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Occupational Wage Survey

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA
October 1951

Bulletin No. 1070

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION............................................ ..... ......................

1

THE OKLAHOMA CITY METROPOLITAN A R E A ....................... .................. .......

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE.........................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ...... .................. •••••.••••.......
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .... ........ ........ •••••.....
A-3
Maintenance and power plant-occupations ........................
A~4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ••••.•••.....•••••••••••

3
6
7
S

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-63
Insurance carriers
.................. .......... •••••

10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction.................
C-205 Bakeries ..............................
C-r27
Printing...............................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ..........
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..........

11
11
11
11
11

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plantworkers ..•••••..........

12

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions
...................... •••••
E~2
Scheduled weekly hours .............
E-3
Paid holidays ...................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .......
E~5
Paid sick leave ...........
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ............ ........... ........ ...... •••••.....
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ....................

12
13
13
14
15
16
16

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey .....................................................

17

I N D E X ....................................................... •......................

19

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

April 10, 1952

Introduction 1/
The Oklahoma City Area is 1 of 4*0 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations that are common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of
sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional
and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information
for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divi­
sions.
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries were studied on an industry basis,
within the framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data
for those jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting) occupational earnings for several industries or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or
minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized cn shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Oklahoma City Metropolitan A re a
Population of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area,
which includes Oklahoma County, totaled more than 325,000 pei>sons in 1950. About three-fourths of these lived within the
city limits of Oklahoma City.
Geographically located in the center of the State,
Oklahoma City is a leading wholesale and distribution point. It
has five railroad lines operating out of three stations, eight
operating bus companies, and is one of the more important avi­
ation centers in the Southwest. Oil and livestock play a major

2/
Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in Atlanta, Ga.,
by Louis B. Woytych, under the direction of Harry H. Hall, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau's
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations in Washington, D. C #
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




role in the city's economy. Oklahoma City ranks as 1 of the 12
primary livestock markets in the United States and boasts 2 of
the largest high-gravity oil fields in the world with over 2,000
wells adjoining and within the city limits.

Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the Okla­
Metropolitan Area totaled 127,650 during October
1 9 5 1 * 2/
Almost 15,000 of these were employed in manufacturing
plants and approximately 40 percent of all manufacturing workers
were employed in food and kindred products establishments. An
additional 2,000 were engaged in metal processing and over 1,600
were on printing and publishing firm payrolls.

homa City

Oklahoma City's position as the center of a wide trad­
ing area is indicated by the heavy concentration of employment
in nonmanufacturing industries — about three-fourths of all
wage and salary workers earned their livelihood in nonmanufacturing establishments. Dominating other industry groups in the
area, wholesale and retail trade establishments employed over
34,000 persons while Federal, State, and local government em­
ployees numbered 33,500. Employees of firms performing service
functions totaled about 13,500 and another 8,050 were engaged
in construction activities. During October 1951, the total value
of building permits issued was almost $2 million, over half of
which was for residential dwellings.

Among the industries and establishment-aize groups
studied by the Bureau, about half of the manufacturing plant
workers were employed in establishments having written agree­
ments with labor organizations. In the nonmanufacturing indus­
tries, the group including transportation, communication, and
other public utilities was the most highly unionized; approxi­
mately 70 percent of the nonoffice workers in this group were
employed under the terms of labor-management agreements. About
a fourth of the nonoffice employees in wholesale trade were em­
ployed in unionized establishments. The extent of unionization
in other major industry groups studied was negligible.

The proportion of office workers covered by union con­
tract provisions was considerably lower than for plant workers.
About half the office workers in the public utilities group were
employed under the previsions of union contracts but the union­
ization of office workers in all other industry groups studied
was virtually nonexistent.

2/
Source: Oklahoma City Labor Market Trends, November 1951,
prepared by the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission in co­
operation with the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.

2

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries of workers in Oklahoma Gity estab­
lishments were substantially affected by formal wage adjustments
between January 1950 - the base period for the Wage Stabili­
zation Board*s 10 percent "catch-up” wage formula - and the time
of the study* These general wage increases were much more numer­
ous after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea than during the
preceding 6 months. Between June 1950 and October 1951, the
earnings of more than two-fifths of the plant and office workers
in all industries were affected by formal wage adjustments.
Public utilities employees were most notably affected; fourfifths of the plant workers and nine-tenths of the office work­
ers in this broad industry group received at least one general
wage increase during the period. Manufacturing establishments
granted formal wage increases to seven-tenths of the plant work­
ers and one-fifth of the office workers during the same period.
More than a third of the plant workers and half the office em­
ployees in wholesale trade establishments had received at least
one formal wage adjustment, while a fourth of the plant workers
and a third of the office workers in finance, insurance, and real
estate concerns received general wage increases. The proportion
of workers receiving formal wage adjustments during the period
was substantially less among the services and retail trade
groups.
Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers
with no previous experience were part of the formalized rate
structures for most firms in the area. More than 95 percent of
the plant workers were employed in firms with established minimums ranging from less than 40 cents to more than $1.20 an hour*
Minimum rates ranging from 75 to 85 cents inclusive were most
common — plants employing more than a third of the workers in
all industries reported rates in this range* Almost a fifth of
the employees were in plants whose minimum rates ranged from 8 5
cents to $1, whereas an eighth of all plant workers received a
minimum of more than $1 an hour. No rates below 75 cents were
reported in wholesale trade or public utility companies and less
than 4 percent of the manufacturing plant workers were employed
in establishments having formal entrance rates below 75 cents*




Retail trade and Service establishments generally had lower en­
trance rates than other industries studied.

Wages and salaries of Oklahoma City workers were
higher in manufacturing firms than in nonmanufacturing for al­
most all comparable jobs. Average hourly earnings for plant jobs
studied in all industries were higher in manufacturing estab­
lishments for each of the 18 occupations permitting comparisons.
Office occupations showed the same tendency with employees in
17 of the 18 comparable jobs being paid higher salaries by manu­
facturing companies.
Nearly a sixth of the manufacturing plant workers
were employed on second shifts and about3 percent were employed on
third shifts. About three-fourths of the workers employed on
extra shifts were paid a shift differential, almost always e x ­
pressed as a cents-per-hour addition to day rates. A 5-cent
differential was most commonly reported for second shift work­
ers. Third-shift workers generally received 10 cents an hour
more than the day rate.
About two-thirds of the women office workers and twofifths of the plant workers in all industries had 40-hour work­
week schedules during October 1951. A workweek of this length
was most prevalent for both plant and office workers in the
broad industry groups of manufacturing, public utilities, retail
trade, and finance, and for office workers alone in the whole­
sale trade and service industries* A third of the plant workers
in wholesale trade were scheduled to work 40 hours a week and
an equal proportion were on a 44-hour schedule. More than 43
percent of the workers in service establishments had 48-hour
workweeks.
Virtually all the office workers and almost 90 percent
of the plant workers in the Oklahoma City area received paid
holidays. Six holidays were most common, being granted to more
than half of all workers. The finance, insurance, and real es­
tate companies granted more paid holidays than other industries,
providing at least six paid holidays to all of their employees.

3.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-i

i O face O ccufuiU o n i

(Average s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o urs and ea r n i n g s 1 / f o r se l e c t e d oc c u p a t i o n s studied
o n a n a r e a b asis in O k l a h o m a City, Okla.., b y i n d u s t r y d ivision, Oct o b e r 1951)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber

of

w o rk e rs

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

$

s

$

Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70 . 00 j 75.00 80.00 85.00 90 . 0C

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s $
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
h o u rs
( S ta n d a r d )

and

27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
j

j

o ver
|

Men
Bookkeepers, hand .....................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade ....................
Finance * * ......................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Nonmanufacturing ...................

1

*

161
25
136
38
39
31
13

43.0
43.0
43.0
42.0
43.0
45.0
37.5

69.00
80.00
67.00
74 .
57.00
67.00
76.00

33
32

45.0
45.5

53.50
53.00

_

_

_

_

-

1
-

-

-

-

_

13

!

13

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

1
1

_
_

_

5

7

_

_

5

7

_

15

-

9
6

41.5
40.5
42.0
42.0
42.0
41.0

60.00
62.00
59.00
57.50
60.50
59.00

Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing...................
Wholesale trade .................

194
32
162
77

41.5
42.5
41.0

53.50
56.50
53.00
51.50

_

*

-

Clerks, order ..........................
M a nufacturing ................ ......
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Wholesale trade .................

57
29
28
24

42.0
41.5
42.5
42.5

57.50
60.50
54.50
54.50

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

Clerks, payroll ........................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing ...................

24
11
13

42.0
41.0
43.0

59.00
60.50
58.00

_

_

_

_

_

Office bovs ............................
Nonmanufacturing ...................

42
18

40.5
41.0

35.00
33.50

Tabulating-machine operators ..........
M a n u f acturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing ...................

27
14
13

40.0
40.0
40.5

58.00
61.50
54.00

1

-

;

-

4

_
_

!

_

'
:

7
7

2
2

3
3

_

8
3
5
2

10
2
8
6

_

-

2

28
15
13
3
8
2

19
5
14
3
11

19
1
18
9

18

.

6
1

-

-

-

19

11

_

_

19
18

11
6

19
2
17
15

8
2
6
6

12
4
8

_

2

_

_

_

4

-

6
5
1
1

_

_

1

-

-

_

7

1

.

_

_

_

-

7

1

-

-

-

_

_
_

_

i

!

_
-

-

2
2
-

1
_

5
5

|

_

:

-

12
2

_

_

-

-

12
4

-

5
5

4
2

1

_

1

_

6

1

6
3

-

1

1

_

22
13
9

-

-

3

3

7. ... 12
1
6 : 12
1
2
6

!

•

!
|

?

j

-

-

-

_

18
6

11
1
10
10

_

3
2
1

6

1

1
1

_
-

_

6

14
M

3
2

1

_

3

-

-

i 2L
2/ 8
9
2 /9
,

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
-

1

7
6
1

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

-

5
1
4
1

9
1
8
2

4

7
-

3

2

4
1

7

3
2

2
2

3
4
1
1

2
2

4

_

1
1

_

-

4
1
3

_

_

-

-

_

7
4
3
3

1
1

1
1

3
3

-

-

3
2
1

_

_

-

....

