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Occupational Wage Survey
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
April 1951

Bulletin No. I034

U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
M A U R I C E J. T O B I N , S E C R E T A R Y




Bureau of La bor S t a t i s t i c s
Ewan C l a g u e , C om m iss ioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, V. S. Government Printing Oiliee
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 40 cents




C ontents

Page
number

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................

1

THE CHICAGO (COOK COUNTY) AREA .........................................................
Labor and Industry in the Chicago Area ...............

1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ............................................................
Cross-Industry Occupations ............................
Office clerical o c c u p a t i o n s ................................. ...................
Professional and technical occupations .........................................
Maintenance and pover plant occupations ........................................
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations .................. ............
Characteristic Industry Occupations .............................
Straight-time average earnings ................ .................. ...... .
Union wage scales ...............................................................
Minimum Entrance Rates .......

1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3

SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES ...........................................................

k

TABLES:
Average
1.
2.
3.

earnings for selected occupations studied on an area hasis Office occupations .......................................
Professional and technical occupations ......
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..............
k,
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ....
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry "basis 5. Machinery industries .....
6. Paints and v a r n i s h e s .... .......................
7. Power laundries ................................................................
8. Auto repair shops ........„...... ............. .................................
9. Railroads ...........
Union wage scales for selected occupations 10. Bakeries ........................................................................
11. Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ..... ....................................................
12. Building service .........
13. Local transit operating employees ..........
1 U . Malt liquors ............ ......... ................... ..................... ..•••
15. Motortruck drivers and helpers ....................
16. Printing ................
Entrance rates 17. Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ......................................
Wage practices 18. Shift differential provisions ............. ....................................
19. Scheduled weekly hours .........................................................
20. Paid holidays ..................
21. Paid vacations .......................................
22. Paid sick leave .........
23 • Nonproduction bonuses .............
2k,
Insurance and pension plans ...........................

5
12
12
15
19
22
22
23
23
2k
2k
2k
2k

25
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
29
30
30

APPENDIX:
A. Scope and method of s u r v e y .....................................................
B. Descriptions of occupations studied ...........................................

31
32

INDEX ....................................................................................

^3

In tr o d u c tio n ^
Labor and Industry in Cook County
The Chicago area is one of several important industrial centers in which the Bureau
of Labor Statistics conducted occupational wage surveys during early 1951* 2 / Occupations
that are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on
a community-wide basis.
Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office clerical; (b) professional
and technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial, warehousing and shipping.
In
presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables 1 through 4) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions.
Occupations that are characteristic of particular, important, local industries have
been studied as heretofore on an industry basis, within the framework of the community sur­
vey. 2/
Union scales are presented in lieu of (or supplementing) occupational earnings for
several industries or trades in which the great majority of the workers are employed under
terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are indicative
of prevailing pay practice* Data have also been collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as vacation and sick leave
allowances, paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans.
The community wage survey of Chicago was made in cooperation with other Federal
agencies. Individual agencies received separate tabulations limited to specified geographic,
industrial, and occupational coverage.

The

C h ic a g o , ( C o o k C o u n ty ) A r e a

Chicago, the Nation’s second largest city, is served by 19 trunk line railroads,
major air routes, steamship and barge lines, and a highway transport system that have all
helped to establish and maintain this centrally located city as the leading distribution
point in the country. The Chicago Metropolitan Area L j had a population of 5 l/2 million
inhabitants in 1950, of which 3 l/2 million were concentrated in Chicago.
A total of 4 1/2
million lived in Cook County alone.
The community wage survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics was limited
to Cook County, where fully fourwfifths of manufacturing employment and more than nine-tenths
of the workers in nonmanufacturing establishments of the metropolitan area were concentrated.
Only in the basic iron and steel industry was a major part of the employment concentrated
outside Cook County. *

1/ Prepared in the Bureau’s Division of Wage Statistics by George E. Votava, Regional Wage
Analyst, Region IV, Chicago, 111.
The planning and central direction of the program was the
responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general supervision of
Harry Ober, Chief of the Branch of Industry Wage Studies.
2/ Other areas studied are: Atlanta, Boston, Denver,
New York, San Francis co-Oakland.
Similar studies were conducted in 1950 in Buffalo, Denver, Philadelphia, and San FranciscoOakland.
y See Appendix A for discussion of scope and method of survey.
y The Chicago Metropolitan Area, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget, includes Cook,
Dupage, Kane, Lake, and Will Counties in Illinois and Lake County, Indiana.




Wage and salary nonagricultural employment, other than government, totaled approxi­
mately 1 3/4 million in Cook County in April 1951.
About 760,000 workers were employed in
more than 12,000 manufacturing establishments.
Retail trade activities accounted for the
largest number of establishments (29,000) and the second largest employment total (nearly
300,000). About 145,000 persons were employed in 10,000 wholesale trade outlets. The finance,
insurance, and real estate group accounted for a fifth of the 100,000 establishments in the
county and had an aggregate employment in excess cf 110,000.
A somewhat larger labor force
was required in transportation, communication, and other public utilities. The service indus­
tries gave employment to about 175,000.
Building construction in the Chicago area was at a high level during April and gave
jobs to an estimated 95,000 in 3 counties, Cook and DuPage in Illinois and Lake in Indiana.
Manufacturing activity in Chicago, the Nation’s leading industrial center, is highly
diversified with employment divided in a 3 to 2 ratio between durable goods and nondurable
goods manufactures. 5/ The machinery industries (electrical and nonelectrical) accounted for
nearly a third of manufacturing employment. Other metalworking establishments in Cook County
employed over a fourth of the total.
Food processing, including slaughtering and meat pack­
ing, and the manufacture of confectionery, bakery goods, beverages, and a variety of other
products, engaged 1 of every 8 workers in manufacturing.
Other major industries in the area
are printing and publishing, apparel, chemical products, furniture, and paper products.
Of
the more than 250 manufacturing plants employing 500 or more workers
each, about half* were
engaged in metalworking.
Labor organizations represented about two-thirds of the plant workers in the indus­
tries and establishment-size groups studied in Cook County. The proportion of nonoffice work­
ers employed in establishments having written agreements with labor organizations ranged from
two-fifths in retail trade to nearly complete coverage in the transportation, communication,
and other public utilities group.
Two-thirds of the nonoffice workers in manufacturing were
covered by agreements, as compared with three-fifths in wholesale trade and five-sixths in the
service industries.
Among office workers, the proportion covered by agreements with unions
representing these workers amounted to an eighth on an all-industry basis, one-twelfth in
manufacturing,
and about sevei>*tenths in transportation,
communication,
and other public
utilities.

O c c u p a t io n a l

W age

S tr u c tu r e

The community wage survey was conducted 2 months after the wage " freeze” order of
January 26, 1951 was issued.
Examination of data on general wage changes granted during the
period January 1950 - April 1951 indicated that three-fourths of the establishments visited
adjusted wage and salary scales upward during the 15-month period. Relatively few increases
were granted during the first half of 1950. Between the date of the Korean outbreak and the
January 26 wage 1 freeze," however, general wage adjustments were widespread, particularly in
1
manufacturing, transportation and public utilities, and in wholesale trade. Wage changes dur­
ing the first quarter of 1951 were usually in addition to earlier increases.
Such supple­
mentary adjustments were most common in durable goods manufacturing in which half of the es­
tablishments granted two or more wage increases during the 15-month period.

5/

See Table A in Appendix A for listing of durable and nondurable goods industries

2.
Formalized rate structures with a range of rates for each job were reported in es­
tablishments accounting for about three-fifths of the office and plant workers. Nearly a third
of the plant workers but only a few office workers in the area were in establishments having
a single rate for each job*
The remainder of the labor force in Cook County (a ninth of the
plant workers and fully a third of the office workers) were on payrolls of establishments that
had individual rate determination*
In the following discussion of wages, two main occupational groupings are distin­
guished:
(1) cross-industry occupations, such as office clerical occupations; professional
and technical occupations; maintenance occupations; and custodial, warehousing and shipping
occupations; and (2) characteristic industry occupations* The first group of occupations was
studied on a cross-industry basis from employer payroll records* These occupations are usual­
ly found in all or a number of industries* In general, the characteristic industry occupa­
tions are peculiar to a specific industry. As indicated below, straight-time average rates
or earnings are shown for some industries; union scales are shown for others*
Information for the railroad industry is presented separately in this report and
has not been combined with the data in any of the other tables. This has been done in recog­
nition of the fact that wages in the railroad industry bear strong imprints of interstate coi>siderations that have evolved over a long period of time*
Some of these general considera­
tions are: Nation-wide uniformity in rates of pay for certain key occupations; uniform Na­
tion-wide minimum rates that affect the entire range of occupational rates; and special modes
of wage payment and related practices*
Cross-Industry Occupations
Office clerical occupations— Among the 26 office occupations in which women*s sala­
ries were studied, average weekly earnings ranged from a low of $39 for office girls to a high
of $62*50 for hand bookkeepers (table l)*
In 16 of these occupations, weekly averages were
within the narrow range of $46*50 to $51*50, both rates inclusive. General stenographers con­
stituted the largest occupational group and averaged $51*50,
Other numerically important
groups were routine typists averaging $44> accounting clerks averaging $49#50 and secretaries
averaging $61. Salaries of women were generally higher in offices of manufacturing industries
than in nonmanufacturing.
In 19 of 24 job categories permitting such a comparison, women in
manufacturing establishments typically made $1.50 to $2*50 more a week*
Within the nonmanufacturing group of industries, earnings in the field of wholesale trade and transportation
(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities exceeded earnings in manu­
facturing in most of the job categories permitting a comparison.
Hand bookkeepers, averaging $74*50, had the highest average weekly earnings among
men office workers* In 7 of the 12 occupations in which men*s salaries were studied, average
weekly earnings were $60 or more a week. Accounting clerks constituted the largest group of
men office workers studied; they averaged $61.50 a week. A comparison of salaries of men and
women in similar jobs generally indicated a wage advantage for men* This advantage was great­
est in jobs requiring a substantial amount of training*
Differences in average salaries for
men and women in particular occupations generally do not reflect differences in rates within
the same establishment*
Professional and technical occupations*— Women employed as registered nurses
in
industrial establishments, principally manufacturing,
averaged $62 a week in April 1951
(table 2),
Average weekly earnings of draftsmen ranged from $58.50 for junior draftsmen to
$109*50 for chief draftsmen. Tracers averaged $52 a week.




Maintenance and power plant occupations— Among maintenance and power plant jobs se­
lected for study, plumbers had the highest average earnings, $2.17 an hour, and helpers to the
various trades were lowest with an average of $1.53* Average hourly earnings for other impore
tant trades were $2*09 for painters, $2 for carpenters, and $1*98 for electricians, machin­
ists, and automotive mechanics.
A n examination of the wage distribution indicated that many
of the establishments were paying the union scale for construction workers to their mainte­
nance workers.
For example, carpenters in building construction had a basic union scale of
$2*55. Table 3 shows that nearly a fourth of the maintenance carpenters were earning between
$2.50 and $2.60 an hour. •
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations— In the numerically important stock
handler and hand trucker job classification, average hourly earnings were $1.40 in both manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing establishments (table 4)* Order fillers, averaging $1*44> were
paid more in nonmanufacturing than in manufacturing establishments.
Truck drivers* average
earnings ranged from $1.78 for drivers of light pick-up trucks to $ 1*92 for heavy,
trailertype trucks*
Me n janitors, porters and cleaners averaged $1.22 an hour, $1.24 in manufacturing
and $1*20 in nonmanufacturing. Women performing janitorial duties had an all-industry average
of $1*01 but earned $1.19 in manufacturing establishments as contrasted with 99 cents in non­
manufacturing.
Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time average earnings
Following the practice for the cross-industry occupations previously discussed, the
wage or salary information for the following five industries reflects straight-time earnings
derived from employer payroll records.
Machinery industries— Too 1-and-die makers in Chicago machinery industries averaged
$2.27 an hour in tool-and-die jobbing shops and $2*11 in other types of plants* Janitors and
hand truckers, the lowest paid job categories studied, averaged $1*27 and $1*35, respectively.
Straight-time average earnings of $1.89 were recorded for production machinists*
Interplant
and intraplant variations in job duties, required work skills, and training requirements in
such work fields as assembling, machining, and inspection are commonly found among the ma­
chinery industries.
For wage study purposes, workers in these activities were grouped into
three grades, designated as class A, B, and C* Averages for m e n class A assemblers, inspect­
ors, and operators of designated types of machine tools were at or near the pay level indi­
cated for production machinists*
Hourly averages for men class B workers ranged £rom $1*62
to $1.80 and for men class C workers from $1.41 to $1.62 (table 5).
Women assemblers (class C) averaged $1*29, 2 cents above the average for class C
drill-press operators but 6 cents less than the all-industry hourly earnings for class C in­
spection work*
Incentive systems of wage payment were found in a large number of machinery plants
in Chicago* Comparison of average hourly earnings for time and incentive workers in assembl­
ing, inspection, welding, and machine-tool operating categories revealed that workers paid on
some form of production incentive system usually averaged 15 or more cents an hour above the
average recorded for hourly-rated workers.

3.

Paints and varnishes-— Tinters and varnish makers, who averaged $1.79 and $1*73 an
hour, respectively, were the highest paid processing workers studied in Chicago plants manu­
facturing paints and varnishes (table 6) •
General utility maintenance men employed in the
industry averaged $1*95#
Mixers constituted the largest group of m en workers among the jobs
studied, and their hourly earnings averaged $1*55.
For labeling and packing, men were paid
an average of $1.44 and women $1.25.
Power laundries— Hourly earnings of nearly 3,000 women employed on flatwork-finishing machines in Chicago power laundries averaged 85 cents in April 1951 (table 7) • More than
a third of the workers in the job were paid on an incentive basis, and averaged 89 cents an
hour, 6 cents above earnings of those paid on time rates. More than three-fourths of the women
perforating shirt pressing operations by machine were also paid on an incentive basis, their
average pay being $1.08 compared with $1 for those paid on a time basis.
Me n averaged $1.34
operating washers and $1.15 operating extractors. Stationary boiler firemen, the highest paygroup among m e n fs jobs, averaged $1.56. Both men and women were employed as identifiers; men
in the job averaged $1.17 and women $1.03 an hour.
Auto repair shops— Auto mechanics doing skilled repair work in auto repair shops
and repair departments of dealer establishments averaged $2.06 an hour in April 1951 (table 8;.
A majority of these mechanics were paid on a ”flat-rate” incentive basis whereby they receiv­
ed a percentage of amounts charged customers for labor.
Workers paid on this basis averaged
$2.17 an hour, or 30 cents more per hour than was earned by mechanics paid time rates« Auto
mechanics doing the simpler repair work averaged $1.48# Body repairmen, averaging $2.33, had
the highest earnings among the job categories studied; automobile washers, averaging $1.17,
had the lowest earnings.
Hailroads— Earnings in selected office, professional and technical, maintenance and
power plant, and custodial, warehousing and shipping jobs in the railroad industry in Chicago
are presented in table 9* Unlike office workers surveyed on a cross-industry basis (table 1;,
the earnings have been combined for men and women in the office jobs. Average weekly earnings
in railroad offices ranged from $52. 50 for office boys or girls to $83.50 for hand bookkeep­
ers.
General stenographers averaged $66.50 and secretaries were paid $75*50.
All of the
office salaries are based on a 40-hour week.
Electricians, averaging $2.39 an hour, were the highest paid of the maintenance
workers covered. Carpenters averaged 2 cents an hour less. Trades helpers were earning $1.58
an hour.
Both men and women janitors averaged $1.40 an hour.
ers were earning $1.64.

Building service— The starting rates for elevator operators were $1.33 and $1.30 an
hour in class A and class B buildings, respectively. These minimum rates were increased by 3
cents after completion of 6 months employment.
Elevator starters received 12 1/2 cents more
than the class of building scale for trained operators. Janitresses and matrons were engaged
at a $1.11 rate and also received a 3-cent increase after 6 months. The highest rates record­
ed were a $2.05 minimum for electricians and $1.95 scale for operating engineers employed in
class A buildings.
Hours of work for these employees were 40 a week (table 12).
local transit operating employees— Minimum day work rates for transit workers with
a year of service ranged from $1,548 for elevated and subway guards to $1.70 for operators of
1-man streetcars and busses.
Operators of 2-man cars received $1.60 an hour, but a 5-cent
differential was paid to operators of streetcars and busses for night work. A 40-hour work­
week was provided in the agreement (table 13).
Malt liquors— The union scale for journeyman brewers was $1,875 an hour at the time
of the study.
Apprentices in the brewing department were paid $1,625 for the first 6 months
and $1.75 for the last 18 months of their apprenticeship period.
Laborers were hired at
$1,668 and were paid a minimum of $1,728 after 6 months. Maximum straight-time hours were 40
a week in this industry (table 14)*
Motortruck drivers and helpers— Union scales for motortruck drivers varied widely
according to type of truck operated, materials transported, and, in some categories, whether
employed during day or night shifts. Hourly rates ranged from $1.31 for operators of light
trucks in the retail florist industry to $2.36 for transporting morning papers.
Hates for
most of the motortruck operator classifications were at the $1.70-$1.90 level. Helper rates
ranged from $1.49 to $1.74#
W i t h few exceptions, agreements provided for overtime rates for
work in excess of 40 hours a week (table 15)*
Printing*— Union agreements in the commercial printing industry in Chicago called
for minimum hourly wage scales of $2,593 for hand compositors, $3.05 for electrotypers,
$3
for photo engravers, and $2,662 for pressmen on sheet-fed, flat-bed cylinder presses. Rates of
$1,374 and $1,415 were paid to bindery women according to the type of work performed (table

Stock handlers and hand truck­

Union wage scales
The information for the following seven industries relates to the minimum wage
rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining be­
tween employers and trade unions.
Bakeries— Union wage scales in Chicago bakeries varied according to major products
made, degree of mechanization, type of distribution, job classification, and length of serv­
ice of worker. Minimum hourly rates among those quoted in six major agreements ranged from 96
cents for the first 30 days for women helpers in cake shops to $1.77 for first hands and fore­
men. Weekly hours were 40 except in retail hand shops in which overtime rates were paid after
42 hours a week (table 10).




Building construction— Basic scales among major trades were $2.55 for carpenters and
bricklayers, $2.60 for painters and plumbers, $2,625 for electricians and $2.75 for plaster*ers.
Building laborers had a minimum union rate of $1.85 an hour on April 1, 1951. Workers
in these trades were paid overtime after 40 hours a week (table 11) •

Hand compositors, machine operators, and machine tenders working on English text in
newspaper establishments had a day scale of $2,759 and a night scale of $2.91*
The basic
workweek in'commercial shops was 36 l/4 hours whereas it varied from 35 to 37 l/2 hours among
the trades studied in newspaper establishments.
Minimum Entrance Rates
Most Chicago firms studied had established minimum entrance rates for hiring inex­
perienced plant workers. These entrance rates covered a wide range from less than 50 cents to
more than $1.50, with half the workers employed by firms having entrance rates of $1 or more.
In durable goods manufacturing industries, the proportion of workers in establishments with
over 500 workers and entrance rates of $1 or more was double the proportion in smaller estab­
lishments, but about equal in small and large establishments manufacturing nondurable goods.
The lowest entrance rate in manufacturing and wholesale trade was 75 cents, whereas an eighth

k.

of the workers in retail trade and about a third in services were in establishments with eEn­
trance rates below this figure#
In public utilities, all entrance rates were above 85 cents
(table 17).

S u p p le m e n ta r y

W age

P ra c tic e s

three-fourths by firms granting 1 week after similar service. Vacation practices varied con­
siderably among industries.
The proportion of office worker’ in establishments xrith provi­
s
sions for 2 weeks after a year of service, for example, ranged from a third in retail trade
to nearly all workers in the finance, insurance, and real estate group.
Provisions allowing
2 weeks after 1 year applied to an eighth of the plant workers in manufacturing and service
industries, but to three-fifth3 in wholesale trade. Many firms gave paid vacations to workers
with less than a year of service, and the general practice was to increase vacation allow­
ances after longer service (table 21).

Shift Differentials
Over a fifth of the plant workers in manufacturing in Chicago were employed on sec­
ond and third shift operations
(table 18).
Three-fourths of these workers were on second
shifts.
Almost all of the extra-shift workers were paid shift differentials, about half re­
ceived a cents-pe]>-hour differential and the others a percentage over day-shift rates.
Ten
cents was the most common cents-per-hour differential and ten percent the most common per­
centage differential.

Scheduled Workweek
Two-thirds of the women office workers in all industries in Chicago were scheduled
to work 40 hours a week in April 1951.
Among industry groups, the proportion on this weeklyschedule was smallest in finance, insurance, and real estate; seven-tenths of the women em­
ployed in these offices were scheduled to work less than 40 hours. Few office workers were on
schedules that were longer than 40 hours. Although nearly three-fourths of the plant workers
also were on a 40— hour workweek, most of the others were on longer schedules, typically 48
hours (table 19).

Paid Holidays
Provisions for paid holidays were in effect for practically all office workers and
for over nine-tenths of the plant workers.
A majority of both office and plant workers were
permitted from six to eight paid holidays a year (table 20).
On a broad industry basis, the
outstanding exceptions were in finance, insurance, and read estate where nearly half the of­
fice -workers were entitled to 11 days annually, and in the services group where about threefifths of the plant workers were in firms with no formal provisions for paid holidays.

Paid Vacations
Almost all Chicago employers granted vacations with pay to both plant and office
workers. Firms employing about four-fifths of the office workers allowed 2 weeks after a year
of service, whereas a fifth of the plant workers were employed by films allowing 2 weeks and




Paid Sick Leave
Sick leave plans providing full pay without a waiting period preceding eligibility
covered a considerably higher proportion of office than plant workers.
Such plans, paid for
at least in part by the employer, that applied to workers with a year of service were report­
ed by firms with a third of the office workers compared to only about a tenth of the plant
workers.
Typically, from 5 to 10 days of sick leave with pay were allowed, although a sub­
stantial proportion of workers, particularly office workers in manufacturing, public utilities,
wholesale trade, and finance, were allowed more than 10 days (table 22).

Nonproduction Bonuses
Approximately a third of the office and plant workers in the Chicago area were em­
ployed by establishments that supplemented basic pay with a nonproduction bonus, usually in
the form of a Christmas or yeas>-end bonus (table 23).
Although profit-sharing bonuses were
paid to a relatively small proportion of the workers receiving bonuses in all industries, es­
tablishments employing more than a tenth of the office and nonoffice workers in wholesale
trade, and those with a similar proportion of the office workers in service industries, paid
this type of bonus.

Insurance and Pension Plans
Insurance or pension plans financed entirely or in part by employers were reported
firms employing more than nine-tenths of the office and plant workers in Chicago.
Life
insurance plans were the most prevalent of the various types of insurance plans
reported
(table 24).

by

Retirement pension plans were in force in establishments employing three-fifths of
the office workers and nearly half the plant workers.
Among industry groups transportation,
communication, and other public utilities ranked first in proportion of workers covered; more
than four—fifths of the office and three— fifths of the nonoffice workers were employed by es­
tablishments with retirement pension plans.

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

5

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
Number of
1 ---1—
1
&—
&
1
$
&
1 ----- 8
1
$
1—
$
1—
&
1—
1—
*
1—
1$
#
Number Weekly
sched­ Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.0 0 100.00
of
and
earn­ $
workers uled
and
30.00 under
hours ings
over
3 2 .3 0 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55,00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 *5° 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 ?otoo ?5 .oo 100.00

Men

Retail t r a d e ........ .............
Finance ** ................... ..
Services............. ............

216
75
342
108

39*5 $74 .5 0
40.0 81.00
70.00
39*5
7;
.
AO-O
72. SO
69.50
4 1 .0
65.50
38.5
76.00
40.5

Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B Z j ....... .................. .
Nonmanufacturing............. .

161
154

37.0
37*0

Bookkeepers, hand ......................
Manufacturing .......................
Nonmanufacturing....................

1,302
529
773

47.50
47.50

1
-

-

-

-

-

1

-

34

52

14

34
1

q

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

—
~
-

Clerks, file, class A 2/ .............
Nonmanufacturing ...........••••......

48
43

38.0
38.0

55.00
56.00

-

-

124
27
97
79

40.50
42.50
40.00
39*00

-

3
3

Clerks, general ........................
Manufacturing.......................
Durable g o o d s ....... .............
Nondurable goods ••••••••........ .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ........... ......
Public utilities * .... ...........
Wholesale t r a d e ....... •••••••••••
Retail trade .....................
Finance ** •••••.............. ••••

1,675
592
425
167
1,083
200
513
107
164

39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5

66.00
6 5 .5 0
64.00
69.50
66.50
68.50
68.00
64.50
65.50

Clerks, order ..........................
Manufacturing ...............
Durable goods ......... ...........
Nondurable goods •••.•••••••......
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... ...... .....
Wholesale trade ••••••.... ........
Retail t r a d e .... ...... ..........

1,964
626
389
237
1,338
1,151
131

40.0
39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
4 0.0

65.50
63.00
65.50
59.00
67.00
68.00
58.00

-

J

-

-

12
4
13
19

JL

1
18
-

OO
6
39
5

/.I
*~4»
7
12
10

73
51
22
*
+
11
3
4

1
1

10
10

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

152
133
90
43
19
5
12
1
—
1

58
34
19
15
24
12
_
1
11
-

33
18
9
9
15
3
3
2
4
3

18
12
«
.
12
6
3
3

51
2
_
2
49
9
40

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

8
6
_
6
2
2

30
3
_
3
27
1
18

225
108
H7

54
40
14

33
10
23

10
-

K
P
2
15
1

i.
*
+

-

6
6

54
54

22
22

8
8

26
26

5
5

8
1

-

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

85
8
8
77
1
16
24
36

180
29
28
1
151
17
73
1
48
12

231
73
10
63
158
3
17
4
81
53

173
39
20
19
134
10
66
6
22
30

338
150
63
87
188
19
60
15
65
29

149
43
15
28
106
15
50
3
19
19

335
157
63
94
178
20
128
9
17
4

230
104
45
59
126
22
67
4
32
1

245
109
80
29
136
26
73
23
34
-

349
109
32
77
240
22
113
44
56
5

359
204
129
75
155
8
100
37
10
-

267
150
93
57
117
8
38
4
66
1

179
69
37
32
110
2
96
2
10
-

130
59
45
14
71
5
45

3
-

24
24
20
4
-

17
4

232
157
108
49
75
20
38
11
4
2

-

-

2
-

1
1

9
6

3
3

1
1

11
11

4

1
1

n
11

1
1

-

-

-

-

l
1

2
2

-

27
■27
25

29
6
23
19

37
6
31
27

17
9
8
4

5
3
2
1

3
3
-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

1

_

—

_

-

-

2
2
2
-

15
10
10
5
5
-

9
9
4
3

21
21
3
3
1

14
2
2
12
4
7
-

79
3
3
76
21
11
11
30

96
48
46
2
48
13
32
2
-

219
118
109
9
101
10
24
2
32

161
68
54
14
93
14
51
9
14

14 1
52
32
20
89
14
58
7
1

119
26
21
5
93
15
37
25
4

145
60
26
34
85
5
65
4
10

68
27
23
4
41
9
22
6
4

88
29
21
8
59
6
47
4
2

83
19
10
9
64
10
23
21
8

120
45
34
11
75
8
42
11
14

181
45
37
8
136
61
41

59
25
10
15
34
4
15

34

7

-

"
"

6
3
3
3
2

7
1
1
6
4
2

33
10
3
7
23
19
4

16
3
2
1
13
9
4

98
33
3
30
65
38
27

88
38
8
30
50
37
10

109
50
28
22
59
38
11

229
108
57
51
121
98
12

106
39
13
26
67
56
5

229
67
46
21
162
115
33

218
78
66
12
140
126
11

209
84
82
2
125
H9
2

109
28
H
17
81
75
3

189
24
23
1
165
160
5

168
45
35
10
123
122
-

66
6
2
4
60
60
-

36
5
5

25
4
4

31
31

21
21
-

3
3

-

18
18

17
12
12
5
1
y

-

-

_
-

..
—

20
2
36
11

1

.
H
r
1

132
61
71
i
JL

69
41
28
a
O

5
27
1

1
1

39.0
40.0
38.5
38.5

118
70
48

8
3
2

4
3
3
1
1
-

61.50
64.00
66.00
62.00
59.50
64.00
61.50
62.00
56.00
49.00

114
45
69

39
1

89
1
88
O
20
14
25
23

7
42
-

-

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0

52
7
45

1
-

_
-

3,339
1,674
886
788
2,165
232
1,058
168
507
200

43
4
39
c
7

_
-

_
-

-

116
28
88
10
2
66
10

j

Clerks, accounting.... ...... ..........
Manufacturing........ ...............
Durable goods ••••••.••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ..... ..........
Nonmanufacturing..... ...............
Public utilities * ..... ..........
Wholesale trade ..............
Retail t r a d e ...... ........... .
Finance ** ......... ..............
Services...... ................

