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Occupational Wage Survey
PORTLAND, OREGON
June 1951

Bulletin No. 1042

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page .
number

INTRODUCTION..............................................................................

1

THE FORTLAND METROPOLITAN AREA...........................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE..............................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations.........................................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations....................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations................ ..................
A--4
Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations..........................
Average earnings for occupations studied on an industry basis B-2421
Sawirills and planing mills.................................................
B-2612
Paper and paperboard mills.................................................
B-332
Foundries, ferrous.........................................................
B-3441
Fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal work....................
B-35
Machinery industries.................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers.........................................................
B-7211
Power laundries..................
B-7538
Auto repair shops..........................................................

3
7
8
10

12
12
13
13

1U
1U
15
15

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction......................................................
C-205
Bakeries....................................................................
C-2081
Nonalcoholic beverages.....................................................
C-27
Printing....................................................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees.........................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers.............................................
C-44
Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel....................................
C-/J+6
Stevedoring.....................................................
C-541
Grocery stores and meat markets...........................................
C-58
Restaurants and lunchrooms.................................................
C-6512
Office building service....................................................
C-7011 Hotels......................................................................

16
16
16
16
16
16
17
18
18
18
18
18

Entrance rates Dl 1
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers..................................

19

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions..............................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours.............
E-3
Paid, holidays®.............................................. ..............
E-4
Paid vacations............................................................ •
E-5
Paid sick leave....... ..........................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses......................................................
E-7
Insurance and pension plans..........

19
20
20
21
22
23
23

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey..........................................................

2U

INDEX............... ......................................................................

26

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 2H, I). C. - Price 20 cents

Introduction 1/

The Portland area Is one of several important indus­
trial centers in which the Bureau of labor Statistics conducted
occupational wage surveys during the summer of 1951* 2/ Occu­
pations that are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing Industries were studied on a community—wide basis*
Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in com­
piling earnings data far the following types of occupations:
(a) office; (b) professional and technical; (o) maintenance and
power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping* In pre­
senting earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through
A-4) separate data have been provided wherever possible for
individual broad industry divisions.

Occupations that are characteristio of particular,
important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community sur­
vey*
Earnings data for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables* Union seales (Series C tables) are presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or min-iimim rates are indicative of prevailing
pay practices.

Data have also been
operations and differentials,
benefits such as vacation and
days, nonproduction bonuses,

collected and summarized on shift
hours of work, and supplementary
sick leave allowances, paid holi­
and insurance and pension plans*

Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in San Francisco,
Calif, by John L* Dana, Regional Wage Analyst* The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Branch of
Community Wage Studies of the Bureau's Division of Wages and
Industrial Relations*
2/ Other areas studied are: Baltimore, Bridgeport, Dallas,
and Dayton* Similar studies were conducted earlier in the year
in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, New York and the San Francisco-Qakland area*
2 / See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey*




The Portland Metropolitan Area
Portland and neighboring cities and towns in the fourcounty metropolitan area (Claokamus, Miltnomah, and Washington
counties in Oregon and Clark county in Washington) had a combin­
ed population of more than 550,000 in 1950* About two-thirds
of the population lived in Portland.

Excluding agricultural pursuits and government, more
than 185,000 wage and salary earners were employed in the area
in mid-1951*
A little more than a third (62,000) worked in
approximately 1,A00 manufacturing establishments producing pro­
cessed foods, pulp and paper, wood products, machinery, and a
host of other products valued at mare than a half-billion dol­
lars annually. Although Portland is widely known as the lumber
capital of the Pacific Northwest,the lumber and timber products
industry with 12,000 employees ranked second in the area in June
1951 in terms of employment* Despite some seasonality in employ­
ment, this position is held throughout the year in relation to
the metalworking industries which had 16,000 employees in June*
Other leading manufacturing industries in the area were— food
processing with 10,000, pulp and paper products with 7,000, tex­
tiles and apparel with 5,000,printing and publishing with 4,000,
and furniture with 2,000.

Situated at the confluence of the Columbia and Will­
amette Rivers, Portland is one of the leading ports on the Pacif­
ic Coast* Much of the vast resources in agricultural produce
and timber products of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana
moves through its piers and docks 0 This importance as a distri­
bution center is reflected in the relatively large number of
employees engaged in trade* About 38,000 sales and related dis­
tribution workers were employed in retail trade and 18,000 were
employed in wholesale trade at the time of the survey*
The
service industries provided employment for approximately 22,000
workers and a slightly smaller number were employed in trans­
portation, communication, and other public utilities* The buildind industry employed 13,000. Financial institutions including
insurance carriers and real estate operators employed an esti­
mated 10,000*

2

Among the industry and establishment-size groups sur­
veyed in June 1951, more than four-fifths of the plant workers
were employed in establishments having written contracts with
labor organizations. Collective bargaining, in large part, is
of the multi-employer, industry-wide, master-agreement type in
Portland*
Notable examples of labor-management relations on
this scale are in the paper and pulp, lumbering, and metalwork­
ing industries in manufacturing; and in milk and dairy products
and the maritime Industry in nonmanufaoturing.

The proportion of office workers employed under union
contract provisions was considerably lower than for plant work­
ers* Less than a tenth were employed under the terms of collec­
tive bargaining agreements* Chly in the public utilities group
of industries and in retail trade was unionization in offices
found to any appreciable degree.

Occupational W age Structure
Wage rates were increased for nearly all plant work­
ers in Portland manufacturing establishments between January
1950 and June 1951*
General salary increases for office work­
ers were reported in about half the manufacturing establishments
during the period* Ch the whole, office workers receiving in­
creases gained amounts similar to those allowed plant workers*
These pay raises ranged from 5 to more than 15 cents cm hour,
but for almost four-fifths of the plant workers increases were
from 10 cents upward*
In the nondurable-goods manufacturing
industries (J increases tended toward higher amounts than those
in durable-goods manufacturing, largely reflecting gains made
by workers in the printing and publishing, and the paper and
pulp industries* Ch the other hand, some completed negotiations
in durable goods - notably in the lumber and sawmilling indus­
try - called for substantial increases which were not in force
at the time of the survey since Wage Stabilization Board sanc­
tion had not yet been obtained*

ij

See appendix table for listing of durable and nondurablegoods industries*




General wage increases were granted to slightly more
than half the plant workers in nonmanufaoturing establishments
during the period* Office workers were included in these acrossthe-board adjustments in about half the cases* Pay raises in
manufacturing and nonmanufaoturing varied widely in amount but
a majority of both plant and office workers receiving increases
gained from 1 to 12 cents an hour*
Formalized wage and salary structure for both plant
and office workers were found in a large proportion of Portland
establishments* Wage structures setting a single rate for each
occupational classification predominated for plant workers,
whereas a range of rates was the typical plan for office work­
ers* Established minimum entrance rates for plant workers with
no previous work experience were a part of the formalized rate
structures of a majority of Portland area firms* Over 80 per­
cent of the workers were employed in establishments having es­
tablished minimum rates for inexperienced workers* These minima
ranged from less than 60 cents to more than $1.70 an hour, and
no specified rate was typical of the area as a whole. The high­
est rates were generally found in the durable-goods manufactur­
ing industries and the lowest in retail trade*
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufaoturing* In
19 of 2A office classifications permitting comparison, salaries
of workers in manufacturing plants exceeded those of workers in
nonmanufaoturing establishments*
Average hourly earnings for
plant workers studied in all industries were slightly higher in
manufacturing far 15 of 2A job categories for which comparisons
were possible*

A fourth of the workers in the Portland area manufac­
turing plants were employed on late shifts in June 1951* Almost
all of these workers were paid shift premiums - usually a centsper-hour differential over day-shift rates* The amounts most
commonly reported for each shift were A or 5 cents*

Five-sixths of the women office workers in Portland
were scheduled to work a AO-hour week in June 1951* About 85
percent of the plant workers were also on a AO-hour workweek*

Table

A-l:

O ^ lce OcCiifuUiOHd

3

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Portland, Qreg*, by industry division, June 1951)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
W
eekly (Jnder 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 .5 0 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
W
eekly
earnings $
hours
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) 3 2 .5 0 under
over
3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 4 0 .0 0 4 2 *5 SL 4 5 .0 0 47*50 5Q.QQ 5 2 .5 0 55.00- -SZaSfl -&Q.Q0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 67.5Q 7-Q.QQ 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0
$

B o o k ke ep ers, hand.
M a n u f a c t u r in g .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ..........
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .
R e t a il t r a d e .. . . . .

152
77
75
17
41

4 1 .0
4 0 .0
4 1 .5
4 2 .0
4 2 .5

7 2 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
7 3 .0 0
7 4 .5 0
6 9 .0 0

C l e r k s , a c c o u n t in g .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .
D u r a b le g o o d s ..........
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s . .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g .. . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .
W h o le s a le t r a d e . . .
F in a n c e * * .................

211
67
43
24
144
49
75
16

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

6 5 . SO
6 7 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
6 1 .0 0

C l e r k s , g e n e r a l.
M a n u f a c t u r in g .................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ..........
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W h o le s a le t r a d e . . .

216
--- j j — 4 0 .0
40.U
4 0 .0
175
150
4 0 .0
21
4 0 .0

6 7 .0 0
57700
6 9 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
6 0 .5 0

C le r k s , o rd e r.
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g . . .
W h o le s a le t r a d e .

254
-----57—
207
190

4 0 .5
4175—
4 0 .5
4 0 .5

6 4 .0 0
7 2 .5 0
6 2 .0 0
6 1 .5 0

p a y r o ll.

69

4 0 .5

73
17
56
13
13

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

4 1 .0 0
3 5 .0 0
4 3 .0 0
4 3 .0 0
4 5 .5 0

T a b u la t ln g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s .
N onm anuf a c t u r i n g .
W h o le s a le t r a d e .

30
25
16

4 0 .0
"407(5
4 0 .0

6 5 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
6 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

2

1

-

2
2

2
2

“
-

2
2

4
4

.
-

1
1

-

-

-

5
5
2

-

-

C le r k s ,

B i l l e r s , m a c h in e ( b i l l i n g m a c h in e ) . . . .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...................................................
D u r a b le g o o d s ...........................................
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ....................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ............................................
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * ...............................
W h o le s a le t r a d e .......................................

231
25
12
14
205
94
102

4 7 .0 0
4 0 .5
"4070----- 5 2 .5 0 ’ "1
4 0 .0
5 2 .0 0
4 0 .0
5 2 .5 0
4 0 .5
45 .-50
4 9 .5 0
4 1 .5
4 3 .0 0
4 0 .0

B i l l e r s , m a c h in e (b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e )
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...................................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ...........................................
R e t a i l t r a d e ............................. ..

93
40
53
32

4 0 .0
4 6 .0 0
"4070-----50700---4 0 .0
4 3 .0 0
4 0 .0
4 2 .0 0

-

-

-

25
-

12

-

-

-

-

1

2
2

25
6
17
2

12
5
7

-

1

5

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

1

-

1

_

30

1

6

-

-

-

-

_

-—
.

-

1
1

_
8
6
2
1

-

1
1

_

_

-

3
3
-

-

5
4
1
1

12
1
11

_
-

_
-

7
7
2
1

-

1

-

18

-

_
-

-

24
1

14

1
23

-

-

2
2

1
1
-

.
-

36
1

-

1

18

23

12

1

1

25

9

7

25
19

8
4

-

18

-

r -----r

-

-

-

-—

12

-

-

7
4
4

-

3
1

-

17
5
1
4
12
1
10

r --- 5
"
4
1

24
3

-

3
21
5
12
2

7
7

9
5
4
4
-

47
19
28
24
4

26

7

31

30
30

1
1

6
6

2
1

26
26

7

1
35
12
22

1

7
7
6
1

2

-

"

Transportation (excluding railroads), ccnmiunication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1
2

-

2
-

1

_

See footnote at end of table.
*
**

-

3
1

1
1
-

6 7 .5 0

O ffic e b o ys.
M a n u f a c t u r in g ................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g .. . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W h o le s a le t r a d e . . .

-

_

3

1

«

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
3
3

3
3
3

5
3
3

35

28

30
7

10

2

2

15
3
1

2

5
2

-

2

2

8
8

12

19
8
4
4
11

8

5

7
7

31
31

11 _____3

_ 25l
_

8 ____2 0 _____a
6
26
8
2
2
-

10
25

-

25

“

17
13
8
5
4
1
2
1

17
12
3
9
5
2
1
2

10

29
3
26
22

9

48
13
35
35

32
16
16
2

-

-

10
10
24
3
21
21

-

19
3
3

-

16
12
3

14
12
12

-

2
2

-

-

-

6
3

-

3

9

31

9

31
31

-

6

-

9

4
5
5

24
3
21
21

__ 1 2 ____25 ___ 0
3
10
5

3
22
4
10

-

29
8
8

7
2
2

7
2
2

7
2
-

7 _____ 5.
5
7
5
-

_
.
-

-

-

-

21
6
15
-

5
1
3
1

5
2
3
-

-

4

14

12

-

3

-

4
4

14
14

12
12

3
3

-

-

9 ____ 5 ___
4
9
1
9
1

8- __ 6 _____a\
6
1
2
8
5
2
6
5

4
2

-

2
2

.

2

_
-

_
-

___ 2 ____20. ___ 2

___ 4 _____3l___ 2 ____11J

37
2
35

9
12

_
-

-

35
26
1

26
15
11

23
20
3

10

7

10
7

1

18
17
1
1

- --- 5
"

-

_
-

_
-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

4

6

-

12
8
4

_

3
3

-

1
1

2
1

6
5
5

-

-

___ L
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

“
-

-

2
2
1

1

1
1
1

-

_
-

“
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Qreg., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-l:

O ^ lce OcCUp&tiO+uL - Go4ttl4U4e<t

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Portland, Or eg., by industry division, June 1951)

A verage

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

W eekly
W eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
A X ld
32.50 under
over
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 R0.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

$

Women - Continued
Bookkeepers, hand.
Manufacturing.
Nonaanufacturing.•.
Wholesale trade.
Retail trade....
Finance4* .....
1
Services.......

220
24
196
38
48
21
47

40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0
41.0
38.5
41.0

63.50
71.00
63.00
57.00
62.00
73.00
67.00

Bookkeeplnfl-wwahlne operators, class A.
Manufacturing.
Nonaanufacturing...
Wholesale trade.

128
29
99
22

40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0

53.00
53.00
52.50
54.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B.
Manufacturing
Nonaanufacturing....
Public utilities*.
Wholesale trade...
Retail trade.....
Finance** .......

398
30
368
32
94
54
181

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.5
40.0
39.5

47.50
54.00
47.00
56.00
51.50
46.50
43.00

426
78
27
51
348
73
184
64
27

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0

50.00
51.56
53.00
51.00
49.50
50.00
51.00
47.50
46.00

60

40.0

45.00
45.00
45.50

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer

-■tePel
Manufacturing.......
Durable goods ....
Nondurable goods..
Nonaanufacturing ....
Public utilities*
Wholesale trade...
Retail trade.....
Finance**........
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type).
Nonmanufacturing. •.
Wholesale trade.
Clerks, accounting.
Manufacturing.
Durable goods....
Nondurable goods..
Nonmanufaoturing.....
Public utilities*
Wholesale trade...
Retail trade.....
Finance** .......
Services.........
Clerics, file, class A.
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing ..
Wholesale trade.
Finance** .....