-

9

-

-

_4
1
3
3

2
1

6
4
2
2

7
5

4
2
2
2
-

-

7
3
4

-

i

8

13
2
11
3

2

-

22
1
3
7
11

-

-

-

22

27
9
18
3
15

14
13
1
1

10
2
8

i

-

26
8
4
12
2

13
1 5
10
2
7
1

-

1?
1
14
7
2
5

8
12
3
7
2

20
3
17
7
10

;

12
4
8
4
3
1

20

1

_

;

26

3
2
1
1
2
1
1

-

-

-

8
2
2
3

4
_

_
_

-

-

-

1
1

1

5

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

_
-

_

-

1

2

2
2

!

_
-

_

!
1
!

|

-

2
1

4

_

!

9
9

-

_

-

9

3
1
2
2

2
2

-

!

4
1
3
2
1

|

-

2
2

-

214
66
148
46
78
18

;

_

!

Clerks, accounting ....................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Finance ** ......................

4 1 .0

_

13
13

-

-

-

-

1

7
2
5

9
6
3

7
7
6

_

4
2

_

13
3

_

4

30
30

_

_

_

4

30

3

1
1

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

~

2
2

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

2
1
1

_

2

1
1

-

-

1
1

j

1
Women
Billers, machine (hilling machine) ....
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Services .........................

106
74
21

41.0
41.0
41.5

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade ....................

122
120
17
68
18

42.0
42.0
44.0
41.5
43.0

;

j
!
|
!
!

43.00
43.50
43.50
47.00
47.00
42.50
50.50
37.00

_
-

4
4

6
4

6
4

11
4

-

j

-

-

-

4
4

9
9
2
3
4

10
10
4
6

;

_

j

1

_
_

_
_

!

4

!

14

10
6
11
11
:

_

7
4

10
9
9

-

11
11
5

i
|

12
12

_

!

6

!

**

Fin a n c e ,

i nsurance,




a n d r e a l estate.

c o m munication,

a n d o t h e r p u b l i c u tilities.

:

19
17

6
4

-

-

-

4

;

_

1
S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c luding r a i lroads),

10
6

9
3

4
-

:
,

6

3

!

12
12
3
9

W

4

_

_

_

!

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, O k l a h o m a City, Okla., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
B u r e a u o f Labor Statistics

Table i-ii

Office Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis In Oklahoma City, Okla., by Industry division, October 1951)

Average
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
I
S
s
r
»
'
*
i
t
Wel
e k y W e l Qcder 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 |45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00|75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
eky
h u s eri g 1
or
an n s
(t n a d ( t n a d
Sa d r ) S a d r )
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 147.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00180.00 85.00 90.00 ever
— —
! --— 'I ■
1
I
i
i
1
Women - Continued
i
i
1
$
j
Bookkeeperh . hand ..................
82
1A
281
1
8
10 1 8 11 T
l "
6 1 33
6
17
18
5 34
5 i27
41.5 50.50
_
Manufacturing ................. .
1
2
— 25
! 2 i 1 ; 10
40.5 57.00
2 i
7
- ' 1 i 8
Nonmanufacturing ............... .
256
82
'
41.5 50.00
10
3 33
5 i25 1 5
23 j 4 ! 17
11 'H
8 i 7
1 _
_
_
- ; - 1 - j 3
.
Public utilities * ....... .....
26
43.0 62.50
2
•
2
6
8
■ !
5
i 4 j
4
2
46,50
;is
25
V
i
_
_
_ ! 1
_
_ , _ i 11
j 14
- !11
Retail trade ...............
16
73
43.5 6 l/50
1 ; 8
7
4 '
_
Services ....................
1
1
10
33
44.5 53.00
6 ; 1 : 5
5
4
; “
- ' ~
!
1
_
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ..
.
2 ! 2
17
2
1
17
84
41.5 48 .0 0
4
4
4 ;23 1 8
_
_ I - '; _
_
_
Manufacturing ..................
X
,
15. '40.5” ^9.00
2 ' 6
2
2
- 1 4 !23 : 6
Nonmanufacturing ................
11
72
2
1
17
4
4
41.5 4 8 .0 0
34
43 .5
4,
4
g
Retail trade...... ... rT_T__,
,
45.00
18
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num e
br
o
f
wres
okr

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B . .
.
215
Nonmanufacturing ................ “ 209
Public utilities * ............
10
Wholesale trade ....._ ____ T...T
_
24
Retail trade .............. .
67
Finanna ** trTTT_.rrTr..irrTTtTrrr
107
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ...............*
Manufacturing......... .
Nonmanufucturing ................
Who!Afl.1A tfsHA TT--,TT,,t,rtTTr«,,*
Retail trade.... .
Finance * * ...........T..... T
T

228
48
180
27
77
31

Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) .......
Nonmanufacturing ..... .............
Wholesale trade............ ..

79
— 75
24

Clerks, accounting ..................
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing.......... ......
Public utilities * ............
Retail trade .................
Finance ** ........... .......

660

80
580

136
118
101

Clarks, file, class A .......... ....
Nonmanufacturing
Finance ** ........... .... .

53
52
39

Clerks, file, class B ......... •••••••
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ...............
Finance **... ........... .

237
234
40
25
70

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e nd o f table,
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (e x cluding r a i l r oads),
**
F i n a n c e , insur a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.




41.5 :41.50
_
~4l.T~;4130”
4 0 .0
47.50
4 2 .0
43.00
43.0 4 0 .0 0
40.5 ,41.50
4 1 .0
4 0 .0

41.5

4 2 .0
4 2 .0

39.0

43.00
47.00
a. 50
42.00
,39.00
37.00

41.0 4 8 .0 0
” 4 1 :0 .'47.TO42.5 45.50
44.00

40.5
40.5
40.5

4 8 .0 0

43.50
4 1 .0 '47.50
40.5 42.00
38.0 41.0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

38.0 0

38.00
'36.50
1

40.5 !33.00
40.5 33.00
4 0 .0

36.00

43.5
39.5

38.50
33.00

17
15

9

2

1

18
17
3

_
8

4

22

8
5

10

, 28

19

20

12

8

26
4

7
13

1
8

15

4

6
2

9
3

2
1
1

9

8
11
3

1

_

4

5
3
_

5
_

_

12
10
10

8
8

10
8

6
1

-

“

-

6
4
4
6
4 : 4
- | 1 , 1

_
! -

_
1
1
- : 1

53
15
38
15

56
3
53
23
5
; _
! -

33

;20
7
|13

1

52
i52

26

2

1
1

1 10 ;
1 10 i
— 1
_ ' 4 !
6 I

18
18
_
8

22

7

19

_
-

_
-

33
3
30

31
3
28

17
i 5

25

12

23

-

_

12

13

11

5

_
-

14
14
9

9
9

5
5

48 :01
1
7
94
13
17
4

45
9
17

_
_

!
1
1

13
13

3
10

6

4

18
—
_
-

_
- ,
4 i 13

1

_
-

6
6

62
62

6

25

5
26

2

2

5

6

48
4 i 13
- 1 - 1 4
13 : 8
40
-

_
-

-

“

a
15
a
14
_ ! «
»
5
2
19

7

5

1

1

53

86

8

9
77
,23
;18
;19

106
7
99

5

9
3 ;19
9
3
19
7 i 2
19

8

7
20
|20

2

63

24
63
24
4 | 4
5
38
14

c ommunication, a n d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i lities*

3

6

6
6
1

17
17

' 5
! 6
9
!
!
j

9
14

1
1
! 1

42
40
25
3

6

7
6
2

5

9

— 1
2 ---- i 1
2
- 1 - | 2

9

6

27
8

5
6

_
-

2
2

•
2

1

5
5
_ , _

•

_

_

_

, _

_

_

_

_

6
1

_
-

4
_
4
_

, 1
-

1

_
_
.
.
- . -

_
_
- ! _
-

_

_

18
.
18
24
16
7
4
« ! _
,
”
35

11

-

-

i
!
I

2
1
1

1
____ 1

_ , «
.

5

; 22
4
18
f 12
1 ; 5
i _
j 1

j
!
I
:
'

5
1

4
3
1 _
1 -

- 1 - : - ' - ; - ; i
i
j

5

2

-

-

4
- ! 3 ! -

.
-

_
-

_ 1
-

_
-

-

-

1
| 12

. 1
1

l

' 1

1

-

_

_
-

_
-

_

—
_
_
_
_
.
- i _ !
- . - ! - ; •
_
- : - - - , ■
i
- .
—
- i p -

i
____ i
____

5.

Occupation*

T a b l e A-l:

Qoutinumd

-

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Oklaho*aa City, Okla., by industry division, October 1951)

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly Under 2 7 .5 0 3 0 . 0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 . 5 0 t o . 0 0 t 2 . 5 o t 5 . o o 1 *7 .5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 c 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 .0 0
hours
earnings t
and
(Standard) (Standard)
2 7 . 5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 .5 0 t o . 00 t 2 . 5 0 2 5 . CC t ? . 5 o 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . CC o v e r

Women - Continued

i

1
Clerks, general .............
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .........
Public utilities # ....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade ..........
Finance
.......... .
Services ..............

696
— 81—
615
1C8
11 7
25 6
93
ill

U 2 .0
U 2 .0
1 1 .5
1*0.5
t i.5
U 2 .5
3 8 .5
1*5-5

]* o .5 o
U 5 .5 6
1*0.00
5 0 .0 0
1*2.00
3 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 0
1*0 .0 0

Clerks, order ...............
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .........
Wholesale trade ......

56
13
12

ia .o
1*0.0
ia .o
i* 0 .0

1*0.00
l* 2 .5 o "
3 9 .5 0
. 1*3.00

Clerks, p a y r o l l ..... ........
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .........
Retail trade ..........

68
16
52
10

ia .o
ia .5
1*0.5
ilO.C

1*8.00
5 t .5 0
: 1*6.00
1*6.00

Duplicating-machine operators

18

1*2.0

; U 5 .o o
!
1 1*3.00
! i* 5 .S c T
1*2.00

h3

1*0.0
....i* o ;o
3 9 .5

Key-punch operators .........
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .........

53
— 52—
31

Office £irls ................
Nonmanufacturing ...... ..

