View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Occupational Wage Survey
WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS
Ja n u a ry 1 9 5 2

B u lle tin N o . 1 0 7 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Sage
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................................................................................

1

THE WORCESTER METROPOLITAN A R E A .......................................................................................................................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ..................................................................................................................................................................

1

T A B L E S:
A v e rag e e a rn
A -l
A -2
A -3
A -4

in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s ........................................................................................................................................ . .............
P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s .................................................................................................
M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s ..............................................................................................
C u s t o d i a l , w a r e h o u s i n g , a n d s h i p p i n g o c c u p a t i o n s ........................... . . . . . .........................

3
5
6
7

A v e ra g e e a r n in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an in d u s t r y b a s i s * B -3 5
M a c h in e ry i n d u s t r i e s :
M a c h i n e r y ............................................................................................................
M a c h i n e t o o l s ................................................................................................

9
10

U n io n w a g e s c a l e s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s C -15
B u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n .........................................................................................................................
C -2 0 5
B a k e r i e s .....................................................................................................................................................................................
C - 2 0 8 2 M a l t l i q u o r s .........................................................................................................................................................................
C -2 7
P r i n t i n g ..................................................................................................... . ...........................................................................
C -4 1
L o c a l t r a n s i t o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s .........................................................................................
C -4 2
M o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s a n d h e l p e r s .......................................................................................................................
C -5 4 1
G r o c e r y s t o r e s ....................................................................
C - 7 0 1 1 H o t e l s ..........................................................................................................................................................................................

11
11
11
11
H
12
12
12

E n tra n c e r a t e s D -l
M inim um e n t r a n c e

13

ra te s

fo r

p la n t w o rk e rs

..........................................................................

W a ge p r a c t i c e s E -l
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v i s i o n s ..........................................................................................................................
E -2
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ...................................................................................................
E -3
E -4
E -5
E -6
E -7

P a i d h o l i d a y s ...............................................................................................................................................
P a i d v a c a t i o n s .....................................................................................................
P a i d s i c k l e a v e ............................................................................
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s ..................................................................................
I n s u r a n c e a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s ............................................................

13
14
14
15
16
17
17

APPEN D IX:
S c o p e a n d m e th o d o f s u r v e y ....................... .......................................................................... .. ..................................................

18

I N D E X ____ ; ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................

20

* NOTE - A d d i t i o n a l o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s r e p o r t s
a re a v a ila b le
upon re q u e s t fo r
w om en *s c e m e n t
p r o c e s s s h o e s - c o n v e n t i o n a l l a s t e d (A u g u st 1 9 5 1 )
a n d m e n 's
G oodyear
w e lt sh o es
(A u g u st 1 9 5 1 ) .
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S’ Government Printing Office
Washington 2o, D. C. - Price 20 cents

introduction 1/
The Worcester area is 1 of 4-0 major labor markets in
yhich the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales (Se­
ries C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occu­
pational earnings for several industries or trades in which the
great -majority of the workers are employed under terms of col­
lective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates
are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Worcester Metropolitan A rea
Total population of the Worcester Metropolitan Area,
including the city of Worcester and 12 towns in Worcester
County, was approximately 275,000 in 1950, a 9->percent increase
since 194-0. Of this total, over 200,000 resided in the city of
Worcester.
Employment in manufacturing establishments totaled
over 54,000 in January 1952. Metalworking plants alone accounted
for over 28,000 workers. Worcester plants manufacture a variety

2/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in Boston, Mass.,
by Bernard J. Fahres, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau* s Division of Wages and Industrial Re­
lations in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




of products. Important items produced include grinding wheels
and abrasive products, textile machinery and equipment, electric
motors, drilling machines, iron and steel forgings, fire-fight­
ing equipment, steel wire, clocks, tire chains, paperemaking
machinery, stamped and pressed metals, shoes, rugs, stationery,
sweaters, hosiery, and other textile products.
Worcester is one cf the principal marketing areas of
central Massachusetts. Approximately 8,OCX) sales and distribu­
tion workers were employed in the retail establishments within
scope of the Bureau’s survey 3/ and an additional 2,000 were
engaged in wholesale trade. Approximately 3,000 were employed
in the transportation, communication, and public utilities
group. Service establishments within the scope of the study em­
ployed approximately 2,000 in such diverse fields as automobile
and other repair shops, laundries, cleaning and dyeing establish­
ments, hotels, theaters, and business service establishments.
Finance, insurance, and real estate companies accounted for
approximately 2,700 workers.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
within scope of the Bureau’s survey, nearly half of all plant
workers were employed in establishments having written agree­
ments with labor organizations. The proportion of office work­
ers covered by union contracts was considerably lower than for
plant workers. Only in the public utility and wholesale trade
divisions were there significant proportions of office employees
employed under the provisions of union agreements.

Occupational W age Structure
Wages of most plant workers in the Worcester area were
affected by numerous general wage increases between January
1950 - the base date for the Wage Stabilization Board’s 10-percent ”catch-up" wage increase formula - and the time of the
Bureau’s survey. During the 2-year period, more than 90 percent
of the manufacturing plant workers received at least one formal
wage adjustment. For a majority of these workers, the increases
were more than 15 cents an hour. Virtually all plant workers in
the public utilities group of industries received at least one
formal wage adjustment during the period but the proportion of
workers in other nonmanufacturing industries that had received
general wage increases was substantially less.

3 / These and following employment estimates exclude small
establishments not included in the study; see appendix table
for minimum size of establishment studied in individual indus­
try divisions.

2

Comparatively fewer office workers than plant workers
received formal wage adjustments between January 1950 and Janu­
ary 1952, The customary practice of many establishments to ad­
just office salaries on an individual basis rather than l?y for­
mal means contributed, at least in part, to this difference.
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing about 90 percent of plant
workers and 80 percent of office workers. Approximately the same
number of plant workers were covered by plans providing a range
of rates for each job classification as by plans providing a
single rate. Over twice as many office workers, however, were
affected by plans providing a range of rates as by those pro­
viding a single rate for each job.

Nearly AO percent of the manufacturing plant workers
in the area received pay based on some form of incentive wage
system. The predominant method of incentive wage payment for
those workers was the individual piece-rate system. Incentive
methods of wage payments were negligible in the nonmanufacturing
industries.
Most Worcester firms visited had established minimum
entrance rates for hiring inexperienced plant workers. Although
entrance rates ranged from less than 60 cents to more than $1.35,
over half of all employees were in plants with minimum entrance




rates of 90 cents or more. The highest minimum scale was in the
public utilities group where the majority of the workers were
employed in plants with a minimum of $1.15 or over.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing• In 18 out
of 20 office job classifications permitting comparison, salaries
of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those in nonmanufac­
turing. In half of these instances the difference was between
$3 and $6 a week. Average hourly earnings for plant jobs studied
on an all-industry basis were higher in 14 out of 21 comparable
job classifications.
About a sixth of the manufacturing plant workers in
Worcester were employed on extra shifts in January 1952. Nearly
all these workers received a shift differential which was usually
expressed as a cents-per-hour addition to day rates. Shift dif­
ferentials ranging from 5 to 10 cents an hour were reported for
most workers employed on second shifts while a 10-cent shift
premium was most commonly reported for third-shift workers.
Scheduled 40-hour workweeks were prevalent for plant
workers, although about a fourth worked from 44 to 48 hours a
week. A majority of the plant workers employed in trade and
service establishments worked longer than 40 hours a week. About
three— fifths of the office workers in Worcester were employed
on 40-hour workweek schedules.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

O jjjf ic e

O c c u p y tiO + iA

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Worcester, Mass., by industry division, J a n u a r y 1 9 5 ? )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

$
j$
$
1$
$
$
:$
1$
i$$
1
H
$
Is
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00
Weekly
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 J55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 165.00 67.50 70.00172.50 75.00 1
80.00’
85.001
90.00
earnings
hours
.
' - 1 and
(Standard) (Standard) $
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50
30.00
55.00 |57.50 '60.00 j62.50 65.00 167.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

$

$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Men

%
Bookkeepers. hand ...................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Wholesale trade ...............
Clerks, accounting .......... .......
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Finance ** ................. ...

66.00

11
22
45
13

Clerks, order ............... .......
Manufacturing ....................

41.0
41.0
41.5
40.0

72.00
63.00
67.00

40.0
40.0
40.5
39.0

. 59.00
60.00
58.50
49.00

40.0
40.0

18
34

65.00
63.00

Clerks, payroll ............. .......
Manufacturing ....................

14

39.6
40.0

43
29
14

39.5
39.5
39.0

38.00
43.50
33.00
, 30.50

40.0
39.5
40.0

56.00
62.50
49.50
49.00
52.50
47.50
49.00

40.0
40.0

50.50
, 55.60

34
71
26

39.0
40.0
38.5
39.0

40.00
42.00
39.00
| 44.00

"TB3T
88
41

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

1|
2I

-

44.50
43.50
45.50

40.0
59.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
41.0
38.0

4

54.00

38.5
40.0
37.0
36.5

2

5
1

33.00
32.50
34.00

39.5

1
8

54.00
52.00

Office bova .........................
Manufacturing ...... .............
Nonmanufaoturing .............. .

2

Tabulating-machine operators ........
Women
Billers, maohlne (billing machine) ...
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................
Retail trade .............. .
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)
Nonmanufaoturing ......... ...... .
Wholesale trade ...............
Bookkeepers, h a n d .............. .
Manufacturing ........... ........
Nonmanufaoturing .................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade ..................
Finance ** ........... ........
Bookkeeping-machine operators, olass A
Manufacturing ....................
Bookkeeping-machine operators.class B
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing
.......... ,
Wholesale trade ...............
Calculating-machine operators,
(Comptometer type) ................
Manufacturing .................. .
Nonmanufaoturing ............ .....
Retail trade ........... .

83
-JO-

43
37

14

12

~W
74

11
17
31
10
61

11
11
2/ 11

1 i

16 1

9

rr

8

16 |
4 !
4 :
4

8

7
-;
71

3

i

1

17
3

4

1
1 i
1

3

1
6
3
2

,

18
3
15
4
8

12
3,
2
1

6

11

10 :

5

11

15

22
71
16

;
!

6
16 1
7|

11

1

6
5
1

1

3:

8
8

1
1

|

i 43.00
44.50
41.00
39.50

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




17
3
3

17
17

"23^

7i

3

~29j

16 !
12 i

2 2 * 2TT
16 i

13;

71

4 ;

5 j

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., T„ ,.uary 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4.

O^ice Occupation* - Continued

Table A-li

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Worcester, Mass., by industry division, January 1 9 5 2 )

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

Av erage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

$
| $
$
| $
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
'$
{$
47.50 50.00 52.50 (55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00172.50 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00
3
Under 30.00 32.50 J 5 .OO 37.50 140.00 42.50 j45.00 |
$

$

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

$

*

30.00 32.50 35.00 137.50 40.00 '42.50 45.00 47.50 1
50.00 52.50 55.00 157.50 60.00(62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50
1

Women

Continued

-

**

_____ _

.

r ............................

