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Occupational Wage Survey

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
O c to b e r 1951

B u lle tin

No.

1 06 4

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Ewan Cla*ue For salt* by the Superintendent of Documents, IJ. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, I). C. - Price 20 cents

Commi**ioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION....................................................................

1

THE KANSAS CITY METROPOLITAN A R E A ........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE..............................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ............ .................................... •.......
3
A-2
Professional and technical occupations«•••••••••»................................. 6
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ....................................
9
A-A
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ••••........ .......••••••••
H
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis # B-20A
Grain m i l l i n g ..... ......... ........... ....................... .......... •*•
B-2337 Women's and misses' coats and s u i t s ...... ,.......H
B-35
Machinery industries .....
B-AO
Railroad......................................................................
B-5A52 Milk d e a l e r s ..... *.........................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ........................

U
W
15
16
17

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction....... ••••••.................. ......................
C-205
B a k e r i e s .........................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ••••••••••••••••.......
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..................
C-542
Meat cutters (retail and wholesale) .............
C-6512 Office building service ...............
C-7011 H o t e l s ..............................

16
16
16
19
19
19
19
19

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ............................

20

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ......................... •••••........
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...............
E-3
Paid holiday..................................................................
E-A
Paid vacations .................... ........................... •••••••••.....
E-5
Paid*sick leave ••••••••••••••••••••••••••..... ......... •••••••........
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses •••*••...... ••••............... ........... ...........
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ................ •••••••••«•••••••••••••••.......

20
21
21
22
23
25
25

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ........ .....................•••••......... •••••••••••••

26

INDEX ....................................................................................

26

* NOTE: Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for auto repair shops
(June 1951) and power laundries (May 1951;•

March H , 1952

Introduction 1/
The Kansas City area is one of several important in­
dustrial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is cur­
rently conducting occupational wage surveys. Occupations that
are conmon to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufactoring
industries were studied on a community-wide basis. Cross-indus­
try methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings
data for the following types of occupations: (a) office; (b) pro­
fessional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; (d) cus­
todial, warehousing, and shipping. In presenting earnings infor­
mation for such jobs (tables A-l through A-k) separate data have
been provided wherever possible for individual broad industry
divisions.
Occupations that are characteristic of particular, im­
portant, local industries have been studied on an industry basis,
within the framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data
for these Jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting) occupational earnings for several industries or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or
minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits including vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Kansas City Metropolitan Area
The H-cuuircy Kansas City Metropolitan Area consisting
of Jackson and Wyandotte Counties in Kansas, and Clay and Johnson
Counties in Missouri had an estimated total population of 81^,500
in 1950. The municipality of Kansas City, Mo., accounted for
more than half of this total, the remainder being distributed
among Kansas City, Kans.,
Independence, Mo., and other cities,
villages, and unincorporated areas. The population and the total
labor force of the metropolitan area increased approximately 20
percent during the 10-year period 19^0 to 1950.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau1s regional office in Chicago, 111.,
by James W. Shanks under the direction of George E. Votava,
Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Branch of
Community Wage Studies of the B u r e a u ^ Division of Wages and
Industrial Relations in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix far discussion of scope and method of survey.




In October

1951>

employment in the area totaled over

366,000 workers, of which 108,000 were employed in manufacturing
establishments. Manufacturing employment was divided almost
equally between firms producing durable and nondurable goods. 3 /
Employment in the durable-goods industries was dominated by the
transportation-equipment group, reflecting the growing importance
of Kansas City as an automobile, truck, and aircraft manufactur­
ing center. Other durable-goods industry groups of substantial
importance in the Kansas City area include fabricated metal prod­
ucts, ordnance and accessories, primary metals, electrical ma­
chinery, and nonelectrical machinery.

Of primary importance among the nondurable— goods in­
dustry groups in the Kansas City area is food and kindred prod­
ucts. The Kansas City meat packing industry, which suffered
serious damage in the recent Missouri River flood, has neverthe­
less retained its position of national importance. Among other
significant segments of the food products industry in Kansas City
are grain-mill and bakery products. Additional segments of the
nondurable-goods industries in Kansas City which are of impor­
tance include paper, printing, and publishing; chemicals; and
textile and apparel products.

An employment of more than 100,000 workers in wholesale
and retail trade activities In the Kansas City Metropolitan Area
signify this city*s importance as a commercial center which
serves the vast mid-continent market area. The steady growth of
manufacturing and commerce in Kansas City has been paralleled by
the development of substantial transportation, cemmunication,
and public utilities;
services; and finance industries. Rail,
water, air, and highway transportation provide the facilities
necessary to move commodities and people to and from the Kansas
City area. The transportation needs are served by 12 major
trunk-line railroads, 137 truck lines, 5 airlines, Ik bus lines,
and Missouri River barge traffic.

Occupational Wage Structure
Extensive unionization is indicated by the fact that
an estimated 80 percent of the plant workers within scope of the
study were employed in establishments having written agreements
with labor organizations. Union contract coverage for plant
workers among establishments in the transportation, communica-

3/ See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods industries.

2.

tion, and other public utilities group was almost universal.
Nearly 90 percent of the plant workers in manufacturing and more
than 80 percent in the service industries were employed in union
plants. Although less extensive than among other nonmanufacturing industries, union contract coverage was substantial in
wholesale and retail trade; and finance,
insurance, and real
estate establishments. Over half the total number of plant work­
ers in each of these industry divisions were employed in estab­
lishments having written labor agreements.

Unionisation among Kansas City office workers was re­
latively insignificant, with one major exception. Nearly 60
percent of all office workers in the transportation, communica­
tion, and other public utilities group worked in establishments
having written agreements with unions covering office workers.
Less than 20 percent of the office workers in each of the other
industry groups, however, were covered by union contract provi­
sions.
Wages of over three-fourths the plant workers included
in the survey were formally adjusted upward between January
1950 - the base period far the Wage Stabilization Board* s 10percent "catch-up" wage formula — and the time of the study.
These general wage increases were substantially more numerous
after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea than during the pre­
ceding 6 months. Nearly all of these wage adjustments were made
on a cents-per-hour basis. Manufacturing plant workers generally
received larger increases than workers in nonmanuf ac tur ing es­
tablishments. Almost three-fourths of the manufacturing plant
workers and about a fifth of the nonmanuf ac tur ing workers re­
ceived wage adjustments during the period totaling at least 15
cents an hour. Many large manufacturing firms in the Kansas City
area provide for wage adjustments which are based cnthe Bureau*s
Consumers* Price Index. Several firms included in the survey
had negotiated general wage increases to become effective upon
approval by the WSB.

General wage changes for office workers were less ex­
tensive than for plant workers. Individual merit or length of
service increases are more commonly used by firms to adjust
salary levels of office workers.
Formalized rate structures for time-rated workers wex-e
reported in establishments employing more than three-fourths of
the plant workers, and were common in all broad industry groups
within the scope of the survey. Plans providing single rates
were slightly more prevalent than those with rate ranges. Most
office workers in the Kansas City area were employed in estab­




lishments that based clerical salaries on formalized wage struc­
tures. Individual determination of salary rates fbr office work­
ers, however, prevailed in the service industries and among non­
durable-goods industries.
Incentive methods of wage payments among Kansas City
plant workers were relatively insignificant in all nonmanufac­
turing industry groups. Among nondurable-goods
manufacturing
establishments, however, approximately a fourth of all plant
workers participated in some type of incentive wage plan. In­
centive system coverage among workers in durable-goods manufac­
turing establishments was less extensive, accounting for slightly
more than a tenth of the plant workers.
Minimum entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers
were a part of the formalized wage structures of establishments
employing nearly nine-tenths of the workers in the area. Al­
though entrance rates ranged from less than 60 cents to $ 1 .6 0 an
hour, half the workers were employed in establishments with min­
imum rates between 75 cents and $1.20. A 75-cent minimum was
the lowest rate reported in any manufacturing or public utility
establishment;
lower minima were found in the trade and service
industries.
Single-shift operations and a ^0-hour workweek were
common for plant workers in Kansas City manufacturing plants.
Approximately 15 percent of all plant workers, in both the dura­
ble- and nondurable-goods Industries, were employed on 2d or 3<i
shifts. Nearly all of these workers received shift differentials
usually expressed in terms of a uniform cents-per-hour addition
to day rates. Most extra shift workers received differentials
ranging from k to 7i cents an hour. Forty-hour workweeks were
prevalent among plant workers in all nonmanufacturing groups
with one exception. Most workers in the service industries had
workweek schedules of between kk and ^8 hours. The majority of
women office workers in all industry divisions were scheduled to
work ^0 hours.
About a third of the durable-goods establishments, in­
cluded in the study, employing over 60 percent of all plant
workers in this group, based their rates of first-level super­
visors
(generally designated leadmen or working foremen) on a
fixed differential
above rates earned by those supervised. In
most instances, differentials took the form of specified per­
centages or cents-per-hour additions to the earned rates of the
most highly paid workers supervised. Other plans employed a
method of fixing the minimum of supervisors* rate ranges at the
maximum of the rate ranges applicable to the most highly rated
worker supervised. Such supervisory pay practices were relative­
ly Infrequent among establishments in other industry groups.

A:

3

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

O jfjfice CfccufLcUiO Hl

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

See footnote a* end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Ofyice. OccMfuUtiml - GantUtued

Table A-l:

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVIN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$ _
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Jnder 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 &>.00 fc.50 fe.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 17.50 60.00 62.50 I5.00 I7.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 10.00 15.00 90.00
erig i
anns
and
hus
or
and
(tn a d (t n a d
Sad r ) S a d r )
30.00
35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

i

Men - Continued

!

Office bovs .................... •••
Manufacturing ••••••........ *....

l0.0
i
39.5

U5.50
UU.5o"

191

Uo.o

7
Ul
1?3
25
58
29

Duplicating-machine operators *......
Nonmanufacturing •••••«•*... ••••••«

IOO
t.
I0.0
t
39.5
0
UO.O
39.0

37.50
38.50
38.50
39.OO
37.00
38.5o
39.00
33.50

Uo.o
W~ U o ^
30 Uo.o
lU 39.5
2U Uo.o

55.00
5U.00
56.50
56.50
50.50

23
17

L ±w - “Uo^
2

Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••
Tabulating-machine operators •••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••
Public utilities * ........ ••••
Wholesale trade «••«••••••••••••••
Finance ** •*••••••••••••••••••••

89

—

Billers, machine (
billing machine) ....
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••«
Durable goods •••••••........ .
Nondurable goods •••••... •••••••
Nonmanufacturing *........ ••••••••
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade *......••••••••«
Retail trade .....................

6
6

37
U

6
33
«
.
10
18

_

-

-

-

22J
23
—
7 — To !
3
3
7
16
12

U8
20
10
30
28
10
6
7

9
2

-!
-;

321
123
U3
80
198

Uo.5

U6.50

k f& ~

77
38

Uo.o
Ui.o
Uo.5
Ui.o
Ui.o
Uo.o

U2.00
U7.50
U7.00
52.00
U9.00
,U6.50

178

Ui.o

kl

lUO
93

Ui.o
Uo.5
UU.5

U2.00
U7.00
Ui.oo
38.50
39.00

362
97
U5
52
26$
ll
it
30
5t
1
51

Ui.o
U2.0
U3.0
Ui.5
Ui.o
Uo.o
39.0
UU.G
Ui.5

63.00
62.50
61.50
63.00
63.50
69.00
60.00
53.00
65.00

220

39.5
U " 0—
0a
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
U0.0
Uo.5
38.5

51.50
51.50“
50.50
52.00
51.50
51.50
57.00
U9.50

— W TOo

Bookkeepers, hand •••••••••••••«••••••••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••*••
Durable goods ••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••*••••••••••«••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••
P V l*r*
ni 1
H -if« 4 ........ ....
ht
tVn anal a t a i tiiiiitiiiiintin
yil
rra
Retail trade
Services ............. .
—

10
16

19k

62
31
87

.
_
_!

_
_
-1
_
—

23
3
3|
-;
20
«:

18
18
12
6
-

•'

j
-

1U
lU
1U i

10

6
k

U!

!
3!
3
3

2
2

3
3

i5
9
9

16
-

7

6
3
3

16
3
13

7

2
2
-

13
13
1
1
10

8
8
5
3

1
1
_
_1
_
1

50
28
10
18
22
9
12

38
38
25
13

18 | uu
5 1 12
13 1 3
2
9 1 28
3

2
1

2
2

-

5
2
2

-

7
5
3
1;
-

1
1

.

- 1 -- —

-

-

_
15
1

-

-i
-

_'
_'
-

_j
1

.

_

_

_

1

8

-

-

{

10
10
9
1

-

-1
1
_i
_
-

_|
—

60
26
21 --- T
2!
10
11
3j
21 I
39
u
10 i
10
i
6
10

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

•

-

8
3
5

.

1
lt
i
1
2
11

22 !
i
22
3
18
1
2

5
2
1
-|

uo
23 !
2!
21 !
17 !
3!
13
1
U
_
u

2
_
i

1

18
.
18

lt
i
3

1
3

3
15
-

U5
10
6
k
35
16

16

16
1

2
U8
28

_

-

-

7

m

_

3!
3!
l1
2|

15
15
lU !
-

_

2

_

_

_

10
2

j
!

21
9
7
3
U!
!

9
9;
1!
2!
1
|

“i

31
2
.
2
29
5
22
2

2U!
!
18
1
17
6
1
2
3

25 i
u!
i
2!
2!
21
15
3
3

3!
:
31

iU
5
9

1
1
1j
.

„

_

2
2
1!
1
-|

J
-

_
.
_
_
.

_

2

1
1
_
1

1
1
_!
1
-!
i

_

_
.
_
_
_

,

•
_
.
•!

_

_

?
5
.
i
*

.
.
-

.
.
_
-

_
.
_
-

_
•

1

-

_

_
.
_

_
1

.

_

-

-i

38
11
11
27
5
12

28
2
.
2
26
5

31
10
.
10
21
5

35
17
11
6
18
A?
.

2
13

u
2

-

3

lU

6

3

lU
7
7

6
2
3

-

.

1

-1

3
3

12

1

A
12
12

1

-|

1

u

U

19

1
1

12
10

3
1
2!

3

17 1
7!
10
1
31
0 1
!
18 !
1
1
1|
17 !

_
r j -- —
1
j
-1
1
_1
_:
_
.
-!

See footnote at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




-:
-1
-;

10
2

6
3

1

2h

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A *
Mamifartnring fttTT.tt.ttTtTtft1tt(tt
Ti
k rahle utTittMiitiitMimiriti
ro a ttT.
* hi
Tt. t.r.T.TT.Ttt T.f
Nonmanufacturing *.... ......... .
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ... ....... ......
T?-i n o rv«m
M _______
JL
t
_____ ____

“

1
1

1

Women

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) •
•
Manufacturing ........ .
Nonmanufacturing •••••«••••••••••••••
Retnl1 t a t trttrtTtt1t.ttf
rra

-

3
3

50
2

17

U0
22
9
13
18
3

3
U
13
3
10
21
15

15
-

6

-

23
11
2
0
12

23
2
2

16

16
2
1
13

_
-

12

21
U
15

J

_

3

t

26

36

1

.
26
20

23
n
11
12
7
1

.
.
36
28

•
1

_
6

2
3

8

-

17
10
10
7
!
_
7

_

_

_

•

.

1
j '
_ •

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A

-

-

-

.

-

_

5
,

Oj^ioe OccufiatiotU - Continued

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVIN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W EEK LY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Nme
ubr
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
anns
and
h us erig
or
(tnad (tnad $
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00 !6??5 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47*50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

$
90.00
and
over

Women - Continued
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .
.
Manufacturing ................
Durable ...................
Nondurable .................
Nonoanufacturing ..............
Wholesale trade .............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ............... ..

575 40.5
120 ' 42.0
35 42.5
85 41.5
455 40.0
153 41.0
68 40.5
216 39.5

Calculating-machine operators
(
Comptometer type) ...............
Manufacturing .................
Durable ...................
Nondurable ............... ..
Nonmanufacturing ..............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ............
Retail trade ...............

790
300
M9
151
499
61
134
279

Calculating-machine operators
father than Comptometer type) ...... .
Manufacturing ................
Nonmanufacturing ..............
W l lAon1a
Vo
T
T
, Tri
it,
Clerks, accounting ...............
Manufacturing ................
Durable ...................
Nondurable .......... ......
Nonmanufacturing ..............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ............
Retail trade ......... ......
Finance ** ................
Services ..................
Clerks, file, class A .............
Manufacturing ................
Durable ..................
Nondurable .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ..........
Wholesale trade .............
Retail trade ...............
Finance ** ................
Clerks, file, class B .............
Manufacturing ................
Nonmanufacturing ..............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ............
Retail trade ...............
Finance
C

**

AAa

.............................

