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Occupational Wage Survey
C LEVELAND, O HIO

October 1951

Bulletin No. 1056

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Com m i*sioner




Contents

Page
ffiaber

INTRODUCTION ................................. .............................

1

THE CLEVELAND METROPOLITAN AREA..............................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ..................................................

2

TABLES
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations..................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ........................... •••
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ............. ............«••••
A-4
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ••••••••••••••••••*••»•«••«

3
9
10

12

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2337 Women's and misses' suits and coats .. .......
B-336
Nonferrous foundries ........
B-3391 Iron and steel forgings ......
B-342
Cutlery, hand tools and hardware .......
B-3439 Heating apparatus......
B-3444 Sheet-metal work ............................
B-3463 Stamped and pressed metal products ........
B-3468 Electroplating, plating and polishing ............ •••••••..... .
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery ........ ........ ....... ...................... .....
Machine tools ................................
Machine-tool accessories, production shops .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Machine-tool accessories, jobbing shops ...... ••••••••.....
B-40
Railroads......................................................
B-5452 Milk dealers........... ........................................
B-63
Insurance carriers...... .

19
21
22
23
24
24
25

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction .............. •••••••.....••••......
C-205 Bakeries...................................................
C-2082 Malt liquors ...................................................
C-27
Printing .......... ................ ••••••••...... .....••••••••••••
C-41
Local transit operating employees ..................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers .........

26
26
26
26
26
26

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance ratesfor plant workers ...........................

27

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ......
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours
........
S-3
Paid holidays...................................................
E-4
Paid vacations
E-5
Paid sick leave .................................................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ............
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

28
29
29
30
31
33
33

APPENDIX x
Scope and method of survey... ............ .......... ............. .

34

INDEX .......................................... ..........................

36

*

NOTE - Occupational earnings reports are available upon request for the
following additional industries! auto repair shops (June 1951), ferrous
foundries (June 1951), paints and varnishes (May 1951), and power laundries
(May 1951).
February 29, 1952

15
15
16
16
17
17
18
18

Introduction

2/

The Cleveland area is one of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of labor Statistics plans to conduct occupa­
tional wage surveys during the September 1951 - April 1952 per­
iod. Occupations that are common to a variety of manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a community-wide
basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in
compiling earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and
power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping. In pre­
senting earnings information for such Jobs (tables A-l through
separate data have been provided wherever possible for in­
dividual broad industry divisions.

A-k)

Occupations that are characteristic of particular, im­
portant, local industries have been studied on an industry basis,
within the framework of the community survey. 2/ Earnings data
for these jobs have been presented in Series B tables. Union
scales (Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supple­
menting) occupational earnings for several industries or trades
in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or
minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices.

Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau*s regional office in Chicago,111.,
by Woodrcw C. Linn under the direction of George 1. Votava, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Branch of
Community Wage Studies of the Bureau*s Division of Wages and
Industrial Relations in Washington, D. C.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
3/ See appendix table for listing of durable- ana nondurablegoods industries.




The Cleveland

Metropolitan A rea

Cleveland was ranked by the 1950 census as the sev­
enth largest city in the United States and the eleventh largest
metropolitan area. The total population of the standard metro­
politan area (Cuyahoga and lake Counties) was 1 ,^6 5 ,500> while
the population of Cleveland exceeded 900,000.
Situated on the south shore of Lake Erie at the mouth
of the Cuyahoga River, Cleveland is one of the leading ports on
the Great Lakes. Strategic access to iuportant raw materials,
including iron ore and coal, has helped make Cleveland one of
the Nation*s greatest manufacturing centers.
Total nonagricultural employment (excluding railroads
and government service) in Cuyahoga and Lake Counties was over
575>000 in June 1951* More than 50 percent of the wage and sal­
ary earners were employed in manufacturing establishments. Three
out of every four workers in manufacturing were employed in du­
rable-goods industries. 3 /
Metalworking establishments employ a large majority of
the workers in the durable-goods industries and produce a variety
of products including iron and steel, stampings, forgings and
castings, machine tools, cutting tools, office and household
machines and equipment, industrial machinery and equipment, elec­
trical equipment, motor vehicles and accessories, heating and
cooking apparatus, and industrial fasteners (bolts, nuts, wash­
ers, and rivets).
Other Cleveland-made products include clothing
and
textiles, food and kindred products, paints and chemicals, and
printed matter. Thus, Cleveland has a diversification of important manufacturing industries that call, for a labor supply em­
bodying a variety of skills.
Cleveland*s location and its transportation facilities
also make It an important distribution center. About 123,000
sales and related distribution workers were employed in whole­
sale and retail trade In June 1951. The service Industries em­
ployed lj-2,000 persons in such diverse fields as automobile and
other repair shops, laundries, cleaning and dyeing establish­
ments, hotels, theatres, radio and television stations, and busi­
ness service establishments. The transportation (except rail-

2

roads), coianunication, and other public utilities group required
a labor force of approximately 1+2,000. Financial institutions,
including insurance carriers and real estate operators, employed
an estimated 20,000 workers.
Among the industries and establishment-size
groups
surveyed by the Bureau, seven-eighths of the workers in non­
office jobs were employed in establishments having written agree­
ments with labor organizations. Approximately nine in every ten
factory workers in manufacturing plants were working under the
terms of collective-bargaining agreements. In nonmanufacturing,
seven in every ten workers were represented by labor organiza­
tions. The proportion of office workers covered by union con­
tract provisions was substantially lever than that of plant work­
ers. About one-eighth of all office workers were working under
the provisions of union agreements. Only in the public utilities
group of industries, where over a half of the workers were work­
ing under the terms of agreements covering office workers, was
there any appreciable degree of unionization among offices.

Occupational W age Structure
Nearly all of the establishments studied had made for­
mal upward adjustments in wage rates for plant workers since
January 1950 - the base period for the Wage Stabilization Board*s
wage increase formula. Such Increases varied greatly and were
more numerous in manufacturing Industries in which 75 percent
of all plant workers had received increases of 1 5 cents an hour
or more. In durable-goods manufacturing, nearly two-fifths of
the workers had been given hourly pay raises totaling 20 cents
or more. Wage rate Increases for plant workers in nonmanufacturing tended to be less.
General salary Increases for office workers were re­
ported in fewer establishments. The tendency among larger com­
panies was to grant similar Increases to both office and plant
workers. In many smaller establishments, however, increases for
office workers lagged behind plant workers and in many instances
were granted cn an individual basis in place of general Increases.
Formal wage and salary structures for time workers
were reported in establishments employing nearly 95 percent of
plant workers and 70 percent of office workers. Plans providing




a range of rates for each plant classification were somewhat
more common than plans providing a single rate for each job.
Nearly a third of all plant workers were paid under incentive
systems; in manufacturing industries over 1+0 percent were work­
ing under incentive systems. More than a third of the office
workers were In establishments having formalized wage plans;
virtually all such plans provided a range of rates.

Most Cleveland firms studied had established minimum
entrance rates for hiring inexperienced plant workers. Although
entrance rates ranged, from less than 60 cents to more than $1 .60,
$1 or more was the minimum rate in establishments giving employ­
ment to 80 percent of all plant workers. A 75-cent minimum rate
was the lcvest rate reported in manufacturing; wholesale trade;
and transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
Minimum entrance rates of less than 75 cents an hour were found
in other nonmanufacturing groups studied.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing. In
26 of 31 office classifications permitting comparison, average
salaries of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those of
workers in nonmanufacturing establishments. Average hourly earn­
ings of plant workers studied in all industries were slightly
higher in manufacturing for 23 of 28 job categories for which
comparisons were possible.
Nearly 30 percent of the factory workers in Cleveland
manufacturing plants were employed on extra shifts. Almost all
of the extra shift workers were paid shift differentials. In
durable-goods manufacturing about two-thirds of the workers re­
ceived a cents-per-hour differential and the others a percentage
over day-shift rates. In nondurable goods, virtually all workers
were paid a cents-per-hour differential.

Four-fifths of the women office workers in all indus­
tries were scheduled to work a 1+0-hour week in October 1951.
Schedules of 1 0 hours or more were common for office workers in
+
all industry groups except finance, insurance, and real estate.
Over two-fifths of the workers in these offices were scheduled
to work less than 1+ hours. More than 60 percent of the plant
0
workers were working a 1+0-hour week. Virtually all of the other
workers were scheduled to work more than 1+0 hours.

3
,

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations

O cC U ftotiO tpL

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Cleveland, Chio, by industry division, October 1951)
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Mn
e
Bookkeepers, hand
Manufacturing
Durable goods •
•
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ..
Public utilities i
Wholesale trade
Finance ** .......
Services ..........
Clerics, accounting
Manufacturing
Durable goods •
•
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufactuxlng ..
Public utilities ■
Wholesale trade
Finance ** .......
Services ..........
Cleric8. general ..
Manufacturing
Durable goods . . . .
Nondurable goods •
Nanaanufacturing •. •.
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade •.
Finance ** ........
Services .............
I order
Manufacturing ......
Durable goods •
.
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •.
Wholesale trade
Clerks, payroll ,,
Manufacturing
Durable goods •
•
Nondurable goods
Nonnanufacturlng •
•
Wholesale trade
Duplicating-machine operators
Manufacturing
Durable goods ..
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •.
Office boys
Manufacturing ........ .
Durable goods . . . .
Nondurable goods •
N anufacturing . . . .
onm
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ..
Services ........ .

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
* 0 0 & .0 0
Weekly Undex 3 0 .0 0 3 1 .5 0 3 1 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 * 0 .0 0 * 2 .5 0 4 . 0 0 1 7 .5 0 & . 0 0 & . 5 0 & . 0 0 f r .5 0 i o . 0 0 & . 5 0 i $ . 0 0 & . 5 0 7*0.00 7*2.50
earnings
under
(Standard) (Standard) $
3 0 .0C 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 * 0 .0 0 ^2 .5 0 * 5 .0 0 [*7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0
Weekly

$
8 ii.5 0
8 7 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
8 5 .0 0
81*.50
71*. 50
7 2 .7 0

279
86
1*1*
1*2
193
28
128
12
13

1*0.0
u o .o
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
1*0.0

995
633
373
26 0
362
60
235
21*
20

1*0.0
..1*6.6
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 8 .0
1*2.0

6 6 .0 0
6 6 :5 6 "
6 8 .0 0
61*. 00
6 5 .5 0
6 7 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
6 0 .5 0
6 9 .5 0

879
"■fil*
1*82
130
26 7
35
127
31*
1*7

1*0.0
..1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
3 9 .5
1*2.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5

6 7 .5 0
6 7 .5 6 "
6 6 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
6 6 .0 0
5 5 .5 0

70 3
169
127
1*2
531*
1*89

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

22 0
iei*
11*1*
20
56
35

6 6 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
! 7 5 .5 0
! 5 9 .5 0
61*.00
61*.5o

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

! 6 7 .0 0
"66'. 0 0 '
| 6 8 .0 0
! 5 1 .0 0
6 9 .5 0
: 61*.50

50
— 35“
18
17
15

3 9 .5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .0

i 1*8.50
1" T ra r1
'
1*1*.00

187
57“
1*7
10
130
38
19
60

3 9 .5
~ W .'5
1*0.5
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .0

50 .0 0

5 2 .0 0
la .5 0
1*2.00
1*3.00
3 6 .0 0
1*1.50
1*7.00
1*1*.00
3 8 .5 0

2

10

5
3
2

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1

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56
36

106
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67
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77
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11*
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-

55

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sad
90.00 over

10
10

.
1
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1*
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1*5
5
32
_
8

71
53
1*0
13
18
5
9
1
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86
59
50
9
27
5
22
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61*
35
25
10
29
1*
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1*5^ 1 0 8
26
76
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61
_ 1 15
32
19 l
1*
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37
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51
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65
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211

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73

29
17
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36

79
60
23
37
19
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9
1

99

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90 ,
72 j

5
1*
1*
_

27

93
75
31*
la
18
1*
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1*
-

62

81*
20
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61* J
61*

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fe.oo|)o.oo

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h

n
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1

Occupational W g Survey, Cleveland, O h i o , October 1951
ae
See footnotes at end of table.
U.5. D A TM T (F LABO
EP R EN
R
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
NOTE: Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be show separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
n
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for a ll industries com
bined and for nonmanufacturing.




O jflioe O ccupation^

-

G a ntU uted

(Average straight-time weekly hom-s auiu earnings 1/ for selected oqcupations studied on an area basis
in Cleveland, Ohio, by industiy division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F W
eekly
Weekly
hours. earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $

Sex, occupation, and industiy division

Under

30.00

^0.00 $2.50 fe.oo 17.50 to . 00 1U.50 &5.00 fi7.50 lo.oo 12.50 15.00 $ 7.50 60.00 $ $ 5.oo $67.5> ^0.00 ^2.5C fc.oo %0.00 %5.oc *90.00
62.50 6
5
and
and
under
32.50 35.00 37.50 U0.00 U2.50 U5.00 1. 7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90. 0c ov er

Msn - Continued
Tabula ting-machine operators .........
Manufacturing ..................... .
Durable goods •••••••••........
Nondurable goods ..... .
Nonmanufacturing
............ ......
Finance *# ....................
typists, class B

...... ••••••••»•••

Nonmanufacturing ...........................

152
97
75
22
55

10

Ui

"39"

Uo.o
“TOT
Uo.o

19.00
7 0 (3 "
72.00

Uo.o 68.50
39.5 65.00
Uo.o 63.OO
Uo.o 51.50
■U07CT 52.00

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

2

_

.

-

1

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

.

2

1
1
1

-

2

-

6
6

.

-

7
7

6
3
2
1
3
2
10
10

2_____ I
2 5
2 2
3
2
2
1 8
8
“

127
52
36
16
75
13
U5

75
52
36
16
23
3
20

56 ____ 29
U3 1U
35 1U
8 _
13 15
5 _
8 6

-

-

-

U2
l
Ui
1
39
16

17
13
U
1

U
2
2
1

8
_
8
-

2
1
1
1

u

2
1
1
1
3

.

1?____2
6 6
U U
2 2
13 3
1 8 _
8 ”

6 ___ 12
10
3
2 7
1 3
3 3
1
-

21 15
12 ___ 1U
10 11
2 3
9 1
1
_

.

1? ____ Ik _____ 1 ____ 2.
9
ill
5 3
8 13 U 2
1
1 1 1
10 2
2 _

-

_

-

■

•

Wm n
oe
Billers, machine (billing machine)
Manufacturing ..... .......... •••••
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods
...............
Noonanuracuurang
..........
Public utilities «
.............

Wholesale trade ........................
Services

....... ................

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)
Manufacturing ................... ..
Nonmanuf actaring ............. •••••
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade
................
Bookkeepers, hand ........ ............
Manufacturing ......................
Durable goods ..........
Nondurable goods ..... .........
Nonmanufacturing
••••••.... ••••••«
Public utilities * ............ .
Wholesale trade ................
Finance *# ............ .........
Services .............
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Manufacturing ••••••..... .........
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods
Nonmamfacturlng •••••••••••••••••«
Wholesale trade •.•••••••••••••«
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••••«
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Manufacturing .......... ••••.......
Durable goods ........ •••••••••.
Nondurable goods •••••......... «
Nonmanufacturing •••••••.........
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ........... •••••
Finance ** •.••••••••••••••••••<

UQ.5 U8.50
Uo.O 5i.0o
Uo.o 53.00
111
Uo.5 U7.00
333 Uo.5 U6.00
26
Uo.o U9.00
229 Uo.5 U5.oo
53 Ui.5 UU.00
1U8 Uo.5 50.00
"3r “5E3" ” 5
115 Ui.o U9.50
U2.0 U8.00
12
7U Uo.o U6.00
Uo.o 66.00
529 Uo.o YO.ijO
T 5I123 Uo.o 70.00
38 Uo.5 73.00
368 Uo.o 6U.00
Uo.o 62.00
11
Uo.o 69.00
116
77 39.0 55.oo
no
39.0 6U.00
U27 Uo.o 52.5o
“215“ 1 TOT 5730 1
Uo.o 56.00
188
58 Uo.5 62.00
181
39.5 U6.00
16
39.5 U9.50
1U8 39.5 UU.00
826 UO.O U7.00
TQB"
50.00
118
UO.O 51.00
90 U0.5 U9.00
618
Uo.o U6.00
Uo.o 55.00
20
215 Uo.o 50.50
365 39.5 U2.50
661
"W"
217

1
_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
-

1
-

9
-

U9 50
16 15
U 10
12 5
33 35
3
16 32
16 1 3
_
1 '-3
3
5 -9
-

-

-

-

-

-

9

5

9

.
-

-

-

-

_

5

_

9

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
.
_

_

_
.
•

-

!

-|

_
_
-

5

-

5

5

1
-

1
.
-

1

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




29
9
9
20
20

_
_

.
-

9
5
_

5
_
5
39
2
2
37
_
11
25

n
- •
-

11
_

11
91

5
5
86
1
78

37
.

37
1
36
107
5
1
U
102
15
87

86
37
8
29
U9
2
29
16
26
2
2U
3
20
2
-

2
1
1
uu
-

uu

1
U3
120
22
8
1U
98
_
7
91

75
20
16
U
55
53
2
22
5
17

2
12

33
U
U
29
11
10
3
38
15
12
3
23
6
16

89

39
20
19
50
1
5
38

16

-

16

-

-

-

U6

13

-

-

33
1
1

1

7

3
7
lU
_
_

1U
_
lU
82
26
17
9
56
6
28
19

_

3
9
7
2
1
-

U2 _____ 2 ____ 11
33 3 17
33 .3 9
8
9 _
.

_

_

2
2
2
.

_

_

-

.
-

-

1
.
1
_
-

3U 15
8
lb
12 8
2 _
20 7
2
6
5 2
3

1 7
U5 -6 32
U 8
j
lU
6 3! 18
27 3 .
65 U5 25 3U U7
U7 UU1 22 30 U5
U7 36 18 10 U3
_
8 U 20 2
18 1 3 U 2
2
1
5 _ .
13 1 3 128 55 ____ 28 61 7
1*2 20 30 11
3
19 13 19 11 2
23 7 11 _ 1
86 35 _ 5o U
8
_
1
U
U
73 23 3 U8
12 8 5 1
1

-

20
lU
11
3
6
_

-

-

3

1
1

_

.
_

_

9
9

2
1
1

-

-

21
lb
lU
7
-

.

-

52
16
16
_
36
.
30
2
Uo
26
16
10
lU
1
6
2
2

-

27
11
16
13
_

3

U
-

5
5
3
2

3
3
3
_

-

2

2b

13
10
3
11

5
3
3

«.

.

-

-

1
1
1
.

u
u
_

-

_

1
1
1

_
-

-

Uo

-

-

35
3
3
32
7
5
15

30
25
25
_
5
5

5
25

_
.
.

«
.

9
9

-

-

5U

2U

_

_

19
19

35

1

zU

15

3U
9
_
9
25
_
20
5
-

9
-

-

_
.
_
-

_

_
.

