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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
70.00

Federal Funds

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

72.40
73.10
73.20
74.00

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) ............................................

General and special funds:
SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

EXPLORATION

(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the conduct
and support of science, aeronautics and exploration research and
development activities, including research, development, operations,
support and services; maintenance; construction of facilities including
repair, rehabilitation, revitalization, and modification of facilities, construction of new facilities and additions to existing facilities, facility
planning and design, and restoration, and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized by law; environmental compliance
and restoration; space flight, spacecraft control and communications
activities including operations, production, and services; program
management; personnel and related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901–5902; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed
$35,000 for official reception and representation expenses; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and operation of mission and administrative aircraft, ø$9,761,400,000¿ $10,523,805,000, to remain
available until September 30, ø2007¿ 2008, of which amounts as
determined by the Administrator for salaries and benefits; training,
travel and awards; facility and related costs; information technology
services; science, engineering, fabricating and testing services; and
other administrative services may be transferred to ‘‘Exploration Capabilities’’ in accordance with section ø312(b)¿ 313 of the National
Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended øby Public Law
106–377¿. (Science Appropriations Act, 2006.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0114–0–1–999

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04
00.05
00.06
00.07
00.08
09.01

Obligations by program activity:
Space science ................................................................
4,292
Earth science .................................................................
1,536
Biological & physical research ......................................
925
Aeronautics ....................................................................
963
Education .......................................................................
179
Science ........................................................................... ...................
Exploration systems ....................................................... ...................
Cross-agency supt ......................................................... ...................
Reimbursable program ..................................................
476

2007 est.

672
240
145
1,034
28
4,756
2,532
319
638

...................
...................
...................
734
...................
5,315
3,921
475
615

10,364

11,060

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

21.40
22.00
22.21

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Unobligated balance transferred to other accounts

1,211
1,235
1,173
8,418
10,302
11,139
¥14 ................... ...................

23.90
23.95
23.98

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance expiring or withdrawn .................

9,615
11,537
12,312
¥8,371
¥10,364
¥11,060
¥9 ................... ...................

24.40

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8,371

2006 est.

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

1,235

1,173

1,252

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
7,743
9,761
10,524
40.33
Appropriation permanently reduced (P.L. 109–148) ...................
¥97 ...................
40.35
Appropriation permanently reduced ..........................
¥62
¥27 ...................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................
¥60 ................... ...................
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ..............................
270
27 ...................
43.00
68.00
68.10
68.90

Appropriation (total discretionary) ........................
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
Discretionary:
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
Change in uncollected customer payments from
Federal sources (unexpired) .............................
Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total discretionary) .....................................

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7,891

9,664

10,524

476

638

615

51 ................... ...................
527
PO 00000

638

615

Frm 00001

Fmt 3616

74.40

86.90
86.93

Obligated balance, end of year ................................

8,418

10,302

11,139

2,558
8,371
¥7,433

3,445
10,364
¥8,915

4,894
11,060
¥10,580

¥51 ................... ...................
3,445

4,894

5,374

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new discretionary authority .....................
7,433
Outlays from discretionary balances ............................. ...................

5,373
3,542

5,772
4,808

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

7,433

8,915

10,580

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

¥594
118

¥540
¥98

¥540
¥75

88.90

¥476

¥638

¥615

88.95

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
Against gross budget authority only:
Change in uncollected customer payments from
Federal sources (unexpired) ..................................
Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

¥51 ................... ...................

7,891
6,957

9,664
8,277

10,524
9,965

This appropriation provides for the full costs associated
with the science, aeronautics and exploration (SAE) activities
of the agency, which consist of the programs, or ‘‘themes,’’
within the Science, Exploration Systems, and Aeronautics Research Mission Directorates and Cross-Agency Support Programs. (Education Programs is now an element of CrossAgency Support Programs.) The full costs include both direct
and indirect costs supporting these programs, which provide
for all of the research; development; operations; salaries and
related expenses; design, repair, rehabilitation, modification
of facilities, and construction of new facilities; and other general and administrative activities supporting the themes within SAE.
Detailed performance goals associated with the SAE activities are addressed in NASA’s detailed budget request, and
summaries of these activities are in the NASA chapter of
the 2007 Budget volume. The SAE activities are described
below.
Science.—NASA’s Science Mission Directorate encompasses
three themes: Earth-Sun System, Solar System Exploration,
and Universe. The Directorate seeks to answer fundamental
questions concerning the galaxy and the universe; the connections among the Sun, Earth and heliosphere; the ways in
which Earth’s climate is changing; the comparison of Earth
with other planets in our solar system and around other
stars; the origin and evolution of planetary systems; and the
origin and distribution of life in the universe. The Directorate
achieves its objectives through flight missions (e.g. robotic
spacecraft), ground-based scientific research and data analysis, and the development of new technologies for future missions.
Life on Earth prospers in a biosphere and climate powered
by energy from the Sun and moderated by water and carbon
cycles. Working with the domestic and international partners,
NASA provides accurate, objective, scientific data and analysis to advance understanding of Earth-Sun system processes
and phenomena. This enables improved prediction and reSfmt 3616

