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Occupational Wage Survey

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND
December 1951

Bulletin No. 1071

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION..... .....................................................................

1

THE PROVIDENCE METROPOLITAN AREA ...............

.......

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ................... . ......................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office o c c u p a t i o n s ..... .............. ...................................
A -2
Professional and technical occupations ...........
A-3
Maintenance and power plantoccupations •..........
A -4
Custodial, warehousing, andshippingoccupations ...........................
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-346S Electroplating, plating,andp o l i s h i n g ..................................
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery (except machine tools).......................................
Machine-tool accessories
.........................................
Textile machinery
.................
B-3961 Costume j e w e l r y .........................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ........................................................

3
7
7
9

11
11
12
13
14
14

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction .....................................................
C-205
Bakeries .............................
C-2082 Malt liquors ...................
*......
C-27
P r i n t i n g ..................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ................
*......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ...... ..............................
C-446
S t e v e d o r i n g ................... ............ .......... ...... ..............
C-6512 Office building service ..................................................
C-7011 Hotels ....................................................................

15
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
16

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .................................

17

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ..............................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...................................................
E-3
Paid holidays .............................................
E-4
Paid vacations ............................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ...................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ••••......... ...... ............ ......... .
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ............

17
IS
IS
19
20
22
22

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ......................................................

23

INDEX .....................................................................

25

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request far auto repair shops
(June 1951) and power laundries
(June 1951)
For sale b y th e S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D ocu m e nts, U . S. G o v e rn m e n t P rin tin g O ffic e
W a s h in g to n 2 5 , D . C.

-

P rice 2 0 cents

April lU, 1952

Introduction

1/

The Providence area is 1 of AO major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping*
In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-A) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community survey. 2/
Earnings data for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables*
liiion scales (Series C tables) are presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing
pay practices* Data have also been collected and summarized on
shift operations and differentials , hours of work, and supple­
mentary benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances,
paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension
plans*

The

P rovidence M etropolitan A re a

Total population of the Providence Metropolitan Area
(the major urban centers of Rhode Island and the Attleboro and
North Attleboro sections of Massachusetts) was almost 750,000
in 1950, an increase of nearly 10 percent since 1940* A third
lived in Providence*

1/ Prepared in the Bureau!s regional office in Boston, Mass*,
by Bernard J. Fahres, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst* The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau!s Division of Wages and Industrial Re­
lations in Washington, D. C*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Nonagricultural employment in the area was 293,000 in
December 1951* Employment in the 2,360 manufacturing plants in
the area was almost equally divided between the durable- and
nondurable-goods industries. 2J The major manufacturing indus­
try in the area was textiles. Employment In this industry totaled
about A3,000 workers at the time of the study, reflecting
a decline of about 9,000 workers from the previous year. Lead­
ing durable-goods industries included jewelry, with 23,000
workers, and nonelectrical machinery with 20,000 workers. The
machinery industries were engaged, for the most part, in the
manufacture of textile machinery and machine tools.
Providence plants manufactured a variety of products
in addition to textile goods and jewelry.
Among these were
canvas and rubber footwear, insulated wire and electrical wiring
devices, incandescent and fluorescent lamps, fabricated metal
products, watch cases, and optical goods.
Other products were
garments, industrial chemicals, files, rasps, nuts and bolts,
foundry products, and printing and publishing products.
Employment in nonmanufacturing industries almost equaled
that of manufacturing. More than 50,000 workers earned their
livelihood in retail and wholesale trade, and local, State and
Federal Governments employed 30,000 workers. Also of importance
in the area were a variety of service industries, in which some
20,000 were engaged, and contract construction, with a working
force of 15,000.
Almost 1A,000 were employed in the fields of
transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
The
finance, insurance, and real estate industries employed an ad­
ditional 10,000 workers.
Among the industry and establishment-size groups in­
cluded within the scope of the Bureau's study, slightly over half
of the plant workers were employed in establishments having writ­
ten agreements with labor organizations. The extent of unioniza­
tion varied widely among the different industry groups studied.
In nondurable manufacturing industries, 7 out of 10 employees
were covered by union agreements; among durable-goods establish­
ments about two-fifths of the workers were in unionized estab­
lishments.
Plant workers in nonmanufacturing industries were
not extensively covered by union contract provisions, except in
the public utilities group where nine-tenths of the employees
were covered.
In the other nonmanufacturing groups, the extent
of union coverage among plant workers was not significant. The
extent of union coverage among office workers was slight. Only

2/ See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods industries.

2

a tenth of the office workers were employed under the terms of
collective bargaining agreements. Unionization of office workers
was highest in the public utilities group, where a fifth of
the office workers were employed in establishments having col­
lective bargaining agreements covering white-collar workers*
A substantial labor surplus prevailed in the Provi­
dence area at the time of the survey.
A general slump in the
textile industry as well as the problem of material shortages
in the jewelry trade accounted, in large part, for this condi­
tion. Unemployment in the area totaled 30,000 in December 1951;
by the following month it had risen to 35,000.

Occupational W a g e Structure
Wage rates of a majority of the plant workers in Prov­
idence were formally adjusted upward between January 1950 the base period for the Wage Stabilization Board*s 10 percent
ncatch-up” wage increase formula - and the time of the study.
These general wage increases were substantially more numerous
after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea than during the pre­
ceding 6-months period.
Over the 2-year period, three-fourths
of the manufacturing plant workers had received one or more
general wage increases, generally amounting to between 1U and
26 cents an hour. Formal wage adjustments were normally larger
and more prevalent for plant workers in nondurable goods estab­
lishments than for workers in the durable-goods industries.
In
the nonmanufacturing industries, about half the plant workers
had received formal wage advances since January 1950.
These
increases, in general, ranged from 9 to 16 cents an hour.
General wage adjustments for office workers during
this period were somewhat less frequent than those received by
plant workers. This, at least in part, results from the custom­
ary practice of some establishments of adjusting salaries of
office workers on an individual basis rather than by general
wage increases.




Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing approximately three-fourths
of all plant workers and half of all office workers. Formalized
plans providing a range of rates affected approximately the same
number of plant workers as did plans providing a single rate for
each job. Practically all formal wage plans for office workers
provided a range of rates.
Approximately two-thirds of the plant workers in the
manufacturing industries were paid according to some form of
incentive wage system.
Incentive methods of wage payment were
negligible in the nonmanufacturing industries, except for com­
missions paid to salespersons in retail trade establishments.
Almost 90 percent of the plant workers in the area
were employed in firms having established minimum entrance rates
for inexperienced plant workers.
Although minimum entrance
rates varied widely among industries surveyed, about half of all
plant workers were in establishments with a minimum hourly rate
range of between 75 cents and $1.05.
No firm in the manufac­
turing, public utilities, or wholesale trade divisions reported
a minimum of less than 75 cents.
In retail trade, half of the
workers, and in the service industries, two-fifths of the workers
were in firms whose minimum rate was less than 75 cents.
Wages and salaries of office workers in manufacturing
industries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In 20 out of 25 classifications permitting comparison, average
salaries of office workers in manufacturing establishments ex­
ceeded those in nonmanufacturing plants. For hourly rated plant
employees in custodial, warehousing, and shipping categories a
similar trend was evident with manufacturing rates exceeding
nonmanufacturing in 11 out of 15 cases where comparison was pos­
sible. By contrast, average hourly rates for maintenance workers
were higher in nonmanufacturing establishments for 8 of 9 occu­
pations permitting comparisons.
A fifth of all plant workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were working on late shifts in December 1951. Virtually
all late-shift workers were paid a differential over day rates,
which was usually set in the form of a cents-per-hour premium.

A:

Ojfjjioe Occupation*,

Table A-l

(Average

straight-time we e k l y h ours an d earnings 1 / for
b a s i s i n P r o v i d e n c e , R.

selected occupations

I., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n ,

studied on an area

Decem b e r 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

A verage

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

3,

Cross-Industry Occupations

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

%

%

E A R N IN G S O F—

$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65. CO 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
and
under
(Standard) (Standard)
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 !72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 over
1

Men
Bookkeepers, hand ..........................
Manufacturing ...........................

126
66

41.0
a . 5

1
64.50
68.00

Clerks, accounting .........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ......... ...........
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ...........................

204
100
36
64
104
67
22

39.0
39.0
40.0
38.5
39.0
39.0
36.5

60.50
59.00
53.00
62.50
62.00
67.00
47.00

Clerks, general ............................
Manufacturing ...........................

48
30

39.5
40.0

Clerks, o r d e r ....... .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................... .......
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade .....................

83
24
59
55

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

Clerks, payroll ............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...........................
Duplicating-machine operators ............
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Office boys .................................
Manufacturing ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

PiiVillr* u b i ib i . s
r u u n c ii-Mi"M+1 ea * ••«••••••«•••••••
Tabulating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................................

42
34
13

— n —

;

90
38
52

1O
14

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

10
-

6
2

25
18

7

-

7
3
3
-

8
1
1
-

j

9
2
2
-

12
5
5
-

10
5
5
-

6
1
1
-

4
-

7
7

;
!

7
3
4

7
-

19
16
2
14
3
-

7

'

_

_

_

i 12

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

7

-

-

-

-

2
2

!

i

-

_

-

-

-

34.50
33.50
35.50

“

-

7
6

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

3
3

_

-

-

“

-

-

28
16
12
Q
J

22
14
8
5

22
6
16
o
A

8

8

7
7
6
2
4

-

i 30

2
2

8

-

Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade .........................

30
16

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Nonmanufacturing ................. ......
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade .........................

53
41
18
23

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

46.00
46.00
49.50
43.50

_
*

“

525

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

53.00
53.00
51.00
61.50
52.00
55.50
49.50
48.00

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

414 A 4a o ^

1A
J.O

Bookkeepers, hand ..........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ..........................................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................
Wholesale trade ..............................................................
Retail trade ........................................................................
Services .....................................................................................

3a
270
71
184
34
76
47

39.5
39.5
41.5
39.0

i a .50
48.00

! 39.00
44.50
39.50
36.50

j
i

!

**

12

-

4

-

; ! -

is

3
6
•

-

11
7
7

12
12

11

-

-

_

8
6

13

j

2
2

I 12
5
1

-

|

“

23

^15
15

;

-

4

8
2

12
6

-

_

3

-

j 3
i -

3
3

3

-

11
-

-

-

11

"

I

-

-

j 11

”

■
*

-

-

-

-

_

“

-

2

_

2

-

2

6
1
5

1

2

-

4
1
-

20
4
-

12
! 11
i

25
3
3

1
3
1
1

4
16
j 12

XL

-

3

5

8
-

5

2

”

_

! 7
\- T ~

-

_

6
6
6

5
5

-

-

1
1

_

2

_

**

Finance,

insurance,




a n d real estate.

communication,

10
10

4
1

15
14

7
1

2
1

1

22
8
1
7
14
14

12
4
2
2
8
8

7

-

7
7
-

-

14

-

-

14

-

5
n

3

1

3

3
3

3
3

1
1

3
3

1

1

1
_

1

-

1
-

|
i

j

3

|

2
2

_

-

3
3

|

1
_
_

I

'

_

!

_

3

3
16
10
6
6

-

6

-

n

11
11

4

2
1

1

4

l _—
— 5
5

-

'

! 45

24

[
!
!
|

11
1
10

11

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
2
4

1

-

1
1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

~

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

.

12

18
18
18

6

_

4
1
3

1

1

~

1

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

32
20
12
8

-

-

-

3

“

3

-

83
66
66

21

-

-

17
-

-

4

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

“

”

-

“

5
5

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

1
1

5

11

15

59
48
48

82
60
60

11

22
10
8

11

19
6

2

4

28
6
7

2

-

4

2
2

57
29
29

2

-

7
-

-

-

_

11

-

4
1

-

27
25

43

33

5

11

2
3
38
6
27
5

23
12

14
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

|

i

-

5

-

11

12

1

31
31
7
24

10

-

-

-

5

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

-

-

-

-

23
20
14
6

-

-

-

J

-

_

-

.

-

-

12

-

-

-

6
6

_

5
!

R.

!

10

!

Providence,

-

7
7

13
1

-

_

-

1

| _ " __
_

j
17
17
6

27
15

_

I

1

a -

-

_
i
1

6

Occupational Wage Survey,
and other public utilities.

:

-

i

S e e footn o t e at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),

-

1
1

_

I
|

1
1

“

7
7

-

-

!

-

-

-

!

-

"
2
2

30
27
2

12
4
4

1
1

;
-

;

6

-

1

13
10

1
1

12
7
7
-

!
i

_

18
18

6
-

1

_

1 _

;

3

5
4
1

_

7
1
6
6

13

j
! 42.00
| 44.00

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.5
39.5
39.0

4

i
;

“

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) ................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing ........................

I

-

1

1
1

-

11
-

7

<

”

~

12

~

!

-

-

! 52.50
-

5
3
~

-

_

-

! 50.50
| 53.50

i

10

40.50
39.00

39.0
39.5
38.5

j

4

-

-

ca

_

-

-

.

oy

-

_

-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

61.50
| 61.50

39.0
39.5
38.0
.20•>

-

—

57.00
62.00
55.50
56.00

39.0
38.5

188
112
68
44
76

_

-

61.50
67.00

39.5
40.0

30
10
20

_

I., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. DEPART M E N T OF LABOR

i

T a b l e A-l;

O ^ice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time we e k l y h ours and earnings 1 / for
b a s i s in P r o v i d e n c e ,

R.

A verage

Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

selected occupations

I., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n ,

studied on an area

D e c e m b e r 19 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W EEKLY

E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
|$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
,$
$
1*
Weekly 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 5 0 .0 0 52.50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 6 5 .0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
_
1 _
and
(Standard) (Standard) unSer
27.50 130.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50160.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00:85.00 over
;

1
|

Women - Continued

%
61

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing ......... ..................
Nonmanufacturing ........ ••••••••••••••

24
37
?0

39.5
39.5
39.5

47.00
50.00
45.00

4 0 ,0

4 5 .5 0

39.0
40.0'
39.5
40.5
38.0
38.0

Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale t r a d e ......... .
Retail trade ........................ .
Finance ** ................ .

120
54
239
38
19
169

40.5
37.5

40.00
41.50
42.00
41.00
39.00
43.00
40.50
37.50

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................... .........
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .......••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Retail t r a d e .......... ............ ..
Finance * * ............... ...........

338
“ 191
132
59
147
120
11

39.0
39.5
40.0
38.5
38.5
38.5
38.0

! 4 2 .0 0
! 44.30
42.50
49.00
i 38.50
: 3 7 .0 0
; 34.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...

413
— 174—

Durable goods ...........................

-

r

-

-

-

-

22
—

_

_

1 47
10
10
!
_

14
12

_

_

_

-

22
3
-

1 37
|
I
:

2

_

19

35

, 26
|

-

8

1 13

!

13

! 70

-

i
—

-

-

8
8

-

-

j
1
1
—
; 12
' 12
-

50
37

39.5
39.5

39.50
37.00

-

832
419
169
250

Clerks, accounting .................. ......
Manufacturing ........ ...................
Durable g o o d s ........................
Nondurable goods ••.••••••••••••••••
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ........ •••••....... .
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ................... .
Retail t r a d e ......... ...........
Services ............ ..... ............

Clerks, file, class B ....................... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .......... ........ ........
Durable goods ............. .
Nondurable goods «•••.••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Finance ** ................ ••••••••••
S e r v i c e s ......................... .

_

1

-

54
26

1

T~1—
j
j
i
i

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
39.5
38.5

43.00
45.50
41.00
48.50
41.00
46.00
42.50
1 38.50
49.50

_

413
24
88
109
22

—

39
io—
29
24
399
161
135
26
238
130
18

38.0
■37.0
38.0
37.5

; 44.50
47. 3 0 .
44.00
; 4 4 .0 0

38.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
38.0
37.0
40.0

34.00
35.50
35.00
36.00
33.50
33.50
32.50

i

6

28

26

7
2
5

! 24
2
44
40
4

4
4

12
12

“

-

-

11
!
j

-

-

1
i 11
_

1

_

_

-

48
| 66
! 1 9 ^ : 15
8
15
1 11
: 47 ! 33
!

