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Occupational Wage Suivey
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA
November 1951

Bulletin No. 1082

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................................................

1

THE PITTSBURGH METROPOLITAN AREA ....................................................................................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL W
AGE STRUCTURE...............................................

1

TABLES:
A verage e a rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d o ccu p a tio n s stu d ied on an area b a s i s A -l
O ffic e o ccu p a tio n s .........................................
A-2
P r o fe s s io n a l and t e c h n ic a l o ccu p a tio n s .........................................................................
A-3
M aintenance and power p la n t o ccu p a tio n s ..............................................................
A-4
C u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and sh ip p in g o ccu p a tio n s .... ..............................................
A verage ea rn in g s f o r s e le c t e d o ccu p a tio n s stu d ie d on an in d u s tr y b a s is * B-35
M achinery I n d u s tr ie s ................................................
B-4.0
R a ilr o a d s ........ ........................................... .......................... ............... ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-5452 M ilk d e a l e r s ......................................................................................................................................................
B-63
In su ran ce c a r r ie r s ...............

3

9
10
12

15
16
16

17

Union wage s c a l e s f o r s e le c t e d o ccu p a tio n s C-15
B u ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ............................................
C-205 B a k e r i e s ............................................
C-2082 M alt l i q u o r s ............. .......................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g ...............................................................................................................................................................
C-Al
L ocal t r a n s i t o p e r a tin g em ployees .........................................
C-42
M otortruck d r iv e r s and h e lp e r s ......................................................................... • • • • • • ............... ..
C-54-1 G rocery s t o r e s .................
C-5&
R esta u ra n ts and c a f e t e r i a s .....................
C-6512 O ffic e b u ild in g s e r v i c e ............................................
C-7011 H o te ls • • • • • • • ..............................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ...................... • • • • • • • • • • • • .................... ..

20
20

Entrance r a t e s D -l
Minimum en tra n ce r a t e s f o r p la n t workers .......................................................

21

18
18
18
18
18

19
19

20

Wage p r a c t ic e s E -l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v is io n s ...................................................................
E-2
Scheduled w eekly hours ...............................................................................................................................
E-3
Paid h o l i d a y s .................
E-4
Paid v a c a tio n s .................................. ......................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .............
E-5
Paid s ic k le a v e ..................................
E-6
Nonproduction b on u ses
............ ............... ............................... ................................. • • • • . • •
E-7
In su ran ce and p en sio n p la n s • • • • • ........................................

25
25

APPENDIX:
Scope and method o f s u r v e y ........................................................................................................................ ..

26

INDEX ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

28

♦NOTE - A d d itio n a l o c c u p a tio n a l ea r n in g s r e p o r ts
are a v a ila b le upon r e q u e s t f o r au to r e p a ir sh op s
(A p r il 1951)f fe r r o u s fo u n d r ie s (June 1951;,
p a in t s and v a r n ish e s (March 1951), and power
la u n d r ie s (A p r il 1951).
For sale b y the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

M 7, 1952
ay

21
22
22
23

2U

Introduction 1/
The Pittsburgh area is 1 of UO major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently
conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on
a community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of sampling
were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following
types of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and techni­
cal;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial,
ware­
housing, and shipping*
In presenting earnings information for
such jobs (tables A-l through A-A) separate date have been pro­
vided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey* 2 / Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented
in Series B tables*
Union scales
(Series C tables)
are presented in lieu of
(or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements,
and the
contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials,
hours of work,
and
supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Pittsburgh Metropolitan A re a
Total population of the Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area
(Allegheny, Beaver, Washington,
and Westmoreland Counties) was
almost 2,225,000 in 1951*
The city of Pittsburgh accounted for
U5 percent of the 1,500,000 living in highly industrialized
Allegheny County.

1 / Prepared in the B u r e a u ’s regional
office in New York,
N.Y.,
by Norman J* Samuels, under the direction of Frederick
W. Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The
planning and central direction of the program was carried on in
the B u r e a u ’s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2 / See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Wage and salary workers
(excluding agriculture and
government)
in the area numbered nearly 1,000,000 in November
1951* About two-fifths of these were employed in manufacturing
establishments. Aside from the important steel industry, large
numbers of workers were employed in the fabricated metal pro­
ducts, machinery, and food-processing industries*
Although prominent as a manufacturing center, Pitts­
burgh is also a key area for other important business activities*
Strategically located where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers
join to start the Ohio, the city has long been a center of trade
and commerce*
Over 150,000 people were employed in its stores,
warehouses,
and wholesale outlets in November 1951*
Approxi­
mately 75>000 workers in the transportation, communication, and
public utilities industries were engaged in supplying power to
the factories and moving goods by water, rail, and trucks along
the complex transportation metwork.
Finance,
insurance,
and
real estate organizations employed over 27,000 workers;
the
service industries employed 30,000.
A high degree of unionization exists among Pittsburgh’s
firms* Although the degree of unionization varied among the
industry divisions studied,
the majority of plant workers in
each division were employed in establishments having union con­
tracts* The proportions were particularly high in manufacturing;
public utilities; and in the finance, insurance, and real estate
groups.
Among office workers, nearly 30 percent were in firms
with union contracts covering clerical employees.
The highest
degree of unionization was found in the public utilities group
and retail trade where
slightly more
than half the clerical
workers were employed in establishments with written union agree­
ments*

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries of virtually all
area were affected by formal wage adjustments
1950 - the base date for the Wage Stabilization
cent wage increase formula - and the time of the
General wage increases amounting to 10 or more
were received by a majority of the plant and
during the period.
Plant workers in the large
received a general increase in December 1950 of

workers
in the
between January
B o a r d ’s 10-perB u r e a u ’s study.
cents an hour
office workers
steel companies
12^ cents, plus

2

adjustments in standard job rates ranging up to 15^ cents.
The
total increase for these
steel workers averaged about 16 cents
an hour.

Lowest minimum entrance rates were found in the service indus­
tries where establishments employing two-thirds of the workers
had minimums of 75 cents or less.

Approximately 15 percent of the workers in establish­
ments surveyed were awaiting additional wage increases pending
approval of the Wage Stabilization Board. Most of these pend­
ing increases were for amounts ranging from 3 to 10 cents an
hour.
A t the time of the survey,
the union contract covering
the wages of workers in the steel industry had only a few weeks
to remain in force.
Negotiations between the steel industry
and the union were still in progress as this report went to
print.

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In
29 of 33 office occupations permitting comparison, average sala­
ries in manufacturing plants exceeded those in nonmanufacturing
establishments.
Average hourly earnings for plant workers were
higher in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing for 19 of 27
comparable occupations.

Formalized rate
structures for time workers were in
effect In establishments employing more than 90 percent of Pitts­
b u r g h ^ plant workers.
Nearly two-thirds of these workers were
employed under plans providing a single rate for each occupation;
the remainder were in organizations that had a formalized range
of rates.
This latter method was predominant only in retail
trade and the public utilities
groups.
Salary progression
through a formal range applied to about 70 percent of the office
workers. Salaries for practically all other office workers were
individually determined.
Virtually all of P ittsburgh’s plant workers were em­
ployed in firms having established minimum entrance rates for
workers with no previous work experience.
The greatest concen­
tration of plant workers - nearly 55 percent - was
in firms
with a $1.30 - $1.35 minimum.
This large concentration at a
comparatively high minimum was chiefly due to the prevailing
practice of the steel industry.
For most other industries, there was relatively little
concentration at any rate,
although &
substantial number of
workers in retail trade were in firms with a 75-cent minimum.




About two-fifths of the plant workers in manufacturing
were employed on late shifts in November 1951® Virtually all
extra-shift workers were paid a shift premium, usually expressed
as a cents-per-hour addition to day rates.
At the time of the
study,
the major steel producers and a number of other manu­
facturing establishments in the Pittsburgh area paid shift premi­
ums of 4 and 6 cents an hour for second- and third-shift worko
About three-fourths of the second-shift workers and four-fifths
of the third-shift workers
in the area received shift premiums
of 4 and 6 cents an hour, respectively.

Nearly all plant and office workers in the Pittsburgh
area were eligible for a paid vacation after 1 year of service.
Plant workers generally received 1 w eek whereas three-fourths
of the office workers received 2 weeks. Establishments employing
about 90 percent of the workers paid at least part of some form
of insurance or pension benefits. About one-fourth of the office
workers but less than a tenth of the plant workers were employed
in establishments with formal provisions for paid sick leave
without any waiting period after one or more years of service.
The majority of both plant and office workers were in establish­
ments operating on a scheduled 40-hour workweek.

3,

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
O ^ lc e 0CC44flcUiOHd

Table A-lt

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage
N u m ber
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W eek ly

h us
or

(Standard)

W eek ly
earnings
(Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
J
90.00 100.00 110.00
U
nder 27.50 30 .0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 40 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 5.0 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 $
and
*
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 5.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0.00 loo.oa 110.00 over
j

Mn
a
*
79.50

_
_

_
-

Bookkeepers, hand.........................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * .............................
Retail trade .......................................
Services ..............................................

193
94
78

18
32

4 0 .0

6 3.0 0

-

Bookkeeoing-machine operators, class A . . .
Manufacturing ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................

40

38.0

_
-

_
_
-

_
_

_
-

16

99
10

40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
41.0
40.5

8 4 .00
101.00

53
52

39.0
39.0

45.50
| 45.00

_
-

Clerks, accounting .......................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ................................
Nonmanufacturing......................................
Public utilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ..................................
Services ...............................................

1,062

39.5
40.6
40.0
39.5
39.5

_
-

39.5
39.5

! 72.00
1 74.00
74.50
62.00
65.50
71.00
| 6 0 .50
| 54.00

Clerks, file , class B ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Finance * * ..........................................

91
56
40

39.0
38.5
39.0

34.50
! 34.00
: 32.50

Clerks, general .............................................
833
Manufacturing ........................................... ---- TITDurable goods ......................................
672
Nondurable goods .........................................
39
Nonmanufacturing ................................................
122
Retail trade ..................................................
13
P
l n
a
TTirt. . a. r . T t t t f t .* - T......... T.
n
e
*
34

2

-

2

_

_

3
3
3

.

.

_

•

.

-

2

66.50
'40.0 ' ! 66.50
4 0 .0
i 66.00
74.50
39.5
6 6.50
39.5
38 .0
59.50
83.50
37.5
4 0 .0

_

2

2

21

18

•

-

16
16

_

.

2

21

2
2

1

«.
17
1
1

2

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B . . .
Nonmanufacturing ......................................

4 0 .0

_
-

_

77.50

' W .6
37.5

ssr
751
57
254
73
51
31

_

-

75.50

21

W

_
-

80.50

59.50
64.56
55.50

—

-

-

_
_
-

_

-

_
1 —

-

-

2

_
-

17
17

9
9

1
1

4
4

3

30
9
9
-

5

41
20

_
.
-

2
2

1
1

.
_

26
26

-

-

-

-

_

1

-

-

1

1
2

-

14
14
14
_

_

2

_
-

-

-

_
i “
1
_

2

_
_
-

-

35

17
4

-

22
12

_
— — ! 1—
——
-

—

_
_

_

-

7
9
3
-

_

9

8
8

1

9

_
-

-

_

i

"
! 12
2
h r 2 I 17 ; 7
1 3 i i
3 ! 21 j 6
_
3
1
5
.
.
4
- ! "
_
| “----- 1 -

21

-

1

i

1

2

-

i

_
26

15
10

5
11

_
3
7

_
-

!

!

_

8 !
-

_
[

12

!

1 1?

; 28
17
14
3
n
_
_
5 j

6
6

-

1

i _
24
54
I i — I 16 , 11 | 42
—
5
16
5 1 42 !
_
-

2
2

i

19
9
8

|

_
23

-

4

3
7

_
-

8
1

1

-

2
2

-

7

1

-

7
7
-

_
-

1

-

_
-

_
-

_
- !

71
"lo ^
40

81
59
48

314
303
297

10
21
2

11
22
2

6
11

7

8

1
1

9
18

2
•
i 6
1
_
—
_
-

5

! 73
! 58
58

11

15

1
6
.

_

8
8
3

;
-

16
11

3

_

1

22
2

1

4
-

- t
_

_
-

-

5

5
5
6
2

- !
_
- !
-

i

_
_ 1
-

_
J
“

1
6

-

:

226
11

14

21

1

1
6

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

13
9
3

17

2

15
7
3
4

9

8

5

1

_

4

1

8

4

L

_
.
_
-

-

7

96
4

99

9
6

_
_

_
-

3
_
-

-

_

_
_

_

48
47

41 '
34 i
34 i

111
12

4

56
55

86
26

163 j 123
142 ^123“
138

65

7

1

16
10

2
2

.
9

186

1
_ !
-

251
237

2

18

2
2

g

j

-

li

2
2

2

100

5
_
4

14 1 14
1 ; 4
-

24

5

25
25
25
_
_

35
17

31

6

14
7
4
3
7

10

30
21

19

81
19
80
14
80 ! U
5
5
_
-

_
!

_
-

12
12

_
•
_

.

6
_

1

i

i

Clerks, order .............................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................
Durable goods ................................................
Nondurable goods .........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Wholesale trade ..................................

962

Clerks, payroll .............................................
Manufacturing.......................................
Durable goods ................................................
Nondurable goods .........................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................................
Public utilities * .............................
Services ..............................................

431

652
584
68

310
298

—

354
18
59
27
16

40.0
39.5
39.5
40.5

6 8 .50

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

70.50
71.00
64.50
64.00
64.00

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
41.0
39.5

66.50
67.50
67.50
64.50
62.50
65.50
57.00

18
5
5

6
_
-

_
-

-

-

j

_
_
_

.
_
.
-

|

6

6
i
-

_

.
-

_
_
-

-

-

.

_

_
.
-

.
--

_
_
•
-

-

14
11
7

_

13
13

-

15
15
15
_
-

4

3
3_

39

;
1

! 13
13

_

i

3
3

13
1 13
1 12
[
1

6

|

21

16
16

.
-

!

_

5
__

.

15
7
15
7

i

1
!

6
6

| 4
: 4

11
8
8

11
i 2
i

-

6

4

!
!

28
13

20

21

14
7
18
18

_
_

.

3
3
i

3
3

54
20
16

4
34
33
20
4
4
_

16
10
4

84
49
45
4
35
35

166

27
14
12
2
13
1
12

63
63
60
3

99
92
7
67
61

.
_

85
62
45
17
23
23

165 ! 77 140
!~"7T ! “ 85
72
83

31
22
21
1

132
,

2

8

!

25

1

20

i

3
3

38 118
2?
33 1
113 ! 27
31 111 I 27
2 ; 2 1
2
5 ! 5
2
1

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Fa., November 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




W

55
55
25
25
25
_

_
-

;

8
8

1 16

9
9

2
!

16
19
16 I 16 Y ~ r

3
3

-

-

14

1

12
12

17
13
9

_
. - ._. -

2
2

4
4

!

4

3

!

j

“

!

' t.

_
-

-

1
1

.

.- - -

Table A-l:

O^ice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, N
ovem 1951)
ber

See footnote at end of table.

** Finance, insurance, and real estate,




5,

O ^ ice O ccupa tion ^

T»bie A-i:

C o n tin u e d

-

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings i / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, N
ovem 1951)
ber

A v
S

e

x

N

,

g e

e

r

w

u
0

o m e n

-

C o n t

u e d i

$e

$ r

3r 5 0 .

0

s 3 0 2 .

$

$

p

3 5 5 .

0

0

3 0 7 .

B E R

O F

$

a
0

$

4 50 .

W

$

4 0 2 .

0

O R K E R S

t

4 5 5 .

0

R E C E I
$

i
0

4 0 7 .

I

G V S TN R A I

$

o
0

$

55 0 .

0

H T - G I M TE

50 2 .

W

$

n

5 5 5 .

0

E E K L Y

$

E A R N I N G S

$

,

0
57.50 60.00

0

O F —

$
6 5 .

$a
7 0 0 .

0

$
0

3 2 .

0

3 5 5 .

0

3 0 7 .

40.00
5

0

4 2 .

0

4 5 5 .

4 0 7 .

0

50.00
5

0

5 2 .

0

5 5 5 .

0

50 7 .

5
60.00 65.00

0

7 0 .

7 05 .

0

0

M

a n u

g -

a n c mh i

f a c t u r i n

e

.

D

..

..

u .

c l a s s

..

o

.

.

..

B

. . .

..

.

W

n.

h.

R

r.
.
.

..

a

N
a n u f

c t

r i a

_

g u .

n

T _

.

_n
.

R

e
-

C

.

.

a
C

.. a

N

.

.

.

.

n .
t

l

N

o

R

.

l

.

.. .

.

e

M

. ..

.

.
h.

.i

.r

.

.

.

.
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*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and reed estate.




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6

T»bi« a -1 i

O^ice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations studied <
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
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$
$
$
$
%
$
$
%
$
$
$
%
Weekly Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40,00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.0C 100.00 110.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) *
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 110.00 over

Women - Continued

Clerks, file, class B ....... ............
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Pnblie utilities * tT r t., r.. r__ TT.
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail t r a d e .................... .

