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Occupational Wage Survey

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
December 1951

Bulletin No. 1075

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................

1

THE INDIANAPOLIS METROPOLITAN A R E A .......................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE....................................................... '
......

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...........................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ..............................
A-3
Maintenance and power platnt occupations ..................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations .......................

3
8
9
11

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery.......
Machine-tool accessories ...........................
B-40
Railroads........
B-5452 Milk dealers ...................
B-63
Insurance carriers ...........................................................

13
14
15
15
16

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction..............................................
C-205
Bakeries .....................................................................
C-27
Prin t i n g .....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees .......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............................................

17
17
18
18
18

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ....................................

19

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ................................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ........................
E-3
Paid holidays ................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations ...............................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ........................................................
E-7
- Insurance and pension plans .................................................

19
20
20
21
22
24
24

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ........... ..............................................

25

I N D E X .....................................................................................

27

* MOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are avail­
able upon request for auto repair shops (July 1953), ferrous
foundries (June 1951) and power laundries (June 1951).
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

April 28, 1952 '

Introduction 1/
The Indianapolis area is 1 of 20 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and
shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-2) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions. 2/
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. Earnings data for these jobs
have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales (Series C
tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational
earnings for several industries or trades in which the great
majority of the workers are employed under terms of collective
bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are
indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Indianapolis Metropolitan A re a
Total population of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Area
(Marion County) was more than 552,000 in 1950, an increase of
20 percent during the preceding decade. More than three-fourths
of the total area population lived within the corporate limits
of Indianapolis.

2/ Prepared in the B ureau^ regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by J. W. Shanks under the direction of George E. Votava, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the B ureaus
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations in Washington, D. C.
2/ Construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from this study; see appendix for
discussion of scope and method of survey.




Nonagricultural wage and salaried workers in the area
totaled 276,000 in December 1951; two-fifths of these were em­
ployed in manufacturing establishments. Substantial segments of
the total manufacturing work force were employed in the trans­
portation equipment,machinery, food products, chemicals, paper,
printing and publishing, and fabricated metal products indus­
tries. Important products c£ the transportation equipment group,
which accounted for more than a fourth of all manufacturing em­
ployment, inoluded aircraft engines, motortruck bodies and en­
gines, automobile and aircraft heaters, electric trolley coaches,
and a variety of other automobile and aircraft parts. The ma^»
chinery industries (electrical and nonelectrical) also employed
more than a quarter of all manufacturing workers and produced a
variety of products including radios, phonographs, television
equipment, power-transmission equipment, construction machinery,
and machine-tool accessories.
Substantial employment was concentrated also among
meat packing, canned goods, and bakery products establishments.
Other important products of Indianapolis industry included phar­
maceutical and biological supplies, books, hand tools, apparel,
rubber inner tubes, paper containers, and textile bags.
Nonmanufacturing employment in Indianapolis, estimated
at nearly 162,000 workers, reflects the importance of I n d i a n
apolis as a center of commerce, transportation, and finance.
More than 6,500 retail and wholesale trade outlets provide em­
ployment to approximately 20 percent of all employees in non­
manufacturing industries. Indianapolis wholesale and retail
sales volume was estimated to exceed two and one-half billion
dollars during 1950. Although located on the White River,
Indianapolis does not have access to navigable water; it is, in
fact, the largest inland city in the United States. Other means
of transportation, however, provide abundant facilities neces­
sary to move freight and passengers in and out of the Indian­
apolis area. Transportation demands are serviced by 7 railroads,
105 motor freight lines, 7 airlines, and 20 bus lines.
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
studied by the Bureau, about 70 percent of all plant workers were
employed in establishments having written agreements with labor
organizations. Union contract coverage was most extensive among
public utilities and manufacturing industries; approximately 90
percent of the plant workers in public utility companies and
more than B0 percent of the workers in manufacturing were em­
ployed by establishments having collective-bargaining agree­
ments.
With the exception of the public utilities and services
industry groups, unionization among Indianapolis office workers
was relatively insignificant. More than 60 percent of all office

2

workers in the public utilities industry and 40 percent of those
in the services industries were employed in establishments hav­
ing written union agreements covering office workers.

Occupational W age Structure
Numerous general wage increases affected the earnings
of workers in the Indianapolis area between January 1950, the
base date for the Wage Stabilization Board's 10 percent 1catch­
1
up" wage increase formula, and the time of the Bureau1s survey.
During the 2-year period, approximately nine-tenths of the plant
workers and three-fourths of the office workers employed in sur­
veyed establishments received at least one formal wage adjust­
ment. Plant workers generally received larger wage increases
than those granted to office employees. A majority of the plant
workers received increases equaling or exceeding 15 cents an hour,
whereas office workers typically received less than 15 cents.
Many establishments frequently adjust salaries of office workers
on an individual basis rather than by formalized wage increases
which accounts, at least in part, for the difference between the
wage increases of office and plant workers. General wage in­
creases, for both plant and office workers, were most common
among the manufacturing, public utilities, and service indus­
tries.
Formalized wage and salary structures for time-rated
workers were reported by establishments employing a majority of
workers in the area. More than 85 percent of the manufacturing
plant workers were employed in establishments basing wage rates
of time workers on a formalized structure. These plans were
almost equally divided between those providing single rates and
those with rate ranges. Most office workers within scope of the
study were employed in establishments with formal rate structure
plans, although informal plans represented significant segments
of office workers in the nondurable-goods manufacturing, whole­
sale and retail trade, finance, and services industry divisions.
Incentive methods of wage payment among manufacturing
industry establishments involved substantial numbers of plant
workers in Indianapolis. Among establishments in the nondurablegoods industry, the earnings of about half the plant workers
were based on some type of incentive wage plan; these workers




were concentrated in the meat-packing and chemical industries.
Incentive system coverage among workers in the durable-goods
manufacturing industry was considerably less extensive, account­
ing for approximately one out of every five workers. With one
exception, incentive system coverage among nonmanufacturing
plant employees was insignificant. Nearly a fifth of all services
industry plant workers participated in some type of incentive
plan.
Wage structures in establishments employing a vast
majority of plant workers within scope of the study provided
formal minimum entrance rates for inexperienced workers. Mini­
mum entrance rates among establishments employing an estimated
three-quarters of all plant workers ranged from $0.75 to $1.30
an hour. Among manufacturing firms employing more than 250
workers, minimum entrance rates were typically higher than those
prevailing in smaller manufacturing establishments.
Extra-shift operations among Indianapolis manufacturn­
ing establishments involved a significant proportion of plant
workers. Approximately a fourth of all manufacturing plant
workers were engaged in extra-shift operations. The prevalence
of second- and third-shift work among nondurable-goods manufac­
turing workers was nearly as great as that found in the durablegoods manufacturing group. Virtually all workers on extra
shifts received additional pay in terms of cents-per-hour or
percentage differentials above base day rates. Shift workers in
the durable-goods group typically received differentials of 5
percent for second-shift work and 10 percent for third-shift
work. Among the vast maj ority of nondurable-goods shift workers,
however, differentials were paid in terms of a uniform cents an
hour. More than one-half of the nondurable-goods shift workers
received differentials of between 5 and 7 cents an hour.
Regularly scheduled 40-hour workweeks predominated
among plant and office workers within scope of the study. An
estimated 85 percent of all manufacturing industry plant work­
ers, and an even greater proportion of office workers, were
scheduled to work 40-hour weeks. Forty-hour weekly schedules
were also predominant among office workers in transportation,
communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; re­
tail trade; and services industries. White-collar workers in
the finance, insurance, and real estate groups, however, were
normally scheduled to work less than 40 hours a week.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-lt

3,

Q j^lce 0cC44^uUiOHl

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Indianapolis, Ind., by industry division, December 1951)

A ebage
v
Number

o
f

Sex, occupation, and industry division

hours

Weekly
earnings

61.5
61.5
a .5

67.00
67.00
67.00

Weekly

NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIV IN G STRAIGHT-TIM E W E E K L Y EARNINGS OF—

Under So. 00 I2.50 f5.oo 17.50 fc.00 & .50 fe.oo ?7.50 fo.oo I2.50 §5.00 ?7.50 So. 00 S2.50 &5.00 17.50 $0.00 $5.oo 80.00 §5.00 §0.00 *95.00
and
$
30.00 32.50 35.00137.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

Men
Billers, machine (billing machine) .......
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••••

31
31
31

Bookkeepers, hand .......... .............
Manufacturing
..... ••••••••••
Durable goods •••••••••••.... ..... .
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••«••

111
36
22
16
75
13
68

62.0
76.00
a ; 5 ' "8 S 3 cr
62.0
83.00
60.0
76.00
71.00
62.5
6o.o
81.50
63.0
68.00

Clerks, accounting ........... ............
Manufacturing • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •.... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •..... ...........••••.
Public utilities #
Wholesale trade ....................
Finance * * ............ .......

266
156
126
32
128
33
69
32

63.00
60.5
60.5 1 66”5 i r
68.00
60.5
6o.o
60.50
a . o i 59.00
a . o ! 59.oo
62.0
60.00
60.50
39.5

Clerks, general .............. ..........
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••..... ••
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••••••••»•

608

60.0
66.0
60.0
a .o
38.0

Clerks, order .................... .
Manufacturing .•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods ••••••••••••«••••••«•••
Nondurable goods •••«••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••••••
Clerks, p ayroll.... ................. .
Manufacturing
Durable goods •.••«••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing «•«••••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade
Office boys ...............................
Manufacturing ••••••••••«•••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
Finance ** ............. .
TabulatingHnachine aerators ............ .
Manufacturing
Durable goods ......... .
Nondurable goods «•••••••••••••••«•••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••*•••••••••••••
Wholesale trade •••••»•«•••«•••••••••
Finance ** ••••••••••••••»•••••••••••

~

w

~ ~

106
53
17

66.50
! 69.00
i 59.00
1 65.50
j 55.00

l6 l
62.00
a .o
.... 6 8 .. n s K T " 1 62.50
60
60.5 : 65.00
58.00
6o.o
28
93
61.5 i 62.00
75
a.5 62.50
57
33
18
15
26
12
98
69
69
31
73
s r 13
19
a
15
15

60.5
60.0
60.0
60.0
60.5

a.5

;

63.50
66.50
66.00
63.00
62.00
59.50

60.00
39.5
60.5 ! a . 5 o
39.0 i 38.00
38.00
38.5
60.5
60.0
60.0
60.0
60.5
6 2 .5 '
39.5

62.00

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See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
NOTE:

1
2

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59.50"

61.00
59.00
63.50
66.50
60.50

i

1
15
15
15

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industiy divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

1

8I

3
5
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

O H ice O ccupation^ • G ontiuM M l

Table A-l:

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s i n I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., b y i n H u s t x y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1951)

NUM
BER O W
F ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM WEEKLY EARNINGS O —
E
F

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

N m er
u b
o
f
w rk
o ers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
W
eekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
W ly
eek
e rn g
a in s
hu
o rs
and
(S n a ) (S n a ) $
ta d rd ta d rd
■*0-00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2. 50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

Billers, machine (billing machine) ....
Manufacturing .....••••••••••.......
Durable goods ......... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ........ .
tfiolesale t r a d e ..................

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)
Nonmanufacturing ........ 7. ........ .

I

1

Women

13U

-rr25
15
93
16
U8

35
..... .„6

315

Bookkeepers, hand ....... .............. .
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••....... .
Durable g o o d s .......... ....... ••
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••......
Public utilities * ......
Wholesale trade ......... ........
Finance *» ......................
Services ••••••••••••••••••*•••••

U7
38
230
20
53
22
56

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Manufacturing • •....... •••••••••••.•
Durable goods
Nondurable g o o d s ........... .
Nonmanufacturing .•••••••••••••.....
Wholesale trade ...............
Finance - * * ........... .
S e r v i c e s ........ ................ .

121
55
11
lli
96
27
38
17

Ui.o
39.5
39.0
Uo.o
Ul.5
1*2.0
Uo.5
Uo.5

m ....
Vo3
Uo.5
HTTo
39.5
U2.5
Uo.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
38.0
39.5
39.5
'U
<5.5 ”
Ui.5
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
39.5
37.5

$
U5.50
■UB.5<T
U8.00
U9.50
UU.oo
5i.5o
U3.50
U9.00
u y .a r
63.50
68.00
65.50
71.00
61.50
7U.00
53.00
59.50
58.50
56.00
59:'00“
57.50
60.50
55.00
52.50
U9.00
63.50

_
_
.
-

_
_
_
1
1

_
_
_
-

27
_
_
27.
_
9

1?
_
_
13
_
10

1
1

1
1

10

i

3
2,
5!i
2!
-

V|
6

27
7
7

16 i
12!
8
U
j
u
2
-

20
2
i5

3!
3i

- I
-

.
1
- !
-

_

.
- j
- i
- i

j
1
- !
-

- 1
1
_!

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

2

- 1
1

-

_
-

7j

2
2
-

U
2U
135
33
102
289
52
185

Calculating-machine, operators
(Comptometer type) ...................
Manufacturing •••••••••.•••....... .
Durable goods •
........... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
......... .
Public utilities * • •.......
Wholesale trade • • .... .
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••••••

552
217
97
120
335
28
17U
20

13
- !
13 !
13

16 !

Ul.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.5
39.o

UU.oo
U?.06
U9.00
U6.50
U2.50
50.00
39.50

Uo.o
uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
uo.o
Uo.5
37.5

U9.00
51.00
50.50
51.50
U8.00
U9.50
U9.00
U3.00

!
- j

1i
1

UO.O

78
17
1
16
61

31
21

1
i
;
!
i
1

10 !

9!

U6

9
.
3|
3
3

- ,
U6
22 !
5
9

10
l
9
3

- !
- 1
7
- !

3
1
31

7j
-

.
_

1
_
.

15 ;
- !
1
1
i5
15 I

27
5

19
!

5
22
_!
22 ;

1
- !
- i

1

11
_i
-

1
19

13 1
5
5
8

.

-

U

16
1
1
- !
15
8
7

3°
11
6
5
19
10
1

1

10

72
37
9
28
35
15
1

13 ■
11
1
_!
12 i
9
-

132
38
12
26
95
3
59

27 !
16 i
12 !
U
11
3
1

-

:

52:

5U
17 1
9!
8;
37 i
101
19 !

U7
26 !
7
19
21
9i
12 j
i
1

38
20
5
15
18
3
5
2

no
16 |
11 !
5
9U
3
51
12

77 1
29
19
10
U8
5
23
2

55 !
2U!
10 i
1U
31
5
16

U;
2
11
11
2
2j
j

J

2
1
1
1
1

u
u
u
_
*
*

3
-

_
_
-

_
3
3
"1

1

1

i

-

____ 2i

r

5
3.
3
2;
2
“

10
3
1
2
7
i
U
-

U_____ 1 j
1
11
1
1!
!
2
31
2
-j
2
"
U
1
1
3
1

j

-

_
J
J
“!

13
_
13
10
1
-

3U
lU
12
2
20
-1
8

38
18
9
9
20
!
1

1,
1

1
1
“

12 ;
U1
-t
u!
81
-|
-;
8!

8;

_
-1
_
i

_1
;
-j
_

2

1

j
- 1

-1
1
1
11
. !
—
!
-

_
-

_!

7|
-|
7i
7
-|

_
_____L
1
-|
-1
1
1
•

-

-

“

1
1
1
1
_

8.!

1

28
lU
lit
^
-

(

_
-

8J
i
i

_
-

1
-!
-j
-!
_
_

_

_
_
-1

“

-

23
10
5I
5!
13 ;

18
;
17 ;
uI
13
1
1

6

1
3

-

. 1

^ I
15
7
81
-

2
1
-

-

.

1
1
1

j

_i
- :

-

!

2'

1

.

.

_
_
_

.
-

-

-

j
“

_
-

-

“
1

36 ;
26
7i
19!
10 ;

5 U

_
_
-

|

20
U
3
1
16
1
1

1

_
_
1
1

-i

_

-i

18 ____21
6
lU
1
lU
5
12
21
1
-1
9
8
8

_
_
-

.
-

!

1
1




_
-

"

i

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

22 _____1
6
3
2
u
1
2
19
3
_
10
1
8
-

10
8
2
6
2

1
1

55
2U!
2l
22
31 j
U!
21 :

!

