View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
December 1951

Bul l et i n

UNITED

STATES

No.

1 0 7 4

DEPARTM ENT

M a u rice J. T o b in - S e c r e ta r y




OF

LA B O R

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
p&g»
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................

I

THE NEW ORLEANS METROPOLITAN AR E A ...............................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ....................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations .....................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ...............................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..........
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations........

3
7
8
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-4.0
Railroads .........................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ....................................

11
11

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction...............................................
C-205 Bakeries ..........................................................
C-27
Printing ..........................................................
C-Al
Local transit operating employees ....................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .......................................

12
12
12
12
12

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ........ . •...................

13

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..............................................
E-3
Paid holidays ..................................
E-4
Paid vacations ....................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ..........................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ...............................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .............................

13
14
14
15
16
17
17

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey................................

IS

INDEX........................................................................

20

* NOTE - An additional occupational
earnings report on auto repair
shops (June 1951) is available up­
on request.
For s l by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S Government Printing O f c
ae
.
fie
Washington 2 , D. C - Price 15 cents
5
.

April 23, 1952

Introduction

/

1

The New Orleans Area is 1 of 4 0 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations that are common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of
sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping.
In presenting earnings information
for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4.) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divi­
sions.
Occupations that are characteristic of particular, im­
portant, local industries were studied on an industry basis, with­
in the framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for
these jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The New Or leans Metropolitan A rea
The New Orleans Metropolitan Area (Jefferson, Orleans,
and St. Bernard Parishes) had a total population of 681,000v
persons in 1950.
Of these, approximately 83 percent resided
within the city limits of New Orleans.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau’s regional office in Atlanta, Ga.,
by Louis B. Woytych, under the direction of Harry H. Hall, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau’s
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Advantageously located at the mouth of the Mississippi
River, New Orleans is a leading domestic and foreign trading and
distribution center.
The Port of New Orleans ranks second
in
the United States in dollar volume.
Eighty steamship lines
operate to and from foreign and coastal ports and 4 0 barge lines
connect New Orleans with river cities in the vast Mississippi
River Basin.
Nine major railroads, 6 domestic and 3 interna­
tional airlines, and 75 trucking systems serve the city’s many
distributing and manufacturing establishments.
The Bureau’s estimate of the annual budget for a New
Orleans worker’s family was $3*4-53 during October 1950, the
lowest annual cost among the 3 - large cities surveyed in the
4
United States.
The budget is described as providing a "modest
but adequate" level of living for an urban worker’s family of
four persons— an employed father, a housewife not gainfully em­
ployed, and two children under 15 years of age. Between Novem­
ber 1950 and November 1951, consumers’ prices in New Orleans
rose approximately 5.5 percent.
Nonagricultural wage and salary workers (excluding
government) in the New Orleans Metropolitan Area totaled 286,500
during December 1951. It is estimated that the 290 manufactur­
ing firms within scope of the Bureau’s survey provided employ­
ment for about 44-,200 persons. 2/ The area’s dominant manufac­
turing industries in terms of number of persons employed, are
food, textiles and textile products, transportation equipment,
and metal products and machinery.
The importance of New Orleans as a distribution center
is emphasized by the fact that over a third of all employees in
nonmanufacturing establishments, employing 21 or more persons,
were in transportation, communication, or other public utility
companies.
About 16,000 persons were employed in wholesale
trade establishments and 26,000 were on the payrolls of various
retail trade companies.
An additional 6,000 were employed by
finance, insurance, and real estate firms, and a labor force
of 9,4-00 was required by the various service establishments.
Among the industries and establishment-size
groups
studied by the Bureau, about a fifth of the workers in nonoffice
jobs were employed in establishments having written agreements
with labor organizations.
The public utilities group was the
most highly unionized of all industry groups studied; 95 per­
cent of the nonoffice workers were employed in union establish­
ments. Although more than half the manufacturing plant workers

jl/ These and following estimates exclude small establish­
ments not included in the study; see appendix table for minimum
size of establishment studied in individual industry divisions.

2

were employed under the provisions of union contracts, the ex­
tent of unionization in the other industry groups was substan­
tially lower* The proportion of office workers employed under
union contract provisions was considerably less than for plant
workers* Less than a tenth of the office workers were employed
in establishments with labor-management agreements covering
office employees.

were on the payrolls of companies whose minimum rates ranged
from over 75 cents to and including $1 an hour, whereas over
a fifth of the workers were in firms with minimum wages of over
$i.
No formal entrance rates below 75 cents were reported by
wholesale trade establishments, and only a small percentage of
the manufacturing and public utilities plant workers were employ­
ed in establishments
having minimum entrance rates below 75
cents*
Retail trade and service companies generally had lower
entrance rates than establishments in oth£r industry groups*

Occupational Wage Structure

Wages of manufacturing industry workers were generally
higher than in nonmanufacturing*
In 20 of 22 comparable job
classifications, weekly salaries of office workers in manufac­
turing companies averaged $1 to $10 higher than in nonmanufac­
turing* Average hourly earnings for 13 of 18 plant occupations
in manufacturing firms ranged from 4 to 37 cents higher.

Earnings of a substantial number of plant and office
workers in the New Orleans Area were affected by general wage
increases between January 1950 - the base period for the Wage
Stabilization Boards 10 percent ncatch-upw wage increase for­
mula - and December 1951* These formal wage advances were much
more numerous after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea than
during the preceding 6 months*
After June 1950, about threefourths of the manufacturing plant workers and half of the of­
fice employees received general wage increases*
Approximately
three-fifths of the plant workers in the public utilities and
finance groups and two-fifths of those in the wholesale trade
and service industries received formal wage adjustments during
the period*
General wage increases were least frequent for
workers employed in retail trade establishments with only a
fifth of the plant workers and substantially fewer office workers
receiving formal pay raises*

Virtually all plant workers were employed in estab­
lishments having established minimum entrance rates for inex­
perienced workers*
Plants employing over a third of the work­
ers in all industries had established minimum hourly entrance
rates of 75 cents*
More than a sixth of all plant employees




In December 1951, over 15 percent of the plant workers
employed by manufacturing plants in the New Orleans Area worked
the second shift, and about 5 percent were employed on the third
shift. About 85 percent of these extra-shift workers were paid
a shift differential. Workers employed on second shifts usually
were paid a 5-cent differential; third-shift workers generally
received 6 cents.
At the time of the survey, the scheduled workweek was
40 hours for over two-thirds of the women office workers and
more than seven-tenths of the plant workers in all industries*
Schedules of 40 hours were common in all broad industry groups
studied.
Virtually all office employees and about 65 percent
of the plant workers in the New Orleans Area received at least
four paid holidays a year. Six holidays were most common, being
granted to nearly 40 percent of all workers. Finance, insurance
and real estate companies, as a group, granted more paid holi­
days than other industries, providing nearly a third of their
employees with 12 days a year*

3,

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
O j^ C C e

Table A-ls

0 c C 4 4 fu U lO 4 > tl

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Mew Orleans, La., b y industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y

Av e r a g e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

$

ayvl

25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 5o.oo 52.50 55.00 57.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
|

Men
Bookkeepers, h a n d ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........... ............
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale t r a d e ................. .
Retail t r a d e ....... .......... .
Finance *» .......................
S e r v i c e s .........................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............... .
Wholesale t r a d e ......
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .................... .

MarmfactuHng
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ........ .
Wholesale trade ••••.............
Finance
......................

61
76
16
16

1
39.5 61.50
3 9 3 " ■ 6830
5o.o 58.50
Uo.o 62.00
5o.o 58.00
5o.o 68.50
5o.o 62.50

17

—

5o.o

_

_

-

_
- — “
-

320
229

-

39.5

26

5o.o

556
" 109
537
1L0
255
28

5o.o

62.00

3 9 .3

6 2 .5 0

W ~ ” 39.5

5o.o ; 37.50
32
— 59“ “ 5 0
3 73 5

Office beys .............................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .............. .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ..................
Finance * * ........ ....... .......

5o.o 33.50
220
— 55“ ■ 50:0 13 3 3 5 “
166
39.5 33.50
39.0 33.00
52
50.0 36.00
71
26
39.5 35.00

Secretaries .............................

10

-

39 55
:

50.0

-

-

i

3

1 3

1
;

3

1

-

-

!
-

-

-

«

1

-

- i

_

-

1 “
1 —
—
~

-

_

.

1
1
1 1
1
15 1
15 !
i
15 |
-

1
_

1

6
-

-

11

6

-

n
- i

6
6

-

I
1

-

6

5
1
2
1

i

1°
I
9
- i 1
:
17
17
! 1
_
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

5

1

5

1

-

-

-

y>
1
35
20

-

-

-

1

|

-

-

-

-

1

—1

3

5

60.00

20
20
?8
33
25
-

20
5

53
5
58
22
19
6

37
10
27
6
20
1

!

-

_

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




20
i— i r
16
- ! 7

11

1 !
1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
2
2
?

17

-

-

57.00

Duplicating-machine operators .........
Nonmanufacturing ........ .

0

!

-

65
-------- 15“
53
21
17

50.5 ! 56.50
39.5 65.50
5o.o ; 51.00

_

1

-

13
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

Clerks, payroll .........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ .............
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ ............
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ............... .

“ 5

-

1

50.0 53.5o
Uo.5 53.50
5o.o 53.50
5o.o ! 55.oo
5o.5

_

- 1
! 15
-

!
- 1 -

50.0 56.00
736
i<& '" 3 9 3 r5 5 3 5 “
5o.o 1 55.50
635
5o.o , 55.00
378
213
5o.o 55.50
20
39.0 52.00

223

-

I

-

|

-

_ i

-

_

_

_

-

50.0 61.50
39,5 65.50
50.0 I 60.00
53.5 63.50

Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing ••••••••.... .
Nonmanufacturing ......... ...... .
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale t r a d e ..................
Finance ** .......................

272

.

-

19
39.5 ! 37.50
---- 19“ “ 39 3“ ! 37.56'

330

-

- j

Clerks, file, class B ...........................
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••..........

Clerks, order ...........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ ..........
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................

-

-

-

59.50
59.50
58.00

39

-

-

55.50

E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
:s
$
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.5o 35.00 37.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00j85.00190.00
I
1

2
-

2
_
1

1

8

51

1
51 !
36 i
12 !
2 1
-

1
1 i

1
1

5o 1 77
3 I 1
37 ! 76
20 ; 38
15 i 37
3
1

11
11
1
.
-

58
lir
50
6
23
_
1

-

I
3
3 1
3

17

6

-

1

2

2
9
- 1 9
2
2
- 1 9
1
6
19
21
_
! 5
6 ! 19
16
1
3
15
5 ; 16
1
- 1
8

1

11
2
9
1

2
2
2

1 17
! 2
i 15
1 .
l
t
13 !
13
-

29

;

6
6
6

37

29
8
a

13
11
2
1
.
1
-

37
13
8
-

3

2

-

-

25
12
12
3
7
1

3

3
3

-

58
20
18
33
37 1 36
17
6
! 10
15 i 8 | 5
5
5
16
1 8 i 35
12
32 ! 30
25
16 j *
10
9
1 5
5
13
6
i 2
11
17 ! 20
5
11
l
8
1 ; “ j 3
! _
_
_
_
_
- ;
- '

56
5
51
10
38
3

5?
35
h
i
9
36
55 ! 35
20
59
35
15 ! 3
3
1

66
12
55
57

-

16
6
10
5
3
2

55
6
38
22
12
3

j 57
! 8
! 39
! 26
; 11
1

53
3
50
25
25
1

37 I 33
9 i 7
28 5 26
18
19
3
7
1

-

9

-

5
2
3
3
2

6
-

-

3

6

_

_

!

i
!
!
|
1

k

_

_

-

—

58
8“ i
50 I
16 1
25 1

- |
l
5 | 3

_

_

_

-

.
-

.
-

i

18
56 | 33
19 :
7
11
37 ! 33
2
22
7
30 I 3 1
12
1 1 1
3
_
_ 1
|
20 i 50
10 ! 13

10
1
9

27
2

17

«•
.

