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OFFICE ■
W ORKERS
salaries
hours of work
supplementary benefits

Bulletin




No. 988

MEMPHIS, TENN.
FEBRUARY 1950
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR • BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

CONTENTS

Pag©
Number
Introduction •••••••...... ..................•............•....... •..................
Salaries of Memphis Office Workers, February 1950 ........ •••••••••..............•......
Supplementary Wage Practices
..... •••••.•••••
Tables:

1
1
1

1. Salaries and weekly hours of work, by industry division
2. Percentage distribution, by weekly salaries ................ ••.........
3• Scheduled weekly hours •••••••••••...... .............. ..•••••••...........
k. Scheduled days in workweek ......... ......................................
5. Vacations with pay ....... •.............••.......10
6. Paid holidays ............ ............................... ...•••••••.......
7. Formal provisions for paid sick leave ............................... ......
8. Nonproduction bonuses ••••••.... ...................
9• Insurance and pension plans ........................... •••••..............

3
6
9
9
10
11
12
12

Appendix A:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ...... ................••••••••......

13

Appendix B:
Descriptions of occupations studied ...................................••••••••

15

INTRODUCTION

Surveys of office worker salaries were conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in
more than a score of large cities during 19^8-^9. The survey program provides for annual resurveys
In a major city in each of 5 broad geographic areas. These cities are Atlanta, Boston, Chicago,
Los Angeles, and New York. Initial surveys will be conducted each year in another 5 important
cities. To the extent that resources permit, salary data will also be brought up-to-date in a few
cities last covered 2 or 3 years earlier.
These surveys are designed to provide salary data for selected office occupations on a
cross-industry basis. Data are also obtained on supplementary benefits, such as vacations, holi­
days, sick leave, and insurance and pension plans. Salary and related data are provided Wherever
possible for individual industry divisions.
The Memphis study was prepared in the Bureau* s Division of Wage Statistics by Harry H.
Hall, Regional Wage Analyst, Region III, Atlanta, Georgia. The planning and central direction of
the program was the responsibility of Toivo P. Kanninen and Louis E. Badenhoop under the general
supervision of Harry Ober, Chief of the Branch of Industry Wage Studies.







SALARIES OF OFFICE WORKERS IN MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE, FEBRUARY 1950 l/

Salaries
Average weekly salaries of women office workers in Menqphis varied among 21 occupational
groups from $ 32.50 far routine file clerks and office girls to $50.50 far hand bookkeepers (table 1).
In more than half the occupations included in the February 1950 study, salary levels of women ranged
from $39*50 to $ M u 5 0 a week. General stenographers, representing almost a fourth of the women
clerical workers in the occupations studied, averaged $U2.50. Weekly pay of the second largest
group, clerk-typists, averaged $ 37 *50 .

Men*s salary levels were similar in the various clerk occupational categories with levels
of pay varying from $53 for general clerks to $58 for accounting clerks. Among the limited number
of jobs studied in which men were employed, however, salaries ranged from $33 for office boys to
$71 for hand bookkeepers.

Average salaries within the various industries covered were somewhat different from the
all-industry averages. Inter-industry comparisons of w o m e n s salaries indicated that their weekly
pay levels in manufacturing and wholesale trade were generally slightly above the all-industry
levels; in retail trade and in finance, insurance, and real estate offices, the opposite was typi­
cal.

Although differences in average weekly scheduled hours by industry seldom amounted to
more than 2 hours, in some instances shorter workweeks compensated, in part, for lower salary
levels. Women pay-roll clerks, for example, averaged $3 more a week in wholesale than in retail
trade offices, but their average workweek was also 3 hours longer. On an hourly basis, they aver­
aged $1 in both types of offices. Weekly salaries were converted to hourly averages for each oc­
cupation to permit such comparisons, although clerical worker salaries are commonly expressed in
amounts paid weekly or monthly.

Salaries of individual women workers In the jobs studied varied from a low of $20 to a
high of about $80 a week. There was, however, a considerable concentration of workers within a
narrow salary range in most occupations studied, particularly in salaries of women. Thus, over
half of the women general stenographers earned between $37*50 and $^7*50 weekly, and nearly threefifths of the women performing clerical and typing tasks earned between $30 and $k0 (table 2).

SUPPLEMENTARY WAGE PRACTICES

Work schedules
The tO-hour week was the most common work schedule in Memphis offices. More than twothirds of the women office workers were employed in establishments having this schedule although
weekly hours varied from industry to industry (table 3). In transportation, communication, and
other public utility offices, more than half the women were working 37? hours, whereas a third of
the women in wholesale trade establishments worked at least kk hours.

l/

See Appendix A for discussion of scope and method of survey




- 2 -

A 5-day week was the schedule for three-fifths of the women in Memphis offices (table *v).
This schedule applied to about 80 percent of the women employed in manufacturing offices and 85
percent in offices of transportation, communication, and other public utility concerns. A longer
schedule was more common in finance, insurance, and real estate offices; over half the women em­
ployed in these offices worked 6 days a week.

Paid vacations
All Memphis offices included in the survey had provisions for paid vacations. Nearly all
offices provided vacations of 1 week or more to workers with a year*s service. Over two-thirds of
the workers were employed in offices providing a vacation of 2 weeks after service of 1 year, and,
after 5 years, practically all workers were allowed 2 weeks or more (table 5)*

Paid holidays
More than 90 percent of the Memphis office workers included in the study received at
least 5 paid holidays annually. Holiday practices, however, varied among industry groups. Almost
95 percent of the office workers in retail trade establishments received 5 paid holidays, whereas
over a third of the workers in finance, insurance, and real estate offices were provided 12 paid
holidays each year (table 6).

