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H‘ d
2

Congress, 2d S e s s i o n ................................................................................................................ House Document

4s
2

Occupational Wage Survey

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL
MINNESOTA
N ovem ber

Bulletin

N o.

10 6 8

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




1 9 5 1

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................... . ......................................

1

THE MINNEAPOLIS-ST • PAUL METROPOLITAN AREA. ...........................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE..........................................................

1

TABLES*
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ••••••••...... ........................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ...........
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations
..... ••••••••....... ......
A-A
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations.........................

3
9
10
13

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-20A
Grain m i l l i n g ...........................................................
B-2A31 Millwork................................................................
B-336 Foundries, nonferrous ..............................••••••.... ..........
B-34^4 Sheet-metal w o r k ...................................................
B-3A63 Stamped and pressed metal products......
B-35
Machinery industries................... .............. ..................
B-40
Railroads...............................................................
B-5452 Milk d eal e r s .............................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ••••••••....................... .......•.............• •

16
16
17
17
17
16
19
19
20

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction
...............................................
C-205 Bakeries .................................................................
C-2082 Malt l i q uors.............................................................
C-27
Printing.................................................................
C-41
Local transit operatingemployees ••••••••••...........
C-42
Motortruck drivers andhelpers .........................

21
21
22
22
23
23

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .......... ...............•.... .

2J+

Wage practices E-l
Shift differentialprovisions .. ...........................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ............ .............................•........
E-3
Paid holidays ............................................................
H
Paid vacations........... .... ..........................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ........
E-6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s .... ............ •...............................
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..................... ....... •••••••.........

25
26
26
27
28
30
30

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ....... ........... ............. ..................

31

I N D E X ...................... ................................................ .........

33

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for auto repair shops
(May 1951), ferrous foundries (June 1951) and
power laundries (May 1951).

F o r s a l e by th e S u p e r in te n d e n t o f D ocum ents, U. S , Government P r in t in g O f f i c e ,
W ashington 2 5 , D. G. - P r ic e 25 c e n t s

April 9, 1952

82d Congress, 2d Session

Introduction 1
/
The Minneapolis-St. Paul area is 1 of 40 major labor
markets in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently
conducting occupational wage surveys* Occupations that are com
­
m to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing indus­
on
tries were studied on a community-wide basis*
Gross-industry
methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings
data for the following types of occupations: (a) office; (b)
professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant;
and (d) custodial! warehousing! and shipping• In presenting
earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4)
separate data have been provided wherever possible for indivi­
dual broad industry divisions* 2/
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries were studied on an industry basis,
within the framework of the community survey* Earnings data
for these jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting ) occupational earnings for several industries or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or
m um rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
inim
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Minneapolis - St. Paul
Metropolitan Area
The Minneapolis-St* Paul Metropolitan Area (Anoka,
Dakota, Hennepin, and Ramsey Counties) had an estimated popu­
lation of 1,112,800 in 1950*
It was, thus, the Nation1s thir­
teenth largest metropolitan area* About three-fourths of the
residents lived in Minneapolis or St* Paul* During the 1940
decade the population of the four-county area increased 18 per­
cent* During the same period, the population of Minneapolis
increased 6 percent and St* Paul, 8 percent*

1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional pffice in Chicago, 111*,
by W
oodrow C* Linn, under the direction of George E* Votava,
Regional W and Industrial Relations Analyst*
age
The planning
and central direction of the program was carried on in the
Bureau*s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations in Washing­
ton, D C*
*
2/ The construction and extractive industries and government
institutions were excluded from the study; see appendix for dis­
cussion of scope and method of survey*



House Document 428

W and salary workers in industry* commerce* and
age
government in Minneapolis and St. Paul numbered approximately
406,400 in November 1951* An estimated 114,000 workers were em
­
ployed in manufacturing plants*
Slightly more than a fifth of
a ll factory workers were employed in the machinery industry
which produced, such items as agricultural machinery and equip­
ment, construction equipment, pumps, refrigeration
air
conditioning equipment, and outboard motors.
Other leading
manufacturing industries included fabricated metal products;
food and kindred products; paper, printing and publishing; tex­
tile s and apparel; and lumber and finished lumber products*
Located in the heart of the upper-midwestern agricul­
tural region, the twin-cities area is also an important com er­
m
cia l, financial, and distribution center as indicated by the
large number of workers employed in these a ctivitie s. Wholesale
and re ta il trade provided employment for 113,300 workers, and
another 35,600 were employed by the various branches pf the
transportation industry, including railroads*
Nearly 26,000
persons were employed in finance, insurance and real estate es­
tablishments at the time of the survey*

Building construction, although starting to show a
seasonal decline in November, provided jobs for 23,o6o workers*
The service industries employed 44,000 persons in such diverse
fields as automobile and other repair shops, laundries and
cleaning establishments, hotels, theaters, radio and television
stations, and business service establishments* Federal, State,
and local government agencies reported employment of nearly
40,000 workers in the twin-cities area* Employment in public
u tilitie s totaled 11,000 in November.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages and salaries of workers in the Minneapolis-St*
Paul Metropolitan Area were affected by numerous formal wage
increases between January 1950 - the base period for the W
age
Stabilization! Board*s 10 percent ncatch-upn wage increase for­
mula - and the time of the study.
These increases were m
uch
more numerous after the outbreak of h o stilities in Korea than
during the preceding 6 months. Nearly a ll the establishments
studied had adjusted wage levels of plant workers at least once
during the 22 months preceding the survey*
The total amounts
of these general wage increases varied greatly among establish­
ments, ranging from less than 5 cents an hour to more than 25
cents. About two-fifths of the manufacturing plant workers had
received hourly pay raises totaling 20 cents or more since
January 1950. Wage-rate increases were somewhat smaller for
workers in nonmanufacturing establishments*

2

Formal revisions of office workers* salaries were not
as prevalent as were general increases for plant workers* The
tendency among several of the larger companies was to grant
similar wage increases to both plant and office workers* Gen­
eral wage increases of office workers lagged behind those grant­
ed to plant workers in other establishments, however , partly be­
cause of the practice of adjusting salaries of office workers
on an individual basis*

Nearly 85 percent of the plant workers employed in
the industries and establishment-size groups studied in the
four-county area were employed in establishments having union
agreements* About 9 of every 10 factory workers in manufac­
turing establishments were employed in union plants* In non­
manufacturing industries, the proportion of nonoffice workers
covered by union agreements ranged from less than 45 percent in
financial institutions to virtually 100 percent in the trans­
portation (except railroads)#communication and public u tilitie s
group* Union contracts covered about four-fifths of the non­
office workers in wholesale trade and the services industry,
and approximately two-thirds in re ta il trade*
Unionization was far less extensive among office
workers*
Less than 10 percent of a l l office employees in the
twin-cities area were employed under union agreement provisions*
Only in the public u tilitie s group of industries was there any
appreciable degree of unionization among office workersj about
half the office workers in this industry group were employed
in establishments having union contract provisions covering of­
fice workers*
W rates for time-rated plant workers in a substan­
age
t ia l majority of the establishments studied were patterned on
the basis of formal wage structures • Plans providing a single
rate for each time-rated job classification affected somewhat
more plant workers than those specifying a range of rates for
each job* Am the industry groups studied, single-rate plans
ong
were typical of nondurable goods manufacturing ^/, wholesale
trade, finance, and services* Rate range plans were more com on
m
in the durable goods, public u tilitie s , and re ta il trade groups*

J/ See appendix table far listin g of durable- and nondurablegoods industries.




Virtually a ll formal wage plans reported for office
occupations provided a range of salaries* Few office workers
tfere paid salaries based on single-rate plans, and nearly45
percent were in establishments that determined salaries on an
individual bas i s •
Piece-rate or bonus incentive payment plans covered
about 15 percent of the plant workers in both durable and non­
durable goods manufacturing establishments in the twin-cities
area. They were either nonexistent or relatively insignificant
among nonmanufacturing industries*

Established m um entrance rates for hiring inex­
inim
perienced plant workers were part of the formalized wage struc­
tures in a substantial majority of the firms studied* Entrance
rates ranged frcm less than 75 cents to more than $1*50 an hour*
A $1 or higher m um was reported by establishments giving
inim
employment to more than a half of a l l plant workers.
Four-fifths of a ll wom office workers were scheduled
en
to work a 40-hour week in November 1951* Schedules of 40 hours
were com on for office workers in a ll industry groups except
m
finance, insurance, and real estate*
Over two-fifths of the
workers in these offices were scheduled to work less than 40
hours*
More than 70 percent of a l l plant workers were working
a regularly scheduled 40-hour week0 Virtually a ll of the re­
maining workers were scheduled to work more than 40 hours.
A fifth of the factory workers in manufacturing plants
in. the twin-cities area were employed on second and third shifts
in November* Almost a ll of these workers were paid shift d if­
ferentials* In the nondurable-goods industries shift differen­
t i a l payments were usually expressed in cents-per-hour additions
to day rates* In durable-goods plants, about the same number of
workers were paid percentage differentials over day sh ift rates
as were paid cents-per-hour differentials*
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing estab­
lishments were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In 25 of 34 office classifications permitting comparison, aver­
age salaries in manufacturing industries exceeded those in non­
manufacturing* Average wage rates for plant jobs studied in a ll
industries were higher in manufacturing plants for 20 of 27 job
categories for which comparisons were possible*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
> A-i:

3

Oj^ice Occupation^

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem
N U M BE R OF W O RKERS R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

A verage
Number
of

S ex , occupation, and industry division

$
$
Weekly 2 7 . 5 0 3 0 . 0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0
earning?
(Standard) (Standard)
3 0 .0 0 3 2 . 5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0
Weekly

L$
1*0.00 1*2.50 6 . 0 0

3 7 .5 0

1* 7.50 & . 0 0

5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . o o 5 7 . 5 0 6 3 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 I 5 .0 0 6 7 . 5 0

1x0.00 1 2 .5 0 l*5t00 !*7t5o 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 , 5 0 5 5 , o o 5 7 , 5 0
*

$

$

7 0 .0 0 7 5 . 0 0 6 3 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0

6 0 .0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 .0 0

over

Men
$

3U 2
127
32
95
215

Bookkeepers, h a n d ............. .
Manufacturing .......... •••••,
Durable goods ....... .
Nondurable goods •••••••••<
Nonmanufacturing «......... .
,
Public utilities * •••••••
Wholesale trade ••••••••••
Retail t r a d e ........... .
Finance ** ................
Services ....... ....... .

27

78
aa
U8
18

1*0*0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.5
1*0.0

7 0 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
5 9 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
6 3 .0 0
5 9 .5 0

.

.

.

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2
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7

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21
10
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10

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9
9
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16

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25

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13
3
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9
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33

23
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a

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12
8
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„

13

1
3
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7
1
6
_
.
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1
j

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type)
Nonmanufacturing

UO
56

3 9 .5
3 9 .5 "

5 2 .5 0
5 3 .0 0

1*0.0
6 1 .5 0
1*6.0 " T 9 . ~ o o ~
1*0.0
6 0 .0 0
5 7 .5 0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
6 2 .5 0
1*0.0
6 6 .5 0
1*0.0
61*. 0 0
1*0.0 ! 6 5 . 5 0
1*0.0
1*8.50

Clerks, accounting ..... .
Manufacturing ••..........
Durable goods ••••••••••
Nondurable goods •.....
Nonmanufacturing «........
Public utilities * .....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade
Finance «* •••«•••••••••

711
231
108
123
U80

Clerks, file, class A .......
Nonmanufacturing .........

19
lb

1*0.0
bO .O

Clerks, file, class B ........
Nonmanufacturing ..,•••••••

—

35
31

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

3 8 .0 0
: 3 ? . '5 S “

Clerks, general .............
Manufacturing ........... .
Durable goods .........
Nondurable goods •••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••.••••«••
Public utilities * •••••
Wholesale trade ••••••..
Retail trade
Finance «* .......... .
Services ...... .

320
-------79
bO
39
21*1
26
113
20
57
25

1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
3 9 .0
1*0.5
1* 3.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
3 9 .0
1*2.0

61*. 0 0
6 3 .5 0 6 2 .0 0
6 5 .5 0
61*. 0 0
7 2 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
5 5 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
6 2 .5 0

Clerks, order ...............
Manufacturing ............
Durable goods •........
Nondurable goods •«.....
Nonmanufacturing •••••....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade ..•••••••••

527
112
58
51*
10 5
371
30

5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5
I^ o ~
5 9 .0 0
1*0.0
5 8 .0 0 1
1*0.0
6 0 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5
5 9 .0 0
3 9 .5
1*0.0 j 6 0.0 0

Clerks, payroll ..............
Manufacturing...... .
Durable goods .........
Nondurable goods ......
Nonmanufacturing .........
Public utilities * ....

60

19
25
15

6 0.0 0
1*0.0
C o ro ” 1 6 2 .5 6 1
1*0.0 ! 6 3 . 0 0
1*0.0 | 6 2 . 0 0
1*0.0
5 6 .5 0
1*0.0
6 0 .0 0

27
10
17

1*0.0
1*0.0'
1*0.0

lib

261
38
6i

“

Duplicating-m achine operators
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .........

—

IT ”
16

1*6.50
1* 7.50

1 * 7.50
1* 6160"
1*8.00

1
1

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7
7

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See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

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-

-

- !
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

;

3

1
1 '

-

-

~

i
i

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-fit. Paul, Minn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

O f f ic e .

Table A-l*

O c c u p a t io n *

-

C o n t in u e d

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Mlnn.r by industry division, November 1 951)

Sex, occupation, and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS
Average
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly 2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 ao.oo a 2 .5 o a 5 .o o U 7.50 50.00 52.50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00
W
eekly
(Standard) (Standard)
j
3Q~0Q 3 2 . 5 a 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 JiCLoa U 2.50 ■ MaOO U7.50 5 0 .0 0 -52.5 Q 5 5 a00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 ,5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0

OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 90.00 95.00
and
7 0 .0 0 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 over

Men - Continued
3 9 .5
Uo.o
a o .o
a o .o

39.5

1 63
5U
18
xi.

a o .o
a o .o

3 5 .5 0
3 5 .0 0
3 9 .0 0
за .
3 6 .0 0
3 7 .5 0
зб.

90

15

59
28
6
22
31
8
6

2
5 0 a3
15
as

3

16
50 1

2a

ip
28

n

2
0
y
13
1'

28
13
3

6
a

2

3 8 .0 0
Manufacturing

............................ .
.................................... ..

Tabulating-machine operators ......................
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................ .
W holesale tra d e .............................. ..
Finance « # .............................................

50.00
Stenographers. g en era l
39.5
- 3 6 ,
U 8.00
a b .o
22
3 9 .5
a w
a o .o
a o .o
a o .o

1 25
— 31
9U
17
65

5 8 .5 0
63T505 7 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
5 5 .0 0

_

-

li60
160
U8
1 12
3 00
52
115
69
27
37

a o .o

39.5
39.5
39.5

a o .o
a o .o
a o .o
a o .5

38.5

a o .o

1

2
2

-

1

$

1

7
6

1

-

-

7

6 1 ___ 2 .
_
6
2

x

1
x

u
u

ia

|
8
8

a
a
a

5

1

a
a

a
a
a

10
2
8
1
a

12
3
9
1
8

9
9j
2 I
5

6 ____ 9
1
5
a
5
2
1
3
3

12
a
8

10
_

3

4
3

a

10

5
3!

2
2

ia

2
12
.

12

12
7:
5I
2
3

a J ___ 1
_
l!
2i
1
3!
1
"

a 3 .5 o
U5.bo
a 6 .5 o
a a .50
a 2 .5 o
a 5 .o o
a a .5 o
3 9 .o o
a i.o o
a o .o o

3
-

2

16

3

2

- 1
2;
ia

- -----

-

2

76
8
5

60

19
1

18
ai

68
6
27
15
10

5

2

3

8
18
10

6
8

j

1

I

a 3 .5 o

-

8

13 --J = L

_

8

13
3

15
U3U

a o .o

5 6 .5 0

39.5

59
158
80
7
8
276
ao
aa
68
51
73
262
' “58
30
2
8
20a
12a
3
5
33

51.00

58.00
'TO
39.5 ' 57.00
ao.o ; 59.00
ao.o 1 55.50
ao.o
59.00
ao.o a7.oo
69.50
ao.5
39.0
51.00
ao.o aa.oo
“

a7.oo
39.5
ab.o r-a^OT
ao.o a7.oo
52.00
39.5
a6.oo
39.5
ao.o
a7.oo
ao.o U8.00
39.50
37.5

“
- j
-

-

_

-

_
_
-

Z
.
.
"

1
1

a 3 .o o
a 3 .5 o
a 2 .5 o

Bookkeepers, hand .............................................

7
_

_
- j
-

-

1
-

1
1i
-

-

-

i

!

i

i

1
6
61

1

i
______

10

30
29
16
5

-

16

l'
-

-

k

2

1

-

35

-

1
-

10

63
i5
3
12
us
16
15
6
1
10

35
11 1

11

!
-■

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*# Finance, insurance, aid real estate.




-

1

a

UO.O
3 9 .5
a o .5
a o .5

218
20
198

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A , •
Manufacturing . ............ .........
Durable goods .................. .
Nondurable goods .................
Nonas rmfacturlng ....................
Wholesale trade ..............
8atail trade * _____. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance *# ................................... .

1

u
a

1

7

3

i

B i ll e r s , machine (bookkeeping machine) . . .
Manufacturing ..............................................
Mnnaanufacturing ....................................... .
R e t a il trade
.........................................
S e r v ic e s ...................................................
Manufacturing ......... ........
Durable goods .............. .
Nondurable goods .............
Vonnsnufacturlng ....................
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .....................
Finance ** • ......................
Services • ........................

1

-

2

5
3

6
6

■

Women
f i l l e r s , machine ( b i l l i n g machine) . . . . . . .
M an u factu rin g.............. ............ ...................
Durable goods ................................ ..
Knmkmhla goods t Tt . _T____ t• r t» »t
RoiHf|tinfa/>tnH ng
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ...............................
W holesale trad e .....................................
R e t a il trad e ..........................................
Ftnanna # #
f f T.__ T..________ »»»«
S e r v ic e s ............... ..............................

_

39
6
x
tj
33
ia

ft

32
12

52
2a
5
19

ft
h

2
10

20
23
6
1
10
2

28
1
22
3

31
2
20

U

2

3

55

1
5a
5
2

19
1
18
10
6

5 ; ao 25
3
3
2 - T- T
1
1
•
2
6
2i
38
18: 30
5
_ !
8
.
ia
i *3
1
•
71 5
1 11
11 1 3
5
13
2 1 hl
52 j &
8
2 \
9 10
8
2
7
a
6
2
3
9 a3
35
10
3
6
33
u
1
2
2
20

ia

54
28
8
20
26
9
17

6
- ;

7
2!
- i
2

5
5
-

8 ____ k
1
aj

5

1
1

2
2
u

a
a

_
.
u

8

2
6
2
5
19
6

-

-

-

-

-

30 25
ft
1 "— TF--2
5
2
12
13
»
«
2
15 13
3
1
2
a
ia

21
6
6

3
1

17
3

29

15
1

1
2
1

17
ia
2
12
3
3

3
ia

16
T

„
_

„
_

1
2
1
1

-

23
IT
7
8
8

1

-

91

1i
1;
8
51
-

5
3
3

5
6
5
^
.
.
5
5

15
2
- 1

2
. |
. !

