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Occupational Wage Survey

NEWARK-JERSEY CITY,
NEW JERSEY
November 1951

Bulletin No. 108 !

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................

1

THE NEWARK-JERSEY CITY A R E A .................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .................................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ............................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ........................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .......................................
A-U
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ............................
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2337 Women’s and misses' coats and suits ..........................................
B-33&
Foundries, nonferrous .........................................................
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware .............................................
B-34-63 Stamped and pressed metal products ...........................................
B-34-68 Electroplating, plating,and polishing ........................................
B-35
Machinery industries:
M a c h i n e r y ..........................................................
Machine-tool accessories ...................................................
B-40
Railroads ......................................................................

3

9
10
12

15
16
16
17
17
18
20
20

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction .........................................................
C-205
Bakeries .......................................................................
C-2082
Malt liquors ...................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .......
C-41
Local transit operating employees ............................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ................................................
C-44Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel .......................................
C-44-6
Stevedoring ...................................................................
C-541
Grocery stores .................................................................
C-58
Restaurants ................
C-6512 Office building service ........................................................
C-7011 Hotels .........................................................................

21
21
21
21
22
22
22
23
23
23
23
23

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .....................................

24-

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ..........................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ................
E-3
Paid holidays ..................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations ......................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ................................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ......................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ...................................................

25
26
26
27
28
30
30

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ............................................................

31

I N D E X ........................................................................................

33

* NOTE - A d d ition al occu p ational earn in gs rep o rts are
a v a ila b le upon req u est fo r auto r e p a ir shops (A p ril
1951}, ferro u s fou n d ries (June 1951), p a in ts and var­
n ish es (March 1951) and power la u n d r ies (A p ril 1952)*
For sale by the Kui>erintendent of Documents, I\ S. Government Printing Office
Washington
D. ('. - Price 2o cents

M 6 , 1952
ay

Introduction y

about h a lf o f whom were engaged in the production o f durable
goodso 2 / The machinery and transportation industries are im­
portant segments o f the durable-goods group in the Newark-Jersey
C ity area® About a f i f t h o f the workers in the nondurable-goods
group were in plants producing chemical and a llie d products*

The Newark-Jersey C ity area is 1 o f 40 major labor mar­
kets in which the Bureau o f labor S t a t is tic s is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys* Occupations common to a va­
r ie t y o f manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were stud­
ied on a community-wide b a s is 0 G ross-industry methods of samp­
ling were thus u t iliz e d in compiling earnings data fo r the f o l ­
lowing types o f occupations: (a) o f f i c e ; (b) p rofession a l and
te ch n ica l; (c ) maintenance and power plan t; (d) cu sto d ia l, ware­
housing, and shipping® In presenting earnings inform ation fo r
such jobs (tables A -l through A-4) separate data have been pro­
vided wherever p ossib le fo r in dividu al broad industry d iv ision s*

The area is a lso an important commercial center®
Wholesale and r e t a i l trade establishments employed more than
115,000 workers, whereas finance, insurance, and r e a l estate
industries employed nearly 35,000* The serv ice group, includ­
ing such industries as power laundries, th eatres, h o te ls , and
la b o ra to rie s, employed more than 45,000 workers®
The area contains some o f the most important trans­
portation terminals on the Eastern Seaboard® About 60,000 work­
ers were employed by the area *s transportation and communica­
tio n f a c i l i t i e s and other public u t ilit ie s ®

Occupations c h a ra cte ris tic o f p a rticu la r, important,
lo c a l industries were studied on an industry b a s is , within the
framework o f the community survey* 2 / Earnings data fo r these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables* Union scales (Series
G ta b le s) are presented in lie u o f (or supplementing) occupa­
tio n a l earnings fo r several industries or trades in which the
great m ajority o f the workers are employed under terms o f c o l ­
lectiv e -b a rg a in in g agreements, and the contract or minimum rates
are in d ica tiv e o f prev a ilin g pay practices®

Among the industry and establishm ent-size groups with­
in scope o f the Bureau^ study, 9 o f 10 plant workers were em­
ployed in establishments having w ritten agreements with labor
organizations® The degree o f unionization varied among the in ­
dustries studied® In service industries 7 o f 10 plant workers
were in firms having w ritten agreements with labor organiza­
tio n s , whereas in r e t a i l trade, only 1 o f 3 such workers were
covered by union agreements® The highest degree o f unionization
was in durable-goods manufacturing and the pu blic u t i l i t i e s
group; in these industry groups more than 95 percent o f the
plant workers were in establishments having m io n contracts®
Unionization o f o f f i c e workers was found in establishments em­
ploying 30 percent o f the o f f i c e workers in the area® Such or­
ganization was most extensive in the public u t i l i t y in d u stries,
where fo u r -fift h s o f the workers were in establishments with
union contracts covering o f f i c e workers®

Data were c o lle c t e d and summarized on s h ift operations
and d iffe r e n t ia ls , hours o f work, and supplementary b en efits such
as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holid ays, nonproduc—
tio n bonuses, and insurance and pension plans®

The Newark - Jersey City A re a

Occupational Wage Structure

T otal population of the Newark-Jersey Gity area (Essex,
Hudson,and Union Counties) was approximately 2,000,000 in 1951 more than tw o -fifth s o f the en tire population o f New Jersey®

Wage le v e ls in the Newark-Jersey City area were a f ­
fected by a number o f general wage increases during the period
between January 1950, the base date fo r the Wage S ta b iliz a tio n
Board*s w
catch-uptf wage formula, and November 1951, the time o f
th is survey® Such increases varied g reatly and. were more numer­
ous in the manufacturing industries® Nearly a l l manufacturing
plant employees received at le a s t one general wage increase dur­
ing th is period, the m ajority o f these increases amounting to
from 10 to 20 cents an hour*

N onagricultural wage and sa la ried workers in the area
in November 1951 (excluding government) numbered over 625,000®
Manufacturing in du stries employed more than 364,000 workers,
1 / Prepared in the Bureaufs region al o f f i c e in New York, N®Y*,
by Frank C G rella and Theodore A llis o n , under the d ir e c tio n o f
®
Frederick W. M ueller, Regional Whge and In d u strial Relations
Analysto The planning and cen tra l d ir e c tio n o f the program was
carried on in the Bureau^ D ivision o f Wages and In d u strial Re­
la tio n s *
2 / See appendix fo r d iscu ssion o f scope and method o f survey®




2 / See appendix table fo r l is t in g o f
able-goods industries®

L)

durable- and nondur-

2

General wage increases for o f f i c e workers were reported
in fewer establishments but the tendency among larger companies
was to grant sim ila r increases t o both o f f i c e and plant workers*
In many sm aller establishm ents, however, formal increases fo r
o f f i c e workers lagged behind plant workers because a number o f
establishments adjusted sa la rie s o f o f f i c e workers on an in d iv id ­
ual basis rather than by general wage increaseso
Formalized wage and salary structures fo r time workers
were reported in establishments employing approximately 90 per­
cent o f plant workers and 75 percent o f o f f i c e workers© Forma­
liz e d plans providing a range o f rates fo r each job c l a s s i f i c a ­
tio n a ffe c te d somewhat more plant workers than did plans provid­
ing a sin g le rate fo r each job* S in g le-ra te plans were most
prevalent in wholesale trade and nondurable-goods manufacturing*
Most formal wage plans fo r o f f i c e workers provided a range o f
rates* Individual determination o f rates fo r plant workers was
employed to an appreciable extent only in r e t a i l trade and serv­
ices* I t was the predominant method o f s e ttin g o f f i c e workers'
sa la rie s in r e t a i l and wholesale trade and serv ice industries*
Established minimum entrance rates fo r plant workers
with no previous work experience were a part o f the form alized
rate structures o f most Newark-Jersey C ity area firms* More than
95 percent o f the workers were employed in establishments having
established minimum rates* Half the plant workers were employed
in establishments paying a minimum rate o f more than $1*10* The
minimum standard fo r nine-tenths o f the plant workers in large
nondurable-goods establishments (employing 1,000 or more workers)
ranged from $1*15 to $1*70. In r e t a i l tra de, over a th ird o f the
workers and in se rv ice s more than h a lf the workers were employed
in establishments with minimum rates o f 75 cents or less* A
minimum entrance rate o f more than $1*20 was reported fo r h a lf
the plant workers in the pu blic u t i l i t i e s group*




Only a few firms among those v is it e d established rates
o f pay fo r supervisors according to a fix e d re la tion sh ip to the
pay o f workers supervised* Such plans reported in durable-goods
manufacturing generally provided fo r 7 t o 15 cents d iffe r e n t ia l
fo r leadmen, although in cases where the d iffe r e n t ia l was ex­
pressed in percentage terms, the percentages were 10 to 25 per­
cent above the rates paid to workers supervised* In nondurable
manufacturing, the lowest d iffe r e n t ia l reported fo r supervisors
was 10 percent above the rates paid to the workers supervised*
Wages and sa la rie s o f workers in manufacturing indus­
tr ie s were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing* In
26 o f the 29 o f f i c e jobs perm itting comparison, average sa la ries
in manufacturing plants exceeded those in nonmanufacturing es­
tablishments • In 13 o f these jobs the d ifferen ces ranged be­
tween $2 and $4*50 a week* Where comparison was p o s sib le , av­
erage hourly earnings fo r plant workers studied on a communitywide basis were highest in manufacturing in 14 o f the 2U occu­
pations* However, s p e c ific industry branches con tributing to
the general nonmanufacturing average had an average rate in s one
instances exceeding that fo r the manufacturing group in the same
plant or o f f i c e category* In 25 o f 29 instances where compari­
son was p o s sib le , workers in nondurable-goods manufacturing av­
eraged more an hour than workers in sim ila r employment in dur­
able-goods manufacturing* The higher averages found in the non­
durable-goods group r e fle c t e d the tr a d itio n a lly higher pay
le v e ls in industries such as chemicals and petroleum refin in g *
More than a six th o f a l l plant workers in manufactur­
ing establishments were working on la te s h ift s in November 1951®
V irtu a lly a l l such workers were paid a d iffe r e n t ia l over day( f i r s t ) s h i f t rates which, in somewhat more than h a lf the cases,
was in the form o f a cents-per-hour premium* The premium rang­
ed from 5 to 10 cents on the second s h i f t and 10 cents or more
on the th ird s h ift* The most common percentage premium paid to
second- or t h ir d -s h ift workers was 10 percent*

3,

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Q ^ io e

Table A-l:

O c c u p a tio n *

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1951)

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING 1
STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
and
$
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
------------i

Men
Bookkeepers, h a n d ................ .......
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance ** .........................
Services ...........................
Clerks, accounting .......................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance ** .........................

256
135
72
63
121
20
32
A3
22

39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
39.5
40.0
37.5

713
“ 293
213
85
415
117
81

j

$
75.50
78.50
76.50
81.00
72.00
78.00
64.50
73.50
78.00

38.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.0
36.0
42.5
36.5
37.0

2

2

_
_
_

1

_
_

_

_
_

_

.

_
_

-

_

_
_

2
_

1 _

2

2
_
•

_
-

2
_

_

2

2
-

1

3
3

_

_
_

_
2
1

1
1
_

1

30
7
6
1
23
1
16
5

3

3
3
j

18
6
6
_

17
7
3
4
10
_
_
i

2
_
2
_
2

-

1
_
-

8
3
2
1
5
.

20
! 13
10
3
7
_

_

| 5

7

3

40
32
7

1
1
-

17
4
13

4
i 2
2

6

.
•
-

2
_
-

26
_
_

3
1
2

j i
1

1

3

3
_

51
11
11
_

24
11
7
4
! 13
! 4
i
3

46
i 18
; 15
3
28
17
9

60
1 14
13
i 1
! 46

9
3
4
2

4

3

5

|

32
! 29
! 24
5
3
i 2
1 1

30
23
21

33
23
14
i 9
! 10
.
I 2

1
1
-

-

-

-

40

: 28
! 18
14
4
10
2

30
21
; 21

53
26
23
I 3
| 27
I _

37
7
7

24
13
5
8
11
10
-

<
I

2
7
2

28
26
15
11
2

_

; iA
! 7
4
3
7
1

1
i 1
! -

5

24
15
15

10

! io
33

13
! 7
6
1
6
_

17
16
12
4
1
1

3
9
_

12
_
8

! "

66.50
67.00
64.00
74.00
! 66.50
63.50
50.00

12
3
_

„

157
! 25
: 24
[ 1
i132
14

1

29
24
3
21
5
2
_
1
58
29
26
3
29
4
-

32
21
14
7
11
4
-

21
16
1
15
5
1
_

I

2/38
24
12
12
14
5
_

4

37
14
13
1
23
2
_
10
11

6
3
32
15
_

u
9
1
8
33
4
-

15
17
14

1
Clerks, file, class B ...................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing.....................

—

39.0
39.0
39.0

49
IS
33

44.00
45.50
43.50

1
_
1

3
3

:

i
_
i

8
4
4

-

8
3
5

4

i 22
3
3

27
11
11

i -— |
—
; -

4

_

Clerks, order .............................................. .. ........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .........................................................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................

615
252
170
82
363
140
39

39.5
39.$
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
37.5

67.00
68.50
j 66.50
73.50
66.00
65.50
, 65.50

363

39.0
39.6
39.0
39.5
37.5

63.00
67.50
1 59.50
59.00
| 68.00

"■

220
208
12

.
_
-

-

.

-

-

.

_

-

-

_
-

_

_

.
-

_
_

_
-

_

-

-

_

•

-

-

|

_

-

6
; l
4

“

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

2
1

-

_

_

_

-

1 5
! -

_

26
20
2
27
1
26
26

|

.

! 2
i

2

21
2
19
| 19

1

16
10

-

15
3
22
14

_

19
7

5

-

21
7
14
13
■
1
;

i

_
|

31
17
14
14

36
;

_

9

36
36
**

-

|

26
6
20
20
-

3
1

13
13
12
1
-

1
1
1 1
_

151
69
25
44
82

i

54
10
44
42

'

10

22
11
1

63
55
8
5
3

5
3
2

-

35
i 23
14
! 9
12
i 5

50
13
1 11
2
i 37
21
I 7

30
i 11
9

11
4
7
7

15
5
10
8
2

-

48
26
16

i

-

2

1

2

— r— j

_

-

”

[
Clerks, general ..........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance ** ........................

!

-

_

-

-

-

!

6
-

-

6
5
1
_

-

1

7
1
1
6

.

11
10
1
i

„
-

_

j

25
10
15
15

_

1

5
5
2
3

| 43
11
8
3
32
29

11

_
-

-

!

11
8
3
3

i

-

2
1
1

10
10

_

10

1

Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................

40.0

217
189

119
70
28

'

| 65.00

65.J6

T O T !

40.0
40.0
40.0

:
!
|

63.50
68.00
61.00

'

-

-

«

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
_

j

-

-

4
4

1

_

-

4

-

-

1

-

-

26
15
15
11

6
6
5
1

:

j

7
6
5

,

1
1

16
i 15
j 15

I 2

23
23
21

1

!

i

..

1

17
16
14
2
| 1

1

|

9
9
7
2
-

5
5
1 1
4

|

7
6
6
-

1

! 13
i 4
| 9

31
20
8
12
11

1

i
DuDlicatincr-mAchine operators ...........
Manufacturing................. .......
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing................ .

59
36
26
10
23

39.0
39.5
40.0
38.5
37.5

44.00
44.50
46.00
41.00
43.00

2
2

_
-

_
.
.

8
4
1
3
4

8
j _
8

14
12
8
4
2

3
3
2
1

9
8
6
2
1

i

.
i

11
8
8

3

1 •
: -

1

.
.

.r
_

1
1
1

i

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




2

2

25
25
18
7
-

1

-

!

i

4.

Table A-lx

O j^ ic e

0 C C 4 4 p a U o*U

-

G o 4 tti4 U 4 e d

and

(Average straight-time weekly hours
earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., b y industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

Under W o o

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
32.50 §5.00 3 7 .5 0 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 lo.oo 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 1 5 .00 W o o
and

30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 4 5 .0 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

over

Men - Continued

%
Office boys ..............................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .... ...........
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance * * ....... .................
Services ...........................

459
237
137
100
222
25
27
H5
16

38.5
39.0
40.0
38.0
38.0
37.0
40.0
37.5
39.5

39.50
39.50
39.50
39.00
39.50
47.50
36.50
39.00
39.00

Tabulating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................

246
59
47
12
187
32

37.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
36.5
40.0

62.50
62.50
62.00
65.50
61.50
59.00

16
2
2
14
-

57
27
21
6
30
1
8
19
2

13
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

]

13

1

11
_

13
1

6
_

11
-

1
12
4

•
6
-

28
8
8
_
20
5

51
— 6“
3
3
45
35

79
32
11
21
47
34

69
35
4
31
34

57
40
18
22
17

-

-

9
6
2
3

88
52
13
33

22
18
11
-

16
15

5
1
1

11
1
1

4
1

16
1

2

2
1
_

4

1

2

3

4

2

3
3

_
_

_
_

2
1
1
_

2

1

_

1
1

_

_
_

2
2

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
-

17
3
3
14
-

i 22
4
1
3
18
5

16
4
4
12
3

15
11
9
2
4

6
3
3
3

14
8
8
_
6
-

15
9
7
2
6
-

_
_
-

7
2
_

12
2
2

2
5
2

53
3
2
1
50
4

6
1
1
«
.

7

3

_
_

_

6
_
_
_

_
_

5
2

7
4

3

6

3

10
2

3
1
«
.
1
2
2

_
_
-

i
573
— 253—
128
125
320
109

38.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
36.5
38.0

48.50
'49.50
48.50
50.50
47.50
45.00

245
166
54
81

39.0
38.5
40.0
38.0

46.00
47.00
52.50
43.00

Bookkeepers, hand ........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance ** ..... ......... .........T
Services ...........................

307
~ r a
104
38
165
56
45
54

39.0
89.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
38.0
36.0
41.0

63.50
66.50
64.00
73.50
61.00
62.50
56.00
64.00

331
182
88
94
149
81
18

38.5
38.5
39.5
37.5
38.5
39.0
38.5

52.00
55.00
56.00
54.00
48.50
50.50
49.50

-

-

-

-

11
11

-

-

-

_
-

_

15
2
! 1
! 1
13
8

118
40
34
6
78

39
1 17
14
3
22
3

1 18

19
10
6
4
9
3

32
31
17
14
1

33
31
15
16
2
2

10
6
4
2
4

H
12
12
-

11
9
2
6

11
10
8

4
4
2

2
2
2

6
2
1
1
4

27
23
23
.

34

4

34
10
15
7

11
11
11
_
_
_
*

51
24
18
6
27
16
1
10

36
6
5
1
30
16
12
2

34
34
21
13

13
6
3
3
7

-

6
2
! 2
4

-

5
5

.

-

-

5

1
1
1

14
i 11
iu

: 26
5

20
i4

j

-

9

5

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
! 1

1

8

.

-

-

-

-

3

4

10

1
3

-

-

.

i .

_

_

4

9

_

_

-

-

-

-

3

-

4

1
3

23
5
5

41
38
15
23
3

24
13
6
7
11

.

.

_

_

-

-

j

2
-

13
| _—
—

5

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

2

13

-

-

-

-

i9
! 5

! 5
-

■

5
14
3
3

13
12
8
4
1
-

57
21
7
14
36
28
2

-

18
13
2

11

_
_

40
13
! 5

! 8
27
25

1
_
_
_

3

1

3

5
_
_
5

-

!

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and read estate.




7
5
1
4
2
_

l

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) . . .
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade .................. .
Retail trade .......................

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class A ................................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ..........................................................
Nondurable goods ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................. ..
Wholesale trade ....................................................
Retail trade .......................

24
10
2
8
14
1
_

15
-

45
33
12
21
12
2
1
3
6

_
8
5

_

«
•

58
42
32
10

8
-

.

-

70
21
18
3
49
6
7
33
1

_

14
-

51
30
24
6
21
4

Women

Billers, machine (billing machine) ......
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................

