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HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT

October 1951

Bulletin No. 1059

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary

Ewan Clague - Commissioner







Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................

1

THE HARTFORD METROPOLITAN AREA ........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE...........................................................

2

TABIES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations .......................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ...................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ........................

3
7
7
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery ...............................................
Machine tools ..........................................................
Machine-tool accessories ..................
B-5452 Milk dealers .............................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers .......................................................

11
12
13
15
15

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction ....................................................
C-205
Bakeries ..................................................................
C-27
Printing ..................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ........................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .................................

16
16
16
16
16

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plantworkers ..................................

17

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ............................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ..........................
E-3
Paid holidays ............................................................
E-4
Paid vacations ...».......................................................
E-5
Paid sick leave ..........................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .......................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ..............................................

17
IS
IS
19
20
21
21

APFENDIX:
Scope and method

of s u r v e y ......................................................

22

I N D E X .................................................................................

24

* NOTE - An additional occupational earnings
report is available upon request for ferrous
foundries (June 1951).

March 10, 1952

Introduction 1/

The Hartford area is one of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys#
Occupations common to a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis#
Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilised in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office, (b) professional and technical,
(c) maintenance and power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping# In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A -4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions#
Occupations that are characteristic of particular
local industries that are important in the community have been
studied on an industry basis, within the framework of the com­
munity survey# 2/
Earnings data for these jobs have been pre­
sented in Series B tables#
Union scales (Series C tables) are
presented in lieu of
(or supplementing)
occupational earnings
for several industries or trades in which the great majority of
the workers are employed under terms of collective bargaining
agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of
prevailing pay practices.
Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans#

The

SixVltpOJuL M e tro p o litan

A re a

Total population of the Hartford Metropolitan Area,
including the city of Hartford and 13 towns in Hartford county,
was approximately 357,000 in 1950. TMis represented an Increase
of about 20 percent over the census figure for 1940# More than
half of this total resided in the city of Hartford#

1 / Prepared in the Bureau’s regional office in Boston, Mass#,
by Bernard J# Fahres, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst# The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Branch of Community Wage Studies of the Bu­
r e a u ’s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations In Washington,
D. C#
2 / See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey#




Situated midway between New York and Boston, Hartford
is the capital and largest city in Connecticut.
Its industrial
composition mirrors the changes which have been gradually tak­
ing place in the economy of southern New England# Total nonagricultural employment in the area was 192,000 in October 1951#
Of this number, over 31,000 were employed in the fabricated
metals and aircraft industries, a gain of more than 30 percent
over 1950#
An additional 24,000 workers were employed in the
machinery industry, an increase of 20 percent over the preceding
year# The importance of the metalworking industries to the area
is indicated by the fact that nearly 65,000 workers, or 80 per­
cent of the total manufacturing employment, were within this
classification#
Hartford plants manufacture a variety of products in­
cluding aircraft engines and propellers, typewriters, firearms,
dishwashing machines, machine tools and gages, forgings, time
switches and parking meters, electrical devices, turbines, gears,
coffee makers, and many others#
Among the products of soft
goods industries are parachutes, brushes, apparel, food and kin­
dred products, printing and publishing, textiles,
chemicals,
and rubber products#
Insurance is of major importance in the nonmanufactur­
ing field#
This industry has steadily increased in importance
until today one of the largest concentrations of insurance under­
writing in the western hemisphere is in Hartford#
Over 20,000
were employed in this industry in October 1951#
Other large
groups were found in wholesale and retail trade where some 37,000
are employed, while an additional 19,000 workers were engaged
in the service industries#
Total government employment in the
area was estimated at slightly over 16,000#
The outbreak of hostilities in Korea had important
effects upon total employment in the area#
Over 10,000 workers
in the area were unemployed in January 1950.
However, at the
time of the study, Hartford had a labor shortage in almost all
categories# It was one of six labor areas in the United States
classified by the Bureau of Employment Security of the United
States Department of Labor as an area of labor shortage# The
growth of the aircraft and metalworking industries, with a re­
sulting shortage of labor in virtually all skilled job classi­
fications, was largely accountable for this change#

2 / Connecticut State Employment
Market Letter# October 1951#

Service;

Hartford Labor

2

A significant component of Hartfordfs agricultural
economy is the production and processing of tobacco leaf pri­
marily for use as cigar wrappers 0 Hartford is the center of the
tobacco industry in the Connecticut Valley 0 Today this region
produces two-thirds of all wrapper tobacco used by American
cigar manufacturers*
Among the industries and establishment-size groups
included within the scope of the Bureau's study, two-thirds of
the plant workers were employed in establishments having written
agreements with labor organizations* The degree of unionization
varied widely in the different industry groups studiedo In the
manufacturing industries, about three out of four workers were
covered by union agreements* Plant workers in nonmanufacturing
industries were not extensively affected by union contract pro­
visions, except in the transportation, communication, and public
utility group, where the ratio was approximately the same as in
manufacturing* B y contrast, only about 1 out of 25 plant work­
ers in the services group were included under the terms of a
union agreement* The proportion of office workers represented
by union organizations was significant only in the transporta­
tion, communication and public utility group, where approxi­
mately two out of five were covered*
In all other divisions
union coverage among office workers was negligible*

Occupational

W age

S tructure

Wage levels in the Hartford area were affected by a
number of general wage changes during the period preceding the
survey0
Between January 1950, the base period for the Wage
Stabilization Board's "catch-up1 wage formula,said October 1951,
1
nearly all manufacturing plant employees received general wage
increases* The majority of these were between 10 and 20 cents
an hour* Nonoffice employees in the public utility industries
received similar increases; whereas, workers in wholesale and
retail trade and service establishments received somewhat small­
er increases* About nine—tenths of the total office employment
in manufacturing industries received wage adjustments during
the period - usually expressed in terms of percentages rather
than cents per hour.
Many of the office employees in the fi­
nance and public utilities industries also received wage adjust­
ments; general increases to office workers in other industry
groups were somewhat less frequent*
Formalized rate structures providing a range of rates
for office occupations were reported in establishments employ­
ing over four-fifths of all office workers* This was predomi­
nantly true of manufacturing companies, and of those in the in­
surance field where 9 out of 10 persons were employed by com­
panies having a formal structure and a range of rates* Among
time-rated plant workers two out of three were employed by com­



panies having a similar formalized structure.
Of those remain­
ing , the largest number were employed in plants also with a
formal structure, but with single-rated jobs. Fewer than 1 out
of 10 plant employees in Hartford were employed by companies
where the rate was dependent upon individual determination, the
greatest proportion being in the service industries, in which 3
in 4 rates were determined individually*
The majority of Hartford firms studied had establish­
ed minimum entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers.
On
an all-industry basis, this minimum was typically between 90
cents and $1.20 an hour with the largest single group receiving
$1*05 an hour* Public utilities had the highest entrance rates
with half of all workers employed in plants where the minimum
was $1*10 an hour or over. Among wholesale and retail trade and
service organizations established minimum rates were less typi­
cal and were only found In companies employing about half of the
total*
In retail trade the minimum was set at 75 cents an hour
or under by companies employing approximately half of the total
number of workers.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing, and in 16
out of 21 office classifications permitting comparison, the sal­
aries of 10 averaged $4 a week or more than equivalent positions
in the nonmanufaeturing field.
Average hourly earnings for
plant occupations,
studied on a cross-industry basis, showed a
similar pattern. Within 21 job classifications where comparison
was possible, hourly rates among manufacturing establishments
were higher for 14 jobs*
The scheduled workweek for plant employees reflected
the intensification of defense production in the Hartford area*
Among manufacturing industries, 7 out of 10 workers were on a
scheduled workweek of over 40 hours, with over half this group
on a schedule of 48 hours or more. By contrast, three out of
four workers in the public utility group and half the workers
in trade and service establishments were on a 40-hour workweeko
Office workers were generally scheduled at 40 hours or less in
all divisions. Among manufacturing industries, however, two out
of five office workers were scheduled for an extended workweek
of 48 hours.

Approximately one-fourth of all plant employees in
Hartford manufacturing plants were working on second and thirdshift operations in October 1951.
Virtually all of these were
receiving shift differentials which were principally expressed
in terms of cents per hour. The hourly differential paid to the
largest number of workers on the second shift was 10 cents.
Differentials for workers on third-shift operations
showed less uniformity and in addition to premium pay included
provisions for a full day's pay for reduced hours*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

O ^ice. OcCUfUitia+U

(Average straight-time veekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Avi

Sex,

occupation,

and

industry division

Number
°f

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
Weekly Weekly U n d e r 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
hours earnings $
and
and
(Standard) (Standard)
32.50
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47?50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO. 0 0 o v e r

Men

M a n u f a c t u r i n g .........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ....,
Public utilities
Finance
Clerks,

**

*

.. . . . . .

accounting

..... .

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ....,
Publio utilities
Wholesale trade
Retail
Finance

trade

*
...

..... .

* * ........ ,

Clerks, file, cla s s B
Nonmanufacturing .
Finance

**

....

C l e r k s , g e n e r a l ....
Nonmanufacturing
Clerks,

order

........

Manufacturing

....,

Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale

.
.

trade

Clerks, p a yroll
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .......
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ....
Public

utilities*

Duplicating-machine

operators

Nonmanufacturing
Finance

**

..........

............

O f f i c e b o y s ........ .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...
Nonmanufacturing
Finance

**

..,

Tabulating-machine operators
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .........
Finance

**

*
70.00
63.50
72.50
66.50
78.00

...........

84
22
62
14
25

39 .0
3 9.0
39.0
4 0.0
37.0

287
65
222
26
12
163
43
43
43

38.0
39.5
37.5
40 .0
39.5
40 .0
37.0
37.0
37.0
37.0

61.50
62.00
61.50
72.50
71.00
54.00
59.00

2

39.00
39.00
39.00

9
9
9

80
52

Roolelceepers. h a n d ...... .

4 0.0
40.0

61.50
65.00

-

63
26
37
18
45
28
17
10

3 9.5
40 .0
39.0
40.5
39.5
39.5
39 .0
40 .0

55.00
65.00
48.00
55.50
59.00
55.50
64.50
66.00

29
22

3 8 .0
37.5
37.0
3 8.0
40 .0
37.5
37.5

44.00
46.50
45.50
42.00
37.00
43.00
43.50

3 8.0
3 7.0
37 .0

53.00
53.00
53.00

3 9.5
3 9.5
39.5
39 .0
4 0.5
39 .0

46.00
43.00
47.00
47.00
47.00
45.50

20

21
144
27
117
113
143
~"BF
82

3
1
2

19
2
17

9
4
5
2
2
36
11
25

-

-

36
2
34
2

_

_

_

_

2

_

_

_

5

_

-

_

_

-

2

-

-

_

5

-

2
_
2

*

7
_
7

-

2

_

9
2
7

3
_
3

"
12
5
7

-

-

-

_

_

14
6
8
1
1

-

_
_

_
_
_

10
10
10
_

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

5

7
-

1
1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

_

_

-

_

6

17
3
14
10

-

6
6
_

_

-

_

"

-

2
2

s

5

_

3
4

8
8
8

3
5
5
5

-

6

5
4

3
3
3

1
1
1

1
1

1
1
2

-

-

7

_
-

20
18
3
3

-

17

_
-

"
4

"
3

4

_

22

3

3
3

22
4

3
3
4
3
1
1
1
1
21
1
20
20

"
3
3
3
12

5
5
5
10

-

_

8

12
12

10
10

-

_

_

_
_
-

3
3

11
6
6
24
16
8
8

13
1
12
12

1
1
3
3
3
19
6
13
13

2
2
2

9
9
9

1
1
1

3
2
2

19
9
9

4
1
3

12
10
2

46
14
32
15
14
2

12
3
9

18
1
17
9
3
4

_

10
_
10
1

_
_

2
-

-

-

2
2

_

-

-

"
2
1
1
1

2
-

2
2
4
3
1
-

5
20
_

-

6
1
4
4

-

2

_

32
2
2
2
3
-

_

16
9
7
6
20
4
16
1
4
_

11

9 !
3

_

-

16
9
7
_

7

_
-

2
2

6
3
3
3

5
3
2
-

-

10

8
8

10
10

1
1

2
2

1
1

30
13
13

13
6
5

14
5
5

9
9
8

15
8
8

18
9
9

16
1
17
4
9
1

5

7

_

-

1

_

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

7

8

8

1

_

13
12

6
6
4
4

3
3

2
2

3
3

2
2

-

1
1
"

3
3

1

Wholesale

trade

Retail trade

..............

..................

Finance * * ...... .......

See

Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

22

1

2

-

_

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

2

-

2
1

f o o tnote a t e n d o f table.

*
**

160
40
120
36
51




conmunlcatlon,

and

other public

utilities

-

2

-

5
3

-

9

-

7
4

-

5

-

5
2

3

-

9

_
-

2
2

-

2

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

”

-

“

“

.
_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

~

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

"

_

_

~

_

_

_

-

-

5
5
5

-

2
2

-

_
_

-

2
2

_
_

_

2

-

2
1

-

-

2

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

Women
Billers, mac h in e (billing m a chine)
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ....................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................