40.0

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

44.50
49.50“
52.50
48.00
43.00
43.50
45.00
41.50
47.00
49.00
51.50
46.00
i 46.00
; 48.50
1 52.00
! 43.00

41.0
42.50
85
40.0 ; 47.00
11
, 41.0 ! 41.50
74
42.00
65 41.0
1P307
206
68
138
1,101
139
251
410
186
115

40.0 ! 48.00
40.0
51.00
51.00
40.5
40.0 : 51.00
47.50
39.5
54.50
40.5
50.00
39.5
45.00
40.5
46.50
36.5
41.0
46.50

40.0
44.50
287
45.W
59 ‘ 40.0
40.0
47.00
30
43.00
40.0
29
40.0
44.50
228
54.00
40.5
20
40.0
49.50
6
3
41.0 ' 39.00
55
39.5 ; 43.00
72
1.513
284
1,229
85
190
412
464
78

40.0 ! 36.00
40.0
33.50
40.0
36.50
40.50
40.5
40.0
43.50
34.00
40.0
34.50
39.5
, ^j . o
O

n i uu
y o #n n

1
1
1
-

3
3
-

22
_
_
22
6
16

47
20
20
27
6
3
18

65 111 133 !
n
13
4
1
3
8i
13
3
52, 107 , 122 !
7
74 1 7 !
8
3 | 13 I
37
19 100 !

-

-

14
2
2
12
-!
10 !

51
22~
22
29
28

58
16
3
13
42
7
16
17

125
27
5
22
98
7
8
79

128 j
w !
44 !
25
59
4
11
36

-1
-!

6
3
3

13

16
16

41

3
-

-;

-j
-;
-;
-:
_
-!
-!
-!
- !
-

■
17 1
10
10
-: 7
-| -i -1 7
-|
“
6:
6
-:
6
-

414 335
- ” 1331 5
3
26 281 282
- i
- 1
1
- ;
- i 18
- ; 152 | 98
26 ! 127 j 146
i
2 I
________ 1

67 s

3i
14
17 J
3° I
31

IQ
19

; 329
48
; 281
34
1 20
j 71
148
j

See footnote at end of table.
A
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
*» Finance, insurance, and real estate.




69
2
2

13
12
57
3
1
2
54
1
3
39
4
7

6
28 | 21
6j 1
-; 6i 1
6
22 , 20
1
-■
6 : 12 i -; 14

26

o

1

8

109
33
76
6
7
46
13
J
4

5
9
7
6
2
5
1
52
35
1 1 24
19
15
13 | 1
3
42
71

no

47

2 0 : 11

17 ! 2
31 9
90
36
6
17
12
17
12
53
_
-

'
-

41
O
Q

24
5
2
3
19
17 i
2'
-

27
12
10
2
15
91
3
-

78
30
13
17
48
11
6
31 ;

32

16 :
6
10
16 ,
12
4j

6
6

2
2i
-!

J7

162
162
1
25
92
32
12
62
9
1
8
53
3
4
21 |
25
no
9
101

6
28
44
3
on
<u

157 1
37 ;
10
27
120
8
32
44
21
15

194

30 ;
15
9l
61
15 !
-■
4
31
8!

5
9
14
12
2
45
22
5
18

229 '
23
12
11 i
206
20
48 |
78 !
39 !
21
i
8!
23
7!
4
1
4I
3
3
1!
19
1
-!
13
1: -j
3
-

123
29
12
9
11
20
171
94
6
21
35
14
77 ! 33
12 ; 19
a | 7
23

98 ; 4 8 ! 19 ;
5
3;
45 1 1 9 !
93
18 ! 13 ! 4 :
51 ■ 29 i 15
11
OO.

!
I
I

1
O

i
i
1

-

63
19
11
8
44 1
20
1
10
13
8
1
1
7
4!
3|
19

6
-1
6 I 19
3: 3 i 19
_ ;

7 ! 16
20
20
5! 15
2
3! 5
10
18
2
2: 1
-!
2. _
1'
46
31

10
5

1
2
66
7
4
3
59
10
35
5!
8i
l!

61
22
1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

10
2

_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

2
2
2
_i

-

1
1
1
-j
.j
.

-—
-

- -! - -I - -

_
-

_ _
- -i-

_

j• 1- !*
-;- • |- ’_ _
- _
- - - - - - -

-

7

-

_
.
_
-

8
8
-

_1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1
-

16
3
3
13
1
3
5
4
-

2
1
1
1
1
_

6

2

7i
7
-1

11
1
1
-i
-

2
2
2

'
-|
1
_j
|
- 1 --~

_ _
_
_I _
_ _
!
“: _
-> _
- _
~■ -

_
-

17
2
2
1
5!
5;
10
-|

-

-

6
1
1;
-!
5
4
1!
_1
-i
~1

~

]
-j
-1

-

6j
6
-i
-;
-1
-;
_
-j
-;
- i
-I
_1
- 1

-

i
;
;

-

_
-

i
!
-

.
.
n
-1 -

_
- 1 --“

-

i

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

,

|

-

l

I

________!
________i
________ ________

-

J_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

I

|
-i
-

22
25
12
3
1
3
2
9
19
13
6;
11 ! !3
-i
2
-

37
n
2
21 i
9
39 i 26
10 i 25
16
1
3
4
6
-

-

|

_
-:
-|

8 ! 12
_j 8
12
2
6
1i 6
1i
4
_
-

-

-

_
-

1

-1
i

1

25
12
12
13
13

31 ' 21
1"
6
10
15
6
6
15
4
10
1
-

17
14
15

1;
1!
1
-1

_

_

-

6,

Ofyiee Occupation^ - Continued

Table A-is

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVIN G STRAIG H T-TIM E W EEK LY EARNINGS OF—

A verag e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
and
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over
1!

Onder
*
30.00

;

Women - Continued
Clerks, general ...................
Manufacturing .................
Durable ....................
Nondurable .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ........ ......
Retail trade
................
Finance ** .................
Services
...................

1,548
—261—
137
124
1,28?
249
282
268
422
66

$
49.00
■■570
*"3553.50
53.50
48.00
49.50
52.00
44.00
46.00
52.00

40.0
T&S
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
42.0
38.0
41.0

-

Clerks, order ....................
Manufacturing ..................
Durable ....................
Nondurable ..................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade .......... .
Retail trade ................
Services ....................

397
157
28
129
240
132
54
36

40.0
46.00
40.0
47.50
40.0
55.00
46.00
40.0
40.0
45.50
40.0 j 49.00
40.0 | 39.50
37.00
41.5

1
1
1
-

Clerks, payroll .............. .
Manufacturing ..................
Durable ....................
Nondurable ..... .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance ** ......... .......
Services .......... .

445
2bi
82
119
244
25
52
128
18
21

48.50
40.5
40.o
48.00
49.00
40.5
40.0
47.50
49.00
40.5
48.50
40.5
40.0 i 51.50
40.5 i 48.00
39.0 i 55.00
45.00
42.5

•
-

Duplieating-machine operators
.......
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing ........... .
Wholesale trade ........ .
Retail trade ................
Finance * *
........ ..........

59
18
17
20

40.0
"4070
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

Kev-punch operators .....................................................
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ......................... .. ..................
Retail trade
Finance * * ............................................................

310
31
279
86
72
24
87

40.0
'4070
40.5
40.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

Office girls

206

40.0
["4070—
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
40.0

85
--------2B

40.50
41.50
39.50
39.50
! 41.50
1.38.50

27
27
11
14
2

42
22
20
-

67
14
14

.......................................................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Nonmanufacturing
P iiM 1 c

....................................................
n+.l 11 +.1 « q *
___ . . TT. . ____ _ . .

Wholesale trade ..................................................
Retail trade
»•
Finance * * ............... ..
,
Services ....................

------- £ 5 —

160
13
27
73
15
32

36.50
36.50
36.50
35.50
46.50
34.00
32.50
35.50

!
!
;
I
I
!
|

38
45
16 i 5
2
16
3
22
40
20
16
10
6
10

1

27
20
9
11
7
2
3
2
-

j

1
i
;

1

1
-

U
! 13 ,
3
10
1
1
_

3

!

8
6
6
2
2
_
12
1
11
2
3
5

4

-

1

3
-

!

4
4

i
j

118
17
2
15
101
11
24
66

20
27
6
-;
6 ; 6
20 j
9 : 21
9 1
l
7 I
7 | 5
16
4 !
2

15
6

3

18
-------- 6 “

12
5
1
!

3

19
5
14
-

m
/

10

35
3
32
1
1
22
8

49
|
------- 8“
41
6 !
35

i

1
-

!

27

i
109
19 1
_j
19
90
16
4
33
34
3

32
12
9
3
20
4
2
11
3

29
16
13

9

6
7

6
6
1
5

9
5
2
2

6

34
5
10
5
14

5

35

7

22

3 1

10
2

18
17

8

|
-------------

!

!

;

13
7
1
6
6
1
5

_
-

-

-

_
_
2

9
1
1

2
2

1
1
1

_
_

2
1
1

‘
8i
8

2
-1

34
20
10
10
14
6
6
2

3
-,
3!
3!

-t
18 5 16
39
14 ! T I 11
9
41
5
5
1!
6'
25 1 13
5
1
3j
8
5; 7 ! 2
! 15 1
3
u
1
1
S
2 ! -*■
1

1
i
1 25
16
I 5
! 11
9

2
1
1
1

1

22
5
5

_

-

!

7
4
4
3
1
1
1
_

_!

2
1
1
1
1

-!
4!
j
_
_
4
1
3

i
j

_
_
2
1
1

18
16
_
16
2

-

-

:

j
-

|

1
22 : 11
- 1 7
22
4
8
3
1
U

40
29
1
3
37 j 28
9 ! 4
9
13
3
6
1
9

29
1
28
12
12
2
2

8

2

6

,

8

2

-

8

2

6

-

!

6

2
l

8

_
-

4

3

_

-

-

-

-

1
_
_

3
3

5
1
1
4

_
_
_

„
'
.
.

1

1

3

1

_
_|

3
3
-

_

_
_
4

!
l ------------

-

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
.

-

_
_

|

6
.
6

_

_!

_
-

-

_
_
_

_

_

_

-

-

_ 1
„
l

-

-

-

_

-

_

_
_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

_
|

-

_

6

-

„
_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_
-

_
.

_

*
:

_

5

1
1

2

3

5

_
_
_
-

1

6

j

-

j
j

22
1
21
17

_
_
»

_
_
_

1

_
_
_

|
j

-

_

-

l ------------

_

5

i

2

_

-

40

8

6

■ 60 1
| 34
! 14 |
20 ;
i 26 !

17
4
13

5
_
_
_
5
1
4

38
25
17
8
13
5
5
~
3

10 ! 42
26
- , 28 ! 9 !
9
9
19
10
14 1 17 1
10 !
4
13

36
16
3
13
20
19
-

64
21
7
14
43
1j 1
2
4
7 | 15 1 37
7
3
1 5
-

17

2

40
21
9
12
19
5

56
18
13
5
38
17
9
12

1

i

2
11
2
4

191 162 249 159 1?1
10
10
21
19
54
1
8
47
15
4
18
6
6
2
7
172 152 195 149 110 |
30 ! 22
21
46;
25
26
11
55
23
95
56 | 20
7| 7
55
72
52
22 | 33
55
8
i2j 12|
13 j

56
43
1
8
29
24
2
27
24
13
14 , 32
3
10
16
1
16 ! 1
-' 4

77
18
5
13
59
5
13
29
!
3
! 9

- | 15 1 12
37
13
34
- 1
1
6 ! 6
12 : 13 | 31
28
15
- !
8
20
3
2
12
16
7
11
15
-

See footnote at end of table.
#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
96
29
30
9
28
-i

53
15
24
14
-

1

45.50
i 4b.oO
: 45.50
48.00
51.00
1 44.50
i 39.50
i

102
6

i

i
!
"'!

42

i

_

-

!
_

7,

Table A-l:

O

fy ic e

- G o n tiH M

0 C C 4 4 fu U iO H &

&

A

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Women - Continued
Secretaries .......•••••••..........
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••.....
Durable ••••••••••........... .
Nondurable
Nonmanufacturing .............
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade •••••... .......
Retail trade »•••••••...... .
Finance #* ••••••••••••.........
Services

Nme
ubr
o
f
wres
okr

$
i,*o5
Tl
ol
218
186
1,001
117
301
207
270
106

Stenographers, general ••... ........ . 2,1*7
.
Manufacturing
— 605“
Durable ••••••••.... ...... .
366
Nondurable .••••••........ .
2*0
Nonmanufacturing
15*
,11
Public utilities # .............
305
Wholesale trade
*17
Retail trade •••••••......... .
192
Finance ** ........... .
19
»0
Services ••«•••.•»»••••••••••••••••.
137
Stenographers, technical •••••••••••••.»••
Manufacturing ........ ........ .
Switchboard operators .............
Manufacturing ............. .
Durable ................ ••••••
Nondurable ..••••••••... .
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade
Retail trade •••••••••••... .
Finance ** •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Switchboard operator-receptionists •••••••
Manufacturing ....... .... .
Durable
Nondurable
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade .••.••••••••••••••••
Retail trade •••»••••••... ••••••••
Finance ■ * ••••»••••••....... .
*
Services ... ........ •••.•••••••

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
i w
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under jo.oo 32.50 ^5.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 |5.oo *7.50 lo.oo $ 2 .50 15.00 17.50 lo.oo I2.50 fe.OO I7.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 10.00 $5.00 90.00
and
anns
hu s erig
or
and
(tnad (tnad fo.oo
Sadr) Sadr)
35.00 [ 7 5 *0.00 *2.50 *5.00 *7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 60.00 85.00 90.00 over
3.0

71
--

*0.0
*0.5
105
|.
*0.0
*0.0
*0.0
*0 .5
*0 .5
39.0
*0.5

57.50

58.50
59.00
58.00
57.00
59.50
57.50

56.00
5*.00
60.00

*9.00
*
0.5
*1.0
52.00
*1.0
51.00
*1.0
53.50
*0.0
*8.00
*0.0
51.00
*0.0
*8.00
*7.50
*0 .5
39.5 1 *6.50
*0.0
*
5.50
*
37.5 ' 5 .50
- ■ 0 0 ! 5230“
■*.

*2.0
*2.50
*25
' 9 ■ *0.5 '1335"
7'
*0.0
5 .00
*
25
*1.0
*7.50
5*
3i
l6
*2.5 ; *1.00
*2.0 1 *7.00
7
5
*8.50
19
39.5
*1.0 ! 39.00
89
66
*2.00
39.5
*7.0
35.50
97
**.00
I2
i9
*0 .5
3750 "
in* “TO.r ! *
*1.0
**.50
53

61
315
156
108
25
20

*0.5
*0 .5 i **.50
*0 .5 i **.50
*1 .0 I **.00
39.0
**.50
*0.0
*3.50

Tabulating-aachine operators ••••••••••••«
Nonmanufacturipg ............ .
F l9 ! o M M (ttititimtimimtim
1 l! f

113
no-

*0.5

26

*3.0

Transcribing-machine operators, general .
.
Manufacturing...... ............
Durable goods ....... ....... . •
Nondurable goods ......... .
Nonm&nnfcctaring................
Wholesale trade ..............

*0*
"2
19
1*
115
275
137

•
.
•
•
_
•
•
•
-:
-

-

38

12
•

135
,.0
39.5
” i . " U ..50
100.
130
,.0
*0.0
*0.0
W,.50
39.0
130
,.0
*0.0
150
,.0
38.0
105
,.0

|
•
•
•
-

!
-j
-j

16
•
•

•
-

-

6 ! 12 ;
6!— r n
m

61
•
.
•
m |
•

-

-

_
•
_
.
-

10
11
10 — r
5
10
6
2
_
.
.
•
•! *
-1
i m
-

•
.
16
38 ! 12
.1
9
•
•
m 1
15 : . : 3 ;
;
•:
8! •
6
12 | 13 !

*2.00

*6.00
*OT0”
*1.5 0

•
•
•
.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
_
•
•
-

2
10
52 ! 92
25
_i 5
—
"— T ! n 1 27
-1 2
2
6
'
9j
•
6
18 1
3
5
20
2! 2
*1 i 65
•
2i 6
.
8 ! 30
*
•
2
6
11
*
•
16 | 23 ;
2
10
;
*
-1
| 2
97 i 2*5 351 313 i 2*2 !
6*
65 1 55
19
58
6 i *3
38
51 ! 39 1
16 !
! 21
20
13
1*
78 ! 181 293 : 2*8 187
22
12 ; 31
17
37
60 I
96
11 ! 36
57
36
36
29
* 1 26
58 125
50
*1
9*
10
30
26
19
1 2k
j _
* i 7t 9
1 1 --T —
3
-

7
2
29 ! *8
2i r
7
—
-!
1
1
2
*! 6
70
25 i *1
.
2! *
•
51 2
11 i 17
10
11
6! 5
5* 1 2 | 7
i
36
15 | 85
r
9 i 17
3
11
11
2
6
6
23 1 6 ! 68
6
3
59
9! 2
5
.
•
*
*
*j

6!
6!
6
•!
-|
•
13
• ; 2* ! IT
“
8

10

*8
32
23
-’
“T 1 8
3
3
5
*0
29
23
9
15
9
2
9
20
8

90
30
30
60
31
25

16




22
13
17*
6
59
*1
66
2

86
37
2
35
*9
20
2*

kt \

19 !
2i
17 1
27 I
13 !
!