~60 --- “ 40.0
48

40.0

922

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

53.00
"55750
63.00
53.50
52.00
56.00
53.50
50.50
46.50
52.00

157
39.5
19--- '"'40.0
138
39.5
40.0
75
37
38.5

44.00
45.00
43.50
45.00
41.00

“125--- '"40.0
67
59
796
94
310
257
100
35

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

_
-

_
-

-

4

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

7
-

5

4

1

50

38

70

-

-

-

-

-

-

70

18
7
10

1
1

37

6
2
4

-

-

-

20
20

-

1
4
8

1

.

14

79
3
3

38
8

24
8

_

_

.

8
30
8
15
5
2

8

7
15

-

-

-

6

-

-

5

1
3

1

44

2
1
35

19
14
37

_

6

8

15

-

-

-

-

19
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
18
7
6
1
4

78
15
6
9
63
5
50
4
4

76
20
37
14
5

55
20
8
12
35
5
6
15
9

-

-

-

6

8

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

~

~

8
~

15
4
7
2
2

1
1
-

2
2
-

25
25
24

6
6
6

9
9
2

5
5
4

5
5
5

94
22
10
12
72
2
31
37
2
-

85
8
4
4
77
3
17
33
21
3

96
6

13
3
10

9

-

“

-

_

11

3

43

77

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

1
76
4
30
23
12
7

60
5
2
3
55
6
29
13
6
1

45
3
42
17
11

- 38
11
27
23
2

3

43

-

-

-

-

“

4
7
-

-

13
14
16
-

6

6

7

7

-

-

-

-

7
7

7
7

-

6

6

-

-

6

3
-

6

.

11

20
1
19
13

-

.

5
-

39
16
23
1
1
10
11

50

-

-

47
1
46
1
9
15
20

-

-

-

4

-

9
6
3

-

6
90
14
32
24
17
3
7
1
6
3
3

45
9
36
6
13

3

58
3
55
8
11
13
19

1

-

-

30
1
29
8

4

-

20

8
1
7
1

-

-

37

28
13
15
-

38

5
-

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
**

18

-

-

14
10

9
5
4
8
_

8
-

6

9

13
2
11

6

5

_

.

1
1

12

9

.

4

27
2
25

.

12

_

_

_

-

_

-i

5
5

_
_

-

-

_

-

-

4

11

2

.

-

_

.

5
4

-

_

“

-

-

-

4

3

-

-

4
-

3
3

29
2
27
10
17

16
1
15
12
3

28
5
1
4
23
12
11

18
4
2
2
14
10
4

4
_

_

_

13

6

15
8
7

.

.

_

_

.

_

5
2

-

1

-

-

-

13
9
4

_

_

7

1

_

-

_

7

1

_

_

-

3
3

3

5
7

_

..

-

_

3

-

-

.

3

-

•

_
_

-

.

_

4

-

.

_

-

.

4

-

_

_

-

_

3
3

_
_

_

.

_

.

.

_

_

4

6

1
6

22
7

2
5
8
1

8
7

-

-

4
4
4
105
17
7
10
88
20
30
28
7
3

104
6
6

5

10

3
1
2
1

____ a

.

-

17

3

9

_

_

.

-

-

17

3

9

-

-

-

-

34
5

7

6

-

_

20
1

-

_

14
11
11

_

_

-

5
2
2

-

•

21
12
11
1
9
1
8

_

-

7
3
3

.

_

•

3
3
3

88
20
10
10
68
9
34
6
7
12

3 ____ £_ __ VL _____
3
4
3
4

-

5
-

2

-

_

10
10

-

98
15
37
41
3
2

45
9
3
6
36
9
6
17

34
4
16
14

-

•

.

6
2
4

4
2
1

1
19
1
18

-

-

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

2
_
_
_

_

3

_

_

•

.

1

3

_

.

-

-

_

_

.

-

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

-

_

-

_

_

_
_

_
_

2

4
_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

1
1
1

_

_

Table A— Is

O ^ iC B 0 cC 4 4 fia tiO 4 t4 >

-

G o tU tH M e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Portland, Oreg., by industry division, June 1951)

A verag e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
Weekly
earnings
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) *
and
32.50 under
over
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
$

Women - Continued

129

Clerks, file, class B .....................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Public utilities* ...................
Wholesale trade .....................

Clerks, general ..........................
Manufacturing .................. ........
Durable goods .......................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing .................... .

Retail trade ........... .
Finance ** ..........................

Clerks, order ............................
Manufacturing ..........................
a gnnda ___TT___fTtlI11( ,1|llr
MnnriivnnVil a
.... . ...
Nonmanufacturing..... .................
^nnl a
f.TtrTi,....... ...t >
Retail trade .........................
Clerks, payroll ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable goods ..................... .
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Public utilities* ...................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ......... ...............

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0

39.00
44.50
38.50
43.50
44.00
34.00
37.00

569
222
126
96
347
ioo
48
122
30
47

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.5
39.0
4O .5

49.50
48.50
50.50
46.50
50.00
54.00
53.00
44.50
50.00
51.00

203
64
12
52
139
94
38

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

46.50
48.00
46.50
48.50
45.50
45.5O
46.00

275
131
52
79
144
42
28
59

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
40.5
40.0

51.00
52.00
55.50
49.50
50.00
53.00
52.50
46.50

250
20
230
23
38

Duplicating-machine operators ...........
Nonmanufacturing ........................

29
27

40.0

Key-punch operators .......... ...........
nr>
.......

149
19
130
27
39
21

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

51.50
53.50
51.00
47.50
56.50
45.00

132
13
119
22
17
66

39.5
40.0--39.5
39.0
40.0
39.5

37.00
37.50
37.00
43.00
34.50
35.50

Nonmanufacturing.......................
Public utilities* .................. .
Wholesale trade .....................
.. ..........
Office girls .............................

14
o 41

1 4 ^4
+ tiq A a

TM

.................

............. ..............................

45.50
45.50

30

47

30
19
11

47
2
2
43

9
9
9
-

23
9
9
14

_

3
2
2
1

-

20
20

-

9
9

_
-

_
_

_
-

_

-

44
3
3
41
17
g

21
3
.
3
18
14
4

32
22
12
10
10
10

19
_

26
11
11
15
W

3
3
3
-

6
6
6
-

2
-

4
12

14
1
3

-

10
2

_
-

-

2
-

3

_

_

_

23
15
3
12
8
g
1

81
25
17
8
56
19
14
2
1
20

48
22
11
11
26
10
_

10
1
3

30
4
3

18
6
4

1

4
2

16
1
1

33
16
7
9

31
9
2
7

12
6
x
5

6
3

2
2

52
15
2
13

17
12
5

22
21
1

6
3

3

*
*
O
2

.

2
_
2

.
-

1

_
_

_
.
_

_
-

_
.

.
.

.
.
.

10
10

-

2

-1
-

_
-

_
-

-

.

_

-

-

-

_

.

_

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
2

»

11

2

4

3

2

2

1

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

21
12
6
6
9
1
8

27
3
3
24
11
~
6

28
5
1
4
23
1
10
10

60
47
9
38
13
12
1

27
20
12
8
7
2
_
5

20
8
2
6
12
10
2

14
7
6
1
7
1
3
-

8
4
4
4
4

15
10
9
1
5
4
-

5
1
1
4
3
1

4
3
3
1
1

2
2
2
-

1

2

1

-

28
11
11
17
16

1
1
-

2
1
1
-

1
1
-

2
2

4
3

3
3

4
4

1
-

3
3

_

_

-

-

____ 1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

11

_

_

_

_

-

-

4
4

7
7

-

_

_

_

4

6

18
1

12

11
3

35

27
q

_
-

-

4

17

-

-

8
5

-

-

-

-

3

4

1

7
9

34
7
3

-

-

-

12
9

18

-

6
5

12
2
10
6
2

12

1
-

15

12

8

12

Q

1
X

A
%

g

31
2
3

1R
Xu

23

22

8

5

32

_

13

4
4
4

_

29

_
_

1
-

15
11

“

35
g

_
-

_

10

7
7
6
1

-

19
g

.
2

_

11
10
1

-

_

_

2
13

3

ti

g

1
1

x

x

2

0

2

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_
.
-

_

37
15
16

See footnote at end of table.
*
**

_

1

_

_

68
29
29
39
11

23
9
9
14

20
-

_

74
32
22
10
42
5

46
15
15
31

-

_

17

19
9
9
10

10
-

9

3
2
1
1
-

20

14
-

_

5
1
4
4
-

29
6
23
2
1

-

_

5
2
3
2
1

27
1
26
3
3
2
15

10
14
7

_

11
4
7
3
1
3

42
1
41
4
9
2
20

42
3
39
4
14

1

1

X

7

ip
lb

1
g

13

2
X

1

x

x

x
X

3
2

13
•
X
O
10
1
9

_
_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

11
11

.

_
•

-

-

.

-

.

_
-

-

.
-

-

-

-

O ffic e 0C C S 4 fu U iO H l - C o*U lH 4 4& d
straight-time weekly hours and earnings \J for selected occupations

6

Table A-lx

(Average
studied on an area basis in Portland, Oreg., by industry division, June 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLYEARNINGS OFSex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
W
eekly Under 32.50 $5.00 17.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 $
W
eekly
95.00
earnings
hours
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) ♦
under
32.50
over
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72,50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
$

Women - Continued
Secretaries .............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ........ ..........
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods........ ..........
Monmanufacturing .....................
Publio utilities* .................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance** .........................

603
39.5
I7l- “5575—
101
40.0
40,0
70
432
39.5
116
38.5
40.0
143
54
40.0
39.0
95

60.50
62.50
66.00
56.50
59.50
62.00
58.00
56.00
60.00

Stenographers, general...................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................
Durable goods .....................

977
IBS--89
79
809
178
268
81
232
50

41.0
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

51.50
52755“
53.50
51.50
51.00
51.50
54.50
46.50
48.00
52.50

38.5
38.5
38.0

Nonmanufacturing ........... ........ .
Public utilities* .....................................
Wholesale trade ..........................................
Retail t r a d e .......... ......................................
Finance** .........................
S e r v i c e s ....... ............ ......
Stenographers, t e c h n i c a l ..... ..........
Nonmanufacturing ........ ......... .
Finance** .........................

151
145
12 1

39.5

~ 75—
W

241
41.0
Switchboard operators ...................
n/v
.. ......... . _ - 25--- "4575—
41*0
nff_____ ...............
221
88
40.0
Public utilities* .................
■bnl Aaml a
.. ...........
.
26
40.0
0^4* e4 1 ^ A c
..............
16
40.0
V4
.....
40.5
14
Qat*w4 aaS
....
77
42.5

10
*

Switchboard operator-receptionists..... .
Manu f a c t u r i n g................... .
Durable goods ................
a onAdfl
.... ............

1

Nonmanufacturing ......................

Pub'll r* nt.11 4 + 1 Afl* ...............................................
Wholesale trade ..........................................
Oa+.aI +i* <a
. a
....................... . . . . . . . .
................... ..................• . . . . . .
A fl .....
A
.............

1

1

4

Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Nonmanufacturing...... ..............

343

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical .............................
T f n n nu^A a
lnii
«

r*

Finance** .........................

24
38.5
- 2?- “3575—
24
38.5

-

-

23
-

1

4

1

23

-

-

-

-

1
-

3
1

1
-

61.00
61.00
62.00

“

_

.
-

-

45.00
47.00
45.00
49.00
42.50
44.00
47.00
40.50

_

15
_
15

56.00
DY.UU

40.0
"457540.0
39.5
40.0

-

1
-

44
40.0
- 32--- 4u.u
-

144
Transcrib ine-machine operators, general .
HApwanTrfafttivrlng
” 159—
tfhnl a a a I a + i* 4a ____ _______ .......
. ai
69
W
.......
.... .......... .
22
30
Services ..........................

-

•
-

1
1
1
-

4
-

40.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0
40.5
38.5
39.5

40
41
262
31
96
76
46
13

-

1
-

47.00
50.0O
49.00
51.00
46.00
51.50
49.50
41.00
46.50
42.50

39.5

— 51----- 40.0

_

-

49.00
49.00
50.50
47.50
48.50

50.00
50.00
50.00

_

-

33
_

44
_

33

44
5
17

_

3
14

30

14

19

-

-

-

5

14

-

-

_

5

14

5

3
3
3

3
5
15
-

-

6
1
1

-

98
12
6
6
86
12
17
3
50
4

1

-

28
15
6
9
13
8

86
4
3
1
82
10
30
21
20
1

-

19

_

6
10

3
19
45
4

4
41

_

122
16
7
9

18
6
4
2
12
1
7
3
1

27
5
1
4
22
5
6
8
3

14
14
3
6
_
5

4
3
3

16

106
23
25
24
20
14

57
12
33
3
9
-

38
9
11
-

23
12
8
_

6
2

1

_
-

1

18
-

117
30
48
1
20
18

3

1
3

.

9
9
8

10
10
10

4
4
4

21
21
18

14
12
11

13
11
1

21
21
15

6
6
3

5
5
5

41
5
36
19

46
10
36
20

22
4

19
1

4

1

14

1

18
15

4
3

1

14
14

1
1

17
1
1
16
15
_

.

4
_

18
8
1
7
10
1
1
_

1

4

8

13
5
4
1
8

.

9
.
_
9
1
6
_

8
7
7
.
1

2

-

.
_
.
_
_

1
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_

1

18
11
1

g
6
2
3
49
11
6
5
38

g

23

_

11
-

15

7
_

.

4
3
3

15

7

1

15
.
.

7
_
-

1
_
_

_

_
-

16

11

14
2
_

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

2
-

5
5
5

4
4
4

4
4
4

_

_

-

16
16
16

-

4
4
4

6

1

_

-

_

_

6

1

_

_
_

“

.
.

-

_

-

_
_

_

.
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

.

_
_

1

1
3
3

2

1

1

82
20
14

25
3
3

35
13
7

19
7
2
5
12

16
12
2
10
4
1

g

g

62
7
26
16
13

22
4

1
---- ^

_

_
-

1

2
3

1
1

1
14
3

-

-

1
1
x

_

_
_

9
6
1
1

23
23
7
7

16
16
5

25
24
12
4

-

-

-

-

6

9

6

_

-

_

_

-

7
21

91
18
10
8
73
13
31
1
11
12
6
2
4

11
4

-

.

