510
1.320
1.800
1.600
1.733

A
O
A
O
A
O
A
O
A5
A
O

36

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

MitUmum CsUsuznoe (lai&i job Plant TltobJ&eAA 1/
Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufa cturine

Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries
2/

All establishments ............................

100.0

Under 50 .......................................
50 .............................................
Over 50 and under 55 ..........................
Over 55 and under 60 ..........................

0.7
•3
.7
.7
.6
.9
2.1
.6

Over 60 and under 65 ..........................
65 .............................................
Over 65 and under 70 ..........................
Over 70 and under 75 ..........................
Over 75 and under SO ..........................
8 0 .............................................
Over 80 and under 85 ..........................
Over 85 and under 90 ..........................
Over 90 and tinder 9 5 ..........................
Over 95 and under 100 .........................
Over 100 and under 105 ........................
105 ............................................
Over 105 and under 110 ........................
Over 110 and under 115 ........................
115 ............................................
Over 115 and under 120 ........................
Over 120 and under 125 ............ ...........
Over 125 and under 130 ........................
Over 130 and under 135 ........................
Over 135 and under 140 ........................
Over 240 and under 145 ........................
Over 145 and under 150 ........................
Over 150 and under 155 ........................
Over 155 and under 160 ........................
Establishments with no established minimum ...

1/
2/

2J
*

(2/)
2.6
7.6
.1
3.7
.8
2.0
.7
.5
.6
1.6
1.2
5.0
2.5
.2
.5
3.5
5.4
.8
1.5
.6
4.6
1.8
5.0
2.1
20.0
.7
4.2
2.8
2.2
1.2
3.8
.6
.9
.5
1.0
.6

Nondurable goods

Durable goods

21-100
workers

100.0

_
6.0
1.1
11.6
2.3
2.3
12.2
5.8
25.2
3.2
1.4
2.3
7.0
5.2
2.1
6.0
-

Establishn ents with •
501 or
101-500
101-500
21-100
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

100.0 _
_

100.0

_
-

_
_
-

4.5
-

1.9
-

6.9
3.5
1.7
4.5
.7
3.0
1.9
2.7
2.9
11.8
8.1
14.5
2.2
9.6
10.4
3.7
-

Q/)
4.1
4.7
4.1
11.3
1.1
2.7
_
-

100.0

_
0.2
59.1
1.0
.5
11.2
_
2.8
-

_ 100.0

_
11.6
.
3.4
5.3
2.3
1.5
.8
_
5.7
7.1
1.6
8.0
-

4.4
_

7.9
_

1.7
10.0
-

5.7
1.2
2.5
-

8.6
_
_
_

1.3
.9
5.2
_
-

2.8
2.1
_

4.3
4.3
40.8
7.1
3.6
1.4
-

6.3
-

5.3
2.1
_
-

-

-

-

1.7

5.6
8.9
8.2
7.8

-

-

-

-

-

501 or
more
workers

Wholesale
trade

100.0

_
_
6.6
2.8
_
4.8
8.0
2.4
6.3
2.3
_
16.6
10.0
21.8
2.1
6.6
4.7
_
_
2.7
_
2.3
-

_
2.8
8.1
1.2
1.5
16.1
16.9
5.1
_
2.3
.3
1.5
12.5
6.2
2.4
_
.8
2.9
_
3.9
11.5
1.3
.1
_
_
_

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

Public
utilities*

100.0

100.0

_
*
0.4
.
3.2
.9
3.8
1.3
7.3
3.2
4.2
1.8
18.8
10.1
1.1
_
7.3
1.3
17.8
.
_
.2
1.9
_
5.6

1.3
4.8
5.9
4.8
7.0
11.1
18.0
12.3
.3
13.5
3.6
3.8
1.8
5.6
(2/)
_
1.7
1.2
_
.7
_
_
.1
_
.1
2.1
_

_
_

_
_

-

8.0

-

2.6

1.8

.3

15.1
7.0
1.2
1.2
16.8
17.4
3.0
17.1
.1
2.6
.6
1.1
4.4
_
_
_
2.4
_
.
_
_
_
10.0

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y . , January 1952
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




37

E: Supplementary Wage Practices
Table E-l:

S h i f t ^ iiffe ^ M U ic U

Pa o o UUm U

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in Stamped
and
pressed
metal
products
2/

All manufacturing industries l /
Grain
milling

Shift differential
All industries

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Durable goods

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

Nondurable goods
2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

Electro­
plating,
plating,
and
polishing
2/

Machinery
industries

2d
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

0.3

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ....................

19,3

8.4

21,3

7.7

14.5

9.9

18.5

15.3

8.2

16.3

18. Q
.

Receiving shift differential ........