...T
........

Clerks, file, class A
T 'JnriTnflm if'ft

n<r

...................................................................... ...
_ T ____

Clerks, file, class B ..............................................................................
Manufacturing
Nonmanufaoturing ••
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ...
Finance ** ....

410
192
218
35
42
33
102

39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
37.5

1 44.50
46.50
43.00
50.00
44.00
; 44.00
39.50

20
12

38.5
37.5

'

179
79
100
11
13
68

38.5
40.0
38.0
40.0
38.0
37.0

!

!

6

20
51
15 ;
1
-

-

6
-

-

6

6
!

9

541
17 1
37
2:
9!
3
22

12 ;
2!
10
'
_!
1
7

30
7
23
-

6
l\i

16

56
25
31
4
9
1
15

2
2

1
X

33
20 '
13
2
4
6

78 ;
48
30
5 ;
2
_

*

23

2
2

1:
1 '

30
19
11
4
2
1

28 !

1
8
10
1!
4'
4;

12
4!
8
7
1

10
4;
6
5
1

11'
6i
5;
3
1(
1

7 !
6!
11
_
1

1
1!
_
_

_

2

_

_

_!
.1
- !

8

_

1

_

_

-

2!

1

2

-

“

3

5

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

-

_
_

_
_

_
-

-

.

* -

_

18
18

7
6
1

4
3

-

-

-

-

23
16
7
3

5
4
1

9
9

_

-

-

8
5
3
1
2

15

21

10

15:

12
6

101

16
24

5

6i

3

1

_ j

6

40.0
40.0

44.00
45.00

3

17

21 1

3

-1
6I

1

8

_
-:

22
91
4|

14
5
"

28
21
16

3
4
"

33
1
1

13
13

1
1

18 !
18 '

2

1
-

4
3

11
11

291
235
56
15
14

40.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
38.5

45.50
45.50
45.50
47.00
40.00

-

18
17
1

39
32
7
1

24
19
5
2
1

29
25
4
1

22
17
5
3

-

"

39
30
9
1
1

Duplicating-machine operators

15

39.0

41.00

5

_

2

Kov-punch operators
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Finance ** .«•

64
30
34
29

39.0
40.0
38.0
38.0

43.00
44.50
41.00
40.50

13
6
7
4

3
2
1
1

9
8
1
1

Office girls
Manufacturing ...
Nonmanufacturing
Finance ** ...

52
34
18
18

39.0
40.0
37.0
37.0

37.00
39.00
33.50
33.50

4
4

4
4

_

.

_

_

_

-

_

Secretaries
Manufacturing ...
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade .
Finance ** ...
Services .....

361
240
121
12
76
22

39.5
40.0
38.0
37.0
38.5
38.0

18 ;
10
8

55
43
12

17
11
6

21
10
11
2
7
1

13
5
8

36
29
7

26
20
6

4

-

8
-;

10:
1

_
5
-

67
60

!

r!

7
1

40

46.00
46.50
45.00
47.00

Clerks, order ......
Manufacturing

12

3

21
18 :
1

12 !

39.5
39.0
41.0
43 .0

_
-

1
11---- T
1

39

4

153
103
50
25

_
-

r

10
22
2

Clerks, general
Manufacturing •••
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade .

_

3
1
2

_ !

5!
4!
1!
1

32

9

|

Clerks, payroll
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ..........
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade ..........

1

i

|

50.00
47.00
36.00
37.00
35.50
37.50
29.00
36.50

80.00
75.00 85.00 90.00 ! over

1
i

|

t

Clerks. accounting ...........................................................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .... .............
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .............................................................................. ...
P i n o riR fl

11

1

8
4
4

2

-

4

_
-

1

-

63
53 !
10
3
5

» :

_

3

1

1

3:

2

-

14
6
8
7

3
1
2
2

7

- ;
- 1
- j

7
7

13
7
6
5

10
6
4
4

5
5

1
1

1
1

-

9
3
6
6

-

_

2
2

-

_

1

1
1

3
3

_

!

1

i 55.50
58.00
i 50.00
43.00
! 51.50
! 45.50

J

18
10
8

8

2j

- 1
- i
- i
- i
_ _ _ _ _ _1_

2
2

-

.
_ |
~

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5
1
4
1,

-;

3!

-

_

_

_
-

15
7
8

21
9
12

30
15
15
5
9!
1i

30 '
17
13 ,
2
9
2

- 1

2i
61

9
1

_ ;

8

__L

_

5;
5

«

6
“

8

_

10
6
4

_

4
4

.

10
7
3

19

18
1

_

2;

4

4j

_,

2

1

_

3 ;

-

-i

“;

“:

“

*
*

4
4

-

_
-

Office Occupationd. - Continued.

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Worcester, Mass., by industry division, January 1952)

S ex, o o o u p atio n , and i n d u s tr y d i v i s i o n

Average
«
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly [Jnder 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 |40.00
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 3 5 .00 57.50 4 0.00 142.50

Number
of
workers

Women - C ontinued
S te n o g ra p h e rs . g e n e ra l ..........................................
M a n u f a c tu r in g .......................................................
Nonm&nufaoturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ................................. ..
W holesale t r a d e ............................................
R e t a i l t r a d e .................................................
F inance ** .................... ............................
S e rv ic e s ............................................................

359
194
165
13
53
31
57

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8.5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
4 0 .0
3 7.5
3 8 .5

11

S w itchboard o p e r a to rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
M an u factu rin g ........................................................ — 53—
Nonm anufaoturing .................................................
46
P afa 1 1 +;rN An
17
14
S w itchboard o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t io n i s t s ................
M an u factu rin g ........................................
Nonm&nuf*&o‘ u r i j ^ 99999CV9999S9(##9, #9999
t
W holesale t r a d e ....................... .....................
trflrfP ! , i r - t “ “ T......... i ...................

|
45.00
46.50
42.50
46.50
43.50
4 0 .50
44.00
35.00

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 6 .5
3 8 .6

4 2 .00
44.00
, 40.50
| 34.50

137
4 0 .0
— '"5 5 7 6
4 0 .0
59
22
4 0 .0
23
4 1 .5

: 4 2 .50
4 4 .00
40.50
47.50
36.00

13

3 8.0

i
8

12

8

- !
12 i

.

-

_ !

-

3

- j
- I

2

-

33
liT
!

6
2

i

6

3 ;

-

20

3
3

9
3

- 1

1

9

1

-

-

i !
l

9

1
1

5
3

9

T ra n scrib in g -m ac h in e o p e r a t o r s , g e n e ra l . . .
M anufacturing .........................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ....... .
’..............

125

—
27

3 9 .5
4£>.6
3 7 .0

; 4 4.00
! R 75o“
~
, 41.00

58
42
16

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

48.00
50.50
41.50

B

T v p is ts . o la s s
..........................
M anufacturing ..........................

N ODm4*e ^ |W
D
F inance

1/

y
3/
■
»
**

? t. M “ .
.
* *.......................................................

369

2 2 5
38 .
72
11

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
38m5
40*0
3 8 ,0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

j
!
1
j
\
1

13
10
3
_

8

- 1

36
15
21
3
7
4

6
1 1

1

-

-

_ i

12 !
7
5

I

39

9

,
30 !
5
22

4 7 .50

A

4 5.00 '47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 160.00 [62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 1 over

40
23 i
17 !
1
10
1 j
4 I

44
26 !
18 ;
2
8

-

51
24 |
27
:
9
12
6

8

1

!
20 !
4 i
16
g

50
27
23

5

39.00
' 40.50

14
10
4 '
_
2

2
2

_

-

_
-

-

8

20

.1 39.50
31.50

" , 20
. 22 ! “.

36.50
33.00

7
4

2

5
4 I
1

13
11
2
1I

-

41
25
16
2

1

3

18
8
io

21

18
14
4

11 i
7 !
4 ;
9 :

4 j

5

4

i
!

. 5Q
23

37
31 !

- .i 11
4 :
|
.. . .. S ---- 1
. -

14

5
1
4

5I
4
1 !
“ !

5

2
21
2j
_|

3

5
2

1
1

2 [
1
x
19 1
16 j

7 i
5!
2
8 i
8

1

3
2!
11

2 j
2
5
4

i4
_

_

2 1

l

i

_
_
_
_
"

-

-

- !
-

-

_

3
3

-

_

_

«.

_

_

_

_

.

_t

-

_
_
-

|
- i

- j
1

-

_

-

2
2

j

1

-

1

6
3
3
2,

3
3

-

11

s

17 i
17 1

_
_ !

!
|

_
_
_
_
_i
_
-

_

1

1

1

1

_
1

-

“!

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

i
!

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

_
_j
_
_ 1

1
-1

- !

1

21
12 !
9 1
8 !

14
10
4

i

i

i
i|
- i
- i

3

-

3

2

12 1
3

3

3
-

3

11
10

i

|

_

”

2

j

18 ;
3 ;

65 ' 102
49 ! 74
16
28
2
13
1
12
13

58
16
42

7
6
1
1

6

3 :

I

i

9

11

1

5 i
_
;
2 |

8

\

5
4
1

_

13
12
1
1

14 :

1

3 !

1

3

i

2

3 I

4

8

i !
12
2 1
8 !

i
- '

46
38

2

T a b u la tin g -m a ch in e o p e r a to rs .............................

............ .............
T v p is ts . o la s s
M an u factu rin g .........................

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
!$
I$
$
$
|$
1$
$
$
$
S
1$
$
$
s
’$
'*
42.50 145.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 [57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 |72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

1

J
;
-

1

6
6.

j

S !J

5

- ! - I S 1 j1----- 4
5
5 '
13 '1; 4 i
"
J

_

_

'

_

_
-

-

-

-

_

.

„

_

_ j

j

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

.

_

_ j

_

-

-

-1

-j

" I
_

-

i

1

_____

-

1
x
I!

i_ _

-

_

-

1
_

!
_ 1i _

,

'

_

;

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $25 - 27.50; and 8 at $27.50 •. 30.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $25 - 27.50; and 8 at $27.50 - 30.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Pbofel&ionat and VecJmical Occupation*i

Table A-2 t

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Worcester, Mass., by industiy division, January 1952)

Ae a e
vrg
Sex, occupation, and industry division

<f
r

N U M BER OF W ORKERS RE C EIV IN G STR A IG H T -T IM E W EEKLY E A RN IN G S OF—

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

Number

$

%

57.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 5*5.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 U0.00 H5.00 120.00 125.00 130.00
and
and
under
40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120JDO 125.00 130.00 over

Men
3

Draftsmen, chief ....... ..............
Manufacturing 9999999999cc99994##V99sa99

15

Draftsmen...........................
M&nuf&c'turjln.g ••••eeeeeewemmmmmwmwmeemmm

206
205

40*5
40*5

73*50
73*50

Draftsmen, iunior .....................

