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Occupational Wage Survey

Bulletin No. 1 0 6 9

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION........................................ ...........................

1

THE SALT LAKE CITY METROPOLITAN AREA .............................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE......................................... ............

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ........................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ...............................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.........
A-£
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations ...............

3
6
7
8

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-40
Railroads .....................................................

10

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ...............................................
C-205
Bakeries ............................................•...............
C-27
Printing........................... ................................
C-4-1
Local transit operating employees..........
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers..........

11
11
11
11
11

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ...........................

12

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ......................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .........................
E-3
Paid holidays .......................................................
E-4
Paid vacations ......................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave .............................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses.................
E~7
Insurance and pension pl a n s ........

12
13
13

1U
15
16
16

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ............. ...... ......... ........ .

17

INDEX ............... ...........................................................

19

April 8, 1952

For s l by t e Superintendent o Documents, U S Government P i t n O f c , Washington 2 , D C. - Price 1 c
ae
h
f
. .
r n i g fie
5 .
5 ents

Introduction y
The Salt Lake City area is 1 of 40 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys* Occupations that are common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of
sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) cus­
todial, warehousing, and shipping. In presenting earnings in­
formation for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data
have been provided wherever possible for individual broad in­
dustry divisions*
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries were studied on an industry basis
within the framework of the community survey* 2/ Earnings data
for these jobs have been presented in Series B tables* Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting) occupational earnings for several industries or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or
minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized an shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area
The population of the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area
(Salt Lake County) was estimated at 280,OCX) in 1951*
About
190,000 were concentrated in Salt Lake City*
Wage and salary workers in the area in December 1951
(excluding those in agricultural pursuits) numbered 102,000;
and 1 in every 7 of these was employed in government— Federal,
State, or local*

1/ Prepared in the Bureaufs regional office in San Francisco,
Calif., by William P. 0*Connor under the direction of John L*
Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The plan­
ning and central direction of the program was carried on in the
Bureaufs Division of Whges and Industrial Relations, in Wash­
ington, Do C*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey*



In manufacturing, with 15,000 workers, the most impor­
tant industries in terms of number of workers employed were
primary smelting and refining of copper and other nonferrous
metals, metal fabrication, and food processing* In addition to
the primary smelting and refining of nonferrous metals, the min­
ing of these ores within Salt Lake County provided employment
for 6,000 persons*
As the largest city between the Rocky Mountains and
the Sierras, Salt Lake City is the natural hub of trade in the
intermountain region. Wholesale and retail establishments em­
ployed 32,000 people— about 1 of every 3 workers. The service
industries employed 9,000 people and another 5#000 were in fi­
nance, insurance, and real estate establishments.
Combined employment of the transportation, communica­
tion, and other public utility industries (including railroads)
was 11,000. The building construction industry employed another
6,000 workers.
Among the industry and establishment-size groups stud­
ied in December 1951# less than half of the plant workers were
employed in establishments having written contracts with labor
organizations*
The proportion of plant workers in establish­
ments covered by union agreements varied widely, however, among
the industry divisions studied. Four out of five workers in the
public utilities group were employed in establishments having
union contracts, as were three out of five workers in manufac­
turing. Oily about one worker in every four in wholesale and
retail trade and one in every eight in the service industries
were employed in establishments operating under such agreements •
In the manufacturing and public utilities groups, onefourth and one-third, respectively, of the office employees were
in establishments which had signed union agreements applying to
office workers.
Union organization of office workers in the
other industry groups studied was negligible.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages of more than half the plant workers were affect­
ed by general wage increases between January 1950 - the base
period of the Wage Stabilization Board fs 10 percent "catch-up"
wage increase formula - and the time of the study* These ad­
justments were much more numerous after the outbreak of hostil­
ities in Korea than during the preceding 6 months. The extent
of general wage increases varied sharply among the different
industry groups studied; although two-thirds of the manufactur­
ing plant workers and over four-fifths of nonoffice workers in
the public utility industries received at least one general

2

increase during the period, the wages of less than a fourth of
those in retail trade and service establishments were similarly
affected© The amounts of these pay raises varied considerably
among establishments, but were usually 5 or more cents an hour*
Formal wage increases for office workers were somewhat
less extensive than for those of plant workers, reflecting the
tendency of some establishments to adjust clerical workers* sala­
ries on an individual basis rather than by means of general wage
increases *
Formalized wage structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing over 85 percent of the plant
workers* More than half of these workers were in establishments
using a single rate for each classification, whereas the remain­
der were working under a rate-range system. Among office workers,
about two-thirds were employed in establishments which determin­
ed salaries on the basis of formal rate ranges for each occupa­
tional classification* Nearly all of the remaining office work­
ers were employed in establishments which determined salaries on
an individual basis*
Established minimum entrance rates for inexperienced
plant workers was part of the formalized wage structure in most
Salt Lake City establishments. On an all-industry basis, onefifth of all plant workers were employed in establishments in
which minimum starting rates were less than 75 cents an hour; an
additional seventh were in establishments having starting rates
of exactly 75 cents— the legal minimum for firms engaged in
interstate commerce* The range of minimum rates was from 50 cents
to over $1*50 but no significant concentrations were found above
the 75-cent figure* Minimum rates were generally higher in the
manufacturing, public utilities, and wholesale trade groups than
in retail trade and the service industries*




One-fifth of the manufacturing plant workers were em­
ployed in establishments which determined rates of pay for
first-level supervisors according to a fixed relationship to
the rates of workers supervised* In all cases the differential
was on a cents-per-hour basis*
The lowest differential was 10
cents; the highest, 20 cents. In none of the other industry
groups was this method of setting supervisors1 pay found in more
than two or three establishments*
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing* In 13 of
17 office job classifications permitting comparison, salaries
of workers in manufacturing plants averaged more than those in
nonmanufacturing* Average hourly earnings for plant jobs were
higfier in manufacturing for 7 of the 11 job categories for which
comparisons were possible. Within the nonmanufacturing indus­
tries , wages and salaries in the public utilities group were
consistently higher than the trade, finance, and service groups*
A fourth of the manufacturing workers were emplqyed on
late shift work in December 1951©
Almost all of these workers
received premium payments in terms of cents-per-hour differen­
tials over day shift rates. The most common premium payments
for second-shift work were A and 5 cents an hour, whereas most
third-shift workers received 6 or 8 cents*

Except in the finance group, most women office work­
ers were on a 40-hour workweek* In finance, over half of the
women worked less than 40 hours * Although the 40-hour week was
also the general rule for plant workers in the public utilities
and wholesale trade groups, the major portion of the workers in
the manufacturing, retail trade, and service groups worked 44
to 48 hours a week.

A:

3,

Cross-Industry Occupations

Table A-Is

O j ^ i C e

0 c C 4 4 f u U i O * U

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
|$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
:$
27.50 30.00 32.50135.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45 .00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5 .O 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
O
and
under
1
30.00 132.50 35.00137. 50 40.00 42.50 45.00147.50 5 0 ,0 0 52,50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
•

Weekly

Weekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

j

Billers, machine (billing machine)

13

40.0

*
50.00

1

42.5
42.0
43.0
41.0
41.5
46.5

69.50
74.00
67.50
73.50
65.50
64.50

19

40.5

63.50

Clerks, accounting
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade . .
.
Finance * # .....

226
117"...
109
1 36
33
! 12

42.0
40.5
43.0
40.5
40.0
39.5

63.00
63.50
62.50
58.00
60.50
57.50

-

-

Clerks, general
Manufacturing . .
.
Nonmanufacturing

1
!

89
52
37

41.5
41.6
42.5

61.00 I
64.50
56.50

-

150
33
112
j 94
I 18
j

40.5

60.50
64.00
59.50
59.50
60.00

67.00
— 66.50
68.00 I
40.5

_

40.0
40.0

1
1

1

4

Bookkeepers, hand ...........
Manufacturing........... .
Nonmanufacturing ..........
Public utilities * ......
Wholesale trade ........ .
Retail trade ...........

163
47
116
:
!

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A

Clerks, order
Manufacturing ...
Nonmanufacturing .
.
Wholesale trade
Retail trade . .
.

33
37

!

40.5
40.0
44.0

-

-

-

-

-

-:

-

-

-

-

-

J
-

-

-:
-

-1
-

1
-1
-‘

_—
-j
-,
-:
-

6i
-!
6!
6
-

-

_
-

-

-

l
l

-

_

_

“

-

1
1
1

-

_
_
•

_
-

-

-

_

-

4

1

3

_

4
4

_

J
1
-

41
2i
-!
2
1

1
1
1
•

_

1

1
_
_
1

1
22 !
11 !
-!
1C

2?
12
11 !
4i
6
1!

20
13
?

4

1

3,

1

3

2

14

23
14
9
5
4

16
8
8
6
2

20
12
8
1

5
4
1
1

14
-

3
2

24
-,
15!
7!

14'
11
3
io ;

21
10
11
7
3

i

-

4

-i

8
8
-|

9
9

8
3
5

6
2!
4

1
1
-

l:
l
-i

4
_
4

1
1

6
-i
6
6
-

4
4
-j

21
2
19
12
7

7
7
7
-

23
1
22
22
“

20
7
13
13
-

7
_
7,
6!
1;

_

-

4
4

_

-

_

4j

21

2\

2

3
3i

3
3

_

2
lj

2
J

12
4
8
5!
3j
1
2
1
l;

5'
-j
5;
. 1

6
4
2
_1
----—
-;
-v
-

5'
2
3
3

16
9
7
6
1

17
7
10
3
7

10
4
3

l!

j
;
1
|

15
14

Office boys
Nonmanufacturing

I
!

22
11

30

41.0

n jib

ro
o

Clerks, payroll
Manufacturing . .
.
Nonmanufacturing

44.00 |

J

—
1

1

19
7
12
9
1

19
8i
11 !
8j
1
-

9
5
4

42
17
25

3!
3

4

-

20
12
8
3
1
4

4
4

i
23 i

12
4
8
1
7!

24

3

1

3!
-

1

10
-

1

6

-

8
2
6

8
5
3

3
3,

15
15
-

6
4
2
2

11
4
7
7
-

1?
5
8
7!
1

13
6
7
7
-

6
6
_
_
_
_
-

3
1
2

2
_
2

1
1
_

5
4
1

5
1
4

_
_
-

_
-

_!

1
1
_
1

-

_
_
_
4
4

J
-1

-

6
1
5
2
3

_
_
_
2
2

_
_

_

_
-

_
-

i

i

i

Billers, machine (billing machine)
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing .
.
Wholesale trade
Retail trade . .
.
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade
Finance ** ...

in
14
97
30
12
54
40
! *3

12

42.50 !
40.5
TOT5— 43.00 ;
40.5 ! 42.50
40.0
45.00
41.5 ; 36.00
40.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

43.00
I 43.00
! 43.50
! 45.50

_1

1
1
1

-j
-j

6
6!
6
7,
5
-i
4'

]

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* *
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




|

i
4
4
3
7
7i
“!

