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DAYTON, OHIO
June 1951

Bulletin No. 1041

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
number

INTRODUCTION.......................................................

1

THE DAITON METROPOLITAN A R E A ......................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .......................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations......................................... ....... ..
A-2
Professional and technical occupations»•«................................
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.... .......................
k-U Custodial, warehousing, and shippingoccupations .................

3
7
7
9

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-332 Ferrous foundries ...........................................
B-35 Machinery .............................
B-541 Grocery stores ....................
B-7538 Auto repair shops •.....................................................

11
11
13
13

Union wage
C-15
C-205
C-27
C-41
C-4-2

scales for selected occupations Building construction........................
Bakeries ...............................................................
Printing ...............................................................
Local transit operating employees ...........
Motortruck drivers and helpers ........... .............. .......... ••••«•

14
U
H
15
15

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .................................

16

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions .................
E-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ..... . .........
E-3
Paid holidays .................................
E-4Paid vacations..........
E-5
Paid sick leave ....
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses ............
E-7
Insurance and pension plans ................ ... .............. . ••........

16
17
17
18
19
20
20

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of survey......................... ..........................

21

I N D E X .............................................................................

23

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

Introduction y
The Dayton area is one cf several important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of labor Statistics conducted occu­
pational wage surveys during the summer of 1951 o 2/ Occupations
that are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufactur­
ing industries were studied on a community-wide basis* Cross­
industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) of­
fice; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping* In presenting
earnings information for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4)
separate data have been provided wherever possible for individ­
ual broad industry divisions*
Occupations that are characteristic of particular,
important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on
an industry basis, within the framework of the community sur­
vey*
Earnings data for these jobs have been presented in
Series B tables* Union scales (Series C tables) are presented
in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for several
industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers
are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing
pay practices*
Data have also been
operations and differentials,
benefits such as vacation and
days, nonproduction bonuses,

collected and summarized on shift
hours of work, and supplementary
sick leave allowances, paid holi­
and insurance and pension plans*

The Dayton Metropolitan Area
Total population of the Dayton Metropolitan Area (Mont­
gomery and Greene counties) was more than 450,000 in 1950, a 38
percent increase since 1940* More than half lived in Dayton*

1/ Prepared in the Bureau’s regional office in Chicago, H I #
by Woodrow C* Linn under the direction of George E* Votava, Re­
gional Wage Analyst* The planning and central direction of the
program was carried on in the Branch of Community Wage Studies
of the Bureau’s Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
2/ Other areas studied are: Baltimore, Bridgeport, Dallas,
and Portland (Qreg*). Similar studies were conducted earlier in
the year in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, New York and the
San Erancisco-Qakland area*
jJ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey*



Dayton’s position as an important industrial area is
indicated by the heavy concentration of employment in the manu­
facturing industries* Although Dayton’s industrial plants today
are primarily those which were in existence during the prewar
period, employment was twice as great in June 1951 as in 1939©
Exclusive of establishments employing 20 or fewer workers ij%
247 manufacturing plants provided employment to more than 9^000
workers, as compared with a total of 381 nonmanufacturing firms
with 26,500 workers * More than three-quarters of the workers in
manufacturing were employed in durable-goods manufacturing in­
dustries, the others in nondurable-goods industries* j>/

Nfetalworking plants employed 95 percent of the work­
ers in the durable-goods industries, with nonelectrical machin­
ery plants alone employing about two-thirds of the workers o The
transportation equipment, electrical machinery; and primary met­
als industries were also large*
The major nondurable goods
manufacturing industries in Dayton were rubber products, print­
ing and publishing, food and kindred products, and paper and
allied products*

Dayton plants manufactured a variety of products such
as accounting and bookkeeping machines, air conditioning and
ventilating equipment, autographic registers, bearings, cash
registers, electric refrigerators, printing presses, pumps,
precision gages, scales, and tools and dies0 Other significant
Dayton-made products are aircraft and automotive parts and ac­
cessories, tires, bicycles, castings and forgings, crackers,
cement, chemicals, electric motors, optical lenses and prisms,
paints and varnishes, paper products, and molded plastic prod­
ucts*
Dayton is also the hub of a wide trading area* Ap­
proximately 16,000 sales persons and distribution workers were
employed in retail establishments with 21 or more workers ij,
and 3,200 employees were working in wholesale trade* Exclusive
of the substantial employment in the railroad industry, a labor
force of 5,500 was required by the transportation, communica­
tion, and other public utilities industry group*
Service in­
dustries employed 4,100 persons in such diverse fields as auto­
mobile and other repair shops, laundries, cleaning and dyeing
establishments, hotels, theaters, radio and television stations
and business service establishments*
The finance, insurance,
and real estate industries employed 1,700 white collar workers*

ij See appendix for discussion of size of establishments
studied*
5/ See appendix table for listing of durable and nondurable
goods industries*

2

Located in the Dayton area is Wright-Patters on Air
Force Base, the site of the headquarters of the Air Force Air
Msiterial Command. This command is charged with the engineering,
research, experimental development, and procurement of all air­
craft parts and Supplies and employs a substantial number of
civilian employees.

Among the industries and establishment-size groups
studied by the Bureau, over three-fourths of the workers in nonoffice jobs were employed in establishments having written
agreements with labor organizations. About seven in every eight
workers in manufacturing plants were employed in union estab­
lishments.
In nonmanufacturing firms about two in every five
employees were represented by labor organizations. The propor­
tion of office workers covered by union contract provisions was
considerably lower than for plant workers. less than one-fifth
of all office workers were working under the terms of collective
bargaining agreements.

Occupational Wage Structure
Wages and salaries of half of the workers in Dayton
manufacturing industries in June 1951 were geared to the costof-living through escalator clauses providing for wage changes
based on the Bureaufs Consumers1 Price Index.
Examination of
data on general wage changes granted during the period January
1950 - June 1951 indicated that nearly three-fifths of the es­
tablishments studied had formally adjusted wage and salary scales
upward. Prior to the Korean outbreak relatively few increases
were granted. Subsequent wage adjustments became widespread and
were gathering momentum at the time of the January 26 wage
"freeze*. Wage revisions since that date have been subject to
Wage Stabilization Board regulations.

Formalized rate structures providing a range of rates
for office occupations were reported in establishments employ­
ing about three-fifths of all office workers. Very few office
workers were found working under single rate plans; and over a
third were employed in establishments that determined salaries
on an individual basis.
Nearly 40 percent of the plant workers in the manu­
facturing industries were paid incentive rates. A similar pro­




portion in the machinery industry was paid incentive rates. In­
centive methods of wage payment were negligible in the nonmanu­
facturing industries, except for commissions paid to salespersons
in retail trade establishments.
Over 90 percent of the plant workers were employed in
establishments that had formal rate structures for time-rated
employees; these workers were fairly evenly distributed between
plans providing rate.ranges and single rates for each job. The
remainder of the plant workers were employed in establishments
using individual rate determination for time workers.
Most Dayton firms visited had established minimum en­
trance rates for hiring inexperienced plant workers.
Although
entrance rates ranged from less than 60 cents to more than
$1.40, $1 was the minimum rate in establishments giving employ­
ment to nearly 70 percent of all plant workers. A 75-cent min­
imum rate was the lowest reported in manufacturing; wholesale
trade; and transportation, communication,and other public util­
ities.
Minimum entrance rates of less than 75 cents an hour
were found in the retail trade and service industries.
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than in nonmanufacturing. In 22 of
28 office job classifications permitting comparison, salaries
of workers in manufacturing plants averaged $1 to $12.50 more a
week. Average hourly earnings for plant jobs studied in all in­
dustries were higher for 18 of 21 job categories for which com­
parisons were possible.

Over one-fifth of the workers in Dayton area manufac­
turing plants were employed on second and third shift opera­
tions in June 1951. Almost all of the extra-shift workers were
paid shift differentials. In durable-goods manufacturing, work­
ers were usually paid a percentage differential over first-shift
rates. In nondurable goods about half received a cents-per-hour
differential and the others a percentage over day-shift rates.

Three quarters of the women office workers in all in­
dustries were scheduled to work & 40-hour week in June 1951*
Schedules of 40 hours or more were common for office workers ir
all industry groups except finance, insurance, and real estate.
Two-fifths of the workers in these offices were scheduled to
work less than 40 hours.
Over 70 percent of the plant workers
were also on a 40-hour workwee. Most of the others were on an
extended work schedule.

\ice

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Dayton* Ohio* by industry division* June 1951)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

A verag e

Sax, occupation, and industry division

N
umber
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
eky
Wel
e k y W e l Under 32.5° 35.00 37.50 4 0 .0 0 42.50 4 5 .0 0 47.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 57.50 60 .0 0
an n s
h u s eri g
or
and
(tn a d ( t n a d $
Sad r ) S a d r )
under
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 50 .0 0 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0

$

$

6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0
6 5 .0 0

67.50

70 .0 0

1$
$
$
1$
00 90.001 9 5.0 0
72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5 . ;

72.50 75.00 80.00

8 5.0 0 90.00 95.0 0

over

Men
Bookkeepers, hand ....................
Manufacturing .......... .

112

" 64.
44
20

40.5
w;s

fn *
,
A .K
T
40.5

79.00
78.50
82 00

48

_
-

226

4 0 .0

40.0
40.0
40.0
41.0
41.5

68.30'
6 9 .OO
65.00
56.00
57.50

C e i s file, class B .......... .......
lrc,

13

40.0

41.00

Clerks, general .......... ...........
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
P b l .T
u'l *
• -iiTi---itr-t--.T

232
“ 136
123
33
76
34

Clerks, order .......................
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
U iaIasqIa +«e4
V
%/ n

112
69
54
15
43
“
I
VQ

Office boys ........................
Manufacturing.....................
Nonmanufacturing .......... ........
Tabulating-machine operators ...........
Manufacturing .....................

40.0 71.50
TOO”! 73:0ir
40.0 ! 7 5 .5 0
40.0 ! 65.00
40.5 67.50
4 O.5
7 0 ,5 0
41.0
■40.5"
41.0
38.5
42.0
42.0

68.00
72.00 ”
74.00
64.50
61.50
72.00

40.5
5D7CT"
40.0
40.0

67.50
68.50
68.00
73.50

39.0
51
-- SO- ["39.0
ll
39.5
25
-- 21

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

7
7

_
-

7

6 7 .0 0

198
173
23
30
14

87
-- 52—
71
11

_
-

-

80.00
on <n
;

Clarks, accounting ...................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods...... ..........
Nonmanufacturing .............. .
Public utilities* ...............

Clerks, payroll .....................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ................

_

39.50
40.00”
39.00

40.0 71.00
.W . G " 71.50

-

-

-

3
- --- J
3
-

-

-

5
1
1

4
3

8

4
-

-

-—
-

1
r
~
1

-

2
1
1
1
-

16
9
9
7
2

8
7
6
1
1
1

9
5
4
1
4
1

11
8
8
3
1

14
9
7
2
5
2

1
1

17
5
2
3
12

11
5
5
6
2

12
2
1
1
10

-

-

-

-

1
1—
1
-

“

1

1
1

-—

1
r

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

6
6
7
6 --- T --- 5
2
3
-

_

1

_
~

-

5
5

5

--- T

-

2

_
_

_

8_
_
6
5
1
2

15_ 14_ 44
_
_
14
13
44
38
13
13
1
6
1
1
1
-

12
2
1
1
10
5

2

5

22 _ 27_ 1£
_
_
22
27
15
20
23
15
2
4
-

2
2
2
~

2
2
2
-

•

48

1
1
1
-

7
7

2

9___ 1
1
4
4
1

2

5

___ 4
2
5

11

4
1
8

17
14
11
3
3
3

4

21

16
11
9
2

5

1
3

r
1
2

-

8i
3
3!
-!
5

1

-

3

1
1
1
-

2 ___ 1 ___ 1 ___ £
2
3
4
3
2
4
2
1
5

-

17
13
4
4

2

-

7 0 ,5 0

40 0

Nonmanufacturing ..................

-

6
2
4
_
-

2
1

1
1

7
1
1
6

2
1
1
1

7
3
2
1
4

9
4
4
5

2
2
2

11
11
11

-

-

-

-

8
5
5

_

_

-

-

1

15
15

3

2
2
2
-

3

1 ___ £___ 4
i
4
5
1
3
4
1
1
_

1
1

2
6
3
3
3

4

1 ___ 1
1
1
1
1
6

8
4
1
3
4

_

_

11
10
5
5
1
1

45
4i
1
4
3

37
34
31
3
3

3
3

3

3

3

3

9___ 1 _ 42___ 2
_
12
3
7
5
10
7
4
3
2
1
2
4
7
1
2
2

11
11
8
3
-

11
6
5
1
5

8
7
7
-

7___ £___ 4
7
5
4
5|
5
3
2
1
-|

17
17
15
2

12
12
8
4

_

_

_

_

_

_

4
4

—

_

_
~

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
24_ 20
10
27
9
25
1
2
14
3
9

_

!
5
5
4
1
-

2 ___ 3_
2
3
2
3
-

5

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
-

~
~—

1
r
l

1
1

_

_
-

_
~

8
8
5
3

14
13
1
12
1

7
7
7
-

8
7
7
-1
1

2
1

1
1

2
2

2 ___ 1 ___ £
2
2
3

16
9
7
2
7

3
3
3

12
-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) .......
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods............. .
Nonmanufacturing..................
D ,,k 1 4 / i „ + 41 4 * A am*-

147
99
63
36
48
JX
99

40.5
4 0 .0

40.0
40.0
41.5
i.a n
40.0

50.50
5o;w”

.
-

5 1 .0 0

-

-

48.00

-

-

52 .0 0

-

-

11
13
9
7
"— IT— r —
--- 2
"--- 5
2
2
5
3
1
9
5
2
3
5
3

j.c < j
y

4 7 .5 0

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication* and other public utilities,
** Finance* insurance* and real estate.