118

40.0

58.50

6

Nurses, industrial (registered) ...........

48
48

40.0

57.00

2

Tracers ............................
Manufacturing ........................................

2
0
2
°

40.0
40.0

46.50
46.50

15

40.0 116.00
40*0 116*00

_

6

_

_

5

3

1
4

25
25

2

7

25

11

9

11

1
i

14
14

1
7

77
77

34
34

44
44

20
20

2
2

5

4

5

2
2

_

2
2

3
3

1

5

2
2

9

9

Women

1/

Hours reflect the workweek for




2
2

4
4

2

---- ~ ---- 2 \
l
c!
"i

4
4

6

6i

2

2

-

i
|

10

—
2!

r

2

3

1-----

.
"

i

~

which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

■

'

j -----

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., January 1952
O.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1

6
,

Table a-3:

M aint^nancm a n d Poumk P la n t O ccu p a tio n ^

(Average hourly earnings 1/ *for nen in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Worcester, Mass., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a r n in g s

$
'
$
$
;
$
$
$
i
$
1$
1$
$
$
I
s
$
$
$
$
[
$
$
$
$
1$
$
$
$
$
$
1.00 jl.05 1.10 1.15 [1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2.20; 2.30 2.401 2.50| 2.60 2.70 2.80
and ;
under! ~
- i - i - ! 1.05 !
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2.30!2.40 2.50' 2.60 2.70 2.80 over
r
r

$
Carpenters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ................ .....................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................

142
131
11

1.67
1.77

Electricians, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing .....................................

181
164

1.79
1.79

1 .6 8

“
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

4
3
1

_
-

"

_
-

-

~ |

-

7

9
9

3

10

7 1

3

9

15
14

1

1

- 1
- j

6
6

4
4

16
16

n
11

9
5
4
7
3
4

4
3
1

28
28

8
8

36
36
-

2
2

!
!
!

! '17
6
' 17

8

2

15
14

3
3
-

1
1

1

-

-

43 L i t
35
15

21

!

20
1

8

3

i(
if
j

4!
4

3!
3
j

i1
i

J

1

1|
2

5
4

|

1

J

- 1

-

1

_
j
i

|

3
|
3

_
i

1

_
_

H

j
Engineers, stationary ................................
Nonmanufacturing

84
57
27

....... ...................

1.73
1 .73
1.67

_
-

- ;

-

-

4
---- 1 ---

9
7

4 1

2

-

5

6

5

—
5|

4
r

1

4

4

12

8

4

18

l

8

g

5 i 12
3

g

9

5
5

;

-

-

-

!

_

-

_

;

-

_

"

1

Firemen, stationary b o i l e r .......................... .
Manufacturing................ .....................
Mnnmflnnfftrrhnring . . . . . . . . ___ T...

151
120

31

Helpers, trades, maintenance .......... ...............
Manufacturing
..................
Wr\rrm«mi'f, f + i ing Tttr...TTT.t.f.T.TT..f.tTTT..T.T.T.
B »ur

126
97
29

1.48
1.49
1.43
1.49
1.51
1,43

1

1

-

2
4
7 ---------- ----18
14
5
2
2
4 | 4
5
5

1

-

3
-

1

5
4

3
-

13

21
20

12
1

7
7

16

12
12

12

6

9
9 1

3
3

4
4

39
17

5

8
6
2

22

4
19
4 i 15 i
4

8
1 1
! --“
1

4

1

14
28
14 ; 28

2
2

14
14

2
2

-

2
2

!

1

103
103

1.77
1.77

Machinists. maintenance ...................••»........
Manufacturing ................................... .

174
164

1.83
1.85

Maintenance men, general ut i l i t y ........... ..........
Manufacturing ................ ....................
Nonmanufacturing ....................... ...........

236
196
40
15

1.53
1.60
1.23
1.25

129
57
72
63

1.54
1.53
1.55
1.53

n fia

t . . t . . . T . T . T . . T T t . t 1 , . T . T1. T t . T T T T l T l . . . T .

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
M B m ifa rv h iiri n g

.......................................................................
. . . . . T . T . . . T. T T t T . TTT. . . r r . . . . . . . . . . . .

Nonmanufacturing .......................................................................................................... ...........................
Public utilities * ............................................... ....
Mechanics, maintenance
Manufacturing

77

......................................................................................................... ....

72

Millwrights ............................................................................................................................. ......................................
Manufacturing

98

97

1.76
1,76

- 1

-

79
69

_

1

1

-

-

- '

1

Painters, maintenance ..............................................................................................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................................................................. ...
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75

5S —
20

1.55
1.61
1.40

77
76

1.77
1.77

200
200

1.82
1.82

Tool-and-die makers ..................................
Manufacturing..... ....................... .

7

-

7

-

12

5
7

7
1

-

_

_

-

_

7
3

-

-

-

_

13 1
9 ;
4

4
4

-

34
34

_

_
j
—

6 :
6

3
1

5
3

2
2

2

!

_

7
7

—

5
5

-

_

4

4
4

7
7

13

3
3

1

-

7

4

-

4

:
-

- !
j

—

n

2
2

:

Excludes premium pay for overtime ?nd night work.

*

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,

-:
i
!

!
|

33
33

34
31
3

10
10

-

—

-

20
20

~ |

-

- 1
- i

2

|

46
7
39
39

5
5
-!

7
7

10

9
1

j

9 i
9 !

1

_

10 ;
!

1

!

19
19

20

6 !
6

9

47
47

1

9

7

7

3

4
4

!

-

8

4
3

12

19

6

:

17

6

5
5

-

15
15

17

-

i

17

1
l
1

-

2
2
6
6

.
!
j

1

1
1

2
2

1
1

5
,
5

.1

-

-

-

-

- i

17

4
-

5
5!

13

r *

|

13
13

2,
2

8
8
6

6

i
1

_

_
-

*

-

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

13
r

1

u

12

1

1
------------

12
|

-

-

-

!
_

-

}

;

-

_

-

-

i

1

20
20

13 !

3

13

3

55
56

57
57

11
11

1

.
-

"

-

i

.

"

1

2

5 i io
5p o

3
3

1
1 ‘
X

!

-

'

1

7
7

1
i

3
l
i
3 ---

_

7!
7

7

2
2

6

4

3
- j

_

_

4
4

3

2

8 ;

i
—
_

i

8

4

1

i

14
14

1

-

4

- j

g 1

6

5!
3
5 1 -- 8
-

12
12

5
5
-

6
,

4
4I

48
1 2 ! 13
48 : 11
13

4
4

2
1
-----------"

_

!

1 j
1 i

io

10

-

2
9 1

3!
*
o

I

22
22

1

_ i

4
4

i

-

1

8 |
8

_

!
-;

13 ! 1 3 ! 3
13
15 i 3
i
6 ' 13
16
28
18
5
18 : 16
5 ! 28

10
10

6

4
4

1
1

11 j

-

11

! 11

-

44
44
-

3
3

-

j

3

2

-

!
_

"

3

6

10

1/




- 1

17
5

1.49
1.47

Pipe fitters, maintenance .................... .................................................. .......................................
Manufacturing ............... ......................

-

1

.

j

i

5
5

1.77
1.77

Oilers ........................................................................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing ................................................................................................................................................

—

3

i

t ~ =•

j

i

«I

1

Machine-tool operators, toolroom .....................
Mnmifanturlrig
T.--TT___ _______ ..TT--.-.-irTttt,

_1

2

-

'

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
11
11

-

|

-

-

-1

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, Worces t e r ,

Mass.,

January 1952

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bure a u of Labor Statistics

7,

Table

A-4*

GtUtodtfU, Wa**UouliWff0*d ShiflfUWf OoOMfUltiOtU

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Worcester,"Mass., by industry division, January 19$2)

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Crane

operators, electrio bridge (under 20 tons) ....

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons
and over) .......... ....... ...... .................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
j
$
$
$
Average
•
hourly Under0.75 3.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1,06 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50
earn n s
ig
and
t
D.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 12.20 2.30; 2.40 2.50 over
1
$
:
!
54
1.45
7
15
6
14
10
2
_!
^
n
7
2
48
1.46
10
6
10
13
!
i
i
j
1
_
_
_
_
_
!
31
1.54
1
4
26
.. 1
j
144
1.38
2 i 3
22
2
50
9
12
41
3
---- 1 --- ; --- 1 --1,45
3
g
2
41 1 3
90
2
21
12
ax |
;
j
1
j
;
!
j
i
672
24 i 52
1.16
6
17
26
54
14
36
41
32
69 112 ! 64
3! 2 i
89 1 20
11
_
_
_
_
_
_!
_
4FI--- 1.24 "
7
20
5
22
17
23
31
20
60 108 i 50 | 79
2 ! .1
7
_
_
_
_
221
6
17
1 .0 1
26
16
47
7
9
21
1 i 2
19
9
9 i 4 i 14 ! 10 | - i 4
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_j
_
_
_
_
«:
_
_
_
•
1.35
19
4
1
11 1 2 !
1
_j
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
.90
5
6
23
118
44
3
12
4 ; _ > _
10 !
11
57
8
2
4
6
1 .1 1
7
6
7
4
3 ! -; 2
“
•8
*

Number
o
f
workers

i

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ................
Manufacturing ......................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................
Public utilities * .............................
Retail trade
...................
Finance ** ......................................

Janitors, porters, and oleaners (women) ...............
142
- j l --Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ............................... .
71
Ratai1 trade ....................................
26

1 .0 0
I.2 i
.78
.81

13
13

y \z

39

7

39
3

7
2

1

\ '
_

4
1

133
39
94
32
62

1 .2 0
1.18
1 .2 2
1.14
1.26

-

Packers (men) ................ ............. ..........
Manufacturing .............. .............. ........

247
241

1.44
1.45

3
-

1.05
1.05

15
7
8
s

7
7

10
10

_

_ i

28 '
2
2 ■ 28 i

l
2 j 14 ;
2 , 14
_

(
---- 1 -- ----- ■ -- - ---- 1 --- -------------- : ---- ----i
;
_
_J _j
_:
_
_
_
_I

_

I
!

1

Order fillers .•......................................
Marnif*Ar t i r ng .TTTtr....YTTt.t.tltt.TTTTtT.TTttTt.tt
i.ii
Nonmanufacturing................. *...............
Wholesale trade «••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Ratai1 trade ....................................

-

136
Packers (women) ...»••••.......... ........... .
Manufacturing..... .............................. . ~ T t t ---

4

-

-

1
1

-

23
19
- i 4:
_
4

21

5

1 2 ; 17 |

6

21
7

5
5

12 ; 17
5
3
7
14

6 j
6

21

5

21 !