21

2
19
2

2

8
8
7

29
7
22
12
-

15,
2
13!
3
i

6

6

2
2

2
2

“!
__!

10!
-:
10 j
-!
“|
10!
10
u\

17!
2
15:
8■
“!

4
1
3i
2
-

4
_
4
3

5i
1!

-!

l
|
j

-!
-

-

_
-

_j

4j
4

-!

_!

-1

_!

u\

“!

-1

-

J
-I
J

j

-

”l

i

-

_!

1
1
1

-

-

-

J

_

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

Oj^ice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

_ 30
_
and I .
under I
30.00 32.50

$
32.50 1 5 0 37.50 40.00
3.0
35»QO |3 7 . SO

42.50 i5. 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50
4 0
$

$ $
6.0 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
00

4.
40.00 .25 45.00 ; 7 50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 . - 6 . 0 6 , 0 65*00 & 1 -2 ± Q11 * 3 0 7 0 80.001
4*o
85.00 90.00
7 5 Q 0 0 25 .
UQ Q.Q
5. 0

Women - Continued

*

Bookkeepers, hand
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade .
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade
Retail trade . .
.
Finance ** ...

47

40.0

U TfT
3 tT
4.
00
27

130

"iar
13
59
45

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing .
.
Wholesale trade
Retail trade . .
.
Finance * * ...

183

“0
1"

173
29
30
9
8

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer j
180
Manufacturing .................
47
Nonmanufacturing ...............
133
Wholesale trade ...............
47
Retail trade ....... ........ 1 77

52.50

40.5
4075“
40.0
42.0
39.0

45.50
45.00
53.00
43.00
45.00

40.0
46.0
40.0
40.0

I39.50
42.50
!39.50

41

2
6

39.0

i39.00
!37.00

7
1
9

4.
20
:40.0

40.5
39.5
39.5

44.00
44.00

Clerks, accounting ................ > 338
Manufacturing .................
5
0
Nonmanufacturing ............... | 288
Public utilities * ...........
47
Wholesale trade ..............
70
Retail trade ................
81
Finance ** ................tT,
64
Services........... ........
26

41.0
" 075
4
41.0
40.0
41.0
43*0
38.5
41.5

44.00
'50.50
42.50
47.00
46.00
43.00
37.00
40.00

39.5
39.5
39.0

41.00
39.50
39.00

5
4
j M
! 20
1

40.0
40.0
40.0

Clerks, f le, class B ..............
i
113
Nonmanufacturing............... H039—
Finance ** ................ T.
45

35.00
39.5
3975“ 35.00
"
i34.00
38.5

Clerks, general ................ .
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing...............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Services ...................

41.5
42.0
41.5
41.0
41.0
43.0
41.5

2
49
$
2
i 197
49
5
2
48
32

14

4.0
10

!
i 12
| 12

Clerks, f l , class A ..............
ie
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Finance ** .................

46.50
53.50
44.50
49.00
40.50
45.50
39.00

5
5
5

19
19
1
18

.
.
-

-

1
1

.
.
-

4 ; 16
_
16
4
_
_
4
16

2
1
21
3
8
10

2
1
1
20
6
6
8

4
4
4

_

8
21
8 ' 21
8 > 16

23
23
H

2!
2
-j
-|
-|
2i

15
15
12
44
40
1

23

17

2I
2
1J
6
Ul

1
1
1
2

40
3
4
10
8
26
8
3
0
20
3 ! 10
10
1 j 15
i
_' 4
4
41 r
—
-

19
5
14
5
8
_
-'

14
6
!
8
3
5
1
1|

18
50 i 48
63 | 26
11 1
6
18 1 1
62 J 2
17
5
44 ! 30
12
2
6
7
3
_
6
4 1 19
9
10
24
13 [ 5 13
3

31

9;

31
j

4i

7
7

9
9
3
3
1

5;
5

4!

6

15

8

-

6 2
[
1 1
31 1
2

15 j

41
5 , 8!
5i 1 1 !
18 |
3
1

-

_
-

6!
U
0
40 j

-

13

4

14
3
11
_
11

12
5
7
1i
3

_

2
2

7
7

1|

-1

x!

1
1
-

12 ;
1,
-j

8
8
4

1;
1I
_

1
1i
-|
_j

5!
51
4!
.:
_j

3
3

_
-

_
_
-

_1

14
3
11
_
11
_

-!
_,
-1

-

_
_
;

-

_
-

_
_
-

7
5
2

23

1
22
_| 9
„j
!
_ 1 11 1
j
-1

_
_
_
-

4
:
1
1
3
1;
1
,
l
!
~|

2
1!
1i
1i

_
:
_;

5
4
1
_

_
_
_1
_
_
_

4j
4
_;
_j
_ j

-

_j
-

_I
.
.

4
1
3

5

10!

7
3
3

1

-|

_,
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_

_■

_

_

_

-

_

„;

_i
9!
2
7
-1
1 j
5

i
_;

_

16
20
1
3
_
4
9
20
2
12
1
4 i 101
6
4; 1
1; 6

10 i 21
12 1 23 !
1 2 ' 17
9
56
23
2
11 — n !- 2l“ 7 ! 7
21 I 45
10
9 i 12
17
19 i 5
16!
8! 1
6
1
101
5
31
61 6
2
6J
5
9
13
4
_
2
2
2
4
1|
17
3
2
10
4!
4 ! 1 i
9
■
1
[
____L

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2
6
2
6

14
14

45.00
48.00
I44.00
;45.50
l43.00

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer t
ype) ...............
Nonmanufacturing ..... .... ......

7j

55.50

_

-

_

_

_
_
_
!

_;
_
1
_;
1
-i
-!
-j
_1
!

.
-

31
3;
_j
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_
_j
-1

-

_

.

3

_
_

_
.1
_

_
,

_
-

_
.
.
_
-

-

7
7
_;
_;
_j

_
_
_
_|
_(

_
_
_
_

5
.

Table A-i:

O j^ice OccHfUutiotU - C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

S

e

x

,

o

W
C

C

u

p
o

e
N

N
S

e
M
N

S

p

a

t i o

-

C

n

o

n

,

Av
N u m b e r
o fa n W d e e
w o r k e h r os u
( S t a n

t i n

u

e

e

r

a

g

e

$
ki W nl y e d e 2 k u
r se a r n i n a
( d S a t r a d n )u d
3

l y7 s
g ns
an r
0

N U M
B E R
O F
W
O R K E R S
R
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
! $
. 0
. 0
3 . t 5 0 r ° y 3. 0 2 0 d 3. 5 i5 v0 3. 0i 7 s 0 4. i 5 o 0 0 4n. 0 2 0 4. 5 5 0 47.500 50.00 5 2 .5 5 5 0 .5 0 7 0 [ . 65 0 62.50
a
dd ) e r
3. 0 2 0 ,3 5 5 0 .3 0 7 0 4. 5 0 0 4. 0 2 0 4. 3 5 0 , . 4 0 7 0 5 . 5 0 0[ . 05 20 5 , 5 5 0 .5 0 7 0 .6 5 0 0 6. 0 2 0 6. 5 5 0

v

- D
o n

w
M
N

n

u
m

t i n g - m
a c h i n 2 e5
3 o 9 p . 3 5e 6 r a . 0 t o0 _ r s1
a n . . u. . . f . a . . c. . . t . u . . . r . i . n. . . g . . . 2. . 3. . . . 3. . . 9 . . . 3. 5 . . 5 . . . .0 . . 0 . - . . 1
c . h. . . . . .o . . p. . . e . . r. . a . . .t . o . . . r 8. .s .4 . . . 3. . . 9 . . . 4.5 . . 0 . . . . 5 . . 04 . .
.
4
a n . . u. . . f . a . . c. . . t . u . . .r . i . n. . . g . . . 7. . 5. . . . 3. . . 9 . . i . . 5 . 4. . . 0 . . . . 0 . 4 . 0.
. . . . . .T . . . . . . .
6 2
3 84 . 5

r e. . . t . . a . . .r . i . . e . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . !. . . . . . . 2 . . 6 4. . 9 . 0 . . ! . . . 0 . .5 . . 3 . . . . . 5 . . 0. .
a n u f a c t u r i n g
. r. . u. —. . 4 . . . 6 . . . 5. 5 . . 9 . . . .0 . . 0 .- . . .
. ~. s. .
o n m
a n . . u. . . f . a . . c. . . t . u . . . r . i . n. . . g .; . .221 . . . . 4. . . 0. . !. . . 0 . .5 . . 2. . . . . 5 . - . .0
. .
P l l h I ]1 l ^ f ( ■ 1 1
A S
*
, 2 7
- 3 . 9 i i.. 5 i 6 1 . 5 - 0 T
W
h o l e s . .a . . l . e . . . . . t . . r . .a . . d. . . ; e . . .45 . . . . .4 . . 0. . . . . 5 0. . 3. . . . . 0 . . .0
.
R
e
t a i . l. . . . . t . . r . . a . . d. . . e . . . . . . |. . . . . . . . . 44. . 4 . 1 . . . . 5. 0 . . 0 . . . .5 . . 0 . - . . .
F i n a * n . . c . . e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . j . . . . . . . . . 83 . . 6 . 9 . . . 5 .0 . .0 . . . . 5 . . . 0 -. . . .
*
S
e r v i c e s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . 9. . . . 4. . . 1 . . . . 5. 0 . . 1 . . . .0 . . 0 . - . . .
c

t e n o
M
a n
N
o n
P
u
W
h
R
e
F i n
S
e
w
M
N

a

l i c
n m

g

a p
. . c. .
n . . u.
b
c
o
s .
t a i. . l . .
a # c . .e .
*
n
r v i c e

i t c h
a n u
n m
R
e
t
F i n a
S
e r v
o

r
f . .a
a
l i
l e

u

m

h e r s ,
g
e 5 n 2 e2 4r a 0 l . 4 5 5 . . . . . 5 . . . 0 .
. t . u . . . r . i. . n . . g. . . . . . . . . .1 . . 1 . . 8. . 4. . . 0. . . . .4 5. . 7 . . . . . 5 0. .f . a . . c. . . t . u . . .r . i . n. . . g .! . . . . . 4. . .0 4. . 4 . 0 . . . . 4. 5 . . 5 . . . . i . 0 . . .0 .
. u . . . . t . . i . l. . i . . t . . i . . e . . . 4s. . 7. . . . *4 . . . 0 . . . . 5. 5 . . 0 . . . 0 0 _
.a . . l . e . . . . . t . . r . . a . . d. . . e . . 1 . . 2 . . 8. . . 4 . . 0. . . . . 4 5. . 6. . . . . 5 . . . 0 . .. .t. . . . r . . a . . . . d . . . e. . . . . . .7 . . 4 . . . .4 . . 2. . . . .4 0. . 3. . . . . 5 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i . . . . . 1 . . 2. 3. .3 . 9 . . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . - .
s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 . .2 . . . .3 . . 9 . . . . 4. 5 . . 4 . . . . 0 . . 0. - .

b

o a r d
f a c t u r
a n u f a
a i l
t r
n c e
*
i c e s

i t c h b o a r d
a n u f a c t u r
o n m
a n . . u. . . f . a . .
W
h o l e s a l e
R
e
t a i l
t r
F i n a n . . c . . . .e . . . . . . * .

c

o
i n
t u
a d
*
. . .
o

i n
c. . . t . u .
t
a d
. *. . . .

p

2

2
2
2

0
0
0
6
6
-

. . . . 2 . . . . 1. .
1
2
1
3
. 4. . . 23 . . . .0 8
. . . . “ . . . . . 3.

