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Occupational Wage Survey
BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT

Jam 1951

Bulletin No. 1044

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin * Secretary



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. O. - Price 15 cents

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Ew Clague ' Com l**ioner
an
m




Contents
Page
number
I N T R O D U C T I O N ................................................................................

1

THE BRIDGEPORT METROPOLITAN A R E A ...........................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ................................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..................................
A-4
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations .. ................

•

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-342
Cutlery, hand tools and general hardware ......................
B-35
Machinery industries .........
B-541
Grocery stores ................
B~60
B a n k i n g ..... .............
B-7211 Power laundries ......................................
R-7538
Auto repair shops ..................................

3
6
6
8

.

10
10
12
12
13
13

scales for selected occupations «
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n .... ............
••••
B a k e r i e s ............ ................... ........................ ................
Printing .............
Local transit operating employees ...........................
Motortruck drivers and helpers ...........

14
14
14
14
14

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s .................................. • ••

15

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ................. ..... «.............. ...........
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours • ........
E-3
Paid holidays ........
E-4
Paid vacations .......
E-5
Paid sick leave .............
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ..........
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ............................

15
16
16
17
18
19
19

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey ............... .................... .............. ........ .

20

INDEX .

22

Union wage
C-15
G-205
C-27
C-41
C-42

.

.

.

.

.

.

g

.

.

.

Introduction

y

The Bridgeport area is one of several important indus­
trial centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted
occupational wage surveys during the summer of 1951. 2/ Occu­
pations that are common to a variety of manufacturing and non­
manufacturing industries were studied on a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in com­
piling earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and
power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping. In pre­
senting earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through
A-4) separate data have been provided wherever possible for in­
dividual broad industry divisions.

Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community sur­
vey. 2/
Earnings data for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables. Union scales (Series C tables) are presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing
pay practices.

Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick-leave allowances, paid holi­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau’s regional office in Boston, Mass.
Bernard J. Fahres, Regional Wage Analyst. The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Branch
of Community Wage Studies of the Bureau’s Division of Wages and
Industrial Relations.
2/ Other areas studied are: Baltimore, Dallas, Dayton and
Portland (Oreg.). Similar studies were conducted earlier in
the year in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, New York, and the
San Francisco-Oakland area.
2/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




The B rid g ep o rt M etrop olitan

A rea

The Bridgeport Metropolitan Area, consisting of the
citycf Bridgeport and towns «f Fairfield, Milford, Stratford and
Trumbull had a total of over 250,000 persons in 1951. Of these,
60 percent were in the city of Bridgeport.

Nonagricultural wage and salary workers in the more
than 2,000 establishments in the area totaled 114,000 in June
1951. Approximately 600 manufacturing plants provided employ­
ment for 67,000 of these workers, and of this figure two-thirds
were employed in the machinery and electrical equipment indus­
tries. Although Industrial employment in the area was concen­
trated in durable goods, (J nondurable goods industries also
accounted for a substantial number - with some 5*000 workers
employed in the apparel industries alone.

A considerable number of workers earned their liveli­
hood in nonmanufacturing concerns. Over 17,000 were employed
in the trade industries and 10,000 others were engaged in the
service industries. During 1950, building permits were issued
for 1,300 new dwelling units within the city of Bridgeport and
employment in the construction trades approached the 6,000 level.
Government employment in the area also showed some increase with
approximately 7,500 employed by local, State and Federal agencies.

Slightly over half of all nonoffice employees covered
by the survey were employed in establishments having written
agreements with labor unions. Approximately three out of every
five employees in manufacturing industries were working under
terms of union contracts. The highest proportion of those em­
ployed under the terms of collective bargaining agreements were
in the transportation, communication, and public utilities group
where over 80 percent were covered. The degree of unionization
was noticeably lower for office employees than for plant workers.
About a fourth of all office employees covered in the survey
were employed under the provisions of union agreements. However,
unionization in offices was confined almost exclusively to manu­
facturing industries where over a third of the workers were

jj See appendix table for listing of durable and nondurable
goods industries.

p

r e p r e s e n t e d b y unions, a n d in the t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n ,
a n d u t i l i t i e s g r o u p w h e r e o n e - h a If w e r e e m p l o y e d u n d e r the terras
of a u n i o n c o n t r a c t * A m o n g the r e t a i l trade, finance, a n d s e r v ­
ices
g r o u p s n o n e of the office w o r k e r s w a s
employed in es t a b ­
lishments having
a labor-management agreement covering
office
workers•

O ccu p ation al

W age

S tru ctu re

The s u r v e y w a s m a d e d u r i n g a p e r i o d of i n d u s t r i a l r e ­
covery stimulated b y defense m o bilisation activity*
A moderate
l a b o r s u r p l u s in J a n u a r y 1 9 4 9 h a d b e c o m e
s u b s t a n t i a l b y March.
Unemployment
c o n t i n u e d on the i n c r e a s e u n t i l
J a n u a r y 1950*
A
slight improvement
in M a r c h 1950, o n l y m o d e r a t e l y
alleviating
the c r i t i c a l u n e m p l o y m e n t conditions, p r e v a i l e d u n t i l July* H o w ­
ever, b y S e p t e m b e r 1 9 5 0 u n e m p l o y m e n t h a d d r o p p e d b y a l m o s t half*
A continued
a b s o r p t i o n of t he l a b o r s u r p l u s r e s u l t e d in a b a l ­
a n c e d l a b o r m a r k e t b y I^hrch 1951* This w a s the c o n d i t i o n of the
l a b o r m a r k e t a t the t ime of the p r e s e n t survey*
W a g e l e v e l s i n the B r i d g e p o r t a r e a were a f f e c t e d b y a
number of important
g e n e r a l w a g e i n c r e a s e s in the
latter part
of 1950.
A n t i c i p a t i o n of a
g e n e r a l w a g e freeze f o l l o w i n g the
o u t b r e a k of h o s t i l i t i e s
i n K o r e a plu s the u p w a r d t r e n d in
the
cost of living
l e d t o d e m a n d s b y o r g a n i z e d groups for wag e i n ­
creases a nd other improvements.
S u c h in c r e a s e s w e r e e s p e c i a l l y
noteworthy

among manufacturing

establishments*

Highlighting

this
t r e n d w a s the
a c t i o n of five large c o m p a n i e s in the d u r ­
a b l e - g o o d s i n d u s t r i e s in
granting average hourly
i n c r e a s e s of
10 cents to man y
t h o u s a n d s of p l a n t e m p l o y e e s in O ctober 1950.
S i m i l a r i n c r e a s e s wer e g r a n t e d t o n u m e r o u s groups in n o n d u r a b l e

w a g e s u p o n the i n d i v i d u a l r a t h e r t h a n on the job.
In w h o l e s a l e
a n d r e t a i l t r ade and in the s e r v i c e i n d u s t r i e s t h i s w a s e s p e c i a l ­
ly noticeable
a mong office workers where formal
plans covered
o n l y a b o u t one in four*
Established minimum entrance
rates for inexperienced
plant
w o r k e r s wa s
p a r t o f the f o r m a l i z e d
wage structure
for
f i rms in the
area*
A t h i r d of the e m p l o y e e s w e r e
e m p l o y e d in
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h the m i n i m u m
e n t r a n c e r a t e b e t w e e n 75 cents
and $ 1 an
h o u r a n d a n o t h e r t h i r d w e r e in p l a n t s w i t h a m i n i m u m
h o u r l y r a t e r a n g e of b e t w e e n
$1 and $1.25.
A p p r o x i m a t e l y one
out of s i x w o r k e r s wa s e m p l o y e d b y f i r m s w i t h e s t a b l i s h e d m i n i m a
of over $ 1 * 2 5 a n h o u r f o r p l a n t e m p l o y e e s *
No firm among manu­
facturing, public
u t i l i t i e s , or w h o l e s a l e t r a d e i n d u s t r i e s r e ­
p o r t e d m i n i m a of u n d e r 75 c e n t s a n h o u r w h e r e a s one out of s e v e n
e m p l o y e e s in r e t a i l t r a d e a n d a l m o s t h a l f t h e w o r k e r s i n s e r v i c e
i n d u s t r i e s wer e e m p l o y e d b y f i r m s s p e c i f y i n g a m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e
rate

of u n d e r 75 c e n t s a n ho u r *

W a g e s a n d s a l a r i e s of w o r k e r s i n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s ­
t r i e s w e r e g e n e r a l l y h i g h e r t h a n in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g *
In 1 4 of
17 j o b c a t e g o r i e s p e r m i t t i n g compar i s o n , s a l a r i e s of w o m e n office
workers were
h i g h e r in m a n u f a c t u r i n g t h a n t h o s e i n n o n m a n u f a c ­
tur i n g .
A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r p l a n t jobs s t u d i e d in a l l
industries were
higher in m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments
fo r 1 1
of 13 jo b c a t e g o r i e s f or w h i c h c o m p a r i s o n s w e r e p o s s i b l e .
A p p r o x i m a t e l y a s i x t h of a l l p l a n t w o r k e r s in B r i d g e ­
p o r t m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w o r k e d on e x t r a s h i f t s . N e a r ­
l y a l l of these r e c e i v e d s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l s .
P r e m i u m p a y for a
m a j o r i t y of th e s e w o r k e r s w a s b a s e d on a c e n t s - p e r - h o u r i n c r e a s e
o v e r f i r s t - s h i f t ra t e s , w i t h 5 o r 1 0 c e n t s b e i n g
most commonly
reported*
A s u b s t a n t i a l n u m b e r of
w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d on e x t r a
shifts
r e c e i v e d p r e m i u m p a y b a s e d on a p e r c e n t a g e - u s u a l l y 10

m a n u f a c t u r i n g , t r a n spor t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d w h o l e s a l e trade.
The
t e n d e n c y a m o n g the
l a r g e r c o m p a n i e s was t o
gr a n t s i m i l a r

p e r c e n t - over d a y r a t e s .

i n c r e a s e s to p l a n t a n d office w o r k e r s b u t in a m a j o r i t y of s m a l l ­
er firms
office worker increases lagged behind plant w o r k e r s * •

The s c h e d u l e d w o r k w e e k
f o r 9 out of 1 0 w o m e n
office
w o r k e r s i n m a n u f a c t u r i n g , p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s , a n d w h o l e s a l e trade
w as 4 0 ho u r s *
A m o n g financial groups the 4 0-hour
w o r k w e e k was

Formalized rate structures for time-rated occupations
were r e p o r t e d
in establishments
employing nine-tenths
of the

more
prevalent whereas
among service
industries weekly
work
schedules averaged from 40 to 44 hours.
A m o n g plant employees
7 out of e v e r y 10 h a d a w o r k w e e k of 4 0 h o u r s , a n d a p p r o x i m a t e l y

p l a n t a n d off i c e w o r k e r s
the m a j o r i t y o f the




in the m a n u f a c t u r i n g

industries.

In

o t h e r i n d u s t r i e s t h e r e was a t e n d e n c y t o bas e

1 out of 10 h a d a 4 8 - h o u r s c h e d u l e .

Office Occufu+tianA

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Bridgeport, Conn., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
|
Weekly 25.00 27.50 3 0 . X 32.50 3 5 . X 37.50 40 .0o 42.5C 45.00 47.5C 5 0 . X 52.5C 5 5 . X 57.5C $6 0 . X 62.5C 1 65.0C '67.50 7 0 . X 72.50 7 5 . X '80.x! 8 5 . X
and
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) under
5 0 . X 52.5C 5 5 . X 57.5C 60.0C 62.5C 6 5 . X 67.5C '70.X 72.50 7 5 . X 8 0 . X 85.X ! over
27.50 30.00 32.50 3 5 . X 37.50 4 0 . X 42.5cj 4 5 . X 47.50
$

Men
Bookkeepers, h a n d ............. ........
Manufacturing .......................

37
33

72.50
39.5
“ 39:0 ' 72.50

Clerks, accounting .....................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonraanufacturing ....................

40.0
50
40.0
36 — ” ‘
39.5
14

Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonraanufacturing.............. .
Wholesale trade ..................

39
22
17
11

Clerks, order ..........................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonraanufacturing....... ........... .

