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Occupational Wage Saivey

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
October 1951

Bulletin No. 1060

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




This report was prepared in the Bureau's Middle Atlantic Regional Office.
Communications may be addressed to:
Robert R0
Bureau of
341 Ninth
New York,

Behlow, Regional Director
Labor Statistics
Avenue
New York

The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Middle Atlantic Region includes the following States:
Delaware
New Jersey

New York
Pennsylvania

Introduction 1/
The Philadelphia area is 1 of 40 major labor markets
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. Occupations that are common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a coxnminity-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of
sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations:
(a) Office;
(b) professional
and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping.
In presenting earnings information
for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-k) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad Industry divi­
sions.
Occupations characteristic of particular,
important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data for these
Jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union scales (Series
C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupa­
tional earnings for several industries or trades in which the
great majority of the workers are employed under terms of collec­
tive bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates
are indicative of prevailing pay practices.
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

The Philadelphia Area
The Philadelphia-Camden area, which includes Philadel­
phia and Delaware Counties, Pa. and Camden County, N. J., had an
estimated population of 3,000,000 in 1950. Two-thirds of this
total were concentrated in Philadelphia.
More than a million workers were enployed in nonagricultural industries within the three-county area in October 1951*
Some 700 manufacturing firms employing over 350,000 workers were

l/ Prepared in the Bureau* s regional office in New York City,
by Norman J. Samuels and Theodore Allison, under the direction
of Frederick W. Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial Rela­
tions, in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix far discussion of scope and method of survey.




within scope of the Bureau's study. 3 / Of these, nearly 1*0,000
were employed in establishments manufacturing nonelectrical ma­
chinery. More than 185*000 workers were engaged in establish­
ments producing nondurable goods, kj Philadelphia's favored lo­
cation along the eastern seaboard, with its excellent port, makes
it a natural terminus. This location,
further, contributes to
the city's position as one of the Nation's largest trade and
finance centers. About 80,000 workers were employed in the com­
munications, public utilities, and transportation industries,
including railroads in October 1951* There were some 120,000
workers employed in over 750 establishments engaged in wholesale
and retail trade, and over 1*5,000 workers in nearly 1*00 estab­
lishments in the field of finance,
insurance, and real estate.
The service industries have expanded to meet the needs of this
city and were employing over 1*0,000 workers in October 1951«

Among the industry and establishment-size groups with­
in scope of the Bureau's study, more than three-fourths of the
plant workers were employed in establishments having written
contracts with labor organizations. The degree of unionization
varied widely among industry divisions studied. In manufactur­
ing, over 90 percent of the workers in durable-goods industries
and over 80 percent in nondurable-goods manufacturing,
were
covered by contract provisions. Among the nonmanufacturing divi­
sions, the greatest extent of unionization was found in the pub­
lic utilities group. Virtually all plant workers in this group
were employed in establishments which had formal contracts with
labor organizations. The proportion of office workers employed
under terms of union contracts was much lower than for plant
workers. Only one clerical worker out of seven was so employed.
Only in the public utilities group were office workers covered
b y union agreement to any appreciable degree. Over 7 0 percent
of the office workers in this industry division were working
under union-contract provisions.

Occupational Wage Structure
Almost three-fourths of the office occupations for
which comparisons could be made with the Bureau's last study
(May 1950) showed Increases of 10 percent or more. Hourly rates
for plant workers had generally increased from 9 to 13 percent
during the same period. A large proportion of this advance was

2 / These and following estimates exclude small establishments
not included in the study;
see appendix table for minimum size
of establishment studied in individual industry divisions.
]+/ See appendix table for listing of durable- and nondurablegoods industries.

2

the result of general wage increases* About two-fifths of the
workers in the establishments studied had received at least one
general wage increase since January 1950, the base period for
the Wage Stabilization B o a r d s
10 percent wcatch-up" wage in­
crease formula* These formal wage adjustments were most frequent
among workers in manufacturing establishments. General Wage in­
creases reported were usually cents-per-hour advances although
a substantial number of workers received percentage increases.
About a third of the workers receiving percentage increases
averaged about 10 percent, while the middle half of those re­
ceiving cents-per-hour increases received from 10 to 15 cents an
hour. Nearly two-fifths of these wage actions also contained
provisions for extending fringe benefits; the remainder involved
wage increases only.

A number of workers in Philadelphia had received wage
increases as a result of national or area wage contracts. In
transportation,
general wage increases were granted to railroad
employees on the basis of escalator clauses geared to the Bureau* s
Consumers* Price Index. Workers belonging to the maritime unions
received increases that affected workers in the industry along
the entire Atlantic Coast.

Formalized wage and salary structures for time workers
were reported in establishments employing approximately fivesixths of the plant workers and two-thirds of the office workers.
Formal plans providing a single rate for each job classification
affected more than 1+0 percent of the plant workers but only 3
percent of the office workers. Practically all formal wage plans
for office workers provided for a range of rates. Individual
determination of rates, although affecting only 3 ^ percent of
all office workers, was, nevertheless, the predominant method of
wage determination for office workers in wholesale trade and
service industries.

Established minimum entrance rates for plant employees
with no previous work experience were a part of the formalized
rate structures of Philadelphia area firms employing more than
95 percent of the plant workers. On an all-industry basis, over
half the plant workers were employed in establishments paying a
minimum rate of more than $1 an hour. Minimum entrance rates of
$1 or more were reported by most large (500 workers or more)
manufacturing establishments employing about four-fifths of the
workers in this size-of-establishment category. Half the plant
workers in retail trade, and four-fifths of those in the service
industries were employed in establishments having minimum rates




of 75 cents or less. A $1 or higher minimum was reported for
nearly two-thirds of the employees in the public utilities group.
About 10 percent of the plant workers in wholesale and retail
trade were in establishments which had no minimum entrance rate
policy.

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In
25 of 29 office classifications permitting conparison, average
salaries of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those of
workers in nonmanufacturing establishments. Average hourly earn­
ings of plant workers were higher in manufacturing than in nonmanu­
facturing for 19 of 29 categories for which coiiparisons could be
made. However,
specific industrial divisions contributing to
the general nonmanufacturing average had an average rate,
in
some occupations, exceeding that for the manufacturing group in
the same job category.
More than a fifth of all plant workers in manufactur­
ing establishments were working on late shifts in October 1951Virtually all such workers were paid a differential over day
(first-shift) rates which was in the form of a cents-per-hour
premium for about half the workers and a percentage differential
for the others. Shift premiums of 5 cents an hour or 10 percent
over the day rate were most commonly reported for second-shift
workers.

Supplementary wage benefits were generally granted to
a greater proportion of the office workers than plant workers.
Nearly all workers were receiving paid vacations after 1 year of
service and six or more paid holidays. One-third of the office
workers but only 6 percent of the plant workers were formally
entitled to paid sick leave without any waiting period after 1
year of service. More than three-fourths of the plant workers
were scheduled to work 1+0 hours a week. A workweek of less than
1+0 hours was scheduled for half the office workers.

A fixed relationship between the pay of supervisors
and workers supervised was reported by a tenth of the manufac­
turing establishments, a small number of trade establishments,
and most of the shipping and stevedoring establishments studied.
Among the few manufacturing companies, mainly large metalworking
plants, reporting such formal rate relationships, rates for
leadmen were set from U cents to 15 percent above the rate paid
to the highest-paid worker supervised*
Gang foremen in steve­
doring received 25 cents an hour more than longshoremen.

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table a-Ii

O ^ic* O ccupation^

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on <
basis In Philadelphia, Pa*, by Industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
s
$
%
%
s
$
$
$
1
s
s
$
$
<
$
*
$
$
s
$
Wel
e k y W e l Under 3Q.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
eky
hus
or
erig %
anns
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

s
90.00
and
ever

Men
$
53.00
66.50

399
133
51
82
266
23
78
138

38.0
" 38.0
39.0
37.5
37.5
39.0
39.0
36.5

73.50
77.60
79.50
75.00
71.50
72.00
70.00
73.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...

17

39.0

60.50

Clerks, accounting................ .
Manufacturing........... ........
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing.... ...... ......
Public utilities « .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ..................
Finance ** .........................

1.430
395
225
170
1,035
80
659
40
228

39.0
_ 39.5
40.0
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
37.5

Clerks, file, class A ............................................
Manufacturing ........................................................

37
30

39.0
39.5

50.50
48.50

Clerks, file, class B .............................................
Manufacturing........................................................

110

39.0

37.00

34
— 15—

Bookkeepers, hand ...................
Manufacturing....................
Durable goods ............... .
Nondurable goods.............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade................
Finance * * ....................

W a ini'Pa ntinij m rr........... ....................................
nnw
nftT t ## ||1|(||TT1_TTtTf- _ - TT- T_T
1/v
j-tT fP
T
i

Clerks, general ..........................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing.................
Public utilities • ......................................
Finance * * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clerks, order ...............................................................
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods .............
Nondurable goods ............
Nonmanufacturing............
Wholesale trade ............................................
Retail trade................... ...............................

2 3 ..... ....4 6 .6

63.50
59.00”
56.00
63.00
65.00
65.50
69.50
53.50
54.50

3 7 .6 6 ~

87
56
15

38.5
38.0
40.0

888

39.0
39.0
39.5
38.0
38.5
39.5
37.0

69.50
64.00
64.00
64.00
73.50
70.00
63.00

39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.0
39.0
38.5

59.50
62.5057.00
68.00
58.50
59.50
51.00

371

279
92
517
192
196
802
171

83
88
631
518
83

1

37.OO
34.50
35.00

-

“

-

-

-

6
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

..

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

22
22
4
18

-

-

_

.

_

_

•_

_

1
1

10
2
2
8

21
6
6
15

23
11

-

106
52
51
1
54

-

-

-

-

1

53
15
6
9
38
6
20
1
6

46
3
5

70
H.
7
£5
9 i 5
16 1 2
17
45
2
2
10
5
1
32
9

3
1
i n
! 1
10
1 6

2
2

1
1

8
7

15
2
13
6

7
4
3
3

1

3

9

33

1

1

3
13
12
8 ! 16
1
8
14

4
2
2
2
_
2

71
34
8
26
37
9
10
7
9

8
8

l'
1

«
.

_
-

-

-

2

39

-

5

“ 15

2
2

3
12

-

i 8
4

31
29
2

3

; i

5
3
2

21
| 5
! 16
5
| 11
13
!13
!13

-

1
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

_
-

1

_
-

-

-

-

-

12

_

-

1

See footnotes at end of table
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cownuni cation, and public utilities,
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.




16
1
1
15
6
-

-

n

-

1
1

-

1
! 1

-

-

-

3

8

-

3

-

8

74

10

I

27

-

-

u
14
-

-

27
27

60
32
28

10
10

-

3
3

-

i “
: 1
I 7

-

17
1

(
X

39.5
46.6

Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Manufacturing....................

?

3
3
3

54
23
16
7
31
29

-

16
22
4
4
18 ! ^
_
4
! 18
5
5
1

9
4

8

52 ! 127
8
32
22
4
10
4
44
95
1
3
26
29
10
1
13
49

1

1
1 1

30
2

-

2
28
17
3

106
26
10
16
80
2
37
2
39

2
1

4
1

_

!•*
31
i 24
! 7
| 68
3
52
2
7

1
1

-

?
3

-

-

-

19
17
13
4
2
1
1

46
19
_
19
27
26
-

2
2
1
1

42
24
6
18
18
_
_
18

20
6
1
5
14
9
_
5

74
21
2
19
53
_
26
25

*
-

2
2

31
15
n
4
36
7
_
22

_
49
14
5
9
35
-

32
2
1

1 !
75
29
28
1
46
2
36
6
2

3

90
3?
13 | n
1 l 5
12
6
28
77
16
25
12
38

-

_

12

10

-

l

*

_
66
13
10
3
53
3
38
1
10

2
2

l
1

-

42
23
14
9
19
1
_
17

12
1

_

57
24
8
16
33
2
16

1
1

14
1
1
13

-

107
19
3
16
88
1
86

115
12
11
4
3
8
8
57
104
•
3
54 ,
£/104

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

1
1

3

-

9

? 1

1

19

-

1

6

X
67
2$
25
-

42
7
16
100
22
1
21
78
62
16

.3 1 .,

n

109
91
49
42
18
5
12

12
4
4

44
7
4

4
?
8

62
33
29
4
29'
13
16

54
20
16
4
34
17
15

27
1O
J
8
2
17
4

9

37
19
18
1
18
1
16

35

56

60
27
8
19

67
4
2
2
63
48
15

23
u
14
-

9
-

- ”T r
- 15
2

35

27

39
33
6

33

29
4

-

8
8

3

37
25

14
5
9
19
14
5

4
4

a

32
9

61
23

n
12
38
22
16
62
-

-

62
62

.. 9 . ....43
9

17
13
4
82
78
4

17
15
2
32
18
14

17
4
4

24
4

-

13
13

3

1
20
20

20 iAl6
2
18
2
16

27
27
-

-

25
10
12

18
1
17

100

12
6

26
20

6
6
6

20
6
6

41
9
8
1
32
32

!

-

•
-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Ba., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4*

Table A4i O fe c *

0cC44fuU *O H A> - G on t iH Sim d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




3
,

O fa c* OcCOfuUlOMd - G o*U i*tU +d

Table A-l*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis In Philadelphia, Pa*, by Industry division, October 1951)

Average
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and Industry division

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
s
$
>
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
*
%
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 1*0.00 1*2.50 1 5 .o o 1 )7 .5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0
Weekly
earnings £
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
3 0 . 0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 . 0 0 3 7 .5 0 1*0.00 1 )2 .5 0 1 5 .0 0 1*7.50 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 over

Woemn - Continued

217
1*1*
1 25

3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0

1
iiL .5 0
5 0 .0 6 '“
1*0.00
U 0 .5 0
3 9 .5 0

Bookkeepers, hand ....................
Manufacturing ................... .
Durable goods ••••••••.......
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing........... ......
Public utilities * ........... ..
Wholesale trade
Retail trade *................ .
Finance * * ......... .
Services .......................

669
169
7$
91*
500
17
271)
111
71
97

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 5 .5
3 7 .0
3 8 .5

5 9 .5 °
6 5 .5 0
6 1 .0 0
6 9 .5 0
5 7 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
5 7 .0 0
5 5 .5 0
S l).5 0
6 3 .0 0

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A .»«
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods............ .....
Nondurable goods..... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ........ ..........
Wholesale trade......... .......
Retail trade ......... ..........
Finance « * ..... .............. .

l*Ql*

3 8 .0
3 8 .6
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .5

1 )9 .5 0
5 8 .0 0
5 5 .o o
6 1 .0 0
1*6.00
1*9.00
1*7.00
1*3.50

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) **,*
Manufacturing... ..............
Nonmanufacturing ........... •••••••••
Wholesale trade .............. .
Retail trade ...................

Bookkeeping-machine operators* class B ....
........... •••••••
Manufacturing
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods.....•••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••.... .
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••.••••
Retail trade .......... ....... .
Finance «* .....................
Services ............... .
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type).... « .
..
Manufacturing ...........
Durable goods ....... .
Nondurable goods •••••*.
Nonmanufacturing •.••••••*.
Public utilities « ••*..
Wholesale trade ......
Retail trade...... .
Finance ** .............
Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type)
Nonmanufacturing ........ .
Retail trade ••••••••••••
Finance ** ••••••••••••••

2U7
—

W "

— nr '
61
56
287
79
53
11(8

t

3 9 .0
2 ,1 9 1
3 5 T " 3 9 .6
3 9 .0
123
3 9 .0
215
3 9 .0
1 ,8 5 3
1*6
3 8 .0
1*08
3 9 .0
1*0.0
21*1
3 9 .0
1 ,1 3 7
21
lil.O

1*2.00
-TTToo”
1*7.00
1*7.00
111. 0 0
5 o .5 o
1*8.00
li l .5 0
3 8 .0 0
1*5.50

222
172
897
51*
306
Ii51*
70

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1*6.00
1*7.00
l* 8 .5 o
1 5 .0 0
1 5 .o o
5 o .5 o
l*9.o o
l*3.oo
3 8 .5 o

183
117
1*1*
68

3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 6 .5

1 5 .5 0
i
*3.5o
1*2.00
1*3.00

1 ,2 9 1
m ~

6
6
6

1
1
1

15
-

59

15
-

59
26
29

•

9

m

•

•
«

•
-

-

•
.
•
-

•
30
.
•
•
»
30

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.
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.

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.
•
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7
11*1*
•

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19
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28

m

60

51

60

20
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20
.
•

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1*9
23
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26

263
18
: 10

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57
19
19
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38
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20

60

5
5

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3l*
31
3
62
-

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110
7
7
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•
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11

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103
15
22
27
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12
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.
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20
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6
7
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3
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6
6
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63
11*
1*0
6
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5

k

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•

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7?
39
1
38
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6
8

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10
9
1
8
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m

•

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26
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26
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53

9
26

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12
10
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.

21
21
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m

51*
28
9
17

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158
180
11 n
r
20
7
22
1*
116
169
2
7
8
57
18
25
82
85
a
m
1

lliB
197
97 r f n
26
25
26
71
100
97
•
8
1*0
73
22
7
28
7
10
2

27
13
2
11
ll*
3
2
6
3

6?
20
8
12
1*9
1*
1*2
2
1

16
5
5

30
1
1
•
29
2
27

16

12
12

$
•

•

12
-

•
6

_
-

•
•

•

6

•

•

!5 7
60
31
29
97
1*
1*3
1*9
1

10?
33
23
10
76
1*
23
1*8

58
38
31
7
20
7
2
8
1

81
39
25
H*
1*2
20
16

J.Q

25

2
-

2

2
19
1
15
3

10

25

2

10
.

22
3

2

5

35
H*
10
1*
21
2
19
.

•

6

5

26
1*

2
1

2
2

3

1

2

1

•
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m

-

m

m

•
•
•

m

m

-

•
_

-

-

•

2
2

2
1

9
•

13

15

27
15

1*3
11

95
27
11
16
68
•
10
1*6
12

188
33
19
11*
155
l*
50
73
20

11*6
59
31*
25
87
7
31
1*1
7

176
57
30
27
119
•
32
86
1

5
1
•
1

21
19
2
17

23
23
13
10

15
11
5
6

31
25
12
13

15
li
10
1*

62
8
1
7
51*
.
•

2
-

2
1
1

23
“ 5
2
3
18
-

96
1*
2
13
81
5
21*
39
13

i

5

2
2
-

37
21
11
10
16

1*1*
2
1
1
1*2
•

I
8
; 215
!
2
I
| 30
32
175
6

i

51
<
•

38
1
20
1

1413
T T
15
33
365
1*
67
71*
21 9
1

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




7

20

-

-

1 6 1 i 298
7
3“
1*
3
3
158
291
2
30
5
16
32
226
137
1
•

32
3
29

37

19

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| 16

11
r
7
•

31
1
30
18
2

—
1*7

16
.
•
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•

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52

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19
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10
10
151

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22
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6
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26
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m

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-

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-

-

6
,

tun* A i Q fticm O eoupeU iO H A . - G o n titw d
-:
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v e rage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N
umber
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
eky
Wel
eky Wel e d r
an n s
h u s erig l n e 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
or
and
(tnad ( tnad
Sadr) S adr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Clerks, accounting ................
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods....... ....... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail trade ................
Finance * * .............. .
Services.... ...............

38.5
3,323
"866“ ■ 38.T“
.402
39.5
464
38.0
2,457
38.5
39.0
105
724
39.5
39.5
693
37.0
642
38.5
293

Clerks, file, class A ......... ......
Manufacturing... ..............
Durable goods ............... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ......... .... .
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ......... .
Reta1 t r H
1 .na
»r.ttt..tTtr»
Finance * * ........ .........
Services ...................

633
"'TIT
129
84

Clerks, file, class 8 ..............
Manufacturing ..................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing..... ..........
Wholesale trade........ .....
Retail trade... ........ .____r
F TWnM ** TTtlttTtt-tTTtTItt.ttTtt
i
SertHr.H rTT»-t»tt-iTtt»Trttti,itt»,
»A
Clerks, general ..................
Manufacturing •••.••••••... ..•••••••
Durable goods .............. .
Nondurable goods .... ••••••... .
Nonmanufacturing............. .
Wholesale trade........ ••.....
Ratei1 trade
Finance * * .... ... .
Services ....... ............
Clerks, order ....................
Manufacturing..................
Durable goods •••••••••........
Nondurable goods ............
Nonmanufacturing................ ............
Wholesale trade ..........................
P o t A 11

t ’ nde
p

it«ttTtttitTttiiir--ir

38.5

45.50 --- T 112
18
475 ■
..0
14
2
49.50
1
- 12
45.50
44.50
17 98
2
53.50
47.00
7
42.00
10
48
- 33
42.00
46.00
- 15
45.50
47.30

40.0

420

31
128

47.00

37.5
38.0
37.5
39.5

48.50
44.50
51.00
43.50

22

39.5

40.00

175
64

37.0

43.50
47.00

2,728
— ZSI~ "
314
167
2,247
226

_
-

24
24
-

169
4l
8

33
128

262

2

9

15
42
63

60

6
20

ii
7
4
9
1

-

83
100
10
62
1
1

61
6

35

293

535
99
38
36
28 ’ 63
227 436
4
4
132
a
67 151
83 115
32
34
66

64
26
11

15
38
1

90
38
22

16
5
2
30

38.0

252

1,047
645

38.0

J U T

77

234
550
230
271

21

-

-

2

18
-

30
7

10
12

-

35.50
244 664 440 i627 i236 140
- 39 : 49 136 ! 88
49
39.5. 39.00
- 26 I 23 i 84
40.0
39.50
30
55
- 13 ! 26 1 52
37.50
38.0
33
19
38.0 ;35.00
91
244 625 391 491 148
- 16
58
39 ! 16
39.5 ;40.50
31
14
11
6 121
40.0 33.50
47 i 49
/1 181 !274
37.0 34.00 4/202 9,
80
50
7
38.0 34.50
36 245 132 106
5

38.5 | 50.00
2,133
431" "39.5 55.30""
326
40.0
55.50
39.0 55.00
105
1,702
38.0 48.50
184
39.5 54.00
121
40.0 44.50
38.0 47.00
587
39.0 i 51.50
90
861

.
-

2
6

39.0

43.50

-

1
1

-

-

11
-

53
4

48.00

-

-

50.50
39.50
43.50
37.00

-

11

4
49

-

-

” 3 8 .7 ” ‘49.50“

39.0
38.0
39.5
39.5
39.5

-

11

49

15 !203 '142
- ; 39 H 8 T
- | 39 ! 14
j - : 6
15 1 164 ,122
- ! 13 1 -

2a

i 13
1 2
I n
228
1 34
5 i
5
9 1 41
10 ! 75 ; 34 ; 56
i ~ |
85 1 73
43 286
h"9” 1 ^ ! 12
74
j
15
i 4
!
8
9
59
18
76 ; 55
31 212
8 ! 4
142
62
48
51
23

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




331
69
23
46

412
66

28
38
346
2

152
94
76

314
98
33
65
216
10

22

64
55
52
35

59

89

12
12

10
8
2

47
5
17

35
65
139
14
33
31
46
15

233
57
39
18
176
9
74
35
7
51

150
58
a
17
92
3
24

56
17

52
a

13
5
5
-

239
100

10

1

7
39
3
«
»

24
-

30
18

35

197
$4
a

51
26

66

20
6

21

1

13
143
40

79
30

25
-

2

10
84
155
5
2
3
150
4
14

82
9
70
33
17
16
37
34
3

1

24
3
42
1

6

2

9

36
5
11
1

•

11
22

32

136

61

67
29
38
69
4
14
19
7
25

24
14

89
38
28

10

10

37
9
-

51

3

3

2

10
2
8

18

39

11

29
3

6

2

18

20

8

4

4

10

11
2

6

8

3

3
4

5

4

4
1
1

12
1
1

15
-

9

7

12
1

12
-

2
6

5

4
4
-

2
2

2
1

2

_

6

25
13

4?