6
2

’ 5
3
-

5
5
2

1 2!1
2
1
0 14
1

-6

1
1

-

C

- T

5

E I V I N G
S T R A I G
H T
$
$
$
. 0
6. 0 7 0 7. 5 0 0 72.500 75.00 8 0 . 0 0
~
i
.6 0 7 0 7. 5 0 0 7. 0 2 0 75.000 8 0 1 . 0 8 0 5 . 0 0
. 5

8

20
20

r a
. . .
g
e
. .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

6
- !
6

2
1

-

i 1
_

5

_

!

i
_ j

1

I M
5

E
. 0

0

"
9

0

. 0

32
3

0

-

i -

!

_ 2

21

-

j

1 _
1
-

1 !

- -

-

-

1
8
4

- 3

1

1

_

-

i
-

-

--

7

5

0

1

7

5

»7
3

9
1
6
1

4
9 5
1
2 3
7 6 2 7 ,3
1
:
42;
1
2
9
2 0
9
-!
1 4

1

0
7
4
6

2

4

1
1

6
6

0

6
3
2

1
-

~
2

1
4
7
7
7
4
25
4

. 21. . .7 1 1 3 3
1
_
1 ;
l j
3!
2
i c
1 7 ! 2
_
1!
1 !2
1_
1
-0
- j
|
2 1
1
15;
_
' 6
9
1 2
15
5
1
. !
8
7
j
_
! 0
1
5
2!
5 j
"
j
_ _ l_ _ _ _ _ _[ _ _ _

0

2

5

1
1

5
1
'
0

51
6
._

2

1
!

5
4
8
6
_
_

4

5
2

Hl

-

1
_
9
-

2
1
1
_
;
_
:
j 1
_

1
_

2
1
1

5
5
|

1
_
4
- -

_
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1

i

1 _
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!

l !
1
_ - - - - -2j - - - 1 - _
!
l !
_
j l !
> »
| _
| _
“
! 1

9
9
2
7
_
_

_
_
-

8

’

l

l

i

,
1 1
-3
; J
2
!

_
_
_
_
-

; 4
4

3

-

-

j

2

3

2
<0c

3

J

7

_

_
3

-

’

-

_
_

3

_ j
_

_

_
_

_

3

_

_

1

_

. ;
_

i

_
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1
~
| 1
1!
1 - - - -7 - ? - !
_
l !
_
| 1
_
_
|
_
- ;
-

_

_
_
-

-

_ _

-

8

!

-

1

- -

_
_

-

6
6
_

_
3 _
1
-

4

2
_
2
1 2

1

2

1

_
: 7

j

1

5
5

6
3
8
2

2
— l
;1
_

4

-

1

2

9

1

8
1

4

' j

-

9

7
1

1

8

6

2

3
1
2

!

3
_

5
0
0
0

. 2

-

_

2
o

_

“ 1

1

- [
--

1
2

1

8
8

6

-

:

3
3

_
_2

-

- !

_
1

_

-

i

-

1

!

“
1
”
|
l |
3 _ 2!_ 6
_
_
-1 1!
3
3 ; - 1 ;
*
1!
3 !
1
1
3 1
- i

3

5. . . 2. . .4 . . 4. . .2 . . 8. . .4 . . .9 . . 0 . .
2 !
21 33
4 0!
2 !4
7 1
1
9 |
3 1
2
2
1 1 1 6
9
8 12 12
7 1
0
1 0
3 2
1 3
. . . . - . . . . . 5. . i . .
7
5

e

!

l

3
1
-

4

1

1

-

7
> 1
7 !

6

!

r i n

i




6
1 0
4 4 1 0
4 7 . 5
H3
!

q
. . . . . . . _. . .
7
. .- . . . . . - . . . . . - . . . . . - . . . . . . . .
8
7 1 4
I
. r r . T
_ 1
_
:
_ -!
7
_
. -. .
8
4
. . - . . . . . - . . . . . - . . . . . 4. . . . -

.

_

2. . . . . . 5 . . . . . 2 . ! . . . . . . . . . _ . . . 2 . l j
2 2
2
5
-

1
1

t
. 3. 0 . . 7 . . . 5. . . 10 . . 1 . . . 1 . . 7 . . . 2 . . 0. . . 1 . . 0. . . . 5. .I . . . . . . .
103o r s4 1
. . . . . rw.cr- . . W. . . . . . . 5. . - . 0 . . . . - . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 .
. . . . . . . !.
9 3 . . . . 4 . . .1 . . . .0 . . . . . . . 1. . .1 . 3. .1 . 7 . 7 . . .01 . . 80 . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . .8
. 2. . .8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . -0 . . . . . 0 . 1 . . . . . . . . . . .3 . . 9 .1 . -. . 0 . 0 . . 0.1
1
. 1. . . 9 . . . 3. . . 9 . . . . .3 0 . . 6 . . . . 5 . . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . 5. . . . 1 . 1. . . . 4
. 3. . 3 . . . . 4 . . . 4 . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . 1 . 2 . 5 . . .0 . 2 . 0 . . . . 1 . . . . . 4 . . . .
1
x
i _ s t 1 s 5 1, 4
. .p . . e. . . r . . a .1 . . t 0 . o. 9 r 4 - 0 r e. 4 5 c 4 e . 0 p 0 t i o 3 n
1 i
7
g
. . . . 3. . 2. . . . 4. . . 0 . . . . 4. 0 . . 5 . . . . 5 . . 0. - . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . .3 .
. .r . i . n. . . g . . . 7. . 7. . . . 4. . . 1 . . . . 4. 0 . . 3 . . . . . 0 . . .0- . .
1 i 4
3
1 5
4
r . a. d e 3 9 . . .4 . . 1. . . . . 0. . . . . . . . . _ . . . 4 . . _4. . . . . 0| . . . 0 . . 9
6
1
e
. . . 1. . 8. . . . 4. . . 2 . . . 4. 5 . . 3 . . . . 0 . . 0. _ . . . . . 1 . . . . ! . _ . . . . j . 6 . . . . . _ . . . . . 2
. . . . . . . . . . 1 . . 7. . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . 0 . . . 0. 3. . 0 ~ 9 . 5 2
!
~
i 8

g

E
$
06

d

f f i c e. . . . . . g . . . .i . r . . l . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . 9. . . . . 4. . . 0 1 . 0 3 4 . 5 6 0 1 3
o n m
a n . . u. . . f . a . . c. . . t . u . . .r . i . n. . . g .I — . . yr~ ~. .jr . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . 1 3
. . . . \ . w. ~
. .
F i n a n . . c . . e. . . . . * . . . * . . . . . . . . . . . ! . . . . . . . . . 14 . . 3 .0 . . [ . .0 . 3 . . .1 . . . . 5. 6. . 0 . . . .5 .

O

S

e n

u

r k s ,
o n m
a
R
e
t a

N

S

o m

c

*
i
o
r d
e r
. . . . . . 40 . . . . 4. . . 0 . . . . 3. 0 . . 8 . . . . 5 . . 0. . . . . . 4 . . . . 1 . . 2. . . . 3. . . . . 3. . . . . 8. . . . . . . .
. .
7
-. . 3 A 8 . 01 00
—F _3 7
N
n . . . u . . f. . a . . c . . t. . u . . r. . i . n . . . g . . . 3 . . 4 . . . . 4 . . . 0 . . . .0 . . . . . . . .
3
i l
t r a d e
. . . 1. . .8 . . . 4. . . 0 . . . 3. 5 . . 5 . . . . 5 . . 0.- . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . 3 . l. . . . . 4. . . . 3
1
3 |
l e r k s ,
p
a y
r o
l l
. 6 . . 7. . . . . . . . . . 4 . . .8 . . . . 5. 4 . . 0 0. . . . . 5. . . . . . . _ . . . . . _ . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . 2 5j
1
M
a n u f . . a . . c. . . t . u . . . r . .i . n . . .g . . . . . . . . . 2. . .8 . . . 4. . . 6 . . . . .5 5 . . 1 . . . .0 . . 0 . . . . . . .
1 -6 1
- 5
N
o n m
a n u f a c t u r i n g
3 9 . . . . 4 . . 1. . . . .4 0. . 6. . . . . 5 . . . 0- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . 9 . . . . . 3. .
4
R
e
t a i. . l . . . . t . . r . . a . . d. . . e . . . . . . . . . 1 . . 9. . . . 4 . . . 1 . . . 4 . 5 . . 6 . . . .0 . . 0 .“ . . . 8
1
l !
3
l e

D
K

c

_
_
-

-

_

_
_
_

_

;
_
-

j _
_
* -

:

_

_
_

_i
j-

_
-

- -

_
_
;

- -

1

_
- _
1 _
-

_

_

:
i

_
J

; _
_
1 _
~ -

_

6,

Table A-ij

6^ lce QccufuUiOHA - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

WeeklyWeekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

s
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
s
27.50 30.00 32.50 135.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00,85.00
and
under
5*Q 7
3Q Q 3 2 ^ 0 3 . O 3 tSSLM o*g>..| 42.50 45*00 4Z*JQ_50.00 5.2.50 55-00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
.-Q
i
1
j

Women - Continued
49

39.0

O
w
\
o

Tabulating-machine operators
Nonmanufacturing
Finance **

43

39.0

39.50

-

2
2
2

4i
4!
4

55
48
26

40.0
40.0
40.0

40.50
40.50
40.50

*~ ]
-1

_

2
2
-

14
14
14
-

10
10
2
-

- 4 " " 39TO~ 39T50—
3 "

Transcriblng-machine operators, general
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade

127
19
108
20
26
53

Typists, class A
Manufacturing ...
Nonmanufacturing .
.
Wholesale trade
Retail trade . .
.
Finance ** ...
Typists, class B
Manufacturing .....
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade . ,
.
Retail trade ....
Finance ** .....

204
■” 3T
171
17
32
31
72

-

-

39.5 ' 39.50
40.0 43.00 "
39.5 1 38.50
40.0
39.50
41.0
36.50
39.0 : 39.00
40.0
4075
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
39.5

-

-

1

37.50
‘ 36~.00” '
37.50
; 42.50
; 41.50
: 37.00
35.50

37
10
27
5
21

-

1

-

1

6 ! 13
6 ; 13
6 ! 13

7
7
7

15
14
7

8
5
3

16
3
13
5

24
2
22
4
2
16

-

8

4

49
7
42

31
12
19
2
3
14

-

9
8
15

28
1
27
1
7!
15

14
10
10

-

12
9
6

13:
13 1
9

5
5
1

32 |j
4i
28
4
3
|
a i
33 '
TP
32
6
3
14

18i
2;
16
4
7
4

9
7
2
1
-

12

7
_
7
3
3
1

!