-

-

2
2
2

2

9

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

_

-

-

9

2

_

-

2
2

-

-

"
2
2
2

-

_

-

15

-

1
1
1

_

7
3
3

_
-

-

16
5
11
2

_

10
7
6

15
15

-

_

"
4
4
4

2
2
2
18
1
17
6
10

16
5
11
3

2
1
1
1

-

-

-

2

1
1

-

10

10
3
7

-

-

-

1

1

-

10
2
13
4
9
1

-

-

_

-

13
8
5

3
3

-

5
3
2
2

-

3
1
9
8
1

1
2
2

-

2
2

-

2

-

1
1
1
2

_

3
3
2
"
28
6
22
3
6
2
10

2

-

1
1
1
1

_

2
-

~

_
_
-

-

_
-

“

_
_

_

-

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT1 OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

Office Occufustioni - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

Sex, occupation, and ind u stry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

Women - Continued
59
B ille rs , machine (bookkeeping machine) . . .
Nonmanufacturing ............. ................................ -----53—
22
B e ta il trade ................................................
163
Bookkeepers, hand ...................................................
.Manufacturing ............................. .........................
26
137
Nonnanufacturing ..................................................
Services .............................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operato rs, cla ss A . . .
M anufacturing ..........................................
N onm anufacturing .................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operato rs, c la ss B . . .
M anufactu rin g ........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................
Daf o i 1 4***nr) a f j
JM
h
A* i i i i i i - i i i i

i i

C alculating-m achine operators
(Comptometer type) ............................................
M anufacturing .............. ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................
S 1 fro^A
ririi*i
Finance ** ...............................
C lerks, accounting ............................
M anufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ......................................
q

iiiiii

ii

«Vin l a e o l +•r*e*H
V

.

a

Dofoi 1 f f*o^o

ii ii ii

r

i

Finance ** .........................................................

C lerks, f i l e , c la ss A .............................................
M anufacturing ....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................
C lerks, f i l e , c la ss B ..........................................
M anufacturing .......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................................
Pf i f ui

1

- iii

, | | | . , | | | T| | | r - 1 i i

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

$
s
$
$
$
S
$
s
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Weekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
hours earnings
ana
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60 .00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00 over
32.50
3 9.0
3 3.5
41.0
39.5
39.5
39.5

L.O O
44.00
44.00

_
-

56.50
57.00
56.50

_

2
2
“
_

4

-

-

4

3 9.0

53.50

50
10
40
14
23
313
37
276
17
28
219

39.0
4 0.0
38.5
4 0.0
37.5

56.50
57.50
56.50
57 .00
55.50

-

-

39.0
39.5
39 .0
3 9.5
40.5
32.5

40.00
46.00
39.50
45.50
41.50
38.00

_
-

50
50

305
101
204

3 8.5
40.0
38.0
38.5
37.0

47.00
49.50
45.50
42.50
48.50
46.50
51.50
45.00
56.50
48.50
41.00
45.00
41.50

1
1

39

102

95

641
154
487
38
21
117
294
17
128
29
99

3 9.0
40.0
38.5
40 .0
4 0.5
4 1.0
37 .5
3 9.5
38.5
40.0
38.0

711
162
£49
31
505

3 8.0
4 0.0
37.5
4 0.0
37.0

45.00
48.00
44.00
37.00
40.00
36.00
34.00
36.00

_
-

_
-

6
6
2

-

_
-

57
1
56

55

10

4
6

2
-

55

11
11
7
4

11
11
6
5
54

59
59
48
9

54

3
20

27
4
10
-

4
16
14
2

27
27
1
5
21

3
3

10

4

7

2

10

4

41
14
27

2

3

g
1
_
-

6
1
5

1
1

11
11
10
1
5

33
14
19

27
13
14

20

113
30
83
3
7
30
35

2

12
3
2

7

44

2
2

19
18

33

16
5

-

8

3

3

16

11

58

50

49
5
1
11
32

39
1
3
7
28

9

11

3

19
9

9
3
6

30

14

68

28

6
8

4

64

28

7

4

2

5

1

13
11

3

13
13
7

10
3
7
7
12
5
7
7

29
29
14
9
g

3

4
4

2
2
-

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
4
4

3

3

4

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

19
7
12
9

3
3

3

8
8
4

3

-

1
1
1

2

1

5

23
15
8
1
7

27
14
13

23
12
11

13
2
11

7
4
3

1
1

6
3
3

1

11

11

3

1

1

-

-

-

45
25

26
5

8
2

10

14

4

6

20

21

2

3

4
4

8
4
4
4

4
12

1
17

32
13
19
1
4
5
9

_

.

13

7

1

1

7

6

4

1

3
3

1
-

1

-

1

2

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

12

33
11
22

1

25
13
12
4

6
1

5

5

8

3

3

5

-

1
-

_

_

-

-

1

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

"

-

"

_

_

1

8

5

2

1

-

-

-

1

3

"

-

1
-

1
-

2

_

_

_

_

_

1

1

.

-

-

3

1

-

-

_

21

2

11

105
9
96

82

2
2
-

38
13
25
16
9
64

21
88

3

3
1
2

64
7
57
40
13

-

11 0

5

10
10

147
79

46

4

2

151

113

7

42
11
31
14
8
9

109

-

4

2

8

4

4

14

-

113

132

2
2

20

7
7
2

64
8
56
12
45

3
30

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




20

3
3

4

9

-

. -

2

53
5
44

23
19
9

7

17
15
11
2

5
5

10

-

2

132
15
114

1

4
_
-

50

10
-

_

10
6

2

3

1
-

2

Table A-l:

O^ice

0cC44fHitiO4tl

-

GotUituted

(Average stra ig h t-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selec te d occupations studied on an area
b a sis in H artford, Conn., by indu stry d iv isio n , October 1951)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and indu stry d iv isio n
Women - Continued
C lerks, general .......................................................
M anufactu rin g ................« . . . ..........................
M onm anufacturing......... ....................................
W holesale trad e ..........................................

Number
$
$
$
$
!»
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
of
Weekly
Weekly earnings Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 . 0 0
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) $
32.50
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 . 0( over
279
87
192
52

C lerks, order .....................................................
79
M anufacturing ..................................................... -----19
N onm anufacturing..............................................
60

40.5
39.0
40.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5

$
54.00
56.50
52.50
51.00
44.50
54.00
41.50

_
2

-

2

_
-

1

1
10

-

10
10

C lerks, p ay ro ll ............................................ ..
M anufacturing ...................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................... ..
Public u t i l i t i e s * ....................................
Finance ** ....................................................
D uplicating-m achine operators ........................
M anufactu rin g ...................... ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Finance ** ..........................................
Key-punch operators ...............................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Finance ** ................................... .................
O ffice g ir ls ......................................................... ..
M anufacturing .....................................................
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l?*i noriftP rink .........1TTT- _| r - _ . . r . . T| .
S e c re ta ries ................................................................
M an u factu rin g .....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Pi 1V1t /■* H f i oe afc
1
( fr
Whnl Pen 1 p +y»&H« - . | . TTr. _r | . ( ( ( T,
*
R e ta il trad e ................................................
Finance * * .....................................................
Services .........................................................
S tenographers, general ........................................
M anufacturing .....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Public u t i l i t i e s * ...................................
W holesale trad e .................... .....................
P e ta l 1 trad e , rTT. rr Tr. . r ........., . . . . ,
Finance ** .....................................................
Services ......... ............................

232
164

2
1

39.5
39.5
38.5
40.0
40.5
37.0
38.5
40.0
37.5
37.5
38.0
37.5
37.0
38.0
40.0
37.5
37.0
38.0
39.5
37.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
37.0
37.5

49.50
49.50
5U.50
57.5U
46.50
51.50
43.50
39.00
46.50
47.50
42.00
41.50
41.50
36.00
39.50
35.50
35.50
62.00
61.50
62.00
86. 0
0
55.50
57.00
61.50
62.00

1083
520
563
69
69
56
331
38

39.0
40.0
38.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
37.5
38.0

48.00
49.50
47.00
52.50
47.00
43 .00
46.50
44.00

68
10

19
33
74
30
44
41
631
536
483
104
20
84
73
953
272
681
26
16
60
558

_
-

_
-

"

4
4
-

2

-

2

32
32
24

12

76
76
70
35
3
32
28

-

-

12

-

12

_
2

_
2
_
2

_
_
5
_
5

_
5

8

5
3
_
2
1

17
12
5
5
72
69
62
28
7
21
18

18
18
9

14
6
8

-

7
4
4
3
58
57
53
10
2

27
9
18
8

“
9
9
“
25
16
9
4
3
14
8
6
6
112

93
80
10
1

8
8

9
5

_

1

_

2

13

1

2

1
12

_

_

1

2

"
24
_
24

1
2
2

"
46
2
44
6

17

”
27

4

4

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coimiunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




4
4
4

4

8

129
38
91
4
17
46
17

7
7
4

31
9
22
3

22
2
20
6

2

5
3
2
2

5
5
”

5

47
38
9
1
4

6

6

2

5
5

17
5
-

12

2

4
4
106
69
61
4
3
1

39
1
38
6

28
4
96
43
53
3

40
1

1

49
11
38
6
12

15
3
12
8

6

2
2

13
9
4
1

3
5
5
5
32
27
26

13
4
9

4
22
3
5

1

4

26

3

2

9
4
5

2

1

1

1

2

1

5
1
4
4

3

i

-

4
_

2
1

5
3
2

12

5
7

2
4
1

10
8

17
16
15

83
31
52

69
19
50

81
33
48

2

11

22

22
4
18

-

3

_
-

14
4
4

-

1
-

-

-

_
-

1

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

52
16
36

25
6
19

13
13

8

5
5

10

1

4
4

10

_
-

1

3
3
3
16
16
16

60
16
44

21

-

8

5

26
24

29
28
1
-

62
15
47
g
5
9
1
30 35 32
"
2 1 164 153
1
92 100 104
64 49
119
14
5
3
54

-

13
9
4

8

11
8
8

31

6

2
2

15
15

58
23
35

22
12

_

1
2
2

1
1

66

34

12

5

1
1

47
45
3
3
-

18

4
6
5

2

2

_

2
2
1

1
2

-

-

1

4

1

2
2

1

1

_
2
2
2

1

-

-

75
29
46

29
59

8
8

18
48

1

1

2
1
1
1

41
5
36

3

53

2
2

2
7

4

1

48
33
23

40
3

37
5

109

58
37

6
8

41

8
4
2

27

2
1
6
2

9

1

2

14
30
2

26

1
1

1
0
1

15
3

9

1
2

6
6

1

_
48
-

101

29
72
2
2

44
~

48

_

_

5

15
2
13
4

1
1

5
63
4
_
4
4

1

7

»

_

2

6

6

8

2

2

1

4
29
3

3

_
16
-

1

_

1
1

_
-

1

7

2

_

1

_

11

11
5

-

_
-

_
4
"

_
4

.

_
.

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

11

_

_

2

_

6,

O^iCB 0cC44fuUiO*U - GotUtHMed

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., ty industry division, October 1951)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v er a g e

Weekly Weekly
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and
$
and
32.50 under
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00 over

Women - Continued

160
36
124
12
12
35
41
24

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Whnl esale trade ._____ T . T . ........ .
Retal 1 trade ............______...

F In a rin p ## . . . . __________ _____________

Services .......................

Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Manufacturing .................... .
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transcribing-machine operators,
general .................................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Finance ** ..............................................................
Typists, class A ..............................................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Typists, class B ..............................................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................................
Pub!i c utl 1 1 ties * ................
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade ........ .............

Finance ** .....................

1/
*
**

—

$
45.50
59.00
44.50
51.50
37.00
41.00
50.50
38.50

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
41.5
38.0
38.0

44.50
46.50
43.50
41.50
42.50
46.50
50.50

187
41
146
121

Finance ** ..................... .
Services ............ ...........

38.5
“37'.5
39.0
40.0
39.0
40.0
37.5
39.0

181
69
112
27
51
17
11

Switchboard operators...... ..........
Manufacturing.............. .......
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..............

38.0
“ 39.5'
38.0
37.0

48.00
'4. 5 0 “
9"''
47.50
47.50

341
55
296
276

38.0
39.5
38.0
37.5

45.50
49.00""
45.00
45.50

121

— 77
44

6410

1723

1083
24
21
79
955

39.5
50.0
38.5

50.00
50.00
50.00

38.5
40.0
37.5
40.0
37.5
39.5
37.0

42.50
44.50
41.50
43.50
45.50
39.00
42.00

3
3
-

14
14
3
6

22
4
18
3

~

5

3

7

10
2
8

4
4
4

12

_
3

_

-

-

7

25
14
11
4
5

-

"

2

6
1
5
-

23
4
19
2

13
7
6
-

2

5
11
1

1
5

26
1
25
13
9
1

34
13“
16
4
12

13
1
12

8
3
5
2

-

29
14
15
4
2
8
1

2
6
4

2

31
9
22
16

8
1
7
5

17
3
14
11

21
5
16
15

52
10
42
41

34

52
7
45
45

-

6

29
4
25
_
5
7
4
9

7

5

-

-

2
2

6
6

10
3
7
7

14
13

-

30

-

29

-

25

30
25

29
19

19
19

_

.