56
39
17

39.0
38.5
39.5

69.50
73.00
62.50

-

Office boys ............................
Manufacturing.......................

66
St

40.0

40.00

_

_

40.0

40.50

-

-

Tabulating-machine operators ..........

11

40.0

59.00

58.50
54.00
69.50

60.00
40.5
— 40.0 ■ 59,50"
61.00
40.5
64.50
38.5

_
-

7
6

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

3
3

_

_
-

-

_

3
3

-

8
8

4
4

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_

-

1
1
-

1
1
1

_
_

-

_
_

_

1
1
-

-

-

-

6

-

1
l

16
16

_

7
3

2
2

19
18

16
16

_
-

5 ;
5 ;

_

_

_

_

_

!

1
1
-

5
1
4
4

-

6
_

1
1
-

_

_

-

5
5

10
9

2
1

6
6

1 i __
_
1
5

2
1
1

9
8
1

3
1
2

-

1
1

1
_

1
_

1

1

2
_
2

10
3
7
1

4
4
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

9
9
-

-

-

_
_

1
1
-

12
7
5

2
2
-

-

_

-

-

1
1
1

3
3
-

1
1
-

1
1
-

1

1
1

1
1

13
7
6

16
16
-

-

-

-

_

1

2
2
2

1
_
_

_
_

1

_

_

1

_

_

_

-

1

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
-

_
_
-

- j

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
1
1
8
5

8
4
4
4
4
-

-

_

_

1

1

2

_

2

1
-

_
-

i

_

4

_

!

Women

j
-

8
4
4
4
-

46.00
43.00
48.50

_

_

_

-

-

-

54.50
54.00
52.50
56.00
54.50
52.50
54.50

_

_

-

-

_
-

48.50
50.00
50.00
50.50
42.50

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41.50
46.00
46.50
42.00
37.50
39.00

_
_
_

_

10
_
10

_
10

5

_

_

5

10

87
£7
31
16
40
19

40.5
4070
40.0
40.0
41.0
40.0

41.00
“41 .50"
43.00
37.50
40.00
42.00

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) •
Manufacturing....... ...............
Nonraanufacturing..... ..............

34
14
20

40.0

Bookkeepers, hand ......................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade 2/ ..................

122
41
20
21
81
22
38

40.0

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A .
Manufacturing ........... ........ .
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

53
41
28
13
12

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonraanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade 2/ .............. .
Finance * * ...... ................

180
84
69
15
96
23

1
1
6
1

39.5
41.0

40.0
40.0

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0

40.0
41.5
39.5
40.0
40.0

40.0
39.0
40.5
40.0
38.5

_
-

Billers, machine (billing machine) ....
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities # ...... ........

40.00
37.00

_
'

13
10
6
4
3
! 3

1

10
3
3
7
7

I

-

j~~-

_

5
5
2

—
-

i
-

12
io
8

: 26
i 9
I

3
6
1_
7

2
2
2

9
6
3
5
-

i
5
4
-

—

~ “i
^ -i

20
3
1
2
17

27
13
8

23
11
9
2
12
7

-

|

3
29
5
23

1
6
10

5
14

1
2
11

3

2

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

4
”
4

4

_

5

-

-

-

11
2
2
9
8

1
1
-

27
10
10
17
4
7

11
4
4
7
3
4

1
1
1

8
6
6
2
-

5
5
4
1
-

8
8
5

2
2
2
-

-

2
2
1
1
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

12
11
11
1

2
2
2
-

9

6

9
9
8
1

_

2
2
2

_

5

12
, 8
! 4

j
1
j

2

7
7
7
_
-

35

-

-

2

17
13
11
2

15

-

-

:

1
1

-

-

2
2

1
1

1

11
10
10
1

5
5
3
2
-

8

5-

1

1
■ 1
1

!

_

6

3

15
9
9
6
5
-

12
7
1
6
5

3

4
2
2

-

2
2

6

:

-

2
2

5
5

4

|
h

_

_
-

_
"

|
|

1
1
1

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*#
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7
7

5
5

-

-

4
4

!

1

-

4 ! -

9
9
_
-

6
6
6

6
6
-

j

-

I

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

"

1 '

"

i_
-

1
1
-

_

_

-

„
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

1
_

j

_

-

'

_

-

'

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

'

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4.

Oj^ice Occupation* - Continued

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Bridgeport, Conn., by industry division, June 1951)

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of

w rkers
o

s

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLV EARNINGS OF—

s

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

S

s

$

s

$

>
$

Weekly 25,00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0Ci80.00j 85.00
Weekly
hus
or
erig
a n n s and
and
( t n a d ( t n a d under
Sadr) Sadr)
over
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4C.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00

85.CO

$

Women

-

Continued

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .............. .

Clerks• accounting .....................
Durable goods ......... ....... .
Nondurable goods .................
Pub1ic utilities

* ...............

Clerks, file, class A .................
Manufacturing.................. .

B ...................................

Clerks, file, class
Manufacturing............ ..........

Nonmanufacturing....................
Whol«B l.i trades ...______..........
f Tf
letail trade 2/ ..................
Clerks, order .........................
Manufacturing ....................
Durable goods ......... ....... .
Nonmanufacturing....................

40.0
40.0

45.50
45.50

40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

48.50
50.00
50.50
48.00
45.00
44.50
45.00

14
10

39.5
40.0

47.50
50.50

129
118

40.0

40.00
41.00
34.00

48.00
48.50
49.50

195
" 134..
123
11
61
12
26

11

236
— ITS—
143
29
64
34
13
82
70
50

20
12

40.0

38.0
39.5
o o
(> c'
O\
r

Clerks, general .......................
Manufacturing ....... .
Durable goods .....................

57
56

c
40.6

—
_

_

_
-

_
_
-

_

_
_

40.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
38.0
42.5

45.50
45.00
47.50
38.50
46.50

46.00

40.0
‘“4F.C" 46.50
47.00
40.0
4 0 .0
43.50
43.00
39.5
i t•J 42.50
f
JO

Clerks, payroll .......................
Manufaeturing ...... ........ .
Durable goods ............. .......
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufa cturlnrr ........... ...... .
PnVI r
\
#

245
558
183
45
17
JO

Duplicating-machine operators .........

18

40.0

77
73

40.0
40.0

_

39.0
39.0
oq P

-

-

-

8

-

-

13
§
5

_
_
.

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

_
_

5
3

1

2

8

8

2

7

8

16
16

2
2

6
8

11
4
2
2
7
2
4

14
6
6
8
3
5

39
35
32
3
4
1
1

20
16
16
4
2
1

-

-

1

-

2
2

2
1

2
2

23

22
1

17
17

35
33

5
5

5
5

8

18
17

3
3
3

25
17

21
12

-

12

1

5
1

-

-

-

-

13
10
6
4
3

_
_
_

2

9
6
1
5
3
3

15
13
13

1

6
-

_
•

_

•

—

2
41

12

-

6
6

_

-

2

8

16

11

9
5

11
6
4

! 2
j

8

28
18
14
4
10
1
4
5

2
2

2

4
4
4

12

7
4

2

17
17
15

-

2

5

1

3

5

4
4

8

8

8

~Z~

9
9

15
15

4
4

7
1

2
2

5
5

1
1

3
3

4
4

6

14
10
a-

i
See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

6

24

: 19
i is
j 14
4
1

38
: 34
29
5
4
3

1

1

2
2

-

2

.

2

1
1

_

-

2
1
1

_
_
-

_
_
_
-

.
.
_
-

j

13
11
11

12
8

2

4

1

1

_

_

2

_

1

_

_

_

_

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

“

-

13
12

12
6
6

5
5
5

_
-

_
-

6
5

-

-

-

5
1
1

_

_

_

-

-

8

8
8
8

_

24
22
20
2
2
1
1

j

8

24
23
13

10
1

1
_
-

—

15
15

10

11

20
20
20

13
13

11

3
3
3

2

-

-

12
1

1
1

10

12
12
8

7
7
7

1
1
1

4

2
2
2

_
_
_

5

22
22
2
2

-

3

19.. .
12
17
7

45
44
27
17
1

_
_

3

28

38
27
23
4
11
9
! 1
1

2
2

6
8

4

9
_
_
9
2
6

9
5
5
4

_

36.00
37.50
32. ^0




6
6

1

45.50
45.50

36
--- 25“
in
XU

5
_
5

-

41.00

Key-punch operators ...................
Manufaot.uring ............... ...... .
Office girls ................... ..... .
Manufacturing.... .

—
_

5

44.50
47.00
46.50
49.00

40.0

—
_

17
16
15
1
1
1

11
11
11

25
24

22
2

13
13
12
1
—

_

4
4

1
1

1
_

1
1
1

1
1

_
_

|

-

-

-

_

1
1
1

.

_

2
2
2

_

_

_

_

.
.

1
7
3

12
12

_

5
,

Table A-i:

O^ice Occupation*. - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Bridgeport, Conn., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

A verage

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
1$
*
Weekly
Weekly 2 5 .0 0 2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 |8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0
hours
and
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
2 7 .5 0 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 o v e r
S

Women - C o n tin u e d
S e c r e t a r i e s .....................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................
D u r a b le g o o d s ..................................................
N o n d u ra b le go o d s ...........................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ......................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e .............................................
F in a n c e ** .........................................................

382
294
2 46
48
88
15
28
31

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

5 8 .0 0
6 0 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
5 0 .5 0
5 2 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
5 2 .0 0
5 3 .0 0

S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ...........................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................
D u r a b le g o o d s ..................................................

464

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

5 0 .5 0
5 i; 5 D '"

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................
W h o le s a le t r a d e .............................................
F in a n c e ** .........................................................
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , t e c h n i c a l ......................................

w r~
372
22
70
11
27
2?
13

40.0
iQ n
39.5
40 0
4o ! o

38.5
40.0

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

3
3
2
1

6
4
4
2
1

8
1
1
7
1
1

15
10

13
10

28
18

8
2
3
2

12

_

_

-

-

4
-

14
9

9

10

47.00
47 50
50 * 5
.0
48.50

-

_

4

5

5
2

54.00

51.50

_

2

-

-

-

_

_

1
1

_

2

-

-

_

1

2
4
1
8

-

-

-

-

40.0
40.0

53.00
53.00

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

T r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
g e n e r a l .........................................................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g .........................................................

53
50

40.0
.4 " O'
0.

46.00
46.50 "

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
4

T r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
t e c h n i c a l .....................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................

23
23

40.0
40.0

49.50
49.50

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T y p i s t s , c l a s s A .........................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .................................................

197
177
20

40.0
40.0
4 1 .0

47.50
47.50
45.50

8
8

T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ........................ ................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................
D u r a b le go o d s ..................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ..........................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................
UK a I dQfll a
R e t a i l t r a d e 2 / .............................................
T5M r»o
##

432
351
313
38
81
28

40.0
40.0

43.50
44.00
45.00
37.50

1/
2/
*
**

12

18

42 0

39.5
37.5

4 0 .0 0

•37 00
41 150
3 8 .0 0

2 I 12
1
5 I
1
7
6

5
4

23
23

4 0 .0

3

-

T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s .............................
M a n u fa c t u r in g .........................................................

40.0
40.5

1

2
1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

5
1

4
2

_

_

_

4
3
1
-

9
2
7
5

2

2

4

1
1

7
7

1
1

-

-

-

2
2
2

2
1
-

8
4
4

2
1
1

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

1

1
.

