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Occupational Wage Survey
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
June 1951

Bulletin No. 1045

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number
INTRODUCTION ...................................... ...........................................

1

THE BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN AREA .............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ........... ......................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ............................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ...............
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..........
A-4Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ........
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-203
C a n n i n g ...........................................................................
B-2311
Men's and boys' suits and coats ...............
B-28
Industrial chemicals .........................
B-2851
Paints and varnishes ••••••........
B-332
Ferrous foundries •••••.•••......
B-3411
Tin cans and other t i n w a r e ..............
B-531
Department and women's ready-to-wear stores .....................
B-541
Grocery stores ••••••••..............
B-561
Men's and boys' clothing stores ...............................................
B-591
Drug s t o r e s ............
B-63
Insurance c a r r i e r s ..... ..........
B-6512
Office building s e r v i c e ..... ...............................
B-7211
Power laundries ......................................... ..•••................ .
B-7538
Auto repair shops ........... •••••••••»•••••...................................
Union wage
C-15
C-205
C-2082
C-27
C-£L
C-42
C-44.
C-AA6

scales for selected occupations Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ........
Bakeries ..........................................................................
Malt liquors .....................................................................
Printing ...............................
Local transit operating employees ............. ..............•••»•••..... .
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ............. ....... ••••....... ................
Ocean transport - unlicensed p e r s o n n e l ..... .......................
S t e v e d o r i n g ..................................

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s .......•••••••••••......... .........

3
7
8
10

12
12
1U

15
15
16
16
17
18
18
19
19
20
20

21
21
22
22
22
22
23
23

24

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential p r o v i s i o n s ..... ......
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .......................
E-3
Paid holidays ....................................................................
E-4.
Paid v a c a t i o n s ......... ............................................ ....... •••••
E-5
Paid sick leave •••••............... ••••••...... •••••..........................
E-6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s .............
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ••••••••••.......

26
27
28
28

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ............. .......................................... .......

29

INDEX .........................................................................................

31

2^
25

25

Introduction 1
/

The Baltimore area is one of several important indus­
trial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted
occupational wage surveys during the summer of 1951. 2/ Occu­
pations that are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in com­
piling earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office,* (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and
power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping.
In pre­
senting earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through
A-4) data have been provided separately, wherever possible, for
broad industry divisions.

Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community survey.
Earnings data for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables.
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing
pay practices.

Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

1/ Prepared by Paul E. Warwick, Regional Wage Analyst.
The
planning and central direction of the program was carried on in
the Branch of Community Wage Studies of the Bureau fs Division
of Wages and Industrial Relations.
2/ Other areas studied are: Bridgeport, Dallas, Dayton, and
Portland, Oreg.
Similar studies were conducted earlier in the
year in Atlanta, Boston,
Chicago, Denver, New York and the San
Francisco-Oakland area#
See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.

2/




The Baltimore Metropolitan Area

The Baltimore Metropolitan Area,
including Baltimore
City and Baltimore and Anne Arundel Counties, had approximately
1.300.000 inhabitants in 1950.
Three-fourths of this total was
concentrated in the city of Baltimore.
Nonagricultural employees (excluding government)
in
the Baltimore area totaled over 465,000 during June 1951.
Over
40 percent of these were employed in manufacturing establish­
ments which produce a variety of products, including steel, auto­
mobiles, aircraft, ships, fabricated metal products, industrial
chemicals, and clothing.
The importance of the area not only as a manufacturing
but also as a financial and commercial center is indicated by
the large number of workers employed in the various branches of
trade and finance. Wholesale and retail trade establishments
provided employment to 130,000 workers, and approximately another
25.000
were employed in finance,
insurance, and real estate.
Baltimore harbor is a vital part of the a r e a ’s industrial, com­
mercial, and transportation activities. Approximately 15 million
tons of exports and imports passed through the port in 1950 .
Facilities include dockside grain elevators and coal piers of
large capacity.
Recently added ore unloading facilities repre­
sent an important increase in the p o r t ’s economic potential.
The combined employment of the communication, public utilities,
and transportation industries,
including railroads, was more
than 50 ,000, and the services group employed more than 55,000
workers.
Among the industry and establishment-size groups in­
cluded within the scope of the Bureau’s study 3 /, two-thirds of
the plant workers were employed in establishments having writ­
ten agreements with labor organizations.
Unionization varied
widely in the various industries studied. The highest degree of
unionization was in durable-goods manufacturing
in which
nine-tenths of the workers were covered by written union agree-

lj9

V
See appendix table for listing of durable and nondurable
goods industries#

2.

merits.

Three-fourths

of the w o r k e r s

in nondurabl e - g o o d s

indus­

tries
were emplo y e d in e s t a b lishments h a v i n g u n i o n
contracts.
Plant workers
in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
industries were not
exten­
s i v e l y c o v e r e d b y u n i o n c o n t r a c t prov i s i o n , e x c e p t i n t he p u b l i c
utilities group where three-fourths
of the w o r k e r s w e r e c o v e r ­
ed.
The p r o p o r t i o n of o f f i c e w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d u n d e r u n i o n c o n ­
t r a c t p r o v i s i o n s < w a s c o n s i d e r a b l y l o w e r t h a n f or p l a n t w o r k e r s .
Oi l y
in th e p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s g r o u p of i n d u s t r i e s
a n d in m a n u ­
f a c t u r i n g w a s u n i o n i z a t i o n in o f f i c e s f o u n d
to a n y appreciable
degree.
T h r e e - f i f t h s of the o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s in p u b l i c u t i l i ­
ties and a s ixth
ments

in m a n u f a c t u r i n g were

employed in

establish­

with union contracts.

d e t e r m i n a t i o n of r a t e s , a l t h o u g h
a f f e c t i n g o n l y a n o v e r - a l l 20
p e r c e n t of p l a n t a n d 3 0 p e r c e n t o f o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s , w a s n e v e r ­
theless

area

from January 1919

through

Ifa y

nine-tenths
lishments.

Peak

m a r k e t p r e v a i l i n g a t the time

of

unemployment

the

June

1951

G e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e s , w h i c h i n the 6 m o n t h s i m m e d i ­
a t e l y pre c e d i n g ho s t i l i t i e s in K orea had
affected fewer than 1
i n 1 0 w o r k e r s , w e r e m u c h m o r e n u m e r o u s t h e r e a f t e r . B y June 1 9 5 1
all manufacturing
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d i n the c r o s s - i n d u s t r y
s u r v e y h a d g r a n t e d one or m o r e g e n e r a l i n c r e a s e s t o p l a n t w o r k ­
ers.
F o u r - f i f t h s o f th e i n d u s t r y * s
office employees (concen­
trated in h alf

the establishments)

had also

received such in­

creases. Only 1 in 3 n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments had
ed
general increases, but
t h e s e a c c o u n t e d f o r h a l f the
w o r k e r s a n d t w o - t h i r d s of the
i n the
public utilities
general increases.

grant­
plant

of f i c e w o r k e r s ; 4 o ut of 5 w o r k e r s

group and in

wholesale trade received

F o r m a l i z e d w a g e a n d s a l a r y s t r u c t u r e s for t i m e w o r k e r s
w e r e r e p o r t e d i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g a p p r o x i m a t e l y 80 p e r ­
c e n t of p l a n t w o r k e r s a n d 7 0 p e r c e n t of o f f i c e w o r k e r s . F o r m a l ­
ized plans
p r o v i d i n g a r a n g e of r a t e s f o r e a c h j o b c l a s s i f i c a ­
tion affected somewhat
viding a single rate
plans

for

more

for each

plant workers
job.

plans

pro­

Practically all formal wage

office w orkers provided a ran g e




than did
of r a t e s .

and

services

for plant workers

paying

e m p l o y e d in s uch e stab­
h a l f the pl a n t
workers
a minimum rate

o f $ 1 or

T h i s w as t he m i n i m u m s t a n d a r d f o r n i n e - t e n t h s o f t h e
in l a r g e d u r a b l e - g o o d s

establishments

plant

( e m p l o y i n g 5 0 0 or

m o r e w o r k e r s ) , a n d h a l f of t h o s e i n c o m p a r a b l e n o n d u r a b l e - g o o d s
plants.
In r e t a i l t r a d e a f i f t h , a n d i n
services industries a

reached 55>000
i n J u l y 1 9 4 9 a n d a g a i n in M a r c h 1 9 50.
Gradual
r e e m p l o y m e n t d u r i n g t he s u m m e r a n d f a l l of 1 9 5 0 r e s u l t e d in the
balanced labor
survey.

of t h e p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e
On a n a l l - i n d u s t r y b a s i s ,

e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

workers

p r e v a i l e d in t he B a l t i m o r e
1950.

reta i l trade,

Established minimum entrance rates

half
substantial labor surplus

of w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n f o r t i m e ­

trade,

with no previous
work experience were a part of the formalized
r a t e s t r u c t u r e of a m a j o r i t y of B a l t i m o r e a r e a f i r m s . M o r e t h a n

were

A

method

of w h o l e s a l e

establishments•

more.

Occupational Wage Structure

the p r e d o m i n a n t

rated employees

Individual

of p l a n t w o r k e r s

minimum

rate

reported by

were employed

of 50 c e n t s

or l e ss.

establishments

in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

A $1

or h i g h e r

a c c o u n t i n g for h a l f the

with a

m i n i m u m was
employment

in
the p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s gro u p .
This
ind u s t r y gr o u p was, h o w ­
e v e r , the
only division
in w hich a s i g n i f i c a n t p r o p o r t i o n
of
t he
workers were
e m p l o y e d in
establishments with
no minimum
entrance rate policy.
W a g e s a n d s a l a r i e s of w o r k e r s i n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s ­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing.
In
2 7 of 3 0 o f f i c e
classifications permitting comparison, average
salaries
o f w o r k e r s in m a n u f a c t u r i n g p l a n t s
e x c e e d e d t h o s e in
nonmanufacturing
establishments.
Average hourly earnings
for
plant
workers studied in a l l industries
were u p t o 30 percent
higher in
m a n u f a c t u r i n g f o r 21 of 2 6 c a t e g o r i e s f o r w h i c h c o m ­
parisons were

possible.

However,

specific

industrial branches

c o n t r i b u t i n g t o the g e n e r a l n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g a v e r a g e h a d a n a v ­
erage rate, in
some instances, e x c e e d i n g that for the m a n u f a c ­
t u r i n g g r o u p i n the s a m e

plant

or o f f i c e

category.

A fourth of all plant workers in manufacturing estab­
lishments were working on late shifts in June 1951*
Virtually
all such workers were paid a differential over day (first) shift
rates, which in three cases in four was in the form of a centsper-hour premium. Shift premiums of 4 cents for second shift
work and 6 cents for third and other late shift work were re­
ceived by two-thirds of these workers.

3,

T a b le A - l :

O ^ IC B

0 cC 4 4 fu U iO 4 tl

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, June 1951.)

NUMBER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
100.00
Weekly 20.00 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 to .00 t2.50 I5 .OO 1*7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
W
eekly
and
e r i g and
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
over
*
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37,50 1 0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 15.»PP 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 LOO.00
S

Men
Bookkeepers, hand ..................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ... .............
Nondurable goods .... .........
Nooflsnufacturing ................

211*
T9
23
56
135

75.00
77.00
70.50
79.50
71* 00
.

39.0
3^.5

13

38.0

1*3.50

519

63.00
66.00
66.50
65.50
60.00
57.50
61*.50
56.00
58.00

Clerks, accounting.... .............
Manufacturing ........... ........
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................
P i l r m -MH+.Iaa #
ihl*
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade .................
Finance ** ...................

183
85
251
52
95
21*
75

1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
39.5
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
1*0.5
1*
0.0
39.5

Clerks, file, class B ... ...........
Nonmanufacturing ................

12
*
33

1 1.5
*
1 1.5
*

38.00
37.00

Clerks, order ........ .............
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Wholesale trade .......... .
Pa Ea I1 +ta Ha __t-r--T.T-l Illr
.
r

300
17
*
23
2*
1
253
205
13
*

1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
1*0.5
1 0.0
*

59.50
60.00
57.00
63.00
59.50
56.00
76.50

Clerks, payroll ....................
255
Manufacturing........ ........... “ 19B
I a v Mn i-a + r f r v t ff n * f
57
Pl'
u i ) ltI11t1M * ...... , lrr
l. .
33
1 ■cHrf - r - T . T - T - - T - T I I T I t l I T
fT.tt
16

1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1 0.0
*
1 0.0
*
Ul.O

62.00
61.50
61*.50
63.00
61.50

Duplicating-machine operators ........
Nonmanufacturing ................

2*
1
15

39.0
38.0

1 7.00
*
1 2.50
*

Office boys .......................
Manufacturing .................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ....... .......
Nonmanufacturing...... .
PiihHr i H H H m *
i
)« Eta Ha
_.

286
105
22
83
181

39.5
1 0.0
*
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.0
'0 >
3
jy =
1*0.0
38.0
38.0
1 0.0
*

33.50
31*.00
39.50
33.00
33.50
• k SO
3
3I .50
*
36.50
31.50
32.00

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*
0.0
1*0.0

51.00
61.00
1*5.50
1*1.00

TMnanr!a ** T----t-r-,riIItrffI,,i
l
Tabulating-machlne operators .........
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
TIh a ha a ♦#

_

_

_

_

_

_

16
10
68
83
30
53
36

3

3

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7
6

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1
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1
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11
2
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51
3
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18
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18
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18
3
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1
15
7
8

1*7
5
5
12
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10
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21
10
6
1
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11
9
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38
16
8
8
22
20
1

17
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3

9
8
1
1

25
20
5
5

37
2*
1
13
9
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25
22
3
3

3
1

2
2

1
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13
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15 . JSL __85 . > 5
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21

7

-

_

15

_

_
-

_

5

15

i
*

10
3
3
_
7

.

11
6
6

2
2
1

3

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), connunlcatlon, and public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

f s so
i
60.50

52
10
Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class A .........................

1 0.0
*
1 0.5
*
1 0.0
*
1
*1.0
39.5

y

•
a
j
8
-

8
8

7
-

-

7
k

-

13
6
7
k

13
7
6
1

11 ___2 _
L
8
1
2
3

1 ___3_
*
i
*
3
-

-

O cc u p a tio n a l Wage S u rv e y , B a lt im o r e , M d., June 1951
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f la b o r S t a t i s t i c s

4.

O^ice OccupatiotU - Continued

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time w e e k l y hours a n d earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on a n ar e a "basis
in Baltimore, Md., b y industry division, June 1951.)

NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and Industry division

Num ber
of
workers

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

328

Nonmanufacturing .........................
Wholesale trade .......... .

35
49
244
183

39.5
40.0
40.0
4n.o
39^5
39.5

42.00
44.50
48.00
42 no
41.50
42.50

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)..
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing....... .........
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade ..... ....... .

244
85
159
78
80

40.0
4o .5
40.0
40.0
4o.5

41.00
41.50
40.50
42.00
38.50

Bookkeepers, hand ...........................
Manufacturing....... ..........
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing...........
Public utilities * ............

175
— 55—
25
29
121
11
24
19
25
42

V K o Ia m a I a

T I T - t . f r T r T T I . llTI

trada . T. . T . l t - TI.T T . t T - ttTt
Finance * * ......................... .
Services ..................... .

Ratal

1

$

$

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .....
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ................... .

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
20.00 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.OO 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
and
and
under
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00100.00 over
$

84

58.50
39.5
' 18.-5 '-&700~
65.50
36.5
58.50
40,0
40.0
57.00
40.0
52.00
56.50
39.5
43.0
57.00
64.50
39.0
40.0
54.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class A .................. .......
Mamifftfituri'ng TT---TT*TT--.TtTTT..TTDurable goods ...... ..........
Wrmdura/hla goodm T..TT1..TTTf..ITT
Nonmanufacturlng ........ ........
Wholesale trade ...... .
Ratal1 trada .
r
TPlnanaa
_________ _______ t t t t

293
53
13
40
240
79
37
116

38.5
4o.o
40.0
40.0
38.0
39.5
40.0
36.*5

42.50
45/50
48.50
44.50
42.00
49.50
39.00
37 loo

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B ..................... ................
Manufacturing ..................... .
Durable goods ...... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Wholesale trade ...............
Ratal1 trade . . . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . . . .
Finance
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

557
76
39
37
481
85
93
294

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

38.00
44.50
47.00
41.00
37.00
43.50
36.OO
35.50

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ......................... .............................
Manufacturing ................................................ .................
Durable goods ......... .. ................. . .
Nondurable goods . . . . . ..................................
Nonmanufacturlng .........................................................
Wholesale trade ...................................................
Retail trade .................

655
226
97
129
429
131
256

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
39.5
38.5

44.50
48.00
55.50
142.00
43.00
49.50
41.00

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ......
Nonmanufacturlng ........ ........
Retail trade ......... ..........
Finance * * ... .. ............................................ . .

126
117
15
100

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5

37.00
37.00
34.50
37.00

_

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

6

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

16
1
-

1
15
14

79
8
3
S

66
14
3
n

71
51

52
31

32
5
27
13
14

17

64
31
10
21
33
29

17
2

34
6
28
26
2

43
22

31
6

22
21
_

-

4

18

_

_

_

_

_

6

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

6
_

-

_

_

4
_

1
1

1
1

32
8

_

_

_

22

24

16

31

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

22

24

16

-

-

-

_

_

31
6
8
17

0

7
11

22

22
94

58
2

_
_

_

.

_

4

24

_

_
_

_

_
_

-

-

_

4

24

4

24

94
10
25
59

39

33

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

1
55

24
45

8
46
6
10
30

38
3

35
10

52
20

_

_

_

.

.

_

1

_

_
_

_
_

5
9

4
19
10
8
1

2
23
13
l
i
4

29

3

122
4
2
2
118
21
28
69

17
2
2
i
1
15
7
•
5
J
5

34
10
4
6
24
17
1
2

26
12
6
6
14
13
1

86
38

104
42
12
30
62
15
45

47
19
7
12
28
22
4

75
23
22
1
52
24
24

48
24
23
1
24
13
11

31
3
2
1
28
28

_

-

1

-

-

.

_

_

_

_

_

-

_
1

_
-

-

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

12
5
4
1
7
2

1

_

7

2

_

1
1

_

7
7

2
2

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

_

3
3
2
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

38
21
20
1
17
16
1

15
10
10

6

_

_

_

_

.