—

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

14

1

_
-

Clerks, file, class B 2/ ...............
Manufacturing ••••...................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .................
Finance

-

52

-

L

2
7
2

-

2

1

83
63
20
J
.

19

_

mm

17
6
_
6
11
11

-

23
_
—

—

23
23

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, HI., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 1.__OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

rf ptraielat-timi3 week! Ly ear
Numb<ST Of \
jorkeri rece:IjiPg i
%
*
*
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
1—
1 ---- 1 —
*
*
Number Weekly
62.50 65.00 6 7 .5 0 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75 .0 0 80 .00 85.00 90.00 95.0 0 100.00
Weekly Under 30.00 3 2 .5 0 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.0 0 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00
sched­
of
and
and
workers uled earn- 1
over
30.00 under
hours ings
90.00 95.0 0 100.00
32*30 75.00 80.00 85,00
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45,00 4 7 ,5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62,50 65.00 67.50 70.00
Ave race

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Men - Continued
m

- nATrrrtl 1

.......

Manufacturing.......................
Durable goods .... ................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .................
Public utilities » ...............
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade .................... ••
Services .........................

820
675
542
133
145
42
36
30
26

40.0 $6 1 .5 0
40.01 60.00
61.00
40.0
55.50
39.5
67.00
40.0
62.50
40.0
65.50
39.0
67.00
40.5
76.00
41.0

Manufacturing.......................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... .............
Wholesale trade ..................

167
58
109
26

39.0
39.0
39.5
40.0

50.00
51.50
49.00
46.50

Manufacturing.................. .
Durable g o o d s .... ............... •
Nondurable g o o d s ............ •••••
Nonmanufacturing....................
Public utilities * ............. .
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance **
Services •••••..... ...............

1,808
—
*75T
340
414
1,054
159
218
108
349
220

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
38.5
38.5

40.00
40.00
43.00
37.50
40.00
42.50
39.50
38.50
39.50
40.50

C * «/
4 a \s
MTUlTHsI 5/
....... .
Nonmanufacturing....................
Manufacturing.......................
Nondurable goods ..................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....... ..........
Retail trade .....................
Finance ** ........................

170
124

40.0
40.0

61.50
60.50

843
406
304
102
437
43
173
113

39.5
39.5
40.C
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0

TnnAU4

ma

/W 1 1 4 r\rr m o ^ h 4 n o i

.....

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.0
41.0

50.00
48.00
48.50
48.00
50.50
52.50
51.50
48.50
48.50
50.00

Manufacturing ....................... ..................................... ..
Durable goods ........................................................
Nondurable g o o d s ...............................................
Nonmanufacturing ................. .. ...................................
Public utilities * ....................................... ..
Wholesale t r a d e .....................................• • • • •
Retail trade .....................
Finance * * .... ...... ..
Services ......................................................................

55

-

12
11
11

-

36 ___ 42
40
35
31
9
26
9
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
_

_
_

_

140
93
93
47

176
64
22
42
112
3
15
63
31

4
1
3
1

15
1
14
3

25
6
19
13

17
5
12
3

313
122
45
77
191
5
75
16
51

254
79
29
50
175
26
21
9
92
27

306
105
23
82
201
60

323
177
134
43
146
36
21

60
17
9
8
43
3
10
15

—

4

5
1
4
—

16
4
12

_

-

-

4
1

3

10
26
3
8

44

55
4
46
36

_

-

—

9

—

10
7

11
11

29
26

22

76
18
17
1
58
1
34
20

30
6

35
15
11

78

42

82
26
20

9
13

20
2
11
6

89
44
30
14
45
1
14
20

345
116
36
80
229
8
70

209
68
39
29
141
14
83
31
12
1

380
150
95
55
230
56
124
24
13
13

1
17

2
10

16

4
5

;

10
10

-

-

-

_

-

-

—

—

—

11
1

4

2

5

27

104
21
9
12
83
1
46
14
15

—

1

5

7

14
1
10
1

18

6

5

-

13

12
2

32
41

-

6
6

18
1

3

13
4

—

2
2

_

79
38

1
1

-

2

_

72
54
51

14
1
1

4
2
2

-

13

-

14

15
14
14

18
4
14

4

-

10

“
73
29
27
2
44
2

13
1

16

3
3

-

29
23
6

1
1

5

-

10

6
1
5

1

71
63
61
2
8
8

21
20
17
3
1

6
5
4
1
1

4

65
19

-

10

21
6
15
L
O

2

70 ___ 54
37
65
58
29
8
7
17
5
3
3

52 ___£7
25
49
21
46
4
3
22
3
2
4
/
10
1
3

-

1
-

-

-

1

-

5
3
2

-

-

-

—

1
—

-

—
*
*

9
2
4
2

13
2
1
1
11
2
6

40
25
25

—

15
1

-

-

—

—

-

-

—1

—

12

—
-

1
1

.
.
.

2

1

1

1
—

15
JJL

—

-

*
*

3
4
22

_

-

68
64
44
20
4

48
37
25
12
11
7
1

128
53
36
17
75
18
23
14

10

-

125,
109
84
25
16
3
✓
4
5
3

75
57
54
3
18
9

25
20
13
7
5
0
s

2

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
#* Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

1

Women
T34 1 1

-

-

60.50
63.50
63.00
65.50
57.50
58.00
53.50
54.50

1.728
534
291
243
1,194
139
601
189
210

_

77
60
14

5
1
24

4

39
3
36
7

5
22

152
20
11
9
132
20
100
11
“

1

±

1

12

6
56
13
24

2

148 ___28
32
4
2
22
2
10
116
94
12
5
61
25
8
12
//
10
DO
10
1

“

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

37
12

-

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

50

37
26
24

22
7

10

8
M
4
3
1
4

—

—

11

48
34
18
16
14

6
2

2
3

2

2

-

1

-

1
1

1
12
10

14
14

4
1

10
10

52
18
8
10
34
16

69
31
29

56
33
26
7
23

61
49
31
18
12

2
5
6

5
3

39
4

12
2

2
5

2
38
1
23
4

60 ____ 1
2
23
17
6
2
37
3
18
1
2
14

45
40

5
5
1

2

5

3
4
15

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

—

-

3
1
35
2
31

5
2

2
10
10

-

7

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

y ear]lj£gSJDf -•
workers3 rece:Lying i
straiglit-tinK
Numb3T Of 1
Aveirage
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
%
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Number
45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 10 0 .0 0
sched­ Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50
of
and
and
earn­ $
workers uled
over
30.00 under
ings
hours
70.00 3 & 2 L 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9.5..QO 100.00
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47,5^ 50.00 52,50 55t°o Z L 1 ° 60.00 62,50, 65.00

Women - Continued
Billers, machine (bookkeeping
mnnhine) 2/ ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ......
Retail trade ..........
Servi CAS ...... ........

Manufacturing............
.......... %
Durable g o o d s .... .
Nondurable goods ......
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ......
R + f i1
A.l
...........
SfiwH

.... ..................... .

/VTna nnoTo ~---- el AAA - 7 >»
- - - - A __
V
*
- - ncr_________ ______
Durable goods .........
Nondurable goods ......
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... ..
W»a 1a a a 1a tr*«de.. .....
Retail trad a tTTtt(T.Tr..T.f . . . . . .
...
Pi nflnAA # # ____________ _

467
450
255
66

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5

$46.50
46.50
U.00
48.50

1,016
231
158
73
785
211
298
175

39.5
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.5
40.5
37.5
41.0

62.50
67.50
70.50
60.50
61.00
58.50
60.00
59.50

692
337
182
155
355
158
58
106

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
40.0
41.0
40.0
38.0

58.50
57.50
57.00
58.50
59.00
61.00
58.00
58.00

Manufacturing ............
Durable goods .........
Nondurable goods ......
Nonmanufacturing.........
PnKHn iiW UW flfl * ____
Wholesale trade
Retail t r a d e ..................... .
Finance **
Services ,.......... .............

2,979
877
440
437
2,102
26
461
247
1,223
145

39.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0
40.5
40.5
37.0
43.5

48.00
49.50
50.50
48.50
47.50
48.00
53.00
49.00
45.00
49.00

Calculating-machine operators
(hmnuntcTneter tvne) ................... . .
Manufacturing............
Durable goods • •...... •
Nondurable goods •*•••••
M
Arnnflm
ifnft+.ir»»i n r r _________
PviKHc utilities # ................
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade .............••••••••••
Finance **
Services ......................

4,291
1,538
675
863
2,753
130
639
1,235
128
621

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0

51.50
53.00
54.00
52.50
50.50
53.50
52.50
49.50
46.00
50.00

RnolclfAflnlincrjnftchinfi operators | class B •••
.
JL /U V p !li^ IU lv11A*A Vpwl C W* M
A iU vv
^ C
w
l

«
.
“

-

:
-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

_
—
-

19
19
17

-

—
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

—

-

—

“
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

40
8

102
13

121
43
30
13
78
21
5
42

128
85
31
54
43
18
8
13

208
20

469L
170
85
85
299
8
85
43
146
17

88
53
35
228
3
113
20
67
25

220
117
6l
56
103
4
48
17
22
12

84
44
37
7
40
1
12
7
18
2

394
126
46
80
268
11
54
120
17
66

672
263
119
144
409
15
120
179
11
84

523
163
95
68
360
16
105
162
1
76

426
236
146
90
190
20
35
85
6
44

360
185
118
67
175
28
68
21
9
49

96
93
54
32

92 ___ 42_ ___24
92
47
34
l
34
31
3
15

11
4

4
1
1

18

1
1
_

4
7
1
6

3
3
-

71
l6
2
14
55
4
44
7

—

14
14
10
4
-

11
9
3
6
2

-

-

1

4
4
-

4
-

266
55
10
45
211

—

—

56
22
102
31

277
64
23
a
213
_
26
131
23
33

382
128
28
100
254
12
51
102
20
69

579
110
33
77
469
13
66
207
29
154

-

3
-

9
1

22
5

84
11

3

1
8
1
7
_
_

5
17

11
73
1
10
53
9
_

14
3

461
98
36
62
363
16
23
292
32

-

_

-

268
54
25
29
214
6
10
29
167
2

13
89
3
5
4
77
-

_

145
26
20
6
119
1
10
12
94
2

8
32
—
2
30
-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




85
12
12

7
136
32
42
15

61
15
5
10
46
17
21
8

38
38
30
2

-

3

12 ____ a
12
3

70
70
61
3

_

—

-

15
7
5
1

29
29
20
1
1
-

2
2
2
-

„
18
10
8
-

161
28
28
133
43
54
24

57 ___ 34_
10
32
31
4
1
6
25
24
10
4
10
4
1
15
464
177
98
79
287
—
18

a

143
7

1
1

—

*
*

—
3
-

:

-

-

-

37
4
1
3
33
2
31
-

45

22
21
21

25
25
25

1

-

-

-

9
83
13
10
3
70
17
20
25

52
40
31
9
12
5
3

60
5

48
18
5
13
30

35
1
1

15
13
11
2
2

-

- ---- 339
5
8
5
•0

5
55
14
10
29

15
12

68 ___ 7 1 ___ 34
16
34
29
21
13
5
3
13
24
18
39
39
3
23
24
12
2
4
6
11
3

66
30
30
—
36
21
10
3

11 ___ 21
1
4
1
2
2
—
22
7
20
4
2
-

62
12
8
4
50

26
11
7
4
15

12
1
—
1
11

1 ___ 41
3
“
—
3
—
40
1

-

38
11

10
5

11

—

40

—

—

—
—

1

-

-

1

—

—

—

—

203
115
39
76
88
7
32
9

198
27
11
16
171
5
27
134

104
79
9
70
25
19
5

40
18
6
12
22
20
2

5
4

10
3
2
1
7
6
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—
—
—
—

-

■
”

—

-

—
—
—

—
—

*
”
—
—

40

5

1

-

73
26
19
28

l

34
16
10
8

4
1
1
-

1
1

10 : _ 26
_
26
1
25
—
10
10
10
10
“
-

-

45
20
10
6
2
—

31
_

—
1

—

—
—

10
1

—
—

—

—

—

“

-

2
-

-

2
—

—

—
—

—

-

—

—
“

—

“
■
"

•
*

“

—
*

—
"
■

—
—

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

8

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of workers recieivin/y straight-time weekly earnings of Average
£
$
$
$
1
$
1
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
1
1
1
%
•
$
Weekly
Number
$
Weekly Under 30.00 3 2 .50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 $95.00
schedof
100.00
Sex, occupation, and industry division
earn­ $
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
over
32.50 35.00 ?7.?0 40.00 4 2 .50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57t50 60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7 ,5 0 70.00 72,50 75*00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
Women - Continued
Calculating-machine operators (other
than Comptometer type) .............
Manufacturing.....................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Retail trade ................. . •
Finance * * .....................

464
155
309
32
42
206

39.0 $50.50
54.50
39.5
39.0
48.50
/q zn
.
a.5
*+7 •jyJ
53.00
40.0
38.0
47.50

-

-

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

Clerks, accounting ...................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ........ ...... .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing ..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** .....................
Services............. .........

7,637
2,607
1,554
1,053
5,030
4U
1,126
1,023
1,984
486

39.0
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
38.0
39.5

49.50
52.00
51.50
52.50
48.50
56.50
49.50
47.00
46.50
50.00

Clerks, file, class A ................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goo d s .... ..... ........
Nondurable goods ........... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Public utilities « .............
Wholesale t r a d e ............ .
Finance * * ........... .........
Services .......................

1.352
478
323
155
874
52
169
392
128

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
40.0
37.0
39.5

46.50
48.50
50.00
46.00
45.50
52.50
47.00
45.50
43.50

Clerks, file, class B .................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable g oods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail t r a d e .................. .

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
40.5
40.0

Services .......................

4*545
1,361
792
569
3,184
681
575
1,400
211

39.0

40.50
41.50
42.00
41.00
40.00
43.00
38.50
cn
39.50

Clerks, general.................... .
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale t r a d e ............ ••••
Retail trade ...................
Services .......................

2,707
1,061
720
341
1,646
129
213
388
380

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.5
39.5
39.5

53.00
54.00
55.00
52.00
52.50
55.00
67.00
48.50
53.00

13
13
-

39

25

39

_
2

_
2

_
9

4
20

3
31

14
10
10
4
4
-

51
10
10
41
1
9
12
19
-

251
57
57
194
6
18
79
91
-

384
56
34
22
328
4
27
49
235
13

728
179
124
55
549
9
56
104
316
64

916 1,066
256
156
125
194
62
31
760
810
36
31
156
276
147
167
248
339
82
88

_
-

27
20
20
7
7

115
26
2
24
89
2
70
10

68
13
8
5
55
5
20
3
24

267
24
20
4
243
5
47
85
19

117
40
29
11
77
5
9
33
28

179
81
63
18
98
5
22
43
19

142
52
45
7
90
5
24
54
4

91
8
8
83
16
9

467
65
65
402
26
123

3

-

25

3

12
3
9

22

732
175
118
57
557
56
117
320
56

613 1,360
499
113
317
73
182
40
500
861
246
45
108
103
308
292
29
53

458
196
78
118
262
45
59
107
25

458
195
125
70
263
104
38
82
13

184
51
23
28
133
72
8
6
5

192
36
1
35
156
10
61
35

274
66
56
10
208
6
2
86
54

302
102
66
36
200
10
9
65
37

oi'X

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

—

3

41
35
35
6
2
-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
6
6
—

216
12
2
10
204
1
1
68
H

116
31
85
19
5
51

27
4
23

-

12
1

-

-

-

308
140
104
36
168
18
61
33
40
16

183
38
14
24
145
11
50
17
62
5

287
118
52
66
169
129
11
8
15
6

74
44
38
6
30
1
3
23
3

57
24
17
7
33
2
10
13
8

54
41
13
28
13
3
10

37
12
10
2
25
3
4
14
3

19
13
10
3
6
3
1
1
1

18
10
10
8
1
1

11 ____1
2
7
1
7
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
-

2
2
2
-

18
3
3

3
3
3

2
2
2

2
-

-

-

15
9
1

-

-

2

-

-

289
168
100
68
121
13
6
10
38

163
94
81
13
69
11
19
1
25

3
12

1
6

3

611
228
106
122
383
12
63
90
193
25

572
331
238
93
241
56
43
59
64
19

325
147
100
47
178
28
52
32
55
11

174
96
66
30
78
1
19
39
6

77
40
30
10
37
3
10
23
-

87
41
21
20
46
6
9
24
2

113
43
42
1
70
51
4
/
*
+

31
8
8
23
11
5

645 1,064
489
237
134
252
134
377
575
22
41
101
185
93
125
152
117
72
44

j

268

3

343
190
157
33
153
10
26
8
20

-

-

-

-

_
-

10
10
10
-

2
2
2
-

1
1
1
_
-

31 __ 1
_
2
3
2
2
1
29
1
5
1
2
20
-

-

6 ___ 3_
'1
1
6
2
6
1
1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1
—
1
1

—

2

377

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

35
21
14

_
_

-

12
9
3

11
40

'X

1
1

20
13
7

39
24
15

2
17

1
1

68
44
24
10
1
12

64
4
60

144
100
44
233
40
22
29
84

170
123
92
31
47
10
27
2
3

120
36
34
2
84
4
17
37
24

43
26

17
9
17
1
3
2
10

34
8
7
1
26
1
2
1
22

27
6
5
1
21
1
19
1

7
6
2
4
1
1
—

31
5
5
26
6
10
10

11 _ 20 ___30
_
1
3
1
3
8
30
29
4
26
30
4
2
—

_

Table 1,--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

9,

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number of workesrs receivimz stra:Lght-t:Lme weejkly earning.3 of T
E
%
$
1
$
%
$
1
$
$
1
1
1
$
$
T
9
•
f
%
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.5 0 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 4 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 *95.00 $
of
sched­
100.00
earn­ $
and
workers uled
and
ings 30.00 under
hours
32.50 35.0 0 3 7 .5 0 40.00 42.50 45,0 0 47.50 50.00 52t50 55,00 57,50 60.00 62fJ0 65.00 67.50 70.00 72,50 75,0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95,00 100.00 over

Women - Continued
Clerks, order............... .
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goo d s ...... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail t r a d e ............ ......

2,241
985
292
693
1,256
358
804
78

39.5
39.0
40.0
38.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
38.0

$47.00
48.00
51.50
47.00

Clerks, payroll ......................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods •••••••••••.....
Nonmanufacturing..................
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale t r a d e .............. .
Retail trade ........ ..........
Finance ** .....................
Services .......................

2,732
1,685
1,112
573
1,047
161
177
416
116
177

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
40.0

53.50
53.50
53.50
53.00
54.00

Duplicating-machine operators.....
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goo d s ........
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ................
Wholesale trade ....... .
Retail trade ......... ..........
FI r p r r *
vm's
Services................ ......

534
258
146
112
276
73
25
115
48

39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
3g 5
37.5

44.50
44.00
46.00
41.50
45.50
48.50
43.50
43.00
46.00

Kev-punch operators............. .
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Pnhl 1o nt.^1 l . f c ^
+ii
Wholesale trade ................
Finance * * .....................
Services.......... ............

2,197
939
635
304
1,258
1/7
143
576
94

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
40 !5
38.5
40.0

49.00
50.50
50.50
49.50
47.50
52.50
50.50
45.50
52.50

Office girls.................. ..... .
Manufacturing.................... •
Durable g oods ................ .
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing....... ...... .
PiiKI-t* rrM'H+.'fcka *
UVirtloaclA +T
.
Retail trade ...................
Finance * * .................... .
Services............ ..........

1,301
426
172
254
875
104
?, ,
//
150
343
34

40.0
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
41.0
40.0
39.0
41.5

39.00
40.00
42.00
38.50
38.50
41.00
40.00
40.00
36.00
46.00

46.00

50.50
43.00
52.00

58.00

57.50
51.50
54.00
53.00

_
-

7
7
7

-

-

3
3
1
2

-

31
31
31

146

8
8
8

7
1
1
6
1
4
1
-

10
6
6
4
-

65
54
10
U
11
2
g

38
27
19
8
11
1
-

74
74
1

95
33
27
6
62

3

2
2

9
9

_
-

2
-

7
-

7
7

59
10
10
49

162
26
10
16
136
6
18
9
102
1

4

18
1
28
2

49
338
129
37
92
209




335
82
25
57
253
57
195

397
148
36
112
249
24
211
10

340
193
44
149
147
58
69
20

3.75

a

127
75
43
32
52
1
5
33
7
6

117
66
43
23
51
6
7
21
10
7

281
131
80
51
150
8
14
83
8
37

366
273
171
102
93
3
64
n

76
26
19
7
50
10
39
1

121
40
22
18
81
31
1
17
31

50
21
10
11
29
9
5
1/

62
32
22
10
30
3
2

143
45
12
33
98
15
2
65
-

255
70
38
32
185
2
22
107
9

362
163
101
62
199

168
70
25
45
98
18
27
26
22
5

186
73
41
32
113
45
32
28
4
4

26

26
15
1

6
8
-

9

5
35
-

19

240
63
8
55
177
6

£7
HI
r
28
113
2

43
69
3

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

960510 0 - 51 - 2

120
48
48
72
2
69

1

1

-

3

78
78
68
28
40

1

3

28
no
10

189
62
27
35
127
20
97
10

103

no

51

105

32
19
52
21
20
n

16
89
5
4
1

422
303
226
77
119
4
15
54
9
37

334
245
178
67
89
20
22
39
3
5

204
120
107
13
84
25
10
26
5
18

166
82
65
17
84
12
27
21
19
5

23
15
14
1
8
4
-

10
6
6
4
3
1

12
1
1
n

16
3

53
25
19
6
28
13
3
/
H
r
2

278
134
95
39
144
g
24
72
21

332
146
104
42
186
38
10
52
1

223
n9
109
10
104
21
6
31
22

5
1
l

7
3
3
4

1
1
1
-

3

—

80

45
35
95
32
62
_
_

15

64
30
26
4
34
6

56
17
17
39

9

33
1
2

3

1
1
1
-

37
24
21
3
13
10
2
1

49
23
10
13

269
121
72
49
148
65
45
n
15
12

113
72
23
49
41
4
17
15
4
1

37
30
10
20
7
1
2
_
3
1

1
1
1

-

9
4
3
1
5
5
-

131
95
56
39
36
3
2
16
7
8
_
-

7

-

166 ___5S
32
n7
21
63
n
54
26
49
g
23
6
6
1
4
10
15
8
3
3
5

4

26

26
-

10
10
10
-

5
5
5

_

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
_
—
_

3
3
3
_
_
_
_
_

3

_
_

32
31
1
10
3
2
5
-

21
3
3
18
1
3
6
8

1
-

-

-

36
5
3
2
31
2
3
18
8
_
-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

_
-

_
_
-

-

2
1
1
1

_

-

12
4
4
8

-

_

6
1
_

1
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_
_
_

3
l
_
l

_
_
_
_

2
1

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

&

3
_
3

_
_

_
_
_
.
.
*
1
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_

-

_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

-

_
_
_

.
.
—

-

1

_
_

3

I85
74
59
15
m

28
27
a

5

-

_
_
-

_
_

-

-

-

_
.

.
.
.
-

-

_

_
_

_

_
-

_

1

15
4

61
123
25 --- 63
30
3
22
33
36
60
20
41
16
10

3

4

-

..

_
-

««

—

-

5

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 1. — OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

10

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Nujnber of workers receiving straight-time weekly e arningi3 of i
Average
1
1
$
t
$
$
$
$
1
1“
$
5
*
t
*
$
1
$
T
1
$
$
*
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.5 0 40.00 42.50 45.CO 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.0 0 100.00
sched­
of
and
earn­ $
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
over
hours
3 2 .?0 3 ?.co 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00 .(£LSS l 50.00
5 7 ,5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.CO 90.00 J 5 . c o 100.CO
J2*BSL

Women - Continued
Secretaries ............................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ......... .......
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ........ .........
Retail trade ............. ........
Finance * * ..... .................
Services ........................

7,527
3 ,2 2 6
1,848
1,378
A,301
255
811
1,339
1,269
627

39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
38.0
39.0

$61.00
62.50
63.00
62.00
60.50
66.50
61.50
58.50
59.00
62.50

Stenographers, general ................
Manufacturing.......... ............
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .............. .
Nonmanufacturing.... ...............
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale t r a d e ...... ...........
Retail t r a d e .... ................
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••....
Services ........................

10,392
4,707
2,918
1,789
5,685
437
1,338
732
2,310
868

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
40.5
40.0
37.0
39.0

843
483
360
80
173

Stenographers, technical ..............
Manufacturing......................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................
Finance * * .................... .
Services ........................
Switchboard operators .................
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable g o o d s ..... ...........
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .............................
Retail t r a d e .............. ...................
Finance ** ......••••••••.........
Services ........................

2,203
--- 485“
199
282
1,722
167
302
254
377
622

Switchboard operator-receptionists ....
Manufacturing .......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing..... ..............
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade ................ .
Retail trade ....................
Finance ** ...........
Services ........................