26
“ '" iff "

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

3 7 .5 0
3 6 .5 0

1*2 9
69
360
59
69
97
91
lilt

ia .o
ia .o
ia .o
I10.5
1*0.5
1*3.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5

5 5 .o o
5 t .5 0
5 5 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 3 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0
! 5 0 .5 0
|

Secretaries .................
Manufacturing ............
Monmanufacturing .........
Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade ..........
Finance ■»-*............,
S e r v i c e s .............. .
Stenographers, g e n e r a l ..... .
Manufacturing .............
N onmanuf ac tur i n g ..........
Public utilities * ....
Wholesale t r a d e ........
Retail t r a d e .......... .
Finance
.............

65U
“T O
505
99
116
72
l6 t

ia .o
t o .5
ia .o
1*0.5
1*2.0
1*1*.0
1*0.0

Switchboard operators .......
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing..........
Public utilities # .....
Finance
......... .
S e r v i c e s .............. .

126

1*2.5
1*0.0
1*3.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*6.5

^

19....
107
11
29
36

i
i
!
!

21
21
-

50
-

72
-

50
-

72
-

U /5 0
-

1*7
25
-

12
-

_
-

_
-

1
x
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
|

_
-

“

!

-

_

_

_

-

j

i
!
—
i

;

_
-

-

19
1

-

6
6
-

i

2

i

2
-

!

;

-

S

7
6

7

t
3

1

1
1

2
-

j

8

i

9
2
7
-

17
2
15
-

;

5
2

5
2
8

_
-

1

5
,

_
-

:
s

-

;

-

i 1*5 .0 0

! 1*8 .5 0
1*1*.00 1
1*7 .5 0
h 3 .5 o
i 1*2 .5 0
1*3 .5 0

-

-

-

-

t

;

-

-

1

,

-

-

-

-

;

-

-

-

1*
- ;

-

18

9
9

1

’
;

5
-

8
8
_

|

1*8 |
9 !
39
1
19
-

1

19

9

:

19

10

!
!
1
1

-

-

18

1

-

10

-

26

t
-

16
9
7

i
1* !
;

26

7
1

i
!
!
;

1

1

!
1
1

t
-

3

_

-

37
16
ti
5
10
19
2
5

t5
13
32
G
12
10
2
-

9
6
3
2

5
2
3
2

10
~
9
3

11
-

t
t

7

i
1

62
18
tt
9
10
3
12
10
t
-

1

11
11
2

3
-

-

37.C O
t
1 .3 .0 5 “
3 5 .5 0
t
1*5.50
l* o .5 o
2 9 .0 0 S / k

j

-

-

!

_
-

3
2
1
1

-

r~

-

19
-

I

-

_

61*
H7
2
It
62
103
22 i
t
12
It
20
56
2t
6
7

50
i5
35
18
12
2
3

7

6

7
7

6
6

_

6
6

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

9

1
I

7
1
6
6

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1
-

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

j

_

_

-

-

-

-

:

-

-

-

_
_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

23
_

8
2
6
t
2-

23
11
3

t
’

-

-

77
1
31 ,
39
1*
2 1

7
5

_

-

77

21*
1
11
-

9

_

21*
-

-

-

-

-

-

18

11*

10

-

19
8

!

80
6
7t
15
2t
22
13
t
1
3
1
.

91
16
75
n
22
-

3°
13
11
2
2
-

;

6

1 !
5
t

!
!

11

;
1
i

it
2

11

1

2
2

2t
-

i

2t
t
8
7
5

131
! 10
; 121
1 16
13
30
to
i

7

1
6
3
1

1

!

_

_

i
:
1

t2
2
ho
2
-

33
7
26
3
it
2
6
1

77
26
51
12
8
8
15
9
t
5
-

3

j
,
!

51
5
t6
9
17
_

12
11
-

n
3
6

1

8
20

-

_

_
_
-

-

-

;

-

1

"

_

_

_

_

j

_

:

_

_
_ j

_

_

-

-

1

.
_

_

_

_

-

'

_

-

-

-

1

-

:

-

:

_

_

_

_

|

_

_

!

1

-

-

-

-

|

-

-

;

23
6|
17 i
8 !

t3
3
to
10
_

17
9
8
_
6
-

36

9

' 12

1

:

36
3
12

9

_
-

1
1
-

-

_

..

_

-

-

19
_
'
:
'
:
;

i

•

19 i
1 :
6 ;
121
_ j
t5
31 1
It !
e :
2 1

t !
2 j
2 !
1
1

-

1

21
8
13
5
2

50
8
t2
7
13
6
15
1
16
9
7
t
3

i
1
1

1
1

.

j
!

1
8
_

1
I
1

-

i

6

-

_

|
|
s

21
3
6

6
5
1

1*
1
3
2
1
-

1
1

_

-

!

_

;

-

j

3

12
5
t

-

-

-

_

_

3
9
9
_
_

3

_

-

_
_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

..........




c o m munication, a n d ot h e r p u b l i c utilities,

1

_

_

_

_
;

_

_
_

_

_

-

-

"

-

_

_

!

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

|

_

!
1
1

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
* T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding r a i l r oads),
** F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l estate.

_
_
_
_

_
,

1

_

_

i

_
!

_

_

_

1

_

_
-

_
_
_
..

1

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

3

1
_
_

_

_

j

1
_

-

_

-

|

_

3

i

-

5
1
-

.

-

6

!
S

7
t 1
3 1

I

_

_

-

|

16
t
12
5
2
1
t
-

!

.

1
1
-

!

i

1
1
_

_

-

68 !
28 !
1*0
11 :
1

:

6
1 !
5
2 ;

_

2
2
-

r i

;
7
• 21
; 10

(
'

-

2
-

70
23
t7
2
13
it
12
6

!

-

2
-

3
3

;

,

-

9
5
t

_
—
I

_

10
8

-

5

1

-

12
-

i
,
|
:

6

!

s

Office Occupation* - Continued

T a b l e A-l:

(Average st r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s a nd e a rnings 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u died
on a n a r e a ba s i s in O k l a h o m a City, Okla., b y i n d u s t r y d i vision, O c t o b e r 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N

u
o

Sex, occupation, and industry division

m

f

w

W

o

h
(

b

r

k

e
W e

e
e

o

S

ue
(a

t

r

r

ars

S

k

n

$
$
$
$
ey 7 3 0 .0 .0 35 2 . 5 0 0 3 5 . 0 0 3
r
g
s
a )
r
d
)
. 0 3 5
07 l
. 2 0 30 5 .0 . 0 0 3 5

$
e Ul n ey
k d2
l
n
i n
sr
$a
t d
a n
r d -d
2
7 3

$

$
7 l

o .

$

$

$

$

$

$

5

5o 1 7 . 5 0 o 5 0 .0 0 o 5 2 .5 0
.

1 52 . . 5 0 0o 1

55

$

$

$

7 6 0 .0 0 0 6 5
0
.

.

$

20 6

$

$

$

$
0 8 0

5 6 5

.

70 7 00 . 0 .0 0 7 5

05 8

.

70 7 0

.

.

.
00 7 5 5 . 0 0 0 8 0

00 8

. -

$
50 9 0

.

.
a

1 5

o .

0 2o 1

.

. o5 1 5

07 5 0

.

.

00 5 5

.

20 5 0 5 . 0 .0 0 5 5

0 7 6 0 .0 0
.

6 5

02 6

5 6 5

.

.

9 0 5

0

0

.

n

0 . o 0

.

0 0

e0

r

Women - Continued
Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Hanufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing..... ...............
public utilities % ...............
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ............ .........
Finance
.......................

1

12

6

'

2
1

i

3
l
2
2

9

Transcribing-machine operators, general
1

l5

7

U

o

5

2
6!
i

1

1

2

6

l

9

3

1

3

5
l

l

B

35

.

.-

T

3 0
.o

l

o
9:

o2

1

;0

80

.

..

-o
- 0

-

1
5

5 0
0

2

_

1

0

1

;
3 i r

l
H

3

-

:
1

33 0
-

9
-

17
_

7
-

_

6

1

l

l

3

3

-

8

5
1

|

15

1

1

"

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

1

.

2
2

I

-

T~1

-

-

-

k

2

_

_

I
-

1
-

T

-

-

_

-

_

1

;

_

-

'

-

1

_

;

-

-

!
|

.

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

|

-

-

"

!_______

i_______ :

-

j

-

;

-

;
l

“

i

j

-

i_

_

-

-

-

k

1

>

3
3

5

3

5

-

0

-

-

-

2

6

16

21

-

1

2

21

~

3
-

1

1_______

1
3

-

3

— 1r
3

1

1
-

1

1
1
3

1

-

1

3

3

-

1

3

3

1

3

0

.

8

1
2

2

1

3

-

7

_

3

1

3
3

1

2

i

—T f r
5

2

3

1
-

16

5

1

6 1

2
-

-

1

2

-3

1

2

T

23

2

-

10

-

1
-

!

11
p

5

'

33

3
-

_

3
2

9

1

3

5

9

r

2

2

l 16
-

l

5

7

8

!

1

3

l

3

3
9

3
8

-

5
- “

3
r

2

3

1

1

3

r

1

_

5 3

1.

0

1

3

0

1

1

9

12

_

0 !

5

6c

.

3

o

0

.

3

0

3

3
16

-

0
2
" - “ " - ! - o - 25
- 0

-

. 5
..
"- 6
. - o
.5

65

.

j
01

l

.-

.

3

8

80

5

1

-

1

-

0

3 -

3

1

3
12

-

_

.
-“

3

3

15
-

- 0
0

3

5

1

3 9
33
1

3

.
T .

1

0
0

._

o7

3

3

5

0 8j

1

5

1

.

1

1 5

1
3

Typists, class B ........................
Noraianufacturing .....................
...............
Public utilities
wholesale trade ..................
Finance *->.................. .
Services ..........................

o

- o
- 0

5

~

.

1

5
0

.1

85

.

1

0

-

.
o2

.

3

8

0
- 0
- 0
- 0

0

.1
.-

30
o

1

5

. 1
.-

1
.

l

5

l

0

”

.

3

1

Typists, class A .................. .....
llonmanufacturing.....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Finance
........................

2

0
5 5

.

1 5
1

.

H
1

8
U

.e

t
1l

l

U 6 2
1

l

5

2
6

"

_= _ _ _ _ _
-

-

_

-

~ -

-

-

“

“

~

I
1

j

-

1 / Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

i
/

%

Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:
All workers were at $25.00 to $27.50.
Workers were distributed as follows:
Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

4 at
.
2 at

$95.00 to $100.00; 1 at $110.00 to $115.00; 1 at $115.00 to $120.00;
$90.00 to $95.00;
at $95.00 to $100.00; 2 at $100.00 to $105.00; 1

2 at $125.00 to $130.00.
at $115.00 to $120.00.