68
35
23
12
33
2
2
29

49
32
4
28
17
_
8
2
3

_

_
_

_

6
6
6
_

6
2
2
_

_

_

40
15
2
13
25
9

9
9
9

15

-

-

10
10
7
3

9
9
8
1

1
1

_

-

2
! 2

_
_
-

! -

-

25
13
3
10
12
12

_
_
_

_

28
21
19
2
7
5

3
3
3

-

4

-

_

_
_
_

1

_

16
15
1
14
1

«
»
9

1

_

_
_

_

_
2

10
1
1
9

3

2
2

3

_
_

_

_

_

5,

Table A-l:

O ^ ic e

O cC 4 4 fH iU o*U

(Average straight-time w e e k l y h ours and earnings l / for
b a s i s i n N e w a r k - J e r s e y C i ty,

N. J.,

5 ex, occupation, and industry division

C o n t in u e d

selected occupations

b y industry division,

studied on an area

N o v e m b e r 19 5 1 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verag e

Number
o
f
workers

-

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2.5 0 6 5.0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.0 0 90.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
pnd
(Standard) *
(Standard)
30 .0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2.5 0 6 5.0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0.00 over

Women - Continued

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
. class B ................................
Manufacturing ................ •••••••••
Durable goods .......... •«,,,.......
Nondurable goods ..•••••••.••..... .
Nonmanufacturing............ .,.,,,,
Wholesale t r a d e .... ...............
Retail trade ...................... .
Finance **
Ser v i c e s ...... ,,,.................
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type)
Manufacturing...... ..................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable g o o d s ....... ........
Nonmanufacturing..... ................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale t r a d e ..... .
Retail t r a d e ............. .........
Finance ** •••............
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) .........
Manufacturing...............
Durable g o o d s .................... .
Nondurable g o o d s ................. .
Nonmanufacturing ................. ;....
Uhnl p r a Ia t-i^rlA T. .tT.ttttttttt.
ItfTT
Finance **

497
129
104
25

368
90
19

242
17

814
“ 503
272
231
311
59
83
134
26

—

195
35—
35
47
113
32
70

Clerks, accounting.... ,,,,,,,•..........
Manufacturing •••••••.... ,,,,,,,......
Durable goods ......•••••••.....••••
Nondurable goods .................. .
Nonmanufacturing «••••••,••••.... ,,,,,
Public utilities * ................ .
Wholesale trade ,..•••••..... ...,,,
Retail trade .......... .,*..........
Finance »* ..................... .
Services ......••............... .

1,480

Clerks, file, class A ....................
Manufacturing................ ........
Durable goods .......•»•••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ........•••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Finance ** .........................
Services

345
119
92
27

594""
343
251

886
100
164
139
358
125

226
21
136
33

38.0
39.5
39.5
38.5
38.0
39.5
38.5
37.5
36.5

$
45.50
50.50
50.50
52.50
43.50
47.00
39.50
41.50

—
-

1
1
1
-

58.00

-

-

5 2.0 0
5 2.00

! ! -

36 .0

52.00
52.00
51.50
54.00
57.50
47.00
45.50

-

-

38.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
37.5

47.00
| 49.00"
47.00
50.50
45.00

-

38.5
" 39.0
39.5
38.5
37.5
34.5
39.5
37.5

37 .5

37.5
39.0
40.0
40.5
39.0
38.0
37.0
38.0
38.5
37.5
39.5

|48.50
j 52.50
: 53.00
i 52.0 0
i 45.50
! 50.50
; 48.00
43.00
43.00
; 47.00

38.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
38.0
39.5
37.5
40.0

46.50
48.50
47.00
53.00
44.50
45.00
41.50
59.00

1

19
-

38
3
32
3

19
-

;
-

82

11 ,
11 I
71

------ 1 4
2
"
■
2
i 4

-

2

_

44

-

2
2
42
-

; 1
i 1
| 55
-

11
1
-

1
10

2

1

i 31

i 19

16

-

12
11

20
11

42
4

_
-

i 9
-

2

24

j -

10
10

I 2

14
3
9

-

9
-

8

1

-

1

-

! 21

88
12
-

12
52

12
27
7
7
-

20
i ! 15
2

w~
17
13
40

11
7
14
,

8 1

8
18
128
1 22
15
7

20
37

6
6

1
8
20

6

17
16
8 ;

10
7

1.9

7

; 200

116

55
23
32
; 81

86
68

! 119
: 30
: 14
16
89
15
29
7
32
; 6

106
12
8
8
14
20 | 3
65
5

41

55
1 10
S 10
! 45
j : 38

72
17
17
55

11

11
42

18
114
7
42
14
44
7

j 21
I 1
! -

S ee footnotes at end of table,
*

Transportation

**

Finance,

(excluding railroads),

insurance,




and real

e s t ate.

communication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utili t i e s ,

1

1

_
_

_
_

5

1

4°
31

23

28
27

10

20

2
1

!

!
|
!

1

6
-

17
9
9
-

20

16
16

12

4

-

21
10

,
;

18

9

-

8

18

2

4
-

3

2

2 | 1
2
5
2 | -

j

7
7
3

21
6
1
1

2
1

81
55
16 : 75
6
39
61
31
- , 2
6
7
8 i 7
19
13
28 i 2

_
_
!

1
3
-

1
14

4

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

2
2

1
1

_

_

-

2

2

-

-

i

1

-

26

16

11

28
5
9
4
3
7

31
9
7

8
6
1

I
|

18

16

|

5

2
2

3

i

1

;

-

7

_

22

6
5 , 1

_
_

|

_
_

i _
i _
,
_

3
3

-

1
1

15

_

8

1

_

-

-

-

i

3

-

2
2

_
_

_
_

-

58
33
1 15
1 18
25

_
_
_
_

_

i
! _

i

_
-

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

9

12

22
12
- ; 10
1
4
1

1
1

5
4

1

8
8

-

_
: _
_

1

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

!

2
_

-

1

-

6
6

,

! 8
i 2
7
7

-

2
-

_
_

7
3
-

-

2

-

4

9
9

4
3

9
2
-

_
_
-

_

-

2

!
J

_

! 2
;

1

i 1

_
_
; _
_
-

_

- i 6
1
3
4
- ; -

_
_

!
i

-

3
5

:

i _
_
_

1
_

_

2

4

1 ~

15
_
_

1

-

35
29
15
14

1
: 1

!
j
j

9

1

-

-

13

j

-

_
_

_

„
_
_
_
_

r_—

-

1
8

| 73
51
| 20
! 31

16
H

_

-

1
1
1

72
| 41
: 30

1

.

-

_

59
S 31
15

3
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

2
112

_
_

-

4
4

2

!
_____ 1

_

-

22 i 16
12
15
, 14 1 11
1
1 | 1
! 20 ; 7
4
1 - ; 6 , 5 | 17 1

35
27
' li
; 16
| 8
i -

_

-

4
-

2

136

1

6

g

6

4
-

92
46
79
37
53 " 62 “
32
J 6
33
20
30
31
26
30
9
6
7
3
_
6
9
11
13
5
2 i 1
-

29
3

11
2

1
10

1

9

- |
_
-

8
1

6
6

17
15
! 10
13
- 1
6
2

10
29
10
11
11 1 9
1

4
4
4
-

4
3

4
5
_
_
-

9
-

; 88 , 105
45
58
26
15
30
32
47
43

11
8

70

21 | 14

\ ~ lT !

-

25
17

1
2

46
32
30

8
6 ! 2
| 16 1 14
8
4
1
; 11 i
6

“ 1

23
4
! 3

118
30
9

11
8
20

22

7 1 41
5 ! 10
4 , 8

11
1

98
13

8

56
34
-

43

4

8

8 |
2 |

31
25
15
3
9
!
3

56

85

1

30
14

ioH

ioo

2

2
11

9 h
7 !
2 !
32 !
- 1
32

! 71

6

! 11

-

13
53
- !

53
-

66

41

12

7
25
! T "1— 9 "
”
1
! 8
2
! 1
16
4
4
4
-

84
6"

5
i 1
! 78

16
2

5 2.00
43.00

39
I

19

2

5
-

7 . -

4

1

2
1
-

2

7 !
7

_

1
,

_

-

l

_

_

i
|

]
i

-

Table A-li

Q fy ic e

0 cC 4 4 fu U iO 4 tl

-

C o n t in u e d

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verag e

Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|
$
$
$
Under 30.00 3 2 .5 0 35.00 3 7 .5 0 !
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
and
*
30.00 32.50 3 5 .0 0 37.50 4 0.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Clerks, file, class B .............. .
Manufacturing ........ ................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................

1*371

38.0
40.0
39.0
37.5
40.0
38.5

39.00
42.00
42.00
42.00
38.00
38.00
35.00

W .5
254
100
1,017
160
29

695

36 .5

36 .50

Services ...........................

45

39.5

932
249
174
75
683
125
83
366
39

38.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
37.0
39.5
38.0
36.0
38.5

54.00
62.00
61.50
63.00
51.00
54.00
50.50
47.50
54.00

Clerks, o r d e r ............ ...............
Manufacturing....... .................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing .........................................................
Wholesale trade ....................

535
255
156
99
280
147

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5

46.50
49.00
48.00
51.00
44.00
48.00

Clerks. Davroll ..........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable g o o d s .................' . .............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................
Retail trade ......................
Finance * * ...... ..................
Services ...........................

855
555“
377
289
189
35
60
16
40

39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
38.0
39.0
38.0
37.5
39.5

1 51.50
52.00
51.50
; 52.50
! 49.50
55.50
; 49.50
! 48.00
j 50.50

122
43
28
15
79
29
30

38.0
39.5
40.0
38.5
37.5
38.0

! 4 3 .0 0
46^00
i 46.50
45.50
41.50
38.00
40.50

185
33
26
7
152
12
5
133
2

Duplicating-machine ODerators ...........
Manufacturing .................................... .............................
Durable g o o d s ................. .. .....................................
Nondurable goods .................................................
Nonmanufacturing .........................................................
Wholesale trade ...................
FInnrtftA ** .T.T.rTITIItrr,rtII(1 TII

—

3 7 .5

_
-

«
.
--- -—

15
15

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

5

14

-

-

-

-

•

1
!

j

-

1
!

_
-

7
5
2

!

!

77
^■45“
15
31
31

-

-

1

_

11

!

-

3

1
2

! 10

7
1
1

18
1
1

4
3
3
_

5
-

_

_

-

_

-

.

-

_

-

-

_

6

-

-

_

17
12
2

6

1
!

.

1
Key-punch operators ......................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate




738
228
67
443
54
22

37.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
36.0
39.5
38.0

46.50
48.56
48.50
49.00
45.50
50.00
44.50

! 31
! 19
20

_
_

-

27

; 123

34
23
23

-

-

31
28
12
16
3
3

51

47
39
32
7
8

2

73
28
13
I 15
45
40

70
i 50

2

!

11
14
47
18
7
10
9

! 22
! 9
! 8
1
13
13

28
4

-

6
3
39
3
21
13

86
26
i 15
1 11
! 60
52

2

5

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

5

3

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

18 | 38
r~r^
7
| 6
! 5 ! 1
13
31

-

3
1
39
11
4
7

28
! 16
j 12
i

;

89
24
17
7
65
12
1

34
3
6
24
-

16
7
-

93
80
48
32
13
4
1
3
4

18
7
!
6
i 1
11
1

7
3
1
2
4

10
5
3
2
5

1

189
73
67
6
116
2
11

101
33
29
4
68
17
3

118
57
46
11
61
4
2

-

_
-

-

-

126
74
67
7
52
5
1
2
3

42
3
3
_

29
28
10
18
1
! .

-

16
13
2
11
3
3

10
9
9

42
42
30
12

30
25
17
8
5

_
-

-

24
24
8
16
_
_

4
4
3
1
: ; _

29
6
6
-

2
2
2
.
.
_
_

.
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
2
2

4
2

_

_

; 25
i 21
i 4
1 2
! 2

|
|

.
_

.
_

1
■

2

12
9
4
5
3
3

58
70
40
42 ! 52 1 39
22
9 ! 33
j 20 ! 43
6
16 ! 18
1
8 i 4
1
„
3 ; 13
i
_
1
3
-

2
1
1
-

1
-

41 1 *9
22
40
1
10 ! 34
_
12
1 1 n
_
i 3
4 ! 3

67

6
3
2
1
3
.

-

5
1
_

1
4

51
43
21
22
8

2
2

39
33
3
-

.

1
1

1

_

-

_

4
.

3

_

8
8
7
1

_
_

.

29
29
21
8

23
9
_
2
_

-

.
-

-

•
_

-

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
11
5
6
2

4
4
3
1

10
7
3
4
3

6
.
_

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

.
_
_

6
6

1

.
-

3

-

2
2
2

-

9

96
37
27
10
59
5
2

_

-

1
1
1
-

60
33
18
28
15
19
3
9
32
15
1
4
3 !
3
6 l 21
4
“

48 j 72
9 ; 25

51
39
14
25
12
-

43
15
12
3

34
-

_
-

60
6
4
2
54
, 23
8
! 20
2

94
40
38
2
54
20

-

i 14
j 4

-

108
154
6
6
6
5
1
102
148
13
13
1
13
74 ; 134
- 1 -

40
6
6
_

5
“

-

22

7

_

3

14
2

68
1
1
67
12
24
25
6

2
11

2
6

_
.

6
1
_
1
5
2

67
27
18
9
40
5
1

37
4
78
4

13

29
13
12
1
16
2

37
13
6
7
24
.

74
54
44
10
20
4
2

16
3
3
_

a
!

71
53
37
16
18
5
.

36
144
2

15
-

I

16

7

197 ' 153

3
3
1
2

i

-

-

247
209
56
50
43 j 40

357
48
26
22
309
29
7
268
4

2

47.50

Clerks, general ..........................
Manufacturing.........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade .......... .........
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * .... ............ ........
Services ...........................

72
3
1
2
69
28
8
33

14
14
2
12

_

_

.
.

_

_

.
.

-

2

-

2

-

_

_

_

_

.

3
1

.

_

_

_

3

_

_

_
_
_

_

-

1

-

-

-

_
_

_

_

!

23
18
11
7
5
2

23
21
11
I 10
2
-

i *3
! 10
i 7

9
6
6

3
3
2

_

3
3

5
3
1
2
2
2

1
2
2

3
-

3
3

_
_
_

_
_

7
,

Table A-li

Q fy ic e

O cC H fu U iO H A

-

Q o4 ttiH 4 4 m d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1951)

area

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

an

$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2.5 0 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) %
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 00.00 nmi*

Women - Continued
f
t
Office girls .............................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Secretaries ..............................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** .........................
Services ...........................

338
.. 151
76
45
217

2,560

37.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
36.5

37.50
37.50""
38.00
36.50

38.00
62.00

402

38.5
” 39:5
39.5
38.5
37.5
35.5
39.0
39.0
36.5

164

38 .0

Stenographers, general ...................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................
Services ..........................

2,667
1,503

38.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
37.5

48.00

36 .0

50.00

39.5
38.0
36.5
38.0

48.00

Stenographers, technical ................
Manufacturing.................... .
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ................. .

39.0
323
” "258"” ..39.0
70
4 0 .0
138
39.0

Switchboard operators ...................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable g o o d s ............ . ........
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ............... .
UhAlaaolft t.r»Ha

r

Retail trade ............................
Finance ** ..............................
Services .................................

17562—
889
673
998
164

210
58

1,012
491
1,164
253
277

68
439
127

546
518

101
117
328
43

62
86
115

22

690
Switchboard operator-receptionists ........
Manufacturing .............................. “ 1 7 T ~
Durable goods ..........................
235
Nondurable goods ..................
142
Nonmanufacturing.... ................ .
313
P n K H n trMH+.-U* *
15
Wholesale trade ...................
193
pinann* **
.%
f
44
Services ...........................
54

See
*
**

38.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
38.5
38.5
37.5
39.0
37.0
44.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
37.5
39.5

63.50"

6 4.00
6 3.00
60.00

68.00

9
I
-

45
“19
9

47

22

1
8

10
26

9
16

6
86

1

1

15
15
14

3°

_
-

58.50
57.00
56.00
64.50
49.50
51.50
52.00
50.50

-

_
-

-

44.50

46.00
52.00
58.00
56.50 '
55.00
57.50
49.50
54750“
54.50
55.00

46.00
56.00
45.50
43.00
44.00
46.50

36 .0

47.00
48.00
49.00
47.50
45.50
48.50
45.00
49.00

39.5

41.0 0

_

1
1
! 1
i
-

-

-

_
-

-

j
-

u

275
171
70

149
87
40
47

296

10

62

66

1

1

-

1

-

7
13
42
-

15

2

6
22
2
22
6

108
51
33
18
57
7

; 83
! 28

145
29
28

188
118

438
239

66

130

52
70

15
17
3
76
5

272
141
105
36
131
37
17
16
54
7

109
199
28
77
19
65

3

2
-

26
2
55
j 2
i 6
i 6
29

-

1
116

: 60
j 3

17
i -

-

! 3
; 57

-

17

5
52

-

-

-

1

4

6

20
-

1

1

-

-

13
-

5

19
14

-

-

-

-

5

14
5

-

_

5

18
! 14
20
!
5
23
23
j 13
! 10
-

_

5

7
5

66
12
260

21
6
15

8
162
111

33

322
155
90
65
167
38
59

162
85
77
98

20
11

10
50

10

6

10

9
9
7

16

10

43

11

2

8

7
7
-

38
17

8

49
15
7

9

8

101
104
14
29
5
40
16

200

156

102

51
23
15

107
78
29
93
13
17

1
11
1

33
29

85

26

65
37
54
33
7

230
150
80

150

87
72
51

143
99

66

16

26

66

66

85

51

11
10
10

20

21

33
44
9

23
23
4

21
20
10

103
56
47
47
14

15
5
3
-

i 6
! 18

10
1
21

34

7
17

1

35

20

7

188
153
139
14
35

53
37
33
4
16

80
54
43

52
40
18

8
2

11

11
26
2

_

4

22
12
1
2

4

-

9

6

_

_

11

3

-

30
17
3
14

7

4
3

_

!

_

_

62

60

39

40
19

64
23
14
9
41
18

11
2
10
10

10

63

11
6

3

11

6

3

19

43
26

18
9

2

14
9
3

21

11
15

7

59
35
16
19

6

12

35

10
6

12

4

16
16
4

10
3
7
25

2

12

-

4
4

-

35
56
29

51
30

6?

15

25

38

8

10

22
8
21

12
26

5
3
7

18
15
3
7

6

19
27
4

11
6
2

15

13
5

10

6

j 4

18
19
3

-

-

18

161

1 10
i 10

53
25
13

99
24

87
56
48

3
75

61
30
23
7
31
14
17

17
7

8

2

8

89
34
35
92

1

6

3

67

17

62
10

4

24

5

3

-

12
28

1

i

21

1

10
11
2

8
31

1

5

1
1
12
2

48
30
17
13
18
7

3

6
1

4

-

3
4

10
11

12

2

5

7

5

11

16

6

11

5
4

13
7
5

2
1

1
1

2
6

1
1
1

3

-

_
_
_
-

.
_
_
_
_
_

_

_

_

1

2
1

-

-

-

5

6

_

1

_

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

2

-

-

-

-

8
8

_

•
_

9

2
5

1

1

36
“ 25”
7
18

34
7

!

1

11
91

71
41
80
9
25
9
28
9

21
2

_
_

_

1

28

40
9

12

4

-

-

_

5
-

1

i 15
i

-

-

2

-

4

194
143
77

192

112

-

-

276
191
125

127
36
25

-

-

157
81
43
38
76
9

129
71
25
46
58

-

-

_

19
9
4
5

-

-

4

_

54
4
4
50
5
7
3
34

2

2
2

-

_

1

_
-

l
H

_

-

-

-

1

-

_

-

_

-

27

12

-

_

2
2
13

-

4
-

15

6
5

-

_

36

30

-

28
! : 14
-

18
14
4
4

1

2
2

16
14

10

-

11
12

22
2
6

footnotes at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




50
23

95
9
3

27
13

10
2
2
-

15
3

2

8

1
2
1

-

4

-

•

4
4

3
l
-

-

1
2
2

8

_

-

_

-

-

_

1
1

-

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

5
-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
11

5

38

4

-

-

-

9

-

27

2

4

7
7
3
4

-

11

3
3
3
-

_
_

_

_

_

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41
33
30
3

44

8
1

6

5

6

_

_

_

4

3
g

6

-

-

1

1

8,

Table A-l*

O fy ic e .