Paid sick leave
A fifth of the workers were in offices that had formal provisions for paid sick leave
applying to workers with a year of service. The number of days of sick leave allowed annually
varied among industry groups, and many firms had more liberal provisions for workers with longer
service (table 7).

Nonproduction bonuses
About two-fifths of the workers were employed in offices that paid some form of nonpro­
duction bonus (table 8). Usually these extra payments were made at Christmas or the year-end. Over
85 percent of the finance, insurance, and real estate employees were in offices that paid bonuses.
On the other hand, such payments were rare in transportation, communication, and other public
utilities.

Insurance and pension plans
Nine out of 10 office workers studied were in establishments providing some form of in­
surance or pension plan with premiums paid at least in part by the firm (table 9 ). Eight out of
10 workers benefited from plans providing life insurance, and over half were employed in offices
with retirement pension plans that were in addition to Federal Old Age and Survivors insurance.




TABLE 1,-— Salaries 2/ and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
Memphis, Term., by industry division, February 1950

Sex, occupation, and industry
division 2/

Estimated
number
of
workers

Weekly
salary

Average Weekly
scheduled
hours

Hourly
*rate

weekly
salary

Salary range
of mi ddle
50 percent
of workers

Median

2/

Men
$71*00
68.50

40.5
41.0

$1.75
1.67

$71.00
70.00

$ 57.50 - $78.00
57.50 - 75.00

32
IS

42.00
41.00

40.5
40.5

1.04
1.01

39.50
39.00

36.00 - 43.00
36.00 - 41.50

2H
65
133

58.00
57.00
60.50

40.5
41.0

1.43
1.43
1.48

56.00
56.00
57.50

42.00 - 69.00
53.00 - 64.00
46.00 - 75.00

QJ.erks, .geqeraj, £ / ..............
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ....... .............

87

54.00

40.5

1.33

53.00

44.00 - 63.50

20

53.00

42.0

1 .2 6

53.50

4 4 .0 0

Clerks, order L f ................... ........................
Wholesale trad# ....... ..

119

53.50
54.00

4 2 .0

95

42.5

1.27
1.27

54.00
54.00

4 3 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 -

57.50
57.50

Clerks, nay roll U ............ ..
Manufacturing ♦ . „ « . « .... ..

46
33

55.00
56.00

40.5
40.5

1.36
1.38

48.50
48.50

4 8 .0 0 4 8 .5 0 -

6 0 .0 0
6 6 .5 0

Office boy^ L j ..... .. .........
Manufacturing
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67

33 #00
33.50
33.00

40.5

IS

4 3 .5
4 1 .0

.81
.81
.80

33.00
33.00
33.00

29.50 3 0 .0 0 32.50 -

3 6 .0 0

.9 9

Bookkeepers, .hs^nd 4/ .............
Manufacturing ........
Bookkeeping-machine operators.
clasj B Lj .............«*••*•••
Wholesale trade •••••••••••.••
Clerks, accounting 4/ ...... .
Manufacturing ........ .
Wholesale trade ...........

u
22

25

40.0

■

6 0 .5 0

34.50
34.50

Women
Billers, machine (billing
M SM sg) y

................. ....................................

Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B ille r s . Machine (bookkeeping
machine) .................... .
Bookkeepers. hand U . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing .............. ............

41.00
44.00

1.07
.96

4 1 .0 0
a . 50
4 0 .0 0

37.50 41.50 -

4 0 .0 0

41*5
41.0
41*5

-

44*00
49.00
43.50

25

35.00

39.5

.89

37.00

29.50 -

40.50

72

50.50
53.50

41.Q

1.23
1.34

50.00
51.00

45.50 -

20

57.50
57.50

235
21
93

40.50
39.50
43.00

42.5
42 .C
43.5

.95
.94

39.50

36.50
3 8 .0 0

39,50

.9 9

36.50 -

4 2 ,0 0

3 8 .0 0
a . 00

107

37.50

41.5

.90

3 8 .0 0

34.50

-

41.50

344
91
133
95

42.50
43.50
46,50
37.00

40.5

1.05
1.09
1.11
.93

4 2 .0 0

37.00

-

48.50

4 0 .0
4 2 .0
4 0 .0

43.50
48.50

4 0 .0 0 4 0 .0 0 -

4 4 .0 0

3 8 .0 0

30.00 -

4 2 ,0 0

131
21
99

4 0 .0

3 6 .0 0

5 0 .0 0

-

Bookkeeping-machine operators.

sA&s&Jl

y

....... ......................... .

Manufacturing
Wholesale trade
Finance, insurance, and real
estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) i+J . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . f
,
Wholesale trad© . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
Retail trade

See footnotes at end of table.




5 0 .0 0

53*00

TABLE 1.— Salaries 1/ and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
Memphis, Tenn#, by industry division, February 1950 - Continued

Hourly
rate

Median
y
weekly
salary

Salary range
of middle
50 percent
of workers

Weekly
salary

Average Weeklyscheduled
hours

53

$36.50

42.0

$0.S7

$36.50

$ 35.00 - $39.50

24

36.50

42.5

.86

36.50

35.50 - 40.00

Clerks, accounting 4/ •*•••......
Manufacturing .............. .
Wholesale trade .••••••.... ••
Retail t r a d e ........... ..
Finance, insurance, and real
estate •.... .

288
55
64
35

39.50
39.50
44.50
38.50

40.0
41.5
41.0
41.5

.99
.95
1.09
.93

38.00
39.50
42.00

38

35.50

39.5

Clerks, file. class_A £/ ........
Manufacturing «............ ..
Finance, insurance, and real
e s t a t e .... ••••••••......