3

_

j
[

9
14
j

_

1

13

i 4
i 2

-

69
22
6
I 16
47
i ! 9
! 38
1
l
|
50
2°
1 18
! 2
30
28
2

13
6

i
1

3

6

-

9
2

-

7
7

7
6

3

6
6

28
18
18

43
26
14
12
17
6

17
12
12

47
37
10
60
17
4
33

10
6
-

_

5
1

8
8

3
3

1
1

1

1

1

_

1
1

-

-

_

23
21

19
11

!
1

107

6

14
; 10
1 -

_
_

3

_
_

_
_

_

_

6
2
4

9
2
8
4
4

-

_

4

11

3

36

18
10
; 4
6

21
21
12
9
_
-

17
17
7
10
-

i 10
11
2
_

"

-

-

4

37
24
4
20

! 10
3
-

51
35
29
6
16
14
-

24
21
3
12
8

8
5

11
9

4
4

| 87
l44
j 10

108
48
38
10
60
8
16

i 8
8

2

4

3
2
2

-

110
47
36
11
63
2
;
3
j 31
-

_

-

_

-

2

32

135
39
27
12
96

96
40
40
>
—

49
13

16
!
5

4
2
2

-

-

_
_
2
-

_
32
32

i 34
! 43
! 15
; 9
: -

5
! 3

i 10
1

_

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

1
j “—
—
1 _
i -

_

3

4
-

-

-

1

-

“

_

1

_
_
-

-

l

_
_

-

-

-

:

!

_

_

-

-

-

!

i

j

;

_
_

-

i

I

-

77
42
14
28
35
4
9
2

88
44
14
30
44
1
9
18

24
5

97
65
25
40
32
_
18

13
6
_

_

-

-

-

-

4
1 1

j 4

1
1

: 3
3
i
8
1

4

j

5

5
1
4

!
i
i

!

56

6
6
! 6

9
1
8
6

39
39
_

23
1 17
j 17
i _

31
22
10
12

29
18

1 6
1 2

9
9

_

68

-

3
7
1
«

;

i
i

-

4

3
1 --

2~

I

1

7
3

2
2

i

1
j
j

1

5
6
5
1
1

n

22
p

!

15
7

!
|
j

1
1

i

_

,

1 _

1

1

I
l
i 21
21
p r ^
-

2
2
-

j

2
.
_
_

i

1

j

_
_

_

I
1

_

_

_

!

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

10
10
_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

|

5

-

-

1

l

«.

_

1

, 21
_
_
_

_

j
1
—

1
=
.

1

1

1
1

-

_

_

—

1 _
j
!

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
j

-

_

_

_
_

_

_

j -—
—

j

-

_

_

_

1
1
1

4

2
1
1

!

"
1

36

19
!
5
14
I 17
_

■

1

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6

-

j

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ......... .
Nonmanuf a c t u r i n g ......... ........ .

Clerks, file, clas3 A ......................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............. ........ *...
Nonmanufacturing .......................... .
Finance ** ..............................

_

-

!

_

_
_

_

1

_

_
_
_

_

_

-

-

10

-

j

-

_
_

_

1

_
_

5,

Ofyioe Qccupatia+U - Continued

T a b l e A-l:

(Average s traight-time w e e k l y hours and earnings 1/ for s e l e c t e d occupations st u d i e d on a n area
b a s i s i n P r o v i d e n c e , R. I., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1951)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—
$
2 7 .5 0

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
2 7 .5 0

$
3 0 .0 0

$
3 2 .5 0

$
3 5 .0 0

$
3 7 .5 0

$
4 0 .0 0

$
4 2 .5 0

$
4 5 .0 0

$
4 7 .5 0

$
5 0 .0 0

$
5 2 .5 0

$
5 5 .0 0

$
5 7 .5 0

$
6 0 .0 0

s
6 2 .5 0

$
6 5 .0 0

$
6 7 .5 0

$
7 0 .0 0

$
7 2 .5 0

$
7 5 .0 0

$
8 0 .0 0

3 0 .0 0

$
2 5 .0 0

3 2 .5 0

3 5 .0 0

3 7 .5 0

4 0 .0 0

4 2 .5 0

4 .5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0

5 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0

5 5 .0 0

5 7 .5 0

6 0 .0 0

6 2 .5 0

6 5 .0 0

6 7 .5 0

7 0 .0 0

7 2 .5 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

$
8 5 .0 0
and
over

Women - Continued

Clerks, general ...........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufactur
......
•
Wholesale trade ....... ............ .
Retail t r a d e .................. •••••
Services ....••............... ......

:ng

Clerks, o r d e r ........... ...........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................ .
Durable g o o d s ....... ............ .
Nondurable goods ...................
vo n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............... .......
Wholesale t r a d e ............... •••••
Clerks, payroll ...........................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable g o o d s ............... ••••
N o r m a n u f f e a t u r i n g .............. •••••••
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale t r a d e .........
Retail t r a d e ........ ........ .
Duplicating-machine operators ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Kev-punch o p e r a t o r s ................... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................. .
Durable g o o d s ....... .............. .
Nondurable g o o d s ................. .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Public utilities * ...... ......... .
Office g i r l s ........ ....... ............ .
Manufacturing ..........................
Secretaries ................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ •••••••••
Durable g o o d s ........ ............
Nondurable g o o d s ..........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......................
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale t r a d e ................... .
Retail trade ............... ...... .
Finance * * ......... ..........••••••
Services ............. ............ .

396

3 9 .0

4 9 .5 0

212

3 V .5

5 2 .0 0 " "
4 6 .0 0

_

-

_

5 4 .5 0
4 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

63

4 0 .5

H 9

3 8 .5

184
78
38
16

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

329
223
153
70
106
56
675

T F f—
261
316
98
21
12
52

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

4 4 .5 0
4 3 .0 0
4 6 .0 0
4 2 .5 0
4 3 .0 0

1
-

4 3 .5 0

-

4 2 .5 0
4 1 .0 0

-

1

4 5 .0 0

-

3 9 .5

4 4 .5 0

_

' 3 9 .5
3 9 .5

4 5 .0 0

-

!
|

-

4 2 .5 0

7

3
3
3
3
3

9
8
8
8
9

.5
.5
.0
.0
.0

4 7 .5 0
4 1 .0 0
4 4 .5 0

-

-

;

-

5
-

3 9 .0 0

_

_

-

-

8 .5
9 .5
0 .0
8 .0

! 4 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 0
; 3 9 .0 0

_
-

16
_

J
1

_

j

119

3 8 .0

3 9 .5 0

31

3 8 .0

4 7 .5 0

48

3 9 .0

AO

4 9 .0

i 3 4 .5 0
3 5 .0 0

-

—
!

3 9 .0

5 2 .0 0

_

j

_

,

-

228
109
88
21

663

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3
3
4
3

4 6 .0 0

-

-

5 0 .0 0

-

-

j

124
290

3 9 .5

5 5 .0 0

-

j

3 8 .5

5 2 .5 0

-

5 8 .5 0

-

_

|
1

| 5 2 .5 0

-

-

i 4 9 .0 0
! 5 4 .0 0

-

-

25

3 7 .5
3 9 .0

2

;

5

1

25
12

;

-

j
<

4
8

!
1

!
|

-

2

i

3
3
49
31
21
10
18
-

9

5
40
18

56
a
41

65
10
10
_

18
-

6
28

55
21

18

19
11

5
3
1

13
107

65
56

74

6

-

-

-

11

|
j
;

4
3

i 102
;

93

!
!

24
69

|

37
45
7

3
4

:

6
j
!

3
5

1

L - j6 - . |
55
1 12

22
22
10
12
_

5
-

9
8
-

i
;

2

1

|

1

_

-

2
-

j
;

7
-

24
12

26

|

9
-

18

-

6

2
-

1
-

5

2

2




_
_

_

-

_
-

-

-

10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

8
-

1
-

-

-

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

_

_

-

_
_

-

,

8

!
j

2

-

-

..

_

-

i

10
9
i
-

1
j

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

70

38

31
22

29
16

j

-

-

!

23

:

17

i

23

43
27
16

34
8

27
-

25
-

-

29
16

i
!

31
26

1

8
-

13
38
-

!
!
1

5
46
-

10

-

11

12

j

3
2

2

2

23
6

7

6

6

2
21

16

9

!

3

3

1

3

:

2
-

:
:

-

-

-

-

"

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

j

_

_

_

_
_

!

_

!
j

_
_

;

13

:

i

13
12
1

3

-

19
2

9
1

27

4

!

i

!

8

2

14
9
2
-

14
13

-

4
7
-

2

2

5

1
------- r — |

_

"

j

-

7

I

1
-

_
-

_

!

_
_

)

_

i

_

1

-

|

-

74
40

7
21

1

_

-

!

51
30

13
22
-

_

i

_

-

i
See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

1
1

69
56

1

_

-

-

_

_

10
-

_

6

_
_

_

j
|

_
_

6

2

5

-

;
i

-

2

11

77

_
_
_

-

2

8

67

_
_

-

2
2
-

2
_

|

_
_

_

2
2
-

5
2

91

6
_

7
-

3
2
_

3
1
1

6

_

9
9
-

|

!
!

!
|

18
18

2
2
-

j

35
27

"

18
|
j

‘

2
22
22

;
;

;

7
7

_

3
1

“

-

9

6
_

_

_

6
6
-

I

-

_

_

5
5
_

j

11
-

-

:

25

;

11
-

_

-

_

l

11

;

_

-

-

!

16

_

_

_

_

-

19
11
11
-

“

_

-

-

_

6

2
-

2

11

-

!

-

-

4
!
!

40
1
-

11

6

4
2

42 _
42

_

1
-

|

2

6

-

11

-

-

-

2

!

_

-

_

2
2

13
6

11
_

1
1

;

-

-

3
2

13
5
-

-

-

5

:

_

2
1

4

43
1
-

!

3
2
_

4
4
-

3

!

13

5

-

8?
82

i
;!
j

54
36

2

5
1

1?
11

21

9
-

!

7
-

9
_

19

13

22

8

11
-

35
9
-

17
10

-

!

_

18

49
40
18

18

15
16
H
13

18
_

7
11

4?
31

i
;

26

*1

14
15
11

14
-

!
i

18

40
29

I

33
33
1

:
i

!
j

19

41

4

!
|

1
|

5

25

4

[

14
2
12

8

5

-

33

!
1
j

4

39
14
13
1

4

2
_

i

-

22
1

-

34
6
-

9
20

u
5

!

!

H
12

!

4 8 .0 0

19
1

1
;

15

13

|

-

5

2

H
14

_

!

-

!

-

;
:
!

o
;

20

i
!
I
!

63

-

11

i

14
12

6
-

-

5 2 .0 0

113

89
77

-

_

3 9 .5

3 8 .5
3 9 .0

12

5

6

3 9 .5

3 9 .5

3
27

-

~
_
— |
—

373

18

7

5

249

104
30

!
;

23
;

25

4
4

16
|

55
28

;

3 9 .0 0

28
19

-

17
11

10
-

-

3
-

17

15
10

-

9
20
15
12
-

-

1

i
_

-

4 0 .5 0
3 9 .0 0

!

11
10

44
29

10
_

53
46
26
20

18

'

11

-

28
-

21
10

—
-

1

_
_

_

_

_

i
I

1
-

2
_
_

-

!

-

1
!
:
:

-

3

!

3
1
_

-

1

-

-

1

4
1
-

1
-

2
-

1
-

2

-

-

l
-

2
-

1
-

1

2

-

-

1

3
-

3

1

•

-

1

4
3
2

6,

T a b l e A- i :

Office. 6ccufuUio*t&> - QontUuted

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Providence, R. I,, by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l 25.Q0 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 j42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5 .0 0 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
e r i g and
a nns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 145.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women - Continued
Stenographers• general ..............
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ...............

Number
o
f
wres
okr

997
54
7.
40
.1
173
423
48
101
39
117
118

39.0
39.5
4 0 .0

39.0
38.5
17.5
39.0
4 0 .0

17.5
39.5

$
43.00
44.00
43.00
46.00
4 2 .0 0

47.50
47.00
36.00
41.00
39.00
a . 00
26.00
40.50
55.50
40.00
49.00
!36.00
!43.00
!37.00

Services .....................
Switchboard operators ...............
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities * .............
Retail trade ..................
Finance * * .................. .
Services .....................

184
34
22
12
150
22
52
30
36

37.5
42.5

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade ..................
Finance ** ...................
Services .....................

435
269
85
184
166
64
41
21
34

41.50
42.00
I43.00
39.0 !41.50
39.0 40.50
39.0 42.00
4 0 .0
39.00
37.0 4 0 .0 0
40.0 39.50

Tabulating-machine operators ....... .
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing .................

95
52
43

39.0
39.5
38.0

46.00
46.50
45.00

Transcribing-machine operators, general .
•
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
F n n » ## ..T_tTtll.1T1II,-7-rr l
1 sfp
i

118
54
19
35
64
36

38.0
38.5

4 1 .0 0

Typists, class A ...................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................ .

150
—
58
39
53
40

Fnlr«
ifn*

_T_ ___ T__ t 1TITIIT1
_
l

Typists, class 8 ............................
Manufacturing ...........................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance * * .......................... .

1/
*
*#

802
~ym—
315

63
424
54
247

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

40.0
39.5
40.0
38.5
4 0 .0

39.5
39.5

4. .0
0

-

5
5

18
18

_
_

_

6

41.00
37.5 !a . 50
38.0 i42.50
36.5 39.00

43.50
'44.00
39.50
40.0 i50.50
38.0 !42.50
38.0 42.00

-

_
-

1
_
1
1

39.0 37.00
393. 3930—
39.5 38.00
4 0 .0
44.50
38.0 35.50
39.5 38.00
37.0 36.00

- j
1

31

-

-

1

31

-

-

-

24

j

101
45

3
12
23
16
52
5
5
_
47
-

< 12

61
31
1
30
30
6
10
9
5

4

4
12
12

41

4
56
3

16
25
: 19
3
; 3
i
! 16
2

; 5
| 9
j 57
| 33
11
22
24
9
! 1
: 10

88 112
285
182 i a
71
145 j 37
53
18
37 i 4
103 ! 47
41
9
L I 5
7 1
26 | 18 ! 7
9 ! 1
20 ! 17
22
3
44 | 6
26 ! 12
9
8 I 4 i 1
1
1 8 ; 4
_
_
18 i 8
8
- i 2
1
7 : _
3
1
3 ! 6
8 ; - 1

i 18
i 9
! 9
! 9
i 9

13 : 21
11
17
11 | 17
- ;
2
4
4
2

163 :105 179
81
40
4&
40 ! 48 ; 74
- |
1 7
98
57
123
6
3
1
2
50
48
51

97

62
59
3
35
18
11

83
54
14
40
29
16
6

65

1
6
11
1
1
_

18
:
;
- j
14 !
4
4

11

1

36 ! _
28
6
22
8

103
62
59
3
41
9
31

50
28
17
11
22
6
16

24
21
12
9
3
2
1

55
30
25
10
5

6
2
_
2
4
1
3

19
11
3
8
8
3

5

2
1

1 31 , 3 i
: 29
3
! 15
14
_
! 2
_
i
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_ 1
_ !
- ; -

4
2

_

3

3
_
_
3
_
3
-

1
i
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1
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2
2

1
2

- :

16
3 ! 2 i
9
4 1 5 i 1 ; 2 1
2
5 1 11
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| _ j 8
1
1
1
j
1 j
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1
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,
1

1

8
5
1
4
3
1

11
9
1
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41
35
5
30
6

11
11
4
7
-

6
1
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5

6

-

5

16
4
1
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12
12

!
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_
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-

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3
2 i 1 ;
3
j
2
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2
3
; 3 i 2

_

_
1

2

_

2

1
_

_

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_

_

_

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1
9
1
9
9 j - |

_

_

_
_

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-

-

-

_

-

_

-

_

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-

-

-

-

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-

-

-

-

j

i

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-

-

-

_

1

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours
Transportation (excluding railroads),communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance,and real estate.