1,921
1,083
631
452
838
72
294
157
179
136

900 1,099
286
492
171
334
158
115
607
614
30
27
72
114
264
199
140
249
62
64

719
302
185
117
417
19
79
112
140
67

535
175
94
81
360
20
no
89
76
65

915 1,492 1,191 1,539 h S S S . 1 ,1 6 4
650
558
522
547
664
331
406
178
252
387
464
341
258
186
206
270
171
153
497
514
875
669
945
584
81
48
26
36
51
34
202
122
83
179
193
135
86
132
142
109
59
53
170
432
361
97
314
273
98
90
166
118
119
75

725
371
227
144
354
57
153
22
59
63

651
402
267
135
249
39
117
9
36
48

293
161
105
56
132
23
70
13
17
9

188
104
71
33
84
13
38
7
6
20

-

9
9
8
1
-

15

3
3
2
1
-

90
32
12
20
58
1
8
49
-

285
42
31
11
243
2
16
17
207
1

598
190
107
83
408
14
18
70
267
39

-

-

-

5
3
2
1
1

16
16
9

10
-

101

-

-

21
-

64
1
1

-

-

-

10
-

101
-

21

-

-

-

63
3

-

2
8

1
3
97

16
5
-

13
1
46

-

-

-

20
20

20
20

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

20
—

20
—

-

-

-

51.50
52.50
53.00
52.00
50.00
54.50
53.50
48.50
47.50
51.50

-

-

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0

57.50
57.00
58.50
55.00
57.00

-

40.5
39.0
39.5
39.0
40.5
39.5
40.5
40.0
37.5
43.5

48.00
50.00
52.00
49.00
47.50
54.50
51.00
46.00
48.00
44.50

39.5
39.5
40.0
38.5
39.5
40.0
40.0
40.0
37.5
39.5

49.50
50.00
51.50
47.50
49.50
49.50
51.00
49.00
46.00
50.00

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
2

13
1
2
10

123
77
36
41
46
18
18
10

216
38
13
25
178
2
63

a
58
14

330
143
60
83
187
1
47
52
63
24

676
294
159
135
382
11
18
127
165
61

494
142
45
97
352
12
79
141
91
29

715
2sr
163
98
454
31
49
196
127
51

A6i
298
204
94
163
17
32
26
40
48

303
202
96
106
101
13
18
25
18
27

233
145
71
74
88
16
13
5
26
28

82 ___ 52
44
U
10
19
25
34
38
8
2
2
10
6
15
n
-

17
15
12
3
2
2
-

62
7
55

50
30
20
5
15

84
45
39
10
28

84
56
28
8
13

173
136
37
6
24

76
36
40
17
8

133
84
49
11
34

68
33
35
4

21
10

2

38
23
15
4
11

22

1

195
41
6
35
154
6
2
32
82
32

278
35
10
25
243
6
22
47
63
105

407
98
50
48
309
37
79
49
42
102

358
73
24
49
285
6
37
29
56
157

225
83
18
65
142

165
37
23

142
36
13
23
106
24
50
6
21
5

70
36
26
10
34
4
4

47
18
14
4
29
10
4

67
15
7
8
52
27

U

-

28
5
4
1
23
12
10

3

-

16
7

13
2

13
3
9

1

156
73
10
63
83
21

304
137
91
46
167

332
221
100
121
111

165
113
81
32
52
9
25
14

70
31
28
3
39
8
28
2
1

23
1
1
22

36
35
33
2
1

-

-

39
20
81
23

217
105
31
74
112
12
1
24
16
59

63
55
55
8

6
44
5

266
194
114
80
72
3
12
7
27
23

21
1

1

7

4

6
63
21
16

5

U
39
24
33
32

U
128
16
49
19
29
15
192
108
79
29
84

4
78
2

2
2

4

2
1
1

n
2

2
5

25
19
6
3

3n
195

n2
83
116
30
32
M
19
21
22
2
1
1
20
6
-

3
-

n

1 ____2j
1
3
1
—
3
1
1

229
101
62
39
128
17
32
24
25
30

101
56
30
26
45
1
23
5
12
4

27
1
20
2
4

10
8
5
3
2
1
1

12
12
5
7

28
28
28
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

_
-

1
1
1

2
1
1
1

-

1
1
1

-

1
1
1

-

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

36
9
6

3

6
3
3
3
-

1
1
1

-

-

-

10
-

3

-

1

-

“

-

-

-

16
4
4
12
1

24
3
3
21
20
1

3
2
1
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

14
4

n

n
1
1
10
10

n

"

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*




communication, and other public utilities.

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Conti&aed

11

(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Ave page
Nuinber of work*3rs receivinge straight-time we<ekly earning!
1
1
1
11
•
*
j
*
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 3 2 .50 35.00 37.50 40.00 4 2 .5 0 4 5.0 0 4 7 .5 0 F50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50
of
sched­
earn­ t
and
workers uled
ings 30.00 under
hours
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

1

1

Sex, occupation, and industry division

1

1

1

of $
$
1*
$
* 1
"$
1
*
70.00 72.50 75 .0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .0 0 $
100.00
and
72,50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 over

Women - Continued

-

26
9
9
17
2
15

26
5
3
2
21
1
15

45
32
27
5
13
1
2

28
7
7
21
2
6

63
37
8
29
26
1
17

64
19
12
7
45
4
26

71
10
10
61
3
23

61
32
5
27
29
4
5

54
13
10
3
41
13
2

12
1
1
11
5

43
39
39
4
1
-

4
3
3
1
-

17
4
4
13
5
2

7
1
1
6
-

_
-

-

32
3
3
29
29
-

96
13
11
2
83
15
20
36
12

227
56
15
41
171
71
12
83
3

260
86
57
29
174
39
22
96
16

192
61
42
19
131
26
12
65
27

162
70
51
19
92
31
23
28
8

67
23
14
9
44
6
2
20
11

83
22
12
10
61
38
4
13
5

46
32
12
20
14
3
8
3

21

3
1
1

12

2

-

1

3

-

14
2
12
-

2
1

12
9
3

2
1

-

1
-

3
3
-

_
-

-

-

3
3

7
7

5
5

9
9

5
5

11 ____4
11
2

6
6

1
-

Tabulating-machine operators..........
Manufacturing......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................
Retail trade ....................
Finance * * .... ..................

717
2l3
136
77
504
41
308

38.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
37.5
39.5
36.0

$49.50
55.50
56.00
54.50
47.50
55.50
41*00

-

30
30
30

62
62
2
60

102
102
2
100

Transcribing-machine operators,
general .............................
Manufacturing............... .......
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............... .
Wholesale t r a d e ......... ........
Retail trade ....................
Finance * * ......................
Services................... .

1,222
381
220
161
841
244
101
396
85

39.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
38.0
39.5

48.00
49.50
49.00
49.50
47.50
49.00
47.00
46.00
49.00

-

-

1
1
1
-

U

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical 2 / .... ....................
Nonmanufacturing....... .......

54
48

38.5
38.0

51.50
50.50

-

-

-

-

_
-

Typists, class A .....................
Manufacturing.......... ............
Durable g o o d s ................. .
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing....... ............
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade .................
Finance ** ......................
Services ........................
Typists, class B ......................
Manufacturing......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods ................
Nonmanufacturing...................
Public utilities * ..............
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade ...................
Finance ** ......................
Services ........................

l/

7j
*
**

3.939
1,653
1,108
545
2,286
121
296
603
754
512
9.967
3,719
2,524
1,195
6,248
300
1,382
1,061
2,439
1,066

39.0
39.0
39.5
38.5
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
38.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
39.5
40.0
40.0
38.0
40.0

50.00
51.00
52.50
48.00
49.50
55.50
54.00
45.50
49.50
49.00
44.00
45.50
46.50
44.00
43.00
46.00
45.00
42.00
41.50
42.50

2
2
-

2

120
120
50
12
16
42

124
7
7
117
10
56
49
2

21
12
12
9
2
1
6
500
79
21
58
421
1
12
108
280
20

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




116
58
10
48
58
29
9
20

321
52
7
45
269
1
13
195
45
15

265
76
31
45
189
15
26
40
57
51

655
257
151
106
398
7
36
82
167
106

784 2,548 2,217 1,539
967
637
699
174
461
320
99
725
242
238
317
75
610 1,911 1,250
840
36
2
97
29
181
211
356
104
187
129
311
134
558
327
747
299
288
48
400
167

601
253
174
79
348
25
91
154
78
735
396
296
100
339
80
125
48
62
24

696
312
225
87
384
9
23
118
135
99
712
393
295
98
319
23
135
43
56
62

413
204
161
43
209
16
32
22
78
61

342
182
134
48
160
19
36
6
54
45

195
107
92
15
88
22
13
13
33
7

u
5
9
7
3
4
-

166
72
62
10
94
9
62
1
22

226
120
95
25
106
12
54
13
22

254
120
92
28
134
10
108
4
9

42
23
19
4
19
4
5
2
8

120
89
88
1
31
6
11
5
6

5

3

—

3

86
31
28
3
55
13
21
1
20
_^2
3
3
29
20
9
-

3

”
40
36
32
4
4
4
1
1
1
-

10
10
6
3
1
11
11
10
1
-

-

-

12
1
1
11
6
4
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

1
1
1
-

-

-

_
-

—
_
-

_
_

-

“

_
-

-

_

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

«
—
-

_
_

-

_
-

_
_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

Table 2. — PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS

12

(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

_
Number <f workers r j e v i g s r l g t t L e weeklv earni o s ai p _
nj
Lverage
o
cc i i 3 t« i h - : m
$
*
$
1
$
$
Weekly
T
i
j
*
*
i
1
1
$
l
$
»
$
*
$
i
%
i
%
sched- Hourly Weekly 32.50 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00
of
and
ie
and
workers t l d earn- earn- under
hours ings ings
aTv 1
Ol
v* T
oo
??t 40.00 45t 50.00 5?t00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
00
110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 IA0.00
O
.
8

Sex, occupation, and
industry division
Men
Draftsmen, chief ...............
Manufacturing...............
Nonmanufacturing........... ..
Draftsmen ....................
Manufacturing...............
Durable goods .............
Nondurable goods ......... . •
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ...........
Wholesale trade ............
Draftsmen, junior......... .....
Manufacturing...... .........
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ...........
Services ........... .....
Tracers 2/ ....................
Manufacturing.............. .
Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ....
Manufacturing.............. .
D i T T f l h l ft

g f)n fl p

, , ,

T , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

,

Nondurable goods ........ .
W»tfrr*f+n*r\& O f ..........................................................
>Tmtnf»t.T^
Retail trade .............
1/
2/

423 40.0
39.5
71
40.5
2,598 41.0
1,932 40.0
1,792 40.0
140 39.5
666 44.5
28 39.5
1,137 40.0
881 40.0
256 40.5
99 44.5
59 39.5
AS
39.5
578
479
391
88

40.0
40.0
40.0
39.5
99 39.0
7 7
42 40.0

&
$
2.74 109.50
2772“ 107750"
2.98 120.50
4.
2.05 8. 00
1.95 78.00
1.95 78.00
2.01 79.50
2.29 102.00
1.78 70.50
1.46 58.50
1.46 58.50
1.43 58.00
1.49 66.50
1.32 52.00
1.32 52.00
1.55
1.55
1.55
1.56
1.59
1.46

62.00
62.00
62.00
61.50
62.00
58.50

3
3
..
-

-

_
-

M
-

-

48
40
8
8
7
7

10
10
10
_
_
-

1
_
_
_
1
1

—

1
1
201
157
44
11
4

2
2
2
265
170
95
16
17
16

8
5

67
58

5

3

174
136
126
10
38
152
118
34
13
10
8

q
y

126
101
85
16
25

4

10

A3

3

•
-

15

_
316
309
302
7
7
4
125
104
21
17
10
10

1
1
200
175
163
12
25
6
166
152
14
14
1
-

10
10
261
228
211
17
33
10
108
97
11
6

166
142
117
25
2A
17

126
101
88
13
25
6

112
101
11
150
129
128
1
21

64
64
311
256
217
39
55
2
8
4
4
4

-

-

-

-

-

41

8
5
3
73
27
23
4
46
1
1
1

-

-

19
17
12
5
2

14
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
60
18
18
42
-

5
5
64
31
31
33
-

33
27
6
30
10
10

27
8
19
18

14
7
7
20
.
.
20
*

61
58
3
58

20
-

—
_
18
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

■
n

-

-

-

_

-

58
-

J

6
*
*
✓

1

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Table 3.— MAINTENANCE AND POWER P U N T OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, H I . , April 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
*# Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics




-

16
3
13
57
6
6
51
.
.
-

_

_

34
31
3
7

-

12
3
9
9

33
25
8
112
77
76
1
35
2
2
2

6
25
"
25 --- 6
142
279
208
92
90
175
2
33
50
71
6
1
6
1
6
1

3
3
270
228
214
14
42
6
42
36
6
2

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

-

-

-

;|

Table 3.— MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued

13,

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Electricians» maintenance ......................
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable goods...................... .
Nondurable goods .........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .........................
Public utilities * ........... ............
Retail trade .............................
Finance * * .............................. .
Services........... .................. .

Number of workers receiving straincht-t:une hourly earruLngs of $
$
$
&
¥
$
*
$
*
4
$
$
1
1
5
*
p
*
*
$
1
Under 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1.65 1 .7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2 .1 5 2.20 2.25 2.30 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2.60 $
2.70
and
$
and
1.30 under
over
J
j0
it?? M ° 1,4? lt?0 1,5? 1 ,6 0 1 ,6 5 if 7° 1.7? 1,80 1,85 1 ,9 0 1,95 2 t00 2 t0 > 2.10 2 fl? 2 f20 2 t2? 2t?° 2f3? 2 t/ 2f?0 2,60 2.70
9

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

■ jQ P
3 5-

-&lj 3 8
t?

_

1.94
1.91
2.05
2.07

-

2,079

1,601
478
971
333
81
263
265

1 .9 8
2.24
2.26
1.95

-

*
*

3
3

40
25
25
15
15

5

"

Engineers, stationary...... ....................
Manufacturing.......................... .
Durable goo d s ................... ...... .
Nondurable goods .......................
Nonmanufacturing 2/
................. ,
Wholesale trade ........................ .
Retail trade ............... .
Finance * * ...................... .........
Services ............... .................

Jt Q
L-4

2.650
1,363
390
973
1,287
105
237
430

2.04
1.95
2.07
2.05

2 .1 0
2.17
1.95
2.08

466

-

*
*
—
"

Firemen, stationary boiler .....................
Manufacturing.................... ........ .
Durable goods.............. ........... .
Nondurable goods..... ....................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............. ............
Wholesale trade............... ...........
Retail trade ......................... .
Finance * * ...............................
Services ............................. .. .4

Helpers, trades, maintenance ................. .
Manufacturing ...... ................
Durable goods.........................
Nondurable g o o d s .......... ........... .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................. ........
Public utilities * ..................... .
Wholesale tra d e ............... ...........
Retail trade .............................
Services................... ........ .....

Machinists, maintenance........................
Manufacturing...............................
Durable g o o d s ............................
Nondurable goods ............ .............
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..........................
Wholesale trade ............. ..... .
Services .................................

JUm

.

847
519
328
476
33
87
171
119

1.55
1.52
1.59
1.73
1.85
1.80
1.64
1.77

2,762

1.53
1.52
1.51
1.55
1.59
1.58
1.63
1.58

2,475
1,848

627

289
81
29
71
58

2,676
2,460
1,598

1.61
1.98
1.97
1.97
1.96
2.09
1.82
1.95

5
5
•
*
.

-

216
43

11




256
170
99
71
86
86
-

7
7
-

22
20
20
2
2

23
2
1
1
19
3
-

2?
23
11
12
2
2

32
13
12
1
19
1

9

—

2
3

ISO
146
58
88
4
4

229
63
37
26
166
1
151
3

134
126
103
23
8
8

451
427
316
111
24
14
6

334
326
291
35
8
2
-

340
316
210
106
24
13
-

239
223
188
35
16
-

171
148
111
37
23
11
12

69
66
62
4
3
-

273
263
187
76
10
5
-

3

3
2

-

—
-

46
34
12
12
3
—

187 404
169 335
119 298
50
37
18
69
14
13
3
8
4
”
■
■
*

2
2

2

3

4

8

_

-

—

-

-

-

1
1
1
-

30
30
30
-

70
70
70
-

80
77
25
52
3

"

"

—

-

*
*

1

216
191
140
51
25
1
5
19

264
248
208
40
16
6
10

74
51
10
41
23
1
13

61
22
12
10
39
1
1
5
32

221

■
*

103 __42
103
39
40
36
63
3
3
3
—

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
**
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

97
76
66
10
21
17
1
3

16

"

862

84
54
30
24
30
18
1
11

"

125 — 3Z21
108
11
85
10
23
16
17
2
1
1
10
5
1
9

*
*

40
21
21
19
4
15

— 2£ __26.
26
26
10
29
1
5
10
23

— 38
36
18
18
2
2
“

-M

.

37
29
8

5

34
2
3

9

84
76
51
25
8
—

71
118
53
43 ' 17
36
75
18
3
6

138
8

5

305
188
177
11
117
9
11
97

120
101
87
14
19
11
1
1

308
267
254
13
41
20
1

269
105
86
19
164
25
-

119
87
30
2
1
—

181
156
68
88
25
2
4
19

616
166
69
97
450
20

73
12

22
5

217

2
2

3
130
50
80

_
61
12
14

27

74

22
3
19
5
-

7

3
4
67
20

422
388
233
155
34
20
1

22

1

—

3
2

65 173
61 1 6 2
46
5
56 116
21
4
10
1
4

125
124
99
25
1
-

137
126
118
8
11
10

133
117
115
2
16
12
-

44
35
12
23
9
7
-

31
11
11
n
20
19
-

117
25
20
5
92
92
-

2

8

1

2

1

96
24
23
1
72
12
4
20

353
315
12
303
38
2
12
12
10

304
30
9
21
274
40
64
164

38
17

358
63

190
100
56
44
90
17
71

23
1

4

p.

20
20

9

3
2
2

3

11
10
8
2
1
—
—

-

3

1

-

41
5

17
21
_
2
-

174
131
16
115
43
22
2
-

-

19

9
3
3
6
_

5
17
12
5

1
1
«
.
1

1
22
16

1

18
17

270
74

17
1
_

74
196

33

1

5
36
_
30
5
1

174 ___ ±
44_
n
105
31
4
101
31
69
13

9

10
4

17
5

6
1

4
6

5
12

1
5
1

—

_

9

3

6

-

-

-

»

7

4

m
m

...

m
m

4

—

5

4

1

_
10

20
-

4

1

60
_

m
m

1
1

31
22
6
16
9

32
116
44

1

237

_

15
24

2

1

356
316
230
86
40
8
24

5
-

1
_
..

_

1

1
1

m
m

_

1

_
_

91
~ § r

57
29
5
3

184
177
97
80
7

1

163
150
109
41
13

493
493
468
25
-

114
98
88

216
209
187

2D

22

16

7

22
22
21
1
—

62
14
8
6

48

63
11
1
10
52

50
50

a

1
28
1

50

41

1

-

-

7
5
3

37

30

36
2

29

2
2

34
1

2

1

a

Table 3. — MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued

14

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly
---1
F ~ ?—
V
£
F ~ 1
1
$
1—
F ~ T
Ip
i—
1—
Under 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 . 7 5 1.80, 1.85 1.90 1 .9 5 2.0 0 2 .0 5
$
1.30 uicbr
1.35 1.4 0 1.45 it ?o it55 1.60 1,6? lt70 1,75 1,S0 1»8J> 1 ,9 0 1*21 2.00 2*01 2.10

Maintenance men, general u t i l i t y .....
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable g o o d s ..... .......
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ............ ..
Wholesale trade .............. ..
Retail t r a d e .............. •••..
Finance ** .................. .
Services .......................

2.A78
1,853
996
857
625
276
120
13
164

*1.65
1.66
1.67
1.65
1.61
1.65
1.48
1.57
1.60

94
19
19
75
13
25
2
35

53
14
14
39
30
7
-

52
20
20
32
20
10
-

95
77
45
32
18
5
10
2
-

78
60
20
40
18
2
1
n

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ...
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .... ...........
Public utilities * .............
Wholesale trade ................
Retail t r a d e ................. ..
Services .......................

1.885
427
123
304
1,458
930
132
348
48

1.98
1.84
1.85
1.84
2.02
2.04
1.98
1.99
1.81

3

4

25
25
25
-

4

Mechanics, maintenance........... .
Manufacturing .....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Retail trade ...................
Services .......................

2.144
2,049
1,147
902
95
21
36

1.88
1.87
1.84
1.92
1.94
1.77
2.08

_
-

Millwrights 2/ .......................
Manufacturing.....................
Durable goods ..................
Nondurable goods ...............

1.522
1,401
1,018
383

1.90
1.91
1.92
1.87

-

Oilers »♦ m » _ *♦ • • t•
«*
Manufacturing.....................
Durable g o o d s ............. .....
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Retail trade ...................
Services .......................

1.013
863
546
317
150
28
24

1.55
1.53
1.51
1.57
1.68
1.70
1.77

39
34
7
27
5
-

Painters, maintenance ................
Manufacturing .....................
Durable g o o d s ........... .......
Nondurable goods ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...............
Public utilities * .............
Retail trade ...................
Finance
............ .
S e r vices .................. ..

1.256
434
282
152
822
89
80

2.09
1.81
1.81
1.82
2.23
1.99
2.11
2.40
2.03

34
2

4

50

-

-

-

2
32
-

4

50
-

442

210

3
-

4
4

_
-

•3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
_
2
-

1
1
-

48
45
45
3
3

_
_

-

-

32

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads)* communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




449 221
335 190
166 140
50
169
21
114
4
85
20
7
4
6
-

_
-

_
-

28
25
25
3
3

40
38
37
1
2
2

-

-

-

4

-

248 __64-

47
26
21
24
6
-

194
160
34
54
23
2

51
29
22
13
3

8

3

36

18

24

10

71
10
8
2
61
36
3
22
-

344
33
21
12
111
75
32
4

231 __57 _2£7_ 186
2 105
167
4
2
2
67
4
- 103
100
81
53 255
64
12
40
15 140
6
1
7
13
68
1
32
85
10
23

436
418
376
42
18
5
12

125
112
102
10
13
6
5

171
4
167
2
2

180
180
173
7

71
71
55
16

4
4

3
1
1
.2
2

41
16
12
4
25
25

8

1
-

-

-

152
150

71
71
61
10
-

152
152
91
61
-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

62
52
18
34
10
8
1

25 154
25 153
28
25 125
1
-

5
4
3
1

59
59
9
50
131

130
88
42
4
3
1
4
3

-

3
1

-

m

71
40
20
-

-

18
13
13

-

5
4
1

50 237
50 255
31 172
83
19
2
2

42
35
33
2
139.
87
43
44
52
-

-

26

82
62
34
28

42 _-1522
6
12
1
10
5
20
9
4
5

-

10
4
12

107
104
48
56
3

12

3

34
-

-

82
74
62

12

8
3
5

—

1

■
”

—1

173

7

93
70
39
31
23
-

14
13
13
1
-

21 ___1
21
3
19
3
2
-

2^0

2 .p 0

2,60 2.70

—._ L
_
-

-

-

-

_61
43

4
1
3

-

-

-

43
20
20
-

-

6

179 309
174 307
155 121
19 186
2
5
3

196
196
16
63
117

20
18
6
12
2

57 443 __33- _6£.
20
2
18
37 443
35
65
34
34 419
64
6
1
18
1
3

59
57
9
48
2

22
22
10
12
-

133
133
47
86
-

8
8

1
-

-

_
-

_
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_ _ 9
_ _
1
1
8

234
174
61

113

140
140
71
69

9

8

8
1

21

159
153
148
5

104
101
63
38

-

-

59
59
49
10

5
5
5
-

2
2
2
-

_
-

-

1
-

-_ n
13

-

-

-

-

13

2
1

2
1

27

2

_

1
1

181

-

1
1

1
1
1
-

-

27
17

2
2

10

1.
7
16

13
31
16
15

343
322
311

_ __38.
38
1
37
-

8

8

44.
13

16
1

107
37
33
4
70
1
1

50
1

14 __4Q_ __Z3L
30
45
4
20
3
24
1
6
25
28
10
10
23
3

2tl? 2.20 2*2£ 2*20

F

2.60

19
18
3
15
1
-

22
21
1
20

-

198

14
1
1
13
5

1
-

40
2
2

235
160
107
53
75
20
1

71

16$
109
56
33
23
7

29
25
25
4
4

_
-

no

298
362
92
270
36
1
21

earnings of
1—
1--- i
1—
1
w ~ 1—
2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2.35 2.A0 2.50

l—

_2£,
6
1
5
32
5
7
20

68
“

1
66
62
58
4
4
2
2
-

SL

10

7
3
47
39
6
2

1!

_40,_
_
3
31
2
30
1
1
2
2
9
-

9
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

'

~

-

-

181
7
17
57
100

-

-

-

18
18
320

H
305

1

2.70
and
over

Table 3• — MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS - Continued

15,

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Pipe fitters, maintenance ............................
Manufacturing....................................
Durable g o o d s .................................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ................................
UViaIaaal a f
A
41 tf.le ...... ....... . ..............
rli
.

Plumbers, maintenance ...............................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ..............................
m i l e utllitie. * ............................
TM nATIAA ♦♦
..... .. . ....................a.*

Number
of
workers

983
m

5?H
265
12 H

29
31
51
l6S
g85
12
27
77

jj

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance 2/ ......... .........
Manufacturing ....................................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable goods ...................................

359
319
266
53

Average
hourly
earnings

$1 .9 6
1 .8 9

1.87
1.93
2 .U1
2.5*5
2 .U7
2.37
2.17
1755
2 .3 U
1.95
2.28
2.U7
1.95
1.95
1.95
1 .9U

Num ber o f worlleers receiving straight-t:L n hourly
j
ie
$
$
8
4
$
4
$
?
*
$
$ n$
$
*
Under 1 .3 0 1.35 l.Ho 1 .H5 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1 .6 5 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2.00 2.05
and
$
under
1.30
l.Ho 1 .H5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1.70 W 5 1.80 1.85 l.JO 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .10
$

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

k
k

-

-

1

-

1

3

_
_
,

57

3b
9
27

-

-

« i
.

-

-

!

_
_

_

—
,

.

-

-

-

-

-

-!
_l
,

60
1

-|

l
j
:
1

_
_

3
7

1

6

k

3
3
3

-

to
to

k

-

-

-

k

2
2

1
1

-

-

k

2

-

82

106
10 b
103

3

1

•

-

!
l
j

92
*5

_

52
7°
b5 r~52
kl
U5
2k
7
5

k

92
92
91

69
1

6

5
2

1

-

-

-

2

2

3
l

1

-

-

6

-

_
_
_

1

6
c
0

2
2

3
3
-

-

58
10

3°
30

ks
c

10

30

39

-

_

1

l

5
5

12
12
g

k

21
21
12

17
17

9

8

9

16

15
12
3

55
3*
33
5

l

-

-

2

l

-

-

5
3—
2
2

1

_
-

3

r
-

-

k

5

-

5

k

-

L

-

26

22
18

k

82
7b
75
1

58

36

57

5U
3

Table U.— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

See footnotes at end of table.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coranunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Bureau of Labor Statistics

52

1 - ——

_
1

51
17

0

C
SJ

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Pinance, insurance, and real estate.




