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Occupational Wage Survey
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
September 1951

Bulletin No. 1057

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
I N T R O D U C T I O N ...............................................................................

1

THE SEATTLE METROPOLITAN A R E A .............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ...............................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .........................
A -4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ........................

3
7
7
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2431
Millwork .....................................................................
B-35
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s .... ...........
B-63
Insurance c a r r i e r s .............. ..............•••••••••••••••••.......... .

11
11
12

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction •••’
••••••..........
C-205
B a k e r i e s ...... ..............................................................
C-20B2
Malt liquors .................................................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating e m p l o y e e s ..............
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...................
C-44
Ocean transport - unlicensed p e r s o n n e l ..... .........
C-446
S t e v e d o r i n g ............
C-541
Grocery stores and meat markets ..............
C-5452
Milk d e a l e r s ..... ..................
C-5B
Restaurants ..................................................................
C-591
Drug stores .............
C-6512
Of floe building s e r v i c e ...........
C-7011
Hotels .......................................................................

13
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
15

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .............

16

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential p r o v i s i o n s .............
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ............
K-3
Paid holidays ................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .......................
E-5
Paid sick leave .............................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ........................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ..............

16
17
17
IB
19
20
20

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ........................ ......... ......... ...............

21

INDEX .......................................................................................

23

* NOTE - Occupational earnings reports are available
upon request for the following additional industries:
auto repair shops (June 1951)> ferrous foundries
(June 1951)» and power laundries (May 1951)•

February 28, 1952

Introduction 1/

The Seattle area is one of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics plans to conduct occupational
wage surveys during the September 1951 - April 1952 period*
Occupations that are common to a variety of manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a community-wide
basis* Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilised
in compiling earnings data for the following types of occupa­
tions:
(a) officef (b) professional and technical;
(c) main­
tenance arid power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing, and ship­
ping*
In presenting earnings information for such jobs (tables
A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wherever pos­
sible for individual broad industry divisions*
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries have been studied on an industry
basis, within the framework of the community survey* 2 /
Earn­
ings data for these jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or sup­
plementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or
trades in which the great majority of the workers are employed
under terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the con­
tract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay prac­
tices*

Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

l / Prepared in the Bureau1 regional office in San Francisco,
*
California, by John L* Dana, Regional Wage and Industrial Rela­
tions Analyst*
The planning and central direction of the proram was carried on in the Branch of Community Wage Studies of
he B u r e a u ^ Division of Wages and Industrial Relations in
Washington, D. C*
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey*

f




The

Seattle

Metropolitan A rea

The population of the Seattle Metropolitan Area (King
County) was estimated at 740,000 in 1951*
About two-thirds of
the population lived in Seattle*
Wage and salary workers in the area in September 1951
(excluding those in agricultural pursuits) numbered 272,000; and
one of every 10 of these was employed in the manufacture of air­
craft*
Other manufacturing industries accounted for 36,000,
mainly in food processing (9,000), fabricated metals
(8,000),
and logging and limber products (7,700)*
As a leading West Coast port city, however, economic
activities in Seattle are largely based on commerce*
The city
is the hub of a trading area that extends inland throughout most
of the Northwest United States and Western Canada, and seaward
to Alaska and the farflung lands of the Pacific*
In late 1951,
wholesale and retail trade establishments provided employment
for 68,000* Financial institutions including insurance carriers
and real estate operators had 15,000 workers, and another 32,0 0 0
were employed in the service industries*
The combined employment of the communication, public
utilities, and transportation industries, including railroads,
was 29,000*
In the construction industry, there were 15,000
workers, and in government— Federal, State, and local— 38,000
were employed, with a large majority of these at the huge Puget
Sound Naval Yard at nearby Bremerton*

Long known as an area characterized by the predomi­
nance of union labor, it is not surprising that Seattle had few
nonunion plant workers in September 1951*
Among the industryand establishment-size groups surveyed, 97 of every 100 workers
in nonoffice jobs were employed in establishments having writ­
ten agreements with labor organizations* Collective bargaining
is largely of the multi-employer, industry-wide, master-agree­
ment type*
Notable examples of labor-management relations on
this scale are in food processing, lumbering and metalworking
in manufacturing; and in retail trade and the maritime industry
in nonmanufacturing*

2

Among office workers, the ratio employed tinder union
contract provisions was 1 in every 4* Although this proportion
is considerably less than that for unionized plant workers, it
is relatively high for office workers generally.
In retail
trade, three-quarters of the office workers were employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and in the public
utilities group, two-thirds were in unionized offices*

Occupational W age Structure
Wages and salaries for nearly all office and plant
workers were formally adjusted upward between January 1950 and
September 1951# General increases in the 6-month period immed­
iately preceding hostilities in Korea affected few workers, but
subsequent revisions were widespread*
In general, the pattern
of adjustments was in keeping with the allowable limits pre­
scribed by the Wage Stabilization Board, particularly during
the period beginning with the January 26, 1951, wage "freeze •"

Formalized rate structures were established for almost
all Seattle plant workers*
For about three-quarters of the
workers, these structures set forth a single rate for each occu­
pational classification.
Among office workers, on the other
hand, nearly one-half were employed in establishments that de­
termined salaries on an individual basis*
For other office
workers, plans providing a range of rates for each job classifi­
cation clearly were in the majority*

Seattle is generally recognized as an area with rela­
tively high wage scales* In September 1951, the average hourly




earnings for production workers in all manufacturing industries
was #1*87*
High level pay is further indicated in established
minimum entrance rates for plant workers with no previous work
experience*
Such minima were a part of formalized rate struc­
tures in all but a negligible number of Seattle firms*
Fully
80 percent of the workers were employed In establishments having
minima of $1 an hour or more; more than half were in establish­
ments which paid $1*25 an hour or more*
Highest minimum en­
trance rates were found in manufacturing industries and lowest
in the service industry group*

2/

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those of workers innonmanufacturing*
In 23 of 25 office job classifications permitting com­
parison, salaries of workers in manufacturing plants averaged
$1 to $10.50 more a week.
Average hourly earning’ for plant
s
jobs studied in all industries were higher in manufacturing for
16 of 21 job categories for which comparisons were possible*
About a fourth of the workers in Seattle area manu­
facturing plants were employed on late shifts in September 1951*
Almost all of these workers were paid shift premiums— typically
a cents-per-hour differential over dayshift rates*
The amount
most commonly reported was 10 cents for both second- and thirdshift work*
More than 85 percent of women office workers and a
like proportion of plant workers In Seattle were scheduled to
work a 40-hour week in September 1951* Chief variants from this
schedule were found in the service industries where the 37^-hour
week was established for a third of the women office workers 0

2 / This earnings figure which was derived from the Bureau *s
employment and payrolls program includes premium pay for over­
time and night work*

3
A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
0 c C 4 4 fu U iO 4 tl

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly ho^rs and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Sex, occupation, and industry division

A vebagi
$
s
$
32.50 35.Oo|37.50
42.50
W ekly Weekly
e
e r i g and
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00

30.00

40.00

Men

20 40.0
20 40.0

Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Nonmanufacturing ..................

$
64.00

64.00

182
57
125
38
48
19

40.5
39.5
41.0
40.0
39.5
41.5

Clerks, accounting ..................
334
Manufacturing ....................
91
Nonmanufacturing .................. I 243
Public utilities * .......... .
! 69
Wholesale trade .......... ...... ! 50
Finance ** ....................
64

39.5
40.0
39.5

40.0

I 67.50

Clerks, general .....................
Manufacturing .....................

40.5
41.0

164.00
65.50

Bookkeepers, hand ...................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade .............. ..
Finance
....................
Services ......................

**

600
439

79.00
85.50
76.00
74.50
76.50
73.00

69.00
70.00
i 68.50
40.0 ; 70.00
40.0 68.00

216 40.0 j 67.50
40.0
40.0 ; 71.50
1
40.0 ! 65.50
i 65.50
40.0 66.00
33
— n—
22 40.0 r7I750~
63.00
12
40.0
62.00

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
-

_
-

1

_|

_'
_
_
-

Clerks, order .................... ... ;
Manufacturing .................... ! 72
Nonmanufacturing ..................
144
Wholesale trade ................
119

_
-

Clerks, payroll .....................
Manufacturing ... .................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............

_

_

-

-

-

_
_
_

12
12
-

31
16
15
6

Office boys ....................... .
133
Manufacturing ....... ,
............
42
Nonmanufacturing ..................
91
Wholesale trade ................ ! 12
Finance ** .................... I 39

40.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.5

! 42.00
! 42.50
41.50
: 48.50
I 40.50

Tabulating-machine operators ..........

39.5

71.00

80

-

12

_!

-

_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

50.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 70.00 $ $ $ $ .00|$ $
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50
72.5C 75.00 30.00 85
90.00 95.00
and
47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00! 95.00 over
1
1 i
1
6
;
6j 4 1 2
6; 4 1 2 - - - 1 - - - J
6 -;
_
_
_i
_
_
_
_
7
11 i 2 16 - 29 12 18 40 ___11.. 15
_ 5
.
.
4 !_ 1 _
3
- - 1 - 1 -- 1 - - ! 4 14 i 21 - 12 -1 27 7! 9 18|! 8 15
-j
- ; - - - - 15 i 9 2 4 7 2 5 9 37 - 5
!
2
3
!
- - -j - -!
2 5! 4i 12 5, 6 5 5 2 1
2 -j
1 13
3
-\
j
_
3j_ 16 10 43 6 35 26 ___m 4l! 18 50! 14 __ 13 6l 9
!
-i
,1 \
1 -! -_
4
1 7 2 1 12 34 9 10 8 5 1 -1 1
1 4 1
36
32
6 8
3
9
-- 1 - - - - 1 2; 16 - 16 4 34 14 4 13 8 42 9 12 6! _
_
3
_s
_
-!
6 3 10 5
2 1 15 13 1 6 1 14 _ 12 - 1
7
1 3
1 4 1 - 1 ! 2 2 6;
18
1 2 4
"
_
_
2 5 3 2 14 7 179 32 93 32 85 13 23 61; 38 10 _ 1
1
-!
2 1 ! l - 1 2 174 32 90! 21 54 12 9 181 19 2
_
_
_
_
_
_
1
20
8
59
17
---- 1
:
3 18 _ 1 ; 22 11 15 11 23 14 10 15 4 13 _ 2
2
2
2
4
-j
20 6 11 9 36 12 10 13 4 11 - 2
3 ! 18
6 11 9 28 12 10 5! 4 2 17
"
-!
15!
_
_
_
_
_ •
_
_
12
1 5 6 3 -i 1 1 _ _
3
2 - 3 4j - 1 1 _ _ _
1
-i
j
12 2 2
l
j
1! 2 2|! 3 1
|
_
i
6
1
j
i
i
1 .
_
_
_
18
1
3
19
11 i 15 12 io! -i _ ! 1: l -i( -! _
_
—
_
1
4
5
9
4
2i
_
_
_
16!
6
2, 1 - _ | _ -[ - _ _ _ _ ! _
6
14 !
15
3
,
i
;
_
-1
1
61
i
!
4
2
4
2 | 3 10
-!
i
i
!
j
_
_
2
8
2 5j 5 14! 9 14, 11 1 lt _
1
1
,
6
;
1
-----f
$
|
$
$
45.00j47.50

i
i

i

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ........ ..........
Services ......................
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Retail trade ..................

!

—

281
51
230

68
76
47
35
90
62
35

40.0
~3975
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5

.

49.50

40.5

41.0

49.00 '

49.50
53.00
48.50
45.00

50.00

_
_
-

-i
-!
-j
”

50.00
49.00
46.00

_
-

_
-

i

5
■
5
-:
-

i3

3
!
31
3!

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3
1
2

2

23
1

22
12

10
_j

J

11
11
11

49
24
25

38

2

-

54 j
5j
49 j
9
i
22 j
4
14;

22

6

1

13
6

5

i]
i

13

5
4

1
37

61
i
13
18

4

40
9

17

31
12
7
8!
2

17!

24

5
i

17

19
8
1

I

3,

15

2

10

24
_1

-

5
1
,
3
:

2

5
|
5
j
5
!

1

_

9

3
;

-

2

-

2
2
1

8

9
9

1

1
1

3

6
_
l

8

_
-

-

l
!
i
l
j
-

_
_
-

-1
1
|

l
!
-1
“
7
3
j

-1

1

j
!
j

"
1
—|
-

_
-

-

_
_
-

1

-

2
_

1
1

1
1

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

-

j_

-_
j

1

1'
j
-

_
_
_
-

J

_

_

A

_

1

_

j

_

_
-

1951

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

4«

Table A-l:

O ffice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage
Number
o
f
workers

413
57
356
27

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
I$
$
$
Weekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 |37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00|90.00 95.00
Weekly
earnings and
houTs
and
l
(Standard) (Standard) under
32.50 35.00 37.50 140.00 42.50 45.00, 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

$

Women - Continued
Bookkeepers, hand .......................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities *
.............. .
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................
Services ..........................