30
28

4

15
4
4
-

48

20
12
8

22
2

43
30
5
25
13
3

49

_

1

4
8

4
1

_
-

2

23

1

_

27
5
18
4

10

21
1
20

1

32

21
6
2

12
2
2

28

4
15
5

•
-

-

2
1

_
_

4
6

2
2

_

_

«
-

-

4

4

.
_
4

1

8
2
1
1
6

_

1
1
1

12

_
_

12
12

_
_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

1

3

_

2

_

2

1

_

6

2
10

2
1

1

_

_
•
»
-

3
.

x
x

- i
11 i 15 i
10
10

1
1
1

-

_
-

6

.

_
_

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_
»

-

-

_
_

6
6

.
_

_
.

.

_

43
13
5
8
30
-

38
27
25

20
4
3
1
16

49
25
11
14
24

11
_

33
17
15

22

_
_
_

_

21

192 105 222 268
18“ — T ~ 25“ 105
78
7
14
19
7
27
4
98 196 163
174
16
20
43
x
18
10
66
67
42
39
6
22
45
51
35
20
15
16
-

9
7

a
34
-

34

7
6

1

15
23
1 -- g“
1
-

22
8

14

8
7
7

219
53
51
2
166
14
3

72
-

20
-

20
15

106
29
30 — r~
7
13
17
1
21
76
14
11
15
_
13
13

9

2

11

12

1
-

1
-

1
6

11
11
11

1
1
1

1
1

_

-

-

1

43
43
1
42

-

-

-

.

«

-

-

2

16
8

6
7
_

11
1

1
1

.

10
«
.
10
10
_
-

-

_

_

_

_

_

! 13
_ "13
_

_

7
6

_
-

9
9
9

_
_
_

5

2
8

12
12
_
10
10

13

7
<

O ffice O ccupation* - C ont in u e d

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N
umber
o
f

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
*
Wel
e k y W e l Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 I5.OO 90.00
eky
h u s eri g
or
an n s
and
(tnad ( tnad
Sadr) S adr)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Clerks, nayroll ••••..............
Manufacturing ................
Durable goods ...... .......
Nondurable goods ........ •••••
Nonmanufacturing..............
Public utilities * ..........
Wholesale trade •••••........
Retail trade ..............
Finance * * .... ...........
Duplicating-machine operators ......
Manufacturing........••••••...
Durable goods ..............
Nondurable goods ............
Nonmanufacturing ..............
Wholesale trade ... .........
Retail trade ..............
P4mawaa
Kev-ounch operators ... ..........
Manufacturing ................
Durable goods.... .... .
Nondurable goods....•••.....
Nonmanufacturing..... ........
Public utilities * ..........
Wholesale trade ...••...... .
Retail trade ............. .
Office girls...... .............
Manufacturing ............... .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods.... •••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ......... •••••••
i4414^4aa 4
Wholesale trade .............
41 4 4a
*

Secretaries ....................
Manufacturing ........ ••••••...
Durable goods....... .... .
Nondurable goods ..........................................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................................................................
Public utilities * ...................................................
Wholesale trade ...............................................................
Retail trade ..........................................................................
Finance * * ..................................................................................
Services ........................................................................................

1.599
"itw
355

38.5
38l5
39.5

66a
580

38.0

117
146
177
73
67
303
173
70
103
130

51
U
-Q
J
y*
1.190

38.5
37.5
39.0
39.5
37.0
40.0

$
48.00
47.00
47.00
47.00
49.50
47.00
58.00
45.50
50.00
46.50

39.0 40.50
39.0 41.50
39.5 41.50
38.5 41.50
38.5 | 39.00
39.0 ! 42.00
40.0 : 40.00
-7 e 34.50
*

■ A??

38.5
37.5

257

44.50

40.0

198
735
61

47.00
38.5 45.00
38.0 !43.50
39.0 !47.00

204

40.0

60
>00

39.0
37.0

571
267
76
191
304

38.5
38.5

<70

ty

72
49
76
28

40.0

38.0
38.5
e
JO*?
40.0
oq .7
J7 e
•f c
i.
JO.?
■o e
a

38.0
'17519" " 39.6
856
39.5
38.0
963
38.0
2,645
38.0
174
581
38.5
297
39.5
1,178
37.0
37.5
415
4.464

46.60

51.00
42.00
yfjw

34.50
34.50
37.00
1 34.00
! 34.50
! j f«UU
! 70 rv\
35.50

o
n

sf
t\

on
58.00
62.50.
63.00
62.00
55.00
71.50
56.50
54.00
52.00
55.00

1

-

1

1

22

lb
16
6

6

-

50

up
72^
59
13
38
18

30
12
8

7
-

6
11
1
2

1
2

-

2

24
10
8
2

U
- 1
- 1• _
2
' 12 !
^ +*•

3
2
1

19
29
9
3

29

12
2
0 ; 11

9 !
78 !107
13 i 34
24 ! 24
- : H i 17
- ! 1
10 ! 7
13 i 33 ; 54 : 83
- . 5
1
1 s 1 : 1
13
12 1 31
39 ; 58

110

47

_

22

i 24
77
1

!

102

6

9

15
14
7

62

66

43
H
5
9
29
18
6
1
l

67
35
5
30
32
14
A2

3

6

56
-

-

56

-

-

-

|

-

-

-

-

|

-

-

4

-

1

3

_

-

1
6

55

48
1

-

51
32
25
.7
19
-

192
68
23
45
39
5
6
24
10 ' 4
1 i 5

150
62
2

27
17
7

109 177 1 n (
>
43 i 65 ' 4^
16
45 ! 33
27 ! 20
15
68
66 | 112
6 ' 1
7
- : 65
30
2 ! 13
13
18
58 1 32

84

9
23 !
10 !
3
7 !
13 j
-

56
18
38

6

238
176
26

18
41
37
5
13 1 5
24
4 ! 13
- i 10
4

22
21

4

158

9
30
33

19
31
7

2

46

72
39

16
4

8

1 123

283
165

10 ! 27
37 ! 136
63 ! 120
11
30

2

1
1
2

1
68 1 157
30 j187
90 ; 54 | 6l
10 I H ! 29 1
80 ! 4° | 32
30
97
H 1 96
c
A*
-i I
5
15
1 34
Q
7 ' 6
y
4
16
2
j
12
1
1
I
!
75
7
. 1
_
- |
7 ! 75

19

2

33
41
34 ! 25
11 ! 8
17
23
8
7

11

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6

59
30

}2

89 198
65 152
15
43
48 , 109
26
46
1
19
12
23
2
7

8 1
5
5 1

3

33
27
17
13

4
3
3
1

7

3

10
10

2
1
1

134
36
13
23
98
-

17
7
68
6

i 17
! 8
! | -

11
11

4
6

7
2

33
14
7
7
19
10
1
1
7

28

21

23
21

3

6
1

1
20
2

11

7

8

17
1
10
1

14
3
11

-

5

-

2

-

!

3
3
3

_
-

1

??
25
18
7

??
29
18

77

42
4
35 !
3

4 :
3

8

8

25
7
3
4

9

10

1
1

-

-

18

8

10

8 i
10 !
1

4
4

-

10

1

4
4
4
_

!
j

-

1
1

-|
-j
_I
-i
-j
_i
|

1

2
2

“ 1

8
2
6

_l

2 3 ! 29 E
28 | 6 ! 11

1
8

3
3

-

1

33
24

11

1 i

9

2

4
-|

- j

12
1

i

69
28
19
9
32

1 10

1 1
1
1
1
1

2

j

79
62
52

!
2

2
1 3 1 ; 381
*4
4
1 i 9
3
75

127
1
15
21
83
7

297
-

81
37
147
32

302
42
15
27
260
8
91
13
132
16

5?6
195
83
112
341
10
70

1

1

55

286
93
43
50
193
4
42
28

114
92

27

92

;
!
!
!
!

?8?
211
118
93
178
12
13
18
78
57

j
!
!
:

;
;

J66
144
79
65
222
2
46
19
132
23

461
200
126
74
261
18
72

188
115
57
58
73
2
15

256
150

44

9

9

74
53

33
14

40
34

52
98
106
5
18

139
64
30
34
75
n

20
24
16
4

174
123
46
77
51
15
16
4

11
5

170
95
48
47
75
15
6
1
28
25

168 i
_26_ -62L
27
131 ! 45
16
76 29
11
55 ; 16
40
37 51
28
22 \ 11
2
7 36
3
5

10

60

15
45
22

10
10

8
,

Table 1-1: G f c c e

0 cC 4 4 fu M o 4 U ~ Q o n tU U tm d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v e rage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0o|
C
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 10.00 12.50 15.00 17.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.0C 62.5 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85. 90.00
|
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 10.00 12.50 15.00 17.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.0C 67.5C70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Stenographers, general .............. .
Manufacturing.......... •••••.....
Durable goods ••••............ .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing....... •••••.... .
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ..........•••••••.••*
Finance ** ....... •••••••...... .
Services .....................

6,011
T7Z5T
1,200
1,291
3,517
308
851
368
1,717
210

38.5
$9.0
39.5
38.5
38.0
37.5
39.0
39.5
37.5
38.5

Stenographers, technical.... .........
Manufacturing... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing............ ••••••
Finance ** ....................

293
"158"
105
30

38.0
38.0
38.5
36.0

t
17.00
19.00
50.00
15.00
50.00
19.50
11.50
12.00
17.00
51.50
56.0653.00
12.50

19
19
19
-

-

Switchboard operators ............ .
Manufacturing ......... .
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing... ..............
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ......... .
Retail trade ................. .
Finance ** ..... ••••••.....
Services ..... .......... .

1,278
8
39.5 11.50
257 _i $.6 1 51.66 ■ 10.0
53.00
91
163
38.5 19.50
1,021
8
39.5 12.50
39.5
232
15.50
39.0 15.00
231
2
39.5 39.50
193
38.5 42.50
255
6
110
11.5 36.50

Switchboard operator-receptionists.... .
Manufacturing.... ............. .
Durable goods.... ............ .
Nondurable goods............ .
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ••••••••••....... .
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** .......... .
Services ................ .....

1,152
456
201
252
696
28
333
60
126
119

Tabulating-machine operators.... •••••••
Manufacturing.............. .
Durable goods ......... ...... .
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing.................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ............... .
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * ........... ..................................................

38.5
38.5
39.0
38.5
38.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
37.0
38.0

510
38.5
■ "U0. ~ w .r ”
81
10.0
59
38.5
100
38.5
70
38.5
122
10.0
39.5
22
179
37.5

12.50
11.50
11.00
15.00
11.00
17.50
39.50
12.00
11.50
13.00

_

63
1
1
62
11
17
1
1
1
1
22
22
6
16

5
5
_

121
20
12
8
101
6
12
7
76
“

531
50
18
32
181
19
63
53
339
7

509
103
63
10
106
33
75
56
223
19

689
217
107
U0
112
13
79
95
238
17

540
228
111
1H
312
21
18
28
207
8

853
100
188
212
153
19
57
52
232
93

63$
210
136
101
393
36
136
15
165
11

617
36l
175
189
253
36
86
8
95
28

-

-

20
9
11
11

4

t

6
2
1
1

1
2

15
11
1
1

29
27
2
-

96
1 96
9
20
1 15
1 16
36

141
7
7
137
17
21
32
17
17

84
1
| 1
80
11
8
26
13
22

185
15
5
10
170
21
10
11
19
19

216
19
6
13
197
103
52
19
17
6

159
19
10
39
110
7
9
12
81
1

87
12
12
75

132
20
17
3
112
_
57
ll
21
20

180

81
50
26
21
31
2
8
9
6
9

162
79
25
51
83

71
4
16
; 6

229
70
18
52
159
2
78
13
52
H
31
1
1

20
1.
1
19
8

92
6
3
3
86
8
60

55
-

5

20

19.50 25
57:56“ 57.00
58.00
17.00 25
52.00
53.00

16
-

12
-

1

29
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

16

12

28

28
8

33

1
11

1
27

25

_

_

18.50
11.50

29
T

16

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




12
38
100

13

U
3
16

5

6

17
16
26
21

11
3
1
2
8
2
6

11
1
1
_
10
_
10

_

_

-

-

*
-

387
239
109
130
118
12
66
9
26
5

239
138
77
61
101
27
60

205
116
a
105
59
12
11

73
63
29
31
10
8
«

95
29
13
16
66
11
38

32
20
2
18
12
2
10

10
1

16
17

2

17
-

49
18
31
5

22 i 11
15
35
7
9
1
-

18
17
1
1

29
15
11
1

7
5
2
-

21
20
1
-

_
_
-

7
6
1
-

71
13
2
11
58
/
25
20
9

92
12
21
21
50
2
18
9
18
3

57
31
22
12
23
13
7
_
3

63
37
12
25
26
16
8
1
1

31
12
2
10
19
18

19
12
9
3
7
3
2

6
6
1
5

101
13
15
28
58
22
27
1
4
1

90
11
26
18
16

31
30
5
25
1
2

26
11
11
15

20
15
5
10
5

1

1

1

16
6
5
1
10
1

39
7
6
1
32
10
10
6
6

■»

18

318
197
111
83
151
21
61
4
37
25

9

17
1
28

L
1
3
1
_

_

19
1
1

5
3°

10

-

_

_

_
_

_

2

_
_
_
_

.
.
_
_

_
_

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

30

10

2
2

18

8
8

35
5

_
«
.

_

_

_

_
_

_

18

1

2
2
2

_

_

_
_

_

_

l

_

1

H

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32
21
6
15
11
4

51
29
20
9
22
5

37
13
11
2
21
7
10

11
9
5
1
5
3

20
20
8
12

2
2
1
1

3
3
2
1

1
1
1

25
1

«.

1
21

1
1
1

_
_
_
_

_

21

7

1
16

12
17
9
8
25
16
1
1
1

3

2

-

_

-

«.

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

9.

Table A-l: G fe c e . O c c u p a t io n - G & *U iH 44& d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number

wAi
ucp

Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.0C 72.5C75.00 80.00 85.00
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0C 30.00 85.00 90.00

$
90.00
and
over

Women - Continued

310

Transcribing-machine operators, general •
•
Manufacturing ..... ....... .......
Durable goods ............... .
Nondurable goods..... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing........ .........
Wholesale trade ................

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical ........................
Manufacturing ....................
N r m m n r m f q ng tTT-.tTTtt»»,TTTt.Tttt
.
FIITff M t
Wlli
f

38.5
38.5
40.0
37.5
38.0
40.0
39.5
36.5

$
45.00
47.00
46.00
48.50
44.00
49.50
40«00
39.50

30
20
10
10

38.0
39.0
36.5
36.5

51.50
55.50
44.00
44.00

985
333
150
183
652
258

44.50
Typists, class A ............... .....
2,026
38.5
Manufacturing......... .......... " ' T O T ' 39'.<T ' 45'.50"
46.00
Durable goods .................
593 39.5
45.00
Nondurable goods ...............
250 38.0
44.00
Nonmanufacturing ....... ......... ..
1,183 38.5
PnN) 1r ir M H t1ah * ... T..T__
»
.
118 37.5
47.00
T V o o 1a trqla
J i f qq
_ TtrrTtITTrfft.t T
T
42.00
135 39.5
4I.5O
7
t 11 (t»1T-1TTTt-Tt»
I
,
71 39.5
42.50
Finance ** ....................
687 38.0
172 38.5
47.50
Services .................. .

2
2
-

38
38
-

a

15
15
8
3
4

35

98
17
16
1
81
18
2
61

-

—
-

—
-

—
-

7
39
- ---T~T
7
7
- ; 4
28

162

129
39
21
16
90
15
7
59

202
40
H
26
162
23

_
- |

« j 28
*
*
*
*

32
24
106
11
4
81

1
1
1

92
26
8
18
66
23
6
24

70
33
7
26
37
20
1
10

101
23
14
9
78
50
1
21

102
38
9
29
64
55

4?
29
13
16
20
10

6

7

4

56

2
2
2

5
4
1
1

2
1
1
1

2
2

2 1
1
1
1

4.
4,

1 250
!
: 123
1 112
H
127
11
28
3
19
48
119
1
37

369 231 292 ? U
121
w r 137
#>
67
51
89
73
36
48
48
23
248 141 205
77
5
4.
8
24
.0
5
35 1 18
5
1
29
14
150 114
52 |
91
27
44
*
"
“

133
88
47
41
45
4
36
5

18
60
51 • 14
2
25
26
12
9
4
2
4

4
4
2
2
-

1
1

5
5

2
2

-

_
-

20
85 113
33
58
59
15
4
54 : 50 | 15 i 4
9
4 i
27 ; 54
29
5
3
1
1 1 ; 19
2
2
"i
_
«
.
i5| 18
1
28
15

6
1
1

2
2
2

.
_

5
5

-

-

4
4

11 „ 23
1
1
_
1
1
22
10
22
10

1
1
.
1
_
-

10
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
.
_

_
_

_

_
_

16
_
_

_
_!

_!
_l

_
_

.
.

16

10
10

_
_
_
_

-

_1

-

_

l
'
~1
1

14

14

“
_
—

_

_
-

_
14

16
”

4*728

i,ih"
807
4 7-4
3,447
76
45
.0
356
2,198
367

38.0
39.5
38.5
37.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
36.5
39.5

38.00 209
40.60
40.00
40.00
37.00 209
| 43.50
39.50
7
37.OO
36.50 5/202
37.00

574 594
69
91
5 ! 53
38
64
505 1 503
2
37 ! 21
63 ! 37
323
389
82
51

914 722 873
222 278 | 233
163 197 1 148
81 ! 85
59
692 444 640
1/
/
20
0/
69 111
7 *
+
82
35
119
418 i 323 276
47
13 151

340
170
128
42
170
1/
47
14
84
11

312
117
68
49
195
8
31
6
142
10

“1

_
-

*

_

_

i
1
61
4*
29
19
13
2
6

?5
20
10
10
15

5

5
2

8

4$
2
4
40
3
16
21

25
H
3
11
11
13

21
11
1
10
10

-

2
2

-

_

-

2

-

-

_1
I

10

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2/ Workers* were distributed as follows: 9 - at $90.00 to $95*00; and 10 at $95.00 to $100.00.
4
j/ Workers were distributed as follows: 41 at $90*00 to $100.00; 4 5 at $100.00 to $110.00; and 30 at $110.00 to $120.00.
i j Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at $25.00 to $27.50; and 196 at $27.50 to $30.00.
5/ All workers were at $27.50 to $30.00* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_

_

_

!

.
.

.

_

_ j

i

i
____ 1




•

!
!

1
Typists, class B ...... .....
Manufacturing .......... ......... .
Durable goods ............ .....
Nondurable goods ............. .
Nonmanufacturing
itH H H m * ............ UhnlnnolA
_
____ . .
.
Pa4a 4
1
.... -Finance * * ........... ........
jlAnHM A ___ ___ ___ ___ ____......

_

1
1

_

_

10,

Table A-2r P lO ^edA tfM tfU G 4td * )e c Ju U o a l O cG U ftotiO H d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 40.00
erig
anns
hus
or
(tnad (tnad %
Sadr) Sadr)
40.00 45.00

8.8
J
R

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00105.00110. U5.0C 120.0C125.0C 130.0Cno.oc 150.0 160.00
0c
C
and
55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00 105.00110.00115.0C120.0C125.0C130.0C no.oc 150.0C160.0C over

Men
Draftsmen, chief.... *........ *.....
Manufacturing *.... ....... ...... *

511

43.0
. 4o.o

2,376
Manufacturing
I7S5T”
Durable goods •....•••••••••»•.... 1,589
Nondurable goods *.......... ..
52
Nonmanufacturing .................
735
20
Public utilities *..............
110
Wholesale trade •..•••••••••••••••••
Retail trade.............. •••••
13
Services *.... •••••••.... *.*....
592
Draftsmen, junior............ .
Manufacturing... ............... .
Durable goods
Nondurable goods......... *....