2

-

“

-

14

-

6
2

-

2

137

204
42
162

133

2
28
105

17
144

-

137

31
2
29

-

4

33
33
6

6

144
8
136

31

6

-

3

6~

283
433
196 “193“
90
237
10
2
2
2
12
86
213

16
9
7
_

2
1
1
.

4
2
2
_

2
1
1
_

3

.
_

3
1

2
1
1
1

1

2

_

1

2

_

_

7
7

_

7
5
2

3
1
2

1
1

_

-

-

-

2

2

19
5
14
11

17
6
11
10

12
1
11
4

10
4
6
6

8
1
7
6

28
1
27
27

20
3
17
17

6
2
4
4

23

17
13

12
1
11
11

29
8
21
21

_
-

28
16
12

21
20
1

22
11
11

16
14
2

9
7
2

6
2

4

“

2 11
105
106
3
9
18
74

75
35
40
1

67
26
41

32
14
18
3

34
5
29

36
12
24

32
3
29
1

39

33

15

29

24

28

14
1
13
5

3
1
2
_
2

7

8

9

-

9

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_
_

_

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

9

6

9

3
3

_
_
“

_
_
-

1

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

1
1

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
1
2

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

2
1
1

1
-

_

_

_

_

_

1

1

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1

1

1

-

9
9

-

•

_
-

1

8

Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
_

_

2
2

_
_
“

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

Pio^&Uixinal and 7 ecJuucal Occupation*

Table A-2:

7

(Average straight-tine veekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

S e x , o o o u p a tio n , and in d u str y d iv is io n

Number
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Weekly Weekly 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
earnings ana
(Standard) (Standard) under
4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 RO.OO 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100.00

$

$

$

$

100.00 10&00 110^)0
10^00

1 1 5 .0 0

and
n a n o 1 15 .00 over

Men
D raftsm en, c h i e f . * . . . • • • • • • • • •
M anufacturing.

28

40*0
39*5

283

4 0 .0
4 0* 0
4 0* 0
4 0* 0

7 7 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
7 2 .0 0

159
D raftsm en, .iu n io r............................................................ *
4 0* 0
M a n u f a c t u r i n g * . . . . * . . « . • * . — I B S - “ 4 07 0

6 0 .5 0
6 0 .5 0

14

4 0 .0
4 0* 0

4 8 .5 0
4 8 .0 0

117

3 9 .5
40* 0
38*0
39*5

6 1 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
6 1 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

2
2

M anufacturing* • • • • • • • • . • • • ................• • • • • • • — m ~
Nonmanufa o tu rin g *
55
P u b lic u t l 1 i t-i
19

M anufacturing* • ..................................

— n~

_

-

_

-

-

_
-

_

-

_
_

1

-

-

18
9

10

15

19

8

11

10

*

2

*

g

14

11

21

5

7

1

10

9

9

X

3
3

12
12

4
4

2
2

2
2

_

1

3

g

3
3

2

7

29
29

10

48

1

34
22

53
43
1

U

7
7

4

_
-

10

3

1
1

58
51

9 7 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

17

49
49

14
14

_

1
1

1
1

“
2

"

“

1
1

*

1
1

2

4
4

3
3

1
1

2
2

Women
N u rses, in d u s tr ia l ( r e g is t e r e d ) * ..
M anufacturing* • • • • • ...............................................* *
Nonm anufacturing*
1/
*
**

83

34
24

2

“

2

2
2

1

l

9
9

18
16

19
14
5
5

15
7
6

5
5

8

6
2
2

6
2

9

2
2

8

9
7

5
-

5

1

*

2

1

-

a
m

1

-

*
*

“

-

"

“

Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communicstion, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Maintenance and Powek P lant Occupation*

Table a -3:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly (Aider 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2.5 0
and
earnings 1
and
1 .0 0

190
C arp en ters. m ain ten an ce...............................................................................
M&nuf&oturiiig• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • « * • • • * • • • • • * • « • • • • • « • — n n r~
62
Nonm anufacturing.................................... ................... ..
37
R e ta i1 tr a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
E le c t r ic ia n s . m ain ten an ce..................................................................... ..
N onm anufacturing................................................................. ......................
n..V 1 J « ..4.4 1 4 ^4 a m

311
234
77
40

$
1 .7 7
1 .7 9
1 .7 5
1 .6 2
1 .9 6
1 .8 2
1 .8 0
1 .8 8

12

1 .9 5
1 .8 3

M anufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

58
45
213
114
99

1 .4 3
1.3 9
1.4 8
1 .4 4
1 .1 8

•

44
22

_
-

-

•
1
_

2
_

1

2

1

1 .2 0

-

_

-

2

-

12

11

3
9

_

5

See footnotes at end of table
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), corxunication, and other public utilitie;
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




«.
-

_
-

1 .7 6
OT-

M anufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonm anufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-

under
1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5

9
2
2

1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5

-

2
1
1
1

2

_

2

2
2

2
1

_

6
2

4
4

7
5
2
2

.
-

1

.

.

_

2

-

1

-

-

-

4

_

4

1
_

4
4

7
7

1
1

3
28
19
9
8
1

16
6
10

5
5

9
7
5

13
7

17
15

6
2

2

4

1
12

9

12
8

4
]_

19
17

21
12

9
9

28
21

7
5

12

9
3
1

2
2

47
39

2

8

2

8
2
6
6

23

15

22
1
1

12

3
3

_
_

2

24
19
5
4
1

5

40
34
6
4

5
5

27
19

97
93
4

14

1

4

1

6
8
4
1

4
4

5
5

1
1

11
1
10
10

8
6
2

1

_
1
1

2

3
3

4
4

1
1

2
2

13
2

2

9
9
4

8
6
2
1
1

2 .0 0 2 . 1 0

8
2

4

4

4

4

40
33
7
g
1
1
1

10
1

9

17
6
11

6

_

2 .2 0

2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 over

14
3
11

13

1

12
1

1

-

8

-

-

-

6
6

1
1

i
i

6
6

-

g
8

4
4

!

8

2
2
1

2
2

1
-

6

1

4

3

1

6

1

4

3

_

_

*1

Occupational Hhge Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEFARTHHIIT OF LABOR
Bureau of Tuber Statistics

8
,

Table A-3:

Maintenance and Pow&i P lant Occupation&• Continued

(Average hourly earnings i/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
w
orkers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ ^
$
$ , $ , $
$
$
$
$
$
Average
h u l Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.9 5 2 .0c 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50
ory
erig &
anns
and
and
undei
L.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70
1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1 .9 5 2 .0c 2 .1 c2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 over

Helpers, trades, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ................................
Nonmanufacturing.......... ...................

$
1.42
383
319 '
1.37
64

Machine-tool operators, tool room ........... ......
Manufacturing...... ...... ............... .

317
1.79
” 3 T T . 1.79

-

-

-

-

-

Machinists, maintenance ..........................
Manufacturing .................................

87
- 85“
-

1.79
"T779

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

“

-

-

Maintenance men, general utility ..................
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................

1.54
1.5$
1.54
I.35
1.63
1.31
1.40

_
-

2
2

4
4

Retail trade ...................... .
Finance ** .................................
Services .............................. ••...

242
113
129
16
39
25
28

_

_
2
_

_
4

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...............
Nonmanufacturing....... ................. .
Public utilities * .........................
Retail trade ...............................

226
211
154
45

1.6 2
1.60
1.59

Mechanics, maintenance ....... ...... ..............
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing ........... .
U l i n l O Q i O "Kv*
f1
| | l | 1 | l | t 1 T I M I I * T T T T T ..... T
T

330
186—
144
70

1.79
"1353
1.72
1.72

Millwrights .....................................
Manufacturing ................... ..............

128
..128—

1.68
" H 68

Oilers ..........................................
Manufacturing...... ..................... .

56
55

1.39
1.40

Painters• maintenance ........... ................
ng f,ft,tT,Ttl1.t.tftTtTtfTTttTTTTTTT,T
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Retail trade ...............................
Flnanfift ## .......__T.T_______ ______ _ .T T .________....

90
52
38
16
19

1.6 2
1.51—
1.64
1.52
1.70

Pipe fitters, maintenance ................... .....
Manufacturing .................................

51
44

_

1
1

_

6
6

12
1
11

11
7
4

8
7
1

51
4l
10

66
63
3

91
96
1

39
28
11

65
63
2

10
8
2

12
10
2

8
1
7

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

10
10

_

10
10

2
2

2
2

3
3

15
15

10
10

21
21

21
21

22
22

28
28

39
39

2?
25

27
27

8
8

46
46

22
22

2
2

_

4
4

«
.

_

“

-

1
1

6
6

4
3

24
24

3
3

5
5

8
8

5
5

2
2

12
12

3
3

4
4

4
4

7
7
2

7
5
2

33
27
6

_
-

16
10
6

18
3
15

2
2
-

17
12
5

9
8
1

3

_
_
_

5
4
1

20
_
20

12
7
5

1

1
1
_

1
2
3

_
_
_

_
_
6

11
_

_
«

1
4

_

_
_

_

_

11

1
4

20
8
12
8
3
1
_

_
-

25
25
10
14

7
7
2
5

28
28
25
2

44
44
-

40
40
38
2

21
14
11
3

1$
15
1
14

$
5
3
2

3
3
2
1

3
3
1
1

5
5
2
-

-

5
5
2
1

7
3
4
4

2
2
-

12
_i_.

50
18
19
4 — 5~ 15
12
46
4
12
A
-

32
4
28
28

25
17
8
g

38
38
_

16
8
8
g

22
22
_

18
18
_

32
27
5
4

-

3
T~

4
4

9
9~

57
57

14
14

4
4

-

1
1

5
5

10
10

7
-

-

-

2
2

_

7

1
1

9
9

7
5
2
2

5
5

4

19
12
7
7

3

10
Q
1

2
2

6
c
1
1

-

-

16
10
9 ~~S~
2
7

14
2
12
4,
5
1
2

5
2

1
1

4
4
4
-

-

"

-

-

-

“

3
3
3
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

5
5

_
-

_
1
- — 3“
-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
-

_

-

3
3

2
2

1
1

2
2

7
7

15

1

_

«
.

1

_

5

3

1

_

.

1
1

_

5
2
3

3
2
1

_
-

_

1

8
5
5 ~ 8~

3

2
2

5
5

2
2

4
4

22
1.57
“ " 1 1 .. 1.59 ■
11
1.55

Tool-and-die makers 2 / ............................................................. ...........................
Manufacturing.................................................................................................................................................................. ....

722
"~722—

_

_

1

1
-

4
4

1

1

2
1
1

1

-

3
1
2

_

_

_

8
22
5^ " s r

_

_

_

2

_

-

-

-

2

-

2
2
“

-

„

.

-

.

_

.

2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

8
14
14 — r

?
3

1

4
3
1

4
U

32
32

_

59
59

J
.
_

2

10

2

-

-

4
4

-

-

2
2

-

1

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

7
7
3

3
3
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

25
9
16

7
1
6

1
1

_
_

_
_

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

3
n
X
2

_
_

2

_

_

2

4
3

1
1

-

10

10

23
23

_

3

-

3

2
2
2

-

Plumbers, maintenance............................
Manufacturing...................... .
Nonmanufacturing ................................................ ...............................................................................• • • • .

1.96
1 .9b

1

2

1.67
T j6 3
_




10
16
ST 8
10
2
_
5
5
3
3

-

1

_

_

2
-

1
-

1

69
69

30

-

110

30 n o

86 156
81
“ 86" 156T n s i

32

32

P

5

24
24

4
4

9
,

GudtodicU, WateJtcuUUuj. and Skip p in g Occupation*

Table a-4.:

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly
0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1.7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0
earnings Under
and
under
1
0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 over
$
72
1 .5 2
2
8
20
3
3 24
3
9
24
— 71------ 1 .5 2
2
8
20
3
2
3
9
"
“
~
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
250
6
4
4 15
3 22 30
5
1.4 2
1
2
8
11
1
9 13 71 45
- 22 30
2
7 10
2
13
226
1 .43
1
1
9 13 71 45
6
2
3
5
3
2
1
1
1
24
1 .3 2
5
6
2
2
2
Number
of

O ccupation and in d u str y d iv is io n

Crane o p era to rs, e le c t r i c b rid ge (under 20 to n s) . . . . .
M anufacturing ................................................................ ...........................
Guards ............. .......................................................................................................
M anufacturing ...........................................................................................
Nonm anufacturing ....................................................................................
J a n ito r s , p o rters, and c le a n e r s (men) .........................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ...........................................................................................
Nonm anufacturing .....................................................................................
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ................. .....................................................