60.00
65.00
59.00
54.50

_
_
-

134
96
62

40.5
39.0
39.5

62.50
56.00
57.50

Bpokkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ................... ..
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................
Services ..........................

328
74"
254
25
■ 104
i 47
62
16

40.0
"4S75
39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

54.50
52.50
55.00
61.00
55.00
61.50
47.50
51.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturirig .....................
7/holesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance
........................
Services ..........................

140.0
537
53 ~1 38.0
]40.0
464
68
40.0
40.0
; 98
i40.0
294
;40.0
15

46.50
53.00
46.00
47.50
49.50
44 <00
50.00

3
3
-

40.0
n^:5
j40.0
:40.0

49.50
52.50
49.00
56.00

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
ty De) ..................................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
’
'.bolesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** .................. ......

, 561
1 E5~
1 476
'
25
;
<

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .....................
Nonraanufacturing .....................

52.00
46.50
48.00
O

_ 1

_
-

_

- !
_ •

- :
_

_
-

-

_
_

1

6
_

_

13!

2
2
2

8
8
5
3
_

23
2
21
11
10

74
51 j
23
-

34
11 1
23

-

-

90
90
17
26
47
-

88
23
65
17
13
35
-

51

72
6
66
17
34
15

-

41
4
37
37
-

26
26
2
24
*

39
•
39
3
4
32
- j

2
2
2

_
-

10 .
10
10

83
83
20
62
1

-

-

2
12

3

13
13
13
-

.
6
6
6

23
2
18
_

3

3

42
13
29
3

33
5
28
1

12
15
-

-

-

11 1

23
_

2
3
7

-

-

39
39
12

8
-

1
1
1
-

14
14

12
12
_

- i
6 :

12
12
_
12
-

1
i

.

40.0
40.0

96
67

53.50
51.00

-

-

-

-

-

_
51.50
954
39.5
4
9
111
59.50
39.5
.
.
.
.
..
.
. 9.
50.50 .
4
843 . 39.5 .
. 78 .
. 40.0
.
. 57.50 .
.
. - .
. - .
.-.
.
40.0.
.
. 52.00 .
.
. - .
..
i68 .
_
. .
. .
. .
142 . . 40.5 . . ‘49.00
3
282. . . 39.5 . .i 51.50 . . . - .
.
. .
. . .
6
3
j

; 280
. . .
i 162
1
44
j
10
! 93

.

.

40.0 .
. .
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5

.

i.51.50
. .

_1

1

45 .50
46 .50

-

-

j 48.50

-

-

4
4

;
1

4
4

0

49
1

16
27
- 5

-

! 44.50

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

-

-

-

126
4
. 65 . 122
.
1
. - .
. 14
_
11
27
27
19

69

65

33
33
--

i

i
]




-

8
8
_

6

3
12
2
6 !

93
- !
93
16
17 !
50 !
9

|
_

I
1
[
1

68
9
59
6
14
35
3

68
4
64
7 !
18

31
5 i
96

!
!

13

j

38
1
37 j
6
21
4
6
10
10 |

27
5
22
5
3
12
1

_

30

19 :
19
8
4
7

.

69
9
22
18
13
25
25
15
-

10

2
2

6 i
6 !

1
6
-

80
-7
73
2
27 !
3
21

90
5
85
11
26
15
22

112
:
13
99
!
6
i 17
!
9
I 47

96
23
73
7
17
13
28

36
32
-3
1
28

20
18
11

20
19
6
3
6

5
2

_
2

10
1

46
46

!

10
4
7

63
4
59
2
33
3
15
6

17
17 |
3
13
1
-

23
2

_

1

|

1
1 1
2 j
3

_

23
23
-

_
_
-

13
4
-

12
2
10
2
7
1

14
14
9
5
_

-

-

21
7
7

6 !

3

j

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

-

-

-

4

2
1
1
1
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

14
_
_

14

_

I

_

-

_
17 1
- 1
17
_

_

_

j

_
_
_

_!5_
15
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-1

4
4 [
> I
4
-

6
1
5
_

1

9
9
_

_
_

-

- 1
_

9
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

1
_

5
_

1

-

-

t

1

1

-

-

39
2
37
3
6
2
19

46
8
38.
20
11 1
7

5

18 i
3

10
1

2

h

33 1—

_
_

_

j

1
2

-

-

-s
_
_
_ !
_1

1

_
_
•

_

_
_

10
2
8

18
8
10 1
6
2
1
1

_

3

_

_

1 ;
1

_

_
_

1
_

1
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

| -

-

'

-

7
3
4
1
3

3

_
_
_
_

3
1

_

_
_

2

9 !
9

1

-

_
_
_

_ _
_ _
_| _
~

_
_
_

-

_

1

-

-

"

- j

-

1

“
!

_
-

-

47
_52 l
j
2 1
9
45
44
6
3
4
14
17
27
17

_
_

5 1

20
_

4
-

_
_
_
_

-

49
_

5
_
_

4
_

_
_
_
_

1
1

14

-

_
_
_
_

i

-

-

1
1
_
_

1

-

5

14
7

14
-

8
8
_
8
_

j

18
8
10
_ j
81
1
1

4

69
16
53 i
3
15
9
16

_

0

29
8
21
1

_

21

_

-

_
1
-

18
15
3
1

21

_
- i
_
_
_
_

18
4
14
13

7
2
5
_
1
-

I
I
i

8

13

36
1
35
_

11
5
6
_

-

-

3

86
23
28
6
58
17
2 !
2 |
8
8
46
7 !
2
- -

23
73
3
37
18

!

18
3
1
1

23

84
9
75
5
28
10
21
11

10
16
-

|

Clerks, accounting ......................
1
Manufacturing ........................
:
Noamanufacturing .
.
.
.
.
.
.
'.
Public utilities * .
.
.
.
.
. 1
Wholesale trade .
.
.
.
.
.
. ;
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 1 .
Finance * * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :.
Clerks, file, class A . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................

40.0
;40 .0
! 40.0 A

15 9

, 249

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

1

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

|

5
<

Table A-l: O ffic e 0cC44fuUiOM &' - G o 4 tti4 i4 4 *< i
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division
W - Continued
omen
Clerks, file, class B ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Retail trade ........................................
Finance ** ............................................
Clerks, general .................................. ..........
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Public u tilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade ........................................
Finance ** .................................. .
Services ........................................... ..
Clerks, order ................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Retail trade ........................................
Clerks, payroll .............................................
Manufacturing ................................... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade ........................................
Finance ** ............................
Sei^riees ............................... .
Duplicatinc-machine operators ....................
Manufacturing ...........................................
Nonmanufacturing................................
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade ........................................
Finance * * ....... .................. .
Key-punch operators .............................
Manufacturing ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
Public utilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ..................................
Retail trade .......................................
Finance ** ..................................... ..
Office girls ...................................................
Manufacturing ..7 .................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Wholesale trade . -..............
Fi nance ** .............. ..........................
Secretaries ............................................
Manufacturing ..........................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................
Public utilities * ...........................
Wholesale trade .................................
Retail trade ......................................
Finance ** ..........................................
Services .............................................

Number
$ $ $ $
$
s
$
$ $ $ :$
1s
of
W
eekly
eekly earnings w
workers W
hours (Standard) under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00l 80.00185.00190.00 95.00
anl
(Standard)
32.50 35.00 37.50 40 . 00 !42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.0C1 85.00' 90.0o! 95.00 over
j
644 40.0 ^43.00 26
" '468 ■4O.O w .w — W
36 40.0 42*00
158 40.0 41.50 10
231 39.5 37.00 16
_
1,822 39.5 50.50
368 ~W.0 "5^W ~ 1,254 39.5 47.50
_
170 40.0 55.50
95 40.0 50.50
280 40.5 49.00
_
609 38.5 44.50
100 40.0 47.50
6
225 40.0 46.00
42 40.0 54.00
183 40.0 :i 44.50
6;
45 40.5 ! 46.50
6
116 40.0 l 44.00
_
286 40.0 56.50
-|
93 40.0 59. $0
_;
193 40.0 55.00
62 40.0 58.50
-;
27 40.0 54.50
-j
61 40.0 52.50
-1
30 39.5 54.00
_1
13 40.0 51.00
97 39.5 47.50
ft""] 39.5 148.50
_
‘ 78 40.0 ! 47.00
32 40.0 | 48.50
_
10 40.0 i 43.00
22 39.5 46.00
1
218 39.5 51.50
-i
----52 " IGIU " '3?.50’1-----H
•
176 39.5 | 50.50
!
27 40.0 1 55.50
43 39.5 55.00
12 40.0 50.50
75 39.0 47.00
"
164 39.5 41.50
7
” -% r~ ■■ w izn 45.56
7
119 39.5 39.50
28 40.0 39.50
6
19 39.5 36.00
828 39.5 62.50
259 39.5 67.50
569 39.5 60.50
61 40.0 65.00
110 40.0 62.50
79 ' 40.5 59.50
246 39.5 60.00
73 39.0 58.00
-

69 75 80 63 92
69 73“ 80 ' 55 92
3
6 6 10 3
1 23 14 11 64
65 44 60 28, 13
78 66 111 138 226
-— r 7 ----551
78 65 I ll 131 160
2 1 6
- 11 - 14
4 39 40 35
78 61 55 86 88
- 4 4 17
2 _ - • -191 60 14
ii
-:
2 i _ 19 60 14
9 6 5
2 - 10 4° 5
1i
5 16
2 9
4 1 -! 3 7
-; 3 1
- - - _, _ 4
_ _ 2
1 _
3 ! 1 6 8 22
; 1: 3
3j 1I _
5, 5 22
- ! 4 ; 3 12
3
3
1 1:
7
i
6 ! 5 1 ! 11 22
1
2 6 ! - 1 - ! 9 22
5! 1 _ _
_ 6
-i
1
6 5 j 1 ; 2 15
10:1 9: 46 29 29
1 1 ! 2 , 13 5
9 8 ! 44! 16 24
3
2 16: 3
4
7|
2
M
J i
___ - -8
L
- 6
- - l; 6 2
_ -1
- 6
- 6 - -

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




48 ;
42
28
3:
266
45 !
221i
39
28 1
76 i
60
18
35
35
5
28
11
1
10
2
4
4

30 78 17
16 ----- 5“ \
2
2 3
2 1
3

2
174 1
59
115
5
6
11
56
37
22
8
14
8
4
32
r

30
1
3
17
4
5
2 17
_ 2
2
. I 15
! 1
1I *
1I x
1
20 20
2
1
19 18

_

3
_
1
2
11 12
7 16
| 13
7
3
3

137
42
95
25 !
111
4!
51
4!
24
9n
15 1
.!
15
38
12
26
1
8
10
4
3

72
28 !
44 i
13 !
!
2I
19
10
22 I
r
11
9'
2!
15
1I
14
1
3
9
1

17
12
-5
1
4

1?
1
12
11

34
2
32
2
16
5
6
11
10
1
1

32
9
23
7
4
3
8

60
3
x!
5? 1
19 !
34 !
10 1
5!
6
8
5
2
2!
1
1
1
3?
2
31
13
3
11
3!
1!
3
3
1
27
14
13
6
4
3

5|
2 1
2
! 1
67
72
43 ! 91
24 ! 19
1
10
_
1
_ 7
13 ! 11
|
12 i 4 :
9i 4i
i
3
1; _!
2 -i
48 25
21 i 7
27 I 18
8 j 16
7
6
3| 2 1
3
3!
3 ij _
3
25 5
10
15 5
5 3
4 2
6 -

9

10

_ _
118 60 35
53 36 6
65 24 291
51
8
3 _
14 28
6 6 1
1 1 (
_ _
_!
!
_i
-j
;
8 8 8;
5 6! 4 i
3 2 ! 4'
1 _ 1
1;
1
11 _
1! - I 3

2
2
2
1
_
1
1
_
-

_
_
2
1
1
1
-

6
6
_
6
-

_
_

_
_
-

_
5
4
1
_
1
_

3
3
_
_
_
_
*
_
-

14.
10
1
_
i
1!

_i
i
i
_j

_
_
_
_
_

j
!
_;
'
j
_
_
-j

-

i „
_
_i _
j _
j
|
_ i------- _; _
| _
-!
;
2 1------ [ •—
1 - r"~" —
.
lii
_
_i m
1
i _
I _
,

I

_
_

_

_
_

1
_ 1
_
_1 _
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_ i!

