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Analysis of
Work Stoppages




1 9 5 3

M A JO R

DEVELO PM EN TS

AND
A N N U A L S T A T IS T IC S

Bulletin No. 1163
UNITED

STATES

D E P A R T M E N T

James

P. M i t c h e l l ,

O F

L A B O R

Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner




A n a ly s is
W o rk

of

S to p p a g e s




1953

Major Developments
and Annual Statistics

Bulletin No. 1163
U NITED STATES DEPARTM ENT O F L A B O R
J a m e s P. M i t c h e ll, S e c r e t a r y

BIIRIAU OP LABOR STATISTICS
Kwa* Clagno, Co— isslo— r

F o r sale b y th e Superintenden t o f D ocu m en ts, U . S. G overn m en t Printin g Office
W ashington 25, D . C . - P rice 30 cents




Letter o f Transm ittal

U N IT E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R ,
B u re a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ,
W a sh in g to n , D . C . , M a y 2 8 , 1 9 5 4 .

The S e c re ta ry of L ab or:
I h a v e the hon or to t r a n s m it h e re w ith a r e p o r t on w o rk s to p p a g e s d u r ­
ing the y e a r 1 9 5 3 .
A p o r tio n o f th is r e p o r t w a s p r in te d in the M o n th ly L a b o r
R e v ie w fo r M a y 1 9 5 4 .
T h is b u lle tin w a s p r e p a r e d by A n n J . H e r lih y , L o r e t to R . N o la n , and
D a n ie l P . W i l l i s , J r . , w ith the a s s i s t a n c e o f o th er m e m b e r s o f the s ta ff of the
B u r e a u s D iv is io n o f W a g e s and In d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s , under the d ir e c tio n o f
L ily M a r y D a v id .
T h e B u re a u w is h e s to a ck n o w le d g e the w id e s p r e a d c o o p e r a tio n o f e m ­
p l o y e r s , u n io n s, the F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n and C o n c ilia tio n S e r v i c e , and v a r io u s
State a g e n c ie s in fu rn ish in g in fo r m a tio n n eed ed fo r th is r e p o r t .
E w a n C la g u e , C o m m i s s i o n e r .
H on .

J a m e s P . M it c h e ll,
S e c reta ry of L a b o r.







Contents

P age
S u m m a ry _____________________________________________________________________________________
Stoppages of 10, 000 or m o re w o rk e rs _________________________________________________
T ren d s during the y ea r ______________________________________
M a jo r is s u e s ________________________________________________________________________________
Industry groups affected __________________________________________________________________
Stoppages by S t a t e ___________________________________________________________________________
Stoppages by m etrop olitan a r e a __________________________________________________________
Unions in v o lv e d _____________________________________________________________________________
S ize of w ork sto p p a g e s _____ ________________________________________________________________
D uration of stoppages _____________________________________________________________________
M ethods of term in atin g stoppages _______________________________________________________
D isp o sitio n of i s s u e s _______________________________________________________________________

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T a b le s
W o rk stop pages:
1.
2.
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9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

In the United S ta te s, 1 9 2 7 -5 3 ___________________________________________________
Involving 1 0 ,0 0 0 or m o re w o r k e r s , s e le c te d p e r i o d s _________________________
M onthly trends _____________________________________________________________________
M ajor i s s u e s ________________________________________________________________________
B y ind ustry g r o u p _________________________________________________________________
B y S t a t e _____________________________________________________________________________
B y m etro p o lita n a re a _____________________________________________________________
B y a ffiliation of u n io n s ___________________________________________________________
B y num ber of w o rk ers ___________________________________________________________
B y num ber of e s t a b lis h m e n t s ___________________________________________________
Involving 1 0 ,0 0 0 or m o re w o r k e r s , a n a ly sis o f _____________________________
D uration _____________________________________________________________________________
M ethod o f term in atin g ___________________________________________________________
D isp o sitio n of i s s u e s _____________________________________________________________

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8
8
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A P P E N D IX A - T a b les
W o rk stop pages:
1.
2.
3.

B y sp e c ific in d u s t r y ______________________________________________________________
B y industry group and m a jo r is s u e s
_________________________________________
In States having 25 or m o re sto p p a g es, by in d u stry g ro u p _________________

19
21
24

A P P E N D IX B
’ ’N ational E m e r g e n c y ” D ispute - E a st C o a s t L o n g sh o re m e n 1s strike

_________

31

____________________________________

33

A P P E N D IX C
Methods of co lle ctin g w ork stoppage s ta t is tic s




(v)




1

A n alysis of W ork Stoppages D uring 1953
Sum m ary
Strike activity in 1953 was low er
than in m ost postwar y ea rs when m easu red
in te rm s of total idleness but relatively high
as m easu red by the number of stoppages.
A ll stoppages in effect during the
year resulted in 28, 300, 000 m a n -d ays of
idleness-----lower than in any year since
W orld W ar II except 1951. Idleness in 1953
amounted to one-quarter of 1 percent of total
tim e worked, le s s than on e-h alf the p r o ­
portion in the previous y ea r.
The absence
of any prolonged industrywide stoppages
accounted for the sharp drop in id len ess in
1953 (table 1).
The 5 ,0 9 1 *
work stoppages that
began in 1953 w ere exceeded only in 1952
when 5 ,1 1 7 were recorded. A pproxim ately
2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0 w orkers were directly involved
in disputes which started in 1953-----400,000
below the postw ar average.
Strikes ending in 1953 lasted an
average of 2 0 .3 calendar days, com pared
with 1 9 .6 days in 1952. Idlen ess per worker
involved in stoppages, how ever, was so m e ­
what le s s (1 1 .8 working days) than in the
previous year (1 6 .7 days).
The su ccessfu l culmination of b a r ­
gaining in the steel and automobile indus­
tr ie s and the absence of a m ajor stoppage
in bitu m inous-coal mining were generally
ch a ra cteristic of industrial relations in key
in d u stries.
The steel com panies and the
United Steelw orkers (CIO) agreed on an im ­
m ediate wage in crease of 8 .5 cents an hour
in June 1953 and elim ination of geographic
wage differentials by m i d - 1954. M ajor auto­
m obile m anufacturers and the United A uto­
m obile W orkers (CIO) agreed to basic wage

1 This
1953. It

is the total number of verified strikes
in
does not include 23 sm all disputes
for which the Bureau was unable to secure infor­
mation from the parties that an actual work stop­
page occurred.
All known work stoppages arising out of
labor-m anagem ent disputes involving six or m ore
workers and continuing a full day or shift or
longer are included in this report. Figures on
"workers involved" and "man-days idle" cover
all workers made idle for one shift or longer in
establishm ents directly involved in these stoppages.
They do not m easure the indirect or secondary
effects on other establishm ents or industries whose
em ployees are made idle as a result of m aterial
or service shortages.



adjustm ents and lib e ra lized pension plans
after a reopening of their 5 -y e a r contracts
which continue until 1955. With the decline
in coal production, the United Mine W orkers
(Ind. ) deferred reopening of their contracts.
G reater s tr e s s was placed by the
F ed eral Government upon '‘free bargaining"
in settlem ent of disputes, even in defense
in d u stries.
E a rly in the year the G overn­
m ent offered m ediation, but did not in ter­
cede further in the 6 3 -d a y strike at the
Evendale, Ohio, jet a irc ra ft engine plant of
G eneral E le c tr ic C o .,2 or, later in the y ea r,
in the 5 4-d a y stoppage involving North A m e r ­
ican Aviation, I n c .34 In both instances the
parties w ere urged to settle their differen ces
at the bargaining table.
The em ergency provisions of the
L abor-M an agem en t R elations (T aft-H artley)
A ct w ere invoked by P resident Eisenhower
only once during 1953— in the strike during
October arising, out of the unusual situation
involving about 30,000 E a st Coast lo n gsh ore­
m en.
This strike followed failure of the
International Longshorem en1s A sso cia tio n
(Ind. ) and the New Y ork Shipping A s s o c ia ­
tion to agree on a contract to replace the
one that expired on September 3 0 . F ailure
to reach agreem ent was c lo se ly related to
the riv a lry between this union which had
been expelled fro m the A F L and the new
I L A chartered by the A F L . The longshore­
men returned to work on October 6 after
issuance of a court restraining ord er. The
stoppage was not resum ed at the end of the
8 0 -day T a ft-H a rtle y injunction although a
new contract had nbt been signed and the
results of the N L R B representation election
held in D ecem ber to determ ine the appro­
priate bargaining representative were still
in doubt at the y ea r1s end. *

2 This stoppage, involving m em bers of the
International A ssociation of M achinists (AFL) and
the United Automobile Workers (CIO), was caused
by a dispute over the size of a wage increase,
union security, and supplementary wage benefits.
It began March 16 and lasted until May 18. At
its peak about 5,800 w orkers were idle. A backto-w ork movement in the last month of the stop­
page substantially reduced the number of workers
idle. Agreem ent reached on May 17 provided a
wage increase of 6 to 8 cents an hour, which the
company had offered before the stoppage began,
and other fringe benefits.
3 See table 11 for further details on this
stoppage.
4 See Appendix B for a more detailed d is­
cussion of this dispute.

2

Econom ic conditions were prom inent
among the factors influencing the ch a ra cter­
is tic s of work stoppages in 1953.
P ric e s
were relatively stable despite the te rm in a ­
tion of econom ic controls in F ebruary, and
new production records were attained in
many industries.
R econversion prob lem s
that had attended the end of h ostilities in
W orld War II did not recur after the c e s s a ­
tion of Korean h o stilities.
H owever, in ­
flationary p re ssu re s eased and there was
som e uncertainty over the econom ic outlook,
especially in the latter months of the y ea r.
Union demands and settlem ents were a lso
influenced by increasing competition among
m anufacturers of many products. Few large
strikes of long duration occurred in m anu­
facturing industries. M ost of the long, large
stoppages which did occur were in con stru c­
tion. This industry experienced the highest
level of activity in te rm s of dollar expendi­
tures and physical volume recorded in the
39 y ears for which data are available.

In several instances international
union leadership took action to curb unau­
thorized or "w ild c a t" work stoppages. N ota­
ble among these was the action of the o ffi­
cials of the Bridge, Structural and O rnam en­
tal Iron W orkers (A F L ) in perm anently e x ­
pelling on grounds of insubordination, the
bu siness agent of a local union which carried
on an unauthorized 2 9 -day strike at a Joppa,
111 . , powerplant being constructed to supply
power for A tom ic Energy C o m m issio n fa c il­
itie s .
In the same action, six other m e m ­
bers of the local were suspended fro m p a r ­
ticipation in the union’ s a ffa irs for periods
ranging fro m 7 to 10 y e a r s . This stoppage,
which continued fro m the la st half of Sep­
tem ber through the first half of O ctober,
grew out of a dispute over the con tractor’ s
hiring of ironw orkers fro m outside the Joppa
a re a .
The union lo ca l did not com ply with
the instructions of the international to end
the stoppage.
W ork was resum ed under a
F ed eral Court order restraining picketing
until the N LR B ruled on the dispute.

No work stoppages of serious p r o ­
portions developed in the railroad industry
during the year, although several em ergency
boards were created in 1953 by executive
order under the provisions of the Railway
Labor A c t.
One strike, however, received
widespread attention.
It involved a wage
dispute between the Brotherhood of Railway
C lerk s (AFL) and the Railway E x p re ss A g en ­
cy in Pittsburgh, P a. , Detroit, M ich. , and
M ilwaukee, W is. The stoppage lasted 95 days
in Pittsburgh and for shorter periods in the
other two c ities.
During the course of the
con troversy, union em ployees of the c o m ­
pany in over 20 other cities voted to take
strike action effective onD ecem ber 18. How­
e ver, a Presidential em ergency board was
established on D ecem ber 16 and the union
agreed to term inate the strike in Pittsburgh,
M ilwaukee, and D etroit.

A 6 2-d a y strike involving tru ck d rivers
employed by building m a teria ls
dealers in New York City was term inated
in early Septem ber after the international
president of the T ea m ste rs Union (AFL) in ­
tervened in the dispute. Although this stop­
page
directly involved fewer than 3, 000
tru ck d rivers, it indirectly idledabout 100,000
construction w orkers in the New Y ork m e t­
ropolitan area and halted work on many
p r oj e ct s .

E fforts by union lead ers to curb
unauthorized strike action and interunion
disputes were evident in the y e a r’ s d e v el­
opm ents. Except for the longshore dispute,
the incidence of stoppages resulting from
interunion or intraunion conflicts was slightly
below the two preceding y e a r s. Late in 1953,
the A F L and CIO ratified a no-raiding pact
applying to international unions which v o l­
untarily agree to be bound by it. The A F L
also established a special com m ittee to d e ­
vise m achinery for the m ore effective se ttle ­
ment of jurisdictional disputes among its
affiliates and the CIO reported that its p r o ­
cedure for settling jurisdictional problem s
was functioning su ccessfu lly .



Stoppages of 10, 000 or M ore W orkers
Typically, about 1 stoppage out of
200 involves 10,000 or m ore w o rk ers. This
ratio was approxim ated again in 1953 when
28 such large stoppages were recorded.
M ost of these were relatively short and none
was industrywide in scope.
The 650, 000
w ork ers involved and the 7,270,000 m an-days
of idlen ess in these stoppages made up about
a fourth of the y e a r ’ s to tals.
The large
stoppages accounted for a sm aller proportion
of strike idleness in 1953 than in a ll other
p o s t-W o rld War II y ea rs except 1951.
In
1952, p rim a rily because of the steel strike,
the 35 large stoppages accounted for alm ost
tw o-th irds (6 2 .6 percent) of total idleness
(table s 2 and 11).
Ten of the stoppages involving 10,000
or m ore w orkers w ere in the construction
industry which is essen tially loca l in its
operations. However, three relatively b rie f
construction strikes did affect p rojects of
the A tom ic Energy C o m m issio n .
The auto­
m obile industry experienced 4 stoppages of

3
1 0 ,0 0 0 or m ore w o rk ers; steel, 3; rubber
and telephones, 2 each; a irc ra ft, shipping,
food products, apparel, d a irie s, new spapers,
and containers, 1 each.
Stoppages of construction w ork ers
in northern C alifornia and em ployees of North
A m eric a n A viation, I n c ., produced the la r g ­
est amount of id le n e ss. E leven of the m ajor
stoppages lasted le s s than a week; another
5 were concluded in le s s than 2 w eeks; 4
w ere in effect at le a st 2 weeks but le s s than
a month; and 7 continued m ore than a month.
The longest involved em ployees of the New
J e rse y B ell Telephone C o. ; North A m erica n
Aviation, I n c .; and construction w ork ers in
5 a rea s— northern C alifornia and the m e tro ­
politan a re a s of Philadelphia, D etroit, K ansas
C ity, and Indianapolis. One m ajor stoppage
which began D ecem ber 2 continued into Jan­
uary 1954.
This dispute involved 30, 000
em ployees of two m ajor producers of paper
and m etal containers.
Trends During the Y ear
Stoppages during
1953 generally
followed seasonal trends of other postwar
y e a r s , with the number of strikes and id le ­
n ess reaching highest le v e ls in the second
and third q u arte rs.
The 28 stoppages in ­
volving the m ost w orkers were rather evenly
distributed throughout the year although the
la rg e st number (10) began in the second
quarter; 7 occurred in the fir s t 3 months,
5 in the third quarter, and 6 in the la st 3
m onth s.
The number of new strikes reached
its peak of 596 in M ay, then d ecrea sed each
month, to the y e a r ’ s low of 145 in D ecem b e r.
Id len ess, how ever, was low est in February
(1 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0 m a n -d a y s), in creased to a peak
in June (4,530,000), then declined to 1,700,000
days in Septem ber and rem ained clo se to
this lev el for the re st of the y e a r . A large
portion of the June id len ess was accounted
for by stoppages in the construction tra d e s.
The second quarter of the year was
highest in a ll three m ea su res of strike a c ­
tivity— strik e s, w ork ers involved, and m a n days of id le n e ss.
It accounted for a third
of the y e a r’ s stoppages and tw o-fifth s of the
y e a r’ s id le n e ss.
Eight of the 10 m ajor
strikes that took place in this quarter in ­
volved construction w ork ers and 5 of these
lasted m ore than a month.
Third quarter strikes and id len ess
accounted for 28 percent of the y e a r ’ s strikes
and 30 percent of m a n -d a y s id le . Four large
construction strikes that began in the second




quarter carried over into this period.
A ll
5 large stoppages that began in this period
lasted le s s than a half month.
The number of strikes and w orkers
involved reached low est le v e ls in the fourth
quarter, but m a n -d ays idle in this period
exceeded id len ess in the fir s t quarter. Six
large strikes occu rred in this quarter and
one of these, the strike involving 30, 000
w ork ers in the tin can and paperboard con­
tainer ind ustries, continued into the fir s t half
of January 1954.
The 5 4 -d a y North A m e r ­
ican Aviation stoppage was the longest m ajor
strike during this p eriod .
The other la rg e
strikes were le s s than half a month long.
Notable stoppages involving le s s than 10,000
w ork ers included that of Railway E x p re ss
em p loy ees, and a strike of em ployees of
Pittsburgh departm ent and furniture sto re s
and package d elivery se rv ice s which began
in N ovem ber and continued into 1954.
M ajor Issu es
About th ree-fo u rth s of the y e a r’ s
strike idlen ess was caused by disputes over
w ages a n d /o r other m onetary m atters (table
4 ).
A s in m ost recent y e a r s , many of the
disputes were re so lve d by ’’package" se ttle ­
m ents involving in cre a ses in wages and
changes in vacations, holiday, pension, in ­
surance, or other b e n e fits.*
Am ong the
significant stoppages involving wages alone
or in combination with fringe benefits w ere
10 in the construction industry; 2 telephone
strik e s; the strike at North A m erica n A v ia ­
tion, In c.; the 11-d a y stoppage that suspended
publication of 6 m a jo r New Y ork City n ew s­
p a p ers; and a strike at A m erica n Can C o. ,
and Continental Can C o. , which began in
D ecem ber but continued into the fir s t half
of January 1954.
Disputes over other working con­
ditions, such as job security, shop condi­
tions and p o lic ie s , and w orkloads, accounted
for a fifth of the y e a r’ s stoppages and a
fourth of the number of w ork ers id le. Con­
cern over job security by m em b e rs of the
United H atters, Cap and M illin ery W orkers
5
M o n e t a r y i s s u e s c o m b in e d w it h u n io n
c u r it y a c c o u n te d f o r a n o th e r 4 p e r c e n t o f th e m a n d a y s id le — l e s s th a n in o t h e r p o s t w a r y e a r s .
In
1952 s to p p a g e s o v e r th e s e is s u e r c o m b in e d a c ­
co u n te d f o r n e a r ly h a lf o f a ll m a n -d a y s b e c a u s e
t h e y in c lu d e d th e n a t io n w id e s t e e l s t r ik e .
^ M o s t o f th e d is p u t e s in v o lv in g c h a n g e s in
s u p p le m e n t a r y b e n e f it s th a t w e r e u n a c c o m p a n ie d
b y e ffo r t s to ch a n g e w a g e r a t e s a r e g r o u p e d a s
" o t h e r w a g e s , h o u r s , a n d fr in g e b e n e fit s " o n ta b le
4.
A m on g th e se is s u e s w e re r e tr o a c tiv ity o f p a y ,
h o lid a y s , o r v a c a t io n s .
In a d d it io n a b o u t a t h ir d
o f t h e s t o p p a g e s in t h i s " o t h e r " g r o u p w e r e o v e r
p i e c e r a t e s o r in c e n tiv e s ta n d a r d s .

se­

4
(AFL.) was at issu e in a long strike in sup­
port of their demand for renewal of a con­
tract clause prohibiting further d iversion of
work fro m Norwalk, Conn. , plants of the
Hat Corporation of A m eric a to other a r e a s .7
The strike began in July and was still in
effect at the end of the y ea r.
Union security issu e s alone w ere
dominant in about a tenth of the strikes in
1953, involving le s s than 5 percent of both
the w ork ers involved and of the total id le ­
n ess.
M ost of the stoppages in this group
involved attem pts to gain union recognition
and initial contracts fro m e m p lo y e rs.
Out­
standing among these w ere the lengthy strike
involving em ployees of C alcasieu Paper C o.
and Southern Industries, I n c ., in Elizabeth,
L a . , which began in September 1952, and
the 2 8 -d a y stoppage of Louisiana sugar cane
field w o rk ers. Both of these stoppages failed
to gain union recognition. The paper strike
was accom panied by violen ce,
including
dynam iting.
Stoppages involving work ju r is d ic ­
tion, union rivalry, and sympathetic actions
accounted for a relatively sm all proportion
of the year*s strike activity— about 5 p e r ­
cent of both strikes and w orkers and le s s
than 3 percent of total id len ess.
Duration of stoppages varied a c ­
cording to the m ajor issu e s involved. Strikes
caused by combined wage and union organi­
zation disputes were longest, averaging 29.1
calendar days in 1953, com pared with 37.9
days in 1952 and 3 0 .2 days in 1951. Work
stoppages over working conditions such as
job secu rity, workload, and shop conditions
and p o lic ie s were shortest, averaging 9 .1
calendar days, com pared with about 8 days
in both 1952 and 1951.
Within this range,
stoppages caused by disputes over wages
and related m atters alone averaged 2 0 .6
calendar days; union organization issu e s
alone, 1 9 .8 days; and inter
or intraunion
m a tte rs, 1 3 .3 calendar days.
Industry Groups A ffected
Construction was the only industry
group in which id len ess exceeded 1 percent
of total tim e worked during 1953.
The
7
T h e c o m p a n y o f fe r e d to s ig n a c o n t r a c tu a l
p l e d g e t o g i v e 6 m o n t h ’ s n o t i c e o f in t e n t t o m o v e ,
b u t c h a l l e n g e d t h e l e g a l r ig h t o f th e u n io n t o s t r i k e
in o r d e r to f o r c e a b a n on d iv e r t in g w o r k f r o m
o n e a r e a t o a n o t h e r . In o r d e r t o p a y b e n e f i t s t o
t h e s t r i k e r s th e u n io n s o l d b o n d s t o i t s m e m b e r ­
s h ip t o b e r e p a i d b y a s p e c i a l a s s e s s m e n t .
It
a l s o r e c e i v e d f i n a n c i a l h e lp f r o m th e A F L .
B e­
f o r e th e e n d o f 195 3 it w a s r e p o r t e d th a t m o r e
th a n a m i l l i o n d o l l a r s h a d b e e n p a i d o u t in s t r ik e
foreFRASER
b n e fits .

Digitized


8 . 0 0 0 . 000 m an -days idle in this industry
was greater than in any other industry group.
About half of this idlen ess resulted fro m
the 10 stoppages involving 1 0 ,0 0 0 or m ore
w o rk ers. This industry a lso experienced a
record number of stoppages— 1,039 as co m ­
pared with the previous peak of 794 in 1952
(table 5).

In contrast to 1952 when idleness
in each of 13 industry groups exceeded
1 .000.
000 m a n -d a y s, such id len ess was found
in only 9 groups in 1953. M ore than 2,000,000
m an -days of idleness w ere recorded in each
of 3 industry groups in addition to con stru c­
tion: M achinery (except e le c tric a l); tran sp o r­
tation equipment; and transportation, c o m ­
munication, and public u tilities. In the fir s t
two of these groups id len ess amounted to
about o n e-h alf of 1 percent of total tim e
worked and in the third to about one-fifth
of 1 percent of total tim e worked. Idleness
of m ore than 1,000,000 but le s s than 2,000,000
m an -d ays occurred in fabricated m etal prod ­
u cts; e le c tric a l machineTy, equipment and
supplies; p rim a ry m e ta ls; food and kindred
products; and trad e.
Idleness in the mining industry was
low er than in any year since 1942.
The
850, 000 m a n -d a y s of idleness was about a
fifth of the 1952 total. A total of 460 mining
stoppages was
record ed , a drop fro m the
650 in 1952. Other industries that had fewer
disputes in 1953 than in 1952 included o rd ­
nance and a c c e s s o r ie s ; m achinery (except
e le c tric a l); transportation equipment; lu m ­
ber and wood products; stone, clay, and
g la ss products; textile m ill products; ap­
parel and other finished products; leather
and leather products; paper and allied p rod ­
u cts; rubber products; transportation, c o m ­
munication, and other public u tilities.
Stoppages by State
M ore than a m illion m an -d ays of
idlen ess were recorded in each of 9 indus­
tria lize d States, as com pared with 15 in
1952. The la rg e st was the 3, 070, 000 m an days in New Y ork, followed by 2 ,9 9 0 ,0 0 0
in Pennsylvania, 2 ,9 6 0 ,0 0 0 in C aliforn ia,
2 ,4 5 0 ,0 0 0 in M ichigan, and 2 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0 in
Ohio.
A ll of these figures represent s ig ­
nificant d e c rea se s fro m 1952; the la rg est
d eclin es, how ever,
occurred in P en n syl­
vania and Ohio. C om pared with 1 1 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0
m a n -d a y s of idlen ess recorded for Penn­
sylvania industries in 1952, the 1953 total
represented a decline of about 75 percen t.
Ohio, where steel and coal are also im ­
portant, had 7 ,2 6 0 , 000 m a n -d a y s of id len ess
in 1952 and only 2, 390 , 000 in 1953 (table 6 ).

5
Pennsylvania recorded the la rg est
number of stoppages in 1953 as in 1952— 632
com pared with 692.
There w ere 585 stop­
pages in New Y ork com pared with 600 in
1952; and 518 in Ohio com pared with 444 in
1952. Ten or m ore stoppages were recorded
in all States except South Dakota and V e r ­
mont in which 3 and 8 stoppages occurred ,
resp ectiv ely .

Stoppages by M etropolitan A rea

Five or m ore work stoppages o cc u r­
red in each of 135 m etropolitan a rea s in
1953 (table 7 ).
These a re a s accounted for
about th ree-fo u rth s of a ll strik es, w ork ers
involved, and m an -days of idleness in the
country.