_
2
2

_

10
3
1

3

3
3
•
_|

1 i
1

1
_

_

1

-

61

3
a
31
10
21

_!
_I

-

a5!
10
3
7
3
5
2
ia
1
12
6
3
8

3
3

_
_

_

8
8
6

_

_j

;
.
-

-

-

19
6
a
_
a
2
.
x

i
_1
_
_1

_

-

i

_
_

-

-

1i
1!
6

_

_

-

.

_l

2
1
1

8
3
5
1

_
«
.

_

-

5
1

_

_

_
_

-

-

9

23
19
19

_

_

.

_

8
1
7
1

W

3
3

_

-

_
_

11
8
3
1

a

1

_

-

_

_

_

-

r :

-

-

_

.

;

.
.

1
_

_

_
16 i

11

286
1 *3
16

s*

O ffic e boys .................................................. . . . .
Manufacturing ........................ . . . . . . .........

16 ►

_;
3
61 ' 3
12
1 a
-1

_

j
1j

_

1
.

_

"
_
_
_
_
_

_

_1
_

10
10

_
_

_

xo

”
.

_

-

_

_
_

_
m
m

!

_\

1
1
____ -

-

-

;
_
. 1

_

-

_

5

2
1!

_

'
!

‘

O ^ice OccMfU+iiottl - Continued

Table a -1j

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolic-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem
N M E O W R E S R C IV G S R IG T IM W E L E R IN S O—
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E E K Y A N G F
Sex, occupation, and in d u stry d iv is io n

Women

Nme
uor
$
o
f
eky Wel
ky
wres W e l ee ig 2$7 ^ 5 ° 30.00 3 2 .5 0
okr
anns
r
(tnad (tnad under
Sadr) Sadr)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3
3 5 .0 0 37.50 U0.00 U2.S0 l*5.oo 1*7.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .o o 57.50 6 0 .0 0 62,$0 6 5 .o o 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 $ . 0 0 9 0 .0 0 95.00
and
3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 U0.00 1*2 .$ 0 U 5.oo U7*5° $ 0 , 0 0 52,50 5 5 .o o 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 over
i

- Continued

Bookkeeping-urnchine o p era to rs, c la s s B .
Manufacturing ............................................
Durable goods ....... ...... .
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
P ub lic u t i l i t i e s * .............. ..
W holesale trad e .................................
R e t a il trad e ........................ ..............
Finance * * . . .......................................
S e r v ic e s ................................................
C alculating-m achine operators
(Comptometer typ e) ......................................
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ................................
Nonnan u fa ctu ri ng ......................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ............................
W holesale trade .................................
R e ta il trad e ..............
Finance ** ............... .
Calculating-m achine operators (other
than Comptometer ty p e) .......... .
Manufacturing ............................................
Monmanufactuxlng .................... ........... .
W holesale trade ..................................
R e t a il trade .... ........ .
Finance ** .......... .......... t.
C le r k *, accounting ........................ ...............
Manufacturing
................................ ...
Durable goods .................................. .
Nondurable goods .................... ..
Nonaanufacturing ......................................
W holesale trade .................. ...............
R e t a il trade ........ ............. .................
Finance * # ........................................ ..
S ervices ................................................
C le r k s, f i l e , c la s s A ................................ .
Manufacturing .......... ................................
Durable goods .......... ...........................
Nondurable goods .......... ....................
Nonmanufacturing
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ... .......
W holesale trade ...........
Finance * » .............. .

739
lb
69
?),
596
10
158
76
336
16

1*0.0

$
U i.o o

uo;o T1530“
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0^0
1*1.0
3 9 .5
l*o.5

U 5.50
U 5.50
1*0.00
UU.oo
1*3.50
3 7 .5 0
3 8 .5 0
U i.5 0

80
281
807
7U
2 *9
223
73

3 9 .5
■ 7*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

U
6.00
■ 717700U 7.00
1*6.50
U 6.00
5 i. o o
U 7.00

328

3 9 .5

UU.oo

1 ,1 6 8

31
6“

39.5
1W” "
209
80
20
89

U5.50

38

-

38

85

72
2
2
70

-

8
9
21
-

1U
15
56
-

11
15
1*U
-

-

-

-

-

85
-

-

-1 9
- 1 --- r
-1 1
3
5
U
-

Ult.oo

16
* .50!1*2.50

3 9 .5
Uo.o
1*0,0
3 9 .0

1*2.00
1U 5.50
1*1.00

1*0.0
2 .2 7 6
uTT” '" ~ r a r
1*0.0
169
Uo.o
306
u o .o
1 ,8 0 1
u o .o
297
u o .o
UoU
371
3 9 .5
70
3 9 .5

U 5.50
! U 5.50
i U 5.50
1U 5.00
I U 5.50
U 7.50
U 5.00
1*2.00
U 2.50

u o .o
U2.50
2lt6
---- 58“ - W r " * U 3 . W
Uo.o
U 3.00
U3
3 9 .5 i U 3.00
1*5
Uo.o I U 2.00
158
UO.O IU 8.50
15
uo.o
UU.oo
61
Uo.o
1*2
12.00
*

Htf
iU
5,

5
16
10$
' 6

9

133

1

17

33

26

1*U

2

18
8

31

10

33
9
7
17 !

15

2

11
3
2
6

2

72

-- 5
- “
-

- ----~Z'
-

2

-

2

72
33
39
-

_
0
— 1r
1

-

-

9

-

1 13
9
U
5
1QU
Ui
Uo
7

- — rriT
6

15

8

16

1

2 61
2)|)|
231
66
39
71
12
16
35
36
27 j 5 0
222
165
173
1 '
35
7 i
26
U2
39
39
55 ! U
12
1
8

6

22
26
27 1
7 ~ T — r
1
7
3

-

1$

3:

22

2U

*
«*

6

5|

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




31
20

5
15
11

iu

5

at end of table.

10
1

5U !

52

30
5
19 i

33
8
10
1

23

10
2
8
13
5

1

7

181 : 156
58 | 298
11*1
r ^ i r r n s r — 5 TT
5 T — 1*5“
10
20
1U
1
13
50
51
iu
33
33
233 121 1 03
U3
95
10 1
7
5
3
5
10
26
9
65
39
2U
20
5U
3
15
29
5U
1 13
U
3
26
10

18

-

63

1 11

22 i
13

2
8
13

2

-

8?
35

23

2
3

9

6

!
____1
See footnote

Uf6
37
17
20
109
7
21
6
68
7

53

1*6
16
2
lU

30

22
1
5 i

2

7

2
1
1
5
2
2
_
1
-

1U8

U5
— IT
6
9
5
U3 S
96
3U
22 !
3
18 i 25
38
U
2
IU

j 9
t t ~ I T — IT- T ! 7 :
26
20
'2 ;
27
7
8
2 !
IU
13
_
2
6
7 1
5
5
35

U3

IU

278 ! 297
191
1U7
62
63
5 “H S l
5
28
11
13 1 22
3U |
52
1*2 j 29
216 , 23U
1 3 6 1 96
28 ; 9U ! 58! 26
35 ! 5 7 ! 31
15
12
3U
19
55
26
1
9
U8
25“
iu

111

23
20

3

39
20 !
U
16
19
7
3
9

Ill
1
1

-

13
1

u

10
3
3
7

2
1

3

88
22
7 1
1 5:
66 |
12
6 i
8
!
6
2 1
—
2

u

2
1 1
1 i

18
11
7

.

2
2
2

1
1
1

_
_

_

7

_

_

_

_

_

7 i

_

_

_
_

_

_
_1

-

-

" :

j

2
2
2

-

52
21
6
29
33 ----- T ----- T -----5"
.
1
2
_
32
6
3
18
19
27
_
1
11
7
6
26 I
7
_
6

_
_

_

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_i
_
_1

_

-

-

8
7
61
1$
n j
U
1*6 i
23
1

5

6

u1
2
2

-j

_
.
.
_

5

.|
_
_
_
_
_

j

_1
—
_
_!
_
_

—

_
_

_
_|

_

-

_

57
9
8
8 !

5

-1
_j

-

-

1
r
ii

_
_

_
.
_
_i
_;
_

_

55!
1 !

2

1 1

1
7
1

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

>

-

-

19
1
_
1
18 i
1
7

1
1

6

2
1
1

u
1
-

_

2

_
_

1
u
7 !

-

2

r!

6

-

1
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
i

_
_
_
_
_

"
j
i
_
■
--- 1

_
_
_

12

3
1
173;
3

8

3 !
T —

2
2

•
_

_

$

67
177
10 — r

5
5

-i

_

_

”
21
6
15

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

-

_
_;
6 !
uj

7
_
_

1

7

I
s

_

_1

7

-

«
.
_'

_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_ -----^-j
_
_
_
;
_j
_
_
_
_;
„,
_'
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-:

-

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

_
“

i|

_

_

_

_

_:

_

_

_

.

1 1

____i

6,

Qjflice Occnpatiani - Continued

Table A-lt

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hinneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem

Sex, occupation, and Industry division

N M E O W R E S R C IV G S R IG T IM W K E R IN S O—
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E EE LY A N G F

Average
Nme
u br
o
f
ek
ly Weekly
wrkrs Wers earnings
oe
hu
o

$
1 7 .5 0 50.00 3I .50 3$ .0 0 3 7 .5 0 IiO.OO 1*2.50 li$
5
5.oo ii7 .5 0 & .0 0 & . 5 0 & . 0 0 & .5 0 io.OO & . 5 o I 5.00 1 7 .5 0 70.00 7 5 .0 0 J0.00 8$5 .0 0 $ 3 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
over
?0t 00 3 2.5 0 ? 5.o o 3 7*^0 IiO.OO Ii2.50 !i5 .o o li7.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 70 *op 75.00 80.00 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0

Women - Continued

100
1.
21 100
2 1.
100
(.
187
3 9 .5
1*55
nt u.
i oo

Clarks, general ........
Manufacturing .......
Durable goods ••••■
Nondurable goods • <
Nomaanufacturing ....i
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade .....
Finance *# «••••••.
Services ...»••••••
Clerks, order ....... .
Manufacturing
Durable goods •
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade .
Retail trade •••<
Services •••••••.

C le r iF g .i^ g g ^ L a .« u i t »* ■■

Manufacturing.......
Durable g o o d s ....
Nondurable goods •«
Nonmanufacturing •••••
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade ••••..
Finance ** •••••••.
Services

Implicating-machine operators
Manufacturing ............
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••••••.
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••.,
Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade
Retail trade .»•••*••••
Finance * * •••••......

$
3 6 .5 0
3 7 .5 0
3 8 .0 0
3 7 .0 0
3 6 .5 0
3 9 .0 0
iiO.OO
3 6 .0 0
3 5 .0 0
3ii.0 0

9 87

Ji6,00

Ii3j
31
171
Ui3
1 ,0 2 9
52

Clerks, file, class B .
Manufacturing .....
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ..,
Public utilities
Wholesale trade ,
Retail trade •••<
Finance ** .....
Services

3 9 .5

ft 19^T

>•0

39. 5

3 9 .5

ko.o

loT " O 511.00
TT
100 5 3 .0 0
1.
37
Uo.o
5li.5o
169
71 3 9 . 5 i lill.00
8
100 i 50.50
*.
33
*0
0
216 1 . 1 lt2.00
11 1*0.5 U5.00
6
3. 1 U3.50
80
273
98

100
|.
15J
100
1.
71
82
3 9 .5
100
1.
179
1 100
* 1.
2
6 100
8 1.
332

38

ai.o

59li

100
1.

1T
5
115
138

U5.oo

U0.5

"TOT

■ W .50
0 .0 0 "
5U.50
i |2 . 50
0 .0 0
ii9 .00
3 9 .5 0
j iii.5 o
S 0 .5 0
0 .W

0 .5 0

Uo .o
3 9 .5

: U 7.50
0 .5 0
U6.00
ii9 .0 0
; U
9.00
! 5 1 .5 0
1 U 8.00

100 !
1.
6 Uo.o
6
92
100
1.

3kl
99
36

Uo.o

3 9 .0

1 100
| |.
0
171
100
1.
fcO
~W H
36
3 9 .5
i 100
i 1.
O
100
*.
95
100
1.
17
32
UO.O
1 100
8 1.
2 3 9 .0
1

0 .0 0
1(0.00
3 9 .0 0
1(1.00
3 9.5 b
1*2.50
3 9 .5 0
3 7 .5 0
3 8 .5 0
|

•
ii2
3
1
.
38
-

258
57
29
28
201
25
i|2
79
55

•
3
-

19
.
.
19
-

3
•
-

3 !
12 i
li

0

1
1
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.
1

11
**

!

i
1
i
|
!

2 3?
0
3li
Hi
1 87
10
51
18
87
21

85
153
- ;
85 ! 153 1
_ !
1
12
83 1
3 0 ! Hi
29 ! 38
111 ; 18

~ j
j

137
39
18
21
98
1U
19
28
30
7

198
76
ill*
32
122
21
22t
3li
1|2
1

81

76
20
.
20
56
«

10
-

10
71

h

35
7 j
18
7 i

33
26
3
23
7
1
3
-

17
3
1
2
111
Hi

Hi
3
3
11

„
•
.
_
•
.
.
-

?2i
57
19
38
261*
13
61*
162
25

1
_
;
l
_

1

.
-

10
28
---- 5T— r
8
5
20
5
_
15
2 !
li
1
3 !

58
2l* !
10
Hi !
31* ;
8
8
lb

38
1U
li
10
21*
12
2
.
2
8

53
Hi
2
12
39
20
15
1

2U
10
5
5
Hi
3
li
3
a

26

2
1

16
3
13
10
2
1
3
li

I

87

10
37
li
33
109
10
8
31*

1+
2
18
1
17
2li
2
1
5

16

11

1*2
l£
8
7
27
20 !
- i

32 i
21 |
3 1
1
18
11
10 I
1
!

22

70
0 j
27 1
13 i

16

80
0
2li
18
38
3
15
17
3
-

35
18
6
12
17
2
2
3
li

20
5
3 ;
2 j
15 !
7
li
1
3

k
7
33
12
0

16

13

3
28
3
6

16
$
2B

10

1
|
j
i

62 ____2_
12
1
10
1
2
8
50
1
8
0
1

79
2U
16
8
55
2
31
•
17
5

18
33
3
2
10
2

12
6
6
75
_
19
16
37
3

12 ;

j
i
1
!

30

i
1
1
1
i

h l
15
7 i
2 i
2 1
8
3
3 1
5 !
2
2

5

7
7
3
3
7 i
58 I
22 I
12
10 !
1
36 i
_
28
1
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S

2

2
1
1

-

16

2
Hi
72
11
30 !
10 !
12 !
9
!
j
i
|

- 1
81 !
28
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19
53
2
2li |
22
2
3
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10 i---- !
7
3
1
k j
3
3

1

3

.

.

_

.

_

_

-

12
10

_
_

11
1

17

2a

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1
10

•
17
1
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8
.
8

17 !
3 ;

1

2 |
Hi
• 1
2 ;

3
9

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67
21
7 i
Hi
0 !
1 i
13 1
20 i

12

!
3 ;
11 !
3 !
«,

i

3
2
li
3

1 i
-

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1*
6
9 !
11 i
3
1
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a i
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h
k 1
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23

13
8

11 ;
1 !
-

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1 >
9

- 1

9
3

32
21

10 1
. i
10

13 1
1
9

3

!

_
6

h

3
2
2
1
1

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23 I
2
21
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16

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- ;
1

j
6

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+
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.

!

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.
.
_ !
-

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2
2

10
2

2
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.
•
- 1

a

2

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2 i
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- 1

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ii

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_1
_1
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_

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-----^ !
_ 1
_
- j
.
-

2
.
_

2
11
1;

_

1

_
_ 1
_
_
-

-

12 i

_

2

2
_

-

_
-

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

1
-

.
.

_ ;

_

.
_
_

.
•

-

- !

1

•
.
•
-

6

.
_1
_
:
-

•

12 I ----5"
6
12 !

- '
_
_

1

„ 1

_

l

.
.
.
.
_
_
-

]-------

!




-

----- -i
_
.
_
-

2

-

10

_
_
.
a
6 !

_

11 ___lSJ___15_
6
2
1
2
5
_
1
1
1U
5
- 1 13
3
.
8 1
1
6
1 j
3
1
1
3 ;
!
5
-

10
6
20
9
6
1
3
1 |

.

.
_
.
_
_

2

2

j

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

1

88

16
10
9
1
6
3

-

_

7
.

T A-i: Office Occupation* - Continued
able
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem
N M E O W R E S R C IV G S R IG T IM W K E R IN S O—
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E EE LY A N G F
N u m b e r
of

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women

-

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

and

30.00 12. %

3 ^00

17.

10.0
(
10.0
(
U
0.0
10.0
39.5
10.0
(
10.0
(
39.5
39.5

U2.50
U(5
l.0
U5.50
U3.50
U
1.00
UU.oo
U6. o
o
Uo.oo
39.50

522
— I8J5
9
12U
339
5
3
5
2
200
19

39.5
U
<).6
10.0
(
UO.O
39.5
39.5
10 5
(.
39.0
39.5

3U.50
55:60
37.00
3U.50
3U.00
36.00
35.00
33.00
33.50

1,718

Office airls ••••••.••............
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••«•
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••«••••••
VtalAAAlit trade
Retail trade •••••••••••••••••••••«
Finance
Services •••••••«••••••••••••«•••••

39.5
10.0
(
10.0
(
Uo.o
39.5
Uo«o
Uo.o
Uo.o
38.5
39.5

lo o

Manufacturing
Durable goods ••••••••«•••••••••••«
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••«
Nonnanufacturing ••••••••••«••••••••••

228
U2
7
1,018
li

Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Finance a * • • • • « • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • •
Services • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • •

. «

,3

2U3
195
272
165

• • •
• • •

Uo.o

212
,(6
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Durable goods •••••••••••«•••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••«••••••••••
Nonnanufacturing •••••••••••«•••••••••
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••*•
Retail trade ••••••••••••••••••••••
Finance m ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Services ••••••••••••••••••••• •
• ••«
Stenoeraohers. technical .......... .
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade
Finance
Services

• * r• •

••••••••••
••«••••••

w

U09
505
1,512
Ol £

U50
200
506
na
190

5
7

25
32
133
19
(
32
1
4

lp

r

o

r

Uo.o
39.5
)n n
,
39.5
Uo.o
39.0
39.0
39.5
U
0.o
39.5
U0.0
39.5
UO.O
39.0
39.5

i
|
!
;

55.50
jg|o~ —
55.00
57.50
55.00
i
;

!

55.50
52.00
5U.50
57.00

8

2

7

)i .

UO.OO U « %

8

U9.00
52.00
U7.50
U7.50

213
7
6
28
U8
137
K)
22
93
9

10

25

153

2
3

52

1
3
3
9
23 101
1
15
! 12
22 !
6 *
9

2 8

57
10
10
U7
5
3
3
8

.
2

5
5

9
1
1
8

“
“

52
99
ir
7
9
1 i 8!
8
2
58

6 6
----- “ —

3

5

3

2 6
1
2

19
1 0

-

-

k

8
3
j

25

65

r i

3

69

27
15
1
2
U
2

31 1U
2
1
3
2
9
1
2
U
i
12
25
36 18
12
7
11
91 U
5
1
15
i
. 1

2

5i C 0

5 1 . 0 0

35
6

U6.50
U5.50
; U5.oo
U9.
5o
U3.50
j U3.00
: U5.00
U5.50
U9.50
51.00
51.00

3

s

U5.50
" U

5 1
3
6
1
5
U ;
7
9

3
6

2

“

19
2

n

19
53

120
25
21 i 29
1 6
17
U
3
U
3
2
6

“

U8
l

u
U
3
8
10
15
2
8

5

3
3

21

2

2

2

See fo o tn o te a t end o f t a b le .
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comminication,Imd other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




%

%

%.oo

%

.