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1065

1066

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

EXPLORATION—Continued

(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)—Continued

sponse capabilities for climate, weather, natural hazards, and
even human-induced disasters. Employing a constellation of
about 30 Earth or Sun observing satellites routinely making
measurements with about 100 remote sensing instruments,
NASA’s goal is to continue using the view from space to
study the Earth system and improve prediction of Earth system changes, solar variability, and the connection between
the two.
In seeking to understand the Sun, heliosphere, and planetary environments as a single, connected system, NASA will
pursue two sets of missions: Solar Terrestrial Probe missions
address fundamental science questions about the physics of
plasma and the flow of mass and energy in the solar system;
and Living With a Star missions develop specific knowledge
and understanding of those aspects of the Sun-Earth system
that directly affect life and society. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) will advance our understanding
of the Sun’s corona (its outer ‘‘atmosphere’’) and the origin
of huge eruptions of solar material known as coronal mass
ejections. Under Living With a Star, the Solar Dynamics Observatory will observe the solar interior and atmosphere continuously from geosynchronous orbit to determine the causes
of solar variability. Its images will provide global views of
the sun with four times the resolution of those currently
available.
In the next few decades, NASA will deepen our understanding of the solar system, with spacecraft fanning out to
destinations from the innermost planet to the very edge of
our Sun’s influence. Some will stay in Earth’s orbit, others
will follow looping one-way trajectories through the gravitational forces of the planets, and a few will come back carrying
mystery-unlocking souvenirs from other worlds. Our intensive
investigation of Mars will continue, from orbit and on the
surface, with a new generation of missions, including the
Phoenix lander (August 2007 launch) and the 2009 Mars
Science Laboratory rover.
The Cassini Saturn orbiter will continue to return stunning
images and revise our understanding of the ringed planet
and its moons. Meanwhile, the Messenger mission to Mercury
and the New Horizons mission to Pluto will complete NASA’s
initial reconnaissance of our solar system. We will also study
the Kuiper Belt, and the comets that come from it, to investigate the primordial substances which evolved into the solar
system.
Perplexing and important questions guide our quest to understand the secrets of the universe:

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How did the Universe begin?
Does time have a beginning and an end?
Where did we come from?
Are we alone?
To answer these questions, NASA will continue to operate
its prolific Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer space telescopes,
while planning a series of future missions linked by powerful
new technologies and complementary approaches to shared
science goals. These missions will enhance our ability to find
planets around other stars and peer deep into the history
of the universe and improve our understanding of its structure. The Kepler mission will enable the discovery of Earthsize and smaller planets around other stars. The Gammaray Large-Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will investigate the
high-energy world of black holes and neutron stars. The Space
Interferometry Mission (SIM) will allow indirect detection of
planets through observation of thousands of stars, and will
investigate the structure of planetary disks. SIM will also
demonstrate unprecedented astronomical accuracy and high
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spatial resolution. The James Webb Space Telescope will
study the earliest galaxies and some of the first stars formed
after the Big Bang.
Exploration systems.—The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) includes three themes that work together
to enable sustainable exploration and scientific discovery in
our solar system. The themes are Constellation Systems, Exploration Systems Research and Technology, and Human Systems Research and Technology.
Through the Constellation Systems theme NASA will develop, demonstrate, and deploy the transportation, life support and surface systems that will enable sustained human
and robotic exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. These
include the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) for the transport
and support of human crews traveling to destinations beyond
Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as well as launch vehicles for transport of the CEV and cargo to LEO, and any ground support
infrastructure for communications and operations.
The Constellation Systems theme is responsible for developing capabilities essential to making the nation’s Vision for
Space Exploration a reality. Constellation Systems supports
NASA’s mission to explore the universe and search for life
by developing the transportation and supporting systems to
extend human presence to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. A
human presence will enable scientific activities and discoveries not obtainable with robotic explorers.
The program is established to achieve the goals laid out
by the President in his January 2004 speech, and will do
so by developing the architecture and vehicle systems outlined
in the 2005 Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS).
Further analysis and refinement of the ESAS results will
continue under the direction of the ESMD. Initial Constellation Systems capabilities include the CEV, Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Extravehicular Activity suits and tools required
by the flight crews, and associated ground and mission operations infrastructure. These systems are intended to support
exploration, but in their initial test phases will support Low
Earth Orbit (LEO) missions including crew transportation to
the International Space Station (ISS). The CEV will also be
capable of delivering some cargo to the ISS, although this
will be a backup to commercial systems.
An important element of Constellation Systems is the commercial crew/cargo project. The Vision for Space Exploration
called for NASA to pursue commercial opportunities for providing transportation to the International Space Station. The
crew/cargo program is intended to spur private industry to
provide cost-effective access to low-Earth orbit, allowing
NASA to focus its internal resources on exploration.
Following the initial capabilities, Constellation Systems will
develop crew capabilities for a lunar surface mission by 2020.
These capabilities include: a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle
(HLLV), leveraging engineering design and capabilities from
the Shuttle Program; an Earth Departure Stage (EDS) to
provide the momentum required to propel the CEV from LEO
to Lunar Orbit; a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) to
safely transport astronauts to and from the lunar surface;
and systems, capabilities, and support for extended human
stays on the lunar surface.
Future development will provide crew, cargo transportation
and destination support capabilities required for human exploration of Mars and beyond.
The Exploration Systems Research and Technology (ESRT)
theme is NASA’s investment in the technologies and capabilities that will make the national vision for space exploration
possible. The goals of solar system exploration will be the
primary focus of exploration systems research and technology,
and will demand a robust, ongoing commitment to focused
innovation that will benefit activities across the Agency.
Through a focused research and development effort NASA
will develop technologies planned to mature at intervals alSfmt 3616

