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Occupational Wage Survey

HOUSTON, TEXAS
January 1952

Bulletin No. 1084

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION...................................................

1

THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN A R E A ..... ......................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE..............................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...........................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations •.....................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations...................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ............................
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-35
Machinery industries .........................................
B-5452 Milk dealers ................................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .......................................................
Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ...,..............................................
C-205 Bakeries •...................................................................
C-27
P rinting...................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ....................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ....................................
Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s .................................. •
Wiage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ...............................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .....................................................
E-3
Paid holidays ...............................................................
E-4
Paid vacations................................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e .......................................................
E-6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s ....... .............................................. •
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ...........................................

3
8
8
10

13
H
M

15
15
15
15
15

16

16
17
17
IB
19
21
21

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y .............. ..........................................

22

I N D E X .................................... .....

2U

...___ ...... ........................

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for auto repair shops
(June 1951), ferrous foundries (June 1951), and
power laundries (June 1951).
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 2" , D. C. - Price 20 cents
>

May 21, 1952

Introduction 1/
The Houston area is 1 of 40 major labor markets In
which the Bureau of Labor Stat is ties is currently conducting
occupational wage surreys.
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis. Gross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(o) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.

Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables.
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.

Data were collected and summarised on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Houston Metropolitan Area
The Houston Metropolitan Area (Harris County), with a
total population of 802,000, was the largest in the South in
1950.
About 594-,000 persons lived within the city limits of
Houston, reflecting an increase of over 50 percent since 1940.

The industrial and commercial facilities of Houston
play an integral part in the rising importance of the vast Gulf
Coast area. The port of Houston is the world 9a leading port for
shipment of petroleum and petroleum products, rice, cotton, and
carbon black. The city is also served by six major railroad
systems, a modern network of highways, and an international air­
port.

1/

Prepared in the Bureaufs regional office in Atlanta, Ga.,

by Louis B* Woytych under the direction of Harry H. Hall, Regional
Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and central
direction of the program was carried on in the B u r e a u ^ Division
of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Indicative of H o u s t o n ^ industrial importance is the
large variety of manufacturing plants located in the area. Petro­
leum refining, steel, paper, cement, shipbuilding and repair,
flour milling, iron and steel fabricating, and chemicals are
among the a r e a fs manufacturing industries. Total manufacturing
employment during February 1952 was 82,500, or approximately 24percent of the total nanagrioultural employment. Manufacturers
of machinery, with more than 15,000 workers, employed more work­
ers than any other single manufacturing industry. Manufacturers
of petroleum products ranked second numerically, and employed
almost 11,000; food and kindred products plants had about 10,500
workers•
Although Houston ranks high in industrial importance,
more than three times the number of workers were engaged in non­
manufacturing than in manufacturing activities. Almost 64,000
persons were employed by retail trade establishments with another
20,500 working in wholesale trade concerns. Transportation and
other public utilities had an estimated 32,800 workers on their
payrolls during February 1952 and service industries employed
28,300. About 21,500 persons were engaged in construction activ­
ities attesting to the importance of that industry in the area.
Plants under construction in 1951, or for which the Defense Pro­
duction Administration had issued certificates of accelerated
amortiza^ 1 on, had a total value of almost one-quarter billion
dollars.
Unionisation in Houston area establishments was almost
wholly confined to the plant employees of manufacturing and
transportation, communication, and public utility industries.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups studied^
approximately 50 percent of the manufacturing plants employing
more than two-thirds of the plant workers had collective-bar­
gaining agreements. About 60 percent of the transportation,
communication, and other public utility companies employing more
than four-fifths of the workers in the industry had written
agreements with labor organizations.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages and salaries of many plant and office workers
were formally adjusted upward during the period between the out­
break of hostilities in Korea and the time of the survey0 More
than two-thirds of all manufacturing plant workers and approxi­
mately three-fifths of the office workers received at least one
general wage increase during the period. Generally, these in­
creases were made on a cents-per-hour basis, ranging most fre­
quently from 5 to 10 cents. The percent of workers in the public
utilities and wholesale trade industries that received general
wage increases was similar to that in the manufacturing industry;
however, in other nonmanufacturing industries relatively few
workers received formal wage adjustments between June 1950 and
the time of the study. In contrast to wage adjustments of manu­
facturing employees, those made by nonmanufacturing establish­
ments were generally on a percentage basis.

2 ,

Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were part of the formalized rate structure in most
Houston establishments— nearly all plant workers were employed
in firms with established minima*
Entrance rates exceeding |1
an hour were most prevalent— two-fifths of the plant workers
were employed in establishments having established minima of
this amount#
In manufacturing firms, higher minimum rates were
generally associated with larger companies, whereas retail trade
and service establishments generally had lower entrance rates
than other groups, with about 60 and 70 percent of the workers,
respectively, receiving less than 75 cents an hour#
Wages and salaries for nearly all jobs studied in both
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing plants were considerably
higher in the former *industry group.
In 23 of 25 comparable
plant jobs, hourly rates in manufacturing firms were higher#
Average weekly salaries for all office occupations permitting
comparisons were higher in manufacturing establishments#
Approximately a fourth of the durable and nondurable
manufacturing plant workers in the Houston area were employed
on extra shifts. 2J
Almost all of these workers were paid a
shift differential expressed as a cents-per-hour addition to

2 / See appendix table for lists ng of durable- and nondurablegoods industries#




day-shift rates# A majority of second-shift employees received
an hourly differential of 5 cents or less, whereas three-fourths
of those employed on third shifts were paid a premium between 5
and 10 cents per hour#
The scheduled workweek for a substantial majority of
women office workers and plant workers in all industries was 40
hours#
More than half the office employees in retail trade
establishments had a scheduled workweek in excess of 4-0 hours,
whereas nearly all office employees in the finance, insurance,
and real estate industries were scheduled to work 40 hours or
less#
Among plant employees in all industries, more than twofifths in the services group had a workweek of 48 hours or more
but almost three-fourths of those in public utility plants were
scheduled to work only 40 hours a weeke
Nearly all office workers and three-fourths of the
plant workers in Houston establishments were granted paid holi­
days# Six holidays were most common, being granted to about 40
percent of all workers#
Rates of pay for supervisory employees in plants em­
ploying 10 percent of the manufacturing workers were based on a
fixed relationship to the rates of the occupations supervised#
In a majority of cases, rates were set as a percentage above
the highest rate of the workers supervised and varied by level
of supervision#

3,

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
O ^ice QccufuUiotU

Table A-l*

(Average stra ig h t-tin e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry d iv is io n , January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIG HT-TIM E W E EK L Y EARNINGS OF—

A verage

27.50 30.00 32.50
and
<J
V

0
1 V5

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

3 8 ^ 8 5

3 5 .0 0

s

$

$

37.50

1 * 0 .0 0

37.50

1 * 0 .0 0

1 (2 .5 0

2 1 8

p

1 * 0 .0

3 9

1 * 0 .0

1 5 1

l* o .5

2 9

1 * 0 .0

38

1 * 0 .0

3 5

lt 0 .5

1 9

Clerks, accounting
Manufacturing
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ..
Untmnrnfaftfair ) n

1 * 6 .0

28

1 * 2 .0

2 7 6

1 * 0 .0

1 3 7

1*0*0

6 9 6

1 * 0 .0

1 8 9

1 * 0 .0

1*25

1 * 0 .0

5 2

1 * 0 .0

2 3

gledcs. file, claea A
Nonmanufacturing

l a . o

1 0

1 * 0 .0

5 5 —

Clerks, general
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .....
Nooaanufactaring ...
Public utilities
Wholesale trade •
Retail trade ....
Finance * » .....

"T * o 7 5

1 * 5 .0 0

1 (7 .5 0

5 0 .0 0

;
!

81*

1 * 0 .0

6 8

1 * 0 .0

j

1 * 0 .0

1 * 0 .0

1 * 0 .0

a

1 * 0 .0
1 )0 .0

27

1 * 0 .0

5 0

1 * 0 .0

-

-

•

-

-

-

•

-

-

1 * 0 .5
1 * 0 .0

!

1 )0 .0

.

1

1

6

28

3 9 .0

3 U .0 0

i a

3 l* .0 0

i

H *
-

3
-

!

H *

7 0 .0 0

23

70.00
75.00

1|6

$

$

$

-

1 2

!

1 2

-

85.00

8 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

90.00 95.00 100.00

1 1

-

2

!

1 6

|

1 6

3 1

-

-

-

1 5

•
-

-

-

1 2

1 2

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*

-

_

1

_

3

-

-

-

3

-

-

3

-

!

!

2 6
1

1
9
9
3
1
*

1 6

;

-

-

-

-

U

3

”

•

-

,

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 5

1 3

3

7

3

3

6

5

1
S
1 8

I

13

2
6

1

3

!
1 9 !
1

“

12
-

1

i

;

6

3

!

-

3

1

5

1

3

9

3

1 5

1 1 ?

6 8

6 5

5 6

3 8

1 9

ll*

1 3

1 9

1 8

1 3

1 8
1*6

1*2

12

5 5

6

9

9

3 9

3 2

2k

!
;

1

2

2 0

2 1

.

1

1

1 8

11*

2 0

1 0

5 3

6 6

61*

81*

8 1

9

2
31
10
20

1 1

1 2

17

2 1

1 9

2 3

5 3

3 5

1*7

6 2

3 °

1 7

1

5

!

i
1

"

1 6

1
1

3

-

1 7

1 2

11*

3 3

-

-

I

1 2

i

-

-

h

\

k

-

!
:

!

1
1

3

1
1

108

u s

!
|

%

6

6 1

9

3 9

1*7

31*

i

2 1

9
-

1

1

1 7

-

1

2 2

3

21*

; 1 > 1 ___ L

.3

-

&

1.... .1*3

1 9

3 h

i

1 3

1 7

ll*

3 *
9

6

1*

-

2

2

7

1*

_ J 5

_

10

3 3

!

1 7

3

5 0

10

8

I

3

-

1 8

1

1*

1 3

23

.

!

1 5

la

3 3

nr

_
!
1

n

1 7

2

1

1

-

1 5

3

1*

2 0

9

5

-

1 0

17

1*

6

-

3

1

3

1 2

,

7

1*6

1 9

2 0

6

1*

I 2

!

7

1*6

1 1

2 0

6

1*

28

!

5

2 0

1 5 _

9

1 1

-

9

h

8

8

5

2

7

k

6

ll*
2

1

a .

3

1 8

|

10

18 > 8
6

!

2

6

i

5

I

1 7

-fr
3

2

1

JL
1

2

3

17

I

9

2

-

7

3

!

|

-

-

-

-

!
j

lk
H i

-

-

1 1

-

-

1 1

-

7

-

-

^

|

«.

u

l
t

u

-

1

1 3

10

1 5

1

2
!

liS

-

-

-

j

8

i
I

!

*

1

j

-

5

h

-

-

-

8
8

|

12
1

■

;

6

!

1 2

**

i

-

j

U

-

-

“

j

-

!

“

l

21*

|

!

J*2_
8
2
6

12

ik

1 3
-

|

27
27
1
1 1

lk

3 3

3 1

i

ll*

1 1 7

3**
1

-

3
3
29
1
5
11
2

1

.

-

-

-

1

H *

|

5
1*

_ 9 _

1 1

1*

1

3

-

1 0

1 1

16
16

1

1

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

_

_

_

_

»

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

*

1 2

68

3

3 9

!

-

-

8

1 8

5

1 0 3

1

3

•

-

-

1 0

2 1

&

27

1*

-

I

5
-

87

!

1

-

-

-

-

1

3

-

7
!

1*

“

.

1

2

-

5 6

2 0

3

!

_

1*

6

9

2 3

6

-

2 1

2 6

1 1

•

_

8
3 8

-

-

6

1

1*2

-

1 6

7

1 3

6

-

-

5

1 6

5

-

i

-

105^0 over

6

2

-

1
3

6

9

3

1 0

8

1 *7

1

2

•

-

!

3

3 ?

1 6

-

1

!

.
^

k

1 3
5

2

l*

i
j

105.00

JiL

95.00 100.0C

90.00

and

3 3

8

7

$

$

I $

8 0 .0 0

!

'

1*

5

2

9

-

$

o o

7 5 .

!
I

1 0

1

-

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), connunicaticn, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




6 5 .0 0

-

1 3

-

|

-

3

2 1

-

9

_

1 3

-

_

,

-

8 6

1 * 0 .0

*

6 0 .0 0

1

28

-

-

1 6

1 * 0 .0
3 9 .5

10.0

-

_

- 1

5 7 .S o

5

-

1

1 1

5
1
10

1

li*

-

-

5 9 .5 0

3

6 5 .0 0

-

-

1

-

-

'

1 5

-

5

$

6 0 .0 0

1 5

-

-

21

10

-

-

.00
37.00
36.00

2 2
3 6
1 3 8

~

-

3 5 .0 0

1 * 0 .0

_

-

-

U t .0 0

"5 6 .0 "

-

-

1 * 0 .0

$

$

57.50

9

-

-

H *

-

60.00
57.00
60.00
71.00
&.50
61.50
62.50
67.00
5 9 .0 0

1 * 0 .0

—

:

-

-

l* l* .o o

5 5

1

-

-

1

1 9 6

!

:

!

501

2 8

“

-

’

-

i» 7 .5 0

2 6

Q££ice beys

•

,
1

6 5 .0 0

1 5

Nonmanufacturing

-

73.50
1 63.50
76.50

61*

1

1 1

&

S 5 .o o

$

S 5 .o o

1

3
H *

-

1 2

-

7 0 .5 6

1*0

Duplicating-machine operators

-

15

6 2 .5 0

1 * 0 .0
1 * 0 .0

7 7

-

-

5 5 .0 0

1 * 0 .0

n

!

-

_

:

1 * 0 .0

U k

-

-

3

1

9

_

7 1 .0 0

U2

-

-

5 8 .5 0

:

$

$

50.00 52.50
52.50

3

-

1

-

-

6 5 .5 0

1 9 6

,

-

-

u o .o

1*0

-

-

.

-

•

80.50
65.00
73.50
1 51.00
1
:

J

9

__

-

1 * 0 .0

2 3 8

1
!

-

-

6 9 .0 0

167

Clerks, payroll
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods ••
Nozmanuf a c t u r i n g ....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...

-

•

-

2 3 5

Clerks. order
M a n u f a c t u r i n g....
Nonmanufacturing ••
Wholesale trade

.—

$

1 (7 .5 0

1 7

-

-

5 9 9

361*

1

-

6 9 .5 0

1 * 0 .0

1 3 9

Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade .....
Finance *» ........

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods ..
Nonmanufa c t u r i n g....
Public utilities *
Finance * * ........

"

_

-

5 6 .0 0

1 * 0 .0

9 7 2

,,,,,

4.50
72.60
77.00
68.50
67.00
77.50
76.00
67.50
69.00

1 * 0 .5

0 7

$

liS .o o

Hen
Bookkeepers, hand
Manufacturing
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods ..
Norsaanufacturing....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Finance ** ........
Services ..........

$

$

3 5 .0 0

O
VN
• l

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$

$

$

J L

Number
of
workers

*

k

3
12

1 9

*

1 9

t

1 2

!