%

«.00 57.

60.00

%

•

70.00 7«i.00 80.00

62.% 6^.00 67.%

8«i.oo

90.00 9*5.00

and
over

continued

U39
15U
97
57
285
36
U
3
2
8
1i
7*

m

0.00 85.00 lo.oo 95.00
$7.50 lo.oo 32.50 J5.00 37.50 Uo.oo $2.50 b . o o &7.50 |o.OO §2.50 §5.00 §7.50 IO.OO 12.50 &5.oo ^7.50 fo.oo fe.oo §

U
81
17U
56
118
307
22
136

21
65 65
1)0 “n a
11
5
3
3
29
7
6
12
10
U5
2U
7
2
5
8i 3
i! 7
l
71 U
32
*0
2
8

3

2

3

i

k
2
2

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_

x
x

8
2
2
2

_

3

_

_

3
3

i
1

1
x
x

1
V

3
2

!

„
“

82
25
15
10
5
7
15
6!
1U
1
3
9

101
106
320

113

UU

UU
11
33
lUo
17
A(
27
27
67
2

12U
58
11
U7
66
5
2
3
19
13
6

2U
2
96
36
60
1U6
7
6U
38
22
15

196
90
38
5
2
106

325
157
7
5
8
2
168
18
3U
32
57
2
7

235
102
5
3
U
9
133
17
35
12
U
3

187
62
2
5
37
125
30
8
UO

1 1 6

2 6

2 2

28

19
7
2

18/|

27
10

U7
11

6

8
36
11
3

2

5
3
1

£

8

3

|

1 1

g

j

1U
3
i
j

ll(
0

b

13
1

1 0

3

x

6 0
6 8
2 1

1

6
3

3
2
2

7

5
x
x

1

•»

28

2 1

8
17
1
2

3

2 0

6

3
3

2
2
1 2

5

k

5

1
2

r
?
3

J .

1
3
17
39 !
5

'

205
115
5U
61
90
3

j

185
88
20
68
9
7

! 1.
u
1 2 1

1
3
22
25
27

Uo 1
!
32 1

58

51

9

Uo r ~ k — IT
7
20
17 1
8
20
76 33
3
3J1
17
j
5
5
7
3
8
26 2 1
19
5
x
2 1

7
x

5

38
xx
27
72
11
.

(7
16
17 f
A
£

U3
ol
17
8
1
8
2

u
x
3

51
37
itr

22
1
.
u :

Alt |

5

10
1

91

■a :
j
6

97

!

20
a
0

i

27
xx
x
10
16
L
4
5

7
r

5
u

u
23
8U
8
3L

x

2
7
f
A

8
i ?
A t

9
- 1
-

68
15

1
.
u

xx

*3
5

i f
A
T C
A ?
9
1,
u
1 0
2

2

*
>
l!
i
A

7

5

U

8

1U
8

no

k
3

x
A
x

___ L

2
*

2U
2
x
x
22

0

c
3

16
9
x
8
7
1
,
u

3

2

A

7
O
y

-

-

6
8

-

10
2
1

“

A

j

x
e

3

xx

2

J

1
l
!
1

!
~
“!
I
|
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*
*
~
I

1
___2.
___d___.----a
J
.

x

8

12
10

8

-

2
2

i
1 "

j
i

Table A-l,

&Hice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-ti*« weekly hours and earnings-1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., by industry division, Hoveuber 1951)

Sox, occupation, and industry division

Aer g
v ae
N M E O W R E S R C IV G S R IG T IM W LY E R IN S O—
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E EEK A N G F
Nme
u br
$
$'
$ $
1
o
f
ek
We ly We ly 17.50 30,00 32.50 35.00 37.50 j*o.oo U2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 12.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
ek
wrkrs h u
oe
o rs e rn g
a in s
and
(S n a ) (S d ) u & r
ta d rd tan ard
30.00 -2.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.90 1*2.50 1*5.0Q 1*7.50 59.09 52.59 55.99 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 aver

W
assn - Continued
Switchboard operators
Manufacturing •••.•••••••••••••••.........

’ "** "**" **’

* ****

Switchboard operator-receptionists •«•••••
M
anufacturing
nondurable goods .••••.••••....... . . . .
MoaHmfacturlng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
pnM nt111t4ef
fn
tyhAlaeele tmia ttt, t.........
Ratafl trade
Finance w

1*0,0
uo.o

1*3
36U
ii9
U
O

lonnanufacturlng
Public tat-114 a* « _____

iiia
77

i*6,b
10,0
*

% i|0,0

105
8b

k\,$

552
181
91
90
371

39.5
39.5
39*5
39.5

38
121*

83
65
6i

— W

idiolesale trade ...............................
Retail trade.......................... . ..........

25

Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H
ondurable goods ••••••••••••••••«••
M
onuurafaeturlng
Wholesale trade....... ........................
trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
flninM «• t. t . tttttft, tttttt1M tttl

226

136
12

12

83

39.5

ko.o

10,0
*
10,0
*

39.0
39.5

10.0
*
1*
0.0

39.5
1 0.0
*
10.0
*
ia.o

39.0

596 39.5
— IB3“ “39^5—
68 39.5
115 39.0
ia3 39.5
*
193 10.0
18 10,0
*
176 39.0

Tranacrlblng-eachlne operators, technical
Manufacturing................
BwannfiwfaiiHng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plnenaa ee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

36
23
13

M « t i , olaas i .........................................
Manufacturing ........................................
Durable goods •••••»•••••••••••••••«
|fKI—goods ••••••••••••••«••••
Hwanufacturlng

678

Mholeaala trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Betail trade - ......... ........« ..............
Finance e*
Services •

39*5
10,0
*
39,0

90

Tabulatina-eachine operators
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••
■oaasnufactaring .............................

Transcribing-nachtne operators, general •
•

i*o~o

11

39.5
39.0
39.0

10.0
*
*
297 1 0.0
10.0
173 *
12i* 1 0.0
*
3^ 10.0
*
102 1 0.0
*
1 8 10,0
*
*
32 10.0
*
152 39.5
1*7 39.5

1*3.00
1*7*50
1*7.00
1 8*00
*
1*2.50
50*50
1*3.50
10.00
*
i*2«co
ljo.00
12.50
*
16,00
*

1*5.50
1 6.50
*
11.00
*
11.00
*
1 3.50
*
10,00
*
11.00
*

2
10
- . .
2

10

z
\
3

10

17

.

„
8

:

38*00

1

9

50.00
57.50

1

3

1*5.00

50,00
50.50
17.00
*
12,50
*

_
.

Ll*.bo

1(5.50

18,00
*
l*2, 5o
12.50
*

1 1*3.50
1 3.00
*
1 3.50
*
1 3.50
*
U .O
k O

16. 5o
*
17.00
*
1 6,00
*
12.50
*

l*l*,5o
16.50
*
11.00
*
10,00
*
12.50
*

1
*
2
1
*

57

k

1
*

.
-

u*

U
*

53
1
*

62
21
8

19

10 !

19

i1
1

k

3
3

5
21*
2
1

.
•

1

23

2
8i

.

1

12

59
17

8

1

10

2?
5

:

-•

•

20
7

1*1
8
12
11

10 i
2

-

1

8

13

11

19

1

•

1
1!

17 L i ®
1
2
2

11
16
12 1
2
2

See footnote at end of table.
•
Transportation (excluding railroads), cosanwieation, and other public utilities.
** Finmce, insurance, and real estate.




18
32

9

12 i

“

561
l

1
29
15
10

21

3

1

1

2
5

1*9

12

•

76

ll*

|
3 ! n*
_
_
.
.

12
12

60
----- F
3
1

8
10

21*
12

15.00
*
15.50
*
13.00
*

10

76

53

3

7

10
.

£

5
2

29
2

5
12
1*
2
11
3
2i*

•

78
i5

10
5i

63

6
18
10

ll*
15

98
37
12

25
59

13
8
26
10
2
10
1

17
13
j*
83
8
11

ll*
1*5
5

8
26
1
*
1
7
10

I*

85
19

12

7

66

3l*
1

17
ll*
25
2

9

23

3

1
2
20

2
1
3

66
11

3
8

55

8
6
12
8
21

59
30

23

7
29

6
8
8
2
51

1?
1
12
1
6
1
1
*

26
8

16
9

22
ll

7

3

1
3
1
2

11
10

2
8
18

j*

7
1
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1*5
27

18

9
18
3

8
1
0

21

9
|
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12

2
8

1
8

21*
12
10
2
12
7

$
11*

7

8

<

22
3

3
x

2
1
*

x
x
x
x

x
16

k

a
A
i

5

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1
9

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1
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X
X

1

52
23

17
29
16

7
31*
13

]*
15

23

13

IQ

9
31

3
26

9
3

18
11
7
5

2
1
1

1
1

-

.

135
33

id*
57
37

10 *

72
3B

21

1*7

27

2

12

15
18
102
22

8

39
29

20

6
8
1
*
26
3

3

77

1*2
35
16
5

2

1
*

1

27

13

11*
7
2
1

16
6

31

|
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8

28
x
5

26

11

x!

-

7

k

x
3
7

1
1
1

2
2

19

13

1

3
X
1
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3

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7

x
x

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10

19

.

.

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m

3

9
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7

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2I
20

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xl
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19
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10
9

11

8
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x

3

x

15
10

5
x

81
7U 151
28
1*5 26
18
1h 1 12
31
10
U*
1*6 106 ! 55
1
15 1 6 * 26

3

100

38
12
1
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6
3

3

1

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1
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10

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x
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r —.—a.

x
1

x

.

_

Table A-l:

O ffic e 0cC44fxU iO *U ' G ohI u U4*<1

9,

(vrg arih-iewel husaderig 1/ frslce ocptossuido a ae
Aeae tagttn eky or n anns o eetd cuain tde n n ra
bssi MneplsS. Pu, Mn. b idsr dvso,Mvse 15)
ai n inaoi-t al in, y nuty iiin oebr 91

1/ Hnsrfettewrwe frwihepoesrcieterrglrsrih-ieslre adteerig crepn t teewel
or elc h okek o hc nlye eev hi eua tagttn aais n h anns orsod o hs eky
* T a p r a L n (xldn riras, cnaiain adohrpbi uiiis
r v a t t o ecuig alod) oencto, n te ulc tlte.
« Fnne isrne adra ett.
* iac, nuac, n el sae
TbeA2
al -:

/XI
O O ^ecJuUool OcCUpaUoMd
H.

(vrg srih-iewel husaderig 1 frslce ocptossuido a ae
Aeae tagttn eky or n anns / o eetd cuain tde n n ra
bssi MneplsS. Pu, Mn. b idsr dvso, Mvse 15)
ai n inaoi-t al in, y nuty iiin oebr 91

V
y
y
*

Husrfettewrwe frwihepoesrcieterrglrsrih-ieslre adteerig crepn t teewel hus
or elc h okek o hc mlye eev hi eua tagttn aais n h anns orsod o hs eky or.
Wreswr dsrbtda flos 8a $1.0-$2.0 1 a $2.0-$2.0 k a $2.0-$3.0 2a $3.0-$3.0 2a $3.0-$^.0 ad6a $l0O -$i.0
okr ee itiue s olw: t 150 100) 0 t 100 150; t 150 100; t 100 150; t 150 100; n t l|.O D50.
Alwreswr a $2.0-$2*0
l okr ee t 100 150,
Tasotto (xldn riras, cauiain adohrpbi uiiis
rnprain ecuig alod) onncto, n te ulc tlte.
Ocptoa Wg Sre, MneplsS. Pu, Ma. Mrse 15
cuainl ae uvy inaoi-t al in, eehr 91
HS D P H S TC LBI
.. E A N I F AO
999376 0 - 52 - 2
Bra o LbrSaitc
ueu f ao ttsis




10.
Table A
-3:

M a in te n a n c e a n d Pow eb P l a n t O c c u p a tio n ^

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis in Minneapolis-sE. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem

O

c

c

u

p

a

t i o

n

a n d

dNumber s
of u

i n

Average
t r
hourly y
earnings

workers

C

M

a

N

E

M

r p
a n
D u
N o
o n
P u
R
e
F i n
S e

l e
D
N

N

a

o
P
R

c

e

n

t e r
f . a. . c. . . t
r a b l . e. .
n d u r a
m
a n u
b l i c
t a . i . l. .
a n c e
r v i c e
u

NU BER O W R ER REC IN STR IG T
M
F OK S
EIV G
A H -TIM H U L EARNING O —
E ORY
S F
$
$
$
$
d
i
i
i $ .n $
UnderL.25 vL.30 s1.35 o1.1)0 1.1*5 1 . 5 0 1.55 1.60 f.65 1.70 £.75 1.80 1.85 1 . 9 0 I . 9 5 l.oo 1.05 l.io 1.15 1.20 ^.2 5 ^.3 0 %.35 ^2.1*0 *2.50 2.60
and
$
.
L l I 1*30 l
I
.35 L 1*0 1.U5 1 . 5 0 1 .5 5 I . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 . 8 5 1.90 1 . 9 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2.10 2 . 1 5 2 . 2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.1*0 2 . 5 0 2.60 over

$
s ,
m
a i n t e n a n c 288
e
. 1.91*. .
.
. u . . . . r. . i . n . . g. . .
122
w n
. . . g. . o. . o . d s
70
1.75
b l e
g o o d s
• • • 52 • • 1.81*
•
f a c t u r i n g
• • • • 166 • • 2 .• 0 6 •
•
u
t i l i t i e
s
*
•
•
34 • • 1.92
. . t . .r . . a . . . d . . . e. . .
2.25
55
* *
2.12
21*
s
• • • • »
• • • • • •26 • • 2.11*
•

t r i c i a n
s ,
u f . a. . .c . . t . u . . r. . i . n . . .g
u r a b l e
g o o
o n d u r a b l e
n m
a n u f a c t u
u b l i c
u
t i l
e t a i l
t r a d

m
. . . .
d
g o
r i n
i t
e

n

a
. . .
s
o d
g
i e
•

e 1.99 ,
1.96
. . . . . . . . . . . 1 6. 6 . . * 1.91
.
s
. . • 122 • • 2.01*
•
•
2.09
93
s
#
.
.
57 . . 2.03
• • • • • •19 • • 2.32
•
.

i n

t e

n

a 381 c
n

~ m—

.
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,

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6
6
6
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5
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1*8
36

2
2
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22
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11*
3
5

32
20
11)
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12
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37
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30
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16 _ i o
n
2l)
8 15
3
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5 26
3 25

n _ 2 |_
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g

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W
h
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e
F i n
S e
D
N

N

e e r s
u f a c
r a b l e
n d u r
u i n u
b l i c
o l e s
t a i l
a n c e
r v i c e

a

,
t u

s t a
r i n g
o o d
a b l e
q
f a c t u r
u
t i l i
a l e
t r
t r a d e
* »
•
. s . . . . .» . . . •
g

t i o n a r
• • • • •
. . • •
p o d s
.
i n g
. •
t i e
s
a d e
• •

.
. .
1*80 . 1.81 .
•569• • 1.811“ •
• •
• 29 • •2.00
•
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.
• • 211 • • 1.77 •
•
•
#
.
.
31* . . 2.16
• • 19• • 1.70
•
1.83
1*7
• • • • • • • • 1*0 • • 1.71*
•
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71
1.59
s

y
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7
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1*2 2 1 53
33
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1* i 5
2
29
1)3!
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1*6
19
1
18
27
7

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23

5
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7
33
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10
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l e s . . a . . l . e . . . . .t . r . . a d
a . i . . l . . . t . .r . a . . .d . . e . . . . .
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r s ,
f a
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i
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See

*

footnotes at end of table.
Transportation (excluding railroads), cosounication, and other public utilities.

** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




O

c

c

u

p

a

t i o

n

a

l

W

a g e
B

U

u

S u r v e y ,
M
i n n e
. S .
D E P A R T M E N T
r e a u
o f
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a

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t a

11.

M a in

Table a -3:

te + tO

H

and Powefr

ce

p

la n

t

Occupation^ - Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem
NUM
BER O W R E S R EIV G STR IG T-TIM H U LY EA N G O —
F O K R EC IN
A H
E OR
R IN S F
O

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a n d

Number
d of u
workers

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t
hourlyr
earnings

d
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n u f
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a
b

c t u r i n g
. . . .
l e
g o o d s
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u r a b l e
f p o d s
n u f a c t u r i n g

. .

269

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110
ll i 3
16

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1.87
1.92
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See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities,
m
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

- I

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28

20 I
8 |
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23
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Tabla A-3r

( A
b

O

O

P

c

u

a

a

t i o

n

a n d

i n

e r a
s i s

g

e

Pow+k Plant 0 C O M fiat40HA •GontiM *A
M

C U td

h

i n

o
M

u

r l y
i n n

e
a

e

a
p

r n i n
o l i s

g

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s

1

t .

/
f o
P 1951) u
a

r
l ,

M
M

n
i n

n

i n
. ,

b

s

y

e

l e

NUM
BER O W R E S R EIV G STR IG T-TIM H U L EA N G O —
F O K R EC IN
A H
E O R Y R IN S F
$
$
N ber A
um
verage
d ei
d of u s hourly y U n d L.25 vr1.30 s £ 3 i$ o i.ao i a 5 f . 5 0 1 .5 5 1 . 6 0 f.65 f.70 I . 7 5 f . 8 0 1.85 i.9 0 L 9 5 1.00 1.05 1.10 i i I 5. 2 0
t r
i
n
w
orkers earnings
$
J
1-25 l 0. 1. > 35 I . 40 i.J.5 1 .5 0 1 . 5 5 1.60 1 . 6 5 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 . 8 5 1.90 1.95 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 5 2 . 1 0 2 . 1 5 2 . 2 0 2 . 2 5
f

2
2

5

I t

k ak

-

2 7 U 2.06
8 1 1.83 ..
33
_
a.................................... •s•• •• .•• •
b l e
g o o d
U8
1.83
u. . .f . a . . c . . t . u . . r. . i . n . . g . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193. . . . 2. . 1 6. . . . . - . . . . .| . . . •
. .
.
1 M4 * t H (a e
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i
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.
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1 2

1

i n t e r s ............................................n . c e
,
m
a i n t e n a
a n u f ................. ••••••• g•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •
a c t u r i n
N o n d u r
o n m
a n ..
p i i Kn I n ^ + . H
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m m M* o f
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p

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i l . e. . . r . .s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 . . . 1.59 . .
a n u f . a. . .c . . t . u . . r. . i . n . . . . .g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
193
1.53
1.57
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M

M

c

Maintenance

1
2
r T

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p a t i o n
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2
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i c e
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M f i n u f &
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1

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h e e t - m
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(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn,, by industry division, N ber 1951)
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5
a n d
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5. 1 9

2
y
2

12
12

6
5
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5

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0 12

5
5

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1
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8
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2 0 20 j 5
|
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9
!

5 9 j 8! 7

5

3

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), comm
unication, and other public utilities,
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




0

123 n
e
2
2
i |
712 62
. . . .
2 1
2 2
2 0
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1 (3 w 5
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. . .
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* i

. 01.10 1
5

5
1.00 1

e

a

Order f i l l e r s .......................... .................................................
Manufacturing .....................................................................
Durable goods .............................................. ..
Nondurable goods ..................................... ............. .
Nonmanufacturing .............. . • • • • • • • • • • • • • .....................
Wholesale trade .............. .
R e ta il trade .................................................................

