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ANNUAL R E P O R T
^J^:,J^r^^^_,

OF THE

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
ON THE

STATE OF THE FINANCES

FOK

T 3 H E Y E . A . R 1890»

WASHI^TGTOF:
GOVERNMENT POINTING

V



1.891.

OFFICB.




T RE A SU K Y

D K V A Jl T M E N T ,

Document No. 1337, dd ed.
Secretary,

" I
I
! ' 1

CO NT E N T 8,
Page.
R E C E I P T S AND E X P E N D I T U R E S . . : . . =

Fiscal year 1890
Fiscal year 1891
Fiscal year 1892
Pensions
Sinking fund

:

, .= - .= .

,

'.
>

„

,

SURPLUS R E V E N U E . . .

'...

«.'.

-

„»

xxvii

T A R I F F AND CUSTOMS ADMINISTRATION

General appraisers . =. 1
Special agents

xxxii

^

INTERNAL R E V E N U E

xxxvi
XXXVII

.-.

...:

'.

XXXVII

Estimated reduction in receipts
Increase in expenses for next fiscal year
P U B L I C MONEYS —

xxxix
'XL

....r

XLI

CIRCULATION

-^.. 1

SILVER

,

P R E Q I O U S METALS

XLIV

:

XLVII

-

-1

Deposits and purchases
Coinage
:
Bars
I
Purchases of silver
„
Price of silver
Imports and exports
1
Product of gold and silver
World's coinage
...„.„
Metallic stock
Industrial consumption . . . . . . . -^
Legislation
•.

L

L
L
LI
:.o..'
LI
LI
LI
' LII
J...
LII
LII
LII
' LII

„

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NATIONAL BANKS

-.'

LIII

ENGRAVING AND PRINTING

. LV

F O R E I G N COMMERCE

J

Exports
Imports
Imports entered for consumption

LVI

iu
-'

' T R A D E VTITH CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA

Lviii
LIX
LX

-

LXI

CANADIAN RAILWAY TRANSPORTATION

-....

NAVIGATION
LIGHT-HOUSE SERVICE

.„.„
,

LXVIII
LXIX

STEAMBOAT-INSPECTION S E R V I C E

,

LXX

REVENUE-MARINE SERVICE
MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE

L:siiv
LXV

:..,.

LIFE-SAVING SERVICE




xxi

xxi
xxxiii
xxiV/,
xxvi
xxvii

LXXI
.«.,

:

„

LXXII

III

; i v ' - - , ' / .;,•.•/• "-;^,/^;-•V'\coNTENTs.--,'.-^ ^:''' ' .
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' • ' ^ Z •

,

'•

•,

, , \ - :

-

' ,

^

-

'

; ' .

'

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' -

' • '

'•''.••'•/

-COAJST AND GEODETIC S U R V E Y , . . . . . . - - . . - - , . . . . . . . . . . , . . „ . .
INTERNATIONAL MARINJE C O N F E R E N C E , . . » > , . . . .
.iMMiGRATION . . . . . . . . 1 - - ' . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . 1...
.

Alien contract-labor law . . . - . . . . . - . . . - - . . . . . . . . . - - . „ . . .
Chinese exclusion . . . . . - . . - . - - - - - . . . . . . , = . ,

*

'Lease of Seal Islands

JRECORD O F REAL PROPERTY

..»...

•-

>

•

LXXVI,

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•

^...
......

.;.(

/

. . . . . . . . . . . LXXVII

.. ...w
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•

LXXVII;

'.........-

. . . - . . . . . - i.

• •

-:-•

LXXV
LXXVI

..-.......-'-,.........

W O R L D ' S COLUMBIAN E X P O S I T I O N
OFFICIAL FILES OF THE GOVERNMENT .

P a g e .

LXXIII
LXXIV
LXXIV

.......1.

=.

P U B L I C BUILDINGS . . . - . . . . - „ - . . . » _ . . - . . . . . . . .
•

' :

^

ALASKA."...^...;......-.......--

r

^,.:'.-. :.

•

.;.

•

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-j

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LXXIX
LXXXI

1

j
I

'• SALE^OF' USELESS,PAPERS
. . . . : . . . . , ^ . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . - . . . . LXXXI
DISTRICT OF C O L U M B I A . . . . . . . .
...........^..--..
...I...
. . . . LXXXII
CIVIL SERVICE . . .

..

.

.. — .....

;..

LXXXIII

Tables accompanying, the Report.
T A 6 L E A.—Statement of the outstanding principal of t h e public debt J u n e
. •'. • .
_ ,;30, 1890..:.
....:...........
:.[.....
,.,,
LXXXVII \
TABLE B.—Statement of t h e outstanding principal of the public debt each
'
year from 1791 t o 18901
...........
.
..,.-..
,..
xcv
TABLE C—Analysis of the principal of t h e public debt from J u l y 1, 1856, to
,
: J u l y 1,1890.- = - - . . . . . .
xcvr x
TABLE D.—-Statement of the issue and redemption of loans and Treasury notes
during the fiscal year 1890
.............
. . . . . . xcviii
TABLE E.—Statement shovring. the purchase of bonds on account of the sinking fund during'each fiscal year from its institution in May,
•1869, to J u n e 30, 1890
.........:..:.._....'.........
xcix
TABLE F.—Sinking-fund account for the fiscal year 1890
cv
TABLE G.—^^Statement of 30-year 6 per cent, bonds issued to the several Pacific
railway companies
cvi
TABLE H.-^Statement showing t h e changes in t h e interest-bearing debt dur:
. ing the year ended October 31, 1890..-cviii
•.

•

'

'

,

'

•

'

'

•

•

TABLE I.—Stateinent showing t h e amount of gold and silver coin and bullion; gold, silver, and currency certificates; United States notes,
and national and State bank notes in the United States and distribution thereof each year, from J u n e 30, 1860, to June 30,
/1890
,....;,......
...:.
cvm
TABLE J.—Statement of the standard silver dollars, silver bullion, and subsidiary silver coin in t h e Treasury at t h e end of each month
from December 31,1877, to October 31, 1890
=....
.....
CIX'
TABLEVK.^Statement of the annual appropriations made by Congress for each
fiscal year from 1883to 1 8 9 1 . . . .
.'.
..cxi
TABLE L.—Statement of the n e t receipts during the fiscal year 1890 . . . . . . . . ' c x i i '
TABLE M.—Statement of t h e net disbursements during t h e fiscal year 1890..
cxiii
TABLE N.—Statement of the net receipts and disbursements for the quarter
^ :
ending September .30, 1890
cxv
TABLE 0.—Statement of the receipts of the United States from March 4,1789,
to J u n e 30, 1890..
,
cxvi
TABLE Pi-^Statement of t h e expenditures of the United States from March
4, 1789, to J u n e 30, 1 8 9 0 . . . . .
...1......
cxx
\ :
TABLE Q.—Statement of receipts and disbursements by United States assistant
'
treasurers during^the fiscal year 1890.
cxxiv
TABLE R,—Statement showing t h e present'liabilities of t h e United States to
' , V Indian tribes under treaty stipulations. , . . , , . . , . » . , . „ , v , , , . , . c x x i x ,




/

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LXXIX
•

'"^'I

.

1

CONTENTS.

« ^

^

V

rage.
TABLE S.—Statement-of redeemed United States securities received by the
Office of the Secretary of the Treasury for final count, examination, and destruction, during the fiscal year 1890
cxxxiv
TABLE T.—Statement of United States bonds and other obligations received
and issued by t h e Office of the Secretary of t h e Treasury from
November 1, 1889, to October 31, 1890, inclusive
cxxxv
APPENDIX TO THE R E P O R T .

(
REPORTS OF H E A D S OF BUREAVS^AND OTHER OFFICERS.

•'

^ ;
'

Index to contents of Appendix.—^ejportsi/TTesiauveT, V; Director of Mint, IX; Comraissioner of Internal Revenue, xi,- Comptroller of Currency, x i i ; Chief of Bureau
of Engiaving and Printing, x i i ; First Comptroller, x i i i ; Second Comptroller, x m ;
Commissioner of Customs, xiii;,First Auditor, x i i i ; Second Auditor, x i v ; Third
Auditor, x i v ; Fourth Auditor, XV: Fifth Auditor, XV; Sixth Auditor, x v ; Eegister, x v ; Chief of Division of Special Agents, xviii; Chief of Miscellaneous Division, XVIII; Report of the Board of Examiners, xviii.'

R E P O R T OF T H E TREASURER

;

Revenues and expenditures
State of the Treasury
.'
Unavailable funds
The public d e b t . . . .
The currency
^^
.\
United States notes
1
Gold certificates
.'
Standard silver d'ollars
J
Certificates of deposit, act of J u n e 8, 1872..»
Fractional silver coin
Minor coin
i
,
> Reeoinage of uncurrent coins
..,.
Fractional currency
'
Stolen and counterfeit currency
Receipts from customs at New York
Clearing-house transactions
National banks
Semi-annual duty
;Pacific railroad sinking fund
Indian trust funds
District of Columbia trust funds
Miscellaneous trusts
Redemption of national-bank n o t e s . .
Recommendations and suggestions
Salaries
=
:
Work of the office
-..,

3-101

=
i
,

'
,
.-..-.
'.
„
=»
'..

J:

..1

3
4
7
7'
9
13
13
14
15
, 15
16
17
18
18
19
20
20
> 21
22
22
23
23
24
26
28
31

Appendix,
' Talkie No. 1.—Receipts and expenditures for the fiscal yearl888, as shown ^
by warrants issued..-'
33
Table No. 2.—Receipts and expenditures on account of the Post-Office Department, as shown by warrants issued
,...
34
Table No. 3.—Comparative statement of balances in the Treasury at t h e
close of t h e fiscal years 1888 and 1890
34
Table No. 4.—Balances standing to the credit of disbursing officers and
agents of the United States, J u n e 30,^1890
34




VI

,

CONTENTS.
, Pa<^e-

R E P O R T O F ?'HE TREASURER—Continued.