.
_

O ffic e O ccu p a tio n * - G o4ttu U €*d

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ xor sexected occupations studied o ; an area basis
r
in Cleveland, Chio, by industry division, October 1951)

Average
Number
o
f
workers

Sex, occupation, aid industry division

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$ .
$ .
1
0.00 1*2.50 l 5 .oo £7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 *65.00 *67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 60.00 65.00 90.00
*
32.50 35.00 37.50 1*
Weekly Under W
Weekly
erig
anns
hours
and
under
(tnad (tn
S a d r ) S a dard) $
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*
0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1x7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 nvar

|
Women - Continued

1

Calculating-machine operators
.(Comptometer type) ........ ........ .
Manufacturing •••••......... ••••••••
Durable goods ...... ............
Nondurable goods .... .......... .
Nonmanufacturing •••••••,•••........
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) ..............
Manufacturing ................. •••••
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Wholesale trade ................ .

1,2 2 8
772
632
U *0
1*56
66
208

Clerks, file, class 6 ................,
Manufacturing ...... ...............
Durable goods ,.,,.... .
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities *
yhnl fical a + r f H
»la
lHnanpo
n i 1,1ii m i l ii n m n
Q m aop ....
o H
....

$
51.0 0
53.5o
51*.5o
l*9.5o
l 7 .oo
*
1*8.00
1*7.50

1*0.0
190
50 .50
i*9.50-'
- I2T" ■11070—
1*0.0
no
1*9.50
1*0.0 1 U8.50
19
61
1*0.0
52.50
1*0.0
50.50
33

Clerks; accounting ....... ..... ......
Manufacturing .................... .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ......... .........
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ........ ,,,,,,,*•
Finance ** ....................
Services ............ ........ .
Clerks, file, class A
..... .
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •........... ..... .
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ............... .
Public utilities * ...............
Uhnl coni a +
•
....
........ .
Finance

1*
0.0
i*o.o
1*
0.0
1*
0.0
39.5
1*
0.0
1*0.0

2,115
1,091*
868
226
1,021
268
338
11*8
120

—

350
m ~
125
6*
1
161
10
37
96
18

1*0.0
uo.o
1*0.0
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.5
38.5
39.5

! 52.00
53.00
52.50
55.oo
51.0 0
55.50
! 5o.5o
j 1*7.00
53.oo

1*
9.00
1*0.0
'U070 .. 5'o.osi
1*0.0
50.50
8.50
1*0.0 i 1*
1*0.0 : 1*7.50
66.00
1*0.0
1*7.00
1*0.0
1*6.50
39.5
1*0.0 ; 1*5.50

1,061
1*0.0 ; 1*0.00
l 'C:
G76'~" i 0 "1 !*x;5er.
1* .0
0
1 1*
2.00
285
1*
0.0
i*o.5o
191
39.00
585
39.5
1* .0
0
! 1*1.50
19
*
1*0.0
38.00
257
169
38*50
39.5
1*0.50
1*0.0
91

I
-

-

-

.!
-

!
.i
-|
-,
-

_j
- ! --- “
-!
'
-;
!
_
-

1
9 1
k
h
5
2

2
2
-

-i
_1

n*
3
-!
3!
11!
6
-

_
-1

9
9

1
*
-;
1
*

-

-

.;

3
6
-

-;
211
- 1
21;
- ;
16
5

55
6
6
19
*
-

25
23

2
1
1
1
-

27
3
3
2*
1
.
1
5
-

65
28
H*
H*
37
8
1
19
1

3k
30
29
1
U
1
*

232

10;
-;
10!

3i
1;
151
73
12
*
31
78
2
22
26
2l!

-

-

5
2
-

36
22
16
6
H*
-

i
29
17
13
1
*
12
9

157
293
126 --- 53
18
*
78
18
*
35
167
7*
1
16
10
83
3*
l
18
1*
3
6
31

1*5
2*
1
20,
1
*
21

1
8
5

k
16
1

12 0 1
52,—
38!
H*
68:
1
1 9i
*
n
21

8*
1
W
31
33
20
1
15

-

1
See footnotes at end of table,
*
■
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1

175
86
5U
32
89
6
39

i
1
2U ___ 25 1
2*
l
23!
12 I
23
1
n i
2i
-|

150
no
99
11
1*0
8
26

20
1
*
3
11
16
16

296 I 18?
136
95
105 1
83
31 I 12
160 | 90
22 ! 2 *
1
2*
1
89 !
H* i
5
1
29

30
20'
9
11
10 (
2
8
-

55
15
5
1
10
10
*
-

21 1
17
17 1
-;
1
*
-

31
li
*

i
3 !
-l

37
25
21
1
*
12
3
3
3

18
*
19!
16:
3
29
2
i
.
6

17
8
6!
2
9
5
1

66
56
U9
7
10
7

87
85
82
3
2
2
-

15
3
3

28
15
15
_
13
-

_
-

179
163
69
66
71
23 ! 15
90
77
1*8
35
10
31
13
15
11
1*

126
105
86
19
21
9
12

17

37 i
23
13
10
H* !
-

9
l
*

n 6
63
55
8
53
9
21

126
218
208
61
; il*3
127
11
**! 132
16
17 i 16
70
65
65 i
12
1*
1
i 18
26
1
l
*
2* !
1
15
9
26
8 ! 12

77
1*
151
1*
88
27
7

17
10
11
*
6
7
-

-




107
1 J1
80
6*
1
72
1*
1*
8
20
27
67
1
*
1
*
10 ! 27

8
8
8
-

-

73
16
2
H*
57
8
17
19
13:

11*8
37
l*
l
23
m
20
63

-

6
3
1

26
1
1,
25
3
1

162
77
52
25
85
1*0
31
1
1
*

12
U

26
21
5!
16
5
1*'
*■
1*

5
t
3
1;
i|
ij

21*
20
19
1
1
*
1

28
28
26
2
-

18
15
13
2
3
-

-

-

9k
23
11*
9
31
10
11
10

31
19
12
7
12
1
10
1

6
2
2
k
J
l

3
1
1
2
2

1
1
1

-

-

6
G
1
*
2
2

7
i
*
1
*
3
.
3

_
-j
-i

_
-

_

“

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

1
*
1
*

_
-

-

I?
12 —
1
*
8
1
1
-

-

1
*
-

-

_
-

_
-

k
2
3
1

_

"

_

-

-

3k
33
26
7
1
1
-

38
7
1*6
30
5
1
1

.

-

-

91

2

-

.
-

_

3
-

-

-

_

1 ____ 1
*
1
3
1
3
1
-

22
l*
l
u*
8
2
1
*

2
2
2
-

32 ____ %
32
k
32
h
1
.
1
-

_
-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

’

-

-

-

_

-

-

i
!
|

—

!
—

6.

Table A-Is

Occupatioui - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7
,

Table W j

O

^ tC B

0 c C 4 4 fU v tia H & - G

o 4 ttU

tU

* d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and eamings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Cleveland, Chio, by industiy division, October 1951)

Aveeage
Sex, occupation, and industiy d ivision

N ber
um
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
I2.50 15.00 * ^ So. 00 S2.50 U5.oo &7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 $
37.50
W
eekly
W
eekly Under
70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
s& a0
hours
earnings
under
(Standard) (Standard) $
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 ?7-5o Uo.oo U2.?0 U5,oo 1*7-50 50,00 52,50 55,oo 57,50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 flo.oo 85.00 90.00 over
i

f e m - Continued
Office K iris ........ ............ ..............................
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Nonmanufacturing

............................•••• • •

Uo.o
'w o
Uo.o
6i
Uo.o
Uo.o
16U
25
39*5
65
Uo.o
32
Uo.o

358
" I*

Secretaries ................ ..
Manufacturing ............................... .......... ..
Durable goods .................. • • • • • • • • • • •
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................• • • • • •
Public u t i l i t i e s * . . . . . . ........ .
Wholesale t r a d e ............................•• • • •
Finance *» .............................
Services ................................................

2,102
1,16 8
8lU
35U
93U
132
258
317
178

Stenographers, general • • • • • • ........ • • • • • • •
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Durable goods .................. ................
Nondurable goods • • • • .......... • • • • • • • •
Nonaanufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Public u t i l i t i e s * ..............................
Wholesale trade
Finance ** • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Services

Uo.o
52.50
2,591
I,U65 ' "U'0.0—■ 5U.50...
Uo.o
5U.50
1,16 7
298 Uo.o 5U.oo
1,1 2 6
U9.50
39.5
Uo.o
53.50
169
386
Uo.o
U9.5o
U7.00
387
38.5
Uo.5
U
9.50
137

Stenographers, technical • • • • • .......... • • •••
Manufacturing ............................................
Durable goods .............. ....................
Nondurable goods ............
Nonmanufacturing ............ .

337
" 19 8
1U6
52
139

Wholesale trade .................••••••••

** ........ .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .
Switchboard operators •••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••
F in a n ce

Durable goods ..............................
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing .................................. .
Public u tilities * .............................
Wholesale trade • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

U
lU
5Uo
IB B
156
32
352
32
92
58
125
10

Uo.o
W
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.0
39.5

r*
39.00
' 59.06 '
Ui.oo
36.00
38.50
Uo.oo
39*5o
36.5o

Uo.o
' Uo.d
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5

1
1

9
7

66
37

1

7
2
»
2

37
29
u
16
9

-

-

-

_
- j

-

61.50

6 7 .vr~

63.00
65.50
59.00
67.50
59.00
57.50
57.00

55.00
55.oo
56.50
5 i.o o
5U.50

Uo.o 5U.oo
3 8 .0
5U.oo
Ui.o U8.50
T ' O 5U.50
Uo.o 55.50
UO.O ! U9.00
U2 .0 U5.oo
Uo.o 56.oo
U7.50
U o .5
3 9 .5
U6.50
UU.5 Uo.oo

_
_

-

_
_
-

_
_:
-

-

-

10

_
10

_
10

2U
-1
2Ui
- j
2U
_




U7
29
27
2
18
11
7

U
U
29
28
1
15

25
20
16

u
3
3

5

15

1

1

-

-

28
28
11
lU
3

6
2
2
u
1
1
2

82
29
26
3
53
U
20
13
lU

185
Uo
8
137
16
U7
U3
31

256
961
71
25
160
13
81
50
12

109
U2
105
9
31
55
10

U2U
218
183
35
206
22
107
U6
26

6

U2
12
U
8
30

U6
la
20
21
5

65
17
8
9
U8

-

-j

25 I 50
3 ------ T
2
5
1
22
U5
_1
_
10
21
2U
_
u

-

‘ l
10
-- I i -

13

13
11

1
1
1

1

8
6

109
38
31
7
71,
6
17
15

_i
------ 71
;
- 1
- j
- 1
- j

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
insurance, and real estate.

*# Finance,

52
29
27
2
23

-

109
31 T
23
8
78
10
18
3U
11

1
_
1

1

6
2

_
_

U

h

20
1

_

182
170
71
lUU
20 — BT
82 M B
72
72 S 36
9
11
11
10
30
88
78
51
99
2
2
2I
5j
11
17
17
U7
28
29
35
25
8
3
29
35
256

u
1

U8

_

_

268
190
10U
86
178
19
39
8U
33

3U2 277
321
233 177
w
189
15U ; 195
U
U
23
7U
52
109 100
32
2U
lU
32
35
3
21
27;
33
5
16 ! 10
2?
20
19
1
7

u3

U8 92 70 U 29 u ? 3 7
U
3 10 lU 10 2 27 20
7 122 73 11 22 13
_
3
3
5
7
U5 82 56 3U 27 1 6 17
10
_
1
U
u
U
- j 16
9 12 112 122 2 5
23
8
22
10
2
1
9 23 u u 10 11

U8
39
39

_
9
U
5

38

3l*
33
1
U

_

3

1

27
22
20
2
5

U

60

ho
ho

1U8
113
93
20 i
35
6
5
9
8

171
169
93 111
U3
87
50
2U
78
58!
lli
6
2U ! 12
23 ! 19
12 1 13

63
15U
116 T T
96 1 27
20
17
38
19
16
7
_
2
1
3
19
18
9
9

16
3
3

9

13

9

8
6
2
1

_

8
3_
lU
7
6

1

lU
1

1
-

7
_
U

u

-

-

20
1

■

_

I 87
136
108
28
51
29
7
13!
2

U6
32
32

20
7
6
11
13
1
12
_

lU
5
U
5

99
72
53
19
27
5s
3
6
13

71
51
39
12
20
1
12
5
2

102
39
3o!
9!
63
30
20
12
1

52
35
28
7
17
5
11
1
-

22
19
11
8
3
2
1
_
-

22
22
22

6
2
2
„
u

11
11
11
_
.
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

u

27
1
26
3
3
_
_
_
_
_

i
21
21 1
lU
7

_

-

_

12

_
J
_

_
_
_
_
_

5

2

12

5

10
6
6

U
U

18
6
6

_

!

5

U
U

l_

_
_
_j!
_1

2
2
2

1

1

3
3
_

_
5

1

_
_

-

-

-

_

_!
_
_
-

_

;

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_1

!
-;

_

_

-

8,

fitUU4fuMonA> ' Go*UiH44md

Table A-lt

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

W - Continued
omen
Switchboard operator-receptionists ..........
Manufacturing ..........................................
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing .................................... .

Number
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
of
30.00
eekly earnings
W
eekly
workers W
and
hours (Standard) Under under 32.50 35.00 37.50 1*0.00 U2.50 h5.00 h7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
(Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 hO. 00 h2.50 1*5.00 li7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 and
over

636 1*0.0 1*7.50
555” 1 *0.6 1' 50.00
189 1*0.0 51.50
119 1*0.0 1*8.50
328 1*0.0 1*5.00
23 1*0.5 1*7,00
1U3 39.0 l*i*.5 o
75 39.0 h3.5o
57 h i.5 50.00
Tabulating-machine operators ................... .
133 1*0.0 57.50
Manufacturing ..............................••••••• ----- 77“ 1*63 62166 Durable goods ...........................
50 1*0.0 6l*.50
Nondurable goods • • • • .......... ..
1*1.0
5 6 .5 0
27
Nonmanufacturing ............................................
1*0.0
56
5 1 .5 0
t ^ o ln a a la t r a d e
1*0.0
5 3 .5 0
25
15
Finance ** • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
5 0 .0 0
3 9 .5
Transcribing-machine operators, general •
1*9.00
302
1*0.0
Manufacturing
— I7?T“1* 0 ^ 0 — 1*8 :50"
Durable goods •••••••••••••«••••«••
101
1*8.50
3 9 .5
Nondurable goods
1*8.50
69
1*0.0
Nonmanufacturing ................. ...................
132
1*0.0
1*9.00
Wholesale trade
5 0 .0 0
1*0.0
73
3 9 .0
U 6 .5 0
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••••••••
22
1*0.0
1*9.50
Services
31
Typists, class A .............................. .
1 ,7 2 6
1*0.0
5 1 .0 0
Manufacturing ••••••........••••••.......... 1 ,3 7 U 1 * 0 3 ” " 5 1 3 0 “
Durable goods ........................
1*0.0
5 1 .5 0
1 ,1 7 7
Nondurable goods
5 0 .5 0
1*0.0
197
Nonmanufacturing
1*8.00
352
3 9 .5
. Public u tilitie s * • • ............. . . . . . .
1*0.0
1*6.50
59
1 Wholesale trade
1*0.0 i
1*7.50
' 123
39 . 5
Finance * * . . . . . . . . ___ . . . . . . . . . . .
1*7 .50
88 ’
Services

Typists, class B
Manufacturing

t . . . . T T 1ttrtt. . t . . T t t tt t ft
..................... .............................
............ ...........................• • • • • •

D Table goods mtrtitMtmtttrtti
n
Nondurable goods T -T . T T T T T .,
T T TT. . T

Nonmanufacturing .................................... .
Public u tilities #

Wholesale trade T . . T . . T . T . . . T
T T . T ,.
Finance m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services ............ .

|
t

an area basis

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and Industiy division

an

7h

3 8 .5

1*0.0
2,1*29
" 1 ,0 6 b 1 T * 0 3
782
1*0.0
286
1*0.0
1 ,3 6 1
39.5
71
1*0.5
1*0.0
576
1*16
3 9 .0

221 1*0.0

2
-

-

2

5
5

5
5
5
-

2

_
-

2

2

-

22
1—
1
21
5
I.
12

38
IT
1*
31*

105
23
10
13
82
15 50
11 23
-

-

_

9
1*
-

_
1*

1*0.00

i* i.5 o

20
2

16
1
-

_
1

1*
6

k

_
-

-2

1*
1*

u
.
-

1

_
-.

2

-

-

_
-j

51

_

$

9
1*2

-

36
6

21
3
3

7
1*

85
3r
1*0
11*
31
2
7
ll*
8
8

3

87
1*1
35
6
1*6
2
22
1

18

12
_

18
8
3
5

1
1

131

77
11
131
5
99
15

53

5
-

10
2
5
3

12
1*

7

30

H*

21*

ill

11

80 S 77
1 1•
38 1 22
1 c

l*7h
2k9

178
71
225
20
83
85
27

10
1*
6
5;

3

88

8

28 7
25 3
116
100 i 103
16 !
8
176
137
2 !
7 !
57

2

219

8

117
21
2
19
96
1*
20
1*3

11

369
162
95
67
207
5
107
32
1*9

-

15

11
8

1*79
231
163
68
21*8
8
119
61*
50

-

!

29
11
8
3
18
3

206
177
135
1*2
29
3

-

I
5 i

69
37
25
12
32
17

66
39
6
33
27
25

25 3
210
181
29
1*3
5
12
16
10

89
59
52

8

12
7
2

175
119
92
27
56
1
29
3
23

18

-1

1

262
175
11*5
30
87
20
33
20
il*

5

1
6
17

5 !
16 !
7
5

9

6

37

5

3

33
21
20
1
12
8
1
3

_

67
30

18
12

10
1
1
3
2
21

3
5

k

28
20
2
18
8

8

3

-

81
1*931
32
5

18

2

2

5 0 .0 0
1*2 .50
1*T.00“
1*3.00
1*3 ,00
1*2.50
l*5.oo
1*3.50

52

32
18
11*

h

8

13
2
2

j

191
160 !
137
23
31
5
12

8

11
7

6

54

30
23

0

1
22
8
7

1

ll* j

10
2

221
201
18 2

IQ
20
6
2
10
2

33
29
29
u
2

17
17
7

11*
10
10
_
1*

10
_

20
18

18

u+

_
2
J
1

1
1

2

6
5
5

5

f

2

2
6
3
j
1

21+
19
18
1

2
3
171
11*9
133
16
22
3
9
3

7

12
8

3

10

_

h

_
_
_
_

6

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

6

6

6
_

_

_
6

_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

.

_
_

•

6
_

77
76
72

?8
26
28

10
10
10

2
2
2

1
_

10
_
1
1

_

_

.

.

.

_
_

_
_

1

_

1

j
ll
1

_
_

_

_

8
k

.

_
_

k

1*

1

|

Hours reflect the w eeks for which em
orkw
ployees receive their regular straight-tine salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
W
orkers were distributed as follows: 33 at $90.00to$95.00; 2* at $95.00 to $100.00; 13 at $100.00 to $105.00; 8 at $105.00 to $110.00; k at $110.00 to $115.00.
1
*
W
orkers were distributed as follows: 17 at $90.00to
$95.00;12 at
$95.00
to
$100.00; 9 at $100.00 to $105.00; 3 at $105.00 to $110.00.
W
orkers were distributed as follows: 5 at $90.00 to $95.00; 11 at $95.00 to $100.00.
’Workers were distributed as follows: 12 at $90.00to$95.00;1 at $95.00 to $100.00; 9 at $100.00 to $L05.00; 3 at $105.00 to $110.00.
W
orkers were distributed as follows: 16 at $90.00to$95.00; 12 at $95.00 to $100.00; 3h at $100.00 to $105.00; 5 at $105.00 to $110.00; k at $110.00 to $115.00.
W
orkers were distributed as follows: k at $100.00 to $105.00; k at $110.00 to $115.00.
W
orkers were distributed as follows: 16 at $90.00 to $95.00; 12 at $95.00 to $100.00; 30 at $100.00 to $105.00.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1;
1*

1

k

_

_
_
_

_
_

ll*

7

_
_
_

_
_

h

1

3

5 1+
— i*
3 1

8
8
6

8
6

3
2
2

75
1*
37
ll*

_

_
_
_
_

2

12

_

1
1
1
_

_

_

9.

