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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
The Department of Energy’s 1998 budget request for discretionary authority of $19.2 billion is $2.7 billion above its
1997 level. Nearly all of the increase ($2.3 billion) above 1997
is the result of two changes in how construction projects are
financed. The first increase is a result of how the funds for
DOE construction projects are requested. Starting in the 1998
budget DOE will adopt procedures currently used in many
other agencies that require full up front funding of construction projects rather than requesting the funds incrementally
each year. The change requires that $1.6 billion in budget
authority be added to the 1998 request. This will have no
effect on how the Department executes its spending programs.
Another increase ($0.7 billion) results from the $1 billion 1998
request for the Environmental Management privatization program started by the Congress in 1997. For these projects,
DOE contracts with private parties who construct facilities
to deliver cleanup services in later years when DOE will
pay for the services. Privatization should speed up completion
of these projects, ultimately reducing their overall costs. Although the privatization funds are required to proceed with
the contracts, outlays will not result until later fiscal years
when the private sector delivers the services. Except for these
two areas, all other DOE programs total $16.6 billion in 1998,
a $0.4 billion increase over the 1997 level.

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES

22.22
23.90
23.95

24.40
24.90
24.99

WEAPONS ACTIVITIES
For Department of Energy expenses, including the øpurchase, construction and¿ acquisition of øplant and¿ capital equipment and other
incidental expenses necessary for atomic energy defense weapons activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy
Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), øincluding the acquisition
or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant
or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion;¿ and the purchase
of passenger motor vehicles (not to exceed ø94¿ 70, for replacement
only), ø$3,911,198,000, to remain¿ $3,576,255,000 to become available
October 1, 1997 and $3,497,000,000 to become available on October
1, 1998, all of which shall remain available until expended. (Energy
and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)

70.00

1997 est.

1998 est.

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from
other accounts ....................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ........
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............

Obligations by program activity:
Stockpile stewardship .............................
Stockpile management ............................
Program direction ....................................

1,512
1,958
116

1,663
1,943
329

1,444
1,828
304

1,409
1,788
300

00.91
01.01

Total direct program ...........................
Reimbursable program ............................

3,586
921

3,935
1,400

3,576
1,400

3,497
1,400

10.00

Total obligations .................................

4,507

5,335

4,976

4,897

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of
year:
21.40
Uninvested balance ............................
21.90
Fund balance ......................................

148
343

25
358

..................
358

..................
358

491
4,391

383
5,311

358
4,976

358
4,897

1

..................

..................

..................

22.00
22.10

..................

..................

4,889
–4,507

5,694
–5,335

5,334
–4,976

5,255
–4,897

25
358

..................
358

..................
358

..................
358

383

358

358

358

3,455

3,911

3,576

..................

..................

..................

..................

3,497

936

1,400

1,400

1,400

4,391

5,311

4,976

4,897

1,518
4,507
–4,809

1,271
5,335
–5,420

1,186
4,976
–5,060

1,103
4,897
–4,913

56
–1

..................
..................

..................
..................

..................
..................

1,271

1,186

1,103

1,087

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ........
Outlays from current balances ...............
Outlays from new permanent authority

2,764
1,109
936

3,129
891
1,400

2,861
799
1,400

..................
715
4,198

87.00

Total outlays (gross) ...........................

4,809

5,420

5,060

4,913

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources ..............................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .......................

–899
–37

–1,363
–37

–1,363
–37

–1,363
–37

Total, offsetting collections
(cash) ....................................

–936

–1,400

–1,400

–1,400

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

3,455
3,873

3,911
4,020

3,576
3,660

3,497
3,513

88.90

1999 est.

00.01
00.04
00.06

Total unobligated balance, start of
year ............................................
New budget authority (gross) .................
Resources available from recoveries of
prior year obligations ..........................

Total new budget authority (gross)

..................

72.40

89.00
90.00

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

21.99

Total unobligated balance, end of
year .................................................

6

86.90
86.93
86.97

General and special funds:

1996 actual

Total budgetary resources available
for obligation ..................................
New obligations .......................................
Unobligated balance available, end of
year:
Uninvested balance ............................
Fund balance ......................................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
Permanent:
65.00
Advance appropriation (definite) ........
68.00
Spending authority from offsetting
collections: Offsetting collections
(cash) .............................................

Federal Funds

Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053

Unobligated balance transferred from
other accounts ....................................

Weapons activities.—This program includes the following activities:
Stockpile Stewardship.—This activity provides for the research, development, and engineering activities to support
the safety and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile,
without underground nuclear testing, through a sciencebased Stockpile Stewardship program. The core stewardship
program supports Stockpile Stewardship by maintaining
core competencies at the weapons laboratories and the Nevada Test Site, and through research on enhanced safety
and reliability of the enduring stockpile, dismantlement
techniques, waste minimization, and pollution prevention.
In addition, the core stewardship program maintains the
capability to execute an underground nuclear test if directed by the President. Research and development on inertial confinement fusion is also included and the transfer
of nonsensitive Defense Programs’ funded technology to the
private sector is promoted.
453

454

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
WEAPONS ACTIVITIES—Continued

Stockpile Management.—This activity provides for the
maintenance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, capabilities to modify or produce new weapons if required, lifetime surveillance of the stockpile, and retirement and disposal of weapons and weapon components. The Stockpile
Management program also supports activities that include
maintenance of technical and operational capabilities for
responding to nuclear/radiological accidents and incidents
worldwide. A major initiative under the Stockpile Management program is the dual-track strategy for a new tritium
source to provide tritium for the Nation’s enduring nuclear
weapons stockpile. This program also provides for nuclear
materials surveillance for storage, handling, shipping, safeguarding, control and accountability, and disposition for defense programs nuclear materials located at former Defense
Programs’ facilities.
Weapons Program Direction.—This activity provides personnel and contractual services for the Federal management, direction, and the administration of selected Defense
Programs’ missions.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
23.2
23.3

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .......................
Other than full-time permanent ....
Other personnel compensation ......

25.5
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Total personnel compensation ...
Civilian personnel benefits .................
Benefits for former personnel .............
Travel and transportation of persons
Rental payments to others .................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges .........................
Printing and reproduction ...................
Advisory and assistance services .......
Other services .....................................
Purchases of goods and services
from Government accounts ............
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................................................
Research and development contracts
Supplies and materials ......................
Equipment ...........................................
Land and structures ...........................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ............
Reimbursable obligations ........................

24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

110
3
11

120
..................
6

119
..................
6

120
..................
6

124
24
3
8
1

126
26
..................
12
..................

125
25
..................
12
..................

126
26
..................
12
..................

1
..................
35
261

11
1
76
261

11
1
76
260

11
1
76
261

577

683

678

683

2,124
71
7
90
250
10

2,322
..................
1
100
316
..................

2,286
..................
2
100
..................
..................

2,199
..................
2
100
..................
..................

3,586
921

3,935
1,400

3,576
1,400

3,497
1,400

ø$5,459,304,000¿ to remain available until expended øand, in addition, $160,000,000 for privatization initiatives, to remain available
until expended.¿ $5,052,499,000, to become available on October 1,
1997, and $4,647,000, to become available on October 1, 1998. (Energy
and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

–3
1,459
2,349
405
12

..................
1,740
1,559
300
..................

..................
1,745
1,455
258
..................

..................
1,632
1,310
232
..................

79

..................

..................

..................

1,393
41
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................
..................

1,275
..................
406
23
61
170
15
160

1,118
..................
388
23
50
..................
15
..................

1,006
..................
388
21
45
..................
13
..................

5,735

5,709

5,052

4,647

217
5,563

82
5,627

..................
5,052

..................
4,647

5

..................

..................

..................

32

..................

..................

..................

5,817
–5,735

5,709
–5,709

5,052
–5,052

4,647
–4,647

82

..................

..................

..................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ............

5,551
–6

5,619
..................

5,052
..................

..................
..................

43.00

5,545

5,619

5,052

..................

..................

..................

..................

4,647

18

8

..................

..................

5,563

5,627

5,052

4,647

1,880
5,735
–6,148

2,025
5,709
–6,082

1,652
5,052
–4,962

1,742
4,647
–4,920

563
–5

..................
..................

..................
..................

..................
..................

2,025

1,652

1,742

1,469

Identification code 89–0242–0–1–053

Obligations by program activity:
Corrective activities .................................
Environmental restoration .......................
Waste management .................................
Technology development ..........................
Transportation management ...................
Analysis, education, risk management
and other ............................................
00.07 Nuclear material and facility stabilization ......................................................
00.08 Compliance and program coordination ...
00.09 EM program direction ..............................
00.10 Policy and management ..........................
00.11 Environmental science program ..............
00.12 Environmental management privatization
00.13 Closure projects .......................................
00.14 Fixed asset acquisition ...........................

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04
00.05
00.06

10.00

Total obligations .................................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of
year: Uninvested balance ...................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) .................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of
prior year obligations ..........................
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from
other accounts ....................................
23.90
23.95
24.40

65.00
68.00

70.00

Total budgetary resources available
for obligation ..................................
New obligations .......................................
Unobligated balance available, end of
year: Uninvested balance ...................

Appropriation (total) .......................
Permanent:
Advance appropriation (definite) ........
Spending authority from offsetting
collections: Offsetting collections
(cash) .............................................
Total new budget authority (gross)

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
73.32 Obligated balance transferred from
other accounts ....................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ........
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............

1996 actual

72.40

99.9

Total obligations .................................

4,507

5,335

4,976

4,897

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0240–0–1–053

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ............
Full-time equivalent of overtime and
holiday hours ......................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

2,069

2,034

1,939

1,895

124

124

124

124

DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION

AND

WASTE MANAGEMENT

For Department of Energy expenses, including øthe purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and¿ capital equipment and other
expenses necessary for atomic energy defense environmental restoration and waste management activities in carrying out the purposes
of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et
seq.), including the øacquisition or condemnation of any real property
or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or
expansion; and the¿ purchase of passenger motor vehicles (not to
exceed ø20, of which 19 are¿ 6, for replacement only),

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ........
Outlays from current balances ...............
Outlays from new permanent authority

3,470
2,660
18

3,967
2,107
8

3,789
1,173
..................

..................
1,435
3,485

87.00

Total outlays (gross) ...........................

6,148

6,082

4,962

4,920

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
Non-Federal sources .......................

–18

–8

..................

..................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

5,545
6,130

5,619
6,074

5,052
4,962

4,647
4,920

89.00
90.00

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Environmental Management.—This program encompasses
the following defense-related activities:
The Office of Environmental Management must safely manage the generation, handling, treatment, storage, transportation and disposal of DOE nuclear and hazardous waste.
The 1998 budget request will support the following major
program areas:
Environmental Restoration.—Provides for assessments,
characterization, remediation, and decontamination and decommissioning at contaminated DOE facilities and sites.
Various amounts and types of waste have accumulated at
these facilities and sites as a result of past departmental
activities spanning nearly five decades.
Waste Management.—Provides for the safe, effective and
efficient management of wastes generated by defense activities, through treatment, storage and disposal of various
waste types including high-level, transuranic, low-level,
mixed low-level, hazardous and sanitary wastes in compliance with applicable local, State, and Federal requirements
and internal Department of Energy requirements.
Technology Development.—Conducts technology development activities which focus on the Department’s major environmental management issues while involving the DOE’s
best talent and that of the national (public and private)
science and engineering communities; develop and furnish
in conjunction with the Environmental Management (EM)
customer programs, innovative technologies to reduce risk
to workers, the public, and the environment, reduce cleanup
costs; and/or provide solutions that do not exist to current
problems shared by multiple sites. The Technology Development program is critical to achieving EM cleanup goals
through (1) contributing technologies that enable completion
and (2) through savings that can be redirected to other
cleanup projects. As the pace of cleanup accelerates, the
return on investment in Technology Development will multiply rapidly.
Environmental Science Program.—Responsible for establishing, managing and directing a targeted long-term basic
research agenda for Environmental Management problems
so that ‘‘transformational’’ or breakthrough approaches will
lead to significantly reduced long-term cleanup costs and
risks to workers and the public; ‘‘bridging the gap’’ between
broad fundamental research such as that performed in
DOE’s Office of Energy Research, and needs driven applied
technology development which has been historically supported by Environmental Management; and serving as a
stimuli for focusing the nation’s science infrastructure on
critical environmental management problems. In addition,
the Office is responsible for developing risk policy, requirements and guidance to ensure that risk analysis theory
and processes are integrated into coherent decision making
processes. The goals of these processes must be to meet
Departmental missions while protecting public health,
worker health and safety, ecosystem viability, and cultural
and national resources through integrated risk analysis
practices addressing technical, legal and social elements.
Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization.—Manage a
national program to stabilize and safeguard excess nuclear
materials, currently stored in various forms and locations,
to reduce the potential risks posed to workers and the public. Provide the means to achieve cost savings and efficiencies through deactivation of surplus facilities which results in lower costs of maintaining facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning. Provide interim storage
and stewardship of nuclear materials, including spent nuclear fuel, awaiting ultimate disposition. Support the Nation’s nonproliferation goals and policies through the receipt
and management of foreign research reactor spent nuclear
fuel. Provide policy direction for landlord planning and
budgeting, including reducing site infrastructure costs and

455

managing workforce restructuring. Manage the national
Transportation Management program and the national Pollution Prevention program and provide leadership for crosscutting issues raised by the field and/or Headquarters, as
well as serving as an advocate for the field at Headquarters.
Policy and Management.—Provides funding for overall direction, planning and management of the EM program and
support of crosscutting functions such as public accountability, finance, information management and strategic planning.
EM Program Direction.—Provides salaries and benefits,
travel and other contractual support costs for the Federal
workforce at Headquarters and in the field which support
the Environmental Management Program.
EM Privatization.—EM privatization will be funded under
the Defense EM Privatization Appropriation.
Fixed Assets.—Full funding of construction projects is included in the Defense Asset Acquisition Account.
EM will continue to improve the efficiency of its programs
through a variety of management and contracting strategies. In addition to privatization efforts, emphasis will continue on the reduction of support costs and implementation
of performance-based contracts.
EM is developing a Ten Year Plan to accelerate and complete a substantial amount of the cleanup of the EM complex within the next ten years. To achieve this goal, each
EM site is establishing projects with clearly defined ‘‘endstates’’ to clean up wastes, facilities, and materials. Once
the Ten Year Plan process is well underway, outyear funding for this program will be re-examined.
EM has adopted seven principles to guide its day-to-day
operations and the development of the Ten Year Plan: (1)
Eliminate the most urgent risks; (2) Reduce mortgage and
support costs to free up resources for further risk reductions; (3) Protect worker health and safety; (4) Reduce the
generation of waste; (5) Create a collaborative relationship
between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; (6) Focus
technology development on cost and risk reduction; (7) Integrate waste treatment and disposal across sites.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0242–0–1–053

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
23.1
23.3

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ...........................
Other than full-time permanent .........
Other personnel compensation ...........

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

190
4
5

189
4
5

168
4
4

168
4
4

199
41
2
12
9

198
41
2
12
9

176
36
2
9
7

176
36
2
9
7

18
1
481
860

18
1
479
856

16
1
425
759

16
1
425
759

25.4
25.5
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0
42.0

Total personnel compensation .......
Civilian personnel benefits .....................
Benefits for former personnel .................
Travel and transportation of persons .....
Rental payments to GSA .........................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges .............................
Printing and reproduction .......................
Advisory and assistance services ...........
Other services ..........................................
Purchases of goods and services from
Government accounts .........................
Operation and maintenance of facilities
Research and development contracts .....
Supplies and materials ...........................
Equipment ...............................................
Land and structures ................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ......
Insurance claims and indemnities .........

5
3,548
89
6
106
230
127
1

5
3,531
89
6
106
229
126
1

4
3,123
79
5
94
203
112
1

4
2,718
79
5
94
203
112
1

99.9

Total obligations .................................

5,735

5,709

5,052

4,647

24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0242–0–1–053

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ............

1996 actual

3,214

1997 est.

3,197

1998 est.

3,026

1999 est.

2,941

456

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION
MANAGEMENT—Continued

AND

WASTE

Personnel Summary—Continued
Identification code 89–0242–0–1–053

1005

Full-time equivalent of overtime and
holiday hours ......................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

16

1998 est.

16

1999 est.

16

16

in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), øincluding the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility
acquisition, construction, or expansion, and the purchase of passenger
motor vehicles (not to exceed 2 for replacement only), $1,605,733,000,
to¿ $1,605,981,000 to become available on October 1, 1997 and
$1,604,000,000, to become available on October 1, 1998, all of which
shall remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0243–0–1–053

DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PRIVATIZATION
For Department of Energy expenses for privatization projects necessary for atomic energy defense environmental restoration and waste
management activities authorized by the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), to remain available until expended. $1,006,000,000 to become available on October 1, 1997, and
$800,000,000 to become available on October 1, 1998.
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

1997 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations (object class 25.2) ......

..................

..................

1,006

800

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
22.00 New budget authority (gross) .................
23.95 New obligations .......................................

..................
..................

..................
..................

1,006
–1,006

800
–800

Identification code 89–0249–0–1–053

10.00

1998 est.

1999 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Nonproliferation and national security ...
Fissile materials disposition ...................
Worker and community transition ...........
Naval reactors .........................................
International nuclear safety and security
Environment, safety and health (defense) ..................................................
00.07 Other ........................................................
00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04
00.05
00.06

689
104
50
626
81

32
–10

82
1

54
..................

54
..................

Total obligations .................................

1,457

1,670

1,606

1,604

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of
year:
21.40
Uninvested balance ............................
21.90
Fund balance ......................................

94
31

64
..................

..................
..................

..................
..................

125
1,430

64
1,606

..................
1,606

..................
1,604

3

..................

..................

..................

–38

..................

..................

..................

1

..................

..................

..................

1,521
–1,457

1,670
–1,670

1,606
–1,606

1,604
–1,604

64

..................

..................

..................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ............
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ........

1,386
–5
49

1,606
..................
..................

1,606
..................
..................

..................
..................
..................

43.00

10.00

21.99

..................

1,006

..................

..................

..................

..................

800

22.21

70.00

..................

..................

1,006

800

22.22
23.90

..................
..................
..................

..................
1,006
..................

1,006
800
–30

..................

..................

1,006

Total unobligated balance, start of
year ............................................
New budget authority (gross) .................
Resources available from recoveries of
prior year obligations ..........................
Unobligated balance transferred to other
accounts ..............................................
Unobligated balance transferred from
other accounts ....................................
Total budgetary resources available
for obligation ..................................
New obligations .......................................
Unobligated balance available, end of
year: Uninvested balance ...................

1,776

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.93 Outlays from current balances ...............

..................

..................

..................

30

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

..................
..................

..................
..................

1,006
..................

800
30

89.00
90.00

1999 est.

671
104
70
626
81

..................

..................
..................
..................

1998 est.

646
104
70
683
84

22.00
22.10

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............

1997 est.

562
70
77
681
45

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
Permanent:
65.00
Advance appropriation (definite) ........
Total new budget authority (gross)

1996 actual

23.95
24.40

OTHER DEFENSE ACTIVITIES
For Department of Energy expenses, including the øpurchase, construction and¿ acquisition of øplant and¿ capital equipment and other
expenses necessary for atomic energy defense, other defense activities,

1,430

1,606

1,606

..................

65.00

Environmental
Management
Privatization.—Provides
funding necessary to proceed with privatization of various
DOE environmental management projects that will treat
some of DOE’s most contaminated soil and highly radioactive waste, as well as deactivate contaminated nuclear
facilities that cost excessive amounts of money to maintain.
This new approach to cleanup relies on the private sector
to construct and operate facilities or proceed with cleanup
actions on a fixed-price, fee-for-service basis. These competitively awarded projects are expected to save approximately
30 percent or more over the life-cycle of the projects, when
compared to DOE’s traditional approach of designing, constructing and operating a government-owned facility. Funds
in this account will allow DOE to enter into these contracts
and assures private investors that funds will be available
to pay for services once the facilities are built.

Appropriation (total) .......................
Permanent:
Advance appropriation (definite) ........

..................

..................

..................

1,604

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross)

1,430

1,606

1,606

1,604

1,281
1,457
–1,473

642
1,670
–1,671

641
1,606
–1,606

641
1,604
–1,604

–619
–3

..................
..................

..................
..................

..................
..................

642

641

641

641

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
73.31 Obligated balance transferred to other
accounts ..............................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ........
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
72.40

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ........
Outlays from current balances ...............
Outlays from new permanent authority

1,144
329
..................

1,285
386
..................

1,285
321
..................

..................
321
1,283

87.00

Total outlays (gross) ...........................