092
452

39.5
40.0
39.0
/,p,n
40.0
40.0
37.0

440
23
157
78
167

Clerks, general ..........................
Manufacturing ................... ......
Durable goods ............. .
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * .........................
S e r v i c e s ............... .

1,117
400.
385
16
716
75
197
72

38.5
" 40.0"'
40.0
39.5
38.0
39.0
37.5
37.5

$
39.00
45.60 '
35.50
39.5°
35.50
38.50

8
8

78
2
76

65
12
53

201
90
111

-

12
5
59

16
7
27

60
14
37

-

-

17
17
-

-

-

16
16
2
-

-

_
•

9
9
-

14
14
-

-

*
*

9

-

12
12
12
.
-

3 3 ,5 0
52.00
55.5(5
55.50
57.00
50.00
50.50
52.00
51.00

Clerks, order ............................
Nonmanufacturing................. .
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................

579
--- 3 S T “ '
119
194

40.0
51.50
"
40.0"'1 Z 6 3 T 4 0 .0
50.50
44.50
39.5

2
2
2

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing.........................
Durable goods ......................
.Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale t r a d e .......... .........
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * ............. ...........

751
--- 5S2T "
465
99
187
27
24
101
26

4 0 .0

_
-

Duplicating-machine operators ...........
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .................... .
Nondurable g o o d s ................ ..
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................
Key-punch opera t o r s .... ................ .
Manufacturing ............ ............
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ........ ........
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public u t ilit ie s * . . T.......... T_T
Uhnl M n l e trnilA ..IttT.T.__ T.....-t
Retail t r a d e ........... ...........
Finance ** .........................

—

40.040.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

216
39.5
165“ ' m 5
40.0
151
40.0
11
39.0
54
10
39.0
26
39.0
668
356
321
35
312
73
21
64
150

39.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
38.5

52.00
52.GC
52.00
51.50
53.50
58.50
59.00
52.00
53.00

122
66
56
10
24
9
13

121
76
45
7
6
17
13

84
47
37
1
18
8
10

45
17
28
2
21
1
4

28
13
15
2

10
7
3

15
12
3

113
110
3
1

1
1

-

1
1

13

-

-

2

1

-

1

68
24
24
44
2
8

48
8
8
40
20
-

91
9
7
2
82
13
17
17

53
11
11
42
11
12
-

77
19
19
58
12
7
2

58
12
12
46
3
11
-

120
35
33
2
85
11
26
16

133
63
83
50
10
7
-

123
6
8
.
115
3
37
33

55
42
42
-

157
107
95
12
50
2
17
-

24
12
4
8

8
5

154
139
3
136

6
5
_

39
37
37
-

7
3
3
-

15
15
15
-

141
6
6
-

74
4

5

61
56
36
20

50
i S
49 ! 21
49 j 13
- S
8
1
_
_
1
-

35
31
27
4
4
1
3

37
36
23
7
7
.
7
-

68
43
33
10
25
7
5
7

59
39
36
3
20

62
30
24
6
32
.
•
30
-

62
42
24
18
20
4

34
23
23
11

42
33
18
15
9
1
.
7
1

47
33
21
12
14
,
2
3
9
-

129
113
Id
12
16
6
.

20
18
18
2
-

11
8
8
-

29

_

1

3
_

28
27
1
1
-

-

19
17
17
2
2

11
11
11
-

-

25
15
9
6
10
5
1

41

2
-

-

3

-

-

-

-

41.50
42.66'
42.50
38.50
39.50
43.50
39.50

8
8
8

2

-

44.50

_

48.00
44.50
42.00
41.50
44.00
48.00
39.00

-

-

_

22
22

9
9

9
-

32
5
3
2
27
4

_

_

_

22

9

23

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), cammunioation, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.

-

37
27
23
4
10
8

r

42
11
6
5

31
18
1
12

51
13
12
1
38
14
g
3
13

32
32
9
2
100
56
48
8
44
13
4
,
2
24

5

2

81
46

41
5
35
10
10
12

1
11
8

n ?

76
74
2
43
8
17
18

3

5

45
19
17
2
26
3
20
3

12
1

36
27
21
6
9

6
5
10
6
6
4
3
1
79
69
69
_
10
1

2

13
3
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65
39
39

16
4
4

6
•

3
-

9
.
-

-

2
-

.
.

26
1
2

12
-

6
1
5
•

3
1
2
-

9
_

•
_

2
2
_

_
.

-

-

-

4
4

•
-

20
15
15

9

5
_

.
_

.
_

-

_

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
«
-

_
.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
8

_

4

5
5

2

-

1

66
56
54
4
8
3

4
-

2

2

3

1
-

5
.
5
1
3
1
-

-

-

-

-

4
3

_
.
-

1

2

18
7
7
11
_
6
3

1?
13
9
4
-

26
15
15
11

9
4
4

2
1
1

_

2
1
1

•

-

_
•

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

_

_

_

5
4

1

1

1

1

1

3
2
6

_

_

5

7
,

T a-1: O^ice. QccufxUionl - Continued
abi«
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verag e

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 5.0 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 904)0 100.00 n o . o o
Weekly
earnings *
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 5.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 8 5.00 9 0.00 LOO .00 1104)0 over

Women - Continued

Office girls ............................
Manufacturing....................... .
Durable g o o d s ....... ..............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
PuhliC Utilities * T ___ Tr ____ T T - - - T
Wholesale trade ....................

*
38.00
41.06

470
295“
246
52
172
34
25
97

4 0 .0
38 .0
39.5
37#o

34.00
33.00
35.00
33.00
3 3 .OO

2,237
T7275~
1,019
256
962
87
291
210
217
157

39.5
'39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
37.5
39.0

59.50
627W
61.00
64.50
57.00
66.00
52.00
55.50
58.00
60.00

—

39.0
39.5
39.5

4 2.00

39.0

31
-

10

-

66

128
“ 43“
28

10
21

-

-

81
36 1
27
9
45
24

53
46
7
13

20
80

3

6
8

16

54

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
15
15
7

11
11
7
4
.

22

_

21

2

1

8
-

26
-

1

8

26

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
1
3
3

30
7
3
4

108
-

_
-

145
78
73
5
67
4
8
6
40
9

108
108

234
125
105
20
109
2
23
55
27
2

2
6

3

11
1

1
1
1

.

16
14

3

3

I
Secretaries .............................
Manufacturing.............. ..........
Durable goods ........ .............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale t r a d e ........ ...........
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** .........................
Services ................................................................................

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

81
37
37
44

66
22
20
2
44
4
n
10
n
8

128
44
40
4
84

180
139
68
57
61
53
7
4
82
n2
10
5
30
20
27 i 28

1
72
2
9
1

1

7
13

1 U
40

259
183
137
46
76
6
6
7
32
25

298

202
150
52
96
6
32
24
26
8

208
262
151
199
156
109
43 j 42
57
63
14 s 12
13 1 5
19 ! 9 :
16
20
1 ; n

81
41
24
17
40
8
18
7
2
5

47
28
17
n
19
7
_

n

32
27
27
5
2

31

8
6
2
23
7
1

5
4
1

_
.
_

6
.

.

3

_

_

-

-

_

2
10

2
13

3
-

_

_

3

-

j
Stenographers, general ........................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing........ ............
Public utilities « ................
Wholesale trade ...........................................................
R e t a i l tr a d e T. T. . T, r r _ . T. , r . r . . r . r f
Finance * * ................ .................................... .. .................. ..
Services ...........................

Stenographers, technical ................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing.... ............. .

4,939

51.00
52.00
53.50
44.00
47.00
50.50
45.00
46.00
46.50
49.00

293
150

39.5
.48.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
37.5
38.5

^rr

105

39.5

31

38.5

603
250
207
43
353
58
106
87
73

40.0

46.00
51.00
52.00
45.50
43.00

311

1

150
96
81
15
54

-

2
12

36
30
24
6
6

-

-

-

-

6
2

3
2

32

52.00

3,169
435
1,335
268
413

H
-

2

-

-

-

-

6

4
*

54.50

-

~

1

-

-

“

4 0
40.0
39.5
40.5
40.5
40.5
38.5
42.5

“

“

_
-

l

“

29

u
_

-

-

-

-

_

-

.

-

.

14

a . 00

-

-

-

43.50
42.50
39.50

-

-

14

29
15
14

-

.

-

_

-

-

-

-

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

•

-

i

Switchboard operators ...........................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................................
Durable goods .................................................................
Nondurable goods ........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................__
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance * * .........................
S e r v i c e s ............ ....................................... ...

g

17

9
7

8

264
144
119
25
120
19
19
39
39
4

_

55.50

199
127
118
9
72
22
17

.

-

-

52
13
8
5
39

76
10
6
4
66

454
251
343
108
203
23
110
15
29
26

447
365
252
113
82
25
18
, H

378
213
167
46
165
24
44
61
36

482
279
228
51
203
26
60
Q

22
6

55
53

12
3
9

6
5
1

15
13
2

69
19

40
20
15
5
20
15
5

62
26
21
5
36
3
16
8
6

-

7
—

262
162
137
25
100
24
26
31
13
6

166
105
I

S
L

24
! 61
15
17

8
20
3

126
50
46
4
76
21
29
17
9
-

3

8

3

6 “ --- 1 “

l

2

-

-

51

58
47
43
4

10
6
3
3
4
1

1145
1092
1089
3
53
8
15

540
459
456
3
81
44
13

17?
155
154
1
20
7
4

| *5
68
,
68
| _
1 17
i 10
-

_

-

15
11

21
3

3
6

1
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

6

4

-

-

-

-

15
5
10

27
27

12
6
6

.

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

52

22
15
14
1
7
3

l
<

-

1 2 !
t

1
6 i
_
!
6

4
iH

.

_

.

_

-

_

_

-

_

!

-

.

i

-

_
_
-

4

_

—

_
_

j

_

-

4
11
24

4
37
25

n

8
50
21
1
14
n

-

-

5
40

11

57
28
25
3
29

_

_

_

8
1
-

8
5
-

n

6

30
3
4

.

1
2

46
46
_

6
-

2
4
-

2
-

.

n

9
9
2

1
1

_

_

.

-

1

.

.

.

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

•

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

-

.

.

_

-

_

.

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

^

8
«

0

Table A-l:

O
ffice,

0C C 44fX atiO *U

-

Go*Ui4U4*d

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Fa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 110.0
and
%
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 100.00 n o . o c over
$

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

$

Women - Continued

%
Switchboard operator-receptionists ......
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Durable goods ...................................................
Nondurable g o o d s .............. .. ............. ..
Nonmanufacturing ........ .. .................. ..

39.0

125
78
323
23
208
38
18
36

Wholesale t r a d e ................................. .. ................
Retail trade .......................
S e r v i c e s ....... ...................

4 5 .5 0

-

38.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
41.0
37.0
39.0

--------2 D J -

43.50

3970“

526

45.50
46.50
42.00
43.50
41.50
38.50
51.50
44.50

-

9

46
22
22

-

-

-

24

_

-

-

7
13

15
7
2

-

6
7

20

_

“

81
12

-

-

-

13
6

27
7
7

9
T

12
69

3
-

62
6

-

4

1

10
2
8
2
6

13
2
11
7

12
2
10

_

-

-

•

78
19
6
13
59
7

45

64
21
12
9
43

-

45
H

K

33
2
3

23
19
12
7
4

_

26

34
3
1

64
21
20
23

3
1

-

21
14
18

14
4
4

a

10

3

8
2

14
4

_

5

16
3
13
1

19
2
17
2
10
2

25
15
10
2
2
2

17
12
5
2
1
2

23
18
17
1
5

17
16
16

14
14

-

8
8
7
1

1

.

1

1

-

-

119
112
112

_

.

.

.

-

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

.

_

_

-

_

_

_
_

_

y

-

-

_
_

5

3

3

-

5
5

Q

.

1

8

14

36
20
14
6
16

4

-

-

-

34
33
1
1

59
56
3
1

p

12
2
2

4
1
1

4
3
1

-

-

2

-

4
4
4

10
10
7
3

19
19
16
3

_

-

_

-

-

-

162
144
144

23
19
19

106
93
93

18
3
8

4
.

13
_

4

3

-

-

-

-

!
Tabulating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing ............ .......... .
Nonmanufacturing ..................... .
Public utilities * ................
Retail t r a d e ........ ............ .
Finance ** .........................

246
152
94
23
21
36

Transcribing-machine operators, general ••
Manufacturing ............. ......... .
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .

219
39.5
141 ...“ 3 9 7 5 ”
120
40.0
21
39.0
78
39.0
40
40.0
27
37.5

W h o le s a la tr a d e

TT______ ____ _____

Finance * * ............ ........

Typists, class A .............. ..........
Manufacturing .........................
Durable g o o d s .......... ........
Nondurable g o o d s .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ........... ...........
Wholesale trade ................. .
Finance * * .... .......... ..........

.

.

.

.

.

Wholesale t r a d e .
.
.
.. .
.. .
.. .
Retail trade . .
.
.
.
.
.
..
Finance * * .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Services ....... .............. .

1/
*
**

.

1,904
r
825
108
. 971.
.
.
63
. . 271
. .
. 156
.
. . 425.
56

39.0
40.6
40.0
39.0
.
38.5 .
.
40.0.
40.0 .
. .
.
.
40.0 .
.
36.5 .
38.0

39.50
a . 50
42.00
36.50
.
.
37.50 .
. 39.50 .
.
. 38.50 . .
.
. .
.
.
39.50 .
.
.
36.00 .
38.50

—

.

..
..

..

.
.
. .
.
.

-

-

-

-

-

i

1

-

-

-

i

1

i

1

-

4
4
4

22
22
19
3

91
17
9
8
.
74

193
60
42
18
.
133

-

1
-

1.
.

.

.

.

.

. _
.

. .

. -.

. .

.
1

.

.8
.
66

.

- .

.

.

.

3

8
8
8

.

.18 .
.
95

4

.

.

. . 50 . .

. 13 . .
.
.

190
& r
48
16
.
126
.

. 13 .
.

.
59

4

-

.

.
-

10

4

20

20
11
6

25
9
8
1
16
6
10

27
26
17
9
1
1

21
15
4

28
20
18
2
8
4
2

11 i
8
3

.

6
6

4

-

-

6
-

6
2

•

15 i
4
4

-

-

48.50
51.TN5
51.50
43.00
44.50
42.00
43.00

. .

..

-

45.50
49.66
49.00
50.50
39.00
38.50
38.00

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
39.5
37.0

.

. .

54.00
59.66
45.00
46.00
44.00
44.50

778
--- 477“
456
21
301
148
87

Typists, class B .........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable g o o d s ...... ...............
Nondurable g o o d s ......... .........
Nonmanufacturing .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Public u t i l i t i e s *

39.5
4070T
39.0
39.5
40.0
38.0

80
32
32
48
27
16

91
21
11
10
70
42
17

59
30
28
2
29
12
13

52
37
33
4
15
10
2

45
36
36
9
3
5

62
38
35
3
24
22
-

204
138
135

152
42
39

39
15
15

25
22
22

-

_

286
306
294
202
137
124
106
180
117
20
18
22
.
.
.
157 . 162 . 104 .
. 14 .
. 23 .
. Q.
. . 58 .
. 46 .
. 39 .
. 20 .
. 16 .
. 4 .
.
.
.
50 .
48 .
55 .
10
27
4

-

*

2
4

5

31
10
10
-

14

Ip

1

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

_
_

.
-

.
_

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2
2

11
4
4

_

_

_

.

21
6
1

1
1

7
_

.
_

_
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

3

.

.
-

-

-

-

_
_

_

-

-

-

4
-

-

.
_

_

. 23 .
. 14 .
.

.
110
.
2.
. 37
. 59
.
10
2

.

.
24
.

3

.
.

.3
.

1

.
.

.

.

.

.1
.
13

4

.4
.

. -

.
.

.2

.

.
.

.

1.
6

.
.

2
1
._

. •

.
.

_

3
.

.

7

.

.

.
.

.
.

.
.

.

.
.

1

.
.

-

-

.

.

. _
.

._

.

.
.

- .

._

.

.

.

_

.
.

.
.

_

H
ours reflect the w
orkw
eek for w
hich employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




«.
_

3
.

8 .

.
21

2
2

_

22
1
1

3
.
66
.

2
2

.

3
3

2
2
_
_

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

-

. .

.

.

.

.

.

. _

. .

.

.

.

_

.
.-

.

.

_

.
.

. _

.
.

.

.

•

.
.

.

.

. _

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

9
,

p K ^ ed A ia tu U

Table A-2S

0 "d

*
*1ecJ u U C o l 0 cC 4 ifu U iO 4 U

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa*, by industry division, November 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

$

$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W eek ly
hours
(Standard)

W eek ly
earnings
(Standard)

Under 4.0.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00

$

I -

40.00 45 .OO

50.00

55.00 60.00

65.00

$

$

65.00

70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95 .OCtLOO.OOfLIO.00tL20.00130.0014-0.00150.00160.0dl70.0dL8 .oq;
.
80 200.00
and
70.00 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0 90.00 95.00 jLOO.QCjllO. 00(120. ooft.30.00(140.00|l50.00|l6Q.OO|l70.00|l80.0<j200. PC over

Men

Draftsmen, chief .....
Manufacturing.... .

