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Occupational Wage Survey
DALLAS, TEXAS

June 1951

Bulletin No. 1043

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

BUREAU OF

la b o r

s t a t is t ic s

Ewan c,a«ue ' CommiMioner




Contents
Pag©
number
INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................

1

THE DALLAS METROPOLITAN AREA ......................... *..................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ...............................................................

2

TABLE'S:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ••••••.••••••...... ••.••••••............. •••••••.........
A-2
Professional and technical occupations .....................••••..............
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations .............
A-i
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ........ ••••••••••••........

3
8
8
10

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-232
Men*s and boys* work c l o t h i n g .........
B-35
Machinery industries .........
B-531
Department and women* s ready-to-wear stores .............
B-591
Drug stores ...... .................................. .......... ...... •••••••••
B -6 0
Banking ..........
B -6 3
Insurance carriers ...................... .................... ................
B-7211 Power l a u n d r i e s ...... ........
B-7538 Auto repair shops ............

12
13
1H
15
15
16
17
17

Union wage
C-15
C-205
C -2 7
C-^l
C-l+2

18
18
18
18
18

scales for selected occupations Building c o n struction..........
Bakeries .......................
Printing .......................................................................
Local transit operating employees ..................
Motortruck drivers and helpers .............

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s ...... ....................

19

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ...............
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ...............
E-3
Paid holidays .........................
E-Ij
Paid vacations ........... ................... ............ .....................
E-5
Paid sick leave .........................
E -6
Nonproduction bonuses .......
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .......

19
20
20
21
22
23
23

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ..........

21
1-

INDEX ......................................................................................

26

Introduction

y

The Dallas area is one of several important industrial
centers in which the Bu r e a u of labor Statistics conducted occu­
pational wage surveys during the summer of 1951 • 2/ Occupations
that are common to a v ariety of manufacturing and nonmanufac­
turing industries were studied on a community-wide basis* Grossindustry methods
of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling
earnings data for the following types of o c c u p a t i o n s : (a) of f i c e ;
(b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping*
In presenting ear n ­
ings
information for such jobs (tables A - l through A -4) sepa­
rate data have been provided wherever possible for individual
broad industry divisions*
Occupations
that are characteristic
of particular,
important, local
industries have been studied as heretofore on
an
industry basis, within the framework
of the community survey* 2 J
Earnings data
for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables*
Union scales (Series C tables) are
presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are
employed under terras of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates
axe indicative of prevailing
pay practices*
Data have also been collected and summarized on shift
operations and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary
benefits such as vacation and sick-leave allowances, paid h o l i ­
days, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau *3 regional office in Atlanta,Ga*,
b y Harry H* Hall, Regional Wage Analyst*
The planning and cen­
tral direction of the program was carried on in the Branch of
C ommunity
Wage Studies
of the B u r e a u 1s Division of Wages
and
Industrial Relations.
2/
Other areas studied are: Baltimore, Bridgeport, Dayton,
and Portland, Qreg.
Similar
studies were conducted earlier in
the year
in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, New York and the
San Francisco-Chkland area.
2 / See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




The

Dallas

M etropolitan A re a

The Dallas Ifetropolitan Area (Dallas County) had more
than 610,000 inhabitants in 1950. Two-thirds of these were co n ­
centrated in the city of Dallas.

Nine
United States
highways lead
into Dallas,
the
greatest number entering an y Southwestern
city.
It is also
serviced b y nine
major railroads.
Love Field, D a l l a s 1 m u n i c i ­
pally owned airport, has led the Nation since 1940 in number of
air-line
passengers per capita.
The city is one of the Bell
Telephone system*s 8 regional toll centers, h andling 1,620 toll
circuits and providing direct connections w ith 209 cities. D a l ­
las is the Nation*s leading export cotton market and one of the
largest spot markets.

Nonagricultural employment (excluding
government) in
the Dallas
metropolitan a rea totaled over 275,000 d uring July
1951*
It is estimated that the approximately 400 m a nufactur­
ing plants within scope of the Bureau*s survey provided empl o y ­
ment for about 55,000 persons, i j
The dominant manufacturing
industries in this area are machinery, fabricated m e t a l pro d u c t s ,
furniture and fixtures, and apparel and related products.

A s one
of the leading distribution
centers of the
Southwest,
wholesale and retail trade operations in the Dallas
area are extensive.
About 15,000 persons were employed in the
more
than 240 wholesale trade establishments and n early 27,000
wage and salary employees were distributed over the payrolls of

i j Estimates of the number of establishments and employment
in particular
industries (other than construction) relate
to
firms employing 21 or more workers, the m i n imum size e s t ablish­
ment covered in the study.
See a p pendix for
general scope
of
survey.

2

a p p r oximately 275 retail-trade establishments* More than 13,000
were employed in the finance, insurance, and real estate indus­
tries, whereas
a labor force of almost 2 2 ,0 0 0 was
required b y
the
transportation (excluding railroads), communication,
and
other public utilities group of industries*
During the past 5
years, over 47,000 building units were started in the metr o p o l ­
itan area*
Approximately 26,000 persons were
employed in the
construction trades during 1950* Over 5,000 building units were
started d uring the first 6 months of 1951*
Total
government
employment in the area
was estimated at 22,000 in June 1951*

Among
the industries
and establishment size
groups
surveyed b y the Bu r e a u in June 1951,
about 45
percent of the
workers in nonoffice jobs were employed in establishments having
wri t t e n agreements with
labor organizations.
A b out 6 in every
1 0 workers in m anufacturing plants were employed in union e s tab­
lishments*
In nonmanufacturing, about 3 in every 10 employees
were
r e p r esented b y labor organizations*
Less than a sixth of
all office workers were working under the terms of coliectiveb a rgaining agreements*

Occupational W a g e

Establishe d m i n i m u m entrance rates for the employment
of inexperienced plant workers was part of the form a l i z e d rate
structure in Dallas area firms emplo y i n g n e a r l y all plant w o r k ­
ers* Approximately ha l f of the plant workers were in e s t a b l i s h ­
ments with min i m u m entrance rates of b e t w e e n 7 5 and 90 cents an
hour*
A fourth were in plants w ith a n established m i n i m u m of
$ 1 or more*
Minimum entrance rates
of less than 75 cents
an
hour
were not reported in manufacturing*
In the r e t a i l trade
and services groups, however, n e a r l y three-fourths of the w o r k ­
ers were employed in establishments h a v i n g h o u r l y m i n i m u m rates
under 75 cents.

Wages and salaries of workers in man u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s ­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing*
In 20 of
2 4 office
classifications p e rmitting comparison, salaries
of
workers in manufacturing
plants were h igher than those in n o n ­
manufacturing establ i s h m e n t s • A v erage h o u r l y earnings for plant
jobs
studied in all
industries were hig h e r
for 2 2 of 2 4
job
categories for which comparisons were possible*

Structure

The 17-month period preceding the survey was one of
moderate wage
adjustments in Dallas establishments*
Approxi­
m a t e l y a fourth of the establishments surveyed had, granted gen­
eral wage
increases since January 1, 1950*
Increases
in some
instances were
granted on an individual basis in addition to,
or in place of, general increases*

Formalized rate structures providing a range of rates
for time-rated
occupations were reported in establishments e m ­
ploying three-fifths
of al l office
and plant workers*
Nearly




all the remaining workers
were employed in establishments that
determined wages and salaries on an individual basis*

A tenth of the workers in the Dallas area m a n u f a c t u r ­
ing plants, excluding the m a c h i n e r y industry, were emplo y e d on
second shifts and approximately 1 in 20 w o r k e d on third or other
late shifts. In the durable and nondurable goods industries, 2 /
shift differential payments were u s u a l l y expressed in cents per
hour* The amount of shift d i f ferential paid to the largest n u m ­
ber of workers was
cents per hour on the second shift and 10
cents
on the third shift.
In the m a c h i n e r y
industry, a sixth
of the workers were employed on the second shift an d the m a j o r ­
ity received a differential of 5 cents a n hour*

5 / See appendix table for listing of durable an d nondurable
goods industries*

3

T ab le A - l :

O^iCe Occupation^

(Average straight-time veekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 305.00
Weekly
and
and
erig $
anns
hours
(
Standard) (Stan a d 3 0 .0 0 under
dr)
over
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 65.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 10*5-00
$

Men

_

55
32
29

43.0
43.0
43*5

48.00
48.00
48,00

265
70
195
56
75
29
31

42.0
41.0
42.6
41.5
43.5
39.0
43,5

70.00
72.50
68.50
73.50
62.00
67.50
76.50

13

40.0
40.0

50
— 47--33

41.0
41.0
39.5

49.00
48.00
46.00

40
40

46.0
46.0
42.0

63.00
63.00
63.00

41.5
42.5
44.0
40.5
41.0
41.5
41.0
41.5
40.0

62.00
64.00
68.50
59.00
61.50
62.50
62.50
63.50
55.00

41.0
Ul.O
39.5

36.00
36.00
36.00

1
1

Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing......... .............
Nonmanufaoturing....... ...... .....
Public utilities * ......... .....
Wholesale t r a d e ..... .......... .
Finance ** ......................

407
41.5
~ ~ 7 2 --- — 41.0
335
41.5
98
41.0
155
41.5
54
39.5

59.00
.82.00
58.50
54.50
60.00
63.00

Clerks, order ..........................
Manufacturing.... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ........ ...........
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ..................

297
42.0
42--- “ 42.0
255
42.0
29
42.0
211
41.5

56.00
'"63.50
54.50
52.00
54.50

Clerks, payroll .......................
Nonmanufaoturing..................
Public utilities * ......... .

111

_

_

8
8
8

_

-

-

55.50

Billers, machine, billing machine ......

Bookkeepers. hand ............ ....... ..
Manufacturing ........... ....... .
Nonmanufaoturing ..... ..............
Public utilities * ........... .
Wholesale t r a d e .............. ..
Finance * * .............. ........

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ..

12

Bookkeeping-maohine operators, olass B ..
Finance ** .......... ..... ......
Caloulating-maohine operators (other
than Comptometer type) ................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * .......... .
Clerks, accounting .....................
Manufacturing....................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing............. ......
Public utilities ♦ ...............
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade .....................
Finance ** .......................
Clerks, file, class B ..................
Fi.H8L. d
D0

••eaeeeeeseeaeeeeeeeeeee

22

559
12 2

64
58
437
145
176
37
61
28
26 --17

84--31

41.5
41.0
43.0

-

-

-

2

-

6
6
6
11
11

-

4

-

3

3
3
3
-

-

-

56
9

45

-

7
3
35

i

-

.
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

5
5

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

i
i
-

4
4
4

2

1

2

19

-

-

11

20
1

23
4

-

-

1
1

2

-

_
_
-

2
8
8

-

1

19
3

-

-

-

1

3

9

1

2
2

9

2
1.
J

7

2
2
2

7

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

1
6

-

-

-

4

10
10

-

-

-

2

_

24
24
9
13

5
_
5
5
_

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

2

6

-

-

10

-

_

3
3

11

5

\

4
19
8

5
4
2

28
8
8

20
10
6

_
4

-

-

10
10
10

43
7
4
3
36

22

33

3

2
2

17
5

10

4
-

2
11

39
5
34
23

11

16
-

21

28

16

-

2
8
1

3
14
4

2
20
6

6
6
1

1

18

28

19

48

18
3
15

28
5
23

19
7

2
2
2

2
2
2

_

_

1

-

6

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

1

10
10

6
10

2
2

2

-

9
47
24
12
2
8

_
-

10

21
2

7
3

27
23
4
2
1
1

2

15

-

11

19

16

12

19
14
-

15
3

12
1

8

-

-

2

3

2

3

-

-

.
-

1

2

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_

-

23
7
5

2
2
2

1
1
1

-

2

_
-

2

1
1

9

1

4
4
4

1

10

2
2
2

10
10

116
25
10

15
91
9
67
9
16

-

-

11
11

“

-

57
19
19
38
17

40

22

12

17
5
-

-

8

5

4
4
32

2

10

12

59
2

67
7
16

32
7
25
8

59
16
43
14

11
1
10
2

10
2

12
2
2

.
-

-

-

-

3
17
5

16

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

3
5

22

6

15

13

_

_

2

22
2
20

6

13

11
2

_
_

_
-

1
2

-

-

-

-

10

-

_

_

_
.
.
_

-

3

3

2

-

2

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

.

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

_

9

22

-

12

8

7

18
18
_

63

35
17
18
2

u

_

12

53
.
53

34
9
25
_
25

18

46
5
41

5
5
_
5

7

12

-

24
24

10
6

18
4
4

3
3
3

7
3
3

2

26

2
2

22

4
4

9

2

3

10

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 195
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of labor Statistics




-

1

2
2
2

39

6

_

3
19
4

11

-

-

-

31
4
14

2

-

1

35
14

2

29
28
9
16
3

g

13
_
13

2

30
9
21
2

6

-

3

_

2
2

4
13
4

_
-

9
g
9

-

17
-

31
10
21

_
-

3

11
8
6
1

1

24
3
21

l

5
g
5

2

-

9
9
9

-

-

-

1
2
1

15
15
3

4
4
4

-

3

1

4
4
4

1

-

3

34
33
33
-

4
4
4

1

-

3

_

7
7
7

2
2

3

59.00
59.00
63.00

_

3

10

2

16

2

_

2
2
1

-

_

1
u * * DEPARTMENT OF IABOR
s

Table A-l:

Ojfjfice 0cc44fuUio*U - GosUi+tued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Dallas, Tex., by Industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E AR N IN G S OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0
and
earnings
hours
and
1
(Standard) (Standard)
3 0 .0 0
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 1Q5.QQ. over
$

Men - Continued
Duplicating-machine operators ..........
Nonmanufaoturing............... .
Wholesale t r a d e ............... .

33
31
14

41.0
41.0
41.5

42.00
41.50
43.50

Offioe boys ............................
Manufacturing.... ..................

220

29
181
27
37
105

40.5
40.0
41 .5
40.0
40.5
41.0
42.0
59.5

34.00
38.00
37.50
38.00
33.50
34.50
35.50
3?. 50

Secretaries......... ..................
Nonmanufaoturing....................

43
28

41.0
41.5

61.50
54.00

Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Nonmanufaoturing....................
Finance ♦* .......................

58
48
37

41.0
40.0
39.5

57.00
54.00
53.50

Typists, olass A .................. .

26

48.0

57.50

Billers, machine Chilling machine) .....
Manufacturing ................... .
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable g o o d s ....... .
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
Publio utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade
.... ••••••
Retail trade
Services ......... ............. .

342
109
13
96
233
42
99
48
36

41.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
41.5
42.5
41.5
42.0
40.5

41.00
42.00
44.50
41.50
41.00
42.00
41.00
39.00
41.00

Billers, machine (bookkeeping maohine) ..
Manufacturing.... .
Nonmanufaoturing........... .
Wholesale trade .......... ••••••••

10 1

89
42

43.6
41.0
44.0
44.5

46.60
48.50
46.00
50.00

Bookkeepers, hand .......... ...........
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
Publio utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ............. •••••
Retail t r a d e ................ ..
Finanoe • * ....... ...............
Services ............ ............

408
62
346
53
52
129
45
67

42.5
40.5
42.5
42.0
51.0
43.6
40.0
44.0

53.50
49.00
54.50
55.50
52.50
54.00
57.50
54.00

Bookkeeping-maohine operators, olass A ..
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufaoturing ................... .
Wholesale trade
Retail t r a d e ....... .
Finanoe ** ........................

229
71
168
52

41.5
42.0
41.5
40.0
43.0
40.5

51.50
55.00
50.50
47.00
51.00
50.50

_

39
10

Nondurable goods ••••..... .
Nonmanufaoturing....................
Publio utilities * ...............

