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Occupational Wage Survey
NEW YORK, NEW YORK
April

1951

Bulletin No. I037

U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
M A U R I C E J. T O B I N , S E C R E T A R Y




Bureau of La bor S t a t i s t i c s
Ewan C la g u e , C o m m iss io n er
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, X . S. Government Printing Office
T
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 45 cents




Contents

Page
number

INTRODUCTION........................................................................

1

NEW YORK C I T Y .......................................................................
Labor and Industry in New York City •...... .................... .................

*
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ................................ .........................
Cross-Industry Occupations .......................
Office clerical occupations ...... .............................. . ............
Professional and technical occupations ••• ............................. .... •
Maintenance and power plant occupations
.... *................
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations .......... ..................
Characteristic Industry Occupations........................
Straight-time average earnings ........ .................................
Union wage scales ••••.................... .......................... .........
Minimum Entrance Rates ...........................

1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
4

SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES.......................................................

4

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis 1. Office occupations ..............
2. Professional and technical occupations•*.....................................
3. Maintenance and power plant occupations................. .................. .
4. Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations...................... •••••
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis 5. Men’s and boys’ suits and coats .................. ..........................
6. Women’s and misses’ dresses ............................ .....................
7. Men’s and boys’ dress suits and nightwear.................. ............
3. Paints and varnishes ............................................. ...........
9. Women’s cement-process shoes (conventional lasted) ..........................
10. Children’s stitchdown shoes ......... .................................
11. Machinery industries.......... ......................... *................. ..
12. Banking ........ .......................... .......................... .......
13. Insurance carriers ........................................................ ..
14. Power laundries ...................... ...........................
15. Auto repair shops ............................................ .............
Union wage scales for selected occupations 16. Bakeries ....................... ............................. ...............
17. Building construction......... ..............................
18. Building service employees........... ................................
19. Local transit operating employees..... ..................................
20* Malt l i q u o r s ......... ......................................................
21. Motortruck drivers and helpers ............ .....................
22. Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel ......................................
23. Printing....................................................................
24. Stevedoring........ ................................................... . ••••
Entrance rates 25. Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s .......... ........................ .
Wage practices 26. Shift differential provisions........ .................................... .
27. Scheduled weekly hours ................................. .....................
28. Paid h olidays...................
29. Paid vacations..................... .............. ...................
30. Paid sick leave ........................................... ..................
31* Nonproduction bo n u s e s ...... ................................................
32. Insurance and pension p l a n s ....... .........................................

5
14
15
IS
21
23
24
24
25
25
26
27
23
29
29
30
30
31
31
31
31
32
34
34
35
35
36
36'
37
33
39
39

APPENDIX:
A - Scope and method of s u r v e y .......... .............. •...... ..................
B - Descriptions of occupations studied ..........................................

40
41

I N D E X ...............................................................................

59

In tro d u c tio n 2 /
The New York area is one of several important industrial centers
in which the
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted occupational wage surveys during early 1951* 2 / Occupa­
tions that are common to a variety
of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were
studied on a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized -in
compiling earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office clerical; (b) p r o ­
fessional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and
shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs (tables 1 through U) separate data
have been provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations that are characteristic of particular, important, local industries have
been studied as heretofore on an industry basis, within the framework of the community sur­
vey* 2 / Union scales are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for
several industries
or trades in w h ich the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements,
and the contract or minimum rates are indicative
of prevailing pay practice, Bata have also bee n collected and suimnarized on shift operations
and differentials,
hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as vacation and sick leave
allowances, paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.

N e w Y o r k C ity
New York, the Nation*s largest city and seat of the United Nations, was in a flour­
ishing state of economic activity
in April 1951* Factory employment stood at a near-record
high of almost 1 million workers. Department store sales were 7 percent above the previous
year,
nearly 3 million tons of shipping passed through the country*s busiest port during the
month, and 2 ,0 2 5 new dwelling units were started. Wages and prices of goods and services were
at peak levels during the period.
Labor and Industry in New Y ork City

The fiv e boroughs comprising New York City contain the world*s largest concentrated
population o f over 7^ m illio n people. T otal employment, including government, approximated
3 m illion in A pril 1951*
Of the estimated 1 million workers
in New York manufacturing establishments, more
than two-thirds were employed in nondurable goods industries. The most important among these
was apparel manufacturing with over 300,000 employees. A n additional 119,000 were engaged in
printing and publishing,
and over 8 0 ,0 0 0 worked in food manufacturing and processing indus­
tries. Among durable goods industries,
metalworking establishments accounted for about a
third of the 305>0OO workers. Establishments manufacturing machinery, other than electrical,
employed about 3 6 ,0 0 0 workers.

l/ Prepared in the Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial Relations by Theodore Allison
under the direction of Paul E. Warwick, Regional W a g e Analyst, Region II, New York, N. Y.
The planning and central direction of the program was the responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen
and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general supervision of Harry Ober,
Chief of the Branch of
Industry Wage Studies.
2/ Other areas studied are: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, and San Francisco-Oakland.
Similar studies were conducted in 1950 In Buffalo, Denver, Philadelphia,
and San FranciscoOakland.
3/ See Appendix^A for discussion of scope and method of survey.




In New York, world-famed as a shopping center, nearly 387*000 persons were employed
In retail stores
In April 1951. About 270,000 additional workers were found in wholesale
outlets. Banking,
insurance,
and real estate firms, comprising the city's equally famous
financial community,
had close to 300,000 workers. A labor force of 276,000 was utilized in
transportation (other than railroads),
communication, and other public utilities.
Firms
supplying personal and business services,
technical services, and entertainment gave employ­
ment to 322,000 workers. Central offices of more than 600 firms having branch establishments
throughout the country are concentrated in New York. They employed
over 96,000 persons.
Labor organizations represented nearly four out of five plant workers in the indus­
tries and establishment size groups studied. The extent of organization varied among the
major industry divisions. In the utilities division over nine-tenths
of the plant workers
were employed in establishments having written contracts with unions. In manufacturing indus­
tries the proportion was about nine-tenths, and in retail trade over one-half. The degree of
unionization among office workers was considerably less than among plant workers.
Slightly
more than one-eighth were employed In films having union contracts covering office workers.
Few union agreements covering office workers were negotiated in wholesale trade,
finance,
insurance,
and real estate and service industries. However,
over two-thirds of the office
workers in the utilities division and over two-fifths in retail trade were organized.

O c c u p a tio n a l W a g e

S tru c tu re

Collective bargaining in 195° resulted in very few general wage
increases before
the outbreak of hostilities in Korea. Those settlements which w ere concluded emphasized n o n ­
wage benefits, such as pension, health,
and welfare plans. During the early spring of 1950,
for example, pension plans were written into contracts covering about 2 8 ,0 0 0 gas and elec­
trical utilities workers, while 8,000 New York bricklayers became
the first in their craft
anywhere in the United States to obtain a pension fund.
Bargaining action increased sharply after July, however, w i t h the acceleration of
Inflationary forces and the anticipation of the imposition of wage controls. Twelve thousand
building service employees were the first large group to achieve a substantial wage gain. The
number of general wage increases granted in the final quarter of 19 5 0 was particularly large.
In October, increases of more than 6 percent were given in the maritime industry. Soon there­
after a gain of 1 2 ^ cents an hour was made by more than 30*000 men's clothing workers,
and
39*000 women's coat and suit workers received increases ranging up to $5 a week. These were
followed b y an 8 |-percent "package” increase for 66,000 women's dress workers. About 2^,000
utilities workers received a 5-cent increase in December.
January brought further gains for large numbers of w o r k e r s . Among these were a
1 0 -cent increase for 5*000 employees in the women's higher-priced footwear industry,
gains
ranging from 10 cents to 12-% cents for 8 ,2 0 0 employees of the city's privately-owned bus
lines,
and increases for 2 0 ,0 0 0 laundry employees amounting to 7 ? cents for inside workers,
and
to $5 a w e e k for drivers and helpers. For the entire post-Korean period, the average
across-the-board wage increase for plant workers in New York City was approximately 9 cents
an hour, with the majority ranging from 7 cents to 1 0 | cents.
Approximately three out of four plant and office workers were employed in estab­
lishments having formalized rate structures. Slightly more than a third of the plant workers
were employed in plants having a single rate fhr each job, whereas two-fifths worked in plants
where rate Ganges were established for each occupation. Nearly all clerical rate structures
examined were
in the form of rate ranges. No formal rate plans existed in establishments
employing approximately one-fourth of all workers studied.
In these firms each worker was
paid according to individual merit or other considerations rather than on a job basis.

2.

In the following discussion of wages,
two main occupational groupings are distin­
guished?
(l) cross-Industry occupations,
such as office clerical occupations;
professional
and technical occupations;
maintenance occupations; and custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations; and (2) characteristic industry occupations* The first group of occupations was
studied on a cross-industry "basis from euployer payroll records. These occupations are usually
found in all or a number of industries.
In general,
the characteristic industry occupations
are peculiar to a specific Industry. As indicated "below, straight-time average rates or earn­
ings are shown for some industries; union scales are shown for others.
Cross-Industry Occupations
Office clerical occupations— Of the 26 office occupations in which women's salaries
were studied, 22 showed average weekly earnings higher than $45 (table l). Among the largest
occupational groups of women office workers studied, average weekly earnings for secretaries
were $62.50, general stenographers received $49^50, and routine typists received $1*1. Average
salaries were concentrated in the narrow range between $47 and $5 2 a w e e k for 1 5 occupations
such as Coitqptome ter operators,
accounting clerks, general clerks, and switchboard operators.
The lowest paying office Jobs reported for women were those of routine file clerk and office
girl, w h o averaged $ 38 and $35.50*
respectively. The highest paid w o men employees
studied
received $ 6 5 p er w e e k as hand bookkeepers. For one-third of the jobs studied the highest
average salaries were received b y employees of central offices. A generally high level, of
clerical earnings was also found in wholesale trade and transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public utilities.
Highest average salaries
for men office workers were those of private secretaries
and hand bookkeepers.
These groups received $74.50 and $73.50* respectively.
Office boys,
at $35.50, were the lowest paid. Clerks' salaries averaged $60 a week, with accounting clerks
receiving $59;
payroll clerks, $62.50; and order clerks, $6 3 . The level of earnings for men
in offices of manufacturing plants was generally higher than in nonmanufacturing industries.
Average weekly salaries of N e w York City office workers in April 1951 were generally
between 4 and 10 percent higher than those reported in comparable jobs studied in the Bureau's
previous salary survey of February 1950. The most common increases reported were from $1.50
to $3 per week.

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time average earnings
Following the practice for the cross-Industry occupations previously discussed, the
wage or salary
information for the
following 1 1 industries reflects straight-time earnings
derived from employer payroll records.
Men's and boys' suits and coats— Average earnings
for m e n employed In most of the
job categories studied in the men's clothing industry exceeded $1.90 an hour. Payment on an
incentive basis is prevalent in the Industry, w i t h the result that earnings of more than $3
a n hour were reported for many individual workers. M e n employed as sewing-machine operators
averaged $1.93 working on trousers and $2.14 working on coats. Hand finish pressers of coats
also earned $2.14 on the average; machine finish pressers earned $2.11.
Cutters and markers
averaged $2.48 a n hour.
W o m e n employed
In coat fabrication as hand sewers averaged $1.47 sewing buttons,
$1.55 making buttonholes, and $1.27 in finishing operations. Hand sewers working on trousers
averaged $ 1 . 3 6 a n hour. W o m e n machine operators sewing coats received $1.64 an hour and those
sewing trousers received $ 1 . 5 9 (table 5 ).
Women's and misses' dresses— In August 1950,
data were collected for the New York
City women's and misses' dress industry,
in which the preponderance
of establishments are
organized b y the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (AFL). Average hourly earnings
ranged from 97 cents for thread trimmers to $3.02 a n hour for hand pressers (table 6 ). Hand
sewers averaged $1.45. Sewing-machine operators working on the section system, whereby each
operator fabricates only part of a garment,
averaged $1.39# Those working on a single hand
or tailor system averaged $2.02. Cutters and markers averaged $2.54 an hour. These data do
not reflect the following wage increases which became effective
in union shops December 18,
19 5 0 : 6|-percent increase in all piece rates; weekly increases of $ 5 for cutters and graders;
$4 for sample makers,
drapers and special machine operators;
and $3 for examiners, pinkers,
and cleaners.

Professional and technical occupations— Industrial registered nurses averaged $64.50
a w e e k in April 1951
ln~*New York City
(table 2). The average earnings for men working as
draftsmen ranged from $114.50 for chief draftsmen to $62 per w e e k for junior
draftsmen.

Men's and hoys' dress shirts and nightwear— M e n employed as sewing-machine opera­
tors averaged $1.35* W o m e n sewing-machine
operators averaged $1.20 (table 7)# W o m e n making
buttonholes and sewing buttons by machine received $1.17 eund $1.04,
respectively. Thread
trimmers were the lowest-paid group of women workers,
averaging 90 cents an hour. Data r e ­
ported relate to a November 1950 payroll period;
however,
no general wage changes were re ­
ported in the industry between that date and April 1951.

Maintenance and power plant occupations--Among such skilled maintenance employees
as carpenters,
millwrights, mechanics, pipe fitters, and sheet-metal workers, average hourly
earnings ranged
from $1.81 to $ 1 .8 7 . Machinists and electricians averaged $1.92 an hour.
Hourly earnings of maintenance trades helpers averaged $1.42 (table 3).

Paints and varnishes— Varnish makers averaged $1.74 a n hour In New York City in
March 1951 (table 8 ). The largest group studied were mixers whose average earnings were $1.49
an hour. Lowest earnings for m e n workers among the jobs studied were reported for labelers
and packers, and hand truckers at $1.42 an hour.

Stationary engineers,
responsible for the operation of equipment supplying power,
heat, refrigeration, or air conditioning, received average earnings of $ 1 .9 5 * somewhat higher
than those received by maintenance craftsmen. Stationary boiler firemen averaged $1.58 in
April 1951.

Women's cement process shoes— Hourly earnings as of September 1950 for selected oc­
cupations in plants manufacturing women's conventional lasted cement-process
footwear are
presented in table 9. Early in 1 9 5 1 more than half the firms studied granted an increase of
10 cents a n hour to all plant workers. Average hourly earnings for a majority of the
jobs
studied were over $2 , with machine edge trimmers receiving $2 .5 5 , hand vamp and whole shoe
cutters,making $2.30,
and fancy stitchers earnings $2.22. Treers averaged $1.93 per hour.

Custodial, w a rehousing and shipping occupations--Among custodial occupations, which
are relatively unskilled, average hourly earnIngs were $ 1 .2 0 for watchmen; $1 . 2 2 for janitors,
porters, and cleaners, and $1.37 for guards. Women cleaners received $1.07 an hour. Shippingand-receiving clerks averaged $ 1 .1*2 an hour,
1 cent more than employees w h o handled shipping
only and 3 cents an hour more than those who handled receiving only.
The average pay for hand truckers and stock handlers was $1.44 an hour, whereas
power truckers averaged $1.71*
or 2 7 cents more. Truck drivers on medium sized trucks aver­
aged $ 1 . 7 7 an hour and those driving heavy trucks received $1 . 9 6 (table 4).




Children's stitchdown shoes— Data reported in table 1 0 for this portion of the foot­
wear industry relate to a September 1950 payroll period. Since the survey date,
all firms
studied gave a 10 cent hourly across-the-board increase. Thread
lasters earnings $2.17 per
hour were the highest paid among the m en workers studied in September 1950 • Other average
earnings reported for m en included $1.83 for machine vamp and whole shoe cutters,
$1.89 for
Goodyear stitchers, $2.01 for fancy stitchers, and $1.83 for vanpers. Average hourly earnings
of w o men in the jobs studied ranged from $1.45 for fancy stitchers,
to 98 cents
for floor
girls.

3.

Machinery Industries--Data shown for. machinery industries relate to a January 1951
pay period
(table 11). Only 4 of the 4l firms studied granted general wage increases since
the survey date. Assemblers constituted the largest occupational group studied, with class A
workers earning $1.94 an hour, class B $1.72, and class C $1.34.
The highest average hourly
pay among the jobs studied was $2.03 for tool-and-die makers
in jobbing shops. The average
hourly earnings for top grade men among operators of machine tools, such as drill presses and
engine lathes, ranged between $1.84 and $ 1 .9 6 ; for the next highest skill level,
between
$ 1 . 5 3 and $ 1 .6 9 ; and for workers on routine repetitive operations, between $ 1 . 2 7 and $ 1 .3 6 .

Building service employees— The highest minimum rate reported for unionized b u i l d ­
ing service employees w as $73 Per week fbr window washers and the lowest was $42 for charwomen.
The basic weekly wage under other union contracts varied with the size and type of building
(table 18). The union scales prevailing in office buildings were higher than those in a p a r t ­
ment or loft buildings. The basic weekly scales in the largest office buildings were $64.83
for handymen,
$ 6 2 .8 3 for starters;
and $5 8 .8 3 for elevator operators and porters.
A weekly
schedule of 4o hours was provided by union agreement
in office and loft buildings, whereas a
48-hour w e e k prevailed in apartment houses.

Banking--Men employed as tellers in New York banks averaged more than $60 a w e e k in
April 1951* with note tellers receiving $67.50;
savings tellers, $ 6 6 ; commercial tellers,
$65.50;
and all-around tellers, $ 6l (table 12). Guards earned $54 and cleaners earned $51 a
week. W o m e n operating proof machines averaged $45 a week,
and those handling a limited se­
quence of operations
on a bookkeeping machine received $42, Average weekly salaries
for
stenographers and copy typists were $49 and $39*50, respectively.

Local transit operating employees--Union rates for subway conductors varied, accord­
ing to length-of-service and position worked,
from $1.46 to $1.56 In April 1951*
Motormen
with 1 year of service received $1.70.
Operators of street cars (which have largely b e e n r e ­
placed by busses) received $1.66 after 1 year of service. Most union contracts provided that
bus drivers reach the top of the wage scale after 2 years of service.
Top rates varied from
$1.55 to $1,775 for drivers of the famous Fifth Avenue double-deck busses (table 19).

Insurance carriers— The highest average weekly salary reported among the jobs stud­
ied in insurance companies
(table 13) was the $66 received by men hand bookkeepers. Tabulating-machine operators, the largest group of men workers, received $50.50 per week.
The bulk
of the employees studied were women whose earnings ranged from $ 3 6 .5 0 for routine file clerks
to $60.50 for secretaries.
Copy typists, with average weekly earnings of $40, were the larg­
est occupational group studied. Another large group of workers were general stenographers
whose salaries averaged $47.

Malt liquors— Brewers and bottlers received minimum w e ekly wages of $79*50 In New
Yo r k City in April 1951. The same pay scale was also provided for maintenance and automobile
mechanics and platform men. A basic workweek of 37 l/2 hours was indicated for these occupa­
tions. Engineers and firemen, who worked at straight-time for 40 hours, received $101.50 and
$84.50, respectively (table 2 0 ).

Pcarer laundries— Hourly earnings
for most of the women
in the jobs studied were
under $1. The largest occupational group studied, machine flatwork finishers,
averaged 85
cents per hour (table 14). The highest paid group of woiren workers were machine shirt pressers
at $1.04 a n hour. Men employed as retail receiving clerks and identifiers received $1.09 an
hour, while extractor operators averaged $ 1 . 1 2 and machine washers, $1.41.
Auto repair shops— Hourly earnings for class A automobile mechanics averaged $ 1 .8 7 .
Those on simpler jobs received $1.46.
Body repairmen averaged $1.93 and automotive electri­
cians earned $1.94 per hour. The only jobs studied in which workers averaged less than $1.45
an hour were greasers at $ 1 . 2 6 and automobile washers at $ 1 . 2 0 (table 1 5 ).
Union Vage Scales
The information reported for the following nine industries relates to the minimum
wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. The union scales and hours reported were those in effect
April 1, 1951.
Bakeries--Union wage scales in the New York bakeries varied both by agreement
and type of product bakBd
(table 16). Minimum rates in hand shops for foremen, first hands,
mixers and oven workers baking bread and cake ranged from $1,894 to $2.10.
In machine shops,
the scale for foremen,
mixers,
and ovenmen ranged from $1.62 to $2.18 per hour.
In Hebrew
bake shops, hourly rates for first hands ranged from $2 , 1 3 3 to $2 .5 0 in hand shops and from
$2,125 to $2,268 in machine shops. Most agreements specified 40 as the maximum straight-time
hours per week. However,
some agreements provided for overtime after 42, 4 5 , or 48 hours.
Building construction--Basic hourly rates
for
typical journeymen
construction
workers in April 1951 were:
for painters, $2.60; for carpenters, glaziers, lathers, plumbers
and roofers, $3.00;
for electricians, $3*20; and for bricklayers, $3.25; (table 17). Build­
ing} laborers received a union wage of $2.15 an hour. Rates effective in Manhattan generally
prevailed in the other boroughs of New York City,
though plumbers and painters received an
additional 10 and 15 cents a n hour, respectively, In Brooklyn and Queens. Lathers, plasterers,
and plasters1 helpers were paid overtime after 30 hours per week. The other trades worked at
straights time for either 35 or 40 hours.




Motortruck drivers and helpers— Union scales for motortruck drivers varied by the
size of truck and materials transported (table 21). Drivers of trucks carrying heavy or bulky
items generally received relatively high pay, such as $ 1 .9 0 for beer truck drivers, $2 .0 0 for
drivers of dump trucks and concrete-mixer trucks used in building construction, and $1,844 an
hour for drivers operating fuel oil and coal trucks. Somewhat lower hourly scales were found
for drivers engaged in lighter hauling such as clothing delivery ($1 ,3 7 5 ) and department store
delivery ($1 ,6 7 5 ). Railway express drivers received $1,775 an hour. Most contracts provided
for a maximum workweek of 40 hours at straight-time rates.
Ocean transport--Among offshore unlicensed maritime personnel,
the basic monthly
wages for deck and engine-room occupations were higher on many tankers than for similar jobs
on dry cargo and passenger vessels (table 2 2 ).
The union scales for ordinary seamen and able seamen of dry cargo an d passenger v e s ­
sels were $2 1 3 .7 9 and- $248.41 per month,
respectively. Rates for comparable jobs on tankers
were $2 2 0 .0 9 and $ 2 5 1 .5 5 .
Monthly rates for day men in the engine r oom department of dry cargo and passenger
vessels were $2 8 3 .0 1 for deck engineers, $314.48 for unlicensed junior engineers, and $ 3 9 5 .6 6
for electricians. These same rates applied to electricians and unlicensed junior engineers on
tankers.
For standing watch,
the union scale was $248.41 for oilers and watertenders on dry
cargo and passenger vessels, $3.14 less than the scale on tankers.
In the stewards department, rates ranged from $651*78 per month for chief stewards on
class 1 passenger vessels to $2 1 3 .7 9 for messmen on all types of vessels.
The maximum number of hours at straight-time rates at sea are fixed at 44 for daymen
of the deck department and engine-room department, and 48 for w a tch m e n and stewards. At sea,
the watch standers and stewards' normally work a 5 6 -hour week,
receiving overtime pay for 8
hours (Sunday). In port, all men receive overtime rates for w o r k on Saturday and Sunday.
Printing— Union scales fbr bindery women in book and job shops in New Y o r k City ranged
from $1.00 to $1,233 a n hour. Bookbinders engaged in unskilled machine operations received 95
cents an hour. However, most other bindery occupations were relatively skilled and were paid
rates in excess of $2 a n hour. Union scales In printing occupations were $2,483 F o r hand c o m ­
positors, $ 3 * 2 9 for photoengravers, and $2 , 5 1 3 for most cylinder pressmen.

k

In newspaper work, hourly rates far day w ork were $2,828 for hand compositors, $3.06
for photoengravers, $2 ,0 8 5 for mailers, and $ 2 , 7 1 3 for wet pressmen (table 2 3 ).
Stevedoring— On the New York City docks the hourly scale for longshoremen handling
general cargo wa s $2 in April 1951 • Differentials were paid for handling difficult or danger­
ous cargo and ranged from an additional 5 cents per hour far bulk cargo to $ 1 . 9 0 per hour for
explosives (table 2 k ) .

M i n i m u m Entrance Rates

Established minimum entrance rates fbr the employment of inexperienced plant workers
were included in the formalized rate structure in New York firms employing over nine-tenths of
the plant workers in all industries (table 2 5 ). Although entrance rates set by individual es ­
tablishments ranged from less than 50 cents to more than $ 1 .5 0 an hour, 7 5 cents was the min i ­
m u m rate in firms furnishing nearly one-fourth of the total employment. The 75-cent rate was
also the lowest reported for establishments in manufacturing and wholesale trade. Minimum
entrance rates of less than 7 5 cents a n hour were found in retail trade establishments employ­
ing about a tenth of the plant workers in that industry, and in service firms employing a third
of the workers in the services studied. About two-fifths of all plant workers were employed
in establishments having formal entrance rates ranging between 7 5 cents and $ 1 per hour.

S u p p le m e n ta ry

W age

P ra ctic e s

Shift Differentials
Extra-shift operations,
generally second shifts, accounted for an eighth of all
production workers employed in manufacturing. Two-thirds of these workers were employed
in
nondurable goods industries. Almost all manufacturing establishments paid shift differentials,
coranonly a cents-par-hour differential over day-shift rates. However,
a percentage differ­
ential wa s paid to nearly all extra-shift workers in machinery industries, and to more than
half of these workers in all durable goods industries combined.
In nondurable goods industries a 5 cents-per-hour differential was paid to a third
of the extra-shift workers,
and a differential of 10 cents or more per hour was given to all
others.
In durable goods industries, the prevailing differential was 10 percent or more of 1he
day rate (table 2 6 ).

group, where most office workers received 1 1 or 12 holidays a year, and in transportation, com­
munication, and other public utilities, where almost half of all workers were entitled to 1 1
holidays annually.
Paid Vacations
Virtually all office workers and most of the plant workers in New Y ork City were e m ­
ployed in firms allowing vacations wi t h pay after a year of service. Nine out of ten office
workers were in establishments that granted 2 w e e k s ’ vacation after 1 year, compared to about
k out of 10 plant workers w h o
were entitled to the same vacation period (table 2 9 ). Half of
the plant workers received 1 w e e k after 1 year of service, but after 2 years more than half the
plant workers were granted 2 weeks.* After 1 5 years of service, establishments providing paid
vacations of 3 weeks or more accounted for 2 out of every 3 office workers as contrasted to 1
out of every 3 plant workers.
Paid Sick Leave
Formal provisions for paid sick leave after 1 year of service were provided by estab­
lishments employing over a fourth of the office workers and almost a fifth of the plant workers
(table 30)* The number of days of pa y granted to employees for absence due to sickness varied
among firms and among industrial groupings. A larger proportion of office workers than plant
workers were granted 10 or mare days' sick leave after 1 year of service. The most liberal
plans were provided for workers in central offices.
Although the percentage of all workers employed in firms granting paid sick leave
rose only slightly as the length of service increased, the percentage employed in transporta­
tion, communication, and other public utilities rose until it covered two-thirds of the office
workers and a third of the plant workers after 15 years of service. Certain firms in all in­
dustrial divisions provided paid sick leave after 6 months of service; in all industries com­
bined,
these firms employed a fifth of the
office workers and about an eighth of the plant
workers.
Nonproduction Bonuses
Almost half of the office workers and nearly three-tenths of the plant workers in
New York City received some type of norproduction bonus, w ith the Christmas or year-end bonus
predominating (table 31) • The industry group with the highest proportion of workers receiving
nonproduction bonuses was finance, insurance, and real estate, wi t h about three-fifths of the
office workers receiving such bonuses. Almost half of the nonoffice workers in retail trade
received nonproduction bonuses.
Insurance and Pension Plans

Scheduled Wo r k w e ek
Four-fifths of the w o m e n office workers in all industries were on a scheduled w o r k ­
w e e k of lesb than ^0 hours, w i t h nearly half on a 35-hour weekly schedule. The highest p r o ­
portion working a 4 0 -hour weekly schedule were employed in durable-goods manufacturing indus­
tries, retail trade,
and services ( table 2 7 ). The typical workweek for plant workers in all
industries was ^0 hours.
However, a fifth of the plant workers, found chiefly in manufactur­
ing, retail trade, and public utilities, had scheduled workweek b of more than ^0 hours.
Paid Holidays
Provisions far paid holidays were in effect for practically all office workers and
for approximately nine-tenths
of the plant workers. About two-thirds of the office workers
were in firms that provided from 9 to 12 paid holidays a year, whereas a majority of plant
workers were in firms that provided from 6 to 8 holidays (table 28) . On a broad industry basis,
the largest number of paid holidays were provided in the finance,
insurance, and real estate




Over 90 percent of the office workers and 80 percent of the plant workers were in
establishments having some form of insurance or pension plan financed either wholly cr in part
b y the employer. Life insurance, the most popular type of benefit plan reported, was provided
b y firms employing nearly 85 percent of the office workers and 70 percent of the plant w o r k e r s .
Health insurance was available in establishments accounting for over half of both the plant
and office worker employment.
Retirement pension plans covered a much higher proportion of the office than of the
plant employees.
Sixty-five percent of the office workers surveyed in the New York area were
in establishments having pension plans as contrasted w i t h 3 7 percent of the plant workers so
covered. The industry groups wi t h the highest proportion of workers covered were transporta­
tion, comsunication, and other public utilities; central offices; and finance, insurance, and
real estate. Lowest coverage for plant workers prevailed in the service
industries and for
office workers in durable goods manufacturing Industries (table 3 2 ).

5

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
(Average -weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of workers receiving straight-time -weekly earnings of
T ---T ---1 ---- $
f—
i
i—
i—
1—
1 ---- 1
$
i—
i—
i—
1—
i—
5—
i—
Number Weekly
1
of
sched­ Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4C .00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75.00 30.00 85.00 90.00 ?95.00 100.00
earn­ $
and
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
ever
60.00 62,50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 t5° 75,0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95*00 100.00
22,50 25,oo ?7t?> 40.00 42.50 4 5 ,0 0 4 7 15° 50.00 ?2 ,? 0 5
5715°

?.oo

Men
Billers, machine (billing machine) 2/ ...
Manufacturing................... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... .............
Public utilities * ................
Finance * * ........... .

2 A2
35
177
24
435

38.5
39.5
33.5
37.0
39.0

$52.50
60.50
50.50
54.50
49.50

Bookkeepers, hand •••••••.............. .
Manufacturing ••••...................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing............... • •••«
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................
Services .........................
Central o f f i c e s ........... ..........

1,8 8 6
435
159
326
1 ,2 1 2
170
261
128
571
82
189

37.5
38 .0
39.0
37.5
37.5
36.5
37.5
39.0
37.0
37.5
36.5

73.50
68 .50
65.50
70.50
75.00
79.50
7 1.0 0
72 .0 0
76.50
7 1 .0 0
79.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class A 2/ ......................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..............
Finance * * .............. .........

153
30
114
70

33.5
38.5
33.5
38 .0

60.50
66.00
59.00
58.50

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B 2 / ..... ..................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..................
Finance ** .......................

217
195
154

37.0
37.5
37.0

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) 2 / ....... .........

50

Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) 2/ .............
Nonmanufacturing ............. •••••••
Clerks * accounting....... •••••........
Manufacturing.................. •••••
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ............. .
Nonmanufacturing....... .............
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade .... ••••••••••••••
Retail trade ............... .
Finance ** ................. .
Services.... .....................
Central offices .......•••••••••••••••

-

-

-

•
-

2
2
2
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

10
1
1
1

33
-

18
18

36
36
36

5
-

8
-

31
-

23
17
17
6
-

33
8
20

-

~
-

-

-

-

-

3
-

8
2

31
-

-

-

-

-

3
2

6
-

23

-

-

-

6
-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

6

1

8

23
23
5
18

15
15
-

34
1
26
-

65
29
22
7
36
1
7
2
26
-

23

19
-

C
s

4
4
4

12
5
7
7
-

-

-

67
49
8
21
5
15
18

182
52
16
36
126

93
31
31
47

146
13
6
7
118

14

34

16
29
48
19
4

10
22
1
15

216
62
6
56
129
26
14
25
53
11
25

60
2
15

2
56
6
19

9
-

12
22

-

3
3

-

9
-

-

-

-

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

13

4
4

45
14
12
2
31
3
16
12
-

77
29
18
11
47
8
2
26
11
1

71
25
25
23
1
14
1
7
•23

171
49
36
13
121
8
87
25
1
1

43
7
7
32
6
6
10
10
4

174
82
18
64
82
4
23
23
31
1
10

-

-

32
10
22
13

-

46
3
34
31

5
4

1
1
_

5
5
-

25
7
18
18

•
_
-

-

97
11
7
4
53
18
.
.
18
17

80
9
5
4
65
-

135
14
1
13
108
15
27
58

33

63
2
6

_
-

_
-

—

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

.
.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

14

157
41
12

29
97
33

42

•
-

8

13

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

6
1

1
1

23
21

-

-

19
2
17
1

47.00
47.00
45.00

_
_

8
8
8

12
12
12

35
35
35

13
7
7

3
q

25
17

16
14

20
17

14
14

-

15
15
15

3

14

14

12

13

6
6
-

35
35
12

3
1
-

2
2
-

10
9
9

37.5

56.50

-

-

-

1

-

4

1

2

5

4

3

3

1

21

3

_

92
87

33.0
37.5

59.00
59.50

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

4

6
6

5
3

1
1

2
-

18
18

1
-

-

2D

_

_

-

-

-

18
18

.
.

2D

13
13

_

-

10
10

_

4

-

-

-

-

-

6,995
638
223
415
5,084
1,013
1,255
342
1,987
437
1,273

37.5
37.5
38.0
37.0
37.5
37.5
37.0
40.0
37.0
38.0
37.0

59.00
6 1.5 0
60.00
62.50
57.50
64.00
58.50
56.50
54.00
59.00
62.00

42

303
15
8
7
272
*
52
27
190
3
16

206
4
4
158
3
13
130
12
44

271
24
10
14
220
18
68
5
89
40
27

396
8
8
350
17
15
28
266
24
38

433
28
20
8
325
40
89
39
136
21
80

366
15
4
11
262
17
70
30
110
35
89

610
72
36
36
386
105
113
32
80
56
152

272
9
3
6
239
38
85
22
73
21
24

558
85
23
62
367
78
88
26
128
47
106

384
17
-

459
64
19
45
346
62
82
30

328
22
12
10
204
78
43

251
31
5
26
169
40
32
18
53
26
51

210
27
9
18
135
48
19
6
61
1
48

409
60
26
34
328
87
65
18
124
34
21

299
42
11
31
178
27
47
22
68
14
79

232
16
13
3
160
45
55
16
36

68
4
4
48
9
20
1
7

62

72
11
102

358
19
19
276
156
61
1
28
30
63

26
3

221

433
.69
20
49
284
56
99
18
89
22
80

8

21

56

16

7
1

-

•
-

-

19
4
4
15
14
1

-

-

—

—

41
14
27

-

1

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18

17
288
73
109
3
96
7
79

51
49

3
22
13
2
9m

-

«
,
11
3

2
6
51

Occupational Wage Survey, New- York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6
Hable 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations b y industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of workers rece;
1
&
$
j —
1 — 1—
&
$
&
j 1 — j — %— $
1—
1 — 1—
$
*
Humber Weekly
sched­ Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.0 0 67.50 70 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
of
and
earn­ $
and
workers uled
\
ings 30.00 under
hours
over '
?2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 ,5 0 45,00 4 7 ,5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55,00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 ,5 0 6 5 ,0 0 6 7 .5 0 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 8 5,0 0 90.00 ?5 ,oo 100.00

Men - Continued
Clerks* file* class A 2/ .............. ..
Manufacturing ........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... ............
Wholesale t r a d e ........... .
Finance ** „.................... .
Clerks* file* class B ..................*
Manufacturing.....................
Nonmanufacturing 2/

263
30
226
46
155

Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .................
Wholesale t r a d e ........ .
Retail t r a d e ....................
Finance * * .................... a .
Services ................... .
Central offices.............. .....
Clerks, order .........................
Manufacturing...... ••••....... .
Durable g o o d s ..... ....... .
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ............ .
Wholesale trade ........... ......
Finance ** ............... .
Central offices........... ........
Clerks* payroll...................... .
Manufacturing....... ...............
Durable goods ............... ....
Nondurable goods ••••••••.........
Nonmanufacturing.... .
Public utilities * ....................
Wholesale t r a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade ............................
Finance * * ......................... ..
Services ........... ...........
Central offices ............... ..

$55.50
56.00
55.50
65.00
52.00

37.5
3 6 .0
37.5
37.0
38 .0
36.5

39.50
46.50
38.50
36^50
40.50
41.50

739

37.5
38 .0
39.0
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.0
37.0
37.5
37.5

63.00
58.50
55.00
6 1.5 0
63.50
68 .50
57.50
62.00
56.50
64.00

1*828
255
63
192
1,347
631
565
226

3 8 .0
37.5
37.5
37.5
3 8 .0
37.5
39.5
37.0

63.00
57.50
55.00
58.50
64.00
57.50
72.50
64.00

863
332
109
223
428
153
37
76
79
83
103

3 8 .0
38 .0

62.50
53.00

38.0
38.0

60.00

38.5

62.50
64.00

591
60
493
270
Al

f f n . f l n *fires
li+rl f
Clerks* g e n e r a l ................ ••••••••
Manufacturing ............. .
Durable g o o d s ..... ............. ..

38*0
38.5
3 8 .0
37.0
38.5

3.186
367
169
198
2,080
752
170
743
210

38.0
3 7 .5
39.5
37.5
38.5
36.5

57.00

59.00
63.50

71.00

.
.
55
55
50
5

-

-

—
42
2
40
39

2
2
2

2
2

2
2
2

52
2
46

11

20
18

10
4
*
+

12
4r
H

2
2

2

159
36
21
15
79
18
27
19
4
44

87
10
2
8
53
10
6

80
7

67
65

93
55
23
32
30
18

-

«

18

8

7
68
36
18
5
58

23

-

-

12

27

23

30
18
1
17
12

67
4
2
2
53

61
14
10
4
29

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

12
7
1
18

2
10

17
6

-

12

1
8
18

-

-

18

2
2

47
4

85

-

5
5

9
5

22
9

13

71

36

5
-

5
4

4

5
10

3
2
1

<
—

-

-

1

-

_

3

3
7
3

-

-

2

-

-

18

-

-

-

-

-

18

,-

_
-

5
5

-

5
-

—
-

__

-

-

_

-

-

-

4
43
17
18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

—

38
9
10

19
3
15
15

69
9
8
1
50
28
18
10

-

71.00

21
1
16

-

-

57.00

103
16
75
16
5
12

27

12
-

-

-

28
27
26

51
3
48
45

65
38
5

m
m

13

33
3
30
30

118
9
96
63
2
13

65

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




2

-

9

5
1

7
3
3
—
1
13

26

7
24

-

.10

8
8

26

-

33
15

22

12
1
5

2

48

4

5
7
2
2

256
53
38
15
162
75
15
34
33

16
14
2

22
3
19
18
12
9
2
1

25
1
23
-

26
26
13

19

1
1
-

12

m
m

-

20
1
19
18

m
m

~
-

125
10
2
8
85
44

234
33
26
7

131

211
8
6
2
14L
60

209
19

62

280
82
44
38
156
43
15
62
33
42
118
15
14
1
87
43
20
16

112
16
1
15
96
38
23

60
15
7

35

21
6
30
57
3

20 1
39

-

-

3
46
36
10
8

39
143
5
19

109
6
3
3
86
55
30
17

104
74
23
51
26

33

67
36

35
13

6
2

6

1
2

—

5

-

2

4

7
14

-

2

*
■

19
146
90
2
19
14
44

4

u
107
35
1
34
59
32

13

15
3
4

10
3
7
2

20
19
18

3
3
2

3
-

3
3
-

m
m

m
m

-

-

-

340
11
1

116
8

229
3

-

-

131
12
12

10

8
99
11
66
6
9

3
158
50
9
55
6
68

100
10
2
8
67
30
35
23

35
4
1
3
23
13
10
8

77
9
2
7
42
18
20
26

36
4
4

35
15

27
7

78
29

27

10
5

6
1

1
28

2
2
-

4

19

46

17

2

13

11

8

18

3

2

6

23
22
19
1

3
3

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

155
24

42
6

23
-

54
-

-

-

-

3
80
47

24
84
47
11
16
10
47

6
23
6
2
10
5
13

-

-

21
12

54
45

—

-

7
2
2

-

135
2
2

11
7

-

3
3
-

-

-

-

—,
-

206
13
4

109
3

m
m

2
_

36
26
61
6
64

8
2
12
2

21
5
16
12
-

-

6
2
4

17

11
10

132

~
36
17

74

-

5

8
20
6
10

4

-

8

4

45
13

29
17

225
52
27
105
20
104

-

Q

6

3

10

3

. 9

78
47

143
59
9
. 26
5
50

22
5
41

32
22
10

-

31
2
26

82
8
1
7
61
9
45
13

232
19
1
18
186
8
175
27

124
22
100
9

60
50
25
25

31

28

5
3
2

5

24
17

12
1
-

10

7
3
3

1
10

-

-

10
1

4

3

4
23

2

9

—

1
44

_
26
10

-

_

6
6

_
4

9

7

1
1
*

6

_

Q
J

5

-

2
-

2

_

16

1

15
3

m
m

13

2

8

11

••

8

2

5

-

5

2

1

5
18

6

8

1

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average veekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of workers rec
t-time weekly earnings of
5—
5
1
1
j
$
j
*
*
£
#
1—
1
5
1—
1—
1—
i —
Number Weekly
*
*
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7 .5 0 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 a 5 .o o 90.00
schedof
earn- $
and
...
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours

1—

it
1r
95.00 IDO.00

32,50 35,00 37t?o 40 .0 0 42,50 45.00 4 7*?° 50.00 52,50 55.00 57t?o 60.00 62.50 65.00 67,50 70.00 72 t50 75,00 30.00 a 5 .o o 90.00 95.00 100.00

anri
CuiU
over

Men - Continued
Duplicating-machine operators ...........
Manufacturing ................ ........
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing................... .
Public utilities * ............. .
Wholesale t r a d e ................. .
Retail trade
Finance * * ........................
Services .........................
Central offices .................. .