111
21
16
5
90
59
11
9
5
36
13
5
3

-

-

60
31
20
11
29
1

130
13
9
4

-

-

32
8
4
4
24
1
13
8
2
52
14
10
4

-

-

55
10
6
4
45
3
13
8
21
76
19
14
5

7
28
3
3

-

55
23
19
4
32
8
13
7
3
172
28
13
15
144
46
38
21
38
1

_
-

45
13
2
11
32
5
23
1
3

107
37
14
23
70
22
6
1
36
5

3

See footnote at end of table,
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1
1
1
-

22
10
6
1
5

_

15
3
2
1

8
7
3
4

12
9

1

-

3
-

_

3

3

3

1

9
4

9
7

14
9

2
2

4
4

"

38
35
29

23
23
12
4

7
7
7

2
2

_

3

6

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

9
9

5
5

-

5

9

5

_

_

6

1

_

1
1

-

-

2
2

-

____ 1
1

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

5

_
_

3

11
1

_

-

_

_

_

1
-

-

-

O ffic e 0C C 44fuU iO H &

Table A-l:

-

G o n tiH M & t

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Portland, Oreg., by industry division, June 1951)

A verag e

S e x , o c c u p a t io n , a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

%

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
W eekly
W eekly
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
earnings
hours
workers
and
and
(Standard) (Standard) *
32 .b0
37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

Number

$

$

Women - C o n t in u e d

T y p i s t s , c l a s s A .............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .............,
D u r a b le g o o d s . . .
N o n d u ra b le goo ds
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W h o le s a le t r a d e ..
R e t a il tra d e . . . .
F in a n c e * * ...............
S e r v i c e s .................

413
56
34
22
357
62
114
23
127
31

39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0
42.5
39.0
39.5

48.00
47.50
48.00
47.50
48.00
52.50
45.50
51.50
47.50
48.50

Typists, class B ..... .
M a n u f a c t u r in g ............ .
D u r a b le g o o d s . . .
N o n d u ra b le g o o d s .
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
W h o le s a le t r a d e •
R e t a il tra d e . . . .
F in a n c e * * ...............
S e r v i c e s .................

518
66
39
27
452
65
84
94
189
20

40.0
“4070
40.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.5

41.00
44.00
43.50
45.00
40.50
43.00
41.00
39.50
40.00
43.00

4
-

5

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
3
10

74
10
5
5
64
1
24

72
6
-

6
66
4
43

41
12
8
4
29
6
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

5

1

19

13

-

-

-

-

24
15

-

-

55

52
5
4
1
47
6
4
13
24
-

109
6
6

77
13
6
7
64
5
7
10
31
11

58
15
6
9
43
15
7
1
20
-

3
.

-

-

-

-

-

3

55

-

-

-

25

1
2
-

30

-

-

106
9
6
3
97
5
12
36
42
2

-

103
24
13
29
33
4

-

-

53
15
15

46
2
2

.

_

38
.

44
25

4
11
22
1

2
14
3

.

26
4
2
2
22
1
11
10

30
3

.

13

-

9

37
11
11

13
4
4
9
1
4

3
27
4
1

33
4
2
2
29
9
11
6
3

9

2

4
_

9
9

2

4

_

.

2

4

_

3
5
1
3

26
8
9
4
5
-

1
3

1

_

_
*»

8
3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

..

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

i/ Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table A-2s

p>u^eUUmal and technical Occupation*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings ]/ far selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Portland, Oreg*, by industry division, June 1951)

1/ Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), coscrunioation, and other public utilities*
** Flnanee, Insurance, and real estate*
Occupational




Wage Survey, Portland, Or eg., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table a-3: Maintenance and flowed Plant Occupation*
m
m

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for
in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Portland, Qreg., b y industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

dumber
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

$
Average
hourly Under 1.40
earnings
*
l.bo
1.45

*2.04
2.05
2.05
2.01
2.03
1.92
2.29

Carnenters. maintenance............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................................
Durable goods ...............................

163
96
84
12

Nonmanufacturing............... ...... ........ .
Public utilities* ..........................

67
19
IS

Electricians, maintenance ........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .................... ...... .......
Durable goods ................ ...... ........
Nondurable g o o d s .... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing..................... .........

369
177
105
72
192

2.03
2 .00'
1.97
2.04
2.06

Engineers, s t a t i o n a r y ....... .....................
Manufacturing ................. ................
Durable goods ............... .

167
113
14
99

2.02
2.00
1.98
2.00
2.08
1.89

Nonmanufacturing ................. ....... .
^.mr1 ( m tiri
i
■
■ i ti ii i t iiti
-

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

$
1.95

$
$
2.00 2.05

$
2 .10

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.05

2 .10

2.15

36
35
35

12
12
11
X

-

3
3
3

•

.
-

.
-

29
29
4
25
-

39
38
38
1

13
4
%
9

7
7
7

1
-

-

-

-

1
-

2
-

-

5
1
1

8
6
6

3
2
2

1
-

.
-

-

-

1
-

2
2

-

4
3

2
2

1
1

21
5
2
a
O
16
2

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
-

-

“

“

-

-

2
2
2
-

17
11
3
8
6

68
9
6
3
59

31
31
31
-

-

24
24

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

3
3
3

4
4
4

6
3
3

17
9
9

44
36
2
nu

-

.

.

.

-

-

4

-

-

3

8
g

ok
*
8
Q

3
3

-

-

23
16
16

11
10
4
6
1
x

30
28
28

39
39
31
8

21
17
13
4
4

24
19
15
4

54
16

6
6

8
.

3
-

-

16
38

6
8
5

3

.

7
7
7

5
4

189
30

34
26
26

7

2

2

_

_

-

4
4

3
3

40

10

77

28
27
1
12
12

10
9
1

77
39
38

34
8
8

14
-

26
10
16

14
4
_

-

■ i

54
16

Firemen, stationary boiler ...... ................
Man u f a c t u r i n g................................ .
Purable goods •
,,*trT*>TTTTT*-,
goodfl
Nonmanufacturing .............................. •
,
Ihnl oa«l a
____ ____ .............._____

230
16&
107
55
68
12

1.72
1.76"'
1.65
1.78
1.79
1.70

Helpers, trades, m a i n t e n a n c e .............. .......
Uanufflctnrl
_____...___............._______ _
nnnihl a onni^ii___ _______ ____....__.....____
Nr*ndm**lbl a
,»«»,«,»»•»» ttT-ttr-TT-tt_
Nonmanufacturing......................... .....
PVBTlift Utilities* TTTr,,-rTT--T--TT........

355
106
62
44
249
236

1.68
1.67
1.67
1.67
1.68
1.69

13
9

_

-

22
Machine-tool operators, tool r o o m .............. ..
Manufacturing ................ ................. --- 22

1.90
" 1.50

“

-

-

239
Machinists, maintenance...........................
Manufacturing. ••••••••••••••••..... •••••••••.. ” 217
98
___ --t t __t-Tfttt
119
Nondurable g o o d s .... ............... .
__________ _ _ . . . . _____ _
_ _
NanmTnifaA^m> n 0 * __
1
22
Viihl 4 a
________ ________
...
22

1.96
" 1.95'
1.91
1.99
1*98
1.98

_
-

-

-

-

176
Maintenance men. general utility .................
Manufacturing .................................. --- 51
Din'flhl a o n n H a ____
______________
21
70
Nondurable goods ........................ .
85
Nonmanufacturing •••••• ...... ...........................
23
Public utilities* ....................................
42
Wholesale trade .......................................
flanrl a a a
.
__
__ _________
_
. ______
14

1.90
1.99
1.81
2.04
1.80
1.80
1.82
1.62

nt
e

'3
_

_

13

8
-

-

32
19
X4
5
13
13

2

66
20
15
5

5

4
1
x

46
46

30
159
159

8
2

7
5

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

2
2

_
-

.
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

.

.

-

_

.

-

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

20
12
12
8
8

.

8

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7
g

-

_

See footnote at end of table.
*
**

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45
and
over
2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45

_

-

24
4
4
20
20

30
30
14
16

18
18
13
5
-

14
11
11
3
3

.

1
1

-

-

A

-

-

-

-

7
7

23
6
.
a
0
17
1

22
22
22
-

26
25
20
5
1

2
2

15
13
13
2

16
10
10
6

19
19
1Q
XV

8
8

-

.

«

-

16
8
8

20
15
15

2

8
.
Q
O

5
.
f
t
D

_

.

4
-

90
90

-

-

2
£
2

.
-

3
3
3

.

.
-

-

-

-

12
3
3
9

.

3
3
3

-

14
-

.

_

-

.

-

-

.

.

_

.

4
4

2
_
9

_

_

.

a

14

.

8
_

_

_

1
1

-

1
1

18
18
9

35
35

3
3

1
1

7
-

9

35

3

1

3
.

5
5

3
.

24
24

_

24

3

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

3

-

-

3

-

-

-

5

_

_

4
4

_
-

7

.
.
.

_

_

.

15
2

_

-

.

-

_

-

-

•

2
2

2
2

2

2

_

17
15

-

C
iF
n
f
1

_

_

_
.
_

5
5
5

-

_

.

_
.

g

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-3: Maintenance and Powek Plant Oecnpationi - Con tinued

9

l/

(Average hourly earnings
for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Portland, Or eg., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
2.45
and
over

$
$
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$ • $
$
$
$
$
$
$
A e a e Under $
vrg
1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2.35; 2 .4 0
hul
or y
er i g *
anns
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 2.35 2 .4 0 2.45
$

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing.......................

586

5T25

Nonmanufacturing..... .......

27
534
493

1.90
1.93
1.97

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
-

-

1 .9 0

1.89

-

-

-

-

.

-

320

-

-

3
3

1 .8 8

273
118
155
47
41

1.87
1.85
1.87
1.94
1.96

Millwrights...........................
Manufacturing... ............. ......
Durable goods.................... .
Nondurable goods........ ......... .

347
347
143
204

2.01
2.01
2.01
2.02

Oilers...............................
Manufacturing.......................
Durable goods............... •••••••
Nondurable goods...................

116
86
AO
46

1.68
1.69
1.70
1.68

Painters, maintenance ................... .
Manufacturing......... ............ .
Durable goods .....................
Nonmanufacturing........... ........ .
PnKHf* 1 + 14 1ma*
14 +
Services .................................

151
99
42
57
52
11
JJ
L
19

2.06
2.04
2.01
2.06
2.11
2.14

Pipe fitters, maintenance ................
Manufacturing............... .......
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ................. .

115
108
36
72

1.95
1.96
1.90
1.99

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ...........
Manufacturing.......................

80
63

1.98
2.00

Tool-and-die makers.... ............... .
Manufacturing.......................

80
80

2.05
2.05

-

-

5
5
-

5

:
-

-

15

-

•
»
-

-

-

-

8
8
8

3
3
2
1

3
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

16
15
14

37

-

26

_

-

82 ■HO.
65 108
32
45
76
20
2
17
2
17

-

-

4
4
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

10
10
10

31
31
2
29

2
2
2

1
2 - i _
2

_

i
- |
i

13
13
9
4

5

5
5
5

-

-

21
11

1

5
5 !
5
-

-

-

356
354

-

1
1

2 !
j

_
-

-

i

i
1
1

-

1
1
1

-

44
-

10
10

51
51
12
39

20
20
20
*
*

2 _ 4_
_
1
—
1
7
5

8
3

5
2
2

3
5
5

7
7

44
44

974171 0 - 51 - 2




38
37

18 __13_
18
13
5
13
13
-

_

30 _
-

2
2
2

23 23
3

9
6
6

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

“

m
m

22
22

1
1

22

*
*

19 _ 4_
_
9
4
8
4
1

_
“
*

27
22
22

7
7
7

m
m
m
m

2.
4
23
2
21
1

5
2
3

1

-

_

20
16
2
14

3
1
1
*
■

23
23
23
■
*

43
42
6
36

1
1

36
21

7
7

13
13

1
1

8
8

17 .5 .
1.
17
51

-

-

-

—

—

-

-

-

.
.

_
_

_
-

•

1

-

65.
65
2
63

-

___1 ___ 1 1 _
1
“

5
5

37
37
36
1

99

6
1
1

3

20

w
m

99
31
68

30
5

-

m
m

!

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

38
-

20

25
15

5

17

6

18
18

2
2
2

-

362
6
6

13
13

_

-

20

-

-

-

45

-

1 .8 8

Mechanics, maintenance............... .
ManTifsntwfnfr - .... ..... «........... .
Durable goods........... ............
Nondurable goods...................
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities* ................. .

20
2
1
1

11

11

1

7
7
3
4

12
12
8
4

—

8
8
8
“

1
1

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

1

”

10 _ i_ - 14
_
10
5
2
3
10
4
14
4

“

-

28
15
15
13

7
7

—

6

-

-

-

-

-

15

6

—

4
4

_

1

10
10

_ 3_
_
3

2
-

_

_

*
•

m _ 2_
m _

6

1
1

-

8
2

-

7

-

—

10

6
-

_

6
6

__ 10.

“

_

1515

-

-

-

-

■
*

“

“

_

_ 2L
_
7

"

10

Table

k t QuiioJUal, 'kJa.neJtouliMf and SUipfunt} Occupation*
-A
(Average hourly earnings ^ for selected occupations j/ studied on
an area basis In Portland, Dreg*, by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Crane operators, ale o trie bridge (under
20 tons)........................................ .
M a n ufacturing............... ..................

N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u rly
ea rn in g s

$
$
0.70 0.75
and
under
.75
.80

$
0.80

$
0.85

$
0.90

$
0.95

$
1.00

$
1.05

$
1 .1 0

$
1.15

$

$

$

$

1.25

1.30

1.35

$
1.40

s

1.2 0

1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

•85

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1.2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

2
1

#1.79
1.82

40
40

1.83
1.83

55
52

1.60
1.61

1184
496
193
303
688
125
83
282
100
98

1.26
1.38
1.42
1.36
1.18
1.28
1.25
1 .1 1
1.15
1.20

14
14

351
38
313
66
19
216

1.07
1 .1 1
1.07
1 .1 2
.89
1.08

-

932
34
58
840
704
111

1.47
1.S0”
1.57
1.61
1.46
1.47
1.37

Nonmanufacturing .................. • ...............................................................................
yyhn'] e S * ! . * trede i i « i i f t i i » t « i i i - t r i t T T T t i i __

542
219
204
15
323
245

1.41
1.44
1.44
1.42
1.39
1.48

Packers (women) .......................................................................................................................
Nonmamifacturlng ........................................................
Wholesale trade -TTTT.--.1
..-I-.r.T-,TT,.Tt.-

261
107
83

1.17
1.24
1.26

Shipping c l e r k s ....... ............. .............
M a n u f a cturing..................................
Durable g o o d s ......... ....................
Nondurable g n n d n
Nonmanufacturing .................................................................................................. ..
Wholesale tred n TT_itT_____ T.T.T.T......T..
Retail trade ................................................. ............................................ ...

248
85
37
48
163
131
19

1.58
1.67
1.60
1.72
1.54
1.57
1.45

Receiving clerks ..................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................ .
Thirehle gnnde TT»tttTrr-tttt»«T»»««»i«.«« ■•
Wondimahl a grinda rri,ITTT-TTTTtrTTt».ti...«t
Nonmanufacturing..............................
Wholesale trade ..........___ _____ ...T.T..T
Retail trade .................... ...........

249
51
40
11

1.52
1.60
1.55
1.75
1.50
1.53

Guards ............................................