4
4
3

5
5
-

29
7

29

2
2

-

-

-

57

56

2

10
2

2

8

55

46

2

6

13
36

1

8
8

_
-

-

5

13
-

15
12

_

1
1
1

5
5
^3

-

-

15
4

4

_

_

1

.

_

2
2
2

8
8

1
1

2
2

6
6

3
3
3

9
7

2
2

2

_

6

g

“

4
4
-

8
8

-

1
22
2

12

1

28
9

13
7

3

4
11

3
3
3

1

3

10

2
2
2

_

1

2
2

3
3
3

-

1
1

1

5

6

1

7
7
3

10

-

4

4

4

3
3

2
2

6
6

2

4

1

16

4
4

2

2

6

4

4
-

2

1

3

2

4

1
1

-

-

1

-

_

2
2
2

1

-

"

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

"

-

-

-

_

11

Women

12

58

30

6

27

-

_

6

-

25
_

2

_
4
2

2

16
g

34
15
_
15
19
2

13
4

85
20

_

4
16
65

21

43
24

2

_

17
15
4

12
10
2

11
2
2

65
23
4
19
42
4

22
12

g

10

13

-Q

22

22
4

24

15

_

-

_

-

.
-

_

_
.
-

.
-

_

_

_

_

.
-

3

13

34

11

12
7

1

9

3

13

11

5

1

2

30
17

_

20

5

20

32
4
28

61
4
47

2

.

4

_
1
_
_
_
_
1

3

_

_
18
_

1

-

2

_
_
_

7
4
3

_

2

_

_

_

1

_

2
2

15

2

-

4
4

9

_

_

2

1
1

10

1

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




64
21

_
1

6

_

12

6

12
3

4

_

8
1

_

10

_

9

12

_

_

g

8

62
42

_

20

2
20

15

12

4

1

55
4
51
16
3
4

10

_

1

9
_
_
9

18

1

1

17
3

47

44

10

10

27
4

28

-

2

60
17
43

10

5

33

15

23

10

5

31
14

15
18
»
4
13

20

2

15

1

3

12

1

e
o

A

6
21
10

3
19
16
3

_

10

10
*
V

45

2
2

-

5
g

_

1
X

1

X

47

5

21
20

5
c
o

41
4
37

9

2

5

12
11

3

_
9
11

_

2

6

1

14

_

2

6
1

_

_
_

_

13

5

1

_
10

1

_
_
1

1

3

14

1

9

1

2

13

2

11

_
_

1

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

-

1

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

“

5,

Table

k-ix O ffice OccufuiUoni Continued
-

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied
on an area basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E ARN IN G S OF—

$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
workers

Under 30.00
and
under

Weekly
earnings ♦
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00

32.50

$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.60 50.00 52.50 55.00 67.60 60.00 65.00 70.00 76.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 76.00 80.00 85.00 90,00 96.00 300.00 10* 0 0
*

over

$
Women - Continued
2

15

40

71

2

15

40

62
2

10

2
8

226

Bookkeeping-machine operators, olass B ..

42.5
41.5
43.0
40.0

41.50
41.50
41.50
45.50
44.50
41.00
40.00

628
93
29
64
535
188
194
32

40.5
42.0
42.0
42.0
40.5
40.5
41.0
40.0

48.00
49.00
52.00
47.50
47.50
49.50
45.00
45.00

110
17
93
28

40.5
42.0
40.0
40.0

44.50
41.50
45.00
38.50

1292
254
117
137
1038
177
132
255
85

40.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.5
42.5
39.5
41.0

46.00
45.00
43.50
46.00
46.00
45.50
52.00
39.00
46.50

224
195
17
58
106

40.0
40.0
41.5
39.0
40.0

40.50
40.00
46.50
-41.50
38.50

838
62
776
125
44
36
560

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
42.0
42.0
40.0

35.00
38.00
35.00
41.00
36.00
32.50
33.50

179
1
178

1286
304
142
162
982
173
254
288
217

41.5
41.0
42.5
40.0
41.5
42.0
41.5
43.0
39.5

45.50
47.50
50.50
44.50
44.50
47.00
47.00
40.50
47.00

541

14
110

Calculating-maohine operators
(Comptometer t y p e ) ...................
Manufacturing............... ..... .
Durable goods ........ ....... .
Nonmanufaoturing ...................... .. .............................
Wholesale trade ..................................................
Retail t r a d e .........................................
AA
....
....
Caloulating-maohine operators (other than
Comptometer type) ...................
Manufacturing ....... ........... •••..
N/Mnmanu#eA^tivena

Clerks, aooounting .....................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
m

tsitstssrt ssrtrtr*

Nonmanufaoturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WlOl6 8 &l0
seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee*
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finano•
• • • • • • • t 9« e •• • • • • # • # e
S$rvl098 e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e
Clerks, file, olass A .........................................
Nonmanufaoturing .............................................
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finanoe •* •••••••••••«»»»«•••»»»».
Clerks, file, olass B ........ .........
Manufacturing .................. .....
Nonmanufaoturing .....................
Pv>K| <n ut-t
* tTT-T-,TTI__ ___
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R»+-.o^]

+-.r*nH _T__ T. T. T I . . . T____. . .
«

Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing . . . i - .
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nondurable goods e « e e « e * e e * e e e e e e e e
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance **

41.0

9

3
-

3
2
1

41

23
-

67
2
2

26
11
14

23
9
12
2

65
24
27
9

118
14
1
13
104
38
38
7

9
4
g
3

9
4
e
O
4

18
3
15
12

17
4
1^
10
3

109
26
25
1

118
15
8
7

69
17
4

83
3
9
51

103
9
8

241
37
24
13
204
82
20
26
8

5
2
2

14
1
-

40
14
8

13
-

1

12

4

c

A
V

2

2

24

58
16
16

24

g

1

2

42

22
2

11
26
5

10
10

-

4
-

4
2
45
12
12
33

28
1
24
24
g

10

63
59
2

38
8
29
13

10

8
16
51

13
52
7
2
19
7

39
7

27
3

32
1

24

3
18
8

86
19
1
18
67
9
37

25
8
17
2

17

12

17
2

7
4

11

15

12
2
10

11

57
4
4

47
6
8

33
3
3

53
18
7
2

41
19
9
6

30

9

-

_

13

1
1

15

7

-

-

-

1R
Xu

7

176
37
6
31
139
23
8
8
44

120
24
1

86
21
4
17
64
10
10
10

6
4

23
96
26
4
23
3

9
5

8
6
2

XX

<
5

*
0

10
6
4

10
6

21

180
18
162
17
5

95
12
83

70

70
7
63
4

29
2

10
168
10

16

66
46
7

1
\

32
15
11
4

25
1
1

2
2
2

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
13
4

24
20
1

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

29
2

20
2
2

26
1
1

18

18

25

18

12
10

_

-

_

_

_

g

65
6
-

6
59
25
25

1

9

-

-

g
g
10

11

5
135

39
20
1

1
10

10

19

97
6f

70
13
3

35
4
4
31
7
8

1
1

67
29
12
17
38
19

4
4
2

42
9
g

33

10
2
1
1
8

2
27
10

4

12
2
1

1

3
3
3

1

-

-

_

_

25
16
16

33
20
9

17
13

11

13

18
9

0

c

36

A*
to

43

19
X6

141
23
6
17
118
26
l%
iO

134
2i

169
35
10
25
134
22

130
28

36
2

2

A

T
*

• a
z

2

2

%9
oc

4

2

2

2

171
39
34

168
19
8
11

77
12
7

54

41
g

g
\

g

I
X

2
7

65

53
1f
i
XU

32
13
9

17
9
2

4

1n
Xu

g

2

16

4

15

9

59

0
1A
JLO
VI *
1X0
21
11
X7
31
26

9 A,
A

K
U

132
23

4.1

102
13
1R
XD

149
8
78

41
29

27
A 7
f

59
30

23
an

Vi
ou
1
X
1 1

_

1
1

8

157
8
149
8
16
12
113

.

9

10

13

13
4
4

1R
Xu

21
21
2

40

7
2
g

4

39
39
2
8

21

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1

41

29

-

90
14
76

8
7

12
39

-

97
36
61

24
4

1

-

100
27
73
4

9f
C7

23

g

XX
9
3

g

13
7

3
3

4

4

-

6,

Table A-l:

O ^ ic e Q cC U fu U iO tU ' G < u U i* U i* d
weekly hours and earnings ")J for selected occupations

(Average straight-time
on an area basis in Dallas, Tex,, by industry division, June 1951)

studied

N U M BE R OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E AR N IN G S OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|
:
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.60 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 . 0 0
\iwt~r
and
earnings 6
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
over
3 0 .0 0 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00
70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 m o o
$

Women - Continued
Clerks, general - Continued
Nonmanufacturing - Continued
50
Clerks, order ..........................
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
Wholesale trade .......... .......

Clerks, payroll ................... .
Manufacturing.................... .
Nondurable goods .................

Finance ** ................... .
Servic68 ••••••••••*#•••••••••••••♦
Duplioating-maohine operators ..........
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
EM n f T A# ♦ * T--tT«-,- tt‘TT‘****‘****
ll
Kev-punch operators........... ........
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
Public utilities * ...............

41.5

228
24
204
92
43

40.0
41.0
40.0
39.0
40,5

44.50
45.00
44.50
46.50
36.00

429
104
52
52
325
55
57
36
49

41.5
41.6
41.5
41.5
41.5
43,5
41.5
40.0
43.5

48.50
6 s ;§o h
51.50
59.50
46.50
45,50
47.50
48.00
46.00

41.0
41.0"
42.0
40.0

39.50
38.00
40.00
32.50

40.5
43.5
40.0
41.0
39.5

42.50
55.00
41.00
44.00
39.00

40.0
40.5
40.0

33.50
33.50
34.00
33.00

43
— so—
15
11

268
27
241
68

143
Offioe girls ....................... .
H n n m an iifu n 'k iiH wg
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••
Financ6 **

20

39,00

170
162
41
62

3 9 ,5

1308
40.5
Secretaries...... .................. .
Manufacturing ....................... ""381--- “ 51.0"
114
42.5
Durable goods ....................
247
40.5
Nondurable goods .................
947
Nonmanufaoturing ....................
40.5
193
41.0
Public utilities * ...............
228
41.0
Wholesale trade ..................
79
41.5
Retail t r a d e .......... ..........
313
Finance** .............. ...................................................
40.0
134
40.5
Services ....................................................... .............
Stenographers, general ................. .. ........................... 1761
Manufacturing ............................................................... ~ m —
163
Durable goods ....................
218
Nondurable goods .................
1380
352
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade .................. 471
179
Retail trade ........ ............
280
Finance ** ............. ..... .

41.0
'■"41.6
44.0
40.0
41.0
41.0
41.0
41.5
40.0

56.50
69.50
63.50
57.50
55.00
58.50
53.00
55.50
54.00
56.50
48.50
52.60
58.00
48.50
47.00
47.50
48.00
48.00
46.50

18

]
_

29
4
25

67
5
62

18

9
7

18

2

11

-

6

-

15

11

6

15
15

11

6
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

.

3

21

21

4

g

45
-

19

66
12
1

43
7
3
4
36

47

2

2

1

3

3
5

14

24

13

2

14
-

22
20

13
13

2

-

-

-

-

66

36

27

32
23
9
34
g
7
4

12
10

6
6

14
5

18
4
4

_

5
-

-

6

5

.

10

2

9
3

5

3
3

1
1

3

45

1
1

11

18

4
3

54
g

2

14

1

1

2
2

6

14

6

2
12

35
35

-

_

6

49
2
2

7

22
6
2

4
16

2

24

28

8

12
8

14
3

6
6

-

-

-

\

22
1

8
11
6

4
-

30

4

117
37

27
•2

25

43
43

8
11

10
22

9

25
25
17

8

8

_

_

59
5
_
5
54

124

22

20
20

20

26

16

7
7

26
26
7

-

-

-

-

2

14
14
4
7

15
9

18
18

49
49

21

19

-

-

-

2

1

1

6

-

-

-

-

4

26

33

-

-

-

-

20

2

-

-

1
2

1

-

11
9
19
9

16

43
16

43

20

2

9

-

9

-

10
10
-

7

15

125

-

1

12

7
7

1

12
113
26
29
14
14

U
-

3
11

.
_

5
9

14
E
O
2

7

6
1

•
_
_

11
11

-

11

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

3

1

2

_

1
1

-

-

6
2

2

1

-

-

2

• 1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

1
1

•

6
6

2
2

2
2

_

_

.
_

.
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
.
_

2

2

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

97

176
76
17
59

108

159
67
19
48
92
26

64
16

32

5

8
8

18
3

21
2
1
1

2
1
1

8
1
1

2

-

10
-

_

4

29
80
37
5
9

-

_

1

148
45
_
46
103
16
40

-

-

1

1

29

4
4
g

2

29
7
18

11

.

-

5

3

1

47
47

21

8

1
12

27
4

47
45

6

9
9
9

2

-

_

4

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coumunioation, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5
5
-

16
5
5

1

10

8

2

-

g

5

74
2
2
72
28
24
3
12

207
40
3
37
167
38
45
28
40

10
201

23
14
9
178
44
54
20
42

6

4
2

118

264
40
10
30
224
35
77
36
55

214
68
24
44
146
58
55
6
23

8

195
69
24
45
126
34
55
12
24

8
6
2

89
16
29
31
14
114
1
1
113
30
60
13
10

22
12
10

10 0

86

26
17

15

8

21
2

36
13

38

5
38

10

12

72
15
6
9
57
10
20
5
19

94
9
3
6
85
34
22
11
18

11

59
24
11
13
35
15
_
20
"

12 2

53
19
34
69
22

17
7
11
12

85
67
57
10
18
_

21

11

2

2

1
10

9

4

1

8

2

12

-

4
3

10

10
10
•
_

10
8

15
_
_
_
15
_
10

”

6

19

_
_
_ .
_
_

..

1
1

l
l
_
_
_

-

3

-

-

-

_

48
17

3

i

_
_
_
.
.
_
_
_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

3

_
7

2

2

»
_

_

1

_
_
_

_
_
“

_
_

~

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
.
_
_
_

_

_
_

■

-

7,

Table A-i:

O^ice OccnfuUioni - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly h v r and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied
oes
on an area basis in Dallas, Tex., by Industry division, June 1951)
N U M BE R OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

A verage
Number

S x occupation, and Industry division
e,

of
workers

Under

Weekly
Weekly
earnings %
hours
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00

$
$
$
|$
<
9
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00

and
under

32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00

and
over

$

Women - Continued

Stenographers, technioal ...............

174

39.0

8witohboard operators ..................

405
34
15
19
371
55
25
133
61
97

43.0
42.0
44.5

41.00
48.50
60.50

43.0
41.5
42.5
44.5
39.5
45.0

40.00
45.00
46.00
38.50
43.50
35.50

Switchboard operator-receptionists .....
Manufacturing ...................

4 -. *
44.
W / 1aoel a + a
U\
■
F i n a n c e * ...........t.TT..Tr....T
*

Tabulating-maohine operators .... .
Nonmanufacturing ..............
Pi1 4
i K a 4 444am A
1 *

Transoribing-maohine operators, general

•

Public utilities * ...............