15

u
1
11

-

21 , __ 11
_
1
1
16
21
5;
10 1

1

- !
_1
16
15 i

7
6

8
U
_
j
uj

1

i

j

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Manufacturing ........ ..............
Durable goods ................ .
Nondurable g o o d s .................
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••.......
Whole sale trade •«•••••••••••••••
Finance ** ........................

u
v

_

■
- 1
-

1
1
1
_
- 1
!
. !
- ;

9
3
_
3
6
3
3

*
U
1
3
10
U
6

- ;
- |
- |
- i
_

5.

O ffice OcCUfuUiOHA, - Go*UiH44*d

Table A-l:

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y ho u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
basis in Indianapolis,

I n d., b y i n d u s t r y divi s i o n ,

A ve r a g e
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Sex, occupation, and industry division

D e c e m b e r 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*
5.0
0.00 1*2 .5 0 1* 0 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
$

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S t a n d a r d )

$

10.00 132.50 35.00 37^50 1*Q.0Q li2.50 li5.00 li7.5Q 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

and
over

Women - Continued

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comotome ter t y p e ) ....... ••••••••••••••

103
29
7U
52

Nonmanufacturing .••••••............. .

1 ,0 5 6
1 W
166
228
662

Clerks, accounting .......... ........ .
Manufacturing ......... ••••••.........
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••••••......... .
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities
............ 4
.,.,
Wholesale trade ....................
Finance ** ........................ .
Services .................... .......

&

Clerks, file, class A ....................
Manufacturing ..............•«•••«.••••
Durable g o o d s ......•••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ........... «••••••
Nonmanufacturing ..................... .
Finance
........................

58

121
235
1* *
1

106
—

13
67
57

Clerks, order •••••••••••••.......
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ..........................................................................
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Nonmanufacturing ......... ........ .
SPT*Y

"
1

'*** c

l ai ai i ai ai i t i BTi TTi i af ai i i

1*0 .0
' U0.5"
1*0.5
1*0 .0
Uo.o
1*0 .0
1*1 .0
39.0
1*1.5
39.5
u r a —
1*1.5
1*0 .0
39.0
38.5

612

39.5

109

Clerks, file, class 5
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••..
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ....... .. ..... • • • • • • • •
Public utilities -a
Wholesale trade ........ .. ...... ..
Finance
........................
.Services ..........................
Clerks, general ...........................
Manufacturing ........... ....... .
Durable g o o d s ........ .......... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing .................... .
pr^blic nti 1 iti« * *
,?
T»,
Wholesale trade ................ .
Finance #* ........ ..
Services ........ ...... .............

W

26

39.5
uo.o
39.5
19.0

1*1 .0
1*2 .0
1*0 .0

68
1*1
503
2 h

75

312
18

39.5

1*0 .0
1*0.5
39.0
1*0.0

$
1*6 .0 0
l*H*i5f)
1*5.50
i+6.50

228

1*0.0

52.0 0
1*6 .5 0
1*
1*.50

_

_

2

2 !

21

I 1*5.50

-

- 1

2

1*7.0 0
■52 : 5 s 52 .0 0
51*. 00
1*3 .5 0
1*1 .5 0
38.50
1*3.56 1

_

j

- j
- !
-

7 ;

.!
7

37.00

, 1*7 .5 0

5 5 .0 0
1*6 .5 0
1*6 .5 0
38.50

7

1

I
_

1

178
71
13
58
107

99
37

128

37

68
20

11
26

18

29

19

12

13
7

87

1*8

13
32
19

62
8
12
12

28

26
6

10
5
-

-

3

7*
1

9

2

36
37
[

5

22

15
.

10

12

-

3
3
-

-

15
lU

10
10

9

9

17

16

2

91
17

105

1*3
19

21

16

7
71*
2

7
77

3
21*

39
16
7
9
23
2

12

10

2
18

15
6

1

6
1
*
3
1
2

28
6
3
3
22

7
11

1

30
1

1
*
- '
-1

l*i

18
18

2
2

.1

_

»

_

18 l

2

2

- 1

-

-

21
1

- |

-

3 !
3

7 !
3,

-

-

-

-

.

.

3

31

-

1

_

11*
13

*'

li

13

1
1

33
17
2
15
16

1

!

9
7
2
3
2

1

58

67
31
18
13
36

6!

3

15 !

2

8
61
1

”

!

!




coranunication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

1

.

1
1

_

_
-

.

_

_

_

_
_
•

_
.
.

_

1

1

_
-

_!
-

l*

3

3

2

1

2

1

1

1

.

1

..

ji

-

5

1
1
1

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

-

1
1
.

.

_
_
.

_

.
_

2

_

1*

.
_
.

_
.
_

_

1

..

2

1
1
1

1
1*

1

2

1

1

_

H*
9
9

-

1
2

-

-

7!

_

k

1

5

3

l

2

5

1

1

2
1
2

_

20

3I

*

1
1*
7

13

8
6

5

r

6
27
7 ---- 1
1
5
2
1*

13
-

-!

1 !
1 !
1 1

12

2
1*

18

-j

6

—

26
2
26

-

1*

_

_

-

2

-

_
_
.

.

-

.
.
•

_

2
2

.
_
-

_

1*

.

_

_

_

2
.

_
_
_

„!
•

_

_

_

-

_
_

_
_
.
.

1

_

.

..

1

1

23
17 —
1
*
13

6

33
W
-

16
17

5

31
—

y —

-

5
26
12
11*
8
7
-

7

1

121
--ii*
71
9
7
61
*
1*3
2
12
18
5
37
19
IQ
87

50
35
9
26
15

51*
30
17
13
21*

15
7
1
6

56
1*3
30
13
13
1
X

11
9

6
6

10

it

11*
10

37
30
18
12
7
2

19
17
13
1
*
2

5

1

-

-

5
3
1
2

6
6
6

27
22
11
*
8
5

1*5
33
23
10
12
_

----------- 1

8

h

5

h\

5

21

1
*

2

5

■
|
i
_________ I ________ i_________
_

15
13
12
1
2

10
10
10
.

_

_

i|1

k
_
_

1
*

„j

_

1
*

1

_
_

-

-

_

_

-

l
i
-

-

_

.

_

-

_

.

.

_

-

-

J

.

_

-

.

-

-

_

_

.

.

_

?

1

1

li
^

-

3
2
1

-

11
7!
—
7|
U

1

3
9

!

!

S ee f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of tab l e .
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
# # F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.

51*
28

30
17
13

7

18

h j

3

5

1*
60

- |

7

15
15

11
8
1*
1*

5

10

1*1

-

301
70
13

2
95
2

-

*
*

111

23

h:

1
1

111
1*0

7

. i
- 1

.

10
10

8

29
1*

- 1
- '

- ,

10
10

.

- 1

1
*

8
8

38

-

i

10
1*

5
35
71

- 1

_

2

6

7

-

“

15

9

1*1

- j

16

1*6

10 1

- 1
- 1
- 1

26

2

10
10

- 1
5
•
5
!
*!
5
i
1
1
i
52
1 0 3 1 139
_ ;
------- B|
'
- ;
6
.
2
52
103
131:

1

10

k

18

-

!
1
1 ----1
“

2
26

11*

12
3

7 ---- W
-

_

:i

-

10

1*8

-

1*2.0 0
1*5 .5 0
3 7 .5 0
1*0 .00
1*1 .0 0
36.50

3U
80
15

2
2

2

f.1* .06"“
8

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0 .5
1*2.5

_
_

5
29
- ---- T ---- F
6
3
2
2
23

n n r -

m *

_
_

1*8 .50
■ D."W"
5
51*.oo
1*7.0 0
1*7.50

576
56.50
39.5
55T.5-0--- 3 2 I ~ ~i*o;o1*0 .0
; 60.00
235
86
1*0.0
58.00
39.0
53 .0 0
255
5 3 .5 0
22
39.0
1*0
1*0.5
! 5 3 .5 0
38.0
; 52.0 0
153
1*2.0
57.00
35

—

2
_

1

6,

Office Occufuztianl - Continued

T a b l e A-l;
-i:

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o urs a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s in I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1951)

Number
o
f
wres
okr

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$ .
$ %
Under Io.oo 32.50 35.00 37.50 £0 .0 0 J2 .5 0 £5 .0 0 £7 .5 0 io.oo 12.50 55.00 57.50 6 0 .0 0 I2 .5 0 65.00 17.50 70.00 75.00 10.00 15 .0 0 90.00 95.00
eky
Wel
eky Wel
ann s
h u s eri g
or
and
(tnad ( t nad $
Sadr) S adr)
12.50 15.00 1 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75,00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
30.00 32.50 35.00 37*50 10.00!

367
~ W
161
85
118
29
26
22

10.0
-rar
10.5
10.0
10.0
10.5
lo.5
38.5

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women - Continued
Clerks, p a y r o l l ...............
Manufacturing
Durable goods ........ • •
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••.
Public utilities * •••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••
Finance ** •••••••••••••

$
53.50
53:50“
51.00
52.50
53.50
53.50
63.00
57.00

-

.
-

5
1
1
1
-

-

-

-

2

-

“

1
1
1

_
-

3
3
1

12
11
1
3
8

“

-

5
.
5
•
5

S
28I
1
1
27
23

u
26 ;
2
2
.
21
1

38.00 2/ 18
12.5o“
35.50
18
35.00
8
31.50
10

2
2
2

12
2
10

_

.
-

Duplicating-machine operators
Manufacturing ............ i.
Durable goods ••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing ....... .
Finance «* •••••••••••••

61
" 33“"
“
23
15
23
13

10.0
10.5
lo.5
10.0
39.5
39.0

Key-punch operators
Manufacturing •••••••••••••
Durable goods •••••••••«
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing • • ....... .
Public utilities * •••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••
Finance
..............

361
~TT7
63
51
211
13
31

39.5 1 16.00
! 50.50"
10.0 19.00
10.0 5i.5o
39.5 i 11.00
10.0 ; ll.oo
11.0 19.00
39.0 ! 13.50

Office girls ..................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••
Finance ** •••••••••••••

95
32
63
15
10

10.0
lo.5‘
39.5
11.0
38.5

Secretaries ................ .
Manufacturing •••••••••••••
Durable goods ••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••
Public utilities * • ••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••
Finance «*
.... • ••••
Services ••••••••«•«.•«.

875
328
118
210
517
122
111
210
70

10.0
rioicr
10.0
10.5
. 39.5
10.0
10.5
39.0
10.5

Stenographers, general .......
Manufacturing ..•••••••••••
Durable goods ••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing .•••••••••
Public utilities * .....
Wholesale trade ••••••••
Finance «* •••••«•••••••
Services •••••••••••••••

L,377
782
509
273
595
81
101
192
163

181

6
6
6
-!
;
-

-

13.50
l > 00
t.
17.50
13.50
10.00
10.00

61.00 j
.617.00“ 1
i
65.50
63.50
59.00
68.00
57.50
55.50
57.00

lo.o 52.50
“ ITOT '5J.T0"
lo.5 !55.50
10.0 50.00
39.5 j 51.50
10.0 51.00
U.5 51.50
39.0 17.00
38.5 55.50

*
-'
’
•i
•
•i
-1
•
-

-

12
1
8
7

-

10

-

-

;
-|

-

_
-!
■
,

|

3
-:
—
3
1
2

23
11 ,
5:
6
-

5
1
1
1

21
11
1
7
13

-

29 i
20 ;
10
10

9
2

*

Transportation (excluding railroads),

**

Finance,

insurance,




and real estate.

communication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

16
3l
25
9

12
2

3

1

i
8!
5
3
7
1!

6
5

13
10!
1
6
;
3
2

3
2
1
1

56!
10
10
-i
16 !
5!
71
32

50

!
5
9
1
2;

13
9
1

25
-!
25 ;
1
21

1 !
20 117 |
r— w
21 i
i
i
; 37 1
15
59 :
-!
3
-!
8
12! 26
2 : 12

17
9
8
33
1
21;

21
2'

2!
1
38
9
5
1
29
1
5

53
13
8
5
10
3
8
29

23

1: __ 1
_
2!
1
1
3
1!

-

61
13
26
17
21
11

29
21
11
7
8
•
8j
-

1

-

i
3i
3'
3|
j
-;

•
•
-

3
3
3
36!
21
11
1i
0
15
!
i
3
12

2!

1

!

1
1
1
-

!

281
13
1i
9
15
2!
3
10!
2

11 __ 22
21
8j 16
8
3
8
3!
2
1
1
3
11
3

11

-

1'
1
!

23
20
15
5
3
2
1
1
1
1
-

11
5
5
6
1
3
2
-!
-;
-1
-

19! __ 9____ 7
_
1
f
.
13:
9
2
1
5I
11 !
1!
5
•!
1!
6
-j
6
1i
-i
-

5i
2

2:
1!
1

j
-:
.|

1
1
;

1

91 ‘
31
11
20
60 !

75
19
8
11

-

1
I
1.
1
1

8
5
5
•
3
3
-

11
3
2
1
8
2
6
-

2
-

1

.
-

-

|
•!
!
!

21
17
16
1

.i
-

1
1

-

|
2

-

-;
-i
1
-!
i
j

15
1
10

1
1

25
10
-j
10
15
3:
10
2!

15i
6
1
5!
39
5
23 1
10 |

7 !
2
19
8
11
53
3
2
31
10

72!
17
10
7
55
5!
29
!
20;
1;

2

16
18
12

162: 118i 203 1 6 6 ; 172
8 : 66 i
9
* 122 , 61 l
38! 61
81
11
39
20 , 15; 28
33| 11
251
17
7 : 52 1 109i 11 108
3
1
13
16
5
5
15
22
8
11 !
33
5
9
28 i 35
31 | 28
11
7
22
12
10, 13|
7
h
h
1
j
!
!
92

i

56

6
21
17
9
88
;
10
27 1
21
11 !
3
51
2

89
16
11
35
13
15
13
10
57
39

31
5
18
13
2

1
3
1

1i
1i
1|
-!
-i
-

-

-!
-!
1
I
J
j
1
-:
-

;
-!
-

-|

1
15 ,
-

s
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of table*

31!
23
12 ;
11
11,
2
i

2
1
1
1
1
-

6
2
2
1
1
j
1
-!
|
.

;
-1
-!
_!
-;
-.
-

1
1
1
*

_

1
i
-

-

1

-

•
_
-

,
j
-j
j
-j
!
-

-

.
-i
!

66
12
10
32
21I
15I
2i
3
1

7
2
25
13
12
17
21
6
11
2

i
851 _ 4 J
_ 2 ___ 8: _ 1£_ n !
_
_
6i
19
25
6
7
2
11
16
1;
7
2
3;
3
8
5
51
1
18
8
36
7j
2
2;
29
7
31
5I
.
1
1
1
3:
8:
1
b
2
.
1
-

56
39
30 r i ? 1
251 51
5i
1!
11
91
1
1j
3
i
11
1
;
2
-1
3!
i

16
12
n

31

56
20

8
12
36
6
6
7
10|

19
3i

1

u
•
*
1

15
-;
l
i
11!

12
2|
1;
1;

10

1°

7

;
•
•

.
•

_
.

