View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Occupational Wage Survey
A TLA N TA , GEORGIA
March 1951

B ulletin No.

I03I

U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
M A U R I C E J. T O B I N , S E C R E T A R Y




Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s
Ewan Cl agu e, Commi ssi oner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 30 cents




Contents

Page
Number

INTRODUCTION .........................................................................

1

THE ATLANTA. METROPOLITAN AREA ........................................................
Labor and Industry In the Atlanta Area .............................. ............

1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE ..........................................................
Cross-Industry Occupations ..............
Offloe clerical occupations ........................... ............ ........
Professional and technical occupations ........................................
Maintenance and power plant occupations .............................. .
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations ........... ...........
Characteristic Industry Occupations..... .................... .
Straight-tiro© average earnings ..................................
Union wage scales ...... ......................................................
Minimum Entrance R a t e s ...... ........ ................ ...........................

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES .........................................................

3

1

3

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area "basis 1. Office occupations ............. .............................................
2. Professional and technical occupations .......................................
3. Maintenance and power plant occupations ............. ............ .
4. Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations.... ............... ......
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an Industry "basis 5 . Women's, and misses' dresses ............................. .........
6 . Machinery Industries ..................
7 . Department stores ................. ......................... ............
8. Banking ............... ............ ................................... .
9. Power laundries ......................................................... .
10. Auto repair shops ................................................ ............
Union wage scales for selected occupations 11. Bakeries
.... ......... .................................... .
12. Building construction
..... ............................ ........
13. Local transit operating employees.... ........................ ..........
14. Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s .......... ........ ...........................
15. Printing ................... ....................................... ...........
Entrance rates 16. Minimum entrance rates for plant workers .......... ...........................
Wage practices 17. Shift differential provisions ...... . ................................. .......
18. Scheduled weekly hours .............. .............................. .
19. Paid holidays .................................................................
20. Paid vacations ................................ ............. ................. .
21. Paid sick l e a v e ..... ........................................................
22. Nonproduction bonuses .......................
23. Insurance and pension plans .............................................. .

17
18
18
19
20
21
21

APPENDIX:
A - Scope and method of survey ......................... ........................ .
B - Descriptions of occupations studied ......... ...................... .

23

I N D E X ................................................................................

34

4
9
10
11

13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
16

16
17
17

22

In tro d u c tio n J/

Labor and Industry in the Atlanta Area

The Atlanta area is one of several important industrial centers in which the Bureau
of Labor Statistics conducted occupational wage surveys during early 1951* 2/
Occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a commu­
nity-wide basis. Cross-industry methods of sampling were thus utilized in compiling earnings
data for the following types of occupations:
(a) office clerical; (b) professional and tech­
nical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing and shipping. In pre­
senting earnings information for such jobs (tables 1 through 4) separate data have been pro­
vided wherever possible for individual broad industry divisions. Occupations characteristic
of particular, important, local industries have been studied as heretofore on an industry
basis, within the framework of the community survey# 2/
Although only a limited amount of such data was compiled in the present survey,
greater detail will be provided in future studies. Union scales are presented in lieu of (or
supplementing) occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers are employed under terms of collective bargaining agreements, and the
contract or minimum rates are indicative of prevailing pay. practice. Data on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as vacation and sick leave
allowances, paid holidays, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance and pension plans have been
collected and summarized#

The

A t la n t a

M e tr o p o lita n

A re a

The Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Fulton, DeKalb, and Cobb Counties) ranked twentythird in the Nation in population count and had more than 660,000 inhabitants in 1950# Half
of this total was concentrated in Atlanta, one of the most important commercial, financial,
and industrial cities in the South#
Served by 15 main lines of 8 railroad systems, 10 major
air routes, and an extensive network of highways, Atlanta is one of the Nation*s pivotal dis­
tributing points. The city is ranked as the third largest telegraph center, the third largest
telephone switching center in the world, and the tenth In air mail volume in the United States,
indicating its importance as a regional center.
The Bureau*s estimate of the cost of the annual budget for an Atlanta worker*s fam­
ily was $3,833> the fifth highest annual cost among the 34 large cities surveyed 3n the United
States duri.ng October 1950#
The budget is described as providing a ”modest but adequate”
level of living for an urban worker *s family of four persons - an employed father, a housewife
not gainfully employed, and two children under 15 years of age.

1/ Prepared in the Bureau*s Division of Wage Statistics by Harry H. Hall, Regional Wage
Analyst, Region III, Atlanta, Ga.
The planning and central direction of the program was the
responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general supervision of
Harry Ober, Chief of the Branch of Industry Wage Studies.
2/ Other areas studied:
Boston, Mass.; Chicago, 111.; Denver, Colo.; New York, N#Y#;
and San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.
Similar studies were conducted in 1950 in Buffalo, N#Y.;
Denver, Colo.; Philadelphia, Pa.; and San Francis co-Oakland, Calif.
y See Appendix A for discussion of scope and method of survey.




Wage and salary nonagricultural employment in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area totaled
almost 269,000 during March 1951# More than 1,000 manufacturing plants provided employment to
about 61,000 persons in the 3-county area. Commodities produced were valued over $400,000,000
in 1950.
Diversification of products is such that only 4 broad industry groups employed in
excess of 5,000 persons in manufacturing. The textile industries employed about 10,000; food
and kindred products about 9,500; apparel industries about 7,000; and transportation equip­
ment industries (automobile assembling) 7,000.
As the leading distribution center of the Southeast, Atlanta*s wholesale and retail
trade operations are very extensive.
About 28,000 persons were employed in more than 1,900
wholesale trade establishments and 45,400 wage and salary employees were distributed over the
payrolls of more than 3>400 retail trade establishments.
Approximately 15,000 persons were
employed in the finance, insurance, and real estate industries. Exclusive of the substantial
employment in the railroad industry, a labor force of more than 21,000 was required by the
industry group that includes transportation, communication, and other public utilities. Serv­
ice industries provided employment to 31,500 workers#
During the past 5 years, about 50,000 building units were started in. the 3-oounty
metropolitan area# Approximately 17,000 persons were employed in the construction trades dull­
ing the first quarter of 1951, and in spite of restrictions 2,880 building units were started
in the 3-month period#
Atlanta is the center for most of the United States Government activity in the
Southeast#
More than 75 departments and agencies employed about 20,000 people within the
metropolitan area# Total government employment in the area (Federal, State, county and munic­
ipal) was estimated at 37,000.
Less than half of the plant workers in the industries and establishment size groups
surveyed in the Atlanta area were employed in establishments having written agreements with
labor organizations. About three-fifths of the plant workers in manufacturing and four-fifths
in the transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and public utilities industry were
employed in union establishments.
These were the only two major industry divisions in which
over half of the nonoffice workers were covered by agreements.
The degree of unionization
among office workers was considerably lower than among plant workers.
About 1 in every 10
office workers was employed by a firm having an agreement with a union representing office
workers#

O c c u p a tio n a l W a g e

S tru c tu re

The March 1951 period was preceded by an active period of wage adjustments.
Al­
though few wage increases were granted between January and July 1950, accelerated economic
forces with anticipated wage freezes following the outbreak of hostilities in Korea spurred
labor to demand more substantial increases during the latter half of 1950 and early 1951.
These general increases usually ranged from 5 to 15 cents an hour#
Increases were also re­
ceived on an individual basis by many thousands of workers in addition to or in place of gen­
eral increases.

2

.

Slightly more than half the office and plant workers were employed in establish­
ments that had formalized rate structures with a range of rates for each job*
About 22 per-­
cent of the plant workers, as contrasted with less than 1 percent of the clerical workers,
were employed in plants having a single rate for each job* The remainder of the plants had no
formal rate plans and each worker was paid according to individual merit or other considera­
tions rather than on a job basis* Almost half the clerical workers and slightly over a fourth
of the plant workers were employed in these establishments*
In the discussion of wages which follows, two main occupational groupings are dis­
tinguished: (1) cross-industry occupations, such as office clerical occupations, professional
and technical occupations, maintenance occupations, and custodial, warehousing and shipping
occupations; and (2) characteristic industry occupations* The first group of occupations was
studied on a cross-industry basis from employer payroll records* These occupations are usual­
ly found in all or a number of industries*
In general, the characteristic industry occupa­
tions are peculiar to a specific industry*
As indicated below, straight-time average rates
or earnings are shown for some industries; union scales are shown for others*
Cross-Industry Occupations
Office clerical occupations— Among the 25 office occupations in which women *s sala­
ries were studied, average weekly earnings varied from a high of $56 for secretaries to a low
of $35 for routine file clerks* General stenographers, the largest occupational group, aver­
aged $47*
Other numerically important groups were general clerks averaging $43 and account­
ing clerks averaging $46 per week. Weekly salaries for women in manufacturing industries were
generally from $2 to $5 higher than those for women in nonmanufacturing industries (table 1).
Average weekly salaries of men varied from a high of $68 for hand bookkeepers to
about $34 for office boys*
The largest groups of men office workers studied were accounting
clerks and general clerks who averaged $53 and $53*50, respectively* Men*s salaries were also
slightly higher in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing industries*
Average salaries of men, except for file clerks and office boys, were considerably
higher than those of women in comparable jobs surveyed. Differences in average salaries for
men and women in particular occupations, however, generally do not reflect differences in
rates within the same establishment*
Office job averages of March 1951, in general, were from $2 to $3 higher than those
reported in comparable jobs studied in the Bureau*s previous office salary survey of January
1950.
Professional and technical occupations— As shown in table 2, men working as drafts­
men had average weekly earnings of $71*
The average was the same for workers in both manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Junior draftsmen (men) averaged $51 on an. allindustiy basis and $39*50 in manufacturing*
Women employed as industrial nurses averaged
$53*50 per week.
Maintenance and power plant occupations— Among maintenance and power plant jobs
selected for study, millwrights had the highest average rate, $1*97 an hour*
This average
hourly rate was followed by $1*91 for sheet-metal workers and $1.85 for electricians*
The
lowest average rates among the jobs studied were $1*21 for stationary boiler firemen and
$1*11 for oilers.
Custodial, warehousing and shipping occupations— The average hourly pay for men
ranged from 84 cents for truck drivers (light) to $1.41 for guards. The largest group of men
studied, stock handlers and hand truckers, averaged 99 cents an hour, as did packers, another
large group.
Receiving clerics and shipping clerics averaged $1.26 and $1*27, respectively*
Watchmen averaged 95 cents while men janitors, porters, and cleaners averaged 90 cents an
hour.




Characteristic Industry Occupations
Straight-time average earnings
Following the practice for the cross-industry occupations previously discussed the
wage or salary information for the following six industries reflects straight-time earnings
derived from employer payroll records*'
W o m e n s and misses * dresses— Data shown for the dress industry (table 5) are based
on August 1950 payrolls.
In a follow-up check, all establishments in the study reported a
general wage adjustment of 5 percent between August 1950 and March 1951* Of the groups stud­
ied the highest paid were men cutters and markers, who averaged $1.50 an hour* Women sewing
sections of garments by machine received $1 an hour, those performing all the standard sewing
machine operations on a complete garment (single-hand or tailor system) received 94 cents an
hour* Average hourly earnings for hand pressers were 76 cents an hour.
Machinery manufacture— Data shown for machinery industries (table 6) are based on
January 1951 payrolls. In the group studied, however, only one establishment reported a wage
change between that date and March 1951* Production machinists, numerically the most impor­
tant job group in the industry, averaged $1*57 an hour. Tool and die makers, the highest paid
-workers among the 12 jobs studied in machinery, received $1*73 an hour* Average hourly eari>ings for class A assemblers were $1*46* In the welder categories, class A men received $1.52
and class B $1*27, on the average.
Department stores— Among the occupations studied the highest paid workers in
Atlanta*s department stores were the men selling furniture and bedding and men selling floor
covering; these sales groups averaged $95*50 and $70 a week (table 7), Women sales employees
with the highest average earnings were clerks selling women1s and misses* suits and coats at
$42 a week, and clerks selling women*s and misses* dresses at $36.
Among nonselling jobs,
men tailors who altered men*s garments averaged $57*50, and stock girls in selling sections
averaged $22*50 a week.
Banking--The highest paying bank jdba studied were men all-round tellers, who averag­
ed $55*50 a week, and note tellers with weekly average of $54 (table 8).
Women employed as
tellers, (paying, or paying and receiving) earned a weekly average of $45*50*
General ste­
nographers earned $47, and proof-machine operators $40 a week*
Power laundries— Average hourly earnings in power laundries were considerably lower
than those found in the other industries selected for study in the Atlanta area* The largest
occupational group studied, women flatwork finishers, averaged 39 cents an hour* Markers, at
57 cents an hour, and machine shirt pressers, at 53 cents, also accounted for large numbers
of women*
Men operating extractor and washing machines received 73 cents and 87 cents an
hour, respectively (table 9)*
Auto repair shops— Automotive mechanics (class A), employed in general auto repair
shops and in repair departments of dealer establishments, averaged $1.60 an hour*
In other
jobs requiring the care and upkeep of automobiles, body repairmen averaged $1*74; greasers,
93 cents; and washers 76 cents (table 10).
Union Wage Scales
The information reported for the following five industries relates to the minimum
wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade-unions*
Bakeries— Union agreements with Atlanta bakeries (machine shops) provided for mini­
mum hourly scales of $1*30 for dough mixers and overmen and $1*21 for benchmen, rolling-ma­
chine operators, and moldermen.
The workweek in the bakery trades was 40 hours (table 11) •

3
Building constructioiv— The basic hourly union scale for important journeymen trades
in the construction industry was $2*75 for bricklayers, $2,00 for carpenters and brush paint­
ers, $2.50 for electricians and plasterers, and $2.60 for plumbers.
A workweek of 40 hours
prevailed for all trades (table 12).
Local transit operating employees— Operators employed in local transit service re­
ceived a starting rate of $1.30 an hour; after 6 months they advanced to $1.36 and after a
year to $1.40 an hour.
Feedeiv-bus drivers had a minimum hourly scale of $1.25 for the first
6 months of service, $1.31 for the next 6 months, and $1.35 an hour after 1 year of service
(table 13).
Motortruck drivers and helpers— Union scales for motortruck drivers
according to materials transported and length of service.
Hourly rates ranged
for baggage drivers to $1,725 for railway express drivers (money pick-up). The
truck drivers were scaled according to length of service of drivers, ranging
the start to $1.54 after 5 years (table 14).

varied widely
from 95 cents
rates for oil
from $ 1.32 at

Scheduled Workweek
More than two-thirds of the women office workers in industries within scope of the
survey worked a 40—hour week and nearly a fifth were scheduled to work between 35 and 38 3/4
hours a week in March 1951 (table 18) • Three-fourths of all plant workers had a 40-hour work
schedule; practically all others had longer schedules, usually 4 8 hours.
In manufacturing
establishments, the 40—hour schedule applied to almost nine-tenths of the plant workers.
Paid Holidays
Provisions for paid holidays were in effect for practically all office workers and
more than four-fifths of the plant workers (table 19). The most typical arrangements were for
observance of 5, 5 l/2, or 6 paid holidays throughout the year for both office and plant work­
ers.
Nearly 40 percent of the office workers in the finance, insurance, and real estate
groups received 7, 8, 9, or more paid holidays.
Paid Vacations

Printing— In commercial printing shops in Atlanta, union contracts called for mini­
mum wage scales of $2.48 for hand compositors, $2.60S for electro typers, and $ 1.25 for bindery
women.
In newspaper work, the scale for compositors was $2.533 an hour during the day and 8
cents more at night; web pressmen received $2,453 per hour for daytime work and $2.56lan
hour for night work.
A 37 l/2-hour workweek was in effect for all trades except newspaper
mailers, who were paid overtime rates after 40 hours a week.

Almost a 11 Atlanta area establishments studied allowed paid vacations to both office
and plant workers after a year of service (table 20).
For office workers, a 2—week vacation
was most typical, especially in finance, insurance, and real estate, and in services.
For
plant workers the most common practice was to grant 1 week*s vacation after 1 year of service
and 2 weeks after 5 years.

Minimum Entrance Rates

Paid Sick Leave

Atlanta area firms employing more than 90 percent of the plant workers in « n ii>dustries had established minimum entrance rates for the employment of inexperienced plant
workers (table 16). Entrance rates ranged from less than 40 cents to more than $1.30 an hour
but the most prevalent rate was 75 cents. Approximately a tenth of the workers were employed
in establishments having minimum entrance rates of 50 cents or less; these workers were all
employed in retail trade and service industries.

Formal provisions for paid sick leave after 1 year of service were in effect in es­
tablishments employing nearly a third of the office workers and almost an eighth of the plant
workers in all industries. The number of days granted to employees for absences due to sick­
ness varied considerably among the industrial groupings and among the establishments in each
industry group. Most of the plans, however, were effective after 6 months of service and al­
lowances ranged from less than 5 days to more than 25 days for both office and plant workers
(table 21).
Nonproduction Bonuses

S u p p le m e n ta ry

W age

P ractices

Annual earnings were supplemented by nonproduction bonuses in establishments employ­
ing about 2 of every 5 workers (table 22).
Most of the payments were in the form of Christ­
mas or year-end bonuses.
About two-thirds of all retail trade workers were employed in es­
tablishments which gave nonproduction bonuses.