371
139
52
87
232
32
100
61

41.0
40.5
40.0
41.0
41.5
42.5
42.0
40.0

42.00
42.50
42.00
42.50
41.50
44.00
41.50
40.50

40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0

280
18
74

696
154
542

7

2
3

48
15

53
in

16
7

4
3

18
11
5

8

_
_

50
4
19

5

66
23

46
30
14
16
16

2

15
43

4

6

13

5
5

8
8

4
4

1
1

2

4

17

14

10
9

44.00

4

7

9

25

42

42.0
41.5

48.00
43.00

-

-

g

4
9

4
11

o
c

8

TO

An

9Q AA
OO.UU

78

41.0
40.0
38.0

_

8
2

f

"

35.50
3
36.00 118
40.00

170

58
16
42

*
3
7
Q
09

100
21
1T
4

48
21

36
8

79

21
27
6

6
28
1o
X
U

4

12_

3
3

18
18
8

*
t
(

0

61

24

18

8
1R
JO
.

4

21
14
12
7

12

11

158

140

TO
JLC

46

o
o

Cl
f
do

116
28

88
10
56

9

165
25
14

144

A

109
19
90
3

e
O
l <
z
10

113

128
19
109

I
T
21

160

184

in

12
8

6

18

3
3
178

8
10

4
138
7A
ou

6
1
71

93

OO
66

OA
C%

60

2

2

_

_
_
_

7
5
5

3
3
3

_
_
_

_

_

_

22

21

e
0
AQ

16

10

58

*
oo

2

11
7
p
c

4
4
4

_

5
4

_

_

_

0

TC
100
8

9
2

1n
XU

29
1;
xR
>
1o
XX,

2

12
4
3
1

8

_

8
8
1

23

21
1o
lv

_

_

_

_

.
-

.

.

•

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

.

2

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

_

_

1
1

1
1

_
3

_
_

_
_

18

ij
±n
\
2
8

_

2
2

l

2

g

26

7

12
14

5

10

2

2
2

_

2

8

10
10
10

.

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

g

_

_

-

2

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), eomnunioation, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
•
_
_

_

2

5

18

_
_

*
•

_
_
I

8

25
4

8

_
_
_

2
2

3

22
14

o
c

g

47
28
19

7
20
2

_
_
_

_

5
5
1

10
10

7

-

_

3

1R
Ju
L

5

_

2
2

4

12

”
J
?

_

_
_
_

_

_

‘2

CO

12
-

i

2

58

-

1

2

”

_

5

"

3
3

i
An
v

A

“

12

69
17
52

o
c

4

22

~

2

or\

“

40.5

At CA
4o»OU

2

25

8

24

2

c
o

25
5

2

X

2

_

36.50 121
42.00
46.50
37.00
36.00 121

627

2

_
_

41

45.00
45.00
46.50
41.50

40*0
41.0
40.5
41.5
40.0

.. . .

8
4

41

1
36

6

2

17
1
1

80

2

Typists, class 8 .......................
1009
Manufacturing .......................
95
Durable goods ...............
48
Nondurable g o o d s ........ ....
47
Nonmanufacturing ...........................................................
...
*14

nms

8

55

43

3

a

_

49
1

48
7

6

7Q CA
u9sOU
A1 AA
4o.UU

41

2

2
2

73

42
1

5

A\ n
f
AO C

a

10

17

81
1

3

AO
%C

P iiK lIn vrU "H -M .n *

24

_

42.00
42.50
42.00
47.00
43.50

Qf
O7
OC7
60 f

2

16

50
7

7

40.5
40.0
40.5
41.0
42.0

A41 ^ 4A
14e% A i
?w«A i

24

_

*4O
1k
1AC

Typists, class A ... .............
Manufaoturlng ..............T.........
Nonmanufacturing ......... .

2

1

O
U

67
67
15
37

Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

7

_

35

14

4

53.00

8.
T a b le A - 2 :

P'l^edA&OHxU O iut *1e cJu tica l 0cC44fuUiO4U

(A v erage s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u rs and e a r n in g s 1 / f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s tu d ie d
on a n a r e a b a s is i n D a l l a s , T e x . , b y in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , Ju n e 19 51 )

1/
*

H o u rs r e f l e c t th e w orkw eek f o r w h ic h em ployees r e c e iv e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s and th e e a r n in g s c o rre s p o n d t o th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ica tio n , and o th e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .

M o U tte M O H C e G * id

T a b le A - 3 :

P o U A & l P la n t

O c C U p a tU ^ U

(A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 / f o r men i n s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d on
a n a r e a b a s is in D a l l a s , T e x . , b y in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , Jun e 19 51 )
N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G STR A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Occupation and Industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
h u l Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40
ory
erig $
anns
0.85 under
.90
.96 1.00 1.06 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.36 1.40 1.45

$
1.45
1.50

%

1.50

S
$
1.60 1.70

1.60

1.70 1.80

$
$
$
$
$
$
1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
1.90

2.00

2.30

and
over

21
12
9
9

5
2
3
.
2

12
11
10
1
1

_
_

1

2.10

1
1
1

6
6
6

-

-

2.20

$
Carnenters. maintenance............ ...........
Manufacturing....... ............. ...... .
Nonmanufaoturing............................
Retail t r a d e ................. ............

139
52
87
29

1.68
i.h
1.61
1.67

KLeotrioians. maintenance ......................
Manufacturing............................. ..
Durable goods ..................... ......
Nondurable goods ......... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing .............. ....... .

158
108
81
27
50

1.7l
1.76
1.77
1.70
1.62

_

Engineers, stationary ..........................
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable g o o d s ...... ....... ............ .
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufaoturing .............. .............
Public utilities * .......... .......
Services .................................

154
74
27
47
80
38
25

1.63
1.^5
1.75
1.75
1.61
1.66
1.28

_
-

3
-

-

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

2
_
_

_
_

3
-

-

-

-

_

.

5

2
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_
-

_

_

4
4
4
_

-

-

-

5

-

_
_

_
-

_

6

_

_
_

6

-

_
-

_
.

_

-

-

_

_

_
_

_
-

“

■

.

6
3

_
_

_

“

-

6
_
6

2
1

6
3
3
9

_
_
_

_

-

9

21
8
8

16
_

16
16
-

16
16
2

7
2
1
1
5

5
2

9

43
14
29
5

20
13
7
5

10
2
8
4

2
2
1

_

16
16
15
1

11
6
5
1
5

18
18
12
6

13
12
11
1
1

12
11

1

_

15
8

13

5
5

1

3

10
4

19
15

1
1

1
1
-

3
2
-

A
4
6
1
3

1 c
10
4
1
-

24
19
o
o
11
5
3
-

2
3

-

8
7
3
3

_
-

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
a
Bureau of Labor Statistics




2
2
_

U.S, DEPARTMENT OE LABOR

11
1

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

25
6
6

14
14
13
1

5
4
4

19
8
8
4
4

5
4
A
4
i

_

„
-

i

12
1
“
1
11
10

9
,

Tabi® a - 3 :

M a in ten a n ce a n d flow ed P la n t O ccu pation A - C on tin u ed ,
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men In selected occupations studied on
an area basis In Dallas, Tex., by Industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W ORKERS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E ARN IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

$
$
Average
hourly Under 0.85 0.90
erig *
anns
and
under
O .8 5
.90
.95

$
1 .1 0

$
1.15

$

1 .0 0

$
1.05

1 .2 0

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.60

S
$
$
$
1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

3
-

22

4

-

4

$
0.95

$

1 .0 0

$

$
2 .1 0

$
2.30
and
2.30 over

1 2 .20 "
1

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

15
15

-

-

5
5
g

-

-

15

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

_
-

6
6

2

-

17
17
17
_
_
-

$

Firemen, stationary boiler .....................
Manufacturing..............................

95
57

1.44
1.45

3
-

7
-

-

16
16

1
1

-

2
2

-

6
6

1

-

8

6

-

-

-

8

-

g
Nondurable g o o d s ....... .................

28

1.61

-

-

-

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...................
Manufacturing..............................
Nonmanufacturing ...........................

386
292
94

1.23
1.26

26

14

8

2

1 .1 1

17

12

31
27
4

-

Machinists, maintenance...................... .
Manufacturing...... ..... ..................

154
126

1.63
1.65

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

2
8

9

3
3
-

3
5

-

-

_
-

1

_
-

10
1

-

6

-

-

-

-

50
44

42
36

52
52
-

1

2

-

-

6

61
36
25

25

6

51
47
4

1

2

-

_
-

_
-

28
28

6

1

-

16
4

1
1

8

4

46
37
g

13
13

40

33

9

6

20
12
8
20
2
8

20
20

1

13
3
6

1
8
6
1
1

3
3
3
_
3
-

13

22

3

-

12

Maintenance men. general utility..... ....... .
Manufacturing .......... .... ...... ........
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ................. .......
Nonmanufaoturing................... ........
Public utilities * .................
Retail trade ....... ............ ..... .
Finanoe ** ..................... ........
Servioes .................................

477
294
146
148
183
49
38
55
36

1.43
1.46
1.41
1.50
1.39
1.27
1.56
1.35
1.41

"

_

_

-

-

Mechanics, maintenance............. ...........
Manufacturing ................ ..............
Nonmanufaoturing ..... .............. .......

250
162

1.59
1 .6 6

_
-

88

1.47

-

Millwrights ...................................

51

1.85

Plunbers, maintenance ..........................

19

81

1.94

4
4
4
4
-

6

-

-

_
-

-

8

6

11

7
4
10

-

4
-

11

-

43
-

_
-

_
-

10
10

-

-

4
4
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_
-

_

_

_
_

-

1/
*
**

1.35
1.44
1.78
1.36

-

-

_

_

_

_
-




4

14

13
45

8
6

2

2

15

1

-

2
2

2

6

12
10
1

9
4
3

1

-

2

-

-

9

1

1

19
-

45
-

1

16
-

2

-

11
10

43
43
"

16
10

41
13
13
28

63
46
36
10

38
22
2
20

46
36
16
20
10
2
6

2
11

16
7
9
-

162
4

92
7

4

109

17

1

2

-

2

27
-

111
2

114

442
4

39

4

2
2

1

7

2

85
85
-

18
17

113

1

3

10

10

6

14
14
-

22

38
36

_

_

_
6

-

11

15
15

16
16
-

4

4

_

_

_

_

_

3

41

9

7
7
7

7
7

3
_
3
-

3

41

2

1

_

_

1

-

9
_
9

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

4
4
-

9
9
“

6
3

_
_
_
-

1

3

_

-

20
2

25
_
25

-

_
-

3

27
16

6

9

10
10

1

2
2

-

-

-

6

6

-

8

158
147
-

4
4
-

-

-

2

45
28

10 1

-

-

19
16
3

2
2

_

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Transportation (excluding railroads), coxaminication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

9 7 5 7 3 6 0 - 51 - 2

68

29
14

15

3

-

1.41
1 .8 6

60

6

22
20

16
4
4

_
“

-

_
6

-

438
274

110

37
27

8

3
2
1

5
_

2
2

2

6

6

2

13

3
3

“
*

19
3

6
20

24

17

2
2

1
1

2
22

6
11

4

4

-

“

1

2

1
2

17

“

-

“
"

_

_

1

4

-

-

4

4

-

16

29

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

2

-

26

1

5

_

45
45
-

2

5

1
1

1

_
-

2

-

-

12
12

5
4

-

4

g

-

2

-

12
12

-

Jc
.

1

4

1.44

Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-anddie lobbing shops) ...........................

14
9
4
5
5
5
-

6

2

1.48
1.79
1.83
1.78
1.47
1.45
1.49

144
16
128
16
14
34

_
_
-

“

1164
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing .............................. -~ F ? --Dnrfihl p gnnH r . - - - - T - . T T T r _ - T T T - _ - - - - - - - T -14
A
I tTiriiii riitsiiitTriTTTtrr
f
33
Nonmanufaoturing........................ .
1117
Public utilities * .......................
886
Retail trade .............................
44

Painters, maintenance .............. ....... .
Manufacturing ...............................
Nonmanufaoturing ...................... .
Public utilities * ..... ................ .
Retail t r a d e ........... . ....... ........ .
Services .......................... .

_
-

11

5
3

_

11
11

-

-

_

_
.

-

1

-

1

_

___ 2_
2

_

-

-

-

_

_

5

11

4
4
“

4

1

~

3
"
3
“
3
“

-

-

-

-

20

6

2

-

6
2

“
-

2

“
1

“
1

“

10,

Table A-4*

C u s to d ia l, 1 4 Ja teJto u lu u } a n d S A ip fu n p Occu p a t ion^
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ , $
N m e A eae Under $
u b r vrg
1.0
1
0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 $ 0 $1.05 * .1 0 1.15 1.2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 i.40 $.5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80
1
0.50 0.55 $
hul
ory
o
f
and
anns
wres erig %
ok r
and
under
8
70 . 5 . 0 . 5 .
0 .50
90 . 5 1.0 0 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 over
8
. 5 .60 . 5 .
5
9
6
7
$
151
94
57
a

Janitors, porters, and cleaners ( e ) .......
mn
Manufacturing ......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade .....................
Finance **...................... .
Services ........................

2798
856
419
437
1942
404

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (vomen) ......

1036

Nonmanufacturing ....................
Pii 1 11t - 1 t i M •
iVi
.n .A
Retail trade .....................
Tfna ff
tln tt
RowJ eoa

2 11

629
439
259
57
979
90
8
1

1.33
1.47
1.2 0

1.23
.88

1.03
1 .1 0

.6
9
.2
8
.9
9
.2
9
.9
7
.8
7
.4
6
.4
5
.4
8
^2
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56
56
56

13
13
-

105
105
75
30

270
270

94
94

547
124
38

221

Packers ( e ) .........................
mn
Manufacturing.............. ........
Durable goods ... .................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ...... ............

423
187
56
131

1.04
1.05

236

148

1 .1 0
1 .1 1

1.15

1.0 0

1.07
1.03
1.08

42
3

28

1

348

312

170

6

1

34
14

20
20

27
27

15
15

6

6

74

65

66

126

1

12

73
54
7

5
3
43

9
57
34
15

51

29
9
4
5

6
306

30

20
150

-

3

30

2
1
1

11

3
3

10

52
42

100

50
12

2

34
4

18
_
18
-

16

4

2

2

26

3
5
-

18
-

4
-

1

3

2

7

7

_

7

7

-

_

58
40
38

52
52
48
28

1

35
20

76
24
14

23
3
-

9

26

24
2
2

1

3

15

3
-

15
14

46
44

49
26

8

12

2

-

_
-

-

1

-

374
145
45

1.30
1.43
1.37

-

100

10 6
1 .2 1

-

-

36

1

2

14
23

-

16

60
4

4
39
24

_
-

2

-

_

_
-

_

-

-

-

_

_
_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1

3

4

-

-

-

.

-

-

1.09

_

1
-

1

3
3

1
1

18
-

-

25
24

28
-

_

4
1
1

4

4

_

-

20

34
30
4

10

-

6

12
8

4

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




35

87

28

-

_

1 .1 1
1 .1 1

126

59
33
15
14

44
44
87
60

48

12
6
6

-

1.30
1.57

122

80
9
71

16

-

_
-

•
_
-

206

31
13

_

_

_

199
77
40
37

16
20

11
8
86

-

-

213
90
123
58
60

40
7
44

151
55
24
31
96

72
32
40
149

-

_

Receiving clerks ......................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade..................
Retail trade .....................

86

423
34
81
119
159
30

1
2

12

-

-

1.28
1.08

3

2
2

20
20

19
19

-

87
74
34
40
13
-

13
12
1
1

-

2

27
24
24
3
3
-

39
36
34

_
_
-

19
19
_
-

10

3
-

-

2

2
2

3
3
_
-

-

2

-

_

2
2

_

74

28
6
22
21
1

30
4

48

6
68

26
16
10

42
42
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

1

_

229
139
84

19
17

2
5

42
17
25
24

-

6

_

-

Shipping clerks .......................
Manufacturing ......................
Ti^b a £< 1a ..
hTil tw
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade .......... ........
Retail trade............. ........