2
c

1

2
2

12

27

8
r -- 1 "
5
2
5
1

A
4

16
2
9

-

-

6

1

1

5

Occuoational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

4

Table A-l:

Office. Occupation^ - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

W eek ly
W eek ly
e a rn in g s
h o u rs
(S ta n d a rd ) (S ta n d a rd )

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 A2.50 4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00190.00!95.00
ana
and
3 2 .5 0 m , 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7 .5 0 70.00 72.50 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

$
Women - Continued
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine).....
Nonmanufacturing ...................

64
- 25
-

Bookkeepers, hand .....................
Manufacturing ................ ....
Durable goods ...................

185
-- 78
50
28
107

40.0
"40.0

53.00
53.00'

41.0
40.5

63.50
6 -.50"
2
63.50
61,00
64.00

4 0 .0

32

41.0
41.0
40.5
41.0

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A.....
Manufacturing.....................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

39
20
19

41.0
40.0
42.0

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B.....
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods .............. .....
Nondurable goods....... .........
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Whr1*aalA Ira1 I I i r t - - I T - I - T - - T T - r
*_*
,A
Finance**..........................................................................................................

201
— 55
27
27
147
29
81

Nonmanufacturing...................

23

Services .......................

Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ............................
Manufacturing ......................
Durable goods..... ................
Nondurable goods ................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing...........................................................................................
Wholesale trade ....................................................................................

322
22l—
170
51
101
15

Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) ............... . .
.
Manufacturing.....................
Nonmanufacturing ..................
PinapMriW tf.tTT-TttrttTt.1,
. ttT.TT.TTt,

38
13
25
10

Clerks, accounting ...................
Manufacturing...... ........... .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .............. ..
Nonmanufacturing..................
Pl» 1( lt^
lV1 • l.1 AA# t.tT..1TIfltTT. -t»ti
Wholesale trade ................
Services................. .

522
205
112
93
I 317
20
82
29

Clerks, file, class A .................
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Clerks. Hie. class B .............. .
Manufacturing .....................
Nonmanufacturing........ ..........

4L
-- 25
13
12
I 16
! 217
f
1
j 121

40.0

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

9
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_

_

_

8

2

62.00

-

-

-

-

-

58.50
58.50
59.00

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

40.0
39.5
40.0
41.0
39.5

50.50

~ ~ w . t r 53.00"

49.00

7
-

8

-

7

8

7

8

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
-

-

2
2
2

41.0

4 8 .5 0

4 0 .0

50750.
52.50
47.50
, 47.50
i 50 .0 0
! 48.00
43.50

-

*

8
5

12
3

1
-

2
-

4
-

11
-

2

_
-

14
7
6

1
1
1

16
16
5

-

6

3k

-

2

_

2

2

-

_
-

_

-

3

40.5 50.50
" 40.0" 51700“
40.0 50.00
40.0 52 .0 0
41.0 49.50
40.0 41.50
40.0 ~44.00"
40.0 39.50

_
7

_
17

7

17

-

-

8
16
21
6
1

27
2
1
1
25
g
0
13

18
2
-

2
16
7

10

3
2
2
1
22
22

-

39
5
34

6
1
1
4
1
4
2
52
17
&
2J-- * ■
29
9

-

11

7
2
3

7
C
5
1

-

-

5
20
6
5

1
6

-

-

8
8
6
2

_

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
13
9
4!
37
2

26
23
17
6
3
-

30
30
28
2

38
37
33
4
1
-

49
39
38
1
10
-

17
17
12
5

2

“

15
11
10
l
4
-

7
1
6

3
1
2
2

9
6
3
2

4
4

1
1
-

-

56
58
76
2T--- 7 - m
8
3
13
4
7
13
56
37
49
1
3
2
10
1
15
1
9
4

31
19
16
3
12
2
8
-

30
9
6
3
21

23
12
9
3
11
1
4
-

33
7
4
3
26

6
3
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
6
11
5- 6
1
5

4
3
2
1
1
8
8

_
_
_

-

4
2
2

22
13
7
6
9
5
1,
4
3

6
2
2

-

-

2
26
12
14

4
12
7
5

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

4

2
2
-

2

2 ________1
1

-

2
2

17
2
1
1
15

4
1
_

8

_

1
1
1

_

8

_

_

X

3
O

5

-

-

.

_

_

_

3
2
1
1

_
_
-

14

6
6
5
1

-

8
1

15
c
p
14

5
5
5

2
1
1

3
-

g
1

8
1
1

3
3
3

2
~
2

48
67
22 -- 251
17
15
11
7
20
45
6
2
13
9
1
9

Ik

3
3
3

-I
-

38
15
1
14
23

21

20

7
1

-

21
-- 1 "
2
12
3
9

-

27
c
p
4

34

25
5

30
22
8
14
8
5

-

-

6
c
p

9
8

_

3 ________9 ________i
>
3
4
2
9
-

22
30
9 -- ^
4
2
5
281
13
2
6
9
9

6
6

_

10
10

3
2
1

9
8
6
2
1
“

20

1
1

7
a
P
4

n

7
6

-

6
1
5

-

4
1
3
16
2

-

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
1

9
3
1
2
6
4

3

See footnote at end of table,

**

24
--- F

8
2
6

4 7 .5 0

40.5
41.0

8

-

39.5
39.0

4 0 .0

2

-

-

53.50
55.50
57.00
51.50
49.00
46.50

40.0
40.5
4L.5

8

1
-

6 4 ,5 0

39.5 46.00
53TDD39.5 '
40.0 59.00
39.0 | 47.00
39.5 1 43.50
40.0 44.00
38.5 4 2 .0 0

4 0 .0

_

_

-

2
-

-

-

-

.

.

-

-

-

-

_
-

1
1

2
2

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
16
11
5
3

6
4
4
2

2
2
2
-

-

7
1

-

2
-

_
-

-

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

2

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7
5
2

3
3
3

1
1
1
-

-

_
-

.
.
.
-

•
_
_
_

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

.

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

1

_
-

_

3

Q c C U fU ztio tU

Table A-l:

-

5

G o fU tH H e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
A verag e

N umber
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

W eekly
W eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
67.50 V).00 ^2.50 ^5.00 lo.oo I5 .OOJ^O.OO I5 .0 0
Under 32.50 35.00 3 7 .5 0 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 I0 .0 0 k.50 I5 .OO S
ana
$
unaer
j
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

$
Women - Continued
347
233
156
77
1U
45
37

Clerks, general ....................
Manufacturing....... .......... .
.
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing.............. .
Wholesale trade... ............
Clerks, order .................................................................................
Manufacturing.........................................................................
Durable goods................................ ...................... .....
Nondurable goods ........................................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................................................

141

------ 71
—

22
49
70

Key-punch operators ...............
Manufacturing........... .......
Durable goods ................
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufecturlng .................
Public utilities* ..............

40.0
40.U
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

40.0
236
0 .}
209— "4"!
106
40.0
103
39.5
27
40.5
11
40.5

Clerks, payroll ...................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................
Public utilities* ..............
Duplicating-machine operators .........
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing .................

40.0
53.50
4D.U U 54T50H
58.00
4 0 ,0
47.50
39.5
52.00
40.0
54.00
40.0
40.0
50.50
47.50
37.5

-

8
—

-

-

8
-

•
5
-

3
-

-

.

•

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
•

.
"

.
-

-

2

11
21
12
3
9
9

22

7
(

8
4
10
/
4

32
30
7
23 i
2|
-

18
15
12
3
3
2

30
23
18
25
12
11
6j u i
5
5 i
3 1

•
>

6
6

21
7

7
5

-

-

7
14

5
2

5
4
1
3
1

6
5
1
4
1
1

17
12
12
5
2

1
1
1
-

l

39
24
10
14
15

12

•

7
5
5
2

7
6
2!
4
1

-

-

-

15
9
1
8
6
5

7
6
3
3
1
1

9
9
6
3
-

2
1
«
►
1

2
1
1

2
2
•
2

3

3
3

2
2
-

1
1
1

11
10
3
7

2!
2
;
2
!
.
1

23
17
11
j

38
26
15
11
12

3
2
1
1
1

-

1
-—
1

1
r
-

84
59
37
22
25
19

50 .5 0
40.0
52 .0 0
40.0
5 4 .5 0
40.0
40.0 ; 48.00
47,50
40.0
40.0
48.00

•
•
-

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

45.50
46.00
50.00
40.50

3

W

36
34
24
10
2

6
4
2
2
2

40.0 ! 50 .0 0
7T~!.5 1 .SO40.0 ; 5 5 .5 0
4 5 .5 0
39.5
4 5 .0 0
41.5

51
—

-

20
8
6
2
12
2
4
5

-

5 5 .5 0
5 6 .0 0
5 8 .5 0
54 .0 0
5 0 .5 0
5 0 .5 0

3

-

49.00
50 .0 0
4 7 .5 0
4 9 .5 0

5

w --- 5
"--- T

1

1
1
1
16
4
3
1
12
7

28
11
8
3
17
Q
7
5
2

31
17
12
5
14
2
2

31
11
6
5
20

16
5

12
9

-

-

5
11
g

9
3

18 ___ 1
1
11
1
4
7
2
7

10

23
8
6
2
15

17
16
12
4
1

i

1

14
12
6
6
2
2

-

•

-

-

-

I
•

.

.

.

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

5

1

5

22
22
13
9
•

13
10
4
6
3
1

8
8
6
2
•

10
10
6
4
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

«

6
2
1
1
4
4

5
5
3
2

5
5
4
1

7
7
7
-

6
6
4
2

1
1
1

6
6
6

2
2
2

4
4

•

6 ___ 4
6
4
2
3
2
3
-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

•

26 _ 21
_
18
14
16
5
2
9
12
17
£
11
4
4
2
•

8
7
3
4
1
1

~

11 ___ 4
11
4
2
9
2
2
•

A

7
5
4
1
2
2

"
j

5
5
5
-

4
1
1
3

A

15
12
4
8
3

9
6
2
4
3

15
9
3
6
6

2L

•
4

19
9
10
5

60
33
27
6
27

33
14
7
7
19

•
-

•
•
-

-

3
•
-

3
•
1

2
•
1

•
2
•

5
•
1

2
3
-

6
5
1

Stenographers, general ..............
Manufacturing ................... .
Durable goods................ .
Nondurable goods............
Nonmanufacturing ....... ..........
Wholesale trade ................
Finance** ....................

1054
723
593
130
331
59
67

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
37.0

55.00
57.50
58.00
55.00
50.00
51.50
45.00

•
•
-

2
•
2
2

7
4
3
1
3
2
1

40
23
18
5
17
8

48
23
15
8
25
1
8

127
60
55
5
67
1
9

115 120
71
64
48
49
23
15
51
49
16
19
1, n
1

70
50
34
16
20
5
2

86
46
33
13
40
5
4




8
8
8

1

•
•
•

J

2
2
1
1
•

2
1
1

2
2
2

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1
1
1

7
7
7
-

6
1
1

3
3
3

-1
-

63.00
64.50
67.00
61.00
60.00
1 o/.uu
i 57.00
160.50
58.00

n

5

5
5
5
-

9
9
9
-

5

7
7
6
1

1 1

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
37.0
41.0

11

25
20
19
1
5

-

4
4
4

7;
4
2
2
3

262
j 160
| 102
| 133
27
41
33
10

•
-

7
7
6
1
-

-

Secretaries ............... ........
Manufacturing...................
Durable goods.... .............
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing... ....... ......
DnM 4a %+ 14+4Aat
w4
Wholesale trade ........... ....
Finance** ....................
Services .....................

11

4
4

2

Office girls .......................
Manufacturing ...................
Durable goods .................
Nondurable goods ..............

395

4

c

i
j 38
| 34“
—
i 20
i4

-

18
16
10
6
2
2

-

-

-

20
7
4
3
13

14
•

_
51 _ 24
21
40
9
29
11
12
11
3
2
7
2
1
-

88
76
70
6
12
—

82
73
68
5
9
1
*

4
1
5

-

101 _ 52_ 3 7
_
_
78
50
37
60
35
44
2
18
6
2
23
2
7
«
'

20 _ 24
_
23
15
12
15
8
3
1
5

8
8
6
2
-

2
2
.2
-

-

1
3
•

1
-

-

•
*
*

26_ 21
_
26
25
22
22
3
4

17
17
17
•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8
7
1

1

-

*
*

* ___ J1__ I____ 1 --_

6

Ofyice Occupation* - Continued

Table A-i:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5
$
|
$
;
$
50!
o
Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.0q 72.50| 75.00 80.00 8 . 0 90.o ; 95.00
and
and
%
under
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 . 0 90.00 9 . 0 over
50|
50|
$

W eekly
hours
(Standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$

Women - Continued
Switchboard operators .............
Manufacturing........ .........
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods ............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities*.......... .
Wholesale trade .............
Services ..................

165
57
36

Switchboard operator-receptionists ...
Manufacturing .................
Durable goods .......... ....
Nondurable goods.............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Wholesale trade .............

_94_
44

Tabulating-machine operators ........
Manufacturing ......... .......
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Transcribing-machlne operators, general
Manufacturing .................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .... .
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Typists, class A .................
Manufacturing ............. .
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods •••..........
Nonmanufacturing ............ ..
Wholesale trade ...... .......
Typists, class B ........ .
Manufacturing..... ...........
Durable goods........ ......
Nondurable goods ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Public utilities* ............
Wholesale trade .......... .
Finance** ..••••••....... .