Shift Differentials

Insurance and Pension Plans

Nearly a fifth of the factory workers studied in Atlanta manufacturing plants were
employed on extra-shift, operations. More than three-fifths of the workers employed on second,
third, or other extra shifts were paid differentials above their day rates. The amount of the
differential varied, however, among the industries and the plants studied, ranging ffrom 2 1/2
to 15 cents an hour on second shift and from 5 to 16 cents on the third shift (table 17). In
the machinery industries, employees working on second-shift operations (the only extra shift
in these industries) received differential pay of either 5 or 15 cents an hour.

More than 19 of every 20 office workers and 18 of every 20 plant workers were em­
ployed in establishments having some form of insurance and/or pension plan financed wholly or
in part by the employer (table 23). Life insurance plans were most prevalent in all industry
groups for both office and plant workers.
Considerably more than half of all workers were
employed in establishments having hospitalization insurance plans.
Retirement pension plans
were available in establishments employing nearly three-fifths of the office workers and onethird of the plant workers.




u




Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

5,

Table 1.--OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number Weekly
Weekly
sched­
of
earn­
workers uled
ings
hours

Number of workers receiving stra:Lght-time weekly eiirnings of (.
H
(
«
■
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
a
>
1
$
$
$
$
$
♦
$
V
* 1 $
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 *
95.oo
and
sind
under
over
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

Men - Continued
Clerks, pay roll 2/ ............
Nonmanufaoturing 2/ .........
Wholesale trade ..........

77
27
19

40.5
40.5
40.5

$57.00
64.00
66.00

Duplicating-machine operators 2/
Nonmanufacturing ............

23
21

39.5
39.5

43.50
43.00
34.00
34.50
34.00
35.00
36.50
33.00
32.00

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

2
1

_

_

-

Office boys ...................
Manufacturing ...............
Nonmanufacturing 2/ .........
Wholesale trade ..........
Retail trade .............
Finance * * .... ......... .
Services ........ ........
Tabulating-machine operators 2/ .
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ..... 7...
Finance ** ...............
Typists, class A ...............

169
25
144
50
15
37
33
26
23
11

40.0
39.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.0
40.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

55.00
56.50
56.00

16

44.0

51.50

562
54
508
305
18
32

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
40.0

42.00
45.50
a . 50
40.50
38.00
45.50

33

39.0
39.0

40.00
39.00

10
-

-

-

-

10
10
5
5

57
4
53
12
4
21
14

47
12
35
19
3
10

30
4
26
15
2
8
1

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

12
5
7
2
3
-

_

_

46.00

2
2
2
_

10
10
1
4
3
2
2
1
2

10
10

3
3

_

_
-

-

5
1

-

-

3
3

5
1
1

10
2
2

4
-

6
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

1
-

-

-

-

1
-

-

4
3
3

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
3

4
4

_______ 1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

1
2
1

3
1
1

2
2

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

11

36

10
2

20
1
19
9

15
13
2

7

5
4
1

6
2
4

-

_______

_

14
14
9

1
1

_

-

-

1
-

1

4

1
1
1

1
1

4
2
2

_______

_

3
3

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine)
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing 2/
Wholesale trade .
Retail trade ....
Services .......
Billers, machine (bookkeeping
machine) 2/
Nonmanuf ac turing

28

Bookkeepers, hand 2/
Nonmanufacturing 2/
Wholesale trade .
Retail trade ....
Finance ** .....
Services .......

232
225
34
21
86
84

41.0
41.0
40.5
43.5
39.5
42.5

45.50
56.00
49.50
45.00
41.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing 2/
Wholesale trade •
Services .......

190
22
168
128
14

41.0
40.0
41.5
41.5
41.0

49.00
58.00
48.00
49.00
44.50

-

-

-

14
9
5

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

_

2
2

60
2
58
54
1

-

-

-

-

146
4
142
117
-

10

-

_______

-

~

-

”

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

38
38

32
32
2

-

5
25

7
23
-

8

13

81 _
_

-

-

5

-

4

8
8

8

81
51
10

—

-

1
1

17
17

4

-

-

4

-

-

6
3

2
3

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

“

-

_

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

6

8

-

-

-

-

5
5

14

-

-

3

25

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

-

25
25

-

-

7
2

1 1 _______ 1 _______ 1
2
2
13

_____

1
1

117
1
116
53

5

1

-

1

2
1

103
8
95
27
11

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18
5
13
9
3

-

6
2

36
31

8
3

26 _ 21
_
26
23
1

-

1

_______

1

_

11
11

4
4

-

-

5
4
2

1

-

_______

2

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

1 ____4
1
1

2

2

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 ___14
9

-

-

14
10

____4.
4

_______

-

-

-

9

-

23
2

6

11

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-•

-

-

-

8

-

1

2

7

1

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2A
1

9

17

£

21

-

-

-

_

-

2
2

2
2

-

_

13
13

9
8

10
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

—

7

-

5
-

-

-

5
3

5
5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
6
-

-

21
21

*

6

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number Weekly
Weekly
sched­
of
earn­
workers uled
ings
hours

>f Number of workers recejiving €traight-time weekly earn
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1$
$
$
$
1
*
1
$
1
1
1—
1
$
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 4 7.5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
and
and
under
over
80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
0 70.00 72.50 7?j°Q|
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.J0. 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 S b S S L 60.00 6a. 50 65.00

Women - Continued
585
47
538
156
56
288
31

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.5

$40.50
46.00
40.50
42.50
39.50
39.00
42.50

445
80
365
163
154
23

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
40.0
38.0

46.00
49.50
45.00
45.00
45.50
40.50

Calculating-machine operators (other than
nnmnt.nmp.+^r t v f I .____ ..................
,ni
Menu featuring ............... ............
Nonmanufacturing 2/
Wholesale trade ••••••••••••••••••■•••
Petal 1 trade .................. .
Finance **

105
20
85
41
14
21

40.0
40.0
40.0
4 1.0
40.0
39.0

42.50
47.00
41.50
42.00
38.50
39.00

Clerks« accounting •••••••••••••••••.•••••«•
Man11f*aotpring •••••••••••••••••••••••«•••
Wnwmflmiffl<rhirr1 y\& 2 / •••*••••••••«••«•••••
Ptihl "c util ities # ...... .
i
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ttT..t,tt..f.T............
Finance **

1.129
154
975
460
142
67
183

39.0
40.0
39.0
38.0
40.5
40.5
39.0

46.00
47.50
45.50
48.00
48.00
43.50
40.00

Clerks• file• class A 2/
Nonmanufacturinff 2/
Who!esale trade .....................a
Retni1 trade ...... .
Finance **
Services

234
227
82
23
78
41

40.0
40.0
40.5
40.0
39.0
40.0

42.50
42.00
45.50
41.00
40.50
38.50

Clerks• f^1e , class B
Manufaotnring *.........................a
Monmnnnfacturinf? ........................
P^lbl ic uti 1ities * ..................
Wholesale trad©
Retail trade .........................
F t nnnce
..........
Servr ces .............................

621
59
562
30
82
72
296
82

39.5
39.5
39.5
38.0
40.0
40.0
39.0
40.0

35.00
39.00
34.50
38.50
36.50
35.00
33.50
33.00

Bookkeeping—mnelr! n© operators, class B .....

VJhnl
e trade t,fTt.... ...... .
P a . iT t r e d e ...............
*+e
nABne ** ....................... .
Services ........................ .
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) ...................................

Ratal 1 trade ............... ........
FInance ## ....................

15

_

_
_
_
_

_
_

2
2
_
_
_

2
_
.
.
.

128
12
116
33
12
71
_

98
12
86
11
21
45
8

76
3
73
40
1
30
2

86
4
82
44
4
20
14

2
_
_
2

48
2
46

9
6
3
2
1

10
_
10
3
4
2

29
2
27
13
7
5

32
2
30
8
14
4

91
10
81
43
30
7

47
3
44
21
19
2

59 ___4SL
11
4
48
45
22
14
26
22
3

2
_
2

8

10
.
.
10
3
2
5

8
8
5
3
_

21
_
21
11
3
7

17
3
14
11
3
-

17
13
4
4

125
6
119
75
9
3
27

174 ___9 1
22
19
76
155
37
39
12
30
1
14
20
21

2
_

8
3
1
4

_

_

22
»
22
3

_
_

_
_

3
16

2
32

110
14
96
30
3
13
28

4
4

3
3
3

22
22
5
1
16

63
_
63
29

_

21
19
6
4
2

..

_
_
_
_

7

16 1
2
159
6
15
17
86
35

126
3
123
5
10
15
61
' 32

_
4

2
_

59

2
_

59

2
_
_

2
57

_

105
5
100
5
23
16
51
5

48 ___ 21 ___2 1
26
48
35
12
4
3
6
3
3
22
9
15
2
3
27

97 ___ 42
27
70
2
28
8
26
6

14
28
5
3
5
11
4

6
2
4
3

6
3
3

-

2
1
1

3
3

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

1

•-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

38
2
36
18
11
-

19
9
10
7
3
-

9
3
6
1
4
-

16
14
2
1
-

21
7
14
4
10
-

6
4
2
2
-

2
1
1
1
-

2

4

2
2
-

4
4
-

18
5
13
3
2
5
-

_
11
4

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




97
_
97
22
14
59
2

15

_

_

48

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5_ ___
2
3
2

2_
9
-

—
-

5
1
4
2

—
-

-

—
-

—
-

1
1

“
-

-

“
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
■
-

145
30
115
46
21
11
11

72
19
53
25
14
4
9

101
7
94
53
17
6
9

24
5
19
5
9
2
3

43
6
37
28
5
1

25
10
15
12
1
2
-

64 ___ I L ___ I L
2
10
12
54
14
6
28
13
22
1
3
1
2
4

4
2
2
2
-

9
9
9
-

12
12
12
-

8
2
6
6
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

-

3_
1
-

1
1
1

1
1
1

2
2
2
-

4
4
4
-

2
2
2
-

2
2
2
-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

1
1
-

3
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44 ___14, ___
42
14
32
7
2
4
4
4
2

21

3

7

3
-

_
-

1
1
-

2
1

-

1

14
4
3
5
2

-

-

-

_

-

*
-

-

7

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of i
S$
s
?
$
1—
s
P
$
1
4
&
$
$
$
$
§
5
11 —
$
i —
i—
♦
5—
5.
Weekly 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.5 0 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 5 * 00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.0 0 80.00 85.00 90.00 $
95.00
earn­ and
and
under
ings
over
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 7^.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
27.50

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number Weekly
sched­
of
workers uled
hours

Women - Continued
Clerks, general ........................ .
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing 2/ ............ .......
Wholesale trade ................. .
Retail trade ....................
Finance ## ..........................
Services ...........................

1,741
169
1,572
430
146
239
408

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.5
42.0
39.5
40.5

t o . oo
48.00
42.50
44.00
42.00
43.50
37.50

_
-

9
9
2
7

88
9
79
1
10
68

146
6
140
9
11
20
72

180
3
177
57
18
16
61

257
3
254
. 39
32
48
79

270
32
238
88
26
37
62

229
18
211
98
17
34
32

132
26
106
54
6
15
16

75
12
63
14
8
15
2

169
9
160
15
11
7
2

41
7
34
5
8
4
-

63
12
51
26
5
12
7

27
13
14
1
12
-

16
4
12
7
2
3
-

11
8
3
1
2
-

15
4
11
5
4
-

_
_
-

Clerks, order ............................
Manufacturing ............ .............
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....... .......... ..
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................

200
28
172
26
103

40.0
39.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

42.00
44.50
41.50
47.00
38.00

-

2
1
1
■1

8
8
8

17
17
10

35
3
32
3
22

30
1
29
1
27

29
5
24
18

19
5
14
3
10

30
%1
24
12
5

4
4
1

8
4
4
1
1

3
1
2
-

3
3
3
-

3
3
-

3
3
3
-

3
2
1
-

1
1
-

Clerks, pay roll ..........................
Manufacturing ......... ................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Services ...........................

274
108
166
53
50
41
14

39.5
40.0
39.0
37.5
39.5
40.0
a.5

48.50
49.50
48.00
48.50
51.50
45.00
43.00

_
-

1
1
-

8
7
1
1
-

4
4
4
-

9
2
7
2
3
2

12
6
6
2
1
3
-

40
13
27
7
3
9
7

29
39
19 --- ^
20
23
6
9
8
8
1
9
2
-

17
2
15
3
3
6
1

17
6
11
3
1
3
2

34
16
18
4
6
6
-

12
11
1
1
-

19
3
16
3
12
-

10
4
6
3
3
-

8
1
7
3
4
-

Duplicating-machine operators .............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

42
13
29

40.5
39.0
41.0

36.00
36.00
36.50

-

-

12
3
9

3
3

14
6
8

3
2
1

1
1

5
2
3

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

Key-punch operators ................ ......
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
PiihUn n+.iH+.-l pr #
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** .........................

288
22
266
1/
87
38
127

39.5
38.5
39.5
38.0
40.0
40.0
39.5

40.50
44.00
40.50
39.00
42.00
38.00
40.00

_
-

10
10

38
2
36
1

22
1
21
1
7
7
6

23
2
21

47

20
20

4
2
2

2
2
-

3

4
5
10

3
6
12

7

12
2
10
1
3

2
2

_

42
1
41
/
17
5
15

32
10
22
3

-

27
27
2
7
2
16

2

2

13

6

-

-

24
25

39.5
39.5
37.0
40-0
.
39.5

36.00
36.00
3 . SO
Z
37.50
34.50

863
181
682
93
176
93
216
104

40.0
40.0
40.0
38.5
40.5
40.5
39.5
41.0

56.00
56.50
56.00
68.00
57.00
53.00
51.50
53.50

Office girls 2/ ...........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ....................
T>iiKH P i + l H+ -ipR *
i*"
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance ** ........ ............. .

104
100

Secretaries ..............................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
. Public utilities * ...... ...........
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance * * ............... ..........
Services ...........................

5
5

_
-

-

_

_

.-

-

_

_

-

-

31
29
g
2
15

17
15
/

22
22

9
9

17
17

4
4

2
2

5
4

7
-

5
-

3
2

1
2

2

4
4
-

3
3
-

16
6
10
2

51
3
48
12
4
15
17

56
15
41
1
12
7
16
5

73
23
50
1
14
15
17
3

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

4

-

8
—

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




14
2
19

47
2
14
6
25

-

2
2
-

_
“

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

2
2
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

8
5
3
2
1
-

1
1
-

3
2
1
1
-

_
_
-

1
1
-

2
2
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

_
-

_
-

4
4

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

3
-

5
5
-

6
1
5
5
-

_

_

4

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

“

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

68
5
63
1
14
8
27
13

86
13
73
1
17
18
29
8

81
15
66
1
25
4
28
8

88
12
76
15
23
9
19
10

89
17
72
9
20
11
19
13'

68
24
44
4
11
7
11
11

34
20
14
7

29
1
28
9
3
5
9
2

34

14
2
12
4
5
1
2
-

12
5
7
3
1
1
2

23
8
15
10
2
3

-

-

3
4

28
9
4
3
7
5

13
1
12
11
1
-

6
-

-

6
6
-

-

-

13
2
11
1
10
-

8
Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

if
straigllt-turie weekly eanlings < Number of worker,5 rece:iving £
|
$
$
$
i - $

Average
?

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number Weekly
Weekly 25.00
schedof
earn- and
workers uled
. ings under
hours
27.50

$

b

b

27.50 30.00 32.50

$
$
1
$
$
b
35.00 37.50 A0.00 42.50 45.00 47.50

$

$

$

$

$

50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00

57,20 60.00 62,5.0 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 A0.00 A2.50 A?. 00 A7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00|

over

Women - Continued
Stenographers, general .......... .
Mapnf*afvhnring .T.............. .
Public utilities * ..................

Services ......................... .

