View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

Occupational Wage Survey
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
May 1950

B ulletin

No.

1008

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MAURICE J. TOBIN, SECRETARY




Bureau of Labor Statistics
Ewan Clague, Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, l T H Government Printing Office
. .
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 35 cents







Contents
Pag©
Number
INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................................................................
THE PHUADELPHIA METROPOLITAN AREA ........................................................................................................
Labor and Industry in the Philadelphia Area ..................................... ........................................
Sampling and C haracteristics of the Data ..................................................................... ...............
OCCUPATIONAL RATE STRUCTURE .............................................................................................................................
Cross-Industry Occupations .........................................................................................................................
Office c le r ic a l occupations ..........................................................................................................
Maintenance occupations ............. « . . . ......................................................................................• • •
Custodial, warehousing, and trucking occupations .............................................................
Variations in earnings bycounty groupings ..................................................................................
C haracteristic Industry Occupations ......................• ......................................................................
Straight-tim e rates or earnings ...............................................................
Union wage scales .................................................................................................................
Minimum Entrance Rates ........... ............ ......................... ........................................................................
SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES ...........................................................................................................................
TABIES:
1. Establishments and workers and number studied .................................................................
2 . Establishments and workers in selected industries and number stu d ie d ...............
3. Average earnings for selected o ffice occupations ..............................................
U. Average earnings far selected o ffice occupations by county grouping.................
5. Average earnings for selected maintenance, custodial, warehousing and
trucking occupations ........................................................................
6 . Average earnings for selected maintenance, custodial, warehousing and
trucking occupations bycounty grouping ....................................................
7. Average earnings for selected occupations in woolen and worsted te x tile
m ills ........................................................................................................................................................
8 . Average earnings for selected occupations in the paint and varnish
industry .......................................................................................................................
9. Average earnings for selected occupations in ferrous foundries ..............................
10. Average earnings for selected occupations in machinery industries .......................
11. Average earnings for selected occupations in e le ctr ic a l machinery
industries .............
12. Average earnings for selected occupations in department stores ..........................
13. Average earnings for selected occupations in men’s and boys’ clothing
stores ...................................................................................................
lU. Average earnings for selected occupations in women's ready-to-wear stores . . .
15* Average earnings for selected occupations in banks .............................« . . . .................
16. Average earnings for selected occupations in home o ffic es of lif e
insurance companies ............................................................................................................
17. Average earnings for selected occupations in power laundries ..................................
18. Average earnings for selected occupations in auto repair shops ..............................
19. Union wage scales in building construction ..............................................................
20. Union wage scales in bakeries ....................................................................................................
21. Union wage scales for lo ca l tran sit operating employees
..............................
22. Union wage scales in the malt liquor industry .......................
2 3 . Union wage scales for motortruck drivers and helpers ..................................................
2 k . Union wage scales in ocean transport ....................................................................................
2 5 . Union wage scales in stevedoring .............................................................................................
26. Union wage scales in the printing industries ...................................................................
27. S h ift d iffer en tia l provisions in selected manufacturing industries .....................
28. Minimum entrance rates for plant workers . . ........................................................................
29 . Scheduled weekly hours ...........................
3 0 . Paid holidays ................................
31. Paid vacations ....................................................................................................................................
32. Paid sick leave ..................................................................................................................................
33. Nonproduction bonuses .............................
3 k . Insurance and pension plans ..................................
APPENDIX:
Descriptions o f Occupations Studied .................................................................
INDEX..............!. .................................................................... ............................... ...............................................

1
1
1
3
3
3

3
k

^

k
k

5

6
6

2
2
7
16
17
23
2k

25

25
26
27
27
28

29
29

30
31
31
32
32
32
32
33
33
3^
3^
35
36
36
37
38
39
39
57

30




Introduction
O c c u p ational w a g e rate
infor m a t i o n on a n are a basis
serves a v a r i e t y o f important
uses.
F o r example,
employers f r e q u e n t l y find it n e c e s s a r y to compare w a g e and salary scales
in t h e i r c w n establishments w i t h the
general local levels o f pay.
B o t h unions a n d e mployers
use ar e a w a g e information
in col l e c t i v e bargaining.
V a r i o u s b ranches of the F e d e r a l G o v e r n ­
m e n t set w a g e scales for their
d a y - r a t e p e r s o n n e l o n the
basis of
c ommunity-wide surveys.
Firms s e eking locations
for new plants,
d i s t r i b u t i o n outlets,
or n e w offices
u s u a l l y give
c o n s i d e r a t i o n to such information.
I n the ad m i n i s t r a t i o n of p l a c e m e n t in conne c t i o n w i t h u n ­
e m p l o y m e n t compensation, a r e a w a g e statis tics are needed in the e v a l u a t i o n of the s u itability
of job offers.
In m a n y types of g e n e r a l e c o nomic analysis,
infor m a t i o n o n wages b y a r e a a nd
type of w o r k is crucial.
F o r these reasons, the U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of Labor th r o u g h the B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s ­
tics has g i v e n increasing e m p hasis to a r e a w a g e studies,
gene r a l l y w i t h respect to specific
industries.
However,
a cross-industry approach
has b e e n use d in r e c e n t
years in surveying
o f f i c e - c l e r i c a l occupations,
a n d in 1$&9 the a p p l i c a t i o n of
this a p p r o a c h to the colle c t i o n
of w a g e d a t a for industrial as w e l l as o f f i c e -clerical occupations w a s tested in six me d i u m eized cities. 2 /
T h e present w a g e survey covers the largest of the f o u r ma j o r industrial centers, the
P h i l a d e l p h i a area,
in w h i c h the B u r e a u
has u t i lized c r o ss-industry m e t h o d s of
sampl i n g to
study office a nd plant occupations. 3 / E a r n i n g s dat a have b e e n c o m p i l e d on a c r o s s - i n d u s t r y
bas i s for the following
types of occupations:
(a) office-clerical; (b) maintenance; a n d (c)
jobs, g e n e r a l l y unskilled, r e l a t e d to the performance of custodial, wareho u s i n g , a n d t rucking
functions.
O t h er occupations t hat are characteristic of particular,
important, local i n d u s ­
tries have b e e n studied as
here t o f o r e on a n industry basis, w i t h i n the fr a m e w o r k of the c o m ­
m u n i t y survey.
E v e n for those
o c c u p a t i o n a l categories
that lend
themselves to study
on a
c r o s s - i n d u s t r y basis, separate d a t a have b e e n p r o v i d e d w h e r e v e r p o s s i b l e for i ndividual b r o a d
industry divisions. In a d d i t i o n to i n f o rmation on w a g e rates, d a t a on s upplementary benefits,
s uch as v a c a t i o n allowances,
p a i d holidays,
a nd insurance and p e n s i o n plans have als o b e e n
collected a n d tabulated.

The Philadelphia Metropolitan A re a
P h iladelphia,
the N a t i o n ’s third largest city,
has had a history of p o l i t i c a l and
economic leadership
since its f o u n d i n g b y W i l l i a m P e n n in 1681.
Fa m e s as
the site
of the
s i g n i n g o f the
D e c l a r a t i o n of Indepe n d e n c e
a n d of our first n a t i o n a l capital,
Philadelphia
w a s al s o the site of m a n y c o m m e r c i a l " f i r s t s " i n this country, such as the first sugar factory,
the first o r g anized bank, and the first magazine.
The c i t y is n ew the second largest p o r t in
the c o u n t r y in terms of tonnage handled. It is the d i s t r i b u t i n g center for a large area, c o n ­
t ai n i n g farms, factories,
and c o a l mi n e s that supply a w e a l t h of goods u s e d r o und the wo r l d .

l / P r e p a r e d in the B u r e a u ’s D i v i s i o n of W a g e S tatistics b y J e a n A. W e l l s under the d i r e c ­
t i o n pf P a u l E. Warwick, R e g i o n a l W a g e Analyst,
R e g i o n II, N e w York, N. Y.
The p l a n n i n g an d
c en t r a l d i r e c t i o n of the
c o m m m i t y wa g e p r o g r a m w a s the
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y of T o i v o P. K a n n i n e n
a n d Louis E. B a d e n h o o p
u n d e r the g e n e r a l
supervision o f H a r r y Ober,
C h i e f of the B r a n c h o f
I n d u s t r y W a g e Studies.
2 / G r a n d Rapids, Mich.;
a n d Trenton, N. J.

Portland,

Mb . ;

R o ckford, 111.;

tur i n g center.
Labor a n d I n d u s t r y in th e P h i l a d e l p h i a A r e a
P h i l a d e l p h i a w i t h over 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0
inhabitants Is the c e n t e r
of a metropolitan area
hav i n g a p o p u l a t i o n of m o r e t han 3 ,600,000
(Bucks, Chester, De l a w a r e , M o n tgomery, an d P h i l a ­
de l p h i a Counties', Penns y l v a n i a ; an d B u r l i n g t o n , Camden, an d G l o u c e s t e r C o u nties, N e w Jersey).
N o n a g r i c u l t u r a l e m p l o y m e n t (including administrative,
executive, a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s onnel)
in the m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a t o t a l e d
a l m o s t l,i+00,000 in May 1950*
w i t h a b o u t 1,15 0 , 0 0 0 c o n c e n ­
trated in the p r i n c i p a l cou n t i e s o f P hiladelphia, Camden, and Dela w a r e .
I n the e i g h t - c o u n t y area,
a b o u t 7,600 m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s employed, a l m o s t
500,000 persons, e x c l u d i n g a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , executive, a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l p e r s o n n e l . At the time
of t his survey,
the m e t a l w o r k i n g industries
predom i n a t e d w i t h a b o u t
p e r c e n t of the t o t a l
m a n u f a c t u r i n g empl o y m e n t .
N e x t we r e textile industries w i t h a b out 6 3
w orkers and apparel
Industries w i t h 60,000. O t h e r m a n u f a c t u r i n g activities w h i c h furni s h e d s u b s t a n t i a l e m p l o y m e n t
in the m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a w e r e food a n d kindred products,
p r i n t i n g an d p u b l i s h i n g , ch e m i c a l s
an d a l l i e d p roducts, p e t r o l e u m an d c o a l products,
a nd p a p e r an d
allied
pr o d u c t s .
Approxi­
m a t e l y 80 p e r c e n t o f the em p l o y e e s in m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries w e r e c o n c e n t r a t e d in the three
counties of P h i l a d e l p h i a , Camden, a nd Delaware.

kO
>000

As the l a r g e s t c i t y in the N a t i o n ’s second m o s t popul o u s State, P h i l a d e l p h i a is the
h u b of a w i d e r e t a i l t r a d i n g area.
I n M a y 1950,
r e t a i l em p l o y m e n t in
the e i g h t - c o u n t y a r e a
w a s a b out 160,000. O f these, abo u t 2 0 , 0 0 0 persons w o r k e d in P h i l a d e l p h i a ’s d e p a r t m e n t stores.
W h o l e s a l e - t r a d e op e r a t i o n s kept over 53 >000 persons employed in a n i ndustry w h i c h had a sales
volume o f o ver
$*+,250,000,000 in 19* 8 . In the three-county area,
+
retail employees numbered
a b o u t 11*0,000; w h o l e s a l e , 5 0 ,0 0 0 .
E v e r since the c o l o n i a l period,
P h i l a d e l p h i a has b e e n a
l e a d i n g f i n a n c i a l center.
A t the time o f this study, a b o u t 1*0 b a n k s a n d trust companies in the c i t y e m p l o y e d o ver 1 0,000
worke r s . The c i t y is a l s o a sizable insurance center. I n the b r o a d ind u s t r y g r o u p of finance,
insurance, a n d r e a l estate, there w e r e a b o u t 1*7,000 employees, of w h o m 1+1*,000 w e r e w o r k i n g in
the three m a j o r counties.
A lab o r force o f 70,000w a s u t i l i z e d in the e i g h t - c o u n t y a r e a b y the transportation,
communication, a n d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t y industries (excluding r a i l roads).
A b o u t 65,0 0 0 w o r k ­
ers in this g r o u p ser v e d in the three m a j o r counties of the area. S i m i l a r n u m b e r s of em p l o y e e s
w e r e e n g a g e d in the service industries:
6 8,000 in the eight counties,
w i t h about
60,000 o f
these in the three counties.
Building construction
gave jobs t o about 70,000 in the P h i l a d e l p h i a area,
where
17>770 new d w e l l i n g
units w e r e started, d u r i n g the first
6 m o n t h s o f 1950*
P h i l a d e l p h i a has
the h i g h e s t p e r c e n t a g e of
o w n e r - o c c u p i e d dw e l l i n g units a m o n g the 10
largest metropolitan
areas.
I n M a y 1950,
m u n i c i p a l e m ployees.

Philadelphia had

about 7 3>500 govern m e n t

e m p l o y e e s incl u d i n g 2 3 , 0 0 0

Shreveport, La.; Spokane, W a s h . ;

3 / S i m i l a r surveys w e r e co n d u c t e d in D enver, Colo, in N o v e m b e r 19*+9; Buffalo, N. Y., J a n ­
u a r y 1950; a n d S a n F r ancisco-Oakland, Calif., January 1950.




P e r h a p s the a r e a ’s o u t s t a n d i n g assets
a re its t r a d i t i o n a l I n g e n u i t y a n d e n t e rprise
w h i c h have p r o d u c e d a m u l t i - i n d u s t r y economy.
Of the v a ried e c o n o m i c a c t i v i t i e s in P h i l a d e l ­
phia,
i+5 speci f i c m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries have e a c h b e e n c r e d i t e d
during recent years wit h
p r o d u c i n g a n n u a l l y o v e r $20,000,000 w o r t h of goods. A m o n g the d i v erse p r o d u c t s m a d e are radios,
hats, locomotives,
gasol i n e , drugs, oils, cigars, sugar,
e l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , apparel, a n d
textiles,
a l l c o n t r i b u t i n g to this a r e a ’s p o s i t i o n as the c o u n t r y ’s
f o u r t h l argest m a n u f a c ­

Labor organizations
r e p r e s e n t e d approx i m a t e l y
75 p e r c e n t o f the p l a n t w o r k e r s in
the industry a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t size g roups
surveyed in the P h i l a d e l p h i a a r ea.
Extent of or­
g a n i z a t i o n v a r i e d a m o n g the m a j o r industry divisions. I n t r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s )>
communication,
a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities, over 90 p e rcent of the p l a n t w o r k e r s in the three

2

Table 1 —

Footnotes - Continued

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS IN PHILADELPHIA AND NUMBER STUDIED
BY THE "BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS, MAY 1950

Item

Number of
Employment
establishments
Estimated Estimated
In establishments
Estimated Estimated
total
total
total
total
studied
in all
within
within
Studied in all
industries scope of
Office
Total
industries scope of
study 2 /
study

ZJ

u

1/

_

Industry Division
All divisions (Metropolitan Area) 3 / ....
Manufacturing .........................
IXirable goods
..................
Nondurable goods
...............
N onmanufacturing............... ......
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ...........................
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities .....
Services:
Industries covered 8/ ..........
Industries not covered .........

hj

All divisions (Three-county Area) 2/ ••••
M a n u f a c t u r i ng.........................
.............. .
Durable goods
Nondurable goods 2/ ...............
Nonmanufacturing .....................
Wholesale trade ...................
Retail trade ......................
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ...........................
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities .....
Services:
Industries covered 8/ ..........
Industries not covered .........

hj

49,113
7.606
3.196
4,410
41.507
5.248
18,058
4,329
1,665
7.914
i+, 293
**0.396
6,286
2.623
3,663
34,110
4,812
14,370
3,688
1.250
6.526
3.**64

2,512
81*7
337
5x0
1.665
623
6/ 120
354
1/

494
227
112
115
267
54
46

73
495

69
3°
68

-

-

2 .2U0

673
24§
1*24
1.567
594
118
333
67
455
-

430
186
88
9«
244
49
45
63
26

61
—

868,700
470,900
214,900
256,000
397,soo
53.700
158,900
47,100
70,000
55.900
12,200
743,300
386,000
172,300
213.700
357.300
50,200
138,800
44,000
65,000
49.400
9.900

482,000

277.500
132,700
144,800
204,500
29,000
62,900
33.000
51,600
28,000
—

297.980
183,260
104,510
78,750
114,720
3.870
42,320
14,940
43,880
9.710

63,850
28,540
18,210
10.330
35,310
1.670
7,010
14.570
10,670
1.390

-

548,700
338,800
166,100
172,700
209,900
30,100
6/63,100
34,000
1/53.300
29,400

59,730
25.030
15.930
9,ioo
34.700
1,660
6,990
14,180
10,500
1.370

—

—

Size of Establishment
All size groups (Metropolitan Area) 1/ ..
1,001 and over .......................

501 - 1,000 ......................................................
2 5 1 -5 0 0 .............................
1 0 1 -2 5 0 ..........................................................
5 1 -1 0 0 ............................................................
2 1 - 5 0 ..............................................................
1 - 2 0 ................................................................

j

49,113
94
77
245
793
1,209
3.262
43.433

2,512
94
77
245
793
233
1,070
(2/)

494

77
50
91
151
34
91
(2/)

868,700
243,500
50.700
83,200
122,300
87,300
102,200
179.500

$48,700
243,500
50,700
83,200
122,300
17,200
31,800
(2 /)

297.980
204,900
33.230
31,220
23.570
2,340
2.720
(2/)

63.850
41,670
7.540
7.420
4,860
1.050
1,310
(2/)

1
Includes establishments with 1 or more workers in Pennsylvania counties and establishments with U or more
workers in New Jersey counties*
2/ The surrey of office, maintenance, custodial, warehousing, and trucking jobs reported in tables 3»
5»
6 was limited to establishments with more than 100 workers in manufacturing, retail trade, and transportation, coi*muni cat ion, and other public utilities, and to establishments with more than 20 workers in wholesale trade, finance,
insurance, real estate, and service industries; exceptions made in selected industries in which characteristic jobs
were surveyed are indicated in table 2 *




j]
j

—

266,000
153,900
86,840
67,060
112,100
3,660
42,220
14.550
42,33°
9,340

j
hj

Philadelphia Metropolitan Area (Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia
Counties, Pennsylvania, and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, New Jersey)*
Metalworking; lumber, furniture and other wood products;
stone, clay and glass pro­
ducts; instruments and related products; and miscellaneous manufacturing*
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile pro­
ducts; paper and paper products; printing and publishing;
chemicals; products of petroleum
and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products*
6/ Excludes limited price variety stores*
Excludes railroads*
8 Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair services; such pro­
fessional services as engineering, architectural, accounting, auditing and bookkeeping firms;
motion pictures; and nonprofit membership organisations*
2/ Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey*

Table 2.— ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN PHILADELPHIA AND NUMBER
STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MAY I95O

l/

Selected industries in
which characteristic
jobs were surveyed 2

j

......
Woolen and worsted textiles
Paints and varnishes 3 / ............. *
Ferrous foundries 3 / .................
Machinery
....... ..................
Electrical machinery, equipment
and supplies
*...................
Department stores £/ *................
Men's and boys 1 clothing stores
•••
Women's ready-to-wear stores
Banks
*
Home offices of life insurance
companies
Power laundries j/ *..................
Auto repair shops
.................•

6/
6 / ...........
6/ ..........................................................
6/ .........................................

Minimum
sice of
estab­
lish­
ment

21
8
21
21
101
251
21
51
21 %
21
21
5

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

77
33
19
142
23
8
16
15
40
15
70
303

31
11
12

kz

15
8
16
10
16
9
17
26

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

8.550
2.320
2.980
29,020
33.660
19.015
922
2.950
10,570
2.870
4,810
7.430

In estab­
lishments
studied

6,265
1.607
2.679
19.552
24,933
19,015
922
2.515
6,650
2.272
2,136
950

l/ Industries surveyed In months other than May were: Hachinery, November 19^9; Power
Laundries and Auto Repair Shops, June 1950*
2/ Industries are defined in footnotes to tables 7 through 18*
j/ Survey included Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County,
New Jersey*
Survey included Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties, Penn­
sylvania, and Burlington, Camden |md Gloucester Counties, New Jersey*
5/ Survey included Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey*
0/ Survey included Philadelphia County only*

k/

3.

m a j o r cou n t i e s w e r e e m p l o y e d in e s t ablishments h a v i n g w r i t t e n c o n tracts w i t h u n i o n s . I n m a n u ­
f a c t u r i n g industries
the p r o p o r t i o n w a s a b o u t
85 percent; in r e t a i l trade it w a s s l i ghtly
less t h a n h a l f of the w o r k e r s .
T he degree of u n i o n i z a t i o n a m o n g office w o r k e r s w a s c o n s i d e r ­
a b l y low e r t h a n a m o n g p l a n t w o r k e r s .
A p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 out of e v e r y 5 office e m ployees studied
i n the three m a j o r counties w a s c o v e r e d b y a u n i o n contract.
V e r y few u n i o n a g r e ements
had
been negotiated
covering office
w o r k e r s in w h o l e s a l e trade;
finance, insurance,
and real
estate;
a n d in the service
industries.
However,
ab o u t a t h i r d of the
office e n p l oyees in
m a n u f a c t u r i n g plants w e r e cov e r e d and
ab o u t h a l f in t r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding
railroads),
commu n i c a t i o n ,
a n d o t her publ i c
utilities.
I n the five o u t e r counties
o f the P h i l a d e l p h i a
m e t r o p o l i t a n area,
the p r o p o r t i o n of org anized w o r k e r s w a s s l i g h t l y lower t h a n in the t h r e e -

to f o r m a l arr a n g e m e n t s .
It exclu d e s i n formal plans w h e r e b y time o f f w i t h p a y is g r a n t e d at
the d i s c r e t i o n o f the e m p l o y e r or other supervisor.
S i c k leave p l a n s are
f u r t h e r l i m i t e d to
those p r o v i d i n g
fu l l pay for a t least
some amount of time
off without any
p r o v i s i o n for a
w a i t i n g p e r i o d p r e c e d i n g the pay m e n t o f benefits, a n d exclude h e a l t h insurance e v e n t h o u g h it
is p a i d for b y employers. H e a l t h insurance is included, however, u n d e r t a b u l a t i o n s for i n s u r ­
ance a n d p e n s i o n plans.

Occupational

Rate

Structure

c o u n t y area.
S a m p l i n g a n d Ch aracteristics of the D a t a
Th e study of o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s in P h i l a d e l p h i a c o v e r e d six b r o a d industry divisions.
Office, maintenance, custodial, warehousing, and t r u c k i n g jobs r e p o r t e d in tables 3* 4, 5* a nd
6 w e r e s t u d i e d in e stablishments w i t h mor e t han 100 w o r k e r s in manufacturing, r e t a i l trade,
eund t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
(except r a i l r o a d s ) , communication, a nd o t h e r public utilities; a n d in e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h m ore t h a n 20 w o r k e r s in w h o l e s a l e trade,
finance, insurance, r e a l estate,'
a n d s e rvice industries. A m o n g the industries in w h i c h ch a r a c t e r i s t i c jobs w e r e studied, m i n i ­
m u m size o f e s t abli s h m e n t a n d e x t e n t of the
a r e a c o v e r e d w e r e d e t e r m i n e d separately for e a c h
industry,
a n d are indicated
in table 2.
A l t h o u g h size limits frequently
v a ried f r o m th o s e
e s t a b l i s h e d for s u r v e y i n g cro s s - i n d u s t r y office a n d p l a n t jobs,
dat a for these jobs w e r e i n ­
c l u d e d o n l y for firms w h i c h
s a t isfied the size r e q u i r e m e n t s of the b r o a d industry divisions.
S m a l l e r estab l i shments w e r e o m itted because,
in the o c c u pations studied,
they f u r n i s h e d i n ­
s u f f i c i e n t employment to w a r r a n t th e i r i nclusion in the study.
A gre a t e r p r o p o r t i o n of large
t h a n o f s m a l l establishments w e r e s tudied in o r d e r to m a x i m i z e the num b e r of w o r k e r s surveyed
w i t h a v a i l a b l e resources.
E a c h group of est a b l i s h m e n t s of a c e r t a i n size, however, w a s g i v e n
its p r o p e r w e i g h t in the c o m b i n a t i o n o f d a t a b y industry a n d occupation.
A f ourth of the
549*000 w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in the
m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a in M a y 1950, in
the i n d u s t r y divisions a n d size groups studied,
a re a c c o u n t e d f o r in a p p r o x i m a t e l y 150 men's
jobs a n d o v e r h al f as m a n y w o m e n ' s jobs for w h i c h earn i n g s d a t a are
p r e s e n t e d in the a c c o m ­
p a n y i n g t ables
(tables 3 t h r o u g h 18).
A p p r o x i m a t e l y n i n e - t e n t h s o f the w o r k e r s
in the jobs
s t u d i e d o n a cross-industry b a s i s w e r e emp l o y e d i n the
three counties of Philadelphia, D e l a ­
ware,
a n d Camden.
B e c a u s e of this c o n c e n t r a t i o n of employment,
the p r e s e n t a t i o n o f o c c u p a ­
tional earnings by broad
industry d i v i s i o n
(tables 3 a n d 5 ) is limited to the t h r e e - c o u n t y
a r ea. W a g e a n d salary d a t a for a l l industries combined, however, are a l s o p r e s e n t e d f o r v a r i ­
ous o t h e r c o u n t y groupings a s w e l l as f or the m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a (tables 4 a n d 6 ).
T h e earnings inf o r m a t i o n in the repo r t
e x c ludes p r e m i u m p a y for overtime a n d ni g h t
work.
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s are a l s o excluded, b u t incentive earnings, i ncluding c o mmissions
for sales persons, have b e e n included for those w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d un d e r some f o r m of incentive
w a g e system. W e e k l y hours, r e p o r t e d for office, d e p a r t m e n t a n d c l o t h i n g stores, a n d b a n k a n d
insur a n c e occupations, r e f e r to the w o r k schedules for w h i c h the salaries are p a i d r o u n d e d to
th e n e a r e s t h a l f hour; ave r a g e w e e k l y e arnings for t h ese o c c u p a t i o n s have b e e n r o u n d e d t o the
n e a r e s t 5 0 cents.
The n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s
p r e s e n t e d re f e r s to the
esti m a t e d t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t
i n a l l estab l i s hments w i t h i n the scope o f the st u d y
a nd n o t to the nu m b e r a c t u a l l y surveyed.
D a t a a r e s h o w n only for full - t i m e worke r s ,
i.e., th o s e w h o w e r e h i r e d to w o r k the e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t ' s f u l l-time schedule o f hours far the g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l classification.
I n f o r m a t i o n o n w a g e p r a c t i c e s refers to a l l office w o r k e r s a n d to a l l p l a n t w o r k e r s
as s p e c i f i e d in the i n d i vidual tables.
It is p r e s e n t e d
in terms of the p r o p o r t i o n o f a ll
w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d in offices (or p l a n t departments) tha t o bserve the p ractice in question, e x ­
ce p t in the f i rst s ection of table 2 9 , w h e r e sche d u l e d w e e k l y hours
of w o m e n office w o r k e r s
a l o n e are p r e s e nted. B e c a u s e of eli g i b i l i t y r e q u i rements,
the p r o p o r t i o n a c t u a l l y r e c e i v i n g
the speci f i c benefits m a y be smaller. T h e s u m nary of v a c a t i o n a n d sick leave plans is limited




The survey w a s c o n d u c t e d at a p e r i o d o f relative w a g e stability.
The da t a r e f l e c t
co n d i t i o n s just p r i o r to the K o r e a n emergency.
Ma n y u n i o n a g r e e m e n t s
n e g o t i a t e d in the a r e a
d u r i n g the y e a r e n d i n g June 30* 1950*
d i d not provide for w a g e increases.
However, a t least
1 50 ,0 00 w o r k e r s , o f w h o m ab o u t h a l f w e r e in manufacturing industries, r e c e i v e d some increase
u n d e r n e w agr e e m e n t s .
For these w o r k e r s ,
the average increase
a m o u n t e d to
approximately 5
cents a n h o u r in m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d s l i g h t l y more in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries.
Bargaining
w a s m o r e acti v e d u r i n g the p e r i o d in the field of supplemental w a g e b e n efits. N e w or imp r o v e d
w e l f a r e a n d p e n s i o n p l ans w e r e included in contracts covering a s u b s t a n t i a l n u m b e r of w o r k e r s ;
o t h e r b e n e f i t s s u c h as a d d i t i o n a l p a i d holid a y s or improved h o l i d a y pa y p r o v i s i o n s w e r e a l s o
numerous.
I n the d i s c u s s i o n o f w a g e s w h i c h follows,
two m a i n o c c u p a t i o n a l group i n g s are d i s ­
tinguished:
(l) c r o s s - i n d u s t r y occupations--office clerical o c cupations, m a i n t e n a n c e o c c u p a ­
tions, a n d c u stodial, w a r e h o u s i n g , a n d t r u c k i n g occupations;
a n d (2 ) cha r a c t e r i s t i c ind u s t r y
o c c upations.
The first
g r o u p o f o c c u pations w a s studied o n a
cross-industry basis
i n the
e i g h t - c o u n t y m e t r o p o l i t a n area.
H o wever,
the a c c o m p a n y i n g d i s c u s s i o n of e a r n i n g s b y o c c u p a ­
t i o n a n d in d u s t r y
g r o u p r e l a t e s to the three - c o u n t y a r e a w i t h the e x c e p t i o n
o f the s e c t i o n
d e a l i n g w i t h v a r i a t i o n s in ea r n i n g s w i t h i n the eight-county area. T h e s e c o n d g r o u p is c o m p o s e d
of c h a r a c t e r i s t i c industry o c c u pations g e n e r a l l y pec u l i a r to a s p e c i f i c industry.
As indica­
ted below, str a i g h t - t i m e a v e r a g e rates or earnings are s h own fa r some industries, w h i l e u n i o n
scales are
s h o w n for others.
Th e a r e a limits
are defined o n e a c h ea r n i n g s
table p r e s e n t e d
for t h e s e industries.
C r o s s - i n d u s t r y o c c upations
Office c l e r i c a l occupa t i o n s - A m o n g the 28 office occu p a t i o n s in w h i c h w o m e n ' s s a l ­
a r ies w e r e studied,
17 s howed w e e k l y avera g e s of $ 3 8 .5 0 thr o u g h $ 4 3 . 5 0 (tatle 3)* T h e s e o c ­
cu p a t i o n s i n cluded 55 p e r c e n t
o f the w o m e n office w o r k e r s studied.
General
stenographers,
the l a r g e s t o c c u p a t i o n a l gr o u p found i n P h i l a d e l p h i a offices, r e c e i v e d a n a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l ­
a r y of $ 4 1.00.
Other numerically
i mportant groups w e r e rou t i n e
typ i s t s a t
$34.50 a week;
c o m b i n a t i o n clerk-t y p i s t s ,
$35.50* a n d ac c o u n t i n g clerks, $40.00.
L o w e s t p a y i n g office jobs
r e p o r t e d for w o m e n w e r e r o u t i n e file c lerks and office girls,
b o t h w i t h a n a v e rage of $ 3 2 .0 0
w e e k l y . A v e r a g e s of $ 56 .5 0 a w e e k for top-grade secretaries, a n d $ 5 3 . 0 0 a w e e k for h a n d b o o k ­
keepers w e r e the h i g h e s t
r e p o r t e d for w o m e n .
I n al l the 2 6 office jobs w h i c h p e r m i t t e d c o m ­
paris o n s ,
the a v e r a g e salaries of w o m e n w e r e h igher in m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s t h a n in
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g . I n 20 of these the d i fference w a s
$3.50 a w e e k o r more. W i t h i n the m a n u ­
f a c t u r i n g division, a v erage w a g e s ftr w o m e n in firms p r o d u c i n g n o n d u r a b l e g o o d s w e r e g e n e r a l l y
h i g h e r t h a n sa l a r i e s in d u r a b l e - g o o d s establishments.
H a n d b o o k k e e p e r s r e c e i v e d the hig h e s t average w e e k l y s a l a r y r e p o r t e d for m e n o ffice
workers,
$65 . 0 0 .
The largest g r oup
of m e n office w o r k e r s s t u d i e d
c o n s i s t e d of a c c o u n t i n g
clerks, w h o a v e r a g e d
$ 5 5 . 0 0 .a w e e k .
Off i c e boys h a d the lowest
average w i t h $33.00 a week.
A l t h o u g h less a p p a r e n t
t h a n fo r w o m e n ' s salaries,
men's a v erage
sal a r i e s a l s o t e n d e d to be
h i g h e r in m a n u f a c t u r i n g t h a n in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g industries,
a n d w i t h i n the
manufacturing
d i v i s i o n h i g h e r salar i e s w e r e g e n e r a l l y
f o und in nondurable goods
industries.
Average s a l ­
aries o f m e n w e r e h i g h e r
t h a n those o f w o m e n in m o s t comparable
jobs s urveyed.
Differences

in average salaries for men and women in particular occupations generally do not reflect dif­
ferences in rates within the san© establishment.
C o m p a r i n g office job a v e r a g e s of M a y 1950 w i t h those rep o r t e d in the B u r e a u ' s p r e ­
vious office
sala r y s u r v e y
of J a n u a r y 19*+9,
the most co m m o n increase w a s a
d o l l a r a w eek.
M a i n t e n a n c e occupations - A m o n g maintenance jobs selected for study, c a r p enters had
the h i g h e s t a v e rage rate w i t h $ 1 . 8 0 a n hour.
This hourly a v erage w a s closely a p p r o a c h e d b y
p i p e f i t t e r s w i t h $1 . 7 9 a n d b y e l e c t ricians and maintenance me c h a n i c s w i t h $1.72.
A s a group,
h e l p e r s t o the various
m a i n t e n a n c e t r adesmen averaged $1.1*3 a n hour.
The lowest h o u r l y pay
l e v e l a m o n g the jobs s t u died w a s $ 1 .3 1 , reported for bot h oilers a n d sta t i o n a r y b o i l e r firemen.
C u stodial, w a r e h o u s i n g , a n d trucking occupations - F o r the var i o u s custodial, w a r e ­
housing, a n d t r u c k i n g jobs studied,
the average rates for m e n ra n g e d f r o m $ 1 .0 3 for w a t c h m e n
t o $ 1 . 5 6 f or
drivers of h e a v y trucks
(other t h a n trailer type).
Averages
for o t h e r
t r uck
d r i v e r c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s w e r e $ 1 .1+1 a n h o u r for light trucks; $ 1 .5 0 for medium;
a nd $ 1 .5 1 for
h e a v y t r a i l e r type trucks. S t o c k h a n d l e r s and hand truckers, the largest g r oup of m e n studied,
averaged $1.32
a n hour.
However,
this group includes loaders and
u nloaders in ste v e d o r i n g
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , w h o a v e r a g e d $1.7** p e r hour.
Omitting the w a g e data for the
latter w o r kers,
s t o c k h a n d l e r s a n d hand truckers a v e r a g e d $ 1 .2 1 a n hour w h i c h w a s the same as for m a n u f a c t u r ­
ing industries
cons i d e r e d separately.
In the second largest group,
janitors,
porters, and
c leaners,
m e n aver a g e d $ 1 .0 *- a n hour, and women,
1
85 cents. P a y levels of order fillers and
p a c k e r s w e r e similar, w i t h ave r a g e s o f $ 1 .2 0 a nd $ 1 .19 , respectively.
V a r i a t i o n s in earnings
b y co u n t y groupings - No clea r - c u t p a t t e r n
of w a g e d i f f e r ­
entials w as
apparent between
occu p a t i o n a l average
earnings in the
industrial core
of the
P h i l a d e l p h i a M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a (Philadelphia,
Delaware,
a n d C a m d e n Counties), the C o u n t y of
P h i l a d e l p h i a a l one l/,
a n d the r e m a i n i n g Pennsylvania and
N e w J e r s e y counties
in the a r e a
(tables
a n d 6 ). Since the t h r e e - c o u n t y area accounted f o r a p p r o x i m a t e l y nine-tenths o f the
e m p l o y m e n t in o ccupations s tudied in the eight-county M e t r o p o l i t a n Area, o c c upational averages
f o r the t w o a r e a s w e r e ge n e r a l l y quite similar.
Other area comparisons,
however, indicated
th a t office
salaries in a m a j o r i t y
o f the occupations w e r e
somewhat lower
In Phi l a d e l p h i a
C o u n t y t h a n in the r e m a i n i n g
f o u r - c o u n t y Pennsylvania a r e a
a n d the t h r e e - c o u n t y N e w Jers e y
area.
A s i m i l a r c o m p a r i s o n of maintenance,
custodial, war e h o u s i n g , a n d t rucking Jobs i n d i ­
c a t e d t h a t the w a g e adva n t a g e f r o m a r e a to area varied cons i d e r a b l y b y occupation.
Probably
the m o s t
i n f l u e n t i a l a m o n g the
d i v e r s i t y of factors
r e f l e c t e d in occupa t i o n a l w a g e
levels
a m o n g these a r e a s w e r e va r i a t i o n s in the p r o p ortion of w o r k e r s
r e p r e s e n t e d b y e a c h Industry
a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t - s i z e group.
T r ade a n d service
industries w i t h i n the scope o f the study,
f o r example, a c c o u n t e d for a r e l a t i v e l y h i g h prop o r t i o n of the office w o r k e r s in P h i l a d e l p h i a
County,
w h e r e a s in the o u t l y i n g a r e a s earnings of workers in m a n y
occupations r e f l e c t e d the
h i g h e r w a g e l e vels In n u m e r o u s large
manu f a c t u r i n g establishments d i s p e r s e d thro u g h o u t these
areas.

k

C h a r a c t e r i s t i c Indu s t r y O c c u pations
S t r a i g h t - t i m e r a tes or e arnings
F o l l o w i n g t h e pra c t i c e f or the cross-industry occupations p r e v i o u s l y discussed, the
w a g e or s a l a r y
in f o r m a t i o n w h i c h follows
for 12 Industries r e f l e c t s r a t e s
or straight-time
e a r n i n g s d e r i v e d f r o m e m p l o y e r p a y - r o l l records.
W o o l e n a n d w o r s t e d textiles - I n the important t extile center, compr i s i n g P h i l a d e l ­
phia, Camden,
a n d D e l a w a r e Counties,
average earnings of w o o l e n and w o r s t e d w o r k e r s in key
jobs s u r v e y e d r a n g e d f r o m $ 1 .8 1 a n h o u r for m e n l o o m fixers to $ 1 .0 0 an h o u r for w o m e n d o f f era
( s p inning frame, B r a d f o r d system). T h e largest group o f wor k e r s , m e n w o o l e n a n d w o r s t e d w e a v ­
ers, a v e r a g e d
$1.5*+ a n hour.
The a v e rage for a ll w o m e n w e a v e r s w a s
$1.3*+. A v e r a g e h o u r l y
e a r n i n g s of w o m e n in
o t her m a j o r classifications were:
$ 1 .0 5 for y a r n w inders,
$ 1 .0 6
for
f r ame spi n n e r s (Bradford system), a n d $1.1*3 for c l oth menders (table 7 ).




P a i n t s a n d v a r n i s h e s - A m o n g the
paint and varnish workers studied
in the t h r e e c o u n t y area, v a r n i s h m a k e r s a v e r a g e d the h i g h e s t rates, $ 1 . 6 l a n h o u r (table 8 ). The largest
o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s studied w e r e e m p l o y e d as mix e r s ,
at $ 1 .3 5 , a n d as labelers and packers,
a t $ 1 . 2 3 for m e n a n d 98 cents for w o m e n .
T i n t e r s e a r n e d $1.5*+ a n hour, o n the average.
F e r r o u s foundries - H i g h l y - p a i d occu p a t i o n s In ferrous foundries w e r e h a n d coremakers
a n d w o o d pat t e r n m a k e r s ,
w i t h average
e a r n i n g s of $1 . 9 2
an hour.
Fl o o r molders,
paid on a
d a y - r a t e b asis,
a v e r a g e d $1.65;
those o n a p i e c e w o r k b a s i s a v e r a g e d $2.00.
The n u m e r i c a l l y
i m p o r t a n t c l a s s i fication,
chippers a n d grinders,
e a r n e d $1.1*7.
The l owest average ra t e r e ­
p o rted, $ 1 .19 , w a s r e c e i v e d b y h a n d t r u c k e r s (table 9 ).
M a c h i n e r y m a n u f a c t u r e - D a t a s h o w n f o r m a c h i n e r y industries (table 10) are b a s e d on
N o v e m b e r 19 I
+9 pa y r o l l s . However, v e r y few g e n e r a l w a g e c h a n g e s o c c u r r e d b e t w e e n that date
a n d June 1950 in the group o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s studied.
General assemblers
f o r m e d the largest
g r o u p of w o r k e r s stu d i e d in m a c h i n e r y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the P h i l a d e l p h i a area.
Those c l a s s i ­
f i e d as "A" m e n w h o p e r f o r m e d the m o s t d i f f i c u l t a s s e m b l y w o r k a v e r a g e d $ 1 . 6 3 a n hour.
Class
B a s s e m b l e r s e a r n e d a n a v e r a g e of $1.1*9 a n d class C assemblers,
$1.1+1*. T h e h i ghest average
ra t e r e p o r t e d a m o n g the o c c u pations s t u d i e d w a s $ 2 .0 0 an hour, r e c e i v e d b y t o o l a n d die m a k e r s
in jobbing shops.
I n oth e r shops, t o o l a n d die m a k e r s a v e r a g e d $1.77, as d i d class A i n s p e c ­
tors.
P r o d u c t i o n m a c h i n i s t s e a r n e d $ 1 . 6 l a n h o u r in N o v e m b e r I 9I 9 .
+
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y - The l a r g e s t o c c u p a t i o n a l group s t u d i e d w a s a s semblers (class
C), p e r f o r m i n g r o u t i n e a n d r e p e t i t i v e operations,
w h o w e r e p a i d o n the a v e r a g e $ 1 .16 a n h o u r
(table 11).
A s s e m b l e r s (class B),
e n g a g e d In s o m e w h a t more c o m p l i c a t e d w o r k , a v e r a g e d $ 1 . 6 5
a n hour,
w h e r e a s top-grade a s s e m b l e r s (class A )
a v e r a g e d $1. 8 0 .
O n p u n c h press operations,
class A m e n
e a r n e d $1.82.
A substantial number of wom e n were
e m p l o y e d as
routine testers
(class C), a t a n a v e r a g e of $ 1 . 2 7 a n hour.
D e p a r t m e n t stores - H i g h e s t p a i d w o r k e r s in P h i l a d e l p h i a ' s d e p a r t m e n t stores a m o n g
the o c c u p a t i o n s
stu d i e d w e r e f urniture a n d
bedding salesmen w h o earned
$ 1 1 5 .5 0 we ekly, a n d
floor covering salesmen w h o averaged
$102.50
(table 12). W o m e n sales
e m p loyees w i t h the
h i g h e s t a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s w e r e clerks s e l l i n g w o m e n ' s a n d misses' suits a n d coats, a t $ 56 .0 0 a
week,
a n d cle r k s s e l l i n g w o m e n ' s shoes,
a t $1*9.50.
E a r n i n g s of n o n s e l l i n g employees t e n d e d
t o be l o wer t h a n those
o f sales p e o p l e w h o g e n e r a l l y r e c e i v e d
c o m m i s s i o n s o n sales.
I n the
classification
o f s e l l i n g s e c t i o n stockmen,
m e n a v e r a g e d $ 33*50 a we e k ,
a n d w omen, $ 2 8 .0 0 .
M e n a n d w o m e n e l e v a t o r operators e a r n e d $1*2.50 a w e e k .
M e n w o r k i n g as r e c e i v i n g clerks earned
$1*1.50,
a n d d a y p o r t e r s m a d e $1*0.50.
The cashie r - w r a p p e r s ,
lar g e s t g r o u p studied a m o n g the
w o m e n , e a r n e d $ 3 1 .0 0 for a l 0 -hour w e e k .
*
Men's and
$ 1 0 1 .5 0 a w e e k , a n d
ing a n d f u r n i s h i n g s
t a i l o r s w a s $60.00;
s t o c k m e n a t $ 3 6 .0 0 ,

boys'
clothing
stor e s - S a l e s clerks
selling men's
clothing averaged
those sel l i n g m e n ' s f u r n i s h i n g s r e c e i v e d $ 7 8 .5 0 in m e n ’s a n d boys' c l o t h ­
stores
in P h i l a d e l p h i a County.
The a v e r a g e w e e k l y
s a l a r y of a l t e r a t i o n
t hat of fitters, $ 8 1 . 0 0 . L o w e s t p a i d w o r k e r s s t u d i e d w e r e selling s e c t i o n
a n d d a y p o rters a t $ 3 6 .5 0 (table 1 3 ).

