View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

L

0. 3/

Analysis of
Work Stoppages, 1973
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics!
1975

DOcum e n t

A CTIO N

Bulletin 1877




21975

Dayto,
^

c

°

^

C

0.

Analysis of
Work Stoppages, 1973
U.S. Department of Labor
John T. Dunlop, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1975
Bulletin 1877

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
BLS Regional Offices listed on inside back cover. Price $1.20
Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents




Stock Number 029-001-01789-0
Catalog Number L 2.3:1877




P re face
This bulletin, continuing an annual feature o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics in the
field o f industrial relations since 1941, provides a detailed statistical presentation o f
work stoppages in 1973.
Preliminary monthly estimates o f the level o f strike (or lock ou t) activity for the
United States as a whole are issued about 30 days after the end o f the month o f
reference and are available on request. Preliminary estimates for the entire year are
available at the year’ s end; selected final tabulations are issued in the early summer o f
the following year. The methods used to prepare work stoppage statistics are described
in appendix B.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the cooperation o f employers and employer
associations, labor unions, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and
various State agencies which furnished information for this program.
To expedite the release o f this information, the degree o f analysis included in
earlier bulletins has been omitted.
This bulletin was prepared in the Division o f Industrial Relations, O ffice o f Wages
and Industrial Relations.




C o n te n ts
Highlights......................................................................................................................................................................................
Tables:
1. Monthly distribution o f new strikes involving 1,000 workers or more 1971-73 ...............................................
2. Percent o f stoppages and idleness by contract status, 1971-73 ................................... .......................................
3. Percent o f idleness by nfajor issue, 1970-73 ............................................................................................................
4. Work stoppages b y mean and median duration, days idle per worker, and number o f
prolonged strikes, 1954-73 ........................................................................................................................................
5. Unresolved issues in work stoppages, 1973 ..............................................................................................................

1

2
2
2
3
3

Appendixes:
A. Tables:
Work stoppages:
A -l.
A-2.

In the United States, 1927-73 .................................................................................................................
By month, 1972-73 .................................................................................................................................

4
5

A-3.
A-4.

By size and duration, 1973 ......................................................................................................................
Trend of, involving 10,000 workers or more, 1927-73

6
7

A-5.

Involving 10,000 workers or more, beginning in 1973

.....................................................................

8

A-6.
A-7.

By industry group and size, 1973 ..........................................................................................................
By affiliation o f unions involved, 1973 .................................................................................................

11
13

A-8.
A-9.
A -l 0.
A -l 1.
A -l 2.

By
By
By
By
By

size, 1973 ..........................................................................................................
contract status, 1973 ........................................................................................
major issue, 1973 ............................................................................................
..........................
major issue, 1973 ............................................................................................

13
14
16
17
18

A -l 3.
A -l 4.
A -l 5.
A -l 6.
A -l7.
A -l 8.

By major issue and size, 1973 .................................................................................................................
By industry, 1973 ......................................................................................................................................
By industry group and occupation, 1973 ............................................................................................
Government, by major issue and level, 1973 ........................................................................................
Government, and union participation b y major issue, 1 9 7 3 .............................................................
Government, by occupation and level, 1973 ........................................................................................

20
21
27
29
30
31

A -l 9.
A-20.

Government, by occupation and function, 1973 .................................................................................
In government, by State, affllliation and recognition, 1973 ............................................................

32
33

A-21.
A-22.

By standard Federal region, and State, 1973 ....................................................
By standard Federal region, State and occupation, 1973 ...................................................................

36
37

A-23.

In States having 25 stoppages or more by industry, 1973 ................................................................

40

A-24.

By State and metropolitan area, 1973

.................................................................................................

46

A -25.

By industry group and duration, 1973

.................................................................................................

48

A-26.

By duration and major issue, 1973 ........................................................................................................

50

A-27.

By duration and contract status, 1973

.................................................................................................

51

A-28,

Mediation o f, by contract status, 1973 .................................................................................................

52

A-29.

Settlement o f, b y contract status, 1973

...............................................................................................

53

A-30.
A -31.

Settlement o f, by major issue, 1973 ......................................................................................................
Settlement o f, b y industry group, 1973 ...............................................................................................

54
55

A-32.

Procedure for resolving unsettled issues in, by contract status, 1973 ..............................................

57

B. Scope, definition, and m e t h o d s ...................................................................................................................................

58




contract status and
industry group and
contract status and
major issue, 1973
industry group and

H ig h lig h t s
Reversing a 2-year trend, most measures o f strike
activity rose in 1973. There were 5,353 strikes and lock ­
outs or 343 more than in 1972 and 2.3 million workers
or .6 million more participating in strikes than in 1972.
Accordingly, the average size o f a stoppage increased
from 342 to 421 workers per strike over the 2 years.
Total idleness increased by about 3 percent, from 27.1
million days in 1972 to 27.9 million days in 1973. How­
ever, one key measure, the idleness rate, declined to 1.4
working days per thousand from 1.5 per thousand in 1972
as higher employment increased total available working
time in the year.
Work stoppage highlights o f 1973 were:
The parties to these disputes required about the
same time to settle their differences as in
1972— a mean average o f 24 days. Median
duration increased 1 day, to 9 days in 1973.
There was little difference in the number o f strikes
that lasted a month or longer— 1,221 in 1972
and 1,236 in 1973. However, the long stoppages
in 1973 were o f less importance because they
constituted only 17 percent o f all workers who
withheld their services and 63 percent o f total
idleness, compared with 27 percent o f worker’ s
affected and 78 percent o f idleness for the year
before.
Historically, about one-half o f all strikes occur
upon termination o f an agreement; 1973 was
no exception. These disputes were responsible
for 83 percent o f total idleness— the same as
in 1972. In these stoppages, 68 percent o f idle­
ness occurred over wage changes. Disputes over
econom ic conditions caused more than onehalf o f the 1973 stoppages and nearly twothirds o f all days idle.




The 0.14 percent overall idleness rate reflected
wide variation among industries and divisions.
Idleness as a percent o f total working time ex­
ceeded 1 percent in two manufacturing in­
dustries— petroleum and rubber. A t the other
end o f the manufacturing scale were leather at
a 0.03 percent rate, and textiles and printing at
a 0.10 percent rate. In nonmanufacturing, the
highest rate (0 .5 5 ) occurred in mining which
had one-fifth o f all stoppages. More than 40
percent o f the idleness in 1973 took place
during June, July, September, and November.
After leading all States in idleness for the 2
previous years, New York ranked 6th in 1973,
with 1.6 million days away from work. Penn­
sylvania had more days o f idleness (3 million)
than any other State. California and Ohio each
experienced
idleness.

more

than

2

million

days o f

Philadelphia ranked first among metropolitan areas
with 1.7 million days o f idleness. One-third o f
this idleness resulted from a 2-month Philadel­
phia teachers’ strike. Other metropolitan areas
which experienced more than 1 million days
away from the jo b included: Detroit, Los
Angeles, and New York.
Although the number o f stoppages with 10,000
workers or more increased from 18 in 1972 to
25 in 1973, idleness resulting from these walk­
outs declined by about 1.4 million days away
from work over these 2 years.
Heavily industrialized Region V, which included
3 o f the 5 States having the greatest strike
related idleness (O hio, Michigan, and Illinois),
led all other regions with 8.1 million days
o f f the jo b in 1973.

Month

1971

1972

1973

...................

298

250

317

First q u a r te r ...................
January ......................
February ...................
March ........................

78
30
19
29

44
14
12
18

44
15
14
15

Second q u a r t e r ...............
April ..........................
M a y .............................
June ..........................

100
30
39
31

100
33
26
41

104
35
33
36

Total

Month

1971

1972

1973

Third quarter ..............
J u ly ..........................
August ...................
September..............

73
27
23
23

69
21
27
21

101
38
31
32

Fourth q u a r t e r ............
October .................
Novem ber..............
December . . . . . . .

47
21
16
10

37
81
15
4

68
30
24
14

1972

1973

Continued

Table 2. Percent of stoppages and idleness by contract status, 1971-73
1972

19711

1973

19711

Contract status
Stoppages

All stoppages ..................................................
Negotiation of first agreement or union
recognition ................................................................
Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening) ...........................................................
During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved) ...............................
Other ............................................................................
Insufficient information to classify........................

1

Days idle

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

12.8

13.4

12.2

4.7

7.4

9.7

51.3

43.5

50.8

89.4

83.0

82.6

33.1
1.6
1.3

39.8
2.6
.7

33.9
1.3
1.9

5.6
.1
.2

8.7
.6
.2

6.8
.1
.8

Revised.

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Table 3. Percent of idleness by major issue, 1970-73
Percent of days idle
Major issue
1970

All issues .........................................................
Economic1 ..................................................................
Other contractual m atters........................................
Union organization and s e c u rity .............................
Job security...................................................................
Plant administration ..................................................
Other working c o n d itio n s ........................................
Intra-or interunion m a tte rs ......................................

Includes wage changes, supplementary
adjustments, and hours of work.




... ... . 1MQ...
56.9
27.6
9.2
.6
2.6
.6
2.4

benefits, wage

1971

100.0
73.8
10.6
7.0
2.1
5.1
.6
.7

1972

... .. . m s
66.5
5.7
8.4
4.6
12.7
.8
1.2

1973

____ _.100,0..
65.1
2.3
12.1
8.7
9.9
.6
1.3

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Table 4. Work stoppages by mean and median duration, days idle per worker, and number
of prolonged strikes, 1954-73
All stoppages ending during year
Year

Mean

Median
duration

duration

Days idle
per w orker

N um ber of
prolonged strikes1

19 5 4 ....................................... . ........................................

22.5

6

14.7

19 5 5 ...................................................................................

18.5

8

10.7

137

1 9 5 6 ...................................................................................
1957 ...................................................................................

18.9

8

17.4

132

19.2

8

11 .4

124

19 5 8 ...................................................................................

19.7

8

13 3

1 9 5 9 ...................................................................................

2 4 .6

10

11.6
36.7

221

1 9 6 0 ...................................................................................

23 .4

10

14.5

201

1961

...................................................................................

23.7

9

11.2

19 6 2 ...................................................................................

2 4 .6

9

191
224

172

1 9 6 3 ...................................................................................

2 3 .0

8

15.0
17.1

1 9 6 4 ...................................................................................

2 2 .9

8

14 .0

189

1 965 ...................................................................................

2 5 .0

9

15.1

221

1 9 6 6 ...................................................................................

2 2 .2

9

22 .8

9

12.9
14.7

210

1967 ...................................................................................
1 9 6 8 ...................................................................................

24.5

10

18.5

19 6 9 ...................................................................................

22 .5

10

17 .3

261
274

1 9 7 0 ...................................................................................
1971 ...................................................................................

2 5 .0

11

20:1

334

2 7 .0

11

14.5

37 5

19 7 2 ...................................................................................

2 4 .0

8

15.8

313

1 9 7 3 ...................................................................................

2 4 .0

9

12.4

309

203

232

Extending 90 days or longer.

Table 5. Unresolved issues in work stoppages, 1973
(Workers and days idle in thousands)
Workers involved

Stoppages

Days idle

Issues

Total stoppages
covered 1 ......................
Wages and hours .....................
Fringe benefits..........................
Union o rg an izatio n .................
Working con dition s............
Interunion ..................................
Combinations............................
O th e rs ........................................

Percent

Number

Percent

504

100.0

260.1

100.0

2,368.2

100.0

40
5
38
217
135
60

7.9
1.0
7.5
43.1
26.8
11.9
1.8

36.5
1.8
5.4
103.1
18.8
54.8
40.3

14.0
.7
2.1
39.6
7.2
21.0
15.5

230.2
13.3
46.2
602.9
58.0
889.3
528.3

9.7
.6
1.9
25.5
2.5

9

Excludes stoppages which have no information on issues
unsettled or no agreement for issues remaining.




Number

Percent

Number

37.6
22.3

NOTE: Becasue of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Appendix A. Tables

W ork stoppages
Year

W ork ers in v o lv e d 2

Duration
Num ber
Mean 3

Median

1927
1928
1929
1930

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

707
604
921
637

26. 5
27. 6
22. 6
22. 3

3
( 5)
(*)
( fi)

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------............................................................
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

810
841
1, 695
1, 856
2, 014

18. 8
19. 6
16.9
19.5
23. 8

(
(
(
(
(

1936 -------------------------------------------------1937 -------------------------------------------------1938 --------------------------------------------------1939 --------------------------------------- ----------1940 --------------------------------------------------

2,
4,
2,
2,
2,

172
740
772
613
508

-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1945 ---------------------------------------------------

4,
2,
3,
4,
4,

1946 -------------------------------------------------1947 --------------------------------------------------1948 -------------------------------------------------1949 --------------------------------------------------1950 ............................................................
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955

Number
(thousands)

P ercen t
of
total
em ployed

Days of idlen ess during year
Number
(thou­
sands)

P e rce n t of
estim ated total
w orking tim e
total e c o n o m y 4

330
314
289
183

1. 4
1. 3

26, 200

1 .2
.8

5, 350
3, 320

5)
5)
5)
5)
5)

342
324
1, 170
1, 470
1, 120

1. 6
1. 8
6. 3

6 , 890
10 , 500

( 5)

16, 900

7. 2
5. 2

H

1 9 ,6 0 0

15, 500

( 5)
( 5)

23. 3
20. 3
23. 6
23. 4
2 0 .9

( 5)
( 5)
( 5)

789
1, 860
688

( 5S

1, 170
577

13,
2 8,
9,
17,
6,

900
400
150
800
700

( s)
( 5)

( 5)

3. 1
7. 2
2. 8
3. 5
1.7

2 88
968
752
956
750

18. 3
11.7
5. 0
5. 6
9. 9

( 5l)
( 5)
n
( 5)
( 5)

2, 360
840
1, 980
2 , 120
3, 470

6. 1
2. 0
4. 6
4. 8
8 .2

23,
4,
13,
8,
38,

000
180
500
720
000

.
.
.
.
.

4,
3,
3,
3,
4,

985
693
419
606
843

24.
25.
21.
22.

(
(
(
(

1 9 .2

8

4,
2,
1,
3,
2,

600
170
960
030
410

10.5
4. 7
4. 2
6. 7
5. 1

116,
34,
34,
50,
38,

600
100
500
800

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
5,
5,
3,
4,

737
117
091
468
320

17.4
19 . 6
20. 3
22. 5
18. 5

7
7
9
9

2 , 220

4. 5
7. 3
4. 7
3. 1
5 .2

22,
59,
28,
22,
2 8,

1956 ........................................................ —
1957 --------------------------------------------------1958 ...................................... ......................
1 9 5 9 --------------------------------------------------I960 --------------------------------------------------

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

825
673
694
708
333

18. 9
1 9 .2

7
8

1, 900
1, 390

19. 7
24. 6
23. 4

8

2 , 060

10
10

1, 880
1, 320

3 .6
2. 6
3 .9
3. 3
2 .4

1961
1962
1963
1964
1965

--------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------- --------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

367
614
362
655
963

23.7
24. 6
2 3 .0
22. 9
25. 0

9
9
8
8
9

1, 450
1, 230
941
1, 640
1, 550

1966
1967
1968
1969
1970

_________________________________
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
4,
5,
5,
5,

405
595
045
700
716

22.2
22. 8
24. 5
22. 5
2 5.0

9
9
10
10
11

1.
2,
2,
2,
3,

5, 138
5, 010
5, 353

2 7.0
24. 0
24. 0

11

1941
1942
1943
1944

1971 -------------------------------------------------1972 .............................................................
1973 --------------------------------------------------

2
6
8

5

5)
5)
5)
5)

8

8

9

1 2 ,6 0 0

( 5)
( 5

5

M

5

( 5)
0 . 21

.0 8
23
04
10

P er
w ork er
involved
79. 5
4 0.2
18. 5
18. 1
20. 2

32.
14.
13.
13.

4
4
4
8

17. 6
15. 3
13. 3
15.2
11 . 6
9.
5.
6.
4.

8

0
8

07
31

1 1 .0

1. 04
.3 0
.2 8
. 44
. 33

25. 2
15.9
17. 4
16.7
16. 1

600
200

. 18
. 48
. 22
. 18
. 22

10.3
16. 7
11 . 8
14. 7
10. 7

33,
16,
23,
69,
19,

100
500
900
000
100

.2 4
. 12
. 18
.5 0
. 14

17. 4
11. 4
11 . 6
36. 7
14.5

2. 6
2 .2
1. 1
2 .7
2 .5

16,
18,
16,
22,
23,

300
600
100
900
300

.
.
.
.
.

11
13
11
15
15

11. 2
15.0
17. 1
14.0
15. 1

960
870
649
481
305

3 .0
4. 3
3 .8
3. 5
4. 7

25, 400
42, 100
49,018
42, 869
66, 414

. 15
.2 5
.2 8
. 24
. 37

12.9
14. 7
18. 5
17. 3
20. 1

3, 280
1, 714
2, 251

4. 6
2. 3
2 .9

47, 589
27, 066
27, 948

. 26
. 15
. 14

14.5
15. 8
12.4

3,
2,
1,
2,

540
400
530
650

000

900
100
300

1

1
The num ber of stoppages and w o rk e rs related to those stoppages fo r c e and of the total tim e w orked is found in " Total E conom y M easure
beginning in the year; average duration, to those ending in the ye a r.
of Strike Idleness" by Howard N. Fullerton, Monthly L a bor R eview .
Days of idlen ess include all* stoppages in e ffe ct.
V ol. 91, No. 10, Oct. 1968.
A vailable inform ation fo r e a r lie r p e rio d s appears in Handbook of
2 In these tables, w o rk e rs are counted m ore than once if they
Labor S tatistics, BLS Bulletin 1705 (1971), tables 144-149.
F or a
w ere involved in m ore than 1 stoppage during the ye a r.
discu ssion of the p roced u re s involved in the co lle ctio n and com pilation
3 F igures are sim ple averages; each stoppage is given weight r e ­
of w ork stoppage statistics, see BLS Handbook of M ethods fo r Survey
gardless o f its s ize .
and Studies, BLS Bulletin 1711 (1971), chapter 19.
A g ricu ltu ra l and
4 See table A -21 fo r idlen ess as a p ercen t of private n on a gricu lgovernm ent em ployees are included in the total em ployed.
An explana­
tural w orking tim e.
tion of the m easurem ent of idlen ess as a percentage of the total em ployed
5 Not available.




Beginning in month
Number

1972 -----------------------

In e ffe ct during month
Number

P ercent

Beginning in month
Number
(thousands)

In effect during month

P ercent

Number
(thousands)

Percent

Number
(thousands)

P ercent

P ercent of
estim ated
working
tim e

5,010

100. 0

8. 382

100. 0

1. 714

100. 0

3. 070

100. 0

27.066

100. 0

0. 15

427
419
421
498
541
491
404
485
444
395
357
158

8. 5
8. 4
8. 4
9 .9
10. 8
9 .8
8. 1
9. 7
8. 9
7 .9
6. 5
3. 2

643
675
727
759
860
818
706
790
733
665
595
411

7. 7
8. 1
8. 7
9. 1
10. 3
9 .8
8. 4
9. 4
8. 7
7 .9
7. 1
4 .9

79- 7
86. 0
162. 1
186.6
154. 6
311. 3
130. 0
167. 6
143. 2
172. 5
84. 6
35. 4

4. 7
5. 0
9. 5
10. 9
9- 0
18. 2
7. 6
9 .8
8. 4
10. 1
4 .9
2. 1

194. 5
182. 8
220. 4
257. 4
249. 0
412. 5
383. 6
269- 5
259. 6
276.8
202. 2
161.8

6. 3
6. 0
7. 2
8. 4
8. 1
13. 4
12. 5
8. 8
8. 5
9 .0
6 .6
5. 3

2, 530. 0
1,848. 5
1,830. 2
2, 257.6
2, 604. 0
3, 605. 6
3, 437. 2
2 ,8 3 9 -9
2, 402. 9
1, 342. 1
1, 350. 5
1, 017. 8

9. 3
6. 8
6. 8
8. 3
9 .6
13. 3
12. 7
10. 5
8. 9
5. 0
5. 0
3.8

. 17
. 13
. 11
. 15
. 16
. 22
. 23
. 17
. 16
•09
. 08
. 07

5. 353

100. 0

8. 873

100. 0

2. 251

100. 0

3. 321

100. 0

27, 948

100. 0

0. 14

382
349
461
465
536
530
509
498
541
523
350
209

7. 1
6. 5
8. 6
8. 7
10. 0
9. 9
9- 5
9. 3
10. 1
9 .8
6. 5
3. 9

543
560
703
728
837
864
860
864
883
885
671
475

6. 1
6. 3
7 .9
8. 2
9- 4
9- 7
9- 7
9. 7
10. 0
10. 0
7. 6
5. 4

6.
6.
6.
7.
8.
13.
9.
7.
11.
8.
10.
4.

216. 3
228.8
189- 7
205. 5
257. 2
395. 1
323. 7
307. 5
367. 6
297. 2
351. 1
181. 7

6.
6.
5.
6.
7.
11.
9.
9.
11.
8.
10.
5.

5.9
4. 8
4. 8
6. 6
9. 7
10. 4
10. 7
9. 2
10. 6
8. 9
10. 8
7. 6

. 10
•09
.08
. 11
. 16
. 18
■19
. 14
. 20
. 15
. 18
. 14

Jan u ary----------------------F e b r u a r y --------------------M a r c h ------------— —---- — '
'
A p r i l ------------------------- May —------------—
-----------June - — ——-------------- ---J u ly ----------------------------August -—-------------------S e p t e m b e r -------- — -----O ctober ---------------------N o v e m b e r----------------- —
D ecem ber -—--------------1973.............................

Percent

Days o f idlen ess

W orkers involved

Number o f stoppages
Month

January ---------------------Febru ary --------------------M arch -----------------------A p r i l ----------------- —-----—
M a y ---------------------------—
June—--------------------------J u ly ----------------------------A u g u s t -----------------------S e p t e m b e r -----------------O c t o b e r ----------------------N ov em b er------------------D e c e m b e r ----------------- —

NOTE: Because of rounding, sum s o f individual item s may not equal
totals.




151.
151.
143.
161.
184.
308.
208.
158.
268.
193.
230.
90.

4
1
7
7
2
4
1
1
9
9
3
9

7
7
4
2
2
7
2
0
9
6
2
0

5
9
7
2
7
9
7
3
1
9
6
5

1, 6591, 335.
1, 344.
1,831.
2, 7092, 902.
2, 995.
2, 571.
2, 953.
2, 484.
3, 025.
2, 135.

7
0
3
7
1
6
5
0
9
5
8
4

Number
Number of w ork ers

A ll
stoppages

1
day

2 .3
days

4 .6
days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

90 days
and over

60-89
days

Number of stoppages
--------------------------------------------

5,320

833

793

657

950

851

666

261

309

6 and under 20 --------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 ----------------------.-----------------------100 and under 2 50 ---------------------------------------------250 and under 500 ------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -----------------------------------------1,000 and under 5, 000 ------------------------------------5,000 and under 10,000 ---------------------------------10,000 and over ------------------------------------------------

A ll w ork ers

581
1,937
1,338
812
340
264
22
26

61
274
274
162
38
20
2
2

58
209
232
176
69
44
4
1

61
206
159
112
63
48
4
4

105
353
235
135
59
. 53
4
6

108
340
192
108
46
44
6
7

88
299
146
66
37
25
2
3

42
118
45
26
14
14

58
138
55
27
14
16

2

1

W orkers involved (in thousands)
A ll w ork ers ----------------------------------------------

2 ,2 4 7 .6

2 75 .5

2 87 .9

395 .2

491.1

4 1 6 .8

199.9

91.5

89 .8

6 and under 20 ------------------------------------------------- 20 and under 100 ---------------------------------------------100 and under 2 50 ------------------------------------------250 and under 500 -------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 ----------------------------------------1,000 and under 5, 000 ------------------------------------5,000 and under 10,000 ---------------------------------10, 000 and over -----------------------------------------------

7.1
100.3
218.1
280.7
235.2
537.4
139.4
729 .4

.8
15.0
4 5 .6
56.0
2 5 .8
33.7
12.6
86.0

.7
11.3
3 9 .0
6 0.6
4 9 .0
86.1
2 3 .5
17.7

.8
10.7
2 6 .5
4 0 .2
42 .1
93.0
24.1
157.8

1.3
17.8
3 7 .4
47.1
4 1.1
110.5
27.2
2 0 8 .6

1.3
17.6
3 0 .3
3 7 .4
32 .7
98.0
3 8 .4
161.0

1.1
15.2
2 3 .9
21.7
2 5 .8
49. 1
13.5
4 9 .6

.5
5 .8
6 .8
8.9
10.0
3 3 .5
2 6 .0

.7
6 .8
8 .6
8 .8
8.7
33.7
„
2 2 .6

Days of idle (in thousands)
A ll w orker s --------------------------------------------

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

2 75 .5

589.4

1 ,0 7 0 .4

2 ,9 7 1 .6

5 ,2 8 1 .5

5, 829.3

3 ,8 8 8 .1

7 ,2 8 1 .6

6 and under 20 --------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 ----------------------------------------------100 and under 2 50 -------------------------------------------250 and under 500 -------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -----------------------------------------1,000 and under 5,000 ------------------------------------5,000 and under 10,000 ---------------------------------10, 000 and over
--------------------------------------------

163.3
1 ,9 4 7 .1
2 ,7 7 5 .1
3 ,2 7 5 .2
2 ,9 7 1 .9
7 ,8 7 2 .8
1, 185.3
6 ,9 9 6 .5

.8
15.0
4 5 .6
56.0
2 5 .8
33.7
12.6
86.0

1.4
2 1 .5
77.3
119.2
96.4
174.9
4 5 .6
53.0

2 .9
3 8.3
89.4
130.2
139.9
280.2
65.9
3 23 .6

9 .5
128.5
259 .4
3 21 .5
264 .0
730.7
177.1
1 ,0 8 0 .9

18.8
254 .9
4 4 5 .8
542.1
4 6 3 .4
1 ,2 8 6 .1
3 8 3 .6
1 ,8 8 6 .9

3 2 .5
431 .7
688 .8
654.6
654. 6
1 ,3 3 2 .2
500.3
1 ,5 3 4 .6

2 6 .0
286.3
314.2
44 0 .8
526.7
1 ,3 5 2 .4

7 1.3
770 .9
854.8
1 ,0 1 0 .8
801.2
2 ,6 8 2 .6

941.7

1 ,0 8 9 .9

Number of stoppages (percen t)
A ll w ork ers --------------------------------------------6 and under 20 --------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 ---------------------------------------------100 and under 250 ------------------------------------------250 and under 500 ------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 ----------------------------------------1,000 and under 5,000 -------------- ---------------------5,000 and under 10,000 ---------------------------------10,000 and over -----------------------------------------------

100.0

15.7

14.9

12.3

17.9

16.0

12.5

4 .9

10.9
3 6 .4
25.2
15.3
6.4
5.0
.4
.5

1.1
5.2
5.2
3 .0
.7
.4
(*)
(2)

1.1
3 .9
4 .4
3 .3
1.3
.8
.1
(2)

1.1
3 .9
3 .0
2.1
1.2
.9
.1
.1

2 .0
6 .6
4 .4
2 .5
1.1
1.0
.1
.1

2 .0
6 .4
3 .6
2 .0
.9
.8
.1
.1

1.7
5 .6
2 .7
1.2
.7
.5
(1
2)
.1

,8
2 .2
.8
.5
.3
.3
_
(2)

5 .8
!

1.1
2 .6
1.0
.5
.3
.3
•
(2)

W orkers involved (percen t)
--------------------------------------------

100.0

12.3

12.8

17. 6

2 1 .8

18.5

8 .9

4 .1

4 .0

6 and under 20 ---------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 ----------------------------------------------------------------- '---------------------100 and under 250
250 and under 500 -------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 ------------------ ---------------------1,000 and under 5,000 ------------------------------------5,000 and under 10,000 -----------------------------------10,000 and over ------------------------------------------------

.3
4. 5
9.7
12.5
10.5
2 3 .9
6.2
3 2 .5

(2)
.7
2 .0
2 .5
1. 1
1.5
.6
3 .8

(2)
.5
1.7
2 .7
2 .2
3 .8
1.0
.8

(2)
.5
1.2
1 .8
1.9
4 .1
1.1
7 .0

.1
.8
1.7
2. 1
1.8
4 .9
1.2
9.3

.1
.8
1.3
1.7
1.5
4 .4
1.7
7 .2

(2)
.7
1.1
1.0
1.1
2.2
.6
2.2

(2)
.3
.3
.4
.4
1.5

(2)
.3
.4
.4
.4
1.5

1.2

1.0

A ll w ork ers

Days of idle (percen t)
--------------------------------------------

100.0

1.0

2.2

3 .9

10.9

19.4

2 1 .4

14.3

2 6 .8

6 and under 20 ------------------------------------------------20 and under 100 ---------------------------------------------100 and under 2 50 -------------------------------------------250 and under 500
t------------------------------------500 and under 1,000
------------------------------------1,000 and under 5,000 I ---------------------------------5,000 and under 10, 000t------------------------------------10, 000 and over --------- --------------------------------------

.6
7 .2
10.2
12.0
10.9
2 9 .0
4 .4
25 .7

(2)
.1
.2
.2
.1
.1
(2)
.3

(2)
.1
.3
.4
.4
.6
.2
.2

(2)
.1
.3
.5
.5
1.0
.2
1.2

(2)
.5
1.0
1.2
1.0
2 .7
.7
4 .0

.1
.9
1 .6
2 .0
1.7
4 .7
1.4
6.9

.1
1.6
2 .5
2 .4
2 .4
4 .9
1.8
5 .6

.1
1.1
1.2
1.6
1.9
5 .0
3 .5

.3
2 .8
3.1
3 .7
2 .9
9 .9

A ll w ork ers

1 Totals in this table d iffe r fro m those in preceding tables because
these stoppages ended during 1973, and thus included idleness occu rrin g
in p r io r y e a r s .
2 L ess than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.




NOTE:
iequal to ta ls.

Because

of rounding,

-

4 .0

sums o f individual item s m ay not

Days of idlen ess

W ork ers involved
Year

1927 ______________________________________________

Num ber

1928 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

j
5

1929 — _______ — __ __ _____ — _ ______
1930 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

1
1

1931 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1932 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1933 ----------------------------------------------------------------------I 9 3 4 ______________________________________________
I 9 3 5 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

8

1936 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 3 7 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1938 ----------------------------------------------------------------------I 9 3 9 ______________________________________________
1940 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 1 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1942 ---------------------------------------------------------------------I 9 4 3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------1944 ----------------------------------------------------------------------I 945 ---------------------------------------------------------------------1946 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1947 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1948 ---------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 4 9 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1950 .....................................................................................

6

122

7
17
18
9

140
429
725
516

37. 7
43 .2
36. 7
49. 3
46. 1

1,
5,
5,
7,
4,

169
528
39
572
57

26
2
8

4
29
6
10

16
42
31
15
20

18
22

1956
1957
1958
1959

12

1966 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 6 7 ______________________________________________
1968 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 6 9 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

1970 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 7 1 -------------------------------------------- -------------------------1972 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

26

13
21
20

17
14
16
7
18
21

1

P e rce n t of
total fo r
year

P e rce n t of
estim ated
total
w orking
tim e

37 .2
80. 0
3. 6
8. 1

0. 14
. 14
(*)
( 2)

954
337
199
488
523

28. 4
50. 8
30. 7
3 8 .2

.0 3
. 12
. 11
. 15
.0 8

21. 4
2 8 .4
5. 7
48. 9
9 .9

2, 893
9 , 110
171
5, 731
331

20. 8

1, 070
74
737
350
1, 350

45. 3
8. 8
37.2
16.5
38. 9

9, 344
245
9, 427
1, 259
19, 300

40. 6
5 .9
69. 8
14 .4
5 0.7

2 , 920

63. 6
47. 5
44. 5
63.2
30. 7

66 , 400

1, 030
870
1, 920
738
457
1. 690
650
437
1, 210

20. 6
47. 8

27. 1
28. 5
45. 6

758
283
823
845
384

39.
20.
40.
45.

601
318
102

607
387
600
1, 340
994

9
4
0
0

2 9 .2

32. 1
1 .9
32.2
4. 9

. 04
. 14
(2)
.0 9
( 2)
. 13
(2)
. 10
.0 1

. 24

17,
18,
34,
21,

900

5 7.2
51.2
55.3

900
700

56. 0

.
.
.
.
.

5,
36,
7,
7,
12,

680
900
270
520
300

24. 8
62 .6
25. 7
33. 3
4 3 .4

.
.
.
.
.

57
36
07
07

59.
18.
44.
73.
37.

.
.
.
.
.

17
26

700

19 , 600

6 9 .0

1
5
2
7
4

82
21
20

41
25

11

050
600
800
140

41. 4
25. 8
10 . 8
37. 0
2 5.0

4,
4,
3,
7,
6,

950
800
540
990
070

3 0 .4
25. 8

7,
21,
20,
17,
35,

290
400
514
853
440

28. 7
50. 7
41. 8
41. 6
5 3 .4

.0 5
. 15
. 12
. 10

23, 152
7, 499
6 , 062

4 8 .6
27. 7
21. 7

. 13
.0 4
. 03

2 9 .2

1, 653

30. 7
46. 5
37.5
2 6 .9
50. 0

29
18
25

1, 901
390
713

58. 0
22. 7
31. 7

688

9, 737
10,086
195
270

3,
10 ,
50,
7,

26
28
32
25
34

1 Includes id len ess in stoppages beginning in e a r lie r years,




Num ber
(in
thousands)

5 0 .0
43. 6
5. 2
16.4

19
35
28
18

1961
______ ____
___
— _____
1962 _____
1963 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1964 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1965 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

P e rce n t of
total fo r
y ear

165
137
15
30

1951 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1952 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1 9 5 3 ______________________________________________
1954 ----------------------------------------------------------------------1955 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Num ber
(in
thousands)

L e ss than 0.005 p ercen t.

2 2 .0
34. 8

2 6 .0

10

45
06

. 04
. 04
.0 3
. 06
. 05

.2 0

Beginning
date

A p prox­
imate
duration
(calendar
days)1

E stab lish m en t s)
and l o c a t i o n s )

Union(s)
involved2

A p prox­
imate
number of
w ork ers
involved3

M ajor term s o f settlem ent4

City, county and
sch o o l board.
Milwaukee, W is.

State, county
and m unicipal
em ployees

12, 000

25V2-month agreem ent negotiated M arch 20, 1973, provided: 3 -percen t
wage in crea se re tro a ctiv e to D ecem ber 4, 1972, and 3 percen t January 1974;
m inim um 2 p ercen t c o s t -o f-liv in g adjustm ent in July 1974; fu ll-d a y Good
F riday (was half day); and im provem en ts in life and health insurance.

51

Philadelphia School
Board,
Philadelphia, Pa.

A m erican F e d ­
eration of
T ea ch ers

16, 000

7 w eek strike ended with a 4 -y e a r agreem ent negotiated Feb. 27, 1973,
w hich provided fo r 4 p ercen t salary in cre a se (7 p e rce n t fo r te a ch e rs with
11 years of s e r v ic e ) each con tract year, plus $100 in cre a se in increm ent
teach ers r e ce iv e d after fir s t 10 years of s e r v ic e ; 35 pupil m axim um cla s s
s ize in 1975 (was 33); 45 minute daily preparation p e rio d fo r high sch ool
teach ers.

Jan. 10,
1973

16

Board of Education,
Chicago, 111.

A m erica n F e d ­
eration of
T ea ch ers

23, 000

Agreem ent p rovid ed a 2. 5 -p ercen t wage in cre a s e ; a lso reduced sch o o l year
to 39 weeks (fr o m 40) with no lo s s in pay; other benefits w e re a ls o included.

Jan. 31,
1973

5

B oard of Education,
Cleveland, Ohio.

A m erican F e d ­
eration of
T ea ch ers

12, 000

1 - y e a r con tract w hich p rovid es fo r num erous adjustm ents in w orking
conditions, evening-out of vacation schedules and set a lim it of 23 hours
overtim e fo r nonacadem ic e m p loyees.
No salary in cre a se .

Penn Central R a il­
road C o .,
N ortheastern States

United T r a n s ­
portation
Union

73, 000

Strike o c cu rre d when Penn Central issu ed a rule reducing the b a s ic train
crew , through attrition, fro m 3 men to 2 and ended when s trik e rs w ere
o rd e re d back to w ork fo r 90 days by con gre ssio n a l legislation . On May 25,
1973, Penn Central o ffic ia ls postponed indefinitely the reduction in crew
size .

New J e rse y B ell C o .,
Intrastate

International
B rotherhood
of E le ctrica l
W orkers

13,000

P ro te s t against a new com pany p o lic y perm itting cu stom ers to d isconnect
their own phones when they m ove.
Union contended that the p o lic y would
take w ork fro m in stallers and could also prove dangerous to cu sto m e rs.
Com pany p r a c tic e was continued.

Jan. 4,
1973

7

Jan. 8,
1973

Feb. 8,
1973

M ar. 2,
1973

1

M ar. 5,
1973

14

Bitum inous Coal C os.
W est Virginia
(M cD ow ell and
W yom ing Counties)

United Mine
W orkers
(Ind. )

14, 500

P ro te st o ver shift rotation p o lic ie s at s e le cte d U. S. Steel C orp. M ines.
Roving pickets c lo s e d other m ines in the area.
O perations resum ed after
com pany agreed to m eet on pro b le m s with UNW president.

May 1,
1973

22

Building C on tractors
A sso cia tio n of
New J ersey
Intrastate

United B ro th e r­
hood of C a r­
pen ters, and
Join ers; L a ­
b o r e r s ' Inter­
national Union
o f North
A m e rica ;
B rick la y e rs,
M asons and
P la s te r e r s '
International
Union of
A m e rica

15, 000

CJA— d e fe rre d in cre a se of 26 cen ts, e ffe ctive N ovem ber 1, 1973, approved
by the C onstruction Industry Stabilization Com m ittee O ctober 13, 1973; 2 year agreem ent a lso provided: 43 cents an hour in cre a se May 1, 1973, and
47 cents an hour May 1, 1974; CISC maintained ju risd ictio n o ver the 1974
in c re a s e s.

M ay 1,
1973

22

Building C on tractors
A sso cia tio n of
New J e rse y
Intrastate

United B r o th e r ­
hood of C a r ­
penters and
Join ers; L a ­
b o r e r s ' Inter­
national Union
of North
A m e rica ;
B r ick la y e rs,
M asons and
P la s t e r e r s '
International
Union of
A m e rica

15, 000

LIUNA— 2 -y e a r agreem ent provided 35 cents an hour in crea se May 1,
and 35 cents an hour in crea se on May 1, 1974.
BMP— Settlement term s not available.

May 8,
1973

24

B. F, G oodrich Co.
Interstate

Rubber, Cork,
Linoleum
and P la stic
W orkers of
A m e rica ;
United

10, 600

3 -y e a r con tract negotiated June 1973, provided 2 8 .8 cents in cre a se on July
1973; 25 cents on July 1974, and 24 cents June 31, 1975; 11 .8 cents night
differen tial (was 8, 8), e ffe ctive July 1974; 4 -c e n t-a n -h o u r in cre a se in c o m ­
pany contribution to Unem ployment Benefit Fund— w ill guarantee 80 percen t
of g ro ss pay fo r up to 4 y ears after layoff.

June 1,
1973

5

C onstruction C on­
tra cto rs A s s o c ia ­
tions
Chicago, 111.

L a b o re rs '
International
Union of
North
A m e rica

100, 000

2 - y e a r agreem ent approved by the Construction Industry Stabilization
C om m ittee Septem ber 13, 1973, provided 40 cents an hour in cre a se on
June 1, 1973,iand June 1, 1974; 20 cents D ecem ber 1, 1974.

June 1,
1973

63

A ssociated G eneral
C on tractors of
A m e rica , Inc.
(Heavy and H igh­
way, Building and
Utility)
O regon and South­
w estern Washington

International
Union of
Operating
Engineers

15, 000

3 -y e a r agreem ent with pay in cre a s e of 75 cents e ffe ctiv e June 1, 1973,
and 75 cents June 1, 1974; im p roved pensions, vacation pay, in crea sed
m ost travel zone pay; and added a Training Trust Plan.

See footnotes at end of table.




1973,

Beginning
date

A p prox­
imate
duration
(calendar
d ays)1

Establishm ent(s)
and loca tion (s)

Union(s)
involved2

A p prox­
imate
number of
w ork ers
involved3

M ajor term s of settlem ent4

June 12,
1973

4

G eneral E le ctric
Company
Appliance Park,
L ou isville, Ky.

International
Union of
E lectrical,,
Radio and
M achine
W orkers

15, 800

Strike, which resulted fr o m a grievance involving a pay rate dispute of 1
em ployee and the suspension of 2 other em ployees fo r fighting.
The e m ­
p loyees returned to w ork voluntarily.

June 20,
1973

3

F ireston e T ire and
Rubber Co.
Nationwide

Rubber, Cork,
Linoleum and
P la stic
W orkers of
A m e rica ;
United

17, 700

T e rm s are sim ila r to B. F. G oodrich Co.