Leading industrialized centers gen­
e ra lly experienced the greatest number of
strik e s. Eight m etropolitan a rea s had m ore
than 100 work stoppages each;
New Y o r k N ortheastern New Jersey (586), D etroit (198),
Philadelphia (164), Pittsburgh (137), Chicago
(126), L os A n g eles (122), St. L o u is-E a st
St. Louis (115), and Youngstown (110).

The three a rea s with the m ost
strikes were the only ones to experience
m ore than a m illion m an-days of idlen ess
in 1953; by contrast, in 1952, 12 a rea s each
recorded m ore than a m illion days of id le ­
n ess.
D etroit had the highest number of
w orkers involved (248, 000).

Unions Involved

M ore than half (56 percent) of the
stoppages, accounting for about 44 percent
of the w ork ers and 52 percent of the m a n days of id le n e ss, involved a ffiliates of the
A F L (table 8).
Of this id len ess about onehalf was attributable to stoppages in the con­
struction industry. CIO a ffiliates accounted
for a quarter of the str ik e s. T hese involved
38 percent of all w orkers and 34 percent
of the y e a r rs id le n e ss.
U naffiliated unions
accounted for about 15 percent of the strikes
and the w orkers affected, but only 8 p e r ­
cent of the id le n e ss.




Size of Work Stoppages

M ost work stoppages involve r e la ­
tively few w orkers who are em ployed in one
establishm ent.
A lm o st half the stoppages
in 1953 involved few er than 100 w ork ers
each and over fo u r-fifth s affected le s s than
500 w ork ers (table 9).

About 3 out of 4 stoppages in 1953
occurred in a single plant or establishm ent
(table 10).
T hese disputes accounted for
alm ost half of a ll w ork ers (4 6 .5 percent)
and about a third of a ll id le n e ss.
In con­
tra st, although le s s than 1 stoppage in 10
was widespread (involving 11 establishm ents
or m ore) these stoppages w ere respon sible
for a lm ost a third of the w ork ers involved
and tw o-fifth s of the id le n e ss.

Duration of Stoppages

A s in e a rlie r y e a r s , m ost stoppages
(over 60 percent) lasted le s s than 15 cale n ­
dar days although the average strike was
somewhat longer in 1953 than in the 2 p r e ­
ceding y e a r s .
The average length in 1953
was 2 0 .3 calendar days com pared with 1 9 .6
days in 1952 and 1 7 .4 days in 1951. In 1953
about 42 percent of the stoppages continued
for le s s than a week com pared with 46 p e r ­
cent in 1952 (table 12). T his group accounted
for 45 percent of the w orkers involved, but
only 9 percent of the total m an -days of id le ­
n e s s . About one-fifth of the stoppages lasted
a month or m o re .
These accounted for 22
percent of the w orkers and 66 percent of
the total id le n e ss.
There was apparently
no tendency for the la rg e r strikes to be
either shorter or longer than those involving
r elatively few worker s .

Methods of Term inating Stoppages

A s in previous y e a r s , about half of
the stoppages ending in 19£3 were term inated
through direct negotiations between e m ­
p loyers and em ployees or their rep resen ta ­
tives (table 13).
These directly negotiated
settlem ents accounted for 41 percent of the
w orkers and about a quarter of the total
m an -d ays of id le n e ss.

6
Government m ediation and con cilia ­
tion agencies a ssiste d in term inating about
a third of the stoppages in 1953 as in 1952,
com pared with about a fourth of the strikes
in 1950 and 1951.
T hese were generally
the la rg er stoppages so they accounted for
about 45 percent of the w ork ers and 69 p e r ­
cent of the id le n e ss.

N early a sixth (15 percen t) of the
stoppages, involving 12 percen t of the w ork­
e r s and 6 percent of the id le n e ss, ended
without form al settlem ent,
i. e . , neither
settlem ent of the issu e s nor agreem ent to
negotiate after work was resum ed.
T his
group includes s o -c a lle d M s tM strik e s, with
lo
w ork ers returning to their jo b s because their
cause appeared ho p eless or em p loyers hired
new w orkers to replace striking em p loy ees.




E stablish m ents involved in 1 percent of
the strikes reported the discontinuance of
b u sin e ss.

D isposition of Issu e s
The is s u e s in dispute were settled
or disposed of when the strike was t e r ­
m inated in 82 percent of the strikes in­
volving about 75 percent of the w orkers
(table 14).
In m ost of the c a se s in which
som e issu e s rem ained to be settled after
return, they w ere to be settled by direct
negotiations between the em p loyers and the
unions. O thers w ere to be settled with the
aid of Government a g en cies, by arbitration,
or by re fe r r a l to a Governm ent agency for
decision or election.

7
T A B L E 1 .— W ork sto p p a g e s in the United S ta tes,
W ork

N um ber
b e g in n in g
in y e a r

Y ear

19 2 7
1928
1929
1930
1 93 1

______________________ _
_ ___ __________
..............................................
_ . _ _
_ ___
_
__________

1932
1933
1934
1935
1936

stop p a g es

...............

A v era ge
d u r a tio n stop p a g es
e n d in g
in y e a r
(c a le n d a r
d a y s )2

W o r k e r s i n v o l v e d in s t o p ­
p a g e s b e g in n in g in y e a r 3

N um ber
(th o u s a n d s )

P ercen t
o f tota l
e m p lo y e d 4

1927 -53 1
M a n -d a y s

N um ber
(th o u s a n d s )

id le

(a ll

sto p p a g e s)

P ercen t o f
e s t im a t e d
w o r k in g
t im e o f a ll
w ork ers 5

Per
w ork er
in v o lv e d

707
604
921
637
810

2 6 .5
2 7 .6
2 2 .6
2 2 .3
1 8 .8

330
314
289
183
342

1 .4
1 .3
1 .2
.8
1 .6

2 6 ,2 0 0
1 2 ,6 0 0
5 , 350
3 , 320
6 ,8 9 0

0 . 37
. 17
.0 7
.0 5
.1 1

7 9 .5
4 0 .2
1 8 .5
1 8 .1
2 0 .2

841
1 ,6 9 5
1, 8 5 6
2 ,0 1 4
2 , 172

1 9 .6
1 6 .9
1 9 .5
2 3 .8
2 3 .3

324
1 , 17 0
1 ,4 7 0
1, 120
789

1 .8
6 .3
7 .2
5 .2
3. 1

1 0 ,5 0 0
1 6 ,9 0 0
1 9 ,6 0 0
1 5 ,5 0 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

.2 3
. 36
. 38
.2 9
.2 1

3 2 .4
1 4 .4
1 3 .4
1 3 .8
1 7 .6

19 3 7
1938
1939
1940
1941

_______________________
____
_
_____________________
___
_
_
_
_________________________

4 ,7 4 0
2 ,7 7 2
2 ,6 1 3
2 , 508
4 ,2 8 8

2 0 .3
2 3 .6
2 3 .4
2 0 .9
1 8 .3

1 ,8 6 0
688
1 , 17 0
577
2 ,3 6 0

7 .2
2 .8
4 .7
2 .3
8 .4

2 8 ,4 0 0
9 ,1 5 0
1 7 ,8 0 0
6 ,7 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0

.4 3
. 15
.2 8
. 10
.3 2

1 5 .3
1 3 .3
1 5 .2
1 1 .6
9 .8

1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

________________________
_____________
_____________
_ _
__

2 ,9 6 8
3 , 7 52
4 ,9 5 6
4 ,7 5 0
4 ,9 8 5

1 1 .7
5 .0
5 .6
9 .9
2 4 .2

840
1 ,9 8 0
2 , 12 0
3 ,4 7 0
4 ,6 0 0

2 .8
6 .9
7 .0
1 2 .2
14. 5

4 , 180
1 3 ,5 0 0
8 ,7 2 0
3 8 ,0 0 0
1 1 6 ,0 0 0

.0 5
. 15
.0 9
.4 7
1 .4 3

5 .0
6 .8
4. 1
1 1 .0
2 5 .2

1 9 4 7 ____
__ .....
1 9 4 8 _________________
1 9 4 9 _________________ ________
1 9 5 0 6 _________________________
1 95 1

3 ,6 9 3
3 ,4 1 9
3 ,6 0 6
4 ,8 4 3
4 ,7 3 7

2 5 .6
2 1 .8
2 2 .5
1 9 .2
1 7 .4

2 , 17 0
1 ,9 6 0
3 ,0 3 0
2 ,4 1 0
2 ,2 2 0

6 .5
5 .5
9 .0
6 .9
5 .5

3 4 ,6 0 0
3 4 ,1 0 0
5 0 ,5 0 0
3 8 ,8 0 0
2 2 ,9 0 0

.4 1
.3 7
.5 9
.4 4
.2 3

1 5 .9
1 7 .4
1 6 .7
1 6 .1
1 0 .3

1 9 5 2 _________________________
1 9 5 3 7 _______
1954
1 9 5 5 __
1 9 5 6 ... ____ _ _

5 , 117
5 ,0 9 1

1 9 .6
2 0 .3

3, 540
2 ,4 0 0

8 .8
5 .6

5 9 ,1 0 0
2 8 ,3 0 0

.5 7
.2 6

1 6 .7
1 1 .8

____________________

1957
1958

______________
.

___

1959
1960

..............................................
_________________________

1 A v a ila b le in fo r m a t io n f o r e a r l i e r p e r i o d s i s c o n ta in e d in B L S B u lle tin N o . 1 0 1 6 , H a n d b o o k o f L a b o r S ta ­
t i s t i c s , T a b le E 2 .
2 F i g u r e s a r e s i m p le a v e r a g e s ; e a c h s t o p p a g e i s g iv e n e q u a l w e ig h t r e g a r d l e s s o f it s s i z e .
3 W o r k e r s a r e c o u n t e d m o r e t h a n o n c e in t h e s e f i g u r e s i f t h e y w e r e i n v o l v e d i n m o r e t h a n 1 s t o p p a g e d u r ­
in g th e y e a r .
T h u s in 1949 3 6 5 ,0 0 0 t o 4 0 0 ,0 0 0 c o a l m in e r s w e r e ou t on 3 d i s t in c t o c c a s i o n s , a c c o u n t in g f o r
1 ,1 5 0 ,0 0 0 o f a to ta l o f 3 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s .
4 " T o t a l e m p lo y e d w o r k e r s " f o r 1 9 2 7 -5 0 r e f e r s to a ll w o r k e r s e x c e p t t h o s e in o c c u p a t io n s a n d p r o f e s s i o n s
in w h ic h t h e r e i s lit t l e i f a n y u n io n o r g a n i z a t io n o r in w h ic h s t o p p a g e s r a r e l y i f e v e r o c c u r .
In m o s t in d u s t r ie s ,
it i n c lu d e s a ll w a g e a n d s a l a r y w o r k e r s e x c e p t t h o s e in e x e c u t i v e , m a n a g e r i a l , o r h ig h s u p e r v i s o r y p o s i t i o n s , o r
t h o s e p e r f o r m i n g p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k th e n a tu r e o f w h ic h m a k e s u n io n o r g a n iz a t io n o r g r o u p a c t io n u n lik e ly .
It e x ­
c lu d e s a ll s e l f - e m p lo y e d , d o m e s t ic w o r k e r s , w o r k e r s o n f a r m s e m p lo y in g f e w e r th a n 6 p e r s o n s , a ll F e d e r a l a n d
S ta te G o v e r n m e n t e m p l o y e e s , a n d o f f i c i a l s , b o th e l e c t e d a n d a p p o in t e d , in l o c a l g o v e r n m e n t s .
In 1 9 5 1 ,
t h e c o n c e p t o f " t o t a l e m p l o y e d w o r k e r s " w a s c h a n g e d t o c o i n c i d e w it h t h e B u r e a u 's
fig u r e s
f o r n o n a g r ic u lt u r a l e m p lo y m e n t , e x c lu d in g G o v e r n m e n t bu t in c lu d in g w o r k e r s in a ll o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p s .
T ests
sh o w th a t th e p e r c e n t a g e o f t o t a l id le n e s s c o m p u t e d o n th e b a s i s o f t h e s e n e w f i g u r e s u s u a lly d i f f e r s b y l e s s th an
V10 o f a p o i n t w h i l e t h e p e r c e n t a g e o f w o r k e r s i d l e d i f f e r s b y a b o u t 0 . 5 o r 0 . 6 o f a p o i n t .
F o r e x a m p le , th e
p e r c e n t a g e o f w o r k e r s i d l e d u r i n g 1 9 5 0 c o m p u t e d o n t h e s a m e b a s e a s th e f i g u r e s f o r e a r l i e r y e a r s i s 6 . 9 a n d
th e p e r c e n t o f i d le n e s s i s 0 . 4 4 c o m p a r e d w it h 6 . 3 a n d 0 . 4 r e s p e c t i v e l y , c o m p u t e d o n th e n e w b a s e .
5 F or each y e a r,
" e s t im a t e d w o r k in g t im e " w a s c o m p u t e d f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h is t a b le b y m u lt ip ly in g th e
a v e r a g e n u m b e r o f e m p lo y e d w o r k e r s (s e e fo o tn o te 4 ) b y th e n u m b e r o f d a y s w o r k e d b y m o s t e m p l o y e e s .
T h is
n u m b e r e x c lu d e s S a tu rd a y s w h en c u s t o m a r ily n ot w o r k e d , S u n d a y s, an d e s t a b lis h e d h o lid a y s .
6 B e g in n in g in m i d - 1 9 5 0 , a n e w s o u r c e o f s t r ik e " l e a d s " w a s a d d e d t h r o u g h a c o o p e r a t i v e a r r a n g e m e n t
w it h t h e B u r e a u o f E m p l o y m e n t S e c u r i t y o f t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r b y w h i c h l o c a l o f f i c e s o f S t a t e e m p l o y ­
m e n t s e c u r it y a g e n c i e s s u p p ly m o n t h ly r e p o r t s o f w o r k s t o p p a g e s c o m in g to t h e ir a t t e n t io n .
It i s e s t i m a t e d t h a t
t h i s i n c r e a s e d t h e n u m b e r o f s t r i k e s r e p o r t e d in 1 9 5 0 b y p e r h a p s 5 p e r c e n t a n d in 1 9 5 1 a n d 1 9 5 2 b y a p p r o x i m a t e l y
10 p e r c e n t .
H o w e v e r , s in c e m o s t o f th e a d d e d s t o p p a g e s w e r e s m a ll, th e y i n c r e a s e d th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s in ­
v o l v e d a n d m a n - d a y s o f i d l e n e s s b y l e s s t h a n 2 p e r c e n t in 1 9 5 0 a n d b y l e s s t h a n 3 p e r c e n t i n 1 9 5 1 a n d 1 9 5 2 . T e s t s
o f th e e f f e c t o f t h is a d d e d s o u r c e o f in fo r m a t io n h a v e n o t b e e n m a d e s in c e 1 9 5 2 .
7 T h e t o t a l o f 5 , 0 9 1 s t r i k e s d o e s n o t i n c l u d e 23 s m a l l w o r k s t o p p a g e s f o r w h i c h t h e B u r e a u w a s u n a b le t o
s c u e in fo r m
Digitizede forrFRASER a t i o n f r o m t h e p a r t i e s t h a t a n a c t u a l w o r k s t o p p a g e o c c u r r e d .



8
T A B L E 2 .— W ork stop p ag es in v olv in g 10,000 o r m o r e w o r k e r s , s e le c te d p e r io d s
S to p p a g e s in v o lv in g 10, 000 o r m o r e w o r k e r s

P e r io d
N um ber

1 9 3 5 - 3 9 a v e r a g e ----------------------------------------- —
1 9 4 7 - 4 9 a v e r a g e ------- ------------------------ ------------1 9 4 5 ---------- -----------------------------------—
---------------............
............. ..................
1946
1947
...................................................................-----1 9 4 8 - --------------------------------------------------- -------------------1 9 4 9 ---------------- -----------------------------------------------------1 9 5 0 .................................................................- ................
1 9 5 1 -----------------------------------------------------------------------1952..................................................................
1 9 5 3 ............................................ - ............................. -

1

P ercen t
o f tota l
fo r
p e r io d

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d 1
N um ber
(th o u sa n d s)

0 .4
.5
.9
o6
o4
. 6
. 5
.5
.4
,7
. 5

11
18
42
31
15
20
18
22
19
35
28

M a n -d a y s id le

P e rce n t of
tota l fo r
p e r io d

365
1 ,2 7 0
1, 3 5 0
2, 920
1, 0 3 0
870
1 ,9 2 0
738
457
1, 6 9 0
650

N um ber
th ou sa n d s)

P ercen t of
tota l fo r
p e r io d

5 ,2 9 0
2 3 , 800
1 9 ,3 0 0
6 6 ,4 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
1 8 ,9 0 0
3 4 ,9 0 0
2 1 , 700
5 , 680
3 6 ,9 0 0
7 ,2 7 0

{

3 1 .2
5 9 .9
5 0 .7
5 7 .2
5 1 .2
5 5 .3
6 9 .0
5 6 .0
24. 8
6 2 .6
2 5 .7

3 2 .4
5 3 .4
3 8 .9
63. 6
4 7 .5
4 4 .5
6 3 .2
3 0 .7
20. 6
47. 8
27. 1

S e e f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 1.

T A B L E 3 . — M o n t h l y t r e n d s in w o r k s t o p p a g e s ,

N u m ber o f stop p a g es

1 9 5 2 -5 3

W o r k e r s i n v o l v e d in s t o p p a g e s
In e f f e c t d u r i n g m o n t h

M on th

B e g in n in g
in
m on th

In e f f e c t
d u r in g
m on th

438
403
438
529
518
435
433
494
522
459
269
179

568
585
614
756
800
719
694
786
828
768
535

341
327
457
560
596
567
534
484
420
379
281
14 5

492
489
639
798
869
875
841
763
72 1
658
502
354

B e g in n in g
in m o n t h
(th o u s a n d s )

N um ber
(th o u s a n d s )

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g m o n th

P ercen t of
e s t im a t e d
P ercen t
N um ber
w o r k in g
o f tota l
(th o u s a n d s )
t im e o f a ll
e m p lo y e d 1
w ork ers 2

1952

J a n u a r y --------------- ------------------------------------------------F e b r u a r y —-----------------------------------------------------------M a r c h ------------------ ------------ —--------------------------------A p r i l ------------------ --------------------- ------------------------------M a y ----------------------------------- -------------------------------—
—
J u n e ------------- ------------------ ---------------------------------------J u l y -------------------------------- -- ------------ --------------- --------A u g u s t 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------S e p t e m b e r ' ....... . — ............- ....... .............. - ■
-------O c t o b e r ------------------ ------------ ------------------ — ---------N o v e m b e r ---------------------------------------------- --------------D e c e m b e r ----------------------------------- ------------------- —

369

212
190
303
1 ,0 4 0
363
201
166
228
250
450
99
34

251
258
359
1, 170
1 ,2 0 0
990
866
380
378
584
215
82

0 . 64
.6 5
.9 1
2 .9 4
3 . 02
2 .4 9
2 .2 0
.9 4
.9 2
1 .4 2
. 52
.2 0

1 ,3 4 0
1 ,3 7 0
1 ,6 1 0
5 ,3 7 0
8 ,0 2 0
1 5 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,7 0 0
2 ,8 1 0
3 , 390
5 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 6 0
854

0 . 15
. 17
. 19
. 61
.9 6
1 .8 0
1 .4 6
.3 3
.3 9
.5 3
.2 0

189
131
196
312
313
258
293
238

223
193
237
413
406
448
491
393
211
240
175
173

. 53
. 46
.5 9
.9 8
.9 6
1 .0 5
1 0 19
.9 1
.4 9
.5 6
.4 1
.4 1

1 ,3 6 0
1 , 100
1 ,2 6 0
2 , 690
3 ,7 7 0
4 ,5 3 0
3 ,8 8 0
2 ,8 8 0
1 ,7 0 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,5 7 0
1 ,8 8 0

. 16
.1 3
. 14
.2 9
.4 2
.4 8
.3 9
.3 2

.0 9

1953

J a n u a r y -------------------------------- --------------------------- —
F e b r u a r y —--------------- --------------------------------------- —
M a r c h — ----------------------------------------------------- ------~
A p r i l --------------------- --------------- — ---------------------------M a y ------- ---------------------------------- ---------------------------J u n e ----------------------------------------------------------------- —
J u l y -----------------------------------------------------------------------A u g u s t —--------------------- ------- --------------------- ------------S e p t e m b e r --------------------- -------------------- -----------------O c t o b e r -------------------------- -------------------------------------N o v e m b e r — ------------------ ------------------------------------D e c e m b e r — ------------------ ----------—--------- ------------- -

11 9
175
100
76

S e e f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 1.
S e e f o o t n o t e 5 , t a b l e 1.
T h e s e f i g u r e s d o n o t i n c l u d e t h e " m e m o r i a l " s t o p p a g e i n c o a l m in in g ,




. 19
. 17
. 18
.2 0

9
T A B L E 4 . — M a j o r i s s u e s i n v o l v e d in w o r k s t o p p a g e s ,

1953

W o r k s t o p p a g e s b e g in n in g in 1953
W o r k e r s in v o lv e d
M a jo r is s u e s
N um ber

A ll is s u e s

--------------------- — --------------------------------

5 ,0 9 1

P ercen t
of
tota l 1

N um ber 1

1 0 0 .0

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

P ercen t
of
tota l 1

M a n -cL l y s id le
g 1953
(a ll stc> p p ages)

N um ber 1

1 0 0 .0

2 8 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

P ercen t
of
to ta l1

1 0 0 .0

a n d f r i n g e b e n e f i t s 2 -----

2 , 825

5 5 .5

1 ,4 6 0 , 000

6 0 .8

2 1 , 8 0 0 ,0 0 0

77. 1

W a g e i n c r e a s e --------------------------------- ------—
W age d e cre a s e
----------------------------------------W a g e i n c r e a s e , h o u r d e c r e a s e ---------W age in c r e a s e , p e n s io n a n d / o r
s o c i a l i n s u r a n c e b e n e f i t s ----- -----------P e n s io n a n d /o r s o c ia l in s u r a n c e
b e n e f i t s ------- --------------------------------— --------O t h e r 3 ............................. - -

1, 7 9 8
23
89

35. 3
.5
1 .7

8 3 6 ,0 0 0
9 ,2 5 0
7 8 ,2 0 0

3 4 .8
.4
3 .3

1 4 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 3 3 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0

5 1 .5
.5
3 .7

277

5 .4

1 7 7 ,0 0 0

7 .4

2 ,5 4 0 ,0 0 0

9 .0

48
590

.9
11. 6

5 2 ,6 0 0
3 0 7 ,0 0 0

2 .2
12. 8

2 3 4 ,0 0 0
3 ,2 8 0 ,0 0 0

.8
1 1 .6

202

4. 0

4 5 ,2 0 0

1 .9

1 ,2 5 0 ,0 0 0

4 .4

119

2. 3

1 2 ,0 0 0

.5

3 1 7 ,0 0 0

1. 1

26

.5

1 7 ,1 0 0

. 7

5 0 5 ,0 0 0

1 .8

57

1. 1

1 6 ,1 0 0

. 7

4 2 4 ,0 0 0

1 .5

4 .9

9 3 5 ,0 0 0

3 .3

1. 3
.3
. 7

1 .8
.3
.7

W ages, h ou rs,

U n io n o r g a n i z a t i o n w a g e s , h o u r s ,
a n d f r i n g e b e n e f i t s 2 ----------------------------------R e c o g n i t i o n , w a g e s a n d / o r h o u r s -----S tr e n g th e n in g b a r g a in in g p o s i t io n ,
w a g e s a n d / o r h o u r s ------— ------------------C lo s e d o r u n io n s h o p , w a g e s
a n d / o r h o u r s -------------------------------------- ------

U n io n o r g a n i z a t i o n -------------- ------------------ -------

543

R e c o g n i t i o n ----- ----------------------------------------—
S t r e n g t h e n i n g b a r g a i n i n g p o s i t i o n -----C l o s e d o r u n i o n s h o p --------------------- — —
D i s c r i m i n a t i o n --------------------------- —---------O t h e r ----------------------------------- ------------------ —— -

361
38
89
10
45

O t h e r w o r k i n g c o n d i t i o n s ------------------------ —

1 0 .7
7. 1
.7
1. 7
.2
.9

1 1 7 ,0 0 0
3 0 ,5 0 0
6, 500
16, 700
920
6 2 ,5 0 0

(4 )
2. 6

5 2 0 ,0 0 0
9 0 ,1 0 0
1 9 5 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,8 0 0
1 2 0 ,0 0 0

(4 )
.4

1, 135

2 2 .3

6 3 8 ,0 0 0

2 6 .6

3 , 5 6 0 ,0 0 0

1 2 .6

502
540
77
16

9 .9
10. 6
1 .5
. 3

2 3 5 ,0 0 0
3 2 6 ,0 0 0
5 3 , 500
2 3 ,6 0 0

9 .8
13. 6
2 .2
1 .0

1, 7 3 0 , 0 0 0
1, 3 0 0 , 0 0 0
4 9 3 ,0 0 0
3 5 ,8 0 0

6. 1
4 .6
1 .7
. 1

------------

275

5 .4

1 3 0 ,0 0 0

5 .4

6 8 4 ,0 0 0

2 .4

S y m p a t h y ---------------- ------------ -----------------------U n io n r i v a l r y o r f a c t i o n a l i s m 6 ---------J u r i s d i c t i o n ------------------ -----------------------------U n io n r e g u l a t i o n s -----------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------

64
49
158
3
1

1.
1.
3.
.

