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A n a lysis o f
W o rk Stoppages
D u rin g

1951




B u lle tin N o . 1 0 9 0

I'N IT E I)

S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F
M a u r i c e J . T o b i Secretary
n,
Bl'RK AT OF LABOR STATISTICS
E w a n H a g u e , Co m m is s io n e r

L A B O R




A n a ly sis o f
W ork S top pages
D u rin g 1951




Bulletin No. 1 0 9 0
U N IT E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
M aurice J. T obin , S ecreta ry

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
E w an Clague , C om m ission er
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 20 cents

Letter of Transmittal

U ITED STATES D P R M N O IABOR,
N
EAT E T F
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics,
Washington, D. C., June 4, 1952.
The Secretary o f Labors
1951o

I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on work stoppages during the year
A portion o f this report was printed in the Monthly Labor Review for May 1952*

This bulletin was prepared by Ann J. Herlihy, Bernard Yabroff, and Daniel P.
W illis, J r ., with the assistance o f other members o f the sta ff o f the Bureau*s Division o f
Wages and Industrial Relations, under the direction o f Lily Mary David.
The Bureau wishes to acknowledge the widespread cooperation o f employers, unions,
the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and various State agencies in furnishing
information needed for this report.
E A C U Commissioner.
W N LAG E,
Hon. Maurice J. Tobin,
Secretary o f Labor.




( a )

Contents

Page
Introduction ................................ ............................. ....................
WSB-certified disputes •*.... .......... • •• •...... ••••••••••••••••........................
wNational emergency'1 disputes ......... •. •........... ........................ ..............
Monthly trend - leading stoppages ••................ • •...... ...............................
Major issues i n v o l v e d ..... .......... ...................... ................................
Industries a f f e c t e d .............. . ........ ...... ......... ..................... ...........
States involved .............................. ................. ......... ...... ........ .
Cities involved ................. ................. ........ ................................ .
Unions i n v o l v e d .........
•
Dispute status - before and at time of stoppage ....... ...... ......................... ..
Size of s t o p p a g e s ............. ...................... ........ ...............................
Duration of s t o p p a g e s ..... ................•
.............. ......... ...
Methods of terminating stoppages ........................ ...................... .............
Disposition of issues ..................................................... ..................

1
1
3

U
6
7
7
7
7
7
3
3
9
9

Tables
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9»
<
10*
11*
12.
13.
H.

Work stoppages in the United States, 1 9 1 6 - 1 9 5 1 .....
Work stoppages involving 10,000 cr more workers, in selected periods •••••...........
Monthly trends in work stoppages, 1950 and 1 9 5 1 .......
Major issues involved in work stoppages in 1951 • •••••••••••••••••• .............
Work stoppages by industry group, 1951 •. •«.....
Work stoppages by State, 1951 *................
•••••
Work stoppages in selected cities, 1951 .......................
Work stoppages by affiliation of unions involved, 1951 • ••«.......... ........... ..
Work stoppages classified by number of workers involved, 1951 •••••••......
Work stoppages by number of establishments involved, 1951 . ........................
.
Work stoppages involving 10,000 or more workers beginning in 1 9 5 1 ..... .......... ...
Duration of work stoppages ending in 1 9 5 1 ...... ;....................
Method of terminating work stoppages ending in 1951 .............
Disposition of issues in work stoppages ending in 1 9 5 1 ......... ... ........... .

10
11
11
12
13
H
15
16
16
16
17
19
19
19

Appendix A
Table A.
Table B.
Table C.

Work stoppages in 1951, by specific industry
................. ..............
Work stoppages in 1951, by industry group and major issues ....................
Work stoppages in 1951 in States which had 25 or more stoppages during
the year, by industry g r o u p ................. ........... ......... ............

20
22
23

Appendix B
Methods of collecting strike s t a t i s t i c s ..... *.......... ........... ......................




( in )

29




A n a ly s is

o f

W

o r k

S t o p p a g e s

1 9 5 1

(e.g. vacation and holiday pay, shift differ­
entials, and overtime pay). In 1950, 462
stoppages (9.5 percent of all strikes) occurred
over these issues; in 1951, 647 stoppages
(13.7 percent of the total)
were in this
group. The number of workers involved also
increased from
to 383,000. Pensions
and/or social-insurance proposals, which were
important strike issues during 1949 and the
first 6 months of 1950, caused only a minor
proportion of total strike activity in 1951.

Introduction
No long Nation-wide or industry-wide
strikes occurred during 1951, and, in general,
stoppages in 1951 were somewhat shorter than
in earlier postwar years* Consequently, total
idleness caused by such stoppages dropped to
22,900,000 man-days - the lowest point since
1944* Average strike duration during the year
was 17*4 days, compared with 21*8 to 25*6
days during the years 1946-49 and 19*2 days
in 1950.

245,000

WSB— Certified Disputes

The 4,737 1/ work stoppages beginning in
1951 were only slightly fewer than the 4,843
recorded in 1950. The number of strikes
recorded in 1951 has been exceeded in only 5
years (1937, 1944-46, and 1950)
since 1916.
However, total workers involved in 1951 stop­
pages - 2,220,000 - was lower than in most
other years since World War I I • (See table 1.)

The Wage Stabilization Board was given
limited jurisdiction in labor disputes by
Executive Order 10233 issued by the President
on April 21, 1951. The Board was authorized
to investigate and recommend settlement in
any dispute which was not resolved by col­
lective bargaining or by the prior full use
of mediation and conciliation facilities, and
which threatened to interrupt work affecting
the national defense where (1) the parties
jointly agreed to submit the dispute to the
Board; or (2) the President was of the opinion
that the dispute substantially threatened the
progress of national defense and referred it
to the Board. Binding decisions were authoa>ized only if agreed upon by the parties in
advance.

Nineteen stoppages in which 10,000 or
more workers took part began in 1951 (table
2)* The corresponding number in earlier post­
war years ranged from 15 to 31* These stop­
pages in 1951 directly idled approximately
half a million workers and accounted for al­
most 6 million man-days of idleness - a fifth
of the total number of workers and a fourth
of man-days of idleness involved in strikes
of all sizes. These proportions were well be­
low comparable figures for any earlier post­
war year when the large stoppages accounted
for at least half of the man-days of idleness
in all strikes and lock-outs.

During 1951,
the President certified to
the Board five important labor disputes in
which there had been work stoppages: American
Smelting and Refining Co. and the United
Steelworkers
(CIO);
copper and other nonferrous metals companies and the Mine, Mill
and Smelter Workers (Ind.);
and Borg-Warner
Corp., Douglas Aircraft Co., and Wright Aero­
nautical Corp. each with the United Automobile
Workers (CIO), g/

Organized labor's demands for increased
wages and related benefits were the predomi-*nant causes of strikes in 1951, as in 1950.
However, the restraints established by Federal
wage stabilization policies,
as in World War
II, caused a shift from demands for higher
wage rates to demands for "fringe" adjustments

American Smelting and Refining C o . A
strike, called on July 2 bv the United Steel­
workers of America (CIO) at the Garfield,

2 / All known work stoppages arising out
of labor-management disputes,
involving six
or more workers and continuing a full day or
shift or longer are included in this report.
Figures on "workers involved" and "man-days
idle" cover all workers made idle for one
shift or longer in establishments directly in­
volved in these stoppages. They do not measure
the indirect or secondary effects on other
establishments or industries whose employees
are made idle as a result of material or ser­
vice shortages.




D u r in g

2/ Three threatened strikes were averted
or postponed after the President certified
the disputes to the Board. These involved
copper and brass fabricators and UAW (CIO)
(cert. Sept. 24, 1951);
basic steel industry
and Steelworkers (CIO) (eert. Dec. 22, 1951);
and Boeing Airplane Co. and International As­
sociation of Machinists (AFL) (cert. Dec. 28,
1951).

(1 )

- 2 -

Utah,
plant of the American Smelting and Re­
fining Company, idled about 1,300 workers en­
gaged in refining copper and producing sul­
phuric acid,
both important for defense pro­
duction.
It involved union proposals for a
new contract providing a general wage increase,
a job evaluation program, a union shop, and
other benefits*

Workers returned to their jobs after the
President certified the dispute to the WSB on
July 26. Initial recommendations b y the Board
for settlement of the dispute were accepted
by the parties in September. The Board recom­
mended an 8-cent hourly wage increase and
suggested that the other issues be resolved
through collective bargaining. Subsequently
all issues were settled through negotiation
except the amount of increment between 19
labor grades established by the parties.
In
accordance with the parties1 joint request
that it resolve the remaining issue, the
Board,
on October 19, recommended an incre­
ment of 3i cents an hour. The total estimated
average increase amounted to 10 cents an hour.

Copper and other Nonferrous-Metals Com­
panies. Mining, milling,
smelting, and re­
fining of copper and other nonferrous metals
were seriously affected by an industry-wide
strike b y the International Union of Mine,
Mill and Smelter Workers (Ind.)
beginning on
August 27.
Workers affiliated with several
AFL unions and two independent
railroad
brotherhoods were also concerned with the
disputed issues but did not directly partici­
pate in the
strike.
Approximately 40,000
workers were made idle as a result of the dis­
pute over the unions1 proposals involving
wages, pensions, and other benefits.
The dispute was certified to the WSB on
the first day of the walk-out. When union
leaders rejected the Board*s request for a re­
turn to work,
the President invoked the
national emergency strike procedures of the
Labor Management Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act
and appointed a board of inquiry to report on
the issues.

The dispute was partly settled the next
day (August 31) when the Kennecott Copper
Corp.,
largest producer in the industry,
reached a 1-year agreement,
retroactive to
July 1, 1951. The contract provided an acrossthe-board wage increase of 8 cents an hour,
an average increase of 7 cents an hour for
job rate reclassifications,
and a companypaid pension plan estimated to cost 4^ cents
an hour. The settlement was rejected by the
three other major firms in the industry Phelps Dodge Corp., American Smelting &Refining Co.,
 and Anaconda Copper Mining Co.



The board of inquiry reported on Sep­
tember 4 that,
notwithstanding the Kennecott
resumption of work, the continuation of the
strike was causing or aggravating critical
shortages of materials vital to both the de­
fense program and the civilian
economy.
Accordingly,
the President directed the At­
torney General to seek a court injunction to
halt the strike. A temporary court restrairving order was issued on September 5 ordering
an immediate resumption of work and directing
the companies involved in the dispute to be­
gin immediate collective bargaining with their
employees. Most of the workers returned to
their jobs by September 7.
Agreements
closely
similar
to the
Kennecott settlement ware subsequently reached
with the Phelps Dodge Corp. and the American
Smelting & Refining Co.
several weeks after
the
strike ended. B y early November,
con­
tracts had also been negotiated with the Ana­
conda Copper Mining Co. and virtually all of
the smaller firms involved in the dispute. 2/
Borg-Wamer.
A 4-week strike at the
B o r g - W a m e r Corp.,
beginning on October 9,
idled approximately 6,500 workers in plants
in 5 States. The principal issue was a pro­
posal by the United Automobile Workers (CIO)
for the negotiation of a corporation-wide
agreement providing wage increases, insurance,
hospitalization,
pension, and other benefits
to replace existing individual plant con­
tracts.
In his certification of the dispute
to the WBB on October 10, the President de­
clared the strike to be a substantial threat
to defense production. However,
the union
urged the President to reconsider the certi­
fication. It rejected the Board*s request for
termination of the strike, claiming that only
a minor portion of the company*s output in­
volved military items. The President rejected
the union*s appeal.
Following a second re­
quest by the Board for a resumption of pro­
duction, workers approved a recommendation of
the union* s policy committee for a "recess’
1
of the strike,
pending consideration of the
issues by the Board. By November 5, most of
the workers had returned to their jobs.

2 / General wage increases and job-rate re­
visions provided in the Kennecott,
Phelps
Dodge, and Anaconda agreements were approved
by the WSB in December 1951, thus setting the
pattern for approval of agreements
submitted
by the smaller firms. The same general wage
increase provided in the American Smelting
and Refining Co. agreement was approved, but
consideration of job-rate adjustments and
other fringe-benefit provisions was postponed
for further study. Action was deferred on
pension-plan provisions agreed upon by some
of the companies, pending WSB policy develop­
ments.

- 3 -

Aircraft Companies. A strike called by
the United Automobile Workers (CIO) at the
Long Beach, Calif., plant of the Douglas Air­
craft Co*, y manufacturer of military trans­
port planes, caused idleness of approximately
10,000 production and maintenance workers be­
ginning September 5. The union's new contract
proposals included a general wage increase,
part of which was to be retroactive, a union
shop, a company-financed pension plan, and
other benefits*
Starting September 26,
about 10,000 UAW
production workers also walked out at the Wood
Ridge and Garfield, N. J.,
jet engine plants
of the Wright Aeronautical Corp* Major issues
included a general wage increase,
a pension
plan, an improved social-insurance "package,"
and increased vacation pay. An additional
several thousand UAW white-collar members ob­
served picket lines*
The disputes were certified by the Presi­
dent to the WSB on October 12*
Workers voted
on October IS to return to their jobs follow­
ing a recommendation by the union that, the
strikes be "recessed"
pending the Board's
consideration of the disputes.
In the Douglas dispute,
the Board in
February 1952,
recommended wage adjustments
averaging 25 cents an hour and retroactive in
part,a cost-of-living escalator clause agreed
upon by the. parties, and other benefits.
Action on the question of a union shop, one
of the principal issues in the dispute,
was
postponed for later consideration. Terms for
settlement of the Wright dispute were recom­
mended by the Board in March 1952* On the
question of hourly wages, it recommended a
general increase of 12 cents and, in addition,
adjustments in the top four labor grades aver­
aging 2.4 cents for all employees.

"National Emergency" Disputes 5/
The national emergency strike provisions
of the Labor Management Relations Act were

U
The company's three plants at Long
Beach, Santa Monica, and El Segundo were also
affected by strike idleness of some 300 mem­
bers of the United Aircraft Welders' Union
(Ind.).
5/ Labor-management disputes, designated
as "national emergency" disputes a r e :(l) those
specified in the Labor Management Relations
Act as imperiling the "national health and
safety" and (2) those designated under the
Railway Labor Act "Which threaten substantially
to interrupt interstate commerce to a degree
such as to deprive any section of the country
of essential transportation service."



invoked only once during 1951, 6/ in connec­
tion with the Nation-wide strike affecting
copper and other nonferrous metals companies
(described under WSB-certified disputes, page
2).

In the railroad industry, a strike by the
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen (Ind.) idled
approximately 70,000 workers early in 1951.
In the background of the controversy were
negotiations that began in 1949 2 / a n c* i n
volved proposals by the Trainmen and other
unions of operating employees for the estab­
lishment of a
-hour workweek at 48 hours'
pay for yardmen as well as changes in work
rules. The protracted negotiations had been
accompanied by the unions' rejection of emer­
gency board recommendations for settlement of
the dispute,
and by the seizure of the rail­
roads by the Government on Aiogust 27, 1950,
to avert a country-wide strike threatened by
the Trainmen and Conductors. Unrest over the
long-deferred settlement led to scattered
brief walk-outs by the Trainmen in mid-Decem­
ber 1950. Renewed mediation efforts resulted
in a tentative agreement on December 21 with
representatives of the Trainmen,
Conductors,
Engineers,
and Firemen and Enginemen but it
was rejected by the unions' general chairmen.

40

The dispute
flared again in 1951 when
several thousand yard members of the Train­
men's union reported sick and did not report
for duty in several eastern and midwestern
cities on January 30. The unauthorized strike
spread to other key railroad centers and by
February 3 it had reached Nation-wide pro­
portions. As the strike continued, the Federal
Government obtained court orders requiring
the union to show cause why it should not be
ruled in contempt of court-restraining orders
issued during the December 1950 strike.
8/
Appeals for an end to the strike by President
Truman, the union's president, and the Direc­
tor of Defense Mobilization were followed on
February 6 by the start of a back-to-work
movement in several eastern cities. However,
the walk-out continued elsewhere and spread
to additional cities.

6/ In 1950, the emergency provisions were
utilized in the prolonged 1949-50 bituminouscoal dispute.
There was no resort to this
machinery in 1949; in 1948, it was invoked on
seven occasions,
four of which
involved
strikes.
2/ See Work Stoppages in 1950, Monthly
Labor Reviewf May 1951 (page 517).
8/ Fines totaling &l01,000 were imposed
by Federal District Courts in Chicago,
Wash­
ington, D. C., and Cleveland after the union
pleaded guilty to the Government's
contempt
charges.

­

Ca 1 T d inW S
h rt . ren s ork toppages

On February 8, the Army issued an order,
authorized by President Truman, directing all
striking railroad workers to return to their
jobs by 4 p.m.
on February 10 under penalty
of dismissal,
with consequent loss of all
seniority rights* The action was taken on the
ground that
"interference with essential
military and civilian railroad transportation
. . . is intolerable in an emergency•1 Pend­
1
ing the negotiation of a final settlement,
the directive also provided interim hourly
wage increases of 12-g- cents for yardmen and
yardmasters and 5 cents for road-service em­
ployees represented by the four operating
unions,
retroactive to October 1, 1950* The
workers complied with the order and negoti­
ations were resumed* 2/

2 / A settlement reached on May 25, 1951,
provided over-all hourly wage increases of 33
cents for yardmen and 18|- cents for road-ser­
vice employees,
including the interim hourly
wage adjustments ordered by the A r m y ’s direc­
tive of February 8* Agreement was reached,
in principle, on a 4.0-hour workweek for yard­
men, but its inauguration was deferred until
after January 1, 1952,
because of manpower
shortages* The parties further agreed to sub­
mit two controversial work rules to arbitra­
tion, to place a 3-year moratorium, effective
October 1, 1950, on proposals for other wage
and rule changes, and to discuss the question
of annual improvement wage increases after
July 1, 1952* The Wage Stabilization Board
approved the general wage increases on June
12, under its base-date abnormality policy,
"in the light of the lengthy and complex nego­
tiation procedures provided by law for the
 industry."
railroad



Monthly Trend— Leading Stoppages
The year began with 151 stoppages con­
tinuing from earlier years. Inasmuch as these
were generally small,
and localized,
they
accounted for a very small percentage of the
total man-days of idleness in 1951*
T h e 1,144.
new strikes
b e g i n n i n g i n the
first 3 months of 1951
is t h e h i g h e s t n u m b e r
ever recorded for comparable quarters in pre­
vious years.

Man-days of idleness i n the

first

q u a r t e r , h o w e v e r , w e r e o n l y a t h i r d as n u m e r o u s
as in the first 3 mon t h s of 1950
when an in­
dustry-wide

coal

strike and

the protracted

Ch r y s l e r strike were i n progress.

Strike activity in the second quarter of
1951 increased slightly in terms of number of
new strikes and man-days of idleness, compared
with the first quarter totals.
Only three
large strikes occurred in the second quarter,
of which the protracted cotton and rayon tex­
tile stoppage in the South accounted for al­
most a fourth of all strike idleness during
this period.
Strike incidence and idleness rose to
the highest levels in the third quarter of the
year, when almost a third of the y e a r ’s totals
occurred. Six stoppages involving 10,000 or
more workers began in this period.
Following
the usual seasonal pattern, the number of new
strikes dropped to the year’s lowest level in
the last quarter of the year. Idleness in
this quarter was the second lowest of the
year despite
the comparatively large number
of strikes in October.
(See chart and table
3.)

-

Chari 2. Work Stoppages, by Percent of Year's Stoppages
Beginning Each Month

PERCENT

5

-

B rief strik es involving 10,500 workers
at t e x t ile m ills in Fall River, Mass., and
v ic in it y , and 14,000 Westinghouse E le ctric
Corp. employees at East Pittsburgh, Pa., were
the largest beginning in March. A wage d is­
pute led to the 2-day t e x t ile strik e. The
suspension o f a union steward fo r alleged in­
subordination caused the 5-day Westinghouse
Corp. stoppage.
The strik e involving 40,000 workers re­
presented by the T ex tile Workers Union (CIO)
began on A pril 1 at cotton and rayon m ills in
7 Southeastern States as the resu lt o f a wage
dispute. The p o lic y committee o f the union,
on May 5, recommended termination o f the
stoppage in compliance with a request from
the d ire cto r o f the Federal Mediation and
C on ciliation Service. By mid-May, a m ajority
o f the workers had returned to th e ir job s;
others resumed work during la te May, June,
and July.

U IT S A C D A T IN O L B R
N ID T T S IP R M T F A O
'B R U O L B R S A IS IC
U IA F A O T T T S

The only major strik e that began in
January involved 70,000 ra ilroa d workers a cross the Nation (see page 3)# I t involved
more workers than any other stoppage during
the year.
The leading stoppage beginning in Febru­
ary involved 48,000 employees o f woolen and
worsted m ills in 11 Eastern Sta tes. I t began
February 16 a fte r wage negotiations between
the American Woolen Co. and the T ex tile Work­
ers Union (CIO) became deadlocked. A p a rtia l
settlement was reached on March 13 when the
union and the company agreed on a 1-year con­
tra ct providing fo r a 12-cent hourly wage in ­
crease, an esca la tor clause, severance pay,
and increased insurance b e n e fits. Other com­
panies involved in the stoppage generally
accepted th is pattern o f settlem ent. A major­
i t y o f the struck m ills reopened March 19,
but some did not reopen u n til la te March or
A p ril.
Two other large stoppages that began in
February brought idleness to 28,000 coal
miners in West V irginia and 18,000 employees
o f the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co. in
Alabama. The 7-day miners* strike in West
V irginia was ca lled to protest a b i l l in the
State Legislature le g a lizin g safety inspec­
tions by m ine-section foremen. The 13-day
Alabama stoppage ended with an agreement by
the parties to resolve job c la s s ific a t io n and
sen iority
 issues a fte r the resumption o f work.