July 16,
1973

19

G row er Shipper V e g ­
etable A sso cia tio n
of Central C a lifo r ­
nia
Salinas Valley,
C alif.

International
B rotherhood
of T e a m ste rs,
Chauffeurs,
W arehouse­
men and
H elpers of
A m e rica
(In d.)

18, 700

3 -y e a r agreem ent with a pay in crea se of $ 1 .1 0 an hour over a 3 -y e a r
p eriod — 40 cents in 1973 and 35 cents in each of the next 2 y e a rs.
B efore
the in crea se d r iv e r -s titc h e r s w ere paid $4 .6 5 an hour, d riv e rs and fo ld e rs
$4. 25.

July 19,
1973

4

C aliforn ia P r o c ­
e s s o r s , Inc.
N orthern C alifornia

International
Brotherhood
of T ea m sters,
Chauffeurs,
W arehouse­
m en and
H elpers of
A m e rica
(In d.)

30, 000

3 -y e a r agreem ent negotiated July 1973 with approxim ately 2 7 N orthern C a li­
forn ia firm s provided:
13 to 35 cents in cre a se effe ctiv e July 1, 1973;
20 to 25 cents effective July 1, 1974, and 20 to 35 cents July 1, 1975;
overtim e after 40 hours w eekly (was after 48 hours only during 2 annual
10-w eek p e r io d s ); vision care fo r fu ll-tim e w ork ers, and dental care and
paid d ru g -p re scrip tio n plan extended to p a rt-tim e w o rk e rs.

Aug. 13.
1973

9

A sso cia te d G eneral
C on tractors of
A m e rica , Inc.
O regon and South­
w estern Washington

United B r o th e r ­
hood of
Joiners and
L a b o re rs '
International
Union of North
A m e rica

13, 600

CJA— 3 -y e a r agreem ent p rovided 40 cents in cre a se e ffective June 1, 1973,
and 75 cents effective June 1, 1974.
LIUNA— 2 -y e a r contract which provided s im ila r wage in cre a se s as the
carpen ters.

Board of Education
of the School
D istrict of the City
of D etroit
D etroit, M ich.

A m erican F e d ­
eration of
T ea ch ers

12, 600

A settlem ent was reached when the B oard of Education agreed to drop a
demand that the D etroit Federation of T e a ch e rs pay the $ 100, 000 -a-day
co st of keeping adm inistrative person n el in idle sch ools and the teachers
agreed to ca ll off an unfair labor p r a c tic e s action.
The substantive issu es
which caused the strike— wages and cla ss size— are to be submitted to
co m p u lso ry arbitration, and teacher accountability was to be made the sub­
je ct of a special panel appointed by the G overn or.

C h ry sler Corporation
Interstate

International
Union,
United, A u to­
m o b ile , A e r o ­
space, and
A g ricu ltu ra l
Im plem ent
W orkers of
A m e rica
(In d .)

111,400

3 -y e a r agreem ent with a wage in cre a se of 3 p e rce n t in each year of the
contract, plus an additional 12 cents an hour in the fir s t year raising the
b a s ic wage of an assem bly line w ork er fro m $ 4 .4 8 to $4. 73 an hour in the
fir s t year of the contract, and im provem ents in pension plan.

International H ar­
veste r Co.
Interstate

International
Union, United
A utom obile,
A e ro s p a ce and
A gricu ltu ra l
Im plem ent
W ork ers of
A m e rica ;
International
A sso cia tio n of
M achinists
and A e r o ­
space
W orkers

40, 400

3 -y e a r agreem ent provided 3 p ercen t annual in cre a se plus 12 cents e f fe c ­
tive Oct. 1, 1973; and 3 -p e rce n t annual im provem en t fa cto r in crea se e f f e c ­
tive O ctober 1, 1973; and 3 -p ercen t annual im provem ent fa cto r in crea se
effective both O ctober 7 ,1974, and O ctober 6, 1975; 35 of current 40 cents
c o s t -o f-liv in g allow ance in corp ora ted into base rates after the initial wage
in crea se and clause re v ise d to provide quarterly adjustm ents of 1 cent an
hour fo r each 0. 3 point m ovem ent in the BLS—
CPI.
Retirem ent e legib ility
p rovision s and benefits lib e ra liz e d ; im proved dental plan.

Sept. 4,
1973

44

settlem ent listed above.

Sept. 14,
1973

9

O ct. 18,
1973

17

Nov. 5,
1973

7

A sso cia te d U nder­
ground C on tractors
Inc.
B loom F ield H ills,
M ich.

L a b o r e rs ' Inter­
national Union
of North
A m e rica

30, 000

3 -y e a r contract providing:
wage in cre a se s of between 25 to 50 cents in
the fir s t year effective N ovem ber 12, 1973, sam e wage in crea se fo r the
second year; im provem ents w ere m ade in vacation and holiday benefits.

Nov. 5,
1973

7

League of Voluntary
H ospitals and
H om es of New
York
New Y ork City

Retail, W hole­
sale and D e ­
partm ent
Store Union

30, 000

Strike called when cost of living council failed to approve 7. 5 p ercent in ­
c r e a s e granted to hospital w ork ers under a State arbitration award in July
1973.
Strike was settled when the union accepted a wage hike of 6 percent.

See footnotes at end of table.




Beginning
date

Nov. 5,
1973

A p prox­
imate
duration
(calendar
days)1
44

Establishm ent(s)
and lo ca tion (s)

Union(s)
involved2

A p prox­
imate
num ber of
w ork ers
involved3

M ajor term s of settlem ent4

T ra n s-W o rld A i r ­
lines
Interstate

T ran sp ort
W orkers
Union of
A m e rica

21, 000

3 -year agreem ent negotiated D ecem ber 1973 provided: 5 .5 p ercen t wage in ­
cr e a s e re tro a ctive to August 1, 1972, 1.5 p e rce n t effe ctiv e D ecem ber 1,
1973, and 3 p ercen t e ffective O ctober 1974 and A p r i l >1, 1975; and im ­
proved! m edica l and life insurance.

Nov. 15,
1973

*19

C a terpilla r T r a c to r
Co. .
Interstate

International
Union, United
Autom obile,
A e ro sp a ce and
A gricultu ra l
Im plem ent
W orkers of
A m e rica .

36, 000

3 -year agreem ent provided 3 p e rce n t in crea se plus 4 cents e ffective O c t o ­
ber 1, 1973, contract a lso included 3 -p e rce n t Iannual im provem en t fa ctor
in crea se in both 1974 and 1975; and esca la to r clause revised .

D ec. 3,
1973

634

Food E m ployers
Council Inc. Super
Market, Chain
Stores
Southern C aliforn ia

MCBW, LAM,
IUOE and
IB T - (Ind. )

17, 700

3 -y e a r contract p rovided annual wage in cre a se of 30 cents fo r butchers and
head m eatcutters and 27, 25, and 25 cents fo r w eighers and w rappers and
de lica te sse n cle rk s, and fo r continuation of sem iannual c o s t -o f-liv in g a d ­
justm ents. Other term s included in cre a se in financing fo r pension im p ro v e ­
m ents; im proved m ed ica l and dental ben efits; and adoption o f a factfinding
pro ce d u re in c a se s w here the p arties are unable to agree on operational
changes.
The con tract fo r the 7, 000 team sters provided fo r s u c c e s s iv e
annual wage in cre a s e s of 35, 30 and 30 cents fo r hourly paid d riv e rs and
w arehouse w o rk e rs.

D ec. 3,
1973

18

Food E m ployers
Council Inc. Super
M arket, Chain
Stores
N orthern C alifornia

17, 300

3 -y e a r contract provided 30. 5 cents
raised by 33 and 35 cents in the
adjustm ents w ill be made each May
in cre a se fo r each May adjustm ent

1 Includes nonworkdays such as Saturdays, Sundays and established
holidays.
2 The unions listed are those d ire ctly involved in the dispute, but
the num ber of w ork ers involved m ay include m em bers of other unions
or nonunion w ork ers idled by disputes in the sam e establishm ents. The
unions are affiliated with the A F L -C IO , except w here they are noted
as independent (Ind. ).
3 The num ber of w ork ers involved is the m axim um m ade idle fo r
1 shift or longer in establishm ents d ir e ctly involved in a stoppage.




effe ctiv e on Nov. 1, 1973, and w ill be
follow ing 2 ye a rs.
F ive c o s t -o f-liv in g
and N ovem ber with a 3 -point m inim um
and no m inim um fo r N ovem ber.

This figu re does not m easure the in d irect o r secondary e ffe c t on other
establishm ents o r industries w hose em ployees are made idle as a result
of m aterial o r s e r v ic e shortage.
4 Adopted la rg e ly fro m Current Wage D evelopm ents, a monthly
su bscrip tion publication of the Bureau of L abor Statistics.
5 A ll plants except 1 settled on N ovem ber 25.
6 Strike was still in p r o g r e s s at end of ye a r; settled January 5,
1974.

Industry group

6-19
w ork ers

Total

100-249
w ork ers

20-99
w ork ers

,1 10,000
1,000-4,999 5,000-9,999 I w ork ers
w o rk e rs
w ork ers |and over

500-999
w ork ers

250-499
w ork ers

Number of stopp ages
A ll industries ------------------------------------------

1 5.353

Manufacturing --------------------------------------------

' 2.2 8 2

583

1.934

1.354

817

348

271

21

25

189

855

602

313

163

145

7

8

18
6

1
64
18

1
61
.
14

24
3

2
12
3

2
6
2

.
-

1
-

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------Food and kindred products ----------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures ------------------------------------T extile m ill products --------------------------------------

5
186
•
46

A pparel, e tc. 2 ------------------------------------------------Lumber and wood produ cts, except
furniture --------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res ------------------------------------Paper and allied products ------------------------------

45

5

16

14

5

2

3

•

65
82
98

9
8
1

21
29
31

18
30
38

8
9
17

7
5
9

2
1
2

-

-

Printing, publishing and allied in d u s tr ie s -----C hem icals and allied products ----------------------P etroleum refining and related in d u strie s-------

83
132
15

17
10
-

31
56
6

15
31
3

8
20
3

5
10
-

7
5
3

-

-

Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products --------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass p r o d u c t s ----------------------P rim a ry m etal in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------F abricated m etal products 3 -----------------------------

143
10
176
171
295

5
23
6
27

43
3
86
59
135

36
5
35
58
69

19
2
19
22
42

11
8
13
16

27
•
5
13
4

1

2
•
1

M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
supplies ---------------------------------------------------------Tran sportation equipment -------------------------------Instrum ents, e tc . 4 -----------------------------------------M iscellaneous manufacturing industries --------

323

24

131

80

48

21

16

1

2

173
160
35
43

17
5
5
3

55
40
11
19

32
45
7
10

34
17
6
7

18
18
3
2

14
31
3
2

2
3
-

1
1
-

7 52

-

_

Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------

1 , 072
3

394

1.079

504

185

126

14

17

A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s ------------Mining --------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction 5 ------------------------------------Tran sportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -------------------------W holesale and reta il trade
----------------------------

11
1,079
538

1
31
85

5
265
191

1
390
1131|

295
60

2
73
45

1
21
35

3
4

1
1
5

324
499

71
128

136
241

54
56

24
36

11
17

24
16

1
3

3
2

Finance, insurance, and re a l estate -------------S ervices
---------------------------------------------------------G overnm ent 6 -----------------------------------------------------

24
210
387

5
33
40

14
100
127

1
43
94

3
18
68

9
28

1
5
24

1
4

_
1
4

W orkers involved (in thousands)
A ll industries ------------------------------------------

2 .2 5 0 .7

7 .1

100.0

220. 6

282.3

242 .4

564.0

142.8

812.0

M anufacturing --------------------------------------------

963 .4

2 .4

45.2

97.3

105. 6

118.3

304. 5

4 1 .0

249.1

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------Food and kindred products -----------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures ------------------------------------Textile m ill products
------------------------------------

4 .4
69.5
—
9 .4

.2
10.3
2 .3

8.2
1.1

1.4
8 .0
2 .6

2 .8
9 .6

(7)

(7)
3.1
.
1.0

2 .3

-

A pparel, e tc. 2 -----------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood produ cts, except
furniture
-----------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res -----------------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------------

11.2

(7)

.8

2 .4

1.6

1.5

4 .8

-

•

16.8
14.7
2 3.9

.1
.1
(7)

1.1
1.6
1.9

3.1
4 .8
6. 3

2 .5
3 .0
5.7

5.2
3 .8
6.3

4 .7
1.4
3 .7

-

-

-

-

Printing, publishing, and allied industries —
C h em icals and allied products ----------------------Petroleum refining and related in d u stries-------

23.2
32.1
9.1

.2
. 1
•

1.3
2 .8
.3

2 .5
4 .8
.4

2 .3
6 .6
1.0

4. 1
6.9
“

12.8
10.9
7 .3

-

“

Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products ---------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y , and glass products ---------------------P rim a ry m etal industries ------------------------------F abricated m etal products 3 ----------------------------

102.3
2. 1
2 8 .5
56 .6
7 6.7

(7)
.3
(7)
.3

2.1
.2
4 .8
3. 1
6.9

6.0
1.1
5.2
9 .5
10.7

6 .4
.7
5.9
7 .2
14. 1

8.3
6.0
9 .4
10.3

51.1
•
6.3
27. 1
9 .0

6.7

28.3
18.7

167.0

.3

7.2

12.3

16 .6

15.7

3 3.2

5.1

76. 5

87.1
206.2
13.8
8.9

.2
(7)
(7)
(7)

2 .8
2.3
.5
1.0

5.4
7 .2
1.1
1.5

12.4
5.9
1.9
2 .4

13.0
12.2
2. 1
1.4

2 6.7
80.3
8.1
2 .5

10.8
18.4
•

15.8
7 9 .8

M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l -------------------------E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
supplies --------- ----------------------------------------------Tran sportation equipment
----------------------------Instrum ents, e tc . 4 ------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s --------See footnotes at end of table.




.2

-

_
30 .0
«
-

„

-

•

Industry group

Total

6-19
w ork ers

20-99
w ork ers

100-249
w ork ers

250-499
w ork ers

16,006

500-999
w ork ers

1,000-4,999 5 ,0 0 0 -9 ,9 9 9 w ork ers
w ork ers
w ork ers
and over

W orkers irlvolved (in thousands )-Continued
Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------

1,2 87.3

4. 8

A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s tr y , and fis h e r ie s -------Mining ---------------------------------------------------------Contract construction 5 -----------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s
------------------W holesale and retail trade -----------------------

23.2
301 .0
366 .9

(7)
.4

54. 8

123.3

176.7

124.2

2 59 .5

101.8

442 .3

67.4
17.4

104.9
19.4

1.5
4 8 .7
30. 8

2 .5
3 1.4
90.5

18.0
2 5 .0

18.7
14.5
173.6

6.5
10.9

8.4
8. 1

12.4

7 .0
10.4

4 9.2
34.3

5.0
2 3.4

107.0
3 4 .9

.6

.1
6.5
15.2

1.7

_
5.7
24.7

30 .0
63.6

.2

.2

1.0

15.7
9.3

192.7
136.0

.8
1.6

Finance, insurance, and real estate -------S ervices
--------------------------------------------------G overnment 6 ---------------------------------------------

3. 5
67.7
196.4

(7)
.4
.5

4. 6
7 .0

A ll industries ------------------------------------

2 7 ,9 4 8 .4

163. 1

1 ,8 7 2 .9

2 ,9 7 5 .2

3 ,3 2 3 .7

3 ,3 6 2 .1

9 ,3 4 5 .4

948 .8

6,

------------------------------------

1 4 ,3 1 8 .5

64.3

1,086. 6

1 ,9 7 9 .3

2 ,1 8 0 .3

2 ,1 6 5 .2

5 ,0 8 1 .8

229 .0

1 .5 3 2 .0

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------Food and kindred products -----------------------T ob a cco m anufactures ------------------------------T extile m ill products --------------------------------

1 ,0 0 7 .9

6.4

.5
60.7

1.9
213 .4

189.8

77 .3
114.4

142.5
324.3

-

268.0

2 .4

2 9.9

30.3

86.5

89.4

29. 6

-

8.8

1.0
6. 1
24. 1

m
6.5
19.2

8.0

4 2 .0

Days of idlen ess during year (in thousands)

Manufacturing

222.2

554.5

98.8

Apparel, etc. 1 ------------------------------------------2
Lumber and wood p rodu cts, except
furniture -------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures
----------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------

999.4

1.7

11.4

55.9

16.4

3. 6

910.2

-

-

248. 6
290 .9
410 .3

2.0
1.8
2.2

30. 1
3 0.9
4 9 .0

68.8

85. 1
113.7

37.2
43. 5
115.2

83.4
92.3
57.7

27.1
3 7.3
7 2.5

-

-

Printing, publishing, and allied industries
C hem icals and allied products -----------------Petroleum refining and related industries

281.1
501. 1
536.8

6.3
3. 8

69. 1
7 2 .6
3 .8

64.7
101.7
16.4

3 2.9
125.0
7 2 .6

10.9
129. 1

Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products --------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products -------------------Stone, cla y, and glass products --------------P rim ary m etal industries -------------------------Fabricated m etal products 3 ----------------------

1 ,7 4 3 .0
22.7
629.5
760. 5
1 ,2 3 9 .9

67. 8
5. 6
131.1
83.9
133.5

140.6

169.0

281.6

848.8

9 .6
1.4
5.9

66.2

133.1

169.4
256 .4
192.3

,0 0 6 .4

9.2

192.9

199.7

251 .4

221.6

1,2 3 4 .2
1 ,4 3 7 .9
278.3

4 .3

131.1
105.0
27.7
33.3

249. 5
84.9
7 0 .8
91.2

4 00 .4
205 .4
53.3
3 9 .3 .

1, 143.3

M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l -------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies --------------------------------------------------T ransportation equipment
----------------------Instrum ents, etc. 4 ------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries —

2

-

1.2

11.1

127.9
2 14 .4
2 3 6 .5

6.0

85.2
138.3
314 .9

-

_
106.3

m

97.2
68.8

.

444. 1

-

_

234 .0

_
130.1

_
_
9 3 .6

442.3

10.2

679.0

358 .8
522.8
116.0
2 1 .5

16.0
72.7
-

2 7 .6
398 .9

1, 196.9

4 ,2 6 3 .5

719 .8

4 ,4 2 5 .3

200.0

1.5

4 6 .4
4 6 .3
7 .9
13.3

------------------------------

1 3 ,6 2 9 .9

98.8

786.3

995.9

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ------Mining ---------------------------------------------------------Contract construction 5 -----------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s
.......................
W holesale and retail trade -----------------------

4 79 .0
865.4
3, 658 . 8

.1
1.6
8.2

7 .7
39.3
118.8

6.6
189.8

291.8

194.7

228.2

59.0
201 .9
2 6 7 .6

124.9
7 0 .8
1 ,2 4 9 .1

41.7
172.3

28 0 .6
2 8 .5
1 ,4 1 9 .8

3 ,2 9 6 . 5
2, 123.6

20 .5
50.0

169. 1
247.3

208.1
153.1

215.3
136.8

139.8
263. 1

1 ,7 3 7 . 6
512.3

69.1
176.7

737.0
584.3

Finance, insurance, and rea l estate ------S ervices .................................... ..........................
G overn m en t 6 ---------------------------------------------

80.2
822.5
2 ,3 0 3 .9

.9
10.2

15.5
120.7
67,9

9 .0
130.9
103.7

15.3
85.5
170.4

„
89 .6
175.9

3 9.5
171,5
357.8

34.2
2 25 .8

180.0
1, 195.1

Nonmanufacturing

2.0
2.6

7.2

1 The number of stoppages reported fo r a m a jo r industry group or
d ivision may not equal the sum of its com ponents because individual stop­
pages occu rrin g in 2 or m o re groups have been counted in each. The
m ajor industry group and division totals have been adjusted to elim inate
duplication.
W orkers involved and days idle have been allocated among
the resp ective groups.
2 Includes other finished products made fro m fa b rics and sim ilar
m a teria ls .
3 Excludes ordnance, m achinery, and transportation equipm ent.
4 Includes p rofessio n a l,
scie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;
photographic and optical goods; watches and c lo c k s .




-

-

5 "W ork Stoppages, 1973, Selected Final Tabulations" re v ise d .
This revision applies to all tables that contain industry data including
tables that apply only to governm ent w ork stoppages.
6 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical p u rp o se s, been
deem ed to fa ll within the Bureau's definition of a w ork stoppage.
This
does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage has taken
place in violation of any law or public p o licy .
7 F ew er than 100.
NOTE:
equal to ta ls.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums of individual item s m ay not

Days of idlen ess
during year

Stoppages beginning in year
W ork ers involved
A ffiliation
Numbe r

P ercen t

Number
(in
thousands)

P ercen t

Number
(in
thousands)

Total -----------------------------------------------------------

5, 353

100.0

2. 250. 7

100.0

27. 948. 4

A F L -C IO -------------------------------------------------------------U naffiliated unions ----------------------------------------------Single fir m unions ---------------------------------------------D ifferent affiliations 1 -----------------------------------------P ro fe s s io n a l and public
em ployee a ssocia tion s -------------------------------------No union or a ssocia tion involved -----------------------

2 , 988

2, 054
35
42

55. 8
38. 4
.7
.8

1, 276. 5
737.0
11.4
162. 6

56. 7
32. 7
.5
7.2

19, 360. 8
5, 897. 3
292. 8
1, 782.3

182
52

3 .4
1.0

60. 7
2 .5

2. 7
.1

P ercen t

590 .2
2 5 .0

1 Includes w ork stoppages involving unions o f differen t affiliations—
either 1 union o r m ore affiliated with AFL/-CIO and 1 unaffiliated union
o r m ore, or 2 unaffiliated unions or m o re .

NOTE:
equal totals,

Because

of rounding,

100.0

69.3
21 . 1

1.0
6 .4
2. 1

.1

sum s of individual item s m ay not

Table A-8. Work stoppages by contract status and size, 1973
Stoppages beginning in year
Contract status and s ize of stoppage
(Num ber of w ork ers involved)

w
Number

A ll stop p ages---------------------------------------------------

5,353

6 and under 2 0 ----------------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------------

583
1,934
1,354
817
348
271

100 and under 250-----------------------------------------------250 and under 500 ----------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 ---------- --------------------------------1,000 and under 5 ,0 0 0 ----------------------------------------5,000 and under 10,000 -------------------------------------10 , 000 and o v e r -------------------------------------------------N egotiation o f fir s t agreem ent o r
union r e c o g n it io n ---------------------------------------------6 and under 2 0 -----------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------100 and under 250------------------------------------------250 and under 500 -----------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -------------------------------------1,000 and under 5, 000 ---------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 000 --------------------------------10 , 000 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------Renegotiation of agreem ent
(expiration or reo p e n in g )--------------------------------6 and under 2 0 -----------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------100 and under 250------------------------------------------250 and under 500 -----------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -------------------------------------1 ,000 and under 5, 000 ---------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 000 --------------------------------10 , 000 and o v e r ----------------------------------------------

21

25
653
172
310
111

P ercen t

1 00 .0

10.9
36. 1
25.3
15.3
6 .5
5. 1
.4
.5
1 2. 2

3.2
5 .8
2. 1

41

.8
.2
.1

11
8

-

-

2, 717
237
1,037
689
359
187
174
13

5 0.8
4 .4
19.4
12.9
6 .7
3 .5
3.3

21

.4

1,812
131
502
533
400
148

33.9
2 .4
9 .4

.2

1

Days o f idlene 8 8 during year
( 3.11 Sto p p ^ s )

.

Numbe r
(in
thousands)

P ercen t

1 0 0 .0

2, 7948.4

10 0 .0

282.3
2 40 .8
553. 8
132. 5
713. 5

.3
4 .4
9 .8
12.5
10.7
2 4.6
5 .9
31 .7

163. 1
1 ,8 7 2 .9
2 ,9 7 5 .2
3 ,3 2 3 .7
3, 354 .0
9 ,3 0 0 .2
897 .3
6 ,0 6 2 .0

69.6
2 .0

3. 1
.1

13.9
16. 5
13. 7
7.4
16. 1

.6
.6

-

-

Numbe r
(in
thousands)

P ercen t

2,2 5 0 . 7
7. 1
10 0 .0
220. 6

1 ,4 8 2 .4
3. 1
54.5
109. 6
123.0
130. 2
377. 1
8 7 .8
597. 2

.7
.3
.7

65 .9
.1
2 .4
4 .9
5.5
5 .8
16.8

3 .9
2 6 .5

.6

6.7
10.6

11.9
12.0

33.3
3 .2
2 1 .7

2 , 708.9

9. 7
.3

80.4
504 .0
4 1 0 .9
484. 5
123.0
1 ,1 0 6 .2

1 .8

1.5
1.7
.4
4 .0

23, 089. 5
6 1.0
1,201. 5
2 , 290.2
2 ,4 5 0 .7
2, 794.3
7, 569. 7
802.3
5 ,9 1 9 .9

8 2 .6
.2

4. 3
8 .2
8 .8
10.0

27. 1
2 .9
21.2

During term of agreem ent (negotiation
6 and under 2 0 -------- ------- -------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 --------------------------------------------

100 and under 250 -----------------------------------------250 and under 500 -----------------------------------------500 and under 1 ,0 0 0 -------------------------------------1 ,0 0 0 and under 5, 000 ---------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 000 --------------------------------1 0 , 0 0 0 and o v e r ----------------------------------------------

86
8

4

No contract or other con tract sta tu s ----------------6 and under 2 0 -----------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 ------------------------------------------100 and under 250 -----------------------------------------250 and under 500 -----------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -------------------------------------1 ,0 0 0 and under 5, 000 ---------------------------------5, 000 and under 10,000 --------------------------------10 , 000 and o v e r ----------------------- ----------------------

68
22

No inform ation on con tract s t a t u s --------------------6 and under 2 0 -----------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------------------------------100 and under 250------------------------------------------250 and under 500------------------------------------------500 and under 1,000 -------------------------------------1 ,000 and under 5, 000 ---------------------------------5,000 and under 10, 000 --------------------------------10 , 000 and o v e r --------------------------------------------

103

1 L e s s than 0 .0 5 percent.




35
3
6

10.0

7 .5
2 .8
1 .6
.1
.1

1.3
.4
.7
.1
.1

2

_
21

50
18

o

678. 0
1 .6

27 .8
91.4
139. 8
101 . 8
154. 5
44. 7
116. 3
6. 1
.2

1. 5
.3
1.9
.
2. 2
_

-

-

1.9
.4
.9
.3

14. 6
.2
2 .4
2. 8
3 .8
1.4
4. 0

11
2
1

.

.2

_

_

-

“

-

30. 1
.1
1 .2

4. 1
6 .2

4 .5
6 .9
2 .0

5.2
.3
n
n

.i

.i
_
.i
_
.6

(*)
.1
.1
.2

.i
.2

_

-

NOTE: B ecause o f rounding,
equal totals. D ashes denote z e r o s .

1 ,9 0 8 .5
12.4
121 . 1
244. 6
355. 3
375. 9
562. 1
9 5.0
142. 1

6 .8

( l)
.4
.9
1.3
1.3
2 .0

.3
.5

2 8 .9
3. 7
8. 8
7 .8
6 .4
_

.1
(*)
(*)
( ’)
n

2 .2

( r)

-

-

212. 6
5. 6
37. 6
21.8
26. 8

60 .8
60.0

_
-

sums o f individual item s

.8

n

.i
.i
.i
.2
.2

_

m ay not

(W ork ers and days of idlen ess in thousands)
T otal
Industry group

Stoppages beginning
in year
Number

A ll industries •
-------------------- ---------------------M an u factu rin g----------------------------------------------

1 5. 353
1 2,

282

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

W orkers
involved

Negotiation o f fir s t agreem ent
o r union recogn ition
Stoppages beginning
Days of
idlen ess
in /■ear
during
Wo rkers
year (all
Number
involved
stoppages)

Renegotiation ot agreem ent
(expiration o r reopening)
Stoppages beginning
Days of
in year
idlen ess
during
W orkers
year (all
Number
! involved
stoppages)

2 . 250. 7

2 7 ,9 4 8 .4

653

69- 6

2 .7 0 8 .9

2. 725

1, 482. 4

23.089- 5

963. 4

14, 318. 5

289

36. 5

1, 920. 7

1, 535

692. 5

11. 498 .4

22 2 . 2
120 . 8

5
129
_

4. 2
61. 5
„
5. 2

220. 3
849. 3
.
72. 8

O rdnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c ts -------------------------------T ob a cco m a n u fa ctu rers------------------------------------Textile 'm ill p r o d u c t s -------- --------------------------------

5
186
_
46

4. 4
69. 5
_
9- 4

A pparel, etc. 2 -------- --------------------------------- -------Lum ber and wood produ cts, except fu rniture—
Furniture and fixtures -------------------------------------Paper and allied products — --------- —--------- —

45
65
82
98

11 . 2
16. 8

Printing, publishing, and allied in d u s trie s -----C h em icals and allied p r o d u c ts -------------------------P etroleu m refining and related industries —

83
132
15

Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics products —
Leather and leather products ------------------------ —
Stone, cla y, and glass p r o d u c t s ----------------------P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s --------------------------------F a bricated m etal produ cts 4 -----------------------------

143

1 ,0 0 7 .9
_
268. 0

33
_
14

3. 6
_

1. 1

6

9
9

14. 7
23. 9

999.
248.
290.
410.

9
3

6
8

1. 4
.7
1. 5

23. 2
32. 1
9- 1

281. 1
501. 1
536. 8

20
12
1

1. 5
.7
(3)

21

3. 3
.3
l. 5

14
32

1 .8

2. 5

112. 7
6. 6
31. 7
48. 7
1 20 . 2

1 .6

21

4
2
1

18
40

5. 6
9-8

66

10 . 2

1

73

19- 1

52. 5
199-9
248. 3
375. 4

44. 8
26. 9
.6

55
107
13

19- 6
25. 3
8 .9

229- 2
451. 3
536. 0

106
5
124
213

90. 0
1. 1
21. 3
29. 0
62.9

1 ,6 0 1 .4
13. 7
578. 1
628.3
1, 065. 8
1, 787, 4

927.
17.
15.
26.

176
171
295

102.
2.
28.
56.
76.

7

1, 743. 0
22. 7
629- 5
760. 5
1, 239.9

M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l -------------- -----------E le c tr ic a l machinery* equipment, and
supplies —----------------------- ---------------------------- -—
T ran sportation equipm ent--------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 5 -------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries —-------

323

167. 0

2, 006. 4

41

4. 6

104. 7

203

130. 0

173
160
35
43

87. 1
206. 2
13. 8
8 .9

1, 234. 2
1, 437.9
278. 3
2 00 . 0

15
24
3
4

1.9
8. 1
( 3)
.5

68. 8

95. 4
1.9
42. 8

94
90
28
35

29- 7
140. 7
11. 7
6. 7

Nonmanufacturing — -------------------------------------

1 3, 072

1, 287. 3

13, 629- 9

364

33. 1

788. 2

1, 190

789.9

11 . 591. 1

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s — ----------Mining —------------------------------------------------------------Contract con stru ction ---------------------------------------Tran sportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W holesale and retail trade -------------------------------

11

479. 0
865. 4
3, 658.8

1

3
28

( 3)
.3
3. 6

31. 6
24. 4
41. 2

8

1,079
538

23. 2
301. 0
366. 9

28
284

22. 4
5.9
325. 3

446. 4
286. 6
3, 267 .4

324
499

192. 7
136. 0

3, 296. 5
2, 123. 6

63
124

4. 5
5. 7

129- 6
225. 6

191
315

87. 9
122 . 9

3, 013. 4
1,808. 1

24

3. 5
67. 7
196. 4

80. 2
822. 5
2, 303. 9

5
67
73

.5
4. 7
13. 8

15. 1
172. 8
147. 9

17
107
240

2.9
55. 1
167. 5

62. 5
603. 9
2, 102. 7

F inan ce, insurance, and rea l e s t a t e ---------------S e r v i c e s ----------------------------------- :-------------------------G overnm ent 6 ----------- ---- -------------- ------------- — -----See footnotes at end o f table.




10

210

387

3

4

_
108. 3

1

5
6

3
20

110

971. 1
1 , 1 98 .8

265. 3
153. 5

(W ork ers and days of idlen ess in thousands)

Industry group

During te rm o f agi•eement
(negotiation of new a greem ent
not involved
Stoppages beginning
Days of
in year
idlen ess
during
W orkers
Number
year (all
involved
stoppages)

No contract o r o ther
contract statxis
Stoppages beginning
in year
Number

Wo rkers
involved

No inform ation on
contract status

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in year
Number

W orkers
involved

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

A ll industries ------------------------------------------

1,812

678. 0

1 ,9 0 8 .5

68

6. 1

28. 9

103

14. 6

212. 6

M a n u factu rin g-----------------------------------------------

402

228. 4

798. 1

15

1. 1

4. 2

46

4 .9

97. 1

O rdnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c t s -------------------------------T ob a cco m a n u fa c tu r e s -------------------------------------T extile m ill products — -------------------------------------

1

19
5

.2
4. 1
1. 5

1. 9
36. 7
23.9

2

.1
( 3)

.4
( 3)

3
_
5

.1
-

1

1. 0

.7
_
63. 0

A pparel, e t c . 2 ____—— — —_____ _______ __ ____
Lum ber and wood products, except furniture —
Furniture and f i x t u r e s -------- — -------------------------Paper and allied p r o d u c ts ----------------------— -------

13
9
15

3.8
5. 5
3.8
3. 1

17. 5
25. 8
26. 7

1
2

( 3)
( 3)

(3)
.3
_

6
1
1
2

.8
.1
( 3)
.2

1.9
5. 4

11

-

-

8.2

-

Printing, publishing, and allied in d u strie s-----C hem icals and allied p r o d u c t s -------------------------P etroleum refining and related in d u strie s—----

4
13

1. 7

5. 2

1

1

6. 2
.1

22. 8
.1

-

Rubber and m iscella n eou s plastics products —
Leather and leather p r o d u c t s --------------------------Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s ----------------------P rim ary m etal industries -------— -----—— —------F a bricated m etal p rod u cts 4 — --------------------------

12
2

8.8
.6

3
-

25
46
46

5. 1
25. 7
11 . 1

28.
2.
16.
83.
50.

3
4
5
3
2

.8

.7

( 3)
-

.1
-

3
-

.3
-

1. 7

.5
.5
-

1

-

.2
.3
-

4

( 3)
.4
( 3)
.2

( 3)
2. 6
.2
3. 8

2

5
1

-

M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l ---- ---------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
s uppli e s — — — — — ——— — — —
Tran sportation equipment ------- -----------------------Instrum ents, etc. 8 ------- -------- —---- -------- — -----M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u s t r ie s ---------

70

3 1 .4

107. 7

1

( 3)

(3)

8

1. 0

6.6

63
42

55.
56.
1.
1.

193.
132.
10.
3.

-

-

1

1

( 3)

2. 1
.1

-

.2
.4
.1
-

.6
8 .9
.2
-

Nonmanufacturing -----------------------------------------

1, 410

449. 6

1, 110.4

53

5. 0

24. 6

57

9. 7

115. 5

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e rie s -------------Mining — ------------------------ ------——------------------- -—
Contract con stru ction — ----------------------------- ------T ran sportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s — ----------------- — W holesale and retail t r a d e --------------------------------

!
1,046
196

.8
294. 5
31. 4

.8
554. 1
266. 7

1

2
8

( 3)
.3
.2

. 1
.3
1. 4

.
22

6. 4

82. 0

55
42

99. 2
6. 3

137. 1
71. 7

7
5

.6
.3

9. 2
1. 5

8
13

.5
.9

7. 2
16. 6

( 3)

(3)
38. 4
41. 4

1

( 3)
.2
3. 4

2. 5
1. 7
7. 8

_

_

_

6
23

8
6

1. 0
1 .0

5. 7
4. 1

F inance, insurance, and rea l e s t a t e --------- -----S ervices
G overnm ent 6 — — --------- -------- —-------------------------

2

3

1

22
47

3
7
9
7

6. 7

10. 7

1 See footnote 1, table A -6 .
2 Includes other finished products made fro m fa b rics and sim ila r
m aterials.
3 F ew er than 100.
4 Excludes ordnance, m achinery, and transportation equipment.
5 Includes p rofessio n a l, s cie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;
photographic and optica l goods; w atches and c lo c k s .




7
7
9
7

1

.3

-

-

3
2

6
The situations reported here have, fo r statistical purposes,
deem ed to fall within the Bureau's definition o f a w ork stoppage. This
de cisio n does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stop ­
page has taken place in violation of any law o r public policy.
NOTE: Because of rounding,
equal totals. Dashes denote z e ro s .

sums o f individual item s may not

been

Stoppages beginning in year
C ontract status and m a jo r issu e

Numbe r
(thousands)
A ll stoppages-------------------------------- ------------

5,353

N egotiation o f fir s t a g r e e m e n t----— — --------G eneral wage c h a n g e s -----------------------------Supplem entary b e n e f i t s ----------------—-------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts -----------------------------------Other contractual m atters ---------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y — — —
Job s e c u r it y ---------------------------------------------Plant adm in istra tion -------------------------------Other w orking c o n d itio n s ---------------- — —
Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s ------------

653
264
8
7
5
317
16
26
2
6
2

12.2
4 .9
.1
.l
.1
5 .9
.3
.5
( ‘)
.1

Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration
o r r e o p e n in g -------- -------------------------------------G eneral wage changes — —-------------- -------Supplem entary b e n e f i t s -------------------------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts -------------------------—-------Hours of w ork — --------- —-------------------------Other contractual m a t t e r s ---------------------Union organization! and s e c u r it y ------------Job s e c u r it y ------------------ --------------------------Plant adm in istra tion -------------------------------Other w orking c o n d itio n s----------------—-----Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s -----------Not r e p o r t e d ------------------ —— ------- — --------

2,717
2,217
68
29
7
87
98
114
82
8
5
2

During term of agreem ent (negotiation
of new agreem ent not in v o lv e d )----------------G eneral wage ch a n g e s -------- —
-----------------Supplem entary b e n e f i t s --------------------------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts---------------------- —---------Other contractual m a t t e r s ---------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y ------------Job s e c u r i t y ------------------------------- -----------Plant a d m in istration -------------------------------Other w orking conditions — -------------------Interunion o r intraunion m atters ------—
Not r e p o r t e d ----------------------- --------------------

1, 812
18
2
135'
„
23
134
1,090
131
270
9

2 ,2 5 0 .7

P e rce n t

Numbe r
(thousands)

P ercen t

100.0

2 7 .9 4 8 .4

100.0

69.6
2 8.0
.2
2 .5
.8
30.3
1.7
5 .5
( 13
2)
.4
.1

3.1
1.2
(*)
.1
O
1.3
.1
.2

9 .7
3 .0
( ‘)
.2

n

2, 708.9
831 .0
4 .9
62.5
2 .4
1, 685.7
4 8 .3
68.2
2 .6
2 .0
1.2

50 .8
4 1 .4
1.3
.5
.1
1.6
1.8
2. 1
1.5
.1
.1
(*)

1 ,4 8 2 .4
1 ,0 8 4 .0
38.5
10.7
1.0
50.5
81.2
112. 7
94 .7
4 .6
4. 1
.3

65 .9
4 8 .2
1.7
.5
(*)
2 .2
3 .6
5 .0
4 .2
.2
.2
(*)

2 3 ,0 8 9 .5
15, 702.0
1 ,0 0 1 .4
95.0
13.5
630.9
1, 609.7
2, 272.2
1, 560.3
67.9
136.2
.5

8 2 .6
5 6.2
3 .6
.3
n
2 .3
5 .8
8. 1
5 .6
.2
.5
n

33.9
.3

678 .0
6 .2
( 2)
70. 1
.
4 .3
59.5
432 .3
34. 3
68.9
2 .4

1, 908.5
104.5
.4
241 .0
3 5. 8
19.2
124.9
1, 130.9
9 6.7
176.3
8.9

6. 8
.4
( l)
.9
(*)
.1
.4
4 .0
.3
.6
n

28.9
19.0
.5
1.7
_
.4

.1
.1
o
( ‘)
-

100.0

n

0 )

2 .5
.4
2 .5
2 0.4
2 .4
5 .0
.2

No contract or other contract s ta tu s---------G eneral wage c h a n g e s------- ------------------ —
Supplem entary b en efits---------------------------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts----------------------------------Hours of w o r k --------------------------— ----------Other contractual m a t t e r s --------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y ------------Job s e c u r it y ----------------------- -------------- -----Plant a d m in is tr a tio n ------------—------- — —
Other w orking c o n d itio n s-----------------------Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s ----------Not r e p o r t e d --------------------------------------------

68
33
2
8
-

1.3
.6
( l)
.1
-

5

No in fo r m a t io n ---------------------------------------------

!!!