•

7

•
1
6

*

-

1

1
.
1
-

--- •
.
•
.
•

7,

OjfjflcA OccuficUiond - GottiUtued

T a b l e A-lj

(Average straight-time w eekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
b a s i s i n I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . , b y i n d u s t r y div i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1 951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A vebaqe

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
)$
$
$
$
$
W
eekly Under 3 0.00 3 2.50 3 5 .0 0 37.5 0 1 0 .0 0 1 2.50 15.oo 1 7 .5 0 5o.oo 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 57.5 0 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 6 7 .5 0 70.00 75.00 80.0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
W
eekly
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
3 0 .0 0 3 2.50 35.00 37.50 li0.00 1 2 .5 0 15.00 1 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 90.0 0 9 5 .0 0 over

W o m e n - Continued
Stenographers, technical » » « « !
Manufacturing •••••••••••••«
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••«
Finance ** ••••••••••••«,

Switchboard operators
Manufacturing •••••••«
Durable goods ••••,
Nondurable goods • «
Nonmanufacturing •••••
Public utilities
Wholesale trade •
Finance ** •••••••«
Services •••••••••«

*

Switchboard operator-receptionists
Manufacturing
Durable goods ••••••••••••••<
Nondurable goods ....... .
Nonmanufacturing »•••••••••••••,
Public utilities * •«•••••••<
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••<
Finance ** .•••••••••••••••,
Services

Tabulating-machine operators
Manufacturing •••••••••••.
Nonmanufacturing .........
Finance ** •••••••••••,

Transcribing-machine operators, general „
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •••»••••»•••••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••»•••••......
Nonmanufacturing • ••••.... ......... ...
Wholesale trade ••••••••••....... .
Finance ## ....... ••••••••••••••••••

Typists, class A ......
Manufacturing • ••••<
Durable goods • •
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Finance ** • •••.,

95
~

W

~

16
11
188
6b
33

27
128
30
23
25
36
327
113'
66
17
211
U
15
16

12
61
—
39
33
329
tii
31

h
o

255
85
ill
U21
137“
311
26
8Ji
la

3 9 .5
1 0 .0
3 8 .0
37 .5

$
5 6 .0 0
5 7 .5 6
li7.50
1 6 .0 0

1 2 .5
1 0 .0
liO.O
1 0 .0
Ii3.5
liii.5
li2.0

1 6 .5 0
5 1 .5 0
5 2 .5 0
li9.50
llli.OO
16 .5 0
18.5 0

ia.o

ia.5o

1 6 .0

3 7 .5 0

it0.0
liO.O
1*0.0
liO.O
li0.5
li2.5
lil.0
3 8 .$
li0.0

i li6.00
ii7.5o

;
|
!
!
|
1

19.0 0
1 5 .5 0
1 5 .0 0
ii8.50
Ii6.50
10.5 0
11 .0 0

3 9 .0
51.5 0
liO.O ! 5luoo
3 9 .0
51i.5o
38 .$
5 5 .0 0
liO.O
"1 9 “
.<>"
3 8 .0
liO.O
li0.5
lii.5
3 8 .5
liO.O
li0.5
l0 .0
i
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

16.0 0
5o.5o

52.5 0
ii9 .0 0
lili.5o
li8.5o
li2.50
5o.oo
" ir a r
5 0 .5 0
5 0 .5 0
li8.00
li7.00

•

•
■

•

•

1
•
1
1
*

ii
.
Ii
•
Ii
-

25

3

_
•
25

m
*
•
•
•
•

•
i
- 1
- !
.
•

.
1----- —
- !
- 1
• !

-

.
•
-

•

_
•
3
•
.

25

3

•

10
•
10
10
“

*

!
1
!
!
j

6
6
2
8
ii
ii|

“ '
8

j
1

!

2
-

6

ll
ii
2
2
10

3

2
1
3

. •
3

-

ii
•
ii

-

•
8
•
8

•

ii!
~ 1

-

7

3

• 1

>
ii

•
•
•

31

8
8
23
6
1
10
3

21
20
1
1

1?
19
-

18
18
-

25

1?

7
6
1

5
2

1
1

3

3

1
1

2

1

3

20

12
1
1

15
8
5

1
17
1
7

3

3

2

8

5

1

7
3
1
-

11
1
6
1

3
2

5
2

11
12

5
2

3

*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads),
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e state*




communication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

1
1
•j
- j

6
l

_
•
.

5
5

2
2

1
1

3

1
1

.

1
1

1

•
.
.

3
3

-

- 1
j

|

3

•

-

-

1
•

_

.
•

.

1
_

•
11

•

.
.

-

- !
i

3

1

20
2
2
18
5
10

if?
i5

1
n
27
3

6
•
11

3

2
.
2
2

•
55
.
55

10

!

33:
27
i
i
i
i

23
20

67
19
8
11 1
18
•
11
11

!

!
5 i

35
7
2
5
28
1
11

!
13 1
3
1
2 !
10 1
i
ii!
25 I

37
TT

23
1
10
1

ij
1

!
k\

27
sin
22 j
2
3
1

65
25

11 !
11
10
2
18
5

5
i

1
2
32
7
6
1
25
7

3

23
1

10
9
1
25

i

3
19
9
•
-

5

7;

1 |
2
8

1
1
.
-

13

1

2
3
2
1
1
•

18
8
6
2
10
1
•
•

1
___ 12.!
11
8
!
3
1
j
1
_
1
•

i
5
1
1

6

6
1

1
1
3
3

56

27

8

13
12
12
•
1
1
“

5

i<5
6
2
6
37
21
12

73
39
5T r i r
30
61
1
1
8
5

7!

35

26 — T
1
3

22
30
18
10
13
—

w

32
6
5

2

22
17 !
1!
j

n

9

5
5

5

1
1i
3
1 !
lj

1
1

?
6
6
3

m

m

3

m

3

•
•
•

•
_
.
.

m

-

m

•
•

•
.
.

1

-

|

-

-

.
.
-

;

_

•

- j
. j
{
. j

2
_
2
2

•
•
•

•
•
-

•
•

•
•
“

•
•
“i

•
_

-

•
.
“

1
•i
“

_
•

1

|

.
•1

_i

•

.
.

•

.

.

1
1

.

. ;

•
1
•
2

•
•

.
2
1

3
1
2
•

6
1

2

5
5

2
2

2
1

.

-

1

1
1
1
-

92 i u
26
20
till— n r —
“ ”r r
22
82 I
10
11
2
2 1
1
1 !
.
7
8 i 3|
1
i

--------- 1
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f tabl e *

2

11 |
.
.

9

j

I
-

2
2

.1
- ■
- !
- !
if i

1

2
2
2

1
1
15
11
11
1
1

.

_

m

1
I

'

-

.
.
|

1

. 1
. !
.

8,

O ffice O ccupation^

Table A-i:

C o n tin u e d

-

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Indianapolis, Ind., by industry division, December 1951)

Ave *AGE

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

N um ber
workers

$

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

Under

W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

30.00 32.50

30.00 32.50

8

Sex, occupation, and industry division

o
f

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
37.50 1 0 0 1 2 5 1 5 0 1 7 5 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 §0.00 §5.oo 90.00 $
*.0 *.0 *.0 *.0
95.00
and

*.0 *.0 *.0 *.0
37.50 1 0 0 1 2 5 1 5 0 1 7 5 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

3 5 .Q Q

Women - Continued
Typists, class B ........... ....... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ......... ••••••••........
Durable goods ....... ••••••••.......
Nondurable goods ••••••••......... .
Nonmanuiacturing ......................
Public utilities * ............ .....
Wholesale trade ••••....... .
Finance ** ......... ......... .
Services .............................

1,718
15
*3
205
2*
18
1,265
116

191
7U8
66

100
*.
105
*.
105
*.
100
*.
100
*.
105
*.
110
*.
39.0
105
*.

$
115
*.0
125
*.0
120
*.0
130
*.0
110
*.0
150
*.0
1 1.0
**0
39.50
115
*.0

2
-

2*
1
2
2

-

102
-

2

2
2

_

-

2

6
1

_

239

17 ! 20
_
18 j 25
*
1
02 210 ! 11
*
_ _ 98
1
23; 2*
1
8 ; 1 6 5 : 1*
°
16

_

-

275

i*!
!

7

i!

388
111
6
5
16
*
277
20
26
1*
13
3
5

21
6*
90
58
3
2
11
7*
17
11
*
109

90
3
2
2
30
58
16
23
8
8

209
69

10
*
29
1*
10
16
*
19
6
2

k

93
30

9
1

30
63

1

10
3
1
2
7I

9
1
1
8

27
2
2

8

5

k\
2 1

3

1
1

-

2
2

-

1|

-

1
1

-

-

*

"

" 1
7i
'i
"

2'
_

1/
2/
T
**

-

-

2

i

_

_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows: 8 at $25.00 - $ 2 7 .5 0 j and 10 at $27.50 - $30.00.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

PbO^edAiOncU CUid VecA niCol OcCUpatiOHd

Table A-2*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Indianapolis, Ind., by industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F N um ber

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 72.50 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 . 0G 1 0 5 .0 0 110.00 1 1 5 .0 0
W eekly
W eekly
and
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 115.0C over

Men
Draftsmen, chief ...............
Manufacturing ................

20
l6

3 8 .5
3 8 .0

f o i.o o
1 6 7 .5 6

Draftsmen #.».»»«»»»».»»»».»«.»»
Manufacturing ......... .
Durable goods ••••••••••••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ......... .

310
255
227
28

1*0.0
1*0.5

8 5 .0 0
8 6 .5 6

Draftsmen, .junior.......... .
Manufacturing •••••........ ..
Nonmanufacturing ......... .
Public utilities * ..••••»
Tracers ........ ................
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••

u

t*o.5
1 0 .0
*
1 0 .0
*

8 6 .5 0

_
-

-

_
-

8 5 .0 0
7 8 .0 0

-

-

-

211*
“ TBO
3U
10

1 0 .5
*

61*. 0 0
6 6 .0 0
5 3 .5 0
5 8 .5 0

3
5
_

9
9
1

2
2
-

12*
ll*
-

5i
l
1* 1
-

17
13

3 8 .0
3 7 .5

1
*

.

-

_

55

1*0,5
1*0.0
1*0.0
!
1
j

5 6 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

1*0.0 *
“T O T " !
1*0.0 !
1*0.0 J

6 1 .5 0
51 ^ 5
6 1 .0 0
6 U .5 0

l !
1
i

1/
7/
#

1 01
82
12*

j

1*
1*
1*i

-

-I

11
10
1
1

20 1
15 !
7!
3
I

11
6
5

1
1

1
11

1*
3
3
1

9
9
6
3
-|

20
20
-i

15 1
l5

-

-

13
11
2
2

“

-

12
2
1
1
10
26
20 (
6
2

-

-

2
2

7
7

1

1

_

- !

<
- I
-

-

-

-

1
----------

3
1
1

8
8!
8!
-

?
5
5

22
21
20
1

?

9
9
-

21 ____ 21
20
30
25
19
1
5
1
7

32
21
21
11
8i
8;
_

13
13

_
“

~

25
25
_

1
11

26
17
13
1*
9

29
29

5
8

1
-

_

1?
19

1*0
32^
27

_

28

_
_

23
23
19
1*
-

1+2
31*
31
3
8

7
7
6
1

1

5
5
3
2

20
20 ;
12 !
8

5
5
5

!
12 ! ____ 1
_
3
11
11
3;
-

1

i

8 _____ 2
2
8
;
8
2

-

:

2
2
12
12
11
1

: 2/ 6
1
+
1*
1*

6
6
6
_

-

-

_

*
_
_

_
_

_

i

J
J

“

n

H
”

•

[

1

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Manufacturing ••••••••••.....
Durable goods ••.•••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••••

-

_
-

2
2

6
6

1

.
J

.

1
-

.!
-1

;

J

1

-

.
_
_
-

_
-

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $120.00 - $125.00; 1 at $125.00 - $130.00; 2 at $11*0.00 - $ll*5.00j and 1 at $11*5.00 - $150.00.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
NOTEr Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.




9.

MCU4tte4USMCe G*td PoW&l P la n t O cCMficUiOH&

Table A-3:

(Average h o u r l y e a r n i n g s l / f o r m e n i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s in I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1 9 51)

N U M BER OF W O R K ER S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U RLY E A RN IN G S 0 F —

$

$

of
workers

Occupation and industry division

hourly
earnings

1 .0 0 1 .0 5
and
under
1.05 1 .1 0

$
191
1.87
“ isr. '
1.87
103
1.90
52
1.82
36
15
1.77

Carpenters, maintenance ••••«•••••••••••••••••••••••••

TM

Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ..................................
Public utilities * ............ .............

Electricians, maintenance .•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

lm
?k

1*70
1*18
329
89
52

r

1 i k1
*
2 1 ---- j

2

!

|

-

-

-

-1

-

-

.
. —

1 1
*

!
j

12
6

3
1
*

5

-

6

10
9
8
1

i
!
—

i

1

1.9k
1 .8 6

18

6
5

6

2
2

6
"

5

18
5
r “ 1 5"

7
3

8
10

2
2

x

18

_

1

6
6

9
21*
8
17 8 1 16

i5

2

10
10

16

rtf

X

l
ui

i

1
—

7

3

x

2
2 I

2

1

r r
1.96

12
3

7

3

76
71*
57 Q
17

1*7

- 27

21

x

x

3

36

21
9
9 — iF
x?
8
15
1
6
6

11
11
8

1*6

22

?
77

7

c

9

7
7
6

.

.
.
•

.
.

.
•

.

117
95
50
• 1*5

1.82
1 .87 '
1.96 .
•
1.78

.

2
2

6
6

i
*
*
.

.

- j

•

.
•.

.
•

-

.

- •

1

.

.

6

•

1 .6 2

.
•
-

x

1
*

11
11
1
10

3
3
3

.

11*

•

1

ill
"

.

—
.

•

5

22

62

58
58
52

1

5.

21
20 !

6

21

i

llj •

•

x

U
!
i

Firemen, stationary boiler .................... .
Manufacturing
......
Durable g o o d s ......... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing
Services ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••«

Helpers, trades, maintenance
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ............................

23
U
~2 G
~& —

1.UU

1 .C 8 .

92

1.58
1 . 1*0
1.26
1 .21*

108

U
3
1
9

23
2

1.U7
1. & '
1.1*9
1.1*9
1 . 1*0
1.50

186
89
97
37

2
2

6

36
m 1 36
36

6

3 i

3
3

1 j
* i

- ;

-

16 ; 17
7
10
9
1
*
1
3
7
9
3
6

7
3

2
1

l

-

- ,

U

6

16

15 i
p T i “ lF — r
3
8 !
12

1

!
|

2
2 j
x

1

h\
l ■
2 |

7
3

x

l

x

—

8
8“
8

-

x

Hi

12
11
1
27
6 1 2
1 i x

29 s

2

25
13
17 ‘“X3"
7 ;
1
*
6
13

21*
2i —
*
21*

6 | 25
F

6

25!
8;
17!

8

7
6 1

1 35

3

1

32
32

39
32

11
21

7

7

3

3

3
3
3

l

x —

1

1

.

7

1

10i
1

7!
7
7

2
2
2

2 .0 0

387

“ 3B7—

2.56"

2 .0 0

387

- ;

i

Machinists, maintenance
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ....tttt>Tr.fttt»..trtttTtttl1l
N o n m a n u f a c t u r e •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••
Public utilities •
»

Maintenance men. general utility •••»•»•»•••••••••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods »••«•»••••.... ........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r e ........ ••••••••••••••••••••••..*•

53li

-nm —
1*29
67
18
Hi

296
“ 195—
105
90

101

:
i

; 2 .0 2
! 2 .0 3 “
; 2.03

*

-;
_

« .
.
-

-.

t

„ :
- (

-

-

- '

-

-

1.72
1.71*

-

-

• j

- j

-

-

- ;

-

- |

2

1.72
1.71*
1.61*
1.76

•
-

NOTE:

-

-

25
25

-

-

-

—3
r

-

“ I
-

-i

2

2
1

-

2

_
-

2 .0 1

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




-

:

1
*

1
x
1
x

9 j
rj

8 !
1

2
2

9

8
7 |
x

6
9
9

10
10
5

2
2
x

8
8
3

5

1

5

1
*
1
*
3
1

3
3

2
1

3
3

1
1

1

1

1
2/ 7

9
j

15
15;
lt
i;
i
i

9

5

-

3

-

2
2
x

i

1
1

t

j

5

5

1 .^
..

—

.1

- .
•

•

5
5

.

5

.
•

i

5
*
*

1

1
-

-

-

1
1

3

1;

1

1 !

2

2
2

11
2
2

9
9

0
7

9

J

t

21*
2l*

21*
8
8

8

30 i
30 1
30

17! IT
“
1 7 ! 11*
;

6

7

5;

5

2

-

“

-

i

1

-

59
59
59

1*8

1*0

l a

30

37

8

30

7

10

3 7 1 1?11
37 127!
27 i o 5 1
<f
•
1f
t
22
XU

1
131 18
17
1 3 ! 10 ;
Q
7: y
\\
1!
6 :
ll*j

1

1\

-

2
1

6)
6|

1;
1

5i
5o

tnI
Z\
>
J
x

■3
1

1
7

1

102
162,

2
k

c;

-

Qfi

13

1
1
x

21*
2 1*

-

-

3i

8

2i*
;

7

1
.
u

23!
23

k

1*

8

i
I

i

1

1*1

J

1*2
91
3 9 1 21*j 28
J.
J
2l
*
12 ; 39
*
" 3 ^ “ 1 8 f " 91
38
1 8 ! 91
21*j 28
1*2
39
1

x

83

1*
1*2

1 7 ! 12*

7

5

-

5

6 ! 8
“
3 ! ~ T
j >
1
2
3

-

li

6 1 15
1
1 — T "“ I F
6
1
15

2
2

V

3

-

i

Machine-tool operators, toolroom •••••••••••••••••••••
M a n u f a c t u r e .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••••••......

2

x

'

i

6

7

68
3

g !

!