18
1
17
6
9

*
"
6
11 i
5“ I---- T
7 \ 3
1
6 |
3
■

-

; 20
_

: 20
20
-

_
.

1
1

3
3

_

5
3
1
1
-

3
1
2
1
-

6

2
2
2
-

1
1

1
1

- j

.

.

_

.

6
5
-

_

i-------------!
!
|
-

-

-

_

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

3

6

_

-

-

6?
i£
59
20
25

12
12
19
2
11 ” ~ i r r T W
1
8
3
.
.
3
6
_
2
-

Ilf
5
10
6
2
2

_
.

3

52 i 11
7 1 8
10
65
35
1?
21
12
-----— 15
2
6 1 12
10
! r*
5
9
52
2
9 j 12 ! 20
63 j 39
7
5
23
8
10
12
2
9
7
15 ; 5 ! 52
8
31
1
21 i _
1
1
8
3
!
5
5
3
_
_
2
1
1
3
_
1
2
l
5
19 1 3
3
7
-»
1
1
3
7
1
2
10
- ! 3
_ 1 _
_
_
_
_
1
1
3
3
—
1
3 — 1 ---3
Ilf 1 2
3
11 ; 2
2
2

28
13
5 ^ r
9
23
6
5
2
1
2
2
9
-

3 j

1

1

2

1

3

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.3. DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4.

Tabi« A-i:

O ^ioe Occupation^ - C ontinued
/

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 for selected occupations studied on
an area basis in New Orleans, La., by industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

W e ek ly
earnin gs
(S tand ard )

W e ek ly
h ou rs
(S tand ard )

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Under

2 5 .0 0

$

27.50 30.00 32.50135.00 37.50 lo .o

$

$

2.£0 45.00 47.50 5o.oo 52.50 55.oo 57.50

$

$

62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00

8 5 .0 0

90.00

32.50 35.00 37.50 lio.ooi 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo| 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

over

I
i

60.00

and

$

25.00 27.50

30.00

Men - Continued
$
Tabulating-machine operators ......... .
Manufacturing ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing ......... ......... .
Wholesale t r a d e ........... .........

53

61.00

40.0

" 4 0 . 3

T T

40.0 i 60.00
40.0 ! 59.50

41
33

I

10

5 3 3 6 "

10

9

Women
RiTiers, machine (billing machine) .......
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing
................ •••••
Public utilities * ........ ....... .
Wholesale trade ......... ............
Retail trade ...•••••......... ......
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Nonmanufacturing .............
Retail trade .............
Bookkeepers, hand ............... ..........
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing •••••..................
Public utilities * ...... •••••••••••
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ........ ............
Finance ** .................... .
Services .............................

260

“ 2 5

40.0 39.50
T 53“ 1530
4o.o 35.00

63
30

39*5

2

21

31
48

38.5
40.5

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Nonmanufacturing .................... .
Retail trade ....••.......

145

4o.o
"46.0
4o.o
40.5

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufacturing
........ •••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ......... .
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ...................... .
Finance *»
................••••••

308

121

31

93

3

1

98

428

15

40.0

4

9

21

1

39.0
1

5

11
13

1

13

38.00

3

3 9" 3 5

2

36

8 I 17

22

17
3
14

13
9

10

7
18

5
4

45

16

81

29

2

JL
S
35

58

51

7
17

26

T

78

6

-1

29

29

12

4

33
4
14
n
4

22

8

71

17

10
22

43

16

12

3

2

70
T
65

26

l

61
11

53

16

l

1

10

1

17

5

4

12

" IT

50
13
14
17

6

3 6

nr

20

2

18

7
9

1
1

10
1
6
28
2

26
5

19

2

7

16

-

12 .

19

2

9
29
9
20

_JL

22
10

10

17

12

10

16

6

9

9

15

22

11

2

1

23

3
5

14

_JL

21_
15

12

3

_

12

1

9
5
3

1

3

3
19
17

l

10

13

54
4

2
15

18
10

JLL

16

12

10
26

16

10

10

18

51

25

45.00
43.50
34.50
39.50

41.0

70

5

10
10

42.00

39.0
40.0

!
|

-JO

4Q.Q 1 43.50
363o

“563"
0.0

47 j 22 j

9
38

22

2
2

39.5 j 39.00

IF
349
59
204

19
9

15
9

5

42.0 ! 38.00

7 3

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3

28

50.00

Uo.Q 40.00
40.0 : 42.66"
40.5 ! 39.50
39.5 | 41.50

5

16

33
T

j 43.QQ
! 4&36~
1 42.00
j 43.00

nr

4

12_

_

18

49.50

40.0

13
25
5

"IT

56.00

39.0

118

75
"3 5

3

14
3

15
" IT
15

52.50

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptoneter type) ......................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ................. .

2

51.50
54.50

39.5

4 0 .0

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) .............. .......................
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••........... .
Public utilities * •••••••••••••.•••
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ................. .......
Finance ** •••••••••••••••••••••••••

20

51.50

26
49

270

22

60
4
43
13

40.6 1 6 3 0

272

1

60

23

40.0

45
144
43
“I T

23

39.5 1 42.00
U 43o
41.50
39.0 45.oo
40.0 41.50
41.0 39.50

1 9 3 “

232

5

1

5,

0^ *C B

T a b l e A-l:

0 c C 4 4 fu M o 4 tl

-

G o n tiH U e d

( A verag e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n
an
a r e a b a s i s i n N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 19 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N um ber
of

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

- Continued
958
13$
819
81*
305
95
31

Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ....................... .
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................
Wholesale trade .......................................
Retail t r a d e ...........................................
Finance ** ...........................

Clerks, file, class B .......................................
Manufacturing .................. ............
Nomoanufacturing •••••.................................

Pllhl 1A ll+S1 I t.I O -f
C t-

-

TTTIItltt

Clerks, general .............................................................................
Manufacturing ..........................................................................
Nomoanufacturing ................................................................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................

1-378
307
1,071
261

ffaHo ii«t»ti«itT-TTiT_____ t
Finance **
Services .......... ..........................................

2I46
282
73

Hhrtl Aflfll A t.rflHo

r lirri i)-««Tir>

209

iii

39.5 ! i*i.5o
3 9 :r lA.oo 1
U1.00
39.5
38.5 1 1*3.00
39.5 i 1*3.00
38.50
1*1.5
1*0.00
38.5
39.00
1*0.0
37.50
; ui.ob
37.00
39.00

161
5b
105
U3
17
■
M

1*0.0
1(0.0
1*0.5
1*1.5
1*0.5

1*6.00
2*9.50
l*l*.50
1*3.50
i*i.5o

Ik
10

1*1.0
t i '.l

38.00
35.56“

i i ■ i ■r i i i i

1)0.0
151)
"T 3 8 ”
W .6
piih] ^ nt.i 1 i fi as 4 t t l , , T i t t T T « i i T i i
n
38.5
15
Wholesale trade ........................................................... 1*0.0
71
77
1*0.0
J1

Key-punch operators .......... ............
N o n o a n u f a c t u r i n g .................. ..

fffice g i r l s ......................................................................
..
51
ro

.

P.fsi ] +.r»a
rfo I . . .

...
■

ii

—
- l i iiTi

39.00
38.55“
ljO.00
33,50

39.5
3^15
39.5
39.5

Duplicating-machine operators .............
No n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. .........

llAniw
aniif

A
1*2.50
1*6.50
1*2.00
1*7.00
39.50
38.00
i»i.5o

ll*7
------ 15“
129
98

Clerks, p a y r o l l ..................................................
Manufacturing ..................................................................
Konmanufacturing ....................................................
...
Retail trade .
..........................
...••••••••••
fiamn

W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

1*0.0
35.50
259
25" ■ U6V6
5 7 .5 5 l*o.o
23U
35.50
12
38.0
i*i.5o
39.50
92
39.5
60
1*2.5 1 30.00
33.50
63
38.5

Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .................. ......

Clerks, o r d e r ......................................................
Manufacturing ...........................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................................

39.5
1*6.6
39.5
39.5
141.5
38.5
^0.5

39.0
1*0
I k ■ 3^:5
39,0
Th
37*5
13

Clerks, file, class A .....................................
N o m o a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ ......

$
$
$
!$
!$
!$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
$
!$
!$
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 1*2.50 l*5.oo 1*7.50 50.00152.50 55.oo 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.oo 70.00 75.00 80.00!85.00 90.00
$
1 and
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00137.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.5o|55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00!90.00 ! over
1
$

W ~
21
17
■M

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*1.5
1*0.0

1*3.00
i*2.oo
1(8.00
1*5.00
35.00

1
1
1
-

11*
11*
8
6

7
7
2
5

6
6

-

-

Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




communication,

7
7
5

-

6
-

;

_

j

-

!

l

8
35
8 i 35

5o
1*6
T "—
1*6
1*6
2
.
21
10
2
5
8 1 31
1 28
19

5 ! 12 !
I
;
5 ; 12 ;
.
8
5 |
- ;

1
*

_

8 l

-

8 !
8

.
-

-

-

22
22
5

20

2
2

20
19

-

9
9

-

-

-

1

1
1

3

7

-

3
1

7
3

*
*
-

-

_

'

26
;

6

20
20

13
2
11
1
5

9
2
7
«

ii
k

2

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

10
8
2
2

5

5

12 !
5 !
11*
n

23
19
28
3
25
10
10

11

2

20
8

1*

17
5
12
6
2

23

10

1

~

!3
2
H !
11

1

18
16

!

1
~
- I
j

1

30
30

5

7
1 |
6 j
a

12

ll*
! Ik

2

1
1

1
*
i*

§

.

n
3
8
1
6 !
1 j

1
*
1 !
*
1
*

8 1 21
8
21
2
2
10

2
2

-

!
s

-

i
!

1
1

1

9

8
1
*
1
*
3
_

20
1
19
3
H*

1
.
1
-

7

11*
10
1
*
3
_

7
6
•
_

_
_
.
.
-

1
1

_
.
_
_
_

_
-

.
_
_
_
.

-

il

!
l

8
1 1
*
1 i
*

1
*

3

3

k
1

3

3 !