18.7

8.2

21.0

7.7

13.4

9.4

18.5

15.3

8.2

16.3

15.9

.3

Uniform cents (per hour) .........
2 cents ........................
3 or 3 i c e n t s ..................
4 cents ........................
5 cents ........................
5^ or 6 cents ..................
7 cents ........................
7§- cents ............. .........
8 to 8i- cents ..................
9 or 9^- cents ..................
10 cents .......................
Over 10 cents ..................

13.2
.3
.5
3.-4
3.2
.3
1.7
1.0
.2
.9
1.5
.2

6.6
-

13.9
-

6.0
-

8.2
-

8.2
-

16.3
-

11.8
3.5
-

2.5
2.6
-

15.4
_
-

14.3
1.2

.3
.3
1.1
1.2

18.5
2.8
15.7
-

15.3
_

.3
.3
1.1
.9
.2

11.6
1.0
1.6
2.0
4.1
.9
.3
.1
.2
.3
.7
.4

.9
-

.9
-

.1
.1
-

Uniform percentage ................
3 percent ......................
5 p e r c e n t .................. .
7 to 9 percent .................
10 percent .....................

5.4
.1
2.9
.2
2.2

6.9
.1
4.2
02
2.4

1.2
-

1.8
-

1.2
-

.5
.7

O/)
1.8

1.6
1.6

.2
.2

.5

.2
.6
2.8
.1
.2
.3
.9
1.0
.5
1.2
.3
.9

4.0
2.8
.1
2.3
1.4
.2
1.1
1.9
.1

.1
3.1
-

.6
2.1
2.3
.3
-

-

-

3.1
-

_

_

_

_

(2/)

-

-

-

1 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other ..............................

.1

.4

.2

Receiving no differential ............

.4

.1

.3

-

.4

.1

Information not available ...........

.2

.1

-

-

.7

.4

1/
2/
2/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
No workers employed on 3d or other shifts.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.




.9
3.5
7.8
-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

S c h e d u le d ‘U /je& kLf JtouA A

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l / EMPLOYED I N -

M anufacturin'

M anufacturing

Week l y hours

All establishments .......................
Under 35 hours ............................
35 hours ...................................
Over 35 and under 3?k hours .............
3 7 i hours ..................................
Over 3 7 ^ and under AO h o u r s ............
A O hours ...................................
Over A O and under A 5 hours ..............
A 5 hours ...................................
Over A5 and under A8 hours ..............
A 8 hours ...................................
Over A£ h o urs .............................

All
industrie3

100.0
0.2
2.0
3.7
13.6

Durable
goods

All

100.0

100.0

1.6

2.0
2.0

1.5
6.0

5.5

3.9
7.6
80.7
3.8
-

5.A

67.8
6.0
.6
.1
.5

80.2
5.0
.3

■

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

0.6
.5
10.7

.5
78.9
7.8
-

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail

Finance**

All
indus-

Services

Durable

All

'0 /
100.0

5A.0
AA.3

.5
-

1.0

1.0
.2

“

“

100.0

3.1
6.2
31.0
3.5
AA.3
11.9
-

100.0
0.9
.9
1.5
.1
10.3
72.7
12.1
1.5
-

100.0

_
1.5
12.5
17. A
8.5
59.3
.A

.A
-

100.0

l.A
9.7
.5
.8
59.6
1A.0
6.8
7.2

~

~

1 100.0

!

0.6
.1
.2
1.6
1.3
76.3
2.8
A.7
.2
6.8
5.A

100.0

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.6
-

3.0
2.1
A.9
-

.
-

-

2.2
86.1
1.2
1.2
-

_

-

-

7.5
-

86.2
1.6
1.7
-

85.6

.5

52.9
-

-

10.8
-

6.0

6.A

3 .3

A.l

5.2
1.2

7.1
29.2

0.2
77.9
6.6
3.8
11.1

.A

10. A

AA.A
11.8
18. A
.9
6.7
5.8

Services

52.A
18 .A
16.6
2.6

Data relate to wom workers.
en
£/ Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
\J

Table E-3:

P/cud Jholuladfi
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Number of paid holidays

M anufacturin G

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

All establishments ...................

100.0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments providing paid
holidays........ .. .................

99.6

99.8

99.7

100.0

1 to 5t days ................... .
6 days ...........................
Over 6 days and under 7 days .......
7 days ...........................
7i days ..........................
8 days ...................................................................................
9 days ...................................................................................
10 days ............................................................................. ..
10^ days .........................
11 days ...........................
12 days ..........................

.7
66.9
1.5
12.6
1.0
A.l
.6
.8
1.1
9.A
.9

.6
83.A
.2
11.A
3.7

.8
82.1

.2
87.0
.8
6.8
A.A

23.1
25.9
8.5
16.8

-

-

-

-

.A

Establishments providing no paid
holidays..........................

All

Retail
trade

Finance**

Durable
goods

All

...100.0

-

13.0
3.5

.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2

.3

(5/)

99.5
.

25.2
-

.5

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), coaounication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.

100.0

100.0

100.0

- 1 0 0 . 0 ....