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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

lowing pre-planned integration in support of evolving missions.
Within ESRT there are five programs: Advanced Space
Technology, Technology Maturation, Centennial Challenges,
Robotic Lunar Exploration and Prometheus (previously a separate theme). The Advanced Space Technology Program develops new high leverage technologies and concepts. The Technical Maturation Program develops near term technologies
for human robotic exploration and assures their timely transition into exploration systems mission development programs.
The Centennial Challenges Program establishes awards to
stimulate innovative technical accomplishments that could advance the state of civil space exploration and aeronautics.
The Robotic Lunar Exploration Program develops precursor
missions to characterize the lunar environment. The Prometheus program develops nuclear technologies for power and
propulsion. NASA is working closely with other government
agencies, industry, academia and other partners to leverage
common requirements and identify innovative ideas.
The Human Systems Research and Technology (HSRT)
theme focuses on ensuring the health, safety, and productivity
of humans as we embark on missions of exploration in our
solar system. Programs within this theme advance knowledge
and technology critical for supporting long-term human survival and performance during operations beyond Low Earth
Orbit (LEO), with a focus on improving medical care and
human health maintenance. Within HSRT there are three
programs: Human Health and Performance (HHP); Life Support and Habitation (LSH); and Human Systems Integration
(HSI). The HHP program delivers research on questions about
human biology and physiology relevant to the human exploration of the solar system, and delivers technology to help
maintain or improve human health in the space environment.
The LSH program conducts research and develops technology
for life support and other critical systems for spacecraft operations. The HSI program focuses on optimizing human-machine interaction in the operation of spacecraft systems.
Aeronautics research.—NASA aeronautics was built on the
tradition of building expertise in the core disciplines of aeronautics and has been at the forefront of many major advances
in the science of flight.
NASA scientists and engineers have built a substantial base
of knowledge and the analytic tools and capabilities to perform more exacting work to close the gap between experimental and theoretical knowledge. NASA has become the nation’s leading government organization for aeronautical research, with a charter to develop an integrated strategy that
addresses the challenges in aviation by developing technological solutions that will enable a bold new era in aviation.
Although NASA is refocusing the Aeronautics Program to
place greater emphasis on long-term investments in foundational research, we are maintaining our long-standing commitment to benefit the American public by developing technologies that accomplish the following goals:
1. Make the nation’s current and future air transportation
system even safer;
2. Protect local air quality and our global climate;
3. Reduce aircraft noise to benefit airport neighbors, the
aviation industry, and travelers;
4. Enable the movement of more air passengers with fewer
delays; and
5. Enable people to travel faster and farther, anywhere,
anytime.
NASA’s Aeronautics theme consists of three integrated research programs as well as an Aeronautics Test Program
that preserves critical NASA wind tunnel infrastructure.
• The Fundamental Aeronautics Program will conduct research and develop technology to enable revolutionary capabilities for the future of aviation. We will develop advanced
tools and capabilities that will enable whole new classes of
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Federal Funds—Continued