U

3 at
$20.00 to $22.50; 1 at $22.50 to $25.00.
communication, and other public utilities.

P*U^e444XMuU and

A-2:

ecluU col 0cC4€fuUiO4ti

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Oklahoma City, Okla., by industry division, October 1951)

N U M BER OF W O RKERS R EC EIV IN G STR A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y EA RN IN GS OF—

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$

$
$
Weekly
Weekly
1
2 1
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
1

.

5 0c .0 0 o 5 2 . 5 0

5 0 0 .0 0 0 5

5 I 7 .5 0
.

$

$

$

l?.5o 0
.
5

5

2 5

.

$

5

$

5 5

5 5 5

.

.

$

7 0 6 0 0 .0. 0 0 6 5

$

2 0 6 5 .0 0 5 6 7 . 5 0
.
0

0 2 6

.

5

67.60 0
5
.

7 0

$

'
7 0 .0 0

$

$

7 60 0 .0 0 0 6 5
.

7

0 7

.

$

$

$

$

2 7

2 7 0

.

.

5 G 5 0 .0 0 0 8 0
.

06 C 5

.

0 o8 0

. 05 9

$

50 9

C

.

O0 9 0

.

.

$

$

0 9 0

.

510 0

50 0
.
100.00 01

$

$

. 0 0 100 5 .0 0 0 1
0

0 0 1 1 05

0

D

1

.

.

O0

$

1 1 1 50 . 00 0

0

1

.
0
120.00

0 5

and
over
. 0 0

1

2

Hen
$

Draftsmen, .iunior ....................................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................................

1

L l.O
1 1 .5

7

25

lo .o

7 1 .0 0

-

62.505
.

3
-

-

2

2

-

2

2

1

' 1

-

1

_

6 3 .0 0 “

6

—

2

-

1

-

1

-

7 6 .0 0

m—

Draftsmen ..................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................................

17
3 -

9

1
- 8 -

0

- 1 0- . 5
-

-

-

7

- .

C -

O

2
6

5
-

h

"

6T

1
,

3

1

2 •

l

3
2
1

2
i

_

-

6

3
“

2

3
2
1

3

2

-

3

1
1

5

1

2

1

1

2
2

1

_

11

“

5
5

1

1

1

C

9

7

3
2

_

1

1

_

1

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

1

_

11

1

'1

1

3

2

1

1

1

-

-

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ...........................

1/

1 1

l

o

5 .

o 5

.

0

0

|

5

3

1

1
j

1

1

1

flours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S u r vey,

O k l a h o m a C i ty, Okla., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bur e a u of Labor Statistics

0

d
v0 0

0

. 0 0

0

7.

Maintenance and Powe* Plant Occupation*

T a b l e a -3:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an
area basis in Oklahoma City, Okla., by industry division, October 1951)

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ................................
Nonmanufacturing ............ ...................... ..
Services ........................................ .

33
.. 21”

n

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S
[$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30
earnings
»
.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35
3.85
|

$
■

$
1.63
1.6T"
1.41

2
2
2

-

1
"1“
1

-

$

l
! 1
1

1
! 1
; 1

RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y EARNINGS OF—

$

-

2
-

1 -

-

“

; ~

-

“

2
2

j -

! -

-

1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 i1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 over
i
---- i
-----

_

-

$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
I
S
I
S
$
s
$
$
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60! 1.65 1.70 !1.75: 1.80 1 1.8* 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.09 2.10

6
6

1
1
1

-

i 3
_ I
t
-

_

14
13
1

-

_ !
-

i
2 ;
2 1
2 !

6
1
5

1
1
- j

3 i
1
2 !

_ f
- j

2
2
*

8
2
6
-

l

8
_

1
_

-

-

1
1
1

: ~

-

-

2
2
2

_

7
1
6

_

_

1
1

-

4 ! 6
4 ' 6
-

-

-

2

4
4

-

1

4

_

_

_

|

3

"W

;

1
Electricians. m a i n t e n a n c e .................... .........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .............. ............ ............
Nonmanufacturing....................................

58
36
22

1

1.61
1.66
1.54'

-

—

-

“

“

1-

-

~

“

-

| -

”

_
-

5
5
-

2
2
- !

1
1
-

1
!
Engineers, s t a t i o n a r y ................... ..............
Manufacturing ............... ....................... .
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
S e r v i c e s ................... ............ .........

57
"16
47
15

: 1

1.59
1.69
1.56
1.23

-

“

*
*

-

-

-

j-

! 1
j 1

1

3

i

!

3
3

i

| 4
-

!

—

Machinists, maintenance .......... ........ ...... .
Man u f a c t u r i n g ....................................... .

25
--- 15“

1.69
1.76

Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y ......................
Manufacturing ........................................
Nonmanufacturing.... .......... ......... .......... .
Whnl
e t.rfidfi_________Tt__T.TtT._____ t t -___T .t
Retail trade ...... .............. .............. .
Sfinrl ft«s „ _T___

145
70
75
22
27
17

1.36
1.41
1.31
1.26
1.47
.99

Mechanics. automotive (maintenance) ...................
Manufacturing ........................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Piihl 1f n+.l 1 1t ia s * T
t
.
.
.
T
t
T
.
f

370
26
344
287 1

1.42
1.44
1.42
T 1.43t

T

25
15“

1.47
"1.48“

1

i

j

.
-

-

i
i

4

; 7
_

i 4
2

: 7
6

8
8

9
1
8

1
1 1

1
1

_
15
! ^— |
—
14
- ; 1

_,
i

_

; _

8

1

_

1

6

2

-

-

-

2
2

7

-

-

7

|

r

2

T

T

- !

4
4

_
-

2

-

“

4
4

2~

-

1
1

2
2

16
9
7

11
11
_ -

3
2
1

3
l ■
2

_

6

_

_

_

?8
2

5?

51

54
I
54

32
3
29
13

4

36
t
26

1'

5
5

4
4

4
-

-

A
_
_

_
_

-

-

4

7
4

3

-

-

I
t

3
-

!

2 !

-

I

1
2
2

18
-

-

.

8
4
4
3

_

1

i

2
-

| 9
! 9
- :

2

_

2

1

18

r

1

! 4

1 ----

r~“

“

t

-

1
_ .
1
1

j

.

-

T

_
- j

A

! 6
r-6-

! -

_!

6

j

i
Firemen, stationary boiler ............. ................
Manufac t u r i n g ...................................... .

1 ! 4
- r r 1 ! 4
1
!

8
2

4
4

112
4

108

18 f

9

13

2
15
_9

2
11

17
•

23
' 11
12

i o o
T

4

.

t

;

2

1

51
48

“

4

4
4

f

2
2
2

6
6

-

-

4
4

10

3
3
_

6
5
1

5

._

9

_

_

7

10

1
6
8

3
7

_
-

_
- -

-

-

10

1

4
4

-

_
_

_
_

_

_

~

-

_
_

_
_

_

_

5
_
_

2

3

1
1

1
1

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
-

10
10

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2
2

~

-

-

4

7

1
Millwrights .............................................
Ma n u f a c t u r i n g ................. ..................... .

34
34

Oilers ..................... ............ .................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................... .

16
13

Painters, m a i n t e n a n c e ............ ......... .......... .
Nonmanufacturing .....................................

36
---31

Tool-and-die m a k e r s ............................. ...... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................

36
36

1.63
1.63

-

-

“

■-

_

1.46
"T.-43-

1

1.74
1.74

1 ' 4

!
“

-

i -

j

! -

:-

•

~sn

1 |
1
- ' -

i

_

j

~

I
..

1/
2/
*

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r ov e r t i m e a n d n i g h t work.
A l l w o r k e r s w e r e a t $ 2 . 3 0 to $2.35.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railro a d s ) , communication, a n d o t her p u b l i c utili t i e s .




4

_
- |

“

i
j

_

_

O c c u p a t i o n a l Wa g e Survey,
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OP L A B O R

1

_L

_

_

_

_

1

1

-

5
5

?

i

12
12

9
9

7
5
5 j 4

“

l
i

3
3

1

, -

2

3

3
T~

4

i

1

4

1
.

!

j

1.41
1.47

11
11

1 1 4
1
4

1

-

;

i

O k l a h o m a City, Okla., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 1
Bureau of Labor Statistics

•

3 ,
3

~ j “

8

7
7

!

4
4

1

“

8.

C u sto d ia l, W a* Jta uU M f,a M d S U ipfU nq. O am paU otU

Table A-4:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Oklahoma City, Okla., by industry division, October 1951)

Occupation and industry division

NUMBER OF1 WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$ |
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
j
$ !
$
$
$
$
Number A e a e $
vrg
o
f
hul 0.35 0.40 0.45 0 .5 0 0.55 0 .6 0 0.65 0.7010.75 0 .8 0 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 4 j1.45| 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65
ory
.C
a nns
w r e s erig and
okr
and
under
.40 .
45 .50 .55 .60 .65 .70 .75 .80 . 5 .90 . 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.4C 1.4^ 1
8
95
.50' 1.55 1.60 1.65 over
;
j
|

*
O r n operators. electric bridge (under 20 tons) ...
-ne
Manufacturing............................

23
23

14>
.(

-

Guards......... ........... ..............
Manufacturing ............... ............

23
18

1.23
1.26

-

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ............
Manufacturing........................... .
Nonmanufacturing .........................
PVH.
ni*
*
Wholesale trade ........................
R - n-11 -iaik l l ITrr|1T.... T-IT.T-t_____ T
*h
h»ra t
Services........ ..... .... ...........

869
243
626

.90

4

1 .0 8

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ..........
Manufacturing ........................... ..
Nonmanufacturing .......••••..... .......... .
Retail trade.................. ........
Services ...............................
Order fillers..................... *.......
Manufacturing..... ......................
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Retail trade ..........................
Packers ...................................
Manufacturing... .........................
Nonmanufacturing............ .............
Wholesale trade ........................