5
7
2
•

!

7

-

6

1

1

k
1*

5

1

-

.

3

-

1

■

-

6

6

2

3

1

3

1

-

-

1

*

3

-

-

-

2

1
1
1
1

j

1

-

;

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1 9 5 2
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

O rific e, Occ44fuUiOHA> G ontuu4*d
-

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, lex., by industry division, January 1952)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




5,

T b e A i Qjflice, Occupation*. - Continued
al -i
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
*
$
$
IS
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
i
i$
Weekly
Weekly 27. §0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 1*0.00 1*2.50 l*5.oo 1 7.5 0 5 0 .0 0 52.50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 5 .0 0 70.00 7 5 .oo 80.00 8 5 .0 0 90 .00 95. 0a100.00
*
105.00
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
and
L 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 -5 0 1*0.00 1*2.50 i*5.oo 1* 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 . 50 ! 60.00 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 ,0 0 90,00 95,00 iO Q .od(L
7.5
05.00 ov er
i

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type)
Nonmanufa c t u r i n g...........

*
92
------- S i p

1*0.0
1*0.0

1*1*.00
1*2.00

1 .2 7 5
230
92
138

1*0.0
1*0.0
llO.O
1*0.0
1*0.0

5 o .5 o
5 5 .5 0

Clerks, accounting ............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............
Durable goods ...........
Nondurable goods ........
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Public utilities * .....
Wholesale trade .........
Retail trade ............
Finance ** ..............
Services ................
Clerks, file, class A ,
Manufacturing ......
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities
Retail trade ....
Finance * * .....
Clerks, file, class B ...
Manufacturing .......
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods ..
Nonmanufacturing ....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade «.,
Retail trade .....
Finance ** ........

•

261
31*7
215
132
90
111
j
1
i
i
!

10
101
13
28
50

1*79
1
-------7 l ~
I
!
!

28
1*3
1*08
100
110
33
11*9
1 ,7 55
322
193
129
1,1*33
1*60
308
1*11
118
136

Clerks, g e n e r a l .........
Manufacturing ........
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods •,
Nonmanufacturing ....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade .....
Finance ** ........
Services ..........
Clerks, order .............................
Manuf a c t u r i n g ................ .........
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade .......... .............

U7
1*7
70
51*
16

Clerics, p a y r o l l ...........................
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g ..........................
Durable g o o d s ............... .......
Nondurable goods ••••...............
Nonmanufacturing..................... .
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ...................... .
S e r v i c e s .................. .........

300
13 0"
55
75

”

170
60
11
62
29

1*0.0
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*1.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.5
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*1.0
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*1.0
3 9 .5
1*1.5

60.00
5 2 .5 0
1*9.00
1*9.00
5 3 .5 0
l*l*.00
1S .5 o
i
1*9.00

10
10

21*
1
*
-

-

1
*
20

_
-

3
5
12
-

_
-

3
3
-

12
l ii.s o
1 *6 .5 0 " 1*1*.oo
1*8.00
1*0.50
12
1*0.00
1*7.00
3 6 .0 0
3 8 .0 0
12

1*0
i 1 1*0
10
i 3
2
| 23

1*6.00

50.00
U 5.50
6 1 .0 0
3 7 .0 0
1 5 .0 0

1*5.50
1*8.00
5 3 .0 0
1*0.00
1*2*.50
1*9.00
1*3.00
1*1.00
; 1*7.00
1*5.00

1*0.0
1*2.50
~ w . a ..H U 3.50
1*2.00
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*3.50
1*0.0
3 7 .5 0
1*0.0
■ fio.o
1*0.0
1*0 .0
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
1*2.5

1

5 2 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
5 6 .5 0
51*.So
5 0 .5 0

!
!
!
i
! 52.00
i 6 2 .5 0
U i.5 0
5 1 .5 0

-

17
2
!

2 '

1 15
!

1

9
5
l

25

120
23

25
3
3
15
1
*
8
8
-

61
t

28
28
-

8
8
6
1

i
66
55
~ ip
5~
3
2
1 !
*
61
51
12
20
6
15
7
18
; 27

7
21

-

9
-

10

-

9

2
-

-

-

9

! 16
-

-

2

3

• 1

-

2
1

!

2
!

S e e footnote at e nd o f table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and o t h e r public utilities,
* * Finan c e , insurance, and real estate.

81*
r
3
1
*
77
la
10
11
13
2

98
2
1
1
106 ! 96
27
23
12 1 51
12
! 28
8
j 23
2
16

16
6
8
2

5
5
3
2
5

!

5
1
*

-

l

_
9
9

i

1*5
21
3
18
21*

10
1
1
9
k
3
2

5
U*
5

3
25

27

3U
3
•
3
31
5
2°
- i
| 5

2

2
2
1
1

1

19
8

22
” T ~ 1
18
18
1
j

33
2

25
13

-

-

8
11
2

2
31
20

<
_
I

10
1

-

i 13
12

1•
. 8
j

h

17
9 ;
6
6 ;
2 i

; 53
M r i
! 25 ;
8 1
20 !
12

«
.
2
6

____ 1

-

;

11

1*0
15
10
5

-

-

12
12
3
9

5

_
_
_
_

6
1
*
1
3
2
2
_
_
_

-

7
i -

3
2
2

2
2
2

x
1
_
.

_

-

-

-

_

_
„
_
_

_
_

67
23
11
8

-

-

-

-

3

1
1
.
_

6
2
1
*
2
_

„
_
.
-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

25

!
r

-

9
16
_

2
2

3
3

1
3
3
3

!

j

-

3
2
1

3
2
2
1
.
1
_

12
1
*
_
1
*
8
8
_

1
1
.
1
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-■

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

M

j

26
102
~ T ~ 31
j 8
31
_
1
! 18
71
56
7
3
31 I 7
1 ! 5
*
5
6
-

21*
! ll*
ll*
: 10
| 1
! 1
; ; 8
-

20
ll*
ll*
_
6
1
.
5

1 _

.
_

_
.
_

_
.

.

_

.

_

-

-

-

-

! 19
10
5
5
9
| 5

9
3
3

11*
ll*
10
7
6 1
1 j 10
*
1 7 j 1
! 1
2
;
3 ! 1
2
1

-

•

1

«.

.
.
23
ll*
3
11
9
. 3

;

1

|

u

!

_
_
_
_

6
5

1

_

.

1

!

.
_
.

1
;

i

;

1

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

.

1
-

.
_
.

!
I

.

_
_

.
_

i

■

j

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

,

1
-

1
•

|

_
_
_

.
•

_

-

2
! 1
| 1

1
1

j

_

„

;

1

-

_

-

_
_
_

1

1

1

i

_

_

-

3
1
2

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
•

1

| _
_
_
_

-

i
|

j

_
_

1

i

•
« !
. , .
.
3

-

1 _
_
; _
_

j

1
*
1

_
.
_
-

_
_

-

1

1
*
1
3
2
-

.
I

-

-

58
9
1
8
1*9
12
37

69
11
9
2
58
23

1*7
27
11 !
16 !
20 !
6

-

-

16
11
3 | 1
*
2
3
1
1
13 i
7
1
5
7 !
2
5

_

122
12
1
*
8
110
1

1

3
2
_
2
1
1
_

.

1

3 j
3

7 [
— _— j

2
2
_
2

2
1

191

21
ll*
7
6

-

1*7 | 73
75
21* | 20 ! 30
- ; 11
25
21*
9 1 5
27
5i
1*3
11
19
h
25
11
8
17
1
5
1
*
12
|
3 | 1

10
10
5
5

2
2
_
2

-

5

67

3
3 i

3
3

1*8 i
195 11*9
12
! 28 P2S— \ 21*
| 16
21
!5 I
9 !
12
9
5
3 j
36
; 167 123
l 167
76
79
33
23
! 62 ! 31
26
6
I 29 j 5
:
25 i 5
11
2 |
9
3
32
2
! 31*

6
----- 5”
-

k

I 173
19
1 13
i
6
i i5i*
32

9 1 1
*

11
2
9
1
6

; 291*
lia
i 1*7 ; 32
16 ! 21*
8
! 31 I
: 21*7 1 109
82 ! 53
31
57
! 1*9
7
21*
12
6
35

2
2 i

1
*
u

1 121*
18
! 12
1 6

. 82
52 !
! 12
1
*
3 1 9 1 k
- i
2 i
3
32
70 ; i*8 ;
22
5
15
6
20 ; 17 '
3
5
i
u* ! 23
13 I

118
220
138
11
29
31
8
1
*
29
27 I
3
89
189 1 127
2
1 ! 21*
61
12
7
112
69
67
12
8
1 ;
12
7

3
-

1

18 1 11 i
18
11 !

37

_
10
11
19
3 ;
—i
---------- ! B ----- ------ —
- ~ T ~
P
11
19
i 2
- |
11*
I 7
2
5
| 1
*
- !
-

!

116 i
7 M
1
6
109
la
21
39
1
*
1
*

i p

u*
1*7
17
9
15
6
-

10
10
9
1

5
-

18
18

8

23
97
16
11
39
16
15

J




8

7
7

_

_
.

1

-

1

-

j

_
! _
| .
.
1
.
1
• 1 .

_

_
_
-

"

i
i

6,

6 ^ ic e

Table A-it

O c c u p a t io n *

-

C o n t in u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
*
eky
Wel
e k y W e l 27.50 3 0 . 0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 1* . 0 0 1*2.50 l5 .oo 1*7.50 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 60.00 65.00 7 0 . 0 0
0
*
e r i g and
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
0
t
3 0 . 0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 1* . 0 0 1*2.50 l5 .oo 1*7.50 5 o.oo 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 65.oo 70.00 7 5 . 0 0
Average

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Sex, occupation, and industry division

OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 95.0C100. OC105.00
and
80.00 85.00 90.00 ?5-oo 1 0 0 .oc105.oci0 Vsr

1
Women - Continued

|
_

15
*
W~
13

liO.O
10 0
*
i*o!o

39.50
37.00

1*0.0
1*0.0
1
*0.0
1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*1.0
38.5

1»9.00
5636.
59.00
51*.50
1*7.00
1*9.00
1*9.50
1*1.00
1*2.00

-

226
Office girls ........................
Manufacturing........ ............
72
12
Durable goods ............. .....
Nondurable goods ................
60
Nonmanufacturing................. .
11
5*
Public utilities * .............. j 59
!
Wholesale trade .................
33
Finance # * .... ................
50

1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5

35.50
38.00
1*3.00
37.00
3 * 50
1.
36.00
38.00
30.50

Secretaries .........................
1,31*3
1 16
**
Manufacturing................... .
21
0*
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ................
2*
12
Nonmanufacturing .......... ........
897
Public utilities * ..............
255
Wholesale trade .................
233
122
Retail trade ...................
Finance «* .....................
196
Services . . .....................
.'
91

1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
105
*.
39.5
1*0.0

61.00
6U.50
68.00
62.00
59.50
61.00
62.50
5 * 5o
1.
56.50
5 * 50
1.

Stenographers, general ................ 1.218
Manufacturing.... .............. .
r Wi
Durable goods ..................
171
182
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
m
Public utilities * ................. .
2*
13
Wholesale trade .................... .
269
Retail trade .........................
116
Finance #*•................. ...... ...
11
8*
Service*? TtT-.TtrTTfTtf +tTtrTTrttTttt
53

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
105
*.
1 0.0
*
105
*.

51.50
55.00
55.00
55.00
50.50
50.50
51*.00
1*3.50
1*9.50
1*9.00

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

59.00
56.50
52.00

2
2
2

5
i
l

8

21
27
12
21 i 27
1
*
16
3
12
6
6
1
3
1 9
16
27
*
3? i 1 8
29
12
l* i r
l
13
6
2
6
11
1 * 16
1
32
16
25
27
1
*
- I 2 * 26
1
3
6
18
1
*
3
1
n
-

18
18
6
1
*
3
5

i 25
8
j 1
*
I 1
*
17
! 10
5
2
-

-

Kev-punch operators ...................
269
Manufacturing...................
" w
Durable goods...................
23
30
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
216
18
*
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade........... ..... .
97
Retail trade ...................
32
Finance * * .....................
3U

Duplicating-machine operators ..........
—
Retail trade ...................

Stenographers, technical .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ......................

100
--- 5pH
31

8
6

37

12
*
2
2
10
*
38

1
*
1
*
1
*
-

i
!
!
1

1
1

9
9
7

12

11
11
1
*
7

! «
.
- ;
- ;
- ;
j
_ ; _

_

8
1*
1
.
1*
1

17 1
2 !
2

7
2

35
1;
1

-

-

2
5
1
h

H*
21
9
6
2
1
*

-

-

-

-

-

!

_

! 15 !
!
!
3
8 '
1 1
*

-

9
8
3

22
8

3
3
3

-

-

1
*
31
1 ! 31
*
1 i 10
.
10
.
6
3
_
5
21
~ !
- 1
1
20
10 :
- l
7 !
3 j
j
1
!
i
-

i
i




-

7

lf ;
l
7
l
6
7
6
1
-

3

-

5
3
3
2
-

21
1
1
20
6
11
1
2

15
5
-

55
l*
l
1
*
10

;

1 11
*
I 6 s
! 32
1 1
! 2

1 i
- 1
i
1 !
1
-

1
1 ;
1

1

6
3

12
12
12

12
1*

10
3
1
2
7
1
5
1
-

18
7
3
1
*
11
3
6
-

-

-

-

_

63
10

6
1*

53
;
!
!
!

21
22

5
3
2

l
l
1

201

19
*
31
18
;
j 152
! 36
11
39
59
; 7

1 81 1 2 5
1
! 30 ! 6 *
; 22
31
8
33
61
51
16
30
15
23
2
6
20

!
i
;
!
!

i

_
;
-

222 ; 1 6 3
69 1 5 3
1*0 ; 2 9
29 I 2 *
i
153 i n o
58 ! 3 7
31
39
12 1 i
*
35 ! 3 0
9 ! 8
!
1
i
!

_

18
7

1 H* ! 17
16
1
*
3
| 3

16
9 !
8
1 !
7 i
5 1
2

i
'

_ 1
- i
-

105
18
*
20
28
57
11
21

!

1

1

3 !

- !