1,473

1,671

1,606

1,604

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

1,430
1,473

1,606
1,671

1,606
1,606

1,604
1,604

Other defense activities.—This program includes the following activities:

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Nonproliferation and National Security.—The Department’s Nonproliferation and National Security activities
consist of the following areas: Nonproliferation and Verification, Research and Development, Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Intelligence, Nuclear Safeguards and Security,
Security Investigations, Emergency Management and Program Direction. These activities provide policy, direction,
technology development and implementation, and leadership in national and international efforts to reduce the danger to U.S. national security posed by weapons of mass
destruction. Key mission areas are: (1) preventing the
spread of weapons of mass destruction materials, technology, and expertise; (2) detecting the proliferation of
weapons of mass destruction world wide; (3) reversing the
proliferation of nuclear weapons capabilities; and (4) responding to weapons of mass destruction emergencies.
Fissile Materials Disposition.—The Fissile Materials Disposition Program is responsible for the Department’s technical and management efforts to provide for the safe, secure, environmentally sound future storage of all weaponsusable fissile materials (high enriched uranium and plutonium) and the disposition of all fissile materials declared
surplus to national defense needs. Preparations have begun
to dispose of surplus weapons high enriched uranium, over
time, by blending it down to low enriched uranium for
peaceful use as commercial reactor fuel. In addition, DOE
will reduce the number of locations where weapons-usable
fissile materials are stored and will pursue a plutonium
disposition strategy that could involve both immobilization
in glass or ceramic form and burning of surplus plutonium
as mixed oxide fuel in existing reactors. Over the next
two years, DOE will complete tests, process development,
demonstrations, environmental reviews and detailed cost
proposals for both disposition approaches. Near term efforts
also involve implementation of consolidated long-term storage, pending disposition, for those materials; designing and
demonstrating a system to disassemble plutonium weapons
components and convert the plutonium to forms suitable
for long-term storage and either disposition approach; and
cooperative activities with Russia on plutonium disposition
technologies.
Worker and Community Transition.—In accordance with
Section 3161 of the National Defense Authorization Act of
1993, DOE is responsible for mitigating the impact on workers and communities that results from reductions in the
workforce at defense nuclear facilities. This program provides for the development and implementation of plans to
provide options to assist workers affected by workforce restructuring including preference in hiring, outplacement assistance, relocation assistance, and incentives for early retirement or separation. This program also provides impact
assistance to local communities.
Naval Reactors.—This program performs the design, development, and testing necessary to provide the Navy with
safe, militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants in keeping with the Nation’s nuclear-powered fleet defense requirements. During 1998, the program expects to reach 4,800
cumulative reactor-years of safe operation, and will continue to support and improve operating reactors and plant
components. In addition, the program will continue to develop nuclear reactor plant components and systems for
the Navy’s new attack submarine, procure equipment needs
for development and testing activities, and maintain or shut
down aging facilities as appropriate. In 1998, inactivation
will continue on six of the program’s eight land-based prototypes which have been shut down.
Intenational Nuclear Safety and Security.—The International Nuclear Safety decision unit supports management
and operational safety improvements, engineering and technology upgrades, and encourages development and continu-

457

ation of a U.S. equivalent nuclear safety culture at Sovietdesigned reactor sites in Russia, Ukraine, and Central and
Eastern Europe; continues to address safety and nonproliferation concerns related to breeder reactors and spent
fuel management in countries of the former Soviet Union;
supports tasks related to securing the closure of the
Chernobyl nuclear power plant and addressing the ultimate
disposition of Chernobyl’s Unit–4; and continues efforts at
Argonne National Laboratory-West to complete demonstration of the electrometallurgical technology for treatment of
EBR-II spent fuel and other DOE spent fuel types.
Environment, safety and health (Defense).—The Office of
Environment, Safety and Health is a corporate resource
that provides Departmental leadership and management to
protect the workers, public, and environment. This is demonstrated by conducting independent oversight of the Department’s environment, safety, health, and safeguards and
security programs; and by providing technical assistance,
resources, and information sharing. The programs in the
Other Defense Activities are Oversight, Health Studies, and
Radiation Effects Research Foundation support. The goal
of these programs is to improve the performance and effectiveness of the Department’s workforce and contractor employees in matters related to environment, safety, health,
and safeguards and security.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0243–0–1–053

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.8
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
23.1
23.3

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ...........................
Other than full-time permanent .........
Other personnel compensation ...........
Special personal services payments

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

51
1
2
..................

60
1
2
..................

53
1
2
1

53
1
2
1

54
10
1
4
..................

63
12
..................
5
5

57
11
..................
3
5

57
11
..................
3
5

1
..................
33
123

..................
1
44
132

..................
1
39
130

..................
1
39
132

9
560
536

21
609
583

22
599
573

22
608
580

26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Total personnel compensation .......
Civilian personnel benefits .....................
Benefits for former personnel .................
Travel and transportation of persons .....
Rental payments to GSA .........................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges .............................
Printing and reproduction .......................
Advisory and assistance services ...........
Other services ..........................................
Purchases of goods and services from
Government accounts .........................
Operation and maintenance of facilities
Research and development contracts .....
Operation and maintenance of equipment ....................................................
Supplies and materials ...........................
Equipment ...............................................
Land and structures ................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ......

..................
3
79
29
15

4
1
89
41
60

4
1
86
9
66

4
1
86
9
46

99.9

Total obligations .................................

1,457

1,670

1,606

1,604

24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4
25.5
25.7

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0243–0–1–053

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ............
Full-time equivalent of overtime and
holiday hours ......................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

731

785

765

738

6

6

6

6

DEFENSE NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL
For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the purposes
of Public Law 97–425, as amended, øincluding the acquisition of
real property or facility construction or expansion, $200,000,000,¿
to remain available until expended, $190,000,000 to become available
on October 1, 1997, and $190,000,000 to become available on October
1, 1998. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)

458

ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998
Budgetary resources available for obligation:
22.00 New budget authority (gross) .................
23.95 New obligations .......................................

General and special funds—Continued
DEFENSE NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL—Continued

Identification code 89–0244–0–1–053

Obligations by program activity:
10.00 Total obligations (object class 25.2) ......
Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of
year: Uninvested balance ...................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) .................
23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available
for obligation ..................................
New obligations .......................................
Unobligated balance available, end of
year: Uninvested balance ...................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
Permanent:
65.00
Advance appropriation (definite) ........

1996 actual

160

1997 est.

1998 est.

200

190

1999 est.

275

..................
248

88
200

88
190

88
190

248
–160

288
–200

278
–190

278
–275

88

88

88

200

190

..................

..................

..................

..................

190

Total new budget authority (gross)

248

200

190

190

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............

28
160
–151

37
200
–182

55
190
–195

50
275
–233

37

55

50

92

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ........
Outlays from current balances ...............
Outlays from new permanent authority

147
4
..................

100
82
..................

95
100
..................

..................
138
95

87.00

Total outlays (gross) ...........................

151

182

195

233

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

248
151

200
182

190
195

190
233

This appropriation was established by Congress as part
of the 1993 Energy and Water Development Appropriation
(P.L. 102–377) in lieu of payment from the Department of
Energy into the Nuclear Waste Fund for activities related
to the disposal of defense high-level waste.
The outyear funding for this account for fiscal years 2000–
2002 does not reflect the impact of the 1998 viability assessment of Yucca Mountain.
DEFENSE ASSET ACQUISITION
For expenses of national defense activities of the Department of
Energy authorized by the Department of Energy Organization Act
(42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), including the purchase, condemnation, construction, expansion, and acquisition of facility or plant, to remain
available until expended $2,166,859,000 to become available on October 1, 1997, and $1,067,000,000 to become available on October 1,
1998: Provided, That notwithstanding section 302 of Public Law 102–
377, amounts appropriated under this head shall not be available
for transfer to any other appropriation head without further appropriations action by Congress.
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0248–0–1–053

2,167
–2,167

1,067
–1,067

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .......................................
Permanent:
65.00
Advance appropriation (definite) ........

..................

..................

2,167

..................

..................

..................

..................

1,067

Total new budget authority (gross)

..................

..................

2,167

1,067

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............
73.10 New obligations .......................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance: Appropriation .............

..................
..................
..................

..................
..................
..................

..................
2,167
–477

1,690
1,067
–798

..................

..................

1,690

1,959

3

248

70.00

..................
..................

70.00

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

..................
..................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1999 est.

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04

Obligations by program activity:
Defense programs ...................................
Environmental management ...................
Naval reactors .........................................
Fissile materials disposition ...................

..................
..................
..................
..................

..................
..................
..................
..................

1,502
643
22
..................

668
310
19
70

10.00

Total obligations (object class 32.0)

..................

..................

2,167

1,067

72.40

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ........
Outlays from current balances ...............
Outlays from new permanent authority

..................
..................
..................

..................
..................
..................

477
..................
..................

..................
563
235

87.00

Total outlays (gross) ...........................

..................

..................

477

798

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ......................................
Outlays .....................................................

..................
..................

..................
..................

2,167
477

1,067
798

This account provides budget authority necessary to complete useful segments of all new and ongoing construction
projects supporting National Defense programs in the Department of Energy, as opposed to the traditional practice of
requesting incremental budget authority annually throughout
the life of the projects.
Defense Programs.—Provides budget authority in FY 1998
for all new and ongoing construction projects which support
the stockpile stewardship and management programs managed by the Office of Defense Programs. The largest project
is the National Ignition Facility, an inertial fusion facility
to be located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
This project accounts for about two-thirds of the total budget
request for Defense Programs fixed asset funding. Other continuing projects include the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and
the Contained Firing Facility Addition at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Proposed new projects include the
Stockpile Management Restructuring Initiative projects at
various locations.
Naval Reactors.—Provides requested funding in FY 1998
for all new and ongoing construction projects which support
the mission of the Office of Naval Reactors.
Environmental Management.—Provides for refurbishing or
replacing inadequate facilities and infrastructure to meet
modern environmental compliance requirements. Support is
provided to multiple Environmental Management sites and
installations for waste management and nuclear materials
management functions. In waste management, fixed asset
funding will support projects, including upgrades to hazardous/radioactive tank farm systems at the Savannah River and
Hanford sites, landfill construction at Oak Ridge, construction
of the initial tank retrieval system for high level waste at
the Hanford site, removal of high level waste from tanks
at Savannah River, construction of a new hazardous waste
treatment and processing facility at the Pantex Plant and
construction of a decontamination and waste treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the nuclear material and facility stabilization program, funding will
support projects, such as spent nuclear fuel dry storage at
Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, a plutonium stabilization handling system for the Plutonium Finishing Plant
at the Hanford site, construction of an actinide packaging
and storage facility at Savannah River, a spent nuclear fuel

ENERGY PROGRAMS
Federal Funds

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

canister storage and stabilization facility at Hanford, and utility system upgrades at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

ENERGY PROGRAMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
GENERAL SCIENCE

AND

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

For expenses of the Department of Energy activities including the
purchaseø, construction¿ and acquisition of øplant and¿ capital equipment and other expenses necessary for general science and research
activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy
Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), including the øacquisition
or condemnation of any real property or facility or for plant or facility
acquisition, construction, or expansion, $996,000,000 to remain available until expended.¿ purchase of 5 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, $890,910,000 to remain available until expended. Further, for the Large Hadron Collider project, to become available on
October 1 of the fiscal year specified and to remain available until
expended, as follows: 1999, $65,000,000; 2000, $70,000,000; 2001,
$70,000,000; 2002, $70,000,000; 2003, $65,000,000; and 2004,
$54,000,000. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act,
1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04

Obligations by program activity:
High energy physics .......................................................
Superconducting super collider .....................................
Nuclear physics ..............................................................
General science program direction ................................

657
21
300
10

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

988

1,003

891

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

46
966

24
996

17
876

1,012
–988

1,020
–1,003

893
–891

24

17

2

981
996
–15 ...................

891
–15

670
624
5 ...................
316
257
12
10

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

40.00
41.00

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................
Transferred to other accounts .......................................

43.00

Appropriation (total) ..................................................

966

996

876

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

966

996

876

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

514
988
–1,054

448
1,003
–989

462
891
–905

448

462

448

72.40

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

742
312

753
236

662
243

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

1,054

989

905

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

966
1,054

996
989

876
905

High energy physics.—This research program focuses on
gaining insights into the fundamental constituents of matter,
the fundamental forces in nature, and the transformations
between matter and energy at the most elementary level.
The program encompasses both experimental and theoretical
particle physics research and related advanced accelerator

459

and detector technology R&D. The primary mode of experimental research involves the study of collisions of energetic
particles using large particle accelerators or colliding beam
facilities.
Research in 1998 will continue to focus on studies of known
fundamental particle constituents, the search for new particle
constituents, and the pursuit of a unified description of the
four fundamental forces in nature.
In addition to contributing to breakthrough discoveries such
as the existence of the top quark, high energy physics research enhances national economic competitiveness. State-ofthe-art technology developed for accelerators and detectors
contribute to progress in fields such as fast electronics, highspeed computing, superconducting magnet technology, and
high-power radio frequency devices. High energy physics research also continues to make major contributions to accelerator technology and provides the expertise necessary for the
expansion of such technology into fields such as medical
diagnostics, and applied research using synchrotron light
sources.
The 1998 high energy physics budget request will support
the continued operation of all three of the Department’s major
high energy physics facilities: the Tevatron, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron
(AGS). In addition, $35 million, an increase of $20 million,
is provided for the Department’s FY 1998 contribution to U.S.
participation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at
CERN. An advance appropriation of $394 million is requested
for the LHC project for FY 1999 through FY 2004. This financing will allow DOE to meet its obligations to the LHC,
as outlined under the international agreement to be signed
in the summer of 1997.
The high energy physics R&D request provides funding for
advanced accelerator and detector R&D that is necessary for
next-generation high energy particle accelerators. The FY
1998 request provides $48 million to continue the fabrication
of BaBar, the detector for the B-Factory, and the upgrades
of the two detectors at Fermilab, CDF and D-Zero, a $12.4
million increase over the 1997 enacted level.
Superconducting Super Collider.—The Department will continue the orderly termination of the Superconducting Super
Collider (SSC) in 1998, as directed by Congress in the 1994
Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. No additional funding for such activities is requested in 1998. Due
to the efficiency of the SSC termination, $15 million in unobligated balances will be transferred to reduce the FY 1998
Energy Supply R&D appropriation request.
Nuclear Physics.—The goal of the nuclear physics program
is to understand the interactions and structure of atomic
nuclei and to investigate fundamental particles and forces
of nature as manifested in nuclear matter. In 1998, the program will continue to focus on the role of quarks in the
composition and interactions of nuclei, the application of nuclear physics methods to astrophysical problems, the properties of neutrinos, and the mechanisms by which colliding
nuclei exchange mass, energy, and angular momentum.
The nuclear physics program supports and provides experimental equipment to qualified scientists and research groups
conducting experiments at nuclear physics accelerator facilities. In addition, nuclear physics accelerators generate many
of the radioisotopes used for medical diagnosis and treatments; support several cooperative programs in biomedical
research and atomic physics; and provide training opportunities for health physicists concerned with radiation-effects on
humans.
The TJNAF/CEBAF experimental program began in FY
1996 and will continue in FY 1998 with the conduct of research in all three experimental halls. Experimental operations have also been initiated at the Radioactive Ion Beam
facility in Oak Ridge National Laboratory and will continue

460

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
GENERAL SCIENCE

AND

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES—Continued

in 1998. Operation of ATLAS (BNL), TAGS (BNL), and the
88-inch cyclotron (LBNL) will be supported, as will the operation of the university-based accelerator laboratories.
General science program direction.—Provides direction,
management, and administrative support to high energy and
nuclear physics programs within general science.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251

11.1
12.1
21.0
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4
25.5
31.0
32.0
41.0
99.9

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
7
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
1
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
1
Advisory and assistance services .................................. ...................
Other services ................................................................
21
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
2
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
335
Research and development contracts ...........................
195
Equipment ......................................................................
84
Land and structures ......................................................
195
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................
147
Total obligations ........................................................

988

1997 est.

1998 est.

7
6
1
1
1 ...................
1
1
1
1
2
339
238
86
195
132

2
350
259
112
25
134

1,003

891

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0222–0–1–251

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

108
1

1997 est.

1998 est.

100
90
1 ...................

SCIENCE ASSETS ACQUISITION
For expenses of Department of Energy general science and research
activities, including the purchase, construction, expansion, and acquisition of plant, real property, and other physcial assets necessary to
carry out the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101,
et seq.), including condemnation of any real property or facility,
$126,870,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 302 of Public Law 102–377, amounts appropriated under this head shall not be available for transfer to any
other appropriation head without further appropriations action by
Congress.
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0247–0–1–251

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

00.01
00.02

Obligations by program activity:
High energy physics asset acquisition .......................... ................... ...................
Nuclear physics asset acquisition ................................. ................... ...................

51
76

10.00

Total obligations (object class 32.0) ........................ ................... ...................

127

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................ ................... ...................
New obligations ............................................................. ................... ...................

127
–127

40.00

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation .................................................................. ................... ...................

127

Change in unpaid obligations:
73.10 New obligations ............................................................. ................... ...................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...................................................... ................... ...................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation ............................................................. ................... ...................
Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new current authority .............................. ................... ...................
Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ...................
90.00 Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ...................

This account provides full budget authority to complete useful segments of all new and on-going construction projects
supporting the Department of Energy’s general science and
research activities, as opposed to the traditional practice of
requesting incremental budget authority annually throughout
the life of the project.
The High Energy and Nuclear Physics programs request
funding for advanced accelerator and detector facilities that
are required to conduct forefront physics research. In High
Energy Physics, budget authority of $31.0 million is requested
to complete the Fermilab Main Injector Project, and $9.4 million to complete the SLAC Master Substation Upgrade, both
in FY 1998. A total of $5.5 million is also requested for
engineering design of the Neutrinos at the Main Infector
project, and $5.0 million for construction of the C0 detector
hall at Fermilab. Nuclear Physics requests budget authority
of $76.0 million to complete the Relativistic Heavy Ion
Collidor.
ENERGY SUPPLY, RESEARCH

AND

DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

For expenses of the Department of Energy activities including the
purchaseø, construction¿ and acquisition of øplant and¿ capital equipment and other expenses necessary for energy supply, research and
development, and uranium supply and enrichment activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act
(42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), including øthe acquisition or condemnation
of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition,
construction, or expansion;¿ purchase of passenger motor vehicles
(not to exceed ø24¿ 13 for replacement only), ø$2,710,908,000¿
$2,999,497,000, to remain available until expended, of which
$15,000,000 shall be derived by transfer from unobligated balances
under ‘‘General Science and Research’’ originally available for superconducting Super Collider termination activities, to be merged with
this account and to be available for the time and purposes for which
this account is available, and of which not to exceed $25,000 may
be for official reception and representation expenses for transparency
activities. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0224–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Solar and renewable energy ......................................
252
266
343
00.02
Nuclear fission ..........................................................
246
222
218
00.03
Uranium enrichment activities .................................. ................... ...................
79
00.04
Environment, safety and health ................................
115
86
109
00.05
Environmental restoration and waste management
632
587
682
00.06
Biological and environmental research ....................
390
384
377
00.07
Magnetic fusion .........................................................
240
231
225
00.08
Supporting research and technical analysis ............
888
689
869
00.09
Multiprogram facilities support ................................
33
14 ...................
00.10
In-house energy management ...................................
2 ................... ...................
00.11
Technical information management program ...........
12
12
12
00.12
Nuclear safety policy .................................................
13 ................... ...................
00.14
Multi-program operations .......................................... ...................
98
100
00.15
Computational and technology research .................. ...................
151 ...................
00.91
01.01

Total direct obligations .........................................
Reimbursable program ..................................................

2,823
917

2,740
1,498

3,014
1,350

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

3,740

4,238

4,364

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

233
3,676

178
4,209

164
4,349

10

15

15

3,919
–3,740

4,402
–4,238

4,528
–4,364

178

164

164

2,727

2,711

2,984

21.40

127
–83
44

83

127
83

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
40.35
42.00

Appropriation rescinded ............................................
Transferred from other accounts ..............................

43.00

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

2,758

2,711

2,999

917

1,498

1,350

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

3,676

4,209

4,349

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

2,228
3,740
–4,032
–10

1,926
4,238
–4,323
–15

1,826
4,364
–4,198
–15

1,926

1,826

1,977

68.00
70.00

–6 ................... ...................
38 ...................
15

72.40

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

1,241
1,874
917

1,220
1,605
1,498

1,350
1,498
1,350

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

4,032

4,323

4,198

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
–917
88.40
Non-Federal sources ............................................. ...................

–1,373
–125

–1,225
–125

88.90

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................