About 21,000 garment workers, members o f
the International Ladies* Garment Workers
Union (AFL) in New York, New Jersey, Con­
n ecticu t, and eastern Pennsylvania, stopped
work fo r 2 days in June. Work was resumed on
June 14, a fte r an agreement was reached on
1equitable d istrib u tio n 1 o f work among con­
1
1
tra ct shops in New York and nearby areas;
conversion from weekly wages to piece rates
in some "section-w ork” shops; increased mini­
m wage scales to r e fle c t actual rate,s being
um
paid; and increased health and vacation bene­
fits .
An. 11-day strik e in June idled approxi­
mately 15,000 maritime workers on the East,
West, and Gulf Coasts. Three CIO maritime
unions - the National Maritime Union, Marine
Engineers* B en eficia l A ssociation, and Ameri­
can Radio A ssociation - called th is strike to
enforce th e ir demands fo r wage increases and
a shorter basic workweek. Only dry cargo
vessels carrying nondefense m aterials were
a ffe cte d .
In la te July, 24,000 C aterpilla r Tractor
Co. employees at East Peoria, 111., began a
strike to support th eir wage demands. This
stoppage continued u n til the end o f September,
when members o f the United Automobile Workers
(CIO) r a tifie d an agreement providing a gener­
a l wage increase and a c o s t -o f-liv in g esca­
la to r clause. The other large strik es that
occurred in July were r e la tiv e ly b riefs 27,000
employees o f Chrysler Corp. in D etroit, Mich.,
stopped work because o f alleged production
lin e speed-ups; and 12,000 Jones and Laughlin
S teel Corp. employees in Aliquippa, Pa., were
idled follow ing the dismissal o f a worker fo r
alleged sleeping on the jo b .

- 6 The only major strike beginning in August
involved about 4-0,000 employees o f copper and
other nonferrous metal mines, m ills , and
smelters. (See W
SB - c e r t ifie d disputes,
page 2 .)
The two la rgest September strikes in­
volved 10,000 Douglas A ircra ft Co. employees
in C aliforn ia and 13,000 workers in the Gaiv
fie ld and Wood Ridge. N. J . , plants o f Wright
Aeronautical Corp. (See W B - c e r t ifie d d is­
S
putes, page 3 .)
The la rgest o f the four major stoppages
in October lasted 21 days and involved 25,000
employees o f the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Rail­
road Co. in the Birmingham, A la ., area. In
th is w ildcat strik e members o f the United
Steelworkers (CIO) protested the l a y - o f f o f
w
extra men.1 In another October strik e , ste e l
1
production was a lso a ffe cte d by an 8-day
stoppage o f 14,500 employees o f the Inland
Steel Co. at East Chicago, Ind. I t ended with
an agreement to submit an incentive-pay dis­
pute to a rb itra tio n .
A longshoremen*s strik e that started in
October in the New York-New Jersey and Boston
ports disrupted shipping on the East Coast.
I t was ca lle d by several insurgent lo c a ls
a fte r they had refused to r a t ify a 2-year con­
tra ct reached early in the month by the In ter­
national Longshoremen’ s Union (AFL) and ship­
ping and stevedoring firm s. On November 9, a
m ajority o f the 17,000 strik in g longshoremen
returned to th e ir jobs at the request o f a
Board o f Inquiry appointed by the New York
State In du strial Commissioner.
The shortest large strik e o f the year
was a 1-day stoppage in October by 14,000 em­
ployees o f milk dealers in New York C ity, New
Jersey, and Connecticut. I t was settled when
the International Brotherhood o f Teamsters,
Chauffeurs and Warehousemen (AFL) and the em
­
ployers agreed on a $10-a-week wage increase
anda2-cen t hourly increase in the employers*
contribution to a welfare tru st fund.
None o f the strik es that began in Novem­
ber or December involved as many as 10,000
workers, and none o f the large strikes that
began in p rio r months continued in to December.

Major Issues Involved
Monetary issues (wages, hours, pensions,
so cia l insurance, and other frin ge ben efits)
accounted fo r the la rgest
proportion o f
strik e s, o f t o t a l workers involved, and o f
man-days o f idleness in 1951 as in other
recent years. These were the prin cip al issues
in more than 40 percent o f a l l strik es,




accounting fo r over h a lf o f a l l workers i n ­
volved and more than 60 percent o f the to ta l
strik e id len ess. (See table 4 .)
The number of stoppages in which pensions
and/or insurance matters (e ith e r alone or com­
bined with important wage demands) were pri­
mary issues dropped from 365 in 1950 to 104
in 1951. Although these issues accounted fo r
only a minor proportion o f the t o t a l number o f
workers involved and to ta l man-days id le ,
they were important in the stoppage a ffe ctin g
some 40,000 workers in the nonferrous metals
industry in August, and in the b r ie f stoppage
o f some 10,500 t e x t ile workers in March. A ll
other strik es in which pension and/or so cia l
insurance plans were o f major importance i n ­
volved fewer than 5,000 workers.
Disputes over such working conditions as
jo b secu rity, shop conditions, and p o lic ie s ,
and work load caused about 28 percent o f a l l
strik es, the la rgest proportion in the past 6
years. They accounted fo r about a third o f
a l l workers involved and a f i f t h o f to ta l
strik e id len ess. Among the largest o f these
strikes were b r ie f stoppages involving West
V irginia coal miners in February; Westinghouse
E le ctric Corp. workers in March; and Jones &
Laughlin Corp. and Chrysler Corp. employees
in July.
Union
recognition and other
unionsecurity questions were primary issues in
approximately 15 percent o f the stoppages and
were important, along with wage issu es, in
another 4 percent. No large stoppages in­
volved these issu es.
As in most years o f the preceding 2 de­
cades, ju r is d ic tio n a l,
union -rivalry, and
sympathy strik es accounted fo r a comparative­
ly small proportion o f strik e a c t iv it y in
1951 - about 7 percent o f strik e s, 6 percent
o f workers involved, and 4 percent o f id le ­
ness.
Average duration o f stoppages varied
according to issu e. Stoppages over combined
issues o f wages and union-organization matters
tended to be lon gest, averaging 30.2 calendar
days compared with 26 in 1950, and 44 in 1949*
Those over union^organization matters alone
had an average duration o f 22.1 days, a slig h t
increase over the 20 days in 1950, but corn
siderably less than the 29 days in 1949* Work
stoppages over wages and related issues lasted
15*7 calendar days compared with 18.5 in 1950
and 26 in 1949* They were s lig h tly longer
than work stoppages in which in te r - or intra­
union matters were the major cause; these
strikes averaged 14• & days (a s lig h t drop
from the 16 days in 1949 and 1950). Disputes
over other working conditions were shortest,
averaging 7 .8 days in 1951 compared with 8.5
in 1950 and 12 in 1949.

-

7

-

Industries Affected

C ities Involved

T extiles had the most idleness o f any
irriustry group in 1951 (ta b le $) • The year*s
two longest large strikes were in t e x t ile s ;
they accounted fo r about 70 percent o f the
to ta l o f 3,490,000 man-days o f idleness in
th is industry group*

Ten or more work stoppages occurred in
each o f 74 c i t ie s in 1951 (ta b le 7)* These
c i t ie s accounted fo r about tw o -fifth s o f a l l
stoppages (2,012) and more than a third o f
a l l workers involved (800,000) and man-days
o f idleness (8,500,000) in the country as a
whole.

Machinery, except
e le c t r ic a l, had a
to ta l o f 3,370,000 man-days o f idlen ess. More
than a third o f th is idleness was caused by
the prolonged stoppages at the C aterpillar
Tractor Co*, and the Brown & Sharpe Manufac­
turing Co* The September stoppages at the
Douglas A ircra ft C o., and the Wright Aero­
nautical Corp., arid the prolonged stoppage o f
2,$00 workers at the Mobile yard o f the Ala­
bama Drydock & Shipbuilding Co*, caused more
than a quarter o f the t o ta l idleness o f
2,600,000 man-days, recorded in the trans­
portation-equipment group*
Six other industry groups had more than
1,000,000 man-days id le : primary metal indus­
tr ie s ; fabricated metal products; e le c t r ic a l
machinery, equipment and supplies; mining;
construction; and transportation, communica­
tio n , and other public u t ilit ie s * At lea st 1
major stoppage, involving 10,000 workers or
more, occurred in each o f these groups except
construction* In the construction and pu blicu t ilit y groups, strike idleness accounted fo r
less than two-tenths o f 1 percent o f to ta l
working time.
The

construction industry

led all o t h e r

groups in number o f stoppages - 651 - and thus
exceeded the previous peak o f 615 recorded in
1949* There were 622 strikes in the mining
industry in 1931, compared w i t h 508 recorded
in 1950, and 476 in 1949.

In general, the la rgest, most indus­
tr ia liz e d c it ie s had the most strik es. Only 2
c i t ie s experienced more than 100 stoppages
during the year - New York had 329 stoppages
(the same number as in 1950) and D etroit 161.
Only 6 other c i t ie s had as many as 50 stop­
pages - Philadelphia (6 7 ), Los Angeles (6 2 ),
Chicago (59), Akron (5 8 ), Pittsburgh (5 7 ), and
S t. Louis (5 6 ).
Detroit strik es accounted fo r the largest
number o f workers involved (122,000) and mandays o f idleness (945,000).*
New York came
next with 84,000 workers and 883,000 man-days
o f idleness. Chicago was the only other c it y
with more than h a lf a m illion man-days o f
idleness.

Unions Involved
Unions a ffilia t e d with the AFL accounted
fo r almost h a lf the strikes (table 8) in 1951
and between a fourth and a third o f the work­
ers and man-days o f idleness. CIO a ff i li a t e s
were involved in stoppages accounting fo r
about h a lf o f a l l the workers and man-days o f
idleness but less than a third o f the number
o f stoppages. U naffiliated unions took part
in about a f i f t h o f the stoppages and workers,
but only an eighth o f the to ta l idleness re­
sulted from these stoppages.

States Involved

Dispute Status— Before and at Time of Stoppage

More than a m illion man-days o f strike
idleness occurred in each o f nine States. Most
o f these were the leading industrialized
States o f the country. The two large stop­
pages o f Tennessee Goal, Iron & Railroad Go.
workers were responsible fo r almost a fourth
o f the to ta l idleness in Alabama. New York
(2,530,000) and I l l in o i s (2,090,000) experi­
enced the greatest number o f man-days id le
because t)f stoppages.

In less than a f i f t h o f the 1951 cases
was there resort to services o f Federal,
State, and lo c a l mediation agencies or o f
other neutral parties before work stoppages
occurred. Although the data available fo r
many o f the remaining cases are incomplete,
most o f these stoppages undoubtedly occurred
without u tiliz a tio n o f mediation machinery.

Pennsylvania with 630, and New York with
570, had the largest number o f stoppages.
Ohio ranked th ird, with 402 stoppages. Only
six other
 States had as many as 200 stoppages*


Uncontroverted information relating to
the length o f the dispute before the stoppage
began was obtained fo r 1,884 strik es. About
h a lf of these, involving approximately 40 per­
cent o f the workers, grew out o f disputes
that had been in e ffe c t fo r less than two

- 8 -

disputes
months:

weeks. About a f i f t h o f the stoppages, in ­
volving 29 percent o f the workers, followed

Length o f dispute
before stoDoaere

fo r more

than 2

Workers involved
Number Percent

18.1

144,095

12.5

589

31.2

306,214

26.6

416
169
369

22.1
9 .0
19.6

176,133
189,950
334,948

15.3
16.5
29.1

1,884

100.0

1,151,340

100.0

Information regarding the status o f the
contract at the time o f the stoppage was fu r­
nished in about fo u r -fift h s o f the cases.
More than h a lf the stoppages fo r which data
were available occurred when contracts were
in e ffe c t , whereas tw o -fifth s took place where
no contract existed or where previous con­
tracts had expired. In another 5 percent o f
the cases the parties disagreed as to whether
contracts were in e ffe c t when the stoppages
occurred. 10/
Disagreement over unsettled grievances
was the la rgest single cause o f stoppages
occurring while contracts were in e ff e c t .
Others were caused by attempts to a lte r pro­
vision s o f current contracts o r, with con­
tra ct terns nearing expiration, disagreement
over new provisions. Most o f the stoppages,
occurring when no contract was in e f f e c t , in ­
volved eith er attempts to obtain union recog­
n ition , or a contract, fo r the f i r s t time, or
disagreement over new contract provisions to
replace recen tly expired agreements.
Size o f Stoppages
About h a lf (2,306) the y ea r's stoppages
involved fewer than 100 workers each. These
accounted fo r only U percent o f the to ta l
number o f workers involved, however, and 5.5
percent o f to ta l s t r ik e ‘ idleness (ta b le 9)*
Stoppages involving 1,000 or more workers

10/ Information on th is subject is some­
times furnished by both p a rties; more fre ­
quently, by only one party to the stoppage.
Since i t is not fe a sib le to v e r ify the accuracy
o f the r e p lie s , which often involve interpre­
tation o f the written con tra ct, only a general
summary based on number o f strikes rather than
number o f workers or man-days c la s s ifie d by
contract status i s presented.




existed

341

1 day or le ss ..............
More than 1 day but
le ss than -k month...
month and le ss
than 2 months ••••••
2 months (60 days) . . .
More than 2 months . . .
Total ....................

Stoppages
Number Percent

that had

(415) comprised le ss than a tenth o f a l l stop­
pages and accounted fo r about two-thirds o f
the workers involved and man-days i d le , res­
p ectiv ely . The 19 la rg e st, each involving
10,O X or more workers, accounted fo r about a
C)
f i f t h o f the workers and 25 percent o f strik e
idleness during the year. Information on the
19 major disputes i s presented in table 11.
As in previous years, by fa r the largest
number o f stoppages beginning in 1951 (80 per­
cent) affected a single plant or establish­
ment. These stoppages included 55 percent o f
the to ta l number o f workers involved and
accounted fo r about h a lf the strik e idleness
(ta b le 10). Only 5 percent (250) o f the stop­
pages extended to more than 10 establishments,
but these were responsible fo r nearly a third
o f the to ta l workers involved and a sim ilar
proportion o f the yea r's strik e id len ess.
Duration of Stoppages
The average work stoppage ending in 1951
lasted 17.4- calendar days, a decrease from the
19.2 day average in 1950. About h a lf the
stoppages continued fo r le ss than a week most o f them only 1 to 3 days (table 12).
These b r ie f stoppages included almost h a lf
the to ta l workers id le but, because they were
re la tiv e ly short, accounted fo r only 10 per­
cent o f the to ta l man-days id le . On the other
hand, two-thirds o f the to ta l idleness re­
sulted from the 15.5 percent o f the stoppages
that lasted fo r a month or more. Approxi­
mately a third o f the stoppages, accounting
fo r about the same proportion o f to ta l workers
and man-days i d l e , continued fo r longer than
a week but le s s than a month.
The stoppages involving 10,000 or more
workers were a l l terminated in 1951. Six o f
these continued fo r le ss than a week, nine
lasted more than a week but le ss than a month,
and four ran fo r more than a month.

- 9 -

Chari 3. D
uration of W Stoppages, Averages for Selected Periods
ork

and 1949 (ta b le 13)• However, these d ir e c tly
negotiated settlements included only a third
o f a l l workers involved and about a f i f t h o f
to ta l idlen ess.
Government mediation and co n cilia tio n
agencies helped to terminate about 25 percent
o f the stoppages - about the same proportion
as in 1950 and 194-9 but well below the pro­
portions from 194-0 to 194-8 (ranging from 30.5
to 70 percent). Because Government repre­
sentatives intervene more frequently in the
larger and more prolonged stoppages, stoppages
in 1951 concluded with such help included
more than a third o f a l l workers and threefift h s o f to ta l idlen ess.
About 21 percent o f a l l stoppages, in­
volving a sim ilar proportion o f workers, ended
without formal settlement (e ith e r settlement
o f the issues or agreement to negotiate
further a fte r resumption o f work). This group
included " l o s t 1 strikes in which workers
*
either returned without settlement or sought
other employment because th e ir cause appeared
hopeless. Establishments in a small number
o f cases (4-7) reported the discontinuance o f
business.

Stoppages in manufacturing industries
were s lig h tly longer than strik es in nonmanu­
facturing. About a f i f t h o f the manufactur­
ing stoppages compared with approximately an
eighth o f the strikes in the nonmanufacturing
industries 'la sted a month or more. Stoppages
continuing at le a st a week but le ss than a
month accounted fo r about a th ird of* the t o t a l
strikes in both groups. Less than h a lf o f the
strikes in manufacturing but more than h a lf
o f the stoppages in nonmanufacturing indus­
t r ie s lasted le ss than a week.
Methods o f Terminating Stoppages
D irect negotiations between employers
and workers or th e ir representatives, without
the pa rticip a tion o f any outside agency,
served as the basis fo r termination o f 51 per­
cent o f a l l stoppages ending in 1951, conpared with approximately 55 percent in 1950




D isposition o f Issues
As in 1950, the issues in dispute were
settled or disposed o f before work was resumed
a fte r most 1951 stoppages (ta b le 14.) • This
group accounted fo r 65 percent o f the workers
and 75 percent o f the idleness. In a m ajority
o f these cases agreement was reached on the
issues or on th e ir referra l to established
grievance procedure. In a minority o f in­
stances, however, the strikers returned to
work without agreement on the issues or pro­
v ision fo r th e ir subsequent adjustment. In 16
percent o f the disputes the parties agreed to
resume work while continuing th eir negoti­
ation s. An additional 7 percent were termi­
nated by an understanding to negotiate with
the aid o f a third party, to submit the d is­
pute to a rb itra tion , or to re fe r the unsettled
issues to an appropriate government agency
fo r decision or e le ctio n .

TABLE 1.— Work stoppages in the United States, 1916-1951

Work stoppages
Year
Number

Workers involved 1/

Average
duration
(calendar
days) 2 /

1 9 1 6 ......
1 9 1 7 ......
1 9 1 g ......
1 9 1 9 ......
1 9 2 0 ......
1 9 2 1 ......
1 9 2 2 ......
1923 ......
1 9 2 h ......
1925 ......
1 P2 6 ......
1927 ......

3.789
b,b50
3.353

(6 /)
(lf)

3 .6 3 0
3 ,bll

(|/)

1 9 2 8......
1929 ......
1930 ......
1 9 3 1 ......
1932 ......
1933 ......
1 9 3 H ......
1 9 3 5 ......
1 9 3 6 ......
1937 ......
1 9 3 2 ......
1939 ......

60b
9 21

2.385
1 ,1 1 2

1.553
I.2 H9
1,301
1.035
707

637
gio
8 bl

(t f )
(tf)
W)
(tf)
(I/)
(f/>
<f/>

(Jf)
2675
2 7 .6
2 2 .6
2 2 .3

18.8
1 9 .6

Number
(thousands)

1 ,6 0 0
1 .2 3 0
l,2 b0
b,l6 0
1,
1*60
1 ,1 0 0
1 ,6 1 0

Man-day6 idle

Percent
of total
employed b/

g.b
6.3

(6 /)
(f/)

6 .2
2 0 .8

(F)

<51)

7.2

(F)
(F)
(F)
(F)
(6 /)
(F)
(F)

6 .b

655

8.7
3.5
3.1

b2S

2 .0

330
33 0

1 .5

757

Number
(thousands)

l.b

2 6 ,2 0 0

289

i.3

1 2 ,6 0 0

1 .2

183
3 U2
32 b

5 .3 5 0
3 .3 2 0

1 .8

31U

.8

6 ,8 9 0

1 .6

1 0 ,5 0 0
1 6 ,9 0 0
1 9 ,6 0 0
1 5 ,5 0 0
1 3 .9 0 0

2 ,01h
2 .1 7 2

2 3 .8

1 ,1 7 0
i,b70
1 ,1 2 0

23.3

UjbO
2.772
2,613

2 0 .3

789
1 .8 6 0

2 3 .6
2 3 .b

1,170

U.7

1 7 ,8 0 0

1 9 U0 ......
1 9 U 1 ......

2 ,5 0 8

2 0 .9

577

b,2gg

18.3
11.7
5.0
5.6
9.9
2 b. 2

2.3
g.b

6 ,7 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0

1 .6 9 5
1 ,8 5 6

I 9 h 2 ......

2 ,9 6 8

1 9 U 3 ......
1 9 U U ......

3 .7 5 2
M 56

1 9 ^ 5 ......
1 9 ^ 6 ......
19 U7 ......
1 9 b 8 ......
I9 U9 ......
1 9 5 0 i f ....
1 9 5 1 ......