40.5

16.0

40.0
39.5
42.5
38.0
39.0
40.0
43.5

1,552
43.5
6&3 " 40. 6
40.0
583
40.0
17

40.0
227
Tracers.............. •••..........
—W
“ 40.0
Manufacturing........
40.0
26
Nonmanufacturing.... •••••.... •••••

%

113.50
io6.$o

-

86.50 m.
'52:30“ 81.50
87.50
96.00 • 88.50
86.50
93.00
98.50
“
68.00
' 59T3T
58.50
79.50

-

_
16

“

48.50 25
■48700T 25
52.50
*

t t

15
21
15
6

-

1
1
1
93
I 89
89

71
65
6

-

“

“

22
22

~T~

69 141
69 133
68 131
1
2
8
1
6
_
1
-

160
142
140
2
18
1
12
1
4

333
294
290
4
39
28
n

240
196
194
2
44
6
6
32

314
174
167
7
140
4
16
2
118

102 157 339
99 " - n r 106
99 n 5 105
1
“

301
121
120
1

184
59
29
“

61
10
3
7

75
12
7
5

10
2
8

4
4

n
n
n
-

-

90

EJT1

-

2
2

-

4
4

6

-

3

18
n

40
34

35
35

57
16

37
36

183 171 230
134 104 169
127
97 171
18
7
7
67 i 41
49
1 | 1
12
' 10
1
3 , 3
28
35
63

194
99
97
2
95
•
.
1
94

30
3
3
27
1
_
_
26

61
3
1
2

53
1

78

49
22

10
9
8” 4

79
14

124
52
52

42
15
15

81
26
26

28
«
.
_

24

72
2
10
_
60

27
_
_
1
26

55
_
_
1
54

28

no
29

_
28

4
4

6
6

2
2

_
-

_
_

_

_
24
2
10
_
12

_
_
.
.
_
-

_

_
_
-

-

32

1

i

Women
Draftsmen ... ..... ........ ........

42

40.0

68.00

_

Draftsmen, junior ...................
Manufacturing ................ .
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••*

89
65
24

40.0
40.0
39.5

57.50
56.00
62.00

2

Tracers.......... *.... *..... .....
Nonmanufacturing............•••••••

172
$6

39.5

47.50 n
47."dO”“
n

304

39.0
39.5
40.0
39.0
38.0
38.0
40.0
37.0

60.00
60.50
62.50
58.50
58.00
65.50

Nurses, industrial (registered) .......
Manufacturing.... •••••...... .*••••
Durable goods ...................... • • • • • * . . • • • •
Nondurable goods............... • • • • • • ........... ..
Nonmanufacturing............................. .................. ..
Puhlia utilities * ......................... ....

-.rftrtrtTTfTItt.T tT
tT 1

P a L ) 11 t. m r l a
F 1TIMTift® H t t t t f , , f , t . t . . . T T t t t f t t t t

W
119

114
71
20
24
25

6

2
-

«
_

16

25
24
1

24
18
6

-

-

18
18
-

34
24

61
19

4

25
14

58
45
23
22
13
1
7
5

2

6

1

47 i 19
18
24

-

3

54 .OO

1

n
n
1
6

56.00

3

A

4

6
3
3

10

60
51
17
34
9
2
A
3

1

14
2
12

— — t
77
59
36
23
18
7
1
8

38
28
17
n
10
3
5

21
17
7
10
4
A

15
15
13
2
-

5
3

2
1
2
2

1
1
1

i

2

Hours reflect the workweek far which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




1,
1

tm »

a -3*

Maintenance and Poumi Plant OccuftatianA

(Average hourly earnings A f
nen in selected occupations studied on an area
basis In Philadelphia, Pa., by Industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is io n

C a rp en ters. m aintenance ...................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g .............................................. ••••••••............. ..
Durable g o o d s ................... .........................................................
Nondurable goods .............................................................. ..
N onm anufacturlng..................................................... ......................

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m aintenance ...............................................................
M anufacturing ....................................................................................
Durable g o o d s ............................................................................
Nondurable goods ......................................................................
N onm anufacturlng............................................................................
PnKHn lrMH-MAH # .................................................................
Ra+a 41 -t.v>*riA ...............................................................................
VI nanna M ___________________________ _____________

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly Under & 90 5 .9 5 f . 0 0 f . 0 5 £ .1 0 £ .1 5 f .2 0 £ .2 5 i . 3 0 i . 3 5 i . 4 0 f . 4 5 i . 5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 . 8 0 i . 9 0 *2.00 *2.10 £.20 £ .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 £ .7 0 1 .8 0
earnings $
and
0 .9 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 *4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 over

$
1 ,1 7 2
1 .9 4
"0 7
~ y a r
1 .8 2
319
505
1 .9 1
2 .1 2
348
1 ,9 3
37
2 ,2 7
22
16S 2 *4 1
in ?
1 ,8 2
1 ,2 8
19
1 ,7 0 3

1 I 297
709
588
406
187

1 .9 2
" "O Z
1 .8 4

88

2.06
1.86
1.86
2.24

53

-

-

-

6
-

-

-

6

6

-

-

7
-

-

-

6
1
1
5

-

5
1

-

1
4

5

-

8
1

5
-

1 .5 4

-

-

-

-

7

-

2

-

1

5

7

13
1
1
12

39

25
4
21
14

1

9
3

4

2
-

10
10
1
9
-

7
7

5

1

18
12
11
1
6

101
82
30
52
19

8
14

13

10

2

6

11
11

77
49
24
25
28

3

9

2

3
7

3

7

7

3

1?
5

40
18
18
-

21
12

-

7

10
1

2

3
8

15

104- I 65
89
16
73
15

153
111
42
12

3
3
6
2

208
164
77
87
44
23

A

16

53
49
35
14
4
2

3

7

2

2

106
69
1
68
37
2

8

/ t
4f°
Q
2

77

8
1

2

116
83
10
73
33
8

45
a
8
33
4

_

_

_
.

_
-

_

_

_
_

-

25

8
1
1
_
7

66 191
27
5

187

22

4

2
2

_

39
15

23
21

_
4

2

_
_

15
24

21
1

27

2

39

187
4

c
j

25

4

2
2

46

21

29
14
15
17
/
4
6

13

8
6

-

32
32
.
32
-

2
l
*¥

162
29
14
15
133

11
122

4

26

87 316 45? 259 12?
68 220 366 206 118
130 267 143 82
20 90 99 63 36
96
86 53
7
19
33

15

5
/
4

48

9
/
h

15
15

1/
*4

-

1
E n g in eers, s t a t i o n a r y ................... ....................................................
M anufacturing ...................................................................................
Durable g o o d s ......................................................................... ..
Nondurable goods .....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..••••••••............ ............................. ..
PiiKH a irM'H+.'fam • .................................................................
i t t t t t ttfTT|. T-TTTr- T t r - TT-TTTTTTT-t
Vi TtfipnA W I t l M M M I T f l f M t f t T f t t M I f T T - f t l
S e r v i c e s ................................ ......................................................

1 ,4 5 2
1 .7 0
~ ^ 7 T "1773
1 .6 9
229
1 .7 5
744
479
1 .6 4
1 .8 7
90
1.84
79
I .54
114
173
1 .4 9

-

-

-

4

-

-

6
-

!
-

- ! 4

-

-

6

32

1

1

31

9

1
-

-

-

-

4

-

6

12

22

9

3

1
30

6

24
4

2

22

Ill
93
19
74
18

267
172
37
135
95

3

5
28

-

4

15

43
48

7

211

281
134 235
42
51
92 184
77 l 46
11 i 5
8
32

20
14

4
6

166
130
42

1

36

79
63
42

88

22
11
3

1,038 1 .4 8
— w r ~ “ 1732—
204
1 .4 9
565
1 .5 3
1 .3 7
269
I .58
40
1 .3 0
51
62 I .25
110 1 .4 0

H elp e rs, tr a d e s , m aintenance ........................................................
M anufacturing ...................................................................................
.......................
........
DiiweVI m rp A 4m
A/
Nondurable goods ................................................................... ..
N onm anufacturing.............................................................................
PiiKH a itMU-M ah » .................................................................
Wi/Oac»«1a
..................
.............. ..
D a fa ll
________________ ____ ____ _____________
Wm e m n a M
............................................. . . . . . .

2 ,5 0 4
1 .5 4
l l a s r ”0 7
1 .4 2
543
1 ,2 6 3
1 .6 4
698
1 .4 6
1 .5 3
1 .5 1
55
I .46
72
1 .2 4
49

3
„
3

_
_
-

16
19
85 106
45
99 | a
24
— I - ’ 5 “ 23“ - n r | “ 7^“ "“ IB— " 7 6 |
. |
18
72
18
11
3
1
2 45 16 68
77
4
20 23
19
45 18
9
13
13

45
_
-

3

24
15

io

31
_
31

1
5
12

17

7

28

?o

6

11

20
12

10
1

12
8

g

2 25
2 12
5

2

13
3

20

2

1

?1
21
3

28
25

1

18

16
3

29
16

10
8

12
1

2

0

3

76
35
19

16
a

3
14

24

3
20
116
99
53
46
17

8
3
6

3

106

12
60
34

78
38

1
5

28

172
149
95
54
23
16

7

369 356
3a 243
142 97
199 146
28

10
6
11
1

124

86
6

“ 75“

2
10

393
159
82
77

236
215

13

15

1

100
19
16

3

1
20

70

12
54
4
/

4*
42

5

1

26
16
4
/
4

20

-

20

1
12
8
8
2

2

-

-

-

6
2
|

4

8
1

4

4

1

_ i

13

/

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

9

.
.
-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

32
32
32

_

-

-

20
127
52
29
23
75

66
3
5
1

483

9

4

456

8

1

456
27
24

8
1

3

1

47
23
18

6

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




1
6

18

1ft
6
12

26

03
93

6

1 37
118
18

!
!

i
Firem en, s ta tio n a r y b o i l e r ............................................ •••••••
Maniif.r»fiiHng
Durable goods .............................................................................
Nondurable g o o d s .....................................................................
N onm anufacturing..................... .................................................... ..
P iiKH a nMI-t-M aa * .................................................................
^
« . * » * Tt t t * t t T Tl T TT f T T t T r T _ tTTT__t
_
W nATlftA S# _______ ___. ______________ _ _______ . . . . . .
5 amH M a _„_____ . . . ___ ___. . . . . . . . . . . . . _____. . . . . .
3

143
80

I 64
164
164
-

-

-

-

12,

Tabia t>
-}t

Maintenance and Pouf*. Plant Occupationi * Gontinm d
o

(Average hourly earnings 2 / for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number A e a e
vrg
o
f
hu l Jnder 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
ory
w r e s eri g 1
okr
an n s
and
3.9a .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.1C2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over
$
1.81
1.81’
"

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ........ •••••••.
Manufacturing ..........................

245
" 245
■

Machinists, maintenance..... ............. .
Manufacturing................ ........
Durable goods.... .......... .........
Nondurable goods ..................... .
Nonmanufacturing........................

1,451
1,377 1
512
865
74

2.03
hro3
1.85
2.14
1.91
1.87

Maintenance men. general utility............ .
Manufacturing........................ .
Durable goods ................. .......
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing..... ..................
Public utilities * ....................
W r l 1rn t f d .IttttlTlITttT.ri.TttritttTTt.
i>
rl*
Retail trade ............ ............
Finance ** ...................................
Services ...................... ••••••••

1,117
“ 55Z
285
369
463

1.57
"1735
1.58
1.54
1.59
1,75

119
63
62

1.39
1.47

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ............
Manufacturing...... .......... ...... .
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufac
turing..... ....... ..... .
Public utilities * ........ .......... .
Uhnl«m 1 * fmri. , f f, . 1 . , T , , TTTtfT.T
1 ,
.TTtrT1tt
Services ..............•••••..........

1,577
~25C
81
199
1,297
653

Mechanics, maintenance ........... ......... .
Manufacturing..........................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods .... ........ •••••.«•••••
Nonmanufacturing........................
Public utilities » T,..... ..........................

+» ............. ........... .......... ......
ro

Millwrights ..............................
Manufacturing ........... ......... ..••••••
Durable goods ................ .
Nondurable goods ............. .........

47

110
109

1.61
1.60

2

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

22
2

-

-

T

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

-

-

-

6

_

-

-

2
20

13
13
13
-

_

10
2

-

2
8

76
f
~

W

30
18
28
2

4
4

4
4

29
29

30
30

46

6

i t

T

-

8
8

2
2

20
20
12
8

79 196 372 132 119
79 192 316 125 119
48 83 183 86 90
31 109 133 39 29
7
4 56
/ vj
5
4 yf

10
20

-

50
34
34
16

23
4

1.69
"3757
1.77
1.63
1.70
1.70

-53
23

16
7

28

7
9

258

1.88

39

1.49

20
5

2,001

1.82

r779T“
665
1,131
205
36
70

1.80
1.83
1.81
1.78
1.87

3

6

1

488

”733
376
107

25

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

2

-

-

-

13

44
39

2
1 6

-

2

15

-

6
6
2

13
-

4
-

28
5

11
5

7
f
oc\

17
7
3
4
10
3

1
1

1.88

1

70

9

4
4
62
37
JO

11

5

4

12
10
2

72
47
OK
O

a

2$6
248

8

11
11
10
1

3

36

8

6

71
71
55
16

68
68
66
2

106

20
20

7
13

-

16

66

37 p

-

-

-

-

2

1
1

12
12

9

9

27
27

1

12

9

27

30 62 374
.

2

62

1

_

374

4

_

_
_

2

_
_
_

2

7

_

l

_
_
_

_

1

_
_
_
m
m

O
«
•

I

9

-

-

-

-

-

106
10
6

46
10

8
8

3
5

-

_

4
96

10

8

5

1

-

-

-

5

L

36

11

A
/
04

36

“

•
»

86

50 47 L9Q
25 31 L87
10 29
7
15 2 180
25 16
3

_
_

20

182 239 291 394
136 324 366 298
26
73 73 88 174 119
15 173 63 236 192 179
- 10 46 15 25
6

41

8

30

16

1
6

4

1.85
"3735
1.84

2P
20

4
13

262
51 160 2 2 L_
41 29 51 44
1
11
18 or
40 18 33 19
41 119 264 248 218
21
64 221 175
CO
14

1?

4

78
45
15
30
33

10
10

25
18 151
1H

2
2
-

92
55
32
23
37
18

43
25

-

1}

2

73 202 146 224
46 162 78 141
18 31 43 90
28 131 35 51
27 40 68 83
2
16
27
oq
26
14 19 75
-

8
2

-

8

43
43

38
38

22
22

r

7
2

21
6

1

/

-

_

20

27
27

5
~

1
1

-

6

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




“

73
50
23
13
4

K
0
2

?

138

p6

103 137
100
96
3 a

56
37
19

_
_

11
11
11

3
3

1

m
m

5

4

A

_
_

_
_

1

<
X

4

*

_

5

4

_

2
2
2

“

13-

M aintenance and Powee P lant O ccnpationl - Contin ued

**“ •

(Average hourly earnings A/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., tyJLpdustry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
% $
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
3hder0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1*40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
\
and
3.90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workere

Average
hourly
earnings

Oilers......................... ...... .
Manufacturing........ ...................
Durable goods............ .............
Nondurable goods .............. ....... .

460
"438“
160
278

$
1.46
3
T.47 HT ”
1
1.44
1.48
3

Painters, maintenance • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . ...... .
Manufacturing ......... ............ .
Durable goods ... ...................... • ......... .
Nondurable goods • • . . . . ......... ................ .
......... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • •
Nonmanufacturing

820
"4TT123
294
403
164
69
113
54

1.74
i.8 2 " 1
1.69
1.88
1.66
1.83
2.07
1.41
1.16

R a +J) 1 1

+.Y*®rl«

t«flt-TTTTTT»l»ttT»»»»rT»rttfTtt»

Finnn . ** t T . . . . . . .
oa
SflnHnan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pine fitters, maintenance ........... .
Manufacturing.......... ..... ............
T i *VIa
Vw
m
Nondurable goods ......... ....... ..... .
Nonmanufacturing.............. ........... ..... .

819

1.84
2.03
2,02

Plumbers, maintenance ..................• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Manufacturing ................ • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » ....... .
Durable goods ................. • • • • .....................
Nondurable goods .......................... ............ .
Nonmanufacturing ...... ..... .......... .
Po+^^1
UMnsh a a M
..... .. .
.
..............

169
1.74
83 1TIT?
1.73
43
1.83
40
86
1.70
2.06
27
1.60
33
1.16
12

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

7

**

■■

1?

7

-

-

7

7

15

15

4

4?

14

Hi T T
3
4

22
4

2?

4

25

4

1
24

-

14
*
“

17
15
2
13
: 2

45
4$
18
27

52
-

61

33
33
24
9

43
37
18
19

1?
9
9

21
7

10
10
7
3

6o

20
40

-

-

-

52

10

7
14

52

10

14

i

2

Y fT .. r.96"
-

_
_

_

—

_

_
_

-

_

_

_

_

10
10

51
2
49

42
47
23
24

9
9
5
4

92
51
20
31
a

94 157
90 39
8
28
62 31
4 118
107
6
4
2

81
42
36
6
39

2

10

56
56
g
48

i “

1
[

fi

9!
11
87

13
28

2
2

1.97

266
505
48

1
1

7

-

-

_

•

J*
c
/

48 54
46 30

57
39

22
25
25

46 30
2 24

39
18

*
J

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

3

18

“

-

47
22

_

**

17
17
13
4

_

0/

2

3
-

-

1

-

-

n
_1

2

53
47
2/
23
6

98 186 121
98 167 121
1106 * 72
64 i 61 49
19
*
“

24
17
7
10
7
7

28
15
12
3
13

31
31
22
9

-

_

~

77 I64
54 1S4
_ !
_ j
54 164
23
“
—
1

-

21
21

_

-

_

21

—

-

_

“

“

j
l

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance
Manufacturing... ........................
Durable goods....... ..................
NnndnmMa
« .............................
a
Iam
Lne
a + h i »4 v\rr
............. ......

Tool-and-die makers .......... .............. .
M o n l n i r ncr______...........................
i -To + i l

220
190
102
88
30

1.87
18''
.5"
1.83
1.88
1.99

2

2

6

2

15

1

19
7
4
3
12

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

.

2

2

6

2

-

2

g

-

.

-

-

-

-

2

2
2
2

2.06
1,369
i ; 6r ~
t

2

-

-

1
1
1

15
1
H

4
4
4

1
1

/

1
1
-

1
! A

40
40

12
12
3
9 !

6
6
1
5

53
53

23
20
2
18
3
1

1

1
1

31
29
23
6
2

1
1
1

1

1
1

5
5

7

5

_

1

-

-

7
7

.

-

13
4

4
4

1

4
9

4

93 120 234 267 235 L15
93 120 230 267 235 L15

2
2

13

47
47
20
27

27
18
18
-

9
3
2

87
70
50
20
17

-

-

-

x

-

1

5
-

-

1

-

.

_
.

-

.

_

5
3

_

1
x

-

-

9
9
9

210
210

1
i
1/
*
#*

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




i

H,
Table A-4: C u s t o d ia l,

W a A e iu m liH f, a n d S U i p p iu t f O cc u p a t io n ^

(Average hourly earnings i/ for selected occupations 7 j studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Undei 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 i.15 1.20 i.25 i.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
$
0.75 •80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over

Crane ooerators. electric bridge (under 20 tons) ••••
Manufacturing............. ........... .
Durable goods...... ............ ........
Nondurable goods........ •••••••••••••••••••

561
52*
502
22

$
1.56
1.56"
1.56
1.57

23
23
23

Crane ooerators. electric bridge (20 tons and over) •
Manufacturing •••••••... ............. ••••••••

692
war

1.69
1. W

26
26

Guards................. ................... .
Manufacturing.......... .
Durable goods.... .......... ......... .

1,554
765
308
481
419

1.34
1.42
1.42
1.40
1.16
1.13

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men) ............
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ... .
Durable goods ............ ............ .
Nondurable goods ......... ......... ••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ........ •••••••.... ••••••••••
Public utilities « ......................
Uhnl.^1 a +t oHa | I . 1 T l t t T t . l t T t ) , , l r |,‘r , , | m i |
*
Retail trade ...................... •••••••
W n o n M • • ________ ____________________
Sat^H m o t i r » t i T T t » » » r « t - t - i r i t T » « » t t » » t T r t T t r r
i

7,959

1.13

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (women) •••••••••••••
Manufacturing .•••••••......•••••••••••••••....
Durable goods •••••................. .•••••
Nondurable goods ................. •••••••••
Nonmanufacturing.............. ....... ••••••

4.A12
804
316
488
3,608
173
92
383

Nonmanufacturing

4 f* I l H 1 1 +.1 C O

•

IlIITtMItlllTtTtlftlTITtll

.........
R.f.4 1
TM no n M

+ t »o A a

_............. .

________________________________________________

_____________________________

W

r ;$ r
1,314
2,431
4,214
566
1,245
1,017
925

iiiiiiTiTTr-iiTiiTitTtitiiTitrttnititt

506

Order fillers ................................
Manufacturing .......................... .
Durable goods.... •••••••.... ••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods............. .
Nonmanufacturing goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ...... • • • • •
Wholesale trade....... .
Retail trade • • • • • « • « • • . . . • • . ...... ........• • • • • • •

2,592
W "
316
594
1,682
890

To^inr |

Manufacturing
Durable goods.................. ••••....
NnrwIiTfiiltla

a

ftt»t»TiT-»TtiTiii-it,ri»tTTT»

Nonmanufacturing ...... ........ .
Wholesale trade..........................................
Retail trade...... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « • •

646

2,004
l,37o
695
681
628
428
199

1.28
1.20
1.05
1.33
1.05
1.03
I.07
•90

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

5
5

-

6
6

-

6

-

-

1.43

-

-

1 .2 6

-

-

1.29
1.35
1.38
1.32

42
2
2
40
40

105 551 335 266
32 l2l 54
2
24
- 32 97 ! 52
105 519 214 ! 212
-1 27 56 34 ! 26
16 98 41 74
20 42 ino;
3
62 345 97

.93 202 252
1.07
13 22
1.18
13 10
1.00
12
.90 189 230
3
1.12
/ i
n
.91
*►
.86
40 14
g1
•92
.81 J/138 201
•o x
1.35
1.32
1.44
1.26
1.37

5

4

4?