_
_
_
„
_
_

22 __36j__ 50,__ 5i___ 26. 137
2 2 16 3 20
22 34 48 43 33 117
2
7
3 5
~ 4 10 13 4 29
9
6 1 7 4 12
1
8 16 48
14 15 24

-

_
120
87
33
7
71
14!
5
!
3'
1!
2I
1!
1!
18
3
15
13
1
1

!
j------_
_
-;
:
4 _1
1
_
4! 1i
1' _ !
3 1
-

10

-

26

V? 102
27 34
22 66
_ 4
3 11
11 11
8 34
8
-

95
35
60
2
11
14
33

71 29
33 18
38 11
9
6 5
1 _
19 * 6
3 -

42
21

a_

1
1
12
7

48 15 12 !
30 — r 8
18 9 4 !
3 1 3
8 8 1
4 «. _
3
-! -

6
4
2
2
~j

5
5
5

_
-

6,

Table A-i:

O ffic e O c c u p a tio n ^

-

C on t i n u e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sax, occupation, and industry division

Number
$ $ s $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ %
$ $ $
of
eekly $
eekly W
workers W
hours earnings 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 A0.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
(Standard) (Standard) and 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
WftB

W - Continued
omen
e
Stenographers, general......... . ..................... 1,553 39.5 53.00
Manufacturing .................... ...................... A a ” 39.5 55.50
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... 1,071 40.0 52.00
Public utilities * ........................... 154 40.0 55.50
Wholesale trade ................................. 252 40.0 51.50
Retail trade ...................................... 170 40.5 52.50
Finance ** .......................................... 363 39.5 51.50
Services ............................................. 132 38.5 50.50
Stenographers, technical .............................
Switchboard operators ..................................
Manufacturing ............................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................
Public utilities * .............................
Wholesale trade ...................................
Retail trade.......................................
Finance ** ............................................
Services ...............................................

39
462
48
414
222
16
61
18
97

Switchboard operator-receptionists ........... 377
Manufacturing ............................................ ■ ~w~
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... 268
Public utilities * ............................. ; 26
Wholesale trade ...................................
74
Retail trade ........................................
64
P i^ ,
llll(Ttl. TT.__ 73
31
S*rv1
. . . . .. . .

38.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.5

57.00
46.50
56.00
45.50
! 43.00
| 46.50
47.50
;! 49.50
i 48.50

40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
39.5
39.5

48.00
50.00
47.00
48.50
47.50
48.00
46.50
43.50

10
10
10
”

_
-

2 5
>
- ------T
2 5!
-1
-i
-|
2 5;
" “|
_
1 60 6 33!
1 60 6 ; 33
- 60 6 3° j
-! -■
j
1!
i
_
3
“i
!
i
1 ! 3 | 7: 12
!
1!
- 1 3 7 12
-;
2
-6 •-3
-1
|1 j3 1
7

35 119 178 85
10 30 18 35
25 89 160 50|
- 12 5 5
11, 21 40 17 i
5 19 35 5!
6 34 41 23;
3 3 39 “i
i
_ 3ji
2
?2 61 15 117;
1---- 2]
3
32 58 15 i 115,
10 27 _ ! 4611
_i
8 2 12 11 10 ! 4
2
4 2 2
14 3 63
44 57
5 18
39 39
_ 7
14 8
9 9
Q 15
8

70
20
50
5
14
14
10 I
7

58
12 !
46 i
3!
-1
11 !
5-a>
0!
1
1

291 158 186
60 28 69
231 130 117
31 14 29
45 24 33
17 7 13
83 73 38
55 12 4!
1

1
34 27
4 2
30 25
2i! 16!
3 10;
5 9
10 ~
45
23
22
3
6
4
Q

5

40 i
12
28,
23 I
-1
1!,
«
4

33 29
5
28 1 15
1i 4
12 ! 5!
13 ! 4 !
O
O

l
i
Tabulating-machine operators ......................
36 40.0 61.00
1 2 1 2
! 7 1
Nonmanufacturing ...................................... --- 22“ 40.0 I 55.50
1 2 1 2 3 7 1
-!
3
_ _ 1 3 i 4 i 2 ! 11 26 19 1 22 16 6
Transcribine-machine operators, general .. 120 39.5 i 49.00
1
_ 1-----j
Manufacturing ..........................................
35 40.0 i 5^.00
3 5 11 4 2 1
- 1 ~ ! 3 ; 4 i 2 i n 23 14 11 ! 12 4
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
85 39.5 | 47.50
1
i 3 4 1 5 17 11 8 |
Winance .................. ...........
51 39.5 1 46,50
i
|
i
1
Typists, class A ........................................... 761 39.5 | 48.00
9 57 70 120 142 i . 92 99 56 62
Manufacturing........................... ............... IGE “TOT-; 5 0 0 ”
! 1 1
1 8 6 4 /. 18 39
Nonmanufacturing ....................................... 657 39.5 47.00
! 8 56 70 312 1?6 i 88 95 ]] 23
Public u tilities * ................
8 14 19 i 24 38
80 40.0 49.50
3
3
Wholesale trade ..........., ....................
26 40.0 51.50
6 3 3 6
_ _ : 1 3 10 15 28 26 5 4
Retail trade .................................... .
99 40.0 49.50
Finance * * ............................................ 439 39.5 46.00
8 1 55 57 88 104 35 40 19 13
P.ervicea ................
10 3
13 38,0 41.00
Typists, class B ............................................ 783 39.5 41.50 13 79 95 103 216 75 89 16 84 10 3
Manufacturing ............................................ r n r ' "•TOT1 3 12 7 4 1 78 9
Nonmanufacturing..................................... 668 39.5 40.00 13 79 94 ! 106 2C4 68 85 15 6 1 3
- 11 15 j 25 40 11 10 5 3
Wholesale trade .................................. 120 40.0 40.50
Finance ** .......................................... 290 39.5 38.00 13 68 49 ! 52 76 25 5 2
1/ Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

212
122
90|
19!
20 j
51
381
8|

79
27
52
27
17
2
8
“

9
2
7
5
2
-

11
11
4
-5
2

20
23|
18
5i
li
lj!
-1

4'
7 5
2 5
5 1 _
1 1 ._
31 _
“

4
1
1i
_
1
_
-

.

.
_
-

9i
6f
3 |j
3
~!

5
4i
1
1
-

2
1
1
1
_

1i
!

_
-j
_i

_
-i
_
_
_
“!
;
2
2
2;
~

2
-

-,

1

2
_

2

51 13
5 7
2

2
■2

5
5

_
-

_
-

;
_:

3

7

2

5

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3\

167
79
88
3
4
61
12
8

l

2!
1

u

i

4
2
2
_
2
-

-

_
5

-

2
2
1
1
-

-

-

_

.
_
_
_
_
3
-

_
-.
_
_I
-i
1
!
!
n! - j!
'
-!
_ t_
;
!
31 f
1
_
_
-

1

-

|
-T
! _

_
_
_

-

-

-

_
-

_

1

-1
-j
1

-

i

weekly hours.
-

_
“
_
_
_

-i

10
1
1

29 !
17
12
2
2
2!
6

_
-

-

-

i

_

-

-

_

-

—

7,

Table A-2:

P^O^eidAX^tcU G4td ^ e c Ju U C a l 0cC 4€fuUiOH d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division
Men
Draftsmen, chief ...........
Manufacturing ...........
Draftsmen .......................
Manufacturing ...........
Draftsmen, .junior .........
Manufacturing ...........
Nonmanufacturing ....
Tracers ...........................
Manufacturing ...........

Weekly Weekly
earning?
(Standard) (Standard)

259

'W T

135
117
16
67

57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00( 67.50 70.00
Under 50.00 52.50
and
$ under
50.00 12*50 15*00. 12*10 60.00 .6.2*10 .65x00 .62*10. 70.00. 7.2*50.

40.0
40.0

00.00L05, 00(1110.0Cp.l5»0C|12O%£x)
.

9 0 .0 0| 95*00fL<

15 j 43

11 41
1 u!
15 1 4 i
15 ;

_13i

62.50

and

_11
_12_
27

71.00
67.00
62.50

.

8Q.Qo| 85.00, 90.00 11
95.00tl00.00(l< .,00(110. lO,15*0QiL2Q.0Ql.
.05
OL

I

40.5 98.50
40.5 102.50
40.0 82.50
TOT 84.00
40.5 70.50
41.0
40.0

75.0o| 80.00| 85.00

_31

13 ! 13
9 i 13
4

16

14

34

13

17

1/ Hour3 reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table A-3: M a in te n a n c e O K (t p0W 4k P la n t O c C H fU ltiO n l
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Carpenters, maintenance .....................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
Retail trade ................................................ ......... .
Services .....................................................................
Electricians, maintenance .................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
___T ...........................................i - - T

339
228
111
24

Engineers, stationary ........................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................................................
Wholesale trade ........................................................
Services ...............................................................

443
199
244
56
50

10

247
209
38
10

i .50 1.55 \.60 1.65 *L.70 1.75 *1.80 1.85 *1.90 1.95 *2.00 *2.05 *2.10 *2.15 *2.20 *2.25 *2.30 *2.35 *2.40 *2.45 $
2.50
and
1.45 under
1,50 1,55 1.60 1,65 1,70 1,75 1.80 1,85 1.90 1*95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2,15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2,35 2.40 2.45 2.50 over

Average
hourly Under i.45
and
earnings %

1
2.01
1.97
2.10
2.24
2.21
2.02

1.99
2.24
2.36

1.94
1.99
1.89
1.82
2.00

Firemen, stationary boiler ................................................ 108 1.73
Manufacturing ................................................................. ----78 ll.TT"
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
30 1.69
See footnote at end of table.




_
_
-

_
_
-

9
-9

2
1
1

11
9
2

_
_
_
-

_
-

8
8
~

8
-

-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-1
1
-

-3
-3
-

3
3

-

-

~

8

30

60
55
5
-

16
15
1
1
8
8

33
10
23
11
2

-

82
42
67
58
9

78
6
72
20
“

41
19
22
17

16
10
6
2

26

93
49
44
4
8

27
27

1
1

-5
5

-

_
_
“
.
-

2
1
1

_
3
2
1

60
_

15
15
3
2

33
4
29
22
7

25
25
_
_
-

30
2
28
_
2

24
24

8
8

22
8
14

2
2
“

-

20 124

16
4
36
32
4

30
_
_

60

i

-

50
1
4
3

13
2
11

18
17

5

2
3
1

5
4

1

1
1

1

66

1
_

-

63
-3
-

2
_
2
1
6

3
3
3
7
7
-

2
_
2
1

8
2
6

2
4

_
.-

6
-

3

2
1
1

_
_
_
-

6

19

1
1
1

4
2
2
1

- 6'
- 10
4

*
_
-

-

6
6
6

4
-4
-

-

-

4
4
1
3

8
11
10

_
-

_
-

1
1

16

Occupational Mage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8,

T a 3: Maintenance and Powe* P lant Occnpationi>• Qnnttnaed
able (Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
and area basis in Seattle, Wash., by industry division, September 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number Average Under 1.45 i .50 I .» 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 $2.00 $2.05 $2.10 $2.15 $2.20 $2.25 *2.30 $2.35 $2,40 $2.45 $
of hourly
2.50
workers earnings $
and
and
1.45 under 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1 »8? 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2,10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2,35 2.40
1.50
2.50 over
2.45

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..................... ...................... 100 1.64
Manufacturing ................................................................. — 57“ T-.39Nonmanufacturing ........................................................ ..
43 1.71

1
1

-

8
8

29
29

20
8
12

18
3
15

Machinists, maintenance ....................................................
Manufacturing................................................................
Nonmanufacturing.............................................. .............

344
582
62

2.03
2.03

_

2.02

-

_
-

-

-

4
4
-

-

Maintenance men, general utility .....................................
Manufacturing................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..........................................................
Public utilities * ....................................................
Wholesale trade .........................................................
Retail trade ..................... ......... .............................
Services .....................................................................

416
283
135
25
46
20
18

1.82
r:$3
1,80
1.81
1.87
2.02
1.74

30
16
14
8
-

4
4

24
20
4
2
-

23
13
10
4
2
1

17
3
14
5

-

-

3
3
3

2
2
2

-

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ................................ 590 1.99
Manufacturing .................................................................. ...ior~ “5754“
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................... 489 1.98
302 1.96
Public utilities * ........ ......... ..........
17 2.05

6
2

Mechanics, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ................. ................. ..

162
115

1.93
1.97

_

Millwriehts ..........................................
Manufacturing .....................................

149
138

2.04
2.05

-

-

101

92

1.75
1.76

-

-

226

2.06

_
_

-

-

Oilers ...............................................
Manufacturing .....................................

Painters, maintenance ................................
Manufacturing.............. .......................

Pit*

tir. . . , . . tIIT

fitters, maintenance ............................
__ T-T.....
Uflnnfar>hnrlng i i . it t , ,,
i
Nonmanufacturing .................. ...............
P^lh] I( 1^ ^1 I
» 1.
* tTT--IIIIIll.TItttt.lITIl|-tl

Plumbers, maintenance ................................

workers,

Sheet-metal
maintenance .................. ...
Manufacturing .....................................