11 _ 1_
_
10
1
_
10
1
2
1
1
2

1

! 19
1 8
! _ i
8 !
11
i 8 ;
!
! 2 !
I
; -

10 !
7

4

!
26 ! 19 i
18
10
15 ; 8
2
3
8
9
8

_
_
_

5

131 1 48 : 33 ! 25
80 , 27 ! 19 i 19
16
20
2
4
60
11 i 17 ! 15
21
51
14 ! 6
13 ; 10 ! 12 i 6
24
! 2 i _
8
1
6
10 ! -

i
4 , 7 1 15 ! 22
9
1 1 3
15 i 4
3 | 4 I 4 , 7 | 5

21
9
_
10
_ ! 10
11
9
3
8
16

39.5

4 0 :0
4 0 .0

126
72
50
22
54

10
13
5
17
_
17
3
9 1 25
4
1
H

8
5
_
_
10
_
10
- ■ 6
- ;
4
_
1 I 11 | 24
11 1 11
_
1
11
10
1
13
6
_
1
4
3
_ 1 _
_
2
- i
_
2
-

42.00

4 0 .0

4

36
6
6
30
2

$
85.00
and
over

7,

Table A-2:

(Average

Pka^eMd&H&l a n d *1ecJutiCol 0CC44fxUiO*U

straight-time wee k l y hours and earnings i / for selected occupations studied on a n
a r e a b a s i s i n P r o v i d e n c e , R. I., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S t a n d a r d )

Men
Draftsmen, c h i e f ......... ......
Manufacturing

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
Under 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50(75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
$

4-2 ,50 -4i»gQ 42*50

60,00 62.50

50.00' 52.50! 55.00 57.50

65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00300.00

and
over

%
19

17"

4 0 .0

84.50

“4
0TT ■E473CT

D r a f t s m e n ........... .
Manufacturing ................
Nonmanufacturing .............
Public utilities * .......

154
T3ST
16

"4^r

61.50

14

4 0 .0

60.50

Draftsmen, Junior ...............

27

4 0 .0

4 0 .0

55.50
'56700”
55.00
57.50

26
26

58.00

66

12

72.00
73.50

39.5

40.0

1/
*

~5T
39

20

40.'C
40.0
39.5

_J4_

13 I 2 6

11

26

34

2

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Manufacturing ......... ......
Durable ...................
Nondurable ...... .

19

1
1 9 j 14
17
34
5
11

12

3

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

T b e a- ! Maintenance and Ptuue*. Plant Occupation4
al 3
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Providence, R. I., by industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance............ .
Manufacturing..........
Durable goods
Nondurable goods .................... .
Nonmanufacturing ..... ................ .....

Number
o
f
wres
okr

10
*3
l
~355—
iia
217

15
*
32

Electricians, maintenance ............. ........
no
....
pnrahlA g r H
n t a ( ,,,,,, iiiitiiiiriti'r-iri
(
VAn^nvtoKIA ctaaH■
•
•
Nonmanufacturing ............. .........
Services ........ .
........... .

m

"155—
163
192

110
11

Engineers, stationary
Manufacturing ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing.... ......... ........ .
Services... ......... .••••••.... ......

212
155
57
22

Firemen, stationary boiler........ •••••...... .
Manufacturing .... .......... ........ .
Durable goods ......... ....... ........ .
Nondurable goods.................. .....
Nonmanufacturing ......................... .

667
510—

See footnote at end of table,




$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
A e a e !%
vrg
h u l 0.85 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 jl.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1 .3 5
ory
e r i g and
anns
under
.90 .95 1 .0 0 i.o5;i.io 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.2511.30 1.35 1 .
1*0
[
1
_
_
2
1 j “
£.66
1
7
—
! T"" —
2
- — r
- 1 —
TT55
_ 1
1.66
1
2
- |
- I
16*
.1
- ! 1
1
1
1.76
5
—
1
5
1.85
1
|
j
|
11
11
5

1 .6 9

T755—
1.62
1*69
1.78
1 .6 1

1.79
1.78
1.81
1.31
112
.*
1 ^ 6 --

123

1 .2 9

387
157

111
.**
119
.*

!
- 1 _
- ! !
- ! *
*
10 30
10 30
10 I 30
-

;
-

.
!

1
!

- j
1
*
j ! ; 1
*

5
- ; 5
5
5
3
5 ! 3

_
8
5
5
3

-

20
11
11
9

_
-

-

7
7
7
.
51*
51 ! -i -|
3 i

1
*

1
*
1
*
61
37
17
20
21*

_
"

86
60
18
12
*
26
-

11 129
27
! 2
1 2 109
6
29
25 131 !58
1 1 12 i 1
;2* H9 |57
1
*
i 1 31 !51

51
|1 6
*

19

-

1
H*
1
*
3

15

2
2
- s2
2
2
2

8*
1
69 83
23 2
1 6 81
*
- 1
69

86 159
13
75 1 *
11
** 85
31
58
11 16
1
5

3

3
3

6
-

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
1 1 0 1 1 5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2.56
.* .*
.*
,and
.*
1 . 1.50 1.60 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2.50 ove*
1*5
_ 6
1
2* i _ l
1
6* 11 51 89 7* 35
1
**
1
*
1
- 6
60
1
9 39 17 83 73 3*
*
3
-r
l
- 17 16 11 27
- 6
5*
1
9 - - - j 1
6 39 30 67 62
7
3
- 6
1
1
1
5
15 1
*
1
*
1
3 | 3
15

10
1

5
18
i :!18

6
6

86
38

1
*
1
*

_ r2-

7

6
31
18
*
2 1 2
69
2
65
1
*
2
1
-

-

- 13
- j“

10 _ 3 J 1
1 1
3
7
2 !- - !_
- J- _

8
L_8__;.
|
i 8 8
5 - , - - - ,i - :-

-

-

1

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

2_
_
_
2
_
•
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8,

Table A-3:

M aintenance and flowed P la n t Occupation* • Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for me n in selected occupations studied on an area
b a s i s i n P r o v i d e n c e , R. I., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

Helpers, trades, maintenance............. .
365
Manufacturing ............................. “2Bo
Durable goods ...........................
88
192
Nondurable goods ............ ............
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
85
pik *r i+- 1^+$ - (Tr(.B1, ,,,,f( x iiairiiriir
iVl l* i.i .
* i
J
70
Machinists, maintenance..... ...................
Manufacturing ....... ......................
Durable goods ............. .............
Nondurable goods ................... .....
Nonmanufacturing ........ .....*.......... .

552
5U2
218
31
2*
10

Maintenance men, general utility ........... ....
Manufactaring.................... .........
Durable goods... ................ .......
Nondurable goods ........ ..... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ...... .....................
P i Ii r n. I"+ p.s
i H > ti i d
t
It
T T r .rTIfTIT1TitIII
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ...........................
.frirfK .... T.ITir T T 1.Ttr....rTIiri , ,t
Stv ri
I t
I

626
509
83
12
*6
117
39
30
30
12

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ................. .
Manufacturing ...................... ...... ........ .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ... ............ ...........
Public utilities - ................. ..............
*
Retail trade ......................................

300
18
282
223
la

Mechanics, m a i n t e n a n c e ... ..... ..............
Manufacturing ............................... ..........
Durable goods ....................... ..............
Nondurable goods ................ ..................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ .................... .

600

T I B ---- " 1 7 6 6 ..:
1.61*
1
107
1 .6 6
!
1*11
82
1.71
1

O i l e r s ........... .................................. .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................ ................
Durable goods ............. ........................
Nondurable goods .I,,,,,,.,,.,,..--*-*.-*****...

132
“ 132

1 1 .6 6
!
|

v.
n
O
o

1

Millwrights ............... .................. ............
Manufacturing ......................... *..............

I
! 1.36
! 1.35
1.33
! 1.35

TIBI
51*
1*27

1 .1*8
“ j 1.1*9
1 .1*8

!

-

~
-

-

!
!
| _
: j ~

1.65
T 7 § “ 1
1.59
1.67

_
.
.

Plumbers, maintenance ........
Manufacturing ............. . ..T, r

, 13

11

bheet-metal workers, maintenance .......................
Manufacturing ............. ....... ....... .

27

i

Tool-and-die makers ......... ...........
Manufacturing

.............. .

1/
*

26
31*0
339

1,72
1.72
1.79
1.79

10

-

3

~

-

-

-

-

-

»

-

-

-

1*5
“T T

76
76

6

-

- 1 12
1*5 - 61*

2 J 10
10

_

!

- 1 10

2

-

-

_

_
_

_

-

_

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

’ j .

! -

-

_

„

~
-

“

“

- ,

-

:

-

-

1

_

-

_

-

1*2

5

■ 18

-

2

i 1*2
-

3
-

12
6

I

7
7

-

-

18
18
2
16

_

6

9
9
-

16
238
1*3: 12

21
21

22 ia
2 2 ; ia

5?
58

1*3
25

1

12

57

1*2
6
36

la
J 39

_

1*3

8
26 " I T
2
1*
_
21*
1*
1*
30

27

2

-

1

1
1
1

6

_

6

_
_

1
1

57
51*

_

8
8
8

-

20

1*6
11

-

6

-

-

1

31*

_
_

„

1

_

7

2
2

1 !
1 !

1* 1 1
1* 10 j
|

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j -----! —_

1

-

1

.

1
1

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-

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-

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-

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-

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-

_
-

_
-

2
2
2
-

1
1
1 | - , _
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_
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! _ ; - ; _
_
_
_
_
; _
_

_
_

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-

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

17

_
_
-

-

; -

-

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„

_

_

-

-

-

1
8
br^ _
1
3 7
_
2 _
- - 6 17

-

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9
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3

28
26

_ !

6

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26 12
23 12
20 8
3 1
*
3 5 12
3 11
3 11
2 i1
_
2 |
i
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19

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1*

:

-

17
_

-

_ I

-

;

-

_
3
- ; _
3
3
-

58

12
1*6

_

i

1
1
-

_
_
_

-

~
_

-

-

;

1

-

-

i

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_

i -

-

-

_
_

i

-

! -

_

13

1
1
1

$
$
J
$
1
$
$
$
$
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2.50
.*
- and
2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 1 0 2 5 | over
.* .o

_

_

-

“

5o
31*

2

3°;

12

18

260
22

13
13

-

18

~ w r
2$l

-

211*
211*
6
208

18

7
7
7

6
2
2

3
3
3
-

-

“

-

11*
; 11 *
i 11 *

-

-

-

„

3

-

“

-

-

-

6

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




10

_

_

-

_

tr. _
_

_

-

3

178
: 171*
: 52
; 122

!
!

1.1*9
; i.ia

! 1.59
j i, 6 l

-

6

Pipe fitters, maintenance ....................... ......
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................ ...........
Durable g o o d s ....... . .............. ........ .
Nondurable g o o d s ....... t
T
t.........

27

-

-

_

_

163
T35
30

-

-

Painters, maintenance ........................ ........ ..
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................
Durable goods .............. ....... ...............
Nondurable goods ....................... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ........ .............. .

106

H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
%
$
|
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae $
vrg
h u l 0.85
ory
.* .*
e r i g and 0.9010.95 1.00|1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 1 0 1 1 5 i.5o 1.60 1.70 1.80
anns
under
.90 .95 l.oo 1 .0 5 l.io 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 1 0 1 1 5 i.5o 1.60 1.70 1,80 1.90
.* .*
1
$
10
1° 3*
1.38
1
7 32 18 2* 75 66
5 , 2
1
67
7
7
- I 7 32
- ! 2
10 ; 1.38
7 | 31 l* 23 30 62
17
*
l
7 7
- - ; 2
1
1 20 32
1
*
1.35
9
1 1*
* 1
- i 3 18
10 : 3 22 13 22 10 30
17
*
1.39
7 7
2 ! 3 2
110
.*
1
20
1 15
3
*
1
*
1
*
1 15
2
l.Wi
1
1
*
17
*
I
.
28 16 1 * 186 1 1
2 * 1*
1.65
1
13
- | 28 13 l * 1 1 122 l *
- 1.65
l
l3 8*
- 1 - 1 - ! 15
1
1.71
19 71! 81
“
- ! 13 ! 13 1 1 113 ! ia 13
- , - 1.61
2*
2 2
1.69
- ' - | 3
“ j
118
.*
1
1
1 1 19 2* ! 18 50 57 17 77 ! 15 100 85 53 32
*
*
118
.*
10 21 ! 16 38 j k7 17 73 ! 15
*
*
67 6o 39 32
- 1 - !
- i
1.38
1 ! 6 18 1 ^ 3*
20
1
3 1
- ' ~
10 20 ! 10 20 17 13 73 , 15
S 1.50
*
17| 57 38 32
*
*
- j i
2 12 10
118
.*
1
1 ; 9 3
33 25 1 *
1
*
; 6
8 25
1.56
_
_
_
_
_
_
10
I 7 1
1.53
9
_
_ 1 :
2 2
2
2
1.U2
10
i
*
1
*
*
_
1
1
1.21
10
i
2 32 1 17
1.60
38 i 8? 7* i 1
1 7
*
1
— —
-! -1 _ : -; 5 l
2
2
15*
.1
7
- 25 15
1.60
38 ! 82 ! 73
1
7 *
_
- 1.62
36 62 73
1
15 3*
1
118
.*
2
2 20 7 - : ■
- 10
- 12
- 3 10
1.66 ; *
5 18
57 303 62 77

1
1
2
2

|

-

-

1*8
1*8

1

-

_
-

! -

2
1*
2 ! 1*

3
17

_ I _

_

2

h

-

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

_

-

-

_
! _
[ ----- !
-

! -

-

_

3 5 1 23

_

32
32
9

1 1 5 i 58
115

58

“

i *

1
”

13 | 22

1 1
2

„

1 ”

— I—

?

9

l -

_

20
20 [

1*7

! -

! 52
52

2 2

-

|

1

|

1

ib
jll*

\ ~ Z ~ ~ r~-"- ! -

12

1~

1
2

!

: 3
■ 3

9.

T b e aal v

Gudtodial, WaleJuuUiny, and S/Upfunf OecMfuUioni

(Average h o u r l y earnings
basis

1/ for selected occupations 2 / s t udied on a n area

i n P r o v i d e n c e , B.

I., b y

industry division,

D e c e m b e r 1 9 51)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ...

bj

Guards .....................................
Manufacturing .............................

190
111*
1+8
66
76

Nondurable goods ......... ..............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ........ .
Manufacturing ............... .............
Durable goods ............ ..............
Nondurable goods ...... .................
Nonmanufacturing.......... .............. ..
Public utilities * ......................
Wholesale trade .........................
Betail trade ...........................
Finance ** .................... ........
Services ..............................

1,579
I7o88
515
573
19
+1
67
52
19 I
+

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ..........
Manufacturing....... .............. .......
Durable goods ....................... .
Nondurable goods ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing ..........................

296

Order fillers ...............................
Manufacturing ................. ...........
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods .................. .....
Konmanufacturing............... .
Wholesale trade .........................
Packers (men) ............ .......... .
Manufacturing ........ .....................
Durable goods ......... ....... .........
Nondurable goods ............. ..........
Nonmanufacturing .................. ........
Wholesale trade ............ .............
Packers (women) ....................... .
Manufacturing...... ............... .......
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ...... ........... ......

126

52
95
6+
1
31
201
332
21
0+
103
101
128
118

6+
15
“ 588--

300
288
57
il
+
L.168
l,037
715
322

Beceiving clerks ............ .................
Manufacturing.............................
Durable goods ... .......... .............
Nondurable goods... .....................
Nonmanufacturing ................. ..........
Wholesale trade ...... ...................
Betail trade ...........................

27 I
+
I78 --

Shipping clerks ..................... ........
Manufacturing ......... ...................
Durable goods ........ ..................
Nondurable goods... .....................
Nonmanufacturing ................... .......
Wholesale trade ... ............... ......

512
"T36211

See footnotes a t e n d of table.
*
T ransportation (excluding railroads),
**

Finance,

999958 0

-




insurance,

52 - 2

an d real estate.