W o m e n ' s r e a d y - t o - w e a r stores - I n w o m e n ' s r e a d y - t o - w e a r stores, w e e k l y e arnings fo r
w o m e n employees
s t u d i e d r a n g e d f r o m $ 2 5 .0 0 for s t o c k m e n
in s e l l i n g s e ctions t o $ 53*50 fo r
c l e r k s s e l l i n g w o m e n ' s suits a n d coats (table 1*+).
O t her w o m e n sales
c l e r k s a v e r a g e d $1+1*.50
in w o m e n ' s dresses,
$ 37*00 i n w o m e n ' s a c c e s s o r i e s ,
a n d $ 3 6 .5 0 i n b l o u s e s a n d neckwear.
The
l a r g e s t g r o u p of w o m e n w o r k e r s
s t u d i e d o t h e r t h a n sales
c lerks w e r e a l t e r a t i o n
sewers, w h o
e a r n e d $1*1.50.
O f the r e l a t i v e l y f ew m e n e m p l o y e d i n these stores,
the l a r g e s t group w e r e
d a y po r t e r s , w h o a v e r a g e d $ 1 0 .0 0 f o r a s c h e d u l e d w o r k w e e k o f 1+0 hours.
+
B a n k s - Th e h i g h e s t p a y i n g b a n k job s t u d i e d in P h i l a d e l p h i a C o m i t y w a s that of c o m ­
m e r c i a l teller,
w i t h m e n a v e r a g i n g $ 5 8 .5 0 a w e e k ,
a n d w o m e n $1+8.00.
Men employed
as b a n k
guards
e a r n e d a w e e k l y ave r a g e o f $1+2.00; w a t c h m e n r e c e i v e d $35 * 0 0 .
A n important job
fo r
w o m e n b a n k e m p l o y e e s w a s t h a t o f bo o k k e e p i n g - m a c h i n e operator. T h e a v e r a g e ra t e for s uch w o r k

5*

when the employee was responsible for only one section of the records was $3^*50 & week,
while more advanced operators averaged $36.50. General stenographers earned $39*00, and
proof-machine operators, $ 36.50 (table 15)*
Home offices of life insurance companies - A w e e k l y salary of $76 . 0 0 w a s the a v e rage
fo r m e n employed as section h e ads in home offices of life insurance companies in P h i l a d e l p h i a
C o u n t y in May 1950.
The b u l k of the
employees in these offices w e r e women,
w h o s e e a r nings
a m o n g the jobs studied r a n g e d f r o m $ 30 .0 0 a w e e k for r o u tine file clerks to $ 68.00 for u n d e r ­
writers.
The average salary for b o t h a c c o u n t i n g
clerks and general stenographers w a s $ 3 6 . 0 0
a w e e k (table

16 ).

Power laundries - Ave r a g e h o u r l y e a r nings of p o wer laundry w o r k e r s w e r e r e l a t i v e l y
l o w e r than those found in the other industries s elected for study in the Phil a d e l p h i a area. I n
the largest occupational group studied,
mac h i n e f l a t w o r k finishers,
all the w o m e n
surveyed
e a r n e d less th a n
90 cents a n hour,
a n d the a v e rage
w a s 66 cents
(table 17)*
Mar k e r s
and
identifiers, at 73 cents a n hour, and m a c hine shirt pressers, at 79 cents, a l s o a c c o u n t e d for
large numbers of women.
F o r the r e l a t i v e l y few m e n empl o y e d in p o w e r laundries, w a g e s in k e y
jobs studied ranged fro m a n
average o f 74 cents for
bundle w r a p p e r s to
$ 1 .1 1 a n hou r
for
s t a t ionary b o i l er firemen.
A uto re p a i r shops - Average h o u r l y p a y o f $ 1 .60 w a s received b y
a u t o m e c h a n i c s on
s k i lled repair work; those on simpler jobs r e c e i v e d $1.31.
B o d y r e p a i r m e n a v e r a g e d $ 1 .6 9 a n d
a u tomotive electricians earn e d $2.03 a n hour. The only jobs studied in w h i c h w o r k e r s a v e r a g e d
less than $ 1 .3 0 a n hour w e r e greasers,
at 89 cents,
and automobile w ashers,
at 92
cents
(table 18 ).
U n i o n W a g e Scales
The information r e p o r t e d for the f o l l o w i n g 8 industries relates to the m i n i m u m w a g e
rates an d m a x i m u m straight-time hours p er w e e k
a g r e e d u p o n t h r ough collective b a r g a i n i n g b e ­
t w een employers a n d t r a d e - u n i o n s .
B u i l d i n g c o n s t ruction - The basic h o u r l y w a g e scales for numer i c a l l y important j o u r ­
n e y m e n trades of u n i o n w o r k e r s in the c o n s t r u c t i o n industry w e r e
$ 2 .1 5 for painters, $ 2 ,5 2 5
for carpenters,
$ 2 .7 5 for plumbers, a nd s t e a m f i t t e r s , $ 2 ,8 7 5 for electricians, a nd $ 3*25 for
b r i c k layers (table 19). W i t h few exceptions,
these scales w ere in effect o n m o s t u n i o n p r o ­
jects in the five Pennsy l v a n i a counties of the m e t r o p o l i t a n Philadelphia area. S l i g h t l y lower
w a g e scales,
however,
h ad b e e n negotiat ed in a few
small towns in the area.
The
minimum
h o u r l y wage scales in Camden, N e w Jersey,
d i f fered in m a n y instances fro m those in P h i l a d e l ­
phia, since m a n y of the trades h a d separate contracts
for the Cam d e n are a w h i c h had b e e n n e ­
g o t i a t e d at d i fferent dates
u n d e r var y i n g b u s i n e s s conditions
a nd labor r e q u i rements.
The
C a m d e n scales w e r e in eff e c t a l s o o n u n i o n jobs in G l oucester County and in the s outhern p o r ­
t i o n of Bu r l i n g t o n County.
A scheduled w o r k w e e k of 40 hours prev a i l e d for m o s t of the trades
in the area.
Ba k e r ies - U n i o n w a g e scales in Phil a d e l p h i a bakeries varied
considerably both by
agree m e n t and b y
occupation
(table 20).
M i n i m u m scales for
dough mixers in mac h i n e
shops
b a k i n g bread an d cake, r a n g e d f r o m $ 1 .35 to $1, 5 4 5 a n hour.
The hourly w a g e scales of benchm e n r anged from $ 1 .2 1 to $1.48. W a g e scales r a n g i n g f r o m 90 cents to $ 1,065 a n hou r w e r e r e ­
p o r t e d for w o m e n w r a p p e r s . W e e k l y hours
repo r t e d for all
agreements w e r e 40. W h i l e P h i l a ­
d e l p h i a bakeries wer e
found to be h i g h l y organized,
this w a s not true
t h r o ughout the w h o l e
m e t r o p o l i t a n area.
In some small outlyin g t e a m s , w h e r e u n i o n contracts had b e e n negotiated,
w a g e scales w e r e lower in two
cases and c o m p arable w i t h those in P h i l a delphia p r o p e r in a few
others.
L o cal transit
o p erating employees - Sev e r a l u n i o n
contracts have b e e n ne g o t i a t e d
cover i n g transit wor k e r s in the Phi l a d e l p h i a a r e a (table 21). In the c ontract c o v e r i n g P h i l a ­
delphia,
operators of 1 -man cars and busses wer e p a i d a m i n i m u m hourly scale o f $ 1 . 4 5 after




1 y e a r ’s service.
Operators and c o n d u c t o r s on 2 - m a n cars r e c e i v e d $ 1 . 3 7 a n hour.
I n Camden,
the l o cal bus ope r a t i o n is p a r t of a n interstate system,
and the scale for d r i vers w a s $ 1 . 5 9
an hour.
L o c a l t r a n s i t oper a t i o n s in D e l a w a r e County are parts of inte r u r b a n systems an d the
w o r k e r s are
covered b y three
u n i o n contracts. W a g e scales for
oper a t o r s of 1 - man
cars or
busses u n d e r these contracts, ar e $ 1 .3 3 a n d $ 1 .3 5 an h o u r after 1 y e a r ’s service a nd $ 1 .3 0 a n
hour fo r operators
and conductors
on 2 -man cars.
The m a j o r i t y
of the
co n t r a c t s
covering
transit w o r k e r s in the a r e a p r o v i d e for a 4 4 -hour work w e e k .
H o wever, in D e l a w a r e County, one
contract a llows 48 hours of w o r k a t straight-time
rates and a n o t h e r allo w s 54 h o u r s . I n the
smaller P e n n s y l v a n i a towns in the
m e t r o p o l i t a n area,
organ i z e d t r a n s i t operations h ad lower
wa g e scales t h a n those for P h i l a d e l p h i a proper.
Ma l t liquor - The m a l t liquor industry in the a rea had n e g o t i a t e d m i n i m u m w a g e scales
for b r e w e r y w o r k e r s
r a n g i n g f r o m $ 5 9 .0 0 a w e e k for
f i rst-year a p p r e n t i c e s to $ 7 0 .0 0 a w e e k
for the job of
’first m a n ” . S k i l l e d w o r k e r s ,
’
such as m alt m i l l e r s an d syrup m i xers,
had a
scale of $ 68.00 a week;
that fo r w o r k e r s classified as labelers a n d crowners,
pasteu r i z e r s ,
and a l l - a r o u n d w o r k e r s w a s $ 6 5 . 0 0 p e r w e e k (table 22).
The same scales
as w e l l as a 4 0 - h o u r
scheduled w o r k w e e k w e r e in e f f e c t in all breweries in the
e i g h t - c o u n t y m e t r o p o l i t a n area.
M o t o r t r u c k drives#; a n d h e l pers - U n i o n scales for m o t o r t r u c k
drivers in the P h i l a ­
del p h i a a r e a v a r i e d som e w h a t
a c c o r d i n g to materials h a u l e d and c o u n t y in w h i c h
the c o n t r a c t
w a s in e f f e c t (table 23). H o u r l y rates r a n g e d from $ 1.45 for b u i l d i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n e x c a v a t i n g
w o r k in P h i l a d e l p h i a C o u n t y a n d $ 1 . 4 7 for railway express d r i vers
in C a m d e n C o u n t y to $1, 7 3 5
for b r e w e r y drivers h a u l i n g k e g b e e r an d $ 1,788 for drivers, da y a n d night, h a u l i n g n e w s p a p e r s
a n d m a g a z i n e s in P h i l a d e l p h i a County.
A m i n i m u m scale of $1.50 a n h o u r p r e v a i l e d for s e v e r a l
groups of drivers in the three .counties,
a m ong w h i c h we r e g e n eral
h a ulage dri v e r s in P h i l a ­
d e l p h i a a n d D elaware Counties;
b u i l d i n g materials
and freight
d r i v e r s in P h i l a d e l p h i a a n d
C a m d e n Counties; an d d rivers for b e e r distributors in al l three c o u nties. S cales fo r d r i v e r s ’
helpers r a n g e d
f r o m $ 1 .2 5 a n h o u r
for b e e r distribution
in a l l three counties to $ 1.6 6 a n
hour for those w o r k i n g on t rucks h a u l i n g k e g beer far P h i l a d e l p h i a C o u n t y br e w e r i e s . A 4 0 - h o u r
w e e k w a 3 p r o v i d e d for
in a l l contra c t s .
Though union
scales for d r ivers in B u r l i n g t o n a n d
G l o u c e s t e r C o unties o f Ne w J e r s e y w e r e the same as those in e ffect in Camden,
some scales in
effe c t in the three l e s s - p o p u l a t e d P e n n s y l v a n i a counties
in the m e t r o p o l i t a n -area w e r e lower
than t h ose found in P h i l a d e l p h i a a n d D e l a w a r e Counties.
Ocean
t ransport - W a g e scales for
unlicensed marit i m e
p e r s o n n e l at
the p o r t
of
P h i l a d e l p h i a w e r e the same as those in e f f e c t at other ports on the A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f Coasts.
Fo r al l workers,
the b a s i c m o n t h l y scales w e r e supplemented b y a c l o t h i n g a l l o w a n c e of $ 7 . 5 0
a month.
B a s i c scales in u n i o n a g r e ements w i t h firms
operating t a n k e r s w e r e s l i g h t l y h i g h e r
th a n those found in the ag r e e m e n t s
w i t h dry-cargo ship owners.
This historical differential
is b a s e d u p o n the a d d e d dangers involved an d the less desirable w o r k i n g cond i t i o n s on tankers.
The u n i o n
a g reements w i t h the
opera t o r s of dry cargo ships al s o
covered passenger
ships.
Hcwever, o nly a limited n u m b e r of the latter operate out of the p o r t o f P h i l adelphia.
O n ships cov e r e d b y d r y - c a r g o agreements,
the basic scale fo r able s e a m e n sta n d i n g
w a t c h e s w a s $ 2 2 6 . 0 1 a month,
a n d the o r d i n a r y s e a m a n ’s scale w a s $193.1*7 (table 24).
In the
engine-room, the basic m o n t h l y ra t e for daytime oil firemen wa s $ 2 14.18, w h i l e that for w a t c h ­
s t a n d i n g oilers w a s $226.01,
the same as able seamen.
B a sic m o n t h l y rates
I n the s t e w a r d ’s
d e p a r t m e n t r a n g e d f r o m $ 19 3 .4 7 f o r m e s s m e n and u t i l itymen to $ 2 8 1 . 7 5 for c h i e f stewards.
On tankers,
w a g e scales differed somewhat b e t w e e n c o n t r a c t s nego t i a t e d b y the N a ­
tional Maritime U n i o n an d those o f the S e a f a r e r s ’ International U nion. The b a s i c m o n t h l y ra t e
ftr able s eamen covered b y the for m e r w a s $228 . , and for those c o v e r e d b y the latter, $ 225 .50 *
96
W e e k l y hours of w o r k w h i l e at sea for all day m e n in the d e c k a n d s t e w a r d ’s d e p a r t ­
m e nts w e r e fixed at 44.
T^he scales
for these day m e n
included a $ 2 5 .0 0
m o n t h l y p a y m e n t in
lieu o f w o r k on S u n d a y at a n overtime rate.
Hours of w o r k
for w a t c h - s t a n d e r s in these two
d e p a rtments w e r e 56 w i t h overt i m e p a y for the 8 hours on Sunday.
I n po r t a ll seam e n r e c e i v e d
overtime p a y a f t e r 40 h o urs w o r k a week.

6.

S t e v e d o r i n g - The $ 1 . 8 8 a n h our p a y scale for u n i o n
l o n g s h o r e m e n h a n d l i n g general
c a r g o in the
P h i l a d e l p h i a a r e a is in accord w i t h the rate in e f f e c t
a t a l l N o r t h Atlantic
C o a s t por t s .
A n a d d i t i o n a l 10 or 15 cents
an hou r was p a i d
for h a n d l i n g c e r t a i n difficult
types o f cargo,
a n d dou b l e - p a y a m o u n t i n g to $ 3 .7 6 a n h o u r for m o v i n g
explosives or damaged
c a r g o (table 25).
Other s p ecial w a g e scales reported wer e
$ 1 .38 a n h o u r for loading a n d u n ­
l o a d i n g r a i l r o a d cars,
a nd f r o m $ 1 .7 8 to $ 1 .9 3 an hour for various operations
involved in
h a n d l i n g b a nanas. In specific situations r e q uiring the l o n g s h o r e m e n to spend extra time t r a v ­
e l i n g t o t h e i r place of work, t h e y receive a flat rate of $ 1.8 8 a n h o u r for such travel time.
T he m a x i m u m w e e k l y
straight-time hours allowed by the u n i o n a g r e e m e n t c overing longshoremen
n u m b e r e d 4-0.
P r i n t i n g - In c o m m e r c i a l p rinting shops in Philadelphia, u n i o n contracts called for
m i n i m u m w a g e scales of $ 2 .2 0 a n h o u r ftar hand compositors, $ 2 .7 5 Tor p hotoengravers, and $ 1.0 0
a n h o u r f or b i n d e r y wo m e n .
I n news p a p e r work,
the scale for c o mpositors w a s
$ 2 .40 a n horn*
d u r i n g the d a y a n d 8 cents m ore at night;
w e b pressmen r e c e i v e d $ 2 ,2 6 6 p e r h o u r for daytime
w o r k a n d $ 2 , 5 7 7 a n h o u r far n i g h t w o r k (table 26). The Philadelphia scales g e n erally prevailed
for those p r i n t i n g trades w h i c h w e r e organized in Camd e n an d D e l a w a r e Counties.
Exceptions
w e r e t y p o g r a p h i c a l wo r kers, w e b pressmen, and stereotypers on daytime w o r k in Dela w a r e County,
where slightly
lower scales w e r e negotiated.
Scheduled w e e k l y
h o urs a f t e r w h i c h
overtime
r a tes a p p l i e d v a r i e d b y
individual trades f r o m 33 3 A to ^ 0 * w i t h 37 l /2 hours
a week pre­
d o m i nating.
I n the other five counties comprising the P h i l a d e l p h i a m e t r o p o l i t a n area, u n i o n ­
ization of the p r i n t i n g
trades w a s limited w i t h
some lower rates n e g o t i a t e d
in the smaller
communities.
M i n i m u m E n t r a n c e Rates

t y p i c a l sch e d u l e
for w o m e n office w o r k e r s
In finance,
insurance,
a n d r e a l estate,
and in
t r a n s p ortation, communi c a t i o n , an d o t h e r p u b l i c util i t i e s .
N e a r l y thr e e - f o u r t h s of the plant
w o r k e r s in a l l i n dustries w e r e o n a 4 0 - h o u r w e e k l y schedule.
F e w e r t h a n 6 p e r c e n t had s c h e d ­
uled workweeks
of less t h a n 40 hours;
a l m o s t 10 p ercent,
chiefly in manufacturing and
in
transpo r t a t i o n , c o m munication, a n d other pub l i c u t i l ities, w e r e o n a 4 8 - h o u r w e e k (table 2 9 ).
Paid holidays
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a i d holidays w e r e in e f f e c t for p r a c t i c a l l y a l l office w o r k e r s and
for over 90 p e r c e n t of the
plant w o r k e r s .
A m a j o r i t y o f b o t h office
a n d p l a n t w o r k e r s we r e
in firms
t h a t p r o v i d e d f r o m 6 to 8 p a i d h o l i d a y s a y e a r
(table 30).
A m o n g the
exceptions
w e r e the finance, insurance, euid r e a l estate g r o u p in w h i c h a m a j o r i t y o f office w o r k e r s w e r e
in firms
p r o v i d i n g 13 p a i d holidays,
a n d t r ansportation,
c o mmunication,
a n d other
public
u t i lities in w h i c h h a l f the w o r k e r s w e r e e n t i t l e d t o 9 d ays annually.
P a i d va c a t i o n s
A l m o s t a l l P h i l a d e l p h i a a r e a firms
a l l o w e d p a i d v a c a t i o n s t o b o t h office a n d plant
w o r k e r s a f t e r a y e a r of service.
A 2 -week p e r i o d w a s
t y p i c a l for office w o r k e r s .
Although
1 of e v e r y 4 of these w o r k e r s w e r e in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s that p r o v i d e d o n l y 1 w e e k a f t e r a year
of service, n e a r l y 9 o f © v e r y 10 w e r e in e s t a b l i s h n © n t s t hat gra n t e d 2 w e e k s a f ter 2 years of
service. T y p i c a l v a c a t i o n prov i s i o n s for p l a n t w o r k e r s w a s 1 w e e k a f t e r a y ear of service and
2 w e e k s a f t e r 5 years* service. A c o n siderable n u m b e r of w o r k e r s , 2 out of 3 office and 1 out
o f 3 plant, w e r e in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g p a i d vacations" a f t e r 6 m o n t h s o f service. I n the
finance, insurance,
a n d r e a l estate group,
9 o f e v e r y 10 office w o r k e r s w e r e in firms w h i c h
g r a n t e d p a i d v a c a t i o n s of f r o m 1 to 2 w e e k s a f t e r 6 m o n t h s of service (table 3 1 ).
P a i d s ick leave

E s t a b l i s h e d m i n i m u m e ntrance rates forlhe employment of inexperienced plant workers
w a s pa r t of the formalized rate structure
in Philadelphia are a firms em p l o y i n g ab o u t 95 p e r ­
cent of the p l a n t w o r k e r s
in al l industries (table 28).
A l t h o u g h e ntrance
rates set b y in ­
d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r a nged f r o m
less than 50 cents to more t h a n $ 1 .5 0 a n hour, 75 cents
w a s the m i n i m u m rate in firms furnishing almost a fourth o f the total e m p l o y m e n t . The 75-cent
r ate w a s a l s o the lowest
rep o r t e d for establishments in manufacturing,
w h o l esale trade, and
transportation,
conwunication,
a nd other public utilities.
M i n i m u m entrance
rates of less
t h a n 75 cents a n hou r w e r e found in retail trade
firms w i t h ne a r l y h a l f of the employment in
the industry,
a nd in service establishments employing two-thirds of
the w o r k e r s in services
studied.

F o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s far p a i d s i c k leave a f t e r a y e a r of service w e r e limited to e s t a b ­
lishments e m p l o y i n g a b o u t a third of the office w o r k e r s a n d less t h a n a t e n t h
o f the plant
workers.
The n u m b e r o f days of p a y
g r a n t e d to e m p l o y e e s for a b s e n c e
due to sickness varied
c o n s i d e r a b l y a m o n g the indust r i a l groupings a n d a m o n g the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in each g r oup (table
32).
A r e l a t i v e l y large p r o p o r t i o n of the w o r k e r s , b o t h p l a n t a n d office, in-the t r a n s p o r t a ­
tion,
c o m m u nication,
a n d other pub l i c u t i l i t i e s g r o u p w e r e in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
t h a t provided
r a t h e r l i b e r a l p l a n s for p a i d sick leave a f t e r a y e a r of service,
as d i d firms in the ret a i l
trade group, a l t h o u g h service r e q u irements in this group w e r e u s u a l l y greater.
Nonproduction bonuses

Supplementary

Wage

Practices

S h i f t d i f f e r e n tials
I n the selected ma n u f a c t u r i n g industries in w h i c h p r o d u c t i o n Jobs w e r e studied, the
p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s
empl o y e d on second shifts
varied from 12.8 p e r c e n t In the paint
and
v a r n i s h firms to 2 1 . 7 pe r c e n t in w o o l e n a nd w o r s t e d mills (table 27).
Fewer workers were e m ­
p l o y e d o n third or other
shifts w i t h the largest percentage
(5 .5 ) in the paint
and varnish
industry.
A l l establishments o p e rating extra shifts paid shift d i fferentials w i t h the e x c e p ­
t i o n of a few w o o l e n and w o r s t e d mills
a nd ferrous foundries.
In w o o l e n a nd w o r s t e d mills,
seco n d - s h i f t w o r k e r s w e r e typi c a l l y p aid differentials
a m o u n t i n g to 5 cents or less a n hour,
w h e r e a s t h i r d - shift w o r k e r s u s u a l l y received between 5 a n d 10 cents, tyorkers in the paint and
v a r n i s h p l a n t s studied w e r e p a i d a 5 -cent differential o n second shifts a n d 10 cents on third
shifts. • In the m e t a l w o r k i n g industries studied, the differential c o m m o n l y p a i d to a l l e x t r a ­
shift w o r k e r s w a s 10 percent o f the day rate.
Scheduled workweek
H a l f of the w o m e n office w o r kers in all
industries w e r e on a 4 0 - h o u r w e e k and over
a f i f t h w e r e scheduled to w o r k 3 7 ^ hours
a w e e k in May 1950.
The 37 £ - k o u r w e e k w a s the most




A l m o s t h a l f of the office w o r k e r s a n d n e a r l y two-f i f t h s of the p l a n t w o r k e r s in the
P h i l a d e l p h i a a r e a r e c e i v e d some type of n o n p r o d u c t i o n bonus, u s u a l l y in the f o r m of a Christmas
or y e a r - e n d b o n u s .
The l argest p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e d these bonuses w e r e office
emp l o y e e s in w h o l e s a l e trade an d non- o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s in r e t a i l trade (table 3 3 ).
I nsurance a n d p e n s i o n pl a n s
S e v e n t e e n out o f e v ery
20 office a n d p l a n t w o r k e r s w e r e In establi s h u e n t s having
some f o r m of insurance or p e n s i o n p l a n f i n a n c e d w h o l l y or in p a r t b y the e m p l o y e r (table 3 4 ).
Li f e insurance,
the m o s t p o p u l a r type o f b e n e f i t p l a n re p o r t e d ,
w a s p r o v i d e d b y firms w i t h
n e a r l y thr e e - f o u r t h s o f the office
a n d p l a n t empl o y m e n t .
H e a l t h Insurance w a s available in
establishments
a c c o u n t i n g f o r ov e r h a l f
of the p l a n t w o r k e r s
a n d a l m o s t two-fifths
of the
office w o r k e r s .
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n plans c o v e r e d a h i g h e r p r o p o r t i o n of the
office t han p l a n t e m ­
plo y m e n t .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g 11 of e v e r y 2 0 office w o r k e r s c o m p a r e d w i t h 7 of e v ery 20
p l a n t w o r k e r s h a d a d o p t e d p e n s i o n plans. These p r o p o r t i o n s w e r e m u c h h i g h e r in transportation,
communication, a n d other p u b l i c utilities, a n d w e r e l owest In service industries.

7
Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings i f and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations b y industry division 2/)

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

2j

$
$
8
$
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35-00

K
Number Weekly
Weekly Under
sched­ Hourly
of
and
workers uled earnings earnings
under
hours

£
*
25.00

27.50 3-Q.oo. 22.J0 35.00 37.50

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
1
1
1—
1
$
1
?
1
1
1
1
$
3 7 . 5 0 4 o .o o 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 7 . 5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 95-00 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0

1 ---- 1
1----

?---$
*
7 5 . 0 0 8 0 .0 0
85.OC
and
4 o .o o 4 2 . 5 0 4 5 . 0 0 4 L 5 2 . 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 55.-OQ 5 L 5 Q 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 . 5 0 75.O O 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 ovei

6 7 .5 0

7 0 .0 0

$

7 2 .5 0

Men
Bookkeepers, h a n d .............................
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable g o o d s ..................... ......
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services ................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .......
Clerks, a c c o unting............................
Manufacturing..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable g o o d s .... ...................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................
Clerks, file, class A 3 / ......................
Nonmanufacturing...........................
Clerks, file, class B 3 / .......................
Nonmanufacturing
.......................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Clerks, general ...............................
Manufacturing..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................

See footnotes at ^ d

913036 0 - 50 -2




446
125
59
66
321
96
151
57
37
1,292
597
321
276
695
223
94
278

39.5
39.0
38.5
uo.o
39.5
40.5
38.5
41.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0
38.5
38.5

$1.65
1.87
1.90
1.83
1.57
1.33
1.65
1.63
1.04
1.41
1.46
l.4 l
1.53
1.38
1.56
1.31
1.25

$65.00
73.00
73.00
73.00
62.00
54.00
63.50
67.00
4i.oo
55.00
57.00
55.00
59.50
53.00
61.00
50.50
48.00

77
*3
28
7«
72
57

l .4 l
1.13
1.12

55-00
44.50
43.50
31.50
31.00

552
229
93

39.0
39-5
39.0
37.0
37.0
36.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
35.5

162

Uo.o

829

277

18 9
88

•*5

.84
.85
l.4 s
1.46
1.43
1.50
1.49
1.49
1.59
1.6 l

3O.5O

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
-

-

-

-

16

-

-

-

-

•
•
-

-

16
16

-

bi

25

-

2
2
-

bi

23
21
2

-

2
-

4
11
-

-

-

2

11

33
19
19
l4
5
1
8

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

8
8

35
35

-

-

-

—

2

11

-

-

8

10
10
13
11

30

7

-

6
38
18
17
1
20
5
2
5

25

8

-

-

-

3

6
6
5

*
*

-

59 .0 0
5 6 .5 0

*
•

6

18
2
1
1
16
1

64.50

-

-

-

-

-

6

6
-

13
38
7
1
6
31
6

2
3
3

17
-

19

2
2
11

-

-

-

7

19

11

-

-

-

55
20
9

94
55
17
3*
39
5

112
3?
3^
5
73
31
31

1
1
1

-

53
26
23
3
27
3
23

2b
1
23
19

-

19

13
-

13

-

-

-

13
9

-

7

7

6

-

b

1
2b

-

1

1

-

112
65
56
9
to

84
50
25
25
3^

54
30
7

-

2?
24
5

13
5
8
11
10

15

-

93
54
31
23
39
5

b

6
28
5
l
20

101
35
26
9
66
to
12
9

to

18

17

—

1

2

2

-

1

2

34

1

1
1

1

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

24

to
15

15

67
23
10
13
44
8

11

3
33

11

33

2

12

-

9

1

3

2

2
2

5
-

l
-

8

2

-

l

7
Z
25
7

25

6

9
6
10

15

12
7
7

55
22

lb

-

9

3?
24
20

l

■
■

3

b
ib
2
b

2

3

9

8

3

-

5

-

8
33
21

13
3

42
21
21

10

-

3

~

33
4
2
2
29
5

10

47

to

21

28

26

21
7
15

3
18
-

9
15

9

1

-

7
7

1

6

113
37
11
26
76
17
7
29

35
6
6

46
4
4

—

17
5
1
4
12
4
6

l

3
3

2

2

1

22

24

-

4

17

21
17
3

5

1
18
12
1

13

8
8

15

-

—

58.50
57.50
57.00
58.50
59.00

16
-

io4
17
11
6

51
23

n

29

18
7

60
17

11
11
5
3

9

2

57

-

-

13

b

61
4l
34
7
20
9
5

7

1

5

62
18

ib
b
bb

8

19

ib

5

5

-

12
3
27
10

—

-

-

2

-

-

-

25
22
9
13
3

39
19
8
11
20
20

80
36
13
23
44
4l

19
9

18

10
10
-

2
16
12
10
•

-

-

-

2

3

-

3

—

-

-

-

30

m
m
68
16
13
3
52
30
17
3

-

57
14

126
28

8

6

6

22

-

_

17
2

25

2

_

43

9*

27
4

18
4

15
9
3

10

76

3

4
3
l
21

10
—
5

«.
10

8

8

-

8

-

•
-

—

8
5
3

2

-

2

-

of table.

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8
Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average earnings 1 / and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations b y industry division 2/)

Sex, occupation, and industry*division

2j

Average
Number of workers receiving straiLght-tjLme weekly earnings of J
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
Number Weekly
f
1
?
f
?
?
Weekly Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4o.oo 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50
of
sched- Hourly
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
25.00 under
hours
27.50 30.00 22i52. 35.00 3LJLQ-. 4o.oo 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00

1
1---- 1
i
$
70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85 .0C
72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

and
ovei

Men - Continued
Clerks, order .......... ............. .........
Manufacturing.... ..........................
Durable goods
....................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nnnmpmi’ t irMn£ ~ \J .......................................................................................
faft’
Wholegfllft trpd« . ,«...... ...............
Detail trade ............................

687
285
67
218
1+02

Clerks, pay r o l l ................. .......... .
Mftrni-Par*taring -...................... .......
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ............ ........ .
Nonmanufaeturing
............. ...... .
tfknlaaala

289
220

Clerk— typists ..................................
Manufacturing ...............................
VAumoniifci
niF 7 /
__
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
i ti 11 ti a i
i
t

128
77
81
X

H
26

3

$ 52.00

39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
39.5

1.1+7
1.1*6
1.1*0

57.50

1
*

57.00
54.50

2

1.57

60.50
58.50
62.50

39.0

1.08

296 39. R
47 40.0

123
97

m
m

$ 1.32
1.46
l.5l
1.43
1.23
1.22
1.3^

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

1.1*8
1.58

2

57.50
59.50
56.50

2

3

*

3

48.50
48.00

2

53.50

M

6

mm

37
25

2
mm
mm

2

«
•

_

—
.

mm

J

1.06

42.00
4l.oo

1.09

43.50

XP
JC

41.0

1 11

46.50

46
28

39.0
X« R

qi

y°»y

.88

1R * RO
yy yu
34.00

4
4

Office boys ............... ....................
Manufacturing...... .......................
TViK . T 1a car* a
\
irn«*i^**Y *nV 1 A C f r da
Ptt
IT n w m .T i n f or'flirln ST
. . . . .
W* a 1 Aaol a f.r*oda

892
319
17R
A1
144
R7x

38.0
39.5

33.00

2

130

38.0
UO . R
* tv J

Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication*, and other public
«f 414 flag
fiamrt aai

282

36.0

.87
.86
.86
.86
.86
.84
•7R
ty
•89

T /*
t
...

J

Stenographers, general J
Manufacturing

........... .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .

See footnotes at e nd of table




y yy*y
xq
yy*y
j17.0
1• v

y

-IQ R
r

18 R
y°*y

xp
*
7Q
1

17. y
yi R

44

10.0
*

J
ks

•

ho.o

22
19
X
j
/

jx
j1
52

34.00

32.00
32.00
10 R0
y' *
32.00

jv*

.94
.85

36.00
32.00

1.33
1.31

53.00
52.50

2
2

52
21
10
21

.

18
6
12
88
86

2
2

in
XU
R
y

ll*6
11
6
R

IS

135
21

192

6

18
70

108

89

JJ

26

16
62
a.

tm

6

5
y
76
37
11
24
39
21
k
ll*

53

10
2
s
*3

y

7
i
—
w.

12

6
6

2

34 .OO
3H .00

1
28
21

106

4

1

3
y

2
2

38-5
40.0

"4 4*4 M
1
4«a
!
tTaninowrfo r>frtiT* 1n u>

29
1

1

7

25
18

7
1

108
53
lo

XT
yi

5

1*4
1*2

3

22

1

20
2

1

11

5

15

y

R

M
y

1
*
1

16

69

1
1

26
11

15

l*+3
3

q
y

18

6

10

1*4

7

8
g

19
jy

6
6

26
13

0
c.

8
y

2
2

25
20

2

20

55

1*0

21
10
2
8
11

4

l

20
15
12

X
y
R

16
4
12

16
7

q

18

3

R
y

4

5

4

2

O
£
5

9
9

11

13

4

6
1
y

11

2
q
y

1
1

PX
i4

13

I
X
9

c.
0
c.

20
11

10
10

1
1
1

5

0

1

3

R
y
c
5

1
1

48
31
12
19
17

J

Q

16
4
1

4
4
4

3
12
c
5

R
y

2
3

1
1

l
l

2

2

1

1

9*

19
3
3

1

2

16
7
1

1

2

53

4

1

2

q
17
Ai

y

5

6
6

13
13

16
X

«»

mm

O
T»

6
7

2

•

-

1
mm

4
4

l

1
1

7
7

5

5

X

1X
xo
xo

1
X

18

9
9

12

2

jx

7
i
7

2

3

10
1

9

15

R
2

ll
22
15

24
24

y

4

4l
19

y

y

79

32

52
28
10
18
24
21
3

3

52
52

23
«3
3
80

1R
A «/

6

1

10
4

R
J

11
**
10
2
8
3*+
19
15

5
5

4
1

1
1

1
l

17
17
17
x(

3

2
0
£
1
X

9

(Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued

^

(Average earnings
and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations by industry division 2/)

3
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Zj

Number of workers receiving strai ght-tj.me weekly earnings of -

$
¥
Number Weekly
Under 25.00 27.50
of
Weekly
sched­ Hourly
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
25.00 under
hours

8
$
$
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
1
$
1
$
$
1 ---- $
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1 0.00 1*2.50 1 5.00 **7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 $
*
*
85.00

27.50 30.00 32.50 35-op 3Z-.-5.Q 1 0.00 12 .50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00
*
*

and
over

Men - Continued
Tabulating-machine operators..................
Manufacturing..............................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....

310

39.0
39.5
H5
66 $ 0.0
**9 39.0
195
k-T

38.5
40 0

129

38.0

61*9
297

38.5
39.0

♦ 1.33
1.1*3
I .36
1.50

$ 52.00

1.30
1 SI
1.11

50.00

56.50
51*. 50
58.50

-

7P 50
1 2.00
*

-

1.06
1.09
1.05
1.13
1.05

1 1.00
*

_

1*2.50
12.00
*
1 3.00
*
10.00
*

-

1.05
1.04
.97
.97
.9$
.95

-

1

16

-

-

1

16

13
-

15
-

13

15

9

1
-

1
6

27
7

6
1
20

-

1

15

13

15

6

20

2

59

$5

62

-

90
55

205

-

26

25

k

11

1
3

22

7
l
*
ll*

23

11

k
7

12

20
11
$
7
9
X

21
12

6

3

9
3
9

19

16

Ik

2

k

1
1

20
8
6
2
12

2
2
2

ll
% 8
3
5
3

3

-

3

$
u

1

3

2

_

2

5

«.

k

2
1

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
2

Ik

7
5

20

12

11

k

3

3

-

53
35

32

XV

30
30

16

k

k
k

10
20

2

k

(

■7

6

8
2
1
1
6
£
0

8
2
1
1
6

c
b

9

3
2
1
6

c
b

15
k

1
3
11
11

9
3
y

2
2

3

2

6
c
O

-

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) ...........
Manufacturing..... ........................
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Services ..............................................................................................
Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine) j / ....
Nonmanufacturing jj/ ........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....

120 40.0
177 38.0
352 38.0
167 37.5
70

40.0

HP

39.5

1*3
U2

1*0.5
36.5

Bookkeepers, h a n d .....................................................................................
Manufacturing ........................................................................................
Durable goods ...............................................................................
Nondurable goods ......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing
........................
Wholesale trade .........................
Retail trade ............................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Services ..............................................................................................

693
174
39
135
519

38.0

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ......................
Manufacturing ...................... . . ............................................................
Durable goods ...............................................................................
Nondurable goods ........................
Nonmanufacturing
....... .
Wholesale trade .........................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....

1*85
127
6?
64
358
ii*i

See footnotes at end of table.




266 39.5

232
56
71

138

195

39.0
38.5
38.5
38.5
37.0
39.5

!.39
1.42
1.36
1.42
1.35
1.32
1.29
1.39
1.38

38.5
39.0
40.0

1.10
1.2U
1 .0s

39.0
w

Js*

39.5

38.0
38.5

39.0
38.0

i.k i

1.05
1.09
1.01

12
2
10

-

-

-

-

-

2

39.50
41.50

-

-

-

-

-

2

k

38.50
38.50
38.00

1
1
1

k
k
k

21
21
12

29
29
17

3*1.50

-

-

9

53.00
55.50
51*.50
55.50

-

-

-

52.00

51.00
49.50
51.50
5»i.50

$7
23

22
17

5

5
23

25
32

2

-

$2
ko

12

30
9

2

1

22

26

50
g

29
35

$2

33
29
ll
18

155

k

18

28

«.

66

1

-

21

_

—

_

_
-

-

-

10

-

33
33
25

36
35
29

52
50
30

12
12
12

8

9

k
k

9
9

-

-

k

3

-

_

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

133
26

17
2
2

112

22

16

59

15

6$
5$

1

6

21
20
16
2

6

15

59

16

k
k

2

-

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2
2

—

—

—

—

1

-

-

-

53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
16

-

-

-

-

-

1*2.50

-

-

-

53
21
32

53

37
j1
37

*

k
2

39

-

-

15

10

55
21

-

k

-

11

5

19

ko

63

6
-

39
7
27

jj

5

-

k

6
12
22

1
58
18

2
1$
-

1
8

k
kl
25
25

2
2$
107
59
K)
10
28

k
k

99

-

l6

16

?3
Ul

3$

16
18
-

9

118
18
3
15
100
51
18

•

2
5

15

7
6

31

21

26

12

k

6
6
q
j

22
R

J

22
26
2

-

6
1

kg

-

13
18

-

1

9

18
9
3
6

J
Q

l

-

-

-

-

-

__

k

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

k
-

5

-

-

2
1

15

-

-

«

-

•

-

12
2

4

35

-

-

0

3

9

-

-

\

Ik

-

2

*2.50
*
18.50
*
1 3.00
*
53.50
10.50
*

38.50

30

-

1

lU

k
10
8

_

tt
0

1
7
51

_

-

-

-

16

39

9

7
f

3

1&
10

I

I

7
9

18
21
21

9

3

-

16

1
5

9
ll
15

•

_

$
5

_

—

_

1

—

—

2

2
-

l

-

17
17

-

—
,

—

17

1

-

6
8

—
15

—

..

..

2

-

c

b

3
J
5
_

_

2

9

2
15

_

l
_

1
1
1

wm

mm

10

Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations hy industry division 2/)

Humber of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of
Average
$
J
¥
I
%---- I---- ?—
$
1—
?
$
V
I
1—
F
1
F
Number Weekly
60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 $
*
*
Weekly Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 to).00 1 2.50 1 5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55-00
sched­ Hourly
of
85.00
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
and
25.00 under
hours
over
*
50.00 5 L ^ 0 55.00 51.-59. 60.00 62.50 65.00 §L51 70.00 12.5 0 JStfio 80.00 85.00
*
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 1«).00 1 2.50 1 5.00

F

F

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2/

Women - Continued
Bookkeeping^cachine operators, class S .......
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing
......................
Wholesale trade .......................
Detail trade ......... .................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e .....
Services..............................
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer
type) .....................................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing
......................
Wholesale trade .......................
Detail trade ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...........................
Calculating-machine operator, (other than
Comptometer type) .........................
Manufacturing
.........................
nondurable goods ......................
Honmanufaoturing
......................
finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Clerks, accounting...................
Manufacturing.......................
/
Durable goods .....................
Nondurable g o o d s ..... ............
Nonmanufacturing.....................
Wholesale t r a d e .......... ........
Detail trade..................
Finance, insurance, and real estate
Transportation (excluding railroads)
communication, and other public
utilities ......................
Services .........................

See footnotes at end of table.




1,663 39.0
222 39.0
99 39.0
123 39.5
1 ,w n 38.5

285

190
913
35

1.232
503
289

214
729

l&k
**57

38

£

9.0
.5
I .5
S

£

.0

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
38-5

F

%
2,921

837

517
320
2.08U
527
5l»*
808

1£

1.12

>
13.50

1 .0U

11.00
*

•95

36.50
39.50

1.01

.85
•91
1.06
1.06
1.12
1.11
1.12

266

288

6

101

$37.00
42.00

6

1
101

260

3
3

282

3*1.50

iS

52

35.00
1*2.50

86

15H

32

21
16

101
10

22
27
3^9

213

17
7

3?
l*
l

10

18
181
77
18
77
5

51

26

5
18
15

2

192

167

112

87
5

20

88

203

33

52
27
25
151

92
29

*13-50

5

6

ll

91

55

•97

10.00
*
11.50
*
38.00

88

ll
30

.96

37.00

3

10

1.25

l.cfc

37.5
37.5

1.12
1.12
1.00
1.00

39.50
42.00

62

56
2l
*

i57
63
18

lc
f
8
6
to

35.5

38.O
38.5
38.5
38.5
38.0
38.5
39-0
40.0
37.0

I .03

1.05

l.Oi*

1.12
1.10
1.17

1.00

1.01
.95

1.00

38.5

1.27

38.5

l.oi*

10
1

20

81

83
25
1*9

31

68

18

1

81*
51*
30

2
2
U

18

Ik

38.50

lJ

38.00

10

38.00
37.00
19.00
*
10.00
*

63
73
15

2<

% %
50
1

u5

13

8
12

2
zk

10
10
57.50

6

36

8

28

7

21

10

2

1

12

10

18

2

12

13

8

5

*»9
5

10

12

61*
37
18
19
27

79
30
18

t*
o
31

10

3

3

5
3

H

1

3

3

32

to. 00

to). 00
* 3.00
*
U 2.50
to*.50
3s. 50
39.50

i
*

10

8

1 7.00
*

38.0

56

iol*

27
253
7

t*
o

238

1

1 1.50
*
1 1 .5°
*
14.00
*

398
1*9

62

5>*

20
13

6 * 37.5
>

222

$ 0.95
1.08

»
*

i27

16
16
i
*

111

6
1
1

21

1

21
20

1*21

303

1*85

1*8

56

15
*

20

3
373

i
*

39

58

11*

?6

247

103
131

117

17

to

27

3
3
18

15
15
33

20

12
266
81*

12

1*2
83

122

21
13

**

68

16

3§
97

182

172

102

73

23
1*9

39

3

8

13
7

2
2

1*

315

260

158

66

118

87
27

67
51
197
89

U

26
26

60
173
25

£

1

2l*8
73
23
50
175
55

20
to*

10
1*6

98
1*9

6l

38

t
o*

22

17
?7

12

1*9
5

32

9
29

16

8

1*0
6

12
10

3

3

6

11

13

20

10

1*0

21

1*0

19

62

31
*

11

1
1

2

13
9

11
8
2

1*
27
12
5

1
1
1

17
13

l

12

1*

5
5

n
Table 3 .— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations hy industry division

2j)

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2/

Number of workers
$
*
£
$
$
$
*
t
Number Weekly
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00
Weekly
sched­ Hourly
of
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
25.00 under
hours
27.50 10.00 32-50 35.00 37*5° 4o.oo 42.50 45.00 47.50

receiving stiraight►-time weekly earn! ngs oJ
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
*
1
$—
I—
47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

$
85.00
and
orer

Women - Continued
Clerks, file, class A .......................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing J\ J ......................
Wholesale trade .......................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services ..............................