1/
*
**

21

108
26
23
26

22
22

50
17

41.0
39.5
40.5
38.5
4 2.0

41.5
40.5
44.5

40.0

15

4 0 .0

~ W

49
49
11

11

13

24

53

77

73

2
10

1 j _ 20
8_

59.50
64:00"
52.50
10_

55.00

11
1

40.0

201

4 0 .0

44.00
44.50
46.00

97
157
13
26
34

4 0 .0

4 2 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

42 .0 0

42.00
39.50
41.50

17
1!
7

131
7

lj

6

1!
6
i

57.50
52.50
47.00
47.00

455
298

40.5
39.0

10

2

39.5 i 48.50
49.00
39.5
54.00
44.00
39.5
4 0 .0
44.50

40.0

_11

2

4 0 .0

40.5
355
"285" "403T
4 0 .0
257
4 0 .0
29
41.5
69
19
40.5

12

19

9

40.5 ! 47.00
4 0 .0
48.50
4 0 .0
50.50
46.50
39.5
45.50
41.5
4 8 .0 0
40.5

40

109

47.00
52.50
56.50
45.00
44.00
48.50
45.00
43.00

1
!
6
|

21

15

T

1
5
10
2

4

29

^0
7
13
9
4
3

106

42
25
1|
7

7
4
!

5
1
28
7

31

1
21

5

6i
52

11
11i

11

6

4!
5i
1!
2

16

17
16

_46

48

72
62
10

641

9
|

6
121
4
!

2!

7

Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communications, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE:

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due
to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of
retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all indus­
tries combined and for the nonmanufacturing industry group.

Table A-2:

P^ia^eHioual cuut ectm ical Occupation*

7

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations
studied on an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F -

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

W eekly
earnings
(Standard) (Standard)
W eekly

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
Under 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115*00 120.00 125.00 130.00 1135.00 140.00
and
$
under
52.50 55.00
57.50 60.00 62.50 65 .OO 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 over

$

i

Men
Draftsmen, chief...............................
Manufacturing......... .....................

40
--- 23

_

_

_

_

_

-

41.5 109.50
5
” 4D'.T~ 1 0 2 ' 0 “

-

-

-

-

-

_

7
7

Draftsmen.......................................
Manufacturing. ................. .............

202

42.0

89.00

_

_

_

_

_

144

4 1.0

si;ocn

-

-

-

-

-

Draftsmen, /junior...............................
•'tuning •ttiirtiitiitiiit__

90
63

41.5 ! 67.50
40.5 I 65.50

8
7

5

1

3

11
11

1

69
67
52
15

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

1
1
1

4
4

8
8

2
2

3

9
9
5

4

»

3

_

2
1

1

36
35

20
20

25

15

5

4

21

11

1

1

11

5

3

11

23
13

7
7
7

15
14
13

6

4
r

1
1
1

-

11
10 t
5

4

-

8

23

8

20

16

2 ___ 1 ____ 3_
2
3
3

5

2
2

_

-

8
8

4
-

8

17

-

10

_

-

___ k.
3

3

7
-

1

4 ____
-

_

2

5

3
-

_

_

-

_

10

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered)............. .
Manufacturing................ ...............
^InnHiipahl » gnorln 1TTT.

__ ..........

68.00
67.50
67.50
67.50

1
1
1

2
2
2

—

5

h

11 !
11
10 |

1

1

5 —
3
2

2

-

_
-

-

.

.
.

2
1

______ 1______i
l/

_ !
_ ;

.

1

Hour8 reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salariee an^ the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Mai n t e n a n c e

Table a -3:

a n d

PauteA

Plant

Occupation&

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
|
$
Aeae
vrg
hu l Under
or y
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 . 7 5 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 i2.25
er i g
anns
$
under
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30

Carpenters, maintenance................ .
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods... ....... ..........
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing......................

244
204
169
35
40

S
1.95
2.00
2.02
1.88
1.73

1
1

Electricians, maintenance .................
Manufacturing..... ..................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .................. .
Public utilities * .................

535
475
406
68
61
49

1.99
2.02
2.03
1.97
1.73
1.74

-

1

1
-

-

_
_
-

1.86
1.85
1.99
1.80
1.87

-

_
3
- - T~
2
1
_
-

68
50

1.65
TV64 ..
1.64
1.63
1.68

2
2
2
-

5
1
1
4

_
-

2
2
2
_
-

10
9
4
5
1

339
182
138
44

1.43
1.50
1.54
1.38

26
8
3
5

47
8
3
5

39
19
3
16

34
16
14
2

56
11
9
2

Engineers. stationary......... *...... .
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ............. .... .
Nondurable goods
.........
Nonmanufacturing .....................

165
—
—

Firemen. stationary boiler .............. .
Manufacturing......... ..............
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing................. ....

174

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..............
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .................. .

1
-

31
79
55

56

-

_

1
1

-

1
_
_
1
_
-

.
4
9
8
2
6
1

-

..
-

1
1
4

i
| 22
j 18
1 14
1 4

22
2
2
20

6
4
4
2

7
6
4
2
1

5
1
1
4

12
12
5
7
-

17
17
7
10
-

4
4
2
2
-

11
10
6
4
1
1

8
8
6
2
-

21
21
20
1
-

25
23
18
5
2
2

30
26
21
5
4
3

28
27
16
11
1
1

21
10
1
14
1 15
15
—! 8
21
14
5
13
-j
-! l
1
5
- ; 7 ! 21
13
13
1
1
1
1
! 71
1 5
i
28
18 ! 1 2
6
1
14 | 1 5 1 26
;
.
2
1
15 1 17 ; 1 1
14
1 4 1 14
1
1
2
3 ! 2
21
9
17
_
12
12
8
6
13
12
1
1
4j
13
-

17
6
1
5
11

25
4
4
21

16
3
3
13

11
11
8
3
-

-

-

4
_
4

3
2

2
_

11 | 20 i
!
-!
_
n
20
10
15
81
8
8
-

1

24 i 19
33
19
20
24
19 i 19
16 ! 19 j
16 j 23
3 i
4j 1
"

i

1 4
14

12
2

See footnote at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




:
j

5
5
5

1l
1|
1

_
5 _ 2_
5
7
7
4
1
-

-

45
28
23
5
17
17

____ i
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

6
6
5
1
13
13
12
1
-

_
-

1
$
j2.30
and
over

15
15
14
1
-

1
1
1
-

_
-

_!
-j
-;
-j

19. 127
4..
149 126
135 121
14
5
1
-

29
29
26
3
-

1
1
1
*
*

1
1
1
-

_

_;

-

-

-

_

_

-!
-1
-j

-

j
;
-j

_

125
125
118
7
-

16
16
11
5
-

3
3
3

9
9
5
4
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-;

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-i

____ i

-

1

-

i

6
6
7
6
6
1
-

6
3
-

3
3

8

Table A-3:

Mai*lte44Ci41Ge CUtd Pout&i P latit O ccupatUm i. • Qo*Ui*ut*d
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on
an area basis in Daytcn, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N T N G S O F —

Machinists, maintenance ..................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods... .......... ....... .
Nondurable goods ...................

222
““216“
140
76

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
|
$
Aeae
vrg
hu l Under 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2 . 5 !2.30
ory
2
e rig $
a nns
and
and
1.25 ffio1 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1 . 5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2 .3 0 over
_
_
_
_
8
18
1.98
20
20
8
16
24
24
3
48
3
5
11
1 . -11
8
1.98
20
20
8
11
3
17
3
5
11
1
48
24
24
13
_
8
10
2
8
1
1.99
3
10
3
48
4
9
19
15
1.97
1
12
2
7
1
4
17
1
4
5
9
13

Machine-tool operators, tool room.... ......
Manufacturing ........................

770
.770

2.15
2.15

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_ ;
[

Maintenance men. general utility ...........
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Services .........................

131
75
53
22
56
21

1.69
1.83
1.81
1.86
1.50
1.43

7
7
2

3
1
1
2
-

4
4
3

_
-

8
- !
8
-

190
1.67
- 50“ “1.90
39
1.94
11
1.74
140
1.59
80
1.64
17
1.37

7
-

-

_
-

15
-

_
7
3
4

_
-

Occupation and industry division

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) .........
Manufacturing ............. ............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ....................

N
umber
o
f
wres
okr

.
-

24
24

82
82

150
150

163
163

140
140

5
3
3
2
2

6
4
4
2
1

29
26
24
2
3
-

7
2
2
5
-

11
8
2
6
3
-

6
6
6
-

10
8
8
2
-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

5
5
5
_
-

5
5
5
-

_
_
_
-

2
-

21
2
1
1
19
18
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

20
5
4 1 20
20
j
1
1
1

_
-

_
2
2
-

9
4
2
2
5
5
-

3
2
1
1
1
_
_
-

10
4

2
2

2

7
7
15

-

-

3
3
3

_
-

_
-

6
6
6
~

12
12
7
5

_

_

-

-

316
67

-

_
-

-

_
-

Oilers ................................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods..... ........ ........
Nondurable goods ................... .

115
hur68
47

1.56
1.56
1.64
1.45

7
7
7

3
3
1
2

8
8
8

2
2
1
1

7
7
7!

Painters, maintenance .....................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ............... .
Nonmanufacturing ......................
P p r t « 44 , t
|a)'
iii
Services .........................

154
120
104
16
34
10
10

1.82
1.89
1.90
1.80
1.59

-

_
_
-

_
-

5
-

-

-

-

-

1
-!
- 1
1

_

5

_
15
14

1.74

-

1 .9 9
2 .0 2
2 .0 3

_
-

-

-

-

1.99

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

43

1.97

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ................
Manufacturing .................................

147
147

-

-

2.04
2.04
1

2.24
951
" 951" 2.24“

I

1
!
1

_
_

1

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night vork.
Other than tool-and-die Jobbing shops.
Includes 273 workers at $2.30 to $2.35 and 20 workers at $2.35 and over.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

29
29
14
15

15
15
15
-

15
15
14
1

26
26
21
5

17
17
17
-

37
37
37
-

128
128
116
12

25
25
25
-

34
34
34
-

_
-

2
2
2
-

4
4
4
-

11
11
1
10

11
11
9
2

8
8
6
2

5
5
55
40
15

21
21
14
7

13
13
13
-

32
32
31
1

7
7
6
1

180
180
151
29

39
39
39
-

_
~

_
-

_
~

_
-

5
5
4
1

10
3
10
3
5
3i 5

27
27
25
2

20
20
9
11

23
23
23

_
-

.-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

4
r

3
2i
1i
1i
1

8
3
1
2
5

14
2
1
1
12

13
10
8
2
3

4
4
4

8
8
6
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

1
1

-

_
-

-

-

1
3

-

! 1
s
1
----

10

-

_

_

8
8
8

-

-

-

-

72
68
64
4
4

-

-

-

-

4

5 ___5 _ k _
__
5
5
4
1
5
4
4

_

_

_
-

_
-

-

j

-! 4
1
!
13 i 1
- 1 --j ~
-

2
4
1
1

2
2

1
-

2I
-1
i
_
—
! 1
---- j --- 1 ---

-

_j
-

_

_
-

19
14
14
-

1

1

_
-

1

_
-

1
1
_
1
-

16
9
9
-

1
-

-

8
8
7

_
_
_
-

23
23

28
26
25
1

-

_

23 ___5_..-125
4
2
_
3
23
15
11
6
-

141
141

10
8
6
2

j

Plumbers, maintenance ...........................




13
13

_
-

_
-

*
**

7
7

_
-

1.97
1.97
1.99
1.91

3/

7
7

3
15
15
-

383

if

10
10

_
23
3
-

Millwrights ............................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ....................

2/

3
3

_
-

2.01
2.02
2.04
1.85

Tool-and-die makers 2/ ...................
Manufacturing .................................

1
1

1
1
4•

15
3
11

430
514
364
50

Nondurable goods ..........................

3
3

18
3

7

-

2
2

-

!

_
-

Mechanics, maintenance ............. ......
Manufacturing....................... .
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ............. ...... .

294
” 272“
223
49

8
:i
8
6
23
-

_
-

Pipe fitters, maintenance .................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ..................... .

_
-

i
_
-

1

6
6
6
-

14
14
10
4

23
21
15
6

31
31
21
10

16
16
10
6
_

_

5

4

4

1

1
1

2
2

5
5

13
13

6
6

3
3

3
3

|

_
1

5
5
5
-

-

NOTE:

____ 5_
l

5

11
11

135
135
114
21

40
40
40
-

18 __69L
18
69

33
33

-

-

10
10

44
44

93
93

116
116

___M _

38

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

26

-

_

-

-

335 ^293
335 ^293
1

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due
to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of
retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all indus­
tries combined and for the nonaanufacturing industry group.

Table

a

-4:

Gu&todial? *10atelto*UUuj> and S/upfUHQ Occupation*

9

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on
an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

s
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number A e a e
vrg
o
f
hul
ory
0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 !1 . 7 5
w r e s erig Under
okr
anns
$
under
.80 .85 .90 .
95 1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80
0.75

Occupation and industry division

|
$
11.80
and
over

$
Crane operators, electric bridge (under
20 tons)........................... ..
Manufacturing ...................... ..

91 1.65
. 31 T M

_

Guards ...............................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

405 1.60
■75 - " 0 3
3
276 1.68
98 1.48
31 1.24

_
-

_

-

_
_
-

_
3

1
-

_
-

-

-

1.28
1.03
.93
.93

11
11
3
8

54
8
8
46
5
2
3

51
13
9
4
38
12
4

2
80
- - 6"—
1
5
2
74
2
2
3
42
3
-

Janitors, porters and cleaners (woman) .......
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ............ .........
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Finance ** ........................

157
.99
--- 55^ 1.S5
29 1.29
27 1.22
101
•84
53
•75

38
38
29

17
2
2
15
13

15
15

10
10
6

3

4

1
1
1

Order fillers ..........................
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing .............. .......
Wholesale trade ....................

327
-- 1 S T
205
112

1.42
T.57
1.33
1.39

-

4
4
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

1
1
1
-

Packers (men) ..........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ....................
Nonmanufacturing............. ........

1,783
776

379
628
86
a
86
48

1.25
"-3
T.5
1 .4 1
1 .2 4
1 .0 4

1.50
jpr '7 6 ~
13”
227
1.67
1.32
105
69 1.20
401

—

Packers (women) ........................