73
105
96
33
62

225

comnunication,

76

60

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
!
$
$
Aeae
vrg
h u l Undeijo.7 5 0 .8 0 j . 85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1 . 1 1 5 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 I.8 0 1 .9 0 '2 . !2 . ;2 .2 0 2 .3 0
ory
1+0 . +
o
00
10
erig
anns
*
!- j- 1 i'
0 7 5 .80 ! .85 I .90 .95 11.00 1 .0 5 1 ,1 0 1,15 1 ,2 0 1 ,2 5 11.30 1,35 l l o 1 1 5 1 ,5 0 1 .6 0 1,70 1 ,8 0 1 ,9 0 2 .0 0 ,2 .1 0 2 , '2 3 ' 2 .
.*
.+! ,+
20 . 0
1+0
1
i
$
2
26
1.
1+1
5
3
5
6
1 -i
1
1. +
11
1
+: 2
1
+ 28 [ 10
8
3
3 28
5 16
5: 51+ 19
_
_j
_ _
1 .2 2
2
1
+
1
10
1
+
1
+ 28
3
3+ 18 \ k ! 2
1
1
3
k: 2
+
2 1 1
1 .1 2
18
2
10
2
21+
2
1
+
26 j 10
1.29
1
1
5
1
1 03
21+ i ^
16
20
1 .1 2
1 .1 6
1 .1 0
1 .2 1

1.05
1.
1+0
1 .0 5

.96
1.12
.78
.99
1.05
.99
1.18
.97

11
++

11
++
_
16

28
_
-:

10
1.17
1.21
.99
113
.+
1.10
10
1.13
2
1.20
1.2b " 1 .2 7
1.12
2
1.17
1.21
,9b

.95
.88
1.10
1.31
110
.+
1.22
1.53
11+
.1
1.33
1.05
115
.+
117
.+
1.35
1.57
1.33
1.37

3^

32

20
20

6
6

11+
1
.
13
-

-

5
5
1
+

i
+
1
+
-

26

_
_

20

1
5
7
6
6
1
15
15
15
-

20
51
20 : 51

-

1
20
50
-; -

58 7^ 273 126 130 157 191+
32 1 32 170
79 118 120 171+
22 i 10 160
73 22
25 63
22
20
10
10
6
96 95 111
12 37 20
30 26 i ^2 103
1+7
_
2
1 !
+
1
8: 6
6
61 6
7
3
7
2 10 j
20 j 6 ' 33
50 13
3
_
2 ! 28 i
6 i 3 39 27
1
+
1
+
6; 5
-!
75
15
+
25

35
19
19
16

57 102
1 ! 6
+
1
+
-! 6
53 96

13 17
11 8
25
1I 8
25
6 12 ! 9
6 12
9
1
51 21 2+
51 20 21
9 20 j 21
_
12
+
1
3
1
-. 31

16

7
7
_
9

10
+
19
19
2i

52 ! 20
30 20
20 1
10 1 20
22 1

22 !
1
+
_
1
+
2

*
19
13
3
10
6
-

9
9
9
_
16

3
3
.
13
13

- 1 10
- 10
*
_
8
- ' - j 8 ; 7 1 *
_
_
_ 1 _
- : - ; - j “

3
3
3

18
18

12

6
12
-

-

7
7
7

12 1
+
-1
12
+
12
+

_
-

-

16

Occupational W a g e Survey,
and other public utilities.

Providence,

B ureau of Labor Statistics

B.

12

11+

V
5
_
9
9

98

25
21

32!

52!
11+
12
-I
-i
2i

1
_!
1
-! 1
12
-

6
6
6
-

9
9

-

3 ;
3

32
_ 53
3 1 12
3 ! 12

j

-| 2

+
15 56 ! 9
12 j 53 39
2 j 31 i 27
10 22 ! 12 i
3 i
3 !

I., D e c e m b e r

9
33
18
5
13

3 1 10 j 15
3 ! 10 i 15

10

_
-

-

-

-

1
+
1
+
1
+
-

7

9

2
2

12
11
b
k \ 11
j

-

23!

-

23

-

5
—
51
3i
2
-!

_,
123
123
- i -1
-1 25 j
123 |

26
1 5 ! 26 j 15
22
8
9
22 i
1
6! 6 \ 6
2
8 16
6
1
+
3 j 18
8
1
+
1
6
9

10
2

2
8 10
|
6 i 101
2j _
-i

25
25 i

13
13
1
12

13

23

84

6 1 0 3 !170
i
3 103! sm
1 90 : 7 6 :
2 1 3 ; 88
6
3
6;
3

97

13
13

1 2 ;I83
+1
50 ioi+! 11
5! 8I
11
132 1 1 170 39 85
+5
5;
+
292 136 39 85
11
132 !
5 j i
1
+
- 023 3U
*
_ : 9
[ 9
_ 25
21+ 20
1
- 16
i 1 20
+
- 16
1 j 20
+
- ; _
1 20 ; _
9
9 1 _
9
_
.
1 H+j j 9
9
- | 9
_ 1 2 11 21+ 17 22 38 j
3
_
_ 11 18
1
1 20 38l
j l
- 11 18
1 ; _ 28
! - 20 ! 10 !
2- 2
6
16: 2 i - |
_
6
j 9
- |

1 ! 1 1 182
+

70 11+1
58 111+
35
23 111+
12 27
3 13
3
2
6
_ 12
-

9
S
T
2
1
+
3
1
1
1

11
++
11
++
11
++
12
12 j
12
-:
_; _j
-!
-; -; -

_
7
7.
18
18
l+
l
1
+
-;

18 ! 5
__ _-ili
18 ! 5
8;
6; 1
7t
12
1
+
1
9
-! 7!
2
; -; _ 79
11
79
11
! 6 ! - 54
5 i - 25
-j i
1
:
,

-

1951
U.S. D E P A B T M E N T OF

-

-j
-!
-:

-

2

ll
- 11
- 11
- 2 _
_ _
-( 2 _
-

_
_ _
- -i - - _
- - - -i _j _
- - - -

i

2

-j
2
-j
_
_
_!
_
2
-

_ | _
- I -

1 6 : 29 3^
+
1 6 16 131
+
18
8

3
3

16

3

-!
-:

13
13|
3
-

13

;
_
;
_
i -

.
- !
; !
_
_
i 2
!
2
2
1 _
1
; “
1
1
_
_
_
-

11 ! 10
35 | n 10
-; 35 11 10
- -| -

38

1

-

15
11
i+ ! 11
i
- ; 1
:

11+
1
1

_
.
-

_
_
_
.
_
-

! _
_
: 1

_
_
-

' ; ; - ;
- ;
_
- !
_
J 1+ i
1
1
1 1+
i -

.
_
-

10 | l!+ ! -

-

- ! -

-

-

-

LABOB

10,

Table

A-k: C u s to d ia l, W a te U o itlU u }, a n d S U ip fU w f O ccu p a tio n ^ - C o n tin u e d
(Average hourly earnings i f for selected occupations 2 / studied on a n area
basis in Providence, R. I., b y industry division, December 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G

Occupation and industry division

Shipping-and-receiving clerks .... ............ .
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods... ........ ...............
Nondurable goods ........ ................
Nonmanufacturing........ ..................
Wholesale trade ...........
Retail trade... ........ ........... .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................
Manufacturing ................. ............
Durable goods ........ ..................
Nondurable goods ............. ............
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Wholesale trade .......... ...............
Retail trade ........... ....... .........
Truck drivers, light (ti d r 1^ tons) ...... ......
ne
Manufacturing .................. ..... .
Nonmanufacturing.......... ............ .
Retail trade .......... ......... ...... .

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
er i g Under0.75 0 .8 0 O.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1.10
anns
$
,1
0.75 .80 .85 .90 .9 5 1,00 1 ,0 5 1 * 0 1.15
1
_i
2 23
24 49
1 .2 7
455
1 .2 7
2 22
12 33
3^3
-j - 22
192
1 .1 8
2 10
- 22
-j 12 11
1 .3 8
171
_
92
1 .2 8
12 16
1
_
_ 12 6
52
1 .2 8
___
1
1 .1 8
10
32
82 63 112
2,472
1 .2 5
3 19 43 78
67 166
1,646 ' 1.28
6 47 38 39 133
5
3
1.22
6 13 127
625
3 ! 6 17
5
- 30 32 26
1,021
1.32
6
826
16
74 28 33
1.19
3 19 38 75 ! 1 6
_
1.45
159
i
6 52 27 31
294
1.24
2
1
1.03
373
3 19 38 75 76 10 22
_ 17
_
_
60
2
1
1.19
-:
-, -i
- 5B“ 1.26
2
- 15
1i
2
32
1.13
_
_ ! 1 _ _ _ 15 2
1.02
20

Truck drivers, medium (li to and including 4 tons) .
..
Manufacturing........ ...... ....... .......
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing............. .............
Public utilities * ....... ...............
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ............... ............

613
2 S1 "

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) .....
Manufacturing ........ ............. ..... .
Nonmanufacturing................ ..........
Public utilities * ........... ........... .

294

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer tvoe) ..............................
Manufacturing.................... .........
Nonmanufacturing... ...... .................
Public utilities * .......................
Wholesale trade ............. ............
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ... ................ .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ .............
Durable goods .......... ...............
Nondurable goods ........ ................
Nonmanufacturing ................. .............
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ................
Manufacturing ............... .........................

Vatetawa ....................................
Manufacturing ...................... t..................
Durable goods ........................ .............
Nondurable goods ......................... ........
Nonmanufacturing .......................... T
Retail t r a d e ..... ................... t . f
.
Finance * * ............ ...........................
Services ........... ....... ...................... .

68
213
332
59
137
108
47
247
214
432
33
399
45

197

1.32
1.3^
1.14
1.40
1.30
1.49
1.36
1.11
1.51
1.42
1.53
1.47
1.46
1.48
1.46
1.47
1.43

_

39

if

-

-

-

-

-

-

-i
_'
-

-i
39 29
_1
9
30 28

_

.i
_
_

_

-

_

-

_
_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

-

4o
4o
30
10

_
-

_
_
_

9

9
9
_
_

82

82
823
! 678
284
394
145
42
29
15

96
79
79

-

17
17
206
195
121

74
11
10

18
12
6

2

21

_

_

2
2
-

_

_j
! _

1.18
1.21
1.10
1.29

6 L-3L.i.11 ! 23
22
9 ! 11
9
- 22

3
3
3
3
3
-i -j 18 ! 15
; _
*;
18 1 5 ! j _I

1 .0 6

6

_

11
12 10 I 12
4
9 ! 4

83

75
75

21
6
6

1

3

26
14

6
4

9
6

43
40

4
2

6
_

5
5

1
-

2
2

_

14
12

4
2
2

6
3
-

4o
3

2
2

_
6
6

5

1

2

_
_

90

13

18
11

_
_

_
_

22

I
'
1
425
373
159 249 358
3 40
85
74 246 318
266 105 15
8 96 11
150
108

5
5
-

k

81
34
47
9
9

13
12
1

17

n

.
17
14
•
3
J

7
2
5

i

9
1
1
-

7
7

6
6

47

34

156

47 47
i t i 2 1 1
3
24 i 38 ! 21 ! ^5 46
- ! 75 i 8
| 109
j
50
i
6| ; 59
48 ! 2
11
11

; 18
-:
- 18
_
_
i 18

6

52
!T
”
5 15 ; 46
_| _!
i
5 15 46
1
12 ! 34
9
9 ; 12 1 34
9 1 12 : 3^
i
!

1 18 227
; 13 10
i 5 217
214

-I
_j _

_

7
7

6
6
12
12
12
_

12

_

2

8
5
3

i
2

23
12
2
10
11
1
£

21

2

1?

1
1

19
19

13 I
13

87

25
20

2
2

16
71
16 i 41
! 30
5 j 16
*3

5

_

_

1
1

_

-

I
_i

8
_
_
_
_
_|
8 I
5
3
3
j
!

_ |
_

56
17

10
10

2
2

-

-

17
39

10

2

_

_

0

-!

-

- | | ”

_

_

_ 1

5

1

3°

5

1
1

k

1
0
!1

12 j

17

206

41

12 162
5
3
1
k
1

49
20
13
7
29

68

9°
88
15
73
2

67

46
rrr
22

12
CB

]

_
_

l
j - 1 _

- 1 _

- i -

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

I 25
25 i

i
I
1

2

_
-

_
-

_
2

_

_!

_
_

_
_
-

_

1

_
-

-

11

1

5

*
-

-

■
-

-

-

I

-

-

-

24

1

2

_
_

_

_
_
_

30

13
13

16

—

_
_

i

30

5

_i

i

30

39 i 54
21 166 11
2 15 — r
! 2
5
39 ! 52 19 151
1
; 5
20 : 19
1
39 32
"
1
j
21 30 h 21 311 1
- —
1
7 27
3 31
.
3i!
1
7 27 ! 3
14
3 18

10
10

11 6
. i 6'
_! 6
1|

2

i

_
_

12

6

24
24
11
13
-

27 125
27 ; 50

15

10

.94

20 108
20 92
10 58
10 34
- 16
_ 14
2
221 114
221 101
117 48
104 53
- 33
! 1
1 12
_
2
2

1

1.32
1.32

.89

1
1 ,2 0 1 ,2 5 1,30 i.y> 1,40 1.45 1.50 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 |2.20 2 30; 2.40
.
1 --

.
_

_

H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
i
$
I
$
.
1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1.90 2 .0 0 2 10! 2.20j 2 .3 0

10
; 10

1 .0 8

S T R A IG H T -T IM E

$

_
_

183
1.37
— 3S5— 1.35
98 ! 1.35
48 | 1.36
1.46
37

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night vork,
Study limited to m e n vorkers except vhere otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, Insurance, and real estate.




29

-

1

2/
*
**

$

Number
o
f
wres
okr

i
j

5

-

-

-

-

u

B:

.

Characteristic Industry O ccupations

Table B 68t SAecbutfUatUu}, PlaUn^,and PolutdHfi/
-3U

1/

The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating, and metal polishing (Group 34-68) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifi­

cation Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
All occupations were predominantly paid on a time basis.

M acltineny HwAuA&UeA 1/

Table B-35:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

Occupation and sex

A verage
h o u rly
e arnin gs

2/

Machinery (except Machine Tools)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 . c 2 . c 2.6C 2.7C2.80 2.90 3.00
5
4

and.
unaei

and

1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1,90 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2.30 2 .4^ 2 .5 0 2.60 2.7C 2.8C2.90 3.00

over

3/

Men
Assemblers, class A 4 / ..................................
a
Assemblers, class B 4 / a ..................................................................................................
Assemblers, class C 4 /b .................................... ......................................... ...................
Electricians, maintenance 4 /a ....................................... ......................................
Inspectors, class A £/a .................................................................................................
Inspectors, class B 4 /a ....................... ...................................... ...................................
Inspectors, class C 4 A
............. ...... ............. .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4 / & ...... ............

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £/:
T o t a l .....................................
T i m e .................... ..............
Incentive .............................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A 4 /b ............... ....... ....... .
Engine-lathe operators, class A 4 / a .................
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4/a ......... .
Milling-machine operators, class A 4 / a ............................... . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including h a n d screw
machine), class A :
Total ..........................
Time ........................
Incentive ....... ...........

70
321
171
41
42
60
139
103

$
9
1.56
1.42
1.35
1.61

-

1

_

_

_

-

1 .6 2

_
-

-

_

34

394
34
1.
80

1.63
1.61
1.71

28
45
86
51

1.49
1.65
1.66

84
62
22

1.64

5
32
_

_

_

_

_

_

22

64
17

_

3

33
9

_

_

1.50
1.25
1.10

3
4
3 ! 2

12

12
6

34
35
3
1
1
10
8

_
“

_

j
j

3
5
30
1

63
17
1
1
6
6

_

i
1

_

_

_

6

5
2

1

4
1

4
1

5

27
21
5
1
2
4

13
42
22
4
12
25
3

3
26
5
22
8
13

12
10
2

11/ 1/7
15 91 136
9
23 11
2/

_

_

-

_

;

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

4

1
1

1.61
|

_

9
6
2
1
9

6
3

5

1

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

”

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

7

37

-*-4 -

c
0

2

7

1
2

7

1
1

1

4

11
13

•a

1

•a
J
6

2

_

9
6

14

1

7
0

3

7
0

1

3
3
2

6
17

6
10
/l
4 -*-

16

11

6 19
12
42

7

45
/o
4*£

3 1

1

il

i
1
i
_
_

_

j

_

_

!

_

1
i

j
_

1

-

8
9
5
8

XX ij.

2/

_

1.67

1.73

10
28
6
1
3
6
14

J

7
_

_

34
25

_

1
_ i

rt
1
i

4
2

6

2

6

_

_

_

_

j
_

_

i
“

j
See f o otnotes at end of table.