3
_

1
70
21*
17 i 15
9
53
8 1
15 !
6
12
3
13
5
l

-

3

3

-

3

.
.

3
-

-

_
-

3
.

-

Ik
8 :
.

\
35 ! 19
2
10
16
12 ; 25 ;
7 | 25 j
-

8
“

5 ;
1

_
-

_
-

_

- ,
1
- i

15
7
8
1
7

•- j

,

_
.

_
-

_
.

_ ,
. !

_

7
16
1 1 1 !
6 ! 15 |
. 1 1 1
Ik

-

8
5
3
3

6

_ ;

" |

- i

- j

_

_
-

_
_

-

2
2

2
2

1

1

-

i
- !

- !
!
.

-

-

5

-

-

_

-

_
.

_
.
-

5

1
-

3
1
2

i

_
-

11*
5
9
5

_
-

_

•
-

'

_

-

- j
. ;
- !

.
l

I

_
-

-

1
1
6
5
1
1

23
19
k
1

1
!

“ 1

_
-

3

1
1

.

-

15
k
u
11

2
2

Ik
n
23
3 !
18 !
.

i

2
1

-

2
2

22
11 :
n
2
6
3

82
23 1 100 !
71 i 1 3
+
_
17 j 12 i 10 [“ 18“ j
82
51*
31 ! 13 | 82 1
1 !
3 !
9 !
3 !
n !
1
32 i
1 j
*
3
1
i°
l* i
7
J 2 1 6
6

16 ;
!
3
j
11*
2
i
196
166
110 ' 181* j 50
6
16
1*3 * 60
57
9
1* 127 ; 11
**
153 i 106
21
1*2 | 7
38
35
16
9
1 ! 11* ! 21*
*7
10 i
1*1
15 i 38 1 2
12 ;
19 1 31
31
23
i 31* !
^ | 6 !
2 1 2

-

-

6

33
1
32 !

!♦
i*

-

12
30.50
3<J),Q
0
12
25,50 •a/ 9
33.50 & *
Sr 3

29
■
a
18
.
6
152
13
139
1
*8
7
1*1
33
10

1

-

!

13?
21
118
22
16
57
>f
21
2

-

-

88 ! 185
15?
10
1T“
11*9 i 80 ! 169 ;
1 ,
*
7 ! 21* !
71 ! 37 i 82
2 ! 11*
21*
6
1 1 i
*
i
8 : 12 1
7
7
5
!
6

35 ! 121*
6 1 16
29 ; 108
.
6
8
18
30
21
51
3
-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
**

5?
42
l6 [
ir
38
1
*1
1
3
22
11
8
11*

_

i

1

-

_

-

I
6 1
6 J
3 j
3

26
12
1

11
i

k
2
2

7
7

6
6

3
3

6

3

_

-

1

6

_

_

.

-

.

_
-

_

-

-

6,

Office, Occupations - Continued

Tabi« A-i*

~y

(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s

for s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n

an a rea b asis in New Orleans, La,, b y industry division, December 1951)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

W e e k ly
(S ta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S t a n d a r d )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!$
$
j$
$
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.50 50.00 52.50 5 5.00 57.50 50 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 57 .5 0 6 0.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00
1
and
*
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 50.00 52.50 5 5.00 57.50 50 .0 0 ? 2 .? 0 55 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00 75-00 80 .0 0 8 5.00 90.00 over
I

W omen - Continued
Secretaries ..............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......... ............
Public utilities « .......... .
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................
Finance
.......................
Services ...........................

798
— zcr
583
159
196
108
66
55

Stenographers, general ............... .
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * ....... .................
Services .......................

5 0 .0
1,071*
— 2 5 0 " ■ "5 0 7 0 "'
5 0 .0
835
170
3 9 .5
358
39.5
5 0 .5
87
5 0 .0
133
86
5 0.5

39.5
... 5 0
3 9 .5
39.5
39.5
5 0 .0
38.5
5 0 .0

39.5
39.5

1
5 5.50
5 7 .0 0 “
53.5o
57.oo
5 5 .0 0
51 .5 0
5 5.00
50 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

5 5.50
59.50
5 5.50
55.00
5 5.50
50.00
58.00
5 i.5 o

_
- i
-

_
-

-

-

5o .5o
59.50

_

_

-

-

21
21
-

33

Stenographers, technical ................
Nonmanufacturing ••••.................

23
IB

Switchboard operators ............... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................... .
Nonmanufacturing ................. .
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail t r a d e ......................
Finance # * ....... ........ ........
Services ••••••....................

265
3B
226
39
33
70
37
57

5o .o
37 .0 0
AO.0
U2.5o
50 .0
36 .0 0
57.00
39.5
3 9 .0
50.00
5 1 .0
33.00
38.5 ; 39.00
25.50
5 1.5

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** .........................
Services ......... .................

217
65
153
68
35
27
18

5 0 .0
5 0 .0
5o .o
5 2 .0
39.5
3 9.5

50 .5 0
5 3.50
3 9.00
5 1.00
3 6.50
36.00
52.00

Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Nonmanufacturing ................... .

55
37

37.5
37 .0

5o.oo
3 8 .M '

Transcribing-machine operators, general
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ........

55
55
20

39.5
3 9 .0
50 .0

U2.50
51 .0 0
53 .5 0

Typists, class A .......................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ....... ........
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance ** .......................

195
51

3 9 .5
39 .5
3 9 .0
3 9.5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

51.50
5h.50
51.00
53 .5 0
53.00
35.50

153
59
62
35

-

-

15
15
- !
- [
15

-

Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




10
-

5^6

27

_
_
.
-

_
-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

5

10
10

_

_

.

-

-

-

1

2

3

11
3
9
63
10
53
15
23
12
5

9
1
8
3
2
3

21
6
15 1
3 i
6

25
11
15
5
1
-

30
9
21
2
2
15
2

25
11
15
10
5
-

|

9

1

8
1
_

1
1

2

1

2

«.

_

2
2

3
3

15
i5
6

55

23
10
13
12
1

15

16

3
1

3
3
2

29

3

3
2 ;

-

16
10
6
6
_
_
.

-

-

-

3
3

_
_

3

_

-

-

_
.
_

_
_
_
_

_
,

_

-

_

-

-

-

3
_
-

3

.
3

5
i

_

_

2
2

_
_
_
_

_

_

.
_

1
_

1?
19
2
11
5
2
-

_
_
_
_
-

3
3

1

13
i
8
7

_
-

_

_
-

_

_
_

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_

7

6

2

2
.

1
1

_
.

5
1
3

1
-

-

69
37
32
11
19
2
_

XL — 22_
15
11
7
2
8
3

2 ____ 2 _ ____ 5 _ ____
_
2

-

5

-

5
.

1

7
2

-

22 1 16
3 |
5
12
19
11
11
_
6
2
1 |

3
3

9

2

5

5

13
9

15
10

2
2

5o
9
26

29

2
-

-

-

-

1
-

_

5
2

-

6

-

1
-

1

-

-

-

26 .....5 9 . ____ S _ 20
9
3
5
17 1 39
2
1
3 1
3
3
I 15

-

i

1
1

32
11
21
5
11
1
2
2

81
23
58
5
26
25
3
1

23

1
1

-

-

72
36
36
19
1
5
1
10

1
10

-

-

-

55
35
10
5 1
3 i

77
12
65
15
25
5
5
17

3

5
5
3
3
3

-

i
!

96
#
73
26
25
11
10

79
15
56
32
22
2
-

_
_

-

7

-

'
;

25
8”
16
16

9

-

87
39
58
7
18
9
15

19
5
15
10

-

25
6
19

1

5
5 !

9

56
11
55
23
15
2
5

-

2

19?
32
167
25
88
13
37
5

107
17
90
57
19
17
5
3

25
5
19
6
2
2

9

1
1

i

-

68
26
52
2
19
15
5 1
3 |

6

-

c o n m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

170
151
10
27
160
115
22
30
67
79
5
9
27
5
27 1
5
3
2

2
2

5

51
2
59
3
13 | 15
13 ! 16
5
7
1
8

1
1 1

9
.

.

-

57
16
31 |

3
3

35

!
25
7
15
-

_

25
1
23

_52
11
35 ! 31
j
5
12
2
22 i a
.
!
3
1

;

1
1

5
-

5
11

81
32
15
6
9
8
32 ! 72
! 16
19
- 1 20
26
3 1
8
2
9
3
2 ;
1
3

-

-

-

15

-

12
15
12 ! 15
- |
12
5
5
2 j
2

33
*
6

15
-

-

_

See footnotes at e nd of table.
*
**

10
10

2

12
12
_

l

10
3
7

T

-

9

7

1

1

_

_

2
2

5

7

1

1
6

1
1

1
1

_
_

-

_

1
1

_

-

3
3
3

10
10

_

7

3
1

17

7

2
-

5

-

r - r

3

_

2
-

1

_

m
m

1
1
1

8
1
1

.

_

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

_

_
-

-

$

_

5
5

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

—

-

-

-

_
_

..
_

_
_

_

_

-

7«

Table A-l:

O j ^ C C e

Q c C 4 4 f u U i O * t A >

- G o t U U U i e d ,

1/

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on
an area basis in New Orleans, La., by industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A ver a g e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women

-

N um ber
of
workers

$
W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.oo 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50

$

$

55.00

57.50

60.00 62.50

$

$

$

[3

75.00 80.00 85.00; 90.00
1 and
75.00 80.00 85. :
00 90.00 over

65.00

70.00

%

25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.oo U7.5o 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 70.00
j

Continued
%

JOO
i.
39.5
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
Ul.O
39.0
UO.O

17
*7
%

i

1

--------%

Nonmanufacturing ................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade..............
Retail trade ................

“

U28
U
7
l*
i7
123
55
56

1

-

-

30.00

1

33.50
35.50

'

35.00
UO.O1“
3
3U.50
38.00
37.00

-

1
8

9
-

1

9

-

-

51
6

-

i

u

52
7
2
5
1

38
8
2
7
1

1
20

127
3
30
63
18

2

”

U2

-

12

2

13

-

7
16
1
12

5

lU

6

7

38
15
23
6
7

U

3

3

u

-

-

3

1

2

3

u
-

-

1------- —
-

,k

-

u

-

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

1
3

-

-

-

u

!

-

-

-

-

u

-

3
L

1/
7/
3/
U/
*
**

16
2

23

U

99

16

-

-

36
7

52

83
9
33
20

127

51

-

-

-

*

_

!

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*■

!
_________ 1
---------------1

u

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows:
11 at $90.00 to $95.00; 5 at $100.00 to $105.00.
All workers were at $20.00 to $22.50.
All workers were at $22.50 to $25.00.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table A - 2 i

P^U ^eH iO H cU G 4ut

eo Ju U ca l 0 cC 4 € p a iia *l

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ far selected occupations studied on
an area basis in New Orleans, La., b y industry division, December 1951)

A ver a g e
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y

$
W e e k ly

W e e k ly

(S ta n d a r d )

(S ta n d a rd )

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

E A R N IN G S O F—

$

$

$

$

$

$

Uo.oo U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
unSer

u2*50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 7 0 .0 0 72 .5 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.0c105
M en
“

J

D r a f t s m e n ....................................................................... .. .....................
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • ......................................
^ n n m a r m f a r .+ .in H n g

t

92
“

"75-

16

# t T T t t T T T t l t t i t I i t , ttg

Uo.o

75.50
7535"
75.50

.