5

3
1

” j

*

14

~

12
12

"

-

15
15

7 i 18
71 17

-

7
7

25
25

28
- ! 28

-

66
66

!
28 j
20
8 !

20
-

_ ! 20

3

32 !
32 |

19

27
12
4
4 : 27 ! 12

59
59

2
2

-

-

2
2

3
3

3
3

-

3
3

“i

98
69
29
12
16

1.42
1.40
1.48
1.43
| 1.51
j

Shipping clerks ........ .............................
146
1.43
Manufacturing ............ ........................
IT7--- "1.41"
Nonmanufacturing...... ............ ...... ........
29
1.50
Wholesale trade
1 20
1.53
Shipping-and-receiving clerks ......... ..............
Manufacturing .............................. .
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade ...................................

143
l06
37

12
21

1.34
1.36
1.29
1.40

1 .15

1

_

—
. ;

1

1

-

- j

5 ‘
3 j
2 i

-

5
5 ;
-

1
11
1 1 11
_
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
-

5
5
-

- ;

4
- ;

_

_

_

_ ;

'!
x

4

1

6
5

1

1
-

-

- 1

3

n
r
2 |
2 ;

- :

-

-

1
_

_

-

See footnotes at end of table.
• Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1- |
---= )

5
5
_

_

1
7
10
7 ;

_

1 !

1

1 ;

6 ,

2
2

3
3

4
4

10
10

5
5

-

-

-

2
“

-

- |

-

2
Receiving clerks .....................................
Manufacturing
Nonmanufaoturing .......................... .
Wholasela trada ........................__ ......
Retail t r a d e .... .•. •........ ..................

_

-

30 :
22
8:
8 :

7 1 10
10
7

10 ; 13
12
5
5 ' 1
5
-

2
1

1

-

7
7
-

4
13
3 ; 9
1
4
4

a

2

5

9 : 11
g | 7 i
4
4
i

15 ;
15

5
4

3
2
1 j

55
44

9
7,

11
7
1

2

4
9
9 --- n
_ | l\

2
2

A

„
l
J
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
!

_

_
_

_
_

11
5!

_

_

J

j

6!

5
- |

|

1
6,
6

J
_

f

Z\

_

2

1

31 !
31

J
_

2
_

4

2 ;
2

9

35
19
16
5
11

J

1

i

---- ! --^ ---- ---- ----- -----1 ----

2i
c1
-

-

_

‘

_

_

_
j
-!

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., January 19^2
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8
,

Table

n-A, G tu to d u U , W aneJuuUiH Q, and S k ip p in g

Occupation* - Gautiuuod

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Worcester,“ Mass., by industry division7 January 19^2)

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
2.20|$2.30 2.40, 2.50
hourly Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 . 0 0 2.10$
earn n s
ig
and
1

0.75
Stock handlers and truckers, hand
Manufacturing .....................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .
Wholesale trade ........ ........................

1 ,0 0 0

578
422
70
262

$
1.29
nsr~
1.28
1 ,32
1.35
1 .04

.80

.85

.90

10

13
9
4

2

-

23
15

11

2

8

3

.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1*60 1.70 1 ,8 Q 1*90 2 . 0 0 2 ,J0 ‘2.20 2.30* 2.40 2.50 over
1
1

10

_
4

10

2

14

3
3
-

12

_

1

100

16
84

5 j 23
25 j

1

96
93
3

136
36

10

36
4
5
27

p

8

54
j 43
31
si 13
1 ! 30 j 23

48

3

103
95

254
197
57
47

8
8

14
13

125

1

119

6

x

11
6

6

18

2

4

-

5

2

12
6

7 ___ si
8
5

2

2

2

6

2

2

107

10

3

-

]
|

-

-

-

„

-1
.1

2

„
|

_

„

_

-

-

-

12

“j
1
1

|
Truck driver, light (under 1^ tons) .......... .
Manufacturing......................... ...........

72
40
32

1.32
1.44
1.17

- ---IT

3
3

-

-

17
17

-

4
4

9
9

---—
I
- !

4
4

6
6 1

-

11
11

12
12

1

|

2
2

-

H—

-

I

i

u

4

1

j

Truck drivers, medium (1^- tons to and including
4 tons) ................ ...........................
M&nuf8Lc*buri.u£> ••#•••••#•••••••#••#•§••#•••*##•##•••#
Nonmanufacturing...... ........................ »..
Wh^ 11 B 1f
.*
1
taaiiriafriTiT-i'iiTiTTiTirT-'-iT
^^
■lllTllirilTlll1l11TT11lm71TT1-T“TT“

l

4
' -

|

!

i

i
i

378
101

277
102

150

1.29
1 1.30
j 1.29
i 1.31
1.24

_

_

-

-

-

„!
,
!
—
-

-

1

T
-

14
9
5

13

1

65 | 78 | 1 1 0
x j 8 j 6 CT
64 i 70 j 60
1 %A
Prs
zr
an
64

2

10

3
3

1

5

1

2
1

2

49

4

20

9

9

10

R

40
40 1

4 , 20
s
_

R!

4!

3
3

j
—
l

4

2
2

-

-!

-

j

—i
•

-

-

1

"
|

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons.
trailer type) .......................................
Tt ffiTiTTi'i r T . , . . .
T£
.) .] .r_
Nonmanufacturing.......... ...................... .
p i i io
iVl
1 i+ iRR'it',.,....,,..,...,,....,..,.....
:

163
24
139
92

1.53
1.44
1.55

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

4

_

7
y

- ! 11

4 ; 95

3

4

4
_

8

a

95
84

15
xx
4

2
2

1

x

|

-i
!

.

24

«I
.

_
"1

j

I

!
Tr*uok drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ................................. ......
l(gI.I(TTTflT|[rTI1IlllTflT-T-__._*_-_T_
Nnn n A i v A
riT^^
-tr»i-rtTT_r-.T-TT-__TT*T-*-_--rWholesale trade ............................. .

i
i
j

_

24

j

i
159
25
134
33

1.50
1.78
1.44
1.32

15

15
-

-

"

-

;

“

- |

-

~

9 ;

_ ;

9

12

-

9

3
3

8

12

- : 12
3 l _

11
1

64

8

-

12

40

1

2 1

g
-

: 64

x

4
4

i
2

3 1 10
%—
V ) io

|

38
4

-:

-

-

i
_
l

I

1

_1
_
i
---1
"

_

-

2

-

-

i
J

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ...........................
Manufacturing.... ..................... ...........
Nonmanufacturing ...............................

63
42
21

I 1.41
! 1.43
! 1.36

4
-!
4

1

-

-

-

-

- ;

1

■

‘

j

'

'

3
3

3

'

'

!

3 i 19
3
9
10
“

2

-!

-

2

:

-

i
!

“I

•i
i

4

-

i
!
i

*
-

oi
—

-

-

4
-

i
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ...............
MfT lT 1
tTV f
Tl£ T t « * t t l l T t t l t r T t T T t T T t » « t l T l ' r r T - “ ' 1 t * *

95
95

1.53
1.53“

------ , ----- 1 ----- 1 -----

1
----

2
2

1
----

6
1

10

g

in
Xv

17
17

44
At
fA
r

12
1

12

2

2
2

1

|
Watchmen •••••......... ..............................
Manufacturing ............. .......................
Nonmanufacturing

233
199
34

1.23
1.26

-

1 .0 2

1

4

1

1

!

;

1

!

i j

1

;
1

-

4
1

j

j

1/ Excludes premium pay for overrime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
3/ Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at 6$ - 70 centsj and 6 at 70 - 7? cents.
” Transportation (excluding railroads), comiaunication, and other public utilities.
~y




1

9 ; 6
1
---5~;
1 i
9 1

7 1 47
47

-

9 ; 26
9
26

18
33
16 ' 27
2
6

7

I

44
43

x

8
8

6
6

n !
10 ;

xi

1

lI
i:

l
i

.

_

:

i

J -- 3
i
j

:

!1 ”
i

1

-

-

~

9,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-3$t M acU U l& U f, U n d u it/U ei. 1/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Occupation and sex

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

It

1
$
$
IS
S
s
s
S
S
Is
I
s
I
s
S
s
!
S
Dhderjl.0011.05 1 .1 0 1
II.I5 1.20 1.25 1 .3 0 11.35 1.U0 1.1+5 1 . 5 0 1.6o 1.70 1.80
!
f
c
1 .00
,
1.20 i
1.25 JL30. 1.35i 1 A 0 1 A 5
1.05 1
.,10 1 .151
,
Jl £Q. 1.701l.fiol1.Q0

k/a

k/a

k/a,

k/a

k
/a

k
/a

k
/a

k.
/a

k/b

k/a

k
/a

jand

I . Q p j

2

. 1 Q|

g

ovcr
. 2 f.. ; . . . 2 ,,603 2.70 ^: Q
Q
a
. Q p 2.80 2 ,90,3.00|

j

.............................
Assemblers, class A
Assemblers, class B £/b .............................
Assemblers, class C £/a .............................
Electricians, maintenance 4 / a ................. .
inspectors, class A
.......... ..................
Inspectors, class B ¥ / a ........... ............... .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners U/a ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A
................................ ...
Drill-press operators, radial, class A
....
Drill-press operators, single- or m ultiplespindle, class A
............... ...........
Engine-lathe operators, class A
Grinding-machine operators, class A
Milling-machine operators, class A J7 .
____
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand”
screw machine), class A: T o t a l ............. .
Time ............
Incentive .......
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5/: T o t a l ..... .................... .
Time ..............................
Incentive ............. ..........
Drill-press operators, radial,
class B: Total ............. ......... ........
Time ..............................
Incentive ............ ............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B
.......... ............... .
Engine-lathe operators, class B
............
Grinding-machine operators,
class B: T o t a l ................ ......... .
Time ..............................
Incentive ................ .......
Milling-machine operators,
class B: T o t a l .................... ............
T i m e ..............................
Incentive .......... ..............
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand”
screw machine), class B: Total ...............
Time ............
Incentive .......
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C
£ / .............. ................ .
Drill-press operators, radial, class C
......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiple­
ap indie, class C
................... .......

k/a,

i$

,50 : .6o 2 70 2 , , 0 | .9 0 3.00
2
8 2

j

Men

kfb

ls

i
$

| i$
$

2.10] 2.20(2. 30

!

Machinery 3 /

k
/a

$
$
1.90 2 .0 0

l

232
372
161
60
67
51
158

$
1.83
1.87
1.43
1.84
1.69
1.55
1.26

8

3

2

820
66

1.80
1.69

- :

- 1
“

1
1

9
-

4 1
1 ,

2 1
1 :
- ;

2 |
2 1
-

3
9
-

5
15
~

10 1 3
2u ! 26
- 1 _

7
19
_

9

1 1
- 1
~ 1

11

23

11 1
11 1
1

4
1

14
17
19
-

12

50

67;

32 I

65
29

23

16 !