0. 9

e

1

i t o r s ,
p o r t e r s ,
a n d 9 2 c4 l. e9 a 7 n6 6 e 1 r 2 s 10
n u f a . . . c . . t . u. . . r . i . n. . . g . . . . . . . . . • . . • . . •. . .• . . • . T. ~. T . . . 7
.W.
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.
N o n d u r a b l e . . . . g . . o . . o . . d . . s• . . •. . . . • . . •. . • 1 • 0 • 9 • 1 . 1 0 _
2
o n m
a n u f a c t u r i n g
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7 8 5
W
h o l e s .a. . l. e. . . . . t. . r . a. .. . . d. . . . . e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. . .• . •1 0• • • • • . • 1 _ . 1
R
e t a i l
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Finance ft* ............................. ..
5 6 1 . 9 5
5 0 1
S e r v ic e s • • • • ........ ............. ..........................................
2 4:
5 7
. 8 5
n

NUM
BER O W R ER R EIV G STR IG T-TIM H U L EA NING O —
F O K S EC IN
A H
E ORY R
S F
$
$
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5
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$
! $ ^ $
$
g e
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5
g s

N u m bA e v r e r a
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ateiuuUisu}, and Skipping OeenpatUm - G
i ofUU m
wd

(Arerage hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St. Paul, M
inn., by industry division, N ber 1951)
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O

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a
M

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M

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R

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M
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N ber A
um
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u
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orkers' earnings
$
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51*5
115

$
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1.39
1.38
1.49
1.34
1.39
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e 3,989 , 1 . 6 n0 a n10 d
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1.42
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875
.
1.43
844
10
. . .2,270 • 1.39•
•
•
.
«
549
1.39
.
1,052
1.43
10
657
1.32

-

14

11

59

3

2

32
25
1
24
7
_
.
7
“

15

7
1
6
-

10

32
32

03

43
14
26

16
15
1
i

46
22
7
15
24
1
6
17

95
33
7
26
62
_
44
15
3

j

7°
42
40

6I
36
26
10
31
1
19
11

2

28
1
14
13
~

42
-

4

16
10

6
34
.
•
25

20
2
18
9
_
2

3
3

58
16

_

.

.

“

-

-

-

3!

?

■

2

1

1

1

1

1

1:

1

1

21
12
8
4
9
1
6
i 2

12
6
6
_
6
5
1
-

17
12
.
12
5
4
_

36
6
_
6
30
6
24

7
7
7
.
.
.

10 _ k
4
7
4
4
_{
3
-1
3
_
-;
_
3

1
i
!
-

3
3

3
3
_

1

~

571 740
157 368
145 , 48
12 320
414 372
288 10
61 273
65 89

2
_
2

42
38

20

50
.
_
50
39
11

29

.“

-

_|

j

_

.

«
.
17
_
16

25
6
_
6
19
18
“

15
37
26
11

23

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1

2

46 108
5 80
4
1 80
28
4l
15 28
20

4
2
2

!_zs_
L

-

-

J
J

-

?? 275 1 8 5 1 6 3 9 753
73 i 4 i 142 r 354 246
42 38 76 196 220
31 103 66 158 2 6
26 134 43 285 507
_
«.
- 113
60
7
29 1 1 281 260
4 134
19 44 32

“

16
1

8
.

1

71
28
13 16
12
3
42 43
8 ! 40
34
3

.
3i
1
2

|

S

. 9 $2 . 0 0 : 2 . 0 5
S 8

1

17
6
47
38
8

42 Lj6_ \
33 25
17 19
16
6
9 11
6
9
5

10
8
1
_! 7
2
2
2
1

3

1
1

1.85 V .90 \

-— =
1

-

_
.

i
91 __26.
14 29
12 19
2 10
77
7
4
58
18
3

3
.

?o

10
• 18
18 106
- 30
28
1
17 48

-

1

2
2
2

8
7
1

9

8

- --- ff

22

10

1 .8 0

and
1.65 1.70 1.75 l.ftn 1.85 l.col 1 , ?.OG 2.05 over
.95
!

53 125
90
22
6
_ 84
31 35
30 35
1
-

27

r 19

9

_
.

3
3

1 ,6 0

9
8
7
1

1 6 6 33? 1 2 8
io5 5lr r
f
33 23 65
_
72 31
61 279 63
48 264 60
13 15
3

35
33
25
8
6

_

k

V8
6

21
_

168
57
44

_
-

3
•
3
22
20
2

111 1?6
69 133
42
3
1
1

225

1?
19
19

23

1

8

22

44 ly>8
lT i f e r

2?

6

9
9
3
3

1

4
_
4
_1 4
_
.
_■ .
- ;

_
_
•- i
.
-

.
_
_

2

”

|

NUM
BER O W R E S R EIV G STR IG T
F O K R EC IN
A H -TIM H U LY EARNING O —
E OR
S F
$
$
$
L i 1s. 2 0 1.25 1.30 1$.35 l . 4 o U s 1.50 1.SS 1 . 6 0 1.65 1 .70 1.75

f.oo f.05

n

127
52

20
15

13
6
7
3
1
~

14
5
2
“

«|___ l i___ 5
»
_
5
~ 5
- 1
-1 1
-!
~

1 ! __k
_
li 1
1
1
_
-i
3
3
■

6
6
6
-

1

1 _ 2 £ ___ 1
•
1
1
_
1 24
3
_ 17

1
2
_

6
8
8
.

-

_

•
_

-

42
30
30

6
-

-

-

1
1
1

_
-

-

-

_

-

.

-

b

l i c

1

3

1?
13
.
13
6

3

11

108

75
33

12

6

5
1

21
15
6
14

44
8
75
5
39
31

!
51
5
_
32
31
1

16

1

19
14

12

-

6

75
_

1 ___
_

S
*

e e

f o
T

o
r a




t n
n

s

o
p

t e s
o r t a

a
t i o

t

e
n

n

d
( e

o
x

f
c

l u

t a b
d i n

l e
g

.
r a

i l r o

a

d

s

) ,

c

o

m

m

u

n

i c

a

t i o

n

,

a

n

d

o

t h

e

r

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u

u

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.

15,

G

Table A-iis

u

&

t a1 d

ia l,

4

S) U

t p f aU n d w

p

O G c C& Mf i U f m i m t d t m dd *
&

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Minneapolis-St.~Paul, M
inn,, by industry division, N ber 1951)
ovem
NUM
BER O W R E S R EIV G STR IG T
F O K R EC IN
A H -TIM H U L EA N G O —
E O R Y R IN S F
O

c

c

u

p

a

t i o

n

a n d

i n

d

u

s

t r y

d

i v

i s

i o

1

n

. 0

. 1 1 . 5 1 1 0 . 2 1 5 . 31

5 1

0. 3

5

|
l.l»5 l 1 . i . * 5 0 0
-

1

U l5_l*2oj]
T

T

r u c k
N c n m
a
P u b
i t i o l
R
e t
S e r v

r i v e r
n u f a c t u
l i c
u
t
e s a l e
a i l
t r a
. . i . c . . e . . s. . . . . . .

$
,
l i g
h
t
(611 n 1.62 e r
u
d
r i n g
n
s X 5T
r
i l i t i e
s
*
83
1 . 5 1 *
t r a d e
1 8 6 1 . 5 3
d e
. . . . . . .1 3 7 1 . 5 2
62
. . . .
1 . 5 6
s

r u c k
d r i v e r s .
M
e d i a n
M
a n u f a c t u r i n g
D u r a b l e
g o o d s
• • • .
N o n d u r a b l e
g o o d s
•
N o n m
a n u f a c t u r i n g
. .
P u b l i c
u
t i l i t i e
s
*
W
h o l e s a l e
t r a d e
R
e t a i l
t r a d e
. . . .
S e r v . . i . c . . e. . .s . . . . . . . . .

,O 7
1O B
99
, 2 0
1 . , 1. *
8 9
3 5
. 1 7
2 3

r u c k
d
r i v e
K o n a a n u f a c
P u b l i c
u
R
e t a i l
t r

( 1*20 v e1 r. 5
o
155- T I T
1 8 9 1.50
. .9 9 1 . 5

T

T

d

r s
t u r
t i l
a d

,

i n
i t
e

h e
g
i e

a
.

s

v
.

y
.

*

.

1

.

6 1j .5 5 t
2
"TTST
1 . 5 1
9 1 . 7
5 1 *. 5
5 1 . 5
1 1 . 5
5 1.61
1.60

1 &

o

n

d

i n

c

l u

d

i n

g

1 *1

3 t 2 o 3 n 26s

1 5

t o

n

s

,

t

1)

6

r

a

i l e

r

t y

p

I

e

1

"

)

1 *
!1
5
5
-j

-

6

T

r u
M
N

c
a

D
N

o
P
W
R

k e r s ,
p o w e r
( f o
r k 1*1*5 l i 1.51t
f
n u f a . . . c . . t . .u. . . . . r . . .i . .n . . g . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $. 7 .6 . . . 1.51 .
. . .
u r a b l . .e . . . . g. . o. . o. . d. . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168 . . . 1.55
. .
o n d u r a . . b . . l . e . . . . . .. . g . . o . . o . . d.. . s . . . . . . . . . . 108
1.1*5
n m
a n . .u . . f . a . . c . . . .. t . u. . .r .. i. . .n . . . . g. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 . . . 1.51 .
. .
. . .
u b l i c
* u . . . t . . i . l . . i . t. . i . .e . . .s . . .- . . . . . . . 121*. . . .1.1*9.
. .
. .
h o l e s .a . . l . e . . . . . t . r . . a . . d . . .e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . 1.57 .
.
. . .
e t a i . .l . . . .t . r . a. . . d . . . . e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0
1.56

!

)

, 1

1

5

. . . . . . . 3 .
3
~
-- : 3
_
_
.
. . . _. . !.
. . . ._ . . . .- . . . -. . . . - . . . . _.
_
. . . _. . . . . . . . - . . . . . _ .
-

.

.

r -k ! - l i f t . )
■
-

.

“

.

_
_ _
_
- ;

. . . 2.
_ - -_
2
_
- _
2
_
_
_
_
_
_ ; _
- -

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_
- . -

-

-

_

_ i
_ !
-

-

'

.

.

.

1

l . 7. 1 6 .5 8 o0 1 ! 1 1 . . 6 8 5 5

1

. 6

0

7

1

0

1
!
2 7 li.6

9 _21
1
7 8 !

W

r u c k e r s ,
p o w e r . . . .( . o . . . . . t . h. . . e . r 82 t h 1.1*1n
a
M
a n u f a . . . c . . t . u. . . r . i . . n. .. . . . .g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 . . 1.1*1
.

f
“

o

a t c h . . .m . . e. . n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528 . . . 1.30 . . . . 1* . . 12 . . 11* . . . 3. . . 12. . . 57. . . . 6. . . 27 . . . 17 . . .12 .
. .
. . .
.
. .
. .
.
.
.
.
.
a n u f a. . . c . . t . u. . . r . i . n. . . g. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295“. . . 1.38
. .
2l*
h 8
" T
9
_
.
. .
. .
.
D u r a b l . e . . . . . g .. . o. . . . o . . . . d . . . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11*6. . . . 1.30. . . . . - . . . . - . . . .- . . . 9
5 10
_ 11*
_
.
N o n d u r a • •• • • •e • ............ o................. .
b l
g
o d s
1.1*6
11*9
8
1*
N o n m
a n u . .f .a . . c . . t. ... u . . r. . l ..n. . . . . g. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 233
.
1
1.19
1* 12 ! 11*
3
3
57
3 13
1*
Public u t ilitie s * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61*
1 .3 0
12
_
_ 31
_
_
_
_
_
_
i f c o l e s a ..............................................................
l e
t r a d e
70
2
1.23
3
3
1
2
R
e t a i l
t r a d e
12 1 2
1.07
59
3
F i n a * * n ............... .................................................
c e
1 . 11*
12
31
13
M

32
32 !
1*8
30
23
7
18

2
2

7
3

81*
59
1*6
13
25
l l *

2
1*
11
1

63
21*
21
3
39

26

8
i
1*

2

8

1

x

69

1*2
16
26
27
7
20

”

51!

; Si

28
3
3

20
7
7

25
1
16
6

13

1
1

6
6

36
36
_
36

_

1
1!

1*31
l !

„
_

.
1 .0 7 '
81
57
21*
26
25
-

18

/

19
16
16
3

3
_
3
6

-

/
*

/

E
S

x c l u d e s
p r e m
i u m
p a y
f
t u d y
l i m
i t e d
t o
m e n
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n
( e x c l u
F i n a n c e ,
i n s u r a n c e ,
a




d

w
n

o

r

o

o r k e
i n g
d
r e

v

e r t i m
e
a n
r s
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r a i l r o
a d s
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d
.

w h
) ,

n

i g h
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c o m

t
o

m

t h
u

w

e
n

o

r k .
r w
i s e
i c a t i o n

,

6

3

- 10L

5

7

73 7 9 1

9

8

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3

1

13

i
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23
22
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-

J
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15
15
15

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1* 1?
3 19
1 15!
2
u
1
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l j

„

3

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j

1
?
*
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|
11
9

18

16
16

5

7 7

j

T

. 9

71

^!
j1 _

.
. .
21 . 26 2 0 0 .
21 25_ 97 !
5 : 9 56
16 1 6 1*1
_
1 103
98
-i „
_
5
-: 1

1

. 6 5 1 1

5 1 9 1
3 1 7
5 3 62
1 U 2 * ! 80|
1 71 17
2 17 2 : 3s
i
1 5
1 72
1 * 8 7 '
2 7 3 -! 12 5 2
1 * 3 1 * !
1 1 5
3 2
5 2
|3 0 1 0 0
1 2
1 1 1*6; 67 1*3
1 2
7

j
2
2 0 6
-! 181*
- i 20

11 . .79 0 d

i -

0

|
j
r u c k
d r i v e r s ,
h e a v y
( o v e r
1 * i t o n s ,
o t h e r
t h a n
t r a
i l e
r
. .
. . .
t a m
e )
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 . . . 1.56 . . . . . . 1. . _ . . . . . . . . .
.
1 191 193
1. . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
— .
M o n m a n u f a c t a
r i n
g
. . . . . . . . .166 . . . 1.51* . . . . -. .' . . . . . . “ . . . . -. . . . - . !. . .- .
. .
. . .
92!
- ;
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T

. 5
! -

11 j
' 3j
3!

3
13:

I3 t

5

2

*

0
3
2
0

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t o _r, I lg )
n s

a

1

I -

_

_
„
_

_

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1
i ___ : ________ ! ___
_
_
_

,

i n

a

d

n

i c
d

a

o

t e

t h

d

e

.

r

p

u

b

l i c

u

t i l i t

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.

16,

B

:

C

h

a

r

a

c

t

e

r

i

s

t

i c

I

n

d

u

s

t

r

y

O

c

c

u

p

a

204: QtoUH M dli+ U j, l/

Table B-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

hourly
*
of
workers earning! ■ JaH 1.40
1/
SS 8r 1.45

Occupation 2/

Bolters ............................................................
Grain-elevator operators ........................... .
Millers, flour ........................ ......................
Oilers .............................................................
Packers, flour ................................................
Packers, f e e d .................................................
Smutters ..........................................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand...............
Sweepers ................... ......................................
Watchmen ..........................................................

$
1.68

10
16

1 .6 1

1.76
1.50
1.59
1.59
1.54
1.51
1.44
1.44

19
*3
111*
41
13
222
91
10

_
_
-

_
_
_
2

1
1 .4 5
1 .5 0

_
_
3

1
*
1
1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0
1.55

1 .6 0

_
_
3
9

2

_
_
33
_
_
_

.
_
_
89
10

12

16

-

206

16

-

_

3
3
3
1
_
-

1 .6 5

3
14
_
_
102
19
_
-

*
*
*
1.65 1.70 1.75

1 .8 0

1.70

1 .8 5

7
3
_
_
_
_
_

1.75

1 .8 0

_
_
1
_
_

_
13

_
3

_
_
_
.
_

_
.

_
3

_
_
'

1

20

/ The study Included establishments vith more than
workers engaged in the manufacture of flour and other grain mill
products (Group
) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget.
/ Data limited to men workers; all workers were paid on a time basis.
. Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
/

2041

(1945

2
2

2431:

Table B-

O

c

c

u

/
p

a

t i o

n

2

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

1/

NUM
BER O W R E S REC IN STR IG T-TIM H U L EA NING O —
F OKR
EIV G
A H
E ORY R
S F
A
verage
$
$
$
$
$ . $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
hourly
e
5
earnings U n d1.20 r 1 . 2 1 5 . 3 1 0 . 3 i 5 . 4 1 o , 4 1 5 . 5 1 0 . 5 1.60 1.65 1 . 7 1 0 . 7 1.80 1 . 8 1 5 . 9 1 0 . 9 2.00 2 . 0 2.10
5
5
5
3
/ $
1.80 1 1 . . 7 8 51 5 , . 9 1 0 . 9 5
2 . 0 0
1.20 1 . 2 1 5 * 3 0 1 - . 3 l 5. 4 . o1 . 4 1 5 . 5 1 0 . 5 1.60 - 1 .. 61 . 5 7 0
5

$
2
2 2
10
18
9
3
A s s e m
b l e r s ,
s . . a . . s . . h . . ., . . . .d . . . o . . . o . . r . , . 7 . . 0a . . n . 1. d . . . . 5 . .f 4 . r . a . m
e
5
1 . . . 7 . . 1• . - . . . . -. . . . .- . . . . - . . . . -. . . . . - . . . . - . . . . -. . . . . -. . . . - . . . 4 . . 8 . . . .
C a b i n e t m
a k e r s
( m
i l l w
o r 6k 4 )
. .
.
.
.
C
u t - o f f - s a w
o p e r a t o r s
( t r e a d l e - o p e r a t e d
o r
4
6
1
1
3
3
7
2 5
1 - \. 5 7
s w
i n ......................................................................
g i n g )
- a n d
M
o l d e r
a n d
s t i c k e r
o p e 4 r 6 a t o r s - ( 1s- . e 6 t-8 - u ” p
o p 1 e - r a t e ) 2 4 5. - . 6 . .
1
5 M
o l d e r
a n d
s t i c k . . e . . .r . . . . .o. . . p . . .e .1 . r 0. a. . t 1 o . r5 s 5 - ( f - e 1 e d
o n- l y 4)
1
4 - O
f f - b e a r . e . . r. . s. . ., . . . m. . . .a . .c . .h . . i .n . . e . . . . . . 2 . . 2 . . . . 1 . . . . 4. . 1. . .1 . . . . - . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . ' . . . . 16
1
1 1
3
9
P l a n e r
o p e r a t o r . . s . . . . . ( . . s . . e . . t. . - . u. 2 . . 7p . . . 1. . a . . . 5n . . 2d . . - . ; o p e - r a t e )1 2
"
2
13
3
R i p - s a w . . . o . . . p . . .e . . r. . a . . t . o. . . r . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 . .0 . . . 1 . . . .5 . . 6 . . - . . . . . ; . . . . -. . . . 2 1
4
2
6
2 0 1 7 19
16
8 4
1
. 4 l
. 1
1
6 1
1^52
Truck d r iv e r s , l ig h t (under l £ tons) ...........................
7
"
’
|
1

20

l/ The study included establishments with more than
workers engaged in the production of millwork (Group
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
/ Data limited to men workers; all workers were paid on a time basis.
/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

2
3




2*31) as defined
1

1

1 0

-

- 8
-

-

2
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 -

1

- -

-

-

'
1 ____
_

in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual

-

-

-

- -

"

-

-

1 - - -

1
!