Draftsmen .............
Manufacturing.... .
Nonmanufacturing ..,
Public utilities
Wholesale trade ,
Services .......

286

$
40.5
1075"

16
15

139.50

1,838

40.0

90.50

17554"

"407TT
40.0

ir a r

304
55
36

211

Draftsmen, junior ....
Manufacturing ......
Nonmanufacturing ..,

678
661
17

Tracers ...............
Manufacturing .....

144
-127“

40.0

40.0
40.0

40.0

71.50

27

83

72.00

IT

39.5

51.50

2

62

14
9

40.0

61.00

40.0

7

64.W

ic r

17
"IT

23

"IT

34
15
4
13

18

13

4
4

4

80

103

64
14

12

96.00

"4070“

320

64
36
28

5
7

61.50

83

16

14

12

87.00
71.50

4T TOT

"50T W

1

43

10"

30

6
7

10

39

142
T32T

234

212 I 112

"SET' l'8o
22

5i

32

-i

17

84

IT
l

17 |

42

11
11

13
13

376

349

1

101
69

-9 3

92

28

54
54

13

12

12
12

27

-

3

32

"4 2"

111

54
38

16

48

32
32

38

~W

12
12

16

"TT

IT

Women

Draftsmen, junior ...........
Manufacturing
.... .......
,

38

39.5

14"

77070“

56.50
37700"

T r a c e r s ................ .......
Manufacturing.... ..........

IT

38.5
■4070“

44.50 2/26
31700"

Nurses, industrial (registered)
Manufacturing ..............
Nonmanufaoturing...... ••••.
Retail trade ........

g/
*

40.0
77070“

63. ^ 0
>
"55700"

22

39.0

68.50

10

39.5

73.00

315

W

17

U

21

14

30
29

1

80

67

~W 1 2 "
2
2

50

70

45
5

6T
1

1

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
Workers were distributed as follows t 16 at $35 - 37.50} and 10 at $37.50 - 40.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




10,

Maintenance and Ponte* Plant Occupation*

Table a -3:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ..............................
Manufacturing ......................... .......... .
Durable goods ............................
Nondurable g o o d s ........ .............. ........
Nonmanufacturing............... ..................

Number
o
f
workers

1,150

-r & r
978
54
118
65

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
* 1
hourly
1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.40 2.50 2 .6 0 2.80
earnings Under 1.15 1 .2 0 1*25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 i.8o 1.85
*
1.15 1.2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2 .4 0 2.50 2.60 2.80 3 .0 0

$
1.92

1.&

1
'

1.89
1.87
2.19
2.58
1.57

20
11
Electricians, maintenance........ ............. .
Manufacturing............ ............. .
Durable goods ••«...............................
Nondurable g o o d s ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ........ .......•••••............. .
PnKHf* n H U f l o q « .............................
Pnfo4 1
......
......... . .
...
Engineers, stationary ................................
Manufacturing .................. ••••...............
Durable goods ......... ................... ..
Nondurable g o o d s .......................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Public utilities * .............................
Retail trade ................. ..................
1M nAnoo M _ ___________ __________ __________
S e r v i c e s ...... ............... •••••••••........
Firemen, stationary boiler ....••••.............. .
Manufacturing......... ..................... .
Durable g o o d s .............. ......... ••••••••••
Nondurable g o o d s ........ ............... .......
Nonmanufacturing ............. .....................
Retail t r a d e ...................................
Servi c e s ........ ........................ .
Helpers, trades, maintenance .........................
Manufacturing....... .............................
Durable g o o d s ....... ...................... .
Nondurable goods ...................... •••••••••
Nonmanufacturing........ .........................
PllM^n
T4+ $oo #
■
...
.....

Machine-tool operators, to o lro o m .... ............... .
Manufacturing ..... ...............................
Machinists. maintenance
Manufacturing..................... ..................... •••••..............
Durable goods ................................... .
Nondurable goods .................. .............
....
PliW ^a

H

.

....
......
- ..............

2,072
131
112
62

-

-

2 .0 0
1.99.
1.99
1.98
2.20
2.01
2.68

-

JH
964
696
552
144

268
12
70
90
82
1,095
888“
738
150
207
32
54

2,689
2,6£r
2,550
91
48
36

1

5
-

24
16

1.85
1.91”
1.89.
2.02
1.66
1.85
2.36
1.31
1.45
1.64
1.63
1.61
1.71
1.70
1.68
1.17

1.91
1.91 ”
2.01
2.01
2.01
2.16
2.07
1.97

22

11
10
6

8

3

12
12

2

-

12
-

_ i

3
3
3
-

-

10

- i
10
30
_
10
30

10

22
-

s

—

16
_ !
- j
12
4

22

3

_

5
5
-

;
j
1
!

- 1

-

-

61
ss
22
6
33
31

_
- 1
- i
-

_

_

_ 1

-

- !
-

-

16

12
11

6
14
1

11
1

19
19
19
-

49
49
45
4
-

95
95
95
-

100

229
229
226
3
-

80
51
29
20
19

199
193
187
6
6

3

-

12
12
12
-

66
35
35
31
1

6

24

16
_
g
8

j
16

6

8

16
16

510
11

12

-

-

4

187
182
174
8
5

5

494
490
475
15
4
2

21
20
20

38 3.65 !52
39
74
41
70
32 f S i l r w
35
33
21
70
32 139
75
31
12
19
4
61
6
6
1 | 6
7 ! 16
4
- i
1 j 3
3
4
_
- j
- i 8
3
! 5
1
5
6
i ~
1 | 6 : 1

19
79 ; 33 375 128 ;
78 i 30 374 128
19
8
78
76 !
14 358
11 1
16
16
52
- !
1
1
3
3 j 1
1
i
“
i
j158 ! 153 1
129 593 2246
155 555 2216 151 153
121 515 12198
95 130
18 ! 56
40
4
23
30
7
1 38
4
4 ! 3g
7
30
!
8
'
29
40
8
40
29
- !
2
2
2
- j

_
j

1
1
1

4
4
4
-

14
14
10
4

?8
49
36 ! 42
36 ! 42
i
2 ! 7
2
7
78
78
78
-

16

M

j 69
1 69
! 52 i

|

17

i

8
8
8
-

l_30_ 115
: 20
; 4
! 16
j 10 115
8
i

230

74 * 52 ! 70
76
52
r r w , 74
227 : 70
61
43
9
9
3
4
-

177
177

17
17

83
83

64 372
64 ' 360
50 352
8
14
12
12

39

19
19
17
2

29
27
2
10
10
i

1

8
1

-

521
521

63
56
51
5
7

790
769
739
36
21
21

-

77
63
62
1
14

1

?o
30
21
9

16
16
16
-

|

-

_

41
-

37

1

12
12

-

a
38

25
25

1
1

?? 1 15
33 ! 14
55
1
33
55
- ! - j 13
1
3
_
1
2
i
1
2 i ?8
4
20
4
2
2 ! 15
2
2
5
- j 18
_
_
18
! _
-

2?

8

14
7
7
11

8

6

11

g

g

10
3
3
7
7

6
6
6

2
2
2

-

-

_
-

-

-

42
39
39

-

-

3

-

-

-

67
52
48
4
15
15

-

_

-

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

5
5

50
50

21
21

10
10

2
2

1
1

-

- 2L -

_

_

-

-

63
63

153
153

15
15

446 1537 1 20
446 1534
19

J
____ 1
____

-

-

54
54
54
-

3
3

26
9
9

_
-

_
-

444 1521
2
13

26

?8

21 _
-

56
54
54
2

1
1
1

1

19
19

87
25
18
70
15
12
3
7
5
- j 5! 7

82

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau pf Labor Statistics




33
33
33

over

5

|

!
!
!

7
6
6
1
1
_

24
24

-

1

i
j

6
-

21
20

7
7
7
-

-

! '

|

;

3 | 22
_
_ ;

2
2 1
2 !
- |

-

3
3
-

3

1

16
18
12
- 1 12

20
3
3
17
/

-

6 !

2
2
2

20
53
17
45
- ! 39 | 17
- | 6
- i 8 j 3
—
i
3
- ! 8

-

3

11

6

16
27
11
- ! ~
j
—
- t
27 i 16
11
4
1 3
16 1 8
19
I
14
10
- ! 10 !
- ; io !
i
14 1 _

1

169
169
153

38
33
28
5
5

94
94
94
-

2
1

~ r

5
4

_
3
-

24 I
g
16

10

1

8

1

10
24
- ! -

_

1

1

4
3
3
-

2

4

_ !
30

4
3
3

19
19

8

5

2

IP
-

16

1

5

4

_
_ —
•
-

-

i

1.58
4,204
'"4,053“ "1.59
3,875
1.59
178
1.61
151
1.41
1.48
117
733
--- 733“

-

1

1 .5 6

2,315

4

-

4

-

$
3.00
and

18
1
1
1

38
28
24
4
10
10

26
18
18
8

16 _ 2 1 _
12
23
12
18
5
£

26

26

11,

T x-3r Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupat ion^ - Continued
able
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Undei 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2.4 0 2.50 2.60 2.80 3.00
earnings
and
1
1.15 1 .2 0 l.?5 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .5 5 1.6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2,80 3.00 over

Maintenance men, general utility •••.................
Manufacturing .......... •••........*...............
Nonmanufacturing ................ *.................

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) •••••••»••*.••••••
Manufacturing....... •••••.....
Durable goods ............................. •••••
Nondurable goods ......................... *.....
Nonmanufa cturing *••••*.... *........*.......*.....

Mechanics, maintenance............ ...........*......
Manufacturing.....................................
Durable goods ............ ................. .
Nondurable g o o d s .... .............. ............
Millwrights ..........................................
Manufacturing ....... ......................... .

Manufacturing ••••*........ .................. .
Durable ^ o o d s ............. ....................
NnnHiirflVila grinH«
Nonmanufacturing..... ............................
Public utllltlsa * ,........................ .
Painters, maintenance ................ ................
Manufacturing •••*••........ ••••..................
Durable g o o d s .... •••.................... ......
Nondurable goods ••••........................ .
Nonmanufacturing *....... •••......................
P n M i / n+.it i+.ia* a TT.t.T1TTT.T.TTfftftttttllitf
»
Rjktfll 1 troH* tttttttitTtttttttttttttittr-tttTt.i
FlnATICA **

6a
297
344
69
65
i/(
n

t
1.71
1.76
1.67
1.65
2.13
1.3g

24

10

4

24

10

24

10

769
--- 290“
155
135
09
3?9
99

1.89
1. %
1.94
1.97
1.85
1.79
2.09

2,3142,197“
2,009
188

1.8 6
1.8 6
1.8 6

2,369
2,369

1.96
1.96

-

884.
832
810

1.55

52
34-

38

15

38

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

4

-

- !
i

\
10
2
2

-

1

2
2
2

_

_

-

-

r~i
- 1

5
4
4

6
6“

1

38

30

160

23

17

8
22
3
3

136

17

24

6

10

6

45

136
20
20

8

30
29

10
2
2

-

4

64
21

49
16
33
9
7
17

3

-

14

12

38

85

2
2

4
-

8

8
8

1
3

25
7
18

10

43
40

21
1

g

_

*

16
15
3

4

12
12

8

L

8

-

-

-

42

4
4
30

26
6
6
6

77
63

6

263
215
215
-

_

_

-

-

-

;
_ —
-

1

4
16

-

33
29
14
15

-

2
2

4
4

1
1

12
12

7
7

16
16

22
22
22

86
68
68

147
147
147

512
512
511

21

42
42
39

13

4
4

1.83
_

1.55
I .73

-

_
-

1.54

2

_ j

_

1

7
-

- —
-

3

3

_

18
/
A 1

1.6 2
6
-

136

1.6 6

6

27

1.82
2.23
1*53

7

6

- j

1

12

8
in

-

8 i 12

.

20

_

22

1

21 j

!4 |

-

9 i
6 i
3
12 ^

u

8

1

1
3

12

g

3

5
5
5
_
_

1
1
12
12

18
18
J. |
O

|

8

3
3

78
55 101
77
96
39
77 ; 21
96
18 ! 16
1
5
/
A
_ i

12

4

15
14

4
A

1

37
7
30

2

6
3
3

1
1

103
23
18
5
80
77

16
10
6
29
27

2
566
566

560
6
23
23

2
2
p
*

9
3
-

_
116

3

6
6

101
362
361

81
81
64
17

342
19

51
51

77
77

1?
13
13

235
235
154
81

134
133
59
74

1

504
504

482
22

122 1883
122 1883

_ 1
-

_ ;
*

_
-

-J L , 100
11
8

3
34

9
16
102
87
87

_
_

2

18

32

12

12
20
68

12
6

_

/
*■
*

10
6
6

21
12
12
22
22

5

_
_
_

_
-

18
18

13
13

49
49

12

6
6

6
6
6

_
_

_
_

_
-

_
_
-

6
6
6

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

/

16
15
15

6

24
24
24

4

68

6

12

_
•
_

-

2

12

6
5

2

26

6

2

2

16

12

-

6

52

23

-

-

20

10
10

4

50

12

- r

1.77
1.79'
1.80
1.78

905
--- 769“
710
59

23

7

4

2

1 .5 6

22

7
7

-

14

2

”

46

6
6
6

6
6
6

30
30

_

_

1
-

l

~

J
45
42
36

6
3

2

363
352
331

21
11
11

1

30
26

H

10

56 |

3

45
45

2
2

6
6
6

11

1

-

10
1

44, 18
32 ! 15
17
32 i 13
- ’ 2
9
12 ! 3
4
/ : 2
3
A

1

95
78
29
49
17
17

14
7

3

2

4

_

-

_

9
9
9

_

-

4

_

-

_

3

2

3

2

6
6
6

13
13
13

6

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13 —

6
r

!
Pine fitters, maintenance...........................
Manufacturing ................. .
Durable goods ••••............................ .
Nondurable goods *........... ..................
Nonmanufacturing..................................
PllKI 1 / liW 11+A A p # TrTtrtiri.Ttttitiifiiliiiiit,
»

1,768
1,656
1,519
137

112
101

1.85
1.84
1.84
1.87
1.92
1.82

Plumbers, maintenance .............. ..................
Manufacturing *...... .................... .
Nonmanufacturing................. .............

51
33
18

1.80
1.85
1.71

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance •••••.... ......•••••
Manufacturing

198
192

24

2
6
6
2 “i r “ in
6
6

1.99
1.99

Tool-and-die makers .......... .......•••..............
MnniifacfaiT>lng i i t i m r t t t m m i m m m i i M t m M

662
--- 5 5 T

2.08
2.08

.
-

-

- |

2

24
24
4

20

*

2 j 62

367

9
9
2 1 53

366
-

- !
-

2 1
1

2

4 - 1 :
3

2

_

_

!

_

_

_

_

-

_

1

1
4

2

-

1

2
2

2

-

-

4

-

_

_

_

366
1

36
36
25

11
-

1

313
295

59 659
5 9 ! 658

64
6l

262

51 ! 658
8 i

46
15
3
•
a
J

33
18
18

1

1

6
1

10
10

-

-

1

-

20

60
57

13
13

135
135

103

55

103

55

6

5

5

-

1

4
1

5
-

9
7
2

4
4

12
12

20
20

6
3

31
31

7

1
1

25
25

35
35

79
78

4

20

130
130

4

6

-

-

-

4

6

-

-

2

6

_

_

1

— V

-

-

1

-

9

1
1

1
1

•
A

6

1

4

1

7

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




-

_

i

1/
*
**

24 !
- | 24

2

59

59

22
22

9

*

_

12,

Table A-4:

G u & tfu t ifU ,

T V G ,> l& llO U liH (f't C U td

S U iflfU W

f

O oO H

f i a t i fm

i

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAJGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) .........
Nonmanufacturing

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) . . .
Manufacturing ........................................................••••••

Guards ................................ .................. ••••••.••............
Manufacturing ................ ............. ................ ................
Durable goods................ ........................... ...............
Nondurable goods.................• • .......... ................
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance ** ..............................., ...............

N me
u br
o
f
wr e s
okr

3,501
3,467
34

1,616
"1761-6“

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aea e
vr g
$
$
h uly U d 0.75 0.60 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 $
or
n er
1.65 i.7Q i .75 i.80 i.90 1.00 ’fe.io ^.20
e r in s
an g
and
1
3.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7C1.75 1.80 1*90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over

♦
1.72
1.72
1.76

4,851
' 2/591"
2,154
437
2,260
197
118
870
798
277

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (w en) ................ •••••
om
Manufacturing........... ............................................. •••••
Durable goods.......................... .
Nondurable goods........................................... ••••••
Nonmanufacturing.................. ..........................................
m a
eal
...
R + »11 t| A iA , Mi m i « t t t n t t m i i i t i t ir i i t m i i T
aj
*r
FInance

1,549
330
185
145
1,219
48
215
668

Order fille r s ......... ............................. • * . . . . . . . . ........ .
Mam ifar»g m i m t i i i i t i t i i t i i i t t i n m t i r t r T i i
Durable goods •••••.......................................... .
Nondurable goods
..............................................
N m u acturing
on an f
.......................................... .
Wholesale trade .........................................................
Retail trade........... ........ ........................... .............