–917

–1,498

–1,350

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

2,759
3,115

2,711
2,825

2,999
2,848

The purpose of energy supply research and development
activities is to develop new energy technologies and improve
existing energy technologies. Included in this mission are
basic and applied research and targeted programs in technology development and market deployment.
This account provides funds for operating expenses, and
capital equipment for the advancement of the various energy
technologies under examination in the energy supply, research and development mission.
Solar and renewable energy technology.—A strong, balanced
program is proposed for FY 1998 that will contribute toward
strengthening the Nation’s energy security, enhancing global
sales of U.S. energy products, and increasing industrial competitiveness and federal technology transfer. Program activities range from basic cost-shared research in universities and
national laboratories to applied research, development, and
demonstration in full partnership with private sector manufacturers.
The FY 1998 program continues to work in partnership
with industry to develop and promote the use of solar energy.
Specific goals or activities of solar energy programs include:
(1) in photovoltaics: an industry-driven effort in research, production, engineering, and market development; (2) in solar
buildings: a focus on cooperative industry and utility efforts
to effectively use advanced solar technology for water heating;
(3) in solar thermal: working with industry to develop reliable
and efficient power tower and dish/engine systems, while reducing the costs of these emerging technologies and existing
parabolic trough systems; (4) in wind energy: developing and
testing utility-grade wind turbines in collaboration with utilities and industry; and (5) in biofuels: continued R&D to
achieve further reductions in biomass power and biofuels production costs, and to develop high-efficiency thermochemical
and biochemical conversion technologies. In addition to these
specific technologies, the FY 1998 Budget Request calls for
taking advantage of the synergies between emerging biomass
power technologies and new biomass liquid fuel technologies.
These developments raise the prospect of profitable ‘‘energy
crop’’ farming by rural Americans early in the next century,

461

accompanied by improved rural economic development, increased environmental protection in both urban and rural
areas, and new global market opportunities for power technology providers.
The Solar Energy program also includes ongoing support
for: (1) the interagency Committee on Renewable Commerce
and Trade (CORECT), and (2) renewable energy, outreach
information, and technical assistance programs.
The Geothermal Energy program supports work with industry and the utility sector to reduce the life-cycle cost of producing electricity with geothermal resources. The Hydropower
program addresses the primary environmental mitigation issues associated with licensing and sustaining hydropower production. The Electric Energy Systems program includes studies on health effects of electric and magnetic fields, and development of materials and devices employing advanced high
temperature superconducting technology. DOE leads the national effort to capture the energy-saving potential of hightemperature superconductivity. A key element of the effort
is the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative, an industryDOE collaborative effort intended to speed the commercialization of superconductivity products. Energy Storage is focused
on battery energy storage for use by utilities. In the Hydrogen
program, R&D efforts have accelerated the reduction of hydrogen production costs, increased the capabilities of hydrogen
storage, and demonstrated the benefits of using hydrogen by
integrating advanced technologies.
Nuclear Fission.—The FY 1998 request includes funds to
closeout the remaining Advanced Light Water Reactor
(ALWR) activities. The nuclear energy program will undertake a new initiative which will emphasize research and development activities in areas affecting U.S. nuclear plant safety, reliability, and performance improvement; applying DOEdeveloped technologies to reduce the storage, transportation
and repository cost of spent nuclear fuel in the United States;
and removing spent fuel from university reactors and assist
universities in conducting facility cleanups.
The Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems program will
continue to develop and produce nuclear power systems for
use in U.S. space missions and in support of military and
civilian applications. The University Nuclear Science and Reactor Support program will continue to provide educational
and research grants to maintain a stable human resource
base in the nuclear sciences. The Isotope Support decision
unit will continue to ensure adequate supplies of isotopes
which are in the National interest.
Uranium Programs.—In FY 1998, Uranium Programs is
a new decision unit in this account. These programs were
previously funded in the Uranium Supply and Enrichment
Account. This program includes: (1) leading efforts to increase
confidence that the low enriched uranium being purchased
by the United States from Russia has been derived from
high enriched uranium removed from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons; (2) managing the Department’s continuing responsibilities related to gaseous diffusion plants and representing the Department’s interests in transactions with the
United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC); (3) developing
effective and efficient means of using and/or disposing of depleted uranium; and (4) selling excess DOE-owned uranium.
Environment, safety and health.—The Office of Environment, Safety and Health is a corporate resource that fosters
Departmental excellence through innovative leadership in the
protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This
commitment to excellence will be demonstrated by striving
for continuous improvement in developing meaningful programs and policies; conducting independent oversight of environment, safety, health and security performance; and providing technical assistance, resources and information sharing.
The 1998 budget request for the Office of Environment,
Safety and Health reflects these priorities. It is important

462

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
ENERGY SUPPLY, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES—
Continued

to note that the budget request for the Office of Environment,
Safety and Health programs is contained in two accounts:
this and Other Defense Activities. The funding in this account
supports Technical Assistance, National Environmental Policy
Act program, Health Studies, Management and Administration, and Program Direction.
Scientific and Engineering Training and Development.—
This program provides for training, and professional development of technically trained professionals to staff and manage
the Department’s technically complex programs and facilities.
This will ensure that programs are in place to systematically
analyze scientific and engineering job requirements, assess
and identify the necessary technical qualifications and skills
of each position and target training as appropriate, and provide a trained cadre from which the Secretary can fill the
Department’s senior technical managerial positions with
qualified executives.
Biological and environmental research.—This program develops the knowledge base necessary to identify, understand,
and anticipate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and development and utilizes the
Department’s unique scientific and technological capabilities
to solve major scientific problems in the environment, medicine, and biology. Planned 1998 activities include programs
in global climate change; terrestrial, atmospheric and marine
environmental processes; molecular, cellular and systemic
studies on the biological effects of radiation, including radon
emissions; structural biology; and medical applications of nuclear technology and the Human Genome Program. Funding
for the Human Genome Program is provided to allow for
high throughput human DNA sequencing. Funding is provided to begin operation of the environmental and molecular
sciences laboratory, and the human genome laboratory.
Spill test facility.—Fulfilling the direction of Energy and
Water Acts, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization
Act, and the Clean Air Act Amendments, the overall goal
is to conduct user-sponsored spill tests and mitigation responder training in support of plant and community safety
and worker and community health associated with the handling, shipping and storage of hydrocarbons and related chemical industries’ materials with focused attention on liquefied
gaseous fuels and other hazardous fluids. Within this goal,
other Federal agencies such as the Environmental Protection
Agency conduct user-sponsored tests concerning airborne toxic
substances to refine hazard concerns in programs designed
in collaboration with the Department.
Fusion Energy Sciences Program.—At the direction of the
Congress, and with guidance from the National Academy of
Sciences and the Department of Energy’s Fusion Energy Advisory Committee, the Fusion Energy Sciences Program was
significantly restructured in FY 1997. The newly restructured
program will emphasize underlying basic research in plasma
and fusion sciences, with the long-term goal of harnessing
fusion as a viable energy source. The program centers on
the following goals: (1) Advancement of plasma science in
pursuit of national science and technology goals; (2) Development of fusion science, technology and plasma confinement
innovations as the central theme of the domestic program;
and (3) Participation in international fusion energy science
and technology activities.
The budget request of $225 million provides for support
of basic research in plasma science, plasma containment research, and investigation of tokamak alternatives, along with
continued operation of DIII–D and Alcator C-Mod. The
Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be shut down in
FY 1997 with remaining staff collaborating on other machines

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

both domestically and internationally. Fabrication of the
NSTX experiment at PPPL will continue. The FY 1998 budget
provides for completion of the U.S. participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering and Design Activity. ITER addresses the broad physics and engineering challenges that are generic to any next
step toward the goal of fusion energy, and is also consistent
with the fusion energy science mission. Moreover, ITER helps
leverage the U.S. program with the European, Japanese and
Russian fusion programs.
Supporting research and technical analysis.—The role of
these programs is to expand the scientific and engineering
base for future energy technology development and to provide
independent, objective evaluations of energy research activities.
Basic Energy Sciences.—The Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
program funds basic research in the physical, biological,
and engineering sciences that support the Department’s nuclear and non-nuclear technology programs. The BES program is responsible for operating large national user research facilities, including synchrotron light and neutron
sources, and a combustion research facility, as well as
smaller user facilities such as materials preparation and
electron microscopy centers.
The BES program also supports a substantial basic research budget for materials sciences, chemical sciences, energy biosciences, engineering and the geosciences. The program supports a number of research areas that are unique
within the Federal government; in many basic research
areas, such as materials science, funding provided by the
BES program represents a large percentage, or even the
sole source of Federal funding.
The 1998 BES budget request includes continued support
to maintain utilization of the Department’s large state-ofthe-art science facilities. The proposed funding will maintain the quality of service and availability of facility resources to users, including university and government scientists, as well as private companies who rely on unique
BES facilities for their basic research needs. Research areas
that will benefit from the facilities funding include structural biology, materials science, superconductor technology,
and medical research and technology development.
In addition, the BES request includes $23 million in FY
1998 to support research and development and Pre-Title
I activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the National Spallation Neutron Source to meet the Nation’s neutron scattering needs. The request also includes funding
for an instrumentation enhancement of the Department’s
neutron source at LANSCE.
Without a major new neutron source or upgraded operation of an existing research reactor, the United States
will forego significant scientific, technical, and economic
benefits that derive from neutron scattering and materials
irradiation research and the production of medical isotopes.
World-class neutron sources should enable the Nation to
carry out major research activities in areas such as biology,
materials science, superconductivity, pharmaceuticals, electronic materials, and many other technological areas that
are critical for future U.S. economic competitiveness and
national security.
University and Science Education.—This program was
terminated in FY 1997 at the direction of the Congress.
Energy research analyses.—This activity involves the
independent assessment of existing or proposed technological initiatives, including examination of the base of research that underlies energy supply and utilization technologies.
Multiprogram energy laboratories facilities support.—The
goal of the multiprogram energy laboratories facilities support program is to provide funds for rehabilitating, replac-

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

ing or demolishing deficient common-use utilities, roads,
and buildings and to correct ES&H deficiencies at the
multiprogram laboratories. Funding for this program is requested in the Energy Assets Acquisition account.
Computational and Technology Research (CTR).—This
program includes research in Mathematical, Information,
and Computational Sciences and Advanced Energy Projects
that were formerly budgeted as the Applied Mathematical
Sciences and Advanced Energy Projects subprograms respectively in the Basic Energy Sciences Program. The program also includes Laboratory technology research activities formerly budgeted as the Technology Transfer program.
The purpose of the CTR program is to provide an integrated
program in long term computational and technology research to address complex problems. The program also supports the operation of large supercomputer user facilities.
The FY 1998 budget request includes $35 million for the
‘‘Next Generation Internet’’ Initiative.
Technical information management program.—This program contributes to DOE’s missions in advancing energy and
nuclear defense technologies and protecting U.S. economic and
military security through the effective management and control of the Department’s scientific and technical knowledge
which is contained in its information resources. Major objectives which are structured to meet the overall purpose are
the effective management, control, and use of the results of
DOE’s multibillion dollar research program, and the acquisition and management of results of worldwide investment in
energy R&D.
Environmental management.—The Environmental Management Program encompasses the following non-defense activities:
Environmental Restoration.—Provides for assessments,
characterization, remediation, and decontamination and decommissioning at contaminated DOE and legislatively-authorized non-government facilities. Various amounts and
types of waste have accumulated at these facilities and
sites as a result of past department activities spanning
nearly five decades. EM is proposing to accelerate the cleanup at the Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Program
(FUSRAP) sites. An additional $99 million is requested and
will permit the significant completion of the existing
FUSRAP sites by FY 2002, four years ahead of the current
schedule.
Waste Management.—Provides for the safe, effective, and
efficient management of wastes generated by Energy Supply Research and Development funded activities, through
treatment, storage and disposal of various waste types including high-level, transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level,
hazardous, or sanitary wastes in compliance with applicable
local, State and Federal requirements and internal Department of Energy requirements.
Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization.—Manage a
national program to stabilize and safeguard excess nuclear
materials, currently stored in various forms and locations,
to reduce the potential risks posed to workers and the public. Provide the means to achieve cost savings and efficiencies through deactivation of surplus facilities which results in lower costs of maintaining facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning. Provide interim storage
and stewardship of nuclear materials, including spent nuclear fuel, awaiting ultimate disposition. Manage the national Transportation Management program and the national Pollution Prevention program and provide leadership
for crosscutting issues raised by the field and/or Headquarters, as well as serving as an advocate for the field
at Headquarters.
Fixed Assets.—Funding of construction projects is included in the Energy Assets Acquisition account.

463

Policy and management.—Provides executive direction,
management assistance, and administrative support to all
programs within energy supply activities.
Multiprogram Operations.—This account funds the Department’s multiprogram Field Operations Offices. The four affected field operations offices are located at Chicago, Idaho,
Oak Ridge, and Oakland. They perform functions in support
of energy activities throughout the country. Among these
functions are field procurement, engineering and construction
management, environmental safety and health monitoring,
property management, labor relations, legal counsel, and
maintenance of personnel and financial systems. These federal employees conduct the management oversight of approximately 56,800 management and operating contractor employees spread across the four field installations.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0224–0–1–271

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
23.1
23.2
23.3

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .............................................
Other than full-time permanent ...........................
Other personnel compensation .............................

1997 est.

1998 est.

71
2
3

69
2
3

75
2
3

76
14
1
4
1
1

74
14
1
4
1
1

80
15
1
4
1
1

372
1
62
422

361
1
60
408

395
1
65
447

25.4
25.5
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Total personnel compensation .........................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Benefits for former personnel ...................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Rental payments to others ........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

80
346
747
3
109
130
454

78
388
673
3
106
126
441

85
452
728
3
116
138
482

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

2,823
917

2,740
1,498

3,014
1,350

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

3,740

4,238

4,364

24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0224–0–1–271

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

1997 est.

1,118
5

2,022
5

1998 est.

1,933
5

ENERGY ASSETS ACQUISITION
For expenses of Department of Energy energy supply research and
development activities, including the purchase, construction, expansion, and acquisition of plant, real property, and other physical assets
to carry out the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C.
7101, et seq.), including condemnation of any real property or facility,
$88,914,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding section 302 of Public Law 102–377, amounts appropriated under this head shall not be available for transfer to any
other appropriation head without further appropriations action by
Congress.
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0246–0–1–271

00.01
00.02
00.04
00.05

Obligations by program activity:
Solar and renewable technologies .................................
Nuclear energy ...............................................................
Uranium enrichment activities ......................................
Energy research .............................................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

...................
...................
...................
...................

...................
...................
...................
...................

1998 est.

2
11
23
51

464

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued

øURANIUM SUPPLY

ENERGY ASSETS ACQUISITION—Continued
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Identification code 89–0246–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

00.06

Environmental management .......................................... ................... ...................

2

10.00

Total obligations (object class 32.0) ........................ ................... ...................

89

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................ ................... ...................
New obligations ............................................................. ................... ...................

89
–89

40.00

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation .................................................................. ................... ...................

89

73.10
73.20
74.40

Change in unpaid obligations:
New obligations ............................................................. ................... ...................
Total outlays (gross) ...................................................... ................... ...................
Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation ............................................................. ................... ...................

89
–31
58

AND

ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES¿

øFor expenses of the Department of Energy in connection with
operating expenses; the purchase, construction, and acquisition of
plant and capital equipment and other expenses necessary for uranium supply and enrichment activities in carrying out the purposes
of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et
seq.) and the Energy Policy Act (Public Law 102–486, section 901),
including the acquisition or condemnation of any real property or
any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or expansion; purchase of electricity as necessary; and the purchase of passenger motor vehicles (not to exceed 3 for replacement only);
$43,200,000, to remain available until expended: Provided That revenues received by the Department for uranium programs and estimated to total $42,200,000 in fiscal year 1997 shall be retained and
used for the specific purpose of offsetting costs incurred by the Department for such activities notwithstanding the provisions of 31
U.S.C. 3302(b) and 42 U.S.C. 2296(b)(2): Provided further, That the
sum herein appropriated shall be reduced as revenues are received
during fiscal year 1997 so as to result in a final fiscal year 1997
appropriation from the General Fund estimated at not more than
$1,000,000.¿ (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act,
1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

86.90

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority .............................. ................... ...................

31

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ...................

89
31

This account provides full budget authority to complete useful segments of all new and on-going construction projects
supporting the Department of Energy’s energy supply research and development activities, as opposed to the traditional practice of requesting incremental budget authority annually throughout the life of the project.
Solar and Renewable Energy Program.—The $2.2 million
of asset funding will support phase 3 of the Field Test Laboratory Building Renovation and Expansion project. Phase 3 is
the design and construction of a 278 square meter building
addition for high-bay research laboratories to support research activities related to converting renewable energy resources to higher-value fuels and chemicals.
Nuclear Energy and Uranium Programs.—Asset funding
will support fire and safety upgrades of the Test Reactor
Area (TRA) complex at the Idaho National Energy Laboratory
and the construction of cylinder storage yards to provide safe
storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride at the Paducah and
Oak Ridge gaseous diffusion plants. Budget authority of
$10,850,000 will fully fund remaining TRA landlord project
requirements; budget authority of $22.3 million will fully fund
requirements for the two cylinder yard projects.
Energy Research.—Asset funding is requested for two Energy Research programs. The Multiprogram Energy Laboratory Facilities Support program funds the refurbishment or
replacement of inadequate general purpose facilities and infrastructure that support research needs. Budget authority
of $40.3 million is requested to fully fund the completion
of five on-going projects and one new project at Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. An additional $11.0 million in budget authority is requested to fully
fund the completion of the Combustion Research Facility in
the Basic Energy Sciences program.
Environmental Management.—Provides funding for refurbishing or replacing inadequate facilities and infrastructure
to meet environmental requirements at Oak Ridge National
Laboratory (ORNL) and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Specifically, funding will support needed upgrades and construction of waste handling facilities at ORNL
and storage capacity for spent nuclear fuel at INEL.

Identification code 89–0226–0–1–271

00.01
01.01

Obligations by program activity:
Operating expenses ........................................................
Capital investment ........................................................

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.21 Unobligated balance transferred to other accounts

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

88
62 ...................
1 ................... ...................
89

62 ...................

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

84
19 ...................
64
43 ...................
–40 ................... ...................
108
–89

62 ...................
–62 ...................

19 ................... ...................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
64
Permanent:
68.00
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) ..................................... ...................

42 ...................

70.00

1 ...................

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

64

43 ...................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

114
89
–122

81
18
62 ...................
–125
–18

81

18 ...................

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
45
Outlays from current balances ......................................
77
Outlays from new permanent authority ......................... ...................

1 ...................
82
18
42 ...................

72.40

86.90
86.93
86.97
87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

122

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.00
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Federal sources ...................

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

64
122

125

18

–42 ...................

1 ...................
83
18

Uranium Programs.—Beginning in fiscal year 1998, these
programs will be funded in the Energy Supply, Research and
Development Activities account.

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0226–0–1–271

11.1
12.1
23.3
25.1
25.2
25.4
31.0
32.0
99.9

1997 est.

1998 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
2
3 ...................
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
1
1 ...................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
4
3 ...................
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
1
1 ...................
Other services ................................................................
1
1 ...................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
79
49 ...................
Equipment ......................................................................
1 ................... ...................
Land and structures ...................................................... ...................
4 ...................
Total obligations ........................................................

89

62 ...................

73.32
73.45
74.40

465

Obligated balance transferred from other accounts
Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

3 ................... ...................
–6 ................... ...................
353

348

327

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

189
282

146
248

138
229

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

471

394

367

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

415
471

365
394

346
367

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0226–0–1–271

1001

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH

AND

1997 est.

52

1998 est.

46 ...................

DEVELOPMENT

For necessary expenses in carrying out fossil energy research and
development activities, under the authority of the Department of
Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95–91), including the acquisition of interest, including defeasible and equitable interests in any
real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition or
expansion, and for conducting inquiries, technological investigations
and research concerning the extraction, processing, use, and disposal
of mineral substances without objectionable social and environmental
costs (30 U.S.C. 3, 1602, and 1603), performed under the minerals
and materials science programs at the Albany Research Center in
Oregon, ø$364,704,000¿ $346,408,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no part of the sum herein made available
shall be used for the field testing of nuclear explosives in the recovery
of oil and gas. (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.05
00.06
00.07
00.08
00.09

Obligations by program activity:
Coal research and development ....................................
Oil, gas, and shale research and development ............
Program direction and management support ...............
Environmental restoration ..............................................
Cooperative R&D ventures .............................................
Fuels conversion (natural gas and electricity) .............
Plant and capital equipment ........................................
Mining research and development ................................

124
161
66
14
6
2
2
37

112
171
65
15
4
2
3
17

100
155
62
13
6
2
3
5

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

412

389

346

10
415

24 ...................
365
346

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................
22.22 Unobligated balance transferred from other accounts
21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

6 ................... ...................
5 ................... ...................
436
–412

389
–389

346
–346

24 ................... ...................

40.00
41.00
42.00

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................
Transferred to other accounts .......................................
Transferred from other accounts ...................................

43.00

Appropriation (total) ..................................................

415

365

346

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

415

365

346

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

415
412
–471

353
389
–394

348
346
–367

416
365
346
–5 ................... ...................
4 ................... ...................

72.40

The Fossil Energy R&D programs support the Energy Policy Act through research and development that will strengthen the technology base on which industry can draw in developing future new products and processes for the commercial
market. The programs support activities ranging from basic
research in universities and national laboratories to applied
R&D and proof-of-concept projects in private sector firms.
The Fossil Energy R&D programs proposed in the 1998
budget will continue limited Federal support of company-specific technology development and demonstration activities.
The program continues to fund high-priority, high risk and
cross-cutting research that will improve the Nation’s ability
to cleanly and efficiently use coal, and to enhance the economic recovery of our oil and gas reserves.
Coal R&D.—For 1998, programs will continue to focus on
meeting the new goals and objectives and changing mission
the Department of Energy. An integrated research and development program consisting of: (1) Advanced Clean/Efficient
Power Systems, (2) Advanced Fuels Research, and (3) Advanced Research and Technology Development continues to
address technology development.
Advanced Power Systems research and development concentrates on a set of building-block technologies that will
yield the clean coal power generation systems of the future.
Typically, many technologies contribute toward advancing any
single system. By focusing on building-block technologies that
will improve a variety of systems, the Department’s program
makes optimal use of funds for research, development and
demonstration. The categories of these systems that hold
great promise for commercial use include: Advanced Pulverized Coal-fired Powerplants, High Efficiency Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, High Efficiency Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles, Indirectly Fired Cycles, and Advanced Research and Environmental Technology.
The Advanced Clean Fuels Research program will conduct
activities to develop clean methods to produce coal-derived
liquid fuels. This research consists of Coal Preparation, Direct
Liquefaction, Indirect Liquefaction, and Advanced Research
& Environmental Technology.
Oil and gas.—The oil program encompasses new and improved oil recovery and related research and development,
industry cost-shared demonstration of improved and advanced
oil recovery methods, environmental research activities directed to facilitate environmentally acceptable exploration and
production of domestic oil resources, and research directed
to improve technology needed to economically upgrade domestic-use crude oils in an environmentally sound manner.
Consistent with Energy Policy Act objectives, the natural
gas program emphasizes enhanced gas production, storage
technology, and high efficiency, low NOx turbines.
As in all other programs, industry and Gas Research Institute cost-sharing is a key feature. Advanced computational
work and the national laboratory partnership focus on the
transfer of Defense-developed technology to the oil and gas
industry. The fuel cells program will continue under this
heading since gas-fueled fuel cells will most probably be the
first to be developed.

466

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998
partment of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act,
1997.)

General and special funds—Continued
FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH

AND

DEVELOPMENT—Continued

Consistent with Congressional direction, the FY 1998 request also includes funding for the mining research partnership program at the Albany Research Center in Oregon,
which was formerly funded by the Bureau of Mines.
Program direction and management support.—This program
provides the funding for all Headquarters and indirect field
personnel and overhead expenses in Fossil Energy. In addition, it provides support for day-to-day project management
functions.
Environmental restoration.—The Department of Energy is
assisting in payments for the environmental clean-up of
former Fossil Energy projects as required by the Environmental Protection Agency. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites include the Western Superfund Site at Ft. Lewis, Washington,
and the Rock Springs and Hoe Creek Sites in Wyoming. Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) efforts are underway at the Federal Energy Technology Center Morgantown
Office (formerly the Morgantown Energy Technology Center)
to eliminate cross-connections between sewer and storm water
lines, and at the Federal Energy Technology Center Pittsburgh Office (formerly the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center) to clean up contaminated soil and monitor groundwater.
In addition, as a result of internal DOE evaluations other
efforts are underway at both sites of the Federal Energy
Technology Center to correct a number of other environmental
problems.
Fuels conversion.—This program will continue regulatory
reviews and oversight of the transmission of natural gas and
electricity across the U.S. borders and to process certifications
of alternate fuel capability.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
23.3
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

25.4
25.5
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0
99.5

Total personnel compensation ..............................
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Benefits for former personnel ........................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Research and development contracts ...........................
Supplies and materials .................................................
Equipment ......................................................................
Land and structures ......................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................
Below reporting threshold ..............................................

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

1997 est.

1998 est.

57
1
1

54
1
1

53
1
1

59
11
1
3
4
27
43

56
11
1
3
4
25
41

55
10
1
2
4
22
40

7
5
5
60
61
61
171
165
130
8
7
6
3
1
1
2
2
2
9
7
7
4 ................... ...................
412

389

346

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0213–0–1–271

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

NAVAL PETROLEUM

AND

1,163
3

1997 est.

