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Analysis of
Work Stoppages
1963

Bulletin No. 1420

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

HAWAII




Analysis of
Work Stoppages

1963

Bulletin No. 1420

Trends

•

Size and Duration

•

Issues

Industries and Localities Affected • Details of Major Stoppages
Chronology

of

National Emergency Dispute

O ctober 1964

UN ITED STA TES DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR
W . Willard W irtz, Secretary
BUREA U O F LABOR STA TISTIC S
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 35 cents









Preface
This bulletin p rese n ts a d etailed s ta tis tic a l a n a ly­
s is o f w ork stopp ages in 1963, continuing a.n annual featu re
o f the B u reau o f L a b or S ta tistics p r o g r a m in the fie ld o f
in d u stria l re la tio n s . P r e lim in a r y m onthly estim a te s o f the
le v e l o f strik e (o r lockout) a ctiv ity fo r the U nited States
as a w hole a re iss u e d about 30 days a fter the end o f the
m onth o f r e fe r e n c e and a re a vaila b le on re q u e st. P r e li m i ­
n a ry estim a tes fo r the en tire y e a r a re a vaila b le at the
year*s end; s e le c te d fin a l tabulations a re iss u e d in the
sprin g o f the follow in g y e a r.
A c h r o n o lo g y o f the a e ro s p a ce in d u stry dispu te,
in w h ich the e m e r g e n cy p ro v is io n s o f the T a ft-H a r tle y A ct
w e re invoked by the P r e s id e n t in 1963, is p re se n te d in
appendix B..
The m ethods u sed in p rep a rin g w ork
s ta tis tic s a re d e s c r ib e d in appendix C.

stoppage

The B u reau w ish es to ackn ow ledge the co o p e r a tio n
o f e m p lo y e rs and e m p lo y e r a s s o c ia tio n s , la b o r union s, the
F e d e ra l M ediation and C on cilia tio n S e r v ic e , and va rio u s
State a g en cies in furn ish in g in form a tion on w o rk stop p a ges.
Thi^ b ulletin was p re p a re d by E dw ard D. Onanian
under the d ir e c tio n o f J osep h W. B lo ch , in the Bureau*s
D iv isio n o f In d u strial and L a bor R e la tio n s, under the g e n ­
e r a l d ir e c tio n o f L . R. L in se n m a y e r, A ssista n t C o m m is ­
s io n e r fo r W ages and In du strial R e la tion s. D ixie L . King
p re p a re d the ch r o n o lo g y w hich app ears in appendix B .

ill




Contents
Page
S u m m a r y ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------T r e n d s in w o r k s t o p p a g e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------C o n tr a c t s t a t u s __________________________________________________________
S iz e o f s t o p p a g e s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------D u r a t io n ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M a jo r i s s u e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------In d u s tr ie s a f f e c t e d -------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------S to p p a g e s b y l o c a t i o n ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------R e g i o n s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S ta te s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s __________________________________________________________________
M on th ly t r e n d s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------U n ion s i n v o l v e d _________________________________________________________________________
M e d i a t i o n -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S e t t l e m e n t -------------------P r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n s e t tle d i s s u e s ____________________________________________

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T a b le s :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
C h a rt.

W o r k s to p p a g e s in th e U n ited S ta te s , 1927— 3 ____________________________
6
W o r k s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g 1 0 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ,
s e le c t e d p e r i o d s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W o r k s to p p a g e s b y m o n th , 1962— 3 -------------------------------------------------------------6
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y c o n t r a c t sta tu s and m a jo r
i s s u e s , 1963----------------M a jo r i s s u e s in v o lv e d in w o r k s t o p p a g e s , 1 9 6 3 -----------------------------------------W o r k s to p p a g e s b y in d u s tr y g r o u p , 1 9 6 3 ----------------------------------------------------W o r k s to p p a g e s b y r e g io n , 1963 and 1962 _________________________________
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y S ta te , 1 9 6 3 ______________________________________________
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a , 1 963_______________________________
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y a ff ilia t io n o f u n ion s in v o lv e d , 1963__________________
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y c o n t r a c t sta tu s and s i z e o f s to p p a g e , 1963_________
W o r k s to p p a g e s b y n u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s in v o lv e d , 1 9 6 3 --------------W o r k s to p p a g e s in v o lv in g 1 0 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
b e g in n in g in 1 9 6 3 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W o r k s to p p a g e s b y d u r a t io n and c o n t r a c t sta tu s en d in g in 1963________
M e d ia tio n in w o r k s to p p a g e s b y c o n t r a c t sta tu s e n d in g in 1 9 6 3 -----------S e ttle m e n t o f s to p p a g e s b y c o n t r a c t sta tu s en d in g in 1 963--------------------P r o c e d u r e f o r h a n d lin g u n s e t tle d is s u e s in w o r k s to p p a g e s
b y c o n t r a c t sta tu s en d in g in 1 9 6 3 _________________________________________
T r e n d s in w o r k s t o p p a g e s ,

1 9 6 3 __________________________________________

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12
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
23
24
25
26
2

A p p e n d ix e s :
A.

B.

C.

T a b l e s — W o r k s to p p a g e s :
A - l . W o r k s to p p a g e s b y in d u s tr y , 1 9 6 3 ---------------------------------------------------A - 2 . W o r k s to p p a g e s b y in d u s tr y g r o u p and m a jo r i s s u e s , 1963---------A - 3 . W o r k s to p p a g e s in S ta tes h a v in g 25 s to p p a g e s o r m o r e
b y in d u s t r y g r o u p , 1963-------------------------------------------------------------------A - 4 . W o r k s to p p a g e s b y in d u s tr y g r o u p and c o n t r a c t s ta tu s , 1 9 6 3 —

34
40

C h r o n o lo g y — A e r o s p a c e In d u s tr y D is p u te — T h e B o e in g C o . ,
C a lif o r n ia , F l o r i d a , K a n s a s , and W a s h in g to n , 1962— 3 --------------------6

43

S c o p e , m e t h o d s , and d e f i n i t i o n s ----------------—------------------------------------------------

49




v

27
30




Analysis o f W ork

Sum m ary

The n u m ber o f s trik e s (181) beginning in
1963 w h ich in v olv ed 1 ,00 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
re a ch e d its low est p ostw a r le v e l. S trik es
ending in 1963 w e re the s h o rte s t, on the a v ­
e ra g e , sin ce 1958, but th ey rem a in ed r e l a ­
tiv e ly long b y p ostw a r stan d ard s. The a v e ra g e
duration w as 23.0 ca len d a r d a y s, as co m p a re d
with 2 4 .6 in 1962.

B y m o s t m e a s u r e s , strik e a ctiv ity in
1963 d eclin ed to its low est p o s t-W o r ld W ar II
le v e l, thus continuing the p e r io d o f r e la tiv e ly
low strik e a ctiv ity w h ich began in I960. The
num ber o f w o r k e r s in v olv ed in s trik e s 1 b e ­
ginning during the y e a r w as at its low est s in c e
1942; the 9 4 1 ,0 0 0 p a rticip a n ts re p r e s e n te d
2 p e rce n t o f the n on a g ricu ltu ra l w ork fo r c e
(e x c lu s iv e o f gov ern m en t), the s m a lle s t p e r ­
cen tage sin ce 1932. M a n -d a ys o f id le n e ss
resu ltin g fr o m a ll s trik e s in e ffe c t in 1963,
as w e ll as the p e rc e n t o f estim a ted tota l
w orkin g tim e lo st in n on a g ricu ltu ra l e s ta b ­
lish m en ts (e x c lu s iv e o f g ov ern m en t), w e re
both lo w e r than in any y ea r sin ce 1944. W ork
stopp ages beginning during the y e a r tota led
3, 362, the se co n d lo w e st p ostw a r tota l, e x ­
cee d in g on ly the fig u re o f 3, 333 r e c o r d e d
in I960.

M o re than tw o -fifth s o f the s trik e s b e ­
ginning in 1963 o c c u r r e d as an a fterm ath o f
co n tra ct e x p ira tio n s o r re o p e n in g s. A p p r o x i­
m a te ly 36 p e rc e n t o f the stop p a ges took p la ce
during the te r m o f an a g re e m e n t, a sig n ifica n t
in c r e a s e , both in a bsolu te and re la tiv e te r m s ,
o v e r 1962 and 1961 le v e ls . D em ands fo r g e n ­
e r a l w age chan ges w e re the m a jo r is s u e s
in a p p ro x im a te ly tw o -fifth s o f the s trik e s
w hich began during the y e a r . S trik es in v o lv ­
ing plant a d m in istra tio n m a tte rs r e p r e s e n te d
n e a r ly o n e -s ix th o f a ll s tr ik e s , a h ig h er p r o ­
p o rtio n than in the 2 p re v io u s y e a r s . Job
s e c u r ity was the m a jo r iss u e in 6 p e rce n t o f
a ll w ork s to p p a g e s.

In the c o lle c t iv e bargain in g a ren a, the
p o s s ib ility e x is te d , as the y e a r began, o f an
in c r e a s e in strik e a ctiv ity , s in c e a n um ber o f
m a jo r a g reem en ts w e r e sch ed u led eith er to
e x p ire or to be reop en ed . H ow ev er, s e t t le ­
m ents w e re rea ch e d p e a c e a b ly in s e v e r a l k ey
in d u s trie s, n otably s te e l, co m m u n ica tio n s,
cloth in g , and e le c t r ic a l m a ch in e r y .
It was
a ls o an e x ce p tio n a lly p e a c e fu l y e a r fo r the
co n s tru ctio n in d u stry. On the oth er hand, in
the ra ilr o a d in d u stry, w h ere a strik e o f
2 0 0 ,0 0 0 op era tin g em p lo y e e s was freq u en tly
th reaten ed , a w ork stoppage was a v erted by
c o n g r e s s io n a l a ction ca llin g fo r c o m p u ls o r y
a rb itra tion .

S trik es beginning in 1963 w e r e about
equ ally d ivid ed betw een m an ufactu rin g and
nonm anufacturing in d u s trie s, with the fo r m e r
grou p a ccou n tin g fo r th r e e -fifth s o f a ll w o r k ­
e r s in v o lv e d . In n on m an u factu rin g, m a n -d a y s
o f id le n e ss d rop p ed by n e a r ly o n e -th ird fr o m
its 1962 le v e l, la r g e ly as a re s u lt o f a d e ­
clin e o f 2 .2 m illio n m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss in
the co n s tr u c tio n in d u stry.

A s a con se q u e n ce o f the p e a c e fu l s e ttle ­
m en ts cite d a b o v e , th e re w e r e on ly seven
s trik e s beginning in 1963 w h ich in v o lv e d as
m any as 10,000 w o r k e r s , as co m p a re d with an
a v e ra g e o f 17 fo r the 1958—62 p e r io d . The l a r g ­
e s t o f th ese seven stop p a ges o c c u r r e d in the
lu m b e r in d u stry and in v o lv e d 29, 000 w o r k e r s
at its h eigh t. The n ational e m e r g e n c y p r o v i­
sio n s o f the T a ft-H a r tle y A ct w e r e in vok ed in
one d isp u te, that in v olv in g the B oein g C o .; but
the p a rtie s h e re w e r e a b le, with govern m en t
a s s is ta n c e , to settle th eir d iffe r e n c e s with
on ly a few s trik e s o f v e r y sh ort duration
o c c u r r in g p r io r to co n tr a c t ra tifica tio n .
(A
ch ro n o lo g y o f this dispu te a p p ea rs as appen­
d ix B .)

T ren d s in W ork Stoppages

W ork stopp ages beginning in 1963 w h ich
in v o lv e d s ix w o r k e r s o r m o r e a n d la s te d a fu ll
day, o r sh ift, o r lo n g e r tota led 3,362, a p p ro x ­
im a te ly 7 p e rce n t le s s than the n u m ber o f
s trik e s in 1962, and the s e co n d lo w e st fig u re
r e c o r d e d sin ce 1942 (table 1). The num ber
o f w o r k e r s d ir e c t ly in v olv ed in th ese s trik e s
(9 4 1 ,0 0 0 ) was the lo w e st sin ce 1942; it was
a lso 23 p e rc e n t lo w e r than the co r re s p o n d in g
num ber in 1962. O nly 2 p e rc e n t o f the tota l
n o n a g ricu ltu ra l w o rk fo r c e (e x c lu s iv e o f g o v ­
ernm ent) was in v olv ed in s trik e s in 1963,
the s m a lle s t p e rce n ta g e sin ce the d e p r e s s io n
y e a r o f 1932.

1 The terms "work stoppage" and "strike" are used inter­
changeably in this bulletin. Strikes, in this special use, would
thus include lockouts.




Stoppages, 1963

1

2

Chart:

Trends in W o rk Stoppages, 1963




[Semilog scale]

M a n -d a ys o f id le n e ss re su ltin g f r o m
a l l s trik e s in e ffe c t during 1963 tota led
16,100,000, the lo w e st le v e l o f s trik e id le n e s s
s in ce 1944, and 13 p e rc e n t lo w e r than s trik e
id le n e ss in 1962. The p e rc e n t o f w ork in g tim e
lo s t in 1963 in n o n a g ricu ltu ra l esta b lish m e n ts
due to s trik e s (0. 13) w as a ls o at its lo w e st
le v e l s in ce 1944.

C o n tra ct Status

D e sp ite the low le v e l o f s trik e a ctiv ity
during 1963, the n u m ber o f s trik e s a ris in g
during the te r m o f a g re e m e n ts w as su bstan ­
tia lly h ig h er than the 1961 and 1962 le v e ls .
T h e se stop p a ges in 1963, h o w e v e r , a ccou n ted
fo r a p p ro x im a te ly 21 p e rc e n t fe w e r days o f
id le n e ss than in 1962. A s in the 2 p re c e d in g
y e a r s , a p p ro x im a te ly h a lf o f th ese d ispu tes
in v o lv e d m a tte rs o f jo b s e c u r ity and plant
a d m in istra tio n .

Of the estim a te d 9 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 00 ,00 0 c o l ­
le c tiv e b argain in g a g re e m e n ts w h ich a re r e ­
n egotiated o r a re re o p e n e d fo r m o d ific a tio n
ea ch y e a r , fe w e r than 2 p e rc e n t in v o lv e a
w o rk stopp a ge. The n u m ber o f s tr ik e s o c ­
cu r rin g in 1963 as an a fterm a th o f su ch a ctio n
(1 ,4 5 9 ) w as lo w e r than in the 2 p re c e d in g
y e a r s , but con tin u ed to a ccou n t fo r s lig h tly
m o r e than fo u r -fifth s o f tota l s trik e id le n e ss
(table 4 ). A p p ro x im a te ly 82 p e rc e n t o f th ese
s trik e s re s u lte d fr o m dispu tes o v e r g e n e r a l
w age ch an ges a n d /o r su p p lem en ta ry b e n e fits .
W o rk e rs in v olv ed in su ch stop p a ges in 1963
re p r e s e n te d 5 6 .2 p e rc e n t o f a ll s t r ik e r s , as
co m p a re d w ith 64. 6 and 70. 2 p e rc e n t in 1962
and 1961, r e s p e c tiv e ly .

The num ber o f s trik e s a ris in g durin g the
n eg otia tion o f the in itia l c o lle c t iv e b argain in g
a g re e m e n t o r in the union*s qu est fo r r e c o g ­
n ition (607) w as on ly 1 le s s than in 1962,
but in v olv ed a p p ro x im a te ly 20 p e rc e n t fe w e r
w o r k e r s and re s u lte d in 9 p e rc e n t fe w e r days
o f id le n e ss than in 1962. A s a p e rc e n t o f
to ta l s trik e a ctiv ity during the y e a r , h o w e v e r ,
ea ch m e a s u r e in c r e a s e d o v e r 1962 le v e ls .
A p p ro x im a te ly fiv e -s ix th s o f a ll su ch s trik e s
in v o lv e d fe w e r than 100 w o r k e r s e a ch . In on ly
fiv e in sta n ce s w e r e m o r e than 1 ,0 0 0 w o r k ­
e r s in v o lv e d . The m a jo r is s u e s in slig h tly
m o r e than th r e e -fifth s o f th ese stop p a ges
w e r e q u estion s in v olv in g union o rg a n iza tio n
and s e c u r ity .

3

The p r o p o r tio n o f stop p a ges and id le n e s s ,
b y co n tr a c t status, in the 1961—
63 p e r io d
appear in the follow in g tabulation:

Percent of—
Man-days
Stoppages__________ of idleness
1961

All stoppages------- Negotiation of first
agreement or union
recognition---------------- Renegotiation of agree­
ment (expiration or
reopening)---------------- During term of agree­
ment (negotiation of
new agreement not
involved)------------------ Other-------------------------Insufficient informa­
tion to classify-----------

1962

1963

1961

1962

1963

. .

100 .0 100.0 100.0 100 0 100 0 100.0

15.2

16.8

18.1

6 .0

6.6

7.0

45. 1

48.3

43.4

81.3

80.3

81.6

32.2
1.7

29.8
2.5

35.8
1.9

11.6
.3

12.2
.5

11.1
.2

5.8

2.5

.9

.8

.4

1

.

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

Sligh tly le s s than h a lf o f th ese la rg e
s trik e s o c c u r r e d during co n tr a c t re n e g o tia tio n
in 1963, as co m p a re d with 66 and 60 p e rce n t
in 1961 and 1962, r e s p e c tiv e ly . A s co n tr a c t
ren eg otia tion s trik e s have a ccou n ted fo r a
d eclin in g p e rce n ta g e o f la rg e s tr ik e s , th ose
a risin g during the te r m o f an a g re e m e n t have
in c r e a s e d in p ro p o rtio n , r is in g fr o m 32 p e r ­
cent in 1961 to 48 p e rc e n t in 1963.

Only seven stopp a ges in v olv ed 10,000 w o r k ­
e r s o r m o r e , another p ostw a r low (table 2).
T h is to ta l c o m p a r e s with 16 in 1962, and an
a v e ra g e o f 17 in the 1958—
62 p e r io d . T h ese
m a jo r 1963 sto p p a g e s, ea ch o f w hich began
during the fir s t h alf o f the y e a r , and a ll o f
w h ich w e r e settled during the y e a r , in v olv ed
102,000 w o r k e r s , as co m p a re d with the p r e ­
viou s p ostw a r low o f 2 8 3 ,0 0 0 r e c o r d e d in
1957. Id len ess re su ltin g fr o m th ese s tr ik e s ,
com b in ed with that resu ltin g fr o m s trik e s o f
this m agnitude w h ich continued fr o m 1962 into
1963, tota led 3, 5 40 ,0 0 0 m a n -d a y s , o r 22 p e r ­
cent o f tota l id le n e ss in 1963. The la r g e s t o f
th ese seven s to p p a g e s, in volvin g 29,000 w o r k ­
e rs at its height, o c c u r r e d in the lu m ber in ­
d u stry in the P a c ific N orth w est. T h r e e o f
th ese sto p p a g e s, in volvin g a tota l o f 4 2 ,0 0 0
w o r k e r s , w e re co n s tr u c tio n in d u stry s tr ik e s .
E ach o f th ese seven stopp a ges o c c u r r e d d u r ­
ing the re n e g o tia tio n o f a g re e m e n ts ; five r e ­
sulted m a in ly fr o m d ispu tes o v e r g e n e ra l
w age ch a n g e s, and two fr o m d isa g re e m e n ts
o v e r m a tte rs in volvin g union org a n iza tio n and
s e c u r ity .

Size of-S toppages

W hile the num ber o f s trik e s in volvin g
fe w e r than 100 w o r k e r s (1 ,9 5 8 ) h o v e r e d about
the 2, 000 m a rk as it has during the p ast d e c ­
a de, the n u m ber in v olv in g 1 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s o r
m o r e (181) re a ch e d its low est p ostw a r le v e l
(table 11). The a v era g e num ber o f w o r k e r s
in v olv ed in the 3, 362 s trik e s beginning in
1963 was 280, as co m p a re d with 340 and 431
in 1962 and 1961, r e s p e c tiv e ly .

S trik es o f 1 ,00 0 w o r k e r s or m o r e each
a ccou n ted fo r 5. 3 p e rce n t o f a ll w ork s to p ­
pages in 1963, and in v olv ed 5 4 .4 p e rc e n t o f
a ll w o r k e r s , both p ostw a r lo w s.
The total
o f 181 su ch s trik e s in 1963 co m p a re s with
the p rev iou s p ostw a r low of 195 r e c o r d e d in
1961, and the a v era g e o f 241 fo r the 1958—
62
p e rio d . S trik es o f this m agnitude a ccou n ted
fo r a p p rox im a tely 62 p e rc e n t o f a ll strik e
id le n e ss in 1963, a p p ro x im a te ly the sam e p r o ­
p o rtio n as in 1961 and 1962.




S ev e n ty -e ig h t p e rc e n t o f a il s trik e s b e ­
ginning in 1963 w e r e co n fin e d to sin gle e s ta b ­
lish m en ts (table 12). T h e se s trik e s inclu d ed
slig h tly m o r e than h a lf o f a ll w o r k e r s in v olv ed
in s tr ik e s , as co m p a re d w ith 40 p e rce n t in
1962, and accou n ted fo r 3 7 .9 p e rce n t o f tota l
id le n e s s , s lig h tly lo w e r than the 40. 6 p e rce n t
r e c o r d e d in 1962.
S trik es in volvin g 11 e s ­
tablish m en ts or m o r e accou n ted fo r o n e -fifth
o f tota l id le n e s s , as co m p a re d with n e a rly
o n e -th ird in 1962.

A s in d ica ted in the tabulation that fo llo w s ,
a p p ro x im a te ly o n e -tw e lfth o f a ll s trik e s in ­
v o lv e d two e m p lo y e rs o r m o r e who w e re
m e m b e rs o f a fo r m a l a s s o cia tio n ; t h e s e
stopp ages a ccou n ted fo r o n e -th ird o f tota l
id le n e s s . 2

2 Stoppages were classified by type of employer unit in 1963
for the first time.

4

Beginning in 1963

Type of employer unit

Man-days idle
Workers
during 1963
Number involved (all stoppages)

All stoppages-----------------------

3,362

941,000

16,100,000

Single establishment or more
than 1 but under the same
ownership or management------

2,949

655,000

te r m s o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d , th ese s trik e s a c ­
cou n ted fo r a h igh er p ro p o rtio n than that r e ­
c o r d e d in 6 o f the 10 p re ce d in g y e a r s . Of
th ose s trik e s ending during the y e a r w h ich
in v olv ed 1 ,00 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , 30 la ste d
1 m onth o r lo n g e r.

10,200,000
Year

2 employers or more— no
indication of a formal
association or joint­
bargaining arrangement---------

132

34,000

433,000

2 employers or more in a
formal association------------------

281

251,000

5,450,000

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.

D u ration

S trik es ending in 1963 w e r e s h o r te r , on
the a v e ra g e , than in the 4 p re ce d in g y e a r s ,
but rem a in ed r e la tiv e ly l o n g b y p ostw a r
sta n d a rd s.
The a v era g e d uration was 2 3 .0
ca le n d a r d a y s, as co m p a re d with 24.6 in 1962,
and a p p ro x im a te ly 21 days fo r the 1948—
62
p e r io d (tab le 1).

A p p ro x im a te ly 44 p e rc e n t o f a ll s tr ik e s ,
in v olv in g 38 p e rc e n t o f a ll w o r k e r s in v olv ed ,
la ste d le s s than a w eek (table 14). B e ca u se
o f th eir sh ort d u ration , th ese s trik e s a c ­
cou n ted f o r but 5 p e rc e n t o f tota l id le n e s s .
A n oth er 21 p e rc e n t o f a ll s tr ik e s , in volvin g
about the sam e p ro p o rtio n o f a ll w o r k e r s , and
a ccou n tin g fo r 8 .6 p e rce n t o f tota l id le n e s s ,
w e r e co n clu d e d in 7 to 14 d a y s. N e a r ly o n e fifth o f a ll stop p a g es, in volvin g 24 p e rc e n t o f
a ll w o r k e r s , la sted 30 days o r lo n g e r. T h ese
lo n g e r s trik e s a ccou n ted fo r 73 p e rce n t o f
tota l id le n e s s . Included in this latter grou p
w e r e 205 s trik e s w h ich la sted 90 days o r
lo n g e r , and accou n ted fo r 46 p e rce n t o f tota l
id le n e s s , m o r e than tw ice the p ro p o rtio n o f
id le n e ss o c c u r r in g fr o m s trik e s o f such du­
ra tion in 1962. A p a r tia l explan ation fo r the
in c r e a s e d id le n e ss in su ch s trik e s is found
in the fa ct that the 1963 data inclu d e the id l e ­
n e s s resu ltin g fr o m the 114-d ay New Y o rk
C ity n ew sp a p er s trik e .

The n u m b e r o f stopp a ges continuing
30 days o r lon g er re a ch e d a p ostw ar low in
1963, as show n in the tabulation that fo llo w s .
T h e se s tr ik e s , h o w e v e r, a ccou n ted fo r a
h igh er p r o p o r tio n o f tota l id le n e ss than that
r e c o r d e d in 7 o f the 10 p re c e d in g y e a r s . In




1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Number of
stoppages
lasting 1
month or more

Percent
of all
stoppages

1,209
964
777
773
879
735
976
1,045
759
768
698
723
735
898
725
756
862
658

24.2
25.6
22.9
21.5
18.3
15.4
19.2
20.5
21.6
17.8
18.3
19.7
20.2
24.0
21.7
22.7
23. 7
19.7

Only 1 o f the 7 m a jo r s trik e s beginning
in 1963 e x t e n d e d beyon d 30 d a y s.
T h is
stopp a ge, w h ich o c c u r r e d in the lu m b er in ­
d u stry in the P a c ific N orth w est, was 98 c a l ­
endar days in du ration . A part fr o m its s iz e
and d uration , this la tte r strik e
w a s a ls o
sig n ifica n t in that it re p r e se n te d join t a ction
by the W o o d w o rk e rs and the L u m b er and
S a w m ill W o rk e rs union, the la tte r an a ffilia te
o f the C a rp e n te rs union.
A s is to be e x p e cte d , s trik e s o c c u r r in g
during the te r m o f an a g reem en t w e r e s h o rte r
in d uration than oth er types o f d isp u te s.
A p p ro x im a te ly 70 p e rc e n t o f a ll su ch s tr ik e s ,
as co m p a re d with 30 p e rce n t o f s trik e s o v e r
.re n e g o tia tio n , and 26 p e rce n t o f s trik e s o c ­
cu rrin g during the f ir s t co n tra ct n e g o tia tio n s ,
w e r e settled in le s s than a w eek , w h ile on ly
about 5 p e rc e n t la ste d 30 days o r lo n g e r.
A p p ro x im a te ly o n e -fo u rth o f a ll s trik e s o c ­
cu r rin g during co n tr a c t ren e g o tia tio n r e m a in ­
ed in e ffe c t fo r 30 days o r m o r e , as co m p a re d
w ith n e a r ly tw o -fifth s o f the s trik e s o c c u r r in g
during the union*s quest fo r an in itia l a g r e e ­
m ent o r re c o g n itio n . P a rt o f the d e clin e in
a v e ra g e d uration o f a ll s trik e s fo r 1963 is
attribu table to the fa ct that s trik e s a risin g
during the te r m o f the a g reem en t c o m p r is e d
a h igh er p ro p o rtio n o f a ll s trik e s in 1963 than
in the 2 p re v io u s y e a r s .
A p p ro x im a te ly o n e -h a lf o f a ll s trik e s in
n on m anufacturing in d u strie s w e r e se ttle d in
le s s than a w eek , as c o m p a re d w ith n e a r ly

5

tw o -fifth s o f the stopp ages o c c u r r in g in m an u ­
fa ctu rin g . L ik e w is e , a s m a lle r p ro p o rtio n o f
nonm anufacturing s trik e s w e r e o f 30 days o r
lo n g e r d uration , 16 p e r c e n t, as co m p a re d with
24 p e rce n t in m a n u fa ctu rin g. In nine in d u strie s
e x p e rie n cin g 50 stopp a ges or m o r e , a p p r o x i­
m a te ly o n e -fo u rth o r m o r e o f the d ispu tes
continued fo r 30 days o r lon g er: P rin tin g and
publish in g; e le c t r ic a l m a ch in ery ; w h o le sa le
and r e ta il tra d e; p a p er; m a ch in e r y , ex cep t
e le c t r ic a l; ru b b er; lu m b er; ston e, c la y , and
g la s s p ro d u cts ; and fa b rica te d m eta l p ro d u cts .
M a jo r Issu es
The d istrib u tion o f 1963 s trik e s by m a jo r
is s u e s fo llo w e d the sam e p attern as in the
p re ce d in g y e a r . A p p ro x im a te ly tw o -fifth s o f
a ll s trik es o c c u r r e d follow in g d ispu tes o v e r
g e n e ra l w age ch a n g es, w h ile d ispu tes o v e r
union org a n iza tion and s e c u r ity , and plant
a d m in istra tion ea ch accou n ted fo r a p p r o x i­
m a te ly o n e -s ix th o f a ll s trik e s (table 5).
S t r i k e s in volvin g interu n ion o r intraunion
m a tte rs a ccou n ted fo r a p p ro x im a te ly o n e ninth o f the tota l, w h ile o n e -s ix te e n th o f a ll
s trik e s d e v elop ed o v e r jo b s e c u r ity is s u e s .
The d istrib u tion o f s trik e s in volvin g 1,000
w o r k e r s o r m o r e by is s u e s d iffe r e d fr o m the
pattern o f the 2 p re ce d in g y e a r s . G en era l
w age chan ges w e re the p rin c ip a l is s u e s in
35 p e rce n t o f the 1963 s tr ik e s , as co m p a re d
with 46 and 44 p e rc e n t in 1961 and 1962,
r e s p e c tiv e ly . W hile g e n e ra l w age dem ands
d e clin e d in re la tiv e im p o rta n ce in s trik e s in ­
volvin g 1, 000 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , plant a d m in ­
istr a tio n qu estion s a ssu m ed a la r g e r r o le .
In 1963, 31 p e rce n t o f the m a jo r s trik e s a r o s e
o v e r such q u estion s, as co m p a re d w ith 23 and
18 p e rc e n t in 1962 and 1961, r e s p e c tiv e ly .
The p e rc e n t d istrib u tion o f is s u e s in the 181
la r g e s t s trik e s beginning in 1963 a pp ears in
the tabulation that fo llo w s .