131

8
8
20

270
138
32
106
132
56
15
31
28

1

_

12

2

6

_

14

5

170

-

200
186

17
17

30

_
91
156
22

.9
8
.9
8
.7
8
.9
8

Packers (vomen) .......................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing....................
Retnl1 t-ee tT.T IiriTTI. , , , , ,
.rd
r
, ,

6

1

-

. 6 £/331
3
1.14
1.25“

6

6
6

312

’ 7 y 17
.
5

957
262
695
494
115

13
7

348

12

1

.88

Order fillers .........................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade............. ........

4
3
1
1

3
2
1
1

-

96
96
48
48

461

332

1
1

-

10

Guards........... ....... ..... ......
Manufacturing................... .
Nonmanufacturing....................
Finance ** T...... ........... .

10
10

3
3

_

18
_
18
6

-

_

6
1

3

5

10

3
3
7
3
2
1
1

5

_

28
10

18
7
7
5
2

24
102
8

13

51
6“
-

1

37

4

31

6

6

2

20
20

6

2
2

4
4
-

6

45
34

1

31

-

11

3

1
1

15
_

20
10

25
5

_

/
*
►

_

20

15

6
10

14

8

4

6

43
3
40
23
17

7
11

4
7
3
4

6
10

5
5
5

132
92
40
30
10

32
29
3
1
2

30

25
1

24
6

18

30
3
27
27
-

-

39
35
_
35
4
4

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

26
12

25

17

29

64

1

8
7

9

63

31
5

11
11

1
26

11

1

2
1
1

72
72
-

1

3
3

26

-

15
9
6

6

50
18

92

5
5
4

99
99

-

-

-

11
11

12

2

1

3

1
20

20

-

20
10
10

_
_
-

42

9
9

18
2

1

2

8
1

2

6

10

12

25

2

6

2

3
3

7
3
4

3
7
2

5

20
20

28

20
20

_
-

_
-

-

_

31

19

10

11

10
21

11
8
6
2

21

24
17
7

-

-

28

-

_

14
11
3

-

20

20

1

-

9
3
3

18

11

14
9
2

1
1

-

19
2

3
1
2

2

43
43
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11

Table A -k:

G u d to d tfU ,

a t e lu u U

it U

f

G S td

S / t lf lf U

H

f

O c C H p o t iO t U

- G o 4 t t iH 4 4 * d

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis In Dallas, Tex., by Industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Shipping-and-receiving o l e r k s ................ .
Manufacturing................ ••••••••.... .
Durable g o o d s ........................ ......

Number
o
f
workers

602
74
39
3g
528
169
231
83

$
$
$
$
$
$
Average Under $
0.50
0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80
hourly
erig
anns
and
under
3.50
.55
.60
.70
.75
•80 .85
•65

$
0.90

•90

.95

1 .0 0

1.05

$

$
1.05 1 . 1 0
1 .1 0

1 .1 1

-

-

-

17
-

8
8

-

26
-

23

-

26
-

6

-

24
-

31

-

1.60
1.23
1.33
1.19

.
-

_
-

.
-

_
-

24
13

26

6
6

26
4

15
.

13

-

10

-

-

-

-

11

11

17
4
13
-

23

-

1 .1 2

_
_
-

-

-

2

12
1

1.06

_
-

7
7
7

_
-

7
7
7

21

289
200

152
32
16
16

172
19
19
153
26
113
14

132
25
18
7
107
56
45
4

87
39
35
4
48

85

-

42
5

47

14

.
.
-

3
3
.
_
3

40
24
24
16

.8 6

_
-

.91

-

-

52
69
940
429
241
269

1.05
1.09
1.09
1.09
1.05
1.16
.97
.94

-

_
-

Truok drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) .
. 432
Manufacturing...... ....... .................. — 79
Nonmanufaoturing ......... ••••••........... .
353
Public utilities * ......... ................
144
Wholesale trade •••••••••..... ..... ........
26

1.29
~T.18
1.32
1.27
1.09

-

Truok drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ............. .............. .....
Manufacturing .... ...... ..... ..... ••••.... .

1.29
T.3S”

Nonmanufaoturing ......... ....................
Public utilities * ...... ...................
Wholesale t r a d e ............................
Retail t r a d e ....... ........................
Stook handlers and truokers, h a n d ..... .
Manufacturing .................................
Durable g o o d s ...........................
Nondurable goods ............................
Noxmanufaoturing ......... .......... .........
Public utilities * .... ............. .......
Wholesale t r a d e ........................... .
Retail trade ............. ........... .......

1751

Truok drivers, light (under 1^ tons) ....... .
Manufacturing......... ............. .........
Durable goods ...............................
Nondurable goods ............................
Nonmanufaoturing...... ....... ...............
Public utilities * .........................

885
162
70
92
723
272
183
214
54

Retail t r a d e ............................ .
Services ...................................
Truok drivers, medium (l^ tons to and
including 4 tons) .......... ...................
Manufacturing............................
Durable g o o d s .......... ................. .
Nonmanufaoturing........ .............. ......
Public utilities * ...... ...................
Retail t r a d e .............. ................ .

6 88

322
366
1063
462
362
237

1061
12 1

57

3—
2

1.25
1.34

$
$
0.95 1 . 0 0

$
0.85

1 .1 2

1.24
1 .0 2
1 .0 2

1.17
.93
.87
1.03
1 .0 2

1.16
.91
1.04
1.25
•96

$
1 .2 0

$
1.25

5
1.30

$
1.40

$
1.50

1.15

1 .2 0

1.25

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

18
7
-

22

51

83

12 2

34

7
7

8

8

10 1
11

8

8

6

43
_
24
19

75
16
59
“

57
4
4
.
53
29
24

136
37
34
3
99
96
3

18
18
14
4
_
.
-

292
179
46
133
113
113
.
-

51
3

12

_
-

$
1.60

$
$
1.70 1.80
and
1.70 1.80 over

2

16
15
_

_

.

_
-

12 2

32

52
38
18

90
65
13

_

_
.

_

24
2

2

-

-

-

31

30
4
4
_
26

22

_

76
75
75
«
_
_
_

_
.
.
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_
.
_
_
_

2

.
_

7

-

-

2

2

2

_
-

_
.
-

7
7
7

.
-

.
“

-

-

-

_

_

-

21

2

19
3
3
.
3

1

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

_

_

_

219
11

11

208
_
69
139
-

82
_
82
20

-

62

-

.

40
160
89
37
52

_
-

.

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and rail estate.




8
8

$
1.15

-

_
.

2

12 0

24
36
60
48
28
28
20
2

.
8
10

124
22

_

_

37
4
13

13
_
_
4
9

20

36
_
_
36
24

2
-

1
-

2

1
.

12

10
8
2
2

1

_

1

1

58
-

1

10

-

_
24
78

2

10

-

58
•
40
18

22
102

_

2

14
_

12
11

-

2

4

10 0
8
8

92
12

38
42
30
16
14

1
1

_
84
27
43
14
89
14
14
75
6

45
4
4
41

11

91
29
19
10

12

62
41

16
13

13

17
16
14

18
15
13

2
1

2

_

30
14
25

1

69
_
69
16
52
1

11

8

3
_

48
_
43
5

_
-

-

40
9
7

125
33

2

12

10

31
18

92
85

14
7

12
1

21

_

40
26
16

.

8

_

_

11

1

-

1

14

4
4

1

-

5
_

259
252
_

1

3
-

7
-

6

6
2

6
1

-

-

-

-

-

258

58

18
5
_
5
13

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_ .

8

7
_

8

8

250

50
47

47
_
_
47
5

8

8

_

.

2 11

35
4

21
_

_

4

6
20

_
22
22

_
_
_
.
_
_
_

47

3

9
9
_

1

11

7

_

12
10

_

1

1

1

39
18

9

22

2
2

.

260

4
4
.

7

8

6

42
35
24

4

3

8

1
2

1
2

17

_

15
_
-

_

_

8

7

_
_

_
_
7
_

8

1
8

5
2
2

3
3
_

_
_

3

42

4

-

-

81

21

163

6

_

2

15

2

47

79
78

6

161
30

8
6
2

20

1

-

11

_

1

11

-

_
_

-

-

_

_

1
1

2

-

-

17
17

_

_

2

_

_
_
_
_
_

4

_
_
_
_

.

_
3
3

1,
2

Table A-A: C u s t o d i a l ,

f a>ieUotUiHp
W

and

SUipfunf

O c c u p a tio n * - C o n t i n u e d

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an
area basis in Dallas, Tex., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Occupation

industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
Under 0.50
and
$
ander
0.50
.55

$
0.55

$
0.60

.60

.65

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 . 0 0
.70

.75

•80

-

-

.85

•90

•95

11

16
16
16

-

“

1 .0 0

"

1.06

$
$
$
1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15
1 .1 0

1.15 1 . 2 0

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80
and
1.25 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 over
1 .2 0

$
Truokers, power (fork-lift) ............ •......

D..L1 X . . I 1 2 X4
.J
.

A

Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufaoturing.............................
Public utilities * ............. .......... .

375
£33
170
63
142

1.30
“
1.28
1.44
1.25

0 2

10 0

.93
1.06
1.05
1.06
.83
.95
•85
.80
.76

“

”

-

-

2

14
14
14

9
-

-

9

-

20

22

6

16
16

5
5
5

33
33
33

23

44

20
20

8
8

-

3

36
OO

-

44

2

9
18

19
16
16
3

13
13
4
9
-

4
4

16
16
4

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

_

_

-

-

1
2
-

-

-

6

“

“

■

11

1 .2 1

276
123
32
91
153
14
59
46
25

“

2

2

9
-

14
14
9
5

-

16
16
14

-

47
29
29
18
4

16

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

2

6

36
14
4

8

8
8

8

10
22
1
2

18

6
4

“

28

6
2
2

17

4
4

2
11

4
6

18
4
6
6
2

55

23

11
11

21
6

12

14
14

10

27
27
15

2

6

4

7
3
3
4

12
2
2
10

15

-

4
-

35
17

29
“

21

8
21
8

32
32
32

-

-

_

3

9

-

-

1

'

‘

_

_

_

”

“

-

_

“

-

3
4
4

-

-

.

-

.

_

“

'

l/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/ All workers at A5 to 50 cents.
ij Workers were distributed as follows: 30 to 35 cents, 75 workers; 35 to AO cents, 236 workers; AO to A5 cents, 17 workers; A5 to 50 cents, 3 workers.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table B-232

Men'* and

hUobk Glotlump 1
/

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of men’ and boys’ work clothing.
s
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tax., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M ackim fuf 9nA*U&Ue& 1/

Table B-35*

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Under 0.90

$
$
$
$
0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 .1 0

*
0.90

1 .0 0

$
Occupation 7j

of
workers

hourly
earnings

2/

.5
9

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55
1 .2 0

$
1 .6 0

$
$
$
$
$
$
1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90 2.00 2 .1 0

$

1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.90

2.00

2 .1 0

2.20

$

Assemblers, class A ................. .
Assemblers, class B ...........................
Assemblers, class C ... .......... .........

152

148
108
13
15

1.55
1.32
1 .0 2
1.^ 0

33

-

4

1

6

13

2

-

13

7

1

33
13

1

5

2

81

Janitors ••••.................................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 4 / ..................................

1.58
1*27
1.0 0

14

7

11

14

296

1.60

-

-

-

-

6
1 10

2

21

13

a
15

1

-

-

1
1

1

3

3

2

30
7

4

1

-

-

12

12

Inspectors, class A ............................

7
2
5

2

18

-

-

1 .^ 1

27

1
6

-

-

_

-

1

34

36

30
1

5
_

3

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

48

19

16

53

7

14

11

3

38

4

2

_

-

1
10

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

X

X

7

1
X

i

.

-

9
-

2
_

-

_

_
_

2

2

-

27
-

7

2

-

36
4

5

19
3

14
5

4

6

43

_

_

-

-

-

9

-

-

Drill-press operators, single- and multipleEngine-lathe operators, class A .............
Grinding-machine operators, class A .............
Milling—iafb T
B t i '*' op^ra'^-^rs,
K t,T,rT-tttt
Screw-machine operators, automatic,

29
32

1.64
1.56

n«j J

A

IITir

rttlTII-TTT-tT

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B L j .............................................
.

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.
-

-

-

-

8
5

-

1.61

9

1.59

73

1.54

179

1.29

35
24

1.23
1.19

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
gfVJ.AU

_
-

1

16

24

4

5

27
4

1

1
1

22

3

8

3

q
10

3
2

8

n

10

47

14

10

4

5

-

-

18

3

2

3

/

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

4

6

1

6

47
26

-

2
8
6

2

2

-

Drill-press operators, single- and multipleM ) |a
/*

a!a

an T 3 .

.............
..

^.

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
aAT*ntJ ms
ns l alsflfl P
... .........

54

98

1.08

47

1.06

12

4
,

2

1.33

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C l j ............................................ .

6

3

1.66

2

12

2
5

13

9

11

4

6

11

6

16

5

7

5

1

2

Drill-press operators, single- and multipleA

PI a na P

......

-

-

-

-

-

Tool-end-die makers (other than

Tf * a 1

j

__ i

39
31
99
148

1.86
1.11

1.54
1.36

_

2

2

3

2

10

9
2

1

19

1

32

_

1

38

1

7
33

.

_

29

15

2

5

_

n

Q

7

q

22

9

22

4

8

3

1

.
1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in non-electrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by
the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were surveyed.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

2/
ij




^ e ^ 2a > U m a n t a n d

Table B-531:

A verage

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and sex

W o m a n ' A

2/

H e a d y - *Jo- W a a l

S t o b o d 1/

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y EAR N IN G S OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
1
Weekly
Weekly Under 25.00 10.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 « .0 0 foo.oo 4)5.00 110.00 &.5.00 £20.00 125.00 fco.OO
«r>H
erig
anns
hours
and
(t
S andard) ( t n
S a dard)
under
25.00
over
30.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 1D5.00 010.00 105.00 020.00 025.00 050.00

%

$

Men

14
17
16
127
33

Carpenters, maintenance........... .

42.0
/t?»n
,5
41,0
41.0

82.00
30,50
50,50
32*50
40.50

_
1

_

_

_

1

1

6
1

3

2

68
2

34
11

4
13

3

5
1
2

1

4

1

.

1

4

18
1

.

2

3

1

Sales clerks:
Floor coverings............... .
Major appliances (refrigerators,
stoves, washers, etc. - excludes
radios and television) .............
Men's clothing .......................
Men's furnishings......... ....... .
Women's s h o e s ................. .......

25

41.0

89.50

-

-

-

-

_

1

1

1

1

1

3

2

5

2

1

-

1

-

_

1

2

1

2

1H
52
39
63

41.5
43.0
42.0
40.5

83.00
78.50
72.50
67.00

-

-

2
10
8
5

7
6
4
4

12
6
2
10

14
3
3
4

8
1
2
3

9
2
1
5

5
2
2
1

10
3
4

6
2

4
3

2
2

3
-

2

2
1
_

4
1
_

3

4
1
4

8
2

2

1
1
3
3

2
1
3

-

“

-

1

-

2

1
1
.
1

3
1
1
-

9
5
4
1

Stockmen:
Sal11 ng r a r + rms TT__ 1T.T-IITTT.
,1
W*TfthmiftA TItTT. I1I1T ,,,, ,,

115
28

41.5
41.0

31.50
40,00

1

50

39
5

15
7

4

4.

13

2

19

42.5

60.50

-

-

1

2

6

4

4

2

168

41.5
41.5
42.5

30.00
28.00
58*.50

22
10

48

94
38
30

42.0
42.0

a . 00

-

1

24
3

42.5

44.00
37.50

36
30
41

41.5
42.5
43.0

39.00
40.50
28.50

1
10

rT-,

Tailors, alteration, men's garments ......

