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82d Congress, 2d Session

House Document No. 440

Occupational Wage Survey

SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND,
CALIFORNIA
January 1952

B u lle tin

N o. 1076

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Cfague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION .............................................................................

1

THE SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND METROPOLITAN A R E A ..............................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ..............................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ......................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ....... .............................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ...........................

3
10
11
13

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis# B-207
Candy and other confectionery products .....................................
B-2337
Women’s and misses' coats and suits ........................................
B-2A31
Millwork ...................................................................
B-336
Nonferrous foundries .......................................................
B-3A39 Heating apparatus ..........................................
B-35
Machinery industries .......................................................
B-40
Railroads ..................................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .........................................................

16
16
17
17
18
18
19
19

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ......................................
C-203
Canning (fruits and vegetables) .............................................
C-205
Bakeries ...................................................................
C-2081 Nonalcoholic beverages .................................
C-2082 Malt liquors ...............................................................
C-27
Printing ...................................................................
C-Al
Local transit operating employees .......................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .............................................
C-44
Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel ......................................
C-446
Stevedoring................................................................
C-5452 Milk dealers ...............................................................
C-58
Restaurants, cafeterias,and lunchrooms ...............................
C-6512 Office building service .......................

20
20
* 20
20
20
21
21
21
22
22
23
23
23

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..................................

24

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ...........
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..................
E-3
Paid holidays ......................... *
.....................................
E-4
Paid vacations ..............................................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e ........
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ...................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ......................................

25
26
26
27
28
30
30

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ...................................... ...................

31

I N D E X ....................................................................................

33

* NOTE - An additional occupational earn­
ings report is available upon request
for ferrous foundries (June 1951)*
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, I). C. - Price 25 cents

May

2,

1952

The San Franc is co-Oakland Area is 1 of 40 major labor
markets in which the Bureau of labor Statistics is currently
conducting occupational wage surveys.
Occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of
sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional
and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information
for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divi­
sions.

Wage and salary workers (excluding those in agri­
cultural pursuits) in the Bay Area numbered approximately
1,000,000. Manufacturing establishments employed about 172,000
workers in January 1952.
Two-fifths of these were engaged in
the smelting and refining of ferrous and nonferrous metals and
the fabrication of these metals into finished products, such as
tin cans, hardware, structural steel, machinery, and transpor­
tation equipment. At the time of the survey the food industries
employed a fifth of the manufacturing workers. Other important
manufacturing industries were printing and
publishing with
16,000 workers, chemical and petroleum products with 12,000
workers each, and apparel with 7,000 workers.
The paper and
allied products, furniture and fixtures, and stone, clay, and
glass products industries, as a group, gave employment to an­
other 16,000.

Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables.
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.

Of the 670,000 wage and salary workers in nonmanufac­
turing industries, almost 200,000 were in wholesale and retail
trade.
The service industries gave employment to 145,000, and
a labor force of 100,000 was utilized in transportation (in­
cluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate establishments accounted for
52,000 workers. The building construction industry employed
57,000.

Introduction

V

Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The San Francisco - Oakland
Metropolitan A re a
The San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Bay Area (Ala­
meda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Solano
Counties) had a combined population of more than 2,300,000 in
January 1952. About 800,000 lived in San Francisco and 600,000
in Oakland.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in San Fran­
cisco, Calif., by William P. 0*Connor under the direction of
John L. Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning and central direction of the program was carried
on in the Bureau*s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations
in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Navy shipyards had 26,000 workers.
Other government
employment— Federal, State, and local— totaled slightly less
than 100,000.

Among the industry and establishment-size groups in­
cluded in the Bureau1s study, virtually all plant workers in
manufacturing, public utilities, and wholesale trade were in
establishments having written contracts with labor organizations.
In retail trade and the service industries, 90 percent of non­
office workers were employed under union contracts. Collective
bargaining in the area is typically of the multiemployer, indus­
try-wide, master agreement type.

Although only 15 percent of the office workers with­
in the scope of the study were employed in establishments which
had signed union agreements applying to such workers,
this
ratio was relatively high for office workers.
With the ex­
ception of the railroad industry in which all employees were
represented by unions, the public utilities group, with 60 per­
cent of office workers covered by agreements, was the highest
organized among the industry groups studied.

2.

Occupational W ag e Structure
Bay Area wages and salaries were formally adjusted
upward for $0 nercent of office workers and 60 percent of plant
workers between January 1951 , the date of the Bureau*s last
comprehensive wage study in the area, and January 1952# Formal
increases for office workers were generally $2 a week or more.
Although only half the office workers were participants in
general or across-the-board gains, many more were advanced on an
individual or informal basis. This resulted in typical average
salary increases of 3 to 5 percent for office workers. Among
plant workers, formal wage increases of 5 cents or more an hour
were common, and contributed to general gains of 5 to 8 per­
cent in average hourly earnings.
Formalized rate structures for time-rated plant workers
were almost universal in the Bay Area. Only in the service in­
dustries group, where about 10 percent of the workers were em­
ployed In establishments which set rates on an individual basis,
was there any significant variation from the widespread pattern.
The single-rate system predominated in most industry groups
with three-quarters of all plant workers employed in estab­
lishments having this rate structure plan.
The only variant
was the public utilities group.
Three-fourths of the plant
workers in this industry group were employed in establishments
which provided a range of rates for individual occupations.
Among office workers, nearly two-thirds were employed in estab­
lishments using formal structures of the rate-range type.
In
most other establishments, salaries were determined on an indi­
vidual basis.
A small number of office workers were employed
in establishments with single rates established for each office
occupational classification.




Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers were part of the formalized rate structures in
nearly all Bay Area establishments.
On an all-industry basis,
more than half the workers were in establishments having minimum
starting rates above $1.25 an hour. The range of minimum rates
was from under 80 cents to over $1.70, with the higher rates
generally prevailing in manufacturing and wholesale trade.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those of workers in nonmanu­
facturing. In 42 of the 64 job classifications permitting com­
parison, pay rates of workers in manufacturing, both in office
and plant, averaged more than in nonmanufacturing establish­
ments.
However, among the nonmanufacturing industries workers
in the public utilities and wholesale trade groups were paid
average rates comparable to those paid to workers in manufac­
turing.
More than 20 percent of all manufacturing workers in
January 1952, were employed on late shifts.
Nearly all of
these workers received premium rates of pay. Most common secondshift differentials were 5-cents-an-hour or 10-percent additions
to day rates; third-shift workers commonly were paid hourly
shift differentials of either 6 or 10 cents.
In the machinery
industry, differentials were on a percentage basis, with the
second-shift workers receiving a 10-percent premium and the
third-shift a 15-percent premium.
About three-fourths of women office workers were on a
40-hour weekly schedule. Very few worked longer hours, but in
the finance group almost half the women worked less than 40
hours a week. The 40-hour workweek was even more common for
plant workers, more than 90 percent working those hours.

3

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

Q ^ice. QcCMfUltiOMA

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., b y industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
Under
e a r n in g s
a
(S t a n d a r d ) ♦

$

35.00 37.50

s

$

$

$

40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50

$

50.00

$

$

$

$

52.50 55.00 57.50

60.00

62.50 65.00

$

$

$

$

$

$

67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00

$

$

85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and

35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47,50 50,00 52,5Q 55.00 57.50

60.00 62,50 65,00 67,50 70, QQ 72.5Q .25,00

8Q.QQ

90.QQ 95-^00100.00

ov
er

Men
Billers, machine (billing machine) .......
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................

69
” 19"
50
50

Bookkeepers, hand .........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Services .............................

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Nonmanufacturing .......................

40.0

40.0

$
65.00

15

64.00

40.0

65.00
65.00

254

39.5

73.00

23
37
194

40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0

73.50
79.00
72.00
72.00
76.00
68.50

40.0
45.0

60.00
"500"

40.0
40.0

17

60.50

4 0 .0
“4575"

11

66.00

40.0

1!
1
Il
l
26j

55" 197T "77750"

20
114
16

24

15
78

”
sr

12j

18,

-11

38

101
26

15

12
1

10

6

7|
3!
28:
1
24
3;

4

15
7

6

39

67.50

12

33

12

33

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
^fonmanufac turing

[ .....................

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .......................

13

64.50

29

39.5

i 56.50

Clerks, accounting ........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

979
401
176
225
578
107
280
19

40.0

j 68.00
69.56
70.00

urr
40.0

14

_2____ 4_ -221

6 9 .00

32

40.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
42.0
38.5
40.5

67.00
71.50
67.50
56.50
65.50
67.50

Clerks, file, class A .....................

18

39.0

1,072
326
136
190
746
323
289
96

TOT"
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

9|

22!

112

8

2|
0

1,
7;

2!
0

41;

119

16;

-k
2

-324

86 -2 3 k

6;

jza J3
32
19
13

j 59.00

Clerks, general, senior ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance * + ...........................

26
17;
13|
4!
9!
1

140

39.5

82.50

"S3^T
74.00
90.00
82.00
83.50
79.50
80.00

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2

4!

-1
2

4

17
5
3

l
i

92!
15:
25 ;
5
31i

10i
25 !

47
26

14
10
1

6

12

1
6

J JL ___ 12;___ 15

2
8

11

71

75:

140
37

211
23

37

11

24

2
'
2

10

15!

12
11

11

26
103
29
51
23

188
104
52
27

-22
26
147
127

8

24

2^26
49
4
45
47
9
24

12

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L ABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

O

Table A-l:

ffic e

0 c C 4 4 fu U iO * U

~ G o 4 t t iH 4 4 & t

(Average straight-time

weekly hours and earnings ] J for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., b y industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W e e k ly
h o u rs
( S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 35.00 37.5oj40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00

$

62.50 65.00

$
35.00 37.50 40.00142.50

kl± 0 JtLSO 50.00
0

52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00

67.50

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and
70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00 over

1

M en - Continued
Clerks, general, intermediate ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ...........................
Services .............................

1,287
43^

189
243
855
285
171

31U
54

39.5

k .C
to )
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
39.5

66.50
&.50
64.50
71.50
66.00
73.50
62.50
61.50
66.00

_

.
.

-

-

“

_
-

-

42
42
2
40

-

14
1
-

3
-

13
-

3

2?
7
-

-

3

14
-

-

7
18
1
6
6

71
33
20
13
38
2
21
4
7

33
5
2
26

97
19
13
6
78
6
30
42

-

-

11
11
-

130
47
24
23
83:
10;
18
34
10

55
!
16 i
9!
30
8
18 i

3
\

96
27
9
18
69
10
24
30!

1|

-

34

30
13!
131

52
I?
5
9
38

25

107
65
19
46
42
12
6
7
17

80
29
17
12
51
12
12
18
3

8i

16

30
2
2

409
160
83
77
249
60
63

Clerk8. order ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Clerks, payroll ...........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................

1,096
5u'
74
240
782
694

Secretaries ................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonnanufacturing .......................

40.0
3$ .5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

53.50
53.00
52.00
54.00
i 54.00
j 49.50
45.50
i
72.50
! ?2:6 o “ '
! 73.50
! 71.50
; 73.00
■ 73.00

- 1
“ ;

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

! 71.50
! 76.00'"'
j 69.00
1 83.50
; 67.00
69.00

_ ;
- !
-

_ |
-

-

-

-

48.50
! 49.50

3
3

43.00
45.50
49.50
: 45.00
, 42.00
44.50
44.00
42.00
42.00
40.00

69

41

-

12
8
1
7
4
2

6?
6
5
1

59
30
24

11
8!
8’
•!
3!
2I

17

20
73
39
6
26
2

26
10
10
16
8
2
4
2

_

-

_
_

_
-

_

J

_

42
26
16

40.0
M).u
40.5

1

!
-

-

69
_

i

_

_
-

2
-

-

_

-

2
2

7
1

-|
-;

4
4

7
7

2
2

8
5

76
35
4
31
41

42
8
3
5
34 i

22 !
8
6
2
14
2

1

—
41
1

_

4
4
12
18

23
6
5

_
-

_

”

-

32

87
30
4
26
57

153
55
2

14
8
27
3

40
13
38
3

: r
—
1

6
26
_

10

-

14
-

23
36

15
25

9
3

_

-

-

5

_ i

5

- !

4

- 1

5
-

53
98
4 j

3

26

12
_
-

12

i

6

7|
I
!
14

7
19

17
2
_

-

26
71
1i
6

84 !

7

i
1
1 j
1
27 j
11
4
7
16

19

19
12
4
4

8

1
7
7
15
12
6
6

*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




16
.

-

28

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

55
17

139
48
8
40
91
78

7?
16
3
13
57
57

156
35
12
23
121
105

162
45
15
30
117
106

74 I
20 !
4
16 :
54 i

9
9
9

22
9
_

_

9
13
11

11? 1
27 !
7:
20
86
83

12
6
6

5
2
2

12
12
7
5
_

6
6;
i
2
2|
—

1

3
3

-

5
12

i
38
38 j
31 !
4
_
4
27
1

16
5
5
_
11
8

!
1
i
!
j

86
10 1 -4J
6!
76
70
17
6
5
l!
11
11

-

13
11
1l
10;
2
-|

-

-

.
_

_

_

-

-1
1
I

32
11 i
5
6
21
18

4
1
1
_

§
8
•
8
_
_
-

_

-

54
6
48
30
24

5
4
-

_

12
4
8
4

-

41

10

10
4

« -----T
_
_

6'
_

47 !

-

4l
3i
3

2
5
-----1
3!
1
1
_
2
2
1
1
1

1

7
34
27
9
9
*
9
-

1
r

1
1
1

3

1

_

3

5
7

9

_

-

_

7

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

7
6
1

12
«
.

7
7

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

3
3

_

_

_

10
7
3

12
*

See footnotes at end of table.

16
-

-

1
16
17

-

-

-

.

-

102

39.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
39.0
37.5

72.00
73.5070.00

39
31
9
22
8 |
6!
-

2
- i
2 i
2!

- !

-

39.0
39.0

1U
3

51
26
19
7
25
6
12

-

- ;
!
!
-

■W.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.5

30
136
399
15
98
41

20
8i
8
12
6
4

!
- ;
-

178
i r
44
40
94
46

n s"

41
15
8
7
26
6
15 ’

9?
20
_

!

565

—

- !
- !

8

39
32

—

Duplicating-machine operators ............
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Office boys ................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * .............. .
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
39.0
38.5

215
50
23
27
165
119
20
24
2

-!

‘ !
Clerks, general, junior ...................
Manufacturing ............" V . ...........
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ..........................

?2
11
9
2
21
4
4
11
2

128
50
28
22
78
45
2
23

2
2

_
_

1
i

5

O f f ic e

Table A-i:

O c c n f u s tio n l

-

C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 35.00 3 7.50 40.00 4 2 .50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
over
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52,50 55,oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

Men - Continued
$
Tabulating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ...........................

246
U
11
33
202
17
28
150

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0

66.00
69.56
70.00
69.50
65.00
64.00
71.50
64.50

722
1ST"
59
102
561
283
53
43

39.5
41.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5

53.00
54. 5 0 54.00
55.00
52.50
53.50
5I . 5O
56.50

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

6
-

3
-

16
-

5
-

11
3

28
3

-

-

S

6
-

3
1

16
1

5
2

8
-

3
25
2
22

6

-

-

5
-

35!

2

15

3

2

132
19 !
1
18
113
68
14 1
4

172
29
8
21
!
143
72 !
20

72
13 ;
6;
i
7
59
14 1
3
4

59,!
18
7
11
41

13

10

8
3
-!

39
-

1?
3
1
2
10
1
2
7

39
5
2j
32

31
2
2
-

8
3
3
-

29
23

5
2
1

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .......
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade ........................
Bookkeepers, hand .........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services ............................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance * * ...................

Services .................. .

4

20
6
2
4
14
2
12

19
9
3
6
10
2
8

12
2
—
2
10
-

32
7
1
6
25
3
8
14

—

180
39.5
--- I S C - '"'IT. 5
103
40.0
597
—

-%
.

51
21
525
20
179
64
138
124

r

39.5
39". 5
40.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
38.0

40,0

-

-

-

~

5
- !

-

- \

52.00
52;05“
53.00

_

_

-

-

-

-

64.00
76.50
63.50
88.00
63.00
66.00
67.50
63.50
56.50
63.50

_,

- !
- ;
-

_
-

-

- |

- i

_
_
- 1
_
-

„ ;
- ,
- |
-!
-;
_ !
- i

_
_
-

-1
-

-

-

7
28 |
4!
1 1

_

- '

-

- :

_
- |
-

7!

454
60
24
36
394
193
66
95
31

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5

61.00
61.00
61.50
60.50
61.00
i
' 63.00
1 56.50
60.00
59.50

1,459
218
47
171
1,241
359
101
754
20

39.5
39.6
38.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5

53.00
60.00
60.50
60.00
51.50
57.50
50.50
49.00
52.00

-

-

|

_

-

-

1
1
_ ■

-

-

- :

2

1

10

27
37
5 ---- T\
5
1
_

591
5
5;
_i

50
47
8 -----1
8
6
_

22
2
11
61
3i

54,
2!
-

39
2
11
19 !

26

71

25
_

-

_
- '

-'
_
_

-

-

-

1 3 2 ! 185

239
14
4
10
225
14
37
163

- 1
132!
_

-

_

531

117

15 j

4
4
181
8
7
165

11
1|
l!
_l1

11

36
2
5

5

29:

22!
25

“j

70

31

11
4
7
59
15
3li
6
7!

8!
1
7!
23;
35J
- j

180
18!
4|
14!
162
45
7
105

8!
-j
106^
14!
5|
9|
92
14
18
58

561
-j
_
56!
15;

5
26 j
10!
204
231
_|
23
181
116
6
56

3
3

44
1
2
_

2
2
2;
77!

|

3
5;
1

-

1
l!
-|
1:

_

64,

39
1!
101

12

15

3

16

88,
15
7
8
73
24
14
27
7

33
2
2
31
25
6
_

51 j

30

l!
l!
49|
42

l!
29;
18!

5

1!

1'

44
19
9
10
25
21

66;
1!
57
1
-

-

7

29!
6;
6:
-!
23 1
8j

24:
11
2
9
13;
-1
13!

-j

145
45
9
36;
100,
621
7
27!
4

20!
3
15
2
-

5

4
_

-!

l]

2

9

”1
17 i
16!
3!
13
1:
_

1

_
_

J

-

_

-

“1
-|

-

_

J

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

J
J

18!

1—
8
18!
-j

_

-i

20!
141
3!
lli
6I
6?

33
11
10
1
22
15
6
_
1
12
1
1
_
11
4
_
_

_
_ 1

_

-

”

-

-

30!
3!—
l!
2;
27;
5:
15!
_
-1

14!
r!
«i

4
4
1
3

20

7
1
1
l!
_!
_

7

5
51
3!
2
-!

_

6
1
2
3

20
_
_

_
_j

5
_
15

_

_
_

-i|

----- H ---- T
_
_!
_
_
_
_
„!!
1

_

_
_

_

_l

_

-

-1

*

_

_!
-

_
-

-

_

_

-

-1

7
_
_
_
_

„l'
'

27
27
_
_!

7
7

-

28
1
1
_

_

_

_
_
_

-

1
1
1
_
_

il

13
1

_

2
2
21
_ j
_j
_

_
_
_
- !
.1
.

_

_

l!

1

_

-

J

-

131

4.
13 j

_
_!
_j
-j

-

_
_

73
7
_

_!
_

1081
25!
6i
19:
83
731

_
-

-!