Tool-and-die makers ..................................
Manufacturing .................. ..................

y

*

— w ~ 1.98
120 1.97
94 2.00
26 1.86
25 1.85
51 1.92
58 2.11
32 2.11
55
55

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
3
_
-

12
6
6

39
28

]
5

7

37
34
3
3
-

-

2
2
2

12
1
11
11

13
13
13

-

1
1
1

15

11

24

10
10

2
2

31

1

-

11

-

-

2.26
2.26

16
1
1

-

-

~

~

-

-

-

14 149 100
4 129 89
10
10

20

11

14
14
-

31
31
-

15
15

4
4

2
2

17
l6

90
80
-

7
4
3
3
“

46
20
26
9
12
5

2
1
1

~

25
16
9
7

16
16

28 __ 11
4 4
24 9
14 -

1
1

3

10
10

~

~

1
1

23 316 129

39
90
76

17
17

66

-

-

5

5 9
18 307
15 162
7

38
38

23
18

25
25

-

1
~

10

-

-

7
5

-

2
~

-

2

2 ____ L
2
4

~
_
-

-

—
_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

“

_

~

~

~

-

41
41

8
8

“

-

-

"

4
4

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

]
-

*

-

2
2

21
21

6 107

15

22

2

2

2

2

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

3
3
3

5
5

36
14

_

1

1
1

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

33
2
2

1
6

-

4
1

-

_

12
12
12

*

-

-

-

*

-

-

53
43

3
45
45

2
2

13
23
21

10
10

-

”

3

5

2
2

2
2

16
16

_

-

1
1

5

6
6

“

2
2

5

46
42

■

-

“

4
4

64

3
3

2
2

6
6

-

-

5

1

1

8
8

-

-

“

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

*
■

2
2
2

-

1

Excludes premium pay fa r overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), ooasunicatlon, and other public u tilit ie s .




7
~
7

-

_
-

8
6
2

33
19
14
12
-

_

-

3
3
“

x

1

7
_

_

1

1

15
-

-

-

10
10

-

12
12

26
26

5

7

7

6

-

6

-

9,

Table A-4»

C u s to d ia l, W cM eJuM iUHip G Jtd S U ip fU M f O cC M fM iti< &
M

(Average hourly earnings i / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an
area basis in Seattle, Hash., by industry division, September 1951)
N U M B E R OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF-

Number
o
f

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, electric bridge (under
-20 tons) .............................................
Manufacturing........... ...... ...................

Average
hourly Under 1.05 *1 . 1 0 $1.15 *1 . 2 0 *1.25 *1.30 1.35
earnings
and
$
under
1.05 1 . 1 0
1.15 1 . 2 0 1.25 1 . 3 0 1.35 1.40

154
150

*
1.83
l.So

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26
-

1
-

26
-

Receiving clerks ......................................
Manufacturing.................................. .

Nonmanufacturing...........................................................

Nonmanufacturing ...................................

—

253
--- 70
183
99
77
271
124
147
79
54

1.63
1.75“ '
1.58
1.61
1.54
1.68
"T773
1.63
1.66
1.62

1786

1.72
383
----9 7 1.68
286
1.62
107
1.54
104

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

258

_

_
-

-

_

65
65

1
1

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

5

25

33

2

6

33

85

133

57
h i r

29

1

25

3?
24
14
_

9

33
4
12

127
37
9
4
8
69

59
39
20
16
2
1
_
1

18
-

1
1

6
26

172
19 2
88
27 T c r “ 19“
50
69
145
6
4
23
_
_
22
17
13
20
26
34
71
4
24

n

83
34

21
2
_

_

..
24

-

1
_

_
_
_
-

1
_

~

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_
_

-

196
45
151
131
20

84
20
64
64
-

194
12
182
175
7

10
1
9
9

36
21
15
15
-

10

8
r

37

10
10
-

2
1
1

37
12
25

22
10
12
6
6

72
8
64
62
2

90
7
83
33
50

181
180
1
1

122
103
19
6
1

3
1
2
2
~

1
1

_

1
-

_

2
2

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

5

22

32
3
29
23
5

64
10
54
43
11

24
8
16
11
5

4
2
2

10

46
19
27
11
14

2

5

22
22

_
-

6
6
6

2
2
-

8
8
1

30
13
17

2

32
15
17
17

7

12

10

16

11

7
3
4

12
3
8

10

16
15
1

39
11
28
19

1

13
11
x

1
1

20
20

54
11

12
12
6
6

12
12
3
9

9
4
5
5

2
2
2

268
193
75
35
40

12
12
3
9

_
-

60
14
46
11

45

V

24
24

~
- ■

4

_
_

-

5

_

_

7
_

5
4
n

over

-■
•
_
_
_

W

19
-

-

2 .1 0

3
- --- f
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
.
_

9
_
1
8
_

5
2
2
1
16

•

24

“

-

“

13
13
13

-

33
32
1
1

2

15
-

279
276

240
140

16
12

1
1

3

1
1

11
11
11

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

15
15
-

_
-

_

11
11
10
1

5
5

7
5
85
12
149

-

_

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilitiesi
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




,

32
32

-

-

8

524
453
81
309

1.29
645
555“ T T 3 I

_

155

Janitors, porters, and
cleaners (women) ...... ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................
1
i[|
iii i- riii-|---r*_*T““
( ( I
r
1(
( ....i■j ............r-

Packers (women) .... ........ .........................
Manufacturing ......................................

35
35

13

15
14
1
-

8
8
8

12
12

and

_

1 .2 6

_
-

2.05

3

445
1,181
150
24
423
203
381

_
-

2 .0 0

-

1

1.58
1.63
1.52
1.55
1.46

1.95

_

32

653
359“
294
153
129

1.90

-

4

Packers (men) ............................ .............
Manufacturing ...... ............................... —
Nonmanufacturing ...................................
Wholesale trade .................. ..............
Retail trade .................. ............. .

1.85

_

293
35

7
6
1

1.80

-

4

6
6
6
-

1.75

_

182

7

1.70

-

_

1
1
1

1.65

_

144
144
-

920
1.54
— U S - ”1751
602
1.55
1.56
467
1.52
135

1.60

-

91

Order fillers .........................................
Manufacturing.......................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................
Wholesale trade .................................
Retail trade ....................................

1.55

-

15
-

292
288
6
275

1.50

-

1.30
1.42

5
1
1

1.45

\.70 ^L.75 *1.80 \.85 *1.90 ‘
1.95 *2 .0 0 *2.05 *2 .1 0

_

1.44

96
1.14
1.1I“ "
W ~
3/73
1.03
10
1.13

i. 6o 1.65

-

313

137
7

i.55

_

1,6 2 6

1.36
1.42
1.22
1.24
1.27

1.50

-

Guards ................................................

8

$
1.45

_

Janitors. Dorters, and cleaners (men)...................
Manufacturing ..................... .................
Nonmanufacturing................................ .
Public utilities *........................... .
Wholesale trade ............................. .
Retail trade ....................................
Finance * * .......................................
Services ........................................

174
2
70
86
16

I. A Q

12
1?
11
i
29

-

-

-

8
-

8
1
13

29
-

-

13

29

13

35
34
14
4
10

45
33
12

-

9

-

9

3

J*

9
2

2
11
10
1

__ 4Z_
25

22

3

19

19 - J S
li
f
1
29

9
11

1

—

-

1
1
-

-

*
15
15
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

2

2

-

L_
- ___ ____ 1
- -4 - - ~
k

24 ...
1
9
13
15
11
4

20
7
13
11

11
8
3

16
12

1

17

1

13

1

13

23

49
1
48

44

_

-

4

2

3

2
2
-

_

-

"
15
15

“

2
2
-

-

2
2

-

~

-

~

“

"

4

17

“

.. 2j._
..
25
”

”

14
- 3 1
14
24

2
2

1 — rr22
3
39

16

13

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT QF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10,

a- 4*

C u sto d ia l, W a'leiuuU uuj, a n d S A ip fU n f O ccu pation *. - C o n tin u ed
(Average ho urly earn in gs j / fo r selected occupations g/ studied on an
area b a sis in S e a ttle , W ash., by In d u stry d iv is io n , September 1951)

Occupation and industry division

Number

of

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ............................................ 2.329
335
1,994
Public u tilitie s * ................................................................. 764
694
532
Truck drivers, ligh t (under
1 1/2 tons) .......................................................................................

Truck drivers, medium (1 1/2 to and including
Uanufacturing •»••••••••#•••••.»•»»»••«»»•••»•«••••••

Average
hourly
earnings

%

Under
%

1.05

$
under
1.10

$

$

$

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

4
4

37
37

76
19
57

35

57

16

_

-

_

1.10

1.55
1.67
1.53
1.59
1.56

40
40

1

28
28

1.4 2

37

1

28

558 1.84
104 1.74
27 1.69

_

-

-

1.82
305 "1:89 "
1.79
198 1.86

-

' 24!" 1.69

1,3 8 1

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

1

1.15

2
2

11
“ 11
11

1.20

2

1.25

$

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$ $ $ $
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 $
1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10
nrvl
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 over

s
1.30

49
2
47
31

65 121 215 393 596 278
6
18
13 55 33 19
47 115 202 338 563 259
9
88
3
344 253
183 198
33
3
5 112 19 52 144
3
75
_

_

_
-

137
.. ~T36T — 8
W
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,076

Truck drivers, heavy (over k tons, tra iler
bVDA) ****aa«seeeeee*eeeeeeeeeeeeeee«eeeeeee»eee»eeeeee 487
Manufacturing eeeveeeeeeeemeeeeeeeeeeemeeeeeeaavweeee — 139“
298
Nonmanufacturing
Public u t ilitie s ^ • ••e*«*eee**eeeeeeeeeeeee«*ee«e 113
Wholesale trade ••••••eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaeeeaeeee
71 .

1.92
1.97
1.88
1.76
1.94

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
543 1.86
tra iler type) .................................................... ..................
------95“ “IT92
449 1.85
Nonmanufacturing.
Public u tilitie s * ............................................................... 219 1.73
lo-a

-

582 1.73
Truckers, power (fo rk -lift) .................................................. ..
Manufacturing #######. #*,###*##**#,«*«*aa*#eeeeeee**e — 372“ 1.63"' ”
Nonmanufacturing .••••••••»••••••»•«••»»•»••«•»»••»»» 210 1.86
86 1.69
Wholesale trade
42 1.75

_
_
_
_

XX.}

1.90

-

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

2

_

2

2

_
_
_
_

6
6

-

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_
_

-

_

12

6
6

8
8
8

8

337 15
—v r
337

161 1.53
1.64 "
1.33
1.38
1.33

103“
58
18
22

2

2 118 132
~ 3 z r
76
ft
o

_

25
25

20
2tT

_

_
_

_

_

_

_
_

12
_
_

_
-

-

88

-

-

-

88
88

-

-

18
18
18

- 173
“
173
_ 173
32

1

15
17
13
4

1?3
76

56

9
9
•
1

8

8
-

8

-

8
8
7

-

13
12
1
**

1

8
2
6
5
1

**
~

2
3

1
1

1
1
1

“
-

10
5
5
1

22 , 15..
n

14
8
5

2

4

4

32
24
9
15

2

X

6

28

81
81

8
20

-

16

10
5
5
4
1

8

2 ____ -JSL 18
35 18
3
2 4 “
1

1
1
1

L

25

~ 55“

7

90

_
58 ---- —.

-

30

1 ___ z_ 88
6
7
82
1
1 _ _
48

47
34
13

7

52
2
43 41
--- ~T~“ 842“ 13 — 28“ — 4 --172
V
670
30 13

-

37 212
11 201
26 11
_

23
3

4

168

6

_
_
_

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
All workers at $1.00 to |1.05.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




4
4

5

63
63
g
58

8
2
6

-

36
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturpig ••«••••»»»•»»«»»•»••».»»»»•»»»»»•••
Wholesale trade *.•••«.»••.«•»•»»».»»•»»»••••••»•
Retail trade ......................................................... .............

51
27
24
1
18

2
2
2

_

11

-

108
g
107
53 103
16
44 12
8
75

160

215
44

2
“

38
4
34
1
33

28
28
_

67
58
16
42

11 ___
8
-

3

- 171
- 24
“ 52

3
-3

5
5

1

_
—
-

-

44
40
1

3

28
14
14

“

10

10 _4L _
_ 45
_
—
-

72
72
-

“

_
~

20

11,

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations

Table B-2431*

l/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

$
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $2.00 $2.05 $2.10 $
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
2.15 2.20 2.25
and
under
2 / 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10
2.20 2.25 2.30

Num ber
of
workers

Assemblers, sash, door or frame ............................. .
Cabinetmakers (millwork) ..................................................
Cut-off-saw operators (treadle-operated or
swinging) ..........................................................................
Molder and sticker operators (set-up and
operate) .................... .....................................................
Planer operators (set-up and operate) ............................
Rip-saw operators...............................................................
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
4 ton s)....................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

76
102
51
21
6
11
15

$
1.85
1.89
1.91
1.98
1.92
1.91
1.85

2
“
“
-

“

4
“
"

3
~
“
“

“

9
13

-

-

“

-

50
60
15
6
4
4
15

24
12
6
4

4
4
2
-4
3

8
4
”

41
2

-

2
"

”
•
**

4
2
3
5
“

i_____
1/ The study covered plants with more than 20 workers engaged In the manufacture of sash, windows, doors, blinds, mantels, window and door frames and
similar fabricated millwork from purchased lumber.
Data limited to men workersiall occupations were paid on a time basis,
jj/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

7j

Table B-35:

M o c U iM & U f !)tuHuAtsU&L

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2 /
Assemblers, class A ........................................................................
Assemblers, class B ..................................................................
Inspectors, c lass A ........................................................................
Jan ito rs ...............................................................................................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A i j ...........
D rill-p ress operators, ra d ia l, class A ............... ..
Engine-lathe operators, c lass A ........................................................
Milling-machine operators, c lass A ................................................
T urret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw.................
■ j r*] flAa A
Machine-tool operators, production,class B 4/ ..................
11 —
r
j Tu r t l f l l , o l n s f t R ...............__________
D rill-p ress operators, sin g le- and m ultiple«p-4 nHT» p lflQ a P ...........i . t
_ , . . . ] T, , .
M achinists, pro d u ctio n ..................................................................................... ...
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ...............
Truckers, hand ...................................................................................