52.50
rroo"

1

T353T
UO.O

-

-

.
-

-

-

3
-

*

j

3

12
12

*

20

-

9

l6

_

1
u.

j
1

3

X
0

2
2

8
7
X

16
13

J

8
8

7

6

7

~ r
X

l
X

Wom e n
Nurses, industrial (registered) •••••.....
Manufacturing •••••••.................. .

1/

39
—

39.5
“ H O "

■

I
f
2

11
11

5

2
2

1

3
3

3

2

3
3

2

1

3
2

1
1 !

’ !

______ i _____ !
_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, N e w Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F L ABOR
Bu r e a u of Labor Statistics

8
.

M

Table A-3:

o U tteH O H C *

Q 4 td

P oU A & l

P

la n t

Q c C U p o t4 0 4 *1

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in New Orleans, La., by industry division, December 195l)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 i.ao 1.U5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.63 1 .7 0 1 .7 5
earnings
$

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

.80

.85

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

.95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 i.ao 1.U5 i.5o 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75

.90

_

0.75
Carpenters, maintenance ................................
Manufacturing ........................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .....................................
Services ............................ ..............

177
77
100
22

t
1.53
1.50
1.55
1.26

Electricians, maintenance ..............................
Manufacturing ........................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................

178

1 .6 7

“ m r “
37

1.66
1.69

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

2

Engineers, stationary ..................................
Manufacturing ............................ ............
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .....................................

180
--- 5C—
86

1 .6 1

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

6

_

1.77
1.U3

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

6

-

2$

1.31

-

18U
128
56
31

1 .1 6

_

1.15“
1.12
1.22

-

1
3

Helpers, trades, maintenance ................ ..........
Manufacturing ........................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................

U38
216
222

1.25
1.29
1.21

2
2

2
- !
2

Maintenance men, general utility ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................... ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Piihl i r. n+.iT i-M p s -it t1t.tI___ ..T..T-.1TT_ T -t
_
Who! esal e trade .............................._
_
Retail trade ......... ............................

257

1.33
1.57
1.20
1.31
1.11
1.28

16

-

-

6
6
3

2

11
5
6
2

1

k

-

-

1
1

k
k

2

1
1

k
k

7

2

1 .?7

Firemen, stationary b o i l e r .............................
Manufacturing ........................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Rpmri np.s ____ ___ --,T__________t -___ ______________ T

-

k
h
-

7

Services ..........................................

'

9$

165
28
22
39

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ................. .
Manufacturing ......................... ............
Nonnanufacturing .....................................
Public utilities - * ...............................
Whnl psfll e +.r*sde TitT...1f_ T T - . T . T T . T . . T - . T . 1 . T
_

32h
15
2k9

15

5

2

8

1

7
3

a
18

3
3

7

k

k

k

-

-

3
3

3

5

-

k
3

k

-

-

1

2
1

k
k

1

-

22
21
1

3

15

k

19
-

1
-

2
2

1

-

3

7

i

- ;
-

-

-

-

-

61

6

1

ko

16

1

_

2k

a

1

16

9
7

28

3

k

20

_

u

20

-

-

2
6

-

1 |

U

_

7

-

i
i

'

-

_
-

1

11
6

2
2

k

2

16

h

-

1

3

12
10

_

33
: 9
7 ! 2U
2h
1

~

--- 51

..1 . 2 F

103
59

1.39
1.53
1.28

2

-

-

-

6
-

k
k

_

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

1

59

_

_

_

_

-

-

- ;

-

- i

-

-

h
h

_

_

13

_

-

-

13

-

2
2

7

_

7

-

5

16

5

11

-

-

1
1

1.52

f

i H

T

1U

1 .7 6

' . 5 -T

-

- - - - i1 - .-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
8 “T T

1

18
10 T
8
6

9

1
1

1

28
28
-

2

9
9
-

_

_

-

-

9
9
-

-

-

-

37
37

ia

37

2

35

5
5

2

-

2

11
-

-

-

-

-

7

3

7

-

-

30
30
_

n

_
_

a
a

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

12
2

a
-

2a
20

9
-

a

a
u

9

-

-

-

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

_
n

0
y

-

-

_
_

-

11
-

-

22
22

_

_

_

1

U9
5
aa

8
_

i5

_

_

_

_

-

_
—
_ ! — '

_

8

12

-

-

-

-

-

- i 1

-

10
10

16

3

6

3

16

32
32

3
3

_

7

~

16
2
3

3

9

-

13

11
2

13
13

8

- t

-

■

_

If
l
i
11
6

38
10
28
22
6

10
6

1

7
7

9
1
8

13

I
17
li7
-

-

38
13
25

2
2

a
a

k

k
11

7

-

35

11
2a
11
12

27

r f - h

r

-

-

20
1
19
19

17
9

13

8

52
52
-

112
112

_

27

-

27

7

-

-

-

-

- : -

-

_

7
7

_

36
3l
2

20
_

8

n

k

20

a

10
1

2
2

19
19

3
3

3
3

1
1

7

_

_

1

12
1
11
11

6

_

-

16

2
2
-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

i7
2

_

_

_

-

-

-

37
37

-

_

_

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

6

2

r
-

2
2

2
2

“

a

_

Occupational Wage Survey,

r

T
9
6
3

_
-

"
21

2

3
18

_

1

2

-

8

2
2

7

7

18

2
2

2
-

11
16

1

_

_

_ _

_

-

2

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

a
a

-

-

-

3

-

-

18

10
10

E~

8

N e w O r l e a n s , La. ,

December 1951

8.S. DEPARTMENT OF L ABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

9

18
13
5

7
1

5

communication, and other public utilities.

ia
-

-

6
6
-

3

- -1- - - - - - - - -

Excludes p remium p a y for overtime a nd n ight work.

ia
-

11
5
5 r f 6
-

’ 11
-

_ t— r
8

60

8
8

-

18
1
8

9

3

-

ia

2

5

-

-

18

2
2

_

1

90
73
^ 1 “ BIT
6
22

3

12
9
- T
8
9
9
8

25

- 1

_

_

_

10?
i3
a ! 90

-

_

19
6

3

a
n
n

3
3

a
-

-

|
t

1 .2 9

\-v r~ ”




5

3

59
1
58

_

k

-

9
9
-

8

|

1
- 1

-

IT
-

9

-

-

-

1

26
20

k

i

13

- ! 13

_

-

9

15
2

23
20
3

18
18
-

1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.3 0

9

1.65.

Plumbers. maintenance .................................. .

Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1

_

2

_

15 ;
2

_ ! 13

1.65

59

Pine fitters, maintenance ....................... ......
Manufacturing ........................................

*
**

7

-

_

U ’

i

-

—

1/

1
1

2

h

_

7
1

U j

9

11
l~T"|

8
19
- \ T
8 \ 13
I

_

Millwrights ..............................................
Manufacturing .................... ...................

—

7

_

ai2
1.55
" '285""“ " " 1 . 5 5 "
■“
1 .U8
127

Painters, maintenance ................................ .
Manufacturing ....... .................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................

3k

h

\ t~
—

Mechanics, maintenance .................................
Manufacturing ........................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .....................................

Oilers ...................................................
Manufacturing ........................................

la

l
i

16

1.37
l.ii2
1.35
1.37
I .3 3

181
Ui

12
8

h

10
3
7
2

5

1 .6 7

20
17

-

l .8o

$
$
$
$
$
1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2.10 2.20

a

8

9,

Table A-4:

Custodial, Ti/a'ieltoultiu}, and Skipping Occupation*

(Average h o u r l y earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 / studied on an a rea
b a s i s in N e v Orleans, La., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1 951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N u m b er
of
w orkers

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 1$
$, $
Juder0.40 b.45 0 .5 0 0.55 0 .6 0 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1 .4 0 1 .50 j1.60 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0

A ve rag e
h ourly
earnin gs

.45 j.50 .55 .6 0

D.40
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ...
Manufacturing ............................

52
- 52”
-

1 ,2 6

Guards .................. ..................
Manufacturing............................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

481
— i%r~

.97
r.iy
.91
1 .17

Janitors, porters, and clecaiers (men) .... ....... .
Manufacturing............ ....... .
Nonmanufacturing............. ............
Public utilities * ....... ........ .

.65 .70 .75 .8 0

.85 .90 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 I.40 1 5 ' I.60 I1.70 1 .8 0 1.90 over
.0

r*

361
17

428

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .... .... .
.
Nonmanufacturing..... .......... ..........
Retail trade ...................................
Services........................... «...

_

_

_ 173

4

-

-

- . - |173
j

4

1 ,4 8 2

1,367
724
513

4 124 1187 266

75 172

88

4 124 1187 266
_
_
_
i
12 116 226
—i
4 112 71 40

75 172

88

2

7

56

88

56
21

19

41
41

4

147 138
23 47
62 423 107 124 91
— ; 24
6
20
10
8 ! 49
16 11
54
49 118 57 71 11
1
137 21 20
5 95
7
2
15

1
1
1

36 128
36 90
36 27

68 !512 150
SsT 43
6

13

3

28

10

3

144
4
- 140

.52
323 119 134 363 129 136
136
.51 rl23 119 j134
67 62 1 75 1258 64 54
•55
82
.42 ^ 2 5 6 57
3 105

183
180

Services .......................................

_

.71
.98
.90
.67
.74
.59

964
242

5
5

-

12
12

9
9

8

-

-

22
6
6

3
Q
J

1

24 292
5 119
19 173
14 57
18
1
4 97

2
2

1
1

89
71
18
4

40

2

20

21

5 12
5 g
3

35
4
31
29

Packers (men) .............................. .
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing ................ .
Uhnl fsl a trada ____T-TiITrr-tITftl.
ifl
1Ttlf
Retai1 trade ...................................
Packers (women) .............................
Manufar t r ng .......
.iH
-T..,,.tr_ T
_ t

689
—
637
585
49
340
“n r
226
168
53

R A ta d l

tra d *

. T, , .

,

7

,

r

i «

1

-

Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, a n d r e a l e s t ate.




.91
1 .0 1
t

h

.96
.99
.83

5

2

3

5
O
j
C

2
2

•

_ ; _

51
43

47

12

11

8

36

9
3

26
10

O
j

7
1

1

_

i
_ j _ | _

-! - !
-J - j - i
i
! _
) -j
-

;
l _
, -j “

^

26

298
■ 115
'
183
146
37

4

3

51 103
40 78
11
25
i
50 29
50 29
28
23

2

i
—

47
-

i

i

26

12

- ! 35
! 25

1

10

16
7
9

22

51

2

51

5 33
-r r
5 28
3
28

6

2

10

2

1 .0 2

1.06
1.28
~T3T“
1.25
1.28
1.13

_! _ |
1 ” :
-1
- !

-

-

-

1
i
i

-- ^-1
_| _
I!