2,408
w
858
385
1,165
784
381

1.22
1.34
1.34
1.31
1.06
1.30
1.18
1.06
1.09
.92

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

140 153 148 129 168
1
9 10
10
1
9
140 152 148 120 158
”
7
8
105 87
34 38
18 10 13-i 10 69
6 76 43
17 55

71
3
3
66

36

-

-

28
7

-

-

-

4

7
7

4
1

21

-

-

23
21
21

7
7
7

35
35
35

2
2

-

-

83 218 57
13 37 37
13 12 15
25 22
70 181 20
5
8
13
3
10
3
28 155
5
23 18

447 115
111
24
87
336 115

54
36
4
32
18

59
31
27

37 1H
1
205

17
1

10
18

15

4

50

35

35
35

-

98 300 179
31 17 26
28
9 26
8
3
67 283 153
6 17
5
10 13 14
12 30
39 200 122
1 34

25 224 130
10
4
4
10
126
25 2U
/
15
v
_
6 200 125

28

-

7
-

9
9

-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




9
-

-

.98
87 204
1.15 ” — r 15
1.21
14
1
1.06
i
66 189
.93
.82
29
1.02
31
54 16
.94

1.54
1.62 ”
1.65
1.54
1.46
1.41
1.57

41
41

27 176 547 1209 501 264 334 1?4
1107 «oi
27 17^ KJ.O J .71 PJ
W
L
J
354 i a
12
5
3
13

84

36 121 167 178
36 121 167 178

264 170
264 170

29 176
29 176

12 no 79
9 109 72
9 109 20
52
1 7
3
3
1 6

96 121 270 U6
81 112 262 112
81 112 253 n 2
9
9 8
15
4
9
12
8

776 5?
746 58
718 58
28
30 1

76
75
75

1.75
1.75 •

1,953 1.61
1,548 -1.61”
1,754 1.62
94 1.54
105 1.46
59 1.33

Janitors, porters, and gleaners (m
en) . ..........................
Manufacturing ................................. ......... ................
Durable goods......................... ..............................
Nondurable goods .••••••••........... ••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........................................... « . . . ........ .
Public utilities » ....................................................
U in
Vl
A tr^rfA t T T T W t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t r T - T T l t t t t t t t
Retail trade .............................................. .
Finance ** .........................................................
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 51
12 50
1

50
15
35

14

14
14

15
15

4

28

4
4

17
12
9
3

5
1
4

23

23
20

596 1521 371 247
179 13§1 298 190
46 1258 280 172
133 123 18 18
417 140 73 57
Q 53 39 22
3 22 5
18
6
295 74
95 10
5 30
1

12
11
3
8
1

3?
39
35
4

-

n 44
n 37
9 37
2 7

241

194
135
59
47
n
15
18

3

4
2

1

10

2

2
-

22
21
21

87 171
87 171

9 144
5 144
_ 144
5
4

2
_

4
3

10

2

2

1

2

3
1

10

2

2

1

2

1

2
2
2

1

-

_
-

1

7
7
7
-

-

153

_
-

-

33 104
35 104

32
52

81
81

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

—

—

*
•

-

3

1

76 120 182 i n
36 36 83 43
36 10 33
36
73 10
40 84 99 71
40 84 99 71

34 126
22 122
7 122
15
12 4
6

1
1

26
26

-

_

-

_
_

-

_
_

6
6
6
_
_

7
7

7
_

27
27
27
_

-

-

-

1

96

6a

n9

58

345

63

48 285 63
10 60
38 296 56
35 2n 43
82 13
3

273
89 ” 20*
73
74
16 135
64
6
5
3C
n
50
35

98 1?6
58 48
25 31
33
15
40 90
26
6
n
84

61 132
25 U5
25 n s
36 17
12
24 17

Occupational Uage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

13,

T b A t Gu&toduU, lltateUcHUuup, and SUipfUH f Occupatio - Gontmuod
a i« -U
n*
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Pittsburgh, Pa., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N me
u br
o
f

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aea e
vr g
$
$
$
$
$
s
I
S
$
h uly Jnd 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7C
or
er
1 .7 5 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
1
D.75 .80 .85 .90 .95; 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.6 0 I .65 1.7C 1.7* 1.80 1.90 2,00 2.10 2.20 over
%

Packers................ ....................................................
Manufacturing ......................................... ......... *..........
Durable goods......................................................
Nondurable goods................ *................................. .
Nonmanufacturing.................... ......................................
Retail trade.................. ........................................

1,323 1.48
778 “X 5 T
618 1.57
160
1.44
545 1.38
326
1.28
200
1.52

-

3
3
3

-

41
- — 6"
6

i

-

-

-

-

l

-

-

-

-

35
35

-

-

21
21

28
14

14
14

10

10

4
14
14

4
-

5

-

21

5

i

17
12
12

30
30
30

55
34
10

24
21
21

67 247 144
4 122 108
4 73 108
49
63 125 36
63 45 34
80
2

90 205
49 86 no
13 56 101
36 30
9
39 4 95
37 3
1
2
76

99
71
71
28
23
5

12

2

3
3
3
_
-

6

70
54
54
_
16

2

-

6

16

9
7
7
-

88

2

4

16
14
14

25
23
23
_

24
24
24

14
14
14

2

2

_

-

2

2

-

-

3
1
1

5
5
5
_

_
.
_
-

!
Receiving clerks ................................................................
Manufacturing........................... ................... *.............
Durable goods.................... ................................ .
Nondurable goods.......................................... *........
Nonmanufacturing .................. ...................................
Retail trade.................................................. *........
Saw paq »*»«»tt»»#t»t»t»?t»tt-T-»T_tTiiiitrtin
H
Shinning clerks.................... ••••••••.......... .
Manufacturing ......................... *.......... ........... . . . . . . . *
Durable goods........................................................
Nondurable goods ......... ........................••••............
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
UiaI oael a fi«o^A .................... .................. _... . . __
V
Retail trade ............................. •••••••••........ .

568

1.58
1.62

9

5

2

13

331
308
23
237
108

1.53

-

-

-

9

-

-

2

5

-

1 .5 3

13

66

1.65

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

1

4

1

2

8
1
1

-

5
g

1.6 2
1.6 8

23
985
816
776
40
169

1.6 0
i . 6o
1 .6 0

9

1.0 2

100

52

-

-

-

-

1.6 0

-

-

-

- j

1.58
1.77

-

1.50

-

-

2

1

1

2

1?
10

-

48
48
48

?6

17

36
36

1
1

-

-

1

-

-

16

15
15
15

1

-

1

-

-

-

11

1

15
9
9

9
1

6

16
14
14

1

7

10
10
10

-

-

7

1

_
-

g

2
2

3

55 34
39 17
38 14
1
3
16 17
16
12
4 1

6

12
12
1
11

13

11
11

-

-

2

-

3

80
38
35
3
42
36

2

40
35
23

53 168
47 152
47 143
12
9
6 1 16
5
3i
I^
12
61
2
“

80 I64
37 123
37 118
5
43 a
18
3 23

13
9
6

3
4
/

96 i n 154
90 148
90 148
28 21
6
25 21
6
3

68
68

16
8
8

15
9
9
_

23
13
13
-

_

9

6

10

2

2

10

2

_

_

42 80
35 74
32 74
3;
7
6

6
6
6

-

8
8
8

-

13
9
9
4

-

-

4

7

23

7

9
14
14

25

3
6

48
16
12

4
32
15
17

/
+

6

6

31

4

j

Shinning-and-receiving clerks....... .....................
T t nt m m i im t • tu iT 'tttm im titi
'g
Nonmanufacturing ................................ .
U lrlO fll A + ^ . . ......................_ . _ _ ____ ____ ___ _ _________ _ ^
Vt Q
t*O A

482

282
226

................... ....................................................

50

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...............••••••........
Manufacturing............. ..............................................
Durable goods......... •••••••............... ....................
Nondurable goods ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..••••••............. ...••••.••••..........
4a n+414+4 n 4
o 1
...........................
Wholesale trade...............••••............... ...••••••
Retail trade *................................................ .

4,726
2,421
1,861

P a+ o4 1

..

.

...

1.6 0

1
0

1 .6 1
1 .6 1
1.6 3

10

----- 20 ?T 1,57

Nondurable goods................ ••.••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing......................... ................................
Retail trade .............................................................

667

1.4 8

960
3l2
222

Truck drivers, light (under 1+ tons) ................ ...........
Manufacturing......... ........... ........... ••••••••...............

1,1 12

1.4?
1.51
1.52
1.48
1.47
1.56
1.43

1.78
1.76
1.72

90
648
283

1.78
1.83

560

2,305
518

1.8 6

4

_

8
7
1

4
12

4

“

-

3
3
3
-

57
4
4
53

10
24

18

17
15

43
9

17
7

18
-

21
54
3 6 : 47

-

-

42

6

11

4

-

-

-

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

122
2
2

2

10

8

-

34

io
-

4

10

-

_J
-

6

-

-

1?

-

I
-

4

137
13
124

59 187 171
86 139
2
50 12
2
36 127
57 101 32

3
3
19
12
6

53
36
17
15

31
27
4

575 324 569 657 503
373 273 184 349 161
331 253 72 349 130
- 31
42 20 112
202
51 385 308 342
1
1
1
290
27 159 45 89 163 291
6 144 50
3
4 43

59
7
3
4
52

22

3
3
19

_
-

23 14
---- 6 “ 13
1
15 17
15
3

4i
28
io
-

15

52
20
20
— 10
32

22

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*




4 ;

4

-

8
7

-

4
4

-

-

6

-

19

-

27
24
3

44
17
27
15

3

2

12

2

432 646 107
16l 412 50
155 284 50
6 128
271 234 57
3 192
13
90 18
178 24 44

51
4l
41
-

44
25
19
15
3

8
8

13 2?8
64

83 136

12

8

12

_
23

52
12

- 194

4

6

122

m

4

n
n

3

3
1

14
7

7

65
46

10

57
48
48
9
7

40
19
g

6

2

13

/
*¥

3 860
2
3

n

3

-

-

n
14

10
21

2

258
258

6

35
35
35
_
-

9
9

la

9

38
36

-

103

2

1
1
1

-

-

-

_
-

43
43

19 .

43

_
19

-

14

T«b i« A-itr

Q iutodial, WaA/eltouUMQ, and S U ip p in f Occupation* - C on tin u ed
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
b a s i s in P i t t s b u r g h , Pa., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , N o v e m b e r 19 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Truck drivers, m m (l£ to and including A tons) •••
ediu
Manufacturing *..............................................................
Nondurable goods...............*...................... ••••••••

Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons, trailer type) .*.*•
Manufacturing.................. *................... •••••.......... .
Nonmanufacturing •••........••••.....................•••.*•••••

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ......................... ••.*....•............•••••••
Manufacturing......................••••••.....................••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods •••.................... .................••••••

Truckers, pow (fork-lift) ...............•.*..••••••••••••
er
Manufacturing........••**.......... * ..* ...............................
T itwW
V o a
a
. ............ .......... ...............
Nondurable goods .................. ......... •••••........ .

Truckers, pow (other than fork-lift) .••••••*•••••••
er
...........
.. . . U iP
am a

Watchmen.....................................*....*••........................ .
••
Manufacturing •••••............. ••••••••.....................•
a g>< p i i i n t i t i i t i - f ' i i i t M t m i i t f t t t
rr H
Nonmanufacturing
PnhUn li+.IH+.lAp
UVinl A p a l A

Retail trade

A

*

1 T 11 T tr T rT
1 .
t
.

111 . rt *T T ,
^-

, , , , , | . 1 1 1 1 t | 1 | 1 1 1 I t 1 I , 1 IT I t T 1 1 ■

..........................................................................................

IP-)'p p rw .A O
Q nw rl a a a

1/

(
tt tT ,i - t* ,, t tT r tT - *
. ..........................................................................

N u m ber
of
w orkers

2,224

537“
348
489
1,387
579
414

418
m

305

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.74
1.83
1.66
1.95
1.69
1.67
1.82

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
Jnder 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1 .4 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7C 1.75 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0
2.10 2.20
&
and
3.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 I .40 1*45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 I .7 5 1.80 1.9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 over

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.74
1.79
1.73

684
— 225^
95
133
456

-

-

-

12
12
12

1.63
1.63
1.63
1.62
1.62

1.72
1.88
1.80

823
§14~

1.29
1.33
1.35
1.25
1.18
1.29
1.15
1.25
1.19
.79

3 17
3 9
3 7
2
8

10
4
/
*¥

453 131 320 I 63 182 335
7 100 17 163 31 32 a
Q
3 46
7
25 16 a
8
6 16
4 54
126 353 114 157 132 150 294
cn 150 33
9 126
u
J
104 U.J p
JO T
10
80

1
7

220
12
208

1
-

_

_

_

_

.

-

2
2
2

-

_

1
1
1

13
10
10

31 21
24 20
7 1

22
5
17

20
12
12

50 213
38 8
37 8
1
12 205

19 333
145
13
132
1 AA
19 xoo

8
!

|

-

-

i

-

“

| -

9
9
9

12 23
3 23
3 17
6
9

i

1.70
1.70

1,211
195"
697
199
315
40
60
111
72
32

12
12
12

. 1

1.80

1,285
1,248
1,212
36
37

-

i

3

4

A

9
9
-

9

41

16

16
25
3
8
4
10

9
-

7
-

36
23
23

9

7

13

-

4

3
7

9

3

3

5
j

:

5
3
2

84
46
42
4
38
7
6
13
8
4

6o

20
12

48
12
4

12
8

64

44
34
14
20
10

7
-

4

1

15
11

9

9

11
4
4

9
1

242 130 I 69
86 174 77 159
30 167 59 148
56
7 18 n
24 68 53 10
8
8 2
20
12
9 1
4 52
8 24 7

no

24 221 69 176 618
24 221 r w 172 603
16 219 69 172 599
8
2
4

?
5
5

1
1

92 201
45 201

160
160

-

24

45 177 160
47

-

47

59
51
8

64
-

-

6

6

6
6
6

-

6
6
6

6
6
6

6
6
6

9

98
10
1ft
06^ X
U
70

58

58

3

9
0
7

-

-

-

-

57
48
32
16

64

-

44
44
44

20

6

O
ft
A
V

9
O
y

Q
7

!

Excludes prem
ium pay for overtime and night w
ork*
2 / Study limited to m n workers except w
e
here otherwise indicated.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




-

63
63

49
46

37
07
^1

64 255 68
64 255 68

44
22
6
16
22
12

4
4
2
2

92
90
80
10
2

78
78
78

6

4

-

2

93
09

6
3

1
1

-

2
1

3
3

-

-

-

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
M L l i t ' f 0*td .tf i. 1
Ccl+eU.
u4 Ue
/

Tab l e B-35:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.40 2.50
ud
n er
1.05 1 ,1 0 1.15 1 ,2 0 1,25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.4Q 2.50 2.60

$
2.60
an
d
over

Mn
e

Inspectors, class B 3 /a ......................................... ...........
Inspectors, class C 2a ........- ................... ........... .............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 2 /a ...............................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A Lj\ T otal......................................................
TIw ............ t rt ,
a
TneantiVe ..............................................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A 3/a ......................
Drill-press operators, radial, class A 2 /a ..............
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A 2 /b ........... ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class A 2 /a ...........................
Grinding-machine operators, class A 3/a. ....................
Milling-machine operators, class A 2 /a ......................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A 2 /a .....................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B l j s T otal...........................................................
Time.................................................. .
Incentive .............................................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 3/b ...............
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class B 3/b ..................................
Engine-lathe operators, class B 2/a ...........................
ftp T rAj o l n R A ft ft/n
A st-iv
Milling-machine operators, class B 2 /a ......................
Machine-tool*operators, production, class C ^A , A/ . . .
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C ^A ................................ .
Milling-machine operators, class C 2/b ......................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C 2/b ......................................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 2/a ...............................
Machinists, production 2 / a ................................ ...............
Tool-and-die m
akers (other than jobbing shops) 2 /a ....
Welders, hand, class A 2 /a ...................... ......... .
Welders, hand, class B 2 /a ................................................

584

*
1.97
1.87

?? 5

Assemblers, class A 3 /a ......... ...........................................
Assemblers, class B 3/b ......................................................

1.88

147
92
96
240

? 07
l ! 8A
1.40
1.39

_
_
-

_
-

_
14

1.92
1.83
2.04
1.84
1.78

_

_

_

31k

1,896

1,063
833
29
138

_
_

_

_
_

_

2

_

1.82

-

1,391
619
772

1.72
1.61
1.80
1.70

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

102

188

1.69
1.80
1.79
1.70

U9
50
35

1.64
1.64

104

1.62

-

_

20
21

8
12

49

3
19
78

k

34
3

11

3
3

16
11

n

7

8

| 2

2
2

45
39

2

7
13

6

/a

59
15
18
7

40
18
Jf
L
23

3
26

14
o
tC
1

63
30
29
y

3
3

1

27 123
25 115
g
2

64
4
.