1

1

-

1
1

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

1
1

7
7

6
6

3
3

2
2

2
2

5
5

8
8

10
10

5
5

5
5

1
1

5
5

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

4
4

-

1
1

3

1
1

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1
1

-

5

7
5
2

22
21
1

28
21
7

19
15
4

13
10
3

19
16
3

66
66

75
44
41

37
31
29

49
43
40

22

48
40
40

_

_

_

_

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

5

26

8
14
5

9

3

2

3

48
48
47
1

4

7

31

6

6

-

2

5_
5

16
2
3

______

-

4

3
2

4

9
9
9

7
7

7

x

H o u rs r e f l e c t th e w orkw eeks f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s and th e e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
E x c lu d e s d e p a rtm e n t s t o r e s .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




-

-

62
55
45
10

1 "

-

-

-

3

-

1
1
1

39
35

8

-

-

-

5

-

-

27
13

_

-

2
14
14
14

-

5

4

x

9
4
2
2

-

-

8
2

1

-

-

-

1

_

-

-

2

-

-

_

-

5

9
9
8
1

-

-

5

3
1
1

-

-

-

_

2

21
13
13

-

-

-

2

2
4

1

4
1

-

_

9
5
4

_

1

-

-

3
3
3
-

-

/

5
2

2
7

-

2
2
2
-

1
1

2

3
2

-

3

4
4
4
-

1

7

6

x

1
1

-

-

6
3
3
3
2
1
-

1

6

1

-

5
1

4

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

3

30
30

-

-

-

35

1

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

130
130

-

-

-

139

-

5
3
1
2
2

7
4
4
3

42

-

5
4

31
31
31
-

40
36

11
2
9

1

42
38
36
2
4
1

38

-

9
2

9
8
7
1
1
1

31
25

6

44.00
46.00
47.50
38.00
41.00
49.00

101
97
95
2
4
2
1

34

-

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
40.0

18
14
11
3
4
2
1
1

28
28

-

83
56
46
10
27
10

30
10
7
3
20
2
14
4

54

-

S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n is t s . . . . . . .
M a n u fa c t u r in g .........................................................
D u r a b le go o d s ..................................................
N o n d u ra b le goo ds ...........................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e .............................................

n

5
7

10
8
7
1
2
1
1

48
46
2
6

-

8

53
36
15
21
17
-

29

-

10
10

"PM n o r » r » o

41

11
10
9
1
1
1

27
25
2
2

-

45.50
51.50
42.50
47.50
40.50
41.50

65

21
14
10
4
7
1
4

-

41.0
40.0
a.5
42.0
41.5
39.0

S w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s .............................................
M a n u fa c t u r in g .........................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................
W h o le sa le t r a d e .............................................
R A t .n l!
?/

1

6

6

10

17
7
2
5
10
4
3
3

_

6,

Table A - 2 :

P n O ^ e d A iO n x U

G + td

* 1e c tu U c a t

O c c u p a t io n *

(A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu a ie v - on a n a r e a
b a s i s i n B r id g e p o r t , C o n n ., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , Ju n e 1 9 5 1 )

Average

8

vn
1 *
O
•

85.00 90.00 95.00 L00JX 105.00 110.00 115.00 12000 125-00

i
r

45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00

85.00 $
80.00 $
0C
90.00 15.00 100.00 105.00 il0. il5.CC i2aao:

8

W eekly
W eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

%

8 , 8

o
f

workers

$
$
and
under

40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 10.00 15.00 W o o

4

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Number

fc.00 & 0 0 14000 jfbxo 150.00
135.00 14000 145.00 15000 155.00

S

Men
Draftsmen, chief....... ...... ......
Manufacturing .................
Draftsmen .............................
Manufacturing ..................

*8
4
--198
192

Draftsmen, junior .................
88
Manufacturing ................. “ 71-

41.0

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

112.5 0
113.50

-

-

-

-

-

16
15

13
12

28
28

_

40.0
40.0

83.50
■8T.50

-

-

-

1
1

40.0
40.0

62.50
61.00

1
1

3
3

13
13

15
14

13
13

23
18

40.0

61.00

6

5

10

6

2
1

_

-

-

12
12

7
7

3

21
21

25
24

30
30

2?

22

14
14

18
18

16
6

3
2

_
-

1
1

1

1

2
2

5
5

_

6

-

6

_

_

5
5

1
1

1
1

1
1

_
-

-

_

3

3
_
-

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1

1
1

1
1

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ••••••...

50

_

_

1
____ i
____ 1
1/

H o u rs r e f l e c t t h e w o rkw eek s f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s an d t h e e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .

T a b le

a -3

:

M a in te n a n c e a n d P ow esi P la n t O ccu p a t io n *

(A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 / f o r men i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d on a n
a r e a b a s i s i n B r id g e p o r t , C o n n ., b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , J u n e 1 9 5 1 )

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
Number

O c c u p a tio n an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

of

workers

Average
hourly
earnings

U n der l o o

135
1 29

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a in te n a n c e .......................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................................................

201
190

E n g in e e r s , s t a t i o n a r y ................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................................................

42
37

F ire m e n , s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r ....................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .....................-......................................................
D u r a b le g o o d s ......................

K / M f s i fn» vc
T s T w m e ii st

.........

153
134
1 19
15
19
10

f.1 0

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

$

1 .1 5

$

1 .2 0 S1 .2 5 $1 .3 0 S1 .3 5 Si . 4 0

1 .0 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .8 3
r .§ —
1 .8 0
1 .8 6
1 .4 1
1 .4 4
1 .4 6
1 .2 8
1 .1 9
1 .1 1

1 .3 0




1 .4 0

1 .3 5

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

^♦ 20

2 .0 0 2.10

2.20

2 .3 0

1 .5 0

1 .4 5

^ .3 0

h .ifi ^ . 5 0 1^2.60

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2.40

2 .5 0

_

_

..

_

_

_

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

1

-

7
-

7

3

11
8
6
2
3

3

_

2
2

-

4
3

-

-

3

-

1
1

2

-

4
4
2
2

-

7

6
6

10
10

31
30

39
37

24
24

_ 1 5 ....
14

1
1

1
1

3
3

12
10

31
30

12
12

53
52

65
65

18
11

3

-

1
7

[

_

-

12
12
12

-

“ -j
12
12
10
2

1
1

-

2

-

7

2

18

8
8

1
-

_

_

-

-

___ 2_
_
2

_

_

_

2 .6 0

over

_

8

-

____ 1 ___ i
L
S ee f o o t n o t e a t end o f t a b l e .

i .10

!

S
1 .7 2

T T rZ

S 1 .4 5 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .6 0 S 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 s 1 .9 0 i . o o

%
1 .0 0

C a r p e n t e r s , m a in te n a n c e ...........................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................................................

1 .0 5

! 12
9
9

: j
-

2

18

19
19
12
7

-

-

-

36
36
36

-

19
14
14
5
1

15

_

-

-

-

“

-

-

■3

_

___2_
_
2

_

_

—

-

-

-

_

_

_

15

-

-

-

-

15

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
_

-

-

---- !

O c c u p a t io n a l Wage S u r v e y , B r id g e p o r t , C o n n ., Ju n e 1 9 51
U . S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

7,

Table a- 3:

M a in te n a n c e a n d P ou teb P la n t O c c u p a tio n * • C o n tin u e d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an
area basis in Bridgeport, Conn., by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

O c c u p a tio n an d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
U nder 1 .0 0

$

$

$

$

$

1.0 5

$
1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1.2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

1 .4 0

1 .4 5

$
1 .5 0

$
1 .6 0

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1.30

1 .3 5

1.4 0

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

-

-

12
5
5

13
7
5
2

10
10
8
2

98
92
92

123
323
123

31
11
11

_
-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

17
14
10
/
4
3

7
6

6
6

6
6

_

«.

_

-

_

_

6

19
19

25
25

93
93

54
54

22
22

5

38

$

$

$

$
1 .0 0

1 .0 5

$
$
s
s
$
$
$
5
$
!$
1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2.50 ! 2.60
i and
1 . 8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 o v e r

$

H e l p e r s , t r a d e s , m a in te n a n c e ........................................ ..
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................... ............. ........................... ..
D u r a b le go o d s .................................................................. ..

1
-

8
-

1

8
8

307
274.
264
10
33
27

1 .3 0
1 .2 6
1 .2 7

224
0 0/

M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e .......... ................................•••••••
M a n u f a c t u r in g ................................................. .........................

28 0
274

1 .8 4
1 . 84 “

-

M a in te n a n ce men, g e n e r a l u t i l i t y .................................... ..
M a n u f a c t u r in g .......................... .............................................. ..
D u r a b le go o d s ...................................... ..............................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ........................ ..
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ............ .............................................. ••••

1 19
1 03
77
26
16

1 .5 2
1 .5 3
1 .5 3
1 .5 3
1 .4 9

_
•
-

M e c h a n ic s , a u to m o tiv e (m a in te n a n c e ) .......... ..................
M a n u fflc tirr ln g
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ................................................................ ....
P u b li c u t i l i t i e s * .................................., , ___ . . . . .

135
14
121
106

1.6 2

10
8
6
2
2

1 .7 5
1 .7 5

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g .........................................................
P u b li c u t i l i t i e s *
...................................... 1 . . . *
M a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s , t o o l room ........................ .• • • •

M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e ...........................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................................................... ..
D u r a b le g o o d s .............................................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ............................... ......................... ..
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g .................................................... •••••••
P n b l 1 c u t 1 1 1 11 e s * T - - t T ......................T T ___ T- , t .

123
1 2 3 " ’”

O i l e r s ........................ .....................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .......................................................................

125
92

Pnbl1c utilities * _,_
P ip e f i t t e r s , m a in t e n a n c e ....... ...........
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................. ..

1.AB

1 .7 2
1 .6 1
1 .6 0

1 .8 1
108
------ S T ­ ..1 . 8 2
AB
1 .8 5
1 .7 7
35
1 .7 9
25
22
1 .7 7

M i l l w r i g h t s ........................................................................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g .................................................................... ..

P a i n t e r s , m a in te n a n c e ......................• • • • • .........................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................................. ..
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ........................ ....................................... . •

1 .4 5
1 .4 7

1 .7 5
1 .7 $ "
"
1 .4 0
.i : 4 4 “

10

1 .6 3
1 . 66 H
1 .5 2
1 .6 7

69
66

3
3
3
-

6

-

-

-

-

4
2

2
2

-

-

2
2

2

2
2
2

_
-

_
_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

16

-

14
14
14
-

3
3
3
_
-

1
1

23
22
18
4
1

20
15
15
5

1
1

17
15
15
2

8
8
8
-

_

-

8
8
8
-

_
-

2

12
10
10
2

-

-

_

5

9

33
2

39
2
37
37

1

_

_

_

23
2
21
16

7
4

_

14
2
12
11

-

1

-

_

-

23
13
2
11
10
10

15
15
9
6
-

30
27
19
8
3

6
4
4
2

3
2
2
1

_

3

17
10
10
7
7

19
19

28
28

41
41

7

5

1
1

1
1

..

-

-

17
9

8
8
-

3
3

2
2

_

-

-

-

5

_

2
2

5
5
_

1
1

7
1

2
2

2
2

15

_

_

_

1

-

_

9

9

31
29

3
3
2
1

7
5
5

!
---- 1

2
2

1
1

4
4

15
3.5

20
9

20
20

23

22
21

5
2
3

2

5
5
-

-

-

-

1
1

-

2
2

S h e e t - m e t a l w o r k e r s ,m a in t e n a n c e .......................... .............
M a n u f a c t u r in g ....................................................................... ..

64
64

1 .8 3
1 .8 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .0 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-




-

4

-

-

2
1

1 .8 0

23

8
8

5
5
14
14

-

8

3

3

3
2
1
1

7

5
------------1

-

_
_
_

1

_
-

-

-

2
2

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

_

1

_
_

_
_
.

_
_
-

-

-

-

i ^

_

.
_

-

4

-

_

4
4
-

2
2

-

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1
1

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication,and other public u tilities,

.
.

_
-

6
6

[ W -

2/
*

_

78
72

-

2.02

_
-

107
1 07

27
27

641
641

-

38

P lu m b e r s , m a in t e n a n c e ............................... ........................... • •
M a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................................................... ..

T o o l - a n d - d ie m a k e rs ( o t h e r th a n
jo b b in g s h o p s ) ........................
M a n u f a c t u r in g

-

38
38

-

-

8
8

1
1

-

-

2
2

_
_

5

-

-

2

_

-

2
2

-

_

-

-

2

_

-

1 .7 7
1 .7 7

65

_
-

-

2

_
-

_
-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_
-

1
1

-

12
12

29
27

19
18

3
3

5
5

7

3

-

7
7

7

3

1
1

2
2

6
6

6
6

39
39

__ 2 _
3

-

7
7

14
14

40

__94_
94

173
173

40

4
4

3

3
127
1 27

_

3

3
131
131

_
_
11
11

-

_
_
17
17

_
12
12

_

-

15

15

8,

G u d t o d ic U ,

T a b le A - 4 :

*U /C M eJ u U U iH J f a * t d

S U iflfU M Q

0 c C U fu U iO * U >

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Bridgeport, Conn., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

$
s
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Num e A e a e
b r vrg
hul Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0
ory
o
f
anns
w r e s erig
okr
and
$
95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 over
0.75 *80 .85 .90 .
$

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons)..
Crane operators, electric bridge ( 0 tons
2
and over) ............................
Guards ................................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing......................
Finance ** ........................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ........
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * ..................
Retail trade j/ ....................
Finance ** ....................... .
Service ..........................