;

!
8| 6
— r
(T1

8

*!
*

12
32
20 , 2

37
3l*

1
1

i

3
3

l

21
19 ;
15 1 .
! • 1
*
2

18

2 pir
2 1 . 12!
•6
j

2
2

7

73!
71

i a

2

3

r
.

and

2 .3 0 over

2

p

X

2 .2 5 2 .3 0

7
1

28
5
26) --- 5
23
1
3
2!

x

ii

Engineers, stationary • • • .
• .
.
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable g o o d s .
.
.
Nondurable goods •
•
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

$
$
i
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
$
$ _ $
$
. 1$
1.10 1.15 L.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 il.AiO 1.1-5 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1012 .1 5 2 .2 0
j
- 1
1.15 1 .2 0 il.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 .8 5 1.90 1*95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2.151 2.201 2.25

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
1
ai

-j

13
-V -O

?

l!

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety storesj the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

.
•

10,

Table A-3:

M aintenance a nd Poweb P la n t O ccupation*
*

-

G on tin u e d

(Aver a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r m e n i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s i n I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., b y industry, d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

Average $
hourly 1.00 f .0 5
earnings and
under

$

1 .1 0 1
2.l5|$
2.20 $
$
2.25 Si.30
$.15 1 .20 f.25 f.30 jf.35 Jf.Uo f.l*5 1.50 f* 55 f.60 f.6 5 Jl.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 i.90 i.95 1 .0 0 $
2.05 I . 1 0 $
j

and

!

1.05 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.25 11.30 1 .3 5 ;i.i*o ;i.U5 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 I. 7 0 L .75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2.10 2.15! 2.20 12.25 2.30 over
1
i
j
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing
Durable goods • ••••
Nondurable goods • •
Nonmanufacturing • ••••
Public utilities * ,
Wholesale trade ...

$
1.70
1.83
1.86
1.82
1.68
1.70
1.66

1*79
3CT
15
35
1*29
336

61

■

-

2
-

-

-

- 1

“

2

2
- !

l
-

1 ;

2 :

-

”

-

|

3

1 !

-

i !

i
6 !
-

j

27
-

5
-

-

1
3

6 !
1!
1
l!

1

1*3
•

-

-

5 ! 27
5 ! 10
_
8

1*3
39

2
1
1
1 !

21
21
-

k

1
Mechanics» maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing ...

279
T 5 T
159

Millwrights
Manufacturing ,

« j

1.95
T5T- | M S

Oilers
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods

1.83
1.83
1.81*
1.82
1.83

100
20

- j

'
•

9
k

53

i
•

• 1

- >
-

1.83

1 .8 2

1

133
96
1*9
1*7
37
11

*

187
186
98
82

i
|
'
I

•

~

!

-

-

-

•
•

-

-

_
“

1
22
22
•
22

>
-

3
3
-

5
5

3 ;

3:

_

2

_j

6
6
6

2

1.85
1.78

”

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

10
25
9 | 25
• ! 20
21 !
9 !
5
1 1
•

2 !

j

-

T|

1
1

9 1
9 !

i
21 1 26 i ll
12
21
20
10
11
12 1 21 !
16 : .6 j ll
! 21 ;
6 i
,
U
- j
j

i

6j

it
m\

1
2

k

2
2

5
5

■ ' 1 .8 2 "

Sheet "metal workers, maintenance
Manufacturing ,
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ,

51*
5I .j
t
31
23

1

6
r

1 ■
r

1
-

3 1
3 j

k
^

i
5 ; 20
1 ; 20 !
*
1 j 20
*
-

-

38
36
31*
2
2

2 i
2 !

8
1
*

2
2

2
2.

2
2

2
2

1?
13

2

~T]
1

3
3

- S 11

9 i

- !
-|
j

-

-1

35
35

30

30 1
1
10

h

1
•
.
-

!
-I
-I
-!

1!

X

-

-

-

-

-

.

•

-—
-

r
_

ll
j

i'
•
-:
—
j
-

23
23

98 I ^ !

tw

il*!
|

1
1
8
8
1 ;
7

|
-

2
9

12

16
2;

•

-

-

-

.
-

•i
-

.

.!
---- “
.1
j
-

j
j

1

-

™!

-!

1
*
1

-

1

5 j 21*
1
23

-

j
—

—

17

6

1
1

19 j 3 1 1
19! 31

37

1

1
1
12!
11 !

11+ ; 28
12
ll*

l!

13 j

29

1
3!
3i

-Jgj

12

50
50

71
7T

5 ! 18 j 10!
6;

Tool-and-die makers
Manufacturing ...

1/
2/
2/
*

Excludes premium pay for overtime and
Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:
Transportation (excluding railroads),




i

591*
1 5 T

X

1 21j

i

-i

1.96

6!

T|
1.96
1.95

2,13

t t it

night work.
4 at $2.50 - $2.60; 2 at $2.70 - $2.80; and 1 at $3.00 - $3.10.
1 at $2.30 - $2.40; 2 at $2.40 - $2.50; 1 at $2.50 - $2.60; 7 at $2.60 - $2.70; and 2 at $2.80 and over.
communication, and other public utilities.

2!
1
*

J1

23

16

S'

16

6 |
-

101

17
17

21
21

6!

2
1

1
81
“5 1

1
*

37

!
!

2!

1

3
.

k

1

_;

i
-

.

1
1+2i
1*2
;

6
*

2
2j

1
1

3
3
.

.
.
-I
-

-

i
7
7

llT

2
3

li

10 !
10 j

1+0

27
30
30
21*
18 j 28
6 !
2
3

8
-!
-

li

3
1
1
-

•

7
•
.

12
2
10
21
21

6!

|

10

-

-

5

7
7

33

I 1.80

21

21
20
15
5

■ ^
: ll*
i 11
i
3
;

2

1.9U
1.9IT
1.99
1.88

23

-

2
2
2
.
.
•

11+
1
*
1
*
•
10
2
8

i

1.86

Plumbers. maintenance
Manufacturing

8
-

1

_
~ ■

6
1
*
3
1

10
2
2
-

h

i 1.95

Pine fitters, maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods •••
Nondurable goods

-

-

J

-

-

- 1

„

I
!
I
I

Painters, maintenance ,
Manufacturing ••••••••«
Durable goods •••••,
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •••••<
Public utilities * ,

I

m

1.53
I.5J ■
1.59
1.1*3

T

“ IE

- !
- i
|

119 161
1
5
1
1
- ;
15
1
*
8 118! 156
1 90 111*9
2
28
|
i
I
7

23
i5

22
22

50
50

S
h

201*

20a

1
*
-

Table A -4:

Gu&todicU, W ateU tuU iw f'CH id S /u p fU H f Occu fia i ionA

n.

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Indianapolis, Ind., by industry division, December 1951)

N UM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVIN G STRAIGH T-TIM E H OURLY EARNINGS O F -

$
$
$
$
Nmer A e Index iS75 #.80 #•85 &90 jcf.95 L L f.io
ub
verag
.00 $
.
.05
£.15 L.20 £.25 1,30 L jf f.b0 £.1.5 i .50 Lss 1.60 1.65 i.70 i.75 1.80 1.8$ i.90 %.oo 2.10
o
f
h rly
ou
Occupation and industry division
w ers earn g $
ork
in s
and.
" i"
.10
.20
3t75 .80 .85 .90 •95 k.oo L.0£ L L.15 L L,2$ U30 1,35 Lbo l«b5 1.50 1*55 1,60 i»65 If 70 1,75 1,80 1,8$ 1,9Q 2,00 2.10 over
$
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons)...
6 30
1
2
6 3? 12
1 13
1
127
1.63
1
1
3
5
6
Manufacturing
127
6
2
6 30
6 391 12
1
1
1 13
1
1
1.63
3
5
i
|
m % 1 3/ b
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) ..
12
11 1
1.93
b
Manufacturing
TO" .1.96“
1
1r r
~ t
10
1.96
Durable goods
1
1
h u
-|
! m
Guards
1.50
563
6 12
1
8 61 20 81 I2
U6 16
2
?
3
b 3? ib
b2 23
. 116 16
•
6 60 17 80 63 3b b2
Manufacturing....
2
6 12
1
i 35 12
” 563... 1.51"
• 109
Durable goods ...
2
36$
1 10
2 bO 1 n
79 63 33 15
1.51
.
•
.
•
Nondurable goods
6 12
2
1
1 27
1
138
i 3b
l.b9
b 20 ! 6
7! 16
.
.
.
.
.
.
•
•
60
2
2
1 | 3
1
2
Honaanufacturlng ...
U tl
3
3
3; 3
9
7! . 21
J
Finance «* ......
2
2
2
1
1
2b
1.17
3
3
3
- ! *j
3I 3
.1
1
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men)
2.372
1139!! 127 12 210 100
1.15 10b 135 u
3
% 126 lb$ 268 7? 155 131 16? 232
.
•
2 5i 36 bo 68 103 Ib7 199
l
1
2b
77 122 12 20$! 96
1.29
Manufacturing
i;iW
6 2b
_
.
. 12
.
m 2 36 22 37 bl 71 b9 1176 | #8 68 122 J 11 1 6 3 ; 92 1 •
-j
910
Durable goods ••••••
1.32
i
1 — •
.
.; .
• 12
•
- 15 lb
X b2 j b! 1
1.20
Nondurable goods ...
1
378
5 2k
3 b7 32 98 ! 23 b7
9!
Nonnanufactoring .....
1,08b
bj 2! .99 10b 111 36 60 12b 9b 232 39 67 28 22 33 i 56 62 i 5i • ! 5
- 16
• 11
-| -1 1.21
2
Public utilities *..
b 2b 16
1
163
7 i 56 i 5| .
5 ! 17
j
.
. ! 2| 6 10 27 17 22 10 lb ! 5
2 12 : 2 i ~ ! •
Wholesale trade ....
1
1.0b
3
133
.
•
•
.
•
.
.
•
•
1.01
1 19 62 18 26
6
2
1
2 28
21 Finance ** .••••••»<
b
19b
5
7 11
2
172
Services.... •••••
.86 bA3 26
b
7
3 18 51
9| 2i “
- ! - : "i 1
*! 2
j
*!
«.;
.:
.1
8
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women)
2> 1
.97
689
29 13? 90 57 b? | b 155 28 i 2 37 12 bb
2 S 6 b2
_
-1 •
-1 •
•
Manufacturing
150
1.30
2
2;
b2
1
2
2 1 6 ; 2- 17 i 12 bb ! 2
- b2
-j .
- 17 | 10 bb | •
- , - ; -i •
•
•
•
•
•
126
Durable goods •••••
2
1
1.33
j 8
2i • j
1 2
_j .
.
_
. ' 2 i 8: 2
. ! 6
.
. '
•
_
•
•
Nondurable goods ••
2
2k 1.17
2 1 —i .
- ; 20
.
Nonmanufacturing .••••
12
90 55 bl
2
.88
539
29 133
k\ 153
_; _
_
_,
_1
•
«
.
_
- ! 20 l
bo 1.07
Public utilities *
2
10
5
3
Finance *e ••••••••
356
2
1
.89
b 127 ; b2
5 23
b lb 8
- : - 1 _
-; -1 Order fillers .....
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade •
Packers (men) .........
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nomanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade •
Packers (women)
Manufacturing •••
Ncnaanufactaring
Receiving clerks
Manufacturing '
Durable goods •••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade •
fSHnninur elerks
Manufacturing....
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Vfcolesale trade •

810
277
73
20b
533
308

1.11
1.20
1.03
l.b6
1.53

2
1 12
—
*- ;
- 1
•
•
•
.
. 12
2
_
—,
1
- ;
- , - : - ,
1
12
- i •
- | 12 !
"i
• 1 _ | - 1
1 •
.
•

1.57
1.29
1.25

. ! - | - I - :

1.53
1.58
1.58
1.58
l.b0
1.38

•
• • j _
. | .
| •
j ^
i -

1.29
1.3b
1.U9
1.28
1.27
1.21

708
1.32
' i i M 1.35
367 i 1.37
1*26
122
219
1.27
1.27
109
302
"W
163
169
119
77
U
2
50
23
175
123“
63
60
52
30

i

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE:

16
1
1
15
6
2
2
2
11
.
11
-

•
.
-

! 32 | 68 i 5b ' 52 30 bb , 93 20
I
~T9~ 10 3
28
6
i _
.
•
•
. i .
6
3
;
. 28
U ! 10
9
; 32 19 bb b9 30 i bb 65 lb
12 bl 3b j 30
30 lb
32 1
b i ; ? 18 10 55 b« b8 53 75
7 i5 | 21 b6 53 39
36 ; i ! .
- i 7 12 ! 20 bb b3 23
, 36
*
1 10 ! 16
3i 1
|
- ; 36
5 i 8 ! 18
3 bo 1 27
3
6
3 33! 9
31 ■ 5 ! 5 | 7
i
i
?8 | 13 j 53 72 1 7 55
1
3
|
•
6 ! u2 | b2
1
1
7
3
38
- ! - ! 7 ! H j 30 ! - 5b
. 1 2 | 3 S 5 i 11
1 L ai] 9
1
- : 2
1
k 6
2 • i b 6
!
• 1
•
2
1
7 | 3
5 j 9
3
3 ! 3
3 ; b ! 3
- s i
■.
1
1
1 i .
b
b
i 3
*
•
*
•
1
i
1
.
- ' 1
1
i ; .
•
I .
•
1
b i 3
3
1
b i 3
3
•
•
lb
_
.
lb
7

8
?0 j 2b 73 38 91
6
1
75 I 21 ! bb 10
1 ! 16 i 18
6
1
9
1 ! _■ . i
7b i 51 26
2
3 i 29 j 28 90
15
11 i o ; 8
9
-j
3i
b o ; 122 b?! 20 ,75 ! 29
bo 82 i b3 2 0 ! b7i 29
37 55 j 26 18 j b5 1 29
2
3 ; 27 ' 17
21 •
• . b0| . 1 28
- : -; 28 1 “
- | « 1 • 1 *!
_SL| «, |
.
. ; . 32
5! - i ”. •;
- 1 "1
13 18 _|0 U g . L i 18 ;
? “15“ ! 25 10 1 5 16
5 10 ! 18 ! 9 1 1
5
b
b 11
5
7 ; 1
2
b
3
b
5 1
l
3
- i i 26 __L._12_L i l .
3 17 20
! 15
I 6 ! 3 13
8
9
b l 12
- ! 15
i 13
•
j 3“
!

13

27
27
12
15

«.
•

3?
13
13 j
26
26

.i
•
“
6
6
6
.
-

11
1
.
1
10
10 !
| «
-

h 6
U---- 1
;
.
6
b
•
1
1
1
1
•
•
1
1
•
-

.
.
.
•
•
•
.
•
-

—
j
_
_
.
.
-

-i
_

.
•

•

.
-

.
•
•
.
-

•
•
•
-

.
.
•
i
7 __ 2_ .
—4-i 1
11 I 5
1
2
7
_
.
6
7| 3; 1
.
. 1 •
2
1
b> 2
j
2!
2j UOj U-2-LH___ L . _ JL -JL
6 __ 2_
•
1
6
6
2
3
1 7 : 2 i u
i
~ •
6
b
! 61 1 ! 2
- I 1
2
2
!' 1 !; 1
9
3
•
13
: 13 |
j *

Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF.LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented i n
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

12,

Table

k -. Custodial, WaAokoHUnp, aid SUippinf Occupation* - Qoutimtod
-k
( A verage h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s 2/ s t u d i e d o n a n area
b a s i s i n I n d i a n a p o l i s J Ind., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n j D e c e m b e r 1 9 51)

NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIV IN G STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Occupation and industry division

s

[Jnderb, 75 jo.80 io.85 jo.90

!

%
.80

3,75

aureira-aaflzoftftaipg

Manufacturing ............ •••••••••••.........
Durable goods ............... .
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufaeturing ................. .
Wholesale trade
Services ...........••••••••••.... •••••••••••

stock handlers and truckers, hand .............
Manufacturing •••••••.....
Durable goods ................... .
Nondurable goods
Nonaanufacturing •••••••••.... ....... .
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade

210
I F

I

.

p.95 L.00

1

$_

[~
$

16
122
57

2.96k
1,012

568
1,384
523
721

2

86 | 59 j 185
22
33
33
22
33 I 31
1
- ! 2
100 , 53 i 26 163

IPjiffiS 202 m .
L

101

1.50

.I

h
31

157

25

.14-. - .-1 J L

-

593
269

1.39
1.35

lk

Truck drivers, aediua (l£ to and including 4 tons) ...
Manufacturing ............................ ••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufaeturing
public utilities * ......
•••••
tdiolesale trade

1.0U2
T 5 F

1.45

..3 _ l j

x m r

Track drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) j,.,.
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities * ........................
\folesale trade .............. .
ic

222

430

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ...............
Manufacturing

116

tetshpen
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonaanufacturing
.....
Public utilities » •••••••.... ...... ......
Wholesale trade.................. ........
Finance * » .............. ................
S e r v i c e s .............. .......................... .

