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OFFICE ■
W ORKERS
salaries
hours of work
supplementary benefits

B U LLE TIN NO. 1006




PROVIDENCE, R.I.
JUNE 1950
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR • BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C. Price 15 cents




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

i

CONTENTS

Page
Number

Introduction....•.... ........... ........ ................. ..........
Salaries of Providence Office Workers, June 1950 ..............................
Supplementary Wage Practices ••••••••••*•••••••............ •••........... •••••••
Tables:
1*
2*
3«
4*
5.

6.
7.

8*
9.

Salaries and Weekly hours of work, by Industry division ... •••••.....
Percentage distribution, by weekly salaries ............... ........
Scheduled weekly hours ...... ......... ............ ...........
Scheduled days in wozkweek.................... ...............
Vacations with pay ••••••••.............. ••••.*........ ....... .
Paid holidays.... .......... ..•••••••......... ..........•••••
Formal provisions for paid sick leave .................. .........
Nonproduction bonuses..... ............... ••••••.......... •••••
Insurance and pension plans.... ......... ........ •••••••••••....

1
1

1.
3
6
9
9
10
10
11
12
12

Appendix A:
Scope and method of survey •••••••••....... ••••••...... ...........

13

Appendix B:
Descriptions of occupations studied .............. ......... ...... ••
•

15

INTRODUCTION

Surveys o f o f f i c e worker s a la r ie s were conducted by the Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s in
more than a score o f la rg e c i t i e s during 1948-49. The survey program provides f o r annual resurveys
in a major c i t y in each o f 5 broad geographic areas* These c i t i e s are A tla n ta , Boston, Chicago,
Los A ngeles, and New York* I n i tie d surveys w i ll be conducted each year in another 5 important
c it ie s * To the exten t that resources perm it, salary data w i l l a lso be brought u p -to-d a te in a few
c i t i e s la s t covered 2 o r 3 years e a r lie r *
These surveys are designed to provide sa la ry data f o r selected o f f i c e occupations on a
cross-in d u stry basis* Data are a ls o obtained on supplementary b e n e fit s , such as v a ca tion s, h o li­
days, sick le a v e , and insurance and pension plans* Salary and rela ted data are provided wherever
p o s s ib le f o r in d iv id u a l industry d iv is io n s *
The Providence study was prepared
J* Fahres, Regional Wage A nalyst, Region I ,
tio n o f the p r o je c t was the r e s p o n s ib ilit y
general supervision o f Harry Ober, C h ief o f




in the Bureau*s D iv isio n o f Wage S t a t is t ic s by Bernard
Boston, Massachusetts* The planning and cen tra l d ir e c ­
o f Toivo P* Kanninen and Louis E* Badenhoop under the
the Branch o f Industry Wage Studies*




SALARIES OF OFFICE WORKERS IN PROVIDENCE, R. I., JUNE 1$50 l/

S alaries
Average weekly sa la rie s o f women o f f i c e workers in over h a lf o f the 20 job c l a s s i f i c a ­
tion s fo r which data are presented in ta b le 1, f e l l in the $35 - $40 salary bracket in June 1950.
Among the occu pation al groups a t th is le v e l were general stenographers ($39)> c le r k -ty p is ts ($35*50),
and p a y -r o ll clerk s ($ 3 9 .5 0 ), the three num erically most important jobs included in the Providence
survey. Hand bookkeepers with a $46.50 average salary were the highest paid among 5 jobs averaging
above $40 weekly, while o f f i c e g i r l s and clerk s doing routine f i l i n g were at the low end o f the
sca le with average s a la r ie s o f $31 and $32, r e s p e c tiv e ly .
Among 5 job c la s s ific a t io n s fo r which data could be shown fo r men, only o f f i c e boys, with
a $32.50 average, f e l l below the $50 weekly le v e l. Accounting c le r k s , the la rg e st group, earned
$51 weekly; order cle rk s and general cle rk s averaged $55 and $52, r e s p e c tiv e ly . Hand bookkeepers
($62.50) were the highest paid among men workers stu died.
The data on s a la r ie s by broad industry group were too lim ited t o permit more than a few
in terin du stry comparisons. There were in d ica tio n s, however, that o f f i c e worker sa la r ie s in the
nondurable goods manufacturing in d u stries were gen erally higher than in the durable branch, 2/ and
that o f f i c e workers in r e t a i l trade establishments earned le s s than the average fo r a l l in d u strie s.
Salary ra tes o f in d iv id u a l women workers ranged from $25 to over $65 a week. Although
the low est and highest s a la r ie s t y p ic a lly d iffe r e d by $30 or more w ithin in d ivid u al occupations,
the rates fo r a su b sta n tia l p rop ortion o f the workers were o ften grouped near the average fo r the
jo b (ta b le 2 ) . In d ivid u a l s a la r ie s o f general stenographers, fo r example, varied from $25 t o more
than $70, but nearly 3 o f every 5 workers earned between $35 and $45 a week. The salary ra tes o f
s lig h t ly more than h a lf o f a l l women workers in the jobs surveyed were in the $32.50 t o $42.50
range.

SUPPLEM
ENTARY W ® PRACTICES
AG

Wark schedule8
The work schedule in Providence o f f i c e s in June 1950 varied considerably by industry
(ta b le 3 ). In manufacturing, approximately f o u r -f ift h s of the women o f f i c e workers were on a 40-hour
workweek, whereas in tra n sp orta tion , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s about th ree-fou rth s
had a 37lf-hour schedule, and in r e t a i l trade more than h a lf had schedules varying between 37^ and
40 hours. The sh ortest work schedules were in the fin a n ce, insurance, and r e a l esta te group where
n early th ree-fou rth s o f the women o f f i c e workers had a workweek o f le s s than 37^ hours.
A 5-day workweek was standard fo r most women o f f i c e workers in Providence,
wholesale trade n early a th ird o f the workers were required to work
days (ta b le 4 ) .

l / See Appendix A fo r d iscu ssion o f scope and method o f survey.
2 / A li s t i n g o f durable and nondurable in du stries is provided
table on page 13.