133
126

1.60
1,61

U

1.62

227
1.47
"TED " 1.47""
1 .3 6
17
10
1.35
606

1 .2 0

.3
ZS5 " 1 2 "
1 .2 6
423
i.oo
62
12 1
1.07
1 .2 6
36
.99
42
18
1 .0 0
16
.96

5 __ 2 _
8

-

-

-

-

3
-

3
-

4
4
-

25

26

2

-

19
9

2

10

3
2

1

_
-

63
36
27

1.05
1.17

Order fillers ...........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Wholesale trade ....................
Po+n^l
f
.
T
r
f I _ r

205
94

1.24
1.43
1.09

80
26

1 .0 6
1 .2 0

Packers (men) ...........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ......................
NnnHnTn’ p g i d t.T......................T ........................................................... . .T T T .
h
l rns

336
335
288
48

1 .3 2
1 .3 2

Packers (women) .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ............... .......
JnplipTlp c n d
J'rv'ai r n s
. . -T- r-Tr-i-T-ii-t
.

97
97
47
.0
5

1.05
1.05
1.27
.84

-

Receiving clerks ........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods................... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................

166
141

1.36
1.38

-

123

1 .3 8

-

18
25

1.37
1.23

Shipping clerks .........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ......................
N n i rf'Tp g n « t........... rT___ T-T
n d i ’lh n H s
Nonmanufacturing......................
T oonTa +yqr a ((
»\
f_f
....................
Retail trade

151
113
92

1.44
1.47
1.49

_

1 .1 0

21

1.36

38
15

1.36
1.37
1.40

20

See f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .
*
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
*# F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .




.88

1.35

71
71

8
7

1

3

_

-

-

-

6
1

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .......
Manufacturing ........................
Nnnm®"vfpn.y- ng 1i t Tiiii-TTir...
+ipi
ti

111

/n

-

_

3
-

_
-

8

g

23
-

1

1
2

25
25
25

12
12

12

10

7

-

7
4

6

1
1

5

2

1

5

-

2

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

2
2

4
5
5
-

90
72
59
13
18
4
5
3
-

41
34
33

49
36
35

48
44
44

13

4

10
1

1
2
1

i 5
j 5

5
5

1
1
21

20

12

6

3
4
5

1

9
15
2

4
4

12
1
11

-

1
12
12

13

16

6
1

5
] 5

2
2
2

-

- !
- :
| _

2
2

7

-

7

-

-

-

-

3
_

_

_

_

2

_

7
1
6

5

1

7
5

-

27
17
10

3

55 _
13Q_ .1 . .
5
54 127
14
127
54
H
1
1

3

-

2

-

1
1

13
1
3

2
2

1
1

20
2

20

10

14

4

18
16

6

6

4

4

3
7
7

11
2

9
1

7

2

2

2

10

17 - _
7
7

_

_

_

9
9

-

-

1
1

10
10

_
_
_
-

1
1

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

3

68
2
2

-

-

-

-

_
.
.

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
9
5
4

9
9
-

43
43
_

7
3
4
4

_

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

22
22
22

5
5
5

_
-

3
3
3

_
_

2
2
2

4
4
4

_
-

_

-

_
-

_

_
_

4
1
1

3
3
3
_
-

2
2

_
_
-

_
_
•
-

_
_

1
1
1

._

_

1

4
4

31
31
-

_

•
_
-

-

-

2

70

_
_
-

_

-

2

17
16

_
_
-

1

1
2

1

10

43
43
-

1

22
22
20
2

18
18
14
4

71
71
67
4

17
17
13
4

33
33
31

6
6
6

1
1
1

4
4
4

12
12
12

10
10
10

10
10
10

-

.

2
2
2

8
8
8

19
17
17
-

6

13

24

2

12
10

12
12
8

12

4
2
2

2
1

4
-

2

15
13
13
.

36
34
30
4

3

24
24
_
-

2

2

10
10

10

10

14

12

6

15

4

4

13

9

2

2
2
11

11
2
1

8
1

3

39
32
24
g
7

2

_

6

8

-

_
-

2

1

_
_
-

1

_

6

5

9
1

4

and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s

1

12
12

6

15
1
5
1
5

15
15
- !
g ! 15

-

-

32
r ~ w ~ 32
26
4

2

-

2
2

3
-

-

1
1

21
21
1
20

_

8
8

17
15

44
29

7
5
5

6
6

25
18
18
7
-

2

3
3
-

-

2
2

1

5

1

2

4

6

/-

5

2

9
7

1

4

1

1

70
6
70 r ~ f 70
6

10

]_

.
3
26

24
24
2
2

5
5
5

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9,

Table A-4i

G u & t o d ic ii,

I t ) 'O A e itO U & U U f. C U td

S U ip ftfM Q

O o C M fu U tO tU - G o t t t U u f d

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Bridgeport, Conn,, by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
N m e Aeae
u b r vrg
o
f
h ul Under 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10
ory
anns
w r e s erig *
o kr
and
0.75 .80 .
85 .90 . 5 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 over
9

121
Shipping and receiving clerks........... .
Manufacturing............. ........
-- 55“
58
Durable goods ....... ........... .
Nondurable goods....... ........... .
27
36
Nonmanufacturing.......... ............
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ........ .
Manufacturing..................
Durable goods ......... .............
Nondurable.............. ....... .
Nonmanufacturing .............. ....... .
Wholesale trade ............... .....
Retail trade 2 / ....................

1167
81
6 ".
822
39
306
183
77
46

$
1.50
1.56 1.57
1.53
1.36
1.34
T:32T~
1.34
1.22
1.35
1.41
1.33
1.14

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
5

9
-

-

2
2
2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

“

_
-

2
2

.
-

1
1

1

8
53
8 “43”
40
3
1
5
12

33

72

1
-

2
2

_
-

_
2

-

1

-

_
2

_
-

9
3

1
8

11
11

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
2
-

7
7
-

15
2
13
5
5
3

5
5
5
-

9
9
8
1
-

4
4
4
-

5
1
4
4

12
5
7
4
31

_
-

-

_

_

_

15

17

10

7

Truck drivers, light (under I2-tons) ..... .
Manufacturing...................... .
Nanmanufacturing ................... .
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade 2/ .................. .
Services ......... ................

180
-154
86
13
16

1.35
1.25
1.37
1.42
1.09
1.29

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and ineluding A tons) .......... .............
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing......................
PiMI p ivM *M+4ao *
i
........
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade 2 / ....................

250
47
34
13
203
22
68
97

1.35
1.46
1.52
1.30
1.33
1.50
1.40
1.25

_
-

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
trailer type) ...................... .
79
Nonmanufacturing ....................... -- 71
43
P t H . nHUHna #
iK/
.......
a ela
o
28

1.54
~I753
I.4 7
1.62

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) .........................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing.................. .
U t laoelA
Vn

150
1.56
-- 35“ T;38”
112
1.55
100
1.57

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ................
Manufacturing........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

248
221
27

1.49
1.50
1.46

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) .......
Manufacturing........ ...... ....... .

54
46

1.47
T.47

Watchmen.............. ................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ....... ...... .
Nonmanufacturing ................ .......
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade.......... ..........

187
155
123
37
27
10
10

1.13
\ i:i5~

1/
2/
2/
*

1 .2 0
1 .0 2
.9 4

.98

44
6
22

8
8

9
9
4
5
-

-

4
3
3
n
1

29
27
16
n

142 129
65
52 “ n r 123
116 ns
51
2
1
5
6
24
13
1
19
5
12
1
5

302
180
177
3
122
121

126
126
124
2
-

1/6
86
81
5
60
60

73
42
42
_
31

7
5
5

2

.

2
2

15
15
15
_
-

7
7
7
-

_ _
_
-

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

19
2
17
16
1
~

_
-

37
1
36
-

17
3
14
8
_
3

8
5
3
3

40
40
40
.
-

_
-

_
_
-

45
7
7
38
1

18
1
1

20
1
1

7
-

36
n
n

9
8
8

1
1
1

17
1
1
15

19
10
8
1

7

25

1
X

31

4
4

1

-

4

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
1
1
1
_
_
_
_
_

4
.
_
4
4
4
4
«
»
_

.
-

-

_

_

_

_
-

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

17

4

10

7

26
n
7
4
15

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
15

17
-

4

_
10

1
6

1
2

33

35
7
5
2
28
l
16
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

4
4

-

3

4

4
4

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

25
3
22
17

2
2
-

.
-

5
5
-

27
25
2

2

7
3
4

28 .127 __ 3 ___2
6.
32
2 _
13 127
15
4
- -

-

_

_

2

-

-

-

1
1

8
8

2
2

6
-

7
7
6
1

7
7
5
2

16
15
15

16
16
16

-

-

-

7
7
6
1

_

_

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

_

8
2
2
6
1

1
1
1

-

-

_

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated,
Excludes department stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




~ W ~

16
8
9

1
1

23
13
6
7
10

-

9
9
9
-

16
9
7
2
7
3
4

-

-

_
_

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

46
35
30
5
11
5

15
15
5
10

7
6
4
2
1

0

_

_

2
2
1
1
29
29
26
3
-

9
9
_

3
3
3
_

«

7

24

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- — 45— - 1
.9
11
45
43
2
n

-

-

-

_
-

8
8

_
_

9
9

_
-

8

55

57

31
24
24

57
55

27
25

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_
_

_

_

-

_
_
_

-

_

_

.

_

Table B-342!

GutleUf.,

cM o h

J.

7 O oU

O ld Jfa*du tO A *

U

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

Occupation and sex

A verag e
h o u rly
ea rn in g s
2/

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
S
$
i
s
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0
ann
and
under
.80 .85 .90 .95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 over

S

Mon
Heat treaters, class B ............... ....
Inspectors, class C ......................
Machine-tool operators, production, class B ...
Machine-tool operators, production, class C
i
Total y . .........................
Time.................... ...... .
..
Incentive....................... .
Grinding-machine operators, class C .......
Machine-tool operators, tool room....... .
Polishers and buffers, metal........ ......
Polishing and buffing-machine operators ......
Set-up men, machine tools............... .
Truckers, hand........................ .

-

.
-

3

-

3

1.45
1.34
1.49
1.42
1.72
1.49
1.41
1.67
1.98

-

-

-

-

1 .2 1

-

-

-

1

23
28

1 .5 8

58
14
44

_

1.39
1.34

66

20

30
72
44
95
0/
y¥
*
67

-

-

2

2
2
-

-

-

2

1

7
-

-

_
3
3

1

4

8

3
1

2

-

8

Women
Assemblers, class C .................... .
Inspectors, class C .....................

320

71

1.24
1.19

3

9

3

12

9

4
6

1

-

1
1

2

-

-

5
5

4

2
-

4

2

1
1

-

3
-

8

12

11

2
1

1

18
2

2

1

2
2
1

_
-

1

-

-

4

3
3

5

3
3
3

4
4
-

5
5
7
3
9
10

2
25

1

3

39

5

_

_

.

13
6

7

5
2
2

3

-

-

2

23
15

18
3

7
3

10

19
1

1

1

7

10

4

15
18

2

17

1

2

3
1

4

2

6

13

4
4
4

-

1

3

-

3
3
2

2

-

6
4
-

-

8

2
2
1

2

3

11

12

2

18
34
2

7
8
6

1

3

2
4

10

5
15

1

2
8

1

-

7

1

_
i ___
1/
2/
2/

2

2

12
6

10

j
5 ! 9 1164
3
3 ! 4

5
2

4
2

11

Th e s t u d y c o v e r e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h m ore th a n 2 0 w o r k e rs e n g a g e d i n t h e m a n u fa c tu r e o f c u t l e r y , hand t o o l s an d g e n e r a l h a rd w a r e .
E x c lu d e s prem ium p a y f o r o v e r t im e an d n i g h t w o rk .
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r o p e r a t o r s o f m a c h in e - t o o ls n o t shown s e p a r a t e ly .