100
60
312
122

334
23
311
33
212

256

-

-

-

1

“

9
9

31
.82
31
4
.97
:
1.04 1 - | - :22
.77
4'9
4
.74
9
.54
.87
.51
.61
.43

4
4

*
*
8

72
72

8

51
21

8

13

114 60
-!35 i H ;60
l

8
8

13 ! 52

35

52

10

4

3
j

1 .1 1

88
168
4B

1.25 ! - i
i1.04
1.14
“ j ~!“ !“ |“ j -

125
67
58

1.05
1.T5
.94

42

1 .0 1

-

- | ~

36 35
- 36 35

93
10

83

-

-

33

_ | _
!
i
-:- :- 1 — 1

_
-

16
2

27

-

“

72
23
104 49
33 9

85
31
54

43 28
8
4

12

20

31

55

18

4

12

6

4 :13
- 1 10
4 4 I3
4;4 |3
4

5

3
3
—
-

2

3
~

!
Receiving clerks ............................
Manufacturing...................... .....
Nonmanufacturing .........................
Wholesale trade..... ..... ............ .

1 .1 0
114
’
“ n — h 1.18“' 1.09
103
60
l.H

-

11 ! 3

2
2

2
2

-

:_
:_
“.- j- .- 1 -'-

-

-

| _
*
-

_
-

8

4

- I8

6

8

34

9

-

8

-

-

2
1

7 1
- ! 7 -

-

-

-

10

11

72 i72
19 54
53 18
22

1 7
j20

9
2
2

3

25
4

73
70

_ !
!_
10
- - j - i- ;~
- 10 i - ; - I 1 “
- 10 ! - ; -

-

_
-

4

-

-

-

1 2
1

-

-

_ i_
_
• -_
i

-

17 8 ; 10
4 !
_
_
10
7 15 8
- i 2 i- : - !- ;4
2 j“
4 |
- ;

_
“

7
3

“

21

11

1..
5.
- !15
- ! j “

4
4
-

2
2

18
3

3

3 ! 3

~

- 1 -

-

210

Nonmanufacturing... ...... ................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade .......... ...... ...........

162

48
94
62

_
" 1722"’ 1.08
1.13
.95
1 .1 1

_;_
- - 1
- - i

_
-

3

- 1 - ;

-

!
■
1

3.
._
2

—
-

- 1 - 1
- ,

! .1
2

—
“ I “

4

- :-

13
13
9

7
7
3

29 31 45 12 1 ?
9 ; 4
4 ! 8 ; 12
20
27 :41 i 4 ! 3
8
18
2 1 2
! 6

12 ! 3
5 "!
2 . i14 i10 ! 3
!U j10 j 3

32
! 8 ! 1
3 1
- | - | 28
1
- ; 8 ! 1
4 : 2
8
1
4

4 25 !12
-nr-i 7
4 :21 : 5
3
“! ”

• ! —
“
-

-

i
t
1

6 ;14

7

l
-

i. 4 . 12
. .
.
4 12
4 12

22
22

2
2

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

2

4
1

2

3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2

-

2

j 3
1 —
2
: 3
2
1
“ 1 “
2

10

-

10
8

6

4
2

18
18

23
2
21
21

13
13

2
2

-

12

5

Shipping clerks............... ..............

u

1

!

9 21
-i - : 1 “ ; 9 S21
|
!
8
8
4
- - ,- !4 —
- 8
4 | 4 j
1 -

2

114
10

6

2

5
3

114 i60

3?

1
1

-

-

4
4

1
i
17 26 j_A_ 31 • 6 13 U z _
- ! 7
- 1 _
10
4
7 26 I 4 27
6
6 i 17
- 18
2 i11
6 11
4
2 16
2
7 8
6

8

2
6
4
2

t

,21
21 i

18
3

22

4

2
4
1 8 2
18
2

“
2

6

17
17
.

2
!

6
_

2
2

2

-

-

2

-

_
•

-

-

_
_

~

!
i
i
i
See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,




O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S u r v e y , O k l a h o m a City, O k la., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 1
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9.

Table A-Ur

Gu&todicU, W a b o U o u lin f, a n d S k ip p in g Occu p at io n * - C o n tin u e d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Oklahoma City, Okla., by industry division, October 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

Occupation and industry division

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a r n in g s

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ / $ / $
$
$
$
$
$ I
s
$
$
$
4 0
0.35 0 .4 0 0 . 5 1 .5 0 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0 .7 5 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 j .50 1.55 1.60) 1.65
l
and
under
,60 .65 .70 .75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 3.05 7.10 1 1 > 1.20 1.25 1.^0 1.35 1*40 1.45 1.50!1.55 1,60 1.65 over
.*
—a4Q _^A5__a5Q.
!

ShiDoing-and-receiving clerks ..................
’
Manufacturing......... ..................
Nonmanufacturing..........................
PnhUr irMUtdeP * .... tt..... ,r........ t
Retail trade..........................

195
S L —

114
26
34
42

$
1.26
" 1 .2 8
1.23
1.31
1.25
1.10

Stock handlers and truckers, hand...... ,...... .
Manufacturing.......... ................ .
Nonmanufacturing .........................
P l l1f I+1 1+1 * ..T..T.T..tTT.t¥ttttt,tIf.t t
l h t 1.1 . AS
t
U / lP f l t T l A Tirt1t»tTI*T-I,tTtt,t-tt,»TT«lTTtI
H l C l o .f d
Retail trade ...................................
Services...... .......... ...... ...... .

1.12
854
14$ 1"1.TT
1.11
705
267
1.25
180
1.21
236
.89
22
1.05

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons).... ........
Manufacturing.............. ...........••••
Nonmanufacturing.... ............... ......
Who!asaIa trada ........_ ........... _...T. .
_
..
Retail trade ...........................

181
53
128
48
69

.97
1.04
.95
1.01
.87

Truck drivers, medium ( l to and including A tons) . .
l.
Manufacturing....................... ....
Nonmanufacturing .................. ...... .
Public Utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade................ ...... .
Retail trade ..... .....................

701
133
568
137
200
229

1.16
1.26
1.14
1.28
1.14
1.05

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) .....

294
80
214
123

1.30
1.32
1.30
1.25

Nonmanufacturing .................. .......
P , U . nHHHag *
iH/
..............
Truckers, nower (fork-lift) ...... ....... ......••
Manufacturing............... ..... .......
Nonraanufacturing .........................

44
19
25

5

-

4

-

4

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

19
10
9

43
12
31

6

38

6
O

9

1
2
19

38
5
Q
7
18
6

28

72

18

13

28

72

18

!

i

1

” i

-

13
-

-

72

16

-

- i“

28

0
1 *

- !

- i-

_

_ |_ !_
i

_

_

«
.

- f
- :

:

_

-

-

_ j_

_

!
1.29
1.36 --- 1
1.23
-

;
■

;
'

18

16
9
7

18

8

-

18
1

28
5
23

7
1
6
6

23
i

_ 1 _
i

_

11
2
9

- 1-

-

- ;-

19; 68 1 33
2 2,
17 :66 33
- 132 |
13 !32 j
4! - i33
!
!

i
-

6

-

“
-

21
11
10

24
24
20
4

12
6
6
<
L
X

6

54 37
7 11
47 26
Q
1q
7
on 1 TO
<U !X f
c
14 1
-

4
1
3
3
1 1
1 ;3
;- j~

25
15
10
4
c
0

- ■- i -

3
2
34 100 4
16
6
18 94 ’ 4
;2
3
1f U
t
Xo
X
;3
50 ;

” 1 - j 1
5 11 ! 1 1 J I
!
4 ! 3
I
i
1 ; 8
6 l
- ;
-

8
2
6

j

!

93 113 I 37 42 34
4 !4 8 ; 7
89 ;65 j 3° 42 34
40 |
28 ; 34
34 ;40 ! 24 | 14 !
6
15 j25
16 102

14
8
6

16

102
83
2
2

25
6
19

17
q
!4

_

A
3
3
3

X

3

93
47
46
/A
40

9

1
8

-

-

j3

1

1;
!3

1
x

-

-

-

-

-

- :- I
1
-

-

1

1

-

2

j
1 1 5i L 12
x ! 5 J10 A ! 6
24 | 6
9/ 1 6

_

1
|
-

-

135
16
ii
i9
1Ot
Co
c
.
\q
e

i

-

T

67 84
24
84
*0
3
1 y?
1 / 16
22 25
6 4

_ !48 !11
45 J19 4?
j
2
2 !37
48
42 43 ;17 j 6
_ 1
12
6
14 | 5
1
36 n I28 |38 j 11

i

’ 1- !" ,“ 1“
:
;

16

9

-

XU

16
14
2
2

21

7 10
57
27
7 4
6
3° ,
6
15 1
13
-

4
9

~

21

20

5

13
-

20 15
14 5
6 10

5
5

4

1

_

-

4

5

:

4

5

13

11

13
:2

1

54

X

37
29

i 1
|

3
3

:

i

1
!

i
j

8

54
10

1

1

1
11

-

1
1
29
2/29
- i
- j

11 1 1

11

-

1
-

4

-

—

4

-

1

-

-

1

-

|

116
Manufacturing.....

..................... ...................................................................
---

.........

60

56
... _ _

a

16

1.03
1 .1 6

.90
.88

_

1

;

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

i

1

15
14

6
2

10
2
8

4,

7

1

1/
2/

y
*

d e l u d e s premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows:
6 at $1.65 to $1.70; 23 at $1.70 to $1.75.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

999861 0—
52---- -2




16
6
10
8

;

16

i

, 11

5
5

1

i

17
8
9
4

!

2
2

3
3

i

j

3

4
2
2

4
4

3
3

2
-

-

2

15

2

2

15

!

10,

Characteristic Industry Occupations

B

Table B-63*

!)ttluhOH&e GtWUeAA*

Average 2j
Occupation and sex

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

W eek ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
*
*
!
$
$
$
$
$
s
t
%
3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 U0.00 U2.50 ii5.o o U 7.50 5 c .o o 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7£.ooj eo .o o 8 5 .0 0 90.00i 9 5 .0 0 jl0 0 .0 0

and
under

3 2 .5 0 2 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 U0.00 U2.S0 I45.QO U 7.?o 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 ,5 0 6 5 .W 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 80,001 85.001 9 0 .0 0 95.00100.00 over
----------1 ---

1

Men
Section heads .........
Underwriters ..........

22
23

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 5 .5 0
7 1 .5 0

I
t
2

2

6

1
2

j

-

Morgen

h
h

2
1

2

I
1
6

2 ! - i

1

3
2

3 9 .5
Uo.o
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

3 9 .5 0
3 3 .0 0
3 6 .0 0
U2.00

Premium acceptors ....
Section heads .........
Stenographers, general
Typists, class B ......