Table A-2:
PloieUioucd and *J«oiuUcal Occupation*
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

1/ Hours'reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earaing3 correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, (Mo, October 1951
__________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
U.S. DEPARTM O LABOR
ENT F
NOTE: Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores} the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for a ll industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
992546 0—52-----2



10

T » b i«

a -3 :

M aintenance and Powak P lan t Occupation**

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$ 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50
$
$ $
$ $ i $ $
$ , $ $ $ „ $ „ $ $ $ „$ % _$
Number Average
of
hourly
L ss 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 *2.25 2.30 2.35 2.1*0 2.1*5 2.50
''•kers earnings Undei 1.25
and
and
$ undei
1.25 l,™ 1.35 l.liO Ui5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.10 2.35 2.1*0 2. Iff 2.5f over
$
Carpenters, maintenance.......................................................
689 1.98
3 3 1* 13 13 16 9 31* 85 1*8 65 113
65
5° 30 56 10 8
- - - - - ---- T
8
rrs"
16 75
6i ll£ 51
10 7
Manufacturing..................................................................
52i2 " ' 1.93
23
- - - - - 2 “ TT 2 3 — r 13 1*8 1*7 33 109 1*1 U2 19 53 6 7 9 2
1*26 1.93
2
1*2
Durable goods............................................................
1*7
1*7
3
. 8
- • - -• - - 2 8 5 2 3 27 - 28 3 10 - 1* 6 h
116 1.92
6
Nondurable goods.........................................................
- - - 3 3 2 9 3 8 5 18 10 1 1* 1 1* ■a 7 3
8
1
Nonmanufacturing...............................................................
11*7 2. 20
2/57
1
x k j
15 2.03
j
_ «,
. _ 1 - 2 _
16 1.89
1 3 .
1 m
Wholesale trade..................................................... .
1
5 2 - - - - - - 1 - 8 - 12 6 1 1 - - - 1
- m
3/20
Finance * » .................................................................
50 2.20
2 3 - 8 - - 1* “ 2
Services........................................................................
19 1.53
- - “
_ 3
1,666 1.96
Electricians, maintenance..............................................
8
10 10 30 5i
6
7
57 191 78 172 155 I 63 191 156 81, 1*5 7
- - . - Ut - 73 10
8
72
26 1*6 r 55
61 161* 132 158 128 152 81* 21 7
Manufacturing...............................................'.................... 1 , 1*61 1.96
1
- - - - 8 - 72 10 ~ Vk 26 29 n 62 31* 177 1*9 11*8 132 158 121* 132 81* 7 7
-*
Durable goods............................................................... 1,231 1.97
11*5
230 1.90
21 32 12 16 - - 1* 20 - 17 . Nondurable goods....................................................... ..
17 87
1*
- 3 - 7 6 8 1 -; 6 1* 5 6 2 lit 17 6 23 5 63 1* - 21 2
Nonmanufacturing.................... .......................................
205 1.96
1ph 2.10
5
UiiVil ■?r* 11+nl ^+noe M
.
..
X 2
x
21
17 k 63 3
TPinnnoe Am
i
......
.....................
6 1
x x £
5
x
8 3
30 1.71*
earn.
......_
3
7 5
12
36 1.68
n 1
12
Engineers, stationary........................................................
1*95 1.97
? 5
63
- - 3 - - 3 1* - - r r27 5 11 65 77 38 1*3 58 1? 7* 17 32 9 19 •
- r 18
Manufacturing..................... 1............................................. “ “31r * 1.98
f
7
65 68
- - - - - - - - - i* - 11 37 3 29 37 7 3 1 3 e 6 19 • »
Durable goods............................................................
167 1.98
29 33 7
l* 3
19
28 65 - 1* - 15 Nondurable goods.........................................................
21* 1
t
11*5 1.99
- - 3 - - 3 1* n 1 23 5 1 - 9 9 6 51 1 3 i£ 31 2
1.96
Nonmanufacturing...........................................................
1 5
183
nm .
fz
...........
3 L 6 1 18 5
x
1*1 1.60
Firemen, stationary boiler.............................................
13 8 19 1 37 71* 11*2 58 73 77 21* 51 1*1 8 9
653 1.68
9
_
- - i - 1 16 - 33 71 136 36 71 76 22 23 1*1 8 9 ___&___ k
Manufacturing................................................................... — 552“ i . 7o
- - 16 - 33 56 33 12 61* 1*2 17 23 h 1* 9 5 1*
- Durable goods..............................................................
313 1.68
c
Nondursbl6 goods#
239 1.73
15 103 21* 7 3i* 5
37
i 1 i
_
.
101 1.60
9 . 13 ! 2 3 1 1 I 3 6 22 2 1 2 28
7
pil'KI Tf* “\ +.i Aft -M TI__......................T___. --irt
.
16 1 x
26
U* 1.79
11 1 . 6o
X 1
X 1
yhn*] 9 tT*d0» t r-T“*-'*nttTt“VTTlT1 T IT-fT-r»t
1
3| 3
X
12 k 3
Services.
23 1.35
Occupation and industry division

Helpers, trades, maintenance..............................................
Manufacturing.............................................................
Durable goods............................................................
Nondurable good s....................................................
Nonmanufacturing.............................................................(
ptihl ii+.tTS+.ime 4 ___._ir. . . Tr. t._._r... . T. *
W h o l 9 i ' - r * d e , __. . f, fI. T. . t. ttt. tftt.,
FinanceO... ...................................................................
CoWl AA ■ **
.*....
. . . . . . ..
Machinists, maintenance........................................
Manufacturing..................... ..............................................
Durable goods..............................................................
Nondurable goods..............................................••••••
Nonmanufacturing............................................................
J l V ja
PlO

^*j+
|

(J(t |IT- riir i -|--,

Machine-tool operators, tool room.................. .
Manufacturing................................ .

2,552
1,712

~ r ,m n

692
11*8
21*

1*9
53

20
896

865
61*0
225
31
30
1,109
1,108" ‘

8
1.65
1767“ - n
1.63
1.75
8
1.39
1.1*5 3
1 . 1*1
1.38
1
1.31
1.98
8
1.97 — 8~
2.01
1.88
2.00
2,00

1.91
1.91

53 51 59 122
r 21 37 85
1*5 21 37 81*
- - - 1
8 30 22 37
16
6 1 18 10
1 21* 2 5
3 5 2 1*
3 2
3 2
8
3 2
-

-

201 128 31*5 352 200 11*3
179 118 31*3 35l 193 U*3
83 112 31*0 253 127 101*
96 6 3 98 66 39
22 10 2 1 7 2 k 2
3
7
13 6 _ 1

3
3
3

5 17
5 17
5 17

1
1
1

369 157 69
369 157 69
261 11*3 17
108 H* 52
- - »

_

60 178 1*8
6o 177 1*8
36 i 36
21* 173 12
- 1

_

x

_

8

1*
1*
1*

i

-

*
_
.

_

_

_

3 15 67 25 122 132 61* 26 173 116 39
l 15 65 25 120 129 61* 20 173 100 39
13 36 21* 81 73 61* 15 173 90 30
1 2 29 1 39 56 - 5 - 10 9
2 - 2 - 2 3 - 6 - 16 2
2 3
2
6

8

-

8 1*8 32 1*8 12 210 22 31 50 26 Ill 227
8
32 1*8 12 210 22 31 5o 26 110 227
18
*

15
66 25
66 25

79
79

5
5

-

.
.

_

7 1*2 26
7 1*2 26
7 8 26

31*

78 20
78 20

7
7

_
.
•
.

-

-

1
1

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
NOTEi Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the emission of department and
limited-price variety stores) the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for a ll industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.




11,

Table a- 3 :

M aintenance and Pow&i P lan t Occupation* - Continued
{Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations svuuxea 01.
an area basis in Cleveland, Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Maintenance men, general u tility ..............................
Manufacturing................................ ....................................
Durable goods................................................................
Nondurable goods..........................................................
Nonmai ufacturin g.................................. .
Wholesale trade ...................................................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .............................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................................
Public u tilities * .....................................................

$ $ $ $ $ s $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
of
hourly
.25
2.50
workers earnings Jnder L i .30 1.35 l.itO 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.1x0 2.1x5 and
and
mder
over
L.25 L.30 1.35 l./iQ i.J*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1. 65. 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 h.po
9* A
O
2.00 2. 0 c; 2.10 2x15- 2.20
2JiO -2xlt5 9.<0
1 1
$
i,oi»5 1.67 33 10 22 it5 8it 12 72 70 ! 126 1 56 96 130 66 1*7 itl 69 26 26 b 8 . 2 - . _ - _
S r " ■ 1.70". - - 9 T T 65 12 ! 29 5l 125 21 7B 95 38 28 36 66 2 12 3 3 - - - . . _ _
12
20 18 21
26 2 12 3 3
50
327 1.73
7 21
- • 9 5 1*1* 5 1 20 1 n15 9 59 75 20 7 35 itO
.
o
358 1.67
1
7 9
19
_ . 360 1.60 33 10 13 33 19 - ! b3 19 i 1 35 18 35 28 19 5 3 2it lit 1 5
2 «
_
- - - 10- 2 - 1 2 12 ! - 10 12 18 12 6
. . 1 1 .
88 1.69
2 .j _
8 13
10 6
10
39 1.6^
3 6 16
1
6 lit 6
n
12
21
1*59 13 10
I
1
10 13 22 : 5 25 86 190 60 100 26 19 17 16 it It it 5 J it
615 1.79
It
. . _
126 1.67
13 1*? lit 9 O •a 13 - It it it — fc J
9
Q
56 1*90
lit 0 ! 7 j0 7
!
1,
1, u
1.
i1
1.86
10
7
4
4
1 _ . it
22
10
it6
1x89 1.77
25
\ ii lit
it 16
1
_ .
- - - 2 13 1 5 12 73 \litU 1*6 91 j I2 lit 1 - _ _ . it
226 1.83
1
58
5 71
ng, 1*75
8 it 9 ' it 8
68
! 16
33
!
1 : **
9
J
8
22 1.65
.
6 1 21 35 30 11*8 2itl 36 12it lt3 107 103 2$5 91 96 227 26 9 1
1,605 1.96
3 2
.
T 7 r? ~ 1.96 - - - - -- ~ r 1 19 35 30 lld& 225 36 122 lt2 ! 75 102 25it 91 95 227 25 9 1 ._
. 16
• j
26
22
l,U l 2.01
itit
Itit 76 - 226 - . _
16
- - - it 1 3 19 it 127 181 27 100 37 ! 30 ' 99 210 15 95 1 25 9 1 .
_
- !
itd 1.83
16
1
21
9
5'
- 3 2 1 - 2 - - . 16 . | 2 1 ! 32 | 3 ! 1 - I 1 _ 1
_ _ _ _
63 1.81t - j
1 1 I 31 1
2
1.90
6
U! 1 - ! 1 - x! - 1 - - - - 15 1.86
- i - - - ; - - _
- - - 10 - ! 1
_ _
1 _
1,201 1.90
11*2
23 29 i 8it i 19 : 218 128 : 281 i 67 1 89 106 6 9
—
i;i3 6 ” 1.89
- - - - 1 ~ 1 i— “ lit2 - lit 29 ! 8it 19 218 128 281 ; 67 33; 106 I- * 9 1
j - - - _j 1 .
522 1.63 13 ! 22 ! it 1 ! 15 6 1*2 93 i 58 ! 103 U8 68 9 _ i 36 k
_ 1--_
<rj 22 H T 1 r 6 ! 36 82 ! 58 1103 1*8 ! 68 9 _ ! 3
165 “ nS2
i 1 - _ _ _
380 1.6U 2 ! i 2 - n 12 6 ! 32 82 1 58 101 9 : 6b 1 9 . 3 ! b
85 1.56
it i 22 2 i 1 3 - ; it - - 2 39 ! h - - | - j b - - -i - - - !
1
_
502 1.83
8 9 _ 22 9 75 I 26 b3 : i*6 81 $b ! 13 | 1 1 17 ?1 8 7 17 b
5 _ 9 15
- : 1
308 1.89 “ - - - ;
1 9 ! 9 35 ! 32 81 \ bl : 13 3 ! 15 30 8 5
12
b _
1 9 1 8 i ! 22 80 \ c 13 j•1 ; 11 i
183 1.86
_ _ b
_
I
125 1.93
1
8 5
i
12
10
! 18 8 66 17 ! 31* I lit .1 ! it2 . . ! 2 1 _ 2 17
i
i ^
- - - ! 8 9 • I
8
19U 1.75
7
5 _ 9 3
- |
_
- !
. 1 . . it
1 1 1 ; 1 . 2
.. 9 3
21 2.18
- 1 - _ 1 1 8 _ 1 1 5 it8 2 . - _ 1 7 _
_ _ 17 _ _ 5
101 1.76
2
7
I “
1 1 _
10 3 16 15 8 10
70 1*60
8
j
i
1
2 6 6 15 63 66 ! 75 108 90 65 ifi 78 10 20 51 8
705 ! 1.97
- I "
- ! - 1|
690 1.97
2 2 6 i5 n r
81 65 ‘“ c r 78 10 20 _ 8 _
! 7li
_ _
2 1 6 8 7 66 2it ! 101 i 73 iti 21 ! 62 2 _ 51 « _
bib
1.91* - 1 _ . - | . .
276 2.01
1 - - 1 - 7 56 - 50 6 ! 8 2it 20 J 16 8 20 51 8 - - - - - - _ _ it
_ 18 7 1
8 9 6 7 1 1 3
8b 1.75
b _
_
_
. - - - . - - 10 - 1 1? 1 9 2 7 1 1 3 _ . b »
6
hi
1.83
37 1.61* - it
- - 8 7 - 7 7 - it
_
_ 1 1
115 1.96
1
19 10 10 8 29 7 1 9 3 11 2 3
—
- - - - 1 1 1 —L 1 - 19 10 10 7 29 7 1 9 3 11 2 3 _ _ . _
nit 1.96

Mechanics, maintenance.............................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Durable goods ..............................................................
Nondurable goods................. ......................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................................
pphl ie iitllitiAfi * _. . ____ . . . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . .
Finance « ...................................................................
Millwrights .............................................................................
Manufacturing •«.................. ................................
O ilers.................................................................................... .
Manufacturing ...................................................................
Durable goods..................................................... .
Nondurable goods........................................................
Painters, maintenance ..........................................................
Manufacturing ...................................................................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................................
Wholesale trade ..........................................................
Finance ** ....................................................................
Services .............................................................
Pipe fitters, maintenance ...................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Durable goods ..............................................................
Nondurable goods .........................................................
Plumbers, maintenance ..........................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................................................
Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ......................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................
Tool-and-die makers .............................................................. l,69lt
Manufacturing ................................................................... 1,69k

2.13
2.13

_

.

1 2b

!
I

8
8

102 33 bO 53 181 112 20it 351 311 Hi? 97 26
102 33 itO 53 181 112 20it 3^1 311 li*2 97 26

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $2.60 to $2.70} 10 at $2.70 to $2.80; 32 at $2.80 to $2.90; 1 at $3.00 to $3.10} 6 at $3.10 to $3.20; 7 at $3.20 to $3.30.
Workers were distributed as follows: 15 at $2.80 to $2.90; 5 at $3.20 to $3.30.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
* * Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1/
y
2/




“

10
“ 10

12,

Table A-4: G u d io d u U , W a te ltO u H H * } CH id S lu & fU H t} Q cC M tu U iO tU
vAverage hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on
area basis in ClevelandJ Ohio, by industry division, October 1951)

**

Finance, insurance, and real estate,




N TE:
O

Wherever possible earnings data have been presented separately for broad industry divisions.
Data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of department and
limited-price variety stores; the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
data for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

13,

Table

A G*uioA.iolr
-k:

*10'a'leltotUituf. and SUipfMHQ OccupationA - GantiHumd

(Average hourly earnings 1/ xor selected occupations <y studied on an
area basis in Cleveland7 Ohio, by industry division7 October l?5l)

So* footnotes at end of table.

* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
«* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Ik,

Table

$2 .
$2.

**

A-l*: Gudtodial, fyUatmUoHMnp and SA ipfU nf Occupat ion* - Contin ued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Cleveland- Ohio, by industry division7 October 1951)

Excludes preaiua pay for overtins and night work.
Study limited to m workers except where otherwise indicated.
en
Workers distributed as followst 19 at $1.95 to $2.00) 6 at $2.00 to $2.05; I k at $2.0$ to $2.10) 16 at $2.10 to $2.15) 36 at $2.15 to *2.20, 50 at $2.20 to $2.25) k k at $2.25 to $2.30) 18 at $2.30 to
*
5* at $2.35 to $2.1,0} k k at $ *0 to $2.1£, 52 at $ .1 and over.
1
2.1
2 *5
W
orkers distributed as followst 9 at $1.95 to $2.00} 6 at $2.00 to $2.05) I k at $2.05 to $2.10, 16 at $2.10 to $2.15) 36 at $2.15 to $2.20} 32 at $2.20 to $2.25) lit at $2.25 to $2.30} 18 at $2.30 to
5Ji at $2.35 to $2.1(0) k k *t $2.1*0 to $2.1*5) 52 at $2.1 and over.
*5
W
orkers distributed as follows* 10 at $1.95 to $2.00} 18 at $2.20 to $2.25} 30 at $2.30 to $2.35.
W
orkers distributed as follows* 75 at $1.95 to $2.00) 50 at $2.00 to $2.10) 30 at $2.10 to $2.20) 63 at $2.20 to $2.30) 62 at $2.30 to $2.1*0} 22 at $2.1 to $2.50} 6 at $2.50 to $2.60.
*0
Transportation (excluding railroads), consunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




15.
B:

T«bl* B-2337t

Characteristic Industry Occupations

l

i

f

4

G * ld

M

U A &

i'

Q

o o tl

Gm A

B

u

it l y

1/ The 8tatty covered manufacturers of wom
en's and misses' coats and suits, but specifically excluded firms specializing in the production of single skirts and/or fur coats. Industry coverage corresponds
to part of group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
anual (19k$ edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Included in the study were regular and contract shops employing m
ore
than 7 workers and cntting shops with m than 3 workers. Th*8e data relate to Septem 1951.
ore
ber
2/ Excludes prem pay for overtime and night work.
ium
3/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages tvy m
ethod of w paym
age
ent.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-336:

Occupation 2/
Chippers and grinders 3/a ...................................................
Core assemblers and finishers 3/b ....................................
Coremakers, hand 3 / a ............................................................... ................. . .
MaintenanceAAf 7 Al
men, general u tility 3/a .............................................
IIa I
fl
Holders, hand, Much 3/b . ............................................................................
Holders, machine 3/b
p a f • f e y m i e Irmwm

m

ItbI

O of f

vnn/4

.......................................................................................................
7/A

7/a

Pourers, metal 3/b
Sand mixers 3/\T
Shake-out men 3/a..................................................................
Truckers, hand 3/a.............................................. .................
.............................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................