580
82
23
59
4H
26
96
20
101
168
87

37*0
3 8 .0
38.0
38.0
32.0
31.5
38.0
37*0
3 6 .0
37.5
35.5

#46.00
47.00
41.00
49.00
46.00
57.50
47.00
45.00
47.50
43.00
44.50

Office boys ..... ••••••••••.......
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods ................ .
Nonmanufacturing ................... .
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale t r a d e ........ ........
Retail trade ......................
Finance
.......................
Services .................
Central offices .............

5,739
640
164
476
3,810
371
1,238
230
1,063
908
1,289

3 7 .0
37 .0
38.5
36 .0
37.0
3 7 .0
37.0
37.5
36.5
37.5
36.5

35.50
35.50
34.50
36.00
35.00
35.00
36.00
33.50
35.00
33.50
37.50

501 1,430
146
46
1
65
81
45
355 1,038
48
69
72
320
36
33
109
267
90
349
100
246

Secretaries ................ ........ ..
Manufacturing ...............................................
Durable goods ........... ..........
Nondurable goods ............. .
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..................
Public utilities * ............ .
Wholesale trade ..................
Services...... ...................
Central offices .........

389
57
23
34
141
22
56
33
191

37 .0
37.0
39.0
36.0
38.0
36.5
38.5
38 .0
36.5

74.50
75.00
74.00
76.00
67.50
73.00
65.50
61.00
80.00

-

_
-

-

-

Stenographers, general 2 / ............... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................. .
Finance ** ............... .........
Central offices ....... ..............

26C
133
84
na

37.5
38.0
3 8 .0
37 .0

54.50
54.50
52.50
54.00

1,371
81
45
36
1,010
51
72
736
16
280

3 7 .0
37.5
38.5
36.5
37 .0
37.0
3 8 .0
36.5
37 .0
36.5

58.00
57.00
60.50
53.50
55.50
62.00
57.00
51.50
51.00
67.50

Ihbulating-machine operators.......... .
Manufacturing ........................
Durable g o o d s ......... ...........
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..... ...... .
Public utilities * ...... ........
Retail t r a d e ...... ...............
Finance ** ..................... .
Services...... ...................
Central offices ....... .......

.

22

24

-

-

22

20

2
15

~
-

-

_

39
10
8
2
27
2

4
-

3
2

-

2
14
4

-

10
2

8
17
2

22
-

-

19
2
-

954 1,226
112
143
35
33
108
79
686
824
141
27
211
275
76
36
157
256
101
230
156
259
1
-

1

—

1
19
1
-

2
9
7
24
572
104
3

101
282
12
57
24
132
57
186

-

—
-

-

-

74
10
8
2
51
1
13
5
7
25
13

59
10
3
7
46
1
32

494
31
10
21
359
40
175
18
71
55
104

137
6
5
1
64
13
22
5
10
14
67

-

8
5
3

1
-

1

94
21
2
19
67
5
22
1
19
20
6
197
24
11
13
111
5
54

41
6
6
30
1
6
17
6
5
76
15

34
1
23

48
4
62

3
j

12

-

1
-

-

12
9
2
7
3
1
2

-

33
2

46

25
7

23

10
1
1

10

a
2

39
4
1
3
9
3

13
1

7
16

3

18

15
1
2

6
3
13

31
13
g
5
3
1
2

1a
7
7

1
4
2
2

34
2
1
1

1
1

32

37
2
2

94
1

48
4
4

45
12
12

43

a4
5

60

53

29
4

27

31
3

5
53

8
44

24
3
5
14

22

5

15

18

_
-

12

10

34

44

-

-

-

-

12

10

44

—

—

29
5
—

5

-

116
10
6
4
71

77
15
1
14
54
6
5
35
6
8

19

-

42

88
10

1

-

76
8
8

—
-

1

-

71
6
6

34

_
-

-

-

127
7
5
2
98
6
14
77

10

-

-

-

—
-

_

4

-

12

-

12

8
1

3

—

-

20

3

10

84

2
12

11

-

10
73
1
3
65

8
—

26

2

-

85
4
1
so

2
7

“

3

-

27
1
1
25

-

-

.

11

-

36
22
20
12

85
1

-

3

3

2
2
1

-

6
2

4

2

—

3

-

12

3
3
2

104

3
10

-

18
15

10

87
1
1

4

-

_
_

-

-

3

-

45

12

-

m
m

36
27
27
2

1

2

20

•
w

5

16
1
1
13

-

_
-

-

20
6

2

m
m

48
35
10
12

-

_
-

_

30 t
4

m
m

—

16
5

1

—

20
3

...

8

31
22
19
8

-

-

-

_

6
6

4
9

-

1
-

-

n
1

_
_

6
2

-

-

2

9
6
1

_

6

2
19
1
6
11
12

..

-

2
2

3
5

_

«
_

-

-

3

_
21
6

8
3

31
5
3
2
17
6

_

-

1
12
5
13

-

12
12

*

10

4
16

10

«
.

3
19
1

15
45
15
21
2

11

a

_

46

10

24
12

35
3

23
1
3
3
3
13
11

12

22

13
4
2
2
7
1
3

34

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




44
1

6

3
j

18
48
1
35

28
1
21

17
3
8
1
18

1
86
7
10
55
1
7

a

17

2
12

15

6

|
p
-

11
1
12

15

•

16 ------- 39
ii
L.
5

*
*

5
10
J

11

13

24

1

-

-

55

47

22

7

27
1

29
1

2

2

2

1
1

-

Q

2
5
26

9
1

5
57
3
1
29
1
22

7
2a

1a

2
20

5

-

8
Table 1*— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selectsd occupations b y industry division)

Numbeir of workers receiving straight-timei weekly earnings of $
$
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
i
♦
$
$
$
Number Weekly
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.0 0 6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
of
100.00
sched­
earn­ $
and
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
over
hours
?2 ,? 0 35too ?7*?0 40.00 42.50 45,00 4 7 t?o 50.00 5 2 ,5 0 55,00 57t?° 60.00 62.50 65,00 6 7 ,5 0 70.00 72,50 75.00 80.00 85,0 0 90.00 ?5 .oo 100.00
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Men - Continued
283
34
204
19
35

38.0
3 8 .0
38 .0
3 6 .0
37.5

$45.50
46.00
45.00
45.00
41.50

-

-

7
2
5
-

18
2
16
1
10

30
4
26
4
5

48
1
44
3
4

20
3
12
1

40
5
30
1
8

68
8
38
1
8

10
2
8
8

21
6
15

11
1
-

Billers, machine (billing m a c h i n e ) .....
Manuf a c t u r i n g .....................
Durable goods ......... ........ ... 0
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing ... ..... ............
Public utilities * ............... .
Wholesale trade ......... ....... 0•.
Retail trade ..................... .
Finance * * .......................
Services ..........................
Central offices ......................

2,257
445
125
320
1,583
71
740
145
442
185
229

37.0
37.0
39.5
36.5
37.0
37.0
37.0
37.5
36.0
39.5
36.5

48.50
47.50
46.50
47.50
48.50
52.50
50.00
43.50
48.50
43.50
51.0 0

-

5
5
2
3
-

—
-

79
13
11
2
66
40
5
8
13
—

109
38
38
71
1
25
8
22
15
-

304
•88
37
51
214
66
45
62
41
2

342
25
2
23
251
13
66
33
84
55
66

342
65
20
45
251
13
99
30
68
41
26

200
69
13
56
62
9
47
7
6

319
71
18
53
194
16
99
14
57
8
54

84
15
9
6
55
3
39
1
12
34

Billers, machine (bookkeeping
machine) 2 / .......................... ♦
Manufacturing .................. .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... .
Retail t r a d e ...... ...............
Finance ** ........................
Services
.......... .........

1 ,2 1 2
88
1,103
253
185
98

36.5
37.5
36 o0
37.5
36.5
3 8 .0

52.00
51.50
52.00
50.50
45.00
54.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8
8'
-

22
2
20
2
18
-

18
18
12
6
-

66
14
52
14
34
4

79
1
66
18
43
5

95
11
80
53
20
3

112
12
96
32
9
11

200
15
185
26
9
31

Bookkeepers, hand .......................
Manufacturing ........... ............ .
Durable g o o d s ....... ....... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanuf a c t u r i n g .... ................
Public utilities
................
Wholesale t r a d e ..... ........... ..
Retail trade ..............
Finance ** ............ ........
Services .......... .
Central o f f i c e s ..... ........... .

1,499
w n
140
327
933
104
208
128
179
314
99

37.5
37.5
38.5
37.0
37.5
36.5
37.5
38 .0
37.0
38.5
36.0

65.00
63.50
69.50
6 1.0 0
65.50
75.00
66.50
58.50
60.50
67.00
63.50

_
-

_
-

-

-

4
-

7
-

35
17

82
34

14
-

131
55

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

7

34
40

-

-

17
12

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ..
Manufacturing ........................
Durable g o o d s ....... .............
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ................... .
Public utilities * ............. .
Wholesale trade ................. .
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** .................. ••••••
Services ........ ••••••...........
Central offices .......... .........

2,205
181
58
123
1,813
39
213
89
1,4 0 2
70
2 11

37.0
38.5
38.5
38.5
37.0
37.5
38 .0
37.5
36.5
37.5
3 6 .0

53.50
62.00
63.50
6 1.5 0
52.00
57.50
60.00
53.50
50.50
60.00
55.50

Typists, class B 2 / ........ ♦...........
Manufacturing............... ........
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..................
Public utilities * ...............
Services ................. ........

7

1

1

1

-

7

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

200
25
6
19
157
4
127

86
9
1
8
63
4
53

52
11
1
10
33
2
18

50
a
14
23

27
8
6
2
15
3

n
9
5

18
6
1
5
8
1
-

6
1
1
4
-

20
1
1
19
15

-

2
2
-

1
-

-

-

24
2
18

6
14

13
8

4
9

12
4

4
2

7
4

4
1

4
-

-

2
-

1

-

-

176
5
171
10
36
-

180
9
171
30
31

90
8
82
22
2
2

139
4
135
26

6
6
6

1
1
1

-

3
2

-

___!i
3

-

-

—
-

-

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

n

-

-

_

-

88
37
11
26
45

no
34

53
2
'2

206
80
36
44
121
7
75
13
5
21
5

49
17

126
38
30
8
76
1
4
14
15
42
12

46
4
4

131
30
8
22
10 1
42
13

24

181
53
27
26
128
14
40
18
12
44

64
n
2
9
34
1
13

5

18
8
5
3
9
7

Women

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

• -

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

1
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
3
4
6

3

3

11

96

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

3

88

-

-

-

-

-

-

181
2

29?
-

2
16 1

-

287

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

3

2
85
1
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

••

—

—

8

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2
9
21
8
8

-

-

161
—

18

-

-

9
272
6
8

125

10
-

1
7
2
4
211
4
2
2
197
-

20
24
153
-

10

55
70

-

7
31
9
23
6

11
16
18
6

34
69
2
23
7
19
18
7

290
22
8
14
252
7
35
12
179
19
16

248
5
2
3
223
7
19
17
179
1
20

355
9
6
3
323
7
59
3
252
2
23

-

-

34
-

12
4
5
13
17
76
6
-

6
39
7

132
35
5
30
64
1

-

17
31
7
~

24
1
52
28
2
26
12
7

-

-

-

5
25
2
31

6
44
13
33

118
45
17
28
68
1
44

-

3
2
12

-

42
5
-

5

-

24
-

-

-

1

81
44
15
29
37
14

44
3

-

-

_

24
22

18
6

-

-

-

-

41

37
5
5

18

18
14
11
3
3

_

_

3
34
4
19

-

2

_

_

-

-

8
19
10

—

—

-

n
7

5

2
1

-

5
-

_

—

28
2
18
2
6
13

•
—
-

-

—

23

-

12

-

-

20
19

21
-

6
6

14

m
m

_

6
13

14

3
10
13
6

_

2

«

1
1

_

_
-

_

*

1

-

-

..

_

4

_

_

12

•»

_

1

_

13

32

-

_

_

1

-

-

9
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of
&
1
$
1
$
f
t
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32,50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 4-5.00 47.50
of
sched­
earn­ $
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00

workers receiving strain:ht-time weekly earnings of $
1
V
$
1
£
*
$
*
e
$
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00

t

95.00 $
100.00
and
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

Women - Continued
_

_

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B...
Manufacturing......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing ...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail t r a d e .... ................
Finance ** ......................
Services ........................
Central offices ....................

5,113
330
112
218
A,232
66
560
334
3,017
255
551

36.5
38.0
39.5
37.0
36.5
37.0
37.0
39.0
36.0
38.0
36.5

145.50
50.00
48.50
51.00
44.50
51.50
50.50
43.00
43.00
52.50
51.50

37
37
37
-

27
2
2
25
25
-

177
3
3
174
2
172
-

382
2
2
367
3
30
317
17
13

663
14
12
2
643
20
123
500
6

710
58
14
44
613
2
93
50
459
9
39

616
28
7
21
540
10
55
26
428
21
48

618
41
5
36
469
7
35
5
409
13
108

517
34
12
22
426
6
63
U
305
8
57

427
45
28
17
302
15
85
28
143
31
80

292
6
6
229
6
27
6
119
71
57

242
27
25
2
177
12
64
63
38
38

90
10
4
6
45
20
7
11
7
35

72
6
3
3
53
1
11
10
11
20
13

54
H
14
33
26
1
6
7

55
1
1
52
7
23
2
6
14
2

51
25
2
23
21
19
2
5

16
10
10
3
1
2
3

34
2
2
16
12
4
16

31
2
2
5
3
2
24

2
2
2
-

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .......... .......
Manufacturing.......... ...........
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufactur i n g ........... .......
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade ....................
Finance ** ......................
Services ........................
Central offices ............ .

4,870
454
91
363
2,753
280
715
729
855
174
1,663

36.5
38.0
38.5
38.0
36.5
36.5
36.5
37.0
36.0
37.5
36.5

50.50
49.00
50.00
48.50
50.00
54.00
51.50
52.50
46.50
49.00
51.50

-

11
■11
3
8

10
1
1
9
2
6
1

117
26
26
87
9
14
53
11
4

166
10
5
5
130
7
7
11
94
11
26

334
42
7
35
191
2
26
56
101
6
101

470
31
6
25
313
9
76
47
147
34
126

605
93
12
81
300
20
78
67
113
22
212

669
38
19
19
356
40
104
90
107
15
275

824
74
6
68
408
56
160
100
69
23
342

383
24
16
8
199
33
45
45
55
21
160

461
63
8
55
265
47
72
74
68
4
133

213
35
5
30
113
9
46
51
3
4
65

181
11
6
5
105
11
13
69
9
3
65

154
no
32
30
24
6
18
44

121
1
1
67
9
17
34
5
2
53

40
2
2
26
3
21
2

66
3
3
39
1
3
20
15

15

15

13

8
1
4
2
1

_
6
2
4
-

-

-

12

24

7

Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) 2 / ...........
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................
Retail trade .................................................................
Finance ** ............................... ........................................

570
448
64
325

36.5
36.0
38.5
35.5

56
56
4
47

60
60
7
53

61
61
5
56

102
102
12
62

53
27

52
41
7
29

34
17
5
12

2
2
1
1

44
14
6
1

12
12
1

21

1
1

2
2

2
2

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

27

39
28
12
16

-

-

-

-

-

-

48.00
46.00
48.00
46.00

-

6

-

-

9
9

Clerks, accounting ..................................................................
Manufacturing.................. .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ....... .........
Nonmanufactur ing ......... .................................
Public utilities * ...............................................
Wholesale trade ........................................................
Retail trade ........................................................ ...
Finance ** ........................................................................
Services ..............................................................................
Central offices ............. .......

8.540
1,179
341
838
6,030
594
1,551
1,247
1,491
1,147
1,331

37.0
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.0
36.5
36.5
38.0
36.0
37.5
36.5

49.00
50.00
48.00
50.50
48.00
53.50
47.50
45.00
47.00
49.50
54.00

Clerks, file, class A 2/ ..............
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ........ ........
Retail trade .....................
Finance
....................
Services \ ................ ......
.
Central offices ............ ........

3.183
2,038
197
372
59
1,099
311
690

36.5
37.0
37.5
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.5
36.0

48.50
48.50
54.00
50.50
42.50
46.50
49.00
51.50

-

-

-

-

-

2

14
14
4
3

_

-

74
17
12
5
27

338
15
3
12
310
10
54
97
79
70
13

555
78
17
61
432
8
90
157
124
53
45

546
42
8
34
469
17
166
156
68
62
35

791
61
14
47
659
21
137
144
244
113
71

759 1,009
192
158
70
65
122
93
722
533
49
24
228
153
106
131
182
174
76
132
68
95

722
64
26
38
554
62
178
104
117
93
104

952
149
32
117
682
99
155
94
171
163
121

493
58
5
53
336
34
132
48
45
77
99

631
111
45
66
367
73
79
99
39
77
153

363
26
2
24
188
42
55
10
39
42
149

408
49
28
21
259
60
9
57
82
51
100

255
49
6
43
131
36
27
9
49
10
75

23
23

223
94

163
102

572
411
11
62
28
280
30
46

297
156
11
19
2
111
13
107

4 11
282
17
75
7
133
50
92

236
162
28
18
2
91
23
66

317
240
34
37

177
130
11
29
1
70
19
34

235
130
25
27
2
67
9
84

128
82
5

101
71
10
18
2
29
12
30

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
22

-

-

-

30

_

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
21
1

16
6
52
20
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
66
30
40

-

-

114
55
57

a

2
11
23
23

n

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
.
_

_
8
_
8
-

2
_
2
_
2
_

_
-

-

_

-

-

_

_

9

5

-

-

-

-

_
_
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

1

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

125
7

103
20
2
18
62
4

88
17

80
5

26
3

6
2

2

1
1

4

-

-

-

-

_

-

..

17
40
1
29

5
36
1
4
8
17
6
39

209
55
6
49

-

35
44

7
84
26
8
7
1
42
34

84
51
13
9

55
32
1
6

47
31
28
1

29
12
2

18

19
6
20

2

6
4
7

no

25
37
2

n

-

8
11
39
21

_

-

8
2
31
34
8
1
3

18
10

3
1
19

6
4
5

_

3
19

2
4

2
2

_

*

4

-

-

10
5
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

4

4
20
10

6
1

10

-

_

_

_

5

1

-

_
_

-

1

_

_

_

_
_

1

-

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

..

_

-

1

_

n
32

-

15

10

Table 1*— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of workers receiving
Average
$
1
$
$
4
$
1
$
i
?
1$
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.0 0
of
sched­
and
earn­ $
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
? 2 . ? 0 35.00 ?7t?0 40.00 42.50 45,oo 47.?0 50.00 5 2.50 55.00 5 7 .5 0

straight-time weekly earnings of *
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6
5 7 .5 0 60.00 . 2 .5 0 65.0 0 67.50 ! o ^ 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
100.00
and
over
60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.0 0 90.00 95.0 0 10 0 .0 0

Women - Continued

-

-

-

-

-

30

4

-

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

24

9

5

4

-

-

-

1

—

-

2

-

249
39
1
38
107
30
18
32
15
103

410
35
22
13
284
88
18
39
125
91

258
35
1
34
194
33
2
31
78
29

134
30
30
125
9
15
15
70
29

61
30
2
28
24
8
3
7
6
7

144
17

42
13

112
15

76
a

18
3

21
-

7
3

3
3

17
105
33
10
28
22
22

13
21
6
1
1
11
8

15
69
31
10
12
28

41
31
20
11
4

3
11
11
4

13
3
10
8

3
4

3
-

55
18
6
12
27
18
10

74
33
1
32
38
17
13
3

29
6
6
10
3
6
13

18
12
11
6

33

6
5
5
1

9
2
1
1
1
1
6

_

_

-

11
11
11
-

5

-

5
5
-

-

190
82
26
56
94
11
13
55
12
3
H

131
20
2
18
90
24
22
13
27
4
21

139
18
15
3
103
8

72
19
H
5
39
4
2
19
H
H

38
3
3
28

65
24
3
21
32

21
1
1
H

12
■
3
-

4
4
5
19
9

-

3
-

3
1
1
2
-

16
5
7

12
4
4

8

9

545
208
33
175
226
20
79
98
20
111

786
241
u
200
407
11
135
117
128
138

420
53
11
42
259
71
66
64
25
108

915
269
45
224
475
101
68
127
120
171

338
26
16
10
237
• 63
40
62
a
75

540
68
27
41
358
39
47
91
66
1H

169
63
6
57
74
35
12
27
32

431
51
5
46
351
172
H7
29
29

259
37
37
208
72
100
27
H

399
99
17
82
265
177
83
35

343
100
4
96
229
77
133
19
H

196
40
3
37
107
43
54
10
49

136
47
9
38
76
45
26
13

H5
29
8
21
96
57
16
20
20

70
25
4
21
42
17

221
69
29
40
139
49
17
40
13
20
13

161
87
53
34
74
28
4
25
5
12
—

292
122
39
83
161
50

201
57
44
13
136
15
3
47
55
16
8

256
116
31
85
99
12
26
31
8
22
41

152
26
12
H
119
35
22
H
27
21
7

280
102
19
83
158
18
25
17
54
44
20

2,721
658
102
556
1,763
830
656
201
300

37.5
38.0
38.5
37.5
38.0
37.0
38.5
38.5
36.0

47.00
47.00
44.50
47.50
46.50
47.00
45.50
44.00
49.00

4

67
18
18
46
13
33
3

13
6
6
7
1
-

236
72
12
60
133
51
62
20
31

Clerks, payroll .........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .................... .
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Public utilities * ............
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade
Finance **
Services
Central offices ......................

2,627
935
347
588
1,443
299
166
324
376
278
249

37.0
38.0
39.0
37.5
37.0
36.0
36.0
38.0
36.5
38.0
35.5

53.50
50.50
49.50
51.00
54.00
49.50
57.50
51.50
57.50
53.50
61.00

10
10
7
3
-

30
23
1
22
4
-

91
58
28
30
33
9




-

549
231
8
223
246
15
70
90
68
72

Clerks, order ........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Services ..........................
Central offices ......................

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public,utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1
1

31

189
38
38
139
6
10
79
44
12

3

2
-

56

224
2
2
220
25
H2
53
2

7
6
11
—

4
-

1
5
1
2
2

93
93
4
87
2
-

-

-

70
3

77
77
49
28
-

4
-

6
1
1

18
1

4
4
4
-

-

3
43
6
7

85
10
2
8
44
31
2
2
9

51.50
50.50
50.00
50.50
51.50
58.00
48.50
46.50
52.50
53.50

—

1

103
11
11
36
5
4
27

37.0
37.0
38.5
37.0
37.0
37.0
37.0
36.5
38.0
37.0

_

2

162
45
2
43
47
5
2
10
18
12
70

6,265
1,4 0 0
209
1,191
3,725
598
621
1,175
943
1,140

-

8

277
98
4
94
81
H
3
17
35
12
98

Clerks, general .........................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ................. •••••••
Services ..........................
Central offices ......................

4
4
-

5

405
26
8
18
309
96
37
8
105
63
70

6,887
490
731
377
4,310
979
1,711

i,ao6

15

789
140
12
128
545
84
152
19
233
57
104

$38.00
37.00
38.50
37.00
37.50
42.50
39.50
38.00
36.50
37.00
40.00

............................................
................................................
....................................................

9.870
1,272
166

332 1,434 1,473 2.378 1,205 1,105
82
490
78
2 11
70
7
12
26
18
39
43
168
478
60
7
43
44
840 1,044 1,769
835
963
313
21
91
69
51
14
70
121
30
H3
4
155
30
37
27
9
151
65
427
260
586
801 1,204
563
208
HO
137
40
165
H5
398
188
12
172
104
351

37.0
37.0
38 .0
37.0
37.0
37.0
37.0
38.5
36.5
38 .0
36.5

Clerks, file, class B ..................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing .......... .......
Public utilities * .......... ••••••
Wholesale t r a d e ............ ••••••
Retail t r a d e ...... ...............
Finance ** .............. ..........
Services ..........................
Central offices ................... .

-

5
13
7
3

-

40
23
48
9

83
30‘
6
24
36
23
4
17
120
54
15
39
43
19
6
11
7

-

23

-

8
62
25
18

7
7
22
5
4
58
17
4
13
25
4

-

10
11
16

-

-

7

1

-

-

13
1
6

2

2
-

2
1
1
1

1
-

-

11,
Table 1,--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of

Average

T

*
1—
£
5
V
i—
i
$
1
¥ ~
i—
i—
t
1
*—
$
*
fc
Number Weekly
$
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.0 0 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.CO 5 7.5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
of
100.00
sched­
and
earn­ $
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
32.50 35.00 ?7.?0 40.00 42.5 0 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .00 100.00 over

T

Sex, occupation, and industry division

F

Women - Continued
Duplicating-machine operators ..........
Manufacturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .................
Wholesale trade • • ••...............
Retail trade .............. .
Finance * * ...... .................
Central offices ...... ...............

509
4
-8
332
66
36
202
129

36.5
38.0
37.0
36.0
38.5
36.5
35.5

142.50
42.50
42.50
44.00
42.00
42.00
42.00

Key-punch operators ....................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable g o o d s .... .............
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ....................
Finance ** .......................
Services ..........................
Central offices .........................................................................

3.546
278
115
163
2,484
200
211
162
1,665
246
784

37.0
37.0
38.5
36.5
37.0
36.5
37.5
38.5
37.0
36.0
36.5

47.00
47.00
46.50
47.00
46.00
50.00
55.50
47.00
44.50
45.50
48.50

Office g i r l s ............................................. ...............................................
Manufacturing ............................................. ' ................................
Nonmanufacturing ....................

2.476
208
1,701

36.5
37.5
36.5

35.50
34.50
35.50

P iih l ^ n + . I H + . i o s i

^

3 (O
QA £
.
J'J.J

Retail trade .........................................................................
Finance * * ...............................................................................
Services ....................... ..
Central offices .....................

46
1,042
138
567

37.5
36.5
37.5
36.0

37.50
35.50
36.50
36.50

Secretaries ............................
Manufacturing ........................
Durable goods ....................................
Nondurable g o o d s ....... ......................
Nonmanufacturing ....................................
Public utilities * ...........................
Wholesale trade ................................
Retail trade ......................................
Finance * * ......................... .....r___
Services..................... .
Central o f fices .................. ..................

21,811
3,169
710
2,459
14,251
923
4,243
759
4,571
3,755
4,391

37.0
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.0
37.0
36.5
38.0
36.5
37.0
36.5

62.50
63.50
60.50
64.50
61.50
65.50
64.00
61.50
62.00
57.50

07
7f

-

60
9
32
5
27
19

81
1
64
17
5
37
16

32
2
22
5
14
8

83
52
12
40
31

146
3
3
133
2
131
10

590
11
458

-

35
35
-

“

-

-

150
19
127

no

64.50

29
25
6
19
4

35

-

.

j j
1 /

U h n lo Q o lo

_

380
90
155
27
in

_

35
9
4
18
15

61
11
20
3
6
11
30

61
22
23
2
12
16

53
2
50
17
5
28
6

24
14
3
10
10

9
7
3
2
2
2

16
1
15
5
1
9
-

15
15
9
-

8
7
1
6
1

5
3
3
2

315
12
5
7
244
2
10
9
185
38
59

516
44
16
28
375
23
3
26
294
29
97

501
25
21
4
370
44
1
15
248
62
106

486
75
25
50
343
23
8
23
247
42
68

400
43
12
31
276
19
43
26
142
46
81

362
42
9
33
214
14
9
41
136
14
106

209
13
13
100
14
9
15
61
1
96

186
11
7
4
131
19
11
5
89
7
44

Ill
2
1
1
83
38
21
18
6
26

58
3
2
1
41

51

368
38
190

120
9
87

71
5
40

18

19
1
10

23

30
2
26

8
2
6

3
1

LL

695
29
575
iAn
XUU
g

J

C

in
XU

11
343
53
91

26
87
35
140

4
42
23
24

12
-

121
12

279
15
14
1
253
8
30
33
64
118
11

i 1 /

120
7
4

96
2
135

4
260
16
121

-

-

13
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
-

-

-

13

12

109

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

5
2

-

-

12

—

—

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




J !

5
—

-

7
34
88

50

Q

-

8

*
j

1
34
26

19

-

20
20
1
14

-

41
1
28
12
10

1
1

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

24
1
1
18
2
10
6
5

21
14
1
12
1

19
1
1
10
10
-

-

-

7

8

-

-

-

17
3
3
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

4
-

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

4

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

_

5
2
10

308 1,011
22
205
11
33
172
11
688
278
10
15
108
29
36
4
72
209
320
163
118
8

_

4
8

_

19
-

4

_

_

26
2

6
—

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

-

-

—

-

-

—

—

-

2

-

915 1.293
162
105
36
25
137
69
570
886
42
45
298
286
31
74
152
225
56
247
240
245

712
92
14
78
425
32
135
40
150
68
195

534
83
12
71
344
62
113
29
97
43
107

222
51
6
45
99
11
23

164
32

364
86

985 1,765 1,282 2,235 2,062 2,118 1,516 1,893
300
178
300
146
242
267
184
293
1
56
30
77
97
14
154
34
190
146
196
208
164
145
244
154
746 1,547 1,385 1,423
884 1,312
674 1,218
26
60
71
71
109
73
41
114
61
328
520
238
502
429
189
513
90
21
36
61
67
67
37
31
258
526
512
446
307
443
244
329
298
256
221
452
219
454
245
224
388
358
402
390
247
165
314
493

-

962 1,045
263
131
61
23
108
202
556
529
66
49
190
137
63
25
217
134
111
93
226
302

-

46
19
72

_

-

-

-

32
97

86
203
18
84
1
68
32
75

30
-

56
11
35

12

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of
¥^
¥
&
&
$
$
$
•
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50
schedof
and
earn— 1
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
?2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 40,00 42.50 45.00 47,50 50.00
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

workers receiving straijcht-tiiQ8 weeklv eaic*ning8 of $
$
1$
¥
$
$
$
¥
%
1
$
$
¥
$
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0 0 80.00 5 5 .0 0 90.00

%

95.00

52.50 ifrfOQ. 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9fltPQ 10 0 .0 0

#
¥
100.00
and
over

Women - Continued
Stenographers, general ..................
Manufacturing........................
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing.....................
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ............. .....
Retail trade ......................
Finance ** ........................
Services ......................... .
Central offices ......................

21,597
2,570
571
1,999
U,436
1,659
3,928
671
6,182
1,996
A , 59 1

36.5
36.5
38.5
36.0
37.0
37.0
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.5
36.0

$49.50
47.00
50.50
45.50
49.00
49.50
51.00
48.00
48.50
48.50
51.50

Stenographers, technical 2/ ............
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .................
Finance ** ........................
Services ..........................
Central offices ......................

1,899
1,184
546
250
641

36.5
37.0
37.5
38.5
35.5

57.00
56.00
55.50
54.50
59.00

Switchboard operators ..............
Manufacturing.................
Durable goods ...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing........... .
Public utilities * ...........
Wholesale trade ..... ........
Retail trade ................
Finance * * .............. .
Services ...................
Central offices ............... .

5,711
438
135
303
4,708

38.0
37.5
38.5
37.0
38.5
38.5

49.00
53.50
49.50
55.50
48.00
51.00
52.50
47.00
49.00
44.00
53.50

Switchboard ooerators-receptionists ...
Manufacturing .................
Durable goods...............
Nondurable goods .............
Nonmanufacturing ...............
P i l■r
i h ?*
+
#
Wholesale trade .............
Retail trade ................

2.170

Finance ** ........................
Services ..........................
Central offices..... ................

471
774
535
1,438

1,490
565

803
225
578
1,256

qq
yy

491
159
174
333

111

37.5
39.5
37.5
39.0
36.5

37.5
38.0
38.5
37.5
37.5

37 0

37.5
37.5
37.5
38.0
37.5

48.00
48.00
47.00
48.50
48.00
Z.8 * 0
>
50.00
46.00
45.50
47.50
49.50

_

-

32
10

—

10
22
16
6
—

-

-

-

-

-

252
69
69
163
4
1
142
16
20

652 1.099 2,123 2,160 3,001 2,291 3,063 1,522 2,177 1.100
338
86
430
187
158
136
306
397
131
164
61
8
8
87
77
47
119
34
39
53
70
100
261
128
278
52
150
117
391
253
698
866 1,440 1,295 2,212 1,516 1,999
949 1,454
444
128
106
292
132
78
128
222
199
229
31
666
383
548
652
12
137
363
293
254
219
66
30
46
77
59
39
163
79
51
14
876
248
662
548
636
330
649
444
6a
313
60
426
216
216
321
148
52
164
74
153
611
536
271
50
667
487
97
377
451
435

-

_

-

18

1
1

1

15

22
16

4
8

1
—

-

108
80
32
7
27

69
34
14
6
31

60 ___38 ___35____29_
8
16
7
13
2
11
7
7
1
28
18
22
43

779
87
70
17
643
63

771
26
8
18
637
79
213
50
231
64
108

359
8
6
2
307
41
65
82
56
63
44

267
36
4
32
159
16
49
12
52
30
72

274
42
12
30
199
78
47
8

128
33
2
31

98
33
6
27
54
2
34

35
14
2
12
14

40
6

1

486
34
6
28
382
50
54
46
144
88
70

404
33
6
27
303
47
53
31
117

2

654
51
5
46
565
13
65
60
124
303
38

705
12
3

18
6
41

456
7
4
3
448
20
12
18
30
368

97

255

472
184
57
127
267

146
36
13
23
99

79

77

20
5
15
59

88
19
1
18
66

50

28

14

116
50
66
137
16
53
10
24
34

193
91

15 2

32

1

2

2

80
15

-

42

42

-

2
6

1

7

—

—

12
13
—

24
8
64

g

14
3

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




15
14
31

68
26
20
1
40

3
2
1

-

21
19
25

239
150
107
38
76

—

2

-

-

135
81
42
24
48

-

6

-

1
1
-

414
345
88
62
65

84
2

22
7
34

12
4
-

169
121
47
32
43

68

5

51
4
4
31
9

201
122
38
38
71

11

68
5

70
39
3
7

83
31
14
11
50

-

-

122
97
8
49

88
45
28
15
35

—

11

189
3
3
114
23
29
2
55
5
72

75
a
33
7
34

-

-

425
11
7
4
324
5
40
11
250
18
90

45
34
31
3
3

-

-

322
33
13
20
182
11
77
5
62
27
107

31
21
16
5
4

8
8
8

-

—

_
-

924
107
18
89
586
60
190
28
247
61
231

21
21

9
666
33
34
77
240
282
27

183
74
6
68
97
xi+

25
13
12
33

12 -

99
96
291
94
49

393
131
25
106
230
2
93
39
24
72
32

9
82
92

g

18
17
19
30
10

15
127
16
24
85
21

55
68

ll
j.
.?
a
30

27
50
59
16
15

4

4
9

9

11
11

15
16

—

55
11

33

7

8
23

3

91
9
4
8
38
32
4

-

18

-

-

6
31

2
15

-

-

4

13
2
2
04

-

-

11

5
5
7

44

3

3

19
6
13
25

3

-

25

_

_

—

-

-

3

38
2

-

3

3

-

15

21

-

13
4
1
3
7

33
3

-

-

2

2

—

-

-

-

5
-

“

4

5

_

1

*

-

-

-

-

4
2

1

-

—
4
3

7

28

—

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

3
28

_
-

3
1
1
2

4
-

-

_
-

—

-

2

-

-

3

1

_

13
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings l/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by Industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of worker:s recejiving
Average
&
$
i
1
1$
$
$
$
*
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 4 5.0 0 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.5 0 55.00
of
sched­
earn­ $
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
32.50 33-00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47,50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57,50

strai*dit-time weekly earnings of 1
i
1
$
e
$
$
i
$
$
$
$
5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 $
100.00
and
over
60.00 62.50 65.00 67,50 70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00

Women - Continued
_

_

-

-

-

-

—
-

-

-

Tabulating-machine operators ............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...... ..................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...................
Wholesale trade ................. ..
Finance ** .........................
Services ...........................
Central offices .......................

941
73
711
48
448
98
157

36.5
37.C
37.0
38.5
37.0
37.0
36.0

$53.00
63.00
51.00
61.50
48.50
55.00
57.00

Transcribing-machine operators,
general .................................
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** .........................
Services .......... ....... .........
Central offices .......................

1,961
139
1,461
439
38
849
127
361

36.5
37.0
36.5
37.0
37.5
36.0
37.5
36.0

48.00
47.50
48.00
50.50
46.50
46.50
46.50
49.50

-

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical ...............................

67

38.0

49.50

-

Typists, class A .........................
Manufacturing .........................
Durable goods ......................
Nondurable goods ............. .
Nonmanuf a c t u r i n g ......................
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance
.........................
Services ...........................
Central offices ...................... .

7,704
934
419
515
5,424
597
1,074
139
2,724
890
1,346

37.0
37.5
39.0
36.5
37.0
36.5
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.5
36.0

48.50
51.00
47.00
54.50
47.50
49.00
51.50
45.50
46.00
47.50
50.50

_
*
“

Typists, class B .........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Durable g o o d s .... .............
Nondurable goods ...................
Nonmanufacturing ......................
Public utilities * .................
Whole sale trade ....................
Retail trade .......................
Finance
.........................
Services ...........................
Central offices .......................