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

78.9

88.7

88.8

79.8

9.A
61.5
3.8
10.A

5.7
66.1

1.3
75.1

99.8

99.2

85.A

85.6

81.A

95.7

3.9
7A.6

6.A

1.2
89.9

-

-

15.1
2.A
1.2
l.A

17.8

1.0
3.3
3.8

.8 .
71.7
.1
9.1
3.1

1.1
68.8

-

1.6
67.9
.2
10.1
.2
3.5
.1
.6
(2/)
1.2

(2/)
78.5
.A
7.6
6.8

-

1.0
2.7
-

“

-

-

l.A

-

3.6
2.7
2.6
7.1
52.9
6.7

.2

-

-

.8

(2/)
1A.6

-

.7
.1
-

-

1A.A

9.8
1.6
-

Services

100.0

98.6

-

Retail
trade

100.0

.1
79.1
13.2
3.9

-

Whole-

ties*

100.0

100.0

-

_

32.0
-

15.2
1A.A
-

-

.1
-

2.A
-

17.3
-

1.3
2.3
-

18.6

A.3

21.1

11.3

-

-

1A.0
l.A
.8
.8

2.8

-

-

11.2

-

.6
-

-

-

20.2

Occupational W Surrey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 19$2
age

\/




Public

Services
trp

_

.8
-

.2
.3

Whole­
sale
trade

U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F A O
Bureau of Labor Statistics

39

Table E-4:

P a id 7J&ocUiaH4> (tf-obm a l P/tOiUidOHi)

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

* I a NCFACTURI’'

M an u fac tu rin g

Vacation policy

AH
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

W h ole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid "vacations ...»• •

9 9 .2

9 9 * i+

99.8

9 8 .0

9 U .0

1 0 0 .0

99*8

1 0 0 .0

100.0

Under 1 week
1 week •••••••••••••••«........................ ..
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 week* .................... ................. ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks «•••••.•*•••••
3 weeks ••.........................................................

•1

.2

.7
38.0

A ll establishments

All
indus­
tries

Services

N on­
durable
goods

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Servioaa

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99 .3

9 8 .2

9 8 .6

. 9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

.1

2 .2

Durable
goods

N on ­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

2/
!

Public
utili­
ties*

All

J

1 year o f service

3 7 .7
.6

3 7 .5

2 .2

•1

2 .1

60.6

3 5 .6

60.6

6 2 .2

5 6 .0

_

1* 0.3

5 5 .5

1+.7

2 0 .9

-

_

•1+

.1

90.6
_

5 9 .7
-

2 0 .7

1+3*8
-

8 2 .7

900+

9 5 .9

1 + .8

20+

2 .0

56 .2

1 0 .3

-

-

-

-

2 .7

1 .9

-

.2

5 .9
-

•3

-

1 .2

-

-

-

-

-

•3

-

-

.5

•1

•2

6 .0

-

•2

-

-

1 .3

1 .2

•5

6 8 0|.

5 5 .5

1 + .2

2 3 .1

-

3 1 + .3
-

2 6 .0

1 5 .2

2 2 .3

-

-

1 .2
2 .1

-

-

1 .8

10+

10 +

.

“

9 6 .6

9 8 .6

7 7 .5
30+

10 +

•3

6 1 .7
-

1 8 .3
-

‘

1 + 5 .5
.5
1 + 8 .0

.5
•2

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .
Information not available

•1

93*1+

•7
-

.7

9 9 .7

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .0

99*9

Trader 1 week
1 week ........................ ............ ..
Over 1 and -under 2 weeks ••••••••••••••

2 1 .2

260+

2 9 .1

1 8 .3

1 .2

.1

20+

7 1 + .5

70.8

7 6 .0

7 8 .1
-

1 0 0 .0

9 .8

2 weeks ............................... ..

.7
7 2 .1

Over 2 and under

3

3

weeks .................. ••••

.................................................

_

_

-

' 1 K

-

-

1 -3

-

.7

-

.3

1 .3
.8

Over 3 weeks .••«•••••...................... ..

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .
Information net availa ble ...« « « .* .« « • • « »

_

_

-

7 7 .7

-

1 .9

2 years o f service
Establishments with paid vacations ••••••

1*5

-

.1

(3 p
-

12 .0

9 9 .8

_

-

25.8
7h*2
-

-

-

-

-

1 .9

1 0 0 .0

_
1 5 .7
.1

9 9 .5
•1

9 9 .8
«.