6
H9
T
U9 --- I
kl
8

_____1

1/
2/
*
**

and
over
2.15 2.20 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .Ho 2 .5 0 2.60 2 .7 0

7
j

l
3
3

ij+7
lUb
77

1 --- $—
4
1—
1— 1 — $
2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2.20 2 .2 5 2.30 2.35 2 .U0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0
2 .7 0

3
3

-

1

-

-

_
_

_

-

2
Us
2 --- k
kk

1
lU
Ol

2
2

—
_

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

31
3

11

1

~

1
l
—

k
k

6
b'
3
3

1
1

2
2

-

1

3
3

-

-

2

—

k

-

32
11
21

3
3

_
e
D
1A

_

2

23

_
-

12P

124
6U

l

1

-

50
50
32
18
-

earn:Lngs of *
4
4

2
2

-

_

2

-

-

1

-

-

2

Table 4.— CUSTODIAL, WAKEHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

16,

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ b y industry division)

Number
of
workers

2,193
1,456
1 'l§3
263
737
21
299
323

Occupation and industry division

Guards ..............................................

Nonmanufacturing jj/ .............. ...............
Be tail t r a d e ..................................
Finance ** ....................................
Services ......................................

Average
hourly
earnings

$1 .1*
1*
--- T t t --1.4i
1.4l
1,50
l.4i
1.50
1 .1*6

12,817
Manufacturing....................................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing.............................. ..
Public utilities * .... .......................
Wholesale trade ..............................
Retail trade ................................. .
Finance ** ....................................
Services ......................................
Janitors, -porters and cleaners (women) .............
M a n iif

n sr

. . . . . . . _______ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Durable goods ................................
a
............ ...
Nonmanufacturing j / ..............................
..........................................

V h n l n f l a l o
T3a t a l l

t. Y» Q ^ A

Finance *
Services

*

. . . .

..

_______ . . . . . . . . . . . ____

........................................................................................................................

. .......................................................................................... ... ..............................

Order fillers ...................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing ............. .............. .......
Durable g o o d s ....... ..........................
Nondurable goods ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................................................................... .
Wholesale trade ........................................................................................................
Retail trade ..................................

—

s tm

4,083
2,777
5.957
H91
17U
1 ,71*8
1 ,8 7 1
1 .6 7 3

1 .2 2
0 5
1 .2 8
1.19
1.20
1.3*
1.28
1.10
1.3*
1 .1 0

6,801
820~
522
298
5,981
4i
273
2,915
2,662

1 .0 1
1 .1 9
1 .2 3
1 .1 3
.99
1 .0 7
.99
1.15
.81

*»375
l,2l*0
8O9
1*31
3.135
2 ,0 3 1
969

1.44
!.37
1.41
!.?2
1.46
1.44
1.51

i*,9Sl*
3.37?
2,**66
912
1,606
1,188
1*13

1.33
1.35
1.33
1.38
1.29
1.29
1.30

Number of workers receiving straight-time Ihouriy
$
$
$
1
1$
$
1
$
1
$
1
$
1
$
1
1
Under 0 .70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0 .9 5 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1*0 1.1*5
$
n 7n under
U. (\J
.80 .85 •90 .95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 . 1 5 1 .2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.5o 1.45 1.50
.75

_
-

•
-

.

_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

12
19

_
_

257
6b
_

521
76
_
76
3*5
18
15
312

318
87
10
77
231
15
l
159
4o
16

802

66
191
l4
177

515
171
60
ill
344
7
13
181
6
137

7?

75

i r

_

86
29

174
57
50
7
117

_
_
_

.
_

-

-

-

-

125
_
125
8
23
94

120

661

l4o6

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

661

l4o6

120
_

«

2
-

120

4
10
65
17

l*l
l0*

48

-

-

_
75
20
4S

29
57
_

3

_
3

«.

3

-

7

11

(48
1

-

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

28
25

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

7

_

_

-

1 ___ 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20

4l
4o
4o

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

*5
40
4

1
1

'

Nondurable goods . . . . . . ................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing % ] ....................................................................................................
Wholesale trade .. ..................................................................................................

-

11
9
2

"

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




3
3

7

4l
21
3
18
20

31

_

4l
4
72

-

661

_
_
_
_
_

126
58
58
68
10
23
3
28

-

63
16
436
375
190
185
61
*3
18

48
6
107

168
145
1*5
23
2
12
9

-

3*
73
853
648
388
260
205
10
174
21

604
538
308
130
166
25
11
1.23
4
3

112 3181
82
58
26
55
32
27
30 3123
_
1
19
27
3 2715
8 307

3?3
16
2
207
4
114

s o

27
10

17H
166
166
8
1
7

I85
91
40
51
94
1
35
J J
58

49
27
21
6
22
_
1
21

121
80
20
60
4l
20
20

87

19
1

164

50
50

l6l

782 1305
55 f 607
178 262
369 355
235 698
23
31
*
25
5
166 390
1 203
20
66

31

_ 1 2 0

37

37
J 1 — w

_

i L

20
20
-

*7
38
9
238
187
187
-

51
38
13

299
i35
115
20
165
i30
3*
*

-

-

244
40
10
3p
204
83
121

earnings of 1
$
$
1
1
$
1—
1—
1—
1.50 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .30
2 .1*0
and
over
1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2.30 2.U0

128
112
109
3
16
3
5
4

133
ll6
7*
I
42
17
2
8
7

238 -131 _3!8
208 118 256
68 1 1 1 256
7
i4o
62
30
19
9
3
12
2
25
8
28
7

951 2494
770 871
451 710
319 l6l
181 1623
12
21
40
13
118
75
10 903
19 593

964
556
452
104
408
85
3°
46
217
30

906
fc73
1*35
38
*33
*9
l4
26
3*1
3

285
165
159
6
120
2
Q

99
10
729
25*
17*
80
*75
*3 1
35

137,
124
58
66
13
3
9
1

4l
4l
38
3
j

_

752
635
589
46
117
48
10
8
48
3

21 _ 5 6
19
55
52
19
3
j
2
l

j

571 — 53223
18b
37
348
53
1
131*
33
160

667 __ 32.
1*39
11*
9
67
372
5
228
18
138
1
7
9
1
77
6
7
______

5

_______ 2

538
^33
2U7
186
105
88
17

1*51* 246
290 234
88
157
133 146
164
12
136
9
28
3

*3

-

843
1 S5
156

671
93
60
33
578
4l2
160

289 _ 3 5 L .319 _2i6 _4i5_ _j46
155 204 12 1 538 296 175
15 5 198
89 513 l6>* l4l
6
25 13 2
32
3*
135 153 198 178 119 171
103 118 l5s 152
62
78
59
26
30
35
57
93

48

89
19
19

_
_

_

-

-

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

12

-

30

10

-

-

-

-

-

_

..

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

,2 9
658
525
35

-

87

333
2*8
151
97
85
35
*9

_

..

-

70
22
39

-

208
84
3?
5*
124
80

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

10
_

-

-

_
-

_

-

_
30

_
_

_
_

_

2
2

2

9
-

_
_

_

_
_

7
1
1

5
5
J

-

_
_
-

,

280
75
72
3
205
175
30

-

3
17
2
3

-

-

_

20 ___ a __ 311 __ m
3

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

4

5
3
3

450 __52
3
k
25
3
20
1*05
49
58
36
5
3^7
51*
27
15
12
27
26
1

33
26
25
1
7
7

-

_

2
2

-

-

-

-

*5
35
35

51
51
51

-

m
m

-

_

_

-

11 ___5
.
11
5
11
5

4
4

_

-

_
-

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

23
23
23

_

15
15
15

-

-

-

_

10
10
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

Table 4 . ~ CUSTODIAL, W A R E H O U S I N G AbTD SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

17

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

l'.17U
593

Truck drivers, light (under 1^ tons) .............
Manufacturing.................................
Nonmanufacturing
...........................
Public utilities * .........................
Truck drivers, medium (ljr to and including 4 tons)
Manufacturing.................................
Durable goods ..............................
Nondurable g o o d s .... ....... ...............

1 .6 6

581
7U0

1.50
1.55

46l

1 .6 6

22k

1.40

I. 5 U9
795
tei

Receiving clerks .................................
Manufacturing................. ...............
Durable goods ........ ......•..............
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing
...........................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................
Services ...................................

Stock handlers and truckers, h a n d ................
Manufacturing................. ................
Durable goods ..............................
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing
........ ..................
Public utilities * .........................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................
Services .......................... .........

$1 .5 6

i.Sih

Shipping clerks ..................................
Manufacturing.................................
Durable goods ...............................
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing
.......... .................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................

Shlpplng-anA-recelving clerks .....................
Manufacturing................. ................
Durable g o o d s ............ ..................
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing %] ...........................
Public utilities * .........................
Wholesale trade .......................... ..
Retail t r a d e ......... ...................
Services ...................................

Average
hourly
earnings

1.4i
i,*5

1 .5 0
l.Uo

37f
7 51
*

1-36

1.& 7
1 .5 3
1 .0 3

311

357
35
1 .9 59

1 .5 1
1 .5 2

” 17*35

910
525
524

1.55
1 .U9
1.48

61

1 .5 8

189
235
39

1.57
1.38
1.51

18,839
9 .87 k

l.Uo
17 *0

7.085
2.789

1 *?9
1.42
l.Uo

8,965

2,26k

!.53
1 .U2
1.28
1.39

3 .6 7 6
2.970
35
i, 9 Uo
—

reft—

—

1.7S
1761---

1 .29 U
1 .0 5 5

1 .6 9
1 .6 9

3.227
1,511
37®
1.033

$

Under 0 .7 0
and
$
0 70 under
.75




-

.80

^

22._*25. 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

12

-

-

_
-

1

12

-

U

-

-

-

U
u
-

-

-

-

2

2U

37

12

-

2U

-

12
u
8

u
-

_
-

Ug
u
u
uu
-

12
U6

22

lU

2
12
11

13
-

1.78

1 .U5

1.50

-

13

?
u

30
3

11

210

183
102
88

91
31

-

-

-

6

6

-

-

U

1

8

1

-

“

8

3
-

19
-

3

19

U
u

-

5

29

6

17

27

l67
114
_
llU

77
Uo

113

53

37

-

-

6

3
-

-

80
80
80
-

31
-

5
213
-

-

-

-

32

239

l
31
-

3
2

27
-

1

-

U2
Uo
29 “ 1 ^
10
19
19
21
13

1

-

-

5

3
l

-

-

282

106

331

160

lU

-

1

2
2

-

21 “I*gr
10

1

21

139

15 b
10 Uo
63 116

218
-

\ 33

33
-

Uo

73

20

8

68

5

25
-

-

-

175

1

-

17 U

92

60
32

68
1
11

5*

13
356
lbO
15U
6

20

-

u

3
27
-

6

173

17
l

22
2U
20

5
-

10

23

29

l
-

75
U6
36

12
6

10
16
9
7
-

10

29
lU
76

-

-

67

223

54

11

32
33

-

3
157

77
-

86
1

-

2

u

10

8

-

1

_

u

10

,7

52

2

11

3
10

-

5

-

2

9

14
81
6l

20

1
30
60
32
26

27
u

59
1
8

4

*7
3

13
-

2 .0 6

•

8

_

-

_

6

-

-

8
8

-

4

6

26
26

28
-

-

25
~

—

—

—

1

169 191

64

83
58
25

*3

101
88

31

84
4

*7
77
37
39

86
73

6

113
31

82
78

65
13

445

U82

155

S 3 T “4 T T “ 1 S T

3»
59

331
80

103

12
21
20
1
35

8

5
3
27

20

7

89

52

2

-

25
5
5

20
20

5
5
5
4
l
_
-

2
1
1

-

5
5

25

1

4
_
_

29
nr

13
3
13

71

3*

37

1

12

2
21
10
1

8

23
5

-

1

1
68
20
20

Uo
4o
Uo

11

1

16 560 715
l4
13 11
2 5 U 5 661
1
5 U 5 U93
123 195
18

12
6

711
4io

12
398

51

20
6

4

1126
32 ?

2Sk
U5

_

48
44
4

1
1

25

27
_

25
_

15
10
10

57
27
27
30
30

-

30

9
8
1
21
20
1

*
_

1

_
_
_

u
_
_

1

3
_
_

_
_

_

3

.
_
_
_

3
3

3

_

_

3

5

5

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_

20

10

10
10

3
3

.
.
_
_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

_

_

30

7^
Uo
4
36

20

_

-

51 U
10

20

_

_

_£fi.
3?
14

28
1

and
over

5

_

_

28

Ti
F

8

45

6

39
36
3
5

50

45
13

33
27

13
13

44

18

2118 j444 l6ll 171 634
518
990 1549" 725 T45'1 *3
968 1560 153 423 42 118
22
1
Uoo
89 572 323
1168 469 2719 865 128 116
22 1 101
199 132 1547
73
395 205 931 535
7
93
8
57* 132 241 24 o
13
17

-

9

285

2158

6

2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 e.4o

208
l 6l

62 167
32 125
17 153

35
35

-

1.80 l.JO

90 111

?

5

-

1 .6 0 1 .7 0

*7 250 188 163 137
60 112 76 32 106
59
63 69 26 73
1
49 7
6 33
27 13 ? 112 131
31
2 44 19 71 25
25
5
53 92 55
1
-

31" — g r

787 2440 lU58 1603
529 [559 " L O S T 982
320 1265 677 92 U
209 20 U 36 U 58
258 971 Ul7 621
1
12
9U
9
165 U 52 280 29U
81 518 118 233
10
-

5

-

27
57

93
§
26 117
16 13

20

5
llU

86

~ w \ ~5TT s r r

-

196 2kl

170

40
17

-

53 7
268
169

20

21
16

20
20

13

6 gU

153
37

227
1*3
U5
98
84
52
31
9?
5*
14
Uo
44
30
14
-

10
11

1 .8 8

3798

l.JO 1.35 l.Uo

-

-

1 — $---- i
$---- $
2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.40

“

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

960510 0 - 51 -3

Number of workers ]
receiving straight-time hourly earning 8 of $
s
*
1
5
$
$
$
1
$
%
$
*
1
$
1
1
1
*
$
0.75 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.95 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 l.Uo 1.45 1 . 5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1 .9 0

_

516
516

_ 5_
_

-

-

516

-

Thble 4.— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

18,

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

Occupation and industry division

Truck drivers, medium (1^ to and including
4 tons) - Continued
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................ .
Public utilities * ................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
S e r v i c e s ................... .......

Truck drivers . heavy (over 4 tons,, trailer type)
Manufacturing •............ •••,•••••......
Durable g o o d s ................... ........
Nondurable goods .................... ..
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ........... .............
Public utilities * ......................
Wholesale trade ........... ..............
Retail trade .............................

Number
of
workers

1,816
677
662
370
107

4,617
215
77
139
4,401
3,630
210

Average
hourly
earnings

$1.80
1.80
1.87
1.73

1.62

¥

0.70

Under
0.75 0.80 0.85
&
ana
under
,80
•7?

0.70

,8? ,?o

0.90

Number of workers receiving strai ?ht-t: me hourly earn;Lngs of $
§
$
$
$
$
0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1.50 1 .6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2 .0 0 2.10

1

If

1

?95 1.00 1 ,0 5 l t10 1 , 1 5 1,20 1,25 it30 1.35 1,4° i,45 i,5o

3
3

—

1

1

1

6
6

28
-

—

1

27

-

l f60
90
80
10

1.88

561

1.91
1.92
1.94
1.89
1.84

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) .................. ............
Manufacturing.............................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / .......... ............
Public utilities * ................ ...,

1,156
85
1,071
557

1.81
1.96
1.80
1.82

-

Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Manufacturing .........
Durable goods .......
Nondurable goods ....
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ••••
Wholesale trade ....
Retail trade .......

1,853
1,706
1,401
305
147
45
59

1.53
1.52
1.52
1.52
1.61
1.64
1.57

—

—

792
759

1.55
1.55

-

-

6,494
1,910
1,119
791
4,584
91
378
357
152
3,606

.98
1.21
1.21
1.24
.92
1.31
1.19
1*13
1.13
.87

8
-

8

2
-

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) g/
Manufacturing ....................... .

Watchmen ............... .
Manufacturing ........
Durable goods • •••
Nondurable goods •
,
Nonmanufacturing ••••
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade
Retail t r a d e .... .
Finance * * ...... .
Services ........

1/
2/

F

-

2
147
26

104

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

6

97

91

-

8

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night vork.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Includes data for industry divisions not s h o w separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), conmunication, and other public utilities.
Finanee, insurance, and real estate.




175

104

-

2

-

2

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_
,

-

-

- - - — — — —

2

-

27
20
20

6

-

2

7

6

2

7

6

6
23
23 ---6
23

F

- — —

68
63
56
7
5

1

81
75
42
33
6
5
1

294
292
199
93
2

227
226
226

2

_
1

-

5

502
477
426
51
25
25

—
430

388
329
59
42

— -

363
183

n6

21
43

57
17
14
3
40
15
25

132
2
130

62 3502
10
14
10
14

-

48 3492
16
- 21
10
17
- 21
15 3440

92
80
10

-

2

-

-

128
91
60
31
37

-

14

12

11

58

hlo

36
15
21
22

288
181
107
122

-

5

-

-

19

44

~
3

-

73

200
130
85
45
70

247
196
85
111
51

1
26
20
23

3
32
10
6

-

-

383
264
170
94
119
16
52
27
24

—

23
21

184
182

135
133

89
89

261
235

7
6

266
141

164
117
26
91
47

248
126
126

143
89
27
62
54

185
122
43
79
63
1

126
100

156
122
94
28
34
30

53
3

43
43

3
50
8

43

24
23

109
13

31
125

-

1
59
45
20

-

-

—

-

122

-

-

—

-

38
16

44
12

26
15
3
8

4
2

—

-

-

40

1

310
113
197

-

39
10
29

-

2316

n

168

822

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

32

—
32

*

—
_

-

-

-

-

-

•
*

32

—
—

_

_

52
27
25

30
30

21
21
21

2
2

46
43
37
6
3
3

—
— _
—
- -

_
_
-

-

-

60
60

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_

16

1

806
538

19
19

48
14

--

-

-

and
over

j

680
1420
70
57
7
34
14
50
36
50
623 2246 1356
164 2140 13
M
42
291
64
45

-

6
6

55
45

88

14
34
5
29

18
18

no

797
371
337

70
58
16
42
12
5
6

9
9

110
18
18

$

2.30 2.40

1,70 1.80 1 ,9 0 2.00 2 ,10 2 t20 2,30 2.40

112
8
8

1.92
1,90

1

¥

2. 20

2

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

3

-

—

M

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

1

_
—

—
- -

-

_
_
_

-

-

—

—

—
-

-

CHARACTERISTIC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS

19

(Average earnings in selected occupations in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries)
Table 5 .— MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourlyearnings
s/

Number of workers receiving straight-t:une hourly earn:mgs of $
1$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
?
$
1
*
*
$
$
1
*
u
»
?
$
Under 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 . 1 0 1 . 1 5 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1.45 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1.85 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2 .4 0
2.50
and
$
and
1 .0 0 under
over
1 ,0 5 1 , 1 0 1 . 1 5 lt20 It2? 1 .5 0 1 .?? i,¥> 1 ,4 ? 1 ,5 0 1 .5 5 1,6 0 1.65_ 1,70 1,7? lf80 1,8? i»90 it?? 2 f00 2 f10 2 f20 2,?0 2 t 40 2 .5 0

Machinery Industries 3/

Assemblers, class A ......................... .
Assemblers, class B: Tbtal .........................
Time tTTrrtrt..-r^t.f.rtt1. t t .r0
T1r t
Incentive .....................
Assemblers, class C: Total ..................
T i m e .......... ................
Incentive.... ...........
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class A : T o t a l .................... ..............
Incentive ...............................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class B : Total ................ ................. ..
Time ............................ .
Incentive ...............................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class C: T o t a l ................ ..................
Time ...................... ..............
Incentive ........................... ...
T .1 pp+.ri n i a n s *
T
.
................................. ..
nft- 1 a+.hff
F.ngi n«.-1 fl'hhfi

n la s s

npAT»fl

A iIit, , IiliiTt,
R;

7Vvhfl_l

lt

Tr i i » » * * i » *

Tnpfinf.iirp

P ncnr»«»—1 a +.Vif»
. r

n n p rflt.n ra -

C;
l

*
___
Time 7..t..1T.-TT.TT

IVvhA.1

Tnpfln+.ivp

Grinding-machine operators, class A:

Grinding-machine operators, class B:

Grinding-machine operators, class C:

T o t a l ..... «...
THmp
t
Incentive ••••••
T o t a l ...... .
T i m e ..........
Incentive .... .
T o t a l ...... .
Time ...........
Incentive ......

Inspectors, class A .................................................................... ........
Inspectors, class B ............................. ......................................... ..
Inspectors, class C ............................................. ..
0. . . . . .
Janitors .......................... .............................................. ..............................
Machinists, production ......................................................... ..
Milling-machine operators, class A: Total ........................

1,828
2,749
1.330
1,419
2,959
1,940
1,019

$1.85
1.71
1 #59
1.82
1.41
1.31
1.59

532
131
401
528
261
267
1,165
514
651
410
1,011
368
260
108
208
120
88
887
AA7
420
765
272
493
366
69
297
525
1,288
496
1,005
417
659

T rrvs
M

Incentive .......
See footnotes at end of table




aaa

211

_

_
-

-

-

-

25
25
-

238
233
5

1 .8 6
1.80
1.S7

-

-

-

-

1.67
1.57
1.77

-

-

-

1.47
1.3d
1.55

-

-

~
-

t o

_
.
_
_
160 247
337 229
18
23

-

-

-

-

45
45

80
80

126
91
35
-

424
309
115

52
40
12
301
225
76

-

-

10
130

18
152
139
13
122
70
52

106
34
72

-

26

1

-

68

26
7
7
-

38
13
25

40
32
8

-

140
58
82

10
10
152
89
63

6
6
337
85
52

8

4

4
4

51
47
4

6

1

4

55
107
101

120
96
24

80
26
54

77
60
17

129
120
9
51
17
34

/.

1.88
1.72
1.66
x.o^>
1*A3
J-0Hy
1 9 +-- **
*.AP
1 A5
.
1.97
1-•77
- 99
‘
1.95
1.78
1.66
1.85
1.62
1.42
1.66
1.89
1.62
1.45
1.27
1.89
1.95
1 92
x* 7—
2.00

6
5
y

5

y
n

y

263
542
58
489
74
74

45
229
65
164
17
17

97
249

55
63

215
77

244
13

20
9

13
4

3
1

2
2

3
65

291
236
146
90
83
83

249
21
21

63
23
23

77
37
37

13
9
9

9
5
5

4
-

1
5
~
5

2
6
—
6

7

53

80

25

30

118

22

0

_

n
l

46

79

136
U3
~18

25

1

6

62
487
390
97

15
96
78
18
232
188
44

222
217
162
55
77
77

7

-

25

21

30

118

22

2

76
62
14

54
28
26

38
38

55
-

27
_

6
_
6

16

23
_

18
—
18

1
—
1

1
_

1
_

0

1

17
42

1
AP
o*c

1
A
O

73
279
256
23
66

187
166
97
7l
69

6

60
7

63
20
43

10
0
7

23
y

A
H
r
4
fO
63
yy

6

20

C2

Q
y
17
13
-*p
A
H
r

2

3
y

68

54
-

79

54

69
35

2.

0

58
y

A5
Hy
1-3
*P

Q
21

26
15
• -y
*
11

i a
8
8

A.O

L9
Hr7

32
y*~

35
yy

8

34

g
1

A
*
+

3

7

5

30
yy

11

A
H
10

10
7
i

2

-

-

-

15
5
10

1
1
-

11
11

11
1
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
28

3
4

-

15
39

2

38
203

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

112

136

2

-

2

1
1
7
5

-

-

2
-

61
263

11
5
6

41
18
23

29
20
9
27
15
12

-

-

-

11
30
89

67
72
60

2

16
9

-

7i

28
7
21

5
13
8
5
27
11
16
10
88
29
19

-

-

-

-

1

-

10
87
23
64
13
1
32
43
107

y

378
39
1

12
5

43
107
35

19
20
197
42
2
2
16
in
X\J

30
yy

7

6

2

-

9
61
47
14
19

1
1

-

-

55

IS

2
25
32

25

27
37

10

25
39
P7
L9
216
Hr7
Art
83
*40
oy
76
fv
, 2A

37
50
yy

106

7

PA
* r
-H

0
0
3
y
K
y

2

A
.

A
*
+
147

18
181
155
26
15

A
H
r
82
1P
J5
67
77
1
76
40

15
73
248
4

40
56
56
9

38
68
9
8

16

23

11
—

17
-

11
07
r

17

16
16

pp

91
/■L

17

1

_

1
1

—

4

-

4

_
-

-

1
_
1

L
O
0

X

A
H
r

17

14

AO
H-y

70
(y

PA
^Hr

16

l UU
2

7

18

16

0

X

X

98
AO
ou
18
41
7
34
20

120
A5
op

32

132

47

53

35
31
-

31
67
1
66
5

95
AQ
07
6
7
_

20
73
70

10
43

167
i-a
J4
A
O
£
O

1 AP
XOfa
7

y

H
r

2

-

A
H
r

24
g

6

A

AO

87
65
65
38

31
10

7P

60
80
80
27

»

21
17
8
9

60
62
3P
y<-

30

130
38
26
12

2

5
5
7

-

1

_

27
50
5
1

-

-

i
X

_

—

52
102

10
32

70
(y

AO
oU

17

16

22

15

7
111
93
18

30
-

0

21
1
1

9
2
2

34
3
3

-

_

_

_

19

36

14

4

-

-

_

6
86

7

17
J-r

-

_

11

27
36
16
20

1

4

>
.

71
83
61
22

2

-

-

3
13

-

3

3
34

13

3

14

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Thble 5*— MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/ - Continued

20,

Occupation and sex

of
workers

3
Number of wor]*ers receiving straight-t:Lme hourly earn:Lngs < T = “
T --g
if
if
5
1
1
$
$
t
♦
15
$
$
3
3
1
$
Under 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1.10 1.15 1.2 0 1.25 1.30 1 .3 5 1.40 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2.40
2.50
and
$
and
1.00 under
over
1,0? 1,10 1 , 1 5 1,20 1 ,2 5 1,3 0 1 ,3 ? 1 ,4 0 1 .4 ? 1 ,5 0 1,55 lf60 1 ,6 5 1 ,7 0 1,7? 1,80 1 ,8 5 1,9 0 1,95 2,00 2,10 2,20 2,30 2,4 0 2 ,5 0

Average
hourly
earnings
s/

Machinery Industries 3/ - Continued
Men - Continued

618
465
153

2,052
1,242
810

1.29
1.16
1.48

335
95
240
34
320
173
147
51
67

1.27
1.12
1.33
1.43
1.35
1.26
1.45
1.37
1.56

46
81
26
39
14
25
56

yyo

Milling-machine operators, class C :

Total *.........