. 8
2. 1
2 .4
(4 )
. 1

1 0 7 ,0 0 0
2 3 4 ,0 0 0
3 2 7 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
4 ,5 0 0

.4
.8
1 .2

(4)

1 9 ,7 0 0
5 0 ,8 0 0
5 6 , 600
900
1, 5 0 0

N o t r e p o r t e d --------------------- --------------------------------

111

2 .2

1 3 ,2 0 0

. 6

4 5 ,9 0 0

.2

J o b s e c u r i t y ----- ----------------------------------------S h o p c o n d i t i o n s a n d p o l i c i e s -------------------- W o r k lo a d - - - - - O t h e r 5 ----------------------------------------------- ------------

In te r u n io n o r in t r a u n io n m a t t e r s

3
0
1
1

(4 )
(4)

1 T h e s u m o f th e in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l th e t o t a ls f o r th e g r o u p b e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g th e in d iv id u a l
f i g u r e s in t h i s a n d s u b s e q u e n t t a b l e s .
2 " F r i n g e b e n e f i t s " h a s b e e n a d d e d to th e t it le o n ly to in d ic a te in c lu s i o n o f n o n w a g e b e n e f i t s .
T h ere has been
n o c h a n g e f r o m p r e v i o u s y e a r s in d e f in it io n o r c o n t e n t o f t h e s e g r o u p s .
3 I n c l u d e s s t o p p a g e s i n w h i c h th e m a j o r i s s u e w a s r e t r o a c t i v i t y , h o l i d a y s , v a c a t i o n s , j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , p i e c e ­
w o r k r a t e s ,a n d r e la t e d m a t t e r s .
4 L e s s th an a te n th o f 1 p e r c e n t .
5 T h is g r o u p i n c l u d e s p r o t e s t s t r i k e s a g a i n s t a c t i o n , o r l a c k o f a c t i o n , b y G o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s .
6 T h is g r o u p i n c l u d e s t h e 5 - d a y s t r i k e i n v o l v i n g 3 0 , 0 0 0 l o n g s h o r e m e n o n t h e E a s t C o a s t in O c t o b e r .
A l t h o u g h t h e r e w e r e o t h e r i s s u e s i n v o l v e d in t h i s d i s p u t e , t h e o u t s t a n d i n g i s s u e w a s t h e r i v a l r y b e t w e e n th e
I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n (I n d . ) a n d t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's A s s o c i a t i o n ( A F L ) .




10
T A B L E 50— W ork stopp ag es b y in d u stry g rou p , 1953
S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
In d u stry g rou p

h ia n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1953
(a ll s to p p a g e s )
P ercen t of
e s t im a t e d
N um ber
w o r k in g
tim e o f a ll
w o r k e r s 23

N um ber

M A N U F A C T U R IN G

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------------------------F a b r ic a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t o r d n a n c e ,
m a c h i n e r y , a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) ----------------O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s -----------------------------------------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u i p m e n t , a n d s u p p l i e s —-----M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------------- —--------- — ------- -----T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------------------------------------------L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ------------F u r n i t u r e a n d f i x t u r e s --------------------— -------------------------------- —
S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ---------------- ------------ -------------T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------------- -----A p p a r e l an d o th e r fin is h e d p r o d u c t s m a d e f r o m
f a b r i c s a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s — -------------------------------------L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------------F o o d a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------------------------T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ------------------------------ —---------------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s — ---------------------------------------------- —
P r i n t i n g , p u b l i s h i n g , a n d a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s -------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l ------------------------------------------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------- ------------------ -------------------P r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n t ific , and c o n t r o llin g
in s t r u m e n ts ; p h o t o g r a p h ic a n d o p t ic a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s a n d c l o c k s ----------------------------- ----------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------

N ON M A N U F A C T U R IN G

_

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , a n d f i s h i n g ------------------------------------M i n i n g ------------------------ --------------------------------- ----------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------T r a d e ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e --------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , an d o th e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s --------------------- --------------- --------------------------------------S e r v i c e s — p e r s o n a l , b u s i n e s s , a n d o t h e r ----------------------G o v e rn m e n t— a d m in is tr a tio n , p r o t e c tio n ,
a n d s a n i t a t i o n 5 -------------------------------------- ----------------------- ----------

5 ,0 9 1

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

2 8 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

0.26

3 2 ,6 1 2

A l l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------------------- — ------------------------

W ork ers
in v o lv e d 1

1 ,3 2 0 ,0 0 0

1 5 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0

0 .3 6

312

202,000

1 ,5 1 0 ,0 0 0

.4 5

291
23
137
286
179
125
134
128
88

102,000
2 1 ,4 0 0
76 , 600
1 2 6 ,0 0 0
3 0 0 ,0 0 0
19,800
2 5 ,1 0 0
1 9 ,4 0 0
26,600

1 , 690,000
1 6 4 ,0 0 0
1 , 6 2 0 , 000
2 , 150, 000
2 ,7 3 0 ,0 0 0
5 1 2 ,0 0 0
2 6 9 , 000
3 1 6 ,0 0 0
5 9 3 ,0 0 0

.5 7
.3 2
.5 3
.5 0
.5 5
.2 6
.2 8
.2 3
. 19

193
48
213
4
45
44
107
19
102

3 5 , 600
11,900
9 8 ,4 0 0
480
1 5 ,4 0 0
2 1 ,3 0 0
3 6 ,5 0 0
2 , 610
1 4 1 ,0 0 0

2 9 6 , 000
99,10 0
1 , 210,000
2 0 ,8 0 0
222,000
2 4 5 ,0 0 0
8 2 5 ,0 0 0
1 0 5 ,0 0 0
4 9 3 ,0 0 0

.0 9
. 10
.3 0
.0 8
. 16
. 12
.4 3
. 16
.7 1

41
105

1 1 ,4 0 0
21,000

2 4 6 ,0 0 0
2 8 0 ,0 0 0

.2 9
.22

3 2 , 479

1 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0

1 2 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0

. 19

14
460
1, 0 3 9
408
13

8 , 140
1 5 6 ,0 0 0
5 7 4 ,0 0 0
7 1 ,2 0 0
950

1 1 3 ,0 0 0
8 4 6 ,0 0 0
8, 000,000
1 ,0 5 0 , 000
2 1 , 600

(4)
.4 0
1.22
.0 4

372
145

2 5 6 , 000
14 , 4 0 0

2 ,3 8 0 ,0 0 0
202,000

(4)

30

6 , 280

5 3 ,4 0 0

(4)

(4)
.22

1 S e e f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 1.
2 S e e fo o tn o te s 4 an d 5, t a b le 1 ,
3 T h e s u m o f t h e f i g u r e s in t h i s c o l u m n e x c e e d s 5 , 0 9 1 b e c a u s e a f e w s t o p p a g e s e x t e n d i n g i n t o t w o o r m o r e
in d u s t r y g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n t e d in th is c o lu m n in e a c h i n d u s t r y g r o u p a f f e c t e d ; w o r k e r s i n v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s id le
w e r e d i v i d e d a m o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g r o u p s .
4 N ot a v a ila b le .
5 M u n ic ip a lly o p e r a t e d u t i li t ie s a r e in c lu d e d u n d e r " T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s " .




11
T A B L E 6 .— W o rk stopp ages b y State, 1953
W o r k s t o p p a g e s b e g i n n i n g in 1 9 5 3
W o r k e r s i n v o l v e d 12

M a n -d a y s id le
' 19 5 3
( a l l s to ] p p a g e s )

S tate
N um ber
N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

2 5 , 09 1

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

2 8 , 3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

A l a b a m a ---------------------------A r i z o n a ------------------------------A r k a n s a s -------------------------C a l i f o r n i a ------------------------C o l o r a d o ---------------------------C o n n e c t i c u t ---------------------D e l a w a r e ---------------------------

110
13
42
269
34
86
12

3 6 ,2 0 0
2 , 130
1 1 ,7 0 0
210,000
6 ,5 5 0
2 8 ,8 0 0
8 ,4 6 0

1 .5
. 1
. 5
8. 8
.3
1.2
.4

2 8 9 ,0 0 0
4 3 ,5 0 0
1 3 2 ,0 0 0
2 ,9 6 0 ,0 0 0
69,000
52 6 , 000
3 1 6 ,0 0 0

1.0
.2
.5
1 0 .5
.2
1 .9
1. 1

D i s t r i c t o f C o l u m b i a ----F l o r i d a ------------------------------G e o r g i a -----------------------------I l l i n o i s ------------------------------I n d ia n a ------------------------------I o w a ------------------------------------

16
75
54
13
316
191
60

4 , 510
2 4 ,4 0 0
1 3 ,4 0 0
3 ,4 3 0
98,200
1 3 9 ,0 0 0
21,200

.2
1.0
.6
. 1
4. 1
5 .8
.9

2 3 ,9 0 0
2 1 7 ,0 0 0
120,000
20,900
1 ,4 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 4 0 ,0 0 0
3 8 7 ,0 0 0

. 1
.8
.4
. 1
5 .0
5 .5
1 .4

K a n s a s --------------------------- —
K e n t u c k y ---------------------------L o u i s i a n a — ---------------------M a i n e ----------------------------------M a r y l a n d --------------------------M a s s a c h u s e t t s ---------------M i c h i g a n -----------------------------

31
163
70
16
45
176
331

1 5 ,4 0 0
8 5 ,3 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0
5 ,0 9 0
1 9 ,4 0 0
4 6 ,1 0 0
2 9 7 ,0 0 0

.6
3. 6
1.0
.2
.8
1 .9
1 2 .4

3 2 3 ,0 0 0
4 2 2 ,0 0 0
2 8 6 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,6 0 0
191,000
618,000
2 ,4 5 0 ,0 0 0

1. 1
1 .5
1.0
. 1
.7
2.2
8 .7

M i n n e s o t a -------------------------M i s s i s s i p p i ----------------------M i s s o u r i ----------------------------M o n t a n a -----------------------------N e b r a s k a --------------------------N e v a d a ---------------------------------N e w H a m p s h i r e --------------

70
20
140
10
17
17
16

1 6 ,0 0 0
2 ,4 9 0
6 1 ,3 0 0
3 ,7 1 0
4 , 680
3, 610
2 , 110

.7
. 1
2..6
.2
.2
.2
. 1

2 7 2 ,0 0 0
4 8 ,1 0 0
1 , 220,000
9 8 ,0 0 0
8 7 ,4 0 0
2 9 ,7 0 0
2 1 ,8 0 0

1.0
.2
4 .3
.3
.3
. 1
. 1

N e w J e r s e y ----------------------N e w M e x i c o --------------------N e w Y o r k -------------------------N o r t h C a r o l i n a ----------------N o r t h D a k o t a -------------------O h io --------------------------------------O k l a h o m a --------------------------

263
20
585
25
10
518
53

80,600
5 , 870
2 0 8 ,0 0 0
10,100
930
2 1 8 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,4 0 0

3 .4
.2
8 .7
.4

1 ,2 8 0 ,0 0 0
4 1 ,7 0 0
3 ,0 7 0 ,0 0 0
196,000
1 3 ,3 0 0
2 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 5 5 ,0 0 0

4 .5
. 1
10.8
.7

O r e g o n ---------------------------------P e n n s y l v a n i a -------------------R h o d e I s l a n d ---------------------S o u t h C a r o l i n a ------------------S o u t h D a k o t a ---------------------T e n n e s s e e --------------------------T exas
----------------------------------

49
632
37
21
3
125
89

10,200
3 1 8 ,0 0 0
11,200
2 5 ,4 0 0
500
6 5 , 500
5 8 ,1 0 0

.4
1 3 .2
.5
1. 1
( 3)
2 .7
2 .4

1 2 9 ,0 0 0
2 ,9 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 3 4 ,0 0 0
1 1 4 ,0 0 0
18,900
6 0 5 ,0 0 0
668,000

.5
10.6
. 5
.4
. 1
2. 1
2 .4

U t a h ------------------------------------ -V e r m o n t -----------------------------V i r g i n i a — --------------------------W a s h i n g t o n ------------------------W e s t V i r g i n i a --------------------W i s c o n s i n ---------------------------W y o m i n g ------------------------------

39
8
65
66
165
100
16

2 3 ,4 0 0
2 ,0 5 0
2 4 ,9 0 0
4 6 ,0 0 0
4 9 ,5 0 0
3 0 ,3 0 0
1 ,7 4 0

1. 0
. 1
1.0
1 .9
2. 1
1 .3
. 1

2 4 6 ,0 0 0
5 5 ,0 0 0
1 5 7 ,0 0 0
5 8 1 ,0 0 0
3 4 7 ,0 0 0
7 7 1 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,4 0 0

.9
.2
.6
2. 1
1.2
2 .7
. 1

A ll S ta tes

( 3)
9. 1
. 8

( 3)
8 .5
.9

1 S ee fo o tn o te 3, t a b le 1 .
2 T h e s u m o f t h e f i g u r e s in t h i s c o l u m n e x c e e d s 5 , 0 9 1 b e c a u s e t h e s t o p p a g e s e x t e n d i n g a c r o s s S t a t e l i n e s
b e e n c o u n t e d in e a c h S ta te a f f e c t e d , b u t th e w o r k e r s i n v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s id le w e r e d iv id e d a m o n g th e S t a t e s .
3 L e s s th an a te n th o f 1 p e r c e n t .




have

12
T A B L E 7 .— W o rk sto p p a g es b y m e tr o p o lita n a r e a , 1953 1

M e t r o p o lit a n a r e a

W ork stop p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
1953
N um ber 2

W orkers
in v o lv e d

44
30

8 ,7 7 0

25
6
15

6,090
590
6, 11 0

A t l a n t i c C i t y , N . J . ---------A u g u s t a , G a . -----------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d . -------------------B e a u m o n t-P o r t A r th u r ,

6
13
27

840
2 3 ,9 0 0
1 7 ,2 0 0

— -------

14
6

6 , 590
820

B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . ------------B o s t o n , M a s s . --------------------B r i d g e p o r t , C o n n . — --------B r o c k t o n , M a s s . ---------------B u f f a l o , N . Y . ---------------------

42
78
19
9
84

6 , 090
1 4 ,4 0 0
6, 610
2 , 150
3 5, 500

C a n t o n , O h i o --------------------—
C e d a r R a p i d s , I o w a ---------C h a r l e s t o n , W . V a . ---------C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . —------C h e y e n n e , W y o . ----------------

18
7
12
21
8

4 ,8 5 0
2 , 010
8 ,2 7 0
6 , 590
540

126
54
50

7 1 ,4 0 0
19,800
1 4 ,8 0 0

5
22

1, 3 7 0
16,100

C u m b e r l a n d , M d . ------------D a l l a s , T e x . -------------------------D a v e n p o rt, Io w a -R o ck
I s l a n d - M o l i n e , 111. --------D a y t o n , O h i o -----------------------D e c a t u r , 111. ------------------------

6
10

310
1 1 ,6 0 0

5
7
7

4 ,2 8 0
3 ,2 4 0
250

D e n v e r , C o l o . ---------- ----------D e s M o i n e s , I o w a ------------D e t r o i t , M i c h . --------------------D u lu t h , M in n . - S u p e r i o r ,
W i s . -------------------------------------E l m i r a , N . Y . ---------------------

20
21
198

5, 1 2 0
9 , 100
2 4 8 ,0 0 0

15
8

1, 7 6 0
1 ,3 6 0

E r i e , P a . -----------------------------E v a n s v i l l e , I n d . ---------------F a l l R i v e r , M a s s . ------------F a rg o , N . D ak.
----------------F l i n t , M i c h . ------------------ ------

21
15
13
5
6

4 , 170
1 3 ,3 0 0
4 , 120
570
5, 330

8 2 , 600
6 7 ,8 0 0
2 2 ,6 0 0
7 320
47* 7 0 0

F o r t S m i t h , A r k . --------------F o r t W a y n e , I n d . --------------F o r t W o r t h , T e x . ------------F r e s n o , C a l i f . -------------------G a l v e s t o n , T e x . -------- -------- -

8
10
7
18
7

1, 8 7 0
5, 830
2,910
9 , 630
2 , 530

16, 800
6 2 ,6 0 0
19,600
1 5 0 ,0 0 0
5 4 ,2 0 0

G r a n d R a p i d s , M i c h . ------H a r r i s b u r g , P a . ---------------H a r t f o r d , C o n n . ---------------H o u s t o n , T e x . ----------------------H u n t in g t o n , W . V a . A s h l a n d , K y . ---------------------

5
8
14
23

3, 610
2 , 750
3, 710
1 3 ,2 0 0

101,000
5 2 ,9 0 0
4 0 ,9 0 0
1 3 1 ,0 0 0

27

5, 480

I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . ------------J a c k s o n , M i c h . ------------------J a c k s o n , M i s s . -------------------J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . — -------J o h n s t o w n , P a . -------------------

24
11
8
6
12

1 8 ,5 0 0
2 , 360
680
2 , 340
1,210

Y.

C h i c a g o , H I. -----------------------C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o ----------------C l e v e l a n d , O h i o ---------- ------C o l u m b u s , G a . — --------------C o l u m b u s , O h i o -------------------

See fo otn otes at end o f ta b le .




M e tr o p o lita n a r e a

W ork stop p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
1953
N um ber 2

2 5 4 , 0 0 0 K a n s a s C i t y , M o . ----------K in g s t o n - N e w b u r g h P o u g h k e e p s ie , N . Y .—
K n o x v ille , T e n n .
-----------7 2 , 100 L a n s i n g , M i c h . -----------------3 , 5 3 0 L i t t l e R o c k , A r k . -----------3 2 ,7 0 0
L o s A n g e l e s , C a l i f . ------1 8 , 9 0 0 L o u i s v i l l e , K y . ---------------8 1 , 4 0 0 M a c o n , G a . -----------------------1 7 6 ,0 0 0 M a d i s o n , W i s . -------------- —
M e m p h i s , T e n n . --------------1 6 4 ,0 0 0
9 , 0 9 0 M i a m i , F l a . ----------------------M i l w a u k e e , W i s . ------------1 3 3 ,0 0 0 M in n e a p o l is - S t . P a u l,
1 9 8 ,0 0 0
M i n n . --------------------------—-----1 3 5 , 0 0 0 M o b i l e , A l a . ----------------------1 9 , 6 0 0 M u s k e g o n , M i c h . ------------4 0 1 ,0 0 0
N a s h v i l l e , T e n n . ------------7 1 , 100 N e w B r i t a i n - B r i s t o l ,
31, 700
C o n n . --------------------------------1 3 2 , 0 0 0 N e w H a v e n , C o n n . ---------5 0 , 6 0 0 N e w B e d f o r d , M a s s . ----6 , 5 2 0 N e w O r l e a n s , L a . ----- —

A k r o n , O h i o ---------------.---------A lb a n y -S c h e n e c ta d y T r o y , N . Y . ----------------------A lle n to w n - B e th le h e m E a s t o n , P a . ---------------- -----A l t o o n a , P a . -------------------------A t l a n t a , G a . --------------- ----------

B in g h a m to n , N .

4 7 ,5 0 0

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
1953 (a ll
stop p a g es)

W ork ers
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
1 95 3 (a ll
stop p a g es)

40

2 7 ,0 0 0

8 4 3 ,0 0 0

11
32
5
8

2,900
3 3 ,3 0 0
820
2 ,7 6 0

3 0 ,4 0 0
2 8 3 ,0 0 0
5 , 150
3 7 ,5 0 0

122
38
5
11
16

5 7 ,0 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0
580
1,260
9 ,0 4 0

9 5 7 ,0 0 0
1 3 2 ,0 0 0
3, 390
7, 830
3 7 ,7 0 0

12
33

1,000
1 5 ,8 0 0

5 ,0 6 0
5 8 0 ,0 0 0

42
17
10

9, 190
8 ,4 7 0
1 ,4 0 0

186, 000
69,800
39,000

15

2 ,2 4 0

3 2 ,9 0 0

5
18
6
37

1 ,0 8 0
3 , 180
850
1 3 ,8 0 0

12,000
3 3 ,7 0 0
1 1 ,8 0 0
162,000

586

198,000

2 ,5 1 0 ,0 0 0

13
5
8
10

6, 610
2 ,4 5 0
2 ,5 8 0
4 ,6 1 0

6 3 ,7 0 0
3 0 ,6 0 0
1 9 ,4 0 0
9 0 ,3 0 0

28
10
164
6
137

3 8 ,4 0 0
1 ,9 8 0
96,600
1 , 180
1 0 7 ,0 0 0

1 4 3 ,0 0 0
2 4 ,4 0 0
1 ,2 4 0 , 000
2 2 ,3 0 0
739,000

6
19
34
5
6

850
6 , 890
1 0 ,8 0 0
150
380

11,100
5 7 ,4 0 0
129,0 0 0
2 , 740
4 8 ,0 0 0

R e a d i n g , P a . --------------------R e n o , N e v . --------------------------R i c h m o n d , V a . -----------------R o a n o k e , V a . --------------------R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . -------------

13
6
9
5
8

4 ,3 5 0
950
2,290
390
2 ,6 3 0

7 3 ,3 0 0
1 0 ,7 0 0
2 6 , 300
1,900
2 5 ,7 0 0

R o c k f o r d , H I. ------------------S t . J o s e p h , M o . --------------S t. L o u is , M o . - E a s t
S t . L o u i s , 111. ------------S a c r a m e n t o , C a l i f . --------S a g i n a w , M i c h . ----------------

11
6

1,900
1 ,3 0 0

2 8 ,7 0 0
7, 810

115
* 17
7

4 2 ,7 0 0
1 4 ,5 0 0
2 ,0 6 0

621,000
199,000
2 6 , 300

4 6 4 ,0 0 0

8 0 3 ,0 0 0 N e w Y o r k - N o r t h e a s t e r n
449,000
N e w J e r s e y --------------------26 6 , 000 N o r fo lk — o r ts m o u th ,
P
7, 550
V a . -------------------------------------3 6 8 , 0 0 0 O g d e n , U t a h -----------------------O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k la . —
2 , 0 8 0 O m a h a , N e b r . ------------- —
1 1 4 ,0 0 0
P a d u c a h , K y . -------------------1 4 7 , 0 0 0 P e o r i a , 111. -----------------------1 5 , 7 0 0 P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . -----------4 , 6 7 0 P h o e n i x , A r i z . -----------------P i t t s b u r g h , P a . ---------------3 4 ,8 0 0
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e --------------2 0 5 ,0 0 0
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . ------- ------1 ,7 2 0 ,0 0 0
P r o v i d e n c e , R . I . -----------P u e b l o , C o l o . ------------------19, 9 0 0
I R a c i n e , W i s . ---------------------9 ,2 9 0

12
5
14
14

7 ,7 9 0
2 ,2 7 0
3 ,9 2 0
4 ,4 4 0

8 1 ,1 0 0
1 8 ,5 0 0
5 4 ,0 0 0
7 3 ,4 0 0

3 1 , 300

S a l t L a k e C i t y , U t a h -----S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . ---------S a n B e r n a r d in o ., C a l i f . —
S an D ie g o , C a lif. — — —
San F r a n c is c o -O a k la n d ,
C a l i f . ---------------------------------

81

5 8 ,9 0 0

7 3 1 ,0 0 0

3 8 7 ,0 0 0
8 3 ,7 0 0
3, 300
4 5 , 800
1 5 ,1 0 0

S a n J o s e , C a l i f , -------——
S a v a n n a h , G a . ------------- —S c r a n t o n , P a . -------------------S e a c t i - ,, W a s h . -------- -------- S h r e v < n o r t , L a . ---------------

13
8
38
20
5

2 2 ,4 0 0
970
9 ,0 8 0
1 4 ,4 0 0
1 ,9 7 0

2 4 9 ,0 0 0
3, 030
7 2 ,8 0 0
2 4 9 ,0 0 0
9, 890

13
T A B L E 7 .— W ork stop p ag es b y m e tr o p o lita n a r e a , 1953 1 - Continued
W ork stop p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
1953

M e t r o p o lit a n a r e a

N um ber 2
1

W ork ers
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
• 1953 (a ll
stop p a g es)

N um ber 2

W ork ers
in v o lv e d

M a n -d a y s
id le d u r in g
1953 (a ll
stop p a g es)

T r e n t o n , N . J . ----------------T u c s o n , A r i z . -----------------T u l s a , O k la . --------------------U t i c a - R o m e , N . Y . ------7 8 , 10 0 W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . ------- 1 , 5 8 0 W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . -----------W h e e lin g , W . V a . S t e u b e n v i l l e , O h i o ------2 2 5 ,0 0 0

19
5
15
13
23
5

2 , 600
540
4 ,8 8 0
1 ,4 2 0
5 ,3 2 0
6 ,7 7 0

3 4 ,4 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0
3 7 ,9 0 0
2 5 ,2 0 0
3 1 ,8 0 0
4 0 ,0 0 0

29

7, 790

8 8 ,4 0 0

W i c h i t a , K a n s . -----------------W ilk e s B a r r e - H a z le t o n ,
P a . -------------------------------------W i lp n in g t o n , D e l . -----------W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . ---------Y o r k , P a . -------------------------Y o u n g s t o w n , O h io ----------

6

1 ,5 9 0

14, 900

25
9
17
13
110

7, 650
7 ,7 7 0
2 ,6 3 0
2 ,6 5 0
4 1 ,2 0 0

8 4 ,3 0 0
3 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 8 ,3 0 0
3 7 ,9 0 0
2 3 0 ,0 0 0

2 8 , 500
2,980
6 ,2 4 0

27
5

1 0 ,4 0 0
240

19

3 ,9 5 0

18
22
10

1 0 ,6 0 0
1 1 ,5 0 0
4 , 160

1 1 5 ,0 0 0
355,000
112,000

12
11
31

S t o c k t o n , C a l i f . ------- -------------S y r a c u s e , N . Y . ---------------- —
T a c o m a , W a s h . ------------------T a m p a -S t. P e t e r s b u r g ,
F l a . - ...................................... .......
T e r r e H a u t e , I n d . ------------—
T o l e d o , O h i o --------------------------

M e tr o p o lita n a r e a

1 0 1 , 000
1 8 ,6 0 0
69,100

12
7
9

S o u t h B e n d , I n d . -----------------S p o k a n e , W a s h . ------------------S p r i n g f i e l d , 1 1 1 .--------------------S p r i n g f i e Id - H o l y o k e ,
M a s s . ---------------------------------------S p r i n g f i e l d , M o . ------------------S t a m fo r d -N o r w a lk ,
C o n n . --------------------------------------

W o rk stop p a g es
b e g i n n i n g in
1953

4 , 070
1 ,4 6 0
7, 820

68 , 500
1 8 ,9 0 0
7 1 , 800

1 T h e t a b l e i n c l u d e s d a t a f o r e a c h o f t h e m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s t h a t h a d 5 o r m o r e s t o p p a g e s in 1 9 5 3 .
B e g in ­
n i n g w i t h 1 9 5 2 d a t a w e r e t a b u l a t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r 182 m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s .
T h e in fo r m a tio n f o r e a r lie r y e a r s w as
c o n fin e d to c it y b o u n d r ie s .
T h e m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s c a m e p r i n c i p a l l y f r o m th e l i s t s o f S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a s
c o m p il e d b y th e B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t a s o f J a n u a r y 2 8 , 1949 a n d J u n e 5 , 1 9 5 0 .
A fe w a d d it io n a l a r e a s w e r e
a d d e d , i n c l u d i n g s o m e w h e r e m a j o r c i t i e s h a v e b e e n i n c l u d e d in t h e s t r i k e s e r i e s in p r e v i o u s y e a r s .
Som e m e tro ­
p o l i t a n a r e a s i n c l u d e c o u n t i e s in m o r e t h a n o n e S t a t e a n d h e n c e a n a r e a t o t a l m a y e q u a l o r e x c e e d t h e t o t a l f o r th e
S ta te in w h ic h th e m a j o r c i t y is l o c a t e d ( e . g . , th e N e w Y o r k - N o r t h e a s t e r n N e w J e r s e y m e t r o p o li t a n a r e a , w h ic h
in c lu d e s g r e a t e r N e w Y o r k a n d th e s u r r o u n d in g a r e a a s w e ll a s e ig h t c o u n t ie s in N o r t h e a s t e r n N e w J e r s e y , e q u a ls
t h e t o t a l n u m b e r o f s t r i k e s in N e w Y o r k S t a t e in 1 9 5 3 ).
L i s t s o f t h e s e a r e a s a r e a v a i l a b l e u p o n r e q u e s t f r o m th e D iv i s io n o f W a g e s a n d I n d u s t r ia l R e l a t i o n s , B u r e a u
o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
2 In t h i s t a b l e , e x c e p t a s n o t e d b e l o w , i n t e r - m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s t o p p a g e s a r e c o u n t e d s e p a r a t e l y i n e a c h a r e a
a f f e c t e d , w it h th e w o r k e r s in v o lv e d a n d m a n - d a y s id le a l l o c a t e d t o th e r e s p e c t i v e a r e a s .
In t h e f o l l o w i n g s t o p p a g e
i t w a s i m p o s s i b l e t o s e c u r e t h e i n f o r m a t i o n n e c e s s a r y t o m a k e s u c h a l l o c a t i o n s , a n d h e n c e i t i s n o t i n c l u d e d in
th e f i g u r e s f o r a n y m e t r o p o li t a n a r e a : th e s t o p p a g e o f a b o u t 5 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o f t a n k e r c o m p a n i e s a t E a s t a n d G u lf
C o a s t p o r t s in O c t o b e r .