Number Average i .30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 *L.55 1.60 \ . u 1 .7 0 1.7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 *1.95 *2.00 S2.05 *2.10 *2.15 *2.20 *2.25 $2.30
of
hourly
workers earnings and
and
2 / under 1.40 1.45 1.5Q 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2tQQ_ -2.05 2.10 2.1-5 2.20 2.25 2,3Q_ over
1.35
$
2
128 10 11
2
153 1.99
26 1.77
26
_
_
22
6
1
29 1.99
21 1.52
8
1
1
1
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
438 37 32
513 1.99
_
_
36 1.97
1
35
9 18 1 85
113 1.99
121 1.99
96 16
8
1
2
66 1.98
64
75 1.80
3 51
5
21 1 - 7Q
16
15
30
45 1.81
_
_
_
_
_
_
- i
201 2.02
68 77 17 13
1
5
7
7
5 _
5 _
21
2
23 2.28
12 1.63
3
5 1
3

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of non-electrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
7 j Data limited to men workers; all occupations were paid on a time basis.
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
j / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABCR
ENT
i j Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




12 ,

9*UU^UUU>C GoW U& lA'l/

Table B-63:

Avehaqe 2 /
Occupation and sex

N um ber
of
workers

W eekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

$
$
60.00 *
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 %
62.50 65.00 $ 7.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 $
6
100.00
and
and
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00 over
j

Men
C lerks, accounting .................................................
S ectio n heads ............................................................
U nderw riters ..............................................................

10
33
82

39.5
38.5
39.5

%

56.50
88.50
72.50

_

_

_

3

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

8

i

-

1
3
1

_

-

-

-

5

-

-

8

6
2
6

3
4

1

12

2

1

_

_

_

_

3

1
3

1
3

1
7

_

_
_

3

1
-

-

_

_

_
-

_
_

- j
- .

-

16

6
2

5
7

5

12
4

i

1
I

Women
C lerks, a c c o u n tin g ................................................. ...
C lerks, a c tu a ria l ...........................................................................
m

fn «

eae A
n ...................T . T __________ t t _______
..................................................................................

C lerks, general
Key-punch o p erato rs ..............................................
Section heads ............................................................
Stenographers, general ........................................
Tabulating-m achine operato rs ...........................
T yp ists, c la ss A ..............................................................................
T y p ists, c la ss B ...............................................................................
Iln H A p u fl t.KPII 1 T . . T- t l

j

90
15
29
124
424
75
71
55
7
95
98
13

48.00
42.50
43.00
37.50
43.50
46.50
60.00
48.50
51.50
45.00
38.00
57.00

38.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
37.5
39.0
38.0
39.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
1

3
1
o-i 1
1

61 !
6
_
_
_

28

!
'
1
>

|

2
3i
90

40
4
-

2
22

i

i _________-

!

!
!
;
i

t

10
2
12 ji
jj
50 !
2

2i
3!
1
24 i
10!
“

________

|

15 i
4!
L
a \

62 I
2j
2i
3 ii
13
23

,

6
1
1.
H
10
64
15
1
18
16
13

7
_
j

44
11
1
3
1
11
2
i

i
J___________ L - _______:

8
2
2

12
2
c

33
12
9
6
_
6

28
6
8
10
3
7
s
p

!

7

1

2i
3
6
6

9
6
7i
•11
2
6

10 !
5!
3

1

4!
8
7
1
3
6

i

_

6

11
1

P

i ___________

1

-

1

!

1
5

4!
1,
1

t

6
io
i
1

-

1

-

1

i
!
i
|
;
i
J___________ J------------------i ___________ j ____________i____________i___________

-

1

1

|
J
_

_

i

’

i

1
____________ ___________

_

1

'
j
'
i

1

_

_

-

-

i

_
I____________ 1______________

1/ The study covered Insurance carriers (Group 63) as defined In the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget, with more than 20 employees.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

2/




Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

13 .

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions* Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated* )

Table C-15:

fcuUcU+Uf G oiU hucliO H

Table C-2082:

January 1, 1952

oo
c>^o

UchJz&M,

B o ttlin g departm ent:
B o ttlers ......................................................................... $71*. 50
D elivery departm ent:
D rivers ............................................................................ 79.50
H e lp e rs ........................................... ................................ 76.50

Table C-27*

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week
35
35
35
35
35
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
33 1/3
35
35
35
35
35
35
37
35
37
37
37
35
37
35
35
35

1/2
1/2

1/2

1/2

1/2

1/2

Jlo ca l

October 1, 1951

October 1, 1951

Brewery departm ent:
Brewers ........................................................................... $77.50
Loaders ........................................................................... 71*. 50

Hours
per
week

Qp&uUituj, C*MfUo4pm&

Table 2 8 * M o lt £ < 1 *0 *4 .
02

Rate
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops:
Bindery women............................................................... $1,578
Bookbinders ................................................................... 2.857
Compositors, hand ...................................................... 2.857
E lectrotypers ............................................................... 2.930
M achinists operators ............... ................................ 2.857
M ailers ............................................................................ 2.728
Photoengravers ............................................................. 3.021
Press a ss is ta n ts and feeders:
Cylinder press ...................................................... 2.266
P laten press ........................................................ .. 1.886
Pressmen, cylinder .................................................... 2.857
O ffset presses ...................................................... 2.857
Pressmen, platen ........................................................ 2.629
Stereotypers ................................................................. 3.153
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work ............................... 2.857
Compositors, hand - nigh t work .......................... 3.000
Machine operators - day work ............................... 2.857
Machine operators - night work .......................... 3.000
Machine tenders (m achinists) - day work . . . . 2.857
Machine tenders (m achinists) - nigh t work .. 3.000
M ailers - day w o rk .................................................... 2.413
M ailers - night work ................................................ 2.586
Photoengravers - day work ..................................... 2.900
Photoengravers - night work ................................. 3.033
Pressmen, web presses - day work ...................... 2.533
Pressmen, web presses - nigh t work .................. 2.711*
Pressm en-in-charge - day work ............................ 2.667
Pressaen-in-charge - night work ........................ 2.857
S tereotypers - day work ......................................... 2.851
Stereotypers - nigh t work ..................................... 3.000
Table C-a*




1*0
1*0
1*0

PA4*tti*Uj>

C la ssific a tio n

Hours
per
week
1*0
1*0

C la ssific a tio n

Rate
per
hour

1-man busses:
F ir s t 6 months ............................................................. $1,705
A fter 6 m on ths.......................................................... .. 1.760

C-I2t A fotokbuick. jb>Uo&U <Utd cMtotfl&ll
July 1, 1951

Hours
per
week

July 1, 1951

Bread - hand and machine shops:
pA|*onAi^
$2,195
Mixers, overmen, aachinemen ................................. 2.070
Bench hands ................................................................... 1.995
Helpers:
1 y e a r's experience ........................................... 1.690
2 y e a rs' experience ........................................... 1.810
Bread and cake - machine shops:
Men-in-charge of miscellaneous .......................... 1.310
M iscellaneous help:
1 to 6 months ........................................................ 1.110
7 to 12 months ...................................................... 1.160
A fter 1 year .......................................................... 1.250
Women employees:
Floor la d ie s ................... ...................................... 1.230
A ssistant flo o r l a d i e s ............. ....................... 1.180
Machine o perators, experienced .................... 1.170
General workers:
1 to 6 months ........................................................ 0.910
7 to 12 months ...................................................... 0.960
A fter 1 year .......................................................... 1.050
Crackers and cookies:
F irs t mixers, machinemen........... ........................... 1.660
1.530
Second m ixers, peelers .....................................
F ir s t ovenmen......................................'....................... 1.510
Second ovenmen............................................................ 1.1*60
S calers, wrappers ...................................................... 1.1*10
Pan clean ers, feed ers, other helpers:
F irs t 30 days ........................................................ 1.050
Second 30 days ...................................................... 1.150
T hereafter ............................................................... 1.280
Women workers:
Experienced sponge packers ............................ 1.030
Hand bundlers ........................................................ 1.030
P lain sweet packers ........................................... 0.980

C la ssific a tio n

Rate
per
week

C la ssific a tio n

July 1, 1951

C la ssific a tio n

Table

October 1, 1951

R iie - Hours
C la ssific a tio n
p er per
hour week
R rieklayers . . . . . . . ........................
$3,300
C arpenters .......................................... ..
2.1*20
E lec tric ia n s (insid e wiremen) and
fix tu re hangers ........................................ ................... 2.650
P ain ters ............................................................ ..
2.370
P laste re rs ........................................................................... 3.000
Plumbers .............................. ................................................ 2.750
Building laborers ........................................ ..
1.970
Table C—205*

M /Cllt J*4tft44&Ul - GoH^tUiM od

Hours
per
week
-

Rate Hours
per p er
hour week
Armored c ar .................................................... ..
$1,605 40
1.708 48
Baggage .................................................................... ..
Beer ........................................................................................ 1.988 1*0
Helpers ........................................................................... 1.913 40
B uilding:
C onstruction:
Pickup tru ck .......................................................... 2.000 40
Dump truck :
6 yards or le s s .............................................. 2.100 40
7-12 yards ........................................................ 2.300 4o
13-20 yards ...................................................... 2.400 40
Over 20 yards ................................................. 2.550 40
Dumpster, E uclids ......................................... 2.300 40
B ull l i f t operator ....................................... 1.950 40
M aterial:
Sand, g rav el, and concrete hauling:
Factory ra te d 3-yard truck mixer ......... 2.100 40
F la t or warehouse truck ............................ 1.950 40
Food d is trib u tio n - r e t a i l ......................................... 2.013 40
F reight:
Under 125 m iles:
Under i* tons ........................................................... 1.61*5 48
4-6 tons ................................................................... 1.676 48
6-8 tons ................................................................... 1.708 48
Over 8 t o n s ......................................................
1.739 48
T ra ile r or s e m i-tra ile r ................................... 1.770 48
Over 125 m iles:
Under i* tons ........................................................... 1.676 48
4-6 tons ................................................................... 1.708 48
6-8 tons ................................................................... 1.739 48
8-10 tons ................................................................. 1.782 48
Over 10 tons ......................................... ................. 1.833 48
T ra ile r or se m i-tra ile r ................................... 1.895 48
Local pickup delivery ....................................... 1.645 48
P arcel d elivery .................................................... 1.700 40
P riv ate c a rrie r;
Under 20,000 pounds ..................................... 1.850 40
Over 20,000 pounds ....................................... 1.900 40
Helpers ............................................................... 1.775 4o
F uel, s o lid , r e ta il:
1-5 tons ......................................................................... 1.744 48
General:
Dr ay age fo r h ire :
F u rniture ................................................................. 1.708 48
Helpers ..................... ....................................... 1.645 48
Up to and including 2£ tone .......................... 1.645 48
2£-4 tons ................................................................. 1.676 48
1.708 48
4-5 tons ...............................................................
Over 5 tons to sem i-trucks ............................ 1.739 48
Helpers .................................................................... 1.583 46
Part-tim e helpers ................................................ 1.695 48
Grocery - r e ta il:
A fter 1 year ................................................................. 1.625 40
Ice:
R e ta il .............................................................................. 1.600 48
W h o lesale.....................................................................
1.635 40
Ice cream .............................................................................. 1.900 40
Meat - packing house:
5-7 to n s, 6 wheels .................................................... 1.900 40
Milk
Regular d riv e rs .......................................................... 1.906 43 2/3
R e lie f d riv e rs ............................................................ 2.064 1*3 2/3
Other dairy products ............................................... 2.013 1*0
O il - fu e l ............................................................................ 1.868 1*8
Bulk petroleum - in tr a o lty ................................. 1.770 1*8
Soft drink - r e t a i l ........................................................ 2.000 40
Tobacco - r e t a i l ............................................................... 2.013 1*0
C la ss ific a tio n

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
U S DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
..
Bureau of Labor Statistics

H.