48
16

39.50
37.00

17

Clerks, file, class B U ........
Wholesale trade ........
Retail trade .................
Finance, insurance, and real
estate

Sex, occupation, and industry
division 7j

Estimated
number
of
workers

Women - Continued
Calculating-machine onerators
(other than Conrotometer type) U
Finance, insurance, and real
estate ............ .......

40.00

35.50
35.50
37.50
31.00

-

42.00
42.00
48.00
44.50

.90

34.50

31.00 -

38.00

40.5
40.0

.98
.93

38.00
34.00

35.00 34.00 -

44.50
36.00

40.50

41.0

.99

40.00

36.00 -

45.50

184
74
56

32.50
34.50
29.00

41.5
42.5
40.0

.78
.81
.73

33.00
34.00
29.00

30.00 33.00 -

34.00
35.00

25.00 -

33.00

27

33.00

41.0

.80

33.50

30.00 -

33.50

Clerks, general U ..............
Manufacturing •••«•••••..... .
Wholesale trade .......... .
Retail t r a d e ........... ..
Finance, insurance,.and real
estate •..•••••••••••..... .

217
53
77
27

44.00
43.50
46.50
40.00

40.0

40.0

1.10
1.09
1.16
1.00

44.50
44.00
46.00
40.00

37.50
36.00
40.50
35.00

-

50.50
50.50
51.00
46.00

45

42.50

40.0

1.06

42.50

37.00 -

46.00

Clerks, order U ............... .
Wholesale trade ..••••••••••••

u
25

36.50
37.50

40.5
41.0

.90
.91

36.00
33.00

31.00 30.50 -

43.00
46.00

m
jaUL U .............
Manufacturing
....
Wholesale t r a d e ...... .......
Retail t r a d e .............. .

129
52
34
27

42.50
44.00
43.00
40.00

41.0
41.0
43.0
40.0

1.04
1.07
1.00
1.00

42.00
46.00
39.50
40.50

36.00
40.00
36.50
35.00

-

46.00
48.00
46.50
44.00

411
107
88
21

37.50
42.50
36.50
30.50

41.0
40.5
42.5
40.0

.91
1.05
.86
.76

36.50
43.50
35.00

30.00

32.50
33.00
34.50
25.00

-

40.50
48.00
38.50
36.50

129

36.00

41.0

.88

36.50

32.50 -

39.00

16
50

37.50
35.00

38.5
40.5

.95
.86

37.50
34.50

35.50 30.00 -

38.50
38.00

CJterk-typlptfi ...................
Manufacturing........ .
Wholesale trade ............ .
Retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real
e s t a t e ...... ........... .
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities .
S e r v i c e s .... ................

See footnotes at end of table•




40.0
40.0

TABLE 1.— Salaries i j and weekly scheduled hours of work for selected office occupations in
Memphis, Tenn., by industry division, February 1950 - Continued

Sex, occupation, and industry
division 2/

Estimated
number
of
workers

Weekly
salary

Average Weekly
scheduled
hours

Median
Hourly
rate

weekly
galarr

Salary range
of middle
50 percent
of workers

$30.00 - $33.00

2/

Women - Continued
Office girls .....................

42

$32.50

40.5

$0.80

$32.00

Stenographers. general ..........
Manufacturing ................
Wholesale trade ..... ....... .
Retail trade .••••..•••......
Finance, insurance, and real
estate •••••••••••••.......
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities .
Services ..... .

801
167
356
54

42.50
44.00
43.50
40.00

a.o
41.0
41.5
41.0

1.04
1.07
1.05
.98

41.50
42.50
41.50
41.00

37.50
40.00
37.50
39.00

-

46.00
46.00
49.00
45.00

135

40.00

40.5

.99

40.50

34.50 -

44.00

30
59

43.50
38.50

40.0
a.o

1.09
.94

43.50
39.00

a .00 34.50 -

46.00

Stenographers, technical .........

39

44.50

a.5

1.07

40.50

34.50 -

49.00

Switchboard operators U ........
Wholesale trade
Finance, insurance, and real
estate .....................

96
32

40.00
42.50

a.o
40.5

.98
1.05

40.00
43.50

35.00 37.00 -

45.00
46.00

17

34.50

44.0

.78

37.00

27.00 -

a.50

Switchboard operatorreceptionists U .... ..........
Manufacturing ...........
Wholesale trade ......... ..

119
40
52

38.00
39.00
38.00

42.0
a.5
43.5

.90
.94
.87

37.00
37.50
34.00

33.00 32.50 33.00 -

42.50
a.50
44.00

Transcrlbipg-maehlne operators.
geperql U ....................
Manufacturing ............... .

55
25

44.00
37.50

40.0

40.0

1.10
.94

40.00
38.00

36.50 33.50 -

53.00
39.50

Typists, class A ................

57

46.50

a.o

1.13

45.00

42.00 -

51.50

Typists, class B j j .............
Manufacturing ................

95
39

36.50
35.00

40.5
40.5

.90
.86

34.00
32.00

32.00 -

32.00 -

42.00
a.oo

1/

42.00

Excludes pay for overtime.
2/ The study covered representative manufacturing and retail trade establishments and trans­
portation (except railroads), communication, heat, light and power companies with over 100
workers; and establishments with more than 25 workers in wholesale trade, finance, real estate,
insurance and selected service industries (business service; such professional services as
engineering, architectural, accounting, auditing, and bookkeeping firms; motion pictures; and
nonprofit membership organizations).
2/ Value above and below which half of workers* salaries fell.
lj Includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.




-

6

-

TABLE 2.— Percentage distribution of workers in selected office occupations by weekly salaries 1/
in Memphis, Tenn,, February 1950

Percent of men Weekly salaries 1/

$20.00
*£22.49 ...........o......
$22.50 - $24.99 .................
$25.00 - $27.49 .................