9 n S i* ib U e d . 1 /

T a b le B - 3 5 :

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
Number
of
workers

O c c u p a tio n and s e x

Average
hourly
earnings

$

1.05

$
1 .1 0

1 .1 0

1.15

$

U nder

s
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45

$
1 .5 0

1.35 1.40 1.45

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

-

14
13

25
24

$

1.15

$
1 .2 0

$

1 .2 0

1.25

1 .3 0

$
1 .6 0

s
1.70 1.80

s

$

$

|$

$

$

$

!$

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2.40 2.50

21

19

17

11

6

10
2

6

6

16
59
5

18
27
8

13
16
4

17
7
9

11
4
9

6

8
5

6
3

3

2

5

8
6
2

4.

3

2

3

1*

6

2

2.40

2 .5 0 | 2 .6 0

$

2/

1.05

lip

1.83
1.64

-

110

Total

2 .0 2

353
142
31
111

1.67
1.64
1.45
1.69
1.72
1.70
1.49
1.46
1.20

..........................................................

A s s e m b le r s , c l a s s B .
T o t a l ................................................
A s s e m b le r s , c l a s s C i
I n c e n t iv e

...............................

222

/i

h J-

In s p e c t o r s , c l a s s A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
In s p e c to r s , c la s s B
In s p e c t o r s , c la s s C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ja n ito r s

141

154
89
146

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

-

1
8

_

_

8

_
_

_
_

2

8
15
25

12
9
6

_

1

21

10

9

1
_______
Se e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e




2 .6 0

2.70 j

2.70
and
over

$

Men
A s s e m b le r s , c l a s s A :

1.70 1.80 1.90

2
1
1

3

10
9
2
7
3

2

12

19

6

3

3

16

16

19

17
6

11
10

22
10

3

1

7

15
5
1
4
2

62
14
12

59
21

2

30
3

14
15
6
12

5

1

7

10

9
4
18
17
5 ! 7
9 ! 19

18

16

3
3

10
2
3

6

8

1

49
42

£
>

1

7

38
22

4

7
30
10
_

3

10

7

6

4
7

4

2

9
16
1

3

9
3

10
1
1

16
7
7
1
8
2
2

3

-

-

1
2

2

2

2

_

_

----------- 1
Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11

M

Table B-35:

GcltMt&Uf 9 w u t U d 1/
S&fe,

-

Q4t44(
otiU&l

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex

of
workers

hourly
earnings

H

Men - Continued

Drill-press operators, radial, class A .....
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A ....................
Engine-lathe operators, class As Total ....
Time...
Incentive
Grinding-machine operators, class As
Time ..........................
Incentive .......................
Milling-machine operators, class At
T + n .T...........................
n. 1
Time
,
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class As Total .........
Time .......
Incentive ....
Machine-tool operators, production, class B
s
Total 2/ ....... .....................
Time .............................
Incentive ........................
Drill-press operators, single- and multipleppindle, class B
Engine-lathe operators, class B: Total ....
Time...
Incentive
Grinding-machine operators, class B
s
Time ............ ... .
Incentive
Milling-machine operators, class Bs
Time ..........................
Inc n i T ...............................
etTA
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B . .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B Total .........
s
Time.......
Incentive ....
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 2/ U
Engine-lathe operators, class C ....................
Grinding-machine operators, class C ..............
.....

Tool-end-die makers (jobbing shops) ...................
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ...
Truckers,
Ual
Uml

Vtevul

mlerna A
/O oae P

. . .

s

$

$

$

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

|
$
2.70
and
2.60 2.70 over
S *
12 .6 0

$

Machine-tool operators, production, class As
Total 2 / ............................
Time .............................

U a a V\4m a

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
§
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
Under 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1 .4 0 1.45 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0
$
1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0

........

_
_

_
«
_

.
.
_
_

2
2

•

2

566
277
289
39

1.92
1.71
2.12
1.79

25
58
42
16
155
47
108

1.81
1.76
1.72
1.89
2.08
1.71
2.24

78
33
45

1.91
1.68
2.08

58
35
23

1.85
1.75
2.00

666
271
395

1.68
1.49
1.81

42
48
20
28

1.59
1.71
1.37
1.96

120
#

1.78

163
64
99
50

1.65
1.52
1.74
1.7$

79
24
5
5
540
8
34
97
260
243
39
11
16

1.69
1.52
1.77
1.83
1.75
1.37
1.77
1.98
1.94
1.40
2.02
1.76

152
MB

1.20
1.55

29
2

14
5

18
4

34
3

28
4

3
5

8
6

7
13

106

1.52

1

3

3

3

4

5

3

10

\\\l

—
_

_

_

_
_

_

_

•
•

-

•

•

•

-

*

-

*
»

1

2
_
•
—

—
_

1

21
U
7

_
—
-

2
6
6
-

1

—
—

_

_

2
1

_

_

_

4
_
A
2

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
“

2

-

1

—

—

—

2
3

-

—
—

! l
7
3

11

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

1

_

_

A

3

1

1
3

1

—
-

—
1

-

3
10
2
8

—

I
18
18

—
22
.
.
22

I
11
.
.
11

-

12
—
12

4

3

1

1

4

3

I

I

-

—
-

-

5

2

5

2

2
_
2

_
-

.
»
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
—
2

1
—
1

1

1
13
9
4
6
6
-

3
13
11
2

2
7
7
—

—

35
30
5

2
11
10
1
10
_
10

5

8
6
2

5
9
5
4
12
3
9

8
8
! 0
1
I
1 6
6

14
8
6

M
10
A

11
6
5

5
1

7

3

4

3

4

7

3

4

3

6
2
4

21
20
1

8
5
3

4
4

3
3

4
2
2

4
4

2
2

-

80
61 1134 ' 85
18
99 i 35
47
1 50 ; 62
H j 35

63
—
63

39

33

18

15

20

39

33

18

15

20

8
2

8
3

6
1

1
2

1
6

2

2

3
11
3
8

r
8
—
8

2

6

2

5
—
5

2
2

26
7
19
11

21

k
4

3
—
3
5

21
10

9

5

4

4
4
43

•
-

1

4 j 4 1
1
9 I
9 i
1
- 1
6
13 |
8 1
A
2
5 j
1
18 I 35
21
14
A
U
2
13
7
4
3
19
1
-

5

13
10
3
37
6
12

13
9
4
28
12
16
2
10
—

10
33
-

8

1

7
2

2
11

8

1
37

7

6

31

-

-

•
•
-

n

10
—
10

•1
»
5
5

3
—
3

1
—
_
•
-

2

13
13

2
2

5
5

i

•
—
—

3

5
5
2 j

2

-

-

11

2

2

2

2

-

ll
71

2
63

2
50

2
38

2
22
1

-

-

I

-

20
1

5

1
1

2

-

-

-

-

-

1
2
45
24
1

1

1

3

1
21

6

16

5

1

3

i

19

26
24
36

29
44
a

11
59
43

-

1

4

2
19
18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

“

1

-

-

3

6

1
1

3

8

6

16

13
4
9
31

5
—
5

3

2
63
50
1
1
3

_

5

7
•
»
7

2

1
28 ! 30
21 !
19
9 ; 9 j
A ! l i 3 i 2
2 j 2 ! 2 j
3
2
3
- i 2 1 2
1
1
—
3 1 10 ! 13 !
_
1 2 i n2 !
8 1
_
3 1
i
2
3
5 i 4
3
5 ! 2
2
2
!
2
1
1
5
—
2 ! 4
1
1
1
15
39 ! 9 s 18
- ;
l ; 3
2
15 i 2 ! 5
| “
3

18

51
24
27
1

1

1

18

3
3
1

70
33
37
2

13
ii
7
3 ! 6

•

33

131
112
19
5

m
m

_
-

33
33
2

64
47
17
1

•
•

2

28
28
3
—
-

43
38
5
6

_

_
-

31
d

15
14
1
11

1
—

35
35
4

3
2
1

2

6
3
1
2

3

2

3

2

1

2

_

2

-

1

1

Women
T s A i o i j r»_T hj* G . .. .. . ........................
npftTt
m
Machine-tool operators, production, class C 2/ • •
•
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C ....................

i ___ :
_

-

-

-

_

i_ _ _ _ _ _!

2/ The s tu d y covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of non-electrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual ( 9 145

edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were included,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Includes data for operators of machine-tools not shown separately.
lJ High earnings in this classification due to predominance of incentive workers who constitute 85 percent of total.




12,

Table B-541:

1/
2/

CjA&oeSMf

The study covered grocery stores with more than 7 workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-60:

1/
2/

StofreA 1/

Ba+uhi+uj,

1/

The study covered banking establishments , ith more than 20 workers.
r
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

13.

Table B-7211s

l/
2/

P o w e r s J l t U t H C p U e A , 1/

The study covered nower laundries with more than 20 workers*
Excludes prend.van pay for overtime and night work*

Table B-7538:

Auto Refiatis SU&pA 1
/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 4 workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 7538) and motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used (Group 551) as defined in the Standard
Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers*
Occupational Mage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




14.

C:

Uni on Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect July 1, 1951.)

Table C-15:

B u ild tiu j, Q&ftdtkucti&n
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table C-205: B a h & l i e d

Hours
per
week

Journeymen
Bricklayers ......................................
Carpenters

..................... .

Electricians (inside wiremen) ............
Painters

........ ..................... ............

Plasterers

............ .....................

Plumbers .................................. *
Steam fitters .............................

$2,695
2.350
2.4-75
2.200
2.695
2.4-75
2.4-75

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.800

40

Helpers and laborers
Building laborers .........................

Table C-205:

Boh&lied

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Pie and pastry shops:
Bakers, cooks, dough mixers ............
Custard filler mixers ...................
Helpers:
Up to 9 months .......................
Over 9 m o n t h s ..... .......... ........
Dough breakers, porters, tub washers,
common laborers:
Up to 1 m o n t h .............. .........
1 to 3 months ........................
3 to 6 m o n t h s ......... ..............
Over 6 months ........................
General operators (women):
Up to 1 month ........................
1 to 3 m o n t h s .... ...................
3 to 6 months ........................
6 months to 1 y e a r ............ ......
1 to 1 & years ........................
-Over if- y e a r s ..... ..................




$1,670
1.550
1.490
1.405

40
40
40
40

1.370

40

1.180
1.230
1.280
1.330

40
40
40
40

1.000
1.070
1.140
1.200

40
40
40
40

1.565
1.555
1.445

40
40
40

.875
.925

40
40

.950
1.030

40
40

1.045

40
40
40
40

1.095

1.145
1 .1 9 0

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,405
1.270

40
40

1.170
1.220

40
40

.930
.980
1.030
1.100

40
40
40
40

.800
.850
.900
.950
1.000
1.050

40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Newspapers* - Continued
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ....................... .
Night work ............ .
Pressmen-in-charge, web presses:
Day work _____.......................
Night w o r k ............. .
Stereotypers:
Day work ............. ........ .......
Night w o r k ............. ................