Stenographers, techninal 2/
Nonmanufacturing

1,835
280
1,555
199
500
180
501
175

39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
A0.5
A0.5
39.5
A0.5

$47.00
A9.50
46.50
49.00
A7.50
45.00
A3.00

_

58

39.5
A0.5

A7.00
46.00

41.0
39.5

42.00
A3.00
42.00
A9.00
A5.00
A0.50
39.00
36.00

Switchboard operators
Mannf>
qotnpingr
aetrirnpgr ••.•••••••••••••••••••••
Pub! 1o uti 1 1tias # ...................
Who!a salft trade
..... ....
Retail trade
Finance ** ••••••••••••*••••••••••••••
Services

213
33
180
24r

35
17

39.0
A1.5
A1.0
39.5
AA.5

Switchboard operator-receptionists •••••••••
Manufacturing •••••••*•••••••••••••••••••
T n n i l m P l t r ' ng
^p'fr'feiPi
Who"l fts l f trade .......... .
a t
Ratal1 trade ........ .
Finance
Services ••••••••••••■••••••••••••••••

253
57
196
90
16
55'
35

AO.O
A0.5
AO.O
41.0
AO.O
38.5
AO.O

41.00
42.00
A0.50
A0.50
41.00
A0.00
A2.00

....
Nppmamif*af»t.i^ring 2/ ••••••••••••••«••••••
Whftlftsalft trade .............. .
Finance' * * •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
*

65
55
27
22

39.5
39.5
AO.O
39.0

A8.00
46.50
A9.50
A3.50

Transcribing—Tnftfthine operators* general ....
Manufacturing

278
59
219
111
96

39.5
AO.O
39.5
A0.5
38.5

A3.50
A7.00
42.50
A5.00
40.00

Tab*1!fti ng—machi ue operators 2/
"t

Wr>pmannf> . , Tipg 2/ .....................
af>ti >
i
Wholesale trade r.rtt.................
Finance
••»••••••••••••••••••••••••

4k

58

41.0

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

■_

3
_
8
_
_
_
.
.
8

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_

_

1

8

1

23 _ M.
_
5
18
14
1
A
A
5
5
9
3
1

15
6
9

16
_
16
A
A
8
_

20

19

-

-

_
6
2
1

57
7
50
1
16
12
21
_

20
1
6
10
2
1

19
1
1
5
6
6

7
1
6

41

26

10
31
25
2
1
3

26
11
A
9
2

38
1A
2A
3
_
18
3

38 _ 4SL
_
12
1
26
48
6
33
1
3
7
A
7
13

_
-

2
2
2

1
1
-

7
7

9

1A

31

3A
1
33
18
13

_

9

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18
14

5
A
1
_
_
1
_
_

31
20
11

17
5
12
6
A
2

20
18

-

1A
3
11

7

5
5

_

9

-

201
55
146
19
48
14
47
18

_

6

-

207
32
175
12
A9
35
53
26

1A
8
16
A

51
9

-

338.
39
299
' 18
12A
10
129
18

—

_

_
_
_

73
25
48
6
8
A

230
23
207
15
85
37
A9
21

9
1
_
A
2
2

—

81
18
63
11
16
7
27
2

171
6
165
27
25
10
A5
58

—

_

42

46.00

51

76
8
68
11
9
15
21
12

9

7

-

A8
7

41
15
2A

1
1
-

Al

7
3A
12
19

27
7
20
8
5
5
2

11
3
8
2
1
A
1

15 ___ia
17
15
8
8
6
7

39
25
14
13
-

229
49
180
36
59
22
59
A

2

5
2
2

1
-

23

2

-

2 ____2
_
1
5
1
A
-

-

1

-

-

A

8 ____4 ___
6
A
5
A

20 ___11
8
5
7
15
2
9
2
5

7

13
5
8
8
-

70
8
62
3
25
8
23
3
2
2

2 ____ 1
3
2
2
2
2
-

20
1
19
6
8
2
3

6

6

A

-

-

-

6

6

A

-

-

-

6

6

A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_
_

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
2
, 21
18
2

7
A
3
1
2

-

2

15
A
11
5
A
1
1

1

-

2
2

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

A
2
2
-

14
A
10
1
6
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■
*

—
—

—
—

-

-

-

4
.

-

2
2
2

2
2
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

L

2
-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2
2
2

1
1
-

2 ___ L ___
2
A
2
A
-

4
A
A
-

.

_

•»

-

-

-

“
—
-

—
—
“

—
—
—
—

2
2

l
l
-

~

—
—
—
—

9,

Table 1.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average weekly earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)

Number of worker! receiving straight-time weekly earnings of if
&
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
«
8
>
$
s
?
r
$
$
$ ■ $
$
¥
if
$
$
#
\f
$
Weekly 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
95.00
earn­ and
and
ings under
over
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 4? .o o 47.50 50.00 5 , . , 55.00
2.50

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

W eeklysch ed ­
u le d

hours
Women - Continued

43.50
41.00
40.50
41.00

_
-

3
3
3
-

3
3
3
-

40.0

36.50

1

4 0 ,0 0

39.5
37.5
Z1 0
40.5
38.5
40.0

36.00
42.00

21
21
-

131

4 0 .0

2
19

16
58
42

Typists, class A ..........................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ................. .
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance * * .........................
Services ...........................

819
51
768
182
71
353
74

39.5
39.0
39.5
40.5
40.5
39.5
40.0

Typists, class B ..........................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing..... .................
Public utilities * ..................
• a
4 1 J

851

Retail trade ......................
Finance * * ......... ..............
Services .................... .....

703
28

Xu?
158
237
115

$42.00
49.50
a . 50

17
Jf
?

1
-

12

119
1

00

37.00
34.50
34.50

2

1

—

—

1/
2/
*

Finance, insurance, and real estate.

159

183
84
2
181
84
- . 62
8
3
69
69
. 2
29

149
2
147
35
15
77
15

145
13
132
35
17
45
17

105
11
94
23
13
50
1

29
2
27
9
2
12
1

34
3
31
7
1
8
7

12
5
7
5

1
1
-

10
7
3
2

4
4
-

1
1
-

2

2

1

3

_

_

2
2

2
2

1
-

3
-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

250

100

45
16
35

21
17
4

4

-

-

1

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

2

5
4
1
1

1

2
2
2

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
20

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

—

-

-

---Ef —
145
1
42
20
57
25

10

240
4
82

112
54
88

7
17
29
26

56
70
28

9

55
45
3
18

14
7
3

-

8

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

**

48
48
12
21
2

Table 2 .— PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS'
(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for selected occupations by industry division)
Number of
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00
and
under
35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.0Q 47.50 50.00 5.2^0

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
sched­
uled
hours

Hourly Weekly
earn­ earn­
ings
ings

e
workers receiving straight-tinl weekly ea]•nings
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

of r
“
»
s
?
$
$
§
&
72.50 75.00 80.00 35.00 90.00

*
*
95.00 V
ion no
l w •Uv
and
over
75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00
70.00 72.50

??,0Qj JL7,j0 60.00 62.50 65.00

Men
Flroft.cmpn
..........................
Manufacturing ......................
wonmanufacturing 2/ ......... .......
Services ........................
Draftsmen, iunior 2/ ......... .
Manufacturing ...................... .

251
108
143
64

A0.5
40.5
40.5
42.0

$1.75
1.75
1.75
1.30

35
17

AG.O
40.0

26
14
12

39.5
40.0
39.0

$71.00
71.00
71.00
75.50

_
-

5
_

5

____ 6
.____6 ___ 1 L ____ L
3
3
3
13
1
3
3
3
3
”

5
-

5
-

-

1.28
•99

51.00 ____ 1 ____ 1
39.50
3
3

-

6 ____ i ____ l
6
5

1.35
1.33
1.37

53.50
53.00
53.50

5 ____L
6
5
3

1

-

-

1
1

.
4 ____5
2
2
2
3

6 ___ 23- ____6.____ 5
.___2 L
12
21
6
6
8
5
14
2
9
“
3
4

2 ___ii
6
2
5
2

20
6 —
14
6

4
16
25
22

17
7
10

22
15
7
5

8 _____ i
3
2
8
5
~

- ____L

2 ____ 1 ____ 1 ____1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_ ____ 2L
2
1

2 ____1
1
1
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Women

1/
2/

Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
053256 0-si__ 3




_
-

_
_

-

-

-

'

Nurses, industrial (registered)
Manufacturing ..... .............. .
Nonmanufacturing ............. .

'

4 ____1
2
2
2
1

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1
1

‘ -

10
Table 3 •— MAINTENANCE AND POWER PLANT OCCUPATIONS

Occupation and industry division

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

$

1—
0.70 0.75

4
0.80

4
0.85

.80

.85

.90

.75

0.90

4
0.95

*
1.00

•?5

1.00

1.05

_

1.05

Number of
$
1.10 1.15

s
P
1.20

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

_

_

_

$1.56
1.54
1.57
1 /L
J .71
- -

213
139

1.85
1.81

AO
31
in
21

1.47
1.30
1 AT

79
50
29

1.21
1.24
1.18

Machinists. maintenance 2/ ..........
Manufacturing .....................

207
195

Mo nn+.onnnf’ men . c e » T f 1 n+.il itv ....
P
rre»i

169
63
106
60
17
22

1.32
1.39
1.28
1.24
1.34
1.24

P n K H e utiUtiftS * ............ ..
Rato■1 tt p r e
?
i

206
46
160
124
20

1.51
1.43
1.51
1.52
1.45

Ma / H
V
oc r oi
n
2/
MnmiPpotnTirig .............. .......

257
193

1.62
1.59

63
70

1.11

Tj 4 / m tho
).
>
,
O/
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
MnmrPnetnring ................a....

72
26

1.80
1.65

_

Pine fitters* maintenance 2/ ....«»«•
Mflmif*fieturing .....................

s/
51

1.82
1.84

Sheet-metal workers» maintenance ....

18

M n n m f l r m f * 2/ »**..»»*•»**•*«
Retail trade
Services
Mechanics, automotive
1mn 4v +flWQWA i I
\
f

MlT1vrights

1/
2/
#
**

-

21
7
14
5

11
10
1
1

10
3
7
7

2
1
1
1

-

2
2

4
4

2
—

-

-

-

_2_|
3
1
2

-

—

m
#

..
.
.

7
7

4
4

4
4

4
1
3

_

_

-

-

_

2
2
2

1
1
1

1
1
1

_

_
-

6
6

«
.
-

-

9
9

3
3

7
7

23
23

35
31

3
2
1
1
-

. 3.-.
.
5
2
1
2

_
-

20
16
4
4
-

21
5
16
8
4
3

:A3__
6
7
2
4

■ 14 _
3
11
11
-

7
3
4
1

7
1
6
6

10
10
9
1

12
6
6
4

68
3
65
59
4

2Z_
10
17 •
15

16
12

25
12

11
11

26
23

19
18

is .

_

-

4
4

—
-

3
3

-

4
4

1
1

4

—

3

-

4

1

8
8
1
7

_

8
8
-

8
7
1

9
8
1

4
4

2
2

3
3

6
6

4

_

1
1

9
9

-

1 4 _ - 11
5
7
6
7
3
5
2
3
-

31
9
22
22
-

7
6
1
-

4

13
13
7
3

2
2
2

16
16
11
5

_

_
_

-

-

22
12
10
10
-

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
-

_
_

_

.
.
_

10
1
9
4
5

_

_

_

_

_

-

2
2

7
7

19
16

9
8

18
15

«
»

_

3

_

_

_

-

_

-

50

8

-

4

.
.

-

4
3
1

2
2
2
-

_

_
_
_

-

-

$
2.20

$
2.30

$
2.40

$
2.50

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

11
5
6
—

27
4
23
23

75
25

_

-

14
10

1
_
1
1

_
_

$
2.10

8
4

1
1
1

2
-

1
1
1
-

_
_
_
_
_

$
2.00

1.90

62
62

-

2

&
1.90

4
4

1.30

9
7

-

.19— . 12
4
8
19
8
1

1.70

6
5

-

2

1.60

13
12
1
1

-

_

1.45

9
4
5
4

-

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




8
5
3

4

1-91 .

Manufacturing
NoTvmflnnf*pcturint?

1.15

1.40

4

1

Nonmanufacturing

1.35

2

1.97

Manufacturing..... ......... .

-

-

-

1.50

1.30

_

1.67
1.70

cc
\>
J

e
*s receiving straitjht-tiiri hourly earnings of a
•
*
>
i
$
$
i&
n
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80

2

153
55
98

Carnenters. maintenance ....... •••••

i
0
)

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations by industry division)

-

-

1
1

5
2

4
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

___

—

—

—
4
4

-

—

_
—

— 4__ 12
12
4

'

_

«
.

—

—

9
—

-

-

-

-

2

1
1

-13.
5
8

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

83
83

6
6

3
3

9
9

8
8

2
2

1
1

-

-

6
1
5
1

8
5
3
1
2

-

_

-

-

-

-

—
-

—
-

—
—
-

6

-

-

-

-

—

_
-

4
4

_
-

10
10

-

3__

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
7

_

_

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

—

_
-

12

-

-

-

-

-

13
7
6
4

6
4

1
1
-

43

2
2

35
2

8
8

-

-

11

38

11

_

_

2

2

-

-

2
-

5
4

-

5
1

4
3

6
3

3
2

1
-

2
2

-

2
2

1
1

21
21

1

4

1

-

-

—

___1_
3
3

_

_ 3_
_
-

-

-

_ 4_ — 9 .
_
_
4
9
-

5 ..
_
—

_

:

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

11
Table U .— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 7j by industry division)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), oonnnunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12

Table 4.— CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND SHIPPING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ by industry division)

Numl)er oi worl:ers 1•eceiving strain
$
i
i
t
1
i
i
*
i
1
*
Under 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0 .70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0 .9 5 1.0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 . 1 5
$0 .50
1 .2 0
1.10
•55 .60 .65 .70 r?5 ,80 f85 _*2° _t2i 1.0 0

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

.99
1.06
.91

-

Wholesale trade ........................ .
Retail trade *......... *........*..........

2,494
1,264
1,230
271
789
170

.87
.98

Truck drivers, light (under 1 J tons) .............
Manufacturing.................................
Nonmanufacturing ................*.... .
Wholesale trade ....... .
Retail trade ........... ................. .
Services ................... *.......... .

472
19
453
349
77
27

.84
1 .2 8
.82
.81
.85
.81

-

'
■
*

Truck drivers, medium (l^ to and including 4
tons) 3/ .......................................
Nonmanufacturing 3/ ...........................
Wholesale trade ........... *..........
Retail trade ........ *.................... .

1,124
750
264
133

.98
1.01----.88
1.01

—
-

Truck drivere, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer
type) 3 / ............................... .......
Nonmanufacturing 3/ .... *.....................
Wholesale trade ............................

243
220
154

1.15
1.15
1.10

*
"

Occupation and Industry division

Stock handlers and truckers, hand ................
Manufacturing .................................
Nonmanufacturing.... *........................

Truckers, power (fork-lift) 3/ ............ ......
Manufacturing................. *....... *.....

.

_
-

40
22
18
1
11
6

262
50
212
134
56
22

U

3

10

56
36
12
8

14
12
2

3
3
—

10
8
2

125
80
73
7

95
8l
74
7

16
12
4
8

20
20
10
10

39
22
22

229
8

-

-

21
21
21

-

30
30
30

-

650
313
337

402
175
227

139
28
111

-

- 306
*
* 31

208
19

99
12

410
234
176
136
17
23

-

-

3

223

112

56

2

—

•
—

3
3

221
191
23
7

112
93
16
3

-

-

—

-

-

301
98
60
38

■
-

-

•

-

-

45
45
45

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

_

* -

2
2

_

r

-

m
m

_

*

10
6

m
m

*
*

11
11

19
9

4
1

14
14

27
17

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

10
-

■ “

15
-

—

8
8
8

2
2
2

8
8
8

97
44
53

34
24
10

3
3

26
26
-

79
46
33

1
1
-

-

4
2
2

46
46

154
152
2

147
147
-

-

36
17

6
4

3

-

33

-

-

2

46

2

-

2

7

-

2
2

-

-

3

-

7
7

2
2

7
7

—

—

—

3
3

—

22
6

7
1
1

24
id
1

18
18
12

25
18
-

2
1
1

15
10
10

9
9
9

18
14
13
1

10
10

2
-

33
18

43 ___2J___L
37
5
3
21
3

18
18
1

-

11
17
~
6
2 ---z
11
9
8
9
3

155
~U2

"

226
1.11
---- 123--- “TH77-----

m e hourly earedLnes < )f
*
1
$
$
1
1
$
$
$
1
*
f
1.20 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 1 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1 .9 0 2.00
and
1 .2 5 I mS S l,1 m2 L 1.40 i f45 iiio 1.60 l t70 1,80 1 .9 0 2.0 0 over

70

3

'

"
25
25

2
2

15
15

—

4
4

-

-

4
4

-

-

120
78

Watchmen .........................................
Manufacturing .......................*.........
Nonmanufacturing 2 / ...... ....................
Public utilities * .........................
Wholesale trade ............ ......... .
Retail trade ....................
Services .............. *...................

309
---- 157
152
42
38
36
25

1/
2/
2/
*
**

1.39
1.44

'

.95
—

7ZL -----

.98
1.04
1.16
.89
.80

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

6

1

-

8
8
3
3
2

2
2
2

1

-

--

6
-

1

-

-

-

1

-

5

1

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1
-

1

-

-

'
22
20

_

10
10

1

-

"

“
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) 3 / ..... .
Manufacturing........... *......... ..........

1
—

5
5

5
4

1
1

1
-

4
4

2
2

79
59
20
5
7
6
2

31
11
20
2
3

25
22
3
3

34
9
25
17
8

5
2
3
—
3

25
16
9
5
4

4

6
6

-

18
12
14
4 . 12
1
3
2
8
1
1

4
-

-

-

20
10
10
2

2
-

6
-

56
56

_

-

12
-

_

—

-

-

*
“

- :

12 ___
8
6
4
3
3
3
1

5

2

3

8

3

-

-

-

-

5

2

3

8

3

-

-

-

-

2

3

8

3

-

-

-

-

16
-

_

5

-

13
CHARACIERISHC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS

(Average earnings in selected occupations in manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing industries)
T a b le

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

5.— WOMEN’S AND MISSES’ DRESSES l/

tfo.775 $0.80

80.75

80.85

80.90

.85

.90

•95

-

$0,725

1

-

1
1

-

1

1

1
2

2
7

1

12
2

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $0.95 $1.0 0 $1.05 81.10 $1.15 $1 .2 0 $1.25 $1.3 0 $1.35 " I O o

81.45

81.50

8 1.6 0

81.70

81.80

and
under

♦75 —

.775

.80

1.2 0

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.4 0

1.45

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

1.70

1.80

and
over

-

-

-

1

-

1

2

-

1

-

1

1

1

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

9

3

9

4

-

-

-

-

4

1

1

1

1

-

-

6

3

4

1

3

-

1

-

—

-

-

-

1.0 0

1.05

1 .1 0

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

22

10

17

-

14
2

13

5

10

Men
Cutters and markers ..........................