_

_
_

_

_
_

-

_
_

_

_

_

_

.

5
1
4

6
4
2

-

-

_

_

_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

_

4
-

J
5
20
11
9
2
9
8

8
5
5
_

1

12
12
3
9

27
27
8
19

15
15

26
23
4
19

23
20

8
8

6
3

_

2

_

2

1
1

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

20

8

1

~

2

1

“

“

-

"

■

“

"

-

_

_

-

-

30

_

_
-

2
2

4

-

-

-

_

2

4

_

15

_

3
3

21

33

_

1
10
8

38
48
17
28

_

39

_

7
5
8

20
32
2
27

_

-

_

2
56

8

7
1

25
2

16
17
5

_

-

_

_
_
5
1

10
25
3
22

-

-

~T~

54

93
19
9
10
74

3
1
7

_

6
25

_

8

23
T'"

33
l>
£

_

3
35
8
21

-

-

*

j

2

-

13
«*o

46
12
4
8
34
5

-

_

39
16
3
13
23
6
16

-

20
11
3
8
9

-

_

_

41
9
9

-

_

-

-

-

1

-

_
-

-

1
1

-

5

-

1

-

3

-

6
5
5

1
36
11
11
_
25
_

8

4

_

_

_

1

18

-

-

_

_

8

4

_

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

41
33
8
_
8

6

_

_

2
2

1

-

,7
6
1

-

_

_

_

8

27
8
19
10
8

18

_

_
-

_

27
11
16
14
2

26
14
12
8
4

4

_
-

-

6
6
.

-

_
-

.

-

2
2

q
y

_

_
-

_

-

11
11

5
5

_

-

_

-

2
2

10
5

_

_

_

-

16
16

2
15
11

1

_

-

_

-

.

_

6

31
15
6

1

_

2

8
3
3

_

_

14
3
3

11
1
1

_

17
7
10

_

8
6
6

-

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate.




_

_
-

-

-

_

_

5,

O ffice Occupation^ - Continued

T&*i« A-i:

(Average s traight-time w e e k l y hours a nd earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on a n area basis
in Baltimore, Mi., b y Industry division, June 1951.)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and Industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Women - Continued

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
s
$
$
$
$
$ . $
$
Weekly
Weekly 20.00 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 *5.00 *7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
hus
or
e r i g and
anns
and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 *5.00 *7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95*00 LOO .00 over
$

1,17*
33*
156
158
860
22*
265
199
30

39.5
39.5
39.5
*0.0
39.5
39.5
*0.
v
39.0
39.5

**.50
*8.50
53.00
**.50
*3.00
*3.50
39.50
*1.00
**.00

Clerks, file, class A ......... .....
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................
Wholesale trade ........... .

167
- 26 —
13
13
1*1
31

39.5
*0.0
39.5
*1.0
39.5
39.0

*0.00
*6.00
*7.00
**.50
39.00
*3.50

699
111
588
7*
56
362
19

39.0
*0.0
38.5
*0.0
*0.0
38.5
*0.0

33.00
36.OO
32.00
*1.00
28.50
30.50
35.50

Clerks, general ....................
Nonmanufacturing... .............

1,002
807
5*
136
*1

*0.0
39.5
*0.0
39.0
*0.5

*7.00
*5.50
5*.50
**.50
*5.50

212
59
19
*0
JP
-j
6*
83

*0.0
*0.0
*0.0
39.5
*0.0
*0.0
*0.0

*1.00
*1.00
**.00
39.50
*1.50
**.50
39^00

500
305
17*
131
195
59
22
7*
22
18

39.5
*0.0
*0.0
*0.5
39.0
39.0
*0.0
39.0
*0.0
38.5

*9.50
50.50
5* .50
**.50
*9.00
5*.oo
58.00
**.00
**.00
*6.00

109
*0
69
10
39

*0.0
*0.0
*0.0
*0 0
*0.0

38.50
*0.50
37.00
jjo.pu
36.00

Retail trade .................
Services .....................
Clerks, order............ .
Manufacturing ....... ...... .
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
U i t mmalrn
lrl
Aa
Retail trade ..... ............
Clerks, payroll ....................
Manufacturing ................. .
Durable goods .............. .
Nondurable goods ........... .
Nonmanufacturing .......... .
Public utilities * ............
VhnlaM.la traila __r.T.TT.lrr.IIIt
Retail trade ...........
IMmnca **
tT.TTTTtTTttTTtItT
Duplicating-machine operators ........
Manufacturing............ .......
Nonmanufacturing .................
U t1 s t s
Va
a i

Finance ** ........

1
1
-

1
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
3
3

3
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

3

_

_

-

*
-

1*8
59
17
*2
89
1*
23
37
9

62
11
2
9
51
11
20
16
2

128
*3
8
35
85
25
22
27
2

80
13
3
10
67
11
10
3*
-

8*
16
1*
2
68
13
21
17
*

_
-

1
1
-

30
*

25

*
26
-

_
25
1

27
27
16

17
_
17
-

18
5
5
13
-

11
11
5

15
11
11
*
3

9*

181
22
159
20
18
01
y*
-2

117
28
89
■5

8*
21
63
2

18
29
18 — T
12
11
9
3

12
6
6
6

15
8
7
1
*

2
92

120
2
118
2
32
83
1

58
2

38
9

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

25
25

157
153

77
66

77
69

69
56

63
*3

*7
17
15

18
-

2
3

17
-

1*
2

3
-

110
87
1*
16
6

1*1
90

_
12

180
158
15
*1
8

67
67
58
8

16
6
2
*
10
2
7

21
10
10
11

20

*
*
1
3

11

10

-

-

-

-

-

76
*1
8
33
35
9
6
10
>

36
23
7
16
13
1
1
6
5

110
80
6*
16
30
15

59
*2
39
3
17
7

*3
28
20
8
15
*

18
7
7

ll
6
6

2
1
1

-

-

11
7
2
2

5
5

1
1

-

3

7
5
2

5
*
1

*
_
*

_
-

-

-

_
-

9*

_
_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_
-

.

_

-

7

. .
_
-

2
2

7
(

33
10
10
O

8
*
_
*

20
1*
6
8
5

9
5
_
5

5
2
2
3

-

-

2

7

21

*

6

*

3

_

_

3

3
1

12
2

7

-

_

3

1
2

50
28
6
22
22
*

30
23
13
10
7
3

13
9
*

-

_

-

-

_

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

3

1
_

-

~

-

_

_

1

-

~

”

1
1

25
8
17
1
8

15*
5*
25
29
100
21
21
19
*

2 _ 3_
_
2
2
2
1
1
10

9

6

9
8

6
5

S ee footnote a t end of table.
*
Tran s p o r t a t i on (excluding railroads), consunlcatlon, a n d other public utilities,
** Finance, Insurance, a nd r e a l estate.

3

2

10
8

?3
1*
13
1
9
*
2
3

2
2

0

_
-

-

55
18
1*
*
37
12
7
2
5

13
3
2

2

37
23
3
20
1*
1
1
9
1
2

7

22
6
16

12
1
11

10
5
5

7

10

11

2

_

2
10
-

8

7

J

_
_

7
2
2

3
1

“

12
-

k
*
16

j
9
-

2* ___5_
23
3
*
10

-

-

_

-

_

.

k

y
5
4
1

6

k
6

k

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

6
2
*

1

_

_

1

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

"
'

_

3

1

'




_
-

2
3
3

-

_
-

1 ___5^
2

2
9
2

-

-

11
2

2
2
-

16
2
2
1*
3
8
-

75
*
*
71
23
2*
19
-

2
_
2

_
_
-

Clerks, file, class B ...............
Manufacturing ...................
Nonmanufacturing..... .
VViaIa m Ia + T » »
.*d
Datii11 t.mda . .
.
T.......1 1
Tlnanna # * ...... ,r.r, r. 7_1 , T
Services ................. .

71
*2
31
11
29
5
16
5
-

3
3
-

-

120
38
27
11
82
36
2
*
-

109
_
109
*3
*9
*
15
1

_
_
_
"

_
-

_
_
-

*0
*0
.
36
*
-

2

Clerks, accounting... ........ .
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ................
Wholesale trade ...............
Retail trade .................
Finance * * ........ ......... .
Services .....................

-

-

-

-

*

~

_

6,

Office Occupation* - Continued

Tati* A-i:

(Average straight-tine v e e k l y h oars a nd earnings l / for selected occupations studied o n a n ar e a basis
In Baltimore, Ml., b y Industry division, June 1951.)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Sex, occupation, and Industry division

$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
,
$
$
$
80.00 $
85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
Weekly 20.00 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 *5.00 *7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 $
W ekly
e
e r i g and
anns
hus
or
and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 *5.00 *7.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over
$
$

Women - Continued
Key-punch operators ................
Durable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing................
Public utilities * ............

295
---50—
25
25
2*5
3*
16
10*

39.5
*0,0
39.5
39.5
*0,0
30.5

*0.00
*8 .oo~
*9.50
*6.00
38^50
*5.50

_

_

*

16

38

36

_

_

_

.

_

_

-

_
-

*
-

16

-

38
-

36
_

*8
6
6
*2
1

50.00

*

35*0
*.5

89
7t
i
13
38
1,250

61

Stenographers, general............... 1,730
Manufacturing ........ ...........
71*
Durable goods ................
375
Nondurable goods ..............
339
Nonnanufactaring..... ....... .
1,016
168
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ............. .
171
Detail trade .................
95
Finance * * .................
532
_
Rarrl cam TttrTT..t_ T-r.T-____ T
50

39.5
*0.0
39.5
*0.0
39.0
39.5
*0.0
*0.0
38.5
38.5

66

*0.0
*0.0
*0.0

*0.50
*6.50

23
7

31
7

16

2*

38

36

*0

32

16

8

Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Pnh1n+.l
#
f
Wholesale trade ...............
Petal1 trade ..................
Finance ** ...................
Services .....................

Stenographers, technical ............
Manufacturing ..... TT__ ...
___ T
VnnM i f t t
mif
ng T T
IIT.TIIT.
Svitchboard operators ...............
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .............. .
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ...............
Betall trade ................ .
Finance ** rT____________ __ ...
Services ..........................
Tabulatlng-sachlne operators
Manufacturing

............... ..
_
. . . . . . . . . _ ______ ____,

Nonmanufacturing .......................................
Finance * * ................................................ ..

*95
233
262

755
66
169
150

309

28
38
*98
101

*3
58
397
56

69
136
7*

59.00

33

27

33

71
3

2

8

-

22
7

3
*
15
7

6
8

3

13

3
1
1

2

22

29
29

*

l

17
15

-

-

-

-

63
13

60.50

57.50
50.50
67 .OO
52.50
*8.50
*6.50
52.50
*5.00
*6.00
51.00
**.50
*3.00
50.50
*2.00

*3.50
*0.50

3
-

-

-

.
-

_
_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
_

„
_
_
_
-

7
7
_
7

^3.50
39.00
*6.00
*2.00
38.00

38.0

39.5

30.50

73
19
5^
30

39.0
38.5
39.5
39.5

81
1*

19
119

10
67

39
30
39

18

27

33

68

_
5
15
13

.
5

12

13

6

7
7
7

11
*2
2

7
3*
2

1

101
20

263
86

1*9
7*

-

33
53
177

21

231
66
16

61

_
_
61

1*
3
**

83
7
7
76
5
10
61

220

78
16
62
1*2
1
*1
15
80
5

20
81
2
16
11

*5
7

16

35
1*
109
3

53
75
17
6

3
*3
6

i
t

1

22

57

39

-

-

-

2

35

-

-

_
-

21

-

_

_

2

1

22

21

55

_
_
35

-

8

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

1

1

38
1

5*

9*

16

9
*
5
*5

30

3
_
3
13
I
t

3

2
28
6*
3

1

_

22

_

_

37.50

_

**

Finance,

insurance, and rea l estate.




_

1
1

_
-

53

18
11
11

*
3

9
.

1
1

1

9

79
25
5^
123
0
J
23
50

216
138
77
11
61

1*6

13*

96

88

7*
22

17
71

78
32
19

50
Q
7

*6
22

31

10

32
7
*

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

_
_

_
_

.

_
.

_

5

5

5

*

2
1
2

2

_
5

_
*

32

2*3

185

162

ill
90

*8
2*

81

7*

23

3*

*1

18
11

3
3

12

15

98
15

16
2

17
32

1
11
6

50
165

18

7
6

x

*6
6
2

38
32

*
*0
7

32
15

13
20

I
t

7
13

23
19

9

21
1

6

3

*

*

*

8
1

9
9

6

3
3

*
*

*

*
3

7
3

1
8

202

320
72
55
17

1
5

6
6
26
11
2
8
5

5

2

3

______1

See footnote a t e n d of table.
*
Transpo r t a t ion (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities

_

*

5

*

1

_

19
8

1*
10
6

3

1

_

10

25
13

0
7
10

9

8
2
6

31

9

11
2
8

10
2

_

32

*1
6

32
3^
3

1

-

23
13
13

_

2

1*6
27
8

33

22

3
3

10

_
_
8

5

2
2

17

*9.00
55.50
*6.50

2

8

5

37.50

62

32

13
50

**.50

51.00

21
9
2
7

1
1

3
3

52.50
*8.50
55.50

39.5
*0.0
*0.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
*0.5

3*
3
1
2

16

5*.00

39.5
*0.0
30 5
*0.0
39.0
*0.0
39.5
*1.5
38.5
35.5

25
2
2

1

32.00
39.5
- 39.5 - 32.00
38.
s 33.50
30.0
31 . 5
*0

Office girls .......................

Secretaries .......................
Manufacturing ...................

39.5
'" * 0

115
*7

6

6

21

38
29
20

9
9
_
3
6

1
18

5
5
13
10
2
1

-

5
7

11

11
11

15

5
5
3

3

7
1

6

2

3

.
1

-

-

7

_
_
_

_
3

_
_
_
-

-

1

-

5
_
.
-

7
3
3

*

_
_
-

.
_
-

.
_
-

_
_
-

_
.

*
*
_
-

3
.
3

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_

.
.
-

_
.
_

-

1
2
8

1
1

1

2

*8

8

_
3
v
j

2

11

22
16
6

2

32

25
19
6

23
32
3
7

8

2

-

3

2

«.

7

_

2

_

3

-

7
I
-

■1

11
9
R --- 8“
5
6
1

2

3
O

_

1
1
1

2

_

-

_

2

-

_

_

_

. _

_

_

-

_

_

3

_

3

_

3
3

_

7
,
O^ice

Table A-l:

0cC44fuUiO4%l

-

GotUUui*d

(Average straight-time veekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, M d ., by industry division, June 1951*)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S O F—

A v er a g e

Transcribing-machine operators, general

Nonmanufacturing ............... .
Wholesale trade .... .
TMnmnr^ ^j
i
Typists, class A ...................
Manufacturing .......................
Thirable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ........... .
Mnaa 11
Typists, class B .... .............
Nondurable goods ..... .

4/% 414t ^as 4
Wholesale trade ...............
1}af a4 1 4*va A a

159
37
25
112
111
66
775
505
362
52
371
55

39.5
50.0
5o.o
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
50.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
108
50.5
176 38.5
3^ 50.5
1,5^0 50.0
532---- 50.0
160
39.5
272
50.0
1 108
50.0
' 99 39.5
50.0
105
150 51.0
672
39.5
82 50.0

S
51.50
52.00
^3.50
39.00
51.50
57.00
38.50
52.00
55.00
5 5 .00
55.00
39.50
53.00
38.00
*57#uv
3 ( 00

$
$
$ 60.00 65.00
$
$
$
55.00
75.00 s8o.oo $8 5.0 0 $90.00 $9 5 . 0oJfoO.OO
20.00 2 2 .5 0 2 5 .0 0 27.50 30.00 3$2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 50.00 fc .50 &5.00 ^7.50
and
under
22.50 2 5 .0 0 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 6 5.0 0 70 .0 0 75.00 80.00 85.0 0 90.00 95.00100.00 over

_
_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

.

_

_
_

.
_

_

_

2
_
2
2

5 9 .5 0

1

3 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 0

52.50
37.00
35.50
53.00
52.00
35.00
33.50
37.00

_

5
5

.

88
88

1

27

61

22
3 5
3 5
9 20 17
2
6 18 17
35 115
_
2 36
32
2 5
55 33 78
7
26 5 16
IQ 29 55
-*7
288 331 313
35 80 106
10 12 15
68
92
25
251
{
253
* 207
7 1 10
3
19
53 12 28
200 200 122
3 23 28
9
_

23

_

C.\J

£.\jy

19
9

25
3
1
2
21
7
12

9
10
7
3
82 156
26 101
25 98
1 3
56 55
2 15
IS k
"0
3
23
11
15 1
136
50 55
21 19
29 35
86 97
8 16
10 26
p 22
53 25
13 9

15
6
5
2
8
7
1
107

65
39
25
53
6

21
12
3

58
27
25
3
21
11
7
3

8
5
5
5
1
3
7Q
56
56
25
6
12
6
6j_ 21
15 21
13
2
58 22
13 16
21 6
15
7
3
3
5
3
1
58
53
53
5
5

1

11 9
5
5
7 9
5 7
2 2
68 17
56 15
55 11
1 5
12 2
_ 2

1
_
1
17
15
12
2
3

5

8
30
25
5
30
11
13
60

12
11
11
1

6
3
1
2
3
3

_

1

-

_
_

8
1
1
7
1
6

0
0

Women - Continued

Weeklyearnings
(Standard)

S -

occupation, and industry division

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

0
0
0

Sex,

Num ber
of
workers

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

..

_

_

_
_

_
_

.

.

!

2
_
_

_

2

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

.

_

.

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

6

l/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond' to these veekly hours.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
G 4 td

Table A-2:

^ Je c Ju U

c o l O c C H fu U tO M d

(Average straight-time weekly hours a d earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area basis
n.
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, June 1951.)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E

$

$
$
$
$
150.00 1 5 0 .0 0 160.00
and
and
under
50.00 5 5 .0 0 50.00 55.00 6 0 .0 0 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 10 5 .0 0 110.00 1 1 5 .0 0 120.00 125.00130.00 150.00 150.00 1 6 0 .0 0 over

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

76.50
76.50
76.00

_
-

3
3

_

_
-

8

23

56

-

-

-

11
12

55
33
12

72
55
17

72
57
15

112
75
37

59.50

8

^3

3

26

9

5

17

25

1?
11
5

15
.
15
1

8
1

39
39

12
12

6

3
2
2

Draftsmen, chief ....................
Manufacturing ............... .....