-

-

“j

21!
1!

13
_

44:

1

J
_

13

_'

1
-

-

2
4
2 ! --- 4j
2
4|
39

_

10
101
1
9,
-

9:
8

1

6

3

-

1
19 1
10
11
9
9
-i

19

11

25
-

15
1!
9

3

10 !

34

34
_
12
22

2:

16
9
7
96 i
65

13:

87 i
87 1
30 !

-

27
3

112

i
18 !
18 !
12 i

14
14
5

_
_
_
_
_
-

_ 1
-

53:
- i
-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

5

27
27
24

- ---- ^4
-1
-!
_ 1
_
- j
-1
-j

53

- ---- r*
-

-!
_
-

57
25
18
7
32
8

1
-

4
6

[

1
!




3
5
1

33
8
4
4
25
3
2
20

;
!

!
i

!
!
.

”1
!
!

1
!
i

6,

Table A-l: G j ^ i C e

GcCUfuMotU - GotUuUied

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif*., by industry division, January 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0
Weekly
J
earnings a
hours
ana
(Standard) (Standard) e
3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 o v e r

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
t o e ) ............ ........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ...........................
Services .............................

1 ,6 7 5
496
14 9
347
1 ,1 7 9
161
470
44 5
66
37

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
4 0 .0

1
5 6 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
5 7 .0 0
5 5 .0 0
5 7 .5 0
5 5 .5 0
5 3 .5 0
5 1 .5 0
5 6 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
4

-

-

-

-

1

-

'
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ...........................

231
27
204
108
80

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

5 1 .0 0
5 3 .5 0
5 1 .0 0
5 1 .5 0
4 9 .5 0

-

-

11

Clerks, accounting ........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

2 ,6 1 7
43 4
177
307
2 ,1 3 3
219
773
347
589
205

3 9 .0
4 6 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

5 5 .0 0
5 9 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
5 9 .5 0
5 4 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
5 6 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
4 9 .5 0
5 5 .5 0

_
-

Clerks, file, class A .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

495

3 9 .0

23
74
398
39
75
32
213
39

5 3 .0 0
4 0 .5 ” 5 7 .0 0
5 1 .0 0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
5 9 .0 0
3 9 .0
5 2 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5
5 2 .5 0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0 | 4 7 .5 0
5 1 .0 0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
5 2 .0 0

_
-

Clerks, file, class B .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail t r a d e .......... ..............
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

1 ,9 3 4
13 1
68
63
1 ,8 0 3
299
87
1 ,0 5 3
187

4 3 .0 0
& .5 0
4 8 .5 0
4 8 .5 0
4 2 .5 0
4 6 .0 0
4 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 0
4 4 .5 0

196

97

3 9 .5
3 7 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

-

196

11

8

-

- i
17

82

V

-

-

- I
11

47

-

12 1

- !
- |

-

11

47

-

-

12

5
42

-

-

23 0

-

-

230

-

-

-

-

1 96

228

j

11

i

241
12
1
11
229
8
5
160
45

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18 8
7
7

8i

- ;
12

2
*

3-65
- i
6
- 1
4
- i
2
82 1 159
6
7
8!
29
- !
31
93
67

8

34 j

17

-

47
7
40
27
11

-

37
1
2 i

-

14
8
4

13 9
10
3
7
129
17
14
81
17

29
7
22
6
16

_

-

17 !

-

154
34
6
28
1201
10
1
49
54 t
4!
3

254
75
16
59
17 9
8
68
75
21
7

243
66
13
53
177
19
74
67
17

225
70
11
59
15 5 j
20
90
31
1
13

257
68
28
40
18 9
22
83
75
1
8

148
61
18
43!
87|
7:
38
38
3!
1

66
38
15
23
28
8
6
12
-!

8?
17
6
11
46
1
42

39
12
8
4
27
15
2
10

-

—

17
13
5
8
4
3

22
19
11
8
3
3

27
11
9
2
16
16

2
2
_
2
.
_

1

-

-

-

6
—
61

6
:

_
_

-

_
_
-

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

-

_
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

60
25
9
16
35
30
5

18
3
2
1
15
15

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-i
_j
_!
-

_
_
.

_
-

_
_
_
-

_
-

3

1

11

-

14

2 50
3
3
244
52
17
156

49
2
2

-

181
6
21
87
45
22 j
45

1
3
6|
7

47
1
17
5
9
15

32
1
10
8
8
5

339
32
28
4
307
81
24
11 7
79

281
19
1
18
262
53
31
120
42

18

19

-

19
14
21
236
24
11
13
212
9
96
42
46
19

1
i
1
!

52

13 ‘
1!
12
39
2i
10
4
23

120
2i
1
1
118
46
7
19
12

18 |
10
2I
360
45
24
21
315
28
13 7
48
89

13
47
13
11
12 I
34 1
6
4
1
16
7
11 4
30
13
17
84
47
1
11
6

16
7
9

45
45

9

9
I8 3
40
14 1
26
143
13
23
38
54
15
32
8

8
!
24
5
4
7
7
1
51
12
12

_

39
8
2
12

353
73
30
43
28 0
27
1 05
58
56
34

_

-

- I

33

6

6

|
i
!
i
i
;

i
i

6
6
-

6
6
- 1

41
10
3
7;
31
2
2j
_j
26 ;

-

•

j

-

4

6!

M2 ;
52 •
15
37 1
90
20
36
7
21 I
6!

436
93
16
77
343
26
170
27
36
84

42
9
2
7
33
12
10
2
9

34
10
1
9
1 i
24

7
“I
7

159
70;
26!
44
89
9
69
2
6

14

?3

-

3

33

-

10

_

20
3

19

17
8

-

_

42!
2

19

8
9
2

32
1

_

_

49 i
5
1
4i
44 !
16
16
5

-

-

-

79
18
8
10
61 1
1i
52
2
6

28

-

6
2

13

7

-

_
- j

9

38
19

7
2

7
4

8
2;

_

2

_
_

_
_

_
_

19
17
1
2

21
5!

4

2
61
6

_

_
_i
_■

_

2

_

2
1;
1

_

_
_
_
_

_

_

7
~
8

-

14
2
2
7
3

1

7

_

9

.

2

_

7

-

6

”

13
1

_____

2

6

25
10
10

13
13
15
5
2

_

_
_

3

{

_

15

_
2

3

3

i

_|

_
.

-

_
_

_!

_

-1

- 1

i
j
_
I--------

_
_

-

_

_

7,

Table

O^ioe Gcc44fx*ti0 4 U - Continued

ju i*

(Average straight-time weekly nours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., b y industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage

Number
of

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
r$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under J5.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 io.oo 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
Weekly
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
35.00
4Q.QQ A2.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.5Q 55.00 57.50 60.QQ 62.50 65.00 67.5Q 7Q.QQ 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 qo.no Q5.00

95.00 ioo.oo

37.50

and

100.00

over

Women - Continued
Clerks, general, senior ...................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ...........................
Services .............................

711
90
39
51
621
105
203
77
130
106

3,460

Clerks, general, intermediate ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Clerks, general, junior ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
PI
M
.. . . ,
..... T ....
Services .............................
Clerks, order ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade .................
Clerks, payroll ....................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Public utilities
..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................

$
66.50
68.00
65.00
70.50
66.00
69.50
64.50
60.00
62.50

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
49.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.5

56.00
59.00
58.00
60.00
55.00
66.00
54.50
51.00
57.00

3,079
--- 65T "
300
356
2,423
521
443
616
740
103

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.0
39.0

47.50
49.50
47.50
51.00
47.00
53.00
47.50
46.50

43.00

|
! 45.50

420

40.0

33
123
264
204
52

40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

: 54.00
i 56'.0 0 .
• 51.00
57.00
53.00
53.50
53.00

924

—

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.5
38.5
39.0

58.50
57.56
54.00
59.50
59.00
62.00
58.00
57.00
60.00
61.00

T&r- y n v

—

!

116
222
586
119
202
120
83
62

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

72.00

725H
301
422
2,737
306
858
622
588

*

Finance ** ...................
Services ....................

40.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
37.0
39.0

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I
!
!
!
I

- j

-

74
10
-

5;
i

6

-

T

27
1
15

102
1
1

412
27
13

1

3

:

101 1
5
4
5
73

14

\
-

-;
-:
-;

-

-

-

2
2

6
-

-

-

-

2

-

-

6

-

-

-i

-

-

-

1
1

15 |
3!
!
_

3

6

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

18
15
-

!




!
385 1
132
1
42
182
28
1

-

-

10
64

5
-

*

_

-

7
-

6

28
-

9
-

28

9

-

-

-

-

6

-

2
-|

-

7|

-

-

5
-

109
- 1 --4
3i
3 ! 102 j
- ;
! 102
3

7
7

-

\

6
_
_
_
.

—
-

6
-

317
16
6
10

94
9
9
-

301

85
_
-

3
62
133
34

35
15

758
619
1 5 ? ----88
121
47
41
41
457
670
73
131
155
149 1 267
071
An

1

1

64

1

71
1

24

41 i
6'
6!
-i
35!
27
2i

50
7
7
43
33

10

_
10
3

1
6

10
36
23
14
9
13
7
2
1

3

301;

13
15

105

10
-

3
3
102

10

-

j

3
-1
7

612
115
52
63 i
497 l
28
218
134
78

408
109
62 ;

348
120
41
79 1
228 1
18
34
95 !
63
18

213
80
22 1
58!i
133 !
15 1
57
22
38 1
1

115
39
18 !
21 [
76

47
299 !
32
111 !
76 i
7° !

1

7
39 !
15

15

68
47
15
32
21
8
13

58 ; 105
—
4T
3i !
26
15 !
16 1
19
60
27 I
6
27
15
12
23

-

2

12

28
3
-

65
11
5
6
54
4
2
16

25
7

-i

75
7
-

30
3
-

3
25
6
4
5
3!
7

7
68
6
27
10

3
27
2
17

3
22

5

1

4

361 !
74'
24
50
287 !
15 !
138 !
53 |
66

377 I
76
28
48
!
28 !
138 !
34 !
87 !

301

!
72;
76
30 ! ---54
16 1
2!
62]i
14
46 i
81
7
8j
21

2

1

103
17

-

17
86
74
12
96
33
15
18
63
10
32
15
1

5

216
37 !
16
21
179

51
6

164
66
14
52
98
18 !
5j
18 i
47

56
18;
15

61 1
14
-

5
88
15

1

31
38!
37
-j
-

141
47l!
34
12

1

144
52
18!
34|
92!
6l
45'

113
2
_
2
ill!
ill
-

22
46
11 ----- 5
2
4
2
9
16
35
e
14
2
2
.
11
_
7

7

3

6
20

22
4:
- 1

70
6
-

-

91
22 !
9
13
69
38

25]

8?
2
2
83
-

7

38
23
18
5
15
1
2
10

96

1

-

62

2
2
-

_

-

2
_

2
_
•
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-1

_

_

_

.
•
_
.
_

8?
42
20
22
47!
8
2
-!
34!

J
-1

29!
I
!

5
24l1
67
53
3
-

?1
7

-

-

12!
9!
6
3
117
43
13
30
74
3
32
21
9
9

7
24
18
4
123

_
-1
-|
-

_

9
53
51!
_i
|

5

!
|

—
-

_
_
_

_

3
J

J1
_!
_1
-i

-

11

75
22
12 !

26
86
22
29
13
10
12

53
6
19
13
14
1

r-^W

10

3
3
12
12

7
8
8

-

-

-1
_!
-i

_
_

!

109
20
5

30
9
1
8
21
1
12

11
6
3
3
5
-

18
10
3
7
8
8

15

89
27
22
8
6
26

4
3
1

10

-

10
5

-

3

2

9
7

-

_

7
2
2

•
_
-

~
-

_
_
-

1

!
;

_
_
_
_
_

_!

5

_

l?

1

!

1
1?
7

1
2
2
_
-

3

9
—

_

J

8

21
12

_
-

i

1

-

4|
181
16
2
_

_
-

3
1
-

2
1

-

1

1
1
1
_
_

54
10
1
9
44
26
15
_

7
;

33
23
9!
14
10
8
2

77
8!
8|
-!
69 !
8!
47

!

32
20
12
269
20
17
112
20

1

2
15
9!
54
22

59
17
15
2
42
27
2
13
-

-1
-1
_

!
i
!
!

_

_i

.
-

i
42
22
1
21
20
15
4
1

26
4
-

-

16

4
22
6

-

5
2!

48
20
-1
20
28
19
2

_
«

3
3

1

1

2
3
2

2
2

2
2

-

3
-

_

-

2

2

3
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

.
_

1
i

3

8,

Occupation* - Continued

T a b l e A-li

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s i n S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , J a n u a r y 1 952)

A verage
Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F— •

T

$
$
Weekly
Weekly Under 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $
35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

4 2 .5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00:LOO.00
and

4 5 .0 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

Women - Continued
£

232

Duplicating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................

59

11
48
173
44
31
46
26

Services .............................
Key-punch o p e r a t o r s .... ................ ..
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................... .
Public utilities
..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ..........................

1,035
188.
77

*

4 0 .0
40.0

49.50

3 8 .O

-

-

10

13
-

3

3
7

25
-

47

25
-

47
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

45.00
46.50
45.50
46.50
44.00
43.50
! 43.50
] 45.00
44.50
42.50

8

21
12
12

43

40.0

20

4 0 .0
38.5
38.5
39.0
40.0'
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5

3 8 .0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.0
37.5

65.00
68.50”
67.00

6 9 .0 0
64.00
69.00
64.00

61 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
65.00
57.00
60.50
60.00
61.00
56.00
57.00
56.00
54.50
56.00
55.00

- s
-

95

1
1

10

3
32

-

2 !

12

4 ;

21
8

48

4

20

19

3

3

29
5

42

66

3

7

24

_

_

8 1

-

-

- I
i

!

i

7

!

17

-

1

8

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6i
2 j

24

51

I
12 |
-

3 1
!

-

-

-

12
-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

12

3

-

!

-

-

21
21

-

27
11
16
190
19
26
29
102
14

-

Ill
27
22
1
11
48 1
48
51
3

24
s

24 |
!
|

3 i

1

3

i
j
______ i______
_

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
**

Finance,

insurance,




a n d r e a l e state.

communication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

14
3

132 ; 217

- 1

3

2

-

-

-

26
9

|

8i
7
102 ! 113
8!
7
2!
14
4 1
76 ’ 100
84 j

11

10 1
6
1

I

33
22
2
20
11

1
!

1
1

91
7
4
3

2

3
i
—

3

1

589
42 1 158
20 !
69
22!
89
269 1 431
39
51
110
77
29
41
66
138
58
91

5

77,
12]
8!
4
65
9:
18
30

5?

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
21

17
5

2
1
1;

_

1

5

6
6

-

2

-

_

3

6

18
16

6
-

-

-

4

-

6

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1!
_

-

_
_

_
_
_

-

_

_

_

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

_
-

2

6

-

-

_

6

12
2

_
-

[

-

14

11

6

3

7
52

22
111
17

3!

24

2

7
-

- I
11 i
2|
_ !

_
!
_ J

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_|

69 i
27]
9
18 i
42
25 1
!

_

_

-

_

_
_

_
.
_

-

-

-

25

4
4
_

1!

_

*

1 -v

2

331
89
26
63
242
54
48
25
98
17

_

-

2

54
13
4
9
41
3

1 ____ L
1

2

_

-

-

13 i __ 19 .
i
_
11 !
5

|

j

162
45
123
163
- !
32
7
4
- 1
4
5
15
2 j 17
116 , 130
45!
159
2
8
9j
3 i
6 ! 22
41 i
15
2
18
8
30
86 S 34
62
24
10
24
31
15
311

2

_

1
1

-j

115

35 !
17
71
10 !
18
1 i

-

3
3

4

16

2

17
52
4

6

-

13

116

5
3

1

11
22

144
57
9
48
87

1
16

3

4
1

23

6

-

-

21

59

37
5

7

2

5

12

136

4
59

8

10
2
4

8

1

3

123

20

50

8
6
8

17

-

12
2

148
33

4
78

1

3
7
18

12

15
3

119
46'

93

-

_
------ 1
1
~
-

12
8
3
4!

11

70
18

10

7
32

15:
31
73
5

-

28

8
1

5
5
85

9
-

8
1

3
14

40

45
18
3
15
27

j

94

~

6

8

7

-

-

3
7
25

6;

43

124
14

470
768
2,975
466
644
270
1,292
303

10

_

129

1 ,2 3 8

35

1
1

-

4 0 .0

4,213

14

-

3
-

hit 5
0

10

_

2 ,8 6 8

Stenographers, general .........................
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods .............................
Nondurable goods .................. .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ...............................
Finance ** ...........................
Services ....................................

3
-

51.00

20

1

-

52.50
55.00
54.00
55.50
52.00
55.50
56.50
50.50

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.0

71T~
234
481
2,153
263
575
1 227
783
!
305

_

-

37.5

513
206
46
160
307

—

_

39.0

847
118
80
604

Office girls ...............................
1
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................... .......
Durable goods .......................
1
Nondurable good** ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
R a LAI T t. *H a - - t . r t T i r t t r i t . t T i . i l t
r
SM no n *A ##
r
_.TrlT
T-Ir
TServices .............................

51.50
52.50
50.00
53.00

51.00
51.00

39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5
38.5

111

*

Secretaries ................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities
..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ...........................
Services .............................

39.5
'"TOO
40.0
40.0
39.0

420 i

391 1
871
>33
54
304
32
113
50
73
36
728

131
153
68 !
43
63 j 110
289 J 575
71
55
56
167
34
34
111
267
52
17

288
77
9

68
211
20
72
40
61
18
3?4
102
31
71
292
42
57
61
124
8

-

-

-

-

297
62
37
25
235
26
25
32
128
24

??6

264
78
32
46
186
30
45
13
59
39

166
50
17
33
116
27
16
14
44
15

156

248
157
25
132
91
5
17

110
61

58
11

15
7

296
129
43
86
167
24
32
5
96
10

78

21
57

258
31
137

6
75
9

189
91
23
68
98
25
20
1
48
4

43
18
49
23
4

50

20
30
106
3
32

1
50
20
27
17
12
5
10
6
_

_

4

196
98
19:
79
98
32

10
3
37
16

149

41
4
37
108;
131
39
6]
17 j
33

84

___
35 ,

21
14
7
63
21
6

27
21
6
8
1
2

32
4

2
3

2
51
10

11
7
4
14

I

2i
2
2
8'
1

4
-

_
_
.
.

-

_
_
.
-

_

10.____ 2
2
10
_ i

_

_

_

•

10

2

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

9.

Orifice Occupation^ - Continued

Table k - l i

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in S a n F rancisco-Oakland, Calif., b y industry division,

A verage
Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

J a n u a r y 1 9 52)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7 . 5 0 |50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100 .0 0
Weekly
earnings $
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .0 0 100.00 over

Women - Continued
j

<c
f
Stenographers, t e c h n i c a l ............. .
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

364

— W
330

Switchboard operators .....................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance
..........................
Services .............................

887
153
24
129
734
98
148
124
210
154

39.5
■"39.y.
40.0

Switchboard oDerator-receptionists .......
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonm a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Piihl ^ e lt 1111 1a a * .t..TTT.T...T....
i.
.
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Services .............................