8

2

2
1

Women

Cashier—wrappers
.... ..... TTTT..T
El P'tm
npAmt.rm)j pnaaongAr
Fitters, women's garments ...............
Sales clerks:
Bedspreads, draperies, and
blankets ...........................
Blouses and neckwear .................
Boys1 fnrnlshlnga TTT.TTTT*TT.TTIttTTtt
Housewares (except china, glass­
ware and 1amps) T__ ..-.TTTTr.1
.TTt.
TTt
Men's furnishings ....................
Notions, trimmings T.1TTT.TTTtT.TrTtTTt
Silverware and jewelry (excluding
costume jewelry) ...................
Women's accessories (hosiery,
gloves, handbags) ..................
Women's and misses' dresses ..........
Women'8 and misses' suits and
coats ......... ....................

44
37

12

72
19

25
3

1

5

8

2

3

2

3

-

-

-

5

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

12

6
3

2
2

1
2

_

_

_
_

1
_

1

1

_
_

_

_

_
_

.

1

_
.

1

1

_
_

2

10
1

_

7
3

17
9
6

3

7
6

4

12

2
2

1

1

2

7
7

s
2
3

1

7

5

6

1

2

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

17

4.
8
2

5

2

1

1

_

1

13

40.5

47.50

_

1

2

4

1

2

-

-

1

1

_

_

.

_

_

.

_

1

.

_

_

_

118
180

42.0

2

36
27

28
38

15
37

13

9

-

_

1
1

_

_

_

_

2

_
_

_

3

1
6

_

6

_
_

2

12

1
1

2

9

4
9

4

42.5

38.00
42.50

_

2

86

42.0

60.00

1

3

12

17

10

6

7

7

7

2

2

3

20

2

3

1

4
1

1

_

1

3

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 50 workers in department stores (Group 5 3 U ) and women's ready-to-wear stores (Group 5621) as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual
(1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




Sb'U U f. S t& l& i 1 /

Table B-591»

N U M BER OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E ARN IN G S OF—
Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

s

$

s

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 0 .0 0 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 76.00 80.00 85.00 90.OC 95.00 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 110 .0 0
Weekly
Weekly
and
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) under
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 96.00 1 0 0 .0 0 105.00 1 1 0 . 0 0 over
$

Man
Clarks, drug stores (other) 3/ .......
Clerks, soda fountain .......... ......
Dishwashers, machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pharmw,i
'
«+.aw^6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43
38
8
111

51.5
48.5
52.5
50.0

47.5
46.5

_

_

59.00
30.00
27.00

33.50
24.00

_

6

2

_

6

3

-

_

3
4

10
4

_

3

12
2

1
1

1

6
1

4

3

1

2

1

7

.

_

.

_

_

«

_

ft
D

4

1
17r

C±

13

_

.

_

-

-

-

1

_

i n
XU

17

1
_

6

7

-

14

-

Women
Cashiers ........................... .............
Dishwashers, maohine ........... .............
l/
2/
2/

66

14

_

_

_

5

4

1

21

12

19

9

2

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

.
.

1

3
3

-

_
-

-

-

The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for whioh employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Excludes clerks selling cosmetics, tobacco and pipes.

Table B-60:

2/

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
workers

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E ■ W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly- 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
Weekly
e
arnings and
hours
( t ndard) (Standard)
Sa
^ 8 5 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
$

Men
T nn r r i > ~ ~>f mmihlrifi nnnmn'f*nm n
i 1 1 n ~ n T rf

/lnao P
i

5

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

50.50
56.50
30.50

16

Tellers:
N o t e ......................................
Paying or paying and receiving,
commercial ............... ........... .

58

40.0

60.50

90

40.0

57.00

10
195

40.0
40.0

53.50
40.00

12

40.0

151
102
97
21

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

43.00
33.50
49.50
49.00
30.50
40.00
55.00
46.50
43.50

95
27

40.0
40.0

51.00
46.50

19
52

40.0
40.0

41.50
34.50

9

3

1

3

-

5
-

1
1

-

1
2

1

-

4

1

-

2

5

3

-

10

5

8

9

-

-

-

3

6

6

12

8

4

9

10

8

1

13

27

34

41

1
39

1
37

1
8

1
5

1
4

—

1

1
-

-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

5

1

3
7

2
3
4
1

2

7

.

_

_

_

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

42.00

10
81
21
7

3

42.50

16
9
21

-

1

28

Clerks:
Accounting ................................
G e n eral................................ .
A - - ac Katto
PPT
....

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
2

3
-

3

1
-

-

-

-

3

1

4

1

2
-

_
-

-

_
-

2

2

1

1

1

1

3

-

Women
Bookkeeping-machine operators:
Class A ...................................
Class B ...................................
Calculating-machine operators
£/vp.nA.T
n>n+rn+A*
Clerks:
1 To rT0as
H
»
.......
(f
File, class B .............................
General ...................................
P a y roll .................................................

k

Of*fM

t* f
T l

.. .T

,

Proof'-machine operators ........ * ...... ..........
Secretaries ...............................................
S+.ffnnjrmphW'rflj gAnftTJil ...
,
((
fil
lr
npan)t.m>fl___
Tellers:
Paying or paying and receiving,
commercial ................................
S a v i n g s ...................................... ..........
Typists:
Class A ............ .......... ........ «...
Class B .................................. .
1/
2/

23

16

-

-

-

-

25

-

10
5
-

-

-

-

1

1

_

2

-

3
1

1
2

1
2

1
12
26
2

13
14
8

15
10

6

14
3
19
3

5
1

18
3

13
4

13
2

11
4

6
3

10
3

3
5

5
2

3
1

1
-

1
-

2
-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

8
8
8

17
7

_

.

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

•
a

20
-

22

9

-

26

-

-

2

n

3

-

_

-

-

-

-

3

18

-

3
15

17
2

11
-

1
8

-

g

/

_

I
12
3

_

8

5

5

-

_

3

3

-

.
-

-

.
-

1

-

2
-

-

-

The study in the banking industry covered establishments with more than 20 workers.
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




-

-

1
_

-

-

-

-

2

7

-

-

1

5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOB
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16,

Table B-63:

A v er a g e

Occupation and sex

N umber
o
f
workers

9*A44SlGUU>e GoWtieSUs l l

2J

N U M BE R OF W O R KE R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 10.00 15.00 70.00 75.00 10.00 85.00 90.00 *95.00 300.00 105.00 11000
Weekly
and
erig 1
anns
and
under
dr)
(Standard) (Stan a d
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 305.00 3iaoo over
$

Men
Bookkeepers, hand ................ ...

21

39.0

70.50

Clerks:
Accounting ........................
Actuarial .........................

25
26

40.0
39.5

52.50
49.50

79
162
35
68

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

33.50
84.00
53.50
76.00

Office boys ..........................
Section heads .................... ...
Tabulating-machine operators ..........
Underwriters ..........................

1

-

_
-

-

6

1

6

-

1

2

-

2

2

-

-

_

4
-

-

2

5

1
2

1

1
4

4
-

4
3

3
5

2
3

6
-

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
_
-

30
1

14
2

12
-

6
1

1

1
1
3

2
5

-

11
5
7

6
5
6

12
2
5

21
4
9

10
1
12

1
2

14

17
2
2

-

1

_
3

9

_
11
4

_
21
8

_
9
_
2

_
15
_
2

11
_
'

Women
Assemblers ............................
fWtlflmApAra^
tT.tTTITITIttll TTIfT-T
Bookkeeping-maohine operators,
class B .............................
Calculating-machine operators,
(other than Comptometer type) .......
Clerks:
Accounting .........................
Actuarial ..........................
Correspondence, class A ............
finpr’
ajjprtn^Apf'o
»Q<q B tT_T.TrTTt...
1M
ooo A |lf.
f
ii i e * _
File, class B ......................
General ............................
Payroll ............................
Premium-ledger-card ................
Underwriter ........................
Key-punch operators ...................
Office girls ......................... .
Premium acceptors .....................
Secretaries ...........................
Section h e a d s ........ ................
Stenographers, general ................
Switchboard operators .................
Switchboard operator-receptionists ....
Tabulating-machine operators ..........
Transcribing-machine operators,
general ............................ .
Typists:
Class A ............................
Class B ....... ................ .

i/
2/

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
8

_
-

_
2

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
.
_

_
_

_

_

15
6
13

2
1
2

_
_
_

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_

3

4

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

„

2

-

6

-

-

13
3
5
11
6
8
21
1
7
11

7
-

6
8

5
4
2
2

2
-

13
36
26
1
9
16

18
14
3
10
15
36
13
13
16

4
7
11
4
6

2
19
3
6
6

4
4
2
3
7

18
6
1
2
2
7
4
1

10
4
4
17
8
29
7
17
2

19

5

4

6

2

_

4
13
6
15
11

2
14
29
4

-

8
17
30
18
1

2
37
37
18
3

13
11

9
1
5
8

22
2
8
2
10
1
8
2

10

-

3

5

_

1

4

7

5

12

26

9

14

14

12

22

6

-

-

36
94

51
50

43
46

23
34

14
18

-

-

44

4

112

6
111

45

3

4

39.5
39.5

38.50
53.50

19

39.5

40.50

-

1

1

2

5

-

2

10

40.0

39.50

-

-

-

-

2

2

6

186
47

38.00
39.00
45.50
41.50
38.00
34.00
45.50
48.00
39.50
43.50

-

22
1
-

44
<2
5
437
107
29
74
124

39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
40.0

16
4
8

39
10
2
1

30
4
19
3

6
-

126
2
-

80
1
7
15

28
7
1
21
106
12
12

37
29
3
11
13

127
48
44
148
118
145
32
39
37

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0

39.00
33.50
40.50
53.00
53.50
44.50
43.50
38.50
41.50

6
16
2
3
-

6
13
2
_
7
4
5

131

40.0

43.00

-

222
516

39.5
40.0

39.00
35.00

a

_
-

-

4

-

3

29
7
11
_
-

1

2

_

_

2
12

17
26

5

10

24
18
3
-

_
_
3
1

_
5
1

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

2
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

The study covered establishments in the insurance industry with more than 21 workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




PoW&ls J*<3A44u£>UOb 1/

Table B-7211i

N U M BE R OF W O RKE RS R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E AR N IN G S OF—

Oeoupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
0.36 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.56 0.60

and
under

2/

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.55 1.40 1.46

0.65

0,70

0.75

0.80

0.85

0.90

0.95

1.00

1.05

.70

.75

.80

.85

.90

.95

1.00

1.06

1.10

1.16

1.20

1.35

3

3
6
3

29
7
5

2
4
2

4
5
6

2

1

_

3

_

10

5

2

7

-

-

-

5
1
14
7
10

6

_

2

4

_

1

4

4

_
_

«

_

_
_

-

7

2

-

2

-

-

.

1

10

1

-

-

-

-

-

and

•40

.45

•50

•55

.60

_

.

.

_

2

•65

1.30

over

1.35

1.40

1.45

_

1

_

2

2

-

2

-

-

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

-

_

_
_

_

_

"

-

-

-

-

$

Men
Clerks, retail receiving......... .
Extractor operators
Washers, maohine................... .

65
50
52

0.92
.80
•99

30
265
80
87
193
145
50
43

•81
.47
.61
.66
• 57
.55
• 63
.54

3

g

-

-

3

89

-

-

Ill
11

-

-

-

1
5
12
16
51
45
6

2
16
7
26
55
25
10

8
2

7

8

Women
Clerks, retail receiving ................ ...
Finishers, flatwork, maohine
Identifiers.......................... .....
Markers...................................
Pr , i . , n

T n tn l

f t t f t r T t . r . TT. T

Time............................
Incentive . . . . . . . .
Wrappers, b u n d l e .................................................... ..

1/
2/

_

.

1
17
11
6

20
18
2

28
18
7
58
32
6

4

15

4

4
-

.

-

4

_
1
1
9
16
12

4

6
4
4-

4

1

2

_

1

5

-

-

The s tu d y co v e re d power la u n d r ie s w ith more th a n 20 w o r k e rs .
E x c lu d e s premium pa y f o r o v e rtim e and n ig h t w ork.

T a b le B -7 5 38 *

Auto- RefuUfr SUofU i
/
N U M BE R OF W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G ST R A IG H T -TIM E H O U R LY E A R N IN G S OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
o
f
workers

$
0.90

$
1.00

$
1.10

$
1.20

$
1.30

$
1.40

$
1.50

$
1.60

$
1.70

$
1.80

under
•90 1.00

1,10

1.20

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1

4

1
3
2
1
54

4
2
16
12
4
83

24
30
24

11
g
6
2
6
1
g
57
24

14
4
10
1
1
65
20

41
9

$
Average
hourly Under 0.80
earnings *
and
5/

0.80

$
1.90

$
2.00

$
2.10

$
2.20

$
2.30

$
2.40

$
2.60

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

15

26

4

13

6

10

8

16
7
4
4

26
1
1
34

4
3
-

13
.

,8
.

10
-

51

43

51

34

51

43

31

r*
2.60

$
2.70

2.60

2.70

2.80

4

9

5

1

3

17

8
5
-

4
-

9
1
.

6
2
-

1
_
_
_

3
_
_
_

17
_
_

16

14

9

10

8

6

3

10

16

14

9

10

8

6

3

10

$
$
2.80 2.90
and
2.90 over

$
Body repairmen, metali

Total ..................
T-fmA
Incentive ...........
Kleotrioians, automotive ........ ......... ..•••
GHreaserst Total ..............................
Time ................ ...........
4VA
.....................
Mechanics, automotive, olass At Total .........
T i m e .......
Incentive ...
a | me
«^
4« a a 1Mlfl 1
3
WMh#ri| wtoniobil#

160
10
150
22
56
42
14
662
166
486
117
102

2.09
1.48
2.13
1.97
1.26
1.22
1,47
1.74
1.40
1.85
1,22
.84

.
-

_
8
8

_
1
1

_
6
6

-

-

.

.

-

.

.

.

12
35

12

17

24

_
6
6
13
12
1
5

42

33

11

7
7
4
2
2
81
40
41
19

45
4

64
4

60
4

43

1 / The s tu d y co v e re d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith more th a n A w o rk e rs i n g e n e r a l a u to m o b ile r e p a ir sh o p s (G roup 7 5 3 8 ) and m otor v e h ic l e d e a le r e s t a b lis h m e n t s , new and u se d (G roup 55 1) a s d e fin e d i n the
S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r i a l Manual (1 9 4 9 e d it io n ) p re p a re d b y th e B u re a u o f th e B u d g e t.
2 / D a ta li m it e d to men w o rk e rs .
O c c u p a tio n a l Wage S u r v e y , D a l l a s , T e x . , Ju n e 1951
2 / E x c lu d e s premium pa y f o r o v e rtim e and n ig h t w ork.
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s




18,

C:

Union Wage Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect July 1, 1951.;

Table 0-15> & * O U i H 9 e 0 * U t > H 4 d 4 O 4 t
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Table 0-205, & a k & u e 4 .
Hours
per

Classification

week

T.bl. C-27. P / u U U ^ U f . . O t m t U u ^ d
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Hours
per
week

Hewsoaner - Continued

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Journeymen

Asbestos workers

.......................................................................................

Millwrights............... ... ...........
Cement finishers ..........................
Electricians (inside wiremen) .............
Elevator constructors .....................