Q cC 4 4 fH + tiO H d >

-

C < X * ttiH 4 4 & d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N J., by industry division, N
.
ovem 1951)
ber

A verage

Sex, occupationf and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly Under lo.oo 32.50 & . 0 0 37.50 lo.oo 42.50 I s .00 47.50 lo.oo 12.50 15.00 5 7.5 0 &D .00 &2.50 & 5 .0 0 £7.50 $0 .0 0 $2.50 $5.00 10.00 § 5.0 0 $0 .0 0
hours
earnings $
and
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32?50 35.00 37.50 4 0.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
i

Women - Continued

Tabulating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing ....................... .
Duratie goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................

Transcribing-machine operators,
eeneral ..............................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ...... ..............
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................
Finance * * .......................

Transcribing-machine operators,
t e chnical................ .............

380
191

160
31

306
""6 8 .
.

$
52.00
37.5
3970" 1 Z 7 3 0 54.50
39.5
53.00
38.5

1
-

-

~

46.50
; 47.50
!
! 45.50
1 51.50
l 46.00

2

22
238
26
201

38.5
39.o
39.5
38.5
38.0

4 0 .0
38 .0

46.00

-

45.50

2

62

37.5

53.50

-

46

2
1
1

-

-

2
j
j

4

17

20

1

11

7

73
23

48
5

-

9

2

20

~

-

1

2

5

2

9

ri

1

i

2
2

1

—

:
■

7
-

-

-

1

6

-

-

-

1

12
12

33
19
17

3

4

-

2

32
9

61
16

8

52
3

23

3

6

12

3
23
-

33
51
5 ^ h “ 9“
8
5
- 1 1
28
42
i 1
; 27
42
l
—

2
1

2
1

20

5
5

49
4
44

4
45

21

! 24
i

-

12

4

180
283
129
63
78
57
6
51
220
51
2 ! 1
6 | 13
1
2
211
35

-

-

42

271
95
81
14
176

6
1
5
17

20
20
20

6
6
1

40
34
29
5

56
a

2

*
"

5

S 20
5

3
2
1
1
1

8

2
2

n

1
4
15

5
5
-

-

1

2
2
1
1

_
-

_
-

_
_
_

7
3
3
-

9

6
5

Services .............................................
Typists. class B ...........................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ................................
Nonm
anufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * .................. .........
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade ........................................
Finance * * ..........................................
Services ...............................................

1,380
“ 687—
537
150
693
52
26
13
556
46

38.5
39.5“
40.0
39.0
38.0
36.0
40.0
39.0
37.5
36.5

! 47.50
i 49.00 j
!48.00
! 51.00
46.50
; 47.00
! 47.50
| 38.50
i 45.00
57.50

38.0 42.00
— "1 9 :5 " ! U . 50
40.0 j 45.00
635
351
38.5 j 43.50
37.0 |40.50
1,817
46.00
166
36.5
HI
39.5 144.50
46
39.0 ! 40.00
37.0 1 39.50
1,374
48.00
90
38.5

2,803

11

20

-

4

-

-

-

11
5

20
-

-

.
;

4

:

6

7
13

2
11

-

-

1

“

!
_

-

1

4

-

-

3
” |
:
- !
- j
_ |

3

3

-

-

-

s*
33
32
i
21
7
-

; 101 479 498
12 ~68“" 71
i
12
21
40
28
50
427
, 89
411
- J
2
9
31
18
2
3
3
6
7
9
3
80 367 375
35
1
11
12 ;
57

10
9
1
47

•

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
•

_
_
-

.

_
_

-

-

2
-

.

.

_

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

_

_

•

_

_

«

_

3

1

_

-

_
1
1

_
.
•
_

_
_
_

_
-

_
-

2

4

_

_

_
_

2

4

_
_

15

6

16

10

n

200

63
50
36
14
13
8

69
38
30
8 !
31
2
1
;
1

49

36

8

11

47
29

22

8
4
4

3
2
1
8
2

-

176

62

-

-

6

298 | 380
~15§i 116
160 110 i 63
86
58 ! 53
130 | 264
265
11
22
23
28
60
9
1
7
3
101 210
175
8
1

148
94
62
32
54
32

146
81
60

~ |

511
246

_

i

_

j

21
65

16

-

1
3
1

59

3
4

12
32

_

-

3

_

_
_

3
_
_

7

10

_
-

5
1
1

6
_
_

1

4
1

6

4

5

3

1
-

4
-

2
3

3

-

-

30
15
15
11
3
2
1
1

5

-

15
7

_

-

12

a

-

14
2

52
40
40

21

48
41
7
11
1

18
2
.

11 1
11 :

-

_

-

.

_

3

3

5

2

_ I

5
4

4 !
1

2

_

H
ours reflect the w
orkw
eek for w
hich employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours•
W
orkers w
ere distributed as follows* 15 at $90 to 100; 23 at $100 to 110,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




.
.

3

M

115
100
15
85
< 14
|
3

_____ L
2/
2/
*
**

-

.

*

!

117
84
; 77
; 7
33
; 10
j i 1
22

“ j

-

-

1

i
Typists, class A .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable g o o d s .................. .
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing .............. ......
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ............. .
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................

-

2

4
5
1

_
3

.
-

5

3

_

-

•
_
_

_
-

•
.
.
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

2

4

_
-

_

«.
-

_
*

9,

Table A-2i

P to ^ e A & iO H & l G 4 u t

^ e c J tH A C a l

O c C S ip a t i O H d

(Average straight—
time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N J., by industry division, N
.
ovem
ber 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

S ex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 4 0 .0 0 4 5 .0 0 50.00 55.00 60.0 0 65.0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5.0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5.0 0 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.0C 120.00 130.00 140.00 150.00 1 60.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) *
4 0.0 0 4 5.0 0 50.00 55.00 60.0 0 6 5.0 0 70.0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0.0 0 8 5.0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 LOO.0 0 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.0C 130.00 140.00 150.00 160.00 170 .00

Men

Draftsmen, c h i e f .................................................. ..
Manufacturing .....................................................
Durable goods ...................... ....................................... ...
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • .............................
Nonmanufacturing . . • • • ...................................• • • • •

Draftsmen ...............................................................................................
Manufacturing..... .............. •••••
Durable g o o d s .... ................ .
Nondurable goods ...............••••
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................• • • • •
Services .................................. ..................... ..

198
151
115
16
67
63

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

*
1 13.00
I 07. 0 0 '
105.00
122.50
124.50
l?6.r>0

1 ,1 1 8
747
619
128
371
275

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8.5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

8 5.5 0
8 3.0 0
8 1 .5 0
9 1 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

I

-

3
1 !
:
1 j
2 !
~ !

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

r

1

1

-

26
13
8
5
13
7

77
61
61
-

16
13

336
25
119
116

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

! 6 3 .0 0
6 6.5 0
59.5 0
7 0 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
7 0.5 0

Manufacturing •..••••••••••••••••••••••

130
122

3 9.5
3 9 .0

! 4 7 .0 0
4 6 .0 0

480

-

1
:
i
!
!

1
3 1
3 !

132
102
74
94
62
82
12 | 12
28 1 38
9 !
31

91
131
66
no
64
94
2
16
25 1 21
10
15

8
7
6
1
1

17
16
16

-

-

-

2
2

1

30
!

2
2

25

-

5
5

8
8

?6
55

127
121
118
3
6
6

89
81
81

-

6
4
4

2
2

50
27
24
3
23
21

43
30
23 !
7
13
12

48 I
32
29 :
3
!
16 !
16

-

142
107
98 I 71
83
54 !
17
15
36
44
28
23

1
1

4

90
66
56
10 |
24 !
20 j
1

69
22
14
8
47
43

21
13
8
5
8
8

12
4
3
1
8
8

18
18

-

-

-

-

~ !

-

-

"

“

-

4
/

3
12
12

55

4
4 ;

2
2

1

29
23
21
2
6
6

39 ___37
33
14
7
25
8
7 !
6
23 1
6
22

-

36
24
21 !

16
7
1
6
9
9

35
9
7
2
26
25

H
10
9
1
4

23
9

27
7
2
5
20
20

15
1
1
14
14

-

-

9
14
14

/

4
-

4
/

n
9
6
3
2
2 1

5
-

5

J

6
6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

18

4
/

1
58 i

n
4
3
1
7
6

4
4
4

37
35
35

i

!
Draftsmen.. J u n i o r .......................................................................
Manufacturing '
...........................................................................
Durable g o o d s ............. .....................
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • ................... ...
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
S e rvices ......................................• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1

7
7
7

-

-

-

~

~

-

“

_

-

-

:
!

Women

D r aftsmen.... .................. ........

21
3 9 .5
------ 2 l — —3973—

7 2 .0 0
7 2 .0 0

5
5

3

5
5

2

'
Draftsmen. J u n i o r ........... ...........

33

4 0 .0

6 4 .5 0

Nurses, industrial (registered) ........
Manufacturing ........................ ...
Durable goods .............................................. ......
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing .................................. ...........................

292
250
182
68
42

3 9.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .0

6 4 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
62.0 0

T r a c e r s ................ .......
Nonmanufacturing....... .......••••••

29
14
n/

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
40.0

54.50
6 0 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

1/

7

4

12
-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
6

1

1
-

-

7
-

2

5

2

n
10
9
1
1

2

1
35

29

-

-

11

;

24
5
6

|

11
5
e
2

;
j

45
42
32
10
3

63
54
40
14
9

64
53
40
13
n

44
41
33
8
3

4
4
/
4

1
-

-

5
5
c
J

9
9
1
8
“

5
3

2
2

1
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2
“

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1
.

H
ours reflect the w
orkw
eek for w
hich em
ployees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational W Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., N
age
ovem
ber 1951
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10,

T ili« a-3: Maintenance and Poweb Plant Occupation*
a
(Average h o u r l y earnings
basis

1/

for m e n in selected occupations

in N e w a r k-Jersey City,

N. J.,

by industry division,

studied on a n area
November

1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
i
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.9C 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.40 2.5C 2.60 2.70
earnings
and
1
1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45' 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.9C 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2.60 2.70 over

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

$
Carpenters, maintenance ............. .
Manufacturing .....................................
Nondurable goods ........ .................. .
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Electricians, maintenance .......................... .
Manufacturing .....................................
Nondurable goods ................. ............ .
Nonmanufacturing............. ........... •••••••••
Engineers, stationary............ ...................
Manufacturing ............................. ........
Durable g o o d s ....... ......................... .

PhV H

m vtH H + - I a «

a

.....................

Firemen, stationary boiler .......................... .
Manufacturing .................. ..................
Durable goods •••••................. .......... .
Nondurable goods .... ............
Nonmanufacturing .....................
##
..............................................................................

Helpers, trades, maintenance .... ................ ••••
Me

n ff
DlltWI M A

............................ .................................................................................
■

V Ta
\

......................................................................................................

e n /v ^ s

_

.

............ ........................

Nonmanufacturing........... ......................
P iiW 4 a i i f
IHi a I A S f l l o

#
f.T m ^A

.................................................... .............. .

* ____

............................... ................................................ _ ^

Maohine-tool operators,
toolroom .................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing.......................••••••........
Machinists, maintenance .......... ••.••••••......••••
Manufacturing........... ........... •••••••.......
Durable goods ......... ........................
Nondurable goods ••••••••.......................

Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y ...................................... ........................
Manufacturing ....................................................................... .. ....................................
Durable goods .............................................................. .......................................
Nondurable goods .............................. .
Nbnmanufacturing ..................................
PiiV.Hr* irMH+.los * .............................
A

, t l ) I 1 , t | , t t t t t i t T t T T f T TT - T f - T T -

925
807
277
530
118

2.0 6
2.06
1.85
2.17
2.07

-

-

-

-

-

-

L,443
[7255
723
543
177

2 .1 0
2.06

_

_

_

-

-

642

1.93
2.24

2 .3 8

-

-

-

-

-

1.93
2.34

167
17

2.0 2

-

_

820
536
193
343
284
43
36

1.70
"1 7 7 1 —
1.58
1.79

-

_

14

-

13

26
26
8

-

6
2

1.68

I .55

1 .3 0
i

1.64
; 58—
I .46
I .7 7
1.48

1.4 2

34
34
32

49
48
30
18

78
72
59
13

1

6

30
~nr
-

10
20
7
8

23

23
—
--- 9"1
- 1
4
18 j 9 1
1 ! 14

1 ! 15
r

1

r r
!

2

4

1

5

16

2

28

18

8

-

21

8

-

18

5
5

-

7
7

-

5

13

161
53
85' !~~49“
69
15
16
34
76
4
2
71

88
37 “
33
4.

51

!

2

77
~ 6T

9

7
9

9

18
-

2

5
3

7

10

1

3° i

-

-

-

-

-

-

- |

-

2 .0 1
2 .0 0

_
-

-

*
-

-

1.94

-

-

-

-

-

2 .1 0

-

-

-

-

-

2.19

-

- '

-

-

1.76
1.74
1.72

_

7

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

1.88

_

-

-

-

1.79
1.87
1.87

-

-

-

-

;

IIT
3

12
11

6

31
30
27
3

7

1

48
43
40
3
5

82
82
63
19
-

106

9
9
9
-

21
15

36
35
23

12
1

122
121

103
93

137
137
135

10

2

63
58

3

-

1

21

20

26

5

4
4

26

19
19
16

-

5
16

3

16

26

3

119
119
64
55
-

38
37
5
32

62
62
2
60

28
28

1

20
8

22
22
3
19
93
91
70

21
2
14
14
5

9

17
13
9
4
4

122_

19
14

47
38

68
68

10

20
20

2
2

11

10

-

46

24
62

4
5

26
12

20
20
2

80

10

68

18

10

20

2

70
4.

-

-

536
536

1
1

1

536

1
1

-

-

17

-

17
17

3

16

107
67
67
40

155
-

51
3

155
4

88

1

-

12
2

87
81
24
57

85
73
73

89
81
81

64

6

12

8

13
13

143
85

19
18

2
11

10

-

75
58

18

1

20

78
14

-

96
34

88
88

51
-

8

1
3

99 _ 2 4 _
79
24
1
78
24

-

1
15
13

10

~
17

40
36

-

-

10

36
4

3

1

57
57

-

9

-

-

4

m

104
64
40
7
1

220
190
128

62
30

26

126
85
33
52
41
40

93

9
2
7
84

102

40
35
15

284

20
72

20

274

10

5

10

9

10

31

-

30
30

-

-

-

-

-

31
14

•

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

.

—

7

9

92

1
1

74

10

*■
*

9

274

10

-

18

.

_

4?
48

60
60

3
-

10
10

6

4

-

4

4

3

l

-

4

4

289

50
50
29

69

11
11

81
71

50
50

11

1

1

.

-

-

-

11

71

50

-

_

-

10

-

1
1

11

3

-

46
46

13
13

27
27

12
12

36
33

1
1

31
28

59
59

33
33

14
14
H

12
12
12

66

14
13
13

43
39
28

182
178

95
92

292
292

-

-

11

162
16

62

-

“

-

“

4

4

1

7

94
90
51
39
4

194
192
184

-

48
47
34
13

46

65
45

8
2

30
3

'
;

7
7
7
-

28
17

16
1
11
7

20
1

1

%

28
14

73
3

12
2

41
31
27
4

186

10
10

110
20

14

11

78
57
53
4

21
6
8

35
31
27
4
4

2

39
29

10

86

12

22
2

31
7

72

5

-

68

-

-

_

7
24
16

4
14

5
7

-

2
20

5

1

9

9

9

16

2

18

3
3

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




55 _ i 2 . 54
__
48
55
43
21
21
5
22
50
27
6
“
-

2
2

-

2

!

50

26

28

8
8

!

5
5
3

|
--------~

20
8

6

\

39

_

78
25“

3

50
46
31
15
4

10

91 112
94
47
27
46
1 1 67
18
44

82
78
53
25
4

63
54^ “
a
13
9

61

10
5
5

-

1

-

4

-

5

2

53
49
44
5
4

6

410
1.99
■'395""' 1.98

654
352
302
50
302
117

7

6
2

1.81

5

1,666

5

20

69
51
28
23
18

3

1.52

0 5 2
1,009
573
84

17

8

«
-

-

42
37
17

20
12

11
2
1

_

49
32

24
4
5

-

-

13

33

28

14
13

-

-

1

2

1

—

23
15

-

_

2
2
2

_

2
2

-

-

-

2.17

-2722—

132
343

2,130
17715
505
L,211
414
255
87

-

-

. 1

-

203
89
-

288
109
179

1

21
-

38
34
4
31

1
1

44

7

12
12

-

-

•

-

-

-

1

13

-

32
32

13

-

7
7

13

-

_

21
15
4

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

A.

11
6

_

-

_

_

•

-

-

-

_

-

6

CP LABOR

u ,

Table

Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupation* •Continued

~3:

a

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N. J., by industry division, November 1951)

N
N
O

c

c

u

A

p

a

o

u
oU t

fh

w

$

v m

e

o

a

i

u

1
r

$

e

r

n

1

k

ea

or 1

n

l d1 2 .

.

e

i

r

rg
e

y n 1 3.
s

n

U

$
e
15 3 .
g

$

$

1 0 .4 r
s

15 4 .

1 04.

$

$

r$

b

51 4 .

10 .5

M
$
51 5 . n

$
a

1 0 5.

B

1 0 6.

E

$
1 0 7.

$
51 6 .d

$

$

R

$
0 8.
1.95

51 7 .

O

$

$

$

$

2 5 8 .i

.

52

n

20 9

$
2 0 .0

d 2

$
2

0.

F
$
2 5 u1 .

01 .

$

W
$

0 .2
2.40

$
2 03

2 5 2 .s

25 t

1

1 2 .

1 .

.3

1

51 3 .

r

0 5.

.

15 5 .

51 6 .

1 0 6.

15 7 .

1 0 .7

2.00
5 8 .

1 0 .8

2 0 9.

52 9

52 0 .

2 0 .

.1

2

2 5. 1

2 2 0.

C

2 52.

2

2 5 4.

3.

0 7y

6 .

a

$
1

O

$
n
o 0 5.

d
v 0 7

06 .

0

$
M

e

c

M
D

.

.. .

o

o n m

a n u f

. .

r i a g u . . n

c t

.

n

u .

N
N

..

h

a

.

.r . .

.

n

.. .

.

.

.

.
. . a

.

.

. .

. .

n.

.

.

. .

.f.

. . . .. . . .. . b .. .

.

.

.

a

u.

d

.

.

.

. ..

. ..

. ..

..

u

.. . .

.. . .

1 . ,

1 .4

1 .i

2 .

2 . 3 a5 “ .
.. . 6 e6 .. .

l .. . .

.

.

.

.. . 1

. r

.. . .

.. .

.. .

.. .

.

9 .. 7 . 9

.. .

M

.

.

.

e

. . . . . .v . . . .

c

M

. . a

.

D

.

. ..

.

.

. .

.

n . ..

n .

M

.

M

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.

.

i .

l.

.

e

.

a

. . i
. . a

.

D

u . .
N

i
D

u . .
N

P

f

c t

r i an

l

N

.t

u. .

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

d

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

. .
. .b

.

. .

.
.

.
. m ..

f

.

.

a.

1
1

. s

.c. 1

. .

2 . 0 .3 e . .

a.

.
D
o n d u r a b l

.

..

u
N

.

g o o ed s

.
.

. ..

n. . .

. ..

.. . 3

.

_

.. .

..

b . .

. . . . . .

. .

• . • • • .• • u . .
.

.

.

.

.

. b.

..

f
. .

.

. .

. .

.

. .

.. .

•

..

..

. .

. . . * • a •. . • • . .

a.

112 .

. .- 7

.. l • .

_ . -.

t . .

.r .

. . • • .• . u • • . .

.. .

r .
.
.
. a
. .......... •
.
. b .
........................ .

. ..

r

. .

.-.

. .

l .

• .• • • .
.

. .c - . .
. •1

1.7

.
..

a

. .
.