30. 1
.3
n
3. 1
.
.2
2 .6
19.2
1.5
3.1
.1

(')

6 .0
.2
.2

o
C)

.3
.2
( ‘)
n
-

.1

6. 1
3 .8
.3
.4
_
( 2)

13
1
2
4

.2
(*)
o
.1

1.2
.2
( 2)
( 2)

.i
(*)
<)
n

5 .8
.2
.4
.7

n
<>
<)
n

103

1.9

14. 6

.6

212 .6

.8

1 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p ercent.
2 L ess than 100 w ork ers o r days.
3 Idleness in 1973 resulting fro m that which began in 1972.




Days o f idlen ess during year

W orkers involved

NOTE:
equal totals.

(*)

B ecause o f rounding,

sum s

o f individual item s

m

o

m ay not

Days o f idlen ess
during year

Stoppages beginning in year
W orkers involved
M ajor issu es

A ll i s s u e s ------------------- ------------ — ------------G eneral wage changes — — ------------------------------G eneral wage in c r e a s e ------- — -----— — —
—
G eneral wage in crea se plus supplem entary
—
benefits —— — —— —— — — ----— ------— —
G eneral wage increases hour d e cre a se —
G eneral wage d e c r e a s e ------------------ — — —
E scalation c o s t -o f-liv in g in c r e a s e s -----------G eneral wage in crea se and e s c a la t io n ------W ages and w orking c o n d itio n s --------------------Supplem entary benefits — --------------------------------Pensions* insurance* and other w elfare
p rogra m s —
-------—------------ — -----------—— ------Severan ce or d is m is s a l pay; other
paym ents on layoff or s e p a r a t io n -----------P rem iu m pay ------------------- ------- -------- ------------Other — — -------------— -----------------------------------Wage a d ju stm en ts------— — ------------------------------Incentive pay rates or a d m in is tr a tio n ------Job cla s sific a tio n or r a t e s -------------------------D ow n gra d in g--------------------------------------------------R e t r o a c tiv ity --------------------------------------------------Method of com puting p a y ----------------------------Hours of w o r k ---------------------------------------------------Increase — — —----------------------------------------------D e c r e a s e --------------------------------------------------------Other contractu al m a t t e r s -------------------------------Duration of c o n t r a c t ------------------------------------L oca l issu es supplementing national
c o n t r a c t -------------------------- ---------------------------U nspecified — --------- ----------— —----------------------Union organization and se c u r ity -------------- — ----R ecogn ition (c e r t ific a t io n )----------- — ---------—
R ecogn ition and job secu rity issu es — - —
R ecognition and econ om ic i s s u e s ------- ------—
Strengthening bargaining position or
union shop and econ om ic i s s u e s -------------Union s ecu rity -----------------------------------------------R efusal to sign a g r e e m e n t--------------------------Other union organization m a tte rs — —--------Job s e c u r it y ---- —-----------------------------------------------Seniority a n d /o r la y o f f --------------------------------D ivision of w o r k ------------------ -------- ---------------S u bcon tracting------------------- --------— ----------------New m achinery or other tech n ological
i s s u e s -------------------- ------------ -- — -—
Job transfers* bumping* e t c ----------------------T ra n sfer of operations o f p refabricated
goods — . —---------— ---------— —
——- —
------Other —------— ------------------------------------- ------- -----Plant adm inistration — ---- --------------------------------P h ysical facilities* surroundings* e t c ------Safety m easures* dangerous
equipment* e t c -------------------------------------------Supervision ----------------------------------------------------Shift w o r k -----------------------------------------------------W ork a s s ig n m en t------------------------------------------Speedup (w orkload)---------------------------- -----------W ork r u l e s ------------------- ---- ------- -----—— --------O vertim e w o r k --------------------------------------- ------- —

D ischarge and d is c ip lin e ------------------------------O th e r --------------------------------------------------------------Other w orking c o n d itio n s---------------------------------A r b it r a t io n ----------------------------------------------------G rievance p r o c e d u r e s ------------------- ---------------U nspecified con tract v io la tio n s ---- -------------Interunion o r intraunion m a tte rs —-------- ----------Union r iv a lry 1 -----------------------------------------------2
Ju risd iction -rep resen ta tion
of w ork ers 3----------------- ■ ■ ..... ........ ...............
"■■
Ju risd iction a l-w ork assignm ent — -------------Union adm inistration 4 ----------------------------------Sym pathy--------------------------------------------------------O th e r ---------------------------------- ----- —-------------------Not reported — ------------- ------------ ------------------- ------

Number

P e rce n t

P e rce n t

Number
(in
thousands)

P e rce n t

5,353

100.0

2 ,2 5 0 .7

100.0

27, 9 4 8 .4

100 .0

2, 576
583

48.1
10.9

1 ,1 2 7 .3
140. 1

50. 1
6.2

1 6 ,7 1 4 .6
1 ,8 6 5 .0

59.8
6 .7

1*481
21
4
20
53
414
81

2 7 .7
.4
.1
.4
1 .0
7 .7
1.5

446 .8
3 4 .0
.4
5 .4
18.8
48 K 9
43. 1

19.9
1.5
(*)
.2
.8
2 1 .4
1.9

9*1 6 2 .5
136. 0
5 .3
52.3
338.1
5 ,1 5 5 .4
1*067.2

3 2 .8
.5
(*)
.2
1.2
18.4
3 .8

47

.9

3 2 .6

1.4

9 4 2 .4

3 .4

9
13
12
180
24
62

.2
.2
.2
3 .4
.4
1.2

8 .3
.9
1.2
8 3.8
10. 5
4 2 .7

.4
(‘)
. 1
3 .7
.5
1.9

8 8.5
12.4
2 3 .8
4 0 0 .4
106.1
171.4

.3
(‘ )
. 1
1 .4
.4
.6

13
81
7
1
6
92
15

.2
1.5
.1
(‘ )

.4
1.0
0
(‘ )
2 .3
.2

27.3
95.7
13.5
2 .4
11. 1
639.1
4 9 .6

. 1
.3

1.7
.3

8. 5
22.2
1. 0
. 1
.9
51.4
4 .7

0
(‘ )
2 .3
.2

13
64
446
162
4
59

.2
1.2
8.3
3 .0
.1
1. 1

25.7
21. 0
116.8
16.7
.5
8.7

1.1
.9
5.2
.7
(J)
.4

297 .2
292 .3
3 ,3 7 8 .4
290 .2
9 .6
1* 102.8

1. 1
1.0
12. 1
1.0
(*)
3 .9

142
39
11
29
264
58
4
17

2 .7
. 7
.2
.5
4 .9
1. 1
. 1
.3

6 6 .0
18.2
3 .5
3 .3
173.9
16.7
.6
4 .4

2 .9
.8
.2
. 1
7 .7
.7
(*)
.2

1 ,7 1 6 .2
214 .7
19.6
25.3
2 *44 5.4
89.3
99.2
15.5

6.1
.8
. 1
. 1
8 .7
.3
.4
. 1

10
7

.2
. 1

14. 1
3. 5

.6
.2

4 2 .4
8.3

.2
(*)

3
165
1*216
120

. 1
3. 1
2 2 .7
2.2

.5
134.0
535 .0
3 5 .3

(l)
6 .0
2 3 .8
1 .6

2 .4
2* 188.2
2, 770.5
7 11 .8

(1
)
7 .8
9 .9
2. 5

155
53
34
92
49
21
54
346
143
10
45
88
348
6

2 .9
1.0
.6
1.7
.9
.4
1. 0
5 .5
6. 5
2 .7
.2
.8
1. 6
6 .5
. 1

57.0
25. 1
22. 1
32.2
8 5 .4
12.7
51. 5
108.2
105.7
39.2
4 .6
12.3
22.3
79.2
.3

2. 5
1. 1
1. 0
1 .4
3 .8
.6
2.3
4 .8
4 .7
1.7
.2
.5
1.0
3. 5
. 1

236 .2
60. 9
5 7.0
77.7
136.0
136.6
488 .0
307. 6
558.8
167.4
73.3
27.9
66.2
352. 1
132.3

.8
.2
.2
.3
.5
. 5
1.7
1. 1
2 .0
.6
.3
. 1
.2
1.3
.5

26
133
19
99

.5
2. 5
.4
1.8

6 .5
15.8
11. 1
37. 0

.3
.7
.5
1. 6

15.2
47.3
2 2.7
97.3

. 1
.2
. 1
.3

65

1.2

5.8

.3

37.2

292

1 L ess than 0. 05 p ercen t.
2 Includes disputes between unions o f differen t affiliation* such
as those of A F L -C IO affilia tes and independent organization s.
3 Includes dispiites between union, usually of the same affilation
o r 2 lo ca ls of the s^me union, over representation of w o rk e rs.




Number
(in
thousands)

(\)

0

4
Includes disputes within a union o ve r the adm inistration of union
a ffa irs or regulations.
NOTE:

Dashes denotes z e r o s .

(W ork ers and days of idlen ess in thousands)
Total
Industry group

G eneral wage changes

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all)
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
ye a r
W orkers
Num ber
involved

Supplem entary benefits

Days of
idlen ess
during
y ear (all)
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idleness
during
ye a r (all)
stoppages)

A ll industries --------------------------------------------

1 5. 353

2. 250 .7

27. 948 .4

2, 576

1, 127. 3

16. 714. 6

81

43. 1

1. 067 .2

M an u factu rin g-------------------------------------------------

1 2 , 282

9 6 3 .4

14. 318. 5

1. 459

524. 1

8. 771. 1

42

24. 9

666 .5

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------------------------F ood and kindred products --------------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures --------------------------------------Textile m ill products ----------------------------------------Apparel, etc. 2 ---- -----------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood products, except
fu r n it u r e -----------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures --------------------------------------P aper and allied products ---------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries -----C hem icals and allied products -------------------------P etroleu m refining and related industries -------Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics

5
186
46
45

4. 4
6 9.5
9 .4
11 . 2

2 22 . 2

2

2. 0

1, 007 .9
268. 0
9 99 .4

114
23
19

54. 3
4 .4
5. 6

83. 5
804. 9
68 . 5
65. 9

1

3. 2

-

-

2
2

.3

22. 7
_
5. 6
1.3

65
82
98
83
132
15

16. 8
14. 7
23.9
23.2
32. 1
9. 1

248.6
290.9
410. 3
281. 1
501. 1
536. 8

38
60
71
46
99
9

9. 1
9 .8
14.9

6

.5
.9

143
176
171
295
323

102, 3
2. 1
28,5
5 6 .6
76. 7
167.0

1, 743. 0
22.7
629. 5
760. 5
1, 239.9
2, 006. 4

89
7
124
105
207

173
160
35
43

87. 1
206. 2
13. 8
8.9

1, 234.2
1, 437. 9
278. 3

22

200.0

34

7

906. 4
153.5
179. 1

1 3072

1, 287. 3

13, 629.9

1. 125

603.2

7, 943. 5

11

23 .2
301.0
366.9

479. 0
865. 4
3,658.81

4
29
227

.9
4 .9
245. 2

126 . 1

192. 7
136. 0
3 .5
67.7
196.4

3, 296.5
2, 123. 6
80. 2
822. 5
2 , 303.9

177
316
18
117
237

67. 1

Leather and leather products ----------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products -----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries ---------------------------------F a bricated m etal products 3 ------------------------------M achinery, except ele ctr ic a l ------------------ ---------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
s u p p lie s ------------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment ---------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 4 --------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s manufacturing industries ---------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s --------------Mining -----------------------------------------------------------------Contract c o n s t r u c tio n ----------------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------------W holesale and retail trade --------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate ---------------S e rv ice s -------------- — ----------------------------- -----------Governm ent 6 -------------------------------------------------------

10

1, 079
538
324
499
24
210

387

220

88

81

Union organization and secu rity
A ll industries --------------- ■-------------------------M anufacturing -----------------------------------------------O rdance and a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------------------F ood and kindred products --------------------------- ----T ob acco m a n u fa c tu r e s ---------------------------------------T extile m ill products ----------------------------------------Apparel, etc. 2 ---------------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood products, except
furniture ----------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res --------------------------------------P a per and allied products ---------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries -----C hem icals and allied products -------------------------P etroleu m refining and related industries -----R ubber and m iscella neous pla stics
products -----------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products ---------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products -----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries ---------------------------------F abricated m etal p rod u cts 3 -----------------------------M achinery, except ele ctr ic a l ---------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies ------------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment ---------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 4 --------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing industries ----------

11.0
20.6
2 .6

56. 2
u
17. 6
25. 1
49. 2
88 . 7
27.
109.
8.
6.

2
5
0

66.0

3. 3
56. 9
159.0

202. 7
167.5
315. 5
168.3
383 .4
170.7
1, 081.
19 !
463.
458.
774.
1, 285.

7

3

.2

2

1.1

3

6 .0

_
13. 8
1. 1
8.3
2 96 . 2

.3
5. 6

2
3

1 .4

8. 1

4

2. 2

2

.3
7. 2
.2

97 .5
5 .0
169. 8
7. 6

.8
.1
.6
-

15.9
.9
6. 6
-

18. 1

400. 7
_
.2
104.3

8

3
1
1
0

1, 0 1 9 . 2

61.9
1, 842. 3
2, 192. 3
992 .2
66.6

657 .0
2. 005. 1

Job secu rity

5
3
2
1
1

39
_
1
11

5 .9

8
11
1

7. 2
4. 0
(5)

3
4

.2

266. 1
22. 1
2 .6
2. 6

.2
.6

2. 7

Plant adm inistration

446

116. 8

3, 378. 4

264

173.9

2. 445. 4

1. 216

535.0

2, 770. 5

171

36.0

1, 812. 1

95

44. 3

891.5

265

194. 6

1. 219. 9

1

1. 5
4. 1
_
(5)
. 1

136. 1
61. 8
_
4. 5
1. 0

1
16

.2
2. 8
_
1.5
1. 7

.5
.3

5. 7
18.5
6. 5
44. 4
.9
_

16
_

1.5
_

11

2.0

5

.4

67. 1
_
163. 1
910. 5

5
5
4
13
9
-

1. 1
.4
3. 3
5 .9
.7
-

6. 4
10 . £
41 .6
36.9
13.4
(7 5)

. 8
<*)

33.4
.5
16. 1
166.6
46. 7
54. 9

9
5
4
9
9

17. 0
.7
1. 7
4. 6
3 .4

272. 4
19.6
3. 4
184. 4
27. 5

11
1
20

6

5
3

.7
4 .3
1. 8

7.
30.
62.
4.

33
36

11
1
8

12
10

24

1. 0
5. 6
1. 1
1 .6

19
_
1
2

3
2

4
9
2

-

1 .0
2 .0
.2

-

_
5
6

1.9
12 . 1

_
2 3.9
9. 0

8

4. 7

5
9

2.2
1. 6

6
10

1.9
4. 3
.7

6 9.3

3. 6
.3
4 .9
15. 5
10. 3
5 9.2

43. 8
1.9
16. 4
105. 6
4 8.9
510. 6

18. 6
60.0
.1
.2

47. 5
208. 8
. 1
.5

3

31
30
31

18. 7
71. 3
6 .9
10 .4
1 2.2

11

1. 4

19
4
3

8 .6

.3
.3

26. 3
187. 6
17. 8
12.7

2

.2

Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------------------

275

80. 8

1, 566. 3

169

129. 6

1. 553. 9

951

340. 4

1, 550. 6

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ----------------M in in g -----------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction ---------------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------------W holesale and retail trade --------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate --------------S e rv ice s --------------------------------------------------------------Governm ent 6 — -------------------------------------------------- -

2

9
52

(5)
2. 4
42. 3

.2
24. 8
500. 4

2
84
15

19. 0
27. 8
11. 7

287. 3
156.6
199.6

1
751
39

.8
202 .4
27. 8

.8
388. 7
868.9

41
75
3
51
42

11.4
11.3
( 5)
2. 6
10. 6

576. 8
248. 7
1.8
89.9
123. 7

21
17
4
26

18. 2
3 9 .4
_
.4
13. 1

75.9
739.7
_
2. 8
9 1 .9

46
44
1
17
52

83. 3
13.2

121. 8
94. 3
<5)
38.2
37. 8

See footnotes at end o f table.




4
3
7
4

1
2

( 5)
4. 7
8. 2

Industry group

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Numbc r
involved

A ll industries ----------------------------------------

180

83. 8

400 .4

7

M anufacturing --------------------------------------------

88

60. 4

323 .4

1

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c t s ------------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures -----------------------------------T extile m ill products -------------------------------------A pparel, e tc . 1 -----------------------------------------------2
Lum ber and wood products, except
Furniture and fixtu res ----------------------------------P aper and allied products -----------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries —
C hem icals and allied products ---- -----------------P etroleu m refining and related industries ---Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products --------------------------------------Leather and leather products ------Stone, clay, and glass products ----- --------------P rim a ry m etal industries ------------------------------F abricated m etal products 3 --------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l -----------------------E le ctrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies --------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipm ent ----------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 45 -----------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing industries ------Nonmanufacturing

--------------------------------------

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s -----------Mining -------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -------------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ------------------------W holesale and retail trade ----------------------------Finance, insurance, and rea l estate ------------- .
S erv ices — ----------------------------------------------------Governm ent ----------------------------------------------------

Other contractual nlatter 8

Hours of w ork

Wage adjustm ents
Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
involved

1. 0
_ ( 5)

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
ye ar
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages) _

13. 5

92

51. 4

639. 1

( 5)

55

44. 5

483. 3

1
9

0. 7
1. 7

0. 7
8. 8

1
2

1. 0
.4

1.0
1. 8

1
3
2
_
3
1

.2
.4
.9
_
3 .0
( 5)

2 .0
3. 1
23 .3
_
6 4 .6
.6

12
_
1
3
2
3

16.0
. 1
1. 1
.2
1. 1

229.9
_
5 .9
4 .2
2. 8
6 .9

2
8
1

1. 8
14. 9
.9

13. 8
87.2
26. 6

37

6 .9

155. 8

8

1.6

29. 8

-

_
5

I
2. 1

I

_

_

7. 9

-

-

"

3
6
1
3
3

.7
1. 6
.2
.9
.5

7.2
19.7
.2
18. 0
1.4

1
_
_

( 5)

(5)

_

_

-

-

-

7
1
4
9
6
8

7. 4
.2
.9
5. 7
2. 4
1. 3

73.6
.5
5. 1
11. 6
4 .9
38.2

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

21
2
1

32. 9
.2
1. 8

9 4.0
.3
10. 8

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

92

23. 3

77.2

6

1.0

13.4

-

-

-

3

.6

11. 8

1
13

.4
2.2

66.4
2 5 .4

.
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
1. 7

5
9
1
3
5

1. 2
.6
( 5)
.6
1. 8

11.2
14. 5
.4
14. 3
23.7

48
12

10. 3
8. 8

20. 6
12.6

11
7

2. 1
.7
_
1. 1
.4

15.2
4. 1
6 8. 7
13. 6
2 .4

9
5

-

-

________u
•4
Interunion or intraunion m atters

Other w orking comdition s

Not reported

A ll industries -----------------------------------------

143

3 9.2

167. 4

283

73. 4

314.9

65

5. 8

37.2

M anufacturing --------------------------------------------

62

19. 0

103. 2

19

11. 7

27. 7

30

3. 8

20. 1

-

-

-

2

0.1

P.5

I

_

I

( *)

•

■

"

.6

1.5
1 .4

.7
.3
-

1 .4
1.9
-

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -----------------------------F ood and kindred products ------------------------------T ob acco m anufactures -----------------------------------Textile m ill products -------------------------------------Apparel, etc. 2 -----------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood products, except
f u r n it u r e --------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res ----------------------------------Paper and allied products ------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries —
C h em icals and allied products -------------------- —
P etroleu m refining and related industries
Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products --------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products -----------------------Stone, clay, and glass products --------------------P r im a r y m etal industries ------------------------------F abricated m etal products 3 ---------------------------M achinery, except e le c tr ic a l -------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies --------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment ------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 4 -----------------------------------------M iscella n eou s manufacturing industries ------N onm anufacturing--------------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ------------M ining -------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction ------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -------------------------W holesale and retail trade ----------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate ------------S e rv ice s — -------------------------------------------------------G overn m en t 6 --------- ------------------------------------------

1

(l)

_

_

"
/S\
( )
3
2

.4
2. 1

_
7.6

1.2
-

10. 3

’

’

-

-

_
1

_
0 .2

.
6.5

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

.4
1. 7
1.5
1 0.4

1.0
6. 1
4. 7
71. 6

5
_
2
2

.4
_

1.0
1. 4
( 5)

5. 1
2. 6
(5)

4
4
_
1

2. 5
6 .9

20.2

64. 2

264

67
-

<5)
16. 5
-

3. 8
21. 6
-

3
2

1. 5
.4

1
7

.8
1.0

5
2
1
81
x

3
4

(S\

2
5
8
32

1 See footnote 1, table A - 6 .
2 Includes other finished products m ade, fro m fa b rics and sim ilar
m a teria ls.
3 Excludes ordnan ce, m achinery, and transportation equipment.
4 Includes p r ofes sion a l, s cie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;
photographic and optica l goods; w atches and c lo c k s .
5 F ew er than 100.
6 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical pu rposes, been




0. 1

-

i

( s)

2 .2
_
. 1
.4

3
_
3
4

.3
_
. 1
1. 0

2 .4
_
3.5
3. 7

1. 5

4 .5
12.4
_
1.5

!
2
1
1

.2
.2
(5)

.6
1 .4
.2
1. 8

61. 8

287. 3

35

1.9

17.0

!
84
156

2. 5
35. 5
2 1.9

124.9
56. 8
9 0.5

5
10

.5
.5

3.5
3.0

28. 6
.7

7
9

.3
.3

3.5
2 .6

5
9

.3
.2

5. 1
4. 8

2 .4
6 .9

3
4

.4
.9

1.5
7 .5

2
4

(*)
.4

. 1
.6

0
( 5)

-

n

n

deem ed to fa ll within the B u reau's definition of a w ork stoppage. This
d ecision does not constitute a legal determ ination that w ork stoppage has
taken place in violation of any law o r public p o licy .
7 Idleness resulted fr o m a stoppage that began in 1972.
NOTE:
equal to ta ls.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums of individual item s m ay not

M ajor issu e

T otal

6-19
w ork ers

20-99
w ork ers

100-249
w ork ers

250-499
w ork ers

500-999
w ork ers

1.000-4,999
w ork ers

5,000-9,999
w ork ers

1 0 .0 0 0 ■
w ork ers
and ov er

Number of stoppages
5,353

583

1,934

1,354

817

348

271

21

25

2,5 7 6

264

1,051

639

324

160

117

7

14

81
180
7
92
446
264
1,216
143

11
14
1
4
120
15
66
6

27
57
2
29
201
76
313
37

18
43
2
17
64
73
401
42

10
34
2
15
28
51
285
40

5
16

9
13

1
2

1

12
10
18
90
12

15
20
26
49
6

8
-

1
5
4
-

283
65

58
24

115
26

44
11

26
2

23
2

16
-

1
-

-

T o t a l -----------------------------------

2 ,2 5 0 .7

7.1

100.0

2 20 .6

282.3

2 40 .8

553 .8

132.5

713 .5

G eneral wage in crea se --------------Supplem entary b en efits, no
general wage in crea se — — ----Wage ad ju stm en ts--------------- ——~
Hours of w o r k ----------------------- ----Other contractual m a t t e r s --------Union organization and secu rity
Job s e c u r it y ------------ -------------------Plant adm inistration — — ---- ----Other working c o n d itio n s ----------Interunion or intraunion
m a t t e r s ------— ------------------------—
Not r e p o r t e d --------------------------------

1 ,1 2 7 .3

3 .4

54.2

101.2

111.8

109.6

239.3

4 4 .0

4 6 3 .8

43. 1
83 .8
1. 0
5 1 .4
116.8
173.9
535. 0
39.2

. 1
.2
(*)
(*)
1 .4
.2
.8

1.3
3.1

3 .5
12.2
.6
4 .6
9 .8
17.5
9 9 .4
13.3

3 .5
11.8
-•
8 .9
7.1
13.2
60 .8
8 .6

2 5.3
21. 1

6.7
12.2

15.8

1.5
9.1
4 .2
18. 0
2 .0

2 .8
7.3
.3
2 .8
9 .6
12.4
68.3
7 .2

3 3 .6
50.7
49 .2
9 7 .0
8 .0

4 7 .8
-

1 3.6
77.3
142.9
-

7 3.4
5 .8

.6
.3

5.3
1.3

6 .8
2 .0

9 .0
.6

15.7
1.6

2 9 .7
-

6 .3
-

T o t a l ----------------------------------G eneral wage in c r e a s e --------------Supplem entary b en efits, no
general wage in crea se -----------Wage ad ju stm en ts-----------— ■ — - ■
Hours of w o r k ---------------------------Other contractual m a t t e r s --------Union organization and secu rity
Job s e c u r it y ---------------------- — -----Plant a d m in is tr a tio n ------------------Other w orking c o n d itio n s ----------Interunion or intraunion
m a t t e r s --------------------------------------Not r e p o r t e d --------------------------------

_

_

.
_
2
_

_
_
_

W orkers involved (in thousands)

(')

_

.•
_
15.5
_

_
_

*

Days of idlen ess (in thousands)
T o t a l -----------------------------------

2 7 ,9 4 8 .4

G eneral wage in crea se --------------Supplem entary ben efits, no
general wage in crea se -----------Wage a d ju stm en ts-----------------------Hours of w o r k ---------------------------Other contractual m a t t e r s --------Union organization and secu rity
Job s e c u r it y -------------------------------Plant a d m in is tr a tio n -----------------Other working c o n d itio n s----------Interunion or intraunion
m a t t e r s -------------------------------------Not r e p o r t e d --------------------------------

16,714. 6
1 ,0 6 7 .2
400. 4
13. 5
639. 1
3,3 7 8 . 4
2 ,4 4 5 .4
2, 770 .5
167.4
314.9
37.2

1 F ew er than 100.




1 ,8 7 2 .9

2 ,9 7 5 .2

3 ,3 2 3 .7

3 ,3 5 4 .0

9 .3 0 0 .2

897.3

6 ,0 6 2 .0

70. 1

1 ,1 9 2 .6

2, 092 .0

2 ,2 4 5 .3

2 ,4 3 0 .8

4 ,5 7 9 .6

430.2

3 ,6 7 3 .9

2 .3
3 .0

3 7 .6
65 .0
11.2
3 1 .6
307 .7
148.5
243.3
16.5

67. 1
9 2.9
2. 1
114. 7
260. 1
158.2
335. 1
24. 1

30. 0
4 6 .9

756. 1
108.7

130.1
17.4

27. 6

2. 7
58. 6
3 .3
11.3
2. 1

44. 1
3 8 .9
.2
3 6.7
316 .8
63. 0
104. 0
2 6 .6

143.2
172.5
173.3
293 .2
26.2

310.3
1 .9 9 9 .1
840.2
442 .7
7 2 .0

134.4
-

95.2
1 ,0 5 8 .9
1 ,2 0 6 .4
-

4 .4
5 .4

2 9 .9
20.2

14.0
8. 1

2 2 .8
1.2

3 5 .5
2 .3

191. 5

163.1

C)

NOTE:
equal totals.

_

_

_
_
168.4
_
16.8
-

_
_

-

Becau se of rounding, sums o f individual item s m ay not
D ashes denote zeros*

Industry

A ll industries
M anufacturing

---------------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------:--------------------

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ----------------------------------------------Guns, how itzers* m o rta rs, and related
equipment -----------------------------------------------------------------Am m unition, except fo r sm all arm s -----------------------Tanks, and tank com ponents -------------------------------------Sighting and fir e con trol equipm ent ---------------------------Sm all arm s ------------------------------------------------------------------Sm all arm s ammunition --------------------------------------------Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s not elsew here
c la s sifie d ------------------------------------------------------------------Food and kindred products --------------------------------------------M eat products -------------------------------------------------------------Canned and p re s e rv e d fru its, vegetables,
and sea food s -----------------------------------------------------------Grain m ill products ------------------------------------------------Bakery products ---------------------------------------------------------C on fectionery and related products --------------------------B everages -------------------------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s food preparations and
kindred products -------------------------------------------------------

N me
u br

S p ae
to p g s
Ma
en
d ra n1
u tio

Wrk
o ers
in o e
v lv d

2 . 33
55
2 .22
28
5

2 .2
0
2 .0
1
7 .4
0

22 0
. 5 .7
93
6 .4
4
.4

3
1

6
.6
9
.0
14
5 .7

1
.6
1
.3
1
.5

1 .0
4
2.3
4
3 .3
6
7
.2
7
.4
1 .7
9
6 .4
5
56
.
3 .6
6
2 .2
1
3 .4
5

6 .5
9
1. 8
0
2
.2
3 .1
5
1
.1
1
.9
.8
1
.4
1. 1
2
4
.0

l
1
16
8
3
9
1
9
2
5
1
3
1
8
2
3
4
7
2
0

( 3)

Dy o id n s d rin yea
a s f le e s u g r
(all s p a e )
to p g s
P to
ercen f
ta o in
N me to l wrk g
u br
tim
e
2.984
7 4.
01
.4
1. 3 8
4 1 .5
.2
9
22
2 .2
.4
6
"
5
.8
6
.4
29
0 .5
’
.5
10 7
, 0 .9
40
5 .2
1 .8
0
18
6 .2
1. 1
7
6 .2
1
3
.0
3 .9
5
14
6 .4
9 .2
7

.2
3
-

_
_
-

"

T ob a cco m anufactures ----------------------------------------------------Cigarettes -------------------------------------------------------------------C igars --------------------------------------------------------------------------

9
.4
.2

T extile m ill products ------------------------------------------------------Broadwoven fa b r ic m ills , cotton -------------------------------Broadwoven fa b ric m ills, m an-m ade
fib e r and silk ----------------------------------------------------------Broadwoven fa b r ic m ills , w ool including
dyeing and finishing ------------------------------------------------N arrow fa b r ic s and other sm allw ares m ills:
Cotton, w ool, silk, and m an-m ade fib e r --------------Knitting m ills --------------------------------------------------------------Dyeing and finishing textiles, except w ool
fa b r ic s and knit goods ----------------------------------------------F lo o r coverin g m ills -------------------------------------------------Yarn and thread m ills ------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s textile goods ---------------------------------------

4
6
3
3
1
4
1
0
3
5
6
1
1

3 .5
7
2 .3
3
1. 1
5
3
.0
9 .2
5
4 .7
5
2 .2
4
3 .2
0
4.1
6
2 .6
7

.1
.2
2
.0
.4
.6
31
.
28
.

A pparel and other finished products made fro m
fa b r ic s and sim ila r m aterials -------------------------------------M en 's, youths', and b o y s' suits, coats, and
o v ercoa ts ------------------------------------------------------------------M en 's, youths', and b oys' furnishings, w ork
clothing, and allied garm ents ---------------------------------W om en 's, m is s e s ', and ju n io rs' outerw ear ------------W om en 's, m is s e s ', c h ild r e n 's , and infants'
undergarm ents ---------------------------------------------------------Hats, caps, and m il l in e r y ------------------------------------------G ir ls ', ch ild re n 's, and infants' outerw ear ---------------

4
5
4
9
1
2
2
2
_
2
1
4
6
5
2
1
8
3
0
4
1
1
8
2
4
2
6
1
0

1 .9
0
1 .4
6
1 .4
1
5
.2
8
.0
93
.
11
3 .0
3.3
1
1. 3
7
2 .5
9
1 .6
6
2 .7
7
2 .0
5
11 1
8.
4 .9
3
3 .3
0
3 .6
5
1 .3
6
2 .3
3
2 .3
0
3 .5
8
2 .4
6
2 .7
6
2 .8
7
1. 1
3
3 .6
3
2 .2
5
3 .7
0
1 .8
6
1 .2
6
8
.7
1 .0
4
5 .0
3
1.8
5

1 .2
1
.4
5
.0
3
.6
.4
(3
)
.3
1
.6
1 .8
6
1
.0
53
.
9
.5
.1
.9
1. 7
4
71
.
.7
2
.7
2
.6
1
.6
2 .9
3
3
.2
5
.4
2
.4
4
.0
78
.
1
.1
2 .2
3
1 .9
3
18
.
.1
.2
6
.6

M iscella n eou s apparel and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------M iscella n eou s fabricated textile products ----------------Dum ber and wood products, except furniture --------------Logging cam ps and logging co n tra cto rs -------------------Saw m ills and planing m ills ---------------------------------------M illw ork, veneer, plywood, and prefabricated
structu ral w ood products -----------------------------------------W ooden containers -----------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s w ood products ------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res ----------------------------------------------------Household furniture ----------------------------------------------------O ffice furniture ----------------------------------------------------------Pu blic buildings and related furniture ---------------------P a rtition s, shelving, lo ck e rs , and o ffice
and store fixtu res ----------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s furniture and fixtu res -----------------------Paper and allied products -----------------------------------------------P u lp m i ll s ---------------------------------------------------------------------P u lpm ills, except building paper m ills ----------------------Paperboard m ills ------------------------------------------------------Converted paper and paperboard products,
except containers and boxes ------------------------------------P a perboard containers and boxes -----------------------------Building paper and building board m ills ------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries -------------------N ew spapers: Publishing and printing ----------------------P e r io d ica ls : Publishing and printing ----------------------Books ----------------------------------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s publishing -------------------------------------------C om m ercia l printing ---------------------- ----------------------------




22
2

9
8
6
2
0
1
1
2
6
3
0
5

8
3
2
8
3
1
1
3
8

( 3)

28
6 .0
3
.9
.9
.3
1. 6
3
6 .4
4
6
.5
1. 1
3
18
2 .9
3 .4
6
99
9 .4
4
.7
93 8
2.
1 .5
2
3 .0
2
.3
4
.6
5.4
1 .9
9
28
4 .6
1 .2
0
11
0 .6
9 .1
0
2. 1
7
1 .7
9
20
9 .9
11
6 .6
8
.0
4 .5
3
3.1
7
4 .7
0
40
1 .3
5 .8
9
8 .7
7
2 .7
6
6 .9
9
12
4 .4
2 .7
3
21
8 .1
18
7 .1
1 .7
0
1
.1
7
.2
6.1
7

.1
0
-

_
-

_
“
.3
0
_
_
_
.1
-6
_
.2
2
-

_
-

.2
3
-

-

.1
-0
_
-

( W orkers and davs in thousands)
Stoppages
Industry
Num ber

Mean
duration 1

W orkers
involved

Days of idlen ess during year
(all stoppages)
P e rce n t of
Number
total w orking
tim e

M anufacturing— Continued
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries— Continued
M anifold business fo r m i ----------------------G reeting card publishing ------------------------Blankbooks, lo o s e leaf binders and
bookbinding w ork ---------------------------------S ervice industries fo r the printing trade

4
1

58.6
13.0

0. 3
(3)

4. 3
( 3)

5
2

35.7
197.0

.3
( 3)

11. 1
1 .4

C hem icals and allied products -----------------------------------------Industrial inorganic and organic ch em icals ---------------P la s tics m aterials and synthetic re sin s, synthetic
rubber, and other m an -m ad e fib e rs ,
except glass ---------------------------------------------------------------D rugs --------------------------—
----------------------- •
-----------------------Soap, detergents and cleaning preparations,
p erfu m es, c o s m e tic s , and other toilet
preparations ---------------------------------------------------------------Paints, varnishes, la cq u e rs, enam els, and
allied products ----------------------------------------------------------Gum and w ood ch em icals --------------------------------------------A gricu ltu ra l ch em icals -----------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s ch em ical products --------------------------------

132
54

30.7
18.9

32. 1
9. 1

501. 1
119. 6

26
3

2 3.2
18. 1

9 .9
.7

163.7
8. 4

14

22. 3

2 .6

39. 8

7
3
10
15

13.9
23. 6
65. 1
54.5

.7
.3
1. 3
7 .6

6. 7
4 .4
72.5
85.9

P etroleu m refining and related products -----------------------P etroleu m refining ------------------------------------------------------Paving and roofing m a teria ls -------------------------------------M iscella neous products o f p etroleu m and coal ----------

15
10
3
2

94. 1
97 .5
2 4.0
36.5

9.1
8. 7
.3
•

536. 8
5 30 .4
4. 8
1. 6

1. 14
_
_

Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products -----------------T ires and inner tubes -------------------------------------------------Rubber fo o t w e a r -----------------------------------------------------------R eclaim ed rubber ---- :---------------------------------------------------Fabricated rubber products not elsew here

143
43
1
2

21. 1
18. 6
4 3 .0
6 .6

102. 3
82. 4
( 3)
1.3

1, 743.0
1, 089. 9
2 .5
6. 1

1.01
_
.
-

26
71

31. 4
39. 1

9 .4
9.1

2 6 1 .4
383.2

Leather and leather products ------------------------------- '---------Leather tanning and finishing -------------------------------------Industrial leather belting and packing -----------------------Boot and shoe cut stock and findings ------------------------Footw ear, except rubber -------------------------------------------Leather gloves and m ittens ----------------------------------------Luggage ------------------------------------------------------------------------Handbags and other person al leather goods --------------Leather goods not elsew here cla s sifie d ----------------------

10
2

2 6.6
2 0.0

2. 1
. 1

22.7
5.2

-

-

-

-

1
6
_
1
-

33.0
2 7 .4
_
14. 0
-

.2
1.5
_
.2
-

5 .5
10. 1
-

Stone, clay, and glass products --------------------------------------Flat glass ---------------------------------------------------------------------G lass and glassw are, p r e s s e d or blown ---------------------G lass products, made fro m purchased glass ------------Cement, hydraulic -------------------------------------------------------Structural cla y products ---------------------------------------------P ottery and related products ..... .........................................
C oncrete, gypsum, and p la ster products ------------------Cut stone and stone products — ----- ----------------------------A b ra siv e s, a sb e sto s, and m iscella n eou s
nonm etallic m in eral products ..........................................

176
5
7
7
1
12
15
84
3

2 9.6
15. 1
5 .6
8. 3
39.0
34. 9
35. 7
37.9
26. 7

28 .5
1. 7
1. 8
1. 1
( 3)
1. 3
5. 5
9 .5
1. 1

629.5
36. 8
6 .6
6 .9
2 .0
30. 9
137. 3
260.0
21 .9

42

25. 8

6. 4

127.2

-

P rim a ry m etal industries --------------------------Blast furnaces, steelw orks, and rolling
and finishing m ills ------------- -------------- Iron and steel foundries ----- -----------------P rim a ry sm elting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a ls -------- -----------------------Secondary sm elting and refining of
nonferrous m etals -------------------------------R olling, drawing, and extruding of
nonferrous foundries ................................
N onferrous foundries ----------------------------M iscella neous p rim a ry m etal products

171

18. 2

56. 6

760. 5

. 23

35
55

10. 4
20.7

7 .9
19. 4

60. 9
298. 1

7

15.9

9 .4

103. 7

M iscellaneous p la stics products

---------------------------------

Fabricated m etal products, except ordnance,
m achinery, and transportation equipment ------------------M etal cans --------------------------------------------------------------------Cutlery, handtools, and general hardware ....................
Heating apparatus (excep t e le ctr ic ) and
plumbing fixtures ------------------------------------------------------F abricated structural m etal products -----------------------S crew m achine products, bolts, nuts,
scre w s , and riv ets ---------------------------------------------------M etal stam pings ----------------------------------------------------------Coating, engraving, and allied s e r v ic e s -------------------M iscella neous fabricated w ire products -------------------M iscellaneous fabricated m etal products ------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l ------------------------------------------Engines and turbines ---------------------------------------------------Farm m achinery and equipment .................... ...................
Construction, m ining, and m aterial handling
m achinery and equipment -----------------------------------------M etalw orking m achinery and equipment -------------------Special industry m achinery and equipment -----------------




1

_

1.9
-

0.19
-

_

_
-

-

_
.0 3
-

_

. 36
_
_

.
_
_
.
-

_
-

7

36.9

.7

17.4

27
20
20

19.2
23. 8
16. 2

11. 3
4 .2
3.7

171.4
66. 8
42. 1

295
9
25

28. 1
23.9
71. 3

76.7
2 .0
7. 8

1, 239 .9
22.9
283. 9

20
144

33. 3
42.2

5. 6
23. 7

120. 1
526.5

.

-8
19
13
18
39

30.0
8. 3
2 8 .0
14. 7
22.5

1.
26.
.
2.
6.

3
7
7
1
8

24.5
127. 7
13.9
22. 3
98.2

_

323
37
23

18.4
5. 1
2 0.6

167.0
19.2
4 5 .4

2, 006 .4
63.2
590.9

67
42
36

18.6
16. 2
28. 2

58.2
8.6
4. 8

607. 4
109.0
81.0

_

. 34
_

_
_
.

.3 9
.

.