U.750
>+.985
3,693
3 .U19

16.9
19.5

2 5 .6

3 ,6 0 6

2 1 .8
2 2 .5

b,8b3
U.737

1 9 .2
1 7 .u

688

2 ,3 6 0

8 bo
1 ,9 8 0
2 ,1 2 0

6.3
7.2
5.2
3-1
7.2

2 .8

6.9
7.0

2 .8

28,bOO
9.150

b,180
1 3 ,5 0 0
8 ,7 2 0

3 8 ,0 0 0

3. **70
b,6oo

1 2 .2

2 ,1 7 0
1 .9 6 0
3 ,0 3 0
2,
bio

6 .5

3 b,600

5.5
9 .0

3b , 1 0 0
5 0 ,5 0 0

6.9
5.5

2 2 ,9 0 0

2 ,2 2 0

lb. 5

1 1 6 ,0 0 0

3 8 .8 0 0

Percent of
estimated
working
time of all
workers

Per
worker
involved

(6 /)

(6 /)

(6 /)
(6 /)
(£/>
(£/>
(F)

(F)
(F)
(F)
(F)
(F)
<F>
(F)
(F>
(F)

(F)
(6 /)
(F)

(F>
(F)
0 .3 7

79-5

.1 7
.0 7
.0 5
.1 1

bO. 2
18.5
18.1

.2 3
.3 6

.38
.2 9

.2 1
.>+3

2 0 .2
3 2 .b
lb.b
13.*
*
1 3 .8
1 7 .6

.1 5

15.3
13.3

.28

1 5 .2

.1 0
.32
.05
.15
.09
•U7
l.**3
.bl
.37
.59
.bb
.23

1 1 .6
9 .8
5 .0

6 .8

b.i
1 1 .0
2 5 .2
1 5 .9
1 7 .+
*
1 6 .7
1 6 .1
1 0 .3

1/ Information on the number of workers involved in some strikes occurring between 1 9 1 6 and 1 9 2 6 is not available.
However, the missing information is for the smaller disputes, and it is believed that the totals given here are fairly
accurate.
2 / Figures are simple averages; each strike is given equal weigit regardless of its size.
2 / Figures include duplicate counting where workers were involved in more than one stoppage during the year. This is
particularly significant for I9 U9 when 365.000 to bOO.OOO miners were out on 3 distinct occasions, thus accounting for
1 , 5 0 ,0 0 0 of a total of 3 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0 workers.
1
b/ "Total employed workers": For 1927-1950 refers to all workers (based on nonagricultural employment reported by the
Bureau) except those in occupations and professions in which there is little if any union organization or in which strikes
rarely if ever occur. In most industries, it includes all wage and salary workers except those in executive, managerial,
or higi supervisory positions, or those performing professional work the nature of which makes union organization or
group action unlikely. It excludes all self-employed, domestic workers, workers on farms employing fewer than 6 persons,
all Federal and State government employees, and the officials, both elected and appointed, in local governments.
In 1951, the concept of "total employed workers" was changed to coincide with the Bureau's figures of non-agricultural employment, excluding Government, but not excluding workers in certain occupational groups as in earlier years.
Tests show that the percentage of total idleness computed on the basis of these new figures usually differs by less than
one-tenth of a point while the percentage of workers idle differs by about 0,5 or 0,6 of a point. For example, the per­
centage of workers idle during 1 9 5 0 computed on the same base as the figures for earlier years is 6 * 9 aad the percent of
idleness is 0*bb compared with 6 . 3 cud O.b respectively computed on the new base.
5 / For each year,
"estimated working time" was computed for purposes of this table by multiplying the average number
of employed workers (see footnote b) by the number of days worked by most employees. This number excludes Saturdays when
customarily not worked, Sundays, and established holidays.
6 / Not available.
Jj Beginning in mid-1950, a new source of strike "leads" was added. It is estimated that this increased the number of
strikes reported in I9 5 O by perhaps 5 percent and in 1951 by approximately 10 percent. However, since most of the added
stoppages were small, they increased the number of workers involved and man-days of idleness by less than 2 percent in
1 9 5 0 and by less than 3 percent in 1 9 5 1 *




- 11 -

Table 2.—W
ork stoppage* involving 10,000 or m workers, in selected periods
ore

Stoppages in v o lv in g 1 0,000 or more workers
Percent
of to ta l
fo r
p erio d

P erio d
Humber

1935-39
• ••
19m .............................
19*^6
19U7
19U8
19U9
1950
1951

. . . , .....................
..............................
.............................
.............................
.............................
.............................

0.1*
.7
.6
.U
.6
.5
•5
.1*

11
29
31
15
20
18
22
19

Man-days i d l e

Workers in v o lv ed

Humber l/

P ercen t
o f to ta l
fo r
p erio d

365,000

5 , 290,000
9 ,3 ^ 0 ,0 0 0
66 , 100,000
*
17 , 700,000
1 8 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0
3l*, 900,000
2 1 , 700,000
5 ,6 8 0 ,0 0 0

yz.k

1 , 070.000
2 , 920,000
1 , 030,000

Number

H5.3

870,000

63*6
U7 .5
1 .5
A

1 , 920,000

6 3 .2

7 38.000
1*57,000

2 0 .6

30.7

P ercen t
of to ta l
fo r
p erio d
3 1 .2
1*0.5
5 7 .2
5 1 .2
5 5 .3
6 9 .0
5 6 .0
2U. 8

1 / Bomber o f workers in clu d es d u p lic a te co u n tin g where workers were in v o lv ed in more than 1 stoppage d arin g th e y e a r .
T his i s p a r t ic u la r ly s i g n if ic a n t f o r I 9U9 when 365*000 t o *100,000 m iners were out on 3 se p a r a te o c c a sio n s; th e y com prised
1 ,1 5 0 ,0 0 0 o f th e t o t a l o f 3 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0 workers f o r th e country a s a whole (Table 1 ) .

Table 3*—Monthly tren d s in work sto p p a g es, 1950 and 1951

Number o f
stop p ages
Month
B eginning
in
month

In
e ffe c t
during
month

B eginning
in
month
(th ou san d s)

Workers in v o lv e d
\
Man-days i d l e
during month
in stop p ages
P ercen t o f
In e f f e c t d uring month
P ercent
estim a ted
Humber
working
Number
of
(thousands)
tim e o f 8 l l
(th ou san d s)
to ta l
employed l/
workers 2 /

1950
January ....................
February ..................
March .........................
A p ril .........................
M a y ..............................
J u n e ...........................
J u l y ...........................
August .......................
September ................
October .....................
November ..................
December ..................

21*8

368

170.0

206

358
*+53

5 6 .5
8 5 .2
15 9 .0
351*. 0
2 7 8 .0
22H.0
3U6 .O

298

hOJ
U85
1*83
1*63
635

521
550
329
218

605

723
768
732
918
820
801

605
1*23

270.0
1 9 7 .0
2 0 0 .0
6 1 .1

3 0 5 .0
5 2 7 .0

566.0
29U.0
5 0 8 .0
3 7 3 .0
389-0
1 1 1.0
**
1 50.0
*
3 3 0 .0
3 0 8 .0
11U.0

0 .9 3
1 .6 3
1 .71
.88
1.1*9
1.07
l.ll
1.22
1 .23
.9 0
.81*
.31

2 ,7 3 0
8 ,5 9 0
3.8 7 0
3 ,280
3.270

2,630
2 ,7 5 0

2,660
3 .5 1 0
2 ,5 9 0

2,050
912

0 . 1*0
1 .39
.51
.1+9
J+l*
.31+
.39
.32
.1*8
.3 2
.27
.1 2

1951
January .....................
February ..................
March .........................
A p ril .........................
M a y ..............................
June ...........................
J u l y ...........................
August .......................
September ................
October .....................
November ..................
December ..................

if
2/

hl*2
3*+7
355
367
1 1*0
*

396
1*50
505
1*57
1*87

305
186

See f o o tn o te U, Table 1,
See fo o tn o te 5 , Table 1<




593-

51*8
537
5U0
621

615
61*1
*
727
693
728
521
357

2 3 7 .0
1 8 6.0
12 0 .0
I 63 .O

166.0
19U.0

2 6 0 .0

322.0
230.0

.6 6
.8 2
.5 8

2 2 2 .0
21*9.0

.56

261.0

281*. 0

31+5.0

213.0
215.0

31U.0
31+
0.0

2U8.0
81*. 0

81.5

3 6 5 .0

191.0
130.0

.6 2
.6 5
.8 6
.78
.SU
.9 0
.1+7
.3 2

1,270
1.9U0
1.7 1 0
1 .8 9 0
1 ,8 2 0
1 ,8 0 0
1 ,880
2.6U0
2,5U0
2 ,7 9 0

1,610
1,0 2 0

.1 5
.2 6
.2 0
.2 3
.21
.21
.2 2
.2 8
•33
.3 0
.19
.13

- 12 -

TABLE !*•—Major i s s u e s in v o lv ed in work stop p ages in 1951

Major is s u e s
Number

Work stop p ages b egin n in g
in 1951
Workers in v o lv ed
P ercen t
P ercen t
of
Number
of
to ta l
to ta l

Man-days i d l e
d u rin g 1951
( a l l stop p ages)
P ercen t
of
Number
to ta l

A ll is s u e s .................................................................................

u .737

1 0 0 .0

2 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 0 .0

2 2 , 900,000

Wages, hour8 , and fr in g e b e n e f it s i J .........................
Wage i n c r e a s e ............................................................. ..
Wage d ecrea se ....................................................................
Wage in c r e a s e , hour d ecrea se ..................................
Hour in c r e a s e ....................................................................
Wage in c r e a s e , p en sio n an d /or s o c i a l
in su ra n ce b e n e f i t s ....................................................
P en sio n an d /or s o c i a l in su ran ce b e n e f it s . . . .
Other ......................................................................................

2 ,1 0 2

i*l*.l*
2 7 .2
•3
•9

1 ,1 8 0 ,0 0 0

5 3 .2
2 6. k

U *. 300,000
10 , 100,000

1.291
13

1*2
5

85
19
61*7

Union o r g a n is a tio n , w ages, h ou rs, and f r in g e
b e n e f i t s l / .............................................................................

586,000
3 .9 9 0

.2
5 .2

671*.000

62.5
i* i* .o

1*3,800

116,000

1 0 0 .0

$

.1

1 .9 7 0

.1

U.590

1.8
.1
*

82,300

1 , 190,000

383,000

3 .7
•3
1 7 .3

9 6 .7 0 0
2 , 21*0,000

5.2
.1
*
9.8
8.0 .

1 3 .7

5 .7 9 0

206

U.3

53.000

2. 1
*

1 , 81*0,000

R eco g n itio n , wages a n d /or hours ...........................
S tren g th en in g b a rg a in in g p o s i t i o n , wages
a n d /or hours .................................................................
C losed or union shop, wages an d /or hours . . . .
D isc r im in a tio n , wages an d /or hours ....................
O t h e r .....................................................................................

iko

2.9

13,100

.6

1 21*, 000
*

1.9

.5

19.500
19.700
6U0
100

•9
•$
( 2/ )
( 2/ )

1 , 010,000

i* .i*

Union o r g a n isa tio n ...............................................................

682

ll*.l*

82,600

3 .7

1 , 620,000

7 .1

R eco g n itio n ........................................................................
S tr en g th en in g b a rg a in in g p o s i t i o n .......................
C losed or union shop ....................................................
D i s c r i m i n a t i o n .................................................................
O ther ......................................................................................

1*83

10.2

3U.800

60
56
H9
3*

1.2

12,500
11,000
6.030

1 .5

1 .3

Other working c o n d itio n s ..................................................

1 , 31*2

25
36
3

2

.8
.1
( 2/)

395.000
2,61*0

2,860

(2 / )

659.000

2 .9

.6

355.000

•5
•3

1.6
1.2
.1
*

18,1 0 0

.8

271*.000
93 , 1*00
237.000

2 8 .3

761,000

3^ .3

1 180,000
*,

1 8 .2

675
5U7
87
33

1U.3
1 1 .5

1 5 .9

11.1

2 , 000,000
1 , 170,000

8.6

.7

35^.000
2 U5.000
111,000
51,100

5 .0
2 .3

201,000

5*1
3 .6
•9

326

6 .9

132,000

5-9

89!*, 000

3 .9

Sympathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Union r iv a lr y or fa c tio n a lis m ................................
6U
J u r is d ic t io n ......................................................................
176
Union r e g u la tio n s ...........................................................
3
O t h e r ........................................................ ............................
5

1 .6
l.l*
3 .7
.1
.1

3 2 ,9 0 a
2 8 ,9 0 0
6 3 .3 0 0
120
6 .5 9 0

1 .5
1-3
2 .8
( 2 /)
•3

167.000
1 26,000
*

1.8

1-7

10,900

Job s e c u r i t y ......................................................................
Shop c o n d itio n s and p o l i c i e s ..................................
Work lo a d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other ......................................................................................
.
In teru n io n or in tr a u n io n m atters . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Not rep orted .............................................................................

79

1 .0
.7

1.8

•5

820,000

1 .0

.7

2 8 9 .0 0 0
380
1 2 ,1 * 0 0

1 -3
(2 / )

6 3 ,2 0 0

•3

.1

1 / "Triage b e n e f it s '1 has been added t o th e t i t l e o n ly f o r pu rp oses o f c l a r i f i c a t i o n . There h as b eea no change from
p r e v io u s y e a r s in d e f i n i t i o n or co n te n t o f t h e s e groups. T h is change a p p lie s t o a l l t a b le s in which m ajor i s s u e s a r e p re­
se n te d .
2 / L ess than a te n th o f 1 p e r c e n t.




T B E 5*—W stoppages by industry group, 1951
AL
ork
Stoppages b egin n in g
in 1951
In d u stry group
Number

MANUFACTURING...............................................................

Number
(th ou san d s)

P ercen t o f
estim a ted
working
time 1 /

u .737

2 2 , 900.0

0.26

2 . 5US
308

1 ,3 7 0 .0

17 , 500.0
1 . 630.0

•U3
.U8

8U.2
2 .0

136

lOU.O

26S
19U

3/

2 / 2 , 220.0

2l £
6

A ll in d u s t r ie s .....................................................................................................

Primary m etal in d u s t r ie s ........................................................ . ....................
F a b rica ted m etal p rod u cts (ex cep t ordnance, m achinery,
and tr a n sp o r ta tio n equipment) ...............................................................
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ...............................................................................
E le c t r ic a l m achinery, equipment, and s u p p lie s ................................
Machinery (ex cep t e l e c t r i c a l ) ...................................................................
T ra n sp o rta tio n equipment ..............................................................................
Lumber and wood p rod u cts (excep t fu r n itu r e ) ....................................
F urniture and f i x t u r e s ...................................................................................
S to n e, c la y , and g la s s p rod u cts ...............................................................
T e x t ile m i ll p rod u cts .....................................................................................
Apparel and o th e r f in is h e d p rod u cts made from f a b r ic s
and s im ila r m a te r ia ls .................................................................................
L eather and le a t h e r p rod u cts .....................................................................
Food and kindred p rod u cts ............................................................................
Tobacco m anufactures .......................................................................................
Paper and a l l i e d p ro d u cts ............................................................................
P r in t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d in d u s t r ie s ....................................
Chemicals and a l l i e d p rod u cts ...................................................................
P roducts o f petroleum and c o a l .................................................................
Rubber p rod u cts ..................................................................................................
P r o fe s s io n a l, s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n t r o llin g in stru m ents;
photographic and o p t ic a l goods; w atches and c lo c k s ................
M iscella n eo u s m anufacturing in d u s t r ie s ...............................................

Workers
in v o lv ed
(thousands)

Man-days i d l e
d uring 1951

158.0
230.0
22.8

US
99

132
121
210
7«
197
5
5*
27
67
19

21U.0

2 2 .7

19.0

1 53.0

5U.0
22.6
7 7 .5

1 , 300.0

.51

1 5 .5
l.OUO.O
3 .3 7 0 .0
2 , 600.0

.1 3
.uu
.83

251.0
3 0 9 .0

.68
.12
•35

231.0
3 .U90.0

.16
1.07

35U.O

.12

221.0
819.0

.23

.21
.06

1.6
20.6
1.2
20.0

201.0

156

5 .2
1 3 7 .0

700.0

26

10.2

127.0

.17

92

1 2 .7

1 9 5.0

.16

HONMANUFACTURING......................................................

2d 2 , 1S9

8UU.0

5.U 70.0

.11

A g r ic u ltu r e , f o r e s t r y , and f is h in g ........................................................
Mining .......................................................................................................................
C o n stru ctio n .........................................................................................................
T r a d e ........................................................ ................................................................
F inance, in su ra n ce, and r e a l e s t a t e ......................................................
T ra n sp o rta tio n , com munication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s . . .
S e r v ic e s —p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o th e r .............................................
Government—a d m in is tr a tio n , p r o t e c t io n , and s a n it a tio n 5 / . . .

21
622
651
277

1 7 .2
2 SU.0

232.0

3U8.0
1 , 290.0
1 , 190.0

21
387
179
36

231.0
21.3

(U /)
.55
.1 8
.01
(U /)
.17
(U /)

1 / See fo o tn o t e s U and 5 * Table 1*
2 / The fig u r e on number o f v o t e r s
than one stoppage in t h e y e a r ,
2 / T his f ig u r e i s l e s s than th e sum
groups have been counted in t h i s column
among th e r e s p e c t iv e groups,
y
Hot a v a ila b le ,
5 / Stoppages in v o lv in g m u n icip a lly
p u b lic u t i l i t i e s , "




UO.O
XU. 3
L.9

l U .l
U9U.0
2 9 .5
5 5 .5

2S9-0
20S.0
1 ,7 9 0 .0
329.0
28. S

•39

.02
.11

.08

1.01

( in

in v o lv ed in c lu d e s d u p lic a te co u n tin g where th e same workers were in v o lv ed in more
o f th e f ig u r e s below b ecause a few stoppages exten d in g in to two or more in d u stry
in each in d u str y group a f fe c te d ; workers in v o lv e d , and man-days i d l e were d iv id e d
operated u t i l i t i e s a rs in clu d ed under " T ransportation,

communication,

and o th e r

- lb -

T B E 6.-— ork stoppages by State, I 95I
AL
W

S ta te

Work stop p ages b egin n in g
in 1951
Workers in v o lv e d
P ercen t
Number
Number
of
(th ou san d s)
to ta l

Man-days i d l e
d u rin g 1951
( a l l sto p p a g es)
lumber
(th ou san d s)

P ercent
of
to ta l

A l l S t a t e s ......................... *.............................

1 / **.737

2 / 2 ,2 2 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 2 , 900.0

1 0 0 .0

Alabama ...............................................................
A risona ...............................................................
Arkansas .............................................................
C a lifo r n ia .........................................................
Colorado .............................................................
C on n ecticu t ......................................................
Delaware .............................................................

163
2b
25
217
25
gb
17

109.0

b .9
•5
•3
b .b

1 . 270.0
103.0
52.2

5 .5
.5
.2
50
•3
1 .7
•3

D i s t r i c t o f Columbia .......................* . . . . .
F lo r id a ...............................................................
G eorgia ...............................................................
Idaho ....................................................................
I l l i n o i s .............................................................
I n d i a n a .........................................................
I o w a ......................................................................

11
bb
b5
11
283
20b
b7

b .6

Kansas ..................................................................
Kentucky .............................................................
L o u isia n a ...........................................................
Maine ..................................................................
Maryland .............................................................
M a ssach u setts ..................................................
M ichigan .............................................................

22
165
ho
lb
39

M innesota ...........................................................
M is s is s ip p i .......................................................
M issou ri .............................................................
M o n ta n a................ ..............................................
Nebraska .............................................................
Nevada ......................... ........................................
New Hampshire ..................................................

53
35
113
12
15
ll

New J e r s e y ...................................................... ..
New M e x ic o ........................................................
New Y o r k .................................................. ..
North C a r o l i n a ...............................................
North D a k o t a ....................................................
O h i o ......................................................................
Oklahoma .............................................................

200
26
570
3*
3
b02
28

Oregon ..................................................................
P en nsylvan ia .................................................. ..
Bhode I s l a n d ............................. . ....................
South C arolin a ................................................
South Dakota ....................................................
T ennessee ...........................................................
T e x a s ....................................................................
U t a h ......................................................................
Vermont ...............................................................
V ir g in ia .............................................................
Washington .........................................................
West V ir g in ia ..................................................
W isconsin ...........................................................
Wyoming ...............................................................