14,391
1,482
476
1,006
11,305
71V,
1,087
917
7,009
1,578
1,604

37.0
37.5
38.5
37.0
37.0
37.5
36.5
39.0
36.5
37.5
36.5

41.00
42.00
41.00
42.50
40.50
45.00
43.00
40.00
39.50
42.00
A4.00

**

**

1/
2/
*
**

25

6

135
8
100
1
67
4
27

252
6
199
89
6
88
15
47

145
100
41
1
38
20
45

151
3
117
82
26
9
31

87
8
54
18
36
-

4

7

4

377 1,014 1,066 1,297
38
67
124
149
30
95
51
59
8
16
90
29
800
299
985
833
61
90
81
96
102
320
1
66
2
22
41
33
120
560
347
574
42
57
187
115
90
166
40
163

864
82
33
49
588
31
101
28
355
73
194

810
175
93
82
448
29
71
-

64
-

280 1,181 2,491 2,683 2,552 1,690 1,418
52
ICO
180
226
187
191
16
61
77
85
9
114
65
130
102
152
43
149
84'
115
932
205 1,002 2,108 2,326 2,064 1,282
117
25
94
119
63
84
76
190
147
125
85
235
72
102
117
55
217
13
234
707
393
685 1,515 1,720 1,218
174
242
18
390
219
135
184
149
262
299
177
217
23
79
117

627
77
9
68
363
41
66
36
181
39
187

54
54'
10

-

10
8
-

“

-

11
1
10
10
—

20
17
17
-

59
29
25
8
-

94
3
7

245
3
191
22
13
130
24
51

253
14
192
29
9
136
18
47

197
4
155
52
9
84
6
38

7

20

-

65
1
4

3

14
3
5

145
38
86
14
62
10
21

258
8
231
40
170
21
19

-

-

-

3

7

2
2
2
-

95
91
-

194
3
-

8
8
-

c

-

25
66
4

3
145
36
4
84
21
46

128
113
8
75
17
15

116
4
105
-

-

72
68
-

106
5
80
8
35
13
21

58
1
46
4
29
13
11

Excludes premium pay for overtire.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




10

-

109
10
93
-

47
12

8
12
4
1
6
5

43
-

17
5
9
26

20
2
5
4
1
13

27
2
24
22
1

15

18
7
9
3
6
-

7
-

3
2
2
1

2
2

4
-

-

-

-

3
3
-

4

—

4
4
-

11
7
4
-

3
-

1
-

4
-

2

1

1

8
3
5
7

9
9
-

40
17
16
14
1
1
7

9
3
2
2
-

-

—

-

-

—

-

-

_

_
•

-

-

-

-

10
1
6
6
-

25

62
6
48
32
16
8

3

23
5
9
6
1
1
9

5

1

4

2

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

461
46
6
40
334
28
107
2
138
59
81

261
38
12
26
146
10
56
3
59
18
77

270
38
14
24
172
3
66
-

109
55
5
50
34
6
11
1
11
5
20

221
20
20
171
99
44
2
14
12
30

65
18
•
18
30
1
12
-

49
11
2
9
31
1
15
-

42
9
-

23
3
-

8
3
_

6
6
-

3
3
-

1
-

3
3

9
25
1
18
_

3
9
-

3
4
-

6
_
-

3

7
10
17

11
4
7

4
2
8

-

_

_
_

11

4
1

3
-

_
_

245
103
187

463
43
19
24
277
24
75
1
120
57
143

-

-

1

-

611
52
30
22
452
59
50
41
167
135
107

370
134
7
127
184
39
65
9
70
1
52

186
6
2
4
162
29
22
10
80
21
18

95
1
1
82
35
17
3
16
11
12

76
10
10
52
9
8
4
17
14
14

17
6
-

20
-

9

3

13

3

-

-

-

8
_
_

2
-

_
_
_

_
-

7

1
_
_
_

-

14
2
6
6
6

_
_

2
1

44
59
60

6
_
11

1
6
2

6
3
-

3

8
5

9
-

.
.
_

1

_

_

_

_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_

_

1

-

-

-

1

_

14

liable 2.— PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings
5— —
i—
—
i—
*
i
—
i * - $
$
$
is—
r
i—
*
Number Weekly
sched­ Hourly Weekly Under 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 10 5 .0 0 110.00
of
and
workers uled earn­ earn­ $
ings
ings 40.00 under
hours
45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 7? .00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00

i

Sex, occupation, and
industry division

i

of 1 ------ 1------ i
*—
$
i—
*
115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 U 0 . 0 0 145.00
and
over
120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00

$

Men
Draftsmen, chief .....................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ........... .
Services .............. ........

D r a f t s m e n ............................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .............. .
Durable g o o d s ............ . • • • •
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..............
Public utilities * ......
Wholesale t r a d e ........ .......
Finance * * .....................
S e r v i c e s .................... .
Central offices ...................
Draftsmen, junior ................... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g .....................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..............
Services .......................
Central offices ............. •••••
Tracers 2/ ............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .................

38.5
38.5
39.0
39.5

*2.97
2.74
3.17
3.28
2.95

$
114.50
105.50
123.50
129.50
110.^0

-

-

-

-

-

2,697
741'
681
60
1,371
49
88
15
1,211
585

38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
36.5
36.0
38.5
40.0
36.5

2.29
2.05
2.05
2.12
2.39
2.21
2.39
1.96
2.40
2.27

88.00
80.00
80.00
81.50
94.50
80.50
86.00
75.50
96.00
83.00

-

1
1
1
-

4
2
2
2
2
-

22
18
16
2
-

-

-

-

912

38.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
36.5

1.61
1.37
1.70
1.70
1.82

62.00
53.50
67.00
68.00
66.50

-

25
21
2
2
2

136
133
1
2

373
160
173
148

L
O

326 “
395
342
191

-

152
50

39.5
39.5

1.14
1.16

45.00
46.00

40.

W

38.5
39.5

1.92
1.77

74.00
70.00

Draftsmen, junior 2 / ..... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing ..................

64
54

39.5
39.5

1.65
1.68

65.00
66.50

7
- ---- S'

Nurses, industrial (registered) .....
Manuf a c t u r i n g ..................
Durable g o o d s .......
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............ .
Public utilities * .............
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** .................... .
Services .............. .
Central offices ...................

503
161
107
54
280
55
45
109
30
62

37.5
39.0
40.0
37.0
37.5
38.5
38.0
36.5
40.0
36.0

1.72
1.62
1.50
1.86
1.71
1.66
1.68
1.79
1.60
2.00

64.50
63.00
60.00
69.00
64.00
64.00
64.00
65.50
64.00
72.00

-

34
5

49
34

3
-

-

13
12
1
1

20
18
2
-

4

50
42
40
2
5
3
2
3

122
76
72
4
35
2
12
7
14
11

141
65
60
5
21
9
12
55

233
91
84
7
76
3
8
1
64
66

336
72
67
5
149
13
11
120
115

67
22
39
19
6

148
54
59
50
35

164
58
63
57
43

133
22
80
70
31

133
9
88
88
36

33
7
7

3
-

19

25
11
12
2

19
16
1
o

342
339
102 --- 58
93
57
11
9
170
185
10
10
15
1
4
166
149
86
70
20
6
6
14

3
3

18
15
1
2
255
45"
38
8
131
5
126
78

12
7
3
2

25
22
-

19
2
1
16

9
-

267
42
41
1
179
16
1
162
46

138
39
39
82
-

58
15
13
2
24
8
-

100
33
32
1
61
60
6

-

5
5

L

30
30
30

35
10
25
25

47
22
19
19
6

30
5
25
25

18
2
16
16

5
4
4
1

45
18
25
23
2

43
14
14
-

48
3
-

80
12
12
-

36
36
-

16
15
-

45
-

36
-

15
1

45
-

-

-

-

-

-

43
2

57
4

21
21
21
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

27
~
26
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

64
7
-

_

-

..

.
.

-

_

50
50
-

15
19

_

50

3
1
78
17

3
43
-

20
13

17
7

4
-

1
-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

1
-

2
1

5
-

16
15

3
3

2
1

-

6
7
3 ----

z

1
1

2
-

3
-

33
33

5
5

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

61
25
23
2
36
11
7
1
1
—

78
25
19
6
48
2

121
29
17
12
78
13
18
21
10
14

75
35
22
13
33
15
6
7
1
7

5S
13
5
8
38
5
11
16
3
7

59
10
5
5
28
7
3
11
6
21

8
4
3
1
1
1
-

10
4
1
3
6
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

-

—

-

_

26
11

45
-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Women
Draftsmen 2/ .........................
Manufacturing .....................

1/
2/
*
**

-----

m
m

_

-

-

8
6
6
2
2
—

11
7
6
1
4
1
2
1
—

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Includes data for industry divisions not sho\*i separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), comnunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

41
4
5

12
3
3
6
1
3
2
3

_

3

..

5

6
-

-

2

_
-

m
m

Occupational Wage Survey, N e w York, N.Y., April
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

*
*

—

-

1951

Table 3•— MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

1

Occupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ?•/............. .
Manufacturing ...................................................................................
Durable goods ........................................................................
Nondurable goods ............................. . ............................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / . .............................................................
Retail trade .......................
Finance ** .........................
Services ...........................
Electricians, maintenance ...................................................
Manufacturing ....................................... ... ......................................
Nondurable goods ..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....................
Public utilities * ................
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * ............................................................................... ...
Services ..........................................................................................
Central offices .... ......................................................................
Engineers, stationary 2 / ..........................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...................................................................................
D ir m lV l o

grvvl s

N rYn^TiT’ n V n

TT

r

crnrv/^ «

i—
--- -?—
Number Average
of
hourly Under 0.95 1.00 1.05
workers earnings $
0.95 1.00 1 ,0 5 1.10
1,791
210
264
1,254
341
305
259
1,997
799
^79
420
1,174
302
157
400
311
24

Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....................
Public utilities * ................
Retail trade .......................
Finance * * ............................................................. ......
Services .........................................................................................

1,298
132
142
429
542

Firemen , stationary boiler ........................................... ...
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........................................................................... ...
Durable goods ........................................................................
Nondurable goods* ...................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / . ...................
Public utilities * ........ ...... .
Retail trade ........ ... ...............
Finance ** TTTTttt
rt
Services ...... .....................

r,390
416
119
297
974
130
88

Helpers, trades, maintenance 2 / . .........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..... ......... .........
Durable goods ..................... .
Nondurable goods ........... .
o
«r
r

0/

Public utilities * ................
Retail trade ................... .
Finance ** ........... ......... .
no e

296
2,351
1,377
345

1,032
Q60
7W
482
152
123

102

1.95
2.03
1 75
2 12
l!92
2.07
2.36
1.90
1.76
1.58
1.58
1.43
1.64
1.58
1.79
2.06
1.57
1.35

1.30

1,35

99

26

1

-

-

-

-

-

F
~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

38

36
28
2
26
8

193
72
34
38
121
5
59
42

164
91
55
36
73
13
39
10

168
77
26
51
90
31
33
9

106
52

235
145
106
39
90
19
14
33
24

321
150
58
92
169
102
10
41
16
. 2

24
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

88

15
11

22

24
14

1

5

82

19

54

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

-

22

_

_

1

93

82

19

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2
3

-

_

_
_

-

-

-

_

30

5

-

_

38
-

_

-

-

14
68
-

16
6

y
y
$
y
yr
y —
y
y
y —
y
1 —
1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.

1.40 . 1 . & L

-

-

19
-

38

-

7

_

54
7
-

16
31
-

5
1
-

4
-

jj
17
54
18
14
3
19
-

-

jo

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

6

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

407
81
22
59
277
28
35
1

121
50
33
17
61
13
34
5

301
20
20

46
5

95
14
7
7
81
52
29

20

19
19

13

217
84
51

249
69
61
8
176
10
27
124
14
4

33
128
50
3
66
9
5
180
82
25
j

-

281
155
27
22
24 2
73
/o
33
167
72
25
29
41
2

2
2
38
17
4
16
89
14
12
2
72
18
13
4
35
3
242
41
2

10

-

2
2
-

-

2

-

7
7
2
5

35
12
12

-

-

42
11
9
2
31
1
3
_
_

187
42

-

4
4
4

-

-

-

1.42
1.41

47
12

1.26
1.46

12

28
28

108
100
78

-

'x.
je
j
-

-

1

22
8

35
-

-

-

4
24

-

8

67
50
25
25
17
5

3
-

6
6

13
8
8
s
j

1

36

10
5

8

70
70

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

198

68
21
-

-

-

2
14
2

180
31
2
29
149
49
35
65

-

4

_

200
50
11
39
150
32
2
99
16

-

-

-

183
67

-

-

_

197
36
13
74
69

-

-

-

181
29
17
72
62

-

30

-

174
21
10
82
61

-

-

-

98
21
8
40
27

-

“

-

81
3
3
38
37

_

-

-

88
2
2
22
62

-

-

-

131
2
21
5
103

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

67

-

-

-

29
10
1-Q
J 7

-

10

-

-

137
6

4

-

-

24
12
12

-

-

23
1

-

-

_

_

1

143

118
105
5

77
71
51

100

20
6

1

42
145
2

-

2 7

13
-*j

-

-

3
7

3
-

2

3

2 I

154
88

22
66
66
29

71
47
4
43
24
14

4

2

1

8

32

38

4
34

59
8

2
10

83
28
16
12
55
5

23
9
1
8
14
5
5
_

231
70
15
55
161
1

-

41
9

4

230
100
33
67
130

156
97
25
72

20

13

-

10
10

-

124
18
335
204
32
172
130

6

41
26
116
7
-

57
52

34

2

593
310
43
267
283
191
47
43

10

8

2

J/
2

120
-

139
51
25

90
15
75
107
50
51

6

n o

57

36

241
63
11
57
J<~

-

-

-

5

32
4

37

J

79
70
70
Q
7

33

1

-

-

-

j

•

2

235
54
13
j-j
j i

-

8
g

-

7
3
3

21

‘
2.50

2.10

85
18
18

-

30

-

_

-

y

2.00

1.90

26

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1.20 J * 2 L

-

26
8
6
2
18

1.43
1.54
1.40
1.25

1.15-

y —
y —
i —
y —
y —
y —
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45

_

1.92
1.99
1^82
2.14
1.87
1.86
2.05
1.92
1.71
2.09

1*854
5A7
139
408

.

of

— J---C

-

11.81
1.79
1.75
1.82
1.82
2.03
1.77
1.57

474

%—
1.10

3 7
JQ

-

70
-

-

20
18
2

-

19
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
9

G
-

9
13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

4
7

59
10
6

62

23
15

165
145

7
7

6
3

20
2

4
48

_

3
3

2
18
2

-

17
7
23
1
123
71

-

30
30

j

£

62
3
13
46

10
2
-

2

£

145
19
-

18
1

30

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

12
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

-

-

66
37

32
2

99
62

13
13

62
37
12

_

-

36

13

4
-

-

-

n
71

26

o

52

28

30
6
8
1

-

-

13
4
5

7
17
4

15

12

-

-

9
16
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
15

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

1
1
-

-

_

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

_
-

36
36
-

36
-

_

1

-

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

36

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

36

4
-

-

-

-

20

-

-

1
-

••

-

-

-

-

-~ r
"v"~ '
2.70 2.80 2.90
and
2.70 2.80_ 2.90 ever
2.60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Nev York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Table 3.— MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings l / for men in selected occupations by industry division)

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




17

Table 3• — MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earning 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Oilers ........................................................
Manufacturing.....................................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ............................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...........................
PiiHUa ii+1H+.4ac *
Retail tra d e ..................

Number Average Under *
$
i
hourly %
of
0.95 1.00 1.05
workers earnings 0.95
1.00 1.05 1.10
683
27-4
65
209
409

$1.51
1*44
1.39
1.45

IL L

1.56
1 60

48
72

U98
1.38

Paintersr maintenance 2 / ........................ 1.686
Manufacturing...................... .
0
259
Durable goods ...................... .
106
Nondurable goods ....................
153
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...................... .
1,369
PiiVHi iv
* MH-Mao *
211
Dale 41 f
Finance ** •........... .
563
S erv ice s.............................. .
450

1.67
1.76
1.59
1.89
1.65
1 *7
A. 79
1 Q
Q
A.77
1.67
1.45

Pipe fitte r s , maintenance 7 j .................
Manufacturing .....................................
Durable goods .................................
Nondurable goods ............................
Nonmanufacturing g / ...................... .
PiiKMft irMH
* ........................

367

1.87

230

1.86

53
177
135

1.75
1.39

Plumbers, maintenance 2 / ...................... .
Manufacturing .................... ......... .
Durable goods ........... ....................
Nondurable goods •.••.•••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing g j ...........................
Retail trade ...................................

573
76
29
47
483

59

S e rv ice s.................. ........... .

22
221
161

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ••••••
Manufacturing ................................. .
Durable goods ........... .............. .
Nondurable goods ••••.•••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing .......................... .

158
80
32
48
78

1

-

-

1
1

•

2
2

-

2

-

•

m
m
-

•
-

l.? 9

1.60

188
63
33
30
125

20
20

161

1.20

$
1.25

1.30

1.15

1.20

1 . 2?

l .?0

8
6
6

35
7
7
28

69
65
65
4

17

2
2

•
9

32

193

-

2
2

6

m ----- 6’
m
6
m
.
—

-

.
-

.
-

.
-

•
28

•
•
m

•
.
•

8
8

•
24

8

-

8

9

1

•
1

192

9
9
9
-

1.88

-

1.78

-

.
-

-

m
m

1
1
1

-

•

-

m

-

113

2
2

m
e
111

77
7
7
70

m
m

24

35
157

79
32

2
68

-

-

6
6
6

2
2

•

-

-

-

37

35

«
»

1.76

2

1

-

1.63

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

40
39

11

-

•

•
m
m

77
2
2

75

37
24
13

34
10

24

30
13
13
17

49
26

m
e
•
-

12
1
1
1

■
■

55
5

17

3
50

16

2

1.90
2.23
1.70
1.94

9

6

•

2.10

1.83
1.82
1.79
1.84
1.85

$
1.35

40

-

32
18

1
1

46
4
42
115
96
7v

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

53
36
2

34
17
12

1

15
207
34
12
22

170
Z3
/
104
19

150

39
15
24
105
*
12
X
X
67

20

21

7
5
-

6
12
10

37
3
3
34

27
27
•
25

25
7

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

1

1

75
36
17

150

28
18

4

79
4
3

4

8

•
-

4

8

-

•

4

.

m

221
66
22

79
4

167
38
•
38
129
57
j f
17
Xr
36
19

39

n
4

13

12

12
12

1

12

t-time hour!-v earnines of - ....................................................... ..
4
i
4
*
4
4
4
4
i
$
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 . A 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90
0
and
1.70 1.80 l f ?0 2.00 2.10 2,?0 2-30 ?.4Q 2.501 2.60 2.70 2* 22. 2*22 ■ Y .
Q -flE
$

$

7

1 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2 / Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
* Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u tilitie s .
■** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1.3? Hu 40 M ?

$

•
•

•
18

1.50

1.10

$
1.15

m

18
m
e
•
18

orkers
$
$
l .<0 1.45

t

i

16
4
127
56
25
42
4
129

88
2
86

a

54

44

112

41
21
w
iA
43
7

45
27

3
3

-

27
18

22

1

26

93

2

/5
42
29
19

1j
x?
9
-

1

24
24

2

•

24
•

2

37
37

24

87

41

62
1
1

18

4

67
5
39

20
10
10
21
1
20

2

61
2

13
4

1
1

-

1
1

-

16
6
2
8

-

•

m
m

11

m
e
-

m
m
«
m

~

•

.
-

m
m

m

9

•

•

22

1

m
e
m
m

9

-

-

•

-

-

16
16

m
e
-

•

-

-

•

16

.

.
•

-

-

.
•

m
e

7
4
4
•

•
•
•

•
•

_
-

1

5
5
5
•
-

m

-

36

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

4
4

.

.

•

4

-

•

-

70
30
19

8

13

4
3

1
1

11

1

-

2

m
e

40

4

12

3

m

•

-

-

9

10

6

6
6

93
-

7

2,

2
2

m
m
•

•

-

*

46

9
43
19
47
5

8

4
63
•

21

71
25
23

10

1

75

21

10
1

•
•

-

•
-

52
33
5
28
19
18

11
2
6

2
2

-

7
7
7
-

21

5
2

•

2
2

m

m

2
2

12
12

2

12

-

•
-

m

-

.

18
Table 4..— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is io n

JLSfin
JL2JU s p u J^SSi
E
npM
1
1
T ~ 1
i
r ~ T ~ 1----Number Average Under 8 r 1
f
T
V
*
8
1— 1— $
of
hou rly $
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.ifl 2.50
and
workers earnings 0.75
,?0

,80

Crane o p era to rs, e le c t r ic bridge
(under 20 to n s )

Guards 3 / ................................ ......... .
r»g T, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V ni^i|<«h1a gnndA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A
KnnimrmfAatnrl r>g
................
** ..................... .................. ..

J a n ito r sf D orters and clean ers . . . . . . . . .
M anufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nomnanufaoturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PnKI4 a
#
VtiAl*a«1*
. . . . . . ...
R e ta il trad e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S*w 1 M tfl___________________________
C entral o f f ic e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J a n ito r s, p orters and clea n ers
M anufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
_____________________
TVimhlA
NnnAimKI a
______ _________
Nonaanufaoturing 3/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vhnl
a t.mHa_______________
RAt«41 trAf^A__________________
WIM A •#
flA
jUinri A A ______________________
A
Cftnirfll ftffjAAfi

Order f i l l e r s .............•••••••.••........ .
M anufacturing ........................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonaanufacturing 2 / ••••••••••••••••
W holesale trad e *....... ..................
R e ta il trade t t t t t r . r t t t t t t t T t t t t
AAA __________________

134
60
7A

t?5 1.00 1,05 1.10 1,15 1.20 1.25 ;,? o

1,40 1,45 *.?0 *.60 JL,70 1,80 l.?0

42
4
/»
* ----42
>

1.92
1 ftft
2*22

1

8

4

36

1

14,
1/

^.39 ^,40 ^.50 over

fopo S .lo

8

A

«
■

•

•

36

25
25

s
3.296
543
242
301
2,733
iJ O
L
62
1,809

1.37
1.38
1.26
1.48
1.36
1 M
A*^«

16.488
3,930
1,235
2,695
12,116
1,445

1.22
1.20
1.18
1.21
1.22
1.29

601

2.176
5,936
2 068
M2

8,240
355
134
221
7,524
152
385
5,998

a
.

1 .wo

1.46

1.1^
4-.4.J

1.09
1.32
1.04
1.45

361

1.07
1.11
1.20
1.06
1.06
1.14
1.12
1.06
o/
♦7«f
1.19

3.206
1,151
563
588
2,036
1,161
780
iq
*7

1.41
1.31
1.28
1.33
1.47
1.48
1.44
1.66

k l

m
m

5
5
5

7

«»
7
7

m
15

578 402 556
38 130 233
12 36 30
26 q/ 203
540 272 .323
ft
13
s
23 60 30
36 99 213
2
A
479 100 71

58

146 175
17

31

15

17 31
58 129 144
14

15

15
95

5

58

20
20
•

•
-

20
•

8

46
90

77
43
12
31
34
34

224
■ 26"
“
6
20
174 198
Q
y 90
q
1
1
174

566
268
78
190
291
30

877
140
53
87
725

181
13
58
7

38
235
192
251
12

q

80
20

6

14
60
10
ft
27
17

100
17
2
15
83
15
68

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), oonainication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




lt?5

q

95
24
OL

113
16“
16

104
51
0

71

97

53

V
33

52

✓

2
24

317 1917 3033
31
68
44
44
150 1761 2895
ft*
55 104
7
1
36
68
64
64
4
4

231
58
52
6
173
125
4B

82
33
10
23
49
24
25

122
147

3
83

3
177

3
93

353
54
51
3
299
12
5
278

669
14
10
4
638

223
8
g
2
215

89
1

72
40

35
26

7
•

1
88

40
30

26
9

6

11
517

4
188

88

30

9

6

959 1544 2270 1983
416 258 490 255
71 100
8
146
270 187 390 24.7
536 1206 1725 1568
68 546 1 /Q
84
1/
18
20
26
68
106 124
36
261 334 1443 1403
83 176
25
51
7
80
55 160

404
116
48
68
261

174
96
28
68
73

58
28

49

24

2

20
5
153
44
27

12
26

9
6

3
2
1

3

199
14
1A

16
93
16

1M
21
17

185
ft

L

8

51

137

684 1024
252 266
163 126
89
07 140
423 752
70
71

864
149
60
89
694
144

95
187
49
9

148
254
205

6

60
413
43
21

650
18

161
71

33
2

45
26
26

4

584
36
62
463

578
46
18
28
507
18
47
257

12
613

48
68
1
56

10
1

19
1
14

2

190

25

19

11
22

21

100
36
21
15
64
37
27

25
13
9
/
12
6
6

79
45
23
22
34
18
15

m

340 2023 3057
70
22
17
g
18
16
A 62
1

123

288
84
32
52
204

112
19

988 1432 1069
350 156 289
78
137
57
78 232
213
638 1276 780
37
79
94
Z0
29
28
252 289 188
160 740 337
149 125 147

778
4

A

A

120
18
7
11
102
A
3
7

a

21

12

75

6

7

20
366

u

3/
-?**•

23

142
77
57
20
63
43
20
2

25

2

q

109
60
57
3

49
35
14

1/

A

269
122

51

6
2

39
jy

4.
24
<4
/
4

•

•
m

m
e»

«»

13

2

2
5

6

47

51
5

3

34

m
m

m

m
m

44

1
1

m

m

m
m
m

m
m

m

30

33

m

7

m
•

-•

5

78

1
/
4

78
78

e»

m

m

14
2

2
190
73
40
33
114
66
/ft
4
2

80

•

429
384
85
299
45
27
18

554
145
84
61
407
327
72
0
m
*

2

34
.24

326
69
35
34
253
153
90

173
2

197
5
ft
j

204
5
ft

17

m

190
52

197

-

0
ft

196
A

15
15

4

2
171
140

23

75

2
2

m

—
•

-

m

-

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N*Y*, April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

19

Table 4.— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / b y industry division)

Number of workers receiving

Occupation and industry division

Number Average
$
i —
i —
8— i — 8—
of
hourly *
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05
workers earnings 0 75
u. t ?
.80 .85 .90 •9? l t00 1.05 1.10

Packers ? / .....................................................- .........
Manufacturing ...................................................
Durable goods ..............................................
Nondurable g o o d s............. ........................ .
Nonxoanufacturing 2 / ..........................................
Wholesale trade ........................................ .
R etail trade ................................... ...........

6.307
2,9X6
867
2,049
3,324
1,558
1,526

Receiving c le r k s ................................................. .
Manufacturing............................. ................ ..
Durable goods ..................................... . . . .
Nondurable goods ........................................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..........................................
Wholesale trade ...................... ...................
R etail tr a d e ....................................
S e rv ices...................................... ...............
Central o ffice s ................................................

1.381
454
190
264
904
190
552
69
23
1.843
844
257
587
961

*
Wholesale tr a d e .................. ••••
Retail tr a d e ................................. ••••••••
S erv ices ........................... .
Central o f f i c e s ........................ .

389
362
185
38

Shipping-end-receiving clerks 3 / ............
Manufacturing ..................... .....
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods .......................................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................. .
Wholesale trade .........................................
Retail tr a d e ........... ............. ....................
Services ......................... .................. ..

2.769
1,363
372
991
1,215
758
148
76
11»4QQ_ _
4,656
1,865
2,791
6,606
1,766
2,671
1,771
183

-

1.42
1.37
1.49
1.33
1.52
1.54
1.32
1.26

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ? / ............. .
Manufacturing ............................................... .
Durable goods ..............................................
Nondurable g ood s.............................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .......................... ...............
Public u tilitie s * ....................................
Wholesale trade .........................................
R etail tr a d e ......... ............................ ..
S e rv ice s ................................... ........... .

-

-

1.41
1.38
1.40
1.37
1.43
1.81
l!4 2
1.43
1 .U
1.31

1.44
1.41
1.27
1.51
1.46
1.68
1.38
1.40
1.08

PnKHf*

52
42
42
10
10

-

1.39
1.37
1.39
1.36
1.39
1.61
1.30
1.21
1.66

Shipping clerks .....................................................
Manufacturing...................................................
Durable g ood s.......................................
Nondurable g ood s.................... ...................
Nonmanufacturing............................................ .

-

$1.27
1.27
1.24
1.28
1.27
1.32
1.21

-

1
-

1
-

59 214 186 165
20
52 167 115
16 24 71
20 36 143 44
50
39 162 19
34
50
5 162 19
32
7
7
25
25
15
3
3
12

24

32

24
8
16
-

-

61
59
59
2

32
14
18
79
6
6
73

31
15
32
3
16
16
25
9
-

9
14

7

-

1

2

1

-

-

-

-

14
2

-

66
6
6

90
90
6
84

26
26

21
21

-

-

26

21

-

-

60
60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

205 423, 386
102 145 111
18 32
5
97 127 79
3
- 103 276 275
12
78 244 152
17 22
52
8 10
59

370
208
170
38
162

-

-

3
3

n — T ~ i —
1.15 1.20 1.25

-

62
91
9

1.30

1
1.3 5

1 — T ~ 1 — 1
1.40 1 . 1 5 1.50 1.60

1.1?

1.20

1.2?

l.? 0

1 .??

1.40

1.45

551
204
53
151
347
211
120

258
169
42
127
89
32
51

554
221
63
158
333
148
167

220
85
20
65
135
45
86

516
399
226
173
117
52
65

517
196
119
77
321
98
219

Z62
77
13
64
385
57
196

413
122
24
98
285
190
73

721
314
70
244
400
258
142

73
6
6
67
63
4

88
10
10
78
13
34
6

75
32
4
28
43
-

28
10
6
4
18
3
14
-

106
50
27
23
56
53
3

97
28
28
67
13
51
1
2

49
7
4
3
42
6

no

17
-

68
27
26
1
39
13
24
1
2

117
61
34
27
53

159
60
49
11
80

157
53
20
33
99

10
10
33
3

42
25
12
19

46
33
20
5

144
63
45
18
51
20
15
12

130
65
4
61
58
15
12
30

421
324
172
152
89
15
19

78
53
12
41
25

46
29
6
23
17

a

2

49
22
8
14
27

106
79
23
56
27

18
63
2
4

14
13

8
19

-

-

120
35
8
27
71
54
16
351
156
76
80
187
32
73
58
24

113

26
6
20
83

mm

-

65

5
7

-

1.10

—

12
13

11
6

-

-

134
123
24

107
2
2

167
49

99

-

11

35
27
2
6

49
54
13
30
11

127
106
22
84
21
2
15
2

471
269
130
139
194
12
67
103
12

443
249
164
85
174
48
68
45
13

-

5
6
423
235
112
123
141
14
24
91
12

281
139
97
42
135
18
71
44

2

-

-

55

l.? 0
545
229

32
197
313
215
98

$
1 — 1
1
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00
1.90 2.00
N

1.60 1.70

1.80

491
291
53
238
163
85
56

177
46
8
38
U8
102
2

79
51
27
24
28
22
5

10
4
4
6
6
-

105
34
17
17
70
27

55

1
3

26
22
13
9
2
1
2

76
3
1
2
66
43
22
7

2.10

134 ___ 3_
132
2
no
1
3
3
•

7

45
1

7

9

39
4

16
60

2

19

-

42
45

-

•

-

2

237
174
8
166
59
49
10
-

100
96
48
48
4
2

95
24
3
21
71
35
4

414
73
6
67
3a
175
10
-

178
98
61
37
80
74
1

44
31
3
28
13
10

74
33
2
31

351
163
108

5a
350
312

55

38
185

1029 1227 n 5 0
343 271
94
60 146
88
137
6
374 283 125
398 685 956 1056
9
33
525 194
76 587 316 438
77
65 112 423
21
1
3

723
125
36
89
595
7
296
292

181
48
36
95
2

14

a

123
7

-

9n
5n

-

18
34
22
1
347
217
96
121
130
99

22
8

9
-

Q

-

0

n

1

—

-----

See footnotes at end of table,
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_________ 1

-

-

*
-

•
•
-

32
12
12
•

-

24
2
2
22

-

-

-

-

22

-

•
>

12
2
2

56
12
12

12
12
12

2
2

101
24
24
77

1
X

m
.

*
-

21
2
2
19

64
8
2
6
56

/
**

m
m

-

2

131
35
2
33
96

l

-

9
7
7
2
2
-

168
149
7
142
17

9

2

2.50

and
over

-

6
•
6
6
-

144
65
40
25
78

31

r ~

-

62
5
2
3
57
6
6
-

S3
35
18
17
46

a

-

-

8?
50
18
32
35

-

2
9

-

-

1

n

a

n

2 .p 0

-

1

IQ

115
25
25
89
9
64

l
2 .1 0

2.20 2,?0 2.40

-

114
50
15
35
62
17
31
^4
2

81
28
53
26
8
17
1
3

2.30

-

-

7

-

2

-

-

12
-

2
54
5
2
3
49
46
mm

-

-

-

-

58 1018
248

n

2
9

45
16
23
6

_

248
767
767

a
33

6
-

16
_

-

-

8
3

44
27

-

—
2
2

-

1

•

.
.
—

•
-

_

mm

14
14

„

-

-

_

_

m.

599

m.
—
—

mm
mm
_

•

14

601
599

_

_

_

mm
_

mm
mm
—

"
-----------

1— 12.20 r ~
—
2.10

“

20,

Table 4 . — CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / b y industry division)

Occupation and industry division

*
1.00

4

.95 1,00

i fo j

Truck drivers, medium (1-J- to and including
.... .

.............................................

Nonmanufacturing 3 /...........................................
*A

A

^

Retail trade

.

...................

.

1.415
893
56
837
519
113

6,891
1,696
tiw
1,209
5,190
2,027
405

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

•
•

—

_

•

—

m
m

1.20
1.21
1.18
1.23
1.19
1.23
1.12
1.05
1.32
1.03

64

—

1.73
1.54
1.53
1.55
1.88

1,130
652

—

-

—
•
-

1.70
1.63
1.80
1 rTO
1* ( 7

4.262
1,172
558
6H
3,026

—

-

_

—

1.56

1.20

1.10 1.15

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than

1I 1
_______ _____
"*
• • • • • • -------u 1
lTwiiJrgf_1 Irift**••■•***••** * *
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ...........................................
Retail t r a d e ............................. .................

Truckersr power (fork-lift) ............ .
Mapirfact-iTT-!ng
Nonmanufacturing 2/..... ••.............. .
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ......... .
Manufacturing...........................
Durable goods ........................
Nondurable goods ••••..•..............
Nonmanufacturing ............. ...........
Manufacturing

......................................... .

Durable goods ............... ........................ ..
Nondurable goods ............................. ..........
Nonmanufacturing.................................. ..........
Public utilities * ................ .
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .......... .
Finance ** ............... .
Services ................ ••••••.......
Central offices ......................
T/

009
/ki
CJC

-

..

17

17
16

616

172
456

mm

_

3
21
13
8

—

—

—

—

—

1
1

—

84

12

6

-

—
84

—
6
____ L

-

_______
m.

..

_

_

—

5
5

12

12

1
1

3L
3

_______

—
12

______

4

2

22
22

6
-

-

6
-

6

m
m

122 186 278 100
7 93
4
33
4
24
5 39
2
9
54
89 179 185 96
18 10 10
26
13
13
50 82
3
4 12
7 72
56
7 137
91 70

180
48
12
36
132
—

Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

mm

418
137
100
37
281
18
16
104
97
46

249
44
20
24
205
11
15
156

23

275
117
33
84
158

6
6
34
48
64

99
69
19
50
30
3
7
20

8
8
8
-

26
26

6

Excludes premium pay for overtine and and night work.




1.30

$
1.35 1.40

42 __ 32L_______ 9_ _ 30 ___31_
_
30
20
11
9
13
1
3
10
18
9
8
2
20
12
10
1
26
29
_
mm
mm
13
_
•
mm
2
16

24
3

1

2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
2/
*
**

4

4

4

,

4

1.45

1.50

1.60

1.70

4

1.80

$
1.90

$
2.00

$
$
$
$
$
2JL0 2.20 2.30 2*40 2.50

1,3-5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1,35 1.40 1.45 1.50 _3*60 .i s m ..*.3Q 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2*22 2,40 2*50
_
—
•
11
523
87 ___20 153 ___65 ______ a
19 ___6?
2
11
3 122
5
8
1
—
523
21
61
12
3
53
2
2
3
2
2
32
—
•
—
—
12
3
2
3
_
*
8
18
1
21
1
523
2
59
—
11
57
47
*
■
48
29 100
122
2
7
84
1
11
28
21
45
5
1
13
“■
■
*
68
36
14
84
2
12
1
1
1
1
1
2
11

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
Manufacturing....................................................
Durable g o o d s .... ....................
Nondurable goods ................. .

1.25

1.96
1.97
1.92

297
128
88
40
169

-

1.05

i

x+oo

615
372
243
Oe
w

.?o

1.90
1.81
1.74
1.81

4 f782
1, 572
1,802

,8?

1.77
1.80
1 ti
f
1.85
1.76
1 8^
1.64

879
143
14
129

,80

S i.92
2.15
1.52
2.20
1.51
1.67
1 K
ft
1 A
O

044

Manufacturing...........................
Durable goods
....... ......
Nondur*bla goods
Nonmanufacturing 2/.............. •......
Public utilities * .....................................

4

1,10

0.75

M
sirnf*>ft+.inH«g
n

Number of workers recAiving straisrht-tdn3e hour*iy •« miners of -

4

*
*
4
1
Number Average
*
Under
of
hourly *
0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95
workers earnings V

6
6

15
11

228 ___ TL 1838 .2516.
209
39 307 236
72
20
95 224
12
137
19 212
38 1530 2280
19
mm
5
609 523
2
87
29 208
20 _ _ 1 4
34
_
1
— 33

144
144.

36
36
26
10

529
42
32
10
487
345
15
60
45

291
140
98
42
151
65
50
23
5

277
152
32

1$3
73
61

211

120

12

20

123

1(2
11

22

8

6
2

108
9
17
18
35
29

7
98
46

8
260
11

2

2

39

22

6
14
75

47
27

449
34
20

14
376

37

35
77
73
4

88
8

291
43

616 ___ 2_ _36£L__18l
640
—
—
—
—
_
640
6
- 360 18
mm
mm
360 18
4
18_
18

251

—

—

18

_____

—
159

—

—

2

43

35

80

248

7 —345 1887
3 265 1765
873

229
229
40

70
4
66

24

1 ___36
36
1
1
36
—
-

_____

204
204
204
-

-

-

—

—

•
»
-

—
-

*
•

—

6

6
33

„

20

—
-

•
—

74
39

918 _____ 21_
46
133
38
6
8
127
810
25
mm
486
32
1

and
over

75 ______ 58 _____ 34
34
14
75
44
26

72 ___24
2
9

•

—
_

-

—
-

—
-

—
-

72

-

-

-

-

60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—
—

•
*

—
—

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

885 1386
885 1386
885
42
42

—
mm

12
12

88
4

9
63

—
22

—
*
■

4
84

—
—

1

10 ___ 4 _
3

269
59
32
27
207

76
49

18
3

29
18

49
25

3
9

18
4

3
6

—

-

•

mm

-

1

4

-

2

-

-

1
11

—

—

—

—

•

—

—

—

2

2

18
5

7

4

1

6

4

2

6

7

-

-

88

9

190

5
3

1

2

21

CHARACTERISTIC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings in selected occupations in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries)
Table 5.— M E N ’S AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS 1/

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

$2.48
2.47

477
329
225
865
282
583
861
377
484
3,034
703
2,331
100
150

1.87
1.90
2.71
2.14
2.15
2.13
2 .1 1
2.04
2.17
2©14
1.97
2.19
2.47
2.05

2
1
8
5
3
—
—

2
5
3
3
2
2
9
9
4
—

189
259
192
978
276
702

1.93
2 .3 8
2.32
1.96
1.67
2.07

-

-

-

188
1,295
71
1,224
71
59
395
67
107
228

2.20
1.93
1.54
1 .9 6
1.95
1.95
1.91
1.93
2 .0 1
1.89

$

$
Under 0.80 0.90 1.0 0 1 . 1 0
$0.80
.90 1.0 0 1 . 1 0 1 .2 0

• 1 •
V? O
&
O

9

Number of workers receiving s traight-time he)urly earnings of i
•t
f-”
$
f
$
4
1$
\9
$
<
p
4
$
$
$
$
$
1 .3 0 1.40 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0 2,00 2 .1 0 2 .2 0
2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2.80 2.90 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0
and
1.40 l.? 0 1 .6 0 1 ?70 1.80 i.?o 2.00 2 .10 2.2 0 2.30
2.^ 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2.80 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3.40 ? .6 0 over

1

1

1

1

0
Q.
• 1 •
c
v c
v

Number
of
workers

1 ,2 1 0
124

Occupation and sex

1

1

Men

Cutting
Cutters and markers ,
Cutters, body-lining

Coat fabrication
Basters, body-lining and facing, hand ..
Basters, collar, h a n d ....... ..........
Fitters ............. ..................
Pressers, finish, hand: Ibtal .........
Time ..........
Incentive ....
Pressers, finish, machine: Total .... .
Time .......
Incentive ..
Sewing-machine operators: Tbtal 2/ ....

