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Occupational Wage Survey
DENVER, COLORADO
November 1951

Bulletin No. 1066

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION ...............

1

THE DENVER METROPOLITAN AREA

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ,

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office o c c u p a t i o n s .... ..................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ...... .........
k-U
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ......

3
7
7
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis * B-35
Machinery industries ............................................
B-4-0
Railroads .......................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers • i............................................

11

11
12

Union wage scales for selected occupations Building construction ,
...........
C-15
C-205 Bakeries .........................
Printing .........................
C-27
Local transit operating employees
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..
C-A2
Grocery stores ..................
C-5A2 Meat markets .....................

13
13
13
13
13

c-41

c-5u

H
H

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers

15

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ......
E-3
Paid holidays ...............
E-4
Paid vacations ..............
E-5
Paid sick leave ..............
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ......
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .

15
16

16
17
18
20
20

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey

21

INDEX

23

* NOTE - An additional occupational earnings
report is available upon request for ferrous
foundries (June 1951).

March 28, 1952
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 25, D. C.

- Price 2 0 cents

Introduction 1/
The Denver area is one of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades,in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were also collected and summarized on shift oper­
ations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary bene­
fits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays,
nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

Excluding agricultural workers, wage and salary em­
ployees in the area in November 1951 numbered 217,000; and 1 of
every 7 of these was employed in government— Federal, State, or
local.

About 20 percent of the 44,000 workers in manufactur­
ing were employed in the machinery, ordnance, and other metal­
fabricating industries. Also important numerically in manufac­
turing was the foodstuffs (primarily meat and bakery products)
industry which provided employment for 11,000 workers. Among
other manufacturing activities, rubber products, printing, ap­
parel, and luggage and leather goods employed workers in sig­
nificant numbers.

Centrally located in the vast Rocky Mountain West,
Denver is the natural commercial and financial hub for a 7-State
region.
This is reflected in the comparatively large numbers
of workers employed in trade, finance, and services. In late
1951, there were 60,000 sales and related workers in wholesale
and retail trade in Denver. The city’s financial institutions,
including insurance carriers and real estate operators, had
10,000 workers, and 21,000 were employed in the service indus­
tries.

Combined employment of the communication, public
utilities, and transportation industries, including railroads,
was 26,000.
The building construction industry had almost as
many, 22,000 employees.

The Denver Metropolitan Area
Denver and neighboring cities and towns in the 4county metropolitan area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, and Jeffer­
son Counties) had a combined population of more than 565,000 in
1951* Four-fifths of this total was in the city of Denver.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in San Fran­
cisco, Calif., by William P. 0*Connor under the direction of
John L. Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning and central direction of the program was carried
on in the Bureau*s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations
in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of sur­
vey.




Among the industry and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed in November 1951, about five-eighths of the plant workers
were employed in establishments having written contracts with
labor organizations.
The proportion of plant workers covered
by union agreements varied greatly, however, among the industry
groups studied. All plant workers in the public utilities group
were employed in establishments having union contracts, as were
three-fourths of the workers in manufacturing, but less than
half the workers in retail trade and services were under union
contract provisions.

Comparatively few office workers were employed under
union contract terms. Only in manufacturing and the finance
group of industries was unionization in offices found to any
appreciable degree; only about a fifth of the workers in each
industry division were employed in establishments having written
contracts covering office workers.

2

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages were formally adjusted upward for about half
the Denver plant workers during the 11-month period between
January 1951 - the date of the Bureau* s last comprehensive wage
study in the area - and November 1951. These formal pay raises
were almost invariably for 5 cents an hour or more and contri­
buted, in large part, to a 3 to 7 percent general wage advance
in plant occupations during the period. Although almost fourfifths of all workers in the public utilities group of indus­
tries participated in general wage increases, somewhat less than
half of those in other industries were employed in establish­
ments which effected across-the-board advances.

Among office workers, a third were employed in estab­
lishments which formally raised salaries during the period. In­
creases were for $2 or more a week in almost all cases and these
were contributory to a 2 to 6 percent advance in all office
salary levels from January 1951 to November 1951.
As among
plant workers, the largest proportion of workers receiving in­
creases was in the public utilities group.
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing nearly 85 percent of Denver
plant workers. Systems providing a range of rates for each oc­
cupation were in effect for a little more than half of those
under formal structures, and a single rate structure covered
the remainder.
About a third of the office workers were em­
ployed in establishments that determined salaries on an indi­
vidual basis. For other office workers, plans providing a range
of rates for each job classification were in the majority.




Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers
with no previous work experience were a part of the formalized
rate structures of a majority of Denver area firms. On an all­
industry basis, half the plant workers were employed in estab­
lishments paying an hourly minimum of 85 cents or more.
No
specified rate was typical of the area as a whole, however. The
minimums ranged from less than 55 cents to more than $1.35 an
hour with the highest rates reported in manufacturing and the
lowest in retail trade and services.

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing. In 19 of
25 office job classifications permitting comparison, salaries
of workers in manufacturing plants averaged from $1 to $9.50
more a week than in nonmanufacturing. Average hourly earnings
for plant jobs studied in all industries were higher for 13 of
21 job categories for which comparisons were possible.

One of every five manufacturing workers in Denver was
employed on late-shift work in November 1951# Almost all of
these workers received shift premium payments in terms of centsper-hour differentials over day-shift rates. The amounts most
commonly reported were 3 and 5 cents for second-shift work, and
3 cents for third-shift work.

About four-fifths of women office workers in Denver
were scheduled to work a 40-hour week in November 1951. Half
the plant workers were on a 40-hour schedule and half worked
more than 40 hours a week. The majority of those on the longer
schedules worked 48 hours a week.

3

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

0CC4fuUlOHd>
4

O^ i c e

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
j$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
lo.oo 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00;57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50!55.00 57.50!60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 . 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 ovBr
25!
1
j
t
|

Weekly
Weekly Under
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $

Men
Billers, machine (billing machine) ....
Nonmanufacturing ...............
PUbHC Util1t1«S * ......... T T
T

48
46
39

*
50.50
50.50
48,00

44.5
44.5
45*0

Bookkeepers, hand .................
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** .................

210
~5T"
164
87
a
25

42.0
42.0
42.0
40.5
45.5
40.0

Clerks, accounting ................
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing.............. .
Wholesale trade ............. .
.Retail trade ................
Finance ** .................

491
46
445
195
15
26

40.5
“ 423“
40.5
40.5
41.0
39.5

C e i s general ..................
lrc,
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Finance ** .................

216
3
5
183
97
36
37

42.0 59.50
41.0 52.50
42.0 160.50
44.0 i61.00
39.5 J62.00
40.0 58.00

Clerks, order ....................
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ..............

161
42
119
117

U.5 !61.00
“ 403 : 57.00“
42.0 62.50
42.0 62.50

Clerks, payroll ................. .
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade .. ......... .
.

41

--- 23

Office boys .....................
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing............ .
Wholesale trade ..............
Finance ** .................

126
30
96
40
40

Tabulating-machine operators .........
Manufacturing ...........................................................

45
14

18
10

68.50
69.50
68.50

71.50
69.50
55.00

41.0
40.5
41.5
40.0

62.50
63.50
61.50
61.50
52.50

58.00
5530“
61.00
67.00

40.0

38.00
: 38.50
39.5 37.50
40.0 40.50
40.0 36.00
61.00
60.00

40.5
41.0

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See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

21

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-

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Billers, machine (billing machine) ...............
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................

-1

1

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11
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E

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

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See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

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5<

Table A-i:

O

ffc
i

e

O

c

c

u

p

a

t io

n

*

-

C

o

n

tn
i

u

e

d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo,, by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v er ag e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Nme
ubr
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
o
f
00157.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.
.
hus erig $
or
anns
ana
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
1
1

Women - Continued

Services ...................

380
5
5
46
119
13

40.0
"4i;r'
40.0
40.0
40.0
39,o
40.5

$
36.50
42.50
36.00
38.00
35.50
3,>
5*o
35.00

Clerk8 general ..................
.
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ...... ..... .
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ..... T....... .
Services ................. .

748
89
659
107
140
194
41

40.5
40.5
40.5
40.5
40.0
40.0
40.5

46.00
52.00
45.50
51.50
43.00
43.50
46.00

Clerks, f l , class B ..............
ie
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................

Clerks, order ....................
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ............. . _ TT
.

426

Clerks, payroll ... ..............
41.0
195
Manufacturing ................. r~7B.."T T . T '
Nonmanufacturing ...............
117
40.5
Public utilities * ............
41.0
35
Wholesale trade ..............
40.0
27
Retail trade ................
40.0
34
Services ...................
12
41.0

44.00
47.00
43.00
44.50
41.50 i
49.50
48.50
50.00
49.00
58.00 !
46.50 !
46.50

Duplicating-machine operators .........
3
1
Manufacturing .................
— n—
20
Nonmanufacturing ...............

40.0
/CO
i.
40.5

46.00 ;
45.00
46.00

Key-punch operators ...............
Manufacturing .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ..........
Wholesale trade ..............

168
33
135
16
20

40.0
"15
4.
39.5
41.0
40.0

43.50
51.00-1
41.50
42.00
48.50

Office girls .. .................
.
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing....... ........
Retail trade ................

105
13
92
20

40.0
40.5
40.0
40.5

Secretaries .....................
Manufacturing... ..............
Nonmanufacturing ........... .
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance * * ..................
Services ...................

788
97
691
118
261
5
1
194
67

40.0
TTO
40.0
41.0
40.0
41.0
39.5
38.5

134
32
102
63
39

41.0
42.0
40.5
39.5
41.5

_
—
_
_
_
_
_
-

44
3
41
2
4
29
6

68
_
68
16
19
3
1
2

4
4
4

19
-—
19
5

-

8
_
-!
_

-

159
11
13
10
1

89
27
14 ! 4
7 , 23
5
10 1
6
4
3
2
46
4

49 135 i
IT
2
33 133
2
24
13
68
4
4

107
5
102
10 i
31 |
36
1

25
Sr|
9|
6
2

1!
-j
76 !
3
73
13
10
27
8

3
2I
1:
•1
1I

7
r
2
21
1
!

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_' 2
_
2
_
15
_
- ! 15
-

-

18
18
12
6

4?
7
3
8
16
22

27
5
2
2
20
2

16
8
8
2
6

8
5
3
3

10
6
4
1
2
1

10
3
7
2
1
4
-

15
9
6
2
_
3
1

31
5
26
3
5
6
4

11
5
6
1
_
4
1

27
11
16
7
1
6
2

3
3

2

3
3
-

25
25
3

2

2
20 1
_
20
3

1
4
1
4
1
j
21
21
14
19
2! 9
3
21 : 1 6 : 1 ;
9
5
5
2
3!