_

1.14

4
-

4

45
44
1

-

47
47

?6
18
18
18
18

?1
37
37
54
54

80 ?7
1
47
33
1
14
33i 56
3 ! 34
3

42
3l

45
19

31 1 19
11 ! 26
- :

15

1 1 |

1 1

17
-

62
25
25
37
32
5

17
17

23
4
-

4
19
18

524 234 391 688 969 678
288 124 76 66 ” 223 "
”29*f
8 59
2 28 96 108
280 65 74 38 127 190
236 n o 315 622 746 380
6 29 17 28
9 44
/ 84
7
41
6
6
306 155 134
151 67 106
1 0
10 80 56 447 180
28 225 94 16
41

I65 627 2080 105 118 20? 235
111 54! 30 a
39 123 56
; 2 25 22 12
6
111! 54! 22 39 14 101 44
54 ! 573 2050 64 79 80 179
in
i
A
1 39
2 43
7
in 1 0 1 ! _
i
17 10
11 ' m i
1A
5
7
3
91 ! 1QA1 9tt
ffZ 28 16 68 91
i 80 22 23
42

_

1.18
1.08

47

}2
8

46
18

24

16
30

20

-

8

4
61
18
18
43
32
11

30
6?
23
3
20
62
35
27

91
51
8
43
40
13
27
139

48
25
21
93
32
61

132
89
46
43
43
21
10
12

86
30
18
12
56
56

190 143
136 n 6
121 52
15 64
54 27
52 27

n
n
n
10
-

11
n
8
3

_

16 61 103 141
16 “ ST T 5 T t S"

9 224
< 224
F

2
2

87
80
63
17
7
1

37
37
25
12

1

m
m

75 210 n 7
63 97 113
19 79 60
44 18 53
12 113
4
10 112
2
2
1
2

12
6
6
6
1

2
2

1

_

-

-

_

•

•

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

1

89
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

1

-

-

19

-

-

-

66
86
76

49
49
49
-

79 1??
70 132
70 132
-

21
21

29
29

60
60

52 12? 226 132
44 109 204 m
40 109 186 93
18 21
4
8 14 22 18
mm
18
14

771
657
158
499
114
14
48
31
21

470
332
208
124
138
19
84
7
20
g

583
455
184
271
128
61
17
48

2

130
108
108

1

67
35
23
12
32
32

-

-

22

1
-

1 1
i

-

582 366
396 316
185 94
213 222
184 50
169 39
6
9
2
5

9
9
9

-

89
20
20

6
6
6

n o

83

92 68
a 47
51 21
18 15
7 8
n
6

177
89 177
7 81
82 96
35
34
1

124

242 217 128
230 139 i n
130 81 66
100 58 45
12 78 17
10 70 15
8
2
2

76
75
18
57
1
-

5
9
29
13
16
30
30

1

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Vage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




31
29
25
4
2
2

38
32
32
-

14
14
14
-

•

•

_

65

-

1

-

2
_
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_ i

-

-

_

-

-

-

65
65

-

8
8
8
-

_
-

-

-

_
•

-

-

•

-

—

-

-

_

_

2
-

18
18
18
-

10
8

8

-

2
2

8
2
2

1

-

.

22

43 188 286 112 109 136 270 10$ 281 170 870 116
7 6l 33 24 a
5
65 242 64 75 14 75
9 13 16 61 26 46 29 13 36
1 39
7 61 24 n
25
5
4 216 18 46
36 127 253 8 8 6 8
71 2 8
44 206 156 1 9 5 i n
106
37 4 2
159
31 105 2 8
43
3
3 20 118
6 88
5 1 6 225 49 26 2 8
5
25
33 36
50 125 129
68
21 n o
13 50 65
g 60
3
29 15 61
6 21
20
40
9
9

87
26
20
6

/

60
47
12
35
13
13

66
62
59
3

66
54
54
-

14
-

n o

1

36
13
3
10
23

108

-

20

5
1
4

-

1

2

1

3

-

1

-

-

4

4

1

5
5

4
4

3
3

1

7
7
7

-

-

_
-

•

-

-

-

-

14

1

1
-

_

-

-

1

40
40

15
15

_
-

-

1,
5

Table A-4:

G t u i o d ia lf

*kJa>ieU o4U iH p , a n d S k i p p i n g
*

O com ia t io * t i - G o n tiM u a d
f

(Average hourly earning* 1/ for selected -occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Mumfmaturing.............................
Nonmanufacturing ......................... .
Retail trade ..... .

2.081
1,753
328
288

Receiving clerks .............................
Manufacturing....... ....... ........ ......
Durable goods................. .
Nondurable goods....... .................
Nonmanufacturing ........... .
Wholesale trade................... ••••••..
Retail trade.......... ................. .
Shinning clerks ... ..........................
Manufacturing.......... ...................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods.... .....•••••.... ••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ........................... .

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
Aeae
vrg
h u l JnderD.75 0.80 0.8} 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.0C 2.1C12.20
ory
erig
anns
'and
\
3.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.2G over

1
1.14
1.17
.93
.93

“

65
10
55
55

1.38
1.Z5”
1.47
1.40
1.34
1.41
1.27

-

-

8
- -- 1
2
6
3
3
“

845
1.43
— 350“ ■1.31”
231
1.54
1.48
149
1.37
465
1.32
244
1.32
91

-

-d
!

4
p
4
8
8
-

749
3d$
198
107
444
125
283

141
120
21
17

54 145 45
20 42 18
34 103 27
34 71 27

125
89
36
36

100
82
18
18

59 300 38J 578
50 298 370 574
2 13
9
4
2 13
9
4

28
34 13
13 - p d r
- - i 13 - 1 1
21 15 ; 27
- - i 16 15
27

3
-d
3
-

5
r
4
1
1

31
1 ! i 31
31
| “

-

18 50
- — rr r
- 1
1 4
17 45
17 29
“ -

' 1
; j | 1
-

22
22 i
10 1
12 i
1

21
-—
21
20
1

7
5
2
2

74
74
-

58
1
1
57
20
36

57
18
16
2
39
39

70
15
10
5
55
20
35

72
r—
4
1
67
30
37

29
T
5
24
16
-

39 30
3T - J
- l
10
5
21
8 25
3
5 25

25 101
13 52
6 34
7 18
12 49
12 48
83

w
35
21
27
3

4
4
93
30
24
6
63
37
25

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23 ?4
55
40
17 47
38
6 35
11 12
2
6 7
15
1 ! 4 7
14 ! 1 -

?7
22
11
11
35
28
3

11
11
2
9
-

2
_
2
2

10
8
4
4
2
1
1

1?
7
7
_
6
4
2

26
3
3
_
23

25
15
9
6
10
6
4

76
68
31
37
8
-

95
19
9
10
76
36
-

25
14
14
11
3
-

45
13
11
2
32
29
3

17 26 22 14
i 7 18 22
4
| 6 | - 18 , 4
4 ! 1 j
8
10 ! 18 I - 10
8
6
8
2
2
-

18
ul
H
4
2
-

19 67
1; 1
-j 1
1
18 1 66
18 66
-

6?
34
14
20
29

84
75
73
2
9

38
19
19

28
1

8
1

-

-

-

-

37 65
ITd r
12 40
5 18
20 7
6 6 5

-

44
28
20
8
16
j
-

a
£7
27
15
15

-

-

-

3

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

1
1
1
_
_
_
-

8
8
2
6
-

4
_
4
3
1

1
1
_
1

1
1
1
_
-

_
-

_
-

1
SMmincr-and-receiving clerks.......
Manufacturing ............... ........ ......
Durable goods.................. ••••••....
Nondurable goods........ ................
Nonmanufacturing.......................... .
Wholesale trade.................... .....
Services ........ ........................

623
133”
94
39
490
277
81

1.50
1.55
1.56
1.63
1.48
1.61
1.08

- i

j 8

-

Stock handlers and truckers, hand... ............ 12,264
Manufacturing... ................. •••••.... "5,323”
Durable goods ...........................
2,289
Nondurable goods................ • • • 3,034
••
Nonmanufacturing... ......... • • • • • • • 6,9a
••••••
Public utilities * ..................
1,415
Wholesale trade. ..... ....... • • • . 3,114
.
••.
Retail trade........ ....... ......
2,351

1.33 24 ;153 87 188 152 218
2l . 46 162
— rr
1.33” - 1 a ! d
- j - ! - j -j 8 1.39
- ! 20 ' 4 ! 21 38 162
1.29
1.32 24 '133 ;83 j167 !106 |56
i -■ -■ - 1.43
- 128 j 55 i 60 1 16
1.33 15
128 55 1 1 2 ; 4 5 :40
1.25
9 I

Truck drivers, light (under l4 tons) .............
Manufacturing ............ ....... ...... .
Durable goods ............. ..............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing ....... ....• • •
• • ......
Wholesale trade......... ..........
Retail trade... ..................

1.48
1.49”
1.41
1.57
1.48
1.47
1.58

713
157
78
79
556
340
134

J

. 1

J

-

-!

-

- ;

-

1

-

- -1 - -j - 1 1
- j - - | - - j

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,




1

-

-i - -;

21 10
- - - 21 10
5 10
16 187
132
6
126
55
- 1
215 4
77 49

513
185
30
155
328

13
6
6
7
3

30 22
-j 30 1 22
5
12 22

6
6
6

?2 ! 14 49 1 158 1?
_
U.
2 ! 13
0
- 11
7 13
'
13 a
14 49 138; 8 46
a
39! 5\
j
1! j
! - !
1
I
226 i573 1232 ’
1222 698 1691!2178: 753: 1071 >U2
68! 470 296 |804 !445 847! a 9 449 ; 386 272
: 16 178 j2281 356| 194 254 194 194 217 188
j 52 292 68! 448 2511593; 225:255 i 169! 84
,158 103 936 418 253: 844:1759304 685!l40
i - 2 - 64 -i6 a 18 51 : 594 4
- 782 122 143 |I84 709 143
72 124
: 107
48 95 150 232 106 19 1032 109
19 12

?
54
8
6
8
6 ; 46
3
- 46

12

-

-

12

-

23
8
4
4
15
14

30;
18 )
18;
12!

4
4
3
1
-j
-

29 22
1; 18 !
1 13;
- 5|
28
4j
26

49
-

49;

-

1 13

17
14:
13
l
j
3

14 106
13 ! 32
15
13
- 17
1
74
- 72

- -

-

236 201
109 38
93
9
16 29
127 163
7 19
115 142
2
5

3 323
2 23
2
7
- 16
1 300
- 172
_ 1121

4
-

4

-

64
22
18
4
42
13
24
5
9
2
2

-

7
7

-

-

-

19
1
18
6
6
6

-

-

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

18
18
18

-

-

-

-

-

,

16

Table

A-A-.

C u s t o d ia l, ^ U o A a U o u im f, M K

i SAiftftittf 0cOMfuUlO*U - GontiMMmd

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Philadelphia, Pa., by industry division, October 1951)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Truck drivers, medium (if to and including 4 tons) . ..
.
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods... ........... ..... .... .
Nondurable goods...... ..... ...... ••••••••
Nonmanufacturing ••••.... ..••••••••...........

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ......
Manufacturing.... •••••••........... ••••••••••
Durable goods .••••••........... ..... ....
Nondurable goods...... •••••••••...... •••••
Nonmanufacturing..... .....................
Wholesale trade ......... ...............
R t )11 |rnHo ,,«ii»t,«TtTtfi-itTTT-tTT-r_tr____
»j
r

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
t
s
s
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
r
$
$
$
S
s
$
$
$
N m e Aeae
u b r vrg
o
f
h ul Undei 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .5 5 1.60 1.65 1.7C 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
ory
w r e s e rig
okr
a nns
$
and
0.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.4 5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over
1
2,920 1.59
"1757““
1,125“
217 1.52
908 1.59
1,795 1.59
1,057 1.6?
220 1*49

-

-

-

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ...........
Manufacturing........................ «...
Durable goods ...........
Nondurable goods •••••.......... .

582
- 552“
418
144

Watchmen .................... ..... .........
Manufacturing...... ........... ......... .
Durable goods ............ ..............
Nondurable goods • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • ......... • • • • • • . • •
Nonmanufacturing .............................................. .

2,739 1.14
”17511“hT.2£“
406 1.18
1,105 1.25
1,228 1.03
257
.97
147
.99
365 l . n
326 1.11
.79
133

TftTTTTT1TTTT.TT1.....T.-....T

Wholesale trade • • • • • ............. .
Retail trade ................................. ................
Finance ** ............ ............ ............
C»At*in />oe

...................... ........ * . . . .. ........
.

11
-

-

49
27
10
17
22

3 267
2 254
- 13
2
2a
1 13

22

-

13

46
46

6?
25
10
15
38
38

1.39
1.39
1.36
1.48

-

-

-

4

19

-

-

11

14

1
1
1

18
18
18

-

-

80

i

_

1 _
i i

-

21
6
6

23 105
23 i
105
23 ; 94
11

8

-

-

-

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

59
5$
59

25
2>
f
25

-

93
93
28
65
-

!
|

>

-

-

-

-

-

j

_

.

_

32
32
32

-

-

j

1
8

1 I - i _

6

6

!

1

j
100 170 214 ! 84 60 39 314 132 198 339
26n r
~ ~ W ~ ^55“n r 2 2 2 ~ r i r 122“ T 7 T
46 24 54 53
26 6
36 : 25 i 13 176 19 68 126
43
214 43 • 35 26 92 89 76 160
7 !121
4
1 „
i
_
1
2
186
•
6
6
29 10
4 ! 8
i 53
- ! 22
7 36 53 51 51
9i 16
i 13
- 1 10
18 14 17 20 16 19 103
24
1.0
8
6 10

j

60 151
60 151
48 ia
12 10

169 161
5b 131
33 57
17 74
119 30
44
6
6
37 H
30 10
2

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows: 8 at 60 and under 65 cents; 2 - at 65 to 70 cents; 106 at 70 to 75 cents.
4
Workers were distributed as follows: 28 at 65 and under 70 cents; 37 at 70 to 75 cents.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1405

175
46
129
1230
3 619
20 126

72 756
24 73
6 31
18 42
48 683
0 07 c
0 0 (j
21 253
24 55

677
55 316 L
7 191
1A
7 32
159
14 !
a 1309 I486
L
a
•¥ 1022
; 24 27/
1 281 100

6?
63
30
33

60

28

60

28

48
12

2
26

50
50
4
46

4

13

-

1

1
72
1
72
1 - 54

4?8
122
4
118
376
376
55
31
1
30
24

24 199 104
24 199 104
17
1
2
7 198 102
_
-

8
8
4
4
-

_

a

5$

21

1
_
55

21

-

35
35
29
6

2

2
2
2
-

80

10
10

21
10

?o
28

5?
58

42
38

14

10

10
11

28
2

56
2

14
21
20

9

4

_
_

2
3

-

-

37
35
15
20
2

44 322

2

-

_
-

.
_
_

-

44 322

- _
_ _
44 322

j
3 384 !102!589
OQ
108
<7
42
. 108 42 29
3 276 60 560
■ 20
a
j
OCA 60 <&o

_
.
_

.
.
.

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

6

18

-

36
- 24
- - 24
- 12

6
6

-

§9

5
5
_
5

01
< *+
■

54
34
20
14

3
a

1

i

12

5?
38
36
23

81 237 181 112 194
72 44 ; 97 105 i109
58 13 34 91 95
14 31 63 14 14
7
9 193 84
85
70
168
9
&
25 1 A

91 236 159
53 182 152
7 43 15
46 139 137
38 54
7
6
3
29

65

_

6

18
18
18

l




36
29
12

27
19
-

1

1/
2/
j
\J
4/
*
**

77
22
15
7
34
21
13

80

-

1

*

19
-

90
10
10

-

1.72
—
1.49
1.74
1.72
1.60
1.88
I.58

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ............. .......
1,159 1.45
Manufacturing.... ...... ................. -- 755“”1745
501 1.45
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods ................ .......
257 1.45
401 1.45
Nonmanufacturing...... .... .......... .
2/7 1.47
^r+
^ dc| # (jiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiriiiiirtiii
R a +.o 4 1 froHo
.......
..................................
55
1.44

op

-

1,408 1.72
n(J5" T76486 1.60
119 1.66
1,203 1.73
f VQ
x
1*60
1.82
722
79 1.58

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) .... ............ ..... •••••••••.
3,259
M n i n t T ^ncf____ ___________ ____ _ . . . ___ . . . . — 453“
nifpjP
90
Durable goods........ .............. .
Nondurable goods ........................
373
2,796
Nonmanufacturing....... ••••.............. ..
PiiKHn ivMH +I » *
«a
.......
1,091
U iaIAli A
V ffl
....
....
1,234
............
Refs4
1
471

PnKl I < ptl T I
*

4
-

-

-

-

_

2

2

1

-

.

-

_

1
1
1
-

-

.

-

-

30

.

.

-

-

_

-

.

•

_

_

_

_

_

_

17
17
11
6

30
30

?5

10
1

2
2
2
-

_

_

_

_

.

.
-

„

-

_
.

.

17,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
t y iU L - Q c M n U m e d

Table B-2251,

J to A ie fu f

2/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

of

hourly

2/

Adjusters and fixers, knitting machines (A or more
years1 experience) (men) £ / * .................
Boardersi Men and women................... .
Men I f * ........................
Women } / b ......................

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1 .3 5 1.40 1 .4 5 1.50 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2.40 2.60 2 .8 0 3.00
*
0 .8 5

”
.9 5

1.00

_

.9 0

3

1 .0 5

1.10

1 .1 5

1.20

1 .2 5

1.30

1

15
9

6

12
5
7

1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5

2.06

363
67

1 .6 0

1.50

296

1 .6 3

59
49

•
-

-

2

2
1
1

2
1

6
6

•
-

10
6

6

1 .0 5

2

2

-

1*16

3

8

14

Folders (women) 2/b..................... .

189

1.30

6

8

4

Knitters, single-unit or backrack (men) % /b 9 y ....
45 gauge, 20 sections 2/b..................
51 gauge, 24 sections 2 / b ..................
51 gauge, 26 sections
..................
51 gauge, 30 sections 2/b................. ..
60 gauge, 32 sections % / b ..................

761
143

66

2 .3 2
2 .1 5
2 .0 4
2 .3 7
2 .5 7
2 .3 2

-

-

1

6

3
3

12
2
10

«.

2
2

16
4

19
4
15

12

16
3
13

4

155

Loopera, to. (1 at man years1 experienc)
( w - n ) i f b ..............................
Menders, hand (women) s Total.................
Tima..............................
Incentive ............
Finish! Total ...........................
T1m

..........

Incentive......... ..............................
Greys Total ................................. ...................
Time..................................................
Incentive.......................

111
50
82

4

13

9

3

159
135
29

1.42
1.36

2

3
3

1

!

1 .2 9
1 .1 3
1 .3 4

16

7

13

8

16

-

2

513

16

10

15

12

10

7

8

4

-

1.42

14

-

1 .3 3
1 ,1 5

59
53

2
2

-

1 .4 1

106
112

20
20

-

64

1 .1 5
1 .4 2
1 .2 8
1 .1 5

9

It

4

-

1

4

5

57

42

37

40

11

2

2

4

50

51

36

31

38

4
7

x

6

6

6

6

•

2

-

-

1

-

-

•
-

-

-

2
2

5

-

•
-

-

-

-

80
9 ; 10 ; -

79
-

32
•
-

1

-

1

18

4

8

4

3

4

2

13

17

12

10

15

8

4

-

6

4

4

-

-

-

10
2
2

37
4
14

33

78
19
35

96

54
23
9

65

101

4

89
33
4
4
7

-

-

6

2
1
6

2

4

•

2

1
2
2

I

2

1

2

5

2

-IITTITTtf-rTI

VI/,

Incentive .................

399

Preboarderss Men and woswn....................... ............
Men 2/b ........................................
Women l/b....................

286
146
1 40

1.58
1 .5 9
1 .5 7

-

-

-

1

359

1.42

8

8

2

3

j 14

-

-

-

1

7

4

6

-

6

1

29
23

8
2
6
6
2

11

18

14

18

20
5

14

13

12
6
6

4

4
5

■

12
2 ! 6
11
5
! 4
5
2
1 :6
1 ; 9 j 18
8 ! 18
1
1
1 1 ' j

2

-

4
7

6
2

-

10
8
12
6

-

-

5

a
m

12
_

1

8
10

6 !12
6
2

-

2

2

3

2

2

53
31

42

28

4

-

'

-

-

10
2

2

12
3

5
3

3
17

•

-

3

3

28

32

9

-

2

2

2

17

9

7

4

17

9
7

1

12
1
11

9

i

7

4

10

6

2

18

5
5
-

5
19

7

20
1 !12
8
8
6
3
1

6

5
5

5

8

15
17
5

7

6

-

9

8

21

27
5
4

-

-

-

1

8

end
over

x

12
2
10

5

247

88

9

4

56

2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0

5

i
lllSllltlllTI

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40

5

1,01
1.00

Examiners, grey (inspectors, hosiery) (women) 2/b ....

1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0

*
29

10

Time.....................
Incentive .................

1.50

1

4

-

3
9
4

i

_

11

8

6

25

6

17
14

7
9

-

2

-

2

3

22
8

-

-

-

l

-

-

_
-

-■

2
2

-

-

_

2

_

_

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

12

3
4

_

8

4

7
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

«.