Major issue
All large strikes--------------------------------------------------General wage changes---------------Supplementary benefits; no general
wage change-----------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments------------------------------------------------------Hours of work------------------------------------------------------------Other contractual m atters------------------------------------------Union organization and security----------------------------------Job security----------------------------------------------------------------Plant administration--------------------------------------------------Other working conditions--------------------------------------------Interunion or intraunion matters
(generally involves 2unions)-------------------------------------Not reported---------------------------------------------------------------

Percent
of
stoppages
100. 0
34. 8
3. 3
5. 5
.6
.6
7. 7
8 .8
30. 9
2. 2
5.5

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal totals.




G e n e ra l w age ch an ges w e r e the m a jo r
is s u e s in 53 p e rc e n t o f the s trik e s w hich
continued 30 days o r lo n g e r, w h ile union o r ­
gan ization and s e c u r ity m a tte rs w e r e the
p rim e is s u e s in a p p ro x im a te ly 27 p e rc e n t o f
th ese p r o tr a c te d d isp u te s. Plant a d m in is ­
tra tio n and jo b s e c u r ity is s u e s ea ch accou n ted
fo r 5 p e rc e n t o f the long s to p p a g e s.
S trik es in w h ich dem ands fo r g e n e ra l
w age changes o r su p p lem en ta ry b en efits w e re
the p r in c ip a l is s u e s in v olv ed 45 p e rc e n t o f
a ll w o r k e r s , and a ccou n ted fo r 68 p e rc e n t o f
tota l id le n e s s . A p p ro x im a te ly 86 p e rc e n t o f
the s trik e s in w h ich th ese w e r e the p rin c ip a l
is s u e s o c c u r r e d , as w ould be e x p e cte d , during
the re n e g o tia tio n o f a g re e m e n ts . In ea ch o f
the fou r fo llo w in g in d u s trie s , s trik e s o v e r
th ese is s u e s alon e re s u lte d in o v e r 1 m illio n
m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s : L u m b er and w ood p ro d ­
u c ts ,
ex ce p t fu rn itu re; prin tin g; c o n s t r u c ­
tion ; and tra n sp o rta tio n and co m m u n ica tio n
(table A - 2).
S trik es in w hich union o rg a n iza tio n and
s e c u r ity m a tte rs w e re the p r in c ip a l is s u e s
in v olv ed on e-ten th o f a ll w o r k e r s , and a c ­
counted fo r the sam e p r o p o r tio n o f tota l i d l e ­
n e s s . S lightly le s s than th r e e -fo u r th s o f a ll
s trik e s in w h ich th ese w e re the p rim e is s u e s
o c c u r r e d during the n egotia tion o f an in itia l
a g re e m e n t, w h ile 16 p e rc e n t o c c u r r e d during
the te r m o f an a g re e m e n t. T w o in d u s trie s,
co n s tr u c tio n and tra d e , a ccou n ted fo r m o r e
than o n e -th ird o f th ese s tr ik e s .
W ork stopp a ges o v e r plant a d m in istra tio n
q u estion s in v olv ed slig h tly le s s than o n e fou rth o f a ll w o r k e r s , but a ccou n ted fo r on ly
o n e-ten th o f tota l strik e id le n e s s . Both m e a s ­
u re s w e r e h igh er than in 1962, but lo w e r than
in 1961 when su ch s trik e s in v olv ed o n e -th ird
o f a ll w o r k e r s , and a ccou n ted fo r 22 p e rc e n t
o f tota l id le n e s s . In the tra n sp o rta tio n e q u ip ­
m ent in d u stry, th ese is s u e s a ccou n ted fo r
tw o -fifth s o f a ll s trik e s and s lig h tly le s s than
o n e -h a lf o f tota l id le n e s s ; in m in in g, m o r e
than o n e -h a lf o f the s tr ik e s , and o n e -th ir d
o f the id le n e ss w e r e a ttribu table to th ese
is s u e s . A lm o s t 85 p e rc e n t o f the s trik e s d e ­
v e lop in g out o f plant a d m in istra tio n d ispu tes
o c c u r r e d during the te r m o f the a g re e m e n t.
S trik es in w hich jo b s e c u r ity w as the
m a jo r is s u e in v olv ed 8 p e rc e n t o f a ll w o r k e r s ,
and a ccou n ted fo r 4 p e rc e n t o f tota l id le n e s s .
Sligh tly m o r e than th r e e -fifth s o f the s trik e s
o v e r jo b s e c u r ity o c c u r r e d during the te r m
o f an a g re e m e n t, and another 30 p e rc e n t
fo llo w e d the e x p ira tio n o r reop en in g o f an
a g re e m e n t. A p p ro x im a te ly o n e -fifth o f the
id le n e ss re su ltin g fr o m s trik e s in w h ich jo b
s e c u r ity w as the m a jo r is s u e o c c u r r e d in the
p r im a r y m e ta ls in d u s trie s, w h i l e another
16 p e rce n t o c c u r r e d in the ru b b e r in d u stry.

6

Interunion or intraunion is s u e s in v olv ed
le s s than 6 p e rce n t o f a ll w o r k e r s , and a c ­
cou n ted fo r 2 p e rc e n t o f tota l id le n e s s . A ll
but 6 p e rc e n t o f th ese s trik e s o c c u r r e d w h ile
a g re e m e n ts w e r e in e ffe c t. A s in the 2 p r e ­
ced in g y e a r s , fiv e -s ix th s o f the stopp a ges
o v e r th ese is s u e s o c c u r r e d in the co n s tr u c tio n
in d u stry.
In d u stries A ffe cte d
W hile the n u m ber o f s trik e s beginning in
1963 was about eq u a lly d ivid ed betw een m an u ­
fa ctu rin g and n on m anufacturing in d u s trie s , the
f o r m e r a ccou n ted fo r th r e e -fifth s o f the w o r k ­
e r s in v o lv e d , and slig h tly le s s than tw o -th ird s
o f tota l id le n e ss (table 6). A s has b een true
s in ce 1944, the p e rc e n t o f w ork in g tim e lo st
in m an u factu rin g (0. 24) g r e a tly e x c e e d e d that
lo s t in n on m an u factu rin g ( 0 . 0 7 ) . 3 A s again st
1962, id le n e ss in c r e a s e d by 300,000 m a n -d a y s
in m a n u fa ctu rin g, and d e clin e d by 2 .7 m illio n
m a n -d a y s in n on m an u factu rin g. The red u ctio n
in this la tter grou p o f in d u stries stem m ed
a lm o s t e n tire ly fr o m the d e clin e o f 2.2 m illio n
m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss in t h e co n s tr u c tio n
in d u stry.
F iv e in d u stry g ro u p s— lu m b er and w ood
p ro d u cts ; p rintin g and p u b lish in g; ru b b e r;
c o n t r a c t co n s tr u c tio n ; and tra n sp orta tio n
and co m m u n ica tion — e x p e r ie n c e d m o r e than
1 m illio n m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss ea ch in 1963,
and tog eth er a ccou n ted fo r 53 p e rc e n t o f tota l
s trik e id le n e s s during the y e a r . The p e rc e n t
o f e stim a ted w orkin g tim e lo s t in th ese five
in d u stries ran ged fr o m 0. 25 p e rc e n t fo r the
la tter tw o grou ps to 1.06 p e rc e n t in the ru b ber
in d u stry.
L a rg e s trik e s beginning in 1962
a ccou n ted fo r m o r e than tw o -th ird s o f the
id le n e ss in the prin tin g in d u stry, and fo r
a p p ro x im a te ly tw o -fifth s o f the id le n e ss in
tra n sp o rta tio n a n d co m m u n ica tion . In the
lu m b er in d u stry, w h ere th ree m e a s u r e s o f
strik e a ctiv ity w e r e at th eir h igh est le v e ls
sin ce 1954, m o r e than fo u r -fifth s o f the id l e ­
n e ss re s u lte d fr o m a 3 -m on th strik e in the
P a c ific N orth w est. In the ru b ber in d u stry,
tw o p r o tr a c te d s tr ik e s , in v olv in g a tota l o f
slig h tly le s s than 6, 000 w o r k e r s , a ccou n ted
fo r m o r e than h alf o f the id le n e s s .
C on tra ct co n s tr u c tio n , the fifth in d u stry
grou p e x p e rie n cin g m o r e than 1 m illio n days
o f strik e id le n e ss in 1963, a ccou n ted fo r o n e fou rth o f a ll s trik e s beginning during the y e a r ,
22 p e rc e n t o f a l l w o r k e r s in v olv ed ,
and
12 p e r c e n t o f tota l id le n e s s . It should be

^ The percent of time lost in nonmanufacturing was at its
lowest postwar level.




n oted , h o w e v e r , that not on ly w e r e a ll m e a s ­
u re s o f s trik e a ctiv ity in this in d u stry b e lo w
th eir 1962 le v e ls , but 3 o f the 4 m e a s u r e s
w e re at th eir lo w e st le v e ls in a lm o st a d e c ­
ade. An a v e ra g e o f 269>000 w o r k e r s w e r e
in v o lv e d in s trik e s in this in d u stry ea ch y e a r
during the 1958—
62 p e r io d , as co m p a re d w ith
208, 000 in 1963, the lo w e st le v e l sin c e 1955.
In m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s , an a v e ra g e o f
4. 2 m illio n days w as r e c o r d e d durin g the
1958— p e r io d , as c o m p a re d with 1. 9 m illio n
62
in 1963, a ls o the lo w e st le v e l sin c e 1955.

T h r e e oth er in d u stry g ro u p s— p e tro le u m
re fin in g ; ston e, c la y , and g la s s p ro d u cts ; and
m ining— w h ich fa ile d to sustain as g re a t a
lo s s in m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss as th ose noted
p r e v io u s ly , did, n o n e th e le s s , e x p e rie n ce a
p e rce n ta g e lo s s in e stim a te d w ork in g tim e due
to s trik e s w h ich w as su b sta n tia lly g r e a te r
than the n ation al a v e ra g e . In the p e tro le u m
in d u stry, the lo s s o f 0. 71 p e rc e n t o f w orkin g
tim e ca n be tr a c e d in la rg e m e a su r e to a
strik e at the Sh ell O il C o. w h ich began in
1962, and con tin u ed th rou gh July 1963. The
p e rce n ta g e o f tim e lo s t in the p e tro le u m in ­
d u stry , h o w e v e r , was b elow the 1962 le v e l,
as w e r e the n u m ber o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d and
the m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s . In the ston e, c la y ,
and g la s s p ro d u cts grou p, the s tr ik e -in d u c e d
lo s s o f 0.30 p e rc e n t o f w ork in g tim e is la r g e ly
a ttribu table to a 6 -m on th s trik e w h ich e x ­
tended into th re e S tates. A lthough the p e r ­
cen tage lo s s in e stim a te d w orkin g tim e (0. 30)
in m in in g was r e la tiv e ly high, a ll m e a s u r e s
o f s trik e a ctiv ity fe ll b e lo w 1962 le v e ls , with
a d e clin e in e x c e s s o f 50 p e rc e n t bein g r e ­
co r d e d in m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s .
In a to ta l o f 20 in d u s trie s, the n u m ber
o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d in new s trik e s f e ll b e lo w
1962 le v e ls , with a p ostw a r low b ein g r e ­
co r d e d in the p r im a r y m e ta ls , m a ch in e r y ,
ex ce p t e le c t r ic a l, and tra n sp o rta tio n eq u ip ­
m ent in d u s trie s . W ith re g a r d to m a n -d a y s o f
id le n e s s , a d e clin e fr o m 1962 le v e ls was r e ­
c o r d e d in 17 in d u s trie s. In two o f th ese
g ro u p s , m a ch in e r y ,
ex cep t e le c t r ic a l, and
tra n sp o rta tio n equipm en t, id le n e ss f e ll b e lo w
1 m illio n m a n -d a y s fo r the fir s t tim e sin ce
1944 and 1954, r e s p e c tiv e ly .

Stoppages b y L o ca tio n

R e g io n s . R e fle ctin g the g e n e ra l d e clin e
in strik e a ctiv ity in 1963, a ll m e a s u r e s o f
su ch a ctiv ity d e clin e d fr o m 1962 le v e ls in
f o u r r e g io n s , N e w E ngland, E ast N orth

7

C en tra l, W est South C en tra l, and P a c if ic ,
w h ile in the M ountain States th ree o f the
m e a su r e s r e g is t e r e d a d e clin e fr o m 1962
(table 7). In the South A tla n tic re g io n , h o w ­
e v e r , a ll m e a s u r e s in c r e a s e d o v e r the p r e ­
ced in g y e a r , although the p e rc e n t o f w orkin g
tim e lo st in th ese States (0. 10) rem a in ed
b e lo w the n ation al a v era g e ( 0. 1 3) .
D esp ite
the d eclin e in a ll m e a s u r e s noted fo r the
P a c ific r e g io n , the p e rce n t o f w ork in g tim e
lo st in this re g io n , as w e ll as in the M iddle
A tlan tic and E ast South C en tra l r e g io n s , was
above the n ation al a v e ra g e . In the P a c ific
S tates, the r e la tiv e ly g r e a te r lo s s o f w orkin g
tim e was a ttribu table in la r g e m e a su re to
m a jo r s trik e s in the lu m b er and su gar in d u s­
t r ie s . The A tla n tic and Gulf C oast lo n g sh o re
s trik e , along w ith the New Y ork C ity n e w s ­
p ap er s tr ik e , both o f w h ich began in 1962,
h elp ed to r a is e the le v e l o f w ork in g tim e lost
in the M iddle A tla n tic re g io n above the n a­
tion a l a v e ra g e , w h ile a publish in g in d u stry
strik e b e a r s m a jo r r e s p o n s ib ility fo r this
d evelop m en t in the E ast South C en tra l re g io n .

S ta tes. New Y o rk , C a lifo rn ia , and P en n ­
sylvan ia ea ch e x p e rie n ce d m o r e than 1 m illio n
m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss in 1963, and togeth er
a ccou n ted fo r n e a r ly o n e -th ir d o f tota l id l e ­
n e ss during the y e a r (table 8). E ach o f 12 a d ­
d ition a l States e x p e rie n ce d m o r e than 500, 000
m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss during the y e a r . New
Y o rk , with 2 , 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s ,
a lm o st equaled the id le n e ss r e c o r d e d in C a li­
fo rn ia ( 1 , 3 4 0 , 000 m a n -d a y s) and P en n sylvan ia
( 1 , 2 8 0 , 0 0 0 m a n -d a y s) com b in ed .
A p p r o x i­
m a te ly h a lf o f the tim e lo st in New Y o rk State
re su lte d fr o m the a fo rem en tion ed n ew spa p er
and lo n g sh o re s tr ik e s . In C a lifo rn ia , id le n e ss
in 1963 was a p p ro x im a te ly 50 p e rc e n t le s s
than in 1962, w h ile in P en n sylva n ia , id le n e ss
w as at its low est le v e l s in ce 1942.

In fou r States, the p e rce n t o f estim a ted
'w orking tim e lo st due to strik e id le n e ss was
su bstan tia lly h ig h er than the n ational a v era g e
o f 0 . 13 p e rc e n t. H aw aii (0 .4 7 p ercen t) and
O regon (0.46 p ercen t) ranked f ir s t and se co n d ,
w h ile T e n n e s se e and W ashington r e c o r d e d
lo s s e s o f 0. 32 p e r c e n t. In O reg on and W ash ­
ington, the high p e rc e n t o f w ork in g tim e lo st
re su lte d la r g e ly fr o m the lu m ber in d u stry
s trik e , w h ile in H aw aii p rim e r e s p o n s ib ility
m ust be a c c o r d e d the 10-d a y strik e in volvin g
10,500 su gar in d u stry w o r k e r s . The K in gsp ort
P r e s s s trik e , in v olv in g 1 ,7 5 0 w o r k e r s , w h ich
began in M a rch 1963, and w as s till u n settled
at the end o f the y e a r , a ccou n ted fo r a la rg e
p e rc e n t o f s trik e id le n e ss i n T e n n e s s e e .



W hile the above S tates, along with 11 o th e rs ,
p osted a p e rce n t o f w ork in g t i m e l o s t
w hich was h ig h er than the n ation al a v e ra g e ,
32 States and the D is t r ic t o f C olu m b ia fe ll
b e lo w the n ation al a v e ra g e .

In te r m s o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d , New Y o rk
(1 3 0 ,0 0 0 ) and P en n sylvan ia (9 8 ,3 0 0 ) w e r e the
le a d e r s . H ow e v e r, n e a r ly 40 p e rc e n t fe w e r
w o r k e r s w e r e in v olv ed in s trik e s in New Y o rk
in 1963 than in 1962, w hile the n u m ber in ­
v o lv e d in P en n sylvan ia was the lo w e st sin ce
1932. O ther States with la r g e n u m bers o f
w o r k e r s in v o lv e d w e r e Ohio (6 3 ,0 0 0 ), Illin o is
( 61, 700) , and C a lifo rn ia (6 0 ,2 0 0 ). In two o f
th ese States, Ohio and C a lifo rn ia , the nu m ber
o f w o r k e r s was at its lo w e st le v e l sin ce 1940
and 1944, r e s p e c tiv e ly .

Ten S tates, ea ch e x p e rie n cin g 100 s trik e s
or m o r e ,
accounted
fo r slig h tly
over
tw o -th ird s o f the s trik e s beginning in 1963.
New Y o rk and P en n sylva n ia , the tra d itio n a l
le a d e r s , ranked f ir s t and se co n d , r e s p e c ­
tiv e ly . C a lifo rn ia , w h ich ranked th ird , r e ­
co r d e d its s e co n d h ighest n u m ber o f s trik e s
(276) during the p ostw a r e ra . At the oth er
end o f the s c a le , 10 s trik e s o r le s s w e re
r e c o r d e d in ea ch o f the fo llo w in g six States:
A la sk a , M is s is s ip p i, N orth D akota, South
C a ro lin a , V e rm o n t, and W yom in g.

M e tro p o lita n A r e a s . 4 Id len ess resu ltin g
fr o m s trik e s in the New Y o rk m e tro p o lita n
a re a , 2 , 0 9 0 , 0 0 0 m a n -d a y s , was on ly 10, 000
b elow the le v e l r e c o r d e d in 1962 (table 9).
In th ree oth er m e tro p o lita n a r e a s — L o s A n ­
g e le s , P h ila d elp h ia , and St. L o u is— id le n e ss
fe ll in the range betw een o n e -h a lf and t h r e e fourths o f a m illio n m a n -d a y s . In L os A n ­
g e le s , id le n e ss (666, 000 m a n -d a y s) in c r e a s e d
by 10 p e rc e n t o v e r the 1962 le v e l, w h ile
P h ila d elp h ia , w h ich in 1962 had r e c o r d e d a
sharp d e clin e i n id le n e s s ,
e x p e rie n ce d a
4 4 -p e r c e n t in c r e a s e o v e r the p re c e d in g y e a r 's
le v e l as the tim e lo s t r o s e to 7 0 7 ,0 0 0 m a n d ays. In St. L o u is, w h ere a 2 6 -d a y stoppage
o f 2 0 , 0 00 co n s tr u c tio n w o r k e r s o c c u r r e d d u r ­
ing the y e a r , id le n e ss (539>000 m a n -d a y s) w as
12 p e rc e n t h igh er than in 1962.*

* The definitions of several metropolitan areas were altered
by the Bureau of the Budget in October 1963. In all cases,
however, 1963 strike statistics were compiled under the definitions
in effect at the start of the year.
Strike statistics have been compiled on a metropolitan area
basis since 1952.

e
W hile th ese m e tro p o lita n a rea s w e r e e x ­
p e rie n c in g high le v e ls o f strik e id le n e s s , the
tim e lo st due to s trik e s was drop pin g to the
lo w e st le v e l in m o r e than a d eca d e in su ch
a re a s as D e tr o it, L o u is v ille , and P ittsb u rgh .
In s till another a re a , San F r a n c is c o , m a n days o f id le n e ss d e clin e d fr o m 948, 000 in
1962 to 1 88 ,00 0 in 1963. The D etro it situ ation
is p a r tic u la r ly n otew orth y. H e re , m a n -d a y s
o f id le n e s s , w h ich had a v era g ed 1 .2 m illio n
during t h e
1958—
62 p e r i o d ,
d e clin e d to
252, 000. The n um ber o f s trik e s in D e tr o it,
as w e ll as w o r k e r s in v o lv e d , w e re a ls o at
the lo w e st le v e ls in m o r e than a d eca d e .

M onthly T ren d s *
4
On both a m on th ly and q u a rte rly b a s is ,
a ll m e a s u r e s o f s trik e a ctiv ity in 1963 f lu c ­
tuated o v e r a n a r ro w e r ra n ge, with low e r
u pper lim its , than in 1962 (table 3). P ea k
m on th ly id le n e ss during the y e a r ( 2 , 2 4 0 , 0 0 0
m a n -d a y s) w as r e c o r d e d in January, a m onth
r a r e ly n oted fo r high le v e ls o f id le n e s s . T his
d e p a rtu re fr o m the n orm w as b a s ic a lly a
p ro d u ct o f the id le n e ss resu ltin g fr o m two
la r g e s trik e s , the A tlan tic and Gulf C oast long­
s h o re s trik e and the N ew Y o rk C ity n ew spap er
s trik e , w h ich , as p r e v io u s ly noted, began in
1962 and con tin u ed into 1963. A s a c o n s e ­
qu en ce a ls o of th ese tw o stoppages, the high est
q u a rte rly le v e l o f id le n e ss w as r e c o r d e d d u r ­
ing the fir s t 3 m onths o f the y e a r (4, 224, 000
m a n -d a y s ). The m onths o f A p r il th rough S ep ­
te m b e r , w h ich in 1962 accou n ted fo r 12. 2
m illio n m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s , a ccou n ted fo r
but -8. 1 m illio n m a n -d a y s in 1963.
Th is
m a rk ed d e clin e in id le n e ss during the secon d
and th ird q u a rte rs o c c u r r e d as a con se q u e n ce
o f the sh arp d e clin e in id le n e ss in the c o n ­
stru ctio n in d u stry during 1963.
The la r g e s t n u m ber o f s trik e s in e ffe c t
during any m onth in 1963 w as 606, and the
la r g e s t n u m ber o f w o r k e r s in v olv ed in s trik e s
in any m onth was 183, 000, both peaks bein g
r e c o r d e d in July. D uring the p re c e d in g y e a r ,
th ese 1963 peak le v e ls w e r e e x c e e d e d in
4 d iffe r e n t m on th s, w ith a high o f 695 s trik e s
in v olv in g 311 , 00 0 w o r k e r s bein g r e c o r d e d in
June 1962. The h igh est 1963 m on th ly p e rce n t
o f e stim a ted tota l w ork in g tim e lo s t, 0. 22
p e r c e n t, co m p a re d with le v e ls o f 0. 31 and
0. 25 p e r c e n t, r e c o r d e d in June and M ay 1962,
r e s p e c t iv e ly .

A s fo r s trik e s in v olv in g 1, 000 w o r k e r s
o r m o r e , h e re again the 1963 m on th ly and
q u a rte rly range w as n a r ro w e r than in 1962.
Of the s tr ik e s o f su ch m agnitude beginning



in 1963, se v e n , in volvin g a total o f slig h tly
m o r e than 2 6, 0 00 w o r k e r s , continued into
1964. The tabulation that fo llo w s p re s e n ts fo r
1963, as w e ll as fo r the 2 p re ce d in g y e a r s ,
the m on th ly d istrib u tio n o f new s trik e s in ­
vo lv in g 1, 000 w o r k e r s o r m o r e .

Month

1963

1962

1961

January----------------------- -----February---------------------------M arch------------------------- -----A p ril--------------------------------May---------------------------- -----June---------------------------- -----July---------------------------- -----August------------------------- -----September-------------------------October----------------------- -----November-------------------------December-------------------- ------

13
13
6
16
23
16
23
14
17
18
17
5

9
12
16
21
34
21
25
24
22
8
13
6

10
9
13
18
22
26
21
19
12
20
19
6

U nions In volved

A s has been the c a s e sin ce 1958, unions
a ffilia te d w ith the A F L —
CIO w e r e in v o lv e d in
th r e e -fo u r th s o f the w o rk stopp a ges begin n ing
in 1963 (tab le 10). T h e se s trik e s a ccou n ted
fo r 87 p e rc e n t o f to ta l id le n e ss during the
y e a r , a p p ro x im a te ly the sam e p r o p o r tio n r e ­
co r d e d in 1962. In a bsolu te te r m s , h o w e v e r,
m a n -d a y s o f id le n e ss resu ltin g fr o m th e se
s trik e s d e clin e d b y o n e -e ig h th fr o m
1962
le v e ls .
The 780, 000 w o r k e r s in v o lv e d in
AFL—
CIO s trik e s w e r e not on ly fe w e r in n u m ­
b e r than in the p re c e d in g y e a r , but a ls o a c ­
counted fo r a s m a lle r p o rtio n o f a ll w o r k e r s
in v olv ed than in 1962, 83 p e rce n t as co m p a re d
with 86 p e rc e n t.

U n a ffiliated unions p a rticip a te d in s lig h tly
m o r e than o n e -fifth o f the s trik e s beginning
during the y e a r . A s in p r io r y e a r s , a s m a ll
n um ber o f s trik e s (42) o c c u r r e d in w h ich no
union w as in v o lv e d .

M ediation

G overn m en t m e d ia to r s , m o r e than 70
p e rc e n t o f w hom w e r e F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s ,
e n tered 48 p e rc e n t o f th ose s trik e s w hich
w e r e te rm in a te d during 1963, as again st

9
50 p e rce n t in 1962 (table 15). A s m a ll n u m ­
b e r o f s trik e s (42) w e r e settled with the
a s s is ta n ce o f p riv a te m e d ia to r s , w hile no
m ed ia tion was r e p o r te d in 50 p e rc e n t o f th ose
s trik e s ending in the y e a r . Strik es settled
with the a s s is ta n c e o f gov ern m en t m e d ia to rs
w e r e on the a v era g e la r g e r in s iz e a n d /o r
lo n g e r in duration than th ose settled without
outside a s s is ta n c e , as is ev id en ced by the
fa ct that su ch s trik e s in v olv ed m o r e than
th r e e -fifth s o f a ll w o r k e r s , and a ccou n ted fo r
86 p e rce n t o f tota l id le n e s s .
A p p ro x im a te ly 82 p e rc e n t o f a ll strik e s
w h ich o c c u r r e d during the ren eg otia tion o f
a gre e m en ts w e r e settled with the a s s is ta n ce
o f govern m en t m e d ia to r s , as co m p a re d with
75 and 79 p e rc e n t in 1961 and 1962, r e s p e c ­
tiv e ly . G overn m en t m e d ia to rs en tered 44 p e r ­
cent o f a ll stopp ages a risin g out o f the n e g o ­
tiation o f the in itia l a g re e m e n t, and on ly
12 p e rce n t o f th ose s trik e s o c c u r r in g during
the te r m o f an a g reem en t.
Settlem en t
A s in 1962, fo r m a l settlem en ts w e r e
re a ch ed in a p p ro x im a te ly 90 p e rc e n t o f a ll
s trik e s ending in 1963 (table 16). In another
9 p e rce n t o f the s trik e s term in a ted during the
y e a r , e m p lo y e rs re su m e d op era tion s without
form ail settlem en t, eith er with new e m p lo y e e s
o r with return in g s t r ik e r s . F o r ty -o n e s tr ik e s ,
in volvin g 2, 259 w o r k e r s , ca m e to a c lo s e with
the e m p lo y e e s d e c is io n to go out o f b u s in e s s .
S trik es ending during 1963 w h ich a r o s e during
eith er the ren eg otia tion o f an a greem en t o r
the te r m o f an a greem en t w e r e term in a ted
with a fo r m a l settlem en t in a p p ro x im a te ly
93 and 94 p e rc e n t o f a ll c a s e s , r e s p e c tiv e ly .
On the oth er hand, a fo r m a l settlem en t t e r ­
m inated on ly 73 p e rce n t o f th ose s trik e s w h ich
o c c u r r e d during the n egotiation o f the in itia l
a g re e m en t.