216 :
ST
3* |
19
163 i
9
37
*3
51
23

327 : 157

71
33
38 :
256
63
71
*2
68
12

55
*1 !
1*
102
39
*0
•
13
K)

5
r

9

68 j 38
13
16
6
18
81 1
•: *
1i
17 : * 1 1 j 2
30
12
50
10
11 i 6 : 10
7I
2! 1 i -: •1
2
2* ; 7 : -'
13 ; 16 ! 2 ■ 1
-i
*|
*
no : 78 ! 331 29 I
21 ! 17 i 11 i -T
6i 2!
9
12
1
2
51
*i
61
22
89
23 i
1
8 i 22 !
25
15
*8
*0
*i
.
*| 1*
1
5
6
6
12
3
3!
6
11
3
3
2
2
*

n

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

209

22
2
9
32 | 1? i
.
2i
1
15 |
11
17 ; 5
12
3
2
2

181 1 163
w r*o
3*
3*
*2
6
105
123
16
15
20
39
20
27
22
38 !
8
23 !
1*1
*9
38
n
92
32

28
19
13
19
2

10*
31
7
2*
7 '
3
39 !
10 '
12 1
10 I
2

86
23
13
10
63
7!
18!
11 :
22 >
5

73
23
n
12
50
*
2*

109
36
27
n
71
1
3*
26
3
• j 7j
3i
19 !

60
??
16
2*
33
8
25
15
I 8
9[ 8
36 ! 10 ! 12
6
27 ! 1
.
8| 5
!
•
12
*
*
2| 1
*
1 ! 11
5
2
-! 2

*9
29 '
12
17
20
2
*

20
10
~
10
10
10

22
27
ID
9
8; 5j
1
5
18
12 ;
6
8
*
5
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-;
3;
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3
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1

.
.

2
2

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.

.
.
.
.
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3
3
1
2

31 1
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13
16

1*
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1'
—
3!
3;
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5

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8,

Ojfjfice Occupation^ - Continued

Table A-Is

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 195>1)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A vekaqe

$

$

$

lo .o o I 2.50 6 5 .0 0 $ 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 I 5.00 lo .o o I 5.00 90.C
6

and
under
lo .o o 32.50 35 .0 0
3 7 .5 0 L 0.00 L 2.50 L 5.00 L 7.50 5Q.W 5 2 ,5 0 5 5 ,0 0 5 7 ,5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 ,5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 ,0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 f 00 9 0 .0 0
.

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

0

s w
$
$
$
$
„
Under 30 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 35.00 37 .5 0 £o.OO L 2.50 L5.00 1 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 1 2 .5 0 55.00
$

^
c*»
6»V\

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

and
ove

Wcaten - Continued
$

Typists, class A .....<
Manufacturing ••••••<
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing ,. i
.
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade .
.
Betail trade •
Finance #* .... .
Services ...... .

802
305
211
9L
L97
50
86
U5
280
36

Lo.o
LO.O
Lo.o
Lo.5
Lo.o
L i.o
3 9 .5
L 3.0
3 9.5
3 9 .5

Typists, class B .......
Manufacturing ••••••.
Durable goods •• .
•
Nondurable goods <
Nonraanufacturing •.•.
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade •
.
Retail trade ••••<
Finance *»
Services »••••••.<

1 ,8 6 8

L 0.5

188
16L
1 ,5 1 6
179
33L
260
685
58

L i.o
L 0.0
L0 .0
Lo.5
Lo.5
L i.o
3 9 .5
L1.5

_

L 6.00
L 8.00
L 8.00
L 7.50
L5.oo
L7.50
5 0 .5 0
5 0 .5 0
L i.oo
L 8.00
39.00
3 9 .50
Lo.oo
3 9 .0 0
3 9 .0 0
L 6.50
L 2.50
36.50
35.50
3 8 .00

6
3

89
L
2
2
85
L
9
1
67
L

1L6
11
L
7
137
2
3
10
122
-

213
93
76
17
120
3
1L
12
86
5

77
L5
25
20
32
16
L
5
L
3

66
3L
18
16
32
11
18

370
327
71
75
26
60
L5 ; 15
256
295
18
19
61
51
70
L9
111
1L8
5
19

258
107
L5
62
151
11
.5 1
23
50
16

163
9L
37 -----6
1
29
8
5
126
88
21
33
58
51
2
27
11
7
L

60
17
15
2
L3
16
22
2

7

-

-

-

-

7
5
2

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

3

30

198
12
6
6
186

270
2L
3
21
2L6

-

30
-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

6
L7
186
7

Lo
139
7

30

82
58
52
6
2L
7
L

.

L

_

-

_

1
12

6
2
2

-

L

15
3
3

16
8
8
5

_

_

_

J

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

6
17

_

.

2
2

_

2

-

•

-

-1

-

•

•

-

•

•

H
H

-

_

_

_

-

.

-

6

-

.

-

5

-

-

-

•

_

•

2

23

3

37

_

37
37

.

2

23

21

12
6

.

51
2L
27

3

-

52
1
1

.

32
16
10
6
16
1
15

1?
15
8
7
L

_

.
.

.

-

3
-

.

L

3

3

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

P bO ^ eddiO H cU C U ld V e c t u t ic o i O cC U p o tiO n d

Table A-2*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 3/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

S

e eecupation, and industry division
x ,

Number
of
workers

$

Weekly 4 0 .0 0 1
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

Draftsmen ........................
Manufacturing ..................
Nonmanufacturing «................
Public utilities * ............
Draftsmen, junior ..................
Manufacturing ..................

3
2

A

1
1

1
1

1
9
6
2

*
. 0
. 0

0
0
0
0

.7
.7
.
.

0
0

. 0
.6 5 0

3
2

1
9

1
1
1
1

7
1

6
1

1
1

Tracers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Women
Nursesr industrial (registered) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 .
Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 . .
Durable .....................
1
1
Nondurable ..................
1
Monmanufacturing ...................................................
1
Retail trade....................................................

1
7

0
0

. 0 0
. 5 -0

-

$

1. 0 7 0 5. 5 0 0 5. 0 2 0 5. 5 5 0 . 0

5
9
8

0 1
5 3
0
0

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
4. 5 5 0 1. 0 7 0 5. 5 0 0 5. 0 2 0 .5 5 5 0 5. 0 7 0 6. 5 0 0 6. 0 2 0 6. 5 5 0 6. 0 7 0 7. 5 0 0 7. 0 2 0 7. 5 5 0 8. 0 0 0 . 0

2

4 2 .50 1

Men
Draftsmen, chief ..................
Manufacturing ..................

$

0
9

. 0
. 5

_
7- 6

_
. -5

7-

5

.- 5

6

-

5

. 5
1

. 0 - 0

-

-

1
1

0
-

-

-

0 0 -

3

-

. 0

- 0
1- 0
. 0 - 0

5-

.2 0
2

8

.5 0
1
.2 0
2

0 2
2
0
-

- 5

-

5 1
65 “

~

9
1
1

8
-

8
6
2
2

1

. 9. . . 1
0
.
. 1. . . . 1 . . . 0 . . . 5
1
0
.
5
6
1
0
.6
8
1 0 .0
5
2

5

0 7

5 7 . 02

0.8 5

5 0 8 . 00
8
8

1
6

_

. 5 - 0

0 5 6. 0 7 2 0 . 6. 5 5 5 0 0 6. 0 7 0 7. 5 0 0 . 0

0
0

. . . . . 1 . . . 0 . . . . 5. 5 . . 6 . . . . . 5 . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 1 . . . .
0
0 8
0
0 0

0 6

1

3
3

2
2
2

2
75 1 . 0 - 0
5 1
-

-

1

7
9
3
5
3

1 2
21 22
-2
-

1

1
8
6
6

1
1

1
1

5
3

2
06

U
1

2
1

1
3

1
1 2
2

8

1
-

11
- 6

-

2

6

_

6

3

2

1
3
3

5 2

2
2

72

_

2
1 22

8

7
8
2
6
-

-

-

2 2
1

1
-

-

2

8

0

-

5

3

-

-

-

-

_2 __
2

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

- J

_

_

-

.
_
-

-

-

_
-

1

2

2

—

-

_

-

.
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
» Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




2

-

-

-

18

2-

-

0

_

.

-

1 .
-

-

-

_2 _ _ _ _2 _
1

_

-

.
-

1 1 5 1 . 00 . 0

_

1 13
1 2

3
2
1

_
-

_

2
1

00

_1

5. 0 . 0 0 10

and
. 0 105a 0 0 1 0 ) 1 9 0 115.0 0c C 0 over
0 .
5. .
0

_

7
6
6

50

-

-

1 2

$

0 0
0 . 100. 0c 9 1

_

- 2
-

091

2

3

3

8. 05

6 6
3

9
91

1 1 13

0

0. 0

7
7

2

2

3
1

7

3
3

1
1

1 30
5
5
23

1
1
1

1
1

2

0 9

-

9.

M 'oU U eM O M Ce CMU& P a w ** P la n t 0cC *tfuU *O *tA .

T b * A-3:
al.

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation and industry division.

Carpenters, maintenance
Manufacturing .... ......... *..... .........
Nonmanufacturlng ••••••••••••••••«•••••••••••••••*•

232
1*
10
92
28

"3
1

Electricians, maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ............... *........ .....
Durable ........ ................... .
Nondurable •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........... ............ .
Retail trade ........... .4.......,...,,.....,

398
"335

Engineers, stationary ........... ..... ........
Marrafartnrlng ttt..T....r.tttttt1ttttttttfttttttl||
TYurmhl*
ttttmtM ttttiti
Nqndurable •••••••»•... ... .... ........ .
Nonmanufacturlng ••••••............ .
i trade •••••••••••••••••••••*•••••••••«•••
i
Services

281

Firemen, stationary boiler ......... ............
Manufacturing ... .........................
Dttrable
Nondurable... ••••»•••••..... ........... *
jfnrnnannfang
T.Tr.tTtlt ,»»..?» «•««..•■ ■■«•••
Retail.trade

2lh

121
63
15

3k
9U
111
136
i
|2
S3
152

~usu—
33
71

is

22

Helpers, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••*•••••

Pnf a41

*
. .. .

...
............................... ..............
......

.
•

.
.

1.58
15
"1.65
1.67
1»59
1.5l ?/is
1.6U

3*92
1.92
1.91
1*93
1*88

379
” 538—
112
126
ua

1.81
1.86
1.71
1.89
1.81
1.87
1.86
1.80

•

•

6*
1
10
A/

•
•

.
.
•

13
13
12
1
•

12
12
12
.
•

•

m
,

•
•

l

16
*

.
l

•

15

9
9
7
2

•
•

3
5
9

*
51 I 28 63 13
31 23 “ f5" 36
10
8 56
1
*
21 IS
32
c
7
7
20
9
a
7
10
9
1

•
•

•
•

•

8
•

2
•

8
7

_

•

-

-

8

2

7
1

10
10
3
7
-

18
16
11
5
2
2

35
32
8
21*
3
3

23
23
13
10
•

11
10
j
.
u
6
1
1

38
ao
9*
a
29
6

21
■U

_
20
2

8
1 19 52
*
3 “ I T “ 5T — r
■
a
t
s 10
6 12
8
*
8
8

-

•

•

.
•
•

.

-

13
10
6

•
•

l%-

•

1
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7
T— F
2
3
t
1
9

19
18
18
_
1

20

8
2
1
1
6

ll
it

3i
l6
307
169
138
39

32

.
.
•

l6
f

23

- ____________
_________________________________

....................................

_
•
.
.

11
J
,

Durablf ............ ......... .........
Nondurable ................ .........

f.i*a«4n _ _ - _ _ _ __ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _________ _ ___ _ * . . . *
_ __ __

1.90
1-00
-- 7
*. 7
2.01
1.99
1.81
1-07
■U7 f
1#56

5
•
5

1.57
1^ 8
1.52
1*63
1. S
.Q
1.1*6

Machinists, maintenance .......... .

DiiWH*
UKaImosl m

1.92
1.95
1.89
1.96
1.93
1*89

3*
16
—
138
ISO
58

pf|fnh^
iiyn*^
r{^ i t t t n i m t i m i m ■11 t ti m i m i
-i r
i
D i IA%mf*14f^as n _________ _____ __ __
iK r
1

Maintenance men. general utility ••••••••••••*••••••••
Manufacturing .... ....................... .
Durable ................ ...............
Nondurable ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••*

Aeae
vrg
2.2£ $
1 . 0 f.35 f.ko i.16 f.50 f.55 f.a> f.6S f.70 i.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 i.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 L 20 $
*3
2.30 *2.35 * . * * - . &
2 1 0 2 1 5 2.$0$2.60
hul
ory
e r i g Under and
a nns
1*30 under
.*
O .i
f . 5 If h l l 5 1.S0 1.55 lt60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.8Q 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 1 0 i,l6 2.50 2.66 2*70
L3
$
12
1*96
l 21
1
8
6 1*
1
$
5
«
?
1 15
*
9 11
3 6? u
1 * 18
1
.
.
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_ 13 10
1.86
2 63
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9
9
3
5
3
.
.
•
•
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12
2.11
6
21
1
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8
1
8
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1
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3
3
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1
2
2
1
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6
1.83
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3
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8
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n
9 id
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2
2

9
9
9
-

18
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17
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15
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2
1

22
7
1
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3
15

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1
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8
25
11 — 8
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9

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3

37
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27
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7

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36
36
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11*
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9
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32
30
28
2
2

5
1
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1
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•
1
1

72
ia
35
6
31
e
e

12
12
5
7
•

3$
36
6
30
•

1?
£
c
9
1
13
ii
X9

30
i5
1
u*
15
8

1
*

9
c
9

8
g
g

6
5
5

5
1
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11
10
2
8
1

27
27
c
9
22
•

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2
2
2

k
L
4

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'
28, 1 8
17
*
6
3
22 11
**

-

L
*
*
£

9 38
2 “ 31
2
3
• 28
7
7
13
12
5
7
1

6

l

13
8
7
1

50
1*6
20
26
1
*

.

18
*
15
*
ia
1
*
3

16
16
10
6

71
71
12
*
29

ID
10
2
8

29
20
17
3
9
£
3

33
21
21

21
3
3

26
-

88
80

-

•

•

-

12

18

2

4
l.
H

1

6

15
6
2
1
*
9
9

-

26
10
16

80
8

5?
18
*
16
*
2
11
8
1
-

1
7

8




1
.
-

-

7
7
1

6
5

7
•

•

2
.
2
2

6
.

1

lk

1
1

11
I
i

_
-

.

_

.

8
7
7
1

3?
39
1
38

•
•
•

2
-

1
1
-

2
2
2

-

•

•

-

-

10
3
7

2

1

.

3

6
1
1
•
5

16
6
6

•
3

•
-

1
1

_

2

-

•

.
.

•

-

-

-

-

>

•

10
10
-

•

-

•

10

•

-

!

-

-

•

3
3
•
»
3

2
2
2

•

•
•
-

•
•

•
•

•

-

1

•a

9

|

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*

«
•
•

1
*
•— t
1
.
4
_

.
■

12 15
10 I T
2
3
8 12
2

.

•
•

L

Occupational Wage Survey, aansas City- Mo.. October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT (r LABOR
f
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10.

Tabi* x 3 Maintenance and Pouf* Piant Occupation* - Continued
-:
(Average hourly earnings 1 / Tor men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo,, by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and Industry division

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)

•«•«,,«•••»«

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ _ 5.
Number A e a e
vrg
2.60
$
* . * 2.50 *
L
$
.30 L.35 L 1 0 L.U5 L.50 L.S5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 L.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 1.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.1 0 2 1 5 *
.*
of
hul
ory
w r e s e r i g Jnder and
okr
anns l
mder
L,30
.*
.50 l*55 L.60 1.65 1.70 l*i$ 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.2s 2.30 2.35 2.1 0 2 1 5 2.50 2.60 2.70
* .*
£35 L 1 0 i.i£ L
l7
»0

IS

T o A C trad* __T__„TTT__
t^-]

18
*
10
*3
221
118

$
17*
.1
1*91
18*
*1
loi
ll
1,72
1*68
1*76

ias
308
126
18?
107

2li

1.86
'
W
!U82
n 8i
*
1*95
1#85

Millwrights.......................... .......
190
Manufacturing ••••... ........... ......... ,,, ” TS0
IWnkl*
_
121
nondurable ......... ........... ......
69

38

.