55
266
199
109
90
67

1.54
1.61
1.64
1.57
1.32

_
9

Receiving clerks ........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Who!A l lA tTAl
f A .*rA tTT... T-TtTTtrtT.,ttITt

235
155“
121
34
80
52

1.54
1766
1.70
1.55
1.30
1.34




_
-

_
-

_
-

6
6

10
-

1
1

_
-

13
13

1
1

5
5

26
26

16
16

8
8

n
11

2
2

1
1

1
-

7
6

12
12

14
13

3
10
1

9
4
_
4
5

17
13
2
11
4

33
28
19
9
5

7
7
1
6
-

9
8
8
1

94
94
63
31

180
180
180
_
-

_
.
_
-

_
_
-

87
76
71
5
11
10
_
_
-

507
503
434
69
4
4

53
53
45
8
_
_

35
35
33
2
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
-

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

•
_

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
•
«
.
_
-

_
_

_
_
_

-

_
_

_
_

22
2
20
20

2
2
_
-

7
7

79
79

9

6
-

2
-

1
-

1

6
1

12
-

28
2T
10
18
_
-

233
48
7
a
185
4
16
18
20

21
7
7
14
4
5
1
-

no

83
5
1
3
3

63
27
1
26
36
10
_
5

90
70
18
52
20
1
_
2
-

137
92
24
68
45
6
6
_
2

153
102
46
56
51
33
3
2
-

68
60
52
8
8
7

5
5
5
_

3
3
1
2
-

_
_
_
-

10
10
10
.

6
6
«
6
_

20
13
13

1

4
14
4
_
1
-! 3
10
4

-

-

1
_
1
1

6
6
-

•
-

6
.
6
3

1
1

80
1
79
24

42

7
2
5
5

19
3
16
16

50
13
37
37

_
-

1
1
1

4

_

32
32
2
30

20
14
3
n
6

21
5
16
n

19
14
2
12
5

5
4
3
1
1

16
15
9
6
1

24
24
24

1

1

9

3
2
1
1
1

4
4
2
2

1
1
1

12
9

-

-

2
2

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

4

27

18
9

n
11
1

18
42
14 — S~
2
6
_
12
36
4

n
-

_
-

7
35
6
32

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

_
4

-

-

-

4
4

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

19

7

1

5

1

1

3
3
3
-

4
4
4
-

14

4
4

36
5
1
4
31

18
14
8
6
4

7
4
2
2
3

1
1
1
_
-

-

7

34

-

5
1
1
.
4

5
4
4
1
1

-

-

_
14
7
-

7

-

4

17

.
17

J

-

7
e
s

_
34
?2

2

.

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_

_

1
1
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

69
69
62
7

21
21
21
_
-

29
29
29

-

7

10

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
973318 0 - 51 - 2

-

.

-

1.23

Shipping clerks ........................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .......... ............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing.............. .......

1

_

-

Janitors, porters and cleaners (men) ........
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade ....................
Finance * * ................. .......
Services .........................

3

-

9
9
14
8
5
3
6
6

-

.

n
11
11

_
-

-

-

10
9
1
8
1

45
45
45
-

-

9

-

5
4
3
0
2

25
24
21
3
1

90
86
62
24
4

7

7
2
5

11
11
8
3

26
21
1
20
5

5
5
2
3

39
39
30
9

77
77
76
1
-

3
3
1
2
•

5
4
1
1

Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

Table a -4:

Custodial, Waneltoulinq, and Skipping Occupation^ - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on
an area basis in Dayton, Ohio, by industry division, June 1951)
N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation and industry division

Num e
br
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
i
$
$
A e a e Under $
vrg
hul
ory
0.75 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 i1.75 1 1.80
e rig $
a nns
ago
and
0.75
.iS .85
.90 .
95 1 .0 0 1.05 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1.35 1.40 1.45 1 . 5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 jover
$
1

Shinoinf-and-receiving clerks .............
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods .......... ...........
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing................... . •

300
148

124
24
152

33
43

Wholesale trade ...................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ..........
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods.......... ........
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * .................
Wholesale trade ...................
Truck drivers, light (under l£ tons) ........
Manufacturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing ................... .
Wholesale trade...... ............ .

1 .8 6 8

1,456
1,043
413
412
215
105
236
—
114
58

1.50
1.60

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

-

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
type)...............................
Manufacturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
P l JIi
lK f
* » T»,TTTTT--T»,TTTTt--.
Wholesale trade ...................

423
176
68

108
247
87
89
17
307
57
250

131
85

-

1.45
1.48
1.52
1 .3 6
1 .3 6

1.43
1.39
1.47
1.59
1.34
1 .2 0

-

-

-

-

-

4

-!

4

-

-

3

6

3

3
3
3

4
3
3
-

56
33
9
24
23

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

18
18
18
-

4

-

4
12
10
10

1

-

17

2
10

1

8

104
64

64
25

-

6

22

1

2

9

6
1

-

9

5

58
40

3
39

1.49
1.48
1.61
1.39
1.51
1.52
1.57
1.37
1.47
1.59
1.45
1.51

66

-

4
4
4

-

-

_
-

_
-

1

2

1

5

560

1 .6 1

534
26

1.62
1.44

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......
Manufacturing .......................

127
99

1.62
1.62

230

1.33
1.44

Watchmen.................. .
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods......... ........
Nonmanufacturing... •.................
Services .............. ..... .
1/
2/
*
**

172
236

36
5
8
13

1 .5 0
1 .2 0
1 .0 0

.89

_
_
-

i

_

_
-

-

7
4
4
3

_
-

-

20
20

6
6

8
1

-

7
38

1
2

26

9

2

20
6

15 0
122

_
-

_
3

32

-

21

37
85
28

207
85
43
42

127
88

-

71
17
39
36

6

2

12 2

3
3
3

12

5
3

-

2
1

-

i
6 |
-|
-j
6 |

_

12
1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

12

7h
5
5

10
1

22
16
6

_

_
-

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

6

16
4
4

3

9

3
-

-

-

6
6

12

-

-

9
-

-

-

19
19

62

12

62
-

7
-

62

2
1
1

8
6

!

3

1

2
2

2
1
1
1

-

1

-

-

5
5

2

8

5

-

-

1
1

2

8

1

-

-

4

2

8

4

-

5

3

-

115

677

12 1

112

660

104
31
73
17
17

94
18
3
3
-

631
29
17
17
-

-

1
1

*
“

1

i
_i
1

4
4

35
15

2
2

20

-

131

23
7
3
4
16

15
7
7

31
15
7

8

16

10
6

7

2
8
2

33

2
2

31
6

18
7

25

11

-

3
3
-

32 __ y.
32
41
-

1
1

14

-

13
26

1

13 i
6 —
8

5
5

2

r
i
i
i

22
21

21
1
1

1

8

58
40

29
24
24
5

4
4
4
-

16
12
8

4
4

_
26

5

5
-

_
-

4
-

26
-

14
14
-

3
3
-

_
_

2
2

21
2

9

-

-

-

2

l

9

4
4

25
25

-

_
-

6

-

4
4

37
27

13
13.
-

-

332
332
-

-

3
3
-

-

17
16

5
5
54

13
8

_
-

2
2
2

48
48
48

_
-

-

_

_

12
6
6

119
62

15
6

10

5

30
18
18

1

9
4

-

22

-

1
1

j
i
_I
h
-!

_
-

14
14
14

24
15
15
9

-

1

1

-j
-

20

4h

13

4

-

20

13

33

-

-

20

13

2
3

-

12

6

_

_

_

-

-

-

1?
12

1
1

-

-

-

3

6
2
2

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1

4
-

-

14

-

_

_

14
-

-

4
4
4

15
14
14

-

1

6
6

19
18
18

19
19
-

-

10
8

_
-

3

3

15

2

2

5
5

10

2

31
31
31

12
12

18
15
15

2
2
2

16
16

3

-

-

8
1

10

101
101

23 _ 9
_ _

-

\
1
6

i
1

6

2
2

-

9

135
4
j
131
131

9

7
-

169
127
82
45
42
42
-

9
4

6

-

5

-

2

-

26
8

23
18
14
4
5

i

j

-

2

24
24
24

-

4

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited tc workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (
t
luding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




46

1

1 .5 6

Truckers, power (fork-lift) ........ .......
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

32

15

1.55

63

46

116

1

1 .3 6

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type).........................
Nonmanufacturing .....................

6

4
3

15

1 .6 1

1.57
1.39
1.47
1.31

i
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including
4 tens) ............................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ............. ••...
Nonmanufacturing.....................
l+- -+-tA *
i.n i.ft
....
Wholesale trade ...................
Services ..................... .

12
2

1

17

-

NOTE:

11
11

8

5
6

3
5

_

1

-

9
3

_

-

9

16

4

4

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due
to the amission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of
retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all indus­
tries combined and for the nonmanufacturing industry group.

1
1

_
_

Table B-332

1/

2/
3/

^ a u n A iie i,

Q evuuU

11

1/

The study covered ferrous foundries with more than 20 workers.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table B-35: M & c U l H & U f

O + u i u & t s U & i 1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex 2/

Number
o
f
wres
okr

A e a e Under 1.30 1.35 1.40 i.4 5 i.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 I .9 5 $
vrg
$
2.40
2.00 S
2.10 $
2
2.05 $
2.15 * .2 0 $
2.25 ■2.30 $
hul
ory
and
and
crns $
aig
1.30 under
over
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1 . 6 5 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.40
$
j

Machinery 4/
Assemblers, class A ..........................
Assemblers, class B ..........................
Electricians, maintenance .....................
Inspectors, class A .................. .......
Janitors ................................. . •

1,107
1,230
258
464
538

2.17
1.94
2.04
2.04
1.41

7
67

8
31

2
19

5
13
1
342

4
14
55

11
4
11
21

10
5
2
3

2
6
“

1
38
2
4

9
132
2
22
~

59
36
3
26
—

28
298
14
44
-

52
11
9
12
-

18
37
15
5
~

8
71
20
6
~

7
35
5
9

1
162
107
72
—

25
51
58
95
•

71 407
132
83
23
138
*
*

184
56
—

176
33 |
-!
-|
1

1
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A j / Total.........................
it
Time ........................
Incentive.....................
.........
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class A ........................
Engine-lathe operators, class A ..............
Grinding-machine operators, class A ............
Milling-machine operators, class A ............
no
f ' t n t c cIass A __
lnmsi.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand-screw
machine), class A ...................... ..

1,043
700
343
20

2.00
1.98
2.03
1.85

145
121
122
75
22

2.06
1.88
1.99
1.86
1*98

169

1.88

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- l
- 1
!

_
-

_
-

_
-

8
1

15 ! 1 4
3
n
15
2j 1

32
18
14
-

1

!

7
9
7

8

2
2

1

1
3
7

i

l
5
-

3I
2 i

4

73
57
16
class

72
25
47
A-

45
25
20
-

63
24
39
1

40
25
15
1

19
4
6
2
8

9
28
4
2

34
3
7
4

14
3
4
-

35
5
1

2
7
3

12

2

80
66 137
56
37
95
75
56
27
67 ! 50 129
33
59
21
8
16
10
8
39
23
2
1
4
5 Drill-press operators, radial,
14
10
14
8
1

_

_

12
3
9
2

11

26

31
11
*
■

12
24
17
2

3
14
7
2
1

1
12
11
6
4

3
7
11
1

67

7

7

1

65
50
15
2

3

3

4

2j
1i
10
3
1

1

70
52
18
_
~
7
2

4i

10

See footnotes at end of table




Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

M cu U u H & U f, ! )n A tU frU e d if

Table B-35:

-

G o H ,ti* U 4 eA

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex 2/

$
Average Under s
hourly
1 .6 5 1 .7 0
earnings $
and
1 .6 5 under
2/
1 .7 0 1 .7 5

Number
of
workers

$
1 .7 5
1 .8 0

1 .8 0

$
1 .8 5

$
1 .9 0

$
1 .9 5

$
$
2 . CO 2 .0 5

$
2 .1 0

$
2 .1 5

$
2 .2 0

$
2 .2 5

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .3 5

$
2 .4 0

2 .4 5

$
2 .5 0

$ .5 5
2

|
$
$
2 .6 0 2 .6 5

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

2 .4 0

2 .4 5

2 .5 0

2 .5 5

2 .6 0

2 .6 5

2 .7 0

55
35
20
-

353
85
268
-

185
11
174
-

275
10
265
-

254
78
176
-

215
133
82
-

104
104

15
2
13
1

1
1
-

6
6
-

5
1
13
10
1

62
51
97
40
1

62
40
54
10

49
28
1 47
16
9

16
20
48
a
80

32
6
13
6
131

21

96

12

18

23

25

%

$
2 -7 0
fc. IV
ann
over

s

Machinery ij - Continued
i
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B
Total ...........................
T i m e .........................
Incentive.....................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B .....
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class B ^ .........................
Engine-lathe operators, class B .............
Grinding-machine opera tot1
*, class B ........
Milling-machine operators, c h a ^ B ..........
Screw-machine operators, automatie^clas s B .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (inclrnlng^hand-screv
machine), class B ...............

%
J:

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C J / Total ................................
j:
T i m e .............................
Incentive.........................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C ............................ .
Engine-lathe operators, class C .................
Grinding-machine operators, class C .............
Milling-machine operators, class C ..............
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C ....

Machine-tool operators, production, class C (women)
Machine-tool operators, tool r o o m ...... ...........
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) ...
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) .....
Truckers,hand ..................................... .
Welders, hand, class B ............... ..............

1 .9 4
1 .8 7
1 .9 7
1 .6 4

1 ,9 4 4
606
1 ,3 3 8
31
477
154
399
256
243

1 .9 1
1 .8 6
1 .9 8
1 .9 7
2 .0 8

257

1 .9 2

2
_
2

2
2
-

"
2

_

_
-

.1
1
.
-

“

-

4
8
_
4

_
1
-

-

14
9
5
_

25
13
12
6

5
.
5
-

4

• 21
7
!
1 14
j
5

1 j
9 1
2
- 1
1
2 j/

3

28
3i
24
4 /
2
2;
3 >'
/

26
22 {
4 ,
-

- j/

13
2
2 ;
1 |
4 !
2!
- !
-

4 !
1
- !
3
-

6 |

4

43
40
3
2

16 :
5
2 I
1 0 :

4

1 j
/ %

10

215
! 60
, 54 ! 47
:
6 ; 1 68
„ i
|
!
12 i

!