23
23
11

_

3
1
2

61

- '

_

1 !
3 !
8 :
- ;
3
2 ;

5
10
1

76 ! 82 1 1 9
8 ! 21
50
8
1
*
8
: 1*6
16
13
68
61
69
15
*
11
21
15 ! 6
30
11 i 21*
3
21
12
13
6
7
13 i 6
18
3
5
k
lt
i
l
i 230 1 2 3
1* ! 69
10
1
35
19 1 u 1 2 *
! 10
1* i 3 2 ! 1 9
1
j 25 ! 5 ! 9 1 5
o*
;195 |i i I 99 I 1 5
*
27 ! 1 6
! 36 I 2 0
28
69
3* ! 1 5
1
6
65
15
| 33
27
9
_
_
5
33
5

31
l* r
l
i
1* !
1
17 !
3 !
2 i
1 !
*
8 i
il
l*
26
5
21
88
13
*
6
11
25

2 __ ~_i

I
i ___
_

See footnote at e nd of table.
*
Tran s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), c ommunication, a n d o t h e r public utilities,
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

17
*
2
1
1
15
*
8
10
H*
13

_

11 1
3

1
1
1
-

3
1

1
2

2
_
- 1
- |
!
_
78

1

_
- 1
- I

_
- 1
- 1
_

_
-

_

_
- 1
_

-

63

*
16 ! 10
*
ia : 1 7
5 1 23
32 1 23
11
13
6
5
.
1
8 ' 3
6
2
1
1
28 ! 1 6
19
*
*
17 ! i
19
6 !
9
10
11 ; i
*
3 0 j 11 1 12
7 ! 5 1 !
*
20
6 j 8
_
“
_
3
1
1
6 ! 6 ! ^
3
3
1
1

29
18
*
j 16 1 16
1 13 1 11
3 | 5
32 ! 13
10 1 3
8
15
l
_
6
■ _
2

8
3

18
10

8
5

3

3 1
5
1
1 i
*
- !

.
_
_
.
_
.
_

2
l
_

1

i

1
3 ;
1
1 —

_
- ;
- 1
_ 1
- >

_
-

_
-

_
- '
- !
-

19
13
1
*
9
6
2
1
*
_
_
_

6
1
*
1
*
2
2
_
-

_
_
.
_
_

~ j
—

j

_
“
1
*
-

i
i
:

1
*
1
*
_

:
1

_

1
—

r~

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

-

1

1

"

.

!
!
.
.
.

2

1
!

-

_

1
2

2
_

-

1

_
*
*
_ 1
-

7,

O ^ioe Occupation* - Continued

Tab l e A-lt

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

Avebage
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l 27.50
e r i g and
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
37.50 40.00 4 2 . 5 0 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 8 0 . 0 0 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 95.001 0 0 .0 c■1Q5.0C
and
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.oo 57.50 6 0 . 0 0 6 5 . 0 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 . 0 0 95.00 LOO.00105.00 over

$

3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0
3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0

Women - Continued
Switchboard operators ..................
390
Manufacturing ...................... — 56
'13
Nondurable goods .................
43
Nonmanufacturing ..................
334
66
Public utilities * ...............
28
75
53
112

42.0
40.o
4o.o
4o.o
42.0
4o.o
4o.o
4i*o

Switchboard operator-receptionists .......
Manufacturing... ................. .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * .............. *
Wholesale trade ............
Retail trade
... •••’
;
*
Finance ** ..................... .

40.5 tS.oo
hO.o 49.50
40.0 53.50
4o.o |47.00
40.5 S43.00
4o.o 42.00
4o.o !43.50
4i.o 41.50
42.0 1(3.00

39h
126
51
75
268
19
129
72
27

W.S0
4.)'
970”
^6.00
47.00
1(1.50

36
-

12
38
12 ~ T T

.
36
-

5 0 .0 0

12
26
2

39
37
15

"

4
8
-

38
11
6
18

45.50
6

3 8 .5 0
47I 0
0

34.50

46.0

36
_

18
3
!
1 3
1 15
l
| _
9

39.5 51.50
40.0 ‘50.50
4o.o 49.50

12
(
17
9
5
9 ! 5
8 i 37
_
3

19
13
1

-

32
79
2 — 5~~
_
2
2 ' 4
26
77
3
5
8
12
14
3
6
51
1
1
27
34
4
4
4
4
30
23
ll
; 1
11
15
4
11

30
3
3
27
1

3
1
2
17
5

20

6
3
5

n
12
*
j

6

-

28
19

67
2
.
21
_
46

_

6
T
6

7
7- —

3
3

—

32
5 ~

4
_

27
20

h

1

3 1 21 ! 13
10
3 I 13
»
1
3
2
10
10
8
3

-

5
5

5
5

5

7
2
2

rr

1
_

3
3

-

2
2
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

- j

!
1

42.00
46.00
45.00
47.00

_

-

4 0 .0 0
4 1 .0 0
4 2 .0 0
T

.
f
4o.5o T
38.50

41
17
1
16
24

-

-

-

—1

T

t

l*

7

5

32

;

3
2

6
3
7

-

-

57

48
15

5

!

!

1

14
18

100
11
8

5

!

-

.

15
;

2

«
5

1

1

_

21

44
2

24

14

15
2

1
1

I

l

2
3

33
8
4
.

6
6
3
1

21
12
12

18
11

6

71
38
21
17

6
1^

“

_

3
2

1
----

27

1 ;
1 !
1

2
1

1

-

-

-

17
16
16
1

46
12

24
17
17

5

7

1
1

c
j

7
_

_

_
_

.
_
_
_

•
_
_

_
_
.

.
.

-

_
.
_ [

_
-

_

-

:
-

-

-

^ j

_

!
- -\
-

_

1
1 1
1 1

2
2

.

9
5

9
4

34

_

l

.

4

4
2

2

2

25

9

19

4

4

30

--

-

84
25
10
15
59
7
32

21
5~

74
47
12
35
27

7
1

7
2
1
1
5

15

6

45

9

g

;

4

1
16

2
24

_

1
6
1
5

]

4

V

1
5
9
1
8-

14

7
1
4

I
1

89
17

j

_

-

1

j

_

_

_

_

_

1--5t
-

_

j

-

i
1
!
|

_

!

_

--- —
-

4

-

9
9

_

9

1

_

_

-

1

!
_

_ _

_

_

-

_

;

_

_

_

-

!

_

-

_
"

i
!- - - - - -— - - -

_

-

_

_

.

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

;

_

1
1

_

- ;

_

j
j

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

.

1
1

_

_

.

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

:

1

_

-

-

_

_
_

. -

:

_

_ _
.

.

'
_

_

_

_
1

20

Hours reflect t he wor k w e e k fo r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s receive t h e i r regu l a r s t r a ight-time salaries a n d the earni n g s c o r r e s p o n d to these w e e k l y hours.
Tran s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and o t h e r p u b l i c utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7
5

21

8
72
22
20
22

1

7

_ _ _ _ _ _i _ _ _ _

1/
*
**

2

6
6
6

92

18
12
6
74
14
12

_

_
_

i

!

4 ;
5

1

_

-

“

4

17

K

65

27

22

! 6

58 118
1
10 ^ l 5 ~
:
18
10

_

45

8

2

12
11

7

55

3

75

23

-

-

t

5
5

2

5

z—

1
14
37

_

•

1

4

80

12
12

10

11

. . . . .5
.

57

13
T

23

4_

-

i

Typists, class A
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450 . . . . . . 4o.o . . . . 1(9.00 . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 .
. . . .
. . . . .
. . . . . .
.
-. . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ."140. . . . . . .39.5. . . -32750— . . . . . .- . . . 1 ---—.; . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . .
. . . . . . . .
.
i
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... .T
.. . . . . . . . .
84
4o.o 54.50
i
“
Nondurable goods . . . . . _. _ _ . _ _ _. _ _ . _ 56 . . 39.0 . 50.50
.
.
j
Nonmanufacturing............. ......
310
40.0 s 47.00
9
Public utilities * ........... .
4o.o 48.50
78
Wholesale trade ........ ....... ..
4o.o j 45.00
58
|
7
!
2
Retail trade . .............. . . .....
.
40.5 ! 40.50
33
Finance * * ...... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136. . . . . . . . . . 4o.o ! 48.50
.....
Typists, class B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679. . . . . . . . 4o.o
.....
Manufacturing ...................... "181 — 4o.o
Durable goods ...................
4o.o
72
Nondurable goods.......... ......
4o.o
109
Nonmanufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 498
.
4o.o
pnhl 1 c. n . " H t i f.tTrtrrtrT,tr. flT
+i
e
s
86
4o.o
Wholesale trade ................. . . .
128
4o.o
Petal 1 trade . , T T t I 1 T r t 1 . t72 . t t42.0
T
t
F t nanne
tir r
r
,
,
t
,
r
, 200 ,
,
, 39.5

-

_

10

9
9
4
1

4
4

-

-

_

_
_

1

Transcribing-machine operators, general ....
4o.o 53.50
93
Nonmanufacturing ................... — 87"“1' 46.0 53.00
Wholesale trade. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46. . . . . . . 4o.o. . . . 57.50.
. .
. . . .
. . . . . .
Finance * * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19. . . . . . 4o.o. . . . 1(9.50
. .
. . . . .
. . . .

_
_

_
_

_

6
6
5
l

_

-

_

3
1
1

..
_
_
-

5

.

8
7
1
6
1
1

4

j

2

7
7

^
J

8

.

12
t

?

j

2

_

1
1

6
2
2

5
3
3

19
12
9
3 !
i 7

n
21
10

1

4
1
l

2
16
2
J
1
10

12

89
31
8
23
58
7
44

28

18
2

20

l

9

_

- !

21
1

6

j

_

2

16

!

Tabulating-machine operators ............
Nonmanufacturing........ ...........
Public utilities * .............. .

38

_

1_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

8
.
a n d

Table A-2;

7 e c J t4 tio a l

0 c C 4 € fu U iO 4 > U

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Number
of
workers

S e x , o c c u p a t i o n , and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Men
D raftsm en , c h i e f ...........................................................
M a n u factu rin g ........................................................... ..

70
U7

D raftsm en ................... ..
....................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................... ..................
D u rable g o o d s .................................................... ..
N ondurable good s ...............................................
N onm anufacturing .......................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ............... . . . . . . . . . . . .
S e r v i c e s .................................... ..............................

1*73
21*3

*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 1*0.00 £ 2 . 5 0 ]£ 5 .0 0 £ 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .o c 1 0 0 . oc 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 . 0c j l l 5 .0 0
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $
1*0.00 1 .5 0 1*5.o o j 1 .5 0 5 0 . 0 0 ! 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 . 0c 1 0 5 . 0c 1 1 0 .0 0 I l 5 . 0c ji2 0.00
*2
*7
i
1
$
1
6
9 7 .0 0
2
1
1*0.0
3
3
i*
3
36
5
26
2
1*0.0
9 7 .5 0
1
1
*
1
*
- ,
-•
3
_
-

39
230
158
30

1*0.0
1*0.0
1 0 .0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

8 0 .5 0
8 1 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
81*. 00
7 3 .0 0

-

-

188
iiB
70
51*

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

5 6 .0 0
5 6 .0 0
5 6 .0 0
5 8 .0 0

22

19

- !
- ;

-

19
15

T r a c e r s ..................................................................................

21

1*0.0

5 2 .0 0

-

1

7 9 .0 0

_ '
! ---------_

-

-

-

~ :

T/22~ i
!

D raftsm en ..<>•................................................ ....................

!

N u rs e s, i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ................... ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................................................
D u rable g ood s .......................................................
N ondurable goods ................................................
Nonman u f ac tu r i n g ................................. ....................

1
81
I------51
i
1*3
!
18
S
20

1/
2/

3/
U/
*

11

1*0.0

1*0.0
6 7 .0 0
r i i o - . o - 1 6 7 .0 0 ”
1*0.0
6 3 .0 0
1*0.0
, 7 7 .5 0
i 6 6 .0 0
1*0.5
t

2
2
2
-

- ;
-

10
7
7
3
3
-

1*0
-3.6
21
15
21
1$
21
19
3 1
8
1
- ;

29
29
22
17
1

38
32
32
6 !
J
*
2 !

30
27
3
3

8
7
1
1

9
9
_ i
-

17
13
1 ;
*
1 |
*

13
10 !
3 i
3

11
2
9
6

11*
10
1
*
3

20
5
15
15

8

2

5

1

_

_

_

_

_ !
1
-----------

1
1
1 1

_

-

—
1

8
8

- ;

1 1
!
—

3

;

Women

6
6
6

3
- 1
3 j
3 |

_

-

- !

- 1

D raftsm en , . j u n i o r ............................................................
M a n u factu rin g ......................................... ............. ....
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ......................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...............................

20h

—!
- ,

_

_ ,

_

~

!
!
1
I

""

-

*

____ 1

“ 1

17 !
l5
15

2

1

20
16
111
2

J
*

____

_
6

6

66
39
30
9
27
11* !
8

51
21
20 i
1
36
26
1°

1*8
16
'1 3
3
32
31

16
8
8
8
7
1

1
j

29
13
1
*
9
16 !
16
!
_

_

13 |
7
1 i
*
3
8 i

-

-

_

-

_

_

2

_

8 !

-

8

;

h
8

-

8

!

1
*
2

-

i
j
I

-

_

_

-

1
_

_

_

_

_I
_

_
_

-1
_i

~

.
.; -; ~1

.
_
-

j

_

~

_

_

_
_

_

-

_

_

!

_

7
2/ 7

10
1 _____k_
*
6
1
*
2
2
u 3/ 6
1
*
2
2

!
1

i

-

~ i
!

10
10
9
1
-

3
3
_ ;

8

l

5
r 1
1 ;
1

_

_

6
6 !
—
- i
-

„ 1

11
1
*
1
3
7
7

1*5
26
21* !
2 1
19 j
18 ;

1 2 0 .0 0
and
over

_

i

i
1
1

-j
1

_
_

____ i

i

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows:
3 at $125 to 130$ 1 at $135 to ll*0j 1 at $ll*0 to ll*5; 1 at $150 to 155j 1 at $165 to 170.
All workers were at $1?5 to 130.
Workers were distributed as follows: 11 at $30 to 32.50; 11 at $37.50 to 1*0.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table a -3:

Afadntenance and Powek Plant Occupation^

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an
area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance .
Manufacturing........
Durable goods •••••
Nondurable goods ••
Nonmanufacturing •••••
Public utilities *
Retail trade ......
Finance ** ........
Services ..........

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

383
---30o
57
21*9
77
11
26
18
17

$
2.09
2.11*
1.83
2.21
1.91
1.79
2.19
1.93
1.56

©

a
*

’>

c

>

2, 2.50 2.60
uhdeJ i.iq i.i5j i.ao| 1.25 i1.30 1.35 l.i*o!l.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.801.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10| 2.20|2.3o|$
and
$ ! - ! - : - j - :«
*
1.10 i 1.15 1.20 1,25; 1.30 1.35 1 . 1*0 i.l*5i 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.851.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 . 10 ; 2 . 5^ 2.60 over
10

1

3
2

13
11

8
3

25 _21
23
23
-

2 !

2

_21

17
u
13

6

2
-

k

See footnotes at e nd of table.
O c c u pational W a g e Survey, Houston, Tex., J a n u a r y 1 952
*
Tran s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEP A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bur e a u of L a b o r Statistics




10

16

12

10

19
10
10
9!

5
3

39 j 133! 15
39 j 1331
39 133
-

-!

-

-

-

8

2

13;
9

l*i

2/6

9
Table A-3:

M cU * tte* U lH C e a n d

P oW & l P la n t

O cC U p cU 404*1

-

Q o 4 iti4 4 4 4 o A

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an
area basis in Houston, Tex., b y industry division, January 1952)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
#*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.


208472
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 0 - 5 2 - 2
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

10,

Tb a 3 ,
a le -

M aintenance and Powe* Plant Occupation* - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an
area basis in Houston, Tex*, by industry division, January 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRA IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

—

1|08
3BT
33
281
9fi
16

3
9

Finance * * ................... ..................
Services .................... ................... .