Table 0-41:

jU g

C cU

P /U tU ifU j,

Clas sification

Book and job shops:
Bindery women ............... .........
Bookbinders................. , .... .
.
Compositors, hand ............ .........
Machine operators .....................
Machine tenders (machinists) ..........
Machinist-operators ...................
Photoengravers ........................
Press assistants and
feeders ............................
Pressmen:
Cylinder ...........................
Vertical ......... ...............
Platen......... ...................
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day w o r k .............. ............
Night w o r k .................... .
Machine tenders (machinists):
Day work ...........................
Night work .........................
Machinist-operators:
Day w o r k ................. ..........
Night work ............... .........
Photoengravers:
Day work ...........................
Night w o r k .............. ..........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,0 50
2.050
2.100
2.100
2 .150
2.225
2.267

40
40
40
40
40
40
37f

1.876

37f

2.345
2.185
1.900

37l
37-f
37i

2.507
2.640

37f
37f

2.560
2.693

37l
37i

2.640
2.773

3%

2.400
2.714

371
35

371

Hours
per
week

$2,346
2.514

371
35

2.613
2.800

37f
35

2.495
2.640

37i37f

<
7'Ui*tAit

O fL& U itU U p £*HfUo4fM &
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week
Table C-27:

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Working foremen......................
Dough mixers, overmen................
Bench ha n d s ..........................
Divider operators ............ .......
Mixers' helpers, ingredient scalers,
molder operators, oven feeders and
dumpers, open kettle friers, wrappingand slicing-machine operators .......
Helpers (men):
Up to 6 months .............. ......
6 months to 1 year ................
1 to 2 years ......................
Over 2 years ......................
Helpers (women):
Up to 6 months ....................
6 months to 1 year ................
1 to 1- years .....................
f
Over if- years .....................
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Working foremen, dough mixers;
overmen............................
Jobbers ................................
Bench hands, open kettle friers .......
Porters (women;:
Up to 6 months ......... ...........
After 6 months ....................
Packers (women):
Up to 6 months ............... .
After 6 months ....... .............
Frosters (women):
Up to o months .......... .
6 months to ll years ..............
ll to 2 years ................. .
Over 2 years ......................

Table C-27: P A 4 4 t & i 4 U p - Q o 4 l t i H 4 4 & d

“ Q o t U U U i s d

Agreement A*
1-man busses:
First 3 months ......................
3 to 12 months ........ ..............
After 1 year ........................
Agreement B:
1-man busses:
First 3 months ......................
3 to 12 months ......................
After 1 y e a r ....... ................

Table C-42*

M&toflPlUch

Hours
per
week

$1,480
1.510
1.550

40
40
40

.850
.950
1.100

50
50
50

Sb'tia&ld

/and affelp & U
Classification

Bakery:
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B ............................
Food products :
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B ..... ....... ...............
Agreement C ............................
Agreement D ..................................
Agreement E ............................
General transportation:
Truck d r i v e r s ..... ............ ........
Helpers ............... ................ .

Rate
per
hour

$1,470

HOUT8

per
week

1.400

48
48

1.603
1.600
1.430
1.290
1.120

40
40
40
40
40

1.470
1.370

48
48

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

15,

D:
Table D-i:

Minimum

Entrance Rates

ZutbaMoe

1/

P a t e A fort.

E:

Plant ' J n t b .
kaJai

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table E-l:

gjufo

^ b i f o a r t a u t i o t P sU H m M O H A .

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w o r k e rs i n e s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h s p e c i f i e d
minimum r a t e s i n - ________________________

Minimum rate (in cents)

All
Indus-

of

All establishments ......
60 and under ...... .
70 .....................
75 .....................
80 .....................
Over 80 and under 85 ....
85 .....................
Over 85 and under 90 ....
90 .....................
Over 90 and under 95 ....
95 .....................
Over 95 and under 100 ....
100 ....................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
105 ....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
110 ....................
Over 110 and under 115 ...
115 ....................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
120 ....................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 ....................
Over 125 and under 130 ...
130 ....................
Over 130 and under 135 ...
135 ....................
Over 135 and under IkO ...
IkO and over ...........
Establishments with no
established minimum ....

Manufacturing
Nondurable
Durable
Whole­ Retail
goods
goods
Public
sale
trade Serv­
Establishments with ices
101 or utilities* trade
501 or
3/
more
21-100
21-500 more
workers workers workers workers

.LW.,Q...
0.9
.9
10 .2
2.5
.3
2 .2
.9
6.3
.3
2.0
2 .5
5.5

k.l
1 .5
7.7

.2
2.6
2.2
.2
3-k
k.5
k.5
7.3
.1
3.k
k.5

.5
.2
18 .6

20.k
6.5
1 .6
.2
1 6 .1
2.7
6.9
k.8
2.2
-

_
6.k
-

100.0

_
_
1.7
5.3
3.8
5-k
6.3
3.0
1 5 .6
3.8
3.8
6.9
7.3
8.9
12.1
6.9

-

9.2

-

-

32.2

. W J L

100.0

Ik. 8
1 2 .1
k.5
-

3k.3
k.l
k.O
1 .2
3.7
1 5 .6
6.k
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

.7

67.9

30.7

100.0

7.k
1 7 .8
1 6 .k
6.9
16 .6
9.0
-

25.9

100.0

100.0

6 .8
5-1
7.k
11.k

2 1 .k
20.3
28.5
2 .2
.9
8.7
-

-

-

-

2.2

-

10.8

-

-

Shift differential

Durable
goods

Nondurable
goods

Machinery

11.7
5.2
-

39-k

50.2

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, all
establishments .......

13-6

3.k

lk. 9

k.l

7.3

O.k

15.3

2.7

13.0

2.9

Receiving shift
differentials .....

13.
k

3.k

lk. 9

k.l

5.9

.k

15.3

2.7

13 .0

2.9

7.6
1 .0
2.8

2.0
-

8.7
1 .2
3.1

2.3
-

2 .1
1 .1

.k
-

8.5
-

2.7
-

1.7
1.7

.2
-

.7
•3
2.1
.7

.6
.7
•
7
(2/)

.9
.k
2.5
.6

.6
.8
.8
.1

1.0

.k
-

.7
.9
6.5
.k

2.7
-

-

.2
-

5-7
1.0
k.7

1.3
1.3

6 .2
.6
5.6

1.6
1.6

3.0
3-0
-

-

6.8
6.7

-

11.3
-

2.7
2.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

.1

-

-

.1

.1

-

.2

.8

-

-

-

-

Uniform cents
(per hour) ......
Under 5 cents ...
5 cents .......
Over 5 and under
7 l/2 cents ...
7 l/2 cents ....
10 cents ......
Over 10 cents ...
Uniform percent­
age ............
5 percent ......
10 percent .....
Over 10 per­
cent ........
Full day’ pay for
8
reduced hours ....
Receiving no
differential ......

.p

11.3

l.k

18.0
l/
2/

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance and real estate.
\j Excludes department stores.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Cutlery,
hand •
tools,
ant1
hard:fare
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
All
industries

1P0»P

6.7
7.1
13.5
8.3
9.8
k.k
-

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

All manufacturing industries l/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
TJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

Table E-2:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E

ScU& dul& d Ws&eJzhf cMoUtU,
\/ W O R K E R S

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN -

E M P L O Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Weekly hours

All establishments ...................
Under 3 5 hours .......................
3 5 hours .............. • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • •
Over 3 5 and under 3 7 i h o u r s ..............................
3 7 j h o u r s ........*................. .
Over 3 7 j and under 1*0 hours ...........
1*0 hours .*..•••..................... .
Over 1*0 and under 1** hours ••••........
1
1** h o u r s............ ••••••••••••«••«•
1
Over 1** and under 1 8 hours •••••••••••••
1
|
1 8 h o u r s ..........•••••..............
*

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

All

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

1 0 0 .0

Whole­
sale
trade

1 .7

2 .0

3 .9
1 .1

1 .0
-

7.8

1 .3

1 .5

1 .5
8 0 .0

-

8 7 .6

8 7 .6

1 .8

.2

.2

3 .2

.6
_

.

-

.1
6 .1

-

•

8 7 .8

l.*
*i

1 0 0 .0

.

.

2 .7
3 .3

-

1 .2
•

-

9 2 .3
1 .7

-

.

-

.

9.7

8 .3

y

1 0 0 .0

.

0 .6

Retail
trade

.

-

-

1 0 0 .0

!

.
-

9 .7
1* . 0
3

1 0 .9
1* . 8
2

2 1 .5
21 * 0
.
-

•
-

1 .8
m

-

.1*

0

2 7 .2

.8

1 .6
-

1 .7

1 0 0 .0

s

Hui*
11 * !
.*

1 0 0 .0

j

1 .9
-

-

.2

-

.5

1 0 0 .0

.

«
»

I

.2

.8

1* . 3
6
-

1 .7
1 2 .8
•
•

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

11

81**3

•

All
indus­
tries

Services

Finance**

-

u .o
1 .3

-

7 1 .5

3 0 .5
6 .8

7 7 .2

7 6 .1

3 .2
2 .2

2 .9

3 .5

-

-

•

-

3 .8

5 .1
1 1 .0

3.1*

U.3

;

1 * .6

1 1 .7
2 .3

1 3 .0
2 .8

8 2 .5

5 .2

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

_
-

-

-

1 1 .9
-

-

-

-

i

-

1

5 7 .1

6 3 .8

•
1.9
11.1
29.9

!

22.7

.1*

6

1 .2
3 2 .0

1 9 .3
1 2 .1*

ll*.8

2 5 .1*

.i *

1 5 .6

.6
1 3 .2

1 9 .7
1 * .8

Retail
trade

1 1 .2

Services

1
! i o o .o
j -------

a

2 .3

|
i

i________

#*

1 .3
-

-

I

1/
2/
"y
*

1 0 0 .0

-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Services

y

1

Data relate to women workers*
Excludes department stores.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate*

Pa id J to ltd a ifl

Table E-3*

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Number of paid holidays

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN -

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a nufactu res

All

indus­
tis
re

Non­

Durable
goods

durable

| 100.0

100.0

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

I 100.0

y

goods

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

y

Non­
durable
goods

' 100.0

! 10 0 .0

i 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

y

!

1
100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Durable
goods

All

|

1
All establishments .................. .

Retail
trade

~

!
Establishments providing paid
holidays ................... ..... .
1 to 5 days
6 days
6 [ days .............................
j
7 days
7i day ..............................
8 days ..............................
9 days
10 days .............................
11 days
12 days
Establishments providing no paid
holidays • • • • • • • .... ..

1
1

!

99.U

99.8

9 9 .7

100.0

100.0

2.9
18.7

3.7
19.3

3.8
16.6
38.3

2.6
111
*.*
.2
39.0
•
8.1*
8.1*

1.2
1.2
31.0
•
58.5

(V>
33.8
.2
3U.lt
2.1
.6
6.6
.1

37.5
.9
-

-

1*1.0
•

-

-

9 6 .7

98.5

111
*.*
16.3

.
26.3

m

28.8
5.1*

8.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.1
1.7

-

1*3.3
1.5
21*.5
•
2.9
• #
-

100.0

81*.2
_

-

11.0
-

It5.9
6.0
6.0
26.3

8 9 .0

•
-

-

-

92.7

95.3

97.3

85.9

8 *.1
1

9*l
l.*

60.3

8.1*
! 3l*.0
|
.9
1*1.3

9.6
35.8
1.1
1*3.3
1*.6
.9

10.3
33.0
.
1*9.3

6.7
191
*.*
6.2
11*.8
.
3.6
5.2

2.1
13.1*

39.7

26.7

!

« >
1.2
.6

-

1*.7

•
-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

10.1*
30.7
13.6

-

1* .8
9
6 .7

1
i

131
*.*
.5
6.6

|
l

26.2
10.7
.1
6.1

•

7*6

3.1
_

1
1

-

-

1

.6

.2

.3

3.3

1.5

15.8

7.3

1*
.7

2.7

1/ Excludes department stores.
Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
2/ Less +-b»Ti .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
 Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

31.8
.
29.2

m

ll*.l

15.9

5.6

19.7
i
1

___________ i

5 0 .2

17,

Paid V<uaatia*U ($o*mal PmuiMo A)
m

Table u .

P E R C E N T OF PL A NT W O RK ERS E M PL O Y ED IN —

PE R C E N T O F O FFICE W O R K ER S E M PL O Y ED IN —
Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries

M anufacturing

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

y

Finance**

M anufacturing

All
indus­
tries

Services

y

All

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

R etail
trade

Services

y

t .......
.

|

1

!
All establishnonts ......................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

] 100.0

1 100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

j
1
6 months of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......

j
6I*.8

61*.6

62.9

78.5
11.6
61.6
•

Under 1 week .............. .
1 w e e k ............. •••••••••........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ........ .
2 weeks ..............................

6.7
1*5.1
l.*
*l
8.6

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

35.2

35.1*

37.1

21.5

99.2

99.6

99.9

97.7

8.3
1*8.2
5.7
2.1*

7.9
1*6.6
6.1*
2.0

5.3

67.7

50.5

37.2

•

-

6.3
31.5
-

37.2
•

-

12.7

-

32.3

1*9.5

62.8

100.0

100.0

96.1*

67.7

100.0

15.2
•
81*.8
-

22.6
•

58.2

62.6

65.3 .