2 .7

3 2 .7

5 7 .0

6 1 + .0

-

-

H + .7

1 7 .1 +
16 0+
-

6 7 .3

9 9 .8
_

6 5 O+
2 2 .2
1 2 .2

5 5 .7

9 5 .1 +

1 2 .5

1 .9

-

2 3 .7
1 .8

-

-

1 .0

-

-

-

-

1 .2

7 .1 +
8 .1 +
.2

.1

100.0

-

-

.5

-

-

-

.2

•2

9 9 .6

9 9 .8

5 .5

3 .8

1 0 0 .0
_

9 9 .1
2 .2

60.9

3 * + .6

1 + 9 .8

3 1 .2

6 .1

2 1 .1 +

1 1 + .2

3 3 .0
-

1 + 0 .9
-

3 1 + .6
-

*5
3 5 .6

-

-

-

•9

100.0

9 9 .1 +

6 1 .1
-

38.9

li+ .O
8 .2
9*1

)

&

1 0 0 .0

_

10 +

-

10+

-

-

3 years o f service
Establishments with paid vacations ••••••

Establishments with no paid vacations •••
Information not available

13 years

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8

100.0

1 0 0 .0

2 .7

Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks •••••................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ••»••••............
3 weeks
Over 3 weeks .........................

9 9 .7

1 .6

1 .8

.7

1 .6

8 .0

3 .2

2 .6

6 .8

.2

•3

0+

8 9 .2

9 1 + .1

9 6 .9

1 -3
5 .2

3 .0

1 .1

-

.5

(2 /)

( 2 /)

-

-

-

•1

6 7.6

-

-

9 2 .2

8 6 .0

9 8 .0

8 9 .6

-

2 .1

.9

9 .2

•A
-

2 0 ;

1 5 .8
1 3 .1

-

-

.2

.

_

-

T3

-

-

-

~

.1

_

_

1 .9

-

7 7 .o

6 .9
1 3 .5

-

1 .7

1 .0

3 .5
1 .8

I +.3

1 week ......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 week6 •••••••..»..........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks • « . . . . ................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Over 3 weeks
Establishments with no paid vacations •••
Information not available

1*3

5 .7

-

-

-

"

“

(£ /)

.6
-

1.1+

1 9 .9
l i + .O

10 +

“

9 .3
90 .7
_
-

'

9 9 .7

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8

1 .9

.8

1 .1

.1
•_

1 .6

8 .0

2 .3
-

)

•1

•1

1+2*5

1+ 3*0

1+6 .7

&

*h
5 3 .1

1 .8

•3
5 5 .1
.2

-

5 2 .1

-

32.0

-

-

1 .3

1 8 .5
-

7 3 .9
-

1 + 8 .5
-

63.8

7 9 .5

1 6 .1

2 9 .7

.8

Oj

-

(2 /)

(2 /)

^3

T5

-

.1

-

_

1 9 .3

100.0
_
3 1 + .1
1 .9
6 I + .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .6

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 9 0+

2 .1 +
-

20+
-

2 .5

10 .3

_

2 .2

1 + 2 .9

31+.1

1 .5

1 + 0 .3
2 .0

2 .0

2 .1

1+ 9*3

5 1 + .8

5 2 .5

6 0 .2

•3

“

1 .1

-

-

(2 /)

.6

10+

6 .8
-

1+0+

8 6 .0
-

1 + 1 .1

7 .2

-

-

_

-

•2

3 .1

9 9 .8

.2

0
+

.2

.2

"

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

1 9 .5
-

70)
•

2 5 .5
-

5 5 .1
-

3 9 .0
.

6 1 . 1;

2 1 + .0

2 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 .3
9 00 +
-

.3

2 2 .5

"

10+

1 .9

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
L©8s than *05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), ccranunication, and other public u tilitie s
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




1.1+

-

"

*

3*2

3 .6

1 0 0 .0

of service

Establishments with paid vacations ••••••

If

8 .3

•5

.2

9 8 .6

($ /)
5 6 J+
-

2 .0

•2

9 8 .6

1 9 .5

2 .3
.8

“

.3

7 3 .1 +
-

2 .5
9 2 .9

•l*

IO

8 1 + .2
_

0+

9 2 .6

•3
9 2 .6

“*

“
'

.5
8 6 .6

9 9 .8

Occupational W
age

Survey,

Buffalo, N. Y . , January 1952
F.S. D PA TM IT O L B R
E R E
F AO
Bureau of labor Statistics

l+
o

T a b le E - 5 :

paid S lo k Jlje&u* (tyo*m al PA&uUionA,)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturin'

Manufacturing
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utilities*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

y
.