'

\

,

;

'

>

' Table No. 5.—Receipts andvdisbursements of the several kinds of currency
at the Treasury offices ou account of revenues, redemptions, transfers, and exchanges, for the fiscal year 1890
35
Table No. 6.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury of t h e United States,
June 30,1889
'
:.,....
36
Table No. 7.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury of the United States,
June 3 0 , 1 8 9 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L . . . .
37
Table No. 8.—Assets and liabilities of t h e Treasury of the United States, s
,
l
/
September 30, 1889 and 1890, in the form of statement
'
I
adopted July, 1890
38
'
Table No. 9.—Unavailablefunds of t h e general Treasury, and of the Post- Office D e p a r t m e n t . . . . .
.".
-.....-......'....
39
Table No. 10.—Assets and liabilities of the Treasury offices, J u n e 30, 1890.
40
Table No. 11.—Composition and distribul^ion of the bullion fund, by offices,
V
June30,1890-.
............::......
41
Table No, 12.-^Character and distribution "of the assets and liabilities of
the Treasury, J u n e 30,1890 . .
.............
.,....42
,-Table No. 13.—Reconciliation of the several accounts and statements of
^
cash in the Treasury, J u n e 30,1890
. . . . . i . , 43
• Table No. 14.—Semi-annual d u t y assessed upon and collected from national
^
banks for t h e fiscal years from 1864 to 1890
' 43
Table No. 15.-^S;tatement, by loans, of United States bonds held in trust
.
for na;fcional banks, June 30, 1890, and of changes during
'
the fiscal year in the character of the bonds h e l d . . . . . . . .
44
' Table No. 16.—Receipts and disbursements of public moneys through national-bank diepositaries, by fiscal years, froin 1864 to
• •;• ,,
'•• i 8 9 o ' . . . ...:..:
....'.....
44
•
Table No. 17.—Bonds held for t h e sinking funds of t h e Pacific railroad
"
^companiesattheclosedf each fiscal year from 1881 to 1890.
45
Table No. 18."--Dates when each issue of United States currency began and
ceased-----.-.-.
45
Table No. 19.—United States currency 01 each issue and denomination is'
^ sued, redeemed, and outstanding at the close of the fiscal
year 1890 . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . .
. 4 6
Table No. 20.—United States currency of each class issued, redeemed, and
outstanding at t h e close pf the fiscal year 1890 . . . . . . . . . .
50
Table Noi 21.-—Faice and net value of United States currency redeemed,
.
and deductions on account of mutilations, t o J u n e 30,
1890>
•....^.........
L . . . . . . . . . , 50 ,
Table No. 22.-r-United States currency issued, redeemed, and outstanding,
by denominations, at the close of the fiscal year 1890
50 \
Table No. 23.—United States currency of each issue outstanding at t h e
.
close of each fiscal year from 1862 to 1890
--.--52
Table No. 24.—United States notes of eiach denomination issued, redeemed,
1
and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year from 1878
.
. to 1890^ including 11,000,000 of unknown denominations
destroyed......
, 53 i '
Table No. 25.—-Currency certificates, act of June 8, 1872, issued, redeemed,^
and outstanding at the close of each fiscal year from 1873
/
to 1890 . . . - . , . . . . : . . . . . . . .
55'
^ a b l e No. 26.—Gold certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed,
and outstanding at the close, of each fiscal year from 1878
I
to 1890, exclusive of |33,000,580..46 in irregular amounts
issued and redeemed on account of the Geneva Award..,.57




i

CONTENTS.

VII
,

REPORT,OF THE TREASURER—Continued. ^

,

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Page; ,

'

Table No. 27.—Silver certificates of each denomination issued, redeemed,
and outstanding at the close of each; fiscal year from 1878
to 1890
Table No. 28.—Amount of each denomination of Unitecl States notes, currency, gold, and silver certificates, -and national-bank
notes outstanding at the close of each fiscal year, from
1878'to 1890, inciluding 11,000,000 of unknown denominations of United States notes destroyed
Table No. .29.—Amount of gold and silver coin and bullion in the Treasury
at the end of each month from; June, 1878, to September,
1890.
'
Table No. 30.—Amount of paper currency in the Treasury a t the end of each
month from June, 1878, to September, 1890
Table.No. 31.—Amount of gold, silver, and paper currency in the Treasury,
in excess of certificates in circulation, at the end of each
month, from June, 1878, to September, 1890'
Table No. 32.—Amount of paper currency in circulation at th^ end of each
month from June, 1878,^ to September, 1890
Table No. 33.—Estimated stock of gold and silver coin and bullion on June
30, in each year, from 1878 to 1885, and quarterly thereafter, to September, 1890
Table No. 34.—Estimated amount of gold and silver in circulation on June
30, in each year, from 1878 to 1885, and quarterly thereafter, to September, 1890
.«.
Table No. 35.—Estimated amount of gold, silver, and paper currency in cir- ,
culation on J u n e 30, in each year, from 1878 to 1885, and
quarterly thereafter, to September, 1890
Table No. 36—Amount of all kinds of money in clrculalion and total stock
on J u n e 30, in each year, from 1878 to 1885, and quarterly thereafter, to September, 1890
. Table No. 37.—Amount of gold coin and bullion in the Treasury, and of
gold certificates outstanding, at the end of each month
from March, 1878, to September, 1890
Table No. 38.—Amount of standard silver dollars coined, in the Treasury, v
and in circulation, and of silver certificates outstanding,
at the end of each month, from March, 1878, to September, 1890
Table No. 39.—United States notes in the Treasury and certificates of deposit, act of J u n e 8,1872, in the Treasury and in circulation, at the end of each month, from March, 1878, to September, 1890
Table No.40.—Seven-thirty notes issued, redeemed, and o u t s t a n d i n g . . . . . .
Table No; 41.—Coupons from United States bonds and interest notes paid
during the fiscal year 1890, classified by loans
Table No. 42.—Number and amount of checks issued for interest on registered boncls of the United States cluring the fiscal year
1890
:
^.
Table No. 43.^-Interest on 3.65 per cent, bonds of the District of Columbia
paid during the fiscal year 1890
Table No. 44.—Refunding certificates issued under the actof February 26,
1879, converted into bonds of the funded loan of 1 9 0 7 . . . .
Table No. 45.^—Total amount of United States bonds and securities retired
for the sinking fund from May, 1869, to J u n e 30, 1890...'.




59

61

64
66

68
70

.72

72

73

73

74

76

78
80
80

SO
80
80
81

VIII

^

CONTENTS.
: Page.

R E P O R T OF THE TREASURER—Continuecl.

Table No. 46.—Total amount of United States bonds retired from May, 1869,
to J u n e 30, 1890
82
Table No. 47.—Bonds of t h e loans given in statement No. 46, retired prior
toMay,1869
„
83
Table No. 48.—Called bonds redeemed and outstanding June 30, 1890
84
Table No. 49.—Bonds purchased during t h e fiscal year 1890
87
Table No. 50.—Changes during the fiscal year 1890 in the principal of the
interest-bearing debt and debt on which interest has
ceased
87
Table No. 51.—Recapitulation of the public-debt statement for the close
of each fiscal year from J u n e 30,1883, to J u n e 30, 1890, in
t h e form used since J u l y 1, 1885
88
Table No. 52.—National-bank notes received for redemption each month of
the fiscal year 1890, from t h e principal cities and other
places
90
Table No. 53.—Result of the count of national-bank notes received for redemption, by fiscal years, to J u n e 30, 1890
90
Table No. 54.—Mode of payment for notes redeemed by the National Bank
Redemption Agency, by fiscal years, to J u n e 30,1890
91
Table No. 55.—Disposition made of the notes redeemed by the National
Bank Redemption Agency, by fiscal years, to J u n e 30,
1890
91
Table No. 56.—Deposits, redemptions, and transfers and payments on ac^ count of national b a n k s failed, in liquidation, and reducing circulation, and balance of the deposits at the close
of each year
^
:
92
Table No. 57.—Deposits, redemptions, assessments for expenses, and transfers and repayments ou account of the 5 per cent, fund of
national banks, by fiscal years, to June 30,1890, and balance of the deposits at t h e close of each year
93
Table No. 58.—Packages pf national-bank notes delivered during the fiscal
year
93
Table No. 59.—Balanced statement ofreceipts and deliveries of moneys by
the National Bank Redemption Agency for the fiscal year
1890
94
Table No. 60.—Balanced statement of receipts and deliveries of moneys by
the National Bank Redemption Agency, from J u l y 1,1874,
to June 30, 1890
94
Table No. 61.—Expenses incurred in the redemption of national-bank notes,
during the fiscal year 1890
95
Table No. 62.—Monthly receipts from customs at New York, from April,
1878, to September, 1890, and percentage of each kind of
money received
^ 95
Table No. 63.—Movement and expenses of movement of standard silver
dollars, by quarters^ to J u n e 30, 1890
98
Table No. 64.—Shipments of silver coin since J u n e 30, 1885, from t h e
Treasury offices and mints, and charges thereOn for transportation
99
Table No. 65.—Shipments of silver coin from Treasury offices and mints,
from J u l y 1, 1885, to J u n e 30, 1890
...:..
100
Table No. 66.—Changes during t h e fiscal year 18^0 in the force employed in
the'^jTreasurer^s office
100
Table No. 67.—Appropriations made and salaries paid to t h e force employed
in t h e Treasurer's office during the fiscal year 1 8 9 0 . . . . . 1 .
100




CONTENTS.

IX
^

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Page:

R E P O R T OF THE TREASURER—Continued.

Table No. 68.—Number of drafts issued on warrants during the fiscal year
1890.....
:....
Table No. 69.—Letters, telegrams, and money packages received and transmitted during the fiscal year 1 8 9 0 . . . .
R E P O R T OF T H E DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T

^

.'

100
101

.102-293

Deposits and purchases of gold and silv er
. o
=
,
....
Coinage
:
Medals and dies manufactured . .
Gold bars exchanged for gold coin.
Work of Government refineries
'
Purchase of silver bullion, act February 28, 1878
Purchase of silver bullion, act J u l y 14, 1890
Distribution of silver dollars
Circulation of silver dollars
Subsidiary silver coinage
Trade-dollar recoinage
Seignorage on silver . . . . . a
..=
-'
Minor coinage
„
.*.....
•
Minor coins for recoinage
The course of silver
Appropriations and expenditures
.. .
:
Earnings and expenses of the refineries of the coinage mints and assay office
at New York
.„
..
Earnings and expenditures of the mints and assay offices
Classified statement of expenditures
...'.
Regulations for the transaction of business a t the mints and assay offices..
Value of foreign coins
Annual trial of coins
Imports and exports of the precious metals
Movements of gold from, the United States
Coinage legislation of the Fifty-first Congress
1
Legislation recommended.Stock of money in the United States
Gold and silver used in t h e industrial a r t s . . . '
1
Product of gold and silver
,•
'
World's coinage
Summary of the operations of the mints and assay offices
Assay office at St. Louis
Summary of the work of minor assay offices
^.
Monetary statistics of foreign c o u n t r i e s . . . .