.b .

o o l a n d - M

dm

a k e r s

.................................
.
. . ........... . . u . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . f . . . .
. . n . .
.
.
••....••.... ..
r
a.
.
.
. b
.
. .

u

1 ,
.
.

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work,




1 9

4 .

. 8
o. .

7l

. . g7

-

.| .

.

4

.

.

. .

.

.

2. 4 t
2 . .

.d.
o .

7

. 1 .

8.
7

7 .8
g . -

.

1 .
.- . -

.

. 5 .

.

.

.

.

. 9

0 .

.

.

g

.
.

“

.

2

.
. . .

. .t .
.

. . . .

.

.

- u.
. g

“ !

.1

.
.

.

.

-

. .

. o.

. - . .

.
.

S 4 g
.

.4

. 5

g

3

82

210

.1

. .

7 .

.

4F ._

.
9.

.

o

-

_
41 n .
. 9
.
.3.
9. .

.

16

.

20
12
1

.

.

.

.

.

. .
. .

. .
.o

.

.

.

..

c ..

.
7

.

. .

-d 1 .
.g
.. u 0

-.

.
..

.

.o

.

.

-

-

i.

-

.

.

.
o .

-n .
.

.

i
.

.

.5

.

.

.

.

.

-

12
12
12

. n1
.
.
.
4.
. . 4 . .
.1 . 7 . .
. .
s. 4
. 1 .
.
.
_
.
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..

..

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.

o . 7

.

. .r

31 .
3 1s . .

2
d . 11

. ;i

..

. n. 1

. .

2
.

i ..

7 .

-

7 t .1
.1 6

2

o

..

n

.

!.s

5 .

.

. _

8

0 .

.
4
4

.

.
.

a .

.

_
-

.

d.

.
.

g

3
.-

.

1

_ i
-,
.

.

_
s

.

51

1

5

69 2

_

4

1 6 .

3

6
r

1
g

1
.

1 . s

1

3

—
.

6 .

3
3
3

.

6

1

67^

H
.M

.

3;

.

6 .

i 16
.

2 !

2

j

7

5
.

; 1
.

23
i 23
.
13
210

6

6
. 5

I

3

.

1

9 !

l
| 7
105

54
.5

6

1

.

1

_

4

. _
_

s

2

227
1 0 5 13 4
.
105 3 . 43 j . 2 .
4 .

.

n

.
.

1
1
5.

. 3

1

7

.

0
4.

.

61

.

.

.

.

1 .

.
0

.

.

.

-

5 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

•

.

•
_

•

.

~ .

.

.
_

.

.

. 0

.

.

.

•

.

.

•

.

.

.
_

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

a

4.

21

5

.

.
1

.

.
23

.

2 7

1 2 3
.

.

.

9
8.

e
.
.

_
-

.

_ .

.

.

.

.

0 .n

.

.

c.

.

9

8

3

_

.

3

.

1

— .

.

.

.
.

3.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

_

1

4
4

_

4

5

-

86

0

8 3

20

58
.
58 .

8 3

20
.
2

9 8
.
32 .

.
.

-

1

1

.

.

1

3

2

1.

._

.
.

1

8

4

.

7 8

1
1

7 18
.
180

.

_

_

-

5
2

2

_

.
8

.

-

1.
5

4 .

7 1
.7

.

n.

4

01

3

89

4
5

2

2 .

1

.

•

12

4

n .

. 01
.

3

8

4
4

1
7 I2

.

_

•

.

1

.
. -_
_

.

2

2
12
. 1
180 . 7 189
2 .

.

-

. _

.

4

c
.
.

8

1 2

42 .

5 .
.

.

.

.

2

.
-

2

4 2

3 1

3.
.

. i

. 5

.

L 4 2
.

1 0 5
.

-

4

3 1

.-

2
2

5

. r i !— .
•

-

.

2

2

1

1 1

.

-

.

0

- .
2

1

.
.—

1

e .

.

1 . e . L 5 .
.
. 1
.
10
.
.

._

1 1

.

_
.
.|

_

2

1.

.

.

._

1

.

.

.

26
. 2

.

.

-

2

3

.

.
_

.

2

.
62

. 7

. 5
.

.

.

.

.
.

3

. c
62
.
62

7

7.

.

.

69

e

•

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.

.
12

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0 .
.

0 -

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2t

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.

-

2
2

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._

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l .

.

.

1

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_

.

4

. 3 6
.

.
•

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.
40
4.
.

12
.

.

_

.

. 7

.

.

6

2
1

5

.

.

7

1

.
.

.

.

6 5

.

.

4
. 15

.

•

.

.

-

1

.

7

8

.-

.

_ .

5

_.

.

.

.

5

- .

83c

m 7

1 .

.

5

.

. 5 5

3

.

.

.

.

>.

.

. g

9 2

.

_.

-

4 5

.

22
1

. .

n 5l

.

(

.

6 1

4

•

3 .
.3 0
.

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!;

._

8 . 1 .
2 s 5
. . j . .

.

.

-

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a
65. 23 .
l.
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2. 2 1.
6

1

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i .

_.

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d

.

.g

n_ .

.

5
-.

_
.

6

.
-

.

22
.

2

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5 .

64 68
4
5
64 6

68
68
68

n

1.
.

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14915. i 64 112 .
.
.
.
147 . 5 64!108 .
. 231 .
.
. 50 .
4 i
. 124
.
. 60 . 5 8 .
.
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2 .
4.

. 6

5.

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.

6

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m .

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1 .8

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20 .

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5

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3 . i2
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26

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4 . 7.
48. . I .5 .
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35

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1

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49
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a. . .
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l 1,378 .
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9.

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t -. .

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124

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2/

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a .

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t .
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u

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10

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2

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12,

Table a-4,*

GitUoduU, *k)' nduuUuuf', and SUipfUwp Occupation*
a

(Average hourly earnings \J for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., by Industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) ....................................
Manufacturing ............... ....................

277
235"

$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
Average
hourly
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
earnings Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95
1
.80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1 .4 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 .4 0 2.50
0.75
*
1.55
1.34

Crane operators, electric bridge
(20 tons and over) .................................
Manufacturing .............. ............ ........

—

Guards ................ ..............................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................

1,219
i t n r
628
485
106

1.54
1.55
1.46
1.68
1.35

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men) ...............
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonmanufacturing.................... .............
Public utilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ................................
Retail trade ...................................
Finance ** .....................................
Services ........ ......................... .

4,476
"sjwr
1,606
1,4-76
1,394
437
122
293
271
271

1.33
1.36
1.33
1.38
1.26
1.39
1.27
1.15
1.29
1.15

97

W

1.61
..i . 6 r

_

$
2.50
and
over

-

1
1

_

-

3

2
2

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26
-

-

26

62
62

20
20

12
12

59
46

46
20

13
13

32
32

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29
29

_

-

-

-

24
24

16
16

14
14

-

7
7

-

2
2

-

-

111
108
100
8
3

79
78
57
21
1

53
53
47
6
-

87
84
65
19
3

73
55
53
2
18

188
155
97
58
33

140

-

18
14
14

232

-

7
7
7

48

-

11
7
7

33

-

249
33
216
3

no
no
_

91
91

48
48

*

91

48

_

494
297
226
71
197
89
13
45
50
-

441
390
352
38
51
17

300
296
146
150
4
1

279
245
103
142
34
28
3
1
1
1

650

172
142

24
9

64
58

112
28

43
43

142
30
6

9

58
6

28
84

43

15
/

2
_

8

73
73
40
33

24
19
13
6
5

-

65
65

-

4

-

33

4

44
28
16
4

a

108

130

29
12

26
26
82
13

74
24
50
76
15

218
132
40
92
86

45
1
23

19
10
5
27

4
48
23
3

356
274
54
220
82
10
7
48
14
3

267
222
127
95
45
4
8
4
26
3

386
277
231
46
109

4
15
3 ! 12
25
4

180
94
42
52
86
25
13
15
33
-

52

197
36
3
33
161
1
160

60
11
5
6
49
13
22
14

33
13

90

171

12
9
3
78

43
7
36
128

4?
49
49

59

84
3

48
46
33
13
2
1
1

72
6l
5
56
11
11
-

21
2
2
_

-

-

23
25
- hT
8
25
15

38
27
24
3
11

-

-

65

24

17

52
•

8
3
2
2

1

-

-

-

3

3

20
34
52
-

3
3
1
30

_
-

4n
225
186
239

/
{
8
5

10
2

6
12
12

5

10
10
10
_

3

_
_
_ 1

_

„
_

_

17
59

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

4

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

-

i
Janitors.-Dorters, and cleaners (women) ..............
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable g o o d s ..... ............. ............
Nonmanufacturing....................... ..........
Retail trade ...................................
Finance ** ...................fT-f
Services ......... ................... ..........

Order fillers ................. ......................
Manufacturing ................ ....................
Durable goods ............................
Nondurable goods ....................... .......
Nonmanufacturing.......... .......................
Wholesale trade ................................
Retail trade ...................................

—

'

942
353“
185
180
577
62
389
58

1.10
25
1.24™"
1.28
1.20
1.01
25
1
.92
1.03
.84
24

2,092
963.
549
356
1,187
663
512

1.48
1.48
1.49
1.47
1.49
1.34
1.68

i,sa

1.45
1749”
1.55
1.38
1.29
1.30
1.28

24
1

19

-

19
17
2

1
23

1U

I

16
2
2
14
d
6

9

_

52
9
36
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- ' «
.
-

-

7
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

5
4
1

50

-

-

“

“

1
1
1

13
20
12
4.

19
19
-

39
15
14
1
24
24

_

-

a

-

35
4
2
2
31
30
1

62
32
10
22
30
20
10

47
27
21
6
20
13
7

33
28
27
1
5
4
1

79
49
8
30
29
1

-

926
522
393
343
43

_
-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




48
48
2
_
2

19
12
-

12
7
.
"

49
48
1

Ill
86
56
30
25
24
1

204

166 182
72
39 112
50
29 102
10
10
22
no
165 ! 54
165 ; 53 ; n o

1

no
98
47
51
12
12
•

38
37
7
30
1

_
_
_

_
_

_

382
238
176
62
144
n9
13

430
98
68
30
332
8
324

235
63
4
59
172
3
169

16
15
12
3
1

201
175
88
87
26
26

131
n7
37
80
14
8
6

219

61
61
58
3

5

62
37
27
10
25
24
!

1

1
Puckers (men) ........................................
Manufacturing.....................................
Durable goods ........ .........................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonmanufacturing...... ..... ..................... t
Wholesale t r a d e ....... ........................
Retail trade ............ .......................

?3
23
19
4

95

224

81
69
12
14
12
2

1

no

179

1126
60
95
66
15
n4
53
in
52

3

no
46
19
27
64
64

1

173
152
86
66
21
13
8

-

219
196
23

17
17
16
1
«
.

17
17
1
16

_

_

6
6
6

2p
20
20

_
_
_
_

_

6
6
6

6
6
6

14
U
14

-

-

-

1

13
15
15

_

-

9
9
9

_ _

_
-

18
18
12
6

-

_

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF U B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13,

T*bi»

a -* :

Custodial, WanaUouUnf, and SUipfunp Occupation* - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Nevark-Jersey City, N. J., b y industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f

Occupation and Industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
1
*
hourly Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 (2.10 |2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
»
D.75

and
.90 ' .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 over
1

.85

.80

%
Packers (women) ......................................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonnanufacturlng..................................

649
444
284
160
205
70

506

Receiving clerks .....................................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Wholesale trade ................................
Retail trade ...................................

Shipping clerks ......................................
Manufacturing ................................... ..
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ................................. .

401
276
125
105
52
48

368
—
187
111
70

Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k s ............. .
Manufacturing .....................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Wholesale trade ................................

364
153
201
149 .

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable g o o d s ............. ,................
Nonnanufacturlng ..................................
Wholesale trade ................................
Retail t r a d e ..... .............................

5,834
4,057
2,421
1,636
1,777
737
435

1.27

1 .2 6
1.32
1.17
1.30
1 .0b
1.55
1.59
1.57

1.6 2
1.43
1.41
1.44

1.59
1759.
1.56
1.66
1.57
1.55
i:63
1.46
1.50
1.47
1743.
1.36
1.53
1.55
1.55
1.53

2
2
2

-

11
11
8

-

29
24
10
14
5

-

14
14
14
-

-

5

20
14
14
6

32
20
17
3
12

40
28
23
5
12

29
19
14
5
10

2

3
2
2
1

6

7

10

10
-

1

-

-

-

-

1

9
9

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 1

_

1

_
-

_

1
- I
1 j

-

2
2
2

2
- —
2
1

-

12
11
10
1
1

12
6

1

6

5
3
2

14
12
2

14
12

10
6

4
-

12
-

6
4

4

12

3

44

-

6
6

60
2
-

33
33
33
-

43
43
12
31
-

28
23
13

42
28
27

36
33

10

1

62

26

41

41
40
1
-

30
29
28

108
8
8
100

12
12

26

82

21

78
49
29
4
4
”

25
24

9
9
9
-

4
8

13
13
12
1

8
8
8
-

69

55
53
34
19

22

5

1
1
4

-

2
2
2
-

i
3 !

1

-

-

1
1

1
1

11
11

-

5

1
1

-

-

1

-

1
-

7
4
-

-

-

20

51
41

/

10

1

18
15
3

2

19
19
3

2

4

-

2

3

1

2

4

'

21
17
14
3
4

36
18
11
7
18

2
2

1
1

2
2

2
2

2
“

1
-

2
-

2

-

-

-

3
3

89
80
9
9

13
13
13

19
19
-

7
7
7

_

_

_

_

-

- [

”

j

"

-

_

_

1
1 !
- 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
3
2
1

1

18
3
5
4
1

31
30
17
13
1

24
24
13
11
-

33
28
28
5

98
81
61
20
17

55
55
43
12

8
14
6
4
8 ; 4
4

26
23

5
5
"

37
25
12
2

69
1
68
56

1
1

6
6
6
-

1

l !
- 1

__

6 _ -14,
3
14
14
-

i
_
- ;
- 1

-

_

9
9
8
1
-

12
2

16
15
; 16
15
12
1
16

-

62

123
77
4
73
46
30

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

-

16
3
15 124
61 76
Tj 10
64
6
12
1
10
2
6 1 9! 48
4! 36
2 i 6
5
5

16
12
---- 1
12
"

120
119
117
38
2
1
19!
8 i 8
-

127

~Tot
70

_

16 |
16

3
3

119 179
91 127
88 1 72
3 ! 55
28
52
18
10
8

332
315
191
124
17
12
4

44
39
371
318
287
31
53
44
6

507 217
504 ;
179
146
445 :
59
33
38
3
9
2
16

3

398 216
168
297 ;
226
99
71
69
101
48
72
46
1
4

1125 1435 173 .187
” 843 592 114
55
344 179 75
5
499 413 39 ! 50
282 843 59 132
80 32 123
222
2
41 299 13

-

136
123
5
118
13
13
-

26
8
5
3
18
18
-

721
42
679

263
13
250

16p
160
-

-

-

-

-

-

3 L
2 !
2
1
-

l

_

-

_

1
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ......................................
Manufacturing .....................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
PnV\1 Av t +O ^ H a a f
/ i
t

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type) ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................

1,605
—

w r~
1,245
552

2.02
2.04
2.01
2.03

1.94
1.97

195

Truck drivers, light (under 1+ tons) ................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods ..................................
Nondurable goods .................... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Wholesale trade ................................

w r

1.54
1.74
1.51
1.91
1.49
1.21

125

613

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

36
24
_1

-

13
-

-

-

30
3
3

13
-

-

-

-

-

8
8

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*




2
2

-

-;

36
36

24
24

-

13
13

-

-

27
26

91
21
70

157
108
49

205

23 182
- 176
38

38
27

161
-

35
24
24

49
21
21

-

99
99
QQ
77

32
3
3
29

19
19
8
11
-

24
24

36
33

-

-

-

-

-

24
-

33
3

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

8
2
6

14
191

427

-

14
2

16 | 17
16 ! 9
12
9
4
8
-

10
7
3
4
3
-

1
1

2 .1 5

621
---140
62
78
481
183

-

-1

13
13

-

-

4
3
3 | -

12
12
12
-

17
1
1
16
7

314
13
12
1
301
56

T i« a-4 * QudtoduU, *lOateltotUituf,, and SUifLftiwp Gecufiati04tA> - Gontmaad
«b
'
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Newark-Jersey City, N J ., by industry division, N
.
ovem
ber 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Truck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o and
in c lu d in g 4 t o n s ) ..............................................................••••
M anufacturing ..................................................................
Durable g o o d s .....................................................................
N ondurable goods ......................................................
N onm anufacturing ......................................................................
W holesale t r a d e .............. ................. ............... .................
1 1 +/pnHO * » 1l T t » T I t t t l t t 1 T t f T - r - T - - - t r T» . t
S e r v i c e s ........................... ....................................................

T ru ck ers , oower ( f o r k - l i f t ) ..• • • .............. ........................
M anufacturing .............................................................................
D urable goods ........................... ..........................................
Nondurable g o o d s ..............................................................
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g ......................................................................
...........
.........
...........................

1 .7 5
1 .8 4
1 .5 9
1 .8 9
1 .6 7
1 .6 4
1 .7 8
1 .4 2

1 .2 7 5
991
557
434
2 84

-

-

-

-

1 .6 1
1 .6 0
1 .5 5
1 .6 7
1 .6 2
1 .6 8

7,
1

•••.....................

221

— w r

T'hvrn'hl o grruvl H t Tt T. TTt t l . . #. . . , tTTT. T . . . _t » 1t-

163
31

Nondurable goods......................... ............... .

1

24

1 ,0 8 9

—

W T

Retail trade........................................................
Finance ** ••••.........................................••••••••••••

369
338
382
86
100
50
79

SonH r>o]B . T i t t » « i r T - t i i i - » t i i . » - » » » » i « T - r » » * . »

6 7

Public u t i l i t i e s * ...........................................................
Uhnl Afinl a +.Y
*»r1c» tTT. t t r Tt TTT#Tt - t r . - ( f - - t T. Tit

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

8
8

1
-

-

19
12

18
-

-

! 24
1 24
_

7

18

14
1
12

19
-

11
-

19
12

10
10
9
1
-

11

7

-

15
15
13
2

11

!

1 .5 4
1 :$ $
1 .5 3
1 .6 3

1 .2 3
1 .2 5
1 .2 0
1 .3 1
1 .1 8
1 .2 1
1 .1 2
1 .0 9
1 .2 1
1 .2 8

18

19

29
18
18

11
11

8

6
6

70

_
-

1
-

6

7

30
16
2

_
4

2
1

48

64
2
4

18
H
^ 0“
10 | - 1
1
! 8
H

12

_
2

56
1 24
: 24
78
32
2
28
49
1
2
- I 1

93
15
9
6

2

j
_____ j
_____

1/
2/
*
**

Excludes prem
ium pay for overtime and night w
ork.
Study limited to m w
en orkers except w
here otherwise indicated.
Transportation, (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities.
m
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




381
75
27
48
306
276

417
46
46
371
_

303
230
11
219
73
60

-

3

30

-

13

101
89
71
18
12

15?
145
115
30
7
3

400
274
210
64
126

212
144
58
86
68
19

77
77

40
16
15
1

54
54
54

57
56
39
17

33
31
25
6

19
5
5
14
14

23

32 140
55
32 | 86
55
54 i 6 1 30
1
26 i 56
54
2

12
9
12
9
9 ! 12
!

1
1
1

13
13

g

1

!

L ____

689
550
14
536
139
57
82

3?
29

4

64
63

84
-

12
12

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

84
84
-

29
4
-

-

-

| -

_

-

; ! -

-

_

. -

_
_
_
_

_
_
•
_

_
-

| _
-

-

12

-

16
_ 1

63
1 j 16
1
1
j
2 ___ r J ___ 2

77
-

| - '

-

2
i

!

i
l

I 84
81
3°
42
103
94

43
20
14
6
23
-

63
14
12
2
49
25
24

5
1
t
i
1
18
99 ! 70
149
94 | 58
i «
76 ! 10 | 7* ’“ 52“
37
89
5
60
2
27 i 2
5
24
24
2
13 87 ; - S 51 ! 8 , 54
60
21
8
6
48
13 ! 16
3
! g
24
6 i 3 i 32 ! 3
5
i 1 i 1 i 1
1
7
2
2
4
12
32 ; 3
2
5 | 8
2
2
10

i

Watchmen........................................................... ........... .
Manufacturing ............................................................
Durable goods .................................. .......................... ..
Nondurable goods . . . • • ...........................................
Nonm
anufacturing .................... ............................... .