P r o c e d u r e fo r H andling U nsettled Issu e s

In m an y in s ta n ce s , s trik e s a re term in a ted
w ith the un derstan din g that c e r ta in u n settled
is s u e s w ill be r e s o lv e d fo llo w in g the r e s u m p ­
tion o f n o rm a l o p e ra tio n s . In form a tion was
a vaila b le on the m an ner in w h ich su ch is s u e s
w ould be r e s o lv e d in 484 s trik e s ending in
1963 (table 17). In a p p ro x im a te ly o n e -fifth
o f th ese s tr ik e s , the is s u e s w e r e to be su b ­
m itte d to a rb itra tio n , w h ile in a like p r o p o r ­
tion o f c a s e s , the is s u e s w e r e to be settled
b y continued n e g otia tion s. In 9 p e rc e n t o f
th e se s tr ik e s , in volvin g 5 4 ,2 0 0 w o r k e r s , the
iss u e s w e r e to be r e fe r r e d to a govern m en t
a gen cy. V a rio u s oth er d e v ic e s w e r e to be
u tilize d in the re s o lu tio n o f u n settled iss u e s
in 47 p e rce n t o f th ese s tr ik e s .

S ix ty -s e v e n o f the s trik e s in w h ich the
s e r v ic e s o f an a r b itr a to r w e r e to be em p lo y e d
o c c u r r e d during the te r m o f an a g re e m e n t;
29 o c c u r r e d during the ren e g o tia tio n o f an
a g re e m e n t, and 11 m a te r ia liz e d during the
n egotiation o f the in itia l a g re e m e n t. Of th ose
s trik e s in w h ich u n settled is s u e s w e r e to be
r e s o lv e d by continued n e g o tia tio n s, 49, or
slig h tly le s s than h alf, o c c u r r e d during the
te r m o f an a g re e m e n t.
The is s u e s aw aiting r e s o lu tio n in a ll but
2 o f th ese 484 stopp ages a re p re s e n te d in the
tabulation that fo llo w s . In s lig h tly le s s than
h a lf o f th ese s tr ik e s , the is s u e s rem ain in g
w e re interu n ion m a tte rs , but th ese stopp ages
w e r e r e la tiv e ly s m a ll in s iz e as is e v id e n ce d
by the fa ct that they in v olv ed on ly 15 p e rce n t
o f a ll w o r k e r s . On the oth er hand, s trik e s
in w hich w orkin g con d ition s con stitu ted the
u n re s o lv e d is s u e s accou n ted fo r le s s than
o n e -fifth o f a ll sto p p a g e s , but in clu d ed m o r e
than h a lf o f a ll w o r k e r s in v o lv e d .

Stoppages_______ Workers involved_______ Man-days idle
Percent
of
Number
total

Number

Percent
of
total

Number

Percent
of
total

Total stoppages covered 9
1

482

100.0

152,000

100.0

2,330,000

100.0

Wages and hours-------------------Fringe benefits---------------------Union organization----------------Working conditions--------------Interunion matters----------------Combination------------------------Other-----------------------------------

36
28
38
88
229
30
33

7.5
5.8
7.9
18.3
47.5
6.2
6 .8

3,710
21,100
1,470
78,400
22,300
9,110
15,900

2.4
13.9
1.0
51.6
14.7
6.0
10.5

27,300
225,000
43,400
1,510,000
93,700
81,900
347,000

1.2
9.7
1.9
64.9
4.0
3.5
14.9

1 Excludes those for which information was insufficient to classify.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




10
T able 1. W ork Stoppages in the U nited States, 1927—6 3 1
Work stoppages
Year
Number

Average
duration
(calendar
days)3

W orkers involved1
2
Percent
of
Number
(thousands)
total
employed

M an-days idle during year

Number
(thousands)

Percent of
estim ated
total
working
time

Per
worker
involved

1927..........................................................................................
1928..........................................................................................
1929
...................................................................................
1930..........................................................................................

707
604
921
637

26.5
27.6
22.6
22.3

330
314
289
183

1.4
1.3
1.2
.8

2 6 ,2 0 0
12, 600
5, 350
3, 320

0.37
.17
.'07
.05

79.5
40.2
18.5
18.1

1931..........................................................................................
1932.........................................................................................
1933.........................................................................................
1934
...................................................................................
1935----------------------------------------------------------------------------

810
841
1, 695
1, 856
2, 014

18.8
19.6
16.9
19.5
23.8

342
324
1, 170
1, 470
1, 120

1.6
1.8
6.3
7.2
5.2

6, 890
10, 500
1 6 ,9 0 0
19, 600
1 5 ,5 0 0

.11
.23
.36
.38
.29

20.2
32.4
14.4
13.4
13.8

1936 ......................................................................................
1937_________________________________________________
1938......................................................................................
1939______ ________ ________
__ _______ ___
1940..........................................................................................

2,
4,
2,
2,
2,

172
740
772
613
508

23.3
20.3
23.6
23.4
20.9

789
1, 860
688
1, 170
577

3.1
7.2
2.8
4 .7
2.3

1 3 ,9 0 0
28, 400
9, 150
17, 800
6, 700

.21
.43
.15
.28
.10

17.6
15.3
13.3
15.2
11.6

19 4 }
1942.
_____ ____________________________________
1Q43
1944..........................................................................................
1945— ____ __ __________________________________

4,
2,
3,
4,
4,

288
968
752
956
750

18.3
11.7
5 .0
5.6
9.9

2, 360
840
1, 980
2, 120
3, 470

8 .4
2.8
6 .9
7.0
12.2

2 3 ,0 0 0
4, 180
1 3 ,5 0 0
8, 720
3 8 ,0 0 0

.32
.05
.15
.09
.47

9.8
5.0
6.8
4.1
11.0

1Q4A
1947 .....................................................................................
1948 ......................................................................................
1Q4Q
1950----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4,
3,
3,
3,
4,

985
693
419
606
843

24.2
25.6
21.8
22.5
19.2

4,
2,
1,
3,
2,

600
170
960
030
410

14.5
6.5
5.5
9.0
6.9

1 1 6 ,0 0 0
34, 600
34, 100
50, 500
3 8 ,8 0 0

1.43
.41
.37
.59
.4 4

25.2
15.9
17.4
16.7
16.1

1951------------------------------------------------------- -------------------.......... ..... _
_
_
19^?. _
1953..........................................................................................
1 Q^4
_____
1955......................................................................................

4,
5,
5,
3,
4,

737
117
091
468
320

17.4
19.6
20.3
22.5
18.5

2,
3,
2,
1,
2,

220
540
400
530
650

5.5
8.8
5.6
3.7
6.2

22, 900
59, 100
2 8 ,3 0 0
22, 600
2 8 ,2 0 0

.23
.57
.26
.21
.26

10.3
16.7
11.8
14.7
10.7

____________________________________
1956— ___
1957_________________________________________________
1958..........................................................................................
1Q8Q.
____
I960 _ _____ _________________________ __________
1961..........................................................................................
1962 _ _
-------------------------------------- --------------------1963......................... ......... ......................................................

3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,

825
673
694
708
333
367
614
362

18.9
19.2
19.7
24.6
23.4
23.7
24.6
23.0

1,
1,
2,
1,
1,
1,
1,

900
390
060
880
320
450
230
941

4.3
3.1
4.8
4.3
3.0
3.2
2.7
2.0

33, 100
1 6 ,5 0 0
23, 900
69, 000
19, 100
1 6 ,3 0 0
1 8 ,6 0 0
1 6 ,1 0 0

.29
.1 4
.22
.61
.17
.1 4
.16
.13

17.4
11.4
11.6
36.7
14.5
11.2
15.0
17.1

1 The number of stoppages and w orkers relate to those beginning in the year; average duration, to those ending in the
M an-days of idleness include all stoppages in effect.
Available information for earlier periods appears in Handbook of Labor Statistics, BL.S Bulletin 1016 (1951), table E -2 .
For a discussion of the procedures involved in the collection and compilation of work stoppage statistics, see Techniques of
Preparing M ajor BL.S Statistical S eries, BLS Bulletin 1168 (1955), ch. 12.
2 In these tables, w orkers are counted m ore than once if they were involved in m ore than 1 stoppage during the year.
3 F igures are sim ple averages; each stoppage is given equal weight regard less of its size.

year.




11
T able 2.

W ork S to p p ag e s In volvin g 10,000 W orkers or M ore, Selected Periods
W orkers involved

Period

Number

1935—39 (average) ________________________________
--------------------------------1947— (average) — _
49
1945 ________________________________________________
1946 _____________________ __________________________
1Q47
1948______ _________________________________________
1949 -------------------------------------------------------------------------1950__________________________________________________
1951_________________ ________________________________
1952 __ „
______________________________________
____ ___ _____ ___
195^
_
1954_________________ ________________________________
1955______ - . ____ ____________ ___________________
1956___ _____________ _______________________________
1957__________ ___ __________ ______________________
1 958.-______________ _________ _______________________
1959 -------------------------------------------------------------------------1960 .......................................................................................
1961 .
_________________ ____________________
1962 ......................................................................................
1963
...
__________ ______________________________

11
18
42
31
15
20
18
22
19
35
28
18
26
12
13
21
20
17
14
16
7

Number
(thousands)

Percent of
total for
period

32.4
53.4
38.9
63.6
47.5
44.5
63.2
30.7
20.6
47.8
27.1
28.5
45.6
39.9
20.4
40.0
45.0
29.2
41 .4
25.8
10.8

365
270
350
920
030
870
1 ,9 2 0
738
457
1, 690
650
437
1, 210
758
283
823
845
384
601
318
102

1,
1,
2,
1,

M an-days idle

Number
(thousands)1

Percent of
total for
period

5, 290
23, 800
1 9 ,3 0 0
6 6 ,4 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
1 8 ,9 0 0
3 4 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,7 0 0
5, 680
3 6 ,9 0 0
7, 270
7, 520
12,3 0 0
1 9 ,6 0 0
3, 050
1 0 ,6 0 0
5 0 ,8 0 0
7, 140
4 ,9 5 0
4, 800
3, 540

31.2
59.9
50.7
57.2
51.2
55.3
69.0
56.0
24.8
62.6
25.7
33.3
43.4
59.1
18.5
44.2
73.7
37.4
30.4
25.8
22.0

Includes idleness in stoppages beginning in e a rlier y ea rs.

Table 3.

W ork Stoppages by Month, 1962—63

Number of stoppages

W orkers involved in stoppages
In effect during month

Month

Beginning
in
month

In effect
during
month

Beginning
in month
(thousands)

247
216
305
340
442
436
355
352
297
261
230
133

403
387
482
537
653
695
621
617
541
506
442
331

230
198
214
291
377
380
372
312
287
346
223
132

366
323
348
423
543
593
606
545
500
574
467
336

•
M an-days idle
during month

Number
(thousands)

Percent
of total
employed

Number
(thousands)

Percent of
estimated
total
working
time

61
63
90
114
212
131
98
129
92
99
81
45

86
100
134
146
262
311
195
196
181
155
171
146

0.14
.14
.20
.25
.46
.32
.21
.27
.20
.21
.17
.10

862
766
1, 070
1, 130
2, 520
3 ,0 2 0
2, 020
1, 940
1, 590
1, 350
981
1, 330

0.09
.09
.11
.12
.25
.31
.21
.18
.18
.13
.10
.1 4

68
53
40
89
118
128
94
67
81
96
80
27

175
109
90
119
148
181
183
167
155
153
152
82

.15
.12
.09
.19
.25
.27
.19
.14
.17
.20
.17
.06

2, 240
1 ,0 0 0
984
937
1 ,4 3 0
1, 550
1, 810
1, 350
985
1, 420
1 ,4 1 0
977

.22
.11
.10
.09
.1 4
.16
.17
.13
.10
.13
.15
.10

1962
Jar i1?iry
February
— _ _
-------------------------------------------................... . _
Ma roVi .
A p ril ____ __ ___ ___________________________________
May ---------- — ___________________________________
.T u n e _
_ __
July — .
.................................... ......................
August
September ------ _ ________________________________
October - __________ ___________ - _-________ __________
Novem ber _
__ __ ___________________________
D ecem ber
_ -----------------------------------------------------1963
January
_
_ _ _
________________________
February
— _ ___ __ ________________________
March
_ _
-------------------------------------------------A pril

May _ __
June -----

_____ ____________________________
----- --------------------------------------------

T i ll y

August
_
. . .
September
.
__
October —
__ __
November
_
__
D ecem ber — ------ _

— -------------------------------------------------------------------------------_____________________________
. . ------------------------------------. . ---------------------------------




12
Table 4.

W ork Stop p ages by C ontract Status and M ajor Issues, 1963
Stoppages beginning in 1963

Contract status and m ajor issue

W orkers involved
Number

M an-days idle during
1963 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

A ll stoppages------------------------------------------------

3, 362

100. 0

9 4 1 ,0 0 0

100. 0

1 6 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

Negotiation of first a g reem en t__________________
G eneral wage changes and supplementary
b e n e fits_______________________________________
Wage adjustm ents--------------------------------------------Hours of w o r k --------------------------------------------------Union organization and se c u rity -------------------Job security and plant a d m in istra tion --------Inter union or intraunion m a tte r s -----------------O th e r-------------------------------------------------------------------

607

18. 1

4 0 ,5 0 0

4. 3

1, 1 2 0 ,0 0 0

7. 0

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration or
reopening). ------------------ ------ --------------------------G eneral wage changes and supplementary
b e n e fits--------------------- -----------------------------------Wage adjustm ents-------------- ---------------------------Hours of w o r k --------------------------------------------------Union organization and se c u rity -------------------Job security and plant a d m in istra tion --------Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s -----------------O th e r------ --------- ---------------- --------------------------During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreem ent not involved)----------------------------G eneral wage changes and supplementary
b e n e fits------------------------------------------------------------Wage adjustments---------------------------------------------Hours of work — --------- --------------------------------Union organization and se c u rity -------------------Job security and plant a d m in istra tion --------Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s -----------------O th e r--------------------------------------------------------------------

162
10
1
382
34
13
5

1 ,4 5 9

4 3 .4

1, 204

35. 8

No information on contract status----------------------

29

56. 2

3 6 4 ,0 0 0

1 .9

32
4
4
15
4
4

38. 7

8 1 .6

1 ,7 9 0 ,0 0 0

11. 1

1 5 9 ,0 0 0
30
1 3 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0
3 2 6 ,0 0 0
8 3 ,0 0 0

6 ,4 7 0

.7

4 0 ,0 0 0

. 2

3 4 ,9 0 0
360
810
1 ,7 7 0
250
1 ,9 8 0

4 ,6 6 0
200
130
460
100
920
.9

1 3 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 2 7 ,0 0 0
6 9 ,4 0 0
9 2 7 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 1 0 ,0 0 0
7, 350
1 8 4 ,0 0 0

3 0 ,3 0 0
30
1 7 ,1 0 0
2 5 0 ,0 0 0
4 9 ,9 0 0
1 6 ,1 0 0

-

107
1
84
590
359
63
63

5 2 9 ,0 0 0

4 3 5 ,0 0 0
2 ,6 6 0
5 ,6 3 0
5 7 8 ,0 0 0
7 7 ,2 0 0
1 8 ,3 0 0
2, 190

4 0 2 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,9 0 0
4 ,0 6 0
5 3 ,8 0 0
4 5 , 000
480
7, 280

1, 198
40
8
60
111
4
38

No contract or other contract sta tu s----------------G eneral wage changes and supplementary
b e n e fits------------- -------------------------------------------Wage adjustm ents------------------------------------------ Hours of work — --------- --------------------------------Union organization and se c u rity -------------------Job security and plant ad m in istra tion --------Inter union or intraunion m a tte r s -----------------Other _ _________________________________________

NOTE:

1 2 ,3 0 0
270
100
2 3 ,1 0 0
3 ,4 3 0
1 ,0 3 0
250

. 1

1 ,3 6 0

1 0 ,8 0 0

. 1

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

Table 5. Major Issues Involved in W ork Stoppages, 1963
Stoppages beginning in 1963
W orkers involved

M ajor issue
Number

M an-days idle during
1963 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number

A ll is s u e s -----------------------------------------------------General wage ch an g es------------------------------------------G eneral wage in c r e a s e -----------------------------------General wage increase plus
supplementary b enefits--------------------------------General wage in cre ase , hour d e c re a se ------General wage d e cre ase -----------------------------------General wage incrrease and e sc a la tio n --------W ages and working conditions------------------------




3 ,3 6 2
1 ,3 2 2
525
565
21
13
3
195

100 . 0
39. 3

Percent

Number

Percent

9 4 1 ,0 0 0

100 . 0

1 6 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

100 . 0

4 1 .9

1 0 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 .4 9 0 .0 0 0

66. 6

3 9 4 .0 0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 0
15 5 .0 0 0
1 0 ,3 0 0
4 ,9 3 0
240
123 .0 0 0

4 .4 2 0 .0 0 0
9 7 ,7 0 0
3 5 9 ,0 0 0
1 ,6 3 0
4 .3 6 0 .0 0 0

13
T ab le 5.

M ajor Issues Involved in W ork Stoppages, 1963----Continued
Stoppages beginning in 1963

M ajor issu e

W orkers involved
Number

M an-days idle during
1963 (all stoppages)

Percent
Number
2. 3

Percent

Number

Percent

Supplementary benefits-----------------------------------------Pensions, insurance, other w elfare
p rogram s---------------------------------------------------------Severance or d ism issa l pay; other
payments on layoff or se p a r a tio n -------------Prem ium pay-----------------------------------------------------O th er-------------------------------------------------------------------

77

Wage adjustments--------------------------------------------------Incentive pay rates or a d m in istra tion --------Job classification or r a t e s ----------------------------Downgrading------------------------------------------------------R etroactivity-----------------------------------------------------Method of computing pay---------------------------------

164
60
57
11
36

4 .9

4 6 ,8 0 0
18, 100
1 8 ,4 0 0
1 ,9 8 0
8, 270

Hours of w o r k --------------------------------------------------------In c re a se -------------------------------------------------------------D e c r e a s e -------------------------------------------------------------

10
1
9

.3

4 , 190
30
4 , 160

Other contractual m atte rs-----------------------------------Duration of contract ---------------------------------------U nspecified---------------------------------------------------------

32
11
21

1 .0

Union organization and se c u r ity ________________
Recognition (certification)____________________
Recognition and job security i s s u e s ------------Recognition and. economic issu e s-----------------Strengthening bargaining position or
union shop and economic is s u e s ----------------Union se c u rity --------------------------------------------------Refusal to sign agreement ----------------------------Other union organization m a tte r s -----------------

531
209
8
78

15. 8

Job s e c u rity _______________________________________
Seniority an d/or la y o ff-----------------------------------Division of w o r k ----------------------------------------------Subcontracting--------------------------------------------------New machinery or other technological
is s u e s --------------------------------------------------------------Job tra n sfers, bumping, etc_________________
T ransfer of operations or prefabricated
g o o d s__________________________________________
O th er-------------------------------------------------------------------

210
118
4
26

Plant adm inistration---------------------------------------------Physical fa c ilitie s, surroundings, etc--------Safety m e a su re s, dangerous
equipment, etc-----------------------------------------------Supervision-------------------------------------------------------Shift w o rk ----------------------------------------------------------Work assign m e n ts-------------------------------------------Speedup (workload)------------------------------------------Work ru les---------------------------------------------------------Overtime w o r k -------------------------------------------------Discharge and discipline--------------------------------O th er-------------------------------------------------------------------

548
21
37
23
22
32
54
47
16
211
85

Other working conditions------------------------------------A rb itra tio n --------------------------------------------------------Grievance p ro ce d u re s------------------------------------Unspecified contract vio la tio n s---------------------

58
9
27
22

1. 7

1 5 ,8 0 0
1 ,8 3 0
1 0 ,8 0 0
3, 170

1. 7

1 2 1 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,7 0 0
7 3 ,6 0 0
3 2 ,3 0 0

.7

Interunion or intraunion m a tte r s -----------------------Union r iv a lr y 1--------------------------------------------------Jurisdiction2 representation
of w o rk e r s------------------------------------------------------Jurisdictional— work a ssig n m e n t----------------Union adm inistration3 ------------------------------------Sympathy-----------------------------------------------------------O th er-------------------------------------------------------------------

381
10

11. 3

5 1 ,5 0 0
610

5. 5

3 5 2 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,6 0 0

2. 2

Not r e p o rte d -----------------------------------------------------------

29

2 5 ,4 0 0

2. 7

2 5 8 ,0 0 0

27

4 , 740

7
9
34

460
1 ,6 9 0
1 8 ,5 0 0

1 .6

5 6 ,8 0 0
1 4 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,5 0 0
1 5 9 ,0 0 0

92
38
14
92

5. 0

4 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 4 9 ,0 0 0
1 7 8 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
5 1 ,8 0 0

3. 0

.4

75, 000
30
7 5 ,0 0 0

. 5

5, 370
4 , 100
1 ,2 7 0

.6

132 ,0 0 0
113 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,4 0 0

.8

9 4 ,3 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0
380
3 ,4 0 0

10. 0

1 ,6 4 0 ,0 0 0
2 0 3 ,0 0 0
1 6 ,3 0 0
1 1 3 ,0 0 0

10. 2

3 4 ,3 0 0
2 4 ,5 0 0
940
2 0 ,2 0 0
6. 2

7 4 ,2 0 0
4 8 ,4 0 0
1, 150
8, 910

7 4 9 ,0 0 0
2 8 9 ,0 0 0
2 2 ,8 0 0
2 5 0 ,0 0 0
7 .9

6 1 1 ,0 0 0
4 4 0 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,5 0 0
4 4 ,0 0 0

13
13

5, 040
3, 300

4 2 ,2 0 0
3 7 ,7 0 0

5
31

970
6, 500

3. 8

3, 580
2 9 ,3 0 0

16. 3

2 2 5 ,0 0 0
4 , 900

2 3 .9

1 3 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,1 0 0
4 , 700
9, 080
4 4 ,2 0 0
3 0 ,1 0 0
3, 920
8 6 ,1 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0

11
292
3
65
-

3 ,8 9 0

1 0 .4

8 2 ,3 0 0
3 6 ,0 0 0
2 5 ,6 0 0
3 2 ,7 0 0
2 7 2 ,0 0 0
6 2 8 ,0 0 0
4 1 ,0 0 0
3 1 6 ,0 0 0
2 2 3 ,0 0 0

1 ,2 5 0
3 2 ,0 0 0
180
1 7 ,4 0 0
.9

1 ,6 7 0 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

4 ,9 3 0
1 3 0 ,0 0 0
380
2 0 1 ,0 0 0
.4

2 5 ,5 0 0

.2

1 Includes disputes between unions of different affiliation, such as those between unions affiliated with AFL.—CIO and
nonaffiliates.
2 Includes disputes between unions, usually of the same affiliation or 2 locals of the sam e union, over representation
of w orkers.
3 Includes disputes within a union over the administration of union affairs or regulations.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




14
T ab le 6.

W ork Stoppages by Industry G rou p, 1963
Stoppages beginning
in 1963

Industry group

M an-days idle during
1963 (all stoppages)

Number

A ll in d u stries-------------

------------------------------------------

Manufacturing----------------------------

— ----------

Ordnance and a c c e sso r ie s-----------------------------------Food and kindred pro d u cts----------------------------------Tobacco m anufactures------------------------------------------Textile m ill p rodu cts-------------------------------------------Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a te r ia ls ---------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture__________________________________________
Furniture and fixtures------------------------------- -----Paper and allied p ro d u cts-----------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries-----Chem icals and allied products ------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries-------Rubber and m iscellaneous plastics
p rod u cts----------------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products------------------------------Stone, clay, and glass pro d u cts----------------------P rim a ry m etal in d u strie s---------------------------- ----Fabricated m etal products, except ordnance,
m achinery, and transportation equipment-----M achinery, except e le c trica l------------------------------E lectrical m achinery, equipment, and
supplies-------------------------------------- — ----------------Transportation equipment - ------------------------- —
P rofession al, scientific, and controlling
instrum ents; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks--------------------------------M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u strie s----------

W orkers
involved

Number

Percent of
estim ated total
working time

1 3 ,3 6 2

941, 000

16, 100, 000

0.13

1 1 .6 8 4

555, 000

10, 400, 000

0.24

9
158
2
36

8, 720
53, 100
1, 550
1 3 ,0 0 0

2 5 ,4 0 0
4 4 4 ,0 0 0
8, 550
193, 000

0.04
.10
.0 4
.09

109

22, 300

210, 000

.06

64
68
54
58
104
14

41,
9,
9,
14,
20,
1,

400
490
360
200
400
810

1, 290, 000
146, 000
146, 000
1, 700, 000
4 8 1 ,0 0 0
3 3 8 ,0 0 0

.86
.15
.09
.72
.22
.71

82
38
118
131

32, 100
2 3 ,7 0 0
20, 300
5 5 ,4 0 0

1, 100, 000
100, 000
4 5 9 ,0 0 0
637, 000

1.06
.11
.30
.21

193
171

40, 800
58, 500

5 1 6 ,0 0 0
845, 000

.18
.22

109
101

44, 300
71, 500

8 3 5 ,0 0 0
6 7 8 ,0 0 0

.21
.16

27
46

4, 750
7, 800

1 2 2 ,0 0 0
9 4 ,6 0 0

.13
.09

Nonmanufacturing----------------------------------------

1 1 ,6 7 8

3 8 6 ,0 0 0

5, 730, 000

2 .07

Agriculture, forestry, and fish e r ie s----------------Mining-----------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction-------------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary se rv ic e s-------------------------------W holesale and retail tra d e ----------------------------------F in a n c e , in su r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ----------------S e r v ic e s -------------------------------------------------------------------Governm ent------------------- -----------------------------------------

25
153
840

1 6 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,8 0 0
2 0 8 ,0 0 0

84, 600
4 8 1 ,0 0 0
1, 930, 000

(3)
0.30
.25

2, 540, 000
4 9 8 ,0 0 0
30, 800
1 4 8 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,4 0 0

.25
.02
(3)
(3)
(3)

205
293
13
121
29

63,
34,
1,
12,
4,

400
200
320
500
840

1 Stoppages extending into 2 industry groups or m ore have been counted in each industry affected; w orkers
m an-days idle were allocated to the respective groups.
2 Excludes government.
3 Not available.
N OTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

involved and

15
T ab le 7.

W ork Stoppages by R egion ,1 1963 and 1962

Stoppages
beginning in—
1963

U n ite d State*?

N e w E n g la n d
M id d le A t l a n t ic
:
E a s t N o rth C e n tr a l
W e s t N o rth C e n tr a l
S outh A t la n t ic
E a s t S outh C e n t r a l
W e s t S outh C e n t r a l
M o u n ta in
P a c ific

-----

_

_

............... .