5

1

11 - r
2
22
5
4
7
- - — r
" w . y r
1
2
_
1
21
34.50
11
5
5
3
33.00
11
2
4; *
3
_
_
_
i53.50
7
1 1 ; 65
_! _
.i
"00" ■ _
16 . 0 '
-i -: 7
52.50
11; 6
5
-,
-■ ~
57.50
8
_
-1 _
_
i54.00
3
3
_
~j -j 1 ! 5
!49.50
I49.50
7 ! “j 81 7
49.50
-!
“ i 2 1 12
1
1
35.50

4
3
:

2
2

4 ---- !
2
~1
2j
2

7
!

_
_
-

-

98
_!
98
6
:
46!
13
26
7

78 1
81
70 1
6I
17 i
5
35
5

-1

8
7
!
11

—

4

-'

_

_!
!
i
34
51 19
2; -- 1 ! 13
6
32 ! 4
2
4
3
_
10
11
1
-

_
_
_

12
2
10
10

-

115 ! 57 ! 33
17 ! 2 i 3
98 1 5
5| 30
_
22
26
25
4
5
9
23
15
2
2
2

3

-

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




159

4
41

_

24

6
18
2
4
1
_
_
_
_

29
5
24
9
1
3

20
1?
15
7
6
5
2
2
2
2
_
_
1
2
_
2
;
7
1 ; _: _
l
j
7

-|
5 l 120
5
ii 11 i
54 109
32
4
!
2
35 !
2
10 |
5!
3
13
7I
5

-

_
_

1
1
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7
,
6
1

6 .“I
3
_
3
_
1
_
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1
-!
_
1
-1
1
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l
3 ---- 1
1
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2
1

1

1!

-

_

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3°
13
17
12
2
3

1 ; 11
0
9
3
!
71 2
1
2
1
3
11
1

_

9
1
8
2
1
5
;
_
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-

-

61
33
11
9
50
26
5
3
n
17
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2
9
17
3
1
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1

3
3
9
1
24
10
4
1
5
4

6
18!
1
4
4
9

_
-

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-

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-

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5
1
4
_
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1
1

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3
1
12
19
13

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1
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4! --- 1
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4
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6

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10

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10
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- 31
-

24

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j
76
13
63
7
40
_
13
3

_

-

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39 ; 22
6
8
3 ' 14
3
8
6
20
5

_

5

1
2

_
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1
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2
2
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2
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
,
-

_
_

_
_
'

-

-

-

_

_

1

_

_

j
_i
_
_i
_
-

_
_
_

J

_
_

j

-

1

.
j
_I
i
-

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

18
25
8
3
10
22
4i 3
18
5
_
1
;
1
_
!
! -

10
2
8
4
4
_

4

4
1!

4|
4
!

3
3
_

2

-

-

-

_
_
-

3
1
2

_

6.

Table A-l:

O

ffc
i

e

O

c

c

u

p

a

t io

n

*

-

C

o

n

tn
i

u

e

d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., b y industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

$
$
Weekly U n d e r 3 0 . 0 0 3 2 . 5 0
Weekly
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0

$
3 5 .0 0

$
$
3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0

$
4 2 .5 0

$
$
4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0

$

$

$
5 0 .0 0

$

$

$

$

s

$

$

$

$

$

$

5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0

ana

3 7 . 5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0

5 0 ,0 0 5 2 .5 0

5 5 ,0 0 5 7 , 5 0 6 0 , 0 0 6 2 , 5Q 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5Q 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 0 0

over

Women - Continued
$

Stenographers, general ...............
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................
Services ...................

1 ,2 1 0

79

3 9 .5

Switchboard operators ................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................
Services ......................

166

4 1 .5
4 0 .5
4 1 .5
4 2 .5
4 1 .0
4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 4 .0

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................
Services ......................

294
63
231
14
109
58
36
14

3 9 .5
4 3 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

Tabulating-machine operators ..........
Nonmanufacturing ..................

21

4 0 .0

19

3 9 .5

198
1 ,0 1 2
176
367
152
238

19
147
20
16
48
31
32

Transcribing-machine operators, general ,
,
Nonmanufacturing................. .
Wholesale trade ............ .

101

Typists, class A ....................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade .............. .
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................
Services ......................

347

Typists, class B .................
Manufacturing................. .
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ....................
Services ......................

57
35

49
298

4 0 .5
4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 2 .0
4 0 .0

4 0 .5
4 0 .5
4 0 .5
4 4 .0

4 0 .0

4 0 .5
4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 2 .0

54
129
20

4 0 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

45
141
103
239
56

4 0 .0
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .0
4 0 .5
4 0 .5

7
-

-

4 8 .5 0
4 6 .0 0
4 3 .0 0
4 4 .5 0

30

9
2
-

7

-

9
-

7
-

_

5 2 .0 0
4 7 .0 0
5 1 .0 0

7

60
2

175
16

30

58

159

4
4

3
4
8

13
58

5
17

24
50

163

230

23
140

21
209

13
23
54

27
84
8

IQ S.
27
78

m .
35

23
34

63
27

9
3
9

17
96
21
8
2

6 9 ____ 6 l _
14
49
59
20
31 i
23
9
6
21
1 1 !
3 ,

10

144
i
i
;

3 6 ____ 4 0 _ ______a_ ______ 5_ ____ 2 5 _ ______6_
21
1
6
7
15
10
29
19
7
5
_
8
9
3
5
_ !
16
10
4
_
_
_
!
10
5
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

33
10

14

36
14

3

-

-

4 2 .5 0

3

10
-

32

17

13

12

27

16

16

2

9
-

10

6
10

4
_

3

17
_

2
2

-

13
2
_

4
12 i
6 ;

-

32
- 1
1

5
22

_

3
-

2
10
1
1

5
1

4

4 9 .0 0
; 4 1 .5 0
14 9 .0 0
; 4 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 0
4 0 .5 0
3 6 .5 0

9
-

7

24

-

7
3

3
4

7
10

2
1

6
-

29
4

68

6
-

25
-

-

25
-

_

18

22
6
16
-

7

16

2
-

-

-

-

4

1
1

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

8

”
18

72

48

38

4
68

5 ;
43
6 i
_

-

-

-

-

-

5 0 .0 0
4 0 .5 0

27

3 9 .5 0

_
-

8
-

-

8

39

4 3 .5 0

-

-

-

-

_

8

-

-

-

8

3 9 .5 0
4 2 .5 0
3 9 .0 0
4 3 .0 0
4 1 .0 0
3 9 .0 0

3 9 .5

3 6 .5 0

4 0 .5

3 9 .5 0

;

133
1
132

8
-

|

2
-

,

2
31 1
4
j

6

9

10
|

28
89

1
!

7

2 |
36
11
1
8

8

5
2

4
2
2

3 :
17

6 ;

7 !
5 !

3
6

4

5

2
2 !
23
18 ;
13

1
9
!

12"" i
38
10

13 1
—
39 ,
13
1 !
6 |
10 !
9

75 1
15

46

32 1

i

26

16

11

25
10

!
i

27
3

32

8

17

_

3

_

-

-

-

_

2
_

1
l
_

* *

-

_ j

_

_

_
_
_

- !

_

_

_

-

_

_

- j
_
_

-

- i

_
-

-

_ j

5
8
1

5 !
1 !
4

1
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_ ;
_

_

•
_
_

-

-

------------__ |

_
_
_ 1

_

_
_

_
_

-

_ !
_

-

-

- ;

1
;

_

_

-

8

5

3 !
2

7
1
------------

i
!

23 •

16 j

T

3
20 ■
3

3
13 !
9
_
!
1
-

16
8
4 I
!
3 i
1 !
19 !

v
15 ;
2

2

-

3

- |
!
2 !
2

2
;

r i

_
_ !
_ ,
_

-

_

5

2

1
—

-

5
6
2

_ |

-

|

9
_

_

_
_

_

_ ;

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

r

-

-

-

5
3

9

_

!

5
4

-

-

1 :

_

1

_

_|

i

1

2

_ l
_ !

_ i■ _
_j

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

-

-

_

_

_

1
-

I
i

_

j

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

i
i-------- —
_

_
_ ]
1

_

_

_

_
i

j
1

_
_

_

_

1 i
1 j

i

1

-

2

-

_

_

_

-

5 !

2

1

_
_

_

r

1
1

7
4
2
1

_
_ t
_ ■

-

j -----------1
-

I

2'

8
1

_
_
_

_
_

1

!
1 !

_

!

4

2

1

i

_

2

-

4

10 1

_

1

6

2

2

3
2

_

_

_

_
1

i

Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and. other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

_
_
_
_
_

_

i

l/
*

_ ’—

_

|

23

91 i 55 j
16 i
9!

14

n

;

13
5 !

7
-

-

1
1 I
—

1

52

;
1

_

_ !
_
_ 1

1

-

-

_

9

50

-

-

-

_

35
15
20

3 1
!

5

19

20

-

;
2
2
_ j

-

1

24
11 !
13 !
- |

33 i
9

;

1 !
7
1 !

2
1

7
1

48
6
42
_

11

3

3

7

6
1
21

19
91

68

7

1

8

77 1 n o

147
141

27
23
71
10

23

13 !
13
10

4 4 .5 0
4 2 .5 0
4 7 .5 0

-

3
43
3 S
2 1
8

7

_

i

_

9
59

10
8

5
5

_

4 5 .0 0

8

-

25
-

-

4 8 .0 0
4 6 .0 0

4 3 .0 0

-

2
-

3

4 2 .5 0
4 6 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0
! 4 7 .5 0
4 3 .5 0
4 0 .0 0
3 7 .0 0
4 0 .5 0

4 0 7 0 '..." ■ £ 3 .0 0
4 2 .0 0
3 9 .5

73
22

651
67
584

4 8 .0 0

i
i

- ■
.

7

Table A-2:

P ^ ^ e ^ U O n o l a n d ^ e c J u U C a l O c c u p a tio n *

(A v era g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u rs and e a r n in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a
b a s i s i n D e n v e r , C o lo ., by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
!$
*
s
Under 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00 L05.0C110. ch15 . c1L . o;. . c
0 1. o t 20 o p 25 o

Weekly
Weeklyearnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

5Q a .Q0

52,50 55.00 57*50 - Q Q 4 , Q 42*50 65.00 47*5Q 70.00 72.50 75,00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00L05.00no.00115.00i 2 . 0 L 5 0 h 3 . C
L00t2.o.00

Men

!
!