16
140
4 | 10
26
3
8
5
4
2

8

!
1 .6 1
138** S J - 5 3
132
81
50
26
51
a

1 .5 1
1 .6 2
1 .7 1
1 .7 5
1 .7 0

296
407
735
776
676
331

1 .6 0
2. U
2 .4 0
2 .2 4
1 .5 8
1 .9 8

!
37 1
1
1
43
7

5
- !
6
2
i

15

1 !

- !
-

2 1 J/

j

31 !
28 !

i

3 1

/

I ,

3
1
5
2

9
_
-

_
3
-

/_
/

-

-

3
3
/

3
_
_
11
-

16
2 I
2
w lO

4

_
-

1
_
-

_
-

10
—

8
■
*

81
~

3
3

12
1
11

23
1
22

12
12

2
1
1
1

1
2
-

1
2
9
-

1
2
1
18
1

1
3
8

1
1
1

2
-

11
4
2

6
5
2
1

8
3
6

15
11
20

46
16
31

-

-

2
7
5
3
11

-

-

94
12
38
-

96
23
67
1

5

3

29

2

1

8

2
1
1

1
3

1
“

14
2
5
1

14
3
3
1
10

«.
2
-

1
2
1

1
2

S^85

9

20
1
-

18
-

30
1
-

544
”

21
1

-

3
2
1

_

-

2
-

2
^ 2

-

12

31 |
24 !
7 I

1 !
1
24

6
3
3

251
18 i
7 !

t

1
-

1
|

l
/

1
- :
1

29 |
28 !

3
-

2

1

1

2 |
2
1

14
2
12

41
6
35

2
2
-

79

-

13

212

3
-

3

2
2

_

5

3
-

-

-

3
_
1
2
~

•

59
35
no
2

62
19
282
1

1
1
-

“

9
112
194
4

6 /4 9 5
24
2

1

1

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shops

S
Inspectors, class A ........ ........................
Janitors ............................................

11
44

Machine-tool operators, production, class A 5/ ....
Engine-lathe operators, class A .................
Grinding-machine operators, class A ........ .

367
47
31

Machine-tool operators, production, class B 5/ ....
Grinding-machine operators, class B .............

U6

Tool-and-die makers (tool-end-die jobbing shops) ...

2 .5 l/
1*T
2 /5
02
£ .2 5
f .

jf

1 .8 5

1.88
y 5

2 .4 0

Z /4 4

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

15
-

-

-

2
1
-

14
2
-

42
8
2

10
-

43
3
1

2

2

4

18

19

78

1

1

-

-

3

8

12

16

-

-

-

2

2

3

11

16

5

2

26
3
-

_

4

55
27

22
3

21

1

2

1

23

35

_

2
2

12

'jlK s

7

19

19
8"

53

31

'xv 2

6

-

-

-

-

59

212

83

57

9

13

-

112

1/ The study covered establishments with more than20 workers in the machinery (non-electrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by
the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with 8 or more workers were surveyed.
2/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
4 / Includes jobbing shops producing machine-tool accessories for which separate data are also presented.
5/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
6/ For distribution
workers earning $2.40 and over see tool-and-die makers listed under "Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shops" above.
2/ Includes 2 worker: nt $0.80 and under $0.85; 1 at $0.95 - $1.00; 4 at $1.00 - $1.05; 11 at $1.10 - $1.15; 12 at $1.25 - $1.30; 4 at $1.35 - $1.40; and 10 at $1.40 and under $1.45.




-

9




12

M a cU iH & U f ! )M & U jU sU ed.

Table B-35:

ERRATA SHEET
for
BULLETIN NO. 10*1

G o 4 ttiH 4 4 * d

1/ -

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and sex 2 /

N um ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$

$

$

Under 1.3 0
1.35
and
f
e
under
L.30
1.^5 1 J *0

$

$

$

1 .1*0

1.1*5

1.50

1.55

$
I .60

l.*5

1.50

1.55

1.6 0

1.65

25
13

1*
9
5

21

28
2*

38
36

l
l

2
2

$

$
1.70

1.65

_1*7Q__ 1.75

$

$

$

1.8 0

1.85

$
1.90

$

1.75

1.95

s
2.00

s
2 .0 5

1.8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

2.05

2 .1 0

2.15

2.20

2.25

2.30

215
*7

55
35

353
85

185

275

25 *

15

1

6

2

10

268

17*

265

78
176

215
133

10 *

11

82

10 *

13

1

6

2

62

62

32

37

5

_

3

6

1
1

$

2 .1 0

$
$
2.15 2.20

$

2 .2 5

$
$
2.30 2 ,*0

2 .1*0

and
over

$
Machinery * / - Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
c Im b H *>/«
Total ..............................
Time ............................
Incentive .......................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, clans B ............................
TTog-lns- lathe operators , cl ass B ...............
Grindsng-maohlna operatoTR y clsss " ...........
R
Mill 1 n g . m a n M n a operator", class B ............
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B . .
.
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including handecrev mechina), class B .....................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5/s Total .............................
Tine ............................
Incentive ......................
Drill-press operators, single- and tultiplespindie, class C .......... .......... .
Engine-lathe operators, class C ...............
Grinding-machine operators, class C ...........
Milling-machine operators, class C ........
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class C •..
Machine-tool operators, production, class C
(women) ................... ...... .
Machine-tool operators. tool room ................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die Jobbing shops) •
Tool-and-die makers (other than Jobbing shops) ...
Truckers, band ...................................
Welders, hand, class B ...........................

2

2

1,9>A

1.9*

606
1,338
31

1.97
1 .6*

2

2

1.91

2

5

1 .8?

1
1

*77
15*
399
256

1.98
1.97

21*3

1.92

.

270
138

1 .6 1

Ul

1.53
1.70

6

12
6

J

3

k
8

1
9

1
1

1*

2

2

8
6
1
1*

13

26
22
1*

1*
1

*3

60

1*0
3
2

5*

6
12

168

20

16
5
2
10

16
1*
3
5

1*0
10
26
8

5
1

2.0 8

257

5

7
1*

132

81
50

26
51

1*1

296
1*07
735
77 6

676

1 .8 6

1.51

1 .6 2

1.71
1.75
1.70

1.6 0
2 .11*
2 .1*0

2
2
2

35

1*

1*
2
12

3

2
2

21
21

1
1

_

21*
3
1

1*

5

2

3
-

-

9

2

3

_

3
3
12
-

2

6

31

29

28
3

28
1

16
2
2

1*

1*

10

1

25

31

1

18
7

2*
7

1
21*

10

1

1*
2
5

-

1

185

9

.

1

3

1.58
1.98

131

*3
7

12

18

23

25

15

1

2
1
1

12
1
11

23

12

3

2

3

2

1
22

12

3

2

3

2

1
1

2

1
2

_

_

_

8

1

-

-

-

-

-

96
23
67

59
35

62

110

282

1

2

1

*0

1*7

*0
1

5*

16

10

2

l
*

13

10
1

8

21

96

1*
1
3

3

6
3
3

3

2
1

Ik
3
3
1
10

1
2

2

1

2
1
1

-

1

2

1

-

20
1

18

30

11

6
5
2

7
5

1
2

1
1

11

10

8

81

5*1*

3

_

2.2*

331

9

16
20
*8
*1
80

*9

28

51
97

*

1

21
1

1
2

_

1
2

13

6

6
2

1

9
-

1
2
1
18
1

8

15

11

1*6
16

9*

3

38

1

2

-

1

_

2

1

3

_

2

3

6

20

31

11

79

2

13

212

12

5

19

Q
132 5/*95
2*
19*
b

2

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing Shops

11

2.51

1*1*

1.21

Machine-tool operators, production, class A
•••
EngIns-laths oparators, clans A
Grinding-machine operators, class A ...........

367
*7

2.02

31

2.25

Machine-tool operators, production, class B
•••
Grinding-machine operators, class B ...........

1*
16
12
*

1.85

Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die Jobbing
shops) .........................................

735

210
.*

Inspectors, class A
.tttf tttrt,ttTtttf t
Janitors TT. tTt.tt T ,..1TT.tTttrttttTt tttf ,tTTf ttlrf

l/
by the
2/
3/
*/
5/
6/
7/

U

30

I/ 1 1

10
2

2.15

1
*

3

8

2

2

_

1
*
3

1.88
_

1*
2

*2
8
2

10

1

1

3

11

18
8

19

78

12
2

5

55

3

27

1

2

16

2

*3

26
3

22

21

30

50

52

3
7

2

7

10

i

*
1
16

12

2
2

23

35

19

112 SA95

The study covered establishments v ith more than 20 workers in the machinery (non-electrical) industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19*5 sdition) prepared
Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with 8 or more workers were surveyed.
Study limited to m en workers except where otherwise indicated.
Occupational Wage Surrey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABQR
Includes Jobbing shops producing machine-tool accessaries for which separate data are also presented.
Bureau of labor Statistics
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shewn separately.
Includes 295 workers at $2.*0 and under $2.50; 66 at $2.50 - $2.60; 125 at $2.60 - $2.70; 9 at $2.70 and over,
Includes 1 worker at $2.*0 - $2.1*5; 5 at $2.1*5 - $2.50; 3 at $2,50 - $2.55; 2 at $2 .6 5 and over.




CjAaoesuf S to re d y

Table B-5^1:

1/
2/

13

The etudy covered grocery stores with 8 or more workers.
Hours reflect the workweeks for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

Table B -7538:• A u t o

R e fuU'i' S U o f t A .

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation

2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$

$

Under 1.00 1.05
and
$
under
1.00 1.05 1.10

$

1.10

$
1.15

$

1.20

$
1.25

$

1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

1.60

$
1.70

$
1.80

$
1.90

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.50 1.60 1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

37
34
3
4
3

16
7
9
3

1

3
9

$

1.50

%

s

%

s

2.00 2.10 2.20

$

$

2.30

2.40

2.40

2.50

$

$

$

2.50

2.60

2.60

2.70

4

3

14

4

3

14
3

1

16

3
28

1
2

16

28

-

-

2.70
and
over

$

Body repairmen, metal:

Total ..........................
Time .........................
Incentive .................. ...................................
Greasers: Total ..... ..................................
Time ........................... ...... .
Incentive................... ..........
Mechanics, automotive, class A: Total .................
Time ........ ..
Incentive ..............................
Mechanics, automotive, class B .................... ...................................................
Washers , automobile ........................................................................... ......................... ...

159
81
78
50
25
25
383

130
253
60
61

1.95
1.76
2.14
1.45
1.23

.

.

-

-

8
8

4

3

4

3
3

2
2
6

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

9

2
2

2

-

3
3

-

6

•
-

8

-

-

_

-

2

2

37
30 !
7
14
4

1.68

-

-

-

3

-

-

1.87
1.64
1.98
1.49
1.14

-

6

2

5

5

8
8

8

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

5

5

-

-

-

6

8
6

4

~

-

1

8
6
6

-

1/23

6
4
14

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 5 workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 7538)
Industrial Classification Manual (194? edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S.
y
Includes 2 workers at $0.75 - $0.80; 6 workers at $0.80 - $0.85; 8 workers at $0.85 - $0.90; and 7 workers




6

1
-

4

2

25
19

6

3
3

.

20

84
69
15
7
4

l
19

1

-

60
27
33

6
-

7
3
4
_

_

11

.

-

9

11
1

2
1

“

13

11

3

9

8

4
7

3

9

5

_
25
_

25

1

_
_

18
18

1
3

1
6
6
1

_
1

19
3
16
-

1
10
10
-

and motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used (Group 551) as defined in the Standard
Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
at $0.90 - $0.95.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

14

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect July 1, 1951.)

Table C-15:

BuildUuj, Gon&tkuctiou

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours .
per
week

12.500
2.500
2.890
2.500

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Journeymen
Asbestos workers • • • . . ...... • • • • • • • ...
Boilermakers .......... .. ............
Cement finishers........ ............
Electricians (inside wiremen) ..........
Elevator constructors ...............
Engineers - Power equipment operators:
Building construction and heavy
construction*
Heavy equipment*
Cranes (all types) ...........
Power shovels.............. .
Derricks ..................
Medium equipments
Power graders .......... ................
Rollers ................ ..
Trench machines ..........................................
Light equipment:
Bulldozers . . . . ............................................
Pumps, over 4-inch ..................................
Compressors ...................................................
Glazie rs

TTTTTTTT. . . . TTTTT. t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lathers
Machinists .................................. .......
Marble setters...................... ..........................................
Mosaic and terrazzo workers ..................................
P a in t e r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Swing and scaffold ...... .. .... ••••••
S p ra y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P lu m b e rs . . . f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rodmen and reinforcers .............. ..
Roofers, composition . . . . ........ •••• • • •

Roofers, slate and tile.... ..........
Sheet-metal workers .................
Sign painters ......................
Steam fitters ................... .
Stonemasons
Structural-iron workers ............................................
T i le

la y e r s

...............................

2.780
2.780
2.780

40
40
40

2.500
2.370
2.500

40
40
40

2.500
2.370
2.370
2.280
2.670
2.525
2.620
2.620
2.370
2.480
2.780
2.640
2.640
2.770
2.670
2.620
2.500
2.280
2.500
2.500
2.530
2.620
2.890
2.670
2.620

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.950
1.680
1.785
1.740
2.080
1.950
1.680
1.740
2.230
1.740

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Helpers and laborers
Bricklayers' tenders and hod carriers . . . . .
Building laborers ..........................................................
Elevator constructors' helpers ...........................
Marble setters' helpers ..............
Painters' helpers, sign and pictorial ..........
Plasterers' tenders....................................... ..
Plumbers' laborers.......................................................
Terrazzo workers' helpers................. ............. ..
Base grinders ...................................................••••
Tile layers' helpers ...................................................




Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Semimachine shops*
Mixers, overmen ..................
$1,555
Oven feeders and dumpers, molders,
dividers, henchmen, wrapping-machine
set-up men, panners......... ....
1.505
Doughnut-machine operators.........
1.465
Mixers' helpers............. .
1.455
Wrapping-machine helpers, other helpers,
packers ............................... 1.340
leers, wrappers, packers (women) .....
1.170
Bread and cake - Machine shops*
Mixers, ovenmen ........ ...........
1.555
Benchmen, machinemen, head wrappers, head
shippers, moldermen, panners, oven
feeders and dumpers, set-up men,
dividers......... .............
1.505
Doughnut-machine operators............
1.465
Mixers' helpers ................ .....
1.455
Flour blenders ......... .
1.435
Pan greasers .................... . 1.390
Wrappers and packers, bread rackers,
wrapping-machine helpers, other
helpers ............
1.340
leers, wrappers, and packers (women) . .. 1.170
.
Crackers and cookies*
Agreement A:
1.300
Machine captains ............ .
Mixers:
1.100
First 2 weeks.......... .....
1.150
2 to 4 weeks ................
After 1 month ...............
1.275
Packers and wrappers:
First 2 weeks.......... .
.880
2 to 4 weeks .............. .
1.010
After 1 month ............
Handlers, shippers*
First 2 weeks ................
1.050
2 to 4 weeks ............... . 1.100
After 1 month... .... .
1.220
Agreement B*
Head mixers, after 12 months .......
1.615
Senior machinemen.............. .
1.590
Head machinemen (packing and bandoven), mixers, band-oven operators
and machinemen, mixers, receiving
clerks .....................
1.565
Band-oven laminators, after 6 months,
cello-bag machine operators .....
1.505
1.480
Ovenmen, reel ............ ......
Car and truck checkers ...........
1.480
Cuttermen .....................
1.470
Receiving clerks' helpers, reliefmen,
band-oven men, junior machinemen,
syrup mixers, stores stockmen ....
1.450
Shredded wheat cookers ... ...... .
1.445
Reel ovenmen's helpers, car loaders
1.420
and unloaders............ .
Pan feeders ....................
1.395

o
C
O

Structural steel, iron and bridge....
Paperhangers
Pictorial painters ..................
Plasterers

2 .3 2 0

2.890
2.550

Table C-205*

Table C-205:

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

£ah&Ue4, - Continued
Rate
per
hour

Classification

Crackers and cookies: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
H.P.A. machinemen, assistant machinemen, packing and band-oven ..... $1,390
1.380
Truck loaders and order pickers ...
Power truck operators.......... . 1.360
1.350
Icing mixers ........... .......
1.320
Preparation men .............. .
1.310
Stockmen .....................
Utensil working machine operators,
1.300
carton loaders ...............
Paper cuttermen ................
1.295
1.280
Assortment stockmen ............
Grinders, dough feeders, spray
machinemen, sack cleaners
1.270
1.230
Floormen .....................
Timekeepers ...................
1.140
Women on base rate .............
.940

Table C-27:

40
Classification
40
40
40

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

PAdntiiUp

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops*
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bindery womens
Agreement A ..................
$1,240
Group leaders ...............
1.340
1.220
Agreement B ........
Agreement C*
Miscellaneous binding........
1.165
1.250
Feeders
..........
Senior grade group leaders .....
1.425
Senior grade repair and relief . . 1.325
•
Bookbinders*
Agreement A ....... ...........
2.325
Agreement B ...................
2.175
Agreement C ... ...............
2.215
Head job setters ............
2.415
Job setters ............ ....
2.315
Compositors, hand:
2.560
Agreement A ....................
2.525
Electrotypers ....................
2.550
Machine operators*
2.560
Agreement A ... ....... ........
Agreement B ..... ....... .
2.525
Machine tenders (machinists)*
2.560
Agreement A ..... ...... .......
Agreement B .............. ....
2.525

3?l
37*
37*
37*

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C:

Table C-27*

Psuntinp - Continued

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table C-27*

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops* - Continued
Mailers*
Job setters .................. $2,315
Machine operators ..............
2.215
Take-off (women) ...... .........
1.375
Ticket writers, label sorters
(women) ...... .............. 1.325
1.300
Feeders (women) ...............
Photoengravers ............. .....
2.667
Press assistants and feeders*
Agreement A*
Job presses*
2-color Miehle or Miller ....
1.930
2.030
2-color Claybourn ..........
1.930
Pattern presses .............
Web presses*
1.930
80-page .................
32-page Cottrell rotary....
1.985
192-page Goss; 96-page; 64-page
double 2-color (front-end
2.040
man); 32-page Goss .......
Double 5-color, 2- and 5- color
with steam drum; 48-page
perfecting McKee; McKee and
5- color Claybourn ........ 2.090
Agreement B:
1.980
Cylinder ..................
Job feeders ................
1.540
2.030
2-color cylinder ............
Pressmen:
Agreement A*
Job press department*
Miehle, Miller presses ..••••.. 2.465
2-color Claybourn ••••••••••••• 2.585
Kelly presses............
2.385
Pattern press department*
Scott and Webendorfer
offset ................
2.385
Web press division:
Double 5-color, 2- and 5- color
presses with steam drums;
48-page perfecting McKee •••• 2.600
192-page Goss; 64-page double
2.520
2-color presses .........
96-page presses ...........
2.625
32-page Goss .............
2.655
McKee and 5-color Claybourn . . 2.705
.
80-page presses; 32-page
2.570
Cottrell rotary .........
Pressmen-in-charge - double 5color; 2- and 5- color with
steam drums; 48-page
perfecting McKee........
2.815
Pressmen-in-charge - 192-page
Goss; 64-page double 22.760
color.............. .




Union W age Scales - Continued

pAintinff - Continued

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table C-41*

37*
37*

3
37*

37*
37*
37*
37*

37*
37*

Agreement B*
Cylinder*
Automatic job presses:
Kelly, vertical, Miller,
etc,, up to and including
22 x 28 in............ $2,405
2.430
Over 22 x 28 in. ...... .
2-color................ 2.480
Offset presses*
Single-color*
14 x 20; LSB - 17 x 22; LSN 22 x 30; web - 17 x 22;
22 x 29 in............
2.405
EL - 22 X 34; ISQ - 26 X 40;
LSS - 35 x 45; LSJ - 42 x
58; LSF - 50 x 68 in..... 2.430
2-color*
ISR - 26 x 40; LSI - 35 x 45;
LSK - 42 x 58; LSG - 50 x
68 in................
2.555
Platen presses*
1 or 2 job...............
2.175
3 job...................
2.285
4 or 5 job ...............
2.405
Agreement C*
Cylinder presses*
Cylinder or automatic job •••••• 2.405
2.430
Cylinder over 22 x 28 in.....
2.480
2-color ..................
Agreement D:
Rotary presses ............... 2.435

37*

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

37*
37*

Classification

First 6 months ................ .
7 to 12 months ............... «...
After 1 year....................

Table C-421*

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,400
1.450
1.500

51
51
51

37*
37*

2.445
2.657
2.445
2.657
2.445

37*

2.657

37*
40

1.900
2.050
2.600

2.800
2.480

2.613
2.613
2.746
2.455
2.595

Matobinnck Sbliaebd <md dtelpete.
Classification

Newspapers *
Compositors, hand - day work......
Compositors, hand - night work ....
Machine operators - day work.... .
Machine operators - night work . ....
.
Machine tenders (machinists) - day
work..................... .
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work.... ..................
Mailers - day work ............
Mailers - night work ......... .
PhotoengraverB - day work..... .
Photoengravers - night work ... .
Pressmen, web presses - day work •
.
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Pressmen-in-charge - day work ...
Pressmen-in-charge - night work . .
.
Stereotypers - day work....... .
Stereotypers - night work ......

Qfi&uUuuf. CntfUotfeel

1-man cars and busses:

Pressmen* - Continued

37*
37*
37*

Jlocat

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops* - Continued

37*
37*

15

Air reduction............... ....
Beer... .... ......... ........ ..
Helpers.............. ........
Special delivery ............... .
Building*
Construction:
Agreement A*
Concrete-mixer truck*
2 and 3 yd............. .
4 yd. and over......... .
Euclid truck, under 12 yd. . . .
..
Six-wheeler-semitrailer.....
Straight flat truck, dump truck
and winch truck.... .
Agreement B*
Ready-mix truck*.
2 yd..................
3 yd..................
4 yd. and over......... .
Materialt
Job.............
Lumber...........
Helpers
Plumbing .........
Helpers ..... .
Furniture - Retail ......
Helpers...... .
General - Freight......
Grocery ..............
Chain store .......• •
••
Wholesale (after 30 days)
Meat*
Agreement A* ..........
Helpers.... .
Agreement B (after 30 days)
Paper ...... ....... .
Railway express:
- ton .....
*
Over * ton .
.
Rendering ......
Tobacco ... .

Rate
per
hour

$1,520
1*625
1.625
1.625

1.790

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40

1.790

40
40
40
40

1.730

40

1.600
1.650

40
40
40

1.840
1.900

1.700
1.450
1.530
1.350
1.480

1.330
1.600

1.600
1.510
1.430
1.415
1.310
1.380

1.280
1.465
1 .5 0 0

1.614
1.673
1.375
1.400

40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48
40
48
40
48
48
48
40
40
40
40
40

16

D:

Entrance Rates

Table D-l: M d S U J t U U f t £ * U > U i H C e d a t e A

plant

'lU&dz&U

Percent of plant 2/ workej'3 in estab].ishments with
snecified miniLmum rates m Manufactiirinz
Nondurable
An
Durable
Whole­ Retan Serv­
Minimum rate (in cents) Indusgoods
zoods
Public
sale
tries
Establishmej t with ns
utnities* trade trade ices
y
2/
21-250 251 or 21-250 251 or
workers more workers more
workers
workers

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices
3>i^e4& H tieU P/unUUatU

Table *-i»

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift in -

An manufaciturinz industries 1/
All establishments... .
60 or under......... .
Over 60 and under 65 .....
65 .................
Over 65 and under 70 .....
7 0 .................
Over 70 and under 75 ...
7 5 .................
Over 75 and under 80 ...
8 0 .................
Over 80 and under 85 ...
85 .................
Over 85 and under 90 .....
90 .................
Over 90 and under 95 .....
9 5 .................
Over 95 and under 100 ••••
100................
Over 100 and under 105 . .
.
105 ........................
Over 105 and under 110 ...

n o .........................
Over no and under n 5 . .«
n s .........................
Over n 5 and under 120 . .
.

100.0
2.4
1.0
.7
-

.4
.
1
5.2
2.1
.3
.5
3.8
2.2
.
1
2.5
2.2
3.9
4.1
2.4
.9

1 .5

120 .........................
Over 120 and under 125 •••
125 ............... * ........
Over 125 and under 130 . .
.
130................
Over 130 and under 135 . .
.
135................
Over 135 and under 140 ...
U O ................
Over 140 and under 145 • •
•
145 ................
Over 145 and under 150 .
..

22.4
1.8
1.7
1.4
n.i
•2
3.3
•2
.
3
13.3
1.7
1.2
.2

Establishments with no
established minimum ••••
Information not
avanable ...........

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.5
6.7
9.4
3.1
8.2
n.5
-

7.0
23.2
10.6

.6
.
5
-

.9
2.4
2.3
1.3
1.8
2.6
1.5
30.6
.6
2.6
.8
18.4
-

5 .5

100.0

100.0

_
n.4
n.i
5.0
3.1
22.2
6.8
-

3.5
6.1
18.3
5.0
-

100.0

7.7
6.2

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

12.9

-

4.1
4.0
2.9
27.5
5.8

100.0

2.2
2.4
n.4
15.5

19.9
2.0
5.0
27,9
5.4
4.7
2.3
16.7

-

-

7.8

2.2

-

17.7
-

-

12.4
-

-

-

-

6.4
3.3
2.5

1.9
1.7

-

.9

4.3

2.6

14.5

1.0

5.4

-

5.9

6.2

15.0

2.3

“

-

-

“

26.1

14.8

—

-

-

Durable
goods

Percent of workers on
extra shifts, an
-

20,7
Receiving shift
differentials .....
Uniform cents
(per hour) .....
Under 5 cents . .
.
5 cents ......
Over 5 and under
10 cents ....
10 cents .....
Over 10 cents .
..

-

3.7

All
industries

2d 3d or 2d 3d or
shift other shift other
shift
shift

•
2

-

2.1
-

Shift differential

-

.6
21.5
2.5
2.0
-

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




8.8
6.8
9.5

-

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other
than watchmen.
2/ Other than office workers.
1/ Excludes data for finance, insurance and real estate.
A/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of
2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the
data for "all industries."
*

43.6
8.9
7.2
-

Machinetool
accessories
(jobbing
shoos)
2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or 2d 3d or
other shift other shift other
shift other shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
Ferrous Machinery
Nondurable foundries
2/
goods

Uniform percent­
age ..........
5 percent .....
Over 5 and under
10 percent ....
10 percent ....
Over 10
percent .....
Other..........
Receiving no shift
differential .....

i/
2/
1/
A/

2t 21.0
7

1|2 l?f
?

7,9 z6t
?

6.8 2?1?

0.6

*t?

20.4

2.7 20.7

1.2 19.6

7.9 26.3

6.8 25.3

.6

4.9

-

3.9
.
3
.9

2.0
.
2

1.0
-

9.3
.9
3.0

5.8 22.1
•
.
8
.7

6.8
.
_

1.0
.
2

.
3

4.2
_
.
5

_
_

1.5
1.1
.
1

.
6
.4
.8

.6
.6
1.4
•4
- (A/)

4.5
.
3
.6

. 1/9.3 1/4.7 (A/)
9
.8
. 12.0 2.1
3
3.9
-

_
.
3

3.7

.3

.7
.