in fo otn otes to

although

the appendix

Paid vacations

Almost a l l firm s included in the survey reported formal p rov ision s fo r paid vacations fo r
o f f i c e workers (ta b le 5 ) . Over t h r e e -fift h s o f the workers were employed in o f f i c e s that granted
a t le a s t a week a ft e r 6 months o f se rv ice and approximately fo u r - f if t h s worked under plans providing
2 or more weeks a ft e r a year o f s e r v ic e . O ffic e workers were .ra re ly granted vacations o f le s s than
2 weeks with pay a ft e r 5 years o f s e r v ic e . The most li b e r a l p rov ision s fo r fiv e -y e a r employees
were found in the r e t a i l trade group where the m ajority o f workers were in o f f i c e s provid in g paid
vacations exceeding 2 weeks.
Paid holidays
O ffice workers in a l l industry d iv is io n s except r e t a i l trade re ceiv ed 6 or more paid
holidays a year (ta b le 6) . In the la t t e r group, no form al h oliday pay p ro v isio n s were reported by
firm s employing n early a fou rth o f the workers, although a l l other r e t a i l trade firm s provided 9
days with pay. Among other industry d iv is io n s , the number o f paid h olidays varied from 6 to 13.
Almost a l l workers in the fin a n ce, insurance, and r e a l esta te group re ceiv ed 10 or more days, com­
pared to tw o -fifth s who receiv ed as many as 9 days and a f i f t h only 6 days in manufacturing indus­
t r i e s . E ither 9 or 10 days were granted to most workers in the wholesale tra d e, s e r v ic e s , and pub­
l i c u t i l i t i e s groups.
Paid sick leave
About a fou rth o f the Providence o f f i c e workers were employed in establishm ents that had
formal arrangements fo r paid s ic k leave a ft e r a year o f s e r v ic e . Of the workers e l i g i b l e under
formal s ick leave plan s, nearly th ree-fou rth s were e n tit le d t o 10 or more days a y ea r. In most
cases the number o f days allowed did not increase ap preciably w ith longer s e r v ic e . The prop ortion
o f workers covered by s ic k leave plans in the r e t a i l trade and s e rv ice s groups was greater than in
other industry d iv is io n s studied (ta b le 7 ) . S ick leave granted on an inform al b a sis as reported by
a number o f employers is not included in these estim ates.
Nonproduction bonuses
Many employers paid o f f i c e workers seme type o f nonproduction bonus, in nearly a l l cases
these were Christmas or year-end payments (ta b le 8) . Such bonuses supplemented the b a sic pay o f
approximately a th ird o f a l l o f f i c e workers in Providence, and were most prevalent in the w holesale
and r e t a i l trade groups; about h a lf o f these o f f i c e workers receiv ed nonproduction bonus payments.
Insurance and pension plans
. Firms that financed a l l or part o f one o r more types o f insurance or pension plans a c ­
counted fo r about 9 o f every 10 o f f i c e workers studied (ta b le 9 ) . Considerable v a ria tio n in the
exten t and types o f b e n e fit plans were rep orted . L ife insurance was the most prevalent o f the v a r i­
ous types o f insurance pla n s. T h r e e -fifth s o f the o f f i c e workers were employed by firms with l i f e
insurance p lan s, although the p rop ortion varied by industry from 5 percent in se rv ice s t o 7^ p er­
cent in manufacturing.
Retirement pension plans (in a d d ition t o Federal o ld age and survivors* insurance) were
reported by firm s, employing le s s than one-tenth o f the workers in the trade groups. Firms employing
more than f o u r - f if t h s o f the workers In the fin a n ce , insurance, and r e a l e s ta te , and the tran sporta­
t io n , communication,and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s groups had such pension p la n s.




-

3

-

TABLE 1.— Salaries 1/ and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
Providence, R„ I., by industry division, June 1950

Sex, occupation, and industry
d iv is io n

7
j

Estimated
number
of
workers

Weekly
salary

Average Weekly
scheduled
hours

Median
Hourly
ra te

weekly
salary

Salary range
o f middle
50 percent
__o f workers____

$52.50 - $70.00

2/

Men
25

$62.50

40.0

$1.55

$61.00

Clerks, accounting
.......................
Manufacturing ...• • • • .................
Durable g o o d s ............ ..............
Nondurable goods ••••.............

119
70
27
43

51.00
50.50
49.00
52.00

40.0
4 0 .0
40.0
40.0

1.27
1.27
1.22
1.30

50.00
50.00
48.00
50.00

43.00
46.00
47.00
43.00

-

56.00
55.50
49.50
60.00

C lerks, general 4/ .............................
M anufacturing...........

37
33

52.00
51.50

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1.30
1.29

55.00
41.00

40.00 40.00 -

65.00
65.00

C lerks, order
.................................
Wholesale trade . . . . . . ...............

73
70

55.00
54.50

40.5
40.5

1.36
1.35

55.00
50.00

45.00 45.00 -

62.00
62.00

O ffice bo v s ..................................... .

68

32.50

39.5

.83

30.00

30.00 -

34.50

B ill e r s , machine ( b i l l i n g
machine)
.......................................
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••
Durable goods .•••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ••.............

143
91
67
24

39.50
41.00
40.00
43.00

39.5
40.0
40.0
39.5

1.00
1.02
1.00
1.08

40.00
40.00
40.00
44.00

35.50
38.00
38.00
41.50

-

42.00
44.00
42.00
45.00

B ille r s , machine (bookkeeping
machine)
........................................
Wholesale trade ...........................
R e ta il trade

90
31
49

39.00
42.50
37.00

39.5
40.0
39.0

.99
1.06
.94

38.00
43.00
37.00

33.00 38.00 32.00 -

43.00
46.50
a . 50

Bookkeepers, hand 4 / .........................
Manufacturing •••••.....................
Durable goods . ................ ••••
Nondurable goods •...............

150
97
54
43

46.50
46.50
45.50
48.00

38.0
38.0
37.5
38.5

1.22
1.23
1.21
1.25

45.00
45.00
45.00
45.00

42.00
42.00
41.50
42.00

-

50.00
48.0 0
48.00
52.00

Bookkeepers, hand

ij

jj

Women

U

y

Bookkeeping-machine op era tors.
c la s s B 4 / ....................................... ..
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods « . . . .............
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e s t a t e ....................

274
113
80
33

35.50
38.00
39.00
35.50

38.0
39.0
39.0
39.0

.9 4
.97
.99
.91

3 5 .0 0
38.00
38.50
37.00

32.50
35.00
36.00
32.00

-

38.50
40.00
42.Q0
37.00

117

33.00

36.5

.90

32.50

32.00 -

34.50

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) 4 / ................. ..
Manufacturing ••••••••..............
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .....................
R e ta il t r a d e ...........

358
184
122
62
97

38.00
37.50
35.50
41.00
34.50

39.0
39.5
4 0 .0
40.0
38.5

.98
.94
.90
1.03
.90

37.00
37.00
35.00
42.00
34.50

34.00
34.00
33.00
39.50
32.00

-

42.00
42.00
39.00
43.50
37.00

Calculating-machine operators
(oth er than Comptometer type) . .

30

34.50

38.0

.91

36.00

30.00 -

38.00

See footn otes a t end o f table,




TABLE 1.— Salaries 1/ and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
Providence, R. I., by industry division, June 1950 - Continued

Sex, occupation, and in du stry
d iv is io n 2 /

Estimated
number
of
workers

Weekly
salary

Average Weekly
scheduled
hours

Median

Hourly
ra te

sa la rv

Salary range
o f middle
50 percent
o f workers

$33.50
37.00
36.00
37.00
31.00
30.00

y
weekly

Women - Continued

(J

.........................
C lerks, accounting
M anufacturing........................... . . .
Durable goods . . . . . ...................
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . .........
Wholesale trade . . . ................. . . .
R e ta il t r a d e ..................... ..............
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e s t a t e ................................. ..........