20

1.96
2.07 ""
1.67
2.11
1.67
2.33
l.fifi
l.fil

1.80 1.85 1.90

Pine fitters, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing ............................... .. ...................................................................
Durable goods ..............................................................................................
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • ............... ................ .. ..............

366
366
56
310
56

—

-

-

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

9

6

9

3

-

2

.%-

h
-

9

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

_

*

—

•

!
_

-

_

-

2.10

-

2

1
1
1.

_

_

_

-

!

_

-

-

-

_

-

1

-

»

3
_

-

2.11

-

21
19
18
1
2

6

-

-

-

-

»

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

8

1.95 2.00

-

1
3?
- ! 23
1
22 !
1
lfi

-

7
7
1

1

2

2

-

_

3

; 13
IT

!

-

-

fir -

W
~

6

_

5

97

—

-

9
-

2

2

-

-

3
•
\

2.36

Tool-and-die m a k e r s .............................................. ................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................... ........................................

5

-

2
-

_

5
- —

3

2.23
2.23
1.96
2.27

Sheet-metalworkers, maintenance • ...................................... • • • • • •
Manufacturing .................. .. ........ ..

1 10

3
—i

-

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

!

-

“

!

-

_

_

I

-

_
|

-

-

i

19

-

-

_

-

&

i 15
15

-

2
2

j

-

-

1
1 -- —
-

■1
L
J

-

-

-

63

fifi ! 63

191
191 !

8

fifi

15
fi8

11
9

-

1
1

1

2
2
2
2
*

I
|

-

- j

1

-

_

_
1

_

•
-

-

1

3
3 r
6

22
22

15 I
15

9

-

-

-

26

11
6

fio
fio

f
i

-

fifi

“

2.60 over

.

8
8

18
18

$

and

21
21
2
19

_

-

«. ,

,

•

“

_
,

2.20 2.30 2. fiO 2.50

j

!

$

2.30 2.fi0 2.50 2.60

53 i
r_53~

_

-

_

-

_

19

2.05 2.10

“

19 !

«. :
;

$

$
$
$
2.10 2.20

17 ! 10 75 122
1 17 ! 10 ~ W 106 i
_
i .
.
1 2
68 106
3
51
10
17
1
16
7
5

1

|
I

-

-

!

_

fi
fi

-

1

‘“

-

_

*

TTl

-

_

.
“

fi

-

!

-

“

-

i

lfi

1

_

-

|

i

$

2.00 2.05

1.75

1.20

Painters, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ............... •••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••.................. ••••••
Nor— aiuifacturing ......... .
P.f.II f t w t a __________________________ _________ _

k
$
$
$
1
$
1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l . f i O 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70
$
1.10 1.15
1.25 1.30 1.35 l.fiO 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75

Average
hourly
earnings

2l1

-

_ _ _ _
i
1/

%
%
v

Excludes premium pay for overtime and
All workers were at $2*60 to 2.70,
Workers were distributed as follows:
All workers were at $1.05 to 1.10.
Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:

night work.
11 at 90 to 95 cents; 7 at 95 cents to $1.
6 at $1 to 1.05; 6 at $1.05 to 1.10.
11 at 90 to 95 cents; 1 at 95 cents to $1; 8 at $1 to 1.05; 5 at $1.05 to 1.10.

Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table A-fiz

G u d io d u U ,

W

C

H

i

d

S / u p fU H f G cC U p a tiO tU

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

I$

$

0.6010.65

Under

$
S
$
$
$
1$
I
0.70 0.75 0.80 0.65 0.90

$

$
0.60

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons)
Manufacturing ••••................... .........
Guards ............................................
Manufacturing ........... ......................
Durable goods ............................ .
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nomazrufacturing.................. ...........

See footnotes at end of table,




.65

•TO: .75

$

1.52

n

18 1.25
7

1

.80

.85

.90

.95 1.00 x

iJ

1.57

2fi6
~22lT
I
23*
85
151
251

1.66
1.28
1.88
.85

_
_

I

$

0.95 1.00 1.05

“

$
$
$
1.10 1.15

-

-

92 __ 3 k
2
_
2

_16
-

_
-1
-]

1
*

*

90|

'

&

76

!

22

. __ 36
6
6
30
'

$

.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35
11 ___ I
7

11

_!
_

$

1.20 1.25 1.30

.
-

16
16
16
"

23

2
2
21

8
8
8

12
12
3
3
3

$
$
$
$
$
s
!
1.35 l.fiO i.fi5 i.5o 1.60

$

1.70 1.80

i.a> l.fi5 l.5o 1.60

8
8

-

37
37
37

2
2
2

12
12
12 1
12 1
12 1
5
5

_J0_
70

32

1
1
1

-

2fi
2fi
-

2fi

$
;
$
1.90 2.00

■
$

2.10 2.20

and
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 jover

1.70 1.80

fil

i

21 j
21 ;

!
1

22 i
22
1
21

5
5

-

-

-

fi3 L s i
fi3 ; *7
- 1
-

.
-

-

fi3 j

Si

1

‘

’

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston Tex., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11,

'Table A - s
U

G u & tod icU ,

WateUotUitUf,r 04id

SUifXfLUUj, O ccu p a tion *

- C o n tin u ed

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Houston, Tex., by industry division, January 1952)

.Tanitnrs, porters, and cleaners (men) „
Manufacturing ••.....................
Durable g o o d s ....................
Nondurable goods ............ .
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ........
Retail trade ................. .
Finance * * ................. ......
Services ..........................

U
N mer A
ub
verage
nderj
o
f
h rly U 0.60
ou
in
w ers earn gs
ork
*
!
0.60 -65
$
3,660 0.93
198 219
i;i6o 1.17
ll* ll*
519 1.10
61*1 1.22
1U 11*
.81
2,500
18U 205
_
1(08
.96
.92
207
96 193
l,2l|6
.75
.81
21 10
321
2
.80 y 6 ?
318

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women)
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Durable goods .... ................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing .............. .
Public utilities * •••.•••••••••»•
Wholesale t r a d e .........
Retail trade ....... ....... .......
Finance * * ........... ............
Services •••••................... .

1,1*8
97
29
68
1,351
95
29
88
619
520

Occupation and industry division

Order fillers .................... .......
Manufacturing .................. .
Durable g o o d s .... ............. ..
Nondurable goods ••••••.... ......
Nonmanufacturing....................
Wholesale t r a d e ................. .
Retail trade ......................
Packers .................................
Manufacturing ....... ................
Nonraanufa c t u r i n g ..... .
Wholesale trade ...................
Receiving c l e r k s ........... ....... .
Manufacturing ................... ..
Durable g o o d s ............. .......
Nondurable goods *............ .
Nonmanufacturing ............... ..
Wholesale trade ......... .
Retail trade ................ ..
Shipping clerks .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................
Durable g o o d s ............ ........
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing....................
Wholesale trade ........... ...... .
Retail trade ......................
Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..........
Manufacturing ....... .................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonraanufacturing.............. ......
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade ••••............. .

---

907
115
no
682
k9k

187

—

N M E O W R E S R C IV G 1T A E -T E H U L E R IN S O —
U B R F O K R E E IN S R IG IT IM O R Y A N G F
$ i$
$
$
$ |$
!
i
$ i$
$
$
$
$ 1
.
$
$ „$
.7O
0.65 iO 1 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1 .25 1.30 1.35 1.1(0 X.li5 i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80; 1.90 w

.6? J 1*31 170
•9o
1.07
.91*
.65
1*31 170
.98
•
.99
20
.67
7
•69 y 75 60
.50 §036 103
_
l.lU
"t S i ~
1.32
•
1.51
.
1.05 | ! 1.07 1 .99
-

377 1.1(1
,"1760 —
139 i 1.08
106 : i.i3
258 1.38
95 1.59 !
6U 1.65 j
31 l.lili i
163 1.26 i
U 1.25 !
7
103 1.25 j

-

_i
217 1.U7
.
103 1.63
1*5 1.66
58 1.61
111* 1.33
->
51 1.29
5U 1.31
-;
_
1.38
657
192“ 1.5U
^
116 1.52 1 76 1.56 |
1*65 1.31
1.36
n 3
219 1.33
132 1.23

-;
-■
-

. ,10 1.20
1
and
.70, .75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1(0 1.1(5 1.5C 1.60 1.70 1.80!:1.90 2.00! 2.10 2,,20 over

75
_
75
3
18
51*
-

18 5 #
- U
5
- 12
- 33
18 1*91
. 12
20
u*
u 1(59
-

19
2

15 106
2
2
15 10k
- 86
15 18
_ 13
3
- 10
3
_
1

27
1
*
1
*
23
6
17
•
-

.1
-,
-1

-:
“
_
#r
-

See footnotes at end of table.


*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
** Finance,
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ insurance, and real estate.
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

12U 207
80 93
81 81
5 12
38 u k
16 92
3
ll 5
3
15 17
3?i 30! .
16

ll|*» 262 380 1(57 385 267 163,j 219
- ll* 53 X T 82 6l 1*6
9 39 26
3 55!
- ll* 1 * 29 56 61 1*3 18
*1
206 117! 11*6,
11*5 21(8 327 389 303
16 76 30 29 77 31
- 1*8 33 31* 12
2 52|
Hi5 211 11*5 209 102 ! 72 25 l*oj
8 U
5 86 55 1*7! 65
6
5
- 32 32 16 90 | 28

communication, and other public utilities.

-

1*0
-

25
2

32

2
17 1*0
- i 22
-: 2
6
2
9 12
2
2

2
23
-

32
31
.
1

3
3
3
-

1
1

1
*
3
3
1
-!
20
6
11*
12
10

-

-

-

12
-

-!

-

-

-

-

_

21 121
i5
15
6 121
- 111
6 10

2
_
2
2
.
-

n
- ! 11
i 1
*
7
•

57
1*5
1*3
2!
12
12
•
-

78|
77
1*5
32
1
i,
-

l*o
3o|
30
10
6
k

-

-

13
13
-

1*3 _36
8
8
1*3 28
3k
28
9

27
2
2
25

16
6
8
8
8

9 l k 101 33 119 |
9 u * 97 33 n 9 1
-i
9 - ll* 97 ! 33 n 9
- « ; -.
1*
- - ! >: - 1
* - - - /- !
_
-1 .
! -! _

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_

-!
-;
-;
.

-

-

-

.
_; .

.
.
-

-

23
157
58 157
12 138
1*6 19
70

12
12

lk

11*
8

30
7
30
28

21
3
18
6

35
3
32
30

28
28
21
6

6
6
6

3
2
2
1
-■
_ 30! U|
18
!
- — — 2;
. : -; _ 1 2
_i -1
2
18
3°
- ; - 27
2
18
3
~

19,
10 19
3
9 | 16
3
.
3
3
-

-

30
30

16
16
9
7

77 ! 106
35 ! 97
33 : 95!
21 2
1*21 9!
6
35
2! •
5
3

12
-

121 12
1
1
2 i*
8

l+ i 1+
o
2
. ! 33
11
- 22
1*0
9
1
2k

16

7

l;

51*
5
1*6
3

3
3
3

5?
26
26
33
22
n
16
ll*
2
-

3
3

•-

5 ii(
“ 6
6
8
5
3
5
5

20
20
1
*
1
*
1
*

2
3
k\ 12 1
- — —n !
-i .
• j -i
_; .
-! n |
2
a; 1!
3
1
3! 1! ll
3| 1
37:_23_ I18 13
6
n
- 11
-!
-;
6
*8;
7
37 12 1
2
2
1
*
k
2 + - 12
1
3
*
Hi 10 32

2k
1

1
*
-

2 13! 3
2 12 ! 3
1 1 1 -

25
23
23
2
2

2
2
2
-

k

®
uj
_!
u
k\
«
u

1*2
3
30

17
16
9|
7l
1
1

_
-,
.
•;
-;
j in
18 _23_ „ j
- 1 23; " 1
in
"1
- ! 18
- 18 , 1
5 13; 5; 4
U
5
5
1
5
l*i
1
*
-'
. 13
.
n
-; 2
-;

37
30
12
18
7
7

17
ll*
6
8
3
3
-

11*
5 1
1!
*
1 1
9i
“:

18 39_k2_ 20 26
15 17 1*9 18 15
6! 17 35 18 i 1
*
_ n
9
ll*
2 11
3 22
- 1 11
- 22 2
3
- -

26
12
12
11*
iu
5
1
*1
2!
2
lj
-

5
2
2
3
3
1i
*
1r
1
.
3
3;

k

r
I*
.
-

7
7

1*7
5
5

32..
32
-1
32
-!
"i

21*
2l*l
.
-

25 __Si]__ \&l 26 _2£_ 38
- 11*1 3 9 17 ! 23
- 11
9 17 | 21
3
•
2
3
8 15
25 69 1(5 17
. 52 1*0 3
6
2 9
9
7
6
2 5
2
25 10

1
i
|
!

28
-;
. i
28 !
28 !
-

21
10
6
1
*
n
n

-

_
. 1
.
.'
•1

9
5
1
3
3
-

1*9
1*6
17
31
1

1*1
10
10
31

3
3

1
*

30
1

2

2

6;
1!
.
11
5:
5

7; _
7
•
7
•
.
.
8!
8i
8
.
9
X
3
1
5
5

.
5
5
5
_
.
7
7
7
-

16
.
16

5 15
3 12
3
- 6/12
2

3

16
*

2j

3

*

12,

T b a GudtodixU, lAJateUan&itUf, and SUipfUny Occnpationd - Continued
a le -1;:
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Houston, T e x #, by industry division, January 19$2)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................... .
Manufacturing ....................... ................
Durable g o o d s .................................. .
Nondurable goods ................................
Norsaanufa c t u r i n g ........... ................... •••••
Public utilities * ................... ..........
Wholesale t r a d e .................................
Retail trade ....................................

a,$6$>
1,9U9
1,123
826
2,620

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) .................
Manufacturing ................. ................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ...................... ......... .
Wholesale trade ............................ •••••
Retail trade ............... ...... ...............

780

Truck drivers, medium (1% tons to and including I tons)
*
Manufac t u r i n g ............... ........... ...........
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable g o o d s ............ ................... .
N onmanufacturing................. ........... .
Wholesale t r a d e ............ ................
Retail t r a d e .... ........ .......................

767

967
882

99
681
l$0
10$
1,552

Average
hourly Under
earnings
*
0.60
i
1*08
1*20
1.30
1*07
*99
1.17
1.00
.83

332
1,065
398
U2U

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons, trailer type) •••••
*
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........••••..... .............. .
N o n manufacturing............... ...... ......... ••••
Retail t r a d e ....................................

387
126
261
33

9
.91

22
37

75

17
17
16

-

36
36
36

75

-

.
1*28
1.1*9

1*06
1.08
.97
! 1.10
! 1.1*5
! 1.39
; 1.05
I

-

1.35
.95
.9fT i
.99
.97
.90
.96
.85
1.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

.80

.90

.85

-

-

-

513 256 256
325 68 a$
3 - 1 27
n
325 67 22
509 188 j 188 1 207
-!
88
133 5? i 87 81
376 131 1(0 38
103 78 1 60 13a

67
-

3

-

67
67

3
3
”

259 ! 15
11
2
9
2ae
5
! 15
s 2as
-

23
17
17
6
6
-

_

6
1
5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

*i

-

-

•
- 1
-

-

-

-

-

2?