1/
7/

3/
TU

5/
*
**

30 ! 37

Uo

ML M.

66
45
5

Xi

7U

90 j
3 !

2
k

9

36
T
2
3
31
30

1.U5

134
154
754
453

1.29

lM

1.45

3

1.56

-

15
15

14

87 !

-

1.47

138

li

6 \
k
12
12
12
36 !
1 I -

30
3
3
27

12
-

86
31

j 8
H n
1 u
! i 4
! -

69
26
5
5
5
6
3
61 i 2 0

31
12 ! 55
3 | 43

15

20

1*20

1.65

1.80 1.85 1.90

2.00 2.10 over

$

!
$

and

JZL

JXL

6

56
s
14
42
40

77
IT
11

3

M.
W

90
90

2
1

!

10

9
9

283
1.55
97 i 1.45
50 i 1.43

-|

-6
- 10
10 - ;

1
1

10
49
-

, 1.61
.. i ;6i"

i/2£
29

3 7 1 140 ! 80
37!
- j -

21

41: 57
l6 47
14
2
25
1
24

22 343

18

1

,

• :
•

9
,

18

~ ur

;
5 !
1

6

13

12;

*
-

.

13

.

;

3

-

6
1

36 32 18 uu 17 50
14 |
“i r I T n r n r
14 J 13 15 10
6 ; 16
- ;
32
2 22
22 19
2
9 : 12
3
9
. : 1
1
1 i 3
- !
1 ! 1
1
fc i 2
1
|
;
1

40
44
3
21
16
6|
. j
-

16 28
16 n r

10
6
.
-

•

8
;
i 20
j
j 14
i

I

5

338;
338

-

32i

1

7

-

2
2

-;

-;

16

.
•
_
-

2

-!

2

M 1*3]

8| 47

4 11
2

3|

121

2

-i
-

-

2

?&,.

T lS T

37 4 13
l i -I 3
- I 8; 4

28 ?p 1 1
2
7
. >
22 T T i4
• 1 4
. ;
18
4 12 i ° ; . ; .
6 18; 1 ! 2
7i
•j 1
6
2i
. 1 .j 7
21
.

T
2

7
12
12

-

10

3!

10

37 70
6 14
24 - !
5

11

10

46

§..

9

-

29

16
2^31.. f t - 8 L . . J L
l6 i 1
59 43 1 84 38!

-

-

2

-I

1.51

k

2

M9.1.M L.J SUJS l .
3 ; 2 ! -i -

2

T 3 T

4

5
!
3;
5

139
115
24

66
66

60 122
=
~
16
3
5
57 101
- 100
9
1

1.71

415
8
1 .u»
T U T 1 1.15 1
•
115 j 1.11
•
133 ! 1.2 1
1.11
8
167
31
1.35
.
11
1.09
1.18
44
2
6
.81
14

m .

J1

_ i _ ____ 1,-1211
2
____ 6 — 32.
.JL
121 4
6 41 16
2 : 4 15 7 119 2 161

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows:
1 at. $2.10 and under $2.15; and 3 workers at $2.25 - $2.30.
Workers were distributed as follows;
10 at $0.55 and under $0.60; 22 at $0.60 - $0.65; 10 at $0.65 - $0.70; 1 at $0.70 - $0.75.
All at $2.10 and under $2.15.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




US&. 1.60
_6l J 1
L

90< 16
131 ! 96
81
90
16
23 210
-!
131 121
90 ! 3 1 1 332
5 ; 55 ; 22
3 ! 317 !
102 ! 52
61
3!

239
164
75
35

T 3 T
1.61
1.60

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .................. .
Manufacturing
Durable goods ....... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••««•
Nonmanufacturing .......................... .

157
91

1.61

44

29 | 213
28 ; 81
1 132
Ul ! 37

>i

93 | 51 | 20

1.15

708
m r

m

1.90 2.001 2.10

6

Truck drivers, light (under U tons) ....... .
Manufacturing ...... .
Durable goods ••••••••••••••*••••.... •«.•••••••
Nondurable goods
Nonaanufacturing .........................•••••
V i sale trade ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
t ole

32
36

•
$

•

_2L

1.31
1.33
1.33
1.32
1.29

XW

178

„
1.75 1.80! 1, 85

1.66

22

Ul

% _$

.60 1.65

90 | .95 1.00 1.05 |1.10 jU15 jl.20 |l.25 tl.30 1.35 [L.UO k.U5 fL.50

SS 1-55
1.55
1.56
1.56
1.54

72

$

$

tl .05 £.10 L.15 |1.20 U 2 5 1.30 | U35 1 . 4 0 1.45 1.50 1.55

■jd-Sfej.
9
56'
„,

4
-n r

— ^1

—
I

.

-

|
i ____ _
_

•

•

_

.

_

14

|

•
•

1

4

.

—

:

13.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
MOcUi+t&Uf. 9*uit6lt'Uel 1 /

Table B-35:

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$ j
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
h u l Under1 .0 5 1.10
ory
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 jl.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .00 2.05 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0
eri g
ann s
and
$
2/ 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .0 5 2.1C 2.20 2.30 2 .4 0 2.50 over
j

Machinery 3/
Men

Assemblers, class B i b. ....................... •
J
Assemblers, class C 4/a»j>/.....................

1
10 /
126

204
48
1*53
-1g
|

Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4/a ........... ..
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 6/: Total... .....................
Time lttitTttttTttlT.tTTtT1,ttt-TT1Tt
Tn>tf4t&
‘ o v*\
r
....
Aut^matia— n+V rp**+.»»ej o f s A j /
1 .10 »«iq.rT]j l l s
^n
Prill—pr°SQ rp»*^'ria rn^^fl
>#T*t.t*,
l,
A ^/a .I-Tt.T T
t
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A 4/a .................. ..
Engine-lathe operators, class A 4/a ............
Grinding-machine operators, class A A/a .........
Milling-machine operators, class A 4/a ..........
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class A 4/a ............. *.... ......... .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A ija ............... .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 6/: Total............. ....... .
Time ........................
Incentive
fnr^ft r—1f+VA o A * t r s r 1njt R //h
t+opl1 * l.i p T ^ o ' j » sc
,
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 4/a .......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 4/a ........................
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4/a..... ......
4
aa p l
y
Milling-machine operators, class B 4/a..... .
Screw^machine operators, automatic, class B 4/a ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
ro^V4ni1 /dfloa P // ... ..............
n *i f
d
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 6/: Total...... ..... ......... ....
Incentive .......................
Drill-press operators, radial, class C 4/a ...... .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C 4/a ................... .

53
181
899
788

$
I.69
1.54
1.67
1.R5
1.79
1.61
1. y
,1

1.89

-

1 .8 4
2 .2 4

1.80
1.71

16
134
191
48

1 .6 6

10
2

10

9

15

19

5
12

32

g
16

48

3

18
36

! 7
20 ! 10

7
9

3
4

4,

8

1
11

10

3
26

17

1
i _
!
1
!
,
;
!
1
!

-

-

- ! -

-

-

-

-

-

10

7

29

23

-

6

-

-

-

4
4,

I

30
29
12

-

-

- j -

H3

1.96

- ; - ! -

-

-

-

200

1.95

-

- : -

-

-

-

- 1 - ! 1
- ! - i '
- ' -

532
453
79
11
18

1.68
1.61
2.08

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

9
5
5 ! 9
- 1

12
12

1.49

- 1 - 1 -

-

-

_

_

-

-

4

-

2

81
81
81
58
47

1.78
1.60
1.65
1.66
1.75

-

- : -

-

-

-

-

-

- ' ~ j
- j
-

-

2

5
-

x

2 ! 5
4 i 4
l in
1 -U
L
-

76

1.72

459
431
28
50

1.38
1.37
1.51
1.42

-

1.93

_
-

-

1

1.81
1.89
1.88

-

1

4
-

2
- i 5
9
-

-

-

-

5
8
g
2

6
7

38

31

16

12

6

6

-

_

110
17

1.34
1.39
1.42

- , 18 19
14 19
_ i 4 ;
1
i
1

-

16
j “

a

37
4

41

i

1

_

30 in j50
42
30 111
4

9

4

22

2!

6 ;
5 i
6 ;
1
7 |
i
1 5 !

2 ! 1

«

_

_

-

-

49
34
15

51

5

1

19

48

5

1

18

_
3
28
3

_
6
1

_i
1
-

”
_
_
-

_
5
1

|
4! 1

13

15
K
J

1
4
2

55

1

-

-

4

10

16
9

3

8

.

-1

3

8 1 9 1 12
2
2
_

s

_

_

_

_

-

2

x

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

2

x

x

6 ; - ; - ; 3 ! 4 | 2
1 6 i _ ' _
1
4 1

1

- - -

-

-

3

34

62
62

31
31

28
28

10
10

13

14

-

5

x

3 j
i

- j -

-

!

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

4

4
-

-

-

4

3

.
x

1
u

7

3

_

-

-

1

4
c
J

1

1

6
-

12

-

3
2

_

7

—|

1

x

1

-

2

3

X
_

2

8

-

_
20

-

1

!

„
3

4

23

10 : &

1

_
5

_

87 42 ; 88 72
85 i 40 82 68
! 2 ! 2
6 ! /
!
x1 2
! 6 i
-1
j
-1
- i _
j 24 1 7 ' 5 ! 6 ;
1 9 : 12 ; n i 5 1
,H
3 ; 2 ; -I
5

3

1

_

6

1

8

x
x
-

x

x

15

„

43

3

2
-

-

8

6

2
■2
j
5

3
19

-

.
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_

-

i

17 ; 6

1.44

-

“

a

a

4
-

13
3

5

-

i

4

2

1
1

7

4
18
14
8
n

j

2
6

50 S
6 : 16 12
110 ; 36 , 37 12
6
50 | 0 ! 36 | 30 ; 8
15
3 i 13 ;
7 j 4 ,
5
3 ;12; 6
!
2
x
x
x
_1
1 : 3

19
32
16
5
4

!u
1

i

10
3

i
38 151 133 ,
109
38
130 108
i
15i
3 1 1
1 i 4
19 !
15 25 i 8 1 4
I
9 ; 1 !
7 ! 22 I 16 ! 38
2 ! 24 j 52 i 13
1 11
! 3 ! 7 !
- : 1 : 4
9
i
! 2 49 20 : 20

6

-

-

6
1

1

48 1 36 i 96
48 | 36 ! 96
- j 1
1
1
2
5

C
>

x

_

-

2
1

!
-

g

36

14

_

49 ' 4

-

29

Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C 4/a ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand

3

16

33
65

67

14
3

2

_

!
j
!
1
- ; ”
“ ! “ j “

1.24

111

52

6

9
22
1

_
-

-

14
-

5
3

25

8

15

2

5

6

2

|i

2
12

3

2

-

2

2

1

3

6

1j
n

3

3

1

4

-

6

1

_

i
See footnotes at end of table




O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey,

Indianapolis, Ind., Dece m b e r 1951
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T CF L A B O R
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

.

14

M cuJtin& Uf 9

Table B-3*>:

U&tsUeA 1/

-

Gon£UU4*d

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

1.15

$
$
$
$
$
$
1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5

1.20

1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5

i

$
$
Average
hourly tinder 1 . 0 5 1 . 1 0
earnings I
t

I

$

$
$
1 .5 0 1 .5 5

w

*

X .0 5

1 .1 0 1 .1 5

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1.75 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1 . 9 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2.10 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0
and

1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5

1 .7 0 1 .7 5

I.85

1 .8 0

2 #05

1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0

2 ,1 0

2,20

2 , 3 0 2 .4 C 2 .5 C

over

Machinery 3 / - Continued
M e n - Continued
Machine-tool operators, toolroom £ / & ............ ..
M
is
a fa
^ /o
■ r 1 1 ■ ■ 11 r 1 1■
i t1
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) 4 /a .................... .............. ..
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) l j a . . . .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand i j a ................... ..
Welders, hand, class A 4 / a ................................ ............................ .
Welders, hand, class B 4 / a ................................... ..................

*
9
119
93

1 .8 7
1 .7 4

217
130
159
239
37

2 .0 9
2 .0 5
1 .3 0
1 .7 5
1 .6 0

-

54

1 .3 7

82
60
22
55

I
1

1
i

1

-

-

-

1

41
_

i

4

7

6
2
2

-

-

11
1 jC
X0

20
n
f

-

1

3
4

13

20
-

1
-

;

-

-

-

i

4

-

-

: -

1 .4 1
1 .3 4
1 .6 2

_
_

- ; 3
_ 1 _ ; 3
_ i -

1 .4 3

-

1

17

; -

35

7
! - ' -

19
1

-

10
-

30
4

-

1

_

_

_

j

125

14

_

-

8
13

60
10

24
17

42

48

16
-

_
_

_
_

2
1

2
1

3

4

-

-

- i

_

-

-

•

-

_

„

_

58 i

6

i

4
1

1
1

2
1

3

-

-

1

Women
Inspectors, class C i j a . ..................... .......................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 6 / :
T o t a l ..................................................................
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive ........................... .................... ...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C 4 / a ........................................................

7
T
X

1
1

10
9

-

22

19
8

4

13

6
-

8

15
3

11
Q
O

-

16

13
OQ
*7

20
6

-

5
5

3

1

j

1

1

18

1

20
20

—

11

23

-

1

9

14

8

2

1

9

H

17

X

8

7

1
1
l
!

_

9

1

1

2

1

3

1

j 12

2

1

3

1

12

1

_
_

i
1|

1

j

“

1
1

1
2

8

i
-1
1 !
|
1 I

I
i

1 _ 1 _
• _
j

~

j
- j

-

!

-

_

_

_

_

I

-

i

-

_
_ j

1

-

-

-

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
arnmgs

$
$
Under 1.10 1 .1 5

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$ .
1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 $ ^ 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 .2 c 2.25 $2.3C $
1.80
2.35

$

and

1.10 1.15

1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2 .2 5 2.30 2.35 over
j

Machine-tool accessories
Me n
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4/a ............. ..
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4 /a, 6/ ..
Engine-lathe operators, class A £/a ................
Grinding-machine operators, class & / a ........ •••••
Milling-machine operators,'class A £ / a .......
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4 /a, 6/ ..
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4 / a .............. .
Grinding-machine operators, class B 4 /a ...........
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4 /a . . . . . . . . . .
Machinists , production y e . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) 4 /a • • • • •... ... .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

2/

25
153
43
59
21
49
12
12
30
23
217

$
1.07
1.93
1.87
2.00
1.84
1.63
1.70
1.67
1.28
1.87
2.09

2

Z/14

“ |

-

|

3

6

-

| j -

i s -

6

; 2
-

!2
1

i

1
1

2

5

1 1 4

-

-

-

2

6

2

2

|-

-

-

-

4

-

_

-

-

3

5
2
1

1

1

4

-

!

“
____ 1

-

3
2
1

-

7
2
1

5

-

i

2

_

r

|

1
1

6
2
3

11
5!
4

_

45
19
9
10
1

1
i

_

_

3

1

i 1 ___ 1i
_

26
8
5
9
3
1

6

3;

-

16
1
8
1

_
_

_

1

8
3
3

j

1

6

15 1
i

11
6
3

4

_
_
...

_

__

i

4

1

8

_

_

_

60

1

24

1
|

1

3

29
2
25

2
1

_
_
; _

1

_ 1
_ !1

28

1

2

2 ;

u

t

-

i -

-

-

; 35

13

14

2

The study included establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by
the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Includes data for machine-tool accessories also shown separately.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers*
5/ The inverse relationship of average hourly earnings for class B and C assemblers reflects high incentive earnings for a relatively greater proportion of class C than class B assemblers.
2
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
7/ Workers were distributed as follows:
3 at $0.90 - $0.95; 1 at $0.95 - $1.00; 7 at $1.00 - $1.05; and 3 at $1.05 - $1.10.