Stoppages
Industry

liays of idlene iss during year
(all stc ppages)
P e rce n t of
Number
total w orking
tim e

Mean
duration 1

W orkers
involved

54
5
37
22

26. 4
35.0
16.9
36.0

11.2
.4
17. 2
1.9

201 .0
7.9
2 9 8 .4
47.5

E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and supplies -------E le c tr ic tran sm ission and distribution
equipm ent --------------------------------------------------------------E le c tr ic a l industrial apparatus ------------------------------Household appliances ----------------------------------------------E le ctric lighting and w iring equipment ----------------Radio and te lev ision receivin g sets, except
com m unication types -------------------------------------------Com m unication equipment -------------------------------------E lectron ic com ponents and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------M iscella n eou s e le ctr ic a l m achinery, equipment,
and supplies ------------------------------------------------------ -----

173

17.9

87. 1

1, 234.2

39
27
22
29

19.2
18. 9
19.5
13. 4

18.7
20. 8
17.2
8 .0

352.5
260 .7
236 .2
141. 8

8
17
19

20. 8
7. 8
16.2

4 .7
9.-2
5. 8

7 3.0
53. 1
52.7

12

37.0

2 .6

64.2

Transportation equipment -------------------------------------------M otor v eh icles and m otor v eh icle equipment -------A ir c r a ft and parts ------------------------ ■
--------------------------Ship and boatbuilding and repairing ----------------------R ailroad equipment ------------------------------------------------M o to rc y c le s , b ic y c le s , and parts -------------------------M iscella n eou s transportation equipm ent ---------------

160
102
13
19
5
2
19

11.5
10. 1
30.5
19.0
42 .0
6. 3
14.6

206.2
183. 3
4 .5
13. 3
2. 1
1.2
1. 8

1, 437.9
1, 077. 6
99.1
168.1
64. 1
6 .9
23 .0

. 31
_
_
_
_
_

29. 3

13.8

278. 3

.2 2

Number
M anufacturing— Continued
M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l— Continued
G eneral industrial m achinery and equipment -------O ffice, com puting, and accounting m achines -------S erv ice industry m achines -------------------------------------M iscellaneous m achinery, except e le ctr ic a l ----------

P rofes s ion a l, scie n tific, and controlling
instrum ents; photographic and optical
goods; w atches and clo ck s ----------------------------------------Engineering, laboratory, and scie n tific
and re s e a r c h instrum ents and a ssocia ted
equipment --------------------------------------------------------------Instrum ents fo r m easuring, controlling,
and indicating p hysical ch a r a c te r is tics --------------O ptical instrum ents and le n ses ------------------------------Surgical, m edica l, and dental instrum ents
Ophthalmic g o o d s -----------------------------------------------------P hotographic equipment and supplies ------------------- W atches, c lo c k s , clock w ork operated devices
and parts ---------------------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing industries -------------- ------Jew elry, silve rw a re , and plated w are -----------------M usical instrum ents -----------------------------------------------T oys, am usem ent, sporting and athletic goods ----Pens, pen cils, and other o ffic e and
a rtists' m aterials ------------------------------------------------Costum e jew e lry, costum e novelties,
buttons, and m iscella n eou s notions,
except precio u s m etals ----------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing Industries ---------------N onm anufacturing ---------------------------------------------------A g ricultu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s --------------------------A g ricu ltu ra l production ------------------------------------------A g ricu ltu ra l s e r v ic e s and hunting and

3
5
3

5 .4

.2

l. 3

11
1

29. 1
102.6

3. 1
.3

33.7
4 3 .5
16. 1

2 .7
.8
5 .0

5 9 .6
23. 3
5 5 .4

3

4 4.0

1. 8

5 3.9

43
4
11

31. 8
15. 6
_
23.0

8 .9
.7
3. 7

200 .0
8.2
_
65 .6

5

2 1 .9

.5

16. 1
5 1 .4

_
.
_
_
-

"

7 .5

4
19
23, 072

0.25

67. 1
17. 6

10
2
5

_
_
-

________49. ft ..

-

. 18
_
-

.8
3.2

8.7
110.1

1 .2 8 7 .3

13. 629 .9

.0 9

-

M etal mining ------------------------------------------------------------Copper o r e s --------------------------------------------------------Lead and zinc o re s ---------------------------------------------G old and s ilv e r o r e s ------------------------------------------Bauxite and aluminum o r e s -----------------------------F e r r o a llo y o r e s except vanadium ---------------------M etal m ining s e r v ic e s ---------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m etal o re s ----------------------------------Anthracite mining ---------------------------------------------------Bituminous coal and lignite ------------------------------------Crude p etroleu m and natural gas --------------------------Crude p etroleu m and natural gas ---------------------Natural gas liquids ---------------------------------------------Oil and gas fie ld s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------Mining and quarrying of nonm etallic
m in era ls, except fuels -----------------------------------------D im ension stone ------------------------------------------------Crushed and broken stone,
including riprap -----------------------------------------------Sand and gravel --------------------------------------------------Clay, ce ra m ic, and r e fr a c to r y m in era ls ---------C hem ical and fe r t iliz e r m in era l mining ----------N onm etallic m in era ls (except
fuels) s e r v ic e s --------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s nonm etallic m in era ls,
except fuels --------------------------------------------------------




36. 1
35. 7

2 3.2
2 2 .4

479 .0
448.6

. 15
-

3
F o r e s tr y -------------------------------------------------------------------F is h eries ------------------------------------------------------------------

11
7

32 .6

3. 8
26. 6
865 .4
229 .9
_
8. 6
87. 1
35.2
-

.
_
.5 5
_
_

99.0

-

1
1, 079
15
5
7
2
_
1

52. 0
5. 1
36.9
_
2 .9
36.0
102.2
191.0

.2
.7
301.0
8. 8
4 .2
3 .4
.5
_
.8

1, 039
5
2
3

3. 8
5 8.6
68. 3
.
32.5

289. 8
.7
.4
.3

559.9
31.9
20.2
.
11.7

_
_

20
3

38.5
7. 3

1.7
.6

4 3.7
3. 1

_

8
4
1
3

39.9
38.6
27 .0
109.4

.6
.2
( 3)
.3

14.2
4 .2
.9
20. 8

-

-

-

1

-

_

11.0

( 3)

_

.5

_
-

_

_
_
_

-

Stoppages
Industry

W ork ers
involved

Days of idlen ess during year
(all stoppages)
P e rce n t of
Num ber
total w orking
tim e

Number

Mean
duration 1

538

27. 8

366 .9

3, 658. 8

0 .4 0

324
3
3

2 3 .0
1.0
1.0

192.7
73. 1
73.1

3, 296.5
7 3 .3
73.3

.2 8

49

5 7.3

9 .8

519. 8

17
15

4 3 .4
78. 1

2.1
5. 1

7 6 .6
2 82 .4

10
1
6

2 4 .2
4 1 .0
14. 3

2 .0
( 3)
.5

154.0
.7
6 .0

129
107
22

2 8 .0
29 .5
13.6

18.0
1 6.4
1.6

3 90 .4
375.7
14.7

12

6 .6

5 .6

2 6 .0

1
1
3

8 .0
11.0
2 5 .7

( 3)
.1
( 3)

.3
1.2
.7

7
13

6 .3
4 1 .6

5. 3
2 9.3

2 3 .8
849.9

8

4 1.7

29.2

846.7

5

24 .7

.2

3.2

4

2 8 .4

.2

4 .4

1
3

105.0
7 .9

( 3)
.2

3 .4
.9

65
41

2 6 .0
25. 8

3 2 .8
30.3

561.1
511 .6

19

30.2

2. 2

45. 3

5
49
20
11
6
3
9

19.6
5 5 .9
80. 7
2 1 .0
2 5 .5
2 5 .4
1 7.4

. 3
2 3.9
15.2
2 .0
6 .2
( 3)
.3

4 .2
871.7
759.3
28 .6
79.5
1.3
3 .0

499
274
25
18
8
40
2
16

2 3.2
22. 1
2 6.7
3 3.0
10. 8
14.9
2. 3
5 .8

136.0
35.0
4 .2
3. 1
3 .3
6 .0
. 1
2 .2

2, 123.6
593 .0
77.2
70.7
31.2
73. 8
.2
7 .6

12
37
116
225

39.5
27. 1
24.5
2 3 .6

1.3
3 .3
11.5
101.0

34.5
58.7
239 .0
1, 530 .6

21

17.2

2 .4

3 2.8

15

17. 8

2 .0

2 7 .5

1

4 3 .0

( 3)

.8

5

9 .5

.4

4 .5

N onmanufa ctu r in g ,—C ontinue d
C ontract construction

-------------------------------------------------------

T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic , gas,
and sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------------------------R a ilroad transportation -----------------------------------------------R a ilroads ------------------------------------------------------------------Sleeping ca r and other p assen ger
ca r s e r v ic e s -------------- t------- ---------------------------------Railway e xp ress s e r v ic e ---------------------------------------L oca l and suburban transit and interurban
highway p assen ger tr a n s p o r ta tio n ----------------------------L oca l and suburban p assen ger
transportation ------------------------------------------------------In tercity and rural highway
p assen ger transportation -------------------------------------P a ssen ger transportation charter s e r v ic e -----------T erm inal and s e r v ic e fa c ilitie s fo r m otor
v eh icle passen ger transportation ---------------------M otor freight transportation and
w areh ou sin g-----------------------------------------------------------------Trucking, lo ca l and long distance --------------------------P u blic w a r e h o u s in g --------------------------------------------------T erm inal and joint term inal
m aintenance fa c ilitie s fo r m otor
freight transportation ------------------------------------------W ater transportation ---------------------------------------------------Deep sea foreign transportation ----------------------------Deep sea d om estic transportation -------------------------G reat Lakes—
St. Law rence Seaway
tr a n s p o r ta tio n --------------------------------------------------------Transportation on riv e rs and canals ---------------------L ocal w ater transportation ------------------------------------S erv ice s incidental to w ater
transportation --------------------------- ---------------------------Transportation by air ------------------------------------------------ —
A ir transportation, ce rtifica te d
c a r r ie r s ----------------------------------------------------------------A ir transportation, noncertificated
c a r r ie r s ------------- ---------------------------------------------------F ixed fa c ilitie s and s e r v ic e s related
to air transportation --------------------------------------------Pipelin e transportation ------------------------------------------------P ipelin es, except natural gas --------------------------------Transportation s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------------------Freight forw arding -------------------------------------------------A rrangem ent of transportation -----------------------------Stock yards --------------------------------------------------------------Rental of railroad s ca r s -----------------------------------------M iscella n eou s s e r v ic e s incidental
to transportation ---------------------------------------------------Com m unication ------------------------------------------------------------Telephone com m unication (w ire o r r a d io )-------------T elegraph com m unication (w ire o r r a d io )-------------Radio broadcasting and telev ision -------------------------Com m unication s e r v ic e , not
elsew here c la s sifie d -------------- -----------------------------E le ctric, gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ------------------------E le ctric com panies and system s ---------------------------Gas com panies and system s ----------------------------------Com bination com panies and system s -------------------W ater supply ----------------------------------------------------------Sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------------------------Steam supply ----------------------- -----------------------------------Irrigation system s -------------------------------------------------W holesale aund retail trade --------------------------------------W holesale trade --------------------------------------------------M otor ve h icle and autom otive equipment ----D rugs, ch e m ica ls, and allied products -------P ie c e goods, notions, apparel ----------------------G ro c e r ie s and related products -------------------F a rm products—
Raw m aterials --------------------E lectrica l goods ---------------------------------------------Hardware, and plum bing and heating
equipment and supplies ------------------------------M achinery, equipment, and supplies ----------M iscella n eou s w h o le sa le rs ----------------------------R etail trade ---------------------------------------------------------Building m aterials, hardw are, and farm
equipment de a le rs ---------------------------------------Lum ber and other building m aterial
d ealers ----------------------------------------------------------Plum bing, heating, and air conditioning
equipment d ea lers ------------------------------------- —
Paint, glass, and w allpaper s tores --------------E le c tr ic a l supply s to re s -------------------------------H ardware and fa rm equipment d ealers ---------




_

.0 5

Stoppages

Industry
Number

M ean
duration 1

W orkers
in volved

D ays o f id le n e s s du rin g y e a r
(a ll stoppages)
P e rce n t of
Number
total w ork in g
tim e

N onmanuf actu ring— Continued
W holesale and retail trade— Continvi
R etail trade— Continued
G eneral m erch andise stores
Departm ent stores ---------M ail ord e r houses
V a riety sto re s ----------------------------------------------M erchandizing m achine o p e ra to rs --------------D irect selling establishm ents
M iscella n eou s general m erch andise

38
25
1
3
6

F ood store s -------------------------------------------G ro c e r y s t o r e s ---------------------------------M eat and fish (seafood) m arkets ------------------------Fruit s tores and vegetable m arkets
■
Candy, nuts, and co n fection ery
.
stores -------------------------------------------D airy products s tores -------------------R etail b ak eries ------------------------------M iscella n eou s food stores
Autom otive de a le rs and gasoline
s e r v ic e stations ---------------------------------------------------M otor veh icle d ealers (new and
used cars) --------------------------------------------------------M otor v eh icle d ealers (used ca rs

31.4
3 2.5
1 6.0
43.5
3 .6
69. 0

1 8.0
16. 8

3
48
47

3 6.0
19.7
1 9.6
175.0

( 3)
6 7.2
67. 1
-

-

-

[

Sporting goods s tores and
b ic y c le shops -------------------------F a rm and garden supply sto re s •
Jew elry s tores --------------------------Fuel and ice d ealers ----------------R etail s to re s, not elsew here
c l a s s i f i e d ----------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate
Banking
C redit agen cies other than banking ----------Security and com m odity b ro k e rs , d ealers,
exchanges, and s e r v ic e s -------------------------Insurance c a r r ie r s ------------------------------------Insurance agents, b ro k e rs , and s e r v ic e s R eal estate
Com binations of real estate, insurance,
loans, and law o ffice s
Holding and other investm ent com panies
S erv ices ------------------------------------------H otels, room ing houses, cam ps, and
other lodging pla ce s --------------------------------------------------P erson a l s e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s business s e r v ic e s ------------------------------A utom obile repair, autom obile s e r v ic e ,
and garages ---------------------------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s rep air s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------M otion p ictu res -----------------------------------------------------------Am usem ent and re cre a tio n s e r v ic e s ,
except m otion p ictu res —
M edica l and other health s e r v ic e s Legal s e r v ic e s -------------------------------




2. 8
9 22 .6
9 18 .7
4 1. 8

_
_

-

.

-

-

-

. 1

2 .0

-

-

40. 8

4. 4

125 . 8

40.2

4 .2

7

6 0.2

■

118.2

_

_
.2

8 .0

( 3)
"

7 .6

-

"

. 1

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.
-

-

.

-

-

.

-

-

.

_

_

.

25

2 7.0

2 .2

43.0

-

21

26.4
46. 3

2. 1
( 3)

40.3
2. 1

_

( 3)
1 .9
1 .9
4. 8
4. 3
( 3)
-

.6
5 0.3
50. 3
59.4
4 9 .9
.5
_

_
_
_
_
_

i

3 2.0
32.5
32.5
18. 8
1 7.9
2 0.5
15.0

( 3)

.7

-

i
5

7 .0
32. 0

( 3)

. 1
_

_

. 3

7 .6

-

2

27. 3

( 3)

.6

-

24

59.0
7 2 .4
1 5.0

3 .5
( 3)
( 3)

80.2
3 .0

2
2

Eating and drinking pla ce s --------------------------------Eating and drinking p laces ---------------------------M iscella n eou s retail stores
Drug sto re s and p ro p rie ta ry sto re s ---------------Liquor s tores ---------------------------------------------------Antique sto re s and secondhand stores ------------

.

36

1

A pparel and a c c e s s o r y s tores -----------M en’ s and b o ys' clothing and
furnishings sto re s ----------------------W om en's re a d y -to -w e a r stores —
W om en's a c c e s s o r y and specialty
stores ------------------------------------------C h ildren's and infants' w ear
s tores --------- --------------------------------F am ily clothing stores
Shoe sto re s -----------------Custom ta ilo rs ------------F u rr ie r and fur shops ........
M iscellaneous apparel and
a c c e s s o r y s tores
Furniture, hom e furnishings, and
equipment sto re s --------------------------------------------Furniture, hom e furnishings, and
equipm ent sto re s, except appliances -------Household appliance stores -------------------------R adio, te lev ision , and m usic

-

2 96 .7
2 83 .0
.9
1 .9
2. 8
45 . 3

44

.

T ire, battery, and a c c e s s o r y d ea lers -------------G asoline s e r v ic e stations ----------------------- ----------- ■
M iscella n eou s a ircra ft, m arine.

3 2.0

( 3)
( 3)
.9

32
32
17
6

2

2
1
_

_

3
1
16

65. 2
22.0
56.9

_

_

4
( 3)
2 .9

-

-

.

0 . 01
_

- 1

-

_
23.2
, l

_
_
_

50. 8

"

-

1

9 5 .0

( 3)

2. 8

210

1 7.7

67.7

8 22.5

14
19
41

33.2
2 0.0
22. 7

2. 1
3. 1
3. 7

5 0 .0
36. 7
5 7 .3

13
10

23.0
47.4
107.2

.7

4

. 7
2. 1

11. 1
2 3.9
160 . 8

17
56

9 .6
11.3

-

19

-

4 0.0

5. 8
4 3.4
-

4 2 .6
336.2

3 .0

7 6.3

. 03

~

(W ork ers and days in thousands)
Stoppages
Industry

Days of idlene iss during year
(all stc ppages)
P e rce n t of
Number
total w orking
tim e

Number

Mean
duration 1

W orkers
involved

S ervices— Continued
M useum s, art g a lle rie s , botanical and
z o o lo g ica l gardens ----------------------------------------------------N onprofit m em bership organizations ------------------------Private h o u s e h o ld s ----------------------------------------- -------------M iscellaneous s e r v ic e s ------------------------------------------------

2
14

54. 3
10.7

. 1
2. 8

-

-

-

1

10.0

( 3)

5. 6
2 1.7
_
.3

Governm ent 5 ---------------------------------------------------------------------F ederal -------------------------------------------------------------------------State __-___ ------- -------------- ----------------— _—
--------------------C ou n ty --------- ------------------------------------------------------------------City --------------------------------------------------------------------------------School d is tric t --------------------------------------------------------------Other lo ca l governm ent ------------------------------------------------

389
1
29
40
95
210
14

17.9
12. 0
2 2 .4
9. 3
8 .6
19. 1
19.7

196 .4
.5
12. 3
1 3.4
17. 2
149.2
3 .9

2, 303.9
4 .6
133.0
89.2
102. 8
1, 9 2 0 .4
53.9

N onmanuf a ctu r in g— Continue d

1 W eighted by m ultiplying the (Juration of each stoppage
by the w ork ers involved.
2 See footnote 1, table A - 6.
3 Few er than 100.
4 Idleness in 1973 resulting fro m stoppage that began
in 1972.
5 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical




pu rposes, been deem ed to
of a w ork stoppage.
This
determ ination that a w ork
tion of any law or public

-

“
0 .0 7
_
-

"

fa ll within the Bu reau's definition
d ecision does not constitute a legal
stoppage has taken place in v io la ­
p o lic y .

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s
m ay not equal totals.
Dashes denote z e r o s .

Industry group

Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idlen ess
during
y ear (all
stoppages)

A gricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s

67.9

933.5

30

2. 8

31.2

l

.3

.3

3

.9

5. 1

4 .4
69.5

222.2
1, 007.9

-

-

-

1

(*>

<2)

4
11. 2

268.0
999 .4

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

16. 8
14. 7
2 3 .9
23.2
32. 1
9. 1

248.6
290.9
410. 3
281. 1
501. 1
536. 8

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
-

_
.
2
-

_
.9
.

_
.
4 .9
-

-

-

-

-

-

( 4)

143
10
176
171
295
323

102. 3
2. 1
28.5
56. 6
76. 7
167. 0

1, 743.0
22 .7
629.5
760.5
1, 239.9
2, 006 .4

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
*

_
_

-

_
_
.
“

173
160
35
43

87. 1
206.2
13. 8
8.9

1, 234.2
1, 437. 9
278. 3
200.0

1
_
-

.3
_
-

.3
_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

-

-

‘ 3.072

1. 287. 3

13. 629. 9

202

67. 5

933. 1

27

11
1, 079
538

23. 2
301.0
366.9

479. 0
865.4
3, 658. 8

-

324
499

192.7
136. 0

3, 296.5
2, 123. 6

13
3

24
210
387

Finance, insurance, and real estate
S erv ices ------------------------------------------G overn m en t78 ----------------------------------

203

14. 318.5

65
82
98
83
132
15

-------

27. 948 .4

963 .4

46
45

Contract construction -------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ---------------------W holesale and retail trade -----------------------

2. 250. 7

6
186

Nonmanufacturing -------------------------------

3.5
67.7
196. 4

80. 2
822.5
2, 303. 9

1
40
145

94

_
-

See footnotes at end of table,.




-

1.9

26. 1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.9
.1

20. 1
4 .2

4
5

.5
.5

8.9
8.6

( 2)
8. 2
58. 2

1. 1
219 .2
688.6

3
6
9

( 2)
.3
.5

3.0
1. 7
4. 0

P roduction and
maintenance

-

P ro te ctive

31.6

273.0

4. 613

1. 720. 3

2 1 .0 7 8 .4

1.5

6.2

2. 186

817. 0

13. 0 83 .4

1.5

5.5

4
157

2.5
62.0

212. 7
882. 7

-

45
44

8. 1
11. 0

239 .4
995.2

_
.
_
_
-

64
78
93
76
126
14

16.6
14,0
21.9
20. 7
30. 3
8.9

241.7
268. 8
359. 1
265. 8
487. 2
5 36 .4

141
10
173
167
288
313

102.0
2. 1
26.9
49. 1
56. 5
159. 6

1, 730. 8
22. 7
622. 8
725. 8
1, 131.7
1, 943.5

-

-

163
152
35
43

81.4
120. 7
13. 8
8.9

1, 050. 6
888.2
278. 3
200.0

.

2. 427

903. 3

7. 995.0

.
_
_
_

10
1, 079
537

23.2
301.0
363. 9

478.5
865.4
3, 613, 8

_

_

.

-

-

-

( 2)

"

.

1
.
_
54

................................... —

Finance, insurance, and rea l estate --------S ervices ------------------------------------------------------G overn m en t7 8
-----------------------------------------------

-

9

Leather and leather products --------------------Stone, clay, and glass products ---------------P r im a r y m etal industries -------------------------Fabricated m etal products 5 -----------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l --------------------E lectrica l m achinery, equipment, and

A gricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e rie s ...........
Mining .....................................................................
Contract construction -------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s --------------------W holesale and retail trade ------------------- -----

“

10

----------------------------------------

Transportation equipment -..............................
Instrum ents, e t c 8 --------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries —

-

64

A ll industries ------------------------------------

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------F ood and kindred products ----------------------—
T ob acco m anufactures -------------------------------Textile m ill products ---------------------------------A pparel, etc^ ........... ............................................
Lum ber and w ood products, except
furniture ------------------ ---------------------------------Furniture and fixtures ------------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries
Chem icals and allied products ------------------P etroleu m refining and related industries
Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics

_
_
*
-

-

Sales

Nonmanufacturing

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

‘ 5.353

----------------------- -—

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------F ood and kindred products —*— ----T ob a cco m anufactures --------------------T extile m ill products ---------------------Apparel, etc* ----------------------------------Lum ber and w ood products, except
furniture
Furniture and fixtu res ------------------------------P aper and allied products -------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries
Chem icals and allied products ------------- ----P etroleu m refining and related industries
Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics
products
Leather and leather products ----------------Stone, clay, and giftss products ------------P rim a ry m etal industries ----------------------Fabricated m etal products 5 ------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l ----------------E lectrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies ---------------------------------- --------------Transportation equipment ------------------—
Instrum ents, e t c 6 ----------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries

M anufacturing

Days of
idlen ess
during
y ear (all
stoppages)

‘ 2.282

A ll Industries
M anufacturing

C le rica l

P ro fe s s io n a l and technical

Total
Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

.
-

_
_
»
»
_
( 2)

-

.7

.
_
.
30. 1

266. 8

_
-

23

......

u

10.5

.

-

-

-

_

_

I

-

-

-

_
.
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

.
_
.
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
52

_
2 5 .4

240 .4

250
349

138, 3
46. 9

1, 684. 1
967. 1

1
-

1
1

_
.2
4 .5

4 8. 7
.6
17. 1

17
71
114

2. 6
8. 5
18. 9

52. 6
112.5
221 .0

_
3
19

.

.

_
.

.
_
.
.
_
.
_
_
_

.4
-

_
.2
1. 7

2 .2
8.0

S ervice
Industry group

A ll industries
M anufacturing
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------------------------F ood and kindred products -------------------------------T ob acco m anufactures --------------------------------------Textile m ill products ----------------------------------------Apparel, e t c ’ ----------------------------------------------------Lum ber and w ood p rodu cts, except
furniture ----------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtu res --------------------------------------P aper and allied products --------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries ---C hem icals and allied products -------------------------P etroleu m refining and related industries -----Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics
products ----------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products ----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries --------------------------------Fabricated m etal products -------------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l --------------------------E lectrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies ------------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment
Instrum ents, e t c 6 -----------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries
Nonmanufacturing

Stoppages
beginning in
y ear
W orkers
involved

Com binations
Days of
idlen ess
during
y e a r (all
stoppages)

71 .2

1 .4 2 2 .0

315

355.0

( 2)

( 2).

86

143.5

-

-

2
19

1.9
6 .0

9 .5
119.5

.

.

_

l

-

1

i. 3
..2

28 .6
4 .2

Days of
idlen ess
during
y e a r (all
sto p p a g es)

_

1. 2 2 3 .4

-

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

. 4t.1 2 i,.8 ..

j
_

-

1

Not reported
Days of
idlen ess
during
ye a r (all
stoppages)

115

-

-

I

I

-

-

_

_

_
_
.
-

.
_
.
-

_
_
-

1
4
5
5
6
1

.2
.7
2 .0
1.6
1. 8
•1

6 .9
22. 1
5 1 .2
10.3
13.9
.3

-

-

-

2

.3

12.3

-

-

_

_
_
_
-

-

1. 6
7 .5
2 0.2
7. 3

6. 7
34.7
108.2
62.2

I
_

-

3
4
7
9

■

_

_
_
_

-

-

1

( 2)

( 2)

8
8

5 .3
85.5

183.2
549 .7

_

.

-

-

229

211 .5

2. 9 76 .4

-

"

114

71. 1

1. 422.0
-

A g ricultu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s --------Mining -------------------------------------- n------------------Contract construction ----------------------------—
Transportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------W holesale and retail trade -------------------------

20
34

28. 8
2. 7

1, 005 .9
5 3.4

Finance, insurance, and rea l estate -------------S erv ices -----------------------------------------------------------G overnment 7 8------------------------------------------------------

1
54
5

.4
38.7
.6

1.6
357.8
3.3

-

-

1 See footnote 1, table A -6 .
2 Few er than 100.
3 Includes other finished products made fro m fa b r ic s and sim ilar
m a teria ls.
4 Idleness resulting fr o m a w ork stoppage beginning in 1972.
5 Excludes ordnance, m achinery, and transportation equipment.
6 Includes p r o fe s sio n a l, scie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;
photographic and optica l goods; w atches and c lo c k s .
' The situations rep orted here have, fo r statistical pu rposes, been




Stoppages
beginning in
ve ar
W orkers
Numbor
involved

_
_
.

-

_

_
_
_
_
_
-

_

( 2)

.5

.

-

i

3.0

4 5 .0

-

-

36
56

2 4 .0
6 0 .4

577. 1
850.0

.

_

-

-

2
35
96

.4
11.6
112. 1

13.3
128.6
1, 361.9

.
_

_

-

-

_

deem ed to fa ll within the B ureau's definition of a w ork stoppage.
This
d ecision does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage
has taken place in violation of any law o r public p o lic y ,
8
The num ber of stoppages fo r all functions, occupations and lev els
m ay not equal the sum of its com ponents because individual stoppages
occu rrin g in 2 groups o r m ore have been counted in each.
NOTE:
equal totals.

B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not
Dashes denote z e r o s .

M ajor issu e

T otal

F ederal

County

State

City

School
d is tric t

Other
lo ca l
governm ent

Num ber o f stoppages
1

29

40

95

210

14

235
4
5
3
5
42
26
52
7
4
4

25
1
.
•
4
8
1
1
-

54
2
3
1
1
13
3
17
1
-

143
1
1
2
4
22
17
15
3
2

8
-

.
_
1
.
.
.
.
-

7
1
.
.
_
_
5
10
2
2
2

Total ------------------------------------

196.4

0. 5

12.3

13.4

17. 1

149.2

3 .9

W ages ------------------------------------------Supplem entary benefits ........ - ■
■
■
Wage adjustm ents —■—
—-----Hours o f w ork ............................. . ..
Other contractual m atters ———Union organization and secu rity '
Job secu rity
— -------------- ----Plant adm inistration - ..
Other w orking conditions ......... ■
Interunion o r intraunion m atters
Not rep orted ....—

159. 0
.6
.4
.4
1.8
10.7
13. 1
8.2
1. 0
.9
.4

_
.
.
0. 5
.
.
“

2 .7
.5
•
.
.
5.2
2. 7
.3
.6
.2

12. 5
.
.2
.
.
0

12. 6
(3)
. 1
(3)
.4
.7
.6
2. 5
.3
■

128.5
(!)
( 3)
.4
1.5
9.3
6.7
2 .2
.4
.
.2

2 .7

Total -----------------------------------W ages . ,. ... — ----------------------- -Supplem entary benefits
Wage adjustm ents — —
------- —------Hours of w ork —
- - - - ......• —
»
Other contractual m atters —— ...
Union organization and secu rity <
Job secu rity —n — . — ..........
—
Plant adm inistration
Other w orking conditions
Interunion or intraunion m atters
Not rep orted
—

*387

•

.
2
1
2
.
1

W orkers involved (in thousands)

. 5
(3)
.2
■

•
( 3)
.7
.3
.
.2
*

Days of idlen ess (in thousands)
T o t a l -----------------------------------W ages -------------------------------------------Supplem entary benefits Wage adjustm ents - ■ ■ -----------------■■
Hours o f w ork ......- —.
----------Other contractual m atters
Union organization and secu rity ■
Job secu rity ■ ■ '........
■—
Plant adm inistration ...-■■—
■
Other w orking conditions — Interunion or intraunion m atters
Not rep orted —-.................................

2 ,3 0 3 . 9
2 ,0 0 5 . 1
2 .7
2 .4
1. 7
23. 7
123. 7
91.9
37. 8
6.9
7 .5
.6

4. 6

133. 0

89.2

102. 8

1 ,9 2 0 .4

53 .9

4. 6

91 .6
2. 1
.
.
.
25. 1
5.2
1. 7
7.2
.2

79. 1
2. 1
_
.4
.
7 .3
( 3)
.2
~

73. 6
.4
.2
. 1
1.2
9 .8
6 .9
10.3
.3
-

1 ,7 4 1 .4
.3
(3)
1.6
22. 5
105. 1
3 0 .0
14.2
4 .9
.4

19.4
.
.
3 .7
2 9 .9
.8
.2

1 The situations rep orted here have, fo r statistical p u rposes, been
deem ed to fall within the Bu reau's definition o f a w ork stoppage.
This
d ecision does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage
has taken p lace in violation o f any law o r public p o lic y .
2 The num ber of stoppages for all le v e ls does not equal the sum
of its com ponents becau se individual stoppages o ccu rrin g in 2 groups




“

or m ore have been counted in each.
W ork ers involved and days o f id le ­
ness have been allocated among the r e s p e ctiv e groups.
s F ew er than 100.
NOTE:
equal totals.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums o f individual item s m ay not

Table A-17. Government w ork stoppages and union participation by major issue, 1973

M ajor issu e
Total

Called
or
supported
strike

Did not
ca ll or
support
strike

No
inform ation

Number of w ork stoppages
Total

- — -

-- — ..... - -.........

- - - -

n

— CiTTiH
or
supported
strike

Total

W orkers involved (in thousands)

o r intravtnion irintircro

^i

.....

37

23

208

15

12

1
2

j - p o n

327

235

Union organization and s e c u r it y ----------------------------- -

387

196.4

1

159.0
.6
*4
4
l! 8
10.7
13.1

5
42
26
52
7
4
4

5
36
24
35
7
3

3

3

1

1

14

3

185.8

5 .6

4. 9

153.7
.6
3

2 •4

2 .9

(*)
14

(2
")

(2
‘)
1.8

9 .8
12.4
5.2

8.2
1.0

3

.2

(2)
.5

2

1.0
.8
.2

.9
.4

1

1

" ‘ Did not-----ca ll or
No
support
inform ation
strike

.7
.7
.5

.l
.2

Days of idlen ess (in thousands)
Total

-

-

.......... .....

Su 6 lc c tar b cfit
Wage 6ad Ju " tme nt™ 6 1 8

ria n t^ d m h iictra tion
Not r^^orted" intrauni'on m atters
r por
1 The situations reported h ere have, fo r statistical purposes-, been
deem ed to fa ll within the Bureau's definition of a w ork stoppage.
This
does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage has taken
place in violation of any law or public p o lic y .




2

2 ,3 0 3 .9

2 ,1 3 6 .0

20.7

2 ,0 0 5 .1
2 .7
2 .4
1 .7
23.7
123.7
91.9
3 7 .8
6. 9
7. 5
.6

,

1, 884.0
2 .7
2 .3
.i
23.7
117.1
6 1 .8
29.7
6. 9
7 .3
#4

10.5
(2
")

1 |1*x ( , j
LI X
1 X
110.6

(2
‘)

1.6
1

.3

6! 8

5. 3
29 .9
1 .3

.2
.2

F ew er than 100.

NOTE:
equal totals.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums

of individual item s m ay not

Number of stoppages
O ccupation

Total

F ed era l

County

State

A ll o c c u p a t io n s --------------- ----------------------.------

2 387

T e a c h e r s ------------------------------------------- ------------ ---- ----N u r s e s ----------------------—-----------------— — ------- —
—------Other p r o f e s s i o n a l s ----------------------------------------------C l e r i c a l ------------------------------------------------------------------Sales -------------------------------------------- -------------- -----------Sanitation w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------Craft w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------------B lu e -co lla r and m an u a l----------------------------------------P o l i c e ----------------------------------------------------------------------F ir e fig h t e r s ------------------------------------------------------------Other p r o t e c t iv e ----------------------------------------------------S ervice w o r k e r s -------------- -------------------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l, tech n ica l, and c l e r i c a l ----------------C le rica l and b l u e - c o l l a r --------------------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l, technical, and b l u e - c o l l a r ----------P rotective and b l u e - c o l l a r ------------------------------------

117
2
26
9
1
9
8
97
5
2
12
5
24
21
48
3

1
"

196. 4

0. 5

12.3

_

.3

1

29

95

40

1

1
2
5
4
-

_
-

-

-

-

2
2
1

-

-

_

210

11
1
1
5
1
4
2
3
"

14

_
3

-

14
2

-

-

-

-

-

9
6
47
4
1
2
1
1
14
5
2

Other
lo ca l
governm ent

115

-

2
1

-

11
5
2
1
3
1

School
d is tric t

City

1
9
1
"

-

19
19
4
37
~

W orkers involved (in thousands)
______ ^

_

T e a c h e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------N urses --------------------------------------------------------------------Other p rofession a ls ----------------------------------------------C le rica l ------------------------------------------------------------------Sales -----------------------------------------------------------------------Sanitation w ork ers -----------------------------------------------Craft w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------------B lu e -co lla r and m an u a l----------------------------------------P o lice --------------------------------------------------------------------F ir e fig h t e r s -----------------------------------------------------------Other p r o t e c tiv e ----------------------- ----------------------------Service w ork ers ----------------------------------------------------P ro fe s s io n a l, technical, and c l e r i c a l ----------------C le r ica l and b l u e - c o l l a r --------------------------------------P ro fe s s io n a l, technical, and b lu e -c o lla r ---------P rotective and b l u e - c o l l a r ------------------------------------

51.4
.2
6. 6
.5
4. 5
.4
1.3
17.2
.6
.3
.8
.6
60.2
16.2
35. 0
.6

-

.5
-

-

-

. 1
. 1
4. 5
-

4. 1
.7
.4
-

■

.2
1.7
.2

4 .6

133. 0

_

2. 1

-

13.4

17.2

149.2

(3)
.2
.6
. 1

_
. 1
(3)

51. 1
5. 7
.3
1. 1
_
-

-

1.3
0
0
0
(3)
2.9
7 .5
.7
■

.4
.8
7. 0
. 6
.3
0
(3)
.2
6.3
1.0
.4

_

57. 1
2 .3
31. 6

3 .9

.
(3)
-

(3)
3. 6
_
. 1
_
_
_

"

Days of idlen ess (in thousands)
A ll occupations -------------------------------------------T e a c h e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------N urses -------------------------------------------------------------------Other p r o f e s s io n a ls ----------------------------------------------C lerica l ------------------------------------------------------------------Sales ----------------------------------------------------------------------—
Sanitation w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------Craft w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------------B lu e-colla r and m an u a l----------------------------------------P o lice ----------------------------------------- --------------------------F ir e fig h t e r s -----------------------------------------------------------Other p rotective ----------------------------------------------------Service w o r k e r s ------------------------ ------- ------------------—
P rofes s ion a l, technical, and c le r ic a l ---------------C lerica l and b l u e - c o l l a r --------------------------------------P rofes s ion a l, tech n ica l, and b l u e - c o l l a r ----------P rotective and blue - c o l l a r ------------------------------------

2 ,3 0 3 .9
620.7
.2
67,7
4. 0
17. 1
5.3
7.7
208. 0
1.7
1.8
4. 5
3 .3
1, 075.8
88 .0
196.9
1.2

-

-

-

. 1
1.9
17. 1
-

-

102.8

_

(3)
.2
4. 5
.3
-

-

4 .6
-

1 The situations reported h ere have, fo r statistical pu rp oses, been
deem ed to fa ll within the Bu reau's definition of a w ork stoppage.
This
d ecision does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage
has violated any law or public p o lic y .
2 The num ber of stoppages fo r all le v e ls does not equal the sum
of its com ponents because of individual stoppages occu rrin g in 2 groups




89.2

-

'

_
101.2
-

2 .8
.9
4 .8
1.7
.4

_
9 .7
.2
(3)
1. 0
.4
2 7 .4
39.9
5. 5
~

-

.2
(3)
-

5.3
2. 7
42. 8
1. 5
1.8
.7
(3)
.9
38. 8
7. 1
.9

1 ,9 2 0 .4
618.5
_
59. 1
1.7
_
_

_
_

6 .4

1 ,0 4 7 .5
4. 6
182.5
"

53.9

.
_
3. 7
-

_
.4
4 7 .8

_
-

-

1.9
,
_
~

or m ore have been counted in each.
W orkers involved and days of id le ­
ness have been allocated am ong the resp e ctiv e groups.
3 F ew er than 100.
NOTE:
equal totals.

B ecause of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums

of individual item s may not

P r o d u c tio n and
m a in t e n a n c e

P r o fe s s io n a l and
te ch n ica l

F u n ctio n

C le rica l

T o ta l
T each ers N u rses

O th er

S a n it a ­
C ra ft
t io n
w ork ers w ork ers

P r o te c tiv e

P o lic e

O th er

C
< o m b in a ­
t io n o f
p o lic e ,
F ir e - j
j
fir e ­
li g h t e r s ;
fig h te rs ,
and
oth ers

O th er 1
2
O th e r

N u m b er o f w o rk sto p p a g e s

A l l f u n c t i o n s -------------------------------------A d m i n i s t r a t i v e s e r v i c e s --------------------------W e l f a r e s e r v i c e s ----------------------------------------L a w e n f o r c e m e n t a n d c o r r e c t i o n ---------F i r e p r o t e c t i o n ---------------------------------------------S a n it a t io n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------E d u c a t i o n --------------------------------------------------------S t r e e t s a n d h i g h w a y s ----------------------------------P a r k , r e c r e a t i o n , l i b r a r i e s , e t c --------H o s p i t a l s a n d h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ---------------T ra n s p o r ta tio n and a llie d
f a c i l i t i e s -------------------------------------------------------O t h e r u t i l i t i e s ----------------------------------------------O t h e r -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m b i n a t i o n s --------------------------------------------------

387

1 17

10
8
18
1
20
224
10
3
15

_

17
12
4
47

2

26

9

1 17
-

2

4
15
2
4

-

>

"

"

1

9

8

97

5

2

4
_
1
4
-

-

_

_

!