569
204
144

60
365

105

19S
3*

Clerks, file, class B .......................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods T __............... .,
T f v i i o la m o d s ......... ...........
f/nbrb
.
ITmunormfBftbirimr T/ ____________ _________
Who!e sale trade
Betail trade ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real est a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .T.. ....... .......... T__TT

2,820
39^
299
92
j*2 U29
211

1.05
.99

38.50

1.08
1.05

40.00
4i.oo

—
-

.85

32.00
37.00

110
-

38.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
38.0
39.0
37.0
39.0

$1.06
1.10

$4i.oo

1.06

42.00
46.50
40.00

3*.5
39-5

40.0
79.0
JJ9 W
38.0

1.21

43.50

17.00
36.OO

.
.
-

266
-

—

3
3
3

626
2

—,

55

8

3
,5
47
33
7
1
870
98
77
■1

1,242

19.0
ho. 5
37.0

.91
.92
.82
.81
•75
.84

121

17.0
j\ •v

1.08

ho. 00

Clerks, general .............................
Manufacturing .............................
Durable goods . ......................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing.........................
Wholesale trade .......................
Pa tail trade ______ _____ _____________
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...........................
Services................... ....... .

2,483

3«.5
39.5
ho.o

1.13
1.19

43.50
47.00

39.5
38.0
38.5
19. R

1.19
1.09
1.17
.86

37.5

1.13

46.50
47.00
41.50
45.00
34.OO
42.50

37.5
300 39.0

1.16
.97

43.50
38.00

-

—

•6

Clerks, o r d e r ...............................
Manufacturing............................
Durable g o o d s .........................
Nondurable g o o d s ..................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing
.........................................
lfVinl aboI a fci»nA
a
. . .

775
251
35

1.05

4i.oo

1.22
1.18
1.25
.97
1.0*5

47.00

•
-

15
-

-

-

-

6
6

524

39.0
38.5
39.0
38.0
39.5

15

32

89

192

ho.o

.84

10

XI

14
64

Pat*41 fa*oAa

See footnotes at end of table




216

791
326
465
1.692
373
195
361
J

.

1.16

J

463

216

289 iq R

31.00
12.50
30.50

31.00

46.00
47.50

38.50

41.50
11.50

47
h
h
*3
21

19
-

321
50
19

123
33
29
h
90
78
12
229
59
15
24
170
11
■*
0
32
89

36
18
12

6

266

20
-

21
22
73

[
n
-

8
8
2

17

1

250

157

62
13

129

239

121
78
^3

97
64
33
32

82
4l
4i
157
50

302

174
r

53

175
3?
ih

22
19
40

29
8
21
273
^9
52
4o

16
35
123
13
23
36

19
h2

108
24

71

m
m

-

27
32
-

1

S
4
60
95

3?
ih
3

11
25

m
u

25
C
-J

35
2

33
36
1

&

8

7

6

h

2
1

5
5
3

2

h

2
-

2
2

-

-

5
5

1
1
1
-

5

7

2
2
2

—
- I

-

-

7
5
2
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

36

2

10

51
23

7

24
14

1

10

10
26

23
28

1
6

6

26

5

1
1
1
-

1

m
m
m
m
m
m

_
_
_

•

-

—
_

-

-

-

-

•

.
.
-

.
.

_
-

_
_

10
—
_
10
10

2
1
1
1
-

.
.

_

R
J

ish
22
20
2

26

_
-

6

S1
'!

188

-

1

1

53
-

162

48

_

pi

3

2
2

1

21

10

8

9

13

1

13

10

3
27

172

2h

80
32
28

30
15
7

-

7l
ij
22

36
467

h
-

5
7
h

3
17
17

6

188
100
85
15
88
R

ll6
78
hoo

56

5

8
16

9

10

9

110
37
2h

21
772
1 1c-

271

26

2h
19

63
25

h

110

28
12
h

55
23
19
4
32
10
4
17

18
18
-

2
624

11

111
h8
hh
h

11

28
-

1

7
1
2

-

15
9

2
2
2

-

1

_
_

J

4j4
1%
36
113
285
96

_

_

74
44
6
38
30

33

49
95
3

39

25

23

28

5^

7

36
15

97
37

16

5^

25
*3

h
-

38
15

154
35
5
30
119
116
1

80
10
3
7
7?
56

68
h6
3
^3
22
19

87
4
1
3
83
70
1V

33

16

8

129
1

X
j

1

7
(

22
9
13
ll

q

65
37
lh

66
2h

23

13
h2

28
11

11

~

12

27
5

6

10

5

1

22
-

11

20
-

2
15

19

-

32
18
2

9
3

1
1
1

1
1

6
6
6

-

.16

3
6

1

-

ih

12

-

-

2

•

1

1
-

1
-

•
-

1
-

-

-

•

•
-

-

-

16
16

3*

£

1
—
1

-

2

1
_

m

m

-

m

m

_

—

-

_

16

•
-

-

-

12

Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average earnings 1/ and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations by industry division 2/)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

2j

Number of workers receiving s1iraighij-time
Average
$
$
*
$
1
*
$
$
$
?
$
1
Number Weekly
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4o.oo 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00
sched­ Hourly
Weekly
of
and
workers uled earnings earnings $
25.00 under
hours
27.50 *
50.00 32.50 35.00 37-50 4o.oo 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50

weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
$
1
1
1
$
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

and
over

Women - Continued
Clerks, pay roll ............................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
ironmanufacturing.........................

530

39.0

53 4o 0
187 39»5
34 38.0
137
§9 &

$1.12

1.13

1.15
1.12
1.06
1.1*5
i.o 4
1.05
1.1*5

1.08

Clerk-typists ...............................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing.........................
Wholesale trade .......................
Retail trade .........................
Finance, insurance, and real est a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...........................
Services ..............................

4,285 3«.5
1,699 39.0
1.190 39.5
509 38.5
2.586 38 .O
653 39.0
223 39.5
1.178 36.5
124 38.O
408 39.5

1.0 9

Duplicating-machine operators................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing j ......................
j/
Finance, insurance, and real esta t e ....

199 39.0
94 39.0
65 39.5
29 38.5
105 39.0
37 38 .O

Key-punch operators.........................
Manufacturing....... .....................
Durable goods .........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing J\J ..................... .
j
Wholesale t r a d e .......................
Retail t r a d e ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real est a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities •....... ............. .....

See footnotes at end of table,




•92
•99

.97
1.01
.88
.86
.82
.89

$43.50

44.00
45.00
43.50

42.00
46.00
41.00
40.00
O O
O O
• •

He tail trade ......... .................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
1*<H ao
Services ..............................

39.0

644 39.0
246 39.0
398 39.0

35.50
38.50
38.50
39.00

33.50
33.50
32.50
32.50

-

2
-

-

2

5
5

73
53
5

4
1

S

-

146

7

l4
5

32
12
20
ll4
21
32
17

5

2

TO
12

338 119 4
50 327
32 248
IS
79
2SS 867
3 307
95
32
244 277

476
198
179
19
278
6l
P
l6 l

ll
177

3
28
27
17
11
6

S

49
25
20
5
24
5

24

—

71

S
O

104

-

-

24

so
22
6
52

96
14
13
1
82
21
S
4S

—

2

m
m

m
m

-

-

3

169

-

-

3

169

-

-

1
2

10
155

41.50
34.50

-

-

-

4

9

• 94
.95
.92
.99
.92
.96

36.50

—

-

16

-

-

38.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.O
38.5
39.5
37.0

1.0 3
1.0 5
1.0 3
1.0 9

39.50
4 i.s o
4o.oo

.97
.95

43.00
38.00
43.50
38.50
35.00

42 39.5

.99

39.oo

1,0 39

371
224
147
668
193
89
3*3

.87

1.00
1.13

37.00
36.50
38.00
36.00
36.50

4S
20

50
22
2S
21

-

—

-

24

16

58
54
4
46
-

5
4l

10

4

5

677
240
177
63

113

68

26

42
*5

180

114

91
25
66
89

55
36
19

13

3f
14

5l
12
12

1

29
10

15
c
16

396

442

121
94
49
45
27

16

228
135
93

k

203
89

114

168

239

54
5
67

51
17
95

30
70

10

25
51

S

20

p
6
5
1
13
8

35
P
14

24
10
6
4
14
9

92
40
24

36

148
67
22
*5
81
12
19
4l

3

9

437
160

31
146

s

6
2
12
—

1S6
26

12
l4

160

44
15
S4
17

32

16

52
9
4

9
12
3

-

155
93

V,
66
62
1

39
5
in

i
1 S5
127
74
53

58
12
4
4

84

90

53
23
31
5
S
4

47
2?
24
*3
12
9
2

13
l

l4

30

153
127
114
13
26

70
48
44
4
22

5

8
7

16

1
3
m
m

12
45

42
3?
4
3

33

23

4
4
4

2

.
.

2

-

-.

-

11
6

-

-

m
m
-

13

10
10

-

-,

-

4
4

_

-

22

5
5
3
2

-

5

—

-

1

•

3

.
.

-

31
15

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

• -

-

3
3

l

-

-

-

—
-

_
-

-

-

—
-

13
13

6
7

33

28
6

9

0

4
2
3

-

2
-

-

6
5
5

2
12
11
11

-

-

3

1

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

1
-

1

1
10

5

10

17

3

—

-

-

1
-

3

3
3
3

-

1

-

-

-

—

•-

-

-

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*3

28
23
11
12
5
5

14
9

23
1

5

11

-

-

-

-

-

24
19
5
19
17

14

-

-

-

-

-

39
81
53
6
30
15

47
35
20
15
12
3
2
1

9
5
5

1
22
22

-

11
11

-

- ■
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

*
•

"

'

1

6

2
12

5

113
60

6
32
2
2
-

2

1

10

4

11
11

—

«
•

5
5

-

m
m

13

Ta>la 3.— O m C l OCOOP17IQVS - Continued

(Average earnings l/ and veefcly scheduled hour* for
aolaoted occupations l y industry division 2/)
>

Saa footnataa at and af table




14.
fable 3 .— OITIOI OCCaPAflOHS - Continued
(Average •Amingi 1/ and weakly scheduled hours for
selected ooo^aTians by industry diTlsion 2/)

Sax, occupation, and industry division 2/

lumber of workers receiving sibralght-time
Average
i
*
6
i
6
1
6
9
*
f
f
number Weekly
Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 ? 5 .oo 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00
Weekly
sched­ Hourly
of
and
workers uled aarnings earnings 6
25.00 under
hours
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 *0.00 *2.50 * 5.00 * 7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 .5O

weekly earniLngs ol
*
*
$
*
8
f
t
57.50 60.00 L .50 I5.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00

60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 00.00 05.00

$
05.0c
and
over

Women - Oontinuad
Stenographers, taohnical.......... ..........
Manufacturing............................
Durable g o o d s .........................
nondurable g o o d s ..... .................
Honmanufacturing J j j ......................
finance, insurance, and real estate ....

*
*

1.04

*2.50
38.00
39.50

- '
—

S
s
3
5

1.05
.*3

*2.00
3*. 50

—

•
-

9

17

39.00
40.50

-

m
m

m
m

6

22

-

M
m

6

-

-

-

1

22
5

17

♦*7.50
*9.00
*6.00

38.0
62 38.0
*5 37.5
39.5
39.5

1.0*

1 .1 k

*1.00
*5.00
*6.00

135
175

40.0

51.00
ta.oo

37.50

k

Switchboard operators .......................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods .........................
nondurable goods ......................
Honaanufacturing.........................
Wholesale trade .......................
Betail trade ..........................
finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
coaaunioation, and other public
utilities ...........................
Services ..............................

1,284
237
109
128
1.047

133

*1.5

Switchboard operator-receptionists ...........
W«wwf»fttnHt>g .............. .......... .
Durable g o o d s .... .....................
nondurable g o o d s .................... ..
Honmanufac turl n g ....... ••••••............
Wholesale trade ........................
Be tail t r a d e .......... ................
finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
eosniunioation, and other public
utilities ......................... .
Services............................. .

l,04l
U67
228
23?
57*
260
*0
117

39.0
38.5
39.5
38.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
37.0

1.00
1 .0$
1.01
1.08
•?7
•9*
1.6*
i .03

*0.00
*1.00
38.00
37.00
40.50
38.00

*3
m

39.0
39.0

1.08
.97

*2.00
38.00

— ■

5

*69 39.0

1.23
1.3«
1.9
1.27

*8.00
51.50
52.50

-

_
•
•

Tabulating-machine operators.................
Manufacturing.......................
Durable goods ..........................
nondurable goods ..... .......... .
HoBnasufaetarlng Jjj .......................
Betail t r a d e .... .................. .
finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....

Saa footnotas at and of table.




40.0

39.0
39.5
206 38.5

157
288

40.0
38.0

263 *0.0

179

126

53
Hi
29
71

39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
38.5

—

.
.
•
•

*1.23
1.26
1.15
1 .3*
1 .0S
1.00

38.5
310 39.0
372

1.15
1.13
1.01
1.10

.95

1 .6*
1.19

**.00
* 0.00

*6.00
*1.00
*3.50

1

9

-

1
1

15
1
-

1

1

s
0

-

113
6
6

107
6
6

31

107

101
22

1
21

31
15
10

129
22
3
19
107
3?

25

31

m

«
e

1

17

26

12

17

1
1

12

6
11

5
3

9
8

203

21*
*2
23
19
172
3
29
101

1
177
15
6
9

162
4

-

31
10
13
172
22

26

26

12

10

01

2J
16

15
27

11
22

3*
17

05
22

39

3*
113
35
18
17

02
12
2
10

m

122

205

69

no

93
55
*5
10

72

1°
kz

-

5*
2
-

22

•
»
-

15

mm

15

mm

l4
l4

3*
*
33
32

•
»
_

3

06
59
36

26

1
20

i£7
94
0
22

46
23
53
13
3
26

19
23

3
18

7

1
2

9
2

21
22

17

20
2
2
10
15
3

76
0
3

*5

3
■
3

3

16
16
31
«
*

16

04
95
10

38

60

*?
2*
3
1(r

4

2

16

5

3

11
10
2
0
1

16

16

l4
5
9

15

2

1

—

-

—

6
2
2
4
-

5
5
2
3
-

11
1
1
10
10
-

0
3

5
5
-

17

4

-

-

15

7
2
1
1
5
5

7
7
1
6
-

m
m

24
10
5
-

3*
25
6
19
9
9

10
*
*

5

—

15

—

32

27
15
5

24
11

16
16

39
17
9

«
*
7

13
31
3
7

22
1

8
22
«
»
a
*

99
85
44
41
14
4

33
32
24

4l
4l

0
1

31

1

—

1

79
33
23
10
46

64
27
13
14
37

86

60

3
19

1
2

42
1

42
10
10
0
24
5
2

6

10

17

3?
3*

16

16

10

26
9
17

31
30
5

25
1

17
17
5

12

—

1

14

—

2
2
-

2
—

m
m
“

-

—

—

—

m
m

1

m
m

1
-

-

-

-

—
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
.
-

-

—
-

m
m

2
-

—

—

-

•
-

-

—
—

2
—

—

—

—

m
.

-

—
—

-

—

—

n
4
4
—
7
—
2

12
6

$
6
6
-

11
0
0
—
3
—

6
6
6
—
—

16

—
*

—
—
—
—
—

6
6
6
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

2
1

m
m

2
81
32
9
?3
*9
33
6

11
6
5
21
1
10

10
12

.
.
•
- .

15
-

-

3f

2

2
4
6
—

—

2

5
4
1
U
—

—
—

15
Table 3.— OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average earnings JL/ and weekly scheduled hours for
selected occupations b y industry division 2/)

Sex, occupation, and industry division 2/

Average
Number
J
$
*
$
1
r
1
Number Weekly
Weekly Under 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 4o.oo
sched­ Hourly
of
and
workers uled earnings earnings *
25.00 under
hours
27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50

of workers receivJng straight-time weekly earnings of 1
1
$
1
1
$
*
$
*
i

*

*

$

i

*

42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 *
85.00
45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00

and
over

Women - Continued
Transcribing-machine operators, general......
Manufacturing............................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing
......................

38.0
39.0
IKli * q 0
*-jrr z
66 38.5
428 37.5
OR 3S .0
jJ

$ 1.03
1.06

40.5

648

220

1.05
1.10
1.01
1.05

$39.00
41.50
Hi. 00

42.50
3s. 00

Ik

—

-

-

40.00

m
m
—

270

37.0

.90
.99

36:50
36.50

Transcribing-machine operators, technical
..
Manufacturing j/ .........................
Durable goods .........................

100
86
74

39.0

1.08

42.00

39.5
4o.o

1.09

43.00
41.50

—

Typists, class A ...............................................
Manufacturing ...............................................
Durable goods ..........................................
Nondurable goods .....................................
Nonmanufacturing
.....................................
Finance, insurance, and real e s tate .......

611

39.0
351 39.5
22l+ 40.0
127 38.5
260 38.O
181 38.0

1.10
1.11
l.l4

1+3.0°
44.00
45.50
4i.oo

2,639

-

Hetail trade ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....

1/
z]

3/

34

301
272
1,063

38.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.O
38.5
40.0
37.5

61

39.0

680
1+91

189

1,959

1.04

1.06
1.09




1
13

107

•
t
ja

pr
C
-D

97
13
g

3

5
79

5
84

68

28

-

6
35

4
73

—

—

2
—

—
-

-

5
l

2k

-

23
5

-

-

-

l

4
-

-

-

-

-

i.o4

39.50

—

•*

.90
.95
.94

3^.50
37.50

—

63
-

1.01

40.00
33.50
35.50
34.50

-

-

.88
.92
.86

-

63

-

-

-

.85

32.00

-

2
6l

1.06

41.50

-

Excludes p a y for overtime.
Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, N e w Jersey.
Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.

913036 0 - 50 - 3

m
m

74
6

13

*
•

41.50

36.50

1

25

-

Typists, class B ..................... .........................
Manufacturing............................
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods ......................
Nonmanufacturing
......................
Wholesale t r a d e ..................................
Retail t r a d e .......... z ...............................
Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ....
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ...........................

-

k
k
350
32
32
318

5

56
22
10
12

117
68
66
2

3*

^9
R
J

8
6
5

11
6
5

7
6
5

7
7

63
32

90
39
30
9
51

78
3?
36
2

103

5

38

16

3*
23

467

19s

-

18
290

kk

109

ks

300

kl

ko
ko

39
83
17

182
6H
U6
18
118
27

3

86
7^
^7
27
12
5
l

25

% _

1

2

-

-

-

-

5
-

-

1
1

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

..

_

-

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

—

-

5
3

-

•

-

-

-

_

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

18

10

k

91
59
32
12
3

R
J

k

80
66

60
6

lk
1

10

m
m

—

-

-

—

—

k2
18
13
5
2f
*
—

105

2k

6

50

2

28
22
55
31

If
l
lH
10
5

-

9

9
6
5
1
3
2

m
m

mm

I
f
I
f
I
f

5

_

R
J

-

5
5
3

•

lf
l
6
6
-

8
2

.

9

16

2
I
f

■

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
-

-

-

-

12
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

H

The scope of the study in each industry division is indicated in footnotes to table 1.

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

_
_
_

12

61

115
76

423
80
36
225

91
89
2
376
22
148
101

11

17

48
48
48

—

18

i 92
f

u

7
1
2

2
2

2

2

-

1
1

10

5
19
19

67
56

9

30

k

16

12
20
31
24

490

26

36

14

55

-

651

g

28
17

iH

m
m

21
6

75
4l
3

26
18
20
10

-

159
115

I6
f

26
16
10
l8
f

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-■

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

Table 1 . OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - PHILADELPHIA METBOPOLITAN AHEA 1/
+—
(Average earnings Zj for selected occupations by groups of counties in the metropolitan area)

Sex and occupation

Philadelphia and Delaware
Counties, Pa., and Camden
County, N. J.

Philadelphia County, Pa.

Average
weekly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings

$ 65.00
55 .OO
58.50

687
289

52.00
57.50

423
1.125
733
636

$ 65.00

1.292
829

128

42.00

121

892
310

33.00
52.00

275

54.00
58.50
51.50
56.50
41.50
32.50
52.00

649

41.00

566

41.00

38.50
53.00

244

39.50
53.50

Number
of
workers

Bucks, Chester, Delaware,
and Montgomery Counties, Pa*
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings

Burlington, Camden, and
Gloucester Counties, N* J.
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings

Philadelphia
Metropolitan
Area 1

j

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings

Men

W>

Bookkeepers , hand...........
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .........
Clerks, general ............
Clerks, order ..............
Clerks, pay r o l l .... ......
Clerk-typist 8 ..............
Office hoys ................
Tahulating-machine operators

241
820

39
158
164
50
69
30
59
33

$ 64.50

16

60.00
61.00
66.00
61.50

84

41.00

36.00
56.50

102
38
53
4
48

22

(1 /)
$ 57.00

49.00
55.00
60.00
(2 /)
33.00
(2 /)

478

$ 65.00

1,367
999
724

55.00
58.00
53*00

363

58.00

155
927
330

41.50
33 .OO
52-50

707
287

41.50
39.00
53.50
42.50
37 .OO
41.50
40.00

Women

Billers, machine (hilling machine) ............
Billers, machine (hookkeeping machine) ........
Bookkeepers, h a n d ........................... .
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A ........
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ........
Calculating-machine operators (Comptometer type)
Clerks, accounting.......................... ..
Clerks, file, class A ..........................
Clerks, file, class B .........................
Clerks, general ........................ ......
*
Clerks, order .................................
Clerks, pay roll ..............................
Clerk-typists........ ........................
Duplicating-machine operators .................
Key-punch operators.... ......................
Office g i r l s ......................... ........
Secretaries, number 1 ...................... ...
Secretaries, number 2 ...................... ..
Stenographers, g e neral...................... ..
Stenographers, technical •. *............ ......
Switchboard operators...... ............ .....
Switchboard operator-receptionists ............
Tabulating-machine operators ..................
Transcrihing-machine operators, gene r a l .......
Typists, class A .......................
Typists, class B ..............................

j

275
693
485

42.50

1,663
1,232

37.00
41.50

2.921
569
2,820
2,483

40.00
41.00

32.00
43.50
41.00

JR
4,285
199
1.039
444

1.667
2.157
5.665
372
1,284
1,041
465
648

611
2.639

43.50
35.50
36.50
39.50
32.00
56.50
49.00
41.00

47.50
41.00

39.00
48.00
39.00
43.00
34.50

606
452
1.537

1,100
2,670
490
2.676
2,168
719
1,067
3.691
178
897
417
1.467
1,913
4,820
317
1,170
952
391
617
450
2.363

42.50
37.00
41.00
39.50
41.00
31.50
44.00
41.50
42.50

34.50
36.00
38.50
31.50

93
31
127
49

210
52
225
82
95
259
69
219
514

6
106
39

43.50
39.50
54.50
42.50
36.00
46.50
44.00

41.50
35.00
46.00
39.50

48

12
30
33
83

101
172
42
124
264
37

86

45.50

41.50

105
26

44.00
34.00
59.00
57.00
44.00
44.00
42.50
37.00
(3 /)

52.50
47.50

146
181

562

43.00

660

48.00

24

40.50
39.00
45.50
39.00

39

111

<2/>
44.00
39.00
55.50
39-00

42.00
34.50

38
48
158
145

35.oo

43.50
44.50
46.5 0 .
36.00
36.50
40.00

466
19

358

170

49.00
(2 /)

94.50
38 .OO
(2 />
43.00
33.00

56.00
48.50
40.50

275

(2 />
(2 /)

85
46

61

43.50

24
48

37-00

227

(i/>

Xy)

42.50
(2 /)

763
534
1.830
1.253
3.067
614
2.895

2,691
825
1,372
4,671

203
1,108
482

1,888

41.50
32.00
43.50
41.50
43.00
35.50
36.50
39.50
32.00
56.00

2,452
6,042

48.50

380
1,366
1,168

48.00

41.00
41.00
39.00

490

48.50

689
656

39 .OO

2,735

42.50
34.50

1
The Philadelphia Metropolitan Area, as defined by the Bureau of the Budget, includes Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania, and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester
Counties in New Jersey.
2/ Excludes pay for o^itime*
3/ Insufficient data to Justify presentation of an average.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
T . S. Department of Labor
J
Bureau of Labor Statistics




17
Table 5°— MAINTENANCE, CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected
occupations 2/ by industry division j/)

Number

Occupation and industry division

of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1
Under 0.60
$0.60
.65

Number of workers receiving straig;ht-iijne hourly earn!mgs of $
$
s
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
%
j
1
$
$
8
$ „ *
$
$
0.65 0.70 0.75 o.so 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.3 5 1.1*0 1 .U5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
.70 .75 .SO .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.1 5 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .U0 i.**5 1.50 1.60 1.70 l.SO 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over
$,

$

$

Maintenance
Carpenters, maintenance

.... .

Manufacturing ......... ......... ..••••••••••••••••

1, **
1
S03

$1.80
1.68
1.65
1.71
2. OS
2.35
1.71

-

- '

-

-

-

«

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

1

1
1

-

-

13

2

*
-

IS
-

-

-

*

15
*
*

7
3
2
1
*
1
3

58
5*
28

21
19
11
S
2

96 331
95 2S9
33 105
62 IS*

-

-

Durable goods ..............
Nondurable goods ..... ....... ••••••••*••••••
Nonmanufacturing */ ......... ..... .
Retail trade ..... ............... .... .
Pinance, Insurance, and real estate ••••••••••••
Transportation (excluding railroads), communica­
tion, and other public utilities... .
Services ...... .......... .... .... ....

300
503

2*
*2
1.339
1.155

ttgineers, stationary .................. ..... .
Manufacturing .................. .......... .
Durable goods •••••••••••••.... .
Nondurable goods ........................ .
Nonmanufacturing
.........................
Retail trade ............. ............. .
Vlnance, Insurance, and real estate
Services... .............. .

1 ,2 1 6

1.60

•

857
232

I .63
1.53

-

1.6 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tlremen, stationary boiler
Manufacturing ....... .
Durable'goods .......
Nondurable goods . .
.,
Nonmanufacturing */ . .
.,
Retail trade.... .
,
Services

1,121

3*1
216
*7

60*
551

IS*
s*
27
52
21

625
359

S

95

1.16

-

1.72

-

-

1 .7 1
1.67
1.75
1.80
2.05
1.51

-

-

—

-

1.81
1.11

—

-

1 .1 6
1.39
1.25

-

2
1

-

12

mm

—

-

-

-

-

19
27
11

-

IS
1

-

11
-

7

-

7

-

5
3
-

1

*

15

_

-

a
.

3

2

-

8

2

5
1

2
1

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

1

19
3
2
1

1 8 305 27*
*
1 1 281* 272
*
30 133 200
11 151
72
21
2
7
1
17
3
1
-

222
209
129
80
13

119
52
67

1

*2

-

-

-

1

26
16

-

25
2*
5
19
1

36
27
15

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

1
10

-

-

7

-

2

5

*

-

.-

-

1

2

-

9
1

2

98

155

1
20

36
36

1
S

-

60 1*7

-

2
1
1
2*

17
1

kz

-

21
1

26

-

-

2

16

6

-

-

7
17

-

T
i

-

2

9

6

83
5J
36
15
32
5
27
-

71
68
12
56
3

-

-

6

-

-

*1

153
139
23

72
*9
31
IS
23

ii*2
ii*2
85
57

85
*3
29
l*
l
1
*2
27

87
59
13
16
*
28
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

•

mm

—

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

mm

—

-

mm

-

-

-

•
-

-

—

-

20

2
6

*7
-

31
2*

*0
16
16

3*
3*
38

_

6

—
-

•

-

mm

6

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

mm

*
*

mm

mm

3
2

-

16

S

-

7

^*

*
6

«

-

-

16

6

22

•*

1*6

.—

1
«
,

i3i
*

101
16
85
33
7
17

5* 20S
5*
5*
mm

20
20
.
..
1SS

176

-

9

10

6

*
1
3

12
9
2
5

-

mm

-

26

1
*

-

•

1.12

-

—

-

93

501
252

-

-

62

36S

-

1

12

1

-

1.31
1.33
1.28
1.36
1.25
1.31

S69

1
-

-

57

1
1

53
19
*
25
2*
>
1
*

i.78

Electricians, maintenance................... .
Manufacturing ........ ...... .........
Durable goods........ ................. .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••»•••••••....... .
Nonmanufacturing ...............
Retail trade •••••••••••••...... ..........
Pinance, Insurance, and real estate ...... .
Transportation (excluding railroads), communica­
tion, and other public utilities
Services ..... ......... .... .

-

69
66
37
29
3
1
1
1

•

2S
10
IS
13
-

13

116

1*
1
13

-

1

20
■*

11

1*9
38
l
18
19

mm

56
50
22
28
6

mm

mm

**

20
127
S
-

6

2
1*5
13 S
3?

106

7

*

mm

l
*
-

-

3

1
*
119

I
*

127

8
6
2

9

212

•

S
2
3
3

121
110

37

•

—

22 110
11
31
1
*
11

37
37

69
38

16

-

103
52

16

mm

27

-

-

90 1*2
41
36

30
22
22

-

-

8
3

66
58

91
90

58
8
3

7*
1

•

3
5
5

1

1

-

mm

1

«

-

•

*7
3*
mm

26
21
7
1*
5

1 9 106
*
90
29
22
32
7
3
11

36
51
1
6
-

73
58
39
19
15

IS
1*
S
6

•
*7
32

7
6
6

33
33

32
15

•

*

15

1

1

16

33

3*

13
2

•

mm

1

mm

..
mm

**

•

'

See footnotes at end of table.




Occupational Mage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Kay 1950

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

Table 5.— KAIHTENANCI, CUSTODIAL, WARSHOUSING AND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected
occupations 2/ by industry division

Occupation and industry division 3/

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$

Under

0.60

$0.60

.65

Number of workers receiving1 straight--time hour]Ly earnings of *
$
8
8
8
$
8
8
8
$
8
$
1
*
8
8
8
8
$
8
8
0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.4o 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
f7° •75 •80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 1.05 1.10 l.l? 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over
$

Maintenance - Continued
Helpers, trades, maintenance ••••••••••......... •
Manufacturing ..••••.........
•••••••••••••••
Durable goods
*
Nondurable goods •••••••••••«•••••«••••»•••••••»
Nonmanufacturing .•••••..••••••••••••....... ••••*•
Wholesale trade
Retail t r a d e ..... .................... .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••••••.•
Transportation (excluding railroads), communica­
tion, and other public utilities.......... ..
Services ...........................

2,577
2.119
673
1,446
458
32
57
108

♦1.43

229

1.37

32

.89

Machinists, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing......... ........... ..... .
Durable g o o d s ...... ............... ........ ..
Nondurable goods •..••••••••............ ......
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••*•••••••...... .

1,278
1,252
522
730

1.67
1.69

Maintenance men, general utility ....................*
<
Manufacturing ........... ................ .
Durable g o o d s .... .................. ...... ..
Nondurable goods ......... ............ .
Nonmanufacturing 4/
Wholesale trade .......... ....... .......... .
Retail trade ......... ...................... .
Finance, Insurance, and real estate
Services ........ ................ ...... .

1,124
460
291
I 69
664
180

Kechanics, air-conditioning ••••••••••.... ........ .
Mechanics, automotive ............... .
Manufacturing ........................... ...... .
Durable goods ...•••••.... ................... .
Nondurable goods ••••••••••...... •••••••»••»«»•<
Nonmanufacturing •••.••....... .
Wholesale trade
...... ............. .
Retail trade •••••••••.... ....... .
Transportation (excluding railroads), communica­
tion, and other public utilities •••••••••••.•<
Services ........ ••••••••........ ..... .

See footnotes *at end of table,




26

iM

1.3*
1.51
1.29
1.30
i t e

1 .1 1

-

-

-

5
5

168

1.42
1.4l
1.4l
1.41
1.43
1.54
1.®
1.54
1.24

20

1.57
1.66
1.58

-

7

12
12

9
6
6
3

6
6

4
-

4

146
85
48
37
6l

18
7
5

2
11

116
99

26

30

1

266
246
92
154
20

241
128
14
114
113
12
6
2

158
130
61
69

91
2

17

-

-

_

1
-

1

2
3*

-

9

1
2

-

•

6

••

8

5

6

-

5

-

7

3

2

3

3

20
5

10

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

• -

-

-

.
.
•

1
1
1
-

-

-

1
1

1
1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

1
-

-

1

29
29
2
27

-

•
-

—
-

•
•
-

56
56
-

2
2
-

19

•
•
-

6
•
6
-

15

-

6
3
3
13

75
72
5
67
3

175
100
71
29
75

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

2

124
81
6l
20
*3
-

3

a

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

18
4
15

-

•

2
2

6

-

«,

.
.
•
-

mm

1

1
1

6
*7

-

2

-

15
1
4
10

-

1

«
.
-

-

-

5
-

53
2
2
-

25
-

5
4
1

51
12
1
11
27

25
5

•

-

3
—

me

•

1

•

«•

-

-

-

-

~

-

8
7

1
1

-

-

-

-

77
1

2
18

1

12
2

10

—

2

•

49

5

mm

-

-

-

-

•

61

«

15

-

118
102

~

-

•

•

-« ■

•

mm

•

•

•

-

-

mm

•

me

1

-

•

-

1

mm

•

mm

•

-

-

mm

10

-

2

-

49

10

-

-

mm

2

-

44
5

-

5
3
-

2

•
•
•

5

1

4

•

mm

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

43
39
27
12
4

3*

55
55

28
10

55

7
6
•
6
1

12
3
3

36

9
5

3»
|

10
8
8
2
•

1
1
1
«
.
-

-

mm

2

-

-

16
5

5

11

4o
-

62 134
62 134
26
54

123

123
9
114

36

68
30
28

52
44
3$
6
8
-

80

278
90
68

2

’

22

3«
5
5
-

188
97
57
23
1

-

56

.«
.

44l 204
44l 194
203 120
238 74
10

136
136

40
5
2
3
35
25

54
6
, 4
2
48
17

18
12
5
7
6
-

1
2

80
56

3
•

28

-

m
m
m
«

m
m
m
m

•

-

3

•
•»

-

3

-

27

-

34
2

7

2

2

-

-

mm

-

97

65

70

3^
27
7

10
6
4
55
10

2

48
20

25
23

11
11

-

-

2
68
67

20
28
17

-

—

am

1

11

87

•

mm

-»

•

3

-

343
135
30
105
208
15
35

67

86

7

45

157

6

1

mm

1

12

mm

•
4

16

6
4
2
50
5

1
76

5

79
1

80
723
45

60
42

30
20
6
14
10

89
2
2

4
-

21

16

9

-

80
79
m
e

848

8O3

-

46
37
9
15

28
5
6

-

-

1.46

mm

239
229
101
128
10
4

-

-

1.48

159
la
S9
32
3*
-

-

1.69

26

124
84
73
11
40
12
2

-

1.53
1.77
1.58

479

48
37
13
24
11
3

-

1.45

978
264
75
I89
714
132
77

7

-

1.68

1.66
1.87

-

63
15
30

45

mm

- .

-

-

11

-

2

-

-

mm

me

-

-

mm

23

mm

-

~

2

mm

me

19

T able

5.— MAINTENANCE,

CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING A f ) TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - Continued
fi

(Average h ou r l y earnings 1/ for selected
occreations zj b y industry division ^/)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1.851
1.736

$1.72
1.72
1.68

$
115
79

1.75
1.65
1.65

$
Under 0.60
$0.60
.65

f
%

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourl; earnings of $
$
*
*
1
r
1
1
*
$
1
$ „ *
*
*
$,
1
1
1
# , $
0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
1.40 1.45 i.?o 1.60 1.70 1.S0 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over
.70 •75 .SO .85 .90 •95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 l.JO

i

1

J

Maintenance - Continued
Mechanics, maintenance ......... •••••...... •••••
Manufacturing ........... ................
Durable goods •••••••••............... .
Nondurable goods ...... ..................
Nonmanufacturing k ] ... ............ ........
Retail trade ........................ .
Transport ion (excluding railroads), communica­
tion, and other public utilities
Services ...............................
Millwrighte 4/ .................................

Manufacturing ... ............... ........ ••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ......... ••••••••••.......
Oilers........................ ........... .
Manufacturing ............................. .
Durable goods..... ............ .... .
Nondurable goods ............... .
Nonmanufacturing ....... ..... ....... .
Operators, air-conditioning

IS
IS

1.72
1.65

524

i.6u
1.63
1.61

g ?
109

,

17

.

1.3 1
1 .3 0

1.28
i.3 2

-

-

-

2
2
2
-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
-

-

2
2
-

6
1
1
5
-

11
10
3
7
1
-

36
35
6
29
1
1

36
30
13
17
6
5

81
64

7
57
17
15

•

2

—
*
•

me

—*

“

-

•

—

-

—

*
*

■
■

■
*

5

1

m
m

-

•

mm
mm

•
-

4
4

3
3

1
1

3

2

mm

3

2

•
-

-

-

4

3

1

3

2

-

mm

—

mm

mm

-

-

*
—

56
56
16
1*0

1
«
-'
-

1.53
1.88

-

-

S3*
793
252
541

kl

1.79
1.79
1.65
1.85
1.83

35

1.88

•
m

mm

-

-

mm

-

-

•

•
-

-

•

-

33
-

•

-

Pipe fitters
... .... ............ .
Manufacturing •
...... .........
Durable goods
...
Nondurable goods ........ ................ .
Nonaaxxufacturing k j .................
Transportation (excluding railroads), communicap­
tion, and other public utilities .......... ,

7
6

l

2

64
53
24
29
11
11

420
390
205
185
30
21

159
158
123
35
1
1

374
371
199
172
3
3

2
2
2

62
62

23

16
16
7
9

38
38
37

1

1

27
2
2
25

23
17
-

20
20
20

17

-

1

-

-

-

-

IS
-

IS

m
e

-

33

4

4

9
•

•

-

-

ma

•

mm

-

IS

«
.

mm

2S

6l
1

57

m

29
29
25
4
48
35
18

125

-

-

-

33

-

16

93
30

—
•

-

11

kO

13
13

4
4
—

12

—

4

-

-

-

-

43

U5
17
9
S
28
1
27

81

5*
36
5
31
IS
IS

130
102

63
39
22
17
24

$k

3*

31
23
S

5
5

is

116
91
11
SO

13

25

3*

63

7
5b
18
mm

19
83
28
18

13

6

5

29
12
1
11
17
11
mm

19
5

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

.
.
mm

3
3
3

1
1
1

21

-

a

31
31

-

-

is

23
23
3
20

175
169
85
84
6

6
25

:
-

13
13
13

4
4
4
mm

•
-

mm

-

2

«
mm

5

-

3

1

9

5

36

2S1
281
1
2S0
-

m
m

9
9

1

1
1
1

3

7

1
3

-

-

2
2
2
-

32
31
21
10

-

17
13

9
4

111
110
70

-

28
11

mm

2

137

123

-

7
7

63
62
56
6
1
1

6

•

-

mm

-

5

7

-

44
45
8

-

3

0
1

9
35
13

15

m
m

7

17
—

8?

8

35
28

99
99
39
60
-

23

-

1.31

—
—

6

97

kl

157
150
104
46

1

6
6
6

—

-

m
m

1.56
1.58
1.48
1.6l

1.70
1.02

87
80
26
54

9
-

-

67
69




-

1.53

896
489
126

See footnotes at end of table<

-

1.43

Painters, maintenance ......... .... .... ..... .
Manufacturing ........... ............... .
Durable goods ................. .
Nondurable goods •••••••••••.............. .
Nonmanufacturing U/ ••••••...••••... ........ .
Retail t a e ...... *»••••••........ .
rd.
Finance, insurance, and real estate ••••••••••••<
Transportation (excluding railroads), communicap­
tion* and other public utilities •••••••
Services .... ................ ......... .

363
367
129
102

-

1.73

5U
472
199
273
39

-

23
1

k

IS

a
3

71
17

5
-

•
mm

13

-

a
m

-

mm

mm

-

m
m

mm

28

4

50

1

158

98

7

l4

7

14

14
-

58
58

-

9«
98

70

me
•

-

172
158

78

58

-

12
5

78

132
118
48

14

ik 38
ik zk
—
Ik zk
Ik
Ik
mm

25

-

ss
ss

••

-

mm

mm
mm
mm
-

-

-

20

Table

5.— MAINTENANCE, CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING A ND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected
occupations 2/ by industry division jj/)
----------------------------------------------------------- I
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

8

0.60

$

Under
$ 0.60

—

0.65

.65

Occupation and industry division 2/

.70

-

m
m

Numbier of workers receiving straigiht-ti.me hourly earn! ngs of $
1
8
8
8
8
$
$
8
$
$
$
$
$
8
8
8
8
8
$
$
$
r ~
0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.4o 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 I .90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
i.4o
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30
.75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00 ■
i d l 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 over

j

■

hS.

Maintenance - Continued
152

59

n

.55

-

1.55
1 I54
l.RK

%
jr*
SJ
26

1.55
1.87

16

1.3*
1.3*
1.39

612
606
568

1.48
1.48
1.50

-

1,550
1.052

1.27
I .30
1.28
1.48
1.08

pm

2

9

-

4

1

-

m
m

8
2

a

21

k

11
i
f
2
2

62
17
i4

JJ

2
6

17
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

9

J

9

-

4

1
1

-

-

7
«
*

45

2

10

6

5
3
3

1.80

437
437
351*
g-i

m
m

-

1.68

■*
X*

~

1.69
1.68

80

*
*

1,10

224
191
10*5

_

3
2
1

3
1
l

5

6
6
6

5
5

2
1
1

25

R

s

-

-

9

1.67

11
11

4
7

j9

16
13

28
28
15
X3

-

77

ki

1^

1

61
54
7
12

37
j1

19
18
i
f

X3
13

6

5

2

3
-

1
+
q
j

3
2

14
11

J

R
J

6
6

x

x

1

«
.

m
m

«
•
i
f

r

-

-

m
m
m
m

«
•

2

-

-

*
•

-

-

-

x

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) •••••

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

m
m
m
m

8
8
8

18
18
18

iMnarir'A

lnfiiuTfineA. and real estate

394
498
440

1.05

5.841

1.04

3.033
1.373

1,660

1.11
1.12
1.10

2,808

Janitors, porters and cleaners (men) .•••••••••••••»••

.97

269
_j a

jA

f 4nann, 4nittFAnct. and real estate
Transportation (excluding railroads), commonlcar
tion, and other public utilities . . . ......... • •

1.01

991
892

.97
.95

268

1.18
.81

388
See footnotes at end of table*




U3

4l
8

*8
49

39
39
5

4
4
4

23
23
23

177

303
293
278

l4l
104

15
10
4

19
37
y1

1.36
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

k

-

:

-

-

-

-

-

:

32
2

70
7

69

57
17
17

75
15
15

75

Crane operators, electric-bridge

658

49
49

5
5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

•
»
“

-

-

MM

~

m m
m m
54

5^

25

m
m

51

Q
✓

21

w

m

m 51m
m m
m m
m m

25

m
m
m
m

-

m
m
k

80
—

80
Q
j
15

mm

mm

mm

mm

16

30

50

56

20
9
9
11
11
476
187
80
107
289
39
35
89
2
124

m
m
m
m

11

11
11
283

190
21

169
93
1
29

35

3

25

m
m

2
30
j

m
m

§

J

40

30

63

69

39

438
122
70
1v
52
316
7

292

451

961
227

155

117
27

10

£9
62

7
223

104
67

$

63
70

1*6
122

194

6
1

13
7

113
114
734
28
435
234

16

a

60
59

3kk
209

16

28
68
67

522

154
104
50
23
23

615

135

93
18

17
22

21
3

5
15

3k

t

7
52
30

&3
112
351
59

115

12 2

125
125
125

119
119
119

68

13
12

28

204
204
25
179

§7
66
42
24
1

11

49
41
8

19
19

1

39

**

135
135
135

3
3

62
m

131
131
127

15

71

1

18

34
34

30
30
30

78
73

323
96
119
15
1*1
1

28
28
28

33
3

85

186

3f

36

8

l4l
100
48
52
4l

8

53
3
35

9f

96
89
7
1

207
179
50
129
28

222
149

510
324
105

85

je

45
37

$

\°

2§

12
1
1

25
3

5
1
1

30

3
32

30

15

17
5

4
-

2
-

5
12
12

5
2

3

1

9

1

1

-

16

mm

-

m
m

18

-

-

m
m

~

2
•
.

m
m
zm
m

m
m

«
•
-

-

-

M

m
m

m
m
m m m
m m m

mm

J

«
•

M \
M
•
M

«.