!

i

j

1

Draftsmen, chief

................................................................

Draftsmen ......................

5
4

40.5

109.00

249

40.5

86.50

4

_

40.5

66.50
68.00
64.00

3

2!
-i
2

Draftsmen, junior .................
74
Manufacturing .................. ris—
Nonmanufacturing ...............
30

40.0

~

-------------------------- i
:

4
2
2

j

-;

4

3

4 ! 12
2
5

4
3
1

2

1

1

4

4

4

21 | 28

21

42

19

u

3 !

_
-

_
-

_1
—
-1

H—
-:

7|

7

< --- (
- 10

7

13

7
3 ---- -i 14 ;
1
! 10 1
2
7
4

7
6
1

6
2
4

12

6

15 ! 27
4
4,

4
4

_|
*!

2
2
f

1

j

■
1
—

12

5

?
|

1

—
rj
-!

—
-

!

!
24
17—

41.0 i 61.00
41.0
6.5
2'0

1

3
3!

1
-'

8

3

5 ;

3 ;

2
2

1

2
2

1

1
1

1
1

-,
'

1/

H
1—

! ------------!
-

5

1

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ......
Manufacturing .................

3

2

■

Hours r e f l e c t th e workweeks f o r w hich e m p lo y ees r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s and t h e e a r n in g s co r re sp o n d t o t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s.




T a b le A -3:

Maintenance and Powak Plant Occupation*

(A v era g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 / f o r men i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a
b a s i s i n D en v er, C o l o ., by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

8,

Table a-3:

Maintenance and Powek Plant Occupation&- Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ |
$
$ !
$
$
$
$ ;
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ !
$
Under1.00 1.0511.3011.15!1.20 1.25 1.3011.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 6 ! 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.901.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25
.0
$
and
1.00 1.05 1.10,1.15 1.2011.25 1.30 1.35i .40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60|1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.952.00 2.05 2.10i
i
2.15 2.20 2.25 over

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

197
105
92
5
2

$
1.65
1.72
1.58
1.42

-

1.52
72
45 ‘ 1.56
1.46
27

2
2

1

i

Engineers, stationary ..........
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Services ..............
Firemen, stationary boiler ......
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing...........
Helpers, trades, maintenance ....
Machinists, maintenance .........
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Public utilities * .......

315
140
121
19
17

1.43
1.78
1.78
1.76
1.79

:
1
1
1

2
_; -! 2
-i 2

1
1
1

7
7
7

6
_
6
6

6
6
-

!
12 !
_;
12:
7

2
2

_

_
“

-

.
-

3
2
1

8
3
5

5
5

10

8

27

12

_

_

5

_
-

-; - ; -!
~

-

_

_

2

“

2
1

_

Maintenance men, general utility . .
.
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Services ..............

140
73
67
14

1.62
1.65
1.59
1.37

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Public utilities * .......

472
15
457
438

i 1.70
! 1.64
i 1.70
I 1.70

-; -1
_! ~
-

Mechanics, maintenance .........

110

l 1.73

_

_

Millwrights .................

14

1.78

-!

38

15

2
_
2
2

~

6
_i
6
6'
[
_
-

3
3
-

17 j
_|
17
12!
26

Oilers ....................
Painters, maintenance .........
Manufacturing .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Public utilities * .......

40
36
10
26
16

1.47

-

8 _3_ 105
5j

37

-!
-

_
-!
I
~
*

-

1

14
4
10
-

i

7!
7
6
-

-

1
-

-

24

3
1;

9
6
3
2j

1

2 18
6
2 12
2
| 2

1

“

“

1
4
-|
1 *

4 1 14
2
12
12

_

_

2

2

Tool-and-die makers ...........
Manufacturing .............

3
8
37

1.94
1.94

-

2

1

4 i 12
I --

7

6
; 13 1 --

1

1

~

i

2
2
_

5
3
2
1

6

i

-

-

-

! ~




12}
12

1L 12
_
I 12
11

1 _
_j
- -

~

_

_
_I

_
T
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-!

_

_
-

_
-1

6
6
_
-

1
l

2
_
2

2

_1

_
-

_
-

_
-

I_ _
21
21
_
-

6
6
-

61
5
3
6!
8

3
_
3
3

2
1
1
1
3
2
l

-

-

■

1
1
1.

-

-i

-

_
_

_
_

2
_
2

11

21
21

11
-1 11

!
_
-;

_

2

2
2!
2:

;
13 — 36

2

4

'5

i
i
i

1

5

5

3
_
—

6
6
6

1

5
1 3
2
1
1

_
_
j

-

j

2

1

1
l

17 i
16

,

4

-

4

4

_

!

1

-

l

3

18
18
18

3
!

3

11
1r

_

3

— !

— a
_

«

1

-

1

1

7
7

-

2
~

7

27
20
2

] -—
-

j

!

_

_

21

5
4 72 ; 21 136 ! 1
2
4i 4
|
1
5
2 68 : 1 7 '136
52 1 68 ! 16 I136
10

4
2
2
2

;

1
1
_
-j

”!

8

1
1
1

—

E x c lu d e s premium pay f o r o v e r tim e and n ig h t work.
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tio n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *

1

5

6
6

1
1

l/
*

_J
-

16

1
“

4
4|
-!

. 1
.

i —
!
—

1.85
1.86 --- 1
_
1.86
-

_

31
3
3
-

1
3
3

|
5
8
5
1
5
1

!
_ _
-;
I

20
2 ; 15 i 7 10
_i 8
20
2 13
_j
2
2
7

4

3

-!
_
-

12
12

! l

Sheet-metalworkers, maintenance . .
.
Nonmanufacturing ...........
Public utilities * .......

! 12
_
12

1 12
_ i 12 :
_
i

1

.

1.72
1.60
1.77
1.67

5! 55
2 45
3: 10
3i

15

1
8 : 28 47 i 48 ,
4
_
-! 2
1!
4 ! 6 I 28 46 48
6 1 28 : 42| 36 j
4

t
! -1

1!

8
3
5
1

-

.

_

-I

20
1;
7
3
;
-

*| 7
7
-

26

-1

-1

1

!
12
8
4
3

2
2
2

_

-

3

j

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
—

4

--

-

*

6
6

~

1
i_

_

_

_

_

-

9.

Table A t GuiiodicU, WateUouluUf, and Skipping Occupation*
-k
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Denver, Colo., by industry division, November 1951)

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) .....
Manufacturing.................... ...... .......

42
42

NUMBER OF WORKERS
$
$
$
!
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
h u l Under!3.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 |o.95 1.00 1.05 jl.10 1.15 1.20
ory
erig
anns
1
$
1
0.75 ! .80 .85 , .90 .95 ll.OO 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25
j
S
_
_
. :
_
!
_
1.42
-s - 1 _

-

_

-

-

2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2 : 2

1.04
1.22
.98
1.09
1.06
.93
.94
.94

63
51
-! 1
62
51
8
45
25
1
6
28

65
65
6
10
21
H
17

111
13
98
28
3
26
32
V

93
10
83
2
13
57
g
3

264
22
242
40

.90
1.02
.89
.87

12

_
-

12
9

-

21
2
19
9

147
2
145
4

40
14
3 : 8
37
6
1
2

697
—
524
414
86

1.27
1.38
1.24
1.26
1.11

1
1
i
|

-

10
10
10
-

15
15
15
-

6
2
4
4

14
2
12
4
8

40
35

.84
.82

!
i

_
-

8
8

18
18

7
5

2
2

243
47
196
27
119
50

1.13
1.28
1.10
1.42
i 1.03
1.08

!

_
-

-

11
1
10

_
-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

11

1.68

Guards........ .......................•••••...... .
Nonmanufacturing............. ....... ...........
Finance ** ..................................

75
22
13

1.38
1717
1.04

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men)
........ .
Manufacturing ................... ,...........
Nonmanufacturing..... ........ .................
Public utilities * ................... .
Wholesale trade........... ....................
Retail trade ........................ .

10.81
320
861
161
102
382
88
128

Services ............ ................... •••••
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) ..............
Manufacturing............................... .
Nonmanufacturing ......... ......

Order fillers (men) ..................
Manufacturing........ .........................
Nonmanufacturing .................... ...........
Wholesale trade ........................... .
Retail trade .......... ........ ....... .

r m

Order fillers (women) ............. ............ .
Manufacturing.............................. .
Packers ......... ..... ....................... .
Manufacturing .. ............... .......... .
.
Nonmanufacturing..... .......................
Public utilities * ...........................
Wholesale trade............. ...........
Roffll 1
ft|TTr_T1T-1-*-^.T-_r-----_------Receiving clerks ............................... .
Nonmanufacturing .......................... .....
Wholes©!© t c c ©
ril

...

1.33
-xn-j
1.29 !
i 1.28 j
! 1.28 j

224
89
135
89
34

i 1.41 '
| 1.55
1.31 !
1.29 !
1.30

246
81--------| 165
| 87
j 57
j

—

Nonmanufacturing ................ ............ .
Wholesale trade............ ...................
Retail trade ..............................................................................................................

J
-

113
22
' 91
40
49

Shipping clerks................. .................

Shipping-and-receiving clerks.................

1.33
1.41
1.29
1.32
1.16

-

_
-

-

-

-

161
43
118
3
1
73
8
33

155
13
142
i26
; 20
j 66
!14
i 16

: 66
; 9
| 57
9
! 10
: 34
i 4

54
17
37
8
25

i3 | 5
- j 1
13 ! 4
2
13

41 1106
53 i 78
i 29 ; 2 0 ' 37
58
8
! 24
4
! 8
46
3 ! 6
3
14
1
3
; 2

9
17
12
5

2
2

2

1

_

-

_

_

24
1
23

31
24
1 ! 23
31

11
11

34
34

24
8
16

20
8
12

10
6
4

22
1

19
4

22
9

1
10

18
16

8
g

12

12
7
5
27
5

2
2
1
1

2
- ; - ! 2
2
- !