Incentive ......
Tool-and-die makers (jobbing shops) .......... .......
Tool—and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) ..... .
Truckers, hand ............. .......... ...............
Welders, hand, class A: Total •••••••••••••....... ..

635
215
420
1,015
1,003
1,354
859
506
yyy

Welders, hand, class B:

Total .......... ...........
Time ..................... .
Incentive ......... .

1

At an
1 65
1 AQ
X«07
1.62
1 LL
1*71
2 .2 7
2.11
1.35
1.87
1 7A
2*00
1.73
1.66
1.96

yo<-

226

1
_

_
_

20
-

10

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

213
208
5

31
25
6

22
15
7

12
5

111

12
2
10

56

10
g
2

50

14
10
4

84

-

-

-

10
10
-

120
112
8

179
151
28

154
118
36

253
222
31

152
110
42

26
10
16

33
27
6

26
ID
16

40
15
25

69
57
71
12

69

37
14
23

335

50
40
h^
>
10

97

2

3A
yHr

2
12
5
y

16
18
29
g
21

7

485

21

31
23
g
40
Q
31

29
18
n
41
32
y*"
9

85
67
18
64
26
38

96
70
72
24
41
a

4
10
10
10

6
4
64
62
2

1
64
62
2

1
43
39
J7
A
H
r

H

39

28

97
J1

15

g
31
28

14
-*4
18

39
y/
13

28
30

97
29

15
1

1

7
1
63
47
Hr(
16
18
5
13

28
2
34
298
211
87
87
51
36

18
2
12
50
10
An
106
100
6

13
20
94
48
14
3A

30
4
91
9
3
y
g

29
141
179
88
47
Hrl
AT
4-L

14
14

34
25
9

29
29

18
18

-

3
-

4
_

14

3

24
21
94
4
90

37
y(

-

34
32
2

10
10
-

117
116
1

35
35
-

14
12
0

34
30
4

47
39
g

277
226
51

71
4
67

101
29
72

80
36
44

108
1
107

106
106

68
68

58
58

13
13

29
A
29

16
4
*
T

66
3

10

3

-

-

0

3

6

3

63

14
4
*
T
10
7

4
1

22

43
1
42
10
6
1
5
5
5

3
4
*
t
23
23

3
5
10

-

2

3

6

3

5

1

5

11

26
1

10
7
1
7
2
5
26

5
2

1
-

5
5

11
-

2

7

2

1

26

5

4

2

-

0

K
y

45
H-y

y

0

c

y

1
1
97 237
160 308
16
91
]
_
on
16
IO
yu
2
16
2
16

y

_

2

241
61
-

128
19
-

3

2
143
27
1

y

0

X

1

n
JLL

3

1

7

3

_
1

7

-

_
-

-

21

Women
Assemblers, class C:

Total ............... ..........
Time ........ 0...........
Incentive •••••••••....... . • •••
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class C : Total ............... ....................
Tlmfl ,rliTflfftttittt .(tatti
Incentive ............. ......•••••......
r 1ass R
»
..,,,
Inspectors, class C: T o t a l ...... ...................
T i m e .... ......................
Incentive ......... ............
J a n i t o r s ...... .......................... .........
Milling-machine operators, class C ..........

y

7

1
-

-

-

-

-

1

9
9

6
6

2

7
6
1
5
2

85
74
11
3
1

1.27

6

6

H

1.39
1.96
1.95
1 .90
J 7v
1 70
x . 98
1 .7 1

5

-

33
14
19

33
33

4

12
1

5

2

10

10

77
5
72
1

10

5

4

-

-

_
_
-

6

-

-

-

-

6

_

_

_

«
.

2

_

1

1

1

1

1
1

_

2

2

-

5

3
5

6
4

A
Hr

9
9
2
7
1

0

1

2

2

-

1

-

-

1
-

-

2

-

1

-

Machine-tool Accessories - Production Shops
Men
AflRAmhl
f!ase f
t
l
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
r 1AAR n tIt
»
t 1 r T t T t T T T t T t t tttT.Tt.ITTtT.T.Trttr
Electricians, maintenance ......... ................. .
Engine-lathe operators, class A: T o t a l .... .
,T t,
,t ,
Tn r f n . w p
*l+i
Engine-lathe operators, class B ............ ..........
See footnotes at end of table




m
m

14

1
4

1
1

1

-

2

3

4

22

1

2
6
3
y
3
y

4
5

14

3

a
y

2

5
y
2

1
2
T
J
m
1
1

2

Table

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

5 .—

MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/ - Continued

21,

Number of workers
straight-time hourly earnings of T " '
n — 1
i
1 r^ 1
i
1
$
T -1 1 —
j —
1
1$
1 —
T ~
1
1
I
j —
m * 1
1 “ 1$
$
J
Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.2 0 1 .2 5 1.3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1.65 1.70 1 .7 5 1.80 1 .3 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2.30 2.40
2.50
and
$
and
1.0 0 under
over
1.0? 1.10 1 .1 ? if20 l t2? l f?0 it?? 1
1.4? lt?0 1,55 1,60 1 , 6 ? If 70 1.7? 1,80 1,8? 1 ,9 0 1.9? 2,00 2,10 2,20 2,^0 2 ,4 0 2 ,5 0

1

Machine-tool Accessories - Production Shops
Continued
Men - Continued
Engine-lathe operators, class C:

Total ..............
Incentive .................................

Grinding-machine operators, class B:

Time
Incentive . . . . . .
Total .................................
Time . . . . . T - T t r ,
Incentive .....

Grinding—machine operators, class C
Inspectors, class B ..................................
Inspectors, class C
.
Janitors ..................................................... ... ........................ ... ...................................... ..............................
Machinists, production ......................................................................................... • • • • •
Milling-machine operators, class A .................................................................
1 T

n rr

s

^nf t

cj _ n 1 ^

"R

Milling—machine operators, class C
Truckers, hand ................................ , ........................
Machine-tool Accessories

-

.............................................. ...

57
34
23
180
57
123
1X30
57
43
40
39
48
109
20
70
66
67
34

$1 .4 7
1.46
1.4S

14

1.33
2.10
2.07
1.77
2.11
1.71
2.23
1.21
2*02
2*12
1.66
1.41
2.27

—

—

1.35

47
13
105
13
169
18
17
59
41
37
49
39
1.015
a ., u a ;

-

-

_

—

mm

-

-

-

1
mm

-

-

-

1

5
4
1

6
3
J

7
3

3

4

14
10
4

10
7
3

1.99

1.90
2.03
1.72
1 .6 8
1 .7 7
1*46
1.64
1.64
1.31
1.93
2*09
1.84
1.52
1.42

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1
2

-

.

1

4
3
j
1
8
2
5

3
X

-

-

10
7
1

M
l

mm

-

-

3

mm

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

—

—

1

—

—

-

-

-

1
2
2
8

8
1
6
10

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

9
7

3
7

1

1

1
2

1
59

1
12

1
10
21
-

-

1
3
mm

3
1
7
2
8

1

2
k
2
2
3
6
A
*
r
2
2
9
1

1

-

1

-

13
12

3
1

2

1

4

1
6
9
6

1
J

-

9
A
*
r
5
1

1
4
57
44
13
2
6

1
13

Q
7

pp

in
J\
LJ

7
13
3
1
2

1A

3
6
6

31
22
1

10

6
1

1

7

3
3

Q

4
3

1

-

35
13
22
1

3

-

1

-

-

2
1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
5
5
1

5
7
0
x

2
4

2

-

2
9
q
P

-

-

-

5
7
O
C

9

8

2

Ip
0

7

—

-

7

-

-

3

26

-

-

1

4

-

3

-

-

2

6
2

5
U

J

3

3
7
1
1

1 T

XX

5

Q
7

8
8
1

9

5

9

-

-

-

«»

—
—

5

1

_

-

2

1

-

..

—

2
5
6

1
11
n
X

-

—

—

4

__

12
3

4

Jobbing Shops

Men
Assemblers, class C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,

.

F 1eet.ri ci arm, ma intftnanufi ......tTITti , ,
.
F.ngi ne—1atl m operators, clans A ltl
1(r
,,
t ( t»
Engine-lathe operators, class B ...... ...............
Grinding—machine operators, class A
Grinding—machine operators, class B ..................
Inspectors, class A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Janitors.... .................... ..................*
Machinists, production .............................. . . . . . . ...................................
Mi 11i ng—machine operators, cl ass A .
(
11111
Mi 11ing—machine operators, cl ass R » t i t » i t r i » » T r i t t » i i
Milling-machine operators, class C . . , . . ............... ...
T o o l —and—di « makers * ___________________________ ____

2

1

2

A
*
+

j

13

0

2

1
2

7

—

7

-

-

-

-

16

1

8

10

-

2

7

1

2

2
2
2

2

T

1

—

-

-

2

2

9

2

5

3

1

2
6

3
p

2

7
f
2

-

23
1

0
17

5
40

22

JP
-

rq
PP

1A
JLO

O

3

2

j.

5

0

qn
P-L

r
t
O

T

7

L

O

X

4
c
2

-

6

1

—
0

2

on

q

7

4

_

2

..
A

if

Q

1
16

Q7
7 /

*P /

19
7

_
1 A1
-U fi

«.

3
_
PA
x < +1x

l A?
X*+P

1/
Ihe study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the StandardIndustrial ClassificationManual
(1945 edition)prepared
by theBureau of
the Budget; machine-tool-accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were scheduled. Data in the table relate to March 1951# Of theestimated5X3 establishments
and99,560workers
in theseindustries,
81
establishments with 43>528 workers were actually studied*
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Includes machine-tool-accessory establishments for which separate data are also presented*
y
Workers were distributed as follows: 85 to 90 cents, 40 workers; 90 to 95 cents, 78 workers; 95 cents
to 1dollar, 95
workers.
960510 0 - 5 -4
1




-

_,
A

-

-

2

0

5
5
T
L
n
-L

3

X
2
1
A

1 x o
x2 ft

Table 6,— PAINTS AND VARNISHES 1/

22

Occupation 2/

Labelers and packers (men) ................
Labelers and packers (women) ...............
Maintenance men, general utility ..........
Mixers .....................................
Technicians ................................
Tinters ....................................
Truckers, hand ............................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings y

338
201
165
349
185
H9
255
07

16785
and
under
.90

$1.44
1.25
1.95
1.55
1.65
1.79
1.46
- . fjs
L

gq

-

3
-

WM
.9?
_
12
-

-

I0 .9 5

fiToo

1.00

1 .0 5

Number of workers receiving straight--time hourly earai]ags of $1.80 $1 .9 0 $2766 $2 .1 0 $2 .2 0 $2 .3 0 $2 .40 $2 .5 0
$1 .0 5 H 7 I 6 $1.15 $1.20 $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60

W 7m

1.10

1.15

1.20

1 ,2 5

1.30

1*25

1.40

32
11
3
16
4

15
8
13
8

16
13
8
3

67
25
3
18
10

29
3
1
15
7

12

19

13

31

7
2

-

-

11
-

-

-

1

3

3

2
44
4
6

-

-

-

14

8

-

30

1.45 - 1 ^ 2

1.60

1.70

60
6

81
35
20
64
26
10
49
7

26
28
80
24
24
77
11

28
57
37
41
14
37

-

45
3
3
11
1

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

-

10

1.80 -1*20.

-

-

-

2
3
16

1
-

-

6

18
29
17
38

7

-

17
16

8
1

26

3

2

-

2 ,5 0

-

-

-

-

-

—

1
-

2.60
_

6

3
-

43
-

-

—

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers in the manufacture of paints and varnishes (Group 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 70 establishments and 7,330 workers in the industry, 23 establishments with 5,161 workers were actually studied.
2/ Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table 7.— POWER LAUNDRIES 1/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

sarninizs of ■
i
<
N imiber of workers r<sceivi]c g straight-time h surly <
i
Average
$0.75 $0.80 $0.85 $0.90 $0 .9 5 $1.00 $1.05 $1 .1 0 $1 . 1 5 $1.2 0 $1.25 $1.30 $1 .3 5 $1 .4 0 $1 .4 5 $1 .5 0 $1.55 $1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1 . 7 5 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1 .9 5
hourly
Under and
earn­
$ 0 .75 under
ings 2/
.90
.80
.S?
.8
.9? 1.C0 1.05 1.10 1 . 1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 -1.. 5. ■-1.9Q 1.95 2.00

Men
Clerks, retail receiving:

Total ..........
Time ...........
Incentive ......
Extractor operators .......................
Firemen, stationary b o i l e r ..... .
Identifiers: Total .......................
Time ........................
Incentive ...................
Washers, machine: Total ..................
T i m e ........... ........
Incentive ..............
Wrappers, bundle ...........................
Women
Clerks, retail, receiving .................
Finishers, flatwork, machine: Total ......
T i m e .......
Incentive ...
Identifiers: Total .......................
Time ........................
Incentive ...................
Total .........
Time ..........
Incentive .....
Wrappers, bundle ..........................
Pressers, machine, shirts:

40
24
16
245
45
355
220
135
271
226
45
58

$1.20
1.08
1.39
1.15
1.56
1.17
1.11
1.27
1.34
1.33
1.40
.98

1
1
-

.93

-

1
1
-

3
9

1
1
21
13
13
16

1
1
13
3
3
9

32
45
39
6
9
9
-

6
6
9
66
66
24
18

9
9
21
60
30
30
7
1

6

6

-

6
12

16
735
348
387

28
543
251
292

10

46

6

12

10

164
58
106

18
12
6

12
12

20

15

2
18

6
9
14
168
44

3
3
19
8
17
6
11
15
14
1

18
20
9
11
27
26
1

18

6

18
-

6

-

9
-

9

12
12
12
12
31
30
1

5
5
30
29
10
19
26
24

21
4

16
-

17
2
197
197

16

12
6
6

3
3
52
53
38
15
27
26
1

2

3
3
12
4
4
12
12
-

7
7
27
27
28
13
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
17
17
-

3
3

-

-

8

-

-

-

4

10

9
9
-

15
9

21
18

3
-

6

-

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

3

6

106
2,925
1,870
1,055

221
95
126
181
1,271
294
977

212

.85
.83
.89
1.03
.92

1.12
.95

1.06
1.00
1.08
.87

1/ The study covered power laundries with more than 20 workers.
32 establishments with 3,777 workers were actually studied.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




-

22

2

805
736
69

614
453
161
39

11
11
-

21
18
27

29

14
6

21

102

-

-

48

6
24

21

54
54

72

29
129
54
75
27

24
21
3
28

6
40
9
-

9

162
66

22
161
40

96
15

121
9

18
18

10
103
103

124

10

204

1

42
162

Of the estimated 165 establishments and 13,500 workers in this industry,
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951

Table 8.— AUTO REPAIR SHOPS 1/

O ccupation 2 /

Number
of
work­
ers

Body repairm en, m e ta l: T o ta l ..................................
Time .....................................
In ce n tiv e .........................
G reasers: T o t a l .................................................................
Time ....................................................................
In cen tiv e ........................................................
M echanics, autom otive, c la s s A: T otal .............
T im e ...............
In ce n tiv e . .
M echanics, autom otive, c la s s B: T o ta l .............
Time ...............
In ce n tiv e . .
W ashers, autom ob ile: T o ta l .......................................
Time ..........................................
In ce n tiv e .............................

986
353
633
595
361
234
3 ,002
1,1 2 0
1 ,8 8 2
526
333
193
711
622
89

23

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g str a ig h t-tim e he3urly earnin* SJL...of Average
1 .0
h ou rly Under $ and0 $ 1 .0 5 $ 1 .1 0 $ 1 .1 5 $1 .2 0 $ 1 .2 5 $1.30 $1.3 5 $ 1 .4 0 e i.4 5 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $1.8 0 $1 .9 0 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2 .8 0 £ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 0 . 4 0
earn­
and
in g s y $ 1 .0 0 under 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .30
1 .4 0 1
$ 1 .0 5
1 ,5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2.10 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .40 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 over
_
10
48
10
10
10
11
48
10
32
87
47
56.
10
29
54 210
12.3 3
31
55
73
45
15
60
25
_
6
20
11
1 150
20
2 .1 6
11
37
20
20
57
10
10
10
20
11
28
10
10
32
67
56
10
16
27
23
53 *60
2 .4 3
55
25
15
60
25
_
10
10
10
30
20
20
10
47
20
90
10 155
46
11
23
15
1 .4 1
45
23
_
_
10
20
10
10
30
20
70
10 120
1 .2 1
3
13
45
_
10
10
20
10
36
47
10
1 .72
20
20
11
5
35
2 .0 6
82 270 472 154 200 623 155 146 134 127 147
80 107
50
58
16
24
25
54
31
5
8
34
_
_
30 360
30
50
40 470
30
30
70
1 .8 7
10
96 134 127 H 7
20
52 240 112
80 107
2 .1 7
58
6
84 160 153 125
54
31
5
24
25
8
34
10
30
50 136
1 .4 8
30
10
30
20
50
17
30
20
93
10
20 102
81
10
10
20
30
20
30
1.5 3
20
30
12
30
30
30
7
34
1 .3 9
_
20
—
60 120
30
1 .1 7
40
5
5
41 157
15
53
45 120
_
10
40 137
50 120
20
50
40
1 .1 4
45 110
_
20
20
10
10
1
10
~
5
1 .3 9
5
5
3
“
-

3 / The stu dy covered e sta b lish m en ts w ith more than 4 workers in gen eral auto r ep a ir shops (Group 7538) and motor v e h ic le d ea ler e sta b lish m e n ts, new and used (Group 551) as d efin ed in th e Standard In d u s tr ia l C la s s if ic a t io n
Manual (194-9 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau o f th e Budget, Of th e estim ated 570 esta b lish m en ts and 15,950 workers in th e se in d u s tr ie s , 47 esta b lish m en ts with 2,400 workers were a c tu a lly s tu d ie d .
2 / Data lim ite d to men w orkers,
2/ E xcludes premium pay fo r overtim e and n ig h t work.




Table 9 . —RAILROADS
(Average w eekly earn in gs 1 / and w eekly scheduled hours fo r se le c te d o f f i c e , p r o fe ssio n a l and te c h n ic a l o c cu p a tio n s, and average hourly earn in gs 2 /
fo r s e le c te d m aintenance, power p la n t, c u s to d ia l, warehousing and sh ip p in g occu p ation s in s ix se le c te d r a ilr o a d s, March 1951 2 /)
O ccupation
O ffic e
B i ll e r s , machine ( b illin g m achine) .......................................
Bookkeepers, hand ................................................................................
Bookkeeping-m achine o p e r a to rs, c la s s B ..............................
C alculatin g-m ach in e op erators (Comptometer ty p e) . . .
C alculatin g-m ach in e op erators (other than
Comptometer ty p e) ................. ......................................................
C lerk s, accou n tin g .........................................................................
C lerk s, f i l e , c la s s A ......................................................................
C lerk s, f i l e , c la s s B .......................................................
C lerk s, g en era l .....................................................................................
C le rk s, order ..........................................................................................
C le rk s, p a y r o ll .....................................................................................
D u plicating-m achine o p erators ...................................................
Key-punch o p erators ............................................................................
O ffic e boys and g i r l s ....................................................................
S e c r e t a r i e s ..............................................................................................
S tenograph ers, g en era l ........................................................ ..
Sw itchboard op era to rs .......................................................................
T abulating-m achine o p erators ......................................................
*T ranscribing-m achine o p e r a to rs, g en era l ...........................
T y p is ts , c la s s A ...................................................................................
T y p is ts , c la s s B ..................................................................................
P r o fe ssio n a l and T ech n ical
D raftsm en, c h ie f ...................................................................................
Draftsm en ....................................................................................................
D raftsm en, ju n io r ................................................................................
T racers .........................................................................................................

1/

Average
Weekly
Weekly
scheduled earn in gs 1 /
hours
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$63 .5 0
83.50
6 2 .5 0
63.00

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

64.50
68.50
73.50
61.0 0
72.00
66.00
70.00
61.00
63.50
52.50
75.5 0
66.5 0
60.5 0
65.5 0
64.50
68.5 0
6 2 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

O ccupation

y

M aintenance and Power P lan t
C arpenters, m aintenance ......................................................................
E le c tr ic ia n s , m aintenance .........................................................
E n gin eers, s t a t i o n a r y ............................................................ .............
Firem en, sta tio n a r y b o ile r ...............................................................
H elp ers, tr a d e s, m a in te n a n ce .........................................................
M echanics, m aintenance ................. ......................................................
P a in te r s, m aintenance ........................................................*................
P ipe f i t t e r s , m aintenance ............................................................

Average
hourly
earn in gs 2 /

113.00
88.00
76.50
63.0 0

E xcludes pay fo r overtim e.
2 / E xcludes premium pay fo r overtim e and n ig h t work.
3 / E arnings d ata rep orted do n ot in clu d e a gen eral wage in crea se o f 6 c en ts
an hour, e f f e c t iv e A p ril 1 , 1951, granted to nonoperating em ployees.
y Data lim ite d to men workers ex cep t where o th erw ise in d ic a te d .

$ 2 .3 7
2 .3 9
1 .8 4
1 .63
1 .5 8
1 .8 4
1 .7 9
1 .8 7

C u sto d ia l. W arehousing and Shipping
J a n ito r s , p o r te rs and c le a n e r s (men) ......................................
J a n ito r s, p o r te rs and c le a n e rs (women) ..................................
Stock han d lers and tr u c k e r s, hand ..............................................
T ruckers, power ( f o r k - l if t ) ............................................................
T ruckers, power (other than f o r k - l if t ) ..................................
Watchmen ..........................................................................................................

1 .4 0
1 .40
1 .6 4
1 .8 1
1 .6 2
1 .5 2

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

UNION WAGE SCALES

24.

(Mini Timm wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect April 1, 1951.)

Table 10.— BAKERIES

Classification

Table 10.— BAKERIES - Continued

per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Retail:
Agreement A: l/
$1,70 0
1.650
1.295

42
42
42

1.225

42

1.105

42

1.750
1.700

42
42

1.050
1.240
1.540

42
42
42

1.675

40

1.625

40

1.770

Second hands .................... .
Icers (after 1 year) ................
General bake-shop helpers (after 1
year) ........................ .
Pan greasers and cleaners (after 6
months) ••••••••••••••••••••*•»»..«.
Agreement B:
First hands, spongers, overmen ......
Second hands ........................
Third hands:
First 6 months •••.•••••••••••••••••
6 to 24 m o n t h s ........ •••••••....
24 to 3 6 m o n t h s .... •••••••••••••••
Wholesale - bread:
First hands, mixers, overmen,
spongers ................... •••••••
Second hands, bench or machine
hands, molders or dividers,
ingredientmen .....................

40

1.660

40

1.610

Classification

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B:
Bread:
Group leaders •••••»••••••••........
Mixers, ingredient scalers, oven
operators .......... ....... .
Divider operators, soft-roll scalingmachine operators....... ..... ..*
Molders, oven dumpers and feeders,
benchmen, dough dumpers.... ......
Helpers .......................... .
Inside bakery cleaners ........ .
Cake:
Cake mixers, icing mixers, doughnut
machine mixers, ovenraen, ingre­
dientmen, first scalers ..........
Bake-shop helpers, dumpers ••••••••••
Inside bakery cleaners .......... .
Women helpers:
First 30 days ....................
After 30 days
After 6 m o n t h s ..... •••••.... .
After 1 year
After 3 years

Table 12.— BUIIDING SERVICE

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

40

$1,765

40

1.660

40

1.610

40

1.560
1.400
1.290

40
40
40

1.620
1.360
1.250

40
40
40

.960
1.010
1.060
1.110
1.160

40
40
40
40
40

Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Oven operators, mixers, doughnut
operators, leader decorators ......
Bench hands, ingredient scalers,
divider and depositor operators,
cookie-machine operators, oven
feeders and dumpers, floormen ......
Molder operators, wrapping-machine
set-up men, dough dumpers, assistant
leader decorators ................ .
DeVilbiss grease-machine operators,
pan-washing-machine operators,
stockmen, rack-washing-machine
operators, experienced bake-shop
helpers ...... ••••••........ .
Housekeepers, general bakery helpers .
Inspectors, floorladies, skilled cake

1.510




Coal passers:
Class A and B buildings .......... •••••••••
Unclassified buildings ....................
Electricians .......................... ..... r
Elevator operators:
Class A buildings:
First 6 months ........... ,......... .
After 6 months ........................
Class B buildings:
First 6 m o n t h s ...... .......... .......
After 6 months .......... ......... .....
Elevator starters:
Class A buildings..... ........... .......
Class B buildings •••••••••..••.... .
Firemen and water tenders:
Class A and B buildings .............. .
Unclassified buildings.......... ........ .
Janitors:
Class A buildings:
First 6 months ........................ .
After 6 months ............ ........ .
Class B buildings:
First 6 months ............ ...... ......
After 6 months ............... .
Janitresses and matrons:
First 6 months .................. ..... .
After 6 months •••••••••.... ..... .....
Oilers:
Class A and B buildings ....... ............
Unclassified buildings........ ...... .
Operating engineers:
Class A buildings ........................
Class B buildings.... ....................
Unclassified buildings .....................
Window washers (building employees) ..........

Rate
per
. hour

*1.485
1.440
2.050

Hours
per
week

40

40
An

1.330
1.360

40

1.300
1.330

40
40

1.485
1.455

40
40

1.675
1.630

40
40

1.310
1.340

40
40

1.265
1.295

40
40

1.110
1.H0

40
40

1.640
1.595

40
40

1.950
1.905
1.860
1.820

40

40

40
40
40

40

Table 11.— BUIIDING CONSTRUCTION

1.400
1.290

40
40
Classification

1.280
Bread-and roll-dough panners, doughnut
tray packers, hand icers, make-up
g i r l s ..... .......................
Wrapping-machine feeders, Oliver
wrapper operators, order fillers
and selectors,.cake-cutting machine
operators, cooler girls ...........
General bakery helpers (women) ......

l/ Beginning May 27, 1951. the following hourly rate3
were effectives First hands $1.77, second hands $1.72, icers
(after 1 year) $1,345, general bake-shop helpers (after 1
year) $1.26, pan greasers and cleaners (after 6 months) $1.14*

Classification

1.210

1.160
1.090

40

40

40
40

Bricklayers ..................................
Carpenters ........ ...... ................... .
Electricians ....... ............... .
Painters ............ ................. ........
Plasterers
Plumbers
Building laborers
.... ....... ......

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2,550
2.550
2.625
2.600
2.750
2.600
1.850

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table 13*— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES

Clas sification

2-man cars ••••••••••

Night ...........
1-man cars and busses

Night ........ .

Rate
per
hour 1/
$1,600
1.650
1.700
1.750

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued

Table 13•— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES - Continued

Clas sification

25

Table 15.— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

Rate
per
hour 1/

Hours
per
week

$1,611
1.566
1.548

40
40
40

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table 15.— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS - Continued

Hours
per
week

Elevated and subway:
Conductors............ ...... .
Guards .••••••••••••••••••••••»••••«•••*
Motor coaches:

1.700

40

l/
Rates relate to workers who have completed a year of
service.