$
$
$
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0
and
2 .4 0 2 .5 0 over

1
2 ,3 7 0
h1 ,1 5 2
195
967
1 ,2 0 8
569
108
152

Manufacturing ............................................................

T ru ck e rs , power (o t h e r than f o r k - l i f t )

1*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
l$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Undei 0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.0 0 2 .1 0
earnings
$
.90
.80
0 .7 5
.85
.95 |1.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0
1
1
1

0
0
™ r*
\
. 1 •

O ccu pation and in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

j
34
18
2
16
16
2

10
8
8
j
2
1 2

100
84
73
11
16
10

36
33
1
32
3
3

42
35
4
31
7 !
g

_
-

6
-

_
-

1
-

1

14
1

i

^

5
5
-

26

5
-

4
22

_
-

_
22

-

- 1—
_
_
- i

_
-

~ ! _
_
-

_
-

„
-

_

15.

Characteristic Industry Occupations

B
Table B-2337:

‘fa/arnett*& and

Goatl and Sudti 1/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

o
f
workere

hourly
earnings
2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
*
Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00

%

0.75

.80

.85

.90

106
17
89

104
25
79

86
27
59

_

_

-

and
.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 over

%
All plant occupations:

Total ........................
M e n ......................
Women ....................

5,616
1,7243,892

1.81
2.16
1.66

136

1
1

230
33
197

41
41

-

-

«
-

-

-

-

-

-

385
72
313

343
61
282

349
45
304

433
62
371

351
159
192

254
152
102

168
74
94

178
110
68

227
127
100

72
39
33

31
27
4

36
18
18

11

3

13

8

75

2

14

308 434
86 119
222 315

245
73
172

«
-

1
1

36
36

9
9

11
11

2.94

345
50
295

442
199
243

8

146
15
131

209
82
127

18
13
5

74
39
35

2

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

1

19

1

19

Selected Plant Occupations

Cutter8 and markers (all men) 2 / ....................
Inspectors, final (examiners) (men and women) .......
Men 2 / ............................................
Women 2 / ..........................................

_

8
8

1.91
2.03
1.30

311
142
169

2.08
1.69
2.41

326
159
167

2.43
2.15
2.70

Men 2 / ............................................
W o m e n .............................................
Time ...........................................
Incentive ......................................

1,134
520
614
22
1,112
507
605

1.65
1.31
1.94
2.03
1.65
1.31
1.93

-

.
-

-

Sewing-machine operators, section system
(men and women): Total ...........................
Time .........................
Incentive ....................
M e n ................. .............................
T i m e ...........................................
Incentive ......................................
W o m e n .................................... .........
Time ...........................................
Incentive ..................................

2,502
1,379
1,123
420
283
137
2,082
1,096
986

1.88
1.61
2.21
2.15
1.93
2.58
1.82
1.52
2.16

Thread trimmers (cleaners)
(all women): Total ................................
Time ................. .............
Incentive ........................

160
128
32

1.03
.95
1.34

Pressers, hand (308 men and 3 women):

Pressers, machine (all men):

Total ........
T i m e ......
Incentive ..

Total .................
Time ...............
Incentive ..........

Sewers, hand (finishers) (men and
women): Total .....................................
Time ...................................
Incentive .............................

-

-

1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

_

1

16

_

-

1

16

-

-

-

_
-

„
-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

14
3
11

19
3
16

29
2
27

25
-

23
11
12

11
8
3

4
-

-

5
-

4

-

5

25
1
24
•

24
.
24
1
23

35

5

35
1
34
34

5
2
3
_
3

_
_
_
_
_

1
.
1
1
.
-

6
.
6

-

-

2
.
2
2
_
2

68
1
67
2
1
1
66
.
66

42
9
33
12
9

6
2
4
2
2
_

19
19

4
-

16
•
16

1
1

11
11
-

1
1
-

5
-

-

5

-

9
8
1

48
30
18

95
80
15

21
11
10

12
1
11

20
18
2

16
8
8

27
24
3

15
4
11

12
12
-

26
23
3

10
1
9

67
10
57

8
8

-

8
8

1
1

9
9

22
20
2

4
3
1

27
19
8

58
47
11

57
25
32

97
97
2
95
95

-

35
26
9
35
26
9

11
11
11
11
-

18
18
18
18
-

29
29
29
29

65
63
2
1
64
62
2

76
46
30
76
46
30

92
89
3
92
89
3

84
46
38
84
46
38

146
95
51
8
138
87
51

64
46
18
1
63
45
18

73
52
21
73
52
21

77
6
71
1
76
6
70

46
15
31
1
45
14
31

26
1
25
1
25
25

95
5
90
2
93
4
89

-

8
8
8
8

•
-

307
230
77
31
9
22
276
221
55

175
88
87
30
27
3
145
61
84

158
80
78
43
40

140
69
71

3

-

83
78
5

143
103
40
2
2
141
101
40

234
172
62
11
11
-

63
47
16

140
98
42
2
2
138
96
42

185
138
47
16
16
-

-

9
9
.
9
9

103
98
5
20
20
-

-

34
26
8
34
26
8

72
56
16
9
9
-

-

8
8
8
8
-

223
161
62

115
40
75

99
28
71

190
81
109
51
29
22
139
52
87

-

38
38

1
1

14
14

35
35

-

14
2
12

13
13

25
25

5

3

-

-

1

2

1

5

3

1

2

25

-

1

-

-

169
122
47

8

41
41

134
71
63
40
37
3

94
34
60

25
1
24

23

2
2
2
_
2

104
13
91
28
13
15
76
76

101
25
76
38
13
25
63
12
51

78
3
75
24
2
22
54
1
53

3

30
_
30

4

3
3

14
14
12
12
2
2

6
_
6

30
30
3
.
3
27
27

-

8

*

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the 9tandard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Cutting shops with 4 or more workers were included. Data relate to a September 1951 payroll
period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or predominantly time workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statlstios




0
?MiKeUie& ,'K&*£evi6U4 1/

Table B-336t

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
% $
%
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
1.0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0
2.15 2 .2 0 2.25
$

$

1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0
1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.7? 1.8 0 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30

%
All plant workers 2/ .................................

795

1.53

121

66

1.39
1.78
1.71
1.93
1.88

34
35

1 .2 2
1 .2 0

3

-

16

6

136

85

48

49

46

48

-

3

6

4

4
4
—

19

23

33

81

17

12

37

62

8

7
_

_

37
.

_

_
3

11

11
4
16

10

25

8

29

14

15

3

.

_

_

3

«
,

_

_
2

«
.

3
3

_

3
4

13

4

4

_

_•

Selected Plant Occuoations - Men

Chippers and grinders £/a ...........................
Coremakers, hand 4/a .................................
Cupola t e n d e r s 4/a .................... ......................
Molders, floor £/a ...................................
Molders, hand, bench £/b ............................
Sand mixers 4 / a ......................................
Shake-out men i k ....................................
J

1/
2/
2/
4/

32
27
18

4

_

4

-

-

4
4

-

-

6

20
20

9

-

4
1

8
_

_

-

_

4
_

_
8

10

13

4
4

3

3
4

5

The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data include 8 women workers.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-342*

-

-

Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.

Gutletof,, <Jfand 7oo/f, and JfcviduACVi* 1/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
)
cf.85 8 .90 6.95 L o o 1.05 i.io 1.15 1.20 i.25 i.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 $
2.40
and
and
under
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over

Wen
Assemblers, class G jl/b...........................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiple-spindle,
class C 2 / b ......................................
Heat treaters, class B 2/a ........................
Inspectors, class C 2/a ...........................
Polishers and buffers, metal 2/b ..................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand 2/a .............
Tool-and-die makers 2/a ...........................

31

♦
1.42

1

1

1

1.52
1.44
1.31
1.70
1.04
1.94

39

1.04

-

5

_
4

1

8

3
5

3

3

1

1

1

_

_

1
-

7
6

_
3
13

1
3
4

3

1

1
5
4

2
3
8

1
3
6

5
6

1
2
•
8

1
2
5
18

1

3

1
1
6
37

2

1
_

1
6

1
2

3

_
20

3
23

29

28

10

51

29

27

8

4

1

12
24
28
327
46
47

_

6

14

8

4

10

4

3

1

1

a ■ _
.

1

_
_
4

Women
Inspectors, class C 2/a ...........................

1

16

9

3

6

2

1

-

-

1

-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, hand tools, and hardware (Group 342) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
2/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF t a b o r
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




17,

Table B-3463:

Stamped and PneMed M etal Product* 1/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of non-automotive stamped and pressed metal products (Group 3463) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classi­
fication Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.

Table B-3468.

tU ct^ O fU a iU U f, P la tU U f,0 * u l

PoUlkiHf 1/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating, and metal polishing (Group 3468) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
y
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
y Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $0.85 — »90; 15 at $0,90 - .95; 22 at $0.95 — 1.00; and 9 at $1.00 - 1.05.




MacUineMf ^nduA& U& i 1
/

Table B-35:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

$
Average Under $
1.00 1.05 l.io
hourly
earnings $
1.00
1/
1.0 5 1.10 1.15

$
$
„ $
$
$
$
$
•, !
$ ^ $ ,
* ^ $
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1+0 1.1+5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 *2.It0 $2.50 $2.60 2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3 .oo
$

and
1
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1+0 1.1+5 i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1+0 2.50 2.6o| 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over
1

Machinery 3/
Men
Assemblers, class A:

Total ..........................
Time ........................
I n c e ntive....... ............
Assemblers, class B: Total ..........................
Time ............... .......
Incentive ...................
Assemblers, class C: Total ..........................
Time ........................
Incentive ...................
Electricians, maintenance U/a ........................
Inspectors, class A !+/*>.................... ..........
Inspectors, class B E / a ........... ...................
Inspectors, class C E/a ...............................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners k/i ..................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/s Total ..................................
Time ................................
Incentive ...........................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A: Total ..................................
Time ................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A U
/b ...........................
Engine-lathe operators, class A: Total ...........
Time ..........
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class A U/a ...........
Milling-machine operators, class A: “ Total ........
Time ......
Incentive ..
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class At Total ..................................
Time ................................
I n c e n t i v e .... ......................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw
machine), class A: Total ........... ............
Time .....................
Incentive ................

1,136
1+12
7++
11
1,139
835
301+
638
383
255
191
1+07
183
355
531

$
1.99
1.72
2.11+
1.65
1.56
1.90
1.51+
1.1+2
1.72
1.88
1.90
1.63
1.62
1.32

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

l
l
-

12
+
12
+
-

25
2+
1
1

-

29

29

2
1+
1

-

17

2,ioo

1,062
1,038

1.98
1.86
2.11

1

-

_

-

2
2

16
16
-

10
10
-

29
19
10
2+
1
10
11+

35
3+
1
1
1
+
-

-

2
2

5

l

1
+

li
10
l
16
13
3
36
35
1

12
2
10
69
61
8
51
13
+
8

29
11+
15
6
3
3
2+
1
15
9
7

62

1
+
12
17
+

2
38

2
3
80

3
5
76

-

-

-

3

10
2
8

13
+
13
+
-

-

|
-

1
|

-

7+
1
1
73
20

76

203

95

12
+

2+
1

19

1
+

1

_

1

76
25

203
23

95
17

12
+
6

2+
1
1

19
1

1
+
-

1
-

-

1
-

20
11+

25
1
+

23
1
+

17
-

6
1

18
13
+
1 21
+
2i

il+
32
60

1

2

1
+
19
12
+
3
-

-

-1

1
+
3
21
1
-

276
153
123
96

10
31
79

30 196
26 177
19
1
+
201+
81+
188
28
16
56
11+6 n o
28
26 100
26
16
+
82
28
3
31
18
+
6
78
66
37
23
7 + 122! 99
1
1
55

10
5
5

51
36
15

87
81
6

373
296
77

272
191+
78

1+76
113
363

21+2
102
11+0

11+5
3
11+2

56
2
51+

11+

6

2+
1

31
+

1+
1

6

2+
1

31+

5
88
75
13
58
3+
1
28
6

22
25
16
9
35
39
19
20

1
69
51+
15
32
25
2
23

32
25
7
1+60
1+51
9
52

29
2
27
37
2
35
18

26
70
21
21 !
25
107
28
3

1
- !
-

1
1 |

1

-

-

1 j

1

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

- s
- 1

-

-

-

!

l

-

-

-

3

275

228

31
31

18
18

18
18

11+
1+
1

3
3

1
+
1
+

10
10

1+
7

2

2

2

-

2

-

-

-

11+

2

2

1
18
18
18
26

5
2
3
1
+
13

13

1
+
1
+
1
-

1
+
1
+
-

-

2
2
-

2
2
-

26

13

13

-

1

!
187
77
110

1.91
1.68
2.07

93
1+88
382
106
199
261
151
110

1.83
1.91
1.87
2.06
2.01
1.97
1.83
2.16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
15

17
17

5

7

1

-

2
7

—:

5

5
13
1
12

21
21
21
-

-

5
5
-

7
7
-

8
8
-

51+
15
+
9

1

11+

8
91
90
1
9
32
29
3

28
128
123
5
ll
+
58
53
5

i

-

-

-

-!

-

-

-

-!
i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
1

2

2

1
1
+
1
+

2
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
2.00
1.86
2.01+

1+88
181+
301+

2.02
1.88
2.11

-

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5/: Total ..................................
“
Time ................................
Incentive ..........................

2,581+
1,122
1,1+62

1.76
1.59
1.89

-

Drill-press operators, radial,
class B: Total ..................................
Time ................................
Incentive .................... ......

222
75
11+7

1.73
i.i+5
1.87

~




_

_
-

1
!

267
69
198

See footnotes at end of table.

_
-

7
7
I
1

-i

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

J

-

-

—

-

“

7
7

-

l

-

1

1

-

l

-

-

-

1

1

-

2

13
8
5

60
10
+
20

19
+
13

391
301+
87

261+
165
99

285
115
170

652
29
623

3+
1
2+
1
10

12

2
-

77
15
+
32

18
+
26
22

90
56
3+
1

89
66
23

71
58
13

116
90

26

191+
150
11
++

1
1

2
2
“

15
11
+
1

13
1
12

27
15
12

-

1

7
5
2

26
1+
1
12

1

62

15
15
-

11
8
3

1
1
1

-

33
28
5

196
8
188

20

12

-

-

12

20

12

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

-

15
+
16
29

57

21

1
+

6

7

-

57

21

1
+

6

7

-

3

2

-

79
8
71

93
1
+
89

17
+
-

9
9

11
11

1
+
1
+

-

2
2

-

17
+

10
+
1
+
36

8
8

5
5

9

16

1
+

63 130
2+
1
39
39
91

-

5
1
+
l

-

19
19

16

2

6

2

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
+

6

2

“

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Macltimn^ Owdu&bUeA. 1 - Continued
/

Table B-35*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

O ccu pation and se x

Average
$
2.10 $ .2 0 $2 .3 0 *2.U0 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.8C $2.9C $3 .0 0
2
hourly [Jndei 1 .0 0 1.05 i . i o 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 U s 1 .5 o 1.60 1 .7 0 i . 8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 $
earnings
$
and
1 .0 0
£/
1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 i . 5 o l . 6 o 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.9C 3.0C o v e r

M achinery 3 / - C ontinued
Men - C ontinued
M a ch in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
c l a s s B 5 / : - C ontinued
D r i l l - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s , s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip le s p i n d l e , c l a s s B: T o t a l .......................................
Time ..................................................
I n c e n tiv e .................................... ..

I n c e n tiv e .........

I n c e n tiv e . .

335
230
105
257
178
79
335
133
182

$
1.51*
1.1*6
1 .7 3
1 .6 7
1 .6 6
1 .7 0
1 .7 1
1.55
1.81*

•
*
_
_

_

_
_

_
•

19
9
10
21

_
_

_
_

_

«

_

-

_

_

21
21

O
l
cL

28
18
10
1
1
6
c
o

37
37
1
1
11*
4
10

1*5
11
**
l
2
2
23
13
10

1
*
1
*

<
L

26
19
7
1*0
39
1
21*
0o
cc

2

2i*
23
1

2

32
27
5
8
8
1
*

11

7

21
13
8
79
73
6
53
*D
8

51
1*0
11
1*9
1*6
3
33
17
16

8
5
3

5
2
3

39
12
27

21*
12
12

1
7
2
5

22
22
26
7
19
1*9
1o
J-7
3°

11
2

5

6

_

1

5
11
ii
7
17

6
5

2
71*

7
7
2
5
9

1
1
*

5
3

1

71*

9

17

3

31
31

_
1

k

*

_

_

_

1
_

_

1

_

_

2

1

6

2

1

7

1
*

2

2

9

7

1
*

2

9

1
*

2

—

1
*

2

•

_
_

_
„
_

_

_

2

19

•
»

-

_

6

9

M
B

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

—
.

Screw-m achine o p e r a t o r s , a u to m a tic,

JiM'onH vn
T u r r e t -la t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g hand screw
m ach in e), c l a s s B: T o t a l ...................................................
Time ................................................

M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
c la s s C 5 /:
T o t a l ..........................................................................
Tims ......................................................................
In c e n tiv e ...........................................................
E n g in e -la th e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C:

T o t a l .........................
T i m e .....................
In c e n tiv e .........
G rin din g-m achine o p e r a t o r s , c la s s C: T o ta l ................
T i m e ............
I n c e n tiv e .
T u r r e t -la t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g hand screw
m ach in e), c l a s s C: T o t a l ....................................................
T i m e ................................................
In c e n tiv e ....................................

M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , to o lr o o m i*/a .......................................
WarlrlrH
p m A isW nn V/a
, , , (
■
,
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) h /a . .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) k//* . . . .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand l*/a....................................
WAlriaTMj haru) nlam i A )|/« ,
Welders, hand, class B U/a..............................................................

131
1*1
on
yj
\

2
2

1 .9 6
1 .8 2
o m
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1*81
317
16k

1 .7 0
1 .6 2
1 .8 6

_

1,125
615
510

1 .5 7
1.1*9
1 .6 7

12
2
10

13
13
-

1
*
3
1

20
9
11

30
26
1
*

52
1*0
12

1*3
16
27

37
30
7

9k
71
23
117
63
51*

1.3 9
1 .3 9
1.1*0
1 .5 6
1.1*9
1.61*

_
-

-

_
1
1

10
10
1
1

1
1
-

16
16
-

7
7
5
5

16
16
10
10

10
10

-

1
1

-

209
130
79

1 .5 1
1 .5 1
1.1*9

263
1*81
5o5
703
619
1*53
226

1 .9 9
1.81*
2.09
2.1 1
1 .3 3
T Q^

3i*2
1*7
673

1 .5 2
1 .3 8
1.1*6

85
n

1.7 5

..

9
6
3

15
2
13

1 Mi
x.i***

71*

1
1

i

i

_

_

10

13

_

_

25

21

8
1
*
1
*

29
28
1

58
51*
i
4

1*2
32
10

153
116
37

65
31*
31

1*2
26
16

1*9
17
32

11*
8
6

56
29
27

87
1*7
1*0

238
181
57

236
185
51

130
20
110

52
6
1*6

1*7

20

1*7

20

3
2
1

..
8
1
7

11
7
1
*
6
6

11*
12
2
1*3
31
12

9
1
*
5
11
8
3

9
8
1
16
1
*
12

13

26
23
3

33
28
5

1*0
31*
6

32
23
9

26
8
18

3
2
1

23
71
3
27

1*2
125
73
78

61

51
52
77
86

11*1*
118

135
11

ii*
2

21*
3

21*
8

20
10

8

6

7
7

10
13
2
11
100
7
30

7
107
k
22
11*
29
6

19

9

—

2

•

—

-

-

—
-

2

1
1

-

2

2

2

1*0
71

“
2
2

_

_

-

2

_

18

93

82

68

80

78

17

7

11*

20

6

26
9
52

70
7
2

29

15

17

63

11
7
189

20

11

10
1
*
315

18

3

l

ii

_

5

5
3
_
j
*

6

16

7

12

11*

3

5

5

6

10

7

12

11*

3

5

5

n

12

71*
i*o
96
12 k
2k\
122 1 178 66

_

7

2

1
13

_

1 .7 3

_

1

-

i*

-

2

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

13
26

11
26

1
*
-

30
5

13
1

8
2

5

l

1

_

i

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

Women
Assemblers, class C k/a ....................................................................
Inspectors, class B 5/a .................... ..........
Inspectors, class C E / a ....................................................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class Gt Total .....................................

m
m

Incentive ............................ .