Time . . . . . . . .

Incentive ...
Buttonhole making ...................
Join side seams .....................
Join under-collar, join sleeve—lining
or piece pockets ...............
Sew in sleeve .......................
Shapers, edge and bottom ..............
Under-pressers: Total .................

Hone ...........................

Incentive..... .......

Trousers fabrication
Pressers, finish ••••••••••.........
Sewing-machine operators:
Total 2/
Time ....
Incentive
Attach waistband .......... .
Join outseams ...................
Make pockets ....................
Stitch p o c k e t s .... .
Tacking ..........................
Under-pressers ••••••»..........

See footnotes at end of table,




2

4

8
4
-

10
4
3
10

2

2
2

2
12
2
10
—

-

13
7
2

c
>

-

a
10
31
—

-

2
-

3
2

-

-

-

5
5

4
4

31
22
9

m
.
13

2

-

12

6
16

-

-

-

12
-

16
-

-

-

12
1

8
3
7

15
10
1
12
2
10
9

2
56
21
35
1

7

2
4
4
10
2
8

c
s

14
10

4
2

9

52
22
1
13
6
7
46
24
22
191
76
115
12

5
6
1
22
6
16

10
7
8
75
44
31

7
62
7

14

38
-

55

50

6

-

12
72
33
39
2
4

16
1
6
9

7

26
5
13
8

50
15
35
-

25
15
10
10
4
6
7
7
99
42
57
5
3

25
21
17
1
16
11
5
6
134
40
94
4
14

7
8
2
30
18
12

11
3
26
7
19

6
38

2

■-

-

12

55
5

24
27
15
6
9
22
10
12
168
51
117

14

4

49
24
10
36
36
42
14

28
186
33
153
-

9

58
31
43
43
50
27
23
163
31

38
32
15
104
48
56
97
36
61
190
48

432
-

142

3
3

60
*
“

22
—

6
—

675
89

268
26

73
3

39

33
30
23
113
33
80
182
139
43
252
50
202

22
30
10
95
7
88
93
28
65
221
60
16 1
1
10

24
18
6
73
9
64
71
16
55
177
44
133
11
8

25
3
9
94
60
34
21
13
8
no
12
98

7
13
7
34

9
12
16
25

8
4
6
16

1
1
8
7

34
26
9
17
133
a
92
10
-

25
33
18
15
144
10
134

16
10

7
19

16
13
6
72
18

2
16
19
56

9
4
12
47

54

56

47

5

12
67

30

-

9

18
22
4
133
100
33
77
29
48
194
33
161
6
17

9

14

15
11

31
7
4
78
35
43

16
13
9
88
37
51

7
11
12
116
38
78

8
18
10
68
9
59

19
21
10
67
10
57

16
15
33
61
9
52

8
123

1
138

2
98

30

135

6
100

98
6
14
33
1
6
17

6
129
20
4
31
8
11
21

9
10 1
6
95
1
9
43
5

100
7
2
30

65
3
3
18
6

3

11
19

-

123
15
9
30
-

4
134
2
7
75
9

5

9

2

24

28

9

35

65

13

4
30

2

67
1
3
25
7
12

9

5

9

1
8
5
3

—

10
—

20
—

8
1
14

_

12
3

7
-

6

23
1

1
18
2

3
2

_
_

1
24

2
7

_

24
103
24
79
4
2

7
73
9
64
20
4

2

33
7
4
3
1

«.

19
65
6
59
6
3

69
8
61
3

5

10
U7
17
100
10
6

10
19
9
36
4
32

9
23
11
28
4
24

14
5
14
4
10

4
7
20

4
6
5

4
23
9
11

10
2
3

2
6

n

1

10
4

20

5

11

3

1

4

12
43

11
38

10
15

12
19

3
15

4
7

2
6

8
3

4
10

43
5

38

15
2

19

15

7

6

3

10
1

3
7
16
10

4
1
1

3
1

2
10

1
3

1

_

_

3

3

1

**
■

3
2

—

—

1

_

2
3

30
30
1

1
39
6
33
-

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22

Table 5.— MEN*U AND BOYS* SUITS AND COATS 1/ - Continued

Number
Occupation and sex

of

workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

$

Under 0.80 0 .9 0

1.0 0 1.10

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of
$
$
$
$
$
1
«
>
1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00

r

$

1

3.20 3.40 3.60

$0,80
>90 1,00 1.10, 1.20 io30 1.40 1.30 1.60 1.70

1.90 2.00 2.10

2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70

2.90 3.00 3.20 3.40

3.60

and
over

Men - Continued

Miscellaneous
Inspectors, final (examiners)
J a n i t o r s ......... ••••••..o.
Packers
...... .
Stock clerks, garments .....
Work distributors ........

172
165

210
98
179

$1.81
1.08
1.64
1.41
1.14

12
11

3

29

12

2

22

1
45

8
8

18
4

8
6

67
32

60

34
14
335
96
29
67

7
5

9
4

132

60

84
20
64

35
19
16
3
22

44

2
22

2

1

8

30

15
36

13
27
277
75
15

4
33

12

8

3
4

3
25

3
55
13
2

12
2
83
55
47
8

6
2
156
34
17
17

6
2

11

47
39

88
67

103
43

8

21

16
14
2
10

10
30
24
6
6

3
-

25
13

3

12

2

2

4

9
4

26

21

19

18

22

18

9
3
4

7
7

9

10

3

4

14
19
39

8
34
16
107
37
70

19
2
7
70
14
56

13
18
13
37

24
2
5
6
4
2

5
4
4
4
4

4
1
3

8
25
6
19
2

6

4

2

2

16

46

56

18
3

6

10

1

8

31
56

17
28
53
133
28
105

3

Women

Coat fabrication
Button sewers, hand ...........................
Buttonhole makers , h a n d ........... .......... .
Finishers, hand .............. ................
Sewing-machine operators: Total 'jJ ..........
T i m e .... ..........
Incentive ......... .
Join under-collar, join sleeve-lining,
or piece pockets .......... ......
Pipe edges ................. ................
Sew in sleeves ....................... .
Thread trimmers (cleaners): T o t a l .... .......
Time .............
incentive .......

Trousers fabrication
Sewers, hand (bench workers, finishers)
Sewing-machine operato rs: Total ......
T i m e ......
Incentive ..
Thread trimmers (cleaners) ••••••••.•••

Miscellaneous
Inspectors, final (examiners)

1/
ed 389
2/
2/

Total .........
Time ........
Incentive .....

409
497
2,175

1,501

486

1,015

1.47
1.55
1.27
1.64
1.53
1.69

124
81
46
671
315
356

1.57

463
610

1.36
1.59
1.27

11

170

1.56

3

406
87
44
43

6

62
58
273
139
70
69

49
93
209
128
23
105

55
91
139

102

120

112

28
92

35
77

8

9
7
4
12

.?

1 0

1.17

440
164

1.72

131
53
78

1.24
1.07
1.35

1.31

59
67

36

4
1
25

9
17

6
19
1

26

2

25
4

35

21

26

4
3

2

1

2

2

8

2

14

20

4

10

68

92
40
52

38
13
25

27
8
19

19
9

10

5
8
6
16
4
12

39
31
10
21
2

61
23
8
15
21

65
46
10
36
27

54
53
22
31
7

40
69
30
39
20

63
31
8
23
12

44
58
9
49
18

26
46

6

6
36
4
32
9

11
O
3

23
12
11

16
5
11

5
1
4

12

5
1
4

2

14

1

4

2

14

1

4

10

2

14
14

5

2

2

2

1

64

5
7

-

12

46

1

11

6

1
1
4

2

2

3

1
31
31
2

11
38
9
29

15

11

10

10

1

15

11

10

10

1

The study covered regular (inside) shops and contract shops with more than 2 0 workers, and cutting shops with more than 4 workers engaged in the manufacture of men*s and boys* suits and coats.
establishments and 30,835 workers i n the industry, 86 establishments with 13,285 workers were actually studied.
Data relate t o March 1951.
Excludes premium p a y for overtime a n d night work.
Data relate to all sewing-machine operators including those shown separately.




3

1

-

2.18

1.12

126

4
5

Of the estimat­

Table 6.— WOMEN*S AND MISSES' DRESSES

Occupation and sex

Cutters and markers (2,045 men and 26 women) . . .
Inspectors, fin al (a ll women) ...............................
Pressers, hand (men and women): T o ta l...............
Men..................
Women...............
Sewers, hand (114 men and 7,212 women):
Total ...............
Tim e.................
Incentive . . . . .
Sewing-machine operators, section system
(11 men and 849 women)..........................................
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (ta ilo r)
system (men and women) : T o ta l........................ .
Men............................ .
Women...................... ..
Thread trimmers ( cleaners) (men and women):
T kn
V+ l

*2.54
1.26
3*02
3.09
1.71

7,326
433
6,893

1.45
1.07
1.47

10

860

1.39

-

28,236
4,408
23,828

2.02
2.63
1.91

40

3,052

im m
a

Women..........................
i.fA n i’1l • •a4o1
T^
’P ,
M .............
en
W en ••••••
om

3,010
1 AO

141
3a

a n

•7 (

T 1/
7
J-.J-*
.97
o t
•n
7
1.03
.94

-

-

10

_

122 165

208
208
-

135
135
-

106
106
-

189
177
12

180
180
-

200 212 248 129 133 131
200 212 238 129 133 131
•
10

334
6
328

229

150 151

152

112

60

68

50

6

12

6

6

12

12

229

150 151

152

112

60

68

50

6

12

6

6

12

12

60

30

20

_

•

•

•

•

mm

..

1186 1264 142? 1089
253 239 195 206
933 1025 1227 883

979
143
836

21

63

..

40
io
10
Ol
<A-

6
18

292 347
1
1
291 346

81

90

558 781 1364 1390 1773 1359 1811 1667 1558 1309 1655
16 27 42 44 82 90 100 131
205 178 303
542 754 1322 1346 1691 1269 1711 1536 1353 1131 1352

/ AO A/a JOM ±y\j
ion
lA l
vi+y
oo±
A
A
in
1U
370 851 482 643 375 190
/ n 1O
OO
AA
lift
Q LA
HO
8
1 35 23
34 13
49 105 39 74 20 14
AAn

AO

30
J
.O
2
16

68
on
48
1A
IQ
16
-

2
..
g
2
6

10

738
128
610

•

25

-

2

35
-

4.30

1L
J

—

-

—

•

4.50. 4,60

4.70

4.80 4t?o

5.00

6

4,40

22

-

•

-

-

-

•

_

•

-

•

-

-

62 152 284
62 152 284

59
59

50
50

21
21

14
U

•

•

_

106
105
1

-

6

-

-

•

86
85
1

24
24

150
150

•

357
357

39
39

82
82

_

-

-

_

6

6

6

12

6

•

-

-

43
42
1
12

6

6

6

12

6

-

•

•

12

_

6

-

-

56
34
22

85
17
68

69
38
31

53
24
29

38
10
28

25
12
13

$

5.30

*
$
*
5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.50

•

-

-

J.IO

ZAO

5.20

5,60 J .80 6,00 6,50 7,00

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44
44

27
27

1
1

71
71

29
29

36
36

38
38

18
18

-

-

37
36
1

-

—

—

-

-

22
19
3

34
22
12

42
18
24

21
12
9

31
18
13

-

8

6

-

-

-

-

8

6

-

70
48
22

*

_

6

19

44

1

-

-

24

737 615 466 443 378 294
183 209 123 153 118 104
554 406 343 290 260 190

719
163
556

Nn
u iber c>f workers rejceivini£ straieht-1:ime hoiifly (jarain*is o f -• Continued
$
*
*
k
l
$
$
*
*
4.70 4.80 4.90 5.00 5.10 5.20
4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60

3.50 3,60 3f70 3,80 3,90 4,00 4,10 4,20

18

•••••••

20

12

m
IU

1

10

1
1
$
1
&
i
3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10

3t4°

Men

114

90

63

$
3.30

Cutters and markers (men and women) ......................
Inspectors, fin a l (a ll women) .............................
Pressers, hand (men and women): T o ta l.................
M ............
en
W en . . . . . . . . . .
om
Sewers, hand (men and women): Tot a il ..............
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incentive .........
Sewing-machine operators, section system (men and women)
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (ta ilo r)
system (men and women): Total.................. ....... • • • • • • •
M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •••••••
en
W en ............................ . . . . . . .
om
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (men and women):
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M ..................
en
W en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
om
Work distributors (men and women): T o ta l ........ ........

348

370
6
364

10 111 111

2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3,30

383

537
537

40

2.70

226

489
6
483

40

2.60

278

16
204
194
10

20

*
*
*
*
i
*
2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20

45 113
6
196 181
190 127
6 54

1
32
124
83
a

-

2.60

32
7
130
120
10

30
62
62
-

74
20
20

2.?0 2.40 2.50

$
2.50

2.10 2,20

6
114
46
36
10

10
20

strai cht-tlme hoiirlr eeirningc5 O f *
*
*
*
*
2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40
1.90
2.00

_
6
1
1
17
55 138 217 264 140 121
40 10 22 90
50 128
20 10 22 70 40 118
20
20 10 10

152 367 638 749 775 684 642 499
50 40 21 156 56 72 18
2
102 327 617 593 719 612 624 497

2,071
1,224
5,080
A,822
258

1.0

4m*«
4v4

_
-

0

1

* worke>rs receiving
Nn
u
Number Average
*
*
*
r
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
hourly Under 0.75 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80
of
earnings $
workers
0.75
tzl
.80 .?0 l t00 1,10 1.20 1,30 1,40 l t 50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90

293
121
172

256 254 185
143 116 97
113 138 88

75 173 120
24 70 68
52
51 103

•

3
3

-

53
52
1

-

21
18
3

18
6
12

39
30
9

-

8
6
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

____

W en #«•••••
om

........

-

1/ The study covered inside and contract shops with more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses* Of the estimated 1,647 establishments and 56,413 workers in the industry,
208 establishments with 9,193 workers were actually studied* Data relate to an August 1950 payroll period and do not reflect the following general wage increases granted December 18, 1950 by all union shops, which
comprised over 90 percent of the establishments studied: 6J- percent added to all piece rates; $5 per week to cutters and graders; $4 per week to sample makers, drapers and special machine operators; $3 per week
to examiners, cleaners and pinkers* Likewise, no adjustment has been made to reflect an increase in union minimum effective February 1, 1951*
2/ Exclude premimum pay for overtime and nightwork*
Occupational Wage Survey, New lork, N.T., April 1951
2 / Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment*
U*S* DEPARTMENT OF LABOR




Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

2k
Table 7.— MEN'S AND BOYS* £KISS S H O T ’ AND NIGHTWEAR l/
S

Occupation and sex

Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers
2/

T
$
o.eo
0 .75
and
under
.80
.85

$
0.85

$
0.90

.90

.95

-

2
-

14
14

1
$
0.95 1.00
1.00

1.05

20
-

3
-

1.05

.
>
Number of workers recei,ving straight-time hour!.y earnings c f S
V
?
•
$
V
V
%
$
V
*
$
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.2 5 1.30 1.35 l.lfO 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70

$
1.80

$
1.90

2.00

2.10

$
2.20

1.10

1.1?

_
1
-

1.20

1.2?

1.30

1.3?

1.40

8
6
-

«
.
2
16
-

T
12
4
-

_
2

T
8
8
-

_
4
3
-

_
2
2
-

9
C
J
4
8
8
-

7
2
5.
-

12
12
30
14
16
4
2

2
. 22

4
4
3

91
60
31
2

98
62
36
-

85
39
46
1

83
16
65
5

49
13
36
2

63

2

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

5

2

$
n
2.30 $
2.40
and
2.40 over

1.60

1.4 5

15
-

%

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.CO

2.10

2.20

2.30

6
14
6
-

10
10
■

8
6
6

8
6
-

10
2
2

2
4

2
2

~

2

-

-

-

6

6

-

2
4

2

8

-

2

2

2

-

70
12
58

43
8
35

47
6
41

6
4
2

16
16

3
3

4
4

6
6

2
2

2
2

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Men
Buttonhole rakers, machine •••••••••••••••••••••
Preseers, finish, h a n d ..... ......... ........
Sewing-machine operators, dress shirts .........
Working foremen, processing departments ........

14
98
125
15

66
43
23
58
33
20
24
96
1,248
524
724
191

_

$1.1+2
1.65
1.35
2.18

_

_
-

-

1.04
1.07
.99
1.17
1.13
1.24
1.15
1.48

8
8

2
2

8
6
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
1

1.20
1.11
1.27
.90
.87
. .91

32

38
8
3'
23
14
9

103
5?
48
102
78
24

-

_

_

-

c
4
8
-

c.

4
5

Women
Button sewers, machine:

Total ••••••••........
Time ..................
Incentive ...........
Buttonhole makers, machine: Total •••••••••••••
Time ..............
Incentive ••••••••.
Inspectors, final (examiners) ................
Pressers, finish, hand .............. ..•••••••
Sewing-machine operators, dress shirts:
Total ........;...
Time ........... .
Incentive ........
Thread trimmers: Total .......
Time ................ ...... .
Incentive .....................

112

79

*

32
8
8

-

_

_

1
-

4
4
6
8

8
8
3
8

50
37
13
22

143
97
46
17

6

12

63
14
49
3
3

-

1 6

5

r\

67
39
28
4

<
^
1

CL
r\
C.

-

1

31
32
-

2
2
12
40
12
28
-

-

r\
~
CL

3

CL

44
9
35
-

c.

-

2
2

'
l/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of men's and boys* dress shirts and nightwear. Of the estimated 41 establishments and 2,435 "workers in the industry, 13
establishments with 918 workers were actually studied. Data relate to a November 1950 payroll period. A follcv-up check indicated that no general wage changes were made by the firms studied between November 1950 and
April 195^«
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Table 8.— PAINTS AND VARNISHES l/

Occupation 2/

Labelers and packers (men) ....... •••••••••••••
Labelers and packers (women) .............
Maintenance men, general utility •••••••••••••••
Mixers .......... ..............................
Technicians ............. .......................
Tinters ..... .
Truckers, hand ............ ............... ..
Varnish makers

Number
of
workers

253
123
44
329
87
135
118
82

Average
hourly
earnings
3/

$1.1+2
1.28
1.62
1.1+9
1 .6 7
1.6 0
1.1+2
1.71+

6
Number of workers receivir¥5 straight-time hourly earning£ Of 1
$
$
1
$
$
$
f —
1 --- 1 —
1 --- “1--- 1
1
1
1—
1.8 0
l.l+o 1 .1+5 1 .5 0
1 .6 5 1 .7 0
1 .7 5
1.00 1 .0 5 1.10 1 . 1 5
1.20 1.25 1.30 1 .3 5
1.55 1.6 0
0 .9 5
and
under
1.00
1 .0 5 1.10 1.1? 1.20 1.2? 1.30 1.3? l.l+o 1.1+5 1 .5 0 1-55 1.6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 -L-12 1.8 0 1 .8 5
10
_
_
-

.
.

2
_

-

-

-

-

-

1
8
10
10

3
8
2
_

-

-

-

-

4
38
3
4
_
_
-

28
8
17
13
2
29
-

l/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of paints and varnishes
workers were actually studied. Data relate to March 1951#
2/

Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.

3/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




7
58
8
2
14
-

33
9
7
30
4
8
23
2

36
8
46
8
18
2

57
6
4
57
.4
6
14

33
80
11
13
7
4

21
10
9
10
5
-

5

13
3
29
8
10
6
6

1
17
14
3
3

3
7
2
4
11
12
~

1
10
1
43
9

$
1 .8 5

1.9 0

_

_
5
12

8
5
17

$
2.00

$
2 .1 0

2.10

2 .2 0

_

3
12
1
4
4

$
1.95

2.00

$
1 .9 0

_
2
1
-

2
-

$
2.2 0
and
over
_

2
1

14
3

'
Of the estimated 109 establishments and 4,440 workers in the industry, 19 establishments with 1,571
O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, N ew Yor k , N.Y., A p r i l 1951
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR
B u r e a u o f L a b o r Statis t i c s

25.

Table 9 . --WOMEN’S CEMENT PROCESS SHOES (CONVENTIONAL LASTED) l/

Average $
$
$
$
hourly 0.75 0.80 0.90 1.00
of
earnings and
workers
under
3/
.80
.90 1.00 1.10
Number

Occupation 2/

Assemblers for pullover, machine ........
Bed-machine operators ...................
Cutters, van?) and whole shoe, h a n d .....
Cutters, van?) and whole shoe, machine ...
Edge trimmers, machine ....... ..........
Fancy stitchers ...................... .
Floor hoys ..............................
Side lasters, machine .............. .
Sole attachers, cement process ..........
Top stitchers ................. .
Treers: T o t a l ....... ..................
Time ...........................
Incentive ......... ............
Vampers ......... .......................
Wood-heel-seat fitters, h a n d ...... .
Wood-heel-8eat fitters, machine .........

_

$2.03
2.12
2.30
1.51
2.55
2.22
.94
2.15
2.23
2.04
1.93
1.95
1.93
2.12
1.98
1.91

15

54
245
16

80
181
41
63

81
48
165
33
132

34
96
28

5
-

16
-

*
1.20

*
1.30

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
r
i
$
$
*
*
1.4o 1.5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60

1.20

1.30

l.4o

1.50

1
1
-

7
1
1
1
2
-

1
2
5
9
-

1
1
4
3
3

_
13
-

3
-

~

$
1.10

-

11
11
1
-

2

5
5
2
“

6

10
2
-

1
1
11
1

20
20
1
4

1.70

1.6 0

3
3
7
3
3
1
4
8
4
5
1
4
1

19
-

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

3
1
2
15
_
4
3
5
2
3
1
-

4
1
14
1
7
.
4
5
1
13
6

1
9
13
4
14

2
5
2
1
9

1
7
27
11
11
_

2
3
23
_
5
12
_
6
6
1
6
2
4
3
1
1

7

3
1
2

3
11
2
12
2
10
2
2
5

7

8
1
28
6
22
5
7
5

7
3
2
16
7
9
9
7
7

2.30

2.40

2.50

5
19
_
8
14

2
26
.
11
11
_

3
37

4
5
3
10
4
6
2

3
4
1
9
3
6
_
4
2

.

-

3
12
3
6
3
2
.
2
1
13

2.60
1
1
21
.
4
13
3
5
6
1
.
1
4
8
-

*
*
4
3.00 3.20 3.40
3.60
and
over
3.20 3.40 3.60

*
2.70

*
2.80

*
2 .90

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

21
.
1
18
„
1
7
8
3

1
5

1
2
10

9

.
2

1
1

6

8
2

2
3

3
3
3

2
15

1
4
_
1
1
2

3
1
5

2
_
1
.
2
_

2
2

_

5

7

_

3
1
_
_

_
_

_
„

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

2
_

_

1

6

2
6

.
2

7

4
_
_

_

_
_
-

2

.

5
1
6
-

1
1
1
_
2
2

-

Tho^shudy covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of conventional lasted women’s cement process shoes. Of the estimated 54 establishments and 5,462 workers in the
industry, 21 establisnments with 3 > w o workers were actually studied. Data relate to a September 1950 payroll period. In a follow-up check, 12 of the 21 establishments reported a general wage increase of 10 cents
an hour between September 1950 and April 1951.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Table 10.— CHILDREN’S STITCHDCWN SHOES l /

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

1

$

$

*

0.75

0.80

0.90

1.00

$

$

1 .1 0

1.2 0

1.30

Number of workers receiving straight-■time hourly earnings of
$
$
$
1
$
*
~ r ~

1.40

1.5 0

1.60

1.7 0

1.80

1.90

2.00

2 .1 0

2.20 2.30

*
2.40 2.50

*

*

2.60

2 .70

2.80 2.90 3.00 $

2.70

2.80

2.90 3.00 3.10 ever

6

3

*

6
3
5

3

-

and
under

.80

.90

1.00

2

1 .1 0

*
3

1.20

1.40

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

y

5
3

6

14

8

6

c
5
2
3
5

1.30

1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20

2.30 2,40 2.50 2.60

*

*

*

3.10
and

Men
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine:
Total .......
Time ........
Incentive ....
Edge trimmers, machine ___
.
Fancy stitchers .............. ^ T
Floor boys ............. ;.......
Goodyear stitchers .............. T T _T ^T T
Thread lasters ................... .
Top stitchers ........................................... .
Vanpers : T o t a l ................................. .........
Time ...............................................................
Incentive ..........................................

110
22
88
47
41
26
87
84
35
71

19
52

$1.83
1.75
I .85
1.92
2.01
!84
1.89
2.17
l]84
1.83

2

Q

5

3

2

-

1

2

-

0
c

O

k

16

1

9

3

£
Z

"

7

0
d

q

0

3
q
3

~

1
X

3

d
O
O
d

2

4

8
7

4

R
5

“
*i
i
XX

X

3

X
q

1 5*5
1

5

5

5

q

“

3

0
d

—

X

J
.

l

K
P

2

q

3

X

2
1

2

3

1
.
4

X

)
.

4

d
0
d
b

0
d
4

1
,

“
lb

7

4

Q
O
d
b

0
d

2
1
1
1.
4
5

xo

b

11

5

c
.

b

1

8
8
Q

C
3

2
O
O

1
5

9
"
3

6
3
3

7
13
2

Q
O

7

1

1
.
4

1
.
4

1
.
4

7
3
1

1
5
la
4

4
1
1

4
_

4

9
9

2

4

5
5

5
2

6

2

“
-

-

-

-

*
*

1

-

2

2

•

2

•

1
6

3
-

*

-

~

3

3

4
■

2

•

1

**

1

*

1

•

-

“

I,
4

-

*
*

4

1

1

“
3

4

2
2

1

1

1

-

—

“
—

-

1

1

1

“

*
*

-

2

■

■

■

•

“

*
*

■

-

-

5

O

4

1
.

2

—

1

1

Q

1

-

3

9
2
7
0
d

”

1

1

“

*
*

“

-

1

Women
Fancy stitchers ..........
Floor girls .............................
Top stitchers ........................
Treers ............... ................. ,
Vampers .......... ............. ..

36
19
0

10
12

2

1 .4 5

.98
1 .4 2
1 .0 9

1.49

2

6
1

2
2
1
£

3

£
b

“

X
X

"
O

O
<
c

1

2

“

“

*
*

'
et?dy ccvered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of children’s stitchdcwn shoes. Of the estimated 21 establishments and 1,801 workers in the industry, 11 establishments
and 1,200 workers were actually studied. Data relate to September 1950 and do not reflect a general wage increase of 10 cents an hour granted early in 1951.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A B ®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 11 •— MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1 /

Occupation and sex

Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers
2/

Under
t
0.85

¥
0.85 0.90
t?0

•95

i
$
4
0.95 1 .0 0 1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

-vnri
Number o workc>rs receiving straj ght-time hourly asL n i u f of :
4
4
:
3
4
4
*
T
rr
1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75

1 .0 0 1 .0 ? lflO

1.15

1 .2 0

it2 f

l t ?0

1»?5

1.40

1.45

1 ,5 0

1.55

1 .6 0

2

_

2

2

25

3
35

37

27

55

18

22

76

20

7
14
57

56

26

19
71

A
J
2

1

_

3

-

4

1

1 ,6 5

T
4
1 4
1.80 1.90 2 .0 0

4

4

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0 2.40

i2
1.80 ■. * g_ 2.CO

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

and
2.30 _2*4£ over

282
147
-

3/1
52

151

140
6
2

23

36

20

2

-

4

30
42

1.70

1.75

1

6

84

17
157

20

35
47

20

10

47
I
124
-

-

-

25

43

1

22

11

3

-

-

$

Men

774
553

Al Q/
1.72
1.34

190

1 016

Assemblers, class B ................
Assemblers, class C ........................................
Drill-press operators, single- and
multiple-spindle, class A ................... ..
Drill-press operators, single- and
multiple-spindle, class B ......................
Drill-press operators, single- and
multiple-spindle, class C ......................
Engine-lathe operators, class A .....
Engine-lathe operators, class B ••••••
Engine-lathe operators, class C ......
Grinding-machine operators, class A • .
Inspectors, class A ........................................
Inspectors, class B • • • • ...............................
Inspectors, class C .......................... .............
In4

o

4am

Milling-machine operators, class A . . .
Milling-machine operators, class B . . .
Milling-machine operators, class G . . .
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) ............................................. ..
Tool-and-die makers (other than
jobbing shops) . . • • • ....................................
Truckers, h a n d .......... ......................... ..
Ua 1 or*a K.n^ a 1 .aa R

m
m

16

8

-

5

14

1.84

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

154

1.53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

35

12

55

15

13

4

194
7Q
I7
439
186
84
247
253
132
58

1.27
X.Oy

-

-

20

-

4

4

21

22

10

26

53

2

2

2
A
•
¥

2

-

7

9
13

20

6

10

23

19

a

1 (\ J
X 70

_

8
—

•

•

•

6

9

1 .8 6
1 .6 6

1.34
1.96
1.93
1.61
1.28

_

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

10

10

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2
8

-

-

6
2

-

-

2
8

1
2
1

10

27

6
1

-

•

11
21

5

1

9
-

-

-

1

13
3

1
6
11

9

1

1 .2 0
1 80

6
27
f

4
18

37

-

-

OA
—f

31

46

AO

q
7

555
273
367

1 .3 6

10

-

10

10

32

6

3

6

21

5

29

15
3
37

448

2.03

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

395
431
79

2.02

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.31
1.64

5

-

12

5

5

8

13

26

18

19

69

314

1 .1 6

10

1^85
1.69

15

10

1
2

-

7

8

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

3
67
-

-

-

-

-

50
-

7
-

-

-

-

-

28
40

17
18

29
17

10

10

24

-

-

-

-

-

15

1

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

40

-

U

-

20

-

q

-

2

3
4
-

6

2

30

-

-

3

21

27

5

10

17

-

-

-

9
48

-

5
7
8
2

3
.✓

115
19

39
82
28

22

54

19

20

12

5

-

2

-

-

-

7

34
115
4
3

17

74
3

62
84
35
3

2

44
3
4

10

14

20

36

5

-

13

20

20
20

2

64

62

5

45

1

28
7
25
4

-

-

9

-

18

-

16

64

30

46

58

21

138

8

-

-

7
-

9
-

29

4

16
-

-

71

64
-

69
-

115
-

49
-

19
-

-

-

-

-

-

A
*T

9

-

10

6

12

24

-

10

-

174

92
34

20

-

-

-

106

2

15

m
m

66
6

m
m

m
m

-

-

-

Women

Assemblers, class C .............. ..

-

10

10

40

37

57

55

19

30

8

6

9

7

13

-

-

3

-

j / The study covered establishments with mors than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) and included establishments with more than 7 workers in the manufacture of machinetool accessories (Group 3543) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 246 establishments and 24,541 workers in these
industries, 41 establishments with 13,428 workers were actually studied. Data relate to a January 1951 payroll period. Between January and April 1951, 4 firms studied granted general wage increases of 10 percent,
and 4 cents, 7 cents and 7J- cents an hour, respectively. These adjustments are not reflected in the data.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




27

Table 12.— BANKING 1/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Ave rab o
Weekly Weekly
schedearnuled
ings
hours
2/

0 ricers _i'eceiviInc st]raight-tlins jreeklv earnixXffS of
Jumber Of W 3
1
*
1
1
1
$
1
♦
i
i
1
J
1
1
1
4
i
1
*
r
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.C3 100.00
$
and
30.00
32.50 ?5.°o 37.50 40,00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50,00 53.50 55t°° 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67,50 70,00 73,50 75,00 80.00 95.00 90.00 100.00 over

Under i

Men
Cleaners ....... ................... ••••••
G u a r d s .... ............................ .
Proof-machine operators......... .
Tellers, all around ••••••••.............
Tellers, note ............................
Tellers, paying or paying and receiving,
commercial .....................
Tel 1
ers, s*vtng« ......... .. .......
.
Transit clerks ••••••............ .

1,117
1,674
476
343
286

38.5
36.5
35.5
37.0
36.5

1,359
760
282

36.5
36.5
36.0

37.0
36.0
31.0
37.5
36.5

49.50
42.00
33.50
45.00
49.00

456
620

36.0
37.0
35.5
37.0

55.00
49.00
36.50
49.50
39.50

18
27

120
38
13
21

9
191
29
45
25

«
.
100
8
19
14

•
30
4
32
31

39
398
51
23
8

•

7
-

•
-

14
25

11
11

2
2
19
26

1

3
9
36

19
1
19

32
a
33

27
34
9

60
39
21

24
22
8

69
66
13

29
44
11

74
55
13

61
40
23

86
14
20

61
26
13

108
46
22

93
31
7

79
19
16

93
20
2

102
50
6

•
25
135
1

3
167
300
a
45

3
208
9
38
70

3
502
189
137
275

24
269
37
132
166

166
443
51
116
310

104
269
19
89
247

106
340
101
358

67
119
59
234

152
70
52

109
5

27
1
22

14

3

4

2

2

56

14
61

-

255

21
141

30
36
•
29
180

35

64

8

12

•
3
63

16
15
18
66

26
105
19
182

80
51
2
128

52
47
1
42

53
55
1
73

24
9
4
35

29
13
4
25

18
23
2
14

-

4

4/59

23
65
17
312
118

52
45
2
112

*277

20
50
6
141
1^9
*7/

12
2

-

6
78
45
3

20
-

m

15

•

80
180
42
22
8

143
145
24

-

271
171
83
12
3

a
,

-

-

6
46
26

54
63
31
8
-

•

-

-

-

6
1
9
-

294
67
33
21
33

1
11
9
-

-

65.50
66.00
50.50

818
2,491
915
853
2,554

•
-

151.00
54.00
50.50
61.00
67.50

-

66
73
31
42
4

148
66
56
8

a
.

3

-

.
»
•

3
24

-

•

33
14

-

m

12

m

106
25
9

80
20

63
15

62
48

28
95

1

-

-

-

-

•

-

7

-

21

18

2

-

-

9
14

2
-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

m

a
a

-

-

m

Women
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A . .
.
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B . .
.
Cleaners ................... ....
Proof-machine operators .............
Stenographers, g e n e r a l ......... .
Tellers, paying or paying and receiving,
commercial ...................
Tellers, savings ...................... .
Transit clerks ..................... ••••••
Typists, class A ...................
•wst
py'
/ !m a o Q
%

421

1,139
2,319

*

37
175
m
m
m

n

1/ The study covered banking establishments with more than 50 workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

17

45

222
<7 7

OQQ
*77

640

2 • *

m

/

m

Of the estimated 107 establishments and 59,544 workers in the industry, 23 establishments with 38,042 workers were actually studied.

2J




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y,, April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 13.— INSURANCE CARRIERS j /

Occupation and sex

----- ,
,NumIl r of workei» r ce
e
a weekly e i
e
a miners of •
e living straii
A<
v
---i-srase
s
$
i
4
i
$
I
s
4
4
i
Number Weekly Weekly *
i
¥
4
i
4
%
4
J
1
$
4
*
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
of
sched- earnworkers uled ings and
and
under
hours
2/
10.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.QO 47.50 50.00 58.50 55.W 57.59 60.00 $3.50 65,00 6 , < 70,00 78t50 75.00 80.00 8J.00 90.00 95,00 100.00 over
75?

«SB
Bookkeepers, hand ... ..............
Clarks, *('.o.tynr\+Ang .......................
M ark*j gatiat*1
*
t.t.f......t,l
t
Duplicating-machine operators .•••••••••••
Office boys... ...................
Tahnlating-rachiria operators .............

230
361

inn

35.5 166.00
35.5 48.50
at
- *k
a
JA J •f m
O
36.0

50.00

41
396
446

35.5
36.0

47.00
34.50
50.50

127
78
182

36.0
35.5
36.5

46.50
52.00
47.00

440

35.5
35.5
36.0
36.0
36.5
36.5
36.0
o/ n
l
36.0
vj n
36.0
36.5
36.5
oA "
J 0
O*
C
36.5
36.5
16 5

46.00
46.50
44.50
36.50
44.50
56.50
oq on
J7*w
44.50
19 00
J7* w
60.50
47.00
54.00
49.00
42.50
48.50
47.50
/ TV
/ 50

120

36.0

31

39
li
jj
7

6

11

61
4
4
3
58

14

93
J1
w*

•

-

41

93
12

61
10

109
16

60
25

17
4
25
46

.
—

8

-

6

16

-

-

-

2

3

31

18

29
1
40

8

«
.

27

62

43

73

_

3
111

12

93

47
37
52
416
73
4
13
135
77
10
234
16

53
152
205

15
■O
20
26

2
50
2
360
74
4
97
4f
22
5

56
97
42
106
58
3
5
228
12
j*
38
356
33
11

46.00

325
925
514
2,633
827
190
1f1
■0J
Ac.
1,247
499
1,176
2,548
373
on
i
Oj
C
362
619
1,357
3,862

3
8

17
8

16
11
6

2

6

37

27

22

10
26

10

5
25
18

2

2

14
3

35
4

2
2

15

6
1

6

10

•
»

1

4

4

9

a

13
4
3
29

57

a

26

10

7

4

15

13

8

11

10

20
8
24

7
18
11

5
20

14
5

1
10

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

—

36
14
24

8

56

39

44

23

51

,
»

7

7

—

—

27
62
111
75
20
45
44
*»
*• 10
*
71
40
21
15
o
207 106
4
5
88 120
326 228
10
28
15
46
1
67
32
81
115
135
89
188
91

16
79
35
18
52
8

29
16
5
Q
40
U
i
44
26
51
68
28
7

12
24
39

1
64
8

11
45
2

8
11

2
6
1

2
6

14

27
8
2
13

13
6

7
46

7
11

8
5

2

56
6
68
205
37
10

1
14
6
2
29
5
6
18

10

2

1

90
45
20
9

92
159
57
16

85
10
16
1

102
127
23
4

33

35
26
52
52

63
24
49
80

27
18
16

1
16
15
*✓

2
6

1

a
.

6

23
40
4

10

1

6

26

16

5

7

15
5

7

13
1

31

m

4
m
e

5

m

m
m

7
7

•

•

•

-

-

-

-

m

m

Women
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ...
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
tvne) ..................................
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type)
Clerks, accounting ««••••••••••••••••••»••
Clarke, file, class A
............
PI
^4 1a
e rn X
a
)
0 1 erks, general t...t.t.tr^.,....f...t..t4
Clerks, payroll
Key-punch operators
P ' * aa #4 a
/ 44
v
Secretaries
+++.
............
Stenographers, general ......... .
Stenographers technical +*.,..++.*.****,.
Qf4 ^/ VWa A%/ am m ^
%
%W m **
a *
Switchboard operator-receptionists •••••,.
Tabulatlng-machlne operators ............
Transcribing-machine operators, general •
•

<4 g% i
*o
ees A
e> e
4s l
T
)

16 <
5

40.00

—

16
166

107
f

49

_

-

8
2
124

2
j
4
15
/
121

a

969
123
6
19

87
263
2
173
8
A
o
7
14
15
jj

9A3

15

12
3
3*
LL

970
7

291

79
9
10
240
1»
j7
12
270
31
12
21
59
87
465
571

25
66
361
291

58
17
119
240
34
40
16
65
78
83
163

77

15
7

5

—

1

—

-

—
—

—

—

m

..
.

m
1

<
■

7
m

28

14

60
1
7

2

105
1
6

2
6

3

1
-

.
4

34

17

2

-

6

4

-

•
-

-

1

4

12

K

2

1/ The study* covered establishments with more than 50 workers in Insurance Carriers (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
the estimated 127 establishments and 73,661 workers in these industries, 27 establishments with 42,945 workers were actually studied.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




m

Of

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT (F LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

29,

Table H . — POWER LAUNDRIES 1/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

0.75
and
under
.80

*
0.80

♦
0.85

♦
0.90

0.95

Number of workers receivina straight-time hourly earning 3 Of i
*
i
i
i
*
i
1
i
*
i
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50
1.55

.85

.90

.95

1.00

1 .0 5

l t10

1,15

lf
20

1 ,2 5

1,?0

i,?5

1 ,4 0

1,45

•

7

16
40
23
15

15
34
12
12
40

15
42
47
4
31

25
4
10
34

9
8
8
-

•
24
16
17
19

_
26
4
62
25

59
8
30
8

6
1
2
4
-

27
25
14
n

8
218
206
12
30
19
11
14
4
10
194
51
11
40

8
181
59
122
9
9
16
4
12
79
28
26
2

81
11
70
4
4
44
36
8
184
31
29
2

10

23

2

14

-

-

4

-

-

10
1
1
9
9
212
2
2

23
29
21
8
12
2
10
106
*
-

2
16
16
6
6

14
4

-

-

4
8
8
13

-

1,50

1.60

1*55

1.60

1.65

-f
♦
1.70
1.75

1.80

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

-

8
-

_
22
-

-

-

_
-

•
•
•
-

8
-

-

i

♦
1.85
and
over

Men
Clerks, retail receiving....................
Extractor operators........................
Identifiers ................................
Washers, machine.........................
Wrappers, bundle ........... .................