Table 14.— MALT LIQUORS

Classification

Brewing department:
B r e w e r s ..... .
Hiring rate (first 6 months)

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.875
1.805

40
40

1.625
1.750

40
40

1.770
1.673

40
40

1.728

40
40

Apprentices:
First 6 months
Next 18 months
Bottling department:
Regular ................. »»»
Hiring rate (first 6 months)
Laborers:
Regular ...,
Hiring rate (first 6 months)

1.668

Building: - Continued
Material: l/
Agreement A:
4 tons or less ..... ............... .
Over 4 tons .••••••..... ..... ......
6-wheel (over 4 tons) .............. .
Helpers •••••••••••••••••••••••••....
Agreement B - Brick hauling ............
Helpers ................
Agreement C - Roofing material........ .
Coal:
1 1/2 t o n s ...... .........................
2 tons ..... .
Over 2 tons and tractor used with same
trailer .......... ....... ........ .
6-wheel (over 12 tons) .......... •••••»••••
Tractor used with different trailer.......
Commission house:
1 ton or less .••••••..... ............... .
2 tons ....................................
3 tons ............. .
4 tons ................... .
5 tons ..... ........... .
Helpers ......f.............................
Department store:
U p to 2 tons ................ ............ .
Trailer trucks ...... .
Florists, retail:
1 and under 2 tons •••••••••••••••••••••••••
2 and under 3 tons
3 and under 5 tons •••••••••«•*•••..... •
Furniture, r e t a i l ...........................
Helpers ....................................... .

Table 15.— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS

Classification

Armored car
Automobile supply and accessory, city-wide:
Large unit (semi) ......... .............. .
Small unit (straight) ................ ..
Building:
Construction:
4-wheel
6—wheel
Excavating, paving, grading, sewer and
plastering:
4-wheel, over 2 tons ............... .
Awheel
...........




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,780

40

1.900
1.750

40
40

1.925
2.025

40
40

1.750
1.900
2.000

40
40
40

General-cartage and parcel delivery:
1 and under 2 tons ....... ....... .
2 and under 3 tons •••««••••••••••••»••*••••
3 and under 5 tons .............. .
5 and under 7 tons and tractor-trailers «...
7 and under 10 t o n s .... ...... .
10 and under 20 tons ••.••••«•••••••••••••••
20 tons and over ............ .
Lumber — box and shavings ......... .........
Meat:
Jobbers, wholesale ........ .
Packinghouse, local:
1 ton and under ........ ...... .
Over 1 ton and under 3 t o n s ..... .
Over 3 and under 5 tons ••••••••••*••••••
Over 5 t o n s .... .......................
Helpers •••••..... ............... ••••••
City tractors •••••••••••••••••••••.•••.•
Dump-cart tractors ..... ..... .........
Delicatessen and special delivery •••••••

$1,490
1.550
1.700
1.490
1.700
1.540
1.960

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.740
1.770

40
40

1.800
1.870
1.940

40
40
40

1.730
1.750
1.770
1.790
1.810
1.620

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.660
1.710

40
40

1.310
1.340
1.370
1.700
1.540

50
50
50
40
40

1.750
1.800
1.850
1.900
1.950
2.000
2.050
1.830

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.680

40

1.735
1.805
1.880
1.900
1.550
1.900
1.630
1.735

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Classification

Milk (noncorimission men):
Tank trucks:
Day
Night ••••.••••••••••«••••«
Wholesale
Moving:
Furniture ••••••••••«•••••••••
H e l p e r s .................. .
Newspaper and magazine:
Afternoon papers and magazines
Morning papers ....... ........
O i l .............................
Railway e x p r e s s ..... ...........
Helpers ............ ••••••••••

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,688
1.708
1.896

48
48
48

1.660
1.580

40
40

2.059
2.360
1.875
1.886
1.742

42;
37;
40
40
40

1/ Beginning May 1, 1951, the following hourly rates were
effective: Agreement A - (truck drivers) 4 tons or less $1.64,
over 4 tons $1.70, 6-wheel (over 4 tons) $1.85, and helpers
$1.64$ agreement B - brick hauling $1.80, and helpers $1.64.

Table 16.— PRINTING

Classification

Book and dob shoos 1/
Bindery women:
Gathers, collaters, stitellers, covering
and thread sewers, mailers, blank-book
sewer, paging*- and numbering*-machine
operators ....... ...... ........... .
Automatic-stitcher feeders, folding- or
ruling-machine feeder's, machine opera­
tors, rotary perforating- and punchingmachine operators, table workers ..... «•
Bookbinders:
Commercial work (basic rate) •••••••••••••••
Edition binding (basic r a t e ) .... .
Compositors, h a n d ....... .
Electrotypers ......... ........ .
Machine operators ........... .
Machine tenders (machinists) .... .
Mailers *.... .... ...........................
Photoengravers
Rotogravure ................. .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,415

36

1.374

36

2.433
2.405
2.59?
2.940
2.632
2.632
2.304
3.000
3.062

36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 1 6 .—PRINTING - Continued

26,

Table 1 6 .— PRINTING - Continued

Rate Hours
per
per
C la ssific a tio n
hour week
Newspapers 2 / - Continued
Machine operators (English te x t):
Day work ..................................................................................... $2,759
2.910
Night work .................. ...................................................
36*
Machine tenders (English te x t):
Day work ........................................................................ ............. 2.759 36*
Night w o r k .......................................................... _ _................. 2.910 36*
M ailers:
Day work . . . . . .......................................................... ............... 2.187 37*
Night work T............................. ................................., ............. 2.^27 36*
Photoengravers:
Day work ................ .......................................................
2.979
Night work .............................................................. .............
3.228 36*
Pressmen, web presses - day work.:
Agreement A
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.520 37*
O ffside colormen and registerm en rotogravure .........................................
2.587
Agreement B ................ ...........................................................
2.500 37*
Registermen — rotogravure ......................................... 2.667 371.

Rate Hours
Clas s if ic a t io n
per
per
hour week
Book and job shoos l / - Continued
Press a ss is ta n ts and feed ers:
Senior a s s is ta n ts :
P resses 25 x 38 inches and larger .......................... $2,385 36*
S in g le cylind er; in-charge o f varnishing
machine; o ffs e t; coupon .......................................... 2.357 36*
2 -co lo r sh eet-fed rotary; H arris-Clayboum ,
47 x 72 in ch es, C o ttrell, 36 x 48 inches . . . 2.426 3 6 i
1 or 2 - r o ll rotary; ten sio n m e n .......................... 2.467 36t
Pressmen, cylin d er p resses:
S h eet-fed , fla t-b e d , 46 x 65 inches and under . . . 2.662 36*
S p ecial type p resses; 2 s in g le -c o lo r , s in g le ­
cylin d er Miehle u n its , M iller Majors or
No. 2 K ellys (or any sin g le paired w ith
them except Miehle 7 /0 ) ................................................. 2.690 36*
Newspapers 2 /
Compositors, hand (E nglish te x t):
Day w o r k ............................................................. .......................... 2.759 36*
Night work .........................................................................
2.910 36^

4




1/
'7J
*

Rate Hours
per
per
C la ssific a tio n
hour week
Newspapers 2 j - Continued
Pressmen, web presses - night work:
Agreement, A . TI , TT. . . . ............. .
$2,857 35
O ffside colormen and registerm en rotogravure .................................................................. 2.929 35
Agreement B ........................................................... ..
2.833 35
Registermen - rotogravure ......................................... 3.011 35
S tereotyp ers:
Day work T. . . T, T........... .......................
2.600
Night w o rk ................................................................................. 2.832 34
1 / E ffectiv e May 1, 1951, the hourly rate fo r electrotyp ers
was $3.05; e ffe c tiv e June 5, 1951, the hourly rate for m ailers
was $2.34-5.
2 / E ffectiv e A pril 15, 1951, the hourly rate fo r m ailers was
$2,253 on day work and $2,497 on nigh t work. E ffe ctiv e A pril 3,
1951, pressmen operating web p resses covered by agreement A
received an increase o f $2.50 weekly fo r both day and night
work.

1
(0
s

sto

Table 1 7 .—MINIMUM ENTRANCE RATES FOR PIANT WORKERS 1 /
Percent »f plan t 2 / workers in establishme
p cified minimum ra tes in Manufacturing
Durable goods 1 Nondurable goods
Minimum rate
AH
Esta b lish ments wi1Jo. Public W holesale R eta il Services
(in cen ts)
in d u stries
trade
101-500
1 / workers 501 or workers 501 or u tH itie s * trade
more 101-500 more
workers
workers
A ll establishm ents .....................
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
_
_
2 .0
Under 6 5 ............................................
.5
28.4
_
_
_
_
_
6 .6
65 .........................................................
.9
.5
_
_
_
_
—
Over 65 and under 70 .................
.6
1_
.6
3.5
_
_
_
_
_
•
.2
7 0 ..........................................................
1 .6
_
_
_
•
Over 70 and under 75 .................
.6
(A/)
7 .2
2 5 .8
26.7
Over* * and*under*86*
10.7
l:i
h—
i
8 0 ..........................................................
278
1 .6
4 .1
4?1
573
1573
—
—
Over 80 and under 85 .................
.8
io 7 i
3 .1
1 .9
3.3
5.4
_
5.2
23.2
4 .8
977
4 .7
85 ..........................................................
5.4
3 .4
_
Over 85 and under 90 .................
3.6
.2
1 .1
1 .3
4.4
1 .4
2 .4
—
9 0 ..........................................................
33.0
.2
1 .2
2 .2
1077
4 .4
—
Over 90 and under 95 .................
4 .8
.2
5 .4
4 .0
1 .8
2 .9
74
H .O
3 .0
7 .4
.8
2.3
9 5 .........................................................
.7
Over 95 and under 100 ..............
87 o
1 .8
3 .9
8 .5
47?
1 0 0 .......................................................
7.6
7.3
H .7
3 .7
274
Over 100 and under 105 . . . . . .
1.5
1:1
1374
_
_
_
2 .2
3~0
1 0 5 .......................................................
8 .3
3 .9
—
—
—
12 .0
Over 105 and under 110 ............
2 .1
4 .3
.5
3.5
_
.8
.2.
H O .......................................................
' 1.0
273
4 .1
.3
1.5
—
Over HO and under H 5 ............
4 .6
2 .6
4 .4
5.5
9 .9
.3
2.5
6 .1
15.7
i7 i
H 5 .......................................................
.5
Over H 5 and under 1 2 0 ............
2 .7
2 .9
3 :?
1:?
i:f
t2 .0
l
1 2 0 .......................................................
.2
1 .3
4.5
W)
_
Over 120 and under 125 ............
3 .0
777
4 .1
7.3
ill
_
1 .2
2 .1
.1
8 .0
.2
.3
.3
.1
—
Over 125 and under 130 ............
3 .3
6 .4
9 .3
.3
2 .4
1 .9
_
_
1 3 0 .......................................................
3 .3
.1
1 .5
5.1
1 .9
_
_
_
3 .6
Over 130 and under 135 ............
9 .0
6.1
1.7
3.1
—
_
_
_
•
.2
2 .1
1 3 5 .......................................................
.5
Over 135 and under 1 4 0 ............
.8
2 .1
1 2 .4
:
140
...........................
7i
t78
o
—
_
_
Over 140 and under 1 4 5 ............
276
1 .1
672
145 .......................................................
.4
:
Over 145 and under 150 . . . . . .
27 o
_
_
.3
1 .6
150 and o v e r ................................
67l
3.1
674
Establishm ents w ith no
_
_
6 .1
esta b lish ed minimum..............
H .6
5 .1
2 .6
33.3
5.9
H .7
1 .0
Information not availab le . . •
1 .7
1 .8
.5
.5
5.7
1.3
2/
2/

Table 1 6 .—PRINTING - Continued

Lowest r a tes fo rma lly esta b lish ed fo r h irin g eith er men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Other than o ffic e workers.
Excludes data for fin an ce, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .

Table 1 8 .—SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL PROVISIONS

S h ift d iffe r e n tia l

Percent o f plan t workers employed on each s h if t in a :LI
P aints
manufa<sturing
Machinery
and
Indusitrie s
varnishes
L/
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
s h if t
s h if t
s h ift
s h ift
s h if t
s h if t

Percent o f workers on extra s h if t s ,
aH e sta b lish m e n ts.........................................

17.3

5,6_

14.9

3 .9

6 .4

1 .8

R eceiving s h if t d iffe r e n tia ls ..............
Uniform cents (per hour) ...................
Under 5 cen ts .....................................
5 cents ..................................................
Over 5 and under 10 cents ..........
10 c e n t s ................................................
Over 10 cen ts .....................................
Uniform p e r ce n ta g e ................................
5 percent ..............................................
Over 5 and under 10 percent . . .
10 p e r c e n t...........................................
Over 10 p e r c e n t................................
Other ..............................................................
Receiving no d iffe r e n tia l .......................

16.9
8.3
2 .2
2 .2
.8
2 .6
.5
8.1
1 .9
.2
5 .4
.6
.5
.4

5.5
3.3
.2
.1
1 .8
.8
.4
2 .2

14.9
2*0
_
.2
.4
1 .4
_
12.9
.5
.5
H .7
.2

3 .9
(2 /)
_
(2 /)
(2 /)

1 .8
1 .8
-

3.9
_
3 .8
.1

6 .4
6 .4
_
1 .0
5 .4
_
_
_
_
_

1 .8
•
_
_

-

-

-

-

1 .9
.3
(2 /)
.1

-

~

_
_

1 / Includes data fo r in d u stries other than those shown sep arately.
2 / Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, H I ., A pril 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s

Table 19. — SCHEDULED W E E K L Y HOURS

W e e k l y hours

All establishments ..............................
Under 35 hours ...................................
35 h o u r s ....... ............. ....................
Over 35 and under 37j hours •••••..............
hours ................. ................. .
Over 37s and under 40 hours ...................
40 hours .••••.................................. .
Over 40 and under 44 hours .....................
44 hours .......................... ..............
Over 44 and under 4$ hours ....................
48 hours ........................... .............
Over US and under 52 hours .....................
52 h o u r s ........ ................................
Over 52 hours •••••.............................
Information not available ......................

yi\

1/
2/
3/
*
**

27

Percent of women office workers enployed in Manufacturing g
N on­
Public
All
All
Wholesale Retail
F inane e**
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
trade
industries manufac­
goods
goods
turing

100.0

3.5
4.7
11.0
10.1
66.&
1.1
2.3
.2
.3
—

100.0

.5
2.6
15.2
10.1
69.3
.5
1.1
-

.7
-

-

100.0

-

2.7
5.1
14.1
75.2
.8
1.0
-

1.1
-

—

100.0

1.2
2.4
30.4
3.8
60.9

100.0

.3
-

100.0

-

2.4
2.1
7.8
76.5
1.2
10.0

1.3

3.3
1.5
93.5
1.3
.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

—

100.0

100.0

1.2

12.3
17.1
17.8
23.7
29.0
.1

-

—

-

-

3.9
1.6
89.4
1.3
2.1
.5
(2/)

-

-

All
industries
Services

100.0

8.9
1.4
11.0
6.8
59.4
5.6
5.7
1.0

.2

-

-

—

-

—

2/

100.0

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Manufacturin S
.. __
.
.
Wholesale
Non­
All
Public
Durable
trade
durable utilities*
manufac­
goods
goods
turing

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Retail
Services
trade

100.0

.

.1
.3
2.5

.3
3.6

.8

1.0

.3
71.3
1.5
3.7
3.2
11.8
2.0
.2
1.6
.7

(2/)
74.3
.4
2.5
3.9
10.1
2.3

-

76.2
-

3.8
4.3
9.7
3.6

.9
10.5
3.0
.1
70.2
1.2
-

3.2
10.8

-

-

-

1.6
—

2.4
—

—

.1

_

_

-

-

-

-

2.3
.1
2.8
81.1
4.9
1.3
6.3

3.1
3.2

1.2

-

-

84.7

-

9.0

.7
.4
68.2
7.7
9.9
1.3
7.3
.8
1.6
2.1

100.0
1.6
1.2
.5
-

.9
40.1
-

6.9
1.7
43.7
-

3.4

—

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 20 .— PAID HOLIDAYS

Number of paid holidays

All establishments .........................
Establishments providing paid holidays ......
Under 5 d a y s ......... ............ ......
5 days ..................................
6 d a y s ...... ............................
6k d a y s .... ......... ...... ............
7 days ..................................
7% days ..... .......... ..... *..........
8 days ...................................
Sk days ........................ ........
9 days .................... . ••..........
9i days .................................
10 d a y s ..... ............................
10^ days .................... ...........
11 days ...... ...........................
Establishments providing no paid holidays ....
1/
2/
2/
*
**

Percent of office workers employed in Manufacturing5
Wholesale Retail
Public
Non­
All
All
Durable
trade
trade
industries manufac­
durable utilities*
goods
goods
turing

Services

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.3
(2/)
,
.1
63.6
1.1
12.3
1.9
5.6
1.2
3.1
.4

99.5
.2
86.1
.8
3.3
9.1
—
-

100.0
.2
96.1
1.3
1.7
.7
-

98.6
68.7
6.2
23.7
-

99.7
-

99.1

18.0
56.6
25.1
-

100.0
85.9
11.9
2.2

100.0
7.2
3.1
11.2
8.7
7.3
6.2
3.6

93.9
62.6
1.9
20.5
7.9
1.0

93.7
1.1
.4
83.5
.2
1.6
6.9
-

92.5
1.7
.6
87.3
.3
2.4
.2

96.0
76.3
.3
19.4
-

88.9
3.0
29.5
37.9
18.5
-

100.0
89.3
10.7
-

93.6
1.7
90.9
.5
.5
-

1.4

.3

90.2
.9
.5
77.7
.1
4.7
.1
4.6
1.4
.2
9.8

6.3

7.5

-

6.4

42.0
39.0
1.5
1.2
.3
58.0

.2

.5
9 .6

.7

.5

-

Other than office writers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation,(excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Finance**

Percent of plant l/ workers employed in Manufacturing
All
All
Non­
Public
Wholesale
industries
Durable
durable utilities*
manufac­
trade
goods
2/
goods
turing

(2/)

-

(2 /)

94.3
3.7
1.1
.9

2 .2

1.2
2.6
46.7
-

6.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

-

-

-

4.0

11.1

_

Table 21.— PAID VACATIONS (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

28

Vacation policy

All establishments ....................... ..

Percent or office workers employed-ET=--Manufacturin
Wholesale Retail
Non­
All
All
Public
Finance**
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
trade
industries manufac­
goods
goods
turing

Services

1 Percent of plant l/ workers employed in •
Manufacturin
All
Public
Wholesale Retail
All
Non­
industries
Durable
manufac­
trade
durable utilities*
trade
goods
2/
turing
goods

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with paid vacations ........ .
Under 1 week ••••••......... ............. .
1 w e e k .... ..... ........ ........... .
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ......... ........
2 w e e k s ..................... .

60.5
3.0
50.0
4.9
2.6

60.5
6.1
50.9
1.8
1.7

67.6
8.1
55.6
2.8
1.1

48.1
2.6
42.6
2.9

59.7
58.7
1.0
-

56.7
54.1
2.6
-

27.7
4.3
23.4
-

82.1
56.4
16.0
9.7

66.2
.4
56.8
8.7
.3

27.9
11.1
15.5
1.2
.1

30.2
15.4
13.3
1.5
-

27.9
16.2
11.7
-

34.5
14.0
16.3
4.2
-

8.4
7.9
.5
-

44.3
42.2
2.1
-

33.3
5.6
27.7
-

8.9
3.0
5.3
.6
-

Establishments with no paid vacations »•••••.••

39.5

39.5

32.4

51.9

40.3

43.3

72.3

17.9

33.8

72.1

69.8

72.1

65.5

91.6

55.7

66.7

91.1

Establishments with paid vacations ...........
1 week .................... ........ ......
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 w e e k s ........ ............... ..........
Over 2 weeks ........... ..................

99.9
20.1
.4
78.3
1.1

100.0
18.5
.6
78.9
2.0

100.0
22.7
1.0
76.3
-

100.0
11.0
83.5
5.5

99.6
7.0
92.6
-

100.0
22.2
1.3
76.5
-

100.0
65.4

99.5
1.3
98.2
-

99.7
15.7
78.8
5.2

97.0
74.2
•6
20.9
1.3

97.6
82.9
.9
12.3
1.5

96.4
88.8
1.4
6.2
-

99.9
71.9
-

92.2

4.2

98.7
64.9
31.0
2.8

-

97.7
53.3
44.4
-

91.8
79.1
11.7
1.0

Establishments with no paid vacations ........

.1

.5

.3

3.0

2.4

3.6

.1

1.3

7.8

2.3

8.2

99.5
99.5
-

99.7
2.1
.2
92.2
5.2

97.4
43.6
5.2
47.3
1.3

97.8
56.1
6.8
33.4
1.5

96.7
56.4
10.3
30.0
-

99.9
55.9
39.8
4.2

99.6
32.3
64.5
2.8

93.7
12.8
6.2
74.3
.4

98.3
10.6
87.7
-

91.8
30.8
7.0
53.0
1.0

.5

.3

2.6

2.2

3.3

.1

.4

6.3

1.7

8.2

99.7
.5
67.5
.9
28.9
1.9

97.6
1.3
.6
85.6
1.5
8.4
.2

97.8
1.2
.6
87.9
1.0
6.8
.3

96.7
1.0
88.0
1.5
6.2
-

100.0
3.3
87.6
8.1
1.0

99.6
96.8
2.8
-

93.7
2.9
4.4
78.7
3.9
3.8
-

100.0
1.8
68.7
2.7
26.8
-

91.8
2.0
86.6
1.3
1.9
-

.3

1.0
1.4

2.2

.4

6.3

3.3

6 months of service

1 year of service

-

-

-

.4

-

-

34.6
-

23.8

31.8
.4

60.0

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations •••••......
1 w e e k ...... .............................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ..................
2 weeks ........... .......................
Over 2 weeks •••••....... .......... ......
Establishments with no paid vacations ...... .

99.9
3.5
.6
94.5
1.3
.1

100.0
5.5
1.1
91.4
2.0
-

100.0
6.6
1.7
91.7
-

100.0
3.7
90.8
5.5
-

99.6
3.4
96.2
.4

100.0
3.1
1.6
94.0
1.3
-

100.0
4.1
95.9
-

10 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ...........
1 week .......... •••••....................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s .... .............
2 weeks ............... .................. .
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ..... ............
3 w e e k s ...................................
O ver 3 weeks

..................................

Establishments with no paid vacations ........
Information not available..... ..............

99.9
.2
82.7
3.7
13.2
.1
.1

100.0

100.0

-

-

89.0
.9
10.1
-

92.9
1.3
5.8
-

-

100.0
-

82.3
17.7
-

100.0
.3
99.6
.1
-

100.0
.7
89.0
5.8

100.0
.4
72.6
2.0

-

-

99.5
69.3
11.9
18.3
-

-

-

.5

2 5 . 0

4.5

-

-

8.2

a

1/
2/
*
**

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), oornnunication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Thble 22*— PAID SICK LEAVE (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Provisions for paid sick leave

Percent of office workers employed ;n i
Manufacturing
All
Non­
Public
Wholesale Retail
All
Durable
trade
durable
utilities*
trade
industries manufac­
goods
turing
goods

29

Finance**

Services

Percent of plant l ] workers employed in ManufactureJig
All
— STL
Wholesale
Non­
Public
Durable
industries
trade
durable
utilities*
manufac­
goods
2/
goods
turing

Retail Services
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sick leave ........................
Under 5 days ....................... .
5 d a y s ...... ...... ...... .
6 days ........ ........ ......... .
7 to 9 d a y s ...........................
10 d a y s .......... .................... .
Over lo d a y s ..........................

22.9
1.3
7.0
4.3
2.2
5.4
2.2

30.0
4.1
8.0
5.6
9.5
2.8

29.9
5.8
7.2
5.2
9.4
2.3

30.1
1.2
9.4
6.2
9.7
3.6

14.7
8.6
4.8
.1
1.2
-

22.4
10.9
4.4
2.6
4.5

4.0
1.7
1.9
.3
.1
-

28.3
6.4
3.7
8.1
7.0
3.1

13.5
1.1
5.6
4.0
2.8
-

4*7
.1
2.1
.9
.5
.7
.4

3.7
(2/)
1.5
.9
.8
.5

2.3
(2/)
2.3
-

6.3
2.5
2.3
1.5

6.4
5.6
.8
-

7.0
2.9
3.3
.8
-

7.4
.5
3.4
.2
2.3
1.0
-

5.5
1.4
2.8
(2/)
1.3
-

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave .......... ......... .

77.1

70.0

70.1

69.9

85.3

77.6

96.0

71.7

86.5

95.3

96.3

97.7

93.7

93.6

93.0

92.6

94.5

5 days .................... .
6 d a y s ...................... ....... .
7 to 9 d a y s ......................... .
10 d a y s ........................ •••••••
12 or 13 d a y s ....................... .
15 days ............... .............. ..
IB days ••••••••....................
20 days ................................
Over 20 d a y s .............. ......... .

34.2
.9
3.7
2.6
.6
10.1
3.4
1.5
1.2
2.6
2.6

49.5
1.5
13.0
3.3
19.6
2.1
2.6
1.5
5.9

52.3
2.3
13.2
2.2
22.3
2.0
2.2
.9
7.2

44.5
12.7
5.2
H.9
2.2
3.3
2.6
3.6

21*6
7.7
.1
1.8
4.8
.3
6.9
-

33.0
10.1
6.2
2.6
3.2
8.7
(2/)
2.2
-

7.9
1.9
3.5
1.5
1.0
-

31.5
1.6
4.8
7.5
3.7
2.0
6.2
5.2
.5

22.1
6.1
1.4
4.2
3.2
4.0
.2
3.0

9.4
.6
2.3
1.2
.1
2.4
.1
.6
.1
.7
1.3

8.8
.9
1.4
.9
2.5
.9
.4
1.8

9.5
1.4
2.1
(2/)
3.8
.2
2.0

11»0
5.6
.8
4.6
-

12.1
4.1
2.7
.8
1.3
2.5
.1
.6
-

10.2
3.5
2.3
4.4
—
—
-

9.5
4.6
2.3
.5
•8
(2/)
~
1.3

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ••••••••........ •••••

65.8

50.5

47.7

55.5

78.4

67.0

92.1

68.5

77.9

90.6

91.2

90.5

92.4

89.0

87.9

89.8

90.5

Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sick l e a v e ....................... .
Under 5 d a y s ..........................
5 days .................................
6 d a y s ...... ....... ............ ••••••
7 to 9 days .................. .
10 d a y s ...... ........... ..... ...... .
11 or 12 d a y s .... ......... .......... .
15 days ...............................
IB days ......................... ..... .
20 days ....................... .......
21 days .... ......... ................ .
25 to 40 d a y s ........ ........... .....
4B to 50 days ................ ....... .
Over 50 d a y s ....... ........... .