(1945 edition)
1951

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

$
2

. 0

5

2

1
-

-

. 1

0

17,
T

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation 2/

Chippers and grinders .............. ...........
Coremakers, hand .......................... .
Furnace tenders ..............................
Molders, hand, bench ... .......................
Molders, floor ......................... .....
Molders, machine .............................
Sand mixers ........ \ ........................
Shake-out men ................................

a

b

'? U- c /3 e6 " :
B6 * 3( U 4

l e

if

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Aeae $
vrg
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
hul
ory
e r i g 1.15 1.20 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1.90 1.95 2.00
a nns
and
under
- J Q .JU25- , .3 0 - .35-. UiQ- 1 A 5 J-.5Q - 1.55 L 6 q 1.65 1 . 7 0 1-75 1 r
12t
8o 1 f E i on l os 0 on
<
1
1
$
1.51
1.76
1.69
1.72
1.71
1.74
1.54
1.42

75
14
18
22
7
60

8
32

!

_
1
4

1

_
_
_
_
_ !
!
• |

2
_

_
_
.
_
_
_
■

5

_
_
_
_
2

2

1
_
_
_
_
13

20
_
_
.
1
_
1

2
_
"3
_
6

2

41
_

_
2
_
-

1
_
_
_

_
_
_
_ ;

I

3

2

-

4
3
2
3
7 ! 11
1 1 4
14 |
9

1

6

2
2

_
_
_
_

3

- | 10
____ 1

-

- !

_
_

6
2

30

-

-

-

-

-

1/ The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers. Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.
Data limited to men workers; all workers were paid on a time has is.

2J

Table B-3444: S h e e t - M e t a l W o n k y

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation 2/

11
49
14
14

Assemblers, class A ..........................
Assemblers, class B ......................................................... ............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners .... ............
Vt
t
+n * r1 ca A
.r R * a t
Power-shear operators, class A ..................
P f / T .rVAA * npAm
fc P * i T
pfBl
llf
Punch-press operators, class A ... ;.............
Punch-press operators, class B .................
Sheet-metal machine operators, miscellaneous
machines ........................ .........
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...............
l/
(19?5
2/
3/

The study covered establishments with
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Data limited to men workers; all or a
Excludes premium pay for overtime and

9
9

Aeae
vrg
$
$
$
hul
ory
e r i g Under 1.05 1.10 1.15
ann s
r
3/ f
1 0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20
.*
$
1.73
_
1.45
2
1.28
-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF~
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!
$
$
$
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.4o 1.45 1.50 1.55 l . 6 o 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95
and
1 2 5 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 1.95 over
.*
!
1

1

-

*

- | l

2
1

-

-

■

1
; l

2
1

18

! 3
5 ! -

2
5
1 ! 5
1
7

2

8
4

1 .6 1

-

-

-

11
33

1.55
1.44
1.51
1.53

"

■

-

47
24

1.50
1.34

- i
■ 1 i

1

-

*
2 ! 4 j
2 ! 5
i ---

1
10

4
2
2
4 ! 11

7
~

1
1

1
3

\

’

-

l

-

1

2

2
■

4
■

"

1
2
-

■

-

2
*

2

-

-

-

'

2

1

“

“

-

-

-

2

2

i
!
2
! 10
_

4 ! 6
1 j 2

4

16
1

’

____ 1

more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Group 3444) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
Budget.
majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.
night work.

Table B-3463:

Number
Occupation and sex

Men
Die setters 3/a ......... ................ .
Inspectors, class A 2/a •••.....................
Maintenance men, general utility ^/a .............
Mechanics, maintenance 2/& .................... .
Power-shear operators, class B 2 / a ............
Punch-press operators, class A 2/& ...... ........
Punch-press operators, class B £/a ...............
Tool-and-die makers 3/a .......................

S t a m p e d

a n d

Pledged

M e t a l

PnaJLictd

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
'
$
$
$
$
A e a e $.90
vrg
$
$
f
2.05i$
2.10 *2. 5 2.20
f0
$
1'
£95 l . 0 f.0J 1.10 {.15 f.20 f. 2 5 1.30 1.35 f.40 1.45 1.50 l .55 | .60 1.65 1.70jf.75 i.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 1.00 $
hul
ory
e r i g and
an n s
1
1
_ 1.
- !sad
2/ mder
6;
25
. * 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.16 1.20 1.* 1.30 L 36 i.A0 ^ . , 1.50 1.55 1.60 l. * 1.70 1.76 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.06 t
05
2.00 2.06 2.10 2.16 2.20 mi*
]/5
i
!
1
1
I
;
i
|
!
!
j
$
1.67
1.81
1.58
1.85
1.43
1.57
1.38
1.95

17
8
8
6
17
13
221
72

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

9

6

7

-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-' _
4
-

-

[
-

_
-

-i _
2

2
-| 36 ; 44
11
~1

-i ~
1

_
-

_
-

2!
_i

2! 61 U
j
i■ -!
i 2! -i

1! 4i 4
1
5| -; 3
-I 1! 6
1
! 11
60
24
5 34 1 2
“! _
-; |
-

_
-j
_ j• 1:
_
-1
-

1
4
3

i

_
_
_
3

-

_|
_
-i 1 6 ;

-

20

-'

-

-

!
-

-

27

_
1
_
_|
_
1

!
* j
_
!
!
j

2
3
2

1

-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-j
3

!

6

Woman
Punch-press operators, class B %/b ...............

1.20

71

3

1

4 ! 13

5

7

1

12

-

2

1

; -

-

-

-

-

-

-!

~

L
l/ The study covered establishments with mare than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of non­
•automotive metal stampings (Group 3463) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 1 9 4 5
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR!
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
999376 O - 52-3




Tabla b -35:

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Aeae
vrg
2/

3*75 0 , 8 0 k,85
$
and j
;
idr
ne;
.80 !.85 .90

MacUinendf,

1/

UnAulfrUed

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
!
2
.* .*
$
S
bo95 jdoo L.05 1.10 1,15 1.20 1.25 f.30 l.35 f l o 1 1 5 f.5o L s s 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 i.8 o|i.9 o|l.Oo|^ . 1 0 *2.20 * .30
$
r
1
|
_ i
|_
_
1
i
.* .*
;.95 1.00 1.05 L,1Q J , 5 1.20 1 . 2 5 1.30 1.35 1 1 0 i l 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1 . 7 0 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 . 3 0 over
.1

0 .9 0

Men
663
Incentive ...............
Assemblers, class C 3/a.................. .....
Electricians, maintenance 3/a ...................
Inspectors, class A 3/a ..7......... ........... .
Inspectors, class B 3/a ......... ..............
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 3/a... ..........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 3/a, 1 / .............................
*
Drill-press operators, radial, class A 3/*.......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A 3 / * ......................
Engine-lathe operators, class A 3/a ...........
Screw-machine operators, automatic,”
*
class A Va .......... ....................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A 3/* ............... .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 3/a, h / ...... .......................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 3/a ......
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 3/a ........ ..............
Milling-machine operators, class B 3/a .........
Screw-machine operators, automatic,”
’
class B 3/a ..............................
Turret-latEe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B 3/a ................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 3/a> V •.......... ..................
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C 3/a..... .................
Milling-machine operators, class C 3/a .........
Machine-tool operators, tool room 3/a ............
Machinists, production V a ..... 7........ .
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) 3/a .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) 3/a .
..
Welders, hand, class A: Total ............ 7......
Time ................
Incentive ............
Welders, hand, class B 3/a............ .........

38 5U 29 59
175 118 93 75
160 115 89 73
2
k
15
3
i 1 a b 3 •
•
2
2
1
*
2 10
2 30
5
1
*
1 0 6 i 25 , 2
"
|
J , i
- 20 62 35 62 2 *
15
6 2*
6
2 18
1
|
i
- 12 12 1 16 2*
1
5
| 3
- 116
81 u
2
1
12 2*
1 12
2

21
6*

1.75
1.71
1.56
20*
.1
1.36
1.07
1.86
1.68
1.35

1918
231

1.85
18*
.1

-

122
306
181
263

1.73
1.79
1.97
1.85

-;

38

l*
l
53
17
*
6
1
a v a
1
*

1,86

m

599
265
977
$2

207
$9

308

_

-! .1

_

-

-

-

-

1

( B a t' a

|

-

18
18

n 0

1
*
k

t

52
5i

-: -1 “i 8

-

-

7

-

“

-

“: 6

-

-

2

61

-

-

20

23

12
6

-

_

6

-

I
1

U
22
22

2
2*
1
2*
1

6
17
*
17
*

•

-

“

“

~
”

59 318 593 1 5 0 129! 91
6 15I 13
12 l * 86
l
1
8
1
5! 9
1
*
9
1
2
3
3 35 133
1 25 61
9 13 17
81 10! 5
15 18 135

89
17

53
6

7
7
17
15

1
*
3
2*
1

17 2 1 2 1
3* 1*
30 20 21
26 16
1
*
1 21
*
17
8
“

1 n
8 102
2
u
"

9
15
*
15
*

1
67
67

n
17
6*
lj 1
*
8
"
j

9

2
2

1.83

2

-

1
*

6

8

U

-

2

7

1

2

1
*|

U

2*
1

70

18

32

89

8

13

22

17

5

61 i 81
6
-

55
2

11
2

27
3

19
1

20 l *
l
1 2

7
2

5

3
5

3
1

1

1
2

j
6*
16
3k

1.61
1.76

.

-'

56
37

1.56
1.77

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

8

12
*

8

26 | 'to 155 ! 56

8
3

-| 1
i

35

117
.*
1.71
1 .2 6

-.

-

16

-

2*
1

89
8

1 .2 6

-

- [ 16

■

8

-

.i -

-

_
-i

-

6

-

-

12

-

252

-: -

-

91

-

9

78
238
202
117
7*
16
681
65
190

8

8

-

-

5,
1

1.00
1.83
1.7U
2.07
20*
.1
1.75
1.70
2.28
1.66

-

17
l*
l

-

2

8
-

16 J

-

-

-

6
_!

-

”

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

1

-

22

1
*

3

6

31

18
*

20

10

16

9

-

-

-

-

21

-

-

10

12

6

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

*

1
2

22
33

20

-

-

8
8

-

k6

!

9

-j

- 110
110

t
*
!

u

13
*

55 2 *
12
12
55 2 *
5

-

2
2
1

1

8

8

_i
-1

2
2

13

8

-j -]
'1

1
*
1

0
18

-

-1

52

k

1
*

5

1

2

-

-

-

-

26
il
ti
22
6 U
2 1 n o 121
20 n o 121
1
56
1
*

127

2
l
l
2*
2
39
7
7
1

19
5U
19
1
1
1

26
26
16
16
3

5*
1
16
28
28
5

6
—
27
8
19
9

Women
Assemblers, class C 3/a ........................

208

1.13

2*
1

2*
1

8

8

|
'

16

16

12

2*
1

52

2*
1
\

j

1/ The study included establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (nonelectrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 - edition) prepared
145
by the Bureau of the Budget} machine-tool acessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included in the study,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Surrey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment,
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF IA30R
( ) All or predominantly time workers.
a
Bureau of labor Statistics
ij Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Table B-40:

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and sex

Hoil’ iCuM’
U

i/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
A e a e 1.35 l.Uo l.45 l.5o
vrg
$
l.55 1 . 6 0 1.65 1.70 f.75 1 . 8 0 1.85 1.90 i . 9 5 Loo L o5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 L30 L35 j%.40 *.45
$
e r i g and
an n s
and
under
i/ 1.40 1.45 1.50
1,55 1.60 1,65 1.70 1,75 1.80 1,85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 over

Men
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ....
c
j
n > *ii i , ( | T 1 - 1 T _ - T __ ____ T ____
ra

„

.

.

* .'.

6.
L0
10
210
965
468
547
272
94

$
l.a?
1.69
1.94
1.64
1.46
1-91
a #/A

-

*’* *

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ..
Truckers, power (fork-lift) .... .... ..... ..«•••

-

-

3
70

38

18

386

502

101
3

272
1

97
2

1

3

390

93
854
90
25

1.93
1.59
1.67
1.75

-

1.46

12

6

426

14

_

-

j

l
-

1

3
5

i
6 | 45
I

116

169

1

1

25

1 .8 1
1
*>•7J

78

*....... .

.

-

364

3

-

1

85
15

54?
156

96
5

43
4
-

2

-

0f
C7
116
7J

20
11

1

4

Women
66
!

i

1

1/ The study covered railroads (Group 4 0 with more than 50 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
-)
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers were paid on a time basis.

Table B-5452s

1/
cation
2/
2/




y
y

Milk

jbeal&U>

1/

The study covered retail establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassifi­
Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Routamen normally work a 5-day week.

20.

Tbeb-3 9nbu/uuu>e G&wUesU*y
al 6»
Average
Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Wel
eky

y

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

S.o *.0 *.0 *.0
$
$
$
95*OC100.00
W e l 27.50 jb.oo 32.$0 35.00 37.50 i b o 1 2 5 1 5 0 1 7 5 $0.00 $2.5o $5.oo $7.50 lo.oo £2 .$o fe.oo fo.oo f$.00 $0.00 $5 . 0 0 $0 . 0 0 $
eky
e r i g and
anns
and
*.0 *.0
37.50 1*0.00 1* . 5 0 1 5 0 1 7 5 5 0 . 0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6 5 . 0 0 70.00 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0 95.oo 1 0 0 .o over
2
30.00 32.50 35.00
c

Men
Clerks, accounting •••••••••«
Clerks, file, class B «•••..«

50
21
S e c t i o . . n . . . . . h. . e. . a. < . d. . s. . . . . . . . . . . . 69
.
66
Tabulating-machine operators
198
Underwriters ........ .

W

o m

100
*.
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5

$
170
*.0
38.00
79.50
51.00
71.00

.
_
_
“

9
1
”

6
2
3
l*
l
•' .
19
*
u
k
i
•
10
.
k
.
2
1
1
66

8
6
58
6
2
32
•
.
9
3
2
126

“

1
*
7
5;
~

1
l*
l
2
l
l
5
- ! 20

i
71
1!
_
7
8

u
-;
1
*1
1
*

3
"i
h\
h\

6
3
10
“

3
-1
9
6

17
3
7
10
9
.
9
6

3
6
2
2
9
3
1
1
-

2
k
6

2

2
2
1j
3
2*
1

3
1
*
11

3
1
*
1
*

5
2
-

2
5
-

7
-

2

15

1
*
3
20
l

2

18

e n

Clerks, accounting ..........
Clerks, actuarial ........ .
Clerks, correspondence, class A
Clerks, file, class B
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ....
Clerks, underwriter .........
Key-punch operators .........
Premium acceptors .......... .
Section heads ...... .
Stenographers, general ••••••...
Tabulating-machine operators •••
Typists, class A ...........
Typists, class B ..............
Underwriters •••••••... .

39.0
38.5
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5

209
75
32
263
8*
2
29
172
20
99
21
2*
29
97
553
23

1

120
*.0
ia.5o
58.50
3U.50
a. 5o
5 1 .0 0

39.50
39.50
55.00
ll.o
**$
l3.50
i
Ul.oo
38.00
66.50

33
1*
1
69
6
.
36
10
1
9
111

h7
k

20
6
3
21
8
U
28
1
*
10
72

23
31
3j 5
3; 1
12 1 8
27 ! 5
m
28
19
6
2
10
15
*
15
*
3
5
33
35
78
17
*

23
1*
1
6
1
*
23
7
12
9
37
2
2
32

ll1
_
3
2
5
1
*
5
5
12
5
1
*
ll

1
1
2
9
6
- i
-

1
*
11
2
-

ll
7
1
1
*

1*
1
2
-

-

1
7
-!
-

8
.
3

2
1

k
1

2
-

2

-

16

10

-

2

-

-

-

2
8

-

15
l*
l

8
1

_
-

1
-

.
-

-

1

10
2
_
_
1 3/ 28
*

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_
_

.
_
_
_
_

-

_
_
_

"

1/ The study covered insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 U edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
1J9
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these hours.
3/ Workers were distributed as follows: 11 at $100.00 and under $10$.00} 10 at $105.00 - $110.OOj 7 at $110.00 and over.
~
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1 9 1
.5
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15*

Huildintj G +A > cio t
o t ,t ii4t 4.

J
Rate
per
hour

Classification

$2,900
Bricklayers ........................
Parpenter* .......................
2.U00
2.650
Electricians ........................
Painters .......................... . 1/ 2 . 2 5 5
.
Plasterers ..........................
2.750
2.550
Plumbers ............ ..............
Building laborers ...................
1.670

Hours
per
week
10
*
Uo
Uo
10
*
10
*
Uo
Uo

1/ Minneapolis; $2,250 in St. Paul.

Table

c-205*

Rah&UeA,

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week

Minneapolis
Bread and cake - Hand shops*
Foremen ..........................
Mixers, ovenmen, bench hands ........
Wrapping machine operators ..........
Helpers*
First 1,000 hours ...............
Sixth 1,000 hours ...............
Women hand icers ..................
Bread and cake - Machine shops*
Foremen............. ............
Doughnut machine operators ......... .
Icing and batter mixers..... .
Sponge and dough mixers, oven
operators and ovenmen .............
Depositors, and/or dropmachine operators ................
Dividers, molders, bench hands,
bun-machine operators ............
Traveling-oven feeders and d u m
p e r
doughroora men, slicing and wrappingmachine operators ...............
Foremen (women), twisters, dough
panners, oven and bench helpers ....
Jell or icing-machine operators, cake
wrappers, and semi-automatic
cake wrappers ...................
Helpers:
First 8 weeks ......... ..........
After 8 weeks ............. . ....
Women employees*
Finishers, wrappers, packers*
First o weeks ................
After 8 weeks ................




$1,555
1.UU5
1.185

U5
U5
U5

.868
1.302
1.070

U5
U5
U5

1.800
1.630
1.630

UO
Uo
Uo

1.630

Uo

1 .5 2 0

Uo

1.520

Uo

s

,

1.520

Uo

1.310

Uo

1.310

Uo

1.160
1.310

Uo
Uo

.960

Uo
Uo

1 .0 6 0

‘
Table C-205*

Table C-205: f i c i J z & U & l - G o * U i * M t m A

January 2, 1952

u

l y

1

,

Classification

1

* 5
Rate
per
hour

1
Hours
per
week

- Go*Uin*t*A
July 1, 1951

Bah&ii&L

Classification

Minneapolis - Continued

Bread and cake - Hand shops*
Foremen, supervising 6 or more workers .
Foremen, supervising 5 or less workers,
first hands ......'
..............
Ovenmen, mixers \ ......... .........
Bench hands ...................... .
Helpers:
After 6 months .................
Bread and cake - Semimachine shops*
Ovenmen, dough mixers ..............
Bench hands ......................
Men helpers:
After 6 months ..................
Women hand workers:
After 6 months .................
Bread - Machine shops*
Foremen .............. .......... .
Sponge and dough mixers, ovenmen .....
Bench hands, dividers, molders,
bun-machine operators ........... .
Oven feeders and dumpers,
slicing or wrappingmachine operators ................
Twisters, panners, oven helpers,
bench helpers ............ ......
Helpers*
After 6 weeks ............... .
Women workers*
Foremen...................... .
Finishers, packers, wrappers*
First 8 weeks ................
After 6 weeks... .......... ..
Cake - Machine shops*
Mixers, ovenmen, doughnutmachine operators ...............
Kettle fryers ...... ..............
Helpers:
After 8 weeks ...................
Women workers*
Finishers, wrappers, packers*
After 8 weeks............... .
Crackers and cookies*
Foremen ..........................
Machinemen, marshmallow mixers, sweetovenraen, oven firemen, drawmen .....
Pan greasers, flour dumpers, dough
scalers, sweet-oven reliefmen,
cracker stackers ........ ........
Helpers - After 6 months ...........
Women workers:
Floorladies ....................
Assistant floorladies ............
Cracker packers ................
Wrappers, packers, crackermachine operators, checkers .....
Helpers - After 6 months .........