-

5

7

8

2

4

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

9

7

_

1

2

_

_

9

!

9

15

33
!io

L
—

!

5

|

23

22

21
21

2
26

78
32
46

34

3

io

-

11
6

6

6
2

3

5

4

4

34

26

i

30

17

39

35

36

13

5

2

4

2

26

17

39

35

36

13

5

2

4

2

1

21

20
8

9
3

13

12

22

46
39
7

7
4
3

10

8

37
15

36

6
8

26
13
13

3
7

2
1
1

14

16

18

9

7

6

2
26

6

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

*.

_

-

2
1

-

•

-

3

-

-

-

4

2

| *

Seamers (women)

.........................

1

!
-

—i

5

1

2

-

1
1

3

1

-

15

6

13

23

17

14

14

33

31

14

15

6
8

19

7

21

6

17

**

1/ The study covered establishments with aore than 20 workers, primarily engaged in knitting, dyeing, or finishing full-fashioned hosiery. Data relate to a September 1951 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
B.S. DEPARTMENT QP LABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b All or predominantly incentive workers.
)
y
Includes data for workers on other machines in addition to those shown separately*




Table b-2337*

W om en'* a nd M u * e * ' Goat* a n d S u it* 2/
NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1,616
751
865

f.98
2.51
1.52

81
Z1
46
90

2.68
2.57
2,93
3.12

392
158
234
18
374
142
232

1.62
1,39
1.78
1.77
1.62
1.35
1.78

368
52
316

2.02
1.47
2.11

206
51

2.78
.90

2/
All plant occupations* Total •••.•••••.......... .
M e n ...................
Women.......... ••••••••
Spleered

1
1

65
23
42

27
8
19

40
14
26

25
5
20

12
3
9

63 88
12
9
51 79

104
9
95

54 71
10 11
44 60

90
33
57

66
26
40

50 135
10 71
40 64

86
56
30

98
74
24

65
50
15

4
2

103 83
18 31
85 52

2

/
4
f
t
O
4

i/
A
2
1

10
4
g
8

7
13

68 65
65 61
3 4

23
20
3

*2
ft
o
Q
y
8

“

4
✓

X
6
7

4

28
28
-

26
26
-

17
15
2

63
63

1
i
4
14
X2

OqquBStaSBg

aw4 m v 1 o * fmonl ^/m ..... ..... .......
o *r v s
Pt£a
*>
j V n v (^
irl
man atvI 1 u n m a n )
ttitittr - , , T,t ,
PpA99Arii^ mnnhlnA (lmn) j/h ttt.tT.Tt..tr.tr..ttttttttt
PnoeoAt»i. V A w
tf^
m r\ nA f l i
*>
ufl
_____*_______ _
Sewers, hand (finishers)
(men and women)* Total .................... .
T l l ................... ..
ltA
Incentive .................
Men j / a ..... ..............................
Tims....................................
Incentive....... ........... ........... .
Sewing-machine operators, section system
(80 men and 288 women) t Total.................
T m * t..... ..........
i#
Incentive ............
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
(tailor) system (men) 2/b ...... ••••••....... .
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 2/a ............•

1/
Bureau
2/
2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
.
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aider 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00
and
>.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.10 L.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 over

1
1
3

1
-

1

-

1

_
-

1
1
1

_
-

1
1
1

-

1

-

•2
1
1

-

19

8
1
1 i 7
j
9 i 6

2
2
2
2
-

_
4
4

3

3

U
10
4
U
10
4

52
38
H

30
17
13
_
30
17
13

49
36
13

45
27
18
45
27
18

19
11
8
19
11
8

15 12
2 2
13 10

30
10
20

18 22
5
6
12 17

-

3

1
5

1
2

1
4

2

55
12
43
2
53
10
43

2
5

1

6

27
14
13
2
25
12
13

29
12
17
2
27
10
17

22
6
16
1
21
5
16

23
1
22
23
1
22

28 26
Q 10
19 16
2

7

—

1

18

c
2
2

g

35
g
27
7
28
1
27

14

15

3

-

2

1

_

_

14
1
13
13

15
_
15
15

3

_
_
-

2
_
2
2

1
_
1

_
„

_

31
1
30

19

16

19

16

37
4
34

21
2
19

2

2

3

20

27

m
m

4

„

3

-

3

1

- l .
- I
-

6

14

15

4

5

3

14

15

4

5

3

9

11
i I
___
J

33

19

j

2
•
2

_
_
-

8

7

24

7

i 6

27 10

I

2

24

2

19

’

The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers in part of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual ( 9 - edition) prepared by the
145
of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study. Bata relate to a September 1951 payroll period.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(
b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Table B-336l *?M O u0liC & , ff a t fa * * * * * *
^

1 / The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers.
7 j Data limited to men workers; all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis.




Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Rilladelphia, Ba., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

19,

Table B-3391: S tu m , a n d

l/
Manual
2/
2/

y

S t e a l Q o n y in fl ]/

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of iron and steel forgings (Group 3391) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-342: G u t le 'U f, ta ffo n d

* )0 & U O H ti Jto /u lu A a A A l /
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly 5 .8 5
earnings and
2/

%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
0 . 9 0 0 .9 5 1 . 0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 . 2 0 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2.40 2 . 5 0 2 .6 0 2 . 7 0

under
.9 0

.9 5 1 . 0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 . 2 0 1 .2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 4 0 1 .4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 8 0

Men
AeemmKI mive

%

s l a a s P ^ Ai

Assemblers, class
Inspectors, class

C
C

.......................... * ...................................................
j / a ........................................................................ ..

%

/b

Machine-tool operators, production, class A j / , U ••••
ja
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw
machine), class A l / b ........ ...............

32
79
50

1 .8 2
1 .4 2
1 .3 4

l
6

9

_

1

_

.

..

1
14

13
10

_

2
6

11

4
1

6

5

10
1

13
7

6

2
2

5
8

Q
7
5

3_

7

38

1 .6 3

10

3

16

2

14

1 .5 7

4

3

6

1

...................

137

1 .5 1

3

2

13

3

4

14

Milling-machine operators, class B l / b ..........................................
Polishers and buffers, metal ^ A •••••••••••••••••••••••
Polishing-end-buffing-machine operators l A .............................
Tool-end-die makers l / a ............ ............. .
Truckers, hand l / a .............................................................................................

41

1 .6 6
1 .7 6
1 .5 7
1 .9 2
1 .2 7

6
-

5
2
2

9
33
3
3

9
16
1
-

4
47
8
3

4
21
14
2

4

4

2

Machine-tool operators, production, class

C l/b

169
52
28
22

-

-

-

!

-

-

19

28

-

22

3

6

-

12

-

3

-

-

-

-

2
1

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

15

6

_

2

3

12
1

2
10

6

5

6

1

-

-

_
1

8

-

4
1

_

1
1

14
7

13
1
13

9
2

-

-

!

_
-

_

I
I
1
i

l

-

3

—i

6

i
1

1
-

4
-

~

Women
Assemblers, class C l A * .......................... ..............................••••••••
Inspectors, class C l / a ........................................................................ ..

40

22

1 .2 5
1 .1 6

3

-

3

2

1

_

1

2

_

_

_

| 1
!
I

y
(1945
£/
2/

lj

_

_

i
_____

i

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of cutlery, hand tools, and hardware (Group 342) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Mage Survey, Philadelphia, Ba«, October 1951
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT GF LABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




20,

Table B-3439t

jt& itiH C f AfflUVU itltl 1/

2/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of commercial and domestic heating and cooking equipment (except electric stoves) as defined in groups
3432 and 3439 in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
y Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-3444*

Wo*U

1/

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Group 3
444-) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a September 1951 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Fa., October 1951
2/ Data limited to men workers; all or a majority of workers in each occupation were paid on a time basis*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR
y Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




21*

TabU B-35*

MocluH&Uf

9 n A u & b u 6 & 1/

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

o
f

Occupation and sax

workers

hourly
earnings

i/

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
%
s
$
s
$
$
$
s
%
$
$
$
[ a e 1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2 .4 0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C
fdr
1
and
L.0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2 .5 0 2.60 -2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 aval

Machinery 3/
Man
Useaiblers, class A £/a......................
Usenblers, alaaa Bt Total...................
...........................................................

Issesblers, class C £/b ......................
Electricians, maintenance
..................
Inspectors, class A ^ .................. ...
Inspectors, elaaa V A/*......................
Inspectors, class C
......................
miwrB, porverB, ana cleaners ^/a..... ••••••••••

877
709
396
313
335
124
176
605
117
276

a
1.77
1.76
1.56
1.80
1.82
1.97

11

-

11

12

26 24
25 22

35
33

40
38

1

7

2

13

9

2

2

13

45

36
40
39
x
14
1
1

-

-

-

1

1

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.70
1.96
1.84
2.25




16

7

86

Saa faotaotaa at and of table,

1

3
14

1.85
1.74
2.03

Bngine-lathe operators, class B ±/b ...............
Grinding nschine operators, olass B aA ..................... ..
MUling-nachlne operators, class B £/b .............................
Tnrret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw naohlne), elaaa Bt Total.......................... . . . . . .
Tine.....................................
Incentive .......

1

1.49
1.25

216
134
82

Machine-tool operators, prodnction,
class B 5/t Total ................. ........
Tina........................
Incentive............ .... .
Drill-press operators, radial, olass B £/a ••••••••
Drill-proas operators, single- or naltiplaspindla, elaaa Bt Total ttt___ _______ ......
T1m ................

1

-

Drill-press operators, radial,
class At Total ........................
Tine.......................
Incentive ...................
Drill-presB operators, single- or ■mltlplespindle, class A 4 / b .....................................................................
Ineantiva ....
MillingHnachine operators, class At Total.....
Tins ••••••
Incentive .
Serev-nachlne operators, antonatio, class A 4 A . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw naohlne), class At Total....................................... ..
Tins...........
bMntim t»t-rt»»*r

1

-

1 ,2 1 1

t

1
1

-

1.92
1.83
2.06

sa1 ama A#

•

-

A

1.66

3,016
1,805

Aisa

_

-

2 .0 2

Machine-tool operators, prodnction,
elaaa A 5/t Total ........................
Tina.......................
Incentive ...................

n m a^
s8 ^ 41

_

-

-

20

18 137
1
23
10
33

-

-

-

- 11
- 11
- -

7
3
4

-

-

-

-

11
11

-

-

-

-

-

9
- 15
71 44

-

-

18

5
15
44

-

3

-

26
22

82
5

55 310 153 137
55 133 81 67
39 99 47 32
16 34 34 35
7
15 13 12
11
13 38 17
8
5
51 38
34 32 54 66
8
2
3 24
1

15 12
23 53

40
35

28
U

21

16

2

2

1

34

8

-

-

16 23 53
35 48 31
34
9 1
2
1
4
19 129
16

35
18

14
14

34
10

g
4

3
4

7

53

2

«.

11

_

15
37
21

4 116 264 669 554 550 314 156
96 233 613 195 286 209 100
20
31 56 359 264 105 56

4

-

-

_

_

62

50

35

80

32

46

28

7

22

5

13
49

28

35

80

32

46

28

5

7

4

4

6

5

2

3

_

4

4

6

5

2

3

1

_

1

m

29

1A
XU

-

7

18

7

24

15

X

22

1

1
1

6

7
9

10
8

18
17

7

15
5

1

12

24
16

1

5

3

2

5

9

8

17

12

16

5

3

2

1

5
*
7

33

6

5

si
99

A
O

ft

4
i
4

2
2

•

%
-

1

-

-

1

13

1

438
205
233

1.94
1.77
2.09

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,754
749
1,005
31

1.71
1.52
1.85
1.65

-

-

-

2

-

•

-

-

2

-

99
34
65
385
670
252

1.54
1.40
1.62
1.59
1.68
1.91

193
17
176

1.95
1.52
1.99

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39
35
4

24

10

4

44 200
5
4
73 70
69 57
4 13
4 77

2A
•a

1.83
2.24
1.91

1 .9 6

a
38
3

22
2

11
11

663
479
184
492
335
157
214

8
2
6

-

15
14
1

2

2

2

7
6
1

15 30
12 29
3 1

67
58
9
3

6

2
1
1
13

1

7
5

6
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

9
- 16

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

•

-

•

2

“

-

-

-

-

2

-

2
48
3
5
1
1

20

26

51

13

16

26

6

10

25

7

10

m
71

11
ISA

u
32 /%
5 70
72 134
48 114
24 20
12
43

5 2
50 52
43 50
7 2
38 13
26
7
12
6
43 25

1

1

1

10

1

78
78

28
13

9
-

14

11
X9

0
▼

u

84 206 187 436 249 173 118
2
A
60 187 123 187 81
24 19 64 249 168 171 114
2
1 13
8
2
•

25

11

23

21

32

20

23

9

7

4

5

25

11
-

23

21
-

32
1

20
-

23
1

9

7

4

f

7

1
3

-

-

5
18
14
A
5
35
9
16 187
7
2

4
A

2
1
1

3 24 163
3 22 160
3
*
» 2

20
7

13
48
38
44
11
9

2

59
7
52

_
x

_

9

X

2

2
24 12
1
2
23 12
166 45
7
93 108 131
8
64
9

8
70
4

4
4

1
1
4

18

2
12

1
1
17

1
3
8

1
8

6

33

20

34

13

5

2

7

12

8

13

2

33

20

34

13

5

2

7

12

8

13

2

24
2
22

2

2
1

2
1

a
n

1

9

..

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Sarvoj, Philadelphia, Pt( Oatabar 1951
|
B.8. HEPiBTlBHT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statiatlaa

22,

T & i B-35i
tbe

See footnotes at and of table




M a ciu n a b if UnJUtdik imA 1
/

- G antinum d

23,

Table B-35s

M d c lU H & U f !)* u iu iis U e l

3
/

- G o 4 ttU U t*d

NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

2J

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
% $
$
$
$
$
$
$
f l e 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.0G 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
odr
\
and
L.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.102.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

Textile Machinery - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B j / - Continued
ji
Milling-machine operators, class B ^ / a ........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B j/b ............
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4/a, i/ •
•
Engine-lathe operators, class C V * ...........
Machinists, production ^ a •••••............... .
Tool-and-die makers ^/a ........................
Truckers, hand &/& ............. ..............
Welders, hand, class A A /a ...... ............. .
Welders, hand, class B ija ........ .............

%

39
14
50
7
33
a
22
6
16

1.68
1.48
1.36
1*84
1.92
1.24
1.79
1.62

2

*
■

1

_
1
-

.
2
-

3
-

2

4

2
—
___ i __ 1 __ i
__
_

.
-

_
3
2

2
1

3

26

1

2

1
7
2

3
1

3
21

1

5
1

4
2

3
4

16
7

14

1
1

1
1

2
8

.
1

2 i 6
_ !
3

4

—

_
5
1

8

4

-

-

1
4
1

1.61

*
■

1
•

—

11
13

1
1

2/ The study covered establishments with mare than 20 workers engaged in nonelectrical machinery Industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared
by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were included.
7 j Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Includes data for textile machinery (Group 3552) for which separate data are presented.
y Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
y Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.




R a ilAQ&cU 1 /

Table B-40i

NUMBER OF'WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
$
$
$
$
%
*
$
*
$
$
$
«
Under 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05

%
1 -AS

1-80 1.55 1.60 lf65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10

%
134
12
164
207
169
21
60
47
1,463

1.78
1.77
1.96
1.66
1.54
1.89
1.85
1.97
1.67

-

-

33
-

7
-

4

-

-

1

2
1
1

77
6
21

4
19
7

1
29
-

1
37
-

4
72
-

50
-

146
1
-

1
2
-

-

39

11
7
13

122

815

160

6

126

226

'

Carpenters, maintenance ........................
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) .
.
Electricians, maintenance ......................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ....................
Janitors and cleaners .........................
Maintenance men, general utility ................
Painters, maintenance .........................
Pipe fitters, maintenance ......................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................

'

14

15
127

-

1

12
4
8

4
39

-

-

1
J

1/ The study covered railroads (Group 40) with more than 100 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) pre­
pared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Vage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

24-

1/

Table B-5452:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS O F -

Occupation 2/

Engineers, stationary ..................
Filling-machine tenders ................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ......
Pasteurizers .........................
Refrigerator men ......................
Sanitary m e n .........................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) .......................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than trailer type) ..............
Washers, bottle, machine ................
Washers, can, machine ..................

numoer
of
workers

hourly
earnings
2/

Under
8
1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45 _

I---1.45

8
1.50

8
1.55

$
1.60

1.65

1
1.70

1
1.75

i
1.80

1
1.85

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

4
no
77

---- --- 1---- ---1---- “
1.30
1.40
1.35

5
4

2
10
6
26

4

33
65

2
3

4
-

-

4
-

40
81
78
45
159
150

$
1.64
1.40
1.66
1.50
1.43
1.42

48

1.55

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.55
1.38
1.33

3
3

4
6

52
5

-

4

4

33
67
18

3
2
4
16

3
6
6
-

58
-

4
35
57

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

i—
weekly
1 ---- 1
$
*
1
8
*
earnings Under 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

y

U 10

178

87.50
90.50

i ------ I —

?—

%

8

1—

8

i ------ 8

95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 1X0.00 150.00
and
50.00 55,00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95,00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 140.00 150.00 over

%
Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail 5/ .
..
Routemen (driver-salesmen), wholesale £/

4

8

2

21

15
4

58
4

ns
12

112
8

191
11

151
17

185
25

171
26

123
22

86
20

46
10

42
10

20
7

13
2

17

18

9

12

The study covered retail milk dealer establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5 - 2 as defined in the Standard Industried. Classification Manual
45)
(1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
y Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
2/ Routemen are predominantly on a 5-day workweek.




2,
5

Table B-63«

2/
Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

9*pLufU 2*tC4> G&W U&lA* 1 /

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F-

$
$
s
$
O
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 h . 50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 I 5 .O 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 . 0 L
50)<

00(120 , OCL20.00
*
.0
4s£°
and
under
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.QOlL10.OOtl20.OC

Men

Clerks, accounting .................
Clerks, file, class B ...............
Premium acceptors ..................
Section heads .....................
Tabulating-machine operators .........
Underwriters ......................

%

92
65
48
93
92
336

37.5
37.0
33.0
37.0
38.0
36.5

52.00
33.00
58.00
75.00
46.50
73.00

42
370
22
80
742
412
218
156
275
176
263
784
91
147
1,273
95

36.0
35.5
36.0
37.5
37.O
37.5
35.5
36.0
37.0
37.0
36.5
37.0
36.5
37.5
36.5
36.0

36.00
40.50
38.50
41.00
33.00
45.50
36.50
41.50
38.50
39.50
51.00
41.00
45.50
41.50
36.00
56.00

-

2
-

1
47
7

6
2
13
1

5
6
7

10
35
7
8
157
4
11
10
63
! _
! 20
52
4

6
55
i 5
114
71
109
30
33

3
8
6

6
5
7
5

1
1
1
4
4

7
3
5
4

6
50
5
11
48
27
26
2
37
26
3
115
6
34
148

/
80
5
14
32
27
36
36
10
34
53
13
21
132
13

2
51
1
17
10
68
4
20
35
19
6
80
2
42
41
2

2
18
7
1
51
4
16
15
12
43
88
12
15
72
15

9
1
12
4
6
4

15
1
3
12
21

17
-

28
2
4

32
20
13
10
35
21
8

67
5
9
10
4
82
64
9
3
18
12

20

14
1

u

12

8

12

12

8
5

44

50

4
34

47

13

2

1

1
17
25
24
14

5
17
16

9

11

3

10

22

27

10
22

31

20

Women

AsfA n nA*l T T --.-T T .T
, ti V tf T tT
T .T ___ t - - t _____t
Clerks, accounting .................
Clerks, actuarial................. .
Clerks, file, class A ...............
f1
‘
fGflj f l pf R ,,ttiiT-TT--TTTT--T
t, f
Clerks, general ....................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ..........
Clerks, underwriter ................
Key-punch operators .................
Premium acceptors..................
Section heads.............. .......
Stenographers, general ..............
Tabulating-machine operators .........
Typists, class A ...................
Typists, class B ...................
Underwriters ......................

4.
_
4

161

8
30
2
21
233

-

10
4
8
2
2
-

20
6
24
36
65
6

-

94

-

-

256
2

j 25
! 16
i 185
I 4
21
3
255 ; 247
1
3

-

2

10
19

12

l/ The study covered insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers, as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Mage Survey, Philadelphia. Pa.. October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26,

C:

Union

Wage

Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in effect in Philadelphia County on dates indicated.)

Table C-15:

B u lld u U f G o tU tb U c tfo n

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
P«*
week

Bricklayers .........................
Carpenters .........................
Electricians ........................
Painters -... ............ ..... .
Plasterers................... ......
Plumbers .................. ......... .
Building laborers ....................

13.350
2.650
3.250
2.225
3.000
2.750
1.600

35
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

R o k & U et

July 1, 1951
Classification
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Head ovenmen ...................
Cake decorators, peel-ovenmen .....

Dough mixers, icing mixers .......
Bench and machinemen, steam-box
tenders, ingredient scalers ....
Traveling-oven feeders and
deliverymen................ .
Mixers1 helpers ................
Route packers, pastry packers, bread
wrappers and packers......... .
Flour pliers, dinners, baking
helpers .................... .
Wrappers, leers (women) .........
Agreement Bi
Tray- and traveling-oven super­
visors, oll-ovenmen, reel- and
rotary-ovenmen, mixers, icing
makers ....................
Tray- and traveling-oven feeders,
delivery m e n ................
Bench hands, machine operators,
steam-box tenders, depositor
operators, ingredient scalers ....
Mixers1 helpers.............. .
Wrapping-machine operators, route
packers ...................
Bakery helpers, wrappers, pliers,
handlers, roll baggers and wrap­
pers, pan greasers...........
Wrappers and icers (women) ..... .
Agreement C:
Mixers, traveling-oven operators,
tray-oven operators, head cake
decorators, inventory stockmen . .
.
Oven feeders, delivery men .......
Divider operators, moldermen, icingmachine operators, depositor
operators, ingredient scalers,
henchmen....................