T A B L E 8 . — W o r k s t o p p a g e s b y a f f i l ia t i o n o f u n io n s in v o lv e d ,

1953

W o r k s t o p p a g e s b e g in n in g in 195 3
A ffilia t io n
N um ber

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g
195 3 (a ll s t o p p a g e s )

P ercen t
of
tota l

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

A l l u n i o n s ----------------------------------------------------------

5 , 091

100.0

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

2 8 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

A m e r i c a n F e d e r a t i o n o f L a b o r 2 -----------C o n g r e s s o f I n d u s t r ia l O r g a n iz a t io n s —
U n a f f i l i a t e d u n i o n s ----------------------------------------S i n g l e f i r m u n i o n s ------------- --------------------------D iffe r e n t a ffilia tio n s :
R i v a l u n i o n s 3 ---------------------------------------------C o o p e r a t i n g u n i o n s 4 ------------------------- •
—
N o u n i o n i n v o l v e d ------------------------------------------N o t r e p o r t e d ------------------------------------------------------

2 ,8 6 1
1 ,3 1 2
786
20

5 6 .2
2 5 .8
1 5 .4
.4

1 ,0 6 0 ,0 0 0
901,000
3 2 0 ,0 0 0
7 ,9 4 0

4 4 .2
3 7 .5
1 3 .3
.3

1 4 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0
9 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 , 210,000
4 2 ,8 0 0

51. 6
3 4 .3
7 .8
.2

37
18
46
11

. 7
.4

4 0 ,5 0 0
6 5 ,4 0 0
5 , 560
910

1. 7
2 .7
.2

2 0 4 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 1 0 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,4 0 0
3 ,9 8 0

.7
5 .3
. 1

1

S ee fo o tn o te 3, ta b le

.9
.2

( 5)

( 5)

1.

A l l s t o p p a g e s in 1 9 5 3 i n v o l v i n g t h e U n it e d B r o t h e r h o o d o f C a r p e n t e r s a n d J o i n e r s o f A m e r i c a a r e i n c l u d e d in
t h is c a t e g o r y , a l t h o u g h t h i s u n i o n w i t h d r e w f r o m t h e A F L f r o m A u g u s t 12 t o S e t p e m b e r 8 .
D is p u t e s b e t w e e n u n io n s o f d i ff e r e n t a f fi l ia t i o n s — u n io n s
b e t w e e n t h e m a n d a r e r i v a l s in t h e s a m e f i e l d .
4 T h e s t o p p a g e in v o lv in g N o r th A m e r i c a n A v ia t io n ,
A p p r o x im a t e ly 200 o f th e s e w o r k e r s w e r e r e p r e s e n t e d b y
s e n t e d b y t h e U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e W o r k e r s ( C I O ) .
5 L e s s th an a te n th o f 1 p e r c e n t .




w h ic h

r e c o g n iz e

no

e s t a b lis h e d

ju r is d ic t io n a l

lin e s

I n c . , i s in t h i s g r o u p .
It i n v o l v e d a b o u t 3 2 , 0 0 0 w o r k e r s .
t h e U n it e d W e l d e r s o f A m e r i c a (In d . ); t h e r e s t w e r e r e p r e ­

14
T A B L E 9 . — W ork stop p ag es b y nu m ber o f w o r k e r s in v olv ed , 1953
S t o p p a g e s b e g in n in g in 195 3

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g
1953 (a ll s t o p p a g e s )

N um ber

A l l w o r k e r s ---------*---------- ----------------------------------

5 ,0 9 1

6 a n d u n d e r 2 0 —---------------------------------------------2 0 a n d u n d e r 1 0 0 ---------------- —-----------------------1 0 0 a n d u n d e r 2 5 0 ------------------------------------------2 5 0 a n d u n d e r 5 0 0 --------------------------- --------------5 0 0 a n d u n d e r 1 , 0 0 0 -------------------------------------1 , 0 0 0 a n d u n d e r 5 , 0 0 0 --------------------------------5 , 0 0 0 a n d u n d e r 1 0 , 0 0 0 --------------------------- —
1 0 , 0 0 0 a n d o v e r ------------------------------------------------

69 2
1 ,7 4 0
1, 17 5
645
402
368
41
28

1

P ercen t
of
tota l

100.0

1 3 .6
3 4 .2
23. 1
1 2 .7
7 .9
7 .2
.8
.5

N um ber

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

8 , 350
8 7 ,4 0 0
1 8 7 ,0 0 0
220,000
2 7 6 , 000
6 9 2 ,0 0 0
2 8 1 ,0 0 0
6 5 0 ,0 0 0

P ercen t
of
tota l

100.0

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

2 8 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

0 .3
3. 6
7 .8
9 .2
1 1 .5
28. 8
1 .7
27. 1

141, 000
1 ,3 2 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,5 5 0 ,0 0 0
2 , 6 6 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,4 6 0 ,0 0 0
7 ,2 9 0 ,0 0 0
3 ,5 7 0 ,0 0 0
7 ,2 7 0 , 000

o

N um ber of w ork ers

o
o

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d 1

0 .5
4 .7
9 .0
9 .4
1 2 .3
2 5 .8
12. 6
2 5 .7

S e e fo o tn o te 3 , ta b le 1 .

TABLE

1 0 .— W o r k s to p p a g e s b y n u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s in v o lv e d ,
S t o p p a g e s b e g in n in g in 1 95 3

N u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s
in v o lv e d 1

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d 2
N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

1953

M a n -d a y s id le d u r in g
1953 (a ll s t o p p a g e s )

N um ber

P ercen t
of
tota l

A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s -----------------------------------------

5 ,0 9 1

100.0

2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

2 8 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

100. 0

1 e s t a b l i s h m e n t -----------------------------------------------2 t o 5 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ------- ----------------------------6 t o 1 0 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s -------------------------------- 1 1 e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r m o r e — -------------------N o t r e p o r t e d ------------------------------------------------------

3 ,6 8 4
672
232
477
26

7 2 .4
1 3 .2
4. 6
9 .4
.5

1 , 1 2 0 , 000
3 1 1 ,0 0 0
1 9 7 ,0 0 0
7 6 5 ,0 0 0
10,900

4 6 .5
1 2 .9
8.2
3 1 .9
.5

1 0 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
5 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 1 , 100,000
1 4 2 ,0 0 0

36. 3
1 8 .4
5 .7
39. 1
.5

1 A n e s t a b lis h m e n t ,
f o r p u r p o s e s o f th is t a b le , is d e f in e d a s a s in g le ^ p h y s ic a l l o c a t i o n w h e r e b u s i n e s s is
c o n d u c te d o r w h e r e s e r v i c e s o r in d u s t r ia l o p e r a t io n s a r e p e r f o r m e d ; f o r e x a m p le , a f a c t o r y , m i l l , s t o r e , m in e ,
o r fa r m .
A s t o p p a g e m a y i n v o l v e 1, 2 , o r m o r e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o f a s i n g l e e m p l o y e r o r it m a y i n v o l v e d i f f e r e n t
e m p lo y e r s .
* S e e f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 1.




15
T A B L E 1 1 .— A n a ly s is o f individu al w o rk stop p ag es in v olv in g 10, 000 o r m o r e w o r k e r s , 1953 1

B e g in n in g
d a te

A p p r o x im a t e
A p p r o x im a t e
num ber of
d u r a tio n
E s t a b lis h m e n t (s ) a n d l o c a t io n . U n io n (s ) i n v o l v e d 3
w ork ers
(c a le n d a r
in v o lv e d
days) 2

M a jo r te r m s o f s e t t le m e n t 4

J a n u a r y 15

4

B r i g g s M a n u fa c t u r in g C o . ,
D e t r o i t , M ic h .

U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e
W o r k e r s (C I O )

16,000

W ork ers
re tu rn e d a fte r
s e t t le m e n t o f d is p u te d (w o r k ­
lo a d ) is s u e .

J a n u a r y 21

3

H u dson M o to r C a r C o .,
D e t r o it , M ic h .

U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e
W o r k e r s (C IO )

1 1 ,5 0 0

W o r k e r s r e t u r n e d to jo b s
p e n d in g s e t t le m e n t o f g r i e v ­
an ces
( in c l u d i n g a d i s c h a r g e
c a s e ) u n d er n o r m a l g r ie v a n c e
p rocedu re.

J a n u a r y 30

5

I n la n d S t e e l C o . ,
E a s t C h ic a g o , In d.

U n it e d S t e e l ­
w o r k e r s (C IO )

1 8 ,0 0 0

G r ie v a n c e s , in v o lv in g s u s ­
p e n s io n o f e m p lo y e e s , to b e
processed
th rou g h
r e g u la r
g r ie v a n c e p r o c e d u r e .

5 2 0 , 000

H o u r ly w a g e i n c r e a s e s o f
1 2 % ce n ts f o r b r u s h p a in te r s ;
17% c e n ts f o r s p r a y p a in t e r s ;
a n d 15 c e n t s f o r s t e e l a n d s i g n
p a in te r s .

1 7 ,0 0 0

W o rk e rs r e tu r n e d to th e ir
jo b s a fte r p r o t e s t o f c o m p a n y
a c t i o n in a p p o i n t m e n t o f s u ­
p e r v is o r .

F e b r u a r y 15

57

F e b r u a r y 24

3

B r o . o f P a in t e r s ,
I n t e r s t a t e P a in t C o . , s u b ­
c o n t r a c t o r , (A t o m ic E n e rg y
D e c o r a to r s and
P aperh an ger s
C o m m is s io n c o n s tr u c tio n
(A F L )
p r o j e c t ) , A ik e n and
B a r n w e ll C o u n t ie s , S . C .
S tu d eb a k er C o r p .,
S o u t h B e n d , In d .

U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e
W o r k e r s (C I O )

N ew J e r s e y B e ll T e le p h o n e
C o . , N . J . , S t a t e w id e

T e le p h o n e W o r k e r s
U n io n o f N e w
J e r s e y (In d . ) 6

6 1 4 ,0 0 0

W e e k ly w a g e in c r e a s e s o f
$2 f o r e m p lo y e e s e a r n in g l e s s
th an $ 7 4 .5 0 a w e e k a n d $ 3
fo r
oth er
e m p lo y e e s ;
w age
p r o g r e s s io n s c h e d u le r e d u c e d
f r o m 6 V2 t o 6 y e a r s .

B r o . o f R a ilr o a d
T r a in m e n (In d . )

7 2 7 , 000

A g reem en t
to
preven t
a n d /o r e lim in a t e s lo w d o w n s ;
r e in s ta te m e n t
of
su spen d ed
e m p lo y e e s .

M a r c h 26

35

M a r c h 30

4

U n io n R a i l r o a d C o . ,
(U . S . S t e e l C o r p . ),
P itts b u r g h , P a .

A p r il 2

2

U n it e d R u b b e r
U . S. R u b b er C o .,
W o r k e r s (C I O )
1 1 S ta tes:
C a l i f . , C o n n . , 111. , I n d . ,
M a s s ., M ic h ., N . J . ,
P a ., R . I . , T e n n . , W is .

36, 000

E m p lo y e r -fin a n c e d
h os­
p it a liz a t io n , m e d ic a l, an d s u r ­
g i c a l in s u r a n c e p la n f o r e m ­
p lo y e e s an d th e ir d e p e n d e n ts ;
2 w e e k s 1 v a c a tio n a fte r 3 in ­
stea d o f 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .

A p r i l 13

3

C h r y s le r C o r p . , D e tr o it
an d T r e n t o n , M ic h .

U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e
W o r k e r s (C I O )

4 8 ,0 0 0

T r u c k d riv e r s
c o m p lie d
w it h u n i o n r e q u e s t t h a t t h e y
t e r m in a t e u n a u t h o r iz e d p r o ­
te s t stop p a g e o v e r
p ic k u p s
at
s t r ik e -b o u n d
s u p p lie r ’ s
p la n t.

C o n s tr u c t io n in d u s tr y ,
D e t r o i t , M ic h .

U n it e d B r o . o f
C a rp e n te rs and
J o in e r s (A F L );
B r o . o f P a in t e r s ,
D e c o r a to r s and
P a perh an gers
(A F L )

3 0 ,0 0 0

C a rp en ters* w a ges w e re
in c r e a s e d
12 ce n ts an hou r
w i t h a n i n c r e a s e in e m p l o y e r
c o n t r ib u tio n s f o r l if e an d h o s ­
p it a liz a t io n
in s u r a n c e
of 3
ce n ts a m a n -h o u r
e ffe c tiv e
J u l y 1, 1 9 5 3 a n d 2 c e n t s a d ­
d i t i o n a l e f f e c t i v e A p r i l 1, 1 9 5 4 .
P a in t e r s * w a g e s w e r e in c r e a s ­
e d 1 2 % c e n t s a n h o u r w it h a
2 % -c e n t h o u r ly
i n c r e a s e in
e m p lo y e r
c o n t r ib u tio n s
fo r
h o s p it a liz a t io n in s u r a n c e .

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u stry ,
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .

F iv e A F L B u ild in g
T r a d e s U n io n s :
C a rp en ters,
C em ent
F in is h e r s ,
Iron w ork ers,
G la z ie r s , and
R o o fe r s

20,000

C a rp en ters* and ce m e n t
fin is h e r s *
w ages
in c re a s e d
2 0 cen ts
an h ou r
e ffe c tiv e
M a y 1, 1 9 5 3 w it h a n a d d i t i o n a l
10-c e n t h o u r ly in c r e a s e e ffe c ­
t i v e M a y 1, 1 9 5 4 .
M em bers
o f th e o t h e r b u ild in g t r a d e s
u n io n s in v o lv e d r e c e i v e d v a g e
in c r e a s e s o f v a r y in g a m o u n ts .

v
O

M ay 1

8 50

oo

M ay 1

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




16
TABLE

B e g in n in g
d a te

llo— A n a ly s is
A p p r o x im a t e
d u r a tio n
(c a le n d a r
days 2

M ay 1

19

o f individu al w o r k stopp ag es in v olv in g 10, 000 or m o r e w o r k e r s , 1953 1 - C ontinued
A p p r o x im a t e
num ber of
M a jo r t e r m s o f s e t t le m e n t 4
w ork ers
in v o lv e d

E s t a b lis h m e n t (s ) an d lo c a tio n

U n io n (s ) i n v o l v e d 3

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u stry ,
K n o x v ille , O ak R id g e , and
o t h e r l o c a t i o n s in E a s t e r n
Ten n.

A F L B u ild in g
T r a d e s U n io n s
(K n o x v ille
C o u n c il)

1 5 ,0 0 0

W a g e i n c r e a s e o f 5 .3 p e r ­
cen t.

M a y 11

71

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u stry ,
K a n s a s C ity , M o . , an d
K a n s a s C ity , K a n sa s

T h ree A F L
B u ild in g T r a d e s
U n io n s :
T ea m sters,
L a b o r e r s , and
O p e r a t in g
E n g in e e r s

2 2 ,5 0 0

W a g e i n c r e a s e s r a n g in g
f r o m 7 V to I 2 V c e n ts an h o u r;
2
2
a g r e e m e n t on a p la n f o r s e t t le ­
m e n t o f ju r is d ic t io n a l m a t t e r s .

June 2

27

C o n s tr u c t io n in d u s tr y ,
U ta h

S ix A F L B u ild in g
T r a d e s U n io n s :
T ea m sters,
C a rp en ters,
O p e r a t in g
E n g in e e r s ,
L a borers,
C em en t M asons,
and Ir o n ­
w ork ers

10,000

W a g e i n c r e a s e s r a n g in g
fro m
5 t o 15 c e n t s a n h o u r ,
w it h a d d it io n a l i n c r e a s e s r a n g ­
in g f r o m 2 lk t o 1 0 c e n t s e f ­
f e c t i v e J a n u a r y 1, 1 9 5 4 .

June 3

41

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u stry ,
N o rth e r n an d C e n tr a l C a lif.

H od C a r r ie r s ,
B u ild in g a n d
C om m on
L a b o r e r s (A F L )

10 6 0 , 00 0

W a g e i n c r e a s e o f 15 c e n t s
an h ou r.

June 4

i i 14

F . Ho M c G r a w a n d C o 0 ,
(A t o m ic E n e r g y C o m m is s io n
c o n s tr u c tio n p r o je c t ),
P adu cah , K ye

A F L B u ild in g
T r a d e s U n io n s
(P a d u ca h
C o u n c il)

l 2 l l ,000

I n t e r n a t io n a l o f f i c e r s
of
th e u n io n s i n v o lv e d o r d e r e d
m e m b e r s to r e tu r n to w o r k
p e n d in g n e g o t ia t io n s o n t r a v e l
p a y and o th e r fr in g e b e n e fits .

C o n s tr u c tio n in d u s tr y ,
I n d ia n a p o lis , In d .

I n t 1! . B r o . o f
C a rp e n te rs and
J o in e r s (A F L )

10,000

H o u r ly w a g e i n c r e a s e o f
17 c e n t s e f f e c t i v e A u g u s t 5 ,
1 9 5 3 w it h a d d i t i o n a l 8 c e n t s
e ffe c tiv e
Jan u ary
1,
1954.

8

C a lifo r n ia P r o c e s s o r s and
G r o w e r s , In c. ,N o r t h e m
an d C e n tr a l C a lif.

I n t * l. B r o . o f
T e a m s t e r s (A F L )

3 3 ,0 0 0

W a g e in c r e a s e s ra n g in g
fro m
8 to 1 0 ce n ts an h o u r;
e m p l o y e r s t o c o n t r i b u t e $ 8 .6 5
a m o n th to a h e a lth an d w e l ­
f a r e p la n c o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s
w o r k in g 1 ,6 0 0 h o u r s a y e a r
and th e ir d e p e n d e n ts .

A u g u s t 10

3

P e n n s y lv a n ia D r e s s
M a n u fa c tu r e r s A s s o c ia t io n ,
N o rth e a ste rn P a .

In t * l. L a d i e s 1
G arm en t
W o r k e r s * U n io n
(A F L )

10,000

R e d u c t i o n in b a s i c w o r k ­
w eek fro m
4 0 t o 35 h o u r s ;
6 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in p i e c e
r a te s ; 9 - c e n t h o u r ly w a g e in ­
c r e a s e f o r t im e w o r k e r s .

A u g u s t 19

13

S o u th w e s te r n B e ll T e le p h o n e
C o . , A r k . , 111, (2 c o u n t i e s ) ,
K a n s . , M o . , O k la 0 , a n d
T exas

C o m m u n ic a tio n s
W ork ers of
A m e r i c a (C I O )

5 0 ,0 0 0

W age in c r e a s e s
r a n g in g
fro m
$ 1 .5 0 to
$3 a w eek;
s o m e jo b r e c la s s ific a t io n s and
u p w a r d r e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n o f 13
exch an g es.

A u g u st 26

2

V a rio u s s u b -c o n t r a c to r s

U n it e d B r o . o f
C a rp e n te rs and
J o in e r s (A F L )

11,000

W a g e is s u e to b e s e t t le d
a fte r te r m in a tio n o f s to p p a g e .

U n it e d R u b b e r
W o r k e r s (C IO )

2 5 ,0 0 0

W age i n c r e a s e s a v e r a g in g
5 ce n ts an h o u r; e m p lo y e r p a id h o s p it a liz a t io n , m e d i c a l,
a n d s u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e p la n
f o r e m p lo y e e s and th e ir d e ­
p e n d e n ts; in c r e a s e d p e n s io n s
m o n t h ly , in c lu d in g s o c i a l s e c u r i,t y ; 2 w e e k s 1 v a c a t io n a f t e r
3 in s te a d o f 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ­
ic e .

J u n e 29

36

J u ly 2 8

(A t o m ic E n e r g y C o m m is s io n
c o n s tr u c tio n p r o je c t ),
P adu cah , K y,
A u g u st 27

4

F ir e s t o n e T ir e and R u b b er
C o . , C a l i f . , In d . , I o w a ,
M a s s . , O h io , P a . , a n d
T en n,

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




17
T A B L E 1 1 .— A n a ly s is o f individu al w o r k sto p p a g e s in volvin g 10,000 o r m o r e w o r k e r s , 1953 1 - Continued

B e g in n in g
d a te

O ctob er 1

A p p r o x im a te
d u r a tio n
E s t a b lis h m e n t (s ) a n d lo c a tio n
(c a le n d a r
d a y s )2
5

S h ip p in g in d u s t r y ,
E a st C oast

U n io n (s ) in v o lv e d 3

In t’ l . L o n g s h o r e ­
m e n ’ s A s s ’n .
(I n d .)

A p p r o x im a t e
num ber of
w ork ers
in v o lv e d

M a jo r t e r m s o f s e t t le m e n t 4

3 0 ,0 0 0

W o rk e rs retu rn ed
a fte r
is s u a n c e o f in ju n c t io n o b t a in e d
u n d e r th e e m e r g e n c y p r o v i ­
s io n s o f th e L a b o r -M a n a g e ­
m e n t R e la tio n s A c t .

O cto b e r 23

54

N o r th A m e r i c a n A v ia t io n ,
I n c .,
L o s A n g e le s an d F r e s n o ,
C a l i f . , a n d C o l u m b u s , O h io

U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e
W o r k e r s (C IO );
U n it e d W e l d e r s o f
A m e r i c a ( I n d .) 13

13 3 2 , 0 0 0

W age in c re a s e s o f 4 p e r ­
c e n t an d o th e r fr in g e b e n e fits
g e n e r a l l y a s o f f e r e d b y th e
c o m p a n y p r i o r to th e s t o p p a g e .

O cto b e r 25

7

M ilk d e a l e r s , N ew Y o r k ,
N . Y . , n orth ern N . J . , and
F a ir f ie ld C ou n ty , C o n n .

In t’l . B r o . o f
T e a m s t e r s (A F L )

1 3 ,0 0 0

W age in c re a s e o f $ 6 a
w e e k ; in c r e a s e d v a c a tio n and
in s u r a n c e b e n e fit s , e s tim a te d
to c o s t $ 2 . 50 a w e e k p e r e m ­
p lo y e e .

A liq u ip p a an d S o u th e rn
R a ilr o a d (J o n e s an d
L a u g h lin S t e e l C o r p . ,
A liq u ip p a W o r k s ),
P itts b u r g h , P a .

U n it e d R a i l r o a d
W o r k e r s (C IO );
B r o . o f R a ilr o a d
T r a in m e n , an d
B ro. of L oco­
m o t iv e F ir e m e n
a n d E n g in e m e n
( I n d .)

1 4 1 5 ,0 0 0

S ix n e w s p a p e r s , ( T im e s ,
P o s t , D a ily N e w s , D a ily
M ir r o r , J o u r n a l-A m e r ic a n ,
and W o r ld -T e le g r a m and
S u n ), N e w Y o r k , N . Y .