102
104
105
106
10.7
108
110
Ill
112
112
114
116
116
117
119
121
124
125
126
127
127
,133
134
138
140
145
160
167
171
173
175
197
198
198

Appendix.
Table No. 1.—Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, by weight
Table No. 2.—Deposits and purchases of gold and silver, by value . . .
Table No. 3.—Deposits of unrefined gold of domestic production, with the
States and Territories producing the same, and of refinod
domestic bullion not distributed
Table No. 4.—Deposits of unrefined goldjof domestic production, with the
States and Territories producing the same, and of refined
domestic bullion not distributed
= -....
Table No. 5.—Deposits of unrefined silver of domestic production, with
the States and Territories producing t h e . s a m e , ancLof
refined domestic bullion not distributed
=
^...




214
216

218

220

222

X

,

CONTENTS.
Paere.

REPORT OP THE DiRECTpR OF T H E MINT—Continued.
Table No. 6.—Deposits of unrefined silver of domestic production, with
^ ' States and Territories producing>the same, aud of refined
domestic bullion not distributed
.^
Table No. 7.—Bars manufactured of gold and silver, by weight
Table No. 8.—Bars manufactured of gold arid silver, by value
Table No. 9.—Coinage executed in the mints during the fiscal year
Table No. 10.—Coinage executed at the mints during the calendar year . . .
^ Table No. 11.—Earnings and expenditures of the mints and assay offices...
Table No. 12.—Seignorage on coinage of silver at the mints, and disposition o f s a m e . ,
o---.
Table No. 13.^Asset8 and liabilities of mints and assay offices..
Table No. 14.—Medals manufactured at the mint at Philadelphia
Table No.' 15.—Coinage dies executed at t h e mint at Philadelphia
Table No. 16.—Expenditures from silver profit fund on account of transportation of silver coin
Table No. 17.—Expenditures for distribution of minor coins
Table No. 18.—Wastage and loss of sweeps
.„
Table No. 19.—Quantity and cost of silver bullion delivered on purchases
' at coinage mints, and number of silver dollars c o i n e d . . . .
Table No. 20.—Silver bullion purchases
Table No. 21.—Quantity and cost of silver used in the coinage of silver dollars, and wasted and sold in sweeps, at each mint
Table No. 22.—Quantity and cost of silver used in the coinage of silver dollars, and wasted a^nd sold in sweeps
Table No. 23.—Cost of the silver bullion contracted foi: and delivered, with
the value and cost of the coinage of silver dollars
Table No. 24.—Purchase and coinage into silver dollars of |i2,000,000 worth
of silver bullion
..Table No. 25.—Silver bullion ofi'ered, contracted for and delivered, and
silver dollars coined
i
Table No. 26.—Silver bullion offered, contracted for, and delivered, and
silver dollars coined from March 1, 1878, to J u l y 1, 1890.
Table No. 27.—Highest, lowest, and average of a United States silver dollar, measured by the market price of silver, and the quantity of silver purchasable with a dollar each year sin^o
1873...
Table No. 28.—Degrees of fineness of coinage of calendar year 1889, in per; centages of whole number of coins assayed by assay commission of 1890
Table No. 29.—Comparison of the business of the mints and assay offices..
Table No. 30.—Imports and exports of gold and silver coin and bullion . . .
Table No. 31.—Values of gold and silver ores imported into and exported
from the United S t a t e s . . . .
Table No. 32.—Statement, by countries, of the imports of gold and silver
ore, bullion, and coin into the United States
Table No. 33.—Statement, by countries, of the exports of domestic gold
and silver ore, bullion, and coin from the United States.
Table No. 34.—^Statement, by countries, of the exports of foreign gold
and silver
oo
.'
,..
Table No. 35.—Unrefined gdlcl and silver of domestic production, its distribution by States and Territories: also refined domestic
bullion (not distributed)'deposited at the mints and assay
offices from their organization to the close of the last fiscal
,
year




224
226
226
228
228
230
232
234
236
238
239
239
240
240
241
242
244
246
246
247
247

247

248
250
253
259
260
262
'262

264

CONTENTS.
/.
'
R E P O R T O F T H E D I R E C T O R O F T H E MINT—Continued.

XI
' i

Page.

Table No. SQ.—Coinage value of the gold and silver .produced from t h e
mines of t h e United States
,
Table No. 37.—Commercial ratio of silver to gold each year since 1687
Table No". 38. —Price of silver i n London, per ounce, ancl the equivalent in
United States gold coin
=
Table No. 39.—Coinages of nations
Table No. 40.—World's production of gold and silver
^.
Table No. 41.—Coinage of the mints of the Unitecl States, from their organization
o.
..-.„
R E P O R T OF T H E COMMISSIONER O F INTERNAL R E V E N U E

265
266
267
268
270
272

294-361

Tables.............
294
Collections for t h e current fiscal year
:..
294
Receipt* for the last six fiscal y e a r s . . .
'
296
Gollecfcions for t h e lastfiscal year
^
:.
296
Receipts during t h e last two fiscal years
296
Withdrawals for consumption during t h e last t w o fiscal years
297
Receipts by States and Territories during the year
.'
298
.Receipts for the first three months of t h e present fiscal year
,...
299,
Cost of collection
300
Miscellaneous expenses
300'
Estimated expenses of the internal-revenue service for t h e next fiscal year 301
Increase in expenses for t h e next fiscal year'.
301
Salaries
302
General condition of the office and t h e service
.,
303 i
Scale of salaries of collectors
—
303
Official force
303
Storekeepers, gaugers, etc
'.
I......
304
Expenses of revenue agents
305
Work of revenue agents
-- . 305
Illicit stills s e i z e d - . . .
.^..
„. ...^.
305
Expenditures for t h e discovery and punishment of violators of law
306
Increase in the number of revenue agents .„...=
1
.*
307
Manufacture of stamp paper
i . 307
Stamp production
. 308
Claims for redemption barred by s t a t u t e . . . ,
308
Official count of internal-revenue stamps in v a u l t
308
Comparative statement
„. 309
Production of tobacco, snuff, cigars, and cigarettes
309
Reports of district attorneys
322
Offers in compromise
323
Abstract of seizures
324
Direct t a x
324
Abatement claims
. ...1...
^
. , 325
Refunding claims
o
325
Sales of real property acquired under t h e internal-revenue laws
325
Internal-revenue legislation
326
Special-tax payers
.'
327
Distilleries registered and operated.
•-.
, 329
F r u i t distilleries, registered and. operated
'. - 330
Grain and molaisses distilleries, in operation September 1, 1880 to 1890
33l
Coniparative statement of distilleries registered and operated
331
Stock fed a t d i s t i l l e r i e s . . . . . o
'.
=
334
Miscellaneous assessments..»
o. ^ 335
Assessments for 1890 . . . .
..'
336




XII s

'

^

^,

''

CONTENTS.

\
' .

\

"
^
'

'

'

-

Page. ''

R E P O R T O F T H E COMMISSIONER O F I N T E R N A L R E V E N U E — C o n t i n u e d .

Increased production of spirits
t^37
Produ'ction of distilled spirits
1
337
Increased withdrawal of tax-paid spirits...-.
j
338
Distilled spirits allowed for loss by leakage or evaporation in warehouse.. 338
Spirits removed in bond for export
339'
Increased withdrawals of spirits for scientific purposes a n d use of t h e
United States
\
:..:...
340
Transfer of spirits from distillery warehouses t o manufacturing warehouses
340'
Increased transfers of spirits from distillery warehouses to manufacturing
i warehouses...:
.
^
341
Spirits lost by fire i n v;:arehouses for last eighteen years
341
Different kinds of spirits produced, withdrawn, and remaining in warehouse for t h e las,t two fiscal years
'.
342
Stock on hand, production, and movement of spirits for five years
343
Balance in warehouse a t t h e close of each fiscal year since 1869
344
Spirits in hands of wholesale dealers and rectifiers
344
Spirits in distillery warehouses on^ October 1, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889,
1890
r..:'.
345'
Spirits withdrawn for export during t h e first three months of the present
^ fiscal year
'.
345
Distilled spirits in t h e United States October 1, 1890
> 346
Exportation of manufactured tobacco and snuff in bond
346 .
Exportation of cigars and cigarettes in bond . J
347
Oleomargarine
c
348
Operations in oleomargarine during th'e last t w o fiscal years
350
State and Territorial laws relating to oleomargarine
357
R E P O R T O F T H E COMPTROLLER O F T H E C U R R E N C Y

Amendments to present l a w
1
Deposits
,
Borrowed money
/.
-----,
Domestic exchanges
Substitutes for money
Comparative statements of t h e national banks
Closed national banks
Extension of t h e corporate existence of national banks^
Circulating notes
Interest-bearing funded debt of the United States
Issues and redemptions
Loans
,
Semi-annual publication of reports of condition
Receiverships
Legal decisions
^
.„
;:
Transactions of t h e New York and other clearing-house associationsState, ^savings, private banks, and loan and trust companies
„
Conclusion.. „.-.'.
1
=
'.
R E P O R T OF C H I E F O F T H E B U R E A U O F E N G R A V I N G AND P R I N T I N G

362-441

365
369
^^1
373
: . 381
392
395
397
399
404
407
412
416 '
416
428
428
434
439
442-453

Operations of t h e Bureau

442
Appendix,

Table No. 1.—Statement showing the United States notes, certificates of deposit, bonds, and national-bank notes delivered during
t h e year




445

CONTENTS.

XIII
Paga

R E P O R T O F C H I E F O F T H E B U R E A U O F E N G R A V I N G AND P R I N T I N G — C o n t ' d .