691
3

1998 est.

683
3

OIL SHALE RESERVES

For necessary expenses in carrying out naval petroleum and oil
shale reserve activities, ø$143,786,000¿ $117,000,000, to remain
available until expended: Provided, That the requirements of 10
U.S.C. 7430(b)(2)(B) shall not apply to fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998. (De-

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

152

208

208

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

439
148

437
144

373
117

587
–152

581
–208

490
–208

437

373

282

148

144

117

179
152
–170

161
208
–154

215
208
–134

161

215

289

10.00

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

40.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
72.40

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

59
111

58
96

47
87

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

170

154

134

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

148
170

144
154

117
134

In the past, this program has included those activities necessary to operate, explore, conserve, develop, and produce the
naval petroleum reserves at the maximum efficient rate and
to conserve and protect the oil shale reserves. This has included routine operation and maintenance, development and
exploration drilling, environmental and conservation work,
and construction and installation of on-reserve facilities and
related systems required for the collection, storage, and distribution of produced petroleum and related products.
In order to maximize the return on the taxpayer’s investment and the return to the Treasury and as part of the
Administration’s proposal to reinvent the Department of Energy, Public Law 104–106 authorizes the Department to sell
the Government’s interest in Elk Hills, the major oil and
natural gas field located near Bakersfield, California that accounts for the bulk of this program. Under procedures established in Public Law 104–106, a minimum acceptable price
shall be established for Elk Hills and the sale shall be conducted on a competitive basis to be completed not later than
February 10, 1998. The Department shall also conduct a
study of the remaining petroleum and oil shale reserves to
determine which of the following options would maximize the
value of these reserves to the Government. These options
include (1) retention and operation, (2) transfer to another
Federal agency, (3) lease, or (4) sale. This law also authorizes
the Department to produce Elk Hills at the maximum economic rate. Payments to the State of California for the California State Teachers’ Retirement System are included in the
President’s Budget beginning in FY 1999, in settlement of
a long-standing claim by the state regarding certain Elk Hills
lands.
Elk Hills was originally set aside to provide oil for the
Navy as it converted from coal to oil near the start of this
century. Oil and gas from the field has been produced there
with contractor assistance and sold commercially since 1976.
Producing and selling this oil and natural gas is a commer-

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

cial, not a governmental activity, which is more appropriately
performed by the private sector. Restructuring at Elk Hills
is consistent with the Administration’s commitment to reinvent the government, subjecting public organizations to
market dynamics where this can be done in a way to obtain
the best value for the taxpayer’s dollar. The asset sale proceeds estimate included in the Budget is consistent with the
FY 1997 Budget estimate and is not based on any newly
developed geologic data or evaluations being carried out by
independent experts. When this updated information becomes
available, the estimate is likely to change.

Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271

11.1
12.1
12.1
25.1
25.2
25.4
99.5

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ..............................

517
550
688
–4 ................... ...................
20 ................... ...................

43.00

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

533

550

688

20

20

20

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

553

570

708

68.00
70.00

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
72.40

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

467

1997 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
5
5
Civilian personnel benefits:
Civilian personnel benefits ....................................... ................... ...................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
1
1
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
7
15
Other services ................................................................
127
175
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
11
11
Below reporting threshold ..............................................
1
1

1998 est.

3
2
1
3
187
11
1

684
594
597
555
588
708
–644
–585
–609
–1 ................... ...................
594

597

696

Total obligations ........................................................

152

208

1001

1996 actual

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

78

1997 est.

72

166
458
6
14

165
400
6
14

206
383
6
14

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

644

585

609

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal
sources ..................................................................

–20

–20

–20

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

533
624

550
565

688
589

208

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0219–0–1–271

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

87.00

99.9

86.90
86.93
86.97
86.98

1998 est.

40
89.00
90.00

ENERGY CONSERVATION
For necessary expenses in carrying out energy conservation activities, ø$569,762,000¿ $707,700,000, to remain available until expended, including, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the
excess amount for fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998 determined under the
provisions of section 3003(d) of Public Law 99–509 (15 U.S.C. 4502):
Provided, That ø$149,845,000¿ $191,100,000 shall be for use in energy conservation programs as defined in section 3008(3) of Public
Law 99–509 (15 U.S.C. 4507) and shall not be available until excess
amounts are determined under the provisions of section 3003(d) of
Public Law 99–509 (15 U.S.C. 4502): Provided further, That notwithstanding section 3003(d)(2) of Public Law 99–509 such sums shall
be allocated to the eligible programs as follows: ø$120,845,000¿
$154,100,000 for weatherization assistance grants and ø$29,000,000¿
$37,000,000 for State energy conservation grants. (Department of the
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0215–0–1–272

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Buildings sector .............................................................
88 ................... ...................
Building technology, State and community programs—non-grant .................................................... ...................
90
112
00.03 Building technology, State and community programs
–grants ...................................................................... ...................
150
191
00.04 Federal energy management program ........................... ...................
20
31
00.05 Industrial sector .............................................................
108
119
140
00.06 Transportation sector .....................................................
178
176
203
00.07 Technical and financial assistance ..............................
173 ................... ...................
00.09 Policy and management ................................................
8
33
31
00.01
00.02

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

555

588

708

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

19
553

18 ...................
570
708

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

1 ................... ...................
573
–555

588
–588

708
–708

18 ................... ...................

The Administration’s energy efficiency programs produce
substantial benefits for the Nation—both now and in the future—in terms of economic growth, increased national security and a cleaner environment through the research and
development of energy efficiency and pollution prevention
technologies. These programs carry out the Department’s responsibility under the bipartisan Energy Policy Act of 1992
and other major pieces of authorizing legislation.
The dollar benefits of our carefully constructed programs—
to industries, homeowners, and commercial firms—far exceed
program costs. Furthermore, the technologies developed in
these programs create jobs and global market opportunities
for U.S. firms. When the benefits to national security and
the environment are included, it is clear that these programs
represent investments in a clean, productive future.
In total, the Department’s energy efficiency programs are
projected to save consumers and businesses over $10 billion
per year by the year 2005. Energy efficiency programs for
industry are projected to save U.S. firms over $3 billion annually by the year 2000. Our transportation technologies research is designed to reduce oil imports thereby substantially
reducing the cost of imported oil.
The activities and programs contained in the 1998 Budget
Request represent a balanced portfolio of research and development, applied research and demonstration, and market introduction. Virtually all of the research and development programs are conducted jointly with industrial partners who
share significantly in research costs, often paying 33–50 percent or more. Similarly, demonstration and deployment programs are specifically designed to leverage the existing programs and the efforts of utilities and existing state and local
government programs in energy efficiency and pollution prevention.
Building, State and Community Sector.—In fiscal year
1998, research and development to improve the energy efficiency of appliances, building equipment, and the building
envelope is complemented by new incentive programs designed to move advanced technologies into the marketplace

468

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
ENERGY CONSERVATION—Continued

and produce near-term energy savings with associated economic and environmental benefits. Voluntary partnerships for
lowering the barriers to cost-effective, new technologies based
on the Energy Policy Act of 1992 represent collaborations
with many stakeholders, including manufacturers, utilities,
State and local organizations, and the general public. The
program to develop appliance and lighting test procedures
and standards is utilizing new collaborative processes and
analytical approaches in order to ensure participation by all
interested stakeholders. The program to encourage building
efficiency codes and standards will focus on expanded voluntary programs. The State and Local Partnership Program,
which includes the Weatherization Assistance Program and
the State Energy Program (a consolidated program including
the former State Energy Conservation Program and the Institutional Conservation Program) is designed to promote the
adoption of energy efficient and renewable technologies among
States, municipalities, institutions, and by private citizens.
Federal Energy Management Program.—The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will continue to reduce
the cost of government by advancing energy efficiency and
water conservation, and to use solar and other renewable
energy as a means to reduce energy costs. FEMP’s major
fiscal year 1998 emphasis will be on using private sector
investments to retrofit federal facilities using energy savings
performance contracting, thus stretching federal leveraging
to the maximum.
Industrial Sector.—The FY 1998 program focuses on funding cost-shared research in critical technology areas identified
by industry. Through its ‘‘Industries of the Future’’ initiative,
the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) encourages the
most energy-intensive industries to develop a strategic vision
and a ‘‘technology roadmap’’ to help achieve that vision. By
identifying and prioritizing their technology needs, the industries help OIT target its R&D resources toward where they
can do the most good. The seven energy-intensive and environmentally sensitive industries targeted by OIT include
chemicals, petroleum refining, forest products, steel, aluminum, metal casting, and glass. The focus is on high risk
but promising technologies that decrease these industries’ use
of raw materials and depletable energy resources and reduce
generation of wastes and pollutants. OIT’s Industries of the
Future R&D portfolio is balanced with crosscutting technology
development programs in such areas as cogeneration, advanced materials and combustion. In addition, technology access programs such as Motor Challenge, the National Industrial Competitiveness through Energy, Environment and Economics (NICE3) program, Climate Wise, Invention and Innovation and the Industrial Assessment Centers help further
round out OIT’s overall portfolio.
Transportation Sector.—The FY 1998 program continues development and commercialization of technologies which can
radically alter current projections of U.S. and world demand
for energy, particularly oil. The program represents a major
portion of the Partnership for the Next Generation of Vehicles
with its significant improvements in fuel economy and environmental emissions. Program priorities reflect work on technologies which are most critical to achieve a tripling of light
duty vehicles fuel economy, including hybrid vehicles, fuel
cells, and advanced materials technologies that improve engine efficiency and reduce weight. In addition, the program
will continue to develop alternative fuels and vehicles, and
advanced batteries that enable the use of electricity as an
alternative fuel. These activities include demonstrating advanced alternative fuel vehicles that provide improved range
and reduced emissions, with performance equivalent to conventional vehicles; accelerating the use of alternative fuels

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

and vehicles through implementation of Energy Policy Act
programs; and continuing support for the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium and demonstrating continued progress in improving range and performance for electric and hybrid vehicles.
Policy and Management.—This activity supports management in the development of policy and program evaluation
for energy conservation programs to ensure effective program
delivery.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0215–0–1–272

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
22.0
23.1
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

1997 est.

1998 est.

28
1
1

30
2
2

35
2
2

30
6
1
3
1
1
26
25

34
6
2
4
1
2
28
27

39
8
2
4
1
2
33
32

25.4
25.5
26.0
31.0
41.0

Total personnel compensation ..............................
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Benefits for former personnel ........................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Transportation of things ................................................
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Research and development contracts ...........................
Supplies and materials .................................................
Equipment ......................................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................

1
35
231
1
3
191

2
37
248
2
4
191

2
44
294
2
5
240

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

555

588

708

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0215–0–1–272

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

491
1

1997 est.

444
1

1998 est.

415
1

STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

For necessary expenses for Strategic Petroleum Reserve facility
development and operations and program management activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended
(42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), ø$220,000,000,¿ $209,000,000, to remain
available until expended.ø, of which $220,000,000 shall be repaid
from the ‘‘SPR Operating Fund’’ from amounts made available from
the sale of oil from the Reserve: Provided, That notwithstanding
section 161 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, the Secretary
shall draw down and sell in fiscal year 1997 $220,000,000 worth
of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Provided further, That
the proceeds from the sale shall be deposited into a special account
in the Treasury, to be established and known as the ‘‘SPR Operating
Fund’’, and shall, upon receipt, be transferred to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve account for operations of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.¿ (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Balance, start of year:
Balance, start of year .................................................... ................... ................... ...................
Receipts:
02.01 Receipts .........................................................................
97 ................... ...................
02.02 Receipts ......................................................................... ...................
220 ...................
01.99

02.99

Total receipts .............................................................
97
220 ...................
Appropriation:
05.01 Appropriation ..................................................................
–97
–220 ...................
07.99 Total balance, end of year ............................................ ................... ................... ...................

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

00.01
00.02

Obligations by program activity:
Storage facilities operations ..........................................
Management ..................................................................

242
15

281
16

193
16

12.1
21.0
23.2
23.3
25.1
25.2
25.3

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

257

297

209

25.4

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

99.9

Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
2
Travel and transportation of persons ............................ ...................
Rental payments to others ............................................
1
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
6
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
2
Other services ................................................................
34
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts .................................................................... ...................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
203
Total obligations ........................................................

257

469
2
1
1
5
4
3

2
1
1
5
4
2

1
271

1
184

297

209

21.40

49
284

77 ...................
220
209

1 ................... ...................

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274

1001
23.90
23.95
24.40

40.00
40.25
42.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

334
–257

297
–297

209
–209

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

149

1997 est.

1998 est.

143

137

77 ................... ...................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation .................................................................. ................... ...................
209
Appropriation (special fund, indefinite) ........................
97
220 ...................
Transferred from other accounts ...................................
187 ................... ...................

43.00

Appropriation (total) ..................................................

284

220

209

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

284

220

209

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

1996 actual

SPR PETROLEUM ACCOUNT
Notwithstanding 42 U.S.C. 6240(d) the United States share of crude
oil in Naval Petroleum Reserve Numbered 1 (Elk Hills) may be sold
or otherwise disposed of to other than the Strategic Petroleum
Reserveø: Provided, That outlays in fiscal year 1997 resulting from
the use of funds in this account shall not exceed $5,000,000¿. (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

72.40

129
149
200
257
297
209
–236
–246
–221
–1 ................... ...................
149

200

188

Identification code 89–0233–0–1–274

10.00

1996 actual

1997 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................ ...................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

1998 est.

5

5

21.40

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

158
78

121
125

115
106

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

236

246

221

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

284
236

220
246

209
221

23.90
23.95
24.40

41.00

The object of this program is to reduce the vulnerability
of the United States to energy supply disruptions by maintaining a crude oil stockpile capable of rapid deployment at
the direction of the President. This program enables the
President to meet the Nation’s membership commitments
within the International Energy Agency’s coordinated energy
emergency response plans and programs to deter the use of
energy supply disruptions and to take effective, co-ordinated
action should such an energy supply disruption occur.
The account provides for petroleum reserve storage facility
construction, ongoing operations and maintenance activities,
planning studies, and program administration.
The key measure of program performance is expressed as
capability to comply with Level 1 Performance Criteria. These
criteria are specific engineered performance and reliability
standards applied to critical inventory storage, drawdown,
and distribution systems required for drawing down and distributing crude oil inventory. Output measures for 1998 include:
• Annual drawdown readiness exercises—5.
• Percent of Life Extension Program under contract—89
percent.
• Projected Maintenance Backlog—12–16 craft weeks.
• Oil available for drawdown—563 MMB.
• Drawdown capability—3.7 MMB/day.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0218–0–1–274

1996 actual

1997 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............

9

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
33
New obligations ............................................................. ...................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
33
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Transferred to other accounts .......................................

33
–5

28
–5

28

23

–187 ................... ...................
–187 ................... ...................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
3
73.10 New obligations ............................................................. ...................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ...................................................... ...................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
3
72.40

3
5
–5

3
5
–5

3

3

5

5

86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ...................................... ...................

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
–187 ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ...................
5
5

This account provides for the acquisition, transportation,
and injection of petroleum into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and for its drawdown and distribution. The budget proposes no additional appropriations in 1998 for SPR oil purchases. The small remaining balance will support drawdown/
distribution readiness and the incremental costs of drawdown
in the event of an energy emergency.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0233–0–1–274

25.2
25.3

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Other services ................................................................ ...................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts .................................................................... ...................

1

1

4

4

Total obligations ........................................................ ...................

5

5

1998 est.

99.9
11.1

220
33
28
–187 ................... ...................

9

9

470

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

99.9

ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION
For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of the Energy
Information Administration, ø$66,120,000¿ $62,800,000, to remain
available until expended. (Department of the Interior and Related
Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)

Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
Printing and reproduction ..............................................
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Supplies and materials .................................................

5
4
1
1
1
27

26.0

General and special funds—Continued

12.1
23.1
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Total obligations ........................................................

74

5
5
1
1
1
22

5
5
1
1
1
17

1 ................... ...................
5
5
5

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
23.90
23.95
24.40

40.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

63

Personnel Summary
74

4
72
77
–74

69

63

3 ...................
66
63
69
–69

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

66

63

26
69
–70

25
63
–65

26

25

23

46
30

43
27

41
24

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

76

70

65

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

72
77

66
70

63
65

This program supports energy information activities which
are designed to provide timely, accurate and relevant energy
information for use by the Administration, the Congress, and
the general public. The activities funded in this program include the design, development and maintenance of information systems on petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear, electricity, alternate fuel sources, and energy consumption. This
includes collecting data and ensuring its accuracy; preparing
forecasts of alternative energy futures; and preparing reports
on energy sources, end-uses, prices, supply and demand, and
associated environmental, economic, international, and financial matters. This program also includes the operation of the
Energy Information Administration (EIA) computer facility,
telecommunications support, customer services, and ADP software support to the Department of Energy and others. In
addition, the National Energy Information Center disseminates statistical and analytical publications, reports, and data
files in hard-copy and electronic formats, and responds to
public inquiries. Finally, this activity provides survey and
statistical design standards, documentation standards, and
energy data public-use forms clearance and burden control
services.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1998 est.

417
1

374
1

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0234–0–1–274

10.00
28
74
–76

442
1

1997 est.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

3 ................... ...................

72

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276

63
–63

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new current authority ..............................
86.93 Outlays from current balances ......................................

Identification code 89–0216–0–1–276

69

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

1997 est.

1998 est.

1

1 ...................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
23.95 New obligations .............................................................
24.40 Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

2
–1

1 ...................
–1 ...................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

2
1
2
1
1 ...................
–2 ................... ...................

21.40

1 ................... ...................

72.40

1

2

2

86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ......................................

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
2 ................... ...................

2 ................... ...................

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0234–0–1–274

11.1
25.2
99.9

1997 est.

1998 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
1 ................... ...................
Other services ................................................................ ...................
1 ...................
Total obligations ........................................................

1

1 ...................

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0234–0–1–274

1001

1996 actual

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

1997 est.

1998 est.

8 ................... ...................

ECONOMIC REGULATION
For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of the Office
of Hearings and Appeals, $2,725,000, to remain available until expended. (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

11.1
11.3
11.5

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

27
1
1

27
1
1

26
1
1

Identification code 89–0217–0–1–276

11.9

Total personnel compensation ..............................

29

29

28

00.01

Obligations by program activity:
Economic regulation ......................................................

1996 actual

3

1997 est.

1998 est.

1 ...................

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
00.02

Hearings and appeals ...................................................

4

3

3

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

7

4

3

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

40.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

2
6
8
–7

1 ...................
3
3
4
–4

3
–3

1 ................... ...................

6

3

3

3
7
–8

2
4
–5

1
3
–3

72.40

471

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION
SALARIES AND EXPENSES

For necessary expenses of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to carry out the provisions of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.), including services as authorized
by 5 U.S.C. 3109, the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and official
reception and representation expenses (not to exceed $3,000),
ø$146,290,000¿ $167,577,000, to remain available until expended:
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, not to
exceed ø$146,290,000¿ $167,577,000 of revenues from fees and annual
charges, and other services and collections in fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998
shall be retained and used for necessary expenses in this account,
and shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That
the sum herein appropriated from the General Fund shall be reduced
as revenues are received during fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998 so as to
result in a final fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998 appropriation from the General Fund estimated at not more than $0. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

2

1 ...................

Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

4
4

2
3

2
1

00.02
00.03
00.04

Obligations by program activity:
Hydropower regulation ...................................................
Electric power regulation ...............................................
Natural gas and oil regulation ......................................

51
41
63

48
46
62

51
52
65

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

8

5

3

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

155

156

168

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

6
8

3
5

3
3

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

33
131

10 ...................
146
168

Compliance.—This program, administered by the Office of
General Counsel, is responsible for resolving all remaining
enforcement actions to ensure that oil companies complied
with petroleum regulations in effect prior to decontrol of oil
in January 1981.
Hearings and appeals.—The Office of Hearings and Appeals
issues all final orders of an adjudicatory nature other than
those over which the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
or the Board of Contract Appeals has jurisdiction. It decides
appeals of petroleum enforcement actions and adverse Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act determinations, examines requests for exception relief, and administers refund
proceedings involving funds obtained as a result of petroleum
enforcement actions. This office is also responsible for (a)
conducting hearings and issuing initial agency decisions on
‘‘whistleblower’’ complaints made under the DOE Contractor
Employee Protection Program, (b) issuing final agency decisions on appeals of disputed ‘‘Payment-Equal-to-Taxes’’ determinations made under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982,
as amended, and (c) conducting personnel security administrative review hearings, and performing administrative reviews of initial determinations. The FY 1998 funding request
is limited to expenses related to Petroleum overcharge cases.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0217–0–1–276

11.1
12.1
25.3
99.9

1997 est.

23.90
23.95
24.40

68.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Spending authority from offsetting collections (gross):
Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

1 ................... ...................
165
–155

156
–156

168
–168

10 ................... ...................

131

146

168

72.40

39
24
33
155
156
168
–169
–147
–165
–1 ................... ...................
24

33

36

86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

112
57

124
23

143
22

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

169

147

165

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal
sources ..................................................................

–131

–146

–168

1998 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................

5
1

2
2
1 ...................

1

1

Total obligations ........................................................

7

4

3

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
38
1
–3

1

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0217–0–1–276

1001

21.40

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

1996 actual

82

1997 est.

54

1998 est.

46

89.00
90.00

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is
charged with regulating certain interstate aspects of the natural gas, oil pipeline, hydropower, and electric industries. Such
regulation includes issuing licenses and certificates for construction of facilities, approving rates, inspecting dams, implementing compliance and enforcement activities, and providing
other services to regulated businesses. In 1998, these businesses will pay fees and charges sufficient to fully offset the
cost of the Commission’s operations.