V

# <U €* U & U ed ,

$ $ $ $ $ $
workers eamiogs Under1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.ilO 1.45
and
$ under
1.20
1 . 2$ 1,30 1.35 1,40 1.U5 1.50
$
12 1.80
369 ll54
5 10 5 -5 14 9k 76
122 1.62
3 21 13
178 1.98
5
27 1.73
98 2.03
90 1.99
312 2.07
Number
of

Average
hourly

-

k3
kS

132

72
247
15

2.52
2.47

1.62
1.59
1.48
1.58

-

10

-

_
-

-

8

-

5

13

k

-

-

-

-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
i . 5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 .U0 2.$0 $2.60 $2.70
1.55 1,60 1.65 1,70 1.75 1,80 1 . 8$ 1,90 1.95 2,00 2,10 2,20 2.30 2, 1*0 2,50 2,60 2,70 over
1

51 35 20 7
2 3 35 30
27 -3 k 5
16

5

10

_
-




„

_
-

-

_

10 lit 43

3 8 10 27 20 27
2 7 9 ! Ht 1
9 3it U6 52 32 7 12 3
2
2
1
k
j
J

-

1/ The study covered nonferrous foundries with 0 or m workers. Data relate to an August 1951 payroll period.
ore
Data limited to m workers.
en
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by m
ethod of w paym
age
ent.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
y

_

3
1

3
-

-

1

6
6
1

1

5 3 9
3 5
7 43 2 36
it
19 2 35
lit 17 32 6
9 25 20 50 12 33
2

2
8
it 3
20

5
-

-

.

3
6 7 1
13 12
2 16 5
6

8
-

7

3

u

-

-

1

-

2
1

5

1
6
3

3

6
_

-

-

it 2 - -3 -1 1
1 1 6 10 1 it 3 8
7
1 2
_
8
5
9 10 lit 10 7 30
2
21 18
2i 18
_
1 _ .
1
1 - -

I

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S tatistics

16.

Table B-3391J

0 * td

S te e l

r f -O b f U t f d ' l /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation £/

Number
of
workers

1/
Chippers and grlndars jj/a ..............................
Die sinkers lye
Drop-banner operators, board, 1,200 lbs. and tinder h /b
Drop hamer operators, board, over 1,200
trt 2,000 lbat JiA» ...........
Drop-baner operators, board, ever 2,000 lbs. J^b • •
••
Drop-hanasr operators, stean, 4,000 lbs. and under ly'b
Drop-hanner operators, stean, over 4*000 to
10,000 Ibe. 1/ b .....................................................
Drqp-haaner operators, stem, over 10,000 lbs. h /b . . .
T— niraniths h /b • • • • • • • • .......................... • • • • • ............. • • • • • • • • •
T
Beaters, forge-light work jj/b • • • • • • • • • • • • ..............................
Helpers, forge U /b • • • • • • • • • • • ............................. ...............• • • • • • •
Inspectors, class A U /* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspectors, class B Ij/a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspectors, class C Ij/a • • • • • «• • • • • • • • • •
••••• •••••••••
Mechanics, M
aintenance J^a •• • ••• • • ........• • •
•• • . • • •
•••
Tool-and-die nakers (Including trimmer makers)4/a . . . .
Trin-presa operators, mid trim )\/b
. . ft
Trin-press operators, hot trim 1^> • • • • • • • • • •
•••••••••
Upsettera, 3* and under in diameter h /b ................... .

162
18

115
11*
7
2
29
36
29
28

20

140
229
70
77
54

44
86

35
51
59
14

$ $
$ $
$
$
$ $
$
$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $ $ $
$ $ $
$
L.45 1.50 1*55 1.60 1.# 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30
and
L.40 p e * L.5o U55 1.60 1.65 U70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 over

Average
I
hourly Inder
earnings

1.68
1.86
2.82
2.11
2.27
2.$1

2

2 12 66
.

„

•

•

•

2
3

38

•

1
1

3
1

•

2
1

.

.

2

31

•

*

m
1
X

2.63

2.79
3.55
2.95

2.00
2. 1(2
1.81
1.86
1.64
1.86
1.53
2.20
1.89
2.06

X

-

-

1
1

_

•

m-

i
-

3

-

m

13

-

_

12

1

-

1

3
..

7
1

•

1

4
4

1
10
21

4

8

3

2.64

•

4 20

26
11
3
22 3
3 7
1
3 6
2 1

6
6
2
_
2
1

32

1

-

3

3

19

32

•

•

6
6
17

1

9

1
3

c
P;
3

o
c

1

1

J
L
i

2

1A
■ *6 XO
1 2

c
p

i

l
-

5

0

c.

4

3

2

3

1 •
_
2 2
6 9 8 22 11 12 11
10 7 7 4 13 27 16
1* 11 20 1 1
3
2 1
2 5 5 9 2 3
_ l 2 2 2 10 6
1 3 1 1 g g p
c
6 1 6 7 11 4
3
1 ~ l
-

•

-

j*
5
3
£
7

1

1
c
0
4
2

4

3

2
4 11
8
1 7

9
2
2
2

2
1
4
3

1
9

1

4
2

4
4

U

4

l

1
12
1 12
X
4

3

5
1
5

1
D
O

4

1
2

4

.

2
1
3
2
8
2

2
2
4 14 10
X
5 pa X
■

1

_
1

2
1

1
1

1

7
O

1

1
1

3

1
1
2
_

4

5

5

2
2

1

2

n

1
1
4
1 i /16
7
_
10 20

X

X

m m
1 *

*

1

1/ The study covered establisbn«its with wore than 20 workers engaged in the Manufacture of iron and steel forgings (Group 3391) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
anual (1945 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Data United to non workers.
y Excludes preniun pay for overtine and night work.
h/
Insufficient data to pemit presentation of separate averages by nethod of w paynent.
age
(a) All or predominantly tine workers.
(b) All or predoninantly incentive workers.
5/ W
orkers were distribnted as followst $3.30 to $3*40, 1 worker) $3*1(0 to $3*50, 1 worker) $3.50 to $3.60, 1 worker) $3.60 to $3.70, 5 workers) $3.70 to $3.$0, 2 workers) $4.00 to $4.10, 1 worker)
$4.ro to $4.30, 1 worker) $4.30 to $4.4D, 1 worker) $4.40 and over, 3 workers.

Table B4342:

G

u

l

t

e

0

4

t

d

1/ The study covered firne with nore than 20 vorkers engaged in the Manufacture of cutlery, hand tools.and hardware
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Excludes preniun pay for overtine and night work.
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by nethod of w paynent.
age
(a) All or predoninantly tine vorkers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
y
Includes data for operators of other Machine-tools in addition to those show separately.
n




Jfo/uluM I/IM

1 /

(Group 342) as defined in the Standard industrial Classification Manual
Occupational Vage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
EET
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B -3 k 3 9 i

jiv o t it U f

A p p &

U it lU

2 /

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

2/

Average
hourly
earnings
y

Assemblers, class

Total ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Time ......................................... .
Incentive •••••••••••••••••••
Chippers and grinders h/a ..................................................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle.
class B hfo ................................................. ........
Inspectors, class B L/b ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Janitors h/b ........................................•••••••.....................
Maintenance men, general u tility h/b ••••.••••••••••••
Painters, finish U/b •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Power-shear operators, class A h/b ............................. .
Power-shear operators, class B h/b . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Punch-press operators, class B h/a •.•••••••••••••••••
Stock handlers ana truckers, hand h/b ••••••••••••••••
Tool-and-die makers h/b • ....................................................
Welders, hand, class A i/b
B*

368
2li0
128
29
61
1*2

36
17
28
16
22
62

71
58
1*7

1.78
1.78
1.78
1.70
1.81*
1.72
1.32
1.73
1.70
1.76
1. 1*2
1.67
1.1*3
2.02
2. 01*

$
* *
io s : *10 L15 L20 it 25 L*.30 :L*.35 L*.1*0 L L*.50 *.55 U 60 U 65 L.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 1.00 2.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 $ .25 $ 1.35
$.l*5
2 2.30
and
and
untiet
.25
1 . 10 ]L.15 ,20 L U3Q L.35 i , l * o ;L,l*5 L.50 L.55 L.60 L.65 L.70 L.75 L 1.85 1.90 1.9«? ? - n n ? . 05 ? - i n 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 over
.80
2
2 1* 2 2 6 1* 10 18 10 86 73 67 2 16 2 12 32 1 2 1 2 1 7
1*
c
o
2 2
1 If
u
• 2 . 1* 2 1* 2 2 6 2 8 16 6 62* 68 >0 c xa C 12 32 1 c 1 c 1 0
2
2
1
5
- 2 - • 2 1 - 3 . 1 1 • 2 21 2 9 1 «.
6
2
2
1
3
_
1 16 2 19 5 11 5
2
- 2
_
2 2 1
2 16 10
- - 1* 11 - 11* 1* _ 1* _ _ 1 2*
1 2 6 2
I 3 1 2 3
L i.
3
«* ** 11*
i, in/
2
X
V
2 2
“1 "
6 2 2 2
2 ! J,
I
Jj 2
2 2
2
2
2
2 16 2 2o 5
J
12 - ! 1* 1 6 5 7 13 6 _
1
1
7 h 1*
2
8
h h 1* 12
H* 10
2
2 2 io ;
16
6
•
y
9
i

1/ Tha study covered establishments with ware than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of commercial and domestic heating and cooking equipm (Qroups 3 * 2 and 3 * 9 except electric stoves) as defined
ent
13
13
in the Standard industrial Classification M
anual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to m workers.
en

if

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by m
ethod of w paym
age
ent.
(a) All or predominantly incentive workers.
(b) All or predominantly time workers.
5/ W
orkers were distributed as follows: $2.50 to $2.60, 1 workerj $2.70 to $2.80, 2 workers; $2.80 to $2.90, 2 workers; $3.00 to $3.10, it workers.

%/

Table B-3i*l*l*;
Number
of
workers

Occupation 2(
Assemblers, class A .................................................
Assemblers, class B ................•••••••••.•••;................
Assemblers, class C ; . . . . . . . ..............................
Janitors.......................................................... .
Lay-out m class A ...........................................................
en,
Power-brake operators, class A .............................. .
Power-shear operators, class A • • • • • • • • • • •
•••••••••••
Power-shear operators, class B .................. .............
Punch-press operators, dess A ............................ .
Punch-press operators, class B . . . . . . . . ........ ........ .
Sheet-metal-machine operators, miscellaneous machines
Sheet-metal workers, production.......... ....... ............ .
Stock handlers and truckers, hand
Welders, hand, class A ....................
Welders, hand, class B*
V

1/
V

"if

25
36
6*
1
15
11
27
18
1*
1
30

hi

29
13
29
37
3
5

than 20 workers
night work.

The study covered establishments with more

Average
.2
.1 5
hourly DbderL* 0 f.25 f.30 L.35 lX O 1 *
earnings t
sa d.

992546 0 -5 2 -




NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
2
1.55 1.60 £.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 £.85 i.90 i.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 *2.15 *2.20 *2.25 *2.30*2.35*2X0 * . us

L.20 upAm r
y
.1 0
1.25 L.30 L.35 LXO 1X5 i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.Q5 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 * 2X5 2.50
$
1
2 2
3
1.82
1
U
5
3
U
1
6 u*
2
1.67
7
3
3
.
8 1
1
1
1
2
9 26 15
1*
.1 9
2
1
1
*
1.37
3 5
1
1
2 1
3 3 1.97
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
2
2
3
3
3 2 12
1.85
1
2
1.76
7
3 1
3 1
_
1
1
2
1
1 *
.61
1
1
7
1
2 1 11
1.81
3
1 5
*
3
1
1
2
1.61*
1
l
2
1*
3 U h
3 1 n
*
1
1 2
2
1
1
1.80
3
5 13
!
1
1
2
5 1 1 2
1.93
2
1*
.1 1
5 3 8 7 3 - 1
2
2
1.90
5 13 7 2 2 2 1 - 1 - - - - 1
1
1
1
1
5 7 8 3 6 1
1.75
*
'

'

‘

i

engaged in the manufacture of sheet-metal products (Group

Data limited to men workers; virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay
and

for overtime

S U t d - M d a l W o * k i/

i______

3W*li) as

!

defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual

(19l*5 edition).

1951
U.S. D P R EN G LA O
E A TM T F B R

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October

Bureau of Labor Statistics

18,

Table B-3U : S tam ped and Pledded M eta l p led g et* y
63
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

$ _
$
Average
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1$..1*0
hourly
earnings Under and
1
L.20 under1.30
21
L.25
1 . 1*0 1.1*5

1.35

Mn
e
Die setters Va . . . . . . ............................. .
Inspectors, class A V a .................................
Inspectors, class B ]jya........... ......*•*.......
Inspectors, class C ^a ..............
Maintenance m general utility 3 / a ........... .
en,
Mechanics, m
aintenance 3 / * ................... .
Power-shear operators, class A V a .............. .
Power-shear operators, class B 3 / a .................
Punch-press operators, class A Total .........
s
Tine .....
Incentive
Punch-press operators, class Bt Total
Tine • • ,
••
Incentive
Tool-and-die nakers 3 /a
Truckers, hand 3 / a .............................. .

137
12
22
20
1*8
U*
50
5U
195
9l*
101
375
103
272
126
77

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$- $
2.25 $
1.1*5 fL.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 1.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 $ 2.30 $2.35 $2. 1*0$2.1*5
and
2.1*0 2 . 1*5 over
1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 I .70 1.75 1.80 1.85 l.?0 ^25. 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30

*

1.80
1.85
1.81
1.1*9
1.7U
1.91
1.67
1.1*2
1.80
1.61
1.97
1.66
1.1*0
1.76
2.10
1.3U

1*
1*
-

.
.
.
.
•

.
_

_
-

.

8 12

-

-

6

-

-

_
_

.
.
_
_

_

_

.

.
.
.
.

.
.

8
8
_

26
21*
2
.
.
10 20 5

1

7 13 19
1
10 - 3
1* 6 2
9 7
2 1 1* 39 15
l* 39 13
.
_
2
23 22 36
1
22 22 36
.
3 1

1
1*
9
3

1

3
6
6
U
1*
_

1* 3
2 3
H*
2 3
n*
.
.
21 33 33
28
20 15 17 18
8 6 16 15
19 10 12 1
-

-

-

_

19
7
1*
1*

n*
_

2

1
12
5
7
31*
31*
3

5
3
3
7
3
1*
18
18
1

1*

1

2

3 5 2 - - 1 -*
2 1
1*
2 l 1 2
1 - - 1
10 H* 12 19 6 2 2 10 H* 12 19 6 2 2 13 13 3 3 1 5 1 3
13 13 3 3 1 5 1 3
3 1* 7 13 16 21* 15 11

-

-

2
2
3
3

1
1

7
11
1*
3
11
1
10
16
16
3

18
2

5
2
2

1
-

1*
-

"

•

1

1*

1

1

13
1*
5
6
3
3
16
6
10
22
22
8

5
1

1*
1

1*
-

1

5
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

2

1
1
5

9
9

-

Women
Punch-press operators, olass A 3/b . . ....
Punch-press operators, class B: Total .,
Tine
Incentive

31
190
113
77

1.72
1.39
1.3b
1.1*6

1
2
2

3 5
19 2U 27 18 21* 22 18 i3
8 20 20 8 19 H* 13 11
11 1* 7 10 5 8 5 2

2
6
6

7
7

-

-

“

1*
-

I______ \

1

1
1*
1*

-

-

-

-

1*

*

1*

*

-

-

“

*

1

1/ The study ocvirsd establishments with m than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of non-automotive metal stampings (Group 3463) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
ore
anual (1945
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes prem pay for overtime and night work.
ium
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by m
ethod of w paym
age
ent.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) AH or predominantly incentive workers.

SJecfoofdatUuf, P latin g am t PoluU U tf

Table B-3U68:

y

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

y

Men
Janitors %J ••••••••••.....................................................
lfa4
........................... .....................................................
Platers
3/
vi'f m aviAa man
m
1/

r»avim 1
r»a

4 ftr 3 /

...

_ _ _ _ _ __ _
_ __ _ _ _

...

iT M iu iim ittttitttttm tftiim

Polishers and buffers, metal: T o ta l .................• • • • • • • • • •

incentive

• • • • • • • ..

imffliig — nhfiie operators j / ..........................
handlers and sm okers, hand j | / ................................•••••

fr ill s l i l f amd

Steak

10
1*0
198
11*1
132
1*7
85
35
10

8
1.28
1.63
1.52
1.28
1.91*
1.75
2.01*
1.55
1.1*7

$
$
$
$
$
$
Under L.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 I .60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 $2.10 $2.15 2.20 $2.25 $2.30
and
8 under
1.05 L.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35
1$

-

-

6
-

-

5
-

-

$

2

-

-

-

$

-

-

$

„

2
1* 1 2 1
6
10
7 30 10 22 1*8 11*
7 21* 2
1*0 17 20
5
5 1
5
1
5
5 1
1*
1 1
8
1* 5 6
2
*

-

1

7

u*

-

-

Women

Platers' helpers 1 / • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .......................• • • • • . . . .

$

.

-

12
5

-

-

-

$

-

-

-

-

-

-

„

-

-

6

1*

1

2
7

-

-

-

$

1

1

-

$

7 3
6 3
3 19
1 19
2
1
-

-

C
s
-

-

-

-

1

H*

-

2 17
5
2 12

5 10
2 30 9 13
9
2 30
13

-

-

-

, 2 15
2
2
2

$

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

2
2
-

-

1
|

92

1.19

2 10

1*

35 10 31

1/ The study covered firms with m than 7 workers engaged in all types of electroplating, plating and metal polishing (Group 3468) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification M
ore
anual (1945
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes prem pay for overtime and night work.
ium
Occupational W g Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
ae
3/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by m
ethod of w paym
age
entj all or predominantly time workers.
U.S. D A TM T O LA O
EP R EN F B R
*
Bureau of Labor Statistics




19,

Table B-35*

A fo c A lH e b p H tu H u A tfU e l 1/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

N u m b er
of
w orkers

Occupation and seat
Machinery *
Men
Asseeiblers, class At T otal............................................
Hm* , rT. TTt- . T__T---t__ ITi
Assemblers, class Bt Total ........................................ .
Incentive ..................................
Assemblers, class C £ / * ....................................................
^Electricians, maintenance 2/a ..........................................
Inspectors, class A £/a ............... ....................................
Inspectors, class B 2 /a ....................................................
Inspectors, class C 2 / * .............................. ....................
Janitors, 2/a ......................................................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A y \ Total..........................................................
Time
..........
Incentive........................................
Automatic-lathe operators, class A 2/a ••••••••.••
Drill-press operators, radial,
class At Total ..........................................................
Tim** f t t f t . l f t t f . 1tT. f t . . T. 11t1. . 1111
TnAAnf.4va
_
i i
Drill-press operators, single- and multipleAloflfl A f Trt+ml |B
III! ITTII ll'l
TM tt--TT............. TT--T-t
iba
Incentive ................. ............
Ehgine-lathe operators, class At Total
Time............................
Incentive . . . .
Grinding-machine operators, class At Total ........ ...
Time • • • • •
Incentive
Milling-machine operators, class At Total . . . . . . .
Time..................
Incentive
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class At T otal .......................................................................... .............................
T I umi

- t . T. . T . T T T T r t T - r t T T r t T T . .