1962

1963

1962

1963

2 3, 362

Region

W orkers involved
in stoppages
beginning in—

2 3 , 614

9 4 1 ,0 0 0

1 ,2 3 0 ,0 0 0

1 6 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

227
1, 055
781
246
311
173
156
144
402

281
1 ,0 9 9
934
246
276
196
171
178
429

5 2 ,3 0 0
2 7 0 ,0 0 0
2 1 9 ,0 0 0
7 9 ,7 0 0
7 5 ,4 0 0
4 6 ,4 0 0
2 0 ,7 0 0
4 8 ,6 0 0
1 2 9 ,0 0 0

5 9 ,8 0 0
3 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 8 9 ,0 0 0
6 0 ,8 0 0
7 3 ,3 0 0
5 7 ,3 0 0
4 9 ,3 0 0
4 7 ,4 0 0
2 0 8 ,0 0 0

9 1 1 ,0 0 0
4 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0
9 3 1 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 4 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
9 2 9 ,0 0 0
4 8 2 ,0 0 0
2 ,5 8 0 ,0 0 0

M an-days idle
during
(all stoppages)
1962

Percent of
estim ated total
working time
1963

1962

1 8 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0

0.13

0.16

1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,4 4 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,6 6 0 ,0 0 0
9 0 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,2 7 0 ,0 0 0
6 5 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 2 0 ,0 0 0
9 1 9 ,0 0 0
3 ,6 5 0 ,0 0 0

0.11
.17
.12
.10
.10
.16
.10
.12
.18

0.13
.17
.18
.10
.08
.11
.11
.23
.26

The regions used in this study include: New England— Connecticut, Maine, M assachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and Verm ont; Middle Atlantic— New J e rse y, New York, and Pennsylvania; East North Central— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio,
and W isconsin; W est North Central— Iowa, K ansas, M innesota, M issou ri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; South
Atlantic— Delaware, D istrict of Colum bia, F lorida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and W est
Virginia; East South Central— Alabam a, Kentucky, M ississip p i, and T ennessee; W est South Central— Arkansas, Louisiana,
Oklahoma, and T exas; Mountain— A rizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New M exico, Utah, and Wyoming; and P acific—
A laska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington.
2 Stoppages extending acro ss State lines have been counted in each State affected; w orkers involved and m an-days idle
w ere allocated among the States.
N O TE;

Because of rounding,




sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

16
T ab le 8.

W ork Stoppages by State, 1963
Stoppages beginning
in 1963

State

M an-days idle during
1963 (all stoppages)

Number

W orkers
involved

Number

Percent of
estim ated total
working time

----------------------------------

1 3 ,3 6 2

941. 000

16. 100. 000

0.13

____ __ __
____
___ _____________
Alabam a
Alaska — _ _____________ _______________________
________________ ___________________
A rizo n a —
Arkansas -- ---------------------------------------------------------C a liforn ia-----------------------------------------------------------------

47
10
15
28
276

15, 300
710
2, 720
4, 490
60, 200

1 9 8 ,0 0 0
7, 850
69, 300
31, 900
1 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

0.12
.09
.09
.04
.12

Colorado____________________________________________
Connecticut________________________________________
Delaware _ ______________________________________
D istrict of C o lu m bia- _________ _______ __
F lorid a__ ________ _______________________________

27
53
18
11
83

5, 580
14, 700
2, 290
3, 830
2 2 ,9 0 0

1 0 1 ,0 0 0
2 8 1 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,7 0 0
39, 400
7 2 8 ,0 0 0

.09
.13
.04
.05
.24

G eorgia ___ _____ ___________ _______________
Hawaii -----------------------------------------------------------------Idaho ----------------------- ----- --------------- ---- -----Illin o is ______ ___________ _____________ _____ __
Indiana —
_____
______________________________

25
27
11
213
112

9, 350
2 3 ,4 0 0
1, 290
61, 700
39, 700

2 9 2 ,0 0 0
1 7 6 ,0 0 0
27, 600
8 8 8 ,0 0 0
5 2 6 ,0 0 0

.12
.47
.09
.11
.16

___ _____ _______ __________ _
Iowa__ ___
Kansas — _ __ __ ________________________________
Kentucky
_ ________ _______ _____ __ __
______
Louisiana __ _________________ ______
M aine- — _ _____ — _____________ _ ____ ___

44
25
64
40
13

14,
5,
9,
6,

700
000
710
910
420

108, 000
44, 900
1 1 2 ,0 0 0
3 2 5 ,0 0 0
16, 000

.07
.04
.08
.20
.03

Maryland — ___ _________________
- _______
M a ssa c h u se tts- — ______________________________
Michigan ---- ---------------------------- --------------------------M inn esota__ - ___________________________________
M is s is s ip p i--------------------------------------------------------------

34
114
135
40
10

6, 890
31, 500
3 6 ,8 0 0
7, 720
3, 140

1 5 6 ,0 0 0
510, 000
611, 000
90, 300
9, 880

.07
.12
.12
.0 4
.01

M issou ri _____ ____________ __ _______________
Montana- — ------------------------------------------------------N ebraska ____ __________________ ___ ____ __
Nevada _ ---------- — — __________ ______________
New H am pshire-------------------------------------------------------

108
27
15
22
21

46, 100
7, 570
5, 070
1 2 ,8 0 0
2, 200

654, 000
6 5 ,7 0 0
2 9 ,0 0 0
46, 000
34, 400

.22
.20
.0 4
.15
.07

New J e r s e y _______ __ ___________ _____________
New M exico __ _________________________ _______
New Y ork-----------------------------------------------------------------North Carolina------ ----------------------------- -------------North Dakota ____ _______________________ ____

224
12
437
15
3

41, 900
2, 660
130, 000

1, 560
70

6 2 2 ,0 0 0
9 3 ,5 0 0
2, 600, 000
1 5 ,0 0 0
860

.13
.21
.19
.01
(2)

Ohio ------ —
______
_______ ________________
O k la h o m a ______ __________ ____________ __ __
O regon____________________________________________
P ennsylvania______________________________________
Rhode Island-------------------------------------------------------------

265
16
34
394
19

63, 000
1, 960
20, 400
9 8 ,3 0 0
2, 870

861, 000
2 4 ,7 0 0
508, 000
1, 280, 000
64, 800

.12
.02
.46
.16
.10

South C a ro lin a - ___________________ ________ South Dakota — ------------------------------- ------------------T ennessee__ _______________ _____________________
T e x a s------------------------------------------------------------------------Utah..........................................................................................

7
52
72
23

640
1, 100
1 8 ,2 0 0
7, 350
15, 800

49, 400
3, 340
682, 000
547, 000
7 8 ,0 0 0

.0 4
.01
.32
.10
.14

V e r m o n t - -----------------------------------------------------V irgin ia— ___ ___________________________________
Washington- _____________ _________________
W est Virginia - ___________________________________
W isc o n sin __
________ ______
_______
W yom ing- _____________________________
______

7
38
55
80
56
7

620
7, 890
2 3 ,8 0 0
20, 000
17, 700
260

4, 790
71, 200
5 4 3 ,0 0 0
173, 000
3 3 6 ,0 0 0
1, 240

.02
.03
.32
.18
.13
.01

United S ta te s------

11

•

1 Stoppages extending acro ss State lines have been counted in each State affected; w orkers involved and m an-days idle were
allocated among the States.
2 L e ss than 0.005 percent.
N OTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

17
Table 9.

Metropolitan area

W ork Stoppages by M etropolitan Area, 19631

Stoppages
M an-days idle
beginning in
during 1963
1963
Num ­ W orkers (all stoppages)
ber involved
19

1 ,7 5 0

2 9 ,2 0 0

25

1 4 ,6 0 0

7 8 ,4 0 0

29
15
8

4 , 910
6, 840
1, 130

6 6 ,6 0 0
1 5 6 ,000
1 5 ,3 0 0

B altim ore, Md-------------------------------Baton Rouge, L a --------------------------Beaumont—
Port Arthur, T ex-------Birm ingham , A l a --------------------------Boston, M a s s ---------------------------------

20
9
5
15
51

3, 910
1 ,3 7 0
250
2, 500
1 2 ,8 0 0

1 2 3 ,0 0 0
2 2 ,4 0 0
2 3 ,4 0 0
3 6 ,2 0 0
1 4 2 ,0 0 0

Bridgeport, Conn--------------------------Buffalo, N . Y ----------------------------------Butte, Mont------------------------------------Canton, O hio-------------------------------- —
Cedar Rapids, Iow a----------------------

12
41
6
11
7

1 ,3 7 0
1 9 ,2 0 0
3, 100
3, 550
1, 150

16,6 0 0
19 4 ,0 0 0
15, 600
2 9 ,6 0 0
1 4 ,0 0 0

Chattanooga, T e n n .-G a ---------------Cheyenne, W y o ------------------------------Chicago, 111------------------------------------Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky---------------------Cleveland, O h io-----------------------------

6
5
80
35
56

820
230
2 9 ,5 0 0
5, 700
8 ,6 8 0

1 8 ,1 0 0
800
3 7 4 ,0 0 0
5 1 ,5 0 0
3 1 2 ,0 0 0

Columbus, O h io----------------------------D allas, T ex----------- ------------------------Davenport—
Rock Island— oline,
M
Iowa—
111----------------------------------------Dayton, O hio----------------------------------D enver, C olo-----------------------------------

13
10

5, 240
1 ,6 2 0

4 3 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,9 0 0

14
14
17

7, 740
7, 010
4 ,7 0 0

4 3 ,0 0 0
8 4 ,7 0 0
7 8 ,8 0 0

Des M oines, Iowa--------------------------D etroit, M ic h --------------------------------Duluth—
Superior, Minn. — i s -----W
E rie , Pa------------------------------------------Eugene, O r e g ---------------------------------

11
60
8
9
6

2 ,4 6 0
1 5 ,5 0 0
1 ,0 9 0
2, 810
4 , 930

1 5 ,3 0 0
2 5 2 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 8 0
9 7 ,9 0 0
12 2 ,0 0 0

Evansville, Ind.— y---------------------K
F all R iver, M a s s .— I----------------R.
Flint, M ic h ------------------------------------Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood, F l a ---------------------------Fort Wayne, Ind-----------------------------

8
9
8

820
1 ,4 4 0
4 , 520

9, 800
1 4 ,9 0 0
5 1 ,4 0 0

6
7

390
5, 860

1 0 ,7 0 0
1 7 ,4 0 0

F resno, C a lif---------------------------------Galveston—
Texas City, T e x --------G a ry—
Hammond—
Eas t
Chicago, Ind--------------------------------Grand Rapids, M ich---------------------Hamilton—
Middletown, Ohio---------

5
5

280
450

1 7 ,0 0 0
3 6 ,4 0 0

26
6
7

1 4 ,4 0 0
1 ,8 5 0
900

9 2 ,4 0 0
3 9 ,9 0 0
3, 510

Hartford, Conn------------------------------Honolulu, Hawaii---------------------------Houston, T ex----------------------------------Hunt ingt on— hland,
As
W . Va. —
Ky. —
Ohio-------------- --------Indianapo li s , Ind---------------------------Jackson, M ic h --------------------------------

9
19
23

2, 370
3, 100
2 ,8 7 0

6 9 ,6 0 0
7 1 ,7 0 0
4 2 3 ,0 0 0

13
19
5

2 ,4 7 0
4 , 520
410

1 9 ,8 0 0
1 1 9 ,0 0 0
10,9 0 0

Jacks onville, F la --------------------------J ersey City, N. J---------------------------J ohnstown, P a -------------------------------Kalam azoo, M ic h --------------------------Kansas City, M o .—
Kans---------------Kingston—
Newburgh—
Poughkeepsie, N .Y ---------------------

10
24
5
5
35

2, 540
3, 370
160
1 ,0 1 0
1 4 ,1 0 0

7 5 ,7 0 0
7 7 ,8 0 0
3, 280
3 3 ,6 0 0
1 4 0 ,0 0 0

14

1 ,9 6 0

1 9 ,7 0 0

Knoxvi lie , T e n n ----------------------------Lake C h arles, La--------------------------Lancaster, P a -------------------------------Lansing, M ic h -------------------------------Las V egas, N e v ----------------------------Little Rock—
North Little
Rock, A rk------------------------------------- 1

10
5
6
7
8

7 ,4 6 0
880
380
790
2, 990

1 0 3 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,7 0 0
7, 550
9 ,4 8 0
7 ,6 4 0

7

750

6 ,7 8 0

Akron, O hio-----------------------------------AlbanyHSc he ne c tady—
T roy, N . Y -----------------------------------Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton,
P a .- N . J __________________________
Atlanta, G a -------------------------------------B akersfield, C a lif-------------------------

Metropolitan area

Stoppages
beginning in
M an-days idle
1963
during 1963
N um ­ W orkers (all stoppages)
ber involved

L o s Angeles—Long
Beach, C alif-------------------------------L ou isville, K y . —
Ind--------------------M em phis, T enn----------------------------M iam i, F l a -----------------------------------Milwaukee, W i s ----------------------------

92
17
9
25
25

2 4 ,8 0 0
3, 220
480
7, 550
1 0 ,3 0 0

6 6 6 ,0 0 0
4 2 ,8 0 0
3 2 ,3 0 0
2 3 1 ,0 0 0
8 7 ,2 0 0

Minneapolis—
St. Paul, M inn-----M uncie, Ind-----------------------------------N ashville, T en n ---------------------------Newark, N. J --------------------------------New Bedford, M a s s ---------------------

20
7
11
70
7

4 ,6 1 0
1 ,6 9 0
3 ,4 3 0
1 3 ,3 0 0
710

6 6 ,6 0 0
3 6 ,0 0 0
1 7 ,4 0 0
1 9 3 ,0 0 0
1 6 ,7 0 0

New Haven, Conn------------------------New O rleans, L a_________________
New York, N . Y ----------------------------Ogden, U tah----------------------------------Oklahoma City, Okla--------------------

12
14
302
5
5

2, 760
2 ,6 5 0
6 6 ,6 0 0
2, 230
190

8, 010
2 4 1 ,0 0 0
2 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,8 0 0
1 ,9 3 0

Omaha, N eb r. —
Iowa--------------------Pat e r s on— lifton—
C
P assa ic , N .J -----------------------------P eoria, 111------------------------------------Philadelphia, Pa. — . J ---------------N
Phoenix, A r iz --------------------------------

9

4 , 530

1 8 ,7 0 0

59
13
146
5

1 3 ,3 0 0
1,0 5 0
4 1 ,5 0 0
630

1 3 2 ,0 0 0
3 5 ,8 0 0
7 0 7 ,0 0 0
2, 310

Pittsburgh, P a------------------------------Portland, O r e g .— a s h ---------------W
Providence—
Pawtucket,
R. I. — a s s ----------------------------------M
Provo— rem , U tah---------------------O
Reading, P a -----------------------------------

66
12

24, 100
2, 190

2 2 6 ,0 0 0
2 5 ,3 0 0

13
5
10

2, 190
1 ,8 2 0
1, 150

75, 600
1 0 ,4 0 0
9 ,8 4 0

R ochester, N . Y ---------------------------Sacramento, C a lif -----------------------Saginaw, M ic h ------------------------------St. Joseph, M o ----------------------------St. Louis, M o .—
Ill------------------------

16
15
7
7
69

3, 040
620
970
1 ,6 0 0
3 2 ,6 0 0

3 2 ,5 0 0
2, 340
3 3 ,2 0 0
5 ,7 1 0
5 3 9 ,0 0 0

Salt Lake City, U tah-------------------San Bernardino— iverside—
R
Ontario, C a lif----------------------------San Diego, C a lif---------------------------San F rancisco—
Oakland, C a lif—
San Jose, C a lif-----------------------------

13

6, 880

3 5 ,3 0 0

13
22
69
14

2, 160
3, 880
1 3 ,9 0 0
550

4 0 ,2 0 0
4 1 ,6 0 0
1 8 8 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,4 0 0

Santa B arbara, C a lif-------------------Scranton, P a --------------------------------Seattle, W a s h -------------------------------South Bend, Ind----------------------------Spokane, W ash------------------------------Springfield, 111-------------------------------

6
12
21
7
6
14

1 ,6 5 0
1 ,0 6 0
6 ,4 5 0
1,7 0 0
380
1 ,6 5 0

4 7 ,0 0 0
2 7 ,7 0 0
1 2 8 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,9 0 0
1 ,9 6 0
1 8 ,5 0 0

Springfield—
Chic opee—
Holyoke, M a ss---------------------------Springfield, M o----------------------------Steubenville— eirton,
W
O h io-W . V a_____________________
Stockton, C a lif------------------------------Syracuse, N . Y ------------------------------Tacom a, W ash-------------------------------

12
7

3, 580
990

2 2 7 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,5 0 0

7
13
11
6

2, 380
750
9 ,4 1 0
1 ,2 4 0

1 8 ,3 0 0
25, 700
4 5 , 800
5 3 ,1 0 0

Tampa—
St. Petersburg, F la -----Toledo, O h io--------------------------------Trenton, N .J --------------------------------U tica -R o m e, N .Y ------------------------Washington, D . C . — d .— a ------M
V
Wheeling, W . V a .—
Ohio--------------

7
12
17
7
13
7

3, 120
1 ,7 8 0
2, 160
950
6, 150
2 ,4 4 0

129 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,1 0 0
3 5 ,7 0 0
4 ,0 5 0
5 0 ,8 0 0
1 7 ,4 0 0

W ichita, K ans-------------------------------W ilkes -B a r r e —
Hazleton, P a -----W ilmington, D e l.— .J ----------------N
W o rc e ste r, M a s s ------------------------York, P# __________________________
a
Youngstown— arren , O h io--------W

6
29
15
7
13
16

330
2, 830
1 ,3 5 0
1, 170
1 ,6 9 0
4 ,7 0 0

1 ,4 7 0
3 3 ,8 0 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,9 0 0
1 6 ,3 0 0
5 7 ,6 0 0

1 Includes data for each of the m etropolitan areas that had 5 stoppages or m ore in 1963.
Some m etropolitan areas include counties in m ore than 1 State, and hence, an area total m ay equal or exceed the total
for the State in which the m ajor city is located.
Stoppages in the mining and logging industries are excluded.
Intermetropolitan area stoppages are counted separately in each area affected; the workers involved and m an-days idle
wtere allocated to the respective a rea s.




18
Table 10. W ork Sto p p ages by A ffiliation o f Unions In volved, 1963
Stoppages beginning in 1963
Affiliation

W orkers involved
Number

M an-days idle
during 1963
(all stoppages)

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Total_________________________________________

3, 362

100.0

941, 000

100.0

16, 1 0 0 ,000

100.0

A F L -C I O ___________________________________________
Unaffiliated unions-------------------------------------------------Single firm unions-------------------------------------------------Different affiliations 1
--------- -------------------------------No union in volved--------------------------------------------------Not reported-------------------------------------------------------------

2, 541
719
20
37
42
3

75.6
21.4
.6
1.1
1.2
.1

7 8 0 ,0 0 0
1 3 7 ,0 0 0
4 ,0 5 0
1 8 ,4 0 0
1, 710
200

82.9
14.5
.4
2.0
.2
(2)

1 4 ,0 0 0 , 000
1, 3 2 0 ,0 0 0
5 2 ,7 0 0
7 5 8 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,4 0 0
800

86.7
8 .2
.3
4.7
.1
(2)

1 Includes work stoppages involving unions of different affiliations— either 1 union or m ore affiliated with A F L -C IO and
1 unaffiliated union or m ore, or 2 unaffiliated unions or m ore.
2 L e ss than 0.05 percent.
N OTE:

Because of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




19
T ab le 11. W ork Stoppages by Contract Status and Size o f Stoppage, 1963
M an-days idle
during 1963
(all stoppages)

Stoppages beginning in 1963
Contract status and size of stoppage
(number of w orkers involved)

W orkers involved
Number

Percent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

------

3, 362

100.0

9 4 1 ,0 0 0

100.0

16, 100, 000

100.0

6 and under 2 0 -------------------------------------------------------20 and under 1 0 0 -------------— -----— ----- _
100 and under 250 — ------------ — — - --------250 and under 500____
______________ ____ ___
500 and under 1, 000 --------------------- — - ~
1, 000 and under 5, 000____________________________
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 - ------------------------ _ ----10, 000 and over — ------------- — - - — -

667
1, 291
666
355
202
163
11
7

19.8
38.4
19.8
10.6
6.0
4.8
.3
.2

7, 790
61, 800
104, 000
1 2 1 ,0 0 0
1 3 4 ,0 0 0
3 3 3 ,0 0 0
7 6 ,7 0 0
102, 000

0.8
6.6
11.0
12.9
14.3
35.4
8.2
10.8

160, 000
9 8 1 ,0 0 0
590, 000
570, 000
780, 000
150, 000
330, 000
540, 000

1.0
6.1
9.9
9.7
11.0
32.0
8.2
22.0

Negotiation of first agreement or
union recognition
---------- ------ —
_ _ _
6 and under 20 ------------------- ------------- — —
20 and under 1 0 0 ------------------------ — -------100 and under 250 — —
------------ —
250 and under 500--------------------— —
500 and under 1, 000— --------- - — — — 1, 000 and under 5, 000------------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 - — - —
---------10, 000 and o v e r -------------- ------------------- — —

607
238
271
68
22
3
5
-

18.1
7.1
8.1
2.0
.7
.1
.1
-

40, 500
2, 660
1 1 ,4 0 0
10, 000
7, 160
2, 270
6^ 970
-

4.3
.3
1.2
1.1
.8
.2
.7
-

1, 120, 000
80, 800
3 5 8 ,0 0 0
3 5 2 ,0 0 0
1 1 6 ,0 0 0
47, 400
1 6 6 ,0 0 0
-

7.0
.5
2.2
2.2
.7
.3
1.0
-

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)--------------------_ _ _
6 and under 2 0 ------------------------------------ — ----20 and under 1 0 0 ------------------------ — — 100 and under 250---------------------------------------------250 and under 500__________________ — --------500 and under 1, 000 --------------------- ------ —
1, 000 and under 5, 000------------- ---- _ _ ----— —
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ----------------10, 000 and o v e r ----- ----------------------- — ------

1, 459
184
580
334
168
104
74
8
7

4 3.4
5.5
17.3
9.9
5.0
3.1
2.2
.2
.2

5 2 9 ,0 0 0
2, 290
29, 700
52, 400
57, 300
67, 500
1 6 3 ,0 0 0
54, 600
1 0 2 ,0 0 0

56.2
.2
3.2
5.6
6.1
7.2
17.3
5.8
10.8

During term of agreement (negotiation
of new agreement not involved)-----------------------6 and under 2 0 ---------- — ------------------ - -----20 and under 1 0 0 ---------- —
- — — — 100 and under 250---------------------------------------------250 and under 500_______________ ____ ______
500 and under 1, 000— -------- ------ —
----1, 000 and under 5, 000-------------- - --------- —
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ----------------------------------10, 000 and o v e r -------------- -------- _ — ------

1, 204
207
402
256
162
90
84
3
-

35.8
6.2
12.0
7.6
4.8
2.7
2.5
.1
-

3 6 4 ,0 0 0
2, 410
19, 200
40, 300
55, 600
60, 800
1 6 3 ,0 0 0
22, 100
-

38.7
.3
2.0
4.3
5.9
6.5
17.4
2.3
-

No contract or other contract statu s----------------6 and under 2 0 -------------------- ------------ —
20 and under 1 0 0 -------------------- - — 100 and under 250- — ---------------- ---------— -----250 and under 5 00- ---------500 and under 1, 000— -----------------------1, 000 and under 5, 000 ------------- _
5, 000 and under 10, 0 0 0 ----------------------------------10, 000 and o v e r ------------------------ _

63
27
24
4
3
5
-

1.9
.8
.7
.1
.1
.1
-

6, 470
300
920
550
1, 120
3, 590
-

No information on contract status---------------------6 and under 2 0 ------ ------------------ - --------20 and under 1 0 0 — ----------------- -------- — —
100 and under 250______________ - —
----250 and under 500--------------------500 and under 1, 000----------------- — 1, 000 and under 5, 000------------------------------------5, 000 and under 10, 000 — — —
10, 000 and over - ----- ------------------

29
11
14
4

.9
.3
.4
.1

1, 360
140
600
620

A ll stoppages-------------------------

—

_

-

.1
.1
.1
.4
.1
(M
.i
.i

000
800
000
000
000
000
000
000
000

81.6
.3
3.1
6.4
7.6
9.1
26.0
7.1
22.0

1, 790, 000
24, 400
1 1 2 ,0 0 0
2 0 5 ,0 0 0
2 2 2 ,0 0 0
240, 000
797, 000
1 8 9 ,0 0 0
-

11.1
.2
.7
1.3
1.4
1.5
5.0
1.2
-

40,
2,
5,
1,
6,
24,

000
170
800
090
270
700
-

.2
(M
( )
(M
( )
.2
-

10,
1,
7,
1,

800
870
490
400

.1
(M
(M
i1 )
~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




.7
(l )

13, 100,
50,
497,
1, 030,
1, 230,
1, 470,
4, 190,
1, 140,
3, 540,

-

1 L ess than 0t05 percent.'
NOTE:

-

1,
1,
1,
5,
1,
3,

20
Table 12. W ork Stoppages by N um ber o f Establishm ents Involved, 1963
Stoppages beginning in 1963
W orkers involved

Number of establishments in volved1
Number

3, 362

T o t a l..

1 e s t a b l i s h m e n t ___
.. .
2 to 5 e s t a b lis h m e n ts .

6 t o 10 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

.......... .
...

.................... ..

11 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r m o r e
1 1 t o 4Q e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
_ ... _
_
_
..............
_
_____
50 t o 9 9 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
............... _
1 0 0 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r m o r e ..... _
E x a c t n u m b e r n o t k n ow n 2
....
...
N o t r e p o r t e d ...
..............

2, 621
384
99
115
85
11
18
1
143

Percent
of total

100.0

78.0
11.4
2.9
3.4
2.5
.3
.5
<3>
4.3

Number

Percent
of total

M an-days idle
during 1963
(all stoppages)
Number

Percent

9 4 1 ,0 0 0

100.0

1 6 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

4 7 6 ,0 0 0
1 0 1 ,0 0 0
6 9 ,1 0 0
1 7 3 ,0 0 0
8 6 ,0 0 0
1 4 ,5 0 0
7 2 ,8 0 0
30
1 2 2 ,0 0 0

50.6
10.7
7.3
18.4
9.1
1.5
7.7
(3 )
12.9

6 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
2, 1 1 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,4 5 0 ,0 0 0
8 4 2 ,0 0 0
1 9 5 ,0 0 0
2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
8, 120
1 ,7 3 0 ,0 0 0

37.9
16.8
13.1
21.4
5.2
1.2
14.9
.1
10.8

1 An establishm ent is defined as a single physical location where business is conducted, or where services or industrial
operations are perform ed; for exam ple, a factory, m ill, store, m ine, or farm . A stoppage m ay involve 1 or 2 establishm ents
or m ore of a single em ployer, or it m ay involve different em ployers.
2 Information available indicates m ore than 11 establishments involved in each of these stoppages.
3 L e ss than 0.05 percent.
N OTE;

Because of rounding,




sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

21
T ab le 13.
Beginning
date

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
days)1

W ork Stoppages Involving 10,000 W orkers or M ore Beginning in 1963

Establishm ent(s)
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

Approx­
imate
number of
workers
involved 2

M ajor term s of settlem ent3

Jan. 1

8

M illinery industry,
New York City area.

United Hatters,
Cap and M illinery
W orkers.

10, 000

3 -y e a r contract providing a 10-percent increase
for p ie ce -ra te w ork ers: Z l/z percent effective
on Jan. 1, 1963, an identical i n c r e a s e on
Jan. 1, 1964, and the balance on Jan. 1, 1965;
$ 7 .5 0 a week increase to w eekworkers, onet h i r d effective Jan. 1, 1963, and one-third
effective both Jan. 1, 1964, and Jan. 1, 1965;
companies to pay 4 percent of weekly payroll
to retirem ent fund effective 1965 (was 3 p e r­
cent); joint committee to determine amount of
increase company payments for union labels.

Jan. 2

2

Shoe manufacturers,
Boston and Eastern
M assachusetts.

United Shoe
W orkers.

10, 000

2 -ye ar contract providing two 3-cen t-an -h o u r
general wage in creases, the f i r s t effective
im m ediately and the second on Jan. 1, 1964;
an additional 3 -cent i n c r e a s e in minimum
hourly rates effective Sept. 1, 1963, bringing
the m inimum to $ 1 .3 2 ; 3 cents additional c la s ­
sification adjustment to packers, re p a ire rs,
and booth trim m e rs effective Sept. 1, 1963;
8th p a i d holiday, Columbus Day; improved
company-paid insurance: $20 a week sickness
and accident benefits (was $15); $18 a day h o s­
pital payments (was $12), and effective Jan. 1,
1964, $ 1 ,0 0 0 group life insurance (was $500);
improved provisions for employees affected by
technological change.

Feb. 1

10

Sugar industry, Hawaii.

International
Longshorem en's
and W arehouse­
m en 's Union
(Ind.).

4 10, 500

2 -ye ar contract providing wage i n c r e a s e of
15 cents retroactive to Feb. 1, 1963, and an
additional 10 cents effective Feb. 1, 1964—
8-ce n t g e n e r a l increase plus 2 cents for
additional increase to top 6 labor grades—
distribution to be negotiated.
Holiday and vacation changes included the addi­
tion of the day after Thanksgiving as a 7th
paid holiday, the provision of 3 w eeks' vacation
after 15 years (was 20 years), and a reduction
in qualifying hours for vacations.
Improved sick benefits plan provides for benefits
to begin 1st day employee is ordered by com ­
pany doctor not to report to work (was 4th
day), and extends protection to provide e m e r­
gency care for employees and dependents away
f r o m the island.
Rate protection schedule
im proved; severance allowance extended to
em ployees refusing alternate job (on elimination
of previous job), and employees discharged for
disability; 3 days' repatriation allowance p ro ­
vided for each y e a r's service (was m aximum
of 34 days) for permanently la id -o ff employees
leaving the United States for permanent r e s i­
dence in foreign country, except Canada.
Negotiations continued on pension plan. Industry­
wide bargaining established.

Apr. 1

5 16

Construction industry,
Upstate New York.

International
Brotherhood of
T eam sters (Ind.);
International Hod
C a r r ie r s', Build­
ing and Common
L ab orers' Union.

5 11, 000

2 -y e a r contract providing for an 18-cen t hourly
package in crease, retroactive to Jan. 1, 1963,
and an additional 18 cents an hour in January
1964.
L aborers in four counties w ill receive
additional adjustment in 1964.
The T eam sters
contract includes a penalty provision requiring
contractors to pay 4 or 8 hours' pay if a m e m ­
ber of another craft is assigned to work within
T e a m sters' jurisdiction.

May 1

6 26

Construction industry,
St. Louis, M issou ri
area.

International Union
of Operating
Engineers.

20, 000

3 -y e a r contract retroactive to May 1, providing
a 20 -cen t-an -h o u r increase the f i r s t year,
divided equally between w a g e s and pension
benefits; 20 cents the second year sim ilarly
divided between wages and fringe benefits; the
union has the option of taking any or all of
the final 20 cents, payable the third year, in
fringe benefits; hiring hall issue resolved by
the adoption of a "m od ified re fe rra l sy ste m ,"
under w h i c h four h i r i n g
categories are
established.

See footnotes at end of table.