10
10
$
5

9
2
7
4
3

13
1
12
3
9

10
10
5
5

9
2
7

3
3

13
2
11
9
2

8

-

-

7

16

1

-

-

5
5

-

7
7

16
10
6

1
1

3

42
39
2

26

75 ; 49
15
4
71
34
67
32
2
4

2

9

9

2
-

91

1
,

1
1

;

2

1

2
-

|

2
"

2

!
i

4
_
_
-

1
|
|
1
1

-

10
_
-

- 1 - | - j ITH

-

-

_

_

_

_ ! _

_
-

-

_

_

4

- : 3

_

_ i - ! I

-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_ :

_
_
_ 1
_
_
_
_

4

_ | _ ;
- , _ :
_
_
- 1
-

_
_
_
- | _ ! _
- ; _
_
-

-

4

- ; _

-

_
-

11
_
: 11
76
7
4
-

1

_

_
_
_
_
-

- ■ -

-

-

91
79
12
12
-

10
1
9
5
4

7
1
6
6
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

,

-

_

-

_
_
_

_

_
_

-

-

1
1
_
-

_
_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5 ; 29
2
5
27

2
2

4

1
1

_
-

1
1

_

4

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

- ' -

-

_

_

-

17
17

8
1
7

9

1

-

-

13
13

_ ! -

_

1

-

2 ;
2 :
-

-

9

2
2

-

_
_
_
-

5

_

-

2
-

2

80

-

7

3

2

8

1

16
2
14
10
4

28
8
20
20

38
32
6
6

I

16
2
14
4
6

10

8
5
3

12
4
8
6
2

1

8
4
4

24
12
12

15
14
1

-

-

-

3

12

21
21
11
10
11 ■ 10
2
10
8

-

1

_
-

9
6
3

42

3
2
1

9

-

22
14
8
8
-

13
8
5
5
-

106
26

26
2
24
19
5

H ; 47
- 1 8
14 ! 39
4
19
20
10

-

-

6

36
4
-

55 - 98
8
11
87
47
28
76
7
3

-

6
- ! 6
2 [

2
_
2
1
-

_
-

-

9

; 7 ;
_
- ■ 1
- 1 1 : -

36
4
32
22
10

9

-

1

-

-

-

_

_

_
-

5

-

8
8

2

-

-

4
4

24

-

-

-

_ ! 24
-

-

i ; 1 i 4 ; 2
4
2 , - ! 2
2
2 1 1 ! 1 ! 2 : -

_

-

-

-

4

-

-

_

j 45
- 8
! 37
: 8
: 15
: 4
10

and
1.30 1.35 |1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85; 1.90! 1.95 2.00 over

-

7
4 ! 1
2
2
4 : 1 ; 2
1 : 2 ! 2
1

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

_

-

_

-

"

9975K I

_

-

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) ...

RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
J
$
|
$
!
$
:
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 11.35 lo40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75! I.8 0 ;1.85 1.90 1 . 9 5 ; 2 . 0 0

1

'

-

10
1

-

-

3
1
2

_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_ | _

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

10
10

16

-

10

-

~

9

2

-

-

6
6
6 ! 1
5
- ;
5

12
12
j

-

-

;
■

-

4
4

_
-

1

—

!

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

!

29
2
27
24
2

27
14
13
3
4

:

6
6
-

17
12
5 ■
-

3
2
1
-

|

4

|

4
3

2
_
-

1

;

2
2

!

1
1

;

_

_

■ ' -

2

:

~

'

'

'

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10.

Table A-*:

G u& todicU , W a te U o u liM J f, a n d S A iflfU H f OcCU fia t i O iti - G onti4U4M &
(A verage h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s 2 / s t u d ie d on an a r e a
b a s i s in D en v er, C o l o ., by in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , November 1 9 5 1 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
:
$
$
$
$
$
$
i
$
$
$
$
I
t
Aver g
ae
1.35' 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 l.SOj 1.35 1.90 1 .9 5 |2 . 0 0
h u l Under 0.75 0.80 :0.85 0 . 9 0 jo.95 1 . 0 0 1.05 jl. 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 ;
ory
erig
anns
_ 1 _
%
- I0.75 .30' .85 .9° .9511.00 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 . 2 0 .1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 !1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 jover

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and industry division

*
1.28
1.27
1.28
1.35

1,808
252“

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d .......... .......
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ....................
Public utilities * ..........................
Wholesale trade............................
Retail trade ...............................

1 ,5 2 6

778
364
384

1 .1 8

1.24

1

-

21
1
20

4
^ 1

20

21

21
3
- 1 10
11
3

18

24
24
12
12

12
6

6

43 170
33 r ~ 3
10 i
167
- ; 27
- ;i25

64
3
61
35
25

1

10

15
1

Truck drivers, light (under 1^ tons) ...............
Manufacturing................................ .
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Public utilities » ..........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail trade ...............................
Services ................... ...............

Truck drivers, medium ( ^ to and including 4 tons) ...
1Manufacturing ..................................
Nonmanufacturing................. .............
Public utilities * ..........................
Wholesale trade .............................
Potn 1T t T i o lrfrlTT1TTT1T....__r---TtlI-r-T..T
.»^

718
--- ~%9~
629
263
207
148

1 .2 2

1.31

-

1 .2 1

8

1.33
1.16
1.07
1.33

11

8

-

978
176
802
352
413
35

1.33
1.41
1.32
1.38
1.26

337

r

1.45
1.31
1.45
1.55

8

32
32
32

16
20
16
10
1 0 : i6
•
“

,2 0
-

_
-

1

- i -

2
2

-

12

13
13
13
-

34
34
30
4

12

18

319
154
96 ; 1 . 2 4
69 j 1 . 5 6

Wholesale trade ........... »................
Pafail +y» ^a
h

22

49

74

132

1

j

1
2

4 ;130 !
-1
i 4 !130 1
130 I 4 ! 130 '
2
130

-

1

_

_

1

3
-

2
2

2

-

1

1

6

703
39
664
452
8 I 23
6
189

188
174

93
24
69
16
37
16

10
2
8
8

“

82 _J7_i0 4 8 j 103 _50_jL39^
2
17
11
12
14
3
92 i 47 ! 27
65 35 134
- 104
22
80
26
2
2
20 j 10 t
43 14
5
- 2 1 , 28
1
1 1 15
6
- !

7 ' 75
2

299
111

28

7

21

1
6
1

7
4
3

1
1

-

5
-

18
18
16
-

6

2

4

-

-

1 - j
4 1 4 i - !
_ j
!
j

6
1

5
-

! 25

5

4
~

j "
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ....
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................

31

-

-

4
! 2
- ! 2
-

1

6

8

2
2

1 .3 8

19
13 1

130 75
5 12
125 63
24 50
63 1 0
38
3

I 69
! 13
I 56
i

20
12
8
6

_
-

1
1

1

-

1

2

- !
_

-

49
25 j _
95 1 6 6 185 1 0 6
16
14
97
4
4
2 1 ! 35
95 1 5 0 181 : 9 i 2 1
- 2 2 1 72 103 150
1
2 0 j 38
20
20
19 ! 1 2
i 1
3
11
9
9

1 15
i 11
4 '
i 4
i

- ; -

_
_
_

_
_

! - j - 1 _
_
-

-

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
i

1
1

_
-

1

,

36
15

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

-

! ! j

- i “

3
3

-

1
1

‘
20

- 1 _
- !2 0
_
_
_ :2 0

_

-

_
_

24

1 20

-

-

24

_ 1 20

_

_

j
! 39

26

12

-

-

-

-

- j -

39

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

39

_

26

- ' -

, 12
26
_

_

-

“

53 1 0 4
53 104
48
62
4
42

12

31
-

5

2

12

5

2

6

25

-

22
3

_

01

_

_

5

on
iK
&J

_

9
9

_
Q
7

2

12

1

j
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Public utilities * ..........................

30
28
23

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ......... .............
Manufacturing.................................
MAnmonnfa n+
nt
r
.... _*
O a |A
O*
( ( ii|iriiillI?TT“T__-

157
a
116
73

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .............
Nonmanufacturing ..............................

84
33

-

1.44
1.44
1.47
!
!
1.37 i l
1.30
1.40
1.39
i
i
i

_
-

-

-

“

“

.

_
-

-

_
-

12
12

-

4
-

3
1
2
2

1

19
5
14
10

15
2
13
13

71
3
68
30

“

10
5
5
4

L
j

_
-

4
4
~

14

“

~

_
-

-

2
-

16
5

1
1
-

4

3
2
1
1

1
1

12
10

12
12

-

5
5

_
9
- '9
“ ;9
7 10
7 !10
10

; 2
, 2 t
2

! -

-

- ;

-

-

_

_

_
j

-

~

1

1
1

-

1

_

1.39 i

1
1;

9
8

27
9
8
15 !
1
12;
- i 1
! 8
1
3

i
1
i

32
-

-

8
8

_
1 _

_

.
_

1 "
:

1
1

-

!
- !

" j

i
Watchmen ........................................
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing........ ................ .....
Public utilities * ..........................
Uhn] A q 1n t " a A
.n
.pd
__
Pa Ua i1 trad...•tiTTT____....._ ____ tt -_ T,
_
_

!
!
i

124
73
51
12
15
15

1.05
1.04
1.05
1.30
1.18
.91

8
8
1
_
4

7
4
3
-

5
3
2
-

1

1/
2/
*

E x c lu d e s premium pay f o r o v e r tim e and n i g h t work.
S tu d y l im it e d t o men w orkers e x c e p t where o t h e r w is e i n d ic a t e d .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m u n ication , and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




7
6
1
1

10
17
12 ! 6 !
5 , 4 ;
- , i i
4
•
I 3

6
5
1
-

1
1
|
!
j

1
j

2
1
1
_
1

I

2i

10
10
- 1
_

1
1

4
4

1
1
1

2
3
- ,3 s2
3
!2

1

;
1 --- 1
-

_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

1

1

!

11.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
M o cltiH & U f 9 ttA u A frlied 1 /

Table B-35*

N m e Ae a e
u b r vrg
o
f
hul
ory
w res erig
okr
anns

Occupation 2/

2/

Assemblers, class B 4/a ....................
Electricians, maintenance 4/a...............
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/b, 5/ .
•
Engine-lathe operators, class A JU/b... T.....
Milling-machine operators, class"A 4/b ......
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/a, 5 . ..
/
Drill-press operators, radial, class B 4/a ...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class B 4/a ..................
Engine-lathe operators, class B i / .........
ia
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4/b . . •
.. •
Machinists, production 4/a .................
Stock handlers and t
ruclcers, hand 4/a .........