2

-

-

-!

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

_,
-

21
-

ia

11 !
-

i i 11

-

-

2i
-

2

-

1

-

-

-

21
9
10
2

9
a
n
83
25
57

-

_
-

392
112
12
100
280
31
213
36

13a
12
53

ia :
3
6a
57
n
2
52
ai

-

-

-

.95 1.00

523
ia

6
97
50
a2

1.00 i.Q5

$
$
1.10 I.

$
,

1.05 1.10

1.15 II.

_
-

7
7
7
.

-

-

16
18
18 16

$

595

258
73
73
26 185
7a
3
6 1 98
13
17

a7$
30a
117
a

5
79
1
78
12

3
2

U
a

6

12
3

18
18
-

a
a
_
-

25
2a
1
15

25
1
2a
10
ia

7
7

_

.

135

-

-

-

_

11
10
10
1

13
12
2
10
1

-

60

527

39
29
10
21
-

518
2
7
-

20
1

2
5

29
7
22
19
3

-

7

as
as

17
-

-

17
-

2
a
2a
36 21
n
18
.

.

25

ia
a

3

8

31

19

18

7

7

10
8
1

3
_

-

-

22
22
22
_

3

m
m
-

1

.
_
.
.
.

.
_

-

-

-

3
3

.
-

I

7

:

31
!
1

15
ia
ia

_
_
_

I

-

-

-

22

62
53
16

6
6
16
6
-

12
3
9
-

83
13
70
1

36
9
27

5°
as

1
1
-j

31
31
20
11

53
af-

-

_
.
-

.

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
•
•
•

.
.
.

-

-

10

1

9

32
1
31
221

1
9
-

— I

30 ,
- ; 30
- '
-

-

9

r ^ 9
-

. ,

2

9
-

-

•

-

-

a

2
2 |

_

3

2
2

1

1
:
. ;

1
•

- j

- j

-

-

20
12
3

8
8
-

_
.
.
.

-

9

!

-

_ j

3
2

_ f

j
_ |---- —

2
1
1

_

_ ,

--

Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work*
Data lim ited to men workers except where otherwise indicated*
7 / Workers were distributed as follow s: 2 at 35 to 1*0 cents; 1b at 1*0 to 1*5 cents; 11 at 1+ to 50 cents; 19 at 50 to 55 cents; 21 at 55 to 60 cents*
5
I*/ A ll workers were at 35 to 1*0 cents*
5 / Workers were distributed as follow s: 37 at 30 to 35 cents; 128 at 35 t o 1*0 cents; 37 at 1*0 to 1*5 cents; 108 at 1*5 to 5C cents; 6 at 50 to 55 cents; 20 at 55 to 60 cents.
6 / Workers were distributed as fo llo w s: 8 at §2.20 to 2*30; 1 at §2*30 to 2.1*0; 3 at §2*1*0 to 2.50.
7 / Workers were distributed as fo llo w s: 10 at 1*5 to 50 cents; 1 at 50 to 55 cents.
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s), communication,and other p ublic u t i l i t i e s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




-

-

•
.
.
_

-

3!

;

l/

-

.
.

21
21
.
-

-

16
! 2k
a
23
6
56

5
3
3
2
2

6
6
6
.
.

52
25
$a
53
25
53
31
28
25
3 !
i $3
21
_
21
22 | _
- j “

i

76
20

2.10 2.20 over

6
6
_
-

_

a6

12
12
t

.
_
-

-

«
.
3
3
*

-

37
9
6
3

23. 18
-; -

«
.

.

15
15
-

.
19
19 - 1i 231 71
1i 23 71
1 2 53

•

-

10

2

-

22
9 21
9 11
10
5 1
5 1
n!
9
.
n 1
9
2 -

3*
9
6

:
$
$
i.8o :
L.90 !2.00 J
2.10 2.20
!
1
1 .
jand

2.00
1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 :
105 100 255
63 85 27 30
105 92 22 61 68 15 27
22
90 a
31 3 12 6
15 51 - 30 65 3 21
8 233
2 17 12 3
- 221
.
6
12
2 17 12 3

ia

3a
-

-

n

132
108
98
10
2a
3
20
1
12
5
7
-

3
.

2a 191
22 62
10 18
12 aa
2 129
2 9
_

520

3
3

38

126 62 52 2 aa aa 23
$
UiT 32
20--- S'
T
77 — 21 l 3 T
7 9 20 6
27
21*
31
50
7
23
21
12 2a 17
ll!
a9 ; #
1
_
12 n
a
3
12 7 11 - 3 17
as
m 8
«
»
m 10
m
1 18 3

$

1.60 1.70

20a
81
29
52
123
a3
69
11

18
35
27a 12a 80 l$a
2 - 100
a3
a3
2 - 100
231 122 80 5a
210
33
15 50 a7 38
_
26 39 a
1
IT
22; 2 ao
a
12 - 13
a

1

-

$
1$
|
$
$
$
$ , $
1.20; 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.aoa . a $ 1.50
15

ao

a5

120 19
91
7
12
29

9
3
2 --- 2
2
2
1
7

15
n r
u*
-

1
$

1.25 20
1.30 1.35 i.ao !i.a5 I

$

0.80 0.85 0.90 0.9$

_

_

1.19

.70

-

_

1*18

1.1(3
l.air"
i.a2
i.a8
i.ao

113

-

-

388
--- 2 8 5 '
180
105
103

553
--- 308“
169
139
2a$
a3

18

-

Truckers, poser (fork-lift) ........................ ..*
Manufacturing ......... •••••••••...... .............
Durable goods * .......... ........................
Nondurable goods •••••...........................
Nonmanufacturing ................................••••

95

75
-

_

1.19

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......... ......

.75

-

—

W a t c h m e n .... ••••••............. .................. .
Manufa c t u r i n g ................................. .
Durable goods ............................ •••••••
Nondurable goods ................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................... ........ .
Wholesale trade *......... •••••..................
Retail trade ........ ......... ......... ••••.....
Finance ** ••«•••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Services .................... ...... ..............

.70
-

a
-

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons, other than
*
trailer type) ................... .....................
Nonmanuf a c t u r i n g ..... ....................... .

269

.65
18
18
-

a
-

.97
1.3U
*92
. a

— w r

155

£.60 o.65 0.70 0.7$

1
\

_ ;
« i
— ;

_ j

-

I

—

-

m

« 1
|

-|

M
-

!

-

-

13,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35i

M O c U in & U f,

1/

9

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRA IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

O c c u p a tio n 2 /

Assem blers, cla s s 5 ........................ .................................... ..
Assem blers, c la s s C ..........................................................................

M ach in e-tool o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c la s s A 6 / ............. ..
A +nm -fir*— a+Vo opi rof' r r q r»l aQcA
n
a
]
>
v*
irr
ii
D r ill-p r e s s o p e r a to r s , r a d ia l, c la s s A ......... .................
D r ill-p r e s s o p e r a to r s , s in g l e - o r m u ltip le -s p in d le ,
f>]
A i t . i l •■■TI Ti Ti i I - I tI I TTI i t l t t r- - - i l i i i i ri
nc— a+ o r p a +ArQ
| .H * \
■
cc A _ 1( i i i i - - - i i i i i i t
O Hn rHng-ma r*hi np npp i-a hnr*.t? p la s^ A t - - TT- - TttTTtT- T
t
M illing-m achine o p e ra to rs, c la s s A ...................................
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to rs , hand (in clu d in g hand screw
m achine), c la s s A ..................................................................

M ach in e-tool o p e ra to rs , p ro d u c tio n , c la s s B 6/

............ ..

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 1*0 1.U 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 . 1*0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0
earnings
$
and
1 .2 0
3/
2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 . U0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 over
1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 I .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0

205
25);
192
13?
%

$
1.79
1.63
1.36
1.91
1.23

1,302

1.85

76

2.01
1.6U

h3
211
28
77

1 .7 5
2.01
1.81
1.87

-

-

511

1.85

~

_

78U

1.76

-

3

h8

7

9

0
62

33

8

26

3

U/19

6

..
35

2
5
35

2
8
11

Hi
1

hi
-

2h
50
2

<
31
2
x

5 /lh

10
12
a
j

106

21

12
1

18

13
1
50

1
2b

1
2

-

21

1
7

2

-

3

78

77

396

197

93

71

10

156

lit

12

16

b

x

6

25

x

5
_

1?

k

15

57

31

37

x

_

_

6

_

2

9

9

2

6

5

3

10

lh

11

a
j
a
20

7

2i
Ia
JO
3
6

oa
0

8

2
8

-

-

7

_

_

.

2

_

h

_

_

1
X

j

2

1
.
u

j

aI

a

8

1

_

b

_

_

8

16

10

7

11

1

b

2

-

1
*

b

b

b

8

8

7

b

2

1

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

2

0

2

5

6

5

1

1

-

1

1

_

1

3

5

2

1

1

_

_

1

1

-

-

-

2

-

35

19

16
10
1

7

2

195

57

51

17

318

68

6

-

6 .

_

2
~

2

32

Hu

t

1*6

17

•22

16

27

16

23

30

11*8

27

13

-

-

I
_1

12

-

Q 12
y
2

h

5

-

7

12
51
6

5

6

5
3

x
x

5
6

2

13

2

5

6

18

6

7

8

5

8

3h

59

U2

10

13

11

b

35

-

107

5

-

-

7

2

F)ri I 1— tps a nppra t,nr a } r*ad i al ^ n la a s R
p
rn. TT«
r«.ng ■ — a+ p App rvi t.o r < } plaas K _TT- T__ _____ - ___ t Tt
?
1 .h
>
\?
T u r re t-la th e o p e ra to rs, hand (in clu d in g hand screw
m achine), cla s s B ............................................................ ............................ .......................

31

I .55
1.76

67

I .6 3

-

-

-

M a ch in e-tool o p e r a to r s , p ro d u c tio n , c la s s C 6 j . . o . . . . 0

367

1.1*8

11

16

35

59

*

1

-

11

u

5

h

3

h
3

6

5

3

2

5

1

3h

_

1
*

2

_

21

8

16

13

3

3

h

1

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

-

_

_

.

81*

136

22

137

61*

1*2 158

11
56

D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs, r a d ia l, c la s s C ........... .
D r iii-n r e r s o p e ra to rs, s in g l e - or m u ltip le -s p in d le ,
M illing-m achine o p e ra to rs , cla s s C ...................................
T u rret-la th e o p e ra to rs , hand (in clu d in g hand screw
m achine), c la s s 0 .................................................... ............ ..

M a ch in ists, p r o d u c t i o n ......... ..........................................................
T o o l-a n d -d ie makers (o th e r than t o o l-a n d -d ie job b in g
shops) ............................ ............ ........................... ......................... ..
W elders, hand, c l ass A ......... .....................................................

3

2

U

-•

x

3h

1 .26

9
81

I .3 3
1.72

-

113

1 .3 8

*
*

b62

1 .9 5

12

Ilk
• 51°

2.12
lo97

I18

1
_
15

2h

9

1

19

102

1*8
6 1

_
-

-

b

13

7
28
lh

25
13

3

1

5

-

1

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (I9h5 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952

3/
y

5/
6/
7/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and
night work.
Workers were distributed as follows* 10 at $1 to 1.05; 6 at $1.10 to 1.15; 3 at
Workers were distributed as follows* 1 at 75 to 80 cents; 5 at $1.05 to 1.10; 5
*

$1.15 to 1.20.
at $1.10 to 1.15.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
All workers at $1.




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor

Statistics

i/

Table B-5452:

Occupation 2 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Number hourly
earnings
of
workers
i/

$
0.75
and
under
.30

$
0.35
_

%

0.30
_

%

Filling-machine tenders
Order f i l l e r s ................
Pasteurizers ..................
R efrigerator men ..........
Washers, can, machine •,

19
30
13
27
7

____ iSQ..,.

-

3

1 .2 8
.99
1.05

1.00

3
-

~

"H

2
H
1

%

1.10

-

1.15

1.15

1.20

8
15
1
3

-

6
3

..

%

1.10

1.05
_

_ 1.05

"

_
6
-

1.15
1.06

0.95
_

.95...

..- . t i s . .

■

$

i
1.00

"H P

0.90
■_,

1

1
1.20

~ ~ l --------

2
5
2
-

3
-

4
3

1.30

1.30

.1.25

“ 1 ------1.35

%

1.25

1.35

2
_
4

-

-

-

1.50

1.45

1
_
1
_
“

_

“

%

1.45

1.40

_

2
-

$
1.40

_
1
_
-

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIG HT-TIM E W E EK L Y EARNINGS OF-

Occupation g /

■»---- $
I
1 ---- $
¥“
Number Average
I
¥
weekly
Under 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00
of
earnings $
workers
k/
■5 5 *0 9 . ■52tSQ, 60.00 62*20 65.00 62x50 70.00! 72.50 72x00

Routemen (driver-salesm en), r e t a il 2 / •
•
Routemen (driver-salesm en), wholesale j>/

1/
2/
2/
4/
2/

$

82.50
91.50

299
120

16

13
12

16

17
7

16
2

1

]
J
¥
1 ----- ¥-------- $
$
I ----85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110 .0 0 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 HO. 00
and
80.00 85.00 90.00 95.QQ loaoo 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 125x00 1AQ.0Q

75.00

15

28
10

47

1

$
¥
¥
$
$
^
-¥
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

14

37
13

18

21
15

15

13
3

The study covered r e t a il milk dealer establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the d istrib u tion o f dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial C la ssifica tion Manual (1949
e d ition ) prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget.
Data lim ited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
Straight-tim e earnings (includes commission earnings).
Routemen normally work a 6-day week.

Table B-63:

A verage

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIG HT-TIM E W E EKLY EARNINGS OF—

2/

$
I$
$
1$
T!
$
15. 00 I17.50 J0.00 J 2.50 3 5 .0 0 3 7 . 5 0 ijO.OO 1x2.50 S5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 . 5 0 l o . o o ' 6 5 . 0 0 70.00 75.00 1 0 . 0 0 1 5.00 9 0 .0 0 ! *9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 . (
Weekly
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
j
| (Standard) (Standard) under 1
80.00
72.50
2 7 . 5 0 1 3 0 . 0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 4 0 . 0 0 1*2.50 XS .00 4 7 . 5 0 5 o .o o 5 2 . 5 o f 5 5 . o o i 5 7 . 5 o ! 60.00 65.00 70.00 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 .0 0 : 9 5 . 0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 105 . <
n-----------7
1
------------ 1
!

Men
Clerks:
Accounting
General . . ,
Section heads
Underwriters ,

4 1 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

13

14

*
6 4 .5 0
5 1 .5 0
7 7 .5 0

38.5

7
8

_

;

8 6 .0 0

1

2
-

-

-

!

-

-

2
-

:

-

!

i

1

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

2

-

!

1

-

_

1
-

1
1

;
!
;

i

2
2

1

3
-

-

!