-

-

-

«
•

-

-

SI
M

2

«
•
«
•

«
.

m
m

.
.

.
.

37

.
.

18
18

m
m

3

10
12

:

m
m

-*

-

MM
-

•

-

*
*
“

"

21

Table

5.— MAINTENANCE, CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AN D TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected
occupations 2/ by industry division

]J)

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2.7^7
540

$ ,

Under 0.6 0
$ 0 .6 0

Number of workers receiving strain^ht-time hourly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
f
T
$
$--- 1 --- 1 ---0.6 5 0 .7 0 0 .75 0.80 0.85 0.9 0 0.95 1.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 l.*0 l.*5 1 .5 0 1.60 1 .7 0 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
and
.7 0 _ J 5 . ,80 .8 5 .90 .95 1.00 1,05 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1.20 1.35 1 .3 0 it 35 1,*0 i.*5 1 .5 0 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.9 0 2.00 2f10 2.?0 over
$ „

$

$

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued
Janitors, porters and cleaners (women) •••••••••••••..••
MoTI l fo * . » ^T T . __________ ___________
T ' r + T T \£
Tkimhld tmnA m.________ _____ _________
a M A d S __ ______________
ll/
_____ ____ ___
PAtfll 1
______ ____________ _
Transportation (excluding railroads), communic**
tion, and other public utilities ••••••••..... .
Serv^ce* •
Order f i l l e r s ...... •••••••••••••••••••............. .
Manufacturing *....... ......... .......... •••••••••••
Durable goods ....................................
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••••.... ...... ..
Nonmanufacturing 4/ ..................................
Wholesale trade ............... .......... ....... .
Retail trade ••••••••.................. ......... .
Packers .......................... ......... ............. .
Manufacturing ........ ................ ............. .
Durable g o o d s ..... ............ ......
Nondurable goods ....... .
Nonmaxmfactnring 4/ .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ....................................
Retail t r a d e .... .............. ...................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand «....... .
Manufacturing ........ ................. .
Durable goods ................... .................... ...
Nondurable goods
Nosmaxxufacturing 4/ ....................................... .
Wholesale trade
Retail t r a d e ........• • • • • • • • • ......• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Transportation (excluding railroads), connunication, A d other public utilities • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Truck drivers, light (under

1$

tons) ............. • » • • • • • •

S ee footnotes at end of table*




289 1*50
129
yl
27
102
29
l 60 1*17
12 P50

78
18

138

✓
15

91 1161

jj

27
1+2
69
1
5Q
jj

2

226
314
2,247
322
1.555

•90
.82
.81
•82

122
230

.98
•76

71

32

2

2

2,326

1.20
1.18
1.10
1.2*
1.21
1.20
1.22

-

-

-

-

186
128
58
273
273
-

14
»

104

-

-

925
397
528
1,*01
857
309
2.U71
1.15*

626

1.19
1.25
1.31

528
1.317

1.18
1 .1*

.1.150

1.16

162

.98

1*7

147
g
68

*3

1+3
11

8
6

37

37
22

w
m

-

3
-

-

3

-

-

9

*8

28
72

127
31
27

r
j

2
23

22

68

59

79
73

5

6

3

98
81+
ll+

10*

128

110

73

23
2

*6

-

Ho
6*

-

3

-

9
55

•

-

-

-

-

-

mm

-

-

-

-

73

-

65

*
22
79
67
2
1*1
5*
10

1*5
71

107
72

139

156

*
96

**

6*

63
33

6*
23

23
51

25
10

-

-

3**

*25

93*

*5

8*

1*8

2

3

6

1

6
6

91

18

3
9

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

6

mm

-

1
+

18

-

-

mm

6
85

-

a.

-

1
+
-

•
•

63

-

-

-

l.*l

-•
mm

-

•

92

1 .#

293

i.*6

•
-

-

i.3«

-

mm

1
+

19

11*
102

*66
*66

•

-

620

8
8

-

1.67

31

79
76
3

_

3.173

11

35

•

60

*2

7*

*

6

-

93

3

1.18

a

*5

6l

4

-

4

a

80
11

?2

1

-

136
63

22

mm

-

6*

12 *
113
33

38

-

1.23

31 105

m
m

*5
6
39
99
*2
*2

25

-

55

-

lHH

15*
127
27

33

86

m
m

1
1
1

255
2*7
15*

35

6

86
59

89
38
28
10

5*

55

4

17 *
115
29

99

70
35

l.*l

120
16
13
3
10 *

1

2

9
20

7.30*
1.956
2.117

a

39?
22 U
100
12l+
175
138

18
11
7
102
-

19

51
*2
9

38O
282
212
70
98
51
**

39
7

1
+
1
+
1
+

29
120

1
1

6

120
22
-

86

1.15

97

19
19

59
18

93
25

6

i.*o

106

79
-

-

599
52

47

12
12
12

10

105
26

-

1,201

48

1+6

27
17
3
1*
10
10

- -■ i4
•

57
57

11

10
10
1
+

1+0

94

55
1H1

68
29
18
11
39
35
*

1.32

1 .**

153

8*
*9
32
17
35
35
-

l.a
1.22
1.20

1.586

5

169
63
10
j

*59

5.720
2.5«5

j

181
ho

1

13 , *
02
3.135

60

69

5
1+6

4

3*5
Durable goods .......... ................ ••••••••••
Nondurable goods ................................ .
Nonnanufacturing 4/ ...................................
Wholesale trade .......... .

8

$0.85
•96
I .03

237

7

*7

278 675

107

158
120
1*7

355
320

5«

51

106

13«
99

259

60

58
UH
•

32

**

229
127
18

1*
6
8

27
9

31
24

g

7

63

56
23

67

17

24

7

24

7
7

18

73

*0

62

62
60
2
1

12
12
-

-

652 1379 2685 112* 1*11

106

605 3*3

86
57
29
20

*79
290
189
1J3
67

*2
1

967
289

678
»*12
112

908
51*

39*
!777

98 292

56*
826

8

8

372

1*

25

3*

3

1
1

-

1

1
1

-

-

-

-

39

5

13 '

24

31

-

-

H

*3

261
32

a

.^

30

3
27
U
-

2
2

wm

*86
119
519
351

1068
105

168

1*2

mm

817

168

155

56 1*3
5* 19
37
19
17

1

2

-

-

12*
105

3j
jj
2
1
+

22

119
88
72

73
8
_

32
32

16

8
65
65

-

20

2

2

2

33

*5
*

33

*5

12
12
-

-

107
9*
90
*

365

13

2^+1

203

279
158

1

-

40 1901
•
1
_

_

-

ia

40

106

40

*

5
3

124
65
15

1
1900

2

5

44

-

9
*
*

19 1092
5 249

5

19

1*

210
843

7

372

-

25
-

25

•

9
9

10
10
10

6

*

6

*

6

1

•

-

mm
_

-

6
6
-

9
9

3
-

-

_
mm
m.

_

7
7

—

•

•

- 1900

mt
•
•

9

m
m

66
66
-

m
m
m
m

14
144

3*

9

m
m

23

a

6

32

5
3

1

1*

66
_

mm
mm
mm

-

mm
mm

-

-

-

-

mm

mm
mm

mm
mm

mm

mm
mm

mm
mm

mm
mm,

•

-

7

'm m
mm

mm
mm
mm

mm

mm

_

•

mm

mm

Table

5*— HAIHTHIANCE,

CUSTODIAL, W A R EHOUSING A N D TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - Continued

(Average hourly earnings 1 j for selected
occupations z j hy industry division 3 /)

Number
of
workers

Occupation and industry division 3 /

Average
hourly
earnings

*,

Uhder 0 .6 0
$ 0 .6 0

.65

Humber of workers receiveLng straight-time hourly earnirIgs of
$
$
1
1
$
$
$
%
$
$
1
1
8
$
$
$
*
$
*
*
0.6 5 0 .7 0 0 .7 5 0.80 0.85 0 .9 0 0.9 5 1.00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1.35 l.4o 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 liJO 1.80 1.90 2 .00 2 .1 0 2 .20
and.
.7° .7 5 *50 .85 .90 .9 ? 1.00 I .0 5 1.10 1 .1 5 1.20 1 .2 5 l.JO 1 .3 5 i.4o 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1.80 1.J0 2,00 2*10 2 .2 0 orer

*,

*

$

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) 4/ ...

$ 1 .5 0
1 .S3
1.39
1*46

1 .5 2

1 ,1 3 2
193
Transportation (excluding railroads), communicm-

2,426
615
230
385
1,511

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ....

l #46

I j
17X
m

1,168
l 60

Tf VHf
fA Mfc

. .

aaa/m
Ii

1 .5 6
1.^9

4%
95
V50
1,65^

a^

a* m m
*

f 4 At,m m At
b
%

aaaj Im
i

a

^ 4 mt* 1 4^^A 1 x M
a ee
i
.... *. . .».

maad a
s

m

g
o

_ .. . . ._ ^

* ^
9 b

-

5
2
m
m
1

3
•
-

16

3
-

16
16

a
m

32
2
1
1
30
30

37
36
33
3
1
-

j

52

19
19

m
m

33

A
9
J

12
5
5
3
4
-

5
142
m
m
*
*
a
m

13
5

25
25
15
10

a
a

j

-

m
m

5
4
4
4
-

a
m

33

19
15
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

•

m
m
m
m
m
m

32
32
32

m
m
-

-

-

19
19
19

4
4
2
2

15
IS
15
m
e

45
*5
,5
4o

m
m

w

-

—

-

1.23

•
-

1 .3 3

_

2.31
*
1,^30
539
j j j
891
918
48
274
246

m
m
m
m

- -

*
-

-

_

-

a
m

m
m

--

10
10
10

10
10
10

45
4s
45

12
12
12

3*
22
6

-

•

16
12
12

56 194
51 192
19 . 165
24
32
2
5
4
1

.
.

-

—
•
-

17
1

64
6
6

-

16

232

252

1-T1

17
m

1 .0 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

ib
36
m
m

254
22

187
129

71
33

171
87

157
157

g

57

69

22
262

80

25

■zg
7°

5«

3«

3°
84

55
30

156
4l
115
76

a
35

,7
*•9

5

01
C
X

17

26

43

l4i

2

2

-

7
1

33
,

•

-

. mm.

12

m
m m
ib
36

m
m

. -

m
m

OK

m
m

-

-

12
m
m
a
m

33

1.11
1.09
1.12
.9^

•»

m

-

1.29
1.47

1 .0 0

973
74

26

•
m
m

272 1269
2
2

258
pliT

g

1 .2 4

223

5
j
K
J

270 1011
100

1.24
1.24
1.25
1.28

661

*K)^
4l

6

.93

9

£

49
V

Ui
104

29
*5
Id

206
151
123

159
109
27
82
50
29

25
55

■
7z

65

6l
71
1A

35
15

16

X

6

-

2

5
J

K

97
21
66

72
I
72
72
1f
c

31
g

5
g

13

137

21

272
263
l6l
102
9
-

55
50
29
21
5

K
j
m
m

205

99
95
49
46
4
4
66
66
52
14

15
444

55
-

12
12
1
11
-

15
13

16
16

46
1

13

16
70
3

313

16
16

67

m
m

•
-

x

21
5
2
■
Z

—
■
-

438

-

-

23

30
30

£
S
J

T

.

a
m

m
m

9
-

3
-

q
q

T
7
T
7

59
5Q
254
254

15
r

9
-

15
15

q
j

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

<

Ol
Clm
m
5
-

4
4

_

4

127
40
27
u1

91
91

77

2
a
m

13
87

14
-

. 2
21
a

25
2
• -

25

6

2

-

30

-

-

4

-

-

6
6
m
m

2

-

30

-

-

-

-

6
1
1

8

1
1

112
112
24
55

1

3
3

m
m
m
m

•

m
m

5

-

-

m
m
m
m

-

3

m
m

-

-

18
66
66

62

5

5
3

-

3

-

-

-

-

9

7

5

3

a
m

133
12

85
85
a
m

S4l

*2
7b
10
66
7

193
60

*77
33
18

129

48

1 51

1,112
9U 7

69 1396
21 191
97
13
94
5
45 1205
603
45

16

i.»
1.55

570

79

tW«aMVl as

7
5

1.5®
1.79

286

saA
iM

_
-

17

388
302

.......... . * -

-

25

85

IWiaa VI a

—
-

4

165

Truckers., power (fork lift) ...... .............. .

•
•
-

1 45
1 .5 6

452
Transportation (excluding railroads), communicaA1 a m
a A,
t
4a m A 4 1 4A 4mm

‘ «
•
-

•
a
m
a
m

1 .5 1

2,099

a
ad m
a Am W dV # l m
fP l
e

42
a

1.51

66
9U
Truck drivers, heavy (over b tons,
other than trailer t y p e ) .............. .

150
150

1 50

•
*
-

1

5
5

-

9

^0
7^

€m

1

-

-

-

-

m
m

-

-

1

-

•

m
m

-

-

•

-

-

—

*
•

m
m

-

-

-

a
m

-

-

Transportation (excluding railroads), eommnnica-

nk
_

..

.86

-

126

.71

33

12

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Zj Study limited to men: workers except where otherwise indicated*
f 7 Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Cam dan County, Hew Jersey*
4 / Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately*




g

21

27

T
7

5
j

-

The scope of the study in each industry division is indicated in footnotes to table 1*

23

Table 6.— MAINTENANCE, CUSTODIAL, WAREHOUSING AND TRUCKING OCCUPATIONS - PHILADELPHIA METROPOLITAN AREA 1/
(Average hourly earnings 2/ for selected occupations

Occupation

Philadelphia and Delaware
Counties, Pa*, and Camden
County, N. J.

by groups of counties in the metropolitan area)

Philadelphia County, Pa*

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1,1**
1.339

$1.80

$ 1.83
1.72

1,216

1.60
1 .3 1

935
923
1.058
959
2,236

Bucks, Chester, Delaware
and Montgomery Counties, Pa.
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Burlington, Camden, and
Gloucester Counties, N. J.

Philadelphia
Metropolitan
Area l /

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

153
322
91
233
*02

$ 1.58
1.66

1 .372
1,661
1 .32 5

$ 1.76

2*8
90
8*
337

1.65

Number
of
workers

Maintenance

Carpenters, maintenance ................................................
Electricians, maintenance ..............................................
Engineers, s t a t i o n a r y ..................................... ,
............
firemen, stationary b o i l e r .............................................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ...........................................
Machinists, maintenance .......................... ......................
Maintenance men, general utility .......................................
Mechanics, automotive ..................................... ' ...........
.
Mechanics, maintenance .................................................
Millwrights .............................................................
Oilers ..................................................................
Painters, m a i n t e n a n c e ..................................................
Pipe fitters, m a i n t e n a n c e ........................... ...................
Plumbers, m a i n t e n a n c e ...........•.......................... ...........
Sheet-metal workers, m a i n t e n a n c e .......................................

1,121
2.577
1.278
1,12*
978
1.851
52*
511
856
83*
152
22 *

1.72

.

l.*3
1.68
l.*2
1.57
1-72
1.6*
!.3l
1.56
1.79
1.55
I .69

1,000
997
868
1.338
378
373

701

53*
1*8

153

1.60
1.29
l.*2
1.66
l.*2
1-57
1.71
I .63
I. 3O
1.5*
1*79

1 .5 5
1.70

28*

$1.65

*16
176

1 .7 1
1.58
1.36

217
517

1*37

*16

1 .7 2

3*7
131
*82
1*0

l.*2
l.*l

1.65
1.39
1.42
1*39
1.57
1.66

l.*09
3.155
1,66*
l.*3*

1,083

127

1.58

6*5

85
158
296
*5
*8

1.69
1.69
1.36
1.60
1.78
1.50
1 .7 2

121
101
201
15
*3

1-35
1-59
1.75
(*/)
1.57

579

2,157

960
1,031
208
2**

1.71
1.60
1 .3 2
l.*2
1.67
l.*l
1.55
1.69
1 .6*

1 .3 2
1.55
1.78
1 .5 3
1.68

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking

Crane operators, electric-bridge (under 20 tons) .....................
Crane operators, electric-bridge (20 tons and over) ..................
Guards ..................................................................
Janitors, porters and cleaners (men) ..................................
Janitors, porters and cleaners (women) ............................ ....
Order fillers ..................................... *.....................
Packers .................................................................
Stock handlers and trackers, hand .....................................
Truck drivers, light (under 1J tons) ..................................
Truck drivers, medium (lj to and including k tons) ...... .............
Truck drivers, heavy (over h tons, trailer type) *....................
Truck drivers, heavy (over h tons, other than trailer type) ..........
Truckers, power (fork lift) ............................................
Truckers, power (other than fork lift) ................................
W a t c h m e n ............. .......................... ...... *
.................

2,326

I .38
l.*8
1.27
1.0*
.85
1.20

2,*71
1 3 ,02 *
1,586

1.19
1.32
l.*l

2,*26
1,168

1 .5 0

>07

612
1.550
5.8*1
2.787

2,099
1,112

388
2,3*8

339

270

1.35
l.*0

935
*.991
2 ,61*

1 .2 2
1 .0 3

2.153
2.139
11.073
l.*93
2,069

1 .1 7
1.19

.85

1-33
l.*l

2,012

1.50
1 .5 0
1 .5 6

9*3

1.23

1.51
I .5 6
1.2*

1,020

1 .3 1
I.O 3

312
2 .038

1 .3 1
1 .0 3

332

l.*7

132

*98
531

1.50
1 .3*

68

(*/)
(5/)

8O 3
836

813
185
396
516
1.183
82
199
5*
111
171
90
*37

1.10
.82
1.3*

378
623
96
82
167
1,66*

1.29
1.17
1.01
1.36
1.23
1 .2 *

1,8**
6 ,*27
2.895

63
365
20*
36
102
19
355

1.28

1.16
1.28
l.*3
1.29
l.*0
l.*6

1 .3 5
1 .3 1
1.0 3

1.51
1.50
(*/)
1.29
1.18
1.10

2,631
2,822
13.920
I .638
2.633
1.278
2.159

1,216
*21
2,830

l.*0
l.*7
1.27
I .05
.85
1.20
1.19
I. 3 I
l.*l
l.*9

1.50
1.55
1.25

1 .3 1
1.0*

l/ The Philadelphia Metropolitan Area, as defined V the Bureau of the Budget, includes Bucks * Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania, and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester
Counties in New Jersey*
2/ Excludes premise pay for OT*rti*a and night work.
Occupational Vage Surrey, Philadelphia, Penneylrania, Nay 1950
3/ Study limited to sen workers except where otherwise indicated.
U. 8 . Department of Labor
*/ Insufficient data to Justify presentation of an arerags.
Bnreau of Labor Statistics
913036 0 - 50 - 4




24

CHARACTERISTIC INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS
(Average earnings in selected occupations in manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries)

Table 7*— WOOLEN AND WORSTED TEXTILES 1 /

Number of workers receiving straigjht-time hourly earnings of Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2 / ..

~ W 7 5 $0.80 $0.85 $ 0 .9 0 $ 0 .9 5 $T.oo $1.0$ ¥r.io » U 5 $ 1 .2 0 $1.25 $1 .3 0 $1 .3 5 $1.40 $1.45 $ 1 .5 0 $l.bO ITTTo $ 1.8 0 ¥1790 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .20' 82.5*'
and
under
.80

.8 5

.90

-

-

•»

1 .0 0

1.05

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

24
11

44
44
-

2
1
-

4
3
1
4
14
-

19
19
-

7
7
22

3

10

25
25
20
2
-

10
1
1

1
1

1 .3 5

1.40

16

18
2

1 .4 5

1.50

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1.80

1.9 0

2 .0 0

$2.40
and
2.40 over

2.10

2.20

2.30

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

19
3

12
12
—
12
12

11
-

-

-

7
-

5
«
*
-

Men
Card finishers, woolen and worsted, total •
•
Time .............. ........
Incentive ..................
Card strippers, woolen and worsted .........
Comber tenders, worsted ........... ....
Puller tenders, woolen and worsted......
Janitors ...........................
Loom fixers, woolen and worsted.........
Machinists, maintenance........... .
Truckers, hand......................
Weavers, woolen and worsted, total
....
Time......................
Incentive ....... ............
Box looms, automatic, total .........
Time ......................
Incentive ..................
Box looms, nonautomatio............

159

$1.18

124

1.17
1.23
1.24
1.12

35

61
39

60

1 .3 2

33

1.06
1.81
1.64

236
25
142

i.o 4

9^5

1.5**
l.Ug

34
9x 1
231

1.59

3^
197

1.48
1.6l

520

1.10
1.00
1.43
1.53
1.35

-

-

4

2

1.5^

13

4
l4

10
11

11

6
-

6
—
—

16
—
•
-

13
—
-

—

7
3

5
24
-

41
22
—

31
31
—

3

24
•
24

22

31
3

—

3

—
21

3
27

6
*3
6

3
30
—

30

-

■

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

70
10

73
1
-

13
1
-

75
—

63

^3
—

19

—

75
21
-

63
12

*3

-

-

12

16

26

21
U5

49

27

18
1
1
18

11
11

32
21
11

*3
3«
5

69
5

ik

-

-

5

1
37
10
?

6

-

3

3
6
2

1
35
11
12
1

k

3
1

1

-

1

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

5
-

16
-

-

3

6

19

20
-

12
-

6
-

-

-

70
—

ik l

70
l6
-

72
6
66
20
6

16

i4

3«

3«

28

2k

1

1 .5 0

25
167

-

3
52
—

-

2

^3
—

52
1
-

*3
4
-

42
6
36

1

4
38

17
6
6
—

' -

17

29

51

2

4l
6
35

18
18

2
15
1
8

1
30

17

7

-

11
10

5
8
2
6

6
9
3

—
l4l

-

167
15
152

8
-

k

9
—

—

9
-

-

9

k

3

- •
-

1
1

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

"

~

1

k

4

36
4
32
2

1

10
6
4
30

3«
-

83
15
68

16

Women
Comber tenders, worsted ...............
Doffers, spinning frame, Bradford system . .
.
Menders, cloth, woolen and worsted, total .
.
Time................. ....
Incentive..................
Spinners, frame, Bradford system ........
Spinners, frame, woolen ...............
Weavers, woolen and worsted
.........
Box looms, automatic ...............
Box looms, nonautomatic ..........
Winders, yarn, woolen and worsted, total
Time .................... • •
•
Incentive......... ........
Cone and tube, high speed, nonautomatic .
Cone and tube, slow speed, nonautbmatle .
Filling, automatic .I...............
Filling!.nonautomatic ...............

524
24l
2S3
533
100
255
70

119
551
*
U 55

1.06
1.10
1.3*
1.27

1 .3 1
1 .0 5
1 .0 3
1.14
1.04

99
191
3*

1.01

130

1.0 5

121

1.08

•
•

1

1

1

•*

-

*5
*3

6
6
m
e
12
12
11
7

2

4

37

7

2
6
—

4
••

20

54

-

-

23
-

7

61

7

58
3

-

3

4
—

-

10
3«
2
2

5l

36

6

10

230

102

5*

21
21

30
30
68

10

39
29
42

3

2

*•

8
—

9
2

268
262
6
*5
19
100
102

26

85
39
46

171
4

5
32

5

10

-

5
36

29
7
23

2
-

11

-

10
9
6

16
9
7

3
1
1

•*

10
10

4

•*

*•

-

99

13

7

42
57

1
8
1
6

3
13
7
6

1
11

4 .

1

4
2

-

2
1

-

k
2

w
>

e
*

—

m
m

2

1

5

3

3

-

-

1

■6

-

-

7

6

19

6
9

3

1 J The study covered woolen and worsted textile mills in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, N ew Jersey with more than 20 workers, Of the estimated 77 establishments and 8,550
workers in these establishments, 31 establishments with 6,265 workers were actually studied.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
2 j Excludes premium p ay for overtime and night work,
U. S. Department, of Labor
jy
Includes data for workers not shown separately.




Bureau of Labor Statistics

25

J

Table 8.— PAINTS AND VARNISHES 1

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
£/

Number of workers receiving straight'-time hourly earnings

'
$0.75 ■$0 .80 $0.85 $0.90

I5751T $1.0 0

0

i

$1.0 5 $1 . 1 0 $1 . 1 5 $1.2 0 $1 .2 5 $1 .3 0 $1 .3 5 $l.*+0 $1.1+5 $1 .5 0 $1.55 51.bC 1 0 5 " fiTTo”$1 .7 5 $1.80

fiTsr

$1.9 0 ?T795"

and
under

.80

.25 ... .3Q

1.00

•95

1.10

1.20

1.15

17

1.0 5

15
3

1 .2 5

1.30

10
1
26

ib
5
9
9

1 . 1+0 1.1+5 1.50

1-35

1.6 0

1 .5 5

1.70

1 .6 5

1.80

i-75

1.85

1.90

$2.00
and
over

2.00

1 .9 5

Men
Labelers and packers ................
Maintenance men, general utility ....
Mixers ...............................
Technicians .........................
Tinters ..............................
Varnish makers ......................

no

37
132
56

58
32

-

$1.23
l.* 3
1.35
1.19
1.5*

-

1.6 1

—

.98

8

6
3

-

-

-

9

1

-

-

b

5

-

-

3

-

-

b

27

1

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

6

2

5
-

u
1+

5

10
2

8
b

7
5

b

1

12
1
6

-

5

21
8
12
2

1

-

-

-

-

- .
6

b

-

—
-

-

5
1

2

7
5

i+

k

-

-

-

1

2
1

2
1

6

3

- ■

-

-

2b

5

-

-

3
b

-

l

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

—
-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

13

b
b

-

—
-

-

-

15

8

-

Women
Labelers and packers ................

19
+

-

-

-

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 7 workers in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey engaged in the manufacture of paints and varnishes (Industry 2851) as
defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19 U 5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Of the estimated 33 establishments and 2,320 workers in the industry, 11 establishments and 1,607 workers
were actually studied.
2 j Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

Table 9-— FERROUS FOUNDRIES 1/

-Occupation

Chippers and grinders
Coremakers, hand ....
Holders, floor .....
Time, . ............
Incentive .......
Molders, hand, bench
T i m e .............
Incentive .......
Molders, machine ....
T i m e .............
Incentive .......
Patternmakers, wood .
Shake-out m e n ......
Truckers, hand .....

Number
of
workers
306
136
201
170
31
60
51

9

118
70
1+8
58
90
30

Average
hourly
earnings

11

$i.*7
1.92
1.70

s
Numher of workers receiving straight-t; m hourly earning: of le
$1.05 $ 1 .1 0 $ 1 .1 5 $ 1 .2 0 $1.25 $1 .3 0 $ 1 .3 5 $1 .1+0 $ 1 .1+5 $ 1 .5 0 $1.60 *1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2.20 $ 2 .30 $2.U0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2.60 $ 2 .7 0 $2.80 $2.90

and
under

1 .1 5

1.66

-

-

1.79

-

-

-

1.2 9

-

1.19

5

1.6 5
2.00
1.68

1.7 8
1.6 5
1.96
1.92

27

b

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1.30

59

1.10

23

23

-

•
-

9
6

7
12

1 .3 5

l l o 1 .1+5 1 .5 0
.+
56

35

-

-

-

-

11

b

iU

-

5

-

-

12
1

b
b

—

2

33

1

1.6 0

1.70

1.80

12
18
13
11
2

10
65
133
131
2
11
++

13

7

-

-

1
1

7

m
m

l
—

1+2
2
3?
3*
5

k

2

—

2

29
26
3
10
5
5
36
32
1
+

-

1 .9 0
8

2.00

2.10

2 .2 0

2 .30

6
5
7

b

2

1

2
1

b

5

-

-

-

7

1
1

5

b

3
5

2

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

6

7

b

3

5

1

5
5

b

b

k

-

-

.6
2

7
Us

*
•

2 .1+0 2.50

5

-

-

-

b

3

5

2

1
1

•
•

*
•

—

1

—

•
l

2
7

-

1

1

-

2.60

2 .7 0

b

_

3
1

6

2.80

1

*•
—

5

•

-

3

1

-

3

*
—

1

—

2.90

.
1

1

_
—

3.00
1

-

$ 3 .0 0

and
over
6
5

—

-

1

-

-

-

-

—

1

-

—

1/ The study covered independent foundries in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, New Jersey with more than 20 workers, manufacturing castings from gray iron, malleable iron, or
steel. O f the estimated 19 establishments and 2,980 workers in the industry, 12 establishments with 2,679 workers were actually studied.
2 / Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May I95O
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U. S. Department of Labor




Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 10.— MACHINERY INDUSTRIES 1/

Occupation

2j

Assemblers, class A, total ............................. .
Time ............................ ................
Incentive .... ........ ..........................
Assemblers, class B, total ................................
T i m e .............................................
I n c e n t i v e ..... ............ .....................
Assemblers, class C ........................................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class A ................................ .................
Drill-^press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class B, total ...........................................
T i m e .................................. ..........
I n c e n t i v e .................... ..................
Drill-^press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class C ..................................................
W
T* r*1 an a maint.a«nn a a
»t
Engine-lathe operators, class A ...........................
Ingins-laths operators, class B, t o t a l ..... .............
Time .............................................
I n c e n t i v e ................. ....... ..............
Engine-lathe operators, class 0 ...........................
Grinding-machine operators, class A .... .................
Grinding-machine operators, class B .................. ..
Inspectors, class A * •............ ...... ................. .
.
Inspectors, class B .... ..................................
Inspectors, class 0 .......................................
Machinists, production ........................ ...........
Milling-machine operators, class A, total ................
T i m e .............................................
I n c e n t i v e .......................................
Milling-machine operators, class B .................
Milling-machine operators, class C, total .......... ;••••
T i m e ............ ................................
Incentive ........ ...................••.••••••••*
Tool u 4 die makers (jobbing shops) .......................
Tool and die makers (other than jobbing shops) ......... .
Welders, hand, class A .............. ............. ........
Welders, hand, class B ..........................

Number
of
workers

532
584
148

Average
hourly
earnings

Number of workers r<sceivi:ng str£light-time hourly earning
f? of '
$ 1 .1 0 ♦ 1 .1 5 $ 1 .2 0 $ 1 .2 5 n . 3 0 ‘$1 .3 5 $i.ho 1 0 5 1 1 .5 0 81.40 $1 .7 0 $1.80 $1 .9 0 $2.00 $2.10 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $2.40 $2Tur $2.80
Under i i .05
.and
$ 1 .0 5
1.10 1.15 1.20 1 .2 5 1.30 1-35 i.4o 1 .4 5 1.50 1.6 0 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2.40 2.60 2.80 over

a

-

-

1
1

16
16

-

16

13
13

49
49

47

-

-

16

50

112
89
23
22

m
m

—

9

2
2

3
2
1

8
5
3

—

12

18

$ 1 .6 3

338

1 .5 4
1.8 6
1.4 9
1 .3 7
1.68
1 .4 4

21

-1

56

1 .5 2

—

—

104
47
57

1 .3 5
1 .2 5
1 .4 4

*
•

122

1.24
1 .67 '
1.80
1.52
1.47
1.55
1.33
1.62
1.58
1.77
1.51
I .3 2
1.6l

862
541

321

159
311
212
85
127
95
91
393
131
481
110
363
243
143
100

254
61
3^
27
239

46o
212
149
200

1 .7 6
1 .6 3
1.94

1 .6 7
1.42
1.20

1.6 9

12

*
8

67

a
m
h
—
—
-

2.00
1.77

-

1 .2 3
I .8 3

4
m
m

1.68

mm

—
—
•
*

1
m
m

8
h
11
11
-

2
1
1
—
h
22
10
8
2

34

3

4o
4

5

3

7

5

5

4

h

21
16
5

lh

16

7
4

5

15

3

1
1

13

1

1

10
6
4

30

21

11

11

6
1
5
29
3^
23
12
5
5

13

67

3
-

13
10
2
8
hh

3
25
24
5
12
3
14
119
20
7
- .
18
16
2
ho
lh
7

6

-

1

28
—

56

56
*
*

6

h

1

.-

-

32
32

20

25
-

.
1
-

52
51
1
210
170

42
4l
1
64
46
18

25

2

3
19

5

8
2?
14
11
12
11
19
57

1
-

1
13
22
22
18
4
4
5
15
1
23
18

2
1
1

3£
36

12
2
—
2

27
1
—
1

-

2

5

61
1
16

1
8
29

1
9
6

108

2
2

h
h
-

6

22

22
11

7

64

6

32
3

11
8

7
2h

19
28

58
17

hs
h8
22
22
9

2

6

5

—

—

1

—

—

—

—

1

2
2

—

—

—

—

—

-

1

1
1

—

—

1
lh
2h
9
-

1
5
21
3
-

1

—

—

—

—

—

—

*57
j1
19
9
3

9
3
-

6

9

3

7
1
1

13
-

13
-

28
-

8
-

•-

2
h7

5
5
2

5
8
1
h

6

1

1
3

1

2
2

-

-

'5
5
13
2
—
2

-

-

5
5

lh
lh

10
2

11
1

1

—

-

1
1
1
-

-

74
44
30

3
9
5
29
24
5
8
-

1

&

3
9
9
7
5
—

5
6
6
8
23

95
74
21
96

79
29

65
h9

16

13

5

26

V
68
12
56

hh

22
10
12

26

18

3*
19
47
3
73
13
2
11

175
21
1

3?
4
—
4
2
17
20
h

23

230
26
13
13
10
—
-

10
15
-

27
59
51
8

6
1
—
1
29

17
10
7
19

125
9
18
10
8
7
-

29

13
2
11
58

11
2
9
12
2
—
2

ll6

no

139

>
11

12

18
15

4
33

6
58

2

1
57
2
lh
8

6

22

7

3

1
•-

6
13

20

2

52
5

2
66
*3

49
9

—

—

3
11

3

9
h
5

—

m
m

6

2
2
2
2
1

10
10

h

-

m
m

-

-

-

3
3

2

1

-

9
2

lh
-

-

-

-

1

2

h

3

-

1

l/ The study covered establishments in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania,and Camden County, New Jersey with more than 20 workers in non-electrical machinery industries (Croup 35 ) as defined in the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19h5 edition) prepared by the Bureau, of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were scheduled. Of the estimated lh2 establishments and
29,020 workers in these industries, h2 establishments with 19,015 workers were actually studied. These data relate to November 19^9* Between the date of survey and June 1 1950» 5 relatively small companies of the
,
h2 establishments studied granted wage increases averaging about 5 cents an hour.
2 j Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 199°
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U. S. Department of Labor




Bureau of Labor Statistics

27

Table 11.— SLECTEtCAL 21ACHIH3HT if

Humber
hourly w w
of
and
earnings
workers
under
2/
.80

Occupation and sex

$ 0 5

Humber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of $0.9 0 $ o r $1.00 $i75<r $1715" $ n r r $ 1 .26' $1725 $ 1 .3 0 $1 .3 5 f I T W $17115 $1750 $ i 7 W f u

•85

.90

—

—
—

135

**3

—
20

.95

1 .0 0

1 .0 5

1.10

1.20

2
210

-

2
10

—
2

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

12
28
3*

25
53
41

227

17
20

iu7
82
25

k2

35

1 .2 5 ■A.Jg- . 1.15. 1.1*0

1.15

W l O i r $17 W $ 0 5 " $ o r $ 2 .20

k

11

15

13

—

11

23

12

9

—

—

5

—
19

2

—

—

—

*7

kz
Ik

—
12

-

k

-

-

-

-

13
3

lk

12

3

i.i*5

2.00

2.10

29

2.20

2 .3O

30

$ 2 .30
and
over

Men

$1 . 8 0

1.0^3

1.65
1.16

—
-

65

I .69

—

—

-

-

1.51

3a
565

Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,
class B . . . . ......................................................................
Drill-press operators, single- and multiple-spindle,

-

k
3
-

- ■

10

2
18H

-

-

3

—

—

—

2

—
-

—
-

—
-

—
-

-

—
-

-

-

-

—
11

m

1.1*0
1.66
1.20
1.82
1.32
1.80

*
•
-

303

1 .2 7

1

6

-

19

If8

C .............................................. .

{*5

3

-

-

2

-

-

12

2

kz

1
?
7*

-

10

-

1

2

1

2

4

3

15

2

5
-

10

- ,
1

-

—
1

Homan
Testers, class

C ........................... ........................ .

-

1
12
39

4

a
-

20

-

-

10

lk

—
-

—

—
-

29
181
92

8

7

—
18

—

1

96

Electricians, m a i n t e n a n c e ................ ......... ...

Testers, class

-

-98

k

5
1

1

26

-

-

-

13
3

5

1
4

12

-

-

10

-

1

3

4

8

-

28

kk

&

23

a

18

12

15
1
1

20

lk

-

—
1

10

k

10

1

24
-

22
6
l

3

y*

-

1
-

8

5

-

2

1

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

21

-

-

3

-

-

1

3

3

3

k

-

1+

-

8

4

-

-

-

-

-

—

J

1
The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers in Philadelphia, Delaware, Bucks, Chester and Montgomery Counties, Pennsylvania, end Camden, Gloucester and Burlington Counties, Hew Jersey, manufaoturing electrical machinery equipment and supplies, (except electric lamps and insulated wire and cable) (Groups 361 , 362 , 3 ^ » 366 and 369 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (I9U 5 edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget, Of the estimated 23 establishments, and 33*660 workers in these industries, 15 establishments with 2^,933 workers were actually studied,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

T a b le 1 2 .— DIPAKTHENT STOKES 1 /
JLverage
Yf in
num­
b e r M eekly H o u rly W eekly
of
sched­ ean>- e a rn work­ u le d
in g s
e rs ho urs
T
2/

O ccu p a tio n and sex

Humber o f w o rke rs re c e iv in g s tr a j
Lme w e ekly e a m iilg s o f $
$
$
I
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.0 0 32.50 35.00 37 .50 1 0.00 1 2.50 U5.00 *17.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7.50 60. 70 . 80 .
*

$

$

$

$

$

$

1—
$
$
$
1
$
90 . 100 . 110 . 120 . 130. ll* 0 . $

150.
and
*
25.00 27.50 30.00 ? 2 . ?o 35.00 37 -50 1 0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 **7 .5 0 50.00 ?2-? ° 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 70 . 80. 90 . 100 . 110 . 120 . 130 . 1 U0 . 150 . o v e r

under

Men
E le v a to r o p e ra to rs , passenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
aVtara fn m $ tni*A
_ _____ _____ ____
f i t t e r s , men1 s garm ents .............................................. ..
H n llr
_______ _ . _______
A nv 1 a1 senAWfl 1
...
r\tr /»1 a rlra 1 /*!*AcVarfl 1
_______________________
S a le s c le r k s :
B edspreads, d ra p e rie s , b la n k e ts
Boys* c lo th in g • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • » • • • • •
f lo o r c o v e rin g s
fu r n itu r e and be d d in g
Housewares (e x c e p t c h in a , g la s s w a re ,a n d la m ps) .
M a jo r a p p lia n c e s ( r e fr ig e r a to r s , s to v e s ,
w ashers e t c . ; e xclu d e s ra d io s and te le v is io n ) .
M en*s c lo th in g .......................... .......................................
Men*s furnishings
Vomen*s shoes
/tlnnAyi
I f \a V kioti
s/

aal 1 4f 0 earfl f% •
i
n

inMlimitA

_ __
.....

T a ilo r s , a lte r a tio n , men*s garm ents

112
*8

110
289

201

. . . _____

1 0 .0
*
10 .0
*
1 0 .0
*
10 .0
*

10 .0
*
1 2 .0
*
1 2^0
*
111
188 - 1 2^0
+
22
41.5
18
25

73

86

. 1*6

21

513
...

1 0 .0
*
U o.o

2T&
55

11 .0
*

1 2 .0
*
1 1 .0
*

$ i.o 6
1 . 1*1
1 .7 1
•9 6

1.0 1

l.O t*

56.50
68.50
38 .5 0
1*0.50
U1 .5 0

2.75
1.13

-

l l 20

m

m
.

m
m
8

m
m
7
3

1

1

—

21

ii

—

_

1

lk

m
m
lk
11

k

2d 7

22

R
j

m.

-

87

33

*3

37

m.

m.

1

1
1

33

2
1
1

2
2

2

2

95.00
1 9 .0 0
+
Q .5 0

—

_
M
m
<50
jv

l. iu

1

—
_

78

PI

RX
Jj

m
m

5

5

2

R2
JC
-

i5
**

1
1
k

1

m
m

9

m
m

1
1**
1
163

58.50

1

1

—

1

m
m

8

2

2
2
1

1
3

3

2

m
m

1

8

2

16
3-

2
1

2
2
1
1

1
1
1

1

2

p

2
1

4
1

1
1

1
2

2
7

1

108

2
1

1

m
m
m
m

9 U .0 0

•4

1 .U6

a
i[

2
—

2 .2 3
2 2b

1

23
—
e
_

6 0.50
1.51
I. 5I
*
6U .5 0
2.4^ 10 2.50

1*2.5

1*0 .0
1*0 .0
1*0 .0

$**2.50

3

1
1

5

l

1
1

1

1

9

2

6

2
5

t

1

3

2

16
1
10
8

2

w

3

1
5

1?
21

1
1
8
21

9
15

13

2
2

10

15

22

13

11

m
m

m
m

m
m

m
m

ii*

8

19

18

10
21

1%

7

3

3
3

3

18

4

w

7

2

6
29

X
m
m

1
12

7

1

1

<f

u
17

6

V

6
5

38

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nay 1950
I , S. Department of Labor
T
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 1 2 .— DEPARTMENT STORES l/ - Continued

25.00 2 7 .5 0 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.5 0 Ho. 00

¥

¥

8

-p-e*
, .°

Occupation and sex

Number of workers receiving straJLght-t!Lrae weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
.
$

1
$
$
$
i
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7.5 0

H2.50 H5.00 H 7.50 50.00 L o

5 5 .0 0 57.50 60. 70. 8 0 .

¥

¥
$
$
90. 100. 110 . 120. 130. 1H0. $

150.
and

x?

¥

1°
'g

Average
Num­
ber Weekly Hourly Weekly
sched­ earn- earn- 22.50
of
and
work­ uled
■under
T
ers hours
T

H5.00 H 7.50 50.00 52 .50 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 7 ° . so . 9 0 . 100. 110 . 120. 1 3 ° . 1H0. 150. over

Women
Cashier^wrappers ............ ..................... ..
Elevator operators, passenger ............ .
V4 tf awfl t f m Y I0 cot'pmnt.fl
.Aoi
A
Sales clerks:
Bedspreads, draperies, blankets ............ .
T Tm i eao
I
na/iVutteT*
. ____ ___
t)Aira1 ■Pw*« 4 a i4n o e
V
*
.... . . . ..

e*

Housewares (except china, glassware,and lamps) .
Vavi 1 f
f
0^14ncrfi
*. . . .> «
W ^4 And
a
mm4 •
>
_ __ _ _ ___

eta

Piece goods (yard goods, upholstery fabrics)....
Silverware and jewelry (excluding
costume j e w e l r y ) ..... .
Women’s accessories (hosiery, gloves,handbags) .
Women’s and misses 1 dresses .............. ..
Women’s shoes •••••••••••.......... ........ ..
Women’s and misses’ suits and coats ••••••••••••
Sewers, alteration, women’s garments ........ .

a,

.

1/

Zj

• * .

j•

349
S3
83

8H
6H
*51
155
92
£5
T

92
Hi
179

182

123
U5

99

pOK

Ho.o
Ho.o
HO.O

$0 .7 8
1.0 6
1 .1 3

$31.00
H2.50
H5.00

HO. 5
Ho. 5
Ho. 5

1 .1 1
.9 1
• y*
1.0 0
.96
.96
.88
.96

> 5 .0 0
■ 57.00
H0.50
39.50
^8.50
36.00
39.00

1.0 0
.95
1.09
1.19
1 .3 5
1 .0 8

Ho. 50
3? . 0 °
HH.50
H9.50
56.OO
H3.OO

•70
(v

28.00

Hl.O

Ho.O
H l.O
HO. 5
H0.5
H l.O
H l.O
H i. 5
H i. 5
HO.O
HO.O

9

Ho

72

73

13H

-

-

-

-

-

M
W

l

1
s
2

1

-

3

T
?