2/
U
/




15,

ftctilbOCuU 1/

Table B-40:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F N u m b er
of
w orkers

Occupation £ /

A verag e
h ourly
earnin gs

y
Carpenters, m a i n t e n a n c e ....... ......... .............
Electricians, maintenance ........................... .
Janitors and cleaners (men) ............................
Janitors and cleaners (women) ..........................
Machinists, maintenance ................ ....... ........
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ................. .
Painters, m a i n t e n a n c e ............................... .
Pipe fitters, maintenance ............... ..............
Sheet-metal workers, m a i n t e n a n c e .......... ........ .
Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ............. .....••
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ...

i
1.87
1.97
1.46
1*45
1.97
1.92
1.91
1.98
1.98
1.65
1.70

74
162
55
14
371
17
55
118
59
365
43

!
$
$
j$ . $ , $
$
|
$
$
$
$
|l.60 1.65 1.70;1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 (S.oo Ji.05 1.10 $
2.15 2 .2 0 j2 .2 5 2.30 $
2.35 1.40 11.45 1.50 '1.60 iS.7o!
i
j
: _
_
_
|.
; ! -

fL.35 11.40
and j _
under
.
1.40 11.45 jl.50il.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90
i
i
1
9 ;
7
—
12
18!
14
!
9!
1
_

34

1.95

2.0012.05 2.10
I

_l

7

-

-

-

172

3; 105

-!

J

I

56
36

5

_
-

-

-i 15

-

-

|
4

5

“

155

_ _

-

23

-

371
4
30

-

i
— i

3

?./,0 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80

- i

- i

*

-j

_

—

— j

-

- 1

_

• ;
_ !

3
_

- i

_

- !

.J

«
.

1

77

5

~ |

------ 2.35

2.20 ---- 2.30
2.25
|

~

118

10 i

1
0

2.15

_

1

4

2

2

|3

-1

-

2

.

1
.

.

‘
1
1/
2/
2/

The study covered railroads (Group 40) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budget.
Data relate to m en workers except where otherwise indicated; virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

l/

Table B - 5452:

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVINGr STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y EARNINGS OF—
Occupation 2 /

Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers
2/

8

*
0.95
and
under
1.00

1.00

8

8
1.10

1
1.05

$
1.20

1.15

”

*
1.10

1.05

8
1.25

8
1.30

1.20

8

8
1.40

1.30

8
1.50

1.45

—

—

_ 1.15

8
1.35

8

8

8

8

1.60

8
1.55

1.65

1.70

1.75

—

1.35

1.40

8

10

1

-

1

8

3

2
-

_

2
-

2
4

3

2
7
_

-

4
-

-

_

2

_

3
2

4
2
4
3
*
•
•

3
6
-

1
2

_
2

6
1
2
2

1.25

1.45

“

1.50

1.60

1.55

-

1.65

“

1.70

1.80

1.75

8
Filling-machine tenders ........
Mechanics, automotive
(maintenance) .................
Order fillers ...................
Pasteurizers ....................
Refrigerator men ...............
Sanitary m e n ......... .
Washers, bottle, machine .......
Washers, can, machine ..........

41

1,31

-

1

4

2

3

30
27
18
35
27
18
11

1.45
1.33
1.50
1.20
1.18
1.23
1.42

-

_
-

_
_

2
2

-

-

-

-

1
7
_

6
5
6

5
3

1
_

_

_
_

_

4
12
2

5
3

2
5

-

3
3

_
_
_

4

•

_
_

2

3
_

3

3

3
_

_

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
8
weekly
1
1
*
8
1
8
8
1
8
of
earnings Under 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
workers

(J

Routamen (driver-salesmen),
retail 5/ .................
Routemen (driver-salesmen),
wholesale £ / .............

1/
Manual
2/
2/

y

2/

8
447

96.00

87

102.00

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00
and
over
6 9 .Q Q 62.50 65,Op 67.50 70,9P 7?. 50 75.0Q 80.00 85.QO 90.00 9 5 tQ O 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00

8

6
-

4
-

6
-

10

12

13

11

a

-

1

2

4

3

21
5-

36

67

57

30

32

24

25

15

18

8

4

10

6

12

9

8

5

4

7

1

5

2

3

7
-

-

The study covered retail milk dealer establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
(1949 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Routemen normally work a 5- to 5~^day week.




16,

b

9nA*i/iG*u>e G&wtiesU* 1/

-63:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95-00 100.00105.00
a nns
h u s e r ig and
or
and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) S adr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 over
Average g/

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Men

Section heads ......... ........*...
Tabulating-machine operators..... .
Underwriters ........... ..........................

88
19
65

#
82.50
60.50
69.50

39.0
39.5
38.5

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

1

_
-

-

2
3

2

-

1

-

2

2!

3
3

2

7

1

2
6
12

18
5
17

10

-

8

_

4

3

11
2
6

4

2

14

7
.

_
“

8
5

1
1

Women

Clerks, accounting .............................
Clerks, actuarial ........................ t-t*Clerks, correspondence, class B ..... .
Clerks, file, class A ........................ .
Clerks, file, class B ........................
Clerks, general................ ................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ..................
Clerks, underwriter ............................
Key-punch operators............ .
Premium acceptors................. *
Section heads *.................................
Stenographers, general..................... ..
Tabulating-machine operators......
Typists, class A ......... .
Typists, class B ... ................

Underwriters.....................................

160
31
30
40
250
87
18
66
174
28
72
154
31
38
539
25

38.5
37*5
39.5
38.5
38.5
37.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
39.0

44.50
141.00
j44.00
'41.50
;3 6 .0 0
j54.oo
!4 0 .0 0
!44.50
!4 3 .5 0
4 1 .5 0

61.00
48.00
56.00
47.00
39.50
54.00

2

16
i 2
11
1
i
-!
8 I 24 ! 74
-;
! -1 6
— — !
5

-: -1
-j -

■-

-

-

2

7 j 48
!

! 14 1
1
1
5
61

-

3
21
4

1
-

4
112

22
3|
1
11
9
7
10 ! 9
56
18
4
2
4
19
19
17
31
4i 6
1
_
3
7 j 13
-1 2
15 ! 4
121 I 96
|

!

1/
2/

i

24

1

1

i

!

|

_

24 i 14
4
o\
6
10 ;
5 ! 11 j
2;
7i
- 10
-1
4!
5
31
26
31
9
5
2
1
27
30
1j
3
-1 2!
90
36 j

!

1

31

1
I
!

13

/

8

i1

3

_
_
14
2
— -1
16 !
13
_ -1
2l
3
f

27

25
2
13

23 !
5
-1
14 1

2

5I

___

1

9

I

•;
9
!
-1
71

14 1

8
)
141
2!
2!
1

-

4 !
i
!
i

_1
_1
4
2
.*1

i
1!
3
3

2

8
3
J

_
_ _ _!
_
•
8
4
_! —
8
- | _
- .
14
14
- 11 s 9
6
2
5
6
- 7

3

3

:i

:

:

t
1
1

_

_
«
7
•

8

2
_
-

3

:

1
— _| _
!
- 1 _| _
*
"

3

_
_ _
_
_1 .
_j •
_|
_

i

j „ j
|
1
- j
| . 1
_ j

_
_
_
_

;

_

_

_
_
«1
.
_,
«
_

3

_

_
_
„
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

2
1
|
|

i
i

1

___

i

The study covered Insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget*
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*




Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17,

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

B u ildU u f Go4titn44JctUm

Table C-205:

January 2, 1952

Bricklayers ................................
Carpenters
Electriclana 1T.............................
Painters T.TT...............................
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building laborers ........... ................

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week

$2,750
2.530
2.625
2.325
2.750
2.665
1.650

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bok&Ue*

July 1, 1951

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread department:
Oven leadmen ..................... .
Mixers ..............................
Oven feeders and dumpers,
div i d e m e n , moldermen, bench
and machine hands, roll-machine
operators, head wrappers,
slicers ............. ..............
Twisters ............... ............
Bake-shop helpers, wrappers and
sacksrs, packers, pan greasers,
flour dumpers ..................
Cleaners .................... .......
Cake department:
Bench hands, overmen, doughnutmachine operators, regular
mixers ................... ........
Scaling-machine operators .........
Dumpers, pan boys, helpers ....... .
Wrappers and icers ( w m e n ) ........
Agreement B:
Bread only:
Oven operators, dough mixers,
make-up supervisors .............
Molders, dividers, roll-machine
operators, machine and bench
hands, oven helpers, wrappingmachine o p e r a t o r s ...............




Table C-205:

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bak&Ued. - G ont i*U4*d

Rate
per
hour

$1,580
1.480

1.430
1.330

1 .2 3 0
1.130

Hours
per
week

40
40

40
40

40
40

1.480
1.430
1.230
1.100

40
40
40
40

1.480

40

1.430

40

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Bread only: - Continued
Ingredientmen ............... .
Bread checkers ••••••••••.... ••••
Bread and bun panners .............
Bread rackers, pan greasers,
bread carton fillers, order
fillers, helpers, wrappingmachine operators' helpers .....
Flour dumpers, stockroom
helpers ...... ••••••••••..... .
Cleaners, pan-room helpers, bun
wrappers ...... .
Agreement C:
Bread only:
Mixers, oven operators .......... .
Bread-shipping supervisors,
machine make-up supervisors ....
Wrapping-machine operators,
machine and bench hands •••..•••
Ingredientmen ............... ......
Helpers ..... ......................
Stockroom helpers .................
Cleaners and pan-room helpers ....
Agreement D:
Bread department:
Scalers, oven operators, mixers ..
Dividermen, overmen, molders,
m a c h i n e m e n .... •••••............
Shipping-room and other helpers ..
Cake department:
Ingredient scalers, mixers,
icing mixers, depositormen,
overmen, wrapping-machine
operators ......... ..............
Depositors' helpers, dumpers .....
Shipping-room and other helpers ..
Women workers:
Starting ...••.......... .
After 4 months ....... ...... ....
After 8 m o n t h s ......... .
1 year or m o r e ..................
Agreement E:
Bread department:
Dough mixers, o ven operators,
bread-shipping supervisors .....

BoU&Uej, - Gonti<H4iod
July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

$1,400
1.380
1.330

1.230

Hours
per
week

40
40
40

40

1.180

40

1.130

40

1.480

40

1.480

40

1.430
1.400
1.230
1.180
1.130

40
40
40
40
40

1.480

40

1.430

40
40

1.230

1.460
1.280
1.230

40
40
40

1.020
1.060
1.100
1.140

40
40
40
40

1.480

40

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement E: - Continued
Bread department: - Continued
Machine and bench hands, oven
helpers, bread machine
w r a p p e r s ........................
Bread checkers ..........
Order fillers, wrapping-machine
helpers .......... ............
Stockroom helpers ••••••........ .
Cleaners and pan-room helpers ....
Cake department:
Mixers, cake and icing ....... ..
Depositor operators, bench hands,
scaling-machine operators,
oven helpers ........ .
ingredient scalers ........ •••••••
Checkers .................. ....... .
Foremen (women) •••••••......... .
Helpers ........................... .
Pan cleaners ............••••••••••
I c e r s ....... •••••••..... •••••••••
Agreement F:
Bread only:
Dough mixers, make-up supervisors,
oven operators ............••••••
Machine bench hands, oven helpers,
molders, dividers, roll-machine
operators, wrapping-machine
operators .................. •••••
Panners ........................... .
Wrapping-machine operators'
helpers, bread rackers, pan
greasers, carton fillers,
order f i l l e r s ...................
Flour dumpers, stockroom
h e l p e r s .........................
Bun wrappers, cleaners, and panroom helpers, bun slicers ......
Agreement G:
Oven operators, lead men ............
Dough mixers, doughnut-machine
operators .............. ...... .
Roll-machine operators, dividers,
molders, oven feeders and dumpers,
wrapping-machine operators,
selectors, relieftaen ....... .
Pan greasers .............. ....... .
Flour blenders

Occupational Wage Survey,

Hours
per
week

$1,430
1.380

40
40

1.230
1.180
1.130

40
40
40

1.480

40

1.430
1.400
1.380
1.300
1.230
1.130
1.100

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.480

40

1.430
1.330

40
40

1 .2 3 0

40

1.180

40

1.130

40

1.625

40

1.525

40

1.425
1.375
1.305

40
40
40

I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LA B O R
Bureau o f Labor Statistics

18,

Table C-205:

Rah& U el - Con tin u ed

Table C-27:

P/U+tU+uj, * G o t U i H M t d

Table C - U :

£ o c a l *1'U2*UU

QfX&iatuUf, £*H {U 04f*U
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement 0: - Continued
Stock handlers, Oliver wrappers .....
Bread rackers and panners ...........
General helpers ( w m e n ) •••••••••••••
Agreement H:
Bread department:
Dough mixers, o v e r m e n .......
Bench hands, dough mixers*
helpers, oven loaders mod
dumpers, machine and bench
hands, dividers, moldera, rollmachine operators, wrappingmachine operators •••••.••......
Oven helpers, bread panners ••....
Bread helpers, pan greasers and
setters, bread rackers, wrap­
ping-machine operators1
........ ........
helpers
leers and wrappers •••••••••••••••
Cake department:
Mixers, oven o p e r a t o r s .......... .
Bench and machine h a n d s ......
General helpers .............. •••••
leers ........................

Table C-27:

Hours
per
week

♦1.255
1.205
1.155

40
40
40

1.480

40

1.430
1.330

40
40

1.230
1.100

40
40

1.480
1.430
1.130
1.100

40
40
40
40

PA44tt&1Mfr

July 1, 1951

Clas sification

B o o k and job s h o p s :
Bindery women ........................... .
Bookbinders ........... .
Compositors, hand •••••..................
Elect rot y p e r o ..................
Machine o p e r a t o r s ........ ........ ......
Machine tenders (machinists) ...........
Photoengravers ......................... .
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder .............. ...... ........ .
J o b ............... ...................
R o t a r y ............ .......... .




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.308
2.355
2.390
2.520
2.390
2.390
2.660

40
¥)
40
37$
40
40
37*

2.174
1.317
2.228

40
40
40

Classification

Book and job shops: - Continued
Pressmen:
Cylinder presses - flat-bed and
automatic:
1 or 2 flat-bed) 1 or 2 Kelly;
1 or 2 vertical; 1 or 2
horizontal; 1 or 2 Miller
Simplex; 1 or 2 Millar
High-Speed ••••••..••••..... .
1 double cylinder or 2-color ...
Offset presses:
1 offset, 17 x 22 in..............
Platen presses:
1 or 2 job .......................
3 job ............................
4 j o b ............................
5 j o b ............................
Rotary presses:
1 sheet-feed 2-color rotary; 1
one-roll 1-color rotary; 1 oneroll 2-color rotary, 60 in. or
u n d e r ..... ....................
1 one-roll, 2-color rotary, over
60 in...........................
First and second pressmen .........
Stereotypers:
Agreement A .........................
Agreement B .........................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k ....... .
Compositors, hand - night w o r k ....... .
Machine operators - day w o r k .... .
Machine operators - night w o r k ........
Machine tenders (machinists) - day
work .................................
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work ..............................
Mailers - da y w o r k .•.••••••••••••••••••
Mailers - night w o r k .......... ........
Photoengravers - day work .••••••......
Photoengravers - night work ............
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k .... .
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Pres amen-in-charge - day work ..........
Pressmen-in-charge - night w o r k .......
Stereotypers - day work ..............••
Stereotypers - night work .............

October 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.460
1.480
1.530

40
40
40

Classification

1-man cars and busses:
First y e a r ....... ........................
1-2 years ................... .
After 2 years .......... .......... ••••••

Table C-42:

M 'tU oSlt/U ich 3b*tiuekd.
<24ud J felp& M

♦2.355
2.451

40
40

2.355

40

July 1, 1951

Classification

2.209
2.223
2.328
2.355

40
40
40
40

2.264

40

2.264
2.451

40
40

2.693
2.693

37$
37$

2.640
2.773
2.640
2.773

37$
37$
37$
37$

2.640

37$

2.773
2.490
2.623
2.780
2.913
2.467
2.600
2.647
2.780
2.623
2.757

37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$

Armored car •••••••••••.•••.......... .
Bakery - Biscuit and cracker:
Agreement A ........................
Agreement B - After 30 d a y s ............
Agreement C ................... ....... .
Cheese .................. ............
Department store:
Furniture
............ .
Helpers ...............................
General:
City freight:
4-wheeler - After 12 months ••••••••.
6-wheeler - After 12 months •••.•••••
Transfer and storage ••.•••••••••••••
Helpers ......... .....................
Grocery:
Agreement A ...................... .
Agreement B - City drivers ........... .
Country d r i v e r s ......... ....••••••••
Agreement C - W a r e h o u s e ............. .
Country d r i v e r s ..................
J e l l y .......................................
Meat - Packinghouse:
Agreement A ............................ .
Agreement B .................. .
Agreement C ......••••••••......... .
Milk - C o n d e n s e d ....... .
Moving:
F u r n i t u r e ....... ..............
Produce - Vegetable:
Commission house ................... •••••
Railway express ...... ................ ••••••
Warehouse - Merchandise •••.•••••••••••••••

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.340

40

1.400
1.400
1.400
1.360

50
48
48
40

1.530
1.480

48
48

1.530
1.530
1.350
1.250

48
48
48
48

1.580
1.580
1.580
1.350
1.400
1.350

50
50
50
40
40
40

1.630
1.720
1.600
1.150

40
40
40
40

1.350

48

1.120

40
40
40

1.600
1.430

19,

D:
Table

D-ls

M

Entrance Rates

f Ji4SH 4€ttl U m P
A

u SM O C

E:

H & te A 'f&l P la n t hO & lJ& BStA 1/

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-i.