6

36

8

8

-

17

10
8

6
1

-

39

2

-

2
22

51
46

8
6

10

9

29
16
5

2

27

2
2

-

8
2
2

1
1

66

1

34

14

33

64

85 346
60 65
25 281
13
5

96
34

6

-

-

1

7

29
28

36
32

1
1

k

7

-

-

11

1

-

2

3

11

18

2

10
1

1
”

17

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

_ 30
30
_
„
- ; -

6
1

-

-

-

- ;

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- I

-

Ik

42
36

92
84

6

8
13

70 109
31 85
39 24
13 16

17

15
-

1
22

14

43

8

59

42

75

2

-

15

6
1

9

23
21
2

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

93

1.23

36

28

-

i

~

-

-

-

-

-

_

;
-

- !

-

•

28
- 1

7

-

25 33
57 141
52 32
7
34 o
2
3

8

65
28
14
lo
32
7

46

13

1
7

7

12

16

Z
L
D

2

50 i

3

9

”

23

39

3

2

68

85 117 282 116 140 122 496 103 109
79 108 245 25 60 34 251 12
9 37 91 80 88 245 91 107
6
1

1

2

3 31

50 1 3

2
2

1

-

-

-

1

_
5

-

-

-

2

2

7
17
15

3
2

_
28

5

13
15
17

7 9
9 134
2 58
11 18

3

2

_
_
3

88

12

19

31 43

6

5

-

-

89
43
46
3

89
19
70
7

73
7

62
1

66
6

65 69
14 24
51 45
8
5

14

15

9

1

21

12
8

9

3

3

13

27

13

1

-

1

_
_
18

_

13 25
10
4
5 12

_
3
5

_
_

6

-

_

_

27

2

_

_

_ _
_
_

_
_

-

-

9
54

4
9

00

3
25

12

23

13

J
4
29

30

10

20

5

15

30

57

27

21

13

13

1

8

1

_

-

-

2

3
4

6
2

2
2

2
1

2
1

_

3

2
2

_

-

2
1

-

-

-

-

-

8

9

14

2

7

1

9

13

8

3

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

8

5

112
2

17

50
122

32

27

55 93

6

8

16

22
3

10

10

2

40

_
20
15
1
1

-

1

1

-

63
1

2

2

T

-

_
124
Af

k

12

1 i

_

-

1.93
2.04
1.85
1.63

1 .8 1

6

“ |
„ 1

357
135
283
252

44?

5
8
7

3

1.6 6

150

1

1

365

U3
146

1
8

17

2

201

270
214

16

_
7

2

_

-

_
_

_

1.92
1.93
1.97
1.87

68

_
_

7

-

_

-

|

18

-

93

1

1

3

8

21

18

5
7

3

2

TO

2

5 ! 136
54 S 25

4

5
11
10

20
8
4

13
105
36
7
44
53
6

1

4

2

10

6

5

8

8

1

2

19
10
-

1

1

6

_

4

4

2
-

-

_

-

W mn
oe
Assemblers, class C 2 /a ....................................................

2

3

2

3

1

1 / The study covered establishments with m than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (G
ore
roup 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
anual (194-5 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with m than 7 workers w
ore
ere included.
2 / Excludes prem
ium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational W e Survey, Pittsburgh,
ag
Pa., N
ovem
ber 1951
2 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by m
ethod of w
age payment.
U.S. D PAR EN O LABO
E TM T F
R
(a ) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
L j Includes data for operators of other m
achine tools in addition to those sh n separately.
ow




Table

Rc mumU 1/
UI

B-40:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation 2 /

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

/*c
**

d i+ rw ri/ ’Y+H xra

( mo

l

.......................................... ...

M a e K o n -i n o

$
1.85
1.89
1.97
1.69
1.51

205
19
438
2,018
107
35
210
111
114
151

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) .
Electricians, maintenance ................ .............................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ........................... .
..........................................

Painters, maintenance .................................................................................... ...
Pipe fitters, maintenance .....................................................................................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
1.35 1.40 1.45 i.50 I .5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25
and
ud
n ex
1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30

_
-

_

_

-

-

41

20

3
15

_

_

_

.

.

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29
5

_

-

-

5

-

16

2
21 121
9 19
61
63

3

1 .0 7

1.98
1.86
1.98
1.97

62 171

7

69

.

-

-

4
2

7
4

97
5
4
12
4 176 235
14
4

-

-

1
65 994 929
1
2
8

45

17

3 81

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer
type/ ................................................. ............................................................................

12

_

3

-

_

1
-

-

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1
1
1
1

29
2 40
6
9 37
88

2
-

-

8
1
1

-

17
2
3

1

11 L

16

1.65

1 / The study covered establishments with m than 100 workers in the railroad industry (Group 40) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
ore
anual
(1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Data limited to m workers.
en
2/ Excludes prem
ium pay for overtime and night work.

Milk jbe<U M1 /
&

Thble B-5452:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2 /

Filling-machine tenders .............
Mechanics, automotive
(maintenance) ...........................
Order fillers ...............................
Pasteurizers ..............................
Refrigerator m .........................
en
Sanitary men................................
Truck drivers, light (under l£
tons) .........................................
Truck drivers, m iu (1-J to an
ed m
d
including 4 tons) ....................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4
tons, trailer type) ................
Washers, bottle, machine ...........
Washers, can, machine ................

average
N me
u br
-----hourly 11.50
of
workers earnings and
1/
under
_1.55__
*
1.64
65

1.55

“ i ------1.60

*
1.65

1.60

1.65

1.70

-

44

17

%

1.70

1.75

1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

.

1*75

1.80

1.85

1,90 _

1*95-

2.00

2.05

2.10

-

-

6

..

1

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

_

_

„

_

%

%

%

1

3

2.10
1.62
1.71
1.63
1.60

_

_

_

_

1
4
4
9

8

65

1
19

83
59

3
10
3
2

10

1.61

_

5

5

_

_

11

1.66

~

-

10

-

~

11
51
11

1.78
1.61
1.63

*
•

16
1

34
8

-

-

2

-

11
-

42
79
23
92
90

“ 1------2.20

2.20

2.15_

-

2.15

“ 1------2.10

%

_

_

_

1
7

-

-

-

_

_
1

_

_
2

1
1

_

_

_

~

1

-

-

-

~

-

_

_
1

%

%

2.25

2.30

2.35

-

-

_

29

_
_

-

-

5

_
_
-

_
-

_
“

~

-

-

-

~

-

“

_

-

“

-

%

_
_

_
_

-

-

♦
2.30

-

“

1

2.25

%

“

-

-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

M
V
J
l
O
8

Occupation 2 /

N m er weekly
u b
j
1
t
1
$
%
1
1
$
1
l
*
1
*
1
1
1
$
i
1
1
U
of
earnings a nder 70.00 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 9 0.00 9 5.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 11 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 125.00 130 .0 0 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 160.00 170.00 180.00 190.00 200.00
workers
*
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
an
d
U
70.00
7JS.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9?.oo 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00
160.00 170.00 180.00 190.00 200.00 over

R
outem (driver-salesmen),
en
retail 5 / ...........................
R
outem (driver-salesmen),
en
wholesale £ / .....................
l/
(1949
2/
2/

%

1,054

92.50

11

95

196

138

117

108

98

71

63

29

53

20

31

4

3

15

1

_

_

1

«.

307

104.50

4

29

41

a

17

36

17

18

12

12

13

19

14

12

7

10

6

9

3

2

2

-

3

T study covered retail milk dealer establishments with m
he
ore than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
anual
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to m workers.
en
Occupational W Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., N
age
ovem 1951
ber
Excludes prem
ium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F AO
(J
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
2/ R
outem are predominantly on a 6-day w
en
orkweek.
•




17.

Table B-63s

9nA44b04U>e G&vUesu* y

Aykbaqx! 2 /

Occupation and sex

Number

of

workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

J7.50 jo .o o J2 . 5O 15.00 17.50 40.00 42.50 15.00 £ 7 .5 0 lo .o o $2.50
And

h .o o

§7.50 10.00 15.00 $0.00 $5.00 10.00 $0.00 100 . 0c A o.oc A o.oc 130.00
$

and

under

30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 90.00 100 . 0c 110 . 0c 120 . 0c 130.0C over

Mn
e

25
27
4-5

Clerks, accounting
Section heads . . . .
Underwriters . . . . . .

37.0
38.0
37.5

$
44.50
96.50
66.00

30
124
20
40
51
123
138
93
91
42
136
20
53
209

37.5
38.0
39.0
38.0
37.5
37.5
38.0
38.0
37.5
38.0
37.5
37.5
37.0
36.5

38.50
37.00
52.00
43.00
34.50
32.50
46.50
35.50
37.00
53.50
41.00
43.50
38.00
33.50

3
-

-

-

-

2

6

1

2

1

-

-

-

-

_

1

2

5
-

6

3

2

1
18
2
12

1
1
12
1

5
-

2

2
5

-

-

4

1

1

1
8

5
5

-

1

1

1

1

13

_

-

-

_

1
7

2

.

-

_

-

5

-

4

2

_

7
6

_

_

_

-

-

_
_

_
_

W mn
o e

Assemblers ...................................
Clerks, accounting .....................
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, correspondence, class B
Clerks, file , class A ................
Clerks, file , class B ................
Clerks, general .................. .
Clerks, premium-ledger-oard . . . .
Key-punch operators ...................
Section heads ..............................
Stenographers, general ..............
Tabulating-machine operators ...
Typists, class A ....................... .
Typists, class B ....................... .

22

1
11

6
7

3
35

-

_

-

-

1
18
28

3
10
32

-

2

9

23
6

12
12
1
13

5
43
-

4
24

-

5

-

_
-

4
43

3
52

-

8
56

5
11
8
25
10

-

17
5
2
41

4
11
2
4
4
2
20
21
5
2
35
4
17
7

14
13
-

7
5
7
17
4
12
3
31
2
14
8

-

12

2

2

2

1

_

-

11

1
4

7

11
4
6
3
5

-

-

-

5
2
10
2
2

10
5
6
3

-

-

3
2

-

15

7

16

1
2
1

-

-

8
3
1

10
1

1
-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

2

.

2

- 1
j

i
1 / The study covered establishments with m than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 6 3 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
ore
anual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget.
2 / Hours reflect the w
orkw
eek for which employees receive their regular s t r a ig h t -t im e salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational W
age Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., N
ovem 1951
ber
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F AO
Bureau of labor Statistics

18,

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minium® wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect in Pittsburgh on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

B u ild in g G o+U t>iuctiou

Table C-205:

April 1, 1952

-

C o n tin u e d

Table C-27;

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

B ok & U ed ,

Hours
per
week

-

C o n tin u e d

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

P sU tU iH tj,

Hours
per
week

Classification

Rate
per
hour

flours
per
week

$ 2 ,2 0 0
1.970
1.670
1.705
1.515

37 *
37 *

Book and job shops: - Continued
Bricklayers ....
Carpenters ......
Electricians ....
Painters ••••••••<
Plasterers .....
P l umbers....... .
Building laborers

13.250
2.750

3.2 0 0
2.558
3.150
3.000
1.700

Table C-205*

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

B gJz& U & I

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Ovenmen, utilitymen •••••...... ........
Dough f e e d e r s ...... ...................
Cuttennen, reliefmen ................
Pan cleaners, f e e d e r s ...... ...........
Machine set-up m e n ..... •••••.........
F l o o r m e n...... ........................
Scalers, weighers ......................
Women workers:
Sponge packers .................... .
Sweet packers, machine operators,
carton formers ........... .........
Scalers, weighers, hand bundlers ••••

$1,495
1.A95
1.A95
1.A95
1.AA0
1.330
1.165

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.200

AO

1.200
1.165

AO
AO

July 1, 1951

Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen ........... ................ .
Ovenmen ..................................
Dough m i x e r s .... ............ •••••••.•••.
Benchmen ..........................__ ....
Helpers ........................... .
Wrappers, icers ........
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Working foremen .................... ......
Mixers, ovenmen, ingredient scalers,
cookers •••...••..... ............... .
Molders, dividers, benchmen, machine
hands, bread partners ...................
Oven feeders, d u m p e r s ..... ..............
Mixers' helpers, bake-shop helpers •••••••
Checkers, shipping clerics, wrappingmachine operators.......... ...........
Wrapping-machine helpers
Helpers (women) ..........................
Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A:
Mixing supervisors..... ........ ......
Peelers ............................. .
Rollermen ................ ••••••.......
Ovenmen ...............................
Flour dumpers .................. .
Cuttermen, relieftnen .<.......... ..
Dough feeders, pan cleaners, feeders,
pan d u m p e r s ........... •••••••......
Floormen ................... .
Scalers, weighers .....................
Women workers:
Working supervisors .............. .
Sponge p a c k e r s ..... ...............
Sweet packers •.••••••..... ••••••••
Carton formers, scalers, weighers ••
Agreement B:
Mixers, machine captains .............
Machinemen .....................•••••••
Head icing mixers ....................
Rollermen .................... .
Oven firemen •••••....................




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Table C-2082:

M / C ilt JldxfrUOSlA

November 1, 1951
$1,720
1.620
1.620
1.560
1.A30
1.090

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.720

AO

Classification

Rate
per
week

Hour8
per
week

Apprentices:

1.620

AO

1.560
1.500
1.A30

AO
AO
AO

1.375
1.330
1.090

AO
AO
AO

1.675
1.590
1.5A5
1.A99
1.A55
1.A15

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

1.380
1.325
1.215

AO
AO
AO

1.215
1.195
1.150
1.115

AO
AO
AO
AO

1.660
1.605
1.550
1.550
1.A95

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

First year ................................
Second year ...............................
Bottlers ............................................. ................... .
Brewhouse men ..................... ......................... ..........
Chauffeurs .TrTT.,,...........................
Checkers, stampers, shippers ................
Engin e e r s...... ....................... ......
Firemen, maintenance men, grain driers
First men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helpers on trucks .................... .
Maintenance men in bottlehouse ...............
Utilitymen ...................................

Table C-27:

$61.30

6 5.8 0
72.80
73.80
75.30
73.80
77.80
73.80
74.80
72.50
7A.30
63.80

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

P / U n tiiU f

July 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n ........ .................
Bookbinders ...............................
Compositors, hand .........................
Electrotypers........ ................. .
Machine operators ••.••••••............ .
Mailers ...................................
Photoengravers ............................

$ 1 ,2 2 0

2 .2 2 0
2 .5 6 0
2 .0 0 0
2.560
2.218
2.6A5

37*
37*
37*
AO
37*
37 X
37|

Press assistants and feeders:
2 -color cylinder press helpers ••••••••
Cylinder press helpers, male .........
Platen press feeders, male ............
Cylinder press helpers, female .......
Platen press feeders, female .........
Pressmen, c y l i n d e r.................. .
Pressmen, platen •••••....... ............

37?
37 *
37*
37?
37*

2 .56 0
2.A70

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day w o r k .... ..........••••••........
Night w o r k .... ................. .
Machine operators:
Day w o r k .... ................. .......
Night work ••••••••••.... .............
Mailers:
Day w o r k .............. ...............
Night work •••••••........ ........... .
Pressmen, web presses:
Day w o r k ..............................
Night work .......................... ..
Pressmen-in-charge:
Day w o r k .................. .
Night work ................... .........
Stereotypers:
Day work ••••............. ............
Night work ............................

Table C-U:

J lo c a l

2.666

37*
37*

2.773

2.666
2.773

37*
37*

2.218
2.312

37*
37*

2.A73
2.567

37*
37*

2.673
2.767

37*
37*

2.466
2.562

37*
37*

^ J n ^ U U it O p e K + ti+ U f

ZtfvptodfeeA.
October 1, 1951

Classification

1-man cars:
First 3 months ...........................
4-12 months ...................... ........
After 1 y e a r ........ ................. .
Busses:
First 3 months .......... •••••............
4-12 m o n t h s ....... .................... .
After 1 year •••••.... ............... .
Bamford busses:
First 3 months ....................... ••••
4-8 months ...............____
After 1 year .............................
Brentwood Motor Coach:
First 6 months •••••••••.......... .
7-12 m o n t h s ........... .••••••........
After 1 year ••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••
West Side Motor Coach:
First 3 months ...........................
4-12 months
After 1 year •••••...... ................ .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,645
1.735
1.790

AO
AO
AO

1.645
1.735
1.790

AO
AO
AO

1.170
1.300
1.A30
1.550

46
A6
46
46

1.320
1.420
1.550

46
46
46

1.450
1.500
1.550

AO
AO
AO

Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19,

Tabla C-42:

M a to k fr u tc k 3 > td iie td <OHcl

c-541:

Table

Q / lO ^ U f.