424
204
SI
123
54
40

$41.00
43.00
40.50
45.00
37.00
34.50

38.5
39.5
4 0.0
39.5
39.5
39.5

$1.06
1.09
1.01
1 .1 4
.94
.87

$ 4 o;oo
44.00
41.00
45.00
36.00
33.50

100

38.00

35.5

1.07

34.50

32.50 -

44.00

29

40.50

38.0

1.06

38.00

35.50 -

46.50

269

no

32.00
31.50

38.5
39.5

.83
.80

30.00
30.50

30.00 30.00 -

33.00
32.00

104

31.00

36.5

.85

30.00

28.00 -

34.50

313
214
40
174

44.00
44.50
42.00
45.00

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

1.12
1 .1 2
1.07
1.13

44.00
44.00
41.00
44.50

40.50
41.00
41.00
42.00

-

50.00
50.00
42.00
50.00

37

44.50

3 9.0

1 .14

46.00

36.50 -

51.00

Clerks, order
....................................
Manufacturing ...............•................

128
103

41.50
42.50

39.5
39.0

1 .06
1.08

38.50
38.50

34.00 34.00 -

51.50
55.00

cisxfrs. pay r o i l V ..............................
Manufacturing •••••................... ••
Durable g o o d s ......... •••••••••«
Nondurable goods . . . . . ..........
R e ta il trade •.•••••••••.............
Transportation, communication,
and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ••

452
377
147
230
35

39.50
39.50
38.50
40.50
36.00

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

1.01
1 .00
.97
1.03
.93

39.00
39.00
38.00
40.00
35.00

35.50
35.50
36.00
35.00
32.00

43.00
43.50
40.50
45.00
39.00

28

44.00

38.5

1.15

43.00

42.00 -

46.00,

C le r k - t y p i s t s ............... .................. ..
M anufacturing............................. . .
Durable goods ..............................
Nondurable goods . . . .................
Wholesale trade . ................. . . . . .
R e ta il trade •••••............. ............
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e sta te •••••••••••......... ............
T ransportation, communication,
and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ••
S erv ices ....................... .

801
405
262
143
37
49

35.50
3 5 .5 0 ’
33.50
39.50
34.50
30.50

38.5

33.50
34.50
32.00
41.00
35.00
30.00

30.00 30.00 -

4 0.0
4 0.0
40.5
38.5

.92
.89
.84
.99
.85
.79

30.00
35.00
30.00
28.00

-

39.00
40.00
37.00
44.00
37.00
32.00

232

35.00

36.0

.98

33.50

30.50 -

37.00

50
28 •

42.50
32.00

39.0

40.0

1.09
.80

44.50
30.00

41.00 30.00 -

45.00
35.00

O ffice g i r l s ............................................

23

31.00

38.5

.80

30.00

30.00 -

32.50

C lerks. f n « r

A ....................... ..

tj

C lerks, f i l e , c la s s B
...................
M anufacturing.......... . . ............. . .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e sta te . . ........................... . . . . . .

y

fiLwfcp.
................................
Manufacturing . . ............. ................
Durable goods •............. •••••••
Nondurable goods . . . ............ . .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e sta te ............... .

(J

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f table*




40.0

- $46.00
- 46.00
- 44.00
- 51.50
- 41.00
- 36.50

-

TABLE 1.— Salaries 1 and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
/
Providence, R. I., by industry division, June 1950 - Continued

Sex, occupation, and industry
d iv is io n

2/

Estimated
number
of
workers

Weekly
sa la ry

Average Weekly
scheduled
hours

Median
Hourly
ra te

salary

Salary range
o f middle
50 percent
o f workers

*34.00
34.50
34.00
38.50
38.00
31.00

2/
weekly

Women - Continued
Stenographers, g e n e r a l.....................
Manufacturing .......................••••
Durable goods •••••••.............
Nondurable goods ...............
Wholesale trade ...................
R e ta il trade ........................ ....
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
e s ta te .••••••••••................. ..
Transportation, communication,
and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
S erv ices .........................................

889
431
327
104
96
33

*39.00
38.50
37.50
42.00
43.50
33.00

38.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
38.5
39.0

*1.01
.98
.95
1.07
1 .14
.85

*38.00
38.00
36.00
41.00
42.00
33.00

232

37.50

36.0

1.05

35.50

33.50 -

40.50

40
57

46.50
37.00

39.0
39.5

1.19
.94

48.50
37.00

41.00 33.50 -

51.50
38.50

133
23
44

38.50
44.00
35.00

38.5
39.5
39.0

.99
1.11
.89

38.00
45.50
33.00

32.00 40.00 32.00 -

44.00
48.00
40.00

36

39.00

36.5

1.07

38.50

34.50 -

42.00

Switchboard op era torre c e p tio n is ts
...............
Manufacturing ........................... ..
Durable goods ...........................
Nondurable goods .....................
Wholesale trade

237
181
98
83
32

37.50
38.00
37.50
38.50
36.50

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0

.95
.96
.95
.97
.94

36.00
37.50
36.00
40.00
35.50

33.50
35.00
35.00
30.00
32.50

-

40.50
42.00
40.00
42.00
38.50

. <?Earfltpig>
general ................................................

73

34.00

39.0

.86

31.00

30.00 -

36.00

T y p ists, c la s s A 4 / . . . .....................
Manufacturing ................... ............

63
47

37.00
37.00

39.5
4 0 .0

.93
.93

36.50
37.50

33.00 33.00 -

42.00
42.50

T y p ists, c la s s B V ...........................
Manufacturing . . . . ..................... ..
Wholesale trade ••..••••...........
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
esta te .................................. ..

252
32
32

35.50
34.50
35.00

37.0
4 0 .0
3 8.0

.96
.87
.92

34.00
33.50
35.00

30.00 30.00 32.00 -

38.00
36.00
37.00

169

35.50

36.0

.98

34.50

30.50 -

39.00

U

Switchboard operators
........... ..
Manufacturing ............................. ..
R e ta il t r a d e ......................... ..
Finance, insurance, and r e a l
esta te .............................••••••

U

1/

- *42.00
- 41.00
- 40.00
- 44.00
- A5.00
- 35.00

Excludes pay fo r overtim e.
The study covered rep resen tative manufacturing and r e t a i l establishm ents and trans­
p orta tion (except r a ilr o a d s ), communication, heat, lig h t and power companies with over 100
workers; and establishm ents with more than 25 workers in wholesale trad e, fin a n ce, r e a l e s ta te ,
insurance, and selected ' s e rv ice in d u stries (business s e r v ic e ; such p ro fe ssio n a l s e rv ice s as
engineering, a rch ite c tu r a l, accounting, au d itin g , and bookkeeping firm s; motion p ic tu r e s ; and
n on p rofit membership o rg a n iz a tio n s).
Value above and below which h a lf o f workers’ s a la r ie s f e l l .
Includes data fo r industry d iv is io n s not shown sep arately.

2j

2
J
(J




TABLE 2.— Percentage distribution of workers In selected office occupations by weekly salaries 1/
in Providence, R. I., June 1950

Percent of nan Clerks,
account­
ing

Weekly salaries 1/

♦25.00
$27.50
$ 30.00
$32.50
$35.00

-

$27.1*9 ...................
$29.99 ......... ..........
$32.119 ...................
$3*1.99...................
$37.1*9...................

2.5

$37.50
$50.00
$1*2.50
$1*5.00
$1*
7.50

-

$39.99 ....................
$42.1*9...................
$ * * 9 9 ...................
11.
$1*7.1*9...................
$1*9.99...................

7.6
1 U .3
10.9

$ 50.00
$ 52.50
$55.00
$57.50
$ 60.00

- $52.1*9...................
- $ 5»*.99 ...................
- $ 57 .1*9 ...................
$59-99 ....................... .......
- $ 62.1*9 ...................