Janitors, porters.and cleaners (men) ....... ..
Manufacturing ..................................
Durable g o o d s ....... ........ ..............
Nondurable goods ............ ...............
Nonmanufacturing .................. ........................................................................ ...
Public utilities* ........................................................................................
Wholesale trade ..................................................... ........................................
Retail trade .......................................................................... ..............................
Finance** ....................................................................................................................
Services .......................................................................................................................
Janitors, porters.and cleaners (women) ....................................
Manufacturing ................................................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ............................. ........................................................................
Public utilities* ........................................................................................
- r t t i i
F1 P ia T IC e **

l i t a a r i r i i r i a t i a i a i r i - -

-TT-T Tt t tlT TT TT -T tT TT T- -- -T -- r- -- *

Order fillers ........................................................................................................ ...
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................... ......................................................................................

Nonmanufacturing .................................................. .......................................... ...
Wholesale t r a d e ...................... ........................................................................
Retail trade .........................................................................................................
Packers (men)..............................................................................................................................
Manufacturing ................................................................................................................
Durable goods .....................................................................................................
o

,

i i i i

- i i i t i i i t i - t - i t____ t t ___

------- 5 2 -------

198
90
107

1.46

1

1
1

9
9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

-

-

14

32
32
10
9
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

9

15

-

1

5

4

15

-

2
2

5

4

-

-

-

-

15
13
2

-

-

5

-

-

4
14

-

11
3
8

13
6
7

-

-

110
23
11
12
87
16
-

40
1
30
4
-

4
-

54
2
2
52
-

10
42
-

216
5
211
-

164
22
7
15
142
5
1
48
85
3

50
7
6
1
43
-

13
18
2
10
2
1
1

94
19
2
17
75
17
1
56
_

1

-

-

11
2
9
9

132
74
37
37
58
8
27
22
1

1

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

42
23
8
15
19

33
29
20
9
4
4

61
22
18
4
39
25

_

_

_

_

-

_

11

_

14

•

_

_

_

6
2
11

50
39
29
10
11
6
5

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

2
2

-

-

3

-

-

.

338

4

30

4

10

41

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
4
2

2

-

-

-

5

1

5

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

_

_

12

12

8

12

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

12

7

_

12

8

12

4
2
2

30
20
10

12
10
7

4
2

•
X
o
2

g

-

4
-

4
11
7
7

_

-

-

-

-

.

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

4

-

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

6

-

2
2

10
8

41
40
1

332
258
74

8
2

22

_

-

241
176
176

2

-

-

_

-

-

_

148
-

57
3

9
9

_

5
3

*z
O

£
*
o

2

«Z
O
2

-

156
3
°

148
139
9

153
153

2

Ill
4
4

_

-

91
44
1A
XO

30
24

OQ

OA

-

.

2

-

-

-

2

“

_

_

1

-

-

_

.

72
11
3
D
O
61
AT
OX

-

30
7
7

16
5

-

_

_

_

5

g

7

10
10

11
D

-

-

-

2

25
12
13

15

-

23
20
3

3

15

4

39

6

_

9
7

16
1

15
10
5

4

39
16
23

6
g

54
15
12
o
39
15
24

14

_

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

2

3

1

-

-

n
f
4

107
1 fiA
XvO

_
_

15
-

7
7
7

_
_

32
7
2

11

w

-

11
1

7

2

2

54
54

-

_

_

6
6

-

_

_

47
22

2
2
2

_

28

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

2
2
2

_

_

_

-

48
24
24

_

g

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

-

CO
Dm

-

_

_
_

-

20
20
20

-

_

-

2

-

-

-

6
6

-

28

-

45
45
21

-

-

-

65

_

.

•

-

1
1

j>
c

-

-

-

22

_

_

_

6

14

-

-

_

4

_

36
8
8

-

_

-

_
-

-

2

128

27
27
27

_

9f t
C\i

12
12
12

12
X£

2

3

1
-

-

-

-

22

133
99
1
98
34
34

°
-

_

1

•
X
O

46
12
34
34

4

8

-

Transportation (excluding railroads), ocnmunio&tion, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18
4

5
-

16
1A
XO

8
Q
O

211

See footnotes at end of table.
*
**

15
15

-

14
14

23

20
9
3
6
11

2
2

rt

1

89
89
16
73

12
12

3
O

X

6
c
O

5

2
O
6

35
29

Crane operators, electric bridge (20 tons
a n d over) ...................................... .

$
1.80
and
over

52
11
1
10
41
%x

_
_

-

22
7
6

5
5
2

1

a
O

-

-

25
17
8

25
21
7
14
4
<
Z
O

9

8
a
o

15
XO

m
m

1
X

-

X
15
15

32

32
31
1

24
13
11
O
6
11
2^

24
10
10

5
3

2

14

2

2

14

4
2
g

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Or eg., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT QF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Tah i. a- 4
:

11

Custodial, *k)' teluuUiMf and Skippin g Occupation* - Continued.
a
%
J

(Average hourly earnings i / for selected occupations
studied on
an area basis in Portland, Or eg., by industry division, June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Number
o
f
workers

Oooupation and Industry division

222

Shipping-and-receiving clerks..................
Manufacturing...............................

95
50
45
127
35
84

Retail trade ........... ...... ..........
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ..............
Manufacturing ..... .........................
—
i
._
n

1420
723
480
697

Nonmanufacturing ............................

370
150

Retail trade .............................
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
4 tons) .............................. .......

1154
— gig-68

178
908
713
78
82

Nonmanufacturing................ ...... .
'vK A
OtI
W iaIoacla iwodm
1 fvada

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
388
type) .......... ............................ .
Uami^oAtm*4 n a
\” 113-ndP
275
D«ih1 4 n+4 14+4
125

.......
.......

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ............................... .

413
- 75-

Nonmanufaoturing .............. ...... ..... .
Public utilities*.... ....................
W iaIasal a +wad m

........ . *. . .

Manufacturing ...............................
tfaMinanii+oefiivf ns
W iaIaflolA +vodA

... .......... .
...........

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)..........
I a«m #a a +iiv» n »
f %
4
...
.......
—
Watchmen ........................... ...........
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable goods ............................
Nondurable goods ................... .
Nonmenufacturing............... ............
Public utilities* ....................................
1

T i i t f i . T t r r t - r t _____- - T r - T T r - - r -

________

40
39
334
248
57
357
305
91
214
52
23

$
Average $
hou l
r y 0.70 0.75
ATM
erig
anns
under
.75
.80

$
0.80
.85

$
0.85

$
0.90

$
1.05

$
1 .1 0

$
1.15

$

1.00

1.05

$
0.95

1 .1 0

1.15

1.2 0

1.25

$

.90 . .95- 1.00
.

10

$1.69
1.75
1.81
1.67
1.65

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

11
11
11

15
-

15

1.62
1.55
1.55
1 50
1 59
1.55
1 62
1.61
1.33

1.67
1*73
1-70
1.75
1.65
1.67
1.63
1.70

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

_
-

_
-

10

7
-

6

13
-

5
-

3
-

15
-

3
-

12

17
-

50

273
246
135

88

.

_

-

10

-

6

1

9
5
38

63
60
5
25
5

111

176
81
18
63
95

229
82
14

52
41
36
g

68

_

10

_

9

_
3

12

12

_
3

12

6

_
5

_

-

7

.

•

12

4

26

13
13

14

78
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

4

1

-

3

•

14

250

-

7

13

5

3

3

15
6

17
i

27

6

1A

^4

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

.

26

4

1

A
o

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

_

_

.

_

11

268
1f
t
Xo

n
-

A
%.

AO
40

00
1
Xc p

l
X
-

AQ

202
1 RR
XOO

3

22
10

46
37

3

22

15
9

28

2
12
11
1

227
151
23
128
76
3
73
-

39

86

8
8

3

109
36

31

83

21

21

9

49

1

11

68

OQ
69
OQ
69

43
1R
XD
1R
XO

39

28

AQ
60
16

354
no
/r
Ot
f
6v
AO
Or
277
OCA
696

28

on
6U

20

20
10
10
10
10

14

-

1A
X4
250
940
o

37
9
9
28

27

189

53
1f
t
Xo
qe

2

1 OR
XoO
* Or
1
XcD

-

-

-

-

-

.

1

_

-

_

_

20

1

.

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

R

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

O

_

20
-

-

4

5
R
9

13
R
o

243

5

12

-

6
6

1
1

2
2

5
8

_

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

g

g

A

19
XU

o
Q

g

10

1ft
9

R
2

19
-

18

6

Q

o

19

16

11

10
10

-

-

-

4
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

9
9

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

9
9

-

-

2

1

18

6

19

4

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1

11

6

4
15

4

14
9
.

9
5
-

40
31
-

1

36
35
14

31
31

-

22
22
22
-

21
1
1

3
3

-

-

31
9

3

.

-

-

-

8

-

-

_

4
1

O
243
242
I
X

-

123
AC
%0
AK
49
78
AQ
99
1A.
X%
R
0

*

8
8

4
4

97
AQ

Ot
f

Ot
f
6O

26
pe
69
OR
69

a7
OX
3/

i
«

56

-

/ BA
y / OO

181
162
X
XOX
19
9

_

3
O

-

54
46
%o

-

36
73
14
59
“

OO

A
%

—

1

3

©n
Cr

1.32
1.40
1.43
l.n
1.06
1.09
1.14

12

12

g
24

24

.

-

r-rnsr

-

33
9

10

-

1.68

267
IBB—
90
98
79

24

.

1.76
1.78
1.75

1.64
1.64
1.63
1.65
1.63
1.64

24

147
97
43
7

-

1.61
1.99

4

15

_
-

1.72
1.87
1.65
1.61

1.66

4

4

1.77
1.75

30
17

-

-

9

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/ Workers were distributed as follow: 33 at $1.95 - $2.00; 20 at $2.00 - $2.05; 3 at #2.05 - #2.10.
y
Workers were distributed as follows: 21 at #1.80 - $1.85j 3 at $2.15 - $2.20.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

1.6 6

29
29—

20

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80
and
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 over

1.2 0

3

47
47
qi
OX
1A
XO

9
9
o
V

35
23
A
o
1/
X9
IP
16
R
O
11

4
4

9

15
15
15

_

.

_

31

.

_

.

_

.

-

.

.

_

3

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

3
-

a
8
8

Table B-2421:

12

_ _ _ _ _ ------ —

-

-

-

—

SdUUftill'L G*U& P lo tlitU f M 'U fa 1 /

-

Occupation 2/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
h u l Under 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80
ory
erig $
anns
_
_
_
_
3/

Block setters..................................
Carrier drivers .................... ..........
Cut-off-saw operators ................... .....
Edger m e n .......................... ..........
End-lift truck operators ......................
Firemen, stationary boilers ...................
Graders, lumber (green chain) ..................
Graders, lumber (planed) ......................
Head-saw operators (hand) .....................
Head-saw operators (circular) .................
V4 In rtr\m*o^AT»o
...
.............. ......
Log deckmen .......... ............ ....... .
Lumber stackers (kiln drying) ..................

48
77
53
46
30
84
47
70
25
22
9

123
43
51
12

Millwrights ...................................
Multi-saw trimmer operators (one-man operator) ..
Multi-saw trimmer operators (working with
helpers) .............................. .....
Off-bearers (head rig) ........ ............. .
Planer operators (feed and operate only) .... .
Planer operators (set-up and operate) ..........

$1.78
1.76
1.69
1.91
1.80
1.67
1.74
1.84
2.48
2.62
1.83

2.00

1.91

$

$

$

$

$

$

2.30
_

2.35
_

2.40
_

2.45

2.50

2.35

2.40

2.45

2.50

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

2.60

2.60
and
over

-

-

1

-

2.05

2 .10

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

_

2

1

-

_
-

1

-

_
-

_
-

3
-

4
-

1

1

-

-

3
-

-

-

2

-

4
-

-

8

4

-

4

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

1

6

6

-

2.00

-

2
6

2
8

10
2

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

_

-

7
14
14
7
-

17
17

2

9

11

33
9

11
1

-

8

6
11

9
5

7
-

9

29
18
32
-

1
2

3
4

-

x

3

6

-

12
12

4

-

-

3

8

23
6

-

52
4
26

21
2
10
11
8

17
4
0

20

3
-

3
1

-

1

14

6

17
3

2

-

10
2

2

1

-

-

-

20

g

-

-

-

-

-

15

6

6
21

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

3
7

Q

106

-

8

2

_

2

_

1

2

1

4

X
16
-

-

6

-

2

_

_

_

_

7
-

5
-

1

-

3
-

_
-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

9

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

1

4

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2

2

_
-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

x

x

x

X4

45

37
54
43
23
159

1.77
1.71
1.70
2.05
2.64
1.63

-

19

1.66

-

12

1.95

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
-

1.84

8

1.90
_

1.55
_
-

1.64

50

$

1.85
_

1.50

1.66
1.66

$

11
1

8
2
1
2
12
6

-

7
2

2

-

9

11

g

2

Trimmer operators, double end (one-man

1/
2/
3/

-

7

2

The study covered sawmills and planing mills with more than 20 workers.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Table B-2612* P o j l & l

CHid

PapelhoaSut

M U I &

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation 2/

Number
o
f
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/
Back tenders, group 4 .............................
Back tenders, group g ......... .................... ,
...........................
Back tenders, group 7
Beatermen .............................................
Broke m e n .......... ..................................
Cutters, guillotine type (cut or trim) ............
rtnttfirfij rntsr*y rvp
1T-_T .1 .1TT)T.t .lll(llll
Fourth hands, group 6 .............................
Fourth hands, group 7
tii«Ttttttt»ttTtrtTT«tT-tt
Head stock preparers, group I ......................
Head stock preparers, group II ., ..................
Janitors ................................ ...... ......
Mechanics, maintenance ..............................
Millwrights .......................................
O i l e r s ......... .............................. .
Paper-machine tenders, group 4 ...................
Paper-machine tenders, group 6 ...................
Paper-machine tenders, group 7
..................
Paper testers ............... ........ .............
Thl rd handflj group 4 t(1I.tTTltIT.TT ,,,, , , , TTri<
Third hands, group g ............... .................
Third hands, group 7
.......... ....... ...........
' wi/'Vorfl h*»nd ....
T
’
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ......................
Watchmen ..........................................

12
28
28
93
65
47
39
20
24
38
19
65
64
182
38
12
28
28
45
12
30
28
49
42
39

$1.89
2.01
2.33
1.69
1.60
1.70
1.68
1.65
I .73
1.90
1.87
1.59
1.97
2.02
1.73
2.15
2.29
2.58
1.77
1.69
1.81
1.99
1.59
1.76
1.59

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.55
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 $2.00 2.05 2.10
and
under
1.60
1*65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .10 2.15

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

-

8
29

7
36
7
9

42

24

-

-

6
4
8

4

4
4

_

_

$

2.15

2.20

2.20

2.25

_

_

-

-

59

6

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

4

-

* 1

4

3

-

_
-

.