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Service*

1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

| 1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

2 1 .5
.8
5 .2
3 .1
5 .3
3*7
2 .6
.8

1 8 .0

20 *3

234
2 .6

1+5*2
-

H +.2
5 .1
2 .1

1 5 .8

1 2 .5
3*5
3 .8

5 *1
2 .1

14

6 *8
3*8
3 .2
1 .9

.8
1 6 .8
-

-

5 .1
3 .0

•2
•2
-

1 9 .0

1 3 .6

1+.5
.6
2 .2
4

1 7 .6

4
3 .o

1 1 .0
•2
9*5
.6
-

2 3 .2

4
1+.6
1 .1

7 8 .5

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

8 2 .0

2 9 .7
.2
8 .6
2.1+
1 .2
9 .6
2 .6
2 .8

6 m onths o f s e r v i c e
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ••••••••••••••••••
3 da y s .......................................................................
5 d ays .............................................................. ..
6 d ays
7 d a y s ................................ ......................•••••••
1 0 da y s •••••••••••••••••....................
12 da y s ................................ ..................
O ver 20 d a y s ...................................................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h n o fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s

1+4

.3

•2

5 .1
-

1 2 .6
-

•2

*9
.1
.1
-

.5

•7

1 .2
•2
1 .0

8 5 .8

76 .8

81+.2

9 5 .5

9 9 .1

9 8 .8

99*8

824

2 1 .9
-

2 3 .2

1 5 .8

7 .5

.1
3 .0
14

1 .2
•1
•1
1 .0

2 9 *3
-

•6

2 .1
.1
1 .1
•1
.1
•7

1+.2

-

8 .5

1+7.7
1+.6
.5
l+*9
2 1 .2
8.1+
2 .8
5 .3

854

3 9 .9

5 2 .3

H+.6
1 .8
9 .2
.8
-

6 0 .2

504
1+.6
-

d.8

3*3
-

174

9 .9
.5
1 8 .6
7 .8
8.1+
-

2 .7
-

•7
-

3 4
-

7 9 .7

8 9.0

7 6 .6

5 4 .8

2 6 .0

2 9.8

1 1 .3
.8
-

2 2 .9

.7
-

22.8

1.1+

1 0 .5
1 .6
«
5 .8
3 -2
6 .8
1 .9

H +.6
1 .8

6 0 .1

•5
1 0 .7
1.1+
-

7 0 .3

71+.0

70 .2

30.0

2 6 .0

29 .8

.2
1+.2
2 .1
1 .0
9*6

.5
2 .7
14
-

2.1+

1 .2

(2 /)
-

.1

-

2 .9
-

4

9 .8
-

3 .3
-

2 .6
5 .8
.8
-

•3
1 .6
-

3 .0

8 1 .0

8 7 .5

91+.9

2L+.7
8 .0
7*5
1+4
.8
2 .2
1 .8

2 1 .2
-

5 .1

1 5 -9
.8
1 2 .6
-

5*9
1 0 .5
1*9
14
1 .5
-

2 .1
3 .0
-

-

1 yea r o f s e r v ic e
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ...•• • •• • •• • •• • •• •
5 d a y * ........................................• •••................
7 d a y s ....................... ..
10 d a y s .......................................... ................ ..

15 d a y s ................................................................ ..
20 d a y s «••••••.••••••••••••••••••••«
Over 20 d a y s ................................
E a t a b lis h m a it s w it h n o fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ................................ ..

•3
2 .0

1+.5
2.1+
5 .1
-

5*9
-

3 .8
124

*3
1+4

2 .9
-

.5

4
3 *5
•3
-

-

.3
1 2 .6
-

7 8 .1

7 6 .8

81+.2

9 2 .5

9 7 .9

9 8 .8

95*8

7 0 .7

7 5 .3

•J8.8

91+-9

2 1 .9
3 .8

2 3 .2

1 5 .8

7 .5
.1
3 .0

2 .1

1 .2
.1
•1
-

1+.2

•3
-

3 0 .5
1 5 .9
.8
13*8
-

21+.7
8 .0
1 .8
1+4
.8

2 1 .2
5 .9
1 0 .5

5*1
2 .1
3 .0
-

(2 /)
1+T3
-

1 8 .5

1 .6
•2
-

.1

2 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l " p r o v i s i o n s

3 days
7 da y s ............................................... ••••..............
11 d a y s ................................ ..
12 d a y s ...........................

.3
2 .9
.2
2 .6
2 .1
1+.8

•5
1 .6
-

1 1 .1
-

1 3 .9
-

2J+
_

3 .2
-

14
-

1 .9
-

-

22.9

2 .6
-

124

2 4
2 1 .2
-

(z/)
-

1 1 .7
2 4
2 .8

-

.3
1+4
5*2
-

2 .9
•3
1 2 .6
-

6 .5

8 .7

8 .5

5*3

Tl+.o

7 0 .2

854

3 9 .8

4 9 -6

7 8 .1

76 .8

81+.2

3 2 .7
3*9
1 .9
1 .0

2 6 .0
3 .2
1.1+

29'.8

1 I+.6
1 1 .0

504
1+.6
-

1+24
3 .8
1 0 .1

3 0 .1

1 5 .8

6 .9
3 .1
2 .5
134

5 4
2.1+

6 .3

1+.5
9 .1

3 .2
6 .0
1 2 .2

.8
2 .6
-

6 0 .2
1 6 .8
2 .6

6 7 .3

20 d a y s ......................................................

l+*3
-

7 0 .0

15 d a y s .....................................................................