P h o to -E n g r a v e r s *
U n io n ( A F L )

1 5 ,0 0 0

A m e r ic a n C an C o . and
C o n tin e n ta l C a n C o . ,
N a t io n w id e

U n it e d S t e e l ­
w o r k e r s (C IO )

3 0 ,0 0 0

N o v e m b e r 16

N ov em b er 28

D ecem b er 2

14

11

(1 S )

8Va

H o u r ly w a g e
cen ts.

in c r e a s e

of

A $ 3 .7 5 w e e k l y p a c k a g e i n ­
c r e a s e i n c l u d i n g $3 in w a g e s ,
lib e r a liz e d
w e lfa r e
b e n e fits
an d a n e x tr a p a id h o lid a y a n ­
n u a lly , a n d a g r e e m e n t t o s u b ­
m it q u e s t io n s o f a n a d d it io n a l
w a g e i n c r e a s e a n d r e d u c t io n
i n th e r e g u l a r w o r k w e e k t o
a 3 -m a n fa c t-fin d in g b o a r d .
i” )

1 I n f o r m a t io n in th is t a b le e x c e p t m a j o r t e r m s o f s e t t le m e n t is b a s e d p r i m a r i l y o n r e p l i e s f r o m th e p a r t i e s ,
s u p p le m e n te d b y a v a r ie t y o f s o u r c e s .
In m o s t c a s e s t h e t e r m s o f s e t t l e m e n t a r e c o m p i l e d f r o m t h e n e g o t i a t e d a g r e e ­
m en t o r fr o m n e w sp a p e r and o th e r s e c o n d a r y s o u r c e s .
2 I n c lu d e s n o n w o r k d a y s , s u c h a s S a t u r d a y s , S u n d a y s , a n d h o l id a y s .
O n ly n o r m a l l y s c h e d u l e d w o r k d a y s a r e
u s e d in c o m p u t i n g s t r i k e i d l e n e s s .
3 T h e u n io n s l is t e d a r e t h o s e d i r e c t l y in v o lv e d in th e d is p u t e .
" W o r k e r s i n v o l v e d " i n c l u d e a l l w o r k e r s m a d e i d l e f o r o n e s h i f t o r l o n g e r in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i r e c t l y i n v o l v e d
i n a s t o p p a g e , i n c l u d i n g m e m b e r s o f o t h e r u n i o n s o r n o n u n io n w o r k e r s .
E m p lo y e e s w h o a r e m a d e id le b y m a t e r ia l
o r s e r v i c e s h o r t a g e s in o t h e r e s t a b l is h m e n t s o r i n d u s t r ie s a r e n o t in c lu d e d .
4 T h e B u r e a u ’ s m o n t h l y C u r r e n t W a g e D e v e l o p m e n t s r e p o r t d e s c r i b e s t h e w a g e s e t t l e m e n t s s o m e t i m e s in g r e a t e r
d e t a il th an t h e y a r e p r e s e n t e d h e r e .
5 P a in t e r s e m p lo y e d b y I n t e r s ta te P a in t C o m p a n y s t o p p e d w o r k a n d e s t a b lis h e d p ic k e t l in e s .
E m p lo y e e s o f
o t h e r c o n t r a c t o r s o n t h e p r o j e c t o b s e r v e d t h e p i c k e t l i n e s b u t r e t u r n e d t o w o r k o n F e b r u a r y 19 a f t e r r e m o v a l o f
p ic k e t lin e s .
P a in t e r s r e t u r n e d F e b r u a r y 23 a f t e r r a t ify in g th e w a g e a g r e e m e n t .
6 P i c k e t l in e s e s t a b l is h e d b y a b o u t 7 ,0 0 0 p la n t a n d a c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t e m p l o y e e s , r e p r e s e n t e d b y th e
T e l e p h o n e W o r k e r s U n io n o f N e w J e r s e y (I n d . ), w e r e r e s p e c t e d b y m e m b e r s o f t h e C o m m u n i c a t i o n s W o r k e r s o f
A m e r i c a (C I O ) e m p l o y e d b y N e w J e r s e y B e l l T e l e p h o n e C o . a n d W e s t e r n E l e c t r i c C o .
7 A b o u t 2 , 5 0 0 e m p l o y e e s o f t h e U n io n R a i l r o a d C o . (a s u b s i d i a r y o f U . S . S t e e l C o r p . s e r v i c i n g s t e e l p l a n t s )
w e r e i n v o l v e d in t h e d i s p u t e a n d a b o u t 2 4 , 5 0 0 s t e e l w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y U . S . S t e e l C o r p . in c l o s e l y i n t e g r a t e d
o p e r a tio n s w e r e m a d e id le .
8 A m a j o r i t y o f t h e w o r k e r s i n v o l v e d r e t u r n e d t o t h e i r j o b s J u n e 15 b u t s e v e r a l t h o u s a n d w o r k e r s w e r e i d l e
u n til Ju n e 19.
9 A m a j o r i t y o f t h e w o r k e r s r e t u r n e d t o w o r k J u n e 18 a f t e r C a r p e n t e r s a n d C e m e n t F i n i s h e r s r e a c h e d a g r e e ­
m e n t w it h t h e c o n t r a c t o r s .
O t h e r c r a f t s r e t u r n e d b e t w e e n J u n e 18 a n d J u l y 3 a s a g r e e m e n t s w e r e r e a c h e d .
10
M e m b e r s o f t h e L a b o r e r s ’ U n io n s t o p p e d w o r k o n J u n e 3 .
A w e e k la t e r a p p r o x i m a t e ly 3 0 , 00 0 b u ild in g t r a d e s
w o r k e r s w e r e id le .
T h e A s s o c ia t e d G e n e r a l C o n tr a c t o r s o f A m e r ic a , I n c ., N o r th e r n an d C e n tr a l C a lifo r n ia C h a p te r s ,
c a l l e d o n m e m b e r s in t h e a r e a t o s t o p a l l c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e f f e c t i v e w it h th e c l o s e o f w o r k o n J u n e 2 3 b e c a u s e
o f th e l a b o r e r s ’ s t r i k e a g a i n s t s o m e o f i t s m e m b e r s .
A p p r o x im a t e ly 6 0 , 000 w o r k e r s w e r e id le b y la te J u n e.
1 1
T h e stop p a g e,
in it ia t e d b y P a in t e r s o n J u n e 4 , w a s e x t e n d e d t o o t h e r c r a f t s r e p r e s e n t e d b y th e P a d u c a h
B u ild in g a n d C o n s t r u c t i o n T r a d e s
C o u n c il; b y Ju n e 9 a p p r o x im a t e ly 11, 000 w e r e id le .
12
T h is f i g u r e in c lu d e s e m p l o y e e s o f o t h e r c o n t r a c t o r s w h o w e r e id le b e c a u s e o f p i c k e t l i n e s .
1 3 A p p r o x i m a t e l y 2 0 0 o f t h e w o r k e r s i n v o l v e d in t h i s w o r k s t o p p a g e w e r e r e p r e s e n t e d b y t h e U n it e d W e l d e r s o f
A m e r i c a (I n d . ); t h e r e s t w e r e r e p r e s e n t e d b y t h e U n it e d A u t o m o b i l e W o r k e r s ( C I O ) .
T h e to ta l n u m b e r id le d e c lin e d
a s th e s t o p p a g e c o n t in u e d a n d w o r k e r s r e t u r n e d to t h e ir j o b s .
B y th e e n d o f th e s t r ik e a p p r o x i m a t e ly h a lf o f th e
w o rk e rs had re tu rn e d .
1 4 A b o u t 7 50 e m p l o y e e s o f t h e A l i q u i p p a a n d S o u t h e r n R a i l r o a d (a s u b s i d i a r y o f J o n e s a n d L a u g h l i n S t e e l C o r p . )
w e r e i n v o l v e d in t h e d i s p u t e a n d a b o u t 1 4 , 0 0 0 s t e e l w o r k e r s in c l o s e l y i n t e g r a t e d o p e r a t i o n s v / e r e m a d e i d l e .
15
The
 u n i o n s e t t l e d w it h C o n t i n e n t a l C a n C o . o n J a n u a r y 5 , 1 9 5 4 a n d w it h A m e r i c a n C a n C o . o n J a n u a r y 1 2 ,
1954.
T h e a g r e e m e n t s p r o v i d e d a 1 5 - c e n t h o u r l y " p a c k a g e , " i n c l u d i n g a n 8 V2 - c e n t b a s i c w a g e i n c r e a s e .



18
T A B L E 1 2 .— D uration of w ork stoppages ending in 1953

Workers involved

Stoppages
Duration (calendar days)
Number

Percent
of
total

All periods — ----- ------ ---- — ---------------

5, 109

100.0

day --2 to 3 days------------ --- — ------- -----------4 days and less than 1 w e e k ----- — ------------1 week and less than V* month ( to 14 days)------7
V month and less than 1 month (15 to 29 days) ----z
1 month and less than 2 months (30 to 59 days)----2 months and less than 3 months (60 to 89 days) --3 months and over (90 days and over) -----------

605
819
719
1,041
880

1 1 .8
16.0

1

628

224
193

14. 1
20.4
17.2
12.3
4.4
3. 8

Number

12

2,380,000
199,000

476, 000
388,000
476,000
312,000
360,000
124,000
44,000

Man-days idle
Percent
of
total

Percent
of
total

Number

100.0

228, 0 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

199,000

0.7
3.3
4. 5
10.5
15.2
31. 8
18.9
15. 0

8.4

923,000
1,270,000
2,950,000
4,260,000
8,910,000
5,280,000
4,220,000

20.0

16.3
20.0

13. 1
15. 1
5.2
1.9

See footnote 3, table 1
.
This figure differs from the total man-days idle shown in preceding tables because this and the next two tables
relate to total idleness in all stoppages ending in 1953, including any 1952 idleness in these strikes.
1
2

T A B L E 13.— Method of terminating work stoppages ending in 1953

Number
All m e t hods --------------- ------- ----------Agreement of parties reached —
Directly------------------------- — --- ----With assistance of Government agencies ------With assistance of non-Government mediators
or agencies ------------------------------Terminated without formal settlement-----------Employers discontinued business ---------------Not reported-----------------------------------

1
2

5, 109

Man-days idle

Worker's involved

Stoppages
Method of termination

Percent
of
total
1 0 0 .0

2,442
1 737
,

47. 8
34. 0

26
743
46
115

.5
14. 5
.9
2. 3

Number

1

2,380,000
978,000
1,080,000
17,700
290,000

2, 150
16,400

Percent
of
total

Number

Percent
of
total

100.0

228, 0 0 0 ,0 0 0

100.0

41. 1
45.2

6,610,000
19,300,000

23. 6
68.9

.7

93,100

12.2
.1

1 ,800,000

.3
6.4
.3
.4

87,800
108,000

.7

See footnote 3, table 1 .
See footnote 2, table 12.

T A B L E 14.— Disposition of issues in work stoppages ending in 1953
Workers involved

Stoppages
Disposition of issues
Number

Issues settled or disposed of at termination of
stoppage3 ----------------------------------Some or all issues to be adjusted after resumption
of work —
By direct negotiation between employer and
union ----------------- ------------------By negotiation with the aid of Government
agencies ---------------------------------By arbitration------------------------------By other means 4 ---- -----------------------Not reported ----------------------------------

5, 109

100.0

Number
2,380,000

100.0

4, 183

81.9

74.4

536

10.5

415,000

17. 5

42
115
81
152

2.3
1 .6
3 0
.

38,800
106, 0 0 0
27,300
2 1 , 600

4.5
1 .1
.9

.8

Man-days idle

1

Percent
of
total

j
o
o
o
o

All issues-- -----------------------------------

Percent
of
total

1.6

Number

2

28,000,000

Percent
of
total
100.0

23,700,000

84.7

,2 2 0 ,0 0 0

7.9

339, 0 0 0
1,080,000
402,000
241, 000

3. 8
1 4
.
.9

2

1.2

See footnote 3, table 1
.
See footnote 2, table 12.
3
Includes ( ) those strikes in which a settlement was reached on the issues prior to return to work, ( ) those in
a
b
which the parties agreed to utilize the company’ grievance procedure, and (c) any strikes in which the workers returned
s
without formal agreement or settlement.
4
Included in this group are the cases referred to the National or State labor relations boards or other agencies for
decisions or elections.
1

2




19
Appendix

A

TABLE 1.— Work stoppages by specific industry, 1953
Industry

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
(all stoppages)
Number
involved 1

Industry

All industries ----------------------

25, 091

2,400,000

28,300,000

M a n u fa c tu r in g -C o n tin u e d

M a n u f a c t u r in g .

22 , 612

1, 320,000

15,600,000

312

202,000

1,510,000

130
84

132,000
33,000

522,000
462,000

15

6,400

60,500

Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)-----------------------Logging camps and
logging contractors
Sawmills and planing mills Millwork, plywood, and
prefabricated structural
wood products------------------Wooden containers-------------Miscellaneous wood products —

6

660

19,200

17
22

8,670
7,150

174,000
63,300

38

14,200

211,000

291
9

102,000
28,800

1, 690,000
555,000

35

9,540

250,000

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
(all stoppages)
Number
involved 1

Primary metal industries------------Blast furnaces, steel works,
and rolling m i l l s -------------------Iron and steel foundries-----------Primary smelting and refining
of nonferrous metals and
a llo y s-------------------------------------Secondary smelting and refining
of nonferrous m etals-------------Rolling, drawing, and alloying
of nonferrous m etals------------Nonferrous foundries--------------Miscellaneous primary metal
industries----------------------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)
Tin cans and other tinware-------Cutlery, hand tools, and
general hardware--------------------Heating apparatus (except
electric) and plumbers*
supplies
Fabricated structural metal
products---------------------------Metal stamping, coating,
and engraving-------------------Lighting fixtu res----------------Fabricated wire products---Miscellaneous fabricated
metal products-----------------

2

37

See footnotes at end of table,




13,500
1,440
5,280

215,000
16,500
38,000

8,950

151,000

23

21,400

164,000

1

1,250

24,900

18
1

17,000
1, 300

35,500
94,400

1
1

130
1,460

130
8,690

1

240

710

137

76,600

1, 620,000

56
14
6

30,600
7, 620
2,810

471,000
56, 100
15,300

9
6

7, 180
1,890

156,000
13,700

34

24,200

789,000

12

2,210

118,000

286
9

126, 000
10,100

2, 150,000
157,000

15

15,400

200,000

30
55

Machinery (except electrical)-------Engines and turbines Agricultural machinery
and tractors---------------------------Construction and mining
machinery and equipment----Metalworking machinery---------Special-industry machinery
(except metalworking
machinery)----------------------------General industrial machinery
and equipment----- •
------------------Office and store machines
and d evices---------------------------Service-industry and household
machines-------------------------------Miscellaneous machinery parts—
Transportation equipment-------------Motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment-------------------Aircraft and parts
Ship and boat building
and repairing----------Railroad equipment---Motorcycles, bicycles,
p arts-------------------------

283,000

30

Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies
Electrical generating,
transmission, distribution,
and industrial apparatus-----Electrical appliances-----------Insulated wire and c a b le -------Electrical equipment for motor
vehicles, aircraft, and
railway locomotives and cars —
Electric lam ps--------------------------Communication equipment
and related products --------------Miscellaneous electrical
products-----------------------------------

180,000

25,100

58
6
18

Ordnance and accessories
Guns, howitzers, motors, and
related equipment---------------Ammunition, except for
small arm s---------------------------Tanks and tank components —
Sighting and fire-control
equipment -------------------------Small arm s----------------------------Ordnance and accessories, not
elsewhere classified --------------

9,590

99

9,620
24.600

137,000
416,000

31

185,000

18,300

312,000

9

1,830

59,400

31
48
2

8,440

58

21,600
16,400

248,000
433,000

179

300,000

2,730,000

101
31

203,000
57,800

781,000
1,350,000

32
14

27,900
11,000

308,000
289,000

2

280

1,710

125

19,800

512,000

13
39

3,590
6,470

105,000
190,000

34
20
19

6,260
1,940
1,510

162,000
19,400
35, 600

Furniture and fixtures Household furniture
Office furniture -----Public -building and
professional furniture---------Partitions, shelving, lockers,
and office and store
fixtures---------------------------------Window and door screens,
shades and Venetian.blinds —

m
99
11

25,100
19,600
2,350

269,000
187,000
32,200

3

270

1,730

17

2,720

47,-400

4

180

670

Stone, clay, and glass products Flat glass Glass and glassware,
pressed or blown-------Glass products made of
purchased glass Cement, hydraulic---------- Structural clay products -----Pottery and related products Concrete, gyppum, and
plaster products
Cut-stone and stone products ■
Abrasive, asbestos, and
miscellaneous nonmetallic
mineral products----------------

128
5

19,400
830

316,000
2,330

10

2,320

13,100

9
5
26
17

750
1,330
3,950
3,270

8,410
19,500
68,400
62,500

27
7

2,950
1,150

89,000
19,400

22

2,910

33,500

Textile mill products Yarn and thread mills
(cotton, wool, silk, and
synthetic fiber) ------------Broad-woven fabric mills
(cotton, wool, silk, and
synthetic fiber)—
Narrow fabrics and other
smallwares mills icotton,
wool, silk,and synthetic
fiber) Knitting m i l l s --------- —
Dyeing and finishing textiles
(excppt knit goods) — ------—
Carpets, rugs, and other
floor coverings ---- ■
■ ..
Hats (except cloth and
millinery) Miscellaneous textile goods-----

88

26, 600

593,000

11

3,660

80,200

21

11,100

116,000

5
17

1,700
2, 870

20,500
129,000

12

3,190

37,700

5

1,270

11,600

3
14

1,650
1,090

190,000
7,870

193

35,600

296,000

10

880

5,640

Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar materials --------------Men's, youths*, and boys*
suits, coats, and overcoats —
Men's, youths*, and boys*
furnishings, work clothing,
and allied garments---------------Women's and misses*
outerwear Women's, m isses', children'Sj
and infants* undergarments —
Millinery
Children's and infants*
outerwear-----------------------Fur goods---------------------- ---Miscellaneous apparel and
accessories —
-----------------Miscellaneous fabricated
textile products----------- —
Leather and leather products Leather: tanned, curried,
and finished
Boot and shoe cut stock
and findings--------------------------Footwear (except rubber)--------Leather gloves and mittens-----Luggage ----------------------------------Handbags and small leather
goods
Miscellaneous leather goods

35

6,020

49,200

83

22,200

125,000

11
6

1,030
1,060

23,900
13,300

16
2

990
30

6,470
800
55,100

14

1,830

16

1,480

16,100

48

11,900

99,100

9

1,320

7,290

1
26
1
4

70
9, 100
40
790

1, 190
67,600
320
17,300

3
4

490
120

4,630
740

20
TABLE 1. — Wark stoppages by specific industry, 1953 - Continued

I n d u s tr y

Stoppagesi beginning Man-days idle
in '
1953
during 1953
Workers
Number
(all stoppages)
involved 1

M a n u f a c t u r in g -C o n t in u e d
213
51
9

98,400
17,000
930

1,210,000
84,200
5, 110

23
22
35
6

37,000
4, 670
6,510
2,340

240.000
58,300
61.400
65.400

10
46

3,590
23,500

63.900
576.000

11

2,830

51.900

T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ---------------------C i g a r s ----------------------------------------------T o b a c c o s te m m i n g a n d
r e d r y i n g ----------------- — ... — —-------

4
1

480
80

20,800
3,760

3

400

17,100

P r i n t i n g , p u b lis h in g , a n d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s --------- —---------------- -N e w s p a p e r s ------------------------------------B o o k s ------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c i a l p r i n t i n g --------------------L i th o g r a p h i n g — ----- —......-------------B o o k b in d in g a n d r e l a t e d
i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------S e r v i c e i n d u s t r i e s f o r th e
p r i n ti n g t r a d e -------------------------------

45

15,400

222.000

16
4
2

7,860
660
390

115,000
1, 750
6,740

18

5,930

95.400

5

510

3, 650

44
12
1
13
7

21,300
16, 600
320
1,060
350

245.000
187.000
640
15,300
9,810

6

1,470

26, 800

5

1,450

5,560

C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -------I n d u s t r ia l i n o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s —
I n d u s t r ia l o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s -----D ru g s a n d m e d i c i n e s — —-----------S o ap a n d g l y c e r i n , c le a n in g a n d
p o lis h in g p r e p a r a t i o n s , a n d
s u l fo n a te d o i ls a n d a s s i s t a n t s —
P a in ts , v a rn is h e s , la c q u e rs ,
ja p a n s , and e n a m e ls; in o rg a n ic
c o l o r p i g m e n t s , w h itin g , a n d
w o o d f i l l e r s ---------------------------------G u m a n d w o o d c h e m i c a l s -----------F e r t i l i z e r s ------------ -------------------------V e g e ta b le a n d a n i m a l o ils
a n d f a t s -------------------------- --------------M isc e lla n e o u s c h e m ic a ls ,
in c lu d in g i n d u s t r i a l c h e m i c a l
p r o d u c t s a n d p r e p a r a t i o n s ------

107
9
33
9

36,500
2,500
19,700
7,280

825.000
24, 600
302.000
235.000

7

1,750

109,000

9
10

660
580
690

3,630
39,900
15,000

13

1,340

38,400

14

2,010

57,300

P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l -----P e t r o l e u m r e f in i n g - - - - -------------C o k e a n d b y p r o d u c ts --------------------P a v i n g a n d r o o f in g m a t e r i a l s ----M is c e lla n e o u s p ro d u cts of
p e t r o l e u m an d c o a l --------------------

19
9
2
5

2,610
1,420
20
970

105,000
49,600
1,070
52, 600

3

190

1,670

R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------T i r e s a n d i n n e r t u b e s -----------— —
R u b b e r f o o t w e a r ----------------------------R e c l a i m e d r u b b e r -------------------------R u bber in d u s trie s , not
e l s e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d ------------------

* 102
72
4
1

141,000
110,000
10,900
380

493.000
337.000
33, 700
3,000

28

19,600

119.000

3

P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c ,a n d

controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and clocks -------------------Laboratory, scientific, and
engineering instruments
(except surgical, medical,
a n d d e n t a l ) ----- --------------------------------

Mechanical measuring and
controlling instruments---------Optical instruments and
le n s e s ------------------ ---- ------ ------Surgical, medical, and dental
instruments and supplies-------Opthalmic goods — ------ --------------

Stoppages beginning
_______ in 1953
Number

Man-days idle
during 1953
involved 1 (all stoppages)
W n r lr * » T S

M a n u fa c tu r in g -C o n t in u e d '

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------M e a t p r o d u c t s --------------------------------D a i r y p r o d u c t s ------------------------------C a n n in g an d p r e s e r v i n g f r u i t s ,
v e g e t a b l e s , a n d s e a fo o d s -------G r a i n - m i l l p r o d u c t s ------ —— ------B a k e r y p r o d u c t s ------- ---------------------S u g a r —------ ----------------- ---------------------C o n fe ctio n e ry and re la te d
p r o d u c t s -----------------------------------------B e v e r a g e i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s fo o d p r e p a r a t i o n s
a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------

P a p e r an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------------P u lp , p a p e r , an d p a p e rb o a rd
m i l l s ---------------------------------------------P a p e r c o a t in g a n d g l a s i n g ----------E n v e lo p e s -----— ------------- -----------—
P a p e rb o a rd c o n ta in e rs and
b o x e s ------------------------- --------------------P u lp g o o d s a n d m i s c e l l a n e o u s
c o n v e r te d p a p e r p ro d u cts — —

Industry

41

11,400

246,000

7

3,920

8 7 .3 0 0

9

3,040

8 1 , 300

5

710

11.300

7

750
370

21,900

5

16, 400

Professional, scientific, and
controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and clocks - Continued
Photographic equipment and
supplies---------------------------------J Watches, clocks, clockworkI
operated devices, and parts —
[Miscellaneous manufacturing
j industries ---------------------------------Jewelry, silverwa.re,and
plated w are----------------------------Musical instruments and
parts---------------------------------------Toys and sporting and athletic
goods --------------------------------------Pens, pencils, and other office
and artist*8 m aterials---- ------Costume jewelry, costume
novelties, buttons, and
miscellaneous notions (except
precious metal) ----- ---------------Fabricated plastics products,
not elsewhere classified-------Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries-------------------------------

5

260

4,650

3

2,360

23,500

105

21,000

280,000

4

220

3,290

2

210

8,540

13

3,580

65,800

2

190

7,910

13

2,380

42.300

25

5,490

48,200

46

8,920

104.000

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g --------

*2,479

1,090,000

12,700,000

Agriculture, forestry, and lishing —
Agriculture-----------------------------F is h in g ------------------------------------

14
4
10

8, 140
1,270
6,870

113.000
25.300
87,700

Mining------------------------------------------M e ta l------------------------------ --------Anthracite--------------------------------Bituminous-coal---------------------—
Crude petroleum and natural
gas production —---—
Nonmetallic and quarrying-------

460
15
24
392

156.000
7,820
14,900
130.000

846.000
255.000
108.000
418.000

3
26

100
2,960

2,060
63,100

Construction-------------------------— *1,039
950
Building----------- ------------------ — —
Highways, streets, bridges,
90
docks, e t c .---------------------------—
M iscellaneous----------------------- —
1

574.000
520.000

8,000,000
7.200.000

54,000
40

797.000
350

Trade --------------------------------------------W holesale--------------------------------------------------------------------Retail —

408
205
203

71,200
34.600
36.600

1.050.000
411.000
639.000

Finance, insurance, and real
e s t a t e ---------------------------------------Real estate--------------------- ----------

13
13

950
950

21, 600
21,600

372
23

256,000
15,600

2,380,000
198,000

46

27,000

376.000

12
90
37
62
7
33
25
37

1,470
23.700
4,070
81,900
3,830
80.700
13,800
4,210

25,500
210.000
60.700
283.000
30.700
946.000
219.000
34,200

145

14,400

202,000

19
16
19

42,4 0 0
1 5 .100
13.100

22

3,000
1,870
1,3 5 0
50
2 ,250

19
9

2,8 2 0
440

57.2 0 0
2 , 140

1 70

Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities------------Railroads------------------------------ —
Streetcar and bus transportation
(city and suburban)---------------Intercity motorbus
transportation------------------------Motortruck transportation -------T a x ica b s-------------------- —---------Water transportation---------------Air transportation------------ —
---Communication-----------------------Heat, light, and power-------------Miscellaneous -----------------------Services—personal, bus inessjand
other--------- ---------------------------------Hotels and other lodging
places---- ----- --------------------------Cleaning, dyeing,and pressing—
Barber and beauty shops — ------Business services -------------------Automobile repair services
and garages-----— ------------------Amusement and recreation------Medical and other health