1*9.7

i
j

31.1

1*8
.1*
12.1*

-

1*1.6
H*.9
•
1.7

1.8

56.6
6.6
2.1

77.1*

1*1.8

37.1*

3l*.7

50.3

68.9

73.7

97.3

97.5

98.9

90.6

100.0

2.3
1*8.1
-

86.5
.2
10.8

90.1*
.3
8.2

67.7

63.9

23.3

.1
83.0
.2
llt.O

22.9

36.1

26.3

2.7

2.5

1.1

9.1*

22.6
•

-

9.1*
1*0.3
•
-

31.1

-

-

1*0.6
23.9
9.0

-

38.1*
1

!
!

18.1

38.1*

.
18.1
-

61.6

81.9

97.6

j

83.7

7.7

!

59.1* !
i

1 year of service
Establishments with paid v a c a t i o n s.....
Under 1 week ................ ••••«••••
1 w e e k ...............................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............
2 w e e k s .......... ...................

(j/>
ll*.6
.1
81*.5

«
.

100.0

•

.

.

32.9
67.1

28.0
72.0

77.6

2.9
97.1

-

-

_

.

_

100.0
•

l.*
*l
61*.2
-

62*1*
•
35.2

15.1

2.1*

16.3

9.3
.1
90.2

8.5
.1
91.3

16.3
81.1*

.8

.*
1

.1

2.3

Establishments with paid vacations .......

99.3

99.6

99.9

97.7

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

73.7

97.1*

97.5

98.9

90.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

83.7

1 week ............................ .
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s .............
2 weeks ..............................

8.3
2.2
88.8

5.9
2.6
91.1

5.6
2.9
91.1*

9.0
-

22.5
2.1*
75.1

7.1
.8
92.1

30.7
-

2.9
-

50.1*
-

58.1*
32.2

1*9.5

51.8
7.1*
1*0.8

68.6
-

23.3

1*3.1
1*7.1*
8.1*

1*5.6
-

97.1

1*5.7
39.2
12.6

50.5

69.3

1*6.6
33.1*
17.1*

51*.l*

15.1

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

.7

.1*

.1

-

-

-

26.3

2.6

2.5

1.1

9.1*

-

-

-

16.3

Establishments with paid vacations •••••..

99.7

99.6

9 9 .9

97.7

100.0

97.7

97.1*

97.5

98.9

90.6

100.0

100.0

83.7

1 week ...•••••............... .......
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ............
2 w e e k s ...............................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ........................... ...
3 weeks .................................................................................... ...
Over 3 w e e k s .................................................................. ...

1.8

1.1*
-

.5

9.1

1.2

10.5
-

•
-

15.0

11.3

6.9

32.0

6.1

27.1

79.7

81.9

61.9

27.1*

93.7

78.1

7l*.l

63.2

60.0

6U.2

9.6

2.3
90.1*

-

37.5

77.0

12.3
(]/)
57.6
.3
26.9

«

-

•
•

58.8

37.8

79.3
5.0

7.3
-

H*.l
-

8.1*
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

-

18.8
3.6

-

-

-

-

67.5
2.3
30.2

•

-

2 years of service

88.7
2.3

-

15 years of service

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

2/

1/

3y
*
FRASER
**

•

-

20.8
.1
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

18.5
-

17.5
-

26.7
-

70.2
1.2

.1*

.1

2.3

*
*

Excludes department stores.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Digitized for


100.0

-

6.3
-

100.^

-

11.1*
*

100.0

-

25.9
-

-

-

19.5
2 .3

.3

2.6

•

•

.

25.8
-

27.8
-

1*0.6
2.0
16.0
-

2.5

1.1

9.1*

.1*

-

-

-

*

100.0

-

•

-

*

-

-

16.3

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18.

Table

P a id £ ic J i Jl& aipe (fy o k m a l P a m M

E- :
5

m

A)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Manufacturing

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .....................

All
indus­
tries

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 year of service
Establishment with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ..... .
Under 5 days .................... ..
5 d a y s ..............................
6 days ..............................
7 d a y s ........ .................. .
10 days ........ ............... ......
12 d a y s .... ........................
lit days ................... ..........
15 days .............................
20 days ................. ............
Over 20 days ................... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....... ...........
Under 5 days .........................
5 days ..................... ........ .
6 days .......... ................... .
7 days ......................... .
10 days ....................... .
12 days ..................... ........
lit days ....................... .
15 days .............................
20 days .......... ...................
Over 20 days .................. ......
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ................ ..
15 years of service
Establishments with formal''provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
Under 5 days .............. .
5 day* ..............................
6 days ............................ .
7 days ..............................
10 d a y s ......................... .
12 days ............................ .
lit days .............................
15 days .............................
20 days ..............................
Over 20 d a y s ...... ........ .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........... .

I

; 1 0 0 .0

‘ 1 0 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

1/
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 1 0 0 .0
r —
-------

y
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

I 1 0 0 .0

100.0

;

P u b lic
u tili­
ties*

Non­

D u rab le
goods

All

durable
goods

100.0

lo o .o

100.0

W hole­
sale
trad e

R etail
tra d e

100.0

100.0

1 2 .1

2 3 .1 *
3 .3
6 .7
3 .3
3 .1
.1
1 .1 *
5 .5

26. u

1 .9
7 .2

3 .9
l * .o
8 .0

-

-

7 6 .6

7 3 .6

7 l* .7

6 3 .7

7 3 .2

8 7 .9

8 0 .6

9 7 .1

9 6 .2

1 * 9 .1
1 .6
5 .0
.1*

5 9 .3
1 .7
3 .8

6 1 .1 *

1 * 1 .7
-

2 6 .8
.6
1 7 .6
5 .5

1 6 .9
l* .l*
•

1 9 .2
1 .0
1 5 .8

5 .0
-

1 5 .8
-

2 .9
-

1 3 .5
2 .3

8 .3
2 .8
.1
1 .1 *
2 2 .0

1 0 .3
3 .5
-

3 .1
-

6 .3
-

3 .7
6 .6
3 .1 *
3 .6
-

-

Services

1/
;

100.0

j
2 5 .3
1 *.2
5 .2

1 .9
3 .7
9 .2
3 .9
-

3 6 .3
-

2 6 .8
.6

1 8 .5
-

1 7 .7
8 .5
•
-

1 7 .8
-

1*.8
1 9 .1
1 7 .8
-

l* .l*
6 .3
1 .1 *
-

-

1 .1 *
1*.8

1 9 .2
U .U
1 2 .U
2 .U
•
-

2 .U

-

2 .9
-

!

,

,
-

2 .9
-

1 .5
2 .3

-

-

1
:

-

2 .1
-

I

-

.9
.9

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

9 6 .8

99.3

99.1

100.0

„ 86.7

93.3

5 .1
.9
1 .2

2.0
.7

.9

7.6

6.7

!

-

i

-

:

(1 / )

13.3
i.9
ll.U

6.7

-

-

U.U
2.3

-

2U.8
6.7
7.9
10.2

-

j
i
i

-

>

j

16.8
-

9.2
7.6
-

-

-

.

.9
o
•c
1 .5
-

-

(3 / )

-

1
1

.7
.7

3 .2
1 .1
1 .2
.8
.1

75.2
i

83.2

13.2
10.6

-

-

20.2
1.9
ll.U
-

1.3

-

7.6

-

2.2

30.1
3.2
6.U
12.0
3.U
5 .1

-

-

-

-

2.3

-

-

.9

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

23.8
-

-

7 .5

1 .9
2 8 .3
9 .8

3 1 .7
1 1 .0

-

-

6.9

2.2

5 0 .9

1*0 .7

3 8 .6

5 8 .3

7 3 .2

8 3 .1

8 0 .8

9 5 .0

8 U .2

9 U .9

98.0

99.1

92.U

79.8

93.3

69.9

76.2

1 * 9 .1
1 .6
3 .1 *
O .U

5 9 .3
1 .7
2 .0

6 1 .1 *

1 *1 .7
-

1 6 .9
l* .l*
-

1 5 .8
-

5 .2
2 .8

6 .0

1 0 .2
-

6 .3

3 .U
-

1.3

30.1
3.2
2.8
1 2 .1
3.U
3.5

13.2
10.6
-

5 .2
3 1 .7
1 1 .0

3 1 .5
-

1 .1 *
-

-

.
-

_
-

_
-

2.3
-

5 .1

_
-

7 .5

8 ,0
2 8 .3
9 .8

3 .1
•

2.2

3 .5
•

5^5
3 .9
-

20.2
1 .9
ll.U
-

6.7

1 3 .5
2 .3

.9
.9
-

7.6

2 .9
-

5 .1
.9
1 .0
.9
o

2.0
.7

-

1 9 .2
1 .0
1 2 .U
2 .U

5 .0
-

-

2 6 .8
.6
1 7 .6
5 .5

5 0 .9

1*0.7

3 8 .6

5 8 .3

7 3 .2

8 3 .1

8 0 .8

1*9.1*
1 .6
3 .3
•1*

5 9 .3
1 .7
2 .0

6 1 .1 *
1 .9
2 .2
-

1 *1 .7

2 6 .8
♦6
1 7 .6
5: 5

1 6 .9
U .U

lu 8
2 .8
.1
1 .6
2 3 .1
1 1 .7

5 .5
3 .5
•

i.s

3 .1

3 .9

6 .3
-

1 .9
2 9 .8
1 U .9

3 1 .7
1 6 .2

5^1*
1 7 .8
1 3 .7
U .8

5 0 .6

1 * 0 .7

3 8 .6

5 8 .3

7 3 .2

.1
6 .1
2 2 .0

-

1 .9
2 .2

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

Excludes department stores.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less thAn .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Whole­
sale
trade

1

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................
Under 5 days ........................
5 d a y s ........ .....................
6 d a y s ..... ........................
10 days ..............................
lit days ........................ .
15 days ..............................
Over 20 days ........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .......... .

Durable
goods

All

M a n u fa c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

-

-

U .8

-

-

_
2 .1
«*

-

_

-

—

.u

_

llu
-

-

0/ )
.3
-

-

-

7.6

_
-

-

-

23.8
-

-

-

-

6.9

2.2

-

-

9 5 .0

8 U .2

9 U .9

98.0

99.1

92.U

79.8

93.3

69.9

76.2

2 5 .8
1 .0
1 2 .U
2 .U

5 .0
-

1 5 ,8
_
6 .0
2 .3

5 .2
.9
.9

2.0
.7
•
-

.9

-

7.6
•
-

20.2
1 .9
ll.U
-

6.7
..
-

32.3
3.2
2.8

23.8
9.2
10.6

-

1 .3

-

7.6

-

2*2

3 .5

2 .1
_
-

-

l.U
«
U .8
-

3 .U
.
6 .6

_

_

_

.

•

-

U .o

8 3 .1

7 U .2

9 5 .0

-

-

-

-

2 .9

-

-

-

.U

•c
l.U
-

.9

H i

{}/ )

•

7 .5

,1

•

-

-

-

2I3
-

-

18

-

-

-

6 .9

2I2

7.3

79.8

93.3

6 7 .7

8 U .2

9 U .8

9 8 .0

9 9 .1

92.U

76.2

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-6:

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of bonus

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Services

Finance**

y

i;
!i

mdus-

ii

M anufacturin '
All
indus­
tries

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T WC► KKEILS

ii

"y

M a m i Ain uni n

A 11 !

1.:. li i.O \ ED IN -

Whole-

|

,2 f t .

1

i

Publ.C

!

100.0

100.0

31.5

35.0

51.8

69.5 | 58.8

31.0
.5
-

1

i

30.1

51.8
3.7

67.6

All

i

Durable

■

!

j

|

i

1

100.0

1

1
1

Not.durable
good-:

j

s

v

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

_y_

1
All establishments.... .. ...........

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

i

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 3/ ... .. .............. .. .....

3h.7

Christmas or year-end...... • • • • • • •
Profit-sharing ..................
•••
Other .... ................ •

2 9 .6

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ................... .