1 5 .1
.9
8.1*

$ 62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$ 70.00
$72.50

- $ 6>*.99 ....................
- $67 .1*9 ....................................
- $69.99 ....................................
$72.1*9.......... ..........................
- $7l*.9 9 .....................................

1.7
.9

-

.8

Clerks,
order

M»

5.5

12 .3
23.3

u.8

.9
1**»3

.8
2.5

.8
.
.

2.2

1 .5
1 1 .7
51.5
10.3

ll*.0

8.8

-

2.5
•8

Office
boys

Percent of women Billers,
Billers,
machine
Book­
machine
(book­
keepers ,
(billing
hand
keeping
machine)
machine)

16 .1

7.3
5.9
1.5

12.6

17.8

32.8

11.1

5.6
3.5
9.8

15 .6

2.1
-

1*.U

-

-

-

3.5

8.2

1.5

mm

e»

6.8
—

-

mm

“

•

230
1.4
5.5
4.1
4.1

7.«

—

8.9
**.5

-

1.1
—

mm

-

mm

mm -

-

mm

mm

mm

*•

mm

—

mm

••

5.5

Total....................................

100.0

See footnote at end of table*




1 .3
3.3

•

mm

$ 51.00

. j*

-

—

Average weekly salary 1/ ••.....•
•

i

2.0

-

mm

119

12 .7
.7
3.3

mm

2.5

..............

_
31.3
8.0
26.7
9.3

mm

$75.00 - $79.99 ........ .............. ............
$80.00 - $Si*.99.....................................
$85.00 - $89.99 .....................................

Estimated number of workers

-

mm

—

100.0

-

mm

mm

-

13.3
13 .3

**

100.0

mm

100.0

«.
mm

**

100.0

73

68

l13
*

9°

$55.00

$32.50

$ 39.50

$ 39.00

100.0

150
$1*6.50

- 7 -

TABLE 2.— Percentage distribution of workers in selected office occupations by weekly salaries 1J
in Providence, E. I., June 1950 - Continued

Weekly salaries. 1/

$ 25.00
$27.50
$ 30.00
$ 32.50
$35.00

-

$ 2 7 .4 9 .............
$29-99 .............
$ 32.U 9 .............
$34.99 .............
$37.^9 .............

$37.50
$40.00
$42.50
$45.00
$47.50

-

$39.99
$42.49
$44.99
$47.49
$49.99

$ 50.00
$52.50
$55.00
$57.50
$ 60.00

- $ 52t49 .............
- $54.99 .............
- $57.^9 .................
. $59*99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
- $ 62.49 .............

$ 62«30
$ 65.00
$ 67.50
$ 70.00
$ 72.50

"
*•
-

$75*^0
$20.00
$S5»00

••
-

"
•
*•

.............
.............
.............
.............
.............

$6^*99 • • • * • • • • • • • • • •
$ 6y #^9
$ 6 9 .9 9 .............
$ 72.49
$ 7 4 . 9 9 .................
$79*99
$24.99
$29*99

Percent of women <
Bookkeep­ CalculatingingClerks, Clerks,
machine
Clerks, Clerks, Clerks,
machine
operators
account­ file,
general order pay roll
operators, (Comptometer
ing
class B
class B
type)

16.7

2.4
11.1

12.6

16.5

17.3

12.3

12.2

10.9

8.7
3.3
4.0
1 .1

19*0
8*9
4*5
1.7

4.9
11.1
6.8
15.*
4.0

3.3
20.8
24.8
20.2

3.9

.

10.4
17.9
44.2
12-3
7.4
.4
2.2
5.2

18.0
17.2

-

10.4
4.4
26.8

3.1
1.4

-

-

6 .1
2.6

-

-

-

1.7

-

-

3.2
24.0
3.3.4
14.4
4.2

17.2

12.2

10.9
2.3

13.0

23.O

-

.3
•6
.2
2.0

.4

-

4.2
1.6
6.7

.8
2.3
21.9

1.9
2.2

5.5
3.1

■a

-

.8

15.3
11.9
2.7
.4
.7
1.8
.2
.2

•

.2

*

-

—

mm

-

.2
—

-

'-

-

-

—
-

-

—

-

—
-

—
-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

—

—

••••••••••*•••

•

mm

-

••••••••••».••

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

••••••••••••••

-

—

—

—

-

-

-

—

•
•

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Estimated number of workers ..

274

358

424

269

313

128

452

Average weekly salary 1 / ....

$ 35.50

$38.00

$41.50

$39.50

Total

................

See footnote at end of table




$41.00

$ 32.00

$44.00

- 8 -

2 .— -Percentage

TABLE

distribution of workers in selected office occupations by weekly salaries
in Providence, B. I., June
- Continued

Weekly salaries

1950

Percent of women Switch­
TranSwitch­
board
scribin^Stenog­
Clerkboard
machine
operatorraphers,
typists
opera­
reception­ operators,
general
tors
ists
general

1/

27.^9
29.99
34.99
37 1*9

35.00

.............
- $
- $
.............
- $32.1*9.............
* $
•
••••••••••••••
- $ .
.............

37.50
40.00
1 2.5 0
1 5.00
1 7 .50

-

$
$ .
$*
$* .
$*

$
$
$
$
$60.00

•
"

$ .
$ *.
$ *
$
$

$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$
$72.50

"
—
-

$6^*99
$
$69.99
$ .
$71*.

72 1*9
99

•••*••••••••••
.............
..............
.......... .
.............

79*99
84.99
89.99

•••••••••••♦••
•«••••*•*••***
•••*•••••»••*•

0 .2

~
—
—
—

$25.00
$
$30.00
$32*50
$

27.50

$
$
$*
$*
$*

50.00
52.50
55.00
57.50

70.00

39.99 .............
42 1*9 .............
1 1 * .9 9 .............
1 7 1*9 .............
1 9 . 9 9 .............
52 1*9 .............
51 9 9 .............
57 1*9 ..............
59.99 .............
62.49 .••••••*.••*»»
67*49

$7^*00 — $
$
— $
$ *Q * $
*

80.00
85 0

Total ».«»#•»•••«.**
Estimated number of workers ..
Average weekly salary

1/

1/

•... *

Excludes pay for overtime.




0.5
7.2
37.0

8 .9
15.1

7 1

.*
10.0
7.6
2.9
2.0

*.5
2 .3

17.8

8.2
l*.l

6.3
30.2

-

—

6 .7
7 .1

2.0
i*.o

1.6
-

.8
.8
.8
—

*
•
-

9 .0

ii.i*

2.8

3 .2

20.6

9 .0

17*5
19*0

15.0

1.1*
1.2
1.0
.2

l*.H
16.7
21.1*

uTi
60.3
2.7
!

17.2
15.6
8.8

.6
.1
-

-

3.0
16.5
8.9
26.2

20.3
12.0

2 .7

1*.5
7-5

12.0

18.1
6 .3
2.1
3 .8

.8

3 .7

2 .5

2 .3

.8
-

1 .3

4 .8

11.5

6.0

.8
—

—

1.1*
1.1*
1.1*
l.U

.1
.2
•
—

*
•

—

—

-

.1
—

.7

—

«
•

-

—

—

—

—

*
•

.5

«.