Rate
per
hour

Houri
per
week

$1,670
1.595
1.575

AO
AO
AO

1.530

AO

1.505
1.A80

AO
AO

1.AA5

AO

1.365
1.080

AO
AO

Rate
per
hour

Classification
Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement C: - Continued
General baking helpers, pan
greasers, pan washers, dumpers,
rackers, pan feeders, bread
packers ....................
Hand icers, cake raokers, doughnut
tray packers (women) ..........
Pan liners, cake hand wrappers,
roll packers (women) ..........
Agreement D:
Dough mixers, ovenmen...........
Benchmen................ .
Depositor operators, icing-,
cutting-, wrapping-machine
operators ...................
Pan greasers' helpers ...........
Wrappers and icers (women) .......
Pie and pastry shops:
Agreement A:
Mixers, ovenmen, first hands ..... .
Second hands ...................
Packers .......................
Third hands ....................
Agreement B:
Head order packers, ovenmen, cooks,
dough mixers, custard mixers ...
Order packers, ingredient scalers ...
Cooks' helpers, ovenmen's helpers ...
Pie makers, shell makers .........
Dish washers, helpers, wrappers,
utilitymen and cleaners ...... .
Pie wrappers, crown makers........

1.5A5

AO

1.A55
1.A20

AO
AO

1.395

AO

Classification

1.290
1.550

AO
AO

1.6A5
1.595

AO
AO

Apprentices, first year ...... ........
Apprentices, second year ..............
gineers .................................
Firemen
First men, brewing................ .
First men, bottling......... .........
labellers and crovners, pasteurizers,

Hours
per
week

H.A10

AO

1.205

AO

1.165

AO

1.350
1.210

AO
AO

1.210
1.050
.900

AO
AO
AO

1.630
1.5A0
1.A55
1.375

AO
AO
AO
AO

1.500
1.300
1.300
1.200

AO
AO
AO
AO

1.100
.950

AO
AO

AO

1.A95

Table C-2082:

M

a lt JldXfrU O SlA,

October 1, 1951

Machine bottlers and fillers ..... .....
1.555

AO

Oilers and helpers ........ ...... ..

P A *U ttiiU f

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

January 2, 1952

Table C-205:

Table C-27:

- G o 4 ttiH 4 4 ed

Table C-205:

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$63.00
65.00
76.00
71.00
7A.00
72.00

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

69.00
70.00
72.00
68.00

AO
AO
AO
AO

Classification
Book and job shops:
Bindery women ............. .........
Bookbinders:
Bench workers ...................
Machine workers........ .........
Compositors, hand ..................
Eleotrotypers .....................
Machine operators ...................
Machinist-operators... ..........
Machine tenders (machinists) .........
Mailers:
Agreement A ....................
Agreement B .....................
Photoengravers .....................
Rotogravure ................ ..
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press (68 inches and tinder)
assistants ...................
Cylinder press (over 68 inches)
assistants ...................
2-color cylinder and perfecting press
assistants ........ .
Sheet-fed rotary press assistants ....
Roll-fed rotary press rollmen:
Single-color ..................
2-color .....................
Single-color (Babcock) .........
2-color (Babcock) .............
Pressmen, cylinder:
Cylinder presses (68 inches and
under) ......................
Cylinder presses (over 68 inches) ....
2-color cylinder and perfecting
presses .....................
Roll-fed rotary presses:
Single-color presses ...........
Single-color presses (Babcock):
1st pressmen ...............
2nd pressmen..... ..........
Pressmen, platen ...................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ..........
Compositors, hand - night work
Machine operators - day work........ .
Machine operators - night work .......
Machine tenders (machinists) - day
work ................ ....... .
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work .................................
Mailers - day work .................
Mailers - night work ................
Photoengravers - day work............
Photoengravers - night work ......... .
Pressmen, web presses - day work ......
Rotogravure:
Journeymen ...................
Pressmen, web presses - night work ......
Rotogravure:
Journeymen...................

Rate
per
hour

1
Hours
per
i
veek

♦1.090

AO

1.975
2.025
2.3A0
2.890
2.3A0
2.AA7
2.500

AO
AO
37
37
37
37
37

1.700
1.925
2.857
2.907

AO
AO
36 1/A
37 1/2

2.0A0

AO

2.053

AO

2.065
2.085

AO
AO

2.085
2.105
2.380
2.A00

AO
AO
AO
AO

2.3A5
2.370

AO
AO

2.A15

AO

2.560

AO

2.835
2.700
2.185

AO
AO
AO

210
.*0
2.506
2.LOO
2.506

37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.LOO

37 1/2

2.506
1.900
2.067
2.800
2.993
2.A00

37
37
35
37
37
37

2.A97
2.726

37 1/2
33 3/A

2.911

33 3/A

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

27,

Table C-42:

P /U 4*tU U f - G o n tU u tm d

Table C-27:

M *U o *t> U 4ch 3b^iU B>U < U id J f e l f M

l

Table C-44: 0& & O H ^A G H A fi& U -

PmsU oh h +1 y . Qont w d
u
July 1, 1951
Classification
Newspapers: - Continued
Pressmen-in-charge - day work .......
Rotogravure ...................
Pressmen-in-charge - night work.... .
Rotogravure ...................
Pressmen, web presses - day work:
Rotogravure ...................
Pressmen, web presses - night work:
Rotogravure ...................
Stereotypers - day work ...........
Stereotypers - night work ..........

Table C-U:

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour
$2,600
2.809
2.950
3.284

Hours
per
week
37
37
33
33

1/2
1/2
3/4
3/4

2.640

37 1/2

3.082
2.225
2.275

33 3/4
40
40

£cca l

December 16, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification
Beer:
Brewery - Keg.... .................
Helpers ........................
Distributor - Bottle and keg.........
Helpers ............... .
Building:
Construction - Excavating ...........
Material.........................
Lumber ........................
Plumbing supply .................
Coal...............................
Helpers ........ .......... ........
General ........... ............. .
Freight - Local....................
Helpers ........................
Meat and produce.................... .
Railway express.... ................. .

Hours
per
week

Table C-44: 0& G O H

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Subway, elevated, and high-speed lines:

$1,835
1.760
1.550
1.300

40
40
40
40

1.600
1.600
1.600
1.650
1.618
1.448
1.600
1.600
1.425
1.600
1.720

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

^AGM AfHVU -

Operators:

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week 2
>

Dry cargo and passenger vessels
First 3 months .................
4-6 months... ......... ..... .
7-9 months ....................
10-12 months..................
After 1 year..... ........ .....

$1,510
1.535
1.560
1.585
1.610

44
44
44
44
44

1.410
1.435
1.460
1.485
1.510

44
44
44
44
44

Conductors:
First 3 months.......... ......
4-6 months ....................
7-9 months .......... ..........
10-12 months ...................
After 1 year ..................
2-man cars:
First 3 months..... ...........
4-6 months ....................
7-9 months ..... ...............
10-12 months ......... ........ .
After 1 year ..................

1.410
1.435
1.460
1.485
1.510

44
44
44
44
44

1-man cars and busses:
First 3 months ................
4-6 months ......... ...........
7-9 months ....................
10-12 months..................
After 1 year................ .




1.510
1.535
1.560
1.585
1.610

44
44
44
44
44

Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains:
Vessels of 15,000 - 20,000 tons •
•
Vessels of 10,000 - 15,000 tons .
.
Vessels under 10,000 tons ......
Boatswain's mates.......... .
Carpenters:
Vessels of 15,000 - 20,000 tons •
•
Vessels of 10,000 - 15,000 tons .
.
Vessels under 10,000 tons ......
Carpenter's mates ............. .
Storekeepers........ ..........
Watch men:
Able seamen ............ .
Boatswain's mates ...............
Ordinary seamen .................
Quartermasters .................
Watchmen ......................
Engine-room department:
Day men:
Deck engineers........ .........
Electricians ............... .
Firemen (coal) .................
Firemen (oil) ......... ....... .

See footnotes at end of table.

Hours
per

»nk2/

Engine-room department: - Continued
Day men:
Maintenance electricians.... .....
Refrigeration engineers ..........
Storekeepers ...................
Unlicensed junior engineers ......
Wipers ........................
Watch men:
Firemen - watertenders ...........
Oilers (steam) .................
Oilers (diesel) ................
Steward's department:
Freight ships:
Assistant cooks
Chief cooks ................... .
Chief stewards ................ .
Messmen and utilitymen ...........

$342.14
385.42
289.53
332.81
259.56

40
40
40
40
40

262.89
262.89
286.54

40
40
40

259.56
299.51
325.63
226.26

40
40
40
40

344.49
324.63
286.19

40
40
40

266.21
232.92
272.87

40
40
40

418.72
342.13
292.85
332.81
259.55

40
40
40
40
40

259.55
266.21
266.21
299.50

40
40
40
40

279.52
312.84
345.62
226.25

40
40
40
40

333.73

40

266.21

40

ZSS&«£§

fy jtU & e 4 tA # d P & U O H H t+ l ^
December 16, 1951
Type of ship, department,and classification

Rate
per
month

Dry cargo and passenger vessels - Continued

Qp&uUinq. £mpU<upeA,
October 1, 1951

Type of ship, department,and classification

$356.95
351.68
333.73
294.42

40
40
40
40

319.67
313.68
299.51
293.52
289.53

40
40
40
40
40

262.89
277.77
226.26
262.89
262.89

40
40
40
40
40

299.51
418.72
259.56
249.56

40
40
40
40

Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains................ .
Carpenters ....................
Deck maintenance men (AB) ........
Watch men:
Able seamen... ................
Ordinary seamen....... .........
Quartermasters......... ........
Engine-room department:
Day men:
Electricians.............. .....
Machinists ....................
Storekeepers ...................
Unlicensed junior engineers ......
Wipers ........................
Watch men:
Firemen...... ................
Oilers (steam) .................
Watertenders ...... .............
Unlicensed junior engineers ......
Steward's department:
Assistant cooks ...................
Chief cooks....... ....... .......
Chief stewards ................... .
Messmen and utilitymen.............
Colliers
Deck department:
Day mens
Boatswains.......... ...... .
Watch men:
Able seamen....................

See footnotes at end of table.

28,

Table C-7011: jto i& lA ' • G o n t lH M & t

Table C-AA6x S te< JL ed o 'U *U f

Table C-44« O cG O H . ^A& M AfUt/U -

‘U jtlic G tU G d P m a Ao m h g I y - O oM tiM um d

Type of ship, department and classification

Rate 1Hours
per
per
month week 2/

Colliers - Continued
Deck department: - Continued
Watch men: - Continued
Ordinary seamen ...............
Quartermasters ................
Engine-room departmentt
Day men:
Firemen (coal) ................
Firemen (oil) .................
Maintenance electricians
Vipers ......................
Watch men:
Firemen - watertenders........ .
Steward's department:
Chief cooks .....................
Chief stewards ..................
Measmen and utilitymen....... .
Second cooks..... ...............

I236.2A
262.89

AO
AO

265.69
259.55
3A2.13
261.10

AO
AO
AO
AO

272.87

AO

302.8A
338.86
226.25
269.53

AO
AO
AO
AO

1/ Wage scales and hours per week for dry cargo and
passenger Tessels are those in effect on December 16, 1951,
for Atlantic and Gulf Coast ship operators under contracts
with the Rational Maritime Union, CIO, and the Seafarer's
International Union, AFLj NMU scales are shown for tankers
and colliers. SIU scales for tankers differed somewhat from
NMU scales. The SIU had no contracts with collier operators.
AIT ratings listed receive additional payment in
accordance with the following conditions:
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded
or unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per­
cent or more of dead weight carrying capacity,
$5 per voyage is added. (On vessels carrying
sulphur, cement, cyanide, etc., in bulk lots of
1000 tons or over, members of the SIU are paid
the same as those on vessels carrying explosives.)
3. On vessels operating in described areas of China
coastal waters, a per diem allowance of $2.50 and
an "area bonus" of 100 percent of daily wages is
added. Also, on vessels operating within certain
designated areas of French Indo-China coastal
waters, a per diem allowance of $5 is added.
A. On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by
mines of either belligerent, resulting in physi­
cal damage to the vessel or injury to a crew
member a "vessel attack bonus" of $125 shall be
paid to each crew member.
2/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea. At sea, watch men and the steward's depart­
ment normally work 56 hours a week, and receive overtime pay
for 8 hours on Saturday and 8 on Sunday. Day men at sea
normally work a 44-hour week. In port, all receive overtime
rates for work on Saturday and Sunday.




October 1, 1951

October 1, 1951

December 16, 1951

Rate
per
hour

Classification
Longshoremen:
General cargo ....................
Bulk cargo, cement and lime in bags,
ballast, and all coal cargoes .....
Vet hides, creosoted lumber and
products, cashew oil, naphthaline
and soda ash in bags ............
Refrigerator space cargo (temperature
freezing or lower) rates to be
$
paid full gang .................
Kerosene, gasoline and naphtha in
cases and barrels, when loaded by
case oil gangs, and with a fly ....
Explosives and damaged cargo .......
Table c-65121

Hours
per
week

$2.10

AO

2.15

AO

2.25

AO

2.30

AO

2.30
A.10

AO
AO

O fy lc e B u ild i n g B e s u U c e
October 1, 1951

Classification

Hate
per
week

Hours
per
week

Cleaners, women ....................
Elevator operators... ..............
Elevator starters ...................
Firemen, stationary boiler ...........
Janitors and porters ................
Watchmen
Window washers .....................

$36.00
A7.00
52.25
55.00
A6.00
A7.00
65.00

AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO
AO

Table C-7011x

J t a t e li,

October 1, 1951
Classification

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$5A.50
53.50
56.50
53.61
5A.81
51.50
53.15
60.21

A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8
A8

Bartenders:
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Bathmaids:
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement
Agreement

B
C
D
E
F
G
H
B
C
D
E
F

.....................
.....................
.....................
...........................
.....................
............... .
.....................
.................. .
.....................
.....................
.....................
.... .................

30.00
31.00
29.25
30.00
30.00
30.50

A2
AA
AA
AA
AO
AA

Classification

Bellmen:
Agreement A ..... ••••••....... .....
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C ......................
Agreement D .................
Agreement E ......................
Agreement F ......................
Bus boys:
Agreement A .......................
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C .......................
Agreement D ............... ...... .
Agreement E ......................
Agreement F ......................
Agreement G .......................
Chambermaids:
Agreement A ..........
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C ............................
Agreement D ......................
Dishwashers:
Agreement A ... ...................
Agreement B .......................
Agreement C ..... .................
Agreement D ......................
Agreement E .......................
Housemen:
Agreement A ......................
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C ......................
Agreement D ......................
Agreement E ........ ......... .....
Agreement F .... ................. .
Night bellmen - elevator operators:
Agreement A .......................
Agreement B .................. .
Agreement C .............. ........
Agreement D ......................
Agreement E ......................
Agreement F .......................
Agreement G ......................
Night chefs:
Agreement A .................... .
Agreement B .......................
Agreement C .... ..................
Telephone operators:
Agreement A .................
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C .................... ..
Agreement D .......................
Waitresses:
Agreement A ......................
Agreement B ......................
Agreement C ......................
Agreement D ......................
Agreement E ..............•••••.....
Agreement F ......................

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$19.70
19.00
18.67
20.67
20.25
19.70

48
48
48
48
48
40

25.10
28.65
26.00
25.00
25.81
28.40
27.00

48
48
48
48
44
48
48

30.00
30.00
29.25
29.03

42
44
44
40

32.00
30.50
31.00
31.50
31.47

48
44
48
48
48

34.64
36.00
35.00
32.33
34.20
33.25

48
48
48
48
48
40

25.00
20.69
19.48
33.10
25.75
27.40
30.47

48
48
48
48
48
40
48

62.00
64.50
65.00

48
48
48

34.00
33.65
33.00
32.15

44
44

21.90
20.75
19.00
21.50
19.60
22.12

44
44
44
44
44
44

44
40




29,

D:

Entrance Rates
P d te A f o l P lo 4 it T if& lh eS lA 1 /

Table D-l:

Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments .........................

All
industries
2/

100.0

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufaiuturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Public
Wholesale Retail Services
Establishments with •
utilities*
trade
trade
101-500 501 or
101-500 501 or
more
more
workers workers workers workers
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Under 40 ..................................

0.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.8

Over 40 and under 45 ........................

.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.5

Over 45 and under 50 ........................

_

_

_

_

Over 50 and under 55 .............. *.........

1.2
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3.0
-

12.9
-

Over 55 and under 60 ........................
6 0 .......................................
Over 60 and under 65 ........................

Over 145 and under 150 ......................
150......................................
Over 150 .................................

.4
1.1
1.1
1.7
1.3
.
3
.8
18.4
.
3
2.3
2.9
1.5
2.4
4.3
4.0
.1
.3
3.2
4.2
.8
5.4
2.5
4.9
1.3
6.2
•4
3.6
.9
2.5
4.2
2.1
.6
1.6
.1
4.9
.8
.9
1.3

Establishments with no established minimum......

2.3

Information not available ....................

.4

Over 65 and under 70 ........................
Over 70 and under 75 ........................
75 .......................................
Over 75 and under 80 ........................
Over 80 and under 85 ........................
Over 85 and under 90 ........................
Over 90 and under 95 ........................
Over 95 and under 100 .......................
Over 100 and under 105 ......................
Over 105 and under 110 ......................
Over 110 and under 115 ......................
Over 115 and under 120 ......................
120......................................
Over 120 and under 125 ......................
Over 125 and under 130 ......................
Over 130 and under 135 ......................
Over 135 and under 140 ......................
140......................................
Over 140 and under 145 ......................

.
-

_
14.3
10.9
1.3
4.4
8.7
1.1
»
3.1
1.8
13.2
15.1
8.9
1.0
9.0
2.1
5.1
(2/)
-

_
_
1.8
.
.6
1.5
6.0
.
1.6
3.9
3.6
10.9
7.9
6.3
6.0
8.7
_
4.0
4.6
7.3
3.7
.
5.4
13.7
2.5
-

_
45.0
.
7.2
6.3
3.1
2.5
5.3
1.8
_
3.5
5.1
6.1
.5
4.1
■
.
4.7
2.9
_
1.2
.
_
-

_
_
-

_
3.0
19.2
5.5
.
1.6
_
_
2.5
4.1
3.9
3.1
8.0
_
20.1
2.0
1.5
4.6
_
2.1
3.4
1.2
_
11.2
_
3.0

_
-

_

_
_

6.0
5.6
4.4
1.8
17.8
2.7
12.6
8.1
2.4

_
6.4
1.6
1.2
24.4
_
_
-

_
.
_
_
.
26.1
_
1.9
.6
2.5
3.0
1.5
2.2
_
.7
18.7
5.8
.6
_
2.8
_
_
•
5.8
.
5.2
1.7
2.5
.
_
3.7
2.8

_
1.4
8.5
7.8

_
1.8
_
-

-

.
_
-

10.8

4.8

2.7

-

.
_
_
_
1.7
.
5.8
11.0
11.7
3.0
_
3.0
3.0
9.5
_
_
a/)

-

.7

-

-

9.2

-

-

-

-

.9

1.5
5.9
11.2
2.0
1.1
28.2
4.1
.7
3.6
8.0
9.2
•
_
1.4
2.5
.8
.
.
_
_
1.1

2.2
_
-

2.3
4.0
.

(2/)
_
2.8
.2
.
1.2
_
.8
_
_
.
•
•
.
_
•
_
1.3
_

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
2/
' h n .05 of 1 percent.
ta
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




30,

E:

S u p p le m e n ta ry W a g e

Practices

Table s-i: S h i^ t ubi^^eS Lestti& l fi/u n U id o n i
Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in All manufacturing industries i j
Shift differential

All industries

Durable goods

Nondurable goods

Forgings,
iron and steel

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ...............

16.3

5.1

17.8

4.0

15.0

6.0

21.9

Receiving shift differential ......

15.3

4.9

17.7

4.0

13.2

5.8

Uniform cents (per hour) ......
Under 4 cents .............
4 cents ..................
5 cents ..................
6 cents ..................
6£ cents .................
7 cents ..................
7 - cents .................
$
8 cents ..................
9 cents ..................
10 cents .................
Over 10 cents .............

7.0
.2
1.0
3.4
.4
_
.3
.2
_
1.1
.4

3.1
.1
.1
.5.
.
.5
.5
.2
.2
.9
.1

3.1
.
.6
1.6
_
_
.8
.1

.7
.2
.1
•4
(2/)

10.4
.4
1.4
5.0
.7
_
.5
.5
.
1.4
.5

5.2
.2
_
.2
.7
_
.8
1.0
.3
.4
1.4
.2

Uniform percentage ...........
5 percent.............. .
7 percent ................
7 - percent................
$
8 percent ................
10 percent ...............
Over 10 percent ...........

8.0
1.1
.3
.3
6.3
-

1.7
.2
.1
.1
1.2
.1

14.2
1.1
.7
.7
11.7
-

3.3
.4
.2
2.4
.3

2.7
1.1
1.6
-

.4
.2
.2
-

Other ......................

.3

.1

.4

(2/)

.1

Receiving no differential ........

1.0

.2

.1

(2/)

1.8

\J Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

3d or
other
shift

Cutlery, hand
tools, and
hardware

Machinery
industries

2d
shift

3d or
other
shift

_ 7.7

7.2

1.9

19.5

5.1

21.9

7.7

7.2

1.9

19.5

5.1

10.3
.
_
10.3
_
_
_
.
-

4.2
.
_
_
_
4.2
.
.
.
•
-

.
_
_
_

5.6
_
_
1.1
_
.3

.1
.
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
3.6
.6

_
_
_
(2/)
.1

11.6
6.9
4.7
-

3.5
3.5
.
-

7.2
6.2

1.9

13.9

5.0

.2

-

.2

-

_
_
_
.
.
.
•
_
-

-

2d
shift

-

3d or
other
shift

-

1.0
-

1.9
-

.
13.9
-

5.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(g/)

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

S c h e d u le d W j& e J zL f o tta u /U ,

Table E-2*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

1/

j

EMPLOYED IN—

P E lff ENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u fa c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

M a m f a c t u k in ,G

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

Non­
durable

1 Durable

All

j

2/

goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

Retail
trade

S e r v ic e *

100.0

100.0

good s

j

All establishments.... * ...........