472

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued

Personnel Summary

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION—Continued

Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276

SALARIES AND EXPENSES—Continued

Natural gas and oil.—The Commission is responsible for
the regulation of 150 natural gas pipeline companies and
130 common carrier oil pipelines including the Trans-Alaska
Pipeline System. The Commission issues certificates authorizing natural gas pipelines to construct and operate new facilities and to provide new services; determines just and reasonable rates for the interstate transportation of natural gas
and oil on the pipelines subject to the Commission’s jurisdiction; and authorizes tariff provisions, as appropriate, to allow
the gas and oil pipelines to adjust their services to meet
their customers’ needs and the pipelines’ needs to meet competition in their markets. The Commission has and will continue to develop creative and flexible pricing policies and new
and innovative services to address the changing competitive
marketplace in both the gas and oil industries. While working
to assure the industries are able to meet their service requirements by staying economically healthy, the Commission will
continue to assure that environmental concerns from construction projects are properly addressed and that the public
interest is protected when new services or pricing mechanisms
are authorized.
Hydropower.—The Commission issues preliminary permits,
exemptions, and licenses, including relicenses, for non-federal
hydroelectric projects, enforces their terms and conditions,
and performs dam safety inspections. The Commission regulates more than 1,600 hydroelectric projects which supply
about 5 percent of the electric energy generated in the United
States. The Commission also performs investigations to determine the amount of headwater benefits that are derived from
Federally-owned and FERC-licensed headwater improvements
and returned nearly $6 million in revenues to the U.S. Treasury in 1996.
Electric power.—The Commission is responsible for determining rates for the interstate sale or transmission of wholesale electric energy for more than 200 electric utilities and
for overseeing electric utility corporate transactions. The Commission approves rates for all Federal power marketing agencies except TVA. Implementing the Energy Policy Act of 1992
will result in many changes in the electric power industry
to meet increasing generating capacity needs of the 1990’s,
primarily through nontraditional sources in response to economic forces in the marketplace. The Commission has the
authority to order the provision of transmission service upon
request. The Commission also certifies cogenerators, small
power producers, and exempt wholesale generators.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0212–0–1–276

11.1
11.3
11.5

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

1996 actual

85
2
1

1997 est.

1998 est.

87
2
1

95
19
2
18
3
2
7
14

25.7
26.0
31.0
99.5
99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

155

156

1
2
1
3
1
168

1997 est.

1,374
3

1,357
3

1998 est.

1,377
3

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0206–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
1
22.30 Unobligated balance expiring ........................................ ...................

1998 est.

21.40

23.90
24.40

89.00
90.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

1 ...................
–1 ...................

1 ................... ...................
1 ................... ...................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ................... ...................

This loan guarantee program was started in 1979 to subsidize loans for geothermal energy projects too risky to acquire private sector financing on their own. The fund is no
longer in operation, and has been closed pursuant to 31
U.S.C. 1555. Budget authority in the fund in recent years
has only been needed to support one FTE to monitor the
remaining active agreements and assets of the program. In
1992, that person’s position was incorporated into the geothermal R&D activity, so no new budget authority will be
needed in this account in FY 1998.

CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY
(INCLUDING RESCISSION AND DEFERRAL)

Of the funds made available under this heading for obligation in
øfiscal year 1997 or¿ prior years, ø$123,000,000 are rescinded:¿
$153,000,000 are rescinded, and an additional $133,000,000 of such
funds shall not be available for obligation until October 1, 1998:
Provided, That an additional $50,000,000 shall be available October
1, 1998, to initiate and carry out an international clean coal technology program, to remain available until expended: Provided further,
That not to exceed $15,866,000 in fiscal year 1998 may be used for
administrative oversight of the Clean Coal Technology program: Provided further, That funds made available in previous appropriations
Acts shall be available for any ongoing project regardless of the separate request for proposal under which the project was selected. (42
U.S.C. 13362; Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0235–0–1–271

11.9
12.1
21.0
23.1
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

1996 actual

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT FUND

92
2
1

Total personnel compensation ..............................
88
90
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
16
18
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
2
2
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
17
18
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
3
3
Printing and reproduction ..............................................
2
2
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
6
4
Other services ................................................................
10
13
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts .................................................................... ...................
1
Operation and maintenance of equipment ................... ...................
1
Supplies and materials .................................................
2
1
Equipment ......................................................................
8
3
Below reporting threshold ..............................................
1 ...................

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

50

377

184

832
147

932
15

570
–286

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

3 ................... ...................
982
–50

947
–377

284
–184

932

570

100

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
Unobligated balance rescinded:
40.36
Unobligated balance rescinded ............................ ...................
–123
–153
40.36
Unobligated balance deferred .............................. ................... ...................
–133
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................
–3 ................... ...................
43.00
65.00
70.00

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Advance appropriation (definite) ..............................
Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

–3
150
147

–123

Personnel Summary

1001

407
206
339
50
377
184
–248
–244
–257
–3 ................... ...................
206

339

266

248

244

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

147
248

15
244

–286
257

øAND

70

68

RESCISSION¿ OF FUNDS)

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5180–0–2–271

Public Law 99–190, making continuing appropriations for
1986, provided $400 million from funds in the Energy Security Reserve in the Department of the Treasury for a new
Clean Coal Technology program in the Department of Energy.
This program was authorized under the Clean Coal Technology Reserve proviso of Public Law 98–473 to subsidize
the construction and operation of facilities to demonstrate
the potential commercial feasibility of such technologies.
Termination of the domestic Clean Coal Technology program, after completion of projects now underway, is part of
the President’s realignment of the Department of Energy.
The Administration’s policy calls for limiting the program’s
existing domestic projects which have been selected under
contract. If a project is cancelled, the cancelled project’s funding will either be used to meet the needs of remaining ongoing projects, or will be rescinded if the funds are not needed
by the program.
An advance appropriation of $50 million is requested to
initiate support of an international clean coal technology program. The funds appropriated would become available at the
start of fiscal year 1999. The project will apply U.S. integrated, coal gasification combined cycle technology in the People’s Republic of China to introduce advanced, high efficiency,
clean coal technology in the production of much needed electricity. China’s rapidly expanding economy depends on coal
to supply about three-quarters of its total energy needs.
The Department is proposing a rescission of $153 million
from the program in FY 1998. The proposed rescission would
reduce the total amount appropriated from $2.425 billion to
$2.272 billion. The source of funding for these proposals are
funds available in the cost overrun reserve and are available
from canceled and or savings from restructured projects.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1997 est.

1998 est.

Monies received as investment income on the principal amount
in the Great Plains Project Trust at the Norwest Bank of North
Dakota, in such sums as are earned as of October 1, ø1996¿ 1997,
shall be deposited in this account and immediately transferred to
the General Fund of the Treasury. Monies received as revenue sharing from operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant shall be
immediately transferred to the General Fund of the Treasury. øFunds
are hereby rescinded in the amount of $2,500,000 from unobligated
balances under this head.¿ (Department of the Interior and Related
Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997.)

257

1996 actual

69

1997 est.

ALTERNATIVE FUELS PRODUCTION
(INCLUDING TRANSFER

–286

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

11.1
12.1
25.1
25.2
25.3

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

–286

86.98

Identification code 89–0235–0–1–271

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0235–0–1–271

138 ...................
15

473

1998 est.

5
1
3
5

5
1
3
5

5
1
3
5

41.0

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................

1
35

1
362

1
169

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

50

377

184

1996 actual

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year: Treasury
balance ......................................................................
6
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................ ...................

1997 est.

1998 est.

21.40

23.90
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

6

3

3

5

3

3

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.36
Unobligated balance rescinded ................................. ...................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
68.00
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
2
68.27
Capital transfer to general fund ..........................
–2
68.90
70.00

5
3
–3 ...................

–3 ...................

1
–1

2
–2

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ........................................................... ................... ................... ...................
Total new budget authority (gross) .......................... ...................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

–3 ...................

72.40

10

10

10

10

10

10

–2

–1

–2

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
–2
Outlays ........................................................................... ...................

–4
–1

–2
–2

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Interest from
principal in the Great Plains Project Trust ..........

89.00
90.00

This program was established in 1980 for the purpose of
expediting the development and production of alternative
fuels.
When the Synthetic Fuels Corporation was declared to be
operational in 1982, the uncommitted and unobligated funds
remaining in the program were transferred to the Energy
Security Reserve for use by the Synthetic Fuels Corporation,
with the exception of the loan guarantee for the Great Plains
Gasification Project, which remained under the jurisdiction
of the Department of Energy. The Department exercised its
authority to borrow from the Treasury to repay the Federal
Financing Bank upon default of the borrower in 1985. This
loan was repaid, along with accrued interest, by a Supplemental appropriation in 1986. The Department acquired ownership of the Great Plains plant by foreclosure, which was
completed on July 14, 1986, and continued operation of the

474

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

2

3

3

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

3
2

3
3

3
3

General and special funds—Continued
ALTERNATIVE FUELS PRODUCTION—Continued
(INCLUDING TRANSFER

øAND

RESCISSION¿ OF FUNDS)—Continued

plant without the expenditure of appropriated funds. On October 31, 1988, the Department completed the process of establishing an asset purchase agreement for the Great Plains
Gasification Plant by settlement with Basin Electric Power
Cooperative Association. Responsibilities for other related
agreements—Trust Agreement, Gas Transportation Agreement, Gas Purchase Agreement—were also settled. Under the
terms of the asset purchase agreement a check for $85 million
was provided to the Government as an initial payment. These
agreements are currently the subject of litigation between
the Department, Dakota Gasification Company and the four
pipeline companies which purchase the synthetic gas from
the plant. Future revenue sharing payments to the Department are dependent upon the outcome of this litigation as
well as natural gas prices.
The parties to litigation negotiated settlement agreements
in principle in December 1993. Settlement agreements dated
February 16, 1994, have been signed. These settlement agreements resolve all past disputes as well as restructure the
Gas Purchase Agreements pricing provisions. The settlement
agreements are contingent upon final Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval.
One of the four pipeline companies, which purchases 20
percent of the plant’s output of synthetic natural gas received
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission final approval in December 1994 for its settlement agreement. On December 18,
1996 initial FERC approval was granted for the remaining
three pipeline companies in FERC Opinion 410. One of the
remaining three pipelines which purchases 30 percent of the
plant’s output of synthetic natural gas has declared that effective December 31, 1996 it’s settlement is final.
PAYMENTS

TO

STATES UNDER FEDERAL POWER ACT

Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5105–0–2–806

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Balance, start of year:
01.99 Balance, start of year .................................................... ................... ................... ...................
Receipts:
02.01 Licenses under Federal Power Act from public lands
and national forests, payment to States (37 1/
2%),Energy ................................................................
3
3
3
Appropriation:
05.01 Payments to States under Federal Power Act ...............
–3
–3
–3
07.99 Total balance, end of year ............................................ ................... ................... ...................

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5105–0–2–806

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations (object class 41.0) ............................

2

3

2
3

3
3

3
3

5
–2

6
–3

6
–3

3

3

3

NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL FUND
For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the purposes
of Public Law 97–425, as amended, including the acquisition of real
property or facility construction or expansion, ø$182,000,000¿
$190,000,000, to remain available until expended, to be derived from
the Nuclear Waste Fundø: Provided, That none of the funds provided
herein shall be distributed to the State of Nevada or affected units
of local government (as defined by Public Law 97–425) by direct
payment, grant, or other means, for financial assistance under section
116 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended: Provided
further, That the foregoing proviso shall not apply to payments in
lieu of taxes under section 116(c)(3)(A) of the Nuclear Waste Policy
Act of 1982, as amended: Provided further, That no later than September 30, 1998, the Secretary shall provide to the President and
to the Congress a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site.
The viability assessment shall include: (1) the preliminary design
concept for the critical elements for the repository and waste package;
(2) a total system performance assessment, based upon the design
concept and the scientific data and analysis available by September
30, 1998, describing the probable behavior of the repository in the
Yucca Mountain geological setting relative to the overall system performance standards; (3) a plan and cost estimate for the remaining
work required to complete a license application; and (4) an estimate
of the costs to construct and operate the repository in accordance
with the design concept¿; of which not to exceed $4,875,000 may
be provided to the State of Nevada, solely to conduct scientific oversight responsibilities pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of
1982, (Public Law 97–425), as amended; and of which not to exceed
$6,175,000 may be provided to affected local governments, as defined
in Public Law 97–425, to conduct appropriate activities pursuant to
the Act: Provided further, That the distribution of the funds to the
units of local government shall be determined by the Department
of Energy: Provided further, That the funds shall be made available
to the State and units of local government by direct payment: Provided
further, That within ninety days of the completion of each Federal
fiscal year, each State or local entity shall provide certification to
the Department of Energy, that all funds expended from such payments have been expended for activities as defined in Public Law
97–425. Failure to provide such certification shall cause such entity
to be prohibited from any further funding provided for similar activities: Provided further, That none of the funds herein appropriated
may be: (1) used directly or indirectly to influence legislative action
on any matter pending before Congress or a State legislature or for
lobbying activity as provided in 18 U.S.C. 1913; (2) used for litigation
expenses; or (3) used to support multistate efforts or other coalition
building activities inconsistent with the restrictions contained in this
Act. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)

3

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of year: Treasury
balance ......................................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

The States are paid 37.5 percent of the receipts from licenses for occupancy and use of national forests and public
lands within their boundaries issued by the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission (16 U.S.C. 810).

10.00

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
60.25 Appropriation (special fund, indefinite) ........................
Change in unpaid obligations:
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271

Balance, start of year:
Balance, start of year ....................................................
Receipts:
02.01 Receipts from nuclear powered electric utilities ..........
02.02 Net earnings on investments ........................................
01.99

02.99

2
–2

3

3
–3

3

3
–3

1997 est.

1998 est.

4,519

5,196

5,971

634
208

649
322

655
377

Total receipts .............................................................

842

971

1,032

Total: Balances and collections ....................................
Appropriation:
05.01 Nuclear Waste Fund .......................................................
05.02 Nuclear Regulatory Commission ....................................
05.03 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board ........................

5,361

6,167

7,003

–151
–11
–3

–182
–11
–3

–190
–17
–3

05.99

–165

–196

–210

04.00
3

1996 actual

Subtotal appropriation ...................................................

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
07.99

Total balance, end of year ............................................

5,196

5,971

6,793

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

1996 actual

145

1997 est.

175

1998 est.

ian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan, Revision
1.
The outyear funding for this account for fiscal years 2000–
2002 does not reflect the impact of the 1998 viability assessment of Yucca Mountain.
Status of Funds (in millions of dollars)

182

1996 actual

Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.41 Unobligated balance available, start of year: U.S.
Securities: Par value .................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
23.90
23.95
24.41

40.20

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year: U.S. Securities: Par value .....................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Budget authority (appropriation) ...................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
U.S. Securities: Par value .........................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.41 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
U.S. Securities: Par value .........................................

19
151

25
182

32
190

170
–145

207
–175

222
–182

25

32

40

151

182

190

129
145
–195

79
175
–166

87
182
–186

79

87

475

Unexpended balance, start of year:
U.S. Securities: U.S. securities: Par value ....................
Cash income during the year:
Proprietary receipts:
0220
Nuclear waste disposal fund , Energy ......................
Intragovernmental transactions:
0240
Earnings on investments, Nuclear waste disposal
fund , Energy ........................................................
0101

83

0299

1997 est.

1998 est.

4,668

5,312

6,113

634

649

655

208

322

377

842

971

1,032

–195
–3

–166
–4

–186
–3

0599

72.41

Total cash income .....................................................
Cash outgo during year:
0500 Nuclear waste disposal fund .........................................
0502 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, .......................

–198

–170

–189

5,312

6,113

6,956

Total cash outgo (–) ......................................................
Unexpended balance, end of year:
0701 U.S. Securities: U.S. securities: Par value ....................

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

98
97

91
75

95
91

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

195

166

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

151
195

182
166

1997 est.

1998 est.

186

11.1
12.1
21.0
23.2
23.3
25.2

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Rental payments to others ............................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
Other services ................................................................

17
3
1
2
1
121

19
4
1
2
1
148

18
4
1
2
1
156

190
186

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

145

175

182

The nuclear waste disposal program consists of efforts related to the development, acquisition, and operation of facilities
for the disposal of civilian and defense high level nuclear
waste. These activities are funded by appropriations from the
Nuclear Waste Fund which is paid for by the users of the
disposal service, and the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal account, which was established by Congress as part of the 1993
Energy and Water Development Appropriation (P.L. 102–377)
in lieu of a payment from the Department of Energy into
the Nuclear Waste Fund for activities related to the disposal
of defense high-level waste. As directed by Public Law 104–
206, the Program will complete by September 1998 an assessment of the viability of licensing and constructing a geologic
repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This viability assessment will consist of four components that will include: (1)
the preliminary design concept for the critical components
for the repository and waste package; (2) a total system performance assessment, based upon the design concept and the
scientific data and analysis available by September 30, 1998,
describing the probable behavior of the repository in the
Yucca Mountain geological setting relative to the overall system performance standards; (3) a plan and cost estimate for
the remaining work to complete a license application; and
(4) an estimate of costs to construct and operate the repository
in accordance with the design concept. The completion of the
constituent elements of the viability assessment constitute
a logical convergence at which the Program can make a measurably improved appraisal of the prospects for geological disposal at the Yucca Mountain site. The assessment is an interim step in the process leading to a site recommendation
to the President and to a license application that would be
submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Consistent
with the Conference Report to the FY 1997 Energy and Water
Appropriations, the activities that support the viability assessment will be conducted in accordance with the draft Civil-

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–5227–0–2–271

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION
FUND

1996 actual

248
1

AND

1997 est.

232
1

1998 est.

206
1

DECOMMISSIONING

For necessary expenses in carrying out uranium enrichment facility
decontamination and decommissioning, remedial actions and other
activities of title II of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and title X,
subtitle A of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, ø$200,200,000¿
$248,788,000, to be derived from the Fund, to remain available until
expended: Provided, That ø$34,000,000¿ $40,456,000 of amounts derived from the Fund for such expenses shall be available in accordance with title X, subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. (Energy
and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Balance, start of year:
01.99 Balance, start of year ....................................................
Receipts:
02.01 Assessments ..................................................................
02.02 Earnings on investments ...............................................
02.03 General fund payment ...................................................

186

437

817

160
20
350

160
43
377

167
57
388

02.99

Total receipts .............................................................

530

580

612

Total: Balances and collections ....................................
Appropriation:
05.01 Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund ..............................................................
07.99 Total balance, end of year ............................................

716

1,017

1,429

–279
437

–200
817

–249
1,180

04.00

476

ENERGY PROGRAMS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION
FUND—Continued

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
AND

DECOMMISSIONING

1997 est.

1998 est.

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

00.01
00.02

Obligations by program activity:
Environmental restoration and waste management .....
Uranium / thorium reimbursements ..............................

237
42

166
34

Total obligations ........................................................

279

200

249

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
New obligations .............................................................

279
–279

200
–200

Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Land and structures ......................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................

10
36
220
11
2

7
26
158
8
1

9
32
196
10
2

Total obligations ........................................................

279

200

249

209
40

10.00

25.1
25.2
25.4
32.0
41.0
99.9

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271

1996 actual

Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271

249
–249

Public enterprise funds:
ISOTOPE PRODUCTION

AND

DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM FUND

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4180–0–3–271

New budget authority (gross), detail:
40.20 Appropriation (special fund, definite) ...........................

279

200

249

78
279
–317

40
200
–216

24
249
–236

40

24

37

86.90
86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................

239
78

176
40

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

317

216

236

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

279
317

200
216

249
236

The Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund will cover D&D, remedial action and other costs
associated with environmental clean-up activities at sites
leased and operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation as well as DOE facilities at these and other sites.
A portion of the Fund will be used to reimburse current
owners of uranium and thorium sites for a portion of their
remediation costs for tailings attributable to the sale of uranium or thorium to the Federal Government.
Status of Funds (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5231–0–2–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

24

34

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

8
42

11
24

11
34

50
–39

35
–24

45
–34

11

11

11

42

24

34

6
39
–37

8
24
–24

8
34
–34

8

8

8

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

68.00

480
842
–2 ...................

0199

264

478

842

160

160

167

20

43

57

350

377

388

530

580

612

–317

–216

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Spending authority from offsetting collections (gross):
Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

37

24

34

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal
sources ..................................................................

–42

–24

–34

89.00
90.00
268
–4

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

72.40

1998 est.

Unexpended balance, start of year:
U.S. Securities:
0101
Par value ...................................................................
0102
Unrealized discounts .................................................

1998 est.

39

212
24

87.00

1997 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

10.00
Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

1996 actual

–5 ................... ...................
42
24
34

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
–5 ................... ...................

–236

Total balance, start of year ......................................
Cash income during the year:
Governmental receipts:
0200
Assessments, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund ................................................................
Intragovernmental transactions:
0240
Earnings on investments, Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund .............................................
0241
General fund payment—Defense, Decontamination
and Decommissioning Fund .................................
0299

Total cash income .....................................................
Cash outgo during year:
0500 Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund ..............................................................
Unexpended balance, end of year:
U.S. Securities:
0701
Par value ...................................................................
0702
Unrealized discounts .................................................

0799

Total balance, end of year ........................................

The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope
Production and Distribution Program covers the production
and sale of isotope products and related services to the user
community utilizing Government-owned facilities. The isotopes produced by the Department are those that can be
produced in existing DOE production and research facilities
dedicated to the products required by the Isotope Production
and Distribution program. The isotopes are sold at their market value or at a price determined to be in the best interest
of the government for use in medical diagnoses and therapy,
medical and scientific research, and industrial applications.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4180–0–3–271

480
842
1,218
–2 ................... ...................
478

842

1,218

11.1
25.1
25.2
25.4
25.5

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Research and development contracts ...........................

1996 actual

1
1
2
33
1

1997 est.

1
1
1
19
1

1998 est.

1
1
1
29
1

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS
Federal Funds

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
31.0

Total obligations ........................................................

1

1

24

34

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–4180–0–3–271

2001

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

10

1997 est.

FOR

Appropriation (total) ..................................................

10

4

1

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

10

4

1

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

4
4
–4

5
8
–5

8
3
–2

5

8

9

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
4
Outlays from current balances ...................................... ...................

3
2

1
1

10

10

72.40

COOPERATIVE WORK
86.90
86.93

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–8575–0–7–271

4
4
1
6 ................... ...................

1998 est.

Trust Funds
ADVANCES

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................
Transferred from other accounts ...................................

43.00

39

1

40.00
42.00

70.00

99.9

Equipment ......................................................................

477

1997 est.

1998 est.

87.00

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
24.40 Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

1

1

1

1

1

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

4

5

2

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

10
4

4
5

1
2

1

72.40

18

18

18

18

18

18

86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
6 ................... ...................