22
Table 13.
Beginning
date

Approx­
imate
duration
(calendar
days)1

W ork Sto p p age s Involving 10,000 W orkers or M ore B eginn in g in 1963— Continued
Establishm ent(s)
and location

Union(s)
involved 2

June 1

8

Construction industry,
Buffalo, New York.

International A s s o ­
ciation of Bridge,
Structual and
Ornamental Iron
W orkers; Inter­
national Hod
C a r r ie r s ', Build­
ing and Common
L ab orers' Union;
B ricklayers,
M asons and P la s ­
te re rs' Inter­
national Union;
United B rother­
hood of Carpen­
te rs; International
Union of Operating
Engineers.

June 5

7 98

Lumber industry,
California, Montana,
Oregon, and
Washington.

United Brotherhood
of Carpenters;
International
Woodworkers of
A m erica.

Approx­
imate
number of
w orkers
involved 2

M ajor term s of settlem en t3

11, 000

3-y e a r c o n t r a c t providing a 55-cen t package
in crease, 20 cents an hour in 1963, 20 cents
an hour in 1964, and the remaining 15 cents
in 1965; it was left to the unions to determine
how the money would be allocated between
w a g e s and f r i n g e s .
F orty-hour workweek
retained.

729, 000

3 -ye ar c o n t r a c t providing a 3 0 V2 -cent wage
package. A ll of the agreements provided wage
in creases of 15 cents in 1963— 10 cents e ffe c ­
tive June 1, 1963, and 5 cents effective Dec. 1,
1963, with additional in creases in 1964 and
1965. The agreem ents also provided additional
in creases for adjustments of certain c la s s i­
fications, and I 72 cents for travel time of
woods em ployees.

1 Includes nonworkdays, such as Saturdays, Sundays, and established holidays.
2 The unions listed are those directly involved in the dispute, but the number of w orkers involved m ay include m em bers
of other unions or nonunion w orkers idled by disputes in the same establishm ents.
Number of w orkers involved is the maximum number made idle for 1 shift or longer in establishm ents directly involved
in a stoppage.
This figure does not m easure the indirect or secondary effects on other establishments or industries whose
em ployees are made idle as a result of m aterial or service shortages.
3 Adapted la rgely from Current Wage Developments, published monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
4 Settlement was preceded by a second strike of approximately 8, 600 w orkers April 15 and 16.
5 Peak idleness of 1 1 ,0 0 0 was reached April 8.
6 Peak idleness of 20, 000 was reached about May 20.
7 Approxim ately 7, 000 w orkers returned to work during the first week in August, and a large percentage of the remaining
strikers returned by August 18.
A few hundred w orkers, however, remained idle through September 10.




23
T ab le 14. W ork Stoppages by Duration and C ontract Status Ending in 19631
Stoppages

W orkers involved

M an-days idle

Duration and contract status
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

A ll stoppages_______________________________

3, 333

100.0

1 ,0 1 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

1 6 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

1 day________________________________________________
2 to 3 d a y s _________________________________________
4 to 6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days________________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s ______________________________________
30 to 59 d a y s ______________________________________
60 to 89 d a y s ______________________________________
90 days and o v e r __________________________________

406
533
5 35
710
491
320
133
205

12.2
16.0
16.1
21.3
14.7
9.6
4.0
6.2

9 8 ,6 0 0
1 4 1 ,0 0 0
142, 000
2 2 2 ,0 0 0
1 6 7 ,0 0 0
1 1 7 ,0 0 0
2 7 ,5 0 0
9 4 ,7 0 0

9.8
14.0
14.0
22.0
16.6
11.6
2.7
9.4

9 8 ,6 0 0
2 8 4 ,0 0 0
4 4 9 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,2 3 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 2 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,3 2 0 ,0 0 0
7 ,4 6 0 ,0 0 0

0.6
1.7
2.8
8.6
13.7
18.6
8.1
45.8

Negotiation of first agreement or
union recognition________________________________
1 day_____________________________________________
2 to 3 d a y s _____________________________________
4 to 6 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days_____________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s ___________________________________
30 to 59 d a y s ___________________________________
60 to 89 d a y s ___________________________________
90 days and o v e r ______________________________

580
32
52
68
121
86
94
44
83

17.4
1.0
1.6
2.0
3.6
2.6
2.8
1.3
2.5

3 8 ,2 0 0
5, 670
3, 670
3, 220
8, 630
5, 530
4, 430
2, 450
4, 650

3.8
.6
.4
.3
.9
.5
.4
.2
.5

1 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0
5 ,6 7 0
8, 160
1 0 ,8 0 0
5 5 ,0 0 0
7 7 ,9 0 0
133,000
126 ,0 0 0
6 1 4 ,0 0 0

6.3

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)-------------------------------------------------------1 day---------------------------------------------------- ------------2 to 3 d a y s ______________________________________
4 to 6 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days_____________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s ___________________________________
30 to 59 d a y s ___________________________________
60 to 89 d a y s ___________________________________
90 days and o v e r ______________________________

1, 466
79
149
212
336
312
191
82
105

44.0
2.4
4.5
6 .4
10.1
9.4
5.7
2.5
3.2

5 8 9 ,0 0 0
3 2 ,1 0 0
4 4 ,2 0 0
4 9 ,3 0 0
1 3 3 ,0 0 0
1 2 4 ,0 0 0
9 6 ,4 0 0
2 4 ,5 0 0
8 5 ,2 0 0

58.3
3.2
4 .4
4.9
13.1
12.3
9.5
2.4
8.4

1 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 2 ,1 0 0
8 6 ,5 0 0
1 7 8 ,000
9 0 5 ,0 0 0
1 ,7 4 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,5 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 7 0 ,0 0 0
6 ,6 2 0 ,0 0 0

81.9
.2
.5
1.1
5.6
10.7
15.9
7.2
40.7

During term of agreem ent (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)-------- ------------------1 day_______________ _______ _________________
2 to 3 days — --------------------------------------------------4 to 6 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days_____________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s ______________________________ ___
30 to 59 d a y s ___________________________________
60 to 89 d a y s __ ______________________________
90 days and o v e r ----------------- ---------------------------

1, 196
277
316
238
230
80
33
5
17

35.9
8.3
9.5
7.1
6.9
2.4
1.0
.2
.5

3 7 6 ,0 0 0
59, 300
91, 700
8 8 ,4 0 0
7 8 ,6 0 0
3 6 ,4 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0
420
4, 840

37.2
5.9
9.1
8.7
7.8
3.6
1.6
(2)
.5

1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0
5 9 ,3 0 0
18 6 ,0 0 0
2 5 7 ,0 0 0
4 2 6 ,0 0 0
3 9 7 ,0 0 0
2 9 6 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,6 0 0
2 2 7 ,0 0 0

11.5
.4
1.1
1.6
2.6
2.4
1.8
.1
1.4

No contract or other contract sta tu s ___________
1 day-------------------------------------------------- ---------------2 to 3 d a y s _____________________________________
4 to 6 days _ ___________________________________
7 to 14 days_____________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s _______________________ ___________
30 to 59 d a y s --------------------------------------------------60 to 89 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------90 days and o v e r ______________________________

62
11
13
13
17
5
2
1
-

1.9
.3
.4
.4
.5
.2
.1
(2)

6, 440
940
1, 740
510
2, 250
920
60
20
-

.6
.1
.2
.1
.2
(*)
(2)
(2)

39, 300
940
3, 000
1 ,6 5 0
1 5 ,4 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 1 0
810
"

.2
(2)
(2)
(2)
.1
.1
(2)
(2)

No information on contract status----------------------1 day------------------------------- ----------------------------------2 to 3 d a y s ______________________________________
4 to 6 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------7 to 14 days_____________________________________
15 to 29 d a y s ________________________ — . __
30 to 59 d a y s ___________________________________
60 to 89 d a y s ___________________________________
90 days and o v e r ______________________________

29
7
3
4
6
8
1

.9
.2
.1
.1
.2
.2

1, 370
600
130
240
160
190

.1
.1

1 0 ,2 0 0
600
390
1, 060
1, 130
2, 940

-

(2)

-

60

()

0
(2)
-

(2)

-

4, 130

1 The totals in this table differ from those in preceding tables as these (like the average duration figures
table 1) relate to stoppages ending during the y ea r, and thus include idleness occurring in prior yea rs.
2 L ess than 0.05 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




0

(2)
.1
.3
.5
.8
.8
3.8

.1

0
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
-

(2)

shown in

24
T ab le 15. M ediation in W ork Stoppages by C ontract Status Ending in 1963
W orkers involved

Stoppages
Mediation agency and
contract status

Number

Percent

Percent

Numbe r

M an-days idle
Number

Percent

48.3
33.8
7.3
6.7
.5
1.3
50.4

6 2 0 ,0 0 0
4 4 6 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,2 0 0
1 3 6 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,0 0 0
5 ,9 7 0
3 8 4 ,0 0 0

61.4
44.2
2.8
13.4
1.0
.6
38.0

1 4 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 8 8 ,0 0 0
3 ,2 9 0 ,0 0 0
3 4 7 ,0 0 0
1 1 1 ,000
2, 1 7 0 ,0 0 0

86.0
61.9
1.8
20.2
2.1
.7
13.3

17.4
7.7
5.0
1.8

3 8 ,2 0 0
2 2 ,6 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0
4, 580

3.8
2.2
1.6
.5

1 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0
7 6 4 ,0 0 0
6 2 0 ,0 0 0
6 4 ,5 0 0

6.3
4.7
3.8
.4

.8
.1
.2
9 .5

1, 920
120
180
1 5 ,5 0 0

.2
( 2)
( 2)
1.5

420
2, 310
2 6 4 ,0 0 0

.5
(2)
(2)
1.6

44.0
36.1
25.9
4.3

5 8 9 ,0 0 0
5 4 0 ,0 0 0
3 8 2 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,5 0 0

58.3
53.5
37.8
1.8

1 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0
9, 1 5 0 ,0 0 0
1 9 0 ,0 0 0

81.9
79.1
56.3
1.2

5.6
.3
.2
7.7

1 3 0 ,0 0 0
9 ,7 3 0
490
4 7 ,9 0 0

12.8
1.0
( 2)
4.7

3 ,1 8 0 ,0 0 0
3 4 6 ,0 0 0
3 5 ,4 0 0
4 1 1 ,0 0 0

19.6
2.1
.2
2.5

35.9
4.3
2.8
1.1

3 7 6 ,0 0 0
5 6 ,1 0 0
4 7 ,9 0 0
4 ,0 6 0

37.2
5.5
4.7
.4

1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0
3 4 6 ,0 0 0
2 9 3 ,0 0 0
2 7 ,8 0 0

11.5
2.1
1.8
.2

11
4
27
1 ,0 2 6

.3
.1
.8
30.8

3 ,9 6 0
150
5, 270
3 1 4 ,0 0 0

.4
(2)
.5
31.1

2 3 ,7 0 0
770
7 3 ,5 0 0
1 ,4 5 0 , 000

.1
(2)
.5
8.9

62
2

1.9
.1

6 ,4 4 0
870

.6
.1

3 9 ,3 0 0
4, 710

.2
(2)

<>

1 ,6 1 0
1, 126
243
224
17
42
1 ,681

1, 196
143
92
36

No mediation reported

100.0

185
11
6
257

Other

1 6 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

1 ,4 6 6
1, 203
864
143

State
F ederal and State mediation

100.0

27
2
8
316

Negotiation of first agrfip.mp.nt ...............

1 ,0 1 0 ,0 0 0

580
256
166
61

Staf.fi
_.
Federal and State mediation combined _______
--------Ofhfir
....
... _
Privat.fi mediation
_
......
Nn mfidiatirvn reported ____

100.0

o
o

3, 333

A ll stoppage s_

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration

F ederal
State
F ederal and State mediation
Othpr

_

_

_

No mfidiation rpportfid
During term of agreem ent (negotiation of

F e d e r a l_
State
F ederal and State mediation
Othpr _
.
Privat.fi mfidiation

_

. _

Ffidpral ............... ................... . ... .... _
..............
.State
_
---F ederal and State mediation
combined
.
_ _
Other
.... .....................
Private mediation
No mediatioh reported
No information on contract status_______________
Government mediation
F e d e r a l_
State.
.... _
-----F ederal and State mediation
combined
_ ............ .
O th er .............. ....

Private mediation
No mediation reported

1
2

Because of rounding,




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

870

.1

4, 710

(2)

60

1.8

5, 570

.6

3 4 ,6 0 0

.2

29
6
4
1

.9
.2
.1
(2 )

1 ,3 7 0
460
330
120

.1
(2)
(2)
(2 )

1 0 ,2 0 0
2, 110
1 ,4 4 0
600

(2)
( 2)
(2)

1

(2)

10

(2)

70

(2)

(2)
(2)

110
8, 030

1
22

Includes 7 stoppages, involving 1, 130 w orkers,
L ess than 0.05 percent.

NOTE:

-

-

.1

-

-------------

-

-

2

-

(2)
.7

-

-

40
880

in which private mediation,

sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

1

also,

was employed.

(2)
( 2)

25
Table 16.

Settlement o f Stoppages by Contract Status Ending in 1963
W orkers involved

Stoppages

M ay-days idle

Contract status and settlem ent
Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

A ll stoppages________________________________

3, 333

100.0

1, 0 1 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

1 6 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

Settlement reach ed -------------------------------------------------No form al settlem ent— work resum ed (with
old or new w orkers)---------------------------------------------Employer out of b u sin ess--------------------------------------Insufficient information to c la s s i fy ---------------------

2 ,9 8 7

89.6

9 6 6 ,0 0 0

95.6

1 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

92.2

303
41
2

9.1
1.2
.1

42, 400
2, 260
140

4.2
.2
n

1 ,1 2 0 ,0 0 0
1 4 3 ,0 0 0
840

6.9
.9
(M

Negotiation of first agreem ent or union
recognition________________________________________
Settlement reach ed-------------------------------------------No form al settle m e n t__________________________
Em ployer out of b u sin ess--------------------------------Insufficient information to c la s s i fy __________

580
425
141
13
1

17.4
12.8
4.2
.4
(M

3 8 ,2 0 0
3 2 ,7 0 0
5, 220
320
10

3.8
3.2
.5
(*)
n

1 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0
8 5 3 ,0 0 0
1 6 7 ,0 0 0
11, 000
60

6 .3
5.2
1.0
.1
n

Renegotiation of agreem ent (expiration
or reopening)_______________________________ ____
Settlement reach ed __________________________ _
No form al se ttlem en t---------------------------------------Em ployer out of b u sin ess____________________
Insufficient information to c la s s i fy __________

1 ,4 6 6
1, 366
80
19
1

44.0
41.0
2.4
.6
(M

5 8 9 ,0 0 0
5 6 6 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,8 0 0
1, 310
130

58.3
56.1
2.1
.1
(M

1 3 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
8 4 9 ,0 0 0
8 9 ,4 0 0
780

81.9
76.1
5.2
.5
(*)

During term of agreement (negotiation of
new agreement not involved)____________________
Settlement reach ed _____________________________
No form al se ttlem en t__________________________
Em ployer out of b usin ess______________________
Insufficient information to c la s s i fy __________

1, 196
1, 128
63
5
-

35.9
33.8
1.9
.2
-

3 7 6 ,0 0 0
3 5 9 ,0 0 0
1 6 ,0 0 0
450
-

37.2
35.6
1.6
(M
-

1 ,8 7 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,7 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 0 ,0 0 0
4 1 ,6 0 0
-

11.5
10.6
.6
.3
-

No contract or other contract sta tu s____________
Settlement reached___________________ _______
No form al settlem en t__________________________
Em ployer out of b u sin ess______________________
Insufficient information to c la s s i fy ________

62
46
15
1
-

1.9
1.4
.5

.6
.6
(M

-

6, 440
6, 090
300
50
-

-

3 9 ,3 0 0
3 6 ,6 0 0
2, 640
100
-

.2
.2
(l)
(M
-

No information on contract status-----------------------Settlement reach ed _______ - _______ ___________
No form al settlem en t--------------------------------- —
Employer out of b u sin ess------------------------------Insufficient information to c la s s i fy ----------------

29
22
4
3

.9
.7
.1
.1

1, 370
1, 160
80
130

.1
.1
(M
n

1 0 ,2 0 0
8 ,5 2 0
1, 340
380

.i
.i

( l )

1 L ess than 0.05 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.




( l )

26
Table 17. P rocedure for H andling Unsettled Issues in W ork Stoppages by Contract Status Ending in 1963
W orkers involved

Stoppages
Procedure for handling unsettled
issu es and contract status

Number

Percent

100.0

1 5 2 ,0 0 0

100.0

2 ,3 4 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

107
106
43
226
2

22.1
21.9
8.9
46.7
.4

3 2 ,3 0 0
4 3 ,7 0 0
5 4 ,2 0 0
2 1 ,8 0 0
290

21.2
28.7
35.6
14.3
.2

2 2 6 ,0 0 0
5 5 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 6 0 , 000
9 0 ,3 0 0
460

9.7
23.8
62.6
3.9
(2)

61
11
19
28
3

12.6
2.3
3.9
5.8
.6

4 ,9 9 0
500
2 ,4 6 0
1 ,6 9 0
350

3.3
.3
1.6
1.1
.2

3 1 9 ,0 0 0
6 ,8 9 0
2 6 9 ,0 0 0
4 0 ,6 0 0
2, 280

13.6
.3
11.5
1.7
.1

76
29
34
8
5

15.7
6.0
7.0
1.7
1.0

7 8 ,9 0 0
8 ,7 9 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
5 1 ,3 0 0
1, 170

51.8
5.8
11.6
33.7
.8

1 ,7 7 0 ,0 0 0
1 2 8 ,0 0 0
2 1 9 ,0 0 0
1 ,4 2 0 ,0 0 0
7, 190

75.9
5.5
9.4
60.7
.3

341
67
49
6
217
2

70.5
13.8
10.1
1.2
44.8
.4

6 7 ,5 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0
2 3 ,5 0 0
1 ,2 3 0
1 9 ,4 0 0
290

44.3
15.1
15.4
.8
12.8
.2

2 3 9 ,0 0 0
9 1 ,4 0 0
6 6 ,6 0 0
3, 960
7 6 ,1 0 0
460

10.2
3.9
2.9
.2
3.3
(2)

6

A r b itr a tio n

Percent

484

D irect negotiations

Number

M an-days idle
Number

1.2

1 ,0 0 0

.7

5 ,3 1 0

Percent

Negotiation of first agreement or union
Arbitration
D irect negotiations

Renegotiation of agreement (expiration
or reopening)
D irect negotiations

During term of agreement (negotiation of

D ir e c t n e g o tia tio n s

R eferral to a government agency
Other means

-

R eferral to a government agency

No information on contract status
Arbitration
R eferral to a government agency

1
2

-

4
1
1

.8
.2
.2

-

120
20
860

-

.1
( 2)
.6

-

520
90
4, 700

.2
-

( 2)
( 2)
.2

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Excludes stoppages on which there was no information on issu e s unsettled or no agreement on procedure for handling.
L e ss than 0.05 percent.

NOTE;

Because of rounding,




sums of individual item s m ay not equal totals.

27
Appendix A. Tables----Work Stoppages
Table A-l. Work Stoppages by Industry, 1963
S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 6 3

Stoppages beginning
ii4 l9 63

M a n -d a y s
i d le ,

Industry

1963

In d u stry
N um ber

W orkers
i n v o lv e d

(all

Number

s to p p a g e s )

Workers
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963
(all
stoppages)

All industries----------------------------------------------

1 3, 362

941, 000

16, 100, 000

Manufacturing— Continued

Manufacturing------------------------------------

1 1,684

555, 000

10, 400,000

Ordnance and accessories------------------------Ammunition, except for
small a r m s -----------------------------------------Sighting and fire control
equipment--------------------------------------------Small a r m s ------ Ordnance and accessories, not
elsewhere classified ---------- ---------- _

9

8, 720

25,400

68
46
6

4

3, 190

9, 780

2
1

340
880

2, 140
8, 800

Furniture and fixtures---------------------------------Household furniture----- _ —
Office furniture—
— _____ —
Public building and related
furniture- _____ _
___ „ ___ _
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
office and store fixtu res___________
Miscellaneous furniture and
fixtures----------------------------------------------

7

490

6, 380

2

4, 320

4, 660
Paper and allied products___ — — ___
Pulpmills— ----„ _____ „
Paperm ills, except building
papermills —
- ___ __ ______
Paperboard m i lls -------------------------------Converted paper and paperboard
products, except containers
and boxes____________________________
Paperboard containers

54
3

9, 360
350

1 4 6 ,0 0 0
'3 , 0 8 0

6
5

1, 0 8 0
770

10, 700
13, 400

Food and kindred products-----------------------Meat products------- - Dairy products—
- - ----- -----Canning and preserving fruits,
vegetables, and seafoods------------------Grain m ill products____________ —
----- — —
Bakery products-------------Sugar - — ------_ ----------- — ----Confectionery and related
products--------------- - — __
— Beverage industries-------------Miscellaneous food preparations
and kindred products--------------------------Tobacco manufactures-------------------------------C igars-------- ----------- —
----------- ----Textile m ill products______________________
Broadwoven fabric m ills, cotton-------Broadwoven fabric m ills, manmade
fiber and silk— ---------- ---------------- Broadwoven fabric m ills, wool:
Including dyeing and finishing----------Narrow fabrics and other sm allwares m ills: Cotton, wool,
silk, and manmade fiber-------------Knitting m ills ----------------------------------------- 1
Dyeing and finishing textiles, except
wool fabrics and knitgoods__________
Floor covering m ills___________________
Yarn and thread m i ll s --------------------------Miscellaneous textile goods---------------

158
29
21

53, 100
17, 200
5, 630

444,000
8 1,100
48,0 0 0

14
17
26
5

2,
4,
7,
8,

110
060
410
810

38,700
42,600
31,800
61,000

2
33

460
6, 590

5, 510
130, 000

11

890

5, 050

2
2

1, 550
1, 550

8, 550
8, 550

36

13, 000
1, 100

193,000
4 9,500

460

2, 150

1
3
3

170

11,600

3
10

660
1, 020

6, 390
40, 900

6
1
1
8

8, 060
500
50
990

57,100
4, 500
3, 740
17, 500

Apparel and other finished products
made f r o m f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r
109

W om en's, m is s e s ', and juniors'
outerwear--------------------------------------------Wom en's, m isse s', children's,
and infants' undergarments--------------Hats, caps, and m illinery-------------------G irls', children's, and infants'
outerwear--------------------------------------------Fur goods----------------------------------------------Miscellaneous apparel and
accessories-----------------------------------------Miscellaneous fabricated textile
products------------------- ---------------------- -

22, 300

210,000

5

770

11,200

9

M en's, youths', and boys' suits,
coats, and overcoats--------------- ----- _
M en's, youths', and boys' furnish­
ings, work clothing, and allied

820

33,000

57

5, 850

37, 700

10
6

1, 300
12, 200

15, 200
69,600

5
1

90
10

780
30

7

1, 060

39, 300

9

220

2, 780

Lumber and wood products, except
! 64
Logging camps and logging
contractors-----------------------------------------Sawmills and planing m ills--------------- Millwork, veneer, plywood, and
prefabricated structural wood
products______________ -________________
Wooden containers--------------------------------Miscellaneous wood products-------- —

See footnote at end of table,




41, 400

1, 290, 000

4
28

10, 100
20, 700

369,000
547,000

21
2
12

9, 560
90
910

345, 000
2, 640
22,800

and b o x e s

Building paper and building
board m i lls ---------------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied
industries — _ _____ ______
Newspapers: Publishing, publishing
and printing---------- ------------ ----------Books_______________ ________ _
Com m ercial printing_________________
Manifold business form s
manufacturing------ -------------- ---------Greeting card manufacturing________
Bookbinding and related
industries________
________________
Service industries for the
printing trade____ ______________ _
Chemicals and allied products __ __
Industrial inorganic and organic
ch em icals________ _____ ___________
Plastics materials and synthetic
resins, synthetic rubber, syn­
thetic and other manmade
fibers, except glass____________ __
Drugs_______________ _________________
Soap, detergents and cleaning
preparations, perfumes,
cosm etics, and other toilet
preparations___ _ ________________
Paints, varnishes, lacquers,
enamels, and allied products— ___
Gum and wood ch em icals___________—
Agricultural chem icals_______________
Miscellaneous chemical products___
Petroleum refining and related
industries___________ ______
__ ___
Petroleum refining----------------------------Paving and roofing m aterials___ _ _
Miscellaneous products of
petroleum and c o a l--------------------------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products_____________ _________________
Tires and inner tubes________________
Rubber footwear___ __________ — _
Reclaimed rubber-------------------------------Fabricated rubber products, not
elsewhere c la ssified ____
Miscellaneous plastics products_____
Leather and leather products___ ______
Leather tanning and finishing________
Boot and shoe cut stock and
findings________________________ ____
Footwear, except rubber _ __________
Leather gloves and m itten s--------------Luggage------------------------------------------------Handbags and other personal
leather goods_____ _____
Leather goods, not elsewhere
classified_________ _____

9 ,4 9 0
5, 520
1 ,9 0 9

146, 000
1 0 2 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

2

220

2, 580

7

1, 3 7 0

21, 300

16

2, 630

5 9 ,1 0 0

22

4, 200

4 7, 600

2

320

12, 200

58

14, 200

1, 7 0 0 , 0 0 0

19
1
28

3, 630
1, 7 4 0
7, 640

1, 2 6 0 , 0 0 0
3 61 , 000
55, 500

3
1

440
370

2, 620
1, 8 4 0

5

200

6, 610

1

200

6, 100

104

20, 400

4 8 1 , 000

36

9, 120

3 19, 000

23
6

6, 140
710

100, 000
10, 600

13

2, 560

15, 000

7
1
6
12

300
200
260
1, 1 2 0

1,
3,
3,
27,

14
1
11

1, 8 1 0
60
1, 6 9 0

3 3 8 ,0 0 0
3 14, 000
21, 800

2

60

2, 720

82
25

3 2 , 100
1 8 ,5 0 0
800
80

2
2
28

1, 1 0 0 ,
802,
6,
1,

840
000
690
800

000
000
250
720

„ 25

9 , 150
3, 500

2 1 3 ,0 0 0
8 2, 300

38
4

23, 700
370

100, 000
6, 200

3

4

380
2 0, 600
2, 040
120

3

170

1, 0 9 0

1

40

220

21

2

2,
71,
16,
2,

760
400
200
540

28

Table A-l. Work Stoppages by Industry, 1963— Continued
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Industry
Number

W orkers
involved

_

4 5 9 ,0 0 0
2 , 100

7

4, 080

51, 900

3
1
14

300
140
1 ,3 9 0
3, 250

4, 220
690
6 0 ,2 0 0
3 7 ,1 0 0

9

6, 010
250

1 0 7 ,0 0 0
1, 7 9 0

4, 440

193, 000

1 131

_

Fabricated metal products, except
ordnance, machinery, and trans­
portation equipment---------- - —
— Metal cans_____
___
- —
Cutlery, handtools, and general
h a rd w a rp
_
_ _
..........
Heating apparatus (except electric)
and plumbing fixtures_______________
Fabricated structural metal
products — __ _ _____ — ____ —
Screw machine products, and bolts,
nuts, screws, rivets, and

5 5 ,4 0 0

6 3 7 ,0 0 0

49
29

31, 700
9 ,4 1 0

285, 000
1 2 8 ,0 0 0

7

2 ,0 0 0

Workers
involved

1963
(all
stoppages)

18

3, 060

34, 900

3
13

410
8, 950

5, 670
9 3 ,4 0 0

12

3, 610

84, 000

11

-

Machinery, except electrical---------------------------Farm machinery and equipment-------------Construction, mining, and mate­
rials handling machinery and
................... .

Metalworking machinery and
equipment-------------------------------------------------------------Special industry machinery, except
metalworking machinery—------------------------General industrial machinery
and equipment-------------------------— ------------------------Office, computing, and accounting
machines__________________ _______ _______
Service industry machines____ ___
Miscellaneous machinery, except
electrical------------------------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplie s ------------------------------------------Electric transmission and
distribution equipment---------------------Electrical industrial apparatus i--------Household appliances--------------

Electrical, machinery, equipment,
and supplies— Continued
Electric lighting and wiring
equipment_________________________
Radio and television receiving sets,
except communication types______
Communication equipment___
Electronic components and
accessories. _ _ _____ _ _ _ _ _
Miscellaneous electrical machinery,
e q u ip m e n t a n d s u p p lie s

3, 460

270, 000

Transportation equipment--------------------Motor vehicles and motor vehicle
equipment — ___ — _____ _ _ _
Aircraft and parts _
„
_ _
__
Ship and boat building and
repairing- _
—
___ __ _
___

101

7 1, 500

6 7 8 ,0 0 0

58
12

53, 500
7, 510

5 2 3 ,0 0 0
5 3 ,7 0 0

16
7

5 ,4 0 0
4, 280

6 7 ,8 0 0
2 2 ,3 0 0

8

820

10, 800

27

4, 750

1 2 2 ,0 0 0

5

430

18, 500

11
2

3, 260
370

8 3 ,8 0 0
1 ,0 2 0

2 ,9 7 0

3

110
9, 130
1, 2 4 0

1 4 7 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,2 0 0

13

1, 7 6 0

5 3 ,5 0 0

R a i l r o a d p q n ip m p n f - ..