873
198
106
92
675
58
347
69
105
96

39.5
'TOO
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.5
39.5
39.0

*
*

Tabulating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** ..........................
Transcribing-machine operators, general ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................... .
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
FI pa nra
t
t

Typists, class A ...........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance * * .
.
.
.
Services .
.
.
.

!
i

229

;

4$
23
22
184
47
12
94
---

j
i
i

667
jrfj—
56
115
496
11
298

168

2,221
407
143
264
1,814
259
213
57
1,118
.
. 167

_

39.5
39.5
40.0

4 0 .0
40.0
38.5
40.5

39.0
TOO
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
.
38.5
. 38.5

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

37
- i

37

-

-

-

3
-

53.00

_

_

_

- ,
- !

-

- !
-

17
-

3
-

17
1
15
1
-

3
-

2
-

2

51
7
7
44
7
2
15
10
10

i
;
!
!

37:
134
9
2

151
12
2
10
139
12
2

125
22
31;
23;
37
12

29
30
66

58
14
6
8
44 j

71
23
13
10
48

185
20
14
6
165
6

6
20
22

124
16
2
17

_
-

_
-

_
-

42 1
2

-

-

-

2

-

-

2
2
2

_

2
2
2

1
- |
- i

_
-

-

_
-

52.00
53 . 5O

_
- ;
-

. .

- ;
- ;
_ 1
- .
.

~

_
-

1
1
1

- 1
-

.

.

S e a f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance,

206397

insurance,

O - 52-2




a n d r e a l e s t ate.

communication,

and other public utilities.

-

-

3

68
14

39
16

80
188
- ~ i r
8
7
80
173
- . 16
- :
- 1
16 |
80
.
141
.

64
-

-

6
6 !
29:
- ;
8 ;
20

237

299

5
14
218
19
9
13
.
159
. 18

22
47
230
17
32
2
103
76
.

63

15
192
11
43
28
46
64

10
3
7
53
!
J
1

6
20
15 1

I

12

95
20

12
3
9

61
8
53

15
2
13

82
82

6
2
4

56
11
8
3
45
4 1
9
10
22 i

54
12
6
6
42 :

38

66
55
1
54
11
8
2
_

14
2
-

81

26

16
4
75
10

21
5;
55

17
4
24
20

29
1
9
7

20
38
- ~ r
6
7
20
25
5
4
-

23

r

9

41
12

— W— W

_

**

U
4 :
1

73
9
9
_ i

28
28

159 !
44
19
25
115
10
60
14
2
29

1
1
- !

83
1
l|
82 J

10
1
9
207
15
-

1

_
-

53.00
T5T O 3
53.00
56.00
52.50
; 55.00

53.00
56.00
55.50
56.00
52.00
55.00
53.50
49.50
51.50
.
52.00
.

37
-

"

-

$3.50
53.50
54.00
52.50
[ 56.50
51.50
51.50
54.50
53.50

_
-

52.50
58.50
56.50
58.50
51.50
54.50
52.00
49.50
53.00
49.00

59.00
39.5
1 7 : 5 .. - T O W 59.50
39.5
40.0
62.00
39.0
58.50
40.0 ! 62.00
40.0
61.00
38.5 I 56.50
39.5
41.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.5
40.0
38.5

_

-

61.00
39.5
" 3 9 7 5 ' "69750"'
"
60.50
39.0

119
59 ;
12 ;
27 j
80
1
44
27

15
80

30
7
23
50
6
16
27

0

23
3
20 '
118
25!
12 '
13 1
93 ;
2
73 |
18 j

10
12
2
17
1
86
18 !
7 1
11
68
15
27
1
25
43 '
7
7
36
8
2
20
88
32
4
28
56
2
42 ’
12

186
518
152! 220
34 j
25 |
“ 9T
“
27
14 j
23 !
7!
18 :
1 66
11!
n
i
| 425
161 ! 118 : 195
8
12:
10
! 116
24
67 :
30 |
45
i
i
17
4
1|
. ! 215
. 107
.62 | 115.
10 .
|
22
. 15 I
.19
1
i
L_
_
_
_

29
4
4
1
19
1
81
10
10
71

1

1

2
12 i
3
2
_

18
2
1
1
16
10
_

4
4
1
3
_
_
_

7
-

6

_

6
_
_

-

-

-

-

5
2
2

12
6"
6 1
_ '
6!

4
4
4

_
_
_

_

_:
_

_
_

. 1
_

3
3

18
16
2

22
2
20

34

8
2
_

3
3

_

2
6
_

3

34

36
14:
7
7
22
4
10
4

-

-

_:
-!
_
_,
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_1
_
_

_
_

_
_i
_
_1

_
_

-

_,

_!

3
1
2
28
5
-

_
_
_

_

_ ;

_
_

_

_
_

-

~

-

-

-

9

2
1
-;

3
l
_

6
1,
li
;

3
2 !
_ ;

2

1 :
li
1 !
-

7
6
1

l

_ 1

1
1;

- 1
- !
_
- ■

-

2
-

2

5 !
5;

_
_

_

1
_
-

"i

_

_

2
_
_
-

-

_
-

- ;
- .

-

_
_
_
-

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_!
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_

-

.
.

-

_
_;
_
_

_

2
_
_

_
_1
_ ’

2

-

2
2
-

_
-

_

-

2
1
1
_

-

2

-

3

56
19 |
10 j
9 1
37:
6

3

_

_ :

r

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_

|

11 1
10
56 j
18 !

3 .
i

-

4
4!
li
3!
_
-

77 1
21 !

32

_

2

1:

6:
29 i
y !

ri1
—
-

—
_

-

5

3
2
- |

j
41 !
6 !
3!
3!
35
- j

_
_
_

1 i
- i
_

17

_
_
_
_

-

4
1
1
-

31

_

“

_
_

4 1
6
13

;
1
j
|.

_
_

_

-

37
7
6
21

141
10 ;
- I
10!
4
- '
-

_

-

34
11
11
23

9

1
-

1
-

9
-

99
43
8
40
51
6
3
4
38
.

_

1
_

67
18
1
17
49
23

!

.

29
2

1

13
7
5 i
2!
6 1
- :

.

.
25
1

6.

12

.

6

.

.
'

4,
4
-

13
5
1
4
8
7

5
1
4
7
1

4
_

_
_
1

. _
.

-j

.
I

"

-

_

;, .

.

.
'

_

- [

.
!

■ j

-

>

.
.

.

10,

T a b l e a -i »

O ^ i c e

- C o n t i n u e d

O c c u f u U i O H d

( A v erage s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s i j f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s i n S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , J a n u a r y 1 9 52)

A ve r a g e
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Linder 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00! 95.0C 100.00
»
and

4 2 .5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 inn nfi

37.50 40.00

35.00

Women - Continued

1

Typists, class B ........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................................................................
Public utilities * ................................................................
Wholesale trade ...........................................................................
Retail trade .......................................................................................
Finance
.................................................................. ...........................
Services .......................................................................................................

2,957
525
169
356
2,432
120
629
158
1,222
303

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.0
39.0

47.00
52.00
47.50
54.00
46.00
49.50
48.50
46.00
44.50
44.50

10

3 7 7 ! 546
28 i
28
18
7 1
21)
10
518
103
349|
1 1
9;
14
65
43!
12 '
5 |
41
300
90 j 200
98
85
7i

61
12
12

-

-

10
1

49

-

-

9

658
64
41
23
594
19
133
58
349
35

119
16
16

44

5

i

414
52
18
34
362
24
181
18
94
45

329
85
21
64
244
13
125
13
60
33

171
64
10
54
107

106

86
56
11
45
30
6

51
14
37
55

H

6

48
6
42

10
5

41
32]
11
31
9j
9;

24

3

30
281

6
_
_
_

3

«

28
2
2
_ 1

3

6
_
6

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_ ;

_

!

j

-

_

_
_

!

i

0/

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 / Hburs reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
Workers were distributed as follows* 28 at $100.00 - $105.00; 13 at $105*00 - $110.00,• 26 at $110.00 - $115.00; 13 at $115.00 - $120.00; 8 at $120.00 - $125.00; A at $125.00 - $130.00; and 4 at
$130.00 - $135.00.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1/

P ^e A A iO H o l Gud ^technical OcCUfuUiOtU

Table A-2
*

(Average straight-time

weekly hours and earnings l / for selected occupations studied on an area

basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage
N um ber

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f
w o rk e rs

W e e k ly
h o u rs
( S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S t a n d a r d )

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
L$
$
$
$
$
$
$
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00: LOO.OO L05.00 Lio.oo: L 5 .00 :
1
L20.00 L25.00 L30.00 135.00
and
and
under
L20.00 L25.00 L30.00 L35.00 over
l
L05.00 H O . 00 115 .00 ]
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 . 0 0 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .00 : o o .o o :

M en
|

_

_

_

_

Draftsmen, chief ..........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

225
138
87

40.0
40.5
40.0

100.50
100750“
100.50

Draftsmen ..................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

351
109
242

40.0
40.0
40.0

86.00

asiotr

_
-

_
-

_
-j

85.50

-

-

-1

Draftsmen, junior ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

249
138
111

40.0
-4 o a;
39.5

70.50

_

2
2!

71.50

4
4
-

95

40.0
- ' 40.040.0
40.0
40.0

64.50

_

6

6 4 .0 0 “

-

6

6

8

7

-

-

-

2

70".00“

-

75—

52
18
25

62.00
70.00
66.00

_

_

_

4
9
4 ---- 4
5

6
6

5
-

9!
9i

13
13

;

“1

~

29
18
11

72
18
54

13
91

!
13
IT!
6!
3:
2

8

|

S
IT

t
j

-

_

10
10

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ..........
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

_

J5
14
i
1

13]

50

191
1

1

33

1 7

-

24
10
14

42
40
2

17
15
2

80
40
40

28
8
20

68
22
46

32
13

16 1 ____I
_
7
9 4;
12
-

1

_

1

-

19

|

8

!

i

7
5

2
1

11 !
9i
7!
21
2

16
*

6i
1 0

4!
4i
2!
2:

8]
7i
_!

3

*

1i
11s
1

7

5
2
2

Hours reflect the workweek




15
15

37

-

-

31

_

1
1

-

-

-

2

-

1
1

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41
7
34

-

2
-

3

1
1

1
1

2

3

-

-

2
_

_

_

1

1

_

_

-

-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

1

_

_!

J

_
_

-i

j
j -

I J

_

-!

J

-

-

_
„

_
!

_

j
j_

•

_

«.

_

i
I

i

1

_
_

**1

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ i

1/

30
30

24
9
15

j
10 !

2
i
|

i

5

20

52
2
50

3
1
2

19
11
8

~
'

for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, S a n Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11,

M a in te n a n ce a n d Powek P la n t Occu p at i on^

T a b l e A-3:

(Average h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r m e n i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
basis in San Francisco-Oakland,

Calif., b y industry division,

J a n u a r y 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Occupation and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

$
$ , $ X $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

A37
227
56
171

210
53
71
36
49
Electricians, maintenance ................................

4

2 .1 1

2 .2 0

1

4

206

4

1.84
1.91" “

121
71
30

9
_ !

—'
1

5

2
2

2.03
"2712--2.07

Firemen, stationary boiler ..............................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable
.................. ...................
Nondurable goods ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ................... ....... ..........
Services .................................. .

5

3

5

«

3
3

7

-

1 .7 0

-

3
_

2

3
i

3

3

2
7 !
2

7
7

14

23
$
5

—

1 .6 6

9
9
3

6

1.94
1.70
1.67

14

y

21
6
5

24

y

15

7

3

18

15

47
!

4

5
6

12
11

18
18

21
■* 2
•
8

22

7

2

7
57 j

18

57

1 2}

2

*
*

6

5
4

6

3 —

4

3 i

si

l

Ifi •
X?
X?

9

9

31
25

2
10

1
?6

3

21
21
21

9

3

4

2
2 !

25

6

7
3

3

8 :
3

12
2

!

9

6
°

113

14

26
2&
21
5

100

5
8
8
7
1

26
25

_

30

9
29
1,
2
*6
7 1 *2
25
1
15
12
1
1
2

2
16

16
4

6

64
7

12
6

3

9

6

3

-

7

1.93

9

13

9 j

_
9

16

4

2 .1 2
1.96
2.09

16

n

2

2.05
1.98
2.43

503
244
31
213
259
75
24
160

8
8
6
2

2

2 .2 0

135
14

1
0
x
\ i

3

Engineers, stationary ...................................
Manufacturing ....................................... .
Durable goods ......... ....... ....................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufa c t u r i n g ........................ ....... .
Retail trade .......................................
Finance ** .................................... .
Services ......... ..................................

n

4
i3 !

/
4

2 .1 1
625
“ 397” " 2.15
177
2.09

goa
pd

17 i
4
!

-

2.24
2.05
2.44
2.19

228
184
28

$

$

$

$

, $

44

72
f*
28
13

12

21 *
“
30
1 21

15

22
8

2!

97

18

14

! 17

8
7

8

83

9
4

2
2

17

6

8
0
2
3
2

<
c

5

1
3

203
n 6

49
n

15!

1
l

5
5

11

r
4

03
72
59
18

1C
^

4

4

i
.
4

4

L
0
i.

4

i
4
]
_

3

16

5

11

2,142

Machinists, maintenance .................................
M^nufaeturing ......................... .
Durable goods
Nr»nrhirah1 e goods Tt. . . ...........................

59

2 .2 1

Maintenance men, general utility .......................
Manufflct.nri ng tlTTTtttttT. T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T
Npndurahl e goods
.......... ............
Nonmanufacturing .............................................................

Pt.W / nHUHo, «
M%

Who!esale trade ............................ .
Retail trade .......................................
Services ...........................................

T7 9
TE —

37
206 370 ! 109
23 1 53
375
751
35 ! 21
2
— TCl ” 32" “I G T " T 5 1
"T3T—
84 j 2 T l t
” 3r
12 1 17
10
90
12
16
6 i
5
19 1
17 i
21
1
16
2
29 !
731
67
14
7
13!
_
_
_
_ ! 4
_
8
18
7
_
_
_
_
_ —
— | 4
10
— 51
"
_
_
_
_
_
_
:
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
8
10
7
4
28

! 1.70
! 1.77—

208

1 1 .6 4

961

f 1.80
i

1,274
rtrif
527
598
1A9

!2.13
1 2.13
i 2 .1 2
2.14
i 2.14

T

_
6

509
1.99
"“2 5 T " i "2752—

2.0 1
n

255
44

2.05
1.96

1 .8 7

121

o

6
3

2 .0 2
1.78

i

8

- '
7

_ — 7"

I

2.08

24
33

W

7

8

;

_!
_
_
-

1

15

_'

13

6

_ I
3

1

15

7
5

6

2

2
8
~

1
-

-

26

o

”

6

10
2

7

8

26

1

21

16

1 ?5

11

35

4
7
26

26
24

2

35

6
12

3

•an
i
1

C
J

1
X

14
8

l

8
6

5
5

0
<
c

7
68
??
50
30
7
5
23 i 45
3 ! 18
2| 3

14

12
3
8 ! 12
:
2
381
2
38

1

15
—

_

18

15
2
13

3
1

2i

15
10

7

10
3
5

7
-

j

8

3
1
_

??
59
3
; 56

1

8 !

18

302
233
69
60

7

64
30
30

69
33

3 1
5 | 34
5
_ |
27
2
l
3

27
36
26

3

6

6

73

66

52
14
7

17
3
3
14

12
2

7

-

1

~j
~

479
465
172
293
14 j

49

3

~

1

2
-

-

1 6 l 57
21
42
16
211 6 !
1 0 1 42

52
52

3

-

84
<>7
42
25
17 i

"!
"1

56

17

_

-

-

2 _5zJ
52
2
8 ! 47
4
18
2
4
29

2
_

5

r
." j

8

12 !
8

I

5

7

8
8

“

24
IT

362

3
11

?°
3fii

24

.
26 I i/
1
Q
10
7
2
4

20
3
3

28

*

20

8
2_

l.

5

5

96
87
85

25

35
2?

23

20

6 108
1■1
---15 —
X1
!
4

9
]
_

?

23

7

X

n

18

28
3-5
28~n c r

8
5

24
18

4

2

49
39
32 | 21

22
7

106

i
Helpers, trades, m a i n t e n a n c e ....... ....................
Manufacturing ......... ................ ......... .
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................

$

1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35 2 .40 2.45 2 .5 c 2.60 2.70 2 .8 c over

t
2.18
"7712—
2.13

220

$

2 .3 0 2.35 2.4C ► 2 .4 5 2 .5 c 2 .6C 2 .7 c 2.80
and

1.40 1.45

Carpenters, maintenance .................................

%

*

35
15

1

3!
3

5
5
5

52

_

32
32
23
9

2
2

4
4

2

4

_
_
_

15
15

1

1
i

28
28
28

4

__n

19
19

-

_

4

-

—

_

_

_

_

_

-

19

_

15

15

-

-

-

15

5

_

15

_

_

_

-

-

-

44

2

-

l

5
-

3

-

-

-

|

___[
See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12,

Table A-3:

Maintenance and Pow&i Plant Occupations - Cont inued

(Average hourly earnings \J for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., b y industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
L. 50 L.55 L.60 L.65 L.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

*
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55

Mechanics. automotive (maintenance) ............ .......
Manufacturing .........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * ................................
Services ...........................................

Mechanics, maintenance ...................................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
N o n m a n ufacturing......................................
Public utilities * .... ....... .......... ........
Retail trade .......................................

1.136
iS
1,015
591
13

1
2.18
2.16
2.18
2.20
2.11

925
.. 6 7 T "
359
320
246
86
10

2.02
2.02
1.95
2.10
2.03
1.96
1.99

89
87
71
16

2.09
2.08
2.08
2.08

Oiler......................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................

163
11$
87
31

Painters, maintenance ...................................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Public utilities * ................................
Retail trade ............... ......................
................................. .......
Finance
Services ...........................................

2.08
355
197“ “ x i r ~
2.05
24
2.12
173
158
2.05
28
1.95
2.37
23
2.22
54
52
1.77

-

1.72

*?

and

- ;
- :

1
-

1.69
1.71

-

-

- ;
-

-

- |

1
- I
1 i
1
-

-

- -

3

3

5
-

1
-

5
5
-

1
1

14
1
-

-

1

15
14
-

-

-

-

-

31
30
24
6
1
1
- !

_
_

V

!
;

-

-

-

-

9
9
1
8

4
4
- j
4

9
9
9
-

39
37
18
13 '
5 ; 13
13
-

_
- ;

_
-

_
-

43
-

-

- '

-

-

_
- i

_
-

_

3
-

-

- .
-

-

-

3
-

- !
-

- !
- ;

- j 43
- ; 1
1

- ;

- |

-

-

-

- '

- !

~ |

-

~

3

-

~ -

-

1

41

5

i
j

21
21
21
“

- 1
-

5
-

-

-

_
3 !
- ~~T"
l
2
_
-

-

127
122
108
14
5
5

221

129

5
216
213
3

27
102 j
40 1

187
91
14
77
96
7
-

13
13
13
-

81 123
65 h a f i
2 ! 55

38
21
6
15

6 ! 10
6 ! 10
10
3
3
-

_
_

_

-

1 i 24
2
22
1
1
18
2
- 1 - i
“ 1 2

2 I

1 :

— T

54

-

[

_

?6
36
30
6
3
3
3

375
15

24 360
1 j 204
3
-

44
9
35
6
-

13
2
11
9
2

11
1

39
12

30

1 !
63 ! 56
16 ! 12 : 17 i 10
_
10 !
15
4
- !
-

4
4
4
-

- j

15
7
8
2

H

8
8
2
6

8
8
8

191
3
188
53
-

14
12
2
-

1 30
- | 30 .
- ! 24
- ! 6

-

-

-

101
71
46
25
30
28
-

19
8
5

-

12
12
12

-

55
36
36
-

"

- j
- |

9
14
14
-

-

j
^581
68
!