$2,500
3.125
2.250
2.500
2.375
2.500
2.725

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Engineers - Power equipment operators:

2.000
2.250
2.250
2.250

40
40
40
40

2.000
2.250

40
40

2.000
2.250

40
40

1.750
2.000
2.000
2.250
2.250

40
40
40
40
40

Glaziers ......................................................................... ................................... ...
Lather8 ............................................................................ ................................... ...
Marble setters .............................................................................................
Mosaic and terrazzo w o r k e r s ..... ...
Painters ........ ................................... ... .... ...
Spray, swinging stage ..................
Paperh&ngers ..............................
Plasterers ................................
Plumbers .............................. .
Rodmen ................ ....................................
Roofers, composition ..................................... ...
Roofers, slate and tile ...............................................................
Sheet-metal workers ............................................................................
Sign painters ................................................................................................
Steam fitters ................................................................................................
Stonemasons _____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.875
3.125
2.500
2.500
2.125
2.375
2.125
3.125
2.613
2.250
1.925
2.175
2.500
2.250
2.613
3.125

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Structural- and ornamental-iron workers . . . .
Buckers-up ................................................................................... ...
Sheeters _______ ______________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tile layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2.500
2.625
2.750
2.500

40
40
40
40

Air compressors...... ... ................
Bulldozers .............................
Carry-alls .............................
Cranes, derricks, and draglines.......
Hoists :
1 dr1 t.............................................. .................................................
™
2 or more drums ......................................................................
Mixers:
Less than 14 cubic feet ............................................
14 cubic feet and over ...............................................
Pumps:
X

eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

2 or more p u m p s ........................................................ ...
Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shovels ...............................
•Tractors ........................................... ...

.
...

Agreement A:
Bread mixers ..................... .
O v e rmen...... .......... ...........
Machine operators, panners, twisters,
ingredient scalers, stock clerks,
shipping clerks, checkers, and slice
wrap-machine operators...... .
leers and wrappers (after 6
months) ............ ........ .
Agreement B:
Bread:
Working foremen ............ .
Mixers ..................... ......
Overmen......... ................
Dividermen, moldermen, panners,
twisters, pan dumpers, slice
wrapping-machine operators, bench
hands, and checkers ............
Pan greaser8, rackers, slice wrap­
ping-machine feeders, take-off
men, and helpers (after 6
months) ........................
Cake:
Foremen ................... .
Mixers ...........................
Overmen ................ ..... ...
Machine operators, bench hands,
and ingredient scalera ...... .
Floorladies (after 6 months) .....

$1,530
1.510

40
40

1.420

40

.910

40

1.700
1.590
1.540

45
45
45

1.430




40
40
40
40
40
40

35
35

n
35
35
35
35
35
35

Table C-41: J l o c a l

Q p& uU itU f £*H fU 04f 9*A'
Classification
1.140

45

1.700
1.590
1.540

45
45
45

1.430
1.310

45
45

Rate
per
hour

Street car and bus operators:
1st year.......... ...... ........
After 1 year........ ........... .

$1.33
1.38

Table C-42: M x U o k b u t f J l

a n d Jtelp&U
Table C-27: p A ^ U t t u U ^
Classification
Clas sification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2,563
2.500
2.563
2.468
1.691

40
40
40
38r
f
40

Book and Job
Compositors, hand .........................
Electrotypers .............................
Machine operators .........................
Photoengravers ............... ...... .
Press assistants and fee d e r s.... .........
Press work and feeding own platen
p r e s s e s.............. ...............
Pressmen, cylinder ••........... ...... .
Pressmen, platen ..........................

1.750
2.150
1.963

40
40
40

NewsnaDer

1.350
1.400
1.200
1.900
1.400
1.400

$2,129
2.271
1.963
2.109
2.600
2.743
2.814
2.957
2.636
2.776

45

Helpers and laborers

Bricklayers' tenders .........................................................................
Mortar m i x e r s ......................................................................................
Building laborers ..................................................................................
Elevator constructors' helpers ............
Plasterers' laborers...... ...............
Mortar mixers ..........................

Mailers:
Agreement A - day work............
Agreement A - night work...... .
Agreement B - day work....... ....
Agreement B - night work ••••........
Pressmen, web presses - day work.......
Pressmen, web presses - night work .....
Pressmen-in-charge - day work...... .
Pre8smen-in-charge - night work... .
Stereotypers - day work ....... ......
Stereotypers - night work ............

Compositors, hand - day work ..............
Compositors, hand - night work ............
Machine operators - day work ......... .
Machine operators - night work ............
Machine tenders (machinists) - day work ....
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work ...................... ........ .

2.714
2.857
2.714
2.857
2.714

35
35
35
35
35

2.857

35

Bakery - Feeder trucks..........
B i s c u i t__ .............................
Food...........................
General - Freight:
Agreement A ........ .......... .
Helpers ....................
Agreement B ............. ......
Agreement C ....................
Helpers ....... ..............
Agreement D ....................
Helpers .....................
Agreement E ............ ........
Helpers.... ............... .
Grocery - Chain store:
Day:
First 6 months.......... .....
7-12 months........... .... .
Second year ........ ....... .
After 2 years ................
Grocery - Wholesale... .............
Helpers t.,.t_____ ...............
Liquid carbonic ............... .
Manufacturing .....................
Railway express ...................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,042
1.270
1.175

48
48
40

1.250
1.110
1.315
1.310
1.190
1.350
1.230
1.270
1.220

48
48
48
50
50
48
48
50
50

1.190
1.245
1.410
1.465
1.375
1.150
1.250
1.435
1.699

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Occupational Vage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1.
9

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

M in im u m £jtt>u*nGe. P a teA Job P la n t W /to A eH 1/
Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in -

Minimum rate (in cents)

indue2/

All establishments .....

100.0

Manufacturing
Diorable
Nondurable
good
goods
Whole­
Public
Retail Serv­
Establishments with sale
501 or utilities* trade trade ices
501 or
21-100 101-500
21-100 101-500
more
more
workers workers
workers workers
workers
workers

100.0

100.0

100.0

_
_
_
33.6
9.3
18.0
_
22.8
-

_
_
_
*5.6
8.1
22.7
8.0
5-9
9.7

_
_
.
3.5
3.8
6.9
78.1
-

100.0

100.0

100.0

*2.9
3.9
13.6
1**5
7.1
1.9
-

*0.0
-

7.0

h 0 or under ............
Over *0 and under *5 ...
*5 ....................
Over *5 and under 50 ...
50 .....................
Over 50 and under 55 ...
55 ....................
Over 55 end under 60 ...
6 0 ....................
Over 60 and under 65 ....
65 ....................
Over 65 and under TO ...
7 0 ....................
Over 70 end under 75 ...
75 ....................
Over 75 and under 80 ...
80 ....................
Over 80 and under 85 ...
85 ....................
Over 85 and under 90 ...
90 ....................
Over 90 and under 95 ....
95 ....................
Over 95 end under 100 ....
1 0 0 ...................
Over 100 and under 105 •••
105 ...................
Over 105 and under 110 ...
1 1 0 ...................
Over 110 and under 115 •..
115 ...................
Over 115 and under 120 ...
120 and over ...........

.6
2.3
25.3
.6
3.5
8.1
I.8
*
2.2
3.6
.*
.1
.7
*.7
1.0
13.2
.8
.5
.3
3.*

Establishments with no
established minimum ....

.
6

Information not
available ............

2.6

1.8
2.7
1 .1
2 .1

1.9
.9
2.0
1 .2

-

7.5
-

_
6 8 .0

6.3
1.3
1*.7
.1
-

-

-

-

9.6

7.7

-

2 1.7

8.*
29.9
-

100.0

100.0

100.0
15.0

**.9
15.8
2.9
*.l
1.1
2.5
1.5
8.5
-

3.*

.
1.0
59.7
3.2
10.0
3.*
1.7
3.*
*.8
1.0
6.6
.5
2.8

.1

1.9

Trtle Z-li

.8

50.9
13.8
.*
1.3

5-9
2 .6

2.5
10.7
5.1
9-*
8.6
2.6
6.7
*.l
2.7
9-3
10.2
1.1
*.2
1.5
2.3
-

1/
2/
*

-

*

-

■

-

Percent of plant workers employed
_____ on each shift in -_______
A l l m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s t r ie s l /
Nondiir a b le M a ch in e ry
D u ra b le
A ll
goods
in d u s t r ie s
g<rods
3d o r
3d o r
3d o r
2d
2d
2d
2d
o th e r
o th e r
o th e r
o th e r
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift
shift
s h ift
s h ift
s h ift

1 1 .3

5 .5

16.8

3 .7

* .l

1 .8

16.2

.1

R e c e iv in g s h i f t
• ■ P 'f^rA ntlal ..............
}

1 0 .6

* .2

16.6

3 .3

2 .8

.9

16.2

.1

1 0 .5
.*
1 .1

* .2
.*
.8

1 6 .5
.8
1 .9
1 3 .0
.8
-

3 .3

2 .8

.9

16.2

-

-

.*
.8
2 .1

-

1 1 .6
-

.1
*
.1
-

-

-

U n ifo rm c e n ts
(p e r h o u r) . . . . i .
U nder 5 c e n t s . .
5 c e n t s ................
6 c e n t s ................
7 l/ 2 ce n ts . . . .
10 c e n t s ..............
O ver 10 c e n t s . .

* .8

-

*.0

1.5

-

-

-

1.*

~

PAauiiiOM 4.

P e r c e n t o f w o rk e rs on
e x tra s h if t s , a l l
e s t a b lis h m e n t s ................

-

-

7.6
.8
.6

-

2 .6
.*

-

.2

.*
.8
1 .*

.5
.*

* .6
"

■

.
2

16 .1

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




S llifft

S h ift d iffe r e n tia l

U n ifo rm p e r c e n t age ...........................
5 p e rc e n t ............

.1
.1

-

.1
.1

~

-

■

R e c e iv in g no s h i f t
d i f f e r e n t i a l ..............

.7

1 .3

.2

.*

1 .3

1/

8.8

Supplementary Wage Practices

100.0

.
2.8
.8
17.2

E:

10.8

~

-

■

*

.
9

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex*, June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2:

Scheduled ItJj&eJiLf, JlounA

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W ORKERS

j/

E M P LO Y E D IN -

P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O RKERS E M P LO Y E D IN
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Weekly hours

A ll

industries

Durable
goods

AD

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

if

AD

100.0

0.6

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

100.0

Retail
trade

0.8

1.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

17.2

.1
1.0

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

53.8
2.1
2.0

3 2 .5

Services

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

1
All establishments ............... ••••

Over 35 and under 37^ hours..........
37$- hours ........ ...................
Over 37^ and under 40 hours...... ••••
Over AO and under 44 hours ..........................................
44 hours ...........................
Over 44 and under 48 hours • • • • • .......................
48 hours • • • • • • ............................................................................
Over 48 hours.......................

100.0
0.7
•8
1.5
9.6
64.5
3.7
9.4
3.3
6.1
•4

100.0

100.0

100.0

.

4.1

-

-

3.1
14.2
44.7
4.5
9.7
2.9
20.3
.6

-

43.4
3.9
9.8
3.9
37.8
1.2

6.9
30.8

46.1
5.1
9.6
1.5
-

-

-

0.1
82.5
•8
13.7
2.9

1.9
60.3
6.7
13.8
8.0
4.1
1.1

-

3.9
60.2
10.0
16.1
8.8
.5
.5

2.9
20.9
75.4

.
7
.1

-

46.1
2.7
13.5

-

4.3
5.5
7.4
23.9
14.3

7.7

-

4 2 .7

10.9
1.3

100.0
3.5

3.7
3.5
7.8
47.0
5.5

7.7
26.9
6.0

1.1
_

82.1

61.2
.1
1.5

-

_

7.8
_

15.2
22.0

6.6

_

55.8
2.7
13.1
6.8
7.5
13.0

_

_
1*4

4*1
1 6 .1
8 .9

10.8
6.6
21.5
32.0

1 0 .3

10.1
10.9
18.0
41.9
7.4

1/ Data relate to women workers.
7j Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-3i P & i d JfoliAotfd,
P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O RKE RS E M P L O Y E D IN

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W ORKERS E M P LO Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Nnuber of paid holidays

All establishments ..................

Establishments providing paid
holidays ............... ••••••.....
1 d a y ...........................
2 d a y s ..........................
2$- d a y s ....... ..................
3 d a y s ..........................
4 d a y s ..........................
4fr d a y s .........................
5 d a y s ..........................
5i d a y s .........................
6 d a y s ..........................
7 d a y s ..........................

17 d a y s .........................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ................. ..... ••••

A ll

indus­
tries

Durable
goods

I Q Q t Q ...

■ .IflttaQ- . IQCLtQ

J f l Q t Q . .IQ Q 1O

100.0

100.0

100.0

.
•8
29.4
28.1
41.7
-

_
5.3
.3
54.5

-

.
.8
1.4
3.5
12.2
72.3
-

.5
1.3
40.1
26.9
.7
30.5
-

5.4

9.8

.
3

.1
•1
(2 /)
•4
8.6
•4
28.4
1.6
34.5

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

_
14.4
16.1
26.3
12.1
30.8
-

_
.5
.7
8.5
14.0
51.1
5.6
H.2
—

1.2

Retail
trade

99.7

94.6

5.4
.5
8.9

U Q tQ

Whole­
sale
trade

90.2

98.8

9.9

Non­
durable
goods

■ 3flQ«Q,.

• AD

Public
utili­
ties*

y

I*ss than .05 of 1 per cent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), ooanunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, Insurance, and real estate.

26.4
5.5
30.0
.1
3.7
1.8
32.5

- 1 0 0 .0

1 W .0

7 .2

-

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

84 .2

86.9

90.2

77.5

3.4

11.1
_
2.6
2.9
33.0

Non­
durable
goods

.JfiO a O ...^

98.7

86.0

85.3

82.4

89.1

•
•8
3.0
18*0
21,0

1.7
1.8
•2
•6
20.1
•1
26.3

„
3.7
16.8
16.8

_
6.4
3.5
11.8
60.7
—
-

_
_
34.5
23.5
24.5
5.2
1.4
—
-

17.6

10.9

-

.7

-

27.9
28.0
—
-

26.5
7.3
—
-

45.2
2.2
•6
—
-

1.3

32.7

Public
utili­
ties*

Durable
goods

14.0

14.7

.7

_
_
1.5
•
31.9
6?6
44.2
•
15.8

_
3.0
1.2
56.2
22.2
4.3

1.8
40.5
33."®

3*2

16.6

8.3

5.7
5.6

-

_
-

13.1

9.8

22.5

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.

*
**

-

100.0

All

y




Oocupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
Bureau of labor Statistics

LABOR

Table E-4s

P aid V&GcUlOtU ( ty&UfUil PM4Ulfo*U)
P E R C E N T OF PLA N T W O RKE RS E M P LO Y E D IN

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W O RKE RS E M P LO Y E D IN —

Vacation policy

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

_ 1 0 0 .0

1 3 .4

4 2 .9

2 8 .6

1 5 .7

2 5 .9

_

2 7 .7
1 2 .7
2 .5

3 .0
2 0 .8

5 .9
8 .3

2 3 .2

-

2 .7
-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1/

1 0 0 .0

1 00.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Establishments with paid vacations..
.

4 5 .7

2 4 .9

1 3 .0

3 8 .8

5 2 .3

5 4 .4

9 .3

6 7 .7

5 4 .7

1 7 .6

9 .1

5 .9

Under 1 week.... ...... ......
1 week .............. ...... .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....... .
2 weeks ......... ............
Over 2 weeks........ .... .