100*0

Under 35 hours................ • • • • •
35 hours .........................
Over 35 hours and under 37^ hours • • . . * .
37£ hours • • • • • ... ... ............ • • • •
Over 3 ^ and under 40 hours • • • • • • • • • • • •
7^0 hours ................... • • • * . . •
Over AO and under 44 hours ..........
AA hours .........................
Over AA’and under 48 hours............................. ..
AS hours .............................................................................
Over AS hours ................................................................

1.1
12.2
8.1
19.9
9.0
47.9
.1
1.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.8
1.5
22.4
26.0
38.2
.1

31.6
.5
43.2
.6
24.1

0.2
4*8
7.4
6.2
6.8
74.6

-

-

-

-

100.0

—

7.1
1.3
IS.3
15.7
55.7
.2

1.1
13.1
2.2
78.4
.4

-

-

1.7

3.8

-

.6

100.0
1 .0

100.0

_
5.2
-

5.5
4.2
76.6

-

-

-

8.5
-

100.0

i

100.0

! 100.0

100.0

0.8

0t7

3.9 I
0.4 '
17.9 ! 9.9 :
23.2
9.6
13.6
25.7
6.3
8.4
23.0
54.8
(2/)
.4
2.9
-

-

(2/)

-

1.6
1.9
2.3
76.0
1.8
4.2
3.2
6.5
1.7

1.6
2.4
2.1
85.8
.5
2.0
1.0

3.2
.7

100.0

100.0

j

1.2
_
-

-

3.0
.8
4.0
85.5
1.0
2.4

4.4
-

85.9

(2/)
1.5
1.3
5.4
1.5

•8

1.3

_
-

_

_

(2/)

1.0
.6

_

-

.

57.2

86.9

-

-

5.2
2.1
24.3
11.2

1.5
5.2
4*8

4*4
56.1
10.8
11.6
11.4
5.7

0 .1

4«4
4.6
2.8
49.4
11.0
9.1
16.5
2.1

____________i

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Data relate to women workers*
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
less than *05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate*

Table E-3

P & id J fo lid a ifA '

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED

Number o f p a id h o lid a y s

All
indus­
tries

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .8

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_
1 6 .8
.9
5 1 .1
2 2 .5
.7
7 .1
.9
-

.3
7 5 .1
1 .9
7 .8
6 .2
4*8
.2

-

9 9 .0

9 9 .9

E s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g no p aid
h o l i d a y s ..........................................................................
Information not available ....... .. ....

1/
2/
*
**

.4
.6

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

_
.5
4 1 .2
1 .6
3 0 .6
.2
1 9 .9
-

1

“
.9
3 7 .2
1 .6
3 7 .0
2 3 .2
.1
-

.
4 6 .0

1*6
2 3 .3
.5
1 6 .2
-

_
.7
3 .4
3 .7
7 .9
2 9 .2
2 8 .9
1 .4
1 9 .5
-

4 .5
.6

-

.9
9 .6
1 .2

-

-

-

.3
-

-

.5
-

-

-

-

1 .7
1 .1

.1

-

.2

2 .5

.5
-

Finance**

Manufacturing

All
indus-

Services

-

- 1 0 0 ^ _ 1 1 0 0 .0

-

3 .7
-

“

-

9 7 .3
_
3 .1
2 .8
1 .2
2 .2
5 .3
5 .5
.9
2 .8
3 .8
5 .9
8 .6
2 .5
5 2 .7

2 .7

j_ 1 0 0 .0 _ :
'

9 8 .5
_
.7
4 2 .5
1 1 .7
2 .4
1 8 .0
7 .3 .
8 .0
.6
7 .5
-

1 .5

Non­
durable
goods

1 Durable
| goods

All

'£ /

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Retail
trade

= 30°?°

E s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g p a id h o lid a y s ••

U J - d ay s .......................................................................
12 d a y s ..........................................................................
12^ d a y s ................................................. ••••............

Whole­
sale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 £ d a y s ................ ..................................... •••••••

Public
utili­
ties*

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

(2 /)
.3
2 7 .6
1 .6 .
1 9 .2
2 .8
1 4 .3
.1
5 .6
1 .6
3 .9
1 .0
1 .7
1 .6
2 .6
.7
1 4 .4

Non­
durable
goods

A
ll

A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ..................... ••••.................... ..

1 t o 5 d a y s ................ ...............................................
5 d a y s ..............................................................................
6 d ay s .............................................................................
6 £ d a y s ................................................ ........................
7 d a y s ................................................................ ..
7& d ay s ..................................................................... ....
8 d a y s .......................... ..................................................
8J- d a y s ...........................................................................
9 d a y s ............................................................................
d a y s ................ .........................................................

IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

! 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

.

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

!

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

!

9 7 .5

8 9 .4

9 6 .9

1 0 0 .0

8 0 .4

1 .3
3 .5
5 3 .9
2 .3
2 5 .2
.1
1 2 .4
-

_
3 .2
4 8 .3
1 .8
3 3 .1
1 3 .6
-

-

8 .0
6 7 .0
2 .7
9 .9
5 .0
7 .4

4 .7
2 .0
6 6 .7
4 .7
.1
.6

-

_
2 0 .7
.2
4 5 .1
1 8 .5
-

-

-

1 .3

-

-

-

-

7 .0
(a ? )
9 .5
2 .4
1 0 .4

1 0 .4
2 .0
“

-

(2 /)
1 .1
.2
1 .0

2 .4
3 .7
5 8 .7
2 .7
1 8 .4
•2
1 1 .4
-

1 .6
“

1 0 .6

3 .1

io o . o

:

9 6 .8

1

2 .1
2 .5
5 4 .0
1 .8
2 0 .6
.8
1 1 .4
-

3 .2

1

"

1 .3

-

2 .5

4 0 .6

4*8
1 4 .7

-

1 9 .6

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

p cu b d fy&GGUd&HA, (tf-o k m a l P m 4m A4o h 4>)

Table E-4:

P
V

A

l l

a

e

s

s

t a

1
O
2
O
3
O
E

s
v

y

b

t i o

e

l i s

a

h

o

Al
i n
t r

M a

i l cl
y
d u s ­
i e s
A

n

f

s

t s

e
w

n

u

R
f

C
a

E

c

t

l l

0

.10

. 7 9 p 9 a . 1 3i d 0

0

v . 09 a

i c

r

u

T

O

i n

F

O

F

F

I C

e

0

0

. 0

1

0

8c

.a 61 t 0 i o 0 n . 0 s

y

b

e

l i s

h

e
1

a

r

s
e

n

f

s

e

r

v

i c

b

a

s
v

l i s h
a
t i o

c

t a

v

b
w

v

e

v

e

t a
a c

s

e

r
e
r
e
r

e
w

t . s . . . . . w. . . .9 i t 9 h . 8 9 p 9 a . 1 5i d 0

v . 09 a

0

8c

. a 91 t 0 i o 0

e
s

n
e

h

n

n 1. 0 s0

r

m

s
e

o
n

f

t •s

•

s
• w•

e

r

v

i c

y
l i s

e

t a
a

11 i 00

. 0

-

0 . 9. 9 0

9

0 4 . . 9 73
.- 8
1
. 1 62

8

M

RO
N

A

CY
C

l l [|

0 0 1 1. . 0 00 0

1

-

-

. 21 9

9

. 8 8
. 0

. 1 -

1

. 7 9

62

0

•9 i t 9 h . 8

p

a

i d

v

9 a9

9 c9

.a . 2 6 t i o

e
h

a
m

r
e

s
n

o
t s

f

s
w

e

r

v

i c

00

D

EE ND

1
2

. 2

. .9 7

-

09

-

_

_
. 2

-

0
5

_
-

F—

P

L

A

N

T

W

O

R

K

E

R

S

E

M

t T U R IN
P u b l i cW h o l e R ­ e t a i l
N b o l ne ­ ut i et i s l i * ­ t s r a a l de e t r a d e S e r v i c e s
u r da u r a b l e
g o g o o d os d s
1

01

0 0 1 . 0 0 0 . 00

1. 0 0

. 90

8

. 31

.90

j
j

. 3 8 7 3 4 . 2. 9 6
3
11

I NO

F* A

. . 00

0. 1. 00

T

0

. 2 7
3
. 0 7
. 8
1 2 . .8 8
5. 0. 52 3
. 5 2
-

6

. 14

3

0

. 9 8

7

. 46

0

_

. 9 3 1 2 3 . 5. 11

_
1

-

-

0

1. 0 0 1 0 0 1 . 00 0 . 0 0

0

0
0

1
7

1. 0 0

. 48
. 9
. 7 1

0

. 0

7

. 3

2

_

_
. 7

. 0

. 7

-

-

- •

a

l i s h
t i o

m
n

e
s

n

. 8

. 3

-

. 9

1

-

. 7

-

3

. 6

-

-

0

. 0

9

9

. 91 9

09

0 . 7. 9 0

. 1

9

. 5 9

9

. 61

. 44
. 7 1
. 6 3
. 7

1 1 3 . .5 8 1
5
-1
6 2
. 0 9
7
2
4
. 5
2
. 8 - 1
. 7
1
1
. 1
- 3

8
7
2

. 9 51
. 8 2
. 2 1

43
5
9

. . 66 5 9
. 8 5
3
. 2
. 5 3
. 0 3
. 5 7
- _

. 4

_

• 2-

-

0

0

.90

9

. 2

0

. 0 3

0

. 4 5

9
8

. 4

-

. 64

_
. 8

. 5

* 42
8. 7 . 8 2
9
. 3 6
_
1

_
-

.- 7

0

. 6

3

. 9

. 7 3

6

. 1

. 7
5
. 9
-

-

-

-

n1

s 0 1 0 1 0 . 00 0

0. 0. 09

9

. 91 9

-

09
8

. 2

9

6
2

79
1

9 2 . .5 68
1
. 7

. 81

0

. 0

1

. 0
3
. 4
2
. 2 9
1
. 5 9 9 2
-1
.7
. 4 . 3
-

9

. 2

. 3

0
4
3

. 5
.- 2

“

. 1

-

0 . 7. 9 0

-

0

0

. 3
4
3
. 9
6 . 5 .9 8
. 3 . 6 .
.
-

-

1. 1 0 0 0

0

00

. . 9 00

6

. 41

2

2

. 5

8 1 . 307

03

. .09 9

• •

. 5
. 8
. 6 9
3
8

Cm

1

. 9

. 7

0

4
4
1

3

-

0

. 6

1. 0 0

. 1 5
. 0
. 9

-

0

2
1

. 0

. 4
. 5

-

-

9 i t 9 h . 8 9 p 9 a . 1 i6 d 0

0

v . 09 a

9c

. a 21 t 0 i o 0

n 1. 0 s0

0

1. . .0 . 0 . . .0 . . . . 99.9
.0 .

.4

. 7 3

-

. 3 66

t s
w
i t h
n o
p
a i d
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 . . . . . . .4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. .
. .
.

7

-

09
2

9
8

.4

. 3

7

5.5
. . 0 23

7

. 7

9
. 2
-

3

. 5 1

8

. 1

. 7 9

9

6
.
1
.
. 5 5 5 85
1
.
. 0
1
.9

.3

. 81
0
2

0

0

1. 0 0

1
3.3
1
. 8
2
. . 2 36 2
3
. 5 6
2
. 1
4
4
2 9
. 5 23 8
. 2
.8
-

0

1. 0 0

. 8
. 1

4
1

. 8 6
. 1
2 . .2 1

0

1

1. 0 0

0

6

. 14

0

2

2

. 5

_

4

6

. 1

. 8 5

. 5
. 6
4
. 5 3

.90

3

. 9 5

8

. 44

8

. 7

00

. . 0 63

0

1. 0 0

0

.
3
6
1

. 5

. 5 23

3
1

. 7

•2

3

9
1

. 6

. 7

5

. 2

. 9

*
*

"

1 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Less than ,05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), connunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




. 0

. 7 6

-

3

-

9

4

12

. 7

1

.1 14 0 0 0 0 . 1 .0 0 0

6

. 04

2

_

-

. 3 -

7

e

k

b
c

. 1

k
1
k

5

b
e

s
v

PP EL
M

E

e

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.4. . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . .
. .
. .
. 8
O
v 1ea rn d
u
n d . . .e . . r . . . . 2. . . . . .w . . . e.1 e . . k . . s. . .4
. .
.
2
w . . e . . e . . k. . .s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . .0 . . . . 5 . 5 . . . 0 . . . . . 65. . . 4 . . . . . 4. . 4. . . 6. . . . . .3 .3 . . 0
. 1 5
1
O
v e r
2
3 w a ne de. . . k . . s. u . . .n . . d. . . e. . .r 1. . . . . . 7 . . . . ..3
. 6
. 5
0
. 8
3w
e e. . k. . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . 5. . . . . . . . 3. .4 . . .7 . . . 74
5
. 1 5
4
1
O
v 3 ew r e
e
k
s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 . . . . . . .4 . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . 7. . . .
. .
. .
.
.
E

0

13
7

. 7

t s
w
i t h
n o
p
a i d
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 1. . . . . - . . . . . . . . -

b l i s h m
e n
t s
w
i t h
n o
p
a i d
a . . t . . i . o. . . n . . . s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . -

t a

1w

1. 0 0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . 7 . . . . •. . 2. . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . • . .4 . . . . . . - . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . 4 . . . _
1
. 5
a n d
u
n . d. e r • 4 2
w. 8 e
e- k
s 1 . . . . . .8 . . . . - . . . . . . . 1. . . . . 2 . . . . e
s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 . . 3. . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . 1 . . . . . 8 . 9 . 9 3 7 . . 1 98
8
. 0
2
a n d
u
n . d. e r 3
we
e
k
s
. . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . .30
8
. 0 e k s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . 9 . . . . 1 . . . . . 8. . . . - . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . 9 . . . 2. . . . . 1 . . . . -. . . . . . . .4
. 2
2
. 4
. 3. . . . . . w . . . e . . e. . k. . . s . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 2
2 .7
-- - -

e

w
v

m
e

l i s

1
E

S

y

-

t a

5

E

R

e

k

e

m

o

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . .5 . . .1 . . 2. . . . . .11 . . .4 . . . .5 . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . 9 . . . .
v e r
a n d . . . . . u. . . n. . . d . . . e . . r. 1 . . . . . 2 4. . . . 3 . w . . e 0 e 4 k . s 3
1
. 2
1
. 4
w
e
e k
s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . 6 . . . . . 4 . 8 . . . 3 . . . . . 82. . . 1. . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . .9 . . 0. . . . . .3 . 8 . . . 84 . . . 5. . 4 . 8 .
v e r
2
a n d . . . . . u. . . n. . . d . . . e . . r . 1 . . . . .3 8. . . . . w- . e e k s
. 6
2
w . . e . . . e . . . k . . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . .1 . . . . 2 . . . . - . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . .6 . . . . _ .
v e r
. 3 . . . . . w. . . e. . .e . . k . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . -. .

1
O
2
O
3
O

E

A l l
a n cS e r * v * i c e i n s d u s ­
t r i e s
A

. . . . . . . . .1 9. . 0 9

l i s h m
e n
t s
w
i t h
n o
p
a i d
a . . t . . i . o . . . n . . . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . - . . . . . . . . 1. . . .. . 4 . . . .

w

s

0

i K

e

s

E

O

b

t a

v

W

g

1
O
2
O
3
O
E

E

P u b l i cW h o l e R ­ e t a i l
F in
u t i l i ­ s a le
D u r a b d Nl eu o r na b ­ l te i e s * t r a d e t r a d e
g o o d s g o o d s

0 1 . 00

r v
9i t9 h

N

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 . . 7. . . . .9 . 2 . . .3 . . . . 83 . . . 0 . . . . 5 . . 1 . . . 6 . . . . . 1 . 4 . . . 2 . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . .
n d . . . . . u. . . n. . . d . . . e . . r . 2 . . . . . 2 5 . . . . . w . . 3 e e .k 6 s
. 2
2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . 8 . . . . . 9. 7. . . 5. . . . . 2.6 . . .8 . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . 7 . . . . 8 . 6 . . . 48 . . . 2. . 7. . . 3
n d . . . . . u. . . n. . . d . . .e . . r . . . . 1. .3 . . . . . -w .
e
ek
s
. 6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . .
e e k s
. . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . - . . . . .- . . . -

e e k
.
r
1
a
e e k s
v e r
2
a
w . e. . .e . . k . . s . . . .
v e r
3
w

s

p

o
e

w

t a
a c

n

r

m

w

v

2
E

a

t . a. . . b. . . . l . . i . . . .s . . . . . . h . . . . . . m. . . . . e . 1. . n . 0. . t . 0 . s . .1. . 0 . 0. .

1
E

c

E

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa,, October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

. 0

33,

P a id S lc J z JI& G4J&

Table E-5t

(fy o k m o l P a

m

M O HA)

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k le a v e
indus­
tries

A
ll

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

1/

Non­
durable
goods

1 Durable
j goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

i

j
!
A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts ....................................................

6 months

100.0

24.0

3 1 .9

1 8 .1

1 9 .5
3 .9
(2 /)
-

1 .4
1 .4
5 .0
2 .9
-

.7
7 .8

2 .5
4 .9

100.0

M 100.0
i l i.i.1 IL-.

100.0

2 8 .3

3 3 .1

4 1 .2

Under 5 d ay s ............................................................
5 d ay s ...........................................................................
6 d ay s ...........................................................................
7 d ay s ...........................................................................
10 d ays ........................................................................
U d ays ........................................................................
12 d ay s ........................................................................
15 d ays ........................................................................
1 6 days ........................................................................
20 days ........................................................................
Over 2 0 d ays ...........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................

100.0

100.0

i

100.0

100.0

100.0

3 5 .4

10.6

5 .4

2 .3

2.1

2 .5

2 .9

2.1

1.6
.
1

2.1

1 .3

2 .3
-

-

4 .6
1 .4
1 .5
.4
1 .7
-

2.8

1.0

| 1 0 0 .0

100,0

100.0

.
8
10.1

_

1 .7

16.6

.5
1 5 .2
-

2.8
1.0

9 .2
1 .5

1 4 .3
.5
-

.5

.3
.7
4 .3
-

3 .4
4 .7
3 .1

.
1
.
6
1.0
1.6

2.6

1.2

-

1 .7

1 6 .3
1 .5
.7

8.1

6 .3

3 .2
-

.
8
-

1.2

9 .4
1 3 .1
3 .4
-

2.6

.
6

-

.4

.
6

.
1

.
6

-

-

.4

-

-

.4
.7

(2 /)

.
1
-

.
1
-

1.1
-

1 6 .5
9 .5
(2 /)
.7
-

7 .5

7 .4

.9
2 .3

.

•

1 .4
3 .5
-

1 .7
9 .5
(2 /)
-

.
6

3 .1
-

-

2.2

-

-

4 .1

.
6

2 .5
-

1 1 .3

(2 /)
-

.
1

7 1 .7

6 6 .9

58.8

7 6 .0

68.1

8 1 .9

9 3 .7

64.6

8 9 .4

9 4 .6

9 7 .7

9 7 .9

9 7 .5

8 3 .5

9 2 .5

9 2 .6

8 8 .7

3 3 .3

3 9 .1

4 8 .7

2 8 .3

3 9 .8

2 8 .1

1 0 .3

3 5 .4

1 9 .3

6 .4

2 .9

3 .3

2 .5

1 6 .5

9 .2

1 1 .4

1 1 .9

_

_

1.6

_

1.2

8.6

1 .3

_

.4

_

5 .4
.

4 .6
1 .5

.9
.9
_

1.2

-

2 .5
-

.
8

6.8

-

o f se rv ice

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p aid s i c k l e a v e ............................................
Under 5 d ay s ............................................................
5 d ay s ...........................................................................
6 d ay s ...........................................................................
7 d ay s ...........................................................................
10 days ....................................... .................................
11 days ........................................................................
12 days ........................................................................
15 days ........................................................................
1 6 d ays ........................................................................
20 d ays ........................................................................
Over 2 0 days ...........................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ............................................

.
8
4 .9
4 .9

.
1

1 .5
8 .3

1.6
-

2.1
1 3 .1
_

_

3 .5
_

22.0

2.6

•
-

5 .9

-

-

-

.5
-

-

7 .9
1 .4
.7
7 .8

6 0 .2

7 1 .9

1 6 .3

4 .0
4 .5

6 6 .7

6 0 .9

5 1 .3

1.6

2.8

5 .0
3 .0
6 .7
4 .9

1 4 .7
.3
.7
4 .3
3 .9
3 .8

6 .4
.5
3 .2
2 .4

.7

_

8.1
2 .4

6.2

1 3 .1

1 .5
5 .5

1.2
7 1 .7

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0

o f se rv ice

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................

1 re a r

100.0

100.0

2 .5
3 .2
1 .5
-

1.8
.
6
(2 /)

2 .3

7 .5
5 .8

1 .7
-

1.1

-

6.2

1 .7

.5

8 9 .7

64.6

8 0 .7

.
1
.3
(2 /)
-

9 3 .6

2.2
.
1
-

3 .3

.
6

_
_
_
.

-

-

9 7 .1

9 6 .7

.
1

.
.
.
-

9 .5
•
-

1 .4
1 .4

6.1
_

-

-

3 .1

(2 /)
-

-

-

1.1

2.2

3 .1

2 .5

-

4 .8

.6

9 7 .5

8 3 .5

90.8

_
1 .7
.3
9 .5
(2 /)
.