T n n iln t .'lv . t - I T T ( - t t t 1 r f - t T t T r - ( ( r - r l T

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
mo

Ta

+.^1

iii i

T n /» * n tJ m

i i i i i i

ii T iii .r i iii i

i

i

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B i j t T otal..................... ... .............. ......................
Time.........................................................
Incentive................................ ..............
Automatic-lathe operators, class B 2/a ...................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class Bt T otal.............................................. .
Time............................ .........................................................................
Incentive ....................................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




1,114
562
552
1,536
9ftn
556
439
204
593
436
88
582

4,690
2,612
2,078
75
324
138
186
332
92
240
799
480
319
1,091
739
352
595
295
300
153
74
79
994
503
491
2,585
1,400
1,185
37
299
223
76

A verage
hourly
earnings

2/

$ $ $ % % $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ s $ $ $ $
il*30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
Aider
ip
and
\
Unoea
L.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 !2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

- _ _
2.03
1.90
?.17
_ _ _
1.81
1*66
- - _
2.08
1.53 13 52 a- 1.97
1.92
- - 1.82
1.58 16 1 3
1.40 ,^102 31 29
- - 2.03
- - 1.88
- - 2.22
1.95
- - 2.02
1.83
1
2.17
”1
2.04
!
1.78
_
_
2.13
2.01
1.89
2.19
2.C4 - - 1.89
2.34
2.05
1.87
-

-

_

.

_ 18 75 135 97
18 75 135 93
4
21 18 58 99 26
_ - 4 - 1 5 3 17
2 - 2 3 4
81 53 68 105 65
- 3 2
- 2 - - - 1 2
I

— -

2
2

1
1

_
-

-

_

-1

_
-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.02

1.87
2.17
1.87
1.69
2.09
1.79
1.61
1.54
1.81

_

-

2.22

2.07
1.88
2.25

-

-

_|

-

-

70 15 a 40 73 I ll
70 13 36 27 61 83
2 5 13 12 28

_
-

70 10 27 12
70 10 26 9
1 3

-

5
3
2

4
4

37
31
6
126
191
5
32

24
24
172
159
13
9

2 1
11 8
33 37
20 2

23 69 71 122
21 67 35 74
2 2 36 48
121 122 134 71
97 92 109 51
24 30 25 20
11 2 5 4
4 16 9 6
15 64 66 42
34 25 54 97
8 12 9 3

41 7
90 80 130 258 544 500
82 63 115 210 491 402
8 17 15 48 53 98
10 2 5 3
1 23 11 7 43 26
18 11 7 35 13
1 5
8 13
6 5 25 39 10 49
2 3 22 28 7 28
4 2 3 11 3 21
12 3 39 36 102 78
12 1 33 32 90 67
2 6 4 12 11
16 19 17 32 213 86
13 19 13 28 201 73
3 - 4 4 12 13
11 6 6 42 84 53
11 4 6 - 35 79 35
2 7 5 18
5 7
5 5 15 19 7
5
14 6
8 5 1
44 19 15 30 52
44 13 13 17 46 109
6 2 13 6 17
177 269 224 249 246 195
133 219 194 173 174 136
44 50 30 76 72 59
1 4 4 9 12 3
26 39 12 24 24 15
15 23 6 13 20 14
11 16 6 11 4 1

93
85
8
40
11
29
6
37
183
31
-

147
80
67
69
19
50
3
33
46
42
3

74 64 22 34
63
n 56 13 13
8 q 21
66 47 33 27
66 47 33 27
7 6 6 5
39 29 10 2
65 44 35 7
8
37 _ 12
-

204 76 31 15

1
204 76 31 XT

75
75
7
*
3

83 17
83 17
2 4
7 3 _

4
4
_
1

6

g

1
1
2

_
_

2
2

3
3
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

666 456 367 224 196 us 285 253 195 119 85 49 69
285 260 88 26 1 6 13 8 171 107 136 170 103 274 245 195 119 85 49 69
- - 1
3
19 29 - 37 12 3 5 14 15 34 26 9 1 3 1
1
10
1
27 12 3 4 1/ i * ■v.f 26 Q X O X
X
7

551
115
5
50
41
9

11 49 10 10
2
9 49 10 10

H5 j
no!f
5
233
209
24
60
47
13
8

g

156
103
««
133
76
57
4

n

10
1

53 67 49
40 40 34
13 27 15
68 80 U
61 74 16
7 6 28
62 46 51
31 35 10
31 n 41
17 36 K
5
13, n 7
4
25
137 66 / I£
102 50
35 16
79; 59 65
1 4 69 55 65
_
7
7
_

1
1

-

9
9
68
4
64
23
17
6
16
1
15
1

63
63
85
85
2
2

if
21 37 18 8 8 if
f
21 37 18 8 8 7 3 7
28 68 19 22 19 15 2 3
_
12 1 4 16 67 15 22 19 15 2 3
12 52 54 27 24 37 20 34
_
_
..
3 8 4 _
9 44 50 27 24 37 20 34
14 32 32 34 14 5 n 15
1

13 32 32 34 14 5 n 15
2 4 1 6 n
7 4
j
2 6 XX •7 4
(
K.C.
*
j;
in
68 271 po 19 7f J
2
K7
i if
*
IQ
K fi
28 68
TO
J
5
45 101 77 74 59 50 35 22
_
45 101 77 74 59 50 35 22
3
3

1 4
1 4

_

_

-

-

2
2

_

_

_

_

Occupational Vage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October- 1951
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
Bureau of Labor Statistics

20.

Table b-35: MaolUn^uf 9 tu iu A trU e A . V - Cont inued
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Machinery
hen

-

-

V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$

$ % $ $ $ $ % $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
Jnder
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.751.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
\
unde]
and
jL.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 pL.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

Continued

Continued

B y% -

Machine-tool operators, production,
class
Continued
Drill-press operators, single- and Multiplespindle, class
Total
.........

Bt

Incentive ..............................................
Engine-lathe operators, class
T o t a l .......................... ..

Bt

Grinding-machine operators, class

Killing-aachine operators, olass

Bi

Bt

Incentive . . . .
Total
Tine
Incentive
Total
Tine
Incentive

............
........
.........
..........

Screw-machine operators, automatic,
class
Total
T i n e ................................

.............................................................
Trm»n+Ava
T_
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
naohine), olass Bt T o t a l ........................
Bs

T i m e ......................
Incentive .................
Machine-tool operators, production,
olass C
T o t a l ........................... ......
Tina ...............................
Incentive
................ .
Drill-press operators, radial, class C 2 / * ...... .
Drill-press operators, single- and nultiple■plndla, alaaa Ct T o t a l _ ......tT..T......... ,
_
T i n e ......................

.

£/s

Tnaantlvn tTtft. , Ttt. tt, ,, ,
Engine-lathe operators, class C £/* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(hrlnding-machlne operators, olass C l/a . ________ _ .

MilllngHsachine operators, class C 2/e ............
Screw-nachine operators, autonatio, olass C 2/e •••
Turret-lathe^operators, hand (including hand-sorev
naohine), olass C 2 / e ............................ .
Machine-tool operators, tool roon
................
Machinists, production 2/*
Stock handlers and trackers, hand 2/* ................
Tool-euod-die nakers (tbol-and-die jobbing shops) 3/a
Tool-end-die nakers (other than jobbing shops) 2/» •••
Welders, hand, class
Total ...................... .
Tine

£/*
.................................................

At

Welders, hand, olass

Average
hourly
earnings

. . . ___. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tneentltm Ttr. TTTTT. r-r- rt
B 2 /* ................................................

425
127
298
374
196
178
527
234
293
382
254
128
41

21
20
392
238
154
832
730
102
81
171
117
54
53
114
191
14
129
333
186
737
447
400
411
303
108
241

%

1.91

-

1.95
1.72
2.20
2.04
1.70
2.31
1.81
1.73
1.97
1.97
1.69
2.26
1.80
1.74
1.89
1.46
1.44
1.65
1.39
1.43
1.39
1.52
1.54
1.44
1.53
1.45
1.50
1.96
1.91
1.52
2.10
2.13
1.95
1.81
2.*V5

-

-

_
-

-

-

38
38
2
12

.
73
72
1
31
12

1.68
2.00

1.66

12
1
2
1

“
4
-

13
-

-

-

12 !
1
11

5
4

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

80
70
10
7
23
13 !
10
24
18
”

1
1

5

4,

1
1
1

5
3

-

2
2
2

4
2
2
89
89!
7
22

1
1

-

102
92
10

8
3

5

-

_
9
8
1

3 16 14 45
3 15 13 28
_ 1 1 17
- 2 4 3
2 4 3
8
4
4
95
81
14
4
17
7

27
20
7 10
3i 7 4
o
5 14
16 25 38
22

9 40 6
6 23 5
3 17 1
6 24 10
5 18
Q
7
6 1
11 12 38
11 11 32
_ 1 6

21
15
6
159
140
19
17
35
21
14
20
20
17

11
8
3
66
64
2
9
8
1

19
12
7
34
31
3
“
3
2
1
3
8

4
17
17 14

13
7
56
53
3
49
45
4
37
30
7
4
4

47
32
15
38
38
41
39
2
38
33
5
2
2

53
40
13
23
19
4
7

32 30
30 21
2 9
23 12
19 7
4 5
2

20

2 1
2 1
4
3 3
1 16

57
31
42
37
5
30

32 23 14 21
17 23 14 21
24 20 7 10
1
H
" /f
10 6 4 10
27 52 15 13
21 43
6 9 15 13
42 26 47 9
33 19 34. 1
9 7 13 8
2
3 - 2 2
2
1
2
67 52 29 8
42 42 i 21
25 10 8 8
16
3 3
g
8 _ 3 3

26 15

20
10

50
43
7
2
2

1

-

4

5

-

6
6

14
14
4
4
13
13

22
22

23
23
23
28
2 16
2 16
1 3

10
10

6
6

6
6
1
1

1
2
20
20
4
4

8
8
3
3

7
7
3
3

1

1

3

2
1

2

3
81
31
_
70
35

•

_

16
16
14
14
23
28
5
5
4
/
2
2
_

3 1 3
3 1 3
9 5 3
9 5 3
30 25 32 28 14
30 25 32 28 14
3 - 2 1 2
3 _ 2 1 2
6 1 _ _
6
_ _ . _ _ _
_ _
_
_ _ _

11 6
11 6
21 18
21 18

26
6

1
2
14
14
5
5

_

7
7

1

4 8, _

1 6
8 2 10 28 15 24 15 4 5 1 7 - - - - - 1 4 16 5 19 14 22
10 14 7 20 13
40 25 29 67 73 212 174 22 33 32 . 4
6 - 20
10 4 1
- - - - - - - 20 17 129 46
20 16 129 46
1

-

15 27 25
15 27 25
15 9 15
4
11 9 15
5 10 11
5 10 11

_

18
5
_
24
11
23

1
2
21
20
2

31
29
49
22 47
2
7 32 40 71 45 29 3 3 2

2
-

43
25
28
9
16
14
2

1

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
-

-

-

30 31 7 13 8 9 - - 6 - 2 2
1
27 56 13 77 S3 12 _
23 58 79 107 34 - _
10 1 20 8 16 7 26 14
6
f
15 8 16 7 26

2
2

_

2

5

9
m

ft
>

1

.

-

-

~

Women

B

.......................................................
.......................................................

Assemblers, class
2/&
Inspectors, olass C 2/*
Machine-tool operators, production,
class
T o t a l ..................................
Time
Incentive
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-

Gy t

.........................................................
...............................................
3/a

Grinding-machine operators, olass C
Milling-machine operators, class
2/a

C

See footnotes at end of table.




...........
...............................

87
470
267
174
93
74
96
35

_
1.70
1.50 ^ 1
1.47 3/76
1.27 76
1.85
8
1.59
1.25 . ^48
1.34 19

_
6 6 7 14 26
3 7 17 6 50 77 96 108
25 21 36 n 5 1 1 2
25 21 36 i i 2 1 - 2
- - - - 3 - 1 1 1
2 6 14 l 3
17 14 11 4 1 1
1 4
5

3

3
4

-

1
1

1

5 1
3 2
- 77
- 77

_

4
3

3
-

1

-

6
6

-

Z

_

_

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

5

_
1

1

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

_

-

21,

0 *u!tu 4in ie & V . G ontU m ed

Table b~35: M

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Oooupation and sex 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1/

Mftghing .Igolg
Assemblers, class A 2 A ............................................. .
Assemblers, class Bt T otal ............................ ........................................
Incentive ...................................................
Asseablera, class C £ / * .......................................................
Electricians, maintenance £ / * ...........................................
Inspectors, class A 2/a ..................................................
Inspectors, class B 2/a .......................................................
Janitors 2 / a .................................................................... .
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A Q x Total............................................................
Tims
. ,Incentive ........................................... ..................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class At Total .......................................................................................
Tims v a ....................................................................>
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A1 2 A ......................... ......................................
n e 1 e fta a nrmrt a nrr n a1 e s s le
Grinding-machine operators, class At Incentive ............
Total .................
Time........
Incentive
Milling-machine operators, class At Total .............
Time..........
Incentive
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A % /b . . .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class At T otal .....................................................
Tims
Incentive
Machine-tool operators, production, ...........................................
class B U% Total ...................... .................................................................
Time....................................................................................
Incentive .....................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
Time
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class Bt T otal................... .......................
Time
Incentive ..............................
Milling-machine operators, class B £/b ................. .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class Bt Total ..............................................................
Time.........................................................
Incentive ...........................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B (women) 2A ....................... ................................................... ..
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 2/*» U • •
Grinding-machine operators, class C l / a .............................
Milling-machine operators, class C 2 / a ...............................
Machine-tool operators, tool room V a ...........................................

See footnotes at end of table.




278
259
68
191
36
41
111
53
67
836
234
602
91
27
64
27
106
58
48
150
38
112
150
40
no
60
159
134
431
109
322

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
$
Otader1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 $ 2.10 $ $ $ $2.30 $ $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70
2.05
2.15 2.20 2.25
2.35
anA
t ander
and
L.30
U35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 I .65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 over

%

_
2.14
..
2.01
1.71
2.12
1.56
1.91
1.88
1.65
1.48 10/10
_
2.09
1.89
_
2.16
1.97
1.82
2,03
1.89
i2.04
on

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

5

2

_
_
-

_
_
-

3

3

8

2

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

62
n

51
80
81
18
n
82
139
66
19

-

-

2.21
2.06

1

2.12

1.85
2.17
1.97
1.70
2.06
1.90
-L
»04
1.99
1.84
1.76
1.62
1.78
1.74
1.47
1.52
1.43
1.98
1.52
2.15
2 .14

-

3
3
1

1.92
2.10
2.08
1.88
2.15
2.24
_

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

_
-

_

_ !
«.

_
-

31 2
3
31 1

-

2
2

_

1.68
1.69
1.68

45
12
33
83

_
1 _ 5 7 33
10 20 18 23 21 5
6 16 12 n n
4
4 4 6 12 10 1
8 6 3 6 5
2 1 4 3 4
12 20
12 14 17 3 7
4 13 23 2
_
—
4 2 26 41 33
1 2 20 15 69
_
._
6 26 36
3
1 3 1 19
1 3 1 12
7

_
-

_

-

-

I
" 1
-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

5 10

3

1
6

n

2
2

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
1

-

—

2

3

3

12

-

-

4
1
3
1

1

5
3
3

n

3
8

5 15

1 3
4 12
6 10
2 7
4 3
10 6

2
2
2
2
2

-

3
2
1

-

1
1

-

-

_

_

-

2
1
1
2

-

88 17
-

-

“
-

1
1

9

5
5

1
10
10
4
14 41
3 24
n
17
14 14
10 8
4 6
1 1
10 ! 20
10 7
n
18
1/

7 5 3
2 1 3
5 4
4 12 7
4 8 20
1
4 7 20
16 14 7

7
3
3
-

9

4

-

2
1

3

-

2
1
1

_

12
12

4
5
5

2

6
/*
*■

2
5
1

4
29
9
20

1
1

1
5
1
4 29
3
1 2
2 27
2
2 33
33
1 -

8

4,

3
3

4
4

2
2
2

-

10

-

-

3
3
2

4 14
4
7 2

6

-

1
1

4
4
1
1
1

4 14 28
4 14 28
6
4
2

-

1

33

1
1

. 139 13 6 10
9 32 49 3 8
9 32 49 3 8

1

_
_

-

-

-

1
1
1

2

92 107 103 28 88 38 18
49 58 29 13 g
43 49 74 15 80 38 18
17 n2 18 4 2 1 2
g
9 9 18 4. 2 1 2

10 |
20
_
_
_
8
13 20
8 12 54 46 28 43
15 12
7 9 15 15 17 14 45 19 2 1
15 5
1 3 39 31 n 29 30 14 13 n
5
14 16 5 4, 1 1
3
4
1 1
11 16
-

4 17 8
5 10
—
1
5 9
1 - 19 12
8 15 23 14 1 1
2 1 5 8 1
-

1
1

5

n
n

13 25 12 6
14 8 9 11
8
6 8 9 n
5 13 9
20 4B 9 -

-

9

1
1
I
-

4 4
4 4
7 13
—
—
7 13
1
1

-

6
6

6
6

3
3

2
2

2
2

-

-

5
7

-

-

n

12

1

-

1
1
2
2

—

-

4.

?
1
1
2
2

4
4
4
—
4

1

7 15 26 16 39 57 31 29
g
7 15 20 16 39 57 31 29
4 2 1 1 4 - -

“

-

-

2
2
2

2

1

1

**•

—

-

-

-

5
1
2
2

4,
-

_
-

3

10
3 10
1 4
1 4

3 4 15
3 4 15

2 2

4.

1

9
9
8 6 23
— —
—
8 6 23
3 3
3 3

3

4
4
5

2
2
3 1

1
1
2

n

16

-

8

4,

4
9
9

1
_

9
9
3
3

7 1
7 1
3 10 10
9 5 6
9 5 6
24 17 23
—
24 17 23

l

—

-

-

1

-

2

1

1

2

“

“

2

~

22,

Table b-35;

M

a c /tiH

&

U f

9 H & u A fr U e d

V -

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex 2 /

Average
hourly
earnings
1 /

lVMhin»-fr9l

A W M m te *

$
$
$ $ $
$ $
Jnder L L.20 L.25 L.30 L.35 L.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 f -85 1.90 2.00 1.10 $ $ $ $ * „ $2.70 $2.80 $2.90
$.15
2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60
ami
> mder
an*
L.15 L.20 L.25 L.30 L.35 L.40 L.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 ever

- fryfogt&on Shopp 2/a

Inspectors, class C (women) ......................................................

9
24
7
9
a
12
46
4a

%

1.97
I .69
1.35
i ,69
I .57
1*55
1.44
1*31

1

2

7

2

1
1
4.

7
5

1
10

a

a

5

1
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

435
56
203
87
56

1.96
1.88
1.91
2.04
1.96

Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4 / ....................
D rill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class B ..........................................................................................
Engine-lathe operators, class B ........................................
Grinding-aachine operators, class B ...............................
Milling-machine operators, class B .................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class B ................................. ................................

267
17
55
69
71
40

1.80
1.70
2.04
1.73
1.79
1.70

_

Machine-tool operators, production, class C 4 / ...............
D rill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class G .........................................................................................
fijgine-lathe operators, class C ......................................................
Grinding-machine operators, class C ..........................................
Milling-machine operators, class C .............................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine),class C ................. .......................................................................