151
315

23

67

1 0 .6
6 .0
9 8 .5
b .3

25.2
b.Q

11.0
10.8
3 .2
lb g .o

105.0
1 5.7
8 .6
9 7 .2
1 3 .3
5 .9

12.2
60.0
215.0
20.3
17.8
b i .3

10.1
3 .2
1 .9
5 .1

8 7 .6
9 .9

196.0
2 b. 3
•3
1 9 7 .0
3 .2

25
18
7
1U6
86

1 5 .5
2 7 5 .0
2 2 .3
8 .8
.b
b 7 .8
2 8 .9

2b

11.6

630

5
139

71

231

87
7

2 .b '
b 6.b
b i .b

83.2
b3 .o
.6

.2
1.1
.2
.2
.5
.5
.1
6 .7
b .7
.7
*b
b .b
•6
•3
•5

2 .7
9 .7
•9
.8
1 .9
•5
.1
.1
.2
b .o
.b
9 .0

1.1
an
8.9
.1
.7
12.5
1.0
.b

«/>

2 .2
1 .3

1 ,2 1 0 .0
7 1 .5
b oo.o

59.5
26.6
156.0
1 7 9 .0

29.0
2 , 090.0
763.0
1 0 8 .0
58. b

32b. 0
3b l .o
7 3 .9
1 7 9 .0

1 , 030.0
1 , 600.0
21b. 0

21 b. 0
31b. 0
72.7
39.9
lb .b
7 3 .5

1 , 190.0
9 1.7

2 , 530.0
508.0
1 .3

.1
•7
.8
.1
9 .1
3 .3
.5
*3
l.b
1 .5

.3
.8
b .5
7 .0
•9
•9
l.b
•3
.2
.1
•3
5 .2
.b

11.0
2 .2

<3/>

1 , 690.0
38.1

7 .b
.2

2 b 8 .0

1 .1
8 .3
3.H
1 .2

1 , 910.0
7 8 b .0

270.0
2.8
251.0
29b . 0

(1/)

1 .1
1 .3

•5
.1
2 .1
1 .9
3 .8

9b. b
b 3.b
b il.o

b62.o

2.0

1.9
(3/)

70b . 0

3 .1

326.0
3 .5

.b
.2
1 .8
l.b

(3/)

1/ The sum o f t h i s column exceeds b,737 b ecause th e stop p ages ex ten d in g a c r o s s S ta te l i n e s have been counted in each
S ta te a f f e c t e d , hut th e workers In volved and man-days i d l e were d iv id e d among th e S ta tes*
2 / The f ig u r e on somber o f workers in c lu d e s d u p lic a te co u n tin g where th e same workers were in v o lv e d in more than one
stoppage in th e year*
H
L ess than a te n th o f 1 percent*




- 15 -

TA IE 7*—W stoppages in solooted cities, 1951 1 /
B
ork

C ity

Work stop p ages
b eg in n in g in
Man-days
i d l e during
1951
1951 ( a l l
Number Workers sto p p a g e s)
in v o lv ed
2/

C ity

Work stop p ages
b eg in n in g in
Man-days
i d l e d uring
1951
1951 ( a l l
lumber Workers s to p p a g e s)
in v o lv ed
[2 /

Akron, Ohio . .
A llen to w n , Fa*
A tla n ta , Ga. •
B a ltim o r e, Mi*

58
13
16
18

51,400
2 ,7 9 0
2 ,1 9 0
4 ,4 1 0

181 ,0 0 0
4 5 ,4 0 0
4 5 ,4 0 0
3 4,400

Memphis, Tenn...................................... . .
Milwaukee, W ise....................... • • • • • • •
M in n eap olis, Minn* ....................... • • •
M obile, Ala* .......................*...............

20
23
22
11

1 1 ,8 0 0
1 4 ,4 0 0
9 ,0 1 0
3 ,2 4 0

3 7 ,6 0 0
1 60,000
1 2 7 ,0 0 0
2 8 8 ,0 0 0

Birmingham, Ala* ..................................
B o sto n , Mass* ........................... • • • • • •
B r id g ep o rt, Conn* ................................
B u ffa lo , N* Y* « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

25
23
H
47

9 ,6 6 0
7 ,9 0 0
3 ,1 3 0
8 ,4 5 0

1 20,000
59,7 0 0
58,8 0 0
7 4 ,9 0 0

N a s h v ille , Tenn.......................................
Newark, N* J* • • • • • • ■ • • • • • • • • • • * •
New B edford, Mass................ ..
New Haven, Conn. ..................................

12
35
10
10

770
1 2 ,0 0 0
1 ,9 0 0
3,2 4 0

1 1 ,1 0 0
7 5 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,1 0 0
3 1 ,1 0 0

Camden, N* J . • • • •
Chattanooga, Tenn*
C hicago, 111* • • • •
C in c in n a ti, Ohio •

10
16
59
36

1 ,6 4 0
1 ,6 3 0
36 ,2 0 0
1 1 ,200

7 ,6 7 0
2 4 ,4 0 0
539,000
139 ,0 0 0

New O rlean s,
New York, N*
N orfolk , Va*
Oakland-East

La.......................................
Y* • • • * • • ..........• • • « • •
...........................................
Bay Area, C a lif* ***

15
329
10
40

8 ,5 5 0
8 5 ,4 0 0
1 ,2 3 0
13,200

2 9 3 ,0 0 0
8 8 3 ,0 0 0
7 ,7 3 0
148 ,0 0 0

C levelan d , Ohio
Columbus, Ohio ,
Dayton, Ohio **,
D enver, Colo* ..

38
15
20

18 ,0 0 0
920
3 ,1 7 0
3 ,4 8 0

3 6 9 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,5 0 0
1 2 ,0 0 0
6 3 ,9 0 0

P a s s a ic , N* J* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
P aterson , N* J*
P h ila d e lp h ia , Pa* ................................
Phoenix, A ria .............. • • • • • • .............

10
18
67
11

7 ,0 1 0
4 ,2 6 0
2 8 ,7 0 0
3,3 5 0

8 5 ,2 0 0
7 8 ,4 0 0
2 9 0 ,0 0 0
4 6 ,3 0 0

10
161
10
10

2 ,4 9 0
122,000
1 ,8 1 0
1 ,8 3 0

7 ,8 8 0
9 4 5 ,0 0 0
1 1 ,1 0 0
5 1 ,6 0 0

P ittsb u r g h , Pa.........................................
P ortlan d , Oregon . . . . . .......................
P rovidence, R* I* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
R o ch ester, N* Y* • • • • • • • • • * • • • • • •

57
31
12
10

1 5 ,700
5 ,1 9 0
8 ,5 7 0
2 ,2 6 0

141,000
121 ,0 0 0
4 8 5 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,6 0 0

E r ie , Fa..................
E v a n s v ille , Ind*
F a ll R iv er, Mass*
F ort Wayne, Ind*

15
23
17
10

4 ,6 8 0
1 2 ,8 0 0
12 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,9 0 0

6 4 ,0 0 0
136,000
3 6 ,9 0 0
4 2 ,5 0 0

Sacram ento, C a l i f ..................................
St* L ou is, Mo....................................
St* P au l, Minn............................• • • • • •
San F ra n cisco , C a l i f ............................

11
56
13
31

1 ,3 5 0
2 1 ,6 0 0
3 ,1 2 0
1 0,500

1 0 ,7 0 0
168 ,0 0 0
1 6 ,2 0 0
8 1 ,0 0 0

F ort Worth, Texas •
Gary, Ind.....................
Grand R apids, Mich*
Houston, Texas . . . .

12
25
11
17

1 ,9 3 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
2 ,0 0 0
8 ,9 4 0

4 2 ,7 0 0
2 7 ,7 0 0
3 1 ,0 0 0

S cran ton, Pa.......................................*••
S e a t t l e , Wash* .......................................
Spokane, Wash* ................................
S p r in g fie ld , Mass* • • * . • • ................

18
15
12
12

2 ,4 7 0
12,500
2 ,8 9 0
2 ,1 6 0

U , 400
115,000
9 ,7 9 0
34 ,3 0 0

H untington, W Via.....................• • • • • •
*
I n d ia n a p o lis, Ind* • • • • • • • • • • • • * •
J ersey C ity , N* J* • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Johnstown, Fa.............. • • • • • • ...............

11
22
32
12

3 ,2 0 0
5 ,1 1 0
6 ,8 0 0
8 ,1 0 0

2 5 ,9 0 0
7 5 ,2 0 0
51,800
2 9 ,5 0 0

S yracu se, N* Y* * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • *
Tacoma, Wash.............. *.............................
Terre Haute, Ind* .............. .................
T oled o, Ohio .................... ............... ..

14
11
13
23

4 ,9 5 0
4 ,7 6 0
1 ,7 1 0

12,900

1 6 ,6 0 0
5 7 ,3 0 0
5 ,9 9 0
1 17,000

Kansas C ity , Mo* ••
K n o x v ille , Tenn* ••
Long Beach, C a lif*
Los A n g eles, C a lif*
L o u i s v i ll e , Ky. • • •

14
18
14
62
20

3 ,8 5 0
3 ,4 3 0
1 4 ,0 0 0
1 9,100
3 ,7 5 0

3 6 ,8 0 0
1 9 ,3 0 0
340,000
156 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,8 0 0

Trenton, N* J* • • • • • * • • • • • . . « . « • .
W ashington, D* C* • • • • • • • • * • • • • • •
W orcester, Mass * ............*...........• • • •
Yonkers, N* Y*
Youngstown, O h i o .....................• • • • • •

13
10
12
12
35

2 ,6 8 0
4 ,3 6 0
2 ,1 4 0
4 ,4 3 0
19,7 0 0

2 8 ,0 0 0
2 4 ,8 0 0
2 3 9 ,0 0 0
1 3 2 ,0 0 0
8 0 ,4 0 0

Des M oines, Iowa • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
D e t r o it , Mich......................................••«
E. St* L ou is, 111* • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
E lis a b e th , N* J* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

U

10,400

1 / Data are ta b u la te d s e p a r a te ly f o r 150 c i t i e s , in c lu d in g a l l th o se w ith a p o p u la tio n o f 1 00,000 and over in 194.0 a s w e l l
a s f o r a number o f sm a ller c i t i e s in clu d ed f o r purposes o f r e g io n a l balance* T his t a b le in c lu d e s d ata f o r each o f th e 150
c i t i e s th a t had 10 or more stop p ages in 1951* Except f o r th e O akland-East Bay Area, f ig u r e s r e la t e t o th e corp orate l i m i t s o f
th e r e s p e c t iv e c i t i e s *
2 / In t h i s t a b le e x cep t a s n oted below i n t e r c i t y stop p ages are counted s e p a r a te ly in each c i t y a f f e c t e d , w ith th e workers
in v o lv ed and man-days i d l e a llo c a t e d t o th e r e s p e c t iv e c i t i e s * In a few in s ta n c e s i t was im p o ssib le t o secu re th e d ata n e c e s­
sa r y t o make such a llo c a t io n s * T h erefo re, th e f o llo w in g stop p ages are n o t in clu d ed i n th e f ig u r e s f o r any e i t y s ( 1 ) the
M ation-wide r a ilr o a d stoppage in January a f f e c t i n g ap p roxim ately 7 0 ,0 0 0 w orkers, ( 2 ) th e s t r ik e o f ap p roxim ately 4 8 ,0 0 0 t e x ­
t i l e workers a t w oolen and w orsted m i ll s in 11 S ta t e s in February, and (3 ) th e s t r ik e in th e l a d l e s ' garment in d u stry in June
i n Hew York, Hew J e r se y , C on n ecticu t, and e a s te r n P en nsylvan ia a f f e c t i n g approxim ately 2 1 ,0 0 0 workers*




- 16 -

T B E 8. —W stoppages by affiliation of unions involved, 1951
AL
ork
Stoppages b egin n in g in I 95I
A f f i l i a t i o n o f union

Number

P ercen t
of
to ta l

Workers in v o lv e d
P ercen t
Number
of
to ta l

Man-days i d l e
d u rin g 1951
( a l l stop p ages)
P ercent
Number
of
to ta l

T o ta l ..........................................................................................

9.737

1 0 0 .0

1 / 2 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0

1 0 0 .0

2 2 , 900,000

1 0 0 .0

American F ed era tio n o f Labor ......................................
Congress o f I n d u s tr ia l O rgan ization s ....................
U n a f f ilia t e d u n ions ............................. ............................
S in g le firm u n ions .............................................................
D iffe r e n t a f f i l i a t i o n s :
R iv a l u n ions ...................................................................
C ooperating u n ions ......................................................
No union in v o lv ed ...............................................................
Not rep o rted ..........................................................................

2.117
1.387

UU.8
2 9 .3
2 1 .9
.1*

65U.OOO
1 , 030,000

2 9 .5
1*6. n
22.1*
•3

6 , 570,000
12 , 700,000
3 . 01*0,000

2 8. 7
55.U
1 3 .3
.2

12,600

•5
.6

159.000
351.000

7 .3 9 0
70

.3

35.1*00

( 2/ )

1 / The f ig u r e on number o f workers
stoppage in th e y ea r.
2 / L ess than a te n th o f 1 percent*

1.037
20
59
6

105
6

1 .2
.1
2 .2
.1

1*97,000
6 .9 9 0
11,200

5 3 .0 0 0

370

in c lu d e s d u p lic a te c o u n tin g where th e same workers were in v o lv ed in more

.7
1 .5
.2
( 2/ )
one

TABLE 9*— Work stop p ages c l a s s i f i e d by number o f workers in v o lv e d , 1951
Stoppages b eg in n in g in 1951
Number o f workers

A ll w orkers ..........................................................................
6 and under 20 ...................................................................
20 and under 100 ...............................................................
100 and under 2 5 0 .............................................................
250 and under 500 .............................................................
500 and under 1,000 ........................................................
1.000 and under 5.000 ....................................................
5.000 and under 10,000 ..................................................
10.000 and ov er .................................................................

Workers in v o lv ed 1 /
P ercen t
Number
of
to ta l

Man-days i d l e
d u rin g 1951
( a l l stop p ages)
P ercen t
of
Number
to ta l

Number

P ercent
of
to ta l

9.737

100.0

2 , 220,000

100.0

2 2 , 900,000

100.0

675

1U.2
3H. 5

8,650
8 1,800

.1
*
3 .7
7 .1
9 .2
13.7

151*, 000
1 , 090,000

1*.8

1 ,6 8 0 ,0 0 0
2 , 010,000
2 , 910,000
6 . 520,000
2 . 870,000
5 ,6 8 0 ,0 0 0

1 2 .7
28.1*
1 2 .5
2 U.g

1.631
999
5«9
933
359
U
2
19

21.0
12.U

9 .1
7 .5
•9
.1
*

158.000
203.000
303,000
710,000
295,000
U57 ,000

32.0
1 3 .3

20.6

l/ The fig u r e on number o f workers in c lu d e s d u p lic a te co u n tin g where th e same workers were in v o lv ed in more
stoppage in th e y ea r.

•7

7 .3

8.8

than one

TABLE 10*—Work stop p ages by number o f esta b lish m en ts in v o lv e d , 1951
Man-days i d l e
during 1951
Workers in v o lv e d £-7 _____( a l l stop p ages)__
P ercent
P ercen t
Number
of
of
Number
to ta l
to ta l

Stoppages b eg in n in g in 1951
Number o f e sta b lish m e n ts in v o lv ed

Number

Percent
of
to ta l

A ll esta b lish m en ts ........................................................

9.737

1 00.0

2 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0 .

1 0 0 .0

2 2 , 900,000

1 0 0 .0

1 esta b lish m en t ...............................................................
2 to 5 e sta b lish m en ts ..................................................
6 to 10 esta b lish m en ts ...............................................
11 esta b lish m en ts or m o r e .................. .....................

3.772
59H
121

7 9 .6
1 2 .5
2 .6
5 .3

1 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0
2 8 8,000

5 5 .2

66,900

3 .0
2 8 .8

1 1 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0
H,5^ 0,000
8 5 1 .0 0 0
6 . 370,000

1*8.7
1 9 .8
3 .7

250

638.000

13.0

27.8

1 / An e s ta b lish m e n t, f o r pu rp oses o f t h i s t a b l e , i s d efin e d a s a s in g le p h y s ic a l lo c a t io n where b u sin e s s i s conducted
or where s e r v ic e s or in d u s t r ia l o p e r a tio n s are perform ed; f o r exam ple, a f a c t o r y , m i l l , s t o r e , m ine, or farm* A stoppage
may in v o lv e o n e, tw o, or more e sta b lish m e n ts o f a s in g le employer or i t may in v o lv e d if f e r e n t employers*
2 / The fig u r e on number o f w orkers in c lu d e s d u p lic a te co u n tin g where th e same workers were in v o lv ed in more than one
stoppage in th e year*




- 17 T B S 11.—W stoppages involving 10,000 or more workers beginning in 1951
AU
ork

B e g in n in g
d a te

A p p ro x i­
m a te
d u ra tio n
( c a le n d a r
days) 1 /

E s t a b lis h m e n t ( s ) and l o c a t io n

U n io n (s )

in v o lv e d

g/

A p p ro x i­
m a te
num ber
o f w o rk­
e rs in ­
v o lv e d 2 /

M a jo r te rra s o f s e tt le m e n t

2/

J a n . 30

U

12

R a ilro a d s ,
N a tio n -w id e

B r o . o f R a ilr o a d
T r a in m e n , ( I n d .)

7 0 ,0 0 0

W a g e s -h o u rs -r u le s d is p u te n o t
s e tt le d a t t e r m in a tio n o f s to p p a g e .
A rm y d i r e c t i v e p r o v id e d f o r in t e r i m
h o u r l y w age i n c r e a s e s o f 12-J- c e n t s
f o r y a rd m e n -a w l y a r i m a s t e r s a n d 5
c e n ts f o r
r o a d s e r v i c e e m p lo y e e s ,
e ffe c tiv e
O c t. 1 ,
19 5 0 ,
p e n d in g
s e ttle m e n t o f th e
d is p u te b y th e
p a rtie s in v o lv e d .

F e b . 16

i/

n

W o o le n a n d w o r s t e d m i l l s ,
C o n n ., G a . , K y . , M a in e , M a s s .,
N . H . , N . J . , N . Y . , P a .,
R . I . , and V t .

T e x t i l e W o rk e rs
U n io n , (C IO )

4 8 ,0 0 0

A g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d M a rc h
13
w ith
A m e r ic a n W o o le n C o . ,
th e
la r g e s t
fir m i n th e i n d u s t r y ,
on
one y e a r c o n tr a c t p r o v id in g f o r 12
c e n t s h o u r l y w age i n c r e a s e ,
esca­
la to r
c la u s e ,
im p r o v e d i n s u r a n c e
b e n e fit s , s e ve ra n c e p a y , e t c . O th e r
m ills
in v o lv e d
in
th e
sto p p a g e
g e n e r a l l y a c c e p te d t h e A m e ric a n
W o o le n C o .
p a tte r n o f s e ttle m e n t.

2 8 ,0 0 0

U n i o n m em bers v o t e d t o r e t u r n
t o w o rk F e b . 2 6 ,
w ith re q u e s t t o
g o ve rn o r to v e to b i l l
le g a lizin g
s a fe t y in s p e c tio n s b y s e c tio n fo r e ­
m en.

1 8 ,0 0 0

Is s u e s t o be
s e ttle d b y p a r­
t i e s u p o n re s u m p tio n o f w o r k .

F e b . 19

7

F e b . 22

13

U n i t e d M in e W o r k e r s ,
C o a l m in e s ,
( I n d .)
B l u e f i e l d and N o r th e r n W . V a .

&

Tennessee C o a l, Ir o n
R a ilr o a d
C o .,
B ir m in g h a m a r e a , A l a .

U n ite d S te e lw o r k e rs ,
(C IO )

M a rc h 1 6

2

F a l l R i v e r T e x t i l e M a n u f a c t u r e r s F a l l R i v e r L o o m f ix e r s *
U n io n ( I n d .) , aw l
A s s o c ia tio n ,
S la s h e rs & K n o tF a ll
R i v e r , M a s s , and
T ie r s A s s ’ n . ( I n d .)
v ic in ity

1 0 ,5 0 0

Tw o y e a r c o n t r a c t r a t i f i e d b y
m e m b e rs h ip p r o v i d i n g f o r im m e d ia te
w age i n c r e a s e ,
q u a rte rly c o s t-o fl i v i n g a d ju s tm e n ts , s e ve ra n c e p a y ,
in c r e a s e d
h o s p it a l and i l l n e s s
b e n e f i t s ^ and o t h e r f r i n g e b e n e f i t s .

M a rc h 30

5

W e s tin g h o u s e E l e c t r i c C o r p . ,
E a s t P itts b u rg h , P a .

I n t ' l U n io n o f
E l e c t r i c a l , R a d io
a n d M a c h in e W ork­
e r s , (C IO )

1 4 ,0 0 0

W o rke rs r e tu r n e d w it h o u t f o r ­
m al s e ttle m e n t.

C o tto n and ra y o n m i l l s ,
A l a ., G a ., L a ., N . C . ,
S . C . , T e n n ., and V a .

T e x t i l e W o rke rs
U n io n , (C IO )

4 0 ,0 0 0

P r o d u c t i o n was re s u m e d i n a
m a j o r i t y o f t h e m i l l s i n c o m p lia n c e
w ith a r e q u e s t b y d i r e c t o r o f th e
F e d e r a l M e d ia tio n and C o n c i l i a t i o n
S e rv ic e .
On M ay 7
he a p p o in te d a
s p e c i a l 3 -m a n p a n e l t o a i d t h e p a r ­
t ie s in n e g o tia tio n s .

G a rm e n t m a n u fa c tu r e r s ,
N . Y . , N . J . , C o n n .,
and e a s te r n P a .

I n t ’ l L a d ie s * G a rm e n t
W o rk e rs, ( A F L )

2 1 ,0 0 0

A g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d b e tw e e n a s ­
s o c ia tio n
an d u n i o n
on in c r e a s e d
m inim um w age r a t e s ,
c o n v e rs io n
fr o m
w eek w o rk ( t i m e - r a t e s )
in
" s e c tio n
w o rk"
shops t o a p ie c e r a t e b a s iv S , e q u i t a b l e d i s t r i b u t i o n
o f w o rk am ong s h o p s ,
in c re a s e in
e m p lo y e rs ’
c o n tr ib u tio n
to
th e
h e a lth
an d v a c a t i o n f u n d .
F r in g e
is s u e s and o t h e r c o n t r a c t c la u s e s
r e f e r r e d t o t h e i n d u s t r y ’ s im p a r ­
t i a l c h a ir m a n f o r d e c i s i o n .

M a r itim e i n d u s t r y ,
E a s t , W e s t, a n d G u l f C o a s t s

N a t io n a l M a r itim e
U n i o n ; M a r in e E n g i ­
n e e rs ’ B e n e fic ia l
A s s ’ n . , and A m e r ic a n
R a d io A s s ’ n . , ( C I O )

1 5 ,0 0 0

Im m e d ia te
re d u c tio n
o f th e
b a s i c w o rk w e e k a t s e a a f t e r w h ic h
o v e r tim e i s p a id fro m 4 3 h o u rs to 4 4
h o u r s , w ith a f u r t h e r r e d u c tio n to
40 h o u rs on D e c . 1 5 , 1 9 5 1 ;
b a s ic
wage i n c r e a s e
o f 8 p e rc e n t o v e r
Ja n u a r y 19 5 0 r a te s f o r m ost o f th e
w o rk e rs in v o lv e d .