3

S
Educational services ---------------Miscellaneous--------------------------Government—administra tion,
protection, and sanitation3 —
-----

1,690
3 7 .2 0 0

13

1,000

20

1 ,420

4 ,920
1 0,700
1 7 ,900

30

6,280

5 3,400

1 Workers are counted more than once in these figures if they were involved in more than one stoppage during the year.
This figure is less than the sum of the figures below because a few stoppages extending into two or more industry groups have been counted
in this column in each industry group affected; workers involved and man-days idle were divided among the respective groups.
Stoppages involving municipally operated utilities are included under "transportation, communication, and other public utilities, "




21
TABLE 2 .— Work stoppages by industry group and major issues, 1953
Industry group and major issues

All industries ------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ------------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe benefits 2 —
Union organization-------------------Other working conditions--------Interunion or intraunion
matters ------------------------------ —
Not reported-----------------------------

stoppages beginning
in 1953
Workers

5,091

2,400,000

28,300,000

2, 825

1,460,000

21, 800,000

202
543
1, 135

45,200
117,000
638,000

1,250,000
935,000
3,560,000

275
111

130,000
13,200

684,000
45,900

All manufacturing industries-------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2,-------------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe benefits 2 ,—
Union organization -----------------Other working conditions --------Interunion or intraunion
matters ---------------------------------Not reported-----------------------------

2, 612

1,320,000

15, 600,000

1,549

745,000

11,200,000

125
250
593

28, 800
77,500
433,000

887,000
636, 000
2,730,000

53
54

24,900
6,400

141,000
26,000

Primary metal industries -------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions---Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported-----------------------

312

202,000

1, 510,000

171

84,800

1,020,000

2
20
117

240
1,780
115,000

2,830
43,000
446,000

1
1

370
200

650
970

Fabricated metal products * -Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 — --------------------Union organization-----------Other working conditions —
Interunion or intraunion
matters---------------------------Not reported ---------------------

291

102,000

1, 690,000

200

81,400

1,480,000

13
13
56

970
630
18,400

29,500
14,100
152,000

3
6

170
600

4,850
6,860

Ordnance and a c c e sso r ie s-----Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions---Not reported -----------------------

23

21,400

164,000

12
1
8
2

15,400
400
5,270
330

153,000
400
10,500
490

137

76,600

1, 620,000

84

47,800

1, 090,000

9
8
30

1,720
700
25,000

77,600
17,000
414,000

3
3

430
940

19,200
4, 630

Machinery (except electrical) —
Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ------------------------- -Union organization--------------Other working conditions---Interunion or intraunion
m a t t e r s ---------------------------Not reported -----------------------

286

126, 000

2, 150,000

Transportation equipment-------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 —-----------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported------------------------

Electrical machinery,
equipment,and supplies---------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization-------------Other working conditions---Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported — --------------------

See footnotes at end of table,




'Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
(all stoppages)
Number
involved 1

Man-days idle
during 1953
(all stoppages)

196

72,900

1, 660,000

11
15
57

3,310
2,770
45,900

145,000
29,800
293,000

2
5

1,050
400

15,200
1,700

179

300,000

2,730,000

67

96, 800

1,700,000

11
13
81

9,450
54,000
127,000

288,000
113,000
598,000

3
4

11,900
760

27,900
1,580

All manufacturing
industries - Continued
Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)-------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions ---Interunion or intraunion
matters------------------- ---------Not reported-----------------------Furniture and fixtures-------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ----------------------- ----Union organization---------------Other working conditions ----Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported-----------------------Stone, clay, and glass
products —
-----------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------- —-------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------- ---Union organization--------------Other working conditions ---Interunion or intraunion
matters —---------- ---------------Not reported-----------------------Textile mill products--------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ----------- ---------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported--------------- —
------Apparel, etc. 5 -----------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m a tte rs------------ ---------------Not reported-----------------------Leather and leather products---Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported---------——— -----Food and kindred products ------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------- -------------—
Union organization — ----------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m a tte rs----------------------------Not reported-------------------------

125

19,800

512,000

73

11,500

309,000

4
14
27

320
1,200
6,170

16, 600
11,000
152,000

3
4

370
250

21,800
1,720

134

25, 100

269,000

88

18,500

219,000

10
11
18

1,260
1,280
2,370

21,900
13,100
11,000

3
4

200
1,440

1,880
2,500

128

19,400

316,000

70

10,100

220,000

10
8
34

1,750
370
6,980

33,700
13,100
47,900

4
2

180
120

1,020
200

88

26,600

593,000

37

11,800

219,000

6
15
22

1,250
3,260
8,780

35,900
97,400
235,000

2
6

1,020
490

3, 150
2,870

193

35,600

296, 000

84

23,500

157,000

7
61
23

1,020
3,990
3,840

52,600
57,600
14,000

10
8

2,550
650

13,600
1,250

48

11,900

99,100

27

7,960

80,800

1
6
9

100
870
2,930

1, 300
8,430
8, 140

2
3

40
30

190
240

213

98,400

1,210,000

135

76,700

1,040,000

13
21
38

1,250
3,500
15,600

30,600
62,600
68,000

5
1

1,360
50

7, 730
50

22
TABLE 2 . — Work stoppages by industry group and major issues, 1953 - Continued
Industry group and major issues

All manufacturing
industries - Continued
Tobacco manufactures ----------- -Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Paper and allied products -------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions---Interunion or intraunion
matters---------------------- --------Printing, publishing, and
allied industries —
---------- ---- —
Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits2 --------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m atters-----------------------------Chemicals and allied
products---------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ----- ----------- ------;
—
Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits2 --------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m atters------------------ ----------Not reported----- -----------------Products of petroleum and
c oal-----------------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 -------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions-----

Stoppages beginning
Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
Number involved 1 (all stoppages)

4

480

20,800

1

80

3,760

3

400

17, 100

45

15,400
9,910

130,000

All manufacturing
industries - Continued
Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries - Continued
Union organization-----------Other working conditions —
Interunion or intraunion
matters--------------------------Not reported---------------------

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
Number involved 1 (all stoppages)

222,000

28

Industry group and major issues

1
4
9

50
80
2,560

200
52, 300
26, 600

3

2,760

13,200

44

21,300

245.000

31

20, 600

214.000

6
5
1

220
140
290

5,700
9,340
15,800

1

10

36,500

825.000

71

28,000

594.000

Agriculture, forestry,
and fish in g-------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ------------------------Union organization-----------Other working conditions —

740
2, 700

10,600
14,400

2
2

100
30

1,300
440

32 ,479

1,090,000

12.700.000

1,289

714.000

10.600.000

77
293
543

16,400
39,600
205.000

358.000
300.000
830.000

222
57

105.000
6,830

543.000
19,900

14

8, 140

113,000

11

6,870

86,600

1
1
1

1,200
60
20

25,200
830
390

460

156,000

846.000

66

15,800

323.000

5
21
320

380
3,510
124,000

9, 130
38, 500
448,000

17
31

6, 650
5,280

14,400
13,000

20

107

All nonmanufacturing industries---Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe benefits 2 —
Union organization-------------------Other working conditions---------Interunion or intraunion
matters ------------- --------------------Not reported-----------------------------

17
9

10
9
13

4,250
730
3,280

115,000
36,900
73,200

2
2

80
100

Mining--------------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits2 ---------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters-----------------------------Not reported------------------------

6,300
150

19

2,610 ^

12
5
2

2,050
310
250

97,400
3,470
4, 100

Rubber products----------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits2 --------------------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters------------------------------Not reported------------------------

102

141,000

493,000

63

99,900
40
39,100

810
137,000

2
1

2, 110
30

2, 110
360

Instruments, etc. * -----------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 — ----------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m atters------------------------------

41

11,400

246.000

29

9, 190
320
740
920

3,290
43, 000
7, 780

2

260

740

105

21,000

280,000

70

16, 500

244, 000

5

890

9, 300

574.000

8,000,000

630

449.000

7,330,000

10
112
103

390
18,400
4(1,300

4,280
112,000
158.000

176
8

64,800
860

391.000
2,510

192.000

2
4
4

1,039

353,000

1
35

Construction---------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 -----------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 -----------------------Union organization-----------Other working conditions —
Interunion or intraunion
matters---------------------------Not reported------- -------------

Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries--------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




f05, 000

Trade---------------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------- ----------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters ----------------------------Not reported------------------------

408

71.200

1,050,000

267

56.200

709,000

28
73
20

7,420
3, 320
3, 100

162,000
60,800
98.300

12
8

1,030
140

18.300
1,650

Finance, insurance, and real
estate ------------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe

13

950

21,600

Union organization--------------Other working conditions-----

9
2
2

900
30
20

19,900
1, 690
50

ransportation, communication,
and other public utilities -------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ---------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 ----------------------------

372

256.000

2.380.000

202

168.000

1.960.000

19

6, 170

133,000

23
TABLE 2.— Work stoppages by industry group and major issues, 1953 - Continued
Industry group and major issues

All nonmanufacturing
industries - Continued
Transportation, communication,
and other public
utilities - Continued
Union organization--------------Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
m atte rs----------------------------Not reported-----------------------Services—personal, business,
and other--------------------------------Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization-------------—

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers (all stoppages)
Number
involved 1

48
83

12,500
36,900

51,800
118,000

15
5

32,000
300
14,400

202,000

All nonmanufacturing
industries - Continued
Services—personal, business,
and other - Continued
Other working conditions----Interunion or intraunion
matters---------------- --------- ---Not reported------------------------

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers (all stoppages)
Number
involved 1

9

420

7,020

2
5

200
220

2,800
1,950

117,000
830

145

Industry group and major issues

82

11,000

132,000

13
34

810
1,760

24, 800
33,700

Government—administration
protection, and sanitation ----Wages, hours, and fringe
benefits 2 3
--------------------------5
4
Union organization, wages,
hours, and fringe
benefits 2 --------------------------Union organization--------------Other working conditions----

30

6,280

53,400

22

6, 020

52,300

1
2
5

20
50
190

90
220
810

1 Workers are counted more than once in these figured if they were involved in more than one stoppage in the year,
2 "Fringe benefits" has been added to the title only to indicate inclusion of nonwage benefits. No change from previous years in definition or
content of these groups is indicated by the change in title.
3 This figure is less than the sum of the figures below because a few stoppages, each affecting more than one industry group, have been counted
as separate stoppages in each industry group affected. Workers involved and man-days idle were allocated to the respective groups.
4 Excludes ordnance, machinery, and transportation equipment.
5 Includes other finished products made from fabrics and similar materials.
4 Includes professional, scientific, and controlling instruments; photographic and optical goods; watches and clocks.




24
TABLE 3.—Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953
Stoppages beginning
Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Number Workers (all stoppages)
involved 1

State and industry group

State and Indus -ry group

Stoppages beginning
in 1953
Workers
Number
involved 1

Man-days idle
during 1953
(all stoppages)

2 110

36,200

289,000

California-Continued

Manufacturing ------------------ ----

52

19,200

227,000

Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries----------■--------------------------

6

310

2, 640

Primary metal industries ------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)
—
Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies -------------------------------Machinery (except electrical) ------Transportation equipm ent----------Lumber and wood products
—.
(except furniture) ----------- —Furniture and fixtures
...... .... Stone, clay, and glass products----Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar m aterials---- — —
Paper and allied products------------Printing, publishing, and
allied industries------ —----------------Chemicals and allied products------Rubber products- ■ ■ ■ ..............

29

8,200

Nonmanufacturing-----------------

131

117,000

1, 680,000

4

950

11,700

2
1
1

90
1, 100
3,500

2,580
91,300
45,800

3
2
54
29

1,800
440
88,500
3,720

16,300
10,400
1,280,000
97,000

4
2
3

300
210
280

3,400
2, 580
5,850

2
1

190
2,270

6, 190
6,410

2
1
1

80
20
1,930

2,770
240
1,930

A labam a

.

46, 10(^

58

17,000

62,300

28
11
4

12,300
3,430
170

27, 600
17,000
4, 140

10

770

10,900
1, 680

180

1,020

11,700

132,000

15

Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery,and
transportation equipment) — —
—— —
Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)----------------------Furniture and fixtures —-------- -— Stone, clay, and glass products---Leather and leather products -------Food and kindred products ----------Professional, scientific, and
controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and clocks --------—

210

42

Manufacturing — ------ -----------

3
2

4, 340

74,200

1

40

840

4
3
2
2
2

880
1,510
420
220
170

32* 600
18,300
3,390
550
4,230

1

1, 100

14,300

Nonmanufacturing ----------------Construction ---------- ----------------------Trade----- ---------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
------and other public utilities — —

27

7,390

ca i no
j O|IvU

24
2

4, 130
50

35,500
140

1

3,210

22,500

C alifornia -----------------

*269

210,000

2,960,000

138

93, 100

1,280,000

17

5,360

48,400

Manufacturing

— —
...........

■

Primary metal industries-------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment), — — ---Ordnance and accessories
---- —
Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies-------------------------------Machinery (except electrical) ------Transportation equipment -----------Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)-----------------------Furniture and fixtures --------------- ■
Stone, clay, and glass products---Textile-mill products -----------------Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar materials ---------------Leather and leather products -------Food and kindred products ---------Paper and allied products — --------Printing, publishing, and
allied industries --------------- ---------Chemicals and allied products ----Products of petroleum and coal ---Rubber products —------- —
.............—
Professional, scientific, and
controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and clocks ---------------- ----

See footnotes at end of table,




21
1

10,800
130

178,000
290

3
9
10

410
4,890
24, 600

1, 630
85,900
631, 000

7
10
4
1

1,410
1, 130
650
30

24, 500
16,000
5,720
170

16
1
19
1

370
40
36,200
680

3,960
380
213,000
18,800

3
3
1
4

30
170
190
5,680

230
24,900
2, 130
18,100

2

30

1,480

2

170

4,310

28

20,800

237,000

14

1,840

39,300

34

6,550

69,000

Manufacturing-----------------------

9

2,860

19,700

Primary metal industries------------Ordnance and accessories — --------Machinery (except electrical)------Transportation equipment------------Stone, clay, and glass products---Food and kindred products — ---------

1
1
1
1
1
4

90
750
100
30
260
1,630

3,910
1, 500
4,300
880
4, 870
4,210

Nonmanufacturing----------------Mining--------------------------------------- ---Construction-----------------------------Trade ------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities ----------Services— personal, business,
and other — ---------------------------------

25
3
13
4

3,700
570
2,320
290

49,400
23,300
19,500
2,780

4

500

3,750

1

20

50

86

28,800

526, 000

Manufacturing-----------------------

Nonmanufacturing --— ----------Mining -------------------------------------------Construction--------- -------- ... ...... ........
Trade -------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities ------------Services— personal, business,
and other---- --------------------------------Gove rament— adminis tration,
protection, and sanitation ---------A rkansas ______ ___

Agriculture, forestry, and
fishing---------- -----------------------------M in i n g ------------------------------------ ---Construction---------------------------------Trade---------------------- ----------------------Finance, insurance, and real
estate-------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public u tilitie s ----------Services— personal, business,
and o t h e r ------------ ------------------ ----

47

17,900

379,000

Primary metal industries------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment) ---------Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies — —
— —------------- ----- Machinery (except electrical) ------Furniture and fix tu r e s ----------------Stone, clay, and glass products---Textile-mill products ---------------:---Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar m aterials---------------Paper and allied products — --------Printing, publishing, and
allied industries-------------------------Chemicals and allied piroducts------Rubber products----------------------------Professional, scientific, and
controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and clocks —
-----------------Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries------------------- -----------------

3

1, 170

10,500

9

2,280

31, 100

2
6
4
1
5

1, 100
2,230
80
30
2,440

21, 800
61,800
640
530
195,000

2
2

100
440

780
880

2
4
2

40
6,090
450

860
14,900
2,260

2

1,240

-35,500

3

220

2,000

39
16
9

10,900

147,000

5,730
530

91,500
4,400

9

4,060

40,200

Colorado .

Connecticut

Nonmanufacturing-----------------Construction------------------- —---------Trade--------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public u tilitie s----------Services— personal, business,
and other-----------*
------------------ -----Florida
Manufacturing---------------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment) ---- ---Machinery (except electrical)-----Transportation equipment—--------Furniture and fixtures-----------------Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar m aterials--------------Food and kindred prodvicts Paper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and
allied industries-----------------------Chemicals and allied products----

5

590

11,100

75

24,400

217,000

20

5,910

67,100

4
1
3
1

1,960
530
560
60

32,700
2, 160
8,910
2, 160

2
3
2

20
560
940

390
7,750
1,870

1
3

10
1,280

320
10,800

TABLE 3.—Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued
State and industry group

Stoppages beginning Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
Number involved 1 (all stoppages)

Agriculture, forestry, and
fishing------------------------------------------Construction-----------------------------------T r a d e ------------------------------- ------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities ------------Services— personal, business,
and other -----------------------------------Government— administration,
protection, and sanitation----------Georgia __

Stoppages beginning ' Man-days idle
in 1953
during 1953
Workers
Number involved 1 (all stoppages)

Indiana _____________

Florida-Continued
Nonmanufacturing--------------------

State and industry group

55

18,400

149,000

1
33
5

1,000
15,900
100

3,400
136,000
1, 090

13

1, 180

7, 080

1

no

1, 120

2

150

250

54

13,400

120,000

Manufacturing--------------------------

15

1,810

33,200

Primary metal industries-------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)----------Transportation equipment--------------Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)-------------------------Furniture and fix tu r e s------------------Stone, clay, and glass products---Textile-mill products----------- ------- —
Food and kindred products------------Chemicals and allied products-------

2

80

4,080

2
1

180
470

3,420
1, 670

2
1
1
3
1
2

180
140
20
620
20
110

3,230
3,380
300
16, 100
540
440

Nonmanufacturing----- --------------

39

11,600

86, 800

Mining ---------------- ------------------Construction------------ -------------- ---- —
Trade----------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities--------------Government— administration,
protection, and sanitation---- -------

2
25
5

430
10,300
320

18,600
59,700
1,990

540

6,350

6

2 191

139,000

1,540,000

Manufacturing----------------------

92

98,800

885,000

Primary metal industries-----------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)--------Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies-------------------------------Machinery (except electrical)----Transportation equipment----------Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)---------------------Furniture and fixtures — -----------Stone, clay, and glass products —
Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar materials —
------------Food and kindred products---------Paper and allied products------------Printing, publishing, and
allied in dustries----------------- -----Chemicals and allied products---Rubber products---------------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries -----------------------------------

11

26,400

86,900

14

5, 660

185,000

6
7
13

2, 680
9,350
29,500

51,500
57,600
301,000

2
11
5

70
3,040
370

460
23,000
2, 700

2
6
1

310
1, 330
90

7,280
15,000
270

2
1
11

140
1,300
18,500

1,380
79,400
65,300

Nonmanufacturing----------------M in in g ---------------------------- ----------—
Construction--------------------------------Trade------------------------- ----------------Transportation, communication,
and other public u tilitie s ---------Services— personal, business,
and oth e r----------------------------------Government— administration,
protection, and sanitation--------Iow a _______________

1

100

7,060

99

40,000

657,000

33
38
11

6, 880
24, 800
500

18,700
361,000
12,300

13

7,410

259,000

3

370

5,220

1

60

1,060

60

21,200

387,000

1

30

150

Manufacturing----------- ------------

30

12,400

129,000

2316

98,200

1,430,000

1

20

200

Manufacturing--------------------------

163

60,700

1,060,000

Primary metal industries-------------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)----------Electrical machinery, equipment,
and supplies--------------------------------Machinery (except electrical)--------Transportation equipm ent------------Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)-------------------------Furniture and fixtures-------------------Stone, clay, and glass products---Textile-mill products----------------- —
Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar m aterials----------------Leather and leather products —
------Food and kindred products------------Paper and allied products----------- —
Printing, publishing, and
allied industries--------------------------Chemicals and allied products-------Products of petroleum and coal —
—
Rubber products------------------------ ---Professional, scientific, and
controlling instruments;
photographic and optical goods;
watches and c lo c k s---------------------Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries-------------------------------------

18

9,550

185,000

22

11,400

920
3,540
900
70
280

35,700
3,540
4, 190
3,800
280

2, 180
18,200
860

246,000
*
71,200
247,000
10,500

3
1
4
1
1

8
32
6

1
9

280
3,430

850
34,800

7
9
6
3

960
1, 690
920
350

45,200
9,030
16, 600
1,300

Primary metal industries----------Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and
transportation equipment)--------Ordnance and accessories----- ——
Machinery (except electrical) —
—
Transportation equipment------- —
Furniture and fixtures-----------------Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar materials — -----------Food and kindred products------ Printing, publishing, and
allied industries------------------------ Chemicals and allied products----Rubber p rod u cts--------- ---------------Miscellaneous manufacturing
industries-----------------------------------

9
2
12
4

1, 600
1,240
5,370
870

43,500
3,510
29,600
20,700

3
4
2
1

1,050
470
300
910

8,740
5,380
20,400
1, 810

Illinois

2,390

75,000

5

460

22,800

Nonmanufacturing------------------

153

37, 500

363, 000

Mining------------------ ------------------------Construction------ ---------------------- ---Trade-------------------------------------------Finance, insurance, and real
estate -----------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities------------Services— personal, business,
and other------------------------------------Government— administration,
protection, and sanitation----------

24
72
25

5, 810
23,300
4,990

17,600
254,000
51,800

See footnotes at end of table,

_
70
2, 620

37,340
1,420
34,900

1

300

1,500

Nonmanufacturing —-------------

30

8,830

259,000

Construction --------------------------------T rade------------------------------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public utilities ---- -------

21
6

7,250
150

217,000
5,290

1

330

3,320

22

2, 170

32,500

7

890

3,590

2

100

390

3

1,430

36,400

Kansas _____ _______

31

15,400

323,000

Manufacturing ----- —
---------------12




_
3
5

11

2, 330

21,000

Machinery (except electrical) ----Transportation equipment ------——
Lumber and wood products
(except furniture)---------------- ----- Apparel and other finished
products made from fabrics
and similar materials---------------Food and kindred products----------Rubber products---------------------------

4
2

600
160

5,570
4,080

2

110

1,710

1
1
1

90
70
1,300

2,210
500
6,900

20

13,100

302,000

1
12
3

190
6,890
170

30,800
228,000
290

3

5,820

42,000

1

30

30

Nonmanufacturing---------------Mining--------------------------------------Construction---------------- ------------T r a d e ---------------- ----------------------Transportation, communication,
and other public u tilitie s ----- •
—
Government— administration,
protection, and sanitation------

26
TABLE 3 .— Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued

S ta t e a n d in d u s tr y g r o u p

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
N u m ber
in v o l v e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
(a ll s to p p a g e s)

K e n t u c k y _________________

1 63

8 5 ,3 0 0

4 2 2 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------

30

1 2 ,2 0 0

1 3 3 ,0 0 0

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
tr a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) ----------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s ---------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) -----------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------------------F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s --------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s --------------------------A p p a r e l a n d o th e r f in is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ----------------------L e a t h e r a n d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s -----------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------ —
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ------------------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , a n d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s --------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m an d c o a l ------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d
c o n t r o ll in g i n s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic a n d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s a n d c l o c k s -------------------------------

4

860

3 3 ,0 0 0

2
4

1 ,5 5 0
3 ,5 1 0

3, 590
4 2 ,3 0 0

1
1
2
1

30
50
390
1 60

680
830
4 ,3 1 0
2 ,8 5 0

3
2
3
3

2 , 630
1 ,4 5 0
180
400

1 4 ,8 0 0
2 ,9 6 0
2 , 110
1 7 , 100

1
1
1

10
210
1 10

1 30
620
550

1

670

7 ,3 7 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------

1 33

7 3 ,1 0 0

2 8 9 ,0 0 0

M i n i n g -----------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t io n ---------------------------------------------T r a d e --------------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r --------------- -----------------------------------G o v e rn m e n t— a d m in is tr a tio n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , a n d s a n i t a t i o n ---------------

63
43
11

2 2 ,5 0 0
4 9 ,2 0 0
450

7 6 ,6 0 0
1 9 3 ,0 0 0
7 , 180

12

670

6 ,2 5 0

3

150

4 ,2 6 0

1

1 90

1 ,6 7 0

L o u i s i a n a ________________

70

2 3 ,0 0 0

2 8 6 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------- -

21

1 0 ,2 0 0

1 5 2 ,0 0 0

420
400
3 , 1 50

8 ,8 5 0
400
5 , 850

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) --------------O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ------ -----------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ----------------------------------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ---------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------------------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m a n d c o a l ------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r in g
in d u s t r ie s -------------------------- ---- ------------------N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

-------------------------

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , an d
f i s h i n g -------------------------------------------------------M i n i n g ---------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t io n — --------------—--------- ---------------T r a d e -------------------------------------------------------------F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l
e s t a t e --------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r ------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e nt— a d m in i s t r a t i o n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , a n d s a n i t a t i o n ---------------

S ta te an d in d u s t r y g r o u p

M a r y la n d

i

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
N um ber
in v o lv e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 95 3
(a l l s t o p p a g e s )

- C o n tin u e d

P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , an d
a l li e d i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ---------

1
4

90
220

4 ,0 4 0
5 ,4 4 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------

21

1 1 ,5 0 0

9 8 ,9 0 0

1
5
2

10
3 , 330
50

20
3 8 ,5 0 0
1 ,2 1 0

11

4 ,7 0 0

1 5 ,9 0 0

2

3 ,4 4 0

4 3 , 300

M i n i n g ---------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------T r a d e ----------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------G o v e rn m en t— a d m in is tr a tio n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , an d s a n i t a t i o n -------------M a s s a c h u s e t t s __________

1
1
3

176

4 6 , 1 00

6 1 8 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------

1 08

3 2 ,8 0 0

4 8 1 , 000

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) ---------------O r d n a n c e an d a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p l i e s ------------------------------------------M a c h in e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t -----------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ----------------------S to n e , c l a y , an d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s --------------------------A p p a r e l an d o th e r fin is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
an d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------------- —
L e a t h e r an d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ----------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P a p e r and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , an d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s --------------------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d
c o n t r o ll in g i n s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic a n d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s -----------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c t u r in g
i n d u s t r i e s -------------------------------------------------