3 .1
3 7 .1
2 .4
1 .8
1 .3

3 .1
2 1 .1
.7

5 .8
7 .2

_

7 .2
3 8 .8

7 .4
1 .4

-

-

8 .4

9 .1
-

6 .3
8 .3
1 .4
1 .3
.3

2 .4
3 .0
2 .2
1 .5
-

4 .3
1 .6

.5
-

1 .5
5 8 .4
3 .0
4 .8
-

-

4 .8
5 .1
3 .5
-

54.3

7 5 .1

8 7 .0

6 1 .2

4 7 .7

4 5 .6

9 0 .7

32.3

4 5 .3

8 2 .4

9 0 .9

9 4 .1

8 6 .6

Establishments with paid vacations....

9 9 .5

9 8.5

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

9 2 .2

8 9 .1

9 1 .9

week .......... ............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks...........................
2 weeks .....................
Over 2 weeks............ .....

3 8 .4
.5
5 8 .5
2 .1

6 0 .3
2 .4
3 5 .8
-

8 3 .9

3 2 .9
5 .2
6 1 .9

2 7 .0

3 4 .8

8 5 .2

1 1 .2

2 7 .4

7 9 .9

8 7 .1

9 .2
-

4 .8
-

1 5 .1
-

2 8 .3
-

.5

1 .5

2 .7

Establishments with paid vacations....

9 9 .6

9 9 .4

9 8 .8

1 week ......................
Over 1 and t n e 2 weeks.........
idr
weeks .....................
Over 2 weeks........ ..... ....

14 .6
2 .5
8 0 .4
2 .1

All establishments .............. .

Services

$ apirtfrf pf w r y t a

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

-

-

-

3 7 .3
1 .5

-

4 4 .3
8 .0

-

-

.-

-

4 5 .6

-

-

-

_

_

-

4*8

1 .5
-

5 7 .1

71*4

8 4 .3

7 4 .1

8 5 .4

9 4 .6

9 8 .0

9 7 .7

8 5 .1

7 0 .3

6 6 .3

5 3 .1

5 5 .1

4 0 .1
4 .8

7 5 .4
5 .2
1 7 .1
-

3 0 .0
-

1 year 9 f ggrflcg

1

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

-

13*4
-

-

-

-

-

7 3 .0
-

5 6 .7
8*4

1 3 .9
-

.1

.9

-

8 5 .9
2 .9

70J,
-

7 2 .9
1 .2
1 7 .8
.3

-

2 .2

7 .8

1 0 .9

8 .1

1 4 .6

5 .4

2 .0

2 .3

1 4 .9

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

93.2

9 0 .2

9 3 .9

8 5 .4

98.3

9 8 .0

9 7 .7

8 5 .1

•1

1 4 .2
4 .3
7 9.3

4 1 .3
5.3
4 6 .3

4 3 .3

3 6 .6
2 .8
54.5

52.3

42.0

4 1 .3

3 3 .1

56.3

3 9 .1
1 5 .9
3 0 .1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

* 3 J f y <f gervig?
plp ?

2

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

•
4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .1

1 9 .0

1 7 .6
7 .2

66.6

32 J,
4 .9
6 1 .7

1 7 .0
2 .7
7 9 .7

8 0 .9

1 6 .7
5 .2
7 8 .1

8 1 .0

-

-

-

-

8 .5

-

9 7 .0
2 .9

1 .2

-

-

•1

.9

-

2 .2

9 9 .4

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8

9 3 .4

9 0 .2

6 .5
2 .7
9 0 .2

6 .0

5 .2

6 .8

1 3 .4

•1

-

8 .9

4.3

9 2 .2

6 .8
5 .2
8 8 .0

9 4 .8

8 5 .5

-

-

9 7 .0
2 .9

8 1 .8
2 .8

2 0 .6
1 .6
6 8 .0

-

8 0 .7
1 2 .4

2 1 .1
2 .3
6 9 .0
1 .0

-

2.2

6.6

9 .8

.
6

1 7 .3

.
6

-

-

-

.
3
6 .8

-

-

-

-

3 5.5
7 .0
5 0 .7
4 .8

-

-

9 .8

6 .1

1 4 .6

1 .7

2 .0

2 .3

1 4 .9

9 3 .9

8 5 .4

9 9 .9

9 8 .0

9 7 .7

8 5 .1

1 3 .8
2 .8
7 7 .3

2 9 .8

7 .9

1 4 .4

5 5.6

9 2 .0

-

-

-

7 6 .3
7 .3

3 2 .0
1 .3
6 3 .0
1 .4

2 3 .9
1 5 .9
4 3 .7
1 .6

6 .1

1 4 .6

.1

2 .0

2 .3

1 4 .9

1.6

4 5 .3

-

12.6

4 3 .8

5 Tears of service
Establishments with paid vacations....
week....... ............. .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks........ .
2 weeks .....................
Over 2 weeks .................
1

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

9 9 .6

5
.5
•8
90*4
2 .9

.
4

•
6

.
6

-

1 .2

-

a

-

.
2

.
9

-

-

'

1/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5i

Paid SicJt j£*aua (Qotmal PAoaUioni)
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions f o r paid sick leave

A
ll
indus­
tries

MA UA T R G
N F C U IN

W
holesale
trade

Retail
trade

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100 a .

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

4 .0
1 .8
..
.5
-

1 4 .9
-

6 .2
3 .9
.9
_
ia

2 .5
2 .5

_
1 .7

5 .9
-

1 5 .1
ia
_
1 .5
9 .2
1 .1
1 .9

-

..
-

.7

2 .3
2 .3
_
•
-

-

-

-

9 4 .0

9 7 .0

9 7 .7

9 6 .0

8 5 .1

8 4 .9

9 3 .8

9 7 .5

2 1 .5
1 2 .8
4 .5
4a
-

1 2 .9
.9
2 .5
2 .0
a
.3
1 .2
.5
2 .6
.5
2 .0

7 .7
3 .1
•8
•1
.7
•6
2a

6 .6
5a
-

9a
-

2 6 .9
1 .4
3 .3

1 4 .0
3 .9

5 .8

7 4 .6

7 8 .5

8 7 .1

9 2 .3

2 1 .5
1 2 .8
4*5

1 4 .1

7.7
3 .1
.8

4 .2
-

2 .0
2 .3
a
.5
1 .1
.3
2 .9
.5
4 .1

7 8 .5

8 5 .9

Services

D
urable
goods

utili­
ties*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 .6
3 .0
•6
1 .2
1 .9
1 .6
•2
.6

1 3 .2
2 .3
3 .9
4 .1
2 .9

9 .7
4 .3
—
5 .4

1 7 .3
8 .5
8 .8
-

1 3 .9
4 .4
•4
1 .1
8 .0
-

2 6 .8
2 .5
2 .7
1 .9
1 3 .5
4 .1
2 .1
-

1 2 .2
1 1 .3
.5
a
-

-

1 2 .8
2 .9
3 .7
1 .5
4 .7
-

8 4 .7

8 6 .8

9 0 .3

8 2 .7

8 6 .1

7 3 .2

8 7 .8

2 7 .0
1 .8
4 .1
3*4
.3
•2
3 .0
.6
6 .8
3 .9
2 .9

36.2
9 .5
2 .2
1 .5
4 .1
•4
14*2
4 .3

2 1 .8
1 3 .2
2 .4
.8
5 .4

5 2 .9
5 .2
1 .9
3 .3
8 .8
3 0 .8
2 .9

2 0 .4
4a
1 .9

9 .6

3 3 .0
2 .7
4a
1 4 .1
4 .1
2 .1
3 .9
1 .7

1 8 .8
1 1 .3
2 .8
.9
3 .8
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
f o r paid sic k l e a v e ............................. •••••

7 3 .0

6 3 .8

7 8 .2

4 7 .1

7 9 .6

6 7 .0

Establishments with formal provisions
f o r paid sick l e a v e ........................................
A d a y s ..................................................................
5 d a y s ................................................................
6 days ............................................................... ..
7 d a y s ..................................................................
9 d a y s ..................................................................
10 days •••••••.................. .............. ..
11 days .............. ..................... ............................
12 d a y s ................................................................
15 days ................................................................
20 d a y s ................................................................

2 8 .2
.4
4 .3
4 .1
.3
.3
2 .3
•2
5 .7
4 .5
6 .1

3 7 .0
10 .2

5 2 .9

20a
-

1 .5
«*
4a
a
1 4 .3
4 .3

23.2
1 4 .6
2a
•
•8
5a

3 3 .0
2 .7
4a
1 1 .7
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................ .

7 1 .8

6 3 .0

76.8

A ll e sta b lish m e n ts ...........................

1 0 0 .0

A
ll

1 0 0 .0 _

M
anufacturing

Public
utili­
ties*

Finance**

N
on­
durable
goods

A
ll
indus­
tries

A
ll

D
urable
goods

N
on­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 7 .0
1 2 .7
4 .3
-

6 .0
1 .5
.7
—
•6
1 .1
•1
.8
.8
.1
.3

3 .0
1 .3
•8
-

8 7 .2

8 3 .0

25a
1
—
4 .0
2 .0
1 9 .3
-

8 1 .2

1/

ft Rpnfofi. Q? ggrrtgg
Establishments with formal provisions
1 day ................•••••••.................................
3 d a y s ..................................................................
4 d a y s ..................................................................
5 days ................................. ..............................
6 days ................................................................
7 days ...................................................................
10 days .......................................... .....................
11 d a y s ................................................................
15 d a y s ................................................................
21 days and o v e r ......... ................................

1 5 .3
1 .9
1 .3

•A

-

a
_
-

ia
1 .5

_

Establishments with no formal provisions
l.IM T ofc.M n lsg
Establishments with formal provisions
fo r paid sick leave ........................................
A d a y s ...................................................................
5 d a y s ...................................................................
6 d a y s ........................... .................................... ..
9 days ...................................................................
11 d a y s .................................................................
12 days .................................................................
15 days .................................................................

1/

2a

-

1 .1
3a

-

2 7 .2
1 3 .7
.5
.9

-

-

-

•
3 0 .8
2 .9

4 .9
9 .6

2 .1
8 .0
4 .1

3 .8
•
8 .3

25a
.1
4 .0
.5
1 4 .6
6 .2

4 7 .1

7 9 .6

6 7 .0

7 2 .8

7 4 .6

5 .2
1 .9
3.3
8 .8

4a
a
—
i.i

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), connunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

-

a
.7
a
2a
9 2 .3

1 .8
a
ia
5 .6

1 0 .2
6 .1

19 a
•
1 .9
1 1 .5
1 .1
_
1 .9
2 .5
.5

93a

9 0 .8

7 3 .1

8 0 .6

8 6 .0

6a
5a
1 .2
-

9a
•
1 .8
a

2 6 .9

19 a

2 3 .3

ia
1 .5
_

1 .9
1 0 .1
-

1 .2
•
“

93a

5 .9

-

«
.
ia
5a

5 .9
1 2 .0
6 .1

1 .9
3a
1 .9

9 0 .8

7 3 .1

8 0 .6

2 .5
3?5
1 .3
5a
-

3 .3
_
_
9 4 .2

5 .8
2 .5

6a
1 .0
1 .3

3.3
•

5.3
9.3
76.7

9 4 .2

Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table E-6*

f! (MfVUKUuUjan B otuti& i
P E R C E N T OF P LA N T W O RKERS E M P LO Y E D IN

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W ORKERS E M P LO Y E D IN—

Type of bonus

All establishments.......... .

M a n u f a c t u r in ’

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

IQ, .
Q.0 .
.

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Wholesale
trade

utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Services

All
indus-

j7

. . f Q f . 100.0
.il a i .

.JUB4L. I Q M ......

Finance**

All

_ . O & , 1P0*Q ,. AQQ*Q—
T.

Durable
goods

A3*
9

31.4

21.4

43.0

9 .3

49.0

44.0

69.4

68.5

35.4

2 4 .4

Christmas or year-end ...........
Profit-sharing........... .
Other.................... ..

42.0
2.5
3.1

29.7
3.9
4.0

20.3
.
3
.
8

40.6
8.0
7.8

9 .3

-

47.3
4.5
-

44.0
2.3
-

66.2
1.4
4.8

60.7
7.7
-

33.4
1.7
1.2

2 1 .8
2 .2

.
7

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ..... ............ ....

56.1

68.6

78.6

57.0

9 0 .7

51.0

56.0

30.6

31.5

6 4 .6

75.6

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

. Ilf
. JLQ0,0 .. . f O O
.

.J&tP.,..

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ ...................

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

35.7

5.6

4 6 .5

64.3

54.2

13.1
1.4
1.3

33.3
3.3
-

5.6
-

46.0
2.1
-

62.5
1.0
1.8

50.9
3.3
4.1

84.1

64.3

94.4

53.5

35.7

45.8

Retail
trade

Services

15.9

l/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Unduplicated total.

* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilites.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7i

9 * U 4 4 A G 4 U > e G * u l P-C4Vii04t PAa*U>

P E R C E N T OF P LA N T W O RKERS E M P LO Y E D IN -

P E R C E N T OF O FFICE W ORKERS E M P LO Y E D IN —

Type of plan

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All establishments .... • • • • ... .

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans % / ........... .

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

.. 0 * —
.1 0 9

100.0

Public
utili-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100 .0

100.0

1QM.. 100.0

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

v

IWtQ J Q t i
LQf

Public
All

W...Q.... 100.0

Durable
goods

.AQQ.9

Non­
durable
goods

ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

1 0* q_. .
Q

100.0

100.0

89.8

91.4

87.7

95.7

93.8

85.4

89.4

88.8

87.5

77.3

81.0

81.9

79.7

88.5

68.1

77.9

57.1

Life insurance..... .. ....... ...
Health insurance..............
Hospitalization ..............
Retirement pension

72.1
12.7
52.5
41.8

82.7
13.7
73.3
29.3

83.1
12.5
69.5
2.3

82.2
15.1
77.8
60.5

59.8
.
2
18.8
72.2

73.6
26.1
51.1
42.7

66.7
3.9
64.5
24.4

72.2
17.3
55.0
42.4

80.0
7.7
44*4
17.5

63.0
13.1
51.4
18.7

70.9
18.7
63.8
12.4

77.2
17.7
65.9
3.5

62.5
20.0
61.1
24.3

60.4
3.8
28.0
56.0

62.9
24.0
47.1
24.4

57.5
4.1
46.6
15.7

46.0
12.5
40.2
2.3

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ............ .....

10.2

8.6

12.3

4.3

6.2

14.6

10.6

11.2

12.5

22.7

19.0

18.1

20.3

11.5

31.9

22.1

42.9

"
jj Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.

2/ Unduplicated total.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Dallas, Tex., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Appendix

Scope

W i t h the
exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected b y visits of
field representatives of the Bu r e a u to representative establish­
ments in the a rea surveyed*
In classifying workers b y occupa­
tion, u n i f o r m
job descriptions were used; these are
available
up o n request.
S i x broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of o c cupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance
and
power plant, and (d) custodial,warehousing, and shipping (tables
A - l through A-4).
The covered industry groupings ares m a n ufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication,
and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and r e a l estate; and services.
Information on work
schedules a n d supplementary benefits also was obtained in a r e p ­
resentative group
of establishments in each
of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because the y furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the study.
A m o n g the industries in w h ich characteristic jobs were
studied, m i n i m u m size
of establishment and extent of the
area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see f ol­
lowing table).
A l t hough size limits
frequently varied from
those e stablished for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, d ata for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied
in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed w i t h available resources. Eac h group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its
proper w eight in the
combination of data b y industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes p r e m i u m pay for over­
time and night work.
Nonproduction bonuses are a l s o excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses
and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included.
Where w e e k l y hours
are reported as fpr office clerical, t h e y refer to the w o r k sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for wh i c h the straighttime salaries are paid; average w e e k l y earnings for these occu­
pations have bee n ro u nded to the nearest 50 cents.
The n umber
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study an d no t to the
number
actually surveyed.
Data are shown for
only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices
refers to al l
office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables.
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of al l workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that
observe the practice
in
question, except in the section relat i n g to w o m e n office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled w e e k l y hours. Because of e l i ­
gibility requirements, the
proportion a ctually re c e i v i n g the
specific benefits m a y be smaller.
The
summary of vac a t i o n and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans w h e re b y time off w i t h pa y is granted at the d i s ­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Si c k
leave plans
are further
limited to those providing
full pa y for at
least
some amount of time
off without a n y p rovision for a w a i ting
period preceding the payment of benefits.
These plans a l s o e x ­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for b y employers.
Health insurance is included, however, u n der t a bulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

25.