1229
633
596
52

Finance +* ...........................................................................................

267

J a n ito r s , p o rters, and c le a n e r s (women) ....................................
M a n u fa c tu r in g ............................................................................................
N onnanufactaring .....................................................................................
**
**
’*
.............

438

1 .1 6
1 .2 4

-

8

-

1 .1 0

8

8

1 .4 2
1*07
1 .1 2

540

.95

102

1 .2 2
.8 8

66

348
373

.89

8

-

-

_

68

23
23

6

-

6

21

.8 8

263
82
169

1 .3 1
1 .3 2
1 .3 0
1 .3 2
1 .3 0

-

Packers (men) ....................................................................................................
M anufacturing .............................................................................................
N onm anufacturing ....................................................................................
Pofni ] f
f . . , r .. 1 . . . | _r - - - 1 ..........r ..............

264
217
47
47

1 .3 1
1 .3 4
1 .1 8
1 .1 8

-

Packers (women) ............................ .................................................................
M anufacturing ............................................................................................

413
314

1 .1 0

R eceiv in g c le r k s ............................................................................................
M anufacturing .............................................................................................
N onm anufacturing .....................................................................................

119
60
59
36

1 .3 5
1 .4 4
1 .2 6

103
60
43
17
18

1 .4 5
1 .5 2
1 .3 6
1.19
1 .4 2

185
90
95
45
28

1 .36
1 .3 5
1 .3 7
1 .3 4
1 .2 9
1 .5 4

Order f i l l e r s ...................................................................................................
M anufacturing ............................................................................................
Nonm anufacturing .....................................................................................
Qofoi 1 frorlo . . . . . .

. .v

r

110

T

Shipping c le r k s .......................................................................................
M anufacturing ......................................................................................
Nonm anufacturing ....................................................................................
.

S h io p in g -a n d -r e c e iv in g c le r k s ...........................................................
M anufacturing .............................................................................................
Nonm anufacturing ..................................................................................
W holesale trad e ................................................................................
pft-ho-? "|
iii
t i - | i i -r
i - r .......................... ..... . . ....................................

21

39 115
15
4
24 1 1 1
-

-

20

1 .1 8

_

_

4
4
4
28
-

_




1

2

27
10
3

15
12

3

7
3
4

2

2

-

2

10
6

3
3
-

-

3

4
4

39
1

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

~|
-

-

-

4 :
4
-

“

-

"

-

_

56
54
5
48

2

-

1 .2 0

13
4

2

-

-

10

3

3
3
2

2

-

2
2

83
13
70
2
5
34

70
25
45
-

20
9

11

11
2

9
9

18

69 128 205 153
47 97 133 115
22
31 72 38
1
2
2
4
3
4 17
6
19
4 64 19
5
3
4
6

13

10

2
11

28

1

-

-

4

2

5

5
5

-

4
4

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

16
7
9
9

12
6
6

5

1

1
1

4
4

12
6
6
2

23

36
15

51
13
38
24

33

5

15

12
21

4

6

23
23

19
19

32
4
28

6

8

10
2
8
8

7
3
4
4

9

9

1
8
8

8
1
1

31
28

32
30

40
35

10
10

6

3
3
3

2

6

2
2

6
6

-

-

4
4

8

11
-

-

3
3
3

14
7

15

14
7

2

47
44
3
3

25
23

47
46

2
2

2
2

1
1

22
12
10
10

92
92

29
29

14
14

9
9

4
4

7
7
7

13

14

21

2
11

11

6
6

-

-

18
16

12

1

-

7

7
5

6

6
2

2

16
4

9

4
29
22

7
4

11
6

5

3

|

21

_

-

3
5
5

8

43
43

4

-

1

23
13
13

2
2

-

1
1

16
16

20

-

19
18

22
21

30
30

13

4
4

1

58
36

23
23

9

23

2

67 113
43 81
24 32
3

1

16

5

i

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

994334 0 - 52 - 2

29
29

37 188 109
37 188 109
10
30 12
158 93
22

1

**

41
41

!

3
1

6
6

-

2

-

9

12
2
9

1

7

1

-

-

“

15
6
4

4
4
-

9

3

2

1
2

27
24
3
3

15

7
2
1

9
9
-

5
5
-

20
20

-

56
4
52

2

-

-

-

-

3
3
-

-

-

-

20

20
20

1
1

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

_

2
2

7
5

-

6

_

_

18

-

11

8

9
2

-

-

15

10

11

4
4

4

13

4

8

5

1
1

4
4

15
2

58

1
1

1
1

2
2

19
19

2

10

12
2
10
8

-

2
2

5
5
5

3
3
-

3
3

7
3
4
4
15
4
11
11

-

-

6
6

1
1

8

10
10

-

4
4

-

-

_

1
1

-

-

14
14
-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

2
2

-

8
8
6
2

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10,

Table A-4:

Gu&todial, 'kJa'ieUoulinf and Skipping Occupation*. - Continued
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Hartford, Conn., by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
of
workers

Occupation and industry division

233
190

^a I

a

tv rn rl

a

t

_ ___________ ________, - ■ » ___ ___ , ___ _____________

26
4
22

51
16
15

45

6
8

24
21

54
44
10

209
112
97

41
33
8
1

155
101
54

_

_
2

27
5

1
21

15
-

6
2

18
3

6
4

16
81

7

-

46
4

~

1.25

_

1.25

_

1.32

294

Retail t r a d e ............ ............... .

a

32
32

143

Nonmanufacturing .......... ........................

U V tn l

2
2

14

-

214
13
201

Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) ................

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and
including 4 tons) ............ ............. ........
Manufacturing .....................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................

$
1.25
1.24
1.27
i ,4 7
1.28
1.18

1171
658
513

Stock handlers and truckers, hand .................. ..
Manufacturing...... ..............................
Nonmanufacturing........ .................... ..
___ T-r--r___ t -t - t ___,..... ttt
Pnhl t r ivM 11 t1
.
Wholesale t r a d e .............................. ..
Retail t r a d e .... ............................ .

hourly
earnings

c
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$ /
Under 0.75 0.30 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1.65 1.7C 1 . 7 5 1.30 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10
and
_
and
$
0.35 0.90 0.95 1.00 1 . 0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1 .8c 1.35 1.90 2.00 2.10 over
0.75

1.38
T.38“
1.38
1.38

lo g

186
129

_

5

10

46

3

33

4

_

5

10

46

3

7
6
1

n
2
9
g

-

-

5

10

26

33
10
; 11

-

16
16

5
5

5
5

4

4

1 ,0 3

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21
- ~l 9
~

-

-

-

1 12
1 12
1

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons)
(trailer type) ..................................... ..............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................... .................................................
P iiM - J

a

h

H

H

H

a

?

*

.............................. T ................t T t t t ...................T T

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons) (other than
trailer tvnc) .........................................................................................................................

Manufacturing

.............................................. ......................................................................

Wr\rvmeirmf*o

Yi£?

P llK H c

T i | _T 1 Tf _

llt .iH M p q

I-rh n T p .q n l

a

t r 'a r lA

*

i T T i T i i - | - ‘ _' T T i i T * r i i * -

____ T ............................ , ............................................. r

T . . . - r t t t r T r - T t t . T - T ____ , T T T T T T t t

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ..................................................................................
Manufacturing................. ...................................................................................................

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ...............................................
Manufacturing ........................................ .............................................................................

Watchmen ...............................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing............................................................................................................... ...
Nonmanufacturing................... ... ......... ...
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade ...................................
Finance * * ....................... ...

1/
2/
*
**

214
185
143

1.46
1.42
1.47
1.44
1.64

58
37

' 5
i 5

5

1.45
1.40

131
"1 5 1

251
119
132
27
26
66

.....

1.36
"1 :3 6 ^

1.16
1.22
1.11
.94
1.05
1.19

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

_

-

-

-

-

7

13
8

10

26

4

15

9
2
7

-

5

22
3
19

5

4

4
12

3

_

_

34

12
“

-

3
1
2
2

20
20
-

_
_

9
_
_

9

1
_
1

3

37

1

3
3

37

1

_

_

_

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36
-

2
1

23

15

1

23

15

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

6

1

8

24

1

11

1

23

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

22
22

7
3
4

77
24
53
52

26
6
20
20

33
8
25

_
-

12
12

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
-

-

34
8
26
24

1
1

-

28
7
21
8

6
6

4

4
4

10
10

8
8

159
135
135

8
8
8

22

4

4 120

113

10
10

9
3
6

4

6

-

4

11
5
4

4

2

2
2

2
2

22

56
64
°Z.
60

2

-

3
3

16
16

1
1

7
7

3
3

9
9

5
5

33
33

42
42

4

18
3
15

21

15
14

21

24
24

1

H

15

_

6

1

-

1

3

5
1

-

7

17
17
-

11

73

-

-

-

6
34

11

5

13

40

1

-

13
13

31
11
20
20

1

24

-

60
48
12

9 _2A_
1
8 24

73

-

20
16

161
107
54
32
4
8

1
9
3 !
1
6

4

-

-

95
55
40

_

'

_

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3

1.47
1.46
1.47

439
99
340
130
137

“

84
53
31
2
11
10

12

1

10
11
7
1
3

1

14
99
66
33

_

5

_

_

!

_

_

8

8

4

4

1

_

_

2
2

4

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

60

4

1
1

_

60

-

-

3

23
7

27
27

8
8

-

~

11

2
2

_

_

33
9
26

_

_

4

_

60

_

3

2
23

-

-

-

1
_
_

1

-

-

1

1

1
_

-

-

-

_

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

11

B:

.

Characteristic industry Occupations
M 0 (J u H e > U f

Table B-35:

^ n d u d t 'U e d

1 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
w
orkers

s
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
h u l Under 1.0Q 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90
ory
erig
anns
and
$
under
2/
L.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.30 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.30 2.90 3.00

$
3.00
and
over

Machinery 3/
Men
Total .......................
T i m e .....................
Incentive .................
Assemblers, class B: Total .......................
T i m e ............. ........
Incentive .................
Assemblers, class C i j b ..... .....................
Electricians, maintenance ( J -a.....................
Inspectors, class A £/a ...........................
Inspectors, class B i j a ...........................
Inspectors, class C l j a ...........................
Janitors i j a .....................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/: Total ..............................
Time ............................
Incentive.......................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A £/a ..........
Drill-press operators, radial, class A £/a ......
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A: Total .....................
T i m e ...................
Incentive ...............
Engine-lathe operators, class Aj Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class A: Total .....
T i m e ....
Incentive
Milling-machine operators, class A: Total ......
T i m e .....
Incentive .
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A £/a ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A: Total ...............
Time .............
Incentive ........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B £/: Total ..............................
Time ............................
Incentive .......................
Automatic-lathe operators, class B £/b ..........
Drill-press operators, radial, class B i j b .......
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class B f j \ i .........................
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class B U b .........
Milling-machine operators, class B y b ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B: Total ...............
Time .............
Incentive ........
Assemblers, class A:

171
64
107
646
220
426
393
55
155
214
492
277

$
1.87
1.30
1.92
1.58
1.58
1.57
1.34
1.72
1.70
1.50
1.29
1.21

1257
646
611
14
40

1.87
1.73
1.96
2.19
1.79

32
13
19
136
81
55
304
147
157
144
63
81
75

1.92
1.70
2.07
1.87
1.85
1.90
1.93
1.81
2.05
1.87
1.81
1.91
1.85

275
131
144

1.90
1.81
1.99

1691
349
1342
10
43

1.64
1.51
1.67
1.77
1.65

178
114
40
74
600
308

1.54
1.70
1.54
1.79
1.70
1.55

131
39
92

1.64
1.6 0
± 5 L i

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

-

_

-

1

-

1

_
18
5
13
31
1
1
43
120
6

1
65
33
32
24

2
13
38

6
55
44

8
20
32

18
59
19

1
9
6
3
65
_
5
9
74
59

-

_

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

5
5

5
2
3

11
4
7

-

_

_

_

1

_

_

1

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

3

-

-

-

_

_

-

36

3
10

9
_
9
17

2
11

_
30
9

_
57
18

_
23
39

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
19

3
-

3
27

14
7
7
52

22
9
13
48
1

2
-

_

_

_

_

2
2

_
_

2

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

1

1

1

2

-

-

_

_

_

1

1

1

2

-

-

-

8

_
-

_
_

_
-

8
_

9
1
8

23
5
18
_

20
1
19
_

71
31
40
2
1

69
23
46

1
2
_
2
11
3

1
3
_
3
22
14

3

7
2
5

-

_
-

-

4
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_
_
4

-

_
~

_
1 “

_
-

]-

_
_
_
-

6
3
_
-

1
3
_
3
11
7
_
-

3

2
2
3
2
1

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
1

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

54
19
35
2
_

31
8
23
o
1

24
4
20
1

22
6
16
1

_

_

2

1

3
2

3

2

2
_
_
1

1
1

_

_

_

_

212
128
84
_
9

127 113
67 42
60 71
2
1
1
5

72
13
59
2
4

_

_

18 106
13
65
5
41
2
_
6

234
153
81

185
120
65

6

6

4
3
1
5
2
3
22
15
7
15
11
4
3

2
2
_
13
4
9
31
20
11
20
7
13
49

7
4
3
35
29
6
41
27
14
19
12
7
2

7
3
4
32
25
7
57
36
21
28
13
15

_
3
_
3
4
4

_
_
_
_

3
2
_

a
20
21
24
13
11
3
16
21

-

1
_
1
_

9
1
8
2

23
7
16
67
13
54
6
9
49
21

_

2
2
_
_

12
2
10
3

39
20
19
163
103
60
21
11
33
32

4
14
33
2

16
6
10
18
4
14
2
3
9

16
3
13
3

4
3
1
222
27
195
28
12
26
61
6
_

1

5
1
4
9
6
3
38
22
16
11
1
10
8

1
15
7
8
30
11
19
18
5
13
1

8
2
6
24
6
18
13
1
12
2

8
4
4
19
5
14
8
3
5

14
5
9

3

3

3

3

_

2
3
1
2
8
_
8
1

2

1
_

1
1
1
_
10
1
9
2
2
_
2

12
2
10

9
2
7

3
1
2

2
_
2
4
_
4
4
4

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

«
.