8

$1.50

5
42
7
122

.87
.76
.78
1.00

-

85
16

.94
.77

1

Women
Inspectors, final (examiners) ..•••••••.......
Pressers, h a n d ....... ...... .. ............ .
Sewers, hand ............................ .
Sewing-machine operators, section system ......
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand
(tailor) system........... ...............
Thread trimmers ............................ .

2

39
4
22
11
12

•
»

—

"
1/ Ihe study covered establishments employing more than 7 workers engaged in the manufacture of w>men’s and misses* dresses. All 8 establishments, employing 343 workers, estimated to be in this industry were
*
studied. Ihe data relate to an August 1950 pay period; in a follow-up check, all establishments reported a general wage adjustment of 5 percent between August 1950 and March 1951.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Thble 6.— MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

Assemblers, class A ..... ........ .
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class 5 ......................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiplespindle, class C ......... •••••••.... .
Electricians, maintenance .................
Engine-lathe operators, class B ...........
Inspectors, class B ...... ••••••••....... .
Janitors ........ ....... .......... .
Machinists, production .............. ••••••
Ibol-and-die makers (other than jobbing
' shops) ................ ............... .
Truckers, h a n d ...... ........ ............
Welders, hand, class A .......... .........
Welders, hand, class B ....................

24

1.15

0.75
and
under
.80

0.90

.90

0.80

,95

1.00

Nun;ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $
$
$
9
$
if
y
y
y
y
1
y
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50

V
1.55

$
1.60

8
1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

1.05

1 ,5 0

1.80

1.10

1.20

1,2?

i,55

14
6
15
5
40
94
15
48
25
49

1.07
1.45
1.37
1.15
.91
1.57
1.73
.94
1.52
1.27

-

6

-

1

2

1

5

2

3

-

-

_

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

—

-

6
-

8
-

2
-

1
-

-

_

-

-

_

5

9

“

-

5

6

14
4

"

i,45

i,?o

i,55

1.6o

1.65

1.70

1.75

12

3

2

5

-

-

-

2
3

2
3

—

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

6

-

28

3

4

1

1

1

3

_

_

-

-

$
1.80
and
over

-

-

_

1

...

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

27

-

1

7

-

-

3

_

-

-

1.40
2

1,15

$1.46

20

0.85

$
0.95

y

r

2
15
-

6

6
2

7
3

-

2

1
2
3

2

_

-

-

-

2

4

1

mm

-

2

9

_

-

-

-

1

1
1

-

-

5

5

16

_

_

2

1

1

-

_

_

_

-

3
■
*

1
6

-

_

21

—

17

_

_

■

1/ Ihe study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in non-electrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau
of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were scheduled. Of the estimated 21 establishments and 1,850 workers in these industries, 12 establishments with 1,401 workers were
actually studied, Ihe data relate to a January 1951 pay period; in a follow-up check one establishment reported that a general wage adjustment of 5 ,cents per hour went into effect between January and March 1951.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
_
,.
_ T
T
c
A
.
3/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night vork.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
*
&
U. S. DEPARIMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




u,

Tati® 7.— DEPARTMENT STORES l/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of Average
¥
¥—
¥
¥
¥
¥ ------¥
¥
I---$
¥
¥
Weekly Hourly Weekly i —
5 2.50 55.0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 70.00 80.00 90.00 ¥
37.50 4 0.00 4 2 .5 0 45.00
15.0 0 17.50 20.00 2 2 .5 0 25.00 27.50 30.00
sched­ earn
earn100.00
and
uled
i
i
and
under
5
hours
over
60.00 70.00 30.00 90.00 100.00
J l t l O 2 0 ,0 0 22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.0 0 ZL22. 40.00 42.50 45.00 *17.50 50.00 5 2 .5 0 55.0 0

f

‘ f

Men
Porters, day (cleaners) ..........
Sales clerks:*
Floor coverings ••••••••.......
Furniture and bedding ••••••••••
Women's shoes .......... ......
Stockmen, warehouse .............
Tailors, alteration, men's garments

7k

1 0 .0
*

$0.75

$ 30.00

16
27
25
k7

1 0 .0
*

1.75
2.39

70.00

1* .0
0
1
*0.0
1*
0.0

6

1 .0
*0

22
1*6
93
56
76

1 .0
*0

.86

1*
0.0
1
*0.0
1* .0
0
1*0.0

.80

1 .2 1
.91
1 .1 *
*1

1

3

1
*

13

7

9

37

2

1

95.50
1* .50
8
36.50
57.50

1
11

9

2

1
10

1
*

32.50 35.00

3
5

1

8

3
3

1

1

2

1

2

5

6

5

9

2

1 4 7 .5 0 50.00
1

1

3

2

1
3

2

1
3

1

Women
Sales clerks:
Boys' furnishings ....................
Notions, trimmings ........... ........
Women18 and misses' dresses •••••••••••
Women's and misses' suits and coats ...
Stock girls, selling sections ...........

l/
2/

.95
I .05
.56

3k .50
32.00

38.00
1 2 .0 0
*

2
2

22.50

9

The study covered department stares employing more than 150 workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime.

3
k
2
1

6
1
1

2
13
10
5
1

7
16
15
5

3
3
3
5

10

All k stores in this industry, employing 6,132 workers, were studied.

Table 8.— BANKING l/

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Weekly
sched­
uled
hours

Average
Hourly
earn-

Weekly
earn-

' f

■if

Number of workers receiving straight-time week ly earnings of $40.00 $4 2 .5 0 $45.0 0 $k7.50 $50.00 $5 2.50 $55.0 0 $57.50 $60.00

$ 30.00
and
under
32.50

$ 32.50

$35.00

$3 7 .5 0

35.00

3 7 .5 0

40.00

42.50

45.0 0

7
-

-

2
3
-

4 7 .5 0

50.00

1
2

3

2
2

55.00

??♦?<>

5

2
-

$62.50

$65,001 $67.50

60.00

62.50

65.00

6 7 .5 0

70.00

-

1
3

-

1
*
5

3
-

1

2

_
1

1

*

•

Men
Cleaners ..................................
Tellers, all-around .......................
Tellers, note ..................... ........

12
*
16
21

1*
0.0
1*
0.0
1* .0
0

$0.81*
1.39
1.35

$33.50
5 5 .5 0
54.00

22
-

11
-

165
6*
1
102
156

1* .0
0
1*
0.0
1 .0
*0
1*
0.0

.98
.95
1.00
1.18

39.00
38.00
40.00
4 7.0 0

10
6
-

26
11
11
2

28
20
23
6

39
9
21
11

29
7
19
18

20
7
l*
l
35

8
5
20

1
*
2
7
20

1
2
2
12

13

8

.
5

2

112

1* .0
0

1.1k

4 5 .5 0

«
•

5

9

26

2*
1

12

9

8

10

6

2

1

-

-

Women
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ....
Clerks, transit ...........................
Proof-machine operators.... •••••••••••••••
Stenographers, general ...... ..............
Tellers, paying or paying and
receiving, commercial ..............••••••

'
l/

The study c o vered est a b l i s h m e n t s in the b a n k i n g industry w i t h more t h a n 20 w o r k e r s .

studied.
2
Ex c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for overtime.

]




O f the e s timated 9 esta b l i s h m e n t s a n d 2,1*98 w o r k e r s in t his industry, 7 establ i s h m e n t s a n d 2 ,0 7 1 w o r k e r s w e r e a c t ually
O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, Atlan t a , Georgia, M a r c h 1951
TJ.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR
B u r e a u o f L a b o r Statistics

15,
Table 9.— POWER LAUNDRIES 3 ]
.

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

Num ber of workers receiv ing str,aight-t ime kouxly earnings 0
—
*0.50 $0 .55 l o r *o.b5
*0 .75 $0.80 $0.85 i c f r $0 .95

"$0.30
and
under

*0 .35 i

— -•35

.Uo

to

.5 0

-

—

-

T
“
“

w

*1 .0 0

*1 .0 5

"*1 . 1 0

1$1.15
and
over

.60

.65

.70

.7 5

.80

♦85

.90

.95

1.0 0

1 .0 5

1.10

1 .1 5

2
*
*

1
6
-

4
8
1

5
4

,3
16
6
4

5

1
2
4
7

_
5
19

-

1
3

7

_

9

4
8
4

-

-_
-

7

12

4

20

7

7

_
6
l
5
27
40
8
32

.
.
13
3

—

-

2
-

1
-

-

-

10
10
20
13

2
2
2
11

3
3
5
2

5
_
7
7
2
10

4

.5
8
8
31
Ob
20
46
10
3
7

1
1
4
-

l
-

-

_
-

_
_

-

_
_

-

-

-

2

10

-

4

6

13
_

11

—

-

*_
-

-

.5 5

Men
$0.84
♦73
♦78
•°7

28
54
10
58

Clerks, retail receiving .......................

—
*
*

7

Women
.67

J k

Finishers, flatwork, machine, t o t a l ............

.41
♦59
♦72

1?1
25
3f
141
Prossers, machine, shirt, total

♦57

...... ........

_
l
l

:8.
.5 5

%

182
l l

21
1/ The study covered, power laundries with more than 20 workers.
Z j Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

4
,-,r

.J
ii
3
b
5
1
18
18

40
40
—
3

2
28
24
4
25
25
lb
100
55
45

%

i27
1
1
8
*2
19
23
17

k

4

3

:

—

—

*
■
'
Of the estimated 40 establishments and 2,384 workers in this industry, 16 establishments with 1,275 workers were actually studied.

—

-

Table 10.— AUTO REPAIR SHOPS 1/

Occupation 2/

Body repairmen, metal ........
Electricians, automotive, total
T i m e ....................
Incentive ...............
Greasers ...........................
Mechanics, automotive, class A, total
T i m e ...........................
Incentive.... .................
Mechanics, automotive, class B, total
T i m e ...........................
Incentive ......................
Washers, automobile.................

Number
of
workers
152

S

Average
hourly
earnings

2/

w

and
under
.7 0

w

w

•75

d l

.85

•9°

_

dumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of ~
1 0 3 1 0 5 " 1 0 3 $2.00
* 5 3 5 * 0 3 f T a c $1.20 n t w $1.*K> 1 0 3

•95
_

1.0 0

1 .1 0

1 .2 0

1.30

1 .U0

1.50

5

2

4

2
3

22
1
1

_

l

1.89

ell

.80

_

$l.7>*
1.87
i.s4

17

io*r

w

4
80
92

-

2

18

12

15

7

1
S

_

!:£

_

1.14
1.08

-

_

_

2
2
_

21

_

13

4
4

-

18
18

4
4
_

_

_

_

22

26

10

2
2

14
51
28
23

2
39
lb
23
?g
19
19

5+
*
33
21
3?
24
8

6?
44
20
3°
15
15

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

31
2
2

18
5

149
120
29
9

1
49
8
4l
5

9

5

K
.
/
33
2
31
-

1.80
15
2
2

1.9 0

2.00

15

4
5

-

2
27

2.20

$2.46 $2.66

2.60

2.80

15
1

l
l

4

1
X

-

10

_

10

4

_

«.

10

10

4

-

13
11

2 .U0

_

-

-

-

-

l

14

49

32

—

54
1

27

1

-

l4

49

32

-

J z M

-

-

3.00
1
_

-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 4 workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 753s)
motor vehicle dealer establishments, new and used (Group 551) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual ( 1 9 % edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 66 establishments and 3#l45 workers in these industries, 18 establishments with 1,409 workers were actually studied.
Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, January 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work,
TJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

s
f




16,

UNION WAGE SCALES

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week l / agreed upon through collective bargaining between
employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect April 1, 1951)
Table 12.— BUILDING CONSTRUCTION - Continued

Table 11, — BAKERIES

Classification
Bread and cake— Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread mixers and ovenmen.......... .
Checkers, wrapping-machine operators ...
Agreement B:
Bread:
Foremen ••••••••••..••••••*•••*••.•««
Dough mixers, ovenmen •••••.•••••••••
Benchmen, rolling machine, moldermen.
Checkers ........................
Bread rackers, oven helpers, pan
greasers, (after 6 months); wrappingmachine helpers •••••••••»»••••••••.
Cake:
Foremen ........... ........................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

40

$1.38
1.28

ko

1.52
1.32
1.21
1.19
1.16

40
40
40
40
40

.95

40

1.45
1.30

40
40
-

Ingredient scalers, and scaling-machine
1.09

40

.92
.82

40
40

Engineers-Power equipment operators - Continued
Crane, derrick and dragline •••••......
Pumps rollers ••....
Scrapers .................. ...........
Tractors:
4 0 horsepower and under ••••••••••••••»..
Over 40 horsepower.... ............ ••
Trenching machines .••••*•••••*....... .
Glaziers ....... ........... .......... .
Lathers •••••....
•••••*
Painters, brush.••••••••••••••••••••••
Paperhangers...... ................. .
Plasterers.............
••••••••.
Plumbers •••••.......... ....... .
Rodmen .............. .
Roofers, composition ........ .
Roofers, slate and tile.... .
Sheet-metal workers....... .
Sign painters...... .
Structural and ornamental iron
workers *
Tile layers....................... .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$2.25
1.50
1.75

40
40
40

1.50
1.75
2.00
2.00
2.50
2.0Q
2.10
2.50
2.60
2.00
1.75
2.00
2.20
2.25
2.25
2.50

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
AO
AO

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.10
1.05
1.82
1.10
1.05

40
40
40
40
40

Journeymen
Table 13.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES

1.50

Electricians (inside wiremen) ..............

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
AO

1.50
1.75

40
40

Engineers - Power equipment operators Bulldozersx
Under 40 horsepower.............. .
Over 40 horsepower ...... •••••••••••••••

l/ Hours per week are shown only for industries reporting a
regular workweek after which premium overtime was paid.




Classification

Busses and trackless trolleys:
First 6 months .................
7-12 months ....... ...... ..............
After 1 y e a r ....... .............. .
Feeder busses:
First 6 months ..... ..................
7-12 months..... ............ .........
After 1 y e a r .............

.••«•••

Rate per
hour

$1.30
1.36
1 M

I.25
1.31
1.35

Rate
per
hour

Baggage.....
Helpers

..... ............... ...

#1.320

.... ...

Hours
per
week
40

•7

jy J

/o

•••••••

•• 0
90

zn

Bakery .......................__ ___ _____ ttt

1*200

Beer - Keg drivers

1.335

AO

1.150
1.020

48
48

1*250
1.050

AO

1.200

48

1.250

40

1.235

40

1.490
1.390

40
53

1.321
1*344
1*367
1.380
1.413
1*436
1*459
1.482
1.505
1*528
1*541

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.585
1*725

40
40

•••.•••••••••••

••••••••

General-Freight, city delivery
Helpers

...............

Grocery - Chain store*
Agreement A
Helpers •«••••*••.»•*••••••••••••••••••«,.
Agreement B

........... .

*............................

Grocery - Wholesale:
(After 30 days) •

Lard and vegetable products

Hours
per
week

$2.50
2.35
2.75
2.00
2.20
2.50
2.52

14-— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AND HELPERS

Classification
Armored cars

Helpers and laborers
Bricklayers' tenders ..... •••••••».
Building laborers..... ........ .
Elevator constructors' helpers ••••,
Plasterers' laborers •••••••••••«••
Plumbers' laborers ............ .

Table 12.— BUIIDING CONSTRUCTION

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Classification

.

leers, wrappers, packers, cutters,
(after 6 months) cake-wr&pping -machine

T a b le

City drivers

-

40

Packing house:

•

Meat - Packing house*
Agreement A ...............................
Agreement B •
Oil:
First 6 months
7-12 months •
13-18 months •
19-24 months • . . . . ................
25-30 months •
................
•••••••*..•*
31-36 months
37-42 months • ••••*••••••••••••••••••••••.•.
43-48 months •••••••••••.....
49-54 months •••••••••**»••••*.•••...«••*»**
55-60 months ••••••••••*••...••••
After 5 years ••••••••••..•••. .-»**»••*•••»»
Railway express t
Pick-up and delivery .............. .
Money pick-up

AO

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, Itarch 1951
U . S . DEPARTMENT OP LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

17,

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Table 17.— SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL PROVISIONS

Table 16.— MINIMUM ENTRANCE RATES FOR PLANT WORKERS l/

Table 15.— PRINTING

Hours
per
week

Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments ......

Percent of plant 2/ workers in establishments
with specified minimum rates in - _____
An
Whole­
Retan
Public
Manu­
sale
indus­
Services
trade
facturing utilities*
trade
tries 3/
100.0

100.0

100.0

—
2.5
37.2
2 .6
A.8
A.8
2 .8
3.1
3.2
A.3
3.8
1.7
A.A
9.7
1 .0
10.9
3.2

—
1A.3
57.7
13.7
11.5
2.5
-

100.0

100.0

100.0

3.0
25 .0
18.0
—
3.3
8 .2

30.7
.9
—
2 .6
13.5
1 .1
-

Percent of plant workers
employed on each shift

Shift differential

Book and job shops*
Bindery w o m e n ........
Bookbinders ..........
Compositors, h a n d ....
Electrotypers ........
Machine operators .....
Mailers ..............
Photoengravers .......
Press assistants and
feeders ............
Pressmen, cylinder ....
2 -color presses ....
Rotary and offset
presses .........
Pressmen, platen .....