ESTABLISHMENTS A N D WORKERS IN M A JOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS A ND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN DALLAS, TEX. 1/ A ND NUMBER
STUDIED B Y THE BU R E A U OF IABQR STATISTICS, JUNE 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied

2/

Number of
e s tablishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

17,360
2,750

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on a n area basis
A l l d i v i s i o n s .............. ..•••••••••••••.......
teinufacturing ....................... •••••••••••
Durable goods
...... .............. ...... .
Nondurable goods l j •••••••••••••.....•••••
Nonmanufacturing •.•.•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Wholesale trade •.•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Retail t r a d e .....••••••••••••••••••...... .
Finance, insurance, a nd rea l estate •••••••
Services £ / ............ ............. .

_

1,320

-

409

168

28

30,400

34

2 4 ,1 0 0

-

241
911

66,840
21,660
13,620
8,040

190

86,600

45,180

14,610

21
21
21
21
21

89
241
275
157
149

32

21,800
15,000
26,900

16,640

4,540

41
38
47
32

4,140
13,490
7,550
3,360

2,540
5,790
430

21
21

252
62

141,100
54,500

13,300

9,600

1,580
1,170

1,310

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 67
M 3 n !s an d b o y s 1 work clothing •••••••••....... .
Machinery industries •••••................... •••••
Department and w o m e n s ready-to-wear s t o r e s .....
D rug stores •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••......
B a n k i n g ........................ •••••••••••••••••••
Insurance c a r r i e r s ...... .........••••••••••••••••
Power laundries ................ ................... .
A u t o repair shops

21
2 / 21
51

8
21
21
21
5

8

6

42
14
34

17
9

21

13

16

76

22

53
98

15
24

847
5,300
7,249
1,778
3,150

735
3,909
6,783
1,536

20
520
1,110

2,886

87
2,440

7,344
3,488

4,065

3,160

1,248

3,674

1,811

69
174

1 / Dallas Mstropolitan A r e a (Dallas County).
2 / Total establishment employment.
2/
Mstalworking; lumber, furniture a nd other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments a n d r e l a t e d products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
l j F ood and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing
an d publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; a n d leather and leather products.
Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting an d television; motion pictures; n o n ­
profit membership organizations; a nd engineering a nd architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2 / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




2,
6

Index

Page
number

Page
number

Adjuster (repairm an), sewing machine (men's and boys1
work clo th in g ) ................................................................ .............................................
Asbestos worker (building const m o tio n ) .............. .............. 18
Assembler (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ................................................... ............................
Assembler (machinery) . . . . ............................................. ..............................................
Bench hand (b ak eries) ••••••••............................................. •••••«••••••..........
B i l l e r , machine •••••••••••••••«..•••••»•........................... ...............................
Body repairman, metal (auto rep air shops) ............................................... ....
Bookkeeper, hand ........................... ......................................... ....................................... ..
Bookkeeper, hand (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................................................................
Bookkeeping-machine o perator .....................................................................................3»
Bookkeeping-machine op erator (banking) ...................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .............•••••••••••••
B rick lay er (building co n stru ctio n ) .................................... ...................................
Button sewer, machine (men's and boys' work clo th in g ) •• • ..................
Buttonhole maker, machine (men's and boys' workc l o t h i n g ) ............•••••
Calculating-m achine operator .................... ......................................... ................. ..
Calculating-m achine operator (banking) ............................ ••••••••••••••••
Calculating-m achine operator (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .....................................
Carpenter ^building co n stru ct ion) ....................................................................... ..
C arpenter, m ain ten an ce.................................................................................
C arpenter, maintenance (department and women's readyto-w ear s to re s ) .............................................................................................................
Cashier (drug s to re s ) ..........................................
Cashier-wrapper (department and women's readyto-w ear s to re s ) •••••••••••••.•...........
••••••••••
Cement fin ish er (building const ru ction )
........... •.....................
Cleaner .......................................
Clerk, accounting .................................... ............ ........................................... ..
C lerk , accounting (banking) . . . . . . . .............. ...................... ..................................
C lerk , accounting (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ................ ................. ...........................
Clerk, a c tu a r ia l (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ................................................................
C lerk , correspondence (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ......................................................
C lerk , drug sto re s (drug s to re s ) ......................................................................... ..
Clerk, f i l e ...........................................................................................................................
C lerk , f i l e (banking) .....................................................................................................
Clerk, f i l e (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ••••••••••.••••••••..................................
Clerk, general ........................................ .......................................................................... 3,
C lerk, general (banking) . . . . .................................................••••••••••.............
Clerk, general (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................... ................................................
Clerk, order .............. .................................................................... .....................................
Clerk, p ay ro ll ..................................................................... ........................••.................
Clerk, p ay ro ll (banking) •••••..••••••••...................................... ................... ..
Clerk, p ay ro ll (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ......... ................... ..
C lerk , premium-ledger-card (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ••••...................
C lerk, r e t a i l , receiv in g (power lau n d ries) . . . . . . ......................................
Clerk, soda fountain (drug s to re s ) .....................................................................
Clerk, underw riter (insurance c a r r i e r s )
Compositor, hand (p rin tin g ) ••••••••••••••»............
C u tte r, machine (men's and boys' work clo th in g ) •••••••............




12
16
13
18
3, 4
17
3, 4
16
4, 5
15
16
18
12
12
3, 5
15
16
18
8
14
15
14
18
10
3, 5
15
16
16
16
15
3, 5
15
16
5, 6
15
16
3, 6
3, 6
15
16
16
17
15
16
18
12

Dishwasher, machine ( d r u g s to r e s ) ........................... ................. *........... _ . . . . . .
D raftsm an ..............................................................................................................................
D rill-p re ss o p erato r, s in g le - and m ultiple-spindle (machinery) ..........
Duplicating-machine operator .................................................................
E le c tr ic ia n (building con stru ctio n ) .......................................................... ....
E le c t r i c i a n , automotive (auto re p a ir shops) ...................................... ..
E le c t r i c i a n , maintenance ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
E le c tr ic ia n , maintenance (machinery) ...................................................................
E lectro ty p er (p rin tin g ) •••••••................................................................
E lev ator co n stru cto r (building co n stru ctio n ) .................. ..
E lev ator operatp r, passenger (department and women's
ready-to-w ear sto re s) .................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .......................................................................
Engineer, s t a t i o n a r y ...........................................•••••.................................................
E x tra cto r operator (power laun dries) .................. .......................... .....................
Feeder (b ak eries ) ....................................................................................................
F in ish er, flatw ork, machine (power lau n d ries) ...............................................
F in ish er, fu rn itu re (department and women's readyto-w ear s to re s ) ........................................................................................
Fireman, sta tio n a ry b o i l e r .............................................................................
F i t t e r , women's garments (department and women's readyto-w ear s ta re s ) .......................................................................................................... ..
G lazier (building co n stru ctio n ) ...............................................................................
Greaser (auto re p a ir shops) ........................................................ ............... •••••••
Grinding-machine o perator (machinery) ..............................................................
Guard
............................................... ............................ .................................. ••••.
Helper (b ak eries) .................................
Helper (building co n stru ct ion)
Helper, motortruck d riv e r ...................................
Helper, tra d e s , maintenance
..........................................................................►
Id e n tifie r (power lau n d ries) ................ ......................................................... ..
Inspector (machinery) ........................
In sp ecto r, f i n a l (examiner) (men's and boys' work c l o t h i n g ) ..............
Ja n ito r ......................................................................
•••••••••
Ja n ito r (machinery) ...........
•••••••••••
Key-punch operator .............................................................. •••••.................................
Key-punch operator (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ......... ..............
•••••••••••
Laborer (building co n stru ctio n ) ..............................................................••••••••
Lather (building co n stru ctio n ) .................. ....................................................... ..
Machine operator ( p r i n t i n g ) ...............
•••••••••
Machine tender (p rin tin g ) .......................................................................••••••••••
Machine-tool op erato r (p re d ictio n ) (machinery) ........................••••••••••
Machinist (p rin tin g ) ........................... ••••••••.••••••••..................••••••••.
M achinist, maintenance .......................................................... ..................................... ..
M achinist, production (m a ch in e ry )................................................. ........................
Mailer (p rin tin g ) ••••••••.••••.................
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y .............................................................................
Marble s e t te r (building co n stru ctio n ) .• • ............................... ................... ••
Marker (power lau n d ries) .......................................................... •••••...................... ..
Mechanic, automotive (auto re p a ir shops)•••••••••••••............. •••••••..

15
8
13
4, 6
18
17
8
13
18
18
14
13
8
17
18
17
14

9
14
18
17
13
10
18
18
18
9
17
13
12
10
13
6
16
18
18
18
18
13
18
9
13
18
9
18
17
17

27

Index - C ontinued

Page
number

Page
number
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
......... ............................ ..
Mechanic, maintenance . ................ .......................................................
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ............................................................ ....
M illw rig h t................ ................................................................................... .....................
Millwright (building co n stru ctio n ) ............ ......................•••••••••.............
Mixer (bak eries) .............................................................................
Molder (b ak eries)
......................... ........................•••••................................
Motortruck d r i v e r .............................................................................................•••••••
Nurse, in d u stria l (re g is te re d ) •••••••••..........•••••.................................
O ffice boy ............................................................ ................. ............................................
O ffice boy (banking) •••«••••••••...................................... •••••••................ ..
O ffice boy (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ....................................... •••••••••••••••••
O ffice g i r l .........................................................................................................................
O ffice g i r l (banking) ••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••
O ffice g i r l (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................. .......................... ..•••••••••••
Operator (lo c a l t r a n s i t ) .•••••••••••••.......................
••••••••
Order f i l l e r ................ ...................................................................... ..............................
Ovenman (b a k e rie s) ............................. ..................... ..
P a c k e r ......................................
P ain ter (building co n stru ctio n ) .••••••........................................ ...................
P a in te r, maintenance ....................
••••••••
Paperhanger (building co n stru ctio n ) .................
Pharmacist (re g is te re d ) (d r u g s to r e s ) .................. ................. ................... ..
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ) ..............................................................................
P la s te re r (building co n stru ctio n ) ..........................................
Plumber (building co n stru ctio n ) ......................... ..................... •••••.................
Plumber, maintenance .....................................................................................................
P o rte r ................ .......................... .................................................................. .....................
P o r te r , day (cle a n e r) (department and women's
ready-to-w ear s to r e s ) . .................. ..................................... •••••.............*••••
Power equipment operator (building con stru ctio n ) ....................... ...............
Premium accep to r (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................. ......................................... ..
Press feeder (p rin tin g ; .............
P re sse r, fin is h , machine (men's and boys' work clo th in g ) .....................
P re sse r, machine, s h ir ts (power lau n d ries) .................••••••••••••••••
Pressman (p rin tin g ) ...................................... ••••••...................................................
Proof-machine operator (b a n k in g )...................................................................
Receiving cle rk ..........................................
Receiving clerk (checker) (department and women's
ready-to-w ear s t o r e s ) .....................................................................................
Rodman (building co n stru ctio n ) ...................
•••••••
Roofer (building con stru ctio n ) ............................
•••••••••••••
Sales cle rk (department and women's ready-to-w ear s to re s ) ................
Screw-machine o p erato r, automatic (machinery) ................
S e cre ta ry ........................... ...................................................................................
S e cre ta ry (banking) .................. ..............................................
S e cre ta ry (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ••••••••••••••.••••................
....
S ection head (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ............................................. ••••.••...........
Sewing-machine o p erato r, work pants (men's and boys' work clo th in g )




9
9
13
9
IB
IB
IB
IB
B
4
15
16
6
15
16
IB
10
IB
10
IB
9
IB
15
IB
IB
IB
9
10
14
IB
16
IB
12
17
IB
15
10
14
IB
IB
14
13
4, 6
15
16
16
12

Sheet-m etal worker (building co n stru ctio n ) •••••••••..................................
Shipping c l e r k ..............................................................................................................
Shipping-and-receiving cle rk ............................. •••••••••••••..............•••••
Sign p ain ter (building co n stru ctio n ) ........................................................•••••
Steam f i t t e r (building co n stru ctio n ) ••••......................................................
Stenographer, general ............................. ••••••••.......................... ..
Stenographer, general (banking) ..........................................................
Stenographer, general (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ........................... ..........................
Stenographer, t e c h n i c a l ......................... •••••••........... ..........................••••••••
S tereotyper (p rin tin g ) ••••••................................................... ••••••.................
Stock handler ••••••••••••.............................................................•..................... ..
Stockman (department and women's ready-to-w ear s to r e s ) ••••••••••••.
Stonemason (building co n stru ctio n )
.............. ..
S tru c tu ra l-iro n worker (building co n stru ctio n ) •••••••••••••••••••••
Switchboard operator ••••••.••.......................••••••••••................. ...................
Switchboard operator (banking) .................. ...................••••.......... ••••••••••
Switchboard op erato r (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................................................. ..
Switchboard o p era to r-re ce p tio n ist .......................••••...........•••••••••...........
Switchboard o p e rato r-rece p tio n ist (insurance c a r r i e r s ) •••••••••••••
Tabulating-machine o p e r a t o r ............................................... .••••............................
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance c a r r i e r s ) •••••,................ ..
T a ilo r, a lte r a tio n , men's garments (department and
women's ready-to-w ear s to re s ) ••.•••••••••...................................... ..
T e lle r, note (banking) ............................................................................................. ..
T e lle r, paying or paying and re ce iv in g , commercial
(banking) ........................................ .............••••............... ............................ ...............
T e lle r , savings (banking) •••..••••••••...................................... ............... ••••
Terrazzo worker (building co n stru ctio n ) ............................................................
T ile layer (building con stru ctio n ) ............................. ....................................... ..
Tool-and-die maker ............••••................... ..
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ................................ ......................................... ..
Transcribing-machine operator (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ....................................
Transcribing-machine operator, general ............................
....• •
Truck d r i v e r .................................................................................. ..
Trucker, hand .................. .....................................•••••................................................ ..
Trucker, hand (machinery) ................ ................................................ ..........................
Trucker, p ow er......... •••••.................................................................... ••••••••••••
T u rret-lath e o perator, hand (machinery) .............................................................
T y p i s t ........................................................ ................... ........................................... ..
Typist (banking) ....................................................................................
Typist (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ...................•••••••.....................................................
Underwriter (insurance c a r r i e r s ) .................
Washer, automobile (auto re p a ir shops)
Washer, machine (power laundries) .................
...•••••••••
Watchman ..•••••••••................ •••••••••............. ..................................... ••••«•••
Welder, hand (machinery) ............................
••••••••
Work d istrib u to r (men's and boys' work clo th in g ) ••••••••••............
Wrapper (b ak eries) ••••••••«•••••...........
Wrapper, bundle (power laun dries) .................................... ..
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O FFICE : O — 1951

IB
10
11
IB
IB
6
15
16
7
IB
H
14
IB
IB
7
15
16
7
16
4, 7
16
14
15
15
15
18
18
9
13
16
7
11
H
13
12
13
4, 7
15
16
16
17
17
12
13
12
1$
17


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102