See footnotes at end of table.




1 .7 1

_

50

2

32

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

3
10
1
*

2
8
6

12
2

-

-

1
1

1
*
1
*

1
*

h

5

_
_

_

_

-

M a c k in e t o f

Table

9 n jA u A fc tiM

1/

-

C o n t in u e d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

Under 1 .0 0

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.40 2 .5 0 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00

%

and

1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0
1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2 .5 0 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

Machine-tool Accessories
Men
%
Inspectors, class A £/a ..............................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners t j-a .................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 4/a, 2 / ..............................».....
Engine-lathe operators, class A L ja ..............
Gr1
r lAflfl A / /« r , . . T . , _____
.
M111 ^Tig—
elans A
_TT...... T_
Machine-tool operators, production,
olass B £/a, 2 / ........ *..........................
Engine-lathe operators, class B £/a ..............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw
machine), class B £/a ..........................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £/a, 2/ ...................................
Engine-lathe operators, class C £/a ..............
Grinding-machine operators, class C £/a ..........
Machine-tool operators, toolroom £ / a ........... ..
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing
shops) 4 / a ...........................................................................................................

15
42

1.92

181
96
58
17

1.96
1.94

227
86

1.67
1.69

28

1.67

101

48
30
28

1.37
1.43
1.48
1.92

505

2.09

1.0 6

7

15

4

4

6

4

4

2

-

4

23 35
14 23

2.0 1

1.81

9
11

11

1

1

29
13

81
52

44 31
7
4

1
-

11

-

4

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

8

1

-

17

12

-

-

-

12

12
8

-

1'

4

-

5

8

2

4

47

13

21
20
2

8
5

59
28
23

1

2

2

_

2

2

2

4

6

4

-

4

-

2

4

-

4

.

_

_

7

2

-

2

2

72

2
77

96

24

15

-

8

-

1

24
16

4

4

8
4

-

4
11

3 73

4

2

-

-

124 13

2

-

11

4

-

-

-

2 -

“

“

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) pre­
pared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were included.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Includes data for machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) for which separate data are presented.
i j Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
2/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Table B—40 s

R a ilto o a cU

i/

Occupation 2/

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

Carpenters, maintenance............................ .
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and
over) ..............................................
Electricians, maintenance ...........................
Janitors and cleaners ...............................
Machinists, maintenance .............................
Mechanics, maintenance ..............................
Painters, maintenance ................................
Plumbers, maintenance ....................... ........
Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ....................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...................
Truckers, power (fork-lift) .........................

401

1.85
1.98
1.54
1.98
1.96
1.93
1.96
1.98
1.67
1.68

$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05
1.60 1.6? l f70 1.75 1.80 1.8? 1.9 0 1.95 2,0Q 2.05 2.10

$
1.89

66
736
139
304
284
193
27
57
2,130
394

s
$
Under 1.40 1.45
*
1.40
1.45 1.50

• 1 •
vi
j
O

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

6
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
_
_
_

1

_
-

'

_

39

_

_

-

42
6
_
_
_ ' _
_
_
_
_
19

'

-

122
'

-

47
_
_
_
_
1100
'

-

_
_
_
332
364

3
_
3
_
4
30

4
.
_
_
_
_
553

124 111
25
8

27
18
.

5
6
38

6
21
45
_

_
_

_

'

159
7
32
_
26
10
_
_

1

594

32
-

259
231
100
17
56

10
_
10
_
_
_

52
_
24
_
_
_

'

*

1
_
“

1/ The study covered railroads (Group 40) with more than 20 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2/

21.

C

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage r a t e s and Tnflviwmm s t r a ig h t -t im e hours p e r week agreed upon throu gh c o l l e c t i v e b arga in in g
betw een em ployers and t r a d e -u n io n s • Rates and hours a re th o s e in e f f e c t in Newark.)

Table C-15:

B uU duU p

Table C-205 :

G o iiA tb U J c tU m

April 1, 1952

Bricklayers tT............................................ . . .
Carpenters ................ .....................................
Electricians ...................................................
.....
Painters . . . . . . t....... .................. ..
Plasterers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .
Plum
bers .........................................................
Building laborers ...........................................
Table C-205:

H
ours
per
w
eek

$3,500
3.250
3.250
2.750
3.500

35
35
40
35
35
40
35

3.1 0 0

2.410

B oh & U & i

July 1, 1951
Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen, oven workers, dough mixers ....
Bench workers, second hands ...........
Third hands ................. ..........
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Keymen (Overmen) ....................
Overmen, mixers ....................
Molders, benchmen, dividers, peelers,
scalers, oven dumpers, mixers'
helpers, scaler-feeders, icing
makers ............. ..............
Roll panners ........................
Checkers (cake) ........ ........ .
Icing-machine operators, scalerfeeders' helpers ..................
Checkers (bread) ................. .
Flour dumpers, machine helpers, pan
greasers, cake dumpers, auxiliary
workers, packers and helpers
(cake) .............................
Slicers, wrappers, packers (bread).,.
Cake wrapping-machine operators
(women), machine operators
(women) ...........................
leers (women) ......................
Hand wrappers (women) ...............




“

Table 0-2082.

G o 4 ttiH 4 4 * < t

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,646
1.479
1.292

48
48
48

1.850
1.800

40
40

1.680
1.680
1.640

40
40
40

1.500
1.480

40
40

1.A40
1.440

1.365
1.225
1.200

40
40

40
40
40

Classification

Bread an cake - M
d
achine shops: - Continued
A
greem
ent B:
Bread department:
D gh mixers, proof-box workers,
ou
ovenmen.............................. ..............
P n dum
a
pers, divi demen, molders,
roll-machine operators, benchm m
en, achinem dough mixers'
en,
helpers, ingredient scalers . . . . . .
K en (wrapping m
eym
achine) ................
Checkers .............................................
P greasers, flour dum
an
pers, stockm bench and m
en,
achine helpers . . .
W
rapping-m
achine helpers ..................
Bread rackers
Hn w
a d rappers (w en) ....................
om
C
ake department:
Ingredient scalers an scalingd
m
achine operators .........................
Depositor operators' helpers ...........
D pers, grease-machine operators,
um
auxiliary workers ...........................
H d wrappers (w en) .......................
an
om
H
ebrew baking:
Forem
en, ovenm ...........................................
en
Second hands, mixers ....................................
Bread carriers, helpers..............................
Crackers and cookies:
Doughnut-m
achine operators,
mixers ........... ........................................ .
O m ..................................
ven en
Icing mixers .................................. ...............
Ingredient scalers .......................................
Fork-lift operators, scaling-machine
operators ....................................................
C
ake dum
pers ..................................................
Grease-machine operators, cake wrappingm
achine operators, feeders, depositor
operators, and auxiliary w
orkers ...........
Packers and helpers .....................................
Checkers .........................................................
Checkers, packers (w en) ...........................
om

M

a t t J U fy u O S U

Novanber 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

B d J z e ^ le ^

Rate
per
hour

H
ours
per
w
eek

Apprentice*!:
First year ..................................................
Second year ................................................
$1,835 40

1.715 40
1.680 40
1.515 40
1.475
1.475
1.475
1.235

40
40
40
40

H
ours
per
w
eek

Rate
per
W
eek

Classification

4 60

$
6 8 .

0

0

Labelers, crowners, pasteurizers, soakerwashers, all-round workers, m in
en
charge of packing.....................................

7 8 .

0

0

4

Stock handlers:
First year................ ................................
After 1 year ...............................................

5 7 .

0

0

0

5

Checkers:
First year............................................... .
After 1 year.................. .......................

6 3 .

0

0

0

0

4 0

Porters:
First year........... ........... ................ .
After 1 year............................................ .

6 2 .

0

0

4

6 6 .

0

0

4 0

45
2.067 45
1.4 0 0 45

Table C-27:

P / U + tlitU f

2 .2 0 0

July 1, 1951
Classification

1.740 40
1.740 40
1.6 20 40
1.6 20 40
1.440 40
1.390 40
40
1.355 40
1.305 40
1.1 0 0 40
1.380

.

4 0

6 7 .

1.715 40
1.535 40
1.475 40
1.235 40

.

4 0

6

3

4 0

B
ook and job shops:
Bindery women............................................
Bookbinders:
Hi-Die cutters, non-precision paper
cutters (64-inch knife or under),
operators of Cleveland folding
m
achines with one feeder..........
Compositors, hand ......................................
Electrotypers .............................................
M
achine operators an tenders . . . . . . . . . .
d
Mailers - day w
ork ....................................
Photoengravers ....................... ..................

Rate
per
hour

H
ours
per
w
eek

$1,248

36 1/4

2.193
2.483

36 1/4
36 1/4
37 1 /2
36 1/4
36 1/4
35

3.0 0 0

2.483
2.455
3.057

Occupational W e Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N.J., N
ag
ovem 1951
ber
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
B
ureau of Labor Statistics

0

0

22,

Table C-27:

Table C-42:

P t o U t tifU j - Q o 4 tt i$ 9 M ^ d

M < U o b tb U c k

Table C-44:

2 > b ia e b d

Book and job shops: - Continued
Press assistants and feeders:
2-color Duplex press .......................... .
2 o lo r press with 3-color
-c
attachment ..........................................
Pressmen, cylinder:
Special Kidder presses ................... ...
1 or 2 sin gle-color presses
(not over 68 inches) .........................
Pressmen, platen:
1 to 3 hand-fed presses .......................
4 hand-fed presses ................. ..............
5 hand-fed presses ................................
1 New Era press ............... .....................
Stereotypers - d a y ........................... ..
Stereotypers - night ..................................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w ork................. .
Compositors, hand - night w ork........ .
Machine operators - day work ...................
Machine operators - night work ...............
Machine tenders (machinists) day work .....................................................
Machine tenders (machinists) night work .................................................
Mailers - day work ......................................
Mailers - night w ork...........................
Photoengravers - night work .....................
Pressmen, web presses - day work ..........
Pressmen, web presses - night work ........
Stereotypers - day work ............................
Stereotypers - night work .........................

Table C-41: J lo C x U

* 7 b a n d it

Hours
per
week

$2,082

36 1/4

2.166

36 1/4

2.589

3 1/4
6

2.533

36 1/4

2.251
2.322
2.392
2.533
3.037
3.349

36 1/4
3 1/4
6
36 1/4
3 1/4
6
3 1/2
7
35

2.696
2.800
2.800

37
37
37
37

2.696

37 1/2
3 1/2
7
3 1/2
2
37 1/2
3 1/2
7
33 3/4
37 1/2
30

2.696

6 f2 & u U U u j>

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

1
-man cars and busses:
First 3 months .............................................
4-12 months ................. ..............................
After 1 year ....................... .........................




Armored car ............. ............. .................. ..
Beer drivers .......................................................
Butter and e g g .............................. ...................
General ................................................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Helpers ..........................................................
Laundry - Linen su pp ly ....................... ............

$1,790
1.950
1.675
1.760
1.900
1.430
1.625

40
40
40
48
48
48
40

Market:
3 tons or less ........................................
4 tons ...................... ............................
5 tons ............................................................
7^ t o n s ..........................................................
Tractor and tr a ile r or 6-wheel truck . . .
Helpers ................................................. .

1.700
1.750
1.770
1.820
1.830
1.525

40
40
40
40
40
40

Newspaper Supply:
D ay................................ ........................... .
Night ............................ ................................
Railway express ....................................... ..
Helpers ..........................................................
Soft drink ................. ......................................

2.150
2.218
1.675
1.458
1.750

C m fU o ifM d

Rate
per
hour

Hour8
per
week

$1,660
1.680

44
44
44

1.700

Table C-44:

40
37

40
40
40

6& & O H

fyjilic& nd& d P/eAAann&l 1/
December 16, 1951
Type o f ship, department, and cla ssifica tion

October 1, 1951
C lassification

Hours
per
week

37 1/2

2.800
2.373
2.800
2.880
2.613
3.015
2.507
3.133

Rate
per
hour

C lassification

Rate
Hours
per
per
month week 2 /

Dry cargo and passenger vessels
Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains:
Vessels of 15,000-20,000 tons . . . .
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons . . . .
Vessels under 10,000 tons .............
Boat swain'8 mates ..................................
Carpenters:
Vessels of 15*000-20,000 tons . . . .
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons . . . .
Vessels under 10,000 tons .............

-

C on tin u ed

December 16, 1951

July 1, 1951
Hate
per
hour

C lassification

^ A & n d fL O b t -

fyjilic& nled> P& iAohh&I 1/

G 4td cJfelp&sA.
July 1, 1951

Q /C & O n

$356.95
351.68
333.73
294.42

40
40
40
40

319.67
313.68
299.51

40
40
40

Type o f ship, department, and c la ssifica tion

Rate
Hours
per
per
month week 2 /

Dry cargo and passenger v e sse ls- Continued
Deck department: - Continued
Day men: - Continued
Carpenter’ s mates .................................... $293.52
Storekeepers ............................................. 289.53
Watch men:
Able seamen.................................. ............ 262.89
Boatswain's mates .................................... 277.77
Ordinary seamen ........................................ 226.26
Quart ermast e r s ......................................... 262.89
Watchmen............... .................................... 262.89
Engine-room department:
Day men:
Deck engineers ......................................... 299.51
E le c tr icia n s .............................................. 418.72
Firemen (coa l) ................................. .
259.56
Firemen ( o i l ) ........................................... 249.56
Maintenance electricians ....................... 342.14
Refrigeration en gin eers........................ 385.42
Storekeepers .............................................. 289.53
Unlicensed junior engineers ............. ..
332.81
Wipers ...............................................
259.56
Watch men:
Firemen - watertenders ........................... 262.89
Oilers (stea m )......................................... 262.89
Oilers (d iesel) ...................................... . 286.54
Steward’ s department:
Freight ships:
Chief stewards......................................... 325.63
Chief cooks .............................................
299.51
Third cooks ...................................... .
259.56
Messmen and utilitymen .......................... 226.26
Tankers
Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains .............................................. .
Carpenters .................................................
Deck maintenance men (AB) ................... .
Watch men:
Able seamen ................................................
Ordinary seamen .................................. .
Quartermasters................. ........................
Engine-room department:
Day men:
Electricians ..............................................
M achinists............................................ ...
Storekeepers .............................................
Unlicensed junior engineers .................
Wipers ..................................................... .

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40

344.49
324.63
286.19

40
40
40

266.21

40
40
40

232.92
272.87
418.72
342.13
292.85
332.81
259.55

40
40
40

40
40

'

Table C -U ;

0& & G 41

^ A & H A fa & U -

tynU&enled PefiAonnel 1/

-

Table C-Jjjbi

Type o f ship, department^ and c la ssifica tio n

Rate
Hours
per
per
month week 2 /

Continued

Engine-room department: - Continued
Watch men:
Firemen................................................... .
Oilers (steam) ........................................
Watertenders ............................................
Unlicensed junior engineers ...............
St eward'8 department:
Assistant cooks ...........................................
Chief cooks ...................................................
Chief stewards ................. ...........................
Messmen and utilitymen ..............................

$259.55
266.21
266.21
299.50

40
40
40
40

279.52
312.84
345.62
226.25

40
40
40
40

1 / Wage scales and hours per week f o r dry cargo and pas­
senger vessels are those in effect on December 16, 1951, for
Atlantic and Gulf Coast ship operators under contracts with
the National Maritime Union, CIO, and the Seafarers' Inter­
national Union, AFL; N U scales are shown for tankers. SIU
M
scales fo r tankers differed somewhat from N U scales.
M
All ratings liste d receive additional payment in
accordance with the following conditions:
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lo ts or
over, 10 percent o f basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. O vessels carrying sulphur in amount o f 25 per­
n
cent or more o f dead weight carrying capacity, $5
per voyage is added. (On vessels carrying sul­
phur, cement, cyanide, e t c ., in bulk lo ts of 1000
tons or over, members o f the SIU are paid the
same as those on vessels carrying explosives.)
3. O vessels operating in described areas o f China
n
coastal waters, a per diem allowance o f $2.50 and
an "area bonus" o f 100 percent o f d aily wages is
added. Also, on vessels operating within certain
designated areas o f French Indo-China coastal
waters, a per diem allowance o f $5 is added.
4. On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by
mines o f either belligerent, resulting in physi­
cal damage to the vessel or injury to a crew
member, a "vessel attack bonus" o f $125 shall be
paid to each crew member.
2 / The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea. At sea, watch men and steward's depart­
ment normally work 56 hours a week, and receive overtime
pay fo r 8 hours on Saturday and 8 on Sunday. Day men at
sea normally work a 44 hour week. In port, a ll receive
overtime rates for work on Saturday and Sunday.




Table C-58*

P e d tc U i/L O n ti

November 1, 1951

October 1, 1951

December 16, 1951

Tankers -

§te4P&do>iiMf

Continued

C lassification

Rate
per
hour

Longshoremen:
General cargo, including barrel o il when
part of general cargo, and general cargo
hauled in refrigerator space with above
freezing temperature ..................... ............ $2 ,1 0 0
Bulk cargo, ballast, and a ll coal cargoes,
coal loading and trimming; cement and
lime in bags ................................................. 2 .1 5 0
Hides, w e t ............ .......................................
2.250
Creosoted poles, t ie s , and shingles;
cashew o i l , naphthalene and soda ash
in bags ....................................................
2.250
Refrigerator space cargo- meats, fowls,
and other similar cargo transported at
or below freezing temperature; rates
to be paid fu ll gang .................................. 2.300
Kerosene, gasoline and naphtha in cases
and barrels, when loaded by case o i l
gangs, and with a f ly ................................ 2 .3 0 0
Explosives and damaged cargo ....................... 4 .1 0 0

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40

40
40
40

O ffic e

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

fiu ilc L + U f B & U M C e

November 1, 1951

C fA & O C SU f' S t o r e d

December 1, 1951

Rate
per
week

Classification
C lassification

Hours
per
week

Cooks:
Agreement A .................................................... $100.00
75.00
Agreement B ......................................
R elief cooks ..................... ..................... .
80.00
Night cooks ................. ................. ..
65.00
Second cooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90.00
Countermen:
Agreement A .....................................................
70.00
Agreement B ........................................... . . . , .
60.00
Dishwashers:
Agreement A .................................................
40.00
Agreement B ................................................. ...
35.00
Kitchen men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40.00
Salad men............................
60.00
Waiters and waitresses:
Agreement A ............................... ...................
28.00
Agreement B .....................................................
24.00
Bartenders:
Agreement A ............................................... ..
61.00
Agreement B .....................................................
57.00

Table C-6512:
Table C-541:

Rate
per
week

C lassification

Rate
per
week

Food clerks:
Agreement A:
First 3 months............. ............................. $45.00
4-6 months ......• • • • • • ......................... 50.00
0
7-9 months ............................................... 56.0
1 - 18 months .......................................... 62.00
0
19-24 months .......................... ................ 66.00
After 2 years ............................................. 69.00
Agreement B:
Inexperienced:
First 6 months........ ............................. 40.00
45.00
7-12 months .............................. .
Experienced:
First 6 months ...................................... 45.00
7-12 months .................................. . 50.00
Agreement C:
First 6 months ................. ......................... 36.45
7-12 months ............................................. 38.70
After 1 y e a r ................. .••••.................. . 40.95

Hours
per
week

45
45
45
45
45
45

Office cleaners (women) ....................................
Elevator starters ...............................................
Elevator operators ...................................... .
Firemen . . . . . ........................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Head porters . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ................
Porters ....................... ................. .
Night watchmen .............................................. .
Window c leaners ...................................... .......... .