16
17
91
3h

3 9 .5
Uo.o
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

ii0 .5 0
5 1 .0 0
li3 .5 o
3 6 .0 0

U
20
-

6
3
h

3
6

!

3

|
i

7
12
! 12
1
12
10

! 7
1 1
*
12
|X2

19
: 9
j 12

1

0
; i 27
| k

1 6
! 11

12
1 8
1
i 3
: 5
; 15

-

-

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

2

-

2

■5
2

2
5

h

3

»

2

3

_

-

-

_

15

_

_

6

j

2

1

j
!

h9
30
36
55

-

|

i

Clerks:
Accounting .........
File, class B .....
General ............
Underwriter .......

1/
2/

1

1

$

_

_

-

-

:

_

1

3

j

| _ .
-

.

-

-

_
-

-

1

j
1

1

The study covered establishments in the insurance industry with more than 20 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Surrey, Oklahoma City, Okie., October 1951

U.S. DEPARTMOrr QP LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

11,

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through oolleotive bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

R uildU U f Go4iA.t>lUcti04l

Table C-27:

January 2, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Classification

..................
..........tttT T .f
T ...T
.tt.................. ..............
.............. ....TT ..T
T._-T
Plumbers T tT T Tr.T _T.___ tt..trT
T t.T.TT .T
t
Building l a b o r e r s ............ ..............

Bricklayers
................
C a r p e n t e r s _ ......____ _______ _________ tT..
_
Electricians .....T_
_
Painters
Plasterers
__

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week

$3,500
2.325
2.625
2.000
3.300
2.700
1.430

40
40
40
40
40

i)
f




M tU otfruick 2b*Uom%d <G4*d
July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

Class if ic at ion

Book and job shops:
Bindery women
Bookbinders
Compositors, hand
Electrotypers
Machine operators
Machine tenders (machinists) ....... .

...........................

$1,143
2.090
2.090
2.493
2.090

.

Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder feeders, first year
Platen feeders, first year
Pressmen, c y l i n d e r ........ .
Pressmen, platen
Pressmen, offset ...... .

/az/&
ZJeUl

Bread and c ake - Machine shops:
Baking department:
F o r e m e n ................ ..............
Dough mixers, overmen, icing mixers ..
Bench and machinemen, cake depositor
operators, loaders and dumpers ....
Scalers ................. ....... ••••••
Helpers:
First 6 months .....................
Second 6 months ........... ........
After 1 year .......................
Wrapping department and miscellaneous:
F o r e m e n .... ..........................
Wrapping-machine operators ...........
Checkers .............. ........... .
Flour dumpers, clerks (store or stale
room) .........................
Inexperienced wrapping room helpers,
bread handlers, packers, pan
greasers cake, pan washers, and
cake dumpers:
First 6 months ..................
Second 6 months
After 1 year ........ ...........
Cake department, women workers:
Foreladies, f i r s t ............. .......
Foreladies, second •••••••............
Wrappers, cake filling, cake icing,
cake cutters, machine operators ...
Hand icers, hand wrappers, labelers,
b o x e r s ......................•••••••
New girls:
First 90 days ............ .........
After 90 days .....................

Table C-42:

Honrs
per
week

40
40
40

37*

2.375

40

40
40
40

1.513
1.182
2.090
1.916
2.090

40
40
40
40
40

2.150

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,000
1.075
1.150

48
48
48

1.230
1.180
1.070
.970

48
48
40
40

1.250
1.275
1.300

40
40
40

1.135
1.190
1.300
1.320

40
40
40
40

1.175
1.200
1.225

40
40
40

1.125
1.150
1.175

40
40
40

1.520

40

1.950
1.960
1.885
1.885
1.905

40
40
40
40
40

1.205

Classification

40

1.780

40

Bakery:
Lass than

30

30-60 days
After

60 days

days .................

...... ........... •••••
.............. .......... .

General - Freight:
City hauling

••••••••••••••......... •••••

Helpers .................................

Transfer ................................
Helps*a
........................

Grocery:

July 1, 1951

Classification

PAdJlUtUf

July 1, 1951

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,675
1.525

40
40

1.425

1.400

40
40

.975
1.100
1.175

40
40
40

1.375
1.275
1.250

40
40
40

1.175

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work .................
Night w e r k ...............
Machine operators:
Day w o r k .................
Night work ••••••••.......
Machine tenders (machinists):
Day w e r k .................
Night work ...............
Photoengravers:
Day w o r k .................
Night work ...............
Pressmen, w eb presses:
Day w o r k .................
N i g h t - w o r k ............ .
Stereotypers:
Day w o r k .........
Night work ................

2.440
2.600

37$
37i

2.440

2 .6 0 0

374
37s

2.570
2.730

374
37l

2.720
2.972

36
36

2.493
2.627

374
374

2.493
2.627

374
374

Wholesale:
First 3 months .................
4-9 months
•••••••••••••••••••••••••
After 9 months .....
................ .
Retail:
Agreement A:
First 6 m o n t h s ... ...... •••••••
7-12 months ................
12-24 months .............. .
After 2 y e a r s ...............
Agreement B:
County drivers:
First 6 months ..... .
7-12 months ....... .... .
After 1 year ••••••••
.... ......
City drivers:
First 6 m o n t h s ......
Second 6 months .•••••••••••••••
After 1 year ............. .

40

M e a t .............................
Oil:
Fleet ...................................
and c h e m i c a l ..... ....... .
Lease

Gas
.975
1.100
1.175

40
40
40

1.300
1.200

40
40

1.175

40

1.075

40

.900
.950

40

Table C-41:

Pipeline .........................fr.....
Regular .......................a.........

JloccU ^tO + U it Qp& UitiW f
October 1, 1951

Classification

1-man cars and busses:
First 6 months ..........................
— 2 months
After 1 year ............................

71

Paper
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,130
1.180
1.260

48
48
48

Railway e x p r e s s ......

..................

Occupational Wage' Survey, Oklahoma City, Okla., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12 ,

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

M in im u m £j*t*ance P&teA jo* PUw U Wa*A**A 1/

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Percent of plant workers In establishments with specified
minimum rates in Minimum rate (in cente)

All
Industrie 8

2/

Manufacturing establishments
with -

501 or

21-100

101-500

workers

workers

100.0

100.0

Wholesale
trade

Detail
trade

S U ift *b ity eA *4ttia l PaOu MOHA

Services

more
workere

100.0

Table E-ls
Public
utilitiee*

Shift differential
All establishments ...........

100.0

40 or under ...................
Over 40 and under 45 .........
45 ............................
Over 45 and under 50 .........
50 ............................
Over 50 and under 55 .........
55 ............................
60 ........... .................
Over 60 and under 65 .........
Over 65 and under TO .........
70 ............................
Over 70 and under 75 .........
75 ............................
Over 75 and under 80 .........
80 ............................
Over 80 and under 85 .........
8 5 ............................
Over 85 and under 90 .........
9 0 ............................
Over 90 and under 95 .........
95 ............................
Over 95 and under 100 ........
100 ...........................
Over 100 and under 105 ......
105 ...........................
Over 105 and under 110 ......
1 1 0 ...........................
Over 110 and \mder 115 ......
Over 115 and under 120 ......
120 and over .................

5.7
1.7

1 .0
2.5

1 .2
2.7

.6
.9
5.5
1.5
3.5

1 .6
14.2
2.5
2.7
7.3
8.7
1.1
6.9
1.9
2.6
2.0
4.7
1.3
.7
1.5
.7
.6
1.2
6.5

3.6
38.2
_

_
_
18.3
_

-

-

-

.
.
13.2

-

_
_
-

34.9
.

2.5

9.4
-

32.5

-

-

-

-

5.8
_
11.1
3.7
17.6
3.6
2.9
-

34.1
-

29.3
6.6
_
6.1
.2

4.9
-

13.^
-

3.3
-

-

-

-

7.8

-

4.9
-

-

-

.4

-

-

Information not available ....

4.1

-

-

-

.
-

5.4
5>
-

25.5

12.9
.
11.4
2.1
.6
3.6
.5
4.3
■
-

2 0 .2
17.2

_
3.8

2d
shift

34 or
other
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
a n establishments .................

15.8

2.6

Receiving shift differe n t i a l s ....

12.3

1.5

Uniform cents (per hour) ......
Under 5 cents ...............
5 cents .....................
7 cents ...................
7i cents ....................
10 cents ....................
Over 10 cents ...............

9.9
.7
4.0
1.6
1.6
.
2.0

1.5
.
.2
.3

Other ...........................

2.4

-

3.5

1.1

9.7
13.1

1 .6
8 .6
1 .8

6 .8

17.6
4.7

6 .1

11.2

-

5.0
3.7
.

_
-

7.6
.

-

-

5.1
6.6
_

1.2
4.1
1.4
-

-

_
3.0
4.2
5.2
.
.
-

6.9
1.3
-

_

.

-

Receiving no d i f f e r e n t i a l ........

1/

1.0
(!/>

Less than .05 of 1 percent.

-

-

2.8

-

-

-

1.2

-

-

-

4.9

1.6

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, Insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




100.0

5.1
15.2

47.9

-

.
-

17.2
16.2

9.8
3.7
-

5.3
_

100.0

100.0
1 1.8

_
_
_

Establishments with no
established m i n i m u m ........

1/
2/
*

100.0

Percent of plant
workers employed
on each shift In
all manufacturing
Industries

Occupational Wage Surrey, Oklahoma City, Okla., October 1951
U.S. D K P A R M E f T OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

13,

Table E-2:

S ch e d u le d W j&eJihf J f 0 4
4 *4
*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED IN—
Weekly hours

All establishments ........

35 hours ............. .
Over 35 and under 37^ hours
37§- hours .................
Over 37^- and under 40 hours
40 hours ............. .
Over 40 and under 44 hours
44 hours ..................
Over 44 and under 48 hours ,
48 hours ......... *........
Over 48 and under 50 hours
50 hours ............... .
Over 50 hours ..............