39.2
.1
8.0
2.6
.6
5.5
2.1
1.0
1.6
1.8
.9
4.4
3.7
6.9

51.8
.3
11.1
3.3
10.6
2.1
.4
1.0
2.5
1.9
4.6
.3
13.7

54.5
.4
10.2
2.2
~
11.4
2.0
.6
1.7
2.4
2.9
4.7
•4
15.6

47.2
12.7
5.2
9.2
2.2

25.5
7.7
.1
.8
4.2
-

36.3
1.9
3.5
1.0
-

31.5
4.8

9.6
.9
.9
1.4
-

10.7
1.4
(2/)
2.1

7.6
2.5
.2
-

19.9
3.5
2.3
•
—
—

7.7
1.7
3.3

—
2.1
1.2

5.7

7.2

—
2.1
•
2.8

14.8
5.5
.8
—
—
•
4.6
.3
3.6

17.8
4.1
2.7
.8
2.1

.1
6.1
23.7
-

11.7
1.7
1.2
.1
1.0
.4
(2/)
.1
.1
1.8
.8
4.5

9.5
-

1.6
4.5
1.8
2.0
6.2
2.6
5.7
2.3

22.1
5.0
1.4
3.2
.9
4.2
—
4.1

4.3
10.9

33.7
10.1
6.2
2.6
.9
2.9
1.6
_
1.6
—
2.9
4.9

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..... ...... .

60.8

48.2

45.5

52.8

74.5

66.3

63.7

68.5

77.9

88.3

90.4

89.3

92.4

85.2

All establishments........ ........ .......
6 months of service

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions for
paid sick leave ........... ••••••••••••»•

7.6
- •
2.5
.2
2.1
1.3
1.5

10 years of service

1/
2/
2/
*
**

-

2.7

-

Other than office workers•
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately*
Less than o05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




—

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, HI*, April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

.7

—
—
—

—

1.0

—
—
8.1

7.3
5.8

82.2

80.1

2.3
.8
4.0
.5
(2/)
_
.1
1.8
90.5

30

Table 23.— NONPRODUCTION BONUSES

Type of bonus

All establishments...... ......... ..... ..
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses 2 / ...... ............. ..........
Christinas or year-end .............. .
Profit-sharing ............... .
Other ..................................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ............. .

1/
2/
2/

y

*
#*

Percent of office workers employed in Manufaeturing
Non­
All
Wholesale Retail
Public
—
Durable
durable utilities*
trade
trade
industries manufac­
goods
goods
turing

Finance**

t i

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Manufaeturin
Non­
Wholesale
Public
AH
Durable
industries
durable utilities*
trade
manufac­
goods
2/
goods
turing
All
a JJL

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

36.8
31.4
4.6
2.6

32.5
26.4
5.4
3.3

34.2

6.5
4.61.7

52.1
41.5
13.1

20.1
20.0
-

59.6
53.1
6.5

42.7
39.0
11.2
.6

32.2

5.8
4.8

29.6
24.9
4.7
.7

26.1
4.3
3.6

63.2

67.5

65.8

70.4

40.4

57.3

67.8

27.2

-

-

93.7

47.9

(4/3

79.9

-

Retail
Services
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

35.4
27.2
5.65.3

34.9
26.5
4.5
5.8

36.4
28.7
7.7
4.4

2.0
1.7
.3
-

41*0
31.6
10.5
-

33.6
33.1
.5

27.1
25.8
1.3
1.1

64.6

65.1

63.6

98.0

59.0

66*4

72.9

100.0

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), commmic ation, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 24.— INSURANCE AND PENSION PLANS

Type of plan

All establishments ....................... .
Establishments with insurance or pension
plans y .............. ............ .....
Life insurance ......... ...............
Health insurance ............. •••••.....
Hospitalization............. ••••••••.••
Retirement pension .....................
Other ..................................
Establishments with no insurance or pension
plans .................... .

1/
2/
2/
*
**

Percent of office workers employed in Manufaeturing
All
All
Non­
Public
Wholesale Retail
Durable
industries manufac­
durable utilities*
trade
trade
goods
turing
goods

Services

Retail
Services
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

. ^o»P

100.0

100.0

92.0

96.0
89.6
76.6
65.9
63.9

94.6
89.8
86.9
72.5
64.4

98.5
89.3
58.7
54.3
63.1

98.8
97.8
40.0
21.3
86.4

88.1
75.6
41.4
66.4
49.9

82.4
72.9
63.8
60.3
42.5

94.6
78.5
60.5
67.0
74.3

75.8
64.5
44.0
54.1
27.4

92.9
81.3
71.2
68.7
47.1

97.0
85.5
79.5
75.7
51.2

97.2
87.0
85.1
80.4
56.9

96.4
82.7
69.0
66.9
40.5

96.2
92.9
50.2
39.0
61.8

78.7
64.0
41.0
57.8
43.2

87.5
71.3
60.6
60.0
41.0

82.6
71.5
70.3
71.7
10.8

—

—

—

—

..

..

..

_

7.1

3.0

2.8

3.6

3.8

82.7
61.9
60.4
61.3
—

—

—

—

—

8.0

4.0

5.4

1.5

1.2

Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Unduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Finance**

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in ______ Manufacturing_______ _
AT 1
AJUL
All
Non­
Wholesale
Public
Durable
industries
durable utilities*
trade
manufac­
goods
2/
goods
turing

—

11.9

17.6

5.4

24.2

_

’
21.3

12.5

17.4

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, HI., April 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

A ppendix A “

Scope and Method o/ Survey

V/ith the exception of the -union scale of rate% information presented in this bulletin was collected
by visits of field representatives of the Bureau to representative establishments in the area surveyed. In
classifying workers by occupation, uniform job descriptions were used; they are presented in Appendix B,
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling earnings data for the following types of oc­
cupations: (a) office clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and power plant, and (d) cus­
todial, warehousing and shipping (tables 1 through A). The covered industry groupings are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supplementary benefits
was also obtained in a representative group of establishments in each of these industry divisions. As indi­
cated in table A, only establishments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments were omitted
because they furnished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the
study.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were studied, minimum size of establishment and
extent of the area covered were determined separately for each industry, and are indicated in table B, Al­
though size limits frequently varied from those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms which satisfied the size requirements of the broad in­
dustry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied in order to maximize the
number of workers surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain size, however,
was given its proper weight in the combination of data by industry and occupation.

The earnings information in the report excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. Nonpro­
duction bonuses are also excluded, but incentive earnings, including commissions for salespersons, have been
included for those workers employed under some form of incentive wage system. Where weekly hours are reported
as for office clerical, they refer to the work schedules for which the salaries are paid rounded to the near­
est half-hour; average weekly earnings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The
number of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in all establishments within the scope
of the study and not to the number actually surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
who were hired to work the establishments full-time schedule of hours for the given occupational classifi­
cation.

Information on wage practices refers to all office workers and to all plant workers as specified in
the individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in offices (or plant
departments) that observe the practice in question, except in the section relating to women office workers of
the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually
receiving the specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is limited to
formal arrangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of
the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to those providing full pay for at
least some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting period preceding the payment of benefits.
These plans also exclude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers. Health insurance is in­
cluded, however, under tabulations for insurance and pension plans.

Table A .— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN CHICAGO, ILL., AND NUMBER STUDIED
BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1951

Industry division

All divisions .............................
Manufacturing.............. ............
Durable goods 3/ .....................
Nondurable goods A/ .................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .........................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ..
Services:
Industries covered 5/ ............
Industries not c o v ered .......... .

Employment
Number of establislhments
Estimated
Estimated In establish­
Estimated
total
total
ments studied
total in
within Studied
within
all indus­
Office
scope of Total
scope of
tries 1/
study 2/
study 2/

Estimated
total in
all indus­
tries 1/
29,439
8,597
4,621
3,976
20,842

2,838
1,226
70S
518
1,612

503
175
107
68
328

1,180
5,268
6,810
2,631

103
A9A
23A
322

A2
60
68
58

10A,800
127,700
239,600
88,700

83,500
73,100
136,600
65,200

70,700
17,350
99,960
28,2A0

18,150
6,110
20,450
19,390

3,758
1,195

A59
-

100
-

11A,A00
2A,700

7A,200
-

28,8A0
-

6,640
—

1,AA9,200 1,055,700 A99,A30 113,650
7A9,300
623,100 25A,3A0 42,910
A51,700
399,600 170,100 26,830
297,600
223,500 8A,2A0 16,080
699,900
A32,600 2A5,090 70,740

I
J
Includes establishments with 6 or more workers in Cook County, Illinois.
2/ The survey of office, professional and technical, maintenance and power plant, custodial, warehousing
and trucking jobs reported in tables 1, 2, 3, and A was limited to establishments with more than 100 workers in
manufacturing, transportation, communication, and other public utilities, and retail trade, and in establish­
ments with more than 51 workers in wholesale trade, finance, insurance, real estate, and service industries;
exceptions made in industries in which characteristic jobs were surveyed are indicated in table B.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture and other wood products; stone, clay and glass products, instruments and
related products; and miscellaneous manufacturing.
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and
paper products; printing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and
leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and tele­
vision; motion pictures; nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




Table B .— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN CHICAGO, ILL., AND NUMBER STUDIED BY
THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1951 1/

Selected industries in which
characteristic jobs were
surveyed 2/

Machinery industries .................
Paints and varnishes .................
Power laundries ......................
Auto repair s h o p s ........ ............

1/
2/
2/

Minimum
size of
establishment
studied

y

21
8
21
5

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study
513
70
165
570

81
23
32
A7

Employment
Estimated
total,
within
scope of
study
99,560
7,330
13,500
15,950

In establishments
studied

43,528
5,161
3,777
2,400

The machinery industries were surveyed in March 1951*
Industries are defined in footnotes to tables 5 through 8.
Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with more than 8 workers were included.

32.

Appendix B ~ ^bedc/UfUfond

a f 6cC44^1GtiOM&
f
Office - Continued

The primary purpose of the Bureau’s Job descriptions is to assist its field
staff in classifying workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and
different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area,
into appropriate occupations. This is essential in order to permit the grouping of oc­
cupational wage rates representing comparable Job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s
job descriptions differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or
those prepared for other purposes.
In view of these special characteristics of the
Bureau's job descriptions, their adoption without modification by any single establish­
ment or for any other purpose than that .indicated herein is not recommended.
Where
office workers regularly perform duties classified in more than one occupation, they
are generally classified according to the most skilled or responsible duties that are a
regular part of their job and that are significant in determining their value to the
firm.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundsstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of business transactions.
Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with the structure of the particu­
lar accounting system used.
Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit
items to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to
business transactions usually requiring some knowledge of basic bookkeeping.
Phases or sec­
tions include accounts payable, payrolls, customers' accounts (not including simple type of
billing described under Biller, Machine), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory
controls, etc. In addition, may check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare
control sheets for the accounting department.

Office
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
BILLER, MACHINE
A worker who prepares statements, bills and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary.typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform
other clerical work incidental to billing operations.
Should be designated as working on
billing machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.

A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating machine to per­
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.
Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type

Billing Machine - A worker Who uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, e t c . , which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda,
etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry
of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals
which are automatically accumulated by machine. Ihe, operation usually involves a large num­
ber of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand,
etc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers ' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figures on a customer’s ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures cn a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the deb­
it or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and
standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HARD
A worker who keeps a set of books for recording business transactions and whose
work involves most of the following:
posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or
journals, journalizing transactions where judgment is involved as to accounts affected; post­
ing general ledger; and taking trial balances. May also prepare accounting statements and
bills; may direct work of assistants or accounting clerks.




CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who performs one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple
journal vouchers; accounts payable vouchers; coding invoices or vouchers with proper account­
ing distributions; entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; post­
ing and balancing subsidiary ledgers controlled by general ledger, e.g., accounts receivable,
accounts payable, stock records, voucher journals.
May assist in preparing journal entries.
For workers whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set of books see Bookkeeper, Hand.

CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who is responsible for maintaining an established filing system
and classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material. May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and lo­
cating material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine filing, usually cf material that has already
been classified, or locates or assists in locating material in files. May perform incidental
clerical duties.

33

Office - Continued

Office - Continued

CLERK, GENERAL

SECRETARY

A worker who is typically required to perform a variety of office operations. This
requirement may arise as a result of impracticability of specialization in a small office or
because versatility is essential in meeting peak requirements in larger offices.
The work
generally involves the use of independent judgment in tending to a pattern of office work
from day to day, as well as knowledge relating to phases of office work that occur only oc­
casionally. For example, the range of operations performed may entail all or some combination
of the following: answering correspondence, preparing bills and invoices, posting to various
records, preparing payrolls, filing, etc. May also operate various office machines and type
as the work requires.

A worker who performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an adminis­
trative cr executive position and whose duties involve the following: making appointments for
superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and making phone calls; handling
personal and important or confidential mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initia­
tive; taking dictation, either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine (except where
transcribing machine is used), and transcribing dictation or the recorded information repro­
duced on a transcribing machine.
In addition, may prepare special reports or memoranda for
information of superior.

CLERK, ORDER

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

A worker who receives customers1 orders for material or merchandise by mail, phone,
or personally and whose duties involve any combination of the following:
quoting prices to
customers, making out an order sheet listing the items to make up the order, checking prices
and quantities of items on order sheet, distributing order sheets to respective departments to
be filled. May also check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer, ac­
knowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow-up orders to see that they have been filled,
keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL
A worker who computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on
the payroll sheets and whose duties involve:
calculating workerfs earnings based on time or
production records; posting calculated data on payroll sheet,
showing information such as
worker's name, working days, time, rate, deductions for insurance and total wages due. In
addition, may make out pay checks and assist the paymaster in making up and distributing the
pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities,
reproduces
multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine.
Makes necessary adjustment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not
required to prepare stencil or ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or ditto masters.
May sort, collate, and staple completed material.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, records account­
ing and statistical data on tabulating cards by punching a series of holes in the cards in a
specified sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, following written information on
records.
May be required to duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to ma ­
chine. Keeps files of punch cards. May verify own work or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
A worker w ho performs a variety of routine duties such as running errands; operating
minor office machines;
such as sealers or mailers;
opening and distributing mail; and other
minor clerical work.
(Bonded messengers are excluded from this classification.)




A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one cr more persons, either
in shorthand cr by stenotype or similar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to
transcribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up
and keep files in order, keep simple records, etc.
Does not include transcribing -machine
work.
(See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or spe­
cialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research and to tran­
scribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc.
Does not include transcribing-machine work.
(See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a single or multiple position telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involve: handling incoming, outgoing and intraplant or off Ice calls.
In addition, may
record toll calls and take messages. As a minor part of duties, may give information to pe r ­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders.
For workers who also do typing or
other stenographic work or act as receptionists, (See Switchboard Operator-Receptionist.)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
A worker who in addition to performing duties of operator, on a single position or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and/or performs typing or other routine cleri­
cal work as part of regular duties.
This typing or clerical work m ay take the major part of
this worker's time while at switchboard.
TABULATING -MACH INE OPERATOR
A worker who operates machine that automatically analyzes
punched in groups of tabulating cards, and prints translated data
cords; sets or adjusts machine to add, subtract, multiply, and make
cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts machine. May
tabulated. May sort and verify punched cards.

and translates information
on forms or accounting re­
other calculations; places
file cards after they are

3*.

Professional and Technical - Continued

Office - Continued

TRANSCBIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

DRAFTSMAN - Continued

A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records.
May also type from written copy and do
simple clerical work.
A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar
machine is classified as a Stenographer, General.

drawings. Work is frequently in a specialized field such as architectural,
chanical, or structural drafting.
DRAFTSMAN, CHIEF

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OFERATOB, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a varied tech­
nical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research
from trailscribing-machine records.
May also type from written copy and do simple clerical
work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine is classi­
fied as a Stenographer, Technical.
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make out
bills after calculations have been made by another person.
May operate a teletype machine.
May, in addition, do clerical work involving little special training, such as keeping simple
records, filing records and reports, making out bills, or sorting and distributing incoming
mail.
Class A - A worker who performs one or more of the following:
typing material in
final form from very rough and involved draft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreign language
copy; combining material from several sources; or planning lay-out of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in final
form. May also type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.
May, in
addition, perform clerical duties as outlined above.
Class B - A worker who performs one or more of the following:
typing from relative­
ly clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; setting up sim­
ple standard tabulations,
or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
May, in addition, perform clerical duties as outlined above.

electrical, m e ­

(Draftsman, head; squad leader; squad boss)
A worker who plans and directs activities of one or more draftsmen in preparation
of working plans and detail drawings from rough or detail sketches for engineering, construc­
tion, or manufacturing purposes.
The duties performed involve a combination of the follow­
ing:
interpreting blueprints, sketches, and written or verbal orders; determining work pro­
cedures; assigning duties to subordinates and inspecting their work; and performing more
difficult problems.
May assist subordinates during emergencies or as a regular assignment,
and performs related duties of a supervisory or administrative nature.
DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
(Detailer, assistant draftsman)
A worker who details units or parts of drawings prepared by draftsman or others for
engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. Uses various types of drafting tools
as required.
May prepare drawings from simple plans or sketches, and performs other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service to employees or persons who become ill
or suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment and whose duties
involve all or most of the following:
giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing of* employee's injuries; keeping records of patients treated; and prepar­
ing accident reports for compensation or other purposes. May also assist Physician in ex­
amining applicants, give instruction in health education and illness prevention, and performs
other related duties.
TRACER

Professional and Technical

A worker who copies plans and drawings prepared by others, by placing tracing cloth
or paper over drawing and tracing with pen or pencil. Uses T-square, compass and other draft­
ing tools. May prepare simple drawings and do simple lettering.

DRAFTSMAN
A worker who prepares working plans and, detail drawings from notes, rough or de­
tailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. The duties per­
formed involve a combination of the following:
preparing working plans, detail drawings,
maps, cross-sections, etc., to scale by use of drafting instruments; making engineering com­
putations such as those involved in strength of materials, beams and trusses; verifying com­
pleted work,
checking dimensions, materials to be used, and quantities; writing specifica­
tions; making adjustments or changes in drawings or specifications. In addition, may ink in
lines and letters on pencil drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace




Maintenance and Power Plant
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE
A worker who performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in
good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions,

35

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE - Continued

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

doors, floors, stairs, casings, trim made of wood in an establishment, and whose work involves
most of the following:
planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models or
verbal i n s t r u c t ions; using a variety of carpenters1 hand tools,
portable power tools,
and
standard measuring instruments;
making standard shop computations
relating to dimensions of
work; and selecting materials necessary for the work.

A worker who produces replacement parts and new parts for mechanical equipment o p e r ­
ated in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the f o l l o w i n g : interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and layout of work;
using a variety of m a c h i n i s t ’s
hand tools
and precision measuring instruments;
setting up and operating
standard machine
tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating
to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining;
knowledge of the working p r o ­
perties of the common metals;
selecting standard materials, parts and equipment required for
his work; and fitting and assembling parts. In general, the m a c h i n i s t ’s w o r k normally requires
a rounded training
in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
A worker who performs a variety of electrical trade functions in the installation,
maintenance or repair of equipment for the generating, distribution,
and/or utilization of
electric energy in an establishment, and whose w o r k involves most of the f o l l o w i n g ; install­
ing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators,
transformers,
switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers,
motors, heating units, conduit systems or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layout cr other specifications; l o ­
cating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computa­
tions relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electricians’ hand tools and measuring and testing instruments.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
A worker who operates
and maintains and/or supervises the
operation of stationary
engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply power, heat, refrigeration or airconditioning and whose work Involves:
operating and maintaining and/or supervising the opera­
tion of such equipment as steam engines, air compressors,
generators, motors, turbines, v e n ­
tilating and refrigerating equipment,
steam boilers
and boiler-fed water pumps;
making or
supervising equipment repairs;
and keeping a record of operation of machinery,
temperature,
and fuel consumption.
This classification does not include head or chief engineers in es t a b ­
lishments employing more than one engineer.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
A worker who fires stationary boilers
used in a factory, power plant, or other e s ­
tablishment to furnish heat,
to generate power, or to supply steam for industrial processes,
and whose work involves feeding fuel to fire b y hand
or operating a mechanical stoker,
gas,
or oil burner;
and checking water and safety valves.
In addition, m a y clean, oil, or assist
in repairing boiler room equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A worker who assists another worker in one of the skilled maintenance trades, b y p e r ­
forming specific cr general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with m a ­
terials and tools;
cleaning working area, machine and equipment; assisting worker b y holding
materials or tools; and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman.
In some
trades the term helper
is synonymous with apprentice,
since the helper is expected to learn
the trade of the worker he assists.
The kind of w ork the helper is permitted to perform also
varies from trade to trade:
In some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting and
holding materials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to p e r ­
form specialized machine operations,
or parts of a trade that
are also performed b y workers
on a full-time basis.




MAINTENANCE MAN, GENERAL UTILITY
A worker who keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or structure of a n e s t a b ­
lishment (usually a small plant where specialization in maintenance w o r k is impractical) in
repair; whose duties involve the performance of operations and the use of tools and equipment
of several trades,
rather than specialization in one trade or one type of maintenance work
only, and whose work involves a combination of the following: planning and layout of w o r k r e ­
lating to repair of buildings, machines,
mechanical and/or electrical equipment;
repairing
electrical and/or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning and balancing ne w equipment; and
repairing building,
floors, stairs as well as making and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.
MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
A worker who repairs automobiles, motor trucks and tractors cf a n establishment, and
whose work involves most of the following:
examining automotive equipment to diagnose source
of trouble;
disassembling equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such han d
tools as wrenches, gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves;
reassembling
and/or installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and
aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening bod y bolts.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
A worker who repairs machinery and mechanical equipment of an establishment and whose
work involves most of the following: examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose
source of trouble; dismantling machines and performing repairs that ma i n l y involve the use of
hand tools in scraping and fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts with items o b ­
tained from stock; ordering the production of a defective part b y a machine shop or sending of
the machine
to a machine shop for major repairs;
preparing wri t t e n specifications for major
repairs or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop; and reassembling of machines,
and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
MILLWRIGHT
A worker who installs new machines
machines or heavy equipment when changes in
involves most of the following: planning and
or other specifications; using a variety of

or heavy equipment
and dismantles and installs
the plant layout are required,
and whose work
laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints
hand tools,
and rigging;
m a k i n g standard shop

36.

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

MILLWRIGHT - Continued

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE - Continued

computations relating to stresses,
strength of materials,
and centers of gravity;
aligning
and balancing of equipment;
selecting
standard tools,
equipment and parts to be used; and
installing and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives,
and
speed reducers.
In general, the m i l l w r i g h t ’s work normally requires a rounded training and
experience in the trade
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

A worker who fabricates, installs,
and maintains in good repair the
sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans,
shelves, lockers, tanks, venti­
lators, chutes,
ducts, metal roofing) of an establishment,
and whose w o r k
involves most of
the f o l lowing: planning and laying out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blue­
prints, models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheetmetal working machines;
using a variety of hand tools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping,
fitting and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required.
In general, the work
of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually acquir­
ed through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

OILER
(Greaser; lubricator)
A worker w ho lubricates,
with oil or grease,
of mechanical equipment found in an establishment.

the moving parts or wearing surfaces
Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE

CRANE OPERATOR, ELECTRIC-BRIDGE

(Painter, repair)
A worker w ho paints and redecorates walls,
woodwork, and fixtures of an establish­
ment and whose w o r k involves the following:
knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of
paint required for
different applications;
mixing colors, oils,
white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency; preparing surface for painting by removing
old finish or b y placing p u tty or filler in nail holes and interstices;
applying paint with
spray gun or brush.
PIPE FITTER, MAINTENANCE

(Overhead-crane operator; traveling-crane operator)
A worker wh o lifts and moves heavy objects with an electrically powered hoist which
is mounted on a metal bridge,
and runs along overhead rails.
The work of
the operator in­
volves:
closing switch to turn on electricity; moving electrical controller levers and brake
pedal to run the crane bridge along overhead rails, to run the hoisting trolley b a c k and forth
across the bridge, and to raise and lower the load line and anything attached to it.
(Motions
of crane are usually carried out in response to signals f rom other workers, on the ground.)
Fo r wage study purposes,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers accord­
ing to type of crane operated, as follows:

A worker who
installs and/or repairs pipe and pipe fittings in an establishment,
end whose w o r k involves most of the f o l l o w i n g : laying out of work and/or measuring to locate
position of pipe f r o m drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to
correct lengths wit h
chisel a n d hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine;
threading pipe with stocks a n d dies;
bending pipe b y hand-driven or power-driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings an d fastening pipe to hangers; m a king standard shop computa­
tions relating to pressures, flow,
an d size of pipe required;
and making standard tests to
determine whether finished pipes meet specifications.
This classification does not include
workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems.

GUARD

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

A worker who keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order and whose
wor k involves the following:
knowledge of sanitary codes regarding
installation of vents,
traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
opening clogged drains
with a plunger or p l u m b e r ’s snake; and replacing washers on leaky faucets.

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE

(Tinner; tinsmith)




Crane operator, electric-bridge (under 20 tons)
Crane operator, electric-bridge (20 tons and over)

A worker who has routine police duties,
either at fixed post or on tour, maintain­
ing order, using arms or force where necessary.
This classification includes gatemen who are
stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and other persons entering.

(Day porter, sweeper; charwoman;

Janitress)

A worker who
cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and
washrooms, or premises of a n office,
apartment house, or commercial or other establishment.
The duties performed involve a combina t ion of the following:
sweeping, mopping and/or scrub­
bing, and polishing floors; removing chips” trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furni­
,
ture, or fixtures;
polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor m a i n ­
tenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and rest rooms.
This classification does
not include workers who specialize in window washing;

37

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

ORDER FILLER

TRUCK DRIVER

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
A worker who fills shipping or transfer orders from stored merchandise in acco r d ­
ance with specifications on sales slip, customer orders,
or other instructions.
May, in a d ­
dition to filling orders and indicating items
filled or omitted,
keep records
of outgoing
orders, requisition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other
related duties.

A worker who drives a truck within a city or industrial area
to transport m a t e r i ­
als, merchandise, equipment,
or m e n between various types' of establishments such as:
manu­
facturing plants,
freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments and/or b e ­
tween retail establishments and customers’ houses or places of business.
Duties m a y also in­
volve loading
or unloading truck with or without helpers, ma k i n g minor mechanical repairs,
and keeping truck in good working order.
This classification does not include driver-salesmen
or over-the-road drivers.

PACKER
A worker who prepares
finished products for shipment or storage b y placing them in
boxes or other containers,
the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
size and number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment.
The work of the packer
involves a combination of the f o l l owing:
knowledge of various items
of stock in order to verify content; selecticn"of appropriate type and size of container; in­
serting enclosures in container;
using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or
damage;
closing and sealing containers; and applying labels
or entering identifying data on
container.
This classification does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.