8 i

2

13

121

_ ■

_

_

_

- 1

- ;

-

-

15
139
121
98
7

1.67
1.75
1.86
1.82
1.91

_
-

_
- ;
- '
- :

„ !
-

_
-

155
98
57

1.82
1.74
1.96

_ ,
-

_ ;
-

_
-

_
-

825
548
277

1.63
1.46
1.97

24
24
-

3
3 !
-

1
1
-

78
70
8

1.55
1.51
1.90

_

_ 1

-

-

105
119

1.67
1.53

7
14

133
96
37

1.62
1.51
1.90

_
- ;

122
85
37
45

1.69
1.53
2.08
1.85

2
2

109
75
34

1.65
1.49
2.00

1 1
i

1
1

314
13

1.39
1.37

_

_

- ;

-

28

_
-

1.36

63

3
1

_
-

_
2
-

-

-

_ '
-

_
- j

_
_

2
2
“

1
1
-

61 ! 77
55 ! 50
6 I 23
55 ; 45
68
23
59
6
5 ' 2 | 9
- | - !

_

_

-

-

1
1

_
- |

-

_

_

_ :

62 123 : 143 1 181 1 124 : 53 1 41
7 ! 22
12 | 13 1 3
1
1

_
-

-

-

_
-

1
1

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

4
-

16
2

_
_

-

_
_
-

1:
_
_
1

_

1

_

_

-

-

-

3 1 _! 4 , 1
2 !
28 : 31 ! 18
28
13
5 I 11 ! 29 : 29 ! 16 :
24
3 : 2 0 ; 15
10;
5,
2 i

1
7
6
1

2
12
2

_
_
3 :
8

_
2
3

!
1:
1

3 '
3 !

2
2

_
-

14 ! 17 ! 24 1 42
35
16
11 ; 16
8
7
3 ; 1

29
14
15

9

11

1

2!

_

9

11

1

2

"

-

-

25

29

20

22

27

24

11

4

_

25

29

20

22

27

24

11

4

-

1

«

_

_

1

1

_

_

_

-

-

7
7

2
2

9 1 14
9

14

11
10

3 *
3 .
-!

3
3

13
12
1

11 :
9
2

9

_ 1

9
9

4
4

5
5

4

- |

1

2

1 |

4

4

6
5
1

3
3

3
3

4

10
31
“ |

54
1

5 ,

191 ; 85
68
162
17
29
24
23

6

54
4
8

7

59
27
32

25
4
21

1

-

-

-

1

"

1

2
2

5 ,
13

6
2

15
~

19
2

4
1

5
~

_

_

_

_

2

2

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

44
41
3

23

6

4

4

-

3

2

1

6'

1

6

2

4

4

-

3,

2

1:

36
31
5
4

27

7

2

1

_

6

1
;

4

6

8

5'

1

26
1

3
4

2

1

7

6

2

4 '

4
4

6

3

2

8
-

5:
1

3

1

14
13
1

34
28

12

9
5
4

_

1

1

2

4

3

5i

2

1

1

1

2

4

3

5l

2’

1

29 ' 41
4 ■ i

48

26

1

-

~

-

3

7
2

4

-

_

_

i

7

1
3

20

_
"

3

-

9
3

1
-

-

-

I
f

-

-

-

_

_

~

-

-

-

-




-

_
_

-

_

_
-

-

J

_

1

-

1

-

“|

2

1
See footnotes at end of table.
2 0 6 8 8 6 O - 52

i’
-

_

11
10
1

3

4
4
" ,

_

I
____ L

1
-

.

9
9

3
3

1

-

1
“

1
1
1
4
-

4
8

_
- 1

!

_
3
1
2

j

_
"

2

:
!
:
;
;

8
12

3

-

81

3
8
1
4
-

1

1
_
-

14
-

1
1 '

2
8

14

2 1

-

_
- I

10

2 !

22;

1

_ 1

8

I

19 S 22 j 20
“ 1 4 ; 1

_
-

-

: i

18 !

5

t

7

i
O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S u r v e y , W o r c e s t e r , M e 6 s . , J a n u a r y 1952
U .S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B OP
B u r e a u of Labor S t atistics

-

M otUUH&Uf 9 H&U&frUeA.

Table B-35:

GoAttiHUmd

1/ -

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
I
s
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1,30 1.35 1.U0
l.*J 1.50 1 . 6 0 1.70 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.00 2.10 2 . 2 0 2.30 2.1f0 2.50 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 8 0 2 . 9 0 3.00
earnings $
and
1.00
2/
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.IfO 1 M 1.50 1 . 6 0 1.70 1 . 8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 . 3 0 2,kC 2.50 2 . 6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 8 0 2 . 9 0 3.00 over

Machinery 3/ - Continued
M en - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C k / a t 5 h - Continued
Engine-lathe operators, class C k / a ...............

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C k / a ........... ...........
Machine-tool operators, toolroom k / a .... ....... .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand k j a .......
Tool-and-die maker (other than Jobbing shops) k/a . ....
Welders, hand, class A k/a . ........... ..............
Welders, hand, class B k / a .............................

57
39
74

$
1.41
1.38
1.38

75
46
220
97
45
23

1.43
1.76
1.42
1.89
1.73
1.77

-

-

-

3

2

-

“

59
47

1.12
1.23

9
2

166
102
104
26
95
393
32

1.89
1.70
1.45
1.54
1.30
1.88
1.75

-

-

5

-

2

10

16
10
14

1

9

3

8

1

1
8
1

-

-

-

"

“

”

15
5

6
5

-

3

-

-

-

8

3

3

10

38

-

-

“

3

12
4

4
5

11
6

7

!

4
2

3

7

10

12

4

1

16

;

-

12
2
2

16
8
-

-

-

-

3
1

4
5
1

12
12
1

7

-

1

10

4
4
5

7
1
103

-

“

7

18

-

8
12

-

5

■

10
3

2

1
10

-

2

1

2

-

.

-

_

“

~

“

-

2

-

-

3

1

64
5

32
1

3
-

_

-

-

_

7

36
17
. 2

37
1

14-

6

2

-

-

-

0
0
0

3

■

*
1
X

-

10

-

-

-

2
8
5

18
14
32
6
3

1
5

33
3

2

-

Women
Inspectors, class C k / a .......... .......... .
Machine-tool operators, production, class C U/b ......

-

2

4

6

5

2

3
7

1
6
13
1

Machine Tools
M en
Assemblers, class A k / b ............... ....... .........
Assemblers, class B k / a ....... ........................
^aaaDiVilara} rlaan f I j n
l T/
(
rri
rir-ir-TInspectors, class B k / a .................. ..............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners K / a ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A k / a , 5 / ..
Drill-press operators, radial, class A k / a ...7....
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle , class A k j a ........... ........ .........
Vf _ 10 + VlA rmai1 h r u
Mt
! r r i elaae A I /•
t
Grinding-machine operatora, clean 1 A It7 . rrr.rrTrIr.
a
Milling-machine operators, class A k / a TTTr- t ,,rr
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A k / a ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand”
screw machine), class A U/b .................
Machine-tool operators, production, class B k j a , 5 / ..
Drill-press operators, radial, class B k j a __ 7 __ _
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B k / a ................. ..........
Engine-lathe operators, class B k j a .... ..........
Grinding-machine operators, class "R li/s
t f
f
Millirur-machine operators, clans R lt7a
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B k / a ............................
Machine-tool operators, production, class 6 k / a t 5 / ..
Drill-press operators, radial, class C k / a ..........
Grinding-machine operators, class C k / a ..............
Milling-machine operators . class C k / a ....... . - , , ,
Turret-lathe operators, hand (Including hand
screw machine), class C k / a ............................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand k / a ..............
Welders, hand, class A Iff a ........ 7 ......... ................

15

17

2

5

12
4

51
1

9
6

1

~

1

7

-

7

1.88
1.56
1.53

-

24
42
65
47

1.41
1.45
1.63
1,62

-

2

6

6'

1.74
1.82
1.89
1.94
1.91

85
292
47

-

6

48
81
60

2

-

-

-

-

_
-

8

-

-

.

_
_

2
6

62
10

99
8

76
3

40
1

2

-

-

1

8
4
4

14
10

cl

5
103
17

1
39

12
31

25
9

4

3

2

_

_

_

22
5

8
2

38
13

3
6

2
4

4
8

4
2

6

2

4
13
20
24

19
18
21
11

1
19

3

37

9

1
1
A
w
A
O

9

38
175
8
29
35

1.59
1.39
1.41
1.44
1.36

.

_

-

_

_

_

.

_

24

1
33
1

-

-

-

10

-

4
4

3

15
19
1
7
4

7 !

1

16

1

.

.

1

.

_

-

-

g

6

lc

X

2

24

7

9

6
2

23

5

IO
A
w

1

1

_

_

-

1

2
“

1
2

1
A
rz

A
T

-

"

4

1!

5

“

“

1
1

“

-

-

1

5

3
2

16
1

6

l1

5i

8

_

-

2

8
33
1
3
4

1
45
4
7

6

-

_

_

1

3
2
2

1
11

-

17

1
15
3

.
-

23
3

2

13

4
1
1

2

8
15
17
7
2
18
3

4

1

8
1

2
-

-

-

-

5

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

I

31
45
14

1.45
1.52
1.87

_

-

_

-

_

.

“

”

_
_
-

_

, _
•

3

1
13

-

“
/ i

1

_ 1

1

!

i

|

1/ The study covered establishments with mare than 20 workers engaged in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (I9 U 5 edition) prepared
by the Bureau of the Budget;^machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 35^3) with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a December 19$1 payroll period.
Excludes p remium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for machine-tool establishments (Group 35^1) for which separate data are presented.
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage paynmnt.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
5/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




n,

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated,;

Table C-15:

B uildtiuj Gon&tkuction

Table C-205:

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bricklayers ................... ...... ...... .
Carpenters ....... .......... ..................
Electricians ......... ..... ...... .............
Painters ..... ..................... .
P l a s t e r e r s .........
Plumbers ....................................
Building laborers ................... ...... .

$ 2,700
2.230
2.500
2.000
2.700
2.338
1,650

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table C-205:
July 1, 1951

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Working foremen ........................
Dough m i x e r s .... .................
Dividermen, ovenmen, reliefmen ........
Mixers' helpers, molderaen, oven
feeders, ingredient scalers, machine
operators (shipping), checkers ......
General helpers, flour handlers,
packers ............................ .
Agreement B:
Working foremen .......... ......... .
Mixers ...................... .
Bench hands, divider operators, ovenmen, reliefmen, receivers ...........
Mixers' helpers, molder operators,
ingredient scalers, oven feeders,
dumpers, wrapping-machine
operators, checkers ............ ..•••
Pan greasers, molders* helpers,
rackers, bench helpers
Doughnut department:
Head machine operators ..............
Mixers, machine operators ..........
Packers, boxers ............... .
Agreement C:
Shift foremen ......... .
Shipper foremen
.... ...........
Mixers
Dividermen ................. ............
Moldermen, oven loaders, oven dumpers,
mixers' helpers, batchmen, machine
wrappers ..............................
Bakery helpers, bread rackers, flour
blenders ...... ................... .
Women employees:
Bench helpers, icing-machine
operators ........ ........
leers, packers, wrappers ...........