.
_

_

10
_
10
1

8
_
8
_

11
2
9

3

3

3

3

3

_

_

_

_

3

_

_
_
_
_
1
_
1
_
_
_
2

_
_
_
_
1
_
1
_
_
_
_

_
_

2
_
2

1
_

_
1
_
1
1
_
1
_
_
_
3

1
_
1

2
_
2

4

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
3
3
1

2
_
2

4
4
_

15
6
9

52
30
22

33
23
10

40
26
14

31
17
14

35
14
21

11
1
10

148
37
111
_
1

355
75
280

186
33
153
1
4

142
1
141

30

26

22

9

13

4

3

6

22
2
_

4

3

6
_

1

26
_
1

13

«
.

30
2
1

9

7

287
84
203
2
25

116
7
109

1

144
51
93
1
1

7
3
3
24
16

22
4
1
3
32
34

22
10
6
4
30
59

78
27
20
7
83
98

24
27
11
16
122
14

6
4
2
2
66
20

8
2

4
9

5

2

1

3

7

2

_

9
73
7

5
16
4

2
16
5

1
16
3

3
4
1

7
3
3

2
2
_

_

_
6
_

13
3
10

9
4
5

18
5
13

17
9
8

31
8
23

16
5
11

12
1
11

_
_
1

_

2
54
13

_
_
6
2
4

1

4,
2
2

3

4

_
_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table B-35:

MacUine'uf OtuluAbUM 1/ GotUUtued
-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number

Occupation and sex

wr
o kers

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
hul
ory
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.9C $3.00
e r i g Under 1.00 1.05 1 .10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50
anns
and
and
$
under
2/
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C over

Machinery 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £/: Total............... ...............
Incentive.......... .............
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C i j b .......... ...............
Engine-lathe operators, class C l j& .............
T ling-machine operators, class C y b •....... .
ill
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C 4/b ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C (J & . ................ .
Machine-tool operators, tool room 4 /a ..............
Machinists, production ^/a .........................
............. .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) 4/a .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) 4/a ...
Welders, hand, class A i j b ....................... .
Welders, hand, class B 4/ b ......... ..... .........

616
247
369

$
1.45
1
1.55

-

-

_

_

4
1
3

26
20
6

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

8
-

18
-

62
43
19

72
55
17

2

21
3
3
3
_

5
1
14
2
14

11
18
13
17
_

-

2
-

14
-

5
-

37
-

86
-

53

38

-

-

14
4
,
10

61
41
20

4
2

_
-

2
4
2
-

-

4
-

37
-

60
-

3

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
1

-

2

_
1

-

-

26
13
13

31
10
21

155
42
113

60
/
*
*
■
56

23

4
3
H
3
4

3
5
7
8
3

2
2
5
7
7

11
34
47
48

_
39
2
16

_
18
2
3

2
7
2
_

16
2
4
4
2

_
4
41
-

6
55
6

8
7
11
-

2
19
5
1
25
30
1
16

_
19
15
_
72
49
3
6

2
1
5
_
95
44
8

4
2
9
_
83
101
11

10
4
_
111
89
5

2

_

3

34
14
20

81
34
264
99
99

1.45
1.37
1.5 4
1.50
1.51

a
81
55
464
444
381
40
28

1.40
1.70
1.76
1.25
1.89
1.94
1.92
1.64

421
486

1.19
1.39

13

22
2

16
5

19
6

205
32

47
16

65
50

27
101

2
79

410
11
49

1.38

13

2

5

6

29

13

44

86

1.40

-

-

-

-

1

3

"

15

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

1
-

-

23

13

32

13

32

1

1

20
2
19
7
1
3
4

_
35

14
49

4
42

10

14

16

14

67

33

38

22

10

12

16

14

12

2

3

13

_

_

1

2

4

-

3
-

4
-

23
2
1
47

1

1

11 1 6
2
4
5
26
19
1
2
2
3
2
6
6

12
8

2
1

2
5
3
27
2
3
5
4
1
9
3
2

12
16
2
2

3

2

3
4
_
28
55
8

1
_
11
7
1

_
4
-

_
_
2
3

_
_
_
2

_
_
_
_

Women
Inspectors, class C j j o . ...........................
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4 /b,
..
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C 4/ b .................... .
ng
^oo p //n .t_
Milling-machine operators, class C y b ..........

1

_

j

“

Machine Tools
Men
Assemblers, class A i j b ..................... .....
Assemblers, class B i j b ................ ...... .
Electricians, maintenance i j a . .....................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/b, 5/ ..
Drill-press operators, radial, class A y b ......
Engine-lathe operators, class A i j b .............
Mil 11 fg—^, nVn t p r p v « .y*c ol «ss A 4/b Tt-.TT--T-,t
ra
’
i v * r 3+rr,s
Turret-lathe operators, hand, (including hand
screw machine), class A i j b ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/b, j / • •
>
T t t 1 1 p-Poc0 npn'PnlnT'o
Y»

Engire-lathe operators, class B i j b

P / /h t11 1 1 11 1
..................................

M 1 1 r i£ — r»Vii rt a npovn *f
-f
"T•
c
» /O a c< P
3
/!’* f f t t i i i r t t i i
>
Machine-tool operators, nroduction, class C 4/a, jj/ ..
Tool-and-die makers 4/a ..................... .

See footnotes at end of table.




92
36
10
227
8
17
33

1.92
1.70
1.78
1.8 6
1.72
1.8 2
1.94
1.86

53
121
15
11
31
27
6
32

1.91
1.70
1 r66
1.59
1.74
1.57
1.23
1.99

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3

_

_

_

_

4

3

1
6

1
3

1
2
3

1
2

-

-

5
1
1

2

1
2
1
1

-

4
1
1
1
1

2
1
1

-

5
g
4

6
19
3
1
5
1

4
12

12
1

10
2

8
2
8

_

1
_
_
4

-

-

27
1
2
5
5

19
2
-

8
20
1

8
9
1

3
5
1

3
_

_

_
8

_

3

1
2

■
3

1
2

1

-

2

1
1

2
1

_

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

21
1
3
4

3
_

_

1

_

_

_

_

3

1
/
H1

8
5

/
H

2

2

2

13

8

9

1

2
1

_
-

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

13.

Table B-35:

Machinery HuduAbUeA 1/ - Continued
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
cannng,

A3
9
A7
57
17
61
606
31A
292
66
AO
26
188
A5
25
168
77
91
661
206
A55

*
1.52
1.69
1.71
1.50
1.32
1.15
1.92
1.77
2.C9
1.87
1.81
1.97
1.99
2. CO
2.22
1.92
1.77
2.CA
1.6A
1.A8
1.72
1.81

$
s
$
$
$ $ $ $ s
$ s
$ $ $
$
$
$
nder 1.C0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .A0 1.A5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1 . 8C 1.9C 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2. A0 2.5C 2.60 2.70 2.8C 2.9C 3.00
end
and
under
.00 1.C5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .A0 1.A5 1.50 1.60 1.7C 1.80 1.90 2.0C 2.10 2,20 2,30 2./.0 2,50 2 . 6C 2.70 2.80 2 -Qf 8. nr over

M achine-tool Accessories
Assemblers, class B £/b .................. ........
Electricians, maintenance £ / a ..................
Inspectors, class A £/a ...........................
Inspectors, class B £/a ...........................
Inspectors, class C £/a ...........................
Janitors £ / a .....................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £/: Total .......................... .
T i m e ......................... .
Incentive ......... ...... .......
Engine-lathe operators, class A: Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class A A/a .........
Milling-machine operators, Class A y b ..........
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A i j b ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A: Total ...............
Time .............
Incentive ........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B j / Total ..............................
j:
Time ............................
Incentive .......................
Automatic-lathe operators, class B i j b ..........
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class B l j b ...................... .
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ....
Grinding-machine operators, class B: Total ......
T i m e ....
Incentive
Milling-machine operators, class B i j b ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B £/a ...................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C £/: Total ....................... ......
Time ............................
Incentive .......................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C iJ b . .........................
Grinding-machine operators, class C A/a .........
Milling-machine operators, class C y b .......... .
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) A/a .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops)
...
Stock handlers and truckers, hand A / a ........... .

8

25
89
29
60
273
A9
22A
93
A7
198
123
75
31
17
68
AAA
88
35

1.A5
1.73
1.53
1.82
1.70
1.53
1.73
1.65
1.5A
1.35
1.16
1.66
1.31
1.39
1.A7
1.89
1.89
1.30

27

1.3A

5
1
3
9
3
3
3
2
2

1
7
_
3
3
2
1
-

9
1
8
“
_
1
1
A
1
3
5
1
A 3A 22
A 32 22
2 _ 12 _
1 7
2 -

1
1
A5
2A
21
2
1
2
2
11
2
9
6
6
31
29
2
8
1
1A

1
1
37
17
20

6

A

3

-

1

6

11
-

-

-

- - - 1 1
6 20
- - - - - -

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

“

-

1

"
-

“
“
-

-

“
“
-

-

-

-

22
20
2
2
2
1

3

-

3

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
3
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

"
“
A 5 12
- 1 A
A A 8
~ “
_
A 2
- 2
- - 5 5
- 1 3
- A 2
” A A

2

-

-

2
11

6
1
8
8
A
A
2
2
2

3

1A
1
16
16

2
1
16

88
68
20
3
2
1
17
1
3
9 36
A 2A
5 12
99 13A
A6 A3
53 91
1 9
19 19
1A 9
5 10
38 67
7 20
31 A7
18
5
6 9
61
3
61 3
6
A0 2
7
25
1 7
1 1

-■
58
A7
11
16
15
1
11
1
1
16
1A
2

5
3
A 17
3
A AA
A 33
- 11
2
2
- 12
1
-

2 2 66 A3
3A 20
32 23
1 ~
_ 7 3
3 3 10
6
3 3 A
12 19 13
3 3 2
9 16 11
5
“ 9
A 5 A
7 9
5
7 9
5
_ 3 _
: 3
5
6 1 13

A8
11
37
1
1
1
20
5
15
11
9

2
5
9

3

101
69
32
16
16
A0
10
22
12
10
36
5
31
-

86
A7
39
5
3
2
28
6
S
18
9
9
57
57
-

67 A0 31
26 6 6
A1 3A 25
10 3 A
A
6 3 A
20 18 12
11 9
5
1 2 2A 7 10
11 _ 3
13 7 7
10 1A 9
10 1A 9
2 2

15
15
1
1
2
_
2
9
9
8
8
-

17
_
17
1
1
8
1
5
5
12
12
-

1
1
1A
2
12
12

9
9
3A
3A
2

5
5
1
1
2

2
2
9
9
3

3
3
A
A
1

6
6
3
3
3

3

-

_

1
1
3
3
3

- 6
1A _
6
1A _
_
8 2
_
2 2 _
2 -

2
2
2
2
-

_
3
3

-

-

-

9
2
7

2
2

3
3

_
6
_
1
2
2

_
_
_
2

_
1

-

2
2

_
-

A 3
A 3

7
7
1
1
1
_
3
2
2
6
6

_
-

_
-

_

_
_

_
6
6

_

_

-

-

-

-

72
26

95
10

83 111
8
26

28

11

3

A

A

2
3

_ _
_

_

_
_

..

_
_
-

Women
Inspectors, class C A/*b........................ .

See footnotes at end of table.




“

-

3

-

-

1A

-

-

u.