1067

aircraft that not only meet the noise and emissions requirements of the future but that also provide fast, efficient, and
economical flight.
• The revectored Aviation Safety Program will focus NASA
research on improving the inherent safety attributes of aircraft in order to eliminate fatal accidents and enhancing the
safety of the nation’s current and future national air transportation system.
• The Airspace Systems Program is being realigned to directly address the needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) initiative as defined by the Federal
Aviation Administration and NASA within the Joint Planning
and Development Office (JPDO). NGATS research will enable
major increases in the capacity and mobility of the U.S. air
transportation system through development of technologies,
capabilities, and future concepts.
The Aeronautics Test Program is a new Aeronautics program that will ensure the strategic availability of a critical
suite of wind tunnels which are deemed necessary to meet
Aeronautics, Agency, and National needs.
Cross-agency support programs.—Cross-Agency Support
Programs includes four single-program themes that encompass several ongoing activities and an improved model for
managing NASA’s unique facilities. The themes are Education, Advanced Business Systems, Integrated Enterprise
Management Program, Innovative Partnerships Program, and
Shared Capability Assets Program.
Education at NASA works to inspire and motivate students
at all levels to pursue careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), while also engaging the education community to reach this goal. NASA’s
objectives include: providing elementary and secondary students and teachers with NASA-related education opportunities; supporting higher education research capability and opportunities that attract and prepare students and faculty for
NASA-related careers; providing students, teachers, faculty,
and researchers from underrepresented and underserved communities with opportunities in NASA-related STEM fields;
and increasing student, teacher, and public access to NASA
education resources by developing and deploying innovative
technology applications platforms. NASA engages the public
in shaping and sharing the experience of exploration and
discovery by improving public understanding of science and
technology, including NASA aerospace technology, research,
and exploration missions.
The Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP)
was placed in the new Advanced Business Systems theme
beginning in FY 2006 as a direct funded program versus
being funded within Corporate and Center General and Administrative (G&A) expenses.
IEMP is a large and complex initiative changing the way
financial and business management is performed throughout
NASA. Center and/or Directorate unique approaches are being
replaced with a single set of standard integrated business
processes. Each and every NASA employee will be impacted
by these changes. New IEMP systems are improving business
processes by minimizing data redundancy, standardizing information and electronic data exchanges, processing and recording financial events effectively and efficiently, and ensuring consistent information throughout the Agency. IEMP consists of functional projects that effect business process
changes and that acquire and implement appropriate information technology tools to substantially improve the Agency’s
performance. The program, reformulated in March 2000, will
complete implementation in FY 2008. IEMP is composed of
multiple projects. The following projects are completed and
implemented: Resume Management, Position Description
Management, Travel Management, Core Financials, Program
Management Information Improvement, and Labor Distribution System. The following projects are in planning or develSfmt 3616

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1068

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

EXPLORATION—Continued

(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)—Continued

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opment: SAP Upgrade, Contract Management, and Integrated
Asset Management.
NASA’s Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) is undergoing transition to improve value provided to NASA. The
mission of the new IPP is to provide leveraged technology
alternatives for NASA’s mission directorates, programs, and
projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia,
government agencies, and national laboratories. Products of
the IPP include: leveraged technology investments, dual-use
technology-related partnerships, and secured Intellectual
Property assets. IPP partnerships serve to increase the range
of technology solutions for NASA, enable cost avoidance, and
accelerate technology maturation. IPP consists of the following program elements: Technology Transfer (T2), Space
Products Development (SPD), Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR)/ Small Business Technology Transfer Program
(STTR), and four of NASA’s University Research Engineering
& Technology Institutes (URETI). Together these increase
NASA’s connection to emerging technologies in the external
communities, enable targeted positioning of NASA’s technology portfolio in selected areas, and secure NASA’s Intellectual Property to provide fair access and to support NASA’s
strategic goals. Dual-use partnerships and licensing also create socio-economic benefits within the broader community.
NASA established a new Shared Capability Assets Program, a corporately managed program, to ensure that its key
capabilities and assets will continue to be available to support
the missions that require them. Additionally, NASA will use
this new program to identify and prioritize its critical assets
and make strategic investment decisions to replace, modify,
or disposition them based on NASA and/or national needs.
NASA’s Real Property Management Plan, which is approved
by the Office of Management and Budget, supports NASA’s
goal of preserving key capabilities and assets that are critical
to NASA’s current and future missions.
NASA has identified four specific key capability/asset classes that should be addressed initially to ensure that NASA
retains the needed specialized assets and skills required to
implement NASA’s missions. These are wind tunnels, rocket
propulsion testing, thermal vacuum chambers, and high performance computing capabilities. NASA has assessed the requirements in three of the initial four asset classes: wind
tunnels, rocket propulsion testing, and high performance computing capabilities. While funding for these asset classes is
in the mission directorates (wind tunnel in Aeronautics, rocket propulsion testing in Space Operations, and high performance computing capabilities in Science) all asset classes are
managed in an integrated manner by the program. The requirements assessment for thermal vacuum chambers and
decision as to location of funding are still in progress. After
nomination, review, and selection by the Agency, assets and/
or asset classes will be added to or withdrawn from the
Shared Capability Assets Program account based on an overall prioritization and balance among the assets being considered, and within the overall constraints of Agency priorities
and resources.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0114–0–1–999

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .............................................
Other than full-time permanent ...........................
Other personnel compensation .............................
Total personnel compensation .........................

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2006 est.

2007 est.

12.1
13.0
21.0
22.0
23.1
23.2
23.3

25.4
25.5
25.6
25.7
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Benefits for former personnel ...................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Transportation of things ...........................................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Rental payments to others ........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts .................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Medical care ..............................................................
Operation and maintenance of equipment ...............
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

221
4
42
3
35
3

316
13
56
4
42
4

282
4
50
4
48
4

48
6
263
743

58
7
318
898

66
8
361
922

237
144
4,052
2
28
55
124
103
889

287
173
4,846
2
34
66
149
124
1,073

325
197
5,403
3
38
75
169
141
1,218

99.0
99.0

Direct obligations ..................................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

7,895
476

9,726
638

10,445
615

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

8,371

10,364

11,060

24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel Summary
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0114–0–1–999

Direct:
Civilian full-time equivalent employment .....................
Reimbursable:
2001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment .....................
1001

2006 est.

2007 est.