.4

—

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

801

889

133

237

$35.50

Typists, Typists,
class A class B

l

3.1
10.7
15.0
16.0

$

1/

39.00

$38.50

$37.50

100.0

73
3 *.00

$ l

100.0
63
$37.00

100.0
252
$35.50

TABLE 3*‘ 'Scheduled weekly hours of women in Providence offices, June 1950
"’

Percent of workers emp]Loyed in offices in Manufacturing
Transpor­
Finance,
tation,
All
insur­ communi­
All
Whole­
Non­
Retail
Services
cation,
indus­ manu­ Durable
sale
ance ,
durable
trade
goods
and real and other
tries
fac­
trade
goods
public
turing
estate
utilities

Weekly hours

All offices employing women .........

100.0

100.0

Over 30 and under 35 h o u r s .......
35 hours ..............................
Over 35 and under 374 h o u r s .........
374 hours .............................
Over 37i and under 40 hours .........
40 hours ...................... ........
Over 40 and under 44 hours ..........
4 4 hours ..............................

4.2
1.1

1.6
1.2

-

13.5
15-2

1.7
6.4

5.8

13.^

7.3
81.8
-

50 hours ..............................

1/

Less than 0.05

of

100.0

100.0

100.0

4.1

.

.

3.0

14.5
10.1

-

2.7

.2

-

11.7
79.8
—
-

(lA

—

—

51.8
.6

100.0

7.5
•5
84.9
•
•

13.0
53.4

6.1
2.4
.5

3*6
14.7
52.7
27.3
1.7
*
•

100.0

100.0

100.0

15.8
2.3
54.0

1.0
-

3.3
•

7^.7
24.0
-

ll+-?
I3.tf

.2

-

•3
*
•

•
•

13.1
17.1

66.5
*
•

1 percent.

TABLE H.— Scheduled days in workweek of women in Providence offices, June 1950

Days in week

5 days ............................ .
5 4 d a y s ...............................
6 d a y s ................................

1/

Less than 0.05 of 1 percent,




100.0

100.0

100.0

96.3
3.7

97.6

100.0

a.U

in Transpor­
tation,
communi­
Services
cation,
and other
public
utilities

100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

00

ill offices employing w o m e n ......

Percent of workers emp!Loyed in offices
Manufacturing
Finance,
All
All
Non­ Whole­ Retail insur­
indus­ manu­ Durable durable
sale
ance,
trade
tries
trade
and real
fac­ vgoods
goods
estate
turing

69.1
30.9

100.0

97.!»
2.6

98.7

99.2

1.3

.8

TABLE 5*— Vacations with pay in Providence offices, June 1950

Vacation policy

Percent of workers emp!Loyed in offices in Manufacturing
transpor­
finance,
tation,
All
All
Whole­
insur­ communi­
Non­
fietail
indus­ manu­ Durable
sale
cation,
ance,
Services
durable
trade
tries
fac­
goods
trade
and real and other
goods
turing
public
estate
utilities

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Offices with p aid vacations .........
Under 1 w e e k ......... ..........
1 w e e k ..................... .
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s .......
Over 2 w e e k s ................... .

7*.l
11.7
39.1
2.7

69.8
2^.9
12 .6
*
—

73.9

61.8

38.8
35.1
—

3.0
5*.*
•

1.8

5.2

23.3
9.0

20.6

1.7

-

*.*

9.7

e .k

51.6

53.9

.7

Offices wi t h no paid vacations

25*9

30.8

26.1

38.2

25.6

kk.o

16.1

16.8

6.1

100.0

100.0
33.*

100.0
* 2.8

-

81.5
-

100.0
16.5
65.3

98.6
2 .0

57.2
-

100.0
10.0
90.0

100.0
1 .1

79.*
2.6

66.6

100.0
18.5

100.0

18.0

95.9
.7

-

-

-

All offices studied ..................

6

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

71
*.**
•
•

56.0

83.9

83.2

93.9

62.9

kk.k

29.3

93.2

months of service

1

year of service

Offices with pai d v a c a t i o n s .........
1* w e e k ...........................
2 weeks ..........................
Over 2 w e e k s ...............
Offices with no paid vacations ••....

-

18.2

95.9
*.l

98.9

-

-

-

-

1.*

2 years of service
Offices with paid v a c a t i o n s .........
1 w e e k ...........................
2 weeks ..........................
Over 2 w e e k s .................. .

99.9
15.6
81.8

Offices with/ho pa i d vacations ......

.1

2.5

100.0
32.i
67.9
’ -

100.0

kO.fi
59.2
-

-

100.0
18.5
81.5
-

100.0

100.0

7.1
92.9
-

Sl.S
18.2

-

-

100.0
-

100.0

95.9

100.0

-

98.6

2 .0
96.0

*.l

•

.6

-

-

1.*

5 years of service
Offices w i t h paid v a c a t i o n s .........
1 w e e k ...........................
2 weeks ..........................
Over 2 w e e k s ....................

87.9
7.8

Offices with no paid v a c a t i o n s ......

.1

1/

99.9

k.Z

100.0

7.8
92.2

100.0
*.2
95.8

86.3

-

-

-

100.0
!3.7

-

•

100.0
7.1
92.9
-

-

100.0
—
* 7 .0
53.0

-

100.0

100.0

n .*

-

98.6
2.0
75.0
21.6

-

-

1.*

—

88.6

—

100.0

Less than 0.05 of 1 percent.
TABLE 6.— IPaid holidays in Providence offices, June 1950

Number of paid holidays

All offices studied...............
Offices providing paid holidays .....
Number of holidays:

6 ..............................................
7 ......................................................
8 .........................
9
10 .........................
.........................
1 1 ......................................................
12 or 12} ..................
1 3 .......................................... . ..

Offices providing no paid holidays ..




Percent of workers emp]Loyed in offices
Manufacturing
finance,
Whole­
insur­
All
All
Non­
indus­ manu­ Durable
sale Batail ance,
durable
trad*
tries
fac­
goods
trade
and real
goods
turing
estate

100.0 100.0
9S.1 100.0

100.0
100.0

9.2 19.*
*.l
8.3
15.2 30.6
31.9 39.1
26.0 2.6
5.*
6.2
.1
•
—
1.9

15.3
12.*
36.6
35.7
—
—
•

100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0 77.7
25.8
1.9
21.2
**.5
6.6
•
•

—

-

n .9
67.7
17.9
2.5
*
*

-

77.7
—
—
—

22.3

100.0
100.0
-

.1
51.2
22.2
26.5
-

in Transpor­
tation,
communi­
cation, Services
and other
public
utilities

100.0
100.0
-

12.9
87.1
-

"

—

100.0
10C.0
-

9.5
—
37.2
51.3
-

2.0
■
*

11 -

TABLE 7.— Formal provisions for paid sick leave in Providence offices, June 1950

Percent of workers employed in offices in -

M anufacturing

Provisions for paid sick leave

All offices studied ...............