-

-

12
4
7
-i
1

5

1

|

1

!

2

-

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_
_

_
_
-

-

_

1
1
_

4
1
3

_
_

_
-

_
-

3

1|
1

3
1
2

1
_
1

-

1
1
1
-

_
-

j

-

_

_

-

_
_

_
_

_
-

_
_
_,

-

_

_j

-

_

_*

_
_

_

_
_1
_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_
_1

_




P>u^eUiaM(U and

_
_

* eckmcal Occupation*
7

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
75|
Under 55.00 § . o lo.OO 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 , o L 0 00
5o: 0.
$
55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00J l s Q P i L00.00 L05.00
$

Number

o
f

workers

Men
$
78.00
40.5 I 72.50
40.0 1 81.50

Draftsmen......... ............
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............

78
3
1
47

40.0

Draftsmen, junior ................

19

40.0

65.00

11
7
4
1 1 _

-

- ; i
_ 1 i

2
7
-!
2, 7
j

10
1;
4 1
6
1

3

1 ; 4

5| 4

1

7

6
1
_

_

8
9
7
5
1i 4
1
_!

_

-

_

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table A-2|

_
-

_

-

_

_
_

_

_
_

-

_

-

j
_
_

_;
-

-

~

2 i 20 ,
_
2

_

-j
_1

_

1 20

i

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_
_

7,

Table a -3 :

M a i n t e na n c e a n d P o w e k Plant O ccnp aticn&

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

l/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
*

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8.

T a b le A-4:

G u it o d u U ,

W a b e U o u U tU fr 0 * d

S fu fL fU H f

G c O H f u U iO t U

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Salt Lake City, Utah, by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
r$
i$
r$
nr
$
$
$ ,
. 7 0 jo.75 p .8 0 p . 8 5 b.'9 0 16.95 £ . 0 0 j l. 0 5 |l . l 0 fL.15 £ . 2 0 1 . 2 5 £ . 3 0 |1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 .7 0 J 1 .7 5 ! 1 .8 0 ', 1 . 8 5 1 .9 0 ; 2 . 0 0

Average
hourly
earnings

O ccu p ation and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

D.70

Crane o p e r a t o r s , e l e c t r i c b r id g e (u n d er
20 to n s)
Manufacturing

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (m en ).
M anufacturing
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g .........
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W h o le sa le tr a d e . . .
R e t a il tr a d e ...........
S e r v ic e s ....................

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (women)
Nonmanufac t u r in g
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
R e t a il t r a d e ...........
S e r v ic e s ....................

O rder f i l l e r s
N onm anufacturing . .
W h o le sa le tr a d e
R e ta il tra d e . . .

P a c k e r s (men) .......................................................................................
N onm anufacturing ..........................................................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e ......................................................................

.7 5 [ . 8 0

.8 5 ! .9 0 ! .9 5 1 . 0 0 1 ,0 5 £ . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 i 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 i l . 8 5 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0

*
1 .6 1
1 .6 1

47
47

443
89
354
58
40
162
64

■!

1 .0 8
1 .2 3
1 .0 4
1 .2 9
1 .1 1
1 .0 2

203

27

.8 1
.8 1
1 .2 7
.8 2
.7 5

~w r
18
28
117

337
193
54

1 .2 5
1 .2 5
1 .2 6
1 .1 9

93
59
44

1 .2 9
1 .2 8
1 .3 1

U T

29
2
27
-

15
2
13
1

1
8

9
20

8
15

10
2

61
61

81
81

22
22

3
3

4
56

|
i
!

9
40

5
16

-

-

4
4

-

1 !
1

18
2~~^ 1 8
- ; 18
2
-

24
24
9
15

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

1 0 1 18 j 18 j
3 I 12 I
16!
16

11
11!

13

- 3
-

_

16

_28

9 I 29
- 1 9 ! 29
-

27

_2i

4
-

4
-

_

4

47
5
42
3
6
33

_ 2 i.
11
28
1
10
12

11
9

.1 2

7
25
- ! 23
1
4 !
1
5

2
2

-

1
1

12 ; 9
12 !
9
11
7
1 2

5 !
5
4

20 121
18 119
53
-

15
15
15

10
6
1

2
2
2

93
93
82
11

11
11
11

25 !

26
16
16

7

12
12
9
3

1
1

3

3
3

2
- ;

2
2
2

2
2
2

-i

1
P a ck ers (women) ...................................................................................
M an u factu rin g .................................................................................

~

~

12
8

10
_ i

1
~ i

7
-

5 ;
4

4

-

10
~ 1 10

!

59

1 .3 0

18
35

, 1 .3 5
1 1 .2 4

W ~ , 1.28

-

-

-

-

-

- ;

7
69
29
40

4

! 1 .2 8

1 1.26""
i i.2 i
; 1 .3 0
!

-

“ ,

-

”

7
7

7!

7

-

- !
7 j

-

-

6
6
3
3

-

“

_

~

l
l
11

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T r a n s p o r ta tio n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .

-

6
6
- — s i — 6“
6
6

~
'

-

7
5
3
2

7

7
5
2

3
3
-

14
14
3
11

1
1
1

-

2
2
2

4

4

li
3;

-

-j

"

1

“S

-

-

-

-

1
-

1

7
7

- ;

-

7
’ j

_l

1

1

L




-

7
'

S h ip p in g c le r k s ...................................................................................
N onm anufacturing ..........................................................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e ......................................................................
R e t a il t r a d e .......................................................................... •

“

-

j

1
R e c e iv in g c le r k s .................................................................................
N onm anufacturing ..........................................................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e ......................................................................
R e t a i l t r a d e ............................................................................

-

I

t 1 .0 0
; 1 .0 8

45
26

-

-

,

1
1
1
- r ^ r
1
i

8
8[
8:

2
2
2

7 ; 11
5
1!

4 !

11

7
4

8
8

7
1

2;
- 1

8!
8
1

lj
i!
-

7

i

j
-

ij
1!

1'

____ s i _
3
S
3:

-!
-j

-!

____ 1
-

.
Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9.

G u dioJU cU , W a te lt/H ti'iiU }, 0 * fd S U iflflU U }

T ab le A-4:

Q c C 4 4 f U lt iO *U -

G o4 ttiH 4 4ed

(A verage h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1J f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s 7 j s tu d ie d on an a r e a
b a s i s in S a l t Lake C it y , Utah, by in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , December 1 9 5 1 )

Number
of
workers

O ccu p ation and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
'$
Is
$
1$
|$
$
1$
$
Is
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
$
$
i$
Average
0
hourly UnderL . 7 0 0 . 7 5 [0 .8 0 0.85 0 . 9 0 0 . 9 5 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1 . 2 5 |l . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 1 . 60 ' 1 . 6 5 1.7 0 1 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 | 1 . 9 0 2.00
earnings
_
I
3 .7 0

S h ip p in g - a n d - r e c e iv in g c le r k s
M anufacturing ........................ .
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ...................
R e t a il t r a d e .................... .

“ 93*
87
38

867
U T
750
314
297
139

.8 0

.85

1 .3 1
1 .3 3
1 .3 1
1 .3 6
1 .2 5
1 .3 0

.90 ' .95 1.00 1.05 1 .10 1 . 1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 . 3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 ; 1 . 5 5 : 1 . 60l 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 $ 1 . 9 0 2 .0 0 2.10
------ , ----- , ----- ; ----- 1----- ! ----- 1----- 1----- f
-

I
1 .3 9
1 .4 2
1 .3 5
1 .3 4

S to c k h a n d le r s and t r u c k e r s . hand
M an u factu rin g ......................
N onm anufacturing ................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * . . .
W h o le sa le tr a d e ...........
R e t a il tr a d e ..................

.7 5

180

-

1

2
2
2

-

2
1
1

2

7
7

21
2

2

19

5

1

2

-

1

2

6
1

3
3

3
3

9
9

-

6
6

3

7

1 ; 1?

16 1
2!
14

-

1 I 13
1
1

8

60

19
19

68
22

60
57
3

18
7

1

1

18

4

14
5

15
15

-

19
19

-

3,

2

21
18;
2 ! 15

i ! 19
l i
7

123

4

46 i 119
46
37
63

144
24

120
19
95

6

9

10

10
2
8

24
24

-

-

6
2

22
2

23
23

46
40

2
21

30

66
20

10

19

3
3

14
14

318

1
1

32
16
16
-

5

8
44

23
8

17
16

3
-

35
17
18
3
15

30
288
236

18
18

-

27 - 1 9
16

16'
lli
4

3
3

2

JZ
J___ =
T
=

151
91

____2 ____ -

1

-

3

15

1.

15
13

3
3

3
3

-

3

_

3

34

_

2
7

18
15
3

2

9

14

-

9,

3
3
-

-

2

2

-

l
Truck d r i v e r s , l i g h t (u n d er lj- t o n s )
M anufacturing ........................................
Nonm anufacturing .................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...................... .
W h o lesa le tr a d e .............................
R e t a il t r a d e ...................................

350

88
262
121
86
45

Truck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o and in c lu d in g
4 t o n s ) .....................................................................
M a n u f a c tu r in g .................................................... .
Nonraanufacturing ...............................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e ......................................... .
R e t a il t r a d e .................................................

Truck d r i v e r s , h eavy (o v e r 4 t o n s , t r a i l e r
- - t y p e ) .......................... ..............................................
Nonm anufacturing ...............................................
W h olesale t r a d e ...........................................

T r u c k e r s, power ( f o r k - l i f t )
M an u factu rin g ....................
Nonm anufacturing .............

Watchmen .................... .
M an u factu rin g . . .
N onm anufacturing
R e t a il t r a d e ,

1/
2J
*

; 1 .2 6
! 1 .2 6

|1
-

1 1.26
i 1-35
1 1 .2 4
! 1.11
!

-

I 1 .3 7
---- ! r a t ” '
1 .3 8 ;
334
140
: 1 .4 2
1 .3 8 1
67
127
1 .3 5
5 39

124

_
- -

-

-




-

-

-

6

1

3

3

14

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

11
2

3

9

8

-

77
70
7

5
4

1
1

7

-

6

!

44

I
I

49
18
31

81
39
42
22

95
15
80
47
30
3

105
105

98

1 .6 5

3
3

1 .3 5 |
1 .4 0 1
1 .3 3 |

1.12 !
1 .3 3 !
.9 3
1 .0 0

~
-

1
1

1
1

4

15

1

6

7

2

2

~
1

-

15

6

3
4
4

2
2

2
1

-

8

^
4
-

6
6

8
-

7

-

2

15
8
7
7

2
-

2

19
79
72

3

6
1

-

3

66

92

24
42
41

22
70
-

18
18

1

-

-

_
_

1
1

5
5
-

_

-

_
-

-

_

6
6

42
40

-

-

_

-

14
14
-

1
1

_

_

1
2
2

-

1
12
-

-

-

_

-

12

_

_

70

1.61

H E ----1 1 7 6 ?