_
“1
-

1

1
r
39 23
35 22
/
H
-

51 18
34 18
17 17

22

11

8 ! 9 1 15
— —
6 — ^-1! £ i
11
8
9 15
11
8
9 ! 15

8
8

61
5
56
56

14

7

40

H
14

7

35
5
£

_

6

9
-

2
1
1

-

22
22

3
| _

7

17

6

1

“

30 i 3
71

6
30
6 1 30

3
3

6
6
6

- 1

_

~

1

6

5

12

1

8

8

12

1

8

! 2
3 | 18

_

6
6

_

8 1

3

96
— 95 “

4

32
32

i

1

j

!

--~
i
i
| - j
'
|
i
i

-

10
5

j

123
1123

46 23

51

8

2

i

- ;

-

--= ] 15
_
_ 15

1

5

94
92

2

j

-

;
i

-

-

-

_

—

-

-

g
16
12

8

-

4

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

j

29
19

22

10
10

22

-

3

15
3
12

14 ! 9
8 ! 3
| 3

J

20

18

7
3
4
4

20
3
—
15 1 _
5 3
1 “
_
3
3

N e w Or l e a n s ,

and other public utilities.

La.,

December 1951
U»S.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

4
2

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

9

-

7

1

6
1

1

-

•

_

_

1

_

_

_

15
4

13
13

11
11

-

}6

36
36

-

_

1 9

51 1 ?
9
1
15
36 15
9
36 15

i

Occupational Wage Survey,
communication,

-

4

-

-

!

~

h i:2o~

1.30
1.78

43
“ nr
52 25
47 23
1

.
!

-

4

1.28

108
38
39
30

- !

i
^

_

j

52

!
136

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f t a ble.
*
**

1 .1 1

-

10

l

271
.92 - ^
— 255— —
—

Receiving clerks .............................
Manufacturing .............. ..............
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
PnhUft ntn ■+!« * t
?.**
T
T
,
Wholesale trade...... ......... .........
Rp.l 1 t.mdA T IIft,TTtr-tiriTT,»t,«,«,t,iii,, .
tf I
Shipping clerks .............................
Manufacturing...... ..........................
Nonmanufacturing........................................ . ..... ........
Wholesale trade................................................................................................ ...

1.09
1.03 ■
1.09

-

~

1

94

3

3

40

n
X

25 33

3

2

1

X

1

87
83
80

5
4

1

13

51 112

17
15

41
40

1

Order fillers........... ............... ....
Manufacturing........ ........ .............
Nonmanufacturing....... .................. .
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade

|

_
-

—

-

15
15

3
3

--

.76

254
,0507
1,997

Retail trade ...........................

■
_i _

9

5

5
1

/

16

4

6

7
9

4

5

-

-

-

1
1

9

22
12
10
10

_

?1

7
24
24

42
9
3
3

10,

Table

A-h: Gu&todticU, 74)a>ieJuU*lUuf>, 04td S A tp fU H f QcCMfiatiOHA - G o*U iH 44*d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in New Orleans, La., by industry division, December 1 9 5 1 )

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..................
Manufacturing...... ......... ............
Nonmanufacturing.... ......................
Wholesale trade... .....................

396
157
239
132

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ............... .
Manufacturing ...... .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
Public utilities * ......................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade .......................... .

Try^k drivers, light (under 1 - tons) ... .........
^
Manufacturing............................

37

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING !TRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
S
$ !
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|
$ '
$
:
$
$
Aeae
vrg
$
h u l Under 0 .4 0 0.45 0.50 0.55 ( . 0 0.65 0.70 j . 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.50|1.60 1.70|l.80 1.90
ory
06
o 75
e rig
a nns
$
and
. ol
0 .4 0
.45 .50 .55 .60 j .65 .70 .75 .80 .85 .90 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 I.50!1 .6 0 l1.70 1 S i .90 lover
$
1.28
1. ” '
28
1.28
1.21
1.0^

2,895
1,141
1,754
681
521
552

.95
1.07
.87
.93
.90
.76

748
151

i
-

-

-

-

-

26

1.19
.88

~

_
_

-

-

78 | 14 j 140 !427
1
—
j 170
14 ! 140 :257
- 1 _ i 20
- 176
14 140 61

24

78 !
-j
78 J

26
26

24
24

-

—

1 ~
9
-1 -' 8
-j
1
1

*
*

.97
1.00
.96
•95
.89
1.00

-

-

-

-

-

_; •

_
—

_
~

-

-

_

_
“

22
5
17
8

13
9
4
4

14

-

14

-

9

42

15

14
28
22

15
15

27
27
21

-

14

5
5
3
2

35
31
4
-

1
•

V

8
29
21
g

_2Z_
36
1
1

481 175 I85 184 181 127 168 157
54 117
48 132 j - 21 51 166 51 147 136 44 105
76 21 21 10
12
217 349 175 164 133 15
114 276
4 75 85
3 65 21 12 : 6
92 37 27 86 i 37 1 10 10
9 ! 3 ! 12
2
11 36 144
j 1
3 ! 11
1
j
265

76 32
65 8

—
1
1

Truck drivers, medium ( ^ to and including A tons) . . 1,720
l.
-- 376“
Manufacturing ........................ .
Nonmanufacturing ..........................
1,344
TVhlio
*
t , r T . T. .. T--TT
693
200
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade.......................... .
329

-

1

!
j
62 ! 93 127
- l _ 99
62 ! 93 28
_ 1 75 26
62 : 18 2

i
2 | 37
87 22 ! 39 1 34
1 I 25
1 ! 7
48 j 2
7
5
“
~
1
j
;
t
i
1
2 1 68 , 4 , — 42— 22. - 3 . — 3 4
12 j
1 1 604 1 2
5.. . _
131
1103 ; 9 i 22
5
8 1 15 16 ! 3 34 1
7 50
595 j 9
l 9 63 135 1 27
18 1
1
583 i 42
50
18
j
i
6 29 15 12 27
7
1 3
6 129 30
1 15
—
—
“

5
5

"
_

-

41
38
3
3
*
■

—

56
28
_
28

- . -__ _
_J4_!_61_ 17 , 1 5 1 2
21 ! 4 17 1 A 1 ~
- ! 11
13 j 57
3
12 ! IS
3! 3
l

15 I
11 !
4
4
~i

385
—

_J6_
6
30 1
_
30

27
1 9
21 '
-j
6
9
-1
j
6
9
~
i ~

3
3

—

~

10
10
-

-

~

_

j
t
j
9
_1
-!
-i
9
l
_
_
_
! “1
9

_
-

|
Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons, trailer type) ...
Nonmanufacturing....................... .
Wholesale trade ... .....................

325
1.04
3 5 " 1.03
*7^
48
1.21

Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons, other than
trailer type) .............................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ................
Wholesale trade ... ....................

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ....................
Manufacturing ............................
Nonmanufacturing..........................
PnKHr n . - + i Q *
+ni.P
r..T........

—

"i
"
'

"

7 18
! 7 10
7 *

'

'

'

"

2! —,

7
71

i
j
411
£K5“
142

315
— 167“
148
124

1.07
1.07
1.13

1.43
1.27
1.61
1.66

1

-| -j i
;
'!

-

-

-

-

-1 -

-

-

i

~

2

-

44
44
— 44

6 ! 6
6

-

-|
“1

1

-

2 ! 7
1
5
1
2

19 609 94
9 49 30

60
23
11 : 10

-

-

i
939
142

.79
.88

1

8

15

23

___ 1
1/
2/
2/

ij
*

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as followst 199 at 30 to 35 cents; 57 at 35 to 4 0 cents.
All workers were at $2.00 to $2.10.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




3

-

— [ "

-

j

3
3
3

3
3
3

12

! 9
3
9
3I 9

“

_

3
3
3

_
-

9
9
9

_
_

~

27
27
27

_
_
*
*

3

12
5
7
/
4

3

-

~

21
21
21

22 1 4
22
3
12 ! 3

_
~

28
28
-

25
18 ! 7

30
30
-

20
20
-

41
35
6

8

1
1

1
1

-

!

i

Watchmen........................... ........
Manufacturing ............................

8
; 45
! 45 ! 8
:
8
j
i
1
i
i
1
- 246 1
8 ! 12
2
8 ! 12
„ 1 12
5 j

7 j!64 48
48
7 I 64
_ l 8
7
i
“ 1
-

38

17 i 1 1?
10 i - 15
38 I 7 ! 1
j
1 33 i 7
i
i
9
1
i

l __
_

13 I

7 1 22
5
6
l
I

7

10
2
10 . 2

11
8

3

3

-

73
73
y 73

11,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-liO:

y

RcU lboacU

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

3 /

Carpenters, maintenance........ .
Electricians, maintenance...... .
Helpers, trades, maintenance
Janitors and cleaners (men) .... .
Janitors and cleaners (women)
Machinists, maintenance........ .
Mechanics, maintenance ...........
Painters, maintenance.......... .
Pipe fitters, maintenance ........
Stock handlers and truckers, hand

$
1.86
1.96
1.61
1.38
1.39
1.95
1.90
1.92
1.95
1.45

183

14
2.
232
34-2
55
156
87
28
23
127

S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
!
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ✓ $ , $
1.25 1.30 1.35 1 . 4 0 i
1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
and
i
!
1 ~
under ”
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45; 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70j1 . 7 5 |1.80 1.85,1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05
[
n
i
I
-

-

- ;
17 i
- ;

-

i
7 1
10 1
287
37
55 1

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

Ill
_

4
-

10

-

-

37

- 1

-

25
98
_

_
_

58
18
14
12

1

-

-

j

17
26
_

97 !

-

68
i ;

30
_

1
-

;
129!
-1

-

8

- j

-!

5
-

-

-

63

1

-

o
o

/

Occupation 2

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a r n in g s

V
yCsi

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

_i
1

_!
69
-

1

-!

10

4
101

-

1
—

15 !
|

j

"

'

'

'

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the railroad industry (Group 4-0) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget,
2 / Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table

A verage

B-63: 9nA44/Ui*U>e G&lAleSU*

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

^

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

38
32

37.5
39.0

38.0

35.50
37.00
33.50
37.00
31*. 50
37.00

1 0 0 U2.50 U5.oo
4 .0
U2.50 1 5 0 1*7.50
| .0

$
$
$
1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00

75.00
75.50

9*
1

$
Under 2 5 .0 0 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50

Occupation and sex

$

2$,00

27.50 30.00

32.50 35.00 37.50 bo.oo

50.00 52.50 55.00

60.00

80.00

$
85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and

65.00 7 0.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 85.00 90.00 95.00 t i o o . oover
o

Men
Section heads
Underwriters •

2

12

*5

Wom e n
Clerks:
Accounting ................
Correspondence, class A ••
File, class B ............
General .................. .
Key-punch operators
Premium acceptors ............
Section heads .......... .
Stenographers, g e n e r a l ......
Tabulating-raachine operators
Typists:
Class A ...................
Class B ................. .