Transpor­
tation,
Finance,
All
All
Whole­
communi­
Non­
Retail insurance,
sale
indus­ manu­ Durable
cation, Services
durable
and real
trade
fac­
goods
trade
and other
tries
goods
estate
public
turing
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Offices with formal provisions
for paid sick le a v e ........... .
Under 5 d a y s ........... .
5 days ......................
6 days ......................
7-8-9 days ...................
10 days ............... .......
12 d a y s ................. .
20 days .......... ...... .....
Over 20 days ..................

22.9
3.1
0.8
1.3
.9
5.7
3.6
1.5
6.0

17.9
-

25.0
-

9.3
6.0
1.7
.9

15.2
9.8
-

A. 3
2.3

28.1
6.6
2.A
1.8
5.A
11.9
-

50.5
35.6
11.5
3.A
-

2A.8
1.5
23.3

11.5
1.1
10.A
-

A6.6
-

-

6.6
-

20.3
A.O
16.9
5.A

Offices with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ••••••••.... .

77.1

82.1

75.0

93.A

71.9

A9.5

75.2

88.5

53.A

Offices with formal provisions
for paid sick le a v e .............
Under 5 d a y s ......... ..... .
5 d a y s ..... .................
6 d a y s ...... ................
7-8-9 d a y s ..................
10 d a y s ...... ................
12 d a y s ................. ..
20 days ..................
Over 20 days .................

22.9
3.1
.8
1.3
•A
6.2
3.5
.8
6.8

17.9
9.3
6.0
1.7
.9

25.0
-

6.6
-

-

-

2A.8
1.5
-

A. 3
2.3

23.3

11.5
1.1
10.A
-

A6.6
-

15.2
9.8
-

28.1
50.5
35.6
6.6
2.A
11.5
1.8
3.A
5.A
- •
11.9
-

2A.3
16.9
5.A

Offices with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ........... .

77.1

82.1

75.0

93 .A

71.9

A9.5

75.2

88.5

53.A

Offices with formal provisions
for paid side l e a v e ..... ...... .
Under 5 days ••••••••••••••••••
5 d a y s ......................
6 d a y s ...........
7-8-9 d a y s ..................
10 days ........... ...........
12 days ......................
20 days ......................
Over 20 days .................

22.9
2.0
1.9
1.3
•A
6.2
3.5
.8
6.8

17.9

25.0

6.6

-

-

28.1
6.6
2.A
1.8

2A.8

-

11.5
T
1.1
10. A
-

A6.6
-

Offices with no formal provisions
for paid sick l e a v e ............ ..

77.1

1 year of service

-

-

2 years of service

-

5 ffiqcs-gC-qgnflga




9.3
6.0
1.7
.9

•15.2
9.8
-

82.1

75.0

-

-

50.5
22.5
13.1
11.5
3.A
-

5.A

-

A.3
2.3

11.9

-

1.5
23.3

93 .A

71.9

A9.5

75.2

-

-

-

-

-

2A.3
16.9
5.A

38.5

53 .A

-

12

TABLE 8.— Nonproduction 'bonus©s in Providence offices, June 1950

Percent of workers employed in offices in Manufacturing

Type of bonus

Transpor­
Finance,
tation,
All
All
Non­ Whole­ Retail insur­ communi­
indus­ manu­ Durable
sale
ance,
Services
cation,
durable
trade
tries
fac­
goods
trade
and real and other
goods
turing
estate
public
utilities

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

Offices with nonproduction
bonuses
......... . ...............
Christmas or year-end ..........
Profit-sharing ..................
O t h e r .......... ............... ..

36 .1
3 ^ .7
.5
2 .8

32 .*
3 1 .0

29.U
29.U

3 7 -2
3 3 .6

5 ^ .8
* 7 .1
*

* 7 .0
4 7 .0

U 2.1
U 0.7

2 6 .0
2 6 .0

-

—

1 3 .5
1 3 .5

-

•

3 .8

2 .0

6 .5

Offices w i t h no nonproduction
bonuses ........................... .

6 3 .9

67.6

7 0 .6

6 2.8

All offices studied ...................

1 /

1/

7 .7

-

8 .5

* 5 .2
*

1.1*

5 3 .0

5 7 .9

-

-

7* . o

8 6 .5

Unduplicated total.

TABLE 9«~~Ia8urance and pension plans in Providence offices, June 1950

Type of plan

All offices s t u d i e d ................ ..

Offices w i t h insurance or pension
plans 1/ .......................... .
Life insurance
Health i n s u r a n c e ............ .
Retirement p e n s i o n ............ .
H o s p i t a l i s a t i o n .................
Offices w i t h no insurance or
pension p l a n s ............ .........

Percent of vorkers employed in offices in Manufacturing
Transpor­
tation,
Finance,
All
All
Whole­
insur­ communiNon­
Retail
indus­ m a n u ­ Durable
sale
ance,
Services
.cation,
durable
trade
tries
goods
trade
fac­
and real and other
goods
turing
public
_ estate
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.0

93.1

91.0

96.*

59.6

8O .9

100.0

100.0

79.1

59.1
53.5
*9.6
55.1

73-5
55.5

68.8

55.9

37.7
2U .6

56.2
52 .2

36 .H
86.3

^•7
^.7
1 0.5
*

68.6

59.2
38.5
65 .*

80.8
U 9.6

18.4

38.5

8.0

6.9

9.0

37.1

3*. 9
73-7

33.*
9.3
50.7

3.6

*0.*

7.3

62.8

83.5
1*7.0

20.9

19.1
"

1/

Unduplicated total,




89.0

- 13 -

APPENDIX A

Scope and Method of Survey
The information presented in this "bulletin was collected by visits of field representa­
tives of the Bureau to representative offices in the city surveyed. In classifying workers by oc­
cupation, uniform job descriptions were used; they are presented in Appendix B.
No attempt was made to study all office occupations and,
in general, the Jobs surveyed
were those that are found in a large proportion of offices and that involve duties that are more
or less uniform from firm to firm. The jobs studied are more representative of the salaries of
women than of men office workers.
The study covered six broad industry divisions and in each division only establishments
above a certain size were studied. Cffice employment in smaller establishments was not considered
sufficiently great to warrant inclusion of such establishments in the survey. A greater proportion
of large than of small establishments was studied in order to maximize the proportion of office
workers that could be surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given only its proper influence on the information presented. The industries
included in the study together with the minimum size of establishments and the number of establish­
ments surveyed are summarized below.

Establishments and workers in major industry divisions in Providence, and number
studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, June 1950

Number of
Minimum
establishments
size of
establish­
Estimated
Studied
ment
total
1/

Item

Employment
Estimated
total
2/

In establishments
studied
Total
Office

Industry division

k€k

129,300
102,900

103
178
66
3^

129
53
21
32
20
1^

26

hi

101
26

41,200
61,700
3,100

54,570
37,520
15,730
21,790
1,130

10,900

5,840

7,020
2,750
1,740
1,010
350
590

19

3,700

1,850

1,610

Ik

7,800
900

7,710

26

1,540
180

h6k

All divisions .................... .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ..................
Durable goods 3 / ........... .
Nondurable goods
.........
Wholesale trade ................
Retail trade ...... ......... .
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ............ .
Transportation, commmication,
and other public utilities 5 /
Services 6/ ....................

129

129,300

38
18

68,400
23,800

54,570
42,220

101
101
101
26
101

hf

.281

10

9

520

Size of establishment
All size groups ................. .
501 and o v e r .... ...... .
251 - 500 .......................
101 - 250 .......................
26 - 100 .......................