55
29

39.5
50.0

109.50
99.50

Draftsmen..........................
Manufacturing..... ...... ........
Nonmanuihcturlng ..................

6 70
555
216

50.0
50.0
50.0

l5l

50.0
50.0
50.0

5 2 .0 0

55.50

50.0
50.0

58.00
59.00

2

------- 58

120
106
79
27
15
8

50,0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0

Tracers ....... ....................
Manufacturing ................... .

5
1 b
O

S

Men

Draftsmen, junior ...................
Manufacturing ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................

W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
50.00 55.00 5 0 .0 0 55.00 6 0 .0 0 65.00 70.00 75.00 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .OO 9 0 .0 0 95.00 100.00 10 5 .0 0 110.00 115.00 120.00

0
0

W eekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

3 5 .0 0

8

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

------- 88—

53
67

-

3*v

36
20

-

28
25

-

5

5

.

1

-

12 6

32

71
55

28

25
25

21
21

8
8

5

65
20
55

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2
1

1
1

_ ___ 3_

5
1

3
3

3
3

_
-

-

-

-

5
5

5

_

2

-

-

-

.
-

.
-

.
-

_
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 ___ 5_ ___ 3_
1
5
3

11
10
1

26
25
20

10
10

1

15

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ......
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing ........................
IDafs 4 1 + v* d a
a

59.50
60.00
6 0 .5 0
5 8 .0 0
5 6 .0 0
7 3 • ? 'J

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

27
16
11

21
13
8

5

2

5

1

1

8

-

-

29

5

— T "

1

29
-

1

1

l/ Hours reflect the varkveek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
TJ. . DEPARTMENT OF LABOP
S
Bureau of labor Statistics

8.

Table A-3:

M

o U tte H O H C e

G * u t P o iV Q k

P lc t t U

Q o C U p a tiO H A

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for s e n In selected occupations studied on a n area b asis
in Baltimore, M d . , b y Industry division, June 1951*)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and Industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
Under 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10
$
0.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 I.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
and
1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 I.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over

$

524
- 355”
212
153
159
5*
22

1.68
1.71
1.73
1.67
1.62
1.84
1-30

Electricians, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ..............................
Durable goods ............ ............ .
Nondurable goods ............ ...... .....
Nonmanufacturlng ...........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance ** ................................

660
f93~
311
182
167
16
16

1.73
1.78
1.80
1.74
1.60
1.72
1.26

Engineers, stationary .........................
Manufacturing ........ ....................

419
3o8~
123
185
111
15
33
21
42

I.60
1.66
1.67
1.65
1.44
1.53
1.63
1.28
1.35

Carpenters, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ....................... .
Durable gcods .... .. ...................
Nondurable goods ................. ..
Nonmanufacturing........................ ................. ......................
Retail trade ............................................................................

( | ( .r__f _1 t_r (T|-TTT_
(
Nondurable goods ..... ............. .

T i r V lm ^rrla
Vv^i
riw

Nonmanufacturing ................... ...... .
Wholesale trade .....................................
Retail trade .........................................
Finance * * ................................... .......
Services .......................................................................................

282
Firemen, stationary boiler .......................................................
Manufacturing ................................................................................... --- IBT~
68
Durable goods ..........................................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ....................................... ..
113
101
Nonmanufacturing........... .............................................................
58
Services ..............................................................................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ........ .........
Manufacturing .............................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................

Machine-tool operators, tool room .............
Manufacturing
..... ........... .

Machinists, maintenance ..................................... ........................
Manufacturing ................................ ......................... ......................
Durable g o o d s ................... ................................................... ..
Nondurable goods .................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.
** Finance, Insurance, and real estate




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.44
1 ,12 0 '“T.S?
67 1.20

-

3

-

-

-

1

3
1

9
9
9

.

3

_

1

-

6

22

1,204
1.88
1,171 “ 1.88
1,027 1.88
144
1.89

28
28

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
1
-

18
7
1
4

24
-

-

22
*

5

4
4

39
20

25
20

-

6
5

4
18
6

_
5

4

20
19

20
5

2
7
10

2
2
1

3
-

_

-

_

-

3

-

5
7
-

-

-

-

-

2
10

2
3

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

14
6

_

15
1
3

*

24
57
*5 — 18~
10
37
8
8
12
6
_
2
4
3

13
5
5

18
7

8
6

7
7

_

_

_

_

8
-

7
11
11

6
2
2

7

-

_

10
9

39
30
21
9
9
1
-

33
30
6
24
3
1
-

4

22
22

_

8
2
-

*6
12
56"--- 8“
•
a
2
3
44
5
4
_ 4

_

_

1

_

_

-

-

-

-

24
12
4

14
14
14

_
_
_
.

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

_

_

.

-

1

_

10

2

4
4

_

20

6

-

28

-

3
3

3
3

-

_

10
10

10
10
6

4

12
12

11
10
10

8

-

1

_
_
_
_

-

-

1
1

_
.
_
-

-

-

1

-

8
12
-

39
32
7

36
30

59
5*
5

137
127

177
177

5
5

-

10

34
25
9

19

6

38

-

-

-

-

5
5

2
2

_

.
-

8
18
12
--- 8~ - 35" — 16~
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13*
133
1

105
103

-

-

5

2

___ 25.

24
24
_

33
29
4

3*9
3*1

2

1
-

1

1

10
10

6
6

10
10

12
9
9

.
_

W

8*
81

4*
37

135
135
125

148
137

4
4

1

8
—

1

_
1

_

_
_
_
_

-

20
10

-

_
_
_

Z
6

_

4
1

-

7

-

-

_

T

_
_

12
12
I
t
8

_
_
_
_

-

6

13

_

22
_
.
-

1

_

-

1
1

_

_
4
_
-

_

20
20

_

_
_

8

21
11

5

_
_
_

_

15
5
5

9

10

4

25
13
9
4

1.87

--- 135" 1.87

3

-

-

_

9

58
39
29
10
19

1

59
48
17
31
11
3
2
3
3

2

_

6

5
1

36
33
21
12
3

-

3

3
2
1
-

-

-

27
19
19

13
5
5

-

-

154
146
140
6
8
1
-

-

-

25
18

-

-

-

92
69
68
1
23
6
-

2
2

24

-

-

-

3

106
76
38
38
30
2
1

?
3

4

_
-

60
53
9
44
7
_
2

7

-

-

46
20
5
15
26
_
2

-

1
_
-

-

22
18
18

27
1
2

-

-

85
69
58
11
16
3

-

4

-

93
80
47
33
13
9

69
64
58
6
5
4

2

' 83
76
16
60
7
3
2

20
1
4

-

-

22
20
2
18
2

31
4
4

-

-

_
3

-

-

8
6

3

_
3

20

12
4
4

-

-

3

-

-

4
1

1

3

4

-

-

-

-

11

11
3
5

-

-

4

12
5
-

-

-

2/
1.35 : 27
2
1.43
_
1.42
2
1.43
1.20
25
1.06
11

1,18?

112

1
-

_

-

.
_
_
_

____ 1

_

3

8

10

126
11

38
350

3*7
337
10

23
23

6
6

17
17

-

113
108
108

86

214
214

35

12

35

12

196
18

35

12

78
78

-

_

-

_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9
,
Table a-3:

M aintenance

and Powel P lant Occupation* - Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, June 1951.)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
h u l Under 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 £.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
ory
erig $
anns
and
0.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 over
$

96
72
19

22
_
_
_
22
15
2

5
1
1
_
4
2
2

27
24
24
3
1
2

6
_
_
6
6
-

28
_
28
2
-

56
28
2
26
28
4
2
14
8

129
15
4
11
114
61
3
47
3

53
5
3
2
48
12
12
21
3

53
19
17
2
34
3
23
5
3

5
4
2
2
1
1
“

4
4
3
1
-

3

61
61
1
60

335
335
22
313

84
81
46
35

127
107
105
2
20

109
81
81
28

233
224
208
16
9

-

-

11
11

18
18

33
33

34
34

26
12
12
14
4
8
1

5
2
2
3

17
10
6
4
7
2
1
4

28
11
8
3
17
11
_
-

63
57
35
22
6
6
_
-

13
11
11
2
2
-

3
2

1
1
1

12
12
5
7

83
83
8
75

42
42
10
32

1.73
1.76

17
1

1.89
1.89

20
20

Maintenance men, general utility ............ .
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods ............... .........
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities * ....................
Retail trade ..........................

402
131
38
93
271
122
81

1.54
1.47
1.36
1.51
1.57
1.64
1.39

1
1
"

_
_
_
-

_
_
.
_
-

9
9
9
_
_
_
-

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...........
Manufacturing...........................
Durable goods .......... ............ ..
Nondurable goods .....................
Nonmanufacturing...... ..................
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale trade .......................
Retail trade .......... ..............
Services ............................

449
135
32
103
314
97
59
107
51

1.57
1.56
1.72
1.51
1.58
1.59
1.71
1.57
1.39

_
_
_
_
-

1
_
1
1
_
-

2
_
2
1
_
_
1

1
_
_
1
_
_
1

Mechanics, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ........... ...............
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ............... ......
Nonmanufacturing .........................

1,178
1,080
5*
li
566
98

1.70
1.68
1.84
1.53
1.93

_
-

.
_
_

_
-

_
-

Millwrights ...............................
Manufacturing ........... ...............

161
161

1.67
1.67

Painters, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ..........................
—
Durable goods ......... ........ .......
Nondurable goods ...... .......... .....
Nonmanufacturlng .........................
Retail trade .........................
Finance ** ................. .........
Services ..................... .

31 b
m~

102
79
133
46
56
22

1.55
1.71
1.69
1.73
1.33
1.52
1.2 1
1.12

Pipe fitters, maintenance ................. .
Manufacturing ............... ...........
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods .....................

404
395
221
174

1.77
1.77
1.79
1.75

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance .............
Manufacturing ...........................

105
89

Tool-and-die makers
........... ...........
Manufacturing ........ ...................

153
153

102

3

28
13
9
4
15
6
7

34
24
24
10
2
1
4
3

33
26
26
7
4
1
2
-

37
37
37

19
19
19

-

6
6

5
3
3
2
2
_
-

-

26
9
5 --- 1
_
_
6
5
21
3
3
17
3

18
_
_
_
18
_
8

11
IT
_
4
7
3
4

6
IT
4
2
.
2

12
(T
4
2
6
2
4

23
10
8
2
13
6
4

54
33
4
29
21
4
4

15
10
_
10
5

7
_
_
7
_
_
7
-

2
_
2
_
2
.
-

3
_
_
3
_
_
_
3

22
4
4
18
6
6
_
6

8
3
3
5
1
2
2
~

28
6
6
22
_
2
20

4
_
4
1
1
2
-

_
-

9
9
9

_|
.
-

37
37
9
28

27
27
5
22

!
_

_
_
-

_
_
.
-

_
_
-

3
_
3
-

1
1
1
-

.
_
-

-

50
34
9
25
16

50
28
28
22

■

-

12
12

15
15

2
2

-

46
40
29
U
6
6
-

15
12
8
4
3
3
-

22
20
20
2
-

2
1
1
1
1
_
"

75
75
70
5!

88
88
88
■

36
28
24
4

14
14
14
"

11
11
1
10

32
32

26
26

18
18

9
9

2
2

30
30

10
10

8
8

38
38 j

32
32

3
3

3

6
_

_

-

-

6

-

_
6

_
_
_
-

_

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

30
30

11
.

10
_

7

16
_

5
2

16
_

_
1

11
3
6
2

10
_
4
6

_
7
2
4
1

_
16
_
16
-

-

-

_

_

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

5

2

3|
3

16
1
15

-

_
-

-

-

2

-

2
1

|
l/
2/
*
**

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Workers were distributed as follows: $0.65 to $0.70, 4 workers; $0.70 to $0.75, 6 workers; $0.75 to $0.80, 10 workers; $0.80 to $0.85, 5 workers; $0.85 to $0.90, 2 workers.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, Insurance, and real estate.

978076 0 - 51 -2




■

-

_
-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

34

3
3

34
34

-

“

1
1

1
1

2
2

9
9

1,
0

Table A-4:

G

m

U

oJU g I,

WG>>t&ltO*UUU} 0+td S U i p f U H f

OoCMfuUiOiU

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Baltimore, Md., by industry division, June 1951.)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
■okr
wres

$
Average
hul
o r y Under 0.40
erig $
anns

$
0.45

O .40

.45

.50

-

-

$
0.50

$
$
$
$
$
0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75

.55

•60

.65

.70

.75

-

-

-

-

-

-

.80

$
$
$
$
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
0.85 0.90 0.95 1.0 0 1 .1 0 1.2 0 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.7 0 $1.80 $1.90
and
over
.90
.85
.95 1.0 0 1 .1 0 1.2 0 1.3 0 1,40 1.50 1.6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90

0.80

$
Guards ......................................
Manufacturing ............................
Nondurable g o o d s........ ..............

882

“ 503"
33 3
290

1.34
1.44
3.43
1.45
1 .0 1
1.2 0

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ........
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods .......... .
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufaoturlng ..........................
PUblic utilities * .....................
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade .... ......................
Finance ** ............ .................
Services............. .................

3.d0
T7527“
730
797
1,483
152

1.03

116

1 .1 0

627
350
238

.74
.76
.78

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .......
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods ................... .
Nonmanufacturing.........................
............. .....
Retail trade ..........................
Finance ** ...............................
Services.... ......................... .

1.464
242
69
173

.73
.94

.8 1

1 .1 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

4
_
4
_
_
4

5
5
•
5

no
no
75
35

102

164
164
89
40
35

59

no
no
l

319
45

180

179
49
34
15

_
-

3
3

279
279

20

-

33

.71
.71
.56

20

_
-

1.2 0
1.2 2

_
-

_
-

1.33
1.19
1.19
1.19

_
-

_
_
-

_
—

_
-

Packers (men) ...............................
Manufacturing .............................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods ................... .
Honmanufacturing
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ...........................

1,0 4 2

Packers (women) ..............................
Manufacturing .............................

1,067
1,0*7

566

1.18
1.23
1.34
1.14
1.08

246

1.2 2

16
4
20

20

_
-

1.2 0

650
291
359
392

_
—
-

.6
8

.96
.9 6

102

75
5
22

n
n

114

114

59
_
20
21
18

_
-

_
3

24
105
150

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
~
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

3
8

-

.1 . 3 8
1.38
1.39
1.09
1.19

45
48
138
39
91

-

22

23
91 | 160
1
7

_
-

-

_
-

136
112
16

-

303
43
43

88

260

n
47 i 53
1 ! 195
40
2

-

3
-

_
—
-

_
-

_
3
3

_

_
_

-

_
-

10
.6

* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

-

-

-

-

44
9

-

9
35
33

2

2

2

2

2

-

-

2

2

9
9

-

-

8

2

2

1

n3
15
15
98
24
74

_

_
-

•
-

11
2
11
2

1

-

2
8

88

.
.
-

12
.1

93

27
274

17
79
13

190
190

18

38
38
142
22

-

1
1

3

2

8

-

-

-

3
3

2

8

•
2

4

130

9
26

4
72
41
3

65
24

130

88

43
43
87

59
9
50
29

6

6

16
47
16

19
-

30
15
_
30
15
15

16

63
40
9
31
23

51
15
15
36
27
9

12
n

98
94
4,
17
-

17
4
n

17

-

1

31

79
76
42
34

182

151
61
29
32
90
18
9
34
4
25

365

313

310
31
279
55
16

229
208

4

8
7

175
no
no
65
13
5
15
21

n

133
52
81

49
25
1

n
2
10

108 _ 2 1 h
_
20
4
2
20
88

2

29

7

1

See footnotes at end of table.




-

10
.2

231

17
5

20

212

363
203

20

-

•86

1,044
478
103
375

32

-

.87
.69

695
239

4

-

5

1,2 2 2

Order fillers ............. ..................
Manufacturing..................... .......
Tym*aKl*
...
Nondurable goods ..................... ..
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade ............. ...... .
Retail trade ...........................

Receiving clerks ............................
Manufacturing ............................
TVirrnMa err\/\Aa
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing............ .............
Wholesale trade ....................... .
Retail trade ..........................

1.26
1.15

10

2

16

97

168

82

73

5

82

20

1
6

5
15

15
n
4

58
95

8
8
6
2

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

82
12
2
10

109

322
215
36
179
107
35
72

92
23

26

9

23
79
25

66

6

19
3

32
22

36
19
17
73
66

7

n 8
85
19
55
102 . 30
40
33
30
31
9
3

19
455
453

30

7

3
-

14

34
9
Q
2

32

-

1
2

12

7

39

-

9

1

n
20

8
12

11

16 1
12 1

74
71

25
24

_
-

“

1

•

_
_
_
_

_
-

2
6

1
2

_
_

_
-

98

3
3

-

27
24
24
3
3
-

_
-

6

7
7

33

_
-

120

6

19

_
_

127

2
1
2

33
33

-

2
2

102

2

19
19

4
-

3

17

2

93
13
13

54
54
54

-

21

_ 15—
15

48
120

___A—
4
4
-

29

3

1

_

10

1

100

14

9
13
4
3

20

-

215
214

1

206
193

-

i9

7
7

30
29

26
22

6

-

—

333
313
249
64

_

70
59
n

66

168

8

3

25
5

168

98
98

3

24

10
2

84
46
27

122

1

22
20
2
22
7

-

21

89
89
57
32

3

26

78
-

8
2

2

44

9
7

9

234
33

7

5
3
2

n
n

9

9

69
a

17
12

10
6

28

5

MA.

96
81
81
15
15
-

62
62

-

8

g
19
13

6

37
27
1Q

.

_
_
_

_

4

-

-

J-3

10

12
12

9
9
-

18
8
8

1
1

1
1

10
10

_
_
_
_
—

-

-

“

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

n
10
c
2

8

2

7

-

2

9

5

7

13
n

_
.
-

_
13
13
-

4

2L
24

27

15 _ A 2_
5

21
2

52
52

-

-

8
10

2

1

7
2

2

-

_

1

1

1

2
_
2

_
_
_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11,

Table a-4<

Gu&todial,

WatohoHlUuf

and SUipfUntp 0 ecup a tio*A - Gontinusd

(Average hourly earnings " j for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
j
In Baltimore, Md., by industry division, June 1951*)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and Industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
Average
h u l Under <5.40 0.45
ory
erig
anns
$
.50
0.40
.45

Nomanufacturing...... ......... ..........