Heurs
per
week

St. Paul

Hebrew baking:
Hand shops*
General cakemen, mixers, ovenmen ....
Bench hands, machinemen ..........
Machine shops*
General cakemenj mixers; ovenmen ....
Bench hands, machinemen ..........
Crackers and cookies*
Baking department*
Sponge mixers ..................
Sweet mixers ........ ..........
Assistant sweet mixers ...........
Sponge department*
Ovenmen...................... *
Peelers .......................
Laminator operators, machinemen ...
Lead ovenmen ...................
Take-out men ...................
Laminator sheet feeders ..........
Stackers ......................
Sweet department*
Ovenmen and machinemen ...........
Ovenmen's helpers and relief ......
Inexperienced workers (men)*
First 30 days ...............
Second 30 days ...............
After 60 days ...............
Icing department*
Mixers, machinemen ..............
Packers (chill room) ............
Packers .......................
Weighers and baggers ............
Miscellaneous girls .............
Inexperienced wcrkers (women):
First 30 days ................
Second 30 days ...............
Third 30 days ................
After 6 months ...............
Packing department:
Helpers - men*
First 30 days ...............
Second 30 days ...............
After 60 days ...............
Inexperienced workers (wemen)*
First 30 days .......... .....
S e c 30 d n ad y...............
o
s
After 60 days ................
Sponge packers (cartons and 1
pound Krispies), checkers and
relief (women) ...............
Sponge packers .......... .
.......
Graham packers .................
Sweet packers ..................
Carton formers, caddy stitchers,
senior (women) ...............
B udiers.....................
n

Rate
per
hour

$1,526
1.U73

U5
U5

1.653
1.593

Uo
Uo

1.370
1.315
1.170

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.U50
1.U30
1.315
1.310
1.260
1.260
1.200

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.315
1.260

Uo
Uo

1.000
1.050
1.130

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.315
1.020
1.000
.910
.880

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

.770
.810
.835
.880

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

.900
.950
1.000

Uo
Uo
Uo

.770
.810
.835

Uo

U
o

1.050
1.030
1.030
1.000

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

.955

Uo
Uo

.955

Uo

$1,619

U5

1.508
1.UU1
1.396

U5
U5
U5

1.107

U5

1.525
1.U78

U2i
U2l

1.125

U2*

1.125

U2*

1.800
1.630

uo
Uo

1*520

Uo

1.520

Uo

1.310

Uo

1.310

Uo

1.310

Uo

1.960
1.060

Uo
Uo

1.630
1 .5 2 0

Uo
Uo

1.310

Uo

1.060

Uo

1.5U0

Uo

1.360

Uo

1.300
1.190

Uo
Uo

1.110
1.060
1.050

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.030
.950

Uo
Uo

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22,

Table C-20«2$ M & l t

JldJCffUOSU

Jl 1,1 5
aj 9 1

November 1, 1951

'
Classification
Agreements A and B:
Bottlers .........................
Brewers and maltsters ..............
First men ......................
Cleaners, soaker-washers,
labeling-machine men .............
Agreement C
:
Bottlers:
First 30 days ..................
30-120 days ....................
After 120 days ..................
Brewers and maltsters:
First 30 days ...................
3 0 - 1 2 0 days ....................
After 120 days .................
First men .....................
Brewery utility men................

C

B

o
B
B
C
E
M

M
P
P

o k
i n
o o
o m
A g
A g
l e
a c
A g
C
A
h
r
A

A

A

a
d

c

k

p
r e
r e

e

b

e
m

per
week

Hours t
i
per
week

Classification

1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

10
*
10
*
10
*

o p e r a t o r s : ^
e n t
A
. . .
. . .
. . . . .
2.500 . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .St. . Paul . . . . . . . .
i n a t i o n
m
a c h i n e ,
l i n o t y p e
i n . . .t . e. . . r. . t. . y. . . . . .p. . . e. 2.625. . . 37*. . . . .
. . .
. .
Book and job shops:
m
e n t
B
. . . . . . . 2.575 . . 37*. . . . . . . . . . . .Bindery . women:. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. .
. . . . . . . . .
. r. . s.. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.225 . 37*
.. . . .
Agreement A ....................
n g r a v e r s
. . . 2.61*0 . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foreladies . ...................
. . . .
. . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
a s s i s t a n t s
a n d
f e e d e r Agreement B ....................
s :
m
e n t
A :
Mailers .........................
n d e r
. . . . . . . . . . .2.090. . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . Photoengravers: . . . . . . . .
. . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
l e
v
e r t i c a 1.650 . .37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agreement . A . ....................
l
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
t e n
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1*60. . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agreement. B . ....................
. . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
m
e n t
B :
Press assistants and feeders:
e s
a n d
H
a r r i s
Agreement A:
d e r s
. . . . . . . . . . . 1.110 . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder. feeders ............ .
. . . .
. *.
. . . . . . . . . . . .
e n
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.11*0. . . 1.* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Platen. feeders . ...............
. . .
0
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Agreement B:
m
e n t
C :
n d e r
. . . . . . . . . . .2 .. 0. 9 .0 . . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder,. .perfecting, web,
. .
. . . . . .
. . . . . . .
e n
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 .1*60. . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . l*-color .press. feeders .......
. . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Platen, Carver or Waite
Miehle
o r
1.650

37*

feeders ...................

Rate

C

l a

s

s

i f i c

a

t i o per
n

Hours
per

hour
St. Paul - Continued

Minneapolis - Continued
$67.1*8
70. *
18
7 .1*8
3

$2,500

37*

2.580

37*

1.820
1.970
2.170
2.230
2.580

37*
37*
37*
37*
10
*

2.775
2.635
2.915

35
35
35

2.775
2.635
2.915

35
35
35

2.775
2.635

35
35

2.915
2.315
211
.*5
2.780
2.960
2.620

35
37*37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

2 .7 2 0

2.820
2 .9 2 0

2.620
2.720

Book and job shops 1 - Continued
Pressnent
Agreement At
Cylinder pressest
1 or 2 single; 1 cylinder and 1
platen; 1 Kelly; any 2 of the
following and 1 platent Kelly,
Miehle, Vertical, Simplex,
Horizontal, or Hiller High$2,500
Speed .............
Platen pressest
1 platen or Osterlind .......
1.830
2 platens or 2 Osterlinds ...
3 platens .................
2 .6 0 0
Rotary presses............ .
Agreement B:
Cylinder presses:
1 or 2 single; 1 single cylin­
der and 1 platen; any 1 of
the following and 1 platen:
Kelly, Miehle, Vertical,
Horizontal, Miller HighSpeed; 2 of the following:
Harris imprint, Kelly A or
B; vertical Miehle ........
2.530
2-color and double endors .....
Platen and Carver presses:
1 of each type ............
2 of each type ........ .
3 of each type .............
1 of each type ............
*
Agreement C:
Cylinder presses:
Miehle vertical ...........
Rotary presses:
"A" pressmen - special rotary •
"B" pressmen - special rotary .
Stereotypers:
Agreement A ....... ............
212
.*5
Agreement B ....................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ........
2.725
Compositors, hand - night work .......
2.929
Machine operators - day work ........
2.725
Machine operators - night work .......
2.929
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work
2.725
Machine tenders (machinists) night work .....................
2.929
Mailers - day work.................
221
.5*
Mailers - night work ...............
212
.*3
Photoengravers - day work ...........
2.730
Photoengravers - night work ......... .
2.9U.
Pressmen, web presses - day work .....
Pressmen, web resses - night work ...
2 .6 0 0
Pressmen-in-charge - day work .......
2.690
Pressmen-in-charge - night work ..... .
2.867
Stereotypers - day work .............
212
.*5
Stereotypers - night work...... .. •..
2 .6 0 6

200
.8
220
.1

260
.3
185
.2
190
.8
21*
.10
230
.0
230
.6
218
.*0
210
.*0

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

3*
7
37*

37*

250
.0

b

vertical ..................




K

Book and job shops: - Continued
Pressmen:
Cylinder presses:
6
9.1*8 1 0
*
1 or 2 single cylinders; 1 single
cylinder and 1 platen ........
2-color or double enders or
63.60 1 0
*
single-roll rotary ..........
Platen presses:
65.60 1 0
*
1 press .....................
6 9 .6 0
10
*
2 presses ...................
6 6 .6 0
10
*
3 presses ...................
*
1 presses...................
*
68.60 1 0
72.60 1 0
*
Stereotypers .....................
77.60 1 0
*
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work:
69.60 I t O
Agreement A ....................
Agreement B ....................
Compositors, hand - night work.......
Machine operators - day work:
Agreement A ....................
Agreement B ......... ..........
Table C-27: P / U * t t i * U f
Machine operators - night work .......
July 1, 1951
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work:
Agreement A ....................
R a t He o u r s
Agreement B ....................
Machine tenders (machinists) l a s s i f i c a t i o p n e rp e r
h o u w r e e k
night work .....................
Mailers - day work ................
M
i n n e a p o l i s
Mailers - night work ...............
Photoengravers - day work .......... .
n d
j o b
s h o p s :
Photoengravers - night work .........
r y
w
o m
e n . . . . . . $1,200 . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . Pressmen,. .web .presses . - day .work .....
. . . . .
. . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i n d e r s
. . . . . . . . . 2.1*00. . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . Pressmen, . web . presses. - .night. work. .....
. . . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
o s i t o r s ,
h a n d :
Pressmen-in-charge - day work.......
2 . 5 0 37*
0
Presemen-in-charge - night work ......
A ....................
e m
e n t
e m
e n t
B
. . . . . . . 2.575 . . 37*. . . . . . . . . . . .Stereotypers . -. day. work. ............
. . . .
. .
. . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
r o t y p e r s
. . . . 2.780 . . . 37* . . . . . . . . . . . Stereotypers. - . night. work. ...........
. . . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

t
h i n
r e e
o m
a n d
g r e e
a . i. . l . e. .
o t o e
e s s
g r e e
C
y l i
M
i e h
P
l a
g r e e
S t o k
f e e
P l a t
g r e e
C
y l i
P l a t
Kelly A

pAitoti+Uf • G t m t i m e m A

Table C-27: P A t n t u U f - Q o * U U u m J t

$1,160
1.370
1.200
2.2 *
19

37*
37*
37*
37*

2
.61*0
2.810

37*
37*

2.080
1.1*80

37*
37*

2.105

37*

lil0
.**

37*

212
.*0

35
35
35
35
35
35

3*
7

31
7;
37 r
37*
3:
7:

3 7 1 :
37*
37*
37*
37*

23,

Table C-a.

J lo c a l

Table C-42i M * U o * t * 4 4 c k

Qp&iatUup £mpJ>oyom4
October 1, 1951
Hours
per
week

$1.51*0
1.570

ko
h
o

F
F

k
o
k
o
h
O

G

C
M

I-man ears:
First 9 aonths ....................
Second 9 months ...................
After 18 aonths ...................

1 .6 0 0

10
*

1-man cars and busses:
First 9 aonths............. ,.....
Second 9 aonths ...................
After 18 aonths...................

M<U&*t*4*ck

1.630
1.660
1.700

2)4*00*4

<and JtelpeM.

July 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

G
G

Minneapolis

I c
Bakery:
Retail „.........................
Wholesale ........................
Cracker and cooky .................
Beert
Distributor i
Regular route .............. .
Stock and special ...............
Helpers .......................
Brewery....................... ...
Helpers .......................
Building:
Construction:
Bituainous distributor ..... .....
Duap.........................
Concrete-mixer truck ............
Excavating:
Under 6 cu. yd..................
Tank truck and dumpster.......
Service truck ..................
Material .........................
Concrete blocks, sand and gravel ....
Lumber a n wrecking .............
d
Sash and door... ..............
Plumbing supply:
Wholesale ...................
Retail ...... ...............
Cheese - Freight ....................
Coal..............................
Helpers .........................
Department store .....................
Florist:
Agreement A - Retail ...............




$1,385
1.385
1.350

10
*
10
*
18
*

I c
L
M

1.685
1.556
1.1*96
1.733
1.658

10
*
10
*
10
*

O

1 * 0
10
*

1.670
1.670
1.650

10
*
10
*
10
*

1.670
1.670
1.570
1.505
1
.1*95
1
.1*70
1 1*95
.

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*

1.1*80
1.560
1.560
1.535
1
.1*35
1.520

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*

1.300

1 *8

P
P
R
S
T

l a

s

n

e

i n

a

i f i c
p

o

l i s

July 1, 1951

a

R
t i op
h
-

a t eH o u r s
ne r p e r
o u wr e e k
C

o

n

t i n

u

Classification

e

d

u
a
R
T

t o
h a
k e r y :
e l i e f
r a n s p

t .
u

l
o

d

r

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,825
1.750
1.700

10
*
10
*
10
*

1.670
1.670
1.570
1.51*0

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*

1.670

10
*

2.000
1.950
1.670

10
*
10
*
10
*

1.1*85
1
.51*0
1.106
113
.*0
1.560
1.560

10
*
10
*
18
*
18
*
11
**
11
**

1.530
1.1*70
1
.1*90
1.530

10
*
10
*
11
**
10
*

1.1 8
*5
113
.*0
1
.1*85
1.1*30

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*

1.260
1 1*30
.
1.530
118
.*5
113
.*0

18
*
10
*
10
*

1.725
1.765
1.830
1.880
1.880

10
*
18
*
15
*
15
*
15
*

1.572

10
*

1.598

l*o

1.587
1.580
1.1 8
*5
1
.1*30
1.325
1.090

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*

St. Paul - Continued

l o u r
a n . .d . . . . f . .e . . e . . d. . . . . m. . . $1,530. l . . l . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . Beer . ..............................
. . .i.
. . .
u r n i t u r e *
City delivery ....................
R
e t a i l :
Helpers .......................
A g r e e . m . . . e . . n . . t . . . .A . . . . . . . . . . 1 ..5 .2 0 . . . 1. . * .0 . . . . . . . . Building:. .
.
.
. . . . . . .
H e l p e r s
. . . . . . . . . . . . 1. .1*60. . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . Construction: . . . . . . . . . .
. .
. . . . . . . . . .
A g r e e . m . . . e . . n . . t . . . . B . . . . . . . . . . 1.1*60. . . 1. . * .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . General ..................... .
. . . .
. . . .
W
h o l e s a l e
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.520 . . . 1. . * .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Under . 6. cu.. yd.. ..................
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
e n e r a l :
Service truck - 3 1 ton ..........
/*
P a c k a g e . . . d. . . e. . .l . i . v . . . e . . r . . y . . . 1.520. . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Concrete-mixer truck - 3 yd. ......
. . .
. .
F r e i g h t
T r a n s f e r :
Hauling......
M
e r c h . .a . .n . . d . . i . s . . d. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.580. . . . . 1 0 . .
. .. .. ..
. *.
Concrete and machinery ........
H o u s e h o l d
. . . . . . . . . . .1.620. . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heavy: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . .
. . . .
H e l p e r s *
Winch ....................
Helpers ................
M
e r c h . . a . . n . . d . . i . s. . e. . . . . . . . . 1.530 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
.*.
H o u s e h o l d
. . . . . . . . 1.570. . . 1. . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tank . truck. .................
. . . .
. . . . . .
. . .
H e a v y
h
a u
l i n
g . . . . 2.010 . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . Material: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. . . . . . .
H e l p . . e. . .r . s . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 1.960 . . . 1 . *. 0
. . . .
Concrete block, lumber ...........
C a r
h a u l i n g
. . . . . . 1.710 . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sand. and. gravel.................
. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C
i t y
. p . . . i . c. . . k. . . - . . u . . . p . . . . . .i.5oo . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . Butter . (other than salesmen) ...........
. . .
.*.
. . . . . . .
H e l p e r s
. . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1*50 . . . 1 2 . . . . . . . . . Florist. ............................
. . . .
.* .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l a s s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.530 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . Furniture . .......................... .
. . . .
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
*.
r o c e r y
. .- . . . . W . . . .h . . o . . l . e. . s. . .a . 1.570. . . . 1.* . . . . . . . . . . . . Helpers .........................
. l .e .
. . . .
0
H e l p e r s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1*80 . . . 1.* . . . . . . . . . . General . - .Freight:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
0
e
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. .1*30 . . . 1 . .* 0. . . . . . . . . . . Local . transfer . ....................
. . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H e l p . . e. . .r . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.330. . . . . . . 1.*. . . . . .
.. .. .. .
.0
Helpers .......................
e
c r e a m
:
City pick-up and delivery ...........
A
f 12 e w r e e k s
t
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.705 . . . 1 . *. 0. . . . . . . . . . . Package .delivery . ..................
. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grocery:
a u n d r y :
F a m
i l y
a . n . . d . . . . w . . . h . . o. . . l . e . .1.529. l . e. . 1. 0. . . . . . . . . . . Wholesale ........................
s. . a.
*
i l k
D e p o t :
Helpers .......................
A
f 26e w r e e . . k . .s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . 7 . . 3 . 1. .0* . 0 . . . . . . . . Hardware. - . Wholesale ..........................................
t
. . . . . . .
i l
a n d
g a s o l i n e *
Helpers................. ........
A g r e e m
e n t
A :
Ice:
U n d e r
2 , 1 0 0
g
a l . :
Retail ..........................
F
i r 6 as o t n . t. .h . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1*35. . . .1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . Wholesale ........................
. . .
6-12 a o n . t. .h . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.503 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . Laundry and dry cleaning - Linen supply . . .
. . . .
.*.
. . . . .
A
f t e r . . . 1. . . . y. . . e . . a . . r. . . . . 1.573 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . Market and produce ................. ..
. . . .
. *.
. . . .
2 , 1 0 0
g a l ,
o r
o v e r ;
Helpers ................. ........
F
i r 6 ms to n . . t . h . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1*61. . . .1.0. . . . . . . . . .Meat:
. . .
.
*
6-12 m
o n . . t . h . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.529 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . Wholesale ........................
. . . .
.*.
. . .
A
f 1 ye e r . a . . r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.598 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . .Packing house ...... .............
t
. . . .
. *.
.
A g r e e m
e n t
B :
Newspaper ..........................
T r a n s p o r t
. . . . . . . . . . 1.572 . . . 18 . . . . . . . . . . . .Country . drivers . ...................
. . . .
. *.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A g r e e m
e n t
C :
Split-shift drivers ...............
A
f t e r . . . 1. . . . y. . . e . . a . . r . . . . . . . .1. 1. 8.1 . . . .1.0. . . . . . . . . . Oil . and . gasoline:
. . . . .
.* *
*
r i n t i n g
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i.55o . . . 1. . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . .Agreement. A: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. . . . . . . .
r o d u c e
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i.5io . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Under. .2,100. gal.s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. *.
. . .
. . . . . . .
a i l w
a y. . . . . e . . x . . p. . r. . e . . s . . s . . . . . . . 1.726 . . . 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After 1 year ........................................
. . . .
.
. . . .
*.
c r a p . . . . i. . r . o. . . n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.530. . . . 1 . * . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Over .2,100. gal.:
. . .
. . . . . . . . . .
o b a c c o . . . a . . n . .d . . . . c . . a . . n . . d . . y. . . 1.530 . . . 1 . .* 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After 1 year ........................................
. . . .
. .
S

A
B

s

2)4*00*4

an d dtelpeM , -Continued

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-42t

Table C-42: M & t o * t * U c k

2)4*00*4

<**d dfolp&U - Continued

Agreement B
:
P a u l
After 1 year ...................
Agreement C ......................................................
e r s
. . . . . . . . 1 .. 6 .0 0 . . . 18 . . . . . . . . . Paper . -. Wholesale. ................................................ .
.
.
. *.
. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helpers .........................
r . i . v. . . e . . r . . s . . . . . - . 1 . . . R. 2 . . 8 . e 5 * t. . a . . i. . l . Soft drink .........................
. 1.0
t . . . . - . . . . . W . . . h. . .o . . 1.385. . a . . 1.*e . . . . . . . . . . Helpers .........................
l .e . . s
l0

ho

10
*

l*o

D:

Table D-is

Entrance

Rates

M in im u m Z sitnance Rated fan P la n t 'W anJeend

1/

Percent o f plant workers In establishments with sp ecified minium rates in Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

A ll
industries
2/

A ll establishments ............................................................