A p r il 1

6 / 122

Ju n e 12

2

Ju n e 16

11


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
Sea footnotes at end of table,
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

- 18 -

B e g in n in g
d a te

J u l y 19

J u l y 19

T A B L E 1 1 , — W o rk s t o p p a g e s i n v o l v i n g 1 0 .0— 0 o r....m o re w o r k e r s b e g i n n i n g i n 1 9 5 1 - C o n t i n u e d
' » 0r
A p p ro x i­
A p p ro x i­
m a te
m a te
num ber
U n io n (s ) in v o lv e d 2 /
d u ra tio n
E s t a b lis h m e n t ( s ) and lo c a t io n
M a jo r te rm s o f s e ttle m e n t 2 /
o f w o rk­
( c a le n d a r
e rs in ­
d a y s) 1 /
v o lv e d 2 /

1/

12

5

C h r y s l e r C o r p . (D o d g e M a in
P la n t),
D e t r o i t , M ic h .

U n i t e d A u to m o b ile
W o rke rs, (C IO )

2 7 ,0 0 0

Jo n e s & I & u g h lin S t e e l C o r p .,
A liq u ip p a , P a .

U n ite d S te e lw o r k e rs ,
(C IO )

1 2 ,0 0 0

W o rke rs r e tu r n e d t o t h e i r j obs
w ith o u t fo r m a l a g re e m e n t.

tie s

Is s u e s t o be
s e ttle d b y p a r­
u pon re s u m p tio n o f w o r k .

J u l y 30

63

C a t e r p i l l a r T r a c to r C o .,
E a s t P e o ria , 1 1 1 .

U n i t e d A u t o m o b i le
W o rk e rs, (C IO )

2 4 ,0 0 0

G e n e r a l w age i n c r e a s e o f 13-Jc e n t s a n h o u r . C o s t - o f - l i v i n g wage
a d ju s t m e n t o n F e b . 1 , 1 9 5 2 .

Aug. 27

12

C o p p e r and o th e r n o n -fe r r o u s
m e ta l m in e s , m i l l s and
s m e lte r s ,
N a tio n -w id e

I n t ' l U n io n o f M in e ,
M i l l and S m e lte r
W o rk e rs , ( I n d .)

40,000

K e n n e c o t t C o p p e r C o r p . and t h e
u n io n re a c h e d
a g re e m e n t o n A u g u s t
3 1 o n w age i n c r e a s e s a n d a p e n s i o n
fu n d .
W o rke rs
e m p lo y e d b y t h e
o th e r
c o m p a n ie s
a ffe c te d
b y th e
s trik e
re tu rn e d t o t h e i r jo b s
by
S e p t. 10 u nd e r a F e d e ra l C o u rt i n ­
ju n c tio n .

S e p t. 5

44

D o u g la s A i r c r a f t C o . ,
Lo n g B e a c h , S a n ta M o n ic a ,
an d E l S e g u n d o , C a l i f .

U n i t e d A u to m o b ile
W o rk e rs , ( C I O ) , and
U n ite d A i r c r a f t
W e ld e r s , ( I n d .)

1 0 ,0 0 0

W o rke rs v o te d
to re tu rn
to
w o rk i n
c o m p lia n c e w i t h
re q u e s ts
o f t h e P r e s i d e n t a n d t h e Wage S t a ­
b iliza tio n
B o a rd .
The
WSB h a d
a g re e d t o c o n s id e r th e
is s u e s i n ­
v o lv e d
a fte r
te r m in a tio n o f th e
s tr ik e .

S e p t . 26

23

W r ig h t A e r o n a u tic a l C o r p .,
U n i t e d A u t o m o b i le
W o o d -R id g e a n d G a r f i e l d , N . J .
W o rke rs, (C IO )

1 3 ,0 0 0

U n i o n m em b ers v o t e d t o " r e ­
c e s s ” t h e s t r i k e i n c o m p lia n c e w i t h
re q u e s ts o f th e
P r e s id e n t and th e
Wage S t a b i l i z a t i o n B o a r d ,
and to
g iv e
c o n s i d e r a t i o n t o t h e B o a r d 's
re c o m m e n d a tio n s f o r s e t t l e m e n t .

In la n d S t e e l C o .,
E a s t C h ic a g o , I n d .

U n ite d S te e lw o r k e rs ,
(C IO )

1 4 ,5 0 0

D is p u te
over
in c e n tiv e
pay
re fe rre d to a r b itr a to r s
a p p o in te d
b y th e
d ire c to r
o f th e
Fe d e ra l
M e d i a t i o n and C o n c i l i a t i o n S e r v i c e .

O c t. 11

8

O c t . 15

26

S te v e d o r in g and s h ip p in g
c o m p a n ie s ,
New Y o r k , N . Y .- N e w J e r s e y ,
and B o s t o n , M a s s .

I n t ' l L o n g s h o r e m e n 's
A s s 'n ., ( A F L )

1 7 ,0 0 0

A m a jo r ity o f th e s tr ik e r s re ­
t u r n e d t o w o rk a t t h e r e q u e s t o f a
B o a rd o f I n q u ir y
a p p o in te d b y th e
New Y o r k S t a t e
I n d u s t r i a l Com m is­
s io n e r to in q u ir e i n t o th e d is p u te .

O c t. 24

1

M ilk D e a le r s ,
New Y o r k , N . Y . , New J e r s e y ,
and C o n n .

I n t ' l B r o . o f Team ­
s te rs , (A FL)

1 4 ,0 0 0

Im m e d ia te
w age
in c re a s e
of
$ 10 a w e e k , and
2 c e n ts a n h o u r
in c r e a s e i n e m p lo y e rs ’ c o n t r i b u t i o n
t o t h e W e lfa r e T r u s t F u n d .

O c t . 23

21

Tennessee C o a l, Ir o n & R a ilro a d
C o .,
B ir m in g h a m a r e a , A l a .

U n ite d S te e lw o r k e rs ,
(C IO )

2 5 ,0 0 0
tie s

Is s u e s
t o be s e tt le d b y p a r­
u pon r e s u m p tio n o f w o r k .

1/
I n c l u d e s n o n -w o r k d a y s ,
su c h a s S a t u r d a y s , S u n d a y s , a n d h o l i d a y s .
O n l y n o r m a l l y s c h e d u le d w o r k d a y s a r e u s e d i n
c o m p u tin g s t r i k e i d l e n e s s ,
T h e u n io n s l i s t e d a r e th o s e d i r e c t l y i n v o lv e d i n t h e d i s p u t e .
T h e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s i n v o l v e d m ay i n c l u d e m em bers
o f o t h e r u n i o n s o r n o n - u n i o n w o r k e r s i d l e d b y t h e d i s p u t e i n t h e same e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ,

7j

" W o r k e r s i n v o l v e d ” i n c l u d e a l l w o r k e r s m ade i d l e f o r o n e s h i f t o r l o n g e r i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i r e c t l y i n v o l v e d i n a
s t o p p a g e . T h e y d o n o t m e a s u re
th e in d ir e c t o r
s e c o n d a r y e f f e c t s o n o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r i n d u s t r i e s w h o se e m p lo y e e s
a r e m ade i d l e a s a r e s u l t o f m a t e r i a l o r s e r v i c e s h o r t a g e s ,
2/
D e s c r ip tio n o f s e ttle m e n ts
i s l i m i t e d t o t h e i r m a j o r te r m s
a s t h e y w e re r e a c h e d b y t h e
p a r tie s t o th e d is p u te .
S e t t l e m e n t s a r r i v e d a t a f t e r J a n u a r y 25 w e re i n some i n s t a n c e s s u b j e c t t o WSB a p p r o v a l b u t n o e f f o r t h a s b e e n m ade h e r e
t o r e c o r d a n y r e v i s i o n s i n s e t t l e m e n t s m ade n e c e s s a r y b y B o a r d r u l i n g s .
T h e m o n t h l y C u r r e n t Wage D e v e lo a m e n ts r e p o r t o f
t h e B u r e a u d e s c r i b e s t h e w age s e t t l e m e n t s s o m e tim e s i n g r e a t e r d e t a i l t h a n t h e y a r e p r e s e n t e d h e r e a n d d i s c u s s e s WSB p o l ­
i c y and a c t i o n s ,
A b a c k - t o - w o r k m o ve m e n t b e g a n o n F e b r u a r y 6 i n s e v e r a l E a s t e r n c i t i e s . O t h e r w o r k e r s c o m p lie d w i t h a n A r m y d i r e c ­
t i v e , is s u e d F e b r u a r y 8 , 1 9 5 1 ,
w h ic h o r d e r e d th e m t o r e t u r n t o t h e i r j o b s w i t h i n 4 8 h o u r s o r f a c e d i s m i s s a l an d l o s s o f
s e n io r ity r ig h ts .
j j / T h e m a j o r i t y o f t h e m i l l s r e o p e n e d o n M a rc h 1 9 ,
b u t a s u b s t a n t i a l num ber d i d n o t re o p e n u n t i l l a t e A p r i l .
Som e
7 0 ,0 0 0 m em bers o f t h e T e x t i l e W o rk e rs U n i o n ( C I O ) w e re i d l e d u r i n g t h e p e r i o d o f t h i s s t o p p a g e , b u t o n l y 4 8 ,0 0 0 w e re i n ­
v o l v e d i n t h i s s i n g l e s t o p p a g e . T h e r e m a i n d e r w e re i n v o l v e d i n l o c a l s t o p p a g e s .
6 / T h e p o l i c y c o m m itte e o f t h e u n i o n v o t e d , o n M a y 5 , t o c o m p ly w i t h t h e r e q u e s t t o c a l l o f f t h e s t r i k e ,
A m a jo rity
o th e w o r
Digitized for fFRASERk e r s r e t u r n e d t o t h e i r j o b s b y t h e m id d l e o f M a y ; o t h e r s re s u m e d w o r k d u r i n g l a t e M a y , J u n e , a n d J u l y .
In te rm i
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ t t e n t i d l e n e s s o f o n l y 4 d a y s .

lj

21

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

- 19 TABLE 12.— Duration of work stoppages ending in 1951

S to p p a g e s
D u r a tio n

A l l p e r io d s

1
2
4
1
L
1
2
3

W o rke rs i n v o lv e d

P e rc e n t
N u m b er
of
to ta l

y

100.0 2, 200,000

............................................... ...................................................................................................................................

692

d a y ........................................................................................................................................................................................................
t o 3 d a y s ............................................................................................................... ...................................................................
d a y s a n d l e s s t h a n 1 w e e k ........................................................................................ ...............................
w e e k a n d l e s s t h a n A m o n th .....................................................................................................................
m o n th a n d l e s s t h a n 1 m o n t h ................................................................................... ...............................
m o n th a n d l e s s t h a n 2 m o n th s ...............................................................................................................
m o n th s a n d l e s s t h a n 3 m o n th s ...........................................................................................................
m o n th s a n d o v e r ............... ............................................................................. ...........................................................

14.5
19.3
15.2

723
1 ,0 0 9

680
6
161
ike

5 4 8 ,0 0 0

247,000

1 1 .2
1 9 .2
1 6 .3
2 4 .8
1 3 .8
6 .3
5 .4
3 .0

358,000

303,000

1 4 .3
9 .0
3 .4
3 .1

42

P e rc e n t
of
to ta l

Num ber

100.0 2/ 21, 800,000

4 2 2 ,0 0 0

2 1 .2

9 19

M a n -d a y s :i d l e

P e rc e n t
of
to ta l

Num ber

1 4 0 ,0 0 0

119,000
65,100

100.0

2 4 8 ,0 0 0
8 4 2 ,0 0 0

1 .1
3 .9
5 .2
1 5 .1
1 8 .5

1 130,000

,
3 ,2 7 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,0 5 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,1 1 0 ,0 0 0
4 ,5 7 0 ,0 0 0
,

18.8
2 0 .9

16.6

3 620,000

1/ The figure on number of workers includes duplicate counting where the same workers were involved in more than one
stoppage in the year.
2/ This figure is smaller than the total man-days idle shown in preceding tables because the figures in this and the
next two tables relate only to those stoppages ending in 1
.
9
5
1

TABLE 13.— Method of terminating work stoppages ending in 1951

Stoppages
Method of termination

All methods .................. .................. .................
Agreement of parties reached—
Directly ......................................................
With assistance of Government agencies ......................
With assistance of non-Goverament mediators or agencies ....
Terminated without formal settlement ............................
Employers discontinued business ............ ....................
Not r e p o r t e d ................ ..................... .

Workers involved

Percent
Number
of
total

1 /

100.0

51.4
1 23.9
3
1.0
20.8
1.0

822,000
8 829,000
1
5
5
0
4,040
2
2

Percent
of
total

2/21,800,000

100.0

2,200,000

2,442
1
,
49

Number

100.0

Number

4,758

992
47
9

0

1.9

Man-days idle

Percent
of
total

4,980,000
37.3
1 ,6 3
0
37.7
0.7
0
0 87,900
2 0 ,9
8 2 ,.I 3 0
0 0
.2
1
3
, 1.0
3
0
0184,000

0

,

0
9

22.9
,
0
.4
,
13.3 0
, .6 0
.8

0

0

0

0
0

0

0

0

0
0

0

l/ The figure on number of workers includes duplicate counting where the same workers were involved in more than one
stoppage I n the year.
2/ See footndte 2, table 12.

TABLE 14.— Disposition of issues in work stoppages ending in 1951

Stop]pages
Disposition of issues

Percent
oA
Number
total

Issues settled or disposed of at termination of stoppage 3 / ...
Some or all issues to be adjusted after resumption of worE-By direct negotiation between employer(s) and u n i o n ..... .
By negotiation with the aid of Government agencies ...... .

74.7

1,440,000

757
76
143
131
93

15.9
1.6
3.0
2.8
2.0

By other means 4/ ............................................
Not reported .................. .......... ..................... *.

2/21,800,000

2,200,000
8

3,558

Number

100.0

1 /

7100.0
5

5

0
6
0
8
6
73,500
3
6

Percent

Percent
of
total

Number

,

4

Man-days idle

Workers involved

6
3
,

,

1 . ,3 4 6

5

22.9 0
,
2.8
8
0
. 3.9
9
0
3.3
9
1.7

of
total

0

0

2 0 ,9
0 9
0
05
0528,000
1 ,0
6
0424,000

100.0
0

,
74.9
0

5
0

,
13.7
,
2.3
2.4
,
4.8
1.9

l/ The figure on number of workers includes duplicate counting where the same workers were involved in more than one
stoppage in the year.
2/ See footnote 2, table 12.
3/ Includes (a) those strikes in which a settlement was reached on the issues prior to return to work, (b) those in
which the parties agreed to utilize the company’s grievance procedure, and (c) any strikes in which the workers returned
without formal agreement or settlement.
4/ Included in this group are the cases referred to the National or State labor relations boards or other agencies
for decisions or elections.




0
0
0

0
0

0

0

- 20 -

A p p e n d ix e s
Appendix A includes tables presenting workstoppage data by specific industries, by industry
groups and major issues, and by States with 25 or more

stoppages during the year.
Appendix B includes a b r i e f summary
methods o f c o lle c t in g strik e s t a t is t i c s .

A p p e n d ix

o f the

A

TABLE A .— Work stop p a ges in 1951. by s p e c i f i c in d u s tr y

I n d u s try

W orkers
in v o lv e d

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
. 1951 ( a l l
sto p p a g e s )

%L. ‘‘ .•TJ7, 2 ,2 2 0 ,0 0 0

2 2 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

A l l i n d u s t r ie s ........................................................
MANUFACTURING
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .................................
B la s t fu r n a c e s , s t e e l w ork s, and
r o l l i n g m i l l s .................................................
Iron and s t e e l fo u n d r ie s ............................
Prim ary s m e ltin g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n fe r ro u s m eta ls ........................................
Secondary s m e ltin g snd r e f i n i n g o f
n o n fe r ro u s m eta ls and a l l o y s ..............
R o l l i n g , draw in g, and a l l o y i n g o f
n o n fe r ro u s m eta ls ........................................
N on ferrou s fo u n d r ie s .....................................
M is c e lla n e o u s prim a ry m etal
i n d u s t r ie s ........................................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and t r a n s p o r t a t io n
equipm ent) .................................................................
T in ca n s and o t h e r tin w a re ........................
C u t le r y , h a n d t o o ls , and g e n e ra l
hardware .............................................................
H ea tin g a p p a ra tu s (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c )
and p lu m b ers' s u p p lie s ............................
F a b r ic a t e d s t r u c t u r a l m etal p r o d u c t s ..
M etal sta m ping, c o a t in g , and
e n g ra v in g ..........................................................
L ig h t in g f i x t u r e s ............................................
F a b r ic a t e d w ir e p r o d u c t s ............................
M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r i c a t e d m etal
p r o d u c t s ............................................................

2 / 30g

21U.000

1 ,6 3 0 ,0 0 0

73

1 3 1 ,0 0 0
2 b , 700

5 62 ,00 0
300 ,00 0

15

2 1 ,5 0 0

26U.OOO

ib 6

2

350
lg ,2 0 0
U,9U0

2U3.000
15g ,00 0

36

13.300

10U.000

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

Workers
in v o lv e d I /

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
1951 ( e l l
s to p p a g e s )

MANUFACTURING - C ontinued
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ............................................................
L ogg in g camps and lo g g in g
c o n t r a c t o r s ...................................................
Saw m ills and p la n in g m il ls ...................
M illw o rk , p ly w ood , and p r e fa b r ic a t e d
s t r u c t u r a l wood p r o d u c ts .....................
Wooden c o n t a in e r s ..........................................
M is c e lla n e o u s wood p r o d u c ts ...................

118

22,800

21
U5

2,550

33,800

1 3 ,8 0 0

1 1 b ,000

2 5 1 ,0 0 0

21

3.170

35.800

17
1U

2 ,6 b o
690

5 1 ,2 0 0
1 6 ,1 0 0

F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ...................................
H ousehold fu r n it u r e .....................................
O f f i c e fu r n it u r e ............................................
P u b l ic - b u il d i n g and p r o f e s s io n a l
fu r n it u r e ........................................................
P a r t i t i o n s , s h e l v in g , l o c k e r s , and
o f f i c e and s t o r e f i x t u r e s ...................
Window and d o o r s c r e e n s , sh a d es, and
V en etian b li n d s ..........................................

99
71
19

2 2 ,7 0 0
1 7 ,6 0 0
b ,b 3 0

3 09 ,00 0
2 6 8 ,0 0 0
3 1 ,0 0 0

3

360

b ,b 2 0

2

80

2 ,b b 0

b

230

3.330

S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ..............
F la t g la s s ..........................................................
G la ss and g la s s w a r e , p r e s s e d o r
blown .................................................................
G la ss p r o d u c ts made o f pu rch a sed
g l a 88 .................................................................
Cement, h y d r a u lic ..........................................
S t r u c t u r a l c l a y p r o d u c ts ..........................
P o t t e r y and r e l a t e d p r o d u c ts .................
C o n c r e te , gypsum, and p l a s t e r
p r o d u c t s ............v ..........................................
C u t-s to n e and sto n e p r o d u c ts .................
A b r a s iv e , a s b e s t o s , and m is c e lla n e ­
ous n o n -m e t a llic m in eral
p r o d u c ts ..........................................................

132
5

1 9 ,0 0 0
1 .8 7 0

2 3 1 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,5 0 0

11

2 ,3 b o

2 7 ,2 0 0

b
12
U2
10

2bo
2 ,9 0 0
b .b o o
1 ,8 7 0

6 7 .1 0 0
3 b ,600

2b

2 ,1 1 0
110

21

3,180

3 5 ,0 00

T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts .....................................
Yarn and th re a d m i l l s ( c o t t o n , w o o l,
s i l k , and s y n t h e t ic f i b e r ) ................
Broad-w oven f a b r i c m il ls ( c o t t o n ,
w o o l, s i l k , and s y n t h e t ic f i b e r ) . .
Narrow f a b r i c s end o th e r sm allw eres
m il ls ( c o t t o n , w o o l, s i l k , and
s y n t h e t ic f i b e r ) .......................................
K n it t in g m i l l s .................................................
D yeing and f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s
(e x c e p t k n it g o o d s) .................................
C a rp e ts, r u g s , and o th e r f l o o r
c o v e r in g s ........................................................
Hat8 (e x c e p t c l o t h and m i l l i n e r y ) . . .
M is c e lla n e o u s t e x t i l e g ood s ...................