4

1 3
i 3

2

-

-

-

!

-

3

!

Women
Clerks:
Accounting ......................................................
Correspondence, cla ss A ............................
G en e ra l............................................................
Premium-ledger-card ....................................
Underwriter ....................................................
Key-punch operators ..........................................
Premium acceptors ..............................................
Section heads ......................................................
Stenographers, general ....................................
Typists:
Class A ...........................................................
Class B ....................................................... ...
Underwriters...................................... ................ *

2

3

1

i

49
lU

68
67
33
45
15
33
64
45
132
7

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
41.0
! 39.5
! 4 2 .5
| 39.5
1 39.5
1
! 3 9 .5
:

3 9 .0

1 4 1 .5

48.50
48.50
45.50
3 7 .0 0

46.00
39.00

3
-

45.50
38.50
75.00

-

9

_

14

-

-

-

3
15
6
10

5
9

5
14

3
8
13

-

1

-

4
3
-

;

3

3

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2

_

_

_

_

4 2 .0 0

65.50
48.50

-

2

-

2
12

6

-

-

6

25

10

-

-

-

-

-

6

i
!

44
_

4
1

7
-

1

3
1
15
1

5

2

2

4
6
2
5

1
2

-

3

_
;

7
3
13
! 6
4
3

5

14

9
33

16
12

5

-

-

7
3
6

2

2

-

-

2

3

-

1

-

3

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

.

_

3

3
“

6
2
1
17

-

_
.
.

-

-

7
6

9

2

1

1

-

-

-

5
5

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

l

-

-

1

2

3

-

-

-

7

5

2

-

-

-

-

2

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the—Budget.
2/

Hours r e fle c t the workweek fo r which employees receive th eir regular straight-tim e sala ries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, T ex., January 1952
U.S. D
EPARTM T O LABO
EN F
R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistic s

15

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

H ulldU uf Ga+ut>iucUan

Table C-15:

P A sU tb itU f

Table C-27:

Table C-4-1:

JlcCdl <
7'U**Uit

O peteU itU f Zm fU oifeeA
April 1, 1 3 '
?>2
Rate
per
hour

Classification

B r i c k l a y e r s .......... ....... . . . . . . . . . . ........
C a r p e n t e r s . . . . . . . . . . . .............. • . . . ...... .
Electri c i a n s ........ „ ..........................T „
Painters . . . . . . .o«.......to.
P l a s t e r e r s ........ ............... ........ .
Plumbers
Building laborers

. . . . . . . ................... ...

$3,175
2.1*00
2. 7 5 0
2.275
3.000
2.750
I.li75

Hou r s
per

liO

B ook

and

Uo
l*o
ho
ho
ho

B i n d e r y w o m e n ............... ... ................ ... .........
B o o k b i n d e r s .............. ........................
C o m p o s i t o r s , h a n d .............................
E l e c t r o t y p e r s ................... ... ........ .

B a h & lied ,

B r e a d and c ake - M a c h i n e shops;
F o r e m e n ........................................................................................
D o u g h m i x e r s , i c i n g m i n e r s , s p o n g e r s ....
O v e r me n ...................... .. ..............................................................

B r e a d w r a p p e r s , s l i c e r s , p a c k e r s ......................
P a n g r easers, p a n and b r e a d rack e r s . . . . .
Greasing-machine operators, female, cake
wrapping-machine operators, female
W r a p p e r s and i c ers, f e male;
F i r s t 3 0 da y s ............ ...
c 0 . . . . . 0. .
N e x t 6 0 da y s . . . . . . . . . . c . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A f t e r 90 d a y s

............................................................coo

Hours
per
week

$lo725

I .0
4

lo550

1,500

Mixers,

bakers

m en,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . ................

icing mixers

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

spray machinemen,

icing mixers'

operators,

Packers,
I c ers,

female

helpers,

•

•

•

•

,

.

. c , , . . , . .

.................................................. ........................... ...

2.613
2,613
2.800
1.900
1.970
2.21*0
2.380

| 1*0
1*0

1.950
2.01*0
2.130

1*0
1*0

..o.ooo...,.oooooooo,.o.o...o

2.6 9 3

37?

Compositors,

1 .1 5 0
1,3 0 0

ho
ho

1,275

1*0

1 .1 3 0

1*0

,930
,980
I 0O 6O

1*0
1*0
1*0

hand;

D a y w o r k ..................................... ... ....... „ .
Night work o , . , . . , . . , . . . . . . , . , . , , . , . . . .
Machine operators;
D a y w o r k ............... ... .................. ......
N i g h t w o r k ............................. . . . . . . 0
Machine tenders (machinists);
D a y w o r k ............ ... ............. ...
N i g h t w o r k ......... ...
Mailers:
Day w o r k ............. ... ........ ... ......... 0
N i g h t w o r k ....................................................................... ...

• . . . . »

2.666
2.800

37?
37?

2.666
2.800

37?
37 f

2.666
2.800
2.227
2.293

37?
37?
37?
37?

female

1,655
1 .51*5
lcii 90

1*0
1*0
1*0

....................

f e m a l e ..... ............................

D a y w o r k ................. . . . . . e . . , . ...... ...
N i g h t W O r k ............................................................................................
Pressmen, web presses:
D a y w o r k ...................................... ...... ............................. . . . . . . .

N i g h t w o r k ....................................... ..................................... ....... .........
Pressmen-in-charge:
l.ii35
1.325
1,215
1,195
1.170

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

Day work

....................................

Night work
Stereotypers:

July

1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bakery

......................... .. ............................. ..

Beer:
Helpers

Building construction;
U p to 1 ? t ons ..............................
l ! to n s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D u m p t r u c k .......... .. ............. ..
F l a t b e d , o v e r 1 ? t o n s ...................
Concret e - m i x e r truck, lowboy,
w i n c h t r u c k ............................. ..
Cherr dc al . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H e l p e r s ......................................
W i n c h t r u c k ...... ..........................
C o n f e c t i o n e r y .......................................................................
F a c t o r y - A i r c o p r o d u c t s ...................................... ...
H e l p e r s .......................................................
F u m i t u r e ................... ......... ..........
H e l p e r s ......................... ..................................
General - Freight:
T . o c a l ................. ....................... .. ............................. ............
H e l p e r s ... .............................. .
L o c a l c a r t a g e ............................... . . . . . . 0
B o b - t a i l t r u c k .......................... ..

............................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . o

Day w o r k • • • o o e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N i g h t w o r k ...................... ............................... ... .............

37?

2.973

37?

2.1*87

37?

2.671

35

A g r e e m e n t A ..................... ..
H e l p e r s ..............................

2.553

37?

A g r e e m e n t B ......................................... ..
H e l p e r s .............................

2.71*3

35

2.560
2.693

37?
37?

Helpers
Transport:

.........................................................................

Mail-order house
Helpers
M i l k - W h o l e s a l e .......................................................
R a i l w a y e x p r e s s . • • • • • . ......................

Occupational Wage Survey,

Houston,

Hours
per
week

Tex.,

$1,265

1*8

1.375

......................... ............................................

2.820

0

51
51
51
51

d fe lfie M

37$
37?
1*0

1*0

$1 ,3 0 0
1.330
1.360
1.390

Hours
per
week

S b lio e b d

Table C-42:i

37?
37$

Newspapers;

icing

......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




.

. . . c o o , . . . . , . . , , . , . , . . , ............... ...

Busses:
First 3 months o.......................
1—9 month S « e . e o e . o o o « o o o . e e » o . o e o . . . . o
*
10-15 months ........................
After 15 months ••••............... ..

37?
37?

ho

cutter-

m a c h i n e s e t - u p m e n ............... o . . . . . .
Fioormen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine

3 presses
I presses
4
Stereotypers

• • • • • ...................... . . . . . . . . . .

2.720

1*0
1*0

Photoengravers:

R o l l e m e n . 0 . « • . . 0 . . 0« . . 0 •.. 0 .. •... 0 0 . . 0 0
M i x e r s ’ helpers, dough feeders, trough
handlers,

2-color presses
P r e s s m e n , plat e n ;
1 o r 2 pr e s ses .

2 o6l3

1*0

C r a c k e r s and c o o k i e s ;
Machinemen,

.......... ... ........... ...

2-color presses
....................................
P r e s s m e n , c y l i n d e r ............................................................. ...

Henchmen, machiremen, counters, checkers,
o v e n d u m p e r s and l o a d e r s , w e i g h - u p men,
scaling-machine operators, cake
d u m p e r s , i n g r e d i e n t s c a l e r s , checkers;

female bread twisters and
panners .................. ................ ,

operators

$1,270
2.21*0

Rate
per
hour

Classification

week

j ob shops;

M a c h i n e t e n d e r s ( m a c h i n i s t s ) ...............
P h o t o e n g r a v e r s ................................. . . . .................................................
P r e s s a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s ...........................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per

i*o

July 1, 1951

Classification

Ra t e
per
hour

Classification

week

Machine

Table C-205:

October 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

1*0

1.1*50
1.525

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

1.625
1.700
1.800
1.61*0
1.500
1.800

1*0
1*0

1.225
1.1*30
1.280
1.01*0

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
51*

.91*0

51*

1.270

5o

1.220

50
50

1.170
1.170
1.050
1.295
1.175
1.265
1.215
1,350
1.200
. 926
1.61*1

50
50
50
50
50
50

l*o
i*o
1*8
1*0

J a n u a r y 1 952

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

D:
Table D-i:

Entrance Rates

Minimum CutAauoe Rated. < o Plant Wa/tJtaAA.
^n

1/

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in -

E:

Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

Nondurable
Durable
All
goods
|
goods
Whole­
IndusPublic
Retail Serv­
sale
Establishments with tries
trade ices
utilities*
trade
501 or
501 or
2/
21-100 101-500
21-100 101-500
workers workers more
workers workers more
workers
workers

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table K-i :

Bttif/t Tbi^eoantial PtoUUdtaHd.
Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in All manufacturing industries 1/

All establishments ......
Under 40 ...............
40 .....................
Over 4- and under 4 5 ....
0
45 .....................
Over 45 and under 50 ....
5 0 .....................
Over -50 and under 5 5 ....
55 .....................
Over 55 and under 60 ....
6 0 .....................
Over 60 and under 65 ....
65 .....................
Over 65 and under 70 ....
7 0 .....................
Over 70 and under 75 ....
75 .....................
Over 75 and under 80 ....
8 0 .....................
Over 80 and under 85 ....
85 .....................
Over 85 and under 90 ....
90 .....................
Over 90 and under 95 ....
95 .....................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
100 ....................
Over 100 and under 105 ..•
105 ....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...

no ....................................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
115 .......... .........
Over 115 and under 120 ...
120 ....................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 ....................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
1 3 0 ....................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
Over 14-0 and under 145 ...
145 ....................
1 5 0 ....................
Over 150 ...............
Establishments with no
established minimum ....

1/
2/
*

100.0
1.9
2.0
2.2
.5
3.3
1.3
1.4
.2
.3
.8
1.2
.8
2.1
.5
1.9
19.4
.9
3.6
1.5
4.9
1.7
2.0
.6
1.1
.6
2.8
5.7
.7
1.2
2.8
1.9
2.1
1.6
.5
4 .4
.8

.4
.1
.7
2.3
2.2
3 .3

7.6

1.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.4
28.4
12.0
4.4
17.0
8.4
7.2
16.8
3.4
-

36.0
9.8
15.1
4.1
4.1
4.8
3.7
4.1
10.1
1.9
6.3
-

_
41.8
8.7

8.6
10.5
5.6
25.0
16.5
13.9
8.2
11.7
-

_
16.3
3.6
5.5
7.2
7.0
5.7
6.0
7.6
10.3
1.1
7.2
6.1
10.4
6.0

_
7.0
9.5
6.5
19.2
12.6
35.3
9 .9

15.4
1.5
.8
1.3
18.7
5.6
2.4
1.1
3.5
2.4
5.4
1.5
1.6
1.0
34.7

38.2
10.4
3.4
12.7
3.8
3.0
1.1
2.1
2 .3
*
-

8 .8

3.2
3.8
28.7
-

3.1

4 .9
2.4
2.6
4.7
3.5
1.3
1.0

.4
2.2

100.0

18.6
3.0
12.8
9.5
1.5
2.8
13.8
2.9
9.8
4.6
4.4
2.3
1.2
.4
7.8
5.6
2.3
1.9
9.8
3.4
8.5
31.2
10.6
17.5
1.1
.1
1.9
1.4
- ■
3.0
.2
.9
-

5.2

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




ioo:o

Shift differential

All
industries

Durable
goods

Nondurable
goods

Machinery
industries

3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, all
establishments ........

16.9

8.5

19.2

7.1

14,4

10.0

24.3

11.1

Receiving shift
differential.... .

15.3

8.5

19.1

7.1

12.2

9.9

24.1

11.1

15.7
8.5
3.4
.3
•4
.4
.3
1.8
.6

8.5

7.1 12.2
_
6.3
(2/) 3.2
5.5
.2
.2
_
.7
.7
.4
.3
1.3

9 .9
2.0
5.4
_
.5
.6
.8
.6

24.1
16.3
7.4
_
.4
-

11.1

1.0
5.5
.1
.6
.3
.6
.4

18.9
10.1
3.5
.5
.5
.8

Uniform percent­
age ............

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other ............

.1

-

.2

-

-

-

-

-

(2/)

.1

.1

.2

Uniform cents
(per hour) ......
4 cents ........
5 cents
6 c e n t s ..... .
7 cents ........
8 cents ........
9 cents ........
10 cents .......
Over 10 cents ...

Receiving no
differential .......

1.1

-

-

3.5
-

2.2

-

8.3
_
1.8
_
1.0
-

'
1/
2/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17,

Sclvbch&Led lAJj&eJzlq Ji&uAA

Table E-2:

PERCENT

O F O F F IC E

1 /EM PLOYED

W ORKERS

PERCEN T

IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in '

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Weekly hours

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

100.0

A11 establishments

A ll

100.0

D u r a b le
goods

100.0

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

100.0

37£ hours ........ ... .............. ... .....
Over 3 7 | - and under 4° h o u r s ...... ... .
4
hours • • • • • ......... ........................................... ...
0
Over 40 and under 44- hours «•••••••••••#
44 hours .................. .............
Over 44- and under 4.8 hours .#••••••••*»•
48 h o u r s ..... ........
Over 4$ hours ........ .

1/
£/
%/
*
**

1

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.2

-

0.3

-

5.9

-

-

0

“

0.5

'

-

_

1

10

0 .

1

78.8
5.0
6.9
5.6
•2
.3

-

-

74.3
4.8
4.1
10.6
.3

83.8
5.3
10.0
.6

-

88.8
.5
6.0
4.2
-

79.7
6.7
6.9
5.8

48.9
19.9
26.8
3.9
.5

-

0

6.0
81.6
-

.6
1.0
.4

.

_

4
Q

-

1

..

1.7

100.0
_

85.2
2.2
5.0
3.0
1.1

-

3.8
3.0
19.0
6.8

2.9
.