1

-

33

50

1

-

~

-

-

-

18

56

2

13

10

5

7
l

2

1
7

2

3

5

1
1
1

-

2
1

l

-

H

1

1
1
1
6
lH

2
1

27

6

8
10
6

16
9
j
p
30

17

23
18

12

g

2
20
9
7

2

2
11
1
1

7

15

18

9

11

13

5

3

3

8

7
32

6
16

3

-

-

21

2
10

2

26

7

5

1

1
2

-

23

19

15

8
7

8
8

?

12

8
10

8
10
10

8

ll
H
6
2

19

10

60

9

5

5

9

3

2

-

-

9

-

2

-

3

-

R7
j f

g
26

2
16
10
8
-

1

2H

1

H

H

3

6

,3
H9

1R
lH

q
j

31
15
9

H
7
lH
21

C.

p

5

k

7
j

6

7
9
7

l

-

~

-

•

-

•

—

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

1

T

a#

6

2

2

1

7

1
2

2

1
H

-

M
t

3

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

l

7

H
H
2

All 8 stores in this industry, employing 19,015 workers were studied.

13 .— M B P S AND BOYS1 CLOTHING STORES 1/

Table

2/

-

1

H

The study covered department stores in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania,and Camden County, New Jersey, employing more than 25° workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime.

Occupation

-

-

17

10
H

87

2

-

6
l
11
10
16

1
1

PR

w
m
-

-

2

-

1

18

ji um­
ber
Weekly Hourly Weekly Under 1 —
------- $—
$
—
11—
1 ------ ------T ~ ~T "
1—
------ 1 ------- $—
1
T—
1—
T“
of
sched­ earn- earof $
32.50 35.00 37.50 HO*60 H2.50 H5.00 H7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 5 7 .5 0 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 7 2 .5 0 75. 8 0 . 85 . 90. 95 .
work­ uled
3 2 .5 0
ers hours
T
35.00 37.50 Ho. 00 H2.50 H5.OO H7.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57 . 5 Q 60.00 62.50 £5.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.OO 80 . 85. 90 . ? 5 . 100.

1

¥

¥

¥

¥

¥

¥

r~

T~

r

Titters, m e n 1s garments
Porters, day ( c l e a n e r s ) ........... .
Receiving clerks (checkers) ........
Sales clerks:
H e n 9s clothing ........... .
M e n ’s f u r n i s h i n g s .............. .
Stockmen, selling sections .........
Tailors, alteration, m e n ’s garments

\J

27
3H

10
102
11H
20
88

H6.5 $i .7H
HH.O
.8 3
.92
H5 .5
H6.0
^7 .5
HH.5
Ho. 5

1

$ 8 1 .0 0
3 6 .5 0
4 2 .0 0

8

l.HS

11

2

2

2

-

-

7 8 .5 0

-

..
-

-

-

36.00
60.00

8

3

3

1

2.21 101.50
1 .6 5
.8 1

3

3

H

1

-

..

1
1
1
1

1
1

1
2

1
1

-

5

2

H

1 -----100.
and
over

2

2

1

H

7 10 10
11 11 17

6
6

7
5

*3

5

1

1
-

1

-

1

1
2
1
8

2
1

3

2

2

H

3

5

5

5

7

9

39

22

9

2

1

«.

2

1

2

-

3

-

2

3
-

H

The study covered m e n ’s and boys’ clothing and furnishing stores in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, employing more than 20 workers,

2

1

1

15

1

All l6 stores in the Industry employing 922 workers were studied.

2/ Data limited to men workers,
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime.




Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
T . S. Department of Labor
J
Bureau of Labor Statistics

29
Table lH.— WOMEN*S BSAOT-TO-WEAR STOKSS 1/

$

*5

*

52.50 5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 6 7.50 70.00 72 .50 $
75.00

8

, —
4

$

f

1+0.00 U2.50 i+5.00 1+7.50
H2.50 1+5.00 1+7.50 50.00

5 5 .0 0 57.50 60.00 6 2 .5 0 65.00 6 7.50 70.00 72 .5 0 75 .0 0 over

snd

22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 15.00 3 7 . 50 ,

O

Occupation a n d sex

H umber of workers receiving sisraighl>-time weekly r earniLngs of ?
$
+
>
$
$
$

$
w .o o 32.50 35.00

4=
*

Average
HumWeekly Hourly Weekly $
$
$
$
b er
20.00 2 2 . 5 ° 25.00 2 7.5 0
sched­ e a r n ­ earn­
of
and
ings
ings
uled
work­
under
hours
2/
2/
ers

Men
S
Rl

s

Re c e i v i n g clerks (ch e c k e r s )
A a 1««m a w

Aa ! 1 4 M

7
1

fl A A 4* 4 AV\ O

Uo 0
^0,0
i+oio
io
+

.o

$ 1.01
1.0 0
•1°
fiq

$kn R0
1*0.00
36^00
27 *50

P
C.
0
<
L

2

2

i*

1

IQ

6
6

q
p

6
1

2

p
c.

2

1
*

6

-

7
J
17

pi

7

2
1
+

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

9

2

1

-

-

6

-

-

-

i+

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

5
3

3
2

5
3

3

2
2

2
1

2
1

1
1

-

—

Women

68

flV 4 AW «.A>». A A A t l S

7R

p p

Uo.o
1*0,0

70
S a l e 8 clerks*
Blouses and neckwear
^ifAtn AW 1 e

A AAA

0 aaw 4

.......................................................................... ............................

a Iam a w

l/

0 a1 1 4 n

r * r» A a f 4

51

uo.o
1+0,0
1+0.0
Uo.o

70
i w

A fl

Women*s dresses ......................................................................................• ....................•
Women* s suits and coats .................................................................. ...
Sewers, alteration, women*s g a r m e n t s ......... .
C 4* a

39 .5

a t »C

••

173
*7
192
72

1 0 .0
+

1+0.0

1 .1 5

7 0* p 0
.5 ^
7g *50
$ 5 .5 °

.91

36.50

. p
•9p ^

1 7 • v-,w
j 1 .0 0

•76
*

7

j

-

-

-

-

«

2

3
3

l.U

UU.50

_

3

2

6
6

1 - 3^

5 3 .5 0
ft l .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

l.o U
• 67
'•V

25.00

R

17

25

The study covered women*s ready-to-vear stores In Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania,

J

10

2

2

7

g
R
J

11

11

2

5

7

13

3

7

12

12

1

1
6
12
8

R
J

12

12

5

-

2
l6

2
U
2

11
12
3

11

50

£
12

3

5
15

21

12

employing more than 50 workers.

1*43

15

6

-

-

1
+

2

2

9
7
5

7
8

7
7

1

5

2

-

i*

6

Of the estimated 15 establishments and 2 ,9 5 0 workers in these stores, 1 0 establishments w ith

2,515 workers were actually studied,
2/ Excludes premium p a y for overtime.




Table 1 5 .— BANES 1/

lU

S, Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

30
Table 16.— HOME OFFICES OF LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES l/

—
T— 1 $
Hourly
Weekly
Weekly
scheduled earnings earnings
of
hours
work e r s
2/
2/

Number
O c cupation an d sex

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of $
$
$
$
$
—

1

1

$

1

$

1

$

$

$ 1
$

r

$

1

1
*
*
95.
22.50 25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 $0.00 1*2.50 1 5 .0 0 1 7 .5 0 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70. c» 72.50 75. 8 0 . 8 5 . 90.
and
under
100.
25.00 27.50 30.00 32.50 35.00 3 7 -5 ° $0.00 U 2 . 50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00 52.50
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 7 5 .0 0 8 0 . 8 5 - 9 0 .

$

$

$

3S
L

g 3S
a -

Men
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g .........
P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s ..........
Section h e a d s .............. .

22
12

36.0

3 ^ .0
3 5 .5

$0.97
1.53
2.1$

$35.00
52.00
76.00

-

2
■-

1.03

36.00
30.00
31.50

-

2
16

2

%.5°

-

2
•
•

21

22

75

bz

30
15

19

lb

10

15

2

2

-

-

-

5

lb

25

38

"

“

2
—

-

3
2
*
•

2
•
•

2

—

1
2

2
—

3
3

60

2
•
•

—

27

12

8

5

b

-

-

2

-

17
10

6
“

2
9

1
7

1
2

—

3

b

6

2

1

8

•
•

3

6

12

7

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

—

*
•

*
•

—

—

1

\.

—

1

—

3

—

—

*
•

—

Women
Clerks, a c c o u n t i n g ....... .
Clerks, file, class B ......
Clerk-typists ...............
Clerks, u n derwriters .......
Prem i u m acceptors ..........
Section heads ...............
Stenographers, g e n e r a l .....
Underw r i t e r s ................

l/

l ?3
167
83
5
13
3&

177
6

3 5 .0
3 5 .5
3*. 5
3 3 .0
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 2 .5

.8 5
.9 1
1 .3 2

uu.oo

1.2$

1 .5 6

55.50

1.01

36.00
68.00

2.09

2

2
-

-

-

2

-

35

23

15

2

-

-

—
9

1
1

1

8

-

11

3
2

6

2

2
1

h

2

2

. 2

•
*

*

The study covered home offices of life insurance companies in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania,with more than 20 workers.

Of the estimated lg establishments and 2,870 workers in this industry 9 establishments

with 2,272 workers were actually studied,
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime.
Table 17.— POWER LAUNDRIES 1/

Occupation and sex

Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers
1/

✓-time hourly earnings of Number of workers receiving s ;raigh1
$ 0,600 $ 0,6 25 $ 0,650 $ 0,675 $ 0,700 $ 0 ,7 2 5 $0,750 $ 0 ,775 $0.80 $0.85 $0.90 1 ^ 9 5 $ 1 .0 0 $ 1.0 5 $1.10 $ 1 .1 5 $ 1 .2 0 $ 1 .2 5 11730 $ 1 .3 5 $1.1*0 $1.^5 $ 1 .5 0
$1-55
and
and
under
1.1*0 J a ! 2 . 1.50 _ L J > i over
1 .3 0
1.00 1.05 1.10 1-15 1.20
.800
.JO
•700
.6 75
.750
.6 50
.725
.624
■«5
•775

Men
Extractor operators, total .................
Time .....................................
Incentive .......................... .
Firemen, stationary b o i l e r ...........
Washers, machine, t o t a l ...................
T i m e .............. ......................
I n c e n t i v e ........... ............. ......
Wrappers, bundle ...........................

95
S5

10

b5
109
92
17

22

$0.83
.82
•99
1.11
1.08
1.09
l.Ol*
.7*

-

-

-

-

300
261

8
8
—
-

10

•
*
*
•

5

lho

bb

182

8

U*

36

8

lb
ib

1

19
19
-

12
12
—

b

bz

-

b
b

16
16

-

6
6
6
-

ib
lb
-

20
18
2
1

i
*

1
3

5
5
9
23
15
8

4

xl
6

•
•

—

—

•
•

b

—
—
—
r
*

—
•
•

“
“

•
•

b

6
—

—

—

b

•
•

1
12
12
■
*

—
-

•
*
-

—
-

—
—

—
—

—
•
*

•
“
—

—

4

3

2

—

—

•
*

*•

•
*

10
U8

b
b6

3

1*6

12

■-

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

2
—
—
—

2

1*8

—
—
—
•
•

"
•

12

—

—
-

-

21

10

El
58
58
5

11

—

1
1

6
3
3
1

b

1
1

—
6
6
-

15
13
2
—

1

-

b

—

Women
Finishers, flatwork, machine, t o t a l .......
Time .....................................
Incentive ...................... .........
I d e n t i f i e r s .............. ..................
Markers, t o t a l ........... ‘ .................
.
Time .....................................
Incentive ...............................
Pressers, machine, shirts, total ..........
T i m e .....................................
I n c e n t i v e .............. .................
Wrappers, bundle ...........................

7Uh
596
148
181
237
107

130
680
179
501

156

.66
.65
.71
•73
•73
.66
•78
.79
.70
.82
.71

39
12

12
mm

27
12
15

22

8

J

ibo
35
87
73

1$
61*

63
3?

—

26
16
10
20
15

9
-

1

—

bz

b

25

25

61
12

1

7
8
9

2

-

2

-

23

25
55
4
51

10

1
136

7
99

b
z

&
M
b
lb
10

h9

—

—
—

1 %1

-

mm

*
*

2b

1 / The study covered power laundries in Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania,and Camden County, Hew Jersey with more than 20 workers.
industry, 17 establishments with 2,136 workers were actually studied.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.




*
“
*
*

2

36

9
39

-

-

Of the estimated 70 establishments and h,810 workers in this

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May I95O
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31
Table 1 8 .— AUTC REPAIR SHOPS l/

Number
of
workers

Occupation 2/

Uigj
324

Body repairmen, metal, total ...... ,••••••••••••..... ••••»•

Time ......... ........................... .................
Incentive ................ ................ ...... .
Electricians, automotive ................ ............ .
Mechanics, automotive, class A, total
T i m e ...... .......... ............ .......................
I n c e n t i v e ..........................••••••....... .
Mechanics, automotive, class B, t o t a l ...... ............. .
Time ............ ....... ............ .............. .
I n c e n t i v e .............. .................................
Ws shers, automobile ............... ...... ............ ......

170
18
396
1.635
764
871

594
422
172
549

Average
$0.65 $ 0.70
hourly
and
earnings
under
2
.75
•7°

/

Number of workers recedLving straiglit-time hourly earnings of 8 0 W 7 8 5 $0.90 $0.95 $1.00 $ 1.10 $1.20 $1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $ 1.20 $1.90 $27051 $ 2.20 $2740

W J5 W
.80

.85

.90

_

1.51

-

lh
-

-

•

2.02

2.03

-

.89

36

1.60

29

58

1;4S
1.70
1.31
1.20
1.57
.92

-

26
26
-

13
1
1
•
-

32

5^

200

-

-

—
62

-

1.00

1.10

l4
l4
—

33
30
3
-

32

—

-

$ 1.69

.95

75
42
_
42
85
79
6
23

1
1

_
22
17
5

_
25
25
53

1.20

1.30

16

69
63
6
23

-

16
52
22
30

265

61

155
110
104

55
6
.9

93
ll
27

1.50

1.60

1.70

3
-

33
14

3
-

19
-

65
62
3
3

9
22
lh

3

-

33
30
3
3

154
74
80

311
220
91

265
201

42

32
-

16

32
6

16

1.40

62
76
70
6
6

65
65
6

1.80

1.90

2.00

84

22
16

9

64

65

-

30

19
_

6
_

9
3

127
57
70

87
87

34
13
21

3*
122
.
.
122

-

_
_

3

9

.

17
25
3

64

-

2.20

$ 2 .80

2.60

2.80
22

3

6
—
6

6

3

2.40
3

2h
—
38

3*

3*
3

-

2k
-

22
6
—
6
3

3

3.00

$ 3.00
and
over

6
6
6
6
-

12
12
—
12
12
3

3

1f
The study covered establishments in P h iladelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, N e w Jersey with more than h workers in general automobile repair shops (Group 753 ^) ©ad m o t o r vehicle
dealer establishments, n e w and u s e d (Group 5 5 1 ) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19^9 edition) p r epared b y the B u r e a u of the Budget.
Of the estimated 3^3 establishments and 7 *^3 ^ workers
in these industries, 26 establishments w i t h 9 5 O workers were actually studied.
2 / Data limited to m e n workers.
3/ Excludes premium p a y for overtime a n d night work.
UNION W A G E SCALES
(Minimum wage rates and ma x imum straight-time hours p er week agreed u p o n through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions.
Bates and hours are those in effect in July 1 9 5 0 )
Table 19.--.BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

Classification

Philadelphia and
Delaware Counties, Pa.
Hours
Rate
per
per
hour
week

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

1j
2/

$ 2,675
2.75
3.25
2.525
2.525
1/ 2.875
2- 94
.

ko
ko
?5
ko
ko
ko
ko

2.90

ko

2.525
-

ko

2.175

2 .8 5
2 / 2 .1 5

The scale for electricians in Delaware County was $ 2 .7 5 aa hour
The scale for painters in Delaware County was $ 2 .0 5 an hour.




Classification

Camden County, N. J.
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Journeymen - Continued

Journeymen
Asbestos workers .......... ........................ .
Boilermakers.... ....................... ...........
Bricklayers .............. ....... ..................
C a r p e n t e r s.... ................................ ..
Cement f i n i s h e r s .............. ........... .........
Electricians..... ...... ........... ...............
Elevator constructors ..............................
Engineers— Power equipment operators Building constructions
Heavy equipments
Cranes, power shovels ........ ............. ..
Medium equipments
Toumapulls, carry-alls .....................
Hoists, central power ulants ................
Light equipments
Compressors and pumps ............. ••••••••••
Lathers ........................ ................... .
Painters ........................ .............. .....

Philadelphia and
Delaware Counties, Pa.
Hours
Rate
per
per
hour
week

Camden County, N. J.

-

$ 2,625

2.94

ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho

3 .0 0

ho

3 .0 0
3 .0 0

2.50
2.40

3 .0 0

-

3 .0 0

ho

ko

2.75

ho

ko
ko

2 .8 5
2 .3 0

ho
ho

Paperhangers ............... ........................
Plasterers .............. ......... ............. ..
P l u m b e r s ...........................................
Hodmen .............. ........... ...... .............
Roofers, composition ............. ........ .
Sheet-metal workers .............. ............... .
Steam f i t t e r s ....................... ..............
Structural-iron workers
.... ...... ...... ........
Tile l a y e r s ....................................... .

$ 2,132

3.00
2.75

2.40
2.375
2.575
2.75
2.80
2.75

ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho

$ 2.30

2.80
2.275
2.575
2.75
2.80
2.55

ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho
ho

1.70

ho

1.6 0
2.06
2 .10

ho
ho
ho
ho

3.00
2.75

Helpers and laborers

Bricklayers1 tenders ............ ....... ...........
Building l a b o r e r s ...... ...... ....... ............ .
Elevator constructors1 h e l p e r s ..... ............ .
Plasterers1 l a b o r e r s .......................... .
Tile layers* h e l p e r s .......... .

1.475

1 .4 7 5

2.06
2.00
2.00

ho

ho
ho
ho
ho

1 .8 5

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

32
OTIC® WAGE SCALES - Continued

Table 20.,— BAKERIES
(Philadelphia County, P a . )

Classification

Bread and cake— Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Head ovenmen .................. ..........
Bough mixers, icing m i x e r s ...... .
Bench and machinemen ........ ........ .
Traveling-oven f e e d e r s .... ............
Baiting helpers, pan grea sers ...........
Wrappers, icers (women) ............ .
Agreement B:
Tray- and traveling-oven supervisors,
m i x e r s .......... ..................... .
Tray- and traveling-oven feeders .......
Bench hands, machine o p e r a t o r s ...... .
Bakery helpers, pan greasers ...........
Wrappers, icers (women) ............. .
Agreement C:
Head h e n c h m e n ............. .............
Mixers, traveling-oven operators ......
Benchmen and divider operators .........
General baking helpers, pan greasers ...
Icers (women) ........ ..................
Wrappers ( w o m e n ) .... ...................
Agreement D:
Working foremen .........................
Dough mixers, ovenmen ............ ......
Bepchmen ........ ....... ....... .........
Pan greasers1 helpers ............... .
Wrappers and icers (women) .............

Table 21.— LOCAL TRANSIT OPERATING EMPLOYEES - Continued

Hate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

.
County and classification

Ea.te
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Camden
$ 1.62
1.52
1.58
1.555
1.315
!.°3

1.^5
1.555
1.505
1.25

1.005
1.63
1.5%
l.%5
l.3l
1.105

1.065
1.55
1.35
1.21

1.05
.9 0

Ho
Ho
HO
Ho
HO
Ho
Ho
Ho
HO
Ho
HO
HO
Ho
Ho
Ho
Ho
Ho

Bus drivers:
First 3 m o n t h s ....................... ..
H to 12 months ................. .
After 1 year ............................

$ 1.55

1.57
1.59

Hit
55
55

1.29

55

1.31
1.33

55

1.35
1.30

55
55

1 .3 3

5g

55

Ho
Ho
Ho
Ho
Ho

County and classification

Hours
per
week

Table 22.— MALT LK?TORS
(Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pa., and
Camden County, N. J . )

Philadelphia
Operators and conductors:
1-man cars and busses:
First 3 months
H to 6 months .................... ..... .
7 to 9 m o n t h s .......«...... .......... .

Classification

i.w
1.525
i <55

HH
HH
HH
HH
HH

1.27
1.295
1.32
1.355
1.37

HH
HH
HH
HH
HH

$1.35

1.375

2-man cars:




Bate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Beer:
3rewery— K e g .............................
Helpers ......... ......................
Distributor— Bottle and keg
Helpers ....................... ........
Building:
Construction— E x c a v a t i n g ............... .
Material .......................... .
Lumber ....... ............ ............
Plumbing supply ..................... .
Coal ............................ ........... .
H e l p e r s .... .......................... .
General ......... ......... ....t.............
Freight:
Local •••••............. „..... ........
Helpers ......................... .
Newspaper and magazine:
Day:
Agreement A ..... ...... ............ ..
Agreement B ...................... .
Magazines .......................... .
Day and night .......................... .
Bailway express ......... ....................

$1 ,7 3 5
1.6 6

HO
HO
HO
HO

1 .5 0

1.2 5

1 .3 5 8
1 .5 0

HO
HO
HO
HO
HO.
HO
Ho

1 .5 0
1 .3 2 5

HO
HO

1 .7 2 5

1 .5 9 9

HO
Ho
HO
HO
Ho

1 .5 0
1 .2 5

HO
Ho

1 .6 5

Ho
HO
Ho
HO
HO
HO
Ho
HO

1 .5 5
1 .5 0

1 .6 0
1.6 5
1 . 51 S

1 .6 7 7
i.6 o
1.788

Camden

Table 21.— LOCAL TRAKSIT OPERATING BtPLOYEES

Bate
per
hour

County and classification

Philadelphia

Delaware
Agreement A:
Bus drivers:
First 3 months ...................... .
H to 6 months ....... ........ ........
After 1 year .........................
Agreement B:
Operators and conductors:
1-man cars and busses ............ .
2-man car s .......................... .
Agreement C:
1-man car o p e r a t o r s ....................

Table 2 3 .— MOTORTRUCK DRIVERS AID HELPERS

Apprentices, first y e a r .............
Apprentices, second year «............
Box r e p a i r m e n ............................
Labelers and crowners, pasteurizers,
soaker-washers, all around workers,
men-in-charge of necking ............. .
Machine bottlers and fillers ......... .
Malt millers, first men in bottling
house, syroo mixers .......... .
First men ............ ......................

Bate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$59.00
61.0 0
62.50

Ho
Ho
HO

65.00
66.00

HO
HO

68.00
70 .0 0

HO
Ho

Beer:
Distributor— Bottle and. keg .............
Helpers ................................
Building:
Construction.... ...................
M a t e r i a l ........... ....... ....... .
Lumber ............ ........... .
Plumbing supply ...................
F r e i g h t .... ........................ .
Helpers ............ ............ .
newspaper ........... ......... ............. .
Hallway express ........... ......... .

1 .5 0
1 .5 0
1 .5 0
1 .5 0

1.3 2 5
1 .7 2 5
1 .5 7

Delaware

Beer:
Distributor— Bottle and keg
H e l p e r s .... ......................... .
General ......................................
newspaper ............ ............. .
Hailway express ........... .......... .

1 .5 0
1 .2 5

1.5 0
1 .5 9 5
1 .5 9 3

HO
HO
Ho
Ho
Ho

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table

Table 2U.— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1 /

Type of ship, department and classification

hate
per
month

1/

Hours
per
week

2U.— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL l/ - Continued
—

Type of ship, department and classification

Tankers

Dry cargo ships

Deck department 2/:
Day men:
B o a t s w a i n s ....................... .
C a r p e n t e r s ............................
Carpenter* s m a t e s ....................
Storekeepers ..........................
Watch men:
Able s e a m e n ...........................
Boatswain*s m a t e s ....................
Ordinary s e a m e n ......................
Quartermasters.......................
W a t c h m e n ..............................

$ 288.96
' 258.5*+

253.22
21+9.67

226.01
239.23
193-1+7

226.01
226.01

bb
bb
bb
bb
bs
bs
bs
bs
bs

ji

Engine-room department 2
Day men:
Assistant electricians ...............
Deck e n g i n e e r s .......................
Electricians ..........................
Firemen (coal) .......................
Firemen (oil) ........................
Maintenance electricians.............
Refrigeration e n g i n e e r s ..............
Unlicensed junior engineers ..........
Wipers ................................
Watch men:
Oilers (steam) .......................
Unlicensed junior engineers ..........
Watartenders ..........................

S t e w a r d ^ department 3 /:
Assistant cooks ......................
Chief cooks ...........................
Chief stewards .......................
Messmen and u t i l i t y m e n ...............

285.16
258.56
366.^3
223.05
216.18
296.>+0
336.85

288.12
223.05

226.01
258.56

226.01

223.05
258.56
281.75
193.67

bb
bb
bb
bb
bb
bb
bb
UU
bb
bs
bs
bs

bs

$ 366.63

bb

252.62

UU

288.12
223.05

UU

228.96
228.96

bs
bs

bb

260.79
270.38
299.50
193-67

Us
Us
bs




280.85

1.

bs

199.39

hi

236.88

bs

2.

Carpenters in the tanker deck department are paid
the same as boatswains, i.e. $ 295*00 a month plus
$ 7*50 clothing allowance.

On vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots or
over, 10 percent of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded.

2.

On vessels carrying sulphur in amount of 25 per­
cent or more of dead weight carrying capacity,
$5.00 per voyage is added.
(On vessels carrying
sulphur, members of the Seafarers International
Union are paid the same as those on vessels
carrying explosives.)

Table 25*— STEVEDORING-

3 . On vessels operating in described areas of China
coastal waters, an "area bonus 1 of 100 percent of
1
On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck b y mines
of either belligerents, resulting in physical dam­
age to the vessel or injury to a crew member, a
"vessel attack bonus" of $ 125*00 shall be paid to
each crew member.

UU

228.96

increase paid NMU members.

1/ All ratings listed receive a clothing allowance of $7*50
per month in addition to basic rates shown. All ratings also
receive additional payment in accordance with the following con­
ditions:

H.

bb

b/

All scales reported cover members of the National Maritime
Union of America, CIO. Differences in the contract of the Sea­
farers International Union of North America, A F of L follow:

bs

dally basic wages is added.

298.50

3 / The hours per week reported are the maximum number which
may be worked at straight-time rates at sea, where the members of
the steward* s department normally work 56 hours with 8 hours
(Sunday) paid at the overtime rate.
In port the maximum straighttime hours are Uo per week.

1 . Wage scales on tankers are rounded to the nearest
fifty cents and do not include a $ 3.50 a month

Tankers b j

Deck department 2/:
Day men:
Boatswains .............. .............
C a r p e n t e r s ............................
Watch men:
Able seamen ...........................
Ordinary s e a m e n ......................
Quartermasters.... ...................

Footnotes - Continued
$25.00 monthly in lieu of Sunday work at the overtime rate. This
allowance is included in the basic monthly scales shown for day
men.
In port both day men and watch men receive overtime rates
after U-0 hours of work per week.

3

Steward* 8 department /
s
Assistant oooks ......................
Chief cooks ...........................
Chief stewards .......................
Messmen and utilitymen ...............

26 .— OCEAN TRANSPORT - UNLICENSED PERSONNEL 1/ - Continued

Hours
per
week

U/ - Continued

Engine-room department 2/:
Day men:
Electricians .........................
Storekeepers..........................
Unlicensed junior engineers ..........
Wipers ................................
Watch men:
Oilers ................................
Water t e n d e r s .........................

US

bs
bs

---per
month 1 /

Table

2/ The hours per week reported are the maximum number which
m ay be worked at straight-time rates at sea. Watch standers
normally work 5& hours per week with 8 hours (Sunday) paid at
overtime rates. Day men at sea are compensated at the rate of

Classification

Longshoremen:
General cargo ..............................
Ore, sulphur and all other bulk cargo;
grain-trimming, bagging and stowing at
grain e l e v a t o r ..........................
Hides, w e t .......... ;.....................
Oil, kerosene, gasoline, naphtha in barrels,
drums, cases or other containers (when
over 2 hours* work) .....................
Explosives or damaged cargo ...............
Car loaders and unloaders ....................
Banana loaders and unloaders:
Carriers ......................... .........
Riggers, break-out men and s t a c k e r s ......
Selectors and switchers ...................

fiaie
per
hour

hours
per
week

$ 1.88

bo

1.98
2.03

bo
bo

2.03
3.76
1.38

bo
bo
bo

1.78
1.88

bo
bo
bo

1.93

UNION WAGE SCALES - Continued
Table 26—

Classification

Book and Job shops:
Bindery women ................
Bookbinders:
Bench workers ............
Machine workers ..........
Compositors, hand ...........
Electrotypers ........... ....
Photoengravers ..............
Press assistants and feeders:
Cylinder press (68 inches
and under) assistants ..
Cylinder press (over 68
inches) assistants ....
2-color cylinder and per­
fecting press
assistants .............
Pressmen, cylinder:
Cylinder presses (68 inches
and under) ........... ..
Cylinder presses (over 68
inches) ........... .....
2-color cylinder and perfecting presses .......
Pressmen, platen ............
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand:
Day work .................
Night w o r k ...............
Machine operators:
Day w o r k .................
Night work ...............
Mailers:
Day work . ..............
Night w o r k ...............
Pho t oengraver s :
Day w o r k .................
Night work ...............
Pressmen, web presses:
Day work .................
Night work ...............
Stereotypers:
Day w o r k .............. . • •
Night w o r k ............ ...

j

1

No union organisation.




Table 27-— SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL PROVISIONS IN SELECTED MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

PRINTING

Philadelphia
County, Pa.
Bate
Hours
per
per
hour
week

Camden County,
New Jersey
Bate
Hours
per
per
hour
week

Delaware County,
Pennsylvania
Bate
Hours
per
per
week
hour

Percent of plant workers employed on each shift

Woolen and worsted
textiles

y

Shift differential
$ 1.00

1(0

$ 1.00

1*0

1.90
1.95

1(0

Uo

2.20

2.77
2.75

37$
37$
36*

1.90
1.95
2.20
< i/>
2.75

1.365

10
(

(1/)

1.975

10
(

( i/)

( i/ >

1.99

10
(

( i/ >

< ± /)

1.90
1.95
2.19
(1/) .
2.75

»(0

Electrical
machinery

y

1/

y

(1/)

140

$ 1.00

ferrous
foundries

Paints and
varnishes

1(0

3 rd or

2nd

1(0
1(0
36*

37i

3k

•
•

shift

other
shift

Establishment operating extra shifts •••

1(0

100.0

Establishments paying shift
differentials .........................
Uniform cents (per hour) ............
Under 5 cents ....................
5 cents ...........................
Over 5 &ad under 10 cents .......
10 cent 8 ..........................

2nd

10
(

2.295

1(0

2.34

1(0
1(0

2.11

< i/>
< i/ )
(1/)
< i/>

_

-

u />

3 rd or

2nd

3 rd or

shift

shift

other
shift

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1(5.1

m
m

ii*.i

m
m

17.5

26.U

U 5 .I

1U .1

7.9

26 .1
*

9.6

-

shift

100.0

100.0

66.7

100.0

63.2

88.6

m
m

100.0

i(i(.3

18.9

-

100.0

*
•

88.6

-

-

Uniform percentage ...................
5 percent .........................
Over 5 *ud under 10 p e r c e n t .....
10 percent ........................

< i/>

2nd

other
shift

other
shift

3-5
3*5
-

ll.U
5.2
-

m
m

Pull day*s pay for reduced hours ....

2.27

3 rd or

7*3

-

-

Other ................................

5.6

m
m

.
.
-

-

_

~

100.0

-

-

( i/ >
< i/>

2 .U0
2.507

37$
37*

2 .2 9

1(0
»(0

37 $
37 *

2.1(0

2 .5 0 7

37$
37*

2 .1 9
2 .2 9

1(0
1(0

2.026
2.066

37 *
37 *

2.026
2.066

37$
37*

( l/ >
< i/>

2 .6 9 3

37 *
37 *

2 .6 9 3

37$
37*

2 .6 9 3

2.906

37 *
33 ?

( i/)
< i/>

2 .1 9

2.266

51.8
r

85.9
•
*

82.5
.U

5U .1
6 .5 .

51.8

85*9

82.1

1(7.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19.5

-

-

-

3-1

-

-

-

3-*

m
m

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 21.7

3.5

12.8

5-5

13.6

2.8

1(0

37 $
37 *

—
-

37 $
37 *

2.266

6.2

-

2.1*0
2.1*8

37 $
37 *

2.1(0
2.1(8

2.906
2 .5 7 7

2.266
2 .3 3 3

2.906

2 .3 3 3

2.19

37$
37*

Information not available ..............
-

-

-

2 .1 9

2.1(09

Establishments with no differential ....

UO

UO

Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ...................

Definition
Definition
Definition
Definition

of
of
of
of

industry
industry
industry
industry

appears
appears
appears
appears

in
in
in
in

17.0

footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote

to
to
to
to

table
table
table
table

13.6

•9

7•
8.
9*
11.

Occupational Wage Surrey, Philadelphia, Pennsylrania, May 1950
U . S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

35
Table 28.— MINIMUM ENTRANCE BATES FOB PLANT WORKERS 1/

Percent of plant 2j workers in establishments with
specified minimum rates in -

Percent of plant Zj workers in establishments with
specified minimum rates in -

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
Durable goods

Minimum rate
(in cents)

All
indus­
tries

1/

Establishments with

101 - 500 501 or
workers

▲ 11 establishments ...........
K i ni> nrwlor ...
f

........

Over 50 and under 55 .........
55 ............................
Over 55 and under 60 .........

6 0 .................................................
Over 60 and under 65 .........
6 5 ............................
Over 65 and under 7 ® .........
7 0 ..........•.................
.
Over 70 and under 75 ...............

75

.................................................

Over 75 and under 80 ...............
80 .................................................
Over 80 and under 85 ...............
85 .................................................
Over 85 and under 3 0 ...............
Q O

. / .............................................

Over 9° and under 95 ...............
9 5 .................................................
Over 95 &nd under 1 0 0 .......
1 0 0 ...........................
Over 100 and under 105 ...........

1 0 5 ...............................................
Over 105 and under 110

l/
2/
3/

............

100.0

Nondurable goods

more
workers

101 - 500
workers

more
workers

100.0

100.0

3-1

.6
.1
24.0
1*3
5.6

2.6
1 .5
3 -9
■ .I 1
7

2 .2
i*.o
2.5
3*2
8 .1
*
•5

1*.2

100.0

100.0

.
.
-

—
~
*
•

—
~

-

2.6
.6
.8
1.0
1 .1
*

501 or

-

-

22.7

3.6

1.8

33*3

19.1

5-9
.6

•3

1.5

2.9
2 .1
*

9-7

2.6
2.3
1.8

5-*
i*.o

1U.5
2 .1
*
1.5

-

•8

1.7
29.0

-

-

-

15.9

U .2

•3

-

-

•

-

38 .O
1.2

100.0
8.6
.2
5 .4
5.7
6.9
15-9
l.l

mm

-

6.6

-

-

15-3
7~6

-

-

-

-

-

28.9

I3.6

13.2

1 6.1
*
-

3-2

5.7

2.0
1 .1
*
2 .0•3

1.8

5*6

•7

-

-

-

-

8*6
5 .1

2*5.1
9-7
l.l
l.l

-

-

-

2*3
2*3

-

5*9

100.0

. k

3.0
1.5
2.9

100.0

-

-

6.1

3.0
5.6

3*2

-

-

^•3
9*2
l*.l
1U .5
•3

~
-

-

~

~

100.0

-

~
-

7.5

Transportation,
Whole­
communi­
Retail
Services
cation,
sale
trade
trade
and other
public
utilities

10.8
1*9

••

30-7
•

mm

2.6
.1
*

•3

5

2 .3
1.7

-

1.7
• 5
J

-

-

1.6
-

1.9

-

-

2 .1

1.8

Durable goods
All
indus­
tries

2

/

Nondurable goods

Establishments with

101 - 500 501 or
workers

mo re
workers

-

101 - 500 501 or
workers

more
workers

Transpor­
tation,
Whole­
communi­
Retail
sale
cation,
Services
trade
trade
and other
public
utilities

All establishments - Continued

2.1
2.0

■.5
**
3-5

-

-

n o .................................................
Over 110 and under 1 1 5 .......
1 1 5 ............................
Over 115 and under 120 ........
120 ............................
Over 120 and under 125 .......
1 2 5 ............................
Over 125 and under I 3O ........

0.5

.1
.6

-

1 3 0 .................................................
Over 130 and under I 3 5 ..............
1 3 5 .................................................
Over I35 and under ll*0 ..............
ll| 0 .................................................

-

-

-

me

-

-

-

me

19.0

-

-

-

6

-

-

.*
1

•m

-

-

-

-

-

-

•3

-

-

-

1.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

me

-

-

-

-

-

2.2

-

-

-

Over 11*0 and under ll*5........

1 ^ 5 .................................................
Over 11*5 and under 1 5 0 .............
150 a«d o v e r ..............................

2.8
1.1

2.0

5*6

.6

•3
•9

3-3
•

-

.1
*
.1
*

-

10.8
3 .O
11.3

2.5

2.2
-

2.9
2 .1
*

-

-

-

•5

-

5.0

25.1*

-

.2

~

-

-

-

.*
1

mm

1-9

-

-

-

-

-

1.1

-

mm

3-1

me

5*6

2.8
-

-

-

l+.o

3.0

-

-

Establishments with no
established m i n i m u m .......... .

2.2

Information not a v a i l a b l e ........

3-^

7*2

-

1.5

-

3*2

3.6

6 .1
*

-

-

8 .1
*

Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers, other than watchmen.
Other than office workers.
Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.




Minimum rate
(in cents)

Data relate

b - 1

.1

12.2

12.7

to Philadelphia and.Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania,and Camden County, New Jersey.

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nay 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

36 .

Table 29.— SCHEDULED WEEKLY HOURS 1/
Percent of women office workers3 employed

Weekly hours

.n Transporta­
Manufacturing
Finance, tion, communi­
Non­
All
Wholesale Retail insurance, cation, and
Services
All manu­ Durable
industries
trade
trade
and real
durable
other public
facturing goods
goods
estate
utilities

All establishments .......................

100.0

Under 35 hours ...........................
35 hours .................................
Over 35 and under 37i h o u r s .............
37i h o u r s ............................ .
Over 37i and under 4o h o u r s .............
Uo h o u r s .................................
Over UO and under 4U h o u r s ..............
hour 8 ..................................
Over UU and under 1+8 hours ...............
US h o u r s ................... ..............
Over US hours ............................
Information not available ...............

2.3
8.3
7.1
21.8
8.5
^ 9.9

1J
2/

3J
4/

.6
l.U

.1
—

100.0

100.0

6.**
.*
1

1.5
•3

100.0

m
m
20.7

19.1
5.2

5.2
72.3
- ■
-

68.7
.2
*
*

11.8
.5
17.3
5 .3
6U.6
.5
-

-

100.0
0.1
U.g
g.8
13.2
15.3
55.9
.2
1.7
-

100.0

100.0

3.6

1U .1

8.1*
20.1

100.0

100.0

7.7
2.2

26 .U
X4.U

.1

77.7
3-0
5.6
.1
.1
-

16.5

33.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.8

w
m
10.9
.7
51*.6

Percent of plant 2/ workers employed in Transporta­
Manuf ac turing
tion, communi­
All
Non­
Wholesale Retail cation, and
industries All manu­ Durable
Services
trade
trade
durable
other public
facturing goods
i/
goods
utilities

1.7
.5
.8
2.3

0.3
5.2

82.U
-

81.2
-

6.7
7.2
15.9
13.7

72.9
2.9
4.1
2.5
9.5
2.0

-

-

5-8

.1
—

.1
—

1.1
—

.3

.8

1.5

.
»
2.6

•3

-

6.1*
2.8
—

.5
2.7
6.1

b.O
—

83 .U

79.8
.7
9.2
7.7

-

2.6
.i*
6.6
1.9
—

—

2.6

56.1
18.1
10.7
8.0
1.8
.2

100.0

100.0

1.6

2.8*
.9
1.4
(U/)

-

1.7
1 .1
*

100.0

7.2

_
-

59.4

2.3
.8
1U .5
3U.0
5.0

1.5

15.0

37.0
.5

2.1
17.5
1.6
—

2.5

Data relate to Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania.and Camden County, New Jersey.
Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0.05 o > 1 percent.
f

Table

30 .— iPAID HOLIDAYS 1/

Percent of office workers employei in -

Number of paid holidays

All establishments .......................
Establishments providing paid holidays ..
1 to 5 d a y s ........................
6 d a y s ................................
6J d a y s ...............................
7 d a y s ................................
7i d a y s ...............................
8 d a y s ............... .................
8i days ................................
9 days ............... .................
days ................................
10 days •••••••........................
10& days ..............................
11 days ...............................
lli d a y s ............... ..............
12 d a y s ................ ; ............ .
12j days.........................
13 d a y s ......... ............................
Establishments providing no paid holidays .
Information not a v a i l a b l e ............. .

Si

i

1/
2/
T/
4/

100.0

1.1*

U8.8
.8

100.0

100.0
99-9
1.3
32.9
.8

16.3
3-3
13.3
.1
8.1
.1
.6
2.6
.u

S.iP
b 2
1.0

lb . 3

.1

U

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
1 .3
1 5.6
+
.2 .

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.7
-

98.6

93.6
6.U
55.7

90.1
2.8
57.5
-

97.0
7 .0
61.0

100.0
15.9
56.9

82.8

89.7

37.5

3*43
.7
l*+.0
.2
2.8
•1

b b .s

21.0

26.3

-

2.6

31.1

9^.0
5.1
59-5
.5
22.9
.5
5.5
-

100.0

3-1
35.8
.2
18.6
1.8

100.0
5.8

100.0

.1

52.2
.2

-

mb

6.8
.2
1.0
-

-

29.0
1.9
21.1
b .b

.1
2.3
2.8

6.0

-

5.3
4.1
.6
-

-

-

H 1 .1
+
-

2.2

-

-

-

-

-

m
m

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

mb

1 .0
-

6.6

10.5

1.0

26.1

6.8
1.1

5.5
-

7.2
-

-

-

6.5
.3

50.3
-

1.7

-

mb

7 .2

2.9
63.7
8.6
.5

1.8

78.2
—

.2

-

•
»

4.5
-

B .b

-

mb

21.7

2 .b

.2
•3

28.9
-

.8
I 8.3
.9
9.0
-

-

35.9
2 .0
21+.8
1.7

b .o

~
15.0

16.2
57.6
2.7
2.8
10.1+

3 .2

2.2
-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.5
•

-

-

-

-

—

—

—

m
m

—

m

2.5
■*

-

.9
-

32.1
*
-

.2
15.0

2.1
m
m

-

-

-

-

-

-

56.^

-

-

-

-•

-

-

-

-

-

i .b

6.3
.1

6.0

9.9

3-0

—

17.2

10.3

.9

.

Data relate to Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania .and Camden County, Hew Jersey,
Other than office workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0*05 of 1 percent.




All
Industrie 8

f

workers employed in Transporta­
Manuf ac turing
tion, communi­
Wholesale Retail cation, and
Non­
Services.
All manu­ Durable
trade
trade
durable
other public
facturing goods
goods
utilities
Percent of plant ^

Transporta­
Finance,
Manufacturing
tion, communi­
Wholesale Retail insurance,
Non­
All
cation, and
Services
All manu­ Durable
trade
durable
and real
trade
industries
other public
facturing goods
goods
estate
utilities

-

•3

-

.

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, May 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 3 1 .— PAID YACATIOHS (FORMAL PROVISIONS) 1/

Vacation policy

Percent of office workers employed In Manufacturing
Transporta­
Finance,
All
1 NonWholesale Retail insurance, tion, communi­
Services
industries All manu­ Durable
cation, and
trade
trade
facturing
and real other public
goods durable
goods
estate
utilities

Percent of plant 2/ workers employed in kanufacturing
Transporta­
All
tion, communi­
Non­
Wholesale Bet ail
industries All manu­ Durable
cation, and
Services
durable
trade
trade
facturing goods
other public
2/
goods
utilities

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

10 0 .0

10 0 .0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

10 0 .0

Establishments with paid vacations
Under 1 w e e k ......... ••••.••••••••••••••
1 w e e k .... ............... ....... ......
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ........ ........
2 weeks ........ ....... .................