E xclu d es premium pay f o r o v e r tim e and n ig h t work.
Study l im it e d t o men w orkers e x c e p t where o th e r w is e i n d ic a t e d .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
998573 0 - 52 - 2

23

21
2

16

11
15
1

13
2
11

_2
2

-

3
3

-

13

-

13

1
12
12

I X.
131
13:

1 1 ___ r| ____~ ____=
15
-!
-

±
9
9

_2

1 ____ ^
7

-

3

___ X ___ =___ 4 1
45

1
1

2
1
1

2
-

-

;____ z
i ____ i . ................=_____- ____ - ____- ____- ____- ____=
7

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-




10,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
T ab le B -10:

O ccu p a tio n 7 j

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m ain ten an ce .........................................................
H e lp e r s , t r a d e s , m a in ten a n ce ...................................................
J a n it o r s and c le a n e r s (men) ........................ ............................
J e n i io r s and c le a n e r s (women) ................................................
M a c h in is t s , m ain ten an ce .............................................................
M aintenance men, g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ..........................................
Truck d r i v e r s , medium (1+ t o and in c lu d in g 1 t o n s ) . .
T r u c k e r s, power ( f o r k - l i f t ) .....................................................

Number
of
w orkers

16
112
81

u
79
22
10
6

R cU lto O C u U * lJ

Average
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s
2/

$
1 .9 2
1 .6 3
1 .1 2
1 .1 1
1 .9 3
1 .0 0

iM
u se

ii’RAKlIKr-TIME IiorRLV EARN ixgs o r —
M MHER OF \V K S Ricoicmxc; s r
<)R ICK
1
1 .3 5 1 .1 0
and
under
L i .i o 1 .4 ?

$
1 .1 5

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .5 5

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

&
1 .7 0

$
1 .7 5

$
1 .8 0

3
lc 3 5

$
1 .9 0

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

i,? o

1 .9 5

18
_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
n
-

66
11
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
2

-

-

-

-

-

91

-

_

-

-

13
-

_
79
22
-

**

1/ The stu d y c o v e re d r a il r o a d s (Group 1 0 ) w ith more th a n 2 0 w o rk ers, a s d e f in e d in t h e Standard Industrial!. C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual
p repared by t h e Bureau o f t h e B u dget.
2 / Study l im it e d to men w orkers e x c e p t where o t h e r w is e i n d ic a t e d .
2 / E x clu d es premium pay f o r o v e r tim e and n ig h t vrorko
O ccu p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y , S a l t Lake C i t y ,
U .S .
Bureau

(1 9 1 9 e d i t i o n )

U tah , December 1 9 5 1
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

n,

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage r a t e s and maximum s t r a ig h t - t im e hours p er week a g r e ed upon th ro u g h c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a in in g
b etw een em p loyers and tr a d e u n io n s . R a te s and hours a r e t h o s e i n e f f e c t on d a t e s i n d i c a t e d . )

T ab le C -15*

Table c - 205: fcahefried. - Continued

Q u lld it U f G o u A & lU c t iO n
January 2 , 1 9 5 2
R ate
per
hour

C la s s if ic a t io n

B r ic k la y e r s ....................................................................
C a r p e n te r s ....................................... ....................... ..
E l e c t r i c i a n s .................................................................
P a in t e r s ...................................................... ...................
P l a s t e r e r s ...................... ...............................................
Plumbers ..........................................................................
B u ild in g la b o r e r s ......................................................

Table C -205:

T ab le C-4.1:

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1
Hours
per
week

$ 2 ,7 5 0
2 .0 5 0
2 .4 0 0
2 .0 6 3
2 .6 2 5
2 .5 0 0
1 .5 0 0

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Hours
p er
week

$ 1 ,1 5 0
1 .1 2 5
1 .0 5 0
1 .0 0 0
0 .9 7 5
0 .9 2 5
0 .9 1 0
0 .8 7 5
0 .8 5 0
0 .8 5 0

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

T ab le C -27:

Hours
per
week

Journeymen
Bread and cake - Hand sh o p s:
Foremen .....................................................................
Ovenmen, doughm ixers .........................................
Bench hands .............................................................
In g r e d ie n t s c a l e r s ......... ........................... ..
Checkers ................................... ................................
Women hand i c e r s ......................................... ..
H elp ers:
F i r s t y e a r ........... ............................................
Second y e a r ........... .............. ...........................
Third y e a r ........................................................
Bread and cak e - Machine s h o p s :
F o r e m e n .................................
Dough m ixers and o v e n m e n .................................
I n g r e d ie n t s c a l e r s ...........................................
Machine and benchmen ..........................................
Head wrappers ........................................................
C heckers ................................................................. ..
Bread r a c k e r s , pan g r e a s e r s , women
forem en ...............................................................
H e lp e r s :
F i r s t y e a r ...................................................... ..
Second y e a r ........................................... ..
Women wrapping-m achine o p e r a to r s ................
Women w rapp ers, p a c k e r s , l a b e l e r s ,
s w e e t - r o l l p a n n er s, and i c e r s ................
C r a c k e r s and c o o k ie s :
Machine c a p t a in s ...............................
Ovenmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R ollerm en , a s s i s t a n t i c i n g forem en ...........




P / U n t i*U f

C la s s ific a tio n
$ 1 ,4 7 0
1 .3 2 0
1 .3 0 0
1 .2 3 0
1 .1 2 0
1 .0 9 0

48
48
48
48
48
48

0 .9 2 0
1 .0 0 0
1 .1 0 0

48
48
48

1 .7 2 5
1 .5 8 5
1 .5 1 5
1 .4 6 5
1 .3 9 5
1 .3 4 5

40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .2 3 5

40

1 .1 2 5
1 .2 3 5
1 .1 0 5

40
40
40

1 .0 5 5

40

1 .2 5 0
1 .2 3 5
1 .1 7 5

40
40
40

HoUT8
per
weeks

Book and jo b sh o p s:
C o m p o sito rs, hand ................................................
Machine o p e r a t o r s ....................................... ..
P h o to en g ra v ers ......................................................
P r e s s a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s :
C y lin d e r p r e s s ................................. ..
P la te n p r e s s ........................ ......................... ..
P ressm en, c y l i n d e r ..............................................
Pressm en, p la te n ..................................................
S t e r e o t y p e r s .................................................... ..

$ 1 ,9 5 0
1 .9 5 0
; 2 .5 3 3

40
40
3 7 1/2

1 .5 1 3
1 .5 1 3
2 .0 0 0
2 .0 0 0
1 .9 0 0

40
40
40
40
40

2 .4 8 3
2 .5 8 3
2 .4 8 3
2 .5 8 3
2 .5 5 2
2 .6 5 2
2 .0 9 3
2 .1 5 9
2 .5 3 3
2 .6 6 7
2 .3 0 7
2 .3 7 3
2 .4 4 0
2 .5 0 7
2 .2 9 3
2 .3 4 7

36
36
36
36
36
36
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
40
40

N ew spapers:
C o m p o sito rs, hand - d a y w o r k .................... ..
C o m p o sito rs, hand - n ig h t work ....................
Machine o p e r a to r s - d a y w o r k .................... ..
Machine o p e r a to r s - n i g h t w o r k ....................
Machine t e n d e r s (m a c h in is t s ) - day work .
Machine te n d e r s (m a c h in is t s ) - n ig h t work
M a ile r s - d a y w o r k ..............................................
M a ile r s - n i ^ i t work ..........................................
P h o to en g ra v ers - d a y work ..............................
P h o to en g ra v ers - n ig h t w o r k ..........................
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s - d a y work ................
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s - n i g h t work ...........
Pres sm en-in-ch arge - day w o r k ......................
P ressm en -in -ch a rg e - n ig h t work ..................
S t e r e o t y p e r s - d a y w o r k ...................................
S t e r e o t y p e r s - n ig h t w o r k ...............................

~

K in d o t t e t f l& U

C la s s if ic a t io n

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1
Rate
per
hour

M & t o S lP lU c h

$ 1 ,3 2 0
1 .4 0 0

Hours
p er
week

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1

& G ,h e / lie 4 ,

R ate
per
hour

R ate
per
hour

C la s s ific a tio n

T able C- 4 2 :

J u ly 1 , 1 9 5 1

C la s s if ic a t io n

Q p & u U t iU j' £ *H f U o 4 f e e l

1-man b u s s e s :
F i r s t 6 months ....................................... ..
A f t e r 6 months .......................................................

Journeymen - C ontinued
C rackers and C o o k ies: - C ontinued
O ut-panners .............................................................
In-panners .................................................. ............
Pan c le a n e r s , f e e d e r s ........................................
Cracker e d g e r s ......... .............................................
Sponge pack ers ......................................................
Women m achine ope r a t e r s ...................................
S c a le r s and w e ig h e r s .........................................
Sw eet packers ............. ........................... ..
C ellop hane-m achine o p e r a to r s ...................... ..
F illin g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ...............................

J U in U t
' '

O ctober 1 , 1 9 5 1
R ate
per
hour

C la s s if ic a t io n

J^ C j o I
C

1/4
1/4
1 /4
1/4
1 /4
1 /4
3/4
3/4
1 /2
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2
1 /2

B akerv ................................ ............ ..
G en eral f r e i g h t :
L o ca l c a r ta g e :
Truck d r iv e r s :
Under 6 months ............................ ............
l £ t o n s ........................................................
2 t o n s ....................................... ..
3 - a x le and sem i .......................................
Low-bed, 2 5 t o n s o r o v e r ....................
Winch tr u c k s ......................................... ..
W arehouse:
Under 6 m onths ................................................
Over 6 months ............................ .....................
G rocery - Warehouse:
Agreement A:
Under 9 0 d a y s ........... .................. . » • • . • • • •
Over 9 0 d a y s ........................................... ..
Agreement B - Chain s t o r e :
F i r s t 6 w e e k s ......... ........................................
7 - 1 2 w e e k s ...................................................... ..
A fte r 1 2 weeks ......................................... ..
C o u n t r y .................................................. ............
Meat:
Agreement A:
L ocal - F i r s t y e a r .......................................
L o c a l - A f t e r f i r s t y e a r ............. ............
Moving and s t o r a g e :
Truck d r i v e r s , l £ t o n s :
Under 6 m o n t h s ................................... ............
Over 6 m onths ..................................................
L o c a l van d r i v e r s :
Under 1 y e a r ....................................................
Over 1 y e a r .............................. • • • • • • • • • • •
H elp e r s ...............................................................
O il:
Tank t r a n s p o r t s ...................................................
Paper - W arehouse:
I n e x p e r ie n c e d ........................................................
E x p e r i e n c e d ..................................... .......................
R a ilw ay e x p r e s s ..................................... .....................