Miscellaneous transportation
equipment—
_______ __

1 ,4 7 0

22
10

1 193

Professional, scientific, and control­
ling instruments; photographic and
optical goods; watches and clocks____
Engineering, laboratory, and scien­
tific and research instruments
and associated equipment__________
Instruments for measuring, con­
trolling, and indicating physical
characteristics____________________
Optical instruments and lenses_____
Surgical, medical, and dental
instruments and supplies __
___

6

4 0 ,8 0 0
860

5 1 6 ,0 0 0
5, 430

18

2, 690

3 7 ,0 0 0

O p h t h a lm ia g o o d s

6
2

300
230

5, 860
1, 5 3 0

Photographic equipment and
supplies— __

1

170

11, 200

46

7, 800

9 4, 600

2

2 ,4 3 0

19, 500

17

3, 190

4 6, 700

2

190

1, 3 8 0

23

4 , 200

7 0 , 100

70

10, 700

165, 000

10
14

w a s V ip r s ............




2 0, 300
460

20

Iron and steel foundries— ---------------- Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals ------------------------------------------Secondary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals and alloys_______
Rolling, drawing and extruding of
nonferrous metals _ _
— ___
Nonferrous foundries - -------------------------Miscellaneous primary metal
industries.
. . .
___ —
-------- .

Metal stampings.
.
------- Coating, engraving, and allied
services— .
--------------------Miscellaneous fabricated wire
products -------- ------------------------- — Miscellaneous fabricated metal
products _ —
- . --------------

118
5

55
4

Cut stone and stone products — - —
Abrasive, asbestos, and miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral
products — __ „ _ _______

See footnote at end of table.

Number

(all

Manufacturing— Continued

Stone, clay, and glass products-------------Flat glass— --------------------- ---Glass and glassware, pressed
or blown____________________________
Glass products, made of
purchased glass-------------------------------Cement, hydraulic— ----------------Structural clay products — ---Pottery and related products-------------Concrete, gypsum, and plaster

f» q iiip m a n +

M
an-days
idle,

Industry

stoppages)

Manufacturing— Continued

Primary metal industries___
_
Blast furnaces, steelworks, and

Stoppages beginning
in 1963

Man-days
idle,
1963

1, 7 30
1 2 ,7 0 0

31, 600
9 0, 700

Miscellaneous manufacturing

15

460

1 3 ,5 0 0

14

3, 500

3 4 , 100

26

4 , 090

6 8 ,6 0 0

1 1 71
9
16

5 8 ,5 0 0
14, 600
11, 000

845, 000
3 3 ,2 0 0
45, 400

27

4, 610

133, 000

29

6, 940
5 ,5 4 0

1 4 5 ,0 0 0

28

9, 090
1, 0 6 0
3, 760

3 2 ,0 0 0
1 0 7 ,0 0 0

16

1 ,8 6 0

19, 100

•i n d u s t r i e s

310

3, 620

1, 7 7 0

23, 400

1 1, 6 7 8

3 8 6 ,0 0 0

25

Nonmanufacturing-

6
19

— — ___ __

16, 000

8 4, 600

1 53
8

4 81 , 000
1 4 7 ,0 0 0

131

4 5 , 800
6 ,8 3 0
209
3 8 ,0 0 0

1

30

2, 500

9

760

93, 700

840

2 0 8 ,0 0 0

1 ,9 3 0 ,0 0 0

5 7 ^ 0 UUU
nno
f

2 3 0 ,0 0 0

7
18

. . _ __

Jewelry, silverware, and
plated ware _ ___ — _ __ __ _ ___
Toys, amusement, sporting and
athletic goods_____________________
Pens, pencils, and other office
and artists* materials —
Costume jewelry, costume
novelties, buttons, and
miscellaneous notions, except
precious metal— _____ _
Miscellaneous manufacturing

1 0 1 ,0 0 0

25

in d u s tr ie s

Agriculture, forestry, and
fisheries-------- —
M in in g -

1 109

4 4 , 300

835, 000

20
17
17

8 , 110
7, 050
9, 670

1 5 2 ,0 0 0
4 3 ,2 0 0
153, 000

Metal_____

. ___________

_ _

__________

4

A n t h r a r i ta

Bituminous coal and lignite
Crude petroleum and
natural gas_
......
Mining and quarrying of
nonmetallic minerals,
except fuels— _ - _____ _ ____

Contract construction____

_____ _____

234* 0 00

29

Table A-l. Work Stoppages by Industry, 1963— Continued
S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 6 3
In d u stry
N um ber

W orkers
i n v o lv e d

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
M a n -d a y s
id le ,
1963

N um ber

W orkers
i n v o lv e d

(a ll
s to p p a g e s )

Nonmanuf ac turing— Conti nue d

Transportation, communication, electrie, gas, and sanitary se rv ic e s ----------Railroad transportation-----------------------Local and suburban transit and
interurban passenger
transportation- _ ------------ — ----- Motor freight transportation
and warehousing— ----------------------------W^ter tTfl-nspr>Ttqti '"‘■
p
- Transportation by air------ ------------- Transportation se rv ic e s ----------------------r,
.n-pn'ml1
rli
r»r|....
— ..
Electric, gas, and sanitary
service s ______ - ____ — _ ____ - ___ - ____
_
Wholesale and retail trade ------Wholesale trade ------- - ------- —

1963

(a l l
s to p p a g e s )

Nonmanufacturing— Continued

M a n -d a y s

idle,

in 1 9 6 3
In d u stry

-------

___________________

205
8

6 3 ,4 0 0
3, 040

39

1 1 ,2 0 0

75
34

8, 690
9, 480
5 ,4 9 0
250
13, 100

9
4
16

2, 540, 000
4 8 2 ,0 0 0

1 8 1 ,0 0 0
81,
1, 1 2 0 ,
7,
10,
561,

000
000
090
700
000

20

1 2 ,2 0 0

9 3, 100

293
151
142

34, 200
15, 600
1 8 ,6 0 0

4 9 8 ,0 0 0
1 9 1 ,0 0 0
3 0 7 ,0 0 0

Services
Hotels, rooming houses, camps,
and other lodging p lace s______ —----Personal s e rv ic e s __________________ —
Miscellaneous business services-----Automobile repair, automobile
services, and garages— _________
Miscellaneous repair services---------M n t v i r m p i r » t i v r # » s . ............. .
. .
Amusement and recreation
services, except motion
pir-tm-PS

....

Miscellaneous s e r v ic e s —
Finance, insurance, and real estate ----------

13
2

Real estate ---------------------------------------------------------------- 11

1 ,3 2 0
920
390

30, 800
26, 900
3, 950

Government— —
S ta tu

gnvurnment

12, 500

1 4 8 ,0 0 0

21

3, 640
680
4, 750

60, 900
6, 410
3 1, 100

9
3

180
460
280

3, 540
1 3 ,2 0 0
3, 070

19
28
10

4

Medical and other health
------------ ------services —
_
Educational services—
Museums, art galleries, botanical
and zoological gardens ---------------------------Nonprofit membership
rtroani v.ati r> < _
n3

121

........ .
.
— - _ —

— -------- —
.........
.

—

Local government------------------------- ---------—
—

270

3, 070

13
4

520
210

12, 100
450

1

10

10

4
5

880
660

4, 660
9, 350

29
2
27

4, 840
280
4, 560

15, 400
2, 160
13, 300

1
Stoppages extending into 2 industries or industry groups or more have been counted in each industry or group affected; workers involved
and man-days idle were allocated to the respective industries.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




30
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1963
T otal
Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

Supplementary benefits

General wage changes
Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

All industries-------------------------------------------------------

3, 362

941, 000

16, 100, 000

1, 322

394, 000

10, 700, 000

77

25, 400

258,000

Manufacturing— ----------------------------------------

1 1, 684

555,000

10, 400, 000

777

220, 000

6, 650, 000

1 42

20, 700

217, 000

Ordnance and accessories----------------------------------Food and kindred products--------------------------------Tobacco manufactures----------------------------------------Textile m ill products____________________________

9
158
2
36

4
71
14

5, 450
17, 200

15, 000
230, 000

2
1

490
40

880
220

-

-

-

-

-

9, 910

83, 600

3

380

3, 290

Apparel, etc.2— -------------------------------------------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture--------- ------ ---------- ---------------------------Furniture and fixtures----------------------------------------Paper and allied products-----------------------------------

109

22, 300

210, 000

25

14, 200

123, 000

3

70

150

64
68
54

41, 400
9, 490
9, 360

1, 290, 000
146, 000
146, 000

34
34
27

31, 000
4, 960
3, 830

1, 150, 000
74, 300
76, 300

-

-

1
3

310
490

7, 130
14, 200

58
104

14, 200
20, 400

1, 700, 000
481, 000

22
54

10,500
11, 800

1, 470, 000
363, 000

2
3

180
450

1, 410
960

14

1,810

338, 000

8

1, 080

314, 000

1

400

2, 400

100
700
300
400
800

1, 100, 000
100, 000
459, 000
637, 000
516,000

26
21
63
42
107

394, 000
80, 900
306,000
335,000
315, 000

1
1
5
5
4

60
220
670
8, 340
1, 880

780
330
39, 400
78, 100
17, 900

171

58, 500

845, 000

84

14, 500

536, 000

5

3, 930

17, 400

109
101
27
46

44,
71,
4,
7,

835,
678,
122,
94,

000
000
000
600

64
31
16
30

13,
7,
2,
6,

800
050
840
460

496,000
151, 000
48, 500
85, 500

3
1
1

2, 170
400
50
140

15, 600
16, 500
570
280

Printing, publishing, and allied
industries----------------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products--------------------------Petroleum refining and related
industries _ - ---------------------------------------------------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products------------------------------------------------------- —
Leather and leather products___________________
Stone, clay, and glass products________________
Prim ary metal industries_______________________
-----------------------Fabricated metal products 3------- *
Machinery, except electrical_________________
Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplie s_________________________________________
Transportation equipment---------------------------- —
Instruments, etc.4 _______________________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries----------

82
38
118
131
193

8,
53,
1,
13,

32,
23,
20,
55,
40,

720
100
550
000

300
500
750
800

25,
444,
8,
193,

400
000
550
000

8,
19,
10,
10,
16,

350
100
700
600
600

2

_____

1 1,678

386, 000

5, 730, 000

545

174,000

4, 070, 000

35

4, 790

40, 300

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries---------------Mining-------- -------------------------------------------------Contract construction-----------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services-------------- -----------

25
153
840

16, 000
45, 800
208, 000

84, 600
481, 000
1, 930, 000

12
15
208

3, 510
1, 610
103, 000

34, 900
142, 000
1, 270, 000

1
2
17

30
80
3, 460

270
920
29, 900

205

63, 400

2, 540, 000

72

32, 000

2, 220, 000

5

180

3, 700

Wholesale and retail trad e______________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate___________

293
13
121
29

34,
1,
12,
4,

4 98,000
30, 800
148,000
15, 400

168
4
52
14

24, 200
240
7, 850
1, 670

7

490

3, 890

Nonmanufacturing_______

Sprvirps . _

_

_ ....

Government__ __

_ .

________

___

_____

See footnotes at end of table.




_

___

200
320
500
840

313,
1,
76,
8,

000
160
800
330

_

_

_

2
1

520
20

1, 520
20

31
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1963--- Continued
Hours of work

Wage adjustments
Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
W orkers
Number
involved

Other contractual matters

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppage;s beginning i:n 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

164

46, 800

490, 000

10

4, 190

75,000

32

5 ,3 7 0

132, 000

_ -----

101

31, 700

408, 000

5

430

11, 200

18

4, 820

118,000

Ordnance and accessories______________________
Food and kindred products - — - — — ------Tobacco manufactures— ------------ ------- - —
Textile m ill products------------------- ------- —

1
7
2

110
470
_
100

110
5, 510
_
170

3
-

370
-

9, 940
-

2
-

180
-

210
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

3, 030

6, 380

-

-

-

4

240

3, 680

2
2
1

100
770
280

2, 400
8, 970
5, 080

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

2
1

40
150

400
750

-

30

310

370
-

28, 700
"

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
6
4
13
6

2, 050
1, 100
600
2, 870
1, 730

390
920
540
600
790

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Machinery, except electrical----------- ------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
s upplie s - _______ ____ _____________________ ______
Transportation equipment----------------------------------Instruments, etc.4 ------------------- -------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries----------

11

7, 330

102, 000

-

-

5
6
2
2

4, 050
5, 340
1, 160
420

65, 300
105, 000
58, 500
700

1
-

30
-

-

Nonmanufacturing ------------------------------------

63

15, 100

81, 900

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries---------------Mining ---------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction-----------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services____________________

1
42

70
4, 230
7, 870

130
17, 300
29, 000

9

2, 610

20, 400

-

-

-

1

10

330

2
1
3

40
210
50

160
14, 600
190

3

3, 120

42, 600

5

130

3, 720

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

50

810

All industries
Manufacturing--------- ----------------

Lumber and wood products, except
furniture- ___
____
Furniture and fixtures----------------------------------------Paper and allied products______________________
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries----------------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products — ------------------Petroleum refining and related
industries------------ ------ -------------------------------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products —___________________ ___ _________ ______
Leather and leather products - ---------- Stone, clay, and glass products
___________
Prim ary metal industries______________________
Fabricated metal products 3_____________________

Wholesale and retail trade--------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real e sta te_________
S e rv ices---------------- -----------------------------------------Government_______________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




5

9,
1,
1,
24,
9,

1

1

5
1
2

3, 400
20
90

6 2,600
90
no

-

2

350

21, 100

1
~

160
"

1, 600
-

-

920
-

5

3, 770

63, 900

14

550

13, 600

2

650

21, 300

3
3

150
210

7, 550
1, 180

-

-

32
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Major Issues, 1963— Continued
Union organization
and security
Industry group

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Plant administration

Job security

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Ordnance and accessories----------------------------------Food and kindred products--------------------------------Tobacco manufactures----------------------------------------Textile m ill products-----------------------------------------Apparel, etc.2------------ ----------------------- ------- Lumber and wood products, except
furniture-------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures----------------------------------------Paper and allied products----------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied
industr ie s -____________ ______ ___ ______________
Chemicals and allied products--------------------------Petroleum refining and related
industries----------------------------------------------------------Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products-------------------------------------------------------------Leather and leather products----------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products-----------------------Prim ary metal industries----------------------------------Fabricated metal products 3--------------------------------

531

94, 300

1, 640, 000

210

74, 200

611, 000

548

225,000

1, 670, 000

1 244

All industries-------------------------------------------------------

30, 300

905,000

1 120

54, 100

512, 000

288

170, 000

1, 400, 000

21

8, 290

71, 300

8

570

42, 200

7, 350
30, 500
7, 700
-

2, 030
89, 000

-

2, 450
3, 680
700
-

230
21, 600

-

1
13
1
-

1
33

-

25

870

37, 300

3

870

1, 930

15

2, 040

14, 200

9
15
7

730
1, 270
790

90, 700
41, 000
33, 500

2
3
3

580
120
320

5, 820
2, 280
430

9
7
10

6, 330
1, 590
2, 880

24, 100
10, 900
11, 600

14
21

840
850

129, 000
21, 500

2
5

150
890

4, 940
25, 300

9
11

1, 730
2, 800

10, 700
15, 800

3

140

2, 070

-

-

-

2

190

19, 500

14
5
16
7
26

1, 340
140
980
190
1, 880

800
400
220
000
200

16
3
14
40
22

10, 200
990
5, 240
19, 100
15, 100

476,000
4, 170
64, 800
58, 400
84, 900

52,
1,
41,
6,
42,

100
220
300
870
900

12
1
10
17
21

5, 840
2, 200
480
9, 350
3, 000

98,
11,
2,
123,
41,

-

8

-

-

2, 010

63, 900

Machinery, except electrical-----------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies--------------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment----------------------------------Instruments, etc.4 -----------------------------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries----------

24

1, 620

57, 900

9

2, 610

21, 900

30

26, 800

86,2 0 0

9
7
4
10

5, 580
3, 780
90
320

160, 000
15, 100
3,4 0 0
6, 200

9
7
1
2

13, 600
6, 570
300
360

68, 200
4 6 ,7 0 0
10, 200
1, 530

14
41
2

4, 120
4 6 ,7 0 0
160
100

26, 800
335, 000
330
400

Nonmanufacturing_________________________

1 287

64, 000

737, 000

90

20, 100

99, 300

260

55, 300

272,000

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries---------------Mining_____________________________________________
Contract construction----------------------------------------—
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services----------------------------- -

7
6
123

12, 200
3, 420
35, 400

48, 600
117, 000
321, 000

29
29

8, 440
6, 060

25, 300
30, 900

3
80
85

130
24, 000
15, 200

400
161, 000
71, 800

38

4, 650

87, 400

13

3, 380

6, 340

49

13, 800

25, 000

Wholesale and retail trad e--------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate-,---------------S e rv ices__________________________________________
Government------------------------------------------------------------

65
6
38
5

4, 060
90
1, 430
2, 750

10
l
6
2

1, 030
720
420
90

17, 700
12, 200
6, 670
170

23
1
14
5

890
70
1, 100
170

6, 480
70
7, 050
340

See footnotes at end of table.




103,
2,
51,
6,

000
730
200
060

1

33
Table A-2. Work Stoppages by Industry C^roup and Major Issues, 1963— Continued
Interunion or intraunion
matter s

Other working conditions
Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

All industries____________________________________
Manufacturing— — -

_ —

_ — —

Ordnance and accessories______________________
Food and kindred products —----------------------------- Tobacco manufactures
- ----Textile m ill products
Apparel, etc.1 2
----— * —
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture— —
—
— Furniture and fixtures------------------------ — _______
Paper and allied products - _
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries
— __
Chemicals and allied products-------------------------Petroleum refining and related

Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products__ ________________________ _____________
Leather and leather products
Stone, clay, and glass products
— Prim ary metal industries-----—----------- --- ----------Fabricated metal products 3_______ _____________
Machinery, except electricalElectrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies _ —
_
Transportation equipment
Instruments, etc.4
- - —
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries— —
Nonmanufacturing
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries—
Mining
_ _
—
Contract construction
_ _
__
_ _
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services- ------Wholesale and retail trade — — —
-----Finance, insurance, and real estate —
Services
_ - - ________ _____
__
Government
- — ------ — - — -

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Not reported

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

58

15, 800

121,000

381

51, 500

352. 000

29

3, 890

25, 500

38

12, 000

87, 800

36

8, 710

15, 200

15

2, 210

15, 900

3
1

850
850
40

3, 320
850
320

2
_

270
_

3, 040
_

2
_

160
_

800
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

100

220

4

320

16,000

5

510

6, 840

3
2

1, 230
240

7, 300
590

5
4
2

1,4 6 0
240
680

4, 560
850
2, 600

1

_
_
90

_
_
2, 410

3
2

360
810

860
43 ,7 0 0

1
4

10
2, 040

260
7, 230

2
2

50
620

870
2, 590

3
1
5
3

790
380
4, 010
550

11, 200
1, 130
8, 330
3, 700

1
4
1
2

40
1, 240
830
80

480
2, 380
2, 200
280

_
1
-

_
100
-

_
300
-

4

770

960

2

560

2, 240

-

-

-

1
3
1
"

120
770
150
-

120
4, 710
450
-

2
2

660
280

1, 700
1, 370

1
1

180
500

550
1, 500

20

3, 780

5
7

1

_

_

-

_

"

-

-

-

32, 900

345

42. 800

307. 000

14

1,680

9, 640

1, 600
1, 700

5, 050
3, 010

4
319

1, 330
33, 900

2, 870
149, 000

1
4
5

20
940
550

290
1, 510
1, 840

6

370

24, 400

12

6, 370

150, 000

-

"

-

1

10

60

6

120

2, 010

3

140

5, 980

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

100

400

3
1

1

_

_

1, 080
30

3, 540
120

_

1
'

-

_

-

_

30

_

30
'

1 Stoppages affecting more than 1 industry group have been counted in each group affected; workers involved and man-days idle were
allocated to the respective groups.
2 Includes other finished products made from fabrics and similar m aterials.
3 Excludes ordnance, machinery, and transportation equipment.
4 Includes professional, scientific, and controlling instruments; photographic and optical goods; and watches and clocks.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




34
Table A-3.

W ork.Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19631
Alabama
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

Arkansas
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

California
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (aU
stoppages)

All industries _ --------------------------------------------------

47

15,300

198,000

28

4 ,4 9 0

31,900

276

60,200

1, 340, 000

Manufacturing--------------------------------------------

26

6,4 1 0

9 4,400

13

2, 660

19,700

116

32,400

6 69,000

2
_
-

270
-

1, 670
-

2
-

170
-

4 ,7 5 0
-

7
1

1, 140
20

2 7,400
_
20

-

-

-

1

180

350

2

80

930

1
1
2
2
_
1
_
9

140
150
120
70
_
1, 050
3, 190

2 ,430
4, 650
2, 790
220
_
57,800
_
11,400

1
1
1
4
1

100
290
150
_
1, 570
30

2,9 1 0
5, 510
_
870
_
3, 040
1, 220

14
9
3
4
8
3
8
2
10
3

6, 160
2 ,010
50
400
760
530
3,020
120
600
3, 270

220, 000
34, 800
960
30,300
24,100
3, 380
139,000
2, 290
14,500
61, 100

3
1

200
610

4, 390
1, 220

1

160

950

16
5

1,290
570

15,300
11, 100

1
1

130
370

750
4, 050

1

30

160

7
12

580
11, 200

10,500
63, 300

2

130

3, 060

-

-

-

2

570

2 1, 300
8,7 0 0

21

8 ,8 7 0

103, 000

15

1,830

12,200

160

27,900

6 74,000

10
7

_
7, 790
360

_
35,500
1, 300

10

.
1,520

_
5, 510

18
1
77

2 ,580
180
12,800

31,700
480
161,000

720
-

66,6 0 0
_
-

1
1
1
1
1

60
10
10
30
200

1,220
10
160
3, 280
2 ,000

19
24
2
17
2

10,400
850
80
870
90

438,000
22,400
600
19,300
170

Ordnance and accessories______________________
Food and kindred products_____________________
Tobacco manufactures__________________________
Textile m ill products___________________________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a te ria ls_________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures__________________________
Paper and allied products_______________ _____
Printing, publishing, and allied industries___
Chemicals and allied products ----------------------Petroleum refining and related industries____
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products__________________
Stone, clay, and glass products_______________
Prim ary metal industries______________________
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except electrical -----------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies_____________________________________ —
Transportation equipment______________________
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks____________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing indu stries-------Nonmanufacturing ----------------------------------Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries ________
Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction----------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services----------------------------Wholesale and retail trad e_____________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate__________
S e rv ice s--------------------------------------------------------------Government----------------------------------------------------------

4
_
-

-

Colorado

Florida

Connecticut

_________

27

5, 580

101,000

53

14,700

281,000

83

22,900

728,000

Manufacturing____________________________

7

4, 090

6 8.300

31

11,700

255,000

17

3,830

26,200

220
-

370

!
-

2 ,450
-

-

-

-

A ll industries________________________

Ordnance and accessories____________ _______
Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures---------------------------------------Textile m ill products___________________________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a te ria ls-------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture------------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures__________________________
Paper and allied products______________________
Printing, publishing, and allied industries----Chemicals and allied products_________________
Petroleum refining and related industries-----Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products__________________
Stone, clay, and glass products----------------------Prim ary metal industries__ _________________
Fabricated metal products,. except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except e le c tr ic a l--------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies----------------- ----------------------------------------Transportation equipment______________________
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks____________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries_____

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

7, 350
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

150

4, 360

1
1
_
1
_

120
120
3,200
-

580
5, 540
_
60,800
-

-

-

2
1
3
1
5
1
3

310
10
1,030
150
2, 110
70
1,260

680
980
10,100
590
4, 360
750
2,8 6 0

1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1

20
500
170
230
20
40
60
100

390
500
4 ,9 3 0
3, 200
_
1, 380
790
2 ,820
30C
T

1
-

50
-

370
-

5
5

690
4, 280

10, 300
158, 000

-

1
-

40
-

270
-

1
1

230
140

4 ,9 5 0
140

-

-

-

3

-

1,200
-

60,900
-

-

"

2,990

25,600

2
-

-

570
-

750
_

3
-

Nonmanufacturing________________________

20

1,480

32,200

22

Agriculture, forestry, and fish eries--------------Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction___________________________
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services----------------------------Wholesale and retail trade_____________________
Finance, insurance, and real e sta te--------------S e rv ice s--------------------------------------------------------------Government______________________________________

.

_

_

_

See footnotes at end o f table.




14

1, 150

2 9 ,1 0 0
15,900

9

2,090

_
23, 100

2
3

230
90

1, 100
6, 060

3
8

470
370

960
1, 320

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

10

_
20

1
1

10
50

-

-

-

-

20
190

-

1

80

-

170

-

-

-

-

66

19,100

702,000

1
53

380
9 ,0 9 0

2 ,6 9 0
35,300

5
5

7 ,650
1,650
320
-

633, 000
27,300

-

2

-

3, 330
“

35
Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19631—Continued
Hawaii

Georgia
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

All industries

____ _________________________

Manufacturing_______

_________________

Ordnance and accessories______________________
Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures__________________________
Textile m ill products___________________________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and similar m a teria ls_________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture--------------------------------------------------------- Furniture and fixtures__________________________
Paper and allied products _ -------------- --------- .
Printing, publishing, and allied industries----Chemicals and allied products------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries____
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products__________________
Stone, clay, and glass products -------------------Prim ary metal industries--------------------------------Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except electrical__________________
Electrical machinery, equipment, and
Knpp1if>.fi _
__
Transportation equipment
—
______________
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks______ ___________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries_____
Nonmanufacturing- ---------

----------------

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries--------------Mining____________________________________________
Contract construction___________________________
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services----------------------------Wholesale and retail trade-------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate--------------S e rv ices______________________________ — _______
Government ------------------- — ------- — --------- -

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Illinois
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1960 (all
stoppages)

25

9, 350

292,000

27

23, 400

176,000

213

61. 700

888, 000

14

8, 090

255,000

12

9, 750

92, 900

106

45, 100

732, 000

2
1

900
1, 100

1, 400
49, 500

5
-

7, 940
-

35,700
-

16
_

3, 960
_
_

4 5,800
_
_

-

1

130

5, 720

_

_

3

610

24, 800

1
1
1
1

10
30
330
1, 200

680
310
3, 900
88, 800

1
2
3
-

190
870
580
-

11, 600
26, 900
1
17, 800
-

1
2
6
4
7
2
5
2
7
6

10
170
600
no
no
230
150
290
280
510

3,
37,
1,
11,
61,
24,
11,
18,
62,

1
-

300
-

2, 690
-

1
-

170
-

990
-

13
15

11, 900
9, 380

67, 600
145, 000

2
3

460
3, 640

11, 600
90, 200

-

-

-

10
3

7, 320
2, 080

170, 000
44, 600

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

60
350

560
1, 490

11

1, 270

37, 700

17

13,700

8 3,200

107

16,700

156,000

12, 000
770

48, 000
11, 200

18
50

5, 260
9, 260

18, 100
113, 000

690
100
130
-

2, 150
8, 930
_
13,000
-

10
19
_
6
4

720
700
_
580
140

3, 640
8, 550

5

860

8, 340

2
5

1
2
3

200
_
40
170

2 18, 900
5, 000
_
5, 150
300

7
1
2
-

Indiana

Iowa

1,
i,
1,
2,
1,
1,

50
580
300
240
000
400
200
700
300
800

_

11, 600
1, 530

Kansas

A ll industries___________________________________

112

39. 700

526,000

44

14, 700

108, 000

25

5, 000

44, 900

Manufacturing____________________________

66

28, 500

422, 000

24

12, 200

78, 400

8

3, 130

32, 000

4
_
-

350
_
-

1, 350
_
-

6
_
-

6, 090
-

17, 000
_
-

1
_
-

1,800

3, 610

-

-

Ordnance and accessories- ----------------------------Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures--------------- -------------------- _
Textile m ill products___________ ___ ________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a teria ls-------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture_______________________________________
Furniture and fixtures__________________________
Paper and allied products______________________
Printing, publishing, and allied industries___
Chemicals and allied products------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries-----Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products________________
Stone, clay, and glass products----------- --------Prim ary metal industries___________ _____
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except electrical---------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies-------------- ------- —
-------------------Transportation equipment--------------------------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks____________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries--------

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

2

60

600

3
4
1
5
1
3
3
10

490
1, 320
90
260
70
2, 630
500
7, 790

2, 810
12, 200
2, 410
5, 560
3, 510
108, 000
19, 200
15, 800

1
1
1
1
2
2
2

40
130
10
250
1, 220
100
210

1,760
650
520
250
2, 140
670
540

1
1
_
1

50
200
_
_
910

2, 250
390
_

-

-

-

8
9

1, 780
1, 050

18, 700
30, 500

-

7

3, 890

33, 500

-

-

-

5
8

6, 540
4, 960

150, 000
47, 700

1
-

270
-

21, 400
-

1
1

70
40

7, 250
1, 440

1
1

470
230

930
3, 380

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Nonmanufacturing -------------- ------------------

46

11, 200

104,000

20

2, 440

29, 900

17

1, 870

12, 900

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries--------------Mining ______-___________ _______________ - __ -_____
Contract construction ---------------------------------- Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services-------------- -----------Wholesale and retail trad e-------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate--------------Services --------- ------------------ ---------------------------Government___________________ _____ ___

_
4
25

_

_

_

_

_

550
7, 160

2, 480
69, 100

-

-

-

-

-

16

1, 520

19, 900

9

1, 280

9, 240

7
5

800
220

13, 600
7, 480

2
2

810
120

1,630
8, 360

1
5

20
450

220
3, 120

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

150
2, 370

7, 750
3, 290

-

-

-

2

120

“

-

370
-

-

2
3

See footnotes at end o f table.