Occupational Wage Survey,

Providence,

R.

I., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1
B.S.

DE P A R T M E N T OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

12,

MaclUn&uf OnSuA&UeA 1/ - Continued

Table B-35:

Occupation and sex

o
f

NUMBER OF WORKERS
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
h u l 0 9 > 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1 .4 5
ory . f
under
o/
2/ Z 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0

RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2.60 2.70 2.80 2 ,9 0 3.00
and
1 .6 0 1.70 1 .8 0 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.40 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2.70 2.80 2.90 3 .0 0 over

Machinery (exceot Machine Tools) 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B $J : Total ....... ....... .............

%

1.52

127
70
57

1.49
1.41
1.69

-

-

-

1.50

106

Incentive .....................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B lj& .......
Engine-lathe operators, class B iJb ........ .
Grinding-machine operators, class B ija .........
Milling-machine operators,

603
350
253
13
65
128

1 .4 0

1.69
1.43
1.52
1 .5 6

_
-

-

A
4

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C j /1 Total ................ .
S
Time ................................
Incentive .......... ...........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class Cj Total ................ ....
Time .......................
Incentive ......... .....
Grinding-machine operators, class C Ua. .........
Milling-machine operators, class C y b ..........
Machine-tool operators, toolroom jj* ...... ........
Machinists, production jja. •....... ..............
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ija........... .
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) 4/a .•
Tool-end-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ya. ....
Welders, hand, class A ija.......................

74
32

A

-

-

_

_

1

1 .4 0

_
_
_

12
12

139
116
51

-

14
-

10

11
1
A
20

5
12

18

4

4

A

27

9

5
3

2

5

3

3

9
5
4

15

2

5

x

15

2

5

x

11

5

2

_

-

_

_

_

11

5
6

9

9

5

1

_

_

1
1

5

13
j
2
3 i - j 2
i „
- i 2
2 ! 3
8 j 2 i 1 , 1
7 ; 3
2
11 1 14
8
1
_
14 i 15 49

_

_

1

_

_

!

_

1

2

15

1

_

_

2

5

23
3

10

68
A

21
11

9

A

8
5

24 1 10 27
7 i 25
23
1
3 i 2
12
8 ! 3
7 ! 11 ; 1
1 _
5
6 : 5
3
8 ! 19
-

6

1

6
1
! 1

-

-

18

7

14

3

X

1 4
: 5
1 3

1
1
11

3

_

1

2

-

26

62

9

56
j -

24

2

5

35
28
7

;23

41

7

32

-

4

2

1

33

4

18

72

-

18

22

17

10

26

33
30

26

3 ! A
3 i A
2
7

24

4

_
«
_

11
1 10
1

5
x

45

14

5
X

7

58
14
44

16
12
4

11
7

6

- | - 12
_
_ 12 1 _
_
_
_
- ; 1
- ' - ; 6

54

27
17

20
2

50
30
5
9
14

3
_

1.31

100
166

14
14

80

80

3

101

60

3
3

2
2

A |*
17 \ 7

91

3

_

1 .2 6

1

53
33

4

1.56

“ i

61
22
1

13
13
_

_

I

1.39

1.44
1.34
1.49
1.55
1.61
1.19
1.83
1.78
1.60

3
4

83

57
3
3

_

-

330
235
95
73
28
43

1

60

1

1.61

1 .3 2

28
24
4
-

23
23

1

-

-

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
Time
Incentive ••••••

1

3
9

A

-

\ 2

6
8

4

55
7

4
10

x
5

2

7 11 S 54
_ j 21 ! 30
18
8 : 6

1 1

n

1

i

i

,

1

!
_

_

;

_

_

-

_

8

_

7

1

_
_

_

_

6 i3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
i_

_

1 _ ! _
1 _ i

4

»

* ! _ j „

_

.

j 31

— 1

_

_

_
_
_
j_ |_ !
«
_ i _ !_ i_ j _ ; _
1
i_
7 ! 4
_

1
1

i

1

57
2

j ~

3

Women
Machine-tool operators, production, class C ija. •....
Inspectors, class C ija. ........................ .

13
12

1.28
1.25

1

-

I -

- i 2
- ; - j A j “

A
A

3
! 3 | i

1

Machine-tool Accessories
Men
TnppA k v f j elana B 4 /h t..T.ttTTTtTtrT................
rfrl
Inspectors, class C ija. .................... .....
Janitors, porters, « > e l r r - * i r r “r*-TT***-**
rn
Machine-tool operators, production, class A lja.t */ ...
>
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4 /a.........
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4 /b, j / ...
j
Engine-lathe operators, class B i j b ............
Grinding-^nachine operators, class B U b .... .....
Milling-machine operators, class B y b .......
Machine-tool operators, production, class G 4 / $/ .
a,
..
Anv_w ^no
/_w»
oqq P //
. o
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) ija .
.

i
16
10

1.49
1.36

23
49
30

1 .1 0

i
j ”

_
1

4

10

18
76
24
28

1.69
1.69
1.48
1.40
1.54
1.39
1.25

- ;
- ! - 1 - 1
- j - 1 - j - 1 - !

1 .2 5

18
139

1.56
1.83

_ 1
-

10

1 .2 3

-

124

\

_ ; 1
1
x

5

-

-

a

1

7
-

A

-

1

See footnotes at end of table




x

9

_
3
- I -

2

_
-

-

-

A

: -

3
1

_
20
2
12
A
1

_

1
7
9 23
_
9 13 ! 2
2
1
9 25
- i 1 i - ! 1
7 24 i - ! 1
1
: 1
- | 1

-

A

1

7

„

5 ! _
3 _
_
3 ' _
3 _
_
1 i 1
2
- !1 - ; 1 i 2
1
_
2 i 2
: 1
_
_ J
i J - j
- -

_ | _
_ |
|
7 ! A
54 ! 11 i 31 i 8 ! 7 1 6

11

_

_
_ i_
1
_
_
_
1
_
-

_
j_
'- !_
_
1 _
_
1 _
;_
“
_
;!
"
_
_ 1
- ;-

_
_
3 1 -

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
-

_
_
- j-

_
_

_
_
_

_

1
1

i
-

10

3

_ i 1
_
- 1 !20
15
1
2
- 1 - ! 7
2
- n : 2
9
10 ! *
1
9
A ! 3

A
2

3

3

1

1
8 ; 1
x
x
1 1
1 - 1 _
- ; - : i -

Women
Inspectors, class C jja.

2

2
1 ^
3

3 | ~

i_
!

i

i

J_

_

_

_

j

!

_

J_

__

~

_

_

13,

Table B-3$r

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

M o c l t i m t o f

!}n d u & t s U e d

y

-

Q o 4 t t i 4 U 4 e d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING !TRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
S
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae $
vrg
2.5cj$
2.6q!.70 1.80 1.90 1.00
h u l 3.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1.35 i.40 i.4 5 i.5 0 f.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 1.00 1.10 2 .2 0 2.30 2.4C $
ory
e r i g and
anns
1
under
i
2/ 1.00 1.05 1.10 jl.15 1.20 1 .25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.0012.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.702.80 2.90 3.00 !
over
1
1
--- 1 --

|

Textile Machinery

j
m

1
j
%

Assemblers, class B 4 /b .........................
Assemblers, class C A /b....... .
Electricians, maintenance y & ...................
Inspectors, class B 4 / a ........... .

132
121
21
18

1.53
1.36
1.58
1.59

-

-

1
3
-

1
2
-

4 25
~ ,

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

“

“

“

-

-

114
19

1.69
1.71

_

25

1.71

-

290
100
190
39

-

24
44

1.60
1.36
1.72
1.58
1.57
1.38
1.67

_

-

- 1 - ; l ~
-

51
21
30

1.54
1.30
1.71

-

-

-

- j -

-

-

-

~

-

Machine-tool operators, production, class C A/&, ^/ ...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C: Total... ................
Time .....................................................................
Incentive............. .. .............................. ...
Grinding-machine operators, class G j b. ..................... . « • •
J

224

1.45

_

_

8

Machine-tool operators, tool room a A . . • • • • • • ..........................
Tool-and-die makers A A .................................................................... ........................

Machine-tool operators, production, class A A/b, y ...
Milling-machine operators, class A A /b......
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A ijh .................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B y x Total..........................
Time ................ .........
Incentive.... .................
Engine-lathe operators, class B (J'b............
Milling-machine operators, class B: Total ......
Time .......
Incentive .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B: Total ..............
Time .......... ..
Incentive .........

68

82
54

-

-

12

-

26
3

_
-

12 ! 35
16 , 9
- i -

-

2
-

13
1

1

-

-

2

7

2° ;
25 i 23 S 31
, 18 21 ! 6 24
17
7
! 2
4
6
! 4
1
3
10
10
! 6
9 i
6
9 : 3 ; 6
- 1 1
6
4

15 13
9
15
4
3 I - , -

2

31 20 1 44 1 22
3 ; - ! 4 1 28 20 | 40 ; 22
8
2
4
2
7
4 ' 14

25
25
7
5

17
17
1
1

6 j ~ 1 *

13

4

14 | 2
1
li
5

5
2

_
-

-

! -

i

“

“

~

-

“

2

4

5

H

5

20

28

9

3

6°

13

13 : 7

8

_
-

-

- i _
-

-

2

25

- 1 - ! -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

“

-

•

2

3

1

8

_

_

_

_

_

_

26 j 6
24
2
6

115

:

1

-

'

-

1

2

•

3

8

1 1
3

2 : 3

-

_

1

2

;

4
3

1

7

8
4

i

~

2
j
i

1 1

5
13

1

-

-

1

-

—

~

!

- j
j

1

_
12

_

!

,

_

!

-

1

-

!

-

-

_

|

-

j

-

|

-

-

[
!

-

-

.

1

1

J

-

_

_

_

1
_

_

3 !

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in nonelectrical machinery industries, except the machine-tool industry (Group 35, except 3541) as defined in the Standard
Industrial Classification Manual (194.5 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the Budgetj machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 354-3) with more than 7 workers were included.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for machine-tool accessories (Group 3543) and for textile machinery (Group 3552) for which separate data are presented.
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a)
All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine-tools in addition to those shown separately.

y
U
y




_

_

-

-

"

;

-1

-

1

_

; 5

2

-

1
______ i
.______ l

y

-

2 ; - < -:- 1
2
- -

2
2

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
_

1

5

16 ! 6
3
3 ■ 4 1 1 ! 3
3 ; 4

i

|

_
_ | - j - 1 - j - , ; “
- -

-

7
4

-

1.76

6 I 1 ! 1

14
-

8

-

_

3
3

-

12

1.57

5
6 ! -

13

3

12

27
37

_ '_
-

-

-

1.39

51 _
1 ; -

1

-

1.44

- ; “

1

12

-

25

8
5 i 1
6 ! 6
- 1 5 i 2 ! 3
- i 1
“ ! - j “

27
2

27
6

-

-

~

18
5
16
9

16
H
9

3

1.26

;

7
4

2
-

1.32

28

16
3
1

_

H.

Table B - 3 9 6 l ;

G&ituMve

l
!

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
Aeae
vrg
h u l Under 0.75
ory
erig
anns
0.75

.80

iD , C
.
C
O
J
O
C1

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and sex

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

1/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50
and
.90 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 over

Men
125

1 .93
1.29

86

1 .1 1

68

_

_
4

14
18

27

26

6
6

2
10

2

8

13

6
2

3

5

14

12

24
18
g
Q

2

8
8

12
12

31
25

13

28

25
14
6

8
6

-

14

-

6

I.5 7
425
296
129
226
135
70
95
59
17
36

Polishers and buffers, metal: Total ...... ........
Time .............
Incentive ...........
pr\1 * c i n V DnH V iffin f T o no nporc fnr c ^ / iiii ii ii
1 >l |
n
|_n
o
Punch-press operators, class B 3/a ................
Solderers, class A 3 / a ...... T ................. .
Solderers, class B 3 / a ...................... .
Working foremen, assembly department 3/a ..........
Working foremen, carding and boxing department 3/a ...
Working foremen, coloring and electroolating 3/a ...

8
10

4
4

18

6

-

-

_

1 .1 1

-

1
-

1 .2 2

1.54
1.37
2.15

-

-

-

5

s

4
-

2

1.32

_
-

4

2

-

_
-

-

4

1.31
1.84
1.24

24

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

110
102
8

17
17
17

9

_

-

6

26
15
3
18
-

6

4

50

12

1
7

4

2

32

15
13

4

18
9
18 1
5
-

-

4

9

_

6

9

_

9

_

4
4

8

12

2

2

14

10
8

7
20

-

18

8
20

2
2

5

22
10
20

8
0

1
2
1

3

-

15

4

77
69

10

24
34
15
-

_

16

2

_
-

1 .4 7

11

4

10

3
7
16

Colorers and electroplaters, class B 3^a ...........
Drop hands 3/a ......................

5

9

3

3

4

6

2
2

-

1

28

6

-

-

1

-

-j

-

-

-

11
2

-j
4!

-

1

-

3

9

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

8

15

_

_

_

-

_

_

8

15

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

12

7

2

-

-

4

2

3
7

2
6

_

4
-

_

_

_

-

14
14

_
-

15
15

2

26

-

8

8

8

-

Women
Assemblers, class C: Total ......... ..............
Tnnnirfi*r
ro
(
Por l T o u r p f r e o r pn r l o o ^ / f
ra'
ro pl* n ^
^rr
n
Foot-press operators, class B:“Total ..............
Timfl T-tT-rr-TTTt.t.
Incentive
P n'V—
ni.i
npAT’lhvs p.lnss
f' r r
Tn+Jil_

742
378
364
1 231
1^157
467
690

1 .0 0

52
59
233

•82
.95
.81
1.05
.94
•91
.96
1.17

21

1 .1 2

64

85
71
14
297
168
124
44

75
44
31
479
|226
i 182
| 44

190
130
60
278
249
139

182
104
78
109
125
15

41

110
12
10
2
12
2

110

50

1.15

111

Incentive .........
Solderers, class B 3 /a ..... .....................
Working foremen, assembly department 3/a ..........
Working foremen, carding and boxing department 3/a ...

_

.92
•85

6
6

1 10

_
-

_

t

_

6

-

-

9

32
12

57

28
5

28

31

2

22

26

10
21
2

27

19

28

3

2

2

42

29

22

30

4

12

17

2

27

42

29

22
1

30

4

17

2
1

27

1
2

2

_

_

_

_

_

35

2

2

11

6

4

2

-

6

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

50
52

4
66

52

66
1

1 OU

2

4

3'

19

3

30

2

2

1

7
22 1 14
12
8
10
6
8
36
2
2

15

45
16
29
36

27

2
2

1
6

1

1

47 !

4

-

6

2

7

1
1 ___
_

i ___
_

12

6 1

-

j 13

2

3

_

1

!

i

_

1
6

A verage

OnAu/UZH&e G&WUeAAs

j

Occupation and sex

of
w o rk e rs

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S t a n d a r d )

(Group 3961) as defined in

1/

W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
27*50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00

%

%

and

under
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62,50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 77.50

Women
%
Clerks, accounting.............. .........
Clerks, file, olass A ........................
Clerks, file, class B ........................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ............
Clerks, underwriter.... ............. .
Key-punch operators ........... .......
Section heads ........................
Stenographers, general ..........................................................................
Tabulating-machine operators . • • • • ..........................
Typist8 , class A ..................................................................................................
Typists, class B .................................................................................................

156
22
106
19
39
58
34
69
9
40
173

37.0
37.5
37.0
38.5
37.5
36.5
37.0
37.0
37.5
38.0
37.0

39.50
43.00
32.50
i 35.50
42.00
38.00
52.50
39.00
44.50
42.00
35.00

8

24

26

24

-

-

-

-

32
-

14
4
4
14

17
6
2
3
2
15'

16
7

6

42
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

13

17

-

-

-

-

12
41

19
1
2
20

-

-

24

41

8

8

-

4
10

3
6
4
6
5
3
6
2
8

20

16
4

15
2

-

-

-

7
5
2
6
2
1
3

8

5
8
2
1
-

14

i

14
4
5
1
1
1

6

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

2

-

-

-

j-

-

“
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

“

"

2

4
4
2
12

2
-

"

~

“

"

1

1/ The study covered insurance carriers
Budget.