9,376

12,012

11,211

172

167

141

f

EXPLORATION CAPABILITIES
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the conduct
and support of exploration capabilities research and development activities, including research, development, operations, support and
services; maintenance; construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, revitalization and modification of facilities, construction of
new facilities and additions to existing facilities, facility planning
and design, and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as
authorized by law; environmental compliance and restoration; space
flight, spacecraft control and communications activities including operations, production, and services; program management; personnel
and related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901–5902; travel expenses; purchase and hire
of passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed $35,000 for official reception and representation expenses; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and operation of mission and administrative aircraft,
ø$6,663,000,000¿ $6,234,922,000, to remain available until September
30, ø2007¿ 2008, of which amounts as determined by the Administrator for salaries and benefits; training, travel and awards; facility
and related costs; information technology services; science, engineering, fabricating and testing services; and other administrative services may be transferred to ‘‘Science, Aeronautics and Exploration’’
in accordance with section ø312(b)¿ 313 of the National Aeronautics
and Space Act of 1958, as amended øby Public Law 106–377¿.
(Science Appropriations Act, 2006.)
øFor an additional amount for ‘‘Exploration Capabilities’’,
$349,800,000, to remain available until expended, for necessary expenses related to the consequences of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico
in calendar year 2005: Provided, That the amount provided under
this heading is designated as an emergency requirement pursuant
to section 402 of H. Con. Res. 95 (109th Congress), the concurrent
resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2006.¿ (Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act to Address Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and Pandemic Influenza, 2006.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

837
39
17
893
PO 00000

1,179
53
24

1,051
49
27

1,256

1,127

Frm 00004

Fmt 3616

2005 actual

Identification code 80–0115–0–1–252

00.01
00.02

Obligations by program activity:
Space operations ...........................................................
Exploration systems .......................................................

Sfmt 3643

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NSA

1,140
6,986

2006 est.

2007 est.

7,013
6,205
117 ...................

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
09.01

Reimbursable program ..................................................

352

613

436

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

8,478

7,743

6,641

21.40
22.00
22.22

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts

562
836
634
8,742
7,541
6,671
14 ................... ...................

23.90
23.95
23.98

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance expiring or withdrawn .................

9,318
8,377
7,305
¥8,478
¥7,743
¥6,641
¥4 ................... ...................

24.40

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

836

634

664

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
8,552
7,013
6,234
40.33
Appropriation permanently reduced (P.L. 109–148) ...................
¥66 ...................
40.35
Appropriation permanently reduced ..........................
¥67
¥19 ...................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................
¥270 ................... ...................
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ..............................
60 ................... ...................
43.00
62.00
68.00
68.10

Appropriation (total discretionary) ........................
8,275
6,928
6,234
Mandatory:
Transferred from other accounts .............................. ................... ...................
1
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
Discretionary:
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
352
613
436
Change in uncollected customer payments from
Federal sources (unexpired) .............................
115 ................... ...................

68.90

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total discretionary) .....................................

467

613

436

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

8,742

7,541

6,671

72.40
73.10
73.20
74.00

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (unexpired) ............................................

1,686
8,478
¥8,096

1,953
7,743
¥7,859

1,837
6,641
¥6,805

74.40

86.90
86.93
86.97
87.00

Obligated balance, end of year ................................

¥115 ................... ...................
1,953

1,837

1,673

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new discretionary authority .....................
8,096
5,324
Outlays from discretionary balances ............................. ...................
2,535
Outlays from new mandatory authority ......................... ................... ...................

4,676
2,128
1

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

8,096

7,859

6,805

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

¥410
58

¥517
¥96

88.90

¥352

¥613

¥436

88.95

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority ............................................................
90.00 Outlays ...........................................................................

cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with BUDGET PAG

pabilities activities include Space Operations, and are described below.
Space operations.—Space Operations encompasses three
themes: International Space Station, Space Shuttle Program,
and Space and Flight Support. The International Space Station (ISS) is a complex of research laboratories in low Earth
orbit (LEO) in which American, Russian, Canadian, European, and Japanese astronauts conduct unique scientific and
technological investigations in a micro-gravity environment.
The objective of the ISS is to support scientific research for
human space exploration and maintain a permanent human
presence in Earth orbit. The FY 2007 budget request provides
funding for ISS launch processing activities, the continuation
of ISS on-orbit assembly with a crew of three, and continuation of research payload and experiment deliveries to orbit.
It also includes funding for development of habitability modifications and completion of the regenerative environmental
control and life support system needed to increase the crew
capacity, consistent with human space exploration research
requirements.
The Space Shuttle program’s mission is to support space
exploration by continuing to construct the ISS. The 2007
Budget request also supports one servicing mission to the
Hubble Space Telescope contingent upon safety and technical
feasibility assessments, which will be conducted after the next
Shuttle flight. The 2007 Budget request will allow NASA
to provide appropriate contingency resources to combat flight
hardware obsolescence, maintain ground systems and facilities, and to initiate actions for an orderly phase-out of the
program by 2010. In addition, the Shuttle program will work
closely with the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to
integrate the application of Shuttle flight hardware and selected ground systems to advance the development of the
Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle and Heavy
Lift Launch Vehicle.
Space and Flight Support is comprised of four critical and
distinct programs that provide on-going customer support for
a wide range of services including Space Communications,
Launch Services, Rocket Propulsion Testing, and Crew Health
and Safety. These services are critical for the conduct of space
exploration, aeronautical research, and physiological research.
They are provided to a wide range of customers including
NASA, other U.S. federal agencies, foreign governments, and
commercial interests.