Stoke* - Go*ttitUiad

Table C-541:

C OM
f/lO e }

-

G i*U
o*U 4*d

Jtelp&U
R
l

H

h

C

November 1, 1951

November 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

w

s p

a

p

a
e

s

o t
e

e
r

i
eu

o

f

u

r

r
r

s

Classification
c
a

i
e

k

t

i

Rate Hours
per per
o
week week

Meat cutters: - Continued
1
*
5,
$
1
6Agreement B:
5
6
Apprentices:
B
e
e
r
:
1
*
0
1
.
8
8
3
First year ...................... $1*5.00 1*5
1
*
0
51.00 1*5
1
.
8
1
Second3 year .....................
59.00 1*5
B
u
i
l
d
i
n
g
:
Third year ......................
C
o
n
s
t
r
u
c Journeymen ......................... : 67.50
t
i
o
n
1*5
77.00 1*5
H e a d ................ ...........................
H
e
a
v
y
:
1
ho e .
8
3
C
o
n
c
r
t
e
m
i
x
e
r
Agreement C: 0 1
0 a
2
.
0
3
0
C
a
r
r
y
-*
l
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Apprentices:l
36.50 . 1*5.
E
v1 . . 0 0 . 8 .1 *
. x
.
.
. c .
.
. a
.
.
.
.a
.0
.
. t .
. i . First 6 . months g ....................
. n .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*.
38.50r 1*5 .
E
u
.
.
.
. c
.
.
.l
.
. i 1.900. d 1 .
.
.
. 0 .
.
d.
. Second 6 . months i .................. .
.
.
r
.
.
.
.
v.
.
.
. e .
.
.
.
.s
.
1
*
0 .
l*o.5o . 1*5 .
1
.
9 .
0 .
L
i
g
h
t
.
. Third 6 . months ................... .
.
. 0
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1*3.50 1*5
M
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
Fourth 6 months ..................
a
n
d
s
u
*.
. n
.
.
.
. c .
.
.r 1 . . 1 5 . 7 1 e .
.
. t 0 .
. e
.
. Fifth . 6 months . ................... . 1*6.50
.
.m
.
.
.
. i .
. x .
.
.e
.
.
.
C
o
1*5 . r .
1
.r
6
9
1
*
0
D
u
m
p
t
u
Sixth 60 months ................... . 1*8.50 . 1*5 .
c
k
.
.
.
.
.
L
.
u .
..
.. m ..
..
.. . .. . .. b . ..
.. .
. .e . 1 . . . . 1 . 5.
..
. *
.
.0
.
. t Journeymen. ......................... .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 53.50 . 1*5
.
.
.
.
7 .r . 1
0. e
53.50 . 1*5 . r .
D
e
..
p.
.
.
.
a .
.
. r
.
. . . t . 1 . . 7. 5 . m 8 1 .
.
.*
.
.
. R e .a d . .............................. .
n
.
. t .
.
.
.
.
.s
.
.
t.
.o
.
.
H
e
l
p.
.
.
.
.e
.
.1 . r 0 . 5 6 . 1 * . s . 0
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
a .
.
.
. f .
.
t .
.
.e
.
.
.
Agreement . D: .
1
.
2
5 Apprentices:
0
1
*
0
H
e
l
p
e
r
s
f
i
r
s
1
* 9 r
0
F
u
r
n
i
t 1
u
First 5 6 months ................... l*5.oo 1*5 e
R
.
2 e
G
e
n
e
r
a
l
- Second 6 months .................. e 5o.oo
F
r
g
1*5 i
55.oo 1*5
Third 6 months................ .
C
i
t
y
:
60.00 1*5 s
*
Fourth 6 months ..................
G
e
n
e
.
. r 1 . . 3 5 6 1a
l 8
t
r
a
n
67.50 1*5r
1
* r6
8
Journeymen .........................
T
r
a
c
t
o
a
n
d
t
1
.
8
5
87.00 1*5 .
1 r
*
8
Head....... .............. . .
H
e
l
p
e1
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
5 s
3
5
Agreement E:
H
e
a
v
y
h
a
u
l
i
n
g
:
8.r
T
..
.
r .
.
.
a .
.
.
. i . . . . l . . 1 .. 9 0 . e 9 1 . *
.
.
.
.
. Apprentices:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
31*.80 1*5 .
1 *.
W
.
i .
.
n .
.
.
c .
.
.
h .
. 1 . .1 * 5 9.
. 8 . t
.
. r .
.
. First . 6 months . ..... ............. .
.u
.
.
c
.
. k .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
* . s
38.65 1*5
H
e
e . 1 . . 3 5 . 5 r 1 .
.
.
. .l
.. p .
.
.
.
.
. 8 .
.
.
. Second 6 months.......... ..... .
G
..
.
r .
.
. o . . . . . . . . . . . c . . . . . . . . e. . . . . . . . . . . . . r . 1 . . . . . . . . . y . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 . . . . . . Third . . 60 months. . .......................................... 1 . 1*0.88*.
. . . . .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
.
.
.
1*5 0
1
*
0
1
.r
9
5
Fourth0 6 months ........................................6 1*1*.77 1*5
T
r
a
i
l
e
a
n
d
w
..
.
.. .
. .
. l.
. . p . . . . . . . . . . . e . . . . . . 1 . . . r . 2 . 5 . . 8 . 1 . . . .s . . . * . . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . . Fifth . 6. . months........................................
. . . . . .
. . . . .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .
.
. . 1*8.1*0 . 1*5
. .
.
. .
.
.
H
e .
50.03 - . 1*5.
L
i
n
.
.
e .
.
.
n.
.
.
.
. . 7 5 . 3 .1 * s .
.6
. u
.
.
. p . Sixth 6 . months ....................
.
.
p .
.
.
l.
.
y.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
55.66 1*5
2 .
0. d
0 . Journeymen.......................................................
0.
M
e
a
t
. .
. .
. .
a.
.
. 1n
. . . *
.
.
.
. p 0 .
.
.
. r .
.
.
o.
.
.
.
v
i
1
.
6
8 H e a d .......... ............ .................. .. 1 63.52*
0
M
o
v
i
n
g
1*5 8
1 . r
5
8
1
*
8 .
H
«
i .
p
.
f
.
t
.s .
Agreement F: 0 .
.
.
.
.
.
.
0
P
house * .................. . ......... .
f
o
v
.
i
s 2 . 0 0 0 i1 *
o
n Apprentices:
1
.
7
0
0
*
First 6 x months ................ .e 1 1*5.50 s 1*5 0
R
a
i
l
w
a
y
e
p
r
s
Second 6 months .................. 50.50 1*5
55.50 1*5
Second 12 months .................
Third 12 months..... ............. 6 l.5o 1*5
Journeymen..................................................... 69.50 1*5
Table C-541*
C jA a o eto f S to to eA
Head.................................................................. 77.50 1*5
Retail clerks (male):
Agreement A:
November 1, 1951
First 6 months .......................... ................. . 1*1*.00 1*5
Rate Hours
Second 6 months............................................ 1*6.60 1*5
1*9.00 1*5
per
per
Classification
Third 6 months.........................................
week week
Fourth 6 months.................................. 52.00 1*5
After 2 years................... ............................. 57.00 1*5
Agreement B:
First 6 months............. ................. 1*1.00 1*5
Meat cutters:
Second 6 months ..................... 1*2.50 1*5
Agreement A:
1*1 00 1*5
*.
Third 6 months............. .........
Apprentices:
Fourth 6 months ..................... 1*6.50 1*5
First 6 months ................... $37.75 1*5
After 2 years..... ................ . 50.75 1*5
Second 6 months ................. . 1*2.75 1*5
Agreement C:
Third 6 months ................... 1*5.75 1*5
First year ..................... ................................ 1*7.31 1*5
Fourth 6 months ........... ...... . 1*8.75 1*5
Second year.................................................. 1*9.05 1*5
Fifth 6 months................. . • 51.75 1*5
After 2 years ................................................. 53.09 1*5
Sixth 6 months ................... 51*. 75 1*5
Journeymen .......... ..............
Agreement D:
67.75 1*5
First y e a r .................................................. .. 38.75 1*5
Head ................ ..... ........ . 72.75 1*5
Second y e a r............................................... .
1*1.75 1*5
B

a




k

e

i

y

Classification

n

:

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
r.
t

.

.
.

.
.

Rate Hours
per per
week week

Retail clerks (male): - Continued
Agreement D: - Continued
After 2 years ....................... $10*. 75
Agreement E:
1*3.00
First yea r.................. ........
1*6.00
Second year...................... ..
Third year .......................... 5o.oo
55.oo
After 3 years .......................
Agreement F:
r
u
c
First t 6 months.............. ........ k 35.50
38.50
.
.
. Second 6 . months ..................... .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Third 6. months ...................... . ' 1*0.50
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. After 18 months ..................................................
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 1*2.50 .
.
. Agreement G: .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
l*3.oo
pFirst year .............................................................
p
l
y
:
.
. Second year ...........................................................
.
.
.
.
. u
.
.
.
.
. k .
. 1*6.00 .
.
t .
r .
c .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Third year ............................................... .............. . 50.00
.
.
After 3 years ....................................................... 55.oo
e . Agreement H: .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
31*. 80
.
.
. First . 6 months . .....................................................
.
. f .
o .
.
.
u
r
f
o
u
r
Second 6 months......................... .......................... 36.1*5
t
a
i
l
.
. 38.65 .
.
Third 6 months ................................... ................
h After 18 months ...................................................
t
:
1 *. 15
*1
Agreement I:
*.
First year ............................................................. . 1*1 . 00 .
f
e
r
.
.
.
.
.
.
1*9.00
a
c
t
o
r
Second year ................................................... ..
.
. Third year . .............................................................
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 5i.oo .
.
After 3 years ....................................................... 55.oo
Retail clerks . (female): .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. Agreement A:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
First 6 months ....................................... ...... 1*1.53
Second 6 months ......................
1*3.75
1*6.00
Third 6 monthse ............. ..... .. e
h
e
l
r
Fourth 6 months ................................................... 1*9.00
.
.
d.
.
.
r .
.
. i
.
. v .
.
.
. e
.
.
r.
.
After 2. years ..................................................... .. . 51*. 00
Agreement B: o
s
i
n
.
.
.
.
.
First 6 months ......................... ........................... 36.00
.
Second 6 months .................................................. 38.00.
.
.
.
.
.
Third 6 months ............ ........................................ 39.50
Fourth 6 months ................................................... 1*5.00
After 2 years ....................................................... 1*7.00
Agreement C:
First year ......................................................... ..
la. 15
Second year .......................................................... 1*2.65
After 2 years ....................................................... 1*7.80
Agreement D:
First year ............................................................. 36.75
Second year ......................................................... .. 1$0.25
After 2 years ....................................................... 1*3.25
Agreement E:
First year ..................................... ....................... 1*2.00
1*5.00
Second yea r................... .
1*9.00
Third year ........... ................
51*. 00
After 3 years .......................
Agreement F:
38.25
First year .................................................... .
Second year ........................................................... 1*2.75
Third year ............................................... ............. 1*7.25
After 3 years ....................................................... 5o.oo
Agreement G:
First 6 months ..................................................... .28.75
Second 6 months................................................... 29.30
Third 6 months ..................................................... 30.1*0
After 18 months ................................................... 33.15

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

.

1*5
1*5 .
.
1*5
.
1*5

.
.

.

.

11
**
11
**
11
**
11
**

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
o
o

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

r
.

a

.

.

1*5
1*5
1*5
1*5

.

m

.

11
**
11
**
11
**
11
**

.

.

.

.

11
**
i*l*
11
**

.

.

m

.
1*5
t
1*5
.
1*5
1
*5

11
**
11
**
11
**

.

.

.

.

.

1
*5
1*5
.
1*5
1*5

11
**
11
**
11
**
11
**
11
**

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

11
**
11
**
11
**
11
**
.* *
11

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1
*5
.
1*5
.1 .
*5
1
*5

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

s.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

20,

Table C - 5 U :

CfA& OeAAf S to to e A

-

C on tin u ed

Table C-58:

H e iia u / ia n t^ G 4 id Q /oJ^ete^U O^
-

November 1, 1951

Classification

Wrappers:
Agreement A:
First 6 months ................ .......
Second 6 months .......................
After 1 year .................. ........
Agreement B:
First 6 months ........................
Second 6 months ...................... .
Third 6 months •••••....... ...........
After 18 months ...................... .
Agreement C:
First y e a r .... ................. .
Second y e a r ....... .......... .........
Third year .................... .
After 3 y e a r s ....... ............ .

November 1, 1951
Rate
per
week

HoUT8
per
week

♦39.00
A3.00
47.00

44
44
44

35.50
37.50
39.50
41.50

45
45
45
45

44.00
49.00
51.00
55.00

45
45
45
45

Classification

Dishwashers (female) ••••••.••...............
Dishwashers (male):
Agreement A ••••••••.••....... ............
Agreement B ............... •••••........ .
Agreement C .................... ......•••••
Porters:
Agreement A ...............................
Agreement B •••••........ .
Agreement C .................... ...........
Agreement D •••••••••...... ...............
Waiters ............................... .
Waitresses ...................................

Table C-6512:

T a b le c -5 8 :

(leAtau/ui+ibL a n d G& fe4esUal
November 1, 1951

Classification

Bus boys:
Agreement A ..... ................... .
Agreement B ........... ••••.•••••••......
Bus girls:
Agreement A •••••.........................
Agreement B ......... ••••••••••••••••••••
Agreement C .............. ......••••••••••
Cashiers:
Agreement A •••••••••••...... ............
Agreement B ........••••••................
Chefs:
Agreement A .......... ............. ......
Agreement B ..... ••••••............... .
Agreement C .... ........... ••••••••••••••
Agreement D .... .........................
Counter (female):
Agreement A .... ............ ..........
Agreement B ..............................
Agreement C ..... ...................
Agreement D •••..•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Counter (male):
Agreement A .... ••••••.•••......•••••••••
Agreement B ••••••••..... ••••••••••••••••




Table C-7011:

♦43.53
41.36

Hours
per
week

48
44

39.97
40.30
39.60

44
44
44

37.49
36.00

44
40

62.73
51.00
45.00
45.00

48
44
48
40

46.99
40.52
39.60
36.00

44
44
44
40

51.17
43.47

48
44

November 1, 1951
Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

♦39.97

44

43.53
39.82
39.60

48
44
48

43.53
43.25
39.60
40.80
27.24
24.72

48
44
48
40
48
44

November 1, 1951

Elevator dispatchers (male):
Group I .......... .........................
Group II ........... ........... .
Elevator dispatchers (female):
Group I ..... ••••••......................
Group II .......................... .......
Group III ................................ .
Elevator operators (male):
Group I ................... ............. .
Group II •••••«••••................ .
Group III ................................ .
Elevator operators (female):
Group I .......................... .......
Group I I .... .................. ...........
Group III .............................. .
J anitors:
Group I .......................... .
Group II ..... .................. ..........
Group I I I ..... ....................... .
Janitresses:
Group I ............. ................. .
Group II ..................................
Group III .............................. .
Watchmen:
Group I ........... .................... .
Group II ................ ..................

Rate
per
week

Classification

Bellboys (day):
Agreement A
Agreement B
Agreement C
Agreement D
Agreement E
Agreement F
Agreement G

Hours
per
week

♦75.33
72.24

40
40

58.21
56.64
52.13

40
40
40

58.60
53.27
51.92

40
40
40

50.61
48.13
49.34

40
40
40

55.68
52.19
49.70

40
40
40

44.80
43.69
43.69

40
40
40

58.60
53.27

40
40

..............................
.............
...... ............... ........
..................
................... ...........
......................
.............. ................

Rate
per
hour

Hour 8
per
week

♦0.465
.452
.510
.520
.463
.453
.625

44
44
44
44
44
44
48

.545
.463
.504
.463

44
44
44
44

1.162
.580
.660
.560
1.168
.650

44
44
44
44
44
48

Elevator operators (male):
Agreement A ....... .................... .
Agreement B •••••........................

.917
.920

44
44

Elevator operators (female):
Agreement A ..............................
Agreement C ..............................

.913
.800

44
48

Housemen:
Agreement A .......... ......... ..........
Agreement B ............. ................
Agreement C .................. •••••.......

..972
1.020
.957

44
44
48

Urnan room ..................................

.900

44

.895
.794

44
48

.......................
..............................
.... .........................
..............................

.965
.945
.972
.626

44
44
44.
48

Telephone operators:
Agreement A ..............................
Agreement B ..............................
Agreement C ...... .......................

1.012
.895
.940

44
44
44

Waiters:
Agreement A ............. .................
Agreement B .................. .

.580
.578

44
44

Waitresses ........................... .

.560

44

Bellboys (night):
Agreement A ............................. •
Agreement B ............. .................
Agreement E .... ................. ........
Agreement F ............. .............. .
Bell captains:
Agreement A
Agreement C
Agreement D
Agreement E
Agreement F
Agreement G

Q J fjicC B u ild in f B & u tic e

Classification
Rate
per
week

J io t e U

C o n tin u ed

........... ..................
............. .......... ......
................ ..........
............... .......... .
..............................
..............................

Maids:
Agreement A ..............................
Agreement B ..............................
Porters:
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement

A
B
E
F

21,

D:
Table D-l:

M in im u m

Minimum rate (in cents

All establishments ......
4 0 ......................
45 ......................
Over 45 and under 50 ....
5 0 ......................
Over 50 and under 55 ....
Over 55 and under 60 ....
6 0 ......................
Over 60 and under 65 ....
6 5 ......................
7 0 ......................
Over 70 and under 75 ....
75 ......................
Over 75 and under 80 .....
8 0 ......................
Over 80 and under 85 ....
Over 85 and under 90 .....
9 0 ......................
Over 90 and under 95 .....
95 ......................
Over 95 and under 100 ....