_

-

23

3
-

-

|

1
1

‘ j

Millwright.................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ...... ....................
Durable goods ................................. .
Nondurable goods ..................................

—

-

'
$

1 .6 0 L. 65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .4 5 2 .5 0 2.60 2 .7 0 2.80 over

_ i

-

$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
$
$
$
2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2.35 2 .4 0 2.45 2 .5 0 :2 .6 0

0

$
*
Under 1.40 L.45

to
CM

hourly
earnings

£
01

o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

3
3

_
_!

-

-

_:

2

-

«
_
_

_

2

3 1 12
27
-

_

_

1
1
_

-

-

-

1

"

_

_
_

2
2
2

4
-

4
4

~
_
_

-

4

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

_

_ 1
- j
_

51
j
-

2

-

8
8

-

-

-

6

12
12

6
6

6
_1
_

12
_

6
_
_

-

-

T

8
_

-

_

1

51
50

-

-

_

2
2:
-1

_

_

-

2
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

-j
-!

3

45
7

1
1

6

_
11
- j ----

-

1

-

7
38
-

1.
2'

14
24

—

-

-

-

-

1

_

"
9
8
1
-

-

88
89
15
14
$8 --- 5"
55
14
1
8
2
80
54
14
4
8
1
1
33
1 : 1
j 6
~
i
1
_
' 26
1
6
- I
- j

4
_

_
-

3

T
6

-

-

-

-

-

1
_
1
_

-

-

i
I

|
Pipe fitters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...

21

2.16
2.16
2.05
2.18
2.09

Plumbers, maintenance .

12

Sheet-metal workers. maintenance
Manufacturing

45

_

_

_

2!__222_
10 [_16
18
1
22 ; 2 2 0 : 10 T T
9
14 i
3 ; 1 ;
5 ; 10 j 2 ! 2
- !
20 ! 206
2 i -|
7
7
8 ;
1 J 3 ;
7

2.12
2.11

Machine-tool operators, toolroom
Manufacturing
Tool-and-die makers
Manufacturing

i/
*
**

337
316
37

279

“Z2T

2.11

63
437

x ir
2.37

T3T“ X T T

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8

2

-

23
23

xir

63

---Z— !

- , 11
-;

n

2 |
14
14

_

.

_;

.

1

.

28 ;
___
28
28 i

1 1

2 !

_32_

37:
-!
-

71
71

29 6

15

A 2

296

15

42

l

_

13

Table A-4:

Gu&todial, Wa*ieUo44iliHfy9 04id SlUppM tty 0 cC44f2 U 40H4>
e

(Average h o u r l y e a r n i n g s l / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s 2 / s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
in S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n ,

J a n u a r y 1 9 52)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$

$

o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

Under

hourly
earnings

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 I .25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 .2 0 2 .25
and

i

1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 tl.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 I .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2 .25 over
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ......
Manufacturing .........................................

*
1.81
1.77

322
—

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and
- over) ...................................................
Manufacturing .........................................

120
120

6
6

-

1.93
1 . 9 3 ..

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_ J 6_
36

17
17

-

-

63
57

39
39

115

-

12
12

2
2

22
22

35
35

30
29
-

7
7
7
-

111

3
3

3
3

“

“

“

-

1
1

20
20

~

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

~

9
9

4
4
-

27
27
27

34
14
14

-

-t
-

-

20
~

32
32

-

-

-

-

-

-

j
Guards ....................................................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ..................
Manufacturing .........................................

*
*

( TIiriIirTTirTIIT_T___r

Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * ................................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Retail trade ......................................
Services ...........................................

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
11+4 14 + 4*0 4
+
Da + A 4 1 + V Q a
*

A

Services ...........................................

“

All
250“
1A5
95
171
33
62

_

1.53
'I : s r ~

-

1 .6 8
1.6 1

-

25

1.39
1.52
1.A7
1.55
1.35
1.37
1.33
1.35
1.3A

528
658
A, 125
510

198
565

1 ,9 2 0

-

-

92
7

-

1

20 !
63 i

15

5

A
-

88
7
- ---

E
~

20

15

36

23

3
12

121
20
10
10
AA 217 101
12 : 27 ! A 8
2
15 ! 5A
17
5 ! 5
12 131 : 32
2

2 5 ! 85
i°
1 i
-

15

AA ; 219
2

7

-

15

5

-

-

-

1.35
1.3?
1 .A1

5,311
TTTSTH

5
-

A

7

2
2

4
3

196

88
2
2

6
6

6 !
82 1
1
6

7

-

8
2
6

20
11
9

638 1831
18
79
15
54

126
88

25

190
21
-

10
158

86

38
314
116
70
67

559 1813
48
56

1
10

8
272

12

25

177

“
X
j

9

A 50
130
QQ
77
31
320
14
A
214

440

3

26

1
12

886

58

42

68

AA

45
42
27
15
3

45

41
6
33
5

5

2
1

2
?0

41
4

4

120
615
A47 101
115 ' 33
332
68
168
19
6 I
77
1 j
25
16 1 $0 1 6 i

195
104
91
55
A2

2
5
A

_

5
-

-

5

29

!

_
-

4

1
!

5

122

27
-

23

28
94
5
4
5
79

27
25 i
1;

23

7 i
2j

23

28

!

2

1

2 |

-

-

-

1

!
_
-

1

-

-

1

5 i

2|

-!

-

-

_
-

-

-

“

_

2

-

-

51
-

_|

_;

_

_

-

-

-!
-

-

-,
-J
-i

-i
-j
-j

1
1

_
-1
_

_
_

_
_

-

_
-

-

-

-j
-

-

i

18
98
9 . 26 j 32 i 13
1.27
. ^
13
5 P !
"
.1p r
6
1 .3 6
15
- 1 7
AA ! 1.A6
3
26 1 32
5A7 ; 1.26
85
13
15 i 9
1
6 1 23
1 .2 3
6 1
57
0 I
5
6
4
1 .2 0
20
17
75
270
25
1.27
A5
19
151
606

i.v>

177

50

2
2

2
-

-

2

175

48
13

8
1
28

129 !
- '
129

2
2
2

4
4

2
2 i

2 i
2 | 28

5

- !
_ I

?

-

12
23

33 !
28 j

9
A

“

C

125

1

5 !

1 ;
11
11
_ j

1
5 !
- i
5

1

_ !

_

_

-!
-!
_ 1

-

- j
- s
- j

_
-

-

95 415 426
17 | 19 ; 111
10 i - , 91
7 ! 1 9 ; 20
55
7s; 396 : 315
4
- j 54 j 396 315
4 ! 24 | ~

324
75
35
40
249
239

_

5

-

1

1

5 :

1
Order fillers ............................................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Retail trade .......................................

2,063
— 525“ 1
1A9
277 1
1,637 j

1 ,568
69

i

_

1.6A
1.61
1.65
1.58
1.65
1.65

- ;

_

2A
-

- j

- j - 1
- | 2A
- ; 2A
_ 1
- |

1 .6 6

23
7

7
- ' 16
- ; 16

21

_

7

-

7
1A
1A
“

~

2A
-

43
#

7
3

7

39
4
4
~

3
4

2

24
24
-

2
2

2

44
H
14
30

42
2d
24
4
14

83
d3
80

30

14

-

5
3

59
55

10

206
24

2

6

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

6
6

-

-

-

-■
-

-

_

-

-

-

.

.

.

_

-

-

-

-

78
-

70
33

16
182
176

78
67

6

11

33
37
32
5

166

_

6
2

15

10

-

20
20

12

15

-

10

-

3

4
7

-

98
135
19
15
5
3.4 j 15
116
83
116
81
2
~

8
-

2

i

Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................

%

0 4 1 + v n/a
* 4

1,598
' " 738
510
228
860

630
71

| 1.55
j 1 .6 6
J 1.65
1.60
1. A1

_____ i
S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e .
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
**

Finance,

i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.




_

;

- 1
- j
- !

-

_

2

-

_ |

1 .6 2
1

-

2

A

k
A
-

:

j

_ j
I

2

1
|

c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

3
-

7
7
4
3
-

22

221
8

18
15
3
4

5
3
213

2

210
3

2

249 ; 469 j 184
60 1 3S 0 I 82 !
6
36 | 288
24 1 7 2 ; 76
189 ; 109 i 102
186 107
84
2
18

1?
15

3

7

3
31
31

156

8
8
8
-

-

"i
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

u.

Tabi*

k-ii QuUodial, *U)anaUouiiuf, and S U ip p in f Occupat ion*

-

Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., by industry division, January 1952)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

Packers (women) .... ................................... .
Manufacturing ........................................ .
Nonmanufacturing ......................................

484
285
199

1?6
Retail trade .......................................

73

Receiving clerks .............................. .........
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable gaods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................ .........
Wholesale trade ...................................
Retail trade .......................................

448
159
64
95
289
182

86

Average
hourly
earnings

1.76

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..........................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable gsods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ................... ..................
W Ua Ieecl a + 1*0 A
a4 1 f

A

7
7
-

1

15

12

10

30

1

-

-

12

46
37
9

15

9

12

10

24

-

_

7

_

7

2

64
63

_

_

15

_

-

14
4

1 .7 8
1.78
1.77
1.76
1.81
1.75

451
239“
65
174

1.78
1.78
1.76
1.79

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

38

8
6

7

75
95
75
91
_ l
4
4

5

2
2

5
5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

2

87

2

-

87
87

27
27

-

2

_

_

7

6

42

48
29

2

222
88
134
413
266
76

9
25

2

-

_

16

20

2
2

”

6
6

5

14

~

2
2

2
23

12

114
41
4
37
73
56
17

17
19
16
3

56
38

44
14
4

27
27

14
14

2

i
-

-

-

—

-

-

-

17
-

-

16

4

2 !
2 I

2 j

-

2 ' 17
2

2 i
2
2

-

14

10
4

80 ' 62
18
54

1

38
18
16

32
26
14

17
44
40

2

12

23
7

180

6
1

104
4
4
-

16

8
8

27
_

4

117 __S4_
52
44
4
19
48
25
2
73
73

17

23

7

1

_

3

6

_

7

3

27

15
15

17
15
2

16
16

_

11
3

_

3

3
8
8

3
8
8

19
17
-

27
9
-

63
43
30
13

17

9
18
17

39

29

26
18

10
6

491
300
300

??4

27

11
n

6
5
6
6

1
x

-

-

-

_

_

2

- 1

-

“

_

2
2

100

146

47

127
19

19
17

28
13

2

106
63
-

n

11
8I
31
-

-

-

-

17
17

I

4
19

11!
15

13

13

387
115
46
69
272

286
36
36

127
17

250

no

191

334

1

46

7

2

10 5

325

10 0
12 6

114
12 2

94
14

84
2

-

-

9

1

28

168

10 3

41

59

5

1?

9

3
14
-

6

2
2

12
12
12

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

“

1

2

1

2

%

2

21
6

„
3
3

27
7

2

21
id
18

6

30
26
4

22

11
3
6

51
24
18

10

6

5

1 .6 8

1.79
'1790'"1.84
1.94
1.73
1.75
1.79

11
8

_

7
_

1.80

635

2

27

2

1 .7 8

181
31

rj.i,. J l

—

$
$
$
% $ 5
6
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ,
$ , $
1 .10 1.15 L .20 1.25 1 .3 0 L.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 :
1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2.20 2.25

and
1
1.00 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 l .? 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 .7 0 :
1.75 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 over

$
1.35
1.29
1.45
1 • 57
1.25

212

Shipping clerks ..........................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................. .......

$
$
Jnder L .0 0 1.05

”

1

i
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ......................
Manufacturing .........................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ..................................
Public utilities * ................................
Wholesale trade ........................ ..........
Retail trade .......................................

5,950
12,159“
818
1,311
3,821
693
2 ,3 2 6
714

1 .6 6

5 !

2 i
!

1 .6 8
1.67
1 .8 4
i 1 .6 4
1 .6 5

-

5

-

8

i
- I
i

-

2

6

1765"""'
1.60

80

23

_

8

80

- j
- 1

2

13
2 !

2

6

51

6

41 !261
9 255
75
9 180
6
32

23

51

7

1

6

16
16

161
69
69
92

332 1284 L223
502
140 350
125
67 255
15 283 247
192 934 721

497
196
107
89

301

72
209

3
268

85
12 0

6

1

“

i

i

15

9

24

3

61

52

1

1

78

8

-

-

26

1

27
64

18 1
10

8 18
38

493
220

16

I
5

5

28

34
4

34

2

'

I
}

343
134

62

6
11

-

1

7

6
6
-

1
-

-

J
tons) ...................

WU* 1 A ■Q 1 A f 1*0A o
Retail trade .......................................

683
1 *51

1 .8 1

35
116

Truck drivers, light (under

1 .8 5

532
342

1 .7 8

-

1 .7 5
1 .8 0

-

77

1.94

"

1

"
-

- j

1 .9 7

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,




!
i

j
!
-

-

xx

7

2

4
-

-

-

1
6
i

15

28
27

30

9

7

15

34
29

15

5

2
2

54
27
5

52
27
20

17
8

23

12
4
4

37
10 8

8

10
88

10 8

6

45

to

2

?

x
x

9

12

28
28

ii

28

32

58

-

25

_

5

-

5

12

-

33

-

-

-

Table a -4:

GutioduU, % aleJixuUuuf,, and S kippin g Occupat ion^ - Gont inu d
m
(Ave r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s 2 / s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a b a s i s
in San Francisco-Oakland,

C a l if., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n ,

J a n u a r y 1 9 52)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Occupation and industry division

Cnderjl.00 1.05 |f.10 1 .1 5

I

”“ j

"

W

|
1 '

"W

101

3 ,2 3 4
97 0
1 ,1 5 7
1 ,0 6 2

1

1

6

3

18

_1

1 .8 7
2 .0 8
1 .9 6
1 .8 9

298

1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 over

,25 1.30 1.35 tl.40 1.45

$
1 .9 6

3 ,6 3 3

and

1 .

- I
-

oo j l . 05 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1.20

Truck drivers, medium (1? to and including
4 tons) ......... ............................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Public utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ............................

% $

$
$
$
|
$
$
$
$
s
$
,20 1.25 £.30 f .35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

!

1
1

6
6

3
3

2.00

18
3
15

20
17
17

4

-

-

-

-

3

1
2

4
4

731
395
25
311

-

1 .9 5

674

186
24
17
7
162
91
42
29

751
20
20

-

74
30
44
600
336
225
39

210 1245
82
20
7
20
75
190 1163

-

105
85

577
586

219

81

78
9
69
141
128
2
11

-

145

1

83

67
22

-

22

1

45

-

~

-

81

-

1

81

62
1
61
83

-

-

!
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
type) ........................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ............................

637
T77
58
119
460
244
161

20

8
8
8

2 .6 0
!
!
j

1 .9 9
2 .0 0
2 .0 2
1 .9 9
2 .0 6

-

-

-

-

-

I

!
1

-

i -

i -

_

[-

-

20
8
12

|

~W
5~
45
61
406

270

1 ,1 4 3

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......
Manufacturing ...................... .
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

246

1/
2/
*
**

265
441
43 7
176
16

1 .9 8
1 .9 4
1 .8 9

i

1 ,0 5 9

-

~

I 1 .8 1
"T 7731 .7 0
1 .7 5
1 .9 3
1 .8 1

-

“

~

.

1 .9 9
2 .0 4

_

_

l

2

-

4

13

10

1

98
98
5
93

12 ;
- 12 |
1 : ~i 1

-

-

-

8
71
7

-

13

7

1

13

I 1 .6 5
! 1 .6 5
! 1 .6 6

-

“ i

-

12

22

10
0

18

11 1 13
6
6

18

11 |

3'

7
- j
1
2

27 | 58!
5! 28
5; 18
- ! 10
22
30
18
3
17
4
3

"

79
6
6

73

10
52

j

7

1
!

474
67
31'
36
407
5;

1
2

6! 60
6 j 58
6|

6
52
2

-

65,
55
45 j
54
4 0 1 16!
29!
!4|
20|
l!
5!
1|

_

51
50
3
47
1

31
41
41

54
54

69
18
51
235
66
144

20
20l
20!

-

1

!

_
4
4

-

27;
5:
-

41!
37;
7
30
4!

27
73

6
20
20

7
3
6
6

-

6
6
6
-

-

18
2
-

7.
3
22
-j
22
49
46 ;

13
13
13

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

8
3
3

-

-

5

5

-

i

7
48
48

~

-

_

_
~

-

-

-

21

3

_

-

-

-

3
3

21

-

~

-

81
81

.

_
-

6

-

_

i
_ 150
-I 150

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

~

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

J

-

j

-

Ji

-

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

_

81

_
-

_
_

69
126
75
6

|
_

55
7

68
1
1
~

;

2

6

-

2
16

195
69

26

5

7
7
7

-

j

69
68

29
17
147
42

106
33

-

66
66
7
59

-

46

-

29
29
29;

-

193

99
68
11
57
31
31
~

-

43
39
4

5
22
22i

4

1
9

2
2

4:

711
16
5'

1

-1

~

i239; 1 6 0 : 47
5 5 , 168 i 1 1 7 1 47
55 1 6 4 ! 9 8 1 32
- 1 0 4 1 191 15

2

1 .6 5

21
2
2

2:

67

31

“i

8

lo!

—r ! TA1
L~

H! 01

-

10;

1.78

| 1 .4 5
1 .5 2
1 .4 7
1
4
5
1 5.5 6
1
9
1 .4 2
719
1 .5 7
41
1 .3 1
59
1 .3 5

~w

1

4 1

_

1 .9 8

2 2 I" "05”
0

88
114
44

2

1

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




394 ?

11
11

1
512

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ..................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ............................

Watchmen .......................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ....................... .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................... .
Public utilities * .....................
Retail trade ............................
Finance ** ..............................

-

6

-

72
31

'

!
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ...............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Wholesale trade ........................

-

160
55
18
37
105
75

_

!-

-

16.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
GotuLf and OtU&l GonJfection&Uf PaoAu c U

Table B-2071:

V

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N u m b er
of
w orkers

Occupation and sex

%

%

h o u rly
earnings

2/

$
!
$
$
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20
and
undez
L.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 tL.25

$

i

$
$
$
$
!
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
i
and
11.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 . 9 0 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20|2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
:
i

over

i
1
!

Candy makers, class A ...........
Candy makers, class B ........... .
Candy makers* helpers ........... .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Machinists, maintenance ......... .
Maintenance men, general utility ,
Stock handlers and truckers, hand

$
1.83
1.52
1.32
1.57
1.97
2.25
1.52

74
71
47
27

6
9
124

:

1

-

-

6

1 - i
- ! - !
2

-

! -!j
l
i

j
Women

!
:

Inspectors, c a n d y ............... ,
Packers, hand, bulk .............
Wrappers, machine ............... ,

33

1.31
1.26
1.26

132
72

-

2
1

4

i - ■ 9
! l
1 i : j

-

30

-

-

8

21 S

-j

6
|

8
1
6

7
1
1

-

3

3
9

10

-

6

1

-

1
1
3

-

!