_

_

_

8
-

4
-

4
1
7
25
9
1
2

5
.
-

.
1
-

_
_
-

12
.
_
-

1

2
1

14
7
3
24

-

1
-

-

-

■

■

-

“

2
3
1
20

0. 8

1 1 7 .2

■

12

10 2

_
_

1
3
1
_
63
1
7

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d (in th o u sa n d s )

--------------------------------------

1 9 6 ,4

A d m i n s i t r a t i v e s e r v i c e s --------------------------W e l f a r e s e r v i c e s -----------------------------------------L a w e n f o r c e m e n t a n d c o r r e c t i o n ---------F i r e p r o t e c t i o n ----------------------------------------- —
S a n it a t io n s e r v i c e s -------------------------------------E d u c a t i o n --------------------------------------------------------S t r e e t s a n d h i g h w a y s ----------------------------------P a r k , r e c r e a t i o n , l i b r a r i e s , e t c , ------H o s p i t a l s a n d h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ---------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n an d a llie d
f a c i l i t i e s --------------------------------------------------------O t h e r u t i l i t i e s ----------------------------------------------— - — ----------O t h e r —------------------------ ——
C o m b i n a t i o n s -------------------------------------------------

.8
3. 1
1 .6
.3
1 .0
1 5 3 .2
.6
.2
3 .1

A ll fu n c tio n s

0 .4

0 .5

5 1 .4

.4
5. 8
-

5 1 .4

.2

( 3)
. 1
-

9 .3
1 .7
4. 7
1 6 .9

.2

1. 3

_

( 3)
-

( 3)
-

.3
-

( 3)
.4
-

.4
■
-

-

-

-

( 3)

.5
.4

-

1 7 .2
.6
1 .2
.2
3 .0
.6
. 1
(3)
6. 7
.7
.2
3. 8

0 .6

0 .3

_

_

.6
-

-

.3

-

-

.
.8
-

( 3)
-

-

( 3)
-

2 .7

-

-

-

( 3)
1 .5
.2
9 2 .6

-

2 .6
.5
4. 5
1 2 .5

-

N u m b e r o f d a y s o f id le n e s s (in th o u s a n d s )
A l l f u n c t i o n s --------------------------------------- 2 . 3 0 3 . 9
2. 3
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e s e r v i c e s --------------------------28. 1
W e l f a r e s e r v i c e s ------------------------------------------6 .5
L a w e n f o r c e m e n t a n d c o r r e c t i o n ---------1 .8
F i r e p r o t e c t i o n ---------------------------------------------8 .5
S a n it a t io n s e r v i c e s ------------------ ------------------E d u c a t i o n —----------------------------------------------------- 1 , 9 5 0 . 7
7 .2
S t r e e t s a n d h i g h w a y s --------------------------------.2
P a r k , r e c r e a t i o n , l i b r a r i e s , e t c -------8 .3
H o s p i t a l s a n d h e a lt h s e r v i c e s ---------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n an d a llie d
164. 8
f a c i l i t i e s -------------------------------------------------------1 1 .1
O t h e r u t i l i t i e s -----------------------------------------------O t h e r --------------------------- —------- ———————- ——
2 0 .9
9 3 .5
C o m b i n a t i o n s ------- ------------------------------------ —

6 2 0 .7

0 .2

67. 7

5 .3

7 .7

.4

-

-

62. 2
-

620. 7

.2

1 .2
1 1 .1

-

-

2 0 8 .0

.4

. 3

( 3)
3. 8

-

-

( 3)
3 .6
-

-

■

2 .0

1 .2
11. 1
6 .4
. 1
( 3)

-

1 .2

5 .2

-

-

1 T h e s itu a tio n s r e p o r t e d h e r e h a v e , f o r s t a t is t ic a l p u r p o s e s , b e e n
d e e m e d t o f a l l w it h i n t h e B u r e a u 1 s d e f i n i t i o n o f a w o r k s t o p p a g e .
T h is
d e c i s i o n d o e s n o t c o n s t i t u t e a l e g a l d e t e r m i n a t i o n th a t a w o r k s t o p p a g e
h a s t a k e n p l a c e in v i o l a t i o n o f a n y l a w o r p u b l i c p o l i c y .
2 I n c lu d e s c o m b in a t io n o f o c c u p a t io n s .




4 .0

4 .6
. 8

( 3)

3

F e w e r th a n

NOTE:
equ al to ta ls .

1 4 8 .0
5 .0
3 .8
2 0 .0

1 .7

1 .8

4 .5

.
-

-

-

1 .7
-

-

4 .5
.
-

1. 8

-

( 3)

-

-

-

"

"

.4
1 6 .6
.4
1, 2 5 3 . 1
. 8
.
4. 1

-

“

1 .3 J & 3 -

“

16. 8
1 .5
17. 1
7 1 .4

100.

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s
D a s h e s d e n o te z e r o s .

of

in d i v i d u a l

it e m s

m ay

not

( W o r k e r * a n d d a y s in t h o u s a n d s )

S ta te
T ota l

A l l u n io n s and
a s s o c ia t io n s
O ffic ia lly
N ot
recog­
recog­
n iz e d
n iz e d

O th e r u n io n s 2

A F L -C IO
No
in fo r ­
m a tio n

O ffic ia lly
recog­
n iz e d

N ot
recog­
n iz e d

No
in fo r ­
m a tio n

O ffic ia lly
recog­
n iz e d

N ot
recog­
n iz e d

No
in fo r ­
m a tio n

E m p lo y e e
a s s o c ia tio n
O ffic ia lly
N ot
No
recog­
in fo r ­
recog ­
n iz e d
n iz e d
m a tio n

N o u n io n
or
a s s o c i­
a t io n

N u m b e r o f w o r k s t o p p t ig e s
A l l S t a t e s ---------------------------

J3 8 7

335

41

12

147

12

5

35

3

4

153

13

3

13

A la b a m a
—----------------------------------A l a s k a ---------------------------- ------------A r i z o n a -------- — —------------_ _ _ _ _ _ _
A r k a n s a s ------------- — — — --------C a l i f o r n i a ------------— -------------------

6
2
1
13

3
1
1
13

3
1
-

„
-

3
1
.
.

!

.

_

_

_

_

1
.
-

_
.
-

.
-

_
-

.
-

_
-

1
.
-

6

1

-

-

.
1
6

!
_
-

C o l o r a d o --------------------— -------------C o n n e c t i c u t —— ------- — ------------D e l a w a r e ---------- ---------- — ---------D i s t r i c t o f C o l u m b i a --------------F l o r i d a -------------------------------------------

3
4
4
4

3
4
4
-

_

_

G e o r g i a ---------— ------------------------—
H a w a i i -------------------------------------------I d a h o ----------------------------------------------I l l i n o i s ----------- --------------------------------I n d i a n a --------------------------------------------

7
1
32
7

-

-

_

_
-

3

1

-

1
1
.
27
6

5
5
1

1
.
.
.
-

-

-

_

_ ■

.
_

.
-

-

.
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1
.

1
.
2

.
.
.
_

.
.

-

-

3
1

.
.
.
-

-

2
1
4
-

19
1

-

-

-

1
3
-

_

_

_

.
-

.
-

-

2

-

-

_
1

_
_
-

.
1
.
5
4

1
.
2
1

1
.
.
.

3
_

-

-

1

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5
-

I o w a —— — — --------------------------K a n s a s ------------------------------------------K e n t u c k y ---------------------------------------L o u i s i a n a — ------------— - — --------M a in e ------------------------------- ------——

3
-

2
-

-

1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

a r y l a n d ------------------------------ — —
a s s a c h u s e t t s ................. ............ —
i c h i g a n ---------------------------------------i n n e s o t a ------------- — —— ------i s s i s s i p p i ----------------------------------

4
6
73
1

3
6
70
1

1
2
-

1
-

2
5
22
1

1
-

_

-

_
-

_
2
-

.

-

.
1
42
-

.

-

1
6
-

1
-

-

“

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M i s s o u r i ----------------------------------- —
M o n t a n a —-------------------------------------N e b r a s k a - — ------- — ---------- --------N e v a d a —------- --------------------— ------N e w H a m p s h i r e ------------------------

5
2
1

4
2
1

1
-

-

3
1
1

_
-

-

1
-

-

.
-

_
-

_
-

-

M
M
M
M
M

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

2

“

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

.
-

-

-

N e w J e r s e y ------------- — --------------N e w M e x i c o ---------------— -----------N e w Y o r k - — ------------------------------ N o r t h C a r o l i n a ------------------------ --N o r t h D a k o t a ---------- --------------------

18
2
16
3

17
2
12
1

.
-

1
4
2

5
2
6
1

_
.
-

1
4

3
2
-

_

_

_

_

.

-

.
-

9
4
-

-

.
-

.
2

-

-

-

“

-

-

O h i O ------------------------------------ T _____
-r
O k l a h o m a —--------------------------------O r e g o n —— —------------------------ ------P e n n s y l v a n i a —----------------------------R h o d e I s l a n d --------------------------------

44
2
5
65
6

41
-

2
2
1
2

1
.
-

16
-

-

'

3
20
4

2
1

-

-

-

-

1
.

1
-

1
-

-

20
1
29
2

-

11

-

2

-

-

“

-

.

_

_

_

_

.

-

.

-

.

-

-

3
4

-

1

-

3

2
1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

.

_

.

_

2

1
6
1
24

1
2
1

-

1

-

-

-

1
-

3
1
8

1

-

-

-

-

"

"

"

“

1

-

_

-

7
3
24
1

S e e fo o tn o te s at en d o f ta b le .




3

5
.

_

S o u t h C a r o l i n a -------— ---------------S o u t h D a k o t a — ------------------------T e n n e s s e e — ------—------------ ---------T e x a s ----------------------------------------------------U t a h ------------------------------------------------------V e r m o n t ------------------------- — --------------V i r g i n i a ---------------------------------------------W a s h i n g t o n — ---------------------- —
W e s t V i r g i n i a —---------------- ------—
W i s c o n s i n ------------------------------------W y o m in g

4
60
6

_

"

“

“

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

-

“

-

_

_

.
-

-

-

-

.

-

2

-

1

-

.
-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

.

-

-

-

-

1

3

-

-

-

-

16

-

-

1
1
-

"

"

"

"

(W ork ers and days in thousands)
A ll unions and
associa tion s
O fficially
Not
recog­ recog­
nized
nized

T otal

Em ployee
No union
a ssociation
or
Officially
No
Not
No
in fo r ­
r e c o g ­ r e c o g ­ in fo r ­ a s s o c i ­
ation
m ation
m ation
nized
nized

Other unions2

A F L -C IO
O fficially
Not
No
in fo r ­
recog ­ recog ­
mation
nized
nized

O fficially
No
Not
in fo r ­
recog ­
recog ­
mation
nized
nized

Number of w ork ers involved
A ll S t a t e s -------------------

3 1 9 6 .4

Alabama -----------------------------Alaska --------------------------------A rizona -------------------------------Arkansas ----------------------------C a lifo r n ia -----------------------------

.7
(4)
.7

6

.4

4

187. 0

.3

1. 1

123. 6

1.9

-

.1
(4)
-

(4)
(4)

-

-

.8

_
-

8

_
-

.1
(4)
.7

.1
.(4)

.4

6

.4

-

-

.6
.7
2. 2

_
-

4

.

3

0

.

2

. _ .5 5 . Q . , . . . ! • !
(4)

-

1 .8
2. 2

.5

.5

(4)

-

(4)

G eorgia -------------------------------Hawaii ----------------------------------

1. 6

1. 2
7

.2
-

1. 2

7 .9

.2
-

-

.9

1. 1

.9

.7
.2

_
-

.

.6

.3

.

-

.2

28

I o w a -------------------------------------Kansas —-----------------------------K e n tu ck y ------------------------------Louisiana ---------------------------M a in e -----------------------------------

.9

28

.2

3

2 6 .8

.

-

-

3.6

_
-

.
_
-

_
.
-

1. 1

-

_
-

-

-

-

.4

-

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

7-9

.
-

.4
(4)

I

_

-

(4)

(4)

-

3

.7

_
_
-

(4)

-

-

-

_

3

1. 0

.

:

-

.
_
-

1

.
-

.

.6
2

(4)
2

-

(4)

1

“

.9
.1

.2
1. 7
46. 2
.1

.7
.2
(4)

.5
.2
(4)

1 .4
1. 7
46

M issou ri ----------------------------M on tan a-------------------------------N ebraska ----------------------------Nevada,---------------------------------New H am pshire ------------------

4

New J e rs e y -------------------------New M exico -----------------------New Y ork ---------------------------North Carolina ------------------North Dakota -----------------------

4

Ohio ------------------------------------O k la h om a ----------------------------O regon --------------------------------Pennsylvania ----------------------Rhode Island -----------------------

22

.2
.0
1. 4
3. 0
.6
.

1. 2

.4

.4
30.7
5.8

.4
30.6
5.8

2

Utah -------------------------------------

.2
.3

2

.

-

.

’

2

2

_
-

21. 9

South Carolina -------------------South D a k ota --------------------- —
T en nessee -------------------------—

.2
-

4

3 .9
1. 4
2.8
.5

1

.

1

p

(4)

.2
(4)

See footnotes at end of table.

(4)

.4
.2
(4)

16. 1

-

(4)

_

"

.2
_
3. 1

_

_
_
_

1. 4

3
1

•9
.5

(4)

14. 9

-

-

(4)
24. 4
2.4

(4)

_

-

-

.6

“

(4)

(4)

(4)

.1
_
_

(4)

"

.6
.3
.1
13. 6
-

-

_

_

.4

.4

-

_

2

.

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

_
_

1. 5

2

.

1

_

_

_

_

1. 1

_
_

1

I

_

_

_

-

_

.7
-

3

.2
_

-

-

-

_
.1

(4)

4 .9

(4)

-

-

(4)

.3
5.8
3. 4

(4)

(4)

(4)

.

.4
“

_

-

-

-

-

-

”

“

■

“

1. 6

“

_

-

(4)
.

(4)

-

-

4

-

-

_

~

16. 6

(4)
(4)

_

“

1. 0
1. 4

_

_
-

-

_

-

6
1 .5
.1

1. 2

(4)
.
.

Verm ont -----------------------------.7
1. 6
.2
16. 1

_
.4

(4)
1. 7
26. 5
.1

(4)

-

-

.6

(4)

_
-

-

.6

Q i .4 ..

-

-

-

1 .8
2. 2




8

-

4

1. 2

Washington ------------------------West V irginia ---------------------W isconsin ---------------------------Wyoming ----------------------—----

3

-

1. 2

M aryland ----------------------------M assachusetts --------------------M ic h ig a n ------------------------------M innesota ---------------------------M ississip p i -------------------------

.
-

C o lo ra d o -------------------------------C on n ecticu t--------------------------D elaw are ----------------------------D istrict of Colum bia — -------F lorid a --------------------------------

Illinois --------------------------------Indiana ----------------------------------

0

■

-

-

-

_
(4)

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

'

(4)

.1
_
>
-

.

’

-

-

1. 2

_

_
2. 5

(*)

2

-

M

(4)

_

_
_

-

-

-

(4)

(W ork ers and says in thousands)
A l l u n i o n s an d
a ssocia tion s
O fficially
Not
recogrecognized
nized

State
T otal

D fficially
recognized

Not
recog­
nized

E m p loy ee
a ssocia tion
No
O fficially
Not
No
in for­
recogrecog­
in for­
m ation | nized
nized
m ation

O t h e r u n i o n s 1*
2

A F L -C IO
No
in form ation

No
in fo r­
m ation

O fficially
recog­
nized

Not
recog­
nized

No union
or
S SOC llon

N u m b e r o f d a y •s o f i d l e n e s s

A ll S t a t e s ------------------Alabam a —--------------------------A laska —-------------------------------A r iz o n a --------------------------------A r k a n s a s ------------------------------C a lifo r n ia -----------------------------

32, 3 0 3 . 9

2 ,1 8 6 .1

8. 5
2. 4
2. 1

4 .9
2. 4
2. 1

109- 3

8. 5

3. 6
(4)

-

1, 5 6 3 . 0

1 0. 9

4 .9
2. 4

3. 2

0. 3

( 4)

-

179. 5

83. 1

4. 6

.

.

_

44 3. 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12. 3

3. 6

3. 1

2. 1

_

. 1
-

“

. 3
-

-

35. 1

35. 1

-

-

8. 0

-

-

(4)

-

-

27. 0

-

-

-

C o l o r a d o ------------------------------Connecticut -------------------------D e la w a re ------------------------------D istrict of C olu m b ia -----------F l o r i d a ---------------------------------

9. 5
6. 5
8 .8

9. 5
6. 5
8 .8

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

6. 0
2. 0

_

-

3. 5
4. 5
8 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 6

2. 5

( 4)

-

-

(4)

G e o r g ia --------------------------------Hawaii ---------------------------------Idaho -----------------------------------Illinois --------------------------------Indiana ---------------------------------

7. 1
7 9- 0

6. 2
7 9. 0

309. 3
9 .9

3. 6

Iowa ------------------------------------Kansas --------------------------------K en tu ck y ------------------------------L o u is ia n a -------------------------—
Maine -----------------------------------M a ssa ch u setts---------------------M innesota ---------------------------M ississip p i -------------------------M is s o u r i -----------------------------M on tan a-------------------------------N eb ra sk a -----------------------------Nevada --------------------------------New Ham pshire --------------—

2.
2.
642.
1.

1
7
6
3

83. 7
1 .6
(4)
1. 5
48.
5.
117.
8.

Ohio ------------------------------------O k la h om a -----------------------------

97. 2
.8
6. 1
652.8
40. 5

South Carolina --------------------South D a k o ta -----------------------Ten nessee ---------------------------T e x a s ------------------------------------Utah ------------------------------------Verm ont ----------------------------V irginia ----------------------------Washington -----------------------West V irginia ---------------------W isconsin — -------------- —------Wyoming ------- —---------------------

-

. 5

. 3

-

-

30 4. 0
4. 4

5. 3
5. 5

_

1 .7

1 .9

. 2
6. 2
30 0. 9
. 3

3. 7

. 2

"

3
4
6
3

•9
2. 7
638. 2
1. 3

2. 1
1. 6

1. 2
-

-

1. 6

2 .8

“

-

8 1.6
_

(4)

-

-

1. 5

48.
5.
117.
7.

3
4
3
0

_
_
-

_

2. 0
1. 4

-

1. 2
-

’
( 4)
. 3
1. 3

96. 0
_

1. 2
.8

(4)

6. 0
647. 5
40. 5

(4)
1. 1

_
4. 2

■

“

1. 5

26.
5.
16.
7.

_

_
-

-

. 3

. 4

-

-

-

1 .6
5. 5

_

-

-

-

1. 6

2. 8

-

-

-

-

-

.

.
_

_

_

-

-

"

-

79- 0

_

•9
(4)

_

_

2. 2
4. 1

-

1. 5

“

-

-

38. 1

.2
-

-

-

8 1 .6
_

-

( 4)
. 3

-

_

-

-

. 1
180. 0

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1. 5

-

(4)

16. 4
-

_

_

89- 2

-

-

_
-

_

. 3

5. 6
11. 7

-

“

-

29. 4

1. 1
-

( 4)

■
.

.

.8
(4)

-

-

-

3. 2
59 6. 7
1 8. 9

5. 0

-

3. 8

■

“

"

"

-

2. 8
45. 8
21.6

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

”

“

1 .6

2. 6

( 4)

-

2 2.8
-

-

(4)
-

. 1

( 4)

-

_
-

-

-

1. 3

-

(4)

4 .2

43. 7
-

-

. 1

-

-

3
4
5
0

2. 2

-

-

(4)

1. 6
4. 2

7
6
2
3

_

-

-

.
2.
42 0.
1.

_

_

1-9

.
-

-

-

.4

.9

"

”

1. 5
”

( 4)
(4)

-

2.
8.
1.
89.

0
7
1
3
4

1 .9
7 .9
1. 0
89. 3
"

( 4)
. 1
.
. 4

.8
.
"

1 .9
2. 5
1. 0
69. 1
"

1 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical purposes, been
deem ed to fall within the Bureau's definition of a w ork stoppage. This
does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage has taken
place in violation of any law o r public p olicy. Recogn ition indicates that
a governm ent agency has accepted a union or associa tion as the r e p r e ­
sentative o f its em ployees.
2 Includes 2 o r m ore unions with different affiliations, i. e. A F L CIO and independent unions.




(4)
-

-

New J e r s e y ------------------- ------New M exico ------------------------New York ----------------------------North C a r o lin a --------------------North D akota------------------------

Pennsylvania ---------------------Rhode I s la n d ------------------------

-

-

-

-

■

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

.8
-

_

_
_

-

-

-

5. 4
2 0. 1

"

.4

"

(4)
-

-

*

-

"

(4)

-

"

(4)

"

3 Stoppages extending a c r o s s State lines have been counted in each
State affected: W orkers involved and days idle w ere allocated among the
States.
4 Few er than 100.
5 Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal
totals. Dashes denote z e ro s .

W ork stop p a ges
R e g i o n a n d S t a te
N u m ber

U n it e d S t a t e s

--------------------------------------------------------

5. 353

264
R E G I O N I ---------------------------------------------------------------------C o n n e c t i c u t — — ----------------------------------------------------------- -------------------- 51----------12
M a in e
1 42
M a s s a c h u s e t t s -----------------------------------------------------------—
16
N e w H a m p s h i r e ------------------- ------------------------------------------30
R h o d e I s l a n d ------------------------------------------------- ------------------3
V e r m o n t -----------------------------------------------------------------------------588

D a y s o f id le n e s s

M ean
d u r a tio n

2

W ork ers
in v o lv e d
(t h o u s a n d s )

2 4 .0

2. 2 5 0 . 7

3 1 .3
42. 7
1 3 .5
2 3 .5
5 5 .0

7 8 .9

N u m ber
(th o u s a n d s)

27. 9 4 8 .4

1 2 2 .9

2 .3
3 4 .7
1. 1
1 3 .3
.7

0 .1 3
3 .3 0
.0 3
.0 9
.0 5

3 5 .9
23. o
4 1 .4

226. 1
7 7 .0
149. 1

2. 7 07 . 3
1 ,0 9 8 .9
1 , 6 0 8 .3

. 11
. 18
. 10

4 6 4 .7
11. 8
3 .0

4, 3 2 7 . 6
106 . o
7 0 .3
250. 1
3 ,0 3 1 .8
2 6 1 .9
6 0 7 .5

.1 9
.1 9
.0 9
.0 9
.2 4
.0 8
.5 3

2. 7 6 2 .5
3 * 5 .2
3 8 5 .5
228. 8
7 1 0 .3
1 1 4 .9
6 2 .6
78. 8
7 9 6 .4

.0 9
. 16
.0 7
.0 6
. 33
.0 8

--------------------

12.6

k .i

202

R E G I O N I I I ------------------------------------------------------------------D e l a w a r e -------------------------------—--------------- ------—-----------------D i s t r i c t o f C o l u m b i a --------------------------—------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------- — --------M a r y la n d
P e n n s y l v a n i a ------------—--------------— ---------- ------------ ---------V i r g i n i a --------------------------- ---------------------------- --------------------W e s t V i r g i n i a -------------------------------------------------------------------

1 .5 7 7
24
13
69
623
234
614

1 4 .4
1 3 .3
9 .6
1 9 .0
22 . 8
5. 8
6 .9

R E G I O N I V -----------------------------------------------------------------A1 a V > f im a _____________________

635
90
74
77
205
25
45
15
104

1 8 .5
24. 5
2 8 .5
1 3 .9
1 2 .5
1 3 .9
8 .9
8 8 .3
3 0 .1

210.0

15. 1

10 .6
19.2
13. 8

8 5 0 .8
2 8 7 .0
8 5 .2
210. 7
216. 7
4 0 .6

F l o r i d a -------------------------------------------------------------------------------G e o r g i a - - - - - -- -------------------- -----------------------------------------------K en tu ck y -- ---_
_
M i s s i s s i p p i -----------------------------------------------------------------------N o r t h C a r o l i n a ----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------— ------------------ ---------- ------------—
S ou th C a r o lin a
T e n n e s s e e ------------------------------------------------------------------------R E G IO N V

-------------------------------------------------------------------

I n d ia n a --------------------------------------------------------------------------------M i c h i g a n -------------------------------------------------------------- ------------M i n n e s o t a ——
—— — —— — ————-------- —-------- -------—O h io _______________________________ - ______________________
W i s c o n s i n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 ,5 1 2
372
1 90
262
76
502

19.8
201.8
5 5 .6
1 7 2 .7

2 6 .4
1 6 .3
2 4 .5
8 4 .3
1 1 .5
9 .5
1. 7
35. 8

10 .6

11 0

4 5 .4
1 8 .7
1 8 .3

N e w M e x i c o --------------- ---------------—-------- ---------------------——
O k l a h o m a --------------------------------------------------------------------------T e x a s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

223
26
54
18
28
97

3 9 .9
24. 4
41. 7
4 7 .2
39. 8
41. 6

R E G I O N V I I ---------------------------------------------------------------I o w a -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------K a n s a s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------M is s o u r i
INe D T a sK a

248
73
26
130
19

2 2. 6

R E G I O N V I I I --------------------------------------------------------------C o l o r a d o ----------------------------------------------------------------------------M on ta n a
N o r t h D a k o t a ----------------------------------- --------------------------------S o u t h D a k o t a — ----------------------------------------------------------------

101

8. 1 2 0 . 9
------------------ ^ 7 5 5 . 1
9 2 3 .7
1, 7 8 8 . 8
335. 6
2, 6 4 7 . 5
6 7 0 .2

5 7 .9
7 .0
16. 7
3 .9

R E G I O N V I ............................................................................
A r k a n s a s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

W y o m in g

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

44
18
13

12
8
6

R E G I O N I X ------------------------------------------------------------------A r is o n s
C a l i f o r n i a ____—_______ _ ______ 1____________ _________
_
_
H a w a i i --------------------------------------------------------------------------------N e v a d a ----------------------------------------------; ----------------------------------

390
37
323

R E G I O N X ------------------------------------------------------------------A l a s k a --------------------------------------------------------------------------------T J .tin
_ — _
_ _____ . . . . .
_
_ .

150

O r e g o n --------------------------------------------------------------------------------W a s h i n g t o n ------------------------------------------------------------------------

11
19

8
16
64
62

1 S t o p p a g e s e x t e n d i n g a c r o s s S t a te l i n e s h a v e b e e n c o u n t e d
in e a c h S t a te a f f e c t e d ; w o r k e r s i n v o l v e d a n d d a y s i d l e w e r e
a llo c a t e d a m o n g th e S ta te s .




0 .1 6

1 .5 4 2 .8
-------------------- l o S T
1 8 .3
4 8 0 .3
3 4 .6
1 9 8 .5
4. 8

R E G I O N II ------------------------------------------------------------------N e w J e r s e y ------------------ ----------------------------------------------------N e w Y o r k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

386

A s a p ercen t
o f p r iv a t e
n o n a g r ic u lt u r a l
w o r k in g t im e

1 5 .4
1 5 .7
2 3 .5
73. 6
22. 7
------------------ 2 7 7 0 --------

6.6
17. 1

2 1.0
35. 1
3. 8

22 . 8
8 .4
2 4 .2
1 8 .6
1 0 .4
3 1 .3
5 6 .3
24. 6
3 2 .6
2 8 .0

NOTE:
B ecau se
n ot eq u al to ta ls ,

.2 0
.01

.01
.0 4
.2 4
. 19
. 16

.2 1
. 17
. 11
.2 9
. 17

2. 3 8 4 .3
1 2 1 .3
501. 1
1 4 0 .9
169. 8
1, 4 5 1 . 1

. 13
.0 9
. 21

9 4 .5
24. 8
2. 8
6 2 .2
4. 8

1. 6 7 7 . 0
-------------------3 0 .7
1, 0 1 6 . 3
366. 4

. 17
. 13

23. 8
15. 8
4 .9
. 7

3 1 6 .9
2 6 3 .3
2 6 .3

. 06
. 14
.0 6
.0 3

6. 2
2 4 .0

isr.i

10 .0
6. 2

.6
1. 1

.22
. 10
. 17

.02
.2 6
. 34

.5

2 .0

.02
. 01
.01

1 8 8 .0
8 .3
1 6 5 .6
9 .6
4 .5

2. 9 4 2 .5
5 3 .5
2, 758. 5
97. 1
3 3 .4

. 13
. 04
. 15
.0 3
.0 7

5 5 .9
.7
3. 8
37*. 8
1 3 .6

o f r o u n d in g ,

9. 1

1.

su m s

1 6 6 .5
27. 8
54. 3
8 2 1 .7
262. 8

.2 0
. 15
. 11
.4 4
. 11

o f in d i v i d u a l i t e m s

m ay

P r o fe s s io n a l
and
te ch n ica l

R e g io n a n d S ta te
T ota l

C le r ic a l

S a le s w o r k e r s

B lu e c o lla r

P r o te c tiv e

I

S e r v ic e

C o m b in a t io n s

_________________ i_________________
1
N u m b er o f w ork stop p a ges

5. 353

211

30

76

4. 848

23

1 35

365

R E G I O N I ------------C o n n e c t ic u t
M a in e
M a ssa ch u setts N e w H a m p s h ir e
R h o d e I s l a n d -----V e r m o n t ---------—

264
61
12
142
16
30
3

13
5
1
2
2
3

2
_

11
2
_

2
_
.
2
.
_

5
1

16
2
1

4
.
_

8
1
4

-

-

-

215
51
9
1 17
12
23
3

-

-

-

R E G IO N n ■
N ew J e r s e y —
N e w Y o r k -------

588
202
386

33
7
26

4
1
3

10
6
4

478
164
314

3
3
-

20
5
15

40
16
24

1 ,5 7 7
24
13
69
623
234
614

31
_
_
1
28
_

6

17
_
1
1
12
_

1

1 ,4 3 5
21
9
58
522
226
599

4
_
_
.
4
_

2

15
_
.
4
9
1
1

“

3

69
3
3
5
43
7
8

635
90
74
77
205
25
45
15
104

5
_
2
3
_
.
_
_

3
.
.
3
_
.
.
_

6
.
.
3
.
2
1

!
.
1
_
_
_
_

14
2
6
2
3
.
1
.

-

-

-

568
82
59
62
194
25
39
13
94

-

-

3
1
10

1, 5 1 2
372
1 90
262
76
502
110

97
19
6
37
1
19
15

6
_
_

14
4
_

4
_

7
1
.
_

-

3
1
4
2

1 ,2 3 8
323
1 70
1 77
63
429
76

26
6
3
8
3
4
2

124
20
10
33
8
40
13

R E G IO N V I •
A r k a n s a s ---------L o u i s i a n a ---------N ew M e x ic o
O k la h o m a —
T e x a s -----------

223
26
54
18
28
97

2
_
_
_
_

1
_
_
.
_

1
_
_
_
_

11
2
5
1
1
2

10
_

R E G I O N V II I o w a ---------------------K a n s a s ---------------M i s s o u r i ------------N e b r a s k a -----------

248
73
26
1 30
19

4
1
1

R E G IO N V m
C o l o r a d o --------------M o n t a n a ---------------N o rth D ak ota
S o u th D a k o ta
U t a h -----------------W y o m in g

U n it e d S t a t e s

. R E G IO N HI
D e la w a r e
D is t r ic t o f C o lu m b ia
M a r y l a n d --------------------—
P e n n s y l v a n i a --------------V i r g i n i a -----------------------W e s t V i r g i n i a -------------R E G IO N IV ■
A l a b a m a ----------F l o r i d a -------------G e o r g i a ------------K e n t u c k y ----------M is s is s ip p i
N o r th C a r o lin a •
S ou th C a r o lin a •
T e n n e s s e e -------R E G IO N V I l l i n o i s -------------I n d i a n a ---------- —
M i c h i g a n ----------M i n n e s o t a -------O h io -------------------

2

1
1
_
.

.
_
5
_

2

1
l

8
_
.

1

2

1
.
_

5
1
_
4

-

-

-

101
44
18
13
12
8
6

3
2
1
_
_
_

_
_
_
.
_

-

-

-

R E G IO N IX
A r i z o n a -------------C a lifo r n ia
H a w a ii -----N e v a d a — ------------

390
37
323
11

16
2
12
1
1

3
_

6
.
5
1

R E G IO N X A l a s k a ---------------

1 50
8
16
64
62

19

O r e g o n -------W a s h in g to n

S ee

fo o t n o t e s

at end o f ta b le .




_

2
1

1
.
1
_
_

-

-

_
_

4

_
-

7

3
4

1
3

2
5

7

.
.

198
24
46
17
25
86
210
65
24
1 05
16
84
35
13
11
11
8
6

4
2

_
_
_
_
_
-

1

38
6
7
6
5
_

3
_
2
5

1
.
1
_

8
1
_

19
4
_

6

-

-

12
3

4
2
2
_
_
_

9
5
1
2
1
_

_
_
_
.
_
_
-

-

-

308
34
257
4
13

2
.

27

2

1

28
1
22
3
2

114
8
13
50
43

3

3

12

3

1
2

2
3
7

.
.

.
_

.

25
1

_
-

_

P rofe ssio n a l
and
technical

R egion and State
Total

C le rica l

Salesw orkers

Blue
co lla r

P ro te ctiv e

S ervice

Com binations

Number of w o rk e rs (in thousands)
United States ---

2, 250. 7

REGION I h.......-.......
Connecticut --------------Maine -----------------------M assachusetts ---------New Hampshire -------Rhode Island ------------Verm ont ......................

78.
26.
2.
34.
1.
13.
.

REGION H |
-----------New Jersey --------------New Y ork —.............. —

9
8
3
7
1
3
7

67.9

2. 8

3. 5
1. 8

( 2)

( Z)

31. 6

( 2)

1. 720.2

1.9

71. 2

355.0

1. 7
.7
.
1.0

62. 3
22. 4
2 .2
28. 8
.8
7 .4
.7

.2
_
_
.2
_
_

.2

10. 8
1. 8

.1
. 1
-

.4
.2
1. 0
-

( 2)
-

-

226. 1
77.0
149. 1

8. 6
1. 3
7 .4

.3
( 2)
.2

6. 7
5. 7
1. 0

154. 5
6 1 .4
93. 1

REGION HI |
---------D elaw are —....................
D istrict of Colum bia M aryland ------------------Pennsylvania ------------Virginia --------------------W est Virginia ----------

464.
11.
3.
19.
201.
55.
172.

7
8
0
8
8
6
7

4 .9
( 2)
4. 7
_
. 1

.2
.2
_

15. 6
1. 1
14.4

385. 8
5. 0
1. 7
16.0
142.0
53.5
167. 6

REGION IV ---------Alabama ---------- --------F lo r id a ----------------------G eorgia ----- ------- -------K en tu ck y -------------------M ississip p i --------------North Carolina ---------South Carolina — ........
T ennessee -----------------

210. 0
26. 4
16. 3
24. 5
84. 3
11. 5
9 .5
1. 7
35. 8

.3
_
.2

REGION V ----------Illinois -------- -------------Indiana ........ ..................
M ichigan .......-...............
M innesota ---------------Ohio ...............................
W isconsin -----------------

850.8
287 .0
85. 2
210.7
10. 6
216.7
40. 6

REGION VI j ---------Arkansas ------------------Louisiana ..... ...............
New M exico -------------Oklahoma ----------------Texas ------------------------

_

( 2)

_
_
_

.2
_
_
.2
.
_
_
.

-

1. 3
_
.
.3
_
1.0

57.9
7. 0
16. 7
3. 9
6.2
24.0

1.6
.
_
.
.
1.6

.3
_
_
.3

REGION VII u--------Iowa ------------------------ ~
Kansas ---------------------M issou ri ------------------N ebraska -------------------

94. 5
24. 8
2. 8
62.2
4. 8

.2
( 2)
( 2)
. 1
-

REGION VIII |
-.........
C olorado -------------------

23. 8
15. 8
4. 9
.7
.6

.9
.7
.2
_

----------------------

North Dakota -----------South Dakota -----------Utah -------------------------W yom ing -.................. -

!5

32.
3.
1.
23.
,
2.
2.

(

2f

-

.3
_
.
.
.2
_
( 2 )
( 2)

2. 2
( 2)

1.5
( 2)

.5
. 1
( 2)

_
_
_
( 2)

( 2)
( 2)

.3
( 2) 1

-

.3
-

_
_

.1
_
. 1
_

( 2)
-

-

200. 7
24. 3
14.9
22. 8
82.5
11.5
8. 9
1.6
34. 1

. 1
_
_
.1
_
_
.

617.9
245 .9
71. 1
91.2
9. 1
176. 5
24. 1

1. 1
_

51. 8
6. 8
14. 0
3. 8
5 .9
21. 2
67.
24.
2.
36.
3.

1
3
7
6
5

( 2)

_
.8
.3

_
_
_
_
_
( 2)
( 2)
-

4. 3
_
4 .2
. 1
-

114.4
7 .2
104.5
.2
2. 5

.2
_
_
_
.2

.3
_

51.5
.7
3. 8
36.6
10. 3

1.5
_
_
.4
1. 1

.1
-

_
( 2)

.1

_

(2)

.2

1. 4
.1
.2
.1
1.0
_
( 2)

7. 1
1.9
1.0
1.2
.7
_
.5
( 2)

3. 6
1. 7
.2
.4
.6
.8
( 2)

1. 7
192.2
36.0
12. 8
9 4 .0
.7
34. 7
13.9

3. 1
.2
2. 4
, l
( 2)
.4

1. 0
_
.3
_
.2
.4

5. 5
( 2)

21. 3
.4
.
19. 7
1. 3

5. 5
-

-

.4

55.9
.7
3. 8
37. 8
13. 6

9. 8
_
.9

-

!5

REGION X I-.............
Alaska ---------------------Idaho -------------------------Oregon ---------------------W ashington —
.............. .

4 7 .4
6. 8
1. 3
2 .5
30. 7
2. 1
4 .0

-

-

-

10. 8
.1

. 1
( 2)
( 2)

-

.3
( 2)

15. 3
7 .4
7 .9

_
_
_

14. 0
.7
5. 3
7 .9
( 2)

-

4. 1
( 2)
4 .9
-

4 0 .6
1. 1
39.5

-

_
-

-

( 2)

.2
_
-

( 2)
( 2)

-

188.0
8. 3
165.6
9. 6
4 .5




( 2)

"

14.2
6 .9
4. 5
.5
.6

REGION IX f---------A rizon a --------------------C alifornia ----------------Hawaii ---------------------Nevada ----------------------

See footnotes at end of table.

( 2)

-

( 2)

4
4
1
3
1
4
1

Montana

1

( 2)

8 .4
8. 2
( 2)
.2
( 2)

-

-

5. 7
_
5. 6
( 2)
( 2)

49. 0
.4
4 5 .6
1. 3
1. 7

( 2)

( 2)

2 .4
_

.

(* )

(2)

( 2)

.6
1. 8

( 2)

Region and State
Total

P r o fe s sional
and
technical

C le rica l

S alesw ork ers

Blue
co lla r

P ro te ctiv e

Service

Com binations

Number of days idlen ess (in thousands)
United States ---------

27, 948. 4

933. 5

31. 2

273.0

21. 096. 4

10. 5

1. 422 .0

4. 199. 8

REGION I .................
Connecticut --------------------M aine -----------------------------M assachusetts ---------------New Ham pshire --------------Rhode Island ------------------Verm ont --------------------------

1, 542. 8
806. 3
18. 3
480. 3
34. 6
198.5
4. 8

15.9
7. 6
.3
.6
1. 5
5 .9
-

.9
_
.3
.6
_

16. 3
5.6
_
9 .5
1.2
_

1.0
_
_
1.0
_

12. 3
.2
_
12. 0
-

-

-

1, 286. 9
6 65 .4
17. 6
410. 9
31. 1
157. 1
4. 8

209. 6
127.5
(1
2)
45. 7
.8
35. 6
"

REGION I I ------------- ----New J ersey -------------------New Y ork ------------------------

2, 707. 3
1, 098. 9
1, 608. 3

116.0
5 .2
110. 8

4.5
1. 1
3 .4

80. 7
62.9
17. 8

1, 897.0
888. 4
1, 008. 7

.3
.3
-

461. 1
47. 5
413. 6

147. 7
93. 6
54. 1

REGION HI — .................
D elaw are ..............................
D istrict of Colum bia -----M aryland —
.............. ............
Pennsylvania ------------------Virginia -------------------------W est V irginia ------------------

4, 327. 6
106.0
70. 3
250. 1
3, 031. 8
261 .9
607. 5

46. 8
_
_
3 .0
43.3
_
.5

8. 1
_
_
8. 0
_

2, 754. 9
74. 7
54.5
217. 3
1, 597. 4
246.5
564. 5

1. 6
_
_
1.6
_

( 2)

86.0
2. 7
_
15. 8
68. 3
. 1
1. 0

499. 1
3. 3
1.5
479. 3
_
14. 9

931.2
30. 6
12. 5
12. 4
834. 0
15. 3
26. 5

REGION IV ----------------Alabam a -------------------------F lorid a ---------------------------G eorgia --------------------------Kentucky ------------------------M is s is s ip p i -------- ------------North Carolina ---------------South Carolina ---------------Tennessee ------------------------

2, 762.5
385. 2
385. 5
228. 8
710. 3
114. 9
62.6
78. 8
796 .4

2. 6
.
2 .0
.7
_
_
_
_

3. 4
.
_
3. 4
_
_

2. 4
_
_
_
2.2
_
.2
( 2)

. 1
_
_
.1
.
_
.
_

10. 6
.7
4 .5
1.2
3. 8
-

-

-

2, 611.9
351.9
344. 8
208. 1
696. 3
114. 9
57. 5
78. 5
759. 8

-

-

131. 3
32. 6
34. 2
15. 3
8. 0
4. 5
.3
36.6

REGION V ------------------Illinois ------------------------—
Indiana — --------- --------------M ichigan ------------------------M innesota -----------------------Ohio -------------------------------W isconsin ------------------------

8 ,1 2 0 .9
1,7 5 5 .1
923.7
1 ,7 8 8 .8
335.6
2 ,6 4 7 .5
670.2

512. 1
20.9
9. 9
442. 6
1. 3
16.9
20.5

9. 8
*5. 8
1. 7
2. 3
-

22. 3
.8
.
10. 4
1.5
5 .3
4. 3

5, 891. 8
1, 307. 3
676. 7
755. 1
311. 4
2, 282.2
559. 1

5. 1
( 2)

86.0
47. 1
3. 5
12. 9
12.9
7 .4
2. 2

1, 593. 7
379. 1
227. 8
566. 1
8.5
330. 5
81. 8

REGION V I ............. -—
Arkansas ------------------------Louisiana ------------------------New M exico -------------------Oklahoma -----------------------Texas ------------------------------

2, 384. 3
121.3
501. 1
140.9
169.8
1 ,4 5 1 .1

1. 6
_
_
_
.
1. 6

1.5
_
.
_
_
1.5

.5
_
_
_
.5

2, 283. 7
109.4
454. 3
136. 3
166. 6
I, 417.0

85.2
11.9
44.0
4. 6
2 .0
22. 7

11. 8
_
2. 8
_
1. 2
7. 8

REGION V I I ----------------Iowa -------------------------------Kansas ----------------------------M issou ri ------------------------N ebraska -------------------------

1 ,6 7 7 .0
263.7
30. 7
1 ,0 1 6 .3
366 .4

2. 4
( 2)
1. 5
.9
-

( 2)
( 2)

.9
( 2)

1, 241. 3
250. 9
29.2
624. 5
336. 7

-

155. 2
.8
_
154.4
-

277. 2
11. 8
_
235. 7
29. 7

REGION VHI --------------C olorado -------------------------Montana -------------------------North Dakota ------------------ South Dakota ------------------Utah ------------------------------Wyoming -------------------------

316.9
263.3
26. 3
10. 0
6. 2
9. 1
2. 0

8.4
7 .0
1.4
_
.