¥336
¥100

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
Against gross budget authority only:
Change in uncollected customer payments from
Federal sources (unexpired) ..................................

¥115 ................... ...................

8,275
7,743

6,928
7,246

6,235
6,369

This appropriation provides for the full costs associated
with the Exploration Capabilities activities of the Agency,
which include the International Space Station, Space Shuttle,
and Space and Flight Support themes within the Space Operations Mission Directorate. The full costs include both direct
and indirect costs supporting these programs, and provide
for all of the research; development; operations; salaries and
related expenses; design, repair, rehabilitation, modification
of facilities, and construction of new facilities; and other general and administrative activities supporting the themes within Exploration Capabilities.
Detailed performance goals associated with the Exploration
Capabilities activities are addressed in NASA’s detailed budget request, and summaries of these activities are in the NASA
chapter of the 2007 President’s Budget. The Exploration CaVerDate Aug 31 2005

12:37 Jan 26, 2006

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Frm 00005

1069

Federal Funds—Continued

Fmt 3616

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0115–0–1–252

11.1
11.3
11.5

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .............................................
Other than full-time permanent ...........................
Other personnel compensation .............................

11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
22.0
23.1
23.2
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4
25.5
25.6
25.7
26.0
31.0
32.0
Sfmt 3643

Total personnel compensation .........................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Benefits for former personnel ...................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Transportation of things ...........................................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Rental payments to others ........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Other purchases of goods and services from Government accounts .................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Medical care ..............................................................
Operation and maintenance of equipment ...............
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
E:\BUDGET\NSA.XXX

NSA

2006 est.

2007 est.

782
46
24

523
37
18

615
28
16

852
212
7
32
5
1
4

578
146
2
27
5
1
4

659
165
2
29
4
1
3

55
9
163
516

50
8
148
468

42
7
122
380

226
2,478
2,926
3
66
87
231
141

205
2,250
2,657
3
60
79
210
128

175
1,918
2,203
2
51
67
179
109

1070

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued

nology Enterprise, were included under the ‘‘Space Flight Capabilities’’ account. In FY 2005, the ‘‘Space Flight Capabilities’’ account was renamed the ‘‘Exploration Capabilities’’ account. This account shows spending from balances prior to
the account restructuring.

EXPLORATION CAPABILITIES—Continued
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)—Continued

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)—Continued
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0115–0–1–252

2006 est.

f

2007 est.

41.0

Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

112

101

99.0
99.0

Direct obligations ..................................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

8,126
352

7,130
613

6,205
436

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

8,478

7,743

6,641

SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

87

AND

TECHNOLOGY

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0110–0–1–999

2006 est.

2007 est.

Direct program:
Direct program:
00.01
Space science ............................................................
00.02
Biological and physical research ..............................
00.03
Earth science .............................................................

6,210

6,609

74

21

27

14 ...................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
Total new obligations ....................................................

41
¥27

14 ...................
¥14 ...................

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

72.40
73.10
73.20
73.40
74.10

9,002

Total new obligations (object class 25.5) ................

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Adjustments in expired accounts (net) .........................
Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (expired) ................................................
Obligated balance, end of year ................................

86.93

Direct:
Civilian full-time equivalent employment .....................
Reimbursable:
2001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment .....................
1001

2007 est.

10.00

74.40

Identification code 80–0115–0–1–252

2006 est.

8 ...................
3 ...................
3 ...................

24.40

2005 actual

15
4
8

21.40
23.95

Personnel Summary

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from discretionary balances .............................

694 ................... ...................

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

¥2,098 ................... ...................
2,071 ................... ...................

18

f

14 ................... ...................

HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0111–0–1–252

Direct program:
Direct program:
00.03
Investments and support ..........................................
10.00

Total new obligations (object class 25.5) ................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
23.95 Total new obligations ....................................................
24.40

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
73.10 Total new obligations ....................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.40 Adjustments in expired accounts (net) .........................
74.10 Change in uncollected customer payments from Federal sources (expired) ................................................

2006 est.

2007 est.

16
5
5
¥11 ................... ...................
5

5

5

369
121
121
11 ................... ...................
¥198 ................... ...................
¥63 ................... ...................

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from discretionary balances .............................

198 ................... ...................

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

¥755 ................... ...................
753 ................... ...................

cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with BUDGET PAG

89.00
90.00

88.90
88.96

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
Against gross budget authority only:
Portion of offsetting collections (cash) credited to
expired accounts ...................................................

121

121

121

¥2 ................... ...................

2 ................... ...................