6

1 ,3 8 0

4 4 ,9 0 0

10
1

1 ,7 1 0
1 ,4 6 0

4 2 ,5 0 0
8, 690

6
10
1

2 , 020
6 ,2 1 0
1 40

2 2 ,7 0 0
1 6 4 ,0 0 0
1, 1 50

3
7
3
5

300
2 ,2 0 0
540
1 ,4 8 0

6 ,2 9 0
3 0, 800
2 , 800
3 7 ,4 0 0

17
13
7
1

1 ,5 2 0
2 ,4 3 0
890
270

1 9 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,9 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
6 ,7 3 0

1
3
6

10
1 10
8 ,7 9 0

650
2 ,2 4 0
2 1 , 600

1 7 ,9 0 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------- -----2
2
3
4
3
1

560
210
1 ,7 8 0
3 ,0 8 0
250
1 40

3 , 3£0
4 , 760
7 ,8 1 0
6 7 ,9 0 0
4 7 ,8 0 0
3 , 550

1

1 70

1, 5 5 0

49

1 2 ,8 0 0

1 3 4 ,0 0 0

1
1
24
7

1 ,2 0 0
130
8 ,4 8 0
630

2 5 ,2 0 0
2 ,2 5 0
7 3 ,8 0 0
1 3 , 100

A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , an d
f i s h i n g -----------------------------------------------------M i n i n g ----------------- ------------------------- -------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------T r a d e --------------- ----------------------------------------F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l
e s t a t e ------------ -------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
an d o t h e r -------------------------------------------- -----G o v e rn m e n t— a d m in is tr a tio n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , an d s a r d t a t i o n --------------

1

1 50

7

1 ,2 4 0

1 3 ,7 0 0

68

1 3 ,3 9 0

1 3 7 ,0 0 0

4

1, 6 2 0
2 , 890
2 , 640

2 8 ,2 0 0
*900
4 2 , 600
2 4 ,6 0 0

29
12
1

50

1, 8 9 0

13

5 ,3 9 0

3 5 , 000

8

640

3, 560

1

20

220

M i c h i g a n ________________

331

2 9 7 ,0 0 0

2 ,4 5 0 ,0 0 0

1

10

40

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------- ------

256

2 5 3 ,0 0 0

1 ,5 3 0 ,0 0 0

13

2 , 1 80

1 9 ,4 0 0

32

8 ,5 0 0

1 3 0 ,0 0 0

1

10

180

1

200

200

27
3

7 ,4 3 0
1, 6 0 0

8 1 , 700
1 ,7 4 0

----------------------------

2 45

1 9 ,4 0 0

1 9 1 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------

24

7 ,9 0 0

9 2 ,2 0 0

5
44
60

2 ,7 2 0
2 5 ,6 0 0
1 5 0 ,0 0 0

1 3 6 ,0 0 0
3 8 8 ,0 0 0
3 5 9 ,0 0 0

6

6

4 ,4 4 0

6 1 ,3 0 0

1 ,0 0 0
820
930
260

2 4 ,9 0 0
7 ,9 9 0
1 2 ,1 0 0
370

1
2

150
350

750
2 , 160

30

2
1
1
1
4
2

200
80
250
360
1 ,0 7 0
720

2 , 670
450
250
1 , 3 70
3 , 610
1 0 ,2 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s ---------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) -------------O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ----------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p l i e s -------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ----------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ------------------------S to n e , c l a y , an d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s -------------------------A p p a r e l an d o th e r fin is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
an d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ----------------------L e a t h e r an d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s -----------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P a p e r an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , an d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s ---------

M a r y la n d

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c ts , (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) --------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t ,
a n d s u p p l i e s ---------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ----------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts
( e x c e p t f u r n it u r e ) -----------------------------------F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ------------------------S to n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t ile -m i ll p ro d u cts
------------------------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c ts
-----------------

See footnotes at end of table,




9
6
2

1
_

.

7
4

4 ,2 6 0
1, 1 00

680
3 1, 2 0 0
3 4, 300
3 6 ,2 0 0

2
7

790
3 ,9 2 0

2 ,7 9 0
1 2 6 ,0 0 0

27
TABLE 3.—Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued

S ta te and in d u s tr y g r o u p

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 95 3
W ork ers
N um ber
in v o lv e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
( a ll s t o p p a g e s )

1
35

250
3 9 ,3 0 0

7 , 500
9 0 ,4 0 0

4

3 ,0 5 0

7 6 ,9 0 0

1

950

11, 300

-------------------------

75

4 4 ,2 0 0

9 2 5 ,0 0 0

M in in g ---------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n --------------------------------------------T r a d e --------------------------------------------------------------F i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l

1
38
13

1 40
4 0 ,1 0 0
350

1 40
8 5 0 ,0 0 0
6 , 600

1

30

1, 6 5 0

16

3 ,0 2 0

5 6 , 300

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s -----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r -------------------------------------------------G o v e r n m e n t — a d m in is t r a t i o n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , a n d s a n i t a t i o n ---------------

5

470

1 0 ,9 0 0

1

10

40

_______________

2 70

1 6 ,0 0 0

2 7 2 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------

31

7 ,2 7 0

1 6 3 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -----------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t)
-------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s -------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ------ —
L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------------------F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s -------------------------S to n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----A p p a r e l an d o th e r f in is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
and s im ila r m a t e r ia ls
---------------------F o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P a p e r an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -----------------P r i n t i n g , p u b lis h in g , and
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ------------------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l li e d p r o d u c t s --------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , and
c o n t r o ll in g in s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic a n d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s -------------------------------

1

180

3, 380

3

400

8 ,2 5 0

3
5

860
900

5 6 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,2 0 0

4
3
1

700
380
70

2 7 , 000
2 , 1 80
750

1
3
2

30
700
1, 8 00

2 , 740
1 ,0 2 0
7 , 1 70

1
3

360
720

1 ,0 3 0
3 0 ,7 0 0

M in n e so ta

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g
C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------T r a d e --------------------- --------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s -----------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r -----------------------------------------—
M i s s o u r i _______________

200

1, 1 10

39

8 ,6 9 0

1 0 9 ,0 0 0

15
13

3 ,9 2 0
1 ,4 4 0

4 1 , 1 00
1 2 ,7 0 0

6f

4 0 ,4 0 0

9 5 5 ,0 0 0

M i n i n g --------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n -------------------------------------------T r a d e ---------------------------- -----------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s --------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
an d o t h e r --------- --------------------------------------

2
20
21

20
1 9 ,5 0 0
2 ,9 8 0

1 ,5 4 0
7 4 8 ,0 0 0
8 3 ,9 0 0

15

1 7 ,5 0 0

1 1 8 ,0 0 0

7

390

4 ,2 0 0

J e r s e y ___________

*2 63

8 0 , 600

1 ,2 8 0 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------

172

5 0 ,5 0 0

7 6 1 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ---------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t -------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s ----------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t --------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) -----------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ------------------ —
S t o n e , c l a y , an d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ----------------------A p p a r e l an d o th e r fin is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------------L e a t h e r an d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------P a p e r an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s --------------P r i n t i n g , p u b lis h in g , an d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ------- ------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m an d c o a l -----R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and
c o n t r o ll in g in s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic a n d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s ---------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------------------

9

3 , 130

8 0 ,5 0 0

10

2 ,3 3 0

4 5 ,9 0 0

13
26
4

4 , 890
5 ,4 9 0
4 ,9 3 0

6 5 ,9 0 0
9 7 ,9 0 0
2 0 ,9 0 0

3
7
13
13

1 60
560
1 ,2 4 0
3 ,8 9 0

2 ,0 9 0
5, 850
2 0 ,5 0 0
3 3 ,7 0 0

16
2
9
7

880
200
7 ,7 0 0
1 ,6 1 0

6 ,3 2 0
2 ,4 9 0
8 9 ,2 0 0
1 4 ,0 0 0

2
13
3
8

270
4 ,2 0 0
90
4 ,3 6 0

7 ,5 3 0
1 4 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 7 0
5 0 ,0 0 0

N ew

2

390

1 , 1 10

14

4 ,2 3 0

7 0 ,2 0 0

91

3 0 ,0 0 0

5 2 3 ,0 0 0

2
33
23

370
4 ,8 6 0
4 , 540

3 ,7 0 0
5 0 ,5 0 0
5 8 ,9 0 0

29

2 0 ,0 0 0

4 0 9 ,0 0 0

4

270

1 ,2 8 0

1

40

1 10

____________

2 585

2 0 8 , 000

3 ,0 7 0 ,0 0 0

364

1 0 5 ,0 0 0

2 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ---------------F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p ro d u c ts (e x c ep t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) -----------O r d n a n c e an d a c c e s s o r i e s
-------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s ---------- -------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ---------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ------------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ---------------------S to n e , c l a y , an d g l a s s p r o d u c t s —
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ------------------------A p p a r e l an d o th e r f in is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
an d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------------L e a t h e r an d le a t h e r p r o d u c t s --------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------P a p e r an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s --------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , and
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s -----P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m a n d c o a l —
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s -------------------- ----------------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d
c o n t r o ll i n g in s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic a n d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s --------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c t u r in g
i n d u s t r i e s -------------------- ---------------------------

26

1 6 ,5 0 0

1 2 8 ,0 0 0

29
4

5 ,2 9 0
940

7 2 ,0 0 0
9 7 ,2 0 0

36
25
26

2 0 , 500
3 ,6 7 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

6 7 0 ,0 0 0
2 2 9 ,0 0 0
3 5 2 ,0 0 0

6
23
8
21

970
3 ,3 9 0
2 ,0 2 0
1 ,3 1 0

8 ,4 3 0
4 4 ,5 0 0
2 5 ,7 0 0
1 7 ,3 0 0

50
8
31
9

3 , 158
2 ,2 2 0
5 ,3 0 0
1 ,6 5 0

2 2 , 700
3 3 , 100
7 5 ,2 0 0
1 5 ,3 0 0

9
12
2
2

1 6 ,0 0 0
2 ,7 0 0
580
410

1 4 0 ,0 0 0
7 9 ,3 0 0
3 0 ,3 0 0
3 ,3 6 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------M i n i n g --------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n -----------------------------------------T r a d e ------------------------------- ------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ---------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
an d o t h e r -------------------------------------------—
G o v e rn m en t— a d m in is tr a tio n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , an d s a n i t a t i o n -----------N ew

8

1 ,9 6 0
1 ,3 8 0

Y ork

2 6 , 700

3

2 8 , 400

6 1 ,3 0 0

1 ,2 2 0 , 000

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------------

75

2 0 ,9 0 0

2 6 4 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s ------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) --------------O r d n a n c e and a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s ---------- -------------- ------------ -----M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ----------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ----------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ---------------------------------F u r n it u r e a n d f ix t u r e s ------------------------S to n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ------A p p a r e l a n d o th e r fin is h e d
p ro d u c ts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s ---------------------L e a t h e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c t s -----------F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ----------------P a p e r a n d a l li e d p r o d u c t s -------------------P r in t i n g , p u b lis h in g , and
a l li e d i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d a l li e d p r o d u c t s ----------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m an d c o a l ------R ubber p ro d u cts
----------------------------------~
M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s --------------------------------------------------

2

350

1 4 ,9 0 0

8
1

2 ,8 7 0
240

5 7 ,5 0 0
710

6
5
8

1 ,6 8 0
990
4 ,4 9 0

6 1 ,4 0 0
3 2 ,1 0 0
1 3 ,9 0 0

3
3
6

1 20
1, 1 20
310

2 ,9 3 0
7 ,4 8 0
7 ,4 2 0

6
4
13
1

710
1 ,7 9 0
5 ,2 1 0
380

3 ,2 6 0
5 ,0 1 0
3 9 ,9 0 0
6, 300

3
2
1
1

260
110
20
50

2 , 590
5 ,3 4 0
1 40
250

2

250

3 ,2 2 0

See footnotes at end of table,

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------

M a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------------------------- -

2

2 1 40




S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g '
M a n - d a y s id le
in 1 9 5 3
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
(a ll sto p p a g e s)
N um ber
in v o l v e d 1

M i s s o u r i - C o n tin u e d

M ic h ig a n - C o n tin u e d
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m and c o a l --------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------P r o f e s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , and
c o n t r o ll in g in s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g r a p h ic and o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s ------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g

S ta te an d in d u s t r y g r o u p

9

1 ,2 9 0

1 1 ,4 0 0

29

2 ,7 7 0

3 1 ,9 0 0

28
TABLE 3. —Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued

S t a t e a n d in d u s t r y g r o u p

S to p p a g e s L e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
N u m ber
in v o lv e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
(a l l s t o p p a g e s )

S ta te an d in d u s t r y g r o u p

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
_________ in 1 9 5 3 _________
N u m ber

i n v o lv e d 1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
(a ll s to p p a g e s )

O k l a h o m a _____________

Y o r k - C o n tin u e d

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g --------------------------A g r ic u lt u r e , f o r e s t r y , and
f i s h i n g --------------------------------------------------------M in in g
--------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t io n -------- ;... —
- ...................
T r a d e --------------------------------------------------------------F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , an d r e a l
e s t a t e , -------------- --------------------------------------—
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r ----------------- »■ -------- ----------------G o v e rn m en t— a d m in is tr a tio n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , a n d s a n i t a t i o n ----------------N o rth

C a r o l i n a _____________

M a n u fa c tu rin g

-----------------— -----------

F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , and
-------------t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t)
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t ,
a n d s u p p li e s ---------------- - — ■ --------------—
M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ----------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ; -------------------------------- -F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ------------------------T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s --------------------------P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s - ------------- C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s --------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------- --

221

1
1
54
63

1 0 4 ,0 0 0

9 7 9 ,0 0 0

10
510
1 2 ,5 0 0
2 8 , 600

20
1 3 ,7 0 0
2 0 8 ,0 0 0
3 2 1 ,0 0 0

4

230

6 ,6 6 0

68

6 1 ,4 0 0

3 9 9 ,0 0 0

28

1, 6 1 0

2 9 ,6 0 0

2

40
1 0 ,1 0 0

17

9 ,0 3 0

1 8 7 ,0 0 0

2

390

4 ,0 5 0

1
2

4 ,5 6 0
50

1 0 5 ,0 0 0
2 ,8 5 0

2
1
6
1

550
1 60
2 , 620
20
40
640

6 ,3 0 0
4 , 1 60
6 2 ,1 0 0
200
250
1 ,2 8 0

1
1
8

1 ,0 3 0

8 ,9 1 0

M i n i n g - ---------------- --------------------- —---------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s -------------------

2
5

430
490

2 ,5 9 0
4 ,0 5 0

M a n u fa c tu rin g

----------------------- -------- -

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) ---------------O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o r i e s ------------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s --------------------------------- — ------M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------- T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ----------- ------L u m b e r and w ood p r o d u c ts
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ---------------- -----------------F u r n it u r e a n d f i x t u r e s ------------------------- S to n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s - —
T e x t ile -m i ll p ro d u cts —
-------------------------A p p a r e l a n d o th e r f in is h e d
p ro d u c ts m a d e f r o m fa b r ic s
a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s —------- ------------

F o o d and J dndrcd

products * --—

P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------------------P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , a n d
a l l i e d I n d u s t r i : s -----------------------------------C h e m i c a l s a n d . i l i e d p r o d u c t s ----------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m a n d c o a l -----R u b b e r p r o d u c t s - ---------------------- ----------- -—
P r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , and
c o n t r o ll in g i n s t r u m e n t s ;
p h o to g ra p h ic and o p tic a l g o o d s;
w a t c h e s a n d c l o c k s ----------------------- -------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r in g
in d u s tr ie s ---------------— -----------— --------—
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

------— --------------

A g r ic u lt u r e , f o r e s t r y , and
f i s h i n g ------------------------------------------------------M i n i n g ----------------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t io n --------------------- — ------------------T rade
---------------------------------------------------- -----F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l
e s t a t e --------- ----------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s — ----------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r -------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table,




1

1 10

2 ,2 7 0

*518

O h io

2 5 5 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------

2 ,3 2 0

2 4 ,9 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ------------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) --------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ----------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) ------------------------------S to n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ——
P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , and
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m an d c o a l ------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ------------------------- --------------

2

250

900

2
2

240
280

2 ,2 0 0

1
2

2 60
90

1, 5 6 0
560

1
1
1

40
1 ,0 6 0

1 ,4 8 0
3 ,7 4 0
5 ,2 9 0

41

16,000

2 3 0 .0 0 0

28
5

720
7 ,0 8 0
1 30

1 1 7 .0 0 0
4 1 ,3 0 0
1 ,5 9 0

6

8, 100

6 9 ,5 0 0

1

20

990

49

10,200

1 2 9 .0 0 0

28

7 ,9 8 0

111,000

3

1 ,2 9 0

8 , 480

3

no

9 , 1 40

1 9 6 ,0 0 0

............................

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

1 8 ,4 0 0

12

1 ,0 0 0

25

53

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------

N ew

218* 000

2 ,3 9 0 ,0 0 0

308

1 7 0 ,0 0 0

1 ,8 3 0 ,0 0 0

7-3

3 4 , 1 00

M i n i n g — — --------------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t i o n ----------- :--------------------------------T rade
------------ ---------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
an d o t h e r ------------------------------------------------O r e g o n ________________ _
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------------------P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u cts (e x cep t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) -------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ------------------L u m b e r and w o o d p ro d u cts
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------- ----------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------

2

540
3 ,2 3 0

8, 670
2 9 ,0 0 0

16
4

2 ,3 7 0
550

6 0 .7 0 0
3 ,9 9 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------------

21

2 , 1 80

1 7 .7 0 0

5

10

330
1, 630

5, 890
9 ,4 1 0

5

210

2 ,2 2 0

1

20

160

C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------T r a d e ------------------- ------------------------------ *
--------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r ----------------- -------------------------------

2 6 3 ,0 0 0
P e n n s y lv a n ia

43
7

19,100
9 ,0 4 0

1 1 2 ,0 0 0
2 3 , 000

16
40
11

6 , 1 60
16, 000
2 5 ,3 0 0

101, 000
3 2 9 ,0 0 0
5 6 9 ,0 0 0

4
13
20
1

340
5 ,3 9 0
3 ,0 6 0
1 ,0 0 0

850
4 9 ,2 0 0
9 5 ,4 0 0
3, 000

5
15
3

1 ,2 8 0
1 ,9 2 0
1 ,6 9 0

2 3 , 300
1 3 ,2 0 0
1 7 ,7 0 0

5
11
2
25

320
940
340
3 9 ,2 0 0

5 ,4 5 0
1 4 ,1 0 0
2 6 ,8 0 0
1 5 2 ,0 0 0

2

670

1

1, 5 5 0

13

3 ,7 7 0

2 8 ,2 0 0

210

4 8 ,0 0 0

5 6 5 , 000

2
25
1 12
31

50
5 ,0 9 0
3 6 ,4 0 0
2 ,3 3 0

1 50
3 7 ,2 0 0
4 4 2 ,0 0 0
3 0 ,0 0 0

2

90

3, 570

27

2 , 720

3 4 ,6 0 0

11

1, 3 1 0

1 8 ,1 0 0

__________

*632

3 1 8 .0 0 0

2 ,9 9 0 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------

364

189.000

1 ,6 2 0 ,0 0 0

45

6 7 ,2 0 0

2 6 2 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s ----------------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) — — —
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
an d s u p p l i e s -------------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u i p m e n t ----------------L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n it u r e ) — ---------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ------------ — -------S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s -----T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ------------------------ —
A p p a r e l a n d o th e r fin is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
an d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s —--------------- —
L e a t h e r an d l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s ------—
F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s --------—
T o b a c c o m a n u f a c t u r e s ------------------------P a p e r an d a l li e d p r o d u c t s ------- — -----P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h in g , and
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ---------------------------------C h e m i c a l s an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ------P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o le u m and c o a l ——
R u bber p ro d u cts
----------------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , an d
c o n t r o ll in g in s t r u m e n t , 3 ;
p h o to g r a p h ic an d o p t i c a l g o o d s ;
w a t c h e s an d c l o c k s ---------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g
i n d u s t r i e s ----------------------------------------------—

52

1 0 ,7 0 0

1 7 6 .0 0 0

21

2 1 ,3 0 0

37

16,200

16

1 9 ,8 0 0

1 5 1 .0 0 0
1 85, 000
1 5 0 .0 0 0

7

1,020

7 ,2 1 0

16

1 ,5 8 0

19,200

28
17

6, 110

7 5 , 500
1 4 8 .0 0 0

46
3
32

1 9 ,5 0 0
420

1

80
490

1 1 3 .0 0 0
2 , 570
7 0 ,8 0 0
3, 760
8, 740

320
5 ,3 3 0
470
2 , 750

660
1 9 2 .0 0 0
8 ,3 1 0
7 ,8 8 0

3

1
17
4
4

5 ,5 5 0

6,2 9 0

4

250

2 ,7 2 0

12

3 ,7 2 0

3 9 ,3 0 0

N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----------------------

268

129,000

1 ,3 7 0 ,0 0 0

M in in g — ------------------------------------------------ ------C o n s t r u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------T r a d e ----------- ----------- -------- ---------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l
e s t a t e ---------------------------------- -— --------------

101
61

4 7 ,9 0 0
3 9 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,5 0 0

200 ,0 0 0

60

190

44

1

7 7 3 , 000

2 1 6 ,0 0 0

29
TABLE 3.— Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued
Stoppages beginning
in 1953
W o rk ers
N um ber
involved 1

State and industry group

P e n n s y lv a n ia

-

Is la n d

__________

41

2 9 ,4 0 0

162,000

15

830

1 1 ,8 0 0

5
-

1 ,3 9 0

3 ,0 2 0

2 37

1 1 ,2 0 0

P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s --------- —
F ab ricate d m e ta l products (except
ordnance, m ac h in ery , and
transp ortation e q u i p m e n t ) ---------E le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y , equipm ent,
and s u p p lie s ------------ ------------------------T e x tile -m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------------A p p are l and other finished
products m ad e fr o m fa b r ic s
and sim ila r m a te r ia ls -----------— —
Rubber p ro d u c ts-----------------—
M isc ella n e o u s m anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s -------- ----------------------------------

8 ,3 6 0

*50
2

29 0

2 ,8 6 0

1 0 8 .0 0 0

60

4 , 420

2

1 ,0 8 0

86, 100

3
3

1 ,5 2 0
710

2 ,9 3 0
3 ,4 1 0

1
4

150
4 ,7 0 0

300
9 ,4 2 0

3

150

-----

61

4 4 ,7 0 0

5 3 0 ,0 0 0

M ining ------------ --------- --------------- ------C onstruction -— ------ ----------------------T rad e ■ -------------- ------ ----- ------------■
T ran sportation, com m u nication,
and other public u tilitie s ---------S e r v ic e s — p e r so n a l, b u s in e s s ,
and other —— ---- --------------------G overnm ent— a d m in istration ,
p rote ction , and sanitation --------

1
40
5

50
2 0 ,1 0 0
620

950
3 3 2 ,0 0 0
1 9 .1 6 0

12

2 3 ,6 0 0

17 5, 000

2

200

2 ,8 4 0

1

90

180

U ta h

39

2 3 ,4 0 0

2 4 6 ,0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r in g ----------------------------

1

——

15

4 , 560

2 1 ,9 0 0

P r im a r y m e ta l in du stries ........... . F a b ric a te d m e ta l produ cts (except
ordnance, m a c h in ery , and
transp ortation equipm ent) - .............
Stone, c la y , and gla ss produ cts —

10

3 ,8 1 0

1 5 ,3 0 0

4
1

680
80

5 ,7 4 0
800

24

18, 800

2 2 4 ,0 0 0

15
6
2

1 *3 5 0
1 0 ,4 0 0
20

9 2 ,8 0 0
1 3 1 ,0 0 0
20 0

________________

1 ,3 7 0

-------------- -

21

2 ,8 7 0

2 5 , 600

C onstruction ----------------- ----------------T r a d e ---------- ------------------------------------Tran sportation , com m u nication,
and other public u tilities -------S e r v ic e s— p e r so n a l, b u sin e ss,
and o t h e r ----- ----- — --------------■
------Governm ent— ad m in istration ,
p rote ction , and s a n it a t io n --------

10
3

790
50

10,100

5

1 ,8 6 0

1 4 ,7 0 0

1

10

10

2

160

160

T e n n e s s e e _________ _

Nonm anufacturing

M a n -d a y s idle
during 1953
(a ll stopp ages)

1 3 4 .0 0 0

16

P r o fe s s io n a l, sc ie n tific , and
controllin g in stru m en ts;
photographic and op tical good s;
w atches and c lo c k s ---------------------M isc ella n e o u s m anufacturing
in d u s tr ie s ---------------------------------- —

Nonm anufacturing
M a n u f a c t u r in g ------ --------------------

Stoppages beginning
in 1953
W orkers
N u m ber
in volved 1

State and industry group

T e x a s - C o n tin u e d

C o n tin u e d

T ran sportation, com m u nication,
and other public u t i l i t i e s -------------S e r v ic e s— p e r so n a l, b u sin e ss,
and o t h e r -----------------------------------------G overnm ent— ad m in istration ,
p rote ction , and sanitation ----------Rhode

M a n -d a y s idle
during 1953
(all stopp ages)

670

2 125

6 5 ,5 0 0

6 0 5 .0 0 0

M a n u f a c t u r in g ---------------------------

52

2 0 ,8 0 0

2 4 7 .0 0 0

P r im a r y m e ta l in du stries -------------F ab ricate d m e tal products (except
ordnance, m ac h in ery , and
transp ortation e q u ip m e n t )----------E le c tr ic a l m a c h in ery , equipm ent,
and s u p p l i e s ------------------------------ ----M ach in ery (except e le c tr ic a l) ------L u m b er and wood products
(except furn itu re) ——------ --------------Fu rniture and f i x t u r e s -------------------Stone, clay, and g la ss produ cts —
T e x t ile -m ill p r o d u c t s ----------------—
A p p a re l and other finished
produ cts m ad e fr o m fa b r ic s
and s im ila r m a t e r i a l s ----- —---------F ood and kindred products — -------P ap er and allie d p r o d u c t s ------------P rin tin g, publish ing, and
allie d i n d u s t r ie s ------------------- -------- —
C h e m ic als and a llied p r o d u c t s -----Rubber p r o d u c t s ---------------------------------

5

1 ,3 9 0

14, 600

7

1 ,2 2 0

2 8 ,6 0 0

l
5

10
2 ,6 1 0

390
8 ,7 9 0

6
1
6
2

780
330
540
670

5 7 ,0 0 0
3 ,2 5 0
1 7 ,6 0 0
3 7 ,8 0 0

5
5

1, 690
520

8 ,8 7 0
1 7 ,9 0 0
* 2 ,7 7 0

1
6
2

120
6 ,0 6 0
4 , 820

370
3 5 , 100
1 3 ,8 0 0

N oam annfactur i n g ................ M ining ---------------------------------------------C o n s t r u c t io n --------------------------- ---------T rad e -------------------------------------------------Governm ent— a d m in istration ,
p r ote ction , and sanitation —...------

1

30

200

65

2 4 ,9 0 0

1 5 7 ,0 0 0

9

960

1 2 ,7 0 0

1

n o

1 ,8 2 0

l
3
1
2
1

10
630
40
80
90

10
8 ,9 4 0
110
1 ,7 5 0
90

..- ..........- ... — ■

56

2 4 , 00U

1 4 5 ,0 0 0

M in in g -------------------------------- -----------------------........................................
C o n s t r u c t io n
T r a d e ................... .............................. .................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s -------------S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r -------------------------------------------------

24
17
3

9 ,0 3 0
4 ,4 1 0
230

1 9 ,1 0 0
8 1 ,8 0 0
690

10

1 0 ,0 0 0

4 0 ,2 0 0

2

280

2 ,9 4 0

*66

4 6 , 000

5 8 1 ,0 0 0

— ------------ ---— ....