Table C-AAt

-

Table C-44.:

October 1, 1951

C la ssific a tio n




-

Table C-W6«

507.63
1*81.17
1*33.56
1*50.1*9

1*
*1
11
**

1*02.87 1*1*
31*0.91*
327.21
298.08 1*1*
31*7.83 11
**
**
271*.79 11
1*1*2.91 1*1*
3 1 . 12 11
8* * * *

361.U1

11
**

381* . 1*2

1*1*

262.98 1*1*
262.98 11
**
1*03.22 11
**
377.28 11
**
1*1*
299.1*9
262.98 1*1*

1*1*
1*1*

266.16
266.16
1

C la ssific a tio n

Rate Hours
per
per
month week

Stewards departm ent: 3 / - Continued
F re ig h te rs: - Continued
Chief cooks:
Offshore trade ................................................ $299.1*9 1*1*
Alaska trade .................................................... 300.02 1*1*
Chief stewards:
Offshore trade ............................................. .. 330.71 1*1*
Alaska trade .................................................... 356.12 1*1*
Messmen and u t i l i t y men:
Offshore trad e ............................................... 226.1*6 1*1*
Alaska trade ................................................... 232.82 1*1*
Passenger v essels:
A ssistan t laundrymen:
C lass A v essels .............................................. 232.82 1*1*
C lass B vessels ............................................. 232.82 1*1*
Chefs, c la ss A v essels ..................................... 581*. 71 1*1*
Chief cooks, c la ss B v e s s e ls ........... ........... 372.51 1*1*
Head w aiters, class A vessels ...................... 307.96 1*1*
Linenmen:
Class A vessels .............................................. 266.16 1*1*
Class B vessels ............................ ................. 232.82 1*1*
Messmen and w aiters;
Class A vessels .............................................. 226.1*6 1*1*
Class B vessels .............................................. 226.1*6 1*1*
Room stew ards, class A vessels .................... 226.1*6 1*1*
Second stew ards:
Class A v essels .............................................. 1*16.95 1*1*
Class B vessels .............................................. 337.60 1*1*
Silvermen:
C lass A vessels .............................................. 252.93 1*1*
Class B v e s s e ls ............................ ................. 239.69 1*1*
Storekeepers;
Class A vessels ............................................. 286.27 1*1*
Class B vessels ......................................... .... 286.27 1*1*
Third stew ards;
Class A v essels .............................................. 303.19 1*1*
Class B vessels ....................................... ..
281*. 15 1*1*
1/ A ll ra tin g s receive $7.50 per month clothing allowance
which is included in the basic ra te s shown. A ll ra tin g s of
unlicensed departm ents a lso receive a d d itio n al payment in
accordance w ith conditions as follow s;
1. On v essels carrying explosives in 50-ton lo ts or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
w hile such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 percent
or more of dead weight carrying capacity, $10 per
voyage is added.
3. On v essels operated in described areas of China
co a stal w aters, 75 percent or 100 percent o f dailybasic wages, including allowances in lie u of over­
time fo r Sunday day men, is added according to degree
of proxim ity to the China coast and adjacent areas
rendered unsafe by h o s tilitie s .
2 / The maximum s tra ig h t-tim e hours which may be worked per
week a t sea. The maximum stra ig h t-tim e hours which may be
worked per week in p o rt are i*0 fo r both day men and watchmen.
At sea, the basic workweek fo r deck department watchmen is 56
hours w ith 8 hours being paid a t th e overtime ra te . At sea ,
the basic workweek fo r deck departm ent day men, engineroom day
men and engineroom watchmen is 56 hours, w ith 12 hours being
paid a t the overtime ra te .
The maximum stra ig h t-tim e hours which may be worked per
both a t sea and in p o rt. At sea, the normal workweek fo r
members of the stew ard's departm ent is 56 hours w ith 12 hours
being paid a t the overtim e ra te .

r

£ t& U & d & U *U f

October 1, 1951

October 1 , 1951

Rate Hours
per per
month veek

Deck departm ent; 2j
Day men:
A.B. maintenance men ......................................... $315.00 1 *
*1
Boatswains:
V essels of 15,001 to 20,000
gross tons .................................................... 1*19.00 1 *
*1
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross tons .................................................... 1*02. oo 1*1*
Vessels under 10,000 gross tons ........... 360.00 Ui
C arpenters:
Vessels of 15,001 to 20,000
gross t o n s ................................................... 37l*.oo 1 *
*1
Vessels of 10,001 to 15,000
gross t o n s .......................... ........................ 368.00 kk
V essels under 10,000 gross tons ........... 337.00 11
**
C arpenters' m a te s ............. .................................. 332.00 k k
Deck storekeepers ................................................ 321.00 k k
Watchmen:
Able bodied seamen (3 years) ........................ 288.00 1*8
Able bodied seamen (less than 3 y e a r s ) ... 273.00 1*8
Boatswains' mates ................................................ 315.00 1*8
Ordinary seamen .................................................... 228.00 1*8
Quarterm asters ...................................................... 288.00 1*8
Watchmen (3 y ears) ............................................. 288.00 1*8
Watchmen (less than 3 years) ........................ 273.00 1*8
Engine-room departm ent: £ /
Day men:
C hief e le c tric ia n s :
P-2 tu rb o -e le c tric vessels ...................
P-2 turbine v e ssels ..................................
C -l, C-2, C-3, Victory Ships,
and CIMAVI vessels ................................
C-i* v essels ....................................................
Chief re e fe r engineers:
F reight v e sse ls, le ss than
52,000 cubic fe e t ..................................
Deck engineers:
Class A and B passenger vessels .........
F reig h ters ......................................................
Firemen ...................................................................
U nlicensed ju n io rs ...........................................
Wipe rs ....................................................................
Watchmen:
C hief re e fe r engineers:
R-2 re frig e ra to r steam type
v essels .......................................................
F reight re frig e ra to r v e sse ls, 52,000
cu. f t . and over ....................................
F reight or passenger re frig e ra to r
v e sse ls, le s s than 52,000 ............... .
Class A passenger vessels with
a ir conditioning ....................................
Firemen ............................................................
O ilers ..............................................................
Second e le c tric ia n s :
P-2 tu rb o -e le c tric vessels ............
P-2 turbine vessels ..........................
Unlicensed ju n io rs ....................................
W atertenders « . . . .......................................,
Stewards departm ent: 3 /
F re ig h te rs:
~
A ssistant cooks:
Offshore trade
Alaska trade ..

^ A & H A fU vU

T tn iic n n in d P e e A o n n e t 2/ - C o n tin u e d

T tn li& e n A e d P e e io n n e t y

Rate
Classification

Hours

per

per
week

hour
Longshoremen:
G e n e r a l c a r g o .................... ................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s p e n a l t y c o m m o d i t i e s ...........
Paper and pulp in packages of
lbs. o r m o r e ................................

300

S h o v e l i n g j o b s ...................................
P h o s p h a t e r o c k i n b u l k .........................
B o a r d m e n s t o w i n g b u l k g r a i n ...................
B u l k sulphur,

s o d a ash,

and crude

u n t r e a t e d p o t a s h ..............................
U n t r e a t e d or o f f e n s i v e b o n e s i n b u l k ........
D a m a g e d c a r g o .....................................
W h e n f i r e is b u r n i n g o r c a r g o is
s m o u l d e r i n g i n a h a t c h .......................
E x p l o s i v e s .........................................

Burton men .................................. .............. .

D o n k e y d r i v e r s .......................................
W i n c h d r i v e r s ........................................
Hatch tenders
Sack turners
Side runners

....................................... .
.................. .......................
................ ......................

B o o m m e n ......................... ............ .
B l a d e t r u c k e r s ............ ...........................
S t o w i n g - m a c h i n e d r i v e r s ............................
C o m b i n a t i o n l i f t - t r u c k - j i t n e y d r i v e r s ..........
L i f t - j i t n e y d r i v e r s .................................

Table C-5U*

$1,970
2.070
2.070
2.170

2.270

2.270
2.1*20
2.770
2.820
3.170
3.9UO
2.070
2.070
2,070
2.070
2.070
2,070
2.070
2.070
2.070
2.070
2.070

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

CfAe&esuf Sto tu eA

a n d M e e t M ja /vh e t*.

October 1, 1951
C la ssific a tio n

' Rale
per
week

Grocery and vegetable departm ents:
C lerks;
Under 3 months ...................................................... $1*3.50
3 to 6 months ......................................................... 1*8.50
6 to 9 months ......................................... ............... 51*. 90
9 to 12 months ...................................................... 58.90
Journeymen or dem onstrators .......................... 65.00
Bakery departm ents:
C lerks, male:
Under 1* months ...................................................... 39.50
1* to 8 months ..................................................
1*1*. 50
8 to 12 months ...................................................... 1*6.50
Journeym en........... ................................................... 5 i.5 o
Head salespersons or dem onstrators *......... 51*. 5o
C lerks, female:
Under 1* months ...................................................... 38.50
1* to 8 months ........................................................ 1*0.50
8 to 12 months ...................................................... 1*2.50
Journeymen ............................................................... 1*5.50
Head salespersons or dem onstrators ........... 51.50Meat departm ent:
Managers ......................................................................... 88.50
Forem en................................................. ..
88.50
Head blockmen ............................................................... 88.50
Journeymen .............................. ...................................... 81.00

Hours
per
week
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*6
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

15,

Table C-541:

QA&O&Uf StofreA G4td

Table C-58:

M&cU MjGfiJieil Con tin u ed

a n d JLu j tc Ji/iM n U

-

Bate
per
week

Meat department: - Continued
Apprentices:
Firat 6 months ......... .... ..
151.00 1/
Female employees:
45.00
First 30 days ........ ..... .
Hurt 1 months . T... .... ....... 50.00
.
M ' t months_______ _____ ...___ 55.00
Ar
60.00
Hext 3 months ............... .
Thereafter............ .
65.00

.

Hours
per
week

A0
40
A0
A0
40
40

1/ Apprentices a e advanced 15.00 per week each 6 months.
r'
Upon qualifying they receive Journeyman's sca e
l.

M dk jbealeM

Table 0-5452:
October 1 1951
,

Classification
Drivers:
Regular route drivers ....................................
Semi— drivers .....................................
truck
Relief drivers............................
Inside classifications:
Wight loaders ...........................................
ReHef night loaders__. . . . . . . . . ___ . . . ___
2 p.mr shift or later ............................ .
Relief 2 p,m. shift or la ter....... ............
Paper—
forming maahlna operators ....................
Relief paper-forming machine operators .......
Checkers and pasteurizers ...................
Relief checkers and pasteurisers ..................
All inside men not classified.....................
Relief, all inside men not classified ....... .

-

Rate Hours
per per
day day
#15.25
15.75
16.50
16.00
16.75
15.75
16*50
15.75
16.50
15.50
16.25
15.25
16.00

8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8

R eA toiiSlO ntl, G/ojf&teSUoi
a n d JLu n c Jv u io n U
October 1 1951
,

Classification
Cooks and assistants:
Chefs ..................................................................
Butchers
__. __. . . . __. .. . . . . . . .
Pastry . . . ......................................................
Cooks ............................... . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Griddle cooks .....................................
Cooks * helpers ....................................
Pantrymen...................................................... .
Dishwashers ........................................
Porters, with meals.............. ..........
Porters, without meals..................................
Waiters:
Class A restaurants and cafes
8 hours' straight shift ..............................
6 hours'straight shift ..............................




Rate Hours
per per
day 1/ day
(open)
(open)
(open)
#12.70
10.95
9.45
10.45
8.95
8.95
9.95

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

7.55 40
6.13 30

^b'uuj, Sto^eA Goniinumd
-

G o n tU u ta d
October 1 1951
,

Classification

Bate
per
day

Hours
per
day

Waiters: - Continued
Class B popular price houses:
,
8 h u s striaght shift............ # 8.55 40
or'
6 h u s straight shift....
or'
7.13 30
Waitresses:
8 h u s straight shift........ .......
or'
7.55 40
6 h u s straight shift ............. .
or'
6.13 30
Counter waitresses:
8 h u s straight shift............
or'
8.05 40
Dish-up workers on steam tables:
8.05 40
6 h u s straight shift...........
or'
6.88 3
0
Counter men in cafeterias, fountains,
and dairy lunches:
Head fountain m n 8 h u s straight shift
e, or'
9.55 40
Fountain men, 8 h u s straight shift . .
or'
..
8.55 40
Head fountain girls, 8 h u s
or'
straight shift..... ...........
9.20 40
Fountain girls, 8 hours'straight shift .
.
8.20 40
Captains, cashiers, and food checkers:
Captains, 8 hours'straight shift.......
9.20 40
Cashiers........ .......... ..... .
8.20 40
Food checkers .....................
9.20 40
Bus boys:
8 h u s straight shift.............
or'
7.85 40
Bus girls:
8 h u s straight shift ...............
or'
7.35 40
1/ Per day of 8 hours, unless otherwise indicated.