8

73
375
201
274
213

♦1.09
1.12
1.09
1.41
1.15

10
-

24
2,794
1,98$
806
185
107
78
199
117
82
1,365
198
132
66

.83
.85
.83
.90
.96
.88
1.07
.98
.94
1.04
1.04
.90
.91
.89

8
97
44
53
12
8
4
10
10
33
16
11
5

-

-

-

-

21

«
.
88
31
4

*
15

n

2
6

1
4

19
-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
8

_
3

-

-

-

-

•

1
1
_
-

n

14
4

-

n
-

-

7
-

Women
Clerks, retail receiving....................
Finishers, flatwork, machine: T o t a l .........
T i m e .........
Incentive.....
Identifiers: Total .........................
Time ..........................
Incentive.....................
Markers: Total ............................
Time ..............................
Incentive .........................
Pres sere, machine, shirts ...................
Wrappers, bundle: T o t a l ................... .
T i m e .....................
Incentive •. ••............ .

1/ The study covered power laundries with more than 20 workers.
to March 1951.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

2,042
1,646
396
59
59
62
48
14
98
44
38
6

122
22
100
12
-

12
2
2
163
19
10
9

•
3
3
10
-

4
82
•
-

no
7
7

-

2
2
32
-

2
2
39
-

n
2
4
-

-

_
-

-

Of the estimated 169 establishments and 14,565 workers in the industry, 27 establishments with 3,794 employees were actually studied.

•
_
-

-

_
-

_
_
.
.
-

Data relate

Table 15.— AUTO REPAIR SHOPS l/

Occupation 2/

Body repairmen, metal:

A ir k n m n t .iv A

Greasers:

Total ................
T i m e ................
Incentive ...........
(

Total ............... ...............
Time ............................ ...
Incentive...... Tt,TT.TTT-.tt-,ftt#

Mechanics, automotive, class A:

Total .......................
T i m e ........
Incentive ....
Mechanics, automotive, class B ......... .
Washers, automobile

ftA
a y or&go

Number
of
workers

hourly
earnings

337
242
95
55
473
425
46
1,733
1,006
727
625
299

♦1.93
1.79
2.28
1.94
1.26
1.22
1.60
1.87
1.67
2.15
1.46
1.20

2/

U n d e r

♦
1.00

28
28

r

♦
♦
♦
i
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30

*

i

i to? 1.10 1.1? lt20 1,2? i,?o i ,? 5

96
96

8
8

43
43

n
-

15
15

43
43

n
-

-

10

-

18
51

-

-

40

10
10
28

15
10

n

27

5
-

44
44
mm

_

-

n
j

18
18
10
85

47
47
77
mm

Number of workerst receiving rfcraight-time\ hourly earnings of 1
♦
♦
i
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
i
*
♦
♦
♦
1
♦
1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90
1.40

10
42
37

1,45
18
18

in
in

1.70

1.80

74
66
8

18
18

39
39

-

39
23
16
36
15

n

5

n

5

95
74
21
39
24

i t ?o 1.60

-

10
-

18

9

255
156
99

229

2.00

2.10

-

29
29

71
35
36
5

-

_

228
165
63
128

-

10

5
5

1

5

5

10

-

1.90

1

229
151
78
-

261
247
14

♦

3.00

2.20 2f?0 2.40 2,50 2,60 2 .7 0 2,80 2.90 ? foo

and
over

1

12

1

12

15
10
5
20
10

43
18
25

9
9

4

-

4
5

4
-

4

-

-

_

_

30

77
38
39

73
67

8

51

67

21

130

5

23

5

18

48

6

8

51

67

21

130

5

23

5

18

48

31

22

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 4 workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 7538) and motor vehicle dealer establishments, new andused (Group 551) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 346 establishments and 9,588 workers in the industry, 32 establishments with 1,327 workers were actually studied. Data re­
late to March 1951.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




30,
UNION WAGE SCALES

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions* Rates and hours are those in effect April 1, 1951*)
Table 16.— BAKERIES
Classification

Table 16*— BAKERIES - Continued
Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
First hands, oven workers, mixers....... '$2*033
1.920
Second hands ...........................
Agreement B:
Fnffmnn ...... ....... -..... ...........
1.894
Bench and second hands.................
1.769
Third hands...........................
1.665
Agreement C:
2.100
First hands, oven workers, mixers.......
2.000
Oven loaders and dumpers ...............
Wrapping-machine operators ..............
1.971
Agreement D:
First hands ............................
2.044
1.881
Second hands...........................
n^ipfirfl ,t..Tt....11.................. .
1.656
Hebrew baking - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
2.500
Foremen, first hands ...................
Second hands, third hands ...............
2.375
Agreement B:
First hands, ovenmen...... ...........
2.133
1.900
Second hands ..........................
Agreement C :
2.244
Foremen, first hands......... ..........
2.181
Mixers, ovenmen ........................
2.081
Second hands........................ .
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread department:
1.675
Mixers, ovenmen............... .....
Benchman............ ...............
1.575
Oven loaders and dumpers .............
1.495
Wrappers, head packers and checkers •••*
1.445
General helpers.......... *..........
1.435
Cake department:
Depositors, ingredient scalers,
henchmen, fryers ..................
1.555
General helpers........ ........... .
1.405
1.200
Helpers (women) ................. ....
Agreement B :
Dividers, molders......................
1.575
Flow dumpers ................. .........
1.475
Bakery helpers .........................
1.415
Agreement C:
Oven loaders and dumpers................
1.395
Head slicers or wrappers, checkers ••••..••
1.345
General helpers ............. *..........
1.335
Agreement D:
Tray-oven operators............... •••••
1.575
Confectioners...... *.... .............
1.575
Ingredient scalers, kitchen helpers,
hwwh hands .............................
1.465
Agreement E: (cakes, pies, oookies):
Packers and floormen ....................
1.355
1.110
Wrappers and leers (women) ..............




Hours
per
week

Classification

Table 17*— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION - Continued
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

48
48
48

Women workers..................... .
Agreement G:
Foremen .............. .............
Miscellaneous workers................
Agreement H:
Mixers ............... .

40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48
48
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

Oven helpers, blenders, panners........
Bread wrappers ....... .... ..........
Agreement I:
Holder operators, mixers* helpers ......
Wrappers and packers (women) ..........
Agreement J:
Ovenmen, mixers....................
Bench hands.............. .........
Helpers........... ....... .........
Agreement K:
Mixers, benchmen, ovenmen.............
Second class packers, helpers •••••.....
Third class packers .................
Hebrew baking - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
First hands ... ....................
Second hands .......................
Helpers ....................... .
Agreement B:
First hands..... ..................
Second hands..................... .
Helpers .......................... .
Crackers and cookies:
Flour dumpers.........................
Fig and jam mixers, marshmallow beaters....
Bake-shop general helpers ................
Feeders, sugar wafers ..................
General helpers..................... .

$1,435
1.200

40
40

2.180
1.220

40
40

1.620
1.520
1.450

40
40
40

1.525
1.200

40
40

1.940
1.840
1.740

40
40
40

1.725
1.325
1.225

40
40
40

2.268
2.125
1.696

42
42
42

2.125
1.992
1.592

45
45
45

1.505
1.455
1.320
1.150
1.050

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

Table 17.— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

40
Classification
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Journeymen
Asbestos workers..................... ••••
Boilermakers .................. ..... ....
Bricklayers .....................
Carpenters ...... ........... .......... .
Cement finishers ........................ .
Electricians (inside wiremen) ........ .
Elevator constructors .......... ...........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$3,500
2.750

40
40

3.000

40

2.625

40

3.500
3.375
3.250
2.750

40
40
40
40

3.500
3.125

40
40

3.000
3.000
3.000
3.000
3.000
2.750
3.000
2.600
3.300
3.000
3.000
3.250
3.100
2.527
3.100
3.100
3.200
3.250
3.068

40
35
35
30
40
40
40
35
30
35
35
40

40
40

2.195
2.150
2.200
2.600
2.000
2.400
2.452

40
30
40
40
40

Journeymen - Continued

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement F:
40
40

Classification

$3,000
3.000
3.250
3.000
3.000
3.200
3.000

35
40
35
35
35
35
40

Engineers - Power equipment operators:
Building construction:
Heavy equipment:
Steel erection (cranes and derricks) ...
Scrapers and toumapulls...... .
Medium equipment:
Welding machines and compressors .......
Bulldozers, tractors, locomotives (10
tons and under), motor patrols, road
finishing machines, mixers under 21E..
Heavy construction:
Heavy equipment:
Shovels.............. ............ .
Pile drivers.......................
Cranes (digging bucket) ...... .......
Scrapers and toumapulls .............
Medium equipment:
Cranes (structural steel) ............
Mixers (concrete) and power houses ....
Light equipment:
Compressors (portable, 3 or more in bat­
tery), double-drum hoists and pumps
(concrete) •••••••••.............. .
Glaziers ............... ................. .
Granite cutters ....... .....................
Lathers ..... ................. .
Machinists ................. ........... .
Marble setters............. ................
Mosaic and terrazzo workers..................
Painters ............................
Plasterers.... ............................
Plumbers ............... ..... ..... ..........
Roofers, composition ••••••••.................
Roofers, slate and tile .......... ...........
Sheet-metal workers ............. ...........
Sign painters ...................................
Steam and sprinkler fitters ••••••............
Stonecutters ....................................
Stonemasons.... ........... ................
Structural-iron workers ............. .........
Tile layers ............................

35
35
35
35

35

Helpers and laborers
Bricklayers* tenders........................
Building laborers ...........................
Elevator constructors* helpers ••••••..........
Plasterers1 laborers............. ...........
Plumbers* laborers ............. .............
Terrazzo workers* helpers ................. .
Tile layers* helpers ............... .

35

35

Occupational Wage Survey, New I f k N.I*, April 1951
cr,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31,

UNION WAG E S CALES - Continued

Table 19.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES

Table 18.— BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES

Classification

Chflpwnan ...... ....... .................. .

Rate
per
week
*42.00

Hours
per
week
40

Doormens 1 /
Apartment "A" ................ ..........
* B ...t.......................
»"
»CW .... , .............................................................. T - - T *

55.57
53.26
50.95

48
48
48

Handymens 1/
Loft "A" ..............................
* B ..............................
»"
"C" ..............................
Office "A* ............................
"B" ................................................. ..................................................................
«C« ....................................................................................................................
Apartment "A" .........................
«B" .........................
»C« .........................

62.83
59.90
58.00
64.83
62.83
61.83
57 . a
55.10
52.80

40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48

3tartersj i/
Loft " A * ............ ..................
sg" ................... ... ....................................................................................
»C» TT.. T....r.TTT...... ..... ,^ _
_
Office "A" ............................
«B" ............................
«C« .............................

61.58
59.65
57.00
62.83
61.58
59.83

40
40
40
40
40
40

Assistant starters s 1/
Loft "A" ...........................................................................................................................
» B » ............................ ...
«C» #t.TTtr.TT,tfTTT....tTT.......
Office "A" ............................
"B" .................................................................................. ........
»C» ....................................................................................................................
Window washers

........................................................... ... ...............................................

Others, including elevator operators and
porters s ] J
Loft «A" ...........................................................................................................................
...........................................................................................................................

«C" .t_ t....TT.................ttt
Office "A" ..................................................................................................... ...
»B" ....................................................................................................................
"C" ....................................................................................................................
Apartment " A " ................................... ... .............................................................. ...
"B" .........................................................................................................
»C> TT.......................T

58.83
57.65
56.00
60.83
59.58
57.83

40
40
40
40
40
40

73.00

40

57.58
55.65
54.00
58.83
57.58
55.83
55.57
53.26
50.95

40
40
40
40
40
40
48
48
48

A/ Wage rates for these classifications include only
Manhattan. Class designations refer to the gross area of a build­
ing i "A" - more than 280,000 square feetj nBn - more than 120,000
square feet and not over 280,000 square feetf and "C" - 120,000
square feet or less.




Classification
Subways t
Conductors s
First positions
First y e a r ....... .................
After 1 y e a r ........ ..............
Second position ...................... .
Platform m e n .....................•••••
Road motormens
First y e a r ...........................
After 1 year ...•••................... .
Yard motormens
First year ...........................
After 1 y e a r ............... ....... .
1-man carss
Brooklyn-Queens Transit Lines s
First 6 months ....... ................ .
7 to 12 months .................. ••••••
After 1 y e a r ......................
Busses:
Avenue B and East Broadway Transit Co.:
First 6 months..... ..................
7 to 12 months........... ............
13 to 24 months *.............. ...... .
After 2 years.... ................ ••••
Brooklyn Bus Division, Comprehensive and
East Side Omnibus Corp.s
First 6 months.......................
7 to 12 months.......................
After 1 y e a r .... ...... a ...... ...... .
Fifth Avenue Coach:
Drivers:
First year ........................
Second y e a r .......................
After 2 years ......................
Double decker drivers:
First year ............................
Second y e a r ..........................
After 2 years .........................
Green Lines:
First 6 months .......................
7 to 12 months ........................
13 to 24 months .......................
After 24 months .......................
Jamaica Busses, Inc.:
First 6 months ..... ..................
7 to 12 months.......................
13 to 18 months................ ......
19 to 24 months ......................
After 2 years ........................
New York Omnibus Co.:
First 6 months ........................
7 to 12 months ..... ............ .....
13 to 24 months ......................
After 2 years ........................
Queens Bus Division:
First 6 months .......................
7 to 12 months................. ......
After 1 year .........................

Rate
per
hour

Table 19.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING E M P L OYEES - Continued

Hours
per
week

♦1.510
1.560
1.460
1.410

48
48
48
48

1.650
1.700

48
48

1.500
1.600

48
48
48

Rate
per
hour

Busses: - Continued
Third Avenue Railway Transit System:
*1.350
First 6 months........................
1.400
7 to 12 months................. ..... ••
1.450
13 to 18 months...................... ••
1.500
19 to 24 months..... ..... ............
After 2 years...... ......... ........ . • 1.600
Tri-Boro Coach Corp.:
1.430
First year .............................
1.510
Second year ............ ...... ........ .
1.600
After 2 years.... .....................

HOUT8

per
week

48
48
48
48
48

48
48

1.460
1.560
1.660

Classification

Table 20.— MALT LIQUORS
Classification

1.360
1.440
1.500
1.600

48
48
48
48

1.460
1.560
1.660

48
48
48

1.625
1.635
1.675

44
44
44

1.725
1.735
1.775

44
44
44

1.410
1.450
1.510
1.640

48
48
48
48

1.360
1.430
1.490
1.550
1.600

48
48
48
48
48

1.435
1.535
1.585
1.685

44
44
44
44

1.350
1.450
1.550

48
48
48

48
48
48

Rate
per
week

Apprentices:
First six months ....................... .
1 59.30
60.30
Second six months •........................
61.30
Second year ..............................
79.50
Brewers and bottlers................... .....
Engineers
........... 101.50
Firemen ............ .................... .
84.50
64.50
Garage helpers............................ .
Maintenance and automobile mechanics....... .
79.50
Platform men (loaders and unloaders) ......
79.50

Hour8
per
week
37£
37|
37jr
37*
40
40
37*
3*4

Table 21.— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS

Classification
Beer:
Chauffeurs ............................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helpers t11, . . , ..... , , ............. .
Trailer and 6-wheel truck,
hook and unhook...............................................
Trailer and 6-wheel truck,
load and unload ..............................................
Building:
Construction:
D m tru ck .....................................................
up
6-wheel, 3-axle tractor and trailer •••••••
Material:
Lime, brick, cement......................................
Lumber ..........................................................
Sand, gravel, and concrete-m ix....................
Secondhand brick •«............ ..................... . . .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

*1.900
1.775

40
40

2.051

40

2.101

40

2.000
2.125

40
40

2.000
1.760
2.000
2.375

40
40
40
40

UNION W AGE SCALES - Continued

Table 21.— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

Table 2 1 . — MOTORTRUCK D RIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

Classification
Butter and eggt
Agreement A - Markets
4 t o n s .......... .
5 tons ...........
Agreement B - Purveyors
3 tons and under ...
A tons ...........
Agreement C - Expressmens
3 tons and under........... .
5 tons •••••.................
7 * tons (helpers) ........ .
1
Agreement D - Dairy...... .
Helpers .................... .
Clothings
Coat, dress, and package delivery
Helpers........... ........ .
Coal and fuel oils
Coals
Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, and water
yards In Queens ......................
Rail yards in Queens....... *.... .....
Fuel oil ................................
Department store........................ ••••
Helpers ................ .............. .
Food - Wholesale markets
Agreement A ....... ............ ..........
Helpers .....................••••......
Extra drivers....... ........ ••••••••••
Helpers.............. ............ .
Other than 4-wheel, single-axle truck ....
Extra drivers.... ........ ..........
Agreement B ....... ......................
FTuit and produces
Markets
, 3 tons and und e r....... •••••••••••....
4 t o n s .....•••••••••••..........•••••••
5 tons •••••.......... ••••.... ........
j £ tons ................. .............
Purveyor ............ ............ .
Helpers...... ........... ...... .....
General truckings
Agreement As
1 ton auto and under
2 t o n s .... ............ ........ .....
3 t o n s ........... ................ .
4 tons ........................ .......
5 t o n s ............. ..................
7 £ t o n s ................. .............
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck, tractortrailer, third-axle trucks
Load or unload........ ............
Do cot load or unload ..............
Helpers ............ ..... ............
Agreement Bs
1 ton auto and under ••••••••.......... .
2 t o n s ................. .............
3 t o n s ............... .............. .
4 tons .................. •••••.........




per
hour

Sours
per
week

Rate
Classification

Table 2 1 . — M O T ORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

per
hour

itours
per
week

$1,848
1.910

40
40

2.060

40
40
40

- Continued
Continued
$1,004
1.032

40
40

1.675
1.700

40
40

1.675
1.725
1.400
1.550
1.275

40
40
40
40
40

1.375
1.100

40
40

i.au
1.801
1.8U
1.675
1.425

40
40
40
40
40

1.389
1.222
1.500
1.333
1.778
1.889
1.713

45
45
45
45
45
45
40

1.765
1.815
1.840
1.903
1.575
1.182

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.667
1.692
1.717
1.742
1.767
1.830

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.980
1.830
1.542

40
40
40

1.748
1.773
1.798
1.823

40
40
40
40

7 t tons ............................ <
Six-wheel reach- o r pole-truck, tractor-

trailer, third-axle trucks
Load or unload ................... .
Do not load or unload ............
Helpers.............. .......... .
Agreement Cs
2 t o n s ............................. .
3 t o n s .................... ..........
4 tons ....... .................... .
5 tons ............................. .
7 £ t o n s ................... ..........
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck, tractortrailer, third-axle trucks

Load or unload ........... ............
Do not load or unload .••••••
Helpers ...........•••••••••........ .
Grocery - W holesale.............................
H elpers............................................
Laundrys
Cleaning and dyeing - R e ta il.........
Cloth sponging................... .............
Helpers •••«••••......... .............. .
Linen supply - Non-commercial •••••
Helpers ............................ ......... .
Office towel - Non-commercial.......
Linen supply and towels - Wholesale
S h ir t.......................... .....................
Meats
Branch house .....................................
Hotel supply s
Agreement A .............................
Agreement B .......... .
Pork delivery ....................... .
Slaughterhouse s
Agreement A .................................
Agreement B ............... .
Milks
Retails
Foremen ........................................
Route riders •••••...................
Wholesale s
Foremen .............. ......... ..............
Route riders ••••••......... ...........
Transportation (after 6 months) •
•
Special delivery after 6 months
Moving and storages
Agreement A ..........................
Helpers .......................................
Agreement C - Piano .........................
H elpers...................
Newspapers
Agreement As
Day....................................... .
Night ............................................

1.910
1.623

1.880

40
40
40
40
40

2.030
1.880
1.593
1.693
1.603

40
40
40
40
40

.895
1.750
1.400
1.570
1.230
1.610
1.480
1.350

48
40
40
42
42
38
43
43

1.975

40

1.750
1.975
2.125

40
40
40

1.975
1.945

40
40

2.013
1.938

40
40

2.013
2.088
1.900
1.638

40
40
40
40

1.600
1.380
1.736
1.550

40
40
40
40

2.067
2.274

40
37

1.743

1.768

1.793
1.818

Rate
per
hour

Classification

Newspaper: - Continued
Agreement Bs
... .
Dav
Night ................................
Paper and miscellaneous products:
£ to 2 tons .......................... .. •••
Helpers .......................... .....
Private sanitation ...........................
Helpers ••••••••••••••••••••••«••••••••■••••••
Railway express ...................... ......
Helpers ..... ........................ .
Money delivery........... ................

Hours
per
week

$2,024
2.218

40
37

1.800
1.375
1.625
1.450
1.775
1.575
1.835

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table 22.— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1/
Type of ship, department and classification

Rate
Hours
per
per
month 1/ week

Dry cargo and passenger vessels
Deck departments 2/
Day mens
Boatswains:
Vessels over 20,000 tons (passenger)...
Vessels of 15,000 to 20,000 tons ......
Vessels of 10,000 to 15,000 tons .....
Vessels under 10,000 t o n s ...........
Vessels under 10,000 tons (passenger)..
Boatswain's mates................... .
Carpenters:
Vessels over 20,000 tons (passenger)...
Vessels of 15,000 to 20,000 tons ......
Vessels of 10,000 to 15,000 tons ....
Vessels under 10,000 t o n s ...........
Carpenter's mates .....................
Storekeepers.................. .......
Watch men:
Able seamen..........................
Boatswain's mates........... .........
Ordinary seamen .......................
Quartermasters ........................
Watchmen..... ..................... .
Engine-room departments 2/
Day men:
Assistant electricians ................
Deck engineers ........................
Electricians ........ ..................
Firemen (coal) .......................
Firemen (oil) ................ ........
Plumbers - machinist ...................
Refrigerator engineers........ ..... .
Storekeepers •••••.....................
See footnotes at end of table,

1349.87
337.29
332.31
315.35
332.31
278.20

AA
44
44

AA
44

AA

311.49
302.06
296.40
283.01
277.35
273.58

44
44
44

248.41
262.47
213.79
248.41
248.41

48
48
48
48
48

311.33
283.01
395.66
245.26
235.82
323.29
364.19
273.58

AA
AA

44
44

AA

44

AA
44

AA
AA
AA

33

U N I O N WAGE SCALES - Continued
T a b le 22 * — O C E A N T R A N S P O R T - U N L I C E N S E D P E RSONNEL 1 / - C o n t i n u e d

Type of ship, department and classification

Rate
per
month 1/

Hours
per
week

Table 22*— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL

Type o f ship, department and cla ssifica tion

}J -

Rate
per
month 1 /

Continued

Hours
per
week

T a b l e 22.— O C E A N T R A N S P O R T - U N L I C E N S E D P E R S O N N E L £ / - C o n t i n u e d

Type of ship, department and classification

Tankers U




Hours
per
week

Drv cargo and nassender vessels - Continued

Drv cargo and nassencer vessels - Continued
Engine-room departments 2/ - Continued
Day mens - Continued
Unlicensed junior engineers (freight
ships) ....................... «...
Wipers....... .................. .
Watch men:
Firemen - watertender
Oilers......................... .
0iler3 (diesel) ........
Unlicensed junior engineers (freight
ships) ......... ....... ........ .
Watertenders ....... ....... ...... ..
Stewards department: 2 /
Freighters s
Assistant cooks ................... .
Chief cooks................... .
Chief stewards .....................
Messmen «.................... ..... .
Second cook-bakers.......
Stewards-cooks (coastwise only) ••••••
Passenger vessels:
Assistant storekeepers.......... .
Chefs:
Class I vessels ................ .
Class II vessels.....,......... .
Class III vessels....
Class IV vessels .................
Chief bakers ....... ....... .
Chief bakers and confectioner:
Class II vessels........... .
Class I I I vessels ..... .
Class IV vessels.......... .
Chief bartenders .......... .
Chief butchers:
Class I vessels.......
Class I I vessels •••••.... ••••••••
Class I I I vessels ...... .
Chief crew cooks:
Class I vessels.............. .
Class I I vessels .............. .
Class I I I vessels ................
Chief linenkeepers........ .
Chief pantrymen:
Class I vessels..... ......... .
Class II vessels
Class I I I vessels ........... •••••
Class IV vessels............... .
Chief Silverman:
Class I vessels ...... ..... .
Chief stewards:
Class I vessels ................
Class I I vessels ••••••••••••••••..

Rate
per
month 1/

#314.48
245.26

44
44

248.41
248.41
270.75

48

283.01
248. a

A
S
A
S

245.26
283.01
307.70
213.79
257.84
307.70

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

238.96

A
S

552.36
539.77
427.75
415.17
359.79

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

408.88
361.68
361.68
257.84

AS

342.17
342.17
324.24

A
S
A
S
A
S

352.23
314.48
314.48
257.84

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

298.12
298.12
283.01
283.01

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

257.84

A
S

651.78
639.19

A
S
A
S

A
S
A
S

A
S
A
S
A
S

Stewards department: 2 / “ Continued
Passenger vessels: - Continued
Chief stewards: - Continued
Class III vessels
Class IV vessels ••••••••••••••..
Chief storekeepers
Deck stewards ................................. ..
Galley u t i l i t y .................... •••••••••
General u t i l i t y ............. ....................
Headwaiters:
Class I vessels ........................ .
Class II vessels ........... ...............
Messmen ........................ ..........••••••••
Second stewards:
Class I vessels ............................
Class II vessels ............................
Class III vessels ..........................
Class IV v e s s e ls ........... .
Silverm an...........................
Stewardesses ...................... .
Storekeepers .................... .
Third stewards:
Class I vessels ........... .
Class III v e s s e ls ...........
Waiters and waitresses ....................
Yeomen:
Class 1 v e s s e ls ..........................
Class I I vessels •••.••.................
Class I I I v e s s e ls ........... ••••••»•
Tankers U
Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains.................................... ..
Carpenters .......................................... .
Deck maintenance (A B) ..........
Watch men:
Able seamen........•••••••••••..........
Ordinary seamen............... .................
Quartermasters....................
Engine department:
Day men:
E lectricians ...................... ••••••••••
Machinists ............... .
Storekeeper's
Unlicensed junior engineers
Wipers •••••••........... ..........................
Watch men:
Firemen ••••••............
Oilers ........•••••••••••••.• • • • ...o..
Watertenders .....................................
Unlicensed junior en gin eers......... .

#434.05
434.05
270.43
213.79
213.79
213.79

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

290.56
277.97
213.79

A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S
A
S

270.43
251.55
213.79

48
48
48

257.84
257.84
238.96

48
48
48

325.52
306.75
270.43

44
44
44

251.55
220.09
257.84

48
48
48

395.66
323.29
276.72
314.48
245.26

44
44

Stewards department i
Assistant cooks ..................•••••
Chief cooks ......... ••••••••••.... .
Chief stewards ..... ....... ......... .
Galleymen
Messmen •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
Second cooks and bakers ••••••••••••••••
Utllitymen .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

48
48
48

393.77
381.18
298.12
298.12
226.38
213.79
270.43

- Continued

245.26
251.55
251.55
283.01

48

48

A
U

44
44

48
48
48
48

#264.13
295.61
326.59
220.09
213.79
264.13
213.79

48
48
48
48
48
48
48

2/ All ratings listed receive additional payment in accord­
ance with the following conditional
1. On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 per cent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.
2. On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 percent
or more of dead weight carrying capacity, $5.00 per
voyage is added. (On vessels carrying sulphur, cement,
Cyanide, etc. in bulk lots of 1000 tons or over, mem­
bers of the Seafarers International Union are paid
the same as those on vessels carrying explosives.)
3. On vessels operating in described areas of China
coastal waters, a per diem allowance of $2.50 and an
"area Bonus1 of 100 per cent of daily basic wages is
1
added.
A* On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by mines
of either belligerents, resulting in physical damage
to the vessel or injury to a crew member, a "vessel
attack bonus" of #125*00 shall be paid to each crew
member.
7 j The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week at sea. At sea. watch men normally work 56 hours per week
with 8 hours (Sunday) paid at the overtime rate. Day men at sea
are given compensation (which is included in their basic monthly
wages) in lieu of Sunday work at the overtime rate. In port
both day men and watch men receive overtime rates for work on
Saturday and Sunday.
2 / The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked per
week at sea and in port. Members of the steward Ys department
normally work 56 hours per week at sea with 8 hours (Sunday)
paid at the overtime rate. In port overtime is paid for work
on Saturday and Sunday.
j j All scales reported oover members of the National
Maritime Union of America, CIO. Differences in the contract
of the Seafarers International Union of North America, AFL follows
1. Wage scales on tankers do not include a #3.50 a month
increase paid NMU members,
2. Carpenters In the tanker deck department are paid the
same as boatswains, i.e., #321.80 a month.

34
UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 23.— PRINTING - Continued

Table 23.— PRINTING

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Book and job shops

Rate
per
hour

H0UT8
per
week

Book and job shops - Continued

Bindery women:
Box girls on folding m a c h i n e s ............
Gathering-machine fillers-in, book
examiners, wrappers .....................
Hand collators, stitchers, pasters,
covers, etc..............................
Machine sewers ............................
Pasting-machine operator, Singer or
McCain stitcher operators ..............
All other bindery women ...................

Classification

Table 23.— PRINTING - Continued

$1,080

36.3

1.000

36.3

1.204
1.204

36.3
36.3

1.093
1.233

36.3
36.3

Bookbinders s
Assistant operators on combination and
folding machines, jogging-machine
operators ...............................
Automatic machine feeders, unskilled .....
Blankbook binders? operators of flat
machines; die machines; band-cutting
machines ................................
Book trimmers, stitchers, coverers, sheet
cutters .................................
Hand sheetmen, folding-machine operators,
book trimmers, stock cutters, sheet
and plate cutters, smashing-machine
operators ............................ .
Manifold table workers ....................
Operators of Kast inserting and
stitching machines, Dayton 3-knife
trimmers ................................

2.242

Compositors, h a n d ............................
Electrotypers ................................
Machine operators and t e n d e r s ....... ........
Photoengravers ...............................

2.483
3.000
2.483
3.290

36.3
37.5
36.3
35.0

36.3
36.3

$2,165

36.3

Pressmen, web presses:
Day w o r k ...................................
Night w o r k ........ ................... ......

$2,713
3.045

361
33jr

1.650

36.3

Pressmen-in-charge:
Day work ................. ............... ...»
Night work ................................ .

2.920
3.267

361
33k

2.110

36.3
2.560
3.200

37jr
31*

Pressmen, cylinder:
Cylinder presses (over 68 inches),
perfecting presses, sheet-fed rotary
presses, multi-web ticket presses .......
Permanent provers, sheet-fed rotary
presses with color, presses with bronz­
ing attachment.... .. ••................. •

2.513

36.3

2.588

36.3
Table 24.— STEVEDORING

Pressmen, platen:
2.192

36.3

2.120

36.3

2.200
2.167

1 to 3 presses; 1 automatic press 20“
or under ................................
2 automatic presses, 20“ or under, 2
Webendorfer presses .....................
2 automatic presses, over 20"; 1 2-color
Harris press, 15 x 18” .... ........

Classification
2.190

36.3

2.290
2.340

2.138

36.3
36.3

36.3

Hours
per
week

36.3

Longshoremen:

Newspapers

1.110
1.048

Rate
per
hour

36.3

36.3
36.3

Press assistants and feeders:




Hours
per
week

Stereotypers *
Day w o r k ............... ....................
Night w o r k ..............................

Press assistants and feeders: - Continued
Color cylinder and perfecting presses .....
Platen presses; Miehle vertical or
horizantal; Miller Hi-Speed or Simplex
Kelly A,B,C, Clipper, or automatic
jobber; C and P cylinder p r e s s e s ........
Utility men on web presses; assistants on
cylinder presses over 42 i n c h e s ........ .

Compositors, hand:

Floor help - men ..........................
Floor help - w o m e n ........................
Miehle automatic pony, Kelly #2, Babcock
automatic, Miller Major Simplex,
Premier G.E., Miehle 41, sheet-fed
rotary, and double sheet-fed rotary
presses -....... ................. .

Rate
per
hour

Newspapers - Continued

36.3

1.931
.970

Classification

Day w o r k ...................... ............
Night work ...... ..... ... .

2.828
2.966

361
36$

Machine operators and tenders:
Day w o r k ..... ......................... .
Night work .................................

2.828
2.966

361
36j

Mailers:
Day w o r k ...................................
Night w o r k .............................. ..

2.085
2.318

34t

Photoengravers:
Day w o r k ............... ...................
Night w o r k ............................ .

3.060
3.360

361
36*

37l

General cargo, including barrel oil when
part of general cargo, and general cargo
hauled in refrigerator space with above
freezing temperature ...................... $2.00
Bulk cargo, ballast, and all coal cargoes,
coal loading and trimming; cement and
lime in bags ..............................
2.05
Hides, w e t ..................................
2.15
Creosoted poles, ties, and shingles; cashew
oil, naphthalene and soda ash in
b a g s .................... ............... . •
2.15
Refrigerator space cargo - meats, fowls,
and other similar cargo transported at
or below freezing temperature; rates to
2.20
be paid full gang .........................
Kerosene, gasoline and naphtha in cases
and barrels, when loaded by case oil
2.20
gangs, and with a fly .....................
3.90
Explosives and damaged cargo ................

40

40
40

40

40

40

40

35.
Table 25.— MINIMUM ENTRANCE RATES FOR PLANT WORKERS 1/

Minimum rate
(in cents)

All establishments .......
Under 50 ..................
5 0 .......................
Over 50 and under 5 5 .... .
5 5 .......................
Over and under 6 0 .... .
6 0 ..... ..................
Over 60 and under 65 •••••«
6 5 .......................
Over
nnd under 70 .......
7 0 .......................
Over 70 and under 7 5 .... .
7 5 .......................
Over 75 and under 80 .....
8 0 .......................
Over 80 and under 8 5 .... .
8 5 .......................
Over 85 and under 90 ......
9 0 .......................
Over 90 and under 95 ......
9 5 .......................
Over 95 and under 100 .....
1 0 0 ......................
Over 100 and under 105 ••••
105 ......................
Over 105 and under 110 ....
n
o
......................
Over 110 and under 115 ....
1 1 5 ......................
Over 115 and under 120 ....
1 2 0 ......................
Over 120 and under 125 ....
1 2 5 ......................
Over 125 and under 130 ••••
1 3 0 ......................
Over 130 and under 135 ....
1 3 5 ......................
Over 135 and under 140 ....
H O ......................
Over H O and under H 5 ....
H 5 ......................
Over H 5 and under 150 ••••
150 and o v e r ........ •••••
Establishments with no
established minimum •••••
Information not
available ..............
1/
2/
3/
*

Percent of plant 2/ workers in establishments with soecified m3.ninrum rates in Manufacturing
| Nondurable
Durable
All
goods
1
goods
Public
Wholesale Retail
industries
Establishments with Services
trade
utilities*
trade
501 or 101-500 501 or
2/
10 1-500
more
more
workers
workers
workers
workers
10 0 .0
0.7
.4
.3
1 .1
1 .0
—
.3
1.4
.4
1.7
22.3
5.2
3.0
4.0
2.5
5.2
5.0
8.5
1 .6
2.7
3.3
2 .0
.4
2.7
1 .8
1 .8
.8
1.3

10 0 .0
—
•
•
33.7
6 .6
.
3.2
3.5
5.9
7.1
8.4
13.9
2 .8
4.8
.
1.5
4.1
•
1.3
—
-

10 0 .0
—
27.4
•
2 .6
1.9
1 0 .6
13.1
9.9
3.1
5.5
1.7
2 .6
1 1 .2
-

10 0 .0
—
-

_

18.9
1.4
2 .8
3.3
•
2.3
6.3
1.7
7.9
5.2
7.8
7.7
6 .1
2 .1
3.4

-

-

-

3.4

2 .8

-

5.5

4.8

.4

•

•

-

—
-

59.1
2.3
6 .8
2.3
1.9
.8
1 .0
4.5
2 .8
.8
1 .6
.4
1.4
3.2
.1
.4
1.7
1.5
—
1.9
-

3.7
2.4
2 .0
2.3
—
-

1.4
.3
1 .8
•
.9
.1
.7
.9
.5
3.2

10 0 .0

-

10 0 .0
•
—
4.0
1 2 .0
.6
7.8
2.3
.7
5.4
1 5 .0
•
.4
2.4
.1
3.3
1.9
.9
.5
•
1 .8
2 .8
.8
.4
—
1.4

10 0 .0
•
1 6 .6
.4
8.3
.7
2.7
1 1 .0
2 .1
2 .8
5.0
1.7
17.4
3.1
-

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

1.4
~
3.8
—
1.9

6.3
.9
2 .2
9.6
1 .8
—
2 .8
8.4
3.3

3.3
8.5
18.5
4.3
5.4
1 .2
17.7
8.9
7.9
5.5
2 .8
2 .6
.5
•
2.4

6 .0
1 4 .6
8.7
1.5
6 .0
2.9
8*4
2.3
1 .2
2 .8
.7
1 .2
3.3
.5
•
1.3
-

1.4

1 .1
12.5

1 .8
4.4

«
.3
.8
1.7
-

10.5

1.7

1 4 .6

.4

2 .1

2 0 .2

•4

.2

-

3.9
5.5
1 .8
•
-

-

5.7
1.3
-

Shift differential

Percent of plant workers employed on each shjLft in •
All manufacturing industries 1/
Paints
Nondurable
Durable
Machinery
and
All
goods
varnishes
industries
goods
2d 3d or
2d 3d or
2d 3d or
2d 3d or
2d 3d or
shift other shift other shift other shift other shift other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ............. ... •

9.9

2.7

8.5

lf?
t

n.3

?.5

2.2

7.o

Receiving shift differentials ...

9.6

2.6

8.5

1.9

10.6

3.4

2.2

7.0

Uniform cents (per hour) • • • • •
Under 5 cents • • • • .... ...
5 c e n t s ......... . . . . .....
Over 5 and under 10
c e n t s ........ ... .................... ...
10 Cents . e e . e e e e e e e e e e e e e .
Over 10 cents ..........................................

6.5
.3
2.2

1.9
.4

3.1
.6
1.5

1.3

2.5
-

.4

9.3
.1
2.8

2.2
1.2

1.2
..4
2.4

.3

.4
.4

2.2
.2

.1

4.2

Uniform percentage •••••••••••
5 percent .................
Over 5 and Tinder 10
p e r c e n t ....... .........
10 percent ...........
Over 10 percent •••••••••..
Other
Receiving no differential ......

ij

1 .2
-

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




Table 26.— SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL PROVISIONS

2/

.5
*

.7

1.0
-

2.8
.3

.6
(2/)

.3
1.1
1.1

.5
.1

.8
2.1
2.5

.3

.1

-

.3

(2/)

-

5.4

-

.3

*

•

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

.1
-

•

.6
.4
1.2

1.0
-

-

-

-

.8
.6

.7
.1

•
-

.6

.2

.5

-

.1

-

-

3.6
3.3

-

-

.5

.2

-

-

-

-

-

.6

.1

•

-

-

-

.6

-

-

6.9
•

•
-

-

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 27 .— SCHEDULED WEEKLY HOURS
P e rc e n t o f women office workers e
Employed i n -

Manufacturing
Weekly hours

All establishments.................... ••••••
Under 35 hours ••••••.... ................. .
35 hours •••••................................
Over 35 and under 37^ hours ..................
37i hours • • • • ............................... ...
Over 37j and under 40 hours ..................
40 hours .................... ...................... • • • • .......................
Over 40 and under 44 hours • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Over 44 and under 48 h o u r s .... • • • • • • • ..... ...
48 hours ............................................................................................................................................
Over 48 hours ............................................................................................... ...
Information not a v a i l a b l e ..................... ...................................................