66
20
229
5
6
34
194
2
7

$
1.52
1.70
1.89
1.76
1.86
1.57
1.52

31
33
30
95
28

1.50
1.55
1.36
1.69
1.37

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
>
$
j . 0 i . 5 1. 0 f.35 f.40 f.4 5 1. 0 I.55 i.«0 i. 5 f.70 1.75 i.80 i.85 i.90 i.95 ^.00 ^.05 ^ .10 * . 5* . 0 $ 5 * . 0 2 3 2.40
f2 f2 $3
5
2 1 2 2 ; 2.2 1 2 3 * . 5
6
j
and
i
'
;
.0
,5
.0
.0
l4
i . 5 1.30 1*35 | . 0 1.45 1.50 1• 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80|l.85 1.90 1-95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 2 ! 2.25 2 3 i 2.35 2 4 ! over
l2
1

1

_

j
-1
-i
| -;

! 8

!
-

8

1

i -

3

-;
| 2; -

6
2
13 i
2

24
1

11

10

11

5
2
21 ! 2
6
12
1
4
_
3
2
3 , 26 17
6
15
3 ! 9 i 5! 6

1
51
t
4
1
4
-|
* 20 i
*

4
6
-.

6
4
_
3
1
-| 2

3
4I 2
21 22
_
3
6
2
9 22
1
21
1 17
4
25 47
'

"

'

2
7
18
5
3
4
1
1

3i
11
9
8
_

*j 1
8
2
1

1

2
3
15
5
3
i

2
2
10
2

1

1

_

_

_

_

12
2
5
5

4

5
1
1
1

10
3
2
1

1

i

1
2

!

:
!

:

1

:

8
!
1
2
1

J

-

8 12
|
1
! 2

-

8
1

-

-

“
I

-

7
1

«

1
l
!
11

1
]
H
1l
5
3
|
2
|

~

A

:

7

J
1

___ L

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 945 edi­
1
tion) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2f Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
ij
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
( ) All or predominantly time workers.
a
( ) All or predominantly incentive workers.
b
2/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




Table B^.0:

Occupation 2/

Carpenters, maintenance .......
Electricians, maintenance .... .
Helpers, trades, maintenance . . .
..
Janitors, porters, and cleaners .
,
Machinists, maintenance .......
Painters, maintenance ....... ,
Pipe fitters, maintenance .....
Sheet-metal workers, maintenance .
Stock handlers a d truckers, hand
n

R c t i b u U U

&

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$ !
$
$
$
$
$ |
$
N m e Aeae %
u b r vrg
l7
l5
o
f
hul 1.35 1.40 1.45 j . 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 | . 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
ory
anns
w res erig and
okr
1under " |- 1y
l6
1.55 1.60 | . 5 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.9 -2.00
5
lt4C 1.45 1.50 1
1
i
s
%
: 12
10
6 26
5
4
1.83
_
1 -|
-!
94
1.94
- i 84 10
-1 2
-i
2 6 :1 2 9 138
i
295
1.63
-; 1!
-|
-i
1
2 45 | - i
5
8
1.43
1 200
200
1.93
_
- ! 25
i :
2 I 6 18
1.88
5
1
_
- 30
-1 -;
1
1.93
3
1
_
-:
- 69
1
70
1.93
422
1.56
- 72 340 10

1/ The study covered railroads (Group JO with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
U)
(1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
JJ
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

12.

9 n

&

1
$
1

Table B-63:

4 4 /u

42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00;
90.00 95.00

Average 2/

Nme
ubr
o
f

>

e

G

1/

&

w

eii s U

s

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$

$

$

I
$

el
Wel
e k y Weky 30.00 32.50 35.00[37
anns
hus erig and
or
(tnad (tnad under
Sadr) Sadr)

$

8
0d
&

Occupation and sex

4i u

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

S

81.
10

32.50 35.00 37.50 ;40.00 i 2 .50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52,50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65,00 67,50 70.00 72.50 75,00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
4,

[

:

Men
Clerks, accounting ..................
Clerks, general ....................
Section heads .................. .

!
|
6
6
46

$
39.5
39.5
39.0

50.00
62.00
81.00

-

-i

-(

1

1

1

!
-!

“

”

*

~

”,

”

2

2
1

”

1
”

1
“

1j
-I
-

1
2

2
2

2

1
5

-

5!

_

_

4

1
2

5

_

4

3 3 /1 0

i
J

1

Women

I
j

_

j
l

Clerks, accounting .................
Clerks, file, class B .............
Key-punch operators ................
Premium acceptors ..................

67
46
42
29
S*rHon hAsHu ,tlt,,,,ITtItTT-T..TT.-TTTg,
13
Stenographers, general .............. I 73
Typists, class A ................... i 46
Typists, class B ................... j 111

39.0 ' 43.00
38.5 36.00
39.5 40.50
39.5 40.50
38.5 74.00
39.0 44.50
39.5 42.00
39.0 37.00

_
7

_
5

5
11
5
2
2
2
21

19
4
11
12
5
8
45

1
23
6
6

6

13

81

-

1

-;

4
4

9

21
2

_

16
5
8!
5;
12 |
19

1

4
3

13
3

8

1

13
13
5

2

1

3

1i

1

_

-1
_

2
1
1

3
21

2

-

i
2

2
4
4

I

1

2!

-

l
1

-

2

-j
_
2

_

1
2

-

_
_!

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
T
i

_

_

_(

2

_,
_
_;
n'
_I

_
0
-

!

i

1/ The study covered insurance carriers (Group 63 with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19h9 edition) prepared by the Bureau o t Budget.
)
f he
7/ Hours reflect the workweek for which e q l y e receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
spoes
2/ Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $95.00 - $100.00; k at $100.00 - $105.00; 3 at $105*00 - $110.00; 1 at $130.00 - $135.00.




Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

13

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-15

R u ild U u f

Table c-205: liahesiied - Continued

Q o n d P iu c t ie n

January 2 1952
,
Rate
per
hour

Electricians (inside wiremen) and
fixture hangers ..................

Building laborers ................
Table C-205: & a h &
July 1 1951
,
Classification

Hours
per
week

13.000
2.350

Classification

40
40

2.650
2.390
3.300
2.650
1.575

40
40
40
40
40

U U

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen ........ ............... $1,620
1.530
Dough mixers, ovenmen............
Bench hands ....................
1.480
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Foremen ....................... 1.620
Dough mixers, spongers, ovenmen .....
1.530
Bench hands, machine operators ......
1.480
Hebrew baking - Cake and pastry:
Foremen ....................... 1.620
Dough mixers, spongers, ovenmen .....
1.530
1.480
Bench hands, machine operators ......
Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A
:
Machine captains ............ .
1.525
Head sponge and sweet mixers .....
1.470
Bakers .... ................. 1.435
1.470
Peelers ....................
Mixers, rollermen, drawmen .......... 1.415
Mixers' helpers ............... 1.310
Stackers ....................
1.310
1.310
General helpers ( e ) ..........
mn
Packing and icing departments:
Icing mixers ............... 1.415
Wrapping-machine set-up men •
••••• 1.360
Floormen ..................
1.255
Women employees:
Working supervisors .......
1.195
Sponge packers..... ...... 1.140
Bundlers, machine operators,
hand bundlers, scalers, and
1.110
weighers ..........
Agreement B
:
Baking department:
1.460
Machinemen, sponge........ .
Machinemen, sweet ...........
1.440
1.400
Peelers, ovenmen, sponge.....
1.380
Ovenmen (
sweet), sponge re i f a n
lete
1.330
Dough mixers, rollermen ......
1.260
Dough feeders ..............




Hours
per
week
48
48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

July 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement B - Continued
:
Baking department:
Mixers' helpers ............ $1,230
Sponge overmen's helpers ......
1.220
Pan greasers ............... 1.200
Icing room:
Machinemen; jelly, cream
and icing mixers ..........
1.330
Jelly, cream and icing
mixers' helpers ...........
1.180
Packing department:
Wrapping and labeling machinemen . 1.400
Wrapping and labelingmachine helpers ...........
1.230
General helpers (women):
First month ................
.870
Next 2 months ..............
.910
.
950
Second 3 months ........... ..
Third 3 months ....... ......
.990
Thereafter ................
1.030
General helpers (men):
.980
First month ...............
Next 2 months ..............
1.030
Second 3 months ............
1.070
Third 3 months...... .......
1.110
Thereafter .......... ......
1.160
Table C-27: P ^ i n
July 1 1951
,

- Continued

Table c-27:

July 1 1951
,
Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

U u ^

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops:
Bindery women................. .. $1,225
Bookbinders ....................
2.105
Compositors, hand ................
2.275
Electrotypers ................ .
2.375
Machine operators ...............
2.275
Machine tenders (machinists) .......
2.350
2.270
Mailers............... .......
2.400
Photoengravers ..................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press ...............
1.750
Platen press .................
1.011
Pressmen, cylinder ............... 2.275
Pressmen, platen ................
2.090
Stereotypers ...................
2.412

40
40
40
40
40

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work .......
Compositors, hand - night work ......
Machine operators - day work .......
Machine operators - night work ......

36 2/3
36 2/3
36 2/3
36 2/3

2.714
2.837
2.714
2.837

40
40
40
40
40
40
36 2/3
37 1/2

Rate
per
hour

Classification
Newspapers: - Continued
Machine tenders (machinists) day work ..........................
Machine tenders (machinists) night work ........................
Mailers - day work ..................
Mailers - night work ................
Photoengravers - day work ............
Photoengravers - night work ..........
Pressmen, web presses - day work .....
Pressmen, web presses - night work ....
Offside color men - day ...........
Offside color men - night .........
Pressmen-in-charge - day work ........
Pressmen-in-charge - night w o r k .....
Stereotypers - day w o r k .......... .
Stereotypers - night work ............

Table c-41: J le c a l

$2,714
2.837
2.063
2.183
2.647
2.780
2.360
2.543
2.433
2.621
2.493
2.686
2.553
2.673

Hours
per
week

36 2/3
36
37
37
37
37
37
35
37
35
37
35
37
37

2/3
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

O fietoU intj ZntfU odfeed
October 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

Classification
1-man cars, busses, and trolley coaches:
First 3 months .................
4-12 months ....................
13-18 months ...................
19-24 months ...................
After 2 years ..................

T le c-42: M atosifrutck
ab

2 )biaebd
July 1 1951
,

Classification

$1,380
1.390
1.400

1.410
1.420

Hours
per
week
48
48
48
48
48

<and Jfelp eed
Rate
per
hour

Bakery:
Retail - chain store ............. $1,310
Wholesale:
First month .................. 1.063
After 1 month ................
1.260
Biscuit:
Agreement A .................
1.458
Agreement B .................. 1.240
least:
First 3 months ................
1.283
Thereafter ..................
1.453

Hours
per
week
40
48
48
48
40
44
44

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

14.