Percent of women Bookkeep­
ingBook­
keepers, machine
hand
operators,
class B

Billers,
Clerks,
machine
Clerks, Clerks, Office 3
account­
general order
boys (billing
ing
machine)
]

-

-

-

1.5
1.5

-

_
-

-

0.8
3.8
13.0
6.9

4.2

18.3
22.0

1.4
6.9

1.3
6.0
13.6
14.4
21.2
21.2

5.6
8.3
5.6
20.7
2.8
11.1

7.7
1.3
.9
5.1
4.3
-

13.9
1.4
8.3
1.4
2.8

•4
2.6
—
.
.
—
-

$27.50
$30.00
$32.50
$35.00
$37.50
$40.00

-

$29.99
$32.49
$34.99
$37.49
$39.99
$42.49

.................
.................
..................
..................
............ .
.................

7.5
.5
17.4

3.4
2.3
4.6

1.7
6.7
•8
5.0

$42.50
$4-5.00
$47.50
$50.00
$52.50
$55.00

-

$44.99
$47.49
$49.99
$52.49
$54.99
$57.49

.................
.................
.................
.................
.................
.................

.9
3.7
12.7
5.6
4.2

15.0
3.4
9.2
11.5
9.2
2.3

7.6
2.5
4.2
6.7
18.5
18.5

$57.50
$60.00
$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$70.00

-

$59.99
$62.49
$64.99
$67.49
$69.99
$72.49

.................
............... .
.................
............ .
.................
.................

7.9
3.7
6.5
2.8
6*5
2.3

4.6
3.4
12.7
15.0
«
-

5.9
8.5
—
5.9
.8
-

—
—
-

.8
.8
—
-

$72.50
$75.00
$80.00
$85.00

—
-

$74.99
$79.99
$84.99
$89.99

..................
.......... .......
..................
.................

4.7
5.6
7.5

3.4
-

5.0
1.7
-

-

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total .............. .
Estimated number of workers ......
Average weekly salary 3/ ••»•••••«

See footnote at end of table,




214
$58.00

87
£54.00

22.3
17.9
41.8
7.5
3.0
3.0
1.5
_
-

12j2
10.7
5.3
-

4.6
.8

-

5.6
~

_

100.0

100.0

119

67

131

$53.50

$33.00

$ 41.00

m
m

~
-

-

100.0
72
$50.50

100.0
235
j $40.50

TABLE 2,— Percentage distribution of workers in selected office occupations by weekly salaries 3/
in Memphis, Tenn., February 1950 - Continued

Weekly salaries 3/

♦20,00 - $22.49 ..................
♦22.50 - $24.99 ..................
$25.00 - $27.49 ................ .

Percent of women CalculatingCalculatingmachine
Clerks, Clerks,
machine
operators
Clerks, Clerks,
account­ file
operators
general pay roll
(other than
class B
ing
(Comptometer
Comptometer
type)
type)
.

_

0.9
3.2

3.8

0.7

0*5
6.5
5.4

-

0.8

14.7
19.6
35.4
7.1
4.3
2.2

0.5
.9
9.2
10.1
10.6
8.3

10.0
4.7
18.5
7.0
10.1
13.1
17.7
4.7
3.1
1.6

$27.50
$30.00
$32.50
$35.00
$37.50
$40.00

-

$29.99
$32.49
$34.99
$37.49
$39.99
$42.49

..................
..................
..................
..................
.............. .
..................

2.6
2.9
3.1
8.7
3.2
21.5

9.4
3.8
5.7
41.5
22.6
9.4

3.8
9.7
8.7
18.8
20.9
16.0

$42.50
$45.00
$47.50
$50.00
$52.50
$55.00

-

$44.99
$47.49
$49.99
$52.49
$54.99
$57.49

...................
...................
............... .
...................
.......... ........
.......... ........

15.7
5.5
5.8
7.0
6.1
4.1

_
3.8
-*
-

4.5
5.2
4.5
1.0
1.0
.7

4.3
—

13.9
14.8
4.1
12.9
10.6
3.2

$57.50
$60.00
$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$70,00

-

$59.99
$62.49
$64.99
$67.49
$69.99
$72.49

...................
...................
...................
.... ........... .
....... ...........
...................

4.4
.3
-

_
-

_
2.8
1.0
.7

—

—

$72.50
$75.00
$80.00
$85.00

-

$74.99
$79.99
$84.99
$89.99

...................
...................
...................
...................

.
.
-

-

_
-

—
-

.9
-

Total ••••••••••••..... .

100.0

Estimated number of workers .......
Average weekly salary 3/ «.•*•••»•»

See footnote at end of table,

883041 0 - 50 - 2




344
$42.50

100.0
53
$36.50

•

-

4.7
.8
1.6
1.6
-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

288

184

217

129

$39.50

?32.50

$44.00

$42.50

-

8

-

TABLE 2.— Percentage distribution of workers in selected office occupations by weekly salaries
in Memphis, Term., February 1950 - Continued

Weekly salaries 3/

$20.00 - $22.4-9..............
$22.50 - $24.99 ..............
$25.00 - $27.49 ..............

Percent of women —
TranSwitch­ Switch­
board
scribing- Typists, Typists,
Clerlo- Stenog­ board
machine
typists raphers, opera­ operatorclass A class B
general
tors reception­ operators,
general
ists

0.5
1.2

0.2

2.1
5.2

—
-

-

1.8

—
-

-

$27.50
$30.00
$32.50
$35.00
$37.50
$40.00

-

$29.99
$32.49
$34.99
$37.49
$39.99
$42.49

..............
..............
..............
............. .
..............
..............