$1,2 5 0
2 .4 16
2.480
2.608
2.480
2.267
2.693

37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*
37*

1.637
2.427
2.533

37*
37*
37*

2.597
2.427

37*
m

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work ..........
Night work ........

2.533
2.613

37*
37*

Machine operators:
Day work ..........

2.533

37*

Mailers:
Day work ..........
Night w o r k ........

1.975
2.107

ao

37*

n o ...................
Over n o and under n 5 ...
n 5 .....................
Over n 5 and under 120 ...
1 2 0 .....................
Over 120 and under 125 ...
125 and over ............

Photoengravers:
Day w o r k ........ . •
Night work ........

2.693
2.853

37*
37*

Pressmen, web presses:
Day work ..........
Night work ........

2.453
2 .5 6 1

37*
37*

Pressmen-in-charge:
Day work ..........
Night work ........

2.673
2.781

37*
37*

Stereotypers:
Day work ..........
Night work ........

2.533
2.6U

37*
37*

1133230 0 — 31-------2




AO or u n d e r .............
Over AO and under A 5 ....
A 5 ......................
Over A5 and under 5 0 ....
50 ................. .
Over 50 and under 5 5 ....
5 5 ......................
Over 55 and under 60 ....
60 ......................
Over 60 and under 6 5 ....
65 ......................
Over 65 and under 7 0 ....
7 0 ......................
Over 70 and under 7 5 ....
7 5 ......................
Over 75 and under 80 .....
80 ......................
Over 80 and under 8 5 ....
85 ......................
Over 85 and under 9 0 ....
90 ......................
Over 90 and under 9 5 ....
9 5 ................ .
Over 95 and under 100 ....
1 0 0 .....................
Over 100 and under 105 ...
105 .....................
Over 105 and under 110 ...

Establishments with no
established minimum ...

2 .8
.1
A.6
3.3
—
.6
2 .8 .2
2.3
.8
36.8
1.5
3.7
2 .A
3.7
3.A
1.9
3.6
2.7
1 .1
2.5
A.9

(4/)
.8
5.5
1 .6
6 .A

.

—

.3
—

_
—
7A.9
1 .6
1.7
1 .0
1 .1
2 .6
6 .A
2 .0
-

.1
2.2
6 .A

2 .8
A.3
7.8
5.6
n.9
1 0 .1

An
manufacturing
industries 1 /

Machinery

3rd or
other
shift

2nd
shift

3rd or
other
shift

2nd
shift

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
a n estabnshments..............

13.3

A .8

2 .8

-

Receiving shift differentials.....

8 .6

2.A

2.A

-

Uniform cents (per hour) ........

8 .2

2 .2

2.A

-

Under 5 cents ...............
5 cents ....................
Over 5 and under 10 cents ....
10 cents ................... .
Over 10 cents ...............

3.8
3.1
.6

_

_

_

.6

.7

.A
1 .6
.1
.1

1 .8

—

Uniform percentage .............

.A

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2
(
2/)

—

—

2. A

.A

-

Under 5 percent .............
5 percent ..................
Over 5 and under 10 percent ..

Receiving no differential.........

-

.A
—

A.7

-

.2
5 1.0

l/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant
workers, other than watchmen.
2/ Other than office workers.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
U/
Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public
utilities.

l/
2/

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 18.— SCHEDULED WEEKLY HOURS

Perce
Weekly hours

All establishments........ .................
35 hours ...................................
Over 15 a»d under 38 3/^ h o u r s ........... ...
38 3/4 ho u r s ...............................
Over 3^ 3/^ and under HO hours ........... ...
HO hours .......... .........................
Over HO and under H5 h o u r s ..................
H5 hour8 ....................................
Over H5 and under US h o u r s ..................
H8 h o u r s ...................................
Over H8 and under 50 hours ..................
50 h o u r s ...................................
Over 50 h o u r s ....... .......................

All
industries
100.0
2 .1
15.9
3.6
3.8
67.5
6 .3
.6
.1
.1

Manufacturing

100.0

Public
utilities"1
100.0

_

12 .6
72 .2
1 1 .6
3.6
-

19.9
.6
75.2
3.*
.9
-

Wholesale
trade
100.0
2.9
H.2
79.0
13.9
-

Retail
trade
100.0

Percent of ■
plant 1 / workers employed in -

Finance**

Services

Manufacturing

2/
100.0

100.0

100.0

13.1
1 0 .1
1 1 .2
65.6
-

6 .1
3.9
77.9
8.8
2.7
.6
—

0.6
.2
75.0
5.6
2.9
.7
3.5
.7
2.9
2.9

_
3.2
85.0
9 .2
2 .3
.3
-

All
industries

100.0

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

5.0

_

_

0.3
78.3

87.0
.5

1 6 .7

-

9.H
2.8

_
«
.
63.3
15.7
.1
.8
H.5
6.6
8.8
.2

_

66.2
12.9
2.0
3.3
10.6

Z)

*
**

18.0

1.0

k .k

K o

1.1

'
1j

26.6
15.8
3^.1

Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Table 19.— PAID HOLIDAYS

Percent of office workers employed in Number of paid holidays

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

100.0

100.0

100.0

days ......... ................... ....
5 d a y s .... ..............................
5h d a y s ....................... .........
6 d a y s ..................................
6 > days
|
........................ *
7 d a y s ............................ .....
8 d a y s ................. ................
9 d a y s ..................................
12 days .................................

99.8
.2
.1
l.H
.1
38.6
1 1 .0
32.1
1 .2
6.H
5.^
3.1
.2

100.0
l.H
2.0
29.0
62.3
5.1
.2
-

100.0
M.3

Establishments providing no paid holidays ....

.2

All establishments .........................
Establishments providing paid holidays......
2 d a y s .... ..............................
■5 days .......... ................ .......

1j
2j

2/
*
**

56.5
2 .2
-

other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




!
All
industries

Percent of plant

If

workers employed

i

n -

Retail
trade

Finance**

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.7
.1
35.5
.3
60.9
2.2
.7
-

100.0
3.7
20.0
66.5
9.8
-

100.0
1.3
H7 .6
2 .1
9.3
2 .1
lH.H
12 .3
10.1
.8

99.1
1.3
2 .5
.9
H9 . 1
2 1.0
9.0
15.3
-

82.7
.9
.5
3.9
1 .0
29.9
9.6
30 .2

73.7
1.8
1.2
2 1.0
Hl.l
8.6
-

100.0
5 2.2
33.6
lH.2
-

83.7

96.6

80,8

.9

17.3

Wholesale
trade

.3

Services

Manufacturing

2/

Occupational Wage'Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

6 .6
.1
-

Public
utilities*

-

26.3

-

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

-

-

HH.6
1 .6
33.3
<2/)
2.5
-

5.8
31.7
51.1
8.0
-

H.H
30.H
13.7
27.2

1 6 .3

3.H

19.2

1.7

-

3.1
2.0
-

19

Table 20.— PAID VACATIONS (FORMAL PROVISIONS)

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in Vacation policy

All
industries

Manufacturing

All establishments ........ ................ .

100.0

100.0

65.8
3.1
47.0
10.8
M
34.2

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

62.5
«.3
3 7 .1
1 6 .5
.6
37.5

59.^
59.^
4o.6

58.3
1.1
*1 . 3
1 5 .6

* 5 .5

41.7

5 * .5

99.5
.2
27.5
.5
71.3
.5

100.0

100.0
55.5

99.9
.21+.6
M

9 7 .3

99.2
•2
10.1
.5
#6.2
2.8
.2

100.0
1.8
21.7
.2
76.3
*
*

99.8
4.1
.1
90.1
5.5
.2

100.0
4.8
.2
95.0
-

Finance**

Services

All
industries
2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

84.1
6 1 .2
7.4
15.5
15.9

63.5
.7
35.2
27.6
36.5

38.5
11.8
25.6
.9
.2
61.5

34.4
17.1
16.5
.8

54.0
_
54.0
-

47.7
14.6
33.1

12.8
2.7
10.1

65.6

46.0

41.7
1.9
33.6
4.6
1 .6
58.3

52.3

87.2

100.0
4.5
95.5
-

98.7
1 6 .5
82.2
1.3

94.0
.6
68.6
.3
24.5
6.0

95.9
l.l
85.6
_
9.2
4.1

100.0
»
43.0
2 .5
54.5

80.1
_

94.7

89.9

37.7

7 3 .6
.1

6U.3
33.0
2 .7

100.0
5 .3
94.7
“

99.9
1 5 .0
1 .6
83.3
.1

100.0
8 .3
.7
77.8
13.2
-

100.0
4.5
91.7
3.8
-

98.7
9.8
88.9
!.3

94.9
.6
51.9
1.7
38.3
2.4
5.1

95.9
l.l
78.6
1.6
14.6
4.1

100.0
-

100.0
i.7
98.3
-

9 9 .9

100.0
3.4
•8
77.1
I8 .7

100.0
.5
91.4
8 .1

98.7
9.5
85.7
3.5
1.3

94.9
19.8
l.l
70.9
3.1
5.1

95.9
25.1
.5
70.3

100.0
2 .7
-

6 months of service
Establishments with paid vacations..........
Under 1 week ............................
1 week ..................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s .............. .
2 weeks .................................
Establishments with no paid vacations.......

14.1
31.4
-

1 year of service
Establishments with paid vacations..........
Under 1 w e e k ............................
1 w e e k .................................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ................
2 w eeks.... ....... ................. .
Establishments with no paid vacations.......

1 .8
3*.7
59.5
-

1 .1
43.4
-

55.1

73.8

42.4
19.9

39.6
5.3

1 6 .1
10.1

80.1
_
2U.1

98.0
_

94.3
63I6

19.9

1 5 .3
4 .7
64.8
1 3 .2
2.0

80.1
13 .0
_
66.3
.8
19.9

98.0
2.8
4.7
74.2
16 .3
2.0

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ..........
Under 1 w e e k .............. .............
1 w e e k .................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks .................
2 weeks ........ .........................
Over 2 weeks .......................... ••
Establishments with no paid vacations.......

14.5 ,
85.5
-

56.0
_

30.7
5.7

5 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations ..........
1 week ................................. .
Over 1 and under 2 w e eks .... ......... .
2 weeks .................................
Establishments with no paid vacations.......

2j

2/
*
**

Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication,and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




7.6
90.6
1.7
.1

4.1

97.3

94.3
63.6
30.7
5.7
1951

Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, March

U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics

20,

Table a . — PAID SICK LEAVE (FOBMAL PROVISIONS)

f erce ni of office woi
’
Provisions for paid sick leave

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

rr
Wholesale
trade

it -

—

Retail
trade

Percent of plant l/ workers employed in Finance**

Services

All
industries

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

49.4
28.4
21.0
_
_
_

10.5
2.6
2.4
4.S
.6
.1

7.6
1.8
3.6
2.2

5.0

50.6

89.5

92.4

95.0

49.4
14.2
21.0
l4.2
-

Manufacturing

21.7

1 3 .2

1 6 .1

11.2
7.3
1.2
.1
-

9.2
l.S

3*7
12.4

3f

All establishments ............................

100.0

100.0

24.1
1.1
6.4
3.0

27.S
S.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3 7 .1
2.2
3^.9
- '
-

21.0
3.7
7.5
1.5
3 .5
.2
4.6

8.7
l.S
2.3
1.7
2.9
-

28.6
9.1

IS. 2
5.5
3.8
8.9

9.o
.6
1 .2
4.6
2,6

100.0

Services

6 months of service
Establishments with formal provisions for paid
sick l e a v e ..... .......................... .
Under 5 d a y s .................... ........
5 d a y s ...................................
6 or 7 days *...... .......................
10 d a y s ..................................
12 days *................... .............
13 days ..................................
15 days ..................................
21 d a y s ..................................
22 d a y s ............ ........... ..........
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick l e a v e .......................... .

-

3.7
1.3

M
1.8
.3
1.2
.5
1.1

6.6
1.3
4.3
-

75.9

72.2

62.9

79.0

91.3

71.4

Si. S
'

9 1.0

30.5
.9
8.6
3.0
9.4
3.5

3 7 .1
3**.9
2.2
-

40. S
19.6
4.2
.2
7*3
4.4
-

10.5
4.1
l.S
2.9
1.7
-

31.5
2.9
6 .1
1-3
S.i
6.9
3.9
1-3
1 .0

23.9
- ■
5-7
4.7

.4
.5
1.7
1.0
.3

27.8
S.2
5*6
6.6
3.1
4.3
-

1 2 .1
3.2
3.8
2.7
2.2
.1
.1
-.

69.5

72.2

62.9

59.2

89.5

6S. 5

7 6 .1

87.9

100.0

50.6

78.3

86.8

83.9

37.6
7.6
2.S
10.6
2.1
1.0
1.6
.4
•5
.6
1.0
9.4

36.4
S.2
5.6
6.6

42.7
16 .S
5.1
7.0
.2
-

44.9
4.1

16 .6
2.S
3.4
3.1
2.5
1.5
-

1 6 .1
3 .7
12„4

4.1

_

_
_
_

_
_

.1
.1
3.1

2.S
2.S
—
-

24.8
7.8
7 .3
4.6
.1

4 .4
6 .5

23.9
5.5
5.7
9.0
4.7
*

24.3
9.2

2.9
3.5
3**
*.+

31.5
5.0
1.3
9*6
1.7
- '
5.2
1-3
7.4

5 5 .5

H
S.6
4.3
-

50.6
3 M
2 .2
“
13.5

62.4

63.6

^9.H

5 7 .3

55.1

68.5

7 6 .1

83*4

97.2

6.4
5.2
1.0
3-9
-

-

-

100.0

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions for paid
sick l e a v e ............................... .
Under 5 days *.... ................ .......
5 days ........................... ........
6 or 7 days ..............................
10 days ............ ................... .
12 days ..................................
15 d a y s ................................ ..
20 days .................................. .
21 days ..................................
22 days ...... ............................
25 d a y s ....... ............ ..... .
Over 25 days ...... ........... ...... .
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick leave ............................

4.6
-

-

-

2.2
_

_
1.1
.8

-

_

_
_

5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions for paid
sick l e a v e ..... ..................... .
5 days ...................................
b or 7 d a y s .... ................... ......
10 days ...................................
12 days *....... .......... ...............
15 d a y s ..................................
IS d a y s ..................................
20 days ..................................
21 d a y s ..... ..................... .......
22 days ..................................
25 days ...................................
Over 25 days ...................... ......
Establishments with no formal provisions for
paid sick leave ............................

a
7/
▼
**

Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than 0*05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communications, and other public utilities.
Finance, Insurance, and real estate.




-

14.2
21.0
14.2
*

-

6 .1

l.l
.8
3.1

11.0

44.5

75.2

75.7

-

83.9

U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 22.— UOHPSODUCTION BOHTJSES

Percent of office workers employed in Type of bonus

All establishments ........................
Establishments with nonproduction bonuses J /
i
Christmas or year-end ......... .........
Profit-sharing........................ .
O t h e r ................................ .
Establishments with no nonproduction bonuses

I

All
industries

Manufacturing

100.0

100.0

38.9
35.6
4.0
1.0
6l.l

3^.7
37-4
10.3
6 1.3

Public
utilities*

Percent of plant 1/ workers employed in
All
industries

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

7.9
7.9
92.1

29.5
25.5
3.1
2.0
70.5

54.3
53.^
.9
.8
45.7

*6.0
38.1
6 .1
1.5
55.0

57.2
57.2
42.8

36.3
32.6
4.6
63.7

24.4
21.7
5.5

IS.a
7.3
11.5
81.2

45.1
39.0
2.2
6.1
54.9

73.2
7 2 .2
1 .0
3.0
26.S

41.5
41.5
-

Finance**

Services

Manufacturing

Services

2/

-

75.6

_

58.5

Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
TJnduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table 23.— INSURANCE JUJD PENSIOH PLAITS

Percen t of office wo]rkers employed in Public
utilities*

Retail
trade

o£

plant 1/ workers employed in -

All
industries

Manufac tur ing

All establishments.......... ......... ....

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with insurance or pension
plans 2/ ...............................
Life insurance ........................ .
Health insurance ........................
Hospitalisation ................ ........
Retirement pension.................... .
Establishments with no insurance or pension
plans ..................................

95.5
87.0
40.5
60.6
56.7

98.5
94.2
48.2
77.3
39.8

100.0
92.8
6 1.2
13.6
89.8

90.3
80.0
46.5
64.5
38.7

9 3 .1
90.2
2 9 .1
6 7 .1
83.4

98.9
84.7
35.0
7 1 .0
68.5

9 1.4
9 1 .4
26.3
44.9
1 7 .&

90.2
87.3
5i.i
56.0
33.7

95.8
92.6
6 0 .1
64.6
23.6

100.0
98.9
56.9
27.1
57.1

4.5

1 .5

9.7

6.9

1.1

8.6

9.8

4.2

Type of plan

Wholesale
trade

£erceni
All
industries

Finance**

Services

Manufacturing

1/

Public
utilities*

—

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0 *

78.3
68 .7
34.0
56.9
I8.9

92.0
92.0
40.6
5 6 .6
67.4

48.5
48.5
29.0
41.5
3.0

21.7

8.0

51.5

‘

'1/
2/
3/
■
*
**

Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
TJnduplicated total.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Atlanta, Georgia, M a r c h 1951
U.S. DEPART M E N T O F LABOR
Bureau of L a b o r Statistics

22.