R ate
per
hour

Hours
p er
week

$ 1 ,4 1 6

48

1 .2 4 0
1 .3 2 0
1 .3 7 0
1 .4 2 0
1 .4 7 0
1 .3 9 0

48
48
48
48
48
48

1 .1 8 5
1 .2 6 5

40
40

1 .1 7 0
1 .2 3 0

40
40

1 .2 0 0
1 .2 8 0
1 .4 1 0
1 .5 0 0

40
40
40
48

1 .4 0 0
1 .5 9 0

40
40

1 .1 7 0
1 .3 2 0

48
48

1 .3 0 0
1 .4 2 0
1 .2 9 0

48
48
48

1 .8 4 0

48

1 .1 5 5
1 .2 6 5
1 .7 1 6

40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12,

D:
T ab le D ^ lt

Entrance Rates

Z *U > u M o e >

P < U & L < jo k P l a n t

liJ & iJ b e S U

1/

P e r c e n t o f p la n t w orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith s p e c i f i e d
minimum r a t e s i n Minimum r a t e ( i n c e n t s )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s
_ 2 / _____

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n t s . . . .

0 .3
3 .0
1 .6
5 .7
2 .4
2 .7
4 .5
1 4 .3
.9
1 .9
7 .6
2 .4
.5
2 .4
3 .4
.2
.3
5 .2
1 .7
.3
.6
1 .7
2 .3
.2
3 .4
2 .2
3 .1
1 .4
4 .5
1 .0
1 .4
1 .2
3 .2
6 .2
3 .5

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no
e s t a b l i s h e d minimum .

2 .8

1/
2/
*

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s *

W h o lesa le
tr a d e

R e t a il tr a d e

1 0 0 .0

1 5 .2

1 0 .7
4 .1

2 .7

3 .6
3 .0
1 .5
1 .8
1 .8
5 .3
4 .5
4 .2
2 .8
4 .5
2 .8
.9
2 .2
8 .0
1 6 .4
4 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 4 .2

3 .6

4 .8
1 8 .0

1 0 .7
5 .3

4 .6
7 .5

2 .6
5 .8
1 .9

2 .5

1 4 .4
5 .7
2 .9

5 .8

4 .5
.6
1 5 .2

1 .0
3 .9
2 .1
1 4 .4
5 .0

1 0 0 .0

Shift ^i^f^i^ntiai PA&iUUanl

1 0 0 .0

1 .5
1 9 .1
4 .5
9 .6
1 2 .0
1 8 .2
3 .2
.7
2 .9
1 .4
1 .8
3 .5
1 .6

3 .1
3 2 .3
1 2 .5
3 .4
1 2 .5

P e r c e n t o f p la n t w orkers
em ployed on each s h i f t
in S h ift d iffe r e n tia l
M anufacturing
2d s h i f t

3d or
o th er s h i f t

P e r c e n t o f w orkers on e x t r a s h i f t s ,
a l l e s ta b lis h m e n t s ............................................

1 4 .6

8 .4

R e c e iv in g s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ....................

1 2 .6

6 .7

Uniform c e n ts (p e r h o u r) ......................
4 c e n t s .....................................................
5 c e n t s .....................................................
6 c e n ts .....................................................
8 c e n ts ....................................................
1 0 c e n t s ..................................................
1 5 c e n t s ...................................................

1 2 .0
6 .2
3 .5
1 .0
1 .3
-

6 .7
_
2 .0
4 .1
.5
.1

1 2 .5
n .5

4 .7
2 .5

1 .2
7 .1

4 .6

Uniform p e r c e n ta g e ...................................

-

.6

-

R e c e iv in g no d i f f e r e n t i a l ...........................

3 .0

-

O ther ................................................................

2 .0

1 .7

2 .6
1 .9

7 .1
4 .0

8 .2

7 .0

6 .4

O cc u p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y , S a l t Lake C it y , U tah, December 1 9 5 1
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

7 .7

2 .2

Low est r a t e s f o r m a lly e s t a b l i s h e d f o r h i r in g e i t h e r men o r women p la n t w o rk ers, o t h e r th a n watchmen.
E x c lu d e s d a ta f o r f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




Supplementary Wage Practices

Tahle E-ls

1 0 0 .0

5 0 .........................................
55 .........................................
6 0 .........................................
6 5 .........................................
Over 6 5 and under 7 0 . .
7 0 .........................................
Over 7 0 and under 7 5 . .
7 5 ..........................................
Over 7 5 and und er 8 0 . .
8 0 ..........................................
Over 8 0 and und er 8 5 . .
8 5 ..........................................
Over 8 5 and under 9 0 . .
9 0 .........................................
Over 9 0 and und er 9 5 . .
9 5 ..........................................
Over 9 5 and under 1 0 0 .
1 0 0 .......................................
Over 1 0 0 and under 1 0 5
1 0 5 .......................................
Over 1 0 5 and under 1 1 0
1 1 0 ........... ............................
Over 1 1 0 and und er 1 1 5
U 5 .......................................
Over 1 1 5 and under 1 2 0
1 2 0 .......................................
Over 1 2 0 and und er 1 2 5
1 2 5 .......................................
Over 1 2 5 and und er 1 3 0
1 3 0 ........................................
Over 1 3 0 and und er 1 3 5
1 3 5 ........................................
Over 1 3 5 and under 1 4 0
Over 1 4 0 and tinder 1 4 5
1 5 0 and o v e r ....................

M anufacturing

E:

5 .0

13,

Table E-2*

S c lt &

d u l&

d

I t J j&

c J z lt f

J lo t V

U

,

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS J / EMPLOYED I N W eekly h o u rs

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n t s ................................... ..
Under 3 5 h ou rs .....................................................
3 5 h o u r s ........... ..................... ................................
Over 3 5 h o u rs and und er 3 7 £ h ou rs . . . . . .
37& h ou rs ..................................... ...................
Over 3 7 ^ h ou rs and under 4-0 h o u r s ............
AO h ou rs ................................... .............................
Over AO h ours and under AA h ours
AA h ou rs .................................................................
Over AA h ours and und er A8 h o u r s ..............
A8 h ou rs . . • • • . . • • ......... ....................................
Over A8 h o u r s ..................................... ............ ..

1/
2/
*
**

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

_ - 10 0 *0 .-----

0 .2
.8
1 6 .1
7 1 .1
2 .A
6 .2
2 .0
1 .2

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

Finance**

1 0 0 .0
_
_
_
2 .2
8 9 .9

_
9A-3

-

-

5 .0
1 .1
1 .8

5 .7
-

_
_
•
_
9 2 .2
5 .0
2 .8

Services

1 0 0 .0

_
_
2 .1
6 6 .5
8 .9
1 A .1
7 .0
1 .A

'

1 .0
3 .2
5 8 .0
3 7 .8
_
_
-

"

_
_
7 .1
6 7 .3
6 .8
1 0 .6
A .7
3 .5

All
industries 2 /

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

0 .2
_

0 .1

1 .0

1 .7

_
A 6 .0
1 .1
1 1 .3
6 .9
3 1 .0
a .

_

_
_
_

3 9 .0
_

6 5 .0

1 3 .3
5 .5
AO. 5
“

1 0 .3
1 .8
1 3 .2
9 .7

3.A
_
71.A
1 .1
1 3 .5
8 .A
5 .6

A 1 .0
3 .5
1 0 .3
1 0 .0
3 1 .5
«

3 2.0
6 .2
10.A
A 8 .0

'

Data r e l a t e t o women w o rk ers.
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r I n d u s t r ie s o th e r th a n t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

T ab le E-3:

P/aid JtoUdcufA
.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Number o f p a id h o lid a y s

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Services

industries \J

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0
E s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g p a id
h o lid a y s .............................................................
1 t o 5 d ays ...................................................

8 d ays .............................................. .................

1 0 d ays .............................................................

E s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g no
p a id h o lid a y s ..................................................

*
#*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0___

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

99.A

1 0 0 .0

9 3 .9

7 8 .8

8 8 .1

6 6 .1

8 1 .9

8 6 .7

3 1 .9

.7
A .7
2 3 .3
AO.2
2 .0
7 .5
1 0 .6
6 .A
3 .9

2 .2
9 .0
A 1 .6
3 8 .5
A .l

.8
5.A
1 0 .8
7 0 .5

1 .7
3 .5
3 2 .5
5 3 .1
3 .1
-

A .7
1 7 .0
2 7 .A
2 2 .6
1 .0
6 .0
.1
“

8 .8
2 9 .3
3 6 .5
1 2 .3
1 .2
-

5 .0
5 .2
1 1 .7
3 6 .7
7 .5
“

3 .3
1 1 .A
3 0 .8
3 3 .8
2 .6
-

6 .1

2 1 .2

1 1 .9

3 3 .9

1 8 .1

.7

_

3 .9
-

1 2 .2
“

2 .5
3 6 .8
5 0 .9
6 .9
2 .5
-

7 .9
2 9 .5
A 7 .0
1 5 .0
-

.7

.3

.A

•6

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
-

1 .6
9 .7
A 3 .3
28.A
1 7 .0

_
1 2 .6
2 5 .0
3 1 .6
1 7 .5
“
1 3 .3

A .2
6 .6
1 6 .9
A .2
-

6 8 .1

O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S u rvey, S a l t Lake C it y , U tah, December 1 9 5 1
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

u.

T

a

P
V

A

l l

a

e

y

t i o

n

p

o

E

e

o

N

T

O

F

O

F

F

I C

f

e

r v

i c

n

t s. . . . . .w . . . 100.0
i. t h

100.0

1 0 0.0

E

1 0 0.0

s

t a

y

b

w . . .e . . e .
v e r
w . .e . . e .
w . .e . . e .

s

t a

b

h

l i s

r s
e

m

e

l i s

t s

w

p 100.0 d
a i

o
n

v1 0 0.0 c
a

f

s

a

n

t s

f

s

/ )n

r v

•1 i t 0 h

0

1
E

s

t a

5

b

y

l i s

h

e

e k
.
v e r
1
a
w . .e . . e . .k . . s . . . .
v e r
2
a
w
e e k s. . . .

s

t a

b

l/
2
*

*
*

l i s

I n
/

c
L

F

h

T
i n

e

a

m

1
O
2
O
3
E

w

e

m

a

t10i 0 o.0 n

s

9

9

w

n

o

f

t s

i t( h 2

s
w

e

i t h

e

n

t s

a
o

w

d
n

a

i t( h 2

R

S

E

M

P

L

O

Y

E

D

I N

—

A l l1 /
P u b l i c W h o l e s Ra l ee t a i l
i n d u s t r Mi e Sas ne A r u v f i/ ac ec sut u t ir l i i n t i g e s * t r a d e

100.0

. 8

10 0 .0

r v

c-

a

n. 2 s

t i o

0

0

. 0

7

100.0

9

1 0 0 .0

9

1 0 0.0

10 0 .0

. 5

8 8.1
2 . 4
9
. 0

6
. 4
5 1 . 2. 5
8 . 4

• -•

9

9

5

. 2

1
3

. 5

-

0a

c0

a. 0 t1 i 0o

0n

.s 0

9

9

. 8

0

23.1
2 2 . 5
8
. 4
3 8 . 5
e6 e . k2 s
. . . . . . . . . .2 . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . 6
5. . . 9 . . . . . 6 . . . .9 . . 1. . . . . 0. . . . 7 . . 4 . 6
1
6 0 . 7
1. . . 1 . . . . . 1
o

p

-

t r a d e

S

10 0 .0

1 0 0.0

1 0 0.0

6

10 0 .0

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .0

9

. 4

8

7

7

. 5
. 3

. 5

1

_

1
3

-

. 9

2
2 .6
4

. 1

8 8 .1
2 .4
9 . 5

. 7
. 7

-

8

2
9
7

. 9
. 6
. 5

-

-

a

i d

v

a

c

a

t i o

n . 2 s-

0

. 0 1

0
1

0

0
-

0

. 0

. 6

5

4

. 0

7

. 9

5

-

9

. 9

2

. 0 9

4

2

. 0

2

1

0

. 2

8

1

0

. -.