Manufacturing...........................

Nonmanufacturing .......... ................
Retail trade ..........................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ......... .
Manufacturing ........ ........ .
Durable goods ..........................
nondurable goods ..................... .
Nomanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade ........................
Retail trade ...............
n

I
1
1
!
1

Manufacturing ...................... •.....
Neomanufaoturing ..... ...............••••••
UltAI a m Ia
...... .......
Datall
.
. . .

Truck drivers, mediae (l£ to and
Including 4 tons) ........................ .
Manufacturing......... ................
Nanmauafactoring ........................ .
U iaI mael a ^*a/4e
..
Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tone# trailer type)
Manufacturing.... ..... ....... ...........

291
TO
60
83
148
56
80

1.32
1*44
1*43
i .//

$
0.70

$
0.75

$ ^
0.30

$ ^
0.35

$
0.90

$
0.95

Loo

1 .1 0

1.2 0

1.30

$
$
1.40 1.50

.60

.65

.70

.75

.80

.35

.90

.95

1.0 0

1 .1 0

1.2 0

1.30

1.40

1.50

4
-

2

33
- n S ~

10
2

22
12
1

35
26

35
23

17
13
g

26

10

25
7
7

31

-

4
-

44

-

16
4
12

$
0.55

.55

-

81,2 2

368

Shipping clerks .............................
Manufacturing........................ .

0.60

$ X
0.65

$
0.50

r;zr
1,38

-

3,040

_

-

1,31
1.09

1.18”
1.31
1.0 2
1 .1 1

1.14
1.0 2

888

1.24
m
\ I.ST
666
1.18
292
1.0L
70
1.18

1.25
~ T 3 T

596
235

1.18
1.34

636

4

2

4

20

_

_

_

_

_

„

_

-

10

-

22

-

_

20

u
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

.
-

_
_
“

32
32
32

7
7
7

4
4
4

112
22

•
-

_
_

_
-

_
-

1

12

99
99
98

_

1

•

1

-

-

-

-

1

12

18
4
90
72
18

•
»
-

-

—
-

_
-

-

15

10
10

15
14

99
36
36
63
42

148

92
27
65
56
30

678

IP
13
5
5
8

H
10

16
9
£

10

2

2
2

32
1

8

-

31
28
3

436
364
9
355
72
44

127
85
18
67
42

26

28

25
25

17
4
13

10

11

20
22
2

2
2

,34

1

-

-

1

8

-

15

8

15

70
70

89

18

-

1

2

_
-

82

9
80
4

454
302
120

182
152
36
116

18

82
68

Manufacturing.... ........................
Henmanufmaturing ......................... .
PuK H a rrMH-Mao * .....................
U iaIa a a Ia
.........
Retail trade ..................... .....

1/
2/

F
**

219
186
604
276
328

35
38
98
126
31

1.48
1.52

-

-

_

.97
1 .1 1

.85
1.16
1*13
.85
.73
.«7

-

-

-

-

-

-

2?

21

29

21

-

-

-

-

3

10

3

10

18
18

85
14
71

-

3
73
13
60

-

_
20

A11 workers at 81.90 to |2.00
Transportation (excluding railroads), canansiication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_
16
5

3

9

1

2

16

18
37
4

g
27

17
43
39
4

1
20
12
8

15
7
7

439
209
99
no

412

60
29
29
31
29

20

7
309
178
143
35
131
87
44

46
19
27

153
7
146

87
3
84
7
2

102
10

no
43
67
40

69
31
38
4

54
26
28
24

157
n
146
91

21

9
5
5

106
46

6
6

67
99
58

14

12
1
1

14
7
4
.

23

6

33
30
20

18
18

36

27
14
14
13
12
1

195
186
180
6

27
19
15
4
8

45
33

30
30

42
42

79
54
25
15

83
75

n

9
7

-

8

n

2

2

8

5
3

2

2

15

12

6

3

3
3

2

6
4

1

6

3
-

59
19

9
2
8
8

12

g

29
7
7
22
22

3

19
n

18
18
18

318
1

9

6

118
118
-

319.

37
32

9

-

3

22

12
12
9
3

8

33
29
9

21

-

1
1

22
1

39
27

12
11

3
3
2
1

1
1

37
34

21
12

-

-

90.
89

140

69

2
2

13
5

8
1

67
53
14

130
10

14

7
40
40
-

9

2
2

31

3
3

39

2
10
4
6

60

6

1
8

10

2

12
2

4
4

27

_>

344

14

12-1
12

36
24
3

29
39

5

9

12
9
3

80
25

5

12
15
5

48

230

3

1

22

15

322
22
68

-

9

21
1

2
21

20

4

n

1

92
24

15

89
54
54
35
17
18

-

1

30
19
4

2

-

2

6
12

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.




-

62
19

18
18

12

4 - .24.,
4
24

1.51

640

46
19

4
4,

166

14
18

18
7
n

113
23
90
64

38
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ....... .
Manufacturing ..................... .......

5

23
12
2
10

62
4
58
31
3

14

OfsL

Truckers, power (fork-lift) •••*....... .
Manufacturing ............... ....... .....

2
8

21

3

1.54
1.53”
1 K*T
J-.3•
1.52

215
PL
1 A/
A 91
•r*

-

26

11

_

22

1 .1 6

m

-

1 ^1*

1,2 6

854

-

n
_

1 .2 1
1 IA

113
31
8?
255
185
58

1,113
855
1,072
544
403

-

1.60

$
$ - $
1.70 1.30. 1.90
and
over
1.70 1.30 1.90

1.6 0

g

39
37
37
2
2

•
—

_

— ____ L.
4
-

201 r_.13L3/102.
10
77
“
3
74
10
7
124
102
7
71
75
8
8

15
15

3
3

33
33

23
23

4
4

T

2

_
-

-

_
-■

_
-

7
•
—
-

12,

G g4MU4K[ l/

Table B-203:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
Num ber
of
workers

Occupation and sex

earnings

2/

-_^o_ __ £5-

1.00

1.00

$
1.10

1.10

$

$
$
0.90
0.95

$
0.85
0.75
and
under
.80
. ,8 5 .
.
$
0.80

$

Average

$

1.20

1.20

$
1.30

.iao

$

i.4o

*
1 .U0

1.50

1 . Q 1.60
.2,

$

Men

1.04
1.08
.76
1.29
.82
.98

2k
13

_
28
8
-

_
1
8
12
2

.83
.79
.92

l4
10
36
1U

Adjusters, machine .............. ............. .
Cooks ................. ......... .
Labeler8, hand or machine ......................
Mechanics, maintenance ....................... .
Pilers-in ....................................
Retort operators ..............................

38
196

77
-

2
-

2
-

k

8

1
3
-

3
3
1

1
1
2
-

2
-

1
+
-

1
-

k
-

1

"

3
3
3
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

6

"

"

■

~

Women
Cutters, peelers, slicers, cubers, or
pltters, hand ...............................
Fillers, hand
Labelers, hand or machine ......................

76
337

13

22
53

-

k

8

3

■

3

6

_

_

"

'

l/ The study covered establishments vith more than 20 workers in industry groups 2033 and 2035, as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (19^5 edition) pi-epared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-2311:

Men*d

and

Boyd'

Suitd

and

G o c U d 1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

$
Average $
0.80
hul
ory
erig
anns
under
2/
.80
.85
S

$
0.85

0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1 .1 0

$
1.20

$
1.30

$
$
$ , $
1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70

.90

.95

1.00

1 .1 0

1.2 0

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

1.70

1

%

1.80

$
s
$
$
$
$
$
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50

s
$
2.60 I 2.70
| and

1.80

1.90

2.00

2 .10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70 ! over

3
1
2
4
_
1

8
2
6
1
1

23
9
14
5
1
-

37
27
10
6
_

52
41
11
6
_
-

24
17
7
21
_
2

82
79
3
3
3

94
91
3
13
1

6
3
3

9
2
7
_
_

-

-

-

4
4

2
11
7
7
6
27
1

3
14
2
15
10
18

8
3
7
22
11
4

_

1
1
9
12

_
_

1
2

_

_

3

$

Men
Cutting
Cutters and markers*

To t a l.............. ..
Time .................
Incentive ............
Cutters, body-lining..........................
Cutters, inner-lining.........................
Spreaders...................... ..............

352
280
72
63
6
13

2.16
2.20
2.03
2.14
2.07
1.33

69
64
40
101
102
258
14
6
8
9

1.42
1.64
1.54
2.02
1.85
1.72
1.52
1.25
1.72
1.80

56
9
23
29
6
23
16
45
172

1.75
1*59
1.74
1.61
1.6 8
1.60
1.90
1.64
1.75

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

_
-

-

1

2
1
1

3
3

2
2
-

2

-

-

-

-

2

3

1

-

1
-

1

11
1
11
3
4

17
4
3
_
5
10

6
7
3
2
5
34

3
5
1
1
_
18

3
9
3
6
9
30
7
3

_

_

_

4

_

5
3

15
4
5
3

-

3
3
4

1
_
1
_
-

Coat fabrication
Basters, body-lining and facing, h a n d .........
Basters, collar, hand .........................
Fitters ......................................
Pressers, finish, h a n d ........ ..... ....... .
Pressers, finish, machine.....*...............
Sewing-machine operators 2/ ..................
Join shoulders, cloth* Total ................
T1me ..............
Incentive ........
Join side seams
Join under-collar, join sleeve-lining,
or piece pockets.........................
Sew edge tape .............................
Sew in sleeve .............................
Shaper8, edge and bottom*
Total .............
T i m e ...........
Incentive .......
Shapers, iinder«.r.o1lar ............__ TTTt___ t - - » t
Tal 1ora, all_around ...__lrTrT..... 7 t. -Tti.
_
Under-pressers . . ........................................................................... ....

See footnotes at end of table.




1

_

2

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

-

_
_

_
-

-

-

_
_
_

-

_

_

_

_

_

~

_

-

-

~

_

_

2
1
2

-

-

-

_
-

_
6
2
2

4
9
1
1

1

-

-

1

1
_
_

i | 1
_

_

6

4
_
_
3

_

3

4

21

7
_
4
2
1
1

4

4
3
_
2

6

13
2
11
/
ag
17

5
7
43

3
•
a

3
_
5
_
2

3
1
1
5
3
2

JO

c

J

22

28

10
17
20
3

1
_
11
7
4

3
11
5
1

_

3
3

_
_
_
3
2
6

_
3
2

_

4

_

_

1

1
1

1

.
1

_

1
2

1

9

_

2

4
12

1

15

_

_

9
_

_

_

2

-

_

_
4

i

10

_
4

8

6

3

4

2

3
3

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M en '6 and RoyL>' Suit*, and Goati
.

Table B-2311:

1/

-

Continued

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$
0.75
tinder
.80

$

$
$
0.95 1.00

$

$

1.10

1.20

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.10 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70

1.00

1.20

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

2
12
1
2
1

19

7

-

3

1

13

7

8

-

2

1

-

7
3

-

2

1

4

3

1
1
1
6

1

3
3

-

-

2

7

3

1

2
2

1

2
2
2

$
0.80

$
0.85

.85

.90

.95

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

2
1

-

-

3
3

0.90

1.10

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

and
ever

2.30

2.40

2.50

2
2
1
1

4

-

_
_

4
_
_
_

-

-

-

.

-

_

1

3

1

-

-

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

2.60

2.70

S

Hen - Continued
Trouser fabrication
Pressers, finish ............................
Sewing-machine operators 3/ ,.................
Join inseams .............................
Join outseams .............................
Join seatseams ................. ..........
Make pockets .... .........................
Under-pressers ..............................

39

2.23

132

1.6 6

13

24
42

1.60
1.74
1.75
1.57
1.76

8

1.42
1.41
1.49
.84
.95
1.19

-

1

-

5

-

1
1

20
1

1.88

33

_
-

10
8

2
_
-

-

-

-

2

2

7
4

_

-

-

-

5
4

2
2
-

1
-

-

-

1

2

2

2
1

1
2
4

3
9
-

8
6
-

2

_

5
•

1 U 8
2
3

1

_
_

-

2

_

_

Mtgggllan^oua
Inspectors, final (examiners):

Total .............................
T i m e .......................
Incentive . . .

Packers .....................................
Stock clerks, garments
.................. .
Uef
Um*1
r

26
7
39
73
53
g

aft»4Vei+y%T*e.......

1.12
•83
•94

1
_

_

-

-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
14
3

1

6
6
2

5

3

1
6

13
9

7
-

K
J
11

9
21
6
5
1

1
1

2

_

_ . .....

26

Basters, body-lining and facing, hand ........
Basters, canvas, hand .......................
Basters, collar, hand .......................
Button severs, h a n d .........................
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ............................................... ........................
Finishers, hand .................................................................................................
Fitters ..........................................................................................................................

94
32
55
90
124.

1.41
1.43
1.33

-

1.20

242
26
20
22

1.22
1.24
1.18
1.34
1.52
1.37

.

......

6

3

2
1
1

3
3
-

2

1

_

4

3

_

2
2

-

3
3

-

-

1
_

2

-

4

3

3

3

_

2

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

-

3

1
2

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

9
3
4
5

11

7

5

1
2

1
2
1

-

1
6
2

7
-

-

3

-

2

7

1

-

1
1

4

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

-

1

_

_

_

_

-

4

_

_

_

_

2

1

1
8

5

•

_

_

1

2

2

2

8

5

1

2

2

2
2
1

2

6
7

5

3

1

9
3

U
3

20

3
19
37
_

2

_

Women
Coat fabrication

Pressers, finish, hand .......................
Pressers, finish, machine ....................
Sewing-machine operators: Total 3/ ..........
Time 11 ». --t - 1 t »
Incentive .......
Baste edges ..............................
Baste, jump stitch machine ................
Buttonhole making ........................
Fell body-lining, bottom and side .........
Join shoulders, cloth .....................
./j
Tvn
T I I I T T T . - l l l T T - T T i ( ( I I - . tf1TT
Join under-collar, join sleeve-lining,
or piece pockets........................
Pad collar and lapels...................
Pipe edges ...............................
Sew darts (cloth) ............ .............
Sew edge tape ............................
Sew in sleeve ............................
Stitch edges .............................
Tape armholes............................

a l l -jn-nunB

1.41
1.45
1.32
1.34
1.35
1.49
1.34

1.26
1.30
1.31
1.23
1.38
1.53
1.34

T T . T. T 1 1 . . t I I 1 I I . . I1, t t i
...............................................................................
T t ___T . . ___ t . . T . I 1 1 T l l T ,,,,

12
7

*

T n fa l

TTr t

See footnotes at end of table,

3
-

3
-

-

-

-

5

4
4

2
2

6

-

2

2

_

4
5

7
3

19

19

1.60

4

_

_

_

34

3
6

-

-

1
-

10
1
1

-

1
•

13
-

1
1
5
5
4

2
1
2

4

_

6

3

2

17

4
15
■

1
1
1
-

22
1
21

8
6

10
2

15
16
17
60

9

11
21

2
2

2
8

3
3
79

2

8

71

1
1

-

1

7

-

3
-

6
6
1
4

9
-

2

5
5
-

6

11
5
3

_

_

-

_

-

_

-

1

-

1
6

1
8

1

-

-

4

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

1/

38

1.0 1

10

102

1.09
1.43

4
5

32

9

22
12

1*43
1.53
1.28
1.07

--t-i-tit

T i m e .........
Incentive .....
Under-pressers ..............................




1 .1 1

42
38
29
29
a
30
25
15

Shapers, under collar

-

-

1.27

112

arigA Anrf
T a l 1 r»T* j

38
874
108
766
36
47
28
80
19
31

-

_

_

1

10

9

3
7
-

5
4
-

23
23
-

3
115

22
93
3
7

6
15
_
8

14
5
9

8
4
4

1
2
1
6
106
17
89

2
1
6
117
16

1

101
6

7

9

1
12
1
7

8
16

12

11
6
1

-

2
6
3
7
4
3

4

3

5
3
5

4
7
5
13
9
16

2
1
2
84
4
80
3
7
-

6
4

4
6
14
3
5

12
6

10

7

5
-

19

9

2

1

5
5
3

7
5

P

_

-

-

.
_

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

1

-

-

14
-

2
1

2

2
2

4
-

2
-

2
2

-

3

1

_

-

2

-

_

1

-

-

1
2

-

-

-

-

1

•

-

-

-

1
1

_

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

_

.

1

_

2

3
29

-

22

n

14

-

2

-

-

-

_

2

-

_
-

-

-

-

•
.

49

3

7
4

4
-

1

2

8
1

9
3

5
-

4

6
1

2
1

3
4

-

1

-

3

1
1
1

1
6

1

-

1

6

-

.
-

11

2

7
14
4

.

-

-

22

■
a

15

_

-

-

29

2
2

20
1

_

-

-

48
4

1

21

_

-

67
4

_

c
J

_

-

2
-

54
5

7
3

3

1

5

-

3

57

2

1

_

1
1
6
10
1
2
2
68
1

2
1
8

3

1
2

1
_

«.

1

42

16
36

8

1
2

5
4,

1
2
1
1
3

3

1
2

-

1

1

-

2

4

1

-

_

-

-

2

-

4
4

_

2

_

-

-

-

_

-

2
1

1

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

1

“

-

“

2

-

-

1

3
3

2

_

-

j

1

u ,

Table B-2311:

M e n ' 4 G 4 td
.

B o 4 f4 > ' S u

U

l 0 4 > td

G o o td ,

if . Q o n t U lM

+ d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

$
$
0.75 0.80
and
under
.80
.85

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1.10

$
1.20

$
1.30

$
1.40

-1.95- 1.00

$
0.85

1.10

1.20

1*30

1.Z0

li5Q 1 1.60

8
31
2

2
30

15
38

-

-

2

-

8
38
2
3

_

-

1
1
3
2
2
4
2
1
9

1
1
3

2
1
2
4
2
4
1
1
3
1

$
0.90

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70
and
1.70

1.80

lt9Q

2.00

2.10

2.20

2i3Q

2.40 , ±1
.
Z

0

. 2.60

2.70

over

s

Women - Continued
Trouser fabrication
Severs, hand (bench workers, finishers)
Sewing-machine operators, total j[/ ....
Attach fly .......................
Attach waistband .................
Attach zipper ....................
Join inseams.... .................
Join outseams ....................
Make pockets .....................
Piecing flys ........... ....... .
Serging.......... ...............
Sew on waistband-lining ..........
Stitch pockets ............ .
Tacking ..........................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) ..........