1/
2j

2/
*
**

All
All
industries manufac­
turing
100.0

0.4
44.1
16.0
17.0
3.4
18.8

100.0

Non­
Durable
durable
goods
goods
100.0

100.0

Wholesale
Public
utilities*
trade

Retail
trade

17.1

13.0

25.8

.2
22.0

8.0
22.8

5.1
55.6

34.5
17.0
27.0
8.9
12,6

Central
offices

y

100.0

100.0

100.0
_

30.4

Finance** Services

All
industries

70.4
2.1

9.5
1.4
16.5

40.3
12.9
21.5
2.6

22.4

16.4
. 3.1
33.5
4.3
42.1

100.0

100.0

0.4
45.3

28.5

30.2
11.8

3.2
9.1

.1

-

-

-

-

-

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2

-

-

-

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

—

.3

.1

m
m

6.6

23.5
1.5
37.4
.3
.3.
.1

100.0

100.0

1.6

0.4
2.3

59.9
11.4
11.5
2.7
12.9
-

2.1

9.4
.2
65.6

.9
3.1
3.9

-

-

7.7
2.4

*■ *.

-

—

Percent of plant
Manufacturing
All
Non­
Durable
durable
manufac­
goods
goods
turing

-

Public
Wholesale Retail
trade
utilities*
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.7
5.2

1.6

5.0
8.4
18.8

1.1

1.0

1.7

(2/)

1.5
1.9
3.3

-

-

18.1
45.3

4.6
.5
74.9
5.5

-

11.6
.1

-

72.8

89.3

.6
2.8

1.6

.5

.9

1.2
1.6

1.8

4.7

.2

-

-

2.0

1.8

workers employed in -

3.4
-

3.9
-

—

62.5

57.0

88.8

-

2.8

~

~

-

1.6

5.7

4.5
.1
.5

-

2.2

6.5
17.9

20.0

1.3

8 .8

-

6 .2

-

1.7

•*

9.0

—

**

3.1
-

.7

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 28.— PAID HOLIDAYS

Number of paid holidays

Percent of office workers employed in •
Manufacturing
All
All
Wholesale Retail Finance** Services
Non­
Public
Durable
industries manufac­
durable utilities*
trade
trade
goods
goods
turing

Central
offices

All
industrie s
2/

Percent of plant l / workers employed in Manufacturing
All
Wholesale Retail
Non­
Public
Durable
durable utilities*
manufac­
trade
trade
goods
goods
turing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments providing paid holidays ••••••
1 to 5 d a y s ..... .................... .
5 days ..................................
6 days ................................. .
6^ days ................ ...... .........
7 days ......................... .
7i days .................................
8 days ...... ......... ..... .
8j days ............................. .
9 days ........................... .....
9£ d a y s ....... .........................
10 days .....................
10j days ...............................
11 days .......................... .
ll£ days ............. ..................
12 d a y s .... ................ .
12j or more days ............... ....... .

99.8
.7
3.2
.1
15.3
.4
7.2
1.0
6.9
.8
7.9
2.6
45.1
1.1
7.1
.4

100.0
.4
8.5
1.0
27.1
.8
20.8

100.0
10.7
31.1
14.8
23.3
12.5
7.6
-

100.0
.5
7.5
1.4
25.4
1.2
23.3
18.8
.9
11.5
3.0
5.8
.7
-

100.0

98.8
-

100.0
.1
.3
.9
.1
1.0
2.8
2.9
1.9
71.5
.6
17.9
(2/)

100.0
6.4
8.0
.1
23.0
.2
17.3
1.5
9.4
.1
11.3
3.7
14.4
4.4

100.0
2.6
14.5
.3
12.6
.7
9.9
1.4
10.8
5.1
39.0
1.5
1.6

89.1
3.0
5.0
20.9
.8
23.3
2.9
7.3
.1
6.0
.5
3.0
.1
15.1
(2/)
.9
.2

97.9
3.4
1.4
34.4
2.1
27.2
.2
12.9
9.4
.3
3.4

2.8
.7

98.7
3.8
20.7
.3
7.5
3.4
5.3
1.0
19.0
4.4
28.3
1.6
3.4
-

97.8
21.0
39.8
19.8
12.1
1.7
3.4
—
-

97.9
5.5
2.3
42.6
3.3
19.4
•4
8.5
7.7
.5
4.5
.1
3.1
-

63.4
.6
9.6
5.8'
1.3
5.9
.1
38.8
1.3
-

Establishments providing no paid holidays ...
Information not available ......... .

.2

(2/)
*
*

1.3
—

—

7.3
3.6

2.1
—

2.2

2.1

20.3
16.3

All establishments ....................... .

1/
2/
2/
*
**

-

20.1
.6
11.8
2.1
6.3
.5
—

—

—

Other than office workers.
Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




•
4.0
~
8.2
1.5
1.1
2.9
1.2
3.0
74.6
-

-

.8
75.8
.1
1.1
1.5
4.1
1.0
.5
13.6
.3
1.2

*
•

-

.2
-

-

(2 / )

3.2
-

'

100.0

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.8
8.5
1.2
8.3
46.1
14.5
.9
1.4
1.6
1.3
10.0
-

92.9
35.4
21.5
19.2
.4
5.4
1.6
2.2
7.2
-

6.2

7.1

-

19.6
18.4
2.5
10.8
1.3
1.4
2.8
15.8
1.3
24.2
1.9
*
■

-

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

37.

Table 29.— PAID VACATIONS (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Percent of office workers employed in
Vacation policy

All
All
industries manufac­
turing

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Wholesale
Public
trade
utilities*

Retail
trade

Financ e** Services

Central
offices

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Manufacturing
Wholesale Retail
All
All
Public
Durable
trade
trade
industries manufac­
durable utilities*
goods
turing
goods
___ 2/

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ...........
Under 1 w e e k .............................
1 w e e k ............... ...................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 w e e k s .............................. .
Over 2 weeks ••••................. ••••••••

81.6
3.7
51.5
10.6
15.6
.2

77.8
4.7
44.1
12.7
16.3

61.2
13.0
19.6
19.0
9.6
-

84.7
1.1
54.5
10.0
19.1
-

91.9
73.0
10.4
8.5
-

73.1
1.8
66.6
1.1
3.6
-

62.5
23.7
26.9
7.7
4.2
-

87.1
3.4
40.5
10.8
31.9
.5

78.8
1.5
54.8
16.3
6.2
-

80.2
2.0
63.1
13.5
1.6
-

54.0
16.1
29.9
6.3
1.7

(2/)

51.7
25.4
14.6
9.8
1.9
-

56.8
41.5
8.2
5.5
1.6
-

48.5
15.4
18.6
12.5
2.0
-

61.6
1.0
56.0
4.6
-

50.5
9.1
34.7
6.7
-

61.2
19.4
38.8
2.8
.2
-

28.1
6.8
16.3
4.1
.9
-

Establishments with no paid vacations ........
Information not available ....................

18.4
-

22.2
-

38.8

15.3
-

8.1
-

26.9

37.5
-

12.9
-

21.2
-

19.8
-

42.4
3.6

48.3
-

43.2
-

51.5
-

22.0
16.4

49.5
-

38.8
-

71.9
-

Establishments with paid vacations ...........
1 w e e k ...................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .................
2 w e e k s .... ..............................
Over 2 weeks ...................... .

99.7
8.3
.2
90.7
.5

98.8
14.0
1.3
83.0
.5

100.0
21.0
4.6
74.4
-

98.3
11.0
86.6

100.0
5.3
94.7
-

100.0

100.0
51.5
48.5
-

100.0
2.1
.1
97.1

98.6
9.7
.4
86.2
2.3

100.0
5.0
95.0
-

93.6
50.0
2.4
37.4
3.8

98.0
67.7
2.8
19.8

99.3
75.9
5.3
17.1
1.0

97.2
62.6
1.2
21.5
11.9

78.1
16.5
1.3
57.0
3.3

100.0
39.2
60.8
-

98.7
46.4
52-3
-

96.1
70.9
2.3
21,5
1.4

Establishments with no paid vacations ........
Information not available ...... .............

.3
-

1.2
-

2.8
3.6

2.0
-

.7
-

2.8
-

5.5
16.4

1.3
-

3.9
-

Establishments with paid vacations ........ .
1 week ...................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............. .
2 weeks ..................................
Over 2 weeks .............. ..............

99.8
2.3
•4
94.6
2.5

98.8
6.6
2.5
86.0
3.7

93.8
25.5
10.1
52.8
5.4

98.0
38.9
20.3
31.1
7.7

99.3
43.8
22.0
32.5
1.0

97.2
35.8
19.2
30.3
11.9

78.1
6.5
2.7
65.6
3.3

98.7
6.4
83.8
8.5

97.9
55.9
2.8
37.8
1.4

Establishments with no paid vacations ........
Information not available...................

.2
-

1.2
-

2.6
3.6

2.0

.7

2.8
-

5.5
16.4

1.3
-

2.1

99.9
.3

99.1
.8

100.0
-

93.9
3.1

25.2

57.4
2.1
30.1

98.0
4.2
1.8
70.0
2.0
20.0

97.2
5.8
1.2
68.4
21.8

78.1
2.1
29.1
1.0
45.0

98.7
.6
53.8
42.9
1.4

98.6
5.2
83.2
1.5
8.6

1.3

1.4

All establishments ..........................
6 months of service

1 year of service

-

.7
1.7
-

-

7.7
92.3
-

-

-

.7
-

-

1.4
-

-

7.7

-

2 years of service
100.0
7.5
8.6
83.9
-

-

98.3
6.2
86.9
5.2
1.7
-

100.0
.2
99.8
-

100.0
1.6
- .
98.4
_
-

100.0
.3
90.7
9.0

-

100.0
2.0
.1
95.6
2.3

-

99.4
6.0
.4
85.2
7.8
.6
-

100.0
100.0
-

-

-

-

100.0
21.3
78.7
-

-

15 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ...........
1 week ...................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .................
2 weeks ........... ......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 weeks ....................... ..........
Over 3 w e e k s ...... .......................
Establishments with no paid vacations
Information not available...................

1/
2/
2/
*
**

(1/)

•4

29.3

52.9
31.9
13.1

.9
65.3
4.1

.1
~

.9
~

100.0
1.2
73.2
25.6
_

98.7
1.1
-

100.0

44.4

19.3
79.7
1.0

34.5
18.7
1.3

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




(2/)
-

100.0
1.2

51.1
47.7
-

-

-

~

—

100.0
.3

41.9
54.9
2.9
-

100.0
-

12.1
2.5
79.8
5.6
-

—

99.8
.2
46.0
50.7
2.9

.2
-

74.8

-

.7

.5

-

2.5

—

3.6

2.0

99.3
1.7
2.7
72.5
5.2
17.2

.7
—

2.8

.9
5.5
16.4

100.0
1.3
63.0
35.7

-

.1

—

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

38

Table 30 .— PAID

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments ......... ................

SICK LE4VE (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Percent of office workers employed in
Manufacturing
Wholesale Retail
Non­
Public
All
All
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
trade
industries manufac­
goods
goods
turing

Financ e** Servic es

Central
of fic es

All
industries
2/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

20.6

31.6
2.7
ft.6

28.5
4.2
3.5
-

32.9

18.7

37.6
4.2

16.7

24.1

25.9

11.9

1.2

1.1

2.2

2.0

20.2

11.4

5.1
3.2

-

2.0

17.8

1.0

.9

1.7

4.2
?.l
3.4

4.3
4.3
v .9
7.1
5.1

5.7
2.5
.4

15.5

5.9
1.9
2.9
2.5
-

1.1

1.0

1.4
-

2.4
1.4
-

Percent of plant 1/ vrorkers employed in Manufacturing .......
Wholesale Retail
Non­
Public
All
Durable
trade
durable utilities*
trade
manufac­
goods
turing
goods
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9.3
3.3
3.6
1.3

7.7
.3
4.9
1.9
•6
-

3.5
-

27.5
1.5
8.4
7.1
1.9
8.5
-

31.2
6.1

Services

100.0

6 months of service

Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sick leave ..........................
Under 5 days ............. ..............
5 days ........... ......................
6 days ...................................................................................
7 days ...................................................................................
10 d^ys ....................... .........
12 days ................................
15 days ................................
Over 15 d a y s ................................................... .......
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick leave ....................................... ..........................
Information not available..............................................

1.5
7.7
2.7
.5
5.3
.4
.6

1.0

.3
17.1
1.1
.8

2.0
10.8

2.7
-

.9
-

1.6

-

.8

3.1
3.7
.3
7.1
2.8

1.0

(I/)
.2
.1

8.3
1.4
4.4
1.7
.4
.4 -

1.1

-

2.1

.5
.9
-

15.3
6.9
1.9
.1

.9
-

1.9

-

7°.4
-

68.4
-

71.5
-

67.1
-

97.6
-

81.3
-

62.4
-

83.3
-

75.9
-

74.1
-

84.5
3.6

91.7
-

90.7
-

92.3
-

80.1
16.4

72.5
-

68.8

26.8

34.7

32.9
1.5

21.9
_

.1

2.9

3.9
2.5

1.1

4.9
1.9
-

13.9
11.7
.5

1.1

.7

1.7

2.8

41.4
1.5
10.3
17.6
1.9
8.5
.4
.9
.3

.9
14.8

1.8

13.7
3.5
5.3
1.9
.4
.4
-

6.0

2.7
.3
5.1
2.3
1.7
5.7
1.9

18.9
2.9
7.1
3.1
.4
3.6
.4

35.0
5.9
3.6

.6

35.1
4.8
3.1
4.8
3.5
7.3
6.5
5.1

11.7

10.8
.8

20.5
9.4

16.9
5.6

13.8

27.6
19.4

26.5

1.1

38.8
-

37.7

.3
9.0
1.7
.3
5.6
2.5
2.4
2.3
2.7

62.3
-

79.5
-

73.5
-

64.9
-

77.5

65.0

39.5
.3
14.8
5.9

20.5
9.4

26.5
-

23.4

.1

-

6.1

1.9
1.9
1.2
.2

.9
93.9
-

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sic k leave ..................................................................
Under 5 days ...................................................................
5 days .................................
6 days ..................................................................................
7 days .................................................................................
10 days ................................................................................
11 or 12 days ..................................................................
15 days ........ ........................
20 days ......... •••••••••........ .....
Over 20 days ..•••••••............
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick leave ..........................
Information not available ...................

. ,

11.7
1.4
.4
12.0
1.1
1.1

5.9

2.7
15.5
1.6

3.7
1.5

73.2
-

65.3
*

61.2

30.7

34.7

.1
11.1

.8

.5
10.6

.9
7.8

3.1
1.3
1.2
2.0

-

2.2

2.0
14.2
6.0
2.8
10.2

2.5
-

67.1
-

72.4
-

78.1

38.8

32.9

66.1

1.1

52.9

21.9
-

.7
11.5

3.5
21.9

1.1

1.6

.9
-

1.2

-

-

-

16.5

7.8

9.4

2.2
7.7

67.1
“

33.9

78.1

60.5

-

-

1.1
6.2

5.6
6.1

.2
.2
1.0

3.6

1.9
1.1

2.2

8.8

14.3
1.9
8.5
.1
1.2
1.2

2.2

2.3

2.1

.9
-

86.3
-

83.1
-

88.3
-

69.7
16.4

58.6

13.7
2.3
5.5
1.7
1.5

16.9
5.6
3.6
1.3
4.1
2.3
-

11.7

41.4
1.5
10.3

37.2
3.9

17.6

7.1

1.9
.3
.4

.9

-

8.5

3.2
1.7

2.7

32.7
26.2
.5
.3
5.7

13.8

2.5

83.1
—

88.3
—

50.9
16.4

58.6

62.8

85.7
—

.6

-

.8

-

.1

.9
-

-

1.4
85.7
-

15 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sick leave ..........................
Under 5 d a y s ..... ......................
5 d a y s ........... ......................
6 days ••••....... ........... ..........
7 days ..................................
10 days .................................
12 days ................................
15 days ................ ................
20 to 30 days ...........................
Over 30 days ...... ..... ..... .........
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick l e a v e .... ............ .........
Information not available ...................

1/
2/
2/
*
**

1.7
.4
4.0
1.5

4.9
.6

.6

.9

2.3
9.0

1.5
12.7

3.0
5.1
3.7

69.3
“

65.3

61.2

—

5.4

.8

.6

1.0

3.1
.5

7.2

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2.2

2.7
.3
3.3
2.3
1.7

2.3
7.3

5.6
4.2
-

35.1
2.9
3.1
4.7
3.5
-

2.6

79.5
—

6.2

.1

4.0

2.8

-

1.1

2.9
2.9

1.3
.1

2.0

10.4
2.8

.9
.7

.1

.2
.6

-

6.0

.7

.9

2.8

14.9

5.1

1.7

73.5
—

64.9
~

73.0
3.6

86.3

.3
6.6

1.9
.2

-

.9

4.6

1.9
.1

—

14.3
1.8
8.1

(a/)
.6
.1
1.1

.1

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 31.— NONPRODUCTION BONUSES

Type of bonus

Percent of office workers employed in «
r
.
Manufacturingc
All
All
Non­
Wholesale Retail Finance** Services
Public
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
industries manufac­
trade
goods
goods
turing
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ...................................
Christinas or year-end ......................
Profit-sharing..... ............ ••••••*•••••
O t h e r ......... ......... ....... ............

44.5
34.4
6.8
6.3

50.3
46.8
2.4
2.5

43.4
37.3
2.4
4.4

53.2
50.8
2.4
1.8

18.8
16.4
.4
2.4

49.9
33.4
11.3
3.4

37.9
33.2
3.7
1.0

57.5
37.5
11.3
13.9

33.3
31.8
9.0
.1

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ....... ....... ............ ...........
Information not available

55.5
■
*

49.7

56.6
—

46.8

81.2
—

50.1

62.1
—

42.5

61.7
■
*

All establishments.... ................... .

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Central
offices

All
industries
2/

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Manufacturing
All
Wholesale Retail
Public
Non­
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
trade
manufac­
goods
goods
turing

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

28.2
28.2
- '
2.2

28.3
26.0
1.7
2.2

31.8
29.4
1.9
3.2

35.3
33.1
2.1
2.9

29.7
27.1
1.8
3.4

8.3
8.3
-

28.2
23.1
3.8
1.3

46.2
42.0
4.0
.2

22.8
21.0
1.8

71.3

68.1
3.6

68.2
•
•

64.7
•
*

70.3

75.3
16.4

71.8
•
•

53.8
—

77.2
—

100.0

Other than office wsrkers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 32 .— INSURANCE AND PENSION PIANS

Type of plan

Percent of office workers employed in •
Manufacturing
AIL
Wholesale Retail
Non­
All
Public
Durable
Finance** Services
industries manufac­
durable utilities*
trade
trade
goods
goods
turing

l)

Central
offices

All
industries
2/

Percent o f plant
workers emp]Loyed in Mamiifacturing
All
Wholesale Retail
Non­
Public
Durable
trade
durable utilities*
manufac­
trade
goods
goods
turing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ .......... ..................
Life i n s u r a n c e............................ .
Health insurance ............. .......... .
Hospitalization..................... .
Retirement pension •••••••..... ............

92.5
84.0
50.2
50.7
64.1

84.7
78.2
54.8
38.1
42.1

86.6
83.6
51.2
67.3
25.0

83.9
75.9
56.3
25.8
49.3

98.5
89.7
68.0
33.2
89.2

87.7
81.7
50.0
47.8
42.1

92.1
60.2
49.7
70.8
41.1

95.3
87.9
47.1
62.0
73.0

81.3
75.2
29.9
34.7
43.2

98.8
91.3
55.2
51.5
83.0

81.0
68.9
51.4
57.2
37.0

81.6
71.1
58.3
64.8
31.5

87.8
78.0
53.7
71.6
21.6

77.8
66.8
61.1
60.6
37.7

72.6
64.5
41.0
32.3
54.2

75.7
65.5
35.7
45.8
37.6

91.2
70.2
54.6
70.3
37.5

78.1
67.6
46.4
56.8
17.7

Establishments with no insurance or
pension p l a n s .... ................ ..........
Information not available ........... •••••.....

7.5
*
•

15.3

13.4
—

16.1
•
*

1.5
—

12.3
—

7.9

4.7
—

18.7
—

1.2
—

14.8
4.2

18.4
—

12.2

22.2

9.4
18.0

24.3

8.8
*
•

19.8
2.1

All establishments ................ .

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Other than office vrorkers.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N.Y., April 1951
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Unduplicated total.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0

Services

100.0

40.

Appendix A

“

Bcepo and M ethod

Busutey

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied In order to maximize the
number of workers surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain size, how­
ever, was given its proper weight in the combination of data by industry and occupation.

With the exception of the union scale of rates, information presented in this bulletin was col­
lected by visits of field representatives of the Bureau to representative establishments in the area sur­
veyed. In classifying workers by occupation, uniform job descriptions were used; they are presented in
Appendix B.

The earnings information in the report excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. Ncnproduction bonuses are also excluded, but incentive earnings, including commissions for salespersons, have been
included for those workers employed under some form of incentive wage system. Where weekly hours are re­
ported as for office clerical, they refer to the work schedules for which the salaries are paid rounded to
the nearest half-hour; average weekly earnings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest 50
cents. The number of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in all establishments within
the scope of the study and not to the number actually surveyed. Data are shown for only fill time workers,
i.e., those who were hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule of hours for the given occupa­
tional classification.

Six broad industry divisions and central offices were covered in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations: (a) office clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing and shipping (tables 1 through 4)* The covered industry group­
ings are: manufacturing; transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public utilities; whole­
sale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; services; and central offices. Information
on work schedules and supplementary benefits was also obtained in a representative group of establishments
in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in table A, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in the occupa­
tions studied to warrant their inclusion in the study.

Information on wage practices refers to all office workers and to all plant workers as specified
in the individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in offices (or
plant departments) that observe the practice in question, except in the section relating to women office
workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eligibility requirement^ the proportion
actually receiving the specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is
limited to formal arrangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to those providing full
pay for at least some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting period preceding the payment of
benefits, and exclude health insurance even though it is paid by the employer. Health insurance is included,
however, under tabulations for insurance and pension plans.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were studied, minimum size of establishment and
extent of the area covered were determined separately for each industry, and are indicated in table B. Al­
though size limits frequently varied from those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms which satisfied the size requirements of the broad
industry divisions.

Table A.— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN NEW YORK, N.Y., AND NUMBER STUDIED
BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1951

Item

Number of establishmeiits
Estimated
Estimated
total in all
total
Studied
within scope
industries
of study 2/
i/

Estimated
total in all
industries
i/ .

Employment
Estimated
In establishments
total
studied
within scope
Total
Office
of study 2/

Table B .— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN NEW YORK, N.Y.
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS APRIL 1951 1/
Numbejc of
establislhments

Industry Division
All divisions...................................
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods
.................... .
Nondurable goods 4/ .......................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Transportation (except railroads), communi­
cation, and other public utilities ......
Wholesale trade ......................... .
Retail t r a d e ................ ..............
Finance, insurance, and real estate .......
Services:
Industries covered j>/ ............. .
Industries not covered .................
Central Offices ...........................

106,039
34,604
10,626
23,978
70,811

4,211
1,152
365
787
2,795

651
159
66
93
419

2,634,300
998,000
305,000
693,000
1,539,800

1,339,400
373,800
135,500
238,300
875,400

564,710
112,520
47,490
65,030
407,780

178,820
16,160
5,740
10,420
133,690

3,830
17,771
22,674
9,458

210
787
299
686

60
79
56
99

275,900
269,400
386,900
285,800

222,400
110,600
177,400
210,500

154,970
20,000
81,940
95,540

31,290
7,930
9,350
70,850

12,933
4,145
624

813

125

55,330

14,270

—

73

264,400
57,400
96^500

154,500

_

264

90,200

44,410

28,970

4,211
204
317
699
1,778
1,213

651
136
105
125
183
102

Size of Establishment
All size groups .................................
1,001 and o v e r ............................. .
501 - 1,000 ...................... ............
251 - 500 .....................................
101 - 250 .....................................
5 1 - 1 0 0 ......................................
2 1 - 5 0 .......................................
1 - 2 0 ........................................

106,039
204
319
709
1,344
4,555
14,177
84,231

(/
£)

(1/

m

2,634,300
525,700
216,300
242,400
286,600
316,100
444,600
602,600

1,339,400
525,700
214,700
239,200
276,100
83,700
(2/)
(2/)

564,710
410,280
73,190
44,800
28,760
7,680
w

178,820
128,790
24,920
13,580
8,490
3,040
(2/)

Men's and boys* suits and coats ....
Women's and misses' dresses .......
Men's and boys' dress shirts ......
Paints and varnishes........... .
Women's cement process shoes
(conventional lasted) .......... .
Children's stitchdown shoes ........
Machinery industries..............
B a n k i n g ...........................
Insurance carriers .................
Power laundries ...................
Auto repair shops .................

Estimated
toted
within
scope of
study

Estimated
total
Studied within Studied
scope of
study

109

86
208
13
19

30,335
57,668
2,435
4,440

13,285
9,444
918
1,571

54
21
246
107
127
169
346

21
11
41
23
27
27
32

5,4*2
1,801
24,541
59,544
73,661
14,565
9,588

3,846
1,200
13,428
38,042
42,945
3,794
1,327

J/ 21
8
21
8

389
1,647

21
21
21
51
51
21
5

y

Employment

41

W )

1/ Includes establishments with 1 or more workers in New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties).
2/ The survey of office, professional and technical, maintenance and power plant, custodial, warehousing and shipping jobs reported
in Tables 1,2,3, and 4 was limited to establishments with more than 100 workers in manufacturing, retail trade, and transportation (ex­
cluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities, and to establishments with more than 50 workers in wholesale trade,
finance, insurance, real estate, and service industries; exceptions made in selected industries in which characteristic jobs were sur­
veyed are indicated in table B.
2/ Metal working; lumber, furniture and other wood products; stone, clay and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
4/ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
Jg/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair services; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




Selected industries in which
characteristic jobs were
surveyed 2/

Minimum
size of
establistment
studied

\J Industries surveyed in months other than April were: women's dresses,
August 1950; footwear, September 1950; dress shirts, November 1950; machinery
industries, December 1950; paints and varnishes, power laundries, and automobile
repair shops, March 1951#
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to tables 5 through 15.
2/ Cutting shops with 5 or more workers were included.
Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers
were included.

A p p e n d ix B “

tb e > ic ^ ip ^ io 4 ti.

oj

O c c u fz a tio u d

a
,

S tu d ie d

Office - C o n t inued

The primary purpose o f the Bureau’ s Job description s is to a s s is t it s f i e l d
s ta ff in cla ss ify in g workers who are employed under a, v a riety o f p a yroll t i t l e s and
d iffe re n t work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area,
into appropriate occupations. This is esse n tia l in order to permit the grouping o f o c­
cupational wage rates representing comparable Job content. Because o f th is emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea com parability o f occupational content, the Bureau’ s
Job descriptions d if f e r s ig n ific a n tly from those in use in individual establishments or
those prepared f o r other purposes. In view o f these sp e cia l ch a ra cte ristics o f the
Bureau’ s Job d escrip tion s, th e ir adoption without m odification by any sin gle esta b lish ­
ment or fo r any other purpose than that indicated herein is not recommended.
Where
o f fi c e workers regu larly perform duties c la s s ifie d in more than one occupation, they
are generally c la s s ifie d according to the most s k ille d or responsible duties that are a
regular part o f th eir Job and that are sig n ific a n t in determining th e ir value to the
firm .

O ffice

BOOKKEEPING-M
ACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, E l l i o t t F ish er, Sundsstrand, Burroughs, National Cash R egister) to keep a record o f business tra n sa ction s.
Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typew riter key­
board to keep a set o f records o f business transactions usually requiring a knowledge o f and
experience in b asic bookkeeping p rin cip le s and fa m ilia rity with the structure o f the p a rticu ­
la r accounting system used.
Determines proper records and d is trib u tio n o f debit and c r e d it
items to be used ±a each phase o f the work. May prepare con solidated re p o rts, balance sh eets,
and other records by hand.
Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typew riter key­
board to keep a record o f one or more phases or sections o f a set o f records pertain in g to
business transactions usually requiring some knowledge o f b asic bookkeeping.
Phases or s e c­
tion s include accounts payable, p a y ro lls , customers' accounts (not including simple type o f
b il li n g described under B i l l e r , Machine) , cost distributions, expense d is trib u tio n s , inventory
co n tro ls , e tc . In add ition , may check or a ss is t in preparation o f t r i a l balances and prepare
con trol sheets f o r the accounting department.
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

BILLER, M IN
ACH E
A worker who prepares statements, b i l l s and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary, typewriter. May a lso keep records as to b illin g s or shipping charges o r perform
other c le r ic a l work inciden tal to b il li n g operations. Should be designated as working on
b illin g machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.
B illin g Machine - A worker who uses a sp e cia l b il li n g machine (Moon Hopkins, E ll io t t
Fisher, Burroughs, e t c . , which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare b i l l s
and invoices from customers' purchase orders, in tern a lly prepared orders, shipping memoranda,
e tc . Usually involves a pp lication o f predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry
o f necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the b il li n g machine, and to ta ls
which are automatically accumulated by machine. The, operation usually involves a large num­
ber of carbon copies o f the b i l l being prepared and is often done on a fa n -fo ld machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, E llio t t
Fisher, Remington Rand, e t c ., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers’ b i l l s as part o f the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figu res on a customer’ s ledger record. The machine autom atically accumulates
figu res cel a number of v e r tic a l columns and computes and usually prints autom atically the deb­
i t or cred it balances. Does not involve a knowledge o f bookkeeping. Works from uniform and
standard types o f sales and cre d it s lip s .
BOOKKEEPER, H R
AD
A worker who keeps a set o f books f o r recording business transactions and whose
work involves most o f the fo llo w in g : posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or
Journals, Journalizing transactions where Judgment is involved as to accounts a ffe cte d ; p o st­
ing general ledger; and taking t r i a l balances. May a lso prepare accounting statements and
b i l l s ; may d irect work o f assistants or accounting clerk s.




A worker whose primary fu n ction consists o f operating a ca lcu la tin g machine to per­
form mathematical computations other than addition exclu siv ely .
Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who performs one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple
Journal vouchers; accounts payable vouchers; coding invoices or vouchers with proper account­
ing d istrib u tio n s; entering vouchers in voucher re g is te rs; re c o n cilin g bank accounts; p o st­
ing and balancing subsidiary ledgers con trolled by general led ger, e . g . , accounts re ce iv a b le ,
accounts payable, stock records, voucher Journals.
May a s s is t in preparing Journal e n trie s .
For workers whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set o f books see Bookkeepe r, Hand.
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who is responsible fo r maintaining an establish ed f i l i n g system
and c la s s if ie s and indexes correspondence or other m aterial; may a lso f i l e th is m aterial. May
keep records o f various types in conjunction with f i l e s or supervise others in f i l i n g and l o ­
cating material in the f i l e s . May perform incidental c le r ic a l d u ties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine f i l i n g , usually a t m aterial that has already
been c la s s if ie d , or loca tes or a ssists in locatin g material in f i l e s . May perform inciden tal
c le r ic a l duties.

42,

Office - Continued

Office - Continued

CLERK, GENERAL

SECRETARY

A worker who is t y p ic a lly required to perform a variety o f o f f i c e operations. This
requirement may a rise as a re s u lt o f im p racticab ility o f s p e cia liz a tio n in a sinai 1 o f f i c e or
because v e r s a t ilit y is e s se n tia l in meeting peak requirements in larger o f f i c e s .
The work
gen erally involves the use o f independent judgment in tending to a pattern o f o f f i c e work
from day to day, as w ell as knowledge re la tin g to phases of o f f i c e work that occur only o c ­
ca s io n a lly . For example, the range of operations performed may e n ta il a l l or some combination
o f the fo llo w in g : answering correspondence, preparing b i l l s and in v o ice s, posting to various
record s, preparing p a y r o lls , f i l i n g , e t c . May a lso operate various o f f i c e machines and type
as the work req u ires.

A worker who performs s e cre ta ria l and c le r ic a l duties f o r a superior in an adminis­
tra tiv e cr executive p o sitio n and whose duties involve the follow in g : making appointments fo r
superior; receiv in g people coming into o f f i c e ; answering and making phone c a l ls ; handling
personal and important or co n fid e n tia l m ail, and w riting routine correspondence on own in it ia ­
t iv e ; taking d icta tio n , eith e r in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine (except where
tran scribin g machine is used), and transcribing d icta tio n or the recorded information repro­
duced on a tran scribin g machine.
In a ddition , may prepare sp e cia l reports or memoranda fo r
information o f superior.

CLERK, ORD
ER

STENOGRAPHER, GEN
ERAL

A worker who receiv es customers* orders f o r material or merchandise by m ail, phone,
or p erson ally and whose duties involve any combination o f the fo llo w in g :
quoting p rices to
customers, making out an order sheet lis t in g the items to make up the order, checking p rices
and q u an tities of items on order sheet, d istrib u tin g order sheets to resp ective departments to
be f i l l e d . May a ls o check with c r e d it department to determine cr e d it ratin g o f customer, ac­
knowledge re c e ip t of orders from customers, follow -up orders to see that they have been f i l l e d ,
keep f i l e o f orders receiv ed , and check shipping invoices with o rig in a l orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL
A worker who computes wages o f company employees and enters the necessary data on
the p a y ro ll sheets and whose duties involve: calcu lating worker*s earnings based on time or
production record s; posting ca lcu la ted data on p ayroll sheet, showing information such as
worker*s name, working days, time, ra te , deductions f o r insurance and t o t a l wages due. In
a d d ition , may make out pay checks and a s s is t the paymaster in making up and d istrib u tin g the
pay envelopes. May use a ca lcu la tin g machine.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory r e s p o n s ib ilitie s ,
reproduces
m ultiple copies o f typew ritten or handwritten matter, using a mimeograph or d itto machine.
Makes necessary adjustment such as f o r ink and paper feed counter and cylin der speed. Is not
required to prepare s te n c il or d it t o master. May keep f i l e cf used s te n cils or d itto masters.
May s o r t, c o lla t e , and staple completed m aterial.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory r e s p o n s ib ilitie s , records account­
ing end s t a t is t ic a l data on tabulating cards by punching a series o f holes in the cards in a
s p e c ifie d sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, follow in g w ritten information on
record s.
May be required t o duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to ma­
chine. Keeps f i l e s o f punch cards. May v e r ify own work or work o f others.
OFFICE BOY O GIRL
R
A worker who performs a v a rie ty o f routine duties such as running errands; operating
minor o f f i c e machines; such as sealers or m ailers; opening and d istrib u tin g m ail; and other
minor c l e r i c a l work. (Bonded messengers are excluded from th is c la s s if ic a t io n .)




A worker whose primary fun ction is to take d icta tio n from one cr more persons, either
in shorthand cr by stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to
tran scribe th is d icta tio n on a typew riter. May a lso type from w ritten copy. May a lso set up
and keep f i l e s in order, keep simple record s, e tc .
Does not include transcribing-machine
work. (See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary fun ction is to take d icta tio n from one or more persons,
eith er in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine, involving a varied tech n ica l or spe­
c ia liz e d vocabulary such as in le g a l b r ie fs or reports on s c i e n t if ic research and to tran­
scribe th is d icta tio n on a typew riter. May a lso type from w ritten copy. May a lso set up and
keep f i l e s in order, keep simple record s, e t c .
Does not include transcribing-machine work.
(See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
SW
ITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a sin gle or m ultiple p o sitio n telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involves handling incoming, outgoing and intraplant or o f f ic e c a l ls . In addition , may
record t o l l c a lls and take messages. As a minor part o f d u ties, may give information to per­
sons who c a l l in , or o cca sion a lly take telephone orders.
For workers who a lso do typing or
other stenographic work or act as re c e p tio n ists , (See Switchboard O perator-R eceptionist.)
SW
ITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
A worker who in addition to performing duties o f operator, on a sin gle p o sitio n or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as re ce p tio n ist and/or performs typing or other routine c l e r i ­
ca l work as part o f regular d uties.
This typing or c le r ic a l work may tqke the major part o f
th is worker’ s time while at switchboard.
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates machine that autom atically analyzes
punched in groups o f tabulating cards, and p rints translated data
cords; sets or adjusts machine to add, subtract, m ultiply, and make
cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts machine. May
tabulated. May sort and v e r ify punched cards.

and tran slates information •
on forms or accounting re ­
other ca lcu la tio n s; places
f i l e cards a fte r they are

Professional and Technical - Continued

Office - Continued

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, G ERAL
EN

D
RAFTSM
AN - Continued

A worker whose primary fun ction is to transcribe d icta tio n involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records.
May a lso type from w ritten copy and do
simple c le r ic a l work.
A worker who takes d icta tio n in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar
machine is c la s s ifie d as a Stenographer, General.

drawings. Work is frequently in a specialized fie ld such as a rch ite ctu ra l,
chanical, or structural d raftin g.
DRAFTSM
AN, CHIEF

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary fun ction is to transcribe d icta tio n involving a varied tech ­
n ica l or specia lized vocabulary such as in le g a l b r ie fs or reports on s c ie n t if ic research
from trans crib ing-machine records.
May a lso type from w ritten copy and do simple c le r ic a l
work. A worker who takes d icta tio n in shorthand or by stenotype or sim ilar machine is c la s s i­
fie d as a Stenographer, Technical.
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies o f various m aterial or to make out
b i l l s a fte r calcu lations have been made by another person.
May operate a teletype machine.
May, in addition, do c le r ic a l work involving l i t t l e specia l train in g, such as keeping simple
records, f i l i n g records and rep orts, making out b i l l s , or sortin g and d istrib u tin g incoming
mail.
Class A - A worker who performs one or more o f the follow in g: typing material in
fin a l form from very rough and involved d ra ft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of tech n ical and unusual words or from fo re ig n language
copy; combining m aterial from several sources; or planning lay-ou t o f complicated s t a t is t ic a l
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough d raft in fin a l
form. May also type routine form le t t e r s , varying d e ta ils to su it circumstances.
May, in
addition, perform c l e r ic a l duties as outlined above.
Class B - A worker who performs one or more o f the follow in g: typing from r e la tiv e ­
ly clear or typed d ra fts; routine typing o f forms, insurance p o lic ie s , e t c . ; settin g up sim­
ple standard tabulations, or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
May, in addition, perform c l e r ic a l duties as outlined above.

e l e c t r ic a l , me­

(Draftsman, head; squad leader; squad boss)
A worker who plans and d irects a c tiv itie s o f one or more draftsmen in preparation
o f working plans and d e ta il drawings from rough or d e ta il sketches f o r engineering, construc­
tio n , or manufacturing purposes.
The duties performed involve a combination o f the fo llo w ­
ing:
interpreting b lu ep rin ts, sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work p ro­
cedures; assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting th e ir work; and performing more
d i f f i c u l t problems.
May a ss is t subordinates during emergencies or as a regular assignment,
and performs rela ted duties o f a supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSM
AN, JUNIOR
(D eta iler, assistant draftsman)
A worker who d e ta ils units or parts o f drawings prepared by draftsman or others f o r
engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. Uses various types o f d ra ftin g to o ls
as required.
May prepare drawings from simple plans or sketches, and performs other duties
under d ire ctio n o f a draftsman.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service to employees or persons who become i l l
or su ffe r an accident on the premises o f a fa cto ry or other establishment and whose duties
involve a l l or most o f the fo llo w in g :
giving f i r s t aid to the i l l or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing o f employee's in ju rie s; keeping records o f patien ts treated ; and prepar­
ing accident reports fo r compensation or other purposes. May a lso a s s is t Physician in ex­
amining applican ts, give in stru ction in health education and illn e s s prevention, and performs
other rela ted du ties.
TRACER

P rofessional and Technical

A worker who copies plans and drawings prepared by oth ers, by p lacin g tra cin g clo th
or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or p e n cil. Uses T-square, compass and other d r a ft­
ing t o o ls . May prepare simple drawings and do simple le tte rin g .