6 ................... ...................

In past years, this account received advances from domestic
and foreign sources, to fund research and development activities for civilian reactor, magnetic fusion, and basic energy
sciences. Sources also provided funds for defense programs,
the technical information management program, and conducting the Naval Petroleum Reserves Community Wells Protection program. The account will be terminated when balances
have been expended.

The Alaska Power Administration (APA) is responsible for
operation and maintenance and power marketing for the
Eklutna and Snettisham hydroelectric projects in accordance
with the authorizing legislation for each project.
On November 28, 1995, the Alaska Power Administration
Asset Sale and Termination Act (Public Law 104–58) was
signed into law. Consistent with this legislation, APA’s activities will concentrate on the termination of the Alaska Power
Administration and transfer of its assets to non-federal ownership. This request provides necessary funding for operations
and maintenance activities until the asset transfers take place
in fiscal year 1998.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0304–0–1–271

11.1
12.1
25.2
31.0
99.5
99.9

1997 est.

1998 est.

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
2
2
1
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
1
1
1
Other services ................................................................ ...................
4
1
Equipment ......................................................................
1 ................... ...................
Below reporting threshold .............................................. ...................
1 ...................
Total obligations ........................................................

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS

4

8

3

Personnel Summary

Federal Funds
OPERATION

AND

MAINTENANCE, ALASKA POWER ADMINISTRATION

For necessary expenses of operation and maintenance of projects
in Alaska and of marketing electric power and energy, ø$4,000,000¿
$1,000,000, to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water
Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)

00.01
00.02
00.03
10.00

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Operations and maintenance ........................................
4 ................... ...................
Program direction .......................................................... ...................
4
1
Transition and termination ............................................ ...................
4
2
Total obligations ........................................................

4

8

3

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ................................................... ...................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
10

6
4

2
1

10
–8

3
–3

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

10
–4
6

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

OPERATION

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0304–0–1–271

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0304–0–1–271

General and special funds:

2 ...................

AND

26
1

1997 est.

32
1

1998 est.

11
1

MAINTENANCE, SOUTHEASTERN POWER
ADMINISTRATION

For necessary expenses of operation and maintenance of power
transmission facilities and of marketing electric power and energy
pursuant to the provisions of section 5 of the Flood Control Act
of 1944 (16 U.S.C. 825s), as applied to the southeastern power area,
ø$16,359,000¿ $16,222,000, to remain available until expended; in
addition, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, not to exceed $20,000,000
in reimbursements for transmission wheeling and ancillary services,
to remain available until expended. (Energy and Water Development
Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0302–0–1–271

1996 actual

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Program direction ...................................................... ...................
00.02
Purchase power and wheeling ..................................
19

1997 est.

4
26

1998 est.

4
12

478

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
OPERATION

AND MAINTENANCE, SOUTHEASTERN
ADMINISTRATION—Continued

POWER

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Identification code 89–0302–0–1–271

00.03
00.91
01.01
10.00

Operations and maintenance ....................................

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

4 ................... ...................

Subtotal, direct program ......................................
23
30
Reimbursable program .................................................. ................... ...................

16
20

Total obligations ........................................................

23

30

36

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

17
20

14 ...................
16
36

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

37
–23

30
–30

14 ................... ...................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
20
16
Permanent:
68.00
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) ..................................... ................... ...................
70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

36
–36

20

16

16

mination of methods of operating generating plants individually and in coordination with others to obtain maximum
utilization of resources. Proprietary receipts deposited in
the Treasury were $154 million for fiscal year 1996 and
are estimated to be $168 million for fiscal year 1997 and
$188 million for fiscal year 1998.
Purchase power and wheeling.—Provision is made for the
payment of wheeling fees and for the purchase of electricity
in connection with disposal of power under contracts with
utility companies. After FY 1998, SEPA customers will pay
wheeling fees directly to transmission suppliers.
Starting in FY 1998, the Southeastern Power Administration will set rates, consistent with current law, to begin to
recover the full cost of the Civil Service Retirement System
and Post-Retirement Health Benefits for its employees that
have not been recovered in the past. The estimated increase
in receipts to the Treasury is $3 million annually.
For display purposes only, the unobligated balances of this
account include a continuing fund of $50 thousand, maintained from receipts from the transmission and sale of electric
power in the southeastern area, which is available to defray
expenses necessary to ensure continuity of services (16 U.S.C.
825s–2).
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

20

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0302–0–1–271

36

1997 est.

1998 est.

11.1
25.2
3
23
–23

2
30
–17

15
36
–36

2

15

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent ........
Other services ............................................................

4
26

4
12

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
23
30
Reimbursable obligations .............................................. ................... ...................

16
20

4
19

15

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

23

30

36

Personnel Summary

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new current authority ..............................
18
15
86.93 Outlays from current balances ......................................
5
2
86.97 Outlays from new permanent authority ......................... ................... ...................

15
1
20

87.00

17

36

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.40
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Non-Federal
sources .................................................................. ................... ...................

–20

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority ............................................................
90.00 Outlays ...........................................................................

23

20
23

16
17

1001

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

OPERATION

16
16

The Southeastern Power Administration (SEPA) markets
power generated at Corps of Engineers hydroelectric generating plants in an eleven-State area of the Southeast. Deliveries
are made by means of transmission facilities owned by others.
There are 23 projects now in operation.
SEPA sells wholesale power primarily to publicly and cooperatively-owned electric distribution utilities using wheeling
and pooling agreements with the region’s large private utilities to provide firm power to its customers. SEPA does not
own or operate any transmission facilities. Its long-term contracts provide for periodic electric rate adjustments to ensure
that the Federal Government recovers costs of operation and
capital invested in power, with interest, in keeping with statutory requirements.
The SEPA program includes the following activities:
Program direction.—Provision is made for negotiation and
administration of power contracts, collection of revenues,
development of wholesale power rates, the amortization of
power investment, investigation and planning of proposed
water resources projects, scheduling and dispatch of power
generation, scheduling storage and release of water, administration of contractual operation requirements, and deter-

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0302–0–1–271

AND

41

1997 est.

1998 est.

41

41

MAINTENANCE, SOUTHWESTERN POWER
ADMINISTRATION

For necessary expenses of operation and maintenance of power
transmission facilities and of marketing electric power and energy,
and for construction and acquisition of transmission lines, substations
and appurtenant facilities, and for administrative expenses, including
official reception and representation expenses in an amount not to
exceed $1,500 in carrying out the provisions of section 5 of the Flood
Control Act of 1944 (16 U.S.C. 825s), as applied to the southwestern
power area, ø$25,210,000¿ $26,500,000, to remain available until expended; in addition, notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3302,
not to exceed ø$3,787,000¿ $4,650,000 in reimbursements, to remain
available until expended. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0303–0–1–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Systems operation and maintenance ........................
20
00.02
Purchase power and wheeling ..................................
1
00.03
Construction ..............................................................
9
00.04
Program direction ...................................................... ...................

2
2
1 ...................
6
7
18
18

00.91
01.01

Total direct program .............................................
Reimbursable program ..................................................

30
3

27
4

27
5

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

33

31

32

21.40

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

2

2 ...................

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
22.00
22.10
23.90
23.95
24.40

New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

33

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

36
–33

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
Permanent:
68.00
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................
70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

29

32

1 ................... ...................
31
–31

32
–32

2 ................... ...................

30

25

27

3

4

5

33

29

32

72.40

17
16
17
33
31
32
–33
–30
–32
–1 ................... ...................
16

17

17

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

19
11
3

18
8
4

20
7
5

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

33

30

32

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.00
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Federal sources

–3

–4

–5

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

30
30

25
26

27
27

89.00
90.00

479

Purchase power and wheeling.—Provision is made for the
payment of wheeling fees and for the purchase of energy
in connection with the marketing of power under contracts
with utility companies.
Construction.—The construction program provides transmission, substation, switching and control facilities to transmit power generated at Corps of Engineers’ hydroelectric
projects in the Southwest. This program is coordinated with
the Corps of Engineers’ construction program and customer
requirements. This program also provides for the purchase
of capital electrical equipment used for upgrading the established system to meet changing customer load requirements.
Reimbursable program.—This program involves services
provided by Southwestern Power Administration to others
under various types of reimbursable arrangements. In 1998,
the reimbursable program primarily provides for operation
and maintenance, construction, and power and energy services.
Starting in FY 1998, the Southwestern Power Administration will set rates, consistent with current law, to begin to
recover the full cost of the Civil Service Retirement System
and Post-Retirement Health Benefits for its employees that
have not been recovered in the past. The estimated increase
in receipts to the Treasury is $2 million annually.
For display purposes only, the unobligated balances of this
account include a continuing fund of $300 thousand, which
is replenished from power receipts and is available permanently for emergency expenses that would be necessary to
ensure continuity of service (16 U.S.C. 825s–1; 63 Stat. 767;
65 Stat. 249).
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

The Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) operates in a six-State area as a marketing agent for hydroelectric power produced at Corps of Engineers dams. It also
operates and maintains some 2,225 kilometers (1,380 miles)
of high voltage transmission lines, 24 substations and switching stations, and 46 VHF radio and microwave stations.
Southwestern sells its power at wholesale primarily to publicly and cooperatively owned electric distribution utilities.
Its long-term contracts provide for periodic rate adjustments
to ensure that the Federal Government recovers all costs of
operation and all capital invested in power, with interest,
in keeping with statutory requirements.
Southwestern also is responsible for scheduling and dispatching power, negotiating power sales contracts, and constructing facilities required to meet changing customer load
requirements.
Program Direction.—This activity provides for the overall
direction and support of Southwestern’s program activities
and includes salaries and benefits, travel, support services
and other related expenses such as rent, utilities, communications, supplies, materials and building maintenance.
Systems operation and maintenance.—Provision is made for
investigating and planning proposed water resources projects,
scheduling and dispatching power generation, scheduling storage and release of water, administering contractual operation
requirements, and determining methods of operating generating plants individually and in coordination with others to
obtain maximum utilization of resources. Provision also is
made for maintenance and improvement of the transmission
system and related facilities to ensure reliable service, negotiation and administration of power contracts, collection of
revenue, development of wholesale power rates and the amortization of the power investment. Actual proprietary receipts
in the amount of $81 million were deposited in the Treasury
in 1996. Estimated proprietary receipts in the amount of $93
million in 1997 and $94 million in 1998 are expected.

1996 actual

Identification code 89–0303–0–1–271

1997 est.

1998 est.

11.1
12.1
21.0
23.1
25.2
26.0
31.0

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent ........
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Other services ............................................................
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................

10
2
1
1
8
2
6

11
3
1
1
7
1
3

10
2
1
1
6
1
6

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

30
4

27
4

27
5

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

33

31

32

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0303–0–1–271

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

185
6

1997 est.

193
6

1998 est.

189
4

CONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,
WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

For carrying out the functions authorized by title III, section
302(a)(1)(E) of the Act of August 4, 1977 (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.),
and other related activities including conservation and renewable
resources programs as authorized, including the replacement of not
more than two helicopters through transfers, exchanges, or sale, and
official reception and representation expenses in an amount not to
exceed $1,500, ø$193,582,000¿ $208,334,000, to remain available until
expended, of which ø$185,687,000¿ $202,097,000 shall be derived
from the Department of the Interior Reclamation fund: Provided,
That of the amount herein appropriated, $5,432,000 is for deposit
into the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Account pursuant to title IV of the Reclamation Projects Authorization and Adjustment Act of 1992 øProvided further, That the Secretary of the
Treasury is authorized to transfer from the Colorado River Dam
Fund to the Western Area Power Administration $3,774,000 to carry

480

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
CONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,
WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION—Continued
(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)—Continued

out the power marketing and transmission activities of the Boulder
Canyon project as provided in section 104(a)(4) of the Hoover Power
Plant Act of 1984, to remain available until expended.¿ (Energy and
Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5068–0–2–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Operating expenses:
00.01
Systems operation and maintenance ........................
121
00.02
Purchase power and wheeling ..................................
79
00.04
Program direction ...................................................... ...................
00.05
Utah mitigation and conservation fund ...................
5

33
74
105
6

39
55
106
5

00.91
01.01
02.01

Total operating expenses ......................................
Capital investment ........................................................
Reimbursable program ..................................................

205
37
55

218
32
143

205
24
147

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

297

393

376

70
306

82
333

22
355

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................
22.21 Unobligated balance transferred to other accounts
21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

3 ................... ...................
–1 ................... ...................
378
–297

415
–393

377
–376

82

22

1

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
40.20
Appropriation (special fund, definite) .......................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ..............................

12
8
6
245
185
202
–6 ................... ...................
4
4 ...................

43.00

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

255

197

208

51

136

147

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

306

333

355

68.00
70.00

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
72.40

149
143
171
297
393
376
–300
–366
–349
–3 ................... ...................
143

171

198

86.90
86.93
86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

115
134
51

89
141
136

94
108
147

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

300

366

349

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

–35
–16

–67
–69

–64
–83

88.90

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................

–51

–136

–147

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

255
249

197
230

208
202

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets
electric power in 15 western States from federally-owned

power plants operated primarily by the Bureau of Reclamation, Corps of Engineers, and the International Boundary and
Water Commission. Western operates and maintains approximately 16,850 circuit-miles of high-voltage transmission lines
and 258 substations/switchyards, and constructs additions
and modifications to existing facilities.
In keeping with statutory requirements, Western’s longterm power contracts allow for periodic rate adjustments to
ensure that the Federal Government recovers costs of operation, other costs allocated to power, and the capital investment in power facilities, with interest.
Systems operation and maintenance.—A total of 13 power
systems will be operated and maintained.
Power is sold to wholesale customers such as municipalities,
cooperatives, irrigation districts, public utility districts, State
and Federal Government agencies, and private utilities. Receipts are deposited in the Reclamation fund, the Falcon and
Amistad Operating and Maintenance fund, the General fund,
the Colorado River Dam fund, the Central Valley Project Restoration Fund, the Lower Colorado River Basin Development
fund, and the Upper Colorado River Basin fund.
Purchase of power and wheeling.—The program provides
for firming energy purchases and wheeling necessary to meet
current power sale contractual commitments. Financing of
this program consists of annual appropriated financing and
non-appropriated financing (net billing, bill crediting Federal
reimbursable, and non-Federal customer advances).
System construction.—Western’s construction and rehabilitation activity emphasizes replacement and upgrades of existing infrastructure to sustain reliable power delivery to our
customers, to contain annual maintenance costs, and to improve overall operational efficiency. Western will continue to
participate in joint construction projects to encourage more
widespread transmission access.
Program direction.—This activity provides compensation
and all related expenses for the workforce that operates and
maintains Western’s high voltage interconnected transmission
system (systems operation and maintenance program), and
those that plan design, and supervise the construction of replacement, upgrades and additions (system construction program) to the transmission facilities.
Utah Mitigation and Conservation.—The request includes
$5,432,000 for deposit into the Utah Reclamation Mitigation
and Conservation Account in the U.S. Treasury, pursuant
to Title IV of the Reclamation Projects Authorization and
Adjustment Act of 1992. Funds are earmarked primarily for
environmental mitigation expenditures in the State of Utah
covering fish and wildlife, and recreation resources impacted
by the Colorado River Storage Project.
Reimbursable program.—This program involves services
provided by Western to others under various types of reimbursable arrangements.
Starting in FY 1998, the Western Area Power Administration will set rates, consistent with current law, to begin to
recover the full cost of the Civil Service Retirement System
and Post-Retirement Health Benefits for its employees that
have not been recovered in the past. The estimated increase
in receipts to the Treasury is $8 million annually.
For display purposes only, the unobligated balances of this
account include a continuing fund of $500 thousand, which
is maintained from deposits to the Reclamation Fund, and
is available to ensure continuous operation of power systems
in the event of below normal hydropower generation, equipment failure, or other damage caused by acts of God, flood,
drought, strikes, embargoes, or other conditions which might
cause interruptions in service.

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
63.00

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–5068–0–2–271

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
22.0
23.1
23.3

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .............................................
Other than full-time permanent ...........................
Other personnel compensation .............................

1997 est.

55
1
3

53
1
3

54
1
3

59
14
3
5
3
3

57
13
3
5
3
3

58
15
1
5
3
3

26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

2
7
15
27
5

2
7
14
27
8

2
7
15
24
5

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

242
55

250
143

229
147

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

297

393

376

4
4
91

4
4
3 ...................
101
87

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–5068–0–2–271

Total compensable workyears:
1001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
1005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1,138
36

1997 est.

1998 est.

1,168
36

Appropriation (total) ............................................. ................... ................... ...................

70.00

1998 est.

Total personnel compensation .........................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Benefits for former personnel ...................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Transportation of things ...........................................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ................................................................
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

25.1
25.2
25.3

481

1,168
36

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

1

1

1

73.10
73.20

Change in unpaid obligations:
New obligations .............................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

1
–1

1
–1

1
–1

86.90

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................

1

1

1

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

1
1

1
1

1
1

Pursuant to section 423(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995, Western Area Power
Administration is requesting $1,065,000 to defray operations,
maintenance, and emergency (O,M&E) expenses for the hydroelectric facilities at Falcon and Amistad Dams on the Rio
Grande River. Most of these funds will be made available
to the United States Section of the International Boundary
and Water Commission through a reimbursable agreement.
$200,000 is for an emergency reserve that will remain unobligated unless unanticipated expenses arise. Revenues in excess
of O,M&E will be paid to the General Fund to repay the
costs of replacements and the original investment with interest. Revenues resulting from the Falcon and Amistad dams
power system operations are deposited to the Falcon and
Amistad operating and maintenance fund.
Public enterprise funds:
BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FUND

FALCON

AND

AMISTAD OPERATING

AND

MAINTENANCE FUND

For operation, maintenance, and emergency costs for the hydroelectric facilities at the Falcon and Amistad Dams, ø$970,000¿
$1,065,000, to remain available until expended and to be derived
from the Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund of
the Western Area Power Administration, as provided in section 423
of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and
1995. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)

Balance, start of year:
Balance, start of year ....................................................
Receipts:
02.01 Falcon and Amistad operating and maintenance fund
01.99

04.00

1996 actual

1998 est.

4

1

1

–2

3

3
4

2

4

–1

–3

–3

05.99
07.99

–1
1

–3
1

–3
1

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5178–0–2–271

1996 actual

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1997 est.

1998 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Operating expenses:
00.01
Power business line ..................................................
1,021
922
00.02
Residential exchange ................................................
1,047
160
00.05
Bureau of Reclamation .............................................
47
41
00.06
Corps of Engineers ....................................................
87
92
00.07
Colville settlement .....................................................
15
15
00.19
U.S. Fish & Wildlife ...................................................
12
15
00.20
Planning council ........................................................
8
8
00.21
Fish & wildlife ...........................................................
65
100
00.23
Transmission business line .......................................
178
153
00.24
Conservation & energy efficiency ..............................
51
45
00.25
Interest ......................................................................
371
438
00.26
Pension and health benefits ..................................... ................... ...................

975
1,074
44
95
15
16
8
100
150
51
456
2

00.91

1997 est.

Total: Balances and collections ....................................
Appropriation:
05.01 Falcon and Amistad operating and maintenance fund
Subtotal appropriation ...................................................
Total balance, end of year ............................................

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–5178–0–2–271

Expenditures from the Bonneville Power Administration Fund, established pursuant to Public Law 93–454, are approved for Columbia
River Basin fisheries production, supplementation facilities, and for
official reception and representation expenses in an amount not to
exceed $3,000.
During fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998, no new direct loan obligations
may be made. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act,
1997.)

2,902

1,989

2,986

01.01
01.02
01.03
01.04
01.05

Total operating expenses ......................................
Capital investment:
Power business line ..................................................
Transmission services ...............................................
Conservation & energy efficiency ..............................
Fish & wildlife ...........................................................
Capital equipment .....................................................

25
115
–17
31
7

20
175
47
27
8

13
171
33
27
9

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations (object class 25.3) ............................

1

1

1

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
New obligations .............................................................

1
–1

1
–1

1
–1

01.91

Total capital investment .......................................

161

277

253

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

3,063

2,266

3,239

1

1

21.90

2
–2

2
–2

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year: Fund
balance ......................................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

144
3,154

235
2,266

235
3,239

23.90

3,298

2,501

3,474

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.20
Appropriation (special fund, definite) .......................
1
Permanent:
60.25
Appropriation (special fund, indefinite) .................... ...................
60.47
Portion applied to debt reduction ............................. ...................

Total budgetary resources available for obligation

482

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

Public enterprise funds—Continued
BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FUND—Continued
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

23.95
24.90

New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year: Fund
balance ......................................................................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Authority to borrow (indefinite) .....................................
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
68.00
Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................
68.47
Portion applied to debt reduction .............................
67.15

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

–3,063

–2,266

–3,239

235

235

235

74

191

187

3,348
–268

2,280
–205

3,280
–228

68.90

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ................................................................

3,080

2,075

3,052

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

3,154

2,266

3,239

168
44
22 ...................

25
39

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
Obligated balance:
72.47
Authority to borrow ...............................................
72.90
Fund balance ........................................................
72.99
73.10
73.20

74.47
74.90

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
190
New obligations .............................................................
3,063
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
–3,207
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance:
Authority to borrow ...............................................
44
Fund balance ........................................................ ...................

44
2,266
–2,246

64
3,239
–3,214

25
39

2
89

74.99

Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

44

64

91

86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

3,154
53

2,266
–20

3,237
–23

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

3,207

2,246

3,214

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

–90
–3,258

–90
–2,190

–90
–3,190

88.90

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................

–3,348

–2,280

–3,280

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

–194
–141

–14
–34

–41
–66

Status of Direct Loans (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

1210

Cumulative balance of direct loans outstanding:
Outstanding, start of year .............................................

3

3

3

1290

Outstanding, end of year ..........................................

3

3

3

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is the Federal electric power marketing agency in the Pacific Northwest. BPA
markets hydroelectric power from 21 multipurpose water resource projects of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and
9 projects of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, plus some energy from non-Federal generating projects in the region.
These generating resources and BPA’s transmission system,
planned by the end of 1998 to consist of an estimated 14,800
circuit miles of high-voltage transmission lines and 400 substations, are operated as an integrated power system with
operating and financial results combined and reported as the
Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). BPA is the
largest power wholesaler in the Northwest and provides about
one-half of the region’s electric energy supply and about fourfifths of the region’s electric power transmission capacity.