! - ! 15
1 - ! 104
1 4 i - ! 47

4

4

2

2

!

11
3
1
2

4
1

1

-

-

-

8

3

6
1

4
1

-

-

1
3

1
2
1

-

-

i

3

1

1

-

i

3

-

-i
-|

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

2

-

-

_

7

-

3

1

‘

2

6

!

2
26
13

6

1

1

1
1

i

!
j

-

28
31

65

j

J

i
j

!

___

____

J

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of candy and other confectionery products (Group 2071) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
g / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.

Table

b

l i t om en'd and M iddled' Goatd and S n iid

-2337*

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and sex

All plant occupations:

$
1.90

T o t a l .........................
Men ........ ...... .........
Women ......... .............

824
203

621

2.74
1.63

Cutters and markers (46 men and 3 women) 2/a .........
Fressers, hand (18 men and 18 women) 3 / a .......... .
Pressers, machine (25 men and 2 women;
...........
Sewers, hand (finishers) (women) 2 / b •••••••..........
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (tailor)
system (men and women) 3/b ...... •••••......... ...••
M e n ................... ................................
W o m e n ........ ...................... ••••••••••••••••

49
36
27
266

2.91
2.20
2.40
1.45

%/&

$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
j
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
Average
hourly 0.75 0,80 0.85 .0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 jl.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00
earnings
and
“
1
under
2/
.80 .85 ' .90 .95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1 .4 0 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1 . 9 0 i
2.00 2.20 2 .4 0 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20

54
138

2.16
3.00
1.83

and
over

1

11
11

B

2
17
- i 1 1
2 ! 16

9
-

3 :

9

44
3
41

58
2
56

_

_ !

_

_

_

_

-

-

- 1

- i

1

-

4

-

3

2 (

9

3

31

3 ;
-

9
i

192

$
4.20

-

-

- •

j

2
- ;
2

3

2
-

3

2

j
54
1 ! 2
47 ! 52

35 ; 18
6
- s
6

5
5

1

57
1
56

1
2
15

2

4

24

24

7
7

52
60
49
11
5
7
47 | 49 ! 42

51
7
44

•

4

12
12

_
1
2
24

10
2
8

16
16
|

i 6i
1
5

46
19
27

52
24
28

20
17
3

29
20
9

_

_
1
3
15

5
1
1
8

13
2

2
1
3

17
1

-

3
3

1

1
-

-

-

-

1 24

_
1
5 1 1 ,
- !
3
19
; 17 !
16
2 !
14 !

60
15
45

32
8

6
7
1
6

26
7
19

18
8
10

4
3
25
7
18

-

7
5
2

1
4
2
2

6
6
-

4
4

8
8
-

14
9
5

4

5
4
1

!

7
7
-

12
10
2

6
5
1

17
15
2

2
4

2
2

_

_

2
2
-

-

5
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

;

-

_

1
1

-

8
8

i

1/ The study covered regular (inside) shops with 8 or more workers
in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared b y
the Bureau of the
Budget.
Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Data relate
to a September 1951 payroll period*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
„ ,,
, _
T
5/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
U #S* DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




17

/M ilLu&lk 1/

Table B-2431:

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation

s
1$
is,
$ , $
Average
hourly Under 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70
earnings

Number
o
f
workers

2/

u

1.50

$
2.04
2.05

133
127

Assemblers, sash, door and f r a m e ......... •••••••••••.

$

$

$

$

!
$

$

1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50

%

1.551.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 11.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60

-

-

1

-

-

” !

-j

18

-

100
105

4
12

-

6
10

-

4

-

-

-

Cut-off-saw operators (treadle-operated or
40

2.04

28
24
22
19
67

2.16
1.79
2.11
2.03
1.77

- ;
2 1

_

- ,

-

;
- i
16

-

38

Molder and sticker operators (set-up and
operate) ..............................................
Off-bearers, machine ...................................
Planer operators (set-up and operate) .................
Rip-saw operators .......................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand .....................
Truck drivers, medium (1& to and including
4 tons) ...............................................

2

38

1.91

- :

-

-

-

;

]

.

.

-

-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of millwork
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget, Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period,
2 / Data limited to men workers; sdl workers were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

_

_

_

4

16 !

3

2

n

_

4
-

8
6

2

-

4

-

-

2

12
2

*
15

- 1

5 ! 17
5I
21
7

~

4

4

8

-

_

6

-

_

2

2

~

4
-

4

3

-

|

-

i ____
_

(Group 2431) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945

2/

'ptoouO U et,

Table B-336:

1/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F—

Occupation and sex

N um b er
of

A verag e
hourly
earnin gs

/

2
All Plant Occupations
All workers

$
309

1.85

1
*
is
$
$
s
is
$
$
1$
$
$
1$
1$
$
$
s
Is
$
:$
Is
1 Is
$
1
$
1
$
L.40 |l.45 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .65 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2.00 2 .0 5 ;2 ,1 0 | 2 .1 5 12:.20 2 .2 5 2.30| 2 .3 5 2.4012.45 2.50 2 .6 0
!
and _
f a f i i - a 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 i1 . 8 5 11 .9 0 1 .9 5 ! 2,00 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 i 2 .1 5 !2 .2 0
1
!
1
!
1
j
1
:
i
2
1
61
26
1
47
37
21 | 23
4
3 1 2 i 49
5
5
|

!

Selected Plant Occupations - Men
Chippers and grinders
Coremakers, hand .....
Furnace tenders ......
Mechanics, maintenance
Molders, hand, bench ,
,
Molders, floor ....... .
Molders, m a c h i n e .... ,
Sand mixers ....... .
Shake-out men
Truckers, hand .......

1/
2/

59
32

1.72
2.06

20

6

1 .8 2
2.00

14

2.07

10

2.12

44

16

2.09
1.64

16

1.61

6

1.57

-

! "
I "
-

12
3
31
13
- i “ j ~ : 15 ■ -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_ !

5
, 12

~

-

_

6

1

9 |

_
-

-

2

_

4 ,

| i ; -

: -

-

-

-

:
—

:
~

:
; : 2
1 :
•

!
2
1 13
! 3
! ® l .
1 7 - 4
U

8
5
3
5

!
:

_
I
- ; -

1

2

9

3

-

-

1

-

i
' 2
i -

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

2
1

_

_

_

-

5

:

1

_

6

16

!
; 6
;

_

i

2 .2 5 :2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2.40 2 .4 5 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0
^
i
j

1

_
_

_

_

! 4

*

The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers. Data relate to a July 1951 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
206397

0 - 52 - 3




Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LARCE
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18,

jle o t U

Table B-3439:

U

f A 'p jX O S l& L U

1/

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF

Occupation

2/

N um ber
of
workers

58
59

*
L$
$
i
$
1.35 i.40 1.45 1 .5 0
and ! _
_
_
under
1.4-0 1.45 1.50 1.55

Average
hourly
earnings

$
1.75
1.59
1.72

2/
Assemblers, class A .....................................
Assemblers, class B ....................................
Chippers and grinders ...................................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ............ ..........................
Painters, rough .........................................
Power-shear operators, class A ........................
Tunch-press operators, class A ........................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand .....................
Tool-and-die makers ....................................
Welders, hand, class A .................................
Welders, machine, class A ..............................

6
30
9

10

28
8

36

1.75
2.41

27
38

_ I
“ 1

3

6

1.93
1.77

26

15
5

_

1

14 i
- i
!
_ :

5

32
_ j

_

-

8

8

11

2

_ ;

1

4 !

!
2

3
1

1
1

1

6

7

1

i

1

18

10

7

10

13

1

1 .6 8

21

-

i

1.75
1.69
1.70

53

2
_ !
j

$
1$
$
:
$
$
1
$
$
s
$ ,
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.55 11.60 1.65 1 .7 0 ;1.75 1.80 | .8 5 1.90 jl.95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35 i2.4Q! 2.45 2.50
1
P.
,
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.30 1.85 1.90 1.95 12.00 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.4-5 2.50 2.60
i
-----

A
- .. ----- 1 ---..
.
-

!

_|
1;

i

1
i

M

a c J t iH & U f

! ) w S u d fr U e d

!
li

: .. .
..

1/ The study covered establishments engaged in the manufacture of domestic and industrial oil burners (Group 34-32) and nonelectrical heating and cooking apparatus
in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a November 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers; all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-35:

-!
1

18

1
!
....

19

~
4

."

“

4

2

(Group 34.39) as defined

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A iG H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2/

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

1$

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a r n in g s

J n d e r l , ,50

688
452
182
38
214
66
166
1 ,6 8 2
133

1 .8 5
2 .0 0
2 .0 1
1 .9 3
2 .0 2
1 .7 7
1 .7 3

208
67
108

1 .6 9
1 .8 0
1 .7 6 '

h i

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
j$
65 jl.7 0 L.75 1 .8 0 [l .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .4 5 2.501 2.6C

L.50 1, .55 1 . ,60 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 |l.75 L.80 1 .8 5 !l .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .4 5 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 i o v er
_

1 .9 6
1 .7 0
1 .6 5
2 .1 4
2 .0 1
1 .8 2
1 .5 4
1 .9 8
1 .8 9

35
164
58
56
198
692
23

1 . 55 1 .6 0

\

2J
Assemblers, class A ........... ................... .......
Assemblers, class B ...................... ........ ......
Assemblers, class C ......................................
Electricians, maintenance ...............................
Inspectors, class A .................................... .
Inspectors, class B ...................... .............. .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ........................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A
........
Drill-press operators, radial, class A .............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A .................... ...............
Engine-lathe operators, class A .....................
Grinding-machine operators, class A .................
Milling-machine operators, class A ..................
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A,.... .
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 5/ ........
Drill-press operators, radial, class B .............
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B ...................................
Grinding-machine operators, class B .................
Milling-machine operators, class B .............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), class B .......................
Machine-tool operators, production, class C £ / ........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C ...................................
Milling-machine operators, class C ..................
Machine-tool operators, t o o l r o o m ............ ..........
Machinists, p r o d u c t i o n ........................ .........
Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ......................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) ......
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) .........................................
Welders, hand, class A ..................................

!*

-

_

_

_

|

-

255
161

-

i 40
| 7

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

78

8

-

-

-

-

H
-

20
8

-

:

;

-

2
4

_

_

"

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

!
j

-

4
-

-

:
!
;

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

'
'

-

-

-

-

'

!
|
'

|

-

8

_

135
7

_

_

10
7

35 1
_

36

-

-

195
3

6
4
42

72
4
28

9
59
38

_

_
-

224

46

4
17

67
19

-

35
88

2
2

3
5

11

_

-

51
95
45
300
97
40

1 .6 8
;1 .6 4
2 .2 0
!1 .9 8
'1 .7 3
2 .4 3

1
:
!
:

-

-

-

j

-

4

-

;

-

-

-

265
347

2 .3 8
2 .0 0

'
j1

_

_

-

-

53

-

13
43

33

70

_

28

-

-

_

_

i 17
1 129 ! _
31
i 27
i 42
1 28 J 165

5
4

_

2

_

_

_

7

-

_

4

-

82

_

7

7

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

! _

..

_

_

_

_

13

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

! 26

_

_

_

I.

[

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

96 1 71
- ! 24
-

_

!

_

_

_

_

_

..

4

_

_

98

23

28
12

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

"

!

_
_

27

1-

!

146

136

19

-

10

' 8

7

-

;

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

-

4

-

-

9

_

-

20

I
-

!

1

_

_

-

-

,
-

_

4

4

_

-

-

4

_

-

16

-

.

20

16

_

-

-

*

7

-

-

-

229
-

32

-

25
-

_

940
66

-

-

-

i
|

6
103
8

-

-

-

_

!1 .8 2
| !.6 6

42

! 87 j 20 j 68
31 ! 1
1
_

4

122
310

406

_

48

14
1
198
7

-

1

24
4
1

-

8
8
131
36

79
23

64
6

1

21

121

,

82
95

!

_

,

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 354-3) with more than 7 workers were included. Data relate to a November 1951
payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers; all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
4 / Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $1.25 - $1.30; 44 at $1.4-5 - $1.50.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
2/
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Rcul>VOCuU 1/

Table B-^0:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$

y

................... .

Maintenance men, general utility ......................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)....................
Paint.pf*s, maintenance ............................. .
Pipe fitters, maintenance

J-Lj

34
12

Truck drivers, light (under l £ tons) ..................
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ............................

3

1

1.98
1.69
1.57
1.56
1.97
1.97
1.97
1.85
1.96
1.97
1.62
1.74
1.76

2

1

32
19

— !

_

-

The study covered railroads (Group 40) with more than 20 workers
pared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

-;

A verage

-

~

_

2

302
3
~

_

_

-

_

_

~

30
5

7

_
i ____

-

_

_

-1
11
11

-

_

447
46
25
4
86
110

-

-

1

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

1 ____
_

i _____

_

_

_

_

~

i
____ _

as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) pre­

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

2/
$
3 5 .0 0

W e e k ly
3 2 .5 0
and
|
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d ) u n d e r !
3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

-

9 hAU/UMU>C C&WlieSUsl/

Table B-63:

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

_

—

~i

!

1/

_

-

10t
-

1_____ _____

Occupation and sex

3
96

i.a
i.

i

(women)

|

1 .8 8

97
484
45
19
447
46
25
17
97
110

P

Janitors and cleaners

$

6

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) ..
Electricians, maintenance ..............................

h

of
w
orkers

2/

i 1 1

Occupation

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.45 1 . 5 0 |l.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25
1
and
1
under
1.50 1.55 1.60 I .65 1.70 1*75 1.80 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0

Average
hourly
earnings

$
3 7 .5 0

$
4 0 .0 0

4 0 .0 0

4 2 .5 0

$
4 2 .5 0

4 5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

5 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0

$
5 5 .0 0

$
5 7 .5 0

60.00 162.50

4 5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

5 0 .0 0

‘5 2 . 5 0

5 5 .0 0

5 7 .5 0

6 0 .0 0

62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

14

28

1

4

65.00

$

$

67.50

70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

$

2i»5Q. 75.too

%
90.00

$

$

95.00 100.00

and

80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

1

Men
i

$

Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ............ .
Clerks, a c t u a r i a l ............. .
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, general ............... .
Section heads .................. .
Tabulating-machine operators ...
Underwriters ....................

13 0

3 9 .0

6 0 .0 0

33

3 9 .0

5 3 .5 0

-

-

-

50

3 9 .0

8 5 .0 0

-

-

-

85
24 0

3 8 .5

5 4 .5 0
9 7 .0 0

-

-

3 8 .5

-

-

81

3 9 .0

6 6 .5 0

-

-

-

369

3 8 .5

!

2

1

_

i
1

8

3

4
-

6

i

4
-

7 9 .5 0

!
1 4
_

-

-

-

-

4

1

1

-

-

6
;

!

7

8

6

7
-

7

|
1

n

!
24
_ !

-

1

1

_

13

:

12

2:

4

9

!

1

2
1
u
23

5

10 I

1 / 92

4 !
23 ,

y &

Women
1

Assemblers .....................
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ............ .
Clerks, actuarial .............
Clerks, correspondence, class B
Clerks, file, class A .........
Clerks, file, class B .........
Clerks, general ...............
Clerks, underwriters .......... .
Key-punch operators ........... .
Premium acceptors .............
Section heads ................. .
Stenographers, general .........
Tabulating-machine operators ..
Typists, class A .............. .
Typists, class B ..............
U n d e r w r i t e r s ....................

38

3 9 .5

522
91

3 8 .5
3 9 .0

41

•1 4 6 . 5 0
| 4 9 .0 0

-

! 4 8 .0 0

-

| 4 8 .5 0

-

3 9 .5

1

n

11

12

20

56

4
-

8

1

7

4

8

1

74
12

7

8

58

66

70

47

50

32

!

13

26

12

4

7

-

3
-

2
-

8

!

|

18 ,

2

8

16 0

3 8 .5

i 4 8 .0 0

-

-

21

22

16

i

22

3 9 .0

: 4 0 .5 0

161

146

97

65

i

36

8

3

7
_

635

3 7 .5

i 4 5 .5 0

10 4
-

5
-

24

632

59

93

11 5

76

!

82

67

26

25

28

18

123

3 8 .5

! 5 0 .5 0

-

i

6

10

15

354

3 8 .5

4
1 0

21

-

4
-

14

! 5 1 .0 0

25

32

17

3 9 .5

1 4 2 .0 0

-

57

47
80

i 6 5 .0 0

-

12
-

8
-

4
-

8
-

445

3 7 .5
3 9 .0

i 5 2 .5 0

8

-

18

22

43

53

3 8 .5

! 5 5 .0 0

-

-

1

-

4

-

24

85

15 2

42

69

155

21 3

846

l

3 8 .5

! 4 9 .0 0

-

692

!

3 8 .5

1 4 3 .0 0

8

74

!

3 8 .5

i 6 1 .0 0

"

“

~

“

21

18

12

|
i

1

8

28

52

43

-

;
i

4
-

8

1

1 7

49
-

31
-

48

52

32

51

4
40

10

7

9

17

2

105

143

25

32

17

u
n

149

1

149

1 3
0
;
4

n
4

66
9
12

:

6
4

2

1!
_I

19
9
13

2
46

8:

6

16

17

3
18

18

15 i
14!

-1
4 '

20

i____________

1/ The study covered Insurance Carriers (Group 63 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to an October 1951 payroll period•
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
9 at $100.00 - $105.00; 14 at $105.00 - $110.00; 4 at $110.00 - $115.00; 10 at $115.00 - $120.00; 2 at $120.00 - $125.00; 20 at $125.00 - $130.00; 13 at
Workers were distributed as follows:
$130.00 - $135.00; 13 at $135.00 - $140.00; 7 at $140.00 - $145.00.
Workers were distributed as follows: 7 at $100.00 - $105.00; 3 at $105.00 - $110.00; 6 at $110.00 - $115.00; 4 at $115.00 - $120.00; 8 at $120.00 - $125.00; H at $130.00 - $135.00.

y




Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

C:

20,

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

B u ild in g Go*Ut>lUctton

Table C - 2 0 3 :

Ga*t*U*U^ (

Table C-205:

BaJz&UeA

-

C o n tin u e d

a n d V e^ etalU ei) - C ont i n u ed
January 2, 1952

City and classification

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$3.25
2.45
2.65
2.45
3.167
2.75
1.70

40
40
40
35
30
40
40

3.25
2.45
2.75
2.45
3.125
2.75
1.70

35
40
40
35
40
40
40

City, sex, and classification

Oakland

Hours
per
week 1/

San Francisco
••».«....«*

Painters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building laborers ......................... .

Women
Floorladies
Women workers, except floorladies .......

$1.34
2/ 1.18

40
40

f

1
The maxi mum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week except during seasonal operations when "exempt"
weeks m a y be claimed in accordance with provisions of t h e
Fair Labor Standards Act.
2/
This rate is also t h e basic guaranteed hourly rate
for all workers (both m en a nd women) in any job categories
which m ay be placed on an incentive method of payment.

T ab le c - 2 0 5

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,685
1.765
1.585

37$
37$
37$

2.205
2.145

37$
37$

2.055

37$

1.685
1.765

37$
37$

1.380

40
38

San Francisco - Continued

Oakland - Continued

Bricklayers ...............................
Carpenters ................................
Electricians .................. .............
Painters
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building l a b o r e r s ......... .................