89.00
90.00

NASA’s ‘‘Human Space Flight’’ account included the International Space Station; Space Shuttle Payload and Expendable Launch Vehicle Support; Human Exploration and Development of Space Investments and Support; Space Communications and Data Systems; and Safety, Mission Assurance
and Engineering. In FY 2004, these activities—except for
Safety, Mission Assurance and Engineering, which was allocated as an indirect charge to all programs—along with the
Crosscutting Technologies portion of the Aerospace Tech12:37 Jan 26, 2006

Jkt 206762

405

¥27 ................... ...................

27 ................... ...................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
667 ................... ...................

NASA’s Science, aeronautics and technology account included Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, Earth
Science, Aerospace Technology, and Academic Enterprises. Beginning in 2004, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, Earth Science, the Aeronautics portion of Aerospace
Technology, and Academic Programs (which was renamed
Education Programs in FY 2004), were included under the
Science, aeronautics and exploration account. This account
shows spending from balances prior to the account restructuring.

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
198 ................... ...................

VerDate Aug 31 2005

405

2 ................... ...................

86.93

88.96

391

11 ................... ...................

Obligated balance, end of year ................................

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
Against gross budget authority only:
Portion of offsetting collections (cash) credited to
expired accounts ...................................................

23 ................... ...................

11 ................... ...................

74.40

88.90

¥127
391
405
27
14 ...................
¥694 ................... ...................
1,162 ................... ...................

PO 00000

Frm 00006

Fmt 3616

f

MISSION SUPPORT
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–0112–0–1–999

2006 est.

2007 est.

00.03

Obligations by program activity:
Construction of facilities ...............................................

5

11 ...................

10.00

Total new obligations (object class 32.0) ................

5

11 ...................

21.40

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year

16

11 ...................

Sfmt 3643

E:\BUDGET\NSA.XXX

NSA

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
23.95

Total new obligations ....................................................

24.40

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

Change in obligated balances:
72.40 Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
73.10 Total new obligations ....................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.40 Adjustments in expired accounts (net) .........................
74.40

¥5

¥11 ...................

25
20
20
5
11 ...................
¥19
¥11 ...................
9 ................... ...................
20

20

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from discretionary balances .............................

19

11 ...................

88.90
88.96

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
Against gross budget authority only:
Portion of offsetting collections (cash) credited to
expired accounts ...................................................

90.00

¥158 ................... ...................
159 ................... ...................

¥1 ................... ...................

2005 actual

22.00
23.95
23.98

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance expiring or withdrawn .................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
40.35
Appropriation permanently reduced ..........................

30
30

2006 est.

2007 est.

32

19
8
1
4

20
8
1
5

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

30

32

34

Personnel Summary

32

2005 actual

Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

Direct:
1001 Civilian full-time equivalent employment .....................

34

31
32
34
¥30
¥32
¥34
¥2 ................... ...................

Appropriation (total discretionary) ........................

31

32

34

72.40
73.10
73.20

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ...................................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

4
30
¥30

4
32
¥32

4
34
¥34

74.40

Obligated balance, end of year ................................

4

4

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new discretionary authority .....................
Outlays from discretionary balances .............................

27
3

28
4

30
4

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

30

32

34

89.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................

31

32

34

Frm 00007

Fmt 3616

213

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
2005 actual

Identification code 80–4546–0–4–252

2006 est.

2007 est.

09.00

Obligations by program activity:
Reimbursable program ..................................................

2

26

48

10.00

Total new obligations (object class 25.2) ................

2

26

48

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year ...................
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
4

23.90
23.95

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................

24.40

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

72.40
73.10
73.20

4
¥2

2 ...................
24
48
26
¥26

48
¥48

2 ................... ...................

24

48

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ................................... ................... ...................
Total new obligations ....................................................
2
26
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
¥2
¥12

14
48
¥35

74.40

4

Obligated balance, end of year ................................ ...................

14

27

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new discretionary authority .....................
2
12
Outlays from discretionary balances ............................. ................... ...................

24
11

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

2

12

35

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal
sources ..................................................................

¥4

¥24

¥48

4

86.90
86.93

201

2007 est.

WORKING CAPITAL FUND

86.90
86.93
32
32
34
¥1 ................... ...................

183

2006 est.

f

34

43.00

cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with BUDGET PAG

2007 est.

17
7
1
5

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Discretionary:
68.00
Spending authority from offsetting collections
(gross): Offsetting collections (cash) ...................

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

Total new obligations ................................................

2006 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Supplies and materials .................................................

21.40
22.00

For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended,
ø$32,400,000¿ $33,500,000, to remain available until September 30,
ø2007¿ 2008. (Science Appropriations Act, 2006.)

10.00

2005 actual

Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

1 ................... ...................

INSPECTOR GENERAL

Obligations by program activity:
00.01 Direct program activity ..................................................

34

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

f

Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

32

11.1
12.1
21.0
26.0

NASA’s Mission support account included Research and
Program Management and Construction of Facilities (CoF),
which have not been included in a separate appropriation
since 2001. Those Mission support activities are now budgeted
as part of the full costs associated with projects in the
Science, aeronautics, and exploration account or the Exploration capabilities account. This account shows spending from
balances prior to the account restructuring.