3
3

90
3
3
87
30
50

n

57

38
35

3

_

cj

xx
0
7

Monmanufacturing.......... .,............. .

•

-

.

8
. -~r
2

15
12

1
1
x

•

•

•

•

12
3

.

6

22
19
7
12
3

£l
ut
«✓
$

28
21*
i
t
20

56

2*00
2i05
2.0l
*
19*
.1

Mechanics, maintenance •«««..... ........... .
Manufacturing ............................••*

$*
2
2

1*6
1*6
22

k

15
3
0
j
32

*

2
k
Cil

x

$?

32

XL
?*
*
n

■
a
28
x
x

x
x
y

61
55
19

19
*
13
*

6
5

18
6
5

2
2

5
L
U
a
i
J
L
x

3
x
x
2
2

15 10
*
3k ~ T

9
1

-

1
X
n
n
XX

5
1
*

X
8

3k
3*
l
•)
a,
jl*

2
2
2

65
0
63

2

30
li
f
6
12
12

1

35
18
2
16
17
x1
17
K

65

x
x

1*1
9
X
2
L
<
$
32

12
2
2

36
36

-

.

JO

.

•

_

10

1
-

1
-

1

-

1

I

1.1 8
*
123
— 153— — i & r
69
l ll
.s*
t .X
o
tiiittiiiittttttttiMtiiniiimiiitti
3*
1
**?/
l#ll
j
,t»»»T« irtiTtiititriintimi tt»* t
t
20

Oilers ......................................
p^irahla

t T t t 1 t t . t r t r t r t t t t T t , t t l t t 1 t t 1 f . . t . rt1f lt

a

162
- 55
52
a iTitiitttttiiititmtmttntttiitttii
3*
1
Nonmanufacturing ,,,,,..... .
76
p^Kllr
17
1
tinttlttittfrtttiTT-irtttTflttt'rttl
13

Painters, maintenance
Manufacturing ..... ..,....... ...............

1*97
£89"
1*85
1*95
2.06
1*88
2.06

1
*
1
*

1
*

1

-

1
*
!
9 19 i . 10 12
*
—
— gT 39 ! — ! 30 — y
5
6 39
1 10
3 10
7
1
!
1
k
! 3
.
•
-

-

u*
11
**

•-

-

ia

1
*
29
29 — r
i
t
xi
18

1
x
x

3
3
3

n

7
1
*

7
1
*

3

-

.

i
t
3
3

i
t
3
3

1
x

n

n

11
XX

6
6
2
1
*

18
18
18
.

1

L
a

i

1
*
1
l x

8
8
8

3
x
2

.

_

16
1*
1
12
2
2
2

17
10
10
7
7
*

2
2
2

5
1
*

31
l

.

5
5
3
2

L
a
1

1
30

x

M a m f s H '.i i H

........................................................ ............................................

imp

T k in ih la

nondurable

. . . . . . . . . a . , , . . . , . . . , , , , , . . ,

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ...............................................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D im k la . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _. . . . . . . . . . .

itnititrtt titttin ittttmtiiti «,*«,,

212
232
109
103
110
— 155

22
8*
1

2.01
— &5T"
1*96
2.06

5

— tr

|

£

w

■ 7J
L*

1*85

1
x
x

31
Tl

22
0
7

1.87
— n

1
*
L

4
K
4

—

2

3
3
2
x

~

2

H*
xt
l
9

12

2*
1
2*
1
7
*
17

L-

1
x
x

52
52

23

1

1
*

27

2% — a
r

27
fc 1

oa

27
1

L
a

2

13
13
xx

2

11
**
ua
8
16

2

55
55
x
5i
i

2
2

.7

1
*
— a
r

1
*
5
x — f
<
x

2

2

xn

3

■
a

x

2

1
Tool-and-dia makers ........... ............... .
Ourahle

207
207
207

2*09
2*09
2*09

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work,
7j Workers were distributed as follows! 3 at $1,20 - $1,25} 12 at $1,25 - $1.30.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




.

_

-

13
1

•

13
I'?

1
x
x

33
jj

33

3?
•
jo
J7
39

37

?

17

2

1f
7

2

20
20
20

kt
i
11
**
k*
l

.

«

_

•

1
12

•

2

1

Pise fitters, maintenance .......... ..........

.

.

_

5

12
k
11 1 •
x
0
5
1
l

12

n
n

68
68
68

6
— g~

x

-

10
10

1
1
X

18
18
18

11.

able A-4:

G u A ia d io l. W ateU o H A U u f (U td S lU ftfU H ty G cC M fuU iO tU

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, No., by industry division7 October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ...
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

$
1 .5 3
1.1*7

57
33
33

1 .5 1
1 .5 5 "
1 .5 2
l .63
1 .1 7
•97

2l*l
82
39

Nonmanufacturing

lb

Janitors, porters,and cleaners (men) •••••••.»••»•••
Manufacturing .... ........•••••••••»•••••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ...... ...... ••••••••...
Nonmanufacturing •••••••... .
Public utilities * ....... .
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ....... • • • • • • • • • . • • . • • • . . . ....
F in a n c e

**

, t t ir T r r r i. t . » t T . T t . t t T . t t T l . T r t t t i r t r

Janitors, porters.and cleaners (women) • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Manufacturing ...... .. ........ .. ... .. .... ..
Nanmanufacturing .............•••••••••••...
Public It111t1e9 * ..fMM.ttMMtttrtMttmt
I. .
Retal 1 trade ttMtttumtmmttttt mtitt tt
Finance
rmttitTftfittmtttttrfMttHtu

312
—

W

1,561*
U61

Packers (men) ...... •................. ......
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

5

Nondurable goods •... .
Noonanufacturing ... .......... ......... .
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ..........................

.9 6
“ m

256
6U
U5
133

295
1 ,1 0 3
95
629
379

T ttT T rT rT T T T rT T fT T r T T tfttfrtt#tt

-

-

-

1

1

-

.
-

_

1

166

877
W ~

159
371
3U7
281
66

;

21 ;
!

i "

.9 3
1 .0 9
.97
•8 6

1

_

5

5

b

O

1 11
.**

99
1
1
97

!

63
55
53" ~ W

19
3

5

27
1
16

20 1

_
3

1

-

„

$

$

$

$

3

63

-

1*9

6

3
16

.

-

1
1
1

_

_

8

5
3
3

-

3
3
3

.
-

.
8
8

_

$

$

$

-j

1 .3 5

3

_
»

-

•
•

2
2

_

-

1

5

H*
-

H*

_

-

6

16
-

1*
1
-

6

81
21

37
6

9

6

-

6

3
3
3

hi

1*7

3

1*7

.

.

266 11$ 221* 180
70 " I T Y~W n o
7
27
30
28
1*0 51*
82
32
6$
61 132
70
133 196
12
6
8
58
9
1*1
1*
9
26 127
12
51 111
n
83
3
b
l*
l
1*3
15
28
9
19

1
1

_

3

9

88 209
55 1$0
37 131
18
19
33
59
7
37
1* 12
8
10

1?3
135
39
96
58
22
8
17

22
n
1
10
n

8

137
ll5
19
96
22
7
5
10

39

16
10
6

1
1
1

-

8

172

_

' W
1 .U *

1.1*3
1 .2 1
1 .2 1
1 .2 3

-

12
1*
8

1

r "

1 .1 3

12

-

-

i

116
.*
1 .3 5
1.1*5
1.1*1*

99

27

21 !

1 .3 8
■

5

lb

26
13
13
7
6

1

26
23
3

1

18
18

19

1*6

25

115
80

30
r i r

-

19

_

$

$

$

$

.
16
*
32

-

-

25

22
~

T

80
35

1
1

1*0
2

2
38

20

20

3

3

83
la

21
20
1*2

19

ll*

9
16

9
6

15
3

35
7

10

18

31*
19

10
7

2

18
12

77

19
15
12
3

7
3
3

-

21

6

.

_

_

6
6

60
60

31
31

9

10

18

•

6

•

9

k

18

_

2

2
2
2

8
8
8

70
61
61

21
20
8
12
1

1?
10

3
8

1
ii

3

3

.

37
16
16

.

_
_

21+
21*
21*

33
32

_

_

32
l

9
2

210
202
202

10
9
7
2

2
7

-

_

2
2

?
2
2

1

2

1+6
1+6
8
38

81+
81*
81*

1+ lal*
2
1+ 101*
2
23
19 101+

3

-

.

•

•

_
_

-

-

_
_

_

_

-

.

-

.

_
-

-

-

J

7

8

_

m

3
_

8
.

190 u+i+ 271 269
12 2*
1
59
51*
39
21 12 2b
29
31*
.
20
30 18
38 131 10$ 2$9 21*5
b2
2
10 10$ 220 138
36
79
39
91*
-

2?

101*

63

“ fe lT 9 l” W
1
86
ll*
1
5
3 1*7
6
62
15
15
6
60
1*
7
8
2
ll
7

2
-

-

-

3

_

17

k

17

-

1*

.

.

n

3
3

.

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), oonmmication, and other public utilities
#* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




$

3,159
1 .0 7 yi*6i* 1 70 151 230 151
“"
36
"IT
29
TT30T" ' T72E”
<
q
8
$66
1 .3 5
28
1 .2 2
16
28
20
739
.92
U6U 151* 118 201 115
1,851*
5
208
1 .1 6
i 20
16
2
183
1 .0 5
31
7' H* ii*
996
92
.89 k/313 ! 8$
95
31
b
186
2$
•91 1 13 19
31
<
ji
5
281
•80 2//xi >x 1 6
1*8
35

Order fillers ••••••••••••••••... •••••........
Manufacturing ......... .............. .
Durable goods ............... ..»••••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........ •••••••............
publ1c n . 1 1 1.1 on * i i i i i n t i i i i m m m i i m i
t1
Wholesale trade ....... ••••••••••••••••••»••
Retail trade •••••••••••••••••••••••••••... .

T feirab le

2
2
2

-

-

.

l.b7

362

Guards ........ •••••••.••••••••••••••..... .....
Manufacturing ... ............... •••••••••••
Durable goods ...... ••••••••••••••••••••••••-

$

Under0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0 .8 $ 0.90 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 $ 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 $ 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 i . $ o i . 5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 $ 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 $ 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2.00
and
and
$
0 .7 5 under0 .8 $ 0.90
0 .8 0
0,?5 1 .0 0 1 .0 $ 1 .1 0 1 .1 $ 1 .2 0 1 .2 $ 1 .3 0 1 0 5 l.lfO 1.1+5 1 .5 0 i . 5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 $ 1 ,7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1.8 $ 1 .9 0 1.95 2.0C over

202
15S
12
1 1 *6
1*1*

1*3

1

6$
“

ST

1*8
17
17

55
38

k

-

-

81+
35
25

.

1*9

.

1

•

10

1
+

_

1
3

1
1*8

21+
10

22
21
21

38

10

17

H*

16
1

5

9

ll*

1*

3

-

-

10

18
18
18

1

12
10

10

10
1
1

_
_

.
.

1

-

-

10
.
•

2
_

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, No., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12,

Table

Gu&toduU, WateUou&tiup and SUipfUtup ^ ^ m p a ije n i (Average hourly earning8 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis In Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$ _ $
$
$ „$
$
$_ $
$ „
$
$
$ ,
*
8 . $
Under0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.bo l.b5 1.50 i.5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 $1.85 1.9C $1.95 2.00
and
and
*
over
0.75 under
0*80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.bO 1.b5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.9Q 1.9*: 2.0C

Packers (women) .................... ........
Manufacturing ........••••••••••.....
Nonmanufacturing ......... ......... ......
Retail trade ...... ............ ...... .

8bl
525
316
26b

Receiving clerks .......................... •
Manufacturing ..........
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufactaring ....... •••••••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ........ ...............
Retail trade ............... ..... .....

273
"S i
79
65
129
5b
71

Manufacturing ......... .............•••••••
Unrahle
s tTTfTtT.Ttf1tT*-T.-rTrttTtttltt#,
Nondurable goods, •••«••*•..........•••••••••••«
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade .............. ......
Retail trade

Wo

Siipping-and-receiving clerks .................
Maiufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing .......... ...............
Wholesale trade
Retail trade

75
U5
113
70
b3
503

101
117
285
150
50

l.b7
1.36
1.55
1.57
1.65

Truck drivers, light (under 1* tons) ....................................
Manufacturing....................... .................................... ..
Durable goods ................................

ii09
119
60
59
290
29
157
9b

Whole sale trade

Retail trade

51
“

51
51

.
-

-

-

l.b 0
1.1*3“
1.50
l.bO
1.37
1.39
1.27
1.38
l«b2
1.5b
1.29
1.36

l*k6

l.bb
1.18

61 162
9 111
52 21
52 21
.
-

12
12

21
6
2— r

8
8

1
1

3

6
2

«
.

6

“

•

2

-

.
-

•

8
6

6

-

17

6

-— r

•

8
2
6
6

17
3
lb

6
6
—

8
8

”

-

-

b" 255
bl 15
21 15

12

”

_
-

69 n o
29 85
bO 25
bO 25

_
-

“

-

_

3
3
.

-

-

.
-

8

270

2
19
19

.

6

“

10
3

6
6

3
7
b
3

8

•

6

b
-

b
b

-

•

-

-

-

•

•

lb ! 27
I 13

lb
lb

13

b2
1

16
12

ib

26

lb

lb
12

-

•

12
b
h

19

59

72
36

5
39
20
19

11
-

-

57

36

_

_

.

.

-

2

b9
20
3
10

3b

1

3b
b

l

b

1
1

5

10
7n
1
6
3

17
r
b
2
11

3

.

•

b

.

b

lb
lb
15
4
15

-

1

5
b
b
1

8

l

bb

5
3
2

6
2

-

2

r

18
17

b
1

b
-

•

1^

-

17
8
8
1

3b
2IT
21
3
10

8
7
3
b
1

n

1

10

1

12
10
10

20
20
18
2

22
12

8
10

-

2

“

1

2

6

98
31
1
30

16

1

6
6
•

.

67
3
2

16

-

-

31

lb
10
b
17
b
6

.

.

L
4
.

6

23
2
12
9

}?

16

3
13
23
2
21

b6
28
12
16

18
18

6

6

_

6

17 12
3— 5
2
6
.
1
6
lb
_
lb
6

36
19
9
10
17

51
bo

11
9

bb

32
n

9
2

.

0

51

21

-

1
1
1
_

.
.

.
_

-

10
12
3
9
39
32

.

-

10
1

325 377 908 527 250
U5 257 757 66 8b
6
97 219 32 26
18 38 725 bO 78
210 120 151 U61 166
6 25 17 129
U3
20 63 77 38 37

2?
6

1
1
1

1

-

_
_

1
1
1

-

36 17
3IT
9
25
2
17

. i

-

b

-- S n
T

b5 660
60
1
b
23 56
21 600
9 579
n
13

bb

»

-

2

bb

8

1

I

b5
6

-

6

6
b

_

70 1081 71
n
72 T T
-

8
8

2
3
3
-

1 1
1 -

2
2
2

lb

19
19

- 1
-

b
b
b

5
2

_
-

13
13
13

b
38
3
32

m
»
.

.
-

-

-

26
•

1

-

!

!
8 56 i 7? 37
10 ! 9 ! 12
- 1 _ !
- i
10 i 9 12
8 I b6 70 25
3 28
b
8 b3 b2 21

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), courmnication, and other public utilities,




•

“

l.b 9

— 2IB

b.59b
2,011
711
1,300
2,583
1,263
657

Nonmanufacturing..... ••••••.... ••••••••«••••«
PnM 1 r utd

i.l»4
l.b'9~
1.6b
1.31
1.U2
1.39
l.b 3
l.b8
1.U5
1.5b
l.bo
1.52
1.50
1.56

303

§tock handlers and truckers, hand .....................................
Manufacturing
Durable goods .................. ••••••••
Nondurable goods •••••««•••••••••••......... •••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ...... ............ •••••
Retail trade ......................................................................

Nondurable goods

$
0.98
.97
.99
.93

_

2

21
lb

10
Ac
2

7
b
3

17

18
2
2

26
22
22

1

16
15
1

b

1

10

ib
lit

10

8

3b
15
19

0

-

•
-

)
.
H

15
15

b7

28
10
10

17 , 52
.

18
17
1

17
12
5

26
n

3
3

15

-

97 3,29 603
71 b3 211
.
166
b7
2b b3 b5
26 86 392
•
13 302
22 21 87

71
71
59
12

66
57
b9
8
9
9

61
5

1
1

1
1

lb
1

9331
29
2
50

lb
_

t

26

•
•

1

lb

7

y?

u
4

7

lb

-

9

•

6
6

1

8

6

6

—

_
.

8

6
6
-

16
16
16

•
_

—

•
-

.

9
6
3

-

15
8
8

•
.
-

.