51
267
10
16
8
6
9
a
7
22
18
21
23
34

1.23
1.35
1.44
1.50
1.21
1.46
1.33
1.43
1.31
1.29
1.31
1.21
1.45
1.11

2
7

2
5

_

-

3
8
1

1
3
1

-

_

_

-

2

_
_

1
1

_

1
5

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

3

1

-

-

2
1
4

-

4

2
2
1
4

1
-

~

-

1
1

-

2
1
4
4
3

-

8
1
3
6
5
-

1
24
1
3
1

4
25
3
1
2

-

-

4
5
-

1
5
2

1

-

2
10

83
17

1.13

4

.77

13

2

4
2

5

2

24

23

6

5

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

1

1

5

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

_

_

1

-

-

-

3

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3
1

-

1

-

1
1

2

4

1

6
1

'

'

'

'

1
.

14
1

3
4

'
Inspectors, final (examiners) ........
Janitresses ........................

1
14
-

-

i

6

"
"

K

1/ Includes regular and contract shops with more than 20 workers and cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with more than k workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Data relate to all sewing machine operators, including those shown separately.
ij Workers were distributed as follows: $2.70 to $2.80, 4 workers; $2.90 to $3.00, 1 worker; #3.00 to $3*10, 3 workers.




Table B-28:

9 nAnltlial G U e m i c a U

1/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of industrial inorganic and organic chemicals, other than
synthetic fibers, synthetic rubber and explosives .
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mi., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

'

-

15,

Tati« B-2851:

Paintd and VaAnidUed

1/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of paints and varnishes.
2/ Data limited to men workers.

2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-332:

tfo u n d /U e d , ty e w o u d i f

2/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers In iron and steel foundries (Group 332 except grey iron pipe and fittings), as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Captive foundries of machinery plants vers excluded from the study.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Ml., June 1951
2/ Exoludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics




16,

•ran* B-3U 11

l/
2/

*7^

G ohA and Q tke/i ^inuui/ie if

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

and life m e e i'S Heady- *7e-Weak St& u& i if

Table B-531:

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|$
o
0
0
5
0
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4 0 . c 42.50 45.00 4 7 . C 50 . C 5 2 .5c 55 . C 57 . C 60 . C 70 . C s o . 90 . C 100JX ) . C120 £>0 130.00
5
0
a
0
110 0
Weekly
Weekly Under and
earnings *
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) 25.00 under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50 . C 52.50 55.00 57.50 60 . C 70 . C 80 . C 9 0 . 100.00
0
0
0c
0
0
m o c 120.00 130 . C over
0

27.50

S

Men
pn^^r\+o«or\nQ

t

(

(T1|_TT. . . .
.. .

Finishers, furniture ................................................
Packers, b u l k .................................................................
Porters, day (cleaners) ..............
Receiving clerks (checkers) ..........
Sales clerkss
Bedspreads, draperies, and
blankets ........................
Boys' clothing ....................
Floor covering.............. .....
Furniture and bedding .............
Housewares (except china, glassware
and lamps) ......................
Major appliances (refrigerators,
stoves, washers, etc.)(excludes
radios and television) ..........
Men's clothing ....................
Men's furnishings .................
Women's shoes .....................
Stockmen, selling sections ...........
Stockmen, warehouse ...............
Tailors, alteration, men's garments ....

31
11
45
53
170
55

5

4,

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

42 .0
41.5

34.00
52.00
39.50
32.00
39.50

7
4

8
2

7
86
10

3
27
2

1
10
24
8

6
12
42
55

4 0 .0
4 1 .0
4 0 .0
40.5

43.00
52.00
76.50
83.50

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

1
2

-

-

-

13

43.5

61.50

-

1

-

-

64

40.5
4 1 .0
40.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 2 .0

83.50
73.50
53.00
64.00
30.50
39.50
64.00

40
35
20
56
151
9

41»5
4 1 .0
4 0 .0

1

3

40 0
-

6
7
3

1
1
12
7
8

4
6
2
6

6
3
2
3

-

2
1
2

-

-

2

-

-

4

1
4
3
1

1

-

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

-

1

-

-

-

-

2
1

3
5

8

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

1

1

2

-

-

1

-

-

2
5

16
4

17
14

4
8

1
3
24

5

9
7

2
1
4
38

1

-

4

-

-

-

~

“

1
1

"

-

2
9

“

-

12

~

-

23

~'

1
6
1

-

6

"

_
_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

1
3

2
3
4

_
_

2
3

5
7

12
8

6
12

4
7

1
2

-

3

_

_

1

_

3

_

_

_

1

1
1
1
3

8
8
8
3

8
15
1
6

3
5
1
1

14
4

13

7
1

_
_

_

_
_

_

«.

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

2

2
1

-

_
_

4

2

-

_
_

3

r *

-

_

-

n

13

-

-

-

2
_

_
_

5

_

2

1

3

7

-

-

-

3
1

1

-

“

-

-

_

4

3

-

_

-

3

1

_
_
_
_

-

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1.
7

&*td 'li/am est'A H-eady-

Table b«531:

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF

A
verage 2 /
Number

Occupation and sex

of

workers

*W*qa. S to te i 1/ - C ontinued

6
4
4
Under 1 5 .0 0 1 7 .5 0 § 0 .0 0 § 2 .5 0 § 5 .0 0 § 7 .5 0 lo.CO $ 2 .5 0 1 5 .0 0 $ 7 .5 0 § 0 .0 0 § 2 .5 0 § 5 .0 0 § 7 .5 0 $ 0 .0 0 § 0 .0 0 § 0 .0 0 $9 0 .0 0 lo a o o i i a o o 1 2 0 0 0 b o . 00
Weekly
Weekly
and
and
earnings
hours
under
(Standard) (Standard)
2 5 .0 0 2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 10040 n a o o 120.00 130.00 over
$

Women
Cashier-wrappers .....................
Elevator operators, passenger .........
Fitters, women's garments .............
Sales clerks*
Bedspreads, draperies, and blankets •
Blouses and neckwear ..............
Boys' furnishings .................
Housewares (except china, glassware
and lamps) ......................
Men's f\irnishings .................
Notions, trimmings ..... ...........
Piece goods (yard goods, upholstery
fabrics) .... ...................
Silverware and jewelry (excluding
costume jewelry) ................
Women's accessories (hosiery, gloves,
and handbags) ............ .
Women's and misses' dresses ........
Women's shoes .....................
Women's and misses' suits and coats •
Sewers, alteration, women's garments ..
Stookmen, selling sections ...........

1/

7j

4 0 .5
4 0 .5
3 9 .5

2 9 .0 0
2 7 .0 0
4 1 .0 0

70
51
29

4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .5

3 9 .5 0
3 4 .0 0
3 5 .0 0

74
59
47

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

3 6 .5 0
4 0 .0 0
3 3 .5 0

78

3 9 .5

3 8 .5 0

159
68
112

16
-

61
15
-

_

59
16
“

18
20
8

10
1
6

8

1

2

10

7

56

13
7
4

12
3
4

6

5

8

10
3
1

4
2
“

2
1
1

1
2

4

1
1

1
3

3
9
3

3
11
6

11
10
5

1

1
2
4

4
1
7

17
4
13

13
11
4

13
6
9

11
15
2

3
5
3

5
4
2

4
2
1

1
1
1

-

2

3

8

H

18

6

8

8

4

-

2

2

-

1

3

2

3

27
23
9
2
38
13

19
47
10
2
26
1

36

14
27
U

13
12
9

8

6
17
4

3

10

6

5

3

1
2

_

-

10

4 0 .0

3 5 .5 0

-

137
208
91
54
169
109

4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

3 6 .0 0
4 0 .5 0
4 3 .0 0
4 3 .0 0
3 2 .5 0
2 8 .5 0

6
4
1

-

6

5

_
-

4

6
27

32
58

-

7

26
11

7
42
1

7

7

13
4
10
1

3

i_
_

7
2

1

5
1
4

1

_
_ . _
1

2

-

-

2

1

4

-

2

1

3

_

5
1

3

3

1
2

n

2

-

-

-

-

-

17
9

_
_

-

2

3

2

_

_
-

-

1

The study covered department and women's ready-to-wear stores with more than 50 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table B-5klj

Num ber
of
workers

W eekly
(Standard)

W eekly
earnings
(Standard)

Q/l&&eSUf St&UeA l/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E

A ver a g e

Occupation and sex

25.00 17.50

§0.00 §2.50

W E E K L Y E A R N I N G S O F—

35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0080.00

and
under
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00(85.00

S

Men
Clerks, meat .........................
Fruit m e n .... ................ .

164
227

46
46

52.00
49.50

70

44

34.00

21

Women
Clerks, grocery ......................

1/

2j

The study covered grocery stores with more than 7 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries, and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




_
_
—
“

-

_

.
- - -

4

_

-

3
1

2
6
1

3

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Ml., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18.

Table B-?6l:

Average
Occupation 2/

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

W e e k ly
h o u rs
(S ta n d a r d )

M e*t'A /G+u£ &04fAf G iotltU uf,

g/

W e e k ly
e a r n in g s
(S ta n d a r d )

StcM A,

\1

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E W EEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Jo. 00 J5.00 Jo. 00 J5.00 to. 00 t5.00 Jo. 00 §5.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 ^5.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 15.00 ioo-oc il0.0C 120.00 130.00 140.00 l50.a
and
under
25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 110.00 120.00 130.0C 140.00 150.0C i 6ojo

$
Fitters, Ben1e garments ..........
Porters, day (cleaners) ...........
Sales clerks*
Boys' clothing ................
Men's clothing ................
Tailors, alteration, men's garments

7
18

42.0
44.5

35.50

6
37
33

43.5
45.5
42.5

69.00
98.00
60.50

2

3
2

-

7

4

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

3

7

1

1

1

_
11

1
1

3
5
5

1
4
2

1
11

-

-

1

1

2

1

_

5

4

1/ The study covered men's and boys' clothing and furnishings stores with more than 7 workers.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2/ Data limited to men workers.




Table B-591*

Stored 1/

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

5

1

19,

9*Ut*uuu>& GawU&U' 1/

Table B-63:

The study covered Insurance carriers employing more than 20 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-tine salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Table B-6512:

Q ^ lce B u ild in g S e/u tice

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T I M E -H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S OF

Occupation and sex

Num ber
of
workers

A verage
hourly
earnings

£/

*
Udder 1
0.U5 0.50
$
and
0.k5 under
.50

1
0.65

*
0.55

1
0.60

.60

.*
65

*
0.70

.70

.75

1

0.75 0.80

*
0.85

,85

.90

.80

1
0.90

*
0.95
and
.95 over

$
Men
Elevator operators, passenger ...................
Firemen, stationary boiler .....................
Janitors ......................... ............
Watchmen.....................................

22
2
23
1

12
k
7

2
5
-

"

1
Ik
3

32

2k

55

2

_

8

-

-

13
“

-

k

9
1

21

2

23

17
*
9
63
18

0.78
.93
.71
.68

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

2

163

.69

2

_

_

■

2
2
“

-

2

-

.

Women
Cleaners .................. ...................

1/ The study covered office buildings with more than 7 workers
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-7211:

PoW&ls JtcUUut'UOd' l/
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and

Number
of
workers

sex

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

* 0 .4 0
and
under
.4 5

* 0 .«

$0 .5 0

$

0 .5 5 $ 0 .6 0 $ 0 .6 5 $ 0 .7 0 0 .7 5

$
0 .8 0
.8 5

.9 0

.9 5

5
33

-

4
1
5

2
4

-

2
3

_

$
$
$
1 .2 0 $1 .2 5 $1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5

1

10

$

$

0 .8 5

$

0 .9 0

$

0 .9 5 $1 .0 0

$

1 .0 5

$

1 .1 0 $1 .1 5

i .5 0
and

.50

.5 5

.6 0

.6 5

.7 0

.7 5

.8 0

-

-

-

-

4

2
2

6

-

_

.

1

2

3
3

32
192
29
163
39
20
19
23
23

14
96
96
21

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

6
7
6

4
2

7
2

_

_

4

-

-

1
2

1

-

-

_

1 .0 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .4 5 1 .5 0

over

1 .3 5

1 .4 0

2
8

4
”

2
-

2

1
-

5
6

-

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

$

Men
Clerks, retail receiving ......................................................................
Firemen, stationary boiler ............................................... ...
Washers, machine ...............................................................................................

16
67
38
68

0 .8 0
•84
1 .1 8
.9 8

97
636
io i
455
133

.6 7
•op

-

4,
_

4

4

-

2
A

2
86

4

-

50

7
66
36
30
2

24
7*
»/
►
56
18
22

0

6

-

9

6

2
57

4
18
4

2
18

57
4
2
2
7

14

18

4
5

7
31
2

5

3

71

20

Women
Clerks, retail receiving ............... .....
TO uia

Identifiers *

Incentive ....
Total ..........................
T i m e ................................................................................

.6 8
.6 7
.5 9

61
no

Total

..................................................................................................

108
66
8
3
66

_

.6
8

V77

2/
2/

6
6

_

6

.6 4
.6 1
.6 9
.7 1
•62
•60

/D

'Mima

16
16

•m .
f*+

17

Markers*

4
20
O
ft

16
22
17
5

24
g

g

16
20

/
£

58
18

54
25
25

14

65
25
21
4-

8
13
17
12
5
34
9
2
7

-

_

_

-

_

.

6

-

3
10

2

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
4

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

10

2

3

_

-

_

-

-

.

-

_

1

-

1

4

1

16

2

The study covered power laundries with more than 20 workers
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

A u to. Refuuns Shop*. 1/

Table B-7538:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation 2/

Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
1 /

$

Under 0.75
ar>A

%

$

$

0.80

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.90 0.95 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90

$

0.85

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

2.50

2.70

2.90
and

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.VO 2.50

2.70

2.90

over

3
3

2

17

14

—

2

17

14

under

0.75

.80

.85

-

.90 - i95 1 1.00

- I .1 Q

[ 1 .2Q. JU-3Q.. 1.40 JL*5QL .1*60. 1.70
- .

1.80

1.90

9
5
4
3

4
3
1
3

10

122
62
60

S

Body repairmen, metal*

Total ....................................................
Time .............................................
Incentive ...............................
Electricians, automotive .....................
Greasers ................................. .
Mechanics, automotive, class A* Total ...... .
T i m e ......
Incentive ..
Mechanics, automotive, class B .................................................
Washers, automobile .................................................................................

162

1.84

63
99
39
125
736
252
484
126
177

1.53
2.03

-

-

1.68
1.00

-

15

1.64
1.40
1.76
1.17
•79

16

5

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

12

48

32

11

4
2
5

8

30
23
7

79
22

2
8
67
30
37

70
24
46

4

8

10

16

6

3

23
35
8
27
15

2
56
39
17
25

-

-

44
3
3

14
3
3

3
13
4
9
8

15

6

3

3

-

i/A0

6

15

-

21

-

-

-

42

24

6

10
10

6
101

10

_

_

19
4
15
3

58

3
7
11
2
52

24

25

32

22

20

7

8

8

58

52

24

25

32

22

20

7

8

g

1

X

2

1

2

1
“

-

'

1/ Includes general automobile repair shops and repair departments of retail motor vehicle dealers employing more than U workers,
g/ Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
i j
Workers were distributed as follows* under |0.65, 13 workers; $0.65 to $0.70, 14 workers; $0,70 to $0.75, 13 workers.




Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Mi., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Lab'"- Statistics

21,

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect July 1, 1951.)
Table 0-15* R u U d u i X f Q&HA.t>lUcUo*l

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table C-205:
Hours
per
week

Journeymen
Asbestos workers ......................

Cement finishers ... ..... .............
Electricians (inside wiremen) ...... .....
Elevator constructors ..................
Engineers - Power equipment operators:
Building construction and
Heavy construction:
Heavy equipment:
Derricks, excavating cranes,
shovels .....................
Medium equipment:
Concrete pumps and single-drum
hoists .....................
Light equipment:
Compressors and pumps ..........
Bulldozers and tractors with
attachment ..................
Glaziers .............................
Lathers ..............................
Painters and paperhangers....... .......
Plasterers .................. .........
Plumbers .............................
Rodmen .................. .............
Sheet-metal workers..... ..............
Steam fitters.... ....................
Stonemasons ...........................
Structural-iron workers ................
Tile layers ...........................

$2.50
2.61
3.20
2.42
2.36
2.75
2.71

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

2.60

40

2.025
2.025
1.825
2.20
2.75
2.05
2.50
2.50
2.4-7
2.50
2.50
3.20
2.80
2.50

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Helpers and laborers
Bricklayers' tenders ...................
Building laborers ......................
Elevator constructors' helpers ..........
Plasterers' laborers ...................
Tile layers' helpers ...................




1.48
1.38
1.90
1.48
1.65

40
40
40
40
40

Rak&U&l

Classification

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
Dough mixers, ovenmen ..............
Benchmen .........................
Agreement B:
Dough mixers, journeymen bakers .....
Helpers ........... ..............
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread and cake department:
Mixers, ovenmen ................
Ingredient scalers, bench hands ....
Ovenmen, cake (second class) .....
Divider and moulder operators
(bread) ................. .
Bread wrappers .................
Oven feeders (cake) .............
Pan greasers ...................
Bakery helpers (men and women) ...
Agreement B:
Bread and cake department:
#
Mixers, ovenmen, icing makers ....
Dividermen (bread) ..............
Ingredient scalers, oven dumpers
(bread) .....................
Mouldermen (bread) ..............
Oven dumpers (cake) .............
Coolermen, bakery helpers, pan
greasers .....................
Flour blenders (cake) ...........
Pan greasers (cake) .............
Wrappers and icers (women) .......
Agreement C:
General utilitymen ................
Mixers ...........................
Ovenmen ..........................
Machine operators and cake bench
hands ..........................
Oven loaders and dumpers ...........
Ingredient scalers, bread panners,
dough mixers' helpers .............
Pan greasers .....................