*
**

1
i

100.0

100.0

j

100.0

i 28.0 lt8.5
! 28.0 1*5.6
3.0
1
!
|
j
- 9
65.0 ! 68.5 j 72.0
51.5
i _ _ _
_ 1_ _

2* 3
1.

18.6

70.6

31.8

77.7

69.6

87.7

75.9

18.8
-

68.0
2.6
-

31.8
-

77.7
7.9
7.9

69.6

•
7
5.3

2lwl
.3
-

21
.*

22.8
6L.9

3tO
l.
7.t
1l
l. !
t5 .
.7
7.5

65.3

75.7

81.2

2.t
9l

68.2

22.3

3.;
01

12.3

2tl
l.

-

100.0

1
i

!

i

i

ii
l|

ii
ii
|
iu_i

35.0

j

J

j

-

"! i
i
65.0 i

-

^

8.7

'

U8.2

30.5

i

j
|
i

5o.i
8.7
8.6
112
*.

Excludes department stores.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance and real estate.

Table E-7:

94iA44A&4U>e> a n d P-eStUOtl P l o t U

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T * )F P L A N T WOI IK ERA E M P L O Y E D

r
M a NTFAC TI'IUNi.

M a n u f a c t u r in '

Type of plan

Al l

indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Finance**

• Services

1
j

y

i

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

y

|
|

<lurabti>
koocU

[
I

1N—
i

j

J

Retail
trade

!
|

i

Whole­
sale
trade

Vtlh-0
ties-'

y

i

i

Services

i
i

All establishments

IO O j O

100.0

i

io o

.o

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

i

100.0

100.0

1 100.0

|

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

88.1

79.0

81t.0

59.0

78.1

100.0

i
1
i

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 3 .............................................................
/
Life insurance .................. ...............
Health insurance .......................................................................................
Hospitalization......................................................................• • • • •
Retirement pension ................................................ • • • • • • •
Establishments with no insurance or
pension pl a n s ....................... ....................................................................................

2/
3/

1/

«
**

1

91.3
87.1
82.7
79.8
51».l

8.7

9lt.9

96.2

8ti.3

97.0

51t.9

i '.

92.3
92.7
85.6
61.0

95.0
9lt.6
87.lt
61t.8

69.li
77.b
70.5
29.4

88.8
ItO.O
63.9
37.7

53.2
36.3
38.2
Ht.lt

37.7
35.3
lt9.6
18.0

5.1

3.8

15.7

3.0

Excludes department stores.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total,
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1*5.X

i

3lt.l

96.8
96.8
79.2
86.0
50.7

2lt.l
27.8
31.6
12.0

j1

86.6

;

80.5

1
i

1 76.lt
:
;. 71.1
| j lt3.o
i

;
;|

82.8
82.3
7lt.9
lt6.5

86.2
85.7
77.3
| ii9.6

66.5
66.i
63.0
1 30.3

13.lt

i
|

j

51.9

3.2

1*8.1

85.0
:
:

1
I
!
!

15.0

.

:

!

i

1
!

i

11.9

J__

;
i

81t.0
i
: 50.9
;

|

21.0

J ______ L

29.2

j
i
!

16.0

;

1*6.0

53.9
lt9.2
5o.o
13.6

;

59.7

1*1.5
;
j

i

53.5
31.6

i

i a . 21.9
o

i

i
j
1

69.2
60.2
28.1
ltlt.l
l*t
ti

30.8

!

Occupational Wage Survey, Bridgeport, Conn., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

i

20.

Appendix

Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of rates,
in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical,
(b) professional and technical,
(c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A -4 ). The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximise the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay fcr over­
time and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, thev refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents.
The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits.
These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

21,

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S A N D W O R K E R S IN M A J O R I N D U S T R Y D I V I S I O N S A N D IN S E L E C T E D I N D U S T R I E S IN B R I D G E P O R T ,
S T U D I E D B Y T H E B U R E A U OF L A B O R S T A T I S T I C S , J U N E 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
e s tablishment s
studied
2/

Number of
e s tablishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

CONN.,

Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

l/, A N D N U M B E R

Employment
In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .......................... ..........
Manufacturing ............... ..................
Durable goods
.......... ••••••••....... .
Nondurable goods
• •..... ......... ••••..
Nonmanufacturing •••••.... ...................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ........................... ••••
Wholesale trade .................... •••••••
Retail trade, except department stores ••••
Finance, insurance, and real estate •••••••
Services £/ ..... ....................... .

Jj

(J

—

-

21
21

471
253

158
62

16 1

37
25
96

60,800
51,000
9,800
13,000

17

3,700

22
11

2,400
4,200
1,000

2,440
880

240
630

19

1,700

1,2 10

80

7
9
14

744
4,482
344

570
350
27

13,691

712
3,762
224
730
12,444

256

232

-

92
218

21
21
21
21
21

32
57
78
15
36

27

50,220
41,380

73,800

7,720
6,070
5,550

36,630
4,750

8,840
3,020

520
1,650
450

1,290

250

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 6/
Banking ........... ....... ....... ...... ••••••••..
Cutlery, hand-tool and general hardware .........
Auto repair shops ••••••.•••...... •••••........ .
Grocery stores ........... .......... ••••••..... .
Machinery industries 7/ ....................... .
Power laundries ...... ••••.............. •••••••••

21
21
5

8
21
21

8
17
24
13

60
8

8
30
7

826

12
1,327

10

1/ Bridgeport Metropolitan Area (city of Bridgeport, and towns of Fairfield, Milford, Stratford and Trumbull).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing
and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
7/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.

jj




22.

Inc
Page
number

Assembler (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) ...... .......... .
Assembler (machinery) ..................... ...................... .
Bench hand (bakeries) ........ .............................. 14
Biller, machine .......................... .................. .
Bindery woman (printing) ........................................
Bo d y repairman, metal (auto repair shops) ............... •••••••••••
Bookbinder (printing) .... ,......................... ................ ..
Bookkeeper, hand .................. .......... ........................
Bookkeeping-machine operator .........................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (banking) ......... ............. .......
Bricklayer (building construction) ................ ........... .......
Butcher (grocery stores) ........................... ..................
Calculating-machine operator •••••................. ....... ••••••••••
Carpenter (building construction) .... ............. .••••••••...... .
Carpenter, maintenance ................................
•••••
Checker-cashier (grocery stores)
........... ........ .
•••••
Cleaner ...............
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g .... ................................................
Clerk, accounting (banking) ...........................................
Clerk, f i l e ............................................................
Clerk, g e n e r a l ......... .................................. .............
Clerk, grocery (grocery stores) .......................... .
Clerk, meat (grocery s t o r e s ) .............. ........................ .
Clerk, order ....................... ...................................
Clerk, pay roll ......................... ..............................
Clerk, retail, receiving (power laundries) ............... ..........
Compositor, hand (printing) ............... ...........................
Crane operator, electric bridge ............................. .
D r a f t s m a n .......................
Drill-press operator, radial (machinery) ........................ •••••
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (machinery) ....
Duplicating-machine operator .............................
Electrician (building construction) ..................................
Electrician, maintenance ........
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) «••••••....... ............ .
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ............ ......... .
Mechanic, m a i n t e n a n c e .........
Milling-machine operator (machinery) .................................
Millwright .........
Mixer (bakeries) .....
Molder (bakeries) ................. ........................... .
Motortruck d r i v e r .............. ...... ........ .......................
Nurse, industrial (registered) .....
Office b o y .............................................................
Office g i r l ................ ........ ....................... ..........
O i l e r .................................................................
Operator (local transit) ..............................................
Order f i l l e r ..............
Overman ( b a k e r i e s ) ............. ...... ...... •••••....... ........ .
Packer ................. ................... •••••••............ .
Packer (bakeries) ...................
••••••••••
Painter (building construction) ......................................
Painter, maintenance •••..•••••••.....
Photoengraver (printing) ..................................
Pipe fitter, m a i n t e n a n c e ............... .......... *..................
Plasterer (building construction) .................. ........ .
Plumber (building construction) ......................................
Plumber, maintenance ....
Polisher and buffer, metal (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) ......
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (cutlery,
hand tools and hardware)
••••••••
Porter ••••.••••••......
Porter (bakeries) ....................... ........ ........... .........
Press feeder (printing) .......................
•••••
Presser, machine, shirts (power laundries) ........
••••
Pressman (printing) ....................... ..................... ......
Proof-machine operator (banking) ................ ••••....... ...... .
Receiving c l e r k ........
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) .......
S e c r e t a r y ...............
Secretary (banking) ..............
•••••••••••.•••




10
10
3
14
13
14
3
3
12
14
12
4
14
6
12

8
3* 4
12
4
3* 4
12
12
3> 4
4
13
14

8
6
11
11
4
14
6
10
13
7
11
7
14
14
14
6
3
4
7
14

8
14

8
14
14
7
14
7
14
14
7
10
10
8
14
14
13
14
12
3
11
5
12

Page
number
11
Engine-lathe operator (machinery).... .......................
6
Engineer, stationary..... ................................
Extractor operator (power laundries) .........................
13
Feeder (bakeries) ......
••••
14
Finisher, flatwork, machine (power laundries) •••••............ .
13
Fireman, stationary boiler..........................
6
Froster (bakeries) .......
•••••••••••••
14
Fruit man (grocery stores) .................
••••.•••
12
Greaser (auto repair shops) •••••.... ••••••......
•••••
13
Grinding-machine operator (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) ••••••••
10
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ........................
11
Guard.... .......... ....... •••••............. •••••••••••••
8
10
Heat treater (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) .................
Helper (bakeries) ........................................
14
Helper, motortruck driver ••••••........ •••••.. ••••••••••....
.
14
Helper, trades, maintenance..... ............... ••••••....••••
7
Inspector (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) ..................
10
Inspector (machinery) ..... ..................... ••••••.•••••• 10, 11
Janitor ..........................
8
Janitor (machinery) •••••.••...... •••••.....................
10
Key-punch operator ....... ...................... •••••••....
4
Laborer (building construction) ••.••••••••••••......... ....... .
14
Machine operator (printing) ••••.......
14
Machine tender (printing) ..............................
14
Machine-tool operator, production (cutlery, hand tools and hardware).
10
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ............ .....
11
Machine-tool operator, tool room .............................
7
Machine-tool operator, tool room (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) .
10
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) ........
...••••
11
Machinist (printing) ........................................
14
Machinist, maintenance.......
7
Machinist-operator (printing) .............
14
Maintenance man, general utility .............................
7
Marker (power laundries) ................... •••••••••••••.«•••••
13
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ......... ................ ..
7
Set-up man, machine tools (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) •••••••
10
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance...... ........ ..... ....... .
7
Shipping clerk.......
8
Shipping-and-receiving clerk....................................
9
Steam fitter (building construction) .......
14
Stenographer, general..................
5
Stenographer, general (banking) ............................
12
Stenographer, technical....... ••••••••.... ... ••••••••••••••
.
5
14
Stereotyper (printing) .................
Stock boy (grocery stores)... ........................... .
12
Stock handler ..... ............... .................. .
9
Switchboard operator..... ...... ......... ..... ....... .
5
Switchboard operator (banking) ..... .......... •••••••...••••••
12
5
Switchboard operator-receptionist ............. ............. .
Tabulating-machine operator............. ........... .
3, 5
Teller, paying or paying and receiving, commercial
(banking) .........
12
Teller, savings (banking) .......................
Tool-and-die maker.... .............. ............ ........
7
Tool-and-die maker (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) .......... .
10
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ......................... ..
11
Transcribing-machine operator, general ..•••••••••.•••... .
5
Transcribing-machine operator, technical............
5
Truck driver... ......... ......... ........ ..........
9
Trucker, hand............
9
Trucker, hand (cutlery, hand tools and hardware) .............. .
10
Trucks, hand (machinery) .... .... ...... ................ ..
11
Trucker, power... ...... ....... ............ •••••••••••••••
9
Hirret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ............ ...... .
11
typist... ............................ ••••••............
5
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ..••••«•••••........... .
1
3
Washer, machine (power laundries) .... ...... ................
13
Watchman..........
9
Welder, hand (machinery) .......... .............. ........
H
Wrapper (bakeries)
......••••••••.. ........
.
14
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries)
... ••••••••••
13
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE . 0— 1 5
91

12


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102