•

-

56
7

>

26

1

1
1
1

1

b
b
2
2

3
2
16

21
11
10

1
1

1

.

26
10
16

5

-

- 1

•
m

•
•
-

-

_

•
m
m

13

G u & to d ia l, W a*eit044A 44U } a n d S U lp fU H J f GcCHfZcUiOHA - 3 o fit£ < n a * d

Taole A-4:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for sexwcted occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Kansas City, Mo., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS >

O

T

r u
M

c

k

n

N
o
W
T

r u
r

a

r u
M

a

t

c

k
i

c
D
V

N

k

r u
M

p

u
r
n

n
u
ha

r

a

t i o

n

c

i v
e
r s
t u
r i n

a

n

d

Number
of u
workers

i n

d

,
m
e d i u
g. . . . . • . . •. . •. • . • • • «

r i v
e
r s
,
h e a . .v . . y . . . . .
. . c. . . t . u. . . r. . i . n. . . g. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . .-.
n f o
n g
i i
ca p
r • i t i l ■ i * • *i • / * t t
t
r
t
t
s a l
m
m

e

n
o

o

u

m
b
anI

s

Average
t
hourlyr
earnings

r s .
p o w
e r
( f . .o . . . . r . .
f .a . . .c . . t . .u . . r. . .i . . .n . . . . . g. . . . . . . . . . . . . * . . . . . .• . . . . . • . . . . . «. . —.
a b l e
g . o. . .o . . d . . .s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ha
n g r t ay t vh t l l pT
m
r
t i f i
a n . . u . . .f . a . . c. . . t . u . . . r . i. .n . . g. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .
l i c
u t t . . i U t t t .t 1 , f t i sr T t * T
a al t . ^
s / in f i f
t
Tm t i
n
t
i
t

c k e r s .
D
f l t n f a . f . i .t j . t .H

o
.

w
n.

s
gt

r•
t

t

$
$
n 0 dd . e i 7 0 vr 5 . i 80 s 0. i 8 0 o 5 . n 90
a n d
. 7u 5 n d e r
0 . 90 0 . 8 0 5 . 9 0 0 . 9 1

yU
1
0

$
l 9 1£ 3 . 1 * t 3 o
a n d l i
• • U 1 . • . . . •. .1 . • . .* •- . . 9 . . -. ' • • • • o 1 . 1 * 9
U • 1 • . 1« * 8 • • • • • • • •
•
9
1 . 1 3 * 2u •
1 1 . 1 * 7
3
_
. 2 8 .
l i
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, 6
6
8 1

.6 ( 6o 1 v * 1 e . r5 6 1 *
.- 7 ~' T. . . f i o
. -. .T- I m
t
1 .5t8 T
t1 * t 7 1 . t 5o t
m
2
t 3 i5 m 1 J ^ 3t t
2 8 5 1 .6 6

d
r i v
e r s
,
h e a v y
( o
v e r
e . . . .r . . . . .t . v. . . n . . . e . . . ’ i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . 1. . . . *. .3 .1 . . 5
1, 66"
7 b

l

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p
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a n
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N n r t m
a n
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U
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h o l e s . .a . . l . e . . . . . .t . r . . a . . . . . d . . . e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . .* 3
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a

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c

k. 1. . * - 7 l 8 1 i f . 5t
. . . . 3 •1 0• . 6•6
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7
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11




1

.
-

•

1

3

i

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to *> workers except where otherwise indicated.
■
Workers were diatribe d as follows: 3 at $0.50 - $0.55j 57 at $0.55 - $0 .60 } 127 at $0.60 - $0.65} 29 at $0.65 - $0.70} 21*8 at $0.70 - $0.75.
Workers were distvibt .u
follows: Hi at $0.55 - $0.60} l O at $0.60 - $0.65} 26 at $0.65 - $0.70} 233 at $0.70 - $0.75.
i
Workers were distril .“
ved
follows: 3 at $0.50 - $0.55} 36 at $0.55 - $0.60} 76 at $0.60 - $0.65} 3 A t $0.65 - $0.70} 13 at $0.70 - $0.75.
Workers were distrlbu.— as follows: 1 at $0.55 - $0.60} 5 at $ 0.60 - $0.65; 23 at $0.65 - $0.70} 2 at $0.70 - $0.75.
All 20 workers were at $0.65 - $ 0 . 7 0 .
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $0.55 - $0.60} 5 at $0.60 - $0.65} 3 at $0.65 - SiMPt
$0.70 « $0.75.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities

a

.

.

X *

f
17
*j

i

t

j

!
r

7

JI

H

6

6

1

|
i

_

2
2

i

3\

_

I

. .
. .
1
1

•

6

2

i

W

L

7

2 1 * 6
1*
« 5 * 6 t 7
80
162

6 1*8 3 22
1
1 3 "1
~W 12 9
11 9
*
3
20
10
3
7
1
6
7Q

7

3

2

3
?t
1
1

8
6
6

2

66

1

7
6
1
*
2

n

7

)8

2

2

$
. \ 8 . 08 $ 1 S . * 9 1 0 . 2 9 . 5 0 0
a n d
,5 8 1 Q . 81 .950 1 . 92 5 . 0o 0 v e r
71 5

>

. 71

1

7 • 2 6• 6 1 0 i a .
1 9 5 1 6 * 33
T 1 IA Q / 1
Y L
6•
2
2 5
3
. 0 2 1 61 * 9 1 0 2
6
6

. I 6 s , 7,5 .

.55

* 5

) 1 3 2 3 197 0 5 9
1
16 T u 9
1* i i 1 . 7 l i *8 n
l
n
1 3 5 10
6
9
l l *
3 5

i

1

Q7
2

1

5
9
1
8
6
2
1 *

1*

21
18

8
2
-

1*

3

2
6

1

1

_
.
-

.

1

1

6
1

1
X

1

6
10*
s - *- - 5 - - -

*

6

•

l * u

6
-

•

2

•i

14.

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
l'abio B-2oi: Q ia U t M illin g 1/

1/ The study inoluded establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of flour and other grain mill products (Group iU
£41) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers; all occupations were paid on a time basis.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work-.

Table B-2337* T i/om & tt'A

CHtd M iA A eA ' 8 o a t&

OH&

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/
All plant occupational Total ..................
Men..................
Women... .............
Cutters and markers (men and women) j / ....... .
la
Men 2/a ..................................
Women j/a ................................
Inspectors, final (examiners) ( men and
5
29 women) j/a .............................
Pressers, hand (all women) , /b ....... ...........
2
Prossers, machine (men and women) 2/b.... ........
Msnl/b..................................
Women J / ................................
2b
Sewers, hand (finishers) (all women) ^ / b ...................................
Sewing-machine operators, section system
.........................................................................
..............................

Thread trimmers (cleaners) (all women) , /
2a

1,900
264
1,636
112
54
58

$
1.33
1.58
1.29
1.51
1.99
1.05

34
120
91
75
16
271

1.24
1.32
2.00
2.08
1.63
1.15

824
85

1.48
.92

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$^ $
$
$
$
$
$
$ . $
$„ $^ $
$
$
Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40
and
$
undar
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.002.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60
1
1
-

-

163 139 147 120
8 17 11 22
155 122 136 98
- 14
8! 3
-1
- u
8i 3
j
1
1
1! *
3
6
6
51 7
45 25 26 15
i
9 38
34 ! 26
30
5 23 10

67
3
64
5
5
1
3
1
1
20

132 111 149 139 109 115 85
8 13 7
17 10 12 13
115 101 137 126 1C1 102 78
- 11 1
13
4
1 - 10
1
13
4
3
5
-

19

2
16
3
2
1
21

7
13
5
2
3
21

3
14
2
2
19

3
16
6
5
1
11

5
8
5
4
1
10

8
6
3
3
5

68
13
55
4
4

74
27
47
18
18

45
13
32
5
5

32
13
19
11
11

30
11
19
4
4

28
6
22
2
2

26
8
18
1
1

10
2
8
_
-

15
5
10
.
_

7
5
2
1
1

- , 2
3
8
6
6
5
2
1
11
8

1
3
7
7
3

2
8
7
1
3

1
-

•

-

-

-

4

7
6
1
1

4
4
3

8
7
1
1

1
2
2

_
1
4
4

_
4
4

_
_
4
4

-

-

-

-

41

26

14

17

19

15
1

7

9

2

2

_

“

“

-

-

80
15
65
7
7

-

6
4
2

1
1
_
_
_
_

1
1

_
1
„

X

_

-

-

1

17
1

45 (446 and 820 women) 2/b 61
men 82 84 68 68
2
1
1
3
4
4

48

46

1

-

-

1/ The study covered establishments with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
?ur coats and single skirts were excluded from the study. Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were included. Data relate to a September 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
( ) All or predominantly time workers.
a
T . . DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
JS
( ) All or predominantly incentive workers.
b
Bureau of labor Statistics




15

Table P-35*

M aclu*t& uf UndtUbUei. 1/

1 / The study covered firms vith more than 20 workers in the machinery (n o n e le c tr ic a l) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945
e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget) establishments manufacturing machine-tool acessories with 8 or more workers were included*
2/ Data limited to men workers; all occupations were paid on a time basis*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
( J Includes data far operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.

Table B-40* R cU l*0€U fa 1 /
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

y
Carpenters, maintenance .................__,.T..T.T
Electricians, maintenance •••••••••••••••*••••••••••
Helpers, trades, maintenance
Machinists,
ntananft* .......tt..tftTttfttttlttttt
Maintenance men, general utility •••*•••••••••••••••
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...................................
Mechanics, maintenance •*•••••••••••••••••••*•••••••
Painters, maintenance .............
Pipe fitters, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plumbers, maintenance •••••••••••••••••*••••••••••••
Sheet-metal workers, maintenance «••••••••••••••••••
Janitors, porters.and cleaners
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ••••••••••••••••*•
Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) •••••.................... ..
Truck drivers, medium (lj to and including 1 tons) •
Truckers, power (fork-lift) .... •••••...... .

360
179
810
319
12
*7
6

309
51

55
21
16
*
137
508
19
97
10
*

%

1*89
i.<n
1*62
1*92
1.82
1.88
18*
.1
1.81
I.89
1.89
1.86
1.U5
1.56
1.53
1.70
1.57

$
$
$.
$
$
$
$L.10 L.15 L.20 L.25 L.30 1.35 1 1 0 1.U5 1.50 1*55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75
**
$
$
and
under
6$
.*
L.15 L.20 L.2? L.30 1.35 1 1 0 U 5 1.50 1.55 Lf60 1. 1*70 1.75 1,80
1

2_

19
*

1 * 111 2 1
1 1 *** 1 *

_

15

L
4

_

2

*♦

10

_
-

-

.

20

22
1
*

.

2
86
18 103 262
10
»
1
5
6 26
1

7
1

•
oc
pp
H*

i*

266
7
1

q

$

,* ,*
1.90 1.95 2,00 2.05 2,10 ?.i5 2,20 2,25 2.30 2.35 2 1 0 2 1 5

c
86
2 <<
-p p

O
l
ti
179
ood
« ?
99
cp

1
g

17
pp

9

7

X

1
X

1
X

"
I
X

i

X

c
0

C
C

1

X

1
X

1
0
c

12
27

1

19

3

$

1.85 1.90 1.95 i.oo 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 *2.35 *2.U0

APP

90
7

h

88

§* 1 CO
•
i
H

Occupation 2/

12<

5
2

5

75
1

_

6

2

1/ The study covered companies with more than 20 workers, engaged in furnishing transportation by line-haul railroad, and certain services allied to rail transportation, such as sleeping and dining car
service, railway express, and switching
te’
mir*! comopni.es*
2/ Data limited to men workers; all occupations were paid on a time basis*
Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Ms., October 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




l.
6

Table B-5452* M d k Jb a a lt'ti 1 /

i E ? OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O F-

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

Engineers, stationary............. - ......
Filling-machine tenders ...................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ..........
Order fillers ...........................
Pasteurizers ............... .............
Refrigerator men .........................
Sanitary men............................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Vashers, bottle, machine ..................
Washers, can, machine .....................

21
40
42
26
24
41
62
26
24
10

*
1.86
1.37
1.57
1.42
1.52
1.37
1.37
1.46
1.37
1.37

$
$
$
$
!
$
I
!
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2
H S 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6C '-6* j .70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35
and
under
l
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7C 1.75 !l.SO 1.85 1.90 1 9_5 2.00 2.05 2.10 2,15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.3? 2.40
»

*
40
.
41
62
24
10

- ! 21
.

•
26
1

-

-

_
22

42
_
2

_

-

- ,
_ 1
l

« 1
- 1
i

25

_
1 «

_
-

_

_
_

_

«

_

.
_
_

•

I
!
1
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

weekly
earnings

y
Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail 5/ . .
.
Routemen (driver-salesmen), wholesale £/

$
..o&5XCf50.ocl;f55.00 f6o.oo|:f65.00
L 50 I20.00&5.00 f30.00l35.00(iiooj
Under 70.00 ^ . 0 lo.oo 85.00 90.00 95. 00100.00 i 5 0aio.od: L . 0
$ j0
0
50
and
and
I under
U5.0C 150.00155.00160X0 165.00 over
115.00ll20.00125.00130.00135.00UO.OOl:
70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00idoo.oci05 .odno.ool:

I

307
78

93.00
106.00

24
4

16

4

20

5

27

3

32
3

42

22

34

4

25
3

13
9

1/ The study covered retail establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Bata limited to men workers.
,2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all occupations were paid on a time basis.
y Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
2/ Routemen normally work a 6-day week and weekly salary data relate to this period.




Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17.

Table B-63:

Average
Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME W E E K L Y EARNINGS 0?—

2/

$

Weekly Under jo. 00 12.50 l5.oo 37.50 fo.OO & .5 0 fc.oo 57.50 jo.QO §2.50 35.00 3?.50 lo.oo I 2.50 fe.OO 17.50 170.00 | fcaoj §0.00 fe.OO 10 .00 95.00
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) *
under
30.00; 32.50 35.00 37.50 liO.OO 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75-00 80.00 R5-00 90.00 95.00 over

Men
cuerks, accounting ••••••.?........ .
Clerks, general .........................
Section heads ...........................
Tabulating-machine operators ............
Underwriters............................

O fU u/U U tO e G w U eS U s l /

%
35
16
6a

15

66

39.5
1*0.0
39.0
39.5
39.5

65.50
1*7.00
71*.00
57.00
67.00

.

.

-

.

“

-

-

-

1,
-

_

_

5

2

-

9
-

2
1
*

-

-

17

22

3
5

-

2
3

6
1
.
-

1

1
-

•
1
1
12

13
u

16
l

16

17

1
*

7

10
1

1
-

-

-

1
.

3
1
.I
1

6
.
11

•
-i
2I
l

9
_

8

2

1
*

132
16
39
37

39.5

50.50
1*8.50
1 1 .50
**
1*2.50

^ 1 a i4 re

OHT\
C\J\J

• 30

£

19 5c

38.5
39.5

|

1*5.50

e le e e

L

_ .

Clerks, general .. .................... ...
Clerks, underwriter *.... ...............
Key-punch operators ....................
Premium acceptors................... .
Section heads .............*..........
Stenographers, general .. ...... , .................................
Tabulating-machine operators ....................... ..................

202
5k
61
16
103
2**
11
17

. . . . . . . . . __ _______ ____ _____ . . .

398
31

39.0
38.5
39.0

l*5.oo
l*i.5o
1*2*00
60.50
l*7.5o

100
*.

1*0.0

119

Typists, class B .......................................... ... ....................................
Underwriters *..........................

38.5
39.5
1*0.0

T w is t f l.

c

I m

*

A

39.5
39.5

o i
7

Ii

2
-

Cfl

cn

6
1

*

2
103

8

7

-

-

1

6
5
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1*3.50

-

-

-

2
1
*

37.00
56.50

15

-

0.

-

5

l*2*5o

I
61 !
l
i

1
«

6
60

6
21
18

10
12
1

2
11
39
3

1
*
7

-

-

21

17
1
*

-

26

120

18
12

M

hi

1

1
*

3

!
1

4

23

11*
8
5
3
53
2

25
11
6

28

1
11

■3

36

10
3

-

-

5
1*2

10

2

5
16
2

35

3
0

3

3

5

!

?

1

5

1C
•
2

6

6
_
2

_

.
6
6

1
*
•
-

_

1

4

3

j

3
2

■3

j

6
■
*

1

!
:
e|

Women
Clerks, accounting ................... .
Clerks, a e t n f t H a l . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clerks, premium-ledger*card...... ...
Uxerks, file, cxas* a * • • • • • « » » • « . • • • * • • •

-

15

9
2
1
1
12
H*

£

2
2

j

1.
4

2

17

1
3
-

13
31*
2

2
2

1

.

-

-

1

1

-

11

6

5

7

3

-

1
8

3

15
3
-

_

.

•

..

_

-

»

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
2

7
3

8

1
*

6

-

3

-

3

-

.