Table C-42:

M < U o * f r l 4 4 c k

Table C-42:

S b ' U O & l d

<Htd <Jfeip&ll - Continued
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40

40
40
40
40
60
44

40
48
48
48
48
44
44

Classification

o t o Sl&Utck

2 > H a e * d

<ud <Jfetp&id - Continued
4

July 1 1951
,

Beer*
Breweries ..................... ♦1.460
Distributor ..................... 1.510
1.410
Building:
Construction:
Dump trucks:
1.650
Less than 6 yards ...........
1.750
6 yards or more ........ ....
Euclid, Koehring, lumber carriers,
semi-water tanks, semitrailer, and
1.800
similar trucks to 13 yards .....
1.900
Over 13 yards ..............
1.650
Flat rack service truck .........
2.050
Low-boy trucks ...............
1.550
Helpers ....................
Pickup trucks ...............
1.550
2.050
Tandem Euclid - and similar equipment
Concrete Mixer:
1.800
To 5 cubic yards ............
1.900
Over 5 cubic yards ..........
Material:
Brick:
1.250
First 30 days ..............
Thereafter ................
1.365
Building material drivers:
1.400
First 30 days ..............
1.500
Thereafter ................
Sand, gravel, and ready-mix
concrete:
Mixertruck drivers:
1.700
Under 5 yards .........
1.850
Over 5 yards ..........
Sand, gravel, and mortar (under
15 tons):
First 30 days ............ 1.400
1.500
Thereafter ..............
Structural steel and iron:
1.290
First 3 months ...........
1.340
Second 3 months ..........
1.460
Thereafter ..............
Limber dealers:
Truck drivers ............ 1.325
1.100
Paper - wholesale:
1.100
First 3 months ...........
1.200
Second 3 months ..........
1.350
Thereafter ..............
Plumbing supplies:
1.155
First 3 months ...........
1.305
After 3 months ...........
1.350
Cheese
1.100
Cleaners and dyers .................
1.400
Fish (after 90 days) ...............
Furniture - retail:
Agreement A
:
1.350
First 6 months ...............
1.230
Helpers ....................
1.440
After 6 months ...............
1.290
Helpers....►................
1.150
1.000




Table C 4 2
-.:

3>liae*.d

<md cMelpetod - Continued

July 1 1951
,
Classification

A f a t o * t * U C &

July 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

General:
Freight:
Local pickup and delivery ........ ♦1.320
Short-line or local runs .........
1.320
Winch trucks .................. 1.520
Package delivery:
Furniture ....................
1.230
Helpers ...................
1.100
Panel drivers .................
1.260
Panel drivers with hoppers .......
1.200
Pickup and bulk ...............
1.220
1.050
Helpers ...................
Transfer:
Heavy moving:
1.420
2-5 tons ..................
1.470
5 tons and over .......... \ ...
Low - bed, 20,000 pounds pay '
1.570
load or over ..............
Winch trucks .............. .
. 1.570
Helpers:
First 4 months .......... .. 1.160
After 4 months ............
1.420
Grocery and coffee:
Agreement A
:
First 6 months ................
1.255
Thereafter ...................
1.440
Agreement B
:
Wholesale:
First 4 months............ .
. 1.180
Second 8 months ............ .
. 1.240
Thereafter .................
1.410
Household goods:
Van drivers:
Less than 4 months .............
1.360
Helpers ...................
1.160
After 4 months .............. .. 1.420
1.270
Helpers ...................
Piano movers ...... ............ 1.470
Helpers ...................
1.370
Ice - route drivers .................
1.240
Liquid carbonic ............. .......
1.430
Meat - wholesale:
First month ..................... 1.250
Second month...................
1.310
Third month......... ..........
1.360
After 3 months ................ .
1.410
Milk:
Wholesale relief salesmen:
4-8 months ...................
1.081
After 8 months ................
1.210
Light special delivery ............
1.040
Heavy special delivery ............
1.140
Route salesmen selling to
Government reservations ..........
1.150
Outdoor advertising .................
1.400
Printing and publishing:
Routemen ..... ................ .
1.438
Produce:
First 90 days ................. .
1.100
90 days to 1 year.............. .
1.200
1.320
After 1 year...... ..............

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Railway express:
Drivers ( ^-5 tons) .............. ♦1.680
1
Helpers ....... .............. .
1.594
Soap ...................................... 1.260
Transfer:
Local cartage:
Less than 4 months:
Under 2 tons ............... 1.160
2 tons and over ............
1.210
1.060
Helpers .............. .
After 4 months:
1.320
Under 2 tons ...............
2 tons and over ............
1.370
Helpers................... 1.220
Wine and liquor:
1.220
First 4 months..................
1.280
Second 4 months.................
Thereafter .....................
1.340

Hours
per
week
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
Table C-541:
44
44

Q/l&OeSUf

S t & U e d

November 1 1951
,
Rate
per
hour

Classification
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Managers ........................ ♦1.840
Assistant store managers .............
1.630
Head clerks ............................... 1.650
Clerks..................................... 1.555
Apprentice clerks:
First three months ............... 1.070
Second three months ............... 1.130
Second six months ...............
1.190
1.260
Third six months ................
Fourth six months ...............
1.340

Hours
per
week
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

40
40
40
40
40

Table C-542: M

& c U

M

x

Za J

m

U

November 1 1951
,
54
54
40
40
54
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Managers ( r head meat cutters) ....... ♦1.820
o
Journeymen meat cutters .............
1.740
Apprentice meat cutters:
1.070
First six months ................
1.130
Second six months ...............
Third six months ................ . 1.200
1.270
Fourth six months ...............
1.440
Third year .....................

Hours
per
week
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

15

D:

Entrance Rates

Table D-ii Minimum Znlsvance Rate*

Minimum rate (in cents)

Plant Wa>JzesU 1/

Percent of plant workers in establishments with
All
specified minimum rates in industries
Public
2/
Manufacturing utilities* Wholesale Retail trade Services
trade

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-ii
All establishments ............

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

•
_
_
6.8
6*0
4.4
21.0
1.6
2.0
n.i
1.6
6.7
3.2
7.1
20.4
3.3
4.8
-

_
_
_
_
19.3
.
3.9
7.9
11.4
8.0
7.9
1.0
12.7

2.6
3.4
5.8
_
1.1
2.1
2.4
22.1
_
.
9
15.8
12.9
2.7
5.0
1.4
3.0
1.3
-

Under 55 ......... ...........
55 .........................
Over 55 and under 60 ...........
6 0 .........................
Over 60 and under 65 ...........
65 .........................
Over 65 and under 70 ...........
70 .........................
Over 70 and under 75 ...........
75 .........................
Over 75 and under 80 ...........
8 0 .........................
Over 80 and under 85 ...........
85 .........................
Over 85 and under 90 ...........
9 0 .........................
Over 90 and under 95 ...........
9 5 ..... ...................
Over 95 and under 100 ..........
100...... ..................
Over 100 and under 105 .........
105............ ...........
Over 105 and under 110 .........
n o ........................
Over 110 and under n5 .........
115 ........................
Over 115 and under 120 .,........
120........................
Over 120 and under 125 .........
125........................
Over 125 and under 130 .........
130........................
Over 130 and under 135 .........
135 ........................
Over 135 and t n e 14.0.........
idr

1.1
4.0
1.9
.8
.7
1.6
1.1
.8
_
H.7
(2/)
7.2
7.9
6.5
4.0
2.6
.7
.3
1.9
3.3
.
5
.4
1.4
2.9
1.4
1.5
3.7 '
1.5
n.3
2.9
2.7
.8
.
5
.
3
.
5

_
_
_
4.8
15.4
5.8
1.6
2.7
1.1
1.6
1.2
1.0
2.1
2.0
2.5
1.2
2.0
2.8
30.8
5.7
7.3
2.4
_
.6
1.1

Establishments with no established
minimum........... ..... ...

9.6

4.3

1/
men.
2/
2/
*

-

-

5.8
.8
1.3

-

3.4
39.4
1.8
10.7
4.5
21.1
5.8
.8
.
1
1.2
.
1.1
1.2
1.2
-

20.0

17.5

7.7

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watch- .
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




S h i f t 3 > iffe s ie M tic U P A o a U io n i.

100.0

Shift differential

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments .............

Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in All
Machinery
manufacturing
industries 1/
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift

14.6

_ 5*3__
_

22.5

4.2

Receiving shift differentials ....

14.4

5.3

21.5

4.2

Uniform cents (per hour) .....
3 cents ................
4 cents ....... .........
5 cents ................
6 cents .................
7 cents ................
T - cents................
i
7£ cents ................
8 to 10 cents ............
12 cents ................
Over 12 cents ............

14.4
5.3
.
5
3.3
1.0
.
5
.
1
2.4
.
3
.
9
.1

5.3
4.2

21.5
-

4.2

-

-

-

.
1
.
3
(2/)
.2
.5

2.1
_
16.8
2.6
-

-

(2/)

1.0

Receiving no differential.... .

.
2

-

.
.
2
2/4.0
-

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
2/ 1 - cents.
2£

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF OFFICE
Weekly hours

Al
l
idsre
nutis

100.0

All establishments ...............
Under 35 hours ..................
35 hours ......................
Over 35 and under 37£ hours ........
3?£ hours .....................
Over y i \ and under 40 hours ........
40 hour8 ......................
.
Over A D and under A hours .........
A
A hours ......................
A
Over A and under 48 hours .........
A
48 hours ......................
.
Over A and under 5- hours .........
S
4
5. hours ......................
4
Over 5A hours ..................

Mn f c u i g
auatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

100.0

S c l t & d u l & d

tyJj&eJzlif

J l o u k l

WORKERS EMPLOYED I —
N

Wo e a e
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

Rti tae
eal rd

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Fnne*
iac*

100.0

- 100.0

Al
l
idsre 2 M n f c u i g
nutis / a u a t r n

Srie
evcs

100.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.1
82.6
1.0
10.7
2.3
.
9
.4
-

.
89.3
9.2
1.5
_

6.5
6.2
2.2
72.0
2.5
7.5
3.1
.
_
_

_
9.4
10.7
79.2
_

-

_
-

3.7
75.4
.
9
1.24
6.4
1.2
_
_

.7

_
_
_

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Q/)

0.8
3.5

_
_
52.1

0.1
0.6
1.2
3.7
A.2
78.6
.
8
7.9
2.A
.
5
.
1
-

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

13.5
_
4.6
4.6
54.8
_
16.1
3.0
3.4

.4

1.6
52.5
.
3
11.2
5.7
22.7
2.4
2.7
.
4

_

66.2
13.9
4.0
10.3
1.3

4.8
30.5
1.6
11.0

_

_
_

_
_

_

63.2

41.6

4.7
22.8
3.4
1.8
4.1

7.8
6.8
35.1
4.9
2.4
1.4

0.7
.
6
1.2
4.4
24.5
4.1
35.6
28.9

'
1/
2/
2/
*
**

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than . of 1 percent.
05
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3:

P

a

i cd M

o' dil

a

y i'
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED INNumber of paid holidays

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

W o eae
h l sl
tae
rd

M nfcuig
auatrn

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100 .
C

100.0

95.0

80.3

97.7

96.7

99.1

100.0

98.6

76.5

1 to 5 days .................