_

.
6

88.6

(2 /)

.4

88.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

p a id S lc J i JU j&gm jg

Table s-5t

(ty o b m a l P a

m

UAo h A ) - C o n tin u e d

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e

;

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

A
ll

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

1/

l

A"

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

!

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 1 .4

1 1 .9

1
j

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts ....................................................

100.0

—

100.0

—

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
—

—

100.0
1 - ...............
\

2 T ears o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................
Under 5 d ay s ...........................................................
5 d ay s ...........................................................................
6 d ay s ...........................................................................
7 d ay s ...........................................................................
10 d ay s ..................................................................................................
11 d ay s ..................................................................................................
12 d ay s ..................................................................................................
1 5 d ay s ........................................................................
1 6 and 1 8 d ay s ......................................................
20 d ay s ........................................................................
Over 2 0 d a y s ............................................................
E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................

3 4 .7

4 2 .3

.
8
2.0

1 .5
3 .2

4 .4

1.6

4 8 .9

2.1

3 4 .7

22.0

.

-

9 .9

-

1 .9

2 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .9
1 .4
.7
7 .8

4 .5
5 .0
2 .4
-

1 .5
9 .2

1 .9
-

4 .2
7 .5

6 5 .3

5 7 .7

5 1 .1

6 5 .3

4 0 .3

4 9 .6

4 8 .9

5 0 .4

3 .7
-

.7
2 .4
3 .5
-

8.1

-

_

4 .3
8 .4

1.6

1 9 .3

_

.5
5 .6

3 .3

_

-

.3
8 .4
4 .3
4 .8
4 .5

.
6
2.1

3 5 .4

1 .4

-

1 3 .7

12.2
2 .5
3 .2
1 .5

-

7 .1

-

2 8 .1

_

.7
2 .4
3 .5

3 .9
1 7 .0

.
1

3 9 .8

1 1 .5
5 .5

1.2

-

1.2

.
8

1.2
5 .4

.
6

7 .2

4 .1

1.6

2.2
.
1

.4

1.8
.
6
.
8
.
1
.
1

3 .3
3 .3

4 .9
1 .3

1 6 .5

_

-

.9
-

-

-

-

9 .5

.

-

-

-

-

-

3 .1
1 .5
3 .1

-

-

-

.3
-

1.2

6.1
_

1 .7
9 .5
(2 /)

-

2 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
6

-

1.1

2.2

-

-

-

4 .8

.
6

9 5 .9

9 6 .7

9 5 .1

8 3 .5

90.8

88.6

88.1

1 6 .5

9 .2

2 7 .1

1 1 .9

1 .4
7 .3

1 .7
-

5 .0

4 .8
1 9 .5

6 0 .2

7 1 .9

8 7 .8

64.6

8 0 .7

9 2 .8

3 9 .8

2 9 .7

40.6

36.6

1 9 .3

12.2

8 .5

3 .7

12.6

1.1

1 .7
.3
.5

2.1

1 .3

•4
-

.
1
1.0

.
1

_

.
1

2 .3
-

8.6

1 .4
1 .4

-

6 .3
1 .7

(2 /)
1 .3
.5

9 .2

_

(2 /)
-

2 .5
-

.4

15 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k le a v e ............................................

.
1
1.6

.3
3 .1

4 .5

1.6

Under 5 d ay s ...........................................................
5 c a y s ...........................................................................
6 d ay s ...........................................................................
7 d ay s ...........................................................................
8 d ay s ...........................................................................
10 d ay s ........................................................................
11 d ay s ........................................................................
12 d ay s ........................................................................
1 5 d ay s ........................................................................
1 6 and 1 8 d ay s ......................................................
20 d ay s ........................................................................
Over 2 0 d ay s ............................................................

2 1 .9

2 4 .3

25.2

2 3 .1

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith no f o rm a l p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s i c k l e a v e ............................................

5 9 .7

5 0 .4

5 1 .1

4 9 .6

1/
2/
*
**

.
1
.3
6 .7

-

-

-

.
5 .9
.

12.1

.
6
1.1

-

.7

1.8

1.6
1.1

4 .3

.3

1.8

.5

-

19.2
-

2.1
8.1

1 .5
.

3 .4

-

_
-

22.0
(2 /)
.

1 .4

1.2
-

3 .2

2.8
-

-

3 .6
-

-

_

6.1
5 .0

1.0

5 .4
-

1.2
2 .5
1 .9
-

.
6

1 .4

1 .7
-

.4
.4

-

-

1 7 .8

2 5 .5

6 0 .2

7 0 .3

5 9 .4

6 3 .4

.
6
.
1

_

2 .3
2 8 .7

.5
2 .3

1 .5
9 .2

.
1

2 .5
1 2 .5

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

.
2

-

-

-

2.1

-

_
-

-

.5

1.2

_

-

4 .0
-

-

-

6 .3

3 .4

-

8 0 .7

8 7 .8

9 1 .5

9 6 .3

9 .5
-

.9
-

-

-

_

9 .5
(2 /)
_
(2 /)
-

3 .1

.
6

-

6.2
8 7 .4

-

.

2 .9
_

_

-

•4
4 .8

_

_

_

_

-

2 .5

_

7 .0

1 .3
3 .3

13.0

8 3 .5

90.8

7 2 .9

.7

88.1

3<
5

Table E-6: ft(M p A A cL tcJtU M l &04U4&G&

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

lype of bonus

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

All

V

Non­
durable

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

good s

I
All establishments...... ........ .

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses g / .... ......... ...... .

41.0

35.3

36.1

34.4

23.0

41.1

40.9

55.1

36.8
5.9
2.3

31.6
7.3
1.1

31.2
10.7
1.1

32.1
3.4
1 .1

23.0
-

38.1
13.2
-

39.8
1.0
.6

59.0

64.7

63.9

65.6

77.0

58.9

59.1

Christmas or year-end •••••••••••••••
Profit-sharing............. .
Other •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses..... ................. .

2/
2/
*
**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

42.0

34.7

30.1

36.3

24.7

13.1

47.6
4.8
6.7

35.9
5.4
1.2

30.1
4.2
3.0

26.3
4.3
1.3

32.4
3.8
1.5

21.1
4*8
1.0

13.1

44.9

58.0

65.3

69.9

63.7

75.3

i

- 300.0 _ 100.0

100.0

63.8

61.0

40.2

-

60.4
11.4
2.4

20*4
54.8
6.2
.3
5.7 - 21.7

86.9

36.2

39.0

-

59.8

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), conurunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7t

O stU tteu to e. a n d P -etU io n P la *U

p] l-.PCKNT

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type of plan

All establishments... ........ ... ....
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans g/ ........ ..... • • • • •

All
indus­
tries

100.0

AD

100.0

Durable
goods

100.0

OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

V
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

All

j 100.0

. 100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

goods

200.0

200.0

100.0

100.0

89.2

96.5

97.9

94.8

97.9

79.3

87.2

92.3

4 0 .0

88.4

94.8

96.1

93.7

93.8

56.0

89.6

46.9

Life insurance • • • • • • ... ... ...... ...
Health insurance... • • • • .... • • • • • •
Hospitalization .................
Retirement pension............ .

82.9
47.0
38.9
63.6

94.8
76.6
57.6
63.2

95.2
86.4
76.0
59.8

94.4
65.4
36.8
67.1

95.0
25.9
.5
92.9

75.3
30.1
32.7
51.1

74.2
63.0
42.5
54.8

80.7
18.0
30.7
71.8

29.3
33.4
24.7
21.8

81.0
63.9
46.6
47.4

89.5
76.0
59.3
50.5

89.5
79.8
69.0
52.5

89.4
72.7
51.0
48.8

86.4
40.2
11.6
81.0

50.9
28.6
25.7
24.6

76.6
59.0
36.0
38.1

26.4
24.4
16.9
3.9

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans............... •••••

10.8

3.5

2.1

5.2

2.1

20.7

12.8

7.7

60.0

11.6

5.2

3.9

6.3

6.2

44.0

10.4

53.1

1/
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pa., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

36

Appendix

Scope ar

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A -4). The covered industry groupings ares manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment1* full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table sumnarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

37 ,
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN PHILADELPHIA, PA.,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, OCTOBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

Number of
establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

1/

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establ:Lshments
stud Led
Total

Office

335,567
199,682
118,405
81,277
135,885

62,579
26,812
17,453
9,359
35,767

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

_

All divisions ..................................
Manufacturing.......... ................ .
Durable goods 3 / . ..................... .
Nondurable goods ij......................
Nonmanufacturing ......... .................. .
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .................. ..........
Wholesale trade ................... .......
Retail t r a d e ........ ................... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate .....
Services
.............................

390
146

2,485
721
251
470
1,764

66
80
244

623,845
356,940
170,218
186,722
266,905

101
21
101
21
21

79
627
132
385
541

29
53
35
61
66

59,573
46,525
73,696
45,625
41,486

47,800
6,471
50,102
21,597
9,915

9,126
2,092
6,317
16,591
1,641

21
8
8
21
21
21
21
8/ 21
101
21
21

39
23
24
7
17
15
14
181
6
27
116

20
16
6
5
8
8
8
38
6
11
25

4,661
1,763
689
1,815
5,003
1,135
670
37,612
19,625
4,755
23,058

3,327
1,352
230
1,698
4,192
814
444
24,618
19,625
3,577
11,005

115
31
7
133
478
98
34
3,286
•—
297
7,542

101
101
101
-

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Full-fashioned h o s i e r y ....... .................
Women!s and misses1 coats and suits ...........
Nonferrous foundries •»••••••••••.... .
Forgings, iron and s t e e l .... ................. .
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware .......... ••••
Heating apparatus ..............................
Sheet-metal w o r k ............... ...............
Machinery industries........... ...........
Railroads ....................... .......... .
Milk dealers ••••••.......... ...........
Insurance carriers .............................

7/

1/ Philadelphia Area (Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey)*
2/ Total establishment employment.
*
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
ij Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with U or more workers were included.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




38,

Able seaman (ocean transport) ......................
Adjuster and fixer, knitting machines (full-fashioned
hosiery) ..... ...... ••••••••••••••.........«...
Assembler (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware)
Assembler (heating apparatus) •••••••••••••••..... ••
Assembler (insurance carriers)
.....
Assembler (machinery) ................... •••••••••••
Assembler (sheet-metal work)
Bartender (hotels) ................ .................
Bathmaid (hotels)
Bellman (hotels)
Bench hand (bakeries) ••••••••••••.......
...
Biller, machine ...... ................ .............
Boarder (full-fashioned hosiery) ......... ••••••••••
Boatswain (ocean transport) ........ ...... •••••••••
Bookbinder (printing)
....... .........
,
Bookkeeper, hand
......
Bookkeeping-machine operator ••••••••..............
Bottler, machine (malt liquors)
Boxer (full-fashioned hosiery) ..........
Bricklayer (building construction) •»•••••••••••.... .
Bus boy (hotels) .....................................
Calculating-machine operator............. ...........
Carpenter (building construction) ...... ........... .
Carpenter (ocean transport) .••••.... ......
Carpenter, maintenance
.... •......••••••••••••••••,
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) .....
Chambermaid (hotels) ...•••••.... ••••••.••••••••••••
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) •••••••««•,
Cleaner ••••••••••......... ........................ .
Cleaner (heating apparatus)
............. .
Cleaner (office building service) ••••••••••••...... .
Cleaner (railroads) ....... .............. ••••••••••<
Clerk, accounting..... •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••<
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ••....... ....,
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) •••••.•••••••••<
Clerk, f i l e ........................................ .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••••.....
Clerk, general
••••••••••••«<
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) •••••••«•••••••••<
Clerk, order ...... .... .......•••••••••.............
Clerk, payroll .................
Clerk, premiura-ledger-card (insurance carriers) .....<
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers)
Compositor, hand (printing) ........... .............
Cook (ocean transport)
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ••••..........,
Crane operator, electric bridge
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads) •••••••••«
Crowner (malt liquors) •••••••...... ................
Cutter and marker (women*s and misses1 coats
and suits) ••••........ •............... .
Dishwasher (hotels) •••.•••••••••••....... ...........
Draftsman ....
...,
Drill-press operator (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••«
Duplicating-machine operator •••••.....
....«



Index
Page

Page

27

Electrician (building construction) .................
26
Electrician (ocean transport) ••••••••••«
27
Electrician, maintenance ............... ...............
11
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ...... •••••••••«•••
21
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ....................
23
Electrotyper (printing) .......... ...........
26
28
Elevator operator (office building service) .......... .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .................. .
21, 22
Engineer, deck (ocean transport) ••••«•••••«•••••••••••••
27
Engineer, stationary.... ............. .................
11
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers)
..... •••••••••••
2U
Examiner (full-fashioned hosiery)
17
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ..................
24
Fireman (ocean transport) ............. ................
27, 28
Fireman, stationary boiler .............................
11
Folder (full-fashioned hosiery) •••••••••••••••••••••••••
17
Forming-machine operator, power (sheet-metal work) ...•••
20
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ••••«•••....... .
18
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ............... .
21, 22
Guard .......................
14
19
Hammersmith (iron and steel forgings) ..................
Heater, forge - light work (iron and steel forgings) ••••
19
Helper, forge (iron and steel forgings) ........ ..... .
19
•••... 0... ...... .
27
Helper, motortruck driver ...... .
Helper, trades, maintenance
.... ••••••••
11
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .... ..... .
23
Houseman (hotels) .............................
28
Inspector (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ..........
19
Inspector (machinery) .............. •••••..............
21, 22
Janitor ............ •••••••••........•••••.... ...... .
14
.... ...«•••
20
Janitor (heating apparatus)
Janitor (office building service) ......................
28
Janitor (machinery) •••••••...... .....................
21, 22
Janitor (railroads) ....................................
23
Key-punch operator ............... ..... .......
7
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers)
25
Knitter (full-fashioned hosiery) ..........
17
Labeller (malt liquors) .................•••••••••.... .
26
Laborer (building construction) ........ ................
26
Longshoreman (stevedoring) .......
28
Looper, toe (full-fashioned hosiery) ............... ..
17
26
Machine operator (printing) ...... ...................
Machine tender (printing) ••••••....... .......... .
26
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) ..........
19
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ..... .
21, 22, 23
Machine-tool operator, toolroom •••••••••••...... .
12
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ..•••.••••••o
22
Machinist, maintenance ..........................
12
Machinist, production (machinery) •••••••••••••••••••••..
22, 23
Mailer (printing) ..........................
26
Maintenance man, general utility ............... ..«•«••••
12
Maintenance man, general utility (railroads) ...........
23
Malt miller (malt liquors) •••••••••••...... .....
26
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
•••••••••
••••••••
12
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
(milk dealers) •••••••
24

17
19
20
25

21, 22
20
28
28
28

26
3,

U9 5
17
27

26
3, 5

3’ 26
?
17

26
28
5

26

27

11
23

28
18

H

20
28
23
3, 6
25
25
3, 6
25
3, 6
25
3, 6

,

4 7
25
25

26

27, 28

18

H
23

26
18
28

10
21, 22
4 7

,

39

Index 3o4ttU u*ed
Page
Mechanic, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••..... ••••••••..
Mechanic, maintenance (iron and steel forgings) .... .
Mender, hand (full-fashioned hosiery) ••..••••••.........
Milling-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) .................... 19
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ••«•••••.... ..•••••
Millwright.............................................
Mixer (bakeries) •••••••••••...... ...... •••••••••••••••
Molder (bakeries) ••••••••••••....... •••••••••••••••••••
Molder, hand, bench (nonferrous foundries) •...••••••••.•
Molder, machine (nonferrous foundries) ••, •.... •••••••••
Motortruck driver •.... ....... ,............ .......
Nurse, industrial (registered) ....... ..................
Office boy
........
Office g i r l ..... ..••••••••.................. .
O i l e r ..... ............ ................. ..............
Oiler (ocean transport) .......... ......................
Operator (local transit) ........ ............. ••••••••••
Order f i l l e r .... .............................. .
Overman (bakeries) ....
••••••••••••
P a c k e r ..... ............ ...........••••.........
Packer (bakeries) ••••.••••....•••.•••••••••••••..... .
Painter (building construction) •••••..... .•••••••••••••
Painter, maintenance
..... ............. .
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ••••••••••••••••••.•••••
Painter, rough (heating apparatus) .....
Pairer (full-fashioned hosiery) .... ...... .
Pasteurizer (malt liquors) ...... ........ ..............
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) •••••••••••........ ••••••••••
Photoengraver (printing) ................................
Pipe fitter, maintenance..... ...........
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) ...................
Plasterer (building construction) .••••••••••••••••••••••
Plumber (building construction) ...................
Plumber, maintenance......
Polisher and buffer, metal (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) •••••.••............
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (cutlery, hand
tools, and hardware) •••••••••••....... ••••••••••••••
Porter ...........................
•••••••••
Porter (heating apparatus) .... ••••••.............. .
Porter (office building service) ........................
Porter (machinery) ................... ..................
Pourer, metal (nonferrous foundries) ..... ........
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) .... ........
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal work) ................
Preboarder (full-fashioned hosiery) ............ •••••••••
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) •••••••••••••••••••
Press assistant (printing) .............................
Press feeder (printing) •••••.••.........
Presser (women*s and misses 1 coats and suits) •••••••••••
Pressman (printing) ..... ..........................
Quartermaster (ocean transport) ..... ............
Receiving c l e r k .... .................
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ........ ...............
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) •••••••••••••••
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ••••••••••••••••••..........



Page

12

21
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) •••••.....
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) ..... ••••••••••••••••
27, 28
Seamer (full-fashioned hosiery) ••••....................
17
Secretary ............ ............... ........••••••••••
4, 7
Section head (insurance carriers) ...... ...............
25
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women*s and misses* coats
and suits)
....... •••••....... .............«...
IB
Sewing-machine operator (women’s and misses* coats
and suits) ....... ........ •••••............ ........
IB
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ...................
18
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance..................... ••••
13
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-metal work) ..O0...
20
Shipping c l e r k ...... ••••••.......
15
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k .......
•••••••••
15
Stenographer..... •••••.....«•••••••..................
4, B
25
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ....... ..........
Stereotyper (printing)
.......................... ..
27
Stock h a n d l e r ..... ••••••••.................... ••••••••
15
Stock handler (heating apparatus) •••••........ ........
20
Stock handler (railroads) ....................... ......
23
Store keeper (ocean transport) ........
•••••
27
Switchboard operator ........••••..................... .
B
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••.......... ......
8
Tabulating-machine operator..... ••••................. .
4, B
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ...... .
25
Telephone operator (hotels) ................ *..........
28
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women’s and misses* coats
and suits) ....... .............. ...................
IB
Tool-and-die maker •••••••••........ .
13
Tool-and-die maker (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) ...
19
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ....................... .
22, 23
Tool-and-die maker (sheet-metal work) ................ .
20
T r a c e r .................................................
10
Transcribing-machine operator
.... ...............
9
Truck d r i v e r ........ •«•••••...........................
15, 16
Truck driver (milk dealers) .............. ............ .
24
Trucker, hand ..........................••••..... ••••••••
15
Trucker, hand (cutlery, hand tools, and hardware) .......
19
Trucker, hand (heating apparatus) ............. ........
20
Trucker, hand (machinery) .... .....................•••••
22, 23
Trucker, hand (railroads) ..............................
23
Trucker, power •••••.••••.... ••••••••••................
16
Turret-lathe operator, hand (cutlery, hand tools,
and hardware) ...... .................... .••••••.....
19
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) •••••••••.......
21, 22, 23
Typist .................................................
4, 9
Typist (insurance carriers) ........... ............... .
25
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ....
.••••••••..
25
Waitress (hotels) .......................................
28
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) •••••........ .
24
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ......
24
Watchman ...........................................
16
Watchman (ocean transport) ...................
27
Welder, hand (machinery) ................ ...........
22, 23
Welder, hand (sheet-metal work) ....... •••••••••.......
20
Window washer (office building service) ••»••••••••••••••
28
Wrapper (bakeries) ...........
26

19
17

21 , 22, 23
12
26

26
18
18
27
10

4
7
13
27
27
14

26
14 ^ 1 $
26

26
13
23

20
17

26
24

26
13
23
26
26
13

19
19
14
20
28
21, 22
18
20

20
17
25
26

26
18
26
27, 28

15
24
24
24

\ : U . S G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE

1952 0

204560







C o n te n ts
Page
INTRODUCTION..........................................................

1

THE PHILADELPHIA AREA ............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ......................................................

1

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations...........
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ..........................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..............
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations .............
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2251 Full-fashioned hosiery ...........
B-2337 Women* and misses' coats and suits.... .......
s
B-336
Foundries, nonferrous ................
B-3391 Forgings, iron and steel .........
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware ......................................
6-3439 Heating apparatus .......................
B-3444 Sheet-metal w o r k ......
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery................. . •••................ ...................
Textile machinery..............................
B^40
Railroads.... ..................................
‘ B-5452 Milk dealers ........................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ..............

3
10
11
14
17
18
18
19
19
20
20
21
22
23
24
25

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ............................
C-205
Bakeries ............................................................
C-2082 Malt liquor..........................................................
C-27
Printing................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...............................
C-44
Ocean transport.........
C-446
Stevedoring .......................................
C-6512 Office building service ..............................................
.
C-7011 Hotels ...................................... * ......................

26
26
26
26
27
27
27
28
28
28

Entrance rates -'
D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..............................

29

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ........................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours...........
E-3
Paid holidays ................. ............................ •..........
E-4
Paid vacations ..............
E-5
Paid sick leave .....................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ...................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans •••••••..............................

30
31
31
32
33
35
35

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey... ...............................................

36

INDEX..........................................................................

38

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon reouestfbr auto repair shops
(April 1951), ferrous foundries
(June 1951) 9
paints and varnishes
(March 1951) and power
laundries (April 1951)#
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

April 22, 1952

- Price 2 5 cents


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102