7

. 5

3

6

. 5

6

. 8
. 6
. 7

. 7
3

-

1

9

. 8

0
5

-

. 0

3

_

0

0
3

0
3

2

. 0 1
. 6

. 6

6

3

. 8

. 4

-

-

-

2

. 5

0

0

. 0 1

41 .8
1
. 2
5 7 . 0
-

0

0

. 0

74.5
9
. 6
1 5 . 9

-

-

-

e

o -

. 0 v

p

i c
a

a

s

c

a

1t i 0 o

0n

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91

09

0. 8 . 0

. 4
2
. 9
. 7
_ . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . .
-

1

6

..1 3

2

. 9

0

. 8

-

-

8

9
k

3

1
a

i d

9

i d-

v

a

c-

a

t i o

1 9 0 9 0 . .6 0 1
_

7

-

1

-

9

6

1

. 7

9

5
3
-

. 1
-

n. 2 s

. -.

. 7
. 5

0

0

0

9
2
. 8

8 9 1 8 . 5. 9

8

7

9

7

11

. 5

00

1 4 1 . 9. 2
_ 1 . 9
9 2 . 6

. 5

_

. 0
. 4

00

3
2
9

_

_

-

_

5

-

. 0

. 7
. 8

-

4

.. 00

-

. 5

0

1

1

. 6

3

7

. 3
. 6
. 1

0

. 6

5

7

. 8

0
6

6

-

2

1

_

1

-

. 0

1

0

0

. 0

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7

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p

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v

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 1. . . . .
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . 9 . . . .8 . . .
d . . . . . v . . . o . . . . i. . .d. . . . e . . r . . 1 3 . 2
w
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . 4 . . . . . 1 . . .

l u d e s
s s
t h
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a n c e ,




t s

r s
e

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n
. .
n
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n

i d-

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t a

e

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a

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s

m

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e

E

e

w . . . e . . e . . k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 2. . . . . . 5. . . . . 1.
v e r
1
a n d . . . . . u. . . n . . d. . . e . . r . . 1. . .2 . . 3. . . w.
e 3 e . k0
w
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v e r
2
a n d
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w
ee
. 3
w . . e. . . e . . . .k . . . . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 . . . . . 0 . . . . . 1 . . 1 .
h

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r 2 2. 2
w
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w

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 . . 0 . . . . . 3 . . . . 5 . . .1 . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56.6. . . . . . . .8 . 8 2 9 . 2. 0
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.
w
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w . . e . . . e . . .k . . . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . 8 . . . . . 1 . . . . 4 . . 8. . . . . .0 .
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m

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l iA c l l y
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4 :
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t . a. . . b . . . . . l . . .i . . s. . . . . . h. . . . m. . . . . e . . .n . . .t . s. . . . . . 100.0
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15.

P aid S lcJz Ji&G4j*e (fy& tm al Pa m M xuU )

Table E 5
-:

P

A

r o

l l

v

e

s

6
E

s
f

E

t a
r

o
3
5
6
1
1
1
s

f

0
2
5
t a
o
r

s
f

E

0
2
5
0

f

t a
o
r

s
f

E
f

t a
r

o
3
5
6
7
8
9
1
1
2
4
s

d
d
d
d
d
d
0
2
0
0
t a
o
r

s

f

o

P E R C E N T
O F
O F F I C E
W
O R K E R S
E M
P P L E O R Y C E E D N TI N O— F
P L A N T
p a i d
s i c k
l e a v e
A l l
Pu ur i bn l g i c W h o l e s aR l ee t a i l t r F a i dn e a n c e S * e * r v i c e s A l l
, u f a . c t Pu ur i b n l gi c W h o l e s Ra l ee t a i l
i n d u s t r Mi e as n u f a c tu t i l i t i e s * t r a d e
i n d u s t r M i e as n X
/
u t i l i t i e s *t r a d e

r

o

l i s
p a
a y s
a y s
a y s
d a y
d a y
d a y
b l i s
p a

n

t h

s

o

f

s

e

r v

i c

0

. 0

1

0

0

. 0 1

0

0

h m
i d

e n t s
w
i t h
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o n
s
s i c k
l e a2 v 1 e . 5
2 . . . 9 . . . . 0 . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .2 . . 3. . . . . 3 . . . . 3 . . 6. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 6 . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 . . . . .1 . . . . . . 2 . - . . 9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 1 . . . . . 1. . . 2 . . . . . 6 . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . 8 . . . . . . . - . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . 3 . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . 8 . . . . . 1 . . - .6 . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . 0 . . . . . 1 . . .6 . . . .4 . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . .8 . . . . . . - . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . 8. . . . . . . .- . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . 7 . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . .- 5. . .
m
e n t s
w
i t h
n o
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o
7 . . . 1 . . . . . 0 . . 1 . . 0. . . 0 . . . . . 0 . . . 7 . . 6. . . . . 7. . . . 6 . . .4 . . . .
d
s i c k
l e a7 v 8 e . 5

s
s
s
h
i
y

e

a

r

o

f

s

e

r v

i c

l i s h m
e n t s
w
i t h
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o n
s
3 . . . 8 . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 . . 1. . . . . 3 . . . 3 . 4 . 1. .2 . . . .8.
p a i d
s i c k
l e a v e
y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 .
y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . 1 . . . . 4 . . . 1 . . . 8 . . . . 1 . . .2 . . 9. . . . . 0. . . . . .6 . . . . . 5 . . . . . . 8 . . . 2
y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . 1. . 3. . . .6 . . .6 . . .1 . . 6. . .
y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .
. . a . . y . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . 5 . . . . . 1. . . 6. . . . . 4. . . . 2 . . . . 3 . . . . . . . 9 . 5
. . a . . y . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . 6. . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . 5 . 6
1 5 .
. . a . . y . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . 8. . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . -a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 4. . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . 1
l i s h m
e n t s
w
i t h
n o
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o
p a i d
s i c k
l e a6 v 5 e . 3
. . . . . . . . . . 6 . . 8. . . . . 2. . . . . 6 . 6. .8 . 1 . . .7 . . 9 . . 5 . . . 7 . . .
2
y e a r s
o
f
s e r v i c e
b l i s h m
e n t s
w
i t h
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o n
s
4 2 .
p a i d . . . . . s. . . i . c. . . k . . . . . l . e. . . a . 4 . .v .1 . e. . . 9. . . . 3 . . . 8 . . . 1 7 2 . 7
3 1 . 3
. a. . .y . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . .. 9
8 . 2
. a. . y. . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . 7 . . . . . 1 . . . 5 . . . . . 3 . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . .6 . . 5
a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 . . . . . . . . 1 . . 3. . . 6. . . .6 . . .1 . . 6 . .
-. . . . . . . . . . . .
a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 . . . . 2 . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . 4. . . 0 . . . . . 9 . . . . . .
a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . - . . . . . . . - . .
. . a . . y . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . .% . . . .
d. . . a . . y . . . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . .1 . . . . 0. . . . 1 . . . 9 . . . . . 2 . . .3 . 0 . 4
9 . 5
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . 6 . . . . . . 1 . -. . . 0
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . 4 . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . - .- .
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . 7. . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . 1. . . 5 . .
b l i s h m
e n t s
w
i t h
n o
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o
p a i d . . . . . s . . . i . c. . . k . . . . . l . e. . . a . 5 . .v 8. . e . . . 1 . . . . 6 . . . 1 . . . . 9
6 8 . 7 2 5 7 7 . 3.
5

y

e
m

r s
o
f
s e r v i c e
E s t a b l i s h
e n t s
w
i t h
f o r m
a l
p
r o
v i s i o n
s
f o
r
p
a i d
s i c k
l e a4 v 1 e . 9
3. . . 8 . . . . . 1 . . . 7 . . .2 . . . .7 . . . . 3 . . .1 . . . . 3. . . . 4 . . . 2 .
3
d . .a . . y . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . .
. 9
5
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . 1 .6 . . 5 . . 5 . . 3 . . . . . - . .
6
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . .1 . . . . 6 . . . . . 1 . . .6 .
7
d . .a . . y . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . 2 . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . 4 . . 0. . . . . .9 . . . . . .3
d . .a . .y . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 0
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . 1 . . . . . 1 . . . .1 . . 9. . . . . 2. . . 2 . . . 9 . . . . . 0 . . . . . 5 . . . . . 7. . . . . . 6. . . .
1 2
.d . . a . . y . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . 7. . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . 5 . 6
1 5
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - .
.
1 8
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . 1. . . .
.
.
.
2 0
d a y s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . .4 . . . . . . . . . . . . -.
.
3 . 1
1 5
5 0days ....................
2
. 7

R

K

E

5

8

. 1

R

S

E

M

t r a d e

0

. 0

1

0. .

2

4

-

5

. 1
. 3

1

6
n

- 1

. 4

1
5
-

. 7
7

. 3

1

3
. 5
. 7
. 4

s

0. .

7

5

. 6

. 9

-

9

-

. 9

-

8

. 1
. .8 7
1
. 5

. 0 4

8

. 9

2
3
5

1
1

6
0
4
1
1

.
1

3

. 3
. 1
. 1
. 0
. 1

2
5

0

0

. 0

-

1

0

0

. 0 81

8

. 8

-

. 5
. -2

0. 7 . 0 6

30

1

2
5

. 1

. 0
. 5

-

8

. 0

1 0 0 .0

8

2. .

3

9
1

5

. 1

-

. 7
3 7
-

6

-

. 2

-

n

-

-1
-

. 4

3 2 4 5 . 7. 1
. 5
7
. 7
1 0 . 7
2
. 0
1
. 5
. 8
1
. 5
. 4 -

. 0

s
1

.3 .