100..................................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
105 .....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
n o ...............................................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
115 .....................
Over 115 and under 120 ...

120

...........................

Over 120 and under 125 ...
1 2 5 .....................
Over 125 and under 130 ...

1 3 0 ...........................

Over 130 and under 135 ...
135 and o v e r .......... .

Entrance Rates

Z u tn a n o e . R a te d , fo b

E:

1/

P la n t W & J ta k d

Tabi* E-i,

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates ixL Manufac taring
Nondurable
Durable
All
Whole­
goods
goods
Retail Serv­
Public
indussale
Establishes nts with trade ices
utilities*
tries
trade
501 or 101-500 501 or
101-500
2/
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

100.0
0.1
.2
.5
.5
.7
.3
.5
.3
.3
1.0
.3
6.9
.6
.6
1 . 0

3.0
.3
.9
.7
.6
2.4.
2.4
2.9
1.4
.2
1.5
.7
1.5
.5
2.3
•4
8.1
. 1

46.5
7.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_
_

_
_
_
_

13.1

_

_

-

_

_

-

—

2.2

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

5.1

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

5.2
-

7.3

-

9.9

_

_

_

20.1

-

2.2

_

_
-

-

-

1.5
1.5
2.4
6.2
2.8
38.0
5.2
.9
3.4
8.8

-

_

2.9

_

_

-

-

_

4.8

-

-

2.5
3.4

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

9.0
2.8

-

-

3.0

1 . 0

-

-

-

_

-

9.1

-

6.1

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

15.7
.7
4.0

.5
3.5
.8
_

_

1 . 0

-

3.4
5.3
13.4
5.3
9.6

14.8

3.3
21.7

-

26.8

-

27.6

-

7.1
.4
8.3

3.6

-

-

-

-

.1

-

5.9

-

-

-

3.0
2.9

5.7

2.0

2.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.6
2.7

2.1
2.8
2.7
6.5
30.8

1.7
3.1

2.5

6.1

,7

5.5

_

38.0
5.5

21.7
-

-

3.5
13.5

17.0
5.7

-

-

-

14.0

8.0

18.0

9.5

Uniform cents (per hour) ......
2 cents ....................
4 cents ....................
5 cents ....................
6 cents .................. ..
7 cents ....................
cents ...................
9 cents ....................
10 cents ...................
12 J cents ..................
-14 cents ...................

19.9
.1
17.1
1.0
.6
.5
.2
.1
.3
-

14.8
.2
-

20.8
.1
18.8
.7
_
.5
.3
.1
.3
-

15.5
.2
_
.1
14.6
.3
.1
(2/)
.2
-

11.9
_
1.0
3.9
_
2.1
4.9
_
_
_

8.0
_
_

17.5
_
10.1
4.0
.1
1.3
-

9.3
_
_
1.1
5.2
1.0
_

Uniform percentage ............
5 percent ..................
7£ percent .................
10 percent .................

1.7
.1
.2
1.4

.3
13.2
.3
.3
.1
.1
.2
.1
.6
.6

1.7
_
.2
1.5

.7
.7

-

-

Other .........................

-

.5
_
.6
_

_

_

.9
1.1
-

_

_
2.0
.2
_
.2

2.1
1.6
.5

_
-

.5
_
_

-

.5

-

.1

-

.1

-

-

-

-

1.3

.8

.9

.8

4.1

.3

-

-

Information not available

(2/)

-

-

.4

.2

-

-

-

-

2.9
.4
.6
3.0
_

Receiving no differential ........

-

-

-9a5

16.3

-

-

4.3
4.6

18.0

22.5

-

-

-

3d or
other
shift

15.5

-

-

2d
shift

21.6

..17.4

-

2.5

1.3

3d or
other
shift

.. S.5..
..

2d
shift

Receiving shift differential .....

6.6
2.3

-

3d or
other
shift

Machinery
industries

.16,2 _

-

-

2d
shift

Nondurable
goods

22.9

-

1 . 0

3d or
other
shift

Durable
goods

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ................

-

10.6

-

2.0

2d
shift

-

-

4.8
11.5

Shift differential

-

-

68.6
8.4

All marrufacturing industries 1/
All
industries

-

.8
1.8

10.9

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

14.2
2.5
.3

-

_

_

3.3
—
12.4
11.6
17.6
10.7
2.2
-

-

_

5.3

S A ijfi 3 > i^ e^ e4 ti*eU Pao u M om A

100.0

1.2

1.8
1.7

-

Supplementary Wage Practices

........

(2/)

-

-

1/
2/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.

-

-

Establishments with no
established minimum ....

1.9

16.2

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT 0? LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22,

S cU & d u l& d lA J j& eJ zbf tJ fou A A

Table E- 2 1

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS \ f

Weekly hours

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

.

*

_

-

—

_

2,A
1.5
3.3
2.8
88.5
.1
l.A

-

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

0.2
A.8
2.2
1A.5
5.1
67.5
3.0
2.7
-

Under 35 hours .....................
35 hours.... .......................
Over 35 and under 37k hours ...................................
37^ hours ...........................................................
Over 37^ and under AO hours ...................................
AO hours.... ............ .............................. ...
Over AO and under AA hours ............................... .....
AA hours ...................... ................................. ...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

All establishments .................

Over AA and under A8 h o u r s .
A8 hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Over A8 hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u fa c tu r in g

2.6
1.5
2.9
3.1
88.0
.1
1.8

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.5
1.5
A.9
1.9
90.1
.1

-

51.9
10.0
36.0
-

-

—

7A.7
11.6
A.7

A.O
-

-

-

2.8
.6
5.6

1.7
A.A
1.7
3.6
75.7
8.9

2.1

-

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

_

-

-

-

—

100.0

0.6
•A
.1
.7
.2
77. A
.8
5.0
3.2
9.5
2.1

5.0
3.A
8.6
26.0
30.5
7.9
18.6

18.5
5.1
A6.8
10.0
17.9
.6

-

!

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
1A.0
2.3
1.5

-

N on ­
durable
good s

D urable

All

100.0

100.0

lal

-

utili­
ties*

Public

indus-

Services

*/
1

_

-

trade

All
Finance**

1 0 0 .0

100.0

i

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3.A

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

_

_

_

-

-

10.3

-

-

-

8A.2
.3
.8
1.9
9.8
2.0

8A.2

85.A
2.8

1.0

-

-

-

-

.8
2.1
10.7
2.2

72.8

71.9

_

_

-

-

1.5
“

-

19.1
9.0

19.A
6.9
.9

(2/)

53. A
3.8
20.8
15.5
3.1

A.6
22.7
5.6
A2.A

-

-

6.9

•

“

Services

i

1/
7L]
3/
*
**

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

P .<G u l e ft p lid o d fi

Table £-3:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

'!

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
M an u fac tu re

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Number of paid holidays

All establishments ...................

A ll
indus­
tries

100.0

D urable
goods

All

100.0

100.0

N on ­
durable
good s

100.0

P u blic
utili­
ties*

W h ole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

F inan ce**

Services

All
indus-

A“

±/
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0 !

ioo.
o

-

1

_ 100.0 i 100.0

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

W h ole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. c

96.0

9A.0

83 .A

66.2

N on ­
durable
good s

D urable
goods

i

j
Establishments providing paid
holidays .............. ............
1 to 3 days .......................
A days .......... ...............
5 d a y s .... ........... ... .... ... .....
6 days ............................... ..........................................................
6£ days . . • • • • . ............. .............................. ....................
7 days ................ .............................................................
days ..........................
8 days ...........................
&k days ...........................
9 days ............................
9k days ...........................
10 days ..........................
12 days ................... ...................................................................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays .......................................................................................

99.5
(2/)
.7
.5
66.8
.1
19.7
.3
5.7
.1
1.3
.1
3.7
.5

.5

100.0

98.7

99.8

99.0

-

_

99.A

_

_

_

.9
.1
73 .A

1.1
.1
69.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

88.6

11.3

85.9

3.2
60.1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

2.5
_

•

-

.1

_

_

_

_

3.5

•

_

_

12.0
3.6

-

1.7

_

2.7

21.6

_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.0

16.6

-

1.9

56.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.1

-

-

-

-

-

.3

-

1.5

29.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.5

.6

1.3

29.3

8.1
1.1
8.3

-

-

-

1.3

36.0

-

-

.A

-

8.0

.8
6.9
.A
81.1

A7.9

-

-

-

28.3

99.5

3.6
.5
.7
26.2
(2/)
12.1
(2/)
3.0

52.2
1.1
36.A
2.6
5.6

-

2A.A

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.c

99.5

-

-

-

13.9

2.6

A.3

.2

1.0

-

.5

52.1

A .3

A.8

-

-

_

_

-

«

.2
16.9

# .2
11.5

-

5.0
3A.9

«

_

36.1
1.8
A3.5
l.A
8.3

77.0

69 .A

-

_

_

_

13.5

12.8

19.2

2.0

-

_

-

_

.8

-

8.7

32.5

_

.3

6A.0

_

70.7

_

_

A.O

2.9

_

6.A

Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6.9
13.5
6.5
39.3
(2/)

_
_
_
-

33.8

-

23,

Table E-4«

P a u d

fy * 2 & cU i(m d >

(r f-O b m a l P

a

O 4A U 4J 04U )

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a NUFACTURI'

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

y

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

|

All establishments .....................

100.0

100.0

100.0

1QP •£.

-100,0.

99.9

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

IQQjO, . 100,0

-1QQ.P

IQo*p. _ -IPPtP

100.0

100,0

100.0

.IQQiCL

97.3

_IP0J Q.
L

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.6

IQQjQ. ,
.
,

1 vear of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....

*

Under 1 w e e k ..... ..................
1 w e e k .......... ...................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks ...............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3 weeks ............... •••••••......

21.5
.1
75.7
.6
2.0

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.1

_
10. A
89.6
(2/)

-

1 0 .4
89.6
-

_
10.4
89.4
-

_
66.9
.9
32.2
-

-

-

-

-

.2

-

100.0
_
32.8
i
67.2
-

99.8
_
78.6
21.2
-

-

-

-

.2

100.0
_
1.3
78.7
4.4
15.6
(2/)

98.8

98.5

99.7
«
.
96.1
3.6
-

-

.1
91.4
.4
5.7
.9
-

-

-

-

1.2

1.5

.3

-

2.7

_
28.3
.7
69.8
-

_
100.0
-

_
58.8
38.5
_

_

80.1
3.5
66.3
2.2
8.1
-

-

-

77.6
_
10.2
8.8
-

-

93.7
5.2
1.1
-

3.4

19.9

50.7
49.3
-

-

2 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ••.••

99.9

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0-

98.8

98.5

99.7

100.0

97.3

100.0

100.0

96.6

80.1

1 week ..............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......... .
2 weeks .............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......... .
3 weeks ............................

9.5
.1
87.7
.6
2.0

8.8
91.2
-

8.5
91.5
-

9.9
89.9
-

12.7
.9
86.4
-

13.6
86.4
-

18.3
81.5
-

_
80.0
4.4
15.6

18.9
.7
79.2
-

74.2
6.3
17.0
.9
.1

88.2
7.0
4.5
-

92.2
7.7
.1
-

50.8
46.5
-

25.5
5.2
69.3
-

28.7
1.0
58.1
8.8

51.0
10.8
18.3
^ -

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.1

3.4

(2/)

-

-

-

.2

-

-

-

-

.2

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

19.5
3.8
73.6
3.1

-

2.7

-

-

1.2

1.5

.3

98.8

98.5

99.7

100.0

5.6

2.8
.7

1.2
.8
96.7

1.3
.9
97.8

-

19.9

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....

99.9

1 week ..............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......... .
2 weeks ............ ................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3 weeks ............................ .

1.1
.2
92.9
.4
5.3

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.1

100.0

100.0

_

99.8
_
-

.4
98.0

.4
99.6

-

-

-

1.6

-

8.6

-

.2

(2/)

91.2

100.0

100.0

99.8

1.4
89.7
.9
8.0

.5

9.4

-

-

97.4
-

2.1
-

-

86.7
3.7
.2

100.0
_
-

72.5
2.6
24.9

-

89.7

9 2 .0

_

100.0

100.0

96.6

80.1

6.8

6.0
86.8

5.9
_
81.5
8.8
.4

16.5
2.3
61.3
_

3.4

19.9

-

87.0

-

-

3.5

.9
2.1

1.0

-

10.3

1.2

1.5

.3

-

2.7

100.0

98.8

98.5

99.7

50.0

5.6
88.3
4.9
-

1.4
82.0
1.2
13.9
-

1.2

1.5

(2/)

-

97.3

-

-

77.3
15.9
-

_

7.2
-

-

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....

99.9

1 w e e k ......................... .
2 weeks .............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............
3 weeks .............................
Over 3 weeks .........

.4
80.8
17.6
1.1

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

.1

100.0

100.0

99.8

100.0

79.0

1.4
22.0

_
93.0

96.3

-

-

7.0

3.7
-

(g/)

-

-

20.8
.2

_

76.6
“

1/ Includes data for industries other than those sh n separately.
ow
2 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
"* Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities,
m
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
_
81.8
_
18.2
-

99.8
.9
85.6
_
13.3
.2

-

41.3
8.7
(2/)

-

100.0

97.3

_

100.0

100.0

96.6

80.1

6,0
65.6
-

2.8
70.9
8.8
14.1
-

H.2
65.9
-

3.4

19.9

90.3
_

95.2
_

43.9

9.4
-

4.8
-

53.4
-

6.8
19.7
5.2
68.3
-

2.7

“

.3

Occupational Wage

Survey,

28.4
“

-

P i t t s b u r g h , Pa., N o v e m b e r 1 9 5 1
U . S . D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistic*

P cU d S lcJ z jdjbG4J4>

^ b l e E- 5 *

(% O bm cU P a 4MU&4J0HA)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

Manopactitrino
Provisions for paid sick leave

i l l •st&blishments •................. .

All
indus­
tries

An

Mancfacturisu

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0 .

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

1/
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

8 .5
3 .1
2 .0
—
3 .4

14.0
•4
2 .8
6*4
4 .4
—
-

22*5
*
1 8 .0
.2
—
4 .3

3 .1
.1
1 .8

—
-

1 4 .4
.5
3 .2
3 .6
.5
—
6 .6

9 1.3

6 2 .2

8 5 .6

9 1 .5

8 6 .0

1 0 .0
-

1 6 .9
1 .8

1 4 .0
-

3 .6
.7
3 .7
.5
6 .6

2 5 .0
1 .4
1 0 .9
4 .2
3 .1
2 .0
—
3 .4

JL 0P .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 7 .3
•4
3 .7
1 .3
2 .2
1 .6
•6
7 .5

1 7 .1
.5
1 .0
.9
1 .4
1 .4
1 .1
1 0 .8

1 9 .1
.6
1 .2
1 .2
1 .4
1 .4
1 3 .3

8 .7
1 .2
7 .5
—

8 2 .7

8 2 .9

8 0 .9

2 3 .5
.4
1 .5
1 .3
•4
6 .1
1 .1
1 .4
•6
1 .0

2 3 .3
.5
.9

9 .7

2 0 .7
•4
.8
2 .8
.5
.9
1 .1
.3
1 3 .9

7 6 .5

1 .1 0 0 .0

All

1 0 0 .0

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

Non­
durable
goods
- 1 1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

26.8

5 .5
2 .9
.5

8 .8
-

6 .6

_

_

2 .2

6_jaonto g .o f ggrylge
Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ................................
Under 5 d a y s ............................. .
5 days ..................................................... .
6 days
10 days ............................................ ..
12 d a y s ............................ .............
16 days ••••..•••••...........
Over 20 days ••••............................... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave

i

-

3 7 .8
3 7 .8
-

-

-

.

•
•2
1 .0

■»
•
—
-

•
—

•
—

-

-

7 7 .5

9 6 .9

100.0

1 0 0 .0

8 .1
.1
.5
1 .4
1 .0
2 .1
—
1 .8
1 .2

.7
-

4 .4
—
-

2 2 .5
.6
—
1 7 .4
4 .5

9 1 .9

-

•
2 6 .8
-

-

_
—

-

2 .1

_
8 .8

1 0 0 .0

7 3 .2

94.5

9 1 .2

9 3 .4

7 .8
.

6 7 .2

5 .8
3 .2
.
_

2 6 .2
_
3 .2
1 4 .2

6 .6

.5
-

-

.
_

.
2 .1

8 .8

6 .6

-

4 .4
_

1 year o f service
Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid sick l e a v e ..............................
Under 5 days .......................................
5 days •
6 days .......................................................
7 days •••••••••••................. ................
10 d a y s ...................................... .
11 days ............................................... ..
12 d a y s ....................... .............................
16 days ....................................... .
20 days ................................................. .
Over 20 days ............... ...........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave •••••••.••........ .