D
RAFTSM
AN
A worker who prepares working plans and d e ta il drawings from notes, rough or de­
ta ile d sketches f o r engineering, con struction, or manufacturing purposes. The duties per­
formed involve a combination o f the follow in g:
preparing working plans, d e ta il drawings,
maps, cross-section s, e t c ., to scale by use o f drafting instruments; making engineering com­
putations such as those involved in strength o f m aterials, beams and trusses; v e rify in g com­
pleted work, checking dimensions, materials to be used, and q u an tities; w riting s p e c ific a ­
tio n s; making adjustments or changes in drawings or s p e c ific a tio n s . In addition , may ink in
lin es and le tte rs on p en cil drawings, prepare d e ta il units o f complete drawings, or trace




Maintenance and Power Plant
CARPENTER, M TEN CE
AIN AN
A worker who performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in
good repair building woodwork and equipment such as b in s, crib s , counters, benches, p a r titio n s ,

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

Maintenance and Fewer Plant - Continued

CARPENTER, M
AINTENANCE - Continued

MACHINIST, M TEN CE
AIN AN

doors, f l o o r s , s t a ir s , casin gs, trim made o f wood in an establishment, and whose work involves
most of the fo llo w in g :
planning and laying out o f work from b lu ep rin ts, drawings, models or
verbal in stru etion s; using a va riety o f carpenters' hand t o o ls , portable power t o o ls , and
standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations re la tin g to dimensions o f
work; and s e le ctin g m aterials necessary f o r the work.

A worker who produces replacement parts and new parts f o r mechanical equipment oper­
ated in an establishment, and whose work involves most o f the fo llo w in g : in terp retin g written
instru ction s and s p e c ific a tio n s ; planning and layout o f work; using a v a riety o f m achinist's
hand to o ls and p re cisio n measuring instruments; se ttin g up and operating standard machine
t o o ls ; shaping o f metal parts to clo se tolera n ces; making standard shop computations rela tin g
to dimensions o f work, to o lin g , feeds and speeds o f machining; knowledge o f the working pro­
p e rtie s o f the common metals; se le ctin g standard m aterials, parts and equipment required fo r
h is work; and f i t t i n g and assembling p arts. In general, the m ach inist's work normally requires
a rounded train in g in machine-shop p ra ctice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship
or equivalent train in g and experience.

ELECTRICIAN, M
AINTENANCE
A worker who performs a v a riety o f e le c t r ic a l trade functions in the in s ta lla tio n ,
maintenance or rep a ir o f equipment f o r the generating, d istrib u tio n , and/or u t iliz a t io n o f
e l e c t r ic energy in an establishment, and whose work involves most o f the fo llo w in g : in s t a ll­
ing or repairin g any o f a v a rie ty o f e le c t r ic a l equipment such as generators, transformers,
switchboards, c o n tr o lle r s , c ir c u it breakers, motors, heating u n its, conduit systems or other
transmission equipment; working from blu ep rin ts, drawings, layout cr other s p e c ific a tio n s ; l o ­
catin g etnd diagnosing trouble in the e le c t r ic a l system or equipment; working standard computa­
tion s rela tin g to ioad requirements o f wiring or e le c t r ic a l equipment; and using a v a riety o f
e le c t r ic ia n s ' hand to o ls and measuring and te stin g instruments.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
A worker who operates and maintains and/or supervises the operation o f stationary
engines and equipment (mechanical or e l e c t r ic a l ) to supply power, heat, re fr ig e r a tio n or a ir condition ing and whose work involves: operating and maintaining and/or supervising the opera­
tio n o f such equipment as steam engines, a ir compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ven­
t ila t in g and re fr ig e r a tin g equipment, steam b o ile rs and b o ile r -fe d water pumps; making or
supervising equipment rep a irs; and keeping a record o f operation o f machinery, temperature,
and fu e l consumption. This c la s s ific a t io n does not include head or ch ie f engineers in estab­
lishments employing more than one engineer.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
A worker who f ir e s station ary b o ile rs used in a fa c to ry , power p la n t, or other es­
tablishment to furnish heat, to generate power, or to supply steam f o r in d u strial processes,
and whose work involves feeding fu e l to f i r e by hand or operating a mechanical stoker, gas,
or o i l burner; and checking water and safety valves. In addition, may clean, o i l , or a s s is t
in repairin g b o ile r room equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, M
AINTENANCE
A worker who a s s is ts another worker in one o f the s k ille d maintenance trades, by per­
forming s p e c ific cr general duties o f lesser s k i l l , such as keeping a worker supplied with ma­
t e r ia ls and t o o ls ; cleaning working area, machine and equipment; a ss is tin g worker by holding
m aterials or t o o ls ; and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. In some
trades the term helper is synonymous with apprentice, since the helper is expected to learn
the trade o f the worker he a s s is t s . The kind o f work the helper is permitted to perform a lso
varies from trade to trade: in some trades the helper is confined to supplying, l i f t i n g and
holding m aterials and to o ls and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to per­
form sp ecia lized machine operation s, or parts o f a trade that are a lso performed by workers
on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .




M
AINTENANCE M
AN, GENERAL UTILITY
A worker who keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or structure o f an estab­
lishment (usually a small plant where s p e cia liz a tio n in maintenance work is im practical) in
rep a ir; whose duties involve the performance o f operations and the use o f to o ls and equipment
o f several trad es, rather than s p e cia liz a tio n in one trade or one type o f maintenance work
on ly, and whose work involves a combination o f the fo llo w in g : planning and layout o f work r e ­
la tin g to repair o f bu ild in g s, machines, mechanical and/or e le c t r ic a l equipment; repairing
e le c t r ic a l and/or mechanical equipment; in s ta llin g , align in g and balancing new equipment; and
repairin g b u ild in g, f lo o r s , s ta irs as w ell as making and repairin g b in s, c r ib s , and partitions.
M
ECHANIC, AUTOM
OTIVE (M
AINTENANCE)
A worker who repairs automobiles, motor trucks and tra cto rs cf an establishment, and
whose work involves most o f the follow in g: examining automotive equipment to diagnose source
o f trou b le; disassembling equipment and performing repairs that involve the use o f such hand
to o ls as wrenches, gauges, d r i l l s , or sp ecia lized equipment in disassembling or f i t t i n g parts;
replacin g broken or d efectiv e parts from stock ; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling
and/or in s ta llin g the various assemblies in the v e h icle and making necessary adjustments; and
align in g wheels, adjusting brakes and lig h t s , or tightening body b o lt s .
M
ECHANIC, M TEN CE
AIN AN
A worker who repairs machinery and mechanical equipment o f an establishment and whose
work involves most o f the fo llo w in g : examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose
source o f trou b le; dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use o f
hand to o ls in scraping and f i t t i n g p arts; replacing broken or d e fe ctiv e parts with items ob­
tained from stock; ordering the production o f a d efectiv e part by a machine shop or sending o f
the machine to a machine shop f o r major rep a irs; preparing w ritten s p e c ific a tio n s f o r major
repairs or f o r the production o f parts ordered from machine shop; and reassembling o f machines,
and making a l l necessary adjustments f o r operation.
M
ILLW
RIGHT
A worker who in s ta lls new machines
machines or heavy equipment when changes in
involves most o f the fo llo w in g : planning and
or other s p e c ific a tio n s ; using a va riety o f

or heavy equipment and dismantles and in s ta lls
the plant layout are required, and whose work
laying out o f the work; in terpretin g blueprints
hand t o o ls , and rig g in g ; making standard shop

A5*

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

MILLWRIGHT - Continued

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE - Continued

computations rela tin g to stresses, strength o f m aterials, and centers o f gravity) aligning
and balancing of equipment; selectin g standard t o o ls , equipment and parts to be used; and
in sta llin g and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as d rives, and
speed reducers.
In general, the m illw rig h ts work normally requires a rounded train in g and
experience in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and
experience.

A worker who fa b rica te s , in s ta lls , and maintains in good rep a ir the sheet-metal
equipment and fix tu re s (such as machine guards, grease pans, sh elves, lo ck e rs , tanks, v e n ti­
la to r s , chutes, ducts, metal roofin g ) o f an establishment, and whose work involves most o f
the fo llo w in g : planning and layin g out a l l types o f sheet-metal maintenance work from blu e­
p rin ts, models, car other s p e c ific a tio n s ; setting up and operating a l l a va ila b le types o f sheetmetal working machines; using a v a riety o f hand to o ls in cu ttin g, bending, forming, shaping,
f i t t i n g and assembling; and in s ta llin g sheet-metal a r tic le s as required. In general, the work
o f the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded train in g and experience u sually a cq u ir­
ed through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

OILER
(Greaser; lu b rica tor)
A worker who lu b rica te s , with o i l or grease,
o f mechanical equipment found in an establishment.

the moving parts or wearing surfaces
C ustodial, Warehousing and Shipping

PAINTER, M TEN CE
AIN AN

CRAN OPERATOR, ELECTRIC BRIDGE
E

(Painter, repair)
A worker who paints and redecorates w a lls, woodwork, and fix tu re s o f an esta b lish ­
ment and whose work irvolves the follow in g :
knowledge o f surface p e cu lia ritie s and types o f
paint required fo r d iffe r e n t a pp lica tion s; mixing co lo r s , o i l s , white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain proper co lo r or consistency; preparing surface fo r painting by removing
old fin ish or by placing putty or f i l l e r in n a il holes and in t e r s tic e s ; applying paint with
spray gun or brush.
PIPE FITTER, M TEN CE
AIN AN

(Overhead-crane operator; traveling-crane operator)
A worker who l i f t s and moves heavy ob jects with an e l e c t r ic a l ly powered h o is t which
is mounted on a metal brid ge, and runs along overhead r a i ls .
The work o f the operator in ­
volves: clo sin g switch to turn on e le c t r ic it y ; moving e le c t r ic a l co n tr o lle r levers and brake
pedal to run the crane bridge along overhead r a i ls , to run the h o istin g t r o ll e y back and fo rth
across the b ridge, and to ra ise and lower the load lin e and anything attached to i t .
(Motions
o f crane are usually carried out in response to signals from other workers, on the ground.)
For wage study purposes, the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s c l a s s if i e s workers accord­
ing to type o f crane operated, as fo llo w s:

A worker who in s ta lls and/or repairs pipe and pipe f it t in g s in an establishment,
and whose work involves most of the fo llo w in g : laying out o f work and/or measuring to loca te
p osition of pipe from drawings or other written s p e c ific a tio n s ; cuttin g various sizes o f pipe
to correct lengths with ch is e l and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or p ip e-cu ttin g machine;
threading pipe with stocks and d ies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computa­
tions rela tin g to pressures, flow , and size o f pipe required; and making standard te s ts to
determine whether fin ish ed pipes meet s p e c ific a tio n s . This c la s s ific a t io n does not include
workers primarily engaged in in s ta llin g and repairing building san itation or heating systems.

GAD
UR

PLU BER, M TEN CE
M
AIN AN

JANITOR, PORTER, O CLEAN
R
ER

A worker who keeps the plumbing system o f an establishment in good order and whose
work involves the follow in g:
knowledge o f sanitary codes regarding in s ta lla tio n o f vents,
traps in plumbing system; in s ta llin g or repairing pipes and fix t u r e s ; opening clogged drains
with a plunger or plumber’ s snake; and replacing washers on leaky fa u cets.
SHEET-M
ETAL W RK
O ER, M TEN CE
AIN AN
(Tinner; tinsmith)




Crane operator, e le c t r ic bridge (under 20 tons)
Crane operator, e le c t r ic bridge (20 tons and over)

A worker who has routine p o lic e duties, eith er at fix e d poBt or on tou r, maintain­
ing order, using arms or fo rc e where necessary. This c la s s ific a t io n includes gatemen who are
stationed at gate and check on id e n tity o f employees and other persons en terin g.

(Day p orter, sweeper; charwoman; ja n itress)
A worker who cleans and keeps in an orderly con dition fa c to ry working areas and
washrooms, or premises o f an o f f i c e , apartment house, or commercial or other establishment.
The duties performed involve a combination of the fo llo w in g : sweeping, mopping and/or scrub­
bing, and p olish in g f lo o r s ; removing ch ips, trash, and other re fu se ; dusting equipment, fu r n i­
tu re, or fix tu r e s ; p olish in g metal fix tu re s or trimmings; providing supplies and minor main­
tenance s e rv ice s; and cleaning la v a to rie s, showers, and re st rooms. This c la s s if ic a t io n does
not include workers who sp e cia liz e in window washing.

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

ORDER FILTER

TRU DRIVER
CK

(Order p ick er; stock s e le c to r ; warehouse stockman)
A worker who f i l l s shipping or transfer orders from stored merchandise in accord­
ance with {specification s on sales s li p , customer orders, or other in stru ction s. May, in ad­
d itio n to f i l l i n g orders end in d icatin g items f i l l e d or omitted, keep records o f outgoing
ord ers, re q u is itio n a ddition al stock cr report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other
rela ted du ties.
PACKER
A worker who prepares fin ish ed products fo r shipment or storage b y placing them in
boxes or other containers, the s p e c ific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
siz e and number o f units to be packed, the type o f container employed, and method o f shipment.
The work o f the packer involves a combination o f the follow in g:
knowledge o f various items
o f stock in order to v e r ify content"; select!on~oF appropriate type and size o f container; in ­
sertin g enclosures in container; using ex ce ls io r or other material to prevent breakage or
damage; clo s in g and sealin g containers; and applying labels or entering id en tify in g data on
container. This c la s s ific a t io n does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.
SHIPPING- AND-RECEIVING CLERK
A worker who prepares merchandise fo r shipment, or who receives and is responsible
fo r incoming shipments cf merchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work involves: a knowledge
o f shipping procedures, p r a c tic e s , rou tes, available means of transportation and ra tes; and
preparing records o f the goods shipped, making up b i l l s o f lading, posting weight and ship­
ping charges, and keeping a f i l e o f shipping records. May, in addition , d ire ct or a s s is t in
preparing the merchandise f o r shipment. Receiving work generally involves: v e rify in g or d i­
re ctin g others in v e rify in g the correctness o f shipments against b i l l s o f lading, in v oices,
or other record s; checking f o r shortages and re je ctin g damaged goods; routing merchandise or
m aterials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary records and f i l e s .
For wage study purposes, the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tics c la s s ifie s these workers on
the follow in g b a sis:
Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

A worker who drives a truck within a c it y or in d u strial area to transport materi­
a ls , merchandise, equipment, or men between various types o f establishments such as: manu­
factu rin g p lan ts, fre ig h t depots, warehouses, wholesale and r e t a il establishments and/or be­
tween r e t a il establishments and customers* houses or places o f business. Duties may a lso in ­
volve loading or unloading truck with or without helpers, making minor mechanical rep airs,
and keeping truck in good working order. This c la s s ific a t io n does not include driver-salesmen
or over-the-road drivers.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s c la s s if ie s
according to size and type o f equipment operated, as fo llo w s:
Truck
Truck
Truck
Truck

d riv er,
d river,
d riv er,
d river,

truck drivers

lig h t (under l - l / 2 tons)
medium (1 -1 /2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 ton s, t r a ile r type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than t r a ile r type)

TRUCKER, P W R
O E
A worker who operates a m anually-controlled gasoline or electric-pow ered truck or
tra cto r to transport goods and materials o f a l l kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s c la s s if ie s workers accord­
ing to type o f truck operated, as fo llo w s :
Truckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t )
Truckers, power (other than f o r k - l i f t )
WT H A
AC MN
A worker who guards premises o f plant property, warehouses, o f f i c e b uild ings, or
banks. Makes rounds o f premises p e r io d ic a lly in p rotectin g property against f i r e , th e ft, and
i ll e g a l entry.

STOCK H N IER AN TRUCKER, H N
AD
I)
AD
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or
stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, sto re , or other establishment
whose duties involve one or more o f the follow in g:
loading and unloading various materials
and merchandise on or from freig h t" cars, trucks or other transporting devices; unpacking,
shelving, or placin g m aterials or merchandise in proper storage lo ca tio n ; transporting mate­
r ia ls or merchandise by hand truck, car or wheelbarrow to proper lo ca tio n . May, in addition ,
keep a record o f m aterials handled or check items against invoices or other records.
This
c la s s ific a t io n does not include longshoremen, who load and unload ships.




Men*s and Boys* Suits and Coats
CUTTER A D M R E
N
AKR
A worker who performs a complete job o f marking and cu ttin g clo th and/or lin in g by
hand or machine. Also includes workers who sp e cia liz e in eith er marking or cu ttin g the mate­
r i a l by hand or machine a fte r marking. In add ition , may spread or lay up layers o f fa b r ic , or
may arrange pattern on m aterial and ou tline with chalk.

Men*8 and Boys* Suits and Coats - Continued

Men*s and Boys* Suits and Coats - Continued

INSPECTOR, FINAL - Continued

C UTTER, BODY-LINING

A worker who cuts out tod y -lin in g s (excluding those s p e cia liz in g in
from single or m ultiple layers o f fa b r ic s . In a dd ition , may a lso mark the
cutting op era tion .-

sleeve lin in g )
outlin e forth©

Thread trimmers who may only casually inspect garments are hot included in th is
c l a s s if ic a t io n . In many shops manufacturing inexpensive garments there w i l l be no inspectors
f a l li n g w ithin th is d escrip tion ; in those shops whatever inspection is carried on is usually
performed by Thread Trimmers.

BASTER, BODY-LINING AN FACING, H N
D
AD
JANITOR
A worker who performs one or more o f the follow in g hand operations: attach facin g
or lin in g to the forep a rt, ta ste facin g or shapes a fte r the edge is turned, or ta ste the tody
lin in g smooth. This c la s s ific a t io n does not include ta stin g on canvas, armhole, shoulder,
c o lla r , sleeve lin in g or c u f f .

(Sweeper; cleaner)
A worker who sweeps and cleans shop areas, washrooms and o f fi c e s , aid removes
and re fu se . May wash flo o r s and windows.

waste

BASTER, COLLAR, H N
AD
PACKER
garment.

A worker who performs operations which involve attaching top and under c o lla r to
This c la s s ific a t io n does not include preparing c o lla r s before they are attached.

A worker who places fin ish ed garments in shipping con ta in ers. In a d d ition , may
a ls o seal or clo se container, and/or place shipping or id e n tific a tio n marks on con ta in er.

BU N SEW
TTO
ER, H N
AD
PRESSER, FINISH
A worker who sews buttons to garments by hand,
tion , may match buttons or mark loca tion o f buttons.

using needle and

thread.

In addi­

BU N O M ER, H N
TTO H LE AK
AD
A worker who sewB buttonholes in garments by hand.
FINISHER, H N
AD
A worker who performs one or mare o f the follow in g hand operations: sewing or f e l ­
lin g lin in g to lin in g , or lin in g to cloth at the armholes, shoulders, sleeve bottoms, body
lin in g , top and undercollar to neck o f co a t, and f e llin g com ers where i t is im practical or
undesirable for the various machines to be used - such as corners between facing and bottom
turnup, openings over th ick seams, e t c .
FITTER

(O ff-p resser; over p resser; top presser)
A worker who performs the fin a l pressing operations on completed garments, by means
o f a hand-pressing iron , or a pressing machine which is heated by gas or steam. Workers who
press only a p ortion o f the completed garment are a lso included in th is c l a s s if i c a t io n ; how­
ever, those who merely remove creases from body lin in gs are excluded.
For wage study purposes, in this industry pressers are c la s s if ie d according to the
type o f pressing equipment used in coat fa b rica tion departments o n ly :
Pressers, fin is h , hand - uses hand-pressing iron .
Pressers, fin is h , machine - uses pressing machine which is heated by steam.
SEW
ER, H N
AD
(Bench worker; fin is h e r )

A worker who s o rts , matches and trims cut garment parts and lin in gs preparatory to
the sewing operations. This c la s s ific a t io n excludes workers who do only such sin gle opera­
tions as stamping, marking s iz e s , marking s titc h e s , e t c .

A worker who performs sewing operations by hand including sewing on buttons, making
buttonholes, sewing on s iz e tic k e ts , s titch in g edges, clo s in g openings that have been l e f t by
various hand and machine operations, e t c .

INSPECTOR, FINAL

SEW
ING-M
ACHINE OPERATOR

(Examiner)
A worker who examines and inspects completed garments p rio r to pressing or shipping
and whose work involves: determining whether the garments conform to shop standards o f qual­
ity and marking d efects such as dropped s titc h e s , bad seams, e t c . In addition , may make minor
re p a irs .




A worker who operates a standard indu strial sewing machine or a special-purpose
sewing machine to perform the s titch in g involved In making parts o f garments, in Joining var­
ious garment section s together, or in attaching previously completed garment parts to par­
t i a l l y completed garments.

Men*s and B o y s 1 Suits and Coats - Continued

Men*8 and Boys* Suits and Coats - Continued

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued

STOCK CLERK, GARMENTS

For wage study purposes, in th is industry sewing-machine operators are c la s s ifie d
according to garment; fo r selected sewing operations, workers are further designated accord­
ing to operation, as fo llo w s :
Sewing-machine operators (c o a ts )
Buttonhole making - A worker who operates a buttonhole machine that autom atically
cuts and stitch e s buttonholes in garments or garment parts, and whose work involves: p o s i­
tion in g garment or part with loca tin g mark fo r buttonhole under needle; lowering presser fo o t
and pressing pedal to sta rt machine; and releasing presser fo o t and removing garment when
buttonhole is completed. In a d d ition , may adjust machine to cut d iffe r e n t sizes o f button­
holes .
Join side seams - An operator who join s back to forepart (fro n t) o f garment.

A worker who receives completed garments, stores garments according to s iz e , style
and c o lo r ; and prepares garments fo r shipment. May a lso assemble parts (co a ts, vests, and
trousers) into complete garments and keep records o f garments received and prepared fo r ship­
ment.
This c la s s ific a t io n
stock clerk s and h elpers.

does not include stockroom

TH
READ TRIM ER
M
(Cleaner; clip p e r)
A worker who trims loose thread ends,
with s cisso rs p rio r to pressing or packing.

Join u n d er-colla r, jo in sleeve lin in g , or piece pockets - Includes operators who
jo in u n d er-collar clo th and u n der-collar canvas; or join top-sleeve lin in g to under-sleeve
lin in g ; or sew clo th and lin in g facin gs to the pocket lin in g and may a lso make the cash pocket.

Workers who a lso
t o r s . F in al.

Pipe edges - An operator who, by means o f a fold er attachment,
s tr ip (pipin g) to the raw edges o f seams to form a binding or piping.

For wage study purposes,
to garment, as fo llo w s:

Sew in sleeve - An operator

who sews

completed sleeves

to the

sews a narrow bias

helpers or employees who supervise

body o f the co a t.

basting threads and seam edges o f garments

ca re fu lly examine and inspect

garments are c la s s ifie d as Inspec­

in th is industry thread trimmers are c la s s ifie d according

Thread trimmers (coa ts)
Thread trimners (trou sers)

Sewing-machine operators (trou sers)
UNDER-PRESSER
Attach waistband - An operator who attaches clo th

waistband a l l around top o f trou­
(Forepresser; parts presser)

sers

A worker who uses a hand iron , machine iron , or a powered press to press garment
parts such as pockets, seams, shoulders, e t c . , during the fab rica tin g process.

Joln outseams - An operator who join s front and back legs at outer seam.
Make pockets - An operator who makes eith er complete fro n t, sid e , or back pockets,
or complete pockets exclu sive o f sewing facings (piecin g) to pocket lin in g s .
S titch pockets - An operator who stitch es around edge o f pocket lin in g ,
pockets have been turned, as a re in fo rcin g seam.

For wage study purposes, in th is industry under-pressers are c la s s ifie d according to
garment, as fo llo w s :

a fte r the

Tacking - An operator who sews bar tacks at various parts o f garment, such as at ends
o f pocket openings, a t the bottom o f f l y opening, at top o f back seat opening, at top and
bottom o f b e lt loop s, and/or buttonhole ends fo r reinforcement, on a s p e cia lly designed sew­
ing machine.

Under-pressers (coa ts)
Under-pressers (trou sers)
W RK DISTRIBUTOR
O
(Bundle ca rrie r)

SHAPER, EDGE A D BOTTOM
N
A worker wh o marks and trims lapels,
front edge, and bottom of coat with a shears.
Lapels are marked by means of a special pattern or "shaper". The lower part of the front edge
and bottoms may also be marked w i t h the aid of special patterns.




A worker who ca rries or trucks garments in various stages o f completion to the work­
er who is to perform the next operation on garment. May exercise some d iscre tio n in d is t r i ­
buting work, but has no supervisory r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .

49«

W o m e n ’s and Misses’ Dresses - Continued

W o m e n ’s and Mi s s e s ’ Dresses

CU
TTER A D M R E
N
AKR

SEW
ING-M
ACHINE OPERATOR, SECTION SYSTEM

A worker who marks the ou tlin es o f various garment parts on a p ly o f fa b ric and who
cuts out parts with shears, hand k n ife, or pcwered cuttin g machine. In add ition , may spread
o r lay-up cloth on cuttin g ta b le . This c la s s ific a t io n includes workers who s p e cia liz e in cu t­
tin g or in marking; sp ecia lized markers using perforated patterns, marking by use o f talcum,
are omitted as are a l l workers who sp e c ia liz e in spreading c lo t h .

An operator who uses a standard or sp ecia l purpose sewing machine to perform the
sewing operations required in making parts o f garments, Joining parts made by oth ers, jo in in g
various section s together, or in attaching previously con sisted parts to p a r t ia lly completed
garments, but who does not construct the en tire garment* In shops that operate e n tir e ly on a
section (o r bundle) system th is c la s s ific a t io n would include a l l sewing-machine operators
(except buttonhole makers and button sewers) without any d iffe r e n tia tio n o f operators by type
o f machine or operation performed. In shops that operate p a rtly on a s e ctio n system, th is
c la s s ific a t io n would Include a l l operators who do not construct an en tire garment.

Workers engaged
c la s s ific a tio n .

in marking and cu ttin g

lin in g s and trimmings

are Included in the

INSPECTOR, FINAL (EXAMINER)

SEW
ING-M
ACHINE OPERATOR, SINGLE-HAND (TAILOR) SYSTEM

A worker who examines and inspects completed garments p rio r to pressing or shipping
and whose work involves: determining whether the garments conform to shop standards o f qual­
it y , and marking defects such as dropped s titc h e s , bad seams, e t c . In a dd ition , may make
minor rep a irs.

An operator who uses a sewing machine to perform a l l the standard sewing-machine
operations involved in the manufacture o f a complete garment and whose work in v olv es: assem­
b lin g and Joining a l l parts o f the garment except those added by fin is h e r s . Usually an expe­
rienced operator working on better-grade apparel in which the v a rie ty o f design is so great
and sty le changes so frequent as to prevent the economical use o f a se ctio n system.

Thread trimmers who may only casually inspect garments are not included in th is
c la s s ific a t io n . In many shops manufacturing inexpensive garments there w i l l be no inspectors
fa llin g within th is c la s s ific a t io n ; in those shops whatever inspection Is ca rried on Is usu­
a lly performed by Thread Trimmers.

This c la s s ific a t io n includes workers, employed in single-hand system shops who p a ir up and work as a team and divide work tick e ts equally; th is arrangement is inform al, in con­
tra s t to the section system on which rates are established fo r individual operation s.

PRESSER

TH
READ TRIM ER (CIEANER)
M
(Clipper)

A worker who performs pressing operations (fin is h or under) on garments or garment
parts by means o f a hand-pres sing iron and/or powered press or mangle.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s c la s s if ie s pressers accord­
ing to type o f pressing equipment used, as fo llo w s :

A worker who trims loose thread ends,
with s ciss o rs p rio r to pressing or packing.

basting threads and seam edges o f garments

Workers who a ls o c a re fu lly examine and inspect garments are c l a s s if i e d as In sp ectors.
Presser, hand
Presser, machine
Presser, hand and machine
Workers are c la s s ifie d as "pressers, hand and machine” when siza ble proportions o f
their work are performed by each o f the two methods. Otherwise, the predominant type o f p re s­
sing is the determining fa c to r In c la s s ific a t io n .

F inal.
W RK DISTRIBUTOR
O
A worker who ca rries or trucks garments in various stages o f com pletion to the
worker who is to perform the next operation on garment. May e x ercise some d is cr e tio n in d is ­
trib u tin g work, but has no supervisory re s p o n s ib ilitie s .

SEW
ER, H N (FINISHER)
AD
Men’ s and Boys* Dress Shirts and Nightwear

(Bench worker)
A worker who performs sewing operations by hand Including sewing on buttons, making
buttonholes, stitch in g edges, clo sin g openings that have been l e f t by various hand and machine
operations.
Workers who sp ecia liz e in sewing tick e ts or lab els are not included in th is c l a s s lfic a tio n




BUTTON SEW
ER, M IN
ACH E
A worker who operates a button-sewing maching that autom atically sews buttons to
garments or garment p a rts, and whose work involves: p ositio n in g garment w ith loca tin g mark
fo r button under presser fo o t ; opening button clamp oh presser f o o t , p la cin g button in clamp
and closin g danq>; lowering presser fo o t on garment and pressing pedal to s ta r t machine.

50,

Plaints and Varnishes

Men*a and Boys* Dress Shirts and Nightwear - Continued
BU
TTONH
OLE M
AKER, M IN
ACH E

jLABELER AN PACKER
D

A worker who operates a buttonhole machine that autom atically cuts and stitch e s
buttonholes in garments or garment p arts, and whose work involves: p osition in g garment or
part with loca tin g mark fo r buttonhole under needle; lowering presser fo o t and pressing pedal
to sta rt machine; and relea sin g presser fo o t and removing garment when buttonhole is conpleted.
In a d d ition , may adjust machine to cut d iffe r e n t sizes o f buttonholes.

A Worker who pastes iden tifyin g lab els on cans or other containers by hand or by
means o f a lab elin g machine, and/or who packs labeled containers in to bqxes or cartons.
M
AINTENANCE M
AN, GEN
ERAL UTILITY
(See Maintenance and Power Plant, page 44* for d e sc rip tio n .)

INSPECTOR, FINAL
MIXER
(Examiner)

(Batchmaker; compounder)

A worker who examines and inspects consisted garments p rio r to pressing or shipping
and whose work in v olv es: determining whether the garments conform to shop standards o f quality
and marking d efects such as dropped s titc h e s , bad seams, e t c . In a dd ition , may make minor r e ­
p airs .

A worker who operates one or more mixing machines in which component parts (liqu ids
or s o lid s ) are blended or mixed in con trolled amounts to produce intermediate or finished
products.
TECHNICIAN

Thread trimmers
c l a s s if i c a t io n .

who may only casually

inspect garments

are not included

in th is

PRESSER, FINISH
(O ff-p resser; over p resser; top presser)
A worker who performs the fin a l pressing operations on completed garments, by means
o f a hand-pressing iron , powered press* or mangle. Workers who press only a p ortion o f the
completed garment are a ls o included in th is c la s s ific a t io n .
Workers can be c la s s ifie d according to the type o f pressing equipment used.
SEW
ING-MACHINE OPERATOR, DRESS SHIRTS
A worker who operates a standard industrial sewing machine o r a special-purpose sew­
ing machine to perform the s titch in g involved in making parts o f garments, in join in g various
garment section s together, or in attaching previously couple ted garment parts to p a r tia lly
completed garments.
Separate c la s s ific a t io n s ha\e been establishedfbr Buttonhole Makers, Machine, Button
Sewers, Machine and T a ilo rs , All-Around.
W
ORKING FOREM
EN, PROCESSING D
EPARTM T
EN
(Foremen; a ssista n t foreman; group leader; group head; leader; leadman; supervisor)
A worker who performs duties o f a supervisory nature in connection with a s p e c ific
kind o f work or in a s p e c ific department and regularly performs work requiring manual s k i l l
or p h ysical e f f o r t , which consumes more than 20 percent o f the hours worked by such employee
in the workweek. This c la s s if ic a t io n Includes a l l working supervisors, in a l l processing
operation s. Working foremen in the t o o l room, t o o l c r ib , experimental, and tool-a n d -d ie de­
partments are not included.




(Assistant chemist)
A worker who performs predetermined chemical t e s t s , fo r example, to ascertain
whether purchased raw m aterials meet plant s p e c ific a tio n s , or to determine whether processing
is being performed according to plant standards o f s p e c ific a t io n s . Usually is a co lla ge grad­
uate in chemistry or has equivalent training and experience.
TINTER
(Color matcher, enamel maker)
A worker who co lo rs or tin ts p ain ts, and whose work involves a combination o f the
fo llo w in g : blending basic c o lo r pigments in co rre ct proportions to match standard co lo r
sample or according to s p e c ific a tio n s ; using hand paddle or power mixer to mix ingredients
thoroughly; checking weight and/or v is c o s ity o f batch against sample or s p e c ific a tio n s , and
making necessary additions to mixture to meet requirements. In a dd ition , may add thinner to
ground p a in t.
TRUCKER, H N
AD
A worker who pushes or p u lls hand trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used fo r transport­
ing goods and m aterials o f a l l kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing p lan t, or other estab­
lishment, and usually loads or unloads hand trucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials in
storage b in s, e t c . , and may keep records o f materials moved.
VARNISH M K R
AE
(Kettleman; o i l cooker; varnish cooker)
A worker who cooks necessary Ingredients suck as resin s and gums in k e ttle to make
various types o f varnishes and o i l s according to s p e c ific a tio n s , and whose work involves: reg­
u lating con trols fo r temperature; adding ingredients according to formula or other s p e c ific a ­
tion s checking v is c o s ity o f batch and determining when i t meets the standard sample. In addi­
tio n , may a ls o add thinner to the mixture. See a lso d e fin itio n f o r Mixer.

51,

W o m e n s Cement Process Shoes (Conventional Lasted) - Continued

Wopen*s Cement Process Shoes (Conventional Lasted)

ASSEM
BLES FO PULLOVER, M IN
P
ACH E

WGE

A worker who prepares the upper fo r lastin g by assembling the counter and upper and
operating a machine to tack the upper to the wooden la s t. The work involves: placing counters
on rack o f pan containing cement, lowering rack into pan to apply cement to counters, in s e rt­
ing cemented counter between lin in g and upper at the h eel, settin g a piece o f v e x or tissue
paper next to lin in g to f a c il it a t e removal of la s t a fte r conpletion o f operations, placing
upper on la st making certain that heel seam is in center o f rear o f la s t, settin g la s t on a
jack and pushing jack into machine which automatically drives tacks through the upper into
the heel seat and heel seam.
BED-M
ACHINE O
PERATO
R

TRIMM
ER, M IN
ACH E
(Edge-trimming-machine operator; trimmer, apex; trimmer, margin)

A worker who trim s, cuts to s iz e , and smooths the edges o f shoes by turning and ma­
nipulating the side surfaces o f the soles against the revolving cu ttin g t o o l o f an edge-trim ­
ming machine.
FANCY STITCHER
(Applique s titc h e r ; blind-rcw s titch e r;
strip p e r, s titch in g ; trimming stitch e r)

etching

s tit c h e r ;

eyelet-row

s tit c h e r ;

(Bed la s te r; bed lasting-machine operator; heel and forepart la s te r)
A worker who completes the operations o f drawing the toe and heel o f the upper o f a
shoe tig h tly over the la s t and whose work involves th e-follow in g: . settin g shoe on machine
with sole up, and manipulating hand lev els co n tro llin g a series o f wipers (fr ic t io n p u lle rs )
which draw the upper simultaneously from a l l d ire ctio n s, over edge o f insole at toe and h eel;
holding upper in place with the wipers and, using an autom atically-fed hand-tacking device,
drives tacks through upper at the h eel; and securing upper at the toe in one o f the follow in g
ways: (1) McKay system - tacking down upper in the same manner as the heel is tacked, the
tacks remaining in the finished shoes. (2) Welt system - passing a wire from an anchor tack,
which he drives on one side o f the shoe, around the drawn-in upper at the t o e ,t o the opposite
side where he winds i t around another anchor tack, to hold upper in place u n til i t is s t it c h ­
ed to Insole by a la te r operation; or may staple upper instead o f using above methods. (3)
Cement system - wiping toe in place and holding i t with wiper; trimming o f f surplus toe box,
lin in g and upper, by hand, clo se to in sole; applying cement to insole between lin in g and upper
at toe and fold in g over la stin g allowance o f upper and stick in g i t in in s o le .

cu tte r, sampler;

cu tte r-o u t, upper; upper leather

A worker who cuts vamps and uppers o f shoes from skins or hides with a hand knife
and who performs most o f the follow in g : selectin g hides or skins o f desired thickness and
quality; noting loca tion o f d efectiv e spots in m aterial, and d ire ctio n o f grain o f leath er,
setting pattern on material in such a way as to obtain maximum number o f p ie ce s, and in such
re la tion to the grain o f the leath er, that there w i ll be a minimum o f stretching o f material
in processing o f shoe, drawing knife along edge of pattern, cuttin g part to desired shape; and
bundling cut pieces and marking size on top piece fo r id e n tific a tio n .
CUTTER, V P AN W O SHOE, M IN
AM
T H LE
ACH E
A worker who cuts parts o f shoe uppers from hides, skins or fabricated m aterials,
by means o f a click in g machine and whose work involves the fo llo w in g : settin g leather or other
shoe material on cutting table o f machine; s e le ctin g proper die and se ttin g i t in place on
material; and depressing lever to cause upper arm to drop autom atically on the die with su f­
f ic ie n t force to cut m aterial to the shape and size o f the d ie .




FLOOR BOY O GIRL
R
(Assembly boy or g i r l ; flo o r man; router)
A worker who keep3 stock and distributes p a r tia lly fin ish ed m aterials used in the
manufacture o f footwear to various departments to keep workers supplied with m aterial, using
truck or carrying m aterial. May perform simple machine operations under d ir e ctio n o f foremen,
such as tempering s o le s , and. molding edges o f soles.
SIDE TASTER, M IN
ACH E

CUTTER, V M A D W O SHOE, H N
A P N H LE
AD
(Carver; cu tter, ou tside, hand;
cu tter)

A worker who operates a power-driven sewing machine to s tit c h decorative designs on
shoe uppers, such as outlin in g eye le t row, stitch in g im itation foxings or fancy panel designs,
running extra rows o f stitch in g , and stitch in g piping and ornamental leather s trip s (a p p liq u e )
and whose work involves the follow in g: inserting material under the presser fo o t and needle
o f machine; depressing lever to sta rt machine; and guiding m aterial by hand (usually along
previously marked lin es on m aterial) as stitch in g is performed.

A worker who operates a machine to la st the sides and shanks o f the upper and whose
work involves: drawing out lin in g and upper with hand p in cers, holding shoe so that pincers
o f machine grasp edges o f upper and draw them evenly and c lo s e ly about the la s t , and manipu­
latin g lever o f machine to operate device which drives staples or tacks through the upper at
the 8ides and shanks.
SOLE ATTACHER, CEM T PROCESS
EN
(Compo-conveyor operator; sole layer, machine; sole-laying-m achine operator; s o le r )
A worker who operates a sole-la yin g machine to cement ou tsoles permanently to the
uppers o f shoes and whose work involves the follow in g: brushing a coat o f solvent over the
inner surface o f the outsole from the heel seat to the to e ; pressing outer sole on shoe, being
certain that edges o f sole p ro je c t evenly over edges o f shoe; se ttin g toe part o f shoe and
heel part o f la s t d ir e c tly belcw corresponding Jacks (lugs) o f machine; pressing a ir pedal
(which opens valve on pipe leading to a ir compressor storage tank) to f i l l the a ir cushion and
force the shoe against the Jacks which hold the outsole firm ly in place while the cement
d r ie s .

52,

Children's Stitchdcam Shoes

W o m e n s Cement Process Shoes (Conventional Lasted) - Continued

TOP STITCHER
A w orker w h o operates a sewing machine to stitch the lining to the upper part of a
shoe and to trim off excess edges of lining. The work of the top stitcher involves:
fitting
lining to upper . to obtain proper allowance for insertion of counter or receiving upper and
lining already fitted or cemented together, setting parts into machine at heel seam, lowering
guide down to the edge of top of upper, and guiding parts through machine by hand to complete
stitching and trimming operation.