10*9
11.7
17.3
15.8
12.2
8.3

2.7
4.2
7.0
9.0
10.6
21.6

4.2
6.3
6.3
9.4
10.3
15.6

2.5
19.3
24.5
16.0
4*2
7.6

3.6
10.9
1.8
10.9
21.9
3.6

1.8
10.5
1.8
15.8

3.2
33.7
15.8
8.4
4.2
20.0

$42.50
$45.00
$47.50
$50.00
$52.50
$55.00

-

$44.99
$47.49
$49.99
$52.49
$54.99
$57.49

..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............

5.8
1.0
10.7
3.9
.2
-

15.1
7.7
7.7
3.1
4.4
3.6

15.6
7.3
7.3
7.3
1.0

9.2
6.7
2.5
.8
6.7
-

5.6
1.8
14.6
3.6
3.6

3.5
24.5
5.2
15.8
10.5
-

10.5
2.1
2.1
-

$57.50
$60.00
$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$70.00

-

$59.99
$62.49
$64.99
$67.49
$69.99
$72.49

..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............

.5
—
—
-

.9
.9
.9
—
.4
-

—

10.9
3.6

1.8

—
2.1
-

—
—
-

_

_

—
-

-

$72.50
$75.00
$80.00
$85.00

-

$74.99
$79.99
$84.99
$89.99

..............
..............
..............
..............

T o t a l ......... .....

-

-

-

—
-

100.0

Estimated number of workers ,M

411

801

96

119

55

Average weekly salary 2/ ......

$37.50

$42.50

$40.00

$38.00

$44.00

Excludes pay for overtime,




100.0

m
m
-

100.0

1/

100.0

3.6

—

3.5
—

100.0

m
m
m
m
m
m
-

3.5
100.0
57
$46.50

—

m
m
«
100.0
95
$36.50

TABLE 3.— Scheduled weekly hours of women in Memphis offices, February 1950

Weekly hours

All offices employing women ....
35 hours ............ ...........
3 - - h o u r s ..... .................
7§
Over 37‘ and under 40 h o u r s ....
a
40 hours ............ ...........
Over 40 and under 44 hours .....
44 h o u r s .......... .............
Over 44 and under 4# hours ......
4$ hours ........................
Over 48 hours ••••••••••••••••.•.

Percent of workers emrloved in offices in
Transpor­
tation,
Finance, communi­
All
Manu­ Whole­
indus­ factur­ sale Retail insurance, cation, Services
and real and other
ing
trade trade
tries
estate
public
utilities
100.0

100.0

0.2
5.3
5.9
67.4
3.3
11.4
5.4
.4
.7

1.0
84.1
5.9
3.7
5.3
—

100.0

-

66.8
26.5
4.2
2.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.2
92.1
3.0
4.7
—

3.4
5.8
67.9
8.2
12.6
2.1
—

55.8
3.4
36.4
4.4
—

37.9
37.4
24.7
—

TABLE A.--Scheduled days in workweek of women in Memphis offices, February 1950

Percent

Days in week

All offices employing w o m e n ....
5 days .....••..... .............
days .........................
6 days ...........




o£ wor'kers

emr>loved in offices in Transpor­
tation,
Finance,
All
Manu­ Whole­
communi­
Retail insurance,
indus­ factur­ sale
cation, Services
and real
trade
tries
trade
and other
ing
estate
public
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

60.5
25.5
14.0

79.5
17.3
3.2

63.7
35.3
1.0

67.3
16.9
15.8

35.3
12.1
52.6

85.0
12.1
2.9

U.9
58.1

10
TABLE 5•— Vacations with pay in Memphis offices, February 1950

Vacation policy

All offices stud i e d.... .........

.
Percent of workers emuloved in offices in .
Transpor­
tation,
Finance, communi­
All
Manu­ Whole­
indus­ factur­ sale Retail insurance, cation, Services
and real and other
ing
tries
trade trade
estate
public
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

58.0
54.3
2.6
1.1
42.0

55.6
46.3
7.3
2.0
44.4

48.3
41.7
4.2
2.4
51.7

25.9
25.9

85.4
85.4
-

74.1

74.4
74.4
25.6

14.6

67.2
67.2
32.8

99.4
30.0
67.5
1.9
.6

100.0
38.2
59.8
2.0
-

98.1
26.6
66.8
4.7
1.9

100.0
73.6
26.4
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
68.0
30.0
2.0
-

100.0
9.9
90.1

100.0
2.1
.5
94.3
3.1

100.0
3.7

100.0
1.8

100.0
100.0
—

100.0

100*0
2.9
5.8
85.4
5.9

100.0
5.2

6 months of service
Offices with paid vacations .....
1 week ......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....
2 weeks ................. .
Offices with no paid vacations ...

-

-

1 year of service
Offices with paid vacations .... .
1 week .................... .
2 w e e k s .... .............. ..
Over 2 weeks ............... .
Offices with no paid vacations ...

-

-

5 years of service
Offices with paid vacations ......
1 w e e k .... .............. .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ....
2 weeks ...•••••............
Over 2 weeks ••••••••••••••••

-

-

94.3
2.0

90.2
8.0

-

100.0
—

-

94.8

TABLE 6.— >Paid holidays in Memphis offices, February 1950
Percent of worlcers

Number of paid holidays

All offices studied .......
Offices providing paid holidays ..
Number of holidays:
2 ........................
3 .......................
4 ........................
5 ........ ...............
5§- .......................
6 .......................
7 ............. .......
7 £ ......................
8 ........................
11 ........................
12 .................. .
Offices providing no paid
holidays .......................
Information not available .......f




em>loved

in offices in
Transpor­
tation,
Finance,
All
Manu­ Whole­
communi­
Retail insurance,
indus­ factur­ sale
cation, Services
trade
and real
tries
ing
trade
and other
estate
public
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