2/

(Group 63) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard industrial Classification Manual (19U9 edition) prepared b y the Bureau of the

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees received their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




-

9

2

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

2

N um ber

j

i ___
_

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of medium- and low-priced costume jewelry and costume novelties (except precious metal)
the~Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19^5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3/
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Table B-63:

_

Occupational W a g e Survey, Providence, R. I . , December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15,

C:

(Minimum wage rates

and m a x i m u m straight-time hours per w e e k agreed upon through

between employers and

Table C-15

B u ild in g Go*t&tn,44.cU&n

Table c-205:

Hours
per
week

$2,888
2.250
2.400
2.000
2.850
2.550
1.650

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bkle
aeid

July 1, 1951

Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Working foremen, mixers, ovenmen ........
General h e l p e r s ...................
Bread and cake - Machine s h o p s :
Agreement A:
Mixers, head ovenmen ..................
Jivider operators, head benchraen,
r o l l - o v e n m e n ................... .
Molder operators ......................
Ingredient scalers, mixers'
helpers ........................ ......
Benchmen, head wrappers ...............
Roll-oven helpers ........... .
Flour dumpers ........................
Ovenmen's helpers, molders'
helpers, checkers ...................
Wrappers ......... ......................
Packers ................. ......... .
Agreement B :
Mixers - second class ............. .
Dividers .................. .
Molders ................................ .
Ingredient scalers, mixers'
helpers ......................... .
Flour dumpers ....... .............. .
Molders' helpers, overmen's
helpers, checkers ......... ..........
Wrappers .................... ...........
Pan greasers ...........................
Packers ............................. .
Agreement C:
Working f o r e m e n .......................
Mixer scalers ............ ..............
Mixers
O v e n m e n ............ .............
Divider operators, first
b e n c h m e n .............................




Rates

and hours are

those

Bkle - G m u t d
aeid t t u e

Rate
per
hour

$1,410
1.210

Hours
per
week

40
40

1.540

40

1.440
1.390

40
40

1.340
1.320
1.310
1.290

40
40
40
40

1.290
1.240
1.240

40
40
40

1.540
1.440
1.390

40
40
40

1.340
1.290

40
40

1.290
1.200
1.250
1.240
1.855
1.505
1.455
1.405
1.330

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement C: - Continued
Molders ............ ....................
Wrapping-machine operators,
checkers, pan greasers ............ .
Oven helpers, general
helpers, benchmen, shippingroom helpers .........................
Agreement D:
Mixers (cake) ..........................
Ovenmen .................................
Scalers, fried cake mixers,
icing mixers, fryers, icingand cutting-machine operators ......
Floormen .............................. .
Stock clerks ...........................
Pan greasers, pan washers,
pan papering .........................
Women h e lpers:
First 2 months ......... ............
After 2 m o n t h s .................. .
Agreement E:
Head mixers and scalers ...............
Traveling-ovenmen .....................
Dividers ................................
Head wrapping-machine
operators ............................
Molders ............................... .
First benchmen .........................
Mi x e r s ' helpers .............. .
Ovenmen, roll-ovenmen, ovenmen's
helpers, benchmen ...................
Benchmen's helpers, checkers,
molders' helpers ....................
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
Packers .................................
Pan greasers ........ ....... ......... .

Pie and pastry s h o p s :
C o o k s ........ ...........
Dough mixers ...............................
Bakers .............................. .
Filling mixers, dough breakers,
h e l p e r s ....... ....... .
Women employees:
Beginners ...............................
After 3 months ......... ...............
After 9 months ........................ *

collective bargaining

in effect on dates

indicated.)

Table C-2082:

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

B r i c k l a y e r s ...................................
Carpenters ................... .................
Electricians ........................ .
Painters ................................ .
Plasterers ............................... .
Plumbers ............................... .
Building laborers .............................

trade-unions.

Table c - 2 0 5 :

January 2, 1952

Classification

Union W age Scales

JMfrU, jBdXfrUOAA

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,280

40

1.200

40

1.180

40

1.540
1.465

40
40

1.345
1.245
1.160

40
40

1.130

40
40

Hours
per
week

$1,775
1.763

40
40

1.725
1.713

40
40

1.675
1.650

40
40

1.425
1.550

40
40

40

1.015
1.075

Rate
per
hour

Classification

First m e n ......... ............................
Drivers .................................. .
Maintenance men, wash house men,
kettle men, racking room men,
fermenting room men, cellar men,
platform men ................................
Filler operators, label machine operators ..
Case repairmen, bottle sorters, feeders,
case cleaners, rinser operators, inspec­
tors, case loaders, case stockers,
checkers, material handlers, shippers,
case assemblers, carton assemblers,
utility men, warehousemen .................
Helpers .......................................
Apprentices:
First year .................................
Second y e a r ............ ...................

Table C - 2 7 1

pAdSttifUj,

July 1, 1951
1.640
1.460
1.440

40
40
40

1.410
1.390
1.360
1.340

40
40
40
40

1.310

40

1.290
1.240
1.240
1.190

40
40
40
40

1.330
1.330
1.280

40
40
40

1.230

40

.850
.870
.930

40
40
40

After 12 months ........................
After 18 months ........................

1.000
1.050

40
40

Hebrew baking:
Working foremen ............................
Second hands ..................... ..........

1.956
1.844

45
45

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Book and job shops:
Compositors, hand:
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B ............................
Electrotypers ..............................
Machine operators .........................
Machine tenders (machinists) ............
Photoengravers ................... ........
Press assistants and feeders:
Agreement A:
Cylinder presses ....................
Platen presses ................... .
Agreement B:
All type presses ...................
Pressmen, cylinder (all type presses):
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B .............................
Pressmen, hand fed job presses ...........
Pressmen, platen (all type presses) .....
N ewspapers:
Compositors, hand - day w o r k .......... .
Compositors, hand - night work ..........
Machine operators - day work .............
Machine operators - night work
Machine tenders (machinists) day work .................................
Machine tenders (machinists) night work ...............................

Occupational Wage Survey,

$2,250
2.250
2.400
2.250
2.250
2.560

Hours
per
week

37
36
40
37
37
37

1/2
1/4
1/2
1/2
1/2

1.810
1.810

37 1/2
37 1/2

1.810

36 1/4

2.250
2.190
2.010
2.250

37
36
36
37

1/2
1/4
1/4
1/2

2.547
2.667
2.547
2.667

37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.547

37 1/2

2.667

37 1/2

P r o v i d e n c e , R. I., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LAB O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

Table C-27:

PAsUttituj, ~Continued

Table C-42:

M oto^lPuich 3>bioebd

Table C-6512:

Q ^ lc C BuilcU+lCf, SeSWACe

and aUelp&U - Continued
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Newspapers: - Continued
Photoengravers - day w ork ................
Photoengravers - night work ..............
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k ......
Pressmen, web presses - night work ......
Pressmen-in-charge - day work ...........
Pressmen-in-charge - night w o r k .......
Stereotypers - day work:
Agreement A .............................
Agreement B ................. ...........
Agreement C ........ ........ ....... .
Stereotyper8 - night w o r k ......... .

Hours
per
week

$2,807
2.927
2.485
2.539
2.619
2.672

37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.485
2.435
2.125
2.539

37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

Jlc c o t < lO U d it
1/
Open&tincf CntfUoifeed,

Table C-41:

October 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

1-man cars and busses .................. .

Table C-42:

$1,650

Hours
per
week
40

Classification

Beer:
Brewery:
Agreement A ................ ............
Helpers .............................
Agreement B ........ ........ ........ .
Helpers .............................
Distributor ................................
Helpers .................................
Building construction:
Low-bed equipment ......... ...............
Ready-mix ..................................
Dump truck, heavy .........................
Regular .................................
Department store - Furniture ................
Helpers ................... ................
General - Freight ............................
H e l p e r s ...... ....... ............... ......
Grocery:
Chain store ................................
Helpers .................................
Wholesale ....... ................. ..._____
Helpers .................................
Laundry - After 5 weeks ......................
Helpers ............ .
Milk - Helpers ................................
Newspaper .....................................
Oil:
Agreement A ................................
H e l p e r s .................................
Agreement B ............. .................
Helpers ......................... .......
Agreement C • •............................ .
Railway express .............................

January 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

$1,865

1 .7 0 0
1.763
1.723
1.510
1.400
1.600

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.600
1.450
1.470
1.320
1.470
1.370

40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48

1.470
1.370
1.570
1.470
1.360
1.140
1.062
1.575

48
48
48
48
47
47
40
40

1 .5 0 0

Table c - u 6 s

1951

1.620

1 .5 2 0
1.620
1.420
1.620
1.598

40
40
40
40
40
40

Btevedobincp

January 1, 1952
Classification

Armored car ................................
Bakery:
Agreement A:
Rate A ..................... ............ .
Rate B - 5 tons and o v e r ....... .
Sparemen and helpers:
After 30 d a y s ...... ................
Agreement B ...............................
Agreement C:
Special delivery - utility ............
Sparemen ................................




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,380

40

1.563
1.500

48
48

.926
1.485

54
48

1.270
.963

40
54

Classification

Longshoremen:
Bulk cargo, ballast, cement
in bags ..................................
Explosives or damaged cargo ..............
General f o r e m e n .......... ................
Hatch foremen .............................
Refrigerated space cargo ......... .......
Wet hides, creosoted poles, creosoted
ties, creosoted shingles ...............
Winchmen, watchmen, mobile
equipment operators ....................

Agreement A:
Porters ...... ..............................
Agreement B:
Firemen .................................
Matrons ................... ............. ...
Porters, elevator operators (female) ....
Watchmen ..................... .
Agreement C:
Elevator s t a r t e r s ...... ............ .
Firemen ................ ............. .... .
Matrons ........... .................... .
Porters, watchmen, elevator
operators (female) ......................
Agreement D:
Elevator operators (female),
cleaners (female) .......................
F i r e m e n ......... ............. .............
Janitors ................................
Watchmen ................................

Table C-701.1:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2,150
4.100
2.450
2.200
2.300

40
40
40
40
40

2.250

40

2.150

40

Hours
per
week

$1,000

40

.900
.750
.800
.666

40
40
40
45

1.160
1.320
.920

40
40
40

1.080

40

.860
1.060
.910
.885

48
48
48
48

J ja t U i,

January 1, 1952

Classification

M etob& Utch Sb'UO&ld
a n d dfelpebd
July l,

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Agreement A:
Baggage porters ........... ...............
Bellmen, head ..............................
Bell boys ......................... ........
Bell c a p t a i n s ............. .............. .
Elevator o perators, day ..................
Elevator operators, night ................
H o u s e m e n ...................................
Maids .................................... .
Porters .................................. ..
W a t c h m e n ............................ .
Agreement B:
Bellboys .......... ................ .
Bell c a p t a i n s ...... .......................
Elevator operators ........................
Housemen ...................................
Maids .......................................
Porters ....................................
Agreement C :
B e l l b o y s ........ ......................... .
Bell c a p t a i n s ......... ....................
Bell captains, assistant .................
Elevator operators .............. .
H o u s e m e n .................................. .
Linen maids ................................
Maids, d a y ............................ ..
Maids, n i g h t ...............................
P o r t e r s ...................... ..............

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48
48
48

$0,613
.435
.330
.367
.642
.596
.766
.711
.833
.722

45
45
45
48

.330
.383
.645
.777
.733
.520

48
48
48
45
45
48

.450
.685
.433
.844
.800
.741
.741
.764
.450

48
48
48
45
45
45
45
45
45

17,

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

M in im u m Z utbanoe, P ateA J^on, Plant W&ukeAA, y

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in -

Minimum rate (in cents)

All
indus­
tries
2/

Table E-l:

Manuf acturing
Durable
Nondurable
goods
goods
Whole­
Public
Retail Serv­
Establishments with sale
utilities*
trade
ices
251 or
trade
251 or
21-250
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

S-lufft ^ i^ e ^ * iU c U P/lG-uHiO-HA.
Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

All manufacturing industries 1/
Shift differential

All establishments .......

100.0

Under 60 ..................
60 .........................
Over 60 and under 65 .....
65 .........................
Over 65 and under 70 .....
7 0 .........................
Over 70 and under 75 ....
75 .........................
Over 75 and under SO .....
8 0 .........................
Over 80 and under 85 .....
85 .........................
Over 85 and under 90 .....
90 .........................
Over 90 and under 95 ....
95 .........................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
100 .......................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
105 ........................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
110 .......................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
115 ........................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
120 ........................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 ........................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
1 3 0 ........................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
135 ........................
Over 135 and under 14-0 ...
1 4 0 ........................
Over 140 ..................

0.6
.7
.5
1.2
1.1
1.2

Establishments with no
established mlirimira ....

-

21.9
.3
3.5
1.8
2.5
.1
6.3
2.5
2.0
.7
3.3
3.2
7.2
1.9
2.3
2.6
.7
10.5
1.2
.1
—
5.4
.3
1.0
.9

12.5

100.0

-

_
_
_
_

100.0

-

100.0

_
_
_

49.4
_

27.5
-

21.2
1.0

4.7
3.0

10.7

1.3
1.2
5.9
5.2
_

1.8
_

1.9
4.9
4.1
_
_

2.7
.1
-

3.8
2.7
—
_
_
_
-

20.0

-

27.0
_
_
_
.4
4.1
.7
7.5
.3
1.6
6.5
-

3.9
_
_
-

8.0

3.5
_
1.6
17.8
2.7
-

7.5
2.4
6.8
_
9.3
_
_
.8

14.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
3.9
6.7
5.0
12.3
12.1
6.9
_

8.4
3.7
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
-

3.7
_
_
.

0.4
_
_

3.8

20.2
.2

16.8
_

_
_
.

2.8
2.6
_

1.5
_
_

1.9
4.0
1.0
_
_

2.9
4.5
6.9
15.2
5.4
4.2
-

19.2
10.7
-

_
_
_

6.5
_
17.6
_
14.4
3.1
-

.1
2.7
1.8
_

3.4
_
-

27.4
4.7
-

12.9
-

12.1
_

_

3.8

11.2
_
-

1.6
1.2
_
_

3.5
_

_

7.8
.6
1.1
_
_
_
_

-

-

5.6

11.9

25.7

13.9

2 d shift 2d shift

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, all
establishments ............

13,5

6.5

5.7

1,3

2 0 .3

1 1 ,2

7,3

0 .2

1 .6

Receiving shift
differential ..........

1 0 .8

6.4

4.6

1.3

1 6 .2

1 1 .0

7.3

.2

.9

10.3
6.5
.9

6 .2

3.7
.3
.4
-

1 .0

1 6 .2
1 2 .1

10.7
-

5.6

.2

.9

1.3

Uniform cents
(per hour) .........
4 cents ...........
5 cents ...........
6 c e n t s .......... .
7 c e n t s ......... ..
cents ..........
8 cents ............
9 cents ............
10 cents ..........

2.4
_
_
1.8
_
_
.
_
2.0
.
.

-

_

Nondurable
goods

3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or 2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

5.8
_

_

6.1

6.2
_

18.1
2.0
.

_
_
•
_
_

13.0

Durable
goods

Electro­
plating,
Costume
plating,
jewelry
and pol­
2/
ishing
2/

2.8
_
22.8
_

_

2.4
_
_
_
-

2.9
-

All
industries

100.0

Machinery
industries
(except
machine
tools)

Qaiform percentage ...
5 percent .........
10 percent ........
Receiving no
differential ..........

1/
2/

y

.1
.8
.7
-

1 .2
.1

-

.3

.7
-

.1

-

-

.3

-

-

1 .8
.1
3.3

(2/)

2.5

.6

.2

.2

.2
.1
.1

.9
.5
.4

2.7

.1

1 .1

.5
.3

.1
.2
.3

.2
.1

.2
1 .2
1.4
-

-

-

2 .8
.1

1 .1

6.3

4.0
-

-

.1
.6

-

.9
-

.- 1 J L —

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8

.5

.2

-

-

.3
.3

1.7
1.7

4.1

.2

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

.7

1.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
No workers on third or other shifts.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.

30.2
Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1 / Lowest rates formally established for hiring either m e n or women plant workers other than
watchmen.
2 / Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Table E - 2 j

ScU& ditl& d 'U/j&eJzltf tJlau/iA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l /

W e e k ly h o u r s

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts

...................... ............. .. ................