7l+.o

7 0 .2

854

22.9

1 3 .3
-

.1
1 .1

•1

14
4
•7
-

.1
-

•2
.1
(2 /)
170
•6

(z/)
.7

(2 /)
1 .0

4
3 .5

1 .9
14
1 .5
-

5 .7
2 .2
1 .8

-

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h no fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
9 2 .5

97*9

9 8 .8

9 5 .8

6 9 .5

1+.2

3 0 .5
4 4
.8
-

2J+.7
8 .0
1 .8
1+4

95*8

7 8 .8

7 5 *3

9 4 -9

384

5 .1
-

15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
5 da y s

.............................. ..

12 days ....................................................................

.5
1 .6
-

6 .1
-

24

i4 /

1 1 .7
-

( 2/ )
6 .6
-

-

2.9

*3
1+4
5 .3
-

-

314..7

1 0 .5

2 0 .5

2 0 .1

*3
1 2 .6
-

3 9 .8

1+9*6

5 7 *6

6 9 .9

81+.2 1
1

2 1 .2

•5
-

2 .1
1 .2
.1
•1
-

3 *9

•7

1 .2
.1
.1
1 .0

9 0 .3

9 7 .9

98.8

9 .7
2 .9
1 .2
•
1+
.8

3 .9
*3
-

1 .5

/

5 *9
8 4

1 .9
14
3 .6

2 .1
3 .0

-

-

-

13 .8

9 .7

17.2

-

6 9 .5

75*8

6 1 .6

94-9

•Q

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h n o fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s

l/

4/
?
"*

**

I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s o t h e r th a n t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y *
L ess th a n .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t .
U .S . DEPARTMENT
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tio n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




O o o u p a t io n a l Wage

Surrey,

B u f f a l o , N . Y . , Jan uary 1 95 2

Bureau

of

C LA O
F BR
Labor S tatistics

J\l'(M pSU xlusU ian BoHUACd

Table E-6:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

Type of bonus

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —

M an u fac tu rin g
All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

M a n u fac tu rin g
N on­
durable
good s

Public
utili­
ties*

W h ole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

27.6

7.0

70.3

61.5

31.5

17.8
7.7
2.1

l.*
*l

&L.2
.3
8.5

31.5

2.6

61.U
5.8
3.1

93.0

29.7

38.5

68.5

R etail
trade

Services

All

Durable
goods

N on ­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.0

72.U

y

1
All establishments ....................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ........................ .
Christmas or y e a r - e n d............. .
Profit-sharing ............
Other ...............................
Establishments with no nonproduction
b o n u s e s ......................... .

100.0

100.0

3.l
Ui

18.1

29.3
2.9
3.3

12.6

65.6

1
1
I

100.0
.....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

i 100.0

11.6

37.5

8.3

1*9.9

58.2

76.9

69.1

21.5
13.5
U.9

7.3
1.1
-

39.9
3.8
6.2

58.1

&

71.9
6.7

81.9

88.1*

62.5

91.7

50.1

Ul.8

23.1

30.9

1
i
1

63o7

1.8

9.6
1.3
.8

| 100.0

k*k

23.0

1

io.
U
3.8
1.9

7.2
2.1
1.9

77.0

i.k

15.2

19.0
2.9
2.8

8U.8

90.0

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shewn separately.
Unduplicated total.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7*

9*M 44SU i*t& e C H id P -e+pU O +l P lo ttl

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N -

Type of plan

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N —
M an u fac tu rin g

M a n u fac tu rin g
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

N on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W h ole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

Durable
goods

N on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

1

All establishments .....................

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ .....................

90.U

Life insurance .................. . • • •
Health insurance.................. .
Hospitalization........... .........
Retirement p e n s i o n........ .
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ............ ...........

1/

y
*
**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.1*

96.7

91.3

91.0

79.3

66.0

99.6

69.9

81*.5

91.7

9U.1

85.9

76.8

63.0

63.1*

1*9.1

85.1
6U.6
56.2
57.1

92.7
79.9
71.7
62.0

95.U
87.2
79.9
62.3

8U.8
58.3
1*7.5
60.9

88.1*
1*5.3
5.3
85.1*

75.1
62.2
61.0
29.9

1*6.2
38.9
36.1

88.9
1*1.2
1*2.7
69.8

69.1*
22.2
11*.5
5.2

79.3
66.1
61.6
52.3

88.7
75.6
72.7
57.8

92.1*
83.3
80.2
59.2

79.9
57.6
55.0
51*.6

72.1*
55.2
27.2
59.6

51*.9
35.1*
36.3
36.5

U5.5
1*0.8
36.7
31*.3

1*5.7
20.1
23.0
9.0

9.6

U.6

3,3

8.7

9.0

20.7

3* 0
1.