73
70
188
133

2h
h9

31,100
6,000

6,030
3,920
2,400

7,020
4,350
980
700
990

/
l/ Number of plant and office workers.
2/ Plant and office employment in the Providence Metropolitan Area (as defined by the Bureau
of the Budget).
3 / Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay and glass products;
professional, scientific and controlling instruments; optical goods; watches and clocks; and mis­
cellaneous manufacturing.
Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished products made from
fabrics; paper and paper products; printing and publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and
coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
5/ Excludes railroads.
5/ Business service;
such professional services as engineering, architectural, accounting,
auditing and bookkeeping firms; motion pictures; and nonprofit membership organizations.
^

hj




- Ik -

The Information on weekly salaries excludes overtime pay and nonproduction bonuses hut
Includes incentive earnings. The weekly hours data refer to the work schedules for which these
salaries are p a i d . Hourly rates were obtained by dividing these weekly salaries by scheduled hours.
The number of workers presented refers to the estimated total employed in all establishments with­
in the scope of the study and. not to the number actually surveyed.

Data are shown only for full-time workers, defined as those who are hired
establishments full-time schedule for the occupational classification.

to work the

Information on wage practices refers to all office workers except in the tabulations of
scheduled weekly hours and days in workweek for women workers. It is presented in terms of the
proportion of workers employed in offices with the practice in question.
Because of eligibility
requirements, the proportion actually receiving the benefits in question may be smaller.

The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is limited to formal, arrangements and ex­
cludes informal plans whereby time off with pay may be granted at the discretion of the employer
or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off and exclude health insurance even though paid for by employers.

In evaluating information on variations in salaries with size of establishment,
£n the
few cities in which the coverage Justifies such a summary,
it should be remembered that this fac­
tor may be related to others. There is frequently an important relationship between size and in­
dustrial classification in the broad Industry groups used in these surveys.




15
APPENDIX B

Descriptions of Occupations Studied

The primary purpose of the B u r e a u s Job descriptions is to assist its
field staff in classifying workers w h o are employed under a variety of pay-roll
titles and different w o r k arrangements from office to office and from area to
area,
into appropriate occupations.
This is essential in order to permit the
grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable Job content. B e ­
cause of this emphasis on interoffice and interarea comparability of occupation­
al content,
the Bureau's
Job descriptions differ significantly from those in
use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.
In view
of these special characteristics of the Bureau*s Job descriptions,
their adop­
tion without modification by any single establishment or for any other purpose
than that indicated herein is not recommended. Where
office workers regularly
perform duties classified in more than one occupation, they are generally clas­
sified according to the most skilled or responsible duties that are a regular
part of their
Job and that are significant
in determining their value to the
firm.

BILLER, MACHINE
A worker w h o prepares statements,
bills,
and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
clerical w o r k
incidental to billing operations. Should be designated as working on billing
machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.
Billing Machine - A worker w h o uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., w h ich are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and
invoices from customers' purchase orders,
internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda, etc.
Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry of n ec­
essary extensions, w h ich m ay or m ay not be computed on the billing machine,
and totals which
are automatically accumulated b y machine. The operation usually involves a large number of car­
b on copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker w h o uses a bookkeeping machine (Sunistrand, Elliott
Fisher, Remington Rand, etc., w h ich may or m a y not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers9 bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simultaneous
entry of figures on a customer's ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates figures
on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the debit or
credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W o rks from uniform and standard
types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
A worker w h o keeps a set of books for recording business transactlonsand whose wor k in­
volves most of the following: posting and balancliJjg subsidiary ledgers, cash books or Journals,
Journalizing transactions where Judgment is involved as to accounts affected; posting general
ledger; and taking trial balances. Ma y also prepare accounting statements and bills; may direct
w o r k of assistants or accounting clerks.




BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE 'OPERATOR
A worker w h o operates a Bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher,
strand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of Business transactions.

Sund-

Class A - A worker w h o uses a Bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of Business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in Basic Bookkeeping principles and familiarity w i t h the structure of the particular
accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items
to Be used in each phase of the work.
May prepare consolidated reports, Balance sheets, and
other records By hand.

or

Class B - A worker w h o uses a Bookkeeping machine w i t h
without a typewriter key­
board to keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to Busi­
ness transactions usually requiring some knowledge of Basic Bookkeeping. Phases or sections
„include accounts payable,
pay-roll,
customers1 accounts (not including simple type of Billing
described under Biller, M a c h i n e ), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory control,
etc.
In addition, may check or assist in preparation of trial Balances and prepare control
sheets for the accounting department.
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.

machine to p e r ­

Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker w h o performs one or mare accounting operations such as preparing simple Jour­
na l vouchers, accounts payable vouchers; coding invoices or vouchers w i t h proper accounting dis­
tributions; entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling B ank accounts; posting and B a l ­
ancing subsidiary ledgers controlled B y general ledger, e.g.,
accounts receivable,
accounts
payable, stock records, voucher Journal. May assist in preparing Journal entries. For workers
whose duties Include handling the general ledger or a set of Books, see Bookkeeper, H a n d .
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker w h o is responsible for maintaining a n established filing system
and classifies and Indexes correspondence
other material; may also file this material.
May
keep records .of various types in conjunction w i t h files or supervise others in filing and lo­
cating material in the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.

or

Class B - A worker w h o performs routine filing,
usually of material that has already
B e e n classified',
or locates or assists in locating material in files. M a y perform incidental
clerical duties.
CLERK, GENERAL
A worker w h o is typically required to perform a variety of office operations. This
requirement may arise as a result of lsrpracticability of specialization in a small office or
Because versatility is essential in meeting p eak requirements in larger offices.
The w o r k
generally involves the use of independent Judgment in tending to a pattern of office w o r k from
day to day, as w e l i as knowledge relating to phases of office w o r k that occur only occasionally.
For example, the range of operations performed m a y entail all or some combination of the fol­
lowing: answering correspondence,
preparing Bills and invoices, posting to various records,
preparing p ay rolls,
filing,
etc. M a y also operate various office machines and type as the
w o r k requires.
(See Clerk-Typist.)