-

-

•

2

5

.

1
-

.

.

3

1
*

2
1
1
_

_ i

_

_

2

_

The study covered Insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget*

2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these h n r *
oos




Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

c

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table

C-15* B u U d iiU f G fU U tlU ctib H

Table C-205:

January 2, 1952

Carpenters
Electricians.... .........................
Painters
Plumbers
Building laborers ........................

Table C-205:

#2.860
2.3 65
2.660
2.255
3.025
2.750
1.730

Sour 3
per
week
AO
40
40
40
40
40
40

/Z a h & li& l

July 1. 1953

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Foremen..................... .
Overmen, drawers, mixers, spongers ...
Bench hands....... ............
Auxiliary foremen........
Foremen (women) .................
Wrappers, ingredientmen, icing makers,
head checkers .................
Men helpers ....................
Women helpers ...................
Crackers and cookies:
Agreement A:
Head machinemen...............
Overmen, mixers ................
Rollermen, wrapping-machine
operators ..................
Mixers' helpers .... ......... .
Cracker packers ...............
Sweet-work wrappers and bundlers
(women) ...................
Cooky packers..... .... .
Agreement B
:
Machine captains, head mixers ....
Mixers............ ..........
Icing mixers, bakers .......... .
Drawers (sponge and sweet) .......
Mixers' helpers, assemblers'
helpers... ........ .......
Warehousemen .................
Dough feeders, flour dumpers.....
Working supervisors (women),
stackers ..................
Pan cleaners, pan dumpers, grahampan feeders, conveyormen ... .
Women icing-machine operators,
women machine carton formers ...
Sweet packers, women helpers... .




-

4 ttiH 4 4 * d

Table C'27*

July
Rate
per
hour

Classification

& C iJieSlie4,

Rate
per
hour

#1.850
1.740
1.650
1.390
1.310

Hourc
per

40
40
40
40
40

1.290 40
1.190 40
1.110 40
1.450 40
1.350 40
1.190 40
1.250 40
1.050 4
0
1.050 40
1.010 40
1.595
1.550
1.485
1.430

40
4
0
40
40

1.410 40
1.385 40
1.375

40

1.320

40

1.320

40

1.240
1.215

40
40

P A d fttu U j,

W51
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

#1.350
2.400
2.507
2.453
2.507
2.507
2.160
2.533

37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$

1.947
1.582
1.989

37$
37$
37$

2.507

37$

2.581

37$

2.333
2.439

37$
37$

2.544
2.576

37$
37$

2.250
2.500

37$
37$

2.493
2.640
2.493
2.640
2.493
2.640
2.160
2.293
2.773
2.933
2.400
2.547
2.533
2.680
2.500
2.757

37$

Book and job
Crackers and cookies - Continued
Agreement C:
Bake shop (sponge):
Machinemen, head sponge mixers ....
Sponge mixers ....................
Overmen .................
......
Mixers' helpers ...................
Dough feeders .............. .....
Sack cleaners, miscellaneous floor
workers ........................
Bake shop (sweet):
Machinemen, head mixers ......... .
O v e r m e n ....... .................. .
Mixers' h e l p e r s ..................
Dough feeders ....................
Miscellaneous warkers ............
Icing department:
Machinemen, cooks .............. .
Icing mixers .....................
Packing department:
Sponge packing:
Packers No. 22 cartons
(standard crews) ...........
Conveyor packers (standard
crews), packers from packing
tables .....................
Caddy workers .................
Sweet packing:
Floormen t r u c k e r s.... .........
Graham packers .... ............
Regular packers, hand carton
formers .....................
Tally clerks, cello bag
operators, supply girls,
scalers, machine feeders ....
Caddy stitchers, general
workers, repackers .........
Label room:
Machinemen....................
Assistant machinemen ...........
Truckmen, supply men ..........
S c a l e r s ............. ..........
Bundl e r s.......... ........... .
Closing-machine operators,
machine operators and
f e e d e r s .... ................
Stack caddies, general
workers (casers, hand
wrappers) ....... ..........
Shipping department:
Car loaders, order fillers,
packers, checkers, stockmen ....
Receiving and warehouse:
Requisition clerks, paper cutters,
car unloaders .................

i ..

#1.530
1.460
1.500
1.360
1.300

40
40
40
40
40

1.190

40

1.530
1.500
1.360
1.300
1.190

40
40
40
40
40

1.460
1.410

40
40

1.130

40

1.130
1.110

40
40

1.300
1.130

40
40

1.110

40

1.080

40

.960

40

1.510
1.460
1.300
1.260
1.100

40
40
40
40
40

1.080

40

.960

40

1.310

40

1.310

40

Bindery w o m e n ................ ............
Bookbinders ...............................
Compositors, h a n d ....... ................ .
Electrotypers.... ........................
Machine operators................... •••••
Machine tenders (machinists) ............ .
Mailers ................................ .
Photoengravers.........................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder.............. ........ ........
P l a t e n ..... .................... .
Rotary ....................... .
Pressmen:
Cylinder presses:
1 cylinder with Upham attachment
(when Upham attachment is in
operation). 1 Double Ibder or 2
cylinders: 1 offset 17 x 22
in. or over j 1 cylinder and 1
hand-fed platen; 1 cylinder and
1 automatic platen; 1 automatic
29 to 42 in.; 1 "C" Kelly or 1
Miehie »29"; 1 new Miller Sim­
plex; 1 new No. 1 Kelly, without
assistance, (under a foreman) ###>
1 2-color cylinder (under a
foreman) .......... ..............
Platen presses (hand-fed):
1, 2, or 3 presses .................
4 or 5 presses .................... .
Rotary presses:
1 single-roll (under a foreman) ....
1 double-roll (under a foreman) ....
Stereotypers:
Agreement A ......... ..................
Agreement B .....................
Newspaper
Compositors, hand - day w o r k ..... ........
Compositors, hand - night w o r k ..... ••••••
Machine operators - day w o r k .............
Machine operators - night work ••.•••••••..
Machine tenders (machinists) - d a y w o r k ...
Machine t enders (machinists) - night work .
Mailers - day work .......................
Mailers - night work .................... .
Photoengravers - day w o r k ...... .......
Photoengravers - night w o r k ..............
Pressmen, web presses - day w o r k .... ..
Pressmen, web presses - night work .......
Pressmen-in-charge - day w o r k .......... .
Pressmen-in-charge - night work ..........
Stereotypers - d aywork ............... .
Stereotypers - night w o r k ..... ...........

37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
37$

Occupatioral Ilage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
TJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19,

fable C-41:

j£ocal
Op&uUiHtf £*HfUo4f*eA

1-man cars and busses:
First 4 months .........................
5 to 8 months ..........................
9 to 12 m o n t h s .... ................... .
After 1 year ..........................

Table C-^42:

Rate
per
hour

$1,425
1.445
1.465
1.480

Hours
per
week

-

-

Art< otoS ltst4€c/z 3)440014 < 2 4 td rM &t4
d<i%
July 1, 3951
Classification

Bakery - Biscuit:
Agreement A ................ .......
Agreement B ..................... .......
Building - Material:
Heavy excavating, heavy hauling and
"A" frame truck, wreck truck and
fork t r u c k ......... ............... .
Transit Mix:
Under 5 yds........ .................
5 yds. and over ....................
Distributor t r u c k ........ .
Dump truck:
Under 10 yds. .......................
10 yds. and over ....................
Flat-bed and pick-up ..••••............
Semi-truck and steel truck •••.••......
L u m b e r ...... .................... .
Department store ..................... .
Helpers ........................... .
Flour - Milling:
Agreement A ............................
Helpers .............................
Agreement R ...................
Helpers ............................ .
Agreement C .......•••••.... ........
Agreement D .............. .
Agreement E ............... ...... .
Furniture .................................
He l p e r s ....... ......................
General - Freight:
Local pick-up and delivery ..........
H e l p e r s ........ ........... ......
Transfer ...............................
He l p e r s .
.. ....................
Grocery:
Wholesale ............. ........ .
Chain store ........ ........... .




2

:

A rtatobfrutch 3)440014

Table C-6512:

O ^U C C fe u ilcL + U f S& H M C e

ctfelp&M - Q 0HtiH44* d
July 1, 1951

October 1, 1951
Classification

Table C-4

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,370
1.425

47
47

1.815

40

1.705
1.815
1.705

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.440
1.390
1.440
1.390
1.410
1.480
1.440
1.670
1.610

40
40
40
40

hour

Hours
per
week

$1,150

40

1.090
1.040
1.100
1.0 5 0

40
40
40
40

1.450
1.380
1.400
1.650

40
40
40
40

1.680
1.525

40
40

1.415
1.465

40
40

1.675
1.625
1.400
1.150
1.750
1.670
1.200

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Hide .....................................
Ice:
Wholesale and retail:
Special delivery, cube and supply
d r i v e r s .... ....................
Helpers ............... ..........
Ice and fuel - Railroad car-icing .......
H e l p e r s ..... ....... .................
Ice Cream:
Ttnk t r u c k .... ................
Special delivery ......................
Transport truck ....................
Liquor - City d e l i v e r y .... ..............
Meat:
Packing house ................. ........
Wholesale......... ...................
Milk:
Warehouse and supply ..................
Thnk truck ................... .........
Moving:
Tractor ...............................
Helpers ............................
Paper house ..............................
P r o d u c e ................. .............. .
Railway e x p r e s s .........................
H u g ............. ........................
Soft drink - Semitrailer .................

40

1.595
1.675
1.595
1.675
1.430
1.670
1.620

December 1, 1951
Rate
per

¥>
40

40
40
40
40
40

1.353

48
48
48
48

1.610
1.675

40
48

1.403
1.348

I.403

Table C-542:

Q u tt& U ,

December 1, 1951
Classification

Retail:
Head meat cutters .....................
Journeyman meat cutters ..........
Apprentices:
First year ••••••••••........ ......
Second year .......................
Third y e a r ................... .....
Female employees:
First 6 months ••«........ .......
Thereafter ........................
Wholesale:
Apprentice meat cutters ..............
Semi-skilled workers ..........
Skilled meat c u t t e r s ..... ............
Unskilled w o r k e r s .... ............... .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1.94
1.79

45
45

1.29
1.40
1.53

45
45
45

1.03
1.13

45
45

1.21
1.44
1.68
1.21

45
45
45
45

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Assistant starters (female) .............
Elevator operators:
F e m a l e ...... .........................
Male ................................ .
Elevator starters .......................
Janitors ............................ .
Janitresses ..............................
Maintenance m e n ...................... .
Night f o r e m e n .... .......................

Table C-7011:

Hours
per
week

$0.89

44

.79
.89
.99
.94
.84
1.1A
.99

44
44
44
44
44
44
44

eJfatali, \J

December 1, 1951
Classification

Bartenders:
Service ...............
Front bar ..............
Culinary:
B utchers ........... .
Coffee shop cooks ......
Comaon laborers
(culinary) ..........
Cooks helpers ....... .
Fry and roast cooks ....
Head cold-meat men ....
Pastry girls ...........
Pastry chefs ...........
Second cooks ...........
Second fry and roast
cooks ...............
Swing cooks and night
c h e f s .... ..........
Vegetable cooks .......
Waitresses:
Waitress captains ......
Waitresses............
Bus g i r l s .... .........
Waiters:
Waiter captains .......
Waiters .............. .
Bus b o y s ............ .
Miscellaneous:
Bell captains ...... .
B e l l m e n ...............
Housemen..............
Maids ........ .........
Operating engineers ....
Passenger elevator
operators ..........
Telephone operators
(day) ...............

1/

Hours
Rate per me•nth
i Class A Class B Class C per
hotels hotels hotels week

$255.00 $255.00 $255.00
245.00 245.00 245.00

48
48

229.00
194.50

214.00
184.50

209.00
179.50

48
48

116.05
138.10
205.00
221.00
130.75
241.00
260.50

113.45
132.85
195.00
201.00
125.50
221.00
240.50

113.45
127.60
190.00
198.00
120.25
201.00
225.50

48
48
48
48
48
48
48

190.00

185.00

180.00

48

229.00
130.75

209.00
125.50

199.00
120.25

48
48

128.40
82.20
86.90

123.15
82.20
86.90

112.65
82.20
86.90

48
48
48

164.35
92.70
86.90

157.25
92.70
86.90

157.25
92.70
86.90

48
48
48

70.50
59.50
133.90
128.65
281.00

65.50
57.50
129.70
123.40
266.65

65. p0
57.50
129.70
123.40
266.65

48
48
48
48
48

133.90

128.65

128.65

48

161.20

157.00

151.75

48

uata relate to hotels in Kansas City, Mo. and Kansas,

20,

D:

Entrance Rates

Table D-it M jUum um Cstt/iance- Hated fa t P la n t

U

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified

All establishments .....

100.0

60 or under..........
Over 60 and under 65 ...
6 5 ..................
Over 65 and under 70 ...
7 0 ..................
Over 70 and under 75 ...
75 ..................
Over 75 and under 80 ...
8 0 ..................
Over 80 and under 85 ...
8 5 ..................
Over 85 and under 90 .....
9 0 ..................
Over 90 and under 95 ...
95 ..................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
100.................
Over 100 and under 105 .
..
105 .................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
110.................
Over 110 and under 115 . .
.
115.................
Over 115 and under 120 . .
.
120.................
Over 120 and under 125 .
..
125.................
Over 125 and under 130 . .
.
130.................
Over 130 and under 135 . .
.
135.................
Over 135 and under 140 . .
.
H O .................
Over H O and under H 5 . .
.
H 5 .................
Over H 5 and under 150 .
..
150.................
Over 150 and under 155 . .
.
155.................
Over 155 and under 160 . .
.

2.7
.2
.4
4.6
—
.1
H.6
.
3
2.7
4.4
5.2
2.6
1.2
.9
.3
.9
4.9
4.2
1.7
3.1
.8
.3
1.3
.6
8.0
2.0
6.6
2.0
1.5
.3
.6
.1
4.4
—
3.8
.1
_
.1

Establishments with no
established minimum ....

12.5

100.0

i

1

Manufacturinc
All
Durable
Nondurable
eoods
Minimum rate (in cents) indus­ ____goods____
Public Whole­ Retail Serv­
tries
ents wit sale
2/
251 or 21-250 251 or utilities* trade trade ices
21-250 more
more
workers workers workers workers
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

11.1
13.3
6.1
9.5
4.1
3.1
2.7
20,6
1.6
2.9
5.3
.
4.0
2.8
2.9
6.9
-

3.1
-

—
-

3.7
2.4
2.8
-

2.5
1.5
2.9
•
«
2.0
13.9
8.0
25.6
7.5
4.7
-

-

-

-

4.5
18.0
_
-

-

•
31.4
2.6
4.2
-

7.9
3.0
6.3
1.1
11.9
.
8.2
2.3
7.1
.2
_
_
_
5.4

.
_
12.8
_
7.7
5.1
3.1
4.5
1.9
3.0
.6
.
_
_
.
26.8
_
6.4
-

-

10.0
_
•
15.5
2.6
1.4
1.7
.1
1.7
1.0
22.7
_
19.6
.
2.5
6.1
_

_
10.3
.
2.5
-

15.6
•
10.1
10.5
.9
1.7
.
5.6

.
1.0
_
•
-

.
4.0
.
18.7
-

_
4.5
—
3.1
_
-

_
_
.
4.5
5.0
5.4
1.2
.3
1.9
_
2.1
_
1.1

4.5

5.4

5.3

15.5

.3
2.6
-

-

2.2
-

Table E-li

Shift differential
3.3
.8
.
1
12.8
.
.
_
26.1
4.3
5.4
5.3
.9
_
3.1
.
.
2.5
(2/0
.
.
•
_
.
_
35.4

27.3
7.0
25.3
_
.9
6.7
_
3.1
_
5.0
3.7
_
_
.3
_
.
_

_
_
_
4.0
.2
_
.
-

S J u ^ t ^ b i^ e O e e U ia l PA4H H 440*U

Percent of plant workers employed
_____ on each shift in -______
c
All manuf i turinff industries 1/
uram
Dunable Nondurable
All
Machinery
milling
industries
B O O is
goads
3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or
2d
shift other shift other shift other shift other shift other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

Percent of workers
on extra shifts,
all establishments .....
Receiving shift
differentials .......
Uniform cents
(per hour) ......
3 cents ........
4 cents ........
5 cents ........
6 cents ........
Over 6 and under
7 cents ......
7 cents ........
7£ cents .......
Over 7 - and under
$
10 cents ......
10 cents ........
Over 10 cents ...

Practices

12.0

12.8

19.4 18.5 10.8

0.4

4.2 11.6

4.2 11.9

4.2 19.4 18.5 10.8

.4

10.9 4.2 11.3
(2/) 3.3
2.4
2.6
.3 2.9
.2 2.5
.4

4.2 10.5
.1
4.2
.5 2.4
1.8

4.2 19.4 18.5
- 19.4
.
.
(2/)
_ 18.5
3.2

11.8

_
-

.