Table C-2082:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,710
1.550
1.440

40
40
40

1.390

A0

1.310

40

1.710
1.550

40
40

1.440

A0

1.390

40

1.310

40

1.500
1.390
1.180

40
40
40

1.710
1.540
1.550
1.440

40
40
40
A0

1.390

A0

1.310

40

1.310
1.180

40
40

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D:
Head benchmen ......................... .
Foremen (shippers) .................••••
Mixers .T................... .
Bench hands, dividermen, receivers ....
Molders, oven feeders, mixers'
helpers, wrapping-machine operators,
shipping packers (checkers), ingre­
dient scalers, shippers .............
Bread rackers, pan greasers, general
helpers (men), shipping-room
helpers, flour handlers ........... .
Agreement E :
Foremen .............. .
Cake bakers, b e n c h m e n ................ .
Dough m i x e r s ................. .........
D i v i d e r m e n ............. ......... .
Wrapping-machine operators ......... .
Cake d e c o r a t o r s ..... ..................
Packers
Rotary ovenmen, tray o v e n m e n ........
Cake depositors .................... ..
Pie g i r l s ..... ................. .......
Bench and machine helpers, moldermen ••
Doughnut-machine operators, bread
p a n n e r s ..............................
Checkers ....................... ....... .
Hand icera .......... ........... .
Pan greasers, bread rackers ...........
Pie and pastry shops:
Working foremen .............. ............
Head shippers (night) ............... .
Mixers, dough dividers, ovenmen, head
shippers Tday) ............ ......... .
Filling cooks, reliefmen ..................
Head machine washers, assistant mixers,
dough dividers' helpers, machine
feeders ......... .
Filling-room h e l p e r s ................ .
Checkers and r e c e i v e r s .... ...............
Rimmers .................
Mixers' helpers, fillers' helpers,
checkers' helpers, apple-machine
operators, h o m o g e n i z e r s ..... ..........
Pie machine a nd c ake:
Fillers (women) ........................
Apple-machine helpers, fruit cleaners,
pie packers, boxers
...........
Apple- and pie- machine operators
(women), packers (women) ............
Hebrew baking:
Foremen ..................................
Second hands ........ ........... ..........
First cake bakers, m i x e r s .... .
Second cake bakers, bench hands ..........

M a lt JluffUQSU

February 1, 1952

July 1, 1951

April 1, 1952

Classification

Bah&Ued. - C ontinued

Rate
per
horn*

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Fermenters
Drivers .....................................
Helpers, bottlers, and utility workers ......

$1,650
1.600
1.525

Hours
per
week

$1,620
1.590
1.550
1.440

40
40
40
40

1.390

40
40
40
40
40
40
A0
40
40
40
40
40

1 1.060
j 1.050
1.050
1.010

A0
40
40
40

1.695
1.570

A0
40

1.520
1.520

40
40

1.400
1.400
1.365
1.365

40
40
40
40

40
40
40

A0

1 1.310
i
! 1.810
1.390
1.310
1.290
1.260
i 1.210
! 1.210
! 1.210
| 1.160
i 1.140
1 1.110

Hours
per
week

Table C-27:

PfrUtti+Uf

July 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,930
2,400
1.930
2.266

37*
40
37*
37*

2.400
2.507
2.400
2.507
2.400

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

2.507
2.613
2.773
2.300
2.629
2.320
2.486

37*
37*
37*
40
35
37*
35

Book and job shops;
Compositors, h a n d ............. ...... .....
Electrotypers
Machine operators ....................... ..
Photoengravers ........................ .
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work .............
Compositors, hand - night work
Machine operators - day work ...... •••••••
Machine operators - night work .......... .
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ..
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work ......................... ..........
Photoengravers - day w o r k ........••••••••
Photoengravers - night w o r k .......... .
Pressmen, web presses - d a y w o r k •••••••••
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Stereotypers - day w o r k .............. ..
Stereotypera - night w o r k ............. .

Jlo co i
Qp&Lati+uj, Cm ptoifeel

Table C-41:

1.300

AO

1.170

40

1.160

40

1.110

40

1.778
1.667
1.773
1.667

45
45
45
45

October 1, 1951

Classification

Rate
per
hour

1-man cars and busses:
First 3 months ......... ...................
4-12 m o n t h s .... ............ ....... ......
After 1 year ........ ................

I
'$1,450
1.500
1.550

-lours
per
week

40
40
40

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S u r vey, W o r c e s t e r , Mass,, J a n u a r y 1 952
U.S, D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

12,

Table G-42=

M t i s i k I'isi<*dJ e p U
o a t u c bUui it t l &

Table o-54i:

Quxu.S o e - C n i u d
/uuf t r d o t n e

Rate
per
hour

Classification

tours
per
week

11.325
1.425
1.225
1.225
1.600
1.525
1.400

43
43
48
43
40
40
40

1.146
1.188
1.104
1.470
1.370
1.250
1.100
1.350
1.200
1.598

48
48
48
43
48
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$0.93
.98

43
43

.91
.95

43
43

.95
1.00

43
43

.80
.85

43
43

Agreement B:
Male

C fA & O e S U f

Table C-511:

B t& U e d

February 1> 1952

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Agreement A:
Male
Full-time:
Meat b r e a k d o w n .... ....................
Meat c u t t e r s ..... .................. .
All others in meat department:
First 6 months ......................
After 6 months ............. .
All other departments:
First 6 months
After 6 months ............ «........
Self-service operators:
First 6 m o n t h s .... .,...............
After 6 months .......... .
Part-time:
Meat breakdown .......... ......... .
Meat c u t t e r s ............... ...........
Experienced meat counter operators
after 1 year of service .............
All other:
First 6 months ................ .
After 6 months .................... .




11.56
1.40

45
45

1.07
1.11

45
45

1.00
1.04

45
45

1.04
1.09

45
45

1.55
1.40

43
43

1.05

43

.80
.85

43
43

Full-time:
Clerks, all stores except straight
grocery:
First 6 months ...................
6-12 months •••••••••••••••••••....
12-24 months ................••••••••
After 24 months ......... ...........
Clerks, straight grocery service
stores:
First 6 months .................... .
6-12 months ......... ................
12-24 m o n t h s ........... ............
After 24 months .............. ......
Checkers and clerical, straight grocery
service stores:
First 6 months ......................
6-12 months ................. .
12-24 months ........................
After 24 months ................. .
Meat cutters ........................ .
Part-time:
Meat cutt ers ........... ......... ......
Experienced journeymen casemen ........
Stock clerks, baggers, all stores
except straight grocery:
First 6 m o n t h s .... .................
After 6 months ....... ••••••••......
Stock clerks, baggers, straight
grocery service .......... ...........
Regular part-time checkers, straight
grocery service stores:
First 6 months •••••...... .
After 6 months ................... .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$0.84
.88
.91
.95

43
43
43
43

.79
#84
.86
.91

43
43
43
43

.86
.91
.93
.98

43
43
43
43

.75
.83

43
43

.75

43

.77
.85

43
43

Female

Female
Full-time:
Delicatessen and meats:
First 6 months
After 6 months ............. ........
All other:
First 6 months ................. «...
After 6 months .............. ••••••.
Self-service register operators:
First 6 m o n t h s .... .
After 6 m o n t h s ................ .
Part-time:
First 6 months .........................
After 6 months ...... ••••••........ ••••

Classification

Agreement B: - Continued

Agreement A: - Continued
Bakery:
Under 5 tons ............ ........ ...... .
5 tons and over .......... .......... .
Helpers - After 6 months ......... .
Special d e l i v e r y ............. .
B r e w e r y ................. .
H e l p e r s ............. ................. .
Temporary helpers ....................... .
Department stores:
Parcel
Furniture
Helpers
General •••••••,•••••••••••••••••••••«•«•••••
Helpers ....... ........... .................
Grocery - W h o l e s a l e .............. .......... .
Helpers
Liquor - W h o l e s a l e ................... .
Helpers ..a.........
Railway e x p r e s s .......... ....................

Q/iaoetof Stored - Continued
February 1, 1952

February 1, 1952

July 1, 1951

Table 3-511:

.93
.93
1.00
1.09

45
45
45
45

.89
.93
.96
1.02

45
45
45
45

.96
1.00
1.02
1.11
1.33

45
45
45
45
45

1.35
1.10

Full-time:
Clerks, all stores except straight
grocery:
First 6 m o n t h s .... ...... .•••••••..
6-12 m o n t h s ........... ........... . •
12-24 m o n t h s ................. .
After 24 months .................. .
Clerks, straight grocery service
stores:
First 6 m o n t h s .................... .
6-12 months ...................... .
12-24 months .......... .....
After 24 months .............. .
Checkers and clerical, straight
grocery service stores:
First 6 months
6-12 months
12-24 m o n t h s .... .................. .
After 24 months .................. .
Part-time:
Stock clerks, baggers, all stores
except straight grocery:
First 6 mont h s .......... ...........
After 6 months .......... .
Stock clerks, baggers, straight
grocery service stores ...............
Regular part-time checkers, straight
grocery service stores:
First 6 months ......................
After 6 m o n t h s ................ ..

43
43

Table C-7011:

February 1, 1952

Classification
.75
.35

43

.77
.87

43
43

B a r t e n d e r s ............. ......................
Waiters, waitresses, and b e l l h o p s .......... .
Maids ......... .......... .................
Elevator operators .................. .
Housemen and cleaning women ,..•••.........

$1,229
.470
.733
.720
.650

Hours
per
week

43
43

.75

Rate
per
hour

48
48
45
48
48

13,

D: Entrance Rates
Table D-lt

M in im u m Zntbanoe PateA job P la n t W obkobA

E:

1/

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-l,

S ltifft 3 ii^e ^a 4 tiicU fisUHUdjOHA

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
alnimoi rates in Minimal rate (in cents)

All
industries

Manufacturing

L

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in -

Retail
trade

____ 2 ____
Shift differential
All establishoents ....
60 or under ...........
65 ....................
Over 65 and under 70 ..
7 0 ....................
7 5 .................. .
Over 75 and under 80 ..
8 0 ....................
Oyer 80 and under 85 ..
85 ....................
Oyer 85 and under 90 ..
9 0 ....................
Over 90 and under 95 ..
95 ....................
Oyer 95 and under 100 .
1 0 0 ...................
Oyer 100 and under 105
Over 105 and under 110

n

. o. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Over n o and under n 5
n s ................ .
Over 115 and under 120
Over 120 and under 125
125 ...................
Over 125 and under 130
1 3 0 ...................
Over 135 and under 140

3.00,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
3.1

0.6

4.8

1 .6

1 2 .8

6.2

.7

6.0
6.6
12.0

16.8

4.1

6.5

12.6

1.7

2 .2

2 .8

2.4
.4

.4

. 8

1.5
4.3

1 .1
2 .6

12.6
1.9
4.5
.9
2.5
.4
1.4
2.9

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ............... .