4

“

_

3.5

67.4

100.0

1

/)

76.0
1.0
4.4
3.0
10.4
3.5

S e r v ic e s

_

_

_

_

56.7
5.4
6.6
5.8
15.7
8.5

2.3

100.0

R e t a il
tr a d e

*“

.7

51.5
2.3
24.6
19.3

IN —

W h o le ­
sale
tr a d e

100.0

100.0

_

0.3
•3

_

.9

0 100.0

EM PLOYED

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s*

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

100.0

1
l-------------------------!

W ORKERS

-

D u r a b le
goods

A ll

0 0 100.0.

—

-

-

5

73.1
_

_
4

3.7
1.9
10.4
19.3
10.4

4.3
4.8
17.8

.4

23.8
.
3
17.0
10.6
5.9
32.0
9.3

13.3
10.4
12.4
18.2
28.6
13.8

Data relate to women workers#
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately#
Less than #05rOf 1 percent#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities#
Finance, insurance, and real estate#

P a id

Table E-3 j

PERCENT

Establishments providing paid
holidays • • • • ...... • • • • • • • • • ......
1 to 2^- d a y s ................... • • • • •
3 days ........................ ...
4 days ..............................
5 days ...................... .........
6 days .............. ..................................................
6J d a y s ...................................... ........................................................
7 d a y s ............................ ......................................................................
8 days • • • • • • • • • • • • ............................ • • • • • • » • •
9 days ..............................
10 days • • • • • .................. ............................................................
14 days ..............................................................................................
15 or 16 days
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ...................................................... • • • • • • • • • • • •

b

.............. ... ......

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

8

All establishments

O F O F F IC E

W ORKERS

IN —

OF PLAN T

AU

1 0 0 .0

D u r a b le
goods

1

98.1

96.8

.3

.4
2.8
1.6
4.0
49.2

.9
.7

1 .0

1.5
7.1
54.7
•2
21.3
4.3
1.4

.4
5.6

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

0 _ 10

99.0

-

4.7
50.7

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

0 .

100.0

10 0

0 .

100.0

1
0. 0

0

97.6

.

100.0 . 1 0.
0
1

99.4

_

-

_

.6

4.8
2.9
3.3
47.9

-

-

-

-

2.9
7.9
52.5

-

.6
4.5
69.2

-

-

-

-

-

27.2

4.0

33.2
4.5

8.6

-

24.3
11.3
1.1

2.8

A ll
in d u s ­
tries

S e r v ic e s

I
j

0 100.0.

18.2
61.1
1.3
19.4

-

17.2

.2
48.5
-

0

98.2
1.8
2.7
7.9
12.0
57.1

EM PLOYED

IN —

0 100.0

1

I

76.1

81.4

70.5

2.9
2.5
2.4
5.3
37.5

1.2
4
2.5
3.8
39.5

2.4
7.2
0

_

-

5.2
5.2
35.7

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

R e t a il
tr a d e

S e r v ic e s

1

.

0

2.4
43.0

100.0 .
0

93.1

.6

I

0 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

78.02
.

85.3

56.6

5.6

10.9
7.8
2.9
6.7
26.3

6

2
..

..

-

-

_

1.1
5.3
12.3

_

3.8
2.1
53.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

15.5
1.2

29.0
1.4

15.5

-

_

43.5
2.9

-

-

-

31.4
8.6
3.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.5

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s*

i

20.2
4.7
.6

-

j
D u r a l.lo
,,o „ s

N on­
d u ra b le
goods

All

U

0 . . 01 0

99.4

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

30.3
4.2
4.1
1.5

-

W ORKERS

M a NUFACTURI-'.G

7.9

19.0
54.5
-

-

4.5
-

8.0
12.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

2.0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

35.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .0

1.9

3.2

.6

—

29.5

6.9

37.8

22.0

14.7

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities#
Finance, insurance, and real estate#




EM PLOYED

M a n u f a c t u r in g

H

Number of paid holidays

1/
*
**

A ll
in d u s ­
tries

S e r v ic e s

F in a n c e * *

..

-

2.7
1.0
76.2
5.3
9.1
5.1
.2
.4

R e ta il
tra d e

2/

m
m
-

OF PL A N T

2.4

.6

1.8

23.9

18.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

43.4

18,

Table E-4:

P a id V/GUOcUiOHi ( rfvU H tU PMHU4i<»U)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

V a c a tio n p o l i c y

Manufacturin'-

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries
1/

All

Durable
j goods

|

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
! -------

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .9

9 9 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .0

8 7 .5

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .0

8 4 .1

9 4 .2

9 2 .2

9 6 .3

4 7 .3

8 8 .6

9 2 .8

8 0 .6

.2
3 1 .9
1 .0
6 3 .3
.5

.5
3 7 .5
2 .1
5 7 .6
1 .9

1 .1
5 0 .2
1 .4
4 2 .5
4 .0

_
2 6 .2
2 .7
7 1 .1
-

1 .7
8 1 .2
3 .8
5 .5
-

5 0 .0
2 .3
4 4 .0
-

7 8 .0

8 6 .8
-

2 4 .5
7 1 .5
-

.9
6 6 .1
3 .1
2 4 .1
-

1 7 .3

6 8 .8
-

2 4 .7
2 .2
7 1 .9
-

.4
5 6 .6
1 .6
2 5 .5
-

3 .1

.4

.8

-

1 2 .5

1 .2

-

4 .0

1 5 .9

5 .8

7 .8

E sta b lish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s . . . .

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .0

8 6 .8

9 4 .2

9 2 .2

Under 1 w e e k ..................................................
1 week ................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................
2 weeks .................................................. ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......................
3 weeks .............................................................

.2
1 6 .3
1 .2
8 0 .5
.8
.7

.5
2 7 .7
.8
6 7 .3
1 .4
1 .9

1 .1
3 2 .0
1 .8
6 0 .3

7 .9

2 8 .8

.9
5 3 .3
3 .3
3 5 .6
1 .1
-

1 .7
6 7 .1
6 .3
1 7 .1

-

.4
4 1 .6
1 .7
4 2 .6
.5
-

.3

.4

.8

-

4 .0

1 3 .2

5 .8

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .0

8 6 .8

6 .2
.7
9 0 .5
.9
1 .4

8 .7
1 .3
8 4 .0
1 .7
3 .9

4 .0
2 .2
8 8 .3
.7
4 .0

1 2 .8
.5
8 0 .1
2 .7
3 .9

3 .0
9 7 .0
-

5 .8
2 .2
8 9 .8
2 .2
-

1 1 .6
8 7 .7
.7

_
9 9 .0
1 .0

1 2 .0
8 3 .9
.1

.3

.4

.8

-

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 w e e k ...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............. ...... •
2 weeks .................................. ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......................
3 w e e k s .............................................................

5 .5
.2
5 8 .7
.9
3 4 .4

6 .2
.8
3 9 .0
1 .7
5 1 .9

4 .0
1 .1
4 3 .2
.7
5 0 .2

8 .0
.5
3 5 .3
2 .7
5 3.5

3 .0

5 .8
5 9 .7
2 .2
3 2.3

1 1 .6
7 0 .1
1 8 .3

8 4 .1
1 5 .9

E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s •

.3

.4

.8

—

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts . ....................... .................

1 yea r o f s e r v ic e
E sta b lish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s . . . »
Under 1 week ..................................................
1 week * .............. ..............................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................
2 weeks .............................................................
3 weeks ............................................................
E sta b lish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s •

_
1 8 .7
-

_

_
7 6 .9
-

2 3 .1
-

_
1 3 .2
-

_

_

_

_

_

3 0 .0
-

5 0 .5
4 .9
3 3 .2
-

1 4 .8
-

4 1 .3
3 9.3
-

3 .7

5 2 .7

1 1 .4

7 .2

1 9 .4

9 6 .3

6 2 .4

9 1 .6

9 2 .8

8 0 .6

4 2 .4
4 .9
4 4 .3
_

4 3 .2
4 9 .6
_

3 5 .2
-

-

-

2 yea rs o f s e r v ic e

E sta b lish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s •

-

4 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_

_

2 3 .7
7 3 .6
2 .7
-

9 2 .1
-

1 4 .7
8 3 .1
2 .2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 1 .2
-

-

5 .8
9 3 .3
_

1 1 .9
-

8 4 .1
_

_
3 8 .7
-

_
1 4 .5
-

-

5 5 .3
2 .3

4 7 .9
_
-

-

-

-

7 .8

3 .7

3 7 .6

8 .4

7 .2

1 9 .4

9 4 .2

9 2 .2

9 6 .3

6 2 .4

9 1 .6

9 2 .8

8 0 .6

1 5 .1
1 .5
6 7 .3
.9
2 .0

9 .6
1 .8
7 7 .8
2 .1
2 .9

9 .6
3 .0
7 6 .0
1 .9
1 .7

9 .7
.6
7 9 .6
2 .3
4 .1

3 .9
5 8.5

2 0 .7
1 1 .7
5 9 .2
-

2 4 .9

3 2 .8
_

6 6 .0
_

4 4 .9

-

-

1 .9

2 .9

4 .0

1 3 .2

5 .8

7 .8

3 .7

3 7 .6

8 .4

7 .2

1 9 .4

9 6 .0

8 6 .8

9 4 .2

9 2 .2

9 6 .3

6 2 .4

9 1 .6

9 2 .8

8 0 .6

1 1 .9

.9

7 .6
1 .9
3 6 .2
2 .1
4 6 .4

7 .9
3 .0
4 6 .1
1 .9
3 3 .3

7 .3
.6
2 5 .7
2 .3
6 0 .4

3 .9

3 2 .8
•

2 5 .2

2 0 .7
4 .9
5 8 .2

2 5 .0
_

5 8 .7
2 5 .4

1 4 .2
1 .1
4 0 .8
.9
2 9 .8

4 .0

1 3 .2

5 .8

7 .8

3 .7

-

4 5 .4

5 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
E sta b lis h m e n ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s
1 week ................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................
2 weeks .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......................
3 weeks .............................................................
E sta b lish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s •

-

-

-

-

15 v e a r s o f s e r v i c e
E sta b lis h m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s * . . *

1/
*
**

-

5 9 .2
3 7 .8

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




**

“

-

-

-

-

5 4 .7
-

4 2 .9
_

3 3 .3

7 .8

1 3 .1

4 .9

3 7 .6

8 .4

7 .2

1 9 .4

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics.

19

P a id S io k

Table E-5:

jH&OOLe

(rf-OtUHol pAXMAUtOtU)

PEPCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Mamfacturi',G

Manufacturing

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
industries
1/

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 9 .1

2 5 .7

3 9 .3

1 3 .6

1 5 .8

1 5 .1

2 3 .8

1 3 .1

1 5 .5

1 4 .6
.9
-

1 Durable
j

goods

j
1

J

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts .................................... . . . .

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 2 .6

1 2 .1

1 0 .6

7 .8

2 .0

6 .3
2 .4

5 .7
_
_
-

Non­
durable
goods

Services

1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 .3

6 .8

1 .4

6 months o f s e r v i c e

E sta b lish m en ts w ith form a l p r o v is i o n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e .......................................

-

2 .9
4 .9
3 .3
4 .0
-

5 .9
.7
1 2 .3
4 .9
-

6 0 .7

8 6 .4

8 4 .2

8 4 .9

7 6 .2

8 6 .9

8 4 .5

9 1 .7

9 3 .2

9 8 .6

8 7 .4

8 7 .9

8 9 .4

9 2 .2

9 8 .0

4 4 .2

4 6 .3

4 2 .3

3 1 .2

4 5 .1

2 7 .2

1 3 .3

2 5 .2

1 8 .6

2 3 .0

4 .8

4 2 .5

2 2 .6

1 9 .7

9 .0

6 .8

4 .8
.6
4 .0
7 .1
1 .8
5 .3
1 8 .7

_

_

_

_

_

4 .6
_

_
_
_

5 7 .7

.9
5 .9
2 .5
3 .0
3 .1
3 .1
.6
-

.3
6 .7
.1
1 0 .3
5 .2
3 .1
-

8 .4
.3
2 1 .6
9 .0
-

E sta blish m en ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e .......................................

8 0 .9

7 4 .3

3 3 .6

.6
5 .3
1 .8
5 .9
-

_

_

_

1 3 .3
2 .5
-

3 days ........................................................... ..
5 days ..................................................................
6 t o 9 days .............. ........................................
10 days ............................................ . . ' ...........*
11 o r 12 days ......................................... ..
15 t o 21 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30 days .................................................. ..
Over 30 days ................................ ...................

_

_

_
7 .1
6 .0
-

..

-

1 .3
3 .5
1 .1
( 2 /)
.6
( 2 /)
.3
1 .5

.3
5 .8
_
.7
( 2 /)
-

1 .4
_
-

.6
1 0 .4
_
1 .5
.1
-

-

-

2 .3
1 .1
_
8 .7

1 .5
.4
_
-

.9
_
1 .2
-

1 .9
.1
_
_
_
-

1 vear o f s e r v ic e

E sta b lish m en ts w ith form a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e .......................................
Under 3 days ....................................................
3 days ..................................................................
5 days ..................................................................
6 t o 9 days .... .................................................
10 days ...............................................................
11 o r 12 days .................................................
15 days ...............................................................
20 days •••••...................................................
21 t o 30 days .................................................
Over 30 days ...................................................

.7
.5
2 .4
1 .5
1 2 .1
3 .2
4 .0
6 .0
3 .2
-

2 .5
.3
6 .7
.6
1 6 .1
1 .1
5 .4
9 .9
1 .6
-

_
9 .5
1 .3
2 6 .2
.3
5 .6
3 .4
-

E sta b lish m en ts w ith no form a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k l e a v e ................ ................... ..

6 6 .4

5 5 .8

5 3 .7

_

_

2 5 .0
2 .5
.8
2 .9

-

-

-

-

6 8 .8

2 .9
4 .9
1 3 .3
5 .7
1 4 .6
3 .7
-

3 .5
2 .4
1 2 .3
9 .0
-

.9
6 ,0
.4
6 .0
-

.9
8 .5
1 4 .6
1 .2
-

.1
1 .8
1 .2
1 .0
2 .5
1 .3
2 .6
5 .9
.7
1 .5

.3
1 .7
1 .9
.3
4 .6
.7
5 .0
8 .5

2 .8
1 .4
.6
_
-

9 .5
1 .5
1 0 .4
1 7 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .0
1 .1
1 .2
9 .6
8 .7

5 4 .9

7 2 .8

8 6 .7

7 4 .8

8 1 .4

7 7 .0

9 5 .2

5 7 .5

7 7 .4

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952
*
Transoortation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U S
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Burea^ of
statistics




_

.6
.6
2 .3
_

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

6 .3
4 .8
3 .0
2 .8

1 .1
_
_
-

.1
4 .7
2 .0

2 .7
.1
-

_

_

3 .3
-

-

8 0 .3

9 1 .0

9 3 .2

-

20,
P a id

Table E-5:

S ^ lc J l J0.& G 4AG

(r f-O A 4 fU * l P A A M A i4A Q 4iA ^ - G o M tiH M & d t

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERI ENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
M a n u f a c t u r in *

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Provisions for paid sick leave

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries
1 /

j

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

42.5

22.6

19.7

9.0

6.8

Non­
durable

1 Durable

All

goods

Services

goods

1

!