-

_

_

_

4
12
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

21

_

-

2

-

-

17
55

-

21
63

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
1
6
4

4

-

-

12

-

-

-

-

4

28

2

-

-

-

5
4

24
4

12

-

4
-

8
-

12

-

25
"

_

$
2.35

2.40

2.30

2.35

2.40

2.45

4
_

_

-

-

4

44

23
32
1
-

-

-

.
-

4

8

_
_

_
-

.
_

39

-

-

17
-

2.45 1.50

1.60

1.70

2.50 2.60

2.70

2.80

_

_

_

_

-

_
_
.
_

_
_
_

_

4

1.80
and
over

_

4

_

_

_

4

-

-

_

-

_
_

_
_
_
.
_
-

_

_
_

2
•
_

_
_

4

1
_
.
-

3
4
-

3
.

_

_

8

_

_
_

_

4
4

4

4

12

-

-

_

-

_

-

_
_
_

.

_
_
_

4

_

_

_
_
_

_

.
_

_

.

_

1

4
3

_
,
_

_
_
_

_

_

.
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

8

_

8

_

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

4

-

4

-1

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

5
-

$

_
_

_
.
-

6

-

$
2.25 $2.30

4

_
-

-

-

24
9
9

$

_

4
3

34
26

12

-

_

_
!
_

$

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

l/ The study covered establishments in Clackamus, Columbia, Multnomah, and Washington Counties, Oregon, and Clark County, Washington, with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of paper and paperboard.
2 / Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Qreg., June 1951
♦
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FRASER
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Digitized for


Table B-3 2
3*

fyauwSsiieA., tyensioud, y

13

1/ The study covered Independent foundries with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of castings from gray iron, malleable iron, or steel*
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2J Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

■ rati* b -3Mh :

tyabiicated St’iuciu'ia.l Steel and OmametUal Metal Week ^
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation g/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

5/

Bending.roll operators ...............
Crane operators, electric bridge (under
20 tons).............................
Fitters, structural, class A ...........
Flame-cutting-machine operators .......
Lay-out men, class A ................... .
Power-shear operators, class A ........
Welders, hand, class A ................
Welders, hand, class B ....... .........
Welders, machine, class A .............

1/
Manual
2/
3/

8

1.79
1.90
1.91
1.99
1.75
1 .9 1

$
1.80

$
1.85

1.85

1.90

18
17

2
0
9
99
94

1
2

1.88
1. 8
8

$

$

$

1.90

1.95

20
.0

1.95

20
.0

2.05

and

1.45

$

$

2.05

21
.0

2 .1 0

2.15

$
$
%
$
$
$
2.15 2. 0 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40
2

$
2.45

$
2.50

2 .5 0

over

and

under
1.50

1*55

1*60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

|1.93

1
1

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75

6

_

_

_

_

7

_

_

_
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

3

2
15

2.25

2.30

2.35

2.40 2 . 4 5

.

2

_

4
-

7
-

2 20
.

5

-

-

1

-

42
30

47
48
9

7
5
9

-

1
1
-

1
0

-

-

The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of fabricated structural steel and ornamental iron work (Group 3 - 1 as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
44)
(1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Occupational wage survey, Portland, Qreg., June 1951
U. S DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




14

McuJtUi&Uf 9 HjAuAfcUeA 1/

Table B-35:

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Oootqatl«n

2J

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earningB

2/
Assemblers, class A ......................
Assemblers, class B ......................
Assemblers, claSB C ......................
Electricians, maintenance ..................
Inspectors, class A ......................
Janitors .......... .......... ........ ••••
Machine-tool operators, production, Class A 4/ .
.
Drill-press operators, radial, class A .....
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A ...................
Engine-lathe operators, class A ...........
Milling-machine operators, class A ........
Machine-tool operators, production, class B 4/ .
.
Milling-machine operators, class B ........
Machine-tool operators, production, class C ....
Machinists, production....................
Tool-«nd-die makers (other than jobbing
shops)...............................
Welders, hand, class A ....................

154
82
40
16

1.20

$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40

1.25

..1*35 1*40

$

$

$

1.45

1.50

$

$

under
1*15_ 1.20

-

1*45 -1*.5Q

-

-

-

2

7

-

-

-

1

$

$

$
$
$
$
$
$
1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2 2
.0

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.55--1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

-

-

7
-

9

8
8

1

17

41

7

5
9

2
1

1
4
_

_

_

1

«
.

1
4
_

_
_

1
0
6

_
_
_

_

1

161
4

3

4

-

-

-

-

_

_
4

_
_
_

_

1
2

-

-

-

12

4

1

9

-

-

-

2
0
-

2

-

5

1
1

1
2
1

_

_
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
.1

-

-

-

-

_

_

.
81
17

1

1
2
1

6

27

2

7

_

-

2
2

3
_

1
2

1
1

13
75
34

16

2

4

1
1

41

3

6

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

2.10

2.15

2 20
.

over

30

3

_

_

_

_
_

27

-

1
1
1

-

4

2

3
23

1
1

1
1

-

2.05

7

1

3

1.69
1.52
1.90

30
226

$

%

1.60

and

-

-

16
.6

81
256

$

1.55

1.77
1.92
1.92

1
2

$

and

1.49
1.83
1.76

56
80
43
48

$
1.15

18
.6

26
293
23

1
.10

#1.92
1.67
1.48
1.95

1
1

$

2
-

-

_

_

4

3

15

5

9

23

192

_

_

_

2

5

1
2

1
1
1

1

1

1.89

1
1

-

29

1

167

-

-

-

-

"U

study covered establishment^ with more than 20 workers in the manufacture of non-e]ectrlcal machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.

3/
y

2/ Data limited to men workers*
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately*

Table b-63: O f U u k a n & e G & v U e s r t * 1/
A verag e

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

2/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
W eekly
W eekly 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45 .00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
earnings
hours
and
and
(Standard) (Standard)
under
over
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42,50 45,00 47 .50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

Men
Underwriters .............................

41

38.5

$66.50

27
65
27
111
22
20
54
24
11
36
17
38
22
26
24
61
127

38.5
39.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
33.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
38.0
39.0

44.50
45.00
40.00
36.50
45.00
46.50
50.00
38.00
46.00
57.00
57.50
45.00
49.00
45.50
50.00
43.50
41.00

-

-

-

9

-

-

1

5
11
3

4

1

2
11
2

1
2

-

7

5
6

-

4

-

3

1

-

.

1

_

-

-

-

6

1

2

-

_

-

2

_

_

_

-

5

_

-

.

_

_

-

Women
A s s e m b l e r s ................ ........... .
Clerks, accounting ......................
Clerks, file, class A ...................
Clerks, file, class B ..............
Clerks, general .........................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card.............
Clerks, underwriters ....................
Offioe girls .............................
Premium acceptors .......................
Secretaries ...... ........................
Section h e a d s .... .......... *...........
Stenographers, general ..................
Stenographers, technical ................
Switchboard operator-receptionists •••••.
Transeribing-maohine operators, technical
typists, class A .........................
typists, class B ..................

-

6
10

5
5
6
43

-

5

_

-

-

-

2
6
1
12
4
4
3
6
4

-

3
15

-

.

18

15
7
1

-

-

-

-

-

1
4

-

4

6
8

-

-

-

4
6
6
11
1
4
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

1

2
13

-

-

-

-

_

-

.

-

.

-

2

10

-

-

-

36

17
29

12
16

-

-

-

-

-

4
7

5
12

1

11

2
1
2
6
4
1
.

6
3
1
1
10
9
5
5
20

1
1
14
1
-

1
2
6
-

5
5
9
5

1

-

.

.

-

1

-

1
11

1
2
2
12
9
7
1

-

1

1
5
2

_

1
1
1

12

-

-

5
-

1

7

2

-

3

2

-

-

-

-

2

_

-

-

-

.

2

1

1

_

-

-

-

-

5
.

2

1

l/ The study covered offices of insurance carriers with more than 20 workers.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek far which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these hours.




2

4

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., Jtme 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT 0E LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

fto w e A s J l< U U tftn 4 & l' if

Table B-7211:

15

1/ The study covered power laundries with more than 20 workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table b- 5 8
73>

Aula Requuns SUapA 1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

y

Body repairmen, metal: Total ..............
Tim*
Tt-TT.T..TT.T
Incentive.........
Electricians, automotive) Total ............

236

Incentive...... .
Greasers) Total...................... .
Time ......................
Incentive........
Mechanics, automotive, class A) Total .......
Time .....
Incentive. .
..

61
118
77
41
523
245
.278
56

tJe aVtai*fl

1

a

19/

112
10 4

$
$
f
l
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 $2.15 $2 .2 0 $2.25 $2 .3 0
and
*
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2.30 over
3

_

3
-

_
_

_
5
5

_
28
19
9

.
-

-

-

2 .0 1

_

1.83
2.17

.

.

.

-

_

-

*1.94
1.89
1.99
2.09
A* 1?
2.33
1.57
1.48
1.73

1 90

o
n

_

_

_
_

_

_

n

5

5

5

_

5
5

5
-

5
-

5

_

3

3

8

_
-

3
-

3
3

8

_
14
14

_
9
9

2
2

21
21

1
1

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

/

7

5

8

-

22
22

-

5
5

-

18
18

21
21

2
2

5
5
no
105
5

3
-

35

-

-

-

18
18

35

-

-

13
13
_
14
9
5

9
9

_

78
78
9
/
*
¥
5

_
_
-

_

28

_

_

10

-

5

28
-

_
3

_
-

40
40
3

33
15
18
-

11
11

10

6

1

-

2

5
5

-

3
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

5
75

-

-

-

21

-

88

-

-

-

-

-

75

-

21

-

88

6

-

-

3

130

-

-

3

n3
17

_
-

2

-

29
-

9
9

-

29

-

-

3

1/ The study covered establishments with more than four workers in general automobile repair shoos (Group 7538) and motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used cars (Group 551) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey Portland, Oreg., June 1951
U S DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
. .
Bureau of Labor Statistics




16

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect July 1, 1951.)

Table C-15: B u i l d i n g G o t U t b i v c U & H

Table

C-2081 :

N < m a lca U o lic B e o ^ ia x f^ d

Table C-41: j H o C c U < ' U 2 * U £ t
7
Op&n&tUuf

Classification

Plasterers ............ ... ........
Plumbers

................................

$3,000
2.300

40
40

2.600
2.300
2.850
2.770

40
40
40
40

Classification

All route drivers:
Salesmen ............
Helpers .......... ...............
Warehouse department and syrup plants:
Head syrup men, machine-maintenance
men ......... .................
All other bottle shop employees and
loaders ........ .................
Shipping and receiving clerks ..........

Rate Hours
per
per
day Lweek_

$13.50
12.60
14.00
12.60
13.20

Rate
per
hour

Operators:
First 3 months in platform service ...
Second 3 months in platform service ....
Next 6 months in platform service ....
Thereafter.... ................ .

Hours
per
week

$1.64
1.67
1.69
1.72

Classification

40
40
40
40

o
4

f1xtuTe hangers ..........................
Painters ...................................

Hours
per
week

oo

Bricklayers
Carpenters ....... ................ .
Electricians (inside wiremen) and

Rate
per
hour

CsttfUtuped

40
40
Table C-42: M x U o b & U t c k S b ' U c & l d

< *n d < M elp& id

Table C-205: B a k & U & i

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table

Hours
per
week

C-27: PA4*tti*Uf
Classification

Classification
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Foremen .................................
Ovenmen, mixers ..................
Bench hands ..••.••••..... .........
Head checkers .............. ......
Packers, hand wrappers .............
Helpers:
First year.............
Second year ....................
Third year....................
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Foremen ......................
Ovenmen, mixers ................
Bench hands, cake ...............
Wrapping-machine operators ........
Helpers:
First year ..................
After 1 year....... .........
Agreement B:
Cake and pie workers:
Foreladies (in charge of 4 or
more girls) ......... ......
Cake decorators ..............
Women icers ..................
Crackers and cookies:
Baking department:
Mixers ....... ............... .
Mixers' helpers ................
Bakers ...................... .
Packing department (female):
Working supervisors .............
Packers, machine operators ........
Miscellaneous helpers ............




$2,040
1.930
1.800
1.600
1.400

40
40
40
40
40

1.240
1.290
1.450

40
40
40

2.130
2.020
1.920
1.740

36
36
36
36

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops:
Bindery women ....................
Compositors, hand.... ............
Electrotypers..... ..............
Mailers ...............
.... .............
Photoengravers ...................
Pressmen:
Cylinder .....................
Offset ......................
Platen ......................

$1,440
2.586
2.640
2.586
2.800

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

2.587
2.587
2.520

37*
37*
37*

Newspapers:
1.330
1.570

36
36
Compositors, hand:
Day work .....................
Night work........... .......

1.285
1.225
1.120

40
40
40

1.540
1.430
1.650

40
40
40

1.155
1.045
.990

40
40
40

2.759
2.897
2.393
2.564

37*
35

Photoengravers:
Day work.... .... .
Night work ...................

2.800
2.933

37*
37*

Pressmen, web presses:
Day work .....................
Night work ...................

2.662
2.888

37*
35

General:
Freight:
City pick-up .............. .
Long distance:
100 miles or less, turn-around
run.....................
Helpers ......................

Hours
per
week

$1,750
1.800
1.850
1.900
2.000
2.100
2.200
1.950

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.500

48

1.531
1.468

48
48

1.512
1.575

40
40

1.650
1.512
1.537
1.600

40
40
40
40

1.443
1.950

48
40

3#

Mailers:
Day work .....................
Night work.............. .

Building:
Construction:
Dump trucks:
4 yards and under ....... .....
Over 4 and including 6 yards ...
6-8 yards ..................
8-10 yardB.......... .......
10-12 yards ................
12-20 yards ................
Over 20 yards ............. .
Lumber carriers .............

Rate
per
hour

Grocery:
Wholesale:
Agreement A:
1 ton and under .............
1*»5 tons ..................
Truck and trailer and semi­
trailer ..................
Helpers ...................
Loaders ...................
Extra men ..................
Agreement B:
1 ton and under .............
Food specialty (coffee, etc.) . .
..

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:
Table C-441* Q < Z & O n

-

Table C-441: 0 & G O H

fyuLcnnte d P&Uonunl 1/
Department and classification

Bate
per
month

HOUT8
per
week

Day men*
A.B. maintenance men...........
Boatswainss
Vessels of 15,000-20,000 tons .
...
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons ....
Vessels under 10,000 tons .....
Carpenters t
Vessels of 15,000-20,000 tons . ..
.
Vessels of 10,000-15,000 tons . ..
.
Vessels under 10,000 tons .....
Carpenters' mates ..............
Deck storekeepers ..............
Watchmen*
Able bodied seamen .............
Boatswains' mates ..............
Ordinary seamen ...............
Quartermasters ................
Watchmen.....................

$274.00

44

348.50
332.50
316.50

44
44
44

306.00
300.50
295.00
290.00
279.25

44
44
44
44
44

248.50
274.00
206.00
248.50
248.50

48
48
48
48
48

Engine-room department* g/
Day men*
Chief electricians*
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ....
P-2 turbine vessels ..........
C—1, C-2, C-3, Victory Ships,
and CIMAVI vessels .........
C-4 vessels..... ..........
Deck engineers*
Class A and B passenger vessels .
.
Freighters.... .............
Firemen......................
Unlicensed juniors .............
Wipers........ .............
Watchmen*
Chief reefer engineers*
R - refrigerator steam type
r2
vessels ..................
Freight refrigerator vessels,
52,000 cubic feet and over ...
Freight or passenger refrigerator
vessels, less than 52,000 cubic
feet....................