Table C-205:
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per

Bah&Ued,- Go*UiH44*d

Classification

week

$1,867
1.80

45
45

1.188
.854

48
48

1.415
1.39
1.315

40
40
40

1.28
1.205
1.155
1.118
1.068

40
40
40
40
40

1.39
1.25

40
40

1.18
1.155
1.10

40
40
40

1.10
1.075
1.00
.885

40
40
40
40

1.37
1.32
1.29

40
40
40

1.27
1.22

40
40

1.17
1.02

40
40

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement D:
Bread department:
Oven operators, dough mixers,
doughnut machine operators ....
Bench hands, moulder and divider
operators.... ..............
Ingredient scalers, oven feeders ...
Flour handlers, pan washers .....
Pie and pastry:
Doughnut shops:
Agreement A:
Doughnut-machine operators ......
Packers (women) ............. .
Agreement B:
Foremen .......................
Mixers, machine operators .......
Bakery helpers .................
Doughnut fryer ................
Packers and helpers (women) .....
Crackers and cookies:
* Mixing department:
Working foremen...... ............
Mixers ..... ..... ................
Mixers' helpers ............... .
Flour dumpers ....................
Baking department:
Bakers, peelers, machine captains ....
Ovenmen and reliefmen .............
Fig grinders, ingredient scaler
helpers .......................
Cracker-meal miller helpers,
pan cleaners ...................
Icing department:
Working foremen, machine operators ...
Icing mixers....... ............ ..
Trolly stickers and dippers ........
Delmarvia operators .......... .
Packing department:
Head floormen..... ..............
Utilitymen ......................
Checkers ........................
Sponge packers, handlers ...........
Relief girls - packing gang, other
women help (after 30 days) .......

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,445

40

1.395
1.345
1.225

40
40
40

1.15
.85

40
40

1.54
1.28
1.055
1.20
.92

40
40
40
40
40

1.425
1.375
1.175
1.00

40
40
40
40

1.375
1.275

40
40

1.175

40

1.00

40

1.275
.955
.905

40
40
40
40

1.375
1.20
1.055
1.005

40
40
40
40

.805

40

1 .0 2 5

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22,

C:
Table C-2082:

Table C-27:

M & U JI4SQ44&U

Classification

Brewers, fermenting and kettle room
men -----............ ........... ......
Chauffeurs:
K e g ........................... ......
Helpers ...........................
Trailer ...............................
Helpers ...........................
Grain dryers ............................
Machine bottlers, floormen and
reliefmen.............................
Washhouse and racking room men ...........

Table C-27:

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$64.00




Table C-42:

55.00
51.00
62.00
56.00
66.00

40
40
40
40
40

Artatokt>Utcfl d > a >A
bU el

62.00
64.00

40
40

Classification

Hours
per
veek

$1,425
1.40

40
45

Building construction:
Concrete mixers .......................
Dump excavating .......................
Coal and fuel oil delivery ...............
Helpers .......... .

1.40
1.45
1.21
1.07

40
40
40
40

Department store .........................
Helpers .................. .
Distillery .............. .......... .
Furniture - retail .......................
Helpers ............................ .
General - freight.......... .............
Helpers .................................

1.425
1.15
1.775
1.26
1.14
1.475
1.27

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Grocery:
Retail ...............................
Helpers .........................
Wholesale ............................
Helpers ...........................

1.70
1.422
1.30
1.075

45
45
40
40

Meat:
Hotel and restaurant supply ...........
Packaging - contract hauling ..........

Hour8
per
veek

Rate
per
hour

Armored car ..............................
Bakery - biscuit.........................

Rate
per
hour

40

1.64
1.64

40
40

Milk and ice cream:
Special delivery ......................
Newspaper (city) ........... .............
Helpers ................. ....... .....

1.075
1.625
1.475

44
40
40

Oil:
Agreement A (transport) ...............
Agreement B ..........................
Agreement C (fuel oil) .................

1.55
1.70
1.70

48
40
40

Plumbing and heating:
Agreement A and B .....................
Helpers ...........................
Agreement C ..........................
Railway express .............. ...........
Helpers .................... ..........

1.35
1.225
1.45
1.702
1.546

40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Newspapers:

Rate
per
hour

$0.98
1.86
2.10
2.10

40
40
40
40

Hand compositors, machine operators
and tenders:
Day v o r k ...........................
Night vork .........................
Mailers:
Day vork ...........................
Night vork .........................
Photoengravers:
Day vork ...........................
Night vork .........................
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ............................
Night vork .........................
Stereotypers:
Day vork ...........................
Night vork .........................

$2,495
2.632

36 7/ic
36 7/N

1.775
2.029

40
35

2.733
2.893

37*
37*

2.373
2.543

37*
35

2.373
2.543

37*
35

Hours
per
veek

Book and job shops:
Bindery v o m e n .........................
Bookbinders ..........................
Compositors, hand .....................
Electrotypers .........................
Mailers:
Day work ..........................
Night vork .........................
Machine operators and tenders .........
Photoengravers ........................
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder presses
(over 31 inches) .................
Platen and small automatic
presses ..........................
Pressmen, cylinder:
Single color press
(over 31 inches) .................
Small automatic presses
(up to 31 inches) ................
Pressmen, platen ......................
Stereotypers .........................

P/UttUtUf . Continued

•and JtUpmM.

P/U 4ttilU f

Classification

Union Wage Scales - Continued,

Table C-41: Jlccal <
7'UZ4lAit

1.775
2.029
2.10
2.547

40
35
40
37*

1.71

40

1.37

40

2.10
1.95
1.79
2.419

40
40
40
37*

O p& iatuuj. CmfUodfmml

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
veek

Operators and conductors:
1-man cars and buses:
First 3 months ......................
4 to 6 months ......................
7 to 12 months ......................
After 1 year .......................

$1.43
1.53
1.58
1.63

42*
42*
42*
42*

2-man cars:
First 3 months ......................
4 to 6 months .......................
7 to 12 months .......... ...........
After 1 year ........................

1.38
1.48
1.58
1.58

42*
42*
42*
42*

23

C:
Table C-44:

-

Table C-44:

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week 2/

D ry ca rg o and p a sse n g e r v e s s e ls 3 /
Deck departm ent:
Day men:
B o a tsw a in s :
V e s s e ls o f 1 5 ,0 0 0 - 2 0 ,0 0 0 ton s . . .
V e s s e ls o f 1 0 ,0 0 0 - 1 5 ,0 0 0 to n s . . .
V e s s e ls tinder 1 0 ,0 0 0 ton s ...............
B o a tsw a in 's m ates .......................................
C a rp e n te rs :
V e s s e ls o f 1 5 ,0 0 0 -2 0 ,0 0 0 to n s . . .
V e s s e ls o f 1 0 ,0 0 0 - 1 5 ,0 0 0 ton s . . .
V e s s e ls under 1 0 ,0 0 0 ton s ...............
C a rp e n te r's msufces .......................................
S to re k e e p e rs ..................................................
Watch men:
A ble seamen ....................................................
B o a tsw a in 's mates .......................................
O rd in a ry seamen ...........................................
Q uarte rm asters ..............................................
Watchmen ...........................................................
Engine-room departm ent:
Day men:
Deck e n g in e e r ................................................
E l e c t r i c i a n s ..................................................
Firem en (c o a l) ..............................................
Firem en ( o i l ) ................................................
M aintenance e l e c t r ic i a n s ........................
R e f r ig e r a t io n e n g in e e r s ...................... ....
S t o r e k e e p e r s ......... ........................................
U n lice n s e d j u n io r e n g in e e rs ..................
W ipers ...............................................................
Watch men:
Firem en - watertenders .........
O ile r s (steam ) .............................................
O ile r s ( d ie s e l) ...........................................
S te w a rd 's departm ent:
A s s is t a n t cooks ..................................................
C h ie f cooks ..........................................................
C h ie f stew ards ....................................................
Messmen and u t i l i t y m e n ...................................




*7a < + h A {L O

sU

-

Tabl. C-U!

Type o f s h ip , departm ent and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

R a ts
per
month

Hours
per
week 2 /

Ta n k ers 4 / - C ontinued

$356.95
3 5 1.68
3 33.73
294.42

44
44
44
44

3 1 9.67
3 1 3.68
2 9 9.51
2 9 3.52
2 8 9.53

44
44
44
44
44

2 6 2.89
2 7 7 .7 7

44
44
44
44
44

226.26
2 6 2.89
2 6 2.89
2 9 9.51
4 1 8 .7 2
2 5 9 .5 6
2 4 9.56
3 4 2 .1 4
3 8 5.42
289.53
3 3 2.81
2 5 9.56

44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44

262.89
2 6 2.89
2 8 6 .5 4

44
44
44

259.56
2 9 9.51
3 2 5.63

44
44
44
44

226.26

Tankers 4 /
Deck departm ent:
Day men:
B o atsw ains ......................................................
C a rp e n te rs ................................................
Deck m aintenance men (AB) ......................
Watch men:
A b le seamen ....................................................
O rd in a ry seamen ............................................
Q u arte rm asters ..............................................
Engine-room departm ent:
Day men:
E l e c t r ic ia n s ..................................................
M a ch in is ts ......................................................
S to re k e e p e rs ..................................................
U n lice n s e d ju n io r e n g in e e rs ..................
W ipers ...............................................................

O & e& H

fystlib&M A&d P& M onnel A - GotUm um d
/

fystU b e ttA & d P & U O H H + l U
Type o f s h ip , departm ent and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n

Union Wage Scales • C o n tin u e d

3 4 4.49
324.63
2 8 6.19

266.21
2 3 2.92
2 7 2.87
4 1 8.72
342.13
292.85
3 3 2.81
259.55

44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44

Engine-room departm ent: - Continued
Watch men:
Firem en .............................................................
O ile r s (steam ) ..............................................
W atertenders ..................................................
U n lic e n s e d ju n io r e n g in e e rs ..................
S te w a rd 's departm ent:
A s s is t a n t cooks ..................................................
C h ie f cooks ...........................................................
C h ie f stew ards ....................................................
Messmen and u t i l i t y m e n ...................................

$259.55
266.21
2 6 6.21
2 9 9.50

44
44
44
44

2 79.52
3 1 2.84
3 4 5.62
226.25

44
44
44
44

C o l l i e r s 5/
Deck departm ent:
Day men:
B o atsw ains ......................................................
Watch men:
A b le seamen ....................................................
O rd in a ry seamen ...........................................
Q u arte rm asters ..............................................
Engine-room departm ent:
Day men:
Firem en (c o a l) ..............................................
Firem en ( o i l ) ................................................
M aintenance e l e c t r ic i a n s ........................
W ipers ...............................................................
Watch men:
Firem en - w a te rten d e rs ............................
S te w a rd 's departm ent:
C h ie f cooks ...........................................................
C h ie f stew ards ................................................
Messmen and u t ilit y m e n ...................................
Second c o o k s ........................................................

333.73

44

266.21
2 3 6.24
2 62.89

44
44
44

2 6 5.69
25 9.55
34 2.13
2 6 1.10

44
44
44
44

2 7 2.87

44

3 0 2 .8 4
3 3 8.86
226.25
269.53

44
44
44
44

1/ Wage scales and hours per week are those in effect on
July 16, 1951, for Atlantic and Gulf Coast ship operators
under contracts with the National Maritime Union, CIO. De­
tails of changes are given in the footnotes following. The
Wage Stabilization Board has to date not approved any simi­
lar changes for members of the Seafarers International
Union, AFL.
All ratings listed receive additional payment in
accordance with the following conditions:
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per­
cent or more of dead weight carrying capacity, $5
per voyage is added. (On vessels carrying sul­
phur, cement, cyanide, etc., in bulk lots of 1000
tons or over, members of the SIU are paid the
same as those on vessels carrying explosives.)

Q

c

&

o h

^ J ia n if ia r U

'l4stlic<e4U<*d P & U o n n * l U

'

- Qo*Ui*u*ed

3.

On vessels operating in described areas of China
coastal waters, a per diem allowance of $2.50 and
an "area bonus" of 100 percent of daily wages is
added. Also, on vessels operating within certain
designated areas of French Indo-China coastal
waters, a per diem allowance of $5 is added.
4. On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by
mines of either belligerent, resulting in physi­
cal damage to the vessel or injury to a crew
member, a "vessel attack bonus" of $125 shall be
paid to each crew member.
2/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea. At sea, watch men and the steward's de­
partment normally work 56 hours a week, and receive overtime
pay for 4 hours on Saturday and 8 on Sunday. Day men at sea
normally work a 44-hour week. In port, all receive overtime
rates for work on Saturday and Sunday. Maximum straighttime hours at sea of 40 a week, approved by WSB effective
December 16, 1951, will result in overtime pay for 8 hours
on Saturday for all members.
2/ Wages reflect percentage increases of 3.7 effective
June 16 and 2.5 effective July 15, 1951, totaling 6.2 based
on January 1950 rates. Hours reflect reduction from 48 to
44 a week for watch men and the steward's department effec­
tive June 16. These actions were approved by WSB in Sep­
tember and October 1951.
4/ Wages reflect a 6.2 percent increase over January 1950
rates, and hours a reduction from 48 to 44 for watch men arid
the steward's department, effective July 15, 1951. Both
actions were approved by WSB in October 1951. Differences in
the contract of the SIU were formerly as follows:
1. Wage scales did not include a $3.50 a month in­
crease paid NMU members.
2. Carpenters were paid the same as Boatswains, i.e.,
$321.80 a month.
Wages reflect a 6.2 percent increase over January 1950
rates, and hours a reduction from 48 to 44 for watch men and
the steward's department, effective July 16, 1951. Both
actions were approved by WSB in October 1951. The SIU has
no contracts with collier operators.

Table C-446:

S t & A e d & U iU f

Classification
Longshoremen:
General cargo .........................
Bulk cargo, cement and lime in bags,
including ballast ....................
Copra, damp hides, creosoted lumber and
products ............................
Refrigerator space cargo (temperature
freezing or lower) ...................
Coal, hauled from ship's hold
to bunker ............................
Old coal, restricted spaces ............
Damaged cargo and explosives ...........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2.00

40

2.05

40

2.15

40

2.20

40

2.00

40
40
40

2.52
3.90

D:
Ta b le D - l :

Entrance Rates

E:

M in im u m SjU b a n ce R a ta l fob P la n t W m Us M 1/

Supplementary Wage Practices

T a b le E - i :

S h ift

P e rc e n t o f p la n t w orkers in e sta b lish m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d

Minimum rate (in cents)

Under 4 0 ...............
4 0 .....................
Over 40 and under 45 ....
45 .....................
Over 45 and under 50 ....
5 0 .....................
Over 50 and under 55 ....
5 5 .....................
Over 55 and under 60 ....
6 0 .....................
Over 60 and under 65 .....
65 .....................
Over 65 and under 70 ....
7 0 .....................
Over 70 and under 75 ....
75 .....................
Over 75 and under 80 ....
8 0 .....................
Over 80 and under 85 ....
85 .....................
Over 85 and under 90 ....
9 0 .....................
Over 90 and under 95 ....
95 .....................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
1 0 0 ....................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
1 0 5 ....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
n o ....................
Over n o and under 115 ...
n 5 ....................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
1 2 0 ....................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 ....................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
1 3 0 ....................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
135 and over ...........
Establishments with no
established minimum ....

10 0 *0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

23.3
10.0
10.6

2.8
_
70.2
1.7
2.9
4.5
_
3.5
1.3

8.7
8.0
_
10.0
8.3
n.o
6.2
-

_
2.0
-

_

100.0

1 .4

-

-

_
2.5
2.7
2.9
4.0
6.0
8.3
26.6
-

3.1
.1
2.8
.6
1.6
14.2
3.8

_

-

-

5.3
2.0
36.8
2.9

.3
.9
.3
.8
2.1
( /)
2
.1
.1
2.4
1.6
1.6
1.6
.8
(2/)
16.2
.1
2.4
2.2
1.4
2.1
3.0
2.3
1.1
1.9
4.9
2.9
3.3
(2 / )

.1
10.8

5.1

2 4 .8

21.5
9.8
-

_
-

-

1 0 .4

_
_
6 .0

.4
28.0
_
_
2.3

3.4
_
_
.9
44.0
_
_
2.2
3.2
8.0
1.7
7.6
2.8
.7
3.6
.9
3.9
-

100.0

100. Q

5.1
2.9
5.7
7.1
10.2
12.2
3.9
n .3
5.7
n.o
.6

n.5
5.5
8.5
4.4
18.8
.9
1.0
2.0
n.5
_
8.8
2.1
8.6
_
_
1.6
_
_
2.2
_
3.1

6 .9
6 .2
1 .0
5 .4

_
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

2.7
5.4
-

27.7
6.6
_
10.5

_
5.7
_
_
.
15.0

1.2
2.9
3.2
3.1
3.6
-

.
_
.
-

3.0

30.2

3.1

1 .8

5.0

ic t u r in g in diis t r i e s 1 /
S h ift d if f e r e n t ia

A ll
in d u s t r ie s

D urable
goods

Nondurable
goods

Ind us t r i a
ch e m ica ls

F e rro u s
fo u n d rie s

iin can s
and o th er
tin w are

2d 3d or
2d 3d o r
2d 3d o r
2d 3d or
2d 3d or
2d 3d o r
s h i f t o th e r s h i f t o th er s h i f t o th e r s h i f t o th e r s h i f t o th er s h i f t o th e r
s h if t
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
P e rc e n t o f w orkers on
e x tr a s h i f t s , a n
e s ta b lis h m e n ts ...............

17r7 ?T? 22,?

R e c e iv in g s h i f t
d i f f e r e n t i a l s ............. 1 7 .6
U niform ce n ts
(p e r hour) ........... 11.0
Under 4 c e n ts . . .
.3
4 c e n ts ............... 6 .7
5 c e n ts ................ 2 .4
6 c e n t s ................
.3
Over 6 and under
10 c e n ts .........
.4
.8
10 ce n ts ..............
Over 10 cents . . .
.1
Uniform p e rc e n t­
age ..........................
Under 5 p e r­
c e n t ..................
5 p e rc e n t ............
Over 5 and under
10 p e rc e n t . . .
10 p e rc e n t .........
Over 10 p e r­
cent . . . . . . . . .
R e c e iv in g no d i f f e r ­
e n t i a .................................