175
39
8
36
55
25

1.48
1.44
1.57
1.43
1.55
1.44

4
3

Maohlne-tool operators, production, olass C (women) . . .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ....................

114
15
23

1.23
2.16
1.39

24

See feotnotes at and of table.




............................................

1
1

2
1
1
3
4

Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4 / ...............
Angina-lathe operators, class A ........................................
GrindIng-nachlne operators, class A ................................
Milling-machine operators, class A ..............................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class A ..........................................................................................

lN»wnVmwm kem^

1
2
1

1

2

2

1

2

1
7
1

-

-

6
1
5
4

3

1

5

-

-

-

-

4
3
-

'-

4
1
1

-

10
1
-

-

1

-

3
3

~

1

-

12
5
3

2

4

21 27 20 2-3
1 3 3

1

3

2

3

2

2

x

1

.

1

-

52 106 66 82
2 18 8 24
24 51 24 38
22 ’ 21 10 7
3 13 20 5

11

3

3

1

2

2

2
2

3

_

13
13

24
4
19
4

-

x

3

1
1

1

-

1

_

X

4,

18 17 38 50 26 33
1
4 1 3 3 1 3 2 3 5 8
4 3 4 11 22 6 6
2 8 6 7 15 5 8
1 2 3 10 6 9 6
8
1

“

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

6
2
2
1

“

25

1

..

_

«.

_

_

_

8
1
1

5
2
2

6
6

13
7
6

7

-

-

-

-

2

1

1

9 10
- 1
2
4 _

3

3

1

-

3

1

1

1
2

14

9

9

5

8

8

7

1
6
6

1

2

7
1

-

3
3

1

1

2

-

1
1

5
3

_

_

-

..

_

2

5
5

1

5

-

2

2

2

5
~

9

13

8

3

1

6

_

4

2

3

1

1

1

5

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

3
7

2

-

5

-

1

3
8

2
1
2
1

-

-

-

-

3

2

3

2

6

6

4

2

3

1

1

2

1

1

_

1

1

_

1

_

_

4

4

8

-

_

2

6
1

19
2 4
2 5 4
5 4

.

29
4

1
6

24

18

-

..

3

2

2
3

1

am

6

1

9
.

_
.
-

Mc&iuH&uf 9nSuAtrUeA y

Table B-35t
Occupation and sex 2 /

of
workers

hourly
earnings

2/

- G aniinu+d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
9
under
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45
Under

$

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shoos 3/a
Assemblers, class B ....................................................................
TtMpsnt/ira^ nlaaa k
..
Janitors ........................................................................ ..................

15
14
16
57

$
1.06
1.62
1.97
1.15

Machine-tool operators, production, class A i j .............
Engine-lathe operators, class A ......................................
Grinding-machine operators, class A .............................
MUling-machine operators, class A ...............................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class A ..............................................................

203
85
63
25
18

1.89
1.88
1.98
1.88
1.82

Machine-tool operators, production, class B L j .............
D rill-press operators, radial, class B ...................
Engine-lathe operators, class B .....................................
Grinding-machine operators, class B .............................
Milling-machine operators, class B ...............................

12A
11
32
52
24

1.69
1.58
1.71
1.73
1.66

Machine-tool operators, production, class C i j .............
Milling-machine operators, class C ...............................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
iiiMhl viaJ aI acm P,

41
15
8

1.42
1.42
1.43

Machinists, production ..............................................................
Tool—
and-die makers ..............................................................
Kavw ml emm A
I

55
447
7

26

2

8

2

5

5

-

-

6
-

1
9

_

1
5

3

_
~

—

1.88
2.10
1.80

5 18

1
1

9
2 5
14
1

-

_ ! _ !
!
1

1

1
i

!

1

!
1
1

7
1
5

8 5
3 3
1 ! 1
i

“
3
1
1
—!

3

1
1

14 34 35 49
9 20 16 22
4 10 18
1 2 5 5 6
3 3 4 3 3
9

18 23 41 14
- 13 9 6
5 7 18 7
5 j 2 ~ 12

_

3
4

2
4

6
6

5

6
4

1

3

-

_

_

4 10 2
1 1 3 9 1
1
-

10 24
1 15
5 6
2 3
2

3
3
”

2
2
~

2
2
“

“

~

3
56 13

71

6

69

6
14

12

12
3
9

2
1
6 i 6 9 9
20
6 ;
1 i 1 4

1

4
24

2
31
1

10
28 70

27

1 |
;........... I , , - .
l / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the machinery (non-electrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial G lassification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by
die Bureau of the Budget) machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were also included in the study.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Workers were distributed as follows* 6 at $0.95 to $1.00; 32 at $1.00 to $1.05; 24 at $1.05 to $1.10; 2 at $1.10 to $1.15; 14 at $1.15 to $1.20; 24 at $1.20 to $1.25.
Workers
as follows*
$1.05 to $1.10;
8
t Workers mere distributed as follows* 56 at $1.05 to $1.10; 6 at $1.10 to $1.15; 11 at $1.15 to $1.20; 27at $1.20 to $1.25.
were distributed
9
15
at $1.20 to $1.25.
2 / Workers were distributed as follows* 5 at $1.05 to $1.10;6 at at $1.10 to $1.15; 25 at $1.15 to $1.20; at $1.20 to $1.25.
at
$1.10 to $1.15; 15 at $1.15 to $1.20; 22
Data lim ited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/
10 / Workers were distributed as follows * 8 at $1.15 te $1.20; 2 at $1.25 to $1.30.
Includes establishments producing machine tools and machine-tool accessories for which separate data are also presented.




Table B-40*

R

Number
of
workers

Occupation 2/

Average
hourly
earnings

H

1/
a llied
2/
3/

1.81
1.89
1.92
1.67
1*1*9
1.96
1.82
1.9b
1.67
1.73
1.61

Occupation 2 /
Engineers, stationary ........................................................
Filling-machine tenders ....................................................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...........................
Order f ille r s .........................................................................
Pasteurisers ...........................................................................
Refrigerator mem...................................................................
Sanitary m en...........................................................................
Truck drivers, heavy; (over 4 tons, tra iler type)
Washers, b ottle, machine ..................................................
Washers, can, machine ........................................................

Routemen (driver-salesmen)
Routemen (driver-salesmen)
1/
(1949
2/
2/
y
£/

r eta il . . .
wholesale * J ,

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

3 5 16 37 1 1 6 .
2 1 - . 7 3
2b 16 35 .
3 51 85 2b b 8 3 6 - 8 . . . . - - .
26 15
69
.
9 8 2 8 6 _ .
1 28 _
3
5 277 7 _3 368 87 _ - •. .
_
.
182 - - 9
b
“ 3 5 “ “
“ - “ " _

5
_
■

-

b 23

•

-

•

-

6

-

The study covered ccmpanies vith more than 100 workers engaged in furnishing transportation by line-haul railroad, and certain services
to r a il transportation, such as sleeping and dining ear service, railway express, and switching and terminal eoqsaniee.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-5452s

Occupation

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF$ $
$
$
f.35 i.bo l.b5 i.5o i.55 1.60 1.6$ 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
and
under
ItkO L i i 1*50 i*55_ 1,60 1.(6 1*20 1*21 1,80 1*81 1*20 1*21 2*00 2,0$

%

69
13
75
175
50
110
33
32
752
195
8

Carpenters, maintenance ............................................................
Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons and over) ,•
E lectricians, maintenance...............• .......................................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ..............................................
Janitors, porters and cleaners • • •• • • • • • • • •.........•••••»
Machinists, maintenance • • • • • • • . • • • • • • ............... ..............
Painters, maintenance ................................. •••••• •• •• •• •• «
Pipe fitte r s , maintenance......................... ..............................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand . . . . . . . . . .............. . . .
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including b tons)
Truckers, cower (fo r k -lift) •

l/

c til* Q € u U >

Number
of
workers

30
61
63
62
64
61
42
18
64

11

Number
of
workers

693
1U

M

W

m

i

/

MUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 % $
* ,
$
$
s
$ * $ $
$ ,
1.80 1.85 $
1.70 1.75 $ - * M 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 $
2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60
ami
under
2/ 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 ever
_
1
1
1
1
$1.95
3 1
1
3
5
4
5
4
_
1.61
8
42
1
1
9
_
8
1
1
1.74
3 -4 12 34
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Average
hourly
earnings

1.66

1.65
1.60 ;
1.55 I
1.66
1.57
1.59

$

9
45
13
59

_

_
_

1
20

_

3

jjstf0

-

9

$

2

1

2

3

8

"

Average
Weekly }’
earnings' Under

50
54
15

10

_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
• r* ^ $
95. O 100.00):105.00I:no.oo):H5.ooj:120.0d 125.00|:i30.oc|:135.00 HO.od:U5J0:150.00155 J0C 160 .od 165.00 170 JC 175.00
C

$

$

$

75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
under
70.00 75.00 SO. 00 85.00 90.00 95.00 |100.0qi05.00|ll0.00|ll5.0c|l20.0c|l25.0(il30.00| 135^X31UO.QC|U5a?c|l50.0C|l55.0C)l60.0d 165 JO 170 .PC 175 .O over
C and

95.39
111.55

12
2

20
2

53
4

120

5

HI 132
2

13

4

10

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the processing and reta il distribution of dairy products (Group 54-52) as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification 1
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; a ll workers were paid on a time basis.
Data n »it« a to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey* Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
straight time earnings. (Includes commission earnings).
Bureau af labor S ta tistics
Routemen normally work 5 days during each 6-day cycle.




2$.

Table B-63:

O

h

A

m

A & H O *

G o A S U eA d * H

1 / The study covered o ffices of insurance carriers employing more than 20 workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
2 / Hours refleot the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tim e salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S tatistics




26.

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum rates and maximum straight-time nours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated.)

Table C-2082 i M

Table C-151 B u ild in g G O Jtd tb U c iiO H
October 1. 1951
Hate— Hours
per
per
hour week
$2,700 ko
Bricklayers .............. ...................
2.825 1*0
Carpenters
Electricians ........................................................... 2.825 1*0
painters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1*50 1*0
Plasterers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.825 1*0
plumbers ................................................................. 2.825 1*0
Building laborers ................................................ 2.100 1*0

1*8

1.687
1.687

1*8
1*6

1.550

1*0

i.5oo

1*0

1.380

1*0

1.280
1.060
1.010

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.550
1.280
1.010

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.910
1.800

1*5

1.500
1.300
1.000

1*0
1*0
1*0

Rate
per
hour

1*5

Hours
per
week
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0
1*0

Agreement

o o

1.250

Brewing department*
Regular employees ............................................. $1,900
Twpcrmqr employees*
Less than 6 months service ........................ 1.825
With more than 6 months service ............... 1.900
Apprentices *
First year .................................................. 1.1*95
Second year................................................. 1.525




1*8
1*8

Book and job shops*
Bindery women*
Hand ........ ............ ............... .
Machine ....................................
Bookbinders ............................ ......
Compositors, hand ............................
Electrotypers .................................
Machine operators ............................
Machine tenders (machinists) ................
Photoengravers *
Agreement A ....;..........................
Agreement B (comic syndicate) ...........
Agreement C (rotogravure) ......... .
Press assistants a nd feeders*
C y l i n d e r ................... ....... .
Platen ................. .
Pressmen, cylinder*
1 2-color or 1 press w i t h color attachment
1 perfecting; 1 flat or semirotary; 1
Kidder, C o y or Meisel ..................
1 or 2 single cylinder; 1 single cylinder
and not more than 3 job; engravers'
proofing press; 2 single-color Harris;
1 or 2 Kelly, Miehle, Vertical or Miller
High-Speed w i t h 3 or less job presses •
Pressmen, rotogravure*
1 single-color; 1 multi-color ...........
Pressmen, platen*
1 or 2 .....................................
3 or l ......................... .
i
5 or more ..................................
Stereotypers • .................................
Newspaper*
Compositors, hand - day w o r k ................
Compositors, hand - night work ..............
Machine operators - day w o r k .............
Machine operators - night work ..............
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ....
Machine tenders (machinists) - night work ..
Mailers - day work*
Agreement B ....... ....................... .
Mailers - night work*
Agreement B ................................
Photoengravers - u«y wura*
A ................................
Photoengravers - night w o r k .................
Pressmen, web presses - day work*
Agreement A ...................... ..........
Agreement B (art gravure) ................
Pressmen, w eb presses - night work*
Agreement A ......................
Agreement B (art gravure) ................
Stereotypers - day work ................. .
Stereotypers - night w o r k ...... .............

■"■RBET”
per
hour

2.365
2.1*90
2.710
2.51*0
2.51*0

Jlo c a l

Hours
per
week
1*0
1*0
1*0

Table C-27: P /U to titU f
July 1, 1951

A

$1,687
1.625

Hours
per
week

...Hat”
per
hour

d

Rate
per
hour

Table C-Ul:

G o *U iH 4 4 e d

glassification

Table C-2082*. M a li Jla p to a i
October 1, I9bl
Classification

-

Bottling departmentt
Machine operators ............................................. $1,813
Other regular employees .................................. 1.788
Temporary employees .......................................... 1.638

Table C-205 • /iciA& U ed,
July 1, 1951

B r ead and cake - Hand shops*
Agreement A*
First hands ................................
Second hands ...............................
Male bake-shop helpers and shipping
clerks .................... ..............
Agreement Bt
Overmen ............. ............ ...........
Mixers
B r e a d and c ak e - Machine shops t
Ovenmen, mixers, ingredientmen, cake
decorators ...•••••...... ................. .
Bench or machine hands, doughnut-machine
o p e r a t o r s ........... .......................
Mixers* helpers, oven feeders, helpers and
dumpers, wrapping a nd slicer adjusters ...
Bake-shop helpers, shipping-room helpers,
bread wrappers and slicers ............... .
Han d icers (women) .................... .
W o m e n employees ....... ..................... .
Pie a nd pastry shopsr
D o ugh mixers, ovenmen ............ .
Bake-shop helpers ............................
W r a p p e r girls .................................
Heb r e w baking r
Ovenmen a n d dough mixers • • ................ .
B e n c h workers .................................
Crackers and cookiesr
Mixers, ovenmen, peelers, cracker
ovenmen, m a c h i n e m e n ........................
Bake-shop helpers .............................
A l l other helpers (women) ....................

October 1, 1951

Classification

Classification

Classification

& lt jUtq/UOAA

Hours
per
week

37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.720
2.995
2.965

37 1/2
37 1/2
: 38 3/1*

2.020
1.727

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.563

37 1/2

2.1*90

37 1/2

2.568

37 1/2

2.21*3
2.352
2.1*52
2.7U9

37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.61*0
2.801*
2.61*0
2.801*
2.61*0

2.801*

37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.337

37 1/2

2.503

35

2.883
3.231

37 1/2
35

2.536
2.669

37 1/2
37 1/2

2.71*6
2.980
2.563
2.803

35
35
37 1/2
35

G p & ia tiw f

October 1. 1951

Classification
2-man cars:
First 3 months .........................................
1*-12 months.....................................................
After 1 year.....................................................
Busses *
First 3 months......................... ........................
U-12 months ........................................................
After 1 year ......................................................
Table C-i*2:

A fn to 'li'U tc A

July 1, 1951

Rata
per
hour

per
week

$1,520
1.550
1.570

1*1*
hk
1*1*

1.620
1.650
1.670

1*1*
1*1*
1*1*

<2*1d jftlp & M ,

C lassification
Bakery................................................................................ T
Cracker ....................................................................... T
Beer - Keg and bottle*
Helpers *
Agreement A ...........................................................
Agreement B ...........................................................
Building*
Cons truction*
Excavating truck .................................................
Special tractor type ................... ....................
Carry-all truck ...................................................
Material*
Building supply ...................................................
Reacly-mix truck ................... ...............................
Coal .......................................................................................
H elpers.......................................................................
Tracta* drivers .........................................................
Furniture ............................................................................
Helpers ............................................................. ..
General*
Local trucking*
Single-axle unit .................................................
Trailer, truck and
se m itr a iler .................................................
Grocery - Wholesale ......................................................
Ice*
Experienced route
drivers ........................................ .........................
Helpers ........................................................................t
L in en ................................................................................ T
Moving*
L o ca l............. ............................................................tT
Helpers ..........................
Newspaper and magazine*
Day routemen...............................................................
Night routemen ...........................................................
Produce ........................................................................ rtt
Railway express ...............................................................
Waste paper - City delivery*
Semi or single
trailer ..................................................................T
T
Helpers ...................................................................... T
Wine - City delivery .....................................................

Rate
par
hour

week

$1.1*25
1.660

10
*
15
*

1.500
1.1*30

10
*
10
*

1.870
2.120
2.020

10
*
10
*
10
*

1.650
1.700
l.55o
i.5oo
l.6oo
l.55o
i.5oo

10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
10
*
18
*
18
*

1.5 2 0

18
*

1.600
1.615

18
*
10
*

i.5oo
1.102
1.513

11
**
11
**
10
*

1.675
1.625

18
*
18
*

2.159
2.326
1.625
1.795

18
*
15
*
10
*
10
*

1.300
1.000
i.5oo

10
*
10
*
10
*

Hours
per

Occupational Viage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
U.S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
Bureau of Labor Statistics

D: Entrance Rates
Table D -l:

Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments ..........................................................
60 or under ........................................................................
Over 60 and under 65 ......................................................
Over 65 and under 70 ......................................................
7 0 ...........................................................................................
Over 70 and under 75 ......................................................
Over 75 and under 80 ......................................................
Over 80 and under 85 ......................................................
Over 85 and under 90 ......................................................
Over 90 and under 95 ......................................................
Over 95 and under 100 ....................................................
1 0 0 .........................................................................................
Over 100 and under 105 ..................................................
105 .........................................................................................
Over 105 and under 110 ..................................................
n o .........................................................................................
Over n o and under 1 1 5 ..................................................
n 5 .........................................................................................
Over 115 and under 1 2 0 ..................................................
1 2 0 .........................................................................................
Over 120 and under 125 ..................................................
125 .........................................................................................
Over 125 and tinder 1 3 0 ..................................................
130 .........................................................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ..................................................
135 .........................................................................................
Over 135 and under 140 ..................................................
n o .........................................................................................
Over n o and under n 5 ..................................................
Over n 5 and under 150 ..................................................
Over 150 and under 155 ..................................................
Over 155 and under 160 ..................................................
Over 160 and under 1 6 5 ............................... ..................
165 and over .......................................................................
Establishments with no established m in im a .........
i/
2/
2 /
r eta il
f j
*




£ * U s U i4 lO e

All
industries 2 /

P & te A

fa b

P la n t W

/to k e H

l/

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified minimum rates in Manufacturing
Durable goods Nondurable goods
Wholesale Retail Services
Public
trade
trade
Establishments with
u tilitie s *
1/
251 or 101-250 251 or
101-250 more
more
workers workers workers workers
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.3
.4
.5
.7
.7
.1
5.2
1.3
.3
.3
2.3
.7
1.8
1.4
1.1
2.7
4.7
2.7
1.4
.4
.6
2.8

_
_
_
3.3
_
7.2
19.8
1.7
7.6
8.4
4.7
6.9
9.6
_
_
.1
1.3
_
_
_
29.4
.
_

_
_
_
.2
_
_
_
_
_
1.1
3.8
2.0
3.8

_
_
10.4
_
_
_
15.0
.9 .9
3.4
_
_
_
_
2.6
6.2

_
_
_
_
_
29.9
_
1.5
11.7
_
_
3.9
_
4.3
10.5
_
_
_
_
_
_
3.7
7.2
_
4.6
_
_
8.8
_
_
_
_
.
-

_
_
_
_
3.6
_
_
9.6
_
8.4
_
17.5
32.3
_
_
_
_
2.1
•
_
_
_
3.6
15.1
3.1
_
_
2.9
1.8
_
-

.
_
_
_
5.7
3.3
3.3
_

8.7

„

-

-

4.7

18.4
2.0
10.7
5.4
2.5
1.6
6.3
4.6
_
2.6
.5
_
_
6.6
_
_
.1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
•
_
_
.1

5.2

-

4.1

38.6

.3
4.6

4.1
7.5

3.3
4.7
.4

18.5
1.5

4.4
3.5
(it/)
7.4
(it/)

.4
1.2

-

4.8

-

.4

7 .0

5.6
13.3
3.9
4.7
31.1
2.6
4.6
3.2
12.3
_
.