BPA is responsible for meeting the net firm power requirements of its requesting customers through a variety of means,
including energy conservation programs, acquisition of renewable and other resources, and power exchanges with utilities
both in and outside the region.
BPA will finance its operations on the basis of the selffinancing authority provided by Federal Columbia River
Transmission System Act of 1974 (Transmission Act) (Public
Law 93–454) and the new borrowing authority provided by
the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Pacific Northwest Power Act) (Public Law 96–501)
for energy conservation, renewable energy resources and capital fish facilities. Authority to borrow is available to the
BPA on a permanent, indefinite basis. The amount of borrowing outstanding at any time cannot exceed $3.75 billion.
Operating expenses: Transmission Services Business Line.—
Provides funding from revenues for electric transmission research and development and program support of the capital
investment program described below for transmission services. Provides for operating an estimated 14,800 miles of line
and 400 substations, and for maintaining the facilities and
equipment of the Bonneville transmission system in 1998.
Power Business Line.—Provides for the planning, contractual acquisition and oversight of reliable, cost effective resources. These resources are needed to serve BPA’s portion
of the region’s forecasted net electric load requirements. Also
includes protection, mitigation and enhancement of fish and
wildlife affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia
River and its tributaries in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Power Act. Provides for repayment of the operation and
maintenance (O&M) costs of the 30 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation power generation
projects, and amortization on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
capital investment in power generating facilities and irrigation assistance at Bureau facilities. Also provides for extending the benefits of low cost Federal power to the residential
and small farm customers of investor-owned and publiclyowned utilities, in accordance with the Pacific Northwest
Power Act and for activities of the Pacific Northwest Electric
Power and Conservation Planning Council required by the
Pacific Northwest Power Act.
Energy Efficiency.—Provides for the planning, contractual
acquisition and oversight of reliable, cost effective conservation.
Interest.—Provides for payments to the U.S. Treasury for
interest on borrowings to finance BPA’s transmission services,
conservation, capital equipment, fish and wildlife, and associated projects capital programs under $3.75 billion borrowing
authority provided by the Transmission Act as amended by
the Pacific Northwest Power Act and replenished by Public
Law 98–50. This category also includes interest on Corps
of Engineers, BPA and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation appropriated debt.
Capital Investments: Transmission Services Business
Line.—Provides for the planning, design and construction of
transmission lines, substation and control system additions,
replacements, and enhancements to the FCRPS transmission
system for a reliable, efficient and cost-effective regional
transmission system. Provides for planning, design, and construction work to repair or replace existing transmission lines,
substations, control systems, and general facilities of the
FCRPS transmission system.
Power Business Line.—Provides for direct funding of additions, improvements, and replacements at existing Federal
hydroelectric projects in the Northwest. Also provides for capital investments to implement environmental activities, and
protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by
hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Power Act.

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Energy Efficiency.—Provides for the planning, contractual
acquisition and oversight of reliable, cost effective conservation.
Capital equipment.—Provides for general purpose ADP
equipment, office furniture and equipment, and software capital development in support of all BPA programs.
Contingencies.—Although contingencies are not specifically
funded, the need may arise to provide for purchase of power
in low-water years; for repair and/or replacement of facilities
affected by natural and man-made emergencies, including the
resulting additional costs for contracting, construction, and
operation and maintenance work; for unavoidable increased
costs for the planned program due to necessary but unforeseen adjustments, including engineering and design changes,
contractor and other claims and relocations, or for payment
of a retrospective premium adjustment in excess nuclear property insurance.
Financing.—The Transmission Act provides for the use by
BPA of all receipts, collections, and recoveries in cash from
all sources, including the sale of bonds, to finance the annual
budget programs of BPA. These receipts result primarily from
the sale of power and wheeling services. The Transmission
Act also provides for authority to borrow from the U.S. Treasury at rates comparable to borrowings at open market rates
for similar issues. As amended by the Pacific Northwest
Power Act and replenished by Public Law 98–50, it allows
for $3.75 billion of borrowing to be outstanding at any time.
The fiscal year 1998 capital obligations are estimated to be
$253 million. To the extent BPA capital borrowing authority
is insufficient in 1998, BPA would use cash reserves generated by revenues from customers, if available, to finance
some of these investments.
In FY 1996, BPA made payments to the Treasury of $801
million and also expects to make payments of $791 million
in 1997 and $805 million in 1998. The 1998 payment will
be distributed as follows: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service O&M ($111 million), interest on
bonds and appropriations ($466 million), and amortization
($228 million).
Direct loans.—During FY 1998, no new direct loan obligations may be made.
Operating results.—Total revenues are forecast at approximately $3.3 billion in 1998.
It should be noted that BPA’s revenue forecasts are based
on several critical assumptions about both the supply of and
demand for Federal energy. During the operating year, deviation from the conditions assumed in a rate case may result
in a variation in actual revenues of several hundred million
dollars from the forecast.
Starting in FY 1998 BPA will begin to fully recover, from
the sale of electric power and transmission, funds sufficient
to cover the full cost of Civil Service Retirement System and
Post-Retirement Health Benefits for their employees. The entire cost of BPA employees working under the Federal Employees Retirement System is already fully recovered in
wholesale electric power and transmission rates.

483

Balance Sheet (in millions of dollars)
1995 actual

1996 actual

166

198

300

300

3
152

3
197

3
160

3
160

2

2

2

2

70
3,227
1,084

61
3,258
8,161

60
3,290
8,207

60
3,317
8,230

Total assets ........................................
LIABILITIES:
2102 Federal liabilities: Interest payable ........
Non-Federal liabilities:
2201
Accounts payable ................................
2203
Debt .....................................................
2205
Lease liabilities, net ...........................
2207
Other ...................................................

4,704

11,880

12,022

12,072

44

58

60

60

158
2,563
16
179

151
11,058
..................
162

150
11,121
..................
160

150
11,133
..................
160

2999

2,960

11,429

11,491

11,503

1,477
–13
281

..................
..................
451

..................
..................
531

..................
..................
569

Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

ASSETS:
Federal assets:
1101
Fund balances with Treasury .............
Investments in US securities:
1106
Receivables, net .............................
1206 Non-Federal assets: Receivables, net .....
1601 Net value of assets related to pre–1992
direct loans receivable and acquired
defaulted guaranteed loans receivable: Direct loans, gross ....................
Other Federal assets:
1802
Inventories and related properties .....
1803
Property, plant and equipment, net
1901
Other assets ........................................
1999

Total liabilities ....................................
NET POSITION:
3100 Appropriated capital ................................
3200 Invested capital .......................................
3300 Cumulative results of operations ............

1997 est.

1998 est.

3999

Total net position ................................

1,745

451

531

569

4999

Total liabilities and net position ............

4,705

11,880

12,022

12,072

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
12.1
21.0
22.0
23.1
23.2
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.5
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0
43.0
99.9

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

1998 est.

173
2
6

163
2
6

Total personnel compensation ..............................
182
181
Civilian personnel benefits:
Civilian personnel benefits ....................................... ................... ...................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
30
30
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
11
11
Transportation of things ................................................
5
5
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
10
10
Rental payments to others ............................................
4
4
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
5
5
Printing and reproduction ..............................................
1
1
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
2
2
Other services ................................................................
2,186
1,267
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
152
175
Research and development contracts ...........................
10
10
Supplies and materials .................................................
50
50
Equipment ......................................................................
25
25
Land and structures ......................................................
15
15
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ............................
2
2
Interest and dividends ...................................................
373
473

171

Total obligations ........................................................

175
1
6

1997 est.

3,063

2,266

2
28
10
5
10
4
5
1
2
2,268
175
10
50
25
15
2
456
3,239

Statement of Operations (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

1995 actual

1996 actual

1997 est.

Personnel Summary

1998 est.

0101
0102

Revenue ...................................................
Expense ....................................................

2,386
–2,287

2,428
–2,332

2,270
–1,812

3,272
–2,808

0109

Net income or loss (–) ............................

99

96

458

464

0199

Net income or loss ..................................

99

96

458

464

Identification code 89–4045–0–3–271

2001
2005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

3,160
85

1997 est.

3,131
85

1998 est.

2,930
85

484

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

Public enterprise funds—Continued
COLORADO RIVER BASINS POWER MARKETING FUND, WESTERN AREA
POWER ADMINISTRATION
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4452–0–3–271

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04
10.00

1996 actual

Obligations by program activity:
Program direction .......................................................... ...................
Colorado River storage project ......................................
135
Fort Peck project ............................................................
11
Other projects ................................................................
1

1997 est.

1998 est.

28
86
5
1

25
92
7
1

Total obligations ........................................................

147

120

125

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year: Fund
balance ......................................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

42
123

19
120

19
125

165
–147

139
–120

144
–125

19

19

19

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
68.00
Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................
123
68.27
Capital transfer to general fund .............................. ...................

130
–10

141
–16

21.90

23.90
23.95
24.90

68.90

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year: Fund
balance ......................................................................

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ................................................................

123

120

125

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

123

120

125

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

11
147
–145

14
120
–120

14
125
–125

14

14

of the Colorado River storage project. Western also purchases
electricity and pays wheeling fees to meet firm and nonfirm
commitments.
Colorado River Basin project.—The Colorado River Basin
project includes Western’s expenses associated with the
Central Arizona project and the United States entitlement
from the Navajo coal-fired powerplant. Revenues in excess
of operating expenses are deposited in the Lower Colorado
River Basin development fund.
Fort Peck project.—Revenue collected by Western is used
to defray construction, operation and maintenance and power
marketing expenses associated with the power generation and
transmission facilities of the Fort Peck project, Corps of Engineers—Civil, and emergency expenses to ensure continuous
operation. The Corps operates and maintains the power generating facilities, and Western operates and maintains the
transmission system and performs power marketing functions.
Seedskadee project.—Activity under the Seedskadee project
at Fontenelle Dam in Wyoming was previously included in
the Colorado River Storage project. In 1994, separate reporting was initiated to comply with power repayment requirements.
Dolores project.—Activity under the Dolores project at
McPhee Dam in southwestern Colorado was previously included in the Colorado River Storage project. The facilities
were transferred from the Bureau of Reclamation to Western
late in 1994. Separate reporting was initiated in 1994 to
comply with power repayment requirements.
Starting in FY 1998, the Colorado River Basins Power Marketing Fund will set rates, consistent with current law, to
begin to recover the full cost of the Civil Service Retirement
System and Post-Retirement Health Benefits for its employees
that have not been recovered in the past. The estimated increase in receipts to the Treasury is $1 million annually.

14

70.00

72.40

86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

Balance Sheet (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4452–0–3–271

123
120
125
22 ................... ...................

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

–9
–114

–8
–122

–8
–133

ASSETS:
Federal assets:
1101
Fund balances with Treasury .............
Investments in US securities:
1106
Receivables, net .............................
1206 Non-Federal assets: Receivables, net .....
Other Federal assets:
1802
Inventories and related properties .....
1803
Property, plant and equipment, net
1901
Other assets ........................................

88.90

–123

–130

–141

1999

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
21

–10
–10

–16
–16

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................

145

120

125

Western’s operation and maintenance and power marketing
expenses for the Colorado River storage project, the Colorado
River Basin project, the Seedskadee project, the Dolores
project and the Fort Peck project are financed from power
revenues.
Western operates and maintains approximately 4,000 miles
of transmission lines, substations, switchyards, communications and control equipment associated with this fund. In
FY 1997 and FY 1998, the compensation and related expenses
for all these activities are quantified under Program Direction. Wholesale power is provided to utilities over interconnected high-voltage transmission systems. In keeping with
statutory requirements, long-term power contracts provide for
periodic rate adjustments to ensure that the Federal Government recovers all costs of operation and all capital invested
in power, with interest.
Colorado River storage project.—Western markets power
and operates and maintains the power transmission facilities

Total assets ........................................
LIABILITIES:
2101 Federal liabilities: Accounts payable ......
Non-Federal liabilities:
2201
Accounts payable ................................
2207
Other ...................................................
2999

Total liabilities ....................................
NET POSITION:
3100 Appropriated capital ................................
3300 Cumulative results of operations ............
3600 Other ........................................................

1995 actual

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

54

32

32

32

1
14

1
27

1
27

1
27

3
194
6

3
181
1

3
190
1

3
198
1

272

245

254

262

2

2

2

2

2
2

2
2

2
2

2
2

6

6

6

6

328
–333
271

..................
–24
263

..................
–24
272

..................
–24
280

3999

Total net position ................................

266

239

248

256

4999

Total liabilities and net position ............

272

245

254

262

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–4452–0–3–271

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

11.1
11.5

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

10
1

10
1

10
1

11.9
12.1
21.0
23.1
23.3

Total personnel compensation ..............................
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges

11
2
1
1
1

11
2
1
1
1

11
2
1
1
1

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
25.2
25.3
26.0
31.0
32.0
43.0
99.0

Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Supplies and materials .................................................
Equipment ......................................................................
Land and structures ......................................................
Interest and dividends ...................................................
Subtotal, reimbursable obligations ...............................

28

50

63

3
2
1
5
92
147

3
2
5
4
40
120

3
2
4
5
32
125

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

147

120

125

21.40

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–4452–0–3–271

Total compensable workyears:
2001 Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
2005 Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................
22.10 Resources available from recoveries of prior year obligations .......................................................................

191
1

1997 est.

161
1

1998 est.

161
1

23.90
23.95
24.40

Federal Funds
DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION
For salaries and expenses of the Department of Energy necessary
for Departmental Administration in carrying out the purposes of the
Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101, et seq.),
including the hire of passenger motor vehicles and official reception
and representation expenses (not to exceed $35,000), ø$215,021,000¿
$232,604,000, to remain available until expendedø, plus such additional amounts as necessary to cover increases in the estimated
amount of cost of work for others notwithstanding the provisions
of the Anti-Deficiency Act (31 U.S.C. 1511, et seq.): Provided, That
such increases in cost of work are offset by revenue increases of
the same or greater amount, to remain available until expended¿:
Provided øfurther¿, That moneys received by the Department for
miscellaneous
revenues
estimated
to
total
ø$125,388,000¿
$131,330,000 in fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998 may be retained and used
for operating expenses within this account, and may remain available
until expended, as authorized by section 201 of Public Law 95–238,
notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3302: Provided further,
That the sum herein appropriated shall be reduced by the amount
of miscellaneous revenues received during fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998
so as to result in a final fiscal year ø1997¿ 1998 appropriation from
the General Fund estimated at not more than ø$89,633,000¿
$101,274,000. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act,
1997.)
Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

Balance, start of year:
Balance, start of year .................................................... ................... ................... ...................
Receipts:
02.01 Miscellaneous revenues .................................................
2 ................... ...................
Appropriation:
05.01 Departmental administration .........................................
–2 ................... ...................
07.99 Total balance, end of year ............................................ ................... ................... ...................
01.99

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

00.01
00.04
00.08
00.10
00.11
00.12
00.13
00.18
00.20
00.21
00.22

Obligations by program activity:
Office of Policy ...............................................................
Chief Financial Officer ...................................................
Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs ...............
Operation offices ............................................................
General Counsel .............................................................
Office of the Secretary ...................................................
Board of Contract Appeals ............................................
Cost of work for others ..................................................
Human Resources and Administration ..........................
Field management .........................................................
Economic impact and diversity .....................................

10.00

Total obligations ........................................................

7
233

1 ................... ...................
394
–381
13

228
–221

240
–240

7 ...................

43.00

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections: Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................

261

90

101

105

125

131

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

366

215

233

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.45 Adjustments in unexpired accounts ..............................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
72.40

General and special funds:

Identification code 89–0228–0–1–276

13
215

259
90
101
2 ................... ...................

70.00

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

27
366

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
40.25
Appropriation (special fund, indefinite) ....................

68.00

Identification code 89–0228–0–1–276

485

1996 actual

1997 est.

1998 est.

22
20
21
22
23
22
8
9
8
103 ................... ...................
16
19
21
2
2
3
1
1
1
25
26
38
166
108
111
9
7
8
7
6
7
381

221

240

86.90
86.93
86.97
86.98
87.00

83
88
33
381
221
240
–375
–276
–230
–1 ................... ...................
88

33

43

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
160
Outlays from current balances ......................................
110
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
105
Outlays from permanent balances ................................ ...................

74
70
103
29

83
17
108
22

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

375

276

230

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.00
Federal sources .....................................................
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................

–78
–27

–96
–29

–96
–35

88.90

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................

–105

–125

–131

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

261
270

90
151

101
99

Departmental Administration.—This account funds a wide
array of policy development and analysis activities, institutional and public liaison functions, and other program support
requirements necessary to ensure effective operation and
management. Specific activities provided for are:
Office of Policy.—This organization is the principal adviser
to the Secretary for formulating and recommending national
energy policy, for conducting environmental and economic impact analyses, for Departmental planning strategies and outyear program funding requirements, for conducting integrated
policy analysis, for conducting a systemic evaluation of DOE
programs to ensure that each contributes the maximum toward national energy goals and objectives, for managing the
performance management program, for the formulation of
international energy policy, analyses and assessments of the
current world energy situation, and for international cooperation in energy matters.
Human Resources and Administration.—This office provides
institutional support services to headquarters organizations
and to the Department as a whole. Areas of responsibility
include: organization and management systems; personnel
management; automated data processing management and acquisition; telecommunications management; procurement and
assistance management and oversight; as well as performing
and supplying administration services.
Administrative services related to rent and building operations, printing and graphics, copying, postage, supplies, tele-

486

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION—Continued

phones, Automated Office Support Services charges, Defense
Contract Audit Agency audits, and contract closeouts, will
be performed in the Department’s Intragovernmental Working
Capital Fund (WCF). Funding for the WCF will be justified
in the program’s budgets and requested in affected appropriations.
Chief Financial Officer.—This office is responsible for Departmental budgeting, accounting, financial policy, and compliance.
Congressional, Public, and Intergovernmental Affairs.—This
office is responsible for coordinating, directing, and promoting
important Secretarial and Administrative policies and legislative initiatives. The office responds to requests for information
from the public, Congress, State, and local government officials, media, and other Federal agencies. The office also functions as a Departmental liaison with members of Congress
and the White House. In public affairs, the office’s efforts
include public information activities, press and media services, consumers liaison, communicating with public interest
groups, speaker scheduling, publication of special information
materials, research, speech writing, special projects, internal
communications and editorial services.
Field Management.—This office is responsible for strategic
planning for all field elements and management coordination
and oversight of all operations offices, implementing project
management, cost, facilities management systems and programs.
General Counsel.—This office is responsible for providing
legal services to all energy activities except for those functions
belonging exclusively to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which is served by its own General Counsel and
litigation arising from the Emergency Petroleum Allocation
Act. Its responsibilities entail the provision of legal opinion,
advice and services to administrative and program offices,
and the conduct of both administrative and judicial litigation,
as well as legal advice and support for enforcement activities.
Further, the General Counsel appears before State and Federal agencies in defense of national energy policies and activities. The office is responsible for the coordination and clearance of proposed legislation affecting energy activities and
testimony before Congress. The General Counsel is also responsible for oversight of intelligence activities; ensuring consistency and legal sufficiency of all energy regulations; administering and monitoring standards of conduct requirements;
and conducting the Patents program.
Office of the Secretary.—Directs and supervises the staff
and provides policy guidance to line and staff organizations
in the accomplishment of agency objectives.
Board of Contract Appeals.—Adjudicates disputes arising
out of the Department’s contracts and financial assistance
programs and provides for alternative dispute resolution.
Economic Impact and Diversity.—Is responsible for: (1) advising the Secretary on the effects of the Department’s policies, regulations and actions on minorities and minority business enterprises; (2) conducting research to determine energy
consumption and use patterns of minorities; (3) providing
technical assistance to minority educational institutions and
minority business enterprises to enable them to participate
more fully in Departmental activities; (4) the office also is
responsible for initiatives on historically black colleges and
universities for the Department; (5) administering a Departmental small and disadvantaged business program; (6) serves
as the Department’s enforcer to ensure that the civil rights
of employees are protected and complaints are processed within applicable regulatory timeframes; (7) implements the Department’s environmental justice strategy; and (8) responsible

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

for the Office of Employee Concerns which manages the whistle blower reform initiative.
Cost of Work for Others.—This activity covers the cost of
work performed under orders placed with the Department
by non-DOE entities which are precluded by law from making
advance payments and certain revenue programs. Reimbursement for these costs is made through deposits of offsetting
collections to this account.
Corporate Management Information System.—A FY 1998
initiative supporting National Performance Review objectives
and the requirements of this Department’s Strategic Alignment Initiative by maximizing our investment in streamlined
information and financial systems through the cooperative
development of an automated, technology-based systems approach. Funding in the amount of $8.0 million is provided
for a Corporate Human Resources Information System to support activities such as: position management, processing personnel actions, and applicant/employee tracking of awards
and benefits through a user-friendly, automated information
technology system. In addition, some funds will be used to
update and replace a number of independent, antiquated financial systems with compatible, user-friendly business systems that will provide real-time management and financial
data on a DOE complex-wide basis. Finally, some funds will
support activities for a Department-wide information technology and system planning effort that is needed to conform
with the principles of the new Information Technology Management Reform Act.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0228–0–1–276

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.9
12.1
21.0
23.1
23.2
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other than full-time permanent ...............................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

25.4
26.0
31.0

Total personnel compensation ..............................
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Rental payments to GSA ................................................
Rental payments to others ............................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
Printing and reproduction ..............................................
Advisory and assistance services ..................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Supplies and materials .................................................
Equipment ......................................................................

99.9

Total obligations ........................................................

149
6
1

1997 est.

88
4
2

1998 est.

85
4
2

156
94
91
34
17
16
3
3
3
11 ................... ...................
2 ................... ...................
8
3
3
2 ................... ...................
17
17
17
104
53
76
4
32
32
33 ................... ...................
5 ................... ...................
2
2
2
381

221

240

Personnel Summary
1996 actual

Identification code 89–0228–0–1–276

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

OFFICE

OF THE

2,654
18

1997 est.

1,447
18

1998 est.

1,319
18

INSPECTOR GENERAL

For necessary expenses of the Office of the Inspector General in
carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 1978,
as amended, ø$23,853,000¿ $29,499,000, to remain available until
expended. (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1997.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0236–0–1–276

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

1996 actual

28

1997 est.