6.6

8.8

.2

1 7 f8 20,9

0.6 2t5

2 8 .0

13.9

9 .8

2 2 .3

1 2 .4

8 .5

4 .9

1 7 .6

20.8

.6

.4

2 8 .0

1 3 .9

8.0

1 3 .9
.3
9 .9

9.6

5 .2
.4
.7
3 .1

4 .9
_
.4

1 7 .6
_
1 .5

20.8

.4

2 8 .0

1 3 .9

_

.6
_
_
_

_
_
_

4 .3
5 .7
_

1.0

7 .2
-

.6
_
-

.4

1 8 .0
-

1 1 .3

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

.3
.9
5 .1

1.0

2.0
-

-

.3
.3
7 .3

.5

-

1.2

1.8

8.4

2.8

.3

1 .7

1 .1

( 2/ )

.8

.8
.5
.4

.3
.4

.5

1 .1

5.1

2.0
.6

16 .1
_

_
1 .5

12 .1

1 .4
-

-

-

.2

.5

-

.6

.4
1 .7

1.0

3.0

.4 4.6

_
_

1.6

3 .3
1 .3
-

_

-

_

2.0

_
_

_

_
_

.3

1 .3

_

.2

.2

.1

.7

.1

.1

(2/)

3.1
‘

-

_
-

_
_
_
_
-

6.5

1/ Low est r a t e s fo r m a lly e s t a b lis h e d f o r h i r in g e it h e r men o r women p la n t w o rke rs, o th e r than
watchmen.
2 / E x c lu d e s d a ta f o r f in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
2 / L e s s than .05 o f one p e rc e n t.
*
T r a n s p o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a il r o a d s ) , co usnunication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




p M iu iiia n l

P e rce n t o f p la n t w orkers employed on each s h i f t in -

Manufac turing
m
Nondurable
Durable
indus­
Whole­
____ goods______ ___ goods______
Public
Retail Serv­
tries
Esi.ablishmezits with _
sale
utilities*
trade ices
2/
501 or 101-500 501 or
trade
101-500
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers

All establishments ...... 1 0 0 10

^ b if f e A ^ i U c U

l/
2/

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r in d u s t r ie s o th e r than tho se shown s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than .0 5 o f one p e rc e n t.

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

25,

Table E-2:

PERCENT OF OFFICE

S c h e d u le d

if

W

j& e Je h f J lo u / iA

WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

I

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M an u f actu rin g

Weekly hours

All
indus­
tries

All establishments .................... .

100.0

Under 35 hours .........................
35 hours ...............................
Over 35 and under 37$- hours ............
37$- hours,.................. ......... ..
Over 37$- and under 40 hours ............
4 0 h o u r s ............ ..................
Over 4 0 hours and under 44 hours ...... .
44 hours ..............................
Over 44 and under 48 h o u r s ............ .
48 hours,..............................
Over 4B hours ........................

0.1
2.8
3.7
18.3
5.0
66.2

1/

Durable
goods

All

2.4
1.3
.2
0/)

100,0

100.0

1.2

2.1
-

.4
4.3

3.5

4.9

2.9
87.7
1.7
1.8

M an ufactu re

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

89.5
-

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

-

1.0
5.2
-

85.2
4.2
4.4

-

-

caT )

0 .7
72.2

.6
26.3
.2

100,0

-

100.0 - 100.0 _ 100.0

100.0

„

.

100.0

100.0

_

100,0

_

0.3
.

3.5

1.8
9.7
5.4
83.1
-

-

-

-

-

-

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0 ! 100.0

2/

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

-

12.3
.7
64.6
13.0
4.4
1.3
.2

7.1
11.0
6.0
10.8
65.1

6.2

-

17.3
12.4
50.0
5.4 1
5.1 I
2.1

.

.

•

1.0
4.0 !
.1
74.4
3.7
2.4
4.5
8*4
1.2

Retail
trade

Services

1.1
_
5.6

1.6
3.7

_
84.8
.5
1.5
1.4
5.1
1.4

90.6
_

_
1.3
2.5

0.7

4.6

73.5
1.6
4.5
1.7
10.0
4.1

_
_

_

_

9.4

5.5

72.7
15.7
3.3
7.1
1.2

81.4
3.6
2.9
8.8

45.2
5.9

2.2

1.2

35.2
11.0
11.0
6.9
27.8
1.9

12.5
25.8

Data relate to women workers.

2j includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
j/
*
**

Lass than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3:

ftaud tJfolodayd.
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

All
indus­
tries

All

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All

,p

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

0

M anufactu rin ’ -

M an u f a ctu r in g

Number of paid holidays

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

66.8

95.5

90.8

92.0

82.9

77.3

11.0
64.7

6.3
26.5

7.1

42.6

1.9
66.3
14.7

49.9
21.0

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Services

10 days ...............................................................................
12 days .....................
12fr d^s ....................
13 or more days ...............
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ...........................

]/

%j
*
M

100.0

100.0

99.3

100.0

10Q.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.4
35.7
.2
20.4
1.8
14.6
5.8
5.7
2.3
5.7
-

4.7

3.0

_

50.7

52.0

.6
36.9

_

7.4
1.4

48.0
_
_

9.0
48.0
2.0
13.7
.

23.0
4.3

_
10.5
-

2.8
•

53.1
3.8
29.2
-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

.
4

-

-

“

-

-

.2

.7

Inoludes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6.3
32.0
•

25.7
10.4
8.7
3.5
13.4

“

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.5

100.0

96.7

79.4

1.5
83.6
-

8.4
-

-

“
6.5

.1
9.9
-

11.0
3.1
11.3
16.1
-

8.8
21,8

17.9

(/
g)

15.4
63.1
-

12.4
-

5.8
-

6.8
45.5
-

b

100.0

76.4
3.7
46.9

-

17.5
1.2
2.8
.8
2.7

21.9
1.3
2.6

—
.
6

-

“

1.0
.5

3.3

20.6

-

23.6

1

9 d a y s ........................ ........................................................

100.0

8

1 to 5} days ........................
6$- days ........................ .
7 days
...... .. ........... .
7$- days ........................... ....

100.0

O

Establishments providing paid
holidays ..........................

100.0

rH

....................

8

1

All establishments

.

38.0
-

28.8
-

-

-

33.2

-

8.3
3.9
7.6
-

-

4.5

-

3.3
-

8.7
2.8

24.2

5.7
8.7
4.6

9.2

-

20.0
8.7
4.3
8.6
.7

-

8.0

-

2.1
-

4.3

“
“

~
-

17.1

22.7

“

Occupational Wage Surrey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

26 ,

V&c&U&nl (fyoimal P/UHritio*U)

Table e -4*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

Vacation policy

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—
M an u f actu r in g

M an u f a ctu r in g

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

AH

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

43 a

61.4

31.4

53 a

49.5

34.7
8a

7.7
53.7

-

-

35.0
8.3
9.8

25.5
21.8
2.2

-

3.2
21.2
1.4
5.6

38.6

68.6

46.9

96^4

87a

100.0

51.9

65.6
11.0
23.4

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ....

69.0

70.7

71.2

69.6

86.7

38.8

59.4

72 a

60.6

41.4

35.9

32.3

Under 1 w e e k .... ........ ........
1 week •.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ........
2 weeks ............. ...... ••••••

13.8
35.4
13.4
6.4

16.8
35.1
17.6
1.2

13.6
31.2
26.1
.3

23.3
43.1

.5
84.9

9.3
20.9
22.2
19.7

36.5
21.9
1.1
1.1

19.6
12.2
9.4
•2

11.4
2.6
18.3

1.3

40.1
11.8
7.5
-

19.2
4.6
12.1

3.2

1.9
24.7
5.4
6.8

Establishments with no paid vacations ..

31.0

29.3

28.8

30.4

13.3

61.2

40.6

27.9

39.4

58.6

64.1

67.7

56.9

99.7

99.7

100.0

99.2

100.0

98.9

100.0

99.9

98.8

97.6

99.6

100.0

98.9

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

25.4
18.1
56.2

11.5
26.7
61.8

54.6

12.5

29.6

5.9
94.0

36.9
15.4
46.5

-

-

-

-

.3

.3

99.7

99.7

100.0

99.2

_

_

_

_

10.4
8.2
80.7
•4

12.3
21.2
66.2

5*7
26.7
67.6

26.1
9.9
63.2

-

-

-

All establishments ................. .

All

‘P
‘

100.0

100.0

100.0

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

„ 100,0

6 montfrg pf pqnto.

1 ywff

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

50.5

.fiscntea

Establishments with paid vacations •••••
Under 1 w e e k .........•••••.......
1 week ..••••••.......
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....... .
2 weeks ..........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 w e e k s .................... .
Establishments with no paid vacations ..

23.3
7.8
68.6

1.1
80.6
18.3

_

2.3
82.3
12a
2.9

-

-

-

2.3

-

1.1

3.6

12.6

98.9

96.4

87.4

4.5
85.7

87.5

69.3

70.0
7.9
22.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8

-

la

-

.1

1.2

2.4

a

99.9

98.8

97.8

99.6

100.0

2.3
62.6
22.3
12.4

la
66.8
22.9
9.2

4.5
54.4
21.2
18.8

-

-

-

-

-

2.3

ia

3.6

12.6

98.9

96.4

89.9

_

44.6

_

-

-

35.0

-

-

8.7

59.1

-

84 a

_

1.5
72.7
9.4
13.6
a
.3

-

35.5

-

-

70.4
.9
11.6
1.2

15.9

2 vears of service

Establishments with paid vacations
Under 1 week... ......... • •
••
1 week... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .......
2 weeks.................. ...
Over 2 and under 3 weeks • • • • • • • • • • •
3 weeks .............................................. • • • • • • • • • • •
Establishments with no paid vacations • •

-

-

-

-

-

.8

100.0

_

98.9

_

100.0

_

4.3

23.6

-

-

95.7

75.3

78.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.1

21.3

-

_

•8
-

97.4
1.7

“

-

-

a

22.3
13.4
63.1
-

1.5
52.8
15.3
27.8
.1
.3

-

1.2

2.2

.4

98.8

98a

99.6

100.0

_

1.0
9.3
, .1
61.2
2.9
23.6

1.5
2.0

1.1

67.0
3.6
25.5

73.3
5.4
20.2

.3

.3

99.8

99.7

100.0

99.2

_

_

_

_

_

1.2

.1

13.1

16.0

.7

18.1

48.9

14.9

37.2

67.8

67.7

-

-

-

67.3
13.2

49.7

16.2

-

_

100.0

87.5

64.0
9.5
12.8
1.2

_

«.

19.3

42.8

-

-

74.8

44.6

31.2
1.3
67.5

-

-

“

-

-

12.5

i S aflpa-qft . samsa
k

Establishments with paid vacations • • •
••
Under 1 week...... ....... .
1 week.......... ........
Over 1
under 2 weeks • • • • • •
•••••
2 weeks............. .
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......
3 weeks.... ........... .
Over 3 weeks....... •••• • • • •
••••
Establishments with no paid vacations •
•
\ f

*
**

3.7
•2
54.0

3.3
37.3
1.3
.2

.4
•4
60.4
7.8
30.7

-

•6
66.0
11.5
21.9

_

_

49.1

100.0

-

85.0

_
_

100.0

99.9

_
.
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

26.5
5.0

.
3

-

.8

-

-

-

.1

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0

,*
2
1.2

1.9

—

-

«
*

2a

_

5.8

7.6

23.6

54.7

40.2

34.1

26.1

—

55.0

36.0

—

-

"

-

-

-

.
4

-

1.1

3.6

_
—

-

100.0

_
19.3

—

63.7

-

92.2

_
62.2
.9
19.3
9.8

-

-

-

10.1

-

7.8

17.0

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, M . June 1951
d,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

27,

Jdj&G&e

Table E-5:

( r f o b m a l P a *h U & 4 & m A>)

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN —

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ......................
6

Manufacturing

Ail
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Finance**

Services

Manufacture

AH
All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 .8
.9

0 .5

"y

1 0 0 .0 i 1 00.0

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole-

Retail

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 2 .8
5 .5
3 .5
3 .8

2 .5
2 .0

months of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick loave ..................
Under 5 days .........................
5 days ...............................
6 days ...............................
7 days ...............................
8 days ................................
10 days ..............................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

1 8 .5

2 5 .1

2 3 .2

2 9 .2

1.1*
.2
1 .2

2 5 . 1*
2 .0
1 6 .8
.1*

1 9 .2
6 .6
8 .6
l*.o

1 6 .6

1 .2
1 0 .7

.7
1 3 .1

1 0 .8

2 .0

5 .6

2 .2
3 .5

8 .3
-

l* .l

6 .7
2 .1

8 1 .5

7U.9

7 6 .8

7 0 .8

29.7
1 .8
.7
.3

26 .9

3 5 .6
5.1*
2 .3

7 2 .8

9 .8
_
7 .9
9 .2
70 .3

1 .6
_
1 1 .6
13~7
73 .1

37.1*
2 .1
5 .3
1 .2
.5
5 .6
1 .3
2 .7
11 .7
7 .0
6 2 .6

31*.5
1 .8
.7
.3
3 .3
1 .8
9 .5
1 7 .1
6 5 .5

31*. 0

1*2.1*

.*
.*

31*. 5
7?
.3
2 .3
1 .7
1 .0

2 8 .9

28 .5

33 .2

18^5

81*. 8

27.2

8 .6

8 .2

5 7 .6

6 5 .5

6 6 .0

61*. 1*

H
*.Q

1*1*.7

5 7 .0

7 5 .2

l.l*
.8
2.1;

-

-

-

2 .3
1 8 .1
.

-

9 8 .6

-

6 .2
7lt.6

-

80 .8

-

1 3 .5
1 .2

-

1 .9
83.1*

1 8 .2
2 .6
•1*
1 5 .2
-

81.8

1 .0

.5

-

(2 /)
71*
9 7 .2

.
-

.5

9 9 .5

-

1 0 0 .0

1 .5
-

1 .5
9 6 .5

-

1 0 0 ,0

1 6 .2
-

1 3 .6

j

- !
- 1
1 .1 !
1 .5
8 7 .2
8 3 .8

l*.5
-

9 5 .5

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................. .
Under 5 days ........................ .
5 and 5i days ....................... .
6 days .............................. .
7 and 8 days ........................ .
10 days ....................... .
12 days .............................
15 days ..............................

2 days
0
Over 20
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............... .

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e............ ..
Under 5 days ......... .............

| days ....................
^
6.
.............................
and 8 days .................... .
10 days ..........................
11 and 12 days .....................
15 days ............................
20 days
Over 20
74

Establishments with no fprmal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................
1 5 years o f service
Establishments with formalprovisions
for paid sick leave .................. .
Under 5 d a y s ......... ...............
5 days .............................. .
6 days ...............................
$ and 8 d a y s ........................
10 days ..............................
11 and 12 days ...................... .
1 5 d a y s ............................. .
17 days ..............................
20 days ................. ......... .
Over 20 days ........................ .

7

Establishments with no formal provisions
f paid sick leave... ....... .
or

1/
2/

*
**

2 7 .2

2 .1
7 .9
1 .5
.1*
7.1*
.8
3.1*
3 .1

1 .6
.2
3 .1
1 1
1
1 .6

-

-

•
.
.

_
-

.8

—

7 .9
2 5 .3
6 6 .0

3U.0
_
-

.8

-

-

1.1*
.
.

1 .0

1 .2

26 .9

.2

-

•
-

I
61*. 1*
3 5 .6
5.1*
2 .3
1 .0
8.1*
5 .7
1 2 .8
-

61*.!*
3 5 .6
2T3
1 .0

-

5.1*
5.1*
3 .0
-

-

_
-

9 8 .6
5 6 .8
-

1 .2
.2
•

5 2 .6
2 .8
1*3.2
8 6 .0
7
1 .2
-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5 5 .3
1 .3
1 0 .2
2 .2
.8
3 0 .9
_
5 .7
1*.2
l*lt.7

3 8 .2
ll*.3
9 .5
1 0 .6

21*. 8
21.7

21*. 7
•
3 .0

3 .8

1 .9
1 .2

6 .5
1 5 .2

5 5 .3
1 .3
1 0 .2
2 .2
1 7 .9
.8
1 7 .0
1 .7
1*.2
1*1*.7

3 8 .2
ll*.3
l*.o
1 0 .6

-

-

61 .8

75.2

75.3

5 5 .3
7.*7
.1*
1 7 .9
.8

1*3.0
1*78
11*.0

21*. 8
1375

1*.8

1 .9
1 .2

21*. 7
370
6 .5

.
-

-

_
-

-

6 1 .8

-

1*.8
3 .7

-

1 0 .8

.

-

21*. 8
1 3 .5
1 0 .1
1 .2

*.
3 .0
6 .5
1572

-

-

9 5 .2

7
9 8 .5

1 0 0 .0

95 .5

10 0 .0

21 7

3 .8

3.1*

1*.5
3 .0

7 .5

-

7 .1
1 .7
.5
1*1
(!7 )
71 *

-

.5

7

-

_

1 .5

_
_

2 .3

3.1*

9 2 .9

9 6 .2

9 6 .6

9 5 .5

7 .5
9 2 .5

1 0 .3

3 .8

3.1*

1*.5

3 1 .8

I

_
-

I

-

7h
u

i

-

&
8 9 .7

.
_

•
-

_
-

.7
1 .5
1 .0

.

(2 /)
71*
.7
.6

75.3

1 .0

“

1 .5

_
_
_

-

15 .2

.5

-

-

_
-

_

-

1*.5
3 .0

.
_
-

7
7 5 .3

-

1 .5
1 .0

.1

-

7
7 5 .2

_
•

1*.8
1 .7
.5
1 .3
(2 /)
lT l

-

-

I

-

21*. 7
.

7 .3
1 .1
1 .1
9 .2
.
3 .8

20.1*
7 .6
-

9 .3
-

3 .5
_
-

2 ~2

7

75 .3

7 9 .6

21*. 7
773
1 .1
1 .1
3 .1
9 .9
272
7 5 .3

2 0 .k

7 .6
973
_

3 .5
-

5 .1
1**6
.
_
-

.5

9l*.9
5 .1
1*76
.
_
_

.5

7 9 .6

9l*.9

21*.l

5 .1
1*.6

21*.7
376
1 .1
1 .1
3 .1

1 3 .0

-

3 .9

_

-

-

-

•
-

3.1*

-

3 1 .8

15*8

7 .2

♦5

2 .3
9 6 .2

9 6 .6

95 .5

6 8 .2

7 5 .3

7 5 .9

9l*.9

.5
1 .0
_

.
-

-

1 .5
3 .0
_

_

_
_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

N o n p A c d i U i t U m Bosuti&l

Table 1-6t

PERCEN T OF PLANT W ORKERS EM PLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE W ORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M anufactu rin '

M an u f a ctu r in g

Type of bonus

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Public

All

V

Durable
goods

All

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Non­
durable
goods

Services

All establisfaments..................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / .......................