F or wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies
according to size and type of equipment operated, as follows:
Truck
Truck
Truck
Truck

driver,
driver,
driver,
driver,

truck drivers

light (under 1-1/2 tons)
medium (l-l/2 to and including 4 tons)
h eavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
h eavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER, POWER
SHIPPING—A N D -RECEIVING CLERK
A worker who prepares merchandise for shipment,
or who receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments cf merchandise c r other materials.
t
Shipping work involves:
a knowledge
of s h a p i n g procedures, practices,
routes, available means of transportation and rates;
and
preparing records of the goods shipped,
making up bills of lading,
posting weight and ship­
ping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records.
May, in addition, direct or assist in
preparing the merchandise for shipment.
Receiving work generally involves:
verifying or di ­
recting others in verifying the
correctness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices,
or other records;
checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise or
materials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies these workers on
the following basis:

A worker who operat es a manually-controlled gasoline
or electric-powered truck or
tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.
For wage study purposes,
the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers ac c o r d ­
ing to type of truck operated, as follows:
Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)

WATCHMAN
A worker who
guards premises of plant property, warehouses,
office buildings, or
banks.
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft, and
illegal entry.

Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping-and-receiving clerk
STOCK HANDLER AND TRUCKER, HAND
(Loader a nd unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker;
stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)

Paints and Varnishes

stockman or
LABELER A ND PACKER

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or more of the following:
loading and unloading various materials
and merchandise
on or from freight" cars^
trucks or other
transporting devices;
unpacking,
shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; transporting m a t e ­
rials or merchandise b y hand truck, car or wheelbarrow to proper location.
May, in addition,
keep a record of materjals handled or check items against invoices or other records.
This
classification does not include longshoremen, who load and unload ships.




A worker who pastes identifying labels on cans or other
containers b y hand or b y
means of a labeling machine, and/or who packs labeled containers into boxes or cartons.
MAINTENANCE MAN, GENERAL UTILITY
(See Maintenance and Power Plant, page

35, for description.)

33.

Paints and Varnishes - Continued

MIXER

Machinery Industries

ASSEMBLER
(Batchmaker; compounder)

A worker who operates one or more mixing machines in which component parts (liquids
or solids) are blended or mixed in controlled amounts to produce intermediate or finished
products.

TECHNICIAN
(Assistant chemist)
A worker who performs predetermined chemical tests, for example, to ascertain
whether purchased raw materials meet plant specifications, or to determine whether processing
is being performed according to plant standards or specifications. Usually is a college grad­
uate in chemistry or has equivalent training and experience.

TINTER
(Color matcher, enamel maker)
A worker who colors or tints paints, and whose work involves a combination of the
following:
blending basic color pigments in correct proportions to match standard color
sample or according to specifications; using hand paddle or power mixer to mix ingredients
thoroughly; checking weight and/or viscosity of batch against sample or specifications, and
making necessary additions to mixture to meet requirements. In addition, may add thinner to
ground paint.

TRUCKER, HAND
A worker who pushes or pulls hand trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used for transport­
ing goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other estab­
lishment, and usually loads or unloads hand trucks or wheelbarrows.
May stack materials in
storage bins, etc., and may keep records of materials moved.
VARNISH MAKER
(Kettleman; oil cooker; varnish cooker)
A worker who cooks necessary ingredients such as resins and gums in kettle to make
various types c varnishes and oils according to specifications, and whose work involves: regu­
f
lating controls for temperature; adding ingredients according to formula or other specifica­
tions checking viscosity of batch and determining when it meets the standard sample. In addi­
tion, may also add thinner to the mixture. See also definition for Mixer.




(Bench assembler; floor assembler; jig assembler; line assembler; sub-assembler)
A worker who assembles and/or fits together parts to form complete units or subas­
semblies at a bench, conveyor line, or on the floor, depending upon the size of the units and
the organization of the production process. The work of the assembler may include processing
operations requiring the use of hand tools in scraping, chipping and filing of parts to obtain
a desired fit as well as power tools and special equipment when punching, riveting, soldering
or welding of parts is necessary. Workers who perform any of these processing operations ex­
clusively as part of specialized assembling operations are not included in this classification.
Class A - A worker who assembles parts into complete units or subassemblies that re­
quire fitting of parts and decisions regarding proper performance of any component part or the
assembled unit, and whose work involves any combination of the following: assembling from
drawings, blueprints or other written specifications; assembling units composed of a variety
of parts and/or subassemblies; assembling large units requiring careful fitting and adjusting
of parts to obtain specified clearances; and using a variety of hand and powered tools and
precision measuring instruments.
Class B - A worker who assembles parts into units or subassemblies in accordance
with standard and prescribed procedures, and whose work involves any combination of the fol­
lowing: assembling a limited range of standard and familiar products composed of a number of
small or medium-sized parts requiring some fitting or adjusting; assembling large units that
require little or no fitting of component parts; working under conditions where accurate per­
formance and completion of work within set time limits are essential for subsequent assem­
bling operations; and using a limited variety of hand or powered tools.
Class C - A worker who performs short-cycle, repetitive assembling operations, and
whose work does not involve any fitting or making decisions regarding proper performance of
the component parts or assembling procedures.

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE
Performs such operations as drilling, reaming, countersinking, counterboring, spot­
facing and tapping on one or more types of single-spindle or multiple-spindle drill presses.
This classification includes operators of all types of drill presses other than
radial-drill presses and portable drilling equipment.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine for operations requiring care­
ful positioning, blocking and aligning of units; to determine speeds, feeds, tooling and oper­
ation sequence; and to make all necessary adjustments during operation to achieve requisite
dimensions or
Operator who i required to set up machine where speeds, feeds, tooling and operation
s
sequence are prescribed but whose work involves very difficult operations such as deep drill­
ing, or boring to exacting specifications.

39
Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE - Continued
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make all necessary adjust­
ments during operation or
Operator who i required to maintain set-up made by others, including making all ne­
s
cessary adjustments during operation on work requiring considerable care on the part of the
operator to maintain specified tolerances.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine, on routine and repetitive
operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
(See Maintenance and Power Plant, page

35,

for description.)

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR
Operates an engine lathe for shaping external and internal cylindrical surfaces of
metal objects. The engine lathe, basically characterized by a headstock, tailstock, and powerfed tool carriage, is a general-purpose machine tool used primarily for turning. It is also
commonly used in performing such operations as facing, boring, drilling, and threading; and,
equipped with appropriate attachments, it may be used for a very wide variety of special ma­
chining operations.
The stock may be held in position by the lathe "centers” or by various
types of chucks and fixtures.
This classification excludes operators c bench lathes, automatic lathes, automaticf
screw machines, end hand-turret lathes and hand-screw machines.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints or layout, in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make necessary
adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where care is
essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who i required to maintain operation set up by others, by making
s
all necessary adjustments, where care is essential to achieve very close tolerances or
Operator who is required to set up machine on standard or roughing operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make adjustments during
operation.




ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR - Continued
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing,
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

to dress tools and

Class C - Operator who i required only to operate machine on routine and repetitive
s
operations! to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.
GRINDING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Centerless-grinder operator; cylindrical-grinder operator; external-grinder
operator; internal-grinder operator; surface-grinder operator; Universalgrinder operator)
A worker who operates one of several types of precision grinding machines to grind
internal and external surfaces of metal parts to a smooth and even finish and to required
dimensions. Precision grinding is used primarily as a finishing operation on previously ma­
chined parts, and consists of applying abrasive wheels rotating at high speed to the surfaces
to be ground.
In addition to the types of grinding machines indicated above, this classification
includes operators o f other production grinding machines such an:
single-purpose grinders,
(drill grinders, broach grinders, saw grinders, gear cutter grinders, thread grinders, etc.),
and automatic and semi-automatic general purpose grinding machines.
Class A - An operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds,
tooling and operation sequence; andto make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or
An operator who i required to set up machine from drawings or blueprints or lay-out
s
in accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make nec­
essary adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where
care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - An operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are either prescribed or are known from past
experience; to make adjustments during operation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
An operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, by making all
necessary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools and
to select coolants and cutting oils.
Class C - An operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repeti­
tive operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to
stop the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.

Machinery Industries - Continued

INSPECTOR

Machinery Industries - Continued

MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR

A worker w ho performs such
operations as examining parts or products for flaws and
defects, and checking their dimensions and appearance to determine whether they meet the r e ­
quired standards and specifications.
Class A - A worker who inspects parts,
products,
and/or processes with responsi­
bility for decisions regarding
the quality of the product and/or operations,
and whose work
involves a ny combination of the following:
thorough knowledge
of the processing operations
in the branch
of work to which he is assigned,
including the use of a variety of precision
measuring instruments;
interpreting drawings and specifications
in inspection work on units
composed of a large number of component parts;
examining a variety of products or processing
operations; determining causes of flaws in products and/or processes and suggesting necessary
changes to correct work methods; and devising inspection procedures for n ew products.
Class B - A worker who inspects parts, products,
and/or processes and whose work
involves a ny combination of the following:
knowledge of processing operations in the branch
of wor k to which he is assigned, limited to familiar products and processes or where p erform­
ance is
dependent on past experience;
performing inspection operations on products and/or
processes having rigid specifications,
but where the
inspection procedures involving a se ­
quence of inspection operations,
including decisions regarding proper fit or performance of
some parts; and using precision measuring instruments.
Class C - A worker who inspects parts, products and/or processes and whose work in­
volves any combination of the following:
short-cycle, repetitive inspection operations; using
a standardized, special-purpose measuring instrument repetitively; and visual examination of
parts or products, rejecting units havi n g obvious deformities or flaws.

JANITOR

(Milling-machine operator, automatic; milling-machine operator, hand)
Performs a variety of wor k such as grooving,
planing, and shaping metal objects on
a milling machine, which removes material from metal surfaces b y the cutting action of m u l t i ­
toothed rotating cutters of various sizes and shapes.
Milling-machine types v a r y from the manually controlled machines employed
production to fully automatic (conveyor-fed) machines found in plants engaged in mass
tion.
This classification includes operators of all types of milling machines except
purpose millers such as thread millers,
duplicators, die sinkers, pantograph millers
graving millers.

in unit
produc­
single­
and en­

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments daring operation to achieve r eq­
uisite dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints, or lay-out in
accordance with prescribed feeds,
speeds, tooling and operation sequence, and to make neces­
sary adjustments during operation where changes in wor k and set-up are frequent and where con­
siderable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator m a y be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who
is required to set up machines on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; to make adjustments during oper­
ation; and to maintain prescribed tolerances or
Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, b y making all neces­
sary adjustments, where considerable care is essential to achieve very close tolerances.

(Sweeper; cleaner)
A worker who sweeps and cleans shop areas, washrooms and offices, and removes waste
and refuse.

Operator m a y be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.

M ay wash floors and windows.

MACHINIST, PRODUCTION
A worker who is required to fabricate metal parts involving a series of progressive
operations and whose w o r k
involves most of the following: understanding of w ritten instruc­
tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m a c h i n i s t ’s hand
tools and precision measuring instruments;
setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to d i ­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; understanding of the working p r oper­
ties of the common metals;
and selecting standard materials, parts and equipment needed for
his work.
In general, the m a c h i n i s t ’s w o r k normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and e x ­
perience .




Class C - Operator who is required to operate only, on routine and repetitive oper­
ations;
to make only minor adjustments during operation; and whe n trouble occurs to stop m a ­
chine an d call o n foreman, leadman or set-up m a n to correct the operation.

TOOL-AND-DIE MAKER
(Die maker;

jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker;

gauge maker)

A worker who
constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges,
jigs, fixtures or
dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work, and whose w ork involves most of the
f ollowing:
planning and laying out of work f rom models,
blueprints, drawings or other oral
and written specifications;
using a variety of tool-and-die m a k e r ’s hand tools and precision
measuring instruments;
understanding of the working properties
of common metals and alloys;
setting up and operating of machine tools and related equipment; making necessary shop compu-

kl

Power Laundries

Machinery Industries - Continued

TOOL-AND-DI? MAKER - Continued

CLERK, RET A I L RECEIVING

tations relating to dimensions of work, speed, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating
of metal parts during fabrication as w e l l as of finished tools and dies to achieve required
qualities;
working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed toler­
ances and allowances;
and selecting appropriate materials, tools and processes.
In general,
the tool-and-die m a k e r s work requires
a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom pra c ­
tice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.

A person w h o receives w o r k from routemen or from customers over the counter in the
receiving office or store of a dry-cleaning or laundry establishment and whose w o r k involves
most of the f o l l owing: maintaining a record
of articles or bundles received; returning c o m ­
pleted w o r k to customers w h o call for it; collecting payment and maintaining simple records
of money received; and in establishments where dry cleaning is done, fastening a n identifying
marker to each article,
examining an article for defects such as holes, stains or tears, and
making a record of the identification symbol assigned to each article w i t h a brief description
of the article and of any defects noted. This classification does not include store managers.

For wage study purposes,
of shop, as follows:

the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers by type
EXTRACTOR OPERATOR

Tool-and-die makers, jobbing shops
Tool-and-die makers, other than jobbing shops

A worker w h o removes surplus moisture from materials
(such as w e t cloth, clothing,
knit goods, and yarn) by operating an extractor and whose w o r k involves most of the f o l l o w i n g :
loading material
into perforated drum of machine by hand or hoist;
closing lid and starting
machine, allowing it to run a predetermined time or until fluid stops flowing from drain; r e ­
moving partly dried materials; and hand trucking materials w i t h i n the department. In addition
the worker may assist the W a s h e r in loading, operating, or unloading the wa s h i n g machine.

TRUCKER, HAND

(See Paints and Va r n i s h e s , page

(Whizzer operator)

38> for description,)
FINISHER, FLATWORK, MACHINE

WELDER, HAND

A worker w h o fuses (welds) metal objects together by means of an oxyacetylene torch
or arc welding apparatus in the fabrication of metal shapes and in repairing broken or cracked
metal objects.
In addition to performing hand welding or brazing operation,
he may also lay
out guide lines or marks on metal parts and may cut metal w i t h a cutting torch.

Class A - W o r k e r w h o performs wel d i n g operations requiring most of the following:
planning and
laying out of w o r k from drawings,
blueprints or other wri t t e n specifications;
knowledge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of w o r k and d e ­
termining operation sequence; welding of high pressure vessels or other objects involving c r i ­
tical safety and load requirements;
working from a variety of positions; and ability to weld
with gas or arc ap p a r a t u s .

Class B - W o r k e r w h o is required to perform either arc or gas welding operations on
repetitive work, where no critical safety and load requirements are involved; where the wor k
calls mainly for one position welding; and where the layout and planning of the w o r k are p e r ­
formed by others.




A worker w h o performs
flatwork finishing operations b y machine and whose w o r k i n ­
volves one or more of the following: shaking out the creases in semi-dry w a s h i n g to prepare
it for the
flatwork ironing machine;
feeding clean, damp flatwork pieces
into the flatwork
Ironing machine by placing the articles on the feeder rollers; and catching or receiving a r t i ­
cles as they emerge from the machine and partially folding them.

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
(See Maintenance and Power P l ant, page

35> for description.)

IDENTIFIER
A worker w h o
sorts soiled bundles,
places the
contents into various bags and by
means of flags,
pins or other devices identifies the net w i t h a customer tag or ticket.
In
addition may weigh, list or count some or all articles contained in each bundle. This cl a s s i ­
fication does not include workers w ho mark or otherwise identify each
individual piece c o n ­
tained in a bundle.

k2

Auto Repair Shops - Continued

Pcarer Laundries - Continued

MARKER

GREASER

A worker who marks or affixes "by hand or mechanical means, customer identifying
symbols on soiled garments, linens, or other articles. In addition may weigh, list, or count
articles contained in each bundle, sort contents of each bundle into groups according to treat­
ment to be received, or note and record any damaged or stained condition of articles. This
classification does not include workers who do sorting, examining, or listing without marking
the various articles.
FRESSER, MACHINE, SHIRTS
A worker who operates or tends the operation of one or more of the several type
machines that press shirts, and who perform such shirt pressing operations as body pressing,
bosom pressing, collar and cuff pressing, and/or sleeve pressing.

(Lubricating man)

Lubricates, by means of hand-operated or compressed-air operated grease guns and
oil sprays, all parts of automobile or truck where lubrication i s ‘
required, using proper type
lubricant on the various points on chassis or motors; drains old lubricant from lubricant reser­
voirs and refills with new. May perform other related duties, such as checking radiator water
level, checking and adding distilled water to battery, repairing tires, etc. May also perform
duties of washer.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE
WASHER, MACHINE
A worker who operates one or more washing machines to wash household linens, gar­
ments, curtains, drapes and other articles and whose work involves the following: manipula­
ting valves, switches, and levers to start and stop the machine and to control the amount and
temperature of water for the sudsing and rinsing of each batch; mixing and adding soap, bluing
and bleaching solutions; and loading and unloading the washing machine. In addition may make
minor repairs to washing machine.

Repairs automobiles and trucks, performing such duties as disassembling and overhaul­
ing engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, and other assemblies on automobiles, replac­
ing worn or broken parts, grinding valves, adjusting brakes, tightening body bolts, aligning
wheels, etc. In addition to general automotive mechanics, this classification also Includes
workers whose duties are limited to repairing and overhauling the motor.

WRAPPER, BUNDLE

Class A - Repairs, rebuilds, or overhauls engines, transmissions, clutches, rear
ends or other assemblies, replaces worn or broken parts, grinds valves, bores cylinders, fits
rings. In addition may adjust brakes or lights, tighten body bolts, align wheels, etc. May
remove or replace motors, transmissions or other assemblies. May do machining of parts.

A worker who wraps packages or finished products, or packs articles, goods, or m a ­
terials in cardboard boxes and secures the package or box with twine, ribbon, gummed tape, or
paste. The worker may segregate articles according to size or type, or according to customer’s
order and inspect articles for defects before wrapping.

Auto Repair Shops

BODY REPAIRMAN, METAL

Class B - Adjusts brakes or lights, tightens body bolts, aligns wheels, or makes
other adjustments or repairs of a minor nature; or removes and replaces motors, transmissions,
clutches, rear ends, etc., but does no repairing, rebuilding, or overhauling of these assem­
blies. Workers who are employed as helpers to Mechanics are excluded fl*om this classification.

WASHER, AUTOMOBILE

(Automobile-collision serviceman; fender and body repairman; body man)
(Car washer; wash boy)
Repairs damaged automobile fenders and bodies to restore their original shape and
smoothness of surface by hammering out and filling dents, and by welding breaks in the metal.
May remove bolts and nuts,
take off old fenders, and install new fenders. May perform such
related tasks as replacing broken glass and repairing damaged radiators and woodwork.
May
paint repaired surfaces.




Washes automobiles and trucks; sweeps and cleans interior of automobile; may polish
auto vehicle bodies, using polishing compound and a cloth. Various parts of this Job may be
performed by individual workers in automobile laundries production lines.

**3.

Index
Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Apprentice (malt liquors) ............................................
Assembler (machinery) ...............................................
Bench hand (bakeries) .*........... ..................................
Biller, machine (hilling machine) ...................................
Biller, machine (hilling machine) (railroads) ............ ...........
Biller, machine (hookkeeping machine) ............................. .
Bindery voman (printing) ............................................
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) ............................
Bookbinder (printing) ................................................
Bookkeeper, hand .....................................................
Bookkeeper, hand (railroads) ........................................
Bookkeeping-machine operator ................... .....................
Bookkeeping-machine operator (railroads) .................... ........
Braver (malt liquors) ................................................
Bricklayer (building construction) ...................................
Building laborer (building construction) .............................
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) ................... .
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type) ..........
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) (railroads) .........
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type) (railroads)
Carpenter (building construction) ..................... ..............
Carpenter, maintenance .............................................. .
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ......... .......... ..............
C l e a n e r ....... ......................................................
Cleaner (railroads) ...... ...........................................
Clerk, accounting ....................................................
Clerk, accounting (railroads) ........................................
Clerk, file ...... ...................................................
Clerk, file (railroads) ............................. ................
Clerk, general .......................................................
Clerk, general (railroads) ................... .......................
Clerk, order ................ ........................................
Clerk, order (railroads) ............................................
Clerk, payroll ............................................... .......
Clerk, payroll (railroads) .... ......................................
Clerk, retail, receiving (laundries) .......................
Coal passer (building service) ......................................
Compositor, hand (printing) ..........................................
Conductor (local transit) ...... .....................................
Crane operator, electric bridge .....................................
Draftsman ...................................... .....................
Draftsman (railroads) ••••••............. ............................
Draftsman, chief .............................
Draftsman, chief (railroads) ...... ..................................
Draftsman, junior ........ ...........................................
Draftsman, junior (railroads) ................. ......................
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (machinery) .......




-

38
_

32
32
32
-

k2
-

32
32
32
32
_

_
-

25
19 , 20 , 2 1
2h

6
23
7
25
23
25
5, 7
23
5, 7
23
25
2k
2k

32
32
32
32

7
8
23
23

_

2k
12

3^
3k

36
36
32
32
32
32
33
33
33
33
33
33
hi

_

23
16
23
5, 8
23
5, 8
23
5, 8
23
5, 9
23
6, 9
23
22
2k

-

25

-

2k

36
3^

15
12
23
12
23
12

3k

3^
3h
3k
3k

38

23
19 , 2 0 , 2 1

Duplicating-machine operator ..... .......
Duplicating-machine operator (railroads) ,
Electrician (building construction) .... .
Electrician (building service) ...........
Electrician, maintenance ..... .
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .....
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) ....
Electrotyper (printing) .................
Engineer, stationary .....................
Engineer, stationary (railroads) .......
Elevator operator (building service) ....
Elevator starter (building service) ....
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .......
Extractor operator (laundries) .........
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) .
Fireman (building service) ..............
Fireman, stationary boiler .............
Fireman, stationary boiler (laundries) ..
Fireman, stationary boiler (railroads) ..
First hand (bakeries) ••••••••••••••«••.•
Foreman (bakeries) .....................
Greaser (auto repair shops) ............
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ...
Guard ..... ........................
Guard (local transit) ...................
Helper (bakeries) .......................
Helper, motortruck driver ..... .
Helper, trades, maintenance ............
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) .
leer (bakeries) ......... ..........
Identifier (laundries) ...••••••........
Ingredient scaler (bakeries) ..... .....
Inspector (bakeries) ............
Inspector (machinery) ..................
Janitor ................ ..............
Janitor (building service) ............
Janitor (machinery) ....... .............
Janitor (railroads) ....................
Janitress (building service) ............
Key-punch operator .......... ...........
Key-punch operator (railroads) ..........
Labeler and packer (paints and varnishes)
Laborer (malt liquors) .................
Machine operator (printing) ..........
Machine tender (machinist) (printing) ...
Machinist, maintenance ............. ••••
Machinist, production (machinery) .......

33
33
-

35
39
35
-

35
35
_

39
kl
kl

6, 9
23
2k
2k

13
19 , 20, 21
23
25
13
23
2k
2k

19 , 20 , 21
22
22

-

2k

35

13
22
23

hi

35
-

k2

39
36
_
-

35
35
-

kl
_

ko

36

2k
2k

23
19, 21
16
2k
2k

25
13
23
2k
22
2k
2k

19 , 20, 21
16
2h

ko

36

19 , 20, 21
23

-

2k

33
33
37

9
23
22

-

35
*•-0

25
25
25
13
19, 2 1

Page Number
Description Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description Earnings or rate




35
37
42
42

25
14
22
22
24
23

35

14

35
35

14
23
19, 20, 21

40
35
38
-

34
33
33
33
33

36
«
-

37
-

14
24
22

24
24
25
12

6
23
9
23
14
24
24
24
24
16
24

37

16

-

36

24
14
23
25
15
23

^
-

24
24

36
36
36

15
16

23

42
_
37

25
22
25
25
25
17

36
36
«
36

Second hand (bakeries) ...•••••..... .
Secretary .......................... .
Secretary (railroads) ...................... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ..................
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ................ .
Shipping clerk .............•••••••....... .......
Stenographer, general ................... •••••••••
Stenographer, general (railroads) ................
Stenographer, technical
Stereotyper (printing) ........................
Stock handler ................... .................
Stock handler (railroads) ........................
Switchboard operator ............................ .
Switchboard operator (railroads) ......
••••
Switchboard operator-receptionist ................
Tabulating-machine operator.... .................
Tabulating-machine operator (railroads)
Technician (paints and varnishes) •••••..........
Third hand (bakeries) ......... ..................
Tinter (paints and varnishes) ....... ..........
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ...................
T r a c e r ............. .............................
Tracer (railroads)
Transcribing-machine operator, general
••••
Transcribing-machine operator, general (railroads)
Transcribing-machine operator, technical ........
Truck driver .................... .................
Trucker, h a n d ....................... ............
Trucker, hand (machinery) ...........
Trucker, hand (paints and varnishes) ............
Trucker, hand (railroads) ................. ••••••
Trucker, power .......••••............
Trucker, power (fork-lift) (railroads) ...... .
Trucker, power (other than fork-lift) (railroads)
Typist ................................ ........
Typist (railroads) ...............................
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes) ••••••.... .
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ••••••....
Washer, machine (laundries) •••••••...... ........
W a t c h m a n ................ .................... ••••
Watchman (railroads) ......................
Water tender (building seivice) ...... •••••......
Welder, hand (machinery) ............ ............
Window washer (building service) •••••••••••••••••
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) ......................
.

Mailer (printing)
Maintenance man, general u t i l i t y ....................... *..... ......... ..
Maintenance man, general utility (paints and varnishes)
................. .
Marker (laundries) ................ .................. ........ .............
Matron (building service) ...... •.................... .....................
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ..... ................... .........
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) •••••.......... ...... .
Mechanic, maintenance
.... ................... .......
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) .............
Millings-machine operator (machinery)
..... .
Millwright ......
..... ..................*..... ..........
Mixer (bakeries)
Mixer (paints and varnishes) ......
Molderman (bakeries) ........
Motorman (local transit) ..............
Motortruck driver ............
Nurse, industrial (registered) .......
Office b o y .............. ............ ............................. ........
Office boy (railroads) ......
Office girl ...........
Office girl (railroads)
...... ................................ .
O i l e r ..... ..............................................................
Oiler (building service) ........... ................... ...... ........ ...#
Operating engineer(building service) .....................
.
Operator, bus, trolley coach or streetcar (local transit) .......
Operator, divider (bakeries) ................. ......................... .
Order filler ...............
.
Ovenman (bakeries) ............................
Packer ......................
Painter (building construction) •••••••••••.....
Painter, maintenance.......... ••••••••••...............
Painter, maintenance (railroads) .....................
Photoengraver (printing) ................................
..
Pipe fitter, maintenance...............
Pipe fitter, maintenance (railroads) .....
Plasterer (building construction) .... ..................... ••••.... .
Plumber (building construction) .....................
Plumber, maintenance .......
P o r t e r ........
..
Porter (railroads) .....................
Press assistant (printing) ...............................
Pressei*, machine, shirts (laundries) ..........
Press feeder (printing) .......................... ........................ .
Pressman, cylinder presses (printing) ......
Pressman, web presses (printing) .........
Receiving clerk .............................. .............................

33
33
36
37
37
33
33
33

-

37
37
33
33
33
33
33
38

-

38
40
34
34
34
34
34
37
37
41
38
37
37
37
37
34
34
38
42
42
37
37

41

-

42

24
10
23
1$
17
17
6 , 10
23
10
25
17
23
10
23
10
6, 11
23
22
24
22
20, 2 1
12
23
11
23
11
17
17
20, 2 1
22
23
18
23
23
11
23
22
23
22
18
23
24
20
24
22

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1951


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102