S Ju ^ t

P A a a U ia n i

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates In -___________________

Minimum rate

(in cents)

All
Durable
Nondurable
indus­
____ goods_______ ___ goods_______
Public
tries
Est
XulxlolOS
2/
251 or
251 or
21-250
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

All establishments .•••••.

100.0

60 or under .......... .
65 ........... ........ .
Over 70 and under 75 .....
75 ........................
8 0 ........................
Over 80 and under 85 •••••
85 ........................
Over 85 and under 90 •••••
9 0 ........................
Over 90 and under 95 .....
9 5 ........................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
1 0 0 .......................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
1 0 5 .......................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
1 1 0 .......................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
1 1 5 .......................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
1 2 0 .......................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
1 2 5 .......................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
1 3 0 .......................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
1 3 5 .......................
1 5 0 .......................
Over 150 and under 155 ...
1 6 0 .......................

3.0
1.1
.1
5.2
2.1
1.9
2.7
1.8

Establishments with no
established minimum ....
Information not available

2.4
.6
1.0
1.7
5.2
5.9
2.8
13.3
1.8
.7

.9
14.3
1.7
4.2
3.1
5.2

U/)
.6

(4/)
.8
.1
.1

15.7

(V)

100.0

100 . 0

6.8
2.6
_

.
.
.
1.6
3.5
_

7.5
5.9
7.5
8.8
1.0
7.4
7.4
8.1
_

37.0

-

1.2
7.3
2.5
4.2
31.8
1.4
30.5
4.1
6.0
5.3
-

.6

-

100.0

12.1
2.4
15.0
2.0
2.0
_
4.2
4.0
5.9
.6
_
12.2
_
8.9
_
-

_1 0 0 . 0

4.4
1.6
5.5
_
6.1
3.7
2.6
3.4
28.8
2.4
_
_
_
_
_
. ,

•
_
.
2.7

10.4
18.3
9.0
_
_
_

3.7

_

100.0

_
_
8.3
20.6
.2
_
3.3
3.1
.6
_
_
_
_
14*2
_
_
2.6
18.2

.2
8.0
_

Whole­ Retail
Serv­
sale trade
ices
trade

1/

100.0

_
8.3
5.4
6.7
2.8
-

Shift differential

499,9
17.7
18.6
2.2
4.7
2.8

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, all
establishments ........ ..

49.5

6,?

20.2

,6.)

17,5

Receiving shift
differential ........ .

18.9

5.9

19.9

5.8

16.4

6.1

19.8

2.9

2.5

8.0
.8
2.5
.4
1.3

2.1

.9

14.8
2.6
4.1
1.3
4.5

5.0

15.3

1.7

2.5

.3
1.8
.9

5.1
_

_
_

_

.2
.6
.4

.3
.4
.1
(V)
.1
.3

.5
2.8

1.1

2.5

Uniform cents
(per hour) ........
Under 5 cents ....
5 c e n t s ..........
6 cents
7 cents ...........
Over 7 and under
10 cents ........
10 c e n t s ..... .
12 cents ........ .
12£ cents .........
14 cents .........
15 c e n t s ..... .

1.9

.6
-

_

4.2
8.3
_
_

_

1.5
8.5
1.7
5.0
_
_
_
_

9.6
_

1.0
_
_

-

-

1.5

-

24.3

3.8

9.6

-

-

-

45.6
.4

6.7
_
_
_
-

Uniform percentage ...
5 percent .........
7^ percent .......
10 percent ........
1
p e r c e n t ......

_
.6
_
_
.

.9
10.6
5.8
4.1
.7

.1
.5
.3

3.7
-

2.3
1.4
-

5.2
U/)
1.9

-

-

_

-

-

.3
.9

.4
.2

_

1.3
.8

(4/)
.1
.2

14.4
7.8

4.9

-

2.9
2.0
-

5.6
1.0

.1
1.2

_

.8
.4

12.8

_

•

_

4.5
3.4

1.2
_

_

1.2
-

-

.8
.8

.6
-

«.

1.0
1.3
.9

_

6.9

_

_

.8
.4
-

1.1

-

_

.2

-

.3

-

-

-

-

-

_

Other ......... .

44.3

-

-

.£*2,. »<?,6 - 3*.9

8 hours*pay for 7^
hours' worked .....

.5

.1

.1

-

-

.3

.3

-

-

_

.6

.3

.4

.3

1.1

.1

.8

Receiving no
differential ........ .

10.3

1/

2/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
j / Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of
department and limited-price variety stares, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately re­
presented in the data for "all industries."
L j Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Percent of plant workers employed
_______ on each shift in -________
All manufiicturing indiistries 1/
mcmnery
Machine-tool
A11
Dun able
Nandur&ble
industries £ / accessories
indup tries
goo ds
go<»is
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
shift
other
shift
shift
shift
shift shift shift
shift
shift
3/

7j
y
U

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Includes machine-tool accessory establishments also shown separately.
No workers employed on 3d or other shift.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

20,

S c h e d u le d

Table E-2:

T tfj& e h L f J to u A A

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l / EMPLOYED IN—

M

M a n u fac tu rin g

Weekly hours
All
indus­
tis
re

All establishments ....................... ...
Under 35 hours ........ .................. ...
35 h o u r s .......... .. .......................
Over 35 and under 37 & hours ..............
37^ hours ....... ..................................................................... ...
Over 37^ and under AO h o u r s ..............
AO hours ...................................
Over AO and under A A h o u r s .................................. ..
A A hours ...................................................................... ........................
Over A A and under AS hours ..................................
AS h o u r s ......................... ........................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Over AS and under 50 h o u r s ....... .......
50 hours ................. ....... ....... ..
Over 50 and under 55 h o u r s ............. .

J L Q Q .S L ..

1.A
.8
6.A
8.8
73.7
1.5
A.7
2.2
.5
-

Al
l

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

1.3

Non­
durable
goods
100.0

Public
uii
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
s le
a
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

3/

2/
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

l.A
1.6
22.5
3A.0
39.1
1.2

9.7
A.O
.2
1.8
62.5
8.A
3.6
8. A
l.A
-

2.2

-

-

-

.6

-

l.A

-

-

.2

.3

-

1.3

-

-

93.1

90.6

0.5
96.2
.A
2.A
.5

80.7
.5
16.8
.7

-

-

-

-

.2
-

-

-

96.7

-

-

-

.7
3.2
.9

l.A

-

.3
5. A
1.2
-

-

-

-

-

.5
-

-

All
indus­
tis
re

-

-

anufacturing

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Al
l
|

100.0

100.0

0.5
.1
.A
1.3
.2
70.3
.1
3.5
7.7
8.1
.7
1.1
6.0

0.7

100.0

!

100.0

Public
ui i
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
trade

Retail
trade

Servioes

2/
100.0

100.0

100.0

2. A

-

-

•5
1.8

-

-

1.2

-

_

_

-

1.8
6.2

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

8A.3

86.0

80.0

53.2

78.3
2.3
11 .A
8.0

-

-

-

.6
5.0
1.0
.3
1.1
A.7

.6
A.7
1.3
.5
1.6
5.3

.6
5.7

_

_

AA.O

-

1A.7
A.O
1A.0

-

-

_

2.8
17.8
32.A
1.8

-

-

-

_

3.3

1A.1

_

'

1/
2/
in the
2/
*
**

Data relate to women workers*
Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade du* to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
data for "all industries*"
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation
(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate*

Table E-3:

Ptaid eJfrUuUufd.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
A
ll
indus­
tries

Number of paid holidays

M
anufacturing
A
n

Durable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

PERCENT O PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
F
M anufacturing

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

A
ll
indus­
tries
2/

1/

A
ll

1 Durahlc
j K s
ood

N
on­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1/

.. ......

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

, 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

..

99.3

98.9

98.7

99 .A

99.6

100.0

100.0

96.5

86.2

91.6

91.2

92.7

5A.1

96.2

66.7

1 d a y ......... .. ........................
2 d a y s ........... ......................
3 days ...................................................................
A days .................................
5 d a y s ............ .
5i days ................................
6 d a y s .............. ..................
6£ days .......................... .
7 days .......................... .......
days ................................
8 days .................. ...............
8£ d a y s ............................... .
11 days .............................. .
12 days ................................

.1

_

_

_

_

(3/0

-

-

-

-

-

2.8
7.1

_
_
_

A.2
5.7

-

-

.8

.1
.5
A.A
76.8
2.2
9.A
.8
2.6
1.3
.A
.7

.2

.3
-

-

-

-

l.A

3.8

_

Establishments providing no paid
holidays .................... ............

.7

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .............. ........

Establishments providing paid holidays

-

-

-

.7
•A

-

-

-

97.9

52.7

A6.9

10.5

-

-

88.A
-

-

1.5

96.2
2.0

95 .A
3.0

.5

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.1

1.3

.6

•A

_
-

-

-

_

-

9.5

19.3
AO.7
9.6
11 .A
3. A
5.A
5.5
1.8
2.9

•»

-

60.5
-

26.5

1.1
1.2
2.1
.2
1.5
.1
70.3
(3/)
8.7

_

.9
2.6
_

2.1

-

3.5

_

_

75.1

3.5
.1

_

7A.9

75.1

3A.2

78.8

13.9

_

19.9

7.5

a/)

1.0

_

60.1

_

9.8
1.1

_
_

.2

_

_

_

_

-

8.A

8.8

_

-

-

_

-

3.0

_

3

3.9

( /)

13.8

7.3

A5.9

3.8

-

33.3

i / Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately
represented in the data for "all industries*"
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
3 / Less than *05 of 1 percent.
tf.s. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*
2 0 4 9 8 0




2 0 49 80

21,

Table E-U:

Paid Vacation*

(fyokmal P/UHtiUotU)

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Vacation policy

All establishments

PER C EN T

M a n u fac tu rin g
AH
in d u s ­
tr ie s

..........................................................

100.0

AH

100.0

D u r a b le
goods

100.0

OF PLANT W O RK ERS EM PLO Y ED

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

100.0

u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

S e rv ic e s

2/

1/

100.0

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

100.0 !

j—

i o o .o
— —

i

100.0

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

100.0
1
1

1 vear of service
Establishments with paid vacations

IN -

M anufacturing

••••

Under 1 week .........................
1 w e e k ........................... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........ ...
2 weeks . . « • • • . ................... ...
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ......................... ...
3 weeks ..................... .................... ......................................
Over 3 w e e k s ........ ................. ..
Establishments with no paid vacations

•

99.5
o o

99.1
-

99.5

98.4

_
32.3

39.3
2.2
57.5
.4

38.1
5.1
55.0
.9

66.4
.8

49.0
14.8
33.5
1.1

-

-

-

-

_

73.0
_

100.0

100.0

_

100.0

_

_

25.8

17.6

96.9

96.0

98.6

98.9

97.9

100.0

100.0

95.8

.3
27.9

1 .2

.7
71.8

.6
75.8
1.0
20.3
1.2

1.1
62.1
22.9
11.8

8.7
75.4

62.9

82.9

37.1

11.4

-

-

-

27.0

74.2

82.4

65.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

74..1
5.2
16.8

.6
.1

7.4
17.8
.9

-

-

-

“

_

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.0

.5

.9

.5

1.6

-

-

-

3.1

2.0

1.4

1.1

2.1

99.5

99.1

99.5

98.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.9

98.0

98.6

98.9

97.9

_

_

_

_

_

_

22.2
1.1
76.7

17.2
82.8

-

-

-

-

.6

.4
48.4
21.3
27.6
.9

.6
45.9
20,1
31.1
1.2

-

-

-

.1

_

15.9

-

-

:

-

-

1.5

4.2

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations

. . . .

Under 1 w e e k ................ .. .............. .................... .....
1 w e e k .........................................................................• • • •
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 w e e k s .....................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...............................
3 weeks ...................................................................... .. ...
Over 3 weeks .........................
Establishments with no paid vacations •

_

12.9
2.9
83.2
.4

14.0
5.2
79.0
.9

9.8
.1
88.8
.8

22.0
14.8
60.5
1.1

-

-

-

-

-

•

100.0

_

14.3
4.8
74.8

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.0

.5

.9

.5

1.6

-

-

-

99.1

99.5

98.4

48.3
15.7
32.3

3.1

99.5

1.0

:

«
.

54.4
24.4
19.1

100.0
8.7
59.4
1.0
30.9

-

-

-

100.0

_
51.9
48.1

95.8

_
65.5
.5
28.3

-

:

1.4

i.i

2.1

98.6

98.9

97.9

.4
2.7
6.9
87.4
.9
.3

.6
3.1
1.4
92.6
1.2

1.4

1.1

2.1

98.6

98.9

97.9

.4
2.7

.6
3.1

31.7
3.4
60.4

25.7
4.0
65.5
-

4 6 .2

28

1.9
48.1
-

49.6
12.7

1.1

2.1

-

_

-

1.5

-

4.2

5 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....
Under 1 week ...................... .
1 week .................... ..........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......... .
2 weeks ......... .................. .
Ovep 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 w e e k s ........... ............... .
Over 3 weeks ...........
Establishments with no paid vacations •

_

_
1.2

100.0
-

1.9
5.1
89.8
.9
1.4
-

.5

.9

.5

1.6

99.5

99.1

99.5

98.4

_

_

..

_

1.2

3.4

3.2

100.0

_

_

3.5

_

-

97.5
.8
-

3.4
14.8
75.0
1.1
4.1
-

3.2
1.1
87.9
6.1
1.7

1.9
2.7
91.3
1.3
2.2
.1

100.0

~

-

1.0

1.0

6 .1

-

83.7

-

-

-

-

-

98.0

-

-

94.5
1.1
4.4
-

96.5
-

96.9

-

9.2
3.0

5.5
83.5

1 .6
.3

3.1

-

_
1.7
20.1
75.2
_

.9

100.0
8.7
.2
1.0
77.2
12.7
.2

100,0

_
15.7
_

84.3
-

95.8

_
19.6
_

74.5
_

1.7

-

-

-

4.2

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ••••
Under 1 week ................ ........
1 w e e k ..............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 w e e k s ...................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks ..................... .
Over 3 weeks ........ •••••••........

1.9

1.9

46.3
.5
49.8
1.0

37.6
1.2
58.4
-

-

Establishments with no paid vacations •

.5

.9

.5

-

-

29.2
1.3
67.8

100.0

3.5

-

-

-

53.3
1.1
40.6

20.1
70.6
6.1

67.4

1.6

-

-

26.5
2.6
-

100.0

96.9

98.0

_

100.0

_

1.0

1.0

6 .1

-

52.9
47.1
-

-

66.6
-

26.3
3.0
3.!

C2/)
39.1
2.4
48.3

100.0

8.7

_

_

15.7

19.6

59.5

74.2

1.7

95.8

2

1 .1

2 .0

100.0

1.4

-

-

21.0
3.8
-

-

2.0
4.2

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited- price variety stores, the remainder of retail tra.de is appropriately
represented in the data for ’all industries.”
’
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
2 /
less than .05 of 1 percent.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table E-5:

P a i d SlcJz

Jl&aae

(tyoAmal Pa

m

M

a h

A)

P E R C E N T OF PLANT W O RK E RS EM PL O Y E D IN -

PE R C E N T O F O FFIC E W O R K E R S EM PLO Y ED IN —

M anufacturin '

M anufacturing

Provisions for paid sick leave

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

1
Services

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

2/

1/

1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........ . ..... «...
-

47.5

49.4

55.1

38.8

67.2

27.8

47.2

54.0

3 days ................................
5 days ................................
6 days ................................
7 days ................................
10 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
15 days ...............................
20 days ...............................
22 days ...............................