Table No. 2.—Statement showing t h e internal-revenue stamps delivered
during the year
:
Table No. 3.'—Statement showing the customs stamps delivered during the
year
.,
—
Table No. 4,—Statement showing t h e checks, drafts, certificates, etc., delivered during the year
:
..-„
Table No, 5.—Nummary of all classes of work delivered
Table No. 6.—Schedule of miscellaneous work done for, and of material
furnished to, the various bureaus, etc
, ...,
Table No. 7.—Statement of the various classes of securities and other work
proposed to be executed in the fiscal year 1890
Table No. 8,—Statement showing t h e annual production of securities i n
sheets, and the expenditures for the last eleven years
Table No. 9.—Statement showing the number of employes on the first day
of each month since J u l y 1, 1877
R E P O R T O F T H E F I R S T COMPTROLLER

449
449
450
451
• 452
453
453

...454-467

Warrants received, examined, etc
Requisitions
»
»
Miscellaneous work
Suits a g a i n s t t h e United States
Limitations==
»o..
,..^..
Double compensation
„
Balance of appropriations o = -o
Payment of claims
Reports to Congress under section 272 of the Revised Statutes.
Collection of balances
^
Accounts of disbursing officers
„
«i.
Additional clerks
R E P O R T O F T H E SECOND C O M P T R O L L E R . . . . .

^
.

„ 454
458
458
458
461
462
462
463
464
465
466
_ _ 466
468-472

Accounts, claims, etc., settled, clerks employed, and distribution of wopk.
Requisitions
=o
}
Suits brought
.^.-Office appropriations
Remarks
•
R E P O R T O F T H E COMMISSIONER O F CUSTOMS

Amount received into the Treasury
Amoont paid out of the Treasury
Conduct of the business of the office

446

468
471
471
472
472

473-478

„,

473
474
474

0=00

Appendix,
Table A.—Statement of warehouse transactions a t the several districts and
ports during the year
.„.....,..
_..
Table B.—Statement of duties collected on unclaimed goods entered, and
amount of net proceds of unclaimed goods sold during t h e
year
-...
R E P O R T O F T H E F I R S T A U D I T O R . . = =.

Work of the office :
Accounts adjusted
..,..^..
Customs division
=
Judiciary division... o
Public-debt division
'.
Miscellaneous division
Division of mints and sub-treasuries



476

478

479-492

...^—
«- - - o

„

, „..

479
489
489
489
489
490

XIV

^
'

I

CONTENTS.

. •

.
Page.

R E P O R T O F TH:E F I R S T AUDITOR—Continued.

Work of the office—Continued.
Warehouse and bond division
Comparative statement, by fiscal years, of transactions from 1861 to
1890.
'.
R E P O R T OF T H E SECOND AUDITOR

490
491 ,

493-507

Work of t h e office:
Book-keepers' division
Paymasters' division
'
Ordnance., medical, ancl miscellaneous divisions
Indian division
..^...
Pay and bounty division
Division for the investigation of frauds
Property division
Division of inquiries and replies
Mail division
o o,, Archives division
Old army division.
Condition of public business
Records transferred from t h e Pay Department
Disallowed claims
Useless books and papers . . - . . . =
The prompt payment of claims

' 493
496
496
497
498
499
500
500
501.
\ . . . 502
502
504
505
505
506
506

°...

,

Appendix.
Circular letter for the information of soldiers and their heirs
R E P O R T OF T H E T H I R D AUDITOR

507

...-.

Work of t h e office :
Horse claims division •.
Military division
:
Claims division
°....."
Collection division
:
Miscellaneous division
Book-keepers' division
Review of t h e condition of t h e business of the office
Pension division

....508-522

.....'

'

508
509
510
511
512
512
512
514

Appendix.
Exhibit
Exhibit
Exhibit
Exhibit
Exhibit

A.—Report of the operations of the pension division
B.—Amount of arrears of army pensions disbursed'.
^
:..
C.—Accounts of pension agents, and amounts involved, audited, etc
D.—Miscellaneous pension accounts, etc., audited
E.—Comparative statement showing nature of work and amount
involved in pension division during t h e fiscal year 1889
andl890
„
.-. .
Exhibit F.—Comparative statement of accounts paid by pension agents
during the period from J u l y 1, 1882, to J u n e 30, 1890, and
w^ork in auditing such accounts
Exhibit G.—Comparative statement showing disbursements by pension
agents to pensioners, etc., for t h e five last fiscal years
Exhibit/H.—Consolidated statement of work in pension agencies, etc




516
516
517
517

518

519
520
521

CONTENTS.

XV
Page.

R E P O R T OF T H E T H I R D AUDITOR—Continued.

Exhibit I.—Consolidaited report of the pension division
i.
522-1
Exhibit J.—Statement showing amounts advanced to a n d disbursed by
pension agents, etc . . . . . . ,
.^....
522-2
Exhibit K.—Statement of amounts paid to each class of pensioners, e t c . . . . 522-3
Exhibit L.—Statement showing t h e financial operations of the book-keeper's division
'.
522-4
R E P O R T OF T H E F O U R T H AUDITOR

523-536

Balances, liabilities, and repayments
Appropriations and expenditures of t h e Navy
Exchange
Special fiscal agents a t L o n d o n . . . :
L. „
Work pf the office:
General claims division
Navy pay and pension division
=,,
Paymasters' division
Book-keeper's division
Record and prize division
./.....
Need for an inorease of force
Back-pay and bounty appropriations

523
524
532
5.32

.„

532'
.'' 533
, 534
534
535
535
536

1

R E P O R T O F T H E F I F T H AUDITOR

537-575

Work of t h e office:
Diplomatic and consular division
Internal-revenue division..
Miscellaneous division

,

• ^
.P.

-

538 '
542,
542

,

Appendix.
Table A.—Statement of expenses of t h e diplomatic service
Table B.—Statement of consular fees, salaries, and expenses
Table C.—Statement of consular fees, compensation, expenses, and loss by
exchange
Table D.—Names of. consular clerks, with their salaries and e x p e n s e s . . . .
Table E.—Statement of sundry expenses at consulates in China, J a p a n ,
Siam, Turkey, and Zanzibar
.•
Table F.—Statement of relief afforded seamen, with extra wages and
arrears
,.
Table G.—Statement showing t h e number of seamen sent to t h e United
States, and t h e amount paid at t h e Treasury for passage
' Table H.—Statement showing the character and amountof t h e official fees
collected a t each consulate
Table I.—Internal-revenue stamps and assessments charged and cash'deposited ..'
.!..,..
,
Table K.—Internal-revenue expenses
R E P O R T OF T H E S I X T H AUDITOR

563
564
565
566
570
573
576
576
578

R E P O R T OF T H E R E G I S T E R . . .




559
562

576-579

Work of t h e office
.,
Transactions in money orders and postal notes
General remarks
Distribution Of force aud salaries of the office
Work of t h e office :
Division of receipts and expenditures
Division of loans
Division of notes, coupons, and currency
Division of interest and expense of loans

547
550

580-780

^

,.

580
580
583
585
587

XVI

CONTENTS.

'
.
R E P O R T OF THE REGISTER—Continued.

^

Files . . .
Shall we have
flat
filing
Flat
filing
-.'.
W h a t yet remains to be done
Correction of certain entries
Final balances of accounts
Cost and expenses of public buildings and grounds

Page.

.,...
"
i

i

Statements.
Loan division:
Table A.—Number^and amount of Unitecl States bonds issued
Table B.—Nuniber and amount of United States bonds canceled . . . . . .
Table C.—Transactions in Spanish iudemiiity bonds
^
Table D.—General summary of unissued bonds
Table E.—Work performed by the di vision
Table F.—Days of work and a b s e n c e s . . . :
Note, coupon, and currency division :
Table
I.—Number and amount of gold certificates, currency certificates of deposit, and seven-thirty Treasury notes received and registered
Table IL—Number and amount of interest checks of various loans
on hand J u l y 1, 1888, and received in fiscal year 1889,
and number counted, registered, examined, and com*
pared
Table Ha.—Number and amount of interest checks of various loans
received
Table IIL—Number of redeemed detached coupons of various loans on
hand received, counted, examined, etc
^
Table Ilia.—Comparative statement of redeemed (detached) coupons,
etc.
Table Illb.—Number of redeemed detached coupons of various loans
received
Table IV.—Number and amount of redeemed (detached) coupons received in the note, coupon, and currency division up to
J u n e 30, 1890
Table V.—Number and amount exchanged, redeemed, and transferred United States coupon bonds examined, counted,
etc
Table ' VL—Number and amount of United States notes, silver certificates, gold certificates, refunding certificates, fractional currency, etc., examined, counted, canceled, and
destroyed
'...
Table Via.—Number and amount of United States demand notes, refunding certificates, one, two-year and compound interest notes, counted, canceled, and destroyed
Table . VIL—Schedule of statistical destructions
Table VIIL—Work performed in files rooms, etc
Table
IX.—Number and amount of exchanged, redeemed, and transj
ferred United States coupon bonds, and number of
attached coupons t h a t after examination, registration,
etc., have been delivered to the destruction committee
»




587
588
588
589
589
589
590

591
591
591
592
592
593

594

594
595
597
598
598

599

600

601

603
604
604

605

CONTENTS,

XVII

REPORT O F T H E REGISTER—Continued.

Note, coupon, and currency division- -Contiuued.
Table
X. Number and amount of! exchanged,' redeemed, and transferred United States coupon bonds and bonds of t h e
District of Columbia and Louisville and Portland Canal
Company, and number of attached coupons t h a t have
been examined, registered, and scheduled in duplicate,
and on
file
„
.:.
609
XI.—Consolidated recapitulation of Table X
..
615
Table
Table XII,—Exchanged, redeemed, and transferred United States
coupon bonds, after h a v i n g been entered in the numerical register, returned to and now on file
618
Table XIII.—United States coupon bonds becoming statistical redemptions, and after having been entered in the numerical registers delivered to t h e destruction committee
„
.^ 618
Table XIV.—United States interest-bearing notes and certificates
issued, redeemed, and outstanding.'
619
Receipts and expenditures division :
Receipts from customs
---,
625
sales of public lands
-.,„
627
internal revenue
:
629
631
consular fees
^.1
635
registers'and receivers'fees
637
labor, drayage, etc
638
services of United States officers
640
weighing fees
.
640
customs-officers' fees
640
mileage of examiners
.'....
.'.
641
fines, penalties, and forfeitures (customs)
643
emolument fees (customs) . . . ^
644
immigrant fund
645
fines, penalties, and forfeitures (judiciary)
646
emolument fees (judiciary) . ,
646
sales of Government property
,2
647
' from soldiers' fund
647
Pacific railway companies
„
647
Indian l a n d s . .
647
loans, etc
648
revenues District of Columbia
648
War and Navy Departments
648
profits on coinage
..:
648
re-imbursements national-bank redemption a g e n c y . . . . .
648
miscellaneous....
I Balances of appropriations and expenditures, etc. :
Treasury
-»
650
Diplomatic
682
Judiciary
,
.686
Customs
o
689
Interior civil
.-..
695
Internal revenue
,
.'
704
705
Publicdebt...
Interior—Indians ... =
-.
:..... 706
722
Interior—pensions
Military establishment
.-.».„...
^. 723
FI 9 0
II




XVIII

'

- ^ ^

. CONTENTS.
Page.