66.0
5 .1
4 1 .5
5 .9
1 3 .5

6 7 .7
5 .7
5 3 .0
7 .6
1.1+

6 6 .2
5 .6
49.8
9 .3
1 .5

7 0 .1
5 .9
5 7 .7
5 .2
1 .3

4 9 .8
,1 .5
4 5 .2
.8
2 .3

24.8
!3 .5
9 .6
1 .7

9 1 .0
1 .8
35.^
10 .0
1+3.8

5 5 .9
8 .2
4 7 .4
.3

5 4 .5
2 .6
3 1 .9
4 .7
1 5 .5

3 3 .2
2 1.8
1 0 .6
.2
.6

3 8 .1
2 7 .7
1 0 .4
-

4 2 .1
4 o .o
2 .1
-

3 5 .0
1 8 .1
1 6 .9
e
.
-

25.9
2.U
2 3 .5

2 9 .7
20 .6
5 .7

1 6 .8
4 .2
1 2 .6

2 0 .5
5 .6
1 0 .3
3 .2
1.1+

Establishments with no paid vacations
Information not available ..................
1 year of service

34 .0
•

3 2 .3
•
•

33 .8
—

29 .9
“
“

5 0 .2
—

7 5 .2
—

9 .0

ll.
++l
—

* 5 .5

6 6 .2
.6

6 1 .9
-

5 7.9

6 5.0

1K1

7°_.3

8 3 .2

Establishments with paid vacations .........
Under 1 week ........ .............
1 w e e k .............................. ..
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ............. .
2 weeks
Over 2 weeks .................. .

9 9 .8
(£ /)
2 5 .2
.9
7 3 .0
.7

9 9 .4
.1
1 3 .9
—
84.9
.5

99.8
.1
1 4 .4
8 5 .3

9 8 .7
(4 / )
1 3 .2
8 4 .2

10 0 .0
3 5 .3
61+.7
-

10 0 .0
8 6 .7
1 3 .3

10 0 .0
2 .6
3 .*
9 2 .3
1 .7

100.0
1+1+.3
5 5 .7
-

9 9 .8
4 6 .8
.2
5 2 .S
-

9 9 .0
3 .3
8 2 .2
1 .4
12.1
(4 / )

100.0
5 .1
83.8
1 .3
9 .8
-

100.0
1 1 .3
S6.S
1 .2

100.0
.3
8 1 .5

9 6 .5

10 0 .0
«
•

9 9 .5

70 .6

83.1+

.7
-

1 6 .8
-

25.9
-

8 2 .7
2 .3
1 5 .0
-

Establishments with no paid vacations •••••••

.2
-

.6
-

.2
-

1 .3

-

-

9 9 .8
(4 /)
C9
2 .0
8 8 .0
.9

9 9 .4
(4 / )
9 .2
1 .4
8 7 .7
1 .1

99.8
.1
9 .3
2,1
88.3
-

9 8 .7

1 .3

All establishments .........................
6 months of service

1 .3

-

.
.
-

«
.
-

-

.2
-

.4
.6

99.8
3^ .7
.2
6U.9
-

9 9 .0

-

i .b

-

m
m

3*5

3~4

-

-

m
m

1 6 .1
-

Hi
8 7 .8
2 .0
7 0 .7
3 .2
1 1 .9

.5

1^8
10.%

9 9 .5

8 7 .8

3 5 .5

5 6 .5
3 .2
28.1
-

2 years of service
Establishments with paid vacations .........
Under 1 week ............................
1 week ........... .....................
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ....... ...... ..
2 w e e k s ........ ............ .
Over 2 weeks ..................... .......

.2

.6
—

.2
—

Establishments with paid vacations.........
1 week ........ ................... .....
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............. ..
2 w e e k s ...................................
Over 2 weeks ........ ......................

9 9 .8
2 .8
1 .7
9 !.7
3 .6

9 9 .*
.6
1 .0
9 *. 8
3.0

99.8

Establishments with no paid vacations . .....
Information not available . . ...... • • • • • • • • • .

.2

.6

.2
—

Establishments with no paid vacations ......

9 .0
.2
8 6 .7
2.8

100.0
1 7 .1
5 .0
7 7 .9
••

100.0
10. 1
+
1.1+
8 8 .2
—

100.0
1 .5
3 .1
9 3 .5
1 .9
•

10 0 .0
1 .0
9 9 .0
—

.1
5 2 .1
1 7 .2
2 9 .4
.2

.
2

.4
.6

9 9 .8
22 .6
.2
76 .9
.1

9 9 .2
7 .0
2 .3
8 7 .3
2 .6

100.0
.2
5 9 .2
2H.3
1 6 .1
.2

-

100.0
.2
6I+.7
3^ .1
1 .0
-

10 0 .0

9 6 .5

.1
5 5 .0
1 6 .8
2 7 .7
.4

58 .3
2.8
3 5 .4

-

3 .5

100.0
—
3 0 .2
1 0 .3
5 9 .5
-

6h7 o
.5

1.8
10.1+

9 9 .5

8 7 .8
3 5 .2
3 .2
1+8.7
.7

5 years of service

l/
2/

3j
4/

•3
1.6
9 5.0
2.9

9 8 .7
.9
(*/>
9 4 .5
3.3

10 0 .0
8 .5
5 .°
8 6 .5

—

100.0
2.0
9 2 .0
6 .0

1.3

**

Data relate to Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, Hew Jersey.
Other than office workers*
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0.03 of 1 percent.




10 0 .0
.3
3 .1
8 9 .7
6 .9

100.0
.1
-

99.9

—

.2
—

*■

.2
•6

100.0
4 .7
1 .3
9 1 .7
2 .3

_
*•

10 0 .0
6 .3
1 .9
8 8 .7
3 .1

100.0
2 4 .1
2.8
7 3 .1

m*
m

100.0
2.6
.6
9 5 .6
1 .2

m

10 0 .0
5 .1
8.0
7 9 .6
7 .3

••

•
9 9 .5

.5

1 .8
10.1+

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

38.

Table 32*— PAID SICK LEAVE (FORMAL PROVISIONS) 1/

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .............

Percent or office workers employed in Manufacturing
Transporta­
Finance,
tion, communi­
Non­
All
Wholesale Retail insurance,
All manu­ Durable durable
Services
cation, and
industries
and real
trade
trade
facturing goods
other public
goods
estate
utilities

Percent or plant 2
Manufacturing

workers employed in Transporta­
All
tion, communi­
NonWholesale Retail
industries All manu­ Durable
Services
cation, and
durable
trade
trade
facturing goods
other public
3/
goods
utilities

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

24.0
1.0
8.5
3.7

26.7
2.0
10. g
.2

30.6

20.9

18.7

17.9

23.6

39.6

2.7

14.0
#3

.2

8.2
2.0
1.2

i.i

5.0
6.0
.1
.5

174

3:5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.9

8.8

17.6
5.3
5.0
c 7
0. f

36.4
8.5

7.6

6 months of servic^
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................
Under 5 days ...........................
5 d a y s ....... .........................
6 (lays .................. ............................. ..
7 days ........
lay® ...............................
10 d a y s ....... ...... .
11 days ...............................
12 days ...............................
15 d a y s .... ..........................
16 d a y s ............................ .
20 days ........ .......................
Over 20 days ..................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................................................
Information not available

2.2
6.5
4.1

5.2

6.7

26.1
9.0

mm

.4
.2

.8
.3

-

474

•z 7

mm

2574

-

776

mm

4 )
.2
2* ?
i
•4
2.4

76.0
-

*
.1
.8

5l6
•
•
.1

5^1
mm

3.9
5.0

—
2.0

—
—
—

5.3

8.9
a*

••

—

1.9

1.6

2.2

73.3

7 9 .1

-

—

—

81.3
—

i7 i

mm

—
'—

—
—
_
«.

3.5

2 .1

—

76.4

60.4

779
«
•

—

—

mm

5.3

69.4

274

—

.8
—

4.0
82.1
—

—

—

97.3
-

.2

75

73

—

an

mm

.2

.1

-

mm
mm

—

.2
.3

mm

-

100.0

98.9

(4/)

_
_

mm

1.6

ml

2.5

82.0
10.4

98.1

91.2

82.4

63.6

-

-

-

-

1.9
.8
.3

9.9

22.7

376

.8
1.8
10.5

-

-

. 0

_
«•

mm

(4/)

91.8

.3

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave . . . . .......... • • • • • •
Under 5 d a y s ................................................... ..
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................. .............. ................................
7 , d a y * ......................................... .......................................
7i d a y s ............................................................. .. .............
10 days ............................
11 days ...............................
12 days
...................... ......
15 days ...............................
lb d a y s ....... ................. ......
20 days ......................
Over 20 days .........................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ............ ........
Information not available .............. .

31.0
.8
4.9

$ )
4.9

h i
4.4
2.Q
3.f

28.0
1*6
9.f
.1
.2

31.8
<4/>
llTo
*•
m

31.0
—

.1

M

21.2
1.8
4.7
7.0

23.6

86.2

5.7

mm

1.1
•3

mm

40.8

«•

••

**

—

••

1.1
.5
•2

.1
.1

3.4
2.1
•
»
—
—
_
-

9.6
1 .4

72

•

1

mm

-

1.5

. —
«•

mm

6.1
«
•

9.6
.1

.8
5*3

1.6

6.1
5.0
4.1
«
»
—

3.6

K l

2.4

—
—
•
•

mm

mm

10.4
5.3

77.7
—

69.0

26.6

31.0

i7o

mm

8.9
1.6

2.4

69.0

72.0
- ■

68.2

38.0
•6

34.0

39.1

§.3

4.1

—
2.0
—
4.1
3.6

—

6.6

l74

-

mm

-

mm

mm

mm

•
•
.3

'• m
mm

mm

mm

7.6

mm

•»
e.

2.3

mm

.9
.3

.3
(4/)

mm

mm

26.1

4.0
*
•
78.8
-

76.4
•

13.8
-

94.3
- .

89.8
•6

63.4

26.5

86.2

5.7

3.4

12.8
1.3
•i
2.7
•T

-

mm

2.1

1.1

-

—
8.2
2.1

s7o

9.9

mm

.1
—

3.°

5.5
—
2.9
3.5

mm

1.9

40.6
8.5
-

-

7i

2.6
-

22.3
3.?
7 .1
.1
.5

—

.5
(4/)

3.7

mm
mm

1.6

25.4
mm

98.9

99.9
-

98.1
-

90.1
-

3.^
.5
.2
1.4

.1
.1

5.9
.8

9.9

35.2

376

l78
12.2

77.3

4.2

2.5

.7 .

mm

-

59.4

m

40.6
8.5

9.9

5 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ............. .......
Under 5 d a y s ...... ....................
5 days .................................
o days .................................
7 d a y * ......... .......................
8 days •••••••••.••••••••..... ..... .
10 days ....................... ........
11 days ...............................
12 days........................... .
15 d a y . .................... i ..........
lb d a y s ....... ........................
20 d a y s ........ ......................
Over 20 d a y s ..... .............••••••••
Establishments with no formal provisions
paid sick leave ..................... . . • • • • • • •
Information not available

y
z]
5/

5.3
.3
.8
3.3
•2

3.2

1.6

a

.1

.2
5.1
«
•
.1
.8

«
•
—
8.6
•
•
.1

5.3

8.9
15.9

2.0
M
l4.4

n.i
5.6

62.0

66.0
••

mm

•1
•5
—
—

1.9

2.8

4.0
10.1

60.9

73.4

mm

mm

7i
*
—
•
•
5.8
5.0
4.1
•
-

47i

11.6
—
«
•
3.8

i7x

.3

mm

2.9
.2

mm

mm

.3

mm

mm

mm

4o7s

•
*

•m

1.1
—

2.4
•
•
- -

26.1
-

72
—

.—
—
—
-

16.0

1 .1
19.8

16.9

-

69.0

36.6

73.5

for
13.8

9^.3

**

mm

■*

mm

mm

.

ll

—
.1
—

—
—
—
—
—
~

-

mm

mm

mm

.7

.8
.4

mm

1.4
.6
94.1

—

4.0
39.0

mm

Data relate to Philadelphia and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania* and Camden County, New Jersey,
Other than office workers.
Includes data for Industries other than those shown separately.
Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.




•
•

.3

5.6
86.6
.6

mm

96.6

'

99.9
■
■

2

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

7.6

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

1.1

6.4

mm

mm

mm

23
7

••

3.7

mrn

.4

mm

mm

.3

a
*

mm

mm

mm

mm

mm

1.5

1.6
12.8

32.1

90.1

64.8

59.4

**

mm

m

Occupational Wage Surrey, Philadelphia, Pennsylranla, May 1950
X . S. Department of Labor
T
Bureau of Labor Statistics

39

Table

33 .— NONPRODUCTION BONUSES l/

Percent of office workers employed in Transporta­
Finance,
tion, communi­
Non­
Wholesale Retail insurance,
All
All manu­ Durable
Services
cation, and
durable
trade
trade
and real
industries facturing goods
other public
goods
estate
utilities
Manufacture

Type of bonus

All establishments .......................
Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses k/ .............................
Christmas or year-end............ .
Profit-sharing ........................
Other .................................
Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ................................
Information not available ................

1/
2]
3/
4/

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

^7.5
U5.2
3.2
2.2

37.9
35.7
2 .1
•3

37.7
■3u.1t
3.3
.5

38.2
37.8

U3.7
^3.7
.1

58.2

UU.O
UU.o

.u
-

67.9
65.3
12.7
1.8

-

-

-

“w
7.0

.u

52.5
—

62.1

62.3

61. g

32.1

56.3

Ul.g

56.0

M

mm

100.0

Percent of plant 2/ workers e nployed in c
Transpor taManufac turing
All
tion, communi­
Non­
Wholesale Retail cation, and
industries All manu­ Durable
Services
trade
trade
other public
facturing 30ods durable
11
goods
utilities

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Uo.l
39.6

3U.8
32.8
2 .0

5U.3
U9.5
5.0
7.1

6U.2
6U.2
2.0

15.8
15.8

U6.2

•5

33.3
30.1
3.2
1.1

35.9
3U.9
1.0

.6

38.5
36.0
1 .8
1 .8

59.9
—

60.9
•6

65.2

66.7

6u .i

^5.7

35.8

mm

**
■

—

-

—

*
*

-

—

27.9

-

8^.2
—

20.5
U3.U
10. U

D a t a relate
to P h i l a d e l p h i a and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, N e w Jersey.
Other than office workers.
Includes d a t a for industries other than those shown separately.
Und u p l i c a t e d total.

Table 3H.— INSURANCE A N D P E NSION PLANS 1 /

Type of plan

All establishments ......................
Establishments with insurance or
pension plans k/ .......... ...........
Life insurance .......................
Health insurance .....................
Hospitalization......................
Retirement pension ...................
Qther ................................
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans .........................
Information not available ...............

Percent of office workers employed in ■
IrransportaManufacturing
Finance,
tion, communi­
Non­
Wholesale Retail insurance,
cation, and
All manu­ Durable
All
Services
durable
trade
trade
and real
industries facturing goods
other public
goods
estate
utilities
100.0

8U .5
71.6
35.7
32.0
5U.U
26.6
15.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.0

9U .1
66.U
55-0

39.2
50.5
32.3

97.3
95.5
67.6
U 9.9
U 5.7
37.0

23.2

66.U
63.3
24.2
33.7

86.6
64.0
31.7
50.3

57.7
25.5

29.2
U 1.2

u.o

2.7

83. S

62.6

4/

33-6

U8.S
13. *

100.0

100.0

100.0

80.7

4i.8
35.^

84.6

70.5

8.1
28.3
61.7
9.7

94.9
66.7
29.9
1.2
91.4
27.2

19.3

5 .1

70.9

25.0
13.8

53-2
33-9
36.7

6.4

30.2

58.2

14.8
.6

23.7

m
m
"

D a t a relate
to P h i l a d e l p h i a and Delaware Counties, Pennsylvania, and Camden County, N e w Jersey,
Other than office workers.
Includes dat a for industries other than those shown separately.
Undupl i c a t e d total.




100.0

m
m
“

1J
2/
3/

5.9

63.2

Percent of plant £/ workers employee in Transporta­
Manufacturing
tion, communi­
All
Wholesale Retail
Non­
cation, and
industries All manu­ Durable
Services
trade
durable
trade
other public
facturing goods
n
goods
utilities

"

'

100.0

100.0

92.4

93.3

80.1
66.6
>+3.5

89.1
54.1
35-3
39.9

91.7
73.1
65.2
35.2
36.6
32.9

6.7

8.3

100.0

36.1

35.9
7.6
'

68.5

"

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

51.2

8^.2
58.7

88.2
70.3

30.2
19.8
16.6
10.6
3.5

4g.O

25.0

16.8
15.6
22.6

44.7
27.3
32.4

22.9

26.2

9.7
72.5
20.9

4g.S

15.8

11.8

‘

i .7
59.4
io.4

"

Occupational Wage Survey, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1950
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Office - Continued

Office

BILLER, MACHINE

CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR

A worker who prepares statements, hills and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary typewriter. May also keep records as to hillings or shipping charges or perform
other clerical work incidental to hilling operations. Should he designated as working on
hilling machine or hookkeeping machine as described below.

A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating machine to per­
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.

Billing Machine - A worker who usee a special hilling machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare hills
and invoices from customers1 purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda,
etc. Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry
of necessary extensions, which may or may not he computed on the hilling machine, and totals
which are automatically accumulated hy machine. The operation usually involves a large num­
ber of carbon copies of the hill being prepared and is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers* hills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simulta­
neous entry of figures on a customer*s ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates
figures on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the deb­
it or credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and
standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
A worker who keeps a set of hooks for recording business transactions and whose
work involves most of the following: posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or
Journals, Journalizing transactions where Judgment is involved as to accounts affected; post­
ing general ledger; and taking trial balances. May also prepare accounting statements and
bills; may direct work of assistants or accounting clerks.

Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who performs one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple
Journal vouchers; accounts payable vouchers; coding invoices or vouchers with proper account­
ing distributions; entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; post-*
ing and balancing subsidiary ledgers controlled by general ledger, e.g., accounts receivable,
accounts payable, stock records, voucher Journals. May assist in preparing Journal entries.
For workers whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set of books see Bookkeep­
er, Hand.
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who is responsible for maintaining an established filing system
and classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material. May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and lo­
cating material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine filing, usually of material that has already
been classified, or locates or assists in locating material in files. May perform incidental
clerical duties.
CLERK, GENERAL

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sunds­
trand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of business transactions.
Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with the structure of the particu­
lar accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit
items to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.

A worker who is typically required to perform a variety of office operations. This
requirement may arise as a result of impracticability of specialization in a small office or
because versatility is essential in meeting peak requirements in larger offices. The work
generally involves the use of independent Judgment in tending to a pattern of office work
from day to day, as well as knowledge relating to phases of office work that occur only oc­
casionally. For example, the range of operations performed may entail all or some combination
of the following; answering correspondence, preparing bills and invoices, posting to various
records, preparing pay rolls, filing, etc. May also operate various office machines and type
as the work requires. (See Clerk-Typist).
CLERK, ORDER

Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to-keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to*
business transactions usually requiring some knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sec­
tions include accounts payable, pay rolls, customers* accounts (not including simple type of
billing described under Biller, Machine), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory
controls, etc. In addition may check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare
control sheets for the accounting department.




A worker who receives customers* orders for material or merchandise by mail, phone,
or personally and whose duties involve any combination of the following: quoting prices to
customers, making out an order sheet listing the items to make up the order, checking prices
and quantities of items oh order sheet, distributing order sheets to respective departments to
be filled. May also check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer, ac­
knowledge receipt of orders from customers, follow-up orders to see that they have been filled,
keep file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original orders.

kl
Office - Continued

Office - Continued

CLERK, PAY ROLL

SECRETARY - Continued

A worker who computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on
the pay-roll sheets and whose duties involve: calculating worker's earnings based on time or
production records; posting calculated data on pay-roll sheet, showing information such as
worker's name, working days, time, rate, deductions for insurance and total wages due.
In
addition, may make out pay checks and assist the paymaster in making up and distributing the
pay envelopes. May use a calculating machine,

Number 2 - Performs secretarial duties for a junior officer or departmental manager.
Opens and reads superior's mail and attaches any previous correspondence or data required.
Takes and transcribes rapidly and accurately shorthand dictation consisting of letters, memo­
randa and reports of a technical or nontechnical nature; edits when necessary. Composes re­
plies to routine correspondence, in superior's name. Meets office visitors and takes tele­
phone calls. Schedules appointments for superior. Performs any minor clerical tasks; such as
securing files, tracing complaints, compiling facts, etc., that will conserve time of superi­
or. In his absence from office receives his mail, visitors, and telephone calls. Supplies
routine information or refers to qualified member of organization when of a more complex na­
ture. Keeps tickler file on all pending matters for superior's reference.

CLERK-TYPIST
A worker who does clerical work requiring little special training but the performance
of which requires the use of a typewriter for a major portion of the time and whose work in­
volves typing letters, reports, and other matter from rough draft or corrected copy and one or
more of the following: keeping single records; filing records and reports; making out bills;
sorting and distributing incoming mail.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, reproduces
multiple copies of typewritten or handwritten matter, using a mimeograph or ditto machine.
Makes necessary adjustment such as for ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not
required to prepare stencil or ditto master. May keep file of used stencils or ditto masters.
May sort, collate, and staple completed material.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, records account­
ing and statistical data on tabulating cards'by punching a series of holes in the cards in a
specified sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, following written information on
records. May be required to duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to ma­
chine. Keeps files of p^nch cards. May verify own work or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
A worker who performs a variety of routine duties such as running errands; operating
minor office machines; such as sealers or mailers; opening and distributing mail; and other
minor clerical work. (Bonded messengers are excluded from this classification.)

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
A worker whose primary function Is to take dictation Atom one or more persons, either
In shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, Involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to
transcribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up
and keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine
work. (See Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER., TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons,
either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or spe­
cialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research and to tran­
scribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine work.
(See Transcribing-Machlne Operator.)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a single or multiple position telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involve: handling incoming, outgoing and lntraplant or office calls. In addition, may
record toll calls and taka massages. As a minor part of duties, may give information to per­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For workers who also do typing or
other stenographic work or act as receptionists, see Switchboard Operator-Receptionist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

SECRETARY
Number 1 - Performs secretarial duties for a senior executive, such as, President,
Vice President, Treasurer, Comptroller, etc. Opens and reads superior's mail. Secures facts
and composes replies to substantial portion of correspondence of a nontechnical nature, in
superior's name. Takes and transcribes rapidly and accurately shorthand dictation on coop lex
or confidential matters; edits when necessary. Conveys to others superior's requests for spe­
cial information and keeps tickler file until received. Compiles, arranges, calculates and
types reports on special projects. Files confidential data. Arranges and schedules appoint­
ments. Meets office visitors and takes telephone calls. May attend meetings and conference
and types reports on proceedings. Keeps currently informed and prepares memorandum records on
matters of interest to superior. In superior's absence or preoccupation supplies routine in­
formation to callers or correspondents or refers matter to qualified member of organization.
Performs ary clerical work that may be necessary in order to conserve superior's time.




A worker who in addition to performing duties of operator, on a single position or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and/or performs typing or other routine cleri­
cal work as part of regular duties. This typing or clerical work may take the major part of
this worker's time while at switchboard.
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates machine that automatically analyzes and translates information
punched in groups of tabulating cards, and prints translated data on forms or accounting re­
cords; sets or adjusts machine to add, subtract, multiply, and make other calculations; places
cards to be tabulated in feed magazine and starts machine. May file cards after they are
tabulated. May sort and verify punched cards.

Office - Continued

Maintenance - Continued

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE - Continued

A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a normal rou­
tine vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do
simple clerical work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar
machine is classified as a Stenographer, General.
TRANSCRIBING -MACHINE OPERATOR, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a varied tech­
nical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research
from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do simple clerical
work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine is classi­
fied as a Stenographer, Technical.
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies of
bills after calculations have been made by another person.

various material or to make out
May operate a teletype machine.

Class A - A worker who performs one or more of the following: typing material In
final form from very rough and involved draft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreign language
copy; combining material from several sources; or planning layout of complicated statistical
tables to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing, typing tables from rough draft in final
form. May also type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B - A worker who performs one or more of the following? typing from rela­
tively clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; setting up
simple standard tabulations, or copying more complex tables already setup and spaced properly.

Maintenance

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE
A worker who performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in
good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions,
doors, floors, stairs, casings, trim made of wood In an establishment, and whose work Involves
most of the followings planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenters' hand tools, portable power tools, and
standard measuring Instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of
work; and selecting materials necessary for the work.
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE
A worker who performs a variety of electrical trade functions in the installation,
maintenance or repair of equipment for the generating, distribution, and/or utilization of
electric energy in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the followings instal­
ling or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators, transformers,




switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems or other
transmission equipment; working fbom blueprints, drawings, layout or other specifications; lo­
cating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard computa­
tions relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electricians' hand tools and measuring and testing instruments.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
A worker who operates and maintains and/or supervises the operation of stationary
engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply power, heat, refrigeration or airconditioning and whose work involves: operating and maintaining and/or supervising the opera­
tion of such equipment as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ven­
tilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps; making or
supervising equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery, temperature,
euid fuel consumption. This classification does not include head or chief engineers in estab­
lishments employing more than one engineer.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
A worker who fires stationary boilers used in a factory, power plant, or other es­
tablishment to furnish heat, to generate power, or to s\q>ply steam for industrial processes,
and whose work involves feeding fuel to fire by hand or operating a mechanical stoker, gas,
or oil burner; and checking water and safety valves. In addition, may clean, oil, or assist
in repairing boiler roam equipment.
HELPER, TRADES, MAINTENANCE
A worker who assists another worker In one of the skilled maintenance trades, by per­
forming specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with ma­
terials and tools; cleaning working area, machine and equipment; assisting worker by holding
materials or tools; and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by Journeyman. In some
trades the term helper is synonymous with apprentice, since the helper is expected to learn
the trade of the worker he assists. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform also
varies from trade to trade: in some trades the helper is confined to- supplying, lifting and
holding materials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to per­
form specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on
a full-time basis.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
A worker who produces replacement parts and new parts for mechanical equipment oper­
ated in an establishment, and whose work involves most of the following: interpreting written
instructions and specifications; planning and layout of work; using a variety of machinist's
hand tools and precision measuring Instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard shop computations relating to di­
mensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties
of the cannon metals; selecting standard materials, parts and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assembling parts. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a round­
ed training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equiv­
alent training and experience.

*3 .
Maintenance - Continued

MAINTENANCE MAW, GENERAL UTILITY
A worker who keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or structure of an estab­
lishment (usually a small plant where specialization in maintenance work is impractical) in
repair; whose duties involve the performance of operations and the use of tools and equipment
of several trades, rather than specialization in one trade or one type of maintenance
work
only, and whose work involves a combination of the following: planning and layout of work re­
lating to repair of buildings, machines” mechanical and/or electrical equipment; repairing
electrical and/or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning and balancing new equipment; and
repairing building, floors, stairs as well as making and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.
MECHANIC, A I R - C Q N D T T I Q N I N G

A worker who maintains and repairs air-conditioning or water-cooling equipment, in­
cluding the overhauling of electric motors and pumps, compressors and piping. Inspects and
examines various parts to detect leaks and other faults; disassembles various parts such as
valves, springs, brushes and connections to note their condition and installs new piping,
packing, valves and pipe couplings to stop leaks. Uses hand tools, such as wrenches, pliers,
and pipe threading or cutting tools.
MECHANIC, A U T O M OTIVE

A worker who repairs automobiles, motor trucks and tractors of an establishment, and
whose work involves most of the following: examining automotive equipment to diagnose source
of trouble; disassembling equipment and performing repairs that involve the use of such hand
tools as wrenches, gauges, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts frcm stock; grinding and adjusting valves; reassembling
and/or installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making necessary adjustments; and
aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, of tightening body bolts.
MECHANIC, MA I N T ENANCE

A worker who repairs machinery and mechanical equipment of an establishment and whose
work involves most of the following: examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose
source of trouble; dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of
hand tools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items ob­
tained from stock; ordering the production cf a defective part by a machine shop or sending of
the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications for major
repairs or for the production cf parts ordered from machine shop; and re-assembling of machines,
and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
MII1 WBIGHT
A worker who Installs new machines or heavy equipment and dismantles and installs
machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are required, and whose work
involves most of the following: planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints
or other specifications; using a variety of hand tools, and rigging; making standard shop
computations relating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; aligning
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment and parts to be used; and
installing and maintaining in good order porer transmission equipment such as drives, and
speed reducers. In general, the millwright's work normally requires a rounded training and
experience in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.




Maintenance - Continued

OILER
(Greaser; lubricator)
A worker who lubricates, with oil or grease,
of mechanical equipment found in an establishment.

the moving parts or wearing surfaces

OPERATOR, A I R - C O N D I T I O N I N G

A worker who operates air-conditioning or water-cooling equipment includirg electric
motors and pumps, centrifugals, rotating fans, electric dryers, compressors, and water filters
and coolers. Records temperatures produced by machines and makes necessary adjustments to
produce desired temperatures. Makes minor repairs that do not entail replacement of parts.
PAINTER, M A I N T E N A N C E

(Painter, repair)
A worker who paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an establishnent and whose work Involves the following: knowledge of surface peculiarities and types of
paint required for different applications; mixing colors, oils, white lead, and other paint
ingredients to' obtain proper color or consistency; preparing surface for painting by removing
old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and interstices; applying paint with
spray gun or brush.
P I P E F I T TER, M A I N T E N A N C E

A worker who Installs and/or repairs pipe and pipe fittings in an establishment,
and whose work involves most of the following: laying out of work and/or measuring to locate
position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel and hanroer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine;
threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computa­
tions relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to
determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. This classification does not include
workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation cr heating systems.
PLUMBER, M A I N T E N A N C E

A worker who keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order and whose
work involves the following: knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents,
traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures; opening clogged drains
with a plunger or plumber's snake; and replacing washers on leaky faucets.
SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE

(Tinner; tinsmith)
A worker who fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, venti­
lators, chutes, ducts, metal roofln^ of an establishment, and whose work Involves most of the
following: plannlx^ and laying out all types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints,

Maintenance - Continued

SHEET-METALWORKER, MAINTENANCE - Continued

models, or other specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal
working machines; using a variety of hand tools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting
and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required* In general, the work of the
maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience*

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking

CRAKE OPERATOR, EIECTRIC-BRIDGE
(Overhead-crane operator; traveling-crane operator)
A worker who lifts and moves heavy objects with an electrically powered hoist which
is mounted on a metal bridge, and runs along overhead rails. The work of the operator in­
volves: closing switch to turn on electricity; moving electrical controller levers and brake
pedal to run the crane bridge along overhead rails, to run the hoisting trolley back and forth
across the bridge, and to raise and lower the load line and anything attached to it* (Motions
of crane are usually carried out in response to signals from other workers, on the ground*)
For wage study purposes, crane operators are classified as:
Crane operators, electric-bridge (under 2 0 tons)
Crane operators, electric-bridge (2 0 tons and over)
GUARD
A worker who has routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintain­
ing order, using arms or force where necessary. This classification includes gatenen who are
stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and other persons entering.
JANITOR, PORTER OR CLEARER
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the Jobs described below.
Janitor (Manufacturing; Utilities) (Sweeper; cleaner) - A worker who sweeps and
cleans shop areas, washrooms, and offices, and removes chips and refuse. May wash floors and
windows.
Porter (Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade) (
Day porter, cleaner) - A worker who keeps
the premises of an establishment in a clean, orderly condition. Typical of the duties the
worker performs are: sweeping and mopping floors; removing trash; dusting furniture or fix­
tures; polishing metal fixtures or trimaings; and washing windows and display cases.
Janitor (Office Buildings)(Janitor-maintenance man) - A building service worker, em­
ployed in an office building, "who performs a variety of duties involved in cleaning-the premis­
es, disposing of waste and litter, and providing supplies and minor maintenance services. May,
occasionally, operate a passenger elevator.




Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

JANITOR, PORTER OR CLEARER - Continued
This classification does not include workers whose duties ate limited to cleaning the
premises (see Cleaner - Office Buildings).
Cleaner (Office Buildings) - A worker who keeps halls, offices, and/or rooms of pub­
lic buildings, offices, commercial establishments, cr apartment houses in a clean, orderly con­
dition and whose work involves: sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing floors; disposing of waste
or litter; and/or dusting furniture and equipment. May also be required to polish metal fix­
tures and fittings. This classification does not include window washers.

Cleaner (Hotels) - A person who performs heavy cleaning operations in hotel lobbies,
halls, public baths, showers, and lavatories. May also wash windows.
ORDER FILLER
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the Jobs described below.
Order Filler (Manufacturing; Warehousing and Storage) - A worker who fills shipping
orders from stored merchandise in accordance with either written specifications or verbal in­
structions. May assemble, pack and carry or transport materials to shipping room or delivery
platform.
Order Filler (Wholesale Groceries and Grocery Chain-Stare Warehouses) - A worker who
fills orders from stoqk merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slip op custom­
ers1 orders and whose work involves a combination of the following: picking full case or shelf
merchandise, indicating items filled or omitted on sales slips or customers1 orders, packing
orders, transporting merchandise on a hand truck to shipping room or delivery platform, and
reporting shortages of merchandise to head stock man or other supervisors. A worker who hand­
les incoming goods - opening cases, shelving, etc. - should be classified as Stockman.
Order Picker (Wholesale Drugs, Drug Propie tar ies and Toiletries, and Druggists-Sun­
dries), (Order Filler) ~- A worker who picks or fills merchandise on customer orders and whose
work involves a combination of the following: picking full case or shelf merchandise; indica­
ting Items filled or omitted on orders; storing incoming cases in correct location; and requi­
sitioning case stock to replenish shelf stock and assisting in shelving stock.
Stockman, Warehouse (Department Stores, Dry-Goods Stares, General-Merchandise Stares,
Clothing Stores and Furniture Stores) - A person working in the warehouse who fills customer's
orders for merchandise from salescheck specifications. Places merchandise on flats, skids, or
rollers, and moves to packing department. Also fills transfer orders going to the store for
display on the selling floor. Receives Incoming merchandise from receiving or marking depart­
ments and places it Ir storage. Handles returned goods either by returning it to storage or
sending it to shipping department for delivery to supplier.
PACKER
A worker who prepares finished products far shipment or storage by placing them in
boxes or other containers, the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type,
size and number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment.

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking - Continued

PACKER - Continued

STOCK HANDLER AND TRUCKER, HARD - Continued

The work of the packer involves a combination of the following; knowledge of various items
of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; in­
serting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or
damage; closing and sealing containers; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. This classification does not include packers who also make wooden boxes or crates.

Handler and Stacker (Warehousing) - A worker engaged in the placement and transfer
of household furniture and goods or miscellaneous goods and commodities between the loading
platform and storage roams within the warehouse. The work of the handler and stacker involves
most of the following: loading, unloading, stacking and carrying incoming and/6r outgoing ship­
ments; checking goods against invoices to verify type, condition and quantity of shipments;
and locating and assembling requisitioned goods.

STOCK HANDLER AND TRUCKER, HAND
TRUCK DRIVER
This classification includes workers whose duties correspond to those of one or more
of the Jobs described below.
Loader and Unloader (Shipping and Receiving) (Manufacturing) - A worker whose prin­
cipal duty is to load or unload raw materials, supplies, partially processed or finished prod­
ucts to or from freight cars, trucks (motor, industrial, hand) or other transporting device.
In addition to loading or unloading duties, may also carry, wheel, or hand truck materials to
or from storage space.
Stock Man (Manufacturing) (
Stock Helper) - A worker who, under general supervision
of a head stock man, places incoming goods in proper place in stock room or warehouse, and
whose work involves any combination of the following; knowledge of proper location of goods
in storage area; checking inc< ling goods against invoices; loading or unloading goods from
trucks or railroad cars or unpacking goods. This classification does not include workers who
merely move goods from place to place under immediate supervision.

Truck Driver (Manufacturing) - A worker who drives a truck to transport materials,
merchandise, equipment, or men. May load or unload truck, frequently assisted by Truck-Driver
Helper. May make minor mechanical repairs and keep truck in good working order. This classi­
fication does not include Driver-Salesman.
Truck Driver, Local Delivery (Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade) - A worker who drives
a truck within a city or industrial area and whose work may involve loading and unloading the
truck with or without helpers and delivering between any of the following types of establish­
ments: freight depots, warehouses, wholesale establishments and retail establishments and/or
between retail establishments and customers * houses or places of business. This classifica­
tion does not include drivers who sell or solicit business.
For wage study purposes truck
equipment operated, as follows:

Trucker, Hand (Manufacturing; Wholesale Trade) - A worker who pushes or pulls hand
trucks, cars or wheelbarrows used for transporting goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment, and usually loads or unloads hand
trucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials in storage bins, etc., and may keep records of
materials moved.
Shelver (Wholesale Trade) (Order Picker Helper) - A worker who opens cases of
chandise and places stock on shelves.

mer­

Stock Man or Stock Helper (Wholesale Trade) - A worker who, under general supervi­
sion of a head, stock man, receives and places incoming goods in proper places in stock room
or warehouse and whose work involves a combination of the following: unloading goods from
trucks or railroad cars, checking incoming goods against invoices or requisitions, transporting
goods from unloading platform to stock room, unpacking goods and placing on shelves or other
proper places. He may also perform duties of Order Filler, usually In smaller establishments.
Stock Mem or Stock Helper (Retail Trade) - A worker who, under general supervision
of a head stock men, receives and places incoming goods in proper place in stock room or ware­
house and issues stock, materials, or equipment by filling orders requisitioning such materials.
The work of the stock men involves most of the following: checking incoming goods against in­
voices or requisitions; unpacking goods; loading or unloading goods* from trucks or railroad
cars; tallying the number of cases or other units loaded or unloaded, and placing stock in pro­
per storage place.




Truck
Truck
Truck
Truck

drivers,
drivers,
drivers,
drivers,

drivers are classified according to size and type of

light (under
tons)
medium (l| to and including k tons)
heavy (over k tons, trailer type)
heavy (over U tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER, POWER
A worker who operates a manually-controlled gasoline or elec trie-powered truck or
tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant
or other establishment.
For wage study purposes,

workers are classified on the basis of type of truck oper­

ated as:
Truckers, power (fork-lift)
Truckers, power (other than fork-lift)
WATCHMAN
A worker who guards premises of plant property, warehouses, office buildings, or
banks. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft, and
illegal entry.

W o o l e n and Worsted Textiles - Continued

W o o l e n and Vorated Textiles

CARD FINISHER

JANITOR

A w o r k e r w h o tends the f r o n t
or discharge ends
of a n u m b e r
o f c a r d i n g machi n e s
w h i c h p r e p a r e w o o l for f u r t h e r p r o c e s s i n g b y c l e aning and o pening the fibres, a r r a n g i n g t h e m
p a r a l l e l a n d t r a n s f o r m i n g t h e m into
loose un t w i s t e d strands,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves: d o f f ­
i n g b a l l s o f s l i v e r (worsted system) o r spools o f roving (woolen system); s t a r t i n g n e w balls
b y w i n d i n g e nds
o f strands a r o u n d
r e v o l v i n g axle
or setting in e m p t y spools;
a n d g u i ding
b r o k e n e nds t o t h e i r pl a c e s o n b a lls o r spools.
CARD STRIPPER

(Sweeper; cleaner)
A w o r k e r w h o swee p s a n d cleans sh o p areas, w a s h r o o m s a n d offices, a n d r e m o v e s w a s t e
a n d r e f u s e . M a y w a s h floors a n d w i n d o w s .
LOOM FIXER

A w o r k e r w h o cleans out w a s t e fibres f r o m the c l o t h i n g o f
carding machines
and
w h o s e w o r k involves: m o u n t i n g a w i r e - t o o t h - c o v e r e d stripping r o l l or b r a c k e t s o v e r the drums;
a t t a c h i n g a m a c h i n e - d r i v e n b e l t t o the r o l l which, w h i l e rotating, combs out t he fibres p a c k ­
e d b e t w e e n the t e e t h o f the c a r d clothing;
lifting the s tripping r o l l f r o m the d r u m a n d r e ­
m o v i n g the w a s t e fibres b y t u r n i n g the r o l l a g ainst a stationary comb m o u n t e d o n a t r u c k used
t o t r a n s p o r t the s t r i p p i n g roll.

A w o r k e r w h o p r e p a r e s looms for o p e r a t i o n a n d k e e p s looms in a n a s s i g n e d s e c t i o n of
the w e a v e r o o m in g o o d w o r k i n g c o ndition, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o a t o f the f o l l o w i n g s i n ­
specting and examining
l o oms to see that
t h e y ar e o p e r a t i n g properly;
a d j u s t i n g o r fix i ng
v a r i o u s p a rts of loom;
d i s m a n t l i n g or p a r t i a l l y d i s m a n t l i n g
l o o m to m a k e n e c e s s a r y repairs,
a d j u s t m e n t s or r e p l a c e m e n t s o f p arts;
r e a s s e m b l i n g loom; c h a n g i n g cams a n d gears; i n s t a l l i n g
or setting harness and
r e e d s in position;
c h a n g i n g beams;
cutting and removing cloth from
loom;
a n d u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f h a n d tools.
I n a d d ition,
m a y have supervisory
o r ins p e c t o r a l
d u t i e s ov e r w e a v e r s a n d t h e i r w o r k .

C O M B E R TEMPER, W O R S T E D

MACHINIST, M A I N T E N A N C E

A w o r k e r w h o tends the o p e r a t i o n of a m a chine
that ccnibs out s h ort fibres, re m o v e s
dirt, a n d d e l i v e r s l ong fibres i n a sliv e r w h i c h is coiled in a c a n p r e p a r a t o r y t o the d r a w ­
ing proce s s ,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves:
laying card slivers o n p a i r o f f l u t e d rollers; s t a r t ­
i n g n e w slivers f e e d i n g t h r o u g h m a c h i n e b y p i n c h i n g ends onto ends o f slivers f r o m ex h a u s t e d
balls;
t h r e a d i n g c a r d s livers b e t w e e n co m b i n g a n d drawing rollers, t h r o u g h g a t h e r i n g eyes,
a n d t h r o u g h c o l l a r h e a d into can; a n d r e p l a c i n g ful l cans w i t h e m p t y ones.
DOFFER, SPINNING FRAME
A worker w h o
re m o v e s f u l l b o b b i n s
of y a r n f r o m spindles
o f r i n g or
cap s p i nning
frames, r e p l a c e s w i t h e m p t y ones a n d starts y a r n on empty b obbins. I n a d d i tion, m a y a l s o hel p
p i e c e - u p b r o k e n e nds of y a m .

(See M a i n t e n a n c e , p a g e ^2 for descr i p t i o n . )
MENDER, C L O T H
(Sewer)
A w o rker w h o repairs defects
in c l o t h b y h a n d a n d w h o s e w o r k i n v o l v e s : e x a m i n i n g
d e f e c t s c l o s e l y w h i c h a r e i n d i c a t e d b y c h a l k m a r k s to d e t e r m i n e
m e t h o d of repair; w e a v i n g in
m i s s i n g strands
of yarn w i t h
h a n d needle;
r e p a i r i n g ri p s
a n d tears;
pulling threads w i t h
h e a v y sections (slubs) to t h e surface,
t h i n n i n g them,
a n d w o r k i n g t h e m c a r e f u l l y b a c k into
cloth; a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r fine m e n d i n g as re q u i r e d .

SFDTOERj^FRAME

F o r w a g e study p urposes, w o r k e r s a r e classified a c c o r d i n g t o system.
Dof f e r s , spinning frame, B r a d f o r d s y s t e m
Doff e r s , s p i nning frame, Fren c h s y s t e m
D o f f e r s , s p i n n i n g frame, w o o l e n
FULLER TENDER

A w o r k e r w h o t e n d s the
o p e r a t i o n o f one o r m o r e s i des of r i ng- o r
cap-frame-spin­
n i n g m a c h i n e s w h i c h s p i n y a r n or t h r e a d f r o m r o v i n g b y d r a w i n g o u t str a n d o r r o v i n g t o p r o p e r
size*,
t w i s t i n g it a n d w i n d i n g it o n a b o b b i n or cop,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves:
p l a c i n g full
b o b b i n s o f r o v i n g o n s p i n d l e s o r p i n s o f creel; t h r e a d i n g y a r n t h r o u g h the v a r i o u s g u i d e s a n d
s t a r t i n g it o n a w i n d i n g bob b i n ,
p l e c l n g - u p b r o k e n e n d s h y p i n c h i n g o r t w i s t i n g the t w o ends
together; a n d c l e a n i n g r o l l e r s a n d w i p i n g o f f o t h e r p a r t s of s p i n n i n g frame.
F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a c c o r d i n g t o system.