16.5
14.2
.6
1.7
-

2.4
.
1
.3

.7 18.3
.4 15.4
.
1
.2
(A/)

.7
2.2
-

.2 10.3
10.1

-

2.0
2.0

4.0
4.0

_
-

24.3
20.2

-

.
1
.
1

.
2
_

_

_
_

_

1.2
2.9

.
1
•2

.
7

-

-

(A/)

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

(A/) (A/) (A/)
.3 (A/)

. (A/)
3

.3

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Includes jobbing shops producing machine-tool accessories also shown separately.
Predominate shift differential was 6 cents.
lass than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-2

17

S c h e d u le d h ilje e JiLf Jlo u frl
'
r

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S i /

Weekly hours

All establishments ............. .

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

E M P L O Y E D IN —

M anufactu re

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

100.0

Under 35 hours ...................
35 hours ........................
Over 35 and under 37^ hours ........ .
37£ hours .......................
Over 37£ and under 40 hours.........
40 hours ........................
Over 40 hours and under 44 hours .....
44 hours..... ...... ...... ......
Over 44 and under 43 hours......... .
48 hours ........................
Over 43 hours ....................

0.3
.7
.
3
3.1
1.0
75.0
3.3
9.9
.
5
1.1
-

Information not available .......... .

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.3

0.2
0.6
1.2
.4
1.6 i 0.6 i
3.6
.8 ! 1.9
1.1
90.8 i 71.6
84.3
_
3.3
4.9
20.0
8.7
2.9
_
_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

.4

-

1.1

Public
utili­
ties*

100.0

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

2/

Durable
goods

All

u

100.0

100.0

_
88.7
2.9
8.4
_

3.5
7.6
29.2
1.6
55.5
1.7
.
9
-

.8
-

-

“

45.3

-

-

53.4
•
.
5

All
indus­
tries.

Services

Finance**

100.0
_

100.0
(a/)
0.1
•
1
1.3
j
,
.
2
j 71.7
.
5
;
! 2.9
!
; 9.1
j
j 8.5
5.6
1

“
4.2
58.2
26.6
11.0
-

-

100.0

100.0

1.6
- I
80.4
2.0
9.0
2.7
4.2
-

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

2/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

85.1
1.6
6.9
1.0
5.4

_
0.5
7.3
63.8
3.5
16.4
8.5
-

_
63.1
13.5
23.4

_
78.2
8.6
2.4
2.2
2.4
6.2

_
2.1
39.4
6.1
18.5
31.8
2.1

-

.
0.1

-

-

_
-

j

!
i

Non­
durable
goods

.
1

1/ Data relate to women workers,
2/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the data far
"all industries,"
3/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent,
* Transportation (excluding railroads), camraunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table E-3: fifrid jf^olldcUfl

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Number of paid holidays

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade
!7

Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

! loo.o
j --- ■
—

9 7 .3
-

98.5

98.3
“

99.0
-

9 6 .4
-

100.0

100.0
-

i

-

-

.3
.9
89.6
.3
4 .8

.4
1 .4
95.2

.6
2 .0
94 .5

-

-

1 .5

1 .2

All
indus­
tries

y

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

V
i

All establishments ................

Establishments providing paid
holidays ...................... .
1 day........................
2 days .......... .............
3 days .......................
4 days ..................................................................... ..
5 days................................ ......................................................
6 days ............................................................ ..........................
days .............................................................................. ...
7 days .......................................................................................
8 days ............... ........
10 days ................. .... .
11 days .......................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays ........ ....... ......

.9
.
1
.4
2 .7

-

!
1

-

!

-

-

-

6 8 .8
—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

96.9

63 .2

9 6 .8

71.8

6 8 .8

-

-

-

-

-

1 .6
1 .6

10 .8
11.2
1 .5
4 .7

-

2.1
-

33.2

-

1 .5

1 .7

1 .0

3 .6

-

-

-

31.2

1 00.0 ’ 100.0
!
9 0 .0 ! 9 5 .8
.1 i
.4
.6
1 .6
2 .0
.6
.5
83.2
90 .6
.2

3.4
(2/>
1 0 .0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100*.0

96.2
-

9 4 .2

74.6

80.9

63 .7

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

2 .6
.8
9 1 .5

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

.

87.0

4 5 .6

76.9

6 3 .7

2.6
-

1.3
.
-

7 .2

-

29.0
-

4 .0

-

_
_
_
-

4 .2

3 .8

5 .8

2 5 .4

19.1

36.3

-

_

-

_

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the data for
"all industries,"
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shown separately,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
3/ Less than ,05 of 1 percent,
Bureau of Labor Statistics
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18

P a id V&xx U IohA (rf-obm al Pao4aIAAoh A )

Table E-4:

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN -

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Vacation policy

All
indus­
tries .

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

All
indus­
tries

Services

Finance**

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

5.0

7.5

38.9

29.7

16.4

4.7

7.8
30.0
1.1

29.7

5.7
10.7
-

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ....

60.5

66.1

77.2

42.6

55.6

51.6

86.2

37.3

9.9

5.5

Under 1 week ..................
1 week .......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..........
2 weeks ......................

.7
53.5
.7
.
6

.
6
64.2
.
3
1.0

.
5
75.2
1.5

.
8
40.8
1.0
-

.

-

55.6
-

51.6
-

39.5

33.9

22.8

57.4

44.4

43.4

100.0

100.0

39.9

y

All

U

Durable

gos
od

Non­
durable

gos
od

|

Retail
trade

Services

17
!

i

All establishments ................

6 months of service

Establishments with no paid vacations

...

-

1.5

3.7
5.7
.
5
-

3.4
1.5
.
6
-

3.1
1.9

6.9
-

3.3
34.0
-

13.8

62.7

90.1

94.5

99.3

76.5

96.8

13.0

31.6

77.&

-

-

*

2.8

_

-

-

-

95.0

92.5

61.1

70.3

97.6

97.7

97.4

94.1

87.1

89.9

95.0
.
2
1.8
.
6

96.4
.
3
1.0
-

90.1

50.3

81.1

4.5
2.8

54.8
7.8
31.5
-

36.8
-

8.3
-

5.9

12.9

10.1

-

83.6

1 year of service
...............

93.4

99.2

99.0

99.8

1 week ........................................................................................
Over l and under 2 weeks...........................
2 weeks .....................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........

27.3

19.9

15.6

29.0

-

-

-

-

-

71.1
-

79.3
-

83.4
-

70.8
-

60.1
-

34.2
65.8
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

1.6

.
8

1.0

.
2

-

-

Establishments with paid vacations ......

98.4

99.2

99.0

99.8

100.0

1 week.......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks........ .
2 weeks......... .............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks .............. ........

16.6
.1
81.5
.
2

13.4
•
2
85.6
-

11.5
.
2
87.3
-

17.4
82.4
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

1.6

•8

1.0

.
2

Establishments with paid vacations ....

98.4

99.2

99.0

99.8

100.0

1 week .......................
2 weeks..... *................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.........
3 weeks ...................... .

7.5
84.7
.
1
6.1

3.3
86.5
9.4

2.5
92.7
3.8

5.1
73.5

.8
99.2
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . .
.

1.6

.
8

1.0

.
2

Establishments with paid vacations

-

-

86.3
-

44.9
-

89.3
.
5
6.5
.
5

.7

23.5

3.2

2.4

2.3

2.6

100.0

99.3

76.5

96.8

97.6

97.7

97.4

94.1

87.1

89.9

6.6
•4
93.0
-

25.1
74.9
-

.4
98.9
-

30.7
41.4
4.4

81.5
3.8
10.9
.
6
-

89.1
4.2
3.7
.
6
-

90.2
5.3
2.2
-

85.9
8.7
2.8
-

25.4
11.1
57.6
-

33.4
_
53.7
-

76.8
_
11.1
2.0
-

-

-

.7

23.5

3.2

2.4

2.3

2.6

5.9

12.9

10.1

100.0

99.3

76.5

96.8

97.6

97.7

97.4

94.1

87.1

89.9

20.9
79.1
-

.4
97.2
1.7
-

19.9
52.2

3.7
89.9
2.6
1.4

2.3
91.6
2.5
1.3

8.5
84.3
2.8
1.8

86.3
7.8
-

20.7
66.4

52.5
35.4

4.4

7.1
86.1
2.4
1.2

-

2.0

.7

23.5

3.2

2.4

2.3

2.6

5.9

12.9

10.1

-

-

-

2 years of service

10 yearB of service

_

21.2

_

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the data
for "all industries."
2/
*
**

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Vage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

19

P a id B lo k jH&Goe (fyob m o l P axmaU Io h A)

Table E-5:

PE C N O P A T W R E S E P O E IN
R E T F L N O K R ML Y D —

P R E T O O F E W R E S E P O E IN
E C N F F IC O K R M L Y D —
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments
6
months of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e .... ......... ..
3 days ........................... ,
5 days ................... .
6 d a y s ..... ..................... .
10 d a y s .......................... .
Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave ....,
Information, not a v a i l a b l e ....... ....
1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................
5 days ........... ................ .
6 days ........................... .
7 days ........................... ,
10 days .................. ........ .
12 days .......................... .
15 d a y s ..... ............ ........ .
20 days ............................
30 days .......... ........ ....... .
Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave ....
Information not available ........... .
2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................

5 days ................. .
6 days...... ...............
7 days .................... .
8 days..... .............. ,
10 days ................... .
15 days .......................................................... .

days ................... .
days.... ..... ..........
30 days ....................

20
24

Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave ....
Information not a v a i l a b l e .... .......
10 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .............. .
5 days ........................... .
6 days ...........................
7 days ........................... .
8 days ............... ............ .
10 days .......................... .
30 days .................. ........ .
50 days ............ ......... .
55 days .......................... .
65 days ........ .................. .
Establishments with no formal
provisions for paid sick leave ....
Information not a v a i l a b l e ...... .....

Mn fa tu in
au c r g

A
ll
in u
d s­
trie
s

A
ll

Dra le
ub
gos
od

Nn
o­
d ra le
ub
gos
od

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
ties*
*

Wo ­
h le
sa
le
tra e
d

100.0

100.0

R il
eta
tra e
d

F a ce**
in n
100.0

Mn fa tu eau c r

A
ll
in u
d s­
trie
s
2/

100.0

1/

A
ll

Dra le
ub
gos
od

Nn
o­
d ra le
ub
gos
od

100.0

S rv s
e ice

100.0

100.0

100.0

Pb
u lic
u
tili­
tie
s*

25.8
—
11.0
3.1
11.7

28.3
6.4
4.5
17.4

20.7
20.7
-

81.8
.9

72.8
1.4

69.7
2.0

79.3

23.4
5.8
.4
.7
9.1
.9
5.5
.7
.3

29.9
3.2
.3
.7
14.2
1.4
8.6
1.1
.4

31.2
1.2
.5
1.0
13.1
2.1
12.7

27.4
7.3
16.6

75.7
.9

68.7
1.4

66.8
2.0

72.6

23.4
5.8
.4
.7
(2/)
9.1
5.5
.7
.9
.3

29.9
3.2
.3
.7
(2/)
14.2
8.6
1.1
1.4
.4

31.2
1.1
.5
1.0
.1
13.1
12.7

27.4
7.3
_
16.6
3.5

75.7
.9

68.7
1.4

66.8
2.0

24.2
5.8
.4
.7

29.9
3.2
.3
.7
(2/0
14.2
10.4
1.1

31.2
1.1
.5
1.0
.1
13.1
15.4
-

68.7
1.4

66.3
2.0

(2/)

9.1
6.8
.7
-

.7

74.9
.9

.6

-

2.1
•6

-

-

100.0

14.8
1.9
12.9
_
-

1.7
1.7
_
-

85.2
-

98.3

34.7
27.2
3.2
4.3

_
_
_
100.0

-

.

-

-

-

3.5

-

-

1.7
1.7
.
_
-

65.3
~

98.3
-

34.7
27.2
3.2
_
4.3
-

1.7
1.7
_
-

_
100.0
-

-

72.6
“
27.4
7.3
—
16.6
3.5
72.6

-

100.0
“

-

_
-

100.0

-

_
-

-

l

|

0.8
- 1
*4
.4

0.8
— |
.3 i
1
.5 *

0.7
- j
!
I
.7

1.1
- ]
1.1
_
-

99.3
-

98.9
*
*

100.0
-

1.1
.1
_
.7
_

.7
_
_
.7
_
_
-

2.6
.3
_
.8
_
_
1.5

.
_
_
_
_
_
100.0
-

1
!
I

.7
-1
.2
.7
.2

.3

98.1
-

98.9

99.3
-

97.4
~

1.9
.7
.1
.2

1.1
.1
_
_
_
.7
_
.3

.7
_
_
.7
_
-

2.6
.3
_
_
.8
_
1.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65.3

98.3
•

98.1
-

98.9
-

99.3
-

97.4
-

34.7
27.2
3.2
_

1.7
1.7
_

2.4
.7
.1
.2

1.1
.1
_

2.6
.3

4.3
-

_
_
_

.7

_
_

.7
_

_
_

.7
_
_

.2

.7
_
_
.3

97.6

98.9

99.3

*

**

-

100.0
“

_
-

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65.3

98.3
‘

100.0

—
_
_
-

99.2 j 99.2
|
_

.
_
-

_
_
_

100.0

|
!
i
;

.7
(2/>
.2

.5
(2/)

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

_

.8
_
1.5
97.4

R
etail
tra e
d

S rv s
e ice

y

100.0

i
17.3
.1
7.7
2.0
7.5

Wo ­
h le
sa
le
tra e
d

100.0 !
--------- j -------9.9 !
_ i
9.9 ;
-

26.4
16.6
3.5 1
6.3 1
_ |
1
73.6
26.4
16.6
3.5
4.6
1.7
_
-

-

100.0
-

73.6
-

-

26.4
16.6
3.5

.
_
_

4.6
_
1.7

_
_
_

-

100.0

i

90.1

_

-

73.6

100.0

—
_
100.0
-

_
_
_
_
_
100.0
_
_
_
_
_
_
100.0
-

_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
100.0

■*
‘

'

"

1/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the data for
"all industries".
2/ Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
2/ Loss than 0.05 of 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
* Transportation (excluding railroads) communication, and other public utilities.
,
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance,
real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




20

Table E-6 j

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN -

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Type of bonus

All
indus­
tries

All

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

1/

All
indus­
tries

All

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

£/

All establishments ................... .