CUTTER, VAMP AM ) W H O L E SHOE, MACHINE

(See Women's Cement Process S h o e s , page

5 1 , for description.)

EDGE TRIMMER, MACHINE

(See Women's Cement Process S h o e s , page

5 1 ^ for description.)

TREER
FANCY STITCHER
(Polisher, uppers; shoe treer)
(See Women's Cement Process S h o e s , page
A w orker w h o cleans and finishes shoes by removing spots and discolorations, remedy­
ing any slight cut or blemish,
and rubbing uppers with a hot iron to smooth out wrinkles and
w h o performs most of the following; setting shoe on a treeing form,
the shape of the last,
and depressing lever expanding
form so that shoe w ill fit tightly over it; brushing, clean­
ing, dressing and finishing shoe according to the kind of leather or material; applying color
stain or bleach to blemished spots; burnishing shoe parts; and smoothing out wrinkles in the
uppers w i t h a hot iron.

VAM
PER
(Vamp closer; vamp stitcher; zigzag seamer)
A w orker wh o by use of a power-driven sewing machine, sews together the forepart of
the upper (tip and vamp) and the two quarters of a shoe and whose work involves the following:
setting overlapped edges together under presser foot and needle of machine;
depressing lever
to start machine and guiding material through stitching process;
and sewing top to entire
lower part of upper w h e n
shoe has a cut separate from quarters;
or has a whole vamp. Parts
are sometimes first pasted together b y another worker to insure most accurate stitching.
WOOD-BEEL-SEAT FITTER, HAND
A worker wh o trims the heel seat of a shoe by hand in preparation for attaching the
w o o d heel and whose w o r k involves:
using a hand knife to trim the heel seat of the outside
of the shoe to give It a concave shape and molding the heel seat by pounding with a hammer,
then shaping it to conform with the base of the heel that is to be attached. This opera­
tion is usually performed on high quality w o m e n s shoes.

5 1 , for description.)

FLOOR BO Y OR GIRL
(See Women's Cement Process Shoes, page

5 1 , for description.)

GOODYEAR STITCHER
A worker w h o operates a Goodyear stitching machine to attach the outsole to the welt
of a shoe and whose w o r k involves the following: setting the sole, sole side up; on table rest
of machine underneath needle, and guiding shoe w ith hand as needle sews around shank and fore­
part of shoe,
the stitch extending from a channel that was cut for It in bottom of outsole,
through outsole to upper surface of welt. The w e l t extends around the edge of the sole as fer
h a c k as the breast of the heel.
THREAD LASTER
(Stitchdcwn- thread las ter, Puritan las ter)
A worker w h o operates a stitchdown thread-lasting machine
to last shoes b y sewing
shoe uppers to insoles and whose w o r k involves: pulling shoe upper over last to wh i c h an in­
sole has been tacked,
setting last and upper Into machine,
starting machine w h ich sews the
upper to the insole,
an d guiding the shoe in such a manner that the feeder guide pulls the
upper tightly around last.
TOP STITCHER
(See Women's Cement Process S h o e s , page

52* for description.)

(See Women's Cement Process S h oes, page

52> for description.)

(See Women's Cement Process Shoes, page

52> for description.)

WOOD-HEEL-SEAT FITTER, MACHINE
A worker w h o operates a machine to cut out a piece around the outer margin of the
heel seat,
preparatory to heel attaching and whose work involves:
setting gage on machine
for size of heel to be fitted and adjusting pin stop for right or left shoe, pressing shoe
against stationery horizontal knife In machine to cut through the heel seat between the upper
and the sole until counter of shoe strikes a stop gage, and operating machine which automati­
cally cuts out a U-shaped piece from the heel seat so that the wood heel fits properly whe n
attached.
This machine operation is usually performed on popular and medium-priced women's
shoes.




TREER

VAMPER

53.

M a c h i n e r y Industries - C o n t i n u e d

M a c h i n e r y Industries

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE - Continued

ASSEMBLER
(Bench assembler; floor assembler;

jig assembler; line assembler; sub-assembler)

A worker who assembles and/or fits
together parts to form complete units or subas­
semblies at a bench, conveyor line, or on the floor, depending upon the size of the units and
the organization of the production process.
The work of the. assembler may include processing
operations requiring the use of hand tools in scraping, chipping and filing of parts to obtain
a desired fit as well as power tools and special equipment when punching, riveting, soldering
or welding of parts is necessary.
Workers who perform any of these processing operations exclusivelyas part of specialized assembling operations are not included in this classification.
Class A - A worker who assembles parts into complete units cr subassemblies that r e ­
quire fitting of parts and decisions regarding proper performance of any component part or the
assembled unit, and whose work involves any combination of the following:
assembling from
drawings, blueprints or other written specifications; assembling units composed of a variety
of parts and/or subassemblies; assembling large units requiring careful fitting and adjusting
of parts to obtain specified clearances;
and using a variety of hand and powered tools and
precision measuring instruments.
Class B - A worker who assembles parts into units or subassemblies
in accordance
with standard and prescribed procedures,
and whose work involves any combination of the f o l ­
lowing: assembling a limited range of standard and familiar products composed of a number of
small or medium-sized parts requiring some fitting or adjusting;
assembling large units that
require little or no fitting*of component parts; working under conditions where accurate p e r ­
formance and completion of work within set time limits are essential for
subsequent assem­
bling operations; and using a limited variety of hand or powered tools.
Class C - A worker who performs short-cycle, repetitive assembling operations, and
whose work does not
involve any fitting or making decisions regarding proper performance of
the component parts or assembling procedures.

Performs such operations as drilling, reaming, countersinking, counterboring, spot­
facing and tapping on one or more types of single-spindle or multiple-spindle drill presses.
of drill presses

other than

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine for operations requiring care­
ful positioning, blocking and aligning of units; to determine speeds, feeds, tooling and oper­
ation sequence;
and to make all necessary adjustments during operation to achieve requisite
dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine where speeds, feeds, tooling and operation
sequence are prescribed but whose work involves very difficult operations such as deep drill­
ing, or boring to exacting specifications.




Operator who is required to maintain set-up made b y others, including making all n e ­
cessary adjustments
during operation on work requiring considerable care on the part of the
operator to maintain specified tolerances.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine, on routine and repetitive
operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation;
and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
(See Maintenance and Power Plant, page

4A 9 for description.)

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR
Operates an engine lathe for shaping external and internal cylindrical surfaces of
metal objects. The engine lathe, basically characterized by a headstock, tailstock, and powerfed tool carriage,
is a general-purpose machine tool used primarily for turning.
It is also
commonly used in performing such operations as facing, boring, drilling, and threading; and,
equipped with appropriate attachments,
it may be used for a very wide variety of special m a ­
chining operations.
The stock may be held in position b y the lathe ‘
'centers'’ or b y various
types of chucks and fixtures.
This classification excludes operators cf bench lathes, automatic lathes, automaticscrew machines, and hand-turret lathes and hand-screw machines.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence;
and to make necessary adjustments
during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE

This classification includes operators of all types
radial-drill presses and portable drilling equipment.

Class B - Operator who is required to set up machine
on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make all necessary adju s t ­
ments during operation or

Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings,
blueprints or layout, in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make necessary
adjustments during operation where changes
in work and set-up are frequent and where care is
essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator m ay be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who Is required to maintain operation set up b y others, b y making
all necessary adjustments, where care is essential to achieve ve r y close tolerances or
Operator who is required to set up machine on standard or roughing operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed;
and to make adjustments during
operation.

54.

M a c h i n e r y I n dustries

Machinery Industries - Continued

- Continued

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR - Continued
Operator m a y be required to recognize when tools need dressing,
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

INSPECTOR
to dress tools and

Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine on -routine and repetitive
operations!
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
g r i n d i n g -m a c h i n e ; o p e r a t o r

(Centerless-grinder operator; cylindrical-grinder operator; external-grinder
. operator; internal-grinder operator; surface-grinder operator; Universalgrinder operator)
A worker who operates one of several types of precision grinding machines to grind
internal and external surfaces of metal parts to a smooth and even finish and to required
dimensions.
Precision grinding is used primarily as a finishing operation on previously m a ­
chined parts, and consists of applying abrasive wheels rotating at high speed to the surfaces
to be ground.
In addition to the types of grinding machines indicated above,
this classification
includes operators of other p roduction grinding machines such as:
single-purpose grinders,
(drill grinders, broach grinders, saw grinders,
gear cutter grinders, thread grinders, etc.),
and automatic and semi-automatic general purpose grinding machines.
Class A - A n operator who is required to set up machine;
to select feeds,
speeds,
tooling and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
A n operator who is required to set up machine from drawings or blueprints or lay-out
in accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make n e c ­
essary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where
care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator m a y be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - An operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are either prescribed or are known from past
experience;
to make adjustments
during operation;
and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
A n operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, b y making all
necessary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools and
to select coolants and cutting oils.
Class C - A n operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repeti­
tive operations;
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to
stop the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.




A worker who performs such operations as examining parts or products for flaws and
defects, and checking their dimensions and appearance to determine whether they meet the re­
quired standards and specifications.

Class A - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes with responsi­
bility for decisions regarding the quality of the product and/or operations, and whose work
involves any combination of the following: thorough knowledge of the processing operations
in the branch of work to which he is assigned, including the use of a variety of precision
measuring instruments; interpreting drawings and specifications in inspection work on units
composed of a large number of component parts; examining a variety of products or processing
operations; determining causes of flaws in products and/or processes and suggesting necessary
changes to correct work methods; and devising inspection procedures for new products.

Class B - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes and whose work
involves any combination of the following; knowledge of processing operations in the branch
of work to which he is assigned, limited to familiar products and processes or where perform­
ance is dependent on past experience; performing inspection operations on products and/or
processes having rigid specifications, but where the inspection procedures involving a se­
quence of inspection operations, including decisions regarding proper fit or performance of
some parts; and using precision measuring instruments.

Class C - A worker who inspects parts, products and/or processes and whose work in­
volves any combination of the following: short-cycle, repetitive inspection operations; using
a standardized, special-purpose measuring instrument repetitively; and visual examination of
parts or products, rejecting units having obvious deformities or flaws.

JANITOR
(See Men*s and Boys* Suits and Coats, page ^7, for description.)

MACHINIST > PRODUCTION
A worker who Is required to fabricate metal parts Involving a series of progressive
operations and whose work involves most of the following: understanding of written instruc­
tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist’s hand
tools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of worEi tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; understanding of the working proper­
ties of the common metals; and selecting standard materials, parts and equipment needed far
his work. In general, the machinist’s work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience .

55.

Machinery Industries

- Continued

M a c h i n e r y Indu 3 t r 1eg - Cortlmiel

MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR

TOOL-AND-DIE M AKER - Continued

(Milling-machine operator, automatic; milling-machine operator, hand)
Performs a variety of work such as grooving,
planing, and shaping metal objects on
a milling machine, which removes material from metal surfaces b y the cutting action of m u lti­
toothed rotating cutters of various sizes and shapes.
Milling-machine types vary from the manually controlled machines employed
production to fully automatic (conveyor-fed) machines found in plants engaged in mass
tion.
This classification includes operators of all types of milling machines except
purpose millers such as thread millers,
duplicators, die sinkers, pantograph millers
graving millers.

in unit
produc­
single­
and en­

measuring instruments;
understanding of the wonting properties
of common metals and alloys;
setting up and operating of machine tools and related equipment; making necessary shop compu­
tations relating to dimensions of work, speed, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating
of metal parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required
qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed toler­
ances and allowances;
and selecting appropriate materials, tools and processes.
In general,
the tool-and-die m a k e r ’s work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom pr a c ­
tice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

For wage study purposes,
of shop, as follows:

Class A - Operator who is required to set up irachine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve req­
uisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints, or lay-out in
accordance with prescribed feeds,
speeds, tooling and operation sequence, and to make neces­
sary adjustments during operation where changes In work and set-up are frequent and where con­
siderable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator m a y be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating, o i l s .
Class B - Operator who
is required to set up machines on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; to make adjustments during oper­
ation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, b y making all neces­
sary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.
Class C - Operator who is required to operate only, on routine and repetitive oper­
ations;
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop m a ­
chine and call on foreman, leadman or set-up ma n to correct the operation.

TOOL-AND-DIE MAKER
(Die maker;

Tool-and-die makers, jobbing shops
Tool-and-die makers, other than jobbing shops

TRUCKER, HAND

(See Paints and Varnishes, page 50* for description.)

WELDER, HAND

A worker w h o fuses (welds) metal objects together b y means of an oxyacetylene torch
or arc w elding apparatus in the fabrication of metal shapes and in repairing broken or cracked
metal objects.
In addition to performing hand welding or brazing operation,
he ma y also lay
out guide lines or marks on metal parts and may cut metal w i t h a cutting torch.

Class A - Wor k e r w h o performs welding operations requiring most of the following:
planning and
laying out of w o r k from drawings, blueprints or other wri t t e n specifications;
knowledge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of w o r k and d e ­
termining operation sequence; welding of high pressure vessels or other objects involving cri­
tical safety and load requirements; working from a variety of positions; and ability to weld
with gas or arc apparatus.

jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gauge maker)

A worker who constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges,
jigs, fixtures or
dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work, and whose work involves most of the
following: ' planning and laying out of work from models, blueprints, drawings or other oral
and written specifications;
using a variety of tool-and-die maker*c hand tools and precision




the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers by type

Class B - Wor k e r w h o is required to perform either arc or gas welding operations on
repetitive work, where no critical safety and load requirements are involved; where the work
calls mainly for one position welding; and where the layout and planning of the w o r k are p e r ­
formed by others.

56,

Banking - Continued

Banking

TELLER, PAYING OR PAYING AND RECEIVING, COMMERCIAL

BOOKKEEPING -MACHINE OPERATOR

(See Office, page

41* for description.)

CLEANER
A worker who keeps halls,
offices, and/or rooms of public buildings, offices, com­
mercial establishments, or apartment houses in a clean,
orderly condition and whose work in­
volves: sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing floors; disposing of waste or litter; and/or dust­
ing furniture and equipment.
Ma y also be required to polish metal fixtures and fittings.
This classification does not include window washers.
CLERK, TRANSIT
A worker who sorts and lists checks and whose work includes the following: mechani­
cal endorsement of checks when necessary; manual sorting of checks in racks according to bank;
listing, totalling,
and balancing with predetermined control totals;
locating and adjusting
errors; and preparing checks for mailing back to banks on which drawn.

, Cashes customers' personal or other checks. Ma y also receive deposits on checking
accounts and make entries in customers' account books. Writes up or signs deposit slips to
be used later in balancing books. M a y record the daily transactions and balance accounts.
Ma y supervise
one or more dlerks who record details of transactions, such as names,
dates,
serial numbers,
and amounts involved so that pertinent data may be distributed > w m g the
several departments for recording, filing, and clearing. M a y also handle withdrawls and d e ­
posits on savings accounts.
TELLER, SAVINGS
Receives deposits and pays out withdrawals on savings accounts. Makes entries in
customers'
account books. Writes up or signs deposit slips to be used later in balancing
books.
May record daily transactions and balance accounts. Ma y supervise one or more clerks
who record details of transactions.
TYPIST
(See O ffdee, page

k3,

for description.)

GUARD
(See Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping, page

4-5,

for description.)
Insurance Carriers

PROOF-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker w ho operates assorting machine under general supervision to sort checks,
debits,
credits and other items. Records totals of specific items in appropriate ledgers.
M a y perform additional clerical duties in connection with sorting.

BILLER, MACHINE
(See O ffice, page

k l,

for description.)

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
(See O f fice, page

42*

for description.)
(See O ffice, page ^1, for description.)-

TELLER, A L L AROUND
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Receives deposits and pays out on withdrawals for savings accounts; receives depos­
its and cashes checks
for checking accounts;
receives payments on notes, etc. M ay record
daily transactions and balance accounts.
May supervise one or more clerks who record details
of transactions, such as names, dates, serial numbers, and amounts involved so that pertinent
data m a y be distributed among the several departments for recording, filing, and clearing.

(See O ffice* peg®

k l,

for description.)

CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(See Office, page ^1, for description.)

TELLER, NOTE
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Collects exchange charges and payments on notes, drafts,
rents,
and contracts for
deeds. M a y accept and give receipts for collateral on maturity notes.
Is in charge of send­
ing out notices of maturity.
Receives renewal notes.
Protests items when it is necessary.
Causes notes
to be presented at other places, when place of payment is other than the bank.
Follows up on the value of collateral.
In the case of real estate notes, sees that mortgages
are properly recorded and checks certificates of title. Checks fire insurance coverage.
Must
be familiar with Negotiable Instruments Act and standard^terms of extension agreements.




(See Office, page ^1, for description.)
CLERK, FILE
(See O f f i c e , page hi, for description.)

57,

Insurance Carriers - Cent inued
Power Laundries
C L E R K , GENERAL
CLERK, RETAIL RECEIVING
(See Office, page ^2? for description.)

CLERK,

PAYROLL
(See Office, page *42, for description.)

DUPLICATING-MACKINE OPERATOR
(See Office, page

h2,

for description.)

EXTRACTOR OPERATOR

KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
(See Office, page

A person who receives work from routemen or frpm customers over the counter in the
receiving office or store of a dry-cleaning or laundry establishment
and whose work involves
most of the following; maintaining a record of articles or bundles received; returning com­
pleted work to customers who call for it; collecting payment and maintaining simple records
of money received; and in establishments where dry cleaning is done, fastening an identifying
marker to each article, examining an article for defects such as holes, stains or tears,
and
making a record of the identification symbol assigned to each article with a brief description
of the article and of any defects noted. This classification does not include store managers.

h2,

for description.)

OFFICE BOY OB GIRL
(See O ffice, page * - , for description.)
42
SECRETARY

(Whizzer operator)
A worker who removes surplus moisture from materials
(such as wet cloth, clothing,
knit goods, and yarn) by operating an extractor and whose work involves most of the following:
loading material
into perforated drum of machine by hand or hoist;
closing lid* and starting
machine, allowing it to run a predetermined time or until fluid stops flowing from drain; r e ­
moving partly dried materials; and hand trucking materials within the department. In addition
the worker may assist the Washer in loading, operating, or unloading the washing machine.

(See Office, page * - , for description.)
42
FINISHER, FLATWORK, MACHINE
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
(See Office, page * - , for description.)
42
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL

A worker who performs
flatwork finishing operations b y machine and whose work in­
volves one or more of the following: shaking out the creases in semi-dry washing to prepare
it for the flatwork ironing machine;
feeding clean, damp flatwork pieces
into the flatwork
ironing machine by placing the articles on the feeder rollers; andcatching or receiving a r t i ­
cles as they emerge from the machine and partially folding them.

(See Office, page * - , for description.)
42
IDENTIFIER
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
(See Office, page * - , for description.)
42
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
(See Office, page

k-2,

A worker who sorts
soiled bundles,
places the contents into various bags and by
means of flags,
pins or other devices identifies the net with a customer tag or ticket.
In
addition may weigh, list or count some or all articles contained in each bundle. This classi­
fication does not include workers who mark or otherwise identify each
individual piece c o n ­
tained in a bundle.

for description.)
MARKER

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(See Office, page * - , for description.)
42
TRANSCRIBING-MAC5INE OPERATOR, GENERAL
(See Office, page ^3, for description.)

A vorker who marks or affixes by hand or mechanical means,
customer identifying
symbols on soiled garments, linens, or other articles.
In addition may weigh, list, or count
articles contained in each bundle, sort contents of each bundle into groups according to treat­
ment to be received,
or note and record any damaged or stained condition of articles.
This
classification does not include workers who do sorting, examining, or listing without marking
the various articles.
PRESSER, MACHINE, SHIRTS

TYPIST
(See Office, page ^3, for description.)




A worker who operates or tends the operation of one or more of the several type
machines that press shirts,
and w ho perform such shirt pressing operations as body pressing,
bosom pressing, collar and cuff pressing, and/or sleeve pressing.

58,

Auto Repair Shops - Continued
Power Laundries - Continued

GREASER
WASHER, MACHINE
A worker who
operates one or more washing machines
to wash household linens, gar­
ments, curtains, drapes and other articles and whose work involves the following;
manipula­
ting valves, switches, and levers to start and stop the machine and to control the amount and
temperature of water for the sudsing and rinsing of each hatch; mixing and adding soap, bluing
and bleaching solutions; and loading and unloading the washing machine.
In addition may make
minor repairs to washing machine.

WRAPPER, BUNDLE
A worker who wraps packages or finished products,
or packs articles, goods, or m a ­
terials in cardboard boxes and secures the package or box with twine, ribbon, gummed tape, or
paste. The worker may segregate articles according to size or type, or according to customer's
order and inspect articles for defects before wrapping.

Auto Repair Shops

BODY REPAIRMAN, METAL
(Automobile-collision servicesman; fender and body repairman; body man)
Repairs damaged automobile fenders and bodies to restore their original shape and
smoothness of surface by hammering out and filling dents, and by welding breaks in the metal.
May remove bolts and nuts,
take off old fenders,
and install new fenders.
May perform such
related tasks as replacing broken glass and repairing damaged radiators and woodwork. May
paint repaired surfaces.

(Lubricating man)

Lubricates, by means of hand-operated or compressed-air operated grease guns and
oil sprays, all parts of automobile or truck where lubrication is required, using proper type
lubricant on the various points on chassis or motors; drains old lubricant from lubricant reser­
voirs and refills with new. May perform other related duties, such as checking radiator water
level, checking and adding distilled water to battery, repairing tires, etc. May also perform
duties of washer.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE

Repairs automobiles and trucks, performing such duties as disassembling and overhaul­
ing engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, and other assemblies on automobiles, replac­
ing worn or broken parts, grinding valves, adjusting brakes, tightening body bolts, aligning
wheels, etc. In addition to general automotive mechanics, this classification also includes
workers whose duties are limited to repairing and overhauling the motor.

Class A - Repairs, rebuilds, or overhauls engines, transmissions, clutches, rear
ends or other assemblies, replaces worn or broken parts, grinds valves, bores cylinders, fits
rings. In addition may adjust brakes or lights, tighten body bolts, align wheels, etc. May
remove or replace motors, transmissions or other assemblies. May do machining of parts.

Class B - Adjusts brakes or lights, tightens body bolts, aligns wheels, or makes
other adjustments or repairs of a minor nature; or removes and replaces motors, transmission^
clutches, rear ends, etc., but does no repairing, rebuilding, or overhauling of these assem­
blies. Workers who are employed as helpers to Mechanics are excluded from this classification.

ELECTRICIAN, AUTOMOTIVE
WASHER, AUTOMOBILE
(ignition repairman)

(Car washer; wash boy)
Repairs and installs ignition systems,
starters, coils, panel instruments, wiring,
and other electrical systems and equipment on automobiles: performs such duties as diagnosing
trouble by visual
inspection or b y use of testing devices; adjusting timing; adjusting dis­
tributor breaker-point gaps with thickness gage;
replacing defective parts on starters, gen­
erators, and distributors; and replacing defective ignition and lighting wires. May test and
repair generators.
M ay repair and adjust carburetors.




Washes automobiles and trucks; sweeps and cleans interior of automobile; may polish
auto vehicle bodies, using polishing compound and a cloth. Various parts of this Job may be
performed by individual workers in automobile laundries production lines.

59 .

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Apprentice (malt liquors) ......................................
Asbestos worker (building construction) ........................
Assembler (machinery) ...........................................
Assembler for pullover, machine (women’s cement process
shoes) .........................................................
Ba'ker (ocean transport) .........................................
Bartender (ocean transport) ....................................
Baster, body-lining and facing, hand (men’s and boys' suits
and coats) .................................. ..................
Baster, collar, hand (men’s and boys' suits and coats) .......
Bed-machine operator (women's cement process shoes) ...........
Bench hand (bakeries) ...........................................
Benchraan (bakeries) ....................... .....................
Biller, machine (billing machine) ..............................
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine) ..........................
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine) (insurance carriers) ....
Bindery woman (printing) .......................................
Blender (bakeries) ..............................................
Boatswain (ocean transport) ....................................
Boatswain’8 mate (ocean transport) .............................
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) .....................
Boilermaker (building construction) ............................
Bookbinder (printing) ...........................................
Bookkeeper, hand ................................................
Bookkeeper, hand (insurance carriers) ..........................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ...................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (banking) ........................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (insurance carriers) .............
Bottler (malt liquora) ................................... ......
Brewer (malt liquors) ...........................................
Bricklayer (building construction) .............................
Butcher (ocean transport) ......................................
Buttonhole maker, hand (men's and boys' suits and coats) .....
Buttonhole maker, machine (men's and boys' dress shirts
and nightwear) ................................................
Button 3ewer, hand (men's and boys' suits and coats) ...... .
Button sewer, machine (men’s and boys' dress shirts and
nightwear) ....................................................
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) ...............
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type)
(insurance carriers) .........................................
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type) ....
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type
(insurance carriers) .........................................
Carpenter (building construction) ..............................
Carpenter (ocean transport) ....................................
Carpenter, maintenance .........................................
Carpenter's mate (ocean transport) .............................
Cement finisher (building construction) .......................
Charwoman (building service) ...................................
Checker (bakeries) ..............................................
Chef (ocean transport) .........................................
Cleaner .... .....................................................
Cleaner (banking) ...............................................
Cle rk, accounting ................... ...........................
Clerk, accounting (insurance curriers) ................. .......
Clerk, file ......................................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ...............................




-

53
51
-

47
47
51
-

41
41
56
-

58
-

41
56
41
56
56

31
30
26
?5
33
33
21

21
25
30
30
5, 8
5, 8
23
34
30
32
32
29
30
34
5, 8
23
5, 8, 9
27
23

47

31
31
30
33
22

50
47

24
22

49
4l

24
5, 9

56
41

5,

-

56
-

43
-

_

45
56
4l
56
4l

5 *.>

28
9

28
30
32
15
32
30
31
30
33
18
27
5, 9
28
6 , 9 , 10
2-8

Clerk, general ................................................
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) .......................
Clerk, order ............................
Clerk, payroll .........
Clerk, payroll (insurance carriers) ..........................
Clerk, retail receiving (laundries) .........................
Clerk, transit (banking) .....................................
Compositor, hand (printing) ..................................
Conductor (local transit) ..........................
Confectioner (bakeries) ...........
Cook, assistant (ocean transport) .
Cook, chief (ocean transport) .............................
Cook, second (ocean transport) ...............................
Crane operator, electric bridge .....
Cutter and marker (men’s and boys* suits and coats) ........
Cutter and marker (woman’s and misses’ dresses) ........
Cutter, body-lining ( m a n ’s and boys’ suits and coats) .....
Cutter, vamp and whole shoe, hand(women’s cement process
shoes) .........
Cutter, vamp and whole shoe, machine (children’s stitchdown
shoes) ...................................
Cutter, vamp and whole shoe, machine (women’s cement
process shoes) ............
Depositor (bakeries)............
Divider (bakeries) ........................
Doorman (building service) .....
D r a f t s m a n ....................................*............ . • ••
Draftsman, chief ..................
Draftsman, junior ...........................................
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle
(machinery) ..................................................»
Dumper (bakeries) ...................
Duplicating-machine operator ..................................
Duplicating-machine operator (insurance carriers) .........
Edge trimmer, machine(children’s stitchdown shoes) ..........
Edge trimmer, machine (women’s cement process shoes) ........
Electrician (building construction) .....................
Electrician (ocean transport) ................................
Electrician, assistant (ocean transport) ....................
Electrician, automotive (auto repair shops) ............
Electrician, maintenance .....................................
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ............
Electrotyper (printing) ........
Elevator constructor (building construction) ............
Engineer (malt liqour) ........................................
Engineer, deck (ocean transport) .............................
Engineer, junior unlicensed (ocean transport) ...............
Engineer-power equipment operator (building construction) ...
Engineer, refrigeration (ocean transport) ...................
Engineer, s t a t i o n a r y ...... ...................................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .........................
Extractor operator (laundries) ...............................
Fancy stitcher (children’s stitchdown shoes) .............
Fancy stitcher (women's cement process shoes) ..........
Feeder, sugar wafer (bakeries) ..................
Fig and jam mixer (bakeries) .........
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) .........
Finisher, hand (men’s and boys' suits and coats) ........

42
57
42
42
57
57
56
45
46
49
47

6, 10
28
6, 10
6, 10
28
29
27
34
31
30
33
33
33
13
21
23
21

51

25

52

25

51
43
43
43

25
30
30
31
14
14
14

53
42
57
52
51
58
44
53
44
53
57
52
51
-

26
30

57
.47

7,

11
28
25
25
30
32
32
29
15
26
34
30
31
32
33
30
32
15
24
29
25
25
30
30
29
22

60,

P re B ter
a . an
Description
Fireman (malt liquors) ............... ........... .
Fireman (ocean transport)
................. •••••!•!!!
Fireman, stationary boiler ............ ...... .........
First hand (bakeries) •••••..... ........................
Fitter (men’s and boys* suits and c o a t s ) ..... .........
Floor boy (children’s stitchdown shoes) ........ .......
Floor boy (women’s cement process shoes) ••••...... .....
Floor girl (children’s stitchdown shoes ) ..............
Floorman (bakeries) ••....... .......••••..... ••••••••••
Flour dumper (bakeries) ................................
Foreman (bakeries) .... ................................
Fryer (bakeries) •••••••••••.............. ........
Galleyman (ocean transport).... ................... .
Glazier (building construction) •»•••••••....... .
Goodyear stitcher (children’s stitchdown shoes) •«•••••••
Granite cutter (building construction) •••••........ .
Greaser (auto repair shops) •••••......... ............ .
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ....... •••••••••••
Guard •••••.............. ......................... .
Guard (banking).... ...................................
Handyman (building service)...... •...... ........... .
Head slicer or wrapper (bakeries) ••••«•»•••••.... .
Helper (bakeries) ••••••........ ........... •••••......
Helper, elevator constructor (building construction) ••••
Helper, garage (malt liquors).................... .
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ............ .................
Helper, terrazzo worker (building construction) ..... .
Helper, tile layer (building construction) .......... .
Helper, trades, maintenance ....................... ..
leer (bakeries).... ............••••••••••........... ..
Identifier (laundries) •••••••••............. ....... .
Ingredient scaler (bakeries) .........•••••••••••«•••«•••
Inspector (machinery)
Inspector, final (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) ••••••,
Inspector, final (women’s and misses' dresses)......... ,
Inspector, final (examiner) (men's and boys' dress shirts
and nightwear)
,
Janitor ............................ .......... ...... ..
Janitor (machinery) •••.••••••••.... .
Janitor (men’s and boys’ suits and coats) ............. ..
Key-punch operator ••••..... .
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ••••••••••..... .
Labeler and packer (paints and varnishes) ••••••••••••••.,
Laborer, building (building construction) «•••••••••••»•.,
laborer, plaster (building construction) •••••••••.••••••<
laborer, plumber (building construction)
lather (building construction) •••••••••••••••••«•••.... .
Linenkeeper (ocean transport).... .............
Longshoreman (stevedoring) .......
Machine operator (printing) ..........••••••••.... .
Machine tender (machinist; (printing) ...........
«
Machinist (building construction) .................... .
Machinist (ocean transport) ....................... ••••••<
Machinist, maintenance ••••••...... ......... ...........
Machinist, production (machinery) .......................
Mailer (printing) .................. ........... .........
Maintenance man, general utility ................... .
Maintenance man, general utility (paints and varnishes) .
,




44
47
52
51
52

52
58
54
45
56

44
57
54
47
49
50
45
54
47
42
57
50

-

44
54
-

44
50

33
16
26
34
16
24

Marble setter (building construction)
Marker (laundries) ............ ................ ......... •••
Marshmallow beater (bakeries) .................. ...... •••••«
Mechanic (malt liquors) ................ ......... ........ .
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ......... .
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •••••••••••«•••••••••••*•••*
Mechanic, maintenance ....... ......... ........... *....... .
Messman (ocean transport).... »...... ••................... .
Milling-machine operator (machinery) •••«••••»••••••»*.......
Millwright.............. ..................... ........... .
Mixer (bakeries)
.... .
Mixer (paints and varnishes) ....... ...... •••••.... •••*••••»
Mdder (bakeries) ...... ....................... .
Mdder operator (bakeries) ................... .
Mosaic and terrazzo worker (building construction) ...•••••••••
Motorman (local transit) .......... .................... .
Motortruck driver......... •
........... ........ ..... .
Nurse, industrial (registered) ............... ••••....... .
Office b o y ..... ...... ..... .............. .
Office boy (insurance carriers)........ ............... .
Office girl ................. ........................ ••••••
Office girl (insurance carriers) ...................... .
Oiler .....................................................
Oiler (ocean transport) ............................... .
Operator, hue (local transit) .......... .......... .
Operator, elevator (building service) •••••••.•••••••••••••••••
Order filler ................... ........ ................. .
Oven loader (bakeries) ........... ......................... .
Overman (bakeries) ................... .................... .
Oven worker (bakeries) ..................... ........ .
Packer ............... .................................. .
Packer (bakeries) ............... ....................... .
Packer (men’ and boys’ suits and coats) ......... .
s
Painter (building construction) ............... .
Painter, maintenance
Panner (bakeries) ........................................ .
Pantryman (ocean transport) ............. ............ ..... .
Photoengraver (printing) ..••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Pipe fitter, maintenance .......... .......... .......... .
Plasterer (building construction) ............. ........... .
Platform man, loader and unloader (malt liquors) •«•••••«••••••
Plumber (building construction)
Plumber (ocean transport) ................. ...... .
Plumber, maintenance .................................... .
Porter ......... ..... ........................... .
Porter (building service)..... ............................
Press assistant (printing)
Press feeder (printing) ......................... .
Presser, finish (men’ and boys’ suits and coats).... ..... .
s
Presser, finish, hand (men’ and boys’ suits and coats) •••••••
s
Presser, finish, hand (men's and boys' dress shirts and
nightwear) ••••...................... ...............
Presser, finish, machine (men's and boys* suits and coats) ••••
Presser, hand (women's and misses' dresses) ............... .
Presser, machine, shirts (laundries) .......... .
Pressman, cylinder presses (printing).... ..................
Pressman-in-charge, (printing) ....................... .
Pressman, platen (printing)

57

yg or rate

47
47

30
29
30
31
29
16
16
33
26
16
30
24
30
30
30
31
32
14
7
28
11
28
17
33
31
31
18
30
30
30
19
30
22
30
17
30
33
34
17
30
31
30
32
17
18
31
34
34
21
21

50
47
49
57
-

24
21
23
29
34
34
34

-

•
58
44
44
55
44
•50
-

-

43
42
57
42
57
45
-

46
•

46
47
-

45
-

-

45
45
45
-

61

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Pressmen, web presses (printing) ........
Proof-machine operator (banking) •............. *............
56
Quartermaster (ocean transport) .................................... Receiving c l e r k ........................................ ••••
46
Roofer, composition (building construction) ...............
Roofer, slate and tile (building construction) .............
Seaman, able (ocean transport) ••................ ........•••
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) «• •.............. ••......
Second hand (bakeries) .....................................
42
Secretary................................... .............
Secretary (insurance carriers) •.... ........••..............
57
Sewer, hand (men's and boys1 suits and coats) ........
47
Sewer, hand (women's and misses* dresses) ................
49
Sewing-machine operator (men*s and boys' suits
47
and coats) ....
Sewing-machine operator, dress shirts (men's and boys*
dress shirts and nightwear) ............................. *
50
Sewing-machine operator, section system (women's and
misses' dresses) ....................................
49
Sewing-machine operator, single-hand (tailor) system
(women's and misses' dresses) ........................
49
Shaper, edge and bottom (men's and boys' suits and
coats) .......................
43
Sheet-metal worker (building construction) .................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ................
45
Shipping clerk ...... .••••.................. ............ ..
46
Shipping-and-receiving c l e r k ...............................
46
Side laster, machine (women's cement process shoes) ........
51
Sign painter (building construction) ......................
Silverman (ocean transport) ................................
Sole attacher, cement process (women's cement
51
process shoes) .......................
Sprinkler fitter (building construction) .......... ••••••.••
Starter (building service) ...............................
Starter, assistant (building service) ......................
Steam fitter (building construction) .......................
42
Stenographer, general ............................
Stenographer, general (banking) .................
56
Stenographer, general (insurance carriers) .................
57
Stenographer, technical...................................
42
Stenographer, technical (insurance carriers) ..........
57
Stereotyper (printing) .....................
Steward, chief (ocean transport) ........
Steward, deck (ocean transport) ..............
Steward, second (ocean transport) ....
Stock clerk, garments (men's and boys' suits and coats) ....
43
Stock handler .........................
46
Stonecutter (building construction) ........................
Stonemason (building construction) .........................
Storekeeper (ocean transport) ..............................
Storekeeper, assistant (ocean transport) ...................
Structural-iron worker (building construction) .............
Switchboard operator •..................................... •
42
Switchboard operator (insurance carriers) ..................
57
Switchboard operator-receptionist...................
42
Switchboard operator-receptionist (insurance carriers) .....
57
Truck driver ...............................................
46
Tabulating-machineoperator ......
42
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) ...........
57




34
27
33
19
30
30
32
32
30
7, 11
23
22
23
21, 22
24
23
23
21
30
17
19
19
25
30
33
25
30
31
31
30
7, 12
27
28
12
28
34
33
33
33
22
19
30
30
33
33
30
12
28
12
28
20
7, 13
28

Technician (paints and varnishes) ...........................
Teller, all around (banking) ................................
Teller, note (banking) ......................................
Teller, paying or paying and receiving,
commercial (banking) ...... ................................
Teller, savings (banking) ...................................
Tender, bricklayer (building construction) ...................
Third hand (bakeries) .......................................
Thread laster (children's stitchdown shoes) ..................
Thread trimmer (men's and boys' dress shirts and
nightwear) ................................................
Thread trimmer (men's and boys' suits and coats) .............
Thread trimmer (women's and misses' dresses) .................
Tile layer (building construction) ..........................
Tinter (paints and varnishes) ...............................
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ..............................
Top stitcher (children's stitchdown shoes) ...................
Top stitcher (women's cement process shoes) ..................
Tracer ......................................................
Transcribing-machine operator, general ......................
Transcribing-machine operator, general (insurance carriers) ...
Transcribing-machine operator, technical ....................
Tray-oven operator (bakeries) ...............................
Treer (children’s stitchdown shoes) .........................
Treer (women's cement process shoes) ........................
Trucker, hand ...............................................
Trucker, hand (machinery) ...................................
Trucker, hand (paints and varnishes) ........................
Trucker, power ..............................................
Typist ......................................................
Typist (banking) ............................................
Typist (insurance carriers) .................................
Under-presser (men's and boys' suits and coats) ..........
Utilityman (ocean transport) ................................
Vamper (children's stitchdown shoes) ........................
Vamper (women's cement process shoes) .......................
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes) ......... ...............
Waiter (ocean transport) ....................................
Waiter, head (ocean transport) ..............................
Waitress (ocean transport) ..................................
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ......................
Washer, machine (laundries) .................................
Watchman ....................................................
Watchman (ocean transport)...................................
Watertender (ocean transport) ...............................
Welder, hand (machinery) .....................................
Window waeher (building service) ............................
Wiper (ocean transport) .....................................
Wood-heel-seat fitter, hand (women's cement
process shoes) ............................................
Wood-heel-seat fitter, machine (women's cement
process shoes) ............................................
Work distributor (men's and boys' suits and coats) ...........
Work distributor (women's and misses' dresses) ...............
Working foreman, processing departments (men's and boys'
dress shirts and nightwear) ..............................
Wrapper (bakeries) ..........................................
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) .................................
Wrapping-machine operator (bakeries) ........................
Yoeman (ocean transport) ....................................

50
56
56

24
27
27

56
56

27
27
30
30
25

-

52
48
48
49

52
52

24
22
23
30
24
26
25
25
14
13
28
13
30
25
25
19
26
24
20
8, 13
27
28
21
33
25
25
24
33
33
33
29
29
20
33
33
26
31
33
25
25

52
48
49

25
22
23

50

24
30
29
30
33

-

50
55
52
52
43
43
57
43
-

52
52
46
55
50
46
43
56
57
48
-

52
52
50
-

58
58
46
-

55
-

-

58
-

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1951


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102