.8

6 days .....................
6£ days ....................

54.7
(/
2 )

_
73.5
-

All establishments ...............
Establishments providing paid
holidays ....................

Rti tae
eal rd

2.0

.1

.6

25.4
-

67.1
-

.8

30.0

22.6

4.3

42.3

2.5
2.5

99.0
-

27.7
4.8
18.9

7 days .....................

12.8
14.6

8£ days ....................
9 days .....................
10 days ....................
11 days ....................

.
5
3.0
1.5
7.1

-

-

-

-

1.7

-

-

-

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ....................

5.0

19.7

2.3

3.3

.
9

1/
2/
*
**

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than . 5 of 1 percent.
0
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

4.3
58.9
.8

22.3
12.3

-

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

100.0

100 .
c

100.0

100.0

100.0

83.7

54.7

82.9

83.9

45.2

2.4
71.1
2.4
7.8

7.3
-

5.8
73.3
3.0

5.8
78.1
~

8.3
34.7
1.3

Al . , a u a t r n
l
idsre ±J M n f c u i g
nutis

Al
l
idsre
nutis

4.1
61.2
4.9
6.2
.1

24.8
22.6

.8

12.8
6.6

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

28.6

-

-

-

-

-

1.4

23.5

16.3

45.3

17.1

Rti tae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

,9

-

-

-

-

-

-

16.1

54.8

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4:

P a id TJ/G&cUlosii, (tyotwH&l P/umm aojiA
A
’)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation policy

All establishments ....................

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Mnfcuig
auatrn

100.0

100.C

100.0

99.6

99.0

100.0

38.1
60.1
1.4
(2/)

29.7
69.1
.2

57.1.
42.9
-

.4

1.0

-

99.6

99.0

100.0

100.0

98.7

13.8
.8
83.6
1.4
(2/)

18.4
1.1
79.3
.2

3.0
97.0
-

26.3
2.5
71.2
“

.4

1.0

-

-

99.6

99.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Al
l
cuig
i d s r e 1/ Manufa t r n
nutis

Pbi
ulc
uiiis*
tlte

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti t a e
eal r d

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.7

98.8

100.0

100.0

95.6

93.3

80.5
.6
16.6
(2/)
-

92.3
.7
5.8
-

72.6
2.6

62.2
_
37.8
-

76.8
_
18.8
-

77.4
_
15.9
_
-

2.3

1.2

-

4-4

6.7

99.4

97.7

98.8

100.0

100.0

95.6

93.3

14.6
.6
84.2
-

52.2
6.5
39.0
(2/)
-

72.5
9.7
16.6
-

24.3
17.2
58.5
-

42.4
3.0
54.6
-

43.4
52.2
-

59.7
1.8
31.8
-

.6

2.3

1.2

-

-

4.4

6.7

100.0

99.4

97.7

98.8

100.0

100.0

95.6

93.3

94.0
6.0

10.7
.6
88.1
-

10.4
2.3
82.3
2.0
-

100.0
-

-

4.9
14.6
77.9
2.6
_
-

18.8
_
69.4
1.2
6.2

-

.8
98.0
-

-

.6

2.3

1.2

-

99.4

97.7

98.8

100.0

10.7
79.9
8.8
-

10.4
58.0
1.2
28.1
“

.8
68.8
29.2
-

4.9
57.1
6.0
32.0
~

.6

2.3

1.2

“

Rti tae
eal rd

Finance**

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.7

100.0

99.4

41.3
58.7
-

80.6
18.1
-

.7
93.3
6.0
-

46.2
_
53.2
-

-

1.3

-

.6

100.0*

28.0
70.7
-

94.0
6.0
-

1.3

-

100.0

1 vear of service

Establishments with paid vacations ••••..
1 week ................. ...........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..•••......
2 weeks.................... ......
3 weeks.......... ............
Over 3 weeks..... ................
Establishments with no paid vacations ...

2 4 .8

-

2 vears of service

Establishments with paid vacations .....
1 week ............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ...........
2 weeks ...........................
3 weeks ............ ........ ......
Over 3 weeks ....... ..... ...... .
Establishments with no paid vacations ...
5 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......
1 week ................ ...........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 weeks ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........
3 weeks ...........................
Over 3 weeks ................. .
Establishments with no paid vacations •••

100.0

100.0

98.7

.6
98.2
.2

2.2
97.8
-

_
100.0

13.1
80.5

.4

1.0

-

99.6

99.0

2.7
(2/)
94.8
(2/)
2.1
(2/)

.3

-

4.8
-

-

1.3

.7

-

-

47.6
1.8
43.9
_
-

-

4.4

6.7

100.0

95.6

93.3

_
96.5
3.5
"

18.8
36.8
1.1
38.9

47.6
43.4
2.3

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations .....

100.0

100.0

98.7

100.0

_
89.3
10.7
-

13.1
32.6
53.0
-

_
43.4
56.6
-

Over 2 and under 3 weeks...........
3 weeks ........ ...................

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

“

1.3

2.7
56.1
_

.6
55.9
-

4 0 .8

(2/)

1 w e e k ...... .....................

4 2.3
.2

2.2
47.2
50.6
*
*

.4

1.0

-

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than . 5 of 1 percent.
0
* Transportation (excluding railroads^, communication, and other public utilities,
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




*
*

~
4.4

6.7

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id S i& k £ *4 2 4 *6

Table E-5:

(ty& U tuU P a 4MaU 404U )

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

Al
l
idsre
nutis

Manufacturing

Public
u iiis
tlte*

Wholesale
t ade
r

R t i trade
eal

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

34.9

49.8

43.3

24.2

9.4

46.3

2 days .............................
3 days .............................
4 d a y s .............................
5 days .............................
6 days .............................
7 days .............................
10 days ............................
11 days ............................
12 days ............................
15 days ............................

.5
7.1
.3
11.2
5.6
1.0
3.1
1.0
5.0
.1

48.8
1.0
-

31.7
1.3
2.6
1.4
.3
6.0
-

2.0
2.3
8.3
11.6
-

.8 '
3.3
1.7
.8
2.2
.6

_
20.9
4.1
2.0
4.1
15.2
-

65.1

50.2

56.7

75.8

90.6

53.7

38.4

51.2

43.3

31.7

16.1

49.2

All establishments ....................

Al
l
i d s r e 1/ Manufacturing
nutis

Public
u i i i s*
tlte

Wholesale
trade

Rti t
e a l rade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

12.0

2.1

31.1

27.1

13.3

1.1
5.4
.2
1.6
.8
1.4
.8
.7

2.1
-

20.0
1.6
2.8

5.8
8.8
_

1.6
5.4

9.4

_

100.0

88.0

1.1

15.1

Srie
evc*

100.0

6 months of service

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ...... ...........

.
-

-

_
_

1.4

-

_

.4.7
2.0
-

3.1
-

97.9

68.9

72.9

86.7

100.0

4.3

31.1

28.4

19.8

2.3

_
-

-

5.8
2.5
8.8
9.6

-

-

1.3
1.5
2.1

_
_
_

1 rear of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

2 days .............................
3 days .............................
4 days .............................
5 days .............................
6 days .............................
7 days ............................ .
8 days .............................
10 days ............................
11 days ............................
12 days ............................
15 days ............................
20 days ............................
Over 20 days .......................

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

_

_

.4
.2
.3
8.7
1.6
1.0
.1
10.2
1.0
12.4
.1
2.4
(2/)

34.0
-

.3
18.4
-

61.6

48.8

56.7

17.2
-

1.3
23.3
-

-

-

2.0
4.0
2.3
12.0
11.4

-

68.3

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
2.0

-

-

-

.8
7.7
1.2
1.3
2.2
.6
.3

-

83.9

-

4.1
-

4.9
4.1
36.1
-

50.8

_
1.1
-

98.9

.5
.8
.2
3.5
4.4
.4
2.3
2.1
.7
.2
(2/)

84.9

-

.

2.3
2.0
-

-

95.7

1.6
13.3
-

4.7
11.5
-

68.9

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2.7
_
1.6
8.6
-

1.1
2.1

_
_

2.3
_
-

-

-

_

1.7
-

1.5
2.1
_
.1

_

71.6

80.2

_
_

-

97.7

P aid S icJz JljKUMi ( tyotottcU PamMUhU ) - Ca*U i*U €ed

Table E-5

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ....................

Al
l
idsre
nutis

100.0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
u iiis
tlte*

Wholesale
t
rade

R t i tr d
eal ae

Finance**

Srie
evcs

Al
l
idsre j
nutis

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

43.3

31.7

16.1

49.2

1.1

15.1

2.0
4.0
2.3
7.0
2.5
13.9
-

2.0
7.7
1.2
2.1
2.2
.6
.3

4.1
4.9
4.1
36.1
-

Public
u i i i s*
tl t e

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.3

31.1

28.4

19.8

Manufacturing

Rti t
e a l rade

Srie
evoa

_ _

10 0 ,0

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

2 days .............................
4 d a y s ......................... .
5 days .............................
6 days .............................
7 days .............................
8 d a y s ............................ .
10 days ............................
11 days ............................
12 days ............................
15 days ............................
20 days ............................
■Over 20 days .......................

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

38*4

.4
.5
4.3
1.6
1.0
.1
13.6
1.0
11.8
1.2
2.9
(2/)

5 1.2

_
-

_

35.3
-

1.3
2.6
21.0
15.4
3.0
-

-

-

15 .9

_

_

-

_
1.1
~

.5
1.1
1.0
4.4
.4
4.6
2.1
.7
.3
(2/)

_

_

5 .8

2.1
2.0
.2
“

1.6
18.0
11.5
-

2.3

2.5
8.8
8.0
3.3
-

2.7
8.6
1.1
3.7
1.5
2.1
_
.1

2.3
_
_
_
_
-

61.6

48.8

56.7

68.3

83.9

50.8

98.9

84.9

95.7

68.9

71.6

80.2

97.7

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

39.2

51.2

43.3

31.7

22.3

49.2

1.1

15.9

4.3

31.1

28.4

22.4

2.3

2 days .............................
4 days .............................
5 days .............................
6 days .............................
7 days .............................
8 days .............................
10 day3 ............................
11 d a y s ........... .................
12 d a y s ..... ......................
15 days ............................
18 days ............................
20 days ............................
Over 20 days .......................