98.4

96.6

99.6

97.0

97.9

100.0

100.0

1.2
1.1
4.2
37.7
2.2
25.9
11.0
2.3
3.0
1.7
8.1

-

5.6
3.2
36.5
32.9
6.5
11.9
—
-

7.1
20.4
7.9
37.2
27.0
-

.4
1.7
94.9
-

4.0
22.2
17.1
8.0
8.0
38.6

17.5
63.1
19.4
-

•

—

1.4
.2

2.4
1.0

.4
-

3.0

2.1

—

•

-

-

-

-

-

10.2
5.0
69.9
3.6
11.3

TABUS 7*“ Formal provisions for paid sick leave in Memphis offices, February 1950
—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All offices studied

Percent of wos*kers employed in offices ItxTranspor­
tation,
Finance,
All
communi­
Manta- Whole­
Retail insurance*
cation,
Services
indus­ factor­ sale
and real
trade
tries
and other
trade
ing
estate
public
utilities
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100*0

6 months of service
Offices with formal provisions for
paid sick leave
5 days
6 days ••••••«••••••»«••###••#
7 days ,........ .............
IX) days ............
12 days .....................
15 days
Over 20 days

12.6
1.3
1.9
.2
2.8
1.4
3.6
1.4

12.0

5.3

4.7

-

23.6
5.4
8.6
1.7

«

5.3

-

-

7.9

a*

-

7.3

-

"

24.4
3.4
4.0
17.0
-

Offices with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave •*•«••••••*•«

87*4

88.0

94.7

76.4

75.6

100.0

92.0

20.9
4.7

12.0

18.6

34.5
9.5

19.4
19.4

12.7
4.8

2 .2
.2

4.7

26.1
5.4
11.1
1.7

-

-

-

4.0

-

7.9

—
—

1 year of service
Offices with formal provisions
for paid sick leave
5 days
6 days
7 days
10 days
12 days
15 days
20 days
Over 20 days
Offices with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave
5 years of service
Offices with formal provisions
for paid sick leave
5 days
6 days
7 days ........................................
10 days
12 days
14 days
15 days ........................................
20 days
Over 20 days ............... ..
Offioes with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave
.....




-

—

1.2
1.4
1.0
4.3
5.9

—

3.4
15.2

7.3

-

79.1

88.0

32.2
6.4

.9
.2

4.7

2.5
1.6
1.0

1 .0

mm

-

-

100.0

•

100.0

8.0

‘-

-

3.7
4.3

-

-

-

-

mm

3.6
4.3

—
_
-

21.0

81.4

73.9

65*5

80.6

87.3

12.0

18.6

-

-

86.4
5.4

34.5
3.4

75.2
54.8

12.7
4.8

-

-

-

2.8
15.8

7.3

3.4
9.9
5.3

67.8

88.0

81.4

mm
mm

1.7
_

10.4
8.7

mm

10.1

-

<•
*

—
-

3.6
4.3

60.2

21.0

20.4

•*
»
-

13.6

65.5

24.8

87.3

-

mm

TABUS 8# Nonproduction bonuses in Memphis offices, February 1950
—

Type of bonus

All offices studied #•••*.«•••••.••

Perceri of workers employed in offices in t
Transpor­
tation,
Finance, communi­
All
Manu­ Whole­ Retail insurance,
indus­ factur­ sale trade and real cation, Servioes
tries
ing trade
estate and other
public
utilities
100.0 100.0

100*0 100*0

100.0

100.0

100*0

4*4
4*4

23.9
33.7
10.2

Offices with nonproductlon
bonuses J/ •••••*•****•••••••••••
Christmas or year-end *••...*•
Profit-sharing ••••••••••••**«
Other •••*•»••••*•»••.••*••*••

42.9
30.0
9.4
4.7

42.1
38.9
7.7
-

30.7
10.7
20.0
-

42.4
29.8
9.4
3.2

85.6
67.0
-

-

20.7

-

Offices with no nonporoduction
bonuses ••*•**••••*••**•••##*•*•«

57.1

57.9

69.3

57.6

14.4

95*6

mm

76.1

j/ Unduplioated total*

TABUS 9«— 'Insurance and pension plans in Memphis offices, February 1950

Type of plan

Transpor­
tation,
Finance, communi­
All
Manu­ Whole­ Retail insurance,
indus­ factur­ sale trade and real cation, Services
tries
ing trade
estate and other
public
utilities
100.0 100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

56.0
66.4

91.4
85.5
51.6
55.1
41.0

92.2
83.6
13.8
70.3
25.1

91.6
79.3
6.0
43.2
69.9

100.0
99.0
68.0
55.8
37.8

73.3
69a
57.3
53.1
58.1

5.9

8.6

7.8

8*4

All offices studied...... ....

100*0

100*0

Offioes with insurance or pension
planS
Life insurance
Health insurance
Retirement pension *••••*•*•#*
Hospitalisation *••••#••«•••••

90.7
82.4
37.7
54.3
52.0

94^
81.2

Offioes with no insurance or
pension p aw *»***.**.*.»•....**
i

9.3

1/ Unduplioated totals




40.8

26.7

- 13 -

APPENDIX A

Scope and Method of Survey
The infonnation presented in this "bulletin was collected by visits of field representa­
tives of the Bureau to representative offices in the city surveyed. In classifying workers hy oc­
cupation, uniform job descriptions were used; they are presented in Appendix B.
No attempt was made to study all office occupations and, in general, the jobs surveyed
were those that are found in a large proportion of offices and that involve duties that are more
or less uniform from firm to firm. The jobs studied are more representative of the salaries of
women than of men office workers.
The study covered six broad industry divisions and in each division only establishments
above a certain size were studied. Office employment in smaller establishments was not considered
sufficiently great to warrant inclusion of such establishments in the survey. A greater proportion
of large than of small establishments was studied in order to maximize the proportion of office
workers that could be surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given only its proper influence on the infonnation presented. The industries
included in the study together with' the minimum size of establishments and the number of establish­
ments surveyed are summarized below.