.4

_

-

_
_
.2
18.8
_
_
1 .3
_
_
_
_
_
_

32.2

_

_

6.8
6.5
8 .6
1.3
12.4
2.4
2.4
3.2
5.9
.6
.7
1.7
2.7
_
6.6
1.2
8.4
2.0
_
_
.2
_
.6
.

4.7

-

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Although data could not be shown separately for r eta il trade due to the emission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of
trade is appropriately represented in the data for "all industries."
Imss than .05 of 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
Transportation (excludi ng railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor S ta tistics

28,

E: Supplementary Wage Practices
Table E-i:

S iu jjt

O jU M tiU o n i

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in Shift d ifferen tial

Percent of workers on extra sh ifts,
a ll establishments ......................................
Receiving sh ift d ifferen tials .............
Uniform cents (per hour) .................
Under A cents ..................................
A cents -.............................................
5 cents ..............................................
6 cents ..............................................
7 cents ..............................................
7$■ c e n t s ............................................
8 cents and under 10 cents . . . .
10 cents ............................................
Over 10 cents ..................................
Uniform percentage .............................
5 p ercen t.........................................
Over 5 and under 10 percent . . .
10 percent ........................................
Over 10 percent .............................
Tall day's pay for reduced hours..
Receiving no d ifferen tial .....................

A ll manufacturing industries 1 /
Durable goods
All industries
Nondurable
_Jd or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
other
other
sh ift sh ift
sh ift
sh ift
Shift
21.0 8.0
0
20.0 8%
13.7 6.1
.2
.1
3.5
3.6
.3
•A 2.2
3.8 l.A
.1
.1
.8
.3
1.3 1.6
.1
6.3 1.9
3.1 . .A 1.1
2.8
.7
.1
“
1.0 a / )

22.5
22.1
1A.5
A.O
2.5
.5
A.8
.1
1.0
1.6
7.6
A.O
.A
3.2
-

.A

1 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
2 / No workers employed on third or other sh ifts.
2 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.




8.1
8.1
5.8
_
Q /)
2.6
1.7
.1
.A
.9
.1
2.3
l.A
.9

Stamped and
pressed
Sheet-metal Heating
metal
goods work 2 / apparatus 2 / products 2 /
ja or
2d
2d
2d
other
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift

-

-

-

-

7.2
7.1
7.0
.7
1.3
.3
_
A.7
.1
.1
-

3.3

.1

15.3
12.0
11.1
.9
1.7
8.A
_
.1

-

-.9
.9

16.3
16.3
.6.3
_
_
.2
1.2
1.6
_
13.3
-

11.6
11.6
11.6
_
9.A
2.2
-

_
-

•
_
-

_

-

-

18.A
18.A
1A.8
1.6
6.A
_
5.2
_
1.6
3.6
3.6
_
_
-

nacnxnery
2d
sh ift

3d or
other
sh ift

19.8
19.6
1A.8
_
.
3.6
_
5. A
.3
2.2
3.0
.3
3.9
1.1
2.8

A.O
A.O
3.1
_
_
.1

-

.9
.2

(2/)
.1
.A
2.5
.5
_
_
.5

.A

-

Electroplating,
plating
and polishing
3d or
2d
other
sh ift
sh ift
13.2
12.0
12.0
_
12.0
_
.
_
_
-

1.8
1.2
1.2
_
1.2
_
-

•
_
1.2

_
_
-

_

_

.6

Iron and steel
forgings
3d or
2d
sh ift other
sh ift
30.3
30.3
29.8
_
8.3
_
17. A
1.6
.5
2.0
.5
.5
_
_
-

12.0
12.0

_
_
.1
_
_
11. A
.5
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S ta tistics

29,

Table E-2:

S c h e d u le d W je d z ltf cJlo u n A.

PERCENT OF OFFICE 2/

Weekly hours
All establishments........................................................
Under 35 hours ...................................................................
35 hours ....................................................... ..
^ 5v « r 3 5 sod under 37$- hours ...............................
37$- hours ...............................................................................
Over 37& and under 40 hours .............................................
40 hours ........................................................................................................................
Over 40 hours and under 44- hours ..........................
44. hours ..................................... ...................................................................................
Over 44 and under 48 hours .................................................
48 hours ......................................................................................................................
50 hours ................... .......................
Over 50 and under 56 hours .................................................
56 and 56$- hours .........................................................................................
59 and 60 hours .............................................................................................
66 hours ........ ... ..............................................
Information not available .....................................................

All
indus­
tries

100.0
( 4/ )

.7
.6

8.2
3.0
81.0
.5
4.6
.5
.9

M anufacturing

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

100.0 100.0 _ 100.0
_
-

-

4.8
87.9
.3
6.8
.2

-

6.7
87.5
5.8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

88.6
1.1
9.5
.8
_

-

-

PERCENT OF

WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

-

.1
3.4
.2
94.4
.5
1.2
.2

Retail
trade

2/

1.1
5.7
87.1
6.1
-

-

•

-

-

All

Services

100.0
_
1.6
3.7
21.4
16.0
55.7
1.0
.6

5.3
9.8
5.2
64.9
1.7
3.4
4.5
4.8
-

-

-

-

-

.

i e o ,o _

100.0

!

.4

.9
.7
63.8
1.4
2.7
4.0
14.1
2.7
2.5
4-4
2.2
.3
.3

1.2

-

-

.9
72.4
1.8
1.4
4.1
8.2
2.9
2.6
2.4
2.1
-

-

WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0 : 100.0 . 100.0
_
_
6.1
_
4*8
70.7 79.4 42.0
2.8
1.5
1.3
1.9
1.7
5.1
9.8
1.9
12.4
3.6
3.5
3.2
28.8
2.2
3.1
_
26
8.0
3.6
-

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

goods

i

100.0

PLANT

a n u f a c t u r in g

Durable

All

2/

-

-

-

Finance**

M

_
_
-

65.9
2.3
12.9
4.3
8.1
6.5

Retail
trade

Services

2/

100.0
_
_

.1
32.9
_
7.6
6.2
46.0

,

-

-

4.6
_
2.6

-

j\J Data relate to women workers.
2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
the data fcr "all industries."
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
j j Lass than .05 of 1 percent.
« Transportation (excluding railroads), conaunication, and other public u tilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table E-3i

J h lijd c U fi

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number of paid holidays
All establishments......................... .
Establishments providing paid
holidays ................. .............................
2 days.............................
3 days.......................................................
5 days .................................................................................
6 days .................................................................................
7 days .................................................................................
8 days ............................................... . ..............................
10 days .............................................................................
lOfc days .......................................... .................................
12 days .....................................................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays .....................................................
Information not available........................

All
indus­
tries

100.0

M anufacturing

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0 100.0

100.0

All

98.0

98.6
(3/)
_
1.0
85.2
8.2
1.2
2.6
(1/)
.4

.1
94.0
2.9
1.0
-

1.2
.2

1.7
.3

_

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

2.1
.4

—

.3

-

-

«

41.1
58.9
-

-

-

75.6
3.1
1.4
17.2
.3
2.4

-

-

-

-

Services

All
indus­
tries

G

M a n ufacturi .n

All

Durable

Non­
durable
goods

2/
100.0

100.0

95.4 i 78.1
.9
1.3
10.8
2.0
70.2
74.6
3.1
9.6
.5
.1
•4
“

79.9
1.4
2.3
73.6
2.1
.5
-

2.6
73.1
-

7.0
1.1
75.1
10.9
2.8
-

20.1

24.3

3.1

1/

100.0
_
1.5
96.6
1.9

96.8
.7
-

Finance**

100.0

100.0

_
-

Retail
trade

100.0 . 100.0

99.7
_
.2
85.4
10.0
4.1
-

97.5
_

Whole­
sale
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

100.0

4.6
—

21.7
.2

100.0 100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Services

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.8
.6
89.0
3.2

71.6

75.7

96.9

58.3

_
-

_

-

-

Whole­
sale
trade

40.2

17.5
.6
41.7

-

“
7.2

14.6
-

53.0
1.8
2.2
“

28.4
"
1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the amission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented
in the data for "all industries."
2 / Includes data for industries otter than those shorn separately.
Occupational Whge Surrey, Cleveland, Chlo^ October 1951
y less tton .05 of 1 percent.
“• s » LABOR
* Transportation (excluding railroads)', communication, and other public u tilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




30.

Paid fy&ocUi/uiA (fy&imal PAaailUmi)

Table E-4*
*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Vacation policy

i l l establishm ents.........................................
1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations . . . . .
Qhder 1 w eek.......................................
1 week.............................................. .
Ovar 1 and under 2 w eek*.......................
2 veeka ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 veeka .......................
3 v eek a................. .......................... ..............
Establishments with no paid vacations ..
Information not a v a ila b le ...........................
* yppyg of jr a r to
Eatablianments vxxn paid vaca tio n s.........
Bader 1 v a e k ..................... ..........................
1 v a e k ............................................................
Ovar 1 and under 2 veeka .......................
2 veeka .....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 v eek a .......................

3 veaks.....................................................

Establishments with no paid vacations ••
Information not available ...........................
l y e y s , of gyvagS
Establishments with paid v a ca tio n s.........
1 vaek ............................................................
Ovar 1 and under 2 veeka ...................
2 veeka.....................................................
Ovar 2 and under 3 v eek a .....................
Establishments vith no paid vacations ••
Information not available ...........................
13 years of service
Establishments vith paid vacations •••••
Ovar 1 and under 2 weeks
2 w eeks.................................
Over 2 and under 3 veaks
3 veeka ............................... .
Over 3 w eeks.................
Establishments vith no paid vacations ••
Information not available

All
indus­
tries

M anufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

Services

All
indus-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.5

99.3

99.6

98.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.2

_

_

87.4
1.8
74.5
2.4
8.7

_

73.0
26.4
?6

26.1
73.9
-

8.2
91.8

-

-

-

'

"

99.6

98.4

100.0

_

_

8.6
91.0
(2/)

99.5

99.3

_

_

99.6
1.5
•
95.8

99.5

.9
1.4

.2
.2

-

<2/>

.4
.3

(2/)

99.3
.2
o2

.3

99.6
1.5

99.5

65.0
.2
32.7
•2
.2
•2

70.9
_
28.6

(2/)
-

.2

.3

_

28.1
67.2
2.9

"

19.3
80.0
(2/>
.4
.3

5.8
.5
93.0

_

'V

53.2
45.2
1.6
"

26.0
_
73.3
.1
a
.3
.2

10.0
.3
88.2
.8
.2
.3
.2

_

V

-

.4

2.4
.5
96.7
(2/)
-

.4

99.6
_
-

99.6

16.6
.6
81.2

_

-

25.8
73.6
_
.6

1.6

-

99.0
.1
98.0
_

100.0
_
-

99.4
_
.6

_

1.0

-

99.6

99.0

100.0

.1

—

.4

-

79.2
20.4
-

•4

16.5
•
83.5
•
-

100.0
_

5.3
93.3
1.4
-

1.8
98.2
18.6
63.3
13.7
2.6
1.8

"

.9

(2/)

100.0

-

_

44.1
_
54.8
-

1.0

5.6
94.4
_

100.0
5.9
94.1
_

100.0
_
-

-

91.2
1.5
7.3

-

-

100.0
5.9
82.7
11.4

100.0
_
-

-

67.3
.3
31.0
1.4

-

-

-

12.4
•2
87.5
1.8
53.8
10.7
21.1
~
.1
12.3
.2

98.2
11.7
70.2
13.7
2.6
1.8

87.5
5.1
2.3
73.8
5.6
.7
12.3
.2

98.2
11.7
—
64.4
2.9
19.2

87.5
5.0
1.4
48.7
7.2

1.8

-

M anufacturing

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

71.2

86.9

87.4

65.4
3.1
2.7
28.8
"

65.1
21.8
13.1

72.7
14.7

"

All

97.0

71.2

86.9

_

_

Non­
durable

86.3
2.9
71.9
3.5
8.0
13.7

88.4
2.3
58.2
12.6
15.3
—

86.3
2.9
56.2,
14.0
13.2
-

-

11.6

97.0
90.6
6.4
3.0

I

_

-

12.6

"

88.6

66.0
7.0
24.0

-

-

37.8
3.1
30.3
-

13.7

3.0

28.8

13.1

97.0
7.1
85.6
4.3
3.0

71.2
1.7
66.4
3.1

86.9
28.5
2.5
55.9

28.8

13.1

97.0
7.1
—

71.2

86.9
28.5
•
46.7
11.7

13.9
.
70.6
4.1

13.1

11.4

-

39.3
2.7
44.9
_
-

40.8
_
46.3
—
1.5
11.4

"

88.4
1.9
2.8
75.8
7.1

86.3
.7
3.5
73.3
8.8

11.6

13.7

88.4
1.9

1.8
48.6

24.0

1.2

9.5
25.3
1.3

86.3
.7
2.2
48.5
11.8
21.5
1.6

u .i
-

12.3

11.6

13.7

3.0

.2

Services

goods

100.0 ...190*0 _ 100.0
88.4
2.3
75.6
2.8
7.7
11.6

Retail
trad^

.8

-

48.8

•

28.6
39.5
3.1
28.8

-

-

88.6
13.9
_
73.2
«.
1.5
11.4
88.6

\ J Although data could not be shown separately for r eta il trade due to the omission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of r e ta il trade is appropriately represented in
the data for "all industries."
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951,
2 / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
2 / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
• Transportation (excluding railroads), oommunioation, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table E-5 * Paid SicJz Jl&aue, (fyobm ai PmhaM ohA)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid siok leave

All establishments .......................................
1 vear of service
Establisbaents with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................................
3 d a y s........................................................
A days .........................................................
5 days .........................................................
6 days .........................................................
7 days .........................................................
8 d a y s.......................................................
10 d ays....................................................
02 days .......................................................
19 d a y s....................................................
20 days .......................................................
21 d a y s.....................................................
22 days . . ...................................................
24 days .......................................................
30 days .......................................................
40 days .......................................................
Miaoxisbnents with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................................
Information not available .......................
2 roars of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick le a v e ............................... ..
4 days .........................................................
9 days ........................................................
6 days .........................................................
7 d a y s.........................................................
8 d a y s ........................................................
10 days .....................................................
12 d ays.................................................... ..
19 days .......................................................
18 days .......................................................
20 d ays.....................................................
21 days .......................................................
22 days .......................................................
24 days .......................................................
30 days .......................................................
40 days .......................................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................................
Information not available ..........................

All
indus­
tries

M
anufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

33.1
.4
.2
10.1
.8
.9
2.2
8.5
4.1
1.1
1.7
2.4
.8
(2/)
.3
(2/)

44.1
.4
14.8
.8
4.0
11.7
6.5
1.9
2.2
1.4
.4
-

45.7
.5
13.3
5.3
15.4
3.9
2.6
2.8
1.9
-

39.0
19.3
3.5
•
14.5
_
1.7
-

30.4
5.4
.9
.
24.1
•
•
-

20.6
3.2
8.2
3.9
4.2
_
1.1
-

10.4
_
2.6
.3
1.8
5.2
.3
_
.
.2

18.6
7.2
9.6
1.1
_
_
.7
_
-

66.7
.2

55.6
.3

53.9
.4

61.0
-

69.6
-

79.4
-

89.6
-

33.6
.6
8.4
.8
.5
2.2
7.7
2.9
2.8
1.9
2.3
2.4
.8
(2/)
.3
(2/)

44.4
11.5
.8
4.0
11.0
3.0
4.8
3.5
3.3
1.4
.4
-

45.7
.5
9.1
5.3
14.4
3.9
6.3
4.3
1.9
-

39.0
19.4
3.3
_
.1
14.5
1.7
-

30.4
5.4
-.9
24.1
-

20.6
3.2
8.2
_
3.9
4.2
1.1
-

66.2
.2

55.6
.3

53.9
.4

61.0

69.6

79.4

1




ana outer public u tilitie s ,

Manufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0‘

100.0

2.4
_
2.4

19.8
_

3.7
_
_
_
1.9
1.8

-

3.1
_
2.1
_
_
14.6
_
_
-

17.8
.7
11.5
_
_
5.5
_
_
.1
-

-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.4
(2/)
.8
.8
.4
1.1
.1
.
1.2
(2/)

0.5
_
_
.5
_
.
_
_
_
_

r

y

I

Retail
trade

Services

y

(2/)

_
-

_
•
•
•
*
_
-

81.4
-

95.4
.2

99.5
-

100.0
-

97.6
-

80.2
-

82.2
-

96.3
-

10.4
2.6
.3
1.8
4.7
.3
.5
_
_
.2

18.6
2.2
14.6
1.1
_
.7
-

4.7
(2/>
.8
.6

-.5
.5
_
_
_
_
•
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
•

2.4
2.4
_
_
_
_
_
-

19.8
_
_
3.1
2.1
_

17.8
.7
11.5
_

3.7
_
_

5.5
_
_
.1

1.6
2.1
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

89.6

81.4

97.6
~

80.2

82.2

96.3

'
See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation'(excluding railroads;,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

All
indus-

.7

1.1
»4
.
_
1.1
(2/)
_
(2/)
95.1
.2

99.5

100.0
"
"

_
_
_
_
_

_
14.6

_
_

„

'
Occupational Wage Surrey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1991
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor S tatistics

Table *-5*

Paid S io k Jd&aae (^o^m al P/uuhHohA) » G oniituted
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Provisions for paid sick leave
111

establishments ....................................
5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid aiek leave ....................................
1 day* ............................................................
*
5 day* ............................................................
6 days ............................................................
7 days .............................................................
8 d a y s .............................................................
10 d a y s....................... ..............................
12 days ..........................................................
15 days ..........................................................
18 days ..........................................................
20 d a y s ..........................................................
21 days ..........................................................
25 days ..........................................................
30 d a y s..........................................................
10 d a y s ......................................................
15 days ..........................................................
19 days ..........................................................
60 days ..........................................................
63 days ...........................................................
65 days ..........................................................
Establishments vith bo formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................................
Information not available ...........................
o feerv ice
Establishments vith formal provisions
for paid siek le a v e ...................................
1 days ............................................................
5 days ............................................................
6 days ............................................................
7 d a y s............................................................
8 days ............................................................
10 d a y s......................................................
12 d a y s..........................................................
15 days ..........................................................
18 days ..........................................................
20 days ..........................................................
21 d p y s -----: .................................................
30 days ..........................................................
10 d a y s..........................................................
63 days ..........................................................
65 days ..........................................................
80 d a y s..........................................................
90 days ..........................................................
95 days ..........................................................
101 days ........................................................
Establishments vith no formal provisions
for paid siek leave ....................................
Information not available ...........................