U nd er 3 5 h o u r s ...................................... ..
3 5 and u n d e r 3 7 2 h o u r s
37^- h o u r s ........... .. ..................... .. .............................
O v er 3 7 ^ an d u n d e r 4 0 h o u r s . . . . . . . . . . . .
O v er 4 0 and u n d e r 44- h o u r s
4 4 h o u r s ......................................
O v er 44- and u n d e r 4 8 h o u r s .................................
4 8 hours .............................................. .............................
O v er 4 8 a n d u n d e r 5 0 h o u r s
5 0 h o u r s ............................................ ..................................
O v er 5 0 h o u r s ....................................................... •••••

1/

7j
*
**

!

EMPLOYED I N -

Manufacturing
Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 .9
1 2 .7
2 .1
7 5 .1
.7
.5
-

3 .1
7 7 .0
1 9 .6
-

9 .7
8 .5
2 6 .4
4 4 .5
6 .9
4 .0
-

6 .8

4 0 .5
8 .2
2 6 .3
2 4 .9
-

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

4 .5
1 1 .1
7 .0

1 .8
1 0 .1
1 0 .0

Finance**

Services

1 .3
1 .5
.2
1 .4

7 3 .4
1 .1
.2
_

7 2 .4
1 .3
-

-

-

"

4 .4
-

-

-

”

-

.3
-

~

2 .7

“

1

5 .5
2 9 .3
4 5 .7
1 .6
9 .7
1 .1
.3
-

-

-

-

;i:t ENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

M anufacturin' -

All
indus-

'P

-

v

Dural ile

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .8
3 .2
1 2 .8
6 .9
7 3 .7
1 .0
-

3 .0
.6
.9
6 7 .3
3 .3
2 .2

3 .5
7 3 .5
3 .0
.8

.1
-

1 .6
-

-

“

1 1 .4
7 .9
.7
.9
1 .8

1 0 .3
6 .8
.5
•4
1 .2

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

n

1 0 0 .0

0 .1
1 2 .3
1 4 .1
1 4 .4
5 4 .7

pi

1 __________
_

1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .4
4 .6
9 .9
2 1 .6
8 .6
1 4 .2
2 4 .3
8 .5
2 .3
2 .0
3 .6

2 .2
-

4 .7

2 ,1

7 0 .1
-

8 6 .6
.6

5 9 .1
5 .7
1 .3
1 7 .5
1 0 .8
1 .0
-

.2
.8
1 8 .2
-

.4
3 .7
3 .2
.8

2 .5

3 .3
7 .4

-

2 .3
5 5 .7
2 .1
1 0 .1
7 .7
4 .4
1 2 .1
5 .6

5 .8
4 0 .5
3 .2
7 .3
2 4 .8
1 6 .2
-

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3«

Pfrid <Jfolidcuf'L

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

Number of paid holidays

All establishments

•••••••. .... ......

Establishments providing paid
holidays .............. .

\:v< E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D
p;

IN —

M a n t f a c t u r in

M a n u fa c t u r in g
A ll
in d u s ­
t r ie s

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

D u r a b le
goods

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.5

100.0

98.4

2.0
14.5

_
.2
14.0
1.6
20.4
63.8
-

.1

7 .1
.7
2 .1
37.7
50.8

99.2

99.2

1 to 5 days ............. ........ .
6 days .......................
7 days ............................................................................ .
8 days ..........................
9 days........... ... ...........................................................
10 days ............................. ................................................................................
11 days ................................................. .
12 days ................................................................................................................

1.2
8 .1
1.5
14.0
43.3
18.7
2 .4
10.0

1.5
16.3

Establishments providing
no paid holidays...... •••.•••••••••

.8

.8

1

1 .0

-

26.2
52.0
2.2

30.0
50.4
1 .7

.6
19.1
2.8
20.1
54.4
3.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

A ll
in d u s ­
tr ie s

S e rv ic e s

All

y

-

1 .4

-

2.3
-

-

-

10.9
77.4
11.7
-

93.0
1.2
_
-

-

-

_
45.2
10.6
44.1

1
j

P u b lic
u ti l i ­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

S e rv ic e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

D u r a b le

100.0

100.0

100.0

86.5

88.0

83 .4

92.1

89.8

80.6

80.7

54.5

7.7

8.3
51.4
3 .9
14.3
9 .8
.3

12.4

4 .6
76 .4
3.0
4.5
3.0
.6

2.9
.8
16.6
1.6
26.4
41.5

15.7

.9
2.0

13.7
9 .4
4.2

42.1
4 .1
11.7
18.2
2.7
_

-

1 .6

3 .5

j

All

IN

-

1 3 .5

12.0

23.5

4 .9
25.1
17.5
_
-

i

16.6

7.9

10.2

_

_

_
77.8

52.3
12.6
-

-

19.4

19.3

21.7
5.5
-

45 .5

'
1/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage

Survey,

Providence,

R.

I., D e c e m b e r 1 9 5 1

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4*

Pa-id fy&c&Li&HA* (fyotinud PaxumA 4 h &)
,o

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

PERCEN T

IN —

V a cation policy
in d u s ­
t r ie s

All

D u r a b le

goods

OF PLA N T W O R K ER S EM PL O Y E D

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

F in a n c e * *

S e rv ic e s

A ll
in d u s­
tr ie s

A ll

I

i

D u r a b le
go o d s

1 /

N on­
d u r a b le
goods

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s *

W h o le ­
sa le
tra d e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0 _

99.4

98.9

98.6

99.4

99.5

100.0

99.4

100.0

100.0
11.4

R e ta il
tr a d e

S e rv ic e s

j

|

All establishments .............• • • • .....

IN —

M anufacturi-

M anufacturing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.2

90.9

86.0

95.3

97.4

90.1

100.0

96.8

77.5
.7
13.7
.3

84.0

80.2

.9
6.0

1.9
3.9

87.5
7.8

7.8

9.1

34.0

100.0

92.2

90.9

6.9

69.0
3.5
18.7

78.9
4.3
7.7

1 year of gerel.se
Establishments with paid v a c a t i o n s .....

24.5
•4
73.1
1.4

39.8

Over 1 and under 2 weeks • • • • • • • • • • • •
2 weeks .............••••••••..........
3 weeks •••••••••••••••••............
Establishments with no paid vacations ..

.6

1.1

99.4

98.9

18.8

33.7
.6
64.5

46.9

28.6

32.1

13.4
4.1
82.5

27.7

-

-

-

59.0
.1

51.7

70.5
.3

87.4
-

.6

.5

98.6

99.4

99.5

100.0

99.4

4 0.7
1.0
56.9

22.5
_

6.6
_

9.7
~

7.4
82.7
6.4
2.9

1.4

-

-

•

-

-

68.8
2.9

95.8
4.2

.6

-

-

85.9
2.7
-

-

3 2 .0

51.9
1.2

5 3 .4

65.4
-

37.0

43.1
3.5

4.7

2.6

9.9

86.0

95.3

97.4

90.1

100.0

96.8

74.0
7.3
4.7

83.3
1.7
10.3

19.2

44.0

21,6

53.9

-

-

-

-

40.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

72.8
22.0
2.0
3.2

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations •••••
1 w e e k ......... ................. •••••
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks ........... • • • • • • ........... ....
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks ..................................... • • • • • .............................................. ....
Establishments with no paid vacations

. .

.3
78.3
.6

1.4
.6

76.6

92.9

90.3

-

-

-

-

-

.1

-

.3

-

-

1.1

1.4

.6

.5

-

98.9

98.6

99.4

99.5

.6

100.0

-

-

95.8

90.4

78.2

46.1

68.8

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

-

6 .1

-

4.2

2.7

.4

-

-

-

-

-

3.5

2.0

-

-

7.8

9.1

34.0

4.7

2.6

9.9

-

3.2

92.7

91.5

86.0

96.4

97.4

90.1

100.0

96.8

30.7

5 ye^js. o^,service
Establishments with paid vacations

• • • ••

99.4

9.1
89.2
-

3.7

.6

••

.6

1.1

1.4

• • • ..

99.4

98.9

98.6

5.9

9.1

Establishments with no paid vacations

15,

7 W

P

Over 1 and under 2 weeks . . • • • .........................
2 weeks . . . . • • ......................... ... ....................................................... ...
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s .............................................
3 w e e k s ..... ... ........................................... ...................... .......................
Over 3 weeks • • • • .............................................................................
Establishments with no paid vacations

**

-

90.0
-

9.7
88.1
1.6
.6

1.4
-

6.8
-

98.1
-

92.5
-

-

.7

.5

-

••

_

-

55.9

75.4

-

-

35.6
2.0

1 4 .2

.6

1.1

.2

8 .6

7.4
67.0
25.0
.6

-

8 5 .8
-

4.2
-

1.4

99.4

99.5

1 0 0 .0

99.4

9.7

1.4

6 .8

7.4

100.0
_

100.0
3.4

95.8
4.2

93.9
-

-

-

-

2.7

1 0 0 .0
_

1 0 0 .0

3.4

-

-

-

-

-

17.8
-

16.5
1.0
72.0
.7
2.5

36.2
1.2
73.0
.9
.2

66.3
1.9
-

14.8
2.3
79.0
.3

7.3

8.5

34.0

_

19.5
-

38.9

-

59.4
-

55.9
-

-

-

2 4 .6

55.9
2.0

3.6

2.6

9.9

97.4

97.4
-

15.2

68.7

67.0

12.1

79.5

-

-

-

-

-

30.3
.5

82.9

24.5

17.1

-

4.1
20.9

87.9

-

-

-

.6

.5

-

.6

90.1

92.7

91.5

8 6 .0

96.4

1 5 .8

1 5 .2

1 5 .8

14.8
1.9
70.1

8 .0

-

-

9.3
.3

89.4

-

-

-

14.0

3.6

2.6

-

9 .9

.8

-

58.9

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




99.4

-

3.2

of geyvjLSS

Establishments with paid vacations

1/
*

5.9
_

8.6

89.8
-

Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ....... .
2 weeks ••••••.........................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ........ .
3 weeks ................................

100.0

6 1 .8

1.0
66.5

.9

.7
11.7
1.9

7.7
.2

7.3

8.5

-

62.4
1.9
5.9

_
-

30.7
-

49.3
1 0 .1

1 0 0 .0

19.5
-

-

55.9

49.0

-

-

5.6
19.0

8.9

Occupatiohal Wage Survey, Providence, R. I., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LAB®
Bureau of labor Statistics

96.8
38.9

-

3.2

Paid SicJz Jl&au*e (fyobmcU Paxm AiohA)
m

Table E-5 :

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Manufacturing

P ro v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e
indus­
tries

A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ................................. ..............

pi

A
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

. 1'< 1 NT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

M
AXl-FAf T R U IN

All
indusA
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

J /

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 0 .2

1 8 .7

2 7 .4

4 .9

3 2 .4

2 1 .4

4 5 .2

5 .8

4 3 .6

6 .2

1 .3

2 .3

.3

1 9 .5

9 .3

3 8 .0

1 1 .6

2 .2
2 .2
.5
-

1 .8
1 .6
2 8 .8
.2

5 .2
1 .4
2 .6
1 .4
1 0 .8
-

1 0 .1
1 2 .7
1 8 .1
4 .3
-

_
-

_

_

3 .3
1 0 .3
4 .9
.2
-

4 .0
1 5 .4
8 .0
-

.2
-

2 .3
-

_
_

1 .8
•
2 .2
1 .4
1 .7
_
2 .2
_

1 0 .6
8 .9
1 2 .3
6 .2
_
_
_

4 .4

4 .4
1 .4
-

1 .1
.2
-

-

-

7 9 .8

8 1 .3

7 2 .6

9 5 .1

6 7 .6

7 8 .6

5 4 .8

9 4 .2

5 6 .4

9 3 .8

9 8 .7

9 7 .7

2 0 .2

1 8 .7

2 7 .4

4 .9

3 2 .4

2 1 .4

4 5 .2

5 .8

4 3 .6

6 .2

1 .3

1 .4
2 .6
1 .8
1 .4
6 .5

3 .3

4 .0

1 0 .1
9 .2
1 8 .1
4 .3
-

1 .1
_
-

2 .3

-

-

5 .2
1 .4
2 .6
1 .4

_

-

1 .8
1 .6
6 .2
-

_

-

2 .2
-

1 y ear o f se rv ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................
3 d ays .........................................................................
5 and 5$- days ........................................................
6 d a y s .........................................................................
7 days .........................................................................
1 0 days .................................................................... .
11 days .......................................................................
12 d a y s ......................................................................
2 0 days .......................................................................
Over 2 0 days ...........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s io k l e a v e ............. .............................

1 .4
2 .9
1 .8
1 .4
8 .5
.3
2 .9
1 .0
(2 /)

_

2 .1
.7
2 1 .0
1 1 .6
8 .2
-

-

1 .1
1 .7
1 .4
.6
1 .1
.1

W )

.3

-

_
1 9 .5

-

3 .0
.8
3 .4
_
-

9 9 .7

8 0 .5

9 0 .7

6 2 .0

8 8 .4

2 .3

.3

1 9 .5

9 .3

3 8 .0

1 1 .6

_

_

_

_
_
_

_

1 .8

1 .9

2 .2
1 .4
1 .7

1 0 .6
6 .9
1 2 .3
6 .2

4 .4

_

_

2 .2

2 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith form al p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s ic k l e a v e ...........................................
3 days ..........................................................................
5 d ay s .........................................................................
6 d a y s .........................................................................
7 d a y s .........................................................................
10 days .......................................................................
1 1 d a y s ............. ........................................................
12 days .......................................................................
U d a y s ............. .....................................................
15 days .......................................................................
2 0 days ........................................
Over 2 0 days ..........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ...........................................

.3
2 .9
.3
1 .8
.3
.9

7 9 .8

9 .4
4 .9

1 5 .4
8 .0

-

-

.9
.2

-

-

2 .2
.5

-

-

-

8 1 .3

7 2 .6

9 5 .1

*




1 .4

2 .1
.7
2 1 .0
1 1 .6
8 .2
-

-

3 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .1
1 .5
1 .4
.6
.2
.1
(2 /)
.2
.9
.2

-

2 0 .2
2 .4
.2

1 0 .8

6 7 .6

7 8 .6

See footnotes at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

-

4 .4
-

5 4 .8

9 4 .2

5 6 .4

_
_

_

•

_

-

9 3 .8

.2

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

9 8 .7

97.7

1 7 .6

.3
-

9 9 .7

8 0 .5

_

__

_

_
_

-

.8
3 .4

2 .0

-

3 .0

9 0 .7

6 2 .0

-

8 8 .4

Occupational Wage Surrey, Providence, &. I., December 1951
U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

T a b l e E-5:

Paid S ic k -Hjtaae (Qo**hgI Pam MUuU )

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

Go*Ui*u*ed

IN —

PERCENT

indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

OF PLA N T W O R K ER S EM PLO Y ED

IN —

Mamtactukin

Mancfactuking

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .......................

-

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Al
l

Non­
durable
goods

Durable

1/

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 0 .2

1 8 .7

2 7 .4

4 .9

3 2 .4

2 1 .4

4 5 .2

5 .8

4 3 .6

6 .2

1 .3

2 .3

.3

1 9 .5

9 .3

3 8 .0

1 1 .6

7 .2
1 1 .6
1 8 .1
4 .3
.5
-

_

1 .8
-

7 .1
9 .3
1 2 .3
6 .2
1.1
_

4 .4
_

2 .0

_

_
_

-

-

5 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................
3 days ............................. .
5 days ..................................................................................
6 days ..................................................................................
7 days ...................................................................................
1 0 days ................................ ..
11 days . ............................................................................
12 days ...............................................................................
14. days ................................................................................
2 0 days ...............................................................................
3 0 days ...............................................................................
Over 3 0 days .................................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave . ............................................