.*
1

30.1

15.5

8.3

5.9

U*.l

23.2

37.0

36.6

50.9

100.0

1*1*.U

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo, N. Y., January 1952
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

| 100.0

100.0

1*2

A ppendix— Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of ratqs, in­
formation presented in this bulletin v&s collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations 2 (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4) • The covered industry groupings are t manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

a

of
certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data b y industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table suamarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTA LISH E TS A D W R E S IN M JO IN U Y DIVISIONS A D IN SE E T D INDUSTRIES IN BU
B
MN
N OKR
A R D STR
N
LCE
FFALO N. Y., 1 /
,
A D N M E STU IE B T E B R A O L B R STATISTICS, JA U R 1952
N U BR
D D Y H UEU F A O
NAY

Item

M um number
inim
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ...............................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................
Durable goods 2 / .............................................
Nondurable goods (J ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
u t ilit ie s .....................................................
Wholesale trade ...............................................
Retail t r a d e .................. ..................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........
Services 2 / ••..................................................

21
21
21
21
21

1,645
682
369
313
963

361
163
86
77
198

275,500
191,100
133,700
57,400
84,400

174,570
137,080
98,590
38,490
37,490

22,490
14,790
11,480
3,310
7,700

21
21
21
21
21

127
196
382
103
155

33
41
58
28
38

19,800
12,000
32,600
8,500
11,500

12,700
3,700
11,600
3,820
5,670

1,970
1,440
1,040
2,330
920

21
21
8
21
8
7 / 21
21
21
21

6
21
15
7
7
67
12
8
22

5
15
9
7
6
20
12
5
11

2,567
13,292
1,362
1,518
261
13,041
14,448
491
2,342

2,443
12,563
1,238
1,518
251
7,165
14,448
386
1,465

272

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6 /
Grain m illin g ........................................................... .
Chemicals (selected branches) ...................................
Foundries, nonferrous ..................................
Stamped and pressed metal products ..........................
Electroplating, plating, and p o lish in g ....................
Machinery industries ...................................................
Railroads .......................................................................
Milk dealers .................................................................
Insurance carriers .......................................................

_

90
171
13
1,288
—

39
892

1 / Buffalo Metropolitan Area (Erie and Niagara Counties).
2 / Total establishment employment.
2 / Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing•
(J Food and kindred products; tobacco; tex tiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2 / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




Index
Page
Assembler (machinery) ..............................
31
Bench hand (bakeries) ..............................
34
Biller, m a c hine .....................................
4, 10, 14Bolter (grain milling) .............................
29
Bookbinder (printing) •............. .............. .
35
Bookkeeper, h a n d ............................... • •••
3, 4 9, 10, 14
-,
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••• • • ........ ......
4, 10, 14Bottler (malt liquors) ....... • • • • .................
35
Brewer (malt liquors) ............................ • •
35
Bricklayer (building construction) ..............
34Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r ................ • • • • •
5, 10
Carpenter (building construction) ..........
34Carpenter, maintenance . ...........................
18, 20, 21
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ...........
32
Chemical o p erator (industrial chemicals) ........
29
Chipper and g r i nder (nonferrous foundries) ••••••
30
Cleaner ..............................................
23, 25, 26, 27
Cleaner (r a i l r o a d s ) ................ ...... .
32
Clerk, accounting ................................... 3, 5, 9, 11, 13, 14
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ........ . •
33
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ••••••
33
Clerk, file ..........................................
5, 11, 14Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ......... .......
33
Clerk, g e n e r a l .......... ........... ............. .
3, 6, 9, 11, 14Clerk, o rder
............. ........... ..........
3, 6, 9, 11, 13, 14Clerk, payroll ...................................... 3, 6, 9, 11, 13, U
Clerk, u n d e r w r i t e r (insurance carriers) .........
33
Compositor, hand (printing) ....... ................
35
Crane operator, electric bridge ......... ....... .
23, 25, 27
Die setter (stamped and pressed m e t a l products)..
30
D r a f t s m a n ...................... .....................
16, 17
Drill-press oper a t o r (machinery) ..................
31, 32
Duplicating-machine operator •••••••..............
6, 11
Electrician (building construction) •••••••••••••
34Electrician, maintenance ........... ••••••••..... .
18, 20, 21
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ..........
31
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .. ..........
32
Elec t r o t y p e r (printing) .......................
35
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ...... ...... .
31




Engineer, stationary ........................ ............. .........
Evaporator m (industrial chemicals) ..................
an
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ..................
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ......... ............... ...........
Gas pum an (malt liquors) ......... ........................ ..
pm
Grain-elevator operator (grain milling) ...............
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ......... .
Guard ............................................................................
Helper (bakeries) ••••••••................... ............
Helper, motortruck driver •••••••...........................
Helper, trades, maintenance ....................................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ........••••
Inspector (machinery) ................................................
J a n ito r ........................................................................
Janitor (railroads) ........•••••••••....................
Key-punch operator............................... ........... .
Laboratory assistant (industrial chemicals) . . . . .
Laborer ( building construction) •••••.••••••........
Machine operator (printing) .....................................
Machine tender (printing) .......................................
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) . . .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom .............................
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) . . . . .
Machinist, maintenance .......................... .................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ............
Mailer (printing) ••••••••••••••••••••...................
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ...........................
Maintenance man, general u tility (stamped and
pressed metal products) ...................................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ..................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk
dealers) •••••.•••.........
Mechanic, maintenance •••••••...............................
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ............. ...........
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ....................
Millman (millwork) ....................................... •••••••
Millwright ...................................................................
Millwright (grain milling) ......................................
Mixer (bakeries) ............