Appendix A - Scofte and Method of Sutuey
With the exception of the union scale of rates, information presented in this bulletin was collected
by visits of field representatives of the Bureau to representative establishments in the area surveyed. In
classifying workers by occupation, uniform job descriptions were used; they are presented in Appendix B.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling earnings data for the following types of oc­
cupations: (a) office clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and power plant, and (d) cus­
todial, warehousing and shipping (tables 1 through 4). The covered industry groupings are: manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supplementary benefits
was also obtained in a representative group of establishments in each of these industry divisions. As indi­
cated in table A, only establishments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments were omitted
because they furnished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion in the
study.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were studied, minimum size of establishment and
extent of the area covered were determined separately for each industry, and are indicated in table B. Al­
though size limits frequently varied from those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms which satisfied the size requirements of the broad in­
dustry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied in order to maximize the
number of workers surveyed with available resources. Bach group of establishments of a certain Aize, however,
was given its proper weight in the combination of data by industry and occupation.

The earnings information in the report excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but incentive.earnings, including commissions for salespersons, have been
included for those workers employed under some form of incentive wage system.. Where weekly hours sire reported
as for office clerical, they refer to the work schedules for which the salaries are paid rounded to the near­
est half hour; average weekly* earnings for these occupations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The
number of workers presented refers to the estimated, total employment in all establishments within the scope
of the study and not to the number actually surveyed. Data are shown only for full-time workers, i.e., those
who were hired to work the establishment *s full-time schedule of .
hours for the given occupational classifi­
cation.
Information on wage practices refers to all office workers and to all plant workers as specified in
the individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in offices(or plant
departments) that observe the practice in question, except in the section relating to women office workers of
the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually
receiving the specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is limited to
formal arrangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of
the employer or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to those providing full pay for at
least some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting period preceding the payment of benefits,
and exclude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers. Health insurance is included, however,
under tabulations for insurance and pension plans.

Table A. — ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IH MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA AND
NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1951

Item

flumbqr of establishments
Estimated
Estimated
Estimated
total
total in all
Studied total in all
industries
industries within scope
of study 2/
______i / _
it

Employment
Estimated
In establishments
total
studied
within scope
Total
Office
of study 2/

Industry Division
Manufacturing..............................
Transportation (except railroads), com­
munication, and other public utilities ....
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services:
Industries covered 3/ .................
Industries not covered .................

11,088
1,028
10,060

688
97
591

201
39
162

202,800
61.600
11+
1,200

1$
3.*32
1,205

19
252
52
117

11
1*6
25
39

21,300
28,000
1*5,1+00
15,000

M95
1.319

151
-

1+1
-

20,
1*00
11,10 0

111,10 0
1* ,1+00
2
68,700
13.700
18,000
18,100
9,800
9.100
- .

65.530
25.790
39.7^0

11+.1+20
1,730
12,690

11.990
5.920
. 13,070
1+.920

2,760
2,220
2,560
1+.100

3 . +0
8I
-

11,089
15
23
5*
155
32U
735
9.7«2

688
15
2?
5*
155
128
313
(2/)

201
ik

17
28
6l
?8
k3

<2/)

202,800
31,100
16,700
19,100
23.700
23,000
28,1*00
60,800

111,10 0
31,100
16,700
19,100
23.700
8,700
11,800
(2/)

65,530
29,110
12,590
9,900
9,580
2,670
1,680
(2/)

lU,l+20
!*.510
2,630
2,610
2,880
1,
01+0
750
(2/)

l/ Includes establishments with 1 or more workers in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area (Cobb, DeKalb, and Fulton Counties).
2f The survey of office,professional and technical, maintenance and power plant, custodial, warehousing and shipping jobs reported
in tables 1 , 2 , 3 , and 1* was limited to establishments with more than 100 workers in manufacturing, transportation (except railroads),
communication, and other public utilities, and retail trade, and to establishments with more than 20 workers in wholesale trade,
finance, insurance, and real estate, and service industries; exceptions made in industries in which characteristic jobs were surveyed
are Indicated in table B.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair services; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures:
nonprofit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.




Number of
establishments
Minimum
size of
estab­
lishment
studied

1,050
-

Size of Establishment
All size groups ...............................
1,0 0 1 and over ..............................
501 - 1,000 ................................
2 5 1 - 5 0 0 ..................................
101 - 250 ..................................
51 - 100 ...................................
21 - 50 ....................................
1 - 2 0 .....................................

Table B.— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN
ATLANTA, GEORGIA AND NUMBER STpDIED BY THE BUREAU
OF LABOR STATISTICS, MARCH 1951 1/

Selected industries in which
characteristic jobs were
surveyed 2/

Women*s and misses* dresses.....
Machinery industries ...............
Department stores............. ....
Banking
Power laundries ...................
Auto repair shops ..................

3/

21
21
150
21
21
5

Employment

Estimated
Estimated I *
total
total estab­
Studied within
within
lish­
scope of ments
scope of
study
study studied
8
21

8
12

k

Q
1+
0
66

7
16

18

5*3
1.850
6 ,110

2.322
2,563
3 . 1*5

6,110
2,021
l ! 3!53
x 1,^05

1
J
Industries surveyed in months other than March 1951 were: Women*s and
misses* dresses, August 1950 and Machinery, January 1951.
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to tables 5 through 10.
Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers
were included.

A p p e n d ix

B ■ JbeA crU pdieuA . o f O c c u p a tio u A

S tu d ie d
23

Office - Continued

The primary purpose of the Bureau* s Joh descriptions is to assist its field
staff in classifying workers who are employed under a variety of pay-roll titles and
different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area,
into appropriate occupations. This is essential in order to permit the grouping of oc­
cupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's
job descriptions differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or
those prepared for other purposes. In view of these special characteristics of the
Bureau's job descriptions, their adoption without modification by any single establish­
ment or for any other purpose than that indicated herein is not recommended. Where
office workers regularly perform duties classified in more than one occupation, they
are generally classified according to the most skilled or responsible duties that are a
regular part of their job and that are significant in determining their value to the
firm.
______

Office

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of business transactions.
Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with the structure of the particu­
lar accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit
items to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to
business transactions usually requiring seme knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sec­
tions Include accounts payable, pay rolls, customers' accounts (not including simple type of
billing described under Biller, Machine), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory
controls, etc. In addition may check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare
control sheets for the accounting department.

BILLER, MACHINE
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who prepares statements, bills and Invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform
other clerical work incidental to billing operations. Should be designated as working on
billing machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.

A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating machine to per­
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.
Comptometer type

Billing Machine - A worker who uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda,
etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry
of necessary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals
which are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a large num­
ber of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers* bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figures on a customer's ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the deb­
it or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and
standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
A worker who keeps a set of books for recording business transactions and whose
work involves most of the following: posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or
journals, journalising transactions where judgment Is involved as to accounts affected; post­
ing general ledger; and taking trial balances. May also prepare accounting statements and
bills; may direct work of assistants or accounting clerks.




Other than Comptometer type
*
CIZRK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who performs one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple
journal vouchers; accounts payable vouchers; coding Invoices or vouchers with proper account­
ing distributions; entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; post­
ing and balancing subsidiary ledgers controlled by general ledger, e.g., accounts receivable,
accounts payable, stock records, voucher journals. May assist in preparing journal entries.
For workers whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set of books see Bookkeeper, Hand.
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who is responsible for maintaining an established filing system
and classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material. May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or supervise others In filing and lo­
cating material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine filing, usually of material that has already
been classified, or locates or assists in locating material in files. May perform incidental
clerical duties.

2k.

Office - Continued

Office - Continued

CTERK, GENERAL

SECRETARY

A worker who is typically required to perform & variety of office operations, This
requirement may arise as a result of impracticability of specialization in a small office or
because versatility is essential in meeting peak requirements in larger offices. The work
generally involves the use of independent Judgment in tending to a pattern of office work
from day to day, as well as knowledge relating to phases of office work that occur only oc­
casionally. For example, the range of operations performed may entail all or seme combination
of the following: answering correspondence, preparing bills and invoices, posting to various
records, preparing pay rolls, filing, etc. May also operate various office machines and type
as the work requires .

A worker who performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an adminis­
trative or executive position and whose duties Involve the following: making appointments for
superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and making phone calls;
handling
personal and important or confidential mall, and writing routine correspondence on own Initia­
tive; taking dictation, either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine (except where
transcribing machine is used), and transcribing dictation or the recorded information repro­
duced on a transcribing machine. In addition, may prepare special reports or memoranda for
information of superior.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL

CIERK, ORDER
A worker who receives customers' orders for material or merchandise by mail, phone,
or personally and whose duties involve any combination of the followings quoting .prices to
customers, making out an order sheet listing the items to make up the order, checking prices
and quantities of items on order sheet, distributing order sheets to respective departments to
be filled. May also check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer, ac­
knowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow-up orders to see that they have been filled,
keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original orders.
CI3SRK, PAY POLL
A worker who computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on
the pay roll sheets and whose duties involve: calculating worker's earnings based on time or
production records; posting calculated data on pay roll sheet, showing information such as
worker's naam, working days, time, rate, deductions for Insurance and total wages due. In
addition, may make out pay checks and assist the paymaster in making up and distributing the
pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine.

A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons, either
In shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, Involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to
transcribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up
and keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine
work. (See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or spe­
cialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research and to tran­
scribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not Include transor lb Ing-machine work.
(See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities,
reproduces
multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine.
Makes necessary adjustment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not
required to prepare stencil or ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or ditto masters.
May sort, collate, and staple couple ted material.

A worker who operates a single or multiple position telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involve: handling Incoming, outgoing and intraplant or office calls. In addition, nay
record toll calls and take messages. As a minor part of duties, may give information to per­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For workers who also do typing or
other stenographic work or act as receptionists, see Switchboard Operator-Receptionist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, records account­
ing and statistical data on tabulating cards by punching a series of holes in the cards in a
specified sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, following written information on
records. May be required to duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to ma­
chine . Keeps files of punch cards. May verify own work or work of others •
OFFICE BOY CB GIRL
A worker who performs a variety of routine duties such as running errands; operating
minor office machines; such as sealers or mailers; opening and distributing mall; and other
minor clerical work.
(Bonded messengers are excluded from this classification.)




A worker who in addition to performing duties of operator, on a single position or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and/or performs typing or other routine cleri­
cal work as part of regular duties. This typing or clerical work may take the major part of
this worker's time while at switchboard.
TABUIATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates machine that automatically analyzes and translates information
punched in groups of tabulating cards, and prints translated data on forms or accounting re­
cords; sets or adjusts machine to add, subtract, multiply, and make other calculations; places
cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts machine. May file cards after they are
tabulated. May sort and verify punched cards.

25.

Professional and Technical - Continued

Office - Continued

TRAH5CBIBING-MACHIKE OPERATOR, GENERAL
DRAFTSMAN, JUNIOR
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do
simple clerical work. A worker who takes dictation In shorthand or by stenotype or similar
machine is olasslfied as a Stenographer, General.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHIWE OPERATOR, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary funetlon is to transcribe dictation involving a varied tech­
nical get specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research
from transcrlbing-machine records* May also type from written copy and do simple clerical
work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine Is classi­
fied as a Stenographer, Technical*
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make out
bills after calculations have been made by another person. May operate a teletype machine.
May, in addition, do clerical work involving little special training, such as keeping simple
records, filing records and reports, making out bills, or sorting and distributing incoming
mall.

(Dataller, assistant draftsman)
A worker who details units or parts of drawings prepared by draftsman or others for
engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. Uses various types of drafting tools
as required. May prepare drawings from simple plans or sketches, and performs other duties
under direction of a draftsman.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service to employees or persons who become ill
or suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment and whose duties
involve all or most of the following: giving first aid to the ill or injured; attending to
subsequent dressing of employee’s Injuries; keeping records of patients treated; and prepar­
ing accident reports for compensation or other purposes. May also assist Physician in ex­
amining applicants, give instruction in health education and illness prevention, and performs
other related duties.

Class A - A worker who performs one or more of the following* typing material in
final form from very rough and involved draft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreign language
copy; combining material from several sources; or planning lay-out of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in final
form. May also type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances. May, in
addition, perform clerical duties as outlined above.

Maintenance and Power Plant
CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

Class B - A worker who performs one or more of the following: typing from relative­
ly clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms, Insurance policies, etc.; setting up sim­
ple standard tabulations, or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
May, in addition, perform clerical duties as outlined above.

A worker who performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in
good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions,
doors, floors, stairs, casings, trim made of wood in an establishment, and whose work Involves
most of the following: planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models or
verbal instructions; using a* variety of carpenters’ hand tools, portable power tools, and
standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of
work; and selecting materials necessary for the work.

Professional and Technical
DRAFTSMAN
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
A worker who prepares working plans and detail drawings from notes, rough or de­
tailed sketches for engineering, construction, or manufacturing purposes. The duties per­
formed involve a combination of the following: preparing working plans, detail drawings,
maps, cross-sections, etc., to scale by use of drafting Instruments; making engineering com­
putations such as those involved in strength of materials, beams and trusses; verifying com­
pleted work, checking dimensions, materials to be used, and quantities; writing specifica­
tions; making adjustments or changes in drawings or specifications. In addition, may ink in
lines and letters on pencil drawings, prepare detail units of complete drawings, or trace
drawings. Work is frequently in a specialized field such as architectural, electrical, me­
chanical, or structural drafting.




A worker who performs a variety of electrical trade functions in the Installation,
maintenance or repair of equipment for the generating, distribution, and/or utilization of
electric energy in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the following: install­
ing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers,
switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layout or other specifications; lo­
cating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computa­
tions relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electricians’ hand tools and measuring and testing instruments.

26

Maintenance and Power Plant

Continued

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
A worker who operates and maintains and/or supervises the operation of stationary
engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply power, heat, refrigeration or airconditioning and whose work involves: operating and maintaining and/or supervising the opera­
tion of such equipment as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ven­
tilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and bo Her-fed water pumps; making or
supervising equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery, temperature,
and fuel consumption. This classification does not include head or chief engineers in estab­
lishments employing more than one engineer.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
A worker who fires stationary boilers used in a factory, power plant, or other es­
tablishment to furnish heat, to generate power, or to supply steam for industrial-processes,
and whose work involves feeding fuel to fire by hand or operating a mechanical stoker, gas,
or oil burner; and checking water f u d safety valves. In addition, may clean, oil, or assist
li
in repairing boiler room equipment.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
A worker who produces replacement parts and new parts for mechanical equipment oper­
ated in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the following: interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and layout of work; using a variety of machinists
hand tools and precision measuring Instruments; setting up end operating standard machine
tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating
to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working pro­
perties of the common metals; selecting standard materials, parts and equipment required for
his work; and fitting end assembling peurts. In general, the machinist's work normally requires
a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
MAINTENANCE MAN, GENERAL UTILITY

A worker who repairs machinery f u d mechanical equipment of an establishment and whose
li
work involves most of the following: examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose
source of trouble; dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
hand tools in scraping f u d fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items ob­
li
tained from stock; ordering the production of a defective part by a machine shop or sending of
the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major
repairs or for the production of peurts ordered from machine shop; and reassembling of machines,
and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
MILLWRIGHT
A worker who installs new machines or heavy equipment f u d dismantles and installs
li
machines or heavy equipment when clmnges in the pleuit layout are required, and whose work
involves most of the following: planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints
or other specifications; using a variety of hand tools, cuid rigging; making standard shop
computations relating to stresses, strength of materieds, end centers of gravity; aligning
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment and parts to be used; and
installing and maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives, end
speed reducers.
In general, the millwright's work normally requires a rounded training and
experience in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training end
experience.
OILER
(Greaser; lubricator)
A worker who lubricates, with oil or grease,
of mechanical equipment found in an establishment.

the moving parts of weening surfaces

PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
(ftiinter, repair)

A worker who keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or structure of an estab­
lishment (usufl&ly a small pleuit where specialization in maintenance work is impractical) in
repair; whose duties involve the performance of operations and the use of tools and equipment
of several trades, rather than specialization in one trade or one type of maintenance work
only, and whose work involves a combination of the following: planning and layout of work re­
lating to repair of buildings" machines, mechanical and/or electrical equipment; repairing
electrical and/or mecheLnlcal equipment; installing, aligning and balancing new equipment; and
repairing building, floors, stairs as well as making and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.

A worker who paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, end fixtures of an establish­
ment end whose work involves the following: knowledge of surface peculiarities end types of
paint required for different applications; mixing colors, oils, white lead, and other paint
ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency; preparing surface for painting by removing
old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and interstices; applying paint with
spray gun or brush.

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

PIPE FITTER, MAINTENANCE

A worker 1A10 repairs automobiles, motor trucks and tractors of an establishment, and
whose work involves most of the following: examining automotive equipment to diagnose source
of trouble; disassembling equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such hand
tools as wrenches, gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling
and/or installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and
aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening body bolts.