1 .2
1 .7
1 .8
.6
8 .5
.3
2 .8
.3
.1
1 .8
1 .1

«

_

_

1 .3
-

.8
-

1 1 .4
-

1 8 .6
8 .0
-

2 .2
-

4 .9
.9
.2

-

_
1.6
8 .0
-

5 .2
1 .4
2 .6
1 .4
_

2.2
.5

1 .0
2 0 .2
1 .6

1 0 .8

-

2 .1
.7
-

3 .5
-

1 .4
_

3 2 .6
8.2
-

~

-

-

4 .4
-

.8
.9
1 .4
.6
1.1
.1
(2/)
.2
.9
.2

_
_
_

-

1.1
_

_

2 .3
-

.2

_

_
-

_

-

.3

7 9 .8

8 1 .3

7 2 .6

9 5 .1

6 7 .6

7 8 .6

5 4 .8

9 4 .2

5 6 .4

9 3 .8

9 8 .7

1 8 .7

2 7 .4

4 .9

3 2 .4 .

2 1 .4

4 5 .2

5 .8

4 3 .6

6 .2

1 .3

2 .3

2 .1
.7
-

.8

1 .9
_

9 7 .7

2 0 .2

_
_
-

_

1 7 .6
-

2.2
1 .4
1 .7
2.2
_
_
-

3 .0
_
.8
3 .4
_
_

9 9 .7

8 0 .5

9 0 .7

6 2 .0

8 8 .4

.3

1 9 .5

9 .3

3 8 .0

1 1 .6

1 .8

7 .1
9 .3
1 2 .3
6 .2
1 .1
_
_

4 .4

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ................................................
3 days ..................................................................................
5 days ...................... ..........................................................
6 days ..................................................................................
7 days ....................................................................... ..
1 0 days . - ................................................................. ..
1 1 days ..................................................
1 2 days .................................
1 4 - days .............. ..................
2 0 days ...............................................................................
5 0 days .................................
Over 5 0 days .......... ................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ............ .......

1/
2/
*
**

1.2
1 .7
1 .8
.6
8 .5
.3
2 .8
.3
.1
.4
2 .5

7 9 .8

1 .3
1 1 .4
4 .9
.9
.2

8 1 .3

_
.8
1 8 .6
8 .0
-

7 2 .6

2 .2
-

1 .6
8.0
-

1 .4
2 .6
-

2 .2
.5

1 .0
-

1 .4
-

2 1 .8

9 5 .1

6 7 .6

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than ,05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




5 .2
-

7 .2
1 1 .6
1 8 .1
4 .3
.5
-

_
4 .4
-

3 .5
-

1 .4
_
_
-

10.8

-

-

7 8 .6

5 4 .8

9 4 .2

_
_
1 .1
_
_

2 .3
_

-

-

1.1

.2

9 3 .8

9 8 .7

-

5 6 .4

9 7 .7

_
_

_
_
I

-

_

_
_

_
_

.9
1 .4
.6
1 .1
.1
(2 /)
.2
_

3 2 .6
8 .2
-

_

1 .9
_
_

_

2 .2
1 .4
1 .7
_
2 .2
_

3 .0
.8
3 ,4

_

_
.3

1 7 .6

9 9 .7

8 0 .5

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

9 0 .7

2 .0

6 2 .0

8 8 .4

/\!'onp/lodu&tiOH &GH44Aed

Table E-6:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E

W ORKERS EM PLOYED

A ll
in d u s­
tries

All

D u rab le
goods

N on ­
durab le
goods

Christmas or year-end ............... ...
Profit-sharing ........................
O t h e r ...................................

W h o le ­
sale
tra d e

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s*

R e ta il
trade

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

A ll
in d u s­
tries

A ll

3/

P u b lic
u tili­
ties*

N on­
d urab le
goods

D u rab le
good s

W h ole­
sale
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S erv ices

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

4 2 .5

58.0

75.8

62.7

51.4

44.9

43.9

62.2

27.6

26.6

67.9

52.8

62.4

41.5
1.0

39.7
5.7
12.6

62.8
13.0

60.5
2.2

51.4

43.3
1.4
1.9

42.3
1.6

62.2

24.1
.4
6.1

60.6
3.1
4.2

62.4

.7

24.5
3.1
3.0

52.8

1.9

4 2 .0

24.2

37.3

48.6

55.1

56.1

37.8

72.4

73.4

32.1

47.2

37.6

R e ta il
tra d e

S erv ices

100.0

100.0

-100,0

100.0

100.0

' 100.0

100.0

100.0

56.7

52.6

56.1

4 7 .1

53.1
1.6
2.7

51.9
1.1
.9

56.1
.3

45.3
3.0
1.8

43.3

...

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ..............................

IN -

M anufacturing

M anu facturing

Type of bonus

All establishments .............. ... .....

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O R KE R S E M PL O YE D

IN —

47.4

43.9

52.9

57.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Establishments with no nonproduction

1/
2/
*
##

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7x

9std44A&H4>e> G4id P-e4*U04€ P lo tU

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

P E R C E N T OF P LA N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D

IN —

M anufacture-

M anu facturing

Type of plan

AH
in d u s­
tries

All

D u rab le
goods

N on ­
d u rab le
good s

P u b lic
u tili­
tie s*

W h ole­
sale
tra d e

R e ta il
trad e

F in a n c e * *

S ervices

A ll
in d us­
tries

A ll

D u rab le
goods

2/

P u b lic
u tili­
ties*

Non­
d urab le
goods

IN

W h ole­
sale
tra d e

!

All establishments ........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

. J L Q & l?

Establishments with insurance
or pension plans 2 / ...... ... .............

89.8

88.1

85.5

92.3

92.1

81.6

85.4

100.0

76.3

80.4

82.4

67.6

95.7

86.2

64.9

68.7

58.6

63.2
60.5
63.1
43.2

61.0
59.8
63.2

54.8

70.8

70,1
73.2
74.2

9.3

8 4 .8

60.2
63.2
68.6
19.0

65.7
73.9
17.7

46.1
53.4
57.0
22.1

73.2
76.7
89.1
13.7

86.2
69.6
26.3
60.4

55.1
49.4
52,8

24.1

11.0
24.8
54.9
19.9

48.7
35.9
56.9

31.3

52.5
66.6
30.8

61.2
49.3
65.6

6 0 .4

64.4
61.0

60.5
45.7
58.8

31.1

92.1
76.2
32.6
74.2

1 4 .0

13.3

33.1
41.0
47.4
4.2

10.2

11.9

14.5

7.7

7.9

18.4

1 4 .6

23.7

19.6

17.6

32.4

4.3

13.8

35.1

31.3

41.4

Life insurance .........................
Health i n s u r a n c e ....... ... ............. ...
H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n ............ ...........
Retirement p e n s i o n ........ ...... •••••
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ...........................

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
^ d u p l i c a t e d total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




„

10QxQ , - J
.

U B iP

- ^J.QQt0

—

Occupational Wage Survey, Providence, E. I., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

23

A ppendix — Scope and Method of Survey

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered Industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for & waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN PROVIDENCE, R. I., l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .................................
Manufacturing ............ ..................
Durable goods 2/ ........................
Nondurable goods 4/ .....................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................
Wholesale trade .................. ..... .
Retail trade ........... ................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services j>/.............................

21
21
21
21
21

1,423
875
491
384
548

239
107
54
53
132

191,000
144,700
70,000
74,700
46,300

75,510
52, H O
28,260
23,880
23,370

10,040
4,74-0
3,280
1,460
5,300

21
21
21
21
21

72
133
186
55
102

23
30
34
20
25

10,400
6,200
18,300
5,900
5,500

8,570
1,810
7,250
3,760
1,980

1,130
500
650
2,800
220

8
2/ 21
21
21

25
57
126
20

13
29
28
9

653
10,269
14,580
2,750

4-79
8,622
7,212
1,730

13
1,154
531
1,109

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Electroplating, plating^ and polishing.........
Machinery industries (except machine tools) ....
Costume jewelry............... .......... .
Insurance carriers................... ........

1/ The Providence, R. I., area for this survey consists of most of Bristol, Kent,and Providence Counties with North Kingston in Washington
Countv, Rhode Island and a contiguous section of Massachusetts including Attleboro and North Attleboro,
2/ Total establishment employment,
3/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscel­
laneous manufacturing,
4/ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and pub­
lishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products,
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services,
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables,
7/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




Index
Page
number
Assembler (costume jewelry) ••••••••••..... •.... •.....
14
Assembler (machinery) .... ....................... .....
11, 13
16
Bellboy (hotels) ......................................
Benchman (bakeries) ••••••••••••............ ••••••••.••
15
Biller, m a c h i n e ...... ............................. .
3
Bookkeeper, hand ••.•••••••...........
......
3
Bookkeeping-machine operator ...... •••••«•••••••••••••••
4
Bottle sorter (malt liquors) •••••.... •••••....... .
15
Bricklayer (building construction) ....... •••••••••••••
15
Calculating-machine operator •••••....................
4
Carder (costume jewelry) ............. .............
14
Carpenter (building construction) •••••.... •«••••.•••••
15
Carpenter, maintenance.......... •••••••........•••••••
7
Carton assembler (malt liquors) •••••••••............. .
15
Case assembler (malt liquors) ••••............ ••••.....
15
Case cleaner (malt liquors)
15
Case loader (malt liquors) ..... •••••••••••••••••.•••••
15
Case repairman (malt liquors) ....
•••••••••••••
15
Case stocker (malt liquors)
....................
15
Cellar man (malt liquors) ...................... ••••••••
15
Checker (malt liquors) •••••..................... ......
15
Cleaner ........... ••••••...... ........ ........ .
9
Cleaner (office building service) •••••••••••••••••....
16
Clerk, accounting •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••«••••••••
3, 4
Clerk, accounting (insurancecarriers) ................
14
Clerk, f i l e ...... ••••••••••.... ••••..................
4
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••......... .........
14
Clerk, ge n e r a l .............. ................••••••••••
3, 5
Clerk, o r d e r ................ ......••••••••••••.... .
3, 5
Clerk, payroll ......... ••••...........................
3, 5
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ........
14
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ••••••.........
14
Colorer and electroplater (costume jewelry) .......... .
14
Compositor, hand (printing) ....... •••••••••••........
15
Crane operator, electric b r i d g e ........... .........
9
Draftsman ••••••............................ •••••••••••
7
Drill-press operator (machinery) .......... •••.••«••«•• 11, 12, 13
Driver (malt liquors) •••••••..... ........ ............
15
Drop hand (costume jewelry) .... ......••••••••..... .
14
Duplicating-machine operator ......... ......... •••••••
3, 5
Electrician (building construction) ....... ...........
15




Page
number
Electrician, maintenance .................. ....... •••••
7
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••
11, 13
16
Elevator operator (hotels) ...... ............. ..... .
Elevator operator (office building service) ......... .
16
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ....... ••••.......... 11, 12, 13
Engineer, stationary ••••••••••.... ••••••••••........ .
7
Feeder (malt liquors) ........... •••••••....... ...... .
15
Fermenting room man (malt liquors) ••••....... ••••••••••
15
Filler operator (malt liquors) ..... ...................
15
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .......... •••••••••.........
7
First man (malt liquors) •••••....... •••••••....... ••••
15
Foot-press operator (costume jewelry) ..................
14
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) .................. 11, 12, 13
G u a r d ............ .........••••••.............. ••••••••
9
Hatch foreman (stevedoring) •••••..... .............. .
16
Helper (bakeries) ..... ......... ••••.............. ••••
15
Helper (malt liquors) •••••••••........... ••••••.......
15
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r .... ............... •••••.....
16
Helper, trades, maintenance ..........
•••••••••••••
S
Houseman (hotels)
16
Inspector (machinery) •••••••••••••••••••..... ......... 11, 12, 13
Inspector (malt liquors) ••••••••••••••••...............
15
Janitor ••••••••••••••........... .......... ••••.......
9
Janitor (machinery) .......... ....................... .
11, 12
Janitor (office building service) ....... .
16
Jeweler (costume jewelry) •••.•••••••••••...............
14
Kettle man (malt liquors) ..................... •••••••••.
15
Key-punch operator......... ••••......... .............
5
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .............
14
Label machine operator (malt liquors) ...... ...........
15
Laborer (building construction) ..... ••••........... .
15
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ••••••..... •••••.... .......
16
Machine operator (printing)
15
Machine tender (printing) ••••............. ••••••••••••••
15
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ••••••••••• 11, 12, 13
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) •••••••••••••
12, 13
Machinist, maintenance •••••••.......
8
Machinist, production (machinery) •••••••••••••••••.....
12
Maid (hotels) ...... ••••••.... ••••••••••••••••••••••«..
16
Maintenance man, general u tility..........
8
Maintenance man (malt liquors) ........ ••••••••••••.....
15

26

Index C o n tin u e d
Page
number

Page
number
Material handler (malt liquors) ........... ............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ......... ...........
Mechanic, maintenance ............ .................... .
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ................. •• 11, 12,
Millwright ........ .,........ ......................... •
Mixer (bakeries) ........... ............•..............
Molder (bakeries) ....... .................... ..........
Motortruck driver ••••••••••................
Nurse, industrial(registered) ••••••..........
Office b o y .........
.... ............................
Office girl ...........
Oiler ........ .............. .......... .............. ..
Operator (local transit) ...................... ........
Order f i l l e r ........
Ovenman (bakeries) ...... .••.•••••••••••••••...........
Packer ...... .............................. ......••••••
Packer (bakeries)
.................................
Packer (costume jewelry) ...............................
Painter (building construction) •••••........ ...........
Painter, maintenance..... .................
Photoengraver (printing) ...............................
15,
Pipe fitter, maintenance
..... ............ ......••••
Plasterer (building construction) ........ ..............
Plater (electroplating, plating, and
polishing) ••••••••••.... •••••••..... ...... .
Plater*s helper (electroplating, plating, and
polishing) ................ ........ ................
Platform man (malt liquors) ............................
Plumber (building construction) ......... ............. .
Plumber, maintenance ...... ............................
Polisher and buffer (costume jewelry) •••••••..... .
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating,
and polishing) ....... ..................••••«••••••••
Polishing- and buffing-machine operator (costume
jevelry) ............................................
Porter •••.••••.... ••••••••••........••••...........••••
Porter (hotels) ................................
Porter (office building service) .......................
Press assistant (printing) .......................... .
Press feeder (printing) ............
Pressman (printing) ..... .........••«•••••••...........
15,




1$
8
8
13
8
15
15
16
7
3
5
8
16
9
15
9
15
14
15
8
16
8
15
11
11
15
15
8
14
11
14
9
16
16
15
15
16

Punch-press operator (costume lewelry) ........
Racking room man (malt liquors) ........ •••••••
Receiving c l e r k ............ •••••••...........
Rinser operator (malt liquors) ................
Secretary ••••••••..................... .......
Section head (insurance carriers) .............
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance....... .
Shipper (malt liquors) ...........
•••••
Shipping c l e r k ............... ......... .......
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ..................
Solderer (costume jewelry) ........ ...........
Stenographer.... ...................••••.... .
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ...... ......
Stereotyper (printing) .................... •••••
Stock h a n d l e r ....................... .........
Stock handler (machinery) ............ »•••••••••
Switchboard operator ••••••.............. ••••••
Switchboard operator-receptionist ...... .......
•••••••
Tabulating-machine operator .......
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers)
Tool-and-die m a k e r ...... .
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ................
Transcribing-machine operator...... .
Truck driver .............
••••••
Trucker, h a n d ........ ...................... .
Trucker, hand (machinery) .... .......... .
Trucker, power .............. .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ••..••••
Typist ............
•••••••••
Typist (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••..... .
Utility man (malt liquors) .............. .....
Warehouseman (malt liquors) ..... ........... .
Wash house man (malt liquors) ........ ••••••••••
Watchman ...................•••••»••.... •••••••
Watchman (hotels)
Watchman (office building service) •••••••••••••
Watchman (stevedoring) •••••••••••••........ .
Welder, hand (machinery) •••••••••...... .
Winchman (stevedoring) ••••••••••••...... ••••••
Wrapper (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••.... •••••••
Wrapper (costume jewelry) .........•••••••••••••

14
15
9
15
5
14

8
15
9
10
14

6
14

16
10

12

6
6
3, 6

U
8

12, 13

6
10

10
12
10
11, 12, 13

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 19
52

6
14
15
15
15

10
16
16
16

12
16
15

H







This report was prepared in the Bureau’s New England Regional
Office. Communications may be addressed to:
Wendell D. MacDonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
26l Franklin Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The New England Region includes the following States:
Connecticut
Massachusetts
Maine

New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102