29

1998 est.

29

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
22.00 New budget authority (gross) ........................................

24.40

21.40

23.90
23.95
24.40

40.00

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
New obligations .............................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................
New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Appropriation .............................................................

8
25

5 ...................
24
29

33
–28

29
–29

29
–29

89.00
90.00

1 ................... ...................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ................... ...................

5 ................... ...................

WORKING CAPITAL FUND
25

24

29

5
28
–28

4
29
–25

9
29
–27

4

9

11

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–4563–0–4–276

1997 est.

1998 est.

15
13

16
9

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

28

25

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

25
28

24
25

29
27

93

95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................ ...................
New obligations ............................................................. ...................

93
–93

95
–95

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Spending authority from offsetting collections (gross):
Offsetting collections (cash) ..................................... ...................

93

95

................... ...................
...................
93
...................
–89

4
95
–95

27

89.00
90.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................ ...................

20
7

87.00

10.00

22.00
23.95

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new current authority ..............................
86.93 Outlays from current balances ......................................

68.00

This appropriation provides agencywide audit, inspection,
and investigative functions to identify and correct management and administrative deficiencies which create conditions
for existing or potential instances of fraud, waste, and mismanagement. The audit function provides financial and performance audits of programs and operations. Financial audits
include financial statement and financial related audits. Performance audits include economy and efficiency and program
results audits. The inspections function provides independent
inspections and analyses of the effectiveness, efficiency, and
economy of programs and operations and conducts inquiries
to resolve contractor-employee whistleblower complaints of reprisal. The investigative function provides for the detection
and investigation of improper and illegal activities involving
programs, personnel, and operations.

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance:
Fund balance .............................................................
73.10 New obligations .............................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.90 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance:
Fund balance .............................................................
72.90

86.97
86.98
87.00

1996 actual

...................

4

4

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority ......................... ...................
89
Outlays from permanent balances ................................ ................... ...................

91
4

Total outlays (gross) ................................................. ...................

89

95

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.45
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Offsetting governmental collections ............................................ ...................

–93

–95

89.00
90.00

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0236–0–1–276

Unobligated balance available, end of year:
Uninvested balance ...................................................

487

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ...................
–4 ...................

Statement of Operations (in millions of dollars)
1997 est.

1998 est.

11.1
11.5

Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent ..................................................
Other personnel compensation ..................................

19
1

18
1

11.9
12.1
21.0
23.1
25.1
25.2

Total personnel compensation ..............................
19
20
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
4
5
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
1
1
Rental payments to GSA ................................................ ...................
1
Advisory and assistance services .................................. ................... ...................
Other services ................................................................
4
2

19
5
1
1
1
2

18
1

Identification code 89–4563–0–4–276

1995 actual

1996 actual

0101
0102

Revenue ...................................................
Expense ....................................................

..................
..................

..................
..................

1997 est.

93
–89

1998 est.

95
–95

0109

Net income or loss (–) ............................

..................

..................

4

..................

Balance Sheet (in millions of dollars)

Total obligations ........................................................

28

29

29

Personnel Summary
Identification code 89–0236–0–1–276

1001
1005

Total compensable workyears:
Full-time equivalent employment ..................................
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours

1996 actual

1997 est.

325
1

1998 est.

331
1

290
1

SPECIAL FOREIGN CURRENCY PROGRAM
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 89–0205–0–1–271

21.40

1996 actual

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year:
Uninvested balance ................................................... ...................

1997 est.

1998 est.

1 ...................

1995 actual

1996 actual

ASSETS:
Federal assets: Fund balances with
Treasury ...............................................
1802 Other Federal assets: Inventories and
related properties ................................

..................

..................

2

..................

..................

2

4

1999

Total assets ........................................
LIABILITIES:
2101 Federal liabilities: Accounts payable ......

..................

..................

4

4

..................

..................

4

4

2999

Total liabilities ....................................

..................

..................

4

4

4999

99.9

Identification code 89–4563–0–4–276

1997 est.

1998 est.

Total liabilities and net position ............

..................

..................

4

4

1101

..................

In FY 1997, and continuing in FY 1998, the Department
established a working capital fund to provide headquarters
program offices administrative services such as building
space, information and telecommunications services, supplies,
printing, and copying. In the past, most of the funding for
these goods and services has been requested in Departmental
Administration, and was provided in a way many agency con-

488

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998

General and special funds—Continued
WORKING CAPITAL FUND—Continued

sumers perceived as ‘‘free.’’ Establishment of the working capital fund has helped the Department reduce waste and improve efficiency, since funding for the goods and services is
requested by the program office consumers who purchase
what they need through the working capital fund.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Identification code 89–4563–0–4–276

23.1
23.3
24.0
25.2
25.3
26.0
99.9

Rental payments to GSA ................................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous charges
Printing and reproduction ..............................................
Other services ................................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ....................................................................
Supplies and materials .................................................

1997 est.

1998 est.

...................
...................
...................
...................

56
13
4
7

54
12
7
6

...................
...................

10
3

13
3

Total obligations ........................................................ ...................

93

95

GENERAL FUND RECEIPT ACCOUNTS
(in millions of dollars)
1996 actual

Offsetting receipts from the public:
89–089400 Fees and Recoveries, Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions, Energy ...............................................
89–205100 Leasing of excess SPR capacity: Legislative
proposal, subject to PAYGO ...............................................
89–223000 Oil and gas sale proceeds at NPRs. ...............
89–223100 Privatization of Elk Hills ..................................
89–223200 Proceeds from sale of excess DOE assets
89–223300 Proceeds from uranium sales ..........................
89–223500 Sale or lease of naval petroleum oil shale
reserves: Legislative proposal, subject to PAYGO .............
89–224200 Sale and transmission of electric energy,
Alaska .................................................................................
89–224500 Sale and transmission of electric energy, Falcon Dam .............................................................................
89–224700 Sale and transmission of electric energy,
Southwestern Power Administration ...................................
89–224800 Sale and transmission of electric energy,
Southeastern Power Administration ...................................
89–224900 Sale of power and other utilities, not otherwise classified ....................................................................
89–264700 Proceeds from the sale of Power Marketing
Administrations: APA, SEPA, SWPA, WAPA .........................
89–288900 Repayments on miscellaneous recoverable
costs, not otherwise classified ..........................................
General Fund Offsetting receipts from the public .....................

50

1997 est.

31

1998 est.

22

................... ................... ...................
419
444
175
................... ...................
2,415
5
25
15
...................
29
100
................... ................... ...................
12

11

8

5 ................... ...................
81

93

94

154

168

188

50

43

43

................... ...................

85

68

45

51

844

889

3,196

GENERAL PROVISIONS
PRIORITY PLACEMENT, JOB PLACEMENT, RETRAINING, AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS FOR UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EMPLOYEES AFFECTED BY A REDUCTION IN FORCE
SEC. 301. (a) DEFINITIONS.—
(1) For the purposes of this section, the term ‘‘agency’’ means
the United States Department of Energy.
(2) For the purposes of this section, the term ‘‘eligible employee’’
means any employee of the agency who—
(A) is scheduled to be separated from service due to a reduction
in force under—
(i) regulations prescribed under section 3502 of title 5, United
States Code; or
(ii) procedures established under section 3595 of title 5, United States Code; or
(B) is separated from service due to such a reduction in force,
but does not include—
(i) an employee separated from service for cause on charges
of misconduct or delinquency; or
(ii) an employee who, at the time of separation, meets the
age and service requirements for an immediate annuity under

subchapter III of chapter 83 or chapter 84 of title 5, United
States Code.
(b) PRIORITY PLACEMENT AND RETRAINING PROGRAM.—Not later
than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the United
States Department of Energy shall establish an agency-wide priority
placement and retraining program for eligible employees.
(c) The priority placement program established under subsection
(b) shall include provisions under which a vacant position shall not
be filled by the appointment or transfer of any individual from outside
of the agency if—
(1) there is then available any eligible employee who applies
for the position within 30 days of the agency issuing a job announcement and is qualified (or can be trained or retrained to
become qualified within 90 days of assuming the position) for the
position; and
(2) the position is within the same commuting area as the eligible
employee’s last-held position or residence.
(d) JOB PLACEMENT AND COUNSELING SERVICES.—The head of the
agency may establish a program to provide job placement and counseling services to eligible employees. A program established under
subsection (d) may include, but is not limited to, such services as—
(1) career and personal counseling;
(2) training and job search skills; and
(3) job placement assistance, including assistance provided
through cooperative arrangements with State and local employment services offices.
SEC. 302. None of the funds appropriated by this or any other
Act may be used to implement section 3140 of H.R. 3230 as reported
by the Committee of Conference on July 30, 1996. The Secretary
of Energy shall develop a plan to reorganize the field activities and
management of the national security functions of the Department
of Energy and shall submit such plan to the Congress not later
than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act. The plan
will specifically identify all significant functions performed by the
Department’s national security operations and area offices and make
recommendations as to where those functions should be performed.

TITLE V—GENERAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 501. (a) PURCHASE OF AMERICAN-MADE
UCTS.—It is the sense of the Congress that,

EQUIPMENT AND PRODto the greatest extent
practicable, all equipment and products purchased with funds made
available in this Act should be American-made.
(b) NOTICE REQUIREMENT.—In providing financial assistance to, or
entering into any contract with, any entity using funds made available in this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to the greatest
extent practicable, shall provide to such entity a notice describing
the statement made in subsection (a) by the Congress.
(c) PROHIBITION OF CONTRACTS WITH PERSONS FALSELY LABELING
PRODUCTS AS MADE IN AMERICA.—If it has been finally determined
by a court or Federal agency that any person intentionally affixed
a label bearing a ‘‘Made in America’’ inscription, or any inscription
with the same meaning, to any product sold in or shipped to the
United States that is not made in the United States, the person
shall be ineligible to receive any contract or subcontract made with
funds made available in this Act, pursuant to the debarment, suspension, and ineligibility procedures described in sections 9.400 through
9.409 of title 48, Code of Federal Regulations.
øSEC. 502. 42 U.S.C. 7262 is repealed.¿
SEC. ø503¿ 502. (a) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise
made available by this Act may be used to determine the final point
of discharge for the interceptor drain for the San Luis Unit until
development by the Secretary of the Interior and the State of California of a plan, which shall conform to the water quality standards
of the State of California as approved by the Administrator of the
Environmental Protection Agency, to minimize any detrimental effect
of the San Luis drainage waters.
(b) The costs of the Kesterson Reservoir Cleanup Program and
the costs of the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program shall be classified by the Secretary of the Interior as reimbursable or nonreimbursable and collected until fully repaid pursuant to the ‘‘Cleanup Program— Alternative Repayment Plan’’ and the ‘‘SJVDP—Alternative
Repayment Plan’’ described in the report entitled ‘‘Repayment Report,
Kesterson Reservoir Cleanup Program and San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program, February 1995’’, prepared by the Department of the
Interior, Bureau of Reclamation. Any future obligations of funds by
the United States relating to, or providing for, drainage service or

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
drainage studies for the San Luis Unit shall be fully reimbursable
by San Luis Unit beneficiaries of such service or studies pursuant
to Federal Reclamation law.
SEC. ø504¿ 503. None of the funds made available in this Act
may be used to revise the Missouri River Master Water Control
Manual when it is made known to the Federal entity or official
to which the funds are made available that such revision provides
for an increase in the springtime water release program during the
spring heavy rainfall and snow melt period in States that have rivers
draining into the Missouri River below the Gavins Point Dam.
øSEC. 505. Public Law 101–514, the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1991, is amended effective September 30,
1997 or upon operation of the temperature control device, by striking
the proviso under the heading ‘‘Construction, Rehabilitation, Operation and Maintenance, Western Area Power Administration’’.¿
øSEC. 506. The Secretary of the Interior shall extend the water
service contracts for the following projects, entered into by the Secretary of the Interior under subsection (e) of section 9 of the Reclamation Project Act of 1939 (43 U.S.C. 485h) and section 9(c) of the
Act of December 22, 1944 (58 Stat. 891, chapter 665), for a period
of 1 additional year after the dates on which each of the contracts,
respectively, would expire but for this section:
(1) The Bostwick District (Kansas portion), Missouri River Basin
Project, consisting of the project constructed and operated under
the Act of December 22, 1944 (58 Stat. 887, chapter 665), as a
component of the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, situated in
Republic County, Jewell County, and Cloud County, Kansas.
(2) The Bostwick District (Nebraska portion), Missouri River
Basin Project, consisting of the project constructed and operated
under the Act of December 22, 1944 (58 Stat. 887, chapter 665),
a component of the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, situated
in Harlan County, Franklin County, Webster County, and Nuckolls
County, Nebraska.
(3) The Frenchman-Cambridge District, Missouri River Basin
Project, consisting of the project constructed and operated under
the Act of December 22, 1944 (58 Stat. 887, chapter 665), as a
component of the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, situated in
Chase County, Frontier County, Hitchcock County, Furnas County,
and Harlan County, Nebraska.¿
øSEC. 507. Funds made available by this Act to the Department
of Energy shall be available only for the purposes for which they
have been made available by this Act. The Department of Energy
shall report by February 28, 1997 to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate on the Department of Energy’s adherence to the recommendations included in the accompanying report.¿
SEC. ø508¿ 504. (a) DENIAL OF FUNDS FOR PREVENTING ROTC
ACCESS TO CAMPUS.—None of the funds made available in this Act
may be provided by contract or by grant (including a grant of funds
to be available for student aid) to a subelement of an institution
of higher education øwhen it is made known to the Federal official
having authority to obligate or expend such funds¿ if the Secretary
of Defense determines that the subelement of such institution has
a policy or practice (regardless of when implemented) that prohibits,
or in effect prevents—
(1) the maintaining, establishing, or operation of a unit of the
Senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (in accordance with section
654 of title 10, United States Code, and other applicable Federal
laws) at the subelement of such institution; or
(2) a student at the institution (or subelement) from enrolling
in a unit of the Senior Reserve Officer Training Corps at another
institution of higher education.
(b) EXCEPTION.—The limitation established in subsection (a) shall
not apply to an institution of higher education when it is made
known to the Federal official having authority to obligate or expend
such funds that—
(1) the institution (or subelement) has ceased the policy or practice described in such subsection; or
(2) the institution has a longstanding policy of pacifism based
on historical religious affiliation.
SEC. ø509¿ 505. (a) DENIAL OF FUNDS FOR PREVENTING FEDERAL
MILITARY RECRUITING ON CAMPUS.—None of the funds made available
in this Act may be provided by contract or grant (including a grant
of funds to be available for student aid) to a subelement of an institution of higher education when it is made known to the Federal official
having authority to obligate or expend such funds that the subelement of such institution has a policy or practice (regardless of when
implemented) that prohibits, or in effect prevents—

TITLE V—GENERAL PROVISIONS—Continued

489

(1) entry to campuses, or access to students (who are 17 years
of age or older) on campuses, for purposes of Federal military
recruiting; or
(2) access to the following information pertaining to students
(who are 17 years of age or older) for purposes of Federal military
recruiting: student names, addresses, telephone listings, dates and
places of birth, levels of education, degrees received, prior military
experience, and the most recent previous educational institutions
enrolled in by the students.
(b) EXCEPTION.—The limitation established in subsection (a) shall
not apply to an institution of higher education when it is made
known to the Federal official having authority to obligate or expend
such funds that—
(1) the institution (or subelement) has ceased the policy or practice described in such subsection; or
(2) the institution has a longstanding policy of pacifism based
on historical religious affiliation.
SEC. ø510¿ 506. None of the funds made available in this Act
may be obligated or expended to enter into or renew a contract
with an entity when it is made known to the Federal official having
authority to obligate or expend such funds that—
(1) such entity is otherwise a contractor with the United States
and is subject to the requirement in section 4212(d) of title 38,
United States Code, regarding submission of an annual report to
the Secretary of Labor concerning employment of certain veterans;
and
(2) such entity has not submitted a report as required by that
section for the most recent year for which such requirement was
applicable to such entity.
øSEC. 511. The Administrator may offer employees voluntary separation incentives as deemed necessary which shall not exceed
$25,000. Recipients who accept employment with the United States
within five years after separation shall repay the entire amount to
the Bonneville Power Administration. This authority shall expire September 30, 2000.¿
øSEC. 512. Following section 4(h)(10)(C) of the Northwest Power
Planning and Conservation Act, insert the following new section:
(4)(h)(10)(D) INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC REVIEW PANEL.—(i) The
Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) shall appoint an Independent Scientific Review Panel (Panel), which shall be comprised
of eleven members, to review projects proposed to be funded through
that portion of the Bonneville Power Administration’s (BPA) annual
fish and wildlife budget that implements the Council’s fish and wildlife program. Members shall be appointed from a list of no fewer
than 20 scientists submitted by the National Academy of Sciences
(Academy), provided that Pacific Northwest scientists with expertise
in Columbia River anadromous and non-anadromous fish and wildlife
and ocean experts shall be among those represented on the Panel.
The Academy shall provide such nominations within 90 days of the
date of this enactment, and in any case not later than December
31, 1996. If appointments are required in subsequent years, the Council shall request nominations from the Academy and the Academy
shall provide nominations not later than 90 days after the date of
this request. If the Academy does not provide nominations within
these time requirements, the Council may appoint such members
as the Council deems appropriate.
(ii) SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW GROUPS.—The Council shall establish
Scientific Peer Review Groups (Peer Review Groups), which shall
be comprised of the appropriate number of scientists, from a list
submitted by the Academy to assist the Panel in making its recommendations to the Council for projects to be funded through BPA’s
annual fish and wildlife budget, provided that Pacific Northwest scientists with expertise in Columbia River anadromous and non-anadromous fish and wildlife and ocean experts shall be among those
represented on the Peer Review Groups. The Academy shall provide
such nominations within 90 days of the date of this enactment, and
in any case not later than December 31, 1996. If appointments are
required in subsequent years, the Council shall request nominations
from the Academy and the Academy shall provide nominations not
later than 90 days after the date of this request. If the Academy
does not provide nominations within these time requirements, the
Council may appoint such members as the Council deems appropriate.
(iii) CONFLICT OF INTEREST AND COMPENSATION.—Panel and Peer
Review Group members may be compensated and shall be considered
subject to the conflict of interest standards that apply to scientists
performing comparable work for the National Academy of Sciences;
provided that a Panel or Peer Review Group members with a direct

490

TITLE V—GENERAL PROVISIONS—Continued

or indirect financial interest in a project, or projects, shall recuse
himself or herself from review of, or recommendations associated
with, such project or projects. All expenses of the Panel and the
Peer Review Groups shall be paid by BPA as provided for under
paragraph (vii). Neither the Panel nor the Peer Review Groups shall
be deemed advisory committees within the meaning of the Federal
Advisory Committee Act.
(iv) PROJECT CRITERIA AND REVIEW.—The Peer Groups, in conjunction with the Panel, shall review projects proposed to be funded
through BPA’s annual fish and wildlife budget and make recommendations on matters related to such projects to the Council
no later than June 15 of each year. If the recommendations are
not received by the Council by this date, the Council may proceed
to make final recommendations on project funding to BPA, relying
on the best information available. The Panel and Peer Review Groups
shall review a sufficient number of projects to adequately ensure
that the list of prioritized projects recommended is consistent with
the Council’s program. Project recommendations shall be based on
a determination that projects: arebased on sound science principles;
benefit fish and wildlife; and have a clearly defined objective and
outcome with provisions for monitoring and evaluation of results.
The Panel, with assistance from the Peer Review Groups, shall review, on an annual basis, the results of prior year expenditures
based upon these criteria and submit its findings to the Council
for its review.
(v) PUBLIC REVIEW.—Upon completion of the review of projects
to be funded through BPA’s annual fish and wildlife budget, the
Peer Review Groups shall submit its findings to the Panel. The Panel
shall analyze the information submitted by the Peer Review Groups
and submit recommendations on project priorities to the Council.
The Council shall make the Panel’s findings available to the public
and subject to public comment.
(vi) RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COUNCIL.—The Council shall fully
consider the recommendations of the Panel when making its final
recommendations of projects to be funded through BPA’s annual fish
and wildlife budget, and if the Council does not incorporate a recommendation of the Panel, the Council shall explain in writing its
reasons for not accepting Panel recommendations. In making its rec-

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998
ommendations to BPA, the Council shall consider the impact of ocean
conditions on fish and wildlife populations and shall determine
whether the projects employ cost-effective measures to achieve program objectives. The Council, after consideration of the recommendations of the Panel and other appropriate entities, shall be responsible
for making the final recommendations of projects to be funded
through BPA’s annual fish and wildlife budget.
(vii) COST LIMITATION.—The cost of this provision shall not exceed
$2,000,000 in 1997 dollars.
(viii) EXPIRATION.—This paragraph shall expire on September 30,
2000.¿
øDESIGNATION

OF

JIM CHAPMAN LAKE¿

øSEC. 513. Cooper Lake, located on the Sulphur River near Cooper,
Texas, is named and designated as the ‘‘Jim Chapman Lake’’. Any
reference in a law, map, regulation, document, or record of the United
States to such lake shall be held to be a reference to the ‘‘Jim
Chapman Lake’’.¿
øDESIGNATION

OF

WILLIAM J. JESS DAM

AND

INTAKE STRUCTURE¿

øSEC. 514. The dam located at mile 158.6 on the Rogue River
in Jackson County, Oregon, and commonly known as the Lost Creek
Dam Lake Project, shall be known and designated as the ‘‘William
L. Jess Dam and Intake Structure’’. Any reference in a law, map,
regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United States
to the dam referred to as Lost Creek Dam Lake Project, shall be
deemed to be a reference to the ‘‘William L. Jess Dam and Intake
Structure’’.¿
øDESIGNATION

OF

J. BENNETT JOHNSTON WATERWAY¿

øSEC. 515. The portion of the Red River, Louisiana, from new
river mile 0 to new river mile 235 shall be known and designated
as the ‘‘J. Bennett Johnston Waterway’’. Any reference in a law,
map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United
States to such portion of the Red River shall be deemed to be a
reference to the ‘‘J. Bennett Johnston Waterway’’.¿ (Energy and Water
Development Appropriations Act, 1996.)


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102