18, 20, 22
29
33
18, 20, 22
35
29
31, 32
23, 25, 27
3435
18, 20, 22
32
31
23, 25, 26, 27
32
6, 12, 15
29, 30
34
35
35
31, 32
18, 20, 22
32
18, 20, 22
32
35
18, 20, 22
30
18, 20, 22
33
19, 20, 22
32
31
35
19, 20, 22
29
34

h
S

Index - C o a U in m

ad

Page
M olde r (bakeries) ................ ..................
Molder (nonferrous foundries) .....................
Motortruck d r i v e r . ................................ .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ............... .
Office b o y ........ ................... ..............
Office g i r l .......... ............................ ..
Oiler .............................. ..................
Oiler (grain milling) .............................
Operat o r (local transit) ............... .
Order f i l l e r ......... .................. • ••••..... .
Overman (bakeries) .................................
Packer ............ ................................ ..
Packer, flour (grain milling) .....................
Painter (building construction) ...................
Painter, m a i n tenance ........... .................. .
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ......... ..............
Photoengraver (printing) ...........................
Pipe fitter, maintenance ...........................
Pipe fitter, maintenance (industrial chemicals) • •
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ........ ..
Plasterer (building construction) ........ .......
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) ••
Plumber (building construction) ............. .....
Plumber, m a intenance •••••••..... ..................
Plumber, m a i n t e n a n c e (railroads) .................
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating,
plating, and polishing) . .................. .
P o r t e r ................. .............................
Pourer, me t a l (nonferrous foundries) • ••••.......
Power-shear oper a t o r (stamped and pressed
metal products) • •......... ........... ..........
Premium ac c e p t o r (insurance carriers) • •• • •......
Press assistant (printing) ............. ...........
Press feeder (printing) .................... .
Pressman (printing) ......................... ........
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed
metal p r o d u c t s ) ..................................
Receiving c l e r k ........ ........... .
Refrigerator m a n (milk dealers) ....... ...........




7,
19,
23,
23,
19,
19,

34
30
35
16, 17
3, 9
12, 15
21, 22
29
35
26, 28
34
26, 28
29
34
21, 22
33
35
21, 22
29
32
34
31
34
19, 21
32

31
23, 25, 26, 27
30
30
33
35
35
35
30
24, 26, 28
33

Page
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) . ..........
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) ..........
S ecretary......... ...................
Section head (insurance carriers) ...............
Shake-out m (nonferrous foundries) ...........
an
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ••...........................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) .........
Shipper (millwork) ........................................
Shipping clerk .................... ............................... ••••
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ....................................
Smutter (grain milling) ...........
Stenographer..........................................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ................... ••••
Stereotyper (printing) ..............................
Stillman (industrial chemicals) ............... ••••••••
Stock handler..............................................................
Stock handler (railroads) ................
Switchboard operator.................................................
Switchboard operator-receptionist..........................
Tabulating-machine operator •••••............. ........... .
Tool-and-die maker ............................... •••••••........
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ......... ••••••..........
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal
products) ........................................... ..........•••••
T ra cer..........................................................................
Transcribing-machine operator.........................
Truck d r iv e r ...............................................................
Trucker, hand ......................
Trucker, hand (machinery) ............................
Trucker, hand (railroads) ........................................
Trucker, power......................
Typist ..........................................................................
Typist (insurance carriers) .......................
Underwriter ( insurance carriers)•••••••••••........
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) .................
Watchman.......................................................................
Welder, hand (machinery) ...........
Wrapper (bakeries) .........
Yardman (millwork) ................

☆

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T

33
30
7, 12, 15
33
30
19, 21, 22
32
35
24, 26, 28
24, 26, 28
29
7, 12, 15
33
35
29
24, 26, 28
32
7, 12, 15
8, 12, 15
3, 8, 9, 12
19, 21, 22
32

8,
24, 25, 26,
24,

PR IN T IN G

25,
8,

25,

O FFICE

: 0 —

30
16, 17
13, 15
27, 28
26, 28
32
32
27, 28
13, 15
33
33
33
27, 28
32
34
35

1952







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

BLS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Salt Lake City, Utah
Seattle, Washington

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1064
1067
1068
1070
1042

1058
1069
1057

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
25

15
20
15
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

This report was prepared in the Bureau*s Middle Atlantic Regional Office* Com­
munications may be addressed to:
Robert R* Behlow, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
341 Ninth Avenue
New York, New York
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102