Bricklayers
Carpenters

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

: Bahe/iied

Bread - Machine shops: - Continued
Bench-machine helpers:
First year .............. •••••••••••••••
Second year ........ •••••••••••••••••••
Pan g r e a s e r s ....... •••••••••••............
Cake - Machine shops:
Foremen
Mixers, icing mixers, ovenmen ....... .
Ingredient scalers, scaling-machine
operators, cake dumpers, bench hands,
grease-machine operators, women
auxiliary w o r k e r s ................. ......
Helpers:
First year ••••••.................. ••••••
Second year ..............................
Women workers:
Floorladies ..............................
Cake wrapping-machine operators ••••••••

1.275

January 1, 1952
Table C - 2 0 3 :

Gci+t+U*Uf, ( ty/Uutd

City and classification

<md ,U jetfeialU e4')

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Table C-2081:

ftQMcUcoUolic, BetteAGXf&d
January 1, 1952
Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$77.00
76.50

40
40

Oakland

January 1, 1952

City and classification
City, sex, and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week 1/

Oakland
Men
Bracket I:
(Examples:
Cannery mechanics, class 1;
printers, labels and forms; and
seamer mechanics, class 1) ......... .
Bracket II:
(Examples:
Cannery mechanics, class 2;
head labeling operators; seamer
mechanics, class 2; and shipping
leadermen) ............ ................
Bracket III:
(Examples:
Cannery mechanics, class 3;
cooks, tomatoes; label-machine
operators; retort operators; and
syrup makers) ...................... .
Bracket IV:
(Examples:
Coil cleaners; feeders,
labeling machine; hand casers; and
liner operators) ......................
Bracket V:
(Examples:
Can run attendants; can
forkers; car and truck loaders; and
labeling inspectors) ..................




Bread - Hand shops:
Foremen, o v e n m e n ................... .
Bench hands .................... ..........
Bread and c ake - Machine s h o p s :
Foremen, dough mixers, ovenmen ..........
Dividers, molders, roll-machine
operators .......... ....... .............

$2,000
1.830

40
40

2.145

37$

2.055

San Francisco
Bottlers ....................................
Driver— salesmen •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

37$

San Francisco
Table C-20 8 2 :
$1.90

40

Bread - Hand shops:
Foremen
Dough mixers, o v e n m e n ................... .
Bench and machine helpers ............... .
Cake - Hand shops:

2.003
1.927
1.563

40
40
40

................ .....

2.003

Mixers, o v e n m e n ........ ..................
Helpers:
First y e a r ......................... .
After first y e a r .................... .
Pan cleaners
..... .
Bread - Machine shops:
Foremen
Dough mixers, ovenmen ..•••••••..........
Dividermen, molders, roll-machine
operators, ingredientmen, benchmen,
bread rackers, pan greasing-machine
operators, women bench helpers ••••••••
Flour dumpers .................. ......... .

1.927

40
40

1.411
1.563
1.411

40
40
40

2.205
2.145

37$
37s

2.055
2.055

37$
37$

Foremen
1.73

1.55

40

40

1.42

40

1.34

40

M /cUt jBjXfrU&U

January 1, 1952

City and classification

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$77.00
79.00
81.00

40
40
40

81.50
83.50
85.50

40
40
40

77.00
79.00

40
40

San Francisco
Bottlers:
First shift ...................... .
Second s h i f t ......... .................. .
Third shift ................................
Brewers:
First shift ............................... .
Second shift ................. •••••••••••••
Third shift .................. •••••••......
Clerks (shipping and receiving) and
checkers:
First s h i f t ............. ......... ....... .
Second shift ........................... .

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif,, January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor Statistics

21,

Table C-2082: M & l t

JldXfrUOAA “ C o n t i n u e d

Table C-12: M e t o ^ P u i e k

Table C-Al: J l o C d l <
1'U2*tUt

Qp&iattiuf SmptoKfeed- Continued
January 1, 1952

City and classification

October 1, 1951
Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

San Francisco - Continued
Clerks (shipping and receiving) and
checkers: - Continued
Ihird shift ..............................
Drivers:
Keg beer, bottle beer, shipping
and special trucks ..................
Helpers:
Keg beer, bottle beer, and
shipping trucks ................ .
Night loaders (second s h i f t ) ..............

City a nd classification

40

80.50

Hours
per
week

40
A0

Table C-U:

$ 1 ,6 3 5

48

M e t o ^ l P u i c k jb'Uvefrd

<md Jtelpebd
Table C-27: P A K n U t U f

Rate
per
hour

HOUT8
per
week

San Francisco and Oakland
B o o k and job shops:
Bindery w o m e n .............. .............
Compositors, hand ••••••.•••••••••••••••
E l e c t r o t y p e r s ......
Photoengravers •••••••••••••••••••......
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press ........................
Platen press ..••••••.••••......•••••
Pressmen, cylinder ..................... .
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work
Night w ork ..•••••••••........ ..•••••
Mailers:
D a y w o r k ......... •••••••••........ .
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ...................... •••••••
Night work ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Stereotypers:
Day work .........................
Night work ........ ....... ••••.......

$1,580
2.763
2.733
2.758

37 }
37}
37}
36}

2.200
1.752
2.763

37}
37}
37}

2.715
2.848

37}
37}

2.439

37}

2.608
2.741

37}
37}

2.597
2.731

37}
37}

Table C-U: J l o C d l *J>lKindti

Opebatiuf Cmptotfeed
October 1, 1951

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Oakland
Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and bridge trains:
First 6 m o n t h s ....... ....... ........
After 6 months ••••........ ..........




$1,480
1.530

40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

City a n d classification

Rate
per
hour

Ho UT8
per
week

Oakland
Beverage drivers:
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B .............................. .
Agreement C .............................. .
Building:
Construction:
Dump truck:
4 cubic yards or less .............
4-6 cubic y a r d s .................
6-8 cubic yards .......... •••••••••
8 cubic yards and over ••••••......
Concrete-mixer truck:
3 cubic yards o r less ........ .
4-5 cubic yards .............. ......
Tank or w a t e r truck:
400 gallons or l e s s ......
Over 400 gallons ...... .••••.......
Transport, heavy d u t y .... .......... .
Winch truck and "A" frame ............
Helpers ........................... .
Material:
Dump truck:
4 cubic yards or less .............
4-6 cubic yards ......... ..........
6-8 cubic y a r d s .................. .
8 cubic yards and over ••••••••••..
General:
Drayage f o r hire:
Furniture (new) ........................
Furniture m o v e r s ....... ....... .
Less th a n 10,500 pounds ...............
10,500 pounds and o v e r ................
Low-bed dual or more axle trailer ....
Grocery:
Retail
Wholesale
Laundry:
Delivery - Wholesale .....................
Milk:
Regular .............. ...... ........... .

Newspaper and periodical:
Drivers - Day:
First 6 m o n t h s ........................ .
Second 6 m o n t h s ...........
After 1 year ........ ............•••••••
Oil:
Less than 6 months ...••••.... ....... ••••
6 months to 1 year .............. •••••••••«
1—2 years ................................
After 2 years .......................••••••.

$2,126
2.257
2.388

40
40
40

1.820
1.854
1.935
2.005

40
40
40
40

2.013

40

1.770
1.910
2.010
2.420

40
40
40
40

1.690
1.770
1.850
1.890
1.930

40
40
40
40
40

1.630
1.760
1.850
2.220

40
40
40
40

1.750
1.825
1.900

40
40
40

1.738
1.962

40
45 3/4

1.740
1.800
1.862
1.925
1.988
2.050

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.925
1.925
1.800

46
46
46

2.126
2.257
2.388

40
40
40

2.221
2.382
2.513

40
40
40

San Francisco

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

City and classification

City and classification

Oakland - Continued

Operators and conductors:
1-man busses and trackless trolleys,
?—
man
r*sf and cable cars

1
$

77.50
82.50

3)4>iaebd

dfelpebd - Continued
July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

San Francisco

t o . 00

Kind

1.913
1.913

40
40
40

1.800
1.940
2.040
2.450

40
40
40
40

1.925
1.985

40
40

1.790
1.920
2.150
2.100
1.830

40
40
40
40
40

1.770
1.900
2.080
2.310

40
40
40
40

1.940
1.875
1.820
1.930
2.063

40
46
40
40
40

2.095
2.000

44
40

1.875

40

2.000

40

$2,040

Beer • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Building:
Construction:
Excavating and dump truck:
Under 4 cubic y a r d s .......... ......
4-6 cubic y a r d s .......... ••••••••••
6-8 cubic y a r d s ................. .
8 cubic yards and o v e r ........ •••••
Concrete-mixer truck:
2 cubic yards or less ...............
3 cubic yards .......................
4 cubic yards ............. .........
5 cubic yards ........................
6 cubic yards ...... ...... ..........
Material:
Less than 4 cubic yards •«••••........ .
4-6 cubic yards •••••......••••••••••••
6-8 cubic yards •••••....... ••••••••••.
8 cubic yards and o v e r .... .......... .
Commission market:
First 6 months ..................... •••••••
Second 6 months .......... .......... ••••••
After 1 y e a r ....... ...............
Furniture:
Agreement A ............. ................ .
Agreement B ....... .......... •••••••••••••
General:
Under 2,500 pounds ..................... .
2,500-4,500 pounds
.......... ••••
4,500-6,500 pounds
..............
6,500-15,000 pounds ••••••......... •••••••
15,500-20,500 p o u n d s .............. .......
Over 20,500 pounds ......... •••••....... .
Moving:
Large van ................................
1-ton auto truck ............••••••••••••••
Helpers ..••••••••..............o.........
Newspaper - Day:
First 6 months ............................ .
Second 6 months •«•••................•••••«
After 1 y e a r ................••••••«•••••••
Newspaper - Night:
First 6 m o n t h s ....... .................... .
Second 6 months ••.••••••••••......•••••••
After 1 year ••••••••.......••••••••••«•••

22,

Table C-42:

A

fe t a it lU

c A

S b 'U

Table C-4A:

o e ld

July 1, 1951
Hours
per
week

San Francisco - Continued
Soft drink:
Helpers
Shipping d r i v e r s ................. .......

0& & O H

Table C-44:

$ 1 ,9 1 3
1.975

^ A t O H A fi& U

A
Q
A0

-

fyjtliben&ed PeAAonnel 1/
January 1, 1952

Department and classification

Deck department: 2/
Da y men:
A.B. maintenance m e n ......... ......
Boatswains:
Vessels of 15,001 to 20,000
gross tons ............ ••••••••
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross tons ••••••......... •••••
Vessels under 10,000 gross
t o n s ......••••••••••••••••••••
Carpenters:
Vessels of 15,001 t o 20,000
gross tons •••.•••••••••••....
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross tons ..........
Vessels under 10,000 gross
tons ............................
Carpenters’ m a t e s ....... ....... .
Deck storekeepers ••••••••••••••.•••
Watch men:
Able bodied seamen (3 years) .......
Able bodied seamen (less than 3
years) ........ *............. ......
Boatswains' mates ............... .
Ordinary seamen ••.•••••••••••••••••
Quartermasters .......... ............
Watchmen (3 years) ••••••......•••••
Watchmen (less than 3 years) •••••••
Engine-room department: 2/
Da y men:
Chief electricians:
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ......
P-2 turbine vessels •••••••••....
C— 1, C-2, C-3, Victory ships,
and CIMAVI v e s s e l s ........ .
C-A v e s s e l s ......................
Chief reefer engineers:
Freight vessels, less than
52,000 cubic feet .............




^ A t L + U fU v U

Table C-44:

-

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

$315*00

AA

A19*00

AA

402.00

AA

360.00

AA

37A.OO

AA

368.00

AA

337.00
332.00
321.00

AA
AA
AA

288.00

A8

273.00
315.00
228.00
288.00
288.00

A8
A8
A8
A8

273.00

A8
A8

522.63
A96.17

A0
A0

AA8.56
A65.A9

A0
A0

A17.87

A0

Department and classification

Engine-room d e p artment: 2/ - Continued
Day men: - Continued
Deck engineers:
Class A and B passenger vessels ..
Freighters .........................
F i r e m e n ............ ........... .
Unlicensed j u n i o r s ...................
Wipers ............................... .
Watch men:
Chief reefer engineers:
R-2 refrigerator steam type
vessels .......... ........... .
Freight refrigerator vessels,
cu. ft. and o v e r ........
Freight or passenger refrigerator
vessels, less than
......
Class A passenger vessels with
air c o n d i t i o n i n g ........ .......
Firemen .............. ................ .
O i l e r s ................................
Second electricians:
P-2 turbo-electric vessels .......
P-2 turbine vessels ..............
Unlicensed juniors ...................
Watertendera ..........................

52,000

52,000

Stewards department: 3/
Freighters:
Assistant cooks:
Offshore trade ..•••••••••••......
Alaska trade ....... .
Chief cooks:
Offshore trade ................... .
Alaska t r a d e ........... ,.........
Chief stewards:
Offshore t r a d e ....... .............
Alaska trade ••••••••.....••••••••
Mss amen and utilitymen:
Offshore trade ................. .
Alaska t r a d e ........ ..............
Passenger vessels:
Assistant laundrymen:
Class A vessels ............... .
Class B vessels ...................
Chefs, class A vessels ...............
Chief cooks, class B vessels .... .
Head waiters, class A vessels
Linenmen:
Class A vessels ••••••...........
Class B v e s s e l s ............... .
Messmen and waiters:
Class A vessels •••••••........ .
Class B v e s s e l s ........ .
Room stewards, class A vessels ......
Second stewards:
Class A vessels ...................
Class B vessels ........ ...........

0& & O H

^ A & n & fU v U

-

fyjtlteenied P&Uonnol 1/ - Continued
January 1, 1952

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

City and classification

6& & G U

fynli& eni& d PeAAonnol l/- C on tin u ed

&nd Jtelpete-Cont inued

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

362.83
27A.79

A0
A0
A0
A0
A0

A42.91

A0

361.A1

A0

38A.A2

A0
A0
A0

Stewards department: 3 / - Continued
Passenger vessels: - Continued
Silvemen:
Class A Vessels
Class B vessels ...................
Storekeepers:
Class A vessels
Class B vessels ...................
Third stewards:
Class A vessels
Class B vessels

Hours
per
week

$ 2 5 2 .9 3
2 3 9 .6 9

AA
AA

2 8 6 .2 7
2 8 6 .2 7

AA
AA

3 0 3 .1 9
28A .15

AA
AA

A0

38A.A2

Rate
per
month

Department and classification

I355.9A
3A2.21

313.08

262.98
262.98

A03.22
377.28
299.A9

262.98

A0
A0
A0
40

266.16

AA
AA

299.A9

AA
AA

330,71

AA
AA

226.A6

AA
AA

266.16

300.02
356.12
232.82
232.82
232.82
58A.71
372.51
307.96
266.16

232.82
226.A 6

AA
AA
AA
AA
A
A
A
A
AA

226.A6
226.A6

AA
AA
AA

A16.95
337.60

AA
AA

1/ All ratings receive $7.50 per month clothing allowance
which is included in the basic rates shown. All ratings of
unlicensed departments also receive additional payment in
accordance with conditions as follows:
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per­
cent or more of dead weight carrying capacity,
$10 per voyage is added.
3. On vessels operated in described areas of China
coastal waters, 75 percent or 100 percent of daily
basic wages, including allowances in lieu of over­
time for Sunday day men, is added according to
degree of proximity t o t h e China coast and adjacent
areas rendered unsafe b y hostilities.
Z / The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week at sea. The maximum straight-time hours which m ay be
worked per week in port are 4-0 for both day m en and watch men.
The basic workweek at sea is 56 hours.
Deck department watch
men are paid 8 hours at overtime rates; deck department day
men are paid 12 hours, and engine-room department day m e n and
watch men are paid 16 hours at overtime rates.
3 / The maximum straight-time hours which m ay be worked per
week both at sea and in port. At sea, the basic workweek for
members of the stewards department is 56 hours with 12 hours
being paid at the overtime rate.

Table C-446:

§ te 4 JL & d < V U M

f

January 1, 1952

Classification

Longshoremen:
General cargo ................................
Paper and pulp in packages of 300 pounds
or more ......... ................. . ........
Shoveling jobs ...........................
Phosphate rock and bulk .....................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.97

30

2.07
2,17
2.27

30
30
30

23

Table C-53*

R

e d ta u U

+ n t i,

C

ja J e J &

t i o d ,,

and JLunc/toaomd
Rate
per
hour

City and classification

Longshoremen* - Continued
Bulk sulphur, sods ash and crude untreated
potash .................................... $2.42
2.82
Damaged cargo ..............................
Explosives ........................... ......
3.94
2.12
Gang bosses, general cargo ...................
Winch drivers, general cargo .................
2.07
2.07
Hatch tenders, general cargo .................
Lift-jitney drivers, general cargo ..........
2.07

fA

iik

^ b e a le A

Hours
per

30
30
30
30
30
30
30

l

Hours
per
week

Oakland
Drivers:
Route salesmen ...................
Haulers:
Single ........................
Semi-truck ....................
Inside workers*
Day*
Plant .........................
Icebox men ....................
Pasteurizers ..................
Nights
Plant .........................
Icebox men ....................
Pasteurizers ..................

$ 2.00

40

2.02

40
40

2.09

1.89
1.94

2.02

1 .9 9

2.04

2 .1 1

40
40
40

40
40
40

San Francisco
Drivers*
Route salesmen ...................
Haulers*
Highway drivers ..............
Truck, trailer, semi-trailer .
Inside workers*
Day:
Plant .........................
Icebox men, weighers, samplers
Pasteurizers ......... ........
Night:
Plant .........................
Icebox men, weighers, samplers
Pasteurizers ............ .




2.00
2.13

2.2 2

1 .8 8
1.94

2.02

Rate
per

..t o

40
40
40

40
40
40

2.00

40

2.06
2.13

40

40

Class A restaurants*
Bus boys and bus girls:
Straight shift ....................
Split shift .......................
Combination bus boys and dishwashers
Cashiers and checkers*
Cashiers*
Straight shift .................
Split shift ....................
Checkers*
Straight shift .................
Split shift ....................
Combination cashiers and checkers*
Straight shift .................
Split shift ....................
Cooks and other kitchen help*
Assistants to any station ........
Butchers ..........................
Chicken and fish butchers ........
Cooks (except pastry)*
Chef or head cook in charge ...
Second cook ....................
All other cooks, except night
cook .........................
Night c o o k ..................... .
Oystermen .........................
Pantrymen*
First pantrymen .......... ..
All other p a n t r y m e n ............,
Pastry:
Cooks:
First pastry couk .......... ,
All other pastry c o o k s .... ,
Ice cream m e n ...................
Helpers in pastry s h o p ........ ,
Waiters and waitresses*
Cash houses*
Straight s h i f t ..................
Split s h i f t .................... ,
Other than cash houses*
Straight s h i f t .... ........... .
Split s h i f t .....................
Nightclubs and cocktail lounges ...
Cafeterias, dairy lunches and soda
fountains*
Bus boys and bus girls*
Straight s h i f t ................ .
Split s h i f t ....................... .
Combination bus boys and dishwashers <
Carvers, salad or sandwich men and
women (when serving the public
directly)*
Straight shift ............... ....,
Split s h i f t ....................... .