Table B-35:

Number Average
of
workers earnings

Occupation and sex

2/

MacUimn^ OuduAttUeA 1/ . Continued
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

$

$

s
$
s
$
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Jnder 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
and
*
and
under
L.00 1.05 1.10
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.6C 2.70 2.30 2.90 3.00 over

Machine-tool Accessories - Continued
Jobbing Shoos
Men
Inspectors, class A 4/a ...........................
Janitors L J a .......... ................ ..........
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/a, £/ ..
Engine-lathe operators, class A i j a . .............
Grinding-machine operators, class A £/a .........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A L J b . ...................
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/a> 2/ ••
Engine-lathe operators, class B 4/a .............
Grinding-machine operators, class B 4/a .........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B 4/ a ................ .
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4/a*
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class C l j a .
Tool-and-die makers 4/a ............

5/ ••
.....................................
.........................

12
30
258
37
66

*
1.70
1.10
1.77
1.81
1.87

68
153
29
25

1.77
1.47
1.53
1.60

16
84

1.54
1.21

18
444

1.22
1.89

43
9
35
31
348
29
122
25

1.52
1.69
1.72
1.19
2.04
1.95
2.05
2.22

100
508
60
248

2.01
1.70
1.82
1.71

3

6

54
2
-

41
15
7

48
13
23

24
24
9
10

8
8

9
5

3
11

-

-

2

3

9

-

2

3
2

2

4

29
8

9
6
1

4
38
14
6

1

2

6

“

7

25

6
1

3

5
_

14
1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

22

14

31

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

16

2
8

2
7

3
3

2

10

2

-

20

4

4

5

95

-

_

_

_

_

2

3

-

_

-

-

_

2

_

_

11

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
_
_

7
1
1
3

7

_

3

2

4
1

1
2

3

2
6
_

9

11

83

111

28

-

3

3

72

6

3

23
4
5

2

3

3

44
3
15

Production Shoos
Men
Assemblers, class B L j b ...........................
Electricians, maintenance
Inspectors, class A 4/a ...........................
Janitors 4A
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4/b» 2/
Engine-lathe operators, class A 4 / b
Grinding-machlne operators, class A 4/ b
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A 4/b ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A 4/ b
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/b, 2/ ••
Engine-lathe operators, class B L j b ........... ..
Grinding-machine operators, class
4/b .........
Milling-machine op>erators, class B L j b ..........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class
4/ b ................ .
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4/b, 1 / ••
Milling-machine operators, class C 4/b ..........

£/a .........................................
.........................................................................
••
........... *............
..................
.....................................
B

B

Stock handlers and truckers, hand 4/a

...............*...........

87

31
114
68
88
28

5

5
1

1
_

-

16
-

-

1

4

17

-

-

-

-

-

1.67

-

-

-

1.54
1.45
1.47
1.89
1.29

_
-

-

_
-

2
2

-

—

2

1

2

_

4

5

-

-

-

5
-

_

2

10
2
4

4

8
2
6

6

9
1
4

3
1
6

3

1
3
2

1
23
2
11

3
4
23
14

1

-

1

1
23
3
12

6
2

-

13

6
2
2

2
35
3
19

6
2
6
3

-

-

_
34
4
12

5
3
5
5

2
1
13

2
5
3

3

15
2
4

34
1
17
3

17
1
4
1

53
3
17

44
6
15
1

37
3
15
2

25
4
9

_

15
1
2
2

17
1
8

14

-.

42
2
13
8

_

8
2

5
61
5
32

12
110
10

8
40
1

13
31
1

9
57
9

13
10
5

7
14
2

7
9
1

9
8
3

5
12
6

2
4
2

18

4
61
40
1

57

15 12 34
5 11 12 2

9
3
2
7

1
2

9
3

3
3

4
1

4

_

3
3

2

3

_

_

_

6

2

_
.
.

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

_

2
«
.
.
.

_

6

26

10

8

26

3

3

"

1 / The study covered establishm ents with more than 20 workers engaged in n o n -electrica l machinery in d u stries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial C la ssific a tio n Manual (1945 ed ition ) prepared
by the Bureau of the Budget; m achine-tool accessory establishm ents (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were included. In addition to the Hartford M etropolitan area, th is survey included the New B ritain B risto l M etropolitan area con sistin g of B erlin, B r isto l, New B ritain , P la in v ille , Plymouth and Southington.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Includes data for machine-tool accessories (Group 3543) and m achine-tool (Group 3541) establishm ents for which separate data are presented.
i j In su fficien t data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly in cen tive workers.
2 / Includes data for operators of other machine to o ls in addition to those shown separately.




15,

Table B-5A52:

*

y

2

1.49
1.47
1.34
1.31
1.25
1.23

16

8

28

9
8
6

Average
earnings

Occupation 2/

S

4
1
1

2

55.00

wholesale:

60.00

$
74.00
99.50

167
25

2

84.00

3

5
2
6
6
5
1

2
1

5
1
11

1
3

-

5

7
1
-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

& .0

75.00

65.00 fa,

65.00 70.00 75.00

-

1

-

-

1
4

-

-

2
_

-

-

-

-

-

1
_

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

*fo.<

90.00

95.00 100.0C 105.00 110.0C 115.00

85.00 90.00 95.00

105.00

125.00 130100

125JOO 130.00 135.00

32

23

74.00

40

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

50.00 55.00
and
under

Routemen (driver-salesmen), retail:
5- day workweek ................
6-day workweek ................
Routemen (driver-salesmen)
5-day workweek ......
6-day workweek ......

under

1.20 1.25

$
1.30

15

Filling-machine tenders ....................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........ .
Pasteurizers.............................
Refrigerator men ..........................
Truck drivers, heavy (over A tons, other than
trailer type) ...........................
Washers, bottle, machine ................. .
Washers, can, machine .....................

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Average
earnings

of

Occupation 2/

jb e a le M l/

5

3

15

5

1

1
3

4

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

1/ The study covered milk dealer establishments with more than 20 workers (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) pre­
pared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all occupations were paid on a time basis.
11/ Straight-time earnings. (Includes commission earnings.)

9

Table B-63:

A v e :R A C E
Occupation

and

of

sex

h

2/
$

G&WlleSU' U

A 44A G *U > C

‘

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

1$

$

$

$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00
45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 110.00 12a 00 $>
130.00
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.OC 110.00 120.00 i3aoo o v e r

W eekly
W eekly U n d e r
earnin g s
h ou rs
(S ta n d ard ) (S ta n d ard ) *

r
142.50

and
under

Men

Clerks,

accounting

Clerks,

actuarial

Clerks,

file,

class

Section

heads

............. ......................... .

..................................
...................................

Tabulating-machine
Underwriters

B .....................................................................
operators

...................

....................................................................................................

161
19
43
95
76

571

37 .0
37.5
3 7 .0
37.0
37.0
37.0

$

59.00
69.00
39.00
86.00
54.00
77.50

_

2

_

9

10

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

47

60
2
7

48
12
17

108
27
68

1

2
1
22

-

7

_

_
5

2

6

-

-

-

5
25
2
71
8
52
1

8
21
5
92
11
53

6

9

5

9

4
8
1

2
5
2
"

6
3

4
1

9

11
14

4

6
27
4
1
32
26
10
31
15
37

5

22
1
10
25

52
2
1
15
60

19

19

1

4
6

7

2

8
1

8
3

1
2

*“

~

“

13

17

7

5

5

12

2

2

53

31

24

35

39

50

29

3

_

1

-

-

9
10
57

5
77

28

14
4

7
7

27
23
19
16
10

11
16
8

9
23

3

2

19

9

29

2
11

5

2

11
5
69

“

4
-

Women

Assemblers

..............................................

............................. .
B ...................
.................................. .
......................................... .
................................................
......................
B ..........................................
..................................................

Clerks,

accounting

Clerks,

actuarial

Clerks,

file,

Clerks,

underwriters

Key-punch
Section

Stenographers

Tabulating-machine
Typists,

class

Underwriters

..........

class

operators

heads

......................

................................

ooerators

39
277
59
476
219
458
112
209

99

883
51

37.0
37.5
37.5
3 7.0
37.0
37.0
37 .0
37.0
3 7.5
37.0
36.5

42.50
45.00
50.50
36.00
46.50
42.00
65.00
47.00
47.00
42.00
63.00

-

-

6

_
-

-

5

133

87

-

10
128

9

28
10
61
32
71

-

28
12
184
1

6
17
7
28
14
60
3
28

26
5
7
14
43
1
34

84

71

5

'

9

2

5

1
31
6
15
22
9

33

19
47
10

8

53

7

6
7

4

7

1

_

2

5

1

1

1

1

2

-

"

1/ The study covered insurance carriers (Group 6?) with more than 20 employees, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees
their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




receive

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

.

C: Union Wage Scale
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)
Table C-15»

Table c-205*

BtUldUuj, Qondtbuction

Journeymen
Bricklayers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carpenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electricians....................... . . .........................
Plast erers T
1.T. TT__T. . . . . . TT. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plumbers tTTrTrTTT. T- . . T- .- TTT. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Steamfitters ...............................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

#2.750
2.325
2.625
2.750
2.500
2.700

40
40
40
40
40
40

Table c-205* B a h e iie l
October 1, 1951
Classification
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
Foremen....................................................
Second hands, dough mixers,
oven hands.................................. .
Bench hands .............................................
Helpers (male)
••••••••••••
Frosters (female)
Agreement B:
Foremen .............................. ...............
Second hands • •• •...•• •• • ..........••••••
Bench hands.............................................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Working foremen:
Rate A .................................................
Rate B ••»••••.••••••••.........
Mixers.......................................................
Divider operators, ovenmen,
relief men....................................
Ingredient scalers, assistant mixers,
bench hands, peel ovenmen ...............
Molder operators................................. .
Oven feeders, machine wrappers,
molder helpers, oven dumpers ..........
Floor men............... ................................
Dough room helpers, flour dumpers ...
Pan rackers, pan greasers, machine
packers, bread rackers .....................
Helpers (general) cleaners, pans, etc
Agreement B:
Foremen .....................................................
Mixers (bread) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ovenmen, dividers, mixers (cake) . ..
Bench leaders, assistant mixers . .. .
Bench hands, scalers ..........................
Wrappers (female) ...........................
Mixers' helpers ....................................
Frosters (female) ................................




Table C-4-1:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

#1.621
1.533
1.434
1.163
1.092
1.943
1.781
1.677

48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

1.595
1.520
1.570
1.510
1.495
1.470
1.410
1.395
1.370
1.360
1.295
1.825
1.660
1.560
1.510
1.460
1.435
1.390
1.180

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48

Classification
Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement C:
Mixers......................................................
Doughnut and muffin mixers................
Ingredient scalers (bread) .................
Bench hands, fermentation room
men, flour dumpers .............................
Holders, proofers, pan greasers, oven
feeders and dumpers (bread), ovenmen (cake) ................................ ..........
Divider operators, muffin deposit
and grlddlernsn ................................ .
Bread wrappers, selectors,
general helpers (cake) .....................
Pie and pastry shops:
Agreement A:
Bakers, cooks ..........................................
Dough mixers ...........................................
Bakers' helpers, cooks' helpers ........
Wrappers, packers (female) .................
Agreement B:
Mixers ........................................... .
Ovenmen .....................................................
Ingredient scalers ................................
Wrapping machine-operators,
bench hands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helpers (general) label-machine
operators, selectors .........................

October 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,785
1.610
1.560
1.535

40
40
40
40

1.525
1.510
1.460

40
40
40

1.360
1.310
1.260
1.010
1.720
1.600
1.585
1.535
1.460

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,750
2.320
2.133
2.027
2.187
2.027
1.787

40
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

2.493
2.576
2.546
2.627

37*
37*

Table C-27: P A d u tin C j,
October 1, 1951
Classification
Book and job shops:
Compositors, hand; machine operators ...
Pressmen, cylinder:
Two-color .................................................
Small........................................................
Medium, vertical ....................................
Large, 41-inch......................................
Pressmen, platen:
Automatic.................................................
Hand fed ............. ....................................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand; machine operators:
Day work ............... ..................................
Night work ...............................................
Machine tenders:
Day work .................................................
Night work ...............................................

J lo c a l

O pekatinf Cmptosfeed

October 1, 1951

January 2, 1952
Classification

Baheiied - Continued.

m

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

First 3 months ................................................... $1,610 40
3 to 12 months................................................. . 1.640 40
1.680 40
After 1 year............................................

Table C-A2:

M e to b ts U ic Ji 3>bii4ebd
<+ nd tJfe lp & iA .

October 1, 1951
Classification
Bakery (biscuits) .............................................
Building:
Construction:
Heavy duty trailer:
Up to 40 tons ....................
40 tons and over.............................
Helpers ................................................
Platform trucks, ready mix .................
Dump trucks:
Under 10 tons ....................................
10 tons and over ..............................
Pick-up trucks .....................................
Material........................., ........................
Helpers...............................................
Food products:
Agreement A ...................................................
Agreement B ...................................................
Helpers .....................................................
Agreement C ............................................. .
Helpers .....................................................
Fuel:
Drivers ......................................................
Helpers ..........................................................
General hauling:
Platform, dump trucks, and heavy-duty
trailers up to 20 tons:
Drivers .....................................................
Helpers .....................................................
Heavy-duty trailers,
20 tons and over:
Drivers....................................................
Helpers .....................................................
General transportation:
Drivers ................. ..................................... .
Helpers ................................................. .