-

-

-

2.7

(2/)

•4
.6

.
-

-

-

-

.1
.1

-

-

-

5.2
5.2

_
-

-

-

-

-

.9

.4

-

-

-

-

-

«
.
5.4

.2
.3

.6
-

.
5
.4
.3

•
.2
-

1.0
.4
-

.9
-

Uniform percentage . .
.
10 percent ........

.2
.2

-

.3
.3

_
-

8 hours' pay for
hours worked .....

-

-

-

-

Other............

.7

-

-

-

Receiving no
differential .......

.6

.2

.4

.1

-

(2/)

_

.1
.1

.5
1.0
2.7

4.7
2.0

.9
2.0

.
(2/)

-

1.3
.9

-

.2

16.5

£/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
J/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




S u pplem entary W a g e

100.0 100.0 100.0
5.8

_

E:

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
£/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, No., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E - 2 :

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

S c h e d u le d , tyJj&eJzbf Jfo u sU
l/

EMPLOYED IN—

I

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

AO

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

1

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

6.0
6.4
72.1
5.0
3.4
7.1

53.2
1.9
11.5
6.2
17.3
9.9

0.9
74.1
.9
13.8
2.3
8.0

3.2
46.7
9.2
7.5
29.8
3.6

1.7
3.8
1.6
21.6
8.1
27.6
32.4
3.2

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.6
.3
1.7
.9
63.9
.7
4.9
6.4
14.2
5.4

1

All

3.0
3.2
79.2
.5
4.2
3.9
6.0

a/

i

All establishments................................. .................

100.0

Under 35 hours .............................................................
35 hours ............................................................................
Over 35 and under 3 $ hours * ....................... ..
737£ hours .........................................................................
Over 3 $ and under 40 hours •••••*..••••
740 hours *.......................
Over 40 and under 44 hours..........
4 4 hours ........................
Over 44 and under 48 hours..........
48 hours ........................
Over 48 hours ....................

0.2
2.4
1.3
3.0
4.9
78.2
2.0
3.9
1.5
2.3

1/

2/
*
**

.3

100.0

_
-

1.1
1.6
87.1
1.2
3.2
3.5
1.3
1.0

100.0

-

91.0
_
1.8
5.0
2.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

-

0.9

-

-

2.3
6.5
12.2
65.8
5.2
5.5
2.5
-

1.7
86.1
2.8
6.7
2.7

1.1
10.5
4.0
6.4
8.1
68.8
1.1

100.0

2.0
2.9
84.1
2.1
4.3
2.4
2.2

89.8
1.8
4.4
•4
2.7

100.0

-

4.5
5.9
60.8
.9
6.2
4.3
16.6
.8

-

86.2
1.1
3.3
4.4
5.0

-

D ata r e l a t e t o women w o rk e rs,
In clu d e s d a ta f o r I n d u s t r ie s o th e r th a n th o s e shown s e p a r a te ly *
T r a n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
F in a n c e , in s u ra n ce * and r e a l e s t a t e *

T able & -3 t

P tiid J h lid o u fA
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number o f p a id h o lid a y s

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

Public
utUities*

Whole­
sale
trade

An

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100*0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 8 .0

9 9 .8

9 8 .6

-

_
-

Retail
trade

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .7

.3
.8
.5
9 8 .4

_
—
4 4 .8

Services

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .4

7 4 .0

8 6 .7

8 7 .8

2 8 .9

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 1 .4

8 3 .3

8 9 .3

7 9 .3

_
.6
7 4 .6

-

.6
.9
.2
1 .0
.1
1 .8
6 0 .1
(2 /)
9 .9
8 .3
.4
-

8 .6

1 6 .7

1/

1
A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .................. ..

1 0 0 .0

E s ta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g p a id h o lid a y s •

9 8 .9

9 8 .9

1 d a y ............................................................................
2 d ays ................................... ...............................
3 d a y s .........................................................................
U d a y s .........................................................................
4J- d a y s ...............................................................
5 d a y s ....................... * ...............................................
6 day..............................................................................
6$- days ••••••••*•.....................................
7 d a y s ..................... . . . . « • • • ...................
8 d a y s .............................................
1 0 days .....................................................•••••••
11 days .......................................................................

.1
.1
.3
.1
•7
6 8 .0
.3
13*6
1 1 .1
3 .3
1 .3

_
.3
•4
.5
2 .0
7 7 .2

1 .1

E s ta b lish m e n ts p ro v id in g no p aid
h o lid a y s .............................................••••••••••

1/
2/
*
**

-

9 .6
8 .9

_

.5
-

8 5 .7
7 .1
4 .7

.9
.9
4 .0
6 8 .4

1 2 .2
1 3 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .1

2 .0

•2

-

3 1 .9
-

6 0 .1
2 .8
3 .4
-

1 .4

8 1 .0
1 .6
1 3 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .0

-

4 .1
3 4 .2
1 3 .0
3 .6

.6

“

.3

In clu d e s d a ta f o r i n d u s t r i e s o th e r th a n th o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s th an *05 o f 1 p e r c e n t .
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com nunination, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e *




-

1 6 .2
-

.3
.3
.1
3 .5
6 1 .3

.7
—
6 5 .5

_
.7
.2
7 .0
5 7 .0

8 .1
5 .0

7 .9
2 6 .6

-

-

-

8 .0
1 5 .8
-

-

1 0 .7

2 0 .7

•
2 3 .7
_

-

4 5 .7
1 .0
3 .6
-

.6

2 6 .0

-

-

_

_
_
8 0 .7
.9
5 .1

-

2 .5

3 .2

-

2 5 .0

7 9 .3
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1 2 .2

7 1 .1

_

1 3 .3

O ccu p a tio n a l Vage S u rv ey , Kansas C i t y , M o., O ctober 195 1
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

2 .3
3 .7
_

.7

P a id fyiGCtiUl04*A l^tabm al PjuuUiland)

Table E-4:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Vacation policy
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

i/

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9

99.7

99.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.0

92.5

88.5

76.9

100.0

99.0

93.6

98.9

91.4

.1
a.7
1-4
56.1
.6

_
36.0
.5
63.2
-

_
27.3
.2
71.8
“

94.2

_
6.8

..
85.4
1.4
13.2

76.0

94.2

84.4

90.5
2.7

-

_
73.6
.7
2.6
-

2.2
61.5

5.8
-

.3
80.5
.5
11.2
-

_
79.6
1.0
7.9
-

.1

.3

.7

-

-

1.0

7.5

11.5

23.1

-

99.9

99.7

99.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.0

92.6

88.6

77.3

Under 1 week .......................................................
1 week .................................................................... *
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ... ....**
2 weeks ................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ......................

.1
17.3
•4
79.4
2.1
.6

_
19.6
.9
79.2

22.4
76.9
-

_
16.5
1.8
81.7
-

_
23.2
.1
76.7
-

_
16.4
77.0
6.6
-

22.2
.
3
77.5
-

Establishments with no paid vacations •

.1

.3

.7

-

-

-

-

Establishments with paid vacations •••«

99.9

99.7

99.3

Under 1 week ..................
1 week......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........
2 weeks ................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ........
3 weeks......................

_
4.0
.3
88.2
4.3
3.1

j
.
1.8
.4
93.0

.1

.3

.7

Establishments with paid vacations .**•

99.9

99.7

99.3

Under 1 week ..................
1 week......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks *.......
2 weeks......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks......... ............ .
Over 3 weeks..............

_
4.0
.3
56.3
.2
37.5
1.6

_
1.8
.4
55.9

Establishments with no paid vacations •

.1

All establishments ...............
1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations

••*.

Under 1 week....... * . * • • ......
1 week......... * ............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........
2 weeks ......................
3 weeks.......... ...........
Establishments with no paid vacations

•

_

53.6

45.3
.9
53.8
-

46.4
-

35.9
6.6
57.5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2*0
43.8
2.2
51.0

-

_

-

-

-

_

35.3
-

17.6

7.0

-

4.7
-

1.0

6.4

1.1

8.6

99.0

93.6

98.9

91.4

37.2
9.0
47.4

36.5
7.0
55.4

82.4

-

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations

••••

-

-

-

100.0

100.0
_
5.5

_

91.8
~
2.7

2.0
28.2
2.2
49.0
17.6
-

.3
51.9
4*8
35.2

60.9
4.9
22.8

-

-

.4

-

1.0

-

100.0
_

61.6
3.7
34.7

-

60.3
6.0
11.0
-

2.2
41.8
•4
51.5

-

3.1

-

-

-

7.4

11.4

22.7

-

1.0

6.4

1.1

8.6

99.0

92.6

88.6

77.3

100.0

99.0

93.6

3.1
.7
83.0

_
4.4
-

-

84.7
_
-

87.9
.1

74.3

-

1.8

2.2
5.7
_
84.4
3.6
3.1

_
8.9

72.9

_
1.9
1.4
93.2
3.5

98.9
_
10.9

91.4

.3
6.4
.4
83.8
.4
1.3

-

1.0

6.4

1.1

8.6

99.0

93.6

98.9

91.4

2.2
5.7

_
8.9

_
10.9

17.1

9.0

5 years of service

Establishments with no paid vacations •

-

4.5

2.9
-

96.4
-

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9.3

95.9
3.4
-

10.2
83.2
6.6
-

92.7
-

_
82.9
8.4
8.7

-

-

-

-

-

1.0

7.4

11.4

22.7

99.0

92.6

88.6

77.3

9.3
4.3
67.8

.3
6.4
.4
60.5

_
3.1
.7
58.2

_
4.4

-

-

_
7.3

100.0

_
9.3
4.3
67.8
17.6
-

.7
.9
89.1

_
.7

-

_
-

_

17.1

-

15 years of service

1/
2/
*
**

-

a .6
.3

•

2.9
-

100.0
_
.7
.9
64.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

.7

•
*
10.2

_
7.3

_
-

-

-

-

-

21.8

52.6

63.6

-

-

-

-

-

48.6
-

34.2
-

77.5
-

27.9
9.3

29.1
-

72.1
1.1
26.8
-

-

-

-

-

-

47.8

.7

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately*
Less than .05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




100.0

-

59.2

100.0
1.9
1.4
57.2

-

-

-

34.4

63.1

74.6
_
13.4

74.3
_

1.1

8.6

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

17.6

25.0

13.7
-

39.5
-

56.7
-

21.3
.3

22.7

-

.1

6.4

-

(V )

26.6
-

1.0

7.4

11.4

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo*, October
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1951

Table E-5i

P a id S ic k JtjMHMe (tf& u tu U Pa o v M

oh A )

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P r o v is io n s f a r p a id s i c k le a v e

PEPCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

Manufacturing
Non­
durable
goods

utilities*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Servioes

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

4 .3

7 .9

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

i
i
A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts .................... .............................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

I 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ...............................•••••

2 8 .2

3 5 .1

5 1 .9

1 7 .2

3 7 .6

4 9 .7

3 .7

1 7 .3

2 0 .0

6 .1

4 .1

-

8 .3

1 4 .6

1 3 .9

5 d a y s ...................................................................
6 d a y s ................................. .......................................
S d a y s ........................................................................
1 0 d a y s ...................................... ...............................
1 1 d ays .......................................................................
1 2 days .......................................................................
1 5 days ................................................................... ..
I S days .....................................................................
2 0 days .......................................................................
21 d a y s ......................................................................
4 0 d a y s ................................... ............................... ..

8 .0
1 .7
.5
9 .4
3 .4
.2
.1
2 .3
.8
1 .8

1 2 .3
1 7 .2
.9
.5
3 .0
1 .2

3 .4
1 5 .1
2 .0
1 1 .3

1 0 .4
7 .2
2 0 .1
1 2 .0
-

1 .2
2 .5
-

8 .6
2 .1
5 .5
1 .1
-

.8
3 .3
-

-

1 .6
6 .7
-

-

1 .2
1 8 .8
-

.8
1 .5
2 .4
( f t /)
1 .2
.1
.1

-

-

-

_
3 .6
1 0 .1
.9

7 .6
1 .9
-

2 7 .9
1 .8
.9
5 .9
-

9 .1
5 .6
2 .5

5 .8
-

E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith no form a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e ...........................................

7 1 .8

6 4 .9

4 8 .1

8 2 .8

6 2 .4

5 0 .3

9 6 .3

8 2 .7

8 0 .0

9 1 .7

8 1 .7

8 6 .1

9 5 .7

9 2 .1

In form ation n o t a v a i l a b l e .................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .7

-

-

-

l l w

1 0 0 .0

.oC s e r v i c e

1 5 .4
-

-

-

-

9 3 .5
.4

9 5 .9

1 0 0 .0

_

_

2 .3
.9
1 .2
-

4 .3
_
_
-

5 .8
2 .1
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .1

4 .1

-

8 .3

1 4 .6

1 3 .9

4 .3

7 .9

.6
.3

.8
—
-

_
_

1 .6
—
-

4 .7
—
2 .9
.9
2 .3
1 .9
1 .2
-

_
_
4 .3
-

5 .8
_
2 .1
•
-

-

-

-

8 6 .1

9 5 .7

9 2 .1

ft j u r a q£ .a g g c U a
E s ta b lish m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k le a v e • • • . . . ............................
5 d a y s ........................................................................
6 days ••••........... .................................... ..............
S days ...................................................... • ••..••
1 0 d a y s .......................................................
1 1 d a y s ...................................... ................................
1 2 days .......................................................................
1 5 days .......................................................................
1 8 days ........................................ .......................... ..
2 0 days ................................................. ...................
21 d a y s ....................... ..............................................
25 days .................................•........................ ••••
3 0 d a y s .................................................. ...................
4 0 d a y s ......................................................... ..
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ...........................................

3 0 .9

3 5 .1

4 .7
2 .9
.5
1 1 .3

4 .4
_

-

2 .6
2 .6
1 .1
2 .3
.8
•2

2 2 .6
.9
2 .5
-

3 .0
-

5 1 .9
_
4 3 .3

4 9 .7

3 .7

2 9 .7

5 .8
—
-

5 .0
.6
_

1 .2
_
2 .5
-

8 .0
1 2 .4
2 .1
6 .1

.5
-

5 .2
2 .5

1 5 .1
3 .4
2 .0
1 1 .3

8 .8
6 .6
1 2 .0
~

8 2 .8

6 2 .4

5 0 .3

1 .2

6 9 .1

6s 9

4 8 .1

-

In form ation n o t a v a i l a b l e .............................. ..

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1 6 .7
-

-

1 .8

.5

3 7 .6

9 .0
_

1 .8
5 .9
.9
-

.1

1 7 .2

-

“

9 6 .3

-

-

1.1
-

7 0 .3

2 0 .0
_
1 .2
—
1 8 .8
-

-

8 0 .0

(f t /)
2 .3
2 .3
.1
.1
-

.1
9 3 .5
*U

-

-

-

3 .3
-

-

-

“

6 .7
-

_
_
1 0 .1
3 .6
.9

9 1 .7

8 1 .7

* 5 .9

-

-

1 0 0 .0

3 .7

Occupational Wage Surrey, Kansas City, Ho., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E~5*

(fy& im aJ, pAOu M O Hd') * G o n tU U 4 *tt

P a id S io k

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
P r o v is io n s f a r p a id s i c k l e a v e

utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

X s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ..............••••••••••••

3 6 .8

3 8 .4

5 1 .9

2 4 .0

5 7 .0

4 9 .7

1 9 .4

2 9 .7

2 0 .0

1 .2
—
-

-

2 .5
1 5 .7
-

8 .0
•
2 .1
1 2 .4
6 .1
1 .1

1 .2
1 8 .8
-

Services

1 7 .5
5 .9
1 5 .4
.9
-

.5
5 .2
6 .7
2 .5
-

3 4 .5
5 .8
2 .0
3 .4
1 1 .3
-

6 1 .6

4 8 .1

7 6 .0

4 3 .0

5 0 .3

8 0 .6

7 0 .3

8 0 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

37^ 0

3 8 .8

5 1 .9

2 4 .9

5 7 .0

1 9 .4

2 9 .7

2 0 .0
_
1 .2
—
1 8 .8
—
-

4 .4
—
5 .6
.9
2 .5
-

1 0 .4
1 .8
-

1 2 .4
3 .0
7 .9
,5
1 .2
-

6 3 .2

-

9 .1
-

—
-

Public
utili­
ties*

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 1 .4

5 .5

-

1 1 .0

3 5 .5

.6
.3
.2
3 .9
1 .7
.1
.8
.4
1 .2
.2
2 .0
-

•8
—
3 .3
1 .4
-

-

1 .6
6 .7
2 .7
-

8 8 .2

9 4 .5

1/

5 .0
.6
1 4 .1
—
6 .6
9 .5
8 .8
5 .1
-

4*0
.2
.5
2 .7
6 .3
4 .7
1 .4
1 .1
5 .2
.8
2 .1
.4
2 .0
2 .7 ,
2 .5
•2

All
indus­
tries

(*/)

.4

Whole­
sale
trade

O

Non­
durable
goods

Finance**

All

Durable
goods

t

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts ................................... ...............