Establishments and workers in major industry divisions in Memphis, and number
studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 1950

Item

Number of
Minimum
size of
establishments
establish­
Estimated
ment
Studied
total
____ 1/

Employment
Estimated
total
2/

In establishments
studied
Total
Office

Industry division
All divisions ...................
Manufacturing .................
Wholesale trade .... ..........
Retail trade ...............
Finance, insurance, and real
estate .................•••••
Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities 3 /
Services k / ................ .

8,700

36,600
17,820
2 ,7^0
7,950

7,910
1,^30
1,050
1,320

18

2,600

2,130

2,130

11
13

5,900
l,i*00

^,9^0

960
1,020

108
20
21
27

58,000

25,200
10,900
1^,800

36,600
23,550
7,290
3,930

bO

7,100

316
88
137
18

108

58,000

101
26
101

25
28
13

30,U00
9,000

26

30

101
26

19
2k

1,020

Size of establishment
All size groups ••••..••••.... .
501 and over ..................
2 5 1 . 5 0 0 ...... ..............
101 - 250 ....................
26 - 100 ....................

l/

316
23
33
102
158

1,830

7,910
3,110
2,080
1,^50
1,270

Number of plant and office workers.

2/ Plant and office employment in the Memphis Metropolitan Area (Shelby County).

3 / Excludes railroads.
f/ Business service; such professional services as engineering, architectural, accounting,
auditing, and bookkeeping firms; motion pictures; and nonprofit membership-organizations.




-

Ik

-

The information on weekly salaries excludes overtime pay and nonproduction "bonuses "but
includes incentive earnings. The weekly hours data refer to the work schedules for which these
salaries are paid. Hourly rates were obtained "by dividing these weekly salaries "by scheduled hours.
The number of workers presented refers to the estimated total employed in all establishments with­
in the scope of the study and not to the number actually surveyed.

t)ata are shown only for full-time workers, defined as those who are hired
establishment* s full-time schedule for the occupational classification.

to work the

Information on wage practices refers to all office worleers except in the tabulations of
scheduled weekly hours and days in workweek for women workers. It is presented in terms of the
proportion of workers employed in offices with the practice in question. Because of eligibility
requirements, the proportion actually receiving the benefits in question may be smaller.

The summary of vacation and sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements and ex­
cludes informal plans whereby time off with pay may be granted at the discretion of the employer
or other supervisor. Sick leave plans are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off and exclude health insurance even though paid for. by employers.

In evaluating information on variations in salaries with size of establishment, in the
few cities in which the coverage justifies such a summary, it should be remembered that this fac­
tor may be related to others. There is frequently an important relationship between size and in­
dustrial classification in the broad industry groups used in these surveys.




-

15

-

APPENDIX B

Descriptions of Occupations Studied

The primary purpose of the Bureau’s job descriptions is to assist its
field staff in classifying workers who are employed under a variety of pay-roll
titles and different work arrangements from office to office and from, area to
area, into appropriate occupations. This is essential in order to permit the
grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Be­
cause of this emphasis on interoffice and interarea comparability of occupation­
al content, the Bureau’s job descriptions differ significantly from those in
use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In view
of these special characteristics of the Bureau’s job descriptions, their adop­
tion without modification by any single establishment or for any other purpose
than that indicated herein is not recommended. Where office workers regularly
perform duties classified in more than one occupation, they are generally clas­
sified according to the most skilled or responsible duties that are a regular
part of their job and that are significant in determining their value to the
firm.'

BILLER, MACHINE
A worker who prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than an
ordinary typewriter. May also keep records as to billings or shipping charges or perform other
clerical work incidental to billipg operations. Should be designated as working on billing
machine or bookkeeping machine as described below.
Billing Machine - A worker who uses a special billing machine (Moon Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and
invoices from customers* purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping memoranda, etc.
Usually involves application of predetermined discounts and shipping charges and entry of nec­
essary extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billing machine, and totals which
are automatically accumulated by machine. The operation usually involves a large number of car­
bon copies of the bill being prepared and Is often done on a fan-fold machine.
Bookkeeping Machine - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine (Sundstrand., Elliott
Fisher, Remington Band, etc., which may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare cus­
tomers* bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the simultaneous
entry of figures on a customer’s ledger record. The machine automatically accumulates figures
on a number of vertical columns and computes and usually prints automatically the debit or
credit balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard
types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPER, HAND
A worker who keeps a set of books far recording business transactions and whose work in­
volves most of the following: posting and balancing subsidiary ledgers, cash books or journals,
journalizing transactions where judgment is involved as to accounts affected; posting general
ledger; and taking trial balances. May also prepare accounting statements and bills; may direct
work of assistants or accounting clerks.