29

2 2 ,8 0 0

4 3 4 ,0 0 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s --------- ------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
tr a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) -------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t ---------------—

3

8 ,5 6 0

1 1 1 ,0 0 0

2
4

1 ,6 0 0
6 ,4 5 0

2 8 , ZOO
1 0 8 ,0 0 0

16
1
3

4 , 840
100
580

1 3 5 ,0 0 0
6 ,6 0 0
2 ,1 6 0

1
1

700
10

4 5 ,5 0 0
26 0

V irg in ia

M anufacturing

----------------------—

F a b ric ate d m e ta l p rodu cts (except
ordnan ce, m a c h in e r y , and
transp ortation equipm ent)
...
L u m b er and wood products
(except furniture) ----- --------------------Fu rn itu re and fixtu res -----------—------T e x t ile -m ill products ----------------------Food and kindred produ cts —»
--------- ■
C h e m ic a ls and a llied products ------

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ----------------

73

4 4 ,7 0 0

3 5 8 .0 0 0

M in in g ------------------------------ ------------ —
C o n s t r u c t i o n ----------------------------- ----T r a d e -------------------------------- ----------—
Tran sportation , com m u nication,
and other public u t i l i t i e s ---------S e r v ic e s— p e r so n a l, b u sin e ss,
and o t h e r ------ — ---------------------- -----

14
36
9

2 ,3 2 0
3 8 ,0 0 0
410

1 0 ,5 0 0
3 3 0 .0 0 0
4 , 170

13

3 , 680

1 2 ,4 0 0

1

310

1 ,5 4 0

, ,

W a s h in g to n
M a n u fa c tu r in g

,

Lumber and wood products
----------------------------

89

5 8 , 100

6 68 .000

M a n u fa c tu r in g --------------- ---------------

28

1 3 ,4 0 0

1 3 8 ,0 0 0

P r im a r y m e ta l i n d u s t r i e s ---------------F ab ricate d m e ta l products (except
ordnance, m ach in ery , and
transportation e q u i p m e n t ) -----------Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ------------- —
M achin ery (except e l e c t r i c a l ) --------Tran sportation e q u ip m e n t ---------------Lu m ber and wood products
(except fu r n itu r e )------------- ------ —— —
Stone, c la y , and g la ss p r o d u c t s ----Food and kindred products — ----------C h em icals and a llied p r o d u c t s --------

3

830

6, 820

4
1

2 ,0 1 0
1 ,2 5 0
3 ,5 8 0
3 ,7 5 0

3 9 ,4 0 0
2 4 ,9 6 0
8 ,8 3 0
2 0 ,6 0 0

T exas

See footnotes at end of table,




3

3
1
2
5
4

60
60
770
850

600
1 ,3 7 0
1 4 ,7 0 0
1 8 ,0 0 0

(e x c e p t fu r n it u r e ) - ................... .............
F u r n it u r e a n d f ix t u r e s - — ---------- --F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ---------------P r i n t i n g , p u b lis h in g , an d
a l l i e d i n d u s t r i e s ------------- ----------- ——
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s ----------------------— ——
——

------

37

23 ,2 0 0

1 4 7 ,0 0 0

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and
f i s h i n g .................... ■■— — -—
'
M ining —— — -----------------------C onstruction -———
---------- —
T rad e ------ ------- —
--------------

1
1
20
11

2 ,2 0 0
40
1 8 ,8 0 0
1 ,6 5 0

3 3 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 0 0
7 8 ,8 0 0
2 5 ,7 0 0

Nonmanufacturing

30
TABLE 3.— Work stoppages in States having 25 or more stoppages by industry group, 1953 - Continued

S ta te a n d in d u s t r y g r o u p

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
N u m ber
in v o lv e d 1

M a n - d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
(a ll s to p p a g e s )

W est

380

1

130

2 , 640

165

4 9 ,5 0 0

3 4 7 ,0 0 0

- ......—--- --------------

27

7 ,6 7 0

1 0 0 ,0 0 0

3

950

9 ,3 9 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l in d u s t r ie s
F a b r ic a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c ts (e x c ep t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h in e r y , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t) -------------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t ,
a n d s u p p li e s -------------------------- — . . . . .
M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) --------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t
■■—
L u m b e r and w o o d p r o d u c ts
( e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) --------------------------------S to n e , c la y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s —
A p p a r e l a n d o th e r f in is h e d
p rod u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
a n d s im ila r m a te r ia ls
................ C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s -------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u f a c t u r in g
i n d u s t r i e s — —— — — —— —— ——

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
M in in g —

- ■ ■— ■....
■
■■
. . . . .

C o n s t r u c t io n —........ ■ ■ ■ > .........................
■
T r a d e -----------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , C o m m u n ic a tio n ,.
a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s
..
S e r v i c e s — ■ p e r s o n a l, b u s i n e s s ,
an d o th e r
------------------------

1

M a n -d a y s id le
d u r in g 1 9 5 3
( a ll s t o p p a g e s )

1 00

3 0 ,3 0 0

7 7 1 ,0 0 0

46

2 2 ,5 0 0

6 8 2 ,0 0 0

4

850

3 ,8 4 0

6

2 ,7 3 0

3 9 ,7 0 0

3
8
3

1 ,0 8 0
1 ,4 4 0
3 ,4 4 0

8 6 ,7 0 0
2 2 ,9 0 0
8 6 ,4 0 0

3
2

280
120

8 , 1 30
540

4 , 090

_________

V irg in ia

M a n u fa c tu rin g

M a n u fa c tu r in g •
3

S to p p a g e s b e g in n in g
in 1 9 5 3
W ork ers
in v o lv e d 1

N um ber
W isc o n sin

W a s h in g to n -C o n tin u e d
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
a n d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ----------------S e r v id es— p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o t h e r — - ....................... — ------------

S ta te an d in d u s t r y g r o u p

6

1 ,6 0 0

1 3 ,7 0 0

2
3
2

1 ,2 5 0
540
600

6 ,0 7 0
7 ,8 2 0
3 ,2 9 0

1
6

50
470

470
3 ,9 2 0

1
2

280
970

2 ,2 0 0
2 0 ,9 0 0

1

960

3 2 ,7 0 0

138

4 1 ,8 0 0

2 4 6 ,0 0 0

104
19
3

3 0 ,2 0 0
2 .9 1 0
1 40

1 1 0 ,0 0 0
1 1 4 ,0 0 0
3 ,7 7 0

9

3 , 1 10

1 7 ,5 0 0

3

520

1 ,3 4 0

P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s -----------F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o r d n a n c e , m a c h i n e r y , an d
t r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u i p m e n t ) -----------E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y , e q u ip m e n t,
a n d s u p p l i e s ----------------------------------------M a c h i n e r y (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ------T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t --------- -— L u m b e r an d w o o d p r o d u c t s
(e x c e p t f u r n i t u r e ) -----------------------------F u r n it u r e an d f i x t u r e s ----------------------A p p a r e l an d o th e r f in is h e d
p ro d u cts m a d e fr o m fa b r ic s
a n d s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s -------------------L e a t h e r an d l e a t h e r
p r o d u c t s --------; ----------------------------------------F o o d an d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s -------------P a p e r an d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ----------------R u b b e r p r o d u c t s -------------------------------------M i s c e l l a n e o u s m a n u fa c t u r in g
i n d u s t r i e s -----------------------------------------------

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ■

M i n i n g ------------C o n s t r u c t io n ■
T r a d e -------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t i o n ,
an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,
a n d o th e r
G o v e r n m e n l— «a d m in is t r a t io n ,
p r o t e c t i o n , a n d s a n it a t io n —

1

140

270

7
5
1
2

1 ,0 2 0
7 ,6 4 0
60
3 ,6 8 0

1 8 ,5 0 0
4 0 8 ,0 0 0
260
6 ,5 3 0

1

20

90

54

7 ,8 3 0

8 8 ,5 0 0

1
23
9

300
3 ,8 9 0
870

1 ,7 8 0
4 0 , 400
1 9 ,5 0 0

12

1 ,9 3 0

2 2 ,7 0 0

7

790

3 ,7 7 0

2

60

300

W o r k e r s a r e c o u n t e d m o r e th a n o n c e in t h e s e f i g u r e s i f t h e y w e r e in v o lv e d in m o r e th an o n e s to p p a g e d u r in g th e y e a r .
* T h i s f i g u r e i s l e s s th a n th e s u m o f th e f i g u r e s b e l o w b e c a u s e a fe w s t o p p a g e s e x te n d in g in to tw o o r m o r e in d u s t r y g r o u p s h a v e b e e n c o u n te d in
t h is c o lu m n in e a c h in d u s t r y g r o u p a f f e c t e d ; w o r k e r s in v o l v e d a n d m a n - d a y s id l e w e r e d iv id e d a m o n g th e r e s p e c t i v e g r o u p s .
* I d l e n e s s in 1 9 5 3 r e s u l t i n g f r o m s to p p a g e s w h ic h b e g a n in th e p r e c e d in g y e a r .




31

A pp en d ix
nNational E m erg e n c y " Dispute - E ast Coast
Long shorem en1s Strike
The ’‘national e m e rg e n c y "8 strike
provisions of the Labor Management R ela ­
tions (T aft-H artley) A ct w ere invoked by
P resident Eisenhower in early October 1953
when he appointed a board of inquiry in
the strike of about 30, 000 longshorem en in
North Atlantic ports fro m Maine to V i r ­
g in ia .9
The work stoppage had begun on
October 1 after the New Y ork Shipping A s s o ­
ciation and the International L o n g sh o re m en ^
A sso cia tio n (Ind. ) failed to agree on a new
contract to replace the one that expired on
Septem ber 3 0 . 10
T his union, expelled fro m the A F L
on Septem ber 22 on charges of corruption,
was contending with the newly chartered
International Longshoremen* s A sso cia tio n
(A F L ) for representation o f longshorem en
on the E a st C o a st. Some lo c a ls in the New
Y o rk -N e w Jersey area seceded fro m the old
organization and received charters in the
A F L a ffilia t e .11
P resident Eisenhow er appointed a
board of inquiry to investigate and report
on the is su e s in dispute. The board*s m e m 8
as

L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t

"n a tio n a l

s p e c ifie d
as

in

em erg en cy "
th e

im p e r ilin g

and

th e

(2 ) t h o s e

A ct

"w h ic h

in te r s ta te
p r iv e

L a bor

d e s ig n a te d
th re a te n

s e c t io n

under

th e

of

a

d egree

th e

cou n try

em ergen cy

liz e d .

p ro ce d u res

T h ese

p r o v is io n s

p r e v io u s

o c c a s io n s :

d is p u te

th e

ic a n

at

n a t io n w id e

n o n fe r r o u s
lo n g e d
1948,
See

1 9 4 9 -5 0
in

7

B LS

m ent
1952

of

D is p u t e s

R e la tio n s
(S e r ie s

N o.

2)

fo r

u s u a lly

in

C oast p o rts.
11
T h e a c t io n
N ew

Y ork

w a te rfro n t
le d

and N ew

to

of

th e

C r im e

le g is la t io n
to

u ti­

on

10

in th e p r o ­

d is p u te ;
in v o lv e d

th e

th e

w it h

L a b or

12

oth er
and

in

s tr ik e s .
"N a tio n a l
M an age­

1 9 4 7 -J u n e _3 0 ,
d is c u s s io n

of

Y ork

The

and

p a ttern

fo r

con ­
oth er

A F L

had

C o m m is s io n
w h ic h
by

th e

r e g u la te

Digitized e r FRASERo n s i n t h e
o t h for c o n d i t i


P ort

began
S ta tes

h ir in g
of

grow n

out

in q u ir y
in
of

la te
N ew

1951
Y ork

p roced u res

N ew

Y ork .

and

C o m m is s io n

(in

N ew

L aw s

of

1953,

and

202

of

th e

L aw s

of

1953)

w ere

to

a

com p act

ap p roved
T h ese

ta in

th e

new

w h ic h

w ork ers

and

In d u stry

h ir in g
as

of

"T h e

a re
to

P r e s id e n t,

be

of

and

am ong
1,

D is p u t e

and
ch .

b oth

w as

S ta tes.
S ta tes,
r e q u ir e

w it h

th e

s tip u la te
oth er

b ic e r ­

th in g s ,

1953.
I n v o lv in g

O c c u p a t io n s
4,

w h ic h

h ir in g ,

r e g is te r e d

m eth od s,

A tla n tic

in

N ew

pu rsu an t

U n it e d

id e n t ic a l

D ecem b er

D ecem b er

S ta tes
th e

C o m m is s io n ,

L a bor
th e

of

882

J ersey ,

a d o p te d

tw o

of

ch s.

in N e w

m eth od

A s s o c ia te d
on

th e

C on g ress

shapeu p

W a te r fr o n t

13
m en

th e

la w s ,

o u tla w
S ta te

b etw een

by

A cts

Y ork ,

th e

of

in to

J e rse y

of

w a te rfr o n t
A s s o c ia tio n

W a te r fr o n t

N ew

883

e ffe c tiv e

c o n d itio n s

J e rse y

1950,

fu r th e r

e s ta b lis h e d

w h ic h

and

S top p a g es,

U nder

in

w ere

c o n n e c tio n

(T a ft-H a r tle y ) A c t ,

5,

1953

cop p er

w h ic h

W ork

d e ­

The tem p orary order was later e x ­
tended until O ctober 20 when it was super­
seded by the full 8 0 -d a y injunction in effect
through D ecem ber 2 4 .
The injunction was
broadened to include the rival L on gsh ore­
men* s Union (A F L ) on the ground that this
union was a party to the original dispute
and was involved in the collective bargaining
situation with the sam e e m p loy e rs.

th e A m e r ­

in

s itu a t io n s p r i o r t o
1953.
10
T h e N e w Y o r k S h ip p in g

E ast

and

4

to

e s s e n t ia l

p la n t o f

Y .,

b it u m in o u s -c o a l

s itu a t io n s ,

of

p r o lo n g e d

1951,

c o m p a n ie s ;

in te rr u p t
as

th e

a ffe c tin g

p u b lic a tio n

tra ct h as

th e

s t r ik e

L a bor

in v o k e d

in

A ct

s a fe t y ,"

to

act

been

1952,

in

in

th e

had

N .

C o .;

m e t a ls

E m erg en cy "

a ll

D u n k ir k ,

L o c o m o tiv e

th e

In

of

Following this report,
a 10-day
court restrain ing order against a strike by
the International L ongshorem en ^ A sso cia tio n
(Ind.) was obtained by the Attorney G en eral;
thereupon, the union instructed its m em b e rs
to return to work on O ctober 6.

th o se

R a ilw a y
su ch

tr a n s p o r ta tio n
s e r v ic e ."
9
T h is w a s th e o n ly d is p u te
th e

and

s u b s t a n t ia lly
to

(1 )

R e la tio n s

h e a lth

b e rs were David L . C o le , fo rm e r director
of the F ed eral Mediation and Conciliation
S erv ice; Henry J. C arm an, dean em eritu s
of Colum bia C ollege at Colum bia U n iversity;
and Father Dennis J. C om ey, director of
the Institute of Industrial R elations at St.
Joseph’ s C ollege in Philadelphia. The report
of the B oard, submitted to the P resident on
October 5, stated that the im pact of the
stoppage was "e x tr e m e ly s e r io u s " and that
the chances of getting the men back to work
through collective bargaining were rem ote.
The board reported to the P resident that
w ages, work guarantees, arbitration, hiring
p ra c tic e s, and union security were the m ajor
is s u e s in dispute. Resolution of these is s u e s ,
the board noted, was com plicated by State
laws governing dock labor p r a c t ic e s ,12 and
the m em bership drive of the newly ch ar­
tered IL A (A F L ). This situation caused the
board to rem ark ; "T h e two m ost sensitive
points in this dispute are those relating to
hiring p ra ctices and union r e p r e s e n ta tio n ."13

d e s ig n a te d

a re

M anagem ent

"n a tio n a l

co m m e rce

any

d is p u te s
d is p u te s

B

in

C o a st, "
1953,

p .

L on g sh ore­

th e

M a r itim e

R ep ort
15.

to

th e

32

The A F L L o n g sh o re m en ^ Union
submitted a petition to the National Labor
R elations Board for a representation e le c ­
tion.
E ffo rts of the N LR B to expedite the
election proceedings w ere hindered as both
unions refused to agree to a consent e le c ­
tion for the P ort of New York and thus
elim inate the need fo r fo rm a l hearings on
the rival c la im s .
On O ctober 22, the New
Y o rk Shipping A sso cia tio n petitioned the
N L R B to conduct an im m ediate poll to d e te r­
m ine the appropriate bargaining rep resen ta ­
tive for the longshorem en . A few days later
the Shipping A sso cia tio n announced it would
resum e negotiations with the independent
L o n g sh o re m en ^ Union since such action
seem ed to be required under the te r m s of
the court order and the T a ft-H a rtle y A ct
but that no agreem ent would be concluded
until the N L R B determ ined the bargaining
agent.
N L R B hearings on a representation
election which began in m id -N o v e m b e r, in ­
volved con siderable con troversy concerning
the a rea to be covered in the election. The
A F L union argued that the poll should cover
longshorem en only in the P ort of New York
but the independent union wanted all dock
w o rk ers in the area fro m Maine to V irginia
included; the e m p lo y e rs1 group urged that
a ll categ o ries of dock w ork ers only in the
P ort of New Y o rk be covered.

basic issu e rem ains o p e n .1115 On the b a sis
of the board1s report the N LR B canceled
the scheduled referendum on the ’’la st o ffe r .”
The N L R B , in taking steps to avert
a strike at the expiration of the injunction,
directed that an election be conducted on or
before D ecem ber 23 to choose between the
two unions. A s proposed by the e m p loy ers,
those eligible to vote included longshorem en
and related w orkers in the P ort of New
Y ork em ployed by m em b ers of the New Y ork
Shipping A sso cia tio n . The election was held
on D ecem ber 22 and D ecem ber 2 3. A pp rox­
im ately 2 1 ,0 0 0 votes w ere ca st; of these
9,060 favored the independent union and 7, 568
the A F L affiliate, but 4 ,4 0 5 ballots were
challenged.
The N LR B began a review of
the contested ballots while the A F L union
filed a petition to set aside the election on
the grounds that it had been conducted under
IL A ’’intimidation and in flu en ce .”
The strike did not resum e at the
expiration of the 8 0 -day injunction although
the questions both of representation and of
a new contract w ere unresolved at the end
of the y e a r .
14
q u ir e s
of

a




board

d is p u te

W ith in

15

N L R B

A s required by law, the board of
inquiry review ed the status of the dispute
and reported to the P resident on D ecem ber 4
(60 days after the strike began) that a r e ­
newed w aterfront strike was likely to occur
on D ecem ber 24 at the expiration of the in ­
junction.
The board a lso advised that any
la st offer of the em p loyers would m ost
probably be r e je c t e d .1*
The board stated:
nO bviously no offer which the em p loyers in
New Y ork m ay make at this tim e can deal
with the issu e of union representation, and
none of the p a rties la b o rs under the illusion
that this dispute m ay be resolved while this

T he

th e

w ant

60

to

days

days

m u st

th e

th e

16

T h ese

q u e s tio n s

o f A p r il

th e

B LS

th e

1954.

A

w ill b e

is s u e d

p u b lic a tio n ,

E m erg en cy "

D is p u t e s

m ent

R e la tio n s

1952

(S e r ie s

5,

as

as

W ork
U nder

N o.

2 J!

th e
th ey

o ffe r .
p .

6.

u n s e ttle d

c it. ,

at

o f th is

c o n t a in in g
S u p p le m e n t
S top p a g es,
th e

is s u e d .

file d ,

op.

s till

(T a ft -H a r t le y ) A c t ,

A ct

sta tu s

w h eth er

to

su m m ary

is

is

la s t

w ere
and

on th e

in ju n c t io n
rep ort

P r e s id e n t,

c h r o n o lo g ic a lly

v e lo p m e n ts

an

e m p lo y e e s

to

end

rep ort

v /o r k e r s

R ep ort

a rran ged

to

th is

1J
J
th e

M a n a g e m e n t R e la tio n s

a fte r

a fte r

p o ll

a ccep t

L a b or

o f in q u ir y

L a bor

d is p u te

1954
N o.

d e­
2

to

"N a tio n a l
M anage­

1 9 4 7 -J u n e

30 ,

33

A p p en d ix

C

Methods of Collecting Work Stoppage Statistics 17

The Bureau’ s statistics on work
stoppages include a ll known strikes and lo c k ­
outs in the continental United States involving
as many as six w ork ers and lasting the
equivalent of a full shift or longer.
W ork stoppages are m easured in
te rm s of the number of stoppages, w orkers
involved, and m a n -d a y s of id le n e ss. F igu res
on ’’w orkers involved” and "m a n -d a y s id le ”
cover a ll w orkers made idle for one shift
or longer in establishm ents directly involved
in a stoppage.
They do not m easu re s e c ­
ondary id len ess— that is, the effects on other
establishm ents or industries
whose e m ­
p loyees may be made idle as a result of
m aterial or service* shortages.
Inform ation as to the probable e x is t­
ence of work stoppages is collected fro m a
number of so u rce s. P r e s s clippings on labor
disputes are obtained fro m a com prehensive
coverage of daily and weekly newspapers
throughout the country. Inform ation is r e ­
ceived directly fro m the F ed eral M ediation
and Conciliation Service as w ell a s agencies
in all States such as State boards of m ed ia­
tion and arbitration, re sea rch divisions of
State labor department o ffic e s, and lo ca l
o ffices of State em ploym ent security agencies
provided through the Bureau of Em ploym ent
Security of the U . S . Departm ent of L abor.
V arious em ployer a sso cia tio n s, com panies,
and unions a lso furnish the Bureau with work
stoppage inform ation on a regular b a s is .
Although the Bureau seeks to obtain
com plete coverage of all stoppages involving
six or m ore w ork ers and lasting a full shift
or m o re, inform ation on sm a ller stoppages
is undoubtedly m isse d fro m tim e to tim e .
A fter ascertaining the occurrence
of work stoppages, a questionnaire is m ailed
to each party to the dispute to secure data
such as the number of w orkers involved,
duration, m ajor is s u e s , and method of se ttle ­
m ent. In som e instances, field rep resen ta ­
tives of the Bureau secure the n e c essa ry
inform ation.




The Bureau defines a strike or work
stoppage as a tem porary stoppage of work
by a group of em p loyees to ex p re ss a g r ie v ­
ance or enforce a demand. A lockout is a
tem porary withholding of work fro m a group
of em ployees by an em ployer (or a group of
em p loyers) in order to persuade the w ork ers
to accept the e m p lo y e r’ s te r m s .
Because
of the com plexities involved in m ost la b o r m anagem ent disputes, no attempt is made
to determ ine whether the stoppages are in iti­
ated by the w ork ers or the e m p loy e rs. The
te rm s ’’ strik e” and "w ork stoppage” are
used interchangeably.
Certain
ch a ra cteristics
norm ally
are found to exist: (1) The stoppage is te m ­
porary rather than perm anent; (2) the action
is by or against a group rather than an in ­
dividual; (3) the objective is to exp ress a
grievance or enforce a demand; and (4) an
em p loy e r-em p lo y e e relationship e x ists, a l­
though the grievance m ay or m ay not be
against the em ployer of the striking group.
In jurisdiction al as w ell as rival union or
representation strik e s, the m ajor elem en ts
of dispute m ay be between the unions rather
than directly with the em p loy er. In a sy m ­
pathy strike, there is usually no dispute
between the striking w ork ers and their im ­
m ediate em ployer but the purpose is to
give union support or broaden group p r e s ­
sure for the benefit of another group of
w o rk ers. Sympathy or p rotest strikes may
a lso be intended to record the w o rk e rs1
feelin gs against actions (or absence of a c ­
tion) by lo c a l, State, or F ed eral G overn­
ment agencies on m a tters of general worker
concern.
1 More detailed information on methods of
T
calculation, sources, and classification is availa­
ble in BLS Report No. 11, ’’Collection and Com­
pilation of Work Stoppage Statistics. ”

u S G V R MN P ININ OF E 15 O 30 36 30
. . O E N E T R T G F IC 94


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102