100.0

60 or u n d er............................... .........................................

0.9
1.1
.9
14.5
.9
1.1
4.5
4.7
1.8
2.0
.2
1.4
1.8
1.8
1.9
.1
2.2
1.2

Over 70 and under 75 ........................................................
Over 75 and under 80 ........................................................
8 0 ...........................................................................................
Over 80 and under 85 ........................................................
85 ...........................................................................................
Over 85 and under 90 ........................................................
Over 90 and under 95 ...........................
9 5 ...........................................................................................
Over 95 and under 100 ......................................................
1 0 0 ............................. ..........................................................
Over 100 and under 1 0 5 ....................................................
105 ........................................................................................
Over 105 and under 1 1 0 ....................................................
Over 110 and under n 5 ....................................................
Over 115 and under 120 ....................................................
1 2 0 .........................................................................................
Over 120 and under 125 ....................................................
125 ................................................................. ......................
Over 125 and under 130 ....................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ....................................................
1 3 5 ........................................................................................
Over 135 and under 140 ....................................................
Over 140 and under 145 ....................................................
Over 145 and under 150 ....................................................
Over 155 and under 160 ....................................................
165 and o v e r ..................... .................................................
Establishments with no established minimum..............

1/
2/
*

Establishments with ■
251 or
251 or 1 21-250
21-250
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers
100.0

100.0

_
4.6
_
7.8
-

0.9
-

-

9.2
7.5
.9

.4

1.4
5.7
5.0
10.5
17.2
2.7
10.9
8.9
3.2
-

11.9

4.5

9.8

1.6
2.8
.3
7.7

.1
8.0
1.2
1.7
1.2
4.3
1.9
1.1

1.7
1.0
.3

Nondurable goods

Durable goods

-

1.2
1.2
1.6
2.6
26.2
5.4
3.9

100.0
_
12.6
8.2
4.2
8.5
3.1
5.8
_
5.2
5.3
1.6
_
4.5
4.8
.

100.0
19.3
8.4
2.8
1.3
3.9
.8
3.5
2.0
~
4.7
-

-

3.8

2.9
15.4
4.0
.
23.2
_
2.2
4.2
1.4
-

-

17.5

-

13.2
20.5
4.5
3.7
3.7
6.1
5.3
_

_

.4

1.9
2.1
4.9
5.6

Public
u t ilit ie s *

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

2.1
21.0
1.9
_
2.5
9.5
1.6
_
10.4
-

3.9
6.2
3.2
2.0
1.3
3.2
3.0
2.1
2.2
_
1.7
12.5

2.6
4.5
12.9
15.8
2.6
-

1.8
16.6
_
-

12.6

27.6

4.3
5.2
4.1
41.4
1.2
11.2
2.4
5.3
1.3
■1.2
2.6
3.1
1.8

_
12.5
3.2
6.6

2.7
3.6
.3
•
_
.
_
•
_
-

.9

1.8
_
-

4.4

-

-

-

10.0

_
-

-

_
_
1.6
.3
13.0

-

_
-

66.7

Lowest rates formally established fo r hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data fo r finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u t ili t ie s .




Occupational W Survey, Minneapolis-St, Paul, Minn., November 1951
age
U.S. D R EN OF LA O
EPA TM T
BR
Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s

2 $,

E:

Supplementary

Wage

Practices

2 i£ ^ & ^ n iicU P A aaiiia+ tA .

Tbe&i
al -i

Percent o f plant workers employed on each s h ift in A ll nanufacturing industryLee 1 /
Sh ift d iffe re n tia l

A ll industries
2d
sh ift

3d or
other
sh ift

Durable goods
3d or
other
s h ift

2d
sh ift

3d or
other
s h ift

... 1 1 ,9 ....

2d
s h ift

i.6

Percent o f workers on extra sh ifts ,
a ll establishments ...................................

,15,5

. 5.8

Receiving s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l .............

U .3

5.7

17.2

6.7

10.8

4.5

Uniform cents (per hour) ................
3 c e n t s .......... ...............................
4 cents ...........................................
5 cents ...........................................
6 cents ..........................................
7 cents ..........................................
7£ cents ........................................
8 cents ..........................................
10 cents ........................................
11 c e n t s ..................................... ..
12 cents ........................................
12-J- cents ......................................
Over 12^- and under 15 cents . . .
15 cents ........................................
25 cents ........................................
Over 25 cents ...............................

10.2
•4
.7
1.8
.9
(2 /)
.6
.9
2.3
1.0
.5
1.1
-

3.2
.3
.2
.2
.1
.2
(2 /)
.6
(2 /)
.3
1.2
.1

9.9
1.8
1.6
1.1
1.6
2.8
-

2.2
.1
1.0
_
.5
.5
.1

10.5
1.0
1.5
1.8
«.
.1
1.6
2.3
1.0
1.2
-

4.5
.5
.5
.5
.3
.5
(2 /)
.1
*

Uniform percentage ...........................
4 percent ......................................
5 percent .......................................
7 percent .......................................
7J- p e r c e n t.....................................
8 percent ......................................
10 p e r c e n t....................................
12-J- p e r c e n t.................................

4.1
.3
.7
O /)
2.3

2.5
-

7.2
.5
1.3

4.4
-

.3
-

8 hours1 pay fo r 7i hours
worked ....................... ......................
Receiving no d i f f e r e n t i a l ................. .

1/
2/
2/

-

.8
-

(2 /)
.2
(2 /)
2.3

a /)

(2 /)

1.2

.1

-

1.0
-

(2 /)
2.0
.1

2d
sh ift

3d or
other
sh ift

Sheet-metal
work
3d or
other
s h ift

2d
s h ift

Stamped and
pressed metal
products
2d
s h ift 2 /

.. ... ..-2 1 *2 - .

Machinery
industries
2d
s h ift

3d or
other
sh ift

10.8

- . .. 9 . 6

19.9

10.8

7.4

2.3

21.9

17.4

1.6

19.9
19.3
.6

7.4
_
_
7.4
_
_
-

2.3
2.3
_
_
-

21.9
_
_
1.2
12.6
8.1
-

-

10.8
10.8
-

11.0
2.6
1.7
.5
1.9
4.3
_
-

1.6
.2
_
•
_
.2
_
1.2
-

......

-

_

_
-

17.8

_

-

6.4
3.0
•3

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

(2 /)
.3
(2 /)
4.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.1
-

-

-

-

.1

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.2

.2

-

2.2

-

.4

-

-

4.1
. -

1.3
-

Includes data fo r industries other than those shown separately.
N workers reported on 3d s h ift.
o
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.




-

Grain m illing

Nondurable goods

-

1.1

.1

- ’

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
U.S. D R EN O LA O
EPA TM T F B R
Bureau of Labor S ta tistic s

26
S c h e d u le d . U /j& e J U if a tto u S U .
'

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED IN—

M anufacturing

M anufacturing

Weekly hours

Al
l
ids
nu­
tis
re

Al
l

Drbe
ual
gos
od

Non­
drbe
ual
gos
od

100.0

100.0

Pbi
ulc
uii
tl­
te*
is

Whole­
sl
ae
tae
rd

R ti
eal
ta e
rd

Fnne*
iac*

Al
l

S rie
e vcs

indus­
tries

|

Durable
I
goods

AH

2/

Public
utili­

Non­
durable
goods

te*
is

Whole­

sl
ae
tae
rd

Rti
eal
tae
rd

S rie
e vcs

100.o _
_

100.0

100.0

1
All establishments ................
Under 35 hours........ ......... ...
35 hours..... .... ....... ....... .
Over 35 and under 3 J hours........ .
73 $ hours... ................ •••••
7Over 37£ and under 40 hours...... ••••
40 hours ........... ............ .
Over 40 and under 4 - hours... .
4
44 hours.............. ...........
Over 44 and under 48 hours ...........
48 hours ........ .....••••.... •••••
49^ hours... ................. ••••
50 hours......... .......... .
Over 50 hours.............. ......
1/
2/
*
**

100.0
0.1
.3
.4
11.0
6.7
77.0
2.7
1.1
.5
.2
-

100.0
5.6
12.5
79.5
.1
1.3
1.0
_
_
—

1.2
18.7
76.9
.3
.6
2.3
.
-

8.9
8.0
81.3
1.8
_
-

100.0
0.5
99.5
_
~

100.0
2.8
1.4
91.3
4.5
-

100.0

100.0

0.2
2.8
83.9
10.4
2.7

0.1
1.0
.1
30.4
11.3
57.0
.1

-

-

-

“

100.0

100.0

0.3
14.2
1.3
69.9
5.4
4.0
2.2
2.7
—

.
0.4
3.0
-

72.1
7.9
3.7
4.8
3.4
1.4
2.2
1.1

2.6
74.6
3.0
7.3
4.7
4.7
3.1

0.7
78.1
1.6
5.1
2.0
2.6
2.7
1.7

100.0
•
»
1.5
9.1
- *
82.1
2.4
4.5
.4

100.0
64.1
8.9
13.3
7.6
-

6.1

_
59.1
26.5
7.7

91.0
4®3
2.0
1.7
1.0

-

6.7
“

-

65.4
4.3
2.3
17.7
7.4
2.9

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

P& id < Jfolido4fd

Table E-3:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

All
indus­
tries

All establishments ................
Establishments providing paid
holidays ........... .. .........

M anufacturing

M anufacturing

Number of paid holidays

..

1-J- days.... .. ............. .. ....
3 days...................... ..
4 days .................................. .. ............
5 days ................................... ............................... ..
6 days . • • • • • . . .................................. • • • • • • • •
6^ days ................................................... ...................
7 days ..................... .................................................. ..
7£ days ........................................................................
8 days ........... ..............................................................
8£ days ............................. ...........................................
9 days ...........................................................................
9^- days .........................................................................

10 days...... ...... ..........
11 days........... ...........
Establishments providing no paid
holidays... ................... .
1/
g/
*
**

100.0

100.0

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.2

98.6

97.3

100.0

100.0

98.0

99.8

96.4

97.7

95.5

97o2

100.0

93.8

98.0

98.2

93.4

79.7

-

-

_

-

2

_

_

-

-

-

63.6

1.1
66.3

-

-

36.4

13.0

92.7
2.2
4.7

-

-

-

-

10.6
7.0

_
-

“

2.0

-

-

.7
62.0
5.6
10.1
1.1
1.8
1.5
3.9
.3
1.8
9.4

.9
75.7
1.4
8.6
3.0
1.8
2.1
5.1
-

1.8
91.5

-

58.2
2.8
13.7
6.4
3.7
4.4
10.8
-

1.8

1.4

2.7

~

( /)
-

-

4.0
-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Whole­
sale
trade

_
.2
-

.2

_

.7

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

•2
18.4
20.8
6.2

1.5
72.0
1.7
3.3

1.9
1.8
77.7
1.5
11.0

-

-

-

.1
3.5
9.2
1.1
.4
36.5

19.2
-

.6
(2/)
_
.3

(2/)
_

_
_

_
-

_
_
-

3.6

2.3

4.5

2.8

“

2.6
79.6
2.6
11.4

4 .7
9 2 .4

-

-

1 .0

_

-

2.9

3.5
_

64.2
5.7
21.6
2.3
(2/)

15.8
_
61.7

_

1.8
83.2
_
11.2
_

.

20.5
_

_

_

_
_
81.1
_
8.8

2.8
4.3
70.9
_
.1
_
1.6
_
_
_

_

_

_

_
-

-

_
-

2.0

_
_
_
_
-

6 .2

2.0

1.8

6.6

20.3

Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
U* DEPARTMENT OB LABOR
S*
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4t

P a id V*ac4zttonA> (ty okm al PtoHU&ionA,)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

M anufacturing

M anufacturing
Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

All

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

y

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1
All establishments........ ........

I
100.0 | 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9

91.6

97.6

97.7

99.1

95.9

99.5

100.0

96.5

95.6

_

_

.7
86.9
2.8
8.7

_

65.8
33.7
-

72.0
4.9
21.8
1.3
-

66.4
30.1

-

.4
85.3
1.2
9.0
-

_

39.3
1.0
49.8
1.5
-

.6
86.1
2.1
8.9
-

_

7.9
90.9
1.1
-

.3
77.6
1.7
17.5
.4
.1

_

-

81.2
2.0
6.7
4.3
1.4

.8
-

.1
-

5.8
2.6

2.4
-

2.3
-

.9
-

4.1
-

.5
-

-

3.5
-

4.4
-

100.0

99.5

96.5

97.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

300.0

99*0

99.2

100.0

98.2

100.0

100.0

99.2

1 rear of service
Establishments with paid vacations ...
Under 1 week.......... .
1 week ........ ................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks........
2 weeks........... ...........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks... ..... «••••••••••••••••
Establishments with no paid vacations •
•
Information not available ...........

_

-

20.9
3.5
75.6
-

.1
39.0
.3
58.8
_
-

.8
.2

.8
-

-

1.8
-

99.3

100.0

(2/)
36.3
1.5
60.6
.6
-

(2/)
29.5
2.0
67.7
-

_

_

69.5

-

44.8
4.7
48.8
1.7
-

-

-

-

30.5
-

_

75.0
-

24.2
-

.

-

-

-

_

2 veara of service
Establishments with paid vacations ...

««

Under 1 week.......... .........
1 week....... ...............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ••••••••••••
2 weeks... •••••••••••••••••.....
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks... ...................

12.9
1.2
83.6
1.4
.2

Establishments with no paid vacations .
.
Information not available •••••.......

.5
•2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.2

99.9

91.9

98.7

99.5

99.1

_

_

_

_

21.0

4.4

-

-

78.2

94.4
1.1
-

17.3
1.0
68.9
1.5
3.2

•4
63.5
9.0
24.0
2.6
-

.7
73.1
13.1
12.2

-

10.5
83.1
6.4
-

•2
52.7
5.9
37.4
2.1
•4

_

_

_

-

-

-

.8
-

.1
-

5.5
2.6

1.3
-

.5
-

.9
-

91.9

98.7

99.5

99.1

100.0

99.5

.7
.8
65.7
2.7
22.0

6.2
.8
87.0
1.4
3.3

6.1
.7
89.0
.7
3.0

3.2

6.4

95.2
.7
-

9.6
1.5
81.6
.7
6.6

_

_

_

15.5
3.1
81.4
-

17.7
4.1
78.2

13.2
2.0
84.8

14.9
.6
84.5

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

100.0

_

_

_

_

_

52.1
3.9
38.3
5.7
-

33.5
1.6
64.4
-

42.4
51.4
6.2
-

34.8
3.2
58.5
-

73.4
2.0
12.2
4.3
5.8

.5
-

-

3.5
-

2.3
-

100.0

96.5

97.7

8.6
85.2
6.2
-

6.0
86.2
4.3

5.2
5.4
65.0
9.7
12.4

_

3.5

2.3

_

-

-

5 rears of service
Establishments with paid vacations •••••

99.3

300.0

100.0

100.0

300.0

100.0

99.2

99.9

1 week......... .....•••••.....
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..... .
2 weeks ••••••..... ••••••••••••••••
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ...................... .

3.0
.3
89.5
2.7
3.8

3.4
.8
92.7
.2
2.9

2.7

4.1
1.6
87.9
.3
6.1

4.7

1.6

1.4

4*4

-

-

-

-

95.3

85.0
6.4
7.0

95.8
2.0

89.0
6.1
.4

Establishments with no paid vacations •
•
Information not available... .......

.5
.2

.8

.1

5.5
2.6

1.3

.5

.9

-

97.3
-

-

-

M

_

-

-

-

93.1
.5

-

l . T . r , of gegyloe
jJeag
99.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.2

99.9

91.9

98.7

99.5

99.1

100.0

99.5

100.0

96.5

97.7

1 week........ ...............
2 weeks •••••••••................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks........ .
3 weeks .......................
Over 3 weeks ...... ...... ......

2.0
37.8
2.3
56.8
.4

3.4
37.3
58.5
.8

2.7
34.9
60.8
1.6

4.1
39.8
56.1
-

4.7
18.3
77.0
-

1.6
63.9
6.4
28.1
-

1.4
34.0

(2/)
21.2
4.7
74.0

.7
65.1
2.7
22.0
1.4

5.9
44*8
1.0
46.9
.1

6.1
39.1
54.3
-

3.2
42.0
53.9
-

9.6
35.6

6.4
24.5
-

54.8

68.6
-

5.1
66.4
6.2
22.3
-

6.0
54.8

-

35.7
-

5.2
70.4
9.7
12.4
-

Establishments with no paid vacations •
•
Information not available.......... .

.5
.2

-

_

_

-

5.5
2.6

1.3

.5

.9

-

3.5

2.3

Establishments with paid vacations ...

_

\f Includes data for industries other than those shown separately#
%/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transv
'ortation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

63.8
.8

.1

-

.5

-

Occupational Vage Surrey, Minneapolis-St..
Paul, Minn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id S tc J z Jlj& a u G

Table E-5:

[f y o tu n a l PA & vidiO H A ?)

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Provisions for paid sick leave

M anufacture

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

.

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

Durable

gos
od

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

S rie
e vcs

gos
od
j

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

38.0

42.9

32.6

56.7

30.3

35.2

33.6

10.2

16.9

8.5

9.0

7.9

28.2

20.2

31.7

19.5

.1
3.5
8.1
.6
17.3
6.2

-

-

-

-

-

15.6
11.4

2.0
3.8

6.6
1.7

-

_

1.2
4*8
.8
12.0
8.1

3.7
.9
1.4
.4

-

11.0
2.1
2.5
38.1

-

5.1

-

3.2

_

-

-

-

.9
9.2
1.3
6.5
1.5

*"

-

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions
.
for paid sick leave............. .

35.1

.8

.1

3 days ................ ........
4 days .........................
5 days .........................
6 days .........................
7 to 9 days ....................
10 days ...................... ..
12 days ...........................................................................
15 days ...........................................................................
20 dayj ...........................................................................
21 days .....................................................................
3 0 days .................................... .....................................