/U

m

td ,

C

/o j e t &

t i&

l,

January 1, 1952
Hours
per

City and classification

■MSgfr.. „
San Francisco -

§SA I rsflsipqo

January 1, 1952

City and classification

City and classification

-M gek...

e it o U

and JLnncJiMoml - Continued

January 1, 1952

January 1, 1952

Table C-5452*

R

Table C-53:

$9.00
9.75
10.15

9.95
10.70
10.95
11.70
11.95
12.70
11.80
14.65
11.55
19.45
15.90

Rate
per
day

Hours
per
week

$ 9.95
10.70

374

10.45

37*

Continued

Cafeterias, dairy lunches and soda
fountains* - Continued
Cashiers and checkers*
Straight s h i f t .......... .
Split shift .............................
Food checkers (cafeterias)*
Straight s h i f t .................. .
Split shift .................. .
Combination cashiers and food checkers
(cafeteria)*
Straight shift ................... .
Split shift .............................
Counter, fountain and supply men and
womens
Straight s h i f t .... ......... ........ .
Split shift ......................... ...
Dish-up boys and girls (cafeteria)*
Straight shift ..........................
Split shift .............................
Waiters and waitresses*
Straight s h i f t ...................... .
Split s h i f t ....................... .

37A-

37*
11.20 •'*8
374
37*
12.20 J '2
11.45

9.95
10.70

374

37X
JH
e
9.20 yjk
9.95

37*

8.40
9.30

374
37J

14.65
15.90

1 2 .3 0
Table C-6512:

6 ^ ic C B u U d in f Se/U H C*

13.65

1 2 .3 0
15.90
14.65
13.35

1 1 .3 0

7.40
8.30
8.40
9.30
7.40

January 1, 1952

City and classification

Rate
per
hour

Hour
per
week

$1.17

40

1.35
1.29

40
40
40
40

Oakland
Cleaners (women) ........................ .
Elevator service (men and women)*
Starters ...................... ........ T t M t
Assistant starters ........... ........... .
Operators ...................................
Janitors, watchmen, anH handymen ....... _____ t

1.26
1.26

Sfln F r w g i s g o

9.00
9.75
10.15

11.65

12.40

Cleaners (women) ........ .......................
Elevator service (men and women):
Starters ....... ................. ....... ....
Assistant starters .............. ........ .
Operators ...... .............................
Janitors, watchmen, and handymen ........... .

1.27

0

St&UL&dosUtuj, - Continued

1.46
1.41
1.35
1.35

0000

Table C-446i

8




D:
Table D - i :

Entrance Rates

M in im u m £u t>u iu o e, PcUeA <jok P la n t W anke/id, 1/
Percent of plant workers In establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufacturing

Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries
2/

All establishments ...................................
80 or under ...........................................
Over 80 and under 85 .................................
85 .....................................................
Over 85 and under 90 .................................
Over 90 and under 95 .................................
Over 95 and under 100 ................................
100 ....................................................
Over 100 and under 105 .......... ....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...............................
110 ....................................................
Over 110 and under 115 ...............................
Over 115 and under 1 2 0 .............. ................
Over 120 and under 1 2 5 ....................... .......
Over 125 and under 130 ...............................
Over 130 and under 1 3 5

................... .

Over 135 and under H O

......... ......... ......

Over H O

and under H 5

......................

Over H 5

and under 150 .......................

100.0

Durable goods

100.0

1.5

in

-

1.3
.4
2.9
.5
6.1
.4
4.2
.2
5.0
.6

1.4
1.3
2.0
.4
8.5
2.0
6.5
1.2
6.0

100.0

.

1.8
1.5
.8
.4
.9
.5
.9
9.1
2.8
3.3
3.1

1.0

Nondurable goods

Establishmiants with 501 or
501 or
101-500
101-500
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

5.5
-

1.5
.8
12.8
16.7

.3
2.7

-

5.1

11.8
18.8
18.0

5.2

-

100.0
6.8
8.0
3.0
7.2
8.0
3.6

6.2
8.0
3.4

.
5
2.3
3.5

-

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

_
-

1.8
2.1
38.6
-

-

-

-

2.4
4.8
4.9

1.7
2.5
2.5
-

12.0
3.1
-

5.1

.9

6.7
3.6
20.1
-

2.0
3.2

1.6
18.2
1.8
-

27.6
-

7.5

7.1
8.9
-

13.3
5.3
-

Over 165 and under 170 ........................... .
170 and over .................................... .

4.5
.4
1.5
4.1

4.3
-

5.4
-

4.1

-

-

4.3
7.2

Establishments with no established minimum .........

5.5

6.2

-

-

6.0

7.0

Information not available ............................

5.1

2.8

8.3

.8

Over 150 and under 1 5 5 .................. .
Over 155 and under 1 6 0 ............................
1 6 0 ......................................... ..........
Over 160 and under 165 ...............................

.
5

-

9.6

6.5
6.7
5.0
3.2
3.6
11.7
-

5.2
17.5
-

3.4
7.4

0.8
4.2
1.4
.8

3.5
4.6
2.3
5.7

1.2
8.3
1.7
.4
1.9
6.7

-

3.1
2.5
1.3
4.6
7.3
17.4
3.3
2.0
1.4
7.4
1.4
.3

Services

100.0
10.7
-

4.3
1.0
9.1
3.5
3.3
16.8

6.8
3.6
2.0
4.3
9.1
.6
2.9

-

-

8.1

1.0

-

-

1.4

-

1.1
1.9

.7

-

-

-

-

9.6
-

2.3
-

11.2
2.1
9.1
10.5

2.0
-

5.3
-

3.1

-

1.4
-

-

-

12.6

8.7

6.6

15.5

5.6

'

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, S an Franc!sco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-l*

SUi^t

PAauUianl

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in All manufacturing industries i /
Shift differential

All industries
2d
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ........... ..........
Receiving shift differential ..........

3d or
other
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

17.3

7.2

14.3

1.3

14.2
3.5
8.4
-

6.0
.2
2.5
-

-

-

-

-

3.1
.2
-

5.3

14.4

3.2

5.3
3.1
2.2
-

1.6
.8
.5

_

17.5

9.9
3.3
4.3
-

-

.2

-

Uniform percentage ..................
5 percent ....................... .
7*5 p e r c e n t ............. ....... .
10 percent .......................
15 p e r c e n t ......... .............
20 percent .................. .

4.7
.6
-

.7
-

8.3
.5
7.8

Full d a y ’s pay for reduced hours ...

.2

•2

-

Other -.... ..........................

1.1

.5

.8

Receiving no differential ..............

1.0

.6

1.8

1.3

•2

.3
.1

4.1
-

-

-

.1
.2
.4
(2/)

.3
1.1
.1
.4

1.5
.5
.3
1.3
.7
.6

2d
shift

_

,9.3. ..
.

3d or
other
shift

Sheet-metal
work

2d
shift

0.9

_ 7 .2

.9

3d or
other
shift

Candy and
other
confectionery
____ products_
_
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

10,7

. . 0.7

-

6.3

-

10.7

.7

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

10.7
10.7
-

.7
-

9.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.3
9.3

-

.3
-

14.3
14.3

-

.5

-

.3

-

-

.1

-

-

-

1.3
.9
.4

•4

.3

-

-

-

.1

1.5

i/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.




-

Heating
apparatus

3d or
other
shift

2.5

4.5

Uniform cents (per hour) ...........
4 cents ...........................
5 cents ...........................
6 cents ...... ....................
8 c e n t s ......................... .
10 cents .........................
12 cents ..........................
13.3 c e n t s ........ ...............
13*5 c e n t s .......... .............
16 cents .............. ..........
35 cents .........................

1.1
.8

2d
shift

. 15.0

16.2

3.9
.1
1.7
.2
1.6
.1
-

3d or
other
shift

_ -7.2

5.9
15.9

Nondurable goods

Durable goods
2d
shift

Machinery
industries

-

-

-

.7
-

.9
.9

-

-

-

6.3
6.3

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.9

-

-

-

_

.9
.7

1.2

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT GF LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Scheduled 'Itf&eJilif, Jlou/U

Teble E-2:

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC ?

W O RK ERS E M PL O Y E D IN -

2/

PE R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN
M an u fac tu rin g

M an u fac tu rin g

Weekly hours

All
indus­
tries

J.Q0.0

Al
l

100.0

35 h o u r s ...... ........ ...... ......... .
Over 35 and under
hours ............
37}- hours ••••••••.......................
Over 37}- and under 40 hours ..................................

1.3
4.6
11.5
10.2
71.8

Over 40 and under 44 hours • • • • • • • • • • • • »

.5
.1
-

100.0

100.0

-

Over 44 and under 43 hours ....................................

-

-

100.0

-

100.0
.

2.1
6.2
.4
89.2
2.1

7.2
10.6
11.2
71.0

-

Retail
trade

♦
**

All
indus­
tries

Services

94.7
-

1.4
86.1

-

4.0

.9

-

-

! 100.0

-

-

-

4.4
8.1

-

100.0
0.1
8.2
19.1
20.9
51.7

100.0

13.2

j

-

!

4.9
9.7
67.7
3.6
.9

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Durable

All

goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

S ervioc«

goods

100.0 _ . 100.0

1Q0.Q

100.0

100.0

.100,0.

L 100.0

i
0.2
•5
^.1
•2
-

-

1.1
1.8
17.0

1.8

-

-

-

1.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

90.0
-

99.1
-

81.2

94.2

99.2

95.5

26.2
2.0
68.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

90.4

.4

.9

-

1.7
2.3

-

2.0

-

.9
8.7

.8
.8

.4

a/)

2J

Finance**

1/
100.0

1.0
9.8
5.9
83.3

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

-

37&

0.3
4.9
10.3
9.5
75.0

Durable
goods

1

•8

-

-

3.6

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3: P & l d cffolidodf*
*

P E R C E N T O F O FFIC E WO RKERS E M PLO Y ED IN —

P E R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K E R S EM PL O Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Number of paid holidays

M a n u f a c t u r in -

1 Q Q .Q

100.0

1

iQ Q .a

100.0

.

o

100.0 _

8

.

H

100. 0 .

O

^

Public
utili­
ties*

N
on­
durable
goods

1 D
urable
j goods

A
ll

1/

L .

W
hole­
sale
trade

1Q Q * Q _

100.0

93.0

97.1

Retail
trade

1

Servioes

i o o .o

100.0

100.0

68.9

1
|

.4
10.7
38.2
18.0
5.4
7.9
9.8
.5

9.0
.1

99.7

99.2

_

99.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

100.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

30.4
57.2
7.0
3.2

26.9
41.6
31.5

-

8.8
83.3
5.6
2.3

3.1
86.6
10.3

1.4

-

7.8
25.1
64.3
.2
1.3
1.3

-

-

-

.3

.8

-

.5

-

99.1

_

28.2
47.3
22.5
1.2
-

100.0

_

-

-

-

-

-

.6
•2
1.0
6*4
12.2
23.2
28.3
1.4
26.7

-

-

-

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




A
ll
indus­
tries

Services

8

2/
2/
*
**

100. Q

Finance**

H

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ....... •••••••••..... .

lQ O .Q

Retail
trade

H

2
d a y s ................... .
5 d a y s .........................
6 days ....................... .
7 days ••••••..................
8 days ••••..•••..............
9 days .............. ..........
1 0 days
...
••••
11 days
••«..............•••••
11} d a y s ......................
12} days ••••••••......... ••••

100.0

W
hole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

N
on­
durable
goods

O

Establishments providing paid
holidays
•••••••..... •••••••••

100.0

A
ll

Durable
goods

8

ill e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ...... ........

A
ll
indus­
tries

3.5
16.7
51.2
17.1
10.6

I

91.4
1.0
.9
17.8
50.2
20.0
1.5

91.1
2.3
2 6 .6

48.7
12.2
1.3

85.5
_

-

25.7
51.4
5.7
2.7

96.4
4.5

_

_

3.3
2.8
78.0
15.9

_

_
_

3.5
16.1
42.6
1.4
5.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

27.3

12.1
21.0
59.9

11.7
69.8
12.3
3.3

4 6 .2

18.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.6

8.9

14*5

3.6

7.0

2.9

-

31.1

-

-

-

(2/)

-

.9

-

_

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
Bureau of Labor Statistics

27.

P a id V&c&tio nA> (tyokm cU Paoo M ohA)

Table E-4l

PE R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K E R S EM PL O Y E D IN —

PE R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O R K ER S E M PLO Y ED I N -

M an u fac tu rin g

M an u fac tu rin g

Vacation policy

All establishments .................... ...

indus­
tries

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

. lOQtO,,
.

100.0

100.0

100.0

. .100*0 _
.

iQ Q tQ

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0
24.0
.4
75.6
-

100.0
17.9
_

100.0
15.8

100.0
19.2
_

100.0
55.3
_

100.0
65.5
-

100.0
2.1
-

100.0
36.2

82.1
-

84.2
-

80.8
-

44.7
-

100.0
32.3
2.5
65.2
-

34.5
-

97.9
-

63.8
-

All
indus­

tries

1/
.I Q

C t Q ..

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0
63.0
8.8
28.2
-

100.0
75.0
18.3
6.7
-

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

.„10PtQ,..IPQ.,0

iq g .o

.I22.Q...

100.0
74.4
3.1
22.5
-

100.0
88.4
11.6
-

Non­
durable

Servioea

goods

..I Q fi.Q

1 year of service

Establishments with paid vacations ....
1 week ................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 weeks ................................................................... .. ...............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks ........................•••••••

“

“

-

—

—

—

"
"

-

“

100.0
67.6
4.6
26.6
1.1
.1

‘

'

100.0
51.6
48.4
-

'

100.0
61.6
1.7
31.0
5.7
“

'

100.0

66.4
32.3
1.3

'

2 iqarg.of service

Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week ............................ .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ••••........
2 weeks .............. ................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ......... .
3 weeks ............................

100.0

100.0

1 .0

1 .0

.9
97.0
.3
.8

.8
98.1
.1
"
"

100.0
1.4
2.0
96.3
.3
—

100.0
.8
99.2
-

100.0
_
6.4
93.6
-

100.0
_

100.0
_
-

100.0
1.5
-

100.0
-

100.0
-

95.9
2.6

—
'

'

'

100.0
4.0
96.0
- ■

100,0
17.6
9.5
71.5
1.3
.1

100.0

100.0
3.2
.3
91.3
3.5
1.7

100.0
3.8

100.0
3.2
.3
64.9
1.6
29.6

100.0
3.8

30.4
17.4
52.2
-

100.0
41.9
35.8
22.3
-

100.0
19.7
80.3
-

100.0
2.3
3.1
87.3
7.3

100.0
6.5
4.5
89.0
-

100.0
1.4
3.3
95.3
-

100.0
25.2
73.5
1.3

‘

5 .Years of service

Establishments with paid vacations ....
1 week ......................... .......
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ••••........
2 weeks ...............................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ........... .
3 weeks .................... ..........

15

.5
89.4
5.5
4.6

100.0
_

100.0
_

92.9
7.1
~

99.3
.7

100.0

100.0

100.0
89.2
10.8
“

100.0
-

95.0
5.0
“

100.0
-

100.0
-

93.8
.8
5.4

98.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

-

1.7

1.5
81.2
9.1
8.2

85.2
14.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

100.0
3.0

-

-

91.5
4.7

94.4
2.6

—

100.0
4.5
88.8
6.7
“

100.0
2.3
1.7
87.0
7.2
1.8

100.0
3.5
-

100.0
-

100.0
7.0
-

95.4
.7
.4

94.5

88.3

-

-

5.5

4.7

100.0

100.0
3.5

100.0

100.0
7.0

yeqrp of g e ^ i c e

Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week ........................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks ........................................................................ ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................................
3 weeks ................................................................ ....................
Over 3 weeks ......................................................................

1/
*
**

100.0
-

100.0
_

_

_

100.0
-

100.0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56.0
.8

54.1

80.1

39.0

79.1

-

-

-

42.5
.7

44.9

19.9

59.4
1.6

27.7

20.9

54.0
1.7
44.3

67.0

-

23.1
1.9
73.7
1.3

72.3

1 .0

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

28.8
4.2

.4

100.0
3.0

100.0
4.5

-

-

-

64.7

75.8

54.3

-

-

-

31.5

21.2

41.2

2.3
1.7
18.5
9.3
66.4
1.8

-

-

-

-

90.8

88.7

80.9

-

-

-

5.7

11.3

11.5
.6

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table £-5:

P a id S ic J l Jl&CMAe> (tyo tU H o l PsiQ4H&iOH<A')
PE R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K E R S EM PL O Y E D IN -

P E R C E N T OF O FFIC E W O R K ER S E M PLO Y ED IN —

M anufacturing

M anufacturing

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

2 /

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Service*

100.0

A.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

ICO.O

100.C

100.0

1
1
1 100.0

100.0

O
O
b

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ........ ..............

indus­
tries

100.0

28.1

18.0

38 .A

6.1

22.6

18.3

20.1

£
*0

Provisions for paid sick leave

12.7

9.5

6.2

3.5

8.8

9.8

12.3

20.3

1.3
1.3
7.0
6.5
2.7
2.8
.6

.3

A.3
8.1

6.7
3.0

_

2.6

3.2
1.6

_

6.1

_

3.5

_

_

-

_

-

«

l.A

_
-

2.7

2.1
2. A

2.1

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

6 months of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................
3 days ................................
A days ................... .............
5 days .............................. .
6 days ......... ............ ..........
7 days ................. ............. . •
10 days ........................... .
12 days ...................................
U days ......... ......... ...............
15 days .................... ......... .
16 days ............. .................
18 days ..................... .........
Over 20 days .........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

(2/)
1.3
.1
A.A
.1

-

5.2
1.0
3.6
6.2
.9
-

.3
.5

_
-

10.1
2.7
9.7
13.5
2. A
-

-

_

-

-

.5
-

_

2.A
(2/)

7.9
3.7
3.2
3.5
3.2

-

2.1
-

-

-

5.A

-

1.1

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

.5

-

.A
.7

-

-

10.A

-

-

.A
A.2

-

_
_

-

7.A
-

10.2

3.6

_

13.1
17.2

2.9

3. A

A.2

-

-

-

.7
A.9

-

-

.6

_

-

3.6

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

13.2
-

_

-

.1
1.2
.A

(2/)

-

5.3

_

(2/)

9.3

.6

-

71.9

82.0

61.6

93.9

77.A

81.7

79.9

53.1

87.3

90.5

93.8

96.5

91.2

90.2

87.7

79.7

95.8

A6.7

A2.9

A5.8

A1.3

81.3

28.5

28.3

5A.A

25.A

26.9

16.7

3.5

29.1

70.1

25.0

23.1

7.8

.9
.A
1A.1
2.5
.1

1.9

3.6

_
_

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................ .
3 days ............................... .
A days ................................
5 days .................................
6 days .......... .................. .
7 days ................................
8 days ........................ .......
10 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
1A days .............. ............... .
15 days ...............................
16 days ............................ .
18 days ...............................
20 days ......... ......................
Over 20 days ............. ....... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. ..