121

153 ,00 0

3 , 1190,000

12

b ,b 6o

7 9 .1 0 0

50

1 29 ,00 0

2 .9UO.OOO

5

17

880
3.380

2 7 .5 0 0
1 1 3 ,0 0 0

12

2 , b io

38,200

8
10

8,820
1,180
2,980

6 3 .7 0 0
2 5 ,0 0 0
2 0 9 ,0 0 0

210

5b , 000

3 5 b ,000

b

1 ,5 1 0

2.880

32
110

b ,66o

58,900

3 3,6 00

1 3 5 ,00 0

1 .9 7 0

36.900
1,820
15.700
34,200

2 ,6 b 0

23
15

I n d u s try

2b2
8

gU,200
1 0 ,g oo

1 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 b ,200

33

1 0 ,1 0 0

1 71 ,00 0

b3
6U

1 7 .6 0 0
1 9 ,7 0 0

191 ,00 0
2 9 g ,0 0 0

57
7

1 5 ,6 0 0
3U0

2 72 ,00 0

12

5,510

2 9 ,0 0 0

lg

U.580

2 99 ,00 0

6

2 ,0 2 0

15,5 00

1
b
1

620
1 ,3 1 0

10 , ICO

90

2 ,7 0 0

136

i o u . ooo

1,0U 0,000

55
7

66,1 00
U ,3 io
U,6bo

6 2 b ,000
b5,0 00
2 6 ,2 0 0

10

g ,3 6 o

7

3.950

g g ,2 0 0
b l ,800

39
7

1U.600
2 ,0 5 0

1 79,000
36,UOO

M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .....................
E ngines and t u r b in e s .....................................
A g r ic u lt u r a l m achinery and t r a c t o r s . .
C o n s tru ctio n and m ining m achinery
and equipment .................................................
M etalw orking m achinery .................................
S p e c ia l- in d u s t r y m achinery (e x c e p t
m etalw orkin g m a chin ery) ..........................
G eneral in d u s t r ia l m achinery and
equipment ..........................................................
O f f i c e and s t o r e m achines and
d e v ic e s ..............................................................
S e r v ic e -in d u s t r y and h ou seh old
m achines ............................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m achinery p a r t s .................

26g

158^)00
6*520
5 6 ,0 0 0

3 ,3 7 0 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,9 0 0
1 ,1 1 0 ,0 0 0

T ra n sp o r ta tio n equipment .................................
Motor v e h i c l e s and m o t o r -v e h ic le
equipment ..........................................................
A i r c r a f t and p a r t s ..................... ....................
Ship and b oat b u il d i n g and r e p a i r i n g ..
R a ilro a d equipment ..........................................
M o t o r c y c le s , b i c y c l e s , and p a r t s ..........

1,680
11,800

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s .................................
Guns, h o w it z e r s , m o rta rs , and r e l a t e d
equipment ..........................................................
Ammunition, ex ce p t f o r sm all arms . . . .
Small arms ammunition ...................................
E l e c t r i c a l m ach in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
E l e c t r i c a l g e n e r a tin g , tr a n s m is s io n ,
d i s t r i b u t i o n , and in d u s t r ia l
ap p aratu s ..........................................................
E l e c t r i c a l a p p lia n c e s ...................................
I n s u la te d w ire and c a b le ............................
E l e c t r i c a l equipment f o r m otor
v e h i c l e s , a i r c r a f t , and ra ilw a y
lo c o m o t iv e s and c a r s .................................
E l e c t r i c lamps ...................................................
Communication equipm ent and r e l a t e d
p r o d u c ts ............................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c ts . . . .

See footnotes at end of table,




11

9
U9

2,350

2 ,6 6 0

22
Ul

b ,7 b 0
lg .g o o

1 90 ,00 0
7 29,000

26

5.870

166 ,00 0

58

2 1 ,9 0 0

571 ,00 0

7

3 .U50

7 2 ,b oo

30
26

ig ,3 0 0
2 2 ,7 0 0

2 6 2 ,0 0 0
2 5 0 ,0 0 0

19U

2 3 0 ,0 0 0

2 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0

109
2q

1U3.000
U g.goo
1 6 ,1 00
2 1 , g oo
60

g g 3 ,o o o
765 ,00 0
5U1.000
blO.OOO
3 .3 5 0

31
2U

1

A p pa rel and o t h e r fi n is h e d p r o d u c ts
made from f a b r i c s and s im ila r
m a te r ia ls ..............................................................
M e n 's, y o u t h s ', and b o y s ' s u i t s ,
c o a t s , and o v e r c o a t s ..............................
M en 's, y o u t h s ', and b o y s '
fu r n is h in g s , work c l o t h i n g , and
a l l i e d garments .........................................
Women's and m is s e s ' ou terw ea r ..............
Women's, m i s s e s ', c h i l d r e n 's , and
in f a n t s ' undergarm ents ..........................
M illin e r y ............................................................
C h ild r e n 's and i n f a n t s ' ou terw ea r . . .
Fur g oods ............................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a re l and
a c c e s s o r i e s ...................................................
M isc e lla n e o u s f a b r ic a t e d t e x t i l e
p r o d u c ts ..........................................................
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts .....................
L ea th er:
tan n ed, c u r r i e d , and
fi n is h e d ..........................................................
F ootw ear (e x c e p t ru b b er) ..........................
Luggage .................................................................
Handbags and sm a ll le a t h e r g ood s . . . .
M is c e lla n e o u s le a t h e r g ood s ...................

3

7

lb

3

210

15

b o ,b o o

6b0

5

1 .3 1 0
6 ,5 6 0

9

1 .9 3 0

9 .boo

18

2,210

5 8 ,6 0 0

78

2 2 ,6 0 0

2 2 1 ,0 0 0

7

780
20,800

9 ,2 9 0
2 01 ,00 0

56

10
3

2

830

5,820

lb o

2,000

90

2 ,0 5 0

- 21 -

T B EA.— ork stoppages in 1951, by specific industry - C
AL
V
ontinued

Industry

ManStoppages begin­
days id le
ning in 1951
during
Workers . 1951 ( n i l
Number
involved » stoppages)

Industry

Number
M
ANUFACTURING - Continued

M
ANUFACTURING - Continued
Food and kindred uroducts .............................
Meat products ..................................................
Canning end preservin g fr u it s ,
vegetables and sea foods .......................
Bakery products ..............................................
Sugar ..................................................................
Confectionery and rela ted products . . . .
Beverage industries ......................................
M iscellaneous food preparations and
kindred product s ........................................
Tobacco manufactures .......................................
Cigars ................................................................

Paper bags .................................................... ..
Pulp goods and m iscellaneous converted
paper p r o d u c t s ............................................
P rin tin g , p ublishing, and a l li e d
in d u stries ..................... .....................................
Newspapers ........................................................
P e rio d ica ls ......................................................
Commercial p rin tin g ......................................
Greeting cards ..............................................
Bookbinding and rela ted in d u stries . . . .
Service industries fo r the p rin tin g
trade ..............................................................
Chemicalb and a l li e d products ................. ..
In d u strial inorganic chemicals ...............
Tnrin«t,r1«1
rhomf n«l a
Drugs and medicines ......................................
Soap and g ly c e r in , cleaning and
p o lis h in g preparations and
sulfon8ted o i l s and a ssista n ts ...........
P a in ts, varn ishes, lacqu ers, japans,
and enamels; inorganic c o lo r p ig ­
ments, w hiting, and wood f i l l e r s . . . .
G and wood chemicals ...............................
um
F e r t iliz e r s ......................................................
find sq I ibsI oi.1.8 find. f$ ts »• ••
Miscellaneous chem icals, including
in d u strial chemical products and
preparations ................................................

Mandays id le
during
Workers
1951 («11
involved 1/ stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1951

197
5U
6

77,500
2U.600
550

819,000
122,000
b ,630

13
22
^3
5
10
35

2,170
7,7?o
22,800
3 .LU0
990
1U.700

22,800
116,000
2U
6.000
70,200
36,700
196,000

M iscellaneous manufacturing in d u s t r ie s ..
Jew elry, silverw are, and p lated w a re ..
Mimlnal i r>stT*um«nts and part* . . . . . . . .
Toys and sportin g and a t h le t ic g o o d s ..
Pens, p e n c ils , and other o f f i c e and
anti at. n* m atariala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Costume je w e lry , costume n o v e ltie s ,
button s, and m iscellaneous notions
(except p reciou s m etal) .......................
Fabricated p la s t ic s produ cts, not
elsewhere c l a s s i f ie d .............................
Miscellaneous manufacturing
in d u stries ..................................................

12,700
360
■no
2,200

195.000
6.370
11,bOO
18,800

l

760

7.630

lb

1,570

23,900

12

3,b30

b i ,900

bl

b ,090

8b,800

21
9
1
11

17,200
6,200
30
11,000

3b s,ooo
173,000
200
175,000

92
5
X
16

9

570

5.360

5
5

1,610
1,610

l b , 100
1U,100

5U
17
1
1
1
19

20,600
13,800
200
uo
60
3.380

395,000
590
2U
0
U.550
67,boo

15

3 ,lb o

26,500

M in in g ................................. ................................. 2/ 622
Metal ................................................................
23
Anthracite ......................................................
30
5b9
Bituminous-coal ..........................................
Non-m etallic and quarrying .....................
2b

2 8b,000
b3,100
23.900
213,000
3 .U70

1 ,290,000
269,000
81,200
887,000
53,100

27
7
_
b
6
2
U

1.150
260
—
120
290
100
120

29,500
3.390
8 ,bbo
1,030
5,020
5,280
3.960

Construction ......................................................
Building ..........................................................
Highways, s tr e e ts , b rid g e s , docks,
e t c ..................................................................
M is ce lla n e o u s ...............................................

651
573

232,000
217,000

1, 190,000
1 ,060,000

13,900
6bo

123,000
3,720

U

270

2 ,b20

Trade ....................................................................
Wholesale ........................................................
R eta il ..............................................................

277
112
165

b o ,000
20,500
19.500

289,000
72,100
217,000

67
5
15
7

20,000
1,180
g,U80
*950

201,000
39,200
6b ,600
5 ,6bO

Finance, insurance, and re a l e sta te . . . .
In s u ra n c e ........................................................
Real estate ....................................................

21
b
17

l b , 300
12,000
2 , 3bo

208,000
201,000
6,980

6

U,980

3b , 600

387
17

231,000
75,900

1,790,000
b67,ooo

8
2
7
c
J

2,280
320
b20
360

31,800
b ,250
6,630
M 70

86
23
97
30
b9
5
29
19
32

26,600
5.130
21,900
3.520
55.300
6,670
30,900
3.180
1.750

bb5 ,ooo
36,boo
12b , 000
28,800
b83,000
25,500
128,000
b i , 6oo
10,600

179
31
3U
10
5
lb

21,300
b ,830
3,110
3bo
3.190
870

329.000
b s jo o
38,900
b ,290
76,900
7.180

9
15
19
16
26

150
1,110
1,520
b ,900
1,250

b ,020
10,200
39.200
71.500
28,000

36

b ,900

28.800

12

1,060

10,000

Products o f petroleum and co a l ...................
Petroleum r e fin in g ........................................
Coke and byproducts ......................................
Paving and ro o fin g m aterials ...................

19
8
u
7

5 . 2U
0
1,680
1,110
2 ,h60

55.500
37.200
10,500
7.820

Rubber products ..................................................
T ires and inner tubes ..................................
PiV
h'ha?* f aaI wab
Reclaimed r u b b e r ..................... ......................
Rubber in d u s trie s, not elsewhere
c l a s s i f ie d ....................................................

156
107
3
2

137.000
106,000
5,090
710

700.000
bb6 ,ooo
11,900
2,920

bb

25,100

239,000

26

10,200

127,000

b

1.300
690
100

U.370
2,150

A gricu ltu re, fo re s tr ^ a n d fis h in g . . . . . .
A g r ic u lt u r e ....................................................
F o r e s t r y .........................................................
Fiahing ........................................................ ..

T ransportation, communication, and
other pu blic u t i l i t i e s ...............................
Railroads ........................................................
S treetcar and bus transportation
( c i t y and suburban) ...............................
In te r c ity motorbus transportation . . . .
Motortruck transportation .......................
T»t 1cabs ............................................
Water transportation .................................
A ir transportation ......................................
Communication ................................................
Heat, l i g h t , and power .............................
M iscellaneous ................................................

75
3

.

8,390

2
3

N M U
ON AN FACTU G
RIN

P ro fe s sio n a l, s c i e n t i f i c , and
c o n tr o llin g Instruments; photographic
end o p t ic a l goods; watches and c lo ck s . .
Laboratory, s c i e n t i f i c , and
engineering instruments (except
s u rg ic a l, m edical, and dental) ...........
Mechanical measuring and c o n tr o llin g
instruments ..................................................
O ptical instruments and lenses ...............
S u rg ical, m edical, and dental
instruments and supplies .......................
Ophthalmic goods ............................................
Photographic equipment and supplies . . .
Watches, c lo c k s , clockw ork-operated
d e v ice s , and parts ....................................




6
6

l,b 7 0
200

b

2,7bo

53.300
3.130
33.100

1

3.700

22,200

Services—personal,busin ess and o t h e r ...
Hotels and other lodging p laces ...........
Laundries ........................................................
Cleaning, dyeing,and pressin g ...............
Barber and beauty shops ...........................
Business s e rv ice s .......................................
Automobile rep a ir s ervices and
garages ........................................................
Amusement and recrea tion .........................
Medical and other health se rvice s . . . .
Educational s e rv ice s .................................
M iscellaneous ................................................
Government— adm inistration, p r o te c tio n ,
and san itation j j / ........ ................................

1 / The fig u r e on number o f voxkers includes some du plicate counting
where the same workers were involved l a more than one stoppage in the
year.
2 / This fig u r e i s l s s s than the sum o f the fig u r e s below as a few
s tr ik e s , sxtending in to two o r more industry groups hare been counted in
each industry group a ffe c t e d , with workers and man—
days a llo c a te d t o the
re s p e ctiv e groups.
J Stoppages in v olv in g muniolpally operated u t i l i t i e s are inoluded
under "tran sp orta tion , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s . "

2

T BEB.—
AL

Industry group and major issues

York stoppages in

1 5 * "b industry
91 y

Mandays id le
during
Worker s w 1951 ( a l l
involved — stoppages)
'

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1951
Number

group and major issues

Industry group and major issues

Mandays id le
during
Worker* , 1951 ( a l l
involved A/ stoppages)

Stoppages begin­
ning in 1951
Number

A ll in d u stries ....................................................
b,737
Wages and hours .............................................. 2/ 2,102
Union org an iza tion , wages, and hours . . .
206
Union organ ization ........................................
2/ 682
Other working con dition s ........................... 2/ 1 , 3U
2
Interunion or intraunion matters ...........
326
Not reported ....................................................
7q

2 , 220,000
1,180,000
53.000
82,600
761,000
132,000
lo .q o o

22, 900,000
l b , 300,000
l.s b o .o o o
1 ,620,000
b , 180,000
89b , 000
6^.200

A ll manufacturing in d u stries -C ontinued
A pparel, e t c .
............................................
Wages and h o u r s ..........................................
Union organ iza tion , wages,and h o u rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not r e p o r t e d ............................................ ....

210
106
5
62
22
6
9

5b , 000
b5.100
3bo
3,b70
b,530
280
300

35b , 000
235,000
8,250
80,200
2b , 900
2 ,2b0
3.7bo

A ll manufacturing in d u stries ....................... 2/ 2 , 5^8
Wages and hours ..........................................
1,28b
Union organ iza tion , wages, and hours . . .
127
Union organ ization ........................................
353
Other working con dition s ...........................
702
Interunion or intraunion matters ...........
62
Not reported ....................................................
27

1 , 370,000
763,000
10 ,1+00
+
16,900
+
195.000
+
2b , 900
2,610

17, 500,000
11, 300,000
1 , 720,000
1 ,250,000
2 , 990,000
152,000
32,600

Leather and lea th er products ...................
Wages and h o u r s ............ ........................
Union organ ization , wages,and h ou rs..
Union o r g a n iz a t io n ...................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Not reported . . . . ......................................

78
b9
3
10
lb
2

22.600
19,100
180
200
2,920
270

221,000
19b . 000
3.380
b .ib o
18,000
810

Primary metal in d u stries ...........................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

30s
156
3
13
125
9
2

2ll+,000
l l l +,000
6U
0
2 , 51+0
89,800
6,860
700

1 , 630,000
i,o b o ,o o o
23,700
27,700
509,000
3b , 500
570

Food and kindred products .........................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union o r g a n iz a t io n ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

197
102
12
28
53
1
1

77,500
b o , 700
i,ib o
5,290
30,200
60
bo

819,000
52b , 000
3b , 300
67,800
193,000
200
bo

...................
Fabricated metal products
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Union o r g a n iz a t io n ...................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not r e p o r t e d ................................................

2U
2
129
12
35
62
2
2

81+.200
51,200
1,100
5,21+0
25,800
66 0
200

1 , 300,000
8b l ,000
b9,500
309,000
90,300
5,100
1.970

Tobacco manufactures ...................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Not r e p o r t e d ................................................

5
2
1
1
1

1,610
1,070
b io
bo
100

l b , 100
11,boo
2 ,b6o
110
lb o

Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s ...........................
Wages and hours ...................................
Other working con dition s .......................

6
3
3

2,020
36O
1,660

15,500
6 ,b6o
2.990

E le c tr ic a l machinery, equipment,
and supplies ..................................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

Paper and a l li e d products .........................
'Wages and h o u r s ..................... ....................
Union organ iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion masters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

5b
27
b
5
16
1
1

20,600
13,800
990
3bo
5.380
bo
bo

b9b ,o o o
3b7 ,ooo
118,000
b ,070
23,boo
2,160
230

136
69
7
13
39
7
1

101+, 000
51,600
2 ,1+00
1,630
1+2,800
5,620
30

l.o b o .o o o
b ob ,000
63,300
28,700
b8Q,000
5b,800
l.b io

P rin tin g , p u b lish in g , and a l li e d
in du stries ......................................................
Wages and h o u r s ..........................................
Union organ iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................

27
8
5
11
3

1,150
b90
130
b30
50

29,500
6,580
9,b80
12,600
870

Machinery (except e l e c t r i c a l ) .................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not r e p o r t e d ..........................................

268
150
18
29
65
3
3

158,000
10b ,000
l b , 100
5,820
33,500
lbo
190

3 , 370,000
2 , 160,000
767,000
222,000
218,000
1,590
bbo

Chemicals and a l li e d products .................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union org an iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

67
29
3
10
22
2
1

20,000
7,110
3,110
880
8,650
260
10

201,000
118,000
22,^00
16, 3.00
b2,700
2,110
50

Transportation ecuipment ...........................
Wages and hours ............................. ............
Union organ ization , wages, and h o u rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

19U
81
6
16
80
9
2

230,000
82,600
5,830
8,890
127,000
5,020
580

2 ,600,000
1 , 500,000
3bi+,000
182,000
55b , 000
lb ,b o o
2,100

Products o f petroleum and c o a l ...............
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ iza tion , wages, and h ou rs..
Uni on organ ization ............................. ..
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

19
8
2
2
6
1

5 , 2bo
2,050
380
90
2,660
60

55.500
7,350
2,100
2,630
b2,900
500

Rubber products ..............................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

186
71

137,000
55,000
2 ,9bo
2,110
7b , 000
3,200

700,000
290,000
81,800
b6 ,io o
277.000
5,080

Instruments, e t c . 5/ ....................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and hou rs..
Vision o r g a n iz a t io n ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

26
13
2
6

10,200
3,370
2 ,b90
180
b ,070
80

127,000
65,boo
3b , 300
3,520
23,100
320

25
11
7

12,700
5,720
920
1,850
3,300
930

195,000
57,boo
37, boo
57,600
27,800
l b , 500

A ll nonmanufacturing in d u stries ............... 2 / 2,189
Wages and hours ........ .....................................
823
Union organ ization , wages, and hours . .
79
Union o r g a n iz a t io n ......................................
333
Other working con dition s ...........................
6b3
Interunion or intraunion matters ...........
26b
Not reported ....................................................
52

sbb.ooo
b i 5 ,ooo
12,600
35.700
265,000
107,000
8.330

5 ,b70,ooo
3 , 010,000
123,000
373.000
1 , 200,000
7b3,ooo
30,600

Lumber and wood products (except
fu rn itu re) ......................................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages.and h o u r s ..
Union organization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

118
65
8
22
22
1

22,800
l b , 900
960
2,660
b .ib o
lb o

251,000
136,000
27,500
57.700
30,300
280

Furniture and f i x t u r e s ...............................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

99
56
10
1+
1
15
u

22,700
13,300
1,510
1,230
6,360
boo

309,000
187.000
33,800
l b , 500
65,700
8 ,b90

Stone, c la y , and glass products .............
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, end h ou rs..
Union o r g a n iz a t io n ...................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Intenm ion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................................................

132
55
8
26
38
1
+
1

19,000
9,210
b80
1.930
6,530
830
bo

231,000
106,000
2b , 300
2b , 100
72,000
b .b io
250

T e x tile m ill products .................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and h ou rs..
Union organization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .
Not reported ................. ...............................

121
6+
1
8
17
30
1
1

153,000
128,000
680
I , 7b0
22, boo
38O
130

3 ,b9o ,o o o
3,080,000
31,900
8b,boo
276,000
830
20, boo

See footnotes at end of table.




M iscellaneous manufacturing
industries ......................................................
Wages and hours ..........................................
Union organ ization , wages, and hou rs..
Union organ ization ....................................
Other working con dition s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters . . . .

3
8
71

3

b

1
92
bi

8

TABLE B.— Work stoppages in 1951 • "by industry group and major issues - Continued

Industry group and major issues

ManStoppages begin-*
days idle
ning in 1951
during
Workers
Humber involved 1 1951 (a ll
stoppages)

Industry group and major issues

j

A ll nonmanufacturing industries - Continued
Agriculture, forestry, and f i s h i n g ........
Wages and hours ........................................
Union organization, wages, and hours..
Union organization ..................................
Interunion or intraunion matters ........
M ining.............................................................
Wage* nnd honra ................... ...................
Union organization, wages, and hours..
Union organization ..................................
Other working conditions ................. .....
T n t e m it )!o r I n tm n n lm a tte r s . T. . ,
Hot reported ..............................................
Construction ..................................................
Wages and hears ........................................
Union organization, wages, and hours..
Uhion organization ..................................
Other working c o n d itio n s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters ........
Hot reported ..............................................
Trade ..............................................................
Wages and hours ........................................
Union organisation, wages, and hours..
Union organization ..................................
Other working c o n d itio n s .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters ........
Hot rep orted ........*
....................................