5

. 1

-

0

. 0

-

2
1

0

-

2 3 7 9 . 8. 2
. 5
4
. 3
9
. 8
2
. 7
2
. -0

-

-

-

7 6 4 0 . 9. 8

. 4

n

9

-

-

6

3
.2 6
.
1

s

8

0

1
1

0
0
5

-

7

. 1
-. 0
. 3

1
3

5

. 6

. 3
. 2

5

. 4

2

4

. 1

-

5

. -5

. 5

7

9

. 8

6

5

7

0

2
1

-

9

4

. 4

2

0

. 2

3

5
1
2

-

_
5

. 8

3
9

. 0
-

. 3
-

. 6
. 5
4 . 5

6

. 7
7

3

2 2 0 5 . 2. 4 3 3 . 7
1
. -8
3 . 5
2 1
. 8
9
. 1
2
. 7
1
. 0
2
. -5
5 . 2
3 . 9

-

8

. 0

. 5
. 1

-

2

6

6

. 1

1 00.0

-

. 7
. -8
. 4
1
. 8
-

-

2
. 7
1 4 . 0. 5
3 . 9 -

4

. 6

1

0

5

. 4

2

0

0

6

1

. 9

6

8

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

. 7

. . .2 .

3

9
1

-

. 2
-

. 1

-

-

-

2
3
0
. 6

2 5 7 7 . 3. 8

-

-

. 5

6

2

-

. 7
7

-

0

. 4
3

. 8

. 3

-2
-

3

. 0
1

7
. 5

. 8

4
. 2
.8 8 . 7
2
. 7
2
. 0
3 . 5
2 . 3
.1 2 . 3
..27
. 4
1 . 5

2

-

1

5

-

0
5
5
4

-

. 4

4
-

2

-

-

. 5

-

. _2

5

. 0 6

. 1
. 5

6

. 3

1 0 0 .0 9
7

. 8

. 3

9

1 7 0 4 0 . .6 0

-

. 2

3

. 7

1

. 8

1

4
1

. -8

-

. 2

8

2

-

. 0

-

1

3

-

-

8

. 5

3
1

3 . 5
3 5 . .6 7

-

1

. 2

-

-

. 5

-

-

-

. 4

7
. 4

3

1
2

2

. 3

2
2

a

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............




O

e

a
a
a
a
d.
d.
d.
d
b

1

1 1 0 0 0 0 . . 10 0 0

1 1 0 0 0 0 . .0 0

. 0

W

e

b

d
d
d
d

s

E

t a
r

o
3
5
6
8
1
1
1
2

n

t .a . . b . . . l . i . s. . . h . . . m . . . .e . . n . . . t 1. s. . 0 . . . 0 . . . . 0 . 1 . . 0. . . 0 . . . . . 01. . 0

b

d
d
d

i o

m

1
E

i s

. 7

1

. 7

. 4
. 1

2

. 9
5

-

. 5
. 2

6 5 76 4 .2 3 . . 6 21 0 0 .0

Occupational Wage Survey, Salt lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

. 6

7

2

. 2

Table E 6
-:

N an p M

d d 4 *U 4 J0 n

P a ru U

& i

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N
Type of bonus

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

W oeae
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

Mnfcuig
auatrn

100.0

All establishments ..............

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/.......... ••••••••••••

A3.8

29.0

53
.

Christmas or year-end... .
Profit-sharing ...............
Other ........... ...•••... .

AO.9
.
6
3.2

26.3
A.5

5
.3
-

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses .....................

56.2

71.0

9A.7

1
2
*
*

/
/
*

i n
U
F

T

c l u d e s
d
a t a
n d u p l i c a t e d
r a n s p
o r t a t i o
i n a n c e ,
i n s u

f o
t
n

o
r a

r

i n

t

a
( e
n
c

x
e

l .

c
,

d
l u
a

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

Fnne*
iac*

A
U
aua t r n
idsre 1/ Mnf c u i g
nutis

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Wo e a e
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

51.0

83.3

36.0

3A.1

22.1

12.9

A2.6

5A.A

AA.6

A3.A
1.9
6.2

83.3
-

35.6
.
A

30.7
2.2
3.5

20.8
53
.

12.9
-

32.2
7.5
2.9

50.3
53
.
1.7

36.2

56.A

s

100.0

A9.0

16.7

6A.0

65.9

77.9

87.1

57.A

A5.6

55.A

t r i e

i n
d

g
r

s
r a
a
l

e

o
i l r
e

t h
o
s

e
a
t a

r

t h

d

s
t e

)

a
,

n

t h
c

o

o

m

m

s

e
u

s
n

Pbc
uU
uiiis
tlte*

Mnfcuig
auatrn
.

Rti tae
eal rd

100.0

.192,9.

All establishments................

100,0

100.0

Establishments with insurance
or pension plans 2/ ••••••••.......

88.8

97.A

96.2

96.6

83.A
73.2
65.0
3A.A
2.5

93.0
72.3
81.7
30.A

96.2
92.6
50.3
55.6

-

11.2

2.6

Life insurance
Health insurance ...............
Hospitalization ................
Other ......................

h

o

a

t i o

v

n

s
n

,

e
a

p
n

a
d

r a
o

t e
t h

l y
e

.

r

p

u

b

9*tA*4A<UU>e OHcl P-e4iM04t PX(i4tl

W oeae
h lsl
tae
rd
„

i c

_

8.A

.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED INA
U
idsre
nutis

Srie
evos

37.8
l.A
7.2

Table E
-7:

Type of plan

Rti tae
eal rd

A3.6

u
d
n

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N
Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

A
U , a u atrn
idsre XJ M n f cuig
nutis

Wo e a e
hl s l
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

100.0

100.0

100.0

Pbc
uU
uUte*
tiis

Srie
evos

100.0

-- 122a
Q

8A.2

82.6

50.7

8A.1

91.0

85.A

87.A

82.3

59.6

73.7
76.8
75.2
1A.9
8.6

75.0
60.8
60.8
50.6

A8.9
A7.2
A5.9
7.9

75.7
72.7
68.2

79.8
79. A
80.5
35.A

85.A
72.2
50.6
AA.5

86.2
71.6
68.6
1A.6
1.7

70. A
71.0
66.2
15.9
3.7

51.8
56.3
56.3
2.5

-

91.5
75.1
62.8
23.0
5.9

3.8

3.A

15.8

17.A

12.6

17.7

AO.A

100£0

-

-

.
.

26.1

.199*9

1.2

-

15.9

9.0

.

-

100*0 ...

-

Establishments with no

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




A9.3

1A.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

l i c

u

t

17,

Appendix— Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4)* The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing! transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities! wholesale trade! retail trade! finance,
insurance, and real estate! and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but oost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid! average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest $0 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishment1! full-time
schedule for the given occupational olaseifioation*
Information on wage pr&otloes refers to all offioe
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for & waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

18,

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER, 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Numb'er of
establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .................................
Manufacturing..................... .
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..................... .
Wholesale t r a d e ...... ......... .
Retail trade ...........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services 2/................ ............

21
21
21

510
118
392

159
34
125

42,300
14, OCX)
28,300

25,500
8,290
17,210

5,350
1,130
4,220

21
21
21
21
21

47
102
133
46
64

19
29
37
18
22

6,300
5,600
10,500
2,500
3,400

5,060
2,640
6,280
1,400
1,830

1,340
760
860
1,080
180

21

3

3

2,622

2,622

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis
Railroads .....................................

-

i/ Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area (Salt Lake County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




19

Index
Page
num
ber
Beneh hand (bakeries) .... ............. ........... •••.
Biller, machine ................................. .....
Bookkeeper, hand
.... ................ ....
Bookkeeping-machine operator.................. .......
Bricklayer (building construction) ....................
Calculating-machine operator........................
Carpenter (building construction) .............. ••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance ...........................
Cleaner ........ ..... ........ •••••...................
Cleaner (railroads) .................... ••••...... ••••
Clerk, accounting ••••••••........... ••••••••••..... .
Clerk, file ..........................................
Clerk, general.... ...... ...... •••••••••.............
Clerk, order ............................ .............
Clerk, payroll............... .......................
Compositor, hand (printing) ••••••••...................
Crane operator, electric bridge ............ ...........
Draftsman............................................
Duplicating-machine operator ...............
Electrician (building construction) .............. .
Electrician, maintenance.......... ....................
Electrician, maintenance (railroads)•••••••••••.........
Fireman, stationary boiler ................ ........... .
Helper (bakeries) .............
Helper, motortruck driver ..... ....... ................
Helper, trades, maintenance .................... ......
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ...............
Janitor ................
Janitor (railroads) •••••••••••.........
Key-punch operator •••••••••............. ....... ••••••
Laborer (building construction) ............
Machine operator (printing) .................. ........
Machine tender (printing) ..........................
Machinist, maintenance .....................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .... ....... ........
Mailer (printing) ....
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) ••••.... .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)••••••................
Mechanic, maintenance •••••••.... •••••...... ..........




11
3
3, 4
3, 4
11
11
8
10
3, 4
4
3, 4
3, 5
3, 5
11
8
6
$
11
7
10
7
11
11
7
10
8
10
5
11
11
11
7
10
11
10
7
7

Page
number
Mixer (bakeries) ........... ......... ....... .
Motortruck driver............. ......................
Office boy ••••••.....••••••..... ............ •••••••••
Office g i r l .......... ••••••..................... ••••
O i l e r ...............................................
Operator (local transit) ............ ......... .......
4
Order filler.........................................
Overman (bakeries) ........................ .......... .
7
Packer .............................. ........... .....
•••••••••••••.
Packer (bakeries) .............
Painter (building construction) ............
Painter, maintenance...............................
Photoengraver (printing) ••••••••........... ••••••....
Pipe fitter, maintenance.... ••••••••.............. ••••
Plasterer (building construction) ....................
Plumber (building construction) ............. •••••••••••
Porter ..... ••••••...... .... ....... .................
Press assistant (printing) •••••••••••••••••.... ••••••••
Press feeder (printing) .....•••••••........... ••••••••
Pressman (printing) •••••.••••••••••....
Receiving clerk •••••.........
•••••••••••••
Secretary .......................
Shipping clerk ........................ •••••••..... .
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ........
••••••••
Stenographer ....................
Stereotyper (printing) ......
Stock handler.... ...........
Switchboard operator.... ...........
Switchboard operator-receptionist ....................
Tabulating-machine operator ••••••....
Transcribing-machine operator..... ........
Truck driver ..... ••••••••••••••...... .............. .
Truck driver (railroads) •••••••••.........
Trucker, hand ............
Trucker, p o w e r .................................
Trucker, powe. (railroads) ......
Typist ..............................................
Watchman............
Wrapper (bakeries) .............
U

.

S .

G

O

V E R

N

M

11
11
3
5
7
11

8
11

8
11
11
7
11
7
11
11

8
11
11
11

8
5

8

9
5

11
9
$

5
6
6
9
10

9
9
10

6
9
11
E

N

T

P R

I N

T I N

G

O

F







This report was prepared in the Bureau's Western Regional Office.
Communications may he addressed to:
Max D. Kossoris, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 1 7 *
0*870 Market Street
San Francisco 2, California
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Western Region includes the following States:
Arizona
California
Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102