A worker who installs and/or repairs pipe and pipe fittings in an establishment,
f u d whose work involves most of the following: laying out of work and/or measuring to locate
li
position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel f u d hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine;
li
threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computa­
tions relating to pressures, flow, f u d Size of pipe required; cuid making standard tests to
li




27

Maintenance and Power Plant - Continued

PIPE FITTER, MAINTENANCE - Continued
determine whether finished pipes meet specifications.
This classification does not Include
workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems.
SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
(Tinner; tinsmith)
A worker who fabricates, installs, and maintains In good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, venti­
lators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establishment, and whose work Involves most of
the following: planning and laying out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, car other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheetmetal working machines; using a variety of hand tools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping,
fitting and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required. In general, the work
of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually acquir­
ed through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

PACKER
A worker who prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in
boxes or other containers, the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
size and number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment.
The work of the packer involves a combination of the following: knowledge of various items
of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; in­
serting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or
damage; closing and sealing containers; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. This classification does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.
SHIPPING-AND-RECEIVING CLERK
A worker who prepares merchandise for shipment, or who receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work involves: a knowledge
of shipping procedures, practices, routes, available means of transportation and rates; and
preparing records of the goods shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and ship­
ping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records. May, in addition, direct or assist in
preparing the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work generally involves: verifying or di­
recting others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of lading, invoices,
or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing merchandise ormaterials to proper departments; and maintaining necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies these workers on
the following basis:

GUARD
Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping-and-receiving clerk

A worker who has routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintain­
ing order, using arms or force where necessary. This classification includes gatemen who are
stationed at gate and check on Identity of employees and other persons entering.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEARER
(Day porter, sweeper; charwoman; janitress)

STOCK HANDLER AMD TRUCKER, HAND
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman or
stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)

A worker who cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and
washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or other establishment.
The duties performed involve a combination of the following: sweeping, mopping and/or scrub­
bing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furni­
ture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing .supplies and minor main­
tenance services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and rest rooms. This classification does
not include workers who specialize in window washing.

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or more of the following: loading and unloading various materials
and merchandise on or from freight cars, trucks or other transporting devices; unpacking,
shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage location; transporting mate­
rials or merchandise by hand truck, car or wheelbarrow to proper location. May, in addition,
keep a record of materials handled or check items against invoices or other records. This
classification does not include longshoremen, who load and unload ships.

ORDER FILLER

TRUCK DRIVER

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
A worker who fills shipping or transfer orders from stored merchandise in accord­
ance with specifications on sales slip, customer orders, or other instructions. May, in ad­
dition to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing
orders, requisition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other
related duties.




A worker who drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materi­
als, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of establishments such as: manu­
facturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments and/or be­
tween retail establishments and customers * houses or places of business. Duties may also in­
volve loading or unloading truck with or without helpers, making minor mechanical repairs,
and keeping truck in good working order. This classification does not include driver-salesmen
or over-the-road drivers.

28

Custodial, Warehousing and Shipping - Continued

Women's and Misses' Dresses - Continued

TRUCK DRIVER - Continued

INSPECTOR, FINAL (EXAMINER) - Continued

For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies
according to size and type of equipment operated, as follows:
Truck
Truck
Truck
Truck

driver,
driver,
driver,
driver,

truck drivers

light (under 1-1/2 tons)
medium (1-1/2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over b tons, trailer type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

Thread trimmers who may only casually inspect garments are not included in this
classification. In many shops manufacturing inexpensive garments there will be no inspectors
falling within this classification;. in those shops whatever inspection is carried on is usu­
ally performed by THREAD TRIMMERS.
PRESSER
A worker who performs pressing operations (finish or under) on garments or garment
parts by means of a hand-pressing iron and/or powered press or mangle.

TRUCKER, POWER
A worker who operates a manually-controlled gasoline or electric-powered truck or
tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.

For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies pressers accord­
ing to type of pressing equipment used, as follows:
Presser, hand
Presser, machine
Presser, hand and machine

For wage study purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers accord­
ing to type of truck operated, as follows:

Workers are classified as "pressers, hand and machine" when sizable proportions of
their work are performed by each of the two methods. Otherwise, the predominant type of pres­
sing is the determining factor in classification.

Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)
WATCHMAN

SEWER, HAND (FINISHER)
A worker who guards premises of plant property, warehouses, office buildings, or
banks. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft, and
illegal entry.

(Bench worker)
A worker who performs sewing operations by hand including sewing on buttons, making
buttonholes, stitching edges, closing openings that have been left by various hand and machine
operations.
Workers who specialize in sewing tickets or labels are not included in this classi-

W o m e n s and Misses' Dresses

fication.
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, SECTION SYSTEM

CUTTER AND MARKER
A worker who marks the outlines of various garment parts on a ply of fabric and who
cuts out parts with shears, hand knife, or powered cutting machine. In addition, may spread
or lay-up cloth as cutting table. This classification includes workers-who specialize in cut­
ting or in marking; specialized markers using perforated patterns, marking by use of talcum,
are emitted as are all workers who specialize in spreading cloth.
Workers
clas sif icat ion.

engaged in marking and

cutting linings and trimmings

are included in the

An operator who uses a standard or special purpose sewing machine to perform the
sewing operations required in making parts of garments, joining parts made by others, joining
various sections together, or in attaching previously completed parts to partially completed
garments, but who does not construct the entire garment. In shops that operate entirely on a
section (or bundle) system this classification would include all sewing-machine operators
(except buttonhole makers and button sewers) without any differentiation of operators by type
of machine or operation performed. In shops that operate partly on a section system, this
classification would include all operators who do not construct an entire garment.

INSPECTOR, FINAL (EXAMINER)

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, SINGLE HAND (TAILOR) SYSTEM

A worker who examines and inspects completed garments prior to pressing or shipping
and whose work involves: determining whether the garments conform to shop standards of qual­
ity, and marking defects such as dropped stitches, bad seams, etc. In addition, may make
minor repairs.

An operator who uses a sewing machine to perform all the standard sewing-machine
operations involved in the manufacture of a complete garment and whose work involves: assem­
bling and joining all parts of the garment except those added by finishers. Usually an expe­
rienced operator working on better-grade apparel in which the variety of design is so great
and style changes so frequent as to prevent the economical use of a section system.




29

Women*s and Misses' Dresses - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, SINGLE HAND (TAILOR) SYSTEM - Continued

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MULTIPLE-SPINDLE

This classification includes workers, employed in single-hand system shops who pairup and work as a team and divide work tickets equally; this arrangement is informal, in con­
trast to the section system on which rates are established for individual operations.

Performs such operations as drilling, reaming, countersinking, counterboring, spot­
facing and tapping on one or more types of single-spindle or multiple-spindle drill presses.
This classification includes operators of all types
radial-drill presses end portable drilling equipment.

THREAD TRIMMER ( CLEANER)
(Clipper)
A worker who trims loose thread ends,
with scissors prior to pressing or packing.

basting threads and

seem edges of garments

Workers who also carefully examine and inspect garments are classified as INSPECTORS,
FINAL.

Machinery Industries

of drill presses

other than

Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine for operations requiring care­
ful positioning, blocking and aligning of units; to determine speeds, feeds, tooling and oper­
ation sequence; and to make all necessary adjustments during operation to achieve requisite
dimensions or
Operator who is required to set up machine where speeds, feeds, tooling and operation
sequence are prescribed but whose work involves very difficult operations such as deep drill­
ing, or boring to exacting specifications.
Class B - Operator who is required to set up machine on standard operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make all necessary adjust­
ments during operation or

ASSEMBLER
(Bench assembler; floor assembler; jig assembler; line assembler; sub-assembler)
A worker who assembles and/or fits together parts to form complete units or subas­
semblies at a bench, conveyor line, or on the floor, depending upon the size of the units and
the organization of the production process. The work of the assembler may include processing
operations requiring the use of hand tools in scraping, chipping and filing of parts to obtain
a desired fit as well as power tools and special equipment when punching, riveting, soldering
or welding of parts is necessary. Workers who perform any of these processing operations ex­
clusively as part of specialized assembling operations are not included in this classification.
Class A - A worker who assembles parrs into complete units or subassemblies that re­
quire fitting of parts and decisions regarding proper performance of any component part or the
assembled unit, and whose work involves any combination of the following: assembling from
drawings, blueprints or other written specifications; assembling units composed of a variety
of parts and/or subassemblies; assembling large units requiring careful fitting and adjusting
of parts to obtain specified clearances; and using a variety of hand and powered tools and
precision measuring instruments.
Class B - A worker who assembles parts into units or subassemblies in accordance
with standard and prescribed procedures, and whose work involves any combination of the following: assembling a limited range of standard and familiar products composed of a number of
*
small or medium-sized parts requiring some fitting or adjusting; assembling large units that
require little or no fitting of component parts; working under conditions where accurate per­
formance and completion of work within set time limits are essential for subsequent assem­
bling operations; and using a limited variety of hand or powered tools.
Class C - A worker who performs short-cycle, repetitive assembling operations, and
whose work does not involve any fitting or making decisions regarding proper performance of
the component parts or assembling procedures.




Operator who is required to maintain set-up made by others, including making all ne­
cessary adjustments during operation on work requiring considerable care on the part of the
operator to maintain specified tolerances.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine, on routine and repetitive
operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
(See Maintenance end Power Plant, page 25, for description.)

ENGINE-LATHE OHERATQR
Operates an engine lathe for shaping external and internal cylindrical surfaces of
metal objects. The engine lathe, basically characterized by a headstock, tailstock, and powerfed tool carriage, is a general-purpose machine tool used primarily for turning. It is also
commonly used in performing such operations as facing, boring, drilling, and threading; and,
equipped with appropriate attachments, it may be used for a very wide variety of special m a­
chining operations. Die stock may be held in position by the lathe "centers” or by various
types of chucks and fixtures.
This classification excludes operators of bench lathes, automatic lathes, automaticscrew machines, and hand-turret lathes and hand-screw machines.
Class A - Operator who is required to set up machine; to select feeds, speeds, tool­
ing and operation sequence; and to make necessary adjustments during operation to achieve
requisite dimensions or

30.

Machinery Industries - Continued

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR - Continued

Operator who is required to set up machine from drawings, blueprints or layout, in
accordance with prescribed feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence and to make necessary
adjustments during operation where changes in work and set-up are frequent and where care is
essential to achieve very close tolerances.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and
to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils.
Class B - Operator who is required to maintain operation set up by others, by making
all necessary adjustments, where care is essential to achieve very close tolerances or
Operator who is required to set up machine on standard or roughing operations where
feeds, speeds, tooling and operation sequence are prescribed; and to make adjustments during
operation.
Operator may be required to recognize when tools need dressing, to dress tools and
to select proper coolants and cutting oils.
Class C - Operator who is required only to operate machine on routine and repetitive
operations; to make only minor adjustments during operation; and when trouble occurs to stop
the machine and call on foreman, leadman, or set-up man to correct the operation.

Machinery Industries - Continued

JANITOR

(Sweeper; cleaner)
A worker who sweeps and cleans shop areas, washrooms and offices, and removes waste
and refuse. May wash floors and windows.
MACHINIST, PRODUCTION
A worker who is required to fabricate metal parts involving a series of progressive
operations and whose work involves most of the following: understanding of written instruc­
tions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinists hand
tools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds end speeds of machining; understanding of the working proper­
ties of the common metals; and selecting standard materials, parts and equipment needed for
his work. In general, the machinists work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience .

TOOL-AND-DIE MAKER
(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gauge maker)

INSPECTOR
A worker who performs such operations as examining parts or products for flaws and
defects, and checking their dimensions and appearance to determine whether they meet the re­
quired standards and specifications.
Class A - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes with responsi­
bility for decisions regarding the quality of the product and/or operations, and whose work
involves any combination of the following: thorough knowledge of the processing operations
in the branch of work to which he is assigned, including the use of a variety of precision
measuring instruments; interpreting drawings and specifications in inspection work on units
composed of a large number of component parts; examining a variety of products or processing
operations; determining causes of flaws in products and/or processes and suggesting necessary
changes to correct work methods; and devising inspection procedures for new products.
Class B - A worker who inspects parts, products, and/or processes and whose work
involves any combination of the following: knowledge of processing operations in the branch
of work to which he is assigned, limited to familiar products and processes or where perform­
ance is dependent upon past experience; performing inspection operations on products and/or
processes having rigid specifications, but where the inspection procedures involve a se­
quence of inspection operations, including decisions regarding proper fit or performance of
some parts; and using precision measuring instruments.
Class C - A worker who inspects parts, products and/or processes and whose work in­
volves any combination of the following: short-cycle, repetitive inspection operations; using
a standardized, special-purpose measuring instrument repetitively; and visual examination of
parts or products, rejecting units having obvious deformities or flaws.




A worker who constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gauges, jigs, fixtures or
dies for forgings, punching and other metal-forming work, and whose work involves most of the
following: planning and laying out of work from models, blueprints, drawings or other oral
and written specifications; using a variety of tool-and-die maker*s hand tools and precision
measuring instruments; understanding of the working properties of common metals end alloys;
setting up and operating of machine tools and related equipment; making necessary shop compu­
tations relating to dimensions of work, speed, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating
of metal parts during fabrication as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required
qualities; working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed toler­
ances and allowances; and selecting appropriate materials, tools and processes. In general,
the tool-and-die maker's work requires a rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom prac­
tice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
For wage study purposes,
of shop, as follows:

the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies workers by type

Tool-and-die makers, jobbing shops
Tool-and-die makers, other than jobbing shops

TRUCKER, BAND
A worker who pushes or pulls hand trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used for transport­
ing goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other estab­
lishment, and usually loads or unloads hand trucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials It}
storage bins, etc., and may keep records of materials moved.

31

Machinery Industries - Continued

WELDER, HARD

Department Stores - Continued

SALES CLERK - Continued

A worker who fuses (welds) metal objects together by means of an oxyacetylene torch
or arc welding apparatus in the fabrication of metal shapes and in repairing broken or cracked
metal objects. In addition to performing hand welding or brazing operation, he may also lay
out guide lines or marks on metal parts and may cut metal, with a cutting torch.
Class A - Worker who performs welding operations requiring moat of the following:
planning and laying out of work from drawings, blueprints or other written specifications;
knowledge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of work and de­
termining operation sequence; welding of high pressure vessels or other objects involving cri­
tical safety and load requirements; working from a variety of positions; and ability to weld
with gas or arc apparatus.
Class B - Worker who is required to perform either arc or gas welding operations on
repetitive work, where no critical safety and load requirements are involved; where the work
calls mainly for one position welding; and where the layout and planning of the work are per­
formed by others.

M e n ’s furnishings
Notions, trimmings
Piece goods (yard goods, upholstery fabrics)
Silverware and jewelry (excluding costume jewelry)
Women’s accessories (hosiery, gloves, handbags)
Women’s and misses* dresses
Women's shoes
Women’s and misses' suits and coats
STOCK GIRL, SELLING SECTION
A worker who brings merchandise and other materials from stockroom or warehouse to
the selling floor. Places merchandise in proper show cases, drawers, or racks, checking to
see that it is in salable condition. Inspects incoming merchandise and sorts stock according
to size, line, style, color, etc., and places it in proper place in stockroom or warehouse.
May also keep inventory records, assist in marking, dust stock, and run errands.
STOCKMAN, WAREHOUSE

Department Stores
PORTER, DAY (CLEARER)
A worker who keeps the premises of an establishment in a clean, orderly condition.
Typical of the duties the worker performs are: sweeping and mopping floors; removing trash;
dusting furniture or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; and washing windows and
display cases.
SALES CLERK
A worker who sells merchandise in an assigned department of a store or in a store
specializing in one or a few items. Determines merchandise desired by customer, assists in
selection, explains end demonstrates various qualities of the merchandise, receives payment,
and makes out salescheck. May also do own cashiering and wrapping and assist in stocking and
displaying merchandise.
For wage study purposes,
department, as follows:




A person working in the warehouse who fills customers’ orders for merchandise from
salescheck specifications. Places merchandise on flats, skids, or rollers, and moves to pack­
ing department. Also fills transfer orders going to the store for display on the selling
floor. Receives incoming merchandise from receiving or marking departments and places it in
storage. Handles returned goods either by returning it to storage or sending it to shipping
department for delivery to supplier.
TAILOR, ALTERATION, MEN’S GARMENTS
A worker who makes alterations on men’s coats, suits, trousers and vests. Typical
alterations include such items as remodeling shoulders and necklines, re-setting sleeves and
collars, taking-in side seams, and felling, in accordance with markings on garment or in­
structions received from fitter. The work of the alteration tailor involves most of the fol­
lowing: ripping seams and linings, re-cutting fabric, basting in position for sewing, re­
sewing by hand or machine. May also press new seams, or press garment with hand iron or pres­
sing machine when alterations are completed.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies sales clerks by
Banking

Bedspreads, draperies, blankets
Blouses and neckwear
Boys* clothing
Boys* furnishings
Floor coverings
Furniture and bedding
Housewares (except china, glassware and lamps)
Major appliances (refrigerators, stoves, washers, etc.;
excludes radios and television)
Me n ’s clothing

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(See Office, page

23, for description.)