17.200

21

6,280

9

2

5,000

7

2,410

622
97
4

284,000

2
1

3,530
io

66,900
330

A ll nonmanufacturing industries - Continued
finance, insurance, and real estate . . . .
Wages and h o u r s ........................................
19,000
Union organization, wages, and hours..
55.700
Union organization ..................................
Other working conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119,000
Interunion or intraunion matters ........
120

348,000
154,000

1 , 290,000
366,000
15,600

60
403
26
32

15.200
178,000
16,800
6,590

651
274

1 , 190,000
59^,000
3.950
62,300

9

232,000
105,000
700
9.290
52,100
63,400
1.310

277
122
29
85
27
7
7

40,000
33.700
620
2,670
2,210
560
220

289,000

7
64
99

198

93.800

721,000
72,500
21,800

204,000

317.000
7.990

159.000
12,500
68,800
45,100

2,610
63O

Transportation, communication, and
other public u t i lit ie s ................. .
Wages and h o u r s ........................................
Union organisation, wages, and hours..
Union organisation ....................... ; . . . . .
Other working condition* . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interunion or intraunion matters ........
Hot reported .............................................

ManStoppages begin­
days id le
ning in 1951
during
Workers 1951 (a ll
Humber
involved 1/ stoppages)

21
11
2
5

14,300

11,900
20
50

208,000

197.000
180
950

2
1

2,250

9,600
230

387

231,000
173,000

1 , 790,000
1 , 300,000
36,100
30,700
88,100

206
16
51

86

50

4.370

3,250

25,400

24
4

25,000
210

Services—personal,business, and other..
Wages and hours ........................................
Union organization, wages, and hours..
Uhion organization..................................
Other working conditions .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters ........

179
80
18
57
18
6

21,300
15,200

730

218,000
35.800
58,800
6,980
9.740

Government—administration, protection,
and sanitation ............................................
Wages and hours ........................................
Union organization, wages, and hours..
Uhion organization ..................................
Other working conditions .......................
Interunion or intraunion matters ........

36
24
1
4
6
1

4.900
3.530

20,900

400

2,400
3.600

1.530
2.550

1.270

60
270
630

337.000

210

329,000

28,800

360

1.500

1/ Che figure on number o f workers includes some duplicate counting where the same workers were involved- in more than one stoppage in a year.
2 / This figure i s less than the sum o f the figures below because a few stoppages, each affectin g more than one industry group, have bean counted aa
separate stoppages in each industry group affected. Yorkers involved and man-days id le were allocated to the respective groups.
V Excludes ordnance, machinery, and transportation equipment.
5/ Includes other finished products made from fabrios and similar materials.
5 / Includes professional, s c ie n t ific , and controlling instruments; photographic and op tical goods; watches and clocks.

TABLE C. —Work stoppages in 1951 in States which had 25 or more stoppages during the year, by industry group

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

Humber

ALABAMA
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
f a b r i c a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce , m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ............................................ ..................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ..........................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s
made from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r
B M S te ria ls.................................................................
f o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P ro d u cts o f petroleu m and c o a l .....................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ........................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g i n d u s t r ie s . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
M inin g .............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
f i n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and
o t h e r ...........................................................................
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n i t a t i o n .....................................................
AHKAHSAS
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p l i e s ...................................................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
fu r n it u r e and f i x t u r e s ........................................

See footnotes at end of table.




Mandays i d i e
d u rin g
Y ork ers , 1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d 1 / s to p p a g e s )

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951

2 / 163

1 09 ,00 0

1 ,2 7 0 ,0 0 0

28

44.700

304,000

2

830
310

3

4.310

3

200
190

3

2
6
6

7.670
2,690
346,000
1 ,8 6 0

530

4,090
5.710

1 1 ,0 0 0

S ta te and in d u s tr y group

Humber

AHKAHSAS - C ontinued
f o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...............................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ............................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .....................
C o n s tr u c tio n ............................................................
Trade ............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .................................
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ...................................................

6
1

4
2
1
50
19
11
1

1

110

6.330

1
1
12
1

20
890
3 .2 6 0
10

910
2 2 ,2 0 0
1 0 .6 0 0

3

500

2.550

370

2 9 1 ,0 0 0
CALIFORNIA

2

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
W orkers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d l/ s to p p a g e s )

Stoppages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951

750
220

880
2.340
160
20
33,600

15,400
5,^30
7.680
1 5,^ 00

5.360
1 .9 0 0
-160,000

16,400

3 .3 9 0
560

2 5 ,1 0 0

10

240
41,600

14

4,520

2

60

7.220

2

470

2,010

25

6,040

5 2 ,2 0 0

1

550

550

2
2

450

7.590
1,010

240

P rim ary m etal i n d u s t r i e s ............ ............... ..
f a b r i c a t e d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..........................
E l e c t r i o a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s .................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .....................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment .................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ............................................................
fu r n it u r e and f i x t u r e s .....................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s . . . . . . . .
A p p a rel and o t h e r fi n is h e d p r o d u c ts
made from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r
m a te r ia ls ...............................................................
L ea th er and l e a t h e r p r o d u c t s .......................
f o o d and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ..............................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ............................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .....................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ......................................................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and
c o n t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic
& o p t i o a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s . .

1

10

50

2/ 217

9 8 .5 0 0

1 ,2 1 0 ,0 0 0

11

1,820

13.900

7

2,690

1 6 ,6 0 0

6
6
14

2.540
2.060
14,800

2 6 ,5 0 0
3 76 ,00 0

5
1

860
50
640

3 0 ,2 0 0
150
1 1 ,9 0 0

10

34,400

18

920

9 .6 0 0

4
8

80
2.570

680
59.000

1
1
1

20

40

20
500

2 .6 0 0
500

1

230

290

- 2U -

T B E C.—
AL

Work stoppages In 1951 in States which had

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

25

or more stoppages daring the year, hy industry group - Continued

Manda ys i d l e
d u rin g
W orkers
1951 ( « H
in v o lv e d 1 / s to p p a g e s )

S topp ag es b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

CALIFORNIA - C ontinued
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
M ining .............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v i c e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s ,a n d o t h e r . .
COLORADO
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .............. .........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ........................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n t r o l l i n g in stru m en ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atch es and c l o c k s ..........
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m u n ica tion , and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
CONNECTICUT
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o rd n a n ce , m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equip m ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent and
s u p p lie s ....................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent ...................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c ts
made from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r
m a te r ia ls .................................................................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s . . . ' ..........................
P r i n t i n g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
4VlAlia4.W Afl r i - **
4
i(
ill
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ........................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ........................................................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and co n ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atch es and c l o c k s ..........
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e . . . . .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
FLORIDA
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
o rd n a n ce , m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
S ton a , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
A p p a rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls . . . .
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts .................................
C h em icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ........................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and co n ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atch es and c l o c k s ..........
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
M ining .............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
T rade ...............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— admlni s t r a t i o n , u r o t a c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ......................................................

See footnotes at end of table,




S ta te and in d u s t r y group

Number
GEORGIA

U

U60

7

7.760

1

UUO
1 5 ,0 0 0
l , g 70
U9O

8 8 ,7 00
2 5 ,3 0 0
7 ,0 0 0

1U

Ul.UOO
1 ,2 7 0

2 2 2 ,0 0 0
2 3 .5 0 0

25

U .jo o

71.500

37
23
3
35

2 2 ,2 0 0
2U1.000

3.130

2
1
1

580
720
100

8 ,5 8 0
UU.900
190

1

5U0

1

110
GUO
30

1
2
u

60
1.U00
150

u
1

U50
60

8U

2 5 ,2 0 0

7

3 . 5UO

7

U

3 .5 1 0

5
5
2
2
13

2 ,0 0 0
350

2,260
70
7.950

5
6
1

1 .U20
7U0
110

2
1
1

110
go
uoo

1
2
g
k
1

220
60
1,210
350
350

9
5

U20

50

U.790

50

2.7U0
2 ,3 0 0
7U0

M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ; ............................................................
St OBA (
»nf1 £ la a a prnrinrt a
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts .................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
M ining ............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n ...............................................................
T r a d e ..............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Gov ernment — adm ini st ra t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n .....................................................
ILLINOIS

P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
5.700
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent ..............................
1 ,0 2 0
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ...................................
UOO, 000 E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
31.300 M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
6 3.6 00
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
2 8 ,5 0 0 S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
5.6UO T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
32 , UOO A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls . . . .
300
1 29,000 L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts .................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................................
6,820 P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
10,100
UUo Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ........................
P ro d u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l .....................
610 Rubber p r o d u c ts ........................................................
320 P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and con ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic end
60,200
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ..........
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
320 M ining .............................................................................
l.U o o C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
13.3 00 Trade ...............................................................................
1 ,1 3 0 F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
7 ,0 0 0 T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o th e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
5 .7 2 0 S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
1.620 Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ......................................................
1 56 ,00 0

kk

11,000

‘1

1

30
1 .3 3 0

290
6 ,6 6 0

3

280

1

260

3.1 9 0
520

INDIANA

2
2
3

30

6,980

U50

1 .3 3 0
5 .3 6 0

220

1
1

10
2,000

1

U50

3

1,620
90

1

UO

260
u g.000
1U.900
5 0 ,2 0 0
1 ,6 7 0
760

9
2

3 .U80

11,000

250

950

U30

U,050

ll

2

P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ....................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .......................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c t s
made from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r
m a te r ia ls .................................................................
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
Food and k in d red p r o d u c ts .................................
T ob a cco m a nufa ctures ............................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ........................
P ro d u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l .....................

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
W orkers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d l / sto p p a g e s )

Stoppages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951

U5

10,800

179.000

1
1

30
1.730

3.190
3 .U50

2
8
1
1
1
1
1
10
2
1
10

3

380

1 ,7 6 0
Xti
CC

70
3.310

108,000
130
280

130
UO
150

750

3U0

2 9 ,5 0 0

70

130

2,810
a /)

1 3 .5 0 0
60
a /)

1 .6 7 0
n o

1 5 ,1 0 0
3 .1 3 0

UO

1

20

20

283

1U8.000

2 ,0 9 0 ,0 0 0

2k

1 1 ,6 0 0

1 6 3 ,0 0 0

23

1 7 .6 0 0
60

1 2 2 ,0 0 0
6U0

6 ,6 3 0
U 6.000
U.860

U3.300
1 ,1 9 0 ,0 0 0
5 0 ,7 0 0

3

390

1 ,0 5 0

U

1 ,2 2 0
U30
-

1

15
U6
8

3

-

5
5
15
U

1
11
1

650
U .300
1 .5 6 0
1 .8 3 0
20
3 .8 9 0

7.300
y

950
3 .9 5 0
6 ,5 5 0
1 21 ,00 0

6,810
U8.300

20

1

60
810

U
6.800
500
1 ,6 2 0

3

U.U50

55 . UOO

k

220
3.510
15,800
6 ,ih o

2 ,8 9 0
1 2 ,6 0 0
6 6 ,6 0 0

19
U
8
5
1

1 .0 3 0

16,200
20,000

22
6

1U.000

100,000

370

5 . Uoo

5

230

680

20b

1 0 5 ,0 0 0

7 6 3 .0 0 0

29

2 6 , uoo

9 8 , Uoo

15

3.650

3 3 ,Uoo

7

9 .1 5 0

16
ll

12,200
7.980

3 9 .7 0 0
1 3 1 ,0 0 0

2
6
10
2

100
870

11,000

1 ,8 7 0
l.lU O

1 7 .7 0 0
2 9 ,9 0 0

1.550
550
2.620

9 .6 5 0
U , 96o
1 3 ,6 0 0
1.5UO
2 , 0U0
5 . Uoo
3 1 .6 0 0

2
2
11
1
2
1
2

520

280
1,080
680

89.700
930

- 25 -

TABLE C*-Work stoppages in 1951 ia States which had 25 or more stoppages during the year, by industry group - Continued

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
Workers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d if s to p p a g e s )

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

INDIANA - C ontin u ed
Bubber p r o d u c t s ........................................................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n t r o l l i n g In stru m en ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ..........
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g I n d u s t r ie s . .
M ining .............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ..............................................................
T rade ...............................................................................
T in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n .....................................................
IOVA
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
E l e c t r i c a l m achin ery, equipment and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x ce p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls . . . .
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .................................
Rubber p r o d u c t s .......................................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n ................................................. .............
T rede ...............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government — admini st ra t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and semi t a t i o n ......................................................
KENTUCKY
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m ach in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a chin ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x ce p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s .......................................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................

Apparel and other finished products m
ade

from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls . . . .
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ..................................... .........................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ........................
M ining .............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o th e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v i c e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n .
■
^
r_ .......
LOUISIANA
F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
o i o n t i c i a y t an c £ i a s 6 prou u cx s ...................
l
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ..........................................
P ro d u cts pf p etroleu m and c o a l .....................
r
............ M is c e lla n e o u s m anu fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
M ining .........................................................
C o n s tru ctio n ...............................................
Trade ...........................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........

See footnotes at end of table.




S ta te and in d u s tr y group

ManS toppages b e g in ­
days i d l e
n in g in 1951
d u rin g
Workers
1951 ( a l l
Number
in v o lv e d if sto p p a g e s )

LOUISIANA - C ontinued
10

1 0 ,5 0 0

35.900

1

270
600
6 ,6 0 0
8 ,2 0 0
360
2U0

1 1,7 00
1 2 ,7 0 0

3
17
26
6
1

15
6
U7

7.360
280
-■
1 5 .7 0 0

38.700
70,700
3.380
U.800
5U.U00

7.730
U/ 2,U lO

108,000

1

50

6.3UO

l

160

1 .1 3 0

3

U.350

33.100

1

50

950

1
2

30
70

l.U io
550

1
16
1

50
7,110
180

5 0 ,5 0 0
520

3
• U

2 ,3 2 0
U30

3

70

2 ,5 2 0
210

6
2

U30
250

U.220
1 .0 3 0

1,820
2,970

180

3U0

165

9 7 .2 0 0

32U.OOO

3

770

1 3.6 00

5

750

3 ,h 2 0

2
6
1

830
2 ,6 2 0
380

1,U00
U.760
1 ,9 0 0

190
520
U70

U70
2U.600
1 2 ,2 0 0

260
160

1.U90
320

2

2
2
2

2
1
1
1

20

76

2 2,3 00

Ul

65.700

80

9

U0
6

1

50

6

930

3

520

1

210

UO

13.300

1
3

3.690

2

150

1
2
2
1
1
1
1
11
2
1

300

850
2 JU0
UO
60
30
90

200
2,780
2U0
20

110
160
8 7.1 0 0
1U2.000
6 ,2 2 0
1 ,0 0 0

T r a n s p o r ta tio n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— adm ini st r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n .....................................................
MARYLAND
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b rica te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ..........................................
F ood and k in d re d p r o d u c ts .................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m an u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
M ining ............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ..............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o th e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
MASSACHUSETTS
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b rica te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t ra nspo rt a t i on equ ipm ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
M achinery (e x ce p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .......................
T ra n sp o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ..........................................
A p parel and o th e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls . . . .
L eath er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts .................................
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s . . ' ............................
P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
i n d u s t r i e s ...............................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ..................... ..
Rubber p r o d u c ts ........................................................
M isc e lla n e o u s m a nufa cturing in d u s t r ie s . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
C o n s tru ctio n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .............. ....................
S e r v i c e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
MICHIGAN

Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
1 1 ,5 0 0 E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
1 1 ,2 0 0
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .......................
U30 T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
3U1.000
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
910 A p parel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls . . . .
157,000
L eath er and le a t h a r p r o d u c ts ..........................
3 , 8UO Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
2U .700 P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .................... ..
118,000 P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
2.530
2 , 11*0 C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .......................
*
330 P ro d u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l ................
1,580 Rubber p r o d u c ts ..........................................
2 ,6 0 0 P r o f e s s io n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and co n ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
8,180
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atch es and c l o c k s .......
1*90
U60 M is c e lla n e o u s m an u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .

1,180

5.900

3

60

2 ,0 1 0

1

900

9.990

39

1 2 ,2 0 0

1 7 9 .0 0 0

2

740

1.750

U
1

2 ,0 3 0
UJOO
300
uo
350

1 9 ,8 0 0
1 20 ,00 0

7

3
1
2
1
1
1

820
UO
2.2U 0
U20

U

50
290
uo
2 ,3 5 0
260

UO
1 5 .3 0 0
U.500

10
2

610
U20

U.6U0
1 ,8 6 0

151

6 0 ,0 0 0

1 ,0 3 0 ,0 0 0

1
*

880

2 0 ,3 0 0

2

820

228,000

7

2
10
2
6

3
12
16
20

3
7
1

2
2
1
1

22
5
2

7.830

110

U60

3.520

53.100

320
760
2U0
2 8 ,5 0 0

2 .6 3 0

2 .5 1 0
2.9U0
1 ,1 2 0

1,820
80
1.U70
2 ,0 7 0

870
30
U.780

5.580
1 .7 3 0
516,000
20.U00
1 5,1 0 0
1 8,3 00
1 5 .2 0 0
U.820
1 2 ,2 0 0

7,750

u ,320
200

37,600

70

600

U60

8.570

23

6.350

53.600

5

270

7 ,2 0 0

2 1 315

2 15 ,00 0

1 ,6 0 0 .0 0 0

23

lU.OOO

183 ,00 0

U
U

1 1 ,2 0 0

3 8 ,9 0 0

8

3.180

9.870

28

1 1 ,3 0 0
1 1 0 ,00 0

1 9 5 .0 0 0
5 78 ,00 0

62

6
6

860
U90

9,820

5
1

1.850
180

2 0 .U00
180

2
1
9
U

3

1U0
310

5.820
760
110
880
2 U0

3 .3 7 0

1 .3 5 0
3 ,9 0 0

101,000
1 .3 7 0
3 .2 9 0

1
U
6

35 .UOO

8 .U00
770
62,600

2
2

60
870

15 >600

5

1.350

-

TABLE C.— Work

-

stoppages in 1951 in States which had 25 or more stoppages during the year, hy industry group - Continued

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
Workers
1951 ( a l l
In v o lv e d l / sto p p a g e s )

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

M ining ...............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
Trade .................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , co m n u n ica tio n , and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ....................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
MINNESOTA
P rim ary a e t a l in d u s t r ie s ..........................
F a b r ic a t e d a e t a l p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..............................
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s .....................................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ......................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
A p p erel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c t s ............................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and c o n t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ............
M ining ...............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
T rade .................................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v i c e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
MISSISSIPPI
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) .................................................................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................................
A p p a rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ..........................................................
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ..............
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m u n ica tion , and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
MISSOURI
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
tra n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ................................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p l i e s ................................................................... ..
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment ......................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ......................
A p p a rel and o t h e r fi n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c t s ............................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................
P rod u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l ........................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . .
M ining ...............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n .................................................................
Trade .................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unica tion, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n .
and s a n it a t io n ........................................................
FEW JERSEY
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................

See footnotes at end of table.

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
Workers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d l/ s to p p a g e s )

S toppages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

FEW JERSEY - C ontinued

MICHIGAN - C ontin u ed




26

3

U,130

21
11
2

3,880

15

7.790

6

290

53

2 0 ,3 0 0

k'

5
1
2
10
_
1

5

U90
U70

190

350
90
760
1.6U0

130
U .570

1

1,800

1
2

10
120

1
2
6

10
1 ,8 6 0

3

550
90

5

2 ,2 7 0

U

5,830

35

1 7 ,8 0 0

2 0 ,9 0 0 F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
1U.500
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
U.070
9.890 E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
3 00 ,00 0 M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
1 0 ,1 0 0 T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
2 1 b ,000
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s .......................................
2 ,0 1 0 S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
A p p a rel and o t h e r fi n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls . . . .
7.660
2 ,7 0 0 L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts .................................
1 6 ,0 0 0 P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .................................
28,800 P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
u / 1 1 ,5 0 0 C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .......................
2.750 P ro d u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l .....................
2 6 , b oo Rubber p r o d u c ts ........................................................
2 b ,000 P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and con ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ..........
360
M is c e lla n e o u s m an u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
2 ,6 7 0
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
C o n s tr u c tio n ...............................................................
170 Trade ...............................................................................
5 .3 3 0 F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e .........
3 . 0UO T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unicatibn, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
7U0
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
2 0 ,2 0 0 Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n .....................................................
59.700
2 1 b ,000

2
1

blO

710

3 .8 b o
1 0 ,1 0 0

1
1
1
21

110
2 ,5 2 0
2 ,9 2 0
U.000
6 .8 7 0

310
ib 6 ,o o o
b ,800
b .0 0 0
b 3 ,2 0 0

3

300

2 ,0 5 0

113

U i,3 0 0

3 1 b ,000

6

930

2 9 .7 0 0

6

1 ,7 1 0

12,800

2

3
3

3 .1 7 0
H90
3 ,6 0 0

6 ,2 3 0
3 .2 7 0

32,800

1
1
6

20
160
650

160
1 . 9b 0
b ,5 6 o

5

3

690

1 7 .b oo

8

3.230

8,020

9

1 1,5 00

1

80

8 7 ,b oo
250

1

20
160

2
1

190

20
10
1

80
50
7.750
U70
330

16

5.710

3
1

170
b90
2 , b io
1 .5 1 0
930
6 1 ,1 0 0

3.760
6 ,5 0 0
2 7 ,3 0 0

7

290

3.890

2

70

1 .3 6 0

200
2

87.600
1 . 7U0

1 ,1 9 0 ,0 0 0
l b , 800

FEW MEXICO
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .......................
M ining ............................................................................
C o n s tru ctio n ..............................................................
T r a d e .......................................................................... ....
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
FEW YORK
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts ...................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls . . . .
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts .................................
P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s .......................
P ro d u cts o f petroleu m and c o a l .....................
Rubber p r o d u c ts .............................. ..
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and con ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ..........
M isc e lla n e o u s m anu fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
M ining ............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n ...............................................................
T r a d e ..............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o th e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .

9

3.^30
5.630

3 3 .0 0 0

15

2 ,6 b o

50,900
19.300

12

17.300

2 6 2 ,0 0 0

2

290
520
300

2,770

11

l b , 800

365.000

9

9 . 5bO
2 ,3 6 0
2 5 ,5 0 0
1 1 6 ,0 0 0

10

7
3

b

b ,750
300

7

3.580

b

1 ,2 1 0

6 ,8 5 0
1 .3 2 0

7b0
6 ,2 0 0

1 0 ,2 0 0
b 3 ,o o o
5 .1 0 0
8 0 ,5 0 0

1 ,0 9 0
l,8 b 0
100
1 ,8 7 0
3 . 5b o
1 ,1 2 0

b .3 6 0
l b , 300
200
3 8 .0 0 0
1 1 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,b oo

32
13

1 0 ,3 0 0

b 3 ,b o o

930

7,950

1

200

200

2 / 26

9.930

9 1 .7 0 0

1
1

1 ,0 7 0
380

b b .^ o o
380

2
1
2
b
12
2

180

2 .6 3 0
160
230
2 5 ,3 0 0
1 7 .7 0 0

1

lb o

7
3

3.150

6

1

13
1
12
12

3

20

50
b ,0 5 0

3.970
70

280

2

lb o

7bo

2 / 570

1 96 ,00 0

2 ,5 3 0 ,0 0 0

11

8 ,6 6 0

b b ,200

2b

5.760

1 3 6 ,00 0

36
31
19

2 1 ,7 0 0
1 0 ,3 0 0
1 3 ,0 0 0

b 6 2 ,o o o
3 b b ,o o o
2 1 1 ,0 0 0

10
32

780
5.580

3.270
33.200

12
26

610
l b , 900

333.000

78
10
23

2 5 .3 0 0

7.570

b ,2 5 0

1 0 1 .0 0 0
b b ,3 0 0

9 ,2 0 0
600

80,100

170
1.760

2 ,8 3 0
2 7 ,3 0 0

2
2

130

580
3.350

9
33
3
3

3 ,b b o
3 .b 90
230
630
b ,2 5 0
1 3 ,b o o

9
6

9

32
b9
lb
b2
bo

580

2 ,5 0 0

b 6,200
5 1 .6 0 0
3 . b 70
2 ,2 2 0

28,800
78,300

6,800

8 0 ,3 0 0

2 9 ,boo
7 .0 5 0

2 9 b ,000

107,000

- 27 -

TABUS C.

Work stoppages in 1951- in States which had 25 or more stoppages during the year, by industry group - Continued

S topp ages b e g in S t a te and in d u s tr y group

n in g in 1951
Number

W orkers
in v o lv e d 1/

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
1951 ( a l l
sto p p a g e s )

N
EW YORK - C ontinued

6

38

1 ,0 3 0
2U.300

2.U 30
508,000

F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m achin ery, and
x

20

E l e c t r i c a l m achin ery, equipm ent, and
1
1

M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ............................................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................

Trade .................................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
OHIO
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x ce p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ...............................
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s .....................................
E l e c t r i c a l m achin ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s .....................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent .....................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ............................................
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ............................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t ■ ................................ T
P aper and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ..........................
P rod u cts o f petroleu m and c o a l ........................
Rubber p r o d u c t s ..........................................................
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and con­
t r o l l i n g in stru m en ts; p h o to g r a p h ic end
o p t i c a l g o o d s; w atches and c l o c k s ............
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ..............
M ining ...............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
Trade .................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
.Government— adm ini st r a t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ........................................................
OKLAHOMA
Machinery ( ex cep t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s .....................
A pparel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ...................................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ..........................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
Trade .................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
OREGON
P rim ary m eta l in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent)
............................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e * ........................................T
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................

See footnotes at end of table.




Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
Workers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d 1/r s to p p a g e s )

Stoppages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

OREGON - Continued

Government — adm ini s t r a t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ........................................................
NORTH CAROLINA

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

2
_
1
6
1
1

3

30

380

no
.
190

1.8U0
u/ 50

18,000
50
50
360

1,180
U50
2 ,7 6 0
1 ,0 2 0
30 300

60
2 ,1 7 0
20

8

3.080

2 0 ,1 0 0

U02

197,000

1 ,6 9 0 ,0 0 0

130

65

3 8,2 00

2 2 2 ,0 0 0

32
3

1 1,3 00
1 .6 6 0

187 .00 0

8,990

15
35
15

1U.100
1 2,3 00
1 5.9 00

5
3
18

2

500
1 ,1 1 0
2 ,2 3 0
1 ,9 8 0
250
2 ,0 0 0
1 ,9 2 0

2U,900
1U.U00

3

180

3,830

1
l*

120
UU.800

120
2 6 3 ,0 0 0

9

PENNSYLVANIA

2
x
2

U90
20
UO

3 .2 0 0

1
1
6

150
1 ,0 0 0

1 5 ,0 0 0

730

33.300

7

580
UO

1
ll

1U7.000
3U7.000

118,000
2,950
7.630
6 0 ,1 0 0
2 ,0 3 0

710

U

300

1 ,2 7 0

7

2,310

9 . 7UO

1
UO

20
1 0 ,3 0 0
U.990

29.500

2

5.070
130

U3.U00
2 9 ,3 0 0
U.120

UO
10

2U.500
610

151 ,00 0
1 3 ,6 0 0

1

30

70

28

3.190

38,100

U60
210

2 ,7 2 0

3
1

3.900

1

70

9.830

3

160
1 ,1 6 0
660
50
10

2 ,0 1 0
U.630

1
10
1

7.890
180
6U0

6

U30

6 ,2 7 0

67

1 5.5 00

2U8.000

1

580

3
2

30
UO

3 .U60

1,180
1 .0 3 0

2U

3 .6 6 0

72,800

x

1,110
10

3 2 ,0 0 0

1

150
% q«n
JtJOU
720

3

6 ,8 5 0
220

U8.300
2 5 .0 0 0

P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b rica te d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x ce p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..............................
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r i e s ................................... ..
E l e c t r i c a l m achin ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ................................................................... ..
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment .....................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S ton e, c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ............................................
A p parel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls ..........
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ............................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ...................................
T oba cco m anufactures ..............................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ...................................
P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
Chem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c ts ..........................
P ro d u cts o f p etroleu m and c o a l .......................
Rubber p r o d u c t s ..................................... ....................
P r o f e s s io n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and co n ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m en ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s ; w atches and c l o c k s ............
M isc e lla n e o u s m anu fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . .
M ining ..............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n .................................................................
Trade ................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , com m unication, and o th e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .

2 / 630

2 7 5 ,0 0 0

1 ,9 1 0 ,0 0 0

68

3 8 .5 0 0

186.000

Ul
1

1 1 ,0 0 0
210

7 6 ,8 0 0
3 .1 2 0

21
21

18

30.U00
18,9 00
1 2 ,3 0 0

1 90 .00 0
1 38 .00 0
1 12 ,00 0

2
11
2U

120

2,510
5.380

5U0
2U.600
3 1 ,1 0 0
2 1 9 ,0 0 0

29

9 .6 1 0

U9

1 2 ,2 0 0

7

390

21

1 0 ,6 0 0
1 ,0 0 0
2.2U 0

3
10
1

30

RHODE ISLAND
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..............................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .........................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c ts ............................................
A p parel and o th e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls ..........
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ...................................
Rubber p r o d u c ts ..........................................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n ................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o th e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
TENNESSEE
Prim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery, equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s .....................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .........................
T ra n s p o r ta tio n equipment .....................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) .................................................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................................
A p p a rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c ts made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ............................

8 8 ,2 0 0
3 .U50
11+9,000
1 2 ,5 0 0

58,700

9

10
2 ,6 2 0

U30
1 1 ,7 0 0

6
lU

1.990
6.U8O

3.370
23,900

1

50

1 ,6 2 0

9
38
3

580
72.U00
1 3 ,2 0 0
2.U 20
2.U 70

26U.000
1 09 ,00 0
U7.800
3 3 .2 0 0

U7
lU

1 6 ,5 0 0
620

1 15 ,00 0

25

2 2 ,3 0 0

76U.OOO

2

5

380
8 ,1 3 0
100
11.U00

5 0 3 ,0 0 0
200
2 39 ,00 0

1
2
2
U
2

70
550
800
280
80

2
1

120
U60

870
1 1 ,0 0 0

1U6

U7.800

2 5 1 ,0 0 0

2

1 ,8 6 0

8,320

119
uu

1U0

18
26

6.970
550

9.730
U39.000

1
10
2

1
2

T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................................
L eath er and le a t h e r p r o d u c t■ ..........................T
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ...................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ..............
C o n s t r u c t i o n .............................. ..................................
T r a d e .......................................................... r ..................,
F in a n ce, in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .

3
1

5.830

2,800

13.900

U60

9.880
1 ,0 0 0

3.570
1 ,2 3 0

U

710

1 2 ,7 0 0

1
6
3

50
3.630
2 U0

300
15.U00

8
U
U

1 . 1U0
360
2,110

1 2 ,3 0 0
2 ,1 9 0
3 6 .1 0 0

1
1

260
160

2 ,3 0 0

1,850

2.790

Table C.— Work stoppages in

S ta te and in d u s t r y group

1951

in States which had

25

or more stoppages during the year, by industry group - Continued

Mandays i d l e
d u rin g
W orkers
1951 ( a l l
in v o lv e d 1 / sto p p a g e s )

S topp ages b e g in ­
n in g in 1951
Number

TENNESSEE - C ontin u ed
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P ap er and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
C h em icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................
Rubber p r o d u c t s ..........................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . .
M ining ...............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
T rade .................................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ............
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unica tion, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t a c t i o n .
and s a n i t a t i o n .......................................................
TEXAS
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce , m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ...............................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent .....................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c t s .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s .............................................
A p p a rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ...................................
C h em ica ls and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................
P r o d u c ts o f p etroleu m and c o a l ........................
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ..............
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
T rade .................................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ....................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in is t r a t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ........................................................
VIRGINIA
P rim ary m etal i n d u s t r ie s ......................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..........................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n equipment .....................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n i t u r e ) .................................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ..........................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g la s s p r o d u c ts .....................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls ..........
L ea th er and le a t h e r p r o d u c t s ............................
Food and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ............................ ..
P r i n t in g , p u b lis h in g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s .................................................................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..........................
M is c e lla n e o u s m anu fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . . .
M inin g ...............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n .................................................................
Ti* Am ..................................... T r . r . T T I r l T r l - T - t T
a
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ...................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in istr a t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ........................................................
WASHINGTON
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s .....................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u c ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery, and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ..............................

1/
2/

S ta te and in d u s tr y group

ManStoppages b e g in ­
days id le
n in g in 1951
d u rin g
W orkers
1951 ( * n
Number
in v o lv e d 1 / sto p p a g e s )

WASHINGTON - C ontinued

2 ,k 80

5
2

520
1 .3 0 0

_
U

_
_
6 ,0 2 0

2
20

200
2,560

kk

2 1 ,5 0 0
290

18,000
59.700
2,860

20

320

20
5

U.660

3*1.500

90

2 ,k 3 0

1

160

1,280

86

28,900

2 9 k ,000

7

kjio

25,300

2
2
3

100
970
1 .0 3 0

2 ,k 7 0
7 6 ,0 0 0
8 .7 3 0

1
2
1

180

1 1,3 00

150

3.820

20

-

-

60
k / 2 0 ,5 0 0

8
1

1 0 ,3 0 0
U/ 550
k / 70
1 9 .3 0 0
U.730

M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
f u r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ................................... ....
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
F ood and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa ctu rin g in d u s t r ie s . .
A g r i c u l t u r e , f o r e s t r y , and f i s h i n g ............
M inin g .............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t io n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ..........
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .............. ..................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
Government— a d m in ist r a t i o n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n ......................................................

WIST VIRGINIA

2
9
1
1
1
27
5

30
1,580
20
160
1,000
6,510
2U0

3ko
k k ,700
100
960

18,000
33.800
2,080

18
1

11,800
20

k k ,100
k so

3

U70

1 .6 9 0

139

k6 ,k 00

k n .o o o

1
1

kkO
-

31,800

2
3
k

270
720
360

2

9.500

3

7U0
80
20

6 ,0 5 0

10
2,100
180
25.600
3.730
50

kO
2 ,3 9 0
2 ,8 9 0
7 7 ,9 0 0
1 3.5 00

2 , 0k0
100

1 3 ,2 0 0
1 .5 3 0

1
1
1
1

1
81
lk

2
16

3

330

k / 1 .2 5 0
2 .7 5 0

1.980
lk .k o o
k ,650
2 3 5 ,0 0 0

220
880

580

2

110

210

2/ 71

kl.kOO

326,000

1

1,200

9.980

5

300

2,210

P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
s u p p lie s ...................................................................
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) .......................
T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipm ent ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re and f i x t u r e s ........................................
S to n e , c l a y , and g l a s s p r o d u c ts ...................
A p p a rel and o t h e r f i n i s h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s i m il a r m a te r ia ls . . . .
F ood and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .................................
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
C hem icals and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ........................
M ining .............................................................................
C o n s tr u c tio n ...............................................................
T rade ...............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and
o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s ...................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and o t h e r . .
WISCONSIN
P rim ary m etal in d u s t r ie s ...................................
F a b r ic a t e d m etal p r o d u o ts (e x c e p t
ord n a n ce, m a ch in ery , and
t r a n s p o r t a t io n equipm ent) ............................
E l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery , equipm ent, and
iruppl i ms ..................... ................... _______ . . . . .
M achinery (e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ........................
T r a n s p o r ta tio n equipment ...................................
Lumber and wood p r o d u c t s (e x c e p t
fu r n it u r e ) ...............................................................
F u rn itu re end f i x t u r e s ........................................
T e x t i l e - m i l l p r o d u c t s ..........................................
A p pa rel and o t h e r f i n is h e d p r o d u c t s made
from f a b r i c s and s im ila r m a te r ia ls . . . .
L e a th e r and le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..........................
F ood and k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ............................ ..
P r i n t in g , p u b l is h i n g , and a l l i e d
in d u s t r ie s ...............................................................
Rubber p r o d u c ts .......................................... ..
P r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , and con ­
t r o l l i n g in stru m e n ts; p h o to g r a p h ic and
o p t i c a l g o o d s; w atches and c l o c k s ..........
M inin g ............................................................................
C o n s t r u c t i o n ...............................................................
Trade ...............................................................................
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , com m unication, and o t h e r
p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .................................................
S e r v ic e s — p e r s o n a l, b u s in e s s , and
o t h e r ..........................................................................
Government— a d m in is t r a t io n , p r o t e c t i o n ,
and s a n it a t io n .....................................................

1
2

6 .5 0 0

60,100

70

2 3 .0 0 0

13
1
1
1
3
2
1
18
6
1

9.680
i , 8ko
360
1.070
70
1,010
k20

k6,800
5 i.k o o

6 ,k 9 0
610

12,600
2,710
720
i5 .k o o
3 . 3*«>
3 0 ,0 0 0

20

5.920
k20

ll
k

n .k o o
320

55.500
5 .k 50

1

ko

80

231

83.200

k 6 2 ,o o o

2

530

1 1 ,7 0 0

2
1

2,010
280

3

I ,k 5 0

1 5 .3 0 0
1 .6 5 0
6 ,1 0 0

1
k

80
560
820

8 ,k 5 0
1 3 .7 0 0

2
1

850
10

3 . 7UO

1
168

720
7 1 ,2 0 0

k / 330

\6
g

3.690
100

2,260
362,000
19.500
i , 8ko

13
7

680
2ko

i3 .k o o
1 .5 0 0

87

k 3 ,o o o

7 0 k ,o o o

5

1,080

5 3 .2 0 0

8

5.120

2 7 3 .0 0 0

1
10
2

7 .5 5 0

80,200

6,680

5 k ,100

5
5
3

500
k ,080
170

67 ,kOO

1

50
510
1 .1 9 0

2

2
8

■$10

3

70

k

10,200

810

20

310

1 7 .5 0 0
io ,k o o
lk o
2 ,2 9 0

28,700
3 ,k 80
7 5 .6 0 0

1

30

3
9
9

620
2,760
870

1 .0 9 0
7 .7 2 0
1 3 .9 0 0
k ,k 5 0

k

1,110

8 ,2 3 0

2

ko

1 .6 3 0

2

160

980

The f i g u r e on number o f w ork ers in c lu d e s son s d u p li c a t e c o u n tin g where th e sane w ork ers w ere in v o lv e d i n more than one etopp age i n th e y e a r .
T h is f i g u r e i s l e s s than th e sun o f t h e f i g u r e s h elow b e ca u se a few sto p p a g e s , ea ch a f f e c t i n g w ore th a n one in d u s t r y g rou p , h a re b een co u n te d a s
s e p a r a te stop p a g es in ea ch in d u s t r y group a f f e c t e d .
W orkers i n r o l r e d and n a n -d ay s i d l e w ere a l l o c a t e d t o t h e r e s p e c t i v e g ro u p s.
3/ The s t r i k e in t h i s group was p a r t o f an i n t e r s t a t e s t r ik e and i n r o lr e d f e v e r than 6 w ork e r s.
5 / I d le n e s s in 1951 r e s u l t i n g f r o n stop p a g es w hich began in t h e p r e c e d in g y e a r .




- 29 -

Appendix B
Methods of Collecting Strike S tatistics H /
The Bureau* s sta tistics on work stoppages
include a ll known strikes and lock-outs in
the continental United States involving six
or more workers and lasting the equivalent o f
a fu ll sh ift or longer#
Work stoppages are measured in terms o f
the number o f stoppages, number o f workers
involved, and number o f man-days o f idleness#
Figures on 1workers involved“ and “man-days
1
id le" cover a ll workers made id le for one
sh ift or longer in establishments d irectly
involved in a stoppage. They do not measure
secondary idleness - that i s , the effects on
other establishments or industries whose em
­
ployees may be made idle as a result o f m
a­
te ria l or service shortages#
Lead information as to the probable
existence o f work stoppages is collected from
a number o f sources. Clippings on labor dis­
putes are
obtained from a comprehensive
coverage o f daily and weekly
newspapers
throughout the country. Information is re­
ceived d ire ctly from the Federal Mediation
and Conciliation Service as well as from
agencies in a ll States such as State boards
o f mediation and arbitration, research divi­
sions o f State labor department o ffic e s , State
employment service o ffic e s , and unemployment
compensation o ffic e s . Various employer as­
sociations, companies, and unions, which col­
le ct data fo r their own use, also furnish the
Bureau with work-stoppage information.
Upon receipt o f such notices of new work
stoppages a questionnaire is mailed to each
party to the dispute to secure such data as
the number o f workers involved, duration,
major issues, and method o f settlement. In
some instances, fie ld agents o f the Bureau
c o lle ct the information#

11/
More detailed information on methods
o f calculation, sources, and cla ssifica tion
is available in Bulletin N 993, “Techniques
o#
o f Preparing Major BIS S ta tistica l Series•“




The Bureau defines a strike as a temporary
stoppage o f work by a group o f employees to
express a grievance or enforce a demand# A
lock-out is a temporary withholding o f work
from a group o f employees by an employer (or
group o f employers)
in order
to force
acceptance o f the employer*s terms. Because
o f the complexities involved in most labormanagement disputes, the Bureau makes no
e ffo rt to determine whether the stoppages are
initiated by the workers or the employers. The
terms “ strike1 and “ work stoppage** are used
*
interchangeably in this report.
The definitions o f strikes and lock-outs
point out certain characteristics inherent in
each strike or lock-out: ( l ) The stoppage is
temporary rather than permanent; (2) the
action is by or against a group rather than
an individual; (3) the objective is to express
a grievance or enforce a demand; and (4.) an
employeivemployee relationship exists, al­
though the grievance may or may not be against
the employer o f the striking group# In ju ris­
dictional as well as rival union or repre­
sentation strikes, the major elements of dis­
pute may be between two unions rather than
directly with the employer# In a sympathy
strike, there is usually no dispute between
the striking workers and their immediate em
­
ployer but the purpose is to give union sup­
port or broaden group pressure fo r the bene­
f i t o f another group o f workers. Sympathy or
protest strikes may also be intended to record
the workers* feelings against action (or
absence o f action) by lo ca l, State, or Federal
Government agencies on matters o f general
worker concern#
Although the Bureau seeks to obtain com­
plete coverage o f a ll strikes involving six
or more workers and lasting a fu ll sh ift or
longer, information is undoubtedly missing on
some of the smaller strikes. For this reason
the aggregate figures o f workers involved and
man-days o f idleness are rounded to avoid a
sense o f false accuracy. Also, in some in­
stances the figure o f man-days o f idleness is
an estimate to some extent, because the exact
number o f workers id le each day is not known
in prolonged strikes# Because o f rounding the
group totals in certain tables may not exactly
equal the sum o f the individual items#
☆

u. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102