Table C-441: 6 & & G W I

^JU+ndfi&U -

fystU&en&ecl P&Mohm&L 1/

-

Department and classification

Continued
Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

Engine-room department* 2/ - Continued

Deck departments g/

465.50
440.50

44
44

395.50
411.50

44
44

308.00
295.00
267.50
314.50
245.50

44
44
44
44
44

393.00

48

363.25

48

341.50

48

17

Union W age Scales - Continued

Watchmens - Continued
Chief reefer engineers* - Continued
Freight vessels, less than
52,000 cubic feet ..........
Class A passenger vessels with
air conditioning ..........
Firemen...... ..............
Oilers....... ..............
Second electricians*
P-2 turbo-electric vessels ....
P-2 turbine vessels ..........
Unlicensed juniors.......... .
Watertenders .................

fyjtU & eH A etl P& iA au n e J , 1/ - C o n tin u ed
Department and classification

Stewards department*

$366.50

48

363.25
236.00
248.50

48
48
48

381.00
356.50
283.00
248.50

48
48
48
48

^ A &nbp&U -

Rate
per
month

Hours
per
week

$394.00
319.00

48
48

239.00
226.50

48
48

270.50
270.50

48
48

286.50
268.50

48
48

- Continued

Passenger vessels* - Continued
Second stewards:
Class A vessels ............
Class B vessels ............
Silvermen*
Class A vessels ............
Class B vessels ............
Storekeepers *
Class A vessels..... .......
Class B vessels ........... .
Third stewards*
Class A vessels ............
Class B vessels ............

Stewards department* £/
Freighters*
Assistant cooks*
Offshore trade... ..........
Alaska trade ...............
Chief cooks*
Offshore trade........... .
Alaska trade ..............
Chief stewards:
Offshore trade .............
Alaska trade ............. .
Messmen and utility men:
Offshore trade ......... ....
Alaska trade ............. .
Passenger vessels*
Assistant laundrymen*
Class A vessels ............
Class B vessels ............
Chefs, class A vessels ..........
Chief cooks, class B vessels .....
Head waiters, class A vessels ....
Linenaent
Class A vessels ............
Class B vessels...... ......
Messmen and waiters*
Class A vessels.... ........
Class B vessels .............
Boom stewards, class A vessels ...

251.50
251.50

48
48

283.00
283.50

48
48

312.50
336.50

48
48

214.00
220.00

48
48

220.00
220.00
552.50
352.00
291.00

48
48
48
48
48

251.50
220.00

48
48

214.00
214.00
214.00

48
48
48

1/ All ratings receive $7.50 per month clothing allowance
which is included in the basic rates shown. All ratings of
unlicensed departments also receive additional payment in
accordance with conditions as follows*
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per* cent or more of dead weight carrying capacity,
$10 per voyage is added.
3. On vessels operated in described areas of China
coastal waters, 75 percent or 100 percent of daily
basic wages, including allowances in lieu of over­
time for Sunday day men, is added according to de­
gree of proximity to the China coast and adjacent
areas rendered unsafe by hostilities.
2/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea. The maximum straight-time hours which may
be worked per week in port are 40 for both day men and watch­
men. At sea, the normal workweek for watchmen is 56 hours
with 8 hours (Sunday) being paid at the overtime rate. Day
men at sea are compensated at the rate of $25 monthly in
lieu of Sunday work at the overtime rate. This allowance is
included in the basic monthly scales shown for day men.
j / The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
)
per week both at sea and in port. At sea, the normal work­
week for members of the stewards department is 56 hours
with 8 hours (Sunday) being paid at the overtime
rate.

C:
Table C-4463: £ t e 4 * e d o > U * U f

Union W age Scales - Continued
Table C-58:

Redkut/U+H tl, Q/Cufe^e^UcU

Table C-6512s O ^ l o c

Building

&&UHCe

and JLi4McUtoomi
Rate
per
hour

Classification
Longshoremen:
General cargo .....................
Paper and pulp in packages of 300 lbs.
or more... .... .............. .
Shoveling jobs ...................
Phosphate rock in bulk...... .......
Bulk sulphur, soda ash and crude un­
treated potash .......... ........
Damaged cargo ....................
Explosives .......................
Gang bosses, general cargo ............
Hatch tenders, general cargo ...........
Lift-truck-jitney drivers, general cargo . .
.

Table C-541:

♦1.92

30

2.02
2.12
2.22

30
30
30

2.37
2.77
3.74
2.07
2.02
2.02

30
30
30
30
30
30

CjA&&eSl4f Stofo&d.

4Utd M & a t

M/wh e ^ i

Classification
Grocery and vegetable departments:
Clerks:
Under 4 months .................
4 to 3 months ..................
3 to 12 months .................
Over 12 months.................
Head clerks .................. .
Bakery, dairy, and delicatessen
departments:
Clerks:
Under 4 months ............ ....
4 to 3 months ............ .... .
3 to 12 months ...... ............
Over 12 months ............ .
Department heads ..................
Meat department:
Meat cutters:
1st six months .................
2d six months ..................
2d year ......................
3d year.......................
Journeymen....................
Clean-up men, wrappers, checkers,
shipping clerks, and helpers .......
Wrappers in self-service markets:
1st three months ...............
2d three months ................
3d three months ................
4th three months ...............
After 12 months....... .........




Hours
per
week

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

H.10
1.28
1.43
1.58
1.65

40
40
A0
40
40

.90
.95
1.03
1.18
1.30

40
40
40
40
40

1.20
1.33
1.50
1.75
1.95

40
40
40
40
40

1.20

40

1.10
1.20
1.30
1.40
1.50

40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Clas8 A restaurants:
Chefs ..........................
Second cooks.....................
Roast or swing shift cooks •••••... .
Butchers .... ....... .......... .
Night chefs ......................
Fry cooks .......................
Class B restaurants:
Chefs ................... .......
Second or swing shift cooks .........
Night chefs ••••..................
Butchers.... T.... ....... .
Fry cooks .......................

Rate
per
day

Hours
per
week

(open)
♦11.50
11.00
11.00
11.50
10.00

40
40
40
40
40
40

Janitorial work:
Heavy..........................
Light....... ..................
Combination .....................
Utility janitors ...................
Elevator operators ............... .
Watchmen ............ .
Elevator starters ...................

Rate
per
hour

♦1.12
1.07
1.10
1.22
1.12
1.12
1.22

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

11.50 40
11.00 ‘
40
11.00 40
11.00 40
10.00 40
Table C-7011: c M a t e h - (25 EMPLOYEES OR I£SS)

Class A cafeterias:
Chefs ......... ..... ............
Second cooks .....................
Butchers .................. ......
Night chefs ......................
Roast or swing shift cooks......... .
Carvers ............. ........
Steam table ......................
Fry cooks .......................

(open)
11.50
11.00
11.50
11.00
9.00
8.50
10.00

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Class B cafeterias:
Chefs ..........................
Second cooks .....................
Carvers ............... ........
Steam table ......................
Fry cooks........................

11.50
11.00
9.00
8.50
10.00

40
40
40
40
40

Pastry cooks and bakers:
Pastry cooks ..................
Plain pastry cooks ..............
Assistants ...................

12.00
10.00
7.00

40
40
40

Pantry scale:
Head pantrymen ................
Pantrymen....................
Griddle cooks .................

9.00
8.00
8.50

40
40
40

6.35
6.70
7.85

40
40
40

7.50
6.35
6.35

40
40
40

6.00
(open)

40
40

Waiters and waitresses:
Waiters:
Straight shift ................
Split shift ..................
Class B men1 resorts...... ........
8
Soda fountains:
Head mixers.................. .
Second assistants ..............
Bus boys ....... ......... .
Road houses and night clubs:
Cocktail lounge....... ........
Head waiters ....... ...... ....

Classification

Classification

Switchboard operators ...............
Bellmen ............. .
Night bellmen......................
Bell captains ......................
H ousem en . . . . . . . r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Maintenance men ....................
Maids ............................
Housekeepers ................... .
D e sk c le r k s ..M ...................... . . . . .
Combination bell-elevator men.........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦0.93
.72
.77
.82
.93
1.25
.87
.95
.95
.77

44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
44

D:
Table D-li

19

Entrance Rates

M in im u m Cut'kanoe. Rated, jo b P h u t Ti/xto&sAA

1/

E:

Percent of plant workers } establishments vlth
in
-_____ specified minimum rates In - _________
_

Minimum rate
(in cents)

All establishments ....
Under 75 ............
75 .................
Over 75 and under 80 ...
80 .................
Over 80 and under 85 ...
8 5 .................
Over 85 and under 90 ...
90 .................
Over 90 and under 95 ...
95 .................
Over 95 and under 100 . .
..
100 ................
Over 100 and under 105 • •
•
105 ................
Over 105 and under 110 . .
.
n o ................
Over 110 and under 115 • .
•
n5 ................
Over 115 and under 120 . .
.
120 ................
Over 120 and under 125 • •
•
125 ................
Over 125 and x n e 130 . .
rdr
.
130................
Over 130 and under 135 • •
•
135 ................
Over 135 and under AO . .
.
AO ................
Over lUO and under 1^5 . .
.
H5 ................
Over A5 and under 150 . .
.
150 ................
Over 150 and under 155 . .
.
155 ................
Over 155 and under 160 . .
.
1 6 0 ................
Over 160 and under 16 5 . .
.
165 ................
Over 16 5 and under 170 . .
.
170 and over .........
Establishments with no
established minimum . .
..
Information not
available ..........

Manufacturing
All
Public Whole­ Retail Serv­
indus­ Durable Hon­
sale
tries goods ourable utilities* trade trade ices
goods
2/
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

k.B

.
8
1.3
2.0
3.1
3.6
3.0
3.0
2.0
1.1
3.9
lA
2.1
2.1
3A
lA
1.0
2.0
A
1.3
3A
1.0
1.0
7.6
.
3
.
6
.
5
2.2
.
7
1.1
.
7
6.7
-

2.5
.
2
k.8
1.2
.
2
3.6
1 5 .8

.
8

2.1
-

6*9
3.2
3.9
9.7
1.7
1.8
1.3
2.3
5.6
5.8
-

-

-

6 .0

5.2

25.7
1.2
2.3
3.8
1.9

19.5
1.5
3.1
2.2
6.7
5.2
2.2
^.0
3.0
12.6
-

-

-

1 .3

11.3
3.7
.
9
3.0

-

-

3.5

11.0

12.6

10.2

k .3

-

8 .7

5.9
1A

6 .0

*.l
3.2
1.7
k .9

-

2 .2

1 2 .8

~

k .2

1.5
1.0
2.5

"

23.5
k .2

2.5
12.3
1.8
1.5
.
9
5.0
6A
6.7
1.3
2.5
8.1
1A
k .2

6.7
2.1
2.6
2 7 .0

3.1
3.9
~

3A
A.3
k .2

6.8
^.9
11.8
2 .5
k .k

3A
2.0
2.2
2.0
2.9
3.1
7.7
2.5
1.6
3.5

Shift differential

-

-

-

Durable
goods

Nondurable Ferrous
foundries
goods

17A

7.1 13.9

3A

21.6 11A

Receiving shift
differentials ....

13.9

6.3 10.7

2.6

Uniform cents
(per hour) ....
3 cents .....
U cents .....
5 cents .....
10 cents ....
Over 10
cents .....
Uniform percent­
age .........
10 percent ...
Full day's pay for
reduced hours . .
.
Other .........
Receiving no
differential ....

11.0 k .5 6.8
.
5
(2/) (2/) (2/) (2/)
2.8 3.0
5.3
2.9 1.0 1*0
.
1 1.3
.
2
.
9

Machinery

Paper and
paperboard
mills

. . .85
9 .1,

6.2 27.0 21.9

6.0

lA

17.6 10.6 17.9

^•9 17.9

6.2 27.0 21.9

6.0

lA

1 6 .0

k

_
_

21.9
21.9
_
_

6.0
M
1.7
_
-

lA
lA
_
_

8.0
5.1
.
5

17.9

9.3 17.9
2.1 17.9
-

k

.9

-

6 .2

k

.9

lk

.1

_
5.2

5A

2 7 .0

.

2 7 .0

1.9

.
6

1.5

.
3

2A

1.0

-

- 3/8.9 i/5A

-

-

_

_

1.0
1.0

-

1.8
1.8

-

-

-

-

-

3.8
3.8

.
8
.
8

-

-

_
-

-

A

1.0

.
5

1A

.
2

.
5

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

1 .5

.
8

1.6

.
7

1A

.
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.5

.
8

3.2

.
8

i*.o

.
8

-

_

.
6

-

-

Sawmills
and
planing
mills
3d or
2d other 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or
other
shift shift shift other shift other shift other shift other shift shift shift other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
All
industries

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, all
establishments .....

k .2

12.5

-

if
2/
3/

5/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
15 cents.
Predominately 1 5 cents.

5 1 .0

-

l/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or voaen plant
vorkera, other than watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance,and real estate.
3/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communications, and other public
utilities.




Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

All manufacturing industries 1/

10.0
6.0
7.0
3.0
(3/)
9A
7-9
1.5
-

PAaiU4ia * ti.

Table E-ii

100.0 100.0 100.0

1.2

Supplementary Wage Practices

~

Occupational Wage Survey Portland, Oreg., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2:
P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E

Weekly hours

A
ll
in u
d s­
trie
s

Mn fa tu in
au c r g

\J

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

W ORKERS EM PLO YE D I N -

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
ties*

Wo ­
h le
sa
le
tra e
d

100.0

100.0

100.0 _ 100.0
|

0.4

D ra le
ub
gos
od

A
ll

Scit&dul&d tyJje&hly JtouM

1.1

Nn
o­
d ra le
ub
gos
od

R il
eta
tra e
d

F a ce**
in n

S rv s
e ice

A
ll
in u
d sw

MNFCUI O
A r AT I N
t
D ra le
ub
gos
od

A
ll

Nn
o­
d ra le
ub
gos
od

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
tie
s*

Wo ­
h le
sa
le
tra e
d

R
etail
e ice
tra e | Srv s
d

j
All establishments .................

100.0

Under 35 hours ......... ...........
35 hours....................... .
Over 35 hours and under 37J- hours........ *
37$ hours.......................
Over 37J- hours and under 40 hours

0.2
(2/)
1.3
2*8
6*2
85.7
1.5
1.6
.2
.5

Over 40 hours and under 44 hours.....
44 hours ........................
Over 44 hours and under 4 hours ........
8
48 hours.................................. .............
Over 43 hours ............. ...... .