CLEANER
A worker who keeps halls, offices, and/or rooms of public buildings, offices, com­
mercial establishments, or apartment houses in a clean, orderly condition and whose work in­
volves; sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing floors; disposing of waste or litter; and/or dust-

32

Banking - Continued

Power Laundries

CLERK, RETAIL RECEIVING

CLEANER - Continued
ing furniture and equipment. May also be required to polish
This classification does not include window washers.

metal fixtures

and fittings.

CLERK, TRANSIT
A worker who sorts and lists checks and whose work includes the following: mechani­
cal endorsement of checks when necessary; manual sorting of checks in racks according to bank;
listing, totalling, and balancing with predetermined control totals; locating and adjusting
errors; and preparing checks for mailing back to banks on which drawn.

A person who receives work from routemen or from customers over the counter in the
receiving office or store of a dry-cleaning or laundry establishment and whose work involves
most of the following: maintaining a record of articles or bundles received; returning com­
pleted work to customers who call for it; collecting payment and maintaining simple records
of money received; and in establishments where dry cleaning is done, fastening an identifying
marker to each article, examining an article for defects such as holes, stains or tears, and
making a record cf the identification symbol assigned to each article with a brief description
of the article and of any defects noted. This classification does not include store managers.
EXTRACTOR OPERATOR

PROOF-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Whizzer operator)
A worker who operates a sorting machine under general supervision to sort checks,
debits, credits and other items. Records totals of specific items in appropriate ledgers.
May perform additional clerical duties in connection with sorting.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
(See Office, page

2k,

for description.)

A worker who removes surplus moisture from materials (such as wet cloth, clothing,
knit goods, and yarn) by operating an extractor and whose work involves most of the following:
loading material into perforated drum of machine by hand or hoist; closing lid and starting
machine, allowing it to run a predetermined time or until fluid stops flowing from drain; re­
moving partly dried materials; and hand trucking materials within the department. In addition,
the worker may assist the Washer in loading, operating, or unloading the washing machine.
FINISHER, FLATWORK, MACHINE

TELLER, ALL AROUND
Receives deposits and pays out on withdrawals for savings accounts; receives depos­
its and cashes checks for checking accounts; receives payments on notes, etc. May record
daily transactions and balance accounts. May supervise one or more clerks who record details
of transactions, such as names, dates, serial numbers, and amounts involved so that pertinent
data may be distributed among the several departments for recording, filing, and clearing.

A worker who performs flatwork finishing operations by machine and whose work in­
volves one or more of the following: shaking out the creases in semi-dry washing to prepare
it for the fXatwbrk ironing machine; feeding clean, damp flatwork pieces into the flatwork
ironing machine by placing the articles on the feeder rollers; and catching or receiving arti­
cles as they emerge from the machine and partially folding them.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

TELLER, NOTE
(See Maintenance and Power Plant, page 26, for description.)
Collects exchange charges and payments on notes, drafts, rents, and contracts for
deeds. May accept and give receipts for collateral on maturity notes. Is in charge of send­
ing out notices of maturity. Receives renewal notes. Protests items when it is necessary.
Causes notes to be presented at other places, when place of payment is other than the bank.
Follows up on the value of collateral. In the case of real estate notes, sees that mortgages
are properly recorded and checks certificates of title. Checks fire insurance coverage. Must
be familiar with Negotiable Instruments Act and standard terms of extension agreements.

IDENTIFIER
A worker who sorts soiled bundles, places the contents Into various bags and by
means of flags, pins or other devices identifies the net with a customer tag or ticket. In
addition may weigh, list or count some or all articles contained in each bundle. This classi­
fication does not include workers who mark or otherwise identify each individual piece con­
tained in a bundle.

TELLER, PAYING OR PAYING AND RECEIVING, COMMERCIAL
MARKER
Cashes customers* personal, or other checks. May also receive deposits on checking
accounts and make entries in customers* account books. Writes up or signs deposit slips to
be used later in balancing books. May record the daily transactions and balance accounts.
May supervise one or more clerks who record details of transactions, such as names, dates,
serial numbers, and amounts involved so that pertinent data may be distributed among the
several departments for recording, filing, and clearing. May also handle withdrawals and de­
posits on savings accounts.




A worker who marks or affixes by hand or mechanical means, customer identifying
symbols on soiled garments, linens, or other articles. In addition may weigh, list, or count
articles contained in each bundle, sort contents of each bundle into groups according to treat­
ment to be received, or note and record any damaged or stained condition of articles. This
classification does not include workers who do sorting, examining, or listing without marking
the various articles.

33

Power Laundries - Continued

Auto Repair Shops - Continued

PRESSER, MACHINE, SHIBTS

ELECTRICIAN, AUTOMOTIVE - Continued

A worker who operates or tends the operation of one or more of the several type
machines that press shirts, and who perform such shirt pressing operations as body pressing,
bosom pressing, collar and cuff pressing, and/or sleeve pressing.

tributor breaker-point gaps with thickness gage; replacing defective parts on starters, gen­
erators, and distributors; and replacing defective ignition and lighting wires. May test and
repair generators. May repair and adjust carburetors.

WASHER, MACHINE

GREASER

A worker who operates one or more washing machines to wash household linens, gar­
ments, curtains, drapes and other articles and whose work involves the following: manipula­
ting valves, switches, and levers to start and stop the machine and to control the amount and
temperature of water for the sudsing and rinsing of each batch; mixing and adding soap, bluing
and bleaching solutions; and loading and unloading the washing machine. In addition may make
minor repairs to washing machine.

(Lubricating man)
Lubricates, by means of hand-operated or compressed-air operated grease guns and
oil sprays, all parts of automobile or truck where lubrication is required, using proper type
lubricant on the various points on chassis or motors; drains old lubricant from lubricant reser­
voirs and refills with new. May perform other related duties, such as checking radiator water
level, checking and adding distilled water to battery, repairing tires, etc. May also perform
duties of washer.

WRAPPER, BUNDLE
A worker who wraps packages or finished products, or packs articles, goods, or ma­
terials in cardboard boxes and secures the package or box with twine, ribbon, gummed tape, or
paste. The worker may segregate articles according to size or type, or according to customer's
order and inspect articles for defects before wrapping.

Auto Repair Shops

BODY REPAIRMAN, METAL

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE
Repairs automobiles and trucks, performing such duties as disassembling and overhaul­
ing engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, and other assemblies on automobiles, replac­
ing worn or broken parts, grinding valves, adjusting brakes, tightening body bolts, aligning
wheels, etc. In addition to general automotive mechanics, this classification also includes
workers whose duties are limited to repairing and overhauling the motor.
Class A - Repairs, rebuilds, or overhauls engines, transmissions, clutches, rear
ends or other assemblies, replaces worn or broken parts, grinds valves, bores cylinders, fits
rings. In addition may adjust brakes or lights, tighten body bolts, align wheels, etc. May
remove or replace motors, transmissions or other assemblies. May do machining of parts.
/

(Automobile-collision serviceman; fender and body repairman; body man)
Repairs damaged automobile fenders and bodies to restore their original shape and
smoothness of surface by hammering out and filling dents, and by welding breaks in the metal.
May remove bolts and nuts, take off old fenders, and install new fenders. May perform such
related tasks as replacing broken glass and repairing damaged radiators and woodwork. May
paint repaired surfaces.
ELECTRICIAN, AUTOMOTIVE
(Ignition repairman)
Repairs and installs ignition systems, starters, coils, panel instruments, wiring,
and other electrical systems and equipment on automobiles: performs such duties as diagnosing
trouble by visual: inspection or by use of testing devices; adjusting timing; adjusting dis-




Class B - Adjusts brakes or lights, tightens body bolts, align wheels, or makes
other adjustments or repairs of a minor nature; or removes and replaces motors, transmissions,
clutches, rear ends, etc., but does no repairing, rebuilding, or overhauling of these assem­
blies. Workers wix> are employed as helpers to Mechanics are excluded from this classification.

WASHER, AUTOMOBILE
(Car washer; wash boy)
Washes automobiles and trucks; sweeps and cleans interior of automobile; may polish
auto vehicle bodies, using polishing compound and a cloth. Various parts of this Job may be
performed by individual workers in automobile laundries production lines.







35

lex
Page Number
Description Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description Earnings or rate
Asbestos worker (building construction) .............. ........................ . ........................

Assembler (machinery) ................................. .............................. ................... • •
Benchm (bakeries) ................... ...................................................................• •
an
Benohm
an, head (bakeries) ........................................................................... .
Biller, m
achine (billing —shine) ......................... ...........................................
Biller, m
achine (bookkeeping — chine) ......................... ....................................
Bindery vooan (printing) ............. .....................................................................
Body repairman, — tal (auto repair shops) ........................................................
Boilermaker (building construction) ......................... ........ ......................... .
Bookbinder (printing) ................ .. • • • ...................................... ........ ...............
Bookkeeper, hand ••••••••••••••••..................................... ...............................
Bookkeeping-machine operator
..............................................
Bookkeeplng-—chine operator (banking) .................................................. ..........
Bread radar (bakeries) .................................................................... ..............
Bricklayer (building construction) ..................................................................
Building laborer (building construction) .........................................................
Calculatlng-maohine operator (Cooptom ter type) ............................ ..................
e
Calculating-maohlne operator (other than Coaptometer type) ............. .
Carpenter (building construction) ..................................... ............. ................
Carpenter, maintenance ......................................................................................
Cement fin ish er (building construction) ....... .........................................................
Checker (bakeries) ..................... ...............................................................................
Cleaner ...................................... ....................................................................* ..........
Cleaner (banking) ......... ................... ....................... ................................ ..............
Clerk, accounting ....................................................... ................................ ............
Clerk, f i l e ................................................................ ................................................
Clerk, general ................................................................................. ......... *...............
Clerk, o r d e r ............ ...................................................................................................
Clerk, payroll ................................... ............................................... ...................
Clerk, r e t a il receivin g (laundries) ................... ....................................................
Clerk, transit (banking) ................ ...........................................
Conposltor, hand (prin tin g) ............................... * ........................................ ......... .
Cutter and marker (womens and misses' dresses) ..................... ..............................
Dough mixer (bakeries) ........................................... .......................... .......................
Draftsman.................................................................................................... ................
Draftsman, Junior ...................................................................................... ................
D rill-p ress operator, sin gle- and multiplespindle (machinery) .......................... ...................................................... ..............
Driver, bus (lo c a l tra n s it) ......................................................................................
Duplicating-machine operator ....................................................................................
Electrician (building construction) ............................... ........................................
E lectrician , automotive (auto repair shops) .................................................... .
E lectricia n , maintenance ..........................................................................................
E lectricia n , maintenance (machinery) ..............................................................
Electrotyper (prin tin g) ...................................... ...........................................
Elevator constructor (building construction) .......................... ..............................
Engineer (building construction) .......................... .......................... .............. ..
Engineer, stationary ..................... ......... ..........................................................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .................................................................. .........
Extractor operator (laundries) ................................................................................
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) ..................................................
Fireman, stationary b o i l e r .................................. ................... ...............................
Fireman, stationary b o ile r (laundries) ........................................................
Foreman, working (bakeries) .............. ............................................... .....................
Greaser (auto repair shops) ............................................. .............. ................ .
Glazier (building construction) .................................................................. .............
Guard ....................................................................... ....................... ............................
Helper, bakery (bakeries) .................................................................... ...................
Helper, elevator constructor (building construction) ...........................................
Helper, motortruck driver ........................................................................................
Helper, pan greaser (bakeries) .................................................... ............................
le e r (bakeries) .........................................................................................................
Id e n tifie r ( laundries) ......... ....................................................................................
Inspector (women's and misses' dresses) ......... ........................................................
Inspector (machinery) ................................................................................................
Janitor ............................................................................ ...................................... .
Janitor (machinery) ............................... .............................................. ............
Key-punch o p e r a to r ....... .............................................................................................
Laborer, plasterer (building construction) .............................................................
Lather (building construction) ......... ......................................................................
Machine operator (bakeries) ............ ........................................................................
Machine operator (prin tin g) ................................................................................. .
Machinist, maintenance......... ......... ........................................ ......... .
Machinist, production (machinery) .................................................................. ••••••
Mailer (prin tin g) .................................................................. ................ ...................
Maintenance man, general u t ilit y ................ ......................................................... .
Marker (laundries) ...................... ................................................................. •••••••
Mechanic, automotive ................................................................ ..........................
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ........................................ .......................

-

16

29
.

13
16
16

-

23
23

3

33

17
15

-

16

-

5

17

-

23
23
31
_
_

23
23
-

25
_

•27
31
23
23
2k

2k
2k

32
32

k, 5

5, 6

Ik

16
16
16
6
6
16
10
16
16
11

Ik

6
6

k, 7

7
5, 7
15

Ik

28

17
13

-

16

25
25

9
9

29

13

2k

5, 7

-

_

16

-

16

33
25

15

29
_

10

13
17

26

16
16
10

29
32
32

13
15
15

26

10

32

15

_

16

33
27

_
_
_

_

32
28

30
27
30

2k
_
_
-

15
16
11
16
16
16
16
16

15
13
13
11

13
7
16
16
16

_

17

26

10

JO

13
17

25
32
26
33

10

15
10

15

Mechanic, maintenance....... ...............................................
M illwright ................................... ................................... ..
Mixer (bakeries) ..................................... ..........................
Molderman (bakeries) ............................ ............................
Motortruck d r i v e r ............................................................. .
Nurse, Industrial (reg istered ) ....................... ................
O ffice b o y ....... .................................................................
O ffice g i r l ............................................................. .
O iler ...................................................................................
Operator, trackless t r o lle y (lo c a l tra n s it) ..................
Operator, power equipment (building construction) . . . . .
Order f i l l e r ..................... ....................... ....................... .
Overman (bakeries) .............................................................
Overman, helpers (bakeries) .............................................
Packer ....................... ................................................ .........
Painter (building construction) ......................................
Painter, maintenance .......... .......................... .................
Pan greaser (bakeries) .....................
Paperhanger (building construction) ..................... .........
Photoengraver (prin tin g) .............. ...................................
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance .................................................
Plasterer (building construction) .................................
Plumber (building construction) ....................................
Plumber, laborers (building construction) ................ .
Porter ........................................ .......................................
Porter, day (clean er) (department stores) .............. .
Presser, hand (women's and misses* dresses) .................
Press assistant (prin tin g) ............................ ................ .
Press feeder (p rin tin g) ....................................................
Presser, machine, sh irt (laundries) ...............................
Pressman, cylinder (p rin tin g) ...................
Pressman, platen (p rin tin g) .............................................
Pressman, web presses (p rin tin g ) .............. .....................
Proof-machine operator (banking) ....... ....................... ...
Receiving clerk ................................... ............................ .
Rodman (building construction) ...................................... .
Rolling-machineman (bakeries) .......... ........................... .
Roofer (building construction) ..................................... .
Sales clerk (department stores) .......................... ......... .
Secretary ..................... ................ ..................................
Sewer, hand (women's and misses' dresses) ...................
Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' dresses)
Scaler (bakeries) ..................... .......................................
Sheet-metalworker (building construction) ............
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance .....................................
Shipping c l e r k ..................... .......................................... .
Shlpplng-and-recelvlng clerk ..........................................
Stenographer, general ................ .......................... .........
Stenographer, general (banking) .................................
Stenographer, technical .......................... .....................
Stereotyper (p rin tin g) ..................................................
Stock g i r l , se llin g section (department stores) .........
Stock handler ......................................................... .........
Stockman, warehouse (department stores) .............. .
Structural-Iron worker (building construction) ...........
Switchboard o p e r a to r .............. ............................ ...........
Switchboard operator-receptionist .................................
Tabulating-machine operator ............................................
T a ilo r, a ltera tion , men's garments (department stores)
T e lle r, all-around (banking) ..........................................
T e lle r , note (banking) ....................................................
T e lle r , paying, or paying and receivin g, commercial
(banking) ................................... ...................................
Tender, bricklayer (building construction) ..................
Thread trimner (women's and misses' dresses) ..............
T ile layer (building construction) ...............................
Tool-and-dle maker (machinery) .............. ......................
Transcriblng-machlne operator, g e n e r a l....... .
Truck d r i v e r ................................... .................................
Trucker, hand ....................................................................
Trucker, hand (machinery) ................ ..............................
Trucker, p o w e r............................................ ...................
T y p i s t .......................................................... ....................
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) .........................
Washer, machine (laundries) ............................................
Watchman............................................... .......................... .
Welder, hand (machinery) ....................... .........................
Wrapper (bakeries) .............................................. ......... .
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) ...........................................

10
10
16
16
16
9
5
7
10
16
16
11

26
26
_
_
.

25

2k
2k

26
_
_

27

16

26

16
11
16
10
16
16
17
10

_

16

_

_

16
16
11
lk
13
17
17
15
17
17
17
lk
11
16
16

_

16

31
2k
28
28

lk
7
13
13

-

27
26
_
_
-

_

27
31
28
-

33
-

32
27

_
>

27
27

27

2k

32
2k
-

31
27
31
2k
2k
2k
31
32
32
32
_

29
-

30
25
27
27
30
28
25
33
33
28
31
-

33

16

16
10
11
11
8
lk
8
17
lk
12
lk
16
8
8
5, 8
lk
lk
lk
lk
16
13
16
13
8
12
12
13
12
5, 9
15
15
12
13
16
15

☆ U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 - 1 951


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102