Table C-7011:
45
45
45
45
45
45
45

Hours
per
week

$34.51 34 1/4
57.30 40
51.23 40
53.43 40
57.28 40
51.83 40
63.a 46
70.00 40

< fo td i,
J

November 1, 1951
C lassification
Bellboys ................................ ..........................
Elevator operators .......................... ............ ..
Maids ........................................... ................... .
Housemen (miscellaneous w orkers)..........•••••

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$18.00
29.00
32.00
40.00

48
48
48
48

24.

D:
Table D-i:

Entrance Rates

MifUmum ZstbuMOe (lat&L fan Plant 'lO&J&eAA 1/
Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in -

Manufjicturine
Minimum rate (in cents)

A ll
industries
2/

Durable goods

Nondurable goods
Establish!aents with _
1001 or
1001 or
101-500
501-1000
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

101-500
workers
A ll establishments ................................................... ..
Under 6 0 ..............*.........................................................

100.0

Over 140 and tinder 145 ..................... ...............

0.4
.6
1.9
5.9
.4
4.3
.8
1.5
2.8
3.8
3.9
2.0
1.1
2.9
2.7
1.8
6.5
3.5
5.2
.4
5.3
1.0
8.6
1.0
3.3
1.0
4.0
.4
1.9
.4
4.3

Over 145 and tinder 150 *.••••....................... »....»• • •

2.2

Over 150 and under 1 5 5 ..........

2.3
1.7

Over 155 and under 1 6 0 ................••••••*.•••••••••••

1.5

Over 160 and tinder 1 6 5 ............••••••••••.........••••••
Over 165 and under 170 ...................................................
170 and o v e r ..........*...........*............................ .

1.0
.4
3.1
1.4

Establishments with no established minimum ..............

2.6

Over 75 and under 80 *.............................................*.*•
Over 80 and under 85 ................. *.............. •••...............
Over 85 and under 90 .*•••••••........................... *.........
Over 90 and under 9 5 .......... ..........................................
Over 95 and under 100 .....................................................
Over 100 and under 105 ................................ ...............
Over 105 and tinder 1 1 0 ........*.......................................
Over 110 and tinder 115 ................••••••......................
Over 115 and under 1 2 0 ..........................
Over 120 and under 1 2 5 ...................................................
Over 125 and under 130 ...................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ......................... .........................
Over 135 and under 14-0................................ *......... ••••

.1

.1

1/
2/
*




501-1000
workers

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

6.1
2.2
10.8
15.3
3.8

9.4
14.3
5.1
15.6
14.0
11.7
20.1
9.8
*
-

10.2
2.3
3.1
16.7
10.6
12.8
1.2
3.2
1.3
10.7
1.8
9.6
1.4
1.5
9.4

3.0
26.7
11.4
6.5
11.0
3.5
2.7
3.3
1.7
3.2
4.2
7.3
3.8
2.8
.8
-

3.4
2.0
22.2
2.7
11.0
6*2
4.3
12.5
-

3.7
4.1
1.6
4.5
7.4
4.4
15.3

2.4
3.4
-

5.5
1.6
.2
5.4
16.1
9.1
13.0
6.4
_

_

4.5
-

-

4.2
-

-

-

-

-

.7

.8

-

.8

_

17.2
18.5
-

Public
u t ilitie s *

.

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.5
18.5
4.5
6.9
1.5
1.2
26.4
1.1
2.3
2.0
-

5.0
4.2
1.0
1.2
2.7
5.3
5.7
9.5
2.8
5.6
1.3
.4
5.9
1.0
16.6
1.0
1.0
4 .4
-

2.6
17.0
17.1
17.0
12.1
1.0
.6
11.1
_
-

10.0
21.1
26.8
1.4
2.5
4.1
•4
.6
10.6
3.8
1.4
.9
_
•
-

-

.2

6.8

1.6

2.4

7.1
8.5
-

100,0

_

8.3
11.3

-

8.6

_
_
5.3
-

.

2.0

30.3
-

10.6

_
7.8

-

15.8

-

_
-

14.7

_
-

5.7
8.9

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen*
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J ., November 1951
Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u tilitie s *
U.S. D PA TM N C LABO
E R ET F
R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

25.

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-li

S U ifft

Percent of plant workers em
ployed on each shift in All manufacturing industries 1/
Shift differential

All industries
3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ....................

__

Durable goods
3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

A.2 _
_

1A,A

Nondurable goods

.

2,A

Machinery
industries

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

11.8

7,2

2,5.

0.6

7.2

1.2

2d
shift

_

Cutlery, hand
tools, and
hardware

Electroplating,
plating, and
polishing
2d
shift

12.0

Stamped and pressed
metal products

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

A.7

7.9

2,3

Receiving shift differential .........

13.2

A.O

1A.2

2.2

11.5

7.1

2.5

.6

7.2

1.2

12.0

A.7

7.9

2.3

Uniform cents (per hour) ..........
A cents ........................
cents .......................
5 cents ........................
6 cents ........................
7 cents ..................................
7^ cents ................. .
8 cents .......... .......................
9 cents ............................... .
10 cents ............................ .
Over 10 cents .........................

6.1
.6

3.0

2.9
.2

.7

7.1

2.A

.6

l.A

1.0

12.0

A.7

_

2.3

-

ll.A
1.2

-

-

-

.6

-

-

.1

3.0
.1
3.0

Uniform percentage .......................
Under 5 percent .......................
5 percent ...............................
Over 5 and tinder 10 p e r c e n t ......
10 percent ..............................
Over 10 p e r c e n t .................. ...
Other ..............................
Receiving no differential ............

1/
2/

-

1.5
(2/)
1 .2

-

(2/)
.2
.5
. 2

.1

_

-

_

.1

_

-

_

-

-

.1
.5
.1
1.8
.3

1.1
.9

1.8
.2

.A

7.0

1.0

11.1

1.5

( g /)

( 2 /)

.1
.3
6.6

-

-

-

.2
.5
10.A

-

1.3
.3
1.8
.5
.1
.1
(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

( 2 /)

-

8.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.9

-

-

-

-

.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.6
2.0

.A

.5
.1

l.A

3.5

A.7

-

(2/)
(2/)

.1

_

A .9

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

.1

_

A.9

.2

_

7.9

_

-

-

.1
-

2.3
-

_

.2

7.9
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.1

-

.2

-

-

-

-

-

.9

-

-

-

-

.3

.2

.2

.2

.3

.1

-

-

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.1
1.1
.3

(2/)
.6
1.2
.A

-

2.0

.1
.7
.2

Includes data for industries other than those show separately.
n
Less than .05 of 1 percent.




.2

.2

-

( a /)
-

-

_

-

Occupational W Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N J., N
age
.
ovem 1951
ber
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT ET F AO
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26,

S ch e d u le d Idfje& hly cMausU,

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF OFFICE W O R K E R S i/ EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M anu factu re

Weekly hours

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

M an u fa c tu r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

All

2/

l Q Q i0...
t

Under 35 h o u r s ..... ...................
35 hours ...............................
Over 35 and under 37$- h o u r s .... .....••
37^ h o u r s ..... ........................
Over 37$- and under 40 h o u r s .... .........
40 hours ........ ......................................................
Over 40 and tinder 44 hours .....................................
44 hours ............................................................................................
Over 44 and under 48 hours ......................................
48 h o u r s .... ......... ........... ........... ...
Over 48 and under 55 hours ...............................
55 hours .................................................. .............................................
58 hours . . . • • • ............................... .................................... ...

0.3
26.8
2.7

,

13.8
8.3
41.1
.3
.1
5.6
.7
.3

i.QO,o_, .JffisSL

0.2
2.3

-

. 1PQ . Q ,
,
,
- .

MQtlL.
0.5
6.5
.8
33.6
12.5
46.1

72.2
-

..JUQtP

5.8

9.2
1.6
13.9
2.4
71.1

-

p JU&JL

55.0
9.0
11.9
20.6
3.5

-

0.3
8 .8
2.4
67.6
.3

-

-

-

65.0
1.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10.0
2.1
52.7
3.2
1.5

12.7

19.7

-

-

1 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17.2

1.0
.1
26.7

28.1
-

-

.6

.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

1/
2/
*
**

.

5.5
7.8

.5
17.6
5.9
60.0
.2

'

‘

'

'

‘

'

goods

1
l-lQ9tSL ,UlQfi.fi,- lOfitfi

1

All establishments ............. .......

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable

o.l
.7
.9
1.7
.9
74.6
1.9
2.7
6.6
4.6
3.7
1.3
.3

Whole­
sale
trade

.100.0

Retail
trade

Servioeg

1 0 0 .0

100.0
2.3

0.9
1 .1
1.2

-

76.5
.9
1.3
6.5
4.9
4.7
1.7
.3

68.8
1.0
2 .1
9.7
7.8
7.4
2.7
.5

_

0.1

-

-

2.3
2.8
3.2

-

_

-

1 2 .6
1 2 .1
56.0
1 .2
3.4
14.7

_

-

89.8
.8

80.0

89.5

_

-

-

1 .1

18.5
1.5

.4
7.8

-

_

_

_

-

2 .2

-

.4
3.3
43.6
25.3
2 .0
4.8
17.1
1 .2

-

_

_

_

..

-

'

-

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Paid Jhdidcufl

Table E-3:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN
M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

AU

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

y

' Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Ail
indus­
tries

All

ipp.0,

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

- I Q Q i f i .....

1Q0.Q

100.0

100.0

94.6

100.0

100.0

8 4 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

1

All establishments • • • • • • • • .• • • • .......
Establishments providing paid
holidays ............................................................................
1 to 5 days ................................ ................................
5$- days .............................
6 d a y s ........ .........••••••••••••
6$- d a y s ...........................
7 d a y s .......... ................ .
7$- days .........••••••..............
8$ days ...................................... ..... .......................
9 days ................... .. ................• • • • • • • • ............. ..
9$- days .............................................................................
10 d a y s .............. ..................... .. .....................................
10$- days ........... ................
11$- d a y s ........ .................. .
12 days ................ .......... .
13 or more days .................... .
Establishments providing no paid
h o l i d a y s ........... • • • • • ........ ••••

100 .0 _ .

99.9
.1
(2/)
10.1
1.1
31.1
.7
10.3
.6
9.2
. 5

1.3
.6
5.4
.2
27.6
1.1

AQQtP _ , A P Q .f i — ,

100.0

_A 2Q iP —

1 0 0 .0

100.0

10 0 .0

.1
.1
15.8
.7
52.0
.8
20.0

*
**

_

-

AS2QtO„. - A Q Q i f i - U

S fi.fi....1

1 0 0 .0

96.4

_

100.0
_

98.1

-

-

6.7
1.4
5.2
2.30
.3

55.3

-

2.4
1.1

5.1

-

-

8.5

37.5

7.3
16.6
-

1.0
9.7
-

1.3

8.3
3.8
2.4
20.5
2.2
10.6

5.1
29.0

-

-

-

-

-

3.6

-

62.4
.6
17.6

-

-

3.0
-

-

.3
.3
17.3
2.3
29.4
1.0
25.0
-

-

20.8

-

9.7
14.8
4.3
2.6

.4
-

1.5

-

.1
4.9
-

( 2 /)

.1

-

.3

'

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




10 0 .0

-

.7
.9
26.8
2.3
38.6
1.9
13.3
.1
2.9
.4
2.9
.5
4.0
2.8

-

1 5 .1

4.1
.4
1.6
.7
.1
3.6
-

‘

}/
2f

100.0

J M ft t P

-

8 .3

-

(2/)

1.3
-

17.4

-

-

-

67.2

4.3

30.8

-

-

-

.6

-

7.7

77.4
4.1

-

A P Q t f i ....l JLQQx P
1
1

1 0 0 .0

99.0

98.4

.5
1.2
27.3
.9
43.5
2.4
16.7

_

1.3

-

3 .2
3 2 .2
2 .3
2 9 .2

24.4
-

51.9
3.7
16.3

.4
17.5

_
-

21.0
-

2.3
•
-

-

-

-

2.6
1.9
.6
.1
•8

.9
1.2

1.3
5.1
1.6
.3
-

27.3

-

-

-

-

-

1.9

1.0

1.6

. 5

5

. 5.9

3.4
35.0
18.5
10.1
.4
1.6
-

7.6
-

6
10.4
.4
1.6
_

30.5
-

21.9
-

~

-

3.2
-

12.3
14.7
45.8

4 2 .0

.6

4.4

26.1
-

-

-

-

1.2

12.1
11.1

3.0
_

.1

-

-

-

-

4.1

16.0

5.4
"

Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N, J., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

27,

Paid V/iocUdCH^ (fyobmal P x UIIohA)
am

Table E-4

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

V a c a tio n p o l i c y

Manufacture.u

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

All

1/

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

ServioM

!

,!
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10Q.Q

E stablish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s . . . . .

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 0 .5

Under 1 week .......................................................
1 week ....................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ......................... .
3 weeks ..................................................................

.2
1 4 .3
.2
8 2 .3
2 .0
.9

E stablish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s •.

.1

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts ..............................................

X 79ST o f

.5
1 2 .3
.5
8 5 .6
1 .1
-

.7
1 1 .2
.7
8 7 .4
-

_
1 4 .7
8 1 .7
3 .6
-

_

5 5.7
4 4 .3
-

1 0 .7
8 9 .3
-

-

-

-

-

1 6 .5
7 0 .9
1 2 .6
-

.3
9 2 .7
5 .8
1 .2
-

_
1 7 .3
7 8 .4
.6
.7

1 .8
6 9 .0
1 .5
2 6 .0
.5
.8

3 .0

.4

9 7 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 .7
8 0 .8
5 .8
.7

.6
3 9 .8
2 1 .0
3 6 .9
.5
•8

.8
4 5 .3
2 6 .9
2 6 .0
1 .0

1 .2
4 7 .9
3 7 .5
1 3 .4
-

4 0 .9
8 .8
4 7 .7
2 .6

3 .0

.4

-

-

-

2 .3
7 7 .0
1 .9
1 7 .8
1 .0

3 .5
9 0 .7
1 .4
4 .4
-

-

_
3 6 .9
_
6 3 .1
-

-

.3
5 3 .6
2 .8
4 0 .6
_
2 .7

-

-

-

-

_
4 8 .2
51.8
-

_
6 5 .8
_

-

2 2 .8
6 9 .2
8 .0
-

-

-

9 .5

2 4 .7
-

2 yea rs o f s e r v ic e
E stablish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s ..........

9 9 .9

Under 1 week ......................................................
1 week ....................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ..................................................................

.2
2 .9
.8
9 2 .9
2 .2
.9

E stablish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s . .

.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.5
4-.9
1 .5
9 2 .0
1 .1

.7
2 .6
1 .7
9 5 .0
-

_
9 .8
1 .1
8 5 .5
3 .6

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
_

1 0 0 .0

.4
9 9 .6
-

2 .7
9 7 .3
-

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0

_

-

1 0 0 .0
_

8 7 .4
1 2 .6
-

(2 /)
.2
9 2 .8
5 .8
1 .2
-

_

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 7 .5
_

1 0 0 .0

_
1 2 .5
_

1 0 0 .0

_

9 0 .5

27.5
1 .5
7 1 .0
_

.6
_

5 6 .6

_

-

9 1 .4
8 .0
-

3 3 .9

-

-

-

9 .5

-

5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
E sta blish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a t io n s ............

9 9 .9

1 w e e k .................. ................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........................
2 weeks .................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................
3 weeks ..................................................................

.2
.3
8 2 .1
1 3 .4
3 .9

E stablish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a tio n s . .

.1

H

99.9

1 week ....................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........................
2 weeks ..................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........................
3 weeks ..................................................................
Over 3 weeks .......................................................

.1
.2
3 7 .0
2 .5
5 8 .8
1 .3

E stablish m en ts w ith no p a id v a c a t io n s ••

.1

2/
*
**

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

( 2 /)
.7
9 7 .4
1 .9

.1
1 .0
9 8 .9
—
-

_
9 3 .9
6 .1

_
1 0 0 .0
-

1 .9
9 7 .0
1 .1

_
8 6 .1
1 3 .9

_
4 0 .5
5 1 .0
8 .5

1 .7
8 6 .4
5 .8
3 .1

4 .2
5 .3
8 6 .1
4 .0

4 .1
6 .8
8 7 .1
2 .0

2 .7
7 .6
8 8 .8
.9

6 .3
5 .3
8 4 .3
4 .1

-

-

-

-

3 .0

.4

-

-

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
_

1 0 0 .0

-

-

-

6 .1

6 9 .9
-

.1
.7
5 0 .6

2 9 .9

-

-

-

-

7 0 .1

9 3 .9
-

5 5 .4
-

4 8 .6
-

“

1 0 0 .0

-

( 2 /)
.5
44-.1

•

2 9 .0
1.1
*
*

1 0 0 .0
_

4 6 .6
-

5 3 .4
~

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .0

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

-

1 .7

-

-

2 5 .0
9 .5
6 0 .7
4 .8

4 6 .1
•6
4 8 .6
-

2 .8
1 .4
4 6 .6
1.0
4 7 .3
.5

2 .4
1 .8
4 3 .8
1 .2
5 0.8
-

.1
2 .8
4 9 .0
1 .0
4 7 .1
-

3 .0

.4

“

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than ,05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 0 .5

.6

6 .1
_

8 1 .5
_
1 8 .5

1 7 .9
1 .0
8 0 .5
.6

8 4 .4

8 3 .0
_

1 5 .0

1 .4

-

-

-

9 .5

_
-

o i * » r v io e

E stablish m en ts w ith p a id v a c a tio n s ..........

\f

1 0 0 .0

“

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

6 .3

_

_

_

3 4 .8
1 .6
5 7 .3
-

4 3 .9
-

5 6 .1
-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 0 .5

1 7 .9

.6

6 .1

_

5 9 .4
_

2 2 .1
.6
-

_

6 0 .0

_

7 1 .6
_

«.

3 1 .4
8 .0
-

1 2 .8
9 .5

Occupational Wage Surrey, Nevark-Jersey City, N, J., November 1951
Bureau of Labor Statistics

28,

Paid BicJl JUjUMAG (rf&UHal PaA4M&40HA)

Table E-5:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

P rov ision s fo r paid s ick lea v e

M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

100.0

100.0

E stablishm ents w ith form al p rov ision s
fo r paid s ick lea v e .................«•*.•••••

28 .9

17 .6

Under 5 d a y s ........... *............................•••
5 d a y s ......................... *................................
6 days *................. .................................. ..
7 days •••••....................... ..........................
1© d a y s ................................... *....................
12 day..............................................................
15 d a y s ............... *........................................
17 d a y s ..................... *..................................
20 d a y s ..........................................................

1 .3
4 .2
3 .9
.1
13 .7
2 .0
2 .4
.5
.8

Establishm ents w ith no form al p rov ision s
fo r paid s ick le a v e ...........*............•••••

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods
1

■W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

8ervioea

!
!

100.0

10 0.0

10 0.0

100.0

10 0.0

100.0

1 0 0.0

10 0.0

10 0.0

10 0.0

10 0.0

100.0

10 0.0

10 0.0

14 .6

24.1

1 .1

24.4

19 .8

63 .6

3 8 .6

4 .7

3 .0

2 .6

3 .6

1 .0

12 .3

19 .7

14*8

2 .0
4 .6
1 .2
—
3 .8
1 .0
4 .6
.4

2 .4
5 .3
.7
3 .6
1 .4
1 .2
-

1 .0
3 .2
2 .3
_
4 .3
1 2 .0
1 .3

.4
.7
“

1 .1
6 .7
14 .1
2 .5
~

5.5
2 .8
11.5
-

5 .1
6 .4
44 .3
6 .0
1 .8
“

1 .0
4 .6
12 .7
.6
19.7

1 .9
.9
.9
—
.3
.5
.2

1 .8
.4
—
•2
•6
-

1 .6
—
1 .0
—

2 .0
1 .0
—
.6
—

_
1 .0
—
-

“

8 .1
.5
11 .1
—
-

6 .6
—
2 .5
5 .7

7 1 .1

8 2 .4

8 5 .4

75.9

98.9

75 .6

80 .2

36 .4

6 1 .4

95 .3

9 7 .0

9 7 .4

9 6 .4

9 9 .0

8 7 .7

80.3

8 5 .2

35.7

A ll establishm ents ..........................................