9

A worker who r e c e iv e s custom ers ord ers f o r m a te ria l or merchandise hy m a il, phone,
o r p e rso n a lly and whose d u tie s in v olv e any com bination o f the fo llo w in g : qu otin g p r ic e s t o cu s­
tom ers, making out an ord er sh eet l i s t i n g the items t o make up the o r d e r , checking p r ic e s and
q u a n titie s o f items on ord er s h e e t, d is t r ib u t in g order sh eets to r e s p e c tiv e departments t o he
f i l l e d . May a ls o check w ith c r e d it department to determine c r e d it r a tin g o f custom er, acknowl­
edge r e c e ip t o f ord ers from custom ers, fo llo w -u p ord ers to see th at they have been f i l l e d , keep
f i l e o f ord ers r e c e iv e d , and check shipping in v o ic e s w ith o r ig in a l o r d e r s .
CLERK, PAY-ROLL
A worker who co n fu te s wages o f company employees and en ters the n ecessary data on the
p a y - r o ll sh eets and whose d u tie s in v o lv e : c a lc u la tin g worker's earnings based on time or produc­
t io n r e c o r d s ; p o stin g c a lc u la te d data on p a y - r o ll sh e e t, showing in form ation such as w o rk e r's
name, working days, tim e, r a t e , d eduction s f o r in su ran ce, and t o t a l wages due. In a d d itio n , may
make out pay checks and a s s i s t the paymaster in making up and d is t r ib u t in g the pay e n v elop es.
May use a c a lc u la t in g machine.
CLERK-TYPIST
A worker who does c l e r i c a l work r e q u ir in g l i t t l e s p e c ia l tr a in in g but the perfonnance
o f which req u ire s the use o f a ty p e w rite r f o r a major p o r tio n o f the time and whose work in-*
v olv es typ in g l e t t e r s , r e p o r t s , and oth er m atter from rough d r a ft or c o r r e c te d copy and one or
more o f the fo llo w in g ? keeping sim ple r e c o r d s ; f i l i n g re co rd s and r e p o r t s ; making out b i l l s ;
s o r tin g and d is t r ib u t in g incoming m a il.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR l /
Under g en era l su p e rv is io n and w ith no su p erv isory r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s , re co rd s accou nt­
ing and s t a t i s t i c a l data on ta b u la tin g cards by punching a s e r ie s o f h o le s in the card&v4ja«a
s p e c if ie d sequence, usin g a num erical key-punch machine, fo llo w in g w r itte n in form ation on r e c ­
o rd s. May be req u ire d to d u p lic a te cards by u sin g the d u p lic a tin g d e v ice attached t o machine.
Keeps f i l e s on punched c a r d s . May v e r if y own work or work o f o th e r s .
OFFICE BOY O GIRL
R
A worker who perform s a v a r ie t y o f x-outlne d u tie s such as running erra n d s;
minor o f f i c e machines, such as s e a le r s or m a ile rs; opening and d is t r ib u t in g m a il,
minor c l e r i c a l w ork. (Bonded messengers are exclu ded from t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . )

op era tin g
and oth er

SECRETARY 1 /
A worker who perform s s e c r e t a r ia l and c l e r i c a l d u tie s f o r a su p e rio r in an adminis­
t r a t iv e or e x ecu tiv e p o s it io n and whose d u tie s in v o lv e the fo llo w in g : making appointments fa r
s u p e rio r; r e c e iv in g p eople coming in to o f f i c e ; . answering and making phono c a l l s ; handling p e r­
son a l and important or c o n fid e n t ia l m a il, and w r itin g ro u tin e correspondence on own i n i t i a t i v e ;
takin g d ic t a t io n , e it h e r in shorthand o r by sten otype o r s im ila r machine (e x ce p t where tra n ­
s c r ib in g machine Is u s e d ), and tr a n s c r ib in g d ic t a t io n o r the recorded in form a tion reproduced on
a tra n s crib in g machine. In a d d itio n , may prepare s p e c ia l r e p o r ts o r memoranda fa r in form ation
o f s u p e r io r .
'
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
A worker whose primary fu n c tio n i s t o take d ic t a t io n from one o r more p e rso n s, e it h e r
in shorthand o r by sten otype o r s im ila r machine, in v o lv in g a normal r o u tin e v o ca b u la ry , and to

l/

Not surveyed in a l l c i t i e s




-

1 0

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL - Continued
tran scrib e th is d ic ta tio n on a typ ew riter. May a ls o type from w ritte n copy* May a ls o s e t up and
keep f i l e s In ord er, keep sta p le reco rd s, e t c . Does not Include transcrlblng-m achlne work. (See
Trariscriblng-M achlne O perator.)

STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary fu n ction Is to take d ic ta tio n from one or more p erso n s, e ith e r
In shorthand or T stenotype or sim ila r machine, Involving a v aried te ch n ic a l or sp e c ia liz e d
oy
vocabulary such as In le g a l b r ie fs or rep o rts on s c ie n t ific research and to tran scrib e th is
d ic ta tio n on a typ ew riter. May a ls o type from w ritte n copy. May a ls o s e t up and keep f i l e s In
o rd er, keep sim ple re co rd s, e t c . Does n ot Include tran scrlbln g-m ach lns work. (Sse T ran scribin gMachine O perator. )

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a sin g le or m u ltip le p o s itio n telephone sw itchboard, and whose
d u ties In v o lv e: handling Incoming, ou tgoin g, and In tra p lan t or o ffic e c a l l s . In a d d itio n , may
record t o l l c a lls and take m essages. As a minor p a rt o f d u tie s , may g iv e inform ation to per­
sons who c a l l in , or o cca sio n a lly take telephone o rd ers. For workers who a ls o do typ in g or
other stenographic work or a c t as r e c e p tio n is ts , see Switchboard O p erator-R ecep tion ist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
A worker who In a d d itio n to perform ing, d u ties o f op erator, on a sin g le p o s itio n or
m onitor-type sw itchboard, a c ts as r e c e p tio n is t and/or perform s typin g or oth er rou tin e c le r ic a l
work a s p a rt o f reg u la r d u tie s . T h is typ in g or c le r ic a l work may take the major part o f th is
w ork er's tim e w h ile a t sw itchboard.

TRAN3CRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
A worker vhpse primary fu n ction i s to tran scrib e d ic ta tio n Involving a normal rou tin e
vocabulary from transorlblng-m achlne re co rd s. May a ls o type from w ritte n copy and do sta p le
c le r ic a l work. A worker who takes d ic ta tio n In shorthand o r by stenotype or sim ila r machine Is
c la s s ifie d as a Stenographer, G eneral.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary fu n ction lq to tran scrib e d ic ta tio n Involvin g a varied tech ­
n ic a l or sp e c ia liz e d vocabulary such as In le g a l b r ie fs or rep orts on s c ie n t if ic research from
tra n scrib lng-m achlne re co rd s. May a ls o type from w ritte n copy and do sta p le c le r ic a l work. A
worker who takes d ic ta tio n In* shorthand or by stenotype or sim ila r machine i s c la s s ifie d as a
Stenographer, T ech n ica l..
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typ ew riter to make cop ies o f variou s m a teria l or to make out b i l l s
a fte r c a lc u la tio n s have been made by another p erson . May operate a te le ty p e machine.
C lass A - A worker who perform s one or more o f the fo llo w in g : typin g m a teria l In
fin a l form from very rough and Involved d r a ft) copying from p la in or corrected copy In whloh
^here Is a frequen t and varied use o f te ch n ic a l and unusual words or from fo re ig n language copy;
combining m a teria l from sev era l so u rces; or planning la y -o u t o f com plicated s t a t i s t ic a l ta b le s
to m aintain u n iform ity and balanoe In sp acin g; typ in g ta b le s from rough d r a ft In fin a l form .
May a ls o type rou tin e form le t t e r s , varying d e ta ils to s u it circum stances.
C lass B - A worker who perform s one or more o f the fo llo w in g : typin g from r e la tiv e ly
d e a r or typed d r a ft s ; rou tin e typin g o f form s, Insurance p o lic ie s , e t c .;
s e ttin g up sta p le
standard ta b u la tio n s, or copying more coop le x ta b le s already s e t up and spaced p ro p erly .




6P0 83-110^07


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102