33.9

20.8

19.4

23.6

2.7

45.2

82.8

48.9

33.0

27.6

15.5

14.6

17.2

13.6

48.5

81.6

59,0

Christmas or year-end ..............
Profit-sharing........... ........
Other ............................

31.0
1.3
2.1

20.7
.6

19.4
.5

23.4
1.0

2.5

74.2
8.6
-

43.2
1.3
5.7

33.0

14.6

15.6

12.0

1.4

1.4

1.6

1.6

41.0
3.2
4.3

70.7
10.9
1.3

59.0

-

25.4
1.5
1.4

15.0

.2

39.1
1.9
4.2

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ..........................

66.1

79.2

80.6

76.4

97.3

54.8

17.2

51.1

67.0

72.4

84.5

85.4

82.8

86.4

51.5

18.4

41.0

1/
2/
*
**

-

-

-

-

•

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplloated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities.
Finanoe, insurance, and real estate.

Table E - T j

9 < H d 4 4 /K i4 U > e

G < i P-e*UiOH Piatt*
4 u

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

PERCEN T OF PLANT WORKERS EM PLOYED IN—

M an u f a ctu r in g

Type of plan

All
indus
tries

All

Durable
goods

100.0_

M anufactu rin ’

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail

100.0

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

J kQ Q iQ

100.0

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

1/

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

s

Whole-

Retail

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Services

All establishments ..................

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..................

89.4

94.4

100.0

83.1

96.1

89.8,

89.3

82.4

61.4

89.0

95.0

100.0

85.1

90.9

65.2

85.8

49.2

81.3
42.1
a. 2
61.2

90.1
66.1
60.0
65.8

100.0
84.6
73.3
79.1

70.0
28.6
33.0
38.9

95.9
5.1
3.8
93.8

69.9
40.4
39.5
62.8

66.9
45.1
30.4
52.1

73.2
30.3
45.5
43.7

57.6
45.0
17.9
20.8

80.8
65.0
54.9
63.0

91.5
80,9
71.8
71.3

100.0
95.2
81.2
79.2

74.6
52.6
53.3
55.8

79.7
39.3
24.1
64.5

55.7
39.3
36.2
40.9

58.2
33.3
18.0
56.3

38.8
34.3
24.3
8.7

10.6

5.6

16.9

3.9

10.2

10.7

17.6

38.6

11.0

5.0

14.9

9.1

34.8

14.2

50.8

Life insurance ....................
Health insurance ...................
Hospitalisation ....................
Retirement pension.................
Establishment with no insurance or
pension plans... .............. .

lo o .o

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/
*
**

Unduplicated total.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




m s

100.0

100.0 _100*0_

Occupational Wage Survey, Baltimore, Md.,
Bureau of Labor Statistics

June 1951

29

.

Appendix — Scope and Method of Survey

With the exception of the union scale of rates,
in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used;
these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical,
(b) professional and technical,
(c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4)* The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing;
transportation (except railroads),
communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisons.
As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the study.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.

A greater proportion cf large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired towork the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments)
that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefitst These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

30

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN BALTIMORE, MD., l/, AND NUMBER
STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JUNE 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions...... .........
Manufacturing ........... .............. .....
Durable goods 2/ ............ ..............
Nondurable goods L j ............ ......... .
Nonmanufacturing .............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...............................
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ..... .
Retail trade ..............................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ...... .
Services 2 / .... .......

—
101
101
-

937
227
77
150
710

239
63
25
38
176

241,100
141,600
93,200
48,400
99,500

150 ,4.00
9 2,330

23,9 20
9 ,130

74,800
17,530
58,070

7,270
1,860
14,790

101
21
101
21
21

37
234
81
171
187

21
45
29
37
44

27,800
12,900
30,200
15,600
13,000

23,150
4,250
18,750
6,720
5,200

5,760
1,430
2,100
4,790
710

21
5
21
8
21
21
51
8
8
8
21
8
21
5

9
72

7
36
5
7
6
6
14
11
9
9
13

2,233
5,732
4,082
817
538
4,029
12,067
3,776
480
1,956
7,651
448
4,250
4,014

1,983
3,920
3,637
628
538
3,935
10,930
3,072
327
1,407
3,991
351
2,439
1,269

148
196
425
79
16

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 6/
C a n n i n g ............. ...... ....................
Mens' and boys' suits and coats .................
Industrial chemicals........... ................
Paints and varnishes .......•••••.............••••
Ferrous foundries •••••................. .........
Tin cans and other tinware ....... ...............
Department and women's ready-to-wear stores ••••••
Grocery stores ............................... .
Men's and boys' clothing stores ...........•••••••
Drug stores .....................................
Insurance carriers •••••••••••..... .........
Office building service ............... .........
Power laundries............. .................. .
Auto repair shops .......................... .....

6
8
6
8
22
49
19
55
52
11
34
115

8
14

22

242
1,335

248
63
100
3,180
12
122
170

1/ Baltimore Metropolitan Area (Baltimore city, Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture,and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and miscellan­
eous manufacturing.
i j Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and publish­
ing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.

2/

Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with more than 4 workers were included.




31.

Index
Page
number

Page
number
Adjuster (repairman), sewing machine (men's and boys*
suits and coats .............. ............... ......... ........... .
Adjuster, machine (canning) ........ ...... .............. ...••.•••••
Asbestos worker (building construction) ...... ......... ••••..... ...
Baster, hand (men's and boys* suits and coats) •.... 12, 13
Bench hand (bakeries) .................. ................. ••••••••••.
Biller, m a c h i n e ............. ................. ............. .
Bindery woman (printing) ............................ .............. .
Boatswain (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••••••••••
Body maker (tin cans and other tinware) .......... ............... .
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) ••«•••••••••••••••••••••••
Boilermaker (building construction) ......................... .
Bookbinder (printing) ......... .................... ............. .
Bookkeeper, h a n d ....... ....... ........... ......... ................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ................... ................... •
Bottler (malt liquors) ...... .......... ...........................
Brewer (malt liquors) ....... ............ ............ .
Bricklayer (building construction) ......... ................. 21
Button sewer, hand (men*s and boys* suits and coats)
......
Buttonhole maker, hand (men1s and boys* suits and coats) ..... .
Calculating-machine operator .................................
Carpenter (building construction)
Carpenter (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ..... ......... .
Carpenter, maintenance ....................................... .
Carpenter, maintenance (department and women* s
ready-to-wear stores) ............................
Cashier-wrapper (department and women* s ready-to-wear stores) ......
Cement finisher (building construction) .............................
Chauffeur (malt liquor) ........................... .......... .......
Chemical operator (industrial chemicals) .......... ......... .......
Chipper and grinder (ferrous foundries) ......... .......... •.♦••••••
Cleaner ••«•••...... ............ ......... •••••....... ............ .
Cleaner (office building service) ......... .
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g .......................... •••••..... ....... •••••••
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ..................................
Clerk, drug stores (drug stores) ..... ..............................
Clerk, f i l e ..........................................................
Clerk, g e n e r a l ......... .............. * ............ ••••••...... .
Clerk, grocery (grocery s t o r e s ) ....... ........ ....................
Clerk, meat (grocery stores) •••••••.................................
Clerk, order .........................................................
Clerk, p a y r o l l .........................
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) •••••.... ..........
Clerk, retail, receiving (power laundries) .................... .
Clerk, soda fountain (drug stores) ..... ..................... ......
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) ................... .........
Coater operator (tin cans and other tinware) •••••••••.... •••••••••
Compositor, hand (printing)..... •••••............. .............. .
Conductor (local transit) ••••••••....... .......... ........... .
Cook (canning) ••••.................... .......................... «...
Cook (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••...............
Coremaker, hand (ferrous foundries) ..... .......................... .
Cuber, hand
(canning)•••••.....
Cutter, hand (canning) ..............................................
Cutter (men*s and boys* suits and coats) ...••......................
Cutter and marker (men*s and boys* suits and coats) ••••••••...... .
Die setter (tin cans and other tinware) .......... ................ .
D r a f t s m a n ............................................................
Duplicating-machine operator •••••••................................
Electrician
(buildingconstruction) ..............




13
12
21
21
4
22
23
16
20
21
22
3> 4
3, 4
22
22
13
13
4
21
23
3

17
21
22
14
15
10
19
3, 5
19
13
3, 5
5
17
17
3, 5
3> 5
19
20
18
19
16
22
22
12
23
15
12
12
12
12
16
7
3, 5
21

Electrician (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...............
Electrician, automotive (auto repair shops) ........................
Electrician, maintenance ......... •••••••••••.................... .
Electrician, maintenance (industrial chemicals) ....................
Electro typer (printing) ..................................... ........
Elevator constructor (building construction) ................... ••••
Elevator operator, passenger (department and women*s
ready-to-wear stores) ................................ .............
Elevator operator, passenger (office building service) •••••.......
Engineer (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ................. .
Engineer, stationary ••••••••......................... ............. .
Extractor operator (power laundries) ••••••...... ................. .
Feeder (bakeries) ........ ................................ ..........
Filler, hand (canning) ..............................................
Finisher, flatwork, machine (power laundries) ......................
Finisher, furniture (department and women*s
ready-to-wear stores) ................... ............ ....... ••••••
Finisher, hand (men*s and boys* suits and coats) .... •••••••.......
Fireman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••••••«•••••
Fireman, stationary boiler .......... ................ ...............
Fireman, stationary boiler (office building service) ......... •••••
Fireman, stationary boiler (power laundries)
Fitter (men's and boys* suits and coats) .................. .........
Fitter, men*s garments (men*s and boys* clothing stores) ..........
Fitter, women’s garments (department and women*s
ready-to-wear stores) ................. ••••••.......... .
16
Floorman (malt liquors) .............. ............ ............... .
Flour blender (bakeries) ........................ ....... .......... .
Fruit man (grocery stores) •••••••................... ............ .
Glazier (building construction) ..... ............. ...... .
Grain dryer (malt liquors) ...... ....................... ...........
Greaser (auto repair shops) • •••....................... .............
Guard ................................................................
Guard (industrial chemicals) ........................................
Helper (bakeries) ............................
Helper (building construction) ......................................
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ...... ........... ........... ....... ......
Helper, trades, maintenance.................. ................. .... •
Identifier (power laundries) ........... ............ ............ ....
Inspector, final (examiner) (men*s and boys* suits and coats) ••••••
Janitor ........ .......... ............ . ........... ..................
Janitor (men's and boys* suits and coats) .......... .............. .
Janitor (office building service) .....................
Janitor (tin cans and other tinware) ......... ............. .........
Key-punch operator ••••••••••••••••.....
Labeler, hand or machine (canning) ........ .................. .
Labeler and packer (paints and varnishes) • •........................
Laboratory assistant (industrial chemicals) ••••••••••..............
Laborer (building construction)
Lather (building construction) •••••...........................
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ..........................................
Machine operator (printing) ••••••••.... .............. .............
Machine tender (printing) ••••••....... ........ ....... .............
Machine-tool operator, tool room ................. ••••••.......... .
Machinist (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••••••••••
Machinist, maintenance
...................... ......•••••••••••.
Machinist, maintenance (tin cans and other tinware) .......... ......
Mailer (printing) ......
Maintenance man, general utility ............. ......... ........... • •
Marker (power laundries) ••••••••....... ..........................*•

23
20
8
14
22
21
16, 17
19
23
8
20
21
12
20
16
13
23
8
19
20
12, 13
18
17
21
21
17
21
22
20
10
14
21
21
22
8
20
13 > 14
10
13, 14
19
16
6
12
15
14
21
21
23
22
22
8
23
8
16
22
9
20

32,

Index - Q a * U u u * e d
Page
number

Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) •••••••••.••...... ••••••••
20
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) • •....... ...... ••••»•••••...... .
9
Mechanic, m a i n t e n a n c e ........ ............. .......... ......... .
9
Mechanic, maintenance (canning) ............ ...... ............ ......
12
Messman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) «••••••••••...•••••
23
M i l l w r i g h t ...............
9
21
Mixer (bakeries) ....... .................... ......... .......... .
Mixer (paints and varnishes) ...................................... .
15
Molder (bakeries) ......................... ................... ......
21
15
Molder, floor (ferrous foundries) ..... .............. ..............
Molder, hand, bench (ferrous foundries) ••••••••••••................
15
Motortruck d r i v e r ............••••••............ ....... .
22
Nurse, industrial (registered) •••••.........
7
Office boy .... ..................................... .......... .
3
Office girl ......................
6
23
Oiler (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••..... ..........
Operator (local transit) •••••••••..... ................ ........... .
22
Order f i l l e r .........................................................
10
Ovenman (bakeries) .......
21
P a c k e r ................
10
21
Packer (bakeries) ..................................
Packer (men's and boys’ suits and coats) ......... .
13
Packer, bulk (department and women’s
ready-to-wear stores) ••••••.......
16
Painter (building construction) ...........................
21
Painter, maintenance
...... ••••........ ............ ......... .
9
Pairer and turner (men’s and boys* suits and coats) •••.••••••••••••
13
Paperhanger (building construction) ....... •••••••.......
21
Reeler, hand (canning) .............................
12
Fhotoengraver (printing) ............
22
12
Piler-in (canning) ...........
Pipe fitter, maintenance ...................
9
Pipe fitter, maintenance (industrial chemicals) ........ ....... ..
14
Pitter, hand (canning)
..... .•••••••••......... ........ ....... .
12
Plasterer (building construction) ..............
.......
21
Plumber (building construction)
21
Porter ...................
10
Porter, day (cleaner) (men’s and boys’ suits and coats)«••••»•••••.•
16
Porter, day (cleaner) (department and women's
ready-to-wear stores)
.... •••••••...... ......... .
16
Power equipment operator (building construction) ............. ••••••
21
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ..................................... 19
Rresser, finish, hand - coats (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) •••• 12, 13
Presser, finish, machine - coats (men’s and boys’ suits and coats).. 12, 13
Presser, finish - trousers (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) •••••••
13
Presser, machine, shirts (power laundries) •••••••••••••••»•..•••••
20
Press feeder (printing)
22
22
Pressman (printing) .......................
Punch-press operator (tin cans and other tinware) ....... •••••••••••
16
Quartermaster (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ........... .
23

Receiving clerk... .....................••••••••••.... •••••

10

Receiving clerk (checkers) (department and women's
ready-to-wear stores) •••••••••........
Retort operator (canning) ....................... •..••••••«..... ••••
Rodman (building construction) •••..........
Sales clerk (department and women’s ready-to-wear stores) ......... .
Sales clerk (men's and boys’ clothing stores)
Seaman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••••••••••••••.•
S e c r e t a r y ...........
Section head (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .... ........ ......... .......... • •

16
12
21
16, 17
16
23
6
19




U. S. GOVERNMENT

Page
number
Sewer, alteration, women’s garments (department and women’s
ready-to-wear stores) .................... •••••..... ........... .
17
Sewer, hand - trousers (bench worker, finisher)
(men’s and boys' suits and coats) ........ •••••........... .......
14
Sewing-machine operator (men’s and boys' suits and coats)
12, 13, 14
...... .
15
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries)
Shaper (men's and boys* suits and coats) ......... .............. .
12, 13
Sheet-metal worker (building construction) ••••••••••••••••••..•••••
21
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ............ .
9
11
Shipping clerk .............. ................. ................ ••••••
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k .... ................... ...............
11
Slicer, hand (canning) .............. .................. ...... .
12
fitting-machine operator, hand-feed (tin cans and other tinware) ••
16
Spreader (men's and boys' suits and coats) ...... ......... .........
12
Steam fitter (building construction) ............. ..................
21
6
Stenographer, general .............................................
Stenographer, technical .............. ••••................. .
6
Stereotyper (printing) ............ ......... •••••...................
22
Steward (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••••...........
23
Stock clerk (men’s and boys’ suits and coats)
13
Stock handler ..................................................... .
11
Stockman (department and women’s ready-to-wear stores) ......... .
16, 17
Stonemason (building construction) ........... ••••••...... ........ .
21
Storekeeper (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...............
23
Structural-iron worker (building construction) •••••••..............
21
Switchboard o p e r a t o r .... . ..........................................
6
3, 6
Tabulating-machine operator ,,,,,,............................... .
Tailor, all-around (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) •••••••••••••••
12, 13
Tailor, alteration, men's garments (department and women's
ready-to-wear stores)
16
Tailor, alteration, men's garments (men’s and boys'
clothing s t o r e s ) .... .............................
16
15
Technician (paints and varnishes) •••••.... ....... .......... .......
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (men's and boys' suits and coats) ........ .
13, 14
21
Tile layer (building construction) ....... ••••••.................. .
Tinter (paints and v a r n i s h e s ) .... ....... ................. ....... .
15
Tool-and-die maker ............ ................ ........ .
9
Tool-and-die maker (tin cans and other-tinware) ••••••••••••••••••••
16
7
Tracer ............................................................
Transcribing-machine operator, general ...........
7
Truck driver .......
11
11
Trucker, h a n d .... •••••......... .......... ................. ........
Trucker, power •••••..... .............. ...... .............. .
11
Trucker, power (tins cans and other tinware) •••••••••••••••••«•••••
16
T y p i s t ..... ................
7
Under-presser (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) ........ •••••••••••
12, 13
Underwriter (insurance carriers) ................. ..................
19
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes) ••••••....... ....... ....... .
15
Washer automobile (auto repair shops) ............................. .
20
Washer, machine (power laundries) ••••••••................ •*••«•••••
20
Washhouse man (malt liquors) ................................................... 22
11
Watchman .............................•••••................... .......
Watchman (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) .........................
13
Watchman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••.... ....... .
23
Watchman (office building s e r v i c e ) ....................... ..........
19
Watertender (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ....... .
23
Wiper (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel)
........•••••
23
Work distributor (men's and boys' suits and coats) ................ .
13
Wrapper (bakeries) .......................................... ....... .
21
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries) .......... .................... .
20

OFFICE : O— 1951

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

- Price 20 cents


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102