(Wet finisher, w o ol)

S p i nners, frame, B r a d f o r d s y s t e m
S pinners, frame, F r e n c h s y s t e m
S p i n n e r s , frame, w o o l e n

A worker who
oper a t e s a m a c h i n e that causes
fibres o f w o o l
t o fel t o r interlock,
th u s s t r e n g t h e n i n g
c l o t h p r e p a r a t o r y t o o t her f i n i s h i n g processes,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves:
threading cloth through rollers
o f m a c h i n e a n d se w i n g the t w o end s t o g e t h e r w i t h a p ortable
s e w i n g m a c h i n e t o m a k e a n e n d l e s s strand w i t h b u l k o f c l oth r e s t i n g
in b o t t o m o f machine;
p o u r i n g p r o p e r a m o u n t o f soap into tank, a n d a d m i t t i n g water; a n d c l e a n i n g a n d o i l i n g machine.




F r a m e s p i n n e r s e m p l o y e d o n th e A m e r i c a n
tions.

s y s t e m a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m these c l a s s i f i c a ­

Paints and Varnishes

Woolen and Worsted Textiles - Continued

TRUCKER, H A N D

LABELER AND PACKER

A w o r k e r w h o pushes or p u l l s h a n d trucks,
cars or w h e e l b a r r o w s u s e d for t r a n s p o r t ­
ing goods a n d m aterials of a l l kinds a b o u t a warehouse,
m a n u f a c t u r i n g plant, o r o t her e s t a b ­
lishment,
a n d usually loads or u n l o a d s h a n d trucks
or w h e e l b a r r o w s . M a y stack m a t e r i a l s in
storage bins, etc., a nd m a y keep r e c ords o f m a t e rials moved.

A worker who
p a s t e s iden t i f y i n g labels
o n cans or o t h e r c o n t a i n e r s
b y hand o r b y
m e a n s o f a l a b e l i n g m achine, a n d / o r w h o packs l a beled containers into b o x e s o r cartons.
M A I N T E N A N C E MAN, G E N E R A L U T I L I T Y
(See M a i n t e n a n c e , p a g e ^3 for d escription.)

WEAVER
( Plain loo m weaver; b o x l o o m weaver; a utomatic l o o m w eaver)
A w o r k e r w h o tends
the o p e r a t i o n of one or mor e looms
to pr o d u c e w o v e n cloth, a nd
w h o s e w o r k involves:
pi e c i n g - u p b r o k e n w a r p threads b y
t w i s t i n g or t y i n g
together the tw o
ends, d r a w i n g the y a r n through the harness, reed, a n d / o r drop w i r e s w h e n necessary; r e p l a c i n g
e m p t y b o b b i n s in shuttle w i t h ful l ones,
if l o o m is not a u t o m a t i c in this respect;
and in­
specting product
as it is w o v e n for impe rfections
a n d s t o p p i n g l o o m a n d remo v i n g i m p e r f e c ­
t i ons w h e n t h e y occur.

MIXER
(Batchmaker; compounder)

or solids)
products.

A w o r k e r w h o ope r a t e s one or m o r e m i x i n g m a c h i n e s in w h i c h c o m p o n e n t p a r t s (liquids
ar e b l e n d e d o r m i x e d
in c o n t r o l l e d a mounts
to pro d u c e i n t e r m e d i a t e
or fin i s h e d

TECHNICIAN
F o r w a g e study purposes, w e a v e r s are classified a c c o r d i n g to the type l o o m operated.
(Assistant chemist)
W e a v e r s , b o x loom, automatic
W e a v e r s , b o x loom, nonautomatic
Weavers, plain loom
WINDER, YARN
A u t o m atic mach i n e s
- A w o r k e r w h o tends the o p e r a t i o n o f a
s e c t i o n or a n
entire
au t o m a t i c m a c h i n e
used to w i n d y a r n fro m one ^ f o r m to a n o t h e r for s hipment or
to facilitate
h a n d l i n g in
later processing.
One or more of the fo l l o w i n g steps,
w h i c h a re m a n u a l l y p e r ­
formed o n n o n a u tomatic winders,
are accomplished automatically
on these machines:
t y i n g in
en d s of yarn;
r emoving full bobbins;
p l a c i n g e m p t y b o b b i n s or cores
o n spindle heads; a n d
piecing-up broken e n d s .
N o n a u tomatic m achines
- A w o r k e r w h o tends
the o p e r a t i o n
of one or mor e of the
v a r i o u s type m a chines
used to w i n d y a r n f r o m one f o r m to a n o t h e r for ship m e n t
or t o f a c i l i ­
tate h a n d l i n g in later processing, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves:
p l a c i n g skeins, bobbins or cones
o f y a r n o n r e e l s or spindles o f machine;
t h r e a d i n g y a r n t h r o u g h the v a r i o u s guides; p iecingu p b r o k e n e nds
b y t w i sting or ty i n g
the two e n d s together;
r e m o v i n g f ull w i n d i n g bobbins,
cones, tubes, or quills a n d r e p l a c i n g t h e m w i t h empty ones.

A Worker w h o performs
predetermined
c h e m i c a l tests,
fo r e x ample,
to
ascertain
w h e t h e r p u r c h a s e d r a w m a t e r i a l s m e e t p l a n t specifications, or t o d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r p r o c e s s i n g
is b e i n g p e r f o r m e d a c c o r d i n g to p l ant standards or specifications. U s u a l l y is a c o llege g r a d ­
uate in c h e m i s t r y or h a s e q u i v a l e n t t r a i n i n g an d experience.
TINTER
(Color match e r , e n a m e l maker)
A w o r k e r w h o c o l o r s or tints paints,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves
a c o m b i n a t i o n of the
following: blending basic
c o l o r p i g m e n t s in c o r r e c t
pr o p o r t i o n s
to match
standard
color
8a m p l e or a c c o r d i n g t o s p ecifications;
u s i n g h a n d paddle
or p o w e r m i x e r t o m i x
ingredients
thoroughly;
checking weig h t and/or viscosity
of b a t c h a g a i n s t sample or specifi c a t i o n s , a n d
m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y a d d i t i o n s t o m i x t u r e t o m e e t requirements.
In a ddition,
m a y a d d thi n n e r to
g r o u n d paint.
V A R N I S H M A KER
(Kettleman; o i l cooker; v a r n i s h cooker)

F o r w a g e study purposes, w i n d e r s are c lassified as follows:




W i n d e r s , cone a nd tube, h i g h speed, non a u t o m a t i c
W i n d e r s , cone and tube, slew speed, n o n a u t o m a t i c
Win d e r s , filling, automatic
W i n d e r s , filling, n o n a u tomatic

A w o r k e r w h o co o k s n e c e s s a r y
ingredients such as r e s i n s a n d g ums in kettle t o make
v a r i o u s types o f v a r n i s h e s and oils a c c o r d i n g to specifIcations, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves:
reg­
u l a t i n g contr o l s for t e m p e rature; a d d i n g ingredients a c c o r d i n g to f o r m u l a o r o t h e r s p e c i f i c a ­
tions c h e c k i n g v i s c o s i t y o f b a t c h a n d d e t e r m i n i n g w h e n it m e e t s the s t a n d a r d sample. I n a d d i ­
tion, m a y a l s o a d d t h i n n e r t o the mixtu r e .
See a l s o d e f i n i t i o n fo r Mixer.

k.
Q
Foundries, Ferrous - Continued

Foundries, Ferrous

CHIPPER AND GRINDER
(Air hammerman; “
bench grinder; chipper; disc grinder; flace grinder; p o r t a b l e - g r i n d e r
operator; p o w e r - c h i s e l operator; shaft grinder; s nagger; stand grinder; swing-frame
grinder)

MOLDER, HAND, BENCH - Continued
trowe l s , slicks, lifters,
b e l l o w s a n d m a l l e t s in p a c k i n g a n d smoo t h i n g o f m o lds or m o l d s e c ­
tions; a n d d i r e c t i n g the p o u r i n g o f the m o l t e n m e t a l s .
MOLDER, M A C H I N E

O p e r a t e s one o r m o r e types of chipping or grin d i n g equi p m e n t in r e m o v i n g undes i r a b l e
p r o j e c t i o n s o r surplus m e t a l (fins, burrs, gates, risers, w e l d seams) f r o m sand- or d i e - c a s t ­
ings, forgings, or w e l d e d u n i t s . The m o r e common types of equi p m e n t e m p l o y e d for s u c h o p e r ­
a t i o n s include p n e u m a t i c chisels,
portable g r i n d i n g tools,
stand grinders,
a n d swing-frame
grinders.
A v a r i e t y o f h a n d tools includ ing hammers,
cold chisels,
h a n d files a n d saws m a y
a l s o b e u t i l i z e d b y the o p e r a t o r in h is work.
This
c l a s s i f i c a t i o n includes w o r k e r s w h o s p e ­
c i a l i z e o n e i t h e r c h i p p i n g or g r i n d i n g work, as w e l l as those w h o p e r f o r m b o t h types o f o p e r ­
a t i ons.
CORE M A K E R , H A N D
A w o r k e r w h o shapes b y h a n d (on b e n c h or floor) v a r y i n g cores u s e d in mo l d s t o f o r m
h o l l o w s a n d h o l es in m e t a l castings, a n d w h o s e w o r k requires m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g ; s electing
a p p r o p r i a t e core b o x e s
a n d w o r k sequence;
c l e aning core b o x e s w i t h
c o m p r e s s e d a i r o r hand
bellows and dusting
p a r t i n g sand o v e r
inside of core bo x to facilitate
r e m o v a l o f finished
core; p a c k i n g a n d r a m m i n g core sand solidly into box, u s i n g shovels, hands, a n d t a m p i n g tools;
selecting and
set t i n g vent w i r e s a n d
rei n f o r c i n g w i r e s into cores;
d e t e r m i n i n g a p propriate
s a n d b l e n d s a n d m o i s t u r e con t e n t of sand
required for a p a r t i c u l a r core;
r e m o v i n g core b o x
f r o m core
and repairing
d a m a g e to Impressions;
b a k i n g cores to h a r d e n them; a n d as s e m b l i n g
c o r e s o f mo r e t h a n one section.
HOLDER,

FLOOR

A w o r k e r w h o shapes large m o l d s or m o l d sections b y h a n d o n the f o u n d r y floor or in
a pit, b y r a m m i n g or p a c k i n g san d a r o u n d a p a t t e r n pla c e d in a flask, a nd w h o s e w o r k Involves
m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g s s e l e c t i n g a n d a s s e mbling appropriate flasks a n d p a t t e r n s a n d p o s i t i o n ­
i n g pa t t e r n s
i n flasks for a v a r i e t y of molds;
d e t e r m i n a t i o n of appro p r i a t e san d bl e n d s a n d
m o i s t u r e c o n t e n t o f s and r e q u i r e d for diff e r e n t molds; p a c k i n g and r a m m i n g sand a r o u n d pattern;
d r a w i n g p a t t e r n a n d s m o o t h i n g mold; s e l e c t i n g a nd s e t ting In p o s i t i o n a p p r o p r i a t e cores; d e t e r ­
m i n a t i o n of a p p r o p r i a t e gating,
v e n t i n g r e i n forcing a n d facing r e q u i r e d f or p a r t i c u l a r mold;
a s s e m b l i n g m o l d s ections int o c o m p l e t e mold; u s i n g s u c h m o l d e r *s han d tools a s riddles, rammers,
trowels, slicks,
lifters, b e l l o w s a n d mal l e t s in c o m p a c t i n g a n d smoothing o f mold; d i r e c t i n g
t h e p o u r i n g o f the m o l t e n m e t a l into mold,
and o p e r a t i o n o f crane in
lifting and moving
of
m o l d o r m o l d sections.
MOL D E R , HAND, B E N C H
A w o r k e r w h o shapes
small a n d m e d i u m - s i z e d molds (or c omponent s ections o f a m o l d
t h a t a r e a s s e m b l e d into c o m p l e t e units) b y h a n d o n a bench, b y r a m m i n g a n d p a c k i n g s and ar o u n d
p a t t e r n s p l a c e d in flasks,
a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t of t he f o l l o w i n g : sele c t i n g a n d a s ­
s e m b l i n g a p p r o p r i a t e f l asks a n d p a t t e r n s for v a r y i n g molds; d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f a p p r o p r i a t e sand
b l e n d s a n d m o i s t u r e c o n t e n t o f sand r e q u i r e d for d i f ferent types of molds; p a c k i n g a n d r a m m i n g
g r e e n sand, d r y sand o r l o a m a r o u n d patterns; dra w i n g p a t terns a n d smoo t h i n g molds; s e l e cting
a n d s e t t i n g co r es in p o sition;
d e t e r m i n a t i o n of t h e types o f ga t i n g n e c e s s a r y for the molds;
f i n i s h i n g m o l d s b y p e r f o r m i n g s u c h operations as facing, venting, a n d r e i n f orcing; a s s e m b l i n g
m o l d s e ctions to f o r m c o m p l e t e molds; selecting and u s i n g such m o l d e r ' s h a n d t o ols as riddles,




A w o r k e r w h o shapes
m o l d s or m o l d sections o n a n y o f s e v e r a l types o f m o l d i n g m a ­
chines, s u c h as roll-over, jarring, a n d s q u eeze machines, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t o f the
f o l l o w i n g : s e l e c t i n g a n d a s s e m b l i n g a p p r o p r i a t e flasks a n d p a t t e r n s a n d p o s i t i o n i n g p a t t e r n s
i n flasks;
fil l i n g flasks w i t h sa n d a n d r a m m i n g o f sand
a r o u n d p a t t e r n w i t h r a m m i n g t o o l or
b y m e c h a n i c a l means;
d e t e r m i n a t i o n of a p p r o p r i a t e
sand blends and moisture
content of sand
r e q u i r e d for p a r t i c u l a r molds;
p r e p a r i n g m o l d s for d r a w i n g of p a t terns, a n d r e p a i r i n g dama g e
t o m o l d impres s i o n s in sand; s e l e c t i n g a n d s e t t i n g in p o s i t i o n a p p r o p r i a t e cores;
determina­
t i o n o f a p p r o p r i a t e venting,
gating,
r e i n f o r c i n g a n d f a c i n g r equired;
assembling upper and
l o w e r sec t i o n s of m olds, a n d g u i d i n g o r a s s i s t i n g in t h e p o u r i n g "of the m o l t e n m e t a l into the
mold.
PATTERNMAKER, W O O D
A w o r k e r w h o b u i l d s w o o d e n p atterns, core b o x e s o r m a t c h plates, a n d w h o s e w o r k i n ­
v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : p l a n n i n g a n d l a y i n g ou t o f w o r k f r o m b l u e prints,
drawings, o r
models;
m a k i n g s t a n d a r d shop c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o d i m e n s i o n s o f w o rk; u s i n g a v a r i e t y of
p a t t e r n m a k e r ' s h a n d tools s u c h a s saws, planes, c h isels, gauges, a n d mallets; o p e r a t i n g v a r i ­
ou s w o o d w o r k i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h as b a n d saws, cir c u l a r
saws,
borers, routers,
lathe planers,
d r i l l pr e s s e s , senders, a n d shapers; c h e c k i n g w o r k with calipers, rules, protractors,
squares,
st r a i g h t - e d g e s , a n d o t her m e a s u r i n g Instruments; a s s e m b l i n g p a t t e r n s a n d sections of p a t t e r n s
b y g l u ing,
nailing, screwing,
a n d d oweling;
w o r k i n g t o r e q u i r e d to l e r a n c e s a n d allowances;
and selecting
the m a t e r i a l s
for the
c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a p a r t i c u l a r p a ttern.
M a y al s o m a k e
s w e e p s (templates) for m a k i n g m o l d s b y the s w e e p - m o l d i n g m e t hod.
I n g e n e r a l the w o r k o f the
patternmaker requires
a rounded training
an d e x p e r i e n c e
usually acquired
t h r o u g h a f ormal
a p p r e n t i c e s h i p or e q u i v a l e n t t r a i n i n g a n d experience.
SHAKE-OUT MAN
A w o r k e r w h o r e m o v e s c a s t i n g s f r o m the m o l d s in w h i c h t h e y w e r e cast, a n d w h o s e w o r k
invol v e s one o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : r e l e a s i n g c l a m p s h o l d i n g
secti o n s of f l a s k together,
s e p a r a t i n g th e sections a n d b r e a k i n g
the s a n d m o l d f r o m t h e c a s t i n g s , u s i n g a s t e e l b a r or
s l e d g e hammer,
or r e m o v i n g
c a s t i n g s f r o m the sand w i t h t h e a i d o f m e t a l hooks;
operating a
v i b r a t i n g s h a k e - o u t s c r e e n in r e m o v i n g s a n d and c a stings f r o m flasks; u s i n g a p n e u m a t i c s h a k e r
w h i c h , w h e n a t t a c h e d to the flask,
jars or jolts
it u n t i l the m o l d
has crumbled;
using a
v i b r a t o r y a i r - h a m m e r to r e m o v e the sa n d a n d castings; s h a k i n g l o o s e l y a d h e r i n g sa n d f r o m c a s t ­
ings; a n d s h o v e l i n g s and s h a k e n f r o m m o l d s into a p i le.
TRUCKER, HAND
(See W o o l e n a n d W o r s t e d T e x t i l e s , p a g e ^ 7 fo r descr i p t i o n . )

Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries

DRILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SINGLE- OR MJLTIPLE-SPINDLE - Continued

ASSEMBLER
(Bench assembler;

floor assembler;

jig assembler;

line assembler;

sub-assembler)

A w o r k e r w h o a s s e mbles a n d / o r fits together
p a rts to f o r m complete units or s u b a s ­
semblies at a bench, c onveyor line, or o n the floor, d e p e n d i n g u p o n the size of the u n i t s a n d
the o r g a n i z a t i o n of the p r o d u c t i o n process.
T he w o r k o f the a s s e m b l e r m a y include p r o c e s s i n g
o p erations requiring the use of h a n d tools in scraping, c h i p p i n g a n d filing of parts to ob t a i n
a des i r e d fit as w e l l as p o w e r t o ols a n d special e q u i pment w h e n punching, riveting, s o l d e r i n g
or w e l d i n g o f parts is n e c e ssary. W o r k e r s w h o p e r f o r m a n y of these p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s e x ­
c l u s i v e l y as p art of s p ecialized a s s e m b l i n g operations cure not included in this classification.
Class A - A w o r k e r w h o a s s e m b l e s parts Into conplete units or subassemblies t hat r e ­
quire fitting of parts a nd deci s i o n s r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r per f o r m a n c e of a ny c o mponent p a r t or the
a s s e m b l e d unit,
and w h o s e w o r k involves
a n y c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g : a s s e m b l i n g
from
drawings, blueprints or ot h e r w r i t t e n specifications;
a s s e m b l i n g units c o m posed of a v a r i e t y
o f parts a n d / o r subassemblies; a s s e m b l i n g large units r e q u i r i n g c a r eful fitting a n d a d j u s t i n g
of p a rts to obt ain spec i f i e d clearances;
a nd u s i n g a v a r i e t y of h a n d a n d p o w e r e d t o ols a nd
p r e c i s i o n m e a s u ring instruments.
C l ass B - A w o r k e r w h o
asse m b l e s parts into u n its or
subassemblies in a c c o rdance
w i t h standard a nd p r e s c r i b e d p r ocedures,
a nd w h o s e w o r k involves a n y c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l ­
l o w i n g : as s e m b ling a limited r a n g e o f standard a nd f amiliar p roducts c o m posed of a n u m b e r o f
s m a l l or m e d i u m -sized p a r t s r e q u i r i n g same fitting or adjusting;
a s s e m b l i n g large un i t s that
r e q uire little or no f i tting of c o m ponent parts; w o r k i n g u n d e r conditions w h e r e a c c u r a t e p e r ­
formance and c o mp l e t i o n
of w o r k w i t h i n set time limits are e s s e n t i a l
for subse q u e n t
assem­
b l i n g operations; a n d u s i n g a l imited var i e t y o f hand or p o w e r e d t o o l s 1
.
C l ass C - A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s short-cycle,
r e p e t i t i v e a s sembling operations, a n d
w h o s e w o r k does not involve a n y f i t t i n g
or m a k i n g decisions
r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r p e r f o r m a n c e of
the coup on e n t parts or a s s e m b l i n g procedures.
B E ILL-PRESS OPERATOR, SIN G L E - OR M O L T I P I E - S P I K D I E
Perfo rms such o p e r ations as drilling, reaming, c ounters i n k i n g , counterboring, spotf aeing a n d tapping on one or m o r e t y p e s o f s i n gle-spindle or mul t i p l e - s p i n d l e d r i l l
presses.
T h i s c l a s s ification i ncludes
operators of a l l types of
r a d i a l - d r i l l p r esses a n d por t a b l e d r i l l i n g equipment.

d r i l l p resses

other

t han

Class A - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to set up m a c h i n e for operations r e q u i r i n g c a r e ­
f u l positioning, b l o c k i n g a n d a l i g n i n g of units; to determine s p e e d s , feeds, t o o l i n g a n d o p e r ­
a t i o n sequence;
and to m a k e a l l n e c e s s a r y a d j u stments
d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n to a chieve requ i s i t e
d i m e n s i o n s or

O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to m a i n t a i n set-up made by others, i n c l u d i n g m a k i n g a l l n e ­
cessary adjustments during
o p e r a t i o n o n w o r k r e q u i r i n g c o n s i d e r a b l e care o n the p art
o f the
o p e r a t o r t o m a i n t a i n s p e c i f i e d t o l e rances.
C l a s s C - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d o nly to operate machine, on r o u t i n e a n d r e p e t i t i v e
operations; to m a k e o n l y m i n o r a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g operation;
a n d w h e n t r o u b l e occurs to stop
the m a c h i n e a nd c a l l o n foreman, leadman, or set-up m a n to c o r r e c t the o p eration.
ELECTR I C I A N ,

MAINTENANCE

(See M a i n t e n a n c e , p a g e

k2

for description.)

ENGINE-LATHE OPERATOR
O p e r a t e s a n engi n e lathe for s h a ping e x t e r n a l and in t e r n a l c y l i n d r i c a l surfa c e s of
m e t a l objects. T h e e n g i n e lathe, b a s i c a l l y c h a r a c terized b y a he a d s t o c k , tailstock, and p o w e r fe d t o o l carriage,
is a g e n e r a l - p u r p o s e m a c hine tool used p r i m a r i l y for turning.
It is al s o
c o m m o n l y u s e d in p e r f o r m i n g s uch o p e r a t i o n s as facing,
boring, drill i n g , a n d threading; and,
e q u i p p e d w i t h a p p r o p r i a t e a t t a c hments, it m a y be u s e d fbr a v e r y w i d e v a r i e t y o f s p e c i a l m a c h i n ­
ing operations.
T h e s t o c k m a y be h e l d in p o s i t i o n b y the lathe " c e nters" or b y var i o u s types
o f chucks a n d fixtures.
T h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n ex c l u d e s operators of b e n c h lathes, a u t o m a t i c lathes, a u t o m a t i c sc r e w machi n e s , a n d h a n d - t u r r e t lathes a n d hand-screw machines.
C l a s s A - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to set up machine; t o sele c t feeds, speeds, t o o l ­
ing a n d o p e r a t i o n
sequence;
a n d to m a k e
nec e s s a r y a d j u stments d u r i n g
o p e r a t i o n to a c h i e v e
r e q u i s i t e d i m e n s i o n s or
O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to s et up machine f r o m drawings,
b l u e p r i n t s or layout, in
a c c o r d a n c e w i t h p r e s c r i b e d feeds, speeds, tooling a n d o p e r a t i o n s e q u e n c e a n d to ma k e n e c e s s a r y
adjustments during operation where
c h a n g e s in w o r k a n d set-up a r e f r e q u e n t a n d w h e r e care is
e s s e n t i a l to a c h i e v e v e r y cl o s e tolerances.
O p e r a t o r m a y b e r e q u i r e d t o r e c o g n i z e w h e n tools n e e d dres s i n g , t o dress tools, a n d
t o s elect p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d c u t t i n g a n d l u b r icating oils.
C l a s s B - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to m a i n t a i n o p e r a t i o n set up b y o t h e r s , b y m a k i n g
a l l n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s , w h e r e c are is e s s e n t i a l t o achieve v e r y close t o l e r a n c e s or
O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d t o se t up mac h i n e o n stand a r d or r o u g h i n g o p e r ations w h e r e
feeds, speeds, t o o l i n g a n d o p e r a t i o n sequence are prescribed;
a n d to m a k e a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g
o p eration.

O p e r a tor w h o is r e q u i r e d to set up ma c h i n e w h e r e s p e e d s , f e e d s , t ooling a n d o p e r a t i o n
s e q u e n c e ar e p r escribed b ut w h o s e w o r k involves v e r y d i f f i c u l t operations such as d e e p d r i l l ­
ing, or b o r i n g to exa c t i n g specifications.

O p e r a t o r m a y b e r e q u i r e d to reco g n i z e w h e n tools n e e d d r e ssing,
t o sele c t p r o p e r c o o l a n t s a n d c u t t i n g oils.

C l ass B - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to set up mac h i n e
o n s t a ndard
opera t i o n s w h e r e
feeds, speeds, toolii^ and o p e r a t i o n sequence a re prescribed; a n d to m a k e all n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t ­
m e n t s d u r i n g o p eration or

C l a s s C - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d only to operate m a c h i n e o n r o u t i n e a n d r e p e t i t i v e
operations; t o m a k e o n l y m i n o r a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g operation;
a n d w h e n t r o u b l e occurs t o stop
the m a c h i n e a n d c a l l o n foreman, leadman,
set-up m a n to correct, the oper a t i o n .




or

t o d r ess t o ols a n d

50.
Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

(SEONDING-MACHINE OPERATOR

INSPECTOR - Continued

( C e n t erles s - g r i n d e r operator; cylindrical-grinder operator; e x t e r n a l - g r i n d e r o p e r a ­
tor; i n t e r n al-grinder operator; surface-grinder operator; U n i v e r s a l - g r i n d e r operator)
A w o r k e r w h o opera t e s one o f several
types of p r e c i s i o n g r i n d i n g m a c h i n e s to grind
internal and
e x t e r n a l surfaces o f m e t a l parts t o a
smooth a n d e v e n f i n i s h a n d to
required
dimensions.
P r e c i s i o n g r i n d i n g is u s e d primarily as a f i n i s h i n g o p e r a t i o n o n p r e v i o u s l y m a ­
c h i n e d parts, a n d consists of a p p l y i n g abrasive w h e e l s r o t a t i n g a t h i g h s p eed t o the surfaces
t o he ground.
I n a d d i t i o n to the types of grinding machines indicated above,
this c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
i n cludes op e r a t ors of o t her p r o d u c t i o n grinding machines s u c h as:
s i n g le-purpose
grinders,
(drill grinders, br o a c h grinders, saw grinders, gear cutter grinders, t h r e a d grinders, etc.),
a n d a u t o m a t i c a n d semi- a u t o m a t i c g e n e r a l purpose grinding mach i n e s .
C l a s s A - A n o p e r a t o r w h o is required to set up machine;
t o s e lect feeds,
speeds,
t o o l i n g a n d o p e r a t i o n sequence; a n d t o make necessary adjus t m e n t s d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n t o achieve
r e q u i s i t e d i m e n sions or
A n o p erator w h o is r e q u i r e d to set up machine f r o m drawi n g s o r blu e p r i n t s or lay-out
in a c c o r d a n c e w i t h p r e s c r i b e d feeds,
speeds, tooling and o p e r a t i o n sequence a n d to m a k e n e c ­
essary adjustments
d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n w h e r e changes in w o r k a n d set-up are
frequent a n d w h e r e
care is e s s e n t i a l to ac h i e v e very close tolerances.
O p e r a t o r m a y b e r e q u i r e d to recognize w h e n tools n e e d dressing, to dress tools, a n d
t o select p r o p e r coolants a n d c u t t i n g and lubricating oils.
C l a s s B - A n ope r a t o r w h o is required to set up m a c h i n e on standard operations w h e r e
feeds, speeds,
t o o l i n g a nd o p e r a t i o n sequence are either p r e s c r i b e d
or a r e k n o w n f r o m pas t
experi e n c e ; t o m a k e a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g operation;
an d to m a i n t a i n p r e s c r i b e d tolerances
or
A n o p e rator w h o is r e q u i r e d to m a i n t a i n o p e r ation set up b y others,
b y m a k i n g all
n e c e s s a r y a d j u s tments, w h e r e con s i d e r a b l e care is es s e n t i a l t o achieve v e r y close t o l e r a n c e s .

in t h e b r a n c h o f w o r k t o w h i c h he is a s s igned,
inclu d i n g th e u se o f a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n
measuring
instruments;
i n t e r p r e t i n g d r a w i n g s a n d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s in i n s p e c t i o n w o r k on units
c o m p o s e d o f a large n u m b e r o f c o m p o n e n t par t s ;
e x a m i n i n g a v a r i e t y o f p r o d u c t s or pr o c e s s i n g
o p e r ations; d e t e r m i n i n g causes of flaws in p r o d u c t s a n d / o r p r o c e s s e s a n d s u g g e s t i n g n e c e s s a r y
cha n g e s t o c o r r e c t w o r k m ethods; a n d d e v i s i n g i n s p e c t i o n p r o c e d u r e s for n e w products.
C l a s s B - A w o r k e r w h o inspects parts,
p roducts,
and/or
p r o c e s s e s a n d wh o s e w o r k
inv o l v e s a n y c o m b i n a t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g : k n o w l e d g e of p r o c e s s i n g
op e r a t i o n s in the b r a n c h
o f w o r k t o w h i c h he is assigned, l i m i t e d t o f a m i l i a r p r o d u c t s a n d p r o c e s s e s o r w h e r e p e r f o r m ­
a n c e is d e p e n d e n t
o n pa s t experience;
performing inspection
o p e r a t i o n s o n p roducts and/ o r
processes having rigid
specifications,
b u t w h e r e the i n s p e c t i o n p r o c e d u r e s involving a s e ­
q u e n c e o f i n s p e c t i o n operations,
in c l u d i n g d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r fit or perf o r m a n c e of
s ome p arts; a n d u s i n g p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g instruments.
C l a s s C - A w o r k e r w h o inspects parts, p r o d u c t s a n d / o r p r o c e s s e s a n d w h o s e w o r k i n ­
v o l v e s a n y c o m b i n a t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g : short-cycle, r e p e t i t i v e i n s p e c t i o n operations; u s i n g
a standa r d i z e d , s p e c i a l - p u r p o s e s m e a s u r i n g instrument rep e t i t i v e l y ; a n d v i s u a l e x a m i n a t i o n of
p a r t s or p r o d u c t s , r e j e c t i n g units h a v i n g obvious d e f o r m i t i e s o r flaws.
MACH I N I S T , P R O D U C T I O N
A w o r k e r w h o is r e q u i r e d to fab r i c a t e m a t a l p a r t s i n v o l v i n g a seri e s of p r o g ressive
o p e r a t i o n s a n d w h o s e w o r k involves
m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f w r i t t e n i n s t r u c ­
tions a n d s p e c i fications; p l a n n i n g a n d l a y i n g cut of work; u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n i s t ’s ha n d
tools a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g instruments;
setting up and operating
s t a n d a r d machine tools;
s h a p i n g o f m e t a l p a r t s to close tolerances; m a k i n g stand a r d shop c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g to d i ­
m e n s i o n s of w o r k , tooling, feeds a n d s peeds o f machining; u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the w o r k i n g p r o p e r ­
t i e s o f the c o n m o n metals;
a n d s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d ma t e r i a l s ,
p a r t s a n d e q u i p m e n t n e e d e d for
hi s w o r k .
I n gen e r a l ,
the m a c h i n i s t ' s w o r k n o r m a l l y r e q u i r e s a r o u n d e d t r a i n i n g in ma c h i n e s h o p p r a c t i c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p or e q u i v a l e n t t raining a n d e x ­
perience .
MILLING-MACHINE OPERATOR

O p e r a t o r m a y be r e q u i r e d to recognize w h e n tools n e e d dressing,
to sel e c t coola nts a nd c u t t i n g oils.

t o dress t o ols a nd
(Mill i n g - m a c h i n e operator, a u tomatic; m i l l i n g - m a c h i n e o perator, hand)

C l a s s C - A n o p e r a t o r w h o is r equired only to operate ma c h i n e o n r o u tine a n d r e p e t ­
itive operations; to mak e only m i n o r adjustments dur i n g operation; a n d w h e n t r ouble occurs to
s t o p the m a c h i n e an d c a l l o n foreman, leadman, or set-up m a n t o c orrect the operation.

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y of w o r k s u c h as grooving, pla n i n g ,
a n d s h a p i n g m e t a l objects on
a m i l l i n g m a c h i n e , w h i c h r e m o v e s m a t e r i a l f r o m m e t a l surfa c e s b y the c u t t i n g a c t i o n o f m u l t i t o o t h e d r o t a t i n g c u t ters o f v a r i o u s sizes a n d shapes.

INSPECTOR
A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s s u c h operations as exam i n i n g p a r t s or p r o d u c t s for
flaws and
d efects,
a n d c he c k i n g t h e i r d i m e n s i o n s an d appearance to dete r m i n e w h e t h e r t h e y m e e t the r e ­
q u i r e d s t a n d a r ds a n d s p e c ifications.

M i l l i n g - m a c h i n e t y p e s v a r y f r o m the
m a n u a l l y c o n t r o l l e d m a c h i n e s enq>loyed
p r o d u c t i o n t o f u l l y a u t o m a t i c (conveyor-fed) m a c h i n e s found in p l a n t s e n g a g e d in mass
tion.
T h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n Includes o p e r a t o r s o f a l l types o f m i l l i n g m a c h i n e s except
p u r p o s e m i l l e r s s u c h as thr e a d m i l l e r s ,
d u p l i c a t o r s , die sinkers, p a n t o g r a p h m i l l e r s
graving millers.

C l a s s A - A w o r k e r w h o Inspects parts,
products,
an d / o r proc e s s e s w i t h
responsi­
b i l i t y f o r d e c i sions r e g a r d i n g t he q u a l i t y of the product a n d / o r
operations,
and whose work
invol v e s a n y c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g : 'thorough knowledge
o f the p r o c e s s i n g
operations

C l a s s A - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d t o set u p machine; t o s e l e c t feeds, speeds, t o o l ­
ing a n d o p e r a t i o n sequence; a n d t o m a k e n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n to a c h ieve r e q ­
uisite dimensions or




in omit
produc­
singleand e n ­

51.

Machinery Industries - Continued

Machinery Industries - Continued

MIIXING-MACHINE OPERATOR - Continued

WEIDER, HAND

from

O p e rator w h o is r e q u i r e d t o set u p m a c h i n e
d rawings, b l u e p rints, or l a y -out in
a c c o r d a n c e w i t h p r e s c r i b e d feeds, speeds, t o o l i n g and- o p e r a t i o n sequence,
an d t o m a k e n e c e s ­
s a r y adju s t m e nts d u r i n g o p e r a t i o n w h e r e changes in w o r k a n d set up are f r e q u e n t a n d w h e r e c o n ­
s iderable care is e s s e n t i a l t o ac h i e v e v ery close tolerances.

A w o r k e r w h o fuses (welds) m e t a l objects together b y m e a n s of a n o x y a c e t y l e n e t o r c h
or a r c w e l d i n g a p p a r a t u s in the f a b r i c a t i o n of metal- s h a p e s a n d in r e p a i r i n g b r o k e n or c r a c k e d
m e t a l objects.
I n a d d i t i o n t o p e r f o r m i n g hand w e l d i n g or b r a z i n g o p eration,
he m a y a l s o lay
o u t g u i d e lines o r m a r k s on m e t a l p a r t s a n d m a y cut m e t a l w i t h a c u t t i n g torch.

O p e rator m a y b e r e q u i r e d to r e cognize w h e n tools n e e d dressing, t o dr e s s tools, an d
to select p r o p e r coolants a n d c u t t i n g a n d l u b r i c a t i n g oils.

C l a s s A - W o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s w e l d i n g operations
r e q u i r i n g m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g :
planning and
l a y i n g o u t o f w o r k f r o m drawings,
bl u e p r i n t s or o t h e r w r i t t e n
s p e c ifications;
k n o w l e d g e o f w e l d i n g p r o p e r t i e s o f a v a r i e t y of m e t a l s a n d alloys; s e t t i n g up o f w o r k a n d d e ­
t e r m i n i n g o p e r a t i o n sequence; w e l d i n g of h i g h pressure ves s e l s o r o t h e r o b j ects i n v o l v i n g c r i ­
t i c a l s a f e t y a n d load req u i r e m e n t s ;
w o r k i n g from a v a r i e t y o f p o s i tions; a n d a b i l i t y t o w e l d
w i t h gas or a r c a p p a ratus.

C l ass B - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d t o set u p m a c h i n e s o n stand a r d
operations where
feeds, speeds, t o o l i n g a n d o p e r a t i o n sequence ar e p r escribed; to mak e a d j u s t m e n t s d u r i n g o p e r ­
ation; a n d to m a i n t a i n p r e s c r i b e d t olerances or
O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to m a i n t a i n o p e r a t i o n set u p by others, b y m a k i n g a l l n e c e s ­
sa r y adjustments, w h e r e con s i d e r a b l e care-is e s s e n t i a l to a c hieve very close t o lerances.
O p e r a t o r m a y be r e q u i r e d to reco g n i z e w h e n tools n e e d dressing,
t o s elect p r o p e r coolants a n d c u t t i n g oils.

t o d r ess tools,

and

C l a s s B - W o r k e r w h o is r e q u i r e d to p e r f o r m eith e r a r c or gas w e l d i n g op e r a t i o n s on
r e p e t i t i v e w o r k , w h e r e n o c r i t i c a l s a f e t y and load r e q u i rements a r e involved;
w h e r e the w o r k
c a l l s m a i n l y fo r one p o s i t i o n w e l d i n g ; a n d w h e r e the layout a n d p l a n n i n g o f the w o r k a r e p e r ­
f o r m e d b y others.

C l a ss C - O p e r a t o r w h o is r e q u i r e d to o perate only, o n routine a n d r e p e t i t i v e o p e r ­
ations; to m a k e o nly m i n o r adj u s t m e n t s d u r i n g operation; a n d w h e n trouble
occurs to stop m a ­
c h i n e an d c a l l o n foreman, lead-man or set-up m a n t o c o r r e c t the operation.
T O O L AN D D I E MAKER
(Die maker;

Electrical Machinery

assembler

jig maker; t o o l maker;

fixture maker;

gauge maker)

A w o r k e r w h o c o n s tructs a n d r e pairs m a c h i n e - s h o p tools,
gauges, jigs,
fixtures or
d i e s for forgings, p u n c h i n g and o t her m e t a l - f o r m i n g work, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves m o s t o f the
f o l l o w i n g ? p l a n n i n g a n d l a ying out o f w o r k f r o m m odels,
blueprints,
d r a w i n g s or o t h e r or a l
a n d w r i t t e n specifications;
u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f t o o l - a n d - d i e m a k e r s h a n d tools a n d p r e c i s i o n
measuring
instruments;
u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the w o r k i n g p r o p e r t i e s of c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d alloys;
s e t t i n g up a n d o p e r a t i n g o f m a c h i n e tools a n d r e l a t e d equipment; m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y shop c o m p u ­
t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g to d i m e n s i o n s o f work,
speed, feeds, a n d t o o l i n g o f machines; h e a t - t r e a t i n g
o f metal parts during
f a b r i c a t i o n as w e l l as of f i n i s h e d tools a n d dies to a c h ieve
required
qualities;
w o r k i n g t o c l ose tolerances; f i t ting a n d a s s e m b l i n g o f p a r t s t o p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r ­
a n c e s and allowances;
a n d s e l e c t i n g app r o p r i a t e m a t e rials, tools a n d p r o c e s s e s .
I n general,
t h e tool-a n d - die m a k e r ’s w o r k
req u i r e s a r o u n d e d
t r a i n i n g in m a c h i n e - s h o p
and
toolroom
p r a c t i c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d t h r o u g h a fo r m a l a p p r e n t i c e s h i p or e q u i v a l e n t t r a i n i n g and experience.

(See M a c h i n e r y I n d u s t r i e s , p a g e * - for description.)
49
D R I L L - P R E S S OPERATOR, S I N G L E - OR M U L T I P L E -SPINDLE
(See M a c h i n e r y I n d u s t r i e s , p a g e
ELECTRICIAN,

* - for description.)
49

MAINTENANCE

(See M a i n t e n a n c e , p a g e

* - f or description.)
42

INSPECTOR
(See M a c h i n e r y I n d u s t r i e s , p a g e 50 for description.)
PUNCH-PRESS OPERATOR

F o r w a g e s t u d y p urposes, t o o l a n d die m a k e r s a r e class i f i e d as:
T o o l a n d die makers, Job b i n g shops
T o o l a n d d ie makers, o t h e r t h a n j o b bing shops
T R UCKER, H A N D
(See V o o l e n a n d W o r s t e d Textiles, p a g e * - for description.)
47




A w o r k e r w h o feeds a n d o p e r a t e s a power press e q u i p p e d w i t h s p e c i a l p r o d u c t i o n dies
t h a t p e r f o r m one or a c o m b i n a t i o n o f c u t t i n g an d sha p i n g op e r a t i o n s o n the stock.
Individual
pieces of stock or partly fabricated units
may be p o s i t i o n e d in the m a c h i n e b y the operator,
o r the
m a c h i n e m a y b e e q u i p p e d w i t h a feeding device that
automatically positions
single
p i e c e s of s t o c k
or r e p e t i t i v e l y p o s i t i o n s
strip or sheet s t o c k
for s u c c e s s i v e
o p e r ations.
P u n c h p r e s s e s are c o m m o n l y de s i g n a t e d b y f u nctional n a m e s d e r i v e d f r o m the o p e r a t i o n
they perform,
s u c h as b l a n k i n g p r e s s
o r forming press;
b y n a m e s d e s c r i p t i v e o f the
frame,

52
Electrical Machinery - Continued.

Electrical Machinery - Continued

PUNCH-PRESS OPERATOR - Continued
WIKER
s u c h as a r c h press;
or b y names that
p r e s s or t o g g l e press.