- 16 -

B OOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker who operates a Bookkeeping machine (Remington Rand, Elliott Fisher,
strand, Burroughs, National Cash Register) to keep a record of business transactions*

Sund-

Class A - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a set of records of business transactions usually requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles and familiarity with the structure of the particular
accounting system used. Determines proper records and distribution of debit and credit items
to be used in each phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and
other records by hand.
Class B - A worker who uses a bookkeeping machine with or without a typewriter key­
board to keep a record of one or more phases or sections of a set of records pertaining to busi­
ness transactions usually requiring some knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections
include accounts payable, pay-roll, customers* accounts (not including simple type of billing
described under Biller, Machine), cost distributions, expense distributions, inventory control,
etc. In addition, may check or assist in preparation of trial balances and prepare control
sheets for the accounting department.
CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
A worker whose primary function consists of operating a calculating
form mathematical computations other than addition exclusively.

machine to per­

Comptometer type
Other than Comptometer type
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
A worker who performs one or more accounting operations such as preparing simple Jour­
nal vouchers, accounts payable vouchers5 coding invoices or vouchers with proper accounting dis­
tributions; entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; posting and bal­
ancing subsidiary ledgers controlled by general ledger, e.g., accounts receivable, accounts
payable, stock records, voucher Journal. May assist in preparing*Journal entries. For workers
whose duties include handling the general ledger or a set of books, see Bookkeeper, Hand.
CLERK, FILE
Class A - A worker who Is responsible for maintaining an established filing system
and classifies and indexes correspondence or other material; may also file this material. May
keep records of various types in conjunction with files or supervise others in filing and lo­
cating material In the files. May perform incidental clerical duties.
Class B - A worker who performs routine filing, usually of material that has already
been classified, or locates or assists in locating material in files. May perform incidental
clerical duties.
C ItEKK, GENERAL
A worker who is typically required to perform a variety of office operations. This
requirement may arise as a result of impracticability of specialization In a small office or
because versatility is essential in meeting peak requirements in larger offices.
The work
generally involves the use of independent Judgment In tending to a pattern of office work from
day to day, as well as knowledge relating to phases of office work that occur only occasionally.
For example, the range of operations performed may entail all of some combination of the fol­
lowing: answering correspondence, preparing bills and invoices, posting to various records,
preparing pay rolls, filing, etc. May also operate various office machines and type as the
work requires. (See Clerk-Typist.)




17 -

CLERK, ORDER
A worker who receives customers* orders for material or merchandise hy mail, phone,
or personally and whose duties involve any combination of the following: quoting prices to cus­
tomers, making out an order sheet listing the items to make up the order, checking prices and
quantities of items on order sheet, distributing order sheets to respective departments to he
filled. May also check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer, acknowl­
edge receipt of orders from customers, follow-up orders to see that they have been filled, keep
file of orders received, and check shipping invoices with original orders.
CLERK, PAY-ROLL
A worker who computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary data on the
pay-roll sheets and whose duties involves calculating worker's earnings based on time or produc­
tion records; posting calculated data on pay-roll sheet, showing information such as worker's
name, working days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. In addition, may
make out pay checks and assist the paymaster in making up and distributing the pay envelopes.
May use a calculating machine.
CLERK-TYPIST
A worker who does clerical work requiring little special training but the performance
of which requires the use of a typewriter for a major portion of the time and whose work in­
volves typing letters, reports, and other matter from rough draft or corrected copy and one or
more of the following: keeping simple records; filing records and reports; making out bills;
sorting and distributing incoming mail.
KEY-PUNCH OPERATOR l/
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities, records account­
ing and statistical data on tabulating cards by punching a series of holes in the cards in a
specified sequence, using a numerical key-punch machine, following written information on rec­
ords. May be required to duplicate cards by using the duplicating device attached to machine.
Keeps files on punched cards. May verify own work or work of others.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
A worker who performs a variety of routine duties such as running errands;
minor office machines, such as sealers or mailers; opening and distributing mail,
minor clerical work. (Bonded messengers are excluded from this classification.)

operating
and other

SECRETARY l/
A worker who performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an adminis­
trative or executive position and whose duties involve the following: - making appointments for
superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and making phone calls; handling per­
sonal and important o r ’
confidential mail, and writing routine correspondence on own initiative;
taking dictation, either in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine (except where tran­
scribing machine is used), and transcribing dictation or the recorded information reproduced on
a transcribing machine. In addition, may prepare special reports or memoranda for Information
of superior.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons, either
in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary, and to

l/

Not surveyed in all cities




- 18 -

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL - Continued
transcribe this dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and
keep files in order, keep simple records, etc. Roes not include transcribing-machine work. (See
Transcribing-Machine Operator.)
STENOGRAPHER, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to take dictation from one or more persons, either
in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research and to transcribe this
dictation on a typewriter. May also type from written copy. May also set up and keep files in
order, keep simple records, etc. Roes not include transcribing-machine work. (See TranscribingMachine Operator.)
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
A worker who operates a single or multiple position telephone switchboard, and whose
duties involve: handling incoming, outgoing, and intraplant or office calls. In addition, may
record toll calls and take messages. As a minor part of duties, may give information to per­
sons who call in, or occasionally take telephone orders. For workers who also do typing or
other stenographic work or act as receptionists, see Switchboard Operator-Receptionist.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
A worker who in addition to performing duties of operator, on a single position or
monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and/or performs typing or other routine clerical
work as part of regular duties. This typing or clerical work may take the major part of this
worker's time while at switchboard.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do simple
clerical work. A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine is
classified as a Stenographer, General.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, TECHNICAL
A worker whose primary function is to transcribe dictation involving a varied tech­
nical or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research from
transcribing-machine records. May also type from written copy and do simple clerical work. A
worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by stenotype or similar machine is classified as a
Stenographer, Technical.
TYPIST
A worker who uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make out bills
after calculations have been made by another person. May operate a teletype machine.
Class A - A worker who performs one or more of the following: typing material in
final form from very rough and involved draft; copying from plain or corrected copy in which
there is a frequent and varied use of technical and unusual words or from foreign language copy;
combining material from several sources; or planning lay-out of complicated statistical tables
to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing; typing tables from rough draft in final form.
May also type routine form letters, varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B - A worker who performs one or more of the f o H e w i n g : typing from relatively
clear or typed drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; setting up simple
standard tabulations, or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.




☆

u s . GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : O — 1950


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102