.1

.3

_

-

-

13.1
.7
3.0
.2
12.9
6.8
(2/)
2.3
.1

12.8
(2/)

-

A.A
2.2

-

-

.6
20.1

1.7
21.6

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.7

7.5
1.1
A.2

20.A
(2/)
-

19.3

3.A

-

-

-

-

3.8
.5

9.7

1.3

#o

-

2.6

53.3

.5

_

2. A
7.0

57.1

5A.2

.A
.7

-

15.2
.8

7.5
6.7

3.2

-

38.9

-

25.A
12.7
1.1
-

-

-

-

-

58.7

18.7

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

9.1

3.7

-

-

-

2.2

10 .A

-

-

-

-

1.2

-

71.5

71.7

-

7.3

-

-

-

6.A
2.1

3.5

9.3
A.l

-

-

-

-

-

8.1
15.1

7.0

6.A
1.7

6.3

-

-

.7
-

-

-

-

13.2
5.0

-

A.9

-

-

A5.6

-

-

7A.6

.6

.1
.1

73.1

-

-

83.3

_
_

_

12.1

_
_
_

A2.1
_

_
18.5
9.5

_
_

19.A
2.5
_
_

2. A

_

7. A

_
_
_

_

3.6

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

.7

70.9

12.1

_

-

-

96.5

_

29.9

75.0

-

76.9

3.6
_

2.2
.6

_

l.A

_
_
_
-

92.2

Occupational Wage Survey, San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1952

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Paid SicJz Jl&G4j*e (tf’Gbm&l Pa4M & h &)
M 40

Table E-5

GonttHued

-

PEFCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u fa c tu r i *

M an u fac tu rin g

Provisions for paid sick leave
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

Non­
durable

Durable

All

goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

goods

u

1
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

47.0

All establishments ......................

42.9

45.8

41.3

83.2

29.1

28.3

54.4

25.4

.1
-

#3
7.1
5.3
.6
17.7

_
1.7
13.9
-

.5
-

\

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1C0.0

100.0

27.4

16*7

3.5

29.1

72.2

26.7

23.1

7.8

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions

3 days ................................
A days ................................
5 days ................................
6 days ............................... .
7 days ................................
8 days ................................
10 d a y s .... ..........................
11 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
14 days ...............................
15 days ...............................
16 days ...............................
18 days ...............................
20 days .....................................................................................
Over 20 days ......................................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................................

6.2
2.1
1.8
,9
13.3
.2
5.3
(2/)
2.9
.1
5.5
5.2
3.4

-

_
-

_
8.2

_
_

_
-

_
-

5.7

7.5
1.1
4.2
1.3
-

%
o

_
-

3.6
6.1

1.9
4.8
2.1
7.9
-

3.5
-

-

-

-

-

-

.7
5.7
-

.4
6.5
2.5
.1
6.7
1.7
.2
-

16.4
5.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.7
.7

-

4.9

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
3.6
-

-

6.7
3.2
6.4
24.1
9.0
1.1
29.0
3.7

54.2

58.7

16.8

70.9

71.7

45.6

74.6

72.6

83.3

96.5

70.9

27.8

73.3

76.9

92.2

45.8

45.1

83.2

29.1

28.3

54.4

25.4

28.8

19.7

3.5

34.9

72.2

26.7

23.1

7.8

1.3
-

3.4

2.9
.5
.5
6.7

7.3
1.3
18.2

53.0

57.1

47.7

45.4

-

11.3
8.4
20.0
.4
.7
-

.8

11.5
-

6.7
.7
3.0

-

-

6.7
.6
1.3

-

10.4

-

7.5
-

-

3.4
12.0
11.9
-

-

19.4
2.5
.8

11.7
7.4
-

2.2
.6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.5
16.8
9.5
-

1.6
-

.4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.7
.7

-

-

3.6

-

4.1
15.3
-

42.4
-

1.4

5 vears of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................................
3 days ........................................................................................
4 days .............................................................................
5 days ................................
7 days .............................................................................
8 days .............................................................................
9 days .............................................................................
10 days ...............................
12 days ...........................................................................
14 days ...........................................................................
15 days ...........................................................................
16 days ...........................................................................
18 days ...............................
20 days ...........................................................................
21 to 25 days ...........................................................
30 days ...........................................................................
Over 30 days ..............................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............................................

1/
2/
*
#*

.1
6.2
.8
1.8
.2
1.3
11.3
5.3

7.1
(2/)
-

.6
5.3
9.4
1.3
-

3.6
.1

6.7
.5

4.4
5.9
.9
2.7

-

2.8

_

_

_

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.6

-

4.8
2.1

3.5

6.1
4.1

3.5
-

19.4
2.5

11.7
7.4

1.7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.8
3.4
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

11.3
(2/)

6.7

8.2
.8

_

5.7

6.7

-

-

3.2

-

-

3.4

7.5
1.1
4.2

.9
.4
6.5
2.5
.1

-

-

-

-

11.2
11.9

1.3

3.5
1.7

1.6

-

3.0

-

.7

-

-

-»
-

3.4

6.3

-

-

8.4
9.8
-

10.6
.7
-

-

27.9
9.C

11.5

«7

-

-

-

3.7

4.0

-

.8

-

-

-

13.2
5.0

7.6
3.7
19.1
1.5

-

25.9
3.7

3.3
.8

-

-

-

3.4

1.4
7.0
3.0

3.8

3.1

.5

7.5
10.4

52.3

54.6

54.2

54.9

16.8

70.9

71.7

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1.9

3.6

.5

.3

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.0
-

14.6
9.5

.8

-

-

12.3

2.1

1.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.7
.7

-

-

-

-

-

3.2

7.0
.1
.1
2.6

-

5.7
4.9

3.0

-

5.8

3.9

45.6

74.6

71.2

80.3

65.1

27.8

-

96.5

38.6

(2/)

73.3

-

-

2.2
.6
-

1.4
-

-

-

.4
3.6

-

76.9

-

92.2

30,

Table E-6:

fianpM >di€c£fon &04tubeA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WO.tKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of bonus

All establishments .......................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M a n u fac tu rin g

All
indus­
tries

100.0

All

100.0

M a n u fac tu rin g

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

All
Finance**

Services

indus­

tries

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

!

1 0 0 .0

100.0

Non­
durable

Durable

All

1/

100.0

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

goods

1

100.0

100.0

i 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ..............................

46.5

40.6

27.7

48.2

19.5

55.3

1 4 .3

6 4 .0

45.5

15.1

1 4 .0

1 4 .2

1 3 .7

2.4

31.8

20.5

16.3

Christmas or year-end .................
Profit-sharing ........................
Other ..................................

43.6
7.7
1.7

38.2
5.3
-

24.2
3.5
-

46.3
6.3
-

18.2
1.3
“

46.9
6.2
10.2

1 3 .3

62.4
14.7

41.3
4.2

12.7
.4
2.3

13.8
.2
“

14.2
-

13.4
.3

2.4

11.2

-

-

23.3
2.7
8.7

9.3

15.7
.6
-

53.5

59.4

72.3

51.8

80.5

44.7

85.7

84.9

86.0

85.8

68.2

79.5

83.7

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses .................................

1/
2/
*
**

1.0

-

“

36.0

54.5

-

86.3

-

97.6

*

Includes data for Industries other than those shoun separately.
Dnduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E - 7 1

OstAMSUUt&e a n d P-e*lli04€ fiia tU
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WO tKERS EMPLOYED I N -

M a n u fac tu rin g

M an u fac tu rin g

Type of plan

All establishments .......................
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ......... ..............

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 100.0

; 100.0

1
1

100.0

All

goods

100.0

1

100.0

Non­
durable

Durable

!

Public
utili­
ties*

goods

i 100.0

100.0

1

i

!

92.3

90.7

88.8

91.8

98.9

96.0

76.6

95.2

80.7

89.9

90.7

90.5

91.0

95.2

87.3

90.0

77.6

Life insurance ........................
Health insurance ......................
Hospitalization .......................
Retirement pension ....................

84.6
60.6
57.3
51.8

77.0
59.1
58.2
55.3

86.3
81.5
81.5
52.4

71.6
46.0
44.6
57.0

96.3
55.4
32.5
90.2

93.8
47.9
51.3
36.4

59.8
42.8
43.3
32.8

92.7
77.4
73.2
51.7

57.7
39.4
46.4
28.2

74.2
60.5
53.3
45.4

82.8
64.5
62.1
49.2

82.9
80.1
80.8
48.6

82.7
49.8
44.5
49.8

86.4
58.6
23.1
84.1

77.5
51.2
24.7

57.8
55.1
52.4
30.5

37.0
58.4
64.0
7.3

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ...........................

7.7

9.3

11.2

8.2

1.1

4.0

23.4

4.8

19.3

10.1

9.3

9.5

9.0

4.8

12.7

10.0

22.4

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Dnduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5 1 .0

Occupational Wage Survey, S a n Francisco-Oakland,

C a l i f . , J a n u a r y .1952

D.S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31.

Appendix

Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed*
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of oooupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4)* The covered Industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services*
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all offioe
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables*
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

32

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND, CALIF., 1/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JANUARY 1952

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

_

1,815
332
141
191
1,483

314
99
47
52
215

334,400
121,700
52,600
69,100
212,700

176,630
62,390
29,500
32,890
114,240

41,420
10,300
3,930
6,370
31,120

101
21
101
21
21

74
630
112
295
372

29
54
40
39
53

62,700
43,000
42,600
38,700
25,700

53,340
8,4-60
26,350
16,340
9,750

8,270
3,120
4,220
14,020
1,490

21
8
21
8
21
8/ 21
101
21

19
17
22
12
14
92
3
115

10
11
9
9
9
24
3
28

2,121
1,030
952
329
1,508
14,999
11,438
16,547

1,459
833
570
276
1,305
8,570
11,438
6,700

All divisions ....................................
Manufacturing ................................
Durable goods 2/ .........................
Nondurable goods ij ......................
Nonmanufacturing .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..............................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade ..............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services 2 / ...............................

101
101
101
-

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Candy, and other confectionery products ........
Women*s and misses* coats and suits .............
M i l l w o r k ......... ................................
Nonferrous foundries .............................
Heating apparatus ............................... .
Machinery industries .............................
Railroads .........................................
Insurance carriers ...............................

7/

86
-

47
28
172
1,408
-

5,913

i
1/ San Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Area (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Sblano Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscel­
laneous manufacturing.
ij Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural s e r v i c e s .
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were included.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




Index
P

Assembler (heating apparatus) ••••••••••••••••••........
Assembler (insurance carriers) .........................
Assembler (machinery) ..............
Assembler, sash, door, and frame (millwork)
..........
Bench hand (bakeries) ........................... ......
Biller, machine........................................
Boatswain (ocean transport) ....... ............... .
Bookbinder (printing) ........ ...... ,
..................
Bookkeeper, h a n d ................... ,
...... .
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••••••.........•••••.......
Bottler (malt liquors) •••••••....... ......... .........
Bottler (nonalcoholic beverages) .......
Brewer (malt liquors) ..... ........ ........... ........
Bricklayer (building construction) ......................
Bus boy (restaurants) ••••••........ ..... ..............
Bus girl (restaurants) •••••••...... ..... ......... ..
Butcher (restaurants) ....... ••••••••........ ..........
Cabinetmaker (millvork) ...................... .........
Calculating-machine operator........ ...... ............
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products) ....
Carpenter (building construction) ............... .......
Carpenter (ocean transport) ...••••..... •••••••••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance ..... ...... •••••..... ......... .
Chipper ani grinder (heating apparatus) ................
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ....... ......
Cleaner ......
Cleaner (machinery) .........
Cleaner (office building service) .............. ........
Cleaner (railroads) ............................... .
Clerk, accounting................ ............ ........
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ..................
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ..... ......... .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ....... ......
Clerk, f i l e ...........................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ..... ..................
Clerk, general........................... .............
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ..... •••••••••..... .
Clerk, o r d e r ........... ••••••••.......................
Clerk, payroll ••••••••••..............•••••........ ••••
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ....... .........
Compositor, hand (printing) ........... .............. .
Cook (canning) .........................................
Cook (ocean transport) ......... ................... •••••
Cook (restaurants) .....................................
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) .................
Crane operator, electric bridge
........
Crane operator, electric bridge(railroads) .............
Cutter and marker (womens and misses* coats
and suits) ...........•••••............. ............
Dishwasher (restaurants)
.
Draftsman....................................




a

13
19
13
17
20
3, 5
22
21
3, 5
3, 5
20
20
20
20
23
23
23
17
3, 6
16
20
22
11
18
17
13
18
23
19
3, 6
19
19
19
3, 6
19
3, 4, 7
19
A, 7
A, 7
19
21
20
22
23
17
13
19
16
23
10

g

e
Drill-press operator (heating apparatus) ..................
Drill-press operator (machinery) ............ .............
D r i v e s a l e s m a n (nonalcoholic beverages) ...........•••••••
Duplicating-machine operator .................. .
Electrician (building construction) ......... ..............
Electrician (ocean transport) .................... .
Electrician, maintenance ••••••.... •••••...... .
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) •••••.... ...........
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ................ ••••••
Electrotyper (printing) ....................................
Elevator operator (office building service) •••••••.......
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .............. •••••••••••
Engineer (ocean transport) ••••••.... ..............
Engineer, stationary ........................................
Fireman (ocean transport) ............................... .
Fireman, stationary boiler ..............................
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) .......... ........ .
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ........
G u a r d ................
Handyman (office building service) ............. ..........
Helper, motortruck driver
.........................
Helper, trades, maintenance ...........................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .......... ........
Inspector (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••
Inspector (machinery) ........... ..................... ..
Janitor ........ ....... ................... ..................
Janitor (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••••
Janitor (machinery) •••••••••••••••......
Janitor (office building service) ........
Janitor (railroads) .................. .............. ...... ..
Key-punch operator ............................. ...........
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ........ ..........
Labeling operator (canning) ................................
Laborer (building construction) ............... ........... .
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ............. ......... ....... .
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ........... .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom ••••••••............ ......
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery)
.............
Machinist, maintenance ••••••••••.......
•••••
Machinist, maintenance (candy and other confectionery
products) ............ ......... •••*......... ••••.......
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) •••••••••.... ...... .
Machinist, production (machinery) •••••••••...............
Mailer (printing) .......... .................... ...........
Maintenance man, general utility ..........................
Maintenance man, general utility (candy and other
confectionery products) ........ .
,
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) .............
Mechanic (canning) ...............
••••••••
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) .............
.....
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (railroads) .••••••••••

18
18
20
A, 8
20
22
11
18
19
21
23
18
22
11
22
11
17
18
13
23
21, 22
11
19
16
13
13
16
18
23
19
8
19
20
20
22, 23
18
12
18
11
16
19
18
21
11
16
19
20
12
19

3U.

Index Continued
gage
Mechanic, maintenance .......................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) .........
Millwright ................ ...... ...... ..
Mixer (bakeries) ••••••••....................
Molder (bakeries) ••••.......................
Molder (nonferrous foundries) ........ .......
Molder operator (millwork) ..................
Motortruck dr i v e r .... ............... .......
Nurse, industrial (registered) .............
Off-bearer (millwork) .................. •••••
Office b o y .... ..... .......... ••••.........
Office g i r l .................................
Oiler .......................................
Oiler (ocean transport) .....................
Operator (local transit) ............•••••••••
Order filler ................... .
Overman (bakeries) ••••••....................
Packer.... ••••••••••••••••.••••••....... ••••
Packer (candy and other confectionery products)
Pantryman (restaurants) ..... .
Painter (building construction) ..............
Painter (heating apparatus) .....•••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance •.......... .............
Painter, maintenance (railroads) .........•••••
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ..... .•••••..... ..
Photoengraver (printing) .....................
Pipe fitter, maintenance ••••...... ..........
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ........ .
Planer operator (millwork) ...................
Plasterer (building construction) •••••.......
Plumber (building construction) .... ••.•••••••
••••••
Plumber, maintenance .............
Porter .........
••••
Porter (machinery) ••••••••••...... •••••••••••
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) .... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •••••••••
Press assistant (printing)..... .............
Press feeder (printing) ••••••••••••••••••••.••
Presser (womens and misses* coats and suits) •
Pressman (printing) ••••••........... •••••••••
Punch-press operator (heating apparatus) ..••••
Quartermaster (ocean transport) •••••••••••••••
Receiving c l e r k ...... •••••«••••••....... ••••
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ....
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) .••••••«•••••
Saw operator (millwork) ........ .
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) .
Seaman, able bodied (ocean transport) •••••••••
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) ••••••••••••
Secretary ••••••••••••..... ..................
Section head (insurance carriers) ......... ..




12
18

12
20
20
17
17

21, 22
10
17
4

8
12
22
21
13

20

23
20
18

12
19
23

21
12
19
17

20
20

12
13
18
18
19

21
21
16

21
18

22
14
23
17
17
18

22
22
A, 8
19

fg
as
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women*s and misses* coats
and suits) .......... .............••••••••••••••...... .
Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats
and suits) ............ ••••••••••........................
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries)
....................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ........ .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ........ ......
Shipping clerk •••••••.•••••••••..... •••••••••••••.•••••••
Shipping-and-receiving clerk •••••••••••••••••«......•••••
Stenographer ............................ ........ •••••••••••
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ......•••••••••••••.....
Stereotyper (printing) .............
•••••••••••••
Steward (ocean transport) ...... •••••••••••••••••••.......
Stock h a n d l e r .... ................
••••
Stock handler (candy and other confectionery products) ...
Stock handler (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••......... .
Stock handler (millwork) ...................................
Stock handler (railroads) ......................
••••
Storekeeper (ocean transport) ••••••••.................. .
Switchboard operator ........ .......... .......... ........ .
Switchboard operator-receptionist ..........................
Tabula ting-machine o p e r a t o r ................ ••••••..... .
Tabula ting-machine operator (insurance carriers) ...... .
Tool-and-die m a k e r ............. ••••••••••••..... ••••.....
Tool-and-die maker (heating apparatus) ............ ••••••••
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ......... ...... ........... .
Transcribing-machine operator ..............................
Truck driver ........................... ......... ...... .
Truck driver (millwork) ............... .
Truck driver (railroads) ....................................
Trucker, hand ...................... ................ ........
Trucker, hand (candy and other confectionery products) ...
Trucker, hand (millwork) ...............
Trucker, hand (machinery)
Trucker, hand (nonferrous foundries) •••••••«••••........
Trucker, hand (railroads) ......... ..................... .
Trucker, power ...................
Trucker, power (railroads) ...........................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) •••••••..... ...•••
T y p i s t ....... .......... ................... ....... .........
Typist (insurance carriers) .••••••................ .......
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ...........................
Waiter (restaurants) ................................
Watchman .........«••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••..••••••••
Watchman (ocean transport) ..........
Watchman (office building service) ...........••••••••••.••
Water tender (ocean transport) •••••••••••••••........... .
Welder, hand (heating apparatus) ••••.... ........ ....... .
Welder, hand (machinery) ........ ........................
Welder, machine (heating apparatus) .................. .
Wrapper (candy and other confectionery products) •••••••••

16
16
17
12
19
14
14
8, 9
19
21
22
14
16
18
17
19
22
9
9
5, 9
19
12
18
18
9
14, 15
17
19
14
16
17
18
17
19
15
19
18
9, 10
19
19
23
15
22
23
22
18
18
18
16

☆ u. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952




“I

THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES

In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
for the following communities:
City

BLS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
,
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas City, Missouri
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, Virginia
Seattle, Washington

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1059
1064
1042
1058
1057

This report was prepared in the
may be addressed to:

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
20

's Western Regional Office.

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Communications

Max D. Kossoris, Regional Director
Bureau of labor Statistics
Roan 1074
870 Market Street
San Francisco 2, California
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics * regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, work injuries, construction and housing.




The Western Region includes the following States:
Arizona
California
Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102