4*6
6.2
.5
14.4
5.8
1.0
1.0
.3
1.2

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............................................

64.9

62.0

57.1

67.4

43.3

69.7

35.9

38.0

42.9

32.6

56.7

' days ..........................................................................
+
5 days ...........................................................................
6 days ...........................................................................
7 to 9 days .............................................................
10 days ........................................................................
12 days ................................................................... ..
13 days ........... ......... .
15 days ...................... .
20 days ...................... .
21 days .......................
30 days.....................
40 days .......................

.1
1.3
6,6
.5
13.0
6.0
5.9
1.0
.3
.4
.8

.1
.9
8.1
.6
6.8
6.2
13.1
1.4
.8
—

_
1.2
9.5
1.2
2.7
1.8
24.9
1.6
—

.2
.
5
6.6
11.3
11.1
2.9
“

_
3.9
2.1
2.5
45.2
3.0

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............

64.1

62.0

57.1

67.4

(Z/)

-

1.4
.8

3.2
9.5
1.2
25.6
1.8

.2
4.0
6.6
-

7.8
11.1

-

2.9

1.6

-

-

-

3.0

-

-

•-

7.1
.3

2.7

-

-

10.6
9.2
4*4

1.4
2.9

1.0
2.0
1.7
5.6
.3
3.7
1.1
(£/)
.1
1.1
.3

4.7

(2/)
*

.7

_

_

23.1

4.7

_
-

~

_

(2/)
_

2.7
17.5

_

10.3

_

3.5
3.3

.5
4.3
_

_

_
_

-

-

4.4

-

-

3.6

3.2

64.8

66.4

89.8

83.1

91.5

91.0

92.1

71.8

79.8

68.3

80.5

34.9

35.2

33.6

10.2

17.2

8.5

9.0

7.9

28.2

25.1

31.7

19.5

_
1.2
4.8
.8
14.6
8.1
2.0
3.4
-

.2
3.8
10.5

_

3.2

_

-

-

-

6.6
1.7
.7

2.6

2.7

3.7
.9
14
.-

_

5.8

-

-

18.9
1.8
-

1.4
2.9

.9
7.9
1.3
10.3
1.5
1.4
1.0
.8

-

-

10.6
9.2
4.4
3.6

2.5
1.3
5.4
.3
4.4
1.6
.1
.1
.1
1.1
.3

3.4

2.1
-

.8

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............................... ..

-

—

43.3

65.1

6 4 .8

_
-

6 6 .4

-

3.2

89.8

82.8

.4

(2/)
_
2.1
~

91.5

-

_
_
-

91.0

(2/)
-

25.6
_

4.7

_

_

4.0
6.1
_
_
_

_
10.3
_
.5
4.3
_
_

-

-

-

_
-

92.1

71.8

74.9

68.3

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn,, November 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




2.7
2.2
16.7

4 .4

80.5

p a id S l& k JUj&cuue (tyobH uU Pa m UaohA) - G on tu u ied

Table. E-5*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .................

M anufacture.
0

M anufacturing
Al
l
ids
nu­
tis
re

Al
l

Drbe
ual
gos
od

Non­
drbe
ual
gos
od

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.9

38.0

4 2 .9

3 2 .6

.9
5.9
.7
13.1
6.0

1.0
8.1
.6
5.7
6.2

1.2
9.5
1.2
.7
1.8

-

-

Pbi
ulc
uii
tl­
te*
is

100.0

W o e . Rti
hleal
sl
ae
tae
rd
ta e
rd

100.0

Fnne*
iac*

Sr i e
ev c s

Al
l
ids
nu­
tis
re
1/

Al
l

Drbe
ual
gos
od

Non­
drbe
ual
gos
od

Pb i
ulc
uii
tl­
te*
is

Woe
hl­
sl
ae
ta e
rd

Rti
ea l
ta e
rd

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .c

33.6

10.2

20.7

14*9

9.0

22.2

28.2

25.1

3 1.7

19.5

2.7

.9
1.4
.4
10.1
(2/)

1.7
.7
6.6

2.6

3.8

.9
7.9
1.3
10.3
1.5
1.4

2.2
14.7
2.7
4.0
8.1

5 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave........ .
4 or 5 days .......... ..........
6 days.... ....................
7 to 9 days................... ..
10 days.................... ..
12 days... .. ....... .. ...........
13 days .............. ..............................
15 days ....................................... ...................................
20 days ..........................................................................
21 days ........................
30 days ........................
4 0 days and over.................
.
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............

- .

1.8
.8
.3
5.3
1.1

1.0
1.6
.8
13.0 ,

1.9
.5
1.6
24.5
-

.8
6.6
-

11.2
11.1
-

56.7

3 4 .9

35.2

3.9

1.2
4.8
.8
14.6
8.1

.5
10.0
.2
18.9
2.3

-

-

12.6
9.2

1.4
2.9

-

-

-

3.3

4.4

~
-

-

-

4.6
45.2
-

-

3.0
-

2.0
2.0

2.9
-

1.4
-

1.3
5.0
.9
9.9
2.0
.1
(2/)
_

.-

_
_

.3
1.2

-

_
.
_
-

2.1

-

3.2

3.6

3.2
-

14.3
(a/)
_
_
_

-

25.6
_
_
_

10.3
.5
4.3

_

_
_

_

-

-

4 .7

-

1.0
.8

_
4.4

_
_

-

6 4 .1

62.0

57.1

67.4

43.3

65.1

64.8

6 6 .4

89.8

79.3

85.1

91.0

7 7 .8

71.8

74.9

68.3

80.5

35.9

38.0

42.9

32.6

56.7

34.9

35.2

33.6

10.2

20.7

14.9

9.0

2 2 .2

28.2

25.1

31.7

19.5

(2/)
.9
5.9
.6
12.3
6.1

.1
.9
•8.1
.6
5.7
6.2

_

3.9

_
.5
10.0
18.9
2.5
-

-

2.6

3.8
12.6
9.2

2.7

10.3

4.0
10.8

.5
4.3

1.0
1.1
.7
1.2
3.1
3.0

2.4
.8

.9
7.9
1.3
5.5
1.5
1.4

2.2
14.7

-

1.2
4.8
.8
9.9
8.1
1.4
4.7

-

-

.2
.
5
6.6
11.3
11.1
2.9

_

8.9
4.3

1.2
9.5
1.2
.7
1.8
1.9
1.6
16.7
8.3

64.1

62.0

57.1

15 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............
4 days ........................
5 days.... •
.................. .
6 days ........................
7 to 9 days ....................
10 days .......................
12 days .......................
13 days .......................
15 days .......................
20 days.......................
21 or 25 days ..................
30 days... ...................
40 days .......................
42 days and over ...............
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............

1/
2/
*
**

-

-

4.6
45.2
-

-

-

-

1.4
2.9
-

-

-

-

3.2

4.4

-

-

-

3.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.0

-

3.6

-

65.1

64.8

89.8

67.4

43.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

_

3.3
-

6 6 .4

1.3
5.0
.3
7.6
2.6
.1
(2/)
2.0

.9
1.4
.4
6.5
(2/)

1.7
_

3 .2
_

.7
-

14 .3

(2/)

3.6

6.6

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
•
_
_
_

1.2

2.1

-

4.7

79.3

85.1

-

.6

-

-

91.0

25.6

77.8

-

_
_

..
..
_

4.9

-

1.7

71.8

74.9

_

_

-

68.3

_

,

_
_
«.

_
4.4
-

80.5

R onuA & L

T able E-6:

PERCENT OF OFFICE

T^pe of bonus

All establishments..... ....... ..
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ .... .............. ..
Christmas or year-end ........ .
Profit-sharing................ .
Other ..••••••............. .
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses....... ...............
1/
2/
*
**

WO tKERS

EMPLOYED IN —

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

100.0

All

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

l
1

M anufacturing
Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

3/
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

I Durable
j
Roods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0 ; 100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Sri e
evc s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

£1.9

32.7

26.7

39.£

2.5

30.6

£9.7

70.8

£9.9

27.7

22.1

20.3

2£.2

1.6

37.5

52.2

20.5

3£*7
5.7
3.£

23.7
9.9
-

9.4
18.8
-

39.£
.1
-

2.5
.6

29.6t
5.4
-

£7.9
1.8
-

59.7
1£.9

31.9
18.1
-

2£.l
£.1
.7

17.6
5.5
.8

13.7
9.7
-

22.3
•£
1.9

1.6
1.6

33.4
£.3
-

£8.3
3.9
-

20.5
-

58.1

67.3

73.3

60.6

97.5

69.£

50.3

29.2

50.1

72.3

77.9

79.7

75.8

98.£

62.5

£7.8

79.5

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately
Unduplicated total#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

9# A 4€ftG 4U > e a n d P -e4tH O H P lo ttA .

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Type of plan

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

M anufacturin'
-

M anufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

All establishments ................

100.0

. 100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans
••............. .

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

Retail
trade

lOOoO

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/
|_
_
1
100.0 1 100.0 ; 100.0
100.0
|

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

86.6

86.6

90.2

82.5

99.9

80.9

89.2

95.2

£8.8

80.3

80.9

87.3

73.1

99.5

72.3

78.£

59.7

Life insurance...... ...........
Health insurance ................
Hospitalization ................
Retirement pension ...............

80.8
65.£
6£.l
50.£

82.8
76.0
75.6
52.3

86.8
86.7
8£.0
63.2

78.3
6£.3
66.3
£0.3

99.9
56.5
16.0
7£.0

70.1
5£.0
58.7
35.0

77.0
61.8
67.2
39.5

92.£
7£*1
76.9
69.7

39.6
21.1
16.9
1.9

71.9
6£.0
58.8
3£*7

73.3
71.9
69.1
3£.7

81.7
82.2
78.£
35.8

6£.l
59.£
57.7
33.£

99.5
65.1
£7.2
52.8

61.0
£2.8
£8.5
36.5

65.1
55.1
£8.1
35.6

50.8
£6.9
35.6
1.3

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans....... .......... .

13.£

13.£

9.8

17.5

.1

19.1

10.8

£.8

51.2

19.7

19.1

12.7

26.9

.5

27.7

21.6

£0.3

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31.

Appendix —Scope id Method of Survey
With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by v is its of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations 2 (a) office
cle rica l, (b) professional and technical, (0 ) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-1 through A-4). The covered industry groupings are; manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public u tilitie s ; wholesale trade; r e ta il trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.
Am the industries in which characteristic jobs were
ong
strdied, m
inimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fo l­
lowing table). Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. W
here weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
a l l establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i . e . , those hired to work the establishment’ s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to a ll office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of a ll workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to wom office workers
en
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of e l i ­
g ib ility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to. those providing fu ll pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though i t is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

3,
2

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDIE TRIES IN MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL, l/>
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, NOVEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum, number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

Numb er of
establi shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

51
51
51
-

1,396
401
191
210
995

316
105
52
53
211

229,000
108,200
58,300
49,900
120,800

136,220
66,350
40,060
26,290
69,870

33,040
12,390
7,190
5,200
20,650

51
21
51
21
21

All divisions .......... ........................
Manufacturing.................... .........
Durable goods 2/........................
Nondurable goods ij.....................
Nonmanufacturing................ ..........
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........................ .
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade .......................... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2/..... ........................

65
322
221
174
213

23
50
44
46
48

22,300
24,400
43,600
16,600
13,900

17,680
9,610
25,960
9,770
6,850

3,290
3,530
5,050
7,400
1,380

21
21
8
21
21
21
51
21
21

8
14
11
12
8
132
14
17
52

8
11
11
10
7
33
12
9
17

2,681
956
479
970
1,106
23,000
20,125
2,238
6,447

2,681
882
479
899
1,051
14,884
19,429
1,679
4,053

637
117

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Grain milling......................... ........
Millwork...... ............................ .
Foundries, nonferrous .................. .
Sheet-metal work ................................
Stamped and pressed metal products ..............
Machinery industries ................ ......... . •
Railroads ......................................
Milk dealers ............................... .
Insurance carriers .............................

2/

-

121
144
2,132
-

121
3,480

2/ MInneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area (Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin,and Ramsey Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
ij Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper
products; printing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coed; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




33.

Index
Page
number
Assembler (machinery) ................ ......
Assembler (millvork) ........ ................
Assembler (sheet-metal work)
Bench hand (bakeries) .......................
Biller, machine ....................... .
Bookbinder (printing) .......................
Bookkeeper, hand ....................... .....
Bookkeeping-machine operator .................
Bolter (grain milling) ................. ..
Bottler (malt liquors) ............... .
Bricklayer (building construction) ...........
Brewer (malt liquors) ...... ..... ......... ..
Cabinetmaker (millvork) •••••••••••••.••......
Calculating-machine operator...... ••••••••.••
Carpenter (building construction) .........
Carpenter, maintenance ..........
•••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ••.... •••••
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ••••
Cleaner ..................
•*•••••••••
Cleaner (railroads) ......... ..... ..........
Clerk, accounting...........•••••.... ......
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) .......
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) .... ••••
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ••••
Clerk, file .................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) .............
Clerk, general .................... ..........
Clerk, o r d e r .................. .............
Clerk, payroll..................... .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers)
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ......
Compositor, hand (printing) ..... .......... .
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ........
Crane operator, electric bridge ............. .
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads) ...
Die setter (stamped and pressed metal products)
Draftsman ........... ............ ••••••••••••
Drill-press operator (machinery) .............
Duplicating-machine operator ••••••«.••••••••••
Electrician (building construction) ..........
Electrician, maintenance ........ ............
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .........
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .........
Electrotyper (printing) .... ................ .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ••••••••.••••
Engineer, stationary
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) .. 0o.......




18
16
17
21
4
22
3, 4
4, 5
16
22
21
22
16
3, 5
21
10
19
17
13
19
3, 3
20
20
20
3, 5, 6
20
3, 6
3, 6
3, 6
20
20
22
17
13
19
17
9
18
3, 6
21
10
18
19
22
18
10
19

Page
number
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ••••....... •.....
Fireman, stationary boiler .........
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ••••••........ ••••
Grain-elevator operator (grain milling) ........
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ......
G u a r d ..............
Helper (bakeries) .....................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ...........................
Helper, trades, maintenance..........••. ••..... ......
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ................
Inspector (machinery) ......................
Inspector (stamped and pressed metal products) ••••••••••
J ani t o r..........
Janitor (machinery) ............
Janitor (railroads) ...................................
Janitor (sheet-metal work) ...............
Key-punch operator ••••••.•••••........
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ...............
Labeling-machine man (malt liquors) ........
Laborer (building construction) ...........
Machine operator (printing) ....................
Machine tender (printing) .........
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ..........
Machine-tool operator, tool room ..........
Machine-tool operator, tool room (machinery) ...........
Machinist, maintenance.............
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .....................
Machinist, production (machinery) •••••••••......... «...
Mailer (printing) ........
Maintenance men, general utility.......................
Maintenance roan, general utility (stamped and pressed
metal products) .............. ................ .
Maltster (malt liquors) .......
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ...........
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ......
Mechanic, maintenance
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) .... ............... .,
Mechanic, maintenance (stamped and pressed metal
products) ...... ....... ..... ......................
Miller, flour (grain milling) ..........
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ............
Millwright......
Mixer (bakeries) .................................. .aoo
Molder (bakeries) .....
Molder (nonferrous foundries) .........
Molder operator (millwork) ...........
Motortruck driver ..........

19
10
17
16
18
13
21
23
10
19
18
17
13
18
19
17
7
20
22
21
22
22
18
11
18
11
19
18
22
11
17
22
11
19
11

19
17
16
18
11
21
21
17
16
23

34,

Index -

C o n t in u e d
Page
number

Page
number
Nurse, industrial (registered) •..................... .
Off-bearer, machine (mi11work) ••••••••••.•••••••••••••••
Office boy
...................•••••••••••........
Office g i r l ............................ „.............
O i l e r ................................................
Oiler (grain milling) ........................... ......
Operator (local transit) .............. ••«••••.•••••••••
Order filler..........................................
Order filler (milk dealers) ....... ...... ........... ••
Ovenman (bakeries) ......
•••••.••
Packer....... ..................... ................ ...
Packer (bakeries) .................•.... ....... ..... .
Packer (grain milling) ......................... .
Painter (building construction) ••••••••••..................
Painter, maintenance
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ......
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ............................
Photoengraver (printing) ••••..........
•••••«•
Pipe fitter, maintenance..... ............. ........ .
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ..................
Planer operator (mill work) ........ ••••••••••.... .
Plasterer (building construction) ...................
Plumber (building construction) ••••••••....... ..... .
Plumber, maintenance .••••••••••..... ••••••••••••.... .
Porter.............
Porter (sheet-metal work) ..............................
Power-brake operator (sheet-metal work)
••...••
••••
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal work) ................
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) ...................................
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ............... .
Press assistant (printing) ......
••••••.••••••••••
Press feeder (printing) .... .......... ............ ..
Pressman (printing) .............................
Punch-press operator (sheet-metal work) ...................
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal
products) .............................
Receiving c l e r k ..................................
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ..........•••••••••••••••
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ........... .
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) ••••••••••«.•.............
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ••••••••••.....
Saw operator (millwork) .............
•••••••••
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ......... *
Secretary •••••••••••••...............
Section head (insurance carriers) .••••••••••............
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ....................




9
16

A
7
12
16
23
13
19
21

1A
21
16
12
19
19
22
12
19
16
21
12
13
17
17

20
22
22

19
19
19
16
16
7

Sheet-metal machine operator, miscellaneous machines
(sheet-metal work) ............................ ••••»
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance...... •••••••••........
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ...... .
Shipping c l e r k ........ .......... ».... ••«•••...•••••••
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ......
Smutter (grain milling) •••••.••••••••.............. ••. •
Stenographer..... ................. •............. ..
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ....... ........ .
Stereotyper (printing) ...............................••
Sticker operator (millwork) .......
Stock handler...........
Stock handler (grain milling) .........................
Stock handler (millwork) ......... ............. .......
21
Stock handler (railroads) .............................
Stock handler (sheet-metal work) ......................
Sweeper (grain milling) ........ ............... ...... .
Switchboard operator •••••••••••,.••••..........
Switchboard operator-receptionist .....................
Tabulating-machine operator
..................
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ••••••••
Tool-and-die m a k e r ...............
21
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) .... ....................
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal
products) ...................
T r a c e r .............................
17
Transcribing-machine operator ...................
Truck d r i v e r ................
Truck driver (millwork) ...............................
Truck driver (railroads) ......... .......... ..........
17
Trucker, hand ......... ....... ......... ....... .
Trucker, hand (grain milling) ....... ..
•••••••••
Trucker, hand (millwork) ....
•••••••••.••••
Trucker, hand (railroads) ••................••••••••••••
22
Trucker, hand (sheet-metal work) ••••••••••••••••......
17
Trucker, power ......
Trucker, 17
power (railroads) ..................
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ..............
1A
Typist ...............................................
Typist (insurance carriers) ..........••••........ ..
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ...... ••••••••••••....
17
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers)
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ........ ......... .
Watchman.......
Watchman (grain milling) .................... .........
Welder, hand (machinery) ••••........
20
17
Wrapper (bakeries) ....................................
☆

17
12
19
14
14
16
4, 7
20
22
16
14
16
16
19
17
16
3
8
4, 8
20
12
18
17
9
8
15
16
19
14
16
16
19
17
15
19
18
8, 9
20
20
19
19
15
16
16
21

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952




This report was prepared in the Bureau’s North Central Regional
Office. Communications may be addressed to:
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102