Indicate how the p o w e r is transmitted,

such as

c r ank
trol,

C l a s s A - A n oper a t o r w h o s e w o r k involves a n y com b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g : d i f f i ­
c u l t p o s i t i o n i n g of w o r k u n its b e c a u s e of size or shape, or type o f o p e r a t i o n to b e performed;
p r o c e s s i n g u n u s u a l l y large w o r k t h a t is posi t i o n e d in-the p r e s s w i t h t h e a i d o f o t h e r workers;
p r o c e s s i n g w o r k units t h a t m u s t b e s t e adied w h ile operations are b e i n g performed;
deep d r a w ­
in g or f o r m i n g
o perations r e q u i r i n g
c areful p o sitioning o f w o r k a n d p r o m p t
r e c o g n i t i o n of
f a u l t y opera t i o n; s h o r t - r u n w o r k r e q u i r i n g a b i l i t y t o p e r f o r m a v a r i e t y o f p u n c h p r e s s o p e r a ­
ti o n s o r to o p e rate s e v e r a l types o f presses; exam i n i n g outp u t a n d m a k i n g a d j u stments as n e c ­
e s s a r y to m a i n t a i n p r o d u c t i o n w i t h i n standards;
and setting, a l i g n i n g a n d a d j u s t i n g dies a n d
fi x t u r e s in the press.
C l a s s B - A n o p e r a t o r w h o is required m a i n l y to feed, c o n t r o l a n d e x a mine o p e r a t i o n
o f the p ress, a n d w h e n t rouble occurs t o call o n foreman, l e a d m a n or d i e m a k e r to c o r r e c t the
s i tuation, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves one or more of the f o l l o w i n g ; p e r f o r m i n g single operation,
s u c h as p u n c h i n g,
b lanking,
o r p i e r c i n g o n small or m e d i u m size s t o c k e a s i l y p o s i t i o n e d b y
hand;
f e e d i n g sm a l l units into the
p r e s s f r o m a feed race
or chute;
l o a d i n g a nd t e n d i n g a
press equipped wi t h
a f e e d i n g d e v i c e for h a n d l i n g a strip o r sheet stock,
or a d i a l drum,
m a g a z i n e or h o p p e r feed for h a n d l i n g individual stock blanks.
TESTER

A worker who
s p e c i a l i z e s in e l e c t r i c a l
signalling, d e t e c t i n g a n d r a d i o eq u i p m e n t .

w i r i n g in the a s s e m b l y

of e l e c t r i c a l c o n ­

C l a s s A - A w o r k e r w h o w i r e s large
units requiring multiple w i r i n g and whose wo r k
i n volves m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : w o r k i n g f r o m b l u e p r i n t s or drawings; p l a n n i n g o f w o r i n g p r o ­
c e d ures o n a v a r i e t y o f units; s e l e c t i n g w i r e s a n d o t h e r m a t e r i a l s r e q u i r e d for the work; d e ­
termining necessary length
o f w i r e s a n d c u t t i n g them;
and testing completed w i r i n g w i t h in­
str u m e n t s to d e t e r m i n e a d e q u a c y o f p e r f o r m a n c e .
C l a s s B - A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s m u l t i p l e w i r i n g i n s t a l lations cn a r e p e t i t i v e basis,
a n d w h o s e w o r k invol v e s
m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : w o r k i n g f r o m d r a w i n g s r e l a t i n g
t o the p a r ­
t i c u l a r w i r i n g o n w h i c h he h a s h a d i n s t r u c t i o n a n d training;
w i r i n g in a c c o r d a n c e w i t h p r e ­
scribed w i r i n g procedures;
u s i n g s t a n d a r d w i r e s p r e p a r e d for the w o r k b y o t h e r s a n d c h e c k i n g
wiring.
Class C - A wo r k e r w h o performs
s h o r t - c y c l e a n d r e p e t i t i v e w i r i n g operations, and
w h o s e w o r k i n volves m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g ; w i r i n g a l i m i t e d p h a s e of the e n t i r e w i r i n g system,
o n a n a s s e m b l y - l i n e basis,
o r i n s t a l l i n g s imple
single wiring;
w o r k i n g in a c c o r d a n c e w i t h
s t r i c t l y p r e s c r i b e d w i r i n g proc e d u r e s ;
u s i n g p r e p a r e d w i r e s or w o r k i n g w i t h w i r e s th a t are
i d e n t i f i e d b y colors;
a n d h a v i n g n o r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r t e s t i n g the
p e r f o r m a n c e of a n y p h ase
of the wiring.

(Air tester; e l e c t r i c - m o t o r tester; hardness inspector; h y d r a u l i c tester;
c o m b u s t i o n - e n g i n e tester; w a t e r tester)

internalD e p a r t m e n t Stores; M e n's a n d Boys* C l o t h i n g a n d F u r n i s h i n g s S t o r e s ;
a n d W o m e n ' s R e a d y - t o - V e a r S tores

A w o r k e r w h o p e r f o r m s tests to determine whe t h e r the
operation and/or characteris­
tics of v a r i o u s parts or p r o d u c t s m e e t r e q u i r e d standards a n d s pecifications.
C l a s s A - A w o r k e r w h o c o n ducts
tests on parts a n d / o r p r o d u c t s w i t h r e s p o n s i b i l i t y
fo r d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g the q u a l i t y a n d / o r operating p e r f ormance of the unit,
and whose work
involves a n y c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g : u s i n g a w i d e v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r i n g i n ­
s t r u m e n t s a n d t e s t i n g equipment; i n t e r preting drawings and s p e c i f i c a t i o n s as to o p e r a t i n g r e ­
q uirements; t e s t i n g a w i d e v a r i e t y o f products or parts;
a n d d e v i s i n g t e s t e q u i p m e n t set-ups
i n c o n d u c t i n g e xperimental, d e v e l opment, or c o mmercial tests.
C l a s s B - A w o r k e r w h o c onducts tests
o n parts a n d / o r p r o d u c t s w i t h some r e s p o n s i ­
b i l i t y for d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g the q u a l i t y and/ o r operating p e r f o r m a n c e o f the p r o d u c t or d e ­
vice, a n d w h o s e w o r k involves
a n y c o m b i n a t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g s t e s t i n g
p r o ducts o r parts
h a v i n g r i g i d sp ecifications,
b u t w h e r e testing procedures
and allowable variations are p r e ­
scribed; p e r f o r m i n g r e p e t i t i v e tests w h i c h involve a sequence o f t e s t i n g operations; a nd us i n g
p r e c i s i o n t e s t i n g equipment.

CASHIER-WRAPPER
A wo r k e r w h o w raps and receives payment for merchandise.
T h e d u t i e s o f this w o r k e r
i n volve
m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g ; r e c e i v i n g payme n t ,
merc h a n d i s e ,
and salescheck from sales­
p e r s o n or customer;
r e v i e w i n g s a l e s c h e c k f o r c o r r e c t computations;
m a k i n g change;
checking
s a l e s c h e c k a g a i n s t m e r c h a n d i s e f o r price,
quality, size, color, imperfections; w r a p p i n g m e r ­
chandise; a t t a c h i n g a d d r e s s l a b e l if m e r c h a n d i s e is t o b e sent.
E L E V A T O R O P E RATOR, P A S S E N G E R
A w o r k e r w h o t r a n s p o r t s p a s s e n g e r s b e t w e e n flo o r s
h ouse, d e p a r t m e n t store, o r s i m i l a r e s t a b l i s h m e n t .

o f a n office b u i l d i n g , a p a r t m e n t

FINISHER, FURNITURE
C l a s s C - A w o r k e r w h o tests p a rts or products a n d w h o s e w o r k involves a n y c o m b i n a ­
t i o n of the f o l l o w i n g : s h o r t-cycle r e p e titive testing operations; using a stan d a r d o r specialp u r p o s e t e s t i n g instrument o r t e s t s e t repetitively;
and a c c e p t i n g o r r e j e c t i n g units o n the
b a s i s of p r e s c r i b e d standards.




A w o r k e r w h o fi n i s h e s s u rfaces
o f n e w f u r n i t u r e a n d / o r re f i nishes s urfaces of d a m ­
a g e d f u r n iture.
T h i s w o r k e r ’s d uties involve
m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g ; r e m o v i n g
finish wit h
v a r n i s h r e m o v e r o r sanding, d o w n t o b a r e w o o d ;
p a d d i n g o r b l e a c h i n g w i t h shellac, alcohol, or
lacquer; a p p l y i n g f i l l e r a n d s m o o t h i n g w i t h s a ndpaper; b l e n d i n g var n i s h , s t a i n o r o t h e r c o a t ­
ing t o o b t a i n
d e s i r e d s h ade a n d t e x t u r e ; a p p l y i n g coating;
p o l i s h i n g c o a t i n g w i t h pumice,
c r u d e oil, f i n i s h i n g lacquer,
furn i t u r e p o l i s h , e tc.
M a y a l s o m a k e m i n o r r e p a i r s or I n s tall
hardware.

D e p a r t m e n t Stores; Men's a n d Boys* C l o t h i n g a n d F u r n i s h i n g s S t o r e s ;
a n d W o m e n s R e a d y -1 o -W e a r St o r e s - C o n t i n u e d

D e p a r t m e n t Stores; M e n ’s a n d B o y s ’ C l o t h i n g a n d F u r n i s h i n g s S t o r e s ;
a n d W o m e n ’s R e a d y - t o - V e a r Stor e s - Continued

FITTER, M E N ’S G ARME N T S

SATES CIERK - Continued

A w o r k e r w h o fits m e n ’s r e a d y - m a d e suits,
t opcoats o r o vercoats o n c u s t o m e r to d e ­
termine a l t e r a t i o n s that a re necessary.
T h e w o r k o f the fitter involves m e a s u r i n g the length
o f sleeves,
trousers, etc.;
ob s e r v i n g collar, shoulders, a n d side seams; m a r k i n g changes on
garment, u s i n g c h a l k or pins; a d v i s i n g customer, r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r fit;
i n f orming salespersons
o f m e a s u r e m e n t s a n d markings; e s t i m a t i n g costs of alterations; a n d e x p l a i n i n g u n u s u a l or d i f ­
f icult a l t e r a t i o n s to tailors.
M a y a l s o p e r f o r m t a i l o r ’s w o r k a f t e r f i n i s h i n g the f i t t i n g of
the g a rments or supervise the tailor shop.

selection, e x plains a n d d e m o n s t r a t e s v a r i o u s qualities o f the m e r c h a n d i s e ,
r e c e i v e s p a yment,
a n d m a k e s out salescheck.
M a y a l s o do o w n c a s h iering and w r a p p i n g a n d a s s i s t in s t o c k i n g a nd
d i s p l a y i n g mer c h a n d i s e .
F o r w a g e s t u d y pu r p o s e s ,

B e d s p r e a d s , draperies, blankets
Blouses and neckwear
B o y s ’ clothing
B o y s ’ furn i s h i n g s
F l o o r co v e r i n g s
Furniture and bedding
H o u s e w a r e s (except china, glassware a n d l a m p s )
M a j o r a p p l i a n c e s (refrigerators, stoves, w a s h e r s , etc.;
e x c l u d e s r a d i o s a n d television)
M e n 1s c l o t h i n g
M e n ’s f u r n i s h i n g s
Notions, trimm i n g s
P i e c e go o d s (yard goods, uphol s t e r y fabrics)
S i l v e i v a r e a n d Jewelry (excluding costume jewelry)
W o m e n ’s a c c e s s o r i e s (hosiery, gloves, handbags)
W o m e n ' s a n d misses' dresses
W o m e n ' s shoes
W o m e n ’s a n d m i s s e s ’ suits and coats

FITTER, W O M E N ’S GARMENTS
A w o r k e r w h o fits w o m e n ’s r e a d y - t o - w e a r suits, coats, o r dresses on c u s t o m e r to d e ­
t e r m i n e a l t e r a t i o n s that
necessary.
T h e w o r k o f the fitter involves m e a s u r i n g the length
o f sleeves, coats, hems, etc.;
ob s e r v i n g collar, shoulders, a n d side seams;
m a r k i n g changes
o n garment,
u s i n g chalk o r pins;
a d v i s i n g cus t o m e r r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r fit;
informing
sales­
p e r s o n s o f me a s u r e m e n t s a n d markings; e s t i m a t i n g costs of alterations; a n d e x p l a i n i n g u n u s u a l
o r d i f f i c u l t a l t e rations to tailors.
M a y a l s o p e r f o r m t a i l o r ’s w o r k a f t e r fi n i s h i n g the f i t ­
t i n g o f the g a r me n t s or supervise the t a i l o r shop.

are

PACKER, B U I K
A w o r k e r w h o p a c k s a n d crates b u l k m e r c h a n d i s e for del i v e r y b y t r u c k or s hipment b y
p a r c e l post,
express,
or freight.
The w o r k o f the p a c k e r involves m o s t o f the
following:
r e c e i v i n g orders or sale sc hecks; ob t a i n i n g m e r c h a n d i s e f r o m s t o c k
or f r o m stockman; c hecking
merchandise against
specifications o n saleschecks;
wrapping and
p a c k i n g mer c h a n d i s e
using
tissue paper,
excelsior, corrugated board,
caftons, w o o d e n crates, etc.;
a t t a c h i n g address
labels o r s t e n c iling name a n d address o n crates or cartons; s ending finished pa c k a g e to s h i p ­
p i n g room.

SEWER, A L T E RATION, W O M E N ’S G A R M E N T S
(Operator;

PORTER, D A Y

sales clerks are c l a s s i f i e d by d e p artment, as follows:

seamstress)

(CLEARER)

A w o r k e r w h o keeps the
prem i s e s o f a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t in a clean, orderly condition.
T y p i c a l o f the duties the w o r k e r per f o r m s are:
swe e p i n g and m o p p i n g floors;
r e m o v i n g trash;
d u s t i n g fu r n i t u re or fixtures; p o l i s h i n g m e t a l fixtures or trimmings; a n d w a s h i n g w i n d o w s and
dis p l a y c a s e s .
R E C E I V I N G C L E R K ( CHECKER)
A w o r k e r w h o r e c eives Incoming s hipments o f mer c h a n d i s e or other m a t e r i a l s a n d w h o s e
w o r k involves m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : v e r i f y i n g o r di r e c t i n g c h e c k e r in v e r i f y i n g the c o r r e c t ­
ne s s o f s hipments aga i n s t b i lls o f lading, invoices, or other records; c h e c k i n g far shortages
a n d r e j e c t i n g dam a g e d goods; r o u t i n g inc o m i n g m e r c h a n d i s e o r mate r i a l s to p r o p e r departments;
k e e p i n g r e c ords of stock;
ve r i f y i n g t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
charges;
corresponding wi t h
s hipper or
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n company.
SALES CIERK
A w o r k e r w h o sells mer c h a n d i s e
in a n a s s i g n e d de p a r t m e n t o f a store or in a store
s p e c i a l i z i n g In one or a few items.
D e t e r m i n e s merch a n d i s e
d e s i r e d b y customer, assists in




A w o r k e r w h o m a k e s a l t e r a t i o n s o n w o m e n ' s dresses, coats, or suits.
Typical alter­
a t i o n s include su c h items a s t a k i n g - u p hems, shortening sleeves, t a k i n g - i n side seams, c h a n g ­
ing s h o u l d e r seams, a n d felling,
In a c c o rdance w i t h m a r k i n g s
o n g a r m e n t or ins t r u c t i o n s r e ­
c e i v e d f r o m fitter.
T h e w o r k o f the s e w e r involves
m o s t of the f o l l o w i n g : r i p p i n g seams or
linings;
r e - c u t t i n g fabric;
b a s t i n g in p o s i t i o n for sewing;
re-sewing by hand
o r ma c h i n e .
M a y a l s o press n e w seams,
o r p r e s s g a r m e n t w i t h h a n d iron or p r e s s i n g m a c h i n e w h e n a l t e r a ­
t i ons a re completed.
ST O C K M A N , S E L L I N G S E C T I O N
A worker w h o brings merchandise
a n d other m a t e r i a l s f r o m s t o c k r o o m or w a r e h o u s e to
the s e l l i n g floor.
P l a c e s m e r c h a n d i s e in p r o p e r show cases,
drawers, or racks,
c h e c k i n g to
see t h a t it is in salable c o ndition.
Ins p e c t s incoming m e r c h a n d i s e a n d sorts s t o c k a c c o r d i n g
t o size,
line, style, color, etc.,
a n d p laces it in p r o p e r p l a c e in s t o c k r o o m o r w a r e h o u s e .
M a y a l s o keep i n v e n t o r y rec o r d s , a s s i s t in marking, d u s t stock, a n d r u n e r rands.

54.
Banks - Continued

Men's

D e p a r t m e n t Stores;
a n d Boys* Clothing a n d F u r n i s h i n g s S t o r e s ;
a n d W o m e n * s R e a d y - t o - W e a r Stores - Cont i n u e d
PROOF-MACHINE OPERATOR

STOCKMAN, W A R E H O U S E
A p e r s o n w o r k i n g in the w a r e h o u s e w h o fills c u s t o m e r s 1 orders for m e r c h a n d i s e from
s a l e s c h e c k s p e c ifications. Plan e s m e r c handise on flats, skids, or rollers, a n d m o r e s to p a c k ­
ing d e p a r t m e n t • A l s o fills
t r a n s f e r orders g o ing
to the store
for d i s p l a y on
the selling
floor.
R e c e i v e s i n c o m i n g m e r c h a n d i s e f r o m r e c e i v i n g or m a r k i n g dep a r t m e n t s a n d pl a c e s it in
storage.
H a n d l es r e t u r n e d goods
e i t h e r h y r e t u r n i n g it to storage or s e n d i n g it to shipping
d e p a r t m e n t fo r d e l i v e r y t o supplier.

A w o rker w h o operates
a sor t i n g m a c h i n e u n d e r g e n e r a l
s u p e r v i s i o n t o sort checks,
deb i t s ,
credits a n d o t h e r items.
R e c o r d s tot a l s
o f s p e c i f i c items in a p p r o p r i a t e ledgers.
M a y p e r f o r m a d d i t i o n a l c l e r i c a l d u t i e s in c o n n e c t i o n w i t h sorting.
STE N O G R A P H E R , G E N E R A L
(See Office, p a g e

hi

for d e scription.)

TELLER, NOTE
TAILOR, A L T E R A T ION, M E N ’S GAR M E N T S
A w o r k e r w h o m a k e s alter a t i o n s on m e n ’s coats,
suits, t r o users a n d vests.
Typical
a l t e r a t i o n s include s u c h items as r e m o d e l i n g shoulders and necklines,
r e - s e t t i n g sleeves a nd
c ollars,
t a k i n g - i n side seams,
a n d felling,
in accordance w i t h m a r k i n g s
o n g a r m e n t or in ­
st r u c t i o n s r e c e i v e d f r o m fitter.
T h e w o r k of the alte r a t i o n tai l o r involves m o s t o f the f o l ­
l o w i n g ; r i p p i n g s e ams a n d linings,
r e - c utting fabric,
h a s t i n g in p o s i t i o n
far sewing, r e ­
s e w i n g b y h a n d or m a c h i n e . M a y a l s o press n ew seams, or p r e s s g a r m e n t w i t h h a n d iron or p r e s s ­
ing m a c h i n e w h e n a l t e r a t i o n s a re completed.

C o l l e c t s exc h a n g e
c harges a nd p a y m e n t s o n notes, drafts,
rents, a n d co n t r a c t s for
dee d s .
M a y a c c e p t a n d g i v e r e c e i p t s fo r c o l l a t e r a l o n m a t u r i t y notes.
Is i n charge o f s e n d ­
ing o u t not i c e s
o f ma t u r i t y .
R e c e i v e s r e n e w a l note s .
P r o t e s t s items w h e n
it is necess a r y.
C a u s e s n o tes t o b e p r e s e n t e d a t o t h e r places,
w h e n place of payment
is o t her th a n the bank.
F o l l o w s up o n the v a l u e o f coll a t e r a l .
I n the c a s e o f r e a l e s t a t e notes, sees that m o r t g a g e s
a r e p r o p e r l y r e c o r d e d a n d c h e c k s c e r t i f i c a t e s o f title. C h e c k B fire insurance coverage.
Must
b e f a m i l i a r w i t h N e g o t i a b l e I n s t r u m e n t s A c t a n d s t a n d a r d t e r m s o f e x t e n s i o n a greements.
TEL L E R , P A Y I N G O R P A Y I N G A N D RECE I V I N G ,

Banks

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
(See Office, p a g e ^ 0 for description.)

COMMERCIAL

C a s h e s c u s t o m e r s * p e r s o n a l o r o t h e r checks.
M a y a l s o rec e i v e
depos i t s o n c h e c k i n g
a c c o u n t s a n d m a k e ent r i e s
in c u s t o m e r s ’ a c c o u n t b o o k s . W r i t e s u p
or signs d e p o s i t slips to
b e u s e d later in b a l a n c i n g books.
M a y r e c o r d the
d a i l y t r a n s a c t i o n s a n d b a l a n c e accounts.
M a y super v i s e one or mo r e
clerks w h o r e c o r d d e t a i l s o f t r a n s a c t i o n s , such a s names,
dates,
s e r i a l numbers,
a n d a m o u n t s invol v e d
so th a t p e r t i n e n t
d a t a m a y be
distributed among
the
s e v e r a l d e p a r t m e n t s for reco r d i n g , filing, a n d clear i n g .
M a y a l s o handle w i t h d r a w a l s a n d d e ­
p o s i t s o n sav i n g s a c c ounts.
TEL L E R , S A Y I N G S

CLEANER
A w o r k e r w h o keeps halls,
offices, and / o r roams of pub l i c buildings, offices, c o m ­
m e r c i a l e s t a b l i shments, o r a p a r t m e n t houses in a clean,
orderly condition and whose w o r k in­
v o l ves: sweeping, m o p p i n g a n d / o r sc r u b b i n g floors; d i s p osing of w a s t e or litter; a n d / o r dustirg f u r n i t u r e a nd e q u i p m e n t .
M a y a l s o be r e q u i r e d to p o l i s h m e t a l
fixt u r e s a n d
fittings.
.This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n d o e s no t Include w i n d o w was h e r s .

R e c e i v e s d e p o s i t s a n d p a y s out w i t h d r a w a l s
o n sav i n g s accounts.
M a kes e n t r i e s in
customers’ account
books. W r i t e s u p or signs
d e p o s i t s l ips to b e us e d later in b a l a n c i n g
books.
Ma y r e c o r d d a i l y t r a n s a c t i o n s a n d b a l a n c e a c c o u n t s .
M a y s upervise on e or m o r e clerks
w h o r e c o r d d e t a i l s o f tra n s a c t i o n s .
WATCHMAN

CIERK, T R A N S I T
(See Custodial, W a r e h o u s i n g a n d T r u c k i n g , p a g e ^ 5 for d e s c r i ption.)
A w o r k e r w h o sorts a n d lists checks a n d w h o s e w o r k includes the following:
mechani­
c a l e n d o r s e m e n t o f checks w h e n necessary; m a n u a l sorting of checks i n r a c k s a c c o r d i n g to bank;
listing, t o talling,
a n d b a l a n c i n g w i t h predet e r m i n e d co n t r o l totals; l o c a t i n g a n d a d j u s t i n g
errors; a n d p r e p a r i n g chec k s for m a i l i n g b a c k to banks on w h i c h drawn.
CIERK-TIPIST
(See O f f i c e , p age

H o m e O f f i c e s o f L ife I n s u r a n c e C o m p a n i e s

CLERK, ACCOUNTING
4 l for description.)

(See O f f i c e , p a g e ^ 0 for d e s c r i ption.)
CIER K , F I L E

GUARD

(See Custodial, Warehousing and Trucking, page V* for description.)




(See Office, page liO far description.)

55
Power Laundries - Continued

Home O ffice s o f L ife Insurance Companies - Continued
CLERK, U DERW
N
RITER

EXTRACTOR OPERATOR - Continued

A worker who, possessing a knowledge o f insurance term inology, a s s is ts underwriter
and whose work involves most o f the fo llo w in g : keeping f i l e s ; w riting le t t e r s ; checking in ­
surance application s fo r errors or om issions; operating a calcu la tin g machine and performing
other c l e r i c a l d u ties,

machine, allow ing i t to run a predetermined time or u n til flu id stops flowing from drain; r e ­
moving p a rtly dried m aterials; and hand trucking materials within the department. In addition ,
the worker may a s s is t the Washer in loading, operating, or unloading the washing machine.
FINISHER, FLATW
ORK, M IN
ACH E

CLERK-TYPIST
A worker who performs flatwork fin ish in g operations, by machine and whose work in ­
volves one or more o f the fo llo w in g : shaking out the creases in semi-dry washing to prepare
i t fo r the flatwork ironing machine; feeding clean, dan?) flatwork p ieces in to the flatwork
ironing machine by placin g the a r t ic le s on the feeder r o l le r s ; and catching or receiv in g a r t i ­
cle s as they emerge from the machine and p a r tia lly fold in g them.

(See O ffic e , page ^1 fo r d e s c r ip tio n .)
PREM
IUM ACCEPTOR
(Insurance cash ier)

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER

A worker who a ccep ts, records and proves remittances received from policyh olders
and the f ie ld o f f ic e s in connection with premiums, in terest on p o lic y loans or to cancel or
reduce p o licy loans; and indorses checks, issues re ceip ts and maintains records o f remittances
held pending adjustments. May conduct correspondence with f i e ld o f f i c e s regarding such rem it­
tances .
SECTION H A
ED
A worker who d ire cts the a c t i v i t i e s o f a group o f workers performing a function or
several related functions and whose duties as section head include the follow in g : train in g
personnel in the se ctio n s; knowing the work situ a tion o f the u n it; determining work assign ­
ments; follow in g up assignments to see that work is accomplished s a t is fa c t o r ily ; and planning
fo r and putting in to e f f e c t ary changes in methods.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
(See O ffic e , page k l fo r d e s c rip tio n .)
U DERW
N
RITER
(F in a l-s e le c t io n -o f-r is k c le rk ;

homer-office underwriter;

interview er,

insurance)

A worker who applies premium r a te s , established by the a ctu a ria l s t a t is t ic ia n fo r
each type o f insurance applied f o r , such as health, acciden t, l i a b i l i t y , f i r e and l i f e , and
examines a p p lica tion fo r fa c to r s , such as age, cre d it ra tin g , and accident experience o f ap­
p lica n t or type o f building i f w ritin g f i r e insurance, to determine whether applicant is a
good r is k .
Power Laundries
EXTRACTOR OPERATOR
(Whizzer operator)
A worker who removes surplus moisture from m aterials (such as wet c lo th , clo th in g ,
kn it goods, and yarn)by operating an e x tra ctor and whose work involves most o f the fo llo w in g :
loading m aterial into perforated drum o f machine by hand or h o is t; clo sin g l id and sta rtin g




(See Maintenance, page k2 fo r d e s crip tio n .)
IDENTIFIER
A worker who sorts s o ile d bundles, places the contents in to various bags and by
means o f fla g s , pins or other devices id e n tifie s the net with a customer tag or t ic k e t . In
addition may weigh, l i s t or count some or a l l a r tic le s contained in each bundle. This c l a s s i ­
fic a t io n does not include workers who mark or otherwise id en tify each individual piece con­
tained in a bundle.
MR E
AKR
A worker who marks or a ffix e s by hand or mechanical means, customer id en tifyin g
symbols on so ile d garments, lin en s, or other a r t ic le s . In addition may weigh, l i s t , or count
a r t ic le s contained in each bundle, sort contents of each bundle into groups according to tre a t­
ment to be receiv ed , or note and record any damaged or stained con d ition o f a r t i c le s . This
c la s s ific a t io n does not include workers who do sortin g , examining, or lis t in g without marking
the various a r t i c le s .
FRESHER/ MACHINE, SHIRTS
A worker who operates or tends the operation o f one or more o f the several type
machines that press s h ir ts , and.who perform such sh irt pressing operations as body pressing,
bosom pressing, c o lla r and c u ff pressing, and/or sleeve pressing.
W
ASHER, M IN
ACH E
A worker who operates one or more washing machines to wash household lin en s, gar­
ments, curtains, drapes and other a r t ic le s and whose work involves the follow in g : manipula­
ting valves, sw itches, and levers to sta rt and stop the machine and to co n tro l the amount and
temperature o f water fo r the sudsing and rin sing o f each batch; mixing and adding soap, bluing
and bleaching so lu tio n s; and loading and unloading the washing machine. In ad d ition may make
minor repairs to washing machine.

56.
Power Laundries - Continued

Auto Repair Shops - Cont inued

WRAPPER, BUNDLE

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE - Continued

A worker who wraps packages or finished products, or packs a r t i c le s , goods, or ma­
t e r ia ls in cardboard boxes and secures the package or box with twine, ribbon, gummed tape, or
p a ste . The worker may segregate a r t ic le s according to size or type, or according to customer's
order and inspect a r t ic le s fo r d efe cts before wrapping.

Class A - Repairs, re b u ild s, or overhauls engines, transm issions, clu tch es, rear
ends, or other assem blies, replaces worn or broken p a rts, grinds v alv es, bores cy lin d ers, f i t s
rin g s . In addition may adjust brakes or lig h t s , tighten body b o lt s , a lig n wheels, e t c . May
remove or replace motors, transmissions or other assem blies. May do machining o f p a rts.

Auto Repair Shops
BODY REPAIRMAN, M
ETAL
(A u tom ob ile-collision serviceman; fender and body repairman; body man)
Repairs damaged automobile fenders and bodies to restore th e ir o r ig in a l shape and
smoothness o f surface by hamnerlng out and f i l l i n g dents, and by welding breaks in the metal.
May remove b o lts and nuts, take o f f old fenders, and in s t a ll new fenders. May perform such
rela ted tasks as replacin g broken glass and repairing damaged radiators and woodwork. May
paint repaired su rfaces.
ELECTRICIAN, AUTOM
OTIVE
(Ig n itio n repairman)
Repairs and in s t a lls ig n itio n systems, s ta rte rs , c o i l s , panel instruments, w iring,
and other e l e c t r ic a l systems and equipment on automobiles: performs such duties as diagnosing
trouble by v isu a l in spection or by use o f testin g devices;, adjusting tim ing; adjusting d is ­
trib u to r breaker-point gaps with thickness gage; replacing d efectiv e parts on s ta rte rs , gen­
e ra to rs, and d is tr ib u to r s ; and replacing defectiv e ig n itio n and lig h tin g w ires. May te s t and
repair generators. May repair and adjust carburetors.
GREASER
(Lubricating man)
Lubricates, by means o f hand-operated or compressed-air operated grease guns and
o i l sprays, a l l parts o f automobile or truck where lu b rica tion is required, using proper type
lubricant on the various poin ts on chassis or motors; drains old lubricant from lubrican t reser­
v o irs and r e f i l l s w ith new. May perform other related d u ties, such as checking radiator water
le v e l, checking and adding d i s t i l le d water to battery, repairin g t i r e s , e t c . May a ls o perform
duties o f washer.
MECHANIC, AUTOM
OTIVE
Repairs automobiles and trucks, performing such duties as disassembling and overhaul­
ing engines, transm issions, clu tch e s, rear ends, and other assemblies on automobiles, rep la c­
ing warn or broken p a rts, grinding valves, adjusting brakes, tightening body b o lt s , aligning
wheels, e t c . In add ition to general automotive mechanics, th is c la s s ific a t io n a ls o includes
workers whose duties are lim ited to repairing and overhauling the motor.




Class B - Adjusts brakes or lig h t s , tightens body b o lt s , align s wheels, or makes
other adjustments or repairs o f a minor nature; or removes and replaces motors, transmissions,
clu tch es, rear ends, e t c . , but does no repairin g, reb u ild in g , or overhauling o f these assem­
b l ie s . Workers who are employed as helpers to Mechanics are excluded from th is c la s s ific a t io n .
W
ASHER, AUTOM
OBILE
(Car washer; wash boy)
Washes automobiles and trucks; sweeps and cleans in te r io r o f automobile; may polish
auto v eh icle bodies, using polish in g compound and a c lo th . Various parts o f th is Job may be
performed by Individual workers in automobile laundries production lin e s .

.

57

Page Number
D escription Earnings or rate
51
k 9

lo

10
-

56
-

10
10

51
-

lo

10

16
16
-

12
-

52
52
18

11

5^
10
5^
lo
5^
lo

lo

11

10
21
21

31
33
17, 23
33
28
29
31
25
2 0 , 2 1 , 23
29
7 , 1 0 , 16
30
7 , 11, 16
30
7 , 11, 16
8 , 1 1 , 16
8 , 1 2 , 16
29
30
H

5^
55
11
5^
55
16

32
31
27
26
32
32
32
9 , 16
9, 16
3^
33
33
31
31
3^
7 , 9, 16
7, 9, 1 0 , 16
29
32
31
31
1 0 , 16

8

29
30

21

-

3*
32
33
33
25
20, 23
32
21
32

51
^9

26

-

18
11
-

16

-

2?

-

56

27
32

31

33
33

31

3

11

CO




-

CO

Apprentice (malt liquors) .......................................
AsteBtos worker ('building construction) .........................
Assembler (electrical machinery) ................................
Assembler (machinery) ...........................................
Bench hand (bakeries) ...........................................
Benchman (bakeries) .............................................
Benchman, head (bakeries) .......................................
Biller, machine (billing machine) ...............................
Biller, machine (bookkeeping machine) ...........................
Bindery woman (printing) ........................................
Boatswain (ocean transport) ..... ...................... .........
Boatswain's mate (ocean transport) ..............................
Body repairman, metal (auto repair shops) .......................
Boilermaker (building construction) .............................
Bookbinder (printing) ...........................................
Bookkeeper, hand .............. ............................... . •
Bookkeeping-machine operator....... ................ ...........
Bookkeeping-machine operator (banks) ............................
Bottler, machine (malt liquors) .................................
Bricklayer (building construction) ..... *.......................
Building laborer (building construction) .... •..................
Calculating-machine operator (Comptometer type) .................
Calculating-machine operator (other than Comptometer type) .......
Card finisher (woolen and worsted textiles) .....................
Card stripper (woolen and worsted textiles) ...... ..............
Carpenter (building construction) ...............................
Carpenter (ocean transport) .....................................
Carpenter, maintenance ..........................................
Carpenter's mate (ocean transport) ..............................
Cashier-wrapper (department stores) .............................
Cashier-wrapper (women's ready-to-wear stores) ..................
Cement finisher (building construction) .........................
Chipper and grinder (ferrous foundries) .........................
C l e a n e r ...... .................................... .............
Cleaner (banks) ...... ..........................................
Clerk, accounting ................................................
Clerk, accounting (home offices of life insurance companies) ....
Clerk, file .............. ......................................
Clerk, file (home offices of life insurance companies) ..........
Clerk, general ..................................................
Clerk, order ...................................................
Clerk, pay roll .................................................
Clerk, transit (banks) ................... ............... .......
Clerk, unlerwriter (home offices of life insurance companies) ....
Clerk-typist .................... ...............................
Clerk-typist (banks) ...... ........... .................... .
Clerk-typist (home offices of life insurance companies) .........
Comber tender, worsted (woolen and worsted textiles)
Compositor, hand (printing) ....................... .............
Conductor (local transit) ..................... ............ .
Cook, assistant (ocean transport) ...............................
Cook, chief (ocean transport) ...................................
Coremaker, hand (ferrous foundries) .............................
Crane operator, electric-bridge.... .................. ..........
Crovner (malt liquors) .............. '
............... ...........
Doffer, spinning frame (woolen and worsted textiles)
Dough mixer (bakeries) ..........................................
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (electrical .
machinery) ....................................................
Drill-press operator, single- and multiple-spindle (machinery) ...
Driver, bus (local transit) .................... .................
Duplicating-machine operator.......... ............... ..........
Electrician (building construction) .................. ..........
Electrician (ocean transport) .......................... .........
Electrician, assistant (ocean transport) ........................
Electrician, automotive (auto repair shops) .....................

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate
Electrician, maintenance ................................
Electrician, maintenance (electrical machinery) ..........
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) .....................
Electrician, maintenance (ocean transport) ...............
Electrotyper (printing) ..... ............................
Elevator constructor (building construction) .............
Elevator operator, passenger (department stores) .........
Elevator operator, passenger (women's ready-to-wear stores)
Engineer, deck (ocean transport) .........................
Engineer, Junior unlicensed (ocean transport) ............
Engineer, refrigeration (ocean transport) ................
Engineer, stationary ....................................
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .......... ....... .....
Extractor operator (laundries) ...........................
Feeder, traveling-oven (bakeries) ........................
Feeder, tray- and traveling-oven (bakeries) ..............
Filler (malt liquors) ........................... ........
Finisher, flatwork, machine (laundries) ..................
Finisher, furniture (department stores) ..................
Fireman (ocean transport) ............. ..................
Fireman, stationary boiler ...............................
Fireman, stationary boiler (laundries) ...................
First man (malt liquors) .............. ..................
Fitter, men's garments (department stores) ...............
Fitter, men's garments (men's and boys* clothing stores) ..
Fitter, women's garments (department stores) .............
Fitter, women's garments (women's ready-to-wear stores) ...
Foreman, working (bakeries) ..............................
Fuller tender (woolen and worsted textiles) ..............
Greaser (auto repair shops) ....... ......................
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ....................
Guard ...................................................
Guard (banks) ............................................
Helper,, bakery (bakeries) ...... .........................
Helper, elevator constructor (building construction) .....
Helper, motortruck driver ................................
Helper, pan greaser (bakeries) .................. ........
Helper, tile layer (building construction) ....... .......
Helper, trades, maintenance ..............................
leer (bakeries) .........................................
Icing mixers (bakeries) .................................
Identifier (laundries) ..................................
Inspector (electrical machinery) .........................
Inspector (machinery) ....................................
J a n i t o r ........... .............. .......................
Janitor (woolen and worsted textiles) ..... ..............
Key-punch operator ............ ...........................
Labeler and packer (paints and varnishes) ...*........ ..
Labeler (malt liquors) ...... ............... ............
Laborer, plasterer (building construction) ...............
Lather (building construction) .......... ................
Loader and unloader, car (stevedoring) ...................
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ...............................
Loom fixer (woolen and worsted textiles) .................
Machineman (bakeries) .................... ...............
Machine operator (bakeries) ............... ..............
Machine operator (printing) ...................... .......
Machinist, maintenance ....... ...........................
Machinist, maintenance (woolen and worsted textiles) .....
Machinist, production (machinery) ..... ..................
Mailer (printing) ....................... ................
Maintenance man, general util i t y .... ........... *.......
Maintenance man, general utility (paints and varnishes) ...
Malt miller (malt liquors) .................. ............
Marker (laundries) .................. .................. .
Mechanic, air-conditioning................ ..............

12

51
19
-

52
52
-

12

19
55
-

55
52
-

12

55
53
53
53
53
16
.56
50
-

-

11

5^
-

12
-

55
51
50
11
16
ll
17
-

16
-

12

16
50
-

^3
^7
55
^3
-

17, 23
27
26

33
3^
31
27, 28
29
33
33
33
17, 23
26
30
32
32
32
30
27
33
17, 23
30
32
27
28
28

29
32

21

31

26
2 0 , 23

29
32
31
32
32
31
1 8 , 23
32
32
30
27
26
2 0 , 2 1 , 23
21
1 2 , 16
25
32
31
31
33
33
21
32
32
3^
18, 23
21
26

3*
25
32
30

1 8 , 23

18

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rate

Page Number
Description
Earnings or rai

18, 23
31
19, 23
24
33

43
56
43
46

_

26

50
43

19, 23
32
25
25
25
25
32
8, 16
13, 16
19, 23
33
32
19
32
31
32
21, 23
32
32
21, 23
27
31
19, 23
32
31
32
25
34
19, 23
31
31
20, 23

-

47
48

48
.48
_

41
41
43

-

43

44
_
-

44
53

-

43
-

-

48
43

-

54
51

-

53
53
53

-

53
53
53

-

41
55
•53

27
28
29
30
34
34
30
34
34
34
29
27
33
27
28
29
32
31
31
27, 28
28
29
33
33
13, 16
30

m

- ■
-

CM

55

o

43
44
53
53
53
55

CM

Mechanic, automotive .....................................
Mechanic, automotive (auto repair shops) ..................
Mechanic, maintenance ....................................
Mender, cloth (woolen and worsted textiles) ...............
Messman (ocean transport) ............................... .
Milling-machine operator (machinery) ......................
Millwright ...............................................
Mixer (bakeries) .................. ........... ...........
Mixer (paints and varnishes) .............................
Molder, floor (ferrous foundries) ............... ........
Molder, hand, bench (ferrous foundries) ..................
Molder, machine (ferrous foundries) ..................... .
Motortruck d r i v e r .... ......... ..........................
Office boy ................. ...................... .......
Office g i r l ................ ..............................
Oiler ..... ........... ...................................
Oiler (ocean transport) .... ..............................
Operator (local transit) ............ .....................
Operator, alr-conditloning ...............................
Operator, divider (bakeries) .............................
Operator, power equipment (building construction) ........ .
Operator, traveling-oven (bakeries) ..................... .
Order filler ............................................ .
Overman (bakeries) ............................. ........ .
Overman, head (bakeries) ..................... .......... .
P a c k e r ............................................. .
Packer, bulk (department stores) .........................
Painter (building construction) .......................... ,
Painter, maintenance ............................ .......
Pan greaser (bakeries) ................... ..............
Baperhanger (building construction) ......................
Pasteurizer (malt liquors) ..............................
Patternmaker, wood (ferrous foundries) ..................
Photoengraver (printing) ................................
Pipe fitter, maintenance ................................
Plasterer (building construction) .............. ........
Plumber (building construction) .........................
Plumber, maintenance ....................................
Porter ......................................... ........
Porter, day (cleaner) (department stores) ................
Porter, day (cleaner) (men's and boys' clothing stores) ...
Porter, day (cleaner) (women's ready-to-wear stores) .....
Premium acceptor (home offices of life Insurance companies)
Press assistant (printing) ....... .......................
Press feeder (printing) .................................
Presser, machine, shirts (laundries) ...... ..............
Pressman, cylinder (printing) .................. ....... .
Pressman, platen (printing) .............................
Pressman, web presses (printing) ........................
Proof-machine operator (banks) ..........................
Punch-press operator (electrical machinery) .... .........
Quartermaster (ocean transport) .........................
Receiving clerk (checker) (department stores) ............
Receiving clerk (checker) (men's and boys' clothing stores)
Receiving clerk (checker) (women's ready-to-wear stores) ..
Repairman, box (malt liquors) ...........................
Rodman (building construction) ............... ........ .
Roofer (building construction) ....................... .
Sales clerk (department stores) ............. ....... .
Sales clerk (men's and boys* clothing stares)
Sales clerk (women's ready-to-wear stores) ..... .........
Seaman, able (ocean transport) ..........................
Seaman, ordinary (ocean transport) .................. .
Secretary......... ..... ................................
Section head (home offices of life Insurance cooqpanles) ...
Sewer, alteration, women's garments (department stares) ...

CM




.

58

Sewer, alteration, women's garments (women's ready-to-wear
stores) ................................. ................
Shake-out man (ferrous foundries) ....................... .
Sheet-metal worker (building construction) .................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance ............................
Spinner, frame (woolen and wbrsted textiles) ...............
Steam fitter (building construction) .......................
Stenographer, general ................................... .
Stenographer, general (banks) ..............................
Stenographer, general (home offices of life insurance
companies) ..............................................
Stenographer, technical .................. .................
Stereotyper (printing) ....................................
Steward, chief (ocean transport) .......................... .
Stock handler .............................................
Stockman, selling section (department stores) ..............
Stockman, selling section (men's and boys* clothing stores) ,
Stockman, selling section (women's ready-to-wear stores) ....
Stockman, warehouse (department stares) ................... .
Storekeeper (ocean transport) .............................
Structural-iron worker (building construction) ............ .
Supervisor, tray- and traveling-oven (bakeries) ........... .
Switchboard operator ......................................
Switchboard operator-receptionist .........................
Syrup mixer (malt liquors) ................................
Tabulating-machine operator ...............................
Tailor, alteration, men's garments (department stores) ....
Tailor, alteration, men's garments (men's and boys' clothing
stores) ........ ...... ............. ........ ..........
Technician (paints and varnishes) .........................
Teller, note (banks) ......................................
Teller, paying, or paying and receiving, conanercial (banks)
Teller, savings (banks) ...................................
Tender, bricklayer (building construction) ................
Tester (electrical machinery) .......... ..................
Tile layer (building construction) ........................
Tlnter (paints and varnishes) .............................
Tool and die maker (machinery) ............................
Transcribing-machine operator, general .................. .
Transcribing-machlne operator, technical ..................
Truck driver ..............................................
Trucker, hand ....................... ................... .
Trucker, hand (ferrous foundries) .........................
Trucker, hand (machinery) .................. t .............
Trucker, hand (woolen and worsted textiles) ...............
Trucker, power ............................................
Typist ................... ................................
Underwriter (hone offices of life insurance companies) ....
Utllltyman (ocean transport) ........ ........... ..... .
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes) ............ .........
Washer, automobile (auto repair shops) ....................
Washer, machine (laundries) ........................ .
Watchman ................................... ..............
Watchman (banks) ........................... ..............
Watchman (ocean transport) ................................
Watertender (ocean transport) .......... ..................
Weaver (woolen and worsted textiles) .................... .
Welder, hand (machinery) ..................................
Winder, yarn (woolen and worsted textiles) .... ...........
Wiper (ocean transport) ...................................
Wirer (electrical machinery) .............. ...............
Wrapper (bakeries) ........................................
Wrapper, bundle (laundries) ......... .....................

☆

2 8

1112-4

53
48
_

43
46
41
54
-

55
41
_
-

45
53
53
53
54
_

41
41
41
54
54
47
54
54
54
52
_

-

-

47
51
42
42
45
45
48
51
47
45
42
55
47
56
55
45
5^
-

-

47
51
47
42
-

-

56

29
25
31
2 0 , 23
24
31
8 , 13, 16
29
30
14, 16
34
33
21, 23
27, 28
28

29
27
33
31
32
14, 16
14, 16
32
9 , 14 ,16
27
28

25
29
29
29
31
27
31
25
26
15, 16
15
2 1 , 2 2 , 23
21, 23
25
26
24
2 2 , 23
15, 16
30
33
25
31
30
2 2 , 23
29
33
33
24
26
• 24
33
27
32
30

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O —

1950


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102