26

75
183
29
71
38
25

20

5o
109

36.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
37.5
39.0
38.0
36.5
38.5

38.0

56.00

6

20

16

2

5
11

12

5

3
13

29

22

5

10

2

5

ia

17

1
*

i
*

20

15

15

18

6

8

2

1*1.50
35.00

k

2!

5
20

15

5

1*
1
11

10

26

2
10

9
7 I

6i
1
*

6
2

3

8

5 I

37.50
33.50

22
2

7

10

16

3

h

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 2 0 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined In the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of
the Budget.
2 / Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Workers were distributed as follows* 1 at $100.00 to $105.00j 8 at $115.00 to $120.00.
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, L a . , December 1 9 5 1
U . S . DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

y




12,

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions*
Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C —15’:

B u ild it U

f

Table C-27:

G Q 4 l d t > l ,4 4 J c U o H ,

P A M t t it U j, ~ G

o t U

in u e d

Table C -42:

M

& t fV lt s U lc h

S b ^ U a etd

<Jlelp& id
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Bricklayers .................................
Carpenters ............. ....................
Electricians ................................
Painters .............. .
Plasterers
plumbers ., T.... ..... . , _ ................
_
Building laborers ...........................

Table C-205:

B a h &

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

January 2, 1952
Hours
per
week

$2*700
2*060
2.500
1.800

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

2*375
2.1*50
1.100

lie d

July 1, 1951

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Working foremen ..........................
Mixers, ovenmen, relief men, and
shipping foremen ......................
Bench hands, dividermen, moldermen,
wrapping-machine operators and
adjusters, automatic-machine oper­
ators, and cake depositor operators ..
Ingredientmen ............................
Panners, flour blenders, mixer
helpers, stock and receiving clerks,
shipping clerks, and checkers ........
Cake slicing machine operators .........
Feeders, off-bearers, and pan
greasers ...............................
Cake icers, wrappers, packers, crumb
packers, and miscellaneous helpers;
First 2 months .....................
Second 2 months ....................
After 1 m o n t h s .....................
*

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,730

1*0

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Book and job shops; - Continued
Press assistants and feeders;
Cylinder feeders .....................
Offset assistants ....................
Platen feeders .......................
Pressmen;
Combination cylinder and platen ....
Cylinder ..............................
Offset presses, 22^ inches .......
Platen ................................
2 presses .........................
Stereotypers;
Agreement A ...........................
Agreement B ...........................

Hours
per
week

$1.1*00
1.725
1.100

1*0
1*0
1*0

2.250
2.250
2.325
1.575
2.000

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

2.510
2.375

y\\

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day w o r k .... .........................
Night work ............................
Machine operators:
Day work ..............................

1*0

1 .3 0 0
1.2 5 0

1.180
1.120

1*0

1*0
1*0

1*0
1*0

1.060

1*0

.890
.950
1.000

1*0
1*0
1*0

2.325

Table C - U :

1*0
1*0

1.625
1.700

1*0
1*0

2.300
2.1*25

1*0
1+0

2.300
2.1*00

1*0
1*0

2.1+50
2.550

1*0
1*0

2.250
2.375

Mailers:
Day work ..............................
Night work ............................
Photoengravers;
Day work ..............................
Night work ............................
Pressmen, web;
Day w o r k .............. ...............
Night work ............................
Pressmen-in-charge;
Day work ..............................
Night work ............................
Stereotypers;
Day work ..............................
Night work ............................

1*0
1*0

2.1*25
1.1*10

2.325
2.1*25

1*0
1*0

J l c c o l

Q p& iatu u f £*MfUo4fmeA'

Table C-27:

October 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

July 1, 1951
Classification
Classification

Book and job shops;
Bindery w o m e n ............................
Bookbinders ..............................
Compositors, hand .......................
Electrotypers ............................
Machine operators .......................
Photoengravers ...........................




Rate
per
hour

$1,050
2.250
2.300
2.375
2.300
2.533

Hours
per
week

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

2-man cars;
First 6 months ........................ .
7-12 months ..............................
After 1 year .............................
1-man cars and busses:
First 6 months ...........................
7-12 months ..............................
After 1 year .............................

Hours
per
week

$1,365
1.395
1.1*25

50 1/3
5o 1/3
50 1/3

1.1*35
1.1*65
1.1*95

5o 1/3
50 1/3
50 1/3

i

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Air reduction ...............................
Truck w ith lift gate ....................
Helpers .............................. .
Armored car .................................
Bakery - Relay drivers .....................
Brewery:
Keg beer - Local d e l i v e r y ..............
U t i l i t y ..................................
Building;
Construction:
1 ton and under ......................
1 1 / 2 - 5 tons .......................
5 tons and o v e r .............. .......
Concrete m i x e r s ............ .........
Material:
Dump truck, stake body truck ........
Concrete-mixer truck, under 1 yards,
*
and t r a i l e r ............ ............
Concrete-mixer truck over 1 yards ...
*
Helpers ...............................
Roofing and sheet metal:
1 ton and under ...................
Over 1 ton ........................
Department store;
Agreement A:
City package delivery ................
Agreement B:
Drivers ...............................
General:
Drayage;
Over 3 tons ...........................
Helpers ............. .................
Trailer ...............................
Helpers ...............................
Motor express:
C i t y ......................................
Special equipment .......................
H e l p e r s .................... ..............
Transfer:
3 tons and under ........................
Over 3 tons ..............................
Helpers ...................................
Grocery - Wholesale ........................
Helpers ..................................
Meat - Packinghouse ........................
Helpers ..................................
Newspapers:
Agreement A:
D a y ...................................
Night .................................
Agreement B:
D a y ...................................

Parcel service ..............................
He l p e r s ..................................
Railway express .............................
Money pick-up ............................
Tobacco ................. ........ ............
Warehouse - Cold storage ...................

Hours
per
week

$1,270
1.370
1.100
1.085

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

1.700
1.1*75

1*0
1*0

1.100

1 .3 0 0

1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

.985

1*0

1.035
1.085
.935

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.000

1 .0 5 0

1*0
1*0

1.375

1*0

1.375

1*0

.91*0

18
*
18
*
18
*
18
*

1 .0 5 0

1 .1 5 0
1.1*00

.890
.990
.890
1.221
1.276
1.110

1*5
1*5
1*5

.950
1.000

18
*

.900
.920

18
*

.860

10
*
10
+

1.010
.950

1*8
1*0

1*0

1.125
1.175

10
*
10
*

1.135
1.050

10
*
10
*
10
*

.875
1.708
1.735
1.120

.900

1*0

1*0

10
*
10
*

_
Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L ABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13,

D:
Table D-is

Entrance Rates

M in im u m S u tsia n o e. P a te4. ft b P la n t W&U&eAA U

E:

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in Minimum rate (in cents)

AX-L
industries
2/

All establishments ...........

100.0

4.0 and tinder ..................
Over 40 and under 45 .........
45 .............................
Over 45 and under 50 .........
5 0 .............................
Over 50 and under 55 .........
55 .............................
Over 55 and under 60 .........
6 0 .............................
Over 60 and under 65 .........
Over 65 and under 70 .........
7 0 .............................
75 .............................
Over 75 and under 80 .........
8 0 .............................
Over 80 and under 85 .........
85 ......................... .
Over 85 and under 90 .........
9 0 .............................
Over 90 and under 95 ..... .
95 ......................... .
Over 95 and under 100 ........
1 0 0 ............................
Over 100 and under 105 .......
105 ............................
Over 105 and under 110 .......
1 1 0 ............................
Over 110 and under 115 .......
115 ............................
Over 115 and under 120 .......
120 and over ..................

7.1
3.6
5.0
1.5
4.9
.4
.3
.4
.5
1.2
.6
.9
33.9
1.3
1.5
1.7
5.2
3.3
1.1
1.4
.1
.3
.8
1.5
3.4
7.9
.8
1.0
1.3
.1
5.4

Establishments with no
established minimum ........
Information not available ....

1/
2/
2/
*

Manufacturing establishments
with 501 or
21-100
101-500
more
workers
workers
workers

100.0

6.0
68.0
1.9
_
2.6
7.6
6.8
7.1
-

100.0

_
_
_
4.0
45.9
6.8
11.1
3.8
_
4.6
2.9
13.8
_
5.4
_

100.0

40.1
8.8
8.2
_
4.6
7.2
20.1
11.0
-

-

.6
1.1

.5

-

-

-

.1

-

-

-

-

Public
utilities*

100.0

0.9
1.1
39.6
2.2
5.6
11.4
1.2
2o3
5.5
7.7
.7
21.8

Q/)
-

Wholesale
trade

100.0

55.0
2.5
2.2
3.0
8.9
3.5
6.4
7.5
1.7
1.8
4.9
_
_
1.8

Table E-l:

S h if t ^ l ^ f t j l ^ it io l P sU H tU iO tU

Services

100.0
19.9
14.7
21.8
6.1
15.3
1.0
4.3
1.4
1.4
5.4
2.6
-

33.3
4.6
1.3
2.0
18.2
5.1
4.2
3.0
.8
12.6
-

2.7
-

3.5
_

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift
in -

100.0

1.3
1.1
-

3.4
_
_
_
_
-

1.9
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

5 .8

.8

-

-

Lowest rate formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Retail
trade

Supplementary W age Practices

1.3
-

Shift differential

All

manufacturing
industries
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift
Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .............

15.4

4.6

Receiving shift differential ....

13.3

3.9

Uniform cents (per hour) .....
3 cents ................
4 cents ................
5 .cents ................
6 cents ................
cents ...............
10 cents ...............
1 - cents ..............
2£

13.3
.4
3.3
6.3

3.9

1.1
1.2
.
5

-

Receiving no differential ......

2.1

.
7

-

-

.9
2.3
-

.
2

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

14.

S cU & dul& d tyJs&eJzlif

T a b l e E-2:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R s l / E M P L O Y E D

Weekly hours

All
industries

All establishments ........ .

100.0

Under 35 hours ............
35 hours ...................
37y hours ......... .
Over 3 7 t and under 4-0 hours
4.0 hours ................... .
Over 4-0 and under 44- hours
44- hours ...................
Over 44- and under 48 hours
4 8 hours ...................
Over 48 and under 50 hours
50 h o u r s ...................
Over 50 hours .............

4.3
9.5
4.6
67.6
3.8
5.5
3.6
.6
.2
.3

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

IN—

Retail trade

P ER C EN T O F PLA N T W O RKERS EM PLO Y ED IN —

Finance**

100.0

-

7.2
-

80.7
6.1
.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.1
23.1
8.6
58.6
.6
.1

100.0

3.4
6.2
3.2
68.0

0.7

10.9
12.5
8.8
67.8

-

2.5
59.1
16.5
14.8
2.6
1.7
2.1

-

10.8

8 .4

5.4
_
_
-

.4
1.2
-

-

c q44AA>
M

-

-

-

Services

100.0

-

0.6
3.6
78.4
10.7
1.4
5.3
-

AH
.
industries 2 /

100.0
1.7
.4
-

(2 /)
71.1
2.1
1.8
6.2
13.3
.2
2.9
.3

Manufacturing

100.0

Public
utilities *

100.0

Wholesale
trade

1C0.C

Retail trade

100.0

Services

100.0

7.3
-

90.6
-

1.6
5.7
2.1

-

-

5.1

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

69.5
6.3
16.9
-

72.2
4.5
8.4
1.8
2.0
8.0
3.1

49.9
9.4
2.7
7.1
24.3
_
6.6

44.7
-

3.3
2.3
44*6
-

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3:

P.<aid cUxUixladfA

P ER C E N T OF O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO YED I N -

Number of paid holidays

A
ll
industries

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

P ER C EN T OF PLAN T W O RKERS EM PLO YED IN —

Finance**

Services

industries 1 /

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ............................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1C0.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments providing paid
holidays ................ .......................