Rate Hours
per per
hour week
$1,485 48
1.650
1.700
1.500
1.600
1.500
1.600
1.500
1.430
1.300
1.400
1.350
1.300
1.050
.950
1.375
1.265

40
40
40
40
40 ‘
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.500 44
1.400 44
1.650
1.400
1.470
1.370

44
44
48
48

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17,

D: Entrance Rates
Table D-l:

M in im u m

Minimum rate (in cents)
All establishments ............
60 or under .........................
7 0 ..........................................
Over 70 and under 75 ........
7 5 ..........................................
8 0 .................................
Over 80 and under 85 ........
85 ..........................................
Over 85 and under 90 ........
9 0 .........................................
Over 90 and under 95 ........
95 .........................................
Over 95 and under 100 ... .
10 0 ........................................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
10 5........................................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
n o ........................................
Over HO and under n 5 ...
n s ........................................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
12 0........................................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
Over 135 and under HO ...
Over 145 and under 150 ...
1 5 0 ........................................
Establishments with no
established
... .

C n ts u zH O e P & ta i j o * P la n t W a ftk a A i 1/

Percent of plant workers in establishments
An
with specified minimum rates in industries
Manufac­ Public Wholesale Retan Services
2/
turing utilities* trade trade
100,0
0.5
.2
.2
11.6
1.5
1.6
2.3
.7
3.5
7.7
2.0
.6
10.0
3.0
21.4
2.4
4.6
.8
1.4
8.8
2.5
.2
1.0
.1
.1

100.0

100.0

7.6
1.5
2.7
.9
3.2
10.4
2.7
.7
12.0
3.5
28.7
3.2
4.4
.9
1.8
11.4
2.4
_
-

29.4
_
_
1.0
24.9
_
5.0
_
20.6
2.8
-

100.0 100.0 100.0
3.9
0.4
1.3.
4.6
3.2 34.3 24.2
.
2.4
5.9
.1
5.7
1.9
.6
4.0
2.5
6.3
_
_
_
4.0
12.0
4.0
2.0
_
2.0
2.2
1.6
.8
3.8
.9
4.5
2.3
4.5
3.9
_
8.2
_
•
2.8
-

n.3

2.0

16.3

46.5

40.3

52.4

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant work­
ers, other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tili­
ties.




E: Supplementary Wage Practices
Table E-l:

'Shift differential

S Ju ^ t ^ b i^ e ^ n tu U P tU M tiA iO H A

Percent of
1Ol
manufticturing
indue-tries 1/
2d 3d or
shift other
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
an establishments .................................. 20.3
Receiving shift differentials ............ 19.4
Uniform cents (per hour) ............... 16.2
Under 5 cen ts............. ...............
.2
5 cents ..........................................
Over 5 and under 10 cents ........
.9
10 cents ........................................ U .8
Over 10 cents ..............................
.3
Uniform percentage .......................... 3.2
5 percent ......................................
.3
Over 5 and under 10 percent ...
10 percent .................................... 2.2
Over 10 percent ...........................
.7
Other j j .............................................
Receiving no shift differential ........
.9

5.5
.6
.3
(2/)
.2
.1
.4
.1
.3
4.5
.4

plant workers employed on each shift in Machinery 2/ Machine tools Machine-tool
accessories
3d or
2d other 2d 3d or 2d 3d or
shift shift shift other shift other
shift
shift
17.5
17.3
10.9
1.3
9.3
.3
6.4
.1
5.4
.9
.2

4.1
4.1
.7
.1
.6
3.4
1.7
1.7
-

16.4
15.9
15.9
15.9
.5

_
_
-

19.0
17.9
12.8
12.8
5.1
.8
(2/)
4.3
1.1

0,4
.4
.4
.4
_
-

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Includes establishments producing machine tools and machine-tool accessories also shown separately.
2 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
i j Includes plans providing a full day’s pay for reduced hours in addition to premium pay; details
omitted to avoid disclosure of individual company practices.
Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18,

Table E-2:

Weekly hours
All establishments ......................................
Under 35 hours •••••....................................
35 hours .........................................................
Over 35 and under 37$- hours .....................
37$- hours......................................................
Over 37$- and under 40 hours.................
40 hours .........................................................
Over 40 and under 44 hours.......................
44 hours ........................................................
Over 44 end under 4& hows .......................
48 hours.............................................. .
50 hours ...............................................
Over 50 hours .......................................................................

S ch ed u led Ttfj&eJzlif JfoufiA

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS l /
All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

lOQsSL, . 100_,0. „
.
(2/)
0.1
2.7
17.0
37.1
1.6
4.2
7.9
27.8
50.5
.
2
1.2
.1
9.7
39.9
-

ioo,p_
.
-

-

Wholesale
trade

100.0 _
7.2
4.1
17.2
3.6
64.0
1.0
2.9
-

-

99.5
-.5
-

EMPLOYED IN—

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance**

Services

100.0
_
3.9
27.8
56.9
3.5
7.9

100.0. _
.
1.0
19.9
.
5
61.5
2.5
14.0
-

2.6
17.9
32.4
4.0
41.1
2.0
-

-

-

.
6

-

-

-

All
in d ^ rie s

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

_loo*Q.. ....IfifitO . .. -iPfifP
(2/)
2.1
2.8
.1
.1
.1
37.7
73.7
30.3
.
5
2.5
3.5
15.6
13.4
15.8
30.3
37.3
2.2
1.0
1.5
11.0
13.0
5.5

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Se

ices

. 100.0
0.1
-

-

2.1

39.1
2.0
9.6
23.9
8.7
7.7
6.8

- .1C0.0

60.5
1.1
11.2

.
3.6
3.4
49.1
6.2
13.6
9.2

6.0
8.6
8.0

4.6

9.9

-

5.0

'

i/
2/
2/
*
**

Data relate to women workers.
Inoludes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3*

Paid iJhlidaAfl

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —
Number of paid holidays

All
industries

iOQtfi.,.,, ......100*0

All establishments ................
Establishments providing paid
holidays .....................
1 to 5 days ........... .......
6 days ......................
6$- days .....................................................
7,days......................
7 - days.....................
$
8 days.................... .
9 days..... ................ .......................
10 days ....................................................
1 $ days................................................
0-

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

99.8
.4
16.1

99.7
.
3
53.2

11 days .....................................................
1 $ days...................................................
5-

3.9
49.4
3.9
4.1
5.8
-

42.1
4.1
-

Establishments providing no paid
holidays.............. ...... .

.
2

100.0

Wholesale
trade
-

100.0
100.0
_

8.3

11.9
79.8
-

27.7
.7
52.0

-

-

.3

g/
*
**

(2/)
16.0
•2

-

8.6
7.2
3.8

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), connnunicat ion, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Retail trade
100*0__
98.5
5.3
25.5

-

59.3
2.4

-

2.0
4.0

-

1.5

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —
Finance**

.... m

,Q

,

100.0
_

-

78.6
5.7
6.6
9.1
-

Services

All
inc^is^ries

. JLDO.C.....

100.0

- 100.0

95.6

91.3

1.9
20.8

15.8
-

20.2
23.3

2.2
-

2.7
43.9

(2/)
37.9
5.7
.
5

11.4
-

-.3
•2
.1

4.4

8.7

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

8ervioes

_100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.1

90.4

90.8

83.5

48.9

2.2
52.7

«.

10.0
27.7
1.3
30.1

4.0
17.9

2.5
9.0

-

58.2

18.5

5.1
9.6
7.0

2.0
1.0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

37.1
3.1
.
-

22.9

-

-

-

4.9

9.6

9.2

14.1
53.4
-

_
_

~
-

_
•4

16.5

-

9.9
1.9
1.9
5.2
51.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table E-4:
Vacation policy

All establishments ........................................

PcUd Qj/Cvc&Uattl {fyokmal PaovM ohA)

PEECENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I N Services

All
imjju^tries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

200.0

IC O rf)

100.0

_100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
«
.
3.2
_
96.8

100.0

97.5
.3
73.5
6.4
17.3

97.4

100.0

89.7

82.4
8.6
6*4

41.6
58*4

35.0
54.7

97.7
1.9
46.6
49.2

100.0
_
66.0
_
34.0

2.5

2.6

-

10.3

2.3

-

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

120*0....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9

99.7

100.0
_
22.7
77.3
-

•98.8
_
17.6
81.2
-

100.0
_
31.4
68.6

-

-

1.2

-

All
industries

1 rear of serrtss
Establishments with paid vacations . . . . « •
Under 1 week .............................................
1 week............ .. ......................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................
2 weeks...................................... .......................
3 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 3 weeks ...................................................................
Establishments with no paid vacations....

6.9
.5
92.3
.1
.1
.1

6.5
2.1
91.1
-

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations..........
1 week .........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..................... ..
2 weeks....................................................
3 weeks .......................................................
Over 3 weeks ........................................... ..
Establishments with no paid vacations ...

99.9
3.6
.5
95.6
.1
.1
.1

99.7
2.8
2.1
94.8
“
.3

100.0
11.1
•
88.9
-

100.0
9.7
90.3
-

100.0
2.6
97.4
-

100.0
3.2
96.8
-

100.0
12.5
3.3
69.8
4.4
10.0
-

97.7
26.1
26.2
45.4

97.4
26.2
35.1
36.1

100.0
23.7
76.3

94.8
27.4
•
67*4

98.4
16.6
_
81.8

100.0
57.0
2.8
40.2

2.3

2.6

-

5.2

1.6

-

1 JQftJTft .C-garviga
Establishments with paid vacations ••••••
1 week......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......................
2 weeks .......................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......................
3 weeks .......................................................
Over 3 weeks .............................................
Establishments with no paid vacations . ..

99.9
3.1
(2/)
66.8
27.8
2.1
.1
.1

99.7
2.2
_
97.5
.3

100.0
1.6
98.4
-

100.0
6.8
93.2
-

100.0
2.6
96.3
1.1
-

100.0
3.2
49.3
44.3
3.2
-

100.0
6.6
3.3
54.6
21.1
4.4
10.0
-

97.7
10.8
8.6
77.6
.1
.6

97*4
8.5
11.4
77.5

100.0
11.9
88.1
-

94.8
20.4
_
74.4
-

-

“

2.3

:
2.6

98.4
13.2
_
81.9
3.3

-

5.2

1.6

15 vears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ..........
1 week .........................................................
2 weeks .......................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.......................
3 weeks.......................................................
Over 3 weeks ..............................................
Establishments with no paid vacations ••••

99.9
3.1
58.5
21.6
13.6
3.1
.1

99.7
2.2
95.8
1.6
.1

100.0
1.6
7.4
91.0
-

100.0
6.8
82.2
11.0
-

100.0
2.6
92.2
—
5.2

100.0
3.2
42.2
33.7
16.1
4.8
-

100 .0
6.6
40.7
21.1
21.6
10.0
-

97.7
10.6
77.9
2.5
6.7

97.4
8.5
84.9
3.2
.8

100.0
11.9
9.2
—
78.9

94.8
11.7
69.1
14.0

98.4
13.2
74.5
10.7

100.0
33 .4
51.2
1.9
13.5

2.3

2.6

-

5.2

1.6

-

-

.3

.3

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Zj
2/




-

-

17.2
_
68.4
4.4
10.0

-

-

-

«.

100.0
33.4
2.8
58.7
1.9
3.2
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table E-5*
Provisions for paid sick leave
All establishments
1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................................
Under 5 days............................................ ,
5 days .......................................................
6 days........................................................
10 days ......................................................
11 days ......................................................
12 days ......................................................
15 days......................................................
16 days ......................................................
20 days......................................................,
24 days......................................................
30 days ......................................................,
Over 30 days.............................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................................
2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................................ .

Ttader 5 d a y s ........................ .
5 days ...............................
6 d a y s ............................... .
10 days .............................. .
12 d a y s .............................. .
16 d a y s .............................. .
20 d a y s .............................. .
d a y s ............................ .
days ..............................
25 days ..............................
30 d a y s ...........................
Over
d a y s ........................ .

22

2k

30

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................................ .
5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................................
3 days .. ...........................

5 days ...............................
6 days ...............................
10 days ..............................
12 days .............................. .

16 days ...... ........................ .
22 days ............................
days ..............................