.
-

'

_

16, 400

36
Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, I9631—Continued
Kentucky
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

Louisiana
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Maryland
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

A ll industries___________________________________

64

9 ,710

112,000

40

6,9 1 0

325, 000

Manufac tu r in g--------------------------------------------

25

4 ,4 1 0

53,800

10

2, 580

8 8,800

Ordnance and accessories_____________________
Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures---------------------------------------Textile m ill products —
--------------------------------Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a teria ls_________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture-----------------------------------------------------------Furniture and fixtures---------------------------------------Paper and allied products — ---------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries___
Chemicals and allied products------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries____
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products_________________ _
Stone, clay, and glass products----------------------Prim ary metal industries--------------------------------Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except e le c tr ic a l--------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplie s ________________ ______________________
Transportation equipment_____________________
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks____________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries--------

.
2
-

710
-

4, 520
-

2
-

170
-

11,900
_
-

2

610

1, 240

-

-

-

-

-

1
2
2
1
2
1
2
-

20
70
540
160
490
140
150
-

360
1,260
540
2, 330
15, 800
2 ,990
150
-

1
3
-

10
1, 340
-

260
52,800
z 2 1 , 200
-

1
1
2
2
2

50
10
320
250
1,310

2, 160
13,400
3,680
11,200
2 ,690

3
3

1, 040
120

10,000
4 ,4 9 0

1
-

10

390
-

5
-

580
-

3,080
-

3
1

270
90

3, 340
6, 730

2

1,040

2, 040

2

1,550

8, 520

-

“

-

1

10

50

"

-

-

N onmanuf ac tur ing-------------------------------------

39

5, 310

58,300

30

4 ,3 3 0

237,000

18

2,700

97,500

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries -----------Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction__________________________
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services-------- -----------------Wholesale and retail trad e-------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate__________
S e rv ices--------------------------------------------------------Government —
-------------------------------------------------

_

10
3, 560

10
45, 100

_

173,000
17,000
1,970
-

_

.

18
13

3, 160
1,790

23,400
21,900

1
22

4
4
-

190
170
-

4, 610
8, 370
"

2
4
1
-

470
280
30
-

Massachusetts

34
.

6,8 9 0

156,000

16

4, 190

58,200

1
_
-

120
_
-

13,500
_
-

-

5

920

.
2,490

-

5
6
2
-

1,260
500
20
-

89,500
5, 140
330
-

.

Michigan

Minnesota

A ll industries___________________________________

114

31,500

510,000

135

36,800

611,000

40

7,7 2 0

90,300

Manufacturing— --------------------------- _ -----

70

24,800

4 0 2,000

83

18,300

290,000

16

5, 190

7 2,000

Ordnance and accessories--------------------------------Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures---------------------------------------Textile m ill products ------------------------------ ----Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a teria ls-------------Lumber and wood products, except
furnitnrp .. .......
........ .
. .....
Furniture and fixtures---------------------------------------Paper and allied products______________________
Printing, publishing, and allied industries----Chemicals and allied products------------------------Petroleum refining and related industries-----Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products—
Leather and leather products---------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products----------------------Prim ary m etal industries
---------------------------Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except e le c tr ic a l--------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies-------------------------------------------- --------------Transportation equipment--------------------------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks------------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries--------

3
10
2

1,220
720
290

10,900
9, 780
9,2 7 0

14
1

1, 580
190

34,500
12,200

2, 890
-

10,600
-

8

760

6, 950

1

300

6, 810

-

-

-

3
2
3
3
1
4
7
2

180
450
430
60
10
2,4 7 0
14,200
100

7, 580
1,750
2, 970
610
1, 090
222,000
51,300
430

1
4
3
2
4
2
3
15

130
410
230
130
650
610
180
2 ,970

130
8 ,900
21,400
3 ,960
13,100
2 2, 930
960
17,700
3 1,200

1
1
1
1
-

40
10
20
10
-

200
100
800
80
-

9
8

1,700
1, 530

54,600
4 ,7 5 0

13
7

2,4 9 0
890

38,300
4 3 ,7 0 0

2
3

570
750

6,9 8 0
24,700

2
-

60
-

3, 290
-

3
9

510
6 ,9 8 0

3, 370
51,100

2
-

840
-

26,300
-

2
1

460
230

8,9 9 0
6, 300

1

20

90

1
1

50
20

1, 170
1,030

44

6,7 1 0

108,000

52

18,500

320,000

24

2, 520

18,300

Nonmanufacturing--------

--------------------------

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries--------------Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction - __ ___________________
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services_______ __________
Wholesale and retail trad e-------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate__________
S e rv ices_______ __________ _______________ _______
Government ---------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end o f table.




_

_

.

_

_

_

3
-

_

_

_

29

2, 580

25, 500

1
33

470
15,400

2, 350
253,000

15

1,680

15,800

10
3
2

3, 860
80
190
"

8 1,300
580
250

4
9
4
1

350
2, 140
80
30

14,200
49, 100
1, 100
240

6
1
2
"

780
20
50
"

2, 270
100
110
-

37
Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19631 Continued
—
M issouri
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Industry group

All industries

New Jersey

Montana
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

_ _

108

46,100

654,000

27

7, 570

65, 700

224

41, 900

622,000

Manufacturing

53

17,300

245,000

10

2, 150

4 0,500

138

33,100

436,000

1
7
1

4, 300
1, 930
50

4, 300
9, 220
4, 770

1
-

40
_
-

1, 060
-

9
4

2, 070
5, 760

23,700
_
40,300

2

120

1,700

-

-

-

2

430

2,380

3
1
3
4
1
1
3
3
2

no
120
160
80
190
80
870
140
180

660
1,200
6, 220
1, 220
2, 590
2, 280
1, 570
1,840
2, 040

4
1
1
3
-

1,690
_
120
60
250
-

36,500
1, 160
60
1, 720
-

4
12
21
2
7
2
8
11

390
2, 040
3 ,430
410
1, 300
150
1, 020
2, 220

2, 700
23,900
34,300
s.7, 600
11,900
1, 160
57,500
70, 800

5
7

340
660

12,200
32,100

-

-

-

18
10

2, 570
1,480

24,900
12,400

2
5

580
7, 370

51,200
109,000

-

-

-

11
6

3, 310
4,9 1 0

38,300
66,500

1
1

20
10

300
550

-

-

-

5
6

570
1, 050

12, 100
5,420

55

28,800

410,000

17

5,420

25,200

86

8, 750

186,000

Ordnance and accessories .............. _
Food and kindred products...

Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar materials ______ _
Lumber and wood products, except

Printing, publishing, and allied industries___
Petroleum refining and related industries___
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products____
Leather and leather products __ _
Stone, clay, and glass products ___ ___ __
Prim ary metal industries
---- . ......
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment__
Machinery, except electrical ........ ................
Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies ._ .....
_ ....... ............. ....... _
Transportation equipment. .............
Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks _
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries_____
Nonmanufacturing
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries
Mining
Contract construction
Transportation, communication, electric,

Government...

._

. .

.

...... . ... ..

_

_

_

_

_

_

33

25,400

29 1 , 700
294,000

1
13

700
4, 360

1,400
19, 000

_
28

7
10
2
2
1

1, 920
1, 060
60
210
100

4, 670
14,600
3, 790
870
400

1
2

70
290
“

1, 020
3, 760
-

25
25
1
7
-

New York
All industries

-

1,600
3, 020
2, 910
720
500
-

_
2 1,290
28,800
109,000
29,600
12,200
5, 160

Ohio

437

Manufacturing

.

.. ..

Food and kindred products ...---- ...

.. ..

861,000

169

777,000

20
4, 210
_
2, 520

360
83,900
_
18,800

7
2
3

610
1, 550
500

6 ,790
8, 550
2, 070

11,700

69,100

1

250

330

_

2, 000
970
6, 290
1, 100

2 100
18,100
4, 150
1,060, 000
57,100

6
7
17
8

660
2 ,440
3, 270
1,670

19,700
20,200
108,000
36,400

25
21

3, 820
12, 800

13

4, 600

138,000

16
21

4, 270
9, 260

60, 500
53,100

61,800
127,000

21
21

3, 850
3 ,470

83,800
4 9,100

8, 780
1, 140

115,000
8, 220

11
22

5, 090
13,800

51,800
109,000

1, 540
3, 020

14,900
18,500

3
8

330
920

18,000
8,8 6 0

........ .

62, 200

759,000

96

11,800

83,600

9
40

1,470
7, 880

3, 120
4 3,500

15
18
1
11
2

1,400
590
150
240
50 !

7, 380
9 ,930
10,900
8, 520
160

_

_

-

See footnotes at end o f table.

_
8, 110
5, 340
173,000
1, 630

194

Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods: watches and clocks
........... ............
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries ....




5
2
8
5

_

7
14

Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies ................................. ......... .. . ....

Contract construction
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas. and sanitary services ......................
Wholesale and retail tra.de..
Finance, insurance, and real estate. ...............
Services .............
Government

_

290
310
1, 560
540

_

Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment

.

63,000
51, 200

12
5
9
12

Petroleum refinincr and related industries
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products
Leather and leather p r o d u c ts ............ .
Stone, clay, and glass products

.......

265

1 ,8 4 0 ,0 0 0

34

.

2, 600, 000

67,900

1
24
12

---- -----

130,000

243

25
4

...... ...... .

Textile m ill products
... .........................
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar materials -----------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture
.......... .........
..... ..... ._ ..
Furniture and fixtures ___ _ ______ ..
.... .
Paper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and allied industries ...

Nonmanufacturing

_

1

-

-

64

34,400

248,000

41
62
3
22
2

| 11,100
| 14,700
160
i
| 1,660
160
1

397,000
103, 000
340
10, 700
310

_

_

!
i
.
!

_
_

_
_

38
Table A-3- Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19631 Continued
—
Oregon
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
W
orkers
Number
involved

Industry group

Pennsylvania
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

Tennessee
Stoppages beginning
in 1963
W
orkers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

34

508, 000

394

98, 300

1, 280, 000

52

18, 200

682, 000

17, 800

494, 000

226

62, 400

703,000

27

13, 700

547, 000

5
-

950
-

5, 160
-

1
10
9

260
5, 770
1, 130

1, 540
35, 400
13, 700

5
-

470
-

2, 540
-

-

Ordnance and accessories__________ _________
Food and kindred products--------------------- ------Tobacco manufactures---------------------------------------Textile m ill products----------------------------------------Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and similar m a teria ls-------------Lumber and wood products, except
fnrn it'll TP
Furniture and fixtures---------------------------------------Paper and allied products--------------------------------Printing, publishing, and allied industries----Chemicals and allied products________________
Petroleum refining and related industries____
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products —
Leather and leather products---------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products----------------------Prim ary metal industries----------------------- ------Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment__
Machinery, except electrical ------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies______ __________________________________
Transportation equipment — — ---- .---------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks------------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries------

20, 400

19

Manufacturing-------------- ---------------------------

-

-

41

4, 370

65, 600

2

930

14, 900

2,
4,
3,
5,
20,
1,
76,

330
1, 740
6, 400
560
1, 350
360
-

18, 700
361, 000
93, 600
1, 080
1, 350
610
2 14, 400

9
_
1

483, 000
780

7
8
5
5
4
1
12
1
17
20

2,
13,

380
770
790
410
500
50
380
40
240
000

490
810
880
270
500
630
100
290
62, 400
138, 000

2
-

80
-

1, 250
-

25
35

5, 220
12, 500

59, 400
103, 000

4
-

1, 180
-

22, 600
-

1
-

60
-

3, 900
-

18
8

6, 180
4, 480

65, 600
7, 760

3
-

330
-

16, 000
-

1

40

80

1
3

30
990

1, 330
34, 300

-

-

-

15

2, 520

13, 700

168

35, 800

577, 000

25

10

_
1, 730

.
4, 360

33
64

.
9, 970
11, 900

.
31, 000
226,000

2
2
1
-

Nonmanufacturing-------------------------------------

16, 600
100

2
1
5
2
1
2
-

630
150
_
10
-

2, 240
6, 620
470
"

21
41
1
6
2

9, 550
1, 740
10
2, 650
30

254, 000
45, 400
110
21, 100
60

_

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries— -------Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction----------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services- ------------------------Wholesale and retail trade_____________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate--------------Sprvirps
.. .
Government----------------------------------------------------------

1,
2,

-

-

4, 590

135, 000

2
16

650
3, 650

86, 800
17, 700

2
3
1
1

210
60
_
10
10

25, 700
4, 620
40
zo

_

Texas
A ll industries — ----------------------------

---------------

72

Ordnance and accessories---------------------------------______________
Food and kindred products----------- — --------------__ — ____
Tobacco manufactures___________________________
Textile m ill products------------------------------------------ ___________ ___________ ______________
Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and similar m aterials_____ __
Lumber and wood products, except
_
furniture---------------------------------------- ------------------Furniture and fixtures--------------------------- ----- —
Paper and allied products _____ ________ ___
_________ ___
Printing, publishing, and allied industries____ ___________ ___________
Chemicals and allied products -----------------------Petroleum refining and related industries_____
—
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products — _______ ___________
Leather and leather products— — - --------------Stone, clay, and glass products------ --------------Prim ary metal industries_______________________
Fabricated metal products,, except ordnance,
—
machinery, and transportation equipment___
Machinery, except electrical---------------- ---------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies _ __
„ — _____ — _____________
—
Transportation equipment ---------- ------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks---------- --------------- Miscellaneous manufacturing industries —

7 ,890

71, 200

14

2, 210

22, 400

460
_
-

5, 140
_
-

3
_
2

370
_
270

5, 990
780

-

-

2

230

690

120
210
10
80
60

_
220
360
000
000
800
260

1
1
1
2
_

80
370
650
_
170

4, 000
4, 090
1, 960
1, 280

80
130

2, 250
3, 480

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

50
160

4, 180
3, 950

1

30

2, 080

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

40
-

1, 520
-

52

______ ______ _______
______ _______

-

3
3

__ ___

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries___________
Mining _______ __________________ ___ ___________
Contract construction — _ — ----- ----------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services— — — -------------Wholesale and retail trad e__________ _________
Finance, insurance, and real estate___________
Services - —
— ------- —
„ ------- --------Government----------------------------------------------------------- —

See footnotes at end o f table.

38

398, 000

2
2
1
2
1

______ ______ _______




547, 000

1, 360

4
-

_____

7, 350

20

-

Manufacturing__ ___________ _________________________ ________________

Nonmanufacturing

Virginia

5, 990

149, 000

24

5, 680

48, 800

3, 530

21, 200

9
9

3, 390
1, 260

4, 530
3, 270

1,500
260

108, 000
13, 100

20
960

34, 600
6, 240

34

'
i
1

1

6
6

3,
6,
136,
2 229,
2,

1,

-

4
2

;

220
490

5, 710
1, 880

_

1
3
’
!

l
l

i
i
!

_

10
50

.

40
140

39

Table A-3. Work Stoppages in States Having 25 Stoppages or More by Industry Group, 19631
—Continued
Washington
Industry group

A ll industries -

—

—

-

in 1963
Workers
Number
involved
— __

West Virginia
M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

in 1963
i
Workers
Number
involved

Wisconsin

M
an-days
idle during
1963 (all
stoppages)

in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

M
an-days
idle duripg
1963 (all
stoppages)

_____

55

23,800

543, 000

80

2 0,000

173,000

56

17,700

336,000

----------

22

16,100

523,000

23

10,600

123,000

37

14,300

301,000

Ordnance and accessories- - __ _ ------ — Food and kindred products-------------------------------Tobacco manufactures---------------------------------------Textile m ill products-------— -------------------Apparel and other finished products made
from fabrics and sim ilar m a teria ls_________
Lumber and wood products, except
— —
furniture— ____ ________________ ____
Furniture and fixtures— --------------------------Paper and allied products----- — — ------- —
Printing, publishing, and allied industries----Chemicals and allied products------- --------------Petroleum refining and related industries-----Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products—
Leather and leather products---------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products------------------- _
Prim ary metal industries______________________
Fabricated metal products, except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment —
Machinery, except e le c tr ic a l--------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies — ------------ --------------- -------------------Transportation equipment--------------------------------Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments; photographic and optical
goods; watches and clocks------------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries--------

.
540
-

1,630
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
1

1,550
120

11,500
2, 560

Manufacturing- ------

- -----------

Nonmanufacturing------------------------------------Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries--------------Mining------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction__________________________
Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services___________________
Wholesale and retail trade-------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real estate--------------S e rv ices------------- ------------------------------------ ------Government --------------------------------------------------------

1
“
“

"

”

~

■

“

■

■

"

16
1
1
1
-

14,900
380
170
20
~

520,000
380
1,390
170
“

1

50
50
960
2 ,230
3, 250

1,850
90
6,4 5 0
19,400
33,900

1
1
1
1

140
230
20
2, 320
70
90
470

1,400
7,6 5 0
950
167, 000
270
770
5, 270

30

90

300
2,050

600
16,000

170
1,990

5, 550
4 2 ,1 0 0

650
1,050

5, 200
39,800

7

2

1,050
6 ,030

4 7 ,1 0 0
8, 310

2

-

-

-

2

3
-

5
5
1
3

1

2

1

3
5

7
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33

7, 720

19,600

57

9 ,430

49,4 0 0

19

3,440

35,700

1
14

600
5,770

600
14,200

35
17

6, 040
3, 230

32,800
10,300

7

490
710

1,860
2, 370

2

100
40

2,420
3,910

6

2

-

-

-

1

140
-

540
-

-

3

20

1

8
-

3
-

_

_

-

-

1

20

_

_
2
3

3

_
90
170

_
1,050
500

1,810
140
70
310
860

8,0 7 0
17,600
400
3,420
4 ,7 0 0

1 No work stoppages were recorded during 1963 for the industry groups for which no data are presented.
2 Idleness in 1963 resulting from stoppages that began in 1962.
NOTE: Stoppages extending into 2 industry groups or more have been counted in each industry group affected; workers involved and
man-days idle were allocated among the respective groups. Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




40
Table

A -4.

Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1963
Negotiation of first agreement
or union recognition

Total
Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
involved

Industry group

Number

~

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

941,000

16, 100,000

607

40, 500

1, 120,000

1 1,459

529,000

1 3 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

------------

11,684

555,000

1 0 ,400,000

325

24, 600

746,000

1 895

303,000

8 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0

------_ ---------- —
---------

9
158
2
36

25,400
444,000
8, 550
193, 000

1
31
10

20
1, 790
_
1, 520

360
61,200
55,900

6
86
1
17

8, 370
28, 700
700
10,400

22,900
302,000
7, 700
123, 000

—

Ordnance and a cc essories------------Food and kindred products---- __
Tobacco manufactures----------------------Textile m ill products---------- — —

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
involved

Number

1 3, 362

All industries_______________ ______________
Manufacturing------------------------

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Renegotiation of agreement
(expiration or reopening)

-

8,
53,
1,
13,

720
100
550
000

---------

109

22, 300

210,000

27

1,290

57,700

36

15,200

124,000

_ --------- _

64
68
54

41, 400
9, 490
9, 360

1, 290, 000
146,000
146,000

8
16
9

520
1, 360
960

19.100
42,000
37, 800

36
42
31

31, 300
7, 270
4, 680

1 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0
98,9 0 0
97, 000

- _ _

58
104

14,200
20,400

1, 700,000
481,000

19
21

890
860

26,100
23,900

29
65

11, 500
14, 000

1, 670, 000
439,000

- —

14

1, 810

338,000

4

250

5, 180

9

1, 480

332,000

Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products----------------------------------------— - -----Leather and leather products------------------------------Stone, clay, and glass products-------------------------Prim ary metal industries_______________________
Fabricated metal products 3 ------------------ _

82
38
118
131
193

32,100
23, 700
20,300
55, 400
40 ,8 0 0

1, 100,000
100,000
459,000
637,000
516,000

20
8
22
12
38

2, 170
1, 570
980
450
2, 420

60, 500
3, 290
31,900
14,100
54,500

38
19
73
59
115

20,200
18,100
14,600
23, 300
20,400

1, 000, 000
79,100
402,000
525,000
381,000

Apparel, etc.2----------------------------- ------------Lumber and wood products, except
furniture --------------------------------------- - —
Furniture and fixtures-----------------__
_ _
Paper and allied products_______
Printing, publishing, and allied
industries----------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products — —
Petroleum refining and related
industries------------------------------------ —

-

171

58, 500

845,000

37

2, 080

118,000

86

24,100

625,000

109
101
27
46

44, 300
71,500
4, 750
7, 800

835,000
678,000
122,000
9 4,600

13
10
7
12

3, 080
1,590
420
450

87,200
18,600
21,400
7, 640

69
38
18
30

25,800
12, 200
4, 170
6, 500

692,000
216,000
100,000
84, 600

--------- 1 1,678

386,000

5 ,7 3 0 ,0 0 0

282

15,800

374,000

*564

226,000

4 ,5 9 0 ,0 0 0

8
8
64

350
540
5 ,470

8, 330
9 9,200
36,200

3
17
245

12,400
2, 200
134,000

49,5 0 0
234,000
1 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0

Machinery, except electrical — — ------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies_______________________ - - —
Transportation equipment------------------- ----Instruments, e t c .4________________________________
Miscellaneous manufacturing indu stries----------Nonmanufacturing___________

_ _

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries
-------------Mining---------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction-------------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services________

25
153
840

16,000
45 ,8 0 0
208,000

84,600
481,000
1 ,9 3 0 ,0 0 0

205

63, 400

2 ,5 4 0 , 000

41

1, 970

36,300

84

39, 100

2 ,2 4 0 ,0 0 0

Wholesale and retail trade_______________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate >
-----Spr yi rp.Q
Government--------------------------------------- - — ---------

293
13
121
29

34,200
1, 320
12,500
4, 840

498,000
30,800
148,000
15,400

97
6
53
5

2, 280
150
2, 310
2, 750

122,000
2,680
62,500
6, 060

159
7
46
4

28, 500
1, 160
7, 790
270

354,000
28,100
7 6,000
1, 370

See footnotes at end of table.




41
Table A-4. Work Stoppages by Industry Group and Contract Status, 1963— Continued

Industry group

During term of agreement
(negotiation of new
agreement not involved)
Stoppages begin­
Man-days
ning in 1963
idle,
Workers
1963 (all
Number
involved stoppages)

No information on
contract status

No contract of
other contract status
Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1963
Workers
Number
involved

Man-days
idle,
1963 (all
stoppages)

1,204

364, 000

1 ,7 9 0 ,0 0 0

63

6, 470

4 0,000

29

1, 360

10,800

430

225,000

1, 070, 000

17

1, 370

4, 100

17

780

4, 010

Ordnance and accessories-----------------------------------Food and kindred products----------------------------------Tobacco manufactures---------------- ----------------------Textile m ill products____________________________

2
38
8

340
22, 500
990

2, 140
79,300
14,200

2
1
1

30
850
70

830
850
280

1

120

600

Apparel, etc.1
2________________________ ___________
Lumber and wood products, except
furniture___________________________ ____________
Furniture and fixtures ---------------------------------------Paper and allied products_______________________

40

5 ,640

27,300

-

-

-

17
10
14

9, 530
860
3, 720

4 1,600
5, 060
11,300

2

20

100

-

-

6
15

1, 830
5, 110

3,280
17,500

1

20
150

810
300

1

'80

1, 000

24
8
20
60
37

9, 730
3 ,990
4, 660
31, 600
18,000

41, 200
17,100
24,300
98,000
79,200

40
50
10

Machinery, except electrical------------------------------Electrical machinery, equipment, and
supplies---------------------------------------------------------------Transportation equipment_______________________
Instruments, e t c .4----------------------------- ---------------Miscellaneous manufacturing industries-----------

47

32,300

102,000

1

25
52
2
4

15, 300
57, 700
160
850

55, 100
443, 000
330
2,450

2
1
-

-

“

"

Nonmanufacturing__________________________

774

139,000

725,000

46

5, 100

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries --------------Mining--------------------------------------------------------------------Contract construction------------------------------------------Transportation, communication, electric,
gas, and sanitary services--------------------------------

2
127
524

130
43, 000
68, 100

390
147,000
294,000

12
1

72

22, 100

258, 000

Wholesale and retail trade______________________
Finance, insurance, and real estate-----------------.......
Services
Government_______________________________________

31
17
1

3, 240
2, 340
110

16,500
8, 350
220

A ll industries--------------------------------------------------------Manufacturing

Printing, publishing, and allied
industries ------------------------------------------------------------Chemicals and allied products--------— __ —
Petroleum refining and related
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
products________________________________ _______
Leather and leather products-------- ------------------Stone, clay, and glass products------- _ ----------Primary metal industries__________ ___________
Fabricated metal products 3__________ _______ _

-

-

-

"

-

-

6

180

930

1

40
-

110
-

3
2

20
270

460
440

160
50
40

1
2
1

40
100
10

790
290
390

30

110

-

-

-

80
20

500
60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

■

35,900

12

570

6, 750

3, 140
30
30

26,300
680
30

6

330

1, 700

6

170

420

2

60

130

3
5
18

40
90
1, 610

130
930
7, 390

3
-

80
100

4, 520
400

-

1

2
1
2

1

-

"

1
1 Stoppages extending into 2 industries or industry groups or more have been counted in each industry or group affected; workers involved
and man-days idle were allocated to the respective groups.
2

I n c lu d e s o th e r f in is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e f r o m f a b r i c s and s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s .

3 Excludes ordnance, machinery, and transportation equipment.
4 Includes professional, scientific, and controlling instruments; photographic and optical goods; watches and clocks.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.







Appendix B.

C hronology---- Aerospace Industry Dispute---- The Boeing Co.,

California, Florida, Kansas, and W ashington, 1962—6 3 1
July 16, 1962
N egotiation s to r e p la c e a co n tra ct e x p irin g on Sept. 15, 1962, began in W ich ita, Kans.
The union p r o p o s e d a 3 -p e r c e n t w age in c r e a s e with an e s c a la to r cla u se , im p r o v e d health
and w e lfa re and p en sion p r o g r a m s , and a union shop or a gen cy shop c la u s e .1 N egotiation s
2
su bsequ en tly m ov ed to S eattle, W ash ., w h ere com pan yw ide b argain in g w as conducted.
August 8
The com pan y, in its cou n ter p r o p o s a ls w h ich the union r e je c te d , o ffe r e d a 16- to
2 6 -c e n t-a n -h o u r w age in c r e a s e o v er a 3 -y e a r p e rio d , and in c r e a s e s in in su ra n ce and b a s ic
m onthly p en sion b e n e fits, but r e je c t e d the union re q u e st fo r a union or a gen cy shop.
August 25
Seattle M a ch in ists v oted au th oriza tion fo r a strik e , as th eir cou n terp a rts in V andenb e rg , C a lif., Cape C an a vera l, F la ., and W ich ita, K an s., had done e a r lie r in the month. No
strik e date w as set, pending vote on the co m p a n y 's fin a l o ffe r .
August 27
N egotiation s re m a in ed d ea d lock ed on the m a jo r is s u e s , and the union n o tifie d the
F e d e r a l M ed iation and C o n cilia tio n S e r v ic e that a s e rio u s dispute existed .
A ugust 28
F e d e ra l M ed iator A lb in P e t e r s o n m et w ith m e m b e rs of the union b argain in g c o m ­
m ittee and sch ed u led a m eetin g with com pan y n e g o tia to rs fo r August 29.
S ep tem b er 4
F e d e r a l m e d ia to rs m et with com pan y and union re p r e s e n ta tiv e s in Seattle. A re v ie w
of the is s u e s did not in d ica te any m a te ria l change in the r e s p e c tiv e p o sitio n s of the p a rtie s .
M ediation e ffo r ts continued in sep a ra te and jo in t m eetin gs through S ep tem ber 10.
S ep tem ber 13
P r e s id e n t K ennedy appointed a th r e e -m a n factfin din g B o a rd to su pplem ent the e ffo r ts
o f the FM CS. B oa rd m e m b e r s w e r e : Saul W allen, B oston , C hairm an; L ew is M. G ill, P h ila ­
delphia, and P a tr ic k J. F is h e r , Indian apolis, all e x p e rie n ce d a r b itr a to r s .
The B o a rd w as
re q u ested to r e p o r t to the P r e s id e n t by O cto b e r 15.
Both the com pan y and the union a g reed
to continue w ork under the p re s e n t co n tra ct until N ovem b er 15.
S ep tem ber 17
The B o a rd m et with the p a r tie s in S eattle, W ash ., and fo r 4 days r e c e iv e d o ra l and
w ritten statem en ts of th eir r e s p e c tiv e p o sitio n s .
Only a lim ite d num ber of k ey is s u e s w e re
c o n s id e r e d in detail— union s e cu rity , w a g es, p e r fo r m a n c e a n a ly sis sy ste m , m an agem ent righ ts,
su bcon tra ctin g, and the co m p a n y 's p r o p o s a l fo r a m o d ific a tio n of the g rie v a n ce p r o c e d u r e s .