R E P O R T OF THK R E G I S T E R — C o n t i n u e d .

Balances of appropriations and expenditures, etc.—Coiitiuued.
Naval establishment
Recapitulation
P u b l i c d e b t of the United States outstanding
.Public debt of t h e United States from 1791 to 1836 . . . .
-1.
Principal of t h e public debt on t h e 1st of J a n u a r y of each year from 1837
to 1843, and on t h e 1st day of July of ^ each 3'ear from 1843 to 1890
•Expenses of collecting t h e revenue from customs
Expenditures for assessing and collecting t h e internal revenue
Statement showing the number, occupation, and compensation of persons
employed in the customs service.,
...
Population, n e t revenue, and net expenditures of the Government from
1837 tol88'9
Comparative statement of t h e receipts and expenditures on account of
internal revenue...
*.-.
Comparative statement of t h e receipts and expenditures on account of
customs
1-.
.'.
Receipts and expenditures of t h e Government
R E P O R T O F T H E C H I E F O F THE D I V I S I O N OF SPECIAL AGENTS

743
751
752
753
755
757
"759
760
777
778
778
• 779

781-789

Review and suggestions....'

781
Appendix.

Table 1.—Transactions in each of the customs districts
Table 2.—Aggregate receipts and expenses of collecting the custom's reve\
n u e f o r t h e y e a r s l 8 7 7 to 1890.

785
789

R E P O R T OF T H E C H I E F OF T H E MISCELLANEOUS D I V I S I O N ON IMMIGRATION..790-797

Alien contract-labor laws
Appendix.
Table No. 1.—Number of immigrants examined by t h e immigrant officials
at the several ports named, and t h e number returned to
the country whence they came, during t h e fiscal year ending June 30,1890
.'
Table No. 2.—Statement of the immigrant fund for the period from August
3, 1882, to J u n e 30,1890
,
Table No. 3.—Nativity'of alien immigrants arriving in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890... ^
• • Table No. 4.—Statement of t h e reported occupations of immigrants who
arrived in t h e United States during the fiscal year ending
J u n e 30, 1890
Table No. 5.—Table showing t h e number of immigrants destined to each
State, Territory, and the District of Columbia,during t h e
fiscal year ending June 30, 1890
...

793

795
795
796 .

797

797

R E P O R T OF T H E BOARD O F EXAMINERS O F T H E TREASURY DEPARTEMNT ..799,887

Report of the Board of Examiners ...*.:
«
Report of Examiner
'
Exhibit A.—Table of t h e general averages of candidates examined for
promotions in t h e Treasury Department during t h e
fiscal year ended J u n e 30, 1890
Exhibit B.—Table of t h e number of examinations for promotions in t h e
Treasury Department, by sexes and classes, passed
or failed, during t h e fiscal year ended J u n e 30, 1890,
Exhibit C.—Table showing the names, in t h e order of merit, of t h e candidates examined for promotion in t h e Treasury
Department who made a general average of 90 or
more, duringthe fiscal year ended J u n e 30,1890




799
800

803

804

806

CONTENTS. •'

XIX

R E P O R T O F BOARD O F E X A M I N E R S O F T R E A S U R Y DEPARTMENT—Continued.

Exhibit D.—Request for office questions, Class 1 ($1,200) and above . . . I . .
Exhibit. E.—Request for office questions. Classes A, B, C, D, a n d E
,
Exhibit F.—Report of candidate's standing. Classes A, B, C, and D . . . . . . .
Exhibit G.--Report of candidate's standing. Class E
Exhibit H.—Report of candidate's standing, Class 1 ancl above
Exhibit L—Relative to tbe rules used in marking the examination papers of
candidates examined for promotions in t h e Treasury
Department
Exhibit J.—The order of the Secretary of the Treasury which directed the
examination for promotion of clerks to positions in
Classes A, B, C, and D . . . .
Exhibit K.—The order of the Secretary of the Treasury to prepare the
necessary examination papers under the President's
classification
.'
Exhibit L.—Laws, rules, regulations, aud orders precluding promotions
within the classified service of the Treasury Department without first subjecting the applicants to examination to test their fitness
Exhibit M.—Letter of Chief Clerk Fred Brackett, relative to the soldiers'
preference credit of 5 per cent, to be.added to the
general average
:
Exhibit N.—The order of Secretary Boutwell, of J u l y 29, 1870, relative to
examinations in the Treasury Department
Exhibit O.—The order of Secretary Bristow which abolished the competitive examinations for admissions and promotions under
President Grant's Civil Service Commission
.
.
Exhibit P.—Rules of Secretary Sherman, dated February 28, 1878, governing examinations for promotions in the Treasury
Department
Exhibit Q.—Circular providing official communication formulas.
Exhibit R.—Form ifor the fold and brief of a standard letter-sheet, size 8
by 10 inches
"".
Exhibit S.—Specimen examination questions for Classes A, B, C, and D m
Exhibit T.—Specimen examination questions for Class E . . Exhibit U.—Specimen examination questions for Class 2
Exhibit Vi—Specimen bureau, division, and general office questions used
for examination for promotion^in t h e divisions of t h e
office of the Secretary of the Treasury and in the various bureaus and offices of the Treasury Department.
Exhibit W.—Specimen of phonography or of stenography used for testing
candidates in translating different systems
Exhibit WW.—Specimens of special dictations to typewriters
Exhibit WWW.—Specimens of special dictation to phonographers or stenographers
I
:
Exhibit X.—Specimen of technical questions in office propounded by t h e
Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey
Exhibit XX.—Specimen of technical accounts submitted? by the Second
Auditor to a clerk under examination
Exhibit Y.—Specimen of miscellaneous mathematical questions and prob^
lems submitted to clerks under examination, or referred to them for solution by their superiors in office.
Exhibits.—Specimen of optional miscellaneous mathematics, the subjects
, . of which were chosen by a candidate.




808
808
809.
810
811

.812

813

814'

814

816
816

816

8ir
817
819
820
824
830

836
878879
879
881
882

883
886




REPORT.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

,

.

Washington^ D, C , December Ij 1890.

SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report:
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.

Fiscal year 1890.
The revenues of the Government from all sources for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1890, were:
From customs
,
From internal revenue
From profits on coinage, bullion deposits, and assays
From Sales of public lands
.\
From fees—consular, letters-patent, and land
From sinking-fund for Pacific railways
,
From tax on national banks
'..
From customs fees, fines, penalties, and forfeitures
From repayment of interest by Pacific railways
From sales of Indian lands
From Soldiers' Home, permanent fund
.'
From tax on seal-skins
From immigrant fund....
From sales of Government property
From deposits for surveying public lands
From depredations on public lands.,
From the District of Columbia
•
; From miscellaneous sources
•
Prom postal service
Total receipts...

.<.

:

|229, 668, 584 57
142, 606, 705 81
10, 217, 244 25
6, 358, 272 51
3, 146, 692 32
; 1, 842, 564 52
1, 301, 326 58
1, 299, 324 52
705, 691 52
372,288 15
308, 886 99
262, 500 00
241, 464 00
192,123 99
112, 314 79
35y 852 37
2,809,130 93
1,600,014 81
60,882, 097 92
463, 963, 080 55

The expenditures for the same period were:
i]or civil expenses
$23, 638, 826 62
For foreign intercourse....!
;
1, 648, 276 59
li'or Indian service
:
6,708,046 67
For pensions
106,936,855 07
]''or the military establishment, including rivers and harbors and
arsenals
44, 582, 838 08
For the naval establishment, including vessels, machinery, and improvements at navy-yards....
22,006,206 24
I'or miscellaneous objects, including public buildings, light-houses,
and collecting the revenues
43,563,696 85
I'or the District of Columbia
,
...\.
5, 677, 419 52
For interest on the public debt
36, 099, 284 05
l o r deficiency in postal revenues
6, 875, 036 91
ijor postal service...
60,882,097 92
Total expenditures




358,618,584 52
"' XXI

XXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The revenues and expenditures of th^ postal service form no part
of the fiscal operations controlled by the Treasury Department, although,
under a requirement of law enacted at the last session of CongresSj they
are included in the tables above i3resented. Deducting these from the
aggregate on both sides of the account there remain as the ordinary
revenues of the Government the sum of $403,0805 982.63 and as ordinary expenditures the sum of $297,736,486.60,.leaving a surplus of
$105,344,496.03. Of this amount there was used in the redemption of
notes and fractional currency, and purchase of bonds for the .sinkingfund, the sum of $48,094,564.66, leaving a net surplus for the year of
$57,249,931.37.,
• . '
As compared with the fiscal year 1889, the receipts for 1890 have
increased $16,030,923.79, as follows:
Source.

111,725,19189
5,835,842 88
521,439 99
285,180 24
203,107 13
101,926 80
84,911 65
52,097 63
51,979 46
49,294 46
16,496 16
5,267 50

Customs
..
. . . .
SinJcing-fund. for Pacific railways
,'
Revenues of the District of Columbia
Fees on letters-patent
Customs emolument fees
Customs fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Profits on coinage, assays, etc
Custom-house fees
Deposits for surveying public lands
Immigrant fund
,
Sales of public lands
Consular fees
Soldiers' Home permanent fund
Tax on circvilation of national banks
Registers' and receiver.s' fees
Sales of Grovernment property
Sales of Indian lands
Tax on seal-skins.;
Depredations on public lands
Miscellaneous items
Total...;

Decrease.

Increase.

,,

.'
18,932,735 79

Net increase.

$1,680,379 28
315,167 88
283,540 26
234,760 58
119,310 52
103,406 43
73,970 04
55,000 00
29,581 92
6,695 09
2,901,812 00

$16,030,923 79

There was an increase of $15,739,871 in the ordinary expenditures,
as follows:
Source.
Pensions
, Civil and miscellaneous
Navy Department
War Department
(Interest on the public debt..
Indian service
Total..