.1
15.5
1.9
.8
19.4
4.2
2.9
2.3
.4

12.9
.3
25.6
-

59.2
4.4
3.6

7.3
2.9
4.2
8.6
4.8
~

Establishments with no formal provisions
for raid sick leave ....................................................

52.5

50.6

44.9

61.2

32.8

72.2

52.8

46.0

94.3

99.4

49.0

49.4

55.1

38.8

67.2

27.8

53.7

54.0

5.7

.6

14.1

3.9
.3

-

2.4
.7
1.2

.6
(1/)

.2

(2/>

All establishments ......................

100.0

100.0

5.7

0.6

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

“

1.9

22.0

14.6

11.7

-

1.7
.1

-

-

-

.6
-

100.0

1 year of service

_
13.7
.1
35.6
-

-

_

_
14.1
41.0
-

~

_
2.1
7.3
-

10.1
14.6
5.4
7.7

-

5.0
8.0
11.4
12.5
17.1
-

.5
2.5
.7
1.2
.2
.1
.2
.1

.2

“

_
.6
(2/>
-

_

-

-

.1
-

-

-

-

(2/>

100.0

_
19.5
-

1.9

_

_

7.5
.6
-

-

5.1
1.4

5.3
3.7
1.7
.6
.4
-

-

-

98.1

78.0

85.4

88.3

-

1.9

22.0

14.6

11.7

-

1.7
.1
-

19.5

6.0

_

-

-

_
_
-

2.1

.6
-

5.1
1.4

5.3
3.7
1.7
.6
•4

1.9
-

-

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................................

3 days ........................................................................................
5 days ........................................................................................
6 d a y s ............................................................................ ..
7 days ........................................................................................
10 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
15 days ...............................
20 days ...............................
22 days .................. ...............
25 d a y s .................. .............

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

.1
14.1
3.4
.8
18.6
4.2

_
10.6
.1
-

_
-

_

6.3

-

-

.5
2.1
13.7

-

40.6
-

-

3.9

.
3

.4

-

-

-

50.6

44.9

34.6

-

2.9
5.2

-

-

-

4.4
-

8.6
4.8

2.8
14.6
7.3
8.8

-

3.6

-

-

“

38.4

2.5
.4
1.0

51.0

-

_

59.2

•

61.2

32.8

5.0
8.0
11.4
12.5
17.1

46.3

.3

-

46.0

.1

-

.2

-

-

*
*

-

4.4

72.2

-

.1

-

-

94.3

99.4

100.0

.1
_

_
-

98.1

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public i:tiJitien.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




78.0

_
-

85.4

_
-

88.3

23,

Table B-5

P a i d Sic J i JL&aae.

p e r c e n t

(Qotmal P

O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

a

*u

m

M

o

*u ) - G < m t i M * * * d

IN —

PER C EN T OF PLANT W O RKERS EM PLO Y ED

M anu facturing

Provisions for paid sick leave

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ......................

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

D u r a b le
goods

All

IN —

M anu facturing
N on­
d u r a b le
goods

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tra d e

F in a n c e * *

A ll
in d u s -

S e rv ic e s

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

A9.0

A9.A

55.1

38.8

67.2

27.8

53.7

5A.0

j

W h o le ­
sa le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

Services

N on­
d u r a b le

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.9

A 0 .6

1A.6

11.7

2/

100.0

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

goods

D u r a b le

All

100.0

100.0

7.2

0.6

goods

V

5 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .... ...............

_

3 days .................................
5 days .................................
6 days ............................. .
7 days ................................
10 days ...............................
12 days ....... ........................
15 days ...............................
20 days ...............................
22 days ...............................
30 days ...............................
AO days ..............................................................................................................

.1
13.2
3.A
.8
9.0
A.2
.7
12.6
.A
1.8
2.8

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................................................

51.0

50.6

AA.9

A9.0

A9.A

55.1

_

2.9
A.2
9.6
-

2.1
13.7
2.8
1A.6
10.7
-

5.0
8.0
11. A
12.5
17.1
-

-

-

-

A. 8

9.8

-

32.8

72.2

A6.3

A6.0

67.2

27.3

53.7

5A.0

_

_

51.A
7.8

6.3

10.6
.1
-

1A.1
-

3.9
.3
-

51.A
-

1A.9

9.3

25.6

-

-

-

31.7
-

3.1

-

9.0

-

-

-

7.8
3.6
A.A
-

61.2

38.8

20.7
-

_

-

6.3
-

.5
3.3
.7
1.2
.7
.1

_

.6

(2/)

-

_
1.7
.1
-

31.A
-

_
6.0
.6
6.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.9
.6

5.3
3.7
1.7
.6
.A
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

l.A

-

92.8

99 .A

100.0

8.2

2.0

2.1

1.9

_

_

_

2.0

2.1
-

1.7
.1
.1

(2/)
.3
.2
.1
.1

(2/)
-

-

-

.1
-

6.7
-

-

98.1

59. A

85.A

83.3

A 0.6

1A.6

11.7

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................................................................
3 d a y s .................................................................................. ...............................
5 days ..................................................................................................................
6 d a y s ........................ .......
7 d a y s ................................
10 days .......... .......... .........
12 d a y s ...............................
15 days ..............................................................................................................
20 days .............................. ....
22 d a y s ..............................................................................................................
25 days ..............................................................................................................
A5 days ..............................................................................................................
60 d a y s .............................................................................................. ...
65 d a y s .................... ....... .
70 days ...............................
90 days ...............................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................

.1
13.2
3.A
.8
8.2
A.2
1.5
10.3
.A
2.3
.A
1.3

.5

_

10.6
.1

_

1A.1
-

3.9
.3

1A.9
-

9.3
-

-

-

25.6
-

-

20.A
-

-

-

-

2.9
A.2
1.0

-

-

3.6

-

-

9.0
-

A.A
-

61.2

32.8

31.3

.3

.A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

l.A
1.0

3.1
-

51.0

50.6

-

-

AA.9

-

_
2.1
13.7
2.8
1A.6
5.3

_
-

5.0
8.0
11.A
12.5
17.1

-

-

-

8.6

5.A

-

-

-

-

5.A
A.A

-

.3
A.5
-

72.2

A6.3

A6.0

.5
A.A
.7
1.2
.2
.1
.5
.1
.2
.2
.1

2

( /)

Q/)
-

91.8

(2/)
-

_
31.A
-

_
6.0
.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.7

-

5.3
3.7
1.7
.6
.A

-

-

1.5

-

-

-

-

1.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.1

-

-

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

1.0
.A
-

-

-

"

-

“

(2/)
-

98.0

97.9

98.1

-

-

59. A

-

•

85.A

88.3

2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries#*
%J Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 J Less than ,05 of 1 percent#
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities#
** Finance, insurance, and real estate#




-

Table

E-6: J\!OHspA&LuUifHl &Q4UU&i

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

Type of bonus

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ •••••••••••••...... .......
Christmas or year-end •••••••••••••••
Profit-sharing •••••••..... .
Other ...............................

All

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

D u r a b le
go o d s

-

M anufacturin

Al
l
in d u s ­
t r ie s

All establishments •••••••••••.... .

P K K C K N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN

IN —

M a n u fac tu rin g
P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

S e rv ic e s

1/

2J

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

46.1

28.3

13.2

56.9

36.0

54 .B

70.3

34.4

6.1

16.3
5.8

5.6
7.4

44.3
5.9

7.4

.4

36.5
2.8
20.6

36.0
-

7.1

4.7

86.8

43.1

64.0

45.2

-

N on­

Durable

jj

All

durable

goods

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tra d e

goods

!

R e ta il
tra d e

S e rv ic e s

1/

100.0

_ 100.0

. 100.0

| 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

45.5

34.7

25.7

15.3

50.8

47.0

50.0

63.8

60.4
12.4

36.2
11.5

21.5
6.0
8.2

12.5
5.6
8.2

7.8
6.1
2.1

23.5
4.3
23.0

34.3

40.6
5.2
4.2

43.3

12.7

29.7

54.5

65.3

74.3

84.7

49.2

53.0

50.0

36.2

i

-

20.5

Establishments with no nonproduction

bonuses

*53.9

71.7

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

2/ Unduplicated total.
*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

9*tA44AX2*U>e G *td P-e*vUO*l P lo tU

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O iK E R S E M P L O Y E D

Type of plan

M anufacturing

All

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tra d e

D u r a b le
goods

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.4

97.5

85.7

93.3

96.6

84*4
73.0
66.3
61.8

91.0
78.3
67.1

93.9
94.1
81.6
71.8

85.5
72.0
72.0
58.3

92.9
92.0
47.1
69.4

92.1
70.0
76.8
66.0

8.5

6.6

2.5

14.3

6.7

3.4

Establishments with insurance or

Life insurance ...........
Health i n s u r a n c e ..... • • • • • • • ...... ...
Hospitalization ...................... ....
Retirement pension ••••••••••••••••••

P E R C E N T OF PL A N T W O R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g
A ll
in d u s ­
t r ie s

91.5

All establishments

IN —

86.4

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

S e rv ic e s

y

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

y

All

.100,0..

goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.8

69.0

86.1

93.7

95.0

72.6
47.7
55.5
61.3

49.1
36.4
18.3
30.5

82.1
78.5
70.6
51.2

89.8
87.6
81.0
59.8

90.4
91.0
81.6
61.7

7.2

31.0

13.9

6.3

5.0

a g o , o_j

N on­
d u r a b le

D u r a b le

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S e rv ic e s

1/

goods

iJOS.0
“ “—

, 100.0

100.0

90.5

88.5

79.5

37.2

88.4
79.5
79.5
55.2

87.0
83.8
54.9
52.8

75.4
53.2
56.3
48.5

25.4
25.9
24.9
1.5

9.5

11.5

20.5

62.8

1
—

.

100,0

.

Establishments with no insurance or

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the
2/
2/
*
**

data for "all industries."
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Indianapolis, Ind., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

25,

A ppendix — Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Eaoh group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioe clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shorn far only full-time
workers, i.e«, those hired to work the establishment1* full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage praotioes refers to all office
and plant workers as speoified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
siok leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Siok leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for & waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN INDIANAPOLIS, 1ND., l/;
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
21
21
21
21
21

1,134
354
199
155
780

260
97
55
42
163

180,800
106,100
73,600
32,500
74,700

112,370
82,600
59,9BO
22,620
29,770

17,480
9,520
6,620
2,900
7,960

21
21
21
21
21

All divisions .................................
Manufacturing .................... ..........
Durable goods 2/ .........................
Nondurable goods i j ........ .............
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities •••..........................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade 2/ ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services £ / .............................

92
165
274
118
131

28
32
34
35
34

13,500
10,100
32,100
9,500
9,500

10,720
3,400
6,800
4,750
4,100

2,320
1,180
690
3,210
560

21
21
21
21

66
10
13
60

35
8
7
22

13,375
7,746
1,423
4,913

11,893
7,552
1,037
2,485

1,588

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 7/
Machinery industries ...........................
Railroads .....................................
Milk dealers ..................................
Insurance carriers ............................

8/

-

73
1,839

1/ Indianapolis Metropolitan Area (Marion County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscel­
laneous manufacturing,
l j Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2 / Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade in the numbered tables due to the omission of a number of department and
limited-price variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for the
nonmanufacturing industry group.
6/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




Assembler (machinery) ..... ............... ......... ............
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery)........
Bench hand (bakeries) .................................... ..
Biller, machine ............................................... .
Bookbinder (printing) .............................. ........ .
Bookkeeper, hand ....................... ........... •••••......
Bookkeeping-machine operator ....... ........ ............. ......
Bricklayer (building construction) ..............................
Calculating-machine operator......... ........................ .
Carpenter (building construction).......
Carpenter, maintenance .................................
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads).
.... .................... ..
Cleaner......
Cleaner (machinery) ...... ...... ........................... .
Cleaner (railroads) ............ ...... ..... ...................
Clerk, accounting ........ ......... ......... ....... ...........
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) •••••.... ..... .
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ................... ...... .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) .............. ....... .
Clerk, file ..................................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) •..............................
Clerk, general .......................... ...... ...............
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ••••••............ ...........
Clerk, order........... ........... ........... ..... .........
Clerk, payroll
...... ....... ..... .................. .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) •••••••...........
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ...•••............ .
Compositor, hand (printing) .................................. .
Crane operator, electric bridge ................................
Draftsman •••••.... ................ ••••........ ..............
Drill-press operator (machinery) ......................... ......
Duplicating-m&chlne operator ....................... ...........
Electrician (building construction) .............. ............. •
Electrician, maintenance ••. •...................................
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .................
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ..........
Electrotyper (printing).......
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ........................... •••«
Engineer, stationary.....................
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) .................... .
Fireman, stationary boiler
.......... ...... ..........•••••••
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) .......................... .
Guard .......... ............... ....... ......................
Helper (bakeries) •••••••••••••••...............................
Helper, motortruck driver •••••••••••.... ..................... .
Helper, trades, maintenance ........... ..... ..... ......... ..
Inspector (machinery) ••...••.... ...... .......................
Janitor......................................................
Janitor (machinery) ......................................... .
Janitor (railroads) .........................................
Key-punch operator ........
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .................. ••«•••
Laborer (building construction) .......... ....................
Machine operator (printing) ....................................
Machine tender (printing) .................. ........ ........ •••••
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ••••••••..... ......
Machine-tool operator, toolroom..... ....................... .
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) .....................
Machinist, maintenance ..........
Machinist, maintenance (railroads).••••.....••.....
Machinist, production (machinery) ..............
Mailer (printing) ...............................
Maintenance man, general utility...............................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ............ .................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milkdealers) .......
Mschanic, automotive (maintenance)(railroads) ....................
Mechanic, maintenance ..............
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ........... ...... •••«......
Digitized Millwright...................................................
for FRASER



27<

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Mixer (bakeries).... ........... ••••••••.................... .
Molder (bakeries)
..................
Motortruck d r i v e r ....... .... .......................................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ...............
Office boy
.................. ............................. ...
Office girl ••••••......................... ..................... .
Oiler ............................................
Operator (local transit) ................ .................... .......
Order f i l l e r .....................................
Order filler (milk dealers) ....... .................................
Overman (bakeries) .................. ....... .................. ......
P a c k e r ..................................
Packer (bakeries)
.
Painter (building construction) ..............................
Painter, maintenance ......................... ................. •••••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ••••••......................... .
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ......................... ............. .
Photoengraver (printing) • •............... ...........................
Pipe fitter, maintenance ............................................
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ................................
Plasterer (building construction).... ...............
Plumber (building construction)..... .........................
Plumber,maintenance ................... .......................... ....
Porter ........ ........ ••••............ ...... ......... ........ .
Porter (machinery) ••••.•••••................... ................... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) • •••.... .....................
Press assistant (printing) ••••......................... ............
ftress feeder (printing) ...................................... .......
Pressman (printing) ................................................
Receiving clerk ................................. .............. ......
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ••••••................ .
Routem&n (driver-salesman) (milk d e a l e r s ) .......
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ........ .......................... .
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ......................
Secretary ...... ............. ...... ••••••......................
Section head (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••••••..•••••••••••
Sheet-metal worker, m a i n t e n a n c e ....... .......... ..................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) •••••••........ .
Shipping clerk ......................
Shipping-and-receiving clerk •••••.................... ............ ..
Stenographer .......... ............. .........................
Stenographer (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ..........
Stereotyper (printing) ...............................................
Stock handler ............. ••••••••••....... ......... ...............
Stock handler (machinery) •••••••..•.................................
Stock handler (railroads) ............................... •••••••••••
Switchboard operator .............................
Switchboard operator-receptionist ••••••.•••...........
Tabulating-machine o p e r a t o r .... ..........................
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) .................. .
Tool-and-die maker .........
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ..... ................................
Tracer ................ ............................ .......... ........
Transcribing-machine operator ....................
Truck d r i v e r ........................
Truck driver (railroads) ........ ................. ......... .........
Trucker, hand ...............
.....
Trucker, hand (machinery)..... .............. ••••••........... •••••
Trucker, hand (railroads) ................
Trucker, power .................................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) •••••••••......... ••••••••••
T y p i s t ......................................... .....................
Typist (insurance carriers) •••••••...... •••••••••••........... ..
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ....................................
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) .............. ............ .
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ............................ •••••
Watchman •••«....... •••••••••.......... .............................
Welder, hand (machinery) ••••••••••...... ......... .................
Wrapper (bakeries) ••••••••••..................... ..................
☆

u. S.

G O VER N M EN T P R IN T IN G O FFIC E : 1952

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13
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13

7, 8
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17 , 18

-204980







This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional
Office. Communications may be addressed to:
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102