1 Although this dispute began during the summer of 1962, the national emergency provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act were not
invoked until January 1963. The Executive Order creating the Board of Inquiry directed this body to investigate the dispute at the
Boeing Company and its Vertol Divisions, as well as a dispute at the Rohr Corporation in Auburn, Wash. , the latter a supplier of
aircraft and missle components for the Boeing Company's commercial and military aircraft. Unions involved in the disputes included,
in addition to the International Association of Machinists (AFL—
CIO), the United Automobile Workers (AFL-CIO), the International
Union of United Weldors (Ind.), the International Union of Operating Engineers (AFL—
CIO) and the United Plant Guard Workers of
America (Ind.).
2 Agency shop clauses were proposed for areas where the union shop is prohibited; contracts with this company had not included
union-shop clauses since 1948.




43

44

The B oa rd con clu d ed that the union s e c u r ity is s u e w as the ch ie f im p ed im en t to a settlem en t,
and d ecid ed that it w ou ld be d e s ir a b le to obtain e x p r e s s io n s of op in ion fr o m B oein g e m p lo y e e s.
The p a rtie s jo in e d in a re q u e s t that the B oa rd be a llow ed to d e fe r its re p o r t to the P r e s id e n t
until N ovem b er 15.
S ep tem ber 24
The B oa rd n o tified the p a r tie s that h ea rin g s w ou ld be re s u m e d in W ashington, D .C .,
beginning O cto b e r 1.
O cto b er 4
The B o a rd r e c e s s e d the h ea rin g s in W ashington.
The p a r tie s a g re e d to re tu rn to
Seattle and m eet w ith F e d e ra l m e d ia to rs to re s u m e e ffo r ts to r e s o lv e the is s u e s not bein g
c o n s id e r e d by the B oard.
O cto b er 10
Both p a r tie s subm itted a lis t of the u n settled is s u e s to a F e d e r a l M ed iation and
C o n cilia tio n panel in Seattle.
T h ree m in or is s u e s w e r e r e s o lv e d ; s e v e r a l other is s u e s w e r e
r e s o lv e d in subsequ en t m eetin gs b etw een O cto b e r 10 and O cto b e r 28.

N ov em b er 6
P r e s id e n t K ennedy announced that the union had a g re e d to p ostp on e strik e a ctio n
until at le a s t Jan. 15, 1963, to p e r m it a p o ll on the union shop iss u e .
The p o ll, w h ich
w ou ld not bind the com pa n y to grant the union shop n or re q u ir e the union to re lin q u ish its
dem and fo r one, w as sch ed u led to b eg in on D e c e m b e r 4.
The B o a rd w as a llow ed to d e fe r
its re p o r t to the P r e s id e n t until Jan. 5, 1963.

N ov e m b er 11
A ll rem ain in g u n settled is s u e s w e re r e v ie w e d in d ir e c t n egotiation s with F e d e r a l
m e d ia to rs . A com pa n y sp ok esm an in d ica ted that in view of the fo rth c o m in g p o ll o f e m p lo y e e s ,
and until reco m m e n d a tio n s on other is s u e s b e fo r e the B o a rd w e r e known, no fu rth er p r o g r e s s
cou ld be m ade at that tim e.
D e c e m b e r 11
The N ational L a b or R ela tion s B oa rd announced that in the
e m p lo y e e s fa v o r e d a union shop b y n e a rly 3 to 1.

nonbinding p o ll B oein g

D e c e m b e r 17
The B oa rd
D e c e m b e r 20.

m et w ith the p a r tie s

in San F r a n c is c o .

M eetin gs

continued through

D e c e m b e r 28
The B o a rd re c o n v e n e d m eetin gs with the p a r tie s in W ashington, D .C . D esp ite the
B o a r d 's p r o p o s a l fo r solv in g the union shop is s u e , n egotia tion s re m a in e d d ea d lock ed . The
B o a rd term in a ted m ed ia tion e ffo r ts and began w ork in g on its r e p o r t to the P r e s id e n t.
Jan. 2, 1963
The B oa rd r e p o r te d to the P r e s id e n t that its e ffo r ts to head o ff a January 15 strik e
had co lla p s e d b e ca u s e of m a n a g em en t's r e s is t a n c e to the union dem and fo r a union shop. The
B oa rd re c o m m e n d e d that the com pan y r e c o n s id e r its p o sitio n on the union s e c u r ity is s u e , and
that the p a r tie s n egotiate an addition al p r o v is io n fo r union s e c u r ity o v e r and above the p re se n t
m ain ten ance of m e m b e rs h ip cla u se.
The B o a rd a ls o re c o m m e n d e d that the w age iss u e be
settled in co n fo rm a n ce with the co m p a n y 's o ffe r .



45

January 10
The p a r tie s m et in W ashington, D .C ., with a panel of F e d e r a l m e d ia to r s . The c o m ­
pany p re s e n te d the pan el with a new set of p r o p o s a ls w h ich d iffe r e d in s e v e r a l im portan t
r e s p e c ts fr o m th ose p re s e n te d in A ugust 1962. Intensive m e d ia tio n e ffo r t s continued through
January 18.

January 15
W illia m E. Sim kin, D ir e c to r of the FM CS, announced that co n s id e r a b le p r o g r e s s had
b een m ade in re c e n t n egotiation s and that the union had a g re e d to h is re q u e s t to p ostp on e any
strik e a ction , at le a s t until m idnight January 18.

January 19
The FM CS D ir e c to r announced that the union had fu rth er p ostp on ed a strik e pending
re s u lts of b a llotin g on the co m p a n y ’ s la test o ffe r .
January 22
The com pa n y r e v is e d its fin al o ffe r to the union, am ending a p o rtio n of its p r o p o s a l
on the k ey " p e r fo r m a n c e a n a ly sis" is s u e , and red u cin g s e n io r ity re q u ire m e n ts fo r p u r p o se s
of r e c a ll fr o m la y o ff, but r e je c tin g the u n ion 's p r o p o s a l to a rb itra te the u n re s o lv e d is s u e s .
January 23
The union

r e je c t e d

the

com pa n y

o ffe r

and o r d e r e d a s trik e to b e g in January 26.

P r e s id e n t K ennedy, stating that a w ork stoppage at the a e r o s p a c e fir m w ou ld be a
s e r io u s th reat to the N a tion 's d efen se e ffo r t, im m e d ia te ly invoked the T a ft-H a r tle y A ct and
appointed a th r e e -m a n B oa rd o f Inquiry to in v estiga te the d isp u te.
B o a rd m e m b e r s w e r e :
B en jam in A aron , D ir e c to r of the Institute of In du strial R e la tio n s at the U n iv e rsity of C a li­
fo rn ia , C h airm an ; L loy d Ulm an, P r o fe s s o r of E c o n o m ic s and In d u stria l R e la tio n s at the
U n iv e rsity of C a lifo rn ia , and J. B. G illin gham , C h airm an o f the D ep artm en t o f E c o n o m ic s
at the U n iv ersity of W ashington.

January 25
The B o a rd of In quiry re p o r te d to the P r e s id e n t.
The r e p o r t s u m m a r iz e d the b a c k ­
ground and p re s e n t status of the dispu te, and con clu d ed that a strik e a p p ea red to be im m inent.
P r e s id e n t K ennedy o r d e r e d the J u stice D ep artm en t to seek an in ju n ction on the grounds
that the national sa fety w ou ld be en dan gered b y a strik e .
U.S. D is t r ic t Judge W illia m J.
L in d b erg , S eattle, W ash ., gran ted a te m p o r a r y in ju n ction and o r d e r e d both s id e s to appear
b e fo r e h im on F e b r u a r y 1 to show cau se why it should not be m ade p erm a n en t fo r the 8 0 -d a y
p e r io d p r e s c r ib e d b y the L a b or M anagem ent R e la tio n s (T a ft-H a rtle y ) A ct.

F e b ru a ry 1
Judge L in d b erg extended the inju nction to 80 d ays,

thus p ro h ib itin g any strik e until

A p r il 15.

F e b ru a ry 7
U.S. A ttorn ey B ro c k A dam s jo in e d a ttorn eys fo r the union in asking Judge L in d b erg
to add language to the 8 0 -d a y in ju n ction to s p e c ify that a ll p r o v is io n s o f the la st union c o n ­
tr a c t re m a in in f o r c e during the te r m of the injunction. T h is w ou ld p erp etu ate the c o n tr a c t's
m ain ten ance of m e m b e rs h ip cla u se.



46
F e b ru a ry 8
Judge L in d b erg d enied the req u est.

F eb ru a ry 9
Union a ttorn eys
F r a n c is c o .

m a ile d an e m e r g e n c y

appeal to the U.S. C ou rt of A pp ea ls in San

F e b ru a ry 15
The U.S. C ou rt of A p p ea ls a g re e d to h ea r argu m en ts that B oein g w as p r e s s u r in g
m a ch in ists to r e s ig n fr o m th eir union.
Subsequently, the co u rt upheld the u n io n 's p o sitio n
and the m ain ten ance of m e m b e rs h ip cla u se w as reta in ed in the e x p ir e d co n tra ct fo r the p e r io d
o f the injunction.
The com pa n y sent a te le g r a m to P r e s id e n t K ennedy re q u e stin g that he seek c o n g r e s ­
sion a l a ction s im ila r to that taken in the re c e n t lo n g sh o r e c a s e , so that "th is dispute can
be se ttle d ."
F e b ru a ry 19
N egotiation s resu m ed .
M a rch 24
The B oa rd of In quiry re c o n v e n e d in Seattle and took w ritte n and o r a l r e p o r ts of the
p o sitio n s of a ll p a r tie s to the dispute.
M a rch 26
The B o a rd o f In quiry m ade its fin a l re p o r t to the P r e s id e n t, in d icatin g that the
p a r tie s rem a in ed d ea d lock ed on the m a jo r is s u e s , d esp ite m e d ia tio n e ffo r ts in 11 s e s s io n s
in Seattle and W ashington, D .C ., betw een F e b ru a ry 19 and M a rch 22.
A p r il 8
The N ational L a b or R ela tion s B oa rd announced that u n o ffic ia l retu rn s of b a llotin g
on the co m p a n y 's fin al o ffe r in d ica ted that the union had r e je c t e d the o ffe r .
A p r il 15
The com pa n y and union announced a tentative a g re e m e n t on te r m s of a new co n tra ct
ju s t h ou rs b e fo r e the ex p ira tio n of the T a ft-H a r tle y inju nction, thus a vertin g a strik e set
fo r m idnight. The union u rg ed its m e m b e rs h ip to a cce p t the p r o p o s a l, w h ich in clu d ed w age
and frin g e b en efit in c r e a s e s totalin g fr o m 2 2 - to 3 2 -c e n ts -a n -h o u r o v e r 3 y e a r s , plus a
c o s t - o f -l iv in g cla u s e , im p r o v e d jo b evalu ation p e r fo r m a n c e a n a ly sis, and a m o d ifie d union
s e c u r ity cla u se w h ich a llow s n ew ly h ir e d w o r k e r s to d e cid e against union m e m b e rs h ip , but
stip u lates that both the union and the com pa n y m u st be n o tifie d of this d e c is io n in w ritin g
during the e m p lo y e e 's " p e r io d of e le c t io n ," d efin ed as the 1 0 -d a y p e r io d fo llo w in g the e m ­
p lo y e e 's initial 30 days of em p loy m en t.
Individuals who fa il to p ro v id e such n o tice a re
re q u ir e d to jo in the union w ithin 20 days a fter the e x p ira tio n o f th eir p e r io d of e le ctio n .

A p r il 17
In Seattlej the union voted to a cce p t
C an a vera l, F la ., r e je c t e d it, and in W ich ita,
vote bein g ta k en .3

3

the co n tra ct.
H ow ever, m a ch in ists at Cape
K a n s., a union m eetin g a djou rn ed w ithout a

Following rejection of the contract, brief wildcat strikes occurred at several locations from mid-April to early May.




47

A p r il 18
S e c r e ta r y of L a b or W. W illa rd W irtz, and W illia m E. Sim kin,
u rg ed the w o r k e r s in Cape C an a vera l to r e c o n s id e r th eir vote.

D ir e c t o r of FM C S,

A p r il 19
The W ich ita union voted to r e je c t the co n tra ct.
A p r il 22
U nion o ffic ia ls m et w ith com pa n y n e g o tia to rs in Seattle.

A p r il 29
The union
a c r o s s the Nation.

announced

a tim eta b le

fo r

p r o g r e s s iv e

w alkouts

at B oein g

op e ra tio n s

M ay 1
A fte r the com pa n y m ade som e new p r o p o s a ls , P r e s id e n t K ennedy w ire d the union
stating that any in terru p tion of op era tion s at B oein g fa c ilit ie s w ould have a s e rio u s im p a ct
on the d efen se p o stu re of the Nation. He u rg ed the union to w ithhold strik e a ctio n and to
subm it the new p ro p o s a ls to the union m e m b e rs h ip fo r a vote.
A. J. H ayes, Intern ation al P r e s id e n t o f LAM, n o tifie d the a ffe cte d lo c a ls that a ll
strik e san ction s w e r e bein g te m p o r a r ily w ithdraw n pending re s u lts of this vote.

M ay 10
IAM m e m b e rs ra tifie d the con tra ct, 4 ending 10 m onths o f n egotiation s.

4 The 3-year contract provided for wage increases of 11 to 14 cents retroactive to Sept. 16, 1962, 5 J/2 to 9 cents additional
effective both Sept. 16, 1963, and September 16, 1964, and the equivalent of 4 cents an hour per employee for revisions in wage
rates; a cost-of-living escalator clause was established with maximum adjustments up to 3 cents each year; $2. 25 a month pension
payments for each year of future service (was $1.75)— minimum $50 a month; relocation policies to be made uniform and written
into agreement, effective June 1, 1963; company assumed rate increase in company-paid hospital-medical-surgical insurance for
employees (previously paid $8. 65— 10. 50 a month, varying by location). The union security proposal mentioned under date of April 15
$
was also incorporated into the contract.






Appendix C. Scope, Methods, and Definitions1
W ork Stoppage S ta tistics
The B u re a u 's s ta tis tic s in clu d e a ll w ork stopp a ges o c c u r r in g in the U nited States
in v olv in g as m any as s ix w o r k e r s and la stin g the eq uivalen t o f a fu ll day o r sh ift o r lo n g e r .
D efin ition s
Strike o r L ock ou t. A strik e is d efin ed as a te m p o r a r y stoppage o f w ork by a grou p
o f e m p lo y e e s (not n e c e s s a r ily m e m b e r s o f a union) to e x p r e s s a g r ie v a n ce o r e n fo r c e a
dem and.
A lock o u t is a te m p o r a r y w ithholding o f w o rk f r o m a grou p o f e m p lo y e e s by an
e m p lo y e r (o r grou p o f e m p lo y e rs ) in o r d e r to induce the e m p lo y e e s to a c c e p t the e m p lo y e r 's
te r m s . B e ca u se o f the co m p le x itie s in v olv ed in m o s t la b o r-m a n a g e m e n t d isp u te s, the B ureau
m akes no e ffo r t to d eterm in e w h eth er the stopp a ges a re in itia te d b y the w o r k e r s o r the
e m p lo y e r s . The te r m s " s t r ik e " and "w o rk s to p p a g e " a re u sed in te rch a n g e a b ly in this bu lletin .
W o rk e rs and Id le n e s s . F ig u r e s on "w o r k e r s in v o lv e d " and "m a n -d a y s id le " in clu d e
a ll w o r k e r s m ade id le f o r one sh ift o r lo n g e r in e sta b lish m en ts d ir e c t ly in v o lv e d in a stop p a ge.
Th ey do not m e a su r e s e co n d a r y id le n e s s — that is , the e ffe c ts o f a stoppage on oth er e s ­
ta blish m en ts o r in d u strie s w h ose e m p lo y e e s m a y be m ade id le a s a re s u lt o f m a te ria l o r
s e r v ic e s h o rta g e s .
The tota l n u m ber o f w o r k e r s in v olv e d in s trik e s in a giv e n y e a r in clu d e s w o r k e r s
cou n ted m o r e than on ce i f th ey w e re in v olv e d in m o r e than one stopp age durin g that y e a r .
(T h u s, in 1949, 365,000 to 400,000 c o a l m in e rs stru ck on th re e d iffe r e n t o c c a s io n s ; they a c ­
cou n ted f o r 1 .1 5 m illio n o f the y e a r 's tota l o f 3. 03 m illio n w o r k e r s .)
In s om e p ro lo n g e d stop p a g es, it is n e c e s s a r y to e s tim a te in p art the total m a n -d a y s
o f id le n e ss i f the ex a ct n u m ber o f w o r k e r s id le e a ch day is not known. S ign ifican t ch an ges
in the nu m ber o f w o r k e r s id le a re s e c u r e d fr o m the p a rtie s f o r u se in com pu tin g m a n -d a y s
o f id le n e s s .
Id len ess as P e r c e n t o f T otal W orking T im e .
In com p u tin g the nu m ber o f w o r k e r s
in v o lv e d in s trik e s as a p e rc e n t o f tota l e m p loy m en t and id le n e s s as a p e rc e n t o f tota l
w ork in g tim e , the fo llo w in g fig u r e s f o r total em p loy m en t have b e e n u sed:
F r o m 1927 to 1950, a ll e m p lo y e e s w e re cou n ted , e x c e p t th ose in o ccu p a tio n s and
p r o fe s s io n s in w h ich little , if any, union o rg a n iza tio n e x is te d o r in w h ich stopp ages
r a r e ly , i f e v e r , o c c u r r e d .
In m o s t in d u s trie s , a ll w age and s a la r y w o r k e r s w e r e in ­
clu d ed ex ce p t th ose in e x e c u tiv e , m a n a g e ria l, o r high s u p e r v is o r y p o s itio n s , o r th ose
p e rfo rm in g p r o fe s s io n a l w ork the nature o f w h ich m ade union o rg a n iz a tio n o r grou p
a ctio n u n lik ely.
The fig u r e ex clu d ed a ll s e lf-e m p lo y e d p e r s o n s ; d o m e s tic w o r k e r s ;
w o r k e r s on fa r m s em p loy in g fe w e r than s ix p e r s o n s ; a ll F e d e r a l and State G overn m en t
e m p lo y e e s ; and o f fic ia ls , both e le c te d and appoin ted, in lo c a l g o v e rn m e n ts .
B eginning in 1951, the B u re a u 's e s tim a te s o f total e m p lo y m e n t in n on a g ricu ltu ra l
esta b lish m e n ts, e x c lu s iv e o f g ov ern m en t, have b een u se d .
Id len ess com p u ted on the
b a s is o f n o n a g ricu ltu ra l em p loy m en t (e x c lu s iv e o f g ov ern m en t) u s u a lly d iffe r s by le s s
than o n e-ten th o f a p e rce n ta g e point fr o m that obtain ed b y the f o r m e r m eth od, w hile
the p e rce n ta g e o f w o r k e r s id le (c o m p a r e d with total em p loy m en t) d iffe r s by about 0. 5
o f a point. F o r e x a m p le, the p ercen ta g e o f w o r k e r s id le durin g 1950 com p u ted on the
sam e b a se as the fig u r e s f o r e a r lie r y e a r s was 6. 9, and the p e rc e n t o f id le n e s s was
0. 44, c o m p a re d w ith 6. 3 and 0. 40, r e s p e c tiv e ly , com p u ted on the new b a s e .
"E s tim a te d w ork in g t im e " is com p u ted b y m u ltip lyin g the a v e ra g e n u m ber o f w o r k e r s
em p loy ed during the y e a r b y the num ber o f days ty p ic a lly w o rk e d by m o s t e m p lo y e e s .
In the com p u ta tion s, Saturdays (when c u s to m a r ily not w o rk e d ), Sundays, and e sta b lish e d
h olid ays as p ro v id e d in m o s t union co n tr a c ts a re e x clu d e d .

1954),

More detailed information is available in Techniques of Preparing Major BLS Statistical Series (BLS Bulletin 1168, December
106.

p.




49

50

D uration. A lthough on ly w ork d a ys a re u sed in com pu tin g m a n -d a y s o f tota l id le n e s s ,
d u ration is e x p r e s s e d in te r m s o f ca le n d a r d a y s, in clu d in g n on w ork d ay s.
State D ata.
Stoppages o c c u r r in g in m o r e than one State a re lis te d s e p a ra te ly in
e a ch State a ffe c te d .
The w o r k e r s and m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s a re a llo ca te d am on g e a ch o f
the a ffe cte d S t a t e s .2 The p r o c e d u r e s ou tlin ed on the p re c e d in g page have a ls o b e e n u s e d in
p re p a rin g e s tim a te s o f id le n e s s by State.
M etrop olita n A re a Data. In form a tion is tabulated s e p a ra te ly f o r the a re a s that c u r ­
re n tly c o m p r is e the lis t o f stan dard m e tr o p o lita n a re a s is s u e d by the B u reau o f the B udget
in a dd ition to a few co m m u n ities h is t o r ic a lly in clu d e d in the s trik e s e r ie s b e fo r e the stan dard
m e tr o p o lita n a re a lis t w as co m p ile d .
The a re a s to w h ich the s trik e s ta tis tic s app ly a re
th ose e s ta b lis h e d b y the B u reau o f the B udget. In form a tion is p u b lish ed on ly f o r th ose a re a s
in w h ich at le a s t fiv e stopp a ges w e r e r e c o r d e d during the y e a r .
Som e m e tro p o lita n a re a s in clu d e co u n ties in m o r e than one State, and, h en ce, s ta ­
t is t ic s fo r an a re a m a y o c c a s io n a lly equal o r e x c e e d the tota l f o r the State in w h ich the
m a jo r c ity is lo c a te d .
Stoppages in the m in in g and lo g g in g in d u s trie s a re e x clu d e d fr o m
m e tr o p o lita n a re a data.
Unions In volved . In form a tion in clu d e s the u n ion (s) d ir e c t ly p a rticip a tin g in the d is ­
pute, although the count o f w o r k e r s in clu d e s a ll who a re m ade id le fo r one sh ift o r lo n g e r
in e sta b lish m en ts d ir e c t ly in v o lv e d in the d ispu te, in clu d in g m e m b e r s o f oth er unions and
nonunion w o r k e r s .
S o u rc e s o f In form a tion
O c c u r r e n c e o f S trik e s .
In form a tion as to actu a l o r p ro b a b le e x is te n ce o f w ork
stopp a ges is c o lle c t e d fr o m a n u m ber o f s o u r c e s . C lipp in gs on la b o r d ispu tes a re obtain ed
fr o m a c o m p r e h e n s iv e c o v e r a g e o f d a ily and w e e k ly n e w sp a p e rs throughout the co u n try . In­
fo r m a tio n is r e c e iv e d r e g u la r ly fr o m the F e d e r a l M ed iation and C o n cilia tio n S e r v ic e . Other
s o u r c e s o f in fo rm a tio n in clu d e State b o a r d s o f m e d ia tio n and a rb itra tio n ; r e s e a r c h d iv is io n s
o f State la b o r d ep a rtm en ts; lo c a l o ffic e s o f State e m p lo y m e n t s e c u r ity a g e n c ie s , ch an n eled
th rou gh the B u reau o f E m p loym en t S e cu rity o f the U. S. D ep artm en t o f L a b o r; and trad e and
union jo u r n a ls . Som e e m p lo y e r a s s o c ia t io n s , co m p a n ie s , and unions a ls o fu rn ish the B ureau
w ith w o rk stopp age in fo rm a tio n on a volu n ta ry c o o p e r a tiv e b a s is eith er as stop p a ges o c c u r
o r p e r io d ic a lly .
R esp on d en ts to Q u estion n a ire. A q u e stio n n a ire is m a ile d to the p a rtie s r e p o r te d as
in v o lv e d in w ork stop p a ges to obtain in fo rm a tio n on the n u m ber o f w o r k e r s in v o lv e d , d uration ,
m a jo r is s u e s , lo c a tio n , m eth od o f settlem en t, and oth er p ertin en t in fo rm a tio n .
L im ita tion s o f Data. A lth ou gh the B u reau s e e k s to obtain co m p le te c o v e r a g e , i. e . ,
a " c e n s u s ” o f a ll s trik e s in v olv in g s ix w o r k e r s o r m o r e and la stin g a fu ll sh ift o r m o r e ,
in fo rm a tio n is undoubtedly m is s in g on s o m e o f the s m a lle r s tr ik e s . P r e s u m a b ly , a llo w a n ce
f o r th ese m is s in g s trik e s w ould not su b sta n tia lly a ffe c t the fig u r e s fo r n u m ber o f w o r k e r s
and m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s .
In its e ffo r ts to im p r o v e the c o m p le te n e s s o f the cou n t o f sto p p a g e s, the B u reau has
sought to d e v e lo p new s o u r c e s o f in fo rm a tio n as to the p ro b a b ly e x is te n ce o f su ch s to p p a g e s.
O ver the y e a r s , th ese s o u r c e s have p ro b a b ly in c r e a s e d the n u m ber o f s trik e s r e c o r d e d , but
have had little e ffe c t on the n um ber o f w o r k e r s o r tota l id le n e s s .
B eginning in m i d - 1950, a new s o u r c e o f strik e " le a d s " w as added th rou gh a c o o p ­
e ra tiv e a rra n g em en t w ith the B ureau o f E m p loym en t S e cu rity o f the U. S. D ep artm en t o f
L a b o r b y w h ich lo c a l o f fic e s o f State em p lo y m e n t s e c u r ity a g e n cie s supply m on th ly r e p o r ts
on w ork stop p a ges co m in g to th eir attention. It is e stim a te d that this in c r e a s e d the n u m ber
o f s trik e s re p o r te d in 1950 b y about 5 p e rc e n t, and in 1951 and 1952, b y a p p ro x im a te ly
10 p e rc e n t. Since m o s t o f th ese stopp a ges w e r e s m a ll, they in c r e a s e d the n um ber o f w o r k e r s
in v o lv e d and m a n -d a y s o f id le n e s s by le s s than 2 p e rc e n t in 1950 and b y le s s than 3 p e rc e n t
in 1951 and 1952.
T e s ts o f the e ffe c t o f this added s o u r c e o f in fo rm a tio n have not b een
m ade sin ce 1952.
A s new lo c a l a g e n cie s having k n ow ledge o f the e x is te n c e o f w ork stopp a ges a re
e s ta b lis h e d o r ch an ges a re m ade in th eir c o lle c t io n m e th o d s, e v e r y e ffo r t is m ade to e s ­
ta b lish co o p e r a tiv e a rra n g em en ts with th em .

The same procedure is followed in allocating data on stoppages occurring in more than one industry, industry group, or
metropolitan area.




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1964 O - 748-624

R e c e n t P u b lic a tio n s in W o r k S to p p a g e s

Analysis

of Work Stoppages,

1962

(BLS Bulletin 1381,1963),p rice 40 cents.

Analysis

of Work Stoppages,

1961

(BLS Bulletin 1339,1962),p rice 35 cents.

Analysis

of Work Stoppages,

I960

(BLS Bulletin 1302,1961),p rice 30 cents.

Analysis

of Work Stoppages,

1959

(BLS Bulletin 1278,I960),p rice 40 cents.

The Dimensions of M ajor Work Stoppages, 1947— (BLS Bulletin 1298, 196l), p rice 30 cents
59
National Em ergency Disputes Under the Labor Management Relations (Taft-H artley) Act,
1947— (BLS Report 169, revised August 1963), fre e .
62
Work Stoppages: A ircraft and Parts Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 175, 1961), fre e .
59
Work Stoppages: Basic Steel Industry, 1901— (BLS Report 206, 1961), fre e .
60
Work Stoppages: Water Transportation Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 176, 1961), fre e .
59
Work Stoppages: Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment Industry, 1927—
58
(BLS Report 148, 1959), fre e .
Work Stoppages by States, 1927— (BLS Report 256, 1963), fre e .
62
Work Stoppages: Contract Construction Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 207, 1962), fre e .
60
Work Stoppages: Meat Products Industry, 1927— (BLS Report 214, 1962), fre e .
60
Work Stoppages: E lectrica l M achinery, Equipment, and Supplies Industry, 1927—
60
(BLS Report 213, 1962), fre e .
Work Stoppages: Metropolitan A rea s, 1952— (BLS Report 236, revised May 1963), fre e .
62
Work Stoppages: Government Em ployees, 1942— (BLS Report 247, 1963), fre e .
61




(For a listing of other industrial relations studies, write for

A D irectory of BLS Studies in Industrial Relations, 1954—
63)


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102