Table C-591*

October 1, 1951
Hours
per8
*
4
week

Classification
Table 0-58:

Table C-591:

October 1 1951
,

October 1 1951
,
Classification

(leAtoufcUl&L , G a^eJ& U oi

Head pharmacists or head salespersons .........
Journeymen registered pharmacists
(after 18 months' experience) .....................
Apprentice registered pharmacists:
12 to 18 months'experience ........................
6 to 12 months' experience .........................
Up to 6 months' experience ..........................
Displaymen..........................................................
Displaymen's helpers:
8 to 12 months' experience .........................
4 to 8 months? experience ...........................
Up to 4 months' experience ..........................
Stockmen ...................................................
Salespersons (male):
Photo equipment ............................................
Demonstrators ............................................. .
Journeymen (non-registered salespersons,
over 12 months'experience) .....................
Apprentices (non-registered salespersons)*
8 to 12 months' experience ......................
4 to 8 months' experience ................
Up to 4 months'experience ......... ...........
Salespersons (female):
Photo equipment ...........................................

#95.50

40

93.00

Bate 1Hours
per
per
week week

Classification
Salespersons (female): - Continued
Demonstrators .....................
Journeymen (non-registered salespersons,
over 12 months'experience) ..........
Apprentices (non-registered salespersons)<
8 to 12 mo t s experience ..........
nh'
4 to 8 m n
o ths' experience ...........
Up to A months experience ..........

Table C-6512:

#52.30

40

52.30

40

47.30
44.80
42.30

40
40
40

Q iuldU uj, S&HMCe

October 1 1951
,

Bate
per
week

C la ssific a tio n

O ffice b u ild in g s:
J a n ito ria l work:
L ight .......................................................................... #1.110
Heavy ........................................................................ 1.135
U tility ja n ito rs .................................................. 1.250
1.300
Licensed u t i l i t y ja n ito rs ............................
E levator o p e ra to r s .................................................... 1.110
S ta rte rs ...................................................................
1.180
A ssistan t s ta rte rs .................................................... 1.130
Foremen .......................................................................... 1.215
Forewomen ...................................................................... 1.180
P a rtitio n g lass cleaners ....................................... 1.260
Watchmen ......................................................................... 1.135
Department s to re s :
J a n ito ria l work:
L ight ......................................................................... 1.100
Heavy . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.150
U tility ja n ito rs .................................................. 1.200
Licensed u t i l i t y ja n ito rs .............................. 1.275
E levator o p erato rs, passenger ............................ 1.085
E levator o p erato rs, fre ig h t ................................. 1.175
E levator s ta rte rs and foremen . . ........................ 1.194
A ssistan t elev ato r s ta rte rs ................................. 1.139
Combination w atchm en-janitors ............................ 1.150

83.00

73.00

Hours
per
week
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

J to ie U

68.00

Table C-7011:
Ootober 1 1951
,

67.30
54.80
49.80
49.80

40
40
40

64.80
59.80

40
40

59.80

40

54.80
52.30
49.80

40
40
40

57.30

40

Classification

Rate
Hours
per
p
er
day 1/ week

Maids ............................ # 8.48
Housekeepers ................... .
9.24
Seamstresses........ ............... 9.24
Inspectresses... ...................
9.24
Linen room women .....................
9.24
Housemen..........................
8.70
Package room men..... .......... ..... 8.90
8.80
Head timekeeper ......................
Timekeeper .........................
8.30
Hat checkers .......................
8.70
Clerks ............................ 9.29
i/ Per day of 8 hours.

40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40

40

16 ,

D:

Table D-l:

M in im u m

Minimum rate (in cents)
All establishments ...............................
Under 75 .................................................
75 ............................................................
Over 75 and under 80 ...........................
Over 80 and under 85 ...........................
Over 85 and under 90 ...........................
Over 90 and under 95 ...........................
95 ............................................................
Over 95 and under 100 .........................
100..........................................................
Over 100 and under 105 ........................
105 ..........................................................
Over 105 and under 110 ........................
110..........................................................
Over 110 and under 115 ........................
115..........................................................
Over 115 and under 120 ........................
120..........................................................
Over 120 and under 125 ........................
125 ..........................................................
Over 125 and under 130 ........................
130 ..........................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ........................
135 ..........................................................
Over 135 and under 140 ........................
140..........................................................
Over 140 and under 145 ........................
145 ..........................................................
Over 145 and under 150 ........................
150..........................................................
Over 150 and under 155 ........................
155 ..........................................................
Over 155 and under 160 ................
160..........................................................
Over 160 and under 165 .......................................
165 ...............................................................................................
Over 165 and under 170 .......................................
170 ...............................................................................................
Over 170 and under 175 .................. ...................
175 and over .............................................................
Establishments with no established
m i n i m u m ......................................................................

Information not available

..............................

Entrance Rates

£*ttn&HCe> P a te A jo b P la n t W a b k s b b 1/

Percent o f p la n t workers in establishm ents w ith sp e cifie d
minimum ra te s in -

All
Public
industries Manufacturing utilities* Wholesale Retail Services
trade trade
2/ .
100.0
2.5
3.8
2.7
.2
.4
.8
4.4
.7
.4
.3
4.7
4.1
5.6
.8
5.3
.2
.9
.1
4.4
(2/)
1.9
1.2
20.8
3.6
.4
2.2
.9
1.2
.3
2.7
.9
4.1
2.3
3.0
2.2
.4
1.6
3.4
2.3
1.4
.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.8
_
.9
.9
.7
.8

_
-

8.0
-

11.6
11.8
1.3
16.8

_
9.2
3.0
_
1.3
7.1
.7
1.9
6.7
5.3
7.9
-

1.4
8.6
6.7
10.7
.9
10.5
_
.8
_

-

1.4
1.3
4.7
1.6
.6
2.7
1.5
41.5
5.5
.3
2.4
1.2
.4
3.9
1.2
6.8
2.4
1.2
2.1
3.3
6.3
2.2
-

-

.9
(2/)

-

-

20.3
7.9
4.1
1.6
_
_
25.2
3.5
2.8
7.3
2.3
.2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100.0
32.7
3.4
3.0
5.1
_
1.8
4.9
-

9.7
25.0
4.0
2.1
_
-

-

1.1
1.2
1.3

7.3
4.5
-8.1
1.8
-

7.1
7.9
4.7
8.8
1.9
4.9
3.0
-

2.5

1.5
5.9

.9
2.3

1.8
1.4

2.7

-

-

.6
-

-

-

.5
2.3
6.6
-

2.4
-

-

“

1.9
4.0

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
2/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.




E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-lt

S / t ijt S b ijja b O tU ic U PbO O idiO H d.

Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in A]LI
manufatstoring
Machinery
Millwork
industi•ies 1/
3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or
2d
shift other shift other shift other
shift
shift
shift

Shift differential

Percent of workers on extra
shifts, all establishments .......
Receiving shift
differentials ..........................
Uniform cents (per hour) ...
3 cents .............................
4 cents .............................
5 cents .............................
6 cents .............................
cents ...........................
7 cents .............................
10 cents ...........................
Over 10 cents ..................
Uniform percentage ...............
10 percent ........................
Full day's pay for reduced
hours ...................................
Other ......................................
Receiving no differential ........

19.8

5.3

14.5

1.7

1.9

19.4
16.6
.7
1.4
2.2
.2
.3
11.8
.3
.3

5.0
.9

14.5
«.

1.7
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
_
•
_
-

.3
2.2
.4

.3
.2
-.1
.3

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

.1
4.0 2/14.5 2/1*7
.3
-

_
-

-

_
_
-

1.9

“
-

-

-

-

-

-

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ 8 hours’ cay for 7^ hours worked plus 10 percent.
2/ 8 hours’ pay for 7 hours worked plus 15 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash., September 1951
C.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17,

Table E-2*
P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E

Weekly hours

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

M anufacturing

R etail trade

F inance **

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.6
5.9
2.1
88.2
.5
1.6
_
.1

1.4
3.5
.6
93.7
.8
-

0.3
-

4.3
9.7
6.4
79.6
-

35 hours ....................................................................................................
Over 35 hours and under hours • * . . . .
37£ hours ................................................................................................
Over 37^ hours and under 40 hours .............. ...
AO hours ....................................................................................................
Over AO hours and under AA hours .....................
AA hours .......................................................
Over AA hours and under 48 hours *..........
48 hours .......................................................
l/
2/
2/
*
**

W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

W holesale
trad e

...................................................................

establishments

1/

P ublic
utilities*

All
industries

A ll

S c h e d u le d W je e Jzlif Jto u tM

-

-

4.1
94.6
1.3
-

-

98.7
1.2
.1

.7

90.7
1.8
5.9
.6

A11 „
industries 2 //

M anufacturing

Public
u tilities *

W holesale
trad e

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

32.5
66.7
.8
-

1.6
•4
.7
.1
87.2
1.7
2.1
.3
5.9

3.3
1.4
91.5
(2/)
3.8

All . f
industries 1 / Manufacturing

Services

-

100,0_
-

94.9
5.1
_

82.6
7.3
_
10.1

100.0

1.5
.3
77.2
3.0
7.6
1.0
9.4

-

-

Services

100.0

-

-

R etail trad e

1.4
.6
96.4
•
1.6

Data relate to women workers*
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
#
Table E-3«
Number o f paid holiday s

A ll estab lishm ents .............................................
E stablishm ents providing paid
ho lid ay s ..............................................................
1 to 5 days ......................................................
6 days .................................................................
7 d a y s ...............................................................
8 d a y s .................................................................
8£ d a y s ...............................................................
9 days .................................................................
10 d a y s ....................................... .....................
11 days .............................................................
E stablishm ents providing no paid
holiday s .............................................................

1/
*
**

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.3
.4
7.5
45.8
29.6

99.9
1 .4
9 .6
29.4
59.0

100.0

100.0

96.4

100.0

97.4

84.3
2 .6
11.2
4 1.0
25.6

-

-

All
industries

.6

14.8
.6
.7

-

.5

-

_

_

_

9 .4
68.8
21.8

13.5
63.8
22.7

7.3
76.6
12.5

-

-

-

-

-

.1

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




P & id J h lu lc u fi

-

3 .6

_

2 .4
25.3
17.0
2.3
50.9
2.1

_

3 .9
54.6
20.2

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

87.7

86.5

98.0

82.1

50.3

4 .9
14.5
25.4
42.0

_

3.8

_

18.7

3 .4
.5

.9
“

2 .6

15.7

12.3

-

-

-

-

-

5.1
45.6
10.6
25.2

12.2
73.6
8 .4

-

-

13.5

2 .0

-

, Retail trade

Services

_

9.1
60.2
12.8

5.2
43.8
1.3

-

-

17.9

49.7

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Seattle, Wash*, September 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-4t
Vacation policy
All establishments .....................................

P a id V & c & tio n i. (Q o n m a l P / U H *U ia *u )

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N Public
utilities*

All
industries

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

, 190,0

99.8

•2

99.3
15.5
_
83.8
.7

99.8
3.7
.5
92.9
2.1
.6
.2

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Services

All
y
industries 1 / Manufacturing

100*0 . 100.0

100.0

100.0
62.5
_
37.5
-

100.0
40.5
59.5
-

100.0
71.8
7.0
21.2
-

100.0
1.9
96.2
1.9
-

99.4
21.1
78.3
-

99.3
4.5
.5
94.3
.7

100.0
10.3
3.0
72.2
14.5
-

100.0
1.8
98.2
-

100.0

100.0

98.8

99.2

97.4
-

100.0
_
95.7
1.9
2.4
-

1 4 .2

33.0
2.9
42.6
19.8
.5

45.2
4.5
10.7
37.9

1 .2

.8

99.8
-•3
94.8
3.3
1.4
.2

99.3
1.2
_
95.9
2.2
.7

100.0

100.0
_
99.5
.5
-

100.0
_
91.1
6.5
2.4
-

100.0
_
100.0
-

9 8 .8

85.5
14.5
-

100.0
_
100.0
-

99.8
.3
_
74.4
.2
24.6
.3
•2

99.3
1.2
_
90.5
7.6
.7

100.0
_
36.8
63.2
-

100 oO
_
75.6
24.4
-

100.0

100.0
67.5
.7
30.6
1.2
-

100.0
_
82.0
18.0
-

. ^CSLaS.__ ... JALlCL ...

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioe.

. lOQ.o . .. J lPO*o , ^.. JLSfi.fi___

1 vear of service
Establishments with paid vacations ........
1 week .....................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .....................
2 weeks ....................................... .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .....................
3 weeks ...................................................
Establishments with no paid vacations ..