1/
2/
*

12.8

3.4

17.4

3.3

H.3

3.4

17.4

3.3

7.2
1.5
2.7

2.2
.2
.2
.5

7.0

.2
.

Uniform cents (per hour) .........
Under 5 c e n t s ..... .......... .
5 cents ........................
6 cents ........................
7 cents ........................
Over 7 and under 10 cents ....
10 cents .......................
Over 10 cents .................

1.2
.5
1.3
-

1.3
-

Uniform percentage ...............
5 percent ......................
10 percent ............. .......

4.1
.4
3.7

1.2
1.2

10.4
2.0
8.4

3.1

Receiving no differential ...........

1.5

-

-

-

5.7

24.5
10.7
16.1

3.6
2.7
2.7

1.5

.1

.3
1.4
3.0
4.9
4.0
4.6
1.4
4.6
4.5
3.0
1.7
2.7
9.0

3.4
9.9

13.2

9.2

8.4

-

-

-

3.2
.
1.7
1.1
1.0

-

-

25.1

6.2
4.1
5.8
.5
5.1
5.5
3.6

2.1

15.3

1 1 .0

1.4
2.7
15.0

19.4
9.6

-

3.4

6.0

2.0
4.8

2 .0

-

.2

3.2
3.1
-

3.8

2 4 .0

31.9

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

58.1

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers oilier than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), comnunioation, and other public utilities.




3d or
other
shift

Receiving shift differential ........

1/
Establishments with no
established minimum .

2d
shift

1.4

.8
1 1 .8

n

Machinery
industries

2 .6

2.3

All
manufacturing
industries 1/
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

ScLexlul& d ItJ&eJzbf Jlou/U

® a ble E-2

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED IN—
Weekly hours

All
industries

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .................................................

0 .5
1 .3
1 8 .2
2 .8
8 .7
6 1 .6

Over 35 and under 3?& hours ...........................
3
hours .................................. ...................................
Over 37^- and under 4.0 hours ...........................
40 hours ........................................................................
Over 40 and under 44 hours .............
44 hours ..................'
..............
Over 44 and under 48 hours .............
Over 48 and under 50 hours .............
50 hours ............................. . •.
Over 50 hours ...... ................. .

_

Retail trade

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

1C0.C

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .c

Under 35 hours ..........................................................

Wholesale
trade

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_
-

9 .3

-

-

-

30.6

1 0 0 .0
_

-

-

.9

4.2

-

6 1 .2

2 3 .2

-

25.9

-

-

-

1 6 .4

2 2 .4

-

6 9 .4

77.9
1.1
10.8
-

30.3
9.0
14.5
.6
.8
-

16.4
-

62.2
4.9
2.8
-

-

-

-

1.7
4.7
-

1.0
3.3
.1
2.5
-

Services

5 .2

0 .7
2 .4
2 .6
8 7 .9

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

-

-

All _ ,
industries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

ICO.O

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

ICO.O

2 .7
.8
4 .9
1 .8
1 .3

3 .2
•9
4 .0
2 .2

-

-

-

-

-

1 1 .5

45.7
12.0
1.8
13.4
13.0
2.2
.4

48.7
14.C
.1
12.6
12.2
2.1

79.2

49.4

13.5
6.7
11.0
22.4
15.4
2.4
1.9

1 0 0 .0

_

_
0 .1
1 5 .1

-

-

-

-

3.5
1.3
16.0
-

4.1
32.0
2.7
6.7
5.1

-

Services

1 0 0 .0
6 .7
-

.6
3 .2
31.1
3.4
7.1
9.1
34.6
-

4.2

1/ Data relate to women workers.
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*# Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3*

P a id Jfolixlcuf i

PERCENT OF ^OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

All establishments ......................

100.0

Establishments providing paid
holidays ............ ..................

99.1

99,3

1 to 5 days ..........................
6 days ...............................
days ............. .. ............... ..
7 days .......... ..................... .
days ................ .............
8 days ............ ...................
9 d a y s ...............................
10 days ..............................
14 days ............. .................

1.8
42.3
4.2
.6
5.1
8.1
36.9
.1

1.8
76.4
4.3
2.2
11.4
3.0
.2

1.9
3.4
85.3
-

.9

.7

1.0

7{-

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ..............................

.

100,0., .

1/

Transportation

*«

Finance,

99.0
_
.7
7.7
-

.

, IPP.t Q

(excluding r a i lroads),

i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.




Retail trade

. .

10.0,0.

100.0

9 6 .2

.6

5.1
10.9

1.2
4.8
7.8
4.0
15.4
66.2

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

..
.

ICO.O

100.0
_

lp .Q rp ,

Wholesale
trade

100.c

ICO.O

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.9

89.3

83.5

51.2

3.5

5.1
19.8

21.C
2.3
7.1
5.5

93.8

90.5

9 2 .6

20.5
10.6
-

17.4
58.2
13.2
_
_

7.4

-

-

6 .2

9.5

.2

-

-

99.8

-

-

3.8

c o m m u n ication, a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities.

—

Public
utilities *

-

-

-

9.9

Services

AU
,
industries X / Manufacturing

14.9
49.7
.1
12.5
.1
3.5
4.1
5.6
-

39.5
7.7
23.1
-

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r indus t r i e s o t h e r than t h ose s h o w n separately.

*

100.0

Wholesale
trade

17.4
H.3
1.8
2 9 .2

20.7
_

6 .4

14.0

16.5
2.2
3.9
15.9
40.9
-

_

3.5

3.8
59.7
-

2.1

10.7

Retail trade

8 .4

Services

27.5
7.0
15.7

6 .2

16.5

4 8 .8

9.1

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S urvey, W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , J a n u a r y 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15,

Table E~4t

P o tft V&C<Ui(UU ( tyobm ol P/UHMAdanA)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Vacation policy

All
industries

1 0 0 .0

All establishments ......................

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

I

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

AH
industries 1 /

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

Services

1 0 0 ,0

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....

98.9

99.1

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

9it.9

1 0 0 .0

91.3

96.6

97.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

96.8

73.3

1 week ................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ............................. .

1 2 .1

7.7

25.0
75.0

20.8

.2
_

29.8
_

itl.8

it7.0

61.5

88.9
.9
7.2

55.0

99.8

78.6
.7
17.3

17.5

86.8

lit.2
.
.
8i*. 9

82.5

U5.0

55.0

26.3

1 .1

.9

8.7

3.i
t

3.0

3.2

26.7

Establishments with paid vacations .....

99.2

99.6

1 w e e k ................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ...............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .............

7.7

-

Establishments with no paid vacations ..

-

92.3
-

-

-

7it.l
5.1

-

-

-

_

2 years of service

9.i
t

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9it.9

1 0 0 .0

91.3

97.3

97.9

1 0 0 .0

96.8

73.3

2.9

18.5

7.3

.2
-

29.8

it2.6

21.it

ii7.0

81.5
-

83.1
it.5

99.8

82.5
-

57.it

70.9
it.5

26.3

-

61.5
-

75.7
9.7
12.5
-

17.5

97.1
-

65.6
7.7
23.5
.5

-

-

5.1

-

8.7

2.7

2 .1

-

3.2

26.7

1 0 0 .0

_

-

-

91.1
.t
i

90.2

.8

.it

99,6

99.6

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

91.3

97.7

97.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

73.3

3.7
.2
92.3
3.i
t

it.2

2.9
-

7.2

.2

U.3

lit.O
5.0
78.9

18.2

_

12.7

22.5

96?5

81.8
-

61.7
25.6

50.8

-

13.9
3.9
77.0
2.9

3.5

95.it
-

5.2
3.1
91.7
-

.t
i

.t
i

8 .7

2.3

2.1

-

26.7

Establishments with paid vacations .....

99.6

99.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

91.3

97.7

97.9

1 week ................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ............................
3 weeks ...............................
Over 3 weeks ..........................

3.5
.2
67.1
27.3
1.5

it.2

2.9

5.2
3.1
it9.2
it2.5

7.2

_

.2

3.7

60.8
lit. 5
17.5

37.0
62.8
-

87.6

13.0
5.0
70.8
•9.1

-

13.1
3.9
65.5
12.8
2. i
t

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.t
i

8.7

2.3

2.1

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

-

-

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week .................................
Over 1 and' under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ...............................
3 weeks .............................. .
Establishments with no paid vacations ...

,

-

97.1
-

-

..

69.7
23.1
-

_

-

77.0

93.9
5.9
-

j

-

-

—

15 years of service

-

-

87.3
8.1

'22.1
75.0

-

-

.t
i

'

1/
*
**

includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

100.0

1 0 0 .0

3.5

18.2

12.7

22.5

11.7
sit.e

57.1
2it.7

55.7
10.2
21.it

50.8

100.0

73.3

26.7

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., januaiy 1952
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
Bureau of Laoor Statistics

Paid S icJi £&aue ( fyanmal P^attUia*u)

Table E-5

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P r o v is io n s f o r p aid s ic k le a v e

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .....................................................

All
industries

iq o 4o .......

Manufacturing

....„ 1 P 0 ^ l

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .c

..... IPQ.G .....

Retail trade

.

JWOjfi

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

,

All
industries 1 /

Services

J I M

-

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

___ 100*0...

.J f i Q t Q ....

Wholesale
trade

...... 1Q0.P

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

,

1 v e a r o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith form al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s ic k le a v e ..............................................

4 5 .7

6 3 .5

2 2 .3

3 .2

3 6 .2

A d a y s ...................................................................
5 and 5 ^ days ........................ ............................
6 days ..................................................................... ..
7 days ...........................................................................
10 days .................................................................
12 days ............................. ..........................................
U days ........................................................................
15 days ........................................................................
20 d a y s .......... .............................................................

.4
1 5 .6
.8
.5
1 7 .4
.4
.1
2 .1
8 .4

_
1 4 .4
7 .9

_

2 6 .0
.8
3 0 .8
4 .1
1 .8

1 .6
1 .6

4 .6
1 9 .2
9 .8
•
.5
2 .1
-

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith no form al p r o v is io n s
f o r paid s ic k le a v e ..............................................