OF

28

The mission of the Office of Inspector General is to conduct
audits and investigations of agency activities. The Inspector
General keeps the Administrator and the Congress informed
of problems and deficiencies in agency programs and operations.

20

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
19
11 ...................

OFFICE

Outlays ...........................................................................

11 ................... ...................

Obligated balance, end of year ................................

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

1071

Federal Funds—Continued

VerDate Aug 31 2005

12:37 Jan 26, 2006

Jkt 206762

PO 00000

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
¥2
¥12
¥13

The Working Capital Fund (WCF) provides goods and services on a reimbursable basis. The WCF finances Scientific
& Engineering Workstation Procurement (SEWP) and NASA
Shared Services Center (NSSC). NSSC commences operation
in 2006, and will perform selected financial management,
human resources, information technology, and procurement
services to the NASA Headquarters and Centers.
Sfmt 3616

E:\BUDGET\NSA.XXX

NSA

1072

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

Trust Funds

NATIONAL SPACE GRANT PROGRAM
Trust Funds
SCIENCE, SPACE,

AND

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION TRUST FUND
2005 actual

Identification code 80–8977–0–7–252

Special and Trust Fund Receipts (in millions of dollars)

2006 est.

2007 est.

00.01

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program activity .................................................. ...................

3 ...................

01.00

10.00

Total new obligations (object class 41.0) ................ ...................

3 ...................

01.99

21.40
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance carried forward, start of year
3
Total new obligations .................................................... ...................

3 ...................
¥3 ...................

2005 actual

Identification code 80–8978–0–7–503

2006 est.

2007 est.

Balance, start of year total ........................................... ...................
14
15
Adjustments:
01.90 Adjustments ...................................................................
14 ................... ...................
Balance, start of year total ...........................................
Receipts:
02.00 Earnings on investments, Science, space and technology education trust fund ......................................

14

14

15

1

1

1

04.00

15

15

16

¥1 ...................

¥1

Total: Balances and collections ....................................
Appropriations:
05.00 Science, space, and technology education trust fund
07.99

Balance, end of year .....................................................

24.40

14

15

2005 actual

1

10.00

Total new obligations (object class 41.0) ................

1 ...................

1

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Total new obligations ....................................................

1 ...................
¥1 ...................

1
¥1

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Mandatory:
60.26
Appropriation (trust fund) .........................................

1 ...................

1

73.10
73.20

Change in obligated balances:
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

1 ...................
¥1 ...................

1
¥1

86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new mandatory authority .........................

1 ...................

1

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

1 ...................
1 ...................

1
1

cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with BUDGET PAG

92.01

Jkt 206762

3

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ................... ...................

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
1 ...................

12:37 Jan 26, 2006

3

f

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program activity ..................................................

VerDate Aug 31 2005

Obligated balance, end of year ................................ ...................

2007 est.

00.01

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
Total investments, start of year: Federal securities:
Par value ...................................................................
92.02 Total investments, end of year: Federal securities:
Par value ...................................................................

Change in obligated balances:
Obligated balance, start of year ................................... ................... ...................
3
Total new obligations .................................................... ...................
3 ...................

74.40

89.00
90.00
2006 est.

3 ................... ...................

15

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–8978–0–7–503

72.40
73.10

Unobligated balance carried forward, end of year

14

14

15

14

15

15

Frm 00008

Fmt 3616

PO 00000

Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds appropriated for ‘‘Science, Aeronautics and Exploration’’, or ‘‘Exploration
Capabilities’’ by this appropriations Act, when any activity has been
initiated by the incurrence of obligations for construction of facilities
or environmental compliance and restoration activities as authorized
by law, such amount available for such activity shall remain available
until expended. This provision does not apply to the amounts appropriated for institutional minor revitalization and construction of facilities, and institutional facility planning and design.
Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds appropriated for ‘‘Science, Aeronautics and Exploration’’, or ‘‘Exploration
Capabilities’’ by this appropriations Act, the amounts appropriated
for construction of facilities shall remain available until September
30, ø2008¿ 2009.
Funds for announced prizes otherwise authorized shall remain
available, without fiscal year limitation, until the prize is claimed
or the offer is withdrawn. Funding shall not be made available for
Centennial Challenges unless authorized.
øFunding made available under the headings ‘‘Exploration Capabilities’’ and ‘‘Science, Aeronautics and Exploration’’ in this Act shall
be governed by the terms and conditions specified in the statement
of managers accompanying the conference report for this Act.¿
øThe unexpired balances of prior appropriations to National Aeronautics and Space Administration for activities for which funds are
provided under this Act may be transferred to the new account established for the appropriation that provides such activity under this
Act. Balances so transferred may be merged with funds in the newly
established account and thereafter may be accounted for as one fund
under the same terms and conditions.¿ Amounts made available in
this Act under the headings, ‘‘Science, Exploration, and Aeronautics’’
and ‘‘Exploration Capabilities’’ may be transferred between such accounts, subject to the reprogramming procedures in section 605 of
this Act. (Science Appropriations Act, 2006.)

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