100.0 i 100.0
0.2 j
-

.7
.5
96.0
-

2.4
.2

-

-

-

1.5

95.2

96.6

1.0

16.1
81.6

4.8
-

-

-

-

.5

-

-

1.2

1.3
-

-

-

-

-

98.0

88.0
8.7
.7
1.3

-

2.0
-

-

5.0
11.3
12.3
70.5
.9

-

100,0 1 _—
-100*0
I
—
!
1 1*3
- !
.9
2.1
.3
2.4
10.8
73.1
84.5
1.0
•6
12.7
2.7
7.0
•6

100.0 —100.0
1.6
.8
3.2
.6

3.0
-

100.0 [- 100.0
1.7
7.0 1
1.4

-

—
-

88.4

88.5

88.1

•

-

-

—
-

-

8.5

5.4

-

-

1.8

—
—
-

£5.6
-

2.2
12.2

100.0 - 100.0
! -------1.8
i
- 1 2.6
|
- 1
1
_
i
100.0
75.3
3.0
7.8
6.4
3.1

- 100.0
|
!
(

3.1
-

8.6
-

61.7
-

11.8
-

14.8

3/ Data refer to women workers*
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
jJ Less than *05 of 1 percent*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*

Table E-3: P & i d
P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Number of paid holidays

All
indus­
tries

Durable
goods

Ail
'

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries.

y

-Public
Durable
goods

All

Non­
durable
goods

utili-

W holesale
trade

Retail
trade

1 to 5 days.................. •
6 days......................
6&- days......................
7 days ............. .. ....... ...
8 days...... .............................................................
8} days......................
9 days.................................................................................. ...
10 days............ .
10£ days............. .
11 days..... ...............
Hi- days ......................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays............ .........

.3
49.9
4.2
24.1
6.3
.5
1.6
.1
10.7
.6
1.7

b

8

O
•

98.3

8

Establishments providing paid holidays
holidays ......................

1 0 0 .0

H

All establishments ................

H

1
100.0

100.0

10Q.0




100.0

-1QQ.0

97.6

100.0

85.5

_
12.4
25.8
4.5
2.0
6.9
.4
45.2
2.8

94.2

.3
72.2
24.1
.2
-

_
64.8
29.4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

.3
-

-

-

3.2

5.8

.8

2.4

-

100.0

99.2

100.0

96.8

.6
81.2
17.7
.
5

19.1
17.6
44.3
18.2

77.8
1.7
15.0
4.7

.6
87.7
6.0
3.3

-

-

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and ether public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*

\/

1 0 0 .0

j
j

100.0 -J£0,9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

84.8

77.9

9 2 .9

86.3

4.6
4.4
80.9 ! 51.7
.1
19.7
2.4

6.8
57.6

5.3
55.1

8.5
60.5

-

-

~

20.4
-

17.5

23.9

-

-

2.7
26.3
40.2
9.7

93.1
«
.
74.5
2.5
13.0
3.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

100.0

lO p fO ^

79.7

-

Services

100.0

71.8

i

2 4 .2

2.5
63.1
4.0
2.2
-

.1
24.1
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

—
-

1.0
.4
-

-

-

•
-

5.2
2.2
-

-

-

_
•
_

-

-

-

14.5

20.3

15.2

22.1

7.1

13.7

6.9

28.2

75.8

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., June 1951
I . S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
T
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4*

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN

Vacation policy

All establishments................

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

21

P a id V*3&cUl(M *l (fy o n m a l P/umUM ohA )

utili­
ties*

sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

34.2

23.2

22.4

24.2

54.8

22.4

8.0

45.5

44.2

«
.
52.1
2.7
-

3.6
18.8
-

8.0

_
44.2

-

_
33.1
.6
11.8

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

11.1

10.2

17.3

1/

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

_ 100.0
_

1.7

24.6

8.2

2.0

1.7

_
21.3
2.8
-

.7
7.5
-

_
2.0
•
-

1.7
_
-

Non­
durable
goods

6 months of service
Establishments with paid vacations ....

.8
27.0
3.4
3.0

.7
7.6
13.4
1.5

1.3
11.8
9.3
-

_
2.4
18.5
3.3

65.8

76.8

77.6

75.8

45.2

77.6

92.0

Establishments with paid vacations ....

98.8

98.4

97.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 week.......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .......................
Over two weeks .................

38.1
.6
57.3
2.8

46.4
41.6
10.4

39.7

45.2
-

42.5
54.8
2.7

36.9
3.5
59.6
-

1.2

1.6

3.0

97.0

Under 1 week ...................
1 week.......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks........... ...........
Establishments with no paid vacations ..
.

3.6
5.8
.8
-

6.6
10.7

-

1.8
7.9
ia
.3

-

1.7
-

54.5

55.8

88.9

89.8

82.7

98.3

75.4

91.8

98.0

98.3

100.0

97.3

94.4

97.7

98.8

97.7

100.0

97.2

100.0

96.5

91.9

80.7
19.3
-

7.2
89.6
.5

28.8

79.7
.1
14.8
3.1

84.5
10.0
4.3

89.8
7.9
-

55.5

9.5

37.1
4.6

70.8
1.8
27.4
-

94.5

65.6
-

2.0
-

82.5
9.4
-

5.6

2.3

1.2

2.3

-

2.8

-

3.5

8.1

97.3

94.4

97.7

98.8

97.7

100.0

97.2

100.0

96.5

91.9

49.3
9.2
36.1
3.1

61.9
15.8
16.8
4.3

55.6
29.0
13.1
-

69.3
21.2
9.5

27.3
3.1
62.2
4.6

42.3
1.8
55.9
-

34.0
3.1
59.4
-

67.5
24.4
-

-

2.8

-

3.5

8.1

-

_

1 rear of service

Establishments with no paid vacations ...

51.8
-

37.2
23.1
-

-

-

-

2.7

_

78.1
-

1 2 .4

_

2 rears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......
1 week .......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks .......................
Over two weeks .................
Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

98.8

98.4

13.7
3.1
79.2
2.8

21.2
5.4
61.4
10.4

19.7
9.9
67.4
-

1.2

1.6

3.0

98.8

98.4

97.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.8
.2
88.2
8.6

1.4
86.6
10.4

2.1
94.9
-

.6
76.4
23.0

_
97.3
2.7

7.0
89.5
3.5

1.2
1.8
97.0
-

1.2

1.6

3.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

53.8
23.1

13.9
1.3
82.1
2.7

22.2
3.5
74.3
-

12.9
1.8
85.3
-

3.9
92.9
.5

16.6
77.8
-

-

-

-

-

2.7

5.6

2.3

1.2

2.3

97.3

94.4

97.7

98.8

97.7

100.0

77.3
20.0

1.1
_
76.1
17.2

4.2
1.2
88.4
3.9

4.7
1.2
87.1
5.8

5.9
2a
87.0
2.7

3.4
87.1
9.5

2.7

5.6

2.3

1.2

2.3

23.1
-

100.0

-

5 rears of service
Establishments with paid vacations ......
1 week .......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .........
2 weeks .......................
Over two weeks.............. .
Establishments with no paid vacations ..
..

l/ Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




97.2
92.6
4.6
2.8

100.0

96.5

91.9

6.1

2.1
3a
91.3
-

17.7

3.5

8.1

92.1
1.8

74.2
-

Occupational Wage Surrey, Portland, Qreg., June 1951
U« S. DEPARTMEHT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22

Table E-5:

Paid S ick j£ GJe (tyobmcU Psu A iatU)
j& 4 * >
MU

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ................

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
industries

utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

N
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

23.7
10.4
4.4
1.5
2.9
3.1
1.4

22.8
5.4
4.7
9.8
1.4
1.5

18*4

28.2
12.0
10.3
2.5

15.4
15.4

27.6
5.3
3.3
4.7
10.1
4.2

14.6
14.3

34.5
29.7

76.3

77.2

81.6

71.8

84.6

72.4

28.3
.7
3.2
1.6
15.2
4.3
1.4
.7
1.2

22.8
»
5.4
4.7
9.8
1.4
1.5

18.4
_

28.2

17.5
1.1

-

-

-

71.7

77.2

81.6

71.8

29.0
1.2
2.1
1.8
1.0
12.5
4.3
3.4
1.5
1.2

22.8
.2
4.7
5.2
7.3
1.4
4.0

18.4
-

28.2
.6
10.3
11.4
2.5

71.0

77.2

81.6

71.8

29.0
1.2
2.1
,9
5.1
5.3
1.6
3.7
9a

22.8

18.4

28.2

71.0

77.2

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.8

7.0
7.0

9.9

6.8
_
Af
t
0.0

Non
durable
goods

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

21.3
4.6
14.1

5.1
1.4
1.7

3.7
_
q
.7

3.5
_

2.6

1.6
■
a

2.8

3.3
1.5
85.4

65.5

78.7

94.9

14.9
.3
9.6

34.6
.6

21.3
4.6
14.1

-

48.7
.6
1.6
3.3
16.4
12.2
4.2
3.g
6.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

82.5

51.3

85.1

65.4

78.7

92.5

96.3

96.5

96.2

oc i
OP.X

17.5

48.7
.6
1.6
3.3

14.9
.3
9.6
-

34.6
.6
.1
-

38.5
21.7
14.1
-

7.5
.1
2.4
.4

3.7

3.5

3.8

14.9

_

_

_

1.9

2.3
2.3

4.7
12.2
11.7
8.0
6.6

#
3
4.7

29.1
3.3
1.5

2.8

o

2.6

2.8
.9

7. v
fn
3.3

82.5

51.3

85.1

65.4

61.5

17.5

48.7
•6
l!6

14.9
•ft
2
Q.0
7 A

34.6
A
•o
1
•X

X4.1

o/
2*4

•9

n/

3.0
•9

2.8
“
“
•

i/

Services

100.0

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid siok leave ..............
5 days .......................
6 days ................. .
7 d*ys ....................... .
10 days ........... ...... .
12 days ......................
15 Hay* ....... .......... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............

-

15.8
2.6

3.4

#
3

1•
*•7
*Q

22

3.5

10
X.7

11
2.X

96.3

96.5

96.2

93.0

90.1

93.2

7.5

3.7

3.5

3.8

#
9

23.7
lf
t
X.2
X.2

6.8

2.4

14.9
2f
t
23

f5
t
j .?

17
X.Q

1.V
2.2

12 5
Xx.2
2.X
21
*.X
1 o
X.7
1.3

-

76.3

Ot ^
f
72.2

23.7
1.3
1.5

_

6.8

21
100.0

1 rear of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............
6 days ...............................
7 days .......................
10 days ...................... .
12 days ......................
15 days ......................
20 days ......................
Over 20 days ...................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ............. .
2 veers of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............
5 days .......................
6 days .......................
7 days....... ........... .
8 days .............. ........
10 days ...................... .
12 days .................. .. ...
15 days ......................
20 days .....................................................................................
Over 20 days ................................ .. ............................... ...
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................................................
5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..............
5 days .......... ............ ...t
6 days .......................
7 days .... ................. t
(
10 days .............. ....... ,
12 days ......................
15 days.................. ,ttttt
20 days ......................
Over 20 days ...................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ......... .

•
15.8
2.6

12.0
10.3
2.5

_
15.3
1.1

3.4

11.2
2.6
4.6

-

ia
15.3
1.1

3.4

¥

•2
4.7
7.3
6.6
1.5
2.5

#6

29.1
3.3
1.5

2.6

4.6
81.6

2 .5

16.4

f/
t
2.4

71.8

an c

o < .p

lo .
J Co
u A
4.7
ie i
15.1
1/ £
X4.2

4.7
•3
*

Cl 9
5X.2

Ar 9
S5.1

3.3
1.5
1.8
27.3

Ce l
o5*4

3.4
#
9
.1

2.8

.9
-

f£
t
2.7

1
X .7

A
.D

2

38.5
Ol
-cJL. 9

1

10.3
11.2
2.6

1/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




•3
4.7

1.9

2 .0

Af
t

inn n
xuu.u

_

_

6.8
-

_

“

""

-

~

92.5

96.3

96.5

96.2

85.1

76.3

93.2

7.5

3.7

3.5

3.8

14.9

6.8

1.9

2.3

23.7
1.3
1.5

3.5

1.9
-

9.3
3.3
-

96*2

85.1

•J-

•2

"
61.5

O1
3.1
9.4
4.0
12
X.2

_

•6
•3
92.5

—

96.3

96.5

3.1
3.1
10.1
4.6
76.3

6.8
~

100.0

•

93.2 j 100.0

Occupational Vage Survey, Portland, Qreg.y June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

23

AtQHflM Kiu&Uan /&04U4A&1

Table E-6*

P E R C E N T OF1 P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

M anufactu re

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Type of bonus

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

All
indus­
tries

Services

Finance**

Durable
goods

All

i/

-

:
g
Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0 u.100,0

100.0

Retail

Services

All establishments .................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2/ .....................

28.5

26.9

36.5

15.3

19.3

27.5

30.8

40.0

19.1

24.2

19.6

29.5

7.9

11.5

30.7

44.6

26.5

22.0
5.3
4.8

19.4
7.5
-

22.8
13.7
-

15.3

2.2

28.4
2.4
-

37.2
10.3
4.7

13.0
6.6
-

17.3
12.1
-

11.5

26.5

-

19.8
4.6
-

7.9

-

25.9
6.1
-

19.1

17.1

71.5

73.1

63.5

84.7

80.7

72.5

69.2

60.0

80.9

75.8

80.4

70.5

92.1

Christmas or year-end ............
Profit-sharing .....................

Other ....... ........ ................................ ...
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ....................................................................................................

1/
2/
*
**

-

-

-

a n d P -e4tH04t P I g

m

88.5

69.3

55.4

-

-

-

73.5

All
indus­
tries

.............................................................

e s ta b lis h m e n ts

E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h in s u r a n c e o r
p e n s i o n p l a n s 2 / ....................................................... ..
in s u r a n c e

H e a lth

............................................................. ...

in s u r a n c e

...........................................................

H o s p i t a l i s a t i o n .............................................................
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n ..............................................., t
E s t a b lis h m e n t s
p e n s io n

w ith

no

in s u r a n c e

p l a n s ......................................

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail

1 0 0 .0

--1Q S.0

1 0 0 .0

,_ lM a Q „

6 3 .2

7 6 .7

9 3 .4

8 9 .2

3 3 .7

8 9 .5

KA Q
00,7

6 2 .2

6 9 .1

6 3 .1

4 8 .6
2 6 .5
1 1 .9
2 8 .4

6 6 .4
4 4 .1
3 3 .0
5 6 .4

5 0 .4
1 0 .9

6 6 .8

2 5 .8

7/ Q
4 2 .6

KA •Q
Al 7
J4«4

00 7

eo 7

6*
*3
&7,7

n
4 J . J-

10 0

of

If c
«
Q
00•
7

17

n

TO O

ri»7

(A /)
Q
4 4 .7

\2J>
/j

iq o
•* .7.0
ft

/Q
M 1
.7,X
LA Q
4 ° .7
O.
0 A 7Q

OA *
< J . J3

6 .6

i n (t
JLU.o

f f

A

lo .p

/A 1

AH
01

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 8 .1

6 9 .3

5 7 .6
3 2 .3
2 4 .8
5 3 .6

5 6 .6
3 4 .4
2 1 .4
4 1 .0

2 1 .9

3 0 .7

of A
J O. . O

All

V

0>
< ,O

K0 A

ic

Services

Finance**

- 1 0 0 .0

K

,

100J Q - -.. JLQ Q

All

mQ

O
K

.