5 4 .3

3 6 .5

7 7 .7

9 6 .8

4 5 .7

6 3 .5

2 3 .0

3 .2

.4
1 5 .3
.8
.5
1 6 .7
.4

2 6 .0
.8
2 9 .1
-

1 4 .4
-

2 8 ,7

1 6 .8

_

3 .4

-

3 .5

7 .5

2 5 .1

1 2 .3

_
_
_
-

3 .5
_
_
_

3 .7
-

3 .7
•

3 .8

9 .2
6 .9
_
2 .7
2 .7
_
3 .6
-

9 6 .5

9 2 .5

7 4 .9

8 7 .7

_

2 8 .7

1 0 .6
6 .2
“

1 .3
.8
.3
.4
.1
.4
.1

6 3 .8

7 1 .3

8 3 .2

9 6 .6

3 6 .2

2 8 .7

1 6 .8

3 .4

-

3 .5

7 .5

2 5 .1

1 2 .3

4 .6
1 6 .1
9 .8

-

•

3 .7

-

-

-

1 .0
.4

_
_

1 0 .6
6.2
_

.1
.4
_

.
_
_
.
_

2 .7
6 .9

-

-

3 .5

-

.6
.8

3 .7

-

-

.1

-

3 .8

-

1 0 0 .0

•
-

6 .1
2 .5
_
-

15 v e a r s o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith form al p r o v is io n s
f o r paid s ic k l e a v e ..............................................

4 days ...........................................................................
5 and 5 l days ..........................................................
6 days ......................................................................
7 days .................................................................
10 days .........................................................................
12 days ........................................................................
14 days ........................................................................
15 days ................................
20 days ................................
Over 20 days ...........................

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................

1/
*
**

.1

3 .1
8 .3
.1

5 4 .3

_

5 .8

-

1.8

7 .9

-

-

3 6 .5

-

1 .6
-

.7

1.6

7 7 .0

9 6 .8

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

3 .6
2 .1
-

-

-

2 8 .7
“

6 3 .8

7 1 .3

8 3 .2

9 6 .6

-

_
_
-

1 0 0 .0

_

9 .2
2 .7
_

_

6 .1
2 .5

3 .6
_

9 6 .5

9 2 .5

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Jfess., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

-

7 4 .9

-

8 7 .7

Table E - 6 j

J\!onp/udncJdan PonnbeA,
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of bonus

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

AH
.
industries Lj

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.c

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

68.9

72.6

52.3

83.9

64.7

61.8

52.2

60.1

64.1

19.4

64.8

55.6

27.3

68.4
.4
6.8

71.7
.8
.2

52.3

83.9

64.7

52.2

-

63.2
.9

19.4
-

64.8
-

27.3

-

-

-

1.0

59.3
.7
.4

55.6

-

61.8
27.4

-

-

-

3.3

-

31.1

All establishments ............ .. ..........

27.4

47.7

35.3

38.2

47.8

39.9

35.9

80.6

35.2

Establishments with nonproduction

Christmas or year-end ..................
Profit-sharing .............. .. ....... . •

-

~

Establishments with no nonproduction

1/
2/
*
**

16.1

Onbusian& e a n d P -en bion P lan*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..........................................
Life insurance .........................
Health insurance ...... .............. .
H o s p i t alization ............ ..............
Retirement pension .................... . . .
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ................ ....... .

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

AH
in d u stries!/

100.0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.c

100.c

.. 1C0.C
..

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.c

100.0

100.0

92.8

94.8

97.1

79.7

71.0

99.8

82.0

87.6

91.7

96.8

83.0

6 4 .3

54 . 2'

52.9
52.3
16.7
3.6

9 9 .8

72.6
44.0
90.3

29.8
31.7
41.6
35.4

80.2
71.6
61.942.0

86.7
76.0
70.3
48.1

96.8
76.1
34.7
51.4

75.4
67.C
54.4
32.3

43.9
48.7
21.4
4.4

12.3
36.5
35.2
8.9

29.0

.2

18.0

12.4

8.3

3.2

17.0

35.7

45.8

89.5
70.7
62.0
59.4

93.9
76.4
80.6
56.5

97.1
44.1
25.7
6 3 .8

74.9
69.2
64.7
45.6

7.2

5.2

2.9

20.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Uhduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

o

All establishments ...... .. ............... ...

All
industries

8

Type of plan

*
*

72.7

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.'
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7i

1/
2/
*

-44.4

.

Occupational Wage Survey, Worcester, Mass., January 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18 ,

Appendix - Scope
Vith the exception of the union scale of rates, in-*
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey
of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, thev refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings* for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment1* full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off vith pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

19,

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN WORCESTER, MASS.,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

---

Numb(3r of
establi
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

l9
/

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

5 ,a w

21
21
21

540
295
245

144
57
87

69,800
52,400
17,400

35,650
24,380
11,270

2,660
3,180

21
21
21
21
21

All divisions .........................................
Manufacturing ............. ...................... .
Nonmanufacturing.......................... *.......
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public utilities...
Wholesale trade ............ ..................
Retail trade •••••..............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ...........
Services 2/ ....................................

19
49
120
21
36

10
20
31
10
16

3,000
2,300
7,700
2,700
1,700

2,690
1,440
3,800
2,170
1,170

380
wo
390
1,830
110

21

49

26

12,940

10,980

1,500

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis
Machinery industries ........... ........ .............

y

1 / Worcester Metropolitan Area (city of Worcester, and towns of Auburn, East Brookfield, Grafton, Holden, Leicester, Milbury, Northborough,
North Brookfield, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Westborough, and West Boylston in Worcester County)*
Total establishment employment*
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services*
tj Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included*




20,

Index
Pass

Pgg§

Assembler (machinery) ••••••••••••..... •••••
Bagger (grocery stores) .... ••••...........
Bartender (hotels) ••••••••••••••...... •••••
Bellhop (hotels) ...........................
Bench hand (bakeries) .... .................
Biller, m a c h i n e ......... ..................
Bookkeeper, hand ......... .......•••••••••••
Bookkeeping-machine operator ................
Bottler (malt liquors) ••••••••••••••••••••••
Bricklayer (building construction) ........ .
Calculating-machine operator ...............
Carpenter (building construction) ..........
Carpenter, maintenance ••••..... ....... .
Checker (grocery stores) ............... .
Cleaner ....... .................
Cleaner (machinery) ................. .......
Clerk (grocery stores) ....... .............
Clerk, accounting ............. ............
Clerk, file ....... ..................
Clerk, general .............................
Clerk, order
..... ....... *............
Clerk, payroll ............ •••••••••••••••••
Compositor, hand (printing) .............
Crane operator, electric bridge .••••••••••••
Draftsman
..... •••••••••••••••..... ......
Drill-press operator (machinery) .•••••••••••
Driver (malt liquors) ......................
Duplicating-machine operator ......... ••••••
Electrician (building construction) ••••....
Electrician, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ...... .
Electrotyper (printing) ..... •••••••••••••••
Elevator operator (hotels) .......... ......
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .... .....
Engineer, stationary .......................
Fermenter (malt liquors) ..... ..............
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .......•••••••••••
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) .... .
Guard •••••••••........... ................ .
Helper (bakeries) ......
.••••••••••••
Helper (malt liquors) •••••••••••••••••••••••
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ........ .........
Helper, trades, maintenance ••••••...... ••••
Houseman (hotels) •••••••••••••••••••••.... .
Inspector (machinery) •••••••••••.......... .
Janitor ••••••...... .......................
Janitor (machinery) ............ ............
Key-punch operator ••••................... ..
Laborer (building construction) ........ ..
Machine operator (printing) ••••••.... .
Machine tender (printing) •••«•••••••••*•.•••
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery)
Machine-tool operator, toolroom............
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) •
Machinist, maintenance ......................




9 , 10
12
12
12
11
3
3
3

11

11
3

11

6
12
7

9 , 10

12
3,

3,
3,

A
A
A
A
A

11
7
5

9, 10
11

A
11

6
9

11
12

9 , 10

6

11

6
9 , 10
7

11
11
12

6
12

9 , 10
7

9 , 10

A
11
11
11
9, 10

6
10

6

Maid (hotels) .......... ••••••••....................... ...
Maintenance man, general utility ••••••••••.....................
Meat cutter (grocery stores) ......... ............ ...... .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ........................
Mechanic, maintenance •••••.................. ••••••••••••
Milling-machine operator (machinery) .............. .
M i l l w r i g h t .....................................
Mixer (bakeries) ............................. •••••.......
Molder (bakeries) ............... •••••••..................
Motortruck driver ••••........................ ••••••......
Nurse, industrial (registered) ........ ......... ••••.....
Office b o y .................................................
Office g i r l ................
Oiler ••••.............................................
Operator (local transit) ......
Order f i l l e r ......................................
Ovenman (bakeries) ......... .......... ••••........ .......
P a c k e r .... ........ ........ ....... ...... ........ ........
Packer (bakeries) ••••••............................... •••••
Painter (building construction) ...... •••••••••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance
Photoengraver (printing) ......
Pipe fitter, m a i n t e n a n c e .... ...................
Plasterer (building construction) ......................
Plumber (building construction) ......
P o r t e r ..............................
Porter (machinery)
........•••••••••••••
Pressman (printing) •••••••••..•««...............
Receiving clerk ........... ...... ............. •••••••••••
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ...........
Secretary ••••••.......•••••••••••................... •••••
Shipping c l e r k ............... •••••..........
•••••••
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ..•••••........... ..••••••••••
S t e n o g r a p h e r ........... ••••••••........... ............. .
Stereotyper (printing) ...............
Stock clerk (grocery stores) ...... ........ ••••••••......
Stock h a n d l e r ..........
Stock handler (machinery) ........... ••••••••••..........
Switchboard o p e r a t o r ......••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••
Switchboard o p e r a t o x w e c e p t i o n i s t .......... •••••••••••••••
Tabulating-machine operator •••••••••••.... .............
Tool-and-die maker ..........
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) .....
Tracer ...................
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r .... .......................
Truck d r i v e r ...................
Trucker, hand ...........................
••••••••
Trucker, hand (machinery) .....
Trucker, p o w e r ........
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) .... ••••••••••••
T y p i s t ....................
Waiter (hotels) ••••••••.«........
Waitress (hotels) ........
W a t c h m a n ..........................
Welder, hand (machinery) ..........
••••••

12
6

12
6
6

9, 10
11
11
12
5

3

A
11
11
7
11
11
6

11
6

11
11
7
9, 10
11
7
9, 10

A
7
7
5
11

12
8

10
5
5
3, 5
6

10
$
5
8
8

10
8
9 , 10

5
12

12
8

10

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
BIS Bulletin No.

City
Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Seattle, Washington

This report was prepared in the Bureau's
cations may be addressed to:

104.5
1044
1056
1043
1041
1059
1064
1042
1058
1057

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

New England Regional Office.

Communi­

Wendell D. MacDonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
261 Franklin Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.




The New England Region includes the following States:
Connecticut
Massachusetts
Maine

New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102