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

.7
.2
.5
_
_
_
-

63. 1
58. 4
.3
3. 4
1.0

REGION I X --------- -------A rizona ---------------------------C alifornia -----------------------Hawaii ----------------------------Nevada -----------------------------

2 ,9 4 2 .5
53.5
2 ,7 5 8 .5
97. 1
33. 4

220. 9
2 .9
137. 4
79.0
1. 6

1.9
_
1.5
.3
-

51.0
_
50. 6
.4
-

1, 777.
50.
1, 703.
7.
16.

3
2
6
0
5

2. 0
_
.
2. 0

109.5
_
107. 8
( 2)
1.5

REGION X ------------------Alaska ----------------------------Idaho --------------------------------Oregon ----------------------------W ashington ---------------------

1 ,1 6 6 .5
27. 8
54. 3
821.7
262. 8

6. 8
_

1. 1
( 2)
1.0

10.0
3.0
7. 0

1, 091 .7
27. 8
50. 9
790.2
222. 8

.5
_

2. 4
_
1 .4
.9
"

-

3.0
3. 8

1 Stoppages extending a c r o s s State lines, and the occupations involved
in these stoppages, have been counted in each State affected: w ork ers
involved and days of idlen ess w ere allocated among States.
2 F ew er than 100.




_

.8
-

-

2 .9
_
2 .9

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

3

Idleness

NOTE:
equal totals.

241. 9
197.7
21. 3
6. 5
5. 2
9. 1
2. 0

-

-

-

_
2 .9
2. 2
1
_
_
_
( 2)
( 2)

-

.5
-

1

*4
_

*
7 80.
.
757.
10.
11.

0
4
5
3
8

54. 1

3 ( 2)

2 .0
24. 0
28. 1

in 1973 resulted fro m a stoppage that began in 1972.

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not
Dashes denote z e r o s .

(W o r k « r » and d a y

In t h o u s a n d s )
A la b a m a

In d u s try g r o u p

A r iz o n a
D ays of
id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a g es)

S top p a g es
b e g i n n in g in
year
W ork ers
N um ber
in v o lv e d

D ays o f
id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a ges)

90

2 6 .4

3 8 5 .2

37

8 .3

5 3 .5

26

7 .0

1 2 1 .3

47

1 8 .8

3 2 3 .9

8

1 .1

1 4 .5

15

3 .6

9 8 .4

1
7

.4
.7

2 .1
1 5 .4

.

a
,

2
4
2

1 .5
1 .4
1 .1

.

•

1
2

.9
.2

3 .7
4 .1

•
_

•
_

a

_

a'

4
5
8
1

.4
3 .7
1 .4

2 .9
2 6 .7
3 3 .1
.4

2
2

.6
.5

3

.8

5 0 .4
1 4 .9
6 .4
1 7 .2

43

7 .6

6 1 .3

3 .8
1 .6

9 .2
1 3 .3
2 0 .2
8 .2
1 .0
.8
8 .5

a

.7 .5

! 8

a

•

1 .3

a
.

a

a
.
a
a
a
_
a
a
a
a

a

•

(2 )

A

a

1 0 5 .5

_
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s --------------------M i n in g - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 14
--------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n -----------------------------------------------------7
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------9
W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ------------------------------------------3
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------------2
S e r v ic e s
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2
G o v e r n m e n t 7 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -—- --------------------------------- --6

1

a

3 1 .4
7 .0
8 .6

5 .0

<a )

a

.

3

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------------------------------

1

(*")

4
1
1

.2

?9
(a )
(a )

-

1 2 .6
.2
.2
a
a

-

-

7 .2

3 9 .0

4
13

2 ?0
4 .2

4 .5
2 8 .6

2
7

(2)
.3

.2
2 .8

_

a

a

2
1

4
1
1
1

1 .8
(* )
.2
(a )

a
.

6 5 .5
.4
1.8
.6
a

a

2
1
2

a

.5

5 .0

a
.

2

.
a

.2
(a )
.8

.5
.3
2 4 .2

a

(* )
.7

.9
2 .1

1

.1

.1

-

-

29

a
a

a

a

C a lifo r n ia

-

-

-

11
_

1
4

-

3 .4

-

2 2 .9

a

a

(* )
2 .8

.2
6 .6
1 5 .5

5

.3

a

a

1

.3

.5

a

a

a

.

-

C o lo ra d o

C o n n e c t ic u t

------------------------------------------------------

323

1 6 5 .6

2 .7 5 8 .5

44

1 5 .8

2 6 3 .3

61

2 6 .8

8 0 6 .3

--------------------------- ----------------------------

157

5 4 .9

7 5 6 .7

17

5 .2

1 8 2 .4

33

1 7 .5

7 1 4 .6

a

3 3 .1

1 8 2 .2

.4

2 .8

1
3

1 .5
.4

1 3 6 .1
1 .4

A l l in d u s t r ie s

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ---------------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ----------------------------------------------—
T e x t ile m i l l p r o d u c t s
------------------------------------------------A p p a r e l , e t c } *_______ —.!---------— ——-------. . . . . . ------------L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c ts , e x c e p t fu r n itu r e —
F u r n itu r e and fix tu r e s
---------------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h i n g , ja n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s - - - - - ----C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s --------R u b b e r and m is c e lla n e o u s p la s t ic s p r o d u c ts —
L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ------------------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s , 4 -----------------------------------M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l -----------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t , and
s u p p lie s
------------------------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---------------------I n s t r u m e n t s * e t c . ’ -------------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s - - -- - - --- --N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

-------------------------------------------------------

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s ---------------------M i n in g - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ------------------ —
-----------------W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ---------------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e -------------------S e r v ic e s
--------------------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------




S top p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
year
W ork ers
N um ber
in v o lv e d

------------------------------------------------- —

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ---------------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s -------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------T e x tile m ill p r o d u c ts
A p p a r e l * e t c . —________________________________________ L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t fu r n itu r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ---------------------— — ------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------- —------------ -— --------P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s --------C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p r o d u c t s
-----------------— —
----P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s ----R u b b e r and m is c e lla n e o u s p la s t ic s p r o d u c t s —
L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------------P r im a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -----------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - ------- ---------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t , an d
s u p p l i e s !- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s * e t c . ’ -------------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s --------------

M a n u fa c tu r in g

A rk an sas
D ays of
Id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a g es)

---------------------------------------------------------

A l l in d u s t r ie s
M a n u fa c tu r in g

S top p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
year
W ork ers
N u m ber
in v o lv e d

„

18
.

4
4
2
3
4
2
12
2
16
-

_
m

a
a

.5
.4
.7
.3
1 .1

1 0 .7
6 .1
1 2 .9
3 .7
1 5 .9

(2)

1.4

.7
1 .3
5 .5

1 5 .2
6 7 .9
2 1 9 .9

•

•

a

5

.
.
a

2
1
1

.1
3 .8

a

1

a
.

1.5
a

a

a

a

(*>

a
a

a
a

a
a
a
a
a
a

1
2

1 2 .7
1 4 0 .6

2

1

1

a

a

a

.3

14
11
23
19

1 .2
.6
3 .2
1 .8

4 3 .9
1 5 .5
8 5 .5
3 3 .0

1
3

.2
.3

5 .5
1 .6

1
5
6
3

14
7
2

3 .5
.9

3 0 .9
1 0 .2
1 .8

1
1
1

£>
(2)

.1
.5
1 6 .7

1
3
2

-

(2)
-

-

166

1 1 0 .6

2 ,0 0 1 .8

5
1
26

2 1 .3

4 1 0 .0
1 .1
2 4 5 .3

31
58
1
31
13

1 3 .7
4 6 .4

(2)
1 3 .8

(*)
1 0 .9
4 .4

2 4 7 .3
8 7 4 .6
1 .1
1 8 7 .1
3 5 .1

( ’)

a

-

27

a

.2
-

1 0 .6

(2)
.2

a
a

(2 )

?9

a

a

(2)

6 .7
7 .0

.5

a

a

1 .8

1 7 .3

a

a

.2
3 .5
2 .3
1 .9

1 2 .5
1 1 9 .3
1 5 9 .9
3 1 .4

.2
4 .1
.6

-

(2)

2 .0
1 8 9 .4
3 0 .3
.3

8 0 .9

28

9 .3

9 1 .8

a

.

a

1.0
2 .8

a

a

14

3 .4

2 8 .2

5 .7
6 0 .7

3
3

3 .2
.4

3 3 .5
5 .6

-

a

.

2
5

.5
.5

5
8

.1
8 .2

a

a

a

.2
1 .2

1 .3
9 .5

4
3

a
a

a

a

a

4
4

.4
1 .8

a

.

1 8 .0
6 .5

(W ork ers and days in thousands)
F lorid a
Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Industry group

A ll i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------------O rdnance and a c c e s s o r ie s
F ood and kindred products T o b a c co m anufactures
T extile m ill products —
Apparel* e tc .5 — -------- — —-----------— ------------- — ,
Lum ber and w ood p rodu cts, except furniture—
P rinting, publishing, and a llied industries — —
C hem icals and allied products
—
P etroleu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s-------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la s tics products —
Leather and leather p r o d u c t s ------- ----- — ----------Stone, clay, and glass products —
—
P rim a ry m etal industries
F abricated m etal p r o d u c ts 4
— *
M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l —
E le ctrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies
— —
— Tran sportation equipment
Instrum ents, e t c .* -----------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s manufacturing industries
Nonmanufacturing -

"

A gricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s - M ining ■ — —
-----Contract construction
T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s —
~
W holesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate — S ervice s - — —
G overn m en t7—
—
— — —

G eorgia
Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stop pages
begin ning in
y * ar
W orkers
Number
involved

M anufacturing

-

— ~

~

-

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s - F ood and kindred products - T ob a cco m anufactures
Textile m ill products - - A pparel, etc.
Lum ber and w ood p rodu cts, except furniture —
Furniture and fixtu res
- - ---P aper and allied products
•
~ Printing, publishing, and allied in d u s tr ie s ------C hem icals and a llied p r o d u c t s -------------------------P etroleu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s-------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la s tics p r o d u c t s ---Leather and leather p r o d u c t s ---------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass products
P rim a ry m etal industries
—
F abricated m etal p r o d u c ts 4
M achinery, except e le c t r ic a l E lectrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies — - —
~ —
T ran sp ortation equipm ent —
Instrum ents, e t c .* -----------------------------------------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing industries

74

16. 3

385. 5

77

24. 5

228. 8

373

2 87 .0

1, 755.1

5. 1
_
1. 0
_
(2)

39

17.2

173.2

.
. 7
1. 0
. 1
.2
(2)
. 1

113.4
_
14. 1
_
_
.2
_
.
18.6
48. 8
_
6.2
4. 8
.9
.3
1.4

1
6
_
2
1
_
_
2
1
5
_
5
1
1
1
3
4

.2
. 8
.
(2)
.8
.
.
.6
(2)
. 5
_
2. 6
(2)
.2
(2)
.5
1.2

1.9
9.3
_
1 .5
1.6
_
.
1. 7
3. 7
9 .4
_
42. 7
4 .7
5. 8
1. 0
15. 5
18. 8

142
_
13
.
1
2
3
1
5
3
_
10
.
10
19
18
26

88. 1
_
1.7
.
.2
.5
(2)
(*)
. 8
1. 1
1.0
_
5 .0
_
1. 5
2. 8
6 .5
56. 1

851. 7
_
11.3
_
1. 1
1.9
1.3
1.7
8 .0
7 .9
21. 1
_
6 5 .6
_
17. 1
4 5.2
4 7 .9
484. 8

4
1
51

1.3
. 5
11.2

4 .0
20. 0
272. 1

1
5
38

1. 1
8.4
7. 3

3 .3
52.2
.
55. 7

15
5
3
_
231

2. 6
6. 1
2. 1
_
199.0

3 7 .9
30. 0
68. 8
_
9 03 .4

16

3. 0

_
.
34. 1

_
2
7

_
.6
2. 7

_
2 .9
12. 8

1
91
44

(2)
32. 1
124. 9

. 1
6 0 .0
350 .4

14
8
2
7
4

5.
1.
.
.
.

221. 0
6. 8
.6
7. 1
2. 6

7
10
1
4
7

1. 0
1. 3
(2)
.2
1.6

10. 0
18.3
2. 5
2. 0
7. 1

23
28
_
12
32

7. 8
3. 8
.
1. 5
2 8 .9

109. 1
52 .4
_
2 2 .0
309.3

8
5
2
2
5

Iowa

Kansas

85.2

923. 7

73

24. 8

263. 7

26

2. 8

3 0 .7

125
_
8
_
1
2
8
7
4
4
1
6
1
9
15
20
11

6 6 .4
_
3. 0
_
. 1
.2
1.9
1. 7
1.4
4. 1
(2)
3. 8
(2)
1. 8
4 .6
4 .4
15. 0

669.2
_
83. 1
_
_
.2
2. 8
6.2
19.2
2 7 .9
5.5
.6
6 3 .0
.5
49. 8
27. 5
29.2
182.4

46
_
4
_
_
2
4
1
1
3
1
_
7
3
2
4
8

17. 8

9

.7

19. 1

.
_
_
_
1
_
_
_
_
1
_
3
4

_
_
_
_
_
( 2)

9 .2
_
.2
.3
1. 2
2. 9

215. 8
_
10. 5
_
_
1 .6
4. 8
1.3
5. 8
8. 1
3. 0
_
8 8 .8
5. 1
.9
42. 6
31. 5

15
10
3
-

78. 7
7 9 .4
13. 1
-

1
3
2

(2)
.4
.2

3. 5
3. 5
_
4. 6

_
-

_
_
.
-

254. 5

27

7. 0

4 7 .9

17

2. 1

11.6

2. 6
9. 8

1
11

.2
6. 0

.2
3 2 .6

_
6

_
.7

5 .9

9
3
_
3

. 7
(2)

14. 0
.2
_
.9
■

3
2
_
1
5

.4
-.4

.7
1.3

( 2)
.6

(2)
3 .6

67

12. 1
11. 7
. 5
18. 8

—

14
17

2. 1
1. 7

_

15
12
1
1
7

12. 5
1.4
(2)

Nonmanufacturing -




Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

192

----

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s
- Mining - Contract construction
T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s —
W holesale and retail trade — - Finance, insurance, and rea l estate
S ervices
--------- “
G overn m en t7

Stop pages
begin ning in
ear
y<
W orkers
Number
involved

23
_
5
_
_
1
_
1
4
.
2
1
3
1

Indiana
A ll industries

Illinois
Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

_

l\

_

212.
18.
.
.
9.

7
7
7
1
9

_

.4
_
_
(2)
1. 1
(2)
1. 5
*
(2)

_

(2)

_

_
_
(2)
.4
.2

_

2. 1

1.3
8. 1
7. 6

Louisiana

Kentucky
Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stop p ages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Maryland
Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
yea r
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

A ll in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------------------

205

84.3

710.3

54

16.7

501.1

69

19.8

250. 1

M anufacturing;..........---------------------------------------

85
_
6

59.4
_
1.6

483.2
_
33.3

24

6 .0

201 .8

1
-

.2
-

1.0
-

33
_
7

10.6
_
1.6

175.8
_
2 0 .8

3
2
1
2
7
2
8
4
1
7
3
5
11

.3
.5
.2
1.0
1.3
.4
3 .0
3 .9
.2
1.1
.6
.7
9.2

10. 6
4 0 .8
4 .5
4. 8
20. 8
8.0
23 .4
107.7
5.5
9 .8
5 .6
3 .4
75.9

I
_
1
1
_
4
2
1
5
4
3

66.9
4 2 .9
1.2
.
3 5 .8
2 .5
23.7

_
_
2
1
1
5
_
3
3
2
3
1

_
_
1.6
.1
.1
.8
_
2 .5
_
.3
.4
.6
2 .0

_
_
38.2
1.4
1.1
13.3
_
3 7 .5
_
22 .9
.7
12.4
19.7

14
5

28. 1
6. 8

7 1.9
45. 5

_
1

_
.1

_
2 .4

1
3

(2)
.6

.1
6 .8

(2
‘)
10.8

.3

1

299.3

36

(2)
_
9.2

74.3

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s --------------------------------Food and kindred products --------------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures --------------------------------------Textile m ill products ---------------------------------------A p parel, etc. 3 -----------------------------------------------------Lumber and wood p rodu cts, except furniture —
Furniture and fixtures -------------------------------------Paper and allied products ---------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied in d u strie s------C hem icals and allied products -------------------------P etroleum refining and related i n d u s t r ie s ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics p ro d u cts---Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass products -----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries --------------------------------Fabricated m etal p r o d u c ts 4 ------------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l --------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies --------------------------- ----------------------- -------T ransportation equipment
Instrum ents, etc. 5-------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries
Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s -------Mining -------------------------------------------------------Contract con stru ction --------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ---------------------W holesale and retail trade ----------------------Finance, insurance, and re a l estate -------S ervices -----------------------------------------------------G overnm ent 7--------- -------------- -----------------------

Manufacturing

-----------------------------------------------

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ---------------------------------Food and kindred products -----------------------------T ob acco m anufactures -------------------------------------Textile m ill products ---------------------------------------A pparel, e t c . 3 -----------------------------------------------------Lumber and wood produ cts, except furniture —
Furniture and fixtures --------------------------------------Paper and allied products ------------------------------------

Printing, publishing, and allied in d u stries------Chem icals and allied products -------------------------P etroleum refining and related in d u s t r ie s ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics p ro d u cts---Leather and leather products ---------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass p r o d u c ts -----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries --------------------------------F abricated m etal p r o d u c ts 4 -----------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l ---------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies -----------------------------------------------------------T ransportation equipment -------------------------------Instruments, etc. 5-----------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries --------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s -------Mining --------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -------------------W holesale and retail trade ----------------------Finance, insurance, and re a l estate -------S ervices -----------------------------------------------------G overn m en t7 --------- -------------------------------------




.7
.3
1.7

2 .0
_
23.2

4

.6

11.8

1

120

25 .0

227. 1

30

83
14

19.3
1.7

66.8
14. 8

-

-

13

7 .3

219.3

8

2.2

2 3 .8

132.9
7 .0
5 .6
“

5
8
1
3

2 .3
1.0
(2)
.2

31.3
4 5 .9
.2
2 .6
"

11
12
_
1
4

2 .3
3 .4
_
(2)
1.4

16.3
3 1 .9
_
.1
2 .1

34.7

480 .3

267

210.7

1 ,7 8 8 .8

76

10.6

3 35 .6

64
_
8

11. 1
_
.7

214.0

124

111.9

800.4

41

473.4
6.7

1
8

1.1
1.3

5.3
36.1

7

7 .3
.
.8

295. 6
.
7 .4

2
1
1
3
4
1
2
_
3
1
2
1
8
10

1.0
(2)
(2)
.4
.6
(!)
(2)

1.4
1.0
.5
2 .5
8.0
.7
.2
16.6
1.6
2 .3
2 .8
4 7 .6
21.7

_
_
1
4
7
5
4
1
5
7
14
15
17

I
.4
1.5
1.0
1.4
.4
.9
.3
3 .7
2 .5
4 .7
15.7
1.7

I
10.9
16.6
15.9
2 8 .4
16.7
4 .8
15.6
58.4
4 9 .9
65.7
100.3
32.1

I
_
_
1
1
.
2
1
1
_
2
3
8
9

“
_
_

.6
.2
1.2
1.7

I
_
_
.2
2 .1
2 .3
56.7
.7
_
1.2
6.4
48.1
4 8.2

6
22
3
2
143

.4
74.2
.2
.4
9 8.8

13.2
326 .9
1.8
1.9
988 .4

3
2
1
35

2 .0
.2
.2
_
3 .2

113.3
2 .0
7 .2
_
4 0 .0

_
.3
.6
2 .0
.2

_
_
2 .5
4 .9
19.2
12.0

12
8
3
“

2 .0
.8 .
1. 1
"

-

M assachusett s
A ll industries

_
.2
.8
_
1.3
.5
(2)

142

.5
.2
(2)
.1
2 .6
1.5

M ichigan

M innesota

12
4
1
_
78

23 .6

16.0
10. 6
.2
_
266.3

1
_
22
22
24
_
3

.7
_
8. 1
10. 8
2. 1
.1

2 6 .6
_
88.0
116.4
2 3 .6
8.9

_
3
21
16
21
2
7

(2)
39.1
5.4
6 .8
(2)
.3

_
.5
271.1
11.1
50.0
3 .2
10.0

_
_
5
8
19
2

6

1.7

2.7

73

4 6 .9

642.6

1

1.6
1.5
(2)

_

.7

(2)
(2)
.1
.3
(2)

.1

1.3

M ississip p i
Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

M issou ri
Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

New Jersey
Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
...............Ye:ar
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idleness
during
year (all
stop p ages)

A ll industries ------------------------------------------

25

11.5

114.9

131

62.2

1 ,0 1 6 .3

202

77 .0

1 ,0 9 8 .9

Manufacturing -------------------------------------------- —

18

8. 1

64.0

61

39 .9

558.9

105

18.2

355.2

6

5.3

62. 1

5

1.4

19.6

2
1
7
4
_
_
2
2
6
2
6
8

(2
")
(2)

2 .5
1.2
422. 1
19.5
_
76.7
_
_
8.5
3 .6
4 9 .6
.3
19.9
61.7

1
3
1
3
7
2
12
_
6
1
17
5
15
8

.2
(2)
.2
.2
1. 1
(2)
2 .5
_
.8
(2)
3.2
.8
2 .0
1.2

1.1
.9
.5
4 .2
4 2.2
5.5
3 6 .4
_
5.3
.4
88.0
16.0
22.7
24.3

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s -------------------------------Food and kindred products ------------------------------T ob acco m anufactures -----------------------------------Textile m ill products ---------------------------------------

A p parel, e t c .3 ---------------------------------------------------------

Lumber and wood p rodu cts, except furniture —
Furniture and fixtures -------- ----------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied in d u strie s----C hem icals and allied p r o d u c t s -------------------------P etroleum refining and related in d u strie s------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products —
Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass products ---------------------P rim a ry m etal industries -------------------------------F abricated m etal products 4 ---------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l —-----------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies ----------------------------------------------------------T ransportation equipment -------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. 5 --------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s --------Nonmanufacturing ---------------------------------------

-

-

_

_
.2
6.0
5.4
_
.5
3. 8
2 2.0
_
.4
8.2
2.1
5.0

_
1
4
1
_
1
1
1
_
1
2
2
2

.2
.6
.4
_
.1
.2
1.0
_
.1
.3
.2
.5

_
2
_
-

_

_

4 .6
_
-

10.3
_
-

6
6
1
2

7

3 .4

50.9

1
5

.1
3 .2

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and f is h e r ie s --------------Mining --------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -------------------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary se r v ic e s --------------------------W holesale and retail trade ----------------------------Finance, insurance, and rea l estate -------------S ervices ----------------------------------------------------------G overn m en t7 -----------------------------------------------------

“

A ll in d u s tr ie s -------------------------------------------

386

149. 1

Manufacturing -----------------------------------------------

188

_
1
_
_

_
(2)
_

92.7
136.4
.7
1.4

9
4
3
3

.9
.4
1.7
1.3

6 .9
3 .9
33.1
44 .2

70

6.4
18.8
(2)
(2)
22.2

4 57 .4

97

58.8

743.7

15. 5
35.2

8
13

1.6
1.6

19.3
2 3 .8

1
14

(2)
_
22.7

2 .6
400 .4

_
.1
_
_

16
17
1
10
5

8 .6
4 .7
(2)
1.0
4 .7

235.3
7 7 .6
.3
17.4
83.7

20
34
1
9
18

19.5
10.8
(2)
1.7
4 .0

82.3
175.2
.5
34.5
4 8 .3

“

North Carolina

New York

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------Food and kindred products ------------------------------T ob acco m anufactures ------------------------------------Textile m ill p r o d u c t s -------------- ------------------------Apparel, etc. 3 ---------------------------------------------------Lumber and wood p rodu cts, except furniture—
Furniture and fixtures -------------------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied in d u s t r ie s ---Chem icals and allied products -----------------------P etroleum refining and related i n d u s t r ie s -----Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products —
Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass products ---------------------P rim ary m etal industries -------------------------------Fabricated m etal products 4 ----------------------------M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and
supplies --------------------------------------- -------- -------- —
T ransportation equipment -------------------------------Instrum ents, e tc .® -------------- ------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s --------Nonmanufacturing

-------------------------------------

A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s -------------Mining --------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s --------------------------- —
W holesale and retail trade -----------------------------Finance, insurance, and rea l estate -------------S e r v ic e * ---- -------------------- ----------------------------------G overn m en t7 ------------------------------------------------------




.9
.
3 .9
_
_
.1
.6
.8
(2)
1.0
1.9

Ohio

1 ,6 0 8 .3

45

9 .5

62.6

504

216.7

2 ,6 4 7 .5

51.7

412.7

25

5. 6

30 .9

2 52

122.5

1 ,5 9 2 .3

14

1.8

14.6

2

.1

.5

8

1.5

3 9.5

10
8
1
5
13
11
4

1.2
3 .0
(2)
.2
2. 8
6.6
2 .4

13.3
11.4
.3
7 .8
32 .0
3 2.3
3 8 .6

_

_

1
1
3
3
2

.3
(2)
.9
.2
_

_
.7
.4
8.9
1.9
_
1.9

1
1
3
10
10
10
9

.9
.1
.1
.9
1.7
2, 6
1.4

20 .3
1.5
.8
8 .6
2 8 .5
15.1
22. 1

5

.3

5.3

3

1.9

34

2 1 .8

277.7

15
9
15
48

3.3
5.0
1.4
14.4

3 4.3
8.2
16.2
100.0

_
_
1
1

_
_
(2)
(2)

"
.
1.3
1.7

18
24
38
40

3.2
7 .5
17.3
15.8

92.3
123.7
335.2
173.8

11
9
6
4

1.7
1.8
5. 5
.2

20. 8
12.3
64.4
.9

7
1
_
-

3.2
.1
_
-

10.3
1.3
_
-

12
27
_
7

8. 1
38.3
_
1. 1

230.2
187.8
_
35. 1

198

1, 195.8
_
3 23 .8

20
_
_
3

4 .0

94.2

1 ,0 5 5 .3

_
.2

31.7
_
.1
6 2 .8

252

_
57

97.4
_
_
17.7

2
76
44

.3
2 1 .5
18.5

9 .0
61.5
157.0

28
48
8
41
16

23.7
7.7
2 .3
4 3 .0
3 .0

269 .5
90.4
44.1
350 .4
117. 6

9
5
3

2 .7
.5
.6

12.9
7 .6
.
8.3

35
36
3
12
44

2 3 .5
6.2
(2)
1.9
22. 1

628.2
76 .9
2.2
23.2
97.2

.

(2)
.5

_

O k la h o m a
In d u s try g r o u p

A l l i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------------------------M a n u fa c tu r in g

---------------------------------------------------------

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s --------------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ------- — --------------------- —
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ----------------------------------------------T e x t ile m il l p r o d u c t s —
----------— — — -------------A p p a re l, e tc
----------------------------------------------------------------L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t fu r n it u r e —
F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ----------------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s --------R u b b e r and m is c e lla n e o u s p la s t ic s p r o d u c t s —
L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 ----------------------------------M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ---------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t , and
s u p p l i e s -------------------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---------------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s . e t c . » --------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ------------N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------- —--------------- —
A g r ic u ltu r e , fo r e s tr y ,

a n d f i s h e r i e s ------------------

S top p a g es
b e g i n n in g in
year
w ork ers
N u m ber
in v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s
b e g i n n in g in
year
w ork ers
N um ber
in v o lv e d

P e n n s y lv a n ia
D ay 8 o f '
id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a g es)

S top p a g es
b e g i n n in g in
year
W ork ers
N u m ber
in v o lv e d

D a y s ox
id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a g es)

28

6 .2

1 6 9 .8

64

3 7 .8

8 2 1 .7

624

2 0 1 .8

3 ,0 3 1 .8

14

5 .4

1 5 8 .1

28

7 .2

8 6 .8

303

8 2 .8

1 ,2 7 5 .6

2 2 .6

3
26

1 .0
4 .4

2 .4
8 3 .0

9
6
7
7
12
11
13
3
16
1
22
24
55
41

1 .3
1 .6
.9
1 .0
2 .2
2 .3
1 .8
1 .8
1 0 .4
.2
2 .9
8 .6
8 .3
1 6 .9

1 3 .9
9 .4
2 9 .7
9 .3
4 2 .7
2 7 .2
5 6 .5
1 4 8 .5
1 0 0 .0
1 .4
2 6 .2
1 1 7 .8
9 7 .0
1 2 7 .3

25
14
4
4
3 21

7 .1
8 .4
.2
1 .4
1 1 9 .0

2 2 1 .1
1 2 8 .4
8 .5
2 5 .3
1 ,7 5 6 .2

2
70
54

.9
2 5 .9
1 2 .7

3 3 .2
5 6 .8
1 1 6 .1

3 1 .6
1 5 .3

5 5 6 .9
2 6 5 .6
9 .5
6 5 2 .8
6 5 2 .8

_
-

_

_

.

“

-

_

2

_

.

-

.

-

(a )

.1

_

1 .1

_
.9

-

1
1

.1

_

_

_

- •

_
_

3 .6

8
2
1
1
1

-

.

_

_

_

3 .7
.1
.2
(2)
(2)

1 9 .7
1 .4
1 .0
.6
.7

(2’)

.4

_

_

-

_

2

3 .6

8 1 .9

1

-

-

-

2

(2 )

1 .5

-

-

-

2

.2

9 .4
2 .6

_

-

4

.5

2 .1

3
2

.5
.8

1 4 .4
2 0 .6

_

-

-

.6

3
2

(2 )

_

_

3

1 .0

5 7 .9

-

_

-

_

14

.9

_

_
_

3

.3

5
1

(2 )

.2

_

3
2

.
.

1 1 .7

1
36

(2 )
3 0 .6
1 3 .3

_

1 .3
-

_

1 .8
7 3 4 .9

(2 )
‘
.2

_

1

42 . 0
2 .1

10

1 4 .9

5 8 0 .7

5 .7
.4

9
9

1 .1
.8

2 3 .2
3 1 .6

_

-

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n ------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ----------------------------------W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ---------------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ------------------S e r v ic e s
-------------------------------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t 7---------------------------------------------------------------------

O regon
D a y s ox
id le n e s s
d u r in g
y e a r (a ll
stop p a ges)

_

_

_

8 .8
.8

2
5

(2 )
.4

.3
6 .1

40
72
1
17
65

.

-

9 3 .1
_

R h o d e I s la n d

(2 )
1 .8
3 0 .7

T enn essee

A l l i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------------------

30

13.3

198.5

104

3 5 .8

796.4

M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------------------

17

4 .8

129.9

71

2 6 .9

609 .8

1

.6

3 .6

4

.5

7.1

_

_

_

3
1
4
4
3
1
6

1.4
1.2
.3
.5
.7
(2)
1.4

101.1
18.7
2 .4
88.0
6 .6
.2
4 8 .6

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s -------------------------------------------T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------------------A p p a r e l , e c t . * --------------------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s , e x c e p t fu r n itu r e F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s --------------------------------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------------------------------------P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , an d a ll ie d in d u s t r ie s —
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g a n d r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s -----R u b b e r and m is c e lla n e o u s p la s t ic s p r o d u c t s L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ------------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------ -—
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s 4 -------------------------------M a c h i n e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ----------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y , e q u ip m e n t , and
s u p p l i e s --------------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ----------------------------------I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . *------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ---------

_

_

_
_

-

-

1
1
3

( 2)
.7
(2)

.7
5.2
3 .2

3

1.7

9 6 .6

2
1

.1
(2)

2 .5
6 .8

-

_

-

6 .

7.7

9 9 .5

7
8
5
9

1.2
2 .5
.5
5.1

18.7
6 8.4
10.4
52.1
4 0 .9
3 2 .7

1

.2

1.9

2

.9

_

_

6 .9

2
6

.9
2 .2

-

-

_

1
1

(2)
.3

(2)
2 .5

2

.4

14.4

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------------------------

13

8 .5

68 .6

33

8 .9

186.6

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h e r i e s --------------M i n in g
-------------------------------------------------------------------------C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s ------------------------------W h o l e s a l e a n d r e t a i l t r a d e ------------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v ic e s
---------------------- -------- ------------------------- — — —
G o v e r n m e n t 7 ----------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

3

.3

3 .0

3
10

.7
6.0

66.9
4 6 .2

2

2 .2

23.2

_
-

_

2
6

.2
5 .8

8
7
1
1
3

.6
1.3
(2)
(2)
.2

13.3
56.4
.5
1.7
1.6




_
_

1.9
4 0 .5

_

Texas
Industry group

Stoppages
beginning in
_____ year
W orkers
involved

V irginia
Days of
idlene s s
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppages
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Washington
Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stoppages)

Stoppage s
beginning in
year
W orkers
Number
involved

Days of
idlene s s
during
year (all
stoppages)

A ll in d u s tr ie s -----------------------------------------

98

2 4 .0

1,451. 1

234

55 .6

2 61 .9

62

3 .6

26 2 .8

Manufacturing ---------------------------------------------

TT

11.8

1, 191.4*

25

11.6

116.7

26

4 .5

91.1

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------F ood and kindred products ----------------------------T ob a cco m anufactures -----------------------------------T extile m ill p r o d u c ts --------------------------- ■---------A pparel, e t c .5—
Lumber and wood p ro d u cts ,e x ce p t fu rn itu re Furniture and fixtures ■
Paper and allied products -----------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries —
C hem icals and allied products ---------------------Petroleum refining and related in d u stries----Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics p r o d u c ts Leather and leather products ------------------------Stone, cla y , and glass products -------------------P rim a ry m etal in d u s tr ie s ------------------------------Fabricated m etal p r o d u c ts 4 --------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l -----------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and

6

(2 )

864.3
7.2
17.5
3 .3
3 .0

1.6

165.8
16.5

(2 )

2

5
2

3
3
3
7

1.0
.6
.3
.1
3 .7

1 .6

3

.3
.3
1.5

11.5
2 8 .7

.5
.5

3 5 .0
5.8

2

;x

15.6

1

(2)
‘

(2
‘)

1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1

(2
‘)
.2
.1
.2
.2
(2)
2. 8
(2)
1.3

.2
4 .2
5 .4
5.2
.3
(2)
2 7 .0
.6
5.2

_
7
6
1
2
2

_
_
1.3
_
1 .9
(2)

_
_
12.1
_
4 5 .0
2 .2
_
19.9
1.4

3
3
2

4 .2
.2
.2

33.2
6.3
2 .4

-

-

-

_
2

_
.2

.
3 .4

_
_
2
-

_
_
1.9
-

_
_
11.0
-

1
2
_
1

.5
.1
_

4 .6
2 .2
_
.2

209
_
183
13

4 4 .0
_
3 6 .8
4 .2

145.2
_
52.9
57.3

37

7
3
_
1
2

1. 1
1.2
_
.1
.7

3 .8

2

7
2

T ransportation equipment -----------------------------Instrum ents, etc. ---------------------------------- ---------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -------

4
1

Nonmanufacturing --------------------------------------

47

A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s tr y , and f i s h e r i e s ------------Mining -------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s --------------------------W holesale and reta il trade ----------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate ------------S ervices ----------------------------------------------------------G overn m en t7-----------------------------------------------------

27 .2

(2 )

12. 2

.2
259. 8

1
15

.1
5.5

8. 1
168.8

11

1.0
3 .3

2 9.0
4 8 .6

t2')
2 .3

i.'i
4 .2

14
2

4

(2)
19.1

171.7

7

.3
.
6.1

2. 1
_
124.3

25.2
6.3
_
1.5
2 .0

5
13
2
2
7

.5
.5
(2)
(2)
1.6

20.2
12.6
2 .8
1.0
8.7

1

W est Virgina
A ll industries -------------------------------------------Manufacturing

----------------------------------------------—

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------Food and kindred p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------T ob acco m anufactures ---------------------------------------Textile m ill products ---------------------------------------Apparel, e t c .5 -----------------------------------------------------Lum ber and w ood produ cts, except furniture —
Furniture and fixtu res --------------------------------------Paper and allied products ----------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied i n d u s t r ie s ------C hem icals and allied products --------------------------P etroleum refining and related industries ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products —
Leather and leather products --------------------------Stone, cla y , and glass products -----------------------P rim a ry m etal industries ---------------------------------Fabricated m etal products 4--------------------------------M achinery, except e le ctr ic a l ---------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and supplies
T ransportation equipment ---------------------------------Instrum ents, etc. -----------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries ---------Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s --------------Mining ----------------------------------------------------------------Contract c o n s t r u c tio n -------------- -------------------------Transportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -----------------------------W holesale and reta il trade --------------------------------Finance, insurance, and rea l estate ---------------S ervices --------------------------------------------------------------G overnment 7-------------------------------------------------------1 No w ork stoppages w ere r e co rd e d during 1973 fo r the industry
groups for which no data are presen ted.
2 Few er than 100.
3 Includes other finished products made fro m fa b r ic s and sim ilar
m a teria ls.
4 Excludes ordnance, m ach in ery, and transportation equipment.
5 Includes p r ofes sion a l, s cie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;




.4
(2)

W isconsin

614

172.7

607.5

110

4 0 .6

670.2

42

16.3

151.5

58

2 1 .8

546.2

1

.2

1. 1

10

1.2

2 2 .8

62 .7
10.9
4 .3
2.1
3 4 .5
.1
_
4 .3
5 .5
50.9
7 .8
13.9
3 .0
8 .8

2
3
4
.
_
_
1
1
2
3
6
19
3
3

.4
.7
.7

10.6
3 3 .6
8.4
4 .8
_
_
24.7
.5
9.2
5 .2 .
3 7.0
326 .5
2 4 .8
10.2

:

:

4
1
1
8
1
1
7
3
2
7
1
3

1.7
(2)
(2)
4 .3
.1
_
.4
.7
4 .3
.4
.5
1.5
.7

_
_
2 .3
.2
.1
.4
1.2
8.2
1.4
4 .6

2

1.5

1.6

1

.2

3 2.0

572

156.4

4 5 6 .0

52

18.8

123.9

513
24

147.8
5.5

284.2
56.4

1
11

.3
1.7

.6
13.4

12
10
1
9
3

1.2
.3
(2)
1.3
.2

68.3
11.1
2 .4
3 2.4
1.1

5
9
.
2
24

.2
.4
_
(2)
16.1

7 .2
13.3
_
.3
89.3

photographic and optical goods; watches and c lo c k s .
6 Idleness in 1973 resulted fro m a stoppage that began in 1972.
7 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical pu rp oses, been
deem ed to fa ll within the Bureau's definition of a w ork stoppage.
This
d ecision does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage
has taken place in violation of any law or public p o lic y .