1/
2/
*
**

All
industries

1 0 0 .0
1 .2
_
4 .5
4 .1
6 4 .9
2 .2
1 5 .3
4 .5
2 .4
.3
.6

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance***
1

Services

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

All
industries 2 / Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

5 .3
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

8 8 .2
6 .2
2 .2
3 .4
_

8 1 .9
3 .9
1 2 .8
.6
.8
_
-

-

“

_
1 1 .5
4 4 .0
6 .7
1 0 .9
1 7 .2
7 .4
_

5 2 .6
1 .7
4 0 .2
5 .1
.4
_
-

-

-

1 5 .7
1 0 .0
5 6 .9
.6
1 1 .5
-

_
-

2 .3

"

-

1 6 .3
-

5 6 .6
1 2 .1
3 .4
4 .1
-

4 .1
3 .4

-

3 .9
6 0 .7
3 .7
1 .3
1 1 .0
1 3 .7
-

-

-

-

-

-

0 .7
1 .2
1 .5
4 3 .0
3 .1
7 .7
6 .9
2 1 .0
1 .1
4 .3
9 .5

-

5 2 .0
-

1 .7
4 6 .3
-

-

-

5 .7

“

-

5 .0
3 1 .8
4 .4
7 .9
5 .1
1 1 .1
2 .4
8 .7
2 3 .6

3 3 .4
.7
3 3 .4
1 4 .4
8 .1
-

8 .0
2 .0

7 .1
-

2 1 .5
5 .1
1 0 .1
4 3 .6
3 .4
7 .4
1 .8

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

E-3

Table

P & i d afolidadfi

P E R C E N T O F PL A N T W O R K E R S E M PL O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Number of paid holidays

All establishments .............
Establishments providing paid
holidays ...... ...............
1 day ........................ .
2 days .......... ........ .
2^ days .................. .
3 days ........................
4 days ................... ....,
5 days ....................... .
6 d a y s ........................
6 £ days ...................... .
7 days ....................... .
8 d a y s .... ............ .
12 d a y s ........... .
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ............... ...... .

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .7

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h o le sa le
tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .3

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

M a n u fa c tu rin g

R e ta il tr a d e

F in a n c e * *

9 5 .7

4 .9

_

1 6 .0

1 .5

1 .6

-

_

5 .2

1 .8

-

-

-

4 .4
6 .3
3 .4

.5
1 .5
7 .7
5 .3

-

-

4 .5

.1

-

-

-

.6

.4

.8
5 .9
9 .4

-

-

-

.9

-

-

-

1 .2

-

19.2

-

6 .1

2 0 .0

-

5 8 .0
-

1 .1

1 .3

1 .3
7 4.8
7 .3
1 0 .1
-

-

9 1 .3

3 .7

1/

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding r a i lroads),
F i n a n c e , insurance, a n d r e a l e state.

2 .0

-

-

6 .7

1 7 .9

-

8 .6




6 6 .6
-

1 3 .5

4 .9

-

-

-

4 .3

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r indus t r i e s o t h e r t h a n t h o s e s h own s e p arately.

*
**

-

-

6 8 .6
-

-

1 0 0 .0

7 4 .4

-

2 .0

1 0 0 .0

_

-

3 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

R e ta il tr a d e

8 5 .2

1 .0

6 0 .2

1 0 0 .0

W h o lesale
tr a d e

_

_

2 .4
6 5 .5

1 0 0 .0

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

9 3 .3

_

9 5 .7

M a n u fa c tu rin g

8 7 .7

_

1 .6

1 0 0 .0

1/

_

.1

.5
.9

S e rv ic e s

All
in d u s tr ie s

5 2 .6

.4
6 .2

7 .0
-

1 2.3

O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey,

communi c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .

_
1 .6

-

_

1 .6
_

1 6 .8

2 .5

_

-

1 2 .1

8 .6

4 1 .2

4 2 .7

-

-

3 1 .4
-

-

•-

-

2 1 .6
-

6 .7

1 4 .8

2 5 .6

O k l a h o m a City, Okla., O c t o b e r 1 9 5 1

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
B u r e a u o f la b o r Stati s t i c s

1 .9
6 1 .9
3 .1
2 .3

S e rv ic e s

1 0 0 .0

7 4 .5

_
5 .1
_

9 .6
2 1 .2

_

7 2.2
-

4 .1

3 6 .0
_
_
2 .6

-

4 .3

-

2 5 .5

Table E-4*

Pa id V<*catio*t& (tyotmcU PaooU m h U )

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Vacation policy

All
in d u s tr ie s

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s*

W h o lesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

F in a n c e * *

S erv ices

A ll
n . M a n u f a c tu r in g
in d u s tr ie s 1 /

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h o lesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

S e rv ic e s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ......

98.3

93.6

99.1

98.9

100.0

100.0

96.3

90.6

91.7

95.0

83.7

93.9

88.2

Under 1 week ...........................
1 w e e k ............... .................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ............. ..................
Over 2 weeks ..........................

41.8
.8
55.2
.5

31.1
59.3
3.2

68.1
31.0
-

45.0
.4
53.5
-

80.8
3.4
15.8

~
.3
99.7
-

16*5
1.2
78.6

1.2
72.2
1.5
15.7

3.9
75.4

67.3
_

53.1
4.1
26.5

88.1
_

54.1
10.0

5.8

2 4 .1

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

1.7

6.4

.9

1.1

98.5

93.6

100.0

98.9

100.0

Under 1 w e e k ..... ................. .
1 w e e k ............................. .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ............. ................. .
Over 2 w e e k s ...................... .

12.7
1.2
84.1
.5

20.2
70.2
3.2

1.2
1.3
97.5
-

24.0
.4
74.5
-

24.1
4.7
71.2
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

1.5

6.4

Establishments with paid vacations ......

98.5

93.6

100.0

98.9

100.0

100.0

1 week .................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ........ ....... ................
Over 2 weeks ..........................

8.3
.1
87.8
2.3

4.2
86.2
3.2

.9
99.1
-

21.5
.4
76.4
.6

17.1
81.6
1.3

.3
93.1
6.6

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

1.5

6.4

All establishments .......................

1 year of service

_

_

_

-

-

12.4
-

27.7
-

3.7

9.4

8.3

5.0

16.3

6.1

11.8

96.3

90.9

91.7

97.4

83.7

93.9

88.2

16.5
_

1.2
47.6
3.1
39.0

3.9
72.9
_

17.3
_
80.1
-

35.3
4.1
.44.3

42.2
8.7
43.0

52.3

14.9

35.9

3.7

9.1

8.3

2.6

6.1

11.8

96.3

90.9

91.7

97.4

83.7

93.9

88.2

15.3

-

81.0
-

21.7
1.7
66.3
1.2

21.0
3.9
66.8

3.7

2 years of service

Establishments with paid vacations .....

100.0

_

-

1.1

-

_
.3
99.7
-

79.8
-

16.3

5 years of service

-

1.1

-

4 6 .8

21.0

22.6
67.4
3.9

41.4

-

4.1
58.0
.6

9.1

8.3

2.6

16.3

6.1

11.8

96.3

90.9

91.7

97.4

83.7

93.9

88.2

15.3

-

7.8
89.6
-

21.0
3.9
44*3
22.5

7.8

4 6 .8

65.1
24.5

15.5
4.1
55.6
8.5

22.6

73.6
7.4

21.1
1.7
51.7
16.4

55.8
15.5

41.4

3.7

9.1

8.3

2.6

16.3

6.1

11.8

•

3£.Jffiftra.-°.CJMPEtoP

Establishments with paid vacations .....

98.5

93.6

100.0

98.9

100.0

1 week .................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .............
2 weeks ...............................
Over 2 weeks ..........................

7.8
.1
66.1
24.5

4.2

.9

18.1

17.1

62.5
26.9

.4
62.7
17.7

66.0
16.9

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

1.5

6.4

-

-

52.4
46.7
-

1.1

1/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

-

100.0

.3
82.8
16.9
-

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City, Okla., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15.

Table E-5s

P a id S io Jz Jljz a a e (fy o k m a l PsuuUAiOHd*)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ......................