M a n u f a c t u r in g

indus­
tries

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

39.0

30.1

20.6
3.2
8.2

10.1

18.6

_

_

2.6
.3
1.8

-

100.0

100.0

33.6
.6
8.5
.8
.5
2.2
3 .0
2 .6
( 2/ )
2.1
6.3
( 2/ )
.6
2 .8
( 2/ )
.2

11.1
.1
11.5
.8

15.7
.5
9.1

-

-

-

5.1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1.0
2.8
3.0

5.3
3.7
3.9

-

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

.9

-

2/

-

•

-

_

2.0

1.7
.3

2.2
9.7
1.1
1.9

-

_

•

_

-

-

1.8

-

_

-

-

_

11.5

tries

1/

19.1
3.3

-

All
indus­

Services

Durable
goods

AH

100.0

—

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

3.5
10.1

13.6

-

-

1.1
1.8

1 .1
6.3

-

-

-

—

—

_

_

1.3

—

•

1.1

.7

_

.1

-

1.7

-

-

-

21.1

-

_

1.1

1.9

-

-

-

55.6

53.9

61.0

69.6

79.1

89.6

.2

.3

.1

-

-

-

6.0
(2 /)
2.1
.6
•1

-

_

_

-

37.9
.6
12.7
.8
.5
2 .2
3 .0
2 .6
( 2/ )
1 .9
6.3
( 2/ )
3.0
( 2/ )
2 .1
.8
.7
.2
.2

11.1
•1
11.5
.8

15.7
.5
9.1

39.0

71.2

-

-

19.1
3.3

19.2
-

20.6
3.2
8.2

10.1

18.6

-

_

2.6
.3
1.8

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

1.0
2.8
3.0

5.3
3.7
3.9

-

-

_

•

_

-

.1

.9

2.0

-

-

1.7
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.2
9.7
1.1

3.5
10.1

-

11.5

-

-

_

_

-

—

1 .8

-

-

-

_

.7
1.9

13.6

—

—

1.8

6.3

_

1.1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

21.1

.2

-

-

-

1.1
1.1
.1

1.9
1.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

< 2/>

.1

-

-

_

-

-

-

1.3

-

-

2.1
2.1

;

Public
utili­
ties*
1 0 0 .0

2.1
2.1

19.8
-

“

_

_

_

2.1
3.1
_

-

**

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

_

Retail
trade

8ervioes

1/

.o

io o

Whole­
sale
trade
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

17.8 '
.7
11.5

3.7

3.9

1.6
1.8
.3

-

_
1.6

"■

-

-

-

.1

-

11.6

-

-

-

97.8

97.9

97.6

80.2

82.2

96.3

7.2
(2 /)
3.3
•6
J

2.2
2.2

2.1
.1

2.1
2.1

31.5
11.7

17.8
.7
11.5

3.7

-

-

"

1.6

-

2.1
3.1

3.9

:
-

-

“•

1.6

-

-

•4

1 .0

-

.6

.1

-

—

-

-

-

-

—
—

1.8
“

-

.3

-

-

.1

-

_

-

2.2
2.2 '

l o o .o

durable
goods

93.8
.2

_

1.7

.5

-

L jS O rO

Non­

Durable
goods

-

.6

1.2
81.1

All

1 .0

-

66.2

100.0

do
do

.5
.2

•2
2 .1
.8

i

M anufacturing

61.9

55.c

53.9

.2

.3

.1

•

_

1.2

_

61.0

25.8

79.1

89.6

81.1

-

-

-

-

-

do
92.6
.2

11.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

97.8

97.9

97.6

65.5

82.2

-

-

-

-

-

96.3
-

1 / Although data eonld not be shovn separately for r e ta il trade due to the omission of a mother of department and variety stores, the remainder of r eta il trade is appropriately represented in
the data for "all industries."
2 / Includes data for industries other than those shovn separately.
2 / lees than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other phhlic u t ilit ie s .
*< Pinanoe, insurance, and real esta te .




Table E-6t fto H ^ /u k iu ctia n B otuU eA
PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

T^pe of bonus

A ll establishm ents.........................................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ............................. ........................
Christmas or year-end.................
P rofit-sh arin g...........................................
O ther..............................................................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ....................................................
Information not a v a ila b le ...........................

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

AH

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

38.2
28. A
9.6
2.0

39.0
26.9
10.3
3.3

61.6
.2

60.7
.3

P E P C K N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.7
21.9
9.8
4.0

49.5
42*7
11.8
1.3

8.7

48.0
33.9
14.1

63.9

50.5

52.0

•A

-

8.7
1.4

-

91.3
-

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

lOO.Oi

29.1
15.0
7.2
6 .9

55.3
51.1
5.5

41.0

30.0
25.7
4.3

26.5
26.2
2.2

70.9
-

44.7

70.0
-

73.5
-

indus­
tries

All

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

41.3
38.2
4.7
1.3

51.7
42.0
19.2
-

34.6
24.2

6.1
$.8

34.3
22.1
6.9
6.0

58.7
-

48.3
-

65.4
-

65.7
-

2/

1/

-

-

D urable
goods

N on­
d urable
goods

I

37.5
14.1

2.6

59.0
-

-

Retail
trade

Services

y

-

i / Although data oould not be shown separately for r e ta il trade due to the omission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of r e ta il trade is appropriately represented in
the data for "all industries."
g / Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2 / Unduplicated to ta ls.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.

Table *-v<

AsUuAG*u>e and P-enteon PAatU
PEPCKNT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

Type of plan
All establishments ......................................
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 1 / ......................................
life insurance ........................................
Health insurance.........
Hospitalisation................ ......................
Retirement pension ........................... ..
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans........ .. .................................
Information not available .........................

All
indus­
tries

Manufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

M anufacturing

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

88.3

94.7

86.5
81.8
57.7
55.9

94.8
84.7

94.3

81.5
70.1
47.3
49.3

Durable
goods

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

90.4
86.7
63.6
42.0
51.9

94.4
92.2
85.2
54.8
57.9

93.5
90.7
82.9
55.4
59.2

97.4
96.9
92.5
53.0
53-4

99.0
99.0
58.7
8.6
88.9

80.5
79.3
40.4
32.3
38.4

85.7
73.4
22.3
33.8
25.9

79.2
73.2
20.1
20.8
32.0

9.4
.2

5.3
.3

6.1
.4

2.6
-

1 .0

19.5
-

14.3

20.8
-

11.7
-

5.3
-

y

y

-

- "

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

An

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

y

!

100.0

100.0

100^1_

80.1
57.2
60.8

93.7
88.5
59.9
36.0

80.1
80,1
40.0
10.2
53.2

69.0
67.5
41.7
27.8
27.0

46.9
41.0
24.5
9.8
3.6

5.2
-

5.7
-

19.9
-

31.0
-

53.1
-

2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of a number of department and variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in
the data for "all industries."
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Cleveland, Ohio, October 1951
y Unduplicated totals.
U. S. DEPARTM OF LABOR
ENT
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilities.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.




A p p e n d ix — Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed*
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job des'>*irtions were used; these are available
i
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisons.
As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the study.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




M e th o d

of S u rv e y

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
Ihe earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, er.cept in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits! These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

35
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN
CLEVELAND, OHIO 1/ AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF IABOR STATISTICS, OCTOBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions..................................
Manufacturing...............................
Durable goods 3 / ................... ...............................................
Nondurable goods
.....................
Nonmanufacturing......... ..................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities.............................
Wholesale trade....................... .
Retail trade 2/ .........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate......
Services 6/.............................

(J

101
101
101

1,342
421
278
143
921

291
107
68
39
184

386,300
259,900
202,600
57,300
126,4-00

189,900
134,700
106,400
28,300
55,200

31,670
16,010
12,190
3,820
15,660

101
21
101
21
21

54
340
76
161
290

24
48
17
46
49

31,000
38,600
15,400
18,400

22,800
7,600
8,400
9,700
6,700

4,830
3,350
570
6,010
900

10
38
13
6
15
9
30
39
240
11
18
52

10
13
11
6
9
9
17
16
75
9
10
18

1,196
4,236
4,390
1,697
3,491
1,057
3,404
1,197
52,373
8,991
2,403
3,590

1,196
3,228
4,318
1,697
1,972
1,057
2,762
752
36,211
8,037
2,049
2,267

79
150
190
193
310
100
239
30
5,369

23,000

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 7/
Women’s and misses’ coats and suits ............
Foundries, nonferrous...........................
Iron and steel forgings.........................
Cutlery, hand tools and hardware •••••••••..... .
Heating apparatus..............................
Sheet-metal work...............................
Stamped and pressed metal products..............
Electroplating, plating and polishing............
Machinery........................... ...........
Railroads........... ......... .............. .
Milk dealers...................................
Insurance carriers..............................

8/

8
8
21
21
21
21
21
8

2/ 2 1
101
21
21

-

231
1,314

1/ The Cleveland Metropolitan Area (Cuyahoga and Lake Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscel­
laneous manufacturing.
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and pub­
lishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade in the numbered tables due to the omission of department and limited price
variety stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in data, for all industries combined and for nonmanufacturing.
6/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
8/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with 4 or more workers were included.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.

y




36 .
Inc
Page
number
Assembler
Assembler
Assembler
Assembler

(cutlery, hand tools ana hardware) ........
(heating apparatus) .........................
(insurance carriers) ........................
(machinery) .................................

Assembler (sheet-metal vork) ..........................
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) .................
Bench hand (bakeries) .................................
Biller, machine ............. .........................
Bookbinder (printing) .................................
Bookkeeper, hand ......................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ..........................
Bottling-machine operator (malt liquors) .............
Bricklayer (building construction) ...................
Calculating-machine operator ................ &........
Carpenter (building construction) ....................
Carpenter, maintenance ................................
Carpenter, maintenance (nonferrous foundries) ........
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ...................
Chipper and grinder (heating apparatus) ..............
Chipper and grinder (iron and steel forgings) ........
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) .... .......
Cleaner (railroads) ...................................
Clerk, accounting .....................................
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ...............
Clerk, file ...........................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ......................
Clerk, general ........................................
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ..................
Clerk, order ..........................................
Clerk, payroll ............................... •........
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ......
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ..............
Compositor, hand (printing) ...........................
Core assemblers and finishers (nonferrous foundries) ..
Coremakers, hand (nonferrous foundries) ...............
Crane operator, electric bridge .......................
Crane operator, electric bridge (railroads) ......... •
Cutter and marker (womens and misses’ coats and suits)
Die setter (iron and steel forgings) ........ .........
Die setter (stamped and pressed metal products) ......
Die sinker (iron and steel forgings) .................
D r a f t s m a n ............................. ................
Drill-press operator (heating apparatus) .............
Drill-pres8 operator (machinery) ......................
Drop-hammer operator (iron and steel forgings) .......
Duplicating-machine operator ..........................
Electrician (building construction) ..................
Electrician, maintenance ......... •...................
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .................
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .....................
Engineer, stationary ............ .....................
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) ..................
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ................
Fireman, stationary boiler ............................




16
IT

25
19 , 20 , 21 ,

22,23

IT

3,

19
26
k
26
k

k

26

26
5
26

10

15

2k
IT

16
15
2k
3, 5
25
5
25
3, 6
25
3, 6
3, 6
25
25
26
15
15
12

2k

15
16
18
16
9

IT
19 , 20, 21 ,

22,23
16

3, 6

26
10
19,21

2k

, , ,

19 20 21

22,23

10

2k
2k
10

Page
number
Grinding-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools
and hardware) ...........................................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ....................
Guard .....................................................
Hammersmith (iron and steel forgings) ...................
Heater, forge (iron and steel forgings) .................
Helper, forge (iron and steel forgings) .................
Helper, motortruck driver .........................
Helper, trades, maintenance ..............................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .................
Inspector (heating apparatus) ............................
Inspector (iron and steel forgings) ......................
Inspector (machinery) ....................................
Inspector (stamped and pressed metal products) ..........
Janitor ...................................... ............
Janitor (electroplating, plating and polishing) .........
Janitor (heating apparatus) ..............................
Janitor (machinery) ................. ....................
Janitor (railroads) ......................................
Janitor (sheet-metal work) ...............................
Key-punch operator .......................................
Laborer (building construction) ..........................
Lay-out man (sheet-metal work) ...........................
Machine operator (printing) ..............................
Machine tender (printing) ................................
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools
and hardware) ............................ ..............
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ...........
Machine-tool operator, tool room .........................
Machine-tool operator, tool room (cutlery, hand tools
and hardware) ...........................................
Machine-tool operator, tool room (machinery) ............
Machinist, maintenance ...................................
Machinist, maintenance (railroads) .......................
Machinist, production (machinery) ........................
Maintenance man, general utility ........ .........
Maintenance man, general utility (electroplating, plating
and polishing ..........................................
Maintenance man, general utility
(heating apparatus) ....................................
Maintenance man, general utility
(nonferrous foundries) ........................... *.....
Maintenance man,general utility (stamped and pressed
metal products) .............. ........................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ..... ................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ......
Mechanic, maintenance ............. .....................
Mechanic, maintenance (iron and steel forgings) ........
Mechanic, maintenance (stamped and pressed
metal products) ...... •......... . **; •• **:............
Milling-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools
and hardware) ........ .......... ......................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ....................

16

19,20,21,
22.23

12

16
16
16
26
10

2k
IT

16
19,20,21,

22.23

18

12
18
IT
19 21

, ,

22.23

2k
IT

6
26
IT

26

26
16

19,20,21,
22.23

10

16
20,21
10

2k

20.23

11
18
IT

15
18
11

2k
11

16
18

16
. 19,20,21,
22,23

Index
Page
number
11
26
15
26
9
3
7
11
26
12
24
26
12,13
26
26
17
11

M illwright ................................................................................................................
Mixer (bakeries) ...........................................................................................
Molder (nonferrous foundries) .........................................................................
Motortruck driver .................................................................................................
Nurse, in d u strial (registered) .......................................................................
Office b o y ..................................................................
Office g ir l ..............................................................................................................
O iler ..........................................................................................................................
Operator (local tra n s it) ...................................................................................
Order f i l l e r ............................................................................................................
Order f i l l e r (milk dealers) .............................................................................
Overman (bakeries) ...............................................................................................
P a c k e r...........................................................
Packer (bakeries) .................................................................................................
Painter (building construction) ............
Painter (heating apparatus) ............................................................................
Pa in te r, maintenance ..........................................................................................
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ...................................................................
2k
P asteurizer (milk dealers) .....................................
2k
15
Pattern maker (nonferrous foundries) ..........................................................
Photoengraver (printing) ......................................................................
26
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance ..................................................................................
11
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance (railroads) ............
2k
26
P lasterer (building construction) ...................................................
P later (electroplating, p lating and polishing) ......................................
18
Plumber (building construction) ..............................
26
Plumber, maintenance ......................
11
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating
and polishing) ....................................................................................................
18
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (electro plating , plating
and polishing) ..................
18
Porter ..........................................................................
12
Porter (railroads) ................................................................................................
24
Pourer, metal (nonferrous foundries) ..........................................................
15
Power-brake operator (sheet-m etal work) ....................................................
17
Power-shear operator (heating apparatus) ..................................................
17
17
Power-shear operator (sheet-m etal work) ............
Power-shear operator (stamped and pressed
metal products) ......................................................................
18
Premium acceptor (insurance ca rriers) ........................................................
25
Press assista n t (printing) ..........
26
Press feeder (printing) .....................................................................................
26
Presser, hand (women*s and misses* coats and su its) .................
15
Presser, hand and machine (women*s and misses* coats
and su its) ............................................................................................................
15
Pressman (printing) ......................................
26
Punch-press operator (heating apparatus) ..................................................
17
Punch-press operator (stamped and pressed metal products) ...............
18
Receiving c l e r k ......................................................................................................
13
R efrigerator man (milk dealers) ................
2k
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) ................................................
24Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) .................................................................
15
Sanitary man (milk d ealers) ..............
24
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ........................................ 19,20,21
Secretary ....................
7
Section head (insurance c a rriers) .............................................
25
Sewer, hand (fin ish er) (women's and misses* coats
and su its) ...........................................
15




37 .

Gantutued

Page
number
15
15

Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses’ coats and su its) . . . .
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries) ................................. ......................
Sheet-metal machine operator, miscellaneous machines
(sheet-m etal work) ...................................................................... ....................
17
11
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ....................................................................
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-m etal work) ...............................
17
Shipping c l e r k ......................... .................................. .......................... ................
13
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ......................................................................
13
Stenographer ............................................................................................................
7
25
Stenographer (insurance ca rriers) ................................................................
Stereotyper (printing) ......................................................................................
26
Stock handler ........................................................................
13
Stock handler (electroplating, p lating and polishing) .......................
18
Stock handler (heating apparatus) ...............................................................
17
Stock handler (machinery) ........................................... .................................... 20,21
Stock handler (railroads) ............................. ...................................................
24
Stock handler (sheet-m etal work) ..................................................................
17
Switchboard operator ...........................................................................................
7
Switchboard operator-receptionist ................................................................
8
Tabulating-machine operator ...........................................................................
4, 8
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's and misses* coats and su its) . . .
15
Tool-and-die m aker......................
11
Tool-and-die maker (heating apparatus) ......................................................
17
16
Tool-and-die maker (iron and s te e l forgings) .............................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) .....................................................................
20,21
22,23
Tool-and-die maker (stamped and pressed metal products) ...................
18
9
Tracer ................
Transcrib ing-machine o p e ra to r......................
8
Trim-press operator (iron and ste e l forgings) ........................................
16
Trimmer maker (iron and ste e l forgings) ....................................................
16
Truck driver .................................................................. ........................................
13>1^
Truck driver (milk dealers) ..............................................................
24
Truck driver (railroads) ..................... ............................................................
24
Trucker, hand ...................................................................................... ..................
13
Trucker, hand (electro plating , plating
and polishing) ..............................................................
18
Trucker, hand (iron and s te e l forgings) ....................................................
16
20,21,22
Trucker, hand (machinery) ..........................
Trucker, hand (nonferrous foundries) .........................................................
15
Trucker, hand (railroads) .......................................................
24
Trucker, hand (sheet-m etalw ork) ..................................................................
17
Trucker, hand (stanped and pressed metal products) .............................
18
Trucker, power .....................................................
14
Trucker, power (railroads) ...............................................................................
24
T urret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ................................................... 19,20,21,
22,23
Typist ........................................................................................................................
4, 8
Typist (insurance ca rrie rs) .............................................................................
25
Underwriter (insurance c a rrie rs ) ......................................................
25
U psetter (iron and ste e l forgings) .............................................................
16
Washer, b o ttle , machine (milk dealers) ......................................................
24
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) ............................................................
24
Watchman..................................................................
14
Welder, hand (heating apparatus) ...................................................................
17
Welder, hand (machinery) ........................................................ ...................... 20,21,23
Welder, hand (sheet-m etalw ork) ..................
17
Wrapper (bakeries) ................................................................................................
26
☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952







This report was prepared in the Bureau's North Central Regional
Office. Communications may be addressed to:
Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and indus­
trial relations, employment, prices, labor turn-over, productivity, work
injuries, construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following states:
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102