State and m etropolitan area

Alabam a:
Birm ingham
--- -----Gadsden ------- —---------- ------------------ - --■
■
M obile " ■
—
■
.......
........ ..— —
T u scaloosa .......- ..............— ■....
■
■
■
A rizon a:
Phoenix
—................ — ■ ........................
—
Tu cson — —......
.. — ......—
..........—......
A rka n sas:
Little R ock— orth Little
N
R o c k --------------------------------------------------------C aliforn ia:
Anaheim -Santa Ana—Garden
G rove ...
—■
■
■
B a k ersfield — ....................................... .....— ■
F resn o -----------------------------------------------------L os A n geles—
Long B e a c h -----------------------M odesto
....
...........
..-.. ...........
Oxnar d—
Ventura
..................
S a cra m e n to ........................—
.......
Salinas— onterey
M
- — -..........
..
San B ern a rd in o-R iv e rsid e —
Ontario
...............
San D i e g o ...... ....
—
.......... ...................
San F r a n cis c o — akland---------------------------O
O akland-East Bay- — ■
■
San F r a n c is c o -------------------------------------San M ateo .. ..........- -----— ..........San J o s e ..........................
■ -......................
■
Santa B arbara — ..... - ....
...................
Santa R osa .....
■ ............... ■ ■■ ■
■
Stockton
.....
■
—
V a lle jo -N a p a --------------------------------------------C olorado:
Denver
....... —..........- .....
............. .
Conne cticut:
B r id g e p o r t........................... — ..............—
H a r tfo r d ----------------------------------------------------New Haven
■ ........... —.......
■
■
■ -------New London—
GrotonrN o r w ic h ------------------ ■■ —.. ........
■
D elaw are:
W ilm ington, Del. — d .— J -------------------M
N.
(D elaw are p o r t io n )...— ........ - ......... - .....
D istrict of Colum bia:
W ashington, D. C .— d .—
M
Va -------------------(D istrict of Colum bia p o r tio n )---------(M aryland portion) ......... .......................
(V irginia portion) ■ '— .....
F lorid a:
F o rt Lauderdale— ollyw ood -------------------H
J a c k s o n v ille ------------ -- -----------------M ia m i........... — ■
................ . Orlando
—
------------------ ----------- ■
Tampa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g --------- -------- ——G eorgia:
A tlan ta------------------------------------------------------Hawaii:
Honolulu ■' ■——
..... —................... ........
Illin ois:
Bloom ington— orm al .
N
—...................
Chicago— orthw estern Indiana Standard
N
Consolidated area —........
.............
C hicago2 ..■
■
■
------------------.. ■
Decatur
..........
' ......
P eoria
............... ..... .........—- .............
R ock ford ------- S p r in g fie ld ........... ..............
' —
....—
—
Indiana:
E vansville, Ind.—
Ky
— -(Indiana portion) .......—
F ort W a y n e ---------------------------------------------Gary— am m ond-E ast C h icago2--------------H
Indianapolis —----- -- -.......... ... -■ >
M u n c ie ----------------- ■ > ----- —■
South Bend ----------------------------------------------T e rre Haute --------------------------------------------Iowa:
Davenport— ock Island— oline,
R
M
111. —
Iowa ------------------------------------------------(Iowa portion) ...... — ................ —- ■
■
■
(Illin ois p o r t io n ).. '
— .......................
Des M oines — ■ ——
Dubuque ■.......
... ...................
......
Sioux City, Iowa—
Nebr ----—
.......
(Iowa portion)
-----------W aterloo --------------------------------------------------See footnotes at end of table.




Stoppages begin­
ning in year
W ork­
Num ­
ers
ber
in­
volved

Days of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stop­
pages)

38
5
5
7

6.3
3. 9
.2
5.2

137.7
81.9
3 .4
81.4

23
5

2. 8
1.2

25. 8
16. 6

8

1.4

10.5

13
5
6
124
5
5
19
7

4. 5
.7
2 .4
42. 7
1. 0
1. 0
8. 0
22. 7

75.3
14. 0
27.7
1, 054.4
28. 1
16.4
80. 5
304. 1

14
9
109
67
20
18
26
6
6
10
8

2. 6
4 .2
31.3
17.4
9. 6
3 .2
13. 6
.9
.8
1. 7
2. 6

58. 6
87. 1
480. 1
277.2
134. 8
4 6 .6
145. 0
18.3
14.6
2 1 .9
16.6

30

13. 5

243.8

14
13
17

3. 7
2. 7
6. 6

101.5
177.9
121.4

7

3. 1

130.2

26
21

11. 8
11.2

89.4
86.3

37
12
14
11

8.2
3. 0
2. 7
2. 5

105. 6
70.3
2 3.9
11. 5

8
15
15
9
12

1. 5
1.3
4. 6
.9
2. 8

45. 6
18.7
95.4
18. 7
3 4 .6

45

16. 1

128. 9

9

7. 8

78. 6

8

.7

5 .0

141
126
13
19
9
9

149.2
147.4
10. 8
25. 1
16. 1
3 .9

922.9
894. 5
77. 6
164.5
58. 7
22 .9

17
15
20
15
21
9
8
5

3.3
2 .9
12. 5
1. 8
19. 1
3. 6
2 .7
1.3

4 8 .6
32.2
119.4
28.4
251. 8
48. 8
37.4
3 .5

17
7
10
22
6
6
5
8

8.2
1.9
6.3
15.2
1. 1
2.3
.3
.9

80. 9
15. 5
65.4
123.5
37.9
234.4
6.2
6 .6

State and m etropolitan area

Kentucky:
L e x in g to n ............... .....
L o u isv ille , K y .—
Ind - >
■
--------(Kentucky portion) -------------- (Indiana portion) ■
■
.... ...... ........—
O w ensboro ............. — >—
-...........................
Paducah — ----------------—— ............. ........
Louisiana:
Baton Rouge — . — ---- ------------------'---M o n r o e ............. .... — --------- > ■■
—■■
---New O rleans —.... —
---------S h re v e p o rt...... ..... ........—■
.....
M aine:
P o rtla n d -----------------------------------------------M aryland:
B altim ore —— ........ ....... ...... — ............ —
M assachusetts:
B o s t o n -------------------------------------------------B rockton —---- — -- -----------------------------F all R ive r, M a s s .— I --------------------R.
(M assach usetts portion) ---—
L aw rence— averhill, M a s s .— H — ■
H
N.
(M assachusetts portion) — ........ —
L ow ell .—...... ...... —
— --------------------New Bedford -----—
P ittsfield —------- - — --- ---------------Springfield—
Chicopee— olyok e,
H
M a s s .—
Conn ■ ' .....
—
(M assachusetts portion)
......—
W o rce ste r
...... ...............
M ichigan:
Ann A r b o r -------------------------------------------Battle C r e e k --------------------------------------D e t r o i t ------------------------------------------------F lin t -----------------------------------------------------Grand Rapids ---- ——----------- - ......... —
Jackson —---- —...... ..... > ...
—
. ...—
K a la m a zo o ------- -- -------------------------------Lansing ■■
—----- ------—■ — —
■
----------Muskegonr-Muskegon Heights ■
—
M innesota:
DuluthHSuperior, M inn.—
Wis -----------(M innesota portion) -.... ■
■
M inneapolis—
St. Paul —
—
M isso u ri:
Kansas City, M o .—
Kans -------------------(M isso u ri portion) -------------i—
(Kansas p o r t io n )..... .........
—
St. Joseph
......— ' ' -—
—
St. L ou is, M o .— ---------Ill
—
(M isso u ri portion) —
----------------------(Illin ois portion) - —...... ...
Springfield - ............
■
-N ebraska:
Omaha, N e b r .— o w a - '— ■
I
■
—
(Nebraska p o r tio n )------------------------Nevada:
Las V egas ——
-—
... ........
—
New H am pshire:
■
M a n ch e s te r---------- — ■ .——New J e rs e y :
Atlantic City —--------- --- -------— .... ■ -—
J e r s e y C it y * ............< ■
. ■
Long Branch— sb u ry P a r k ---------------A
Newark3 —— —
........... — ..
Paterson— lifto n -P a ss a ic 3 ----------------C
New Brunswick—
Perth
Am boy— a y re ville 3 --------- —............—
S
T r e n to n --------------------------------------------- —
VinelancH M illville—
Bridgeton -----------New M e x ico :
A lbu q u erqu e----------------------------------------New Y ork:
Albany—
Schenectady—T r o y ------------------Bingham ton, N . Y . — a -----------------------P
B u f f a l o ------------------------------------------------Kingston—
Newburgh ■ —
■
—
—— —
—
New York— ortheastern New J e rse y
N
Standard C onsolidated a r e a ------------New Y ork , N. Y. SMSA3-------------------N assau and Suffolk Counties4 -----New Y ork City4 -----------------------------Rockland County4 -----------W estch ester County 4 _____________
Roche s t e r ---------------------- ------------- —....—
Syracuse ——------ ------- — ------------------Utica—
Rom e ---- —-------------------------- -- —

Stoppage i begin s
ning in year
W ork­
Num­
ers
ber
in­
volved

b a y s of
idlen ess
during
year (all
stop-

.

5
54
48
6
6
5

.4
51.3
46. 7
4. 6
.2
1. 0

5. 7
216. 7
201 . 8
15. 0
5. 0
9.7

10
6
18
7

6.4
.3
4. 5
1. 9

263. 0
8. 8
61.4
60.4

6

.4

5. 0

41

12. 8

168.2

52
6
6
6
7
6
6
7
13

10. 7
.6
.4
.4
.7
.6
.3
1. 6
1.5

104.4
6.2
14. 1
14. 1
18. 8
17. 9
15. 0
33. 8

20
20
14

4. 8
4. 8
3. 1

138. 1
138. 1
26. 9

8
12
117
18
14
11
9
8
9

2 .2
1. 1
138. 5
4. 7
2. 5
2. 6
2. 5
3.3
.6

9
5
50

.9
.3
8. 5

10. 8
4. 0
2 54. 9

35
25
10
5
90
64
26
6

11.2
9.4
1. 7
.7
46. 9
4 0 .4
6 .6
4. 0

173. 6
162. 7
13. 5
599. 8
529. 5
70. 3
59.9

15
13

2.2
1.9

56.2
49. 6

12

3 .9

2 8.4

6

.3

6
26
13
50
42

1.3
6. 8
2. 7
22. 8
12. 7

13.4
78. 9
67. 1
308.3
150. 5

25
16
6

7.3
3. 0
.5

125. 2
49. 8

11.2

12. 1

21. 1
1,086. 5
61. 0
3 0 .4
10.2

18. 0
31. 2
4. 6

10. 8

6 .9

9

2. 0

17. 8

50
5
47
8

10. 0
.6
12.3
2. 0

4 4 .4
8.2
147.4

358
215
48
128
6
33
20
20
9

13 6. 7
87. 1
5.3
74. 9
.6
6.3
8.4
12. 8
2 .3

1,717. 1
1 ,0 5 4 .2
104. 8
862. 1
14. 9
72.4
97. 1
89. 0
10. 5

22. 2

State and m etrop olitan area

N orth C arolina:
C h a r lo t t e ---------—
........... ......... ...........
G reen sboro—
High Point— inston-Salem ----W
Ohio:
Akron
..— ----------------------- -----------...
Canton ■■
■
........ - ......
.... ...... ....... — ------------- -Cincinnati, O h io-K y. — d ------------In
(Ohio portion) ..... — ------------- ----- --— — —
—
(Kentucky portion) ........... ....— ............... ....
Cleveland
- ---------------------------- -------------- --Columbus
..
..........................................- "
Dayton
------------ - —
---..
.......... —
Hamilton— id dletow n -----------------------------------M
Lim a ..... ..................... ...— .■■
■
■
■
- .. . —
L or a in -E ly r ia
.......................... — -----—----------M a n s fie ld ...........— - ■ — .....................
■
■
S p rin g field ----------------------------------------------------Steubenville— eirton, Ohio—
W
W. V a -----------(Ohio portion)
- .-........— .■
(W est Virginia portion) — — ---------- — »■
■
■
T oled o, Ohio— ich -------------------------M
(Ohio portion)
............... — .... ..... — ■
■
■
Youngstown— arren ------------------ ■■■ ---------W
■
Oklahom a:
T u ls a -------------------------------------------------------------O regon:
Eugene —------. .■
— — .
■
Portland, O r e g .—
Wash -------------------------------(O regon p o r tio n )-------------------------------------(W ashington portion) ----- ---—
S a le m ------------------------------------------------------------Pennsylvania:
Allentownr-Bethlehem—
Easton, P a .— J ——
N.
(Pennsylvania portion ) ------—■■ .------------■—
(New J e r s e y portion) . .■ ............... ....... ■
Altoona —----- --- — ...— ---------------------------------E rie ...... ..— ..—---- --------------------------------H arrisburg — ---------- ——
■■
...
Johnstown ----------------- ------- ------- - ...... - ■ ■ —
L a ncaster — -------- - ' ■■ ...... ■ —
■
.......—.... — ■
■
Philadelphia, P a .— J -------------------------------N.
(Pennsylvania portion) —........... ...- .............
(New J e r s e y portion) ------------- — -------Pittsburgh --------------- — -------------------------------R e a d in g --------------------------------------------------------S cra n ton ..... —.....— ----- --------- ------------— ----- ■
■
H
W ilk e s -B a rre — a z le to n — . — — ------- ------ -- W illia m sp ort
............—— ——
■
— ■
■
Y ork --------------------------------------------------------------

Stoppage s b egin - Days of
idlen ess
ning it year
W ork­
during
Num­
e rs
year (all
ber
in ­
stopvolved - E*&gs)..
14
12

1.4
2. 0

19. 0
7. 2

44
13
55
43
9
83
44
30
9
9
11
5
5
14
5
9
26
23
27

29.0

414. 3
172.3
187. 3
142. 7
4 2 .2
468. 1
149. 2
166.3
21. 7
53.2
56.3
7.2
80. 0
55. 6
42. 8
12. 8
80. 8
79. 7
85. 1

3.2
15. 8
14. 0
1. 5
33. 6
11.8
14. 5
2. 6
2. 6
9 .9
2. 0
7. 1
2. 0
1. 1
.9
12.4
11. 6
18. 1

15

1. 6

67. 7

7
36
29
7
8

2. 7
21 .2
19. 8
1.4
3. 1

6 5.9
503. 0
466. 7
36.3
58.4

30
25
5
6
23
13
14
8
200
163
37
154
21
8
32
10
13

5. 1
4. 6
.5
4. 6
3 .4
4. 7
1.3
2.2
91 .0
81.3
9 .6
34.3
1.8
2 .2
4 .9
.9
4 .7

71.3
68 . 8
2. 6
38. 0
38. 0
74.4
15. 6
10. 0

1,712. 8
1 ,5 8 2 .4
130.4
603. 7
3 3 .9
25. 0
83. 5
12 . 1
24. 7

1 Includes data for each m etropolitan area in w hich 5 stoppages
or m ore began in 1973.
In som e m etropolitan a re a s , includes the
countries in m ore than one State, and hence, an area or exceed the
total for the State in which the m a jor city is loca ted . E xcludes stoppages
in the mining and logging in du stries.
Counts inter m etropolitan area
stoppages separately in each area affected; a llo ca te s w o rk e rs involved




State and m etropolitan area

Rhode Island:
P r o vi dene e—Pa wtu eke t ,
R . I. — a s s ----------------------------------M
(Rhode Island portion) —
South Dakota:
------— — ■
■
—
Sioux F alls
Ten nessee:
Chattanooga, Ten n.—
G a ------------------------------------------------(T ennessee portion) — --------- —
K noxville ----------- ------------ -----------M em phis, Ten n.—
A rk ---------------------------------------------(T ennessee portion) ...... —■ ----N a s h v ille -------------------------- — ■ —
T exas:
Beaumont— ort
P
Arthur .......... - ......... — ----- -----D a lla s --------------------------------------------El P aso ----------------------------------------F o rt W o rth -----------------------------------H o u s t o n ----------------------------------------San Antonio ----------------------------------V irginia:
N orfolk— ortsm outh --------------------P
Richm ond
—
— ----- ■
■
—W ashington:
Richland—
Kennewich -------------------Seattle— v e r e t t -----------------------------E
Spokane------------------------------------------T a c o m a -----------------------------------------W est V irginia:
Charle s t o n ---------------------- —-----------Huntington—
Ashland, W. V a .—
K v. — h io -------------------------------------O
(W est Virginia portion) ---------Park ersbu rg— arietta, W. V a .—
M
Ohio --------------------------------------------(W est V irginia p o r t io n ) ---------W heeling, W. V a .—
Ohio
—
■■
■
(W est V irginia p o r t io n ) ---------W isconsin:
Appleton— s h k o s h
O
——
..■
■
■
Green B a y ..~ ..................... — ------Kenosha - ——.... — ------ --------- —■
M adison --------------------------------Milwaukee —--------- -------------— — ...
—
Racine --------- .
......................

Stoppages begin­
ning in year
W ork Num ­
e rs
ber
in­
volved

30
26

11.3
11. 1

Days o f
idlen ess
during
year (all
stop­
pages)

172. 1
168. 8

7

.4

4. 5

21
20
12

5. 0
5. 0
1. 6

140. 6
140. 1
93.8

27
27
7

14.4
14.4
.8

144. 0
144. 0
41. 6

12
17
6
9
23
7

8. 1
3.2
.3
.8
6. 6
2. 0

214 .4
37. 9
729. 8
17. 8
222 .2
141. 0

10
10

1.4
.8

30. 7
11.4

6
16
8
9

.8
1.9
1. 8
.8

3. 1
3 2 .4
24. 9
12. 1

16

2 .2

18.4

23
16

4 .4
3. 1

85. 5
74. 6

12
9

4. 0
3. 5

22.2
19.7

13
9

2. 6
2. 1

4 5 .4
40. 6

9
7
8
5
30
5

.7
.9
5.3
.2
21. 0
.6

2 6 .9
13. 0
2 0 .7
5. 1
287.3
4. 1

and days idle to the r e s p e ctiv e a r e a s .
1 Included in the Chicago, 111.— orthern Indiana Standard C o n soli­
N
dated area.
3 Included in the New YorkH Northeastern New J e rse y Standard
C onsolidated area.
4 Included in the New Y ork SMSA.

Num ber o f stoppages
Industry group
Total
A ll industries

1
day

2-3
days

4—6
days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

£0=89
days

90 days
and o v er

2 5, 320

833

793

657

950

851

666

261

390

M an u factu rin g ------------------------------------------------

2 2,271

119

228

282

446

451

421

151

173

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ---------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c ts ---------------------- —
-------T ob a cco m a n u fa c tu r e s ------------------. -------------------Textile m ill p r o d u c ts ------------------------ -----------------Apparel, e t c . 3 ----------------------------------------------------Lu m ber and wood products, except
fu r n it u r e ----------------------------------------------------------Furniture and f ix t u r e s ---------------------------------------P aper and allied p r o d u c ts ---------------------------------Printing, publishing, allied in d u s t r ie s ------------C h em icals and allied p r o d u c ts --------------------------P etroleu m refining and related in d u s t r ie s ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products —
Leath er and leather p r o d u c t s ---------------------------Stone, cla y, and glass p r o d u c t s -----------------------P rim a ry metal in d u s t r ie s ---------------------------------F a bricated m etal products 4-------------------------------M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l ---------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipment, and
s u p p lie s ------------------------------------------------------------Tran sportation equipment --------------------------------Instrum ents, e t c . 5----------------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s tr ie s -----------

7
177

1
9

23

31

3
29

1
32

25

16

2
12

44
47

2
2

4
7

6
9

9
9

8
7

9
9

2
1

4
3

67
82
9
82
128
17
142
10
171
164
300
326

3
3
7
6
7
1
4
_
7
10
6
21

5
9
10
7
9
1
13
1
16
19
26
27

6
8
8
5
12
2
20
_
14
28
40
36

10
16
20
17
30
3
17
5
29
30
60
74

18
16
22
12
27
2
26
2
46
32
72
59

15
20
18
14
23
3
37
1
35
24
56
70

6
6
8
6
15
1
12
13
9
14
18

4
4
6
15
5
4
13
1
11
11
26
21

175
159
36
43

17
12
.
1

23
22
3
3

34
17
2
4

30
43
7
10

21
33
7
8

23
17
7
14

13
5
5
1

14
10
5
2

N onm anufacturing-------------------------------------------

2 3.050

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s --------M ining----------------------------------------------------- ;—
C ontract con stru ction ---------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v i c e s ---------------------W holesale and retail t r a d e ------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate -------S e r v i c e s ------------------------------------------------------G overn m en t6 ------------------------------------------------

714

565

375

505

400

245

110

136

12
1,078
542

555
50

1
321
85

1
115
75

55
140

3
13
116

4
8
45

5
19

3
6
12

310
488
24
208
388

27
16
.
17
49

35
36
.
19
68

33
54
4
23
70

63
111
5
35
96

52
94
3
52
67

41
92
6
21
28

25
36
3
16
6

34
49
3
25
4

W orkers involved (in thousands)
All in d u s tr ie s --------------------------------------------

2. 247. 6

275.5

287.9

395.2

491. 1

41 6 .8

199.9

9 1 .5

8 9 .8

M anufacturing-------------------------------------------------

957. 1

4 3 .3

134.0

162.2

232.8

201.5

100.2

4 9 .4

3 3.9

5. 1
76.4

.7
2 .0

4 ,0

35.3

2 .0
8 .7

.2
4 .6

5.9

14.7

2. 2
1.2

8 .5
10. 8

.1
.2

1.3
2 .4

.6
3.3

1. 1
2.2

1.4
1.8

2 .9
.8

.1
(7
)

.9
(7
)

16.4
15. 3
24.3
23.0
30. 8
9 .3
9 9 .6
2. 1
28.0
53. 8
74. 3
164. 8

(7
)
.6
.8
1.7
2. 1
.1
2. 7
_
1.8
4 .2
1.4
8 .7

1,5
1.6
2.2
8 .7
4 .5
.1
25. 7
.2
3 .4
13.5
6. 1
7.3

.9
1.7
2 .2
2 .6
3.5
.1
16.3
1.8
7. 6
10.3
15.3

2 .2
2 .7
4 .4
3 .9
7. 6
2 .6
7. 1
1. 1
5 .6
11.8
2 6 .8
19.5

7.5
3 .4
8 .6
1.7
2 .8
.1
21.3
.4
6 .0
4 .4
9 .5
9 6.5

2 .3
3 .8
3. 1
3 .5
2. 8
.5
20. 3
.2
4 .2
8 .4
12. 6
12.7

1.6
.4
2 .3
.4
6. 2
( ?)
4 .0
_
4 .4
2 .6
2. 1
2 .8

.3
1.0
.7
.6
1.3
5 .7
2. 1
.2
.8
1.2
5 .5
1.9

Tran sportation equipm ent----------------------- —-------Instrum ents, etc. 5 ----------------- — -----------------------M iscella neous manufacturing in d u s t r ie s -----------

8 5.0
206. 5
14. 3
8 .9

8 .6
6.2
.
1.5

13.4
37.5
.3
.3

32.9
27.5
.1
.2

9 .0
110.5
2. 7
1.2

9 .2
13.4
6.2
2 .4

5 .0
5. 1
3 .4
2 .5

4 .0
2 .2
.9
.5

2 .9
4. 1
.8
.4

Nonmanufac t u r in g -------- ---------------------------------

1 .2 9 0 .4

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s --------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c ts --------------------------------T o b a cco m a n u fa c tu r e s --------------------------------------T extile m ill products —--------------------------------------A pparel, e t c .3 ----------------------------------------------------Lu m ber and wood products, except
furniture ----------------------------------------- ----------------Furniture and f i x t u r e s ------------------------ —-----------P aper and a llied p r o d u c t s ---------------------- —------- —
Printing, publishing, and allied in d u s tr ie s------C h em icals and allied p r o d u c t s ------------------- ------P etroleu m refining and related in d u s t r ie s ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics products —
Leath er and leather p ro d u cts----------------------------Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s ----------------- —---P rim a ry m etal i n d u s t r ie s --------------------------------F a bricated me tad products 4-------- — — ----- *--------M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l -------- ------- — -------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and

A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s tr y , and f i s h e r i e s ------— —
M in in g -----------------------------------------------------------------C ontract c o n s t r u c tio n ---------------------------- -----------Tran sportation, com m unication, e le c tr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s ----------------------------W holesale and retail t r a d e ---------------------------- ----Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e ----------------S e r v i c e s ----------------—-------------------------------- — ------G overn m en t6 -------- ------- ----------------------------------------




232.2

153. 8

233.0

258.3

215.3

9 9 .7

42. 1

55.9

24. 1
300. 6
387.9

109. 7
13.3

.8
9 3 .4
19.6

(7
)
4 8 .3
126. 1

37.5
93.3

18.8
8 .8
66.9

1.0
.7
16.2

.3
24.3

3 .4
1.8
28.2

184.8
118.6
3. 7
67.4
203.3

95 .2
2 .0
2 .9
9 .2

7.9
6 .4
„
4 .9
2 0 .8

6. 1
16.4
.8
6 .0
29.3

9 .5
3 1.6
.2
4 0 .3
4 5 .9

15.4
4 0 .6
O
5 .9
58.7

26.9
13.3
.5
2. 6
38 .4

12. 1
1.9
1.8
1.0
.9

11.7
6 .5
.3
3 .9
.1

Days of idlen ess during year (in thousands)
Industry group
Total

1
day

2-3
days

------4=5------days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

90 days
and ov e r

60-89
days

A ll in d u s tr ie s ----------------------—
------------------

27. 187.3

275. 5

589 .4

1 ,0 7 0 .4

2. 971. 6

5 .2 8 1 .5

5 ,8 2 9 .3

3,888. 1

7. 281.6

M anufacturing------------------------------------------------

12. 775.4

43. 3

284 .4

4 56 .9

1 ,4 1 4 .3

2 ,4 0 9 .8

2, 743.9

2 ,0 2 5 . 7

3 ,3 9 7 .2

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------------------F ood and kindred products — --------------------------T ob a cco m a n u fa c tu r e s -------------------------------- -----Textile m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------Apparel, e t c , ----------------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood products, except
f u r n it u r e ---------------------------------------------------------Furniture and f ix t u r e s ---------------------------- ------—
Paper and allied p r o d u c t s --------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied in d u s trie s -----C hem icals and allied p r o d u c ts ------— — -----------P etroleu m refining and related in d u s tr ie s ------Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products —
L eather and leather products — -----------------------Stone, clay, and glass p r o d u c t s ----------------------P rim a ry metal in d u s tr ie s -------------- —---------------F abricated metal p r o d u c ts 4 ------------------------ -—
M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l --------------------------E le ctrica l m achinery, equipment, and
supplies — ------------------------------------------------------T ransportation equipm ent--------------------------------Instrum ents, e t c . 5---- —-------------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ------—

244.6
956 .4
.
206.4
84.5

.7
2. 0
_
. 1
.2

9. 1
_
1.7
5. 6

79. 1
_
1.7
10. 6

10. 0
63. 7
.
8.2
14.4

1.9
63. 5
_
19.0
27. 1

155. 6
_
73. 3
20. 3

450. 8
_
5.5
.4

231.9
132. 6
96. 8
5.9

271. 1
290.3
445 .0
264.5
4 53 .6
577.5
1 ,4 8 0 .8
39.4
586 .4
754.5
1,247. 9
1, 839.5

( 7)
.6
.8
1. 7
2. 1
.1
2. 7
_
1. 8
4 .2
1.4
8. 7

3. 2
3 .4
4. 7
20. 1
8 .2
.3
69. 5
.5
6. 6
22. 7
11.3
15.8

3.6
5. 6
7. 7
5 .9
16. 7
.5
56. 2
_
6.2
24. 3
33. 1
43. 6

14. 5
19. 7
3 3.4
21.5
61. 1
13.9
52. 8
7. 1
36. 6
80.4
150. 1
127. 8

63.9
40. 3
115. 8
22. 1
39. 8
2.0
339.9
4. 7
98. 6
67.4
144. 6
959.2

36. 1
102. 1
9 2.0
105. 6
89. 8
16.9
582. 8
5 .5
128.4
223.4
290. 0
357. 1

9 5 .4
23. 9
106. 3
2 0.2
116. 2
2 .9
199.7
_
229.0
138. 0
98. 1
128.9

54. 3
9 4 .8
84.4
67.4
119. 8
541 .0
177. 2
21. 5
79. 1
194. 2
519 .4
198. 3

1 ,0 2 7 .4
1, 517.3
288.3
200.0

8. 6
6.2
.
1. 5

26. 6
74. 1
.5
.6

81.5
79.4
.3
.7

61.2
610.4
19. 1
8 .5

128.
161.
71.
38.

5
7
2
6

130.2
149.4
103.0
82. 3

226.0
119.4
39. 1
25.9

364. 7
316. 8
55. 1
4 1 .9

N onm anufacturing---------------------------------- ------

14,4 1 1 .9

232.2

304 .9

613. 5

1.557. 3

2. 871. 7

3,085. 5

1 .8 6 2 .4

3 .8 8 4 .3

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and f i s h e r i e s -------------M in in g ---------------------------------------------------------------C ontract c o n s t r u c tio n --------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le ctr ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v i c e s ---------------------------W holesale and retail t r a d e ------------------------- -----Finance, insurance, and real e s t a t e -------- ------S e r v i c e s --------------------------------- --------- ------- ---------G overnm ent6 ------------------------------------------------------

510.5
838.5
4 ,8 3 6 .7

109. 7
13.3

.8
175.4
4 1 .2

( 7)
119. 7
299.0

132. 2
597. 6

282. 0
33. 1
923. 1

35. 7
24. 3
45 6 .9

12. 2
1 ,0 1 6 .3

191. 8
231 .9
1,484. 7

95.2
2 .0

18.0
13. 3

20. 9
57.2
2. 7
20.5
93 .4

68.0
214. 8
1.2
241 .8
301. 7

224. 1
544. 6
.6
93. 8
770.4

802. 6
347. 5
18.5
77. 7
1 ,3 2 2 .2

614. 2
87.9
42. 6
4 6 .9
4 2 .4

1 ,0 7 6 .8
534. 5
20.9
334. 7
9. 1

2, 919 .8
1, 801.7
86.6
830 .8
2, 591.9

„

2 .9
9.2

1 The totals in this table d iffe r fro m those in preceding tables as
these relate to stoppages ending during the year, and thus m ay include
id len ess occu rrin g in p r io r y e a rs .
2 Stoppages extending into 2 o r m o re industries o r industry groups
have been counted in each industry o r industry group; w ork ers involved
and days idle w ere allocated to the re sp e ctiv e industries,
J Includes other finished products made fro m fa b rics and s im ila r
m a teria ls.
4 E xcludes ordnan ce, m achinery, and transportation equipment.
5 Includes p rofession a l,
s cie n tific, and con trollin g instrum ents;




12. 7
43. 5

photographic and optical goods; watches and c lo c k s .
6 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical pu rposes, been
deem ed to fall within the B ureau's definition o f a w ork stoppage.
This
does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage has taken
place in violation o f any law o r public p o licy,
7 Few er than 100.
NOTE: B ecause o f rounding,
equal totals. Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums

of individual item s

m ay not

Number of stoppages
M ajor issu e
T otal

I
day

4 -6
days

2-3
days

7-14
days

15-29
days

30-59
days

90 days
and over

days

-------------------------------------------

5,320

833

793

657

950

851

666

261

309

G eneral wage changes -------------------------------------Supplem entary benefits -----------------------------------Wage adjustm ents --------------------------------------------Hours of w o r k ----------------------------------------------------Other contractual m atters -------------------------------Union organization and secu rity ----------------------■
Job secu rity -----------------------------------------------------Plant adm inistration ------------------------------------------

2,532
81
184
7
91
453
263
1,214
146
287
62

73
8
39
1
9
17
53
481
59
85
8

157
8
47
2
17
31
52
353
31
82
13

273
12
39
2
10
34
29
177
27
44
10

606
19
31
•
18
67
42
105
14
38
10

622
5
9
1
13
77
32
48
4
26
14

481
12
8
«
13
81
29
24
6
8
4

165 '
7
4
1
3
56
11
12
2
-

155
10
7
•
8
90
15
14
5
2
3

A ll stoppages

Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s ----------------------Not reported -----------------------------------------------------

W orkers involved (in thousands)
-----------------------------------------

2 ,2 4 7 .6

2 7 5 .5

287 .9

395.2

491.1

4 1 6 .8

199.9

9 1 .5

8 9.8

G eneral wage changes --------------------------------------Supplem entary benefits -------------------------------------Wage adjustm ents ----------------------------------------------Hours of w ork ---------------------------------------------------Other contractual m atters -------------------------------Union organization and se cu rity ----------------------Job s e c u r it y --------------------------------------------------------Plant adm inistration -----------------------------------------Other w orking conditions ---------------------------------Inter union or intraunion m atters ---------------------Not reported ------------------------------------------------------

1 ,1 4 1 .9
4 2 .6
84.2
1.0
51.9
115.7
158.9
532.5
39.2
7 3 .8
5.7

15 .6
4 .0
13.2
(2)
4 .2
2 .9
23 .9
176.8
13.0
20. 6
1.4

62.7
1.6
2 2 .0
.3
10.7
10.5
2 1 .6
118.4
9.1
29.2
1.7

2 0 4 .4
3 .6
32.3
.3
10.3
14.5
14.6
93.7
8 .0
12.0
1.5

354 .4
10.7
11.8
8 .6
2 1 .4
18.9
56.1
4 .4
4 .3
.4

244 .0
5.0
1.1
.1
6.2
3 1 .8
58.0
60.9
4 .3
4 .8
.5

151.6
8.1
2 .5

51.4
2 .4
.5
.2
1 .8
13.6
5.7
15.8
•(2)

57.7
7.1
.9
„
1.1
9 .8
8.7
1.8
.1
2 .5
(2)

-------------------------------------------

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

27 5 .5

589.4

1 ,0 7 0 .4

2 ,9 7 1 .6

5 ,2 8 1 .5

5 ,8 2 9 .3

3 ,8 8 8 .1

7 ,2 8 1 .6

G eneral wage changes -------- ------------------------------Supplem entary benefits ------------------------------------Wage adjustm ents --------------------------------------------Hours of w ork --------------------------------------------------Other contractual m atters -------------------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y -----------------------Job secu rity -------------------------------------------------------Plant adm inistration -----------------------------------------Other w orking conditions --------------------------------Inter union or intraunion m atters -------------------Not reported -----------------------------------------------------

1 7 ,1 8 0 .9
1 ,0 6 2 .8
415.1
13.5
620.4
2 ,3 8 4 .6
2 ,2 5 3 .8
2 ,7 3 5 .5
169.3
318 .3
3 3 .5

1 5.6
4 .0
13.2
(2)
4 .2
2 .9
2 3 .9
176.8
13.0
2 0 .6
1.4

153.6
2 .8
4 1 .0
.6
20.2
28.2
38.1
224.3
17.6
56.8
6 .0

524.3
15.3
72. 8
1.6
38 .3
4 7 .8
4 5 .6
270 .3
21.2
2 8 .9
4 .2

2 ,2 1 0 .2
65.6
76.3
_
4 9 .5
144.5
112.5
263.3
2 6 .8
2 0 .0
2 .9

3 ,1 3 9 .6
78.7
16.9
2 .4
69.0
407.2
839.7
607.1
63.5
4 9 .7
7.7

4 ,5 7 8 .6
172.4
7 0 .6
.
215 .0
270. 6
222 .4
2 75 .4
8 .0
10.6
5.7

2 ,0 8 6 .5
116 .6
2 5 .6
8 .8
88.5
664 .5
191.1
700.7

4 ,4 7 2 .4
607 .4
9 8 .6

A ll stoppages

9.1
11.1
7 .5 .
9.1
.3
.4
.2

Days o f idlen ess during year (in thousands)
A ll stoppages

1 See footnote 1, table A -2 5,
2 F ew er than 100,




-

NOTE:
equal to ta ls.

5.7
"

135.7
818 .8
780.3
2 1 7 .6
19.3
125.7
5.7

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not
Dashes denote z e r o s .

W orkers involved

Stoppage s
Duration and con tract status
Number

P ercent

Number
(in
thousands)

Days o f idlen ess

P ercent

Number
(in
thousands)

P ercent

------------------------------------------

5,320

100.0

2 ,2 4 7 .6

100.0

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

100.0

1 day ------------------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days --------------------------------------------------------4 to 6 days --------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days -----------------------------------------------------15 to 29 days ----------------------------------------------------30 to 59 days ----------------------------------------------------60 to 89 days
---------------------------------------------------90 days and over -----------------------------------------------

833
793
657
950
851
666
261
309

15.7
14.9
12.3
17.9
16.0
12.5
4 .9
5 .8

275 .5
287 .9
395.2
491.1
4 1 6 .8
199.9
9 1.5
8 9 .8

12.3
12.8
17.6
2 1 .8
18.5
8 .9
4 .1
4 .0

275 .5
589.4
1 ,0 7 0 .4
2 ,9 7 1 .6
5 ,2 8 1 .5
5, 829.3
3, 888.1
7 ,2 8 1 .6

1.0
2 .2
3 .9
10.9
19.4
2 1 .4
14.3
2 6 .8

N egotiation of fir s t agreem ent o r union
recogn ition -----------------------------------------------------1 day ---------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 days ------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days ----------------------------------------------15 to 29 days ---------------------------------------------30 to 59 days --------------------------------------------60 to 89 days --------------------------------------------90 days and over ---------------------------------------

653
23
43
54
106
119
128
61
119

12.3
.4
.8
1.0
2 .0
2.2
2 .4
1.1
2 .2

6 9 .6
3.2
6 .9
6.5
10.2
17.2
12.3
3 .4
9 .8

3.1
.1
.3
.3
.5
.8
.5
.2
.4

1, 808.4
3.2
16.7
2 1 .0
7 0 .5
2 67 .9
334 .9
174.7
919.4

6.7
.1
.1
.3
1.0
1.2
.6
3 .4

Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration or
reopening) -------------------------------------------------------1 day ---------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days ------------------------------------------------4 to 6 days
-----------------------------------------------7 to 14 days
15 to 29 days
----------------------- --------------------30 to 59 days ----------------------------------------------60 to 89 days ----------------------------------------------90 days and over ---------------------------------------

2,684
79
179
287
641
639
498
187
174

50.5
1.5
3 .4
5.4
12.0
12.0
9 .4
3 .5
3 .3

1 ,4 8 3 .8
3 0 .9
81.7
246.2
40 6 .0
3 7 3 .6
179.0
86.9
7 9 .4

66.0
1.4
3 .6
11.0
18.1
16.6
8.0
3 .9
3 .5

2 3 ,3 5 3 .1
3 0.9
194.3
662.2
2, 528.8
4 ,7 7 4 .7
5 ,2 3 1 .5
3 ,6 4 9 .0
6 ,2 8 1 .8

85.9
.1
.7
2 .4
9 .3
17.6
19.2
13.4
23.1

During term o f agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not in v olv ed ) -------------------------1 day -----------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days
-----------------------------------------------4 to 6 days ------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days ----------------------------------------------15 to 29 days ----------------------------------------------30 to 59 days ----------------------------------------------60 to 89 days ---------------------------------------------90 days and over
--------------------------------------

1,817
708
541
281
177
66
25
9
10

34.2
13.3
10.2
5.3
3 .3
1.2
.5
.2
.2

674.5
237 .9
196.6
137.9
7 2 .8
20.3
7. 6
.9
.5

30 .0
10.6
8.7
6.1
3 .2
.9
.3

1 ,8 5 2 .4
237 .9
372.3
373 .0
359 .9
153.8
236 .9
4 8 .7
70 .0

6* 8
.9
1.4
1.4
1.3
.6
.9
.2
.3

No contract or other con tract status ---------------1 day ---------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days ------------------------------------------------4 to 6 days ------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days -----------------------------------------------15 to 29 days ---------------------------------------------30 to 59 d a y s -----------------------------------------------60 to 89 days
-------------------------------------------90 days and over ---------------------------------------

68
16
14
16
9
6
3
1
3

1.3
.3
.3
.3
.2
.1
.1

6.1
2.1
.7
2 .3
.6
.2

.3
.1

No inform ation on contract status -----------------1 day ----------------------------------------------------------2 to 3 days ------------------------------------------------4 to 6 days ------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days -----------------------------------------------15 to 29 days ---------------------------------------------30 to 59 days --------------------------------------------60 to 89 days ----------------------------------------------90 days and over -----------------------------------------

98
7
16
19
17
21
12
3
3

A ll stoppages

1 See footnote 1, table A .2 5 ,
2 Less than 0 .0 5 p erce n t.
3 Few er than 100.




( 3)

( !)
(2 )

(2 )

.1

(2 )
!

.1

(2 )

( 3)

13.6
1.4
2 .0
2 .3
1.2
5.5
.9
.2

1.8
.1
.3
.4
.3
.4
.2
.1

(3 )

- 1

NOTE:
equal totals.