In fo rm atio n n o t a v a i l a b l e .................. ..............

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

5 d a y s ........................................... .............................
6 d a y s .............................•••••••...........................
8 d ay s ••••••••............................... ..................
9 d a y s ................................................ ..................... ..
1 0 d a y s .......................................... ..
1 1 d a y s .......................................................................
1 2 d a y s .......................................................................
1 5 d a y s ................ ......................................................
1 8 d a y s ................ •••••••••••••.............. ..
2 0 d a y s .................................................. ...................
2 1 d a y s ......................................................................
2 2 d a y s .......................................................................
25 d ay s .......................................................................
3 0 d a y s ................................................................
4 0 d a y s ...........* ................. ••••••••••..............
5 0 d a y s ........... •••••••.......................................
5 5 d a y s .......................................................................
X sta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ..........................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

Retail
trade

Services

- A Q 0 .0 ,

1 0 0 .0

1 3 .9

1 2 .6

7 .9

—
—
—
4 .3
8 .3
-

5 .8

—
3 1 .0
3 .6
.9
-

4 .7
1 .2
.9
—
1 .9
1 .7
—
2 .3
1 .2
-

—
2 .1
—
-

8 9 .0

6 0 .8

8 6 >1

8 7 .4

9 2 .1

-

-

3 .7

-

-

-

6 .0

-

1 2 .1

3 5 .5

1 3 .9

1 2 .6

7 .9

•5
.8
—
3 .3
1 .4
-

_
—
-

1 .0
1 .6
—
6 .8
—
2 .7
-

_
—
—
tt.O
3 .6
.9
—
-

4 .7
—
1 .2
.9
1 .9

*
—
-

5 .8
•
2 .1
-

9 4 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 7 .9

-

1 0 0 .0

—

_

A? F f f f F o f
X sta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............. ..............................
2 deya ............................................. ....................... ..
5 d a y s ............................... ..........................................
6 d a y s ............................................. ........................ ..
8 d ay s ................................................. •••••••••
1 0 d s y s ..................... .........................................
1 1 d ay s .......................................................................
1 2 d a y s .......................................................................
U d a y s .......................................................................
1 5 d a y s ...................•••••••••••••••••••••
1 8 d s y s ..................... ...............................•••••••
2 0 d a y s ................................................................. ..
2 1 d a y s ........... ..................................••••••••*.
2 2 d ays ................................................. ..
25 d a y s ..........................................
3 8 dsys
4 0 d a y s .................. ..
5 0 d ay s ••••••............. ................................... . .
8 0 d ay s
6 5 d a y s ........................• • • • • • • • • ..................
1 2 0 d a y s ...........•••••......................................... ..
X sta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v a ...................................... ..

Information not

a v a i l a b l a .................................

.4
4*4
—
5 .6
.9
-

-

.9
9 .0
—
•5
5 .2
-

—
3 4 .5
2 .0
3 .4
1 7 .1

3 .3
-

1 7 .5
5 .9
1 5 .4
.9
-

6 .8
-

—
-

5 .0
•6
—
1 4 .1
6 .6
6 .9
2 .6
8 .8
5 .1
-

6 3 .0

6 1 .2

4 8 .1

7 5 .1

4 3 .0

5 0 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .0
.2
•5
6 .4
4 .7
2 .7
.7
1 .1
3 .8
•8
2 .1
•4
.5
3 .0
4 .0
.9
.9
.2

2 .5
9 .1
3 .0
7 .9
.5
1 .2
-

—
1 0 .4
—
1 .8
-

-

2 .5
-

-

i/ Includes data f a induetries other than those shown separately.
er
7j Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finanee, insurance, and real estate.




4 9 .7

1 .2
—
—
2 .5
1 5 .7
-

8 .0
2 .1
6 .1
1 2 .4
-

8 0 .6

7 0 .3

8 0 .0

-

-

-

~
i .i

1
1
!

-

1 1 .7
.3
•6
.3
—
•2
(a /)
3 .8
1 .7
.1
.4
1 .1
•2
2 .2
.1
.7
8 7 .9

.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .7
2 .3
1 .2
-

4 .3
8 .3
—
-

- -

6 0 .8

8 6 .1

8 7 .4

9 2 .1

3 .7

-

-

-

Table E-6t

flattpsuuijKU ton BosuUeA
PERCENT OF PLANT W ORKERS E M PLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

M a n u fa c tu r in g

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Type of bonus

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Durable

All

good s

1/

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Non­
durable
good s

!

ill establishments

• • • • • • • • .......

.

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ . . . • • ........ ..........
Christmas or year-end ...........
Profit-sharing.... ..... ••••••••«
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses...................

1/
2/
*
**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.4

37.3

40.2

34.3

14.2

42.3

37.0

41.7

25.1

25.0

23.5

26.9

20.1

19.7

34.2

28.6

27.0

24*5
5.8
5.7

28.6
2.9
5.8

33.3
5.7
1.2

23.6
10.7

8.6
5.6
-

39.0
3.4

11.2
11.6
17.2

28.7
9.9
3.2

19.0
4*8
1.3

17.9
2.1
6.3

19.0
1.3
3.3

22.3
2.5
2.1

15.6
4.5

2.1
10.3
7.4

34.2
•4

19.7
.7
13.7

20.5
.9
5.6

64.6

62.7

59.8

65.7

85.8

57.7

63.0

58.3

74.9

75.0

76.5

73.1

79.9

80.3

65.8

71.4

73.0

-

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads;, communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7s 9*tA*tSUi*U>e Otu I P- e H A U O H P l a H l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED I N -

Type of plan

PERCENT OF PLANT W ORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

M a n u fa c tu r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

M a n u fa c tu r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

1
/

Public
utili­
ties*

goods

Non­
durable

100.0

100.0

100.0

--00
3Q.

Durable

All

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

good s

I
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.7

90.0

95.6

84.2

71.7

96.2

85.2 j 80.7

88.1

86.5

89.7

89.8

60.6

70.9

55.5

92.7
80.5
76.5
55.1

76.1
60.7
62.6
44.6

95.6
92.5
58.8
81.9

80.9
61.8
60.3
62.6

53.9
61.1
50.1
15.8

87.7
57.1
58.2
67.5

76.7
62.9
65.2
35.2

72.3
65.6
55.0
36.7

77.6
73.6
65.4
50.7

84.5
80.4
76.0
52.1

70.6
66.8
54.7
49.4

89.8
78.5
56.2
62.2

58.1
42.0
29.1

61.8
51.4
35.7
5.2

49.7
48.3
49.2
4.1

10.0

4.4

15.8

28.3

3.8

14.8

19.3

11.9

13.5

10.3

10.2

39.4

29.1

44.5

100.0

All establishments ................

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans g/ •••••....... «••••«

88.3

91.4

Life insurance .... .....•••••••••.
Health insurance.....
Hospitalization ....... ...... ••••
Retirement pension ........ ......

80.7
67.1
60.8
53.9

84.7
70.9
69.8
50.0

11.7

8.6

7.3

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans .......... ........

l / includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Unduplicated total.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0

100.0

100.0 _ 100.0

a.2

100.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Kansas City, Mo., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26

Appendix

Scope ai

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
t i o n uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings are s manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN KANSAS CITY, MO. l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, OCTOBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
21
21
21
21
21

1,529
531
220
311
998

286
105
51
54
181

188,900
84,900
42,100
42,800
104,000

100,400
46,900
16,600
53,500

19,160
5,540
3,490
2,050
13,620

21
21
21
21
21

All divisions .................................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods 2/..........................
Nondurable goods 4/.......................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..............................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade .......................... .. •
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services 2/................................

97
273
3H
144
170

32
42
42
28
37

22,300
17,500
a , 300
12,000
10,900

18,200
5,800
20,600
4,200
4,700

3,780
2,410
3,820
2,940
670

21
8

7
15
31
13
10
43

6
15
16
13
5
17

1,351
2,123
3,640
14,809
2,016
5,080

1,299
2,123
2,826
L4,809
1,100
3,518

234
118
475

30,300

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Grain milling .................................
Womens and misses' coats and suits ............
Machinery **...................................
Railroads ..................... *..............
Mi] k dealers ............... ............... .
Insurance carriers ............................

7/

8/ 21
21
21
21

-

129
2,564

1/ Kansas City Metropolitan Area (Johnson and Wyandotte Counties, Kansas, and Jackson and Clay Counties, Missouri).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscel­
laneous manufacturing.
4/ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and pub­
lishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather products,
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables*
7/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were included*
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or mere workers were included.




28

Index

Page
number
Assembler (machinery) ••••..... ••••••••••••.•••••••.... ...
15
Bartender (hotels) •.••••••••••••••••••••••••........... ..
19
Bellman (hotels) ................••••••»•••••••••..... ...
19
Bench hand (bakeries) ...... 18
Biller, machine....... ..................................
3> 4
18
Bindery woman (printing) •••••.••••..... ••••••••...... ....
Bolter (grain milling).............
••••••...•••••••••
14
Bookbinder (printing) ..........................................18
Bookkeeper, hand ................... ......................
3$ 4
Bookkeeping-machine operator ....... ........... ••••••••••• 3, 4, 5
Bricklayer (building construction) ....... ••••••.... .
18
19
Butcher (hotels) ......................
Calculating-machine operator
5
Carpenter (building construction)
18
Carpenter, maintenance......... •••••••.......... •••••••••
9
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads).............. ••••••••••.
15
Cleaner ....... ..... ••••••••«••••..... ............... .
11
Cleaner (railroads) ...... ••••••....... ....... •••••••••••
15
Cleaner, grain (grain milling) ............................
14
Clerk, accounting
3, 5
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ........ •••••••••••••
17
17
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers).... ••••••••••.... .
Clerk, file ..............................................
5
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••••••••••»••
17
Clerk, general •••••.................... ......... .......
3, 6, 17
17
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ....... ••••••••.... .
Clerk, order ......
3 6
%
Clerk, payroll ............................
3, 6
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••
17
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ...................
17
Compositor, hand (printing)
18
Cook (hotels) .............
••••••••••..
19
Crane operator, electric bridge ••••••••••••••.•••.... •••••
11
Cutter and marker (women,s and misses* coats and suits) ••••
14
8
Draftsman .....
Drill-press operator (machinery) ..............
15
Duplicating-machine operator ............
4# 6
Electrician (building construction)
18
Electrician, maintenance
.... ••••••••••........
9
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) •.••••••••••••••••••••.
15




Electrotyper (printing) •••••••••••••....... .
Elevator operator (hotels) ...... •••••.•••••.... ••••••••••
Elevator operator (office building service).... ......... .
Engineer, stationary •••••••••••.... ........... ..........
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) .......................
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ............. ••••••••
Fireman, stationary boiler ................................
Grain-elevator operator (grain milling)...... •••••••••••••
G u a r d ...... •••••••••....... .......................... .
Helper (bakeries)..... ••••••••••••••.... ..... .
Helper, motortruck driver ............... .••••••••••..... .
.... .
Helper, trades, maintenance
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) ..................
Houseman (hotels) ................................... ..
Inspector (machinery) •••••.... ....... .......... ........
Inspector, final (examiner) (women*s and misses* coats
and suits) ........... ............. ....... ..... .....
Janitor •••••••••••............
Janitor (office building service) •••••••....... •••••••••••
Janitor (machinery) ...... •••••........ ............ .
Janitor (railroads).... ••••........ ••••••...............
Key-punch operator
....... •••••••......................
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .... .
Laborer (building construction) ••••••••••........ •••••••••
Machine operator (printing) .............. .......... .....
Machine tender (printing) ...........
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ••••••••••••••
Machinist, maintenance..... .............................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) ................. ......
Machinist, production (machinery) .....................
Maid (hotels)..... ......................................
Mailer (printing)
....... ••••...... .
Maintenance man, general utility ••••••••••••••...... ••••••
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) •••••••••••••••
Meat cutter (meat cutters) .... •••••........ •••••••......
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ...... •••••••••••......
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) .........
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (railroads)..... •••••••
Mechanic, maintenance ...........
••••«•••••••••
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ................ ....... .

18
19
19
9
16
16
9
14
11
18
19
9
15
19
15
14
11
19
15
15
6
17
18
18
18
15
9
15
15
19
18
9
15
19
10
16
15
10
15

29

Index * C

Page

o n tin u e d

Page

num
ber
Miller| flour (grain milling) ......... ••.................
Millwright..................
Mixer (bakeries) ••••........ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Motortruck dr i v e r ....... .•••••••••••••....... ••••••••••••
Nurse, industrial (registered) ....... ........... ••......
Office boy .... ....... ................. ...... ..•••.....
Office g i r l ..............................................
O i ler....................................................
Oiler (grain milling) ••••••••••••••••••................ ...
Operator (local transit) .... ••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••
Order filler.............................................
Order filler (milk dealers) ............ ••••••••••........
Ovenman (bakeries) ••••••........ ..•••••••.......... ••••••
Packer......... •........... •••••••••••••..... ......... .
Packer (bakeries) ...... •••••••••........ .••••••••••••••••
Packer (grain milling) ••••••••.......
...»
Painter (building construction) ••••...... •.•••••••••.... •
Painter, maintenance...... •••••.•••....... •••••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••••••••••••••....
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) ••••••••••••••••.... •••••......
Photoengraver (printing) ••••••......... ....... ..........
Pipe fitter, maintenance..... •••••..... •••••••••..••....
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ...... •••••••••••....
Plasterer (building construction) ••••••••••••..... ••••••••
Plumber (building construction) ..... •••••••••..... •••••••
Plumber, maintenance (railroads).... ••••............. ••••
Porter .......... .......... •...... •............. .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •
••••••••••
Press assistant (printing) ••••••••••••••••••...... •..... .
Press feeder (printing)
Presser (women*s and misses1 coats and suits) ••••..... ....
Pressman (printing) .......... .••••••••... •••••••••••••...
Jteoeiving clerk •••••••••••••.... •..... ••••.••••••••••••.•
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) •.......... ••••••••••••••••
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers).... ••••.••••••••
Sanitary man (milk dealers) •••••••.••••••••••••...... •••••
Secretary •••••••••••••.........................
Section head (insurance carriers) ...... •••.»•••••••••••••.
Sewer, hand (finisher) (wamen*s and misses1 coats
and sui ts) .... •........ 14
Sewing-machine operator (womens and misses1 coats
and suits) .... ••.... •••••...... •.... 14




num
ber

14
10
IB
19
8
4
6
10
14
19
11
16
IB
11, 12
18
14
18
10
15
16
18
10
15
18
18
15
11
17
18
18
14
18
12
16
16
16

Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ............ ...... .......
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (railroads) ...............
Shipping c l e r k ..................... ......... ...........
Shipping-and-receiving clerk .............. ..... .
Smutter (grain milling) ......... ........ .
Stenographer .............................................
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ......... ...............
Stereotyper (printing) ........
Stock handler ................... .... ........... ........
Stock handler (grain milling) ......... ............ ......
Stock handler (railroads) ...................... ........ .
Sweeper (grain milling) ................................
Switchboard operator .................. ........... .
Switchboard operator-receptionist••••••••...... ••••••••••••
Tabulating-maehine operator .............. ....... •••.•••••
Tabulating-machine operator (insurancecarriers) ..•••••••••
Telephone operator (hotels) ..............
•••••••••
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (womens and misses* coats
and suits) ..........
Tool-and-die maker ...........................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ..........
••••
Tracer ........................................
Trans oribing-machine operator......... •••••••••••••..... .
Truck driver ............ ......... ....... ........ ......
Truck driver (milk dealers) ...... .
Truck driver (railroads) .... ........ •••••••••..........
Trucker, h a n d ..... *.................... .................
Trucker, hand (grain milling) •••••••••.........•••••.....
Trucker, hand (railroads) .............. ........... ......
Trucker, p o w e r ..............
Trucker, power (railroads) ......... ............ ...... .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ...... •••••••••••••
Typist ••••••......... ••••................. ........ .
Typist (insurance carriers) .......
••••«.••••.•
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ..... .................. .
Waitress (hotels) ....................................
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) •••••••••.........
7
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ............ ....... .
Watchman ........... •••••••••.......... .... ••••...... .
Watchman (grain milling) ••••••••••........•••••••••••••••••
Welder, hand (machinery) .......
Wrapper (bakeries) ......... •••••••.... ............... .

17

10
15
12
12
14
7
17
18
12
14
15
14
7
7
4> 7
17
19
14
10
15
7
12, 13
16
15
12
14
15
13
15
15
8
17
17
19
16
16
13
14
15
18

☆ U, S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 1952 O —995b21




This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional
Office. Communications may be addressed to:
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following states:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102