2k

30 days ..................................................
Over 30 d a y s ....................... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................................
1/
2/
*
**

P a id B ic+ k Jl& avue

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.1
(2/)
10 .k
.8
7 .4
3.0
2.0
.1
6.6
.1
4 .4
(2 /)
64.9

69.2
35.2
2.4
25.6

16.1
.2
9.6
1.9
4.4

18.4
9.4
5.2

35.0
17.4
12.9
2.6
2 .1

23.2

23.5
4.1
4 .4
5.0

6.8
2.3
.3
.8
1.8
.6
.1
.2
.1
_
.6
93.2

1.5

1.0
1.0

17.6
6.1
4.5

34.1
16.0
.8
11.7
4.6
1.0

9.1
3.4
2 .5

3.2

36.1
(2/)
11.5
.8
6.6
1.3
Q
.8
3.0
1.5
4.0
6.3
(2/)
63.9

69.2

36.1
(2/)
11.5
.8
6.6
1.3
.3
3.0
.1
2.0
10.5
63.9

-

1.1
3.6
1.2
.1
30.8

-

35.3
2 .4
25.6
i X
JL. n
-

-

-

_

-

-

3.8
_

-

-

-

-

-

9.0
6.6
-

-

_

10.0
_

-

76.8

76.5

49.9
.2
43.4
1.9
4.4

18.4
9.4
5.2

35.0

23.2

17.4

23.5
4.1
4.4
5.0

-

_
-

_
-

-

*

3.8
_

69.2
35.3
2 .4
25.6

49.9
.2
43.4
1.9
4.4

18.4
9.4
5.2

1.2
3.6
30.8

-

4.8
2.8

65.0

81.6

-

-

81.6

50.1

1.1

-

-

83.9

3.5
1.2
.1
30.8

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

50.1

-

-

-

_
-

65.0

76.8

76.5

8.2
2.3
1.7
.8
.1
2.3
.2
.1
.1
.6
91.8

35.0
17.4

23.2

15.6

.5
4.8
2.3
15.1
76.8

23.5
4.1
4 .4
5.0

8.2
1.7
1.7
1 .4
.1
2.3

-

-

15.6

_
-

-

2 .0
-

-

-

, ---

3.8
81.6

2.0
65.0

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication,and other public utilities,
Finanoe, insurance, and real estate.




( ^ m a l PA o aU iotU )
fyo

-

-

-

.5
1.2
4.8
2.3
5.0
9 .4

-

_
-

10.0

-

10.0
-

-

76.5

-

.7

-

-

_
_

_

.8
98.5

1.5
-

-

.7

-

_
-

-

.8
98.5

1.5
•

-

.7

-

-

-

-

.1
.9
91.8

-

.8

98.5

-

-

-

-

-

_

7.0

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

-

99.0

82.4

65.9

90.9

30.4
1.0
29.4

17.6
6.1
4.5

34.1
16.0
.8

9 .1

-

_
-

-

7.0
-

-

16.3
-

_

3.4
2.5

_
_
-

3.2

_
-

-

69.6

82.4

65.9

90.9

30.4
1.0
29.4

17.6
•
6.1
4.5

34.1
11.5
.8
4.5
16.3

9.1

-

69.6

_
-

-

-

-

7.0
82.4

1.0
-

-

-

-

1.0
65.9

_
-

-

-

3.4
2.5
-

3.2
-

90.9

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

21

Table E-6s ftQ .H fLM ulu& U 04l Bo4U 4A& i
Type of bonus
All establishments ......................................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ ............... ................................
Christmas or year-end..........................
Profit-sharing.....................................
Other ..........................................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses....................
1/
2/
*
**

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

A ±/y Manufacturing
U _

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

industries

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

40.8

5.6
5.6
-

57.6
42.0

“

70.8
68.2
2.6
-

19.9
13.3
6.6

24.7
24.7
-

77.4
75.1
1 .6
.7

86.2

35.7
.8
4.3

88.8
87.1
.9
.8

1.3
.9

4.3
4.3
-

59.2

11.2

94.4

42.4

29.2

80.1

75.3

22.6

13.8

95.7

1 5 .6

8 4 .0

Public
utilities *

..

Wholesale
trade

12& 0

Retail trade

Services

_ .100,0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

42.8
32.0

40.2
40.2

-

73.3
71.1
2.2
-

57.2

26.7

59.8

1 0 .8

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7* OntnAanae. and PanUan P lant.
Type of plan
All establishments..............................••••
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 7 j ......................................
Life insurance ............................
Health insurance ................................
Hospitalization ......................................
Retirement pension ..............................
Establishments with no insurance
or pension plans.....................................
1/
2/
*
*#

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Manufacturing

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

AU
i
industries ± / Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0 . 100.0

100.0

95.7
93.2
65.7
66.9
73.1

97.6
94.3
78.8
84.1
36.2

93.9
93.5
71.3
36.5
73.7

78.1
75.3
49.6
40.7
17.5

84*2
60.6
42.3
25.2
52.9

97.2
97.2
63.6
67.3
92.6

78.7
62.0
36.8
36.3
51.2

87.5
77.8
64.6
67.1
32.6

91.2
84.6

4.3

2.4

6.1

21.9

15.8

2.8

21.3

12.5

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Public
utilities*

All
industries

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

74.1
80.3
29.7

85.6
84.0
65.5
50.8
52.8

78.9
70.2
41.0
49.3
20.5

80.6
53.6
32.9
18.6
49.7

54.4
40.2
19.0
26.6
11.6

8.8

14.4

21.1

19.4

45.6

Occupational Wage Survey, Hartford, Conn., October ±951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

,

22

Appendix — Scope ar

With the exception of the union soale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations i (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A). The covered industry groupings are t manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), oosmnmication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions o As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses end incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioe olerioal, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wags practices refers to all offioe
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offioes (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question,except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table sumnarizing scheduled weekly hours • Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may he smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

23

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN
HARTFORD, CONN, 1/ AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF IABOR STATISTICS, OCTOBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establi shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions......................................
Manufacturing...................................
Nonmanufacturing................................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities...................................
Wholesale trade...............................
Retail trade..................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate...........
Services 2 / ...................................

21
21
21

639
207
432

174
49
125

120,169
72,357
47,812

81,447
50,616
30,831

20,519
4,859
15,660

21
21
21
21
21

35
94
171
63
69

19
29
33
19
25

5,033
3,916
14,443
20,387
4,033

4,474
1,372
7,568
15,336
2,081

740
234
950
13,563
173

21
2/ 21
21

31
97
7

12
40
6

17,401
30,398
717

15,340
24,714
688

14,177
2,062
55

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 4 / ..........
Insurance carriers.................................
Machinery industries................ ..............
Milk dealers.......................................

1/ Hartford Metropolitan Area (city of Hartford and towns of Avon, Bloomfield, East Hartford, Farmington, Glastonbury, Manchester, Newington,
Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, West Hartford, Wethersfield and Windsor).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non-profit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included. In addition to the Hartford Metropolitan
Area, machinery surveys included the New Britain-Bristol Metropolitan Area, consisting of Berlin, Bristol, New Britain, Plainville, Plymouth,
and Southington.

fd




24.

Index
Page
number
A s s e m b l e r (insurance carriers) ......... ...... .................
15
Assem b l e r (machinery) .............................................11,12,13,1**
A utomatic-lathe o p erator (machinery) ...........................
11>13
B e n c h hand (bakeries)
.................... ...................
16
Biller, m a chine
..............................................
3, 4
3, 4
Bookkeeper, hand ..................................................
Bookkeep i n g - m a c h i n e operator ........... .................. .
4
B r i c k l a y e r (building construction)
..........
16
Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r ....... ....... ......... ...... ..
4
Car p e n t e r (building construction) ............ ............. .
16
7
Carpenter, m a i ntenance ........
C l e a n e r ...... ............................. .................. .
9
Clerk, acco u n t i n g ........................................ .........
3, 4
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g (insurance carriers)
15
15
Clerk, act u a r i a l (Insurance carriers) ......................... .
Clerk, f i l e ........................................................
3, I
f
Clerk, file (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ..... .......... ...............
15
Clerk, g e n e r a l ..... ........................ .......................
3, 5
Clerk, o r d e r ........... ............................................
3, 5
3, 5
Clerk, p a y r o l l ......... ....................................
Clerk, u n d e r w r i t e r (insurance carriers) ........................
15
Compositor, hand (printing) .................... ...... •••••••••
16
Crane operator, electric bridge .................................
9
D r a f t s m a n ..........................................
7
Drill-press oper a t o r (machinery) ................................
11,12,13
D u p l i cating-machine o p e r a t o r ..... .......... ....................
3* 5
E l e c t r i c i a n (building construction) .......................... .
16
Electrician, maintenance ............................
7
Electrician, m a i n tenance (machinery) ........................
11,12,13,14
Engine-lathe o p erator (machinery) .......................
1 1 , 1 2,13,14
Engineer, stationary ...................................
7
Filling-machine ten d e r (milk d ealers) ........ .......... .
15
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .................. ................. .
7
F r o s t e r (bakeries) ............ ......... .......... .......... .
16
Grinding-machine o p erator (machinery) .......................
1 1 , 12,13,14
G u a r d ........................................ ......................
9
H e l p e r (bakeries) ......................
16
......................
16
Helper, m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r
Helper, trades, m a i ntenance ................... ..................
8
Inspector (machinery) ....................................
11,12,13,14
J a n i t o r ...... .................. ................. ......... .
9
J a n i t o r (machinery) .....
11,13*14
K e y - p u n c h o p e r a t o r ........................
5
Key - p u n c h o p e rator (insurance carriers) ...................
15
Mac h i n e op e r a t o r (printing) ....... . ............ ......... ......
16
M a chine tender (printing)
....................... .....
16
M a c h i n e - t o o l operator, p r o d u c t i o n (machinery) ..........
1 1,12,13*1^
M a c h i n e - t o o l operator, tool r o c © ................... ............
8
M a c h i n e - t o o l operator, tool r o o m ( m a c h i n e r y ) ..... ........... .
12
Machinist, maintenance ............................................
8
Machinist, p r o d u c t i o n (machinery) ...................
12
Maint e n a n c e man, g e n e r a l utility ................ ................
8
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ........
8
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ............
15
M e c h a n i c , maintenance ........................
8
Millin g - m a c h i n e operator (machinery) .........................
11,12,13*1^




Page
n umber
••••••••
8
M i l l w r i g h t ........................
M i x e r (bakeries) ...... ...... ................................. .
16
16
M o l d e r (bakeries) .....................................
M o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r ..................................................
16
B u r s e , industrial (registered) ...................
7
Office b o y ................
3
Office g i r l ........................................................
5
O i l e r ..... ............
8
O p e r a t o r (local transit) ............... .........................
16
Ord e r f i l l e r ...........
9
O v e r m a n (bakeries) ................ ............ ................ .
16
P a c k e r ..............................................................
9
P a c k e r (bakeries) ...................... ............. ............
16
Painter, m a i n t e n a n c e ..............................................
8
P a s t e u r i s e r (mi l k d e a l e r s ) .........
15
P i p e fitter, m a i n t e n a n c e .........................................
8
P l a s t e r e r (building construction) ...............................
16
P l u m b e r (building co n s truction) .........
••••
16
Plumber, m a i n t e n a n c e ..............................................
8
P o r t e r ............
9
P r e s s m a n (printing) .............
16
R e c e i v i n g c l e r k ...... .............
9
R e f r i g e r a t o r m a n (milk dealers) .......................... ••••••
15
R o u t e m a n (driver-salesman) (milk d e a lers) ............... ..
15
S c r e w - m a c h i n e operator, a u t o m a t i c (machinery) .......
11,12,13
S e c r e t a r y ..........................
5
S e c t i o n h e a d (insurance carriers) ...............................
15
S h i p p i n g c l e r k ................................................ •••••
9
S h i p p i n g - a n d - r e c e i v i n g c l e r k ..........
9
S t e a m f i t t e r (building c onstruction) .......................... .
16
S t e n o g r a p h e r .......................................................
5
S t e n o g r a p h e r (insurance carriers) ...............................
15
S t o c k h a n d l e r ................................
10
S t o c k h a n d l e r (machinery) ........................................
12,13,14
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r ..................
6
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t ..............
6
3* 6
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r .............. .................
T a b u b a t i ng-machine ope r a t o r (Insurance carriers) .............
15
T o o l - a n d - d i e m a k e r ................
8
T o o l - a n d - d i e m a k e r (machinery) ..................................
1 2,13*14
T r a c e r .................................
7
T r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r ...................................
6
T r u c k d r i v e r ...... .........
10
15
T r u c k d r i v e r (milk d e a l e r s ) ............. .......... .............
Trucker, h a n d .................
10
Trucker, h a n d (machinery) ........
12,13,14
T rucker, p o w e r ..............................
10
T u r r e t - l a t h e operator, h a n d (machinery) ........................ 11,12,13,14
T y p i s t ..........
6
T y p i s t (insurance carriers) ..........
15
U n d e r w r i t e r (insurance carriers) ................................
15
W a s h e r , bottle, m a c h i n e (milk dealers) .........................
15
W a s h e r , can, m a c h i n e (milk d e alers ) ............................
15
W a t c h m a n ............................................
10
W e l d e r , h a n d (machinery) .....
12
W r a p p e r (bakeries) .........................
16

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 2 5 , D. C. - Price 2 0 cents

u.s. governm ent printing o f f ic e :

0 — 1952




This report was prepared in the Bureau’s New England Regional
Office. Communications may he addressed to:
Wendell D. MacDonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
26l Franklin Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The New England Region includes the following states:
Connecticut
Massachusetts
Maine

New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont


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