.4
.3
4.3
2.3
1.0
.1
9.5
1.0
11.8
4.6
.6
1.6
1.7

5.8
2.5
8.8
3.0
-

12.6
1.1
3.7
_

2.3
_
_
_
_
_

2.9
.4

-

-

-

_

1.4

-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................

60.8

71.6

77.6

5 years of service

l/
2/
*
**

_
15.9
35.3
-

_

2.0
4.0
2.3
7.0
2.5
-

-

-

7.6
6.3

2.9

56.7

68.3

77.7

-

-

48.8

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
13.3
1.2
2.1
2.2
.6

1.3
2.6
.3
15.4
20.7
3.0

_
4.1
4.9
4.1
36.1
-

_

1.1
-

“

50.8

98.9

.5
.2
1.0
5.7
.4
2.7
2.1
2.6
.2
.5

84.1

_
2.1
2.0
.2
-

_
1.6
4.7
11.5
13.3

-

-

-

-

“

95.7

68.9

1.5
2.1

-

97.7

20,

Table E-6:

M O nfL M ukuU iO H & 04U 4A & 1

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of bonus

Al
i
idsre
nutis

Mnfcuig
auatrn

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte*

Woeae
hlsl
tae
rd

Rti tae
eal rd

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Fnne*
iac*

Srie
evcs

Woeae
hlsl
ta e
rd

100.0

100.0
18.3

Rti t ae
eal rd

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

69.2

62.3

58.1
53.9

41.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ ....................

60.0

69.9

27.3

60.9

59.5

77.1

71.3

55.6

59.7

42.2
13.9
10 .
4

35.3
34.0
.
5

25.7
1.6
-

58.9
8.0
12.3

55.1
9.0
.
5

34.2
18.7
32.5

69.8
_
_
1.5

44.2
12.0
1.5

37.8
21.8
1.5

14.9
3.4
-

63.4
13.2
-

55.7
7.5
2.1

40.0

30.1

72.7

39.1

40.5

22.9

28.7

44.4

40.3

81.7

30.8

37.7

Christmas or year-end ...........
Profit-sharing .................
Other .......................

100.0

Pbi
ulc
uiiis
tlte *

All establishments ................

100o
0

100.0
--1
-----L -

AU
idsre 1 M n f c u i g
nutis / a u a t r n

472

Establishments with no nonproduction

y
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

9*tyU iA O *U >e G 4td P-e+pLiO Sl P lo ttA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type of plan

All establishments ............... .

Al
l
idsre
nutis

10 0 .0

Manufacturing

!£&£_

Public
u iiis
t lte*

Wholesale
t ade
r

. ... 100.0 ........100*0__
..

Rti t
e a l rade

100.0,

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

100.0 .

Srie
evcs

10 0 .0

AU
idsre
nutis

Manufacturing

.10Q.C,,, ...100 aQ.
.

Public
u i i i s*
tlte

Wholesale
trade

Rti t
e a l rade

100*0.. ... JtQQ.C, „ ....-100*0... ..
,
.
.

Srie
evcs

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / .....................

81.8

83.4

8 4 .6

78.8

63.4

94.8

6 0 .2

67.7

72.9

79.3

71.0

62.1

39.1

Life insurance .....................
Health insurance ...................
Hospitalization ....................
Retirement pension ................ .

69.7
42.3
34.8
40.4

5 2 .2

76.3
39.3
34.4
34.8

47.8

56.9
13.9
13.6
31.5

54*4
31.7
25.8
27.0

26.3
30.6

79.3
63.0
37.3
47.0

6 6 .0

17.0
24.4

80.0
56.0
58.7
32.8

5 1.8

17.3
28.2
40.5

84.1
71.0
29.0
68.2

8.9

47.5
26.8
21.3
22.9

31.7
17.1
1.7
9.1

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ..................... ..

18.2

16.6

15.4

21.2

36.6

5.2

39.8

32.3

27.1

20.7

29.0

37.9

60.9

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2 4 .2

2 4 .6

38.1
4 2 .8

Occupational Wage Survey, Denver, Colo., November 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

21

Appendix —Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates , in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupationsx (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical; (o) maintenance and
power plant; and (d) custodial; warehousing; and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads); communication; and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance;
insurance; and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied; minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size; however; was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded;
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings; including
commissions for salespersons; are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical; they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN DENVER, COLO., 1/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, NOVEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ...................................
Manufacturing................... ........ .
Nonmanufacturing .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ................................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate •••••••••
Services 2/ ................................

21
21
21

901
236
665

216
56
160

90,700
30,000
60,700

53,140
18,400
34,740

11,420
2,720
8,700

21
21
21
21
21

62
204
220
84
95

21
31
51
24
33

14,200
12,300
22,300
6,000
5,900

11,910
3,680
12,920
2,680
3,550

3,350
1,210
1,630
2,090

21
21
21

25

14
6
16

3,233
7,252
1,617

2,729
6,685
1,235

248

420

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 4/
Machinery...................................
Railroads .................................... .
Insurance carriers ..............................

8

24

-

984

1/ Denver Metropolitan Area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, and Jefferson Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
lj Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.




23

Index
Page
number
Assembler (machinery) ••••••.... ........ ........... ••....
Baker (bakeries) •.... ............ ••••••........ ••••••••..
Bench hand (bakeries) ••••••............................ ..
Biller| machine ••............. ......................... .
Bindery woman (printing) .................................
Bookbinder (printing) ••••••••........................
Bookkeeper, h a n d .... •....................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator •«.... •••••.... ........... .
Bricklayer (building construction) ............ ...*.......
Calculating-machine operator •••••••••.........
Carpenter (building construction) •••••••••••••••••••..••••••
Carpenter, maintenance •••••................ ...... .......
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ........... •...........
Cleaner........
Cleaner (railroads) ...... ......... ........ ......... ..
Clerk (grocery stores) •«..••••••............... •••••••••••
Clerk, accounting ••.......... .......................... .
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) •••••••.............
Clerk, f i l e ..............................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ...................... ..
Clerk, general ••••••••••.................................
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ..... ..... .......... ••
Clerk, order ............. :...............................
Clerk, payroll..................... ..... ......... ......
Compositor, hand (printing) •••••............ ..... •......
Crane operator, electric bridge .....................
Draftsman ••••••............ ............. .......... .....
Drill-press operator (machinery) ••••••••••.... ......... .
Duplicating-machine operator...................... .......
Electrician (building construction) .......... .......... .
Electrician, maintenance .................................
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .............. .......
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••••••••••....
Electrotyper (printing) ............ ...... .......... ..
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ..••••................ ..
Engineer, stationary .....................................
Fireman, stationary boiler •••••••••••••••............... ••
Guard ••................. ...... .........................
Helper, motortruck driver ................................ .
Helper, trades, maintenance .................. ........... .
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .............. .
Janitor.... .......................
Janitor (railroads) ............ .......... ............. ..
Key-punch operator ......... ........ ...... ...... ....... .
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ................ ••
Laborer (building construction) ...... ......... ...........
Machine operator (printing) ..............................
Machine tender (printing).... ........
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ............
Machinist, maintenance .......... .............. ........ •••
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .............
Machinist, production (machinery) ........................
Mailer (printing) ........................ ••••••••••••••••*




11
13
13
3, 4
13
13
3, 4
4
13
4
13
7
11
9
11
14
3, 4
12
4, 5
12
3, 5
12
3, 5
3, 5
13
9
7
11
5
13
7
11
11
13
11
8
8
9
13, 14
8
11
9
11
5
12
13
13
13
11
8
11
11
13

Page

number
Maintenance man, general utility ....
Manager (grocery stores) ..........
Meat cutter (meat markets) .........
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •
•
Mechanic, maintenance ............ .
Milling-machine operator (machinery)
Millwright •••••••••...............
Mixer (bakerie^ ••••••••••••..... .
Motortruck driver.................
Nurse, industrial (registered) ••••••
Office boy ,
Office girl
Oiler ....

8
14

14

8
8
11
8

13
13, 14
7
3
5

Operator (local transit) ................
Order filler ..........................
Overman (bakeries) .............. .
Packer.......... ...... *..............
Painter (building construction) ...... .
Painter, maintenance....... ......... ..
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••
Photoengraver (printing) ••..............
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ....
Plasterer (building construction) ........
Plumber (building construction) •••••••••••
Porter...... .......... ..... .........
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •••••
Press assistant (printing) •••••••••.....
Pressman (printing) ................ •••••
Receiving clerk ...................... .
Secretary........... .................
Section head (insurance carriers) ••..•••••
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ..... •••••
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads)
Shipping clerk •••••....................
Shlpping-and-receiving clerk ••••••••••••••
Stenographer................. .........
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .......
Stereotyper (printing) ..................
Stock handler.... ••••••••••...........
Stock handler (machinery) ............. .
Stock handler (railroads) ..............
Switchboard operator ••••••••••••••••.•••••
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••«•••••
Tabulating-machine operator •••••••••••••••
Tool-and-die maker .....................
Transcribing-machine operator •••••••••••••
Truck driver •••••••••...... ...........
Trucker, hand ............
Trucker, hand (machinery) •
Trucker, hand (railroads) •
Trucker, power ........••••
Typist ...•••............
Typist (insurance carriers)
Watchman .................
U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E 0 — 1952

8
13
9

13
9

13

8
11
13

11
13
13
9

12
13
13
9

5

12
8
11
9
9

6

12
13

10
11
11
6
6
3, 6

8
6

10
10
11
11
10
6
12
10







This re p o rt was prepared in the B u reau 's Western R egional O f fic e .
Communications may be addressed to :
Max D. K o s s o ris , R egional D ire c to r
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
Room 107^
870 Market S tr e e t
San F ra n cisco 2, C a lif o r n ia
The s e r v ic e s o f the Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s ' r e g io n a l o f f i c e s
are a v a ila b le fo r c o n s u lta tio n on s t a t i s t i c s r e la t in g to wages and indus­
t r i a l r e la t io n s , employment, p r ic e s , la b o r tu rn -o v e r, p r o d u c tiv ity , work
i n ju r ie s , c o n stru ctio n and housing.

The Western Region in clu d e s the fo llo w in g S ta te s :
A rizona
C a lif o r n ia
Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102