Increase.
$19,312,075
739,192
627,396
147,567

Decrease.
96
23
93
23

20,826,232 35

Net increase.

$4,902,200 24
184,161 11
5:086,361 35

$15,739,871 00

In addition to $48,094,564.66 applied to the sinking-fund during the
fiscal year 1890, the net surplus for the year, viz, $57,249,931.37, to^gether with $5,870 received for four per cent, bonds issued for interest




< R E C E I P T S AND E X P E N D I T U R E S , 1891.

XXIII

accrued on refunding certificates converted . during the year, and
$19,601,877.53 taken from the cash balance in the Treasury at the beginning of the year, making altogether $76,857,678.90, was used in the
redemption and purchase of the debt, as follows :
Redemption of—
Loanof July and August, 1861....
Loan of July and August, 1861, continued at 3} per cent..
Loanof 1863
Loan of 1863, continued at SJ per cent
Five-twenties of 1862.....
' Five-twenties of June, 1864.
:
Five-twenties of 1865
"Consols of 1865
Consolsof 1867
Ten-forties of 1864
Funded loan of 1881
Funded loan .of 1881, continued at 3o- per cent
Loan of 1882
*
.
Old demand, compound interest, and other notes
Purchase of—
Funded loan of 1891
'
:
^
.
F n n d e d l o a n o f 1907
Premium on funded loan of 1891
;
Premium on funded loan of 1907
...;
Total

"......

H.100 ^0
2,,300 00
2,500 00
1, 500 00
1,850 00
50 00
3,200 00
2,750 00
11,450 00
3,000 00
1,800 00
5, 200 00
43,750 00
. 2, 330 00

'

.

'
18,486,500
46,227,900
716, 634
11, 340, 864

00
00'
OS
82

76,:857,678 90

Fiscal year 1891.
For the present fiscal year the revenues are estimated as follows:
From customs
From internal revenue
From miscellaneous sources

$221,000,000 00
145,000,000 00
40, 000, 000 00

Total estimated-revenues

,

406,000,000 00

The expenditures for the same period are estimated as follows :
For the civil establishment
F o r t h e military establishment
For the naval establishment
For the Indian service
For pensions
For the District of Columbia
•
For interest on the public debt
For deficiency in postal revenues

.:...
......'

Total estimated expenditures....
«

$105,000,000
44,500,000
' 23, 000^ 000
6,500,000
133,000,000
5,500,000
32,000,000
4, 500, 000

j

, Leaving an estimated surplus for the year of,

.'

00
00
00
00
00
00 .
00
00

354,000,000 00
52, 000, 000 00

Including the revenues to be derived from the postal service, which
are estimated at $66,000,000, but which, as already stated, have not been
heretofore included in these tables of receipts and expenditures, the
total estimated revenues of the Government for the fi.scal year 1891
will be $472,000,000, and the total estimated expenditures $420,000,000,
leaving an available surplus of $52,000,000, as shown above.




XXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

If to the estimated surplus there be added the cash in the Treasury
at the beginning of the year and the national bank fund deposited in
the Treasury under the act of July 14, 1890, the total available assets
for the year, exclusive of fractional silver and minor coin, will be
$162,000,000. There has been paid out during the first four months of
the year in the purchase of bonds for the sinking-fund and in other redemptions of the debt, including premium, about $100,000,000. It is
estimated that the redemptions of four and a half per cent, bonds during the remaining eight months of the year will, be $10,000,000, making
a total outlay for bonds purchased during the year, including premium,
of $110,000,000, leaving a net balance on June 30, 1891, of $52,000,000
available during the next fiscal year.
The estimate of revenue to be derived from customs during the
present fiscal year is based upon the assumptioii that there will be a
probable loss from articles placed on the free list, including sugar,
during the last quarter of the year amounting to twenty-five million;
but as there has been an increase of sixteen million in the duties collected during the first four months of the year, the estimated net loss
for the year is placed at nine million dollars.
Fiscal year 1892.
It is estimated that the revenues of the Government for the fiscal
year 1892 will b e :
From customs
From internal revenue....
From miscellaneous sources

$189,000,000 00
150,000,000 00
34, 000, 000 00

Total estimated revenues

-.

373,000,000 00

The estimates of expenditures for the same period, as submitted by
the several Executive Departments and offices, are as follows:
Legislative establishment
Executive establishment—
Executive proper..
State Department
Treasury Department
War Department
Navy Department
Interior Department....;
Post-Office Department......
Department of Agriculture
Department of Justice..
Department of Labor
Judicial establishment
Foreign intercourse
Military establishment
Naval establishment.....
Indian afiairs
Pensions




$3, 539, 632 75
'

:

$173,120
155,510
8,943,605
2,248,370
426,930
5,429,324
939,720
2,812,003
195, 450
175,520

00
00
80
00
00.
00
00
50
00
00
^—

'.
.....:
,

21, 499, 553
462,100
1,942, 605
26,160,991
32,508,204
6,846,908
135,263,085

30
00
00
77
98
03
00

RECEIPTS

Public Works—
Legislative....
Treasury Department
War Department......
NavykOepartment
Interior Department
Department of Justice

AND

EXPENDITURES,

i892.

xxv

.
$708, 600 00
7,259,070,42
10,698,788 93
823,375 13
307,370 00
4,500 00

.'

$19, 801,704 48
Miscellaneous—
Legislative
Treasury Department
War Department....:
Interior Department...
, Department of Justice....
District of Columbia

3,018,916 69
10,512,912 75
6,002,226 07
3,727,61100
4,262,800 00
5,450,215 17

:.

'.

Deficiency in postal revenues
*
Permanent annual appropriations—
Interest on the public debt
Refunding—customs, internal revenue, etc
Collecting revenue from customs
Miscellaneous

32, 974, 681 68
3,590,862 43
.27, 000, 000
18,076,380
5, 500, 000
22,685,500

00
00
00
00
73,261, 880 00

Total estimated expenditures, exclusive of sinking-fund
Or an estimated surplus of.

,

357, 852, 209 42
15,147, 790 58

Which, added to the available balance at the beginning of the year
($52,000,000), wm m a t e a total of $67,147,790.58 available for the redemption of the four and a half per cent, bonds falling due Sieptember
1, 1891, of which it is estimated there will remain outstanding on July
1, 1891, $51,531,900 the amount outstanding :N^ovember 22, 1890, being
$61,531,900. Of the bonds to be so retired $49,224,928 will be applied
[ to the sinking-fund.
•
The revenue and expenditures of the postal service for the fiscal year
1892 are estimated at $73,955,031.98, which, added to the ordinary
revenues and expenditures of the Government, will make a total revenue
for the year of $446,955,031.98 and a total expenditure of $431,807^241.40, leaving an estimated surplus, as shown above, of $15,147,790.58.
The increase of $65,580,804.72 in the estimates for 1892 over
the estimates for 1891 is to, be found under the following heads:
Pensions, $36,676,000 increase; naval establishment, $8,217,700 increase; Executive establishment, $2,517,700 increase; Indian service,
$1,042,500 increase; public works, $794,000 increase; military establishment, $758,000 increase ; making a total of $50,005,900. The balance of the increase is due to the estimated expenditure for redemption
of national bank notes, and for bounty on the production of sugar,
less a decrease of $4,500,000 in the estimate for interest on the public
debt, and a further decrease of about $3,000,000 under the respective
heads of ^ ^ permanent annual appropriations ^' and ^ ^ miscellaneous. ^'




XXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

, In estimating the revenue for the next fiscal year the loss from articles
transferred to the free list is placed at fifty million, but as the increasing'
demands of the people must swell the volume of imports in other commodities, and the enforcement of the customs laws under the operations
of the administrative act of June 10, 1890, by the prevention of undervaluations and the closer collection of duties, will materially increase
the revenue, it is estimated that an additional collection of not less than
eighteen million will be obtained under these conditions. Upon this
basis the net loss of revenue for the year is put down at thirty-two
million dollars.
Pensions,
The above estimate of $135,263,085, made by the Interior Department, for the year 1892, is based upon the fact that over 250,000 of the
claimants for pensions under old laws 'have availed themselves of the
right to present their claims under the act of June 27, 1890. .Claims
presented under the new law will draw a less monthly rate, and carry
.arrearages for only a short time, and for small amounts, while under the
old laws many of them carry very large arrearages, and many of which
will have been paid during the fiscal year 1891. < The transfer of claims
,
from the old to the new law will therefore very largely reduce the
average annual value of pensions, and a reduction in the amount of
arrearages alone is estimated at $10,000,000 for the year 1892. For
these reasons it is estimated that the amount above named for 1892,
will be sufiBicient to meet the aggregate requirements for that year.
It is deemed advisable and opportune at this time to recommend a
change in the periods of i3aying pensions. At present the law requires
that payments to pensioners shall be made quarterly on the fourth day
of March, June, September, and December in each j^ear, which necessarily involves the accumulation of large sums in the Treasury, amounting to from thirty to thirty-five millions of dollars for each quarterly
payment. This unnecessary withholding of money from circulation
may be obyiated by making twelve monthly payments instead of four
quarterly payments, as now required. Upon consultation with the
Secretary of the Interior it is suggested that the law be changed so
as to divide the eighteen pension agencies Into /three groups, as follows: The pension agencies at Columbus, Ohio, Washington, D. C ,
Boston, Mass., Detroit, Mich., Augusta, Me., and San Francisco, Cal.,
to make their payments quarterly on the fourth day of. March, June,
September, and December ; the i^ension agencies at Indianapolis, Ind.,
Des Moines, Iowa, Buffalo, IsT. Y., Milwaukee, Wis., Louisville, Ky.,
and Pittsburgh, Pa., to make their payments quarterly upon the fourth




.

,

SURPLUS REYENUE.