-

-

-

1 5 .5

1 .2
—
1 .3
7 .5

7 4 .1
1 3 .1
3 7 .8
1 1 .6
- •
—
5 .6
6 .0

7 9 .3

7 6 .7

9 0 .0

2 5 .9

8 3 .1

7 5 .0

8 6 .0

7 7 .5

2 3 .5
.4
.6
.4
.4
3 .5
O

2 0 .7
.4
.8

2 3 .3
.5
.9
1 .9

1 0 .0

7 4 .1
-

1 6 .9
1 .8
3 .6
.7
3 .7

2 5 .0
-

1 4 .0
-

2 2 .5
-

1 .4
.8
4 .2
-

•4
.1
9 .1

2 .2
1 .4
3 .0

.5

1 2 .1

4 .4

1 1 .3

.9
1 .1
.3
1 5 .0

7 6 .5

2 4 .7

3 .2
.6
1 .2
1 .4
-

-

.4
.1
9 .1
-

-

_

.4
.3
-

.
.
—
•
-

4 .0
—
3 .8
-

3 .0
1 5 .8
2 6 .8
—
2 1 .6
-

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .0

9 2 .2

3 2 .8

9 4 .2

7 3 .8

9 3 .4

7 .8
.
4 .0

6 7 .2
..
.
1 5 .8
3 .0

5 .8
.3
2 .9
_

2 6 .2
.
3 .2
4 .0

6 .6

-

-

-

_
_

_

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave • • • ....• .............
Under 5 days ............................................
5 days ................................................... ..
6 days ................................ ..............••••
7 days ....................................................
10 days •••••••••••••................... ..
11 d a y s ........ ............................................
12 days ....................................................
16 days »•••••.•••••........ .....................
20 d a y s ...................................... ..............
Over 20 days .............................. .
Establishments with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave .................................

-

1 .7
c

c.
.0

1 .2
1 .4

-

-

1 .2

-

1 3 .1

_

1 6 .8

1 .3
7 .5

1 1 .6
3 7 .8
1 1 .6

7 9 .3

7 6 .7

9 0 .0

2 0 .7

2 3 .3

1 0 .0

-

-

.7
-

.6

8 .1
( 2 /)
•4
.4
1 .0
.5

_

1 .0

_

-

-

.4

•
-

_
_

-

.5

„

1 0 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 7 .5
.9

_

2 1 .9

.3
-

3 .8

-

3 .5
1 .3

-

6 .6

3 .1
3 .4

2 .1

8 .8

6 .6

2 5 .9

8 3 .1

7 5 .0

8 6 .0

7 7 .5

9 1 .9

9 9 .3

9 2 .2

3 2 .8

9 4 .2

7 3 .8

9 3 .4

7 4 .1

2 0 .6

3 4 .3

1 4 .0

2 2 .5

8 .3

7 .8

6 7 .2

8 .5

2 7 .1

6 .6

1 0 0 .0

.
_

15 yegra. o f ^eryige

Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave .................................
Under 5 days ••••«...............................
5 days ............................................
6 days ••••«............................................
7 days .......................................................
10 days ..................... ............... •••»••••
11 days .....................................................
12 days .................................. ...............
15 d a y s ............................ .......................
16 or 18 d a y s ..........................................
20 d a y s ....................................................
Over 20 days
Establishments with no formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ..................... .

•4
.8

.6
.7
.4
1 .5
.3
1 .4
.5
1 .7
.3
1 7 .1

1 5 .8

7 5 .3

7 9 .3

-

C
•J

...

.9
-

-

1 .1
3 .6
.7
6 .3

-

-

-

-

1 .2
.5
.9

1 .2
•6
1 .2

1 .2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .1

1 .4

-

1 .8

1 7 .5

—
8 .8

7 4 .1

7 6 .7

9 0 .0

2 5 .9

-

—

-

—

Less than .05 of 1 percent.

*
*#

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

_

_

-

-

•

-

-

.4
1 .0
.4

-

.4

—

—

-

-

•6
—




_
-

-

-

.

-

4 .0

-

«-

_
-

4 .0

1 5 .8

-

_

-

3 .2

-

-

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

1 .5
4 .4
2 .7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.4
1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .9
.3

—

-

—

—

—

_

6 .6

2 .0
1 .4
1 0 .1
3 .1
9 .0

4 .9

2 1 .9

5 .1

.3

-

3 .8

5 1 .4

2 .1

9 .7

6 .6

7 9 .4

6 5 .7

8 6 .0

7 7 .5

9 1 .7

9 9.3

9 2 .2

3 2 .8

9 1 .5

7 2 .9

9 3 .4

.5

-

—

-

—

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

7j

-

_

-

—

—

1/

4 .5
4 .2

.7

.4
.1

1 0 0 .0

—

3 .2
1 0 .2

Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
,

U.S. DEPARTMENT CF L A B ®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

•
-

Table E-6:

^anp/U K U uciion R o h u A&L

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of bonus

PEHCKNT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
M a n u fac tu re

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

1

AU
indus­
tries

All

1/

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Durahle
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

goods

i
l

All establishments ....................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / .......................................................................

2 9 .8

1 6 .5

1 7.2

1 3 .3

8 .8

4 9 .6

2 9 .1

8 2 .5

Christmas or year-end ..............
Profit-sharing .........................................................
Other ...............................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses .......................... .

1/
2/
<
2/
*
**

2 4 .6
2 .2
5 .6

16.1*
.2
1 .8

1 7 .2

1 1 .1
.9
1 .3

2 ,2

1 .9

70.2

8 3 .5

8 2 .8

8 6 .7

9 1 .2

-

-

6.6

1 0 0 .0

j

5 3.0

!l

1 0 0 .0 =3 1 0 0 .0
,

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 .2

6 .2

1 6 .5

1 4 .8

1 8.2

2 8 .8

23.0

t .... t

1 1 .1

_

4 4 .2
.3
5 .1

2 9 .1

5 6 .4
1 1 .1
2 2 .8

3 2 .0
2 1 .0
-

9 .7

6 .2
-

2 .5

1 .5

1 .3

1 2 .8
3 .7

14.8

1 7 .2
1.0
-

2 8 .8
2 .4

23.0

-

7 .9

5 0 .4

7 0 .9

1 7 .5

4 7 .0

88.9

92.8

9 3 .8

8 3 .5

8 5 .2

8 1 .8

7 1.2

7 7 .0

-

(2/)

6 .8

-

Includes data fo r industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated to ta l.
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

and P-e*Uio*t Pla*U

Table E-7*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

PEPCKNT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

AU

Durable
goods

M a n u fac tu re

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Wholeside
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

y

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Durable
good s

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Service*

good s
1

A ll establishments ....................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100*0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..........................................................

89.9

98.3

99.1

94.9

98.0

69.6

52.5

Life insurance ......................................
Health insurance ..................................
H osp italiza tion ................................ .
Retirement pension ................... ..........

87.3
59.0
56.7
70.5

96.8
75.8
74.0
82.0

99.1
89.5
86.3
84.6

87.3
18.0
22.0
71.2

98.0
72.1
29.9
88.4

63.1
37.9
29.5
26.4

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plan ...........................................

10.1

1.7

.9

5.1

2.0

30.4

1 0 0 .0

1 100.0

100.0

100.0

90.4

74.9

92.4

98.8

100.0

42.4
20.9
22.5
26.7

89.9
15.2
38.7
79.3

69.6
59.5
37.8
29.4

90.3
79.3
69.6
63.4

98.1
89.4
84.0
73.2

100.0
92.6
88.0
77.9

47.5

9.6

25.1

7.6

1.2

----------

100.0

lQQt0 _

100.0

87.0

100.0

66.9

57.8

62.4

80.2
58.5
46.0
27.9

100.0
72.5
23.8
70.8

50.9
42.7
22.9
25.5

47.6
30.3
17.8
22.9

60.0
54.3
37.5
-

33.1

42.2

37.6

.

l

13.0

100.0

'
1 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 / Unduplicated to ta l.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1951
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

26

.

Appendix - Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations * (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are s manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions far salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment1s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table suamarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

ESTABLISHM
ENTS A D W RK
N
O ERS IN M
AJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS A D IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN PITTSBURGH, PA., l/9
N
A D N M E STUDIED B TH B REAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, N V M E 1951
N U BR
Y
E U
OE BR

Item

Minimum number
o f workers in
establishments
studied
2/

N loer o f
um
establ: Lshments
Estimated
to ta l
Studied
within
scope o f
study

Employment
Estimated
to ta l
within
scope o f
study

In establishments
studied
Total

O ffice

Industry d iv isio n s in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

_

1,241
366
261
10$
875

255
88
57
31
167

441,400
313,100
276,100
37,000
128,300

213,200
145,980
127,780
18,200
67,220

33,550
18,760
15,240
3,520
14,790

101
21
101
21
21

A ll d iv isio n s .................................. ..........................
Manufacturing ••••..............................................
Durable goods 3 / . ..........................................
Nondurable goods k j ........ .............................
Nonmanufacturing................................................
Transportation (excluding ra ilr o a d s ),
communication, and other public
u t i l i t i e s ..................................................
Wholesale trade ............................................
R etail trade ..................................................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Services 5 / ......................................................

50
277
101
153
294

21
39
29
35
43

29,300
18,900
45,300
16,600
18,200

22,850
3,910
25,140
9,740
5,580

3,660
1,450
3,200
5,760
720

21
101
21
21

102
11
27
42

22
11
10
14

26,771
29,502
3,366
5,279

19,442
29,502
2,434
3,176

2,656

101
101
101
-

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6 /
Machinery in du stries ................................................
R a ilr o a d s ........ ............................................... .............
Milk dealers ................................................................
Insurance ca rriers .................................................. ..

7/

-

281
1,888

1 / Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area (Allegheny, Beaver, Washington,and Westmoreland Counties).
2 / Total establishment employment.
2 / Metalworking; lumber, fu rn itu re, and other wood products; stone, cla y , and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
4 / Food and kindred products; tobacco; t e x t ile s ; apparel and other finished t e x t ile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products o f petroleum and c o a l; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5 / H otels; personal se rv ice s ; business se rv ice s ; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and te le v is io n ; motion p ictu res; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and a rch itectu ral serv ices.
£ / Industries are defined in footn otes to wage ta b le s.
2 / Establishments manufacturing m achine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




28

,

Index
Page
Assembler (insurance carriers) ....... •••••••••
Assembler (machinery) ............... •...... •
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) ••••••••••
Bellboy (hotels) ••...... ••••.••••••..... .
Bench hand (bakeries) .....
••••••••••••••
Biller, machine ••••••••.....
....•••••
Bookbinder (printing) ......................••••
Bookkeeper, hand •••••••••............. ••••.•••
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••••••••••••••••••
Bottler (malt liquors) «•••»•••••»•••••••.....
Brewhouse man (malt liquors) • ••••...... .
Bricklayer (building construction)
Bus boy (restaurants) ..... ...................
Bus girl (restaurants) ............. .........
Calculating-machine operator ••••............
Carpenter (building construction) •••••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance ................ ••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ....... •••••
Cashier (restaurants) ...................... ••••
Chef (restaurants) ....... •••••••••...........
Cleaner .......... •••••••••••••...... ..........
Cleaner (machinery) •••*••••••*••••...... •••••
Cleaner (railroads) •••••••••••••••........ .
Clerk, accounting ............ .................
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) .... .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ••••
Clerk, file ....................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ......... •••••
Clerk, general ................. ...... .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ........
Clerk, o r d e r .... ......•••••••••••••......... .
Clerk, payroll ......
••••..
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers)
Compositor, hand (printing) .............. •••••
Crane operator, electric bridge ........... ••••
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads)
Dishwasher (restaurants)
Draftsman ••••••..... ....... ............. .
Drill-press operator (machinery) ...... ...... .




17
15
15
20

18
A
18
3, A
3, A, 5
18
18
18
20
20

5
18
10
16

20
20

12
15
16
3, 5
17
17
3, 5, 6
17
3, 6
3, 6
17
18

12
16
20

9
15

Duplicating-machine operator ••••••........ ..
E lectrician (building construction) ................
E lectrician , maintenance ..................... .
E lectrician, maintenance (m achinery)........ .
E lectrician, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••
Electrotyper ( printing) ...............
Elevator operator (h otels) ................•••••••••
Elevator operator (o ffic e building service) •
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ••••............
Engineer (malt liquors) ••••••••••...................
Engineer, stationary ...................••••••••••••••
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ••••»••
Fireman (malt liquors) ................................... .
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ....................... .
Crain d rier (malt liquors) .................................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) •••••••
Guard ........................................................................
Helper (bakeries) ............••••••..........................
Helper, motortruck driver ..................................
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••..................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ........
Houseman (hotels) ..............................................
Inspector (machinery) ••••...........
•••••
Janitor ................... .........................................
Janitor (machinery) ••••••...................................
Janitor ( o ffic e building service) .............••••
Janitor (railroads) ..............................................
Key-punch operator ................................... ..........
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) •••••
Laborer (building construction) ..................... .
Machine operator (printing) ••••••......... ••••••
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery)
Machine-tool operator, toolroom .......................
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) .
Machinist, maintenance.............
Machinist, production (machinery) ..................
Maid (h otels) •••••........ .
Mailer (printing) • • • .............••••••.................
Maintenance man, general u t ilit y ••••••••••••

10
15

16
18

20
20

15
18

10
16
18
10
18
15

12
18
19
10
16
20

15

12
15
20

16

6
17
18
18
15

10
15

10

15
20
18

11

29

.

Index C o n tin u ed
Page

Page
Meat cutter (grocery stores) . . . . ^ ................................ . . . . . . .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ••••••••••••........ .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (railroads) ................ «
Mechanic, maintenance................... . . . . ................ ...................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) .....• • • • • ...................
M illw rig h t...............................i .................... ...............................
Mixer (bakeries) ........................................... ............................
Molder (bakeries) •••••••........ .................. ............................
Motortruck driver ••••........ ••••••••••............................... .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ••;••••••••••••..................
O ffice b o y ............. .................. ..................................................
O ffice g ir l . . . . . ..........................................................................
O i l e r ..........................
Operator ( lo ca l tra n sit) ........ ••••••••••••••••...............•••
Order f i l l e r .......................................... ...............................
Order f i l l e r (milk dealers) .......... .................... .......... ..
Ovenman (bakeries) ..................... •••••••••••••........................
Packer ...................
Packer (bakeries) ••••.............................................••••••.••••
Painter (building construction) .........
.....
Painter, maintenance . . . . . ....................
Painter, maintenance ( railroads)
................................
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) •••••..............................
Photoengraver (printing) ........................
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance............•••••.................................
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance (railroads) ................... ................
Plasterer (building construction) .............
••••••••
Plumber (building construction) ............................................
Plumber, maintenance .........................................
.....
P o r t e r ......................................................................................
Porter (hotels) ......................
Porter (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Press assistant (printing) ••••.........................••••••••••••
Press feeder (printing) ........................................ ....................
Pressman (printing) ....................
Receiving clerk ••••••••••••••••••...........
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ..............•••••••••••••••••
Retail clerk (grocery stores) ....................................... ..
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ••••.............




19
11
16
16
11
15
11
18
18
19
9
4
7
11
18
12
16
18
13
18
18
11
16
16
18
11
16
18
18
11
12
20
15
18
18
18
13
16
19
16

Sanitary man (milk dealers) ........ •••••••••••••................ .
Secretary ...........................•••••••............................ ••••••••••
Section head (insurance carriers) ............••••••••••••••••
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance •••••..................... ............
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) .......................
Shipping clerk
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ..................................... •••••••
Stenographer.......................................................... .....................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .................................. ..
Stereotyper (printing) ............ ..................... ...........................
Stock handler ................... ..................
Stock handler (railroads) ........ ................... . . ......... .............
Switchboard o p e ra to r......................... ................. ....................
Switchboard operator-receptionist
.................
Tabulating-machine operator . . . . . ............... ..................... .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ..............
Telephone operator (hotels) ••••••••••••••..................
Tool-and-die maker ......................... ....................................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Tracer .................................................. ................................. .
Transcribing-machine operator .....................................
Truck driver ................... ........... ..........................................
Truck driver (milk dealers) ••••••••.......... ...........................
Truck driver (railroads) ...........................................................
Trucker, hand ........................... ........................... ......................
Trucker, hand (railroads) ................... ....................................
Trucker, power
........ ................. ••••••.•••••••..........
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) .................... . . . . . .
T y p i s t ......................................................... •••••••••............
Typist ( insurance carriers)
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ....................
Waiter (hotels) ...........••••••••••••••••••......... .
Waiter ( restaurants) ........................................................ ••••••
Washer, b o ttle , machine ( milk dealers) .............................. .
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ...................... ..•••••••
Watchman....................
Watchman (o ffic e building service) ......................................
Welder, hand (machinery) ...• • • ...............................••••••••••
Wrapper (bakeries) ...................................
Wrapper (grocery stores) ••••........ .........................................

16
4, 7
17
11
16
13
13
4, 7
17
18
13
16
7
7
4, 8
17
20
11
15
9
8
13, 14
16
16
13
16
14
15
8
17
17
20
20
16
16
14
20
15
18
20

U. S . G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F I C E : 1952 0 — 206396







THE OCCUPATIONAL W
AGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

Price

BLS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Seattle, Washington

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1059
1064
1042
1058
1057

This report was prepared in the Bureau's
munications may be addressed to:
Robert R.
Bureau of
34-1 Ninth
New York,

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Middle Atlantic Regional Office.

Com­

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turnover, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102