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses
.................. ........

33.3

22.0

28. 1*

8A

3.8

71A

88.2

25.7

31.0

25 A

2 9 .1

12.6

Christmas or year-end ..............
Profit-sharing.... ......... .......
O t h e r .............. ................

21*.7
i*.9
5.0

17 A
5.7
•6

2 3 .1
5A
A

5A
6.3

3.0
1.3

1*9.7
12.9
8.8

33.8
.1
5^.3

25.7
1 .5
1.8

26.7
i*.o
1.2

21.0
1*.3
.9

21*.9
3.8
.9

7.2
5 .7

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ......... .....................

66.7

78.0

71.6

9 1.6

28.6

11.8

71*.3

69.0

7U .6

70.9

87 A

J
j

1.0

-

96.2

1.0

Public
utili­
ties*

W hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

•

Services

1/

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.2

51A

5 9 .1

2.9
A.3

1*0. 5
9.9
.9

5 9.1
1.2
5 .7

92.8

48.6

1*0.9

l/ Although data could not "be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in the data for
"all industries."
2/ Includes data for industries not shown separately.
3 / Unduplicated totals.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table E-7s

9#A44AOiU>e and P-ettM O tl PJ&HA>

P E R C E N T O F O F F IC E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Type of plan

P E R C E N T OF P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

1/

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Services

1/

All establishments ......... ...........

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 3/ .................... .

81.7

87.5

93.8

7»*.0

91.9

63.8

95 A

1*9A

8 5.1

93.1

93.6

9 1A

Life Insurance ............. .........
Health insurance .....................
Hospitalization .....................
Retirement pension ................. .

70.3
69.2
65.3
56.1

7 1.9
82.1
81.9
61.3

92.6
92.6
91.7
72 .1

7 2 .1
59.9
61.0
38.6

91.6
37.2
3.7
89.I

56.6
57.7
1*1.2
10.5

82.3
61*.1
63.6
89.7

1*8.2
1*2.5
1*2.5
1.3

82.8
76.2
77.8
59.7

91.8
87.7
91.2
68.0

92.5
91.7
88.7
73.0

89.2
73 A
100.0
50.2

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ........................

18.3

12.5

6.2

26.0

8 .1

36.2

U.6

50.6

11*.9

6.9

6A

8.6

16 .1

f
i

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

83.9

60.7

1*1*.5

79.3
1*2.2
13 A
70.8

1*2.9
5^.9
39.5
10.1*

38A
26.0
26.0
10.9

39.3

55.5

Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade due to the omission of 2 large department stores, the remainder of retail trade Is appropriately represented in the data for
"all industries."
2/ Includes data for industries other than those shewn separately.
3/ Uraluplicated totals.
Occupational Wage Survey, Dayton, Ohio, June 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), cammunication, and other public utilities.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




21

Appendix

Scope

With the exception of the union scale of rates, infor­
mation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupation,
uniform job descriptions were used; these are available upon
request.

Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical,
(b) professional and technical,
(c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4). The covered industry groupings are: manufac­
turing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained 3n a repre­
sentative group of establishments in each of these industry di­
visions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in th study.
e

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs
were studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the
area covered were determined separately for each indtistry (see
‘ ollowing table). Although size limits frequently varied from
f
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were Included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions.

A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied In order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




id Method of Survey

of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.

The earnings Information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including com­
missions for salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are
reported as for office clerical* they refer to the work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time
salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations
have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers
presented refers to the estimated total employment in all es­
tablishments within the scope of the study and not to the number
actually surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers,
i.e., those hired to work the establishments full-time schedule
for the given occupational classification.

Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
som amount of time off without any provision for a waiting peri­
od preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also exclude
health insurance even though it is paid for by employers. Health
insurance Is included, however, under tabulations for insurance
and pension plans.

22
ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MUTCR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN DAYTCN, OHIO l/, AND NUMBER
STUDIED BY THE BUREAU CF IABCR STATISTICS, JUNE 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Nuxriber of
establi shments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations were
surveyed on an area basis

-

628
247
155
92
381

196
84
49
35
112

116,600
90,100
68,800
21,300
26,500

90,330
76,110
59,490
16,620
14,220

8,850
6,000
4,300
1,700
2,850

21
21
21
21
21

35
66
182
26
72

17
22
29
18
26

5,500
3,200
12,000
1,700
4,100

4,690
1,370
4,330
1,430
2,400

1,030
320
430
750
320

21
8/ 21
8
8
5

10
81
52
30
64

10
37
18
10
24

3,460
44,531
2,367
1,979
1,986

3,460
42,891
1,271
1,603
994

160
3,265
60
80

21
21
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
Wholesale trade
Retail trade 2 / ......................... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate «•••••••
Services 6/
Industries in which occupations were surveyed
on an industry basis 7/
Ferrous foundries •
Machinery ........................... .
Machine-tool accessories
Grocery stores •••••••«••••..... •
Automobile repair shops *•«••••«••••*••«••••«•<>«••

in

3/ Daytcn tfetropolitan Area (Montgomery and Greene Counties)«
2/ Total establlsfament employment•
2/ Matalworking; lumber, fbrniture and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturinga
Lj Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing
and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products*
j>/ Although data could not be shown separately for retail trade in the numbered tables due to omission of 2 large department stores,
the remainder of retail trade is appropriately represented in data for all industries combined and for the nonmanufacturing industry
group.
6/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
2 / Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




23
Page
number

Page
number
Asbestos w o r k e r (building construction) ...............................
14
A s s e m b l e r (machinery) ....................................
H
Bench hand (bakeries) .................... • •................... ........
14
14
Benchman (bakeries) .................... ..•••••••••••........••••.•••••
Biller, machine ..................................
3
Bindery w oman (printing) .......... ...... •.• • • • • • • • • • ...........
14
13
Bo d y repairman, me t a l (auto repair s h o p s ) ................. •••••••••••
Boilermaker (building construction) ................ • •.........
14
Bookbinder (printing) .............................. ............... .....
14Bookkeeper, hand ......................................................
3, 4
Bookkeeping-machine o p e r a t o r ........
4
Bricklayer (building construction)
14
B utcher (grocery stores) ............................. ........... .......
13
Calculating-machine o p e r a t o r ................................................. 4
Carpenter (building construction) .........................•••••........
14
Carpenter, maintenance * ............. ................. ...... ........ • •
7
Cement f i nisher (building construction) ....................... ...... .
14
C h eckeivcashier (grocery stores) .................. ...... .............
13
C h i p p e r and grinder (ferrous foundries) ............... ...••••....•••
12
C leaner ..........................................................
Clerk, a c c o u n t i n g ........ ......... •••••................. ............. .
3, 4
Clerk, f i l e .......... ........... ........ ............. .
3, 4
3, 5
Clerk, g e n e r a l .......... .............. •••••..... • • • • • •••••••........
Clerk, grocery (grocery stores)
.....•••••••••..........
13
Clerk, meat (grocery stores) ....... ••••••..... ............ ..........•
13
Clerk, o r d e r ......... ................. •••••••.............. .......... .
3, 5
3, 5
Clerk, payroll ............. ............. •••••..... ••••••••••.•••.....
Compositor, hand (printing) .................................... .......
15
Coremaker, hand (ferrous f o u n d r i e s ) ......... ....................... .
12
Crane operator, electric bridge ..............................
9
D r a ftsman ................ ......................... ...... ...............
7
Drill-press operator, r a d i a l (machinery) ............... ...........
11
D r ill-press operator, s ingle- and multiplespindle (machinery) ................................
11
Duplicating-machine o p e r a t o r .........
5
14
E l e c t r i c i a n (building construction) .......... .............. ...... .
Electrician, m a i n t e n a n c e .......... ............... ...... ...... •••••••
7
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .«••••••...... ••••••..... ••••••
11
E l e c t r o t y p e r (printing) ....................................
14
Elevator constructor (building construction) •••••••••••....... .
Engineer, stationary
..........•••••••••..•••••
7
Engine-lathe operator ( m a c h i n e r y ) ........ .................. ........
11, 12
F e e d e r (bakeries) .......... ........... ....................... .
14
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r ............................ .................
7
Flour blender ( b a k e r i e s ) ......... ........................ . ........... .
14
Fruit ma n (grocery stores) ........ .....................................
13
G l a z i e r (building c o n s t r u c t i o n ) ...... ........... ........... ...........
14
G r e a s e r (auto repair shops)
.......... .........••••••••...... .
13
Grinding-machine opera t o r ( m a c h i n e r y ) .................................
11, 12
G u a r d .......... ....... ...........................••• • • •.......... .
9
H e lper (bakeries) •••••••••••••••••........ •••••••........•••••••••••
14
14
H e l p e r (building construction) ........... ..........
Helper, motortruck d r iver ••••.................................... ..
15
Helper, trades, maintenance •••••••••••••.•••••••............••••••••
7
Inspector (machinery) .... • ••••........ .......................... ..
11, 12
9
J a n i t o r .......... ........ ••••...... .......................... .
J a n itor (machinery) ........................................ ......••••••
11* 12
K e y - p u n c h operator
.................... .............. ••••••••••••••
5
La b o r e r (building construction) ........................ ••••••..... .
14
Lather (building construction) ....................................• ••••
14
Machine o perator (printing) ............................... ••••••••••••
14, 15
M a c h i n e t e n d e r (machinist), ( p r i n t i n g ) ............. ............ ......
14, 1 5
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery)
11, 12
M a c h i n e - t o o l operator, t o o l r o o m ........ ............... .
8
M a c h i n e - t o o l operator, t o o l r oom (machinery)
11
Machinist (building c o n s t r u c t i o n ) ....................... .
14
Machinist, maintenance .......... .......................... 8
Mailer (printing) .................. .............. .
15
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ................ .....................
8
Ma r b l e setter (building construction) .................................
14




9

14

13
Mechanic, automotive (auto re p a ir shops) ......................................... ..
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)
8
Mechanic, maintenance
............................................................................. •••••••
8
Milling-machine operator (machinery)
......................................................
H
Millwright ........................................................................................................................
8
14
Mixer (bakeries) ...........••••••••............ ...................................... .............. ....
Holder (bakeries) ........................................ ........................................................... ..
14
12
Molder, flo o r (ferrous foundries) ....................................................................
Holder, machine (ferrous fo u n d rie s ).............................. •••••«.............. ••••
12
Motortruck driver ........................................... •••••••....................................
15
Nurse, in d u strial (reg istered ) ••••••........................................................ ..
7
Office b o y .......................... ••••..........••••••••.......... ............ ................ .................
3
Office g i r l .....................................................................................................
5
O iler ........................................................................................ ..........................................
8
15
Operator (lo c a l t r a n s i t ) ..............••••••............ ................................................ ..
Order f i l l e r ............. ............................................................................ .....................
9
Overman (bakeries)
.............................. ............ ••••••
14
Packer ..................................................................................................................
9
Packer ( b a k e r ie s ).................................. . . . . . . . ............ •«••••••••••••••••••
14
P ain ter (building construction) •••.•••••••••«••••••••••••••••••••••
14P ain ter, maintenance ................................................. ..................
8
Paperhanger (building construction) ...................
•••••••••••
14
Patternmaker, wood (ferrous foundries)
12
Photoengraver (printing) ..................................... 15
P ic to ria l painter (building construction) •.••••••••••••••••••••••••
14
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance......... .................................................. ..
8
P lasterer (building construction) ...................... .................
14
Plumber (building construction) ...............
14
Plumber, maintenance .......................... ..
8
P o r t e r ....................................................................... ..................................9
14
Power equipment operator (building con struction) ........... ..........................
Press a ssista n t (printing) ....................................................
15
Press feeder (printing) ............... .................................................................... ..
15
Pressman (prin tin g) ................... ••••••.................................... 15
9
Receiving c l e r k ................. ..................................................................... .....................
Rodman (building c o n s tr u c tio n )........... ...............................
14
Roofer (building construction) ................................................................ ............
14
Sere w ^nachine operator, automatic (m ach in ery).................. ••••••••••••••
^
11
S ecretary ......... ............ ........................... ..........................................
5
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries) ....................
12
Sheet-m etalworker (building construction) •••••••••••••••••«••••••.
14
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ...................
8
•••••••••••••••
9
Shipping cle rk ..............
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ..................................................................
10
Sign p ain ter (building c o n s tr u c tio n )...............
14
Steam f i t t e r (building con struction)
14
Stenographer, g e n e r a l..............
5
Stereotyper (prin tin g) ...................
15
13
Stock boy (grocery s t o r e s ) ................ ............................. ...................................... ..
Stock h a n d le r.............•.•..••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••
10
Stonemason (building construction) ........... ...................• • • ..o .....• • • .• •
14
S tructural-iron w orker (building c o n s tr u c tio n )........... ................................
14
Svdtchboard o p e r a to r .........................
6
Switchboard o perator-recep tionist ............................................... •••••.............
6
Tabulating-machine operator ........................ ..................................................... ..
3, 6
Terrazzo worker (building construction) ...........................................................
14
H ie la y e r (building construction) .....................................................................
14
Tool-and-die m ak er.........................
8
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)
11, 12
Trans crib ing-machine operator, g e n e r a l....................................................
6
Truck d r i v e r .....................
10
Trucker, hand .............................................
10
Trucker, hand (machinery)
......... .••••••••••.................
11
Urucksr, power ••••••••••••••..................••••»••••••..................................... ..
10
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery)
H
Typist ........................................... ................................................................................ ..
6
viashe r , automobile (auto rep air shops) ..................................................... ..
13
W
atchm an ........................ ................................................................... •••••............ ..
10
Welder, hand (m achinery).............................................. •••»•••••••••••••••••
U
Wrapper (bakeries) ................................................................ ..................................
14


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