XXVII

day of April, July, October,, and January; and the pension agencies at
Topeka, Kans., Chicago, IIL, Philadelphia, Pa., Knoxville, Tenn., I^ew
York City, 'N. Y., and Concord, JST. H., to make their payments quarterly on the fourth day of May, August, NTovember, and February of
each year.
.
During the last fiscal year the first group of agencies disbursed <
$33,953,822; the second group disbursed $35,987,186; and the third
group disbursed $36,552,882, and it is probable that this ratio will be
substantially maintained in the future.
If the change herein recommended should receive favorable consideration, a provision should be incorporated, in any amendment to
the present law that may be adopted, providing for preliminary payments for fractional quarters rendered necessary by the change at all
the agencies, the date of whose regular payments is changed, and also
in all cases of transfer of pensioners from one agency to another. '
8inMng-fund.
Under the requirements of the act of February 25, 1862 (Eevised
Statutes, §§3688, 3689), establishing a sinking-fund for the gradual ex.tinguishment of the public debt, there have been purchased during the
months of July, August, September, and October of the current fiscal
ypar $27,859,100 of the funded loan of 1891 and $16,134,000 of the
funded loan of 1907, at a cost to the fund for premium and anticipated
interest of $1,226,329.76 on the former and $3,844,450.93 on the latter
loan. There have also been added to the fund, by the redemption of
fractional currency. Treasury notes, and United States bonds which had
ceased to bear interest, the sum of $8,764, making a total of $49,072,-,
784.97 applied to the fund as against an estimated requirement for the
year of $49,077,270.
•
' •
SURPLUS REVENUE.

The surplus revenue was largely increased last summer by the pending changes in tariff legislation. And the available balance in the
Treasury was also greatly augmented by the act. of July 14,1890, which
transferred over $54,000,000 from the bank-note redemption fund to the
available cash. This sudden and abnormal increase was the cause of
much concern and some embarrassment to the Department.
To prevent an undue accumulation of money in the Treasury, and
consequent commercial stringency, only two methods were open to the
Secretary, namely, to deposit the public money in national banks, or to




XXVIII

R'EPOR r OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

continue the purchase of United States bonds on such terms as they
could be obtained. For reasons heretofore stated, the former method
was deemed unwise and inexpedient, and the policy of bond purchases
was continued. On account of the rapidly-diminishing supply of United
States bonds on the market, and of the fact that the sudden and great
increase in the surplus compelled the immediate pui'chase of large
quantities, it became very difficult to obtain them in sufficient amounts
and at fair prices. The following is a brief statement of the successive
steps taken to dispose of the constantly-accumulating surplus:
There were outstanding on June 30,1889, United States interest-bearing bonds, issued under the refunding act, in the amount of $815,734,350,
of which $676,095,350 were four percents and $139,639,000 four and
one-half percents. During the fiscal year 1890 there were purchased of
these bonds $73,923,500 fours and $30,623,250 four and one-half percents,
and there remained outstanding June 30, 1890, $602,193,500 fours, including $21,650 issued for refunding certificates, and $109,015,750 four
and one-half percents. Of the bonds so purchased there were applied
to the sinking-fund for the fiscal year 1890 $27,695,600 fours and $12,136,750 four and one-half percents, the residue being ordinary redemptions of the debt.
During this period the Secretary was able to purchase United States
bonds at constantly-decreasing prices, so that at the end of the fiscal
year 1890 the Government was iiaying for four per cent, bonds seven
per cent, less than at the beginning of that period, and for four and onehalf i3er cent, bonds four and one-half per cent, less; but the diminished
supply of bonds held for sale, together with the lower prices which were
being paid, had been gradually curtailing the Government purchases,
and soon after the beginning of the present fiscal year the growing surplus and the prospective needs of the country made it advisable that
steps be taken to obtain more free offerings of bonds to the Government.
Accordingly, on July 19, 1890, a circular was published rescinding
that under which purchases had been made since April 17, 1888, and
inviting new proposals, to be considered July 24, for the sale of the
two classes of bonds before mentioned. Under this circular there were
offered on the day prescribed $6,408,350 four percents and $594,550
four and one-half percents, at prices varying from 121.763 to 128.263
for fours, and from 103i to 104.40 for four and one-halfs, of which there
were purchased all the four percents offered at 124, or less, amounting
to $6,381,350, and all the four and one-halfs offered at 1031, or^ less,
amounting to $584,550. As the amount obtained on this day was less
than the Government desired to purchase, the provisions of the circular




SURPLUS REVENUE.

XXIX

were extended, with the result that further purchases were made,
amounting in the aggregate to $9,652,500 fours and $706,450' four and
one-half percents.
It was soon apparent that these purchases were inadequate to meet'
existing conditions;' therefore, on August 19, the Department gave
notice that four and one-half per cent, bonds would be redeemed with
interest to and including May 31, 1891; and two days later the circiilar
of August 21 was published, inviting the surrender for redemption of
twenty millions of those bonds, upon condition of the prepayment after
September 1, 1890, of all the interest to and including August 31,1891,
on the bonds so surrendered. Under this circular there were redeemed
$20,060,700 four and one-half percents.
NTotwithstanding the disbursements resulting from purchases and
redemptions of bonds under the circulars of July 19 and August 21,
the industrial and commercial interests of the country required that
large additional amounts should be at once returned to the channels of
trade. Accordingly, a circular was published August. 30, 1890, inviting the surrender of an additional twenty millions of four and one-half
percents upon the same terms as before. This was followed by
another, dated September 6, inviting holders of the four per cent, bonds
to accept prepayment of interest on those bonds to July 1, 1891, a
privilege which was subsequently extended to the holders of currency
sixes. Under this circular of August 30, there were redeemed $18,678,100 four and one-half per cent, bonds, and under that of September
6 there was prepaid on the four per cent, bonds and currency sixes interest amounting to $12,009,951.50.
These prepayments of interest are expressly authorized by section
3699 of the Eevised Statutes. They were deemed expedient because of ,
the disposition of the holders of bonds to demand exorbitant prices for
them.
The amount of public money set free within seventy-five dayS'by
these several disbursements was nearly $76,660,000, and the net gain
to circulation was not less than forty-five millions of dollars, yet the
financial conditions made farther prompt disbursements imperatively
necessary. A circular was, therefore, published September 13, 1890,
^ inviting proposals, to be considered on the 17th, for the sale, to the
Government, of sixteen millions of four per cent, bonds. The offerings
under this circular amounted to $35,514,900, of which $17,071,150 were
offered at 1261, or less, and were accepted.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

xxx

The total disbursements since June 30, 1890, by the means above
set forth, are recapitulated as follows:
Bonds redeemed.
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

circular
circular
circular
circular
circular
circular
circular

of April 17,1888
of July 19,1890
of August 19,1890
of August 21,1890
of August 30,1890
of September 6,1890..
of September 13,1890,

Disburseraent.

$2,133,350 $2,358,884 00
17,324,850 21,225,989 46
560,050
581,138 12
20,060,700 20,964,868 42
18,678,100 19,518,176 83

()
*

12,009,951 50
21,617,673 77

75,828,200

Total

17,071,150

98,276,682 10

And the annual reduction of the interest charge, with total saving of
interest, is shown in the following statement, viz:
Reduction
of interest
charge.
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

circular
circular
circular
circular
circular
circular

of April 17,1888
of July 19, 1890
of August 19,1890 .....
of August 21,1890
of August 30,1890
of September 13,1890,

Total since J u n e 30,1890
Add fiscal year 1890
Totals since J u n e 30,1889

$91,548 75
699,449 00
25,202 25
902,731 50
840,514 50
682,846 00

Total saving.
S449,853 94
7,074,411 29
6,300 56
7,061,889 73

3,242,292 00 14,592,455 52
4,334,986 25 34,046,079 20
7,577,278 25 48,638,534 72

It should be stated that, there is no saving of interest on the 4i per
cent, bonds redeemed under the circulars of August 21 and 30, since
all the interest on those bonds to September 1,1891, the date on which
they become redeemable, has been prepaid, and that the reduction in
the annual interest charge on the same bonds takes effect only from
that date.
Another circular inviting the surrender of 4J per cent, bonds for
redemption, with interest to and including August 31, 1891, was published October 9, 1890. Theamount surrendered under that circular
during the month of October was $3,203,100.
The total amount of 4 and 4 J per cent, bonds purchased and redeemed
since March 4, 1889, is $211,832,450, and the amount expended therefor
is $246,620,741.72. The reduction in the annual interest charge by
reason of these transactions is $8,967,609.75, and the total saving of
interest is $51,576,706. OL
It will be seen from the above statement that during the three and
one-third months, from July 19 to November 1, 1890, over $99,000,000
were disbursed in payment for bonds and interest.




•Prepayment of interest.

SURPLUS REVENUE.

XXXI

There are many grave objections to the accumulation of a large surplus in the Treasury, and especially to the power which the control of
such surplus gives to the Secretary. I am sure those objections appeal
to no one with so much force as to the head of the Department upon
whom, rests the difficult and delicate responsibility of its administration.
In my judgment, the gravest defect in our present financial system is
its lack of elasticity. The national-banking system supplied this defect to some extent by the authority which ^the banks have to increase
their circulation in times of stringency, and to reduce when money becomes redundant; but, by reason of the high price of bonds, this authority has ceased to be of much practical value.
The demand for money, ih this country, is so irregular that an amount
of circulation, which will be ample during ten months of the year, will
frequently prove so deficient during the other two months as to cause
stringency and commercial disaster. Such stringency may occur without any speculative manipulations of money, though, unfortunately, it
is often intensified by such manipulations. The crops of the country
have reached proportions so immense that their movement to market,
in August and September, annually causes a dangerous absorption of
money. The lack of a sufficient supply to meet the increased demand
during those months may entail heavy losses upon the agricultural as
well as upon other business interests. Though financial stringency may
occur at any time, and from many causes, yet nearly all of the great
commercial crises in our history have occurred during the months named,
and unless some provision be made to meet such contingencies in the
future, like disasters may be confidently expected.
I am aware that the theory obtains, in the minds of many people,
that if there were no surplus in' the Treasury, a sufficient amount of'
money would be in circulation, and hence no stringency would occur.
The fact is, however, that such stringency has seldom been produced,
by Treasury absorption, but generally by some sudden or unusual demand for money entirely independent of Treasury^ conditions and operations. The financial pressure in September last, which at one tinie
assumed a threateningj character, illustrates the truth of this statement.
There was at that time no accumulation of money in the Treasury from
customs or internal-revenue taxes, nor from any other source that
could have affected the money marketo On the contrary, the total disbursements for all purposes, including bond purchases and interest
prepayments, during the last preceding fifty-three days, had been about
$29,000,000 in excess of the receipts from all sources.