9 7 .5

9 4 .5

9 9 .5

9 8 .1

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .5

6 5 .7

7 7 .5

3 8 .6

8 5 .9

7 2 .4

4 9 .2

.9
2 .2
3 .3
.1
3 6 .8

1 .6
5 .7
4 .3

1 or 3 days ...........................
4 days ............................. .
5 days .................................................................
5 i days ..........................................................
6 days .................. ..............................................
6£ days .............................. .
7 days ............................... .

7£

days ................................
8 days ................................
9 days ............................. .
9 ? days ................................

-

.3
4 .3
.2
3 7 .2
3 .0
2 2 .5
.9
1 5 .8
4 .6

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ............................

1 .4
7 .9
4 3 .0
1 .0
2 8 .8
1 .8
1 0 .6

.8

-

.
5

-

1.0

6.4
13 days ...............................
15 days ...............................

_

2 .5

5.5

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

3 2 .1

.
2
2 0 .2
1 .7
2 7 .0
1 8 .3

7 .1
.9
3 2 .8
6 .1
3 7 .6
-

1 0 .1
3 .5

-

-

“

.5
-

7 1 .5
8 .5
5 .7
-

9 .6
-

*
*

.
5

1 .9

3 .6
1 7 .0
-

1 0 .1
1 .2
2 1 .8
-

5 .2
3 3 .9

4.4
2 .8

4.2

-

8 .5
2 6 .6
-

3 5 .1
-

1 5 .6

7.7
-

~
6 .5

1.1
8 .4

.7
8 .8
3 .4
~

34.3

-

4 1 .1
-

9 .1
.4
1 5 .3
-

2 2 .5

.
4
-

2 0 .9
-

2.2

-

1 2 .3
.7
3 8 .4
5 .7
1 6 .6

_
-

5 4 .1
2 .8
7 .5

_
.8
8 .4
_

1 3 .9
_

1 7 .9

2 .3

_

-

»

-

8 .7

8 .0

3.5

6 .2
2 .0

-

-

_
_
_
-

-

-

-

1 2 .8
-

6 1 .4

14.1

2 7 .6

_
_

5 0 .8

1__________
_
1/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

15,

T a b l e E-4:

P a i d

( r f - o n m c U

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

Vacation policy

P a x m j w U

o

h

A )

IN —

PER C EN T

M a n u f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h o le sa le
tr a d e

R e ta il t r a d e

F in a n c e * *

S e rv ic e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ....

98.4

94.5

99.8

100.0

96.8

100.0

99.2

1 week ........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.... .....
2 weeks .......................
Over 2 weeks....... ...... .....

29.4
.
1
67.6
1.3

21.0
73.5
-

26.4
71.8

34.7
61.3
4.0

62.8
_
34.0
-

9.3
_
90.7
-

19.2
2.9
77.1
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

1.6

5.5

.2

-

3.2

Establishments with paid vacations ....

98.6

95.4

99.8

100.0

96.8

1 week....................... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..........
2 weeks ................ .
Over 2 weeks..............

17.7
.
1
7..
64
4.4

21.0
74.4
-

3.3
94.8
1.7

19.3
71.0
9.7

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

1.4

4.6

.2

-

Establishments with paid vacations ....

98.6

95.4

99.8

100.0

96.8

1 week........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........
2 weeks .............. ........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ...................... .
Over 3 weeks ..... .............

12.0
.1
78.7
6.3
1.0

9.6
83.2
2.6
-

3.3
87.8
.
1
8.6
-

10.4
76.5
9.1
4.0

37.7
—
59.1
-

13.2
-

Establishments with no paid vacations .
..

1.4

4.6

.
2

-

3.2

-

All establishments .............. .

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

AH
in d u s tr ie s 1 /

.

OF PLA N T W O RK ERS EM PLO Y ED

M a n u f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h o le sa le
tr a d e

100.0

100.0

80.6

9 2 .5

53.1
_
24.5
3.0

70.9

IN —

R e ta il tr a d e

S e rv ic e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

49.9

86.8

89.0

84.2

_

24.7

48.1

60.5

35.3

21.6
-

17.5
7.7

32.5
6.2

28.5
-

40.5

13.2

11.0

15.8

1 year of service

1.6

8 .4

.
8

19.4

7.5

50.1

100.0

99.2

81.1

92.5

49.9

93.3

8 9 .0

84.2

43.1
53.7
-

7.3
83.5
9.2

12.8
2.9
83.5
-

4 6 .6

13.6

42.1

52.1

.
5
31.0
3.0

67.5
1.2
23.8
-

32.3

28.6
7.7

44.7
6.5

36.9

43.5

3.2

-

.
8

18.9

7.5

50.1

6.7

11.0

15.8

100.0

99.2

81.8

94.1

50.3

93.3

89.0

84.2

3.7
83.1

12.8
2.9
83.5
_
_

23.1

_

17.2

_

11.0

_

22.1

45.0

23.7

54.8
1.2
1.5
1.2

76.9

64.7

44.0

52.1

_
-

27.5
5.2
6.6
-

.
3
6.2

-

.
8

18.2

5.9

49.7

6.7

11.0

15.8

100.0

99.2

81.3

94.1

50.3

93.3

89.0

84.2

3.7
74.2
_
18.1
4.0

12.3
2.9
81.1

-

2 years of service

-

8 .4

5 years of service

(2/)

1 week.......... .............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........
2 weeks ........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks......
3 weeks ................... ,,,,,
Over 3 weeks........ ...........
Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

l/
2/
*
**

98.6

95.4

j

99.3

12.0
.
1
60.6
(2/)
24.2
1.7

9.6
55.3
30.0
-

1

3.3

1.4

4.6

i

60.7
!

.1
3 5 .7

!

.2

100.0

96.3

1 0 .4

37.7
52.7
_

54.7
30.9
4.0
-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
8 .4

1

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....

i

_
_

6 .4

3.2

“

_

2.4
.
3

23.1

17.2

_

11.0

22.1

_

45.0

23.7

44.9
1.2
11.4
1.2

63.1

52.7

41.4

50.3

13.3
-

14.7
5.2
19.4

12.3
6.2

2.6
-

8 .4

18.2

5.9

6.7

11.0

15.3

_

_

49.7

1.3

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5:

P a id S io tz JH.&G4A&

Pa >04M4>0H4^)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P ro v is io n s f o r p aid s ic k le a v e

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts ..................................................

A
ll
industries

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Public
utilities *

A1
1
n / Manufacturing
industries

Services

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

- .- .,1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .c

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.. - i p o ^ c

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .2
•6
3 .e
3 .1
1 .4
1 .3
•4
1 .5
1 .1

1 9 .8
1 1 .1
3 .2
5 .5
-

1 2 .2
7 .1
5 .1
-

1 2 .0
3 .4
1 .8
6 .1
.7

14 .6
3 .2
.7
8 .3
2 .4
-

8 .9
4 .0
4 .9

9 .5
3 .6
5 .9
-

9 .7
•4
1 .3
3 .4
1 .7
2 .6
.2
a

9 .1
.2
4*6
4 .3
-

3 .4
3 .4
-

5a
.
-

1 5 .9
.7
2 .4

1 .7
.2

.2
1 1 .6
1 .0
-

1 8 .4
3 .5
8 .3
6 .6
_
_
_
-

8 6 .8

8 0 .2

8 7 .8

8 8 .0

8 5 .4

9 1 .1

9 0 .5

9 0 .3

9 0 .9

9 6 .6

94.6

8 4 .1

8 1 .6

2 3 .1
.3
2 .8
2 .0
6 .1
2 .8
.4
2 .6
4 .3
1 .8

2 3 .9
9 .6
1 4 .3
-

1 2 .7
1 .1
7 .6
4 .0
-

3 2 .1
1 .1
2 .8
1 .4
5 .2
1 7 .9
3 .7

2 1 .8
3 .2
3 .0
1 3 .2
2 .4
-

2 3 .4
9 .3
4a
5 .2
4 .8

1 8 .0
8 .5
3 .5
6 .0
-

1 1 .9
a
.5
1 .8
4 .0
3 .2
.2
1 .8
.3
(2 /)

1 0 .8
6 .0
4 .8
-

4 .2
3 .0
.8
.4
-

21.2
.8
5 .5
8 .0
3 .5
3 .1
.3

1 5 .9
_
.7
2 .6
1 1 .6
1 .0
_
-

1 9 .5
1 .1
3 .5
8 .3
6 .6
_
-

7 6 .9

76a

8 7 .3

6 7 .9

7 8 .2

7 6 .6

8 2 .0

8 8 .1

8 9 .2

9 5 .8

7 8 .8

8 4 .1

8 0 .5

2 5 .1
.8
5 .5
8 .0
_
7 .0
3 .8

1 5 .9
_
.7
2 .6
1 1 .6
1 .0
•
_

1 9 .5
1 .1
3 .5

6 months o f s e r v i c e
E stab lish m en ts w ith form al p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ........................................ ..
3 d ays ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days .......................................................................
1 0 days ............... ..............................................
1 2 days ......................................................................
1 4 days ......................................................................
2 0 days ••••...........................................................
Over 2 0 d a y s ................................... .....................
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no form al p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ...........................................

(g /)

3.5
_
_

1 y ear o f s e rv ic e
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith form al p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v e ....................................... ..
1 o r 3 days ............................................. .............
5 d ay s ............... ........................................................
6 days ........................................................................
1 2 days ......................................................................

Over 2 0 days .................................................... ••
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no form a l p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ......................... ..

!
!

1

!

2 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith form a l p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ...........................................
2 o r 3 d a y s .................................................. ..
5 days ........................................................................
1 0 days ......................................................................
1 2 d a y s ....................... ..............................................
1 4 days ............................................. .....................
15 days ......................................................................
2 0 days ......................................................................
21 to 3 0 days .......................................................
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no form al p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s ic k le a v e ...........................................