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

33.6

All establishments .....................

44.2

4 6 .3

42.3

31.2

45.1

27.2

13.3

25.2

18.6

23.0

1.3

2.8

100.0

2 vears of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
2 or 3 days ....................... ...
4- days ..............................
5 to 9 days ........... ... ........... ...
10 or 11 days ..................... . .
12 d a y s .........................r ...................................................................
.
15 days .................................................................................................
18 days ................................................................................................
20 days .............................
21 to 30 days .......................
33 to 4.0 d a y s ..................... .................................................. ...
Over 4-0 days ...............................................................................

-

3.3
9.7
2.0
4.4.9
6.43.5
2.1

_

5.4

_

3.5

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.2
13.3
1.7
9.7

9.5
25.0
1.6
6.8

1.3
2.7
1.8
12.4

-

2.4

.9

-

15.6
2.5
7.7

7.8
13.3
5.7

-

-

-

-

9.9

-

18.7

-

-

-

4.8

1.3

_

2.8
1.4

-

-

-

_

-

-

1.1

-

1.1
1.1

-

2.3
1.5
19.8

11.1
3.0
2.8

_

-

_

-

.6
1.4
.8
1.1
1.0
9.6

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

3.3

2.0

4.6

-

-

-

1.3
.6
1.6
1.3
.9
4.2

-

-

5.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17.6

11.8

15.8

5.9
.9
.4
1.5

8.5

6.0
.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

8.6

-

-

-

-

14.6
3.7

5.4

_

-

-

-

.2
-

9.4
-

.6

2.7
.1

_

_

4.8

_

1.6

3.4

-

-

-

9.0
12.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66.4.

55.8

53.7

57.7

68.8

54.9

72.8

86.7

74.8

81.4

77.0

95.2

57.5

77.4

80.3

91.0

93.2

•

36.2

44.2

46.3

42.3

43.7

45.1

27.2

13.3

25.2

21.1

23.0

4.8

42.5

37.7

19.7

9.0

6.8

2 or 3 days .............................................................................. ...
5 or 6 days ...................................................................................
7 days ...................................................................................................
10 or 11 days ...................................................
12 days ...............................................................................................
15 to 22 days ....... ... ......... ...
25 days ........... ... .................
30 to 50 days ........... ........................................
55 days ........ ...................................................................
60 days ........... ..................
65 to 80 days .......................
90 days and over ................... .

.5
3.1
3.4
9.3
2.0
1.7
2.6
3.0
1.1
3.9
3.8
1.8

5.2
2.5
11.8
1.7
2.7
3.4
1.4
3.7
6.7
4.8
-

9.5

.6
1.3
4.8

4.6
1.1

_

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

63.8

55.8

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...........................................................

-

10 vears of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................................................... ...

1/
2/
*
**

p

-

25.0
1.6
5.6
1.2

-

3.4
-

1.8
5.3
2.7
7.1
12.8
5.9
-

53.7

57.7

-

-

-

-

7.8

3.5
2.4

12.4
15.6
2.5
-

7.8
1.7
-

3.7
-

56.3

Includes data for industries other than those shovn separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
-

-

-

-

.9

13.3
5.7
3.1
.6
7.0
7.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

17.2

-

-

-

-

-

.7
-

5.8
6.4

1.2
14.6

54.9

72.8

86.7

74.8

-

3.4

.2
-

-

9.4
-

1.11.6
2.7
.8
1.0
.9
2.2
.9
2.0
5.6
.3
2.0

78.9

3
#

o

-

1.0
1.4
5.0
1.1
4.6
8.5
(2/)
-

77.0

_

1.4

.6

_

_

-

-

11.1
_

-

-

3.0
2.8

-

4.8

_

-

1.2

-

_

-

.6

-

-

.6
2.8

1.5

15.1
1.1
1.1

_

10.4
2.3
9.5
17.5
.1
-

57.5

_
_

-

95.2

_

.9
_

.1

_

_

1.2

_

_

_

_

.10.9
8.6

1.0
1.7
-

.9
-

2.0

62.3

80.3

91.0

93.2

_

21,

M O H fl'lO t/tt& tiO H . &Q41MA&L

T able E -6 :

PERCENT

O F O F F IC E

W ORKERS

EM PLOYED

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

PEJN’ KNT

IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Type of bonus

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

All establishments..........

... ....... ...

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 7 j • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .... ...

100.0

A ll

100.0

D u r a b le
goods

100.0

56.6

54*6

6

Christmas or y e a r - e n d ........... • • •
Profit-sharing • • • .... ... ..... ... .......
Other ••••........................ •••

51.3
4.1
2.8

50.1
.7
4.2

6

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses •••••...... ........... .......

43.4

45.4

4 .
0

F in a n c e * *

A ll
in d u s ­
tries

S e r v ic e s

9 5
.

100.0

2 .

100.0

.
6
49.7

46

70.5

2

25.1

1.6
4.0

4.4

1.5

43.4
7.9
-

68.7
1.8
9.6

35.1

54.6

73.4

50.3

29.5

-

-

100.0

100.0

1

100.0

1
J

A ll

y

100.0

4

R e ta il
tr a d e

1 0

.

0

45.9

47.9

4

83.8
1
14.8
-

. 45.0
0

3

.9

42.7
1.8
7.0

1.4

54.1

52.1

D u r a b le
goods

j

0
100.0 .

6.

52.7

-

in —

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

R e t a il
tr a d e

S e r v ic e s

100.0

100.0

100 JD

100.0

. 7.87

67.1

72.4

4

54.9
14.6
-

71.3
1.1
7.6

4

32.9

27.6

51.5

'!

0

98.6
4

w orkers em ployed

ANCFACTURIN

M

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

of p l a n t

7
9
1
8

0 100.0

3 3

2 .

79

.

50.33
.
6 3.1
4
14.3

27.5
2.2

36.3

.

3.6
4.2

70.3

92.2

8
8
-

9.3

l/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
'g f Unduplicated total.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities#
** Finance, insurance, and real estate#

T able B-7*

PERCEN T

Type of plan

All establishments.......

... ....... .

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..........................................
Life insurance ........... ... .........
Health insurance • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Hospitalization ......... ........
Retirement pension ........... .
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ••••..................

1/
2/
*
**

O F O F F IC E

94tA44Suuu>e a n d P -e n lio n P M anl

W ORKERS

EM PLOYED

M a n u f a c t u r in g
A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

A ll

D u r a b le
goods

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

R e t a il
tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .2

9 4 •4

9 1 .8

9 6 .8

9 6 .3

8 7 .3

7 5 .6

7 7 .6

7 5 .6

-

1 0 Q .Q

F in a n ce * *

A ll
in d u s ­
tries

S e r v ic e s

y

1 0 0 .0

8 5 .0

OF PLAN T

W ORKERS

EM PLOYED

IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

--1 0 0 .0

i

1 0 0 .0

!

9 9 .7

7 6 .8

i

8 6 .8

7 6 .8

1 0 0 .0

1

D u r a b le
goods

N ond u r a b le
goods

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

R e t a il
tr a d e

S e r v ic e s

A"

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 7 .0

8 9 .2

8 6 .9

8 2 .9

7 3 .8

1
|

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .6

6 5 .0

9 1 .0

6 5 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 4 .4

7 2 .6

4 7 .9

4 7 .9

.

8 9 .5

8 2 .7

9 6 .3

6 4 .3

7 0 .3

5 0 .0

5 7 .7

5 6 .5

5 8 .8

7 6 .6

3 5 .9

2 8 .0

3 5 .3

4 6 .0

5 0 .3

6 6 .8

7 1 .4

6 1 .8

4 9 .1

4 3 .6

3 6 .8

1 5 .5

6 8 .6

6 9 .7

8 1 .8

5 8 .9

7 2 .3

6 4 .7

6 5 .8

6 7 .0

7 2 .7

5 9 .5

7 2 .9

7 5 .0

7 0 .8

3 8 .7

6 4 .5

5 5 .3

4 1 .9

46.1

6 2 .5

5 6 .5

6 7 .8

5 8 .7

5 8 .6

1 3 .7

2 6 .3

4 .8

3 3 .3

4 7 .7

4 1 .5

5 4 .4

4 0 .5

3 9 .5

7 .8

9 .1

5 .6

8 .2

3 .2

3 .7

1 2 .7

2 4 .4

.3

2 3 .2

2 3 .0

1 0 .8

1 3 .1

8 .4

3 5 .0

1 5 .6

2 7 .4

5 2 .1

8 .8

8 5 .9

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABGR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




PERCKNT

IN —

8 6 .7

Occupational Wage Survey, Houston, Tex., January 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

.
.

5
3

22.

Appendix - Scope

With the exception of the union so&le of rates , in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings a r e : manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for eaoh industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, tinder tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

23

ESTABLISH ENTS A D W R E S IN M JO INDUSTRY DIVISIONS A D IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN H U N TEX., l / ,
M
N
OKR
A R
N
O STO ,
A D N M E STUDIED BY TH B R A O LA O STATISTICS, JAN ARY 1952
N U BR
E UEU F BR
U

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Numb*yr of
establifshments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

88,920
41,600
20,780
20,820
47,320

13,550
4,480
2,250
2,230
9,070

18,740
5,040
14,060
3,510
5,970

3,060
1,590
1,420
2,340
660

11,337
1,154
1,088

1,627
105

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ....................................
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods 2 / ............... .
Nondurable goods 4 / ........... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ........... ..................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ............... ......... ••••••
Wholesale t r a d e ........... ...............
Retail t r a d e .... •••••••..... ....... •••••
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services
•••••.......... ...... ....... .

21

71
71
71
71

71
21
21
21

21

1,545
455
261
194
1,090

265
85
49
36
180

175,600
72,700
36,400
36,300
102,900

161
240
394
102
193

34
37
46
27
36

29,100
16,200
34,800
7,600

76

22
5
9

14,937

15,200

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6 7
Machinery industries ••••••............ •••••••••
Milk dealers ............... •••••................
Insurance c a r r i e r s ................... ..........

7 / 21
21
21

7
19

1,300
1,981

840

1 / Houston Metropolitan Area (Harris County)*
2 / Total establishment employment.
2 / Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
i j Food and kindred products; tobacco; t e x t ile s ; apparel and other finished te x tile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products o f petroleum and coa l; rubber products; and leather and leather products*
*>/ H otels; personal services; business serv ices; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and te le v isio n ; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage ta b les.
2 / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 ©r more workers were included.




24*

Assembler (machinery) •••••.......... .........................
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) ••..............
Benchman (bakeries) ............................... •............... •
B ille r , machine ..........................................................
Bookbinder (printing) . . . . .......... ...........................
Bookkeeper, h a n d ....................................•............... .
Bookkeeping-machine o p e r a t o r ..................•......... ••
Bricklayer (building construction) .••••»••••••
Calculating-machine operator . . . .......... •...............
Carpenter (building construction) ............ .
Carpenter, maintenance........ •*•••••••...................
Cleaner . ......................................................................
Cleaner (machinery) ...............................................
Clerk, a cco u n tin g ....................................................
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ..............
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) . . . .
Clerk, f i l e ..................................................................
Clerk, g e n e r a l..................................... ............ .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) .......... ..
Clerk, order ......................... .......... ................ .
Clerk, payroll .............. ...........................................
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers)
Clerk, underwriter (insurance ca rriers) ............
Compositor, hand (printing) ...................................
Crane operator, e le c t r ic bridge ••••.......... •••••
Draftsman ••••••••••••..............................................
D rill-p ress operator (machinery) .........................
Duplicating-machine o p e r a t o r ........ ••••••.............
E lectrician (building construction) ....................
E lectricia n , maintenance.............. ••••..................
Electrotyper (printing) ............................... ..........
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .......................
Engineer, s t a t io n a r y ......................................... .
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) •••••••••
Fireman, stationary b o ile r ................... •••..........
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ........ •«••
Guard •••. .......... .....................................•••«•••«••
Helper (bakeries) •«•••................................. ..........
Helper, motortruck driver .......................................
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••
Inspector (machinery) .............................................
Janitor ............................. .
Janitor (machinery) ........ .
Key-punch operator ••••............................................
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ............
Laborer (building construction) •••••••••.•••««
Machine operator (printing)
Machine tender (printing) ....................•••••••••.
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) •
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
Machinist, maintenance ••••••••••.............
Machinist, production (machinery) .......................
Mailer (printing) ••••••••••............ ..
Maintenance man, general u t ilit y ...................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)...................
Mechanic, maintenance........ ....................................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) •••••••••.



Page

13
13
15
U

15
3, U
U
15
U, 5
15

8
11

13
3, 5

U
H

3, 5
3, 5

H

3, 5
3, 5

U
U
15

10
8
13

3, 6
15
9
15
13
9

H

9
13
10

15
15
9
13
11
13

6
U
15
15
15
13
9
9
13
15
9
9
9
13

Page
M i l l w r i g h t ...... .........................................
Mixer (bakeries) ..........................................
Motortruck driver ....................................... .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ........ ............ ......
Office boy .............................................. .
Office girl ..... ..................... . •• • ...............
Oiler •••••••................. ............................
Operator (local transit) ................................ .
Order filler ....... ........................... ...........
Order filler (milk dealers) ..............................
Overman (bakeries) •••••............... .............. .
Packer .......... ............. ............ ••••••••...... .
Packer (bakeries) ......
Painter (building construction) ...................
Painter, maintenance ........................ ........ .
Pan greaser (bakeries) ............. ......................
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ......................
Photoengraver (printing) ...........
Pipe fitter, maintenance ........................ .........
Plasterer (building construction) •••••.... ...... .
Plumber (building construction) ..........................
Porter ••••••........ ............................ .
Porter (machinery) ........... ............... ........... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •••«••••••••.••••••
Press assistant (printing) ............... .......... .
Press feeder (printing) ......................... .........
Pressman (printing) ..........................
Receiving c l e r k ..........
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ...... ............... .
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers)
.
Secretary
Section head (insurance carriers) ••••.•••••.............
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ................
Shipping clerk ......................
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ............
Stenographer ......
Stenographer (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••........
Stereotyper (printing) ........... ....... .......... .
Stock handler ••••«....................... ........ .
Switchboard o p e r a t o r ..... ............... •••••••...... .
Switchboard operator-receptionist ....................
Tabulating-machine operator •••«•................... .
Tool-and-die m a k e r .... .............
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) .............
Tracer ••••.........
••••••••
Transcribing-machine operator •••..••••••••••..........
Truck driver ........... ......... ...... ...................
Trucker, hand ••••......
Trucker, power ..................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) .................
Typist ............ ........................ ........ .......
............... ............
Typist (insurance carriers)
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ••••••••••.......... •••••
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ............. ....... .
W a t c h m a n ..................
Welder, hand (machinery) ••••...... .......... ......... .
Wrapper (bakeries) .............. ........ .............. .
☆

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1 5
92

9
15
15
g

3
6
9
15
ll

14
15
11
15
15
10

15
14
15
10
15
15
11
13
14
15
15
15
u

14
1/
;
6
14
10
11

11
6
14
15
12

7
7
4, 7
10
13
8
7
12
12
12
13
7
14
14
14
12
13
15


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102