A
ll
industries

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

100.0

100 .0

100.0

100.0

2 8 .1
2 .3
2 .2
7 .9
2 .1
3 .6
5 .0
1 .5
1 .0
2 .5

2 4 .4
1 1 .1
.8
3 .2
5.5
3 .8
-

3 0 .0
.9
6 .7
2 .4
3 .5
1 6 .5
-

71 .9

75.6

3 0 .4
3 .1
6 .1
1 .3
2 .7
7 .4
.9
1.5
4 .4
.1
2 .9

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
A
ll
industries 1 /

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

100 .0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

0 .8
_
.8
-

1 9 .9
2 .5
1 .2
_
16.2
-

2 0 .4
8.5
_
5 .5
3 .1
_
3 .2
_
.1

6 .3
_
_
5 .3
_
_
_
1 .0
-

7 .0
1 .3
1 .4
_
4 .3
-

9 1 .8

9 9 .2

8 0 .1

7 9.6

9 3 .7

9 3 .0

1 1 .0
8 .0
1 6 .2
7 .4

1 1 .7
1 .5
2 .4
1 .9
.5
1 .2
.2
.9
2 .7
.3
.1

1 .5
.7
.8
-

2 5 .2
2 .5
1 .2
5 .3
1 6.2
“

2 6 .0
8 .5
5.5
.7
3 .1
3 .3
4 .3
.6

1 2 .3
_
5.3
6 .0
_
1 .0
-

7 .0
1 .3
1 .4
_
_
4 .3

6 2 .8

5 7 .4

8 8 .3

9 8 .5

7 4 .8

7 4 .0

8 7 .7

9 3 .0

1 0 .4
1 .6
6 .5
_
_
1 .3
1 .0
_
-

37.2
1 9 .1
1 1 .4
_
2 .8
_

42.6

1 1 .7
1 .5
2 .4
1 .9
.2
.6
.6
.9
2 .4
1 .1
_
.1

1 .5
.8
.7
_
_
-

2 5 .2
2 .5
1 .2
1 6 .2
5 .3
_
-

2 6 .0
8 .5
5.5
.7
_
3 .3
3 .1
4 .3
_
_
_
.6

12.3
5 .3
6 .0
_
_
_
1 .0

7 .0
1 .3
1 .4
_
_
_
4 .3

3 .9

1 1 .0
8 .0
_
1 6 .2
_
7 .4

6 2 .6

8 9.6

6 2 .8

5 7 .4

8 8 .3

9 8 .5

7 4.8

7 4 .0

8 7 .7

9 3 .0

3 4 .4
.9
2 .4
6 .8
_
3 .5
1 6 .5
4 .2
.1

3 7 .4
1 2 .7
3 .3
.9
_
3 .2
7 .3
.7
9 .3

1 7 .2
1 .7
6 .5
_
_
1 .3
_
7 .7

37.2
1 9 .1
_
_
1 1 .4
2 .8
-

42.6

1 .5
_
.7
-

2 5.2
2 .5
1 .2
1 6 .2

7 .0
1 .3
1 .4

7 .4

2 6 .0
8 .5
5 .5
.7
3 .3
3 .1
4 .3
_
.6

1 6 .4
5.3
6 .0
_

3 .9

1 3 .0
1 .5
2 .4
1 .9
.2
.4
.6
.9
2 .4
.8
1 .9

6 5 .6

6 2 .6

8 2 .8

6 2 .8

5 7 .4

8 7 .0

9 8 .5

7 4 .0

8 3 .6

Retail trade

Finane **

Services

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

3 5 .2
1 2 .7
3 .3
7 .3
_
5 .1
6 .8

3 .9
1 .7
_
2 .2
-

37.2
1 9 .1
1 1 .4
2 .8
3 .9

42.6

1 1 .0
8 .0
1 6 .2
7 .4

7 0 .0

6 4 .8

9 6 .1

6 2 .8

5 7 .4

2 4 .4
.8
14.3
5.5
3 .8
-

34.2
.9
2 .4
6 .7
4 .2
3 .5
16.5
-

3 7 .4
1 2 .7
3 .3
.9
7 .3
3 .2
.7
9 .3

1 0 .4
1 .6
6 .5
1 .3
1 .0
-

37.2
1 9 .1
- .
1 1 .4
2 .8
3 .9

42.6

6 9 .6

75 .6

6 5 .8

6 2 .6

8 9 .6

3 0 .5
3 .1
6 .1
1 .3
1 .5
7 .1
2 .1
1 .5
3 .8
1 .1
(2 /)
2 .9

2 4 .4
_
.8
1 8 .1
5.5
_
_
_
-

3 4 .4
.9
2 .4
6 .8
_
_
3 .5
1 6.5
4 .2
.1
-

3 7 .4
1 2 .7
3 .3
.9
_
3 .2
7 .3
.7
_
_
9 .3

6 9 .5

75 .6

6 5 .6

3 1 .6
3 .1
6 .1
1 .3
1 .5
6 .5
2 .1
1 .5
3 .8
.9
4 .8

24*4
.8
_
14 .3
5.5
3 .8

6 8 .4

75 .6

1 0 0 .0

M
anufacturing

Retail trade

Services

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
3 days ...............................
4 days ...............................
5 days ...............................
6 days ....................... ........
8 days ...............................
10 days ............... •............. .
11 or 12 days ........................ .
14 to 18 days ........................ .
30 days and over ....................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................. .
.

8 .2
1 .3
.3
2 .4
.4
2 .4
.4
.4
.6
(2 /)

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................. .
Under 5 days .........................
5 days ................... ...........
6 days ................................ .
8 or 9 days .......................... .
10 d a y s .......... .................... .
11 days ................... .......... .
12 days .......... .................... .
14 or 15 days ................ .
22 d a y s ............ ...................
30 days and over
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid siok leave ................... .

_
-

2 yeftrg of pegylcg
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid siok leave .................. .
Under 5 days .......... .............. .
5 days ............................... .
6 days ................................
9 days ................................
10 days ................ ............. .
11 days ...............................
12 days .............. ................
14 or 15 days .........................
22 days ................ ..............
24 days ...............................
30 days and over .....................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ........... ........

-

_
_
-

5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .... .
Under 5 days ................. ........
5 days .................. .............
6 days ................................
9 days ................................
10 days .............................. .
11 days ................... ......... .
12 d a y s ................ ..............
14 or 15 days ........... ........... .
22 days .... .................
30 days and over .....................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 peroent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1 1 .0
8 .0
_
_

16.2
-

_

_

.8

5.3
7 4 .8

5 .1

_
4 .3
9 3 .0

Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City, Okla., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

Table E-6:

1/
2/
*
**

(m pAiodiU itU m Bo4t46&&l

Incltides data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), connunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7i

9*tA44SlG+U>e O tuI P-&H&A041 P lo 4tl

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T O F PL A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of plan
A ll
in d u s tr ie s

,
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans
............. .........

7j

M a n u fa c tu rin g

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

W h o lesale
tr a d e

R e ta il tr a d e

... ISQtP

;,Q0,,Q

, .JUBifi___

S erv ices

F in a n c e * *

-Wifi

........

AH
in d u s tr ie s

.... I QQiQ.
.

1 0 0 .0

95.2

76.3

76.8

85.0

6 4 .0

74.6

42.9
54.3
15.1

2 4 .8

58.9
40.7

51.9
7.7

6 8 .1

52.9
40.3
64.4

4 0 .2

77.0
59.9
62.5
36.3

51.8
18.2
49.1
76.5

5 6 .0

2 4 .2

15.6

Life insurance .................
Health insurance ..................... .
Hospi t a l i z a t i o n .... ..................
Retirement pension ....................

84.5

15.5

4.8

23.7

23.2

15.0

1 4 .0

8^.4
63.4
36.7
57.8

8 6 .0

69.3

,

,
hi/

M a n u fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

. .........
.

6 9 .2

85.5

W h o le sa le
tr a d e

R e ta il t r a d e

IQQaP

—

JfflML,

69.3

66.3

6 0 .9
39.9
14.7

65.3

60.3

60.5

6 4 .2

4 8 .2

2 4 .2

4 2 .8

1 6 .0

46.1
18.0

51.7
50.5

43.7
6.3

19.9
41.0
5.1

30.7

3 0 .8

14.5

30.7

33.7

60.5
31.7
45.9

S e rv ic e s

5 6 .8

5.7

Establishments with no insurance or

1/
2/
*

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
^duplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate.




39.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Oklahoma City, Okla., October 1951
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17.

A ppendix — Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations* (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered Industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational class ifioat ion.
Information on wags practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practloe in
question, except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA., l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, OCTOBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ................................
Manufacturing ...................... ..... .
.
Nonmanufacturing..... ........... ..........
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities....................... ..
Wholesale trade ......... ........... .
Retail trade ...................... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate *•••••
Services 2 / ......................... ...

21
21
21

615
117
498

158
34
124

51,800
14,600
37,200

24,880
8,460
16,420

4,920
1,030
3,890

21
21
21
21
21

60
128
160
73
77

20
28
31
22
23

8,000
6,900
13,900
3,800
4,600

5,760
1,950
4,570
1,550
2,590

1,650
520
460
970
290

21

31

13

1,238

621

339

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis
Insurance carriers ............................

1/ Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area (Oklahoma County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




19

Index
Page
number
Bench hand (bakeries) ................
Biller, machine.... ....... .
Bookbinder (printing) ........ .
Bookkeeper, hand .......... ........ ..
Bookkeeping-machine operator
.... «
Bricklayer (building construction) ••••
Calculating-machine operator..... .
Carpenter (building construction) *••••
Carpenter, maintenance ...............
Cleaner *••••••»•••............... .
Clerk, accounting ................. .
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers)
Clerk, f i l e .... .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) .....
Clerk, general .................. ..
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) •••
Clerk, order ....................... .
Clerk, payroll «••••••••........ .
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers)
Compositor, hand (printing) ........ .
Crane operator, electric bridge .... ..
Draftsman .............. ........ . ••••
Duplicating-machine operator ••••••••••
Electrician (building construction)
Electrician, maintenance .......... ...
Electrotyper (printing) ..............
Engineer, stationary ........... .
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .... .
G u a r d ............................ .
Helper (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••••••
Helper, motortruck driver ............
Janitor ........................... .
Key-punch operator ................. .
Laborer (building construction) ......
Machine operator (printing) »•«••«•••••
Machine tender (printing) ............
Machinist, maintenance ••••••••••••••••
Maintenance man, general utility.....
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ••••
Millwright........... ...... ..... ..
Mixer (bakeries) .....................




11
3

11
3, 4
3, 4

11
4

11
7

a

3, 4
10
4

10
3, 5

10

3, 5
3, 5

10

11

8
6
5

11
7

11
7
7

8
11
11

8
5

11
11
11
7
7
7
7

11

Page
number
Motortruck driver ................ ................. ..
Nurse, industrial (registered) .............. ...........
Office b o y ................ ............. ..............
Office g i r l ............................................
O i l e r .............................................
Operator (local transit) ........
••••••
Order f i l l e r ...........................................
Ovenman (bakeries) .................. ......... .........
P a c k e r .................... .............. .............
Painter (building construction) ................. ......
Painter, maintenance.... •••••••....... ............ ....
Photoengraver (printing) ...... ..... ....... ...........
Plasterer (building construction) ...................... .
Plumber (building construction) ............. ..... .
Porter ....
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ...........
Press assistant (printing) ................
••••••
Press feeder (printing) .....
Pressman (printing) •••••••.•««•••••••••......
Receiving clerk ••••••......
Secretary ••••••..... •••••••••............ .
Section head (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Shipping clerk
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k .......
•
Stenographer .................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ................. .....
Stereotyper (printing) ....... ............ ••••••••.... .
Stock handler ............... ............... .. .........
Switchboard operator............
Switchboard operatoiweoeptionist .......................
Tabula ting-machine operator ...........
Tool-and-die m a k e r .... .......... . •••...... ....... .
Transcribing-raachine operator
...... ...... . ••
Truck driver .........
Trucker, hand ...............
Trucker, power ...........
Typist ...............................
Typist (insurance carriers)
Underwriter (insurance carriers) .......................
Watchman ..........................
Wrapper (bakeries) ••••••....... ••••••••••.... .

11
6
3
5
7
11
8
11
8
11
7
11
11
11
8
iO
11
11
11
8
5
10
8
9
5
10
11
9
5
6
3
7
6
9
9
9
6
10
10
9
11

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952







This report was prepared in the Bureau's Southern Regional Office.
Communications may be addressed to:
Brunswick A. Bagdon, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 664
50 Seventh Street, N. E.
Atlanta 5> Georgia
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Southern Region includes the following States:
North Carolina
Alabama
Arkansas
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Florida
Georgia
Tennessee
Louisiana
Texas
Maryland
Virginia
Mississippi
West Virginia
District of Columbia


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102