2 7 .7
.3
2 .4
2 .0
5 .0
2 .8
.4
.7
1 1 .5
2 .6

3 3 .3
1 .1
2 .8
1 .4
1 .8
1 9 .1
7 .1

1

2 1 .8
3 .2
3 .0
1 3 .2
2 .4
-

64.2

6 6 .7

j

7 8 .2

7 6 .6

2 3 .9
5 .7
5 .0
2 .1
1 1 .1

3 5 .8
1 .1
.6
4 .0
3 0 .1

3 3 .3
.7
2 .8
1 .4
2 .2
7 .7
7 .1
1 1 .4

2 8 .2
3 .2
3 .0
1 3 .2
2 .4
6 .4
-

7 6 .1

6 4 .2

66.7

7 1 .8

2 3 .9
7 .4
2 .1
14*4
-

1
|
I

7 2 .3

7 6 .1

1
|

2 8 .7
.2
2 .4
2 .0
3 .3
2 .7
.4
3 .0
3 .3
1 .0
1 0 .4
7 1 .3

3 5 .8
1 .1
7 .6
4 .0

i

23.1
i

j

1 8 .0
-

|

1 4 .8
.1
.5
1 .8
3 .0
3 .2
.2
.7
5 .0
.3

1 0 .8
6 .0
4*8
-

1 5 .2
3 .0
.8
.4
1 1 .0
.

8 2 .0

8 5 .2

8 9 .2

8 4 .8

7 4 .9

8 4 .1

8 0 .5

2 3 .4
7 .2
4 a
6 .1
1 .2
4 .8
-

1 8 .0
8 .5
3 .5
6 .0
-

1 5 .4
.5
1 .8
3 .1
3 .2
.2
1 .9
1 .0
.6
3 .1

1 0 .8
6 .0
4 .6
.2

1 5 .2
_
3 .0
.8
a
-

2 5 .1
5 .5
8 .0
.8

1 8 .5
-

1 9 .5

7 6 .6

8 2 .0

84.6

8 9 .2

2 3 .4
7 .2
4 .1
7 .3
4 .8

:

8 .5
3.5
-

-

6.0
-

-

6~6
_
8 .3
-

IQ y r a r a Of p e rg jcg
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith form a l p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v e .................... .....................
3 d a y s ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
1 0 days .............................................................. ..
1 2 days .....................................................................
1 4 days .............................................................. ..
20 days ................................................................... ..
2 1 t o 30 days .......................................................
50 days ......................................................................
6 0 days and over ................................................
E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith no form al p ro v is io n s
f o r p aid s ic k le a v e ...........................................

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), comminication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

_

.7
2 .6
1 1 .6
1 .0

1 .1
3 .5
6?6
.

_

-

2 .6
-

8 .3

11.0

2 .3
3 .8
4 .7

84.8

7 4 .9

8 1 .5

8 0 .5

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

Table E -6 :

ft

& 04U6&&1

P ER C EN T OF PLAN T W O RKERS EM PLO YED IN —

P ER C E N T OF O FFIC E W ORKERS EM PLO YED IN—

Type of bonus

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance **

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

All establishments .................... .

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ............................. ..............................

6 2 .1

5 0 .9

4 9 .5

5 9.3

8 4 .9

7 0 .4

Christmas or year-end ...............
Profit-sharing .... ....................
Other ................................

56 .6
5 .8
9 .2

4 6 .4
6 .2
.9

4 6 .9
2 .9
7 .1

4 7 .1
8 .9
1 4 .2

8 2 .6
8 .5
2 .3

6 9 .3

3 7 .9

4 9 .1

5 0.5

4 0 .7

1 5 .1

Establishments with no nonproduction bonuses ...................

1/
2/
*
**

Ail
, /
industries 4 /

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Service*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

— . 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

64.1

3 9 .1

3 1 .0

4 .9

7 1 .1

7 4 .1

4 4 .8

3 7 .8
2 .5
1 .3

3 0 .4
2 .7

4 .3

1 9 .5

4 8 .8
1 5 .3
5 .3

.7

6 1 .2
8 .7
1 0 .9

7 3 .9
2 .8
.2

4 3 .1
1 .7
2 .9

2 9 .6

3 5 .9

6 0 .9

6 9 .0

9 5 .1

2 8 .9

2 5 .9

55.2

-

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other puhlic utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

9nbusian<>e a n d P-enbian PMani

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of plan

All

industries

M
anufacturing

PERCENT' OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans £ / ..... ....... .........

83 .3

7 6 .4

9 1 .1

8 9 .2

6 5 .9

9 5 .7

Life insurance .......... ............
Health insurance ................
Hospitalization................... ..
Retirement pension ..................

7 5 .8
3 8 .8
4 5 .7
3 5 .7

7 4 .2
5 9 .5
5 3 .2
2 1 .1

6 8 .0
4 1 .6
3 0 .6
7 9 .7

8 0 .5
3 4 .4
5 9 .7
3 2 .3

6 5 .9
2 6 .4
3 8 .2
1 3 .6

9 2 .4
3 7 .4
4 8 .9
3 7 .1

Establishments with no insurance
or pension plans ............ .........

1 6 .7

2 3 .6

8 .9

1 0 .8

3 4 .1

4 .3

4 5 .6

All establishments.......... .. ..........

1/
2/
*
**

Manufacturing

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




industries l/

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities *

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Service*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10Q.0

1 0 0 .0

5 4 .4

5 3 .5

5 6 .9

40.6

8 3 .8

5 4 .1

4 1 .3

5 4 .4
1 4 .7
1 5 .6

4 8 .5
3 1 .0
3 2 .6
1 8 .3

5 4 .8

4 0 .9
1 6 .9

2 7 .0
2 0 .1
2 1 .5
3 2 .5

7 0 .7
2 2 .3
4 3 .1
1 9 .4

5 4 .1
2 4 .0
2 9 .7
1 2 .5

4 1 .3
1 9 .0
2 1 .8

4 6 .5

4 3 .1

5 9 .4

1 6 .2

4 5 .9

5 8 .7

-

46.0

-

Occupational Wage Survey, New Orleans, La., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18.

Appendix

Scope ai

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered In compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A)* The covered industry groupings a r e : manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisionso As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying or os a-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time f u d night work* Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
li
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the necurest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers'to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at lesuit
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance f u d pension plans*
li

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN NEW ORLEANS, LA., 1/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
e stabllshments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ............................ ......
Manufacturing ........................... .
Nonmanufacturing ....... .....................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...... ......................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade .............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2/.... ..........................

21
21
21

1,185
290
895

218
55
163

130,800
4-4,200
86,600

61,760
19,800
a , 960

9,010
1,510
7,500

21
21
21
21
21

144
229
277
98
147

31
43
36
25
28

29,200
16,000
26,000
6,000
9,400

20,570
4,790
9,310
2,800
4,490

2,450
1,340
1,150
2,090
470

21
21

8
45

8
18

2,070
3,020

2,070
1,519

749

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 4/
Railroads .......................................
Insurance carriers ...............................

1/ New Orleans Metropolitan Area (Jefferson, Orleans, and St. Bernard Parishes).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
4/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.




20.

Index
Page
Bench hand (bakeries) ......... ••••••••••.
Biller, machine ......... ............... .
Bookbinder (printing) ....................
Bookkeeper, h a n d ..... ......... ..........
Bookkeeping-machine operator ........ ..
Bricklayer (building construction) ......
Calculating-machine operator ••....... ..
Carpenter (building construction) ........
Carpenter, maintenance ....... ....... .
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads)
Cleaner ......................... ....... .
Cleaner (railroads) ............... .......
Clerk, accounting ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ...
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers)
Clerk, f i l e ..... ........................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) •••••••••
Clerk, g e n e r a l ....... .............. .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ••••••
Clerk, o r d e r ........... .................
Clerk, p a y r o l l ..... .....................
Compositor, hand (printing) •••••««•••••••
Crane operator, electric bridge
Draftsman ................. ...............
Duplicating-machine operator ........ .
Electrician (building construction) ••••••
Electrician, maintenance .................
Electrician, ^intenance (railroads) •••••
Electrotyper (printing) ....... .
Engineer, stationary ........ .............
Fireman, stationary boiler ........... .
Guard ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Helper, motortruck driver ................
Helper, trades, maintenance ••••••••••••••
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ••
Janitor ..................................
Janitor (railroads) ........ ••••••.......
Key-punch o p e r a t o r .......
•••••
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ••
Laborer (building construction) ••••••••••
Machine operator (printing) ..•••••......
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) •••••••
Mailer (printing) ••••••.•••..... ........
Maintenance man, general utility .......
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) .......
Mechanic, maintenance
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) .......
Millwright ••••••••...... ...•••••••......
Mixer (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••••••••••




12
4

12
3, 4
3, 4

12

4
12

8
11
9

11
3, 5

11

11
3, 5

11
3, 5

11
3, 5
3, 5

12
9
7

8
11

12
8
8
9

12
8

11
9

11
5

11
12

12

11
12

8
8

8
11

8
12

Pg£§
Molder (bakeries) ••••••••••...... .............. .
Motortruck driver •••••..... .......... ..................
Nurse, industrial (registered) •••••••..... •••••....... .
Office boy ••••••.... ••••••••••..................... ••••
Office girl ..... ....... ..................... ...........
Oiler •••••.••••.... .................... .•••••••••......
Operator (local transit) ................................
Order f i l l e r .............................................
Overman (bakeries) ..................... ......... ........
Packer ..............................................
Packer (bakeries) ••••••.....
Painter (building construction) ••••••••••••••••....... .
Painter, maintenance........
*•••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ........ ......••••.....
Photoengraver (printing) ..........................
*
Pipe fitter, maintenance ••••........ ••••••••.......
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ••••••........ ••••••
Plasterer (building construction) .................
Plumber (building construction) .•••••.... .
Plumber, maintenance...... ••••••••••............. ••••••
Porter .............
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••......
Press assistant (printing) ...............................
Press feeder (printing) ......... .................. •••••
Pressman (printing) ............................
Receiving clerk •••.••...... ........... •••••.......... .
S e c r e t a r y ..... ............. ....... ........... ......... .
Section head (insurance carriers) ......... .............
Shipping clerk ...........................................
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ........... ............ .
Stenographer................••••.••••...... ••••••.......
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ••••••••......
Stereotyper (printing) ••••••••..... ••••••••••••........
Stock handler •••••••••••••.......... ••••••.............
Stock handler (railroads) •••••••••••..........
Switchboard operator ................. ••••••••••••••.....
Switchboard operator-receptionist .......................
Tabulating-machine operator ........•••••••••••••••......
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ••••••••
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r .... ••••••••••••••••......
Truck d r i v e r ..................
Trucker, hand ..........
Trucker, hand (railroads) ••••........ ........... .......
Trucker, p o w e r .............
T y p i s t ............................... ...................
Typist (insurance carriers) ......... ••••••••••••••••••••
Underwriter (insurance c a r riers) ...... ................
Watchman •••••...........
Wrapper (bakeries) .••••••......

12
12
7
3
5
8
12
9
12
9
12
12
8
11
12
8
11
12
12
8
9
11
12
12
12
9
3, 6
11
9
10
6
11
12
10
11
6
6
4, 6
11
6
10
10
11
10
6, 7
11
11
10
12

☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1952 0 — 204573




This report was prepared in the Bureau's Southern Regional Office.
Communications may be addressed to:
Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room
50 Seventh Street, N. E.
Atlanta 5> Georgia

66k

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Southern Region includes the following States:
North Carolina
Alabama
Arkansas
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Florida
Tennessee
Georgia
Texas
Louisiana
Maryland
Virginia
West Virginia
Mississippi
District of Columbia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102