24 .4

20 .1

33 .9

3 .6

32.1

27 .6

7 2 .1

4 2 .7

7 .9

5 .7

2 .6

10 .9

2 .2

12 .8

3 4 .4

14 .8

.4
3 .0
2 .9
.2
.5
17.5
4 .1
1 .5

.3
4 .9
2 .1
.3

-

2 .4
14 .9
-

5.5
2 .8

•
•
.9
1 .2

1 .4
1 .4
.2

1 .2
1 .2

1 .6

5 .6
3 .1
.4

-

.4
3 .2

-

676

-

-

1 .2

3 .6
2 .9

8 .1
•5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .4

10 0.0 ...

6 months o f se rv ice

lW

*u
3 .9
—
-

. -O JfflEZjog
JL

E stablishm ents w ith form al p rov ision s

Under 9 d a y s ............................... *..............
5 days
6 days ••••••••••••...................................
7 d a y s ...............••••••••••............•••*••
9 days *................. *......................................
10 days *..................................................... ..
12 days ..........................................................
15 d a y s ...................... ....................................................• • • •
20 d a y s .................* ...........................• • • • • • • • • • • • «
Over 20 days ...............................................* • • • • • • •

E stablishm ents w ith no form al p rov ision s
fo r paid sick l e a v e ............. * .................. • • • • • •

1 .0
3 .3
-

-

2 .5
.7
-

-

-

7 .6
2 .3

-

.8

6 .6
1 .4
1 .2

-

-

5 .6
4 .5
2 .5

6 .0
1 .4

.2

2.2

1 .6

1 8 .6
1 .1

-

1 .2

64.3

75 .6

79 .9

66 .1

96 .4

.4

11.5
7 .8
-

“

See footnote! at end of table
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
*ft Finance, insurance, and real estate*




-

-

6 .9
1 .7

-

67.9

7 2 .4

-

50.3
1 1 .2
3 .8
2 .9
1 .8

2 7 .9

4 .9
4 .6
12 .9

-

-

.7
1 .7

-

-

-

-

-

.6

-

1 .6

-

•6

.6

•6

1 .0

-

1 .0

4 .8
1 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

19 .7

1 .9

2 .1

-

5 .7

-

57.3

92 .1

-

94.3

89 .1

1 1 .1
14 .7

2 .5

-

-

-

-

97 .8

.5

-

5 .7

**

—

-

9 7 .4

-

-

-

65 .6

8 5 .2

8 7 .2

Occupational Wage Surrey, Nevark-Jersey City, N* J*, November 1991
W.S. DEPARTMENT CP LABOR
Bureau ef Labor Statistics

Paid. Sl&k Jljea&e ($ atmcd P
amm4*o*u ) . Gtm tinum
l

T a b l e E-5 *

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
induv
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

V

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

S r ioea
ev

I

All establishments.......... *.........

100.0

100.0

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ..... •••*••••••••

36.3

25.6

Under 5 days .............. .
5 d a y s .... ••••••••••••••........
6 days ...................... ..
7 days ...............................................................................
8 days ...............................................................................
9 days .........................* ...................................................
10 days .............................................................................
12 d a y s ........ ..
U d a y s ...... *............ *........
15 d a y s .............. ..............
20 d a y s ...... ••••••••••••••••......
Over 20 days .................. .

.4
1.6
.8
.1
.8
.1
5.6
3.6
.2
H.l
7.2
1.8

.3
2.0

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

100.0

100.0

10 0 ,0

100.0

100.0

...JLQOtP..

21.8

33.9

3.6

3 2 .1

27.6

72.1

1.5

1.0
3.3

,,.100*0.

100.0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

. 1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

4 2 .7

9.3

7.6

2.6

16.0

2.2

12.8

3 4 .4

14.8

2 .5

1.2
1.2

.4
3.2

4.6
-

1.4
1.4
.1

1.6

.9
-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

1.6
-

2 jaarA

-

-

-

-

-

1.5
.7

2.4
6.7
-

1.7

2.4

-

-

_

-

-

8.9
1.2
.3
1.4
8.4
1.4

9.4
.7
.4
2.1
3.7
1.6

7.6
2.3
18.6
1.1

1.0
-

5.6
12.7
-

63.7

74.4

78.2

66.1

96.4

67.9

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .......... •••••••

37*4

27.6

24.8

33.9

3.6

Under 5 days ........................
5 days *....... .....................
6 d a y s ......... .
7 days ............................ .
10 d a y s ......... .......••••••......
12 d a y s ...... *........... •.*•••••••
15 days .............. ...............
18 days ............. *.............. .
20 d a y s ..... ........••••••••••••«••
25 d a y s ....... ............... .**...
30 d a y s .......... *.................
Over 30 days ..........

.1
1.6
.8
.3
4.5
3.3
1.7
.3
11.9
1.7
2.8
8.4

.3
2.0
6.7
1.2
.8
1.8
.6
4.5
9.7

1.9
.9
6.0
6.3

1.0
3.3
7.6
2.3
1.3
1.2
17.2

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ...... ••••*.•••••

62.6

72.4

75.2

66.1

5.5
2.8
_

-

_

_

2.1
8.0
-

-

_

47.5
11.8
1.8

10.8
.6
4.5
19.7

.1
.7
.1
1.6
3.6
.3

72.4

27.9

57.3

32.1

32.4

72.1

42.7

—
1.5
.7
1.0
.4

2.4
6.7
5.6
12.7
2.5
2.2
-

2.8
5.5
7.8
11.5
4*8

.9
2.1
6.8
3.8
1.2
42.2
4.4
10.7

2.5
4.6
8.5
.6

4.5
22.0

96.4

67.9

67.6

27.9

57.3

-

.4

2.5
2.2
~

-

19.3
-

8.1
_
_
_
1.2
_
•
_
_
_

3.6
1.9

.5

_

_

4*8
2.0

_
_
_

6.6

_
_
_

.6

-

_

-

_
4.6
-

_
.
1.0
-

10.8
-

1.0

90.7

92.4

97.4

84.0

97.8

87.2

65.6

85.2

9.9

8.0

2.6

17.1

2.2

12.8

38.4

14.8

.9
1.4
.1
.5
.7
.1
.1
-

1.2
1.2
.6
•4
4.6

1.6
_
_
1.0

3.2
1.6
_
_
_
_
1.1
10.8

_
_
_

3.6
1.9
_

.5

6.6
_
_

1.2
•
1.0

92.0

97.4

82.9

97.8

•9
_

_

25.8

1.6
_

-

5.7

.5

VLXMULSLJSZig.fi

1/
2/
*
**

1.5
6.3
.7
1.2
-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Less than .05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




.

“

-

(2/)
.9
1.1
4.1

90.1

4*8
2.0
_
.5
_
-

87.2

8.1
.
.
_

.9

14.7
11.1
4.0

_
_
_
1.6
5.7

61.6

85.2

_
.

Nonp/iedtecJ^nt B onnie*

Table E-6*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PEPCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Type of boons

AH
indus­
tries

AH

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

_100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ........ ................. .

36.9

46.6

41.3

58.1

5.5

Christmas or year-end ••••......... .
Profit-sharing •••••....
Other ...............................

30.9
2.2
4.1

4 2 .2
1.9
3.1

36.6
.5
3.1

50.0
5.2
3.0

5.5
-

Establishments with no nonproduction
b o n u s e s ........ .....................

63.1

53.4

58.7

41.9

94.5

40.6

1/
2/
*
**

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

100.0

All establishments

Retail
trade

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

8ervi*es

100.0

100.0

59.4

30.4

27.1

35.1

38.7

38.9

32.1

50.5

17.2

50.9

52.5

40.3

37.7
8.8
13.9

26.3

21.7

4.1

5.4

31.4
4.7
3.1

28.5
1.1
3.1

36.5
10.8
3.2

1.1

43.3
4.6
4.0

32.5

-

30.8
4.1
4.2

16.1

-

14.3
20.8
-

20.0

28.7
6.2
5.4

69.6

72.9

64.9

61.3

61.1

67.9

49.5

82.8

49.1

47.5

59.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
Unduplicated total,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

Undneance and P-enlian PXani
PEPCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

AH

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

2/

1

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

S ervices

j

100.0

Hospitalisation................. .

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

94.4

98.1

99.2

95.7

99.8

82.1

89.2

9 2.5

71.4

93.3

95.7

97.6

9 2.5

96.6

87.7

86.2

57.4

84.1
72.9
58.5
67.3

95.6
77.8
65.3
66.5

97.6
81.8
62.5
68.8

91.3
69.3
71.3
61.6

40.3
95.1
10.7
94.7

54.2
55.8

91.4
63.2
69.6
66.2

67.3
51.7
51.7
43.9

83.1
73.0

79.4
71.7

74.7
77.7

62.3
56.6

82.8
53.5

4 0 .0

62.3
59.3

87.4
77.4
67.0
62.7

92.1
80.8

46.4
49.4

89.2
62.3
67.4
59.4

71.6
63.1

51.9
62.0

4 2 .0
65.7

41.9
34.6

58.5
58.0

37.0
13.5

5.6

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans £/ .....................

100.0

1.9

.8

4.3

.2

17.9

10.8

7.5

28.6

6.7

4.3

2.4

7.5

3.4

12.3

13.8

4 2.6

28.3

Establishments with no insurance

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Newark-Jersey City, N. J., November 1951
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31

Appendix — Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates , in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

32

.
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN NEWARK-JERSEY CITY, N. J., l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, NOVEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
o f workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number o f
estab li shments
Estimated
tota l
within
Studied
scope o f
study

Employment
Estimated
to ta l
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

O ffice

Industry division s in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ...................................................................
Manufacturing ............................................................
Durable goods 2 / ..................... « ........................
Nondurable goods i j ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Transportation (excluding railroad s),
communication, and other public
u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
Wholesale trade ................................................
Retail trade ......................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate . . . . . .
Services 2 / ........................................................

1,263
514
244
270
749

288
128
63
65
160

386,400
268,300
169,600
98,700
118,100

227,310
154,280
101,630
52,650
73,030

46,760
21,590
14,440
7,150
25,170

101
21
101
21
21

47
285
38
142
237

18
42
16
35
49

32,000
20,500
22,100
25,100
18,400

27,450
4,350
15,210
17,750
8,270

7,490
1,370
2,260
12,760
1,290

8
8
21
21
8
8 / 21
101

109
16
19
13
16
234
9

21
5
12
9
9
45
8

6,063
98C
2,83C
1,055
905
49,164
28,879

1,572
476
2,445
929
645
34,260
28,030

22
41
169
87
40
5,262
”*

101
101
101
-

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6 /
Women1s and misses 1 coats and s u i t s ...........
Foundries, nonferrous ....................................................
Cutlery, hand to o ls , and hardware .............................
Stamped and pressed metal products ...........................
Electroplating, plating,and polishing .....................
Machinery industries ......................................................
R a ilro a d s........ ......................... .......................................

2/

1 / Newark-Jersey City Area (Essex, Hudson,and Union Counties).
2 / Total establishment employment.
2 / Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
4 / Food and kindred products; tobacco; te x tile s ; apparel and other finished te x tile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products o f petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and tele v isio n ; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2 / Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with U or more workers were included.
8 / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




33

.

Index
Page
Assembler (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) •
Assembler (machinery)
Bartender (restaurants) •• ••........ • •
•
Bellboy (hotels) ........ ............. .
Bench hand (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••••.....
Biller, m a c h i n e ...............................
Boatswain (ocean transport) ••••••••••••••....
Bookbinder (printing) • •••...... ..............
Bookkeeper, h a n d ........ ............... ......
Bookkeeping-machine o p e r a t o r ................. .
Bricklayer (building construction) ••.........
Calculating-machine operator ••••.... .........
Carpenter (building construction) .............
Carpenter (ocean transport) ...................
Carpenter, maintenance •••••••.••...... .......
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads)
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) •• ••
Cleaner ............... ............... .........
Cleaner (machinery) ..................... ......
Cleaner (office building service) ........ .
Cleaner (railroads) .......... ........ ...... .
Clerk, accounting ••••••••••....... .......... .
Clerk, file ....................................
Clerk, food (grocery stores) .......... .
Clerk, general ...... ............. ............
Clerk, o r d e r ............. .
Clerk, payroll .......................... .
Compositor, hand (printing) •••••••••••••••••••
Cook (restaurants) .............. ..............
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) .......
Counterman (restaurants) ••••••••••••••.......
Crane operator, electric bridge ......... ......
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads) ...
Cupola tender (nonferrous foundries) ..........
Cutter and marker (womens and misses1 coats
and suits) ........ .............. ....... .
Die setter (stamped and pressed metal products)
Dishwasher (restaurants) •••••••••••••...... .
Draftsman •.............. ............ ....... .
Drill-press operator (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) .................... ............ .
Drill-press operator (machinery)
.... •••••
Duplicating-machine operator
........ ••••••
Electrician (building construction) ...........
Electrician (ocean transport) •••••••••••••••••




16
IB, 19
23
23
21
A
22
21
3, A
A, 5
21
5

21
22

10
20

16
12
18, 20
23
20
3, 5
3, 5, 6
23
3, 6

3,

f

3, 6
21, 22
23
16
23

12
20
16
15
17
23
9

16
18, 19
3, 6
21

22

Pag§
E lectrician , maintenance...........................................................
10
E lectrician , maintenance (machinery) ....................
18
E lectrician , maintenance (railroads)
.......... .••••••••
20
Electrotyper (printing) . . . ................................................
21
Elevator operator (hotels) .................................... .................
23
Elevator operator (o ffic e building service) .......................
23
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ••••................................ 18, 19, 20
Engineer (ocean transport) ....................... ..................... ..
22, 23
Engineer, stationary ........................
10
Fireman (ocean transport) ........................................................
22, 23
Fireman, stationary b o ile r ................••••••...........................
10
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ................................... 18, 19, 20
Guard.................................................................................. •••••
12
Heat treater (cu tlery, hand to o ls , and hardware) ••••••••
16
Helper (bakeries) .........................................................................
21
22
Helper, motortruck driver ................•••••......... •••••.............
Helper, trades, maintenance.................
10
Houseman (hotels) .............
23
Inspector (cu tlery, hand to o ls , and hardware) ...............
16
Inspector (machinery) ....................... ....................... ............... 18, 19, 20
Inspector, fin a l (examiner) (women's and misses' coats
and suits) .......... .......... .........................••••••......... .
15
Janitor ...............................•••••..........................................
12
18, 20
Janitor (machinery) ........ ••••••••••••••••••......... ................
Janitor (railroads) •••••••............................
••••••••
20
Key-punch operator ...................
.............................»
6
Labeler (malt liquors) ........................................ ••••••...........
21
Laborer (building construction) ..............................................
21
Longshoreman (stevedoring) •••••••••...............
23
Machine operator (printing) ..................... ................... ..........
21, 22
Machine tender (printing) .......... ......................... ...................
21, 22
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ••••••••••• 18, 19, 20
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ••••••.................
10
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ...................
19, 20
Machinist, maintenance........ ..................................... •••••••••
10
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ••»•••.................
20
Machinist, production (machinery) ...................
19
Maid (h otels) ................................................................................
23
Mailer (printing) .........................................................................
21, 22
Maintenance man, general u t i li t y
10
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ....................
11
Mechanic, maintenance .........................................
11
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••.••••••••••••••
20
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ................................... 18, 19, 20
Millwright ......................................................................................
11

34,

Index C on tin u ed
Page

Page
Mixer (bakeries) ..............................♦ •.........
Molder ( b a k e r i e s ) ..... ............ ••»••••••»•••••......
Molder (nonferrous foundries) ..... •«*••••«••••».......
Motortruck driver ♦•••..........••••••••»••••••«»•.......
Nurse, Industrial (registered) ••••••••••••«••••••••••••»
Office b o y ..............
Office g i r l ............
O i l e r .....................................................
Oiler (ocean t ra n s p o r t ) .......22, 23
Operator (local transit) .....................
Order f i l l e r ..............................................
Overman (bakeries) ................ ........... .
Packer ........... ............... ......................
12,
Packer (bakeries) •*«•»••••«•••••...........
Painter (building construction) ........ •«•«••••••••»»•»»
Painter, maintenance .........
»»••••••»
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ......................
Pasteurizer (malt liquors) ..................... ••••••••••
21,
Photoengraver (printing) ......... •................ ......
Pipe fitter, m a i n t e n a n c e ..... ...........................
Plasterer (building construction) ................. .
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) •••••••••
Plumber (building construction) ...........
Plumber, maintenance .................
Plumber, maintenance (railroads) ................. ••••••••
Polisher and buffer, metal (cutlery, hand tools, and
hardware) ..............
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating,
and polishing) ...................••••••.••............
Porter ........................
•••••••••.
Porter (machinery)
.... .
IB,
Porter (office building service) •«•••••••••••••••••••••«
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) ............
Press assistant (printing) ...... •••..••...... .
Press feeder (printing) .............. •••••••.........
Presser (women's and misses' coats and suits) .........
Pressman (printing) ................................................
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) ........................
Quartermaster (ocean transport) ...........
Receiving clerk <>»•••»•••••••••«••«•••.....
0
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) ...........
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ...... .
IB,
Secretary ........
••••••••••..
Seaman, able (ocean transport) •••...... ••••...... ••••••




21
21
16
22
9
4
7
11
22
12
21
13
21
21
11
20
21
22
11
21
17
21
11
20
16
17
12
20
23
17
22
22
15
22
17
22
13
16
19
7
22

Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) ...................................♦
22
Sewer, hand (fin ish er) (women's and misses' coats
and suits) ....................... .......... ••••••••..................
15
Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats
and su its) ............•••••«••••••........... .
15
16
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ........ ...........................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ..............................................
11
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ................. .
20
Shipping clerk ........................... ..................................
13
13
Shipping-and-reeelving c l e r k ........................... .......... •••••••
Stenographer ................................
7
Stereotyper (printing) .......... .....» • • • • ............. •••••...........
22
Steward (ocean transport) ................... ....................................
22, 23
Stock handler ••••......................................... .............. ..
13
Stock handler (cu tlery , hand to o ls , and hardware) •••••••
16
Stock handler (machinery) ••••••••••••............ ••••••••••••
19
20
Stock handler (railroads) .............................................
Stock handler (stamped and pressed metal products) •••«••
17
Storekeeper (ocean transport) ............................. ••••••.........
22
Switchboard operator ......................................
7
Switchboard operatorw eceptionist ................
7
Tabulating-machine operator •••••••••«•<>«......................••••
4, B
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's and misses' coats
and su its) ................... ..................... •••••...................... .
15
Tool-and-die maker ......................................................................
11
19, 20
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) .......................... .................
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal
products) ................................
17
Tracer ................. •••••..................................................... .
9
Transcribing-machine operator ..................................................
8
Truck driver ••••••........ ..............................•••••••.................
13, 14
Trucker, h a x d .................
13
Trucker, hand (cu tlery , hand to o ls , and hardware) . . . . . . .
16
Trucker, hand (machinery) ••••••••........................
19
Trucker, hand (railroads) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
20
Trucker, hand (stamped and pressed metal p r o d u cts )..........
17
Trucker, power ...........................................................
14
Trucker, power (railroad s) ••••••••..........................
20
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ........ .......... .......... 18, 19, 20
Typist •••••.............
8
Waiter (restaurants) ...............
23
Watchman........ ............................. ...................................... . . . . . .
14
Watchman (ocean transport) ••••••••............... . . . . . . ......... ..
22, 23
Watertender (ocean transport) ............. . . . . . ......... .
23
Welder, hand (machinery) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••...
19
Wrapper (bakeries) ............................................................ . . . . .
21

^

U . S . G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F I C E : 1952 0 — 206398







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
BLS Bulletin No.

CitY
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Seattle, Washington

This report was prepared
munications may be addressed to:

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1059
1064
1042
1053
1057

in the

Robert R.
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

Pr£2£
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Bureau's Middle Atlantic Regional Office.

Com­

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102