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100*0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

7 6 .2

74

i
0( . x

■ J
J ao . o
i

0O»7
t

on

4 0 *4
1 0 7.

I -7 Q
J Q .U

m a
4 U .J

of Q
JO . 7

< c J .o

O A
A

O .

Durable
goods

1 0 0 * 0 . ..... 1 0 0 . 0

1
0
O 0
O
O 71
A
<co.
fl
4 £ .U

Non­
durable
goods

kh

A

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

8 5 .6

3 7 .5

2 0 .2

5 8 .7

1-3*J
X O
O
2Q

JJL.U

eA K
00,0
K 0
K
00»<
10. J
A
4&

2 8 .7
-L -• 0
A
1 0 .6
no
XO,0

O J
KK

1 4 7
X7 -.4

Ao 5

7 9 .8

ko

mi

2 0 .2

*3
X\J,0

i o

or

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN -

M a n u f a c t u r in g

T ype o f p la n

I

25.6
9.0
-

41.0
3.5

-

A

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

L ife

-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7:

A ll

-

A

“
30 Q
JO .7

Occupational Wage Survey, Portland, Oreg., June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

24

Appendix - Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed.
In classifying workers b y occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used; these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered In compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations t (a) office
olerioal, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-A)» The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a oertain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the study*
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)* Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioe clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables* It is
presented in terms of the proportion of
workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion aotual.ly receiving the
specifio benefits may be smaller* The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off w i t h pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting peri­
od preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also exolude
health insurance even though it is paid for by employers• Health
insurance is included, however, under tabulation for insurance
and pension plans*

25

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN PORTLAND, OREG. 2/, AND NUMBER
STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, JUNE 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Numbe:r of
establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis
All divisions .....................................
Manufacturing ..................................
Durable goods 2 / ................... ....... .
Nondurable goods i j ........... ............
Nonmanufacturing....................... .......
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ................................
Wholesale trade •...........................
Retail t r a d e .................. ....... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate •••••••«
Services 2/ •••••••••••••••................ .

21
21
21
21
21

1,159
380
223
157
779

231
81
41
40
150

116,100
50,600
27,000
23,500
65,600

55,640
24,870
10,280
14,600
30,770

11,000
2,060
950
1,100
8,950

21
21
21
21
21

113
196
279
73
118

25
33
34
28
30

20,300
12,600
20,100
5,600
6,900

12,400
3,760
8,210
3,700
2,700

3,020
1,160
1,300
3,200
270

21
21
21
21
21
21
21
5

47
5
13
11
19
32
17
80

17
5
9
9
11
11
12
19

3,347
6,111
1,250
1,124
3,197
1,950
1,230
3,420

2,004
6,111
1,071
1,012
2,591
994
1,019
1,332

81
234
150
117
391
765
70
150

Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 6/
Sawmills and planing mills
Paper and paperboard mills 2/ ......... •••••••••••
Ferrous foundries
•••••••••
Fabricated structural s t e e l .................. .
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s............ ......... .
Insurance carriers
....................... .
Power l a u n d r i e s ................o•
Auto repair shops ................................

1/ Portland Metropolitan area (Clackamus, Multnomah, and Washington Counties, Oreg.; Clark County, Wash.)
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay and glass products; instruments and related products;
and miscellaneous manufacturing,
(J Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products;
printing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures;
nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Includes establishments in Columbia County, Oreg. in addition to those in the counties listed in footnote 1.



26

Page
number

Page
number
Assembler (insurance carriers) ............ ..•••••••••..... ...••••
Assembler (machinery)
Back tender (paper and paperisoard m i l l s ) ..... •••••••••••••••••.•
.... ........ •••••••••••
Beaterman (paper and paperboard mills)
Bellman (hotels) .•••••«...... •••••••..... 1^
Bench hand (bakeries) ...... ••••••••••.....•....... ............. .
Bending-roll operator (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work)
.... •••
Biller, m a c h i n e ..............
Bindery woman (printing) ............. ................ .......
Boatswain (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...... ........
Block setter (sawmills and planing mills) •••••••••••••••••••..•••
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops)
Bookkeeper, h a n d .... ........................ ........... •••••••.«
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••.......
Bricklayer (building construction) ..............
Brokeman (paper and paperboard mills) ....................... ..
Bus boy (restaurants) ........ ....................... •••••••......
Butcher (restaurants).... ••••••••••••......••••••••••••••••••••.
Calculating-machine operator
Carpenter (building construction) .......
•••••••••••••••••
Carpenter (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance .......B
Carrier driver (sawmills and planing m i l l s ) ..... •••••••••••••••«•
Checker (grocery stores and meat m a r k e t s ) .... ............... ..
Chef (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••••••••••••••••
Chef (restaurants)
Chipper and grinder (ferrous foundries)
Cleaner
10
Clerk (grocery stores and meat markets) ..... IB
Clerk, accounting .......
•••••*•••••••••
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers)
••
Clerk, file ................ .
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) .............................. ••••
Clerk, general ...................... ............ .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ......
••»•••«.••••
Clerk, o r d e r ...... ....................... .......................
Clerk, payroll ......... ............. •••••••••..... .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••••
Clerk, retail, receiving (power laundries) .............. •••••••«•
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) •••••••••»••••••••••••••••
Compositor, hand (printing) ..•••.••••••••......
Cook (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ........ ••••••••••••
Cook (restaurants) •••••••••••••.....
Coremaker, hand (ferrous foundries) •••••••••.......
Crane operator, electric bridge .••••••••••......
Crane operator, electric bridge (fabricated structural steel
and ornamental metal work) ......... ••••••••••••...... •••••••••
Cut-off saw operator (sawmills and planing mills) ........
Cutter, guillotine type (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••••
Cutter, rotary or sheet (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••••
Desk clerk (hotels) .....••••.••......••••o.....•••••••..... .
Draftsman
•••«•••••••••
Drill-press operator, radial (machinery) ................... .
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (machinery) ...
Duplicating-machine operator .......
Edgennan (sawaills and planing m i l l s ) .... ............ •••••••••••




14
14
12
12
16
13
3
16
17
12
15
3> 4
4
16
12
IB
IB
4
16
17
12
IB
17
IB
13

3# 4
14
4# 5
14
3> 5
14
3# 5
3, 5
14
15
14
16
17
IB
13
10
13
12
12
12
IB
7
14
14
5
12

Electrician (building construction) ........ .
Electrician (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ............ .
Electrician, automotive (auto repair shops) ••••••••••••••••.•••••••
Electrician, maintenance
Electrician, maintenance(machinery) •••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••
................. .
Electrotyper (printing).
Elevator operator (office building service)
End-lift trick operator (sawmills and planing mills) ...............
Engine-lathe operator (machinery).........
•••••••••
Engineer (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...............••••
Engineer, stationary ............. ......... ............. .
Extractor operator (power laundries) .......... ••••••••••..... .
Finisher, flatwork, machine (power laundries)
Fireman,(ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••••••••.••••••
Fireman, stationary boilar ........... ••••••........... ••..•••••••••
Fireman, stationary boiler (sawmills and planing mills) ....... •••••
Fitter, structural (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal w o r k ) .... •••••••........ .
Flame-cutting-machine operator (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal w o r k ) ..... ................................ .
Fourth hand (paper and paperboard mills) ••••••••........ •••••••••••
Gang boss (stevedoring) ........ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Grader, lumber (sawmills and planing mills) ...... ••••••••••••••••••
Greaser (auto repair shops)
......
Guard .......................
Hatch tender (stevedoring)
Head—saw operator (sawmills and planing mills) ••••••«••••••••••••••
Head stock preparer (paper and paperboard mills) ...................
Head syrup man (nonalcoholic beverages) ••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••
Head waiter (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••.... .
Helper (bakeries) ...............
Helper (grocery stores and meat markets) ....................... •••••
Helper, motortruck driver
Helper, routeman (nonalcoholic beverages)
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••..•••••
Housekeeper (hotels) ......................................
Houseman (hotels)
Identifier (power laundries) ..........
Inspector (machinery) .............................................
Janitor .......
Janitor (machinery).... ................ ••••••••••••••........ •••••
Janitor (office building service) ••••••••••.•••.•.•••••••••••••••••
Janitor (paper and paperboard mills) .......... ............... .
Key-punch operator .....
Kiln operator (sawmills and planing mills) •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Lay-out man (fabricated structural steel and ornamental metal work)
Lift-truck-jitney driver (stevedoring) ....... ............ ....... .
Linenman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••••••••••••••
Loader (nonalcoholic b e v e r a g e s ) .... ••••••......
Loader, car and truck (sawmills and planing mills) ••••••••••••••••«
Log deckman (sawmills and planing mills) ..........
••••••••••
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ...........
Lumber stacker (kiln drying) (sawmills and planing mills) ••••••••••
Machine-maintenance man (nonalcoholic beverages) ••••••••••••.•••••«
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) •••••••••••••••«••••••
Machine-tool operator, tool room ••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••
Machinist, maintenance •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.»«.••

16
17
15
B
14
16
IB
12
14
17
B
15
15
17
B
12
13
13
12
IB
12
15
10
IB
12
12
16
17
16
IB
16
16
B
IB
IB
15
14
10
14
IB
12
5
12
13
IB
17
16
12
12
IB
12
16
14
B
B

27

Index * Continued

Page
number

Page
number
Machinist, maintenance (sawmills and planing mills) ............ .
Machinist, production (machinery) .•.••..•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Maid (hotels) ••••••••.... ••••••.....•••••........... ............
Mailer (printing) ......... ............. ................ .........
Maintenance man (hotels) ....•.....
Maintenance man, general utility •••...•.••••••••.....
Marker (power laundries)
Meat cutter (grocery stores and meat markets) ............ ••••••••
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops)
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance).... ....................
Mechanic, maintenance..... 9
Mechanic, maintenance (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••••..
Messman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ••••••...••••••••
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ...••••••••....... •••••••••••
Millwright ..............
Millwright (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Millwright (sawmills and planing mills) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Mixer (bakeries) .................
•••••a
Molder, floor (ferrous foundries) ....................
Molder, hand, bench (ferrous foundries) ••••••••••••......••••••••
Molder, machine (ferrous foundries)
••••••••••
Motortruck driver
Multi-saw t rimmer operator (sawmills and planing mills) ..••••.•••
Nurse, industrial (registered) ............. ........ •••••••.....•
Off-bearer (head rig) (sawmills and planing mills) .............. .
Office b o y ........................................................
Office girl ................. ••.•••••••••••••...... ........... .
Office girl (insurance carriers)
Oiler ................... ........................ ••••••••••......
Oiler (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••.•••••••••••
Oiler (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••••••.....
Operator (local transit) «..........
Order f i l l e r ................
Ovenman (bakeries)
Packer
10
Packer (bakeries) ....................
Painter (building construction)
Painter, maintenance
Pantryman (restaurants) ..••••.....
Paper-machine tender (paper and paperboard mills) ••••••••••••••••
Paper tester (paper and paperboard mills) •••••••••••.....••••••••
Photoengraver (printing) ....... •»•••........ •••••••••••••..... .
Pipe fitter, maintenance ..........
Planer operator (sawmills and planing mills) ............ •••••••••
Plasterer (building construction) ••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••*••
Plumber (building construction) ..........
Porter
10
Power-shear operator (fabricated structural steel and
ornamental metal work) ..........................
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Presser, machine, shirts (power laundries) ••••••••••••••••••«••••
Pressman (printing) ••••••••••••••••••••••.•........ ••••••••••••••
Pressman, web (printing) ............................ ••.•••••••••••
Quartermaster (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...........
Receiving clerk ........
Receiving clerk (nonalcoholic beverages) ............. ••••••••••••
Routeman (driver-salesman) (nonalcoholic beverages) ••••••••••.•••




12
14
Id
16
1#
d
15
Id
15
9
12
17
14
9
12
12
16
13
13
13
16
12
7
12
3
5
14
9
17
12
16
10
16
16
16
9
Id
12
12
16
9
12
16
16

13
14
15
16
16
17
10
16
16

Saw filer, bench work (sawmills and planing mills) •••••••••••••••••
Seaman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••.••••••••••
Secretary ••••••••••••....... ••••••••••..... •••••••••••...... ••••••
Secretary (insurance c a r r i e r s ) ...... ........ .
Section head (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••.... •••••••••••••••••
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries) ................... 13
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance •••••••••••••••.••••••........••••••
Shipping clerk
........... ....... ................. •••••••••......
Shipping clerk (grocery stores and meat markets) ..... ••••••.......
Shipping clerk (nonalcoholic beverages) ...... ....................
Shipplng-and-receiving clerk ............................. •••••••••••
Silverman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••••••••••
Sorter, green chain (sawmills and planing mills) ••••••••••••••••••••
Steam table attendant (restaurants)
....... ••••......... •••..
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ..•••••••••.......•..•••••••••••••
Stenographer, general ••••••••••••••.....
Stenographer, technical
Steward (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...................
Stock handler •••••••••••••..... .
Storekeeper (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••••••••«•••••
Switchboard operator ••••...... ........ .
Switchboard operator (hotels)••••••••........
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••••••••••............ •••••••••
Switchboard operator-receptionist(insurance carriers) ••••••••......
Ifcbulating-machine operator
Ihird hand (paper and paperboard mills) ........
•••••
Tbol-and-die maker ...............
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)
Transcribing-machine operator (insurance carriers) •••••••••...... .
Transcribing-machine operator, general ........... ••••••••.•••••••••
Transcribing-machine operator, technical •••••••••.....•••••••••••••
Trimmer operator, double end (sawmills and planing m i l l s ) .... .
Truck driver •
•
•
•
•
•
•
.
.
•••..o...
Trucker, hand ......
Trucker, hand (paper and paperboard mills) •. . . . • • • • • •
Trucker, power ..... ••••••••..... .
Trucker, power (paper and paperboard mills) •••..••••••.••••••••...•
IJrpist ••••••••••••••••••••• • • • • . • • • • • • • o
Typist (insurance carriers) •••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Underwriter (insurance carriers)
Watchman (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ......•••••...... .
Washer, automobile (auto repair s h o p s ) .... ........... •••••........
Washer, machine (power laundries) ••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••
Waiter (restaurants) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••««•...•••••••••
Watchman .....
Watchman (office building service) ••....•••••••••.......•••••••••••
Watchman (paper and paperboard mills) .........
••••.•••.«••
Watertender (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) •••.•••••••.••.
Welder, hand (fabricated structural steel and oranmental
metalwork) .......
.....o.
Welder, hand (machinery) ••••••••••••••••••••••*•••«•••«•.••.••••••.
Welder, machine (fabricated structural steel and ornamental
metalwork) •••••.......... •••••••••••....... •••••••••••••••.....
Wiper (ocean transport - unlicensed personnel) ...............
Wrapper (bakeries) ........••••.....••••••••......
Wrapper (grocery stores and meat markets) •••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

12
17
6
14
14
9
10
Id
16
H
17
12
Id
14
6
6
17
U
17
6
Id
6
14
3# 6
12
9
14
14
6
6
12
11
H
o 12
H
12
. 7
14
14
17
15
15
Id
U
Id
12
17
13
14
13
17
16
Id
15

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O — 1951


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102