(2 )

.6
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
(!)
(2 )

Because o f rounding,

2 8 .9
2 .1
1.4
6.1
4 .2
2 .3
.7
7 .3
4 .8
144.6
1.4
4 .6
8.1
8.2
82.8
2 5 .4
8.4
5.7

(2 )

.1
C)
(2 )

0
(2 )
(!)
2
(2 )

.5
g)
(2 )
(2 )
(2 )

.3
.1

(2 )

(2)

sums o f individual item s m ay not

Stoppages

W orkers involved

M ediation agency and contract status
Number
A ll stoppages

-------------------------------------------

Number
(in
thousands)

P ercent

5,320

100.0

Government m ediation 1 --------------------------------------2
F ed era l m ediation ------------------------------------State m ediation -------------------------------------- r—
F ed era l and State m ediation c o m b in e d -----Other m ediation ---------------------------------- ------Private m ediation --------------------------------------------No m ediation reported -------------------------------------No inform ation ---------------------------------------------------

2, 165
1,700
271
112
82
122
3,009
24

4 0.7
3 2.0
5. 1
2.1
1.5
2 .3
5 6.6
.5

955 .5 •
768 .4
9 9 .6
66.4
21.1
24.7
1 ,2 6 3 .4
4 .0

Negotiation of fir s t agreem ent ------------------------G overnm ent m ediation ----------------------------F ed era l m ediation ------------------------------State m ediation -----------------------------------F ed era l and State m ediation
com bined -----------------------------------------Other m ediation --------------------------------P rivate m ediation -------------------------------------No m ediation reported ----------------------------No in fo r m a tio n --------------------------------------------

653
246
188
34

12.3
4 .6
3 .5
.6

69 .6
3 0 .5
2 0.3
3 .9

2 ,2 4 7 .6

Days o f idlen ess

P ercen t

Number
(in
thousands)

P ercent

100.0

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

100.0

4 2 .5
34.2
4 .4
3 .0
.9
1.1
56.2
.2

18,640.2
1 5 ,4 1 6 .9
1 ,4 0 9 .2
1 ,5 9 8 .5
2 15 .6
222.7
8 ,2 5 4 .6
6 9.8

6 8 .6
56.7
5.2
5 .9
.8
.8
3 0 .4
.3

3.1
1.4
.9
.2

1 ,8 0 8 .4
899.5
693.0
86.2

6.7
3 .3
2 .5
.3

2
22
27
376
4

.4
.5
7.1
.1

.3
5 .9
2 .7
36.3
.1

2,684
1,803
1,443
222

50.5
33 .9
27.1
4 .2

1 ,4 8 3 .8
892.1
727.2
91.7

6 6.0
39.7
3 2 .4
4 .1

2 3 ,3 5 3 .1
1 7 ,4 6 1 .9
14 ,5 0 5 .2
1 ,3 1 4 .5

85.9
64.2
53.4
4 .8

105
33
53
818
10

2 .0
’.6
1.0
15.4
.2

63.5
9.7
9 .9
579.4
2 .3

2 .8
.4
.4
2 5 .8
.1

1 ,5 6 3 .1
79.1
118.4
5 ,7 4 2 .2
30.7

5.7
.3
.4
21.1
.1

1,817
71
33
14

34.2
1.3
.6
.3

674.5
2 3 .8
12.3
4 .0

3 0 .0
1.1
.5
.2

1 ,8 5 2 .4
160.3
104.2
8.1

6 .8
.6
.4
(3 )

4
20
35
1,707
4

.1
.4
.7
32.1
.1

2 .5
5.0
11.8
637. 8
1.0

.1
.2
.5
2 8 .4

2 6 .0
2 2 .0
80.9
1 ,5 8 7 .0
24.2

.1
.1
.3
5 .8
.1

No con tract or other con tract status ----- ---------Governm ent m e d ia tio n ------. -----------------------F ed era l m ediation ----------------------------State m ediation
--------------------------------F ed era l and State m ediation
com bined -----------------------------------------Other m ediation --------------------------------P rivate m ediation ------------------------------------No m ediation reported ----------------------------No inform ation
------------------------------------------

68
6
1

1.3
,1

6.1
.6
.5
-

No inform ation on con tract status ------------- -— —
G overnment m ediation ------------------------------F ed era l m ediation -----------------------------State m ediation —-------------------------------F ed era l and State m ediation
com bined -----------------------------------------Other m ediation --------------------------------Private m e d ia t io n -------------------------------------—
No m ediation reported ----------------------------- —
No inform ation
----------------------------------------

98
39
35
1

Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration or
reop en in g) -------------------------------------------------- -—
Governm ent m ediation ------------------------------F ed era l m ediation ----------------------------State m ediation ---------------------------------F ed era l and State m ediation
com bined -----------------------------------------Other m ediation
----------------------——
----P rivate m ediation -------------------------------------No m ediation reported ----------------------------No inform ation -----------------------------------------During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not involved) -------------------------Governm ent m ediation ------------------------------F ed era l m ediation ------------------ -----------;-------------State m ediation ------------------- •
F ed era l and State m ediation
com bined -----------------------------------------Other m ediation
----------------------------- Private m ediation ------------------------------------No m ediation r e p o r t e d ---- --------------------------No in fo r m a tio n --------------------------------------------

(3 )

i
_
5
5
57

|

-

1,

1
2
2
51
6

1 See footnote 1, table A -2 5 .
2 Includes stoppages involving w ork ers in which private m ediation
a lso was em ployed.
3 L ess than 0 .05 p ercen t.




(3 )

.1
.1
1.1

!

_
.1
.2
5.3

(3 )

.3
.1
1 .6
<3 )

(3 )

.3
(3 )
(3 )

(3 )

-

.2
-

1.8
.7
‘ .7

13.6
8 .5
8.1

.6
.4
.4

(3 )

(4 )

(3 )

(3 )

(4 )

(3 )

.3

(3 )

(4 )

1.0
.1

4 .5
.5
4

(3 )

.4
3l 2
(3 >

.1

2 8.9
2 .2
1-.9

(3 )
(3 )

(3 )

-

(3 )

8.7
111.6
2 1 .6
875.9
11.3

(3 )
(3 )

.2
( 3)

.3
1.2
2 5 .4
-

144.6
116.3
112.6
.3
.8
2 .5
.6
24.1
3. 6

(3 )
(3 )
|

.1
.5
.4
.4
(3 )
(3 )
*)
(3 )

.1
(3)

L ess than 100.

Note: Because of rounding, sums
equal to ta ls.
Dashes denote z e r o s .

of individual item s m ay not

Stoppages

W orkers involved

Contract status and settlem ent

A ll stoppages

Number
(in
thousands)

Days of idlen ess

P ercen t

Number
(in
thousands)

2 ,2 4 7 .6

100.0

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

100.0

7 9.5

1 ,8 6 3 .0

8 2.9

2 5 ,2 6 4 .5

92 .9

.8

2 .3

.1

128.8

.5

591
257
195
2

11.1
4 .8
3 .7
(2)

180.2
25.2
175.8
1.0

8.0
1.1
7 .8
(2)

3 15 .8
951 .6
512.7
14.0

1.2
3 .5
1.9
.1

Number
5,320

100.0

4 ,2 3 0
45

------------------------------------------

F orm al settlem ent reach ed, 2 all issu es
resolv ed
------------------------------------------------------E m ployer out of business or operation
clo s e d ----------------------------------- -------------------------No form a l settlem ent, short p rotest or
sympathy strike ---------------------------------------------Strike broken
------------------------------------------------W ork resum ed under court injunction -----------No inform ation ------------------------------------------------Negotiation of fir s t agreem ent o r union
recognition ---------------------------------------------------F orm a l settlem ent reached, 2 all issu es
r esolv ed ---------------------------------------------------E m ployer out of business or operation
c lo s e d -------------------------------------------------------No fo rm a l settement, short pro te st o r
sympathy strike ------------------------------------------Strike b r o k e n -----------------------------------------------Work resum ed under cou rt in ju n c tio n -------No inform ation -------------------------------------------Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration or
reopen in g) -----------------------------------------------------F orm a l settlem ent reach ed, 2 all issu es
r e s olv ed ---------------------------------------------------Em ployer out of business or operation
clo s e d -------------------------------------------------------No form a l settlem ent, short pro te st or
sympathy strike --------------------------------------Strike broken ----------------------------------------------Work resum ed under cou rt in ju n c tio n -------No inform ation -------------------------------------------During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not involved) -----------------------F orm al settlem ent reach ed, 2 all issu es
r e s olv ed ----------------------------------------------------E m ployer out of business or operation
c lo s e d ---- -------------------------------------------------No form a l settlem ent, short p rotest o r
sympathy strike ----------------------------------------Strike broken ---------------------------------------------W ork resum ed under cou rt in ju n c tio n -------No inform ation -------------------------------------------No con tract or other con tract status -------------F orm al settlem ent reached., 2 all issu es
r es olv ed ---------------------------- -----------------------E m ployer out of business or operation
c lo s e d
----------------------------- -----------------------No form a l settlem ent, short p rotest or
sympathy strike ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Strike broken
W ork resum ed under court i n ju n c t i o n ------No inform ation -------------------------------------------No inform ation on con tract status -----------------F orm a l settlem ent reach ed, 2 all issu es
resolv ed ---------------------------------- .-----------------E m ployer out of business or operation
c lo s e d ------------------------------------------------------No form a l settlem ent, short protest or
sympathy s t r ik e -----------------------------------------Strike broken ---------------------------------------------W ork resum ed under cou rt injunction ------No inform ation --------------------------------------------

P ercent

P ercen t

653

12.3

6 9.6

3.1

1 ,8 0 8 .4

6 .7

480

9 .0

57.2

2 .5

1 ,3 2 4 .5

4 .9

9

.2

.3

(2)

9 .0

5
141
17
1

.1
2 .6
.3
(2)

.5
7.1
3 .6
.9

(2)
.3
.2
(2)

.6
442 .2
2 9 .8
2 .3

(2)
(2)
1 .6
.1
(2)

2, 684

50.5

1 ,4 8 3 .8

66.0

2 3 ,3 5 3 .1

85.9

2,532

4 7 .6

1 ,4 3 8 .1

64.0

2 2 ,6 3 9 .3

83.3

. 1

24

.5

1.4

86.7

.3

10
75
42
1

.2
1.4
.8
(2)

7.3
9 .3
2 7 .5
(3)

.3
.4
1.2
(2)

15.0
437. 6
162.9
11.7

.1
1.6
.6
(2)

1,817

34.2

674.5

3 0 .0

1 ,8 5 2 .4

6 .8

1,082

20 .3

3 51 .8

15.7

1, 143.8

4 .2

8

.1

.4

(2)

29.1

.1

566
26
135
68

10.6
.5
2 .5
M
1.3

170.4
8 .4
143.5
•
6.1

7. 6
.4
6 .4
_
.3

2 97 .9
62.7
318 .8
_
2 8 .9

1.1
.2
1.2

47

.9

' 3 .3

.1

18.3

2

(2)

(3
)

(3)

6
12
1
98

.1
.2
(2)
1.8

1.2
.4
1.2
13.6

89

1.7

12,7

2

(2)

4
3
"

.1
.1
“

.1
.8
(3)
•
~

.1
.1

.6

(2)

.1
(2)
.1
.6

1.4
7 .4
1.2
144 .6

(2)

.6

138.6

0
0

.5
.5

(2)

3 .4

(2)

(2)
(2)
.

.8
1.8
“

(2)
( 2)

"

"

.
1 See footnote 1, table A -2 5,
2 L ess than 0 ,0 5 p ercen t.
3 F ew er than 100.




4 The p arties eith er reached a fo rm a l settlem ent o r agreed on a
procedu re fo r resolvin g their d iffe r e n c e s .
NOTE:
equal totals.

Because of rounding, sums of indivdiual item s m ay not
Dashes denote z e r o s .

Settlement
Work
E m ployer
resum ed
out
No
under
of
iinform ation
court
business
injunction

F o rm a l settlem ent
No fo rm a l settlem ent
reached
reached
Short
P roced u re
A ll
fo r handling protest or
Strike f
issu e s
broken
unresolved sympathy
re so lv e d
issu es
strike

M ajor issu e

Number o f w ork stoppages
A ll stoppages

______________________ - ________________

G eneral wage c h a n g e s ----------------------------------------------------------Supplemental benefits no general wage i n c r e a s e ---------------Wage adjustm ents ---------------------------------------------------------------H ours o f w o r k -----------------------------------------------------------------------Other contractu al m a t t e r s ---------------------------------------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y -------------------------------------- ----Job s e c u r i t y ---------------------— ---------------------------------------------—
—
Plant adm inistration ------------------------------------------------- —
------Other w orking c o n d i t io n s ------------------------------------------------ ----Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s ----------------------------------------Not r e p o r t e d ------------------------------------------------------ —
--------------- -

5, 320

3,635

595

591

5, 532
81
184
7
91
453
263
1, 214
146
287
62

2, 261
69
109
6
67
254
162
547
69
40
51

113
6
26
11
62
28
194
10
142
3

11
19
1
6
4
44
354
56
92
4

2 5 .7 1
88
2
9
-

195

45

36
2
18

22
2
3

-

3
117
12
19
5
1
1

1
-

-

3
9
15
94
6
11
1

2

1
6
2
6

1
-

-

-

1
2

-

.175.8

2. 3

1 .0

17. 8
.9
15. 8
4. 3
1. 7
4. 4
121. 7
1. 1
7. 9
.1

1. 1
(2)
.4
(2)
.2
( 2)
2

(2)

128.8

Number o f w ork ers involved
A ll s t o p p a g e s ---------------------------------------------------------- ——

2, 247. 6

1, 594. 7

268. 3

180. 2

,25. 2

G eneral wage ch a n g e s ----------------------------------------------------------Supplemental benefits no general wage i n c r e a s e ---------------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts -----------------------------------------------------------------Hours of w ork —— -----------------------------------------------------------------Other contractu al m a t t e r s ---------------------~ --------------------------Union organization and s e c u r it y --------------- —--------------------—
—
Job secu rity ------------------------------------------------------------------------Plant a d m in is tr a t io n ---------------------------------------------------------- —
Other w orking c o n d i t io n s --------------------------------- -------------------Interunion o r intraunion m a t t e r s -------------------------------—
------Not r e p o r t e d --------------------------------------------------------------------------

1, 141.9
42. 6
84. 2
1. 0
51.9
115. 7
158.9
532. 5
39. 2
73.8
5. 7

995. 1
37. 3
47. 0
1.0
36. 5
9 5.6
112. 1
230. 1
22. 6
13. 0
4. 6

120. 6
4. 2
14. 5
2. 6
11. 2
14. 6
83. 0
2. 1
15. 1
.5

2. 2
4. 7
(2)
6. 4
.5
27. 1
90. 1
13. 3
35. 4
.4

5. 0
(2)
1.8
2. 0
5. 7
.6
7. 3
.2
2. 5
(2)

-

( 2)
. 1

.
.9
-

Number of days o f idlen ess
A ll s to p p a g e s --------------------------------------------------------------G eneral wage ch a n g e s ----------------------------------------------------------Supplemental benefits no general wage i n c r e a s e ---------------Wage a d ju s tm e n ts -----------------------------------------------------------------Hours of w ork ------------------------------------------------------------------—
-Other contractual m a t t e r s ---------------------------------------------------Union organization and s e c u r i t y -----------------------------------------Job secu rity ------------------------------------------------------------------------Plant a d m in is tr a t io n ----------------—------------------- ——----------------Other working c o n d i t io n s -------------------------------------------- — ---Interunion or intraunions m a t t e r s -------------------------------------Not reported ------------------------------------------------------------------------*. See footnote 1, table A -2 5 .
2 L ess than 100.




2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

22, 541. 3

2, 723. 2

315. 8

951. 6

512. 7

17, 180. 9
1, 062.8
415. 1
13. 5
620. 4
2, 384. 6
2, 253.8
2, 735. 5
169. 3
318. 1
33. 5

15, 047. 7
748. 4
244. 7
13. 4
546. 4
1, 9 1 1 .4
1 ,9 6 3 .9
1 ,8 6 9 .1
133. 7
34. 7
27. 9

1, 556.0
299. 1
56. 9
23. 0
117. 5
195. 5
416. 2
4. 1
53.8
1. 1

2. 5
8. 1
(2)
13. 1
.5
38. 1
147. 8
19. 5
85. 6
.4

367. 8
8 .9
29. 1
5. 8
317. 6
31. 2
60. 8
5. 0
124.9
.5

131. 5
.9
45. 4
28. 3
19- 0
24. 1
237. 5
6 .9
19- 0

NOTE: B ecause o f rounding,
equal totals. Dashes denote z e r o s .

-1

63. 6
5. 5
30. 9
3.9
16. 3
•9
4. 1
( 2)
3. 4

14. 0
11.7
-

2. 3
■

sums o f individual item s m ay not

(W ork ers and days in thousands)
Number o f w ork stoppages
Industry group
Total

A ll in d u s tr ie s ------Manufacturing •
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------------------F ood and kindred p r o d u c t s ------------------------------T ob a cco m a n u fa c tu r e s -------------------------------------T extile m ill p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------A p parel, e tc. s ------------------------------------------------Lum ber and w ood produ cts, except furniture ■
Furniture and f ix t u r e s -------------------------------------P aper and allied p r o d u c t s -------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries-----C hem icals and allied products P etroleu m refining and related industries —
Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics p r o d u c ts Leather and leather products -----------------------Stone, c la y , and glass p r o d u c t s --------------------P rim a ry m etal i n d u s t r ie s -----F abricated m etal products 4 M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l ----- :-------E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
supplies •
T ransportation equipm ent-----------------------Instrum ents, e tc . 5-----------------------------------M iscellaneous m anufacturing industries N onm anufacturing-------------------------------A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s •
Mining
Contract con struction ---------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -----------------------W holesale and reta il trade ■
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate Ser v ice s -------------------------------------------G overn m en t6 ------------------------------------

f o r m a l s ettiem ent
rea ched
P roced u re
A ll issu es
fo r handling
re so lv e d
unresolved
issu es

No fo rm a l settlem ent
rea ched
Short
p rotest o r
Strike
sympathy
broken
strike

W ork
r c 8umcd
under
cou rt
injunction

Em ployer
out
of
business

No
inform ation

* 5, 320

3 ,635

595

591

257

195

45

*2,271

1,879

141

58

125

44

23

7
177

6
152

j
11

-

8

3

3

44
47
67
82
99
82
128
17
142
10
171
164
300
326

39
35
55
66
87
52
112
13
123
5
146
137
265
266

2
8
4
9
5
3
8
3
7
2
10
10
10
16

_
1
_
_
1
2
2
_
2
_
2
1
3
19

3
2
6
4
4
22
3
1
7
3
7
6
12
17

_
_
_
2
2
1
2
_
1
_
6
8
6
6

I
1
1
1
_
2
1
_
2
_
_
2
4
2

-

175
159
36
43

131
126
29
39

15
14
3
-

15
8
1
1

9
6
3
2

3
3
_
1

2
2
_

_
_

-

-

*3,0 5 0

1,757

454

533

132

151

22

1

12
1,078
542

9
365
334

157
169

479
16

3
3
16

74
3

_
3

_
1

310
488
24
208
388

251
400
18
144
236

20
24
2
21
61

8
5
_
6
19

14
44
3
32
17

8
8
_
4
54

9
7
1
1
1

_
_
_
_

2

_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

“

Number o f w o rk e rs involved
A ll industries
M anufacturing
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ----Food and kindred products T ob acco m anufactures -----------------------------------Textile m ill products --------------------------------------A p parel, e t c 3----------------------------------------------------Lum ber and w ood produ cts, except fu rn itu re Furniture and f ix t u r e s -------------------------------------Paper and allied p r o d u c t s -------------: ----------------P rinting, publishing, and allied industries----Chem icals and a llied products
P etroleum refining and related in du stries----Rubber and m iscella n eou s p la stics products •
Leather and leather p r o d u c t s ------------------------Stone, cla y , and glass p r o d u c t s --------------------P rim a ry m etal industries F abricated m etal products 4 M achinery, except e l e c t r i c a l ---------------E le c tr ic a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
supplies
Tran sportation equipment
Instrum ents, etc * ------------M iscella n eou s m anufacturing industries
Nonmanufacturing •
A g ricu ltu re, fo r e s t r y , and fis h e r ie s Mining
Contract c o n s t r u c tio n ---------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s -----------------------W holesale and reta il trade Finance, insurance, and re a l estate
S ervices ---------------------------------------------G overn m en t6 --------------------------- --------See footnotes at end o f table.




2 ,2 4 7 .6

M 9 U

268.3

180.2

2 5 .2

175.8

3 8 .6

15.5

3 0 .9

1.7
.2

1.0

957.1

7 71 .6

97 .9

5.1
7 6 .4

4 .8
7 2 .6

,2
2 .8

.6

.2

8 .5
10.8
16.4
15.3
24 .3
2 3 .0
3 0 .8
9.3
9 9 .6
2 .1
2 8 .0
5 3.8
74 .3
164.8

8.1
7 .6
10.9
11.7
22.1
19.3
21 .7
5.2
87.0
1.3
2 5 .4
4 6.1
67 .5
112.1

.3
2 .1
4.1
2 .8
1.1
.6
7 .0
3 .9
4 .2
.6
.8
3 .3
2 .6
3 8 .9

I
.8
_
.3
1.1
1.0
_
4 .2
_
.3
.1
.2
6.3

.1
.3
.5
.2
.1
.7
(7)
.2
3 .6
.3
.4
.5
1 .0
1.4

I
_
_
.5
.7
.9
.9
_
.4
_
1.1
3 .6
2 .5
5.9

85.0
206 .5
14.3
8.9

6 2.8
164.1
14.0
7.2

8 .5
14.0
.2
-

6.0
16.7
(7)
1.5

.8
4 .6
(7)
(7)

6 .9
6.9
_
.2

(7)
.2
_
"

1 ,2 9 0 .4

823.1

170.4

141.6

9.7

145.0

.6

24.1
30 0 .6
387 .9

2 1 .5
8 7.8
338 .9

58.2
34.9

116.8
5.0

2 .6
1.1
1.3

3 6 .8
7.7

_

_

(7)

(7)

184.8
118.6
3 .7
67 .4
203 .3

86.9
111.7
3 .4
55.4
117.6

6.3
1.3
.1
7.7
61.9

14.6
1.0

.5
1.3
.l
1.4
1.5

7 6.2
3 .3
_
2 .2
18.7

.3
(7)
(7)
(7)
(7)

_
_
_
.
-

-

.7
3 .5

(7
’)
(7)
(7)
.3
.1
_
(7)
_
.2
.4
.1

.9
_
.9
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.
_
_
(7)

(W orkers and days in thousands)
Number of days o f idlen ess
Industry group
Total

A ll industries

F orm al settlem ent
reached
P rocedu re
A ll issu es
fo r handling
re solved
unresolved
issu es

No fo rm a l settlem ent
reached
Short
p rotest or
Strike
broken
sympathy
strike

Work
resum ed
under
court
injunction

E m ployer
out
of
business

No
inform ation

-----------------------------------------------

2 7 ,1 8 7 .3

2 2 ,5 4 1 .3

2 ,7 2 3 .2

3 1 5 .8

9 5 1 .6

512.7

128.8

14.0

---------------------------------------------------

1 2 ,7 7 5 .4

10 ,9 5 9 .8

980.0

64 .8

553.4

121.9

93.3

2 .3

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ------------------------------------F ood and kindred products -----------------------------------T o b a c co m an u factu res!-------------------------------------------Textile m ill products -------------------------------------------A p parel, e t c 3 --------------------------------------------------------Lum ber and wood produ cts, except furniture ------Furniture and fixture, -------------------------------------------Paper and allied products -------------------------------------Printing, publishing,(and allied in d u s tr ie s ------------C hem icals and allied products ------------------------------P etroleum refining and related industries ----------Rubber and m iscella n eou s pla stics p r o d u c t s --------Leather and leather products --------------------------------Stone, c la y , and glass products ----------------------------P rim a ry m etal industries ------------------------------------F a bricated m etal products 4 ------- *------------------------M achinery, except e le c tr ic a l -------------------------------E le c tr ic a l m achinery, equipm ent, and
supplies ----------------------------------------------------------- ----T ransportation equipment ------------------------------------Instrum ents, etc * --------------------------------------------------M iscellaneous manufacturing industries ------------

244 .6
9 56 .4
_
206 .4
84. 5
271.1
290.3
4 4 5 .0
264 .5
4 5 3 .6
577.5
1 ,4 8 0 .8
3 9 .4
586.4
754 .5
1 ,2 4 7 .9
1 ,8 3 9 .5

242.7
876.7
186.1
67.3
196.5
245.9
430 .0
195.4
386.3
184.3
1,415.1
13.6
555.6
696.3
1, 131.8
1 ,4 0 5 .7

_
_
1.6

.8

2 8 .0
_
_
.6
2 .9
.6

-

1.0
1.1
1.0
*
6 .8
*
.3
.1
.3
11.2

2 1 .5
_
15.1
2 .3
54.4
12.7
7 .6
56.9
2 .3
50.1
3 9 .5
2 2 .4
2 0 .5
2 1 .9
66.5
83.0

1 ,0 2 7 .4
1 ,5 1 7 .3
288.3
200 .0

883.0
1 ,368.7
282,0
196. 8

54. 5
85.8
2 .0
-

11.8
2 7 .9
.2
1.5

56.7
14.5
4 .1
1.3

18.8
14.7

--------------------------------------------

1 4 ,4 1 1 .9

1 1 ,5 8 1 .5

1 ,7 4 3 .2

2 50 .9

398.2

390.7

3 5 .5

A g ricu ltu re, fo re s tr y , and fis h e r ie s ------------------Mining ---------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction -----------------------------------------T ransportation, com m unication, e le c t r ic ,
gas, and sanitary s e r v ic e s --------------------------------W holesale and retail trade -----------------------------------fin a n c e , insurance, and rea l estate -------------------S ervices ----------------------------------------------------------------G overnm ent 6 • ---------------------------------------------------------

510.5
838.5
4 ,8 3 2 .1

381.7
336.9
4 ,4 2 1 .9

2 2 4 .6
330.7

183.3
34.2

128.8
4 .7
2 0 .6

89.0
11.8

1.2

2 ,9 1 9 .8
1 ,8 0 1 .7
8 6.6
830.8
2 ,5 9 1 .9

2 ,6 1 3 .0
1 ,6 8 8 .9
7 9.0
645.2
1 ,4 1 4 .9

124.8
16.9
1.1
6 8.9
976.2

19.0
1.4

Manufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

1 See footnote 1, table A -2 5 .
2 Stoppages extending into 2 o r m o re industries or industry groups
have been counted in each industry or industry group; w ork ers involved
and days of idlen ess allocated to the re sp e ctiv e in du stries,
3 Includes other finished products m ade fro m fa b rics and sim ilar
m a teria ls.
4 Excludes ordnance, m achinery, and transportation equipm ent.
5 Includes p r o fe s s io n a l, s cie n tific, and controlling instrum ents;
photographic and optical good s, w atches and c lo c k s .




1 .9 1
29 .3
_
5. 1
12.6
15.0
14.4
5. 1
3 .0
55. 6 i
343.1
13.2
3 .4
6.0
22.1
13.0
'2 9 4 .8

-

.

-

1 .8
11.2

4 7 .0
70.7
3 .8
106.2
16.4

-

_
-

16.8
1.3
.9
7 .8
_
1.3
4 .0
7 .3
11.3
3 6.5

-

7 .2
.7
_
4 .9
6.7
2 5 .0
8.2

_
-

2 .3
-

_
-

_
-

2 .6
5 .8

-

-

-

-

.4

-

-

11.7
.

9 5 .5
14.2
-

7 .4
172.9

-

2 0 .5
9 .6
2 .6
1.4
.2

-

11.7
-

"

6 The situations reported here have, fo r statistical p u rp o se s, been
deem ed to fa ll within the B ureau's definition o f a w ork stoppage.
This
does not constitute a legal determ ination that a w ork stoppage has taken
place in violation o f any law o r public p o lic y .
7 F ew er than 100.
NOTE:
equal to ta ls.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sums

o f individual item s m ay not

Stoppages
P roced u re fo r handling unsettled
issu es and con tract status

A ll s top p a g es2

Number

W orkers involved
Number
(in
thousands)

P ercent

Days o f idlen ess

P ercen t

Number
(in
thousands)

P ercen t

-----------------------------------------

539

100.0

26 6 .6

100.0

2 .6 9 6 .0

100.0

A rbitration --------------------------------------------------------D irect negotiations ---------------------------------------------R e fe rra l to a governm ent a g e n c y ----------------------Other m eans ---------------------------------------------------------

71
268
95
105

13.2
4 9.7
17. 6
19.5

53. 8
153.9
15.2
4 3 .8

20 .2
57.7
5.7
16.4

789 .4
1, 166.8
82 .8
657.0

2 9.3
4 3 .3
3. 1
2 4 .4

Negotiation of fir s t agreem ent o r union
recogn ition -------------------------------------------------------A rbitration ------------------------------------------------D irect negotiations ------------------------------------R e fe r r a l to a governm ent a g e n c y ---------------Other m eans -----------------------------------------------

59
6
23
30
“

10.9
1. 1
4 .3
5 .6
-

6 .5
.3
2 .2
4 .0
-

2 .5
.1
.8
1.5
"

82.2
14.1
3 1 .6
3 6 .6
-

3 .0
.5
1.2
1.4
-

Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration or
reopening) --------------------------------------------------------A rbitration ------------------------------------------------D irect negotiations ------------------------------------R e fe r r a l to a governm ent agency -------------Other m eans -----------------------------------------------

112
25
65
10
12

2 0 .8
4. 6
12.1
1.9
2 .2

143.0
3 4 .8
8 1 .6
1.1
2 5 .4

5 3 .6
13.1
3 0 .6
.4
9 .5

2 ,1 4 1 .2
695.6
949.3
16.3
480 .0

7 9 .4
2 5 .8
35.2
.6
17.8

During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not in volved) --------------------------A rbitration
-----------------------------------------------D irect negotiations -------------------------------------R e fe r r a l to a governm ent agency -------------Other m eans ------------------------------------------------

364
40
178
54
92

67. 5
7 .4
3 3.0
10.0
17.1

116.7
18.6
69.7
10.0
18.3

4 3 .8
7 .0
26 .2
3 .8
6.9

472.1
7 9 .8
185.6
2 9 .8
176.9

17.5
3 .0
6.9
1.1
6. 6

No con tract or other con tract status ---------------A rbitration _________________________________
D irect negotiations -------------------------------------R e fe rra l to a governm ent agency -------------Other m eans -------------------------------------------------

.

4
2
1
1

1 See footnote 1, table A -2 5 .
2 E xcludes stoppages on w hich there was no inform ation on un.
settled is su es or no agreem ent on a p ro ce d u re fo r handling these issu es,
3 L ess than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.




-

_

.

.6

(3)

.3
(4)
(4)

.1
(?)
(3)

.3
(4)
.2

(3)
(3)
(3)

.4

.7

-

.4
.2
.2
4

.1

•..

L ess than 100.

NOTE:
equal totals.

Because of rounding,
Dashes denote z e r o s .

sum s o f individual item s m ay not

A p p e n d ix B.
Work stoppage statistics

ploym ent and idleness as a percent o f total w orking
time, the follow in g em ploym ent figures have been

It is the purpose o f this statistical series to report
all w ork stoppages in the U nited States that involve
six workers o r m ore and last the equivalent o f a full

used:

O ld series—

from 1927 to 1950, all em ployed w o rk ­

ers were included in the base, except those in o c c u ­

day or shift or longer.

pations and professions in w hich little, if any, union

Definitions

organization existed or in which stoppages rarely, if
ever, occu rred. In m ost industries, all wage and salary
w orkers were included in total em ploym ent except

Strike or lockout.

A strike is defined as a tem porary

stoppage o f w ork by a group o f em ployees (n o t neces­
sarily m em bers o f a u n ion ) to express a grievance or
en force a dem and. A lo ck o u t is a tem porary with­
holding or denial o f em ploym ent during a labor dis­
pute to en force terms o f em ploym ent u pon a grou p
o f em ployees. B ecause o f the com plexity o f m ost
labor-m anagem ent disputes, the Bureau m akes n o
attempt to distinguish betw een strikes and lock ou ts
in its statistics; b oth types are included in the term

those in executive, managerial, or high supervisory
positions, or those perform ing professional w ork the
nature o f which m ade union organization o r group
action unlikely. T his measure o f em ploym ent also
exclu ded all self-em ployed persons; dom estic w ork ­
ers; workers on farms em ployin g few er than six
persons; all Federal

and

State

G overnm ent em ­

p loyees; and officials, b oth elected and appointed,
in loca l governm ent.
F rom

1951 to 1966, the B ureau’s estimates o f

“ w ork stoppage” and are used interchangeably.

total em ploym ent in nonagricultural establishments,

Workers and idleness.

exclusive o f governm ent, were used as a base. M an days o f idleness com pu ted on the basis o f nonagri­

T he figures on the num ber o f

“ workers in volved” and “ m an-days idle” include all
w orkers m ade idle for on e shift or longer in estab­
lishments directly in volved in a stoppage. T hey d o
not accou nt fo r secondary idleness— that is, the e f­
fects o f a stoppage on other establishments o r in­
dustries w hose em ployees m ay be m ade idle as a
result o f material o r service shortages.
T he total num ber o f workers involved in strikes
in a given year m ay include dou ble counting o f in­

cultural em ploym ent (exclusive o f governm ent)
usually differed b y less than one-tenth o f a percent­
age point from that obtained by the form er m ethod,
while the percentage o f workers idle (com pa red with
total em ploym ent) differs by about 0.5 o f a point.
F o r exam ple, the percentage o f workers idle during
1950 com pu ted on the base used fo r the earlier years
was 6.9, and the percent o f man-days o f idleness was

dividual workers if they w ere involved in m ore than

0 .4 4 , com p ared with 6.3 and 0 .4 0 ,
com pu ted on the new base.

on e stoppage during that year.

New series 2—

(T h us, in

1949,

respectively,

beginning with 1967, tw o estimates

3 6 5 ,0 0 0 to 4 0 0 ,0 0 0 c o a l miners struck on three

o f em ploym ent have been used, on e based on the

different occasion s; they accounted fo r 1.15 m illion

wage and salary workers in the civilian w ork force,

o f the year’s total o f 3.03 m illion w ork ers.)
In som e p rolon ged stoppages, the total m an-days

and the other on those in the private nonfarm sec­
tor. T he new private nonfarm series closely approxi­

o f idleness are estimated if the num ber o f workers

mates

idle each day is not know n. Significant changes in

excluded governm ent and agricultural workers from

the

form er

B LS

series

which,

as

noted,

the num ber o f w orkers idle are secured from the
parties fo r use in com puting m an-days o f idleness.

The relative measures.

In com puting the num ber o f

workers involved in strikes as a percent o f total em ­




1 More detailed information is available in BLS Handbook
of Methods, BLS Bulletin 1711 (19 72 ), ch. 19.
2 For further information, see “ ‘Total Economy’ Measure
o f Strike Idleness,” Monthly Labor Review, October 1968,
pp. 54-56.

employment totals, but accounted for time lost by
such workers while on strike. In recent years, the
old method has resulted in an increasingly distorted
measure o f the severity o f strikes; with the likely
growth o f strike activity among the two groups, it

outlined on the preceding page also have been used
in preparing estimates o f idleness by State.

Metropolitan area data.

may distort the measure even more in the future.
The new “ total econom y” measure o f strike idleness
now includes government and agricultural workers in

Inform ation is tabulated
separately fo r the areas that currently com prise the
list o f standard m etropolitan statistical areas issued
by the O ffice o f M anagem ent and Budget, form erly
Bureau o f the B udget, in addition to a few c o m ­

its employment count as well as in the computation

munities historically included in the strike series

o f idleness ratios. On the other hand, data for the
private nonfarm sector excludes agricultural and govern­

before the current list o f standard m etropolitan areas

ment workers from employment totals, and these
groups will also be removed from strike figures in
arriving at a percentage o f working time lost (see

tricts include in each S M S A to which the strike
statistics apply are those established by the Office

table A -21). To facilitate comparisons over time, the

lished on ly for those areas in which at least five

figure for the total econom y has been carried back

stoppages were recorded during the year.

to 1939 (see table A -l). The differences resulting
from the use o f the new m ethod are illustrated

than one State, and, hence, statistics fo r an area

was com piled. T h e counties or other political dis­

o f M anagem ent and Budget. Inform ation is p u b ­

Som e m etropolitan areas include counties in m ore

below: The various components o f each series and the
methods o f computation are set forth in the tabulation.

may occasionally equal or exceed the total fo r the

“ Estimated w orking tim e” is com pu ted by multi­
plying the average em ploym ent fo r the year by the

in the mining and logging industries are excluded

num ber o f days typically w orked by m ost em ployed
workers during that year. In these com putations,

State in which the m ajor city is located. Stoppages
from m etropolitan area data, but are reported by
industry and State.

Saturday (w hen custom arily not w ork ed), Sundays,

Unions involved.

and established holidays as p rovided in m ost union

organization w hose contract was involved or which
has taken active leadership in the stoppage. Disputes

contracts are excluded.3

F o r this purpose, the union is the

involving m ore than on e union

are classified as

Duration .

A lthough on ly w orkdays are used in c o m ­
puting total m an-days o f idleness, duration is ex ­

pressed in calendar days, including nonw orkdays.

State data.

Stoppages occurring in m ore than one

State are listed separately in each State affected. T he
workers and m an-days o f idleness are allocated
am ong each o f the affected States. 4 T he procedures

Components and method

3 For example, the total economy figures for 1968 was
computed by multiplying the average employment for the
year by the number o f working days (69,430,000 x 256 =
17,774,080,000) and dividing this figure into the total num­
ber of man-days o f idleness.
4The same procedure is followed in allocating data on
stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry
group, or metropolitan area.

Total economy

Private sector

Old series

Employment

Establishment series
plus wage and
salaried farm workers.

Establishment series
less government,

Establishment series
less government.

Working time

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment times
working days.

Above employment
times working
days.

Man-days o f idleness as a percent
o f estimated total
working time ..............................




Total idleness
_________________ x 100
Above working
time

Total idleness
less farm
and government
_________________ x 100
Above working
time

Total idleness

________________ x 100
Above working
time

jurisdictional or rival union disputes or as involving
cooperating unions. If unorganized w orkers strike,
a separate classification is used. H ow ever, the tabu­
lations o f “ workers in volved ” include all w ho are
m ade idle for one shift or longer in establishments
directly involved in the dispute, including m em bers
o f other unions and nonunion workers. F or publica­
tion purposes, union inform ation is presented by
m ajor affiliation o f the union, i.e., A F L -C IO , or
nonaffiliation such as “ independent,” “ single firm ,”

tion,

m ethod

of

settlement,

and

other

pertinent

inform ation.

Lim itations of data.

A lthough the Bureau seeks to
obtain com plete coverage, i.e., a “ census” o f all
strikes involving six workers or m ore and lasting
a full shift or m ore, inform ation is undoubtedly
missing on som e strikes involving small num bers

o f workers. Presum ably, these missing strikes d o
not substantially affect the num ber o f workers and
m an-days o f idleness reported.

o r “ n o u nion .”

T o im prove the com pleteness o f the cou nt o f stop­
pages, the Bureau has constantly sought to develop
new sources o f inform ation on the p robable exis­
tence o f stoppages. O ver the years, these sources

Sources of information
Occurrence of strikes.

have probably increased the num ber o f strikes re­
Inform ation on the actual or

probable existence o f w ork stoppages is collected
from a num ber o f sources. Clippings on labor dis­
putes are obtained from a com prehensive coverage
of

daily

and w eekly

newspapers

throughout

the

country. Inform ation also is received regularly from
the

Federal

M ediation

and

C onciliation

Service.

Other sources o f inform ation include State Boards
o f m ediation and arbitration; research divisions o f
State labor departments; loca l offices o f State em ­
ploym ent security agencies, channeled through the
M an pow er A dm inistration o f the U.S. Departm ent
o f L a b or; and trade and union journals. Som e em ­
ployer associations, com panies, and unions also
furnish the Bureau with w ork stoppage inform ation
on a voluntary cooperative basis, either as stoppages
occu r or periodically.

Respondents to questionnaire. A questionnaire is
'm ailed to each o f the parties reported as involved in
w ork stoppages to obtain inform ation on the num ber
o f workers involved, duration, m ajor issues, lo ca ­




cord ed , but have had little effect on the num ber o f
workers or total idleness.
Beginning in m id -1950, local offices o f State em ­
ploym ent security agencies w ould r e p o r t5 m onthly
on w ork stoppages com ing to their attention. It is
estimated that this additional source increased the
num ber o f strikes reported in 1950 about 5 percent,
and in 1951 and 1952, approxim ately 10 percent.
B ecause m ost o f these stoppages were small, they
increased the num ber o f workers involved and m andays o f idleness less than 2 percent in 1950 and
less than 3 percent in 1951 and 1952. In 1966,
State em ploym ent security agencies were the sole
source o f inform ation fo r 17 percent o f the strikes
recorded.
A s new local agencies having know ledge o f the
existence o f work stoppages are established or
changes are made in local collection m ethods, every
effort is made by the Bureau to establish cooperative
arrangements.
'U ntil 1969, the compilation of these reports was directed
by the Bureau o f Employment Security.

☆

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1975

0 - 2 1 0 - 8 8 2 (22)

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region 1
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region V
9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago , III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 971-5405

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 749-3516

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154

Regions V II and V III*
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: (404) 526-5418




Regions IX and X * *
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Regions VII and V III are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102