2 9 .4

1.1
68.8
•5
-

.6

80.3
62.9
2.8
13.7
•4
.5
19.7

100.0

89.3

5 2 .6

6 3 .2

47.4
-

2 6 .1

10.7

100.0
79.4
11.8
8.8
-

100.0
25.5
2.0
6 5 .2 .
7.3T
-

89.3
25.4
63.9
10.7

100.0
11.1
2.3
8 6 .6
-

100.0
45.4
54.6
-

99.2
4.9
.2
54.0
39.2
.9
.8

100.0
.6
92.2
7.2
“
-

89.3
2.0
87.3
10.7

100.0
_
95.3
2.3
2.4
-

1 0 0 .0

99.2
4.9

100.0

89.3
2.0
6 7 .8
19.5
10.7

100.0

100.0
_
98.2
-

61.3
56.5
.3
3 .6
.9

38.7

9 8 .0
8 5 .1

12.9
2 .0

g_jrears..o.f service
Establishments with paid vacations . .. . .
1 week...................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .....................
2 weeks ....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks....................
3 weeks...................................................
Establishments with no paid vacations ••

2 .6

85.8
-

.9

.

5. years of service
Establishments with paid vacations •••••
1 week ......................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks........... •••••
2 weeks ..................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ....................
3 weeks...................................... ............
Establishments with no paid vacations ..

2.5
.1
74.3
20.9
1.0
1 .2

.
“
-

1 0 0 .0

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ........
1 week...............................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..............
2 weeks...................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks .............................................. .
Over 3 weeks.........................................
Establishments with no paid vacations ••

-

Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2/




78.7
21.3
-

-

9 8 .8

2.5
.2
64.3
19.6
11.9
.3
1.2

.2
5 0 .0

39.2
4.9
.8

.6
61.7
37.7
-

Occupational Wage Survey,
Bureau

-

84.3
2.3
13.4
-

1 .8

-

Seattle, Wash., September 1951
U.S. DEPARDfflNT OF I A CR
.B
of Labor Statistics

Table E-5t

P a id B lcJz j£&cu*e> (fy&M Hal Psuuti&iOHd')

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

32.3
1.4
4.6
19.3
2.7
2.4
1.2
.7

60.5
_
1.8
52.0
.8
5.9
_

8.8
.9
3.5
4.4
.
-

21.0
8.8
2.8

9.3
1.8
6.8
.7

31.4
5.0
9.7
4.3
7.3
2.4

-

2.7

29.3
28.8
.5
_

67.7

39.5

91.2

79.0

90.7

68.6

38.4
5.9
4.9
19.9
4.2
.2
.9
1.7
.7

60.7
1.8
.2
50.6
7.3
.8
-

23.2
_
1.7
19.7
1.8
-

50.7
17.8
8.6
8.2
2.7

13.3
1.8
10.8

_

-

31.4
10.4
6.7
7.3
4.3
-

13.4

61.6

39.3

76.8

49.3

86.7

37.9
4.7
3.2
21.3
4.2
.5
.4
1.7
1.9

60.7
1.8
_
50.6
7.3
.2
-

23.2
_
1.7
19.7
1.8
-

47.2
14*2
5.0
5.3
2.7
3.6
2.9
13.5

13.3
10.8
_
.7
-

-

•

62.1

39.3

76.8

52.8

37.9
4.7
3.2
18.7
4.2
1.0
2.1
4.0

60.7
1.8

23.2

50.6
7.3
- 1.0

1.7
19.7
1.8
-

62.1

39.3

76.8

All
industries

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Service*

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.0

1.1

11.8

3.4

.7
.4
-

1.9

-

_

4.0
5.8
2.0
-

3.5
2.2
1.3

5.9

1.4
1.8
.3
.3
.2
-

3.4
-

-

4.0
-

70.7

96.0

98.9

88.2

96.6

96.5

94.1

29.3
4.6
6.1
18.6

6.1
1.0

1 .1

.3
-

13.8
2.5
6.8
1.1

5.6
2.2
3.4

2.4
1.4
-

19.1
2.3
13.3
3.5

5.9
1.9
4.0

2.7

-

68.6

70.7

31.4
7.8
2.4
14.2
4.3
-

29.3
4.6
6.1
-

|

ah
, .
industries 1 / Manufacturing

6m
onths of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............................
2 days ..............................................
5 days ..............................................
6 to 7 days ......................................
10 days ............................................
12 days ............................................
20 days ............................................
Over 20 days....................................
Establishments with no formal previsions
for paid sick leave ...........................

-

9.4
_

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............................
5 days ..............................................
6 to 7 days ......................................
10 days ...............................................................................
12 days ...............................................................................
15 days ............................................
17 days ............................................
20 days..............................................................................
Over 20 days .................................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................................................

-

_

.7

_

-

1 .1

.8
(2/)
-

-

-

-

93.9

98.9

80.9

6.0
.9
i.i
2.3
1.4
(2/)
.1
.2

1 .1

•

-

-

19.1
2.3
13.3
3.5
-

-

.2

-

-

86.2

94.4

94.1

12.2
.9

5.6
2.2
3.4
-

-

-

5.9
1.9
4.0
-

-

3.4

-

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...........................
5 days ..............................................
6 to 7 days ......................................
10 days ............................................
12 days ............................................
1A days ............................................
15 days ......................................
20 days ............................................
Over 20 days ..................................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................................................

.8

-

1 .8

-

-

.8
.3
(2/)
-

-

<

4.8

1 .1

2.0
3.4

-

2.7

18.6

86.7

68.6

70.7

94.0

98.9

80.9

87.8

94.4

94.1

47.2
14.2
5.0
1.0
2.8
4.3
9.4
10.5

13.3
1.8
10.8

31.4
7.8
2.4

29.3

1.1

19.1

5.6
2.2
3.4
-

-

4.3
1.9
3.1
5.3

(2/)

2.3
13.3
3.5
-

12.2
.9
1.5
1.1

5.9

-

4.6
6.1
18.6

6.0
.9
1,2
2.0
1.4
.2
.2

52.8

86.7

68.6

70.7

94.0

98.9

80.9

5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................................................
5 days............, ...................................................................
6 to 7 days ....................................................................
10 days ............................................
12 days ............................................
15 days ............................................
20 days ............................................
Over 20 days .....................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave...... ....................
1/
2/
*
**

_

-

Includes data for industries other than those show separately.
n
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities,
m
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

.7

6 .6

-

.1

.8

-

.3

-

-

3.4
2.0

3 .3

-

1.9
4.0
-

87.8

94.4

94.1

Occupational W g Survey, Seattle, W
ae
ash., Septem 1951
ber
U.S. D A TM T O L B R
EP R EN F A O ,
Bureau of Labor Statistics!

20,

Table B-6:

ftOnptoodu&tiOH

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N Type of bonus

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

lndustries2/ Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

- 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1QQ.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses £ / .......................................

4 0 .4

21*4

1 0 .2

40.0

1 6 .3

8 3 .6

5 6 .7

1 7 .8

1 3 .8

1 .8

3 3 .2

2 3 .7

3 2 .0

Profit-sharing ................................
Other...... *................. ...

3 6 .8
2 .1
3 .1

21*4
-

7 .4

1 6 .3

1 7 .2
.8
•4

1 3 .8
«•

2 4 .4
1 1 .2

2 3 .7

-

4 4 .5
5 .0
8 .0

1 .8

2*8

3 7 .8
7 .7

3 1 .3
.7

5 9 .6

7 8 .6

8 9 .8

4 3 .3

8 2 .2

8 6 .2

All establishments ..............................

Establishments with no nonproduction

2/
2/
*
a*

-

“

.3

7 5 .0
3 .0
8 .6

6 0 .0

8 3 .7

1 6 .4

7 j

*
a*




-

*

mi

9 8 .2

.

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

-

1 .6

6 6 .8

7 6 .3

6 8 .0

Includes data for Industries other than those show separately*
n
Unduplicated total*
Transportation (excluding railroads); c m u cation, and other public utilities*
o mni
Finance, Insurance, and real estate*

Table E-7:

2/

-

__ 1 0 0 .0

Wholesale
trade

Includes data for Industries other than those sh w separately*
on
,
Unduplicated total*
Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities,
m
Finance, insurance, and real estate*

and P-enlian P iani

Occupational Wg Survey, Seattle, W
ae
ash*, Septem 1 9 5 1
ber
U.S. D A TM T Q LA O
EP R EN F B R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2 1

A p p e n d ix

Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed*
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial,warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A -A ) . The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services*
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the study.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




M e th o d

o f S u rv e y

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work*
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i*e*, those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workez*s employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question* except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller* The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited t those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

.

22

,

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED
INDUSTRIES IN SEATTLE, WASH., 1/ AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, SEPTEMBER 1951

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

Item

Number of
establishinents
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

147,500
64,200
83,300

89,160
* 43,300
45,860

16,980
5,720
11,260

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions......................................
Manufacturing.................................
Nonmanufacturing..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities....... ........................
Wholesale trade........... ................
Retail trade..............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate.......
Services 2 / ...............................

21
21
21

1,232
3U
891

246

21
21
21
21
21

109
211
312
133
126

27
38
45
35
37

20,400
13,100
29,500
10,600
9,700

16,320
4,ao
15,030
5,830
4,270

2,330
1,440
2,690
4,ao
390

21
21
21

14
19
31

8
10
13

756
3,062
3,017

515
2,711
1,945

65
220
1,679

U

182

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis

U

Mi 11work........... ...............................
Machinery industries..............................
Insurance carriers................................

1/ Seattle Metropolitan Area (King County).
2/ Total establishment employment,
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit member­
ship organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
Industries &re defined in footnotes to wage tables.

U




23

Index
Page
number

Assembler, sash, door, or frame




8

...........

...........
..... 0...,
...........

8

8
8
8

Page
number
8
Millwright ...................... ...... -............ .................
IH v a t * (Y m Vurl An ^ ______ _ ^ ......... ........ .
y
..... ......... .
13
Molder operator (millvork) .............0 ..••••••••,
................
13
M o t ^ r t n w k dr^v®r
3
f)ff iQm bljy t r t t t M f f f t ‘ - t ‘ f r f * * T r r t * r r f T f T “ f * t ‘ ................
f ‘
Office g i r l ............. -..... ....... ....... ...... .
.... ...........
8
................
13
f^riarfltnr (l noal transit)
Order filler
fkamwan (hslmfl A S )
............... .
13
Packer
*,***.,
Packer (bakeries)
13
M n t a r (btiilfHng aonstmatfon) t t t t t m t t t r t m t t i
................
f
t
Painter, maintenanoe .....
Pasteurizer (milk dealers) .... ...... .....
........................................................
If
Pharmacist. (drag stares)
Photoengraver (printing) ......^........*^...,.+. 4 .
,
13
................
f
t
Pipe fitter, maintenance
Planer operator (millvork)
................
13
Plasterer (building construction)
....... .........
13
Plumber (building construction)
Plumber, maintenanoe ............... .tt1f
Porter .... ...................
Pressman (printing) • •••.••.•<>•.................ntn.
Quartermaster (ocean transport)
Receiving olerk
••••••••••••••••<
Rip-saw operator (millwork) . . T T t t r . r t T t t t t r . t t t t t ........ 1 1
t .
15
Salesperson (drugstores) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T i , * , t .......................................................
.
Seaman, able bodied (ocean transport)
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport)
Secretary
................
...
Section head (insurance carriers)
................
f
t
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance
Shipping olerk . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................
.
Shipping-and-receiving olerk .......................................
Starter (building service) .................... f t,
... t t .
t
Stenographer
Stenographer (insurance carriers)
Stereotyper (printing) •••••••••<.... ...... . . . . . . . . . .
Steward (ocean transport) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T A T t T t 1
...
................................
....... .....................
Stock handler ..............................
Switchboard o p e r a t o r ..............................................................................
...
.........................
..
......................
...
.................. T . .
6
Switchboard operator—receptionist
Tabulating-machine operator ........................... ........
...
.........................
Tflhtilflting-mach’
fne operator (insurance carriers)
. . . . .____t t r t t t t t
t
I 5
Tool-and-die maker .. ............................
.
...
........................................
...
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)
T r a c e r .................... ...
...
.....................
........................................ ...................................
...
.............................
...
Transcribing-machine operator .. .......................................
.
...
.........................
...
Truck d r i v e r ...........................
...
................................
...
........................................................................
Truck driver (milk dealers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Truck driver (millwork) •
Trucker, band . . . . ................
...
..........................................................
.
Trucker, hand (machinery)
Trucker, power
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) . . A . A A T * t t t 1
T y p i s t ....................... ...... ................
Typist (insurance carriers) .......
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ...... .............
Waiter (restaurants) ....... ............ .
Watchman ............................ .......... .
Watchman (ocean transport) ......... ............ .
Winch driver (stevedoring) ...................... .
Wrapper (bakeries) .................... ........ .

-fc U . S . G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : 1952 O — 991820

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 20 cents







This report was prepared in the Bureau’s Western Regional Office.
Communications may he addressed to:
Max D. Kossoris, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Room 107^
870 Market Street
San Francisco 2, California
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The Western Region includes the following states:
Arizona
California
Colorado
Idaho
Nevada

New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Washington
Wyoming


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