XXXII

REPORT OP T H E SECRETARY OF TPIE TREASURY.

.

The total apparent surplus on September 10, when the money stringency culminated, was e$99,509,220.53. Of this amount $24,216,804.96
was on ideposit in the banks, and presumably in circulation among the
people, and $21,709,379.77 was fractional silver, which had been in the
Treasury vaults for several years, and was not available for any considerable disbursements. Deducting the sum of these two items, viz,
$45,926,184.73,. left an actual available surplus of only $53,583,035.80.
The amount of the bank-note redemption fund then in the Treasury,
which had been transferred to the available funds by the act of July
14, 1890, was $54,000,000, being substantially the amount of the
available surplus on September 10, 1890. This bank-note fund had
been in the Treasury in varying amounts for many years. In August,
1887, it was $105,873,095.60, which had been gradually reduced by
disbursements to the amount above named. It is apparent, therefore,
that the financial stringency, under discussion, was not produced by the
absorption of money by the Treasury, but by causes wholly outside of
Treasury operations. At the time when the financial pressure in September reached its climax, the extraordinary disbursements for bond purchases had substantially exhausted the entire ordinary Treasury accumulations, and but for the fact that Congress had wisely transferred the banknote redemption fund to the available cash, there would have been no
money at command, in the Treasury^ by which the strained financial
conditions could have been relieved, and threatened panic and disaster
averted. Had this fund been in the banks instead of the Treasury
the business of the country would have been adjusted to the increased
supply, and when ,the strain came it would have been impossible for
the banks to meet it. The Government could not have withdrawn it
from the banks without compelling a contraction of their loans, and
thus diminishing their ability to give relief to their customers.
The more recent financial stringency in JSTovember, immediately after
the disbursement of over $100,000,000 for the purchase and redemption
of bonds within the preceding four months, furnishes another forcible
illustration that such stringencies are due to other causes than Treasury
operations.
TARIFF AND CUSTOMS ADMINISTRATION.

In my report of last year I recommended a revision of the tariff and
the adoption of better methods of customs administration. In providing for a reduction of excessive revenue by a re-arrangement of the
import duties, it was advised'that the opportunity be taken to remove
inequalities and incongruities resulting from defective legislation




.^,,

TAR.IFF AND\qUSTOMS ADMINISTRATION.

XXXIII

and changed conditions of trade, and which bore injuriously upon public and private interests ; to simplify both rates and classification ; to
enlarge the free list by the addition thereto of articles unsuited to domestic production, or which were of an unprofitable or unimportant
character as subjects of domestic industry, and to maintain the'protec-'
tive principle, and thus to stimulate and improve our home markets
and give remunerative employment to our workiugmcn.
In the' recent statutes, respectively known as the ^' Customs Administrative A c f and the ^ Tariff'Act 'of 1890,^^ these views have received
^
legislative approval and sanction. The customs administrative act
went into operation August 1, 1890. Four'months is too short a timi3
in which to determine fully the merits of the law, but in its operation
thus far it seems to have fully justified its enactment. The just interests of the revenue and of honest importers have been promoted, and
the Government has now, to a greater extent than ever before, control of
the means to determine the legal rate and amount of duty due and collectible upon importations.
\
It is recommended that that part of section 8 of the law which requires a statement of the cost of production of consigned merchandise
be repealed, as it is found tp be of little practical utility, and to be
obstructive to legitimate business. Also, that that part of section 19
which imposes additional duties on unusual coverings be modified so
that such coverings shall pay a single duty, at the rate to which they
would*be subject if imported separately, not less than that imposed upon
the contents.
•
'
«,
The purpose of the tariff act of October 1 last was'to effect needed
reduction of revenue, and such an adjustment of duties as would adequately foster and encourage home industries while maintaining the
standard of American wages. This end, it is believed, has been accomplished. More articles than ever before have been placed upon thC/free
list, rates have been reduced on many others,-and increased duties have
been imposed when deemed necessary to the adequate protection of our
agricultural and manufacturing interests.
The area of population, the accumulated wealth and characteristic
resources of the United States, render it certain that, for many years to
come, the home market Avill be a better' one for oiii' own products
' than all others combined. This very superiority of the United States
as a market is an inducement to foreign producers everywhere to
seek access to and control of it. To permit our own iDroducersto be
driven out by foreign competition would be to expel them' from their
best and most natural market, and compel them to seek inferior comFi 90
-III



XXXIV ' REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
petitive markets elsewhere. Free trade can never be successfully estajblished or perpetuated in any country whose home market for its
own products exceeds its aggregate mafrkets abroad.
The provisions for the advancement of reciprocal trade with other
countries, as contemplated by the law, are not hostile to the xDrinciple
of iDrotection, but are believed to be in harmony with it.
The law has been too short a time in operation to warrant discussion •
herein of its ma^ny details. It is believed that the measure is sound
in principle, and that its several classifications, rates, and other provisions haye been adjusted upon a comprehensive view of the vast interests of the whole country. ' The law embraces so many and such
complex interests that it is quite possible a practical test may disclose
-the necessity for some modifications and corrections, but stability and
certainty in the revenue laws are so essential to our financial and
industrial prosperity, that it is earnestly hoped this law ilaay have a
fair trial before any radical and sweeping changes shall be attempted.
The new industries which it was confidently expected would spring up
under its fostering care, and the new home markets which would
thereby be opened for American labor and products, will certainly fail
of realization if any well-grounded,fear shall be aroused as to the stability of the law, or of the principle of protection which it embodies.
Especially will this be the fact if the continued agitation of this question shall cause serious apprehension that the protective principle is to
be discarded, and a tariff for revenue only is to be adoi^ted, whereby
our home market is to be exchanged for an uncertain and vastly inferior foreign one, and the.country is to be depleted of its gold and
silver to pay for foreign labor and material which should be supplied
by our own people.
The continuing controversy between the American system of wiselyadjusted protection, and the opposite system of unchecked industrial
competition with all the world, is the inevitable contest between two
irreconcilable standards of civilization. The conditions under which
we are enabled to make the contest for the higher standard of living
for all classes of our citizens are j)eculiaiiy favorable. The United
States, with absolute freedom of trade, and perfectly untrammeled industrial competition among sixty-three millions of people, unsurpassed
, in energy, industry, and inventive genius, and with the widest jjossible range of climate and natural products, are by these conditions
assured the lowest range of prices compatible with a reasonable return
to producers, and the maintenance of a higher standard of civilization
for the industrial classes.




/

:'

T A R I F F AND CUSTOMS ADMINISTRATION.

.

XXXV

I again urge certain amendments to the lav/s relating to the customs
service, which have been heretofore recommended as essential to economical and efficient adhiinistration.
First. The increase of the permanent apx3roi)riation for the expense
of collecting the revenue from customs.
For many years the fund available for defraying the expenses of col^ lecting the revenue from, customs has been insufficient to cover such
expenses, and the Department has been unable to emx^loy a sufficient
force to properly collect the revenue and guard against evasions. It is
false economy to refase the means to insure the enforcement of the laws
upon which depend the revenues of the Government. The Department
is almost daily compelled to refuse expenditures absolutely necessary
to such enforcement. On this subject the .following is quoted from the '
Secretary's last Annual Eeport :•
Serious embarrassments have occurred several times through deficiency in this appropriation, which has proved insufficient to defray the necessary expenses of collection,
the average annual cost of which exceeds $7,000,000.
The fund at disposal is derived froni the permanent annual appropriation of $5,500,000
made by the act of Ma)rch 3, 1871, " a n d in addition thereto such sums as may be received from fines, penalties, and forfeitures connected with the customs, and from fees
paid into the Treasury by customs officers, and from storage, cartage, drayage, labor,
and services," which on the date of the passage of the act amounted' to nearly
$2,000,000.
'
.
Since that time the annual receipts from these sources have diminished about '
$1,000,000, in consequence of legislation affecting fines, penalties, and forfeitures, and
the abolition of many of the official fees.
'
,

The rapid growth of the country, the opening of an immense line of
unguarded frontier by the building of railways, and the creation of new
ports, make the need of legislation on this subject inore imperative
than ever before.
Second. The compensation of all collectors of customs by fixed sala- •
ries, and the abolishment of all fees, commissions, perquisites, and
emoluments.
,
This is necessary to secure uniformity and the proper adjustment of
the compensation of these officers commensurate with their duties and
responsibilities.
Under the present system the emoluments of some collectors are excessive while in other cases they are inadequate.
Third. The consolidation of customs districts, demanded alike for
reasons of economy and the changed condition of commerce and transportation.
°
'




XXXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

This might be accomplished by authorizing the Secretary of the
Treasury to change the boundaries of customs districts, or to abolish
districts when the expenditures exceed the receipts therein.
Fourth, The abolishment of oaths to monthly accounts of customs
employes as unnecessary and as subjecting these officers to useless expense.
Fifth, Th'e repeal of the laws requiring bonds to be given by individual importers uxion the entry of merchandise for warehouse, and for
the return of packages not designated for examination a,nd delivered to
imiDorters in advance of appraisement and liquidation of duties.
In the case of warehouse bonds the Government is amply protected
bythe possession of the merchandise, and the so-called ^^return bonds''
are found in practice to serve no valuable end. The taking of these useless bonds involves a large expense without any compensating benefit.
Sixth, The revision and codification of the customs laws.
These laws are now scattered through the statutes, and should be
brought together, revised, and re-enacted in one harmonious code.
Seventh. Legislation to secure railway statistics of foreign commerce.
It is indispensable to a proper record and exposition of the foreign
commerce of the United States that railway carriers of merchandise
should be required by law to render such statistical returns as are required of carriers of freight by water.
Any attempt to completely exhibit the foreign trade of the country
is largely neutralized and frustrated at present by the necessity of
merely estimating the greater part of such trade conducted by rail.
General Appraisers,
The report of the General Appraisers* presents an interesting exhibit
of the "workings of the new law regarding appraisements for the three
months ending October 31.
^
. ,
During that period the General Appraisers decided 779 cases of appeals on questions of value, 713 of which arose in IsTew York and 66
at all other ports. They received during the same period 1,700 protests upon questions of classification, of which 1,129 related to importations at I:^ew York and 571 to importations at other ports. During
the same time they disposed of 704 of these cases, leaving 996 i3'ending.
' It appears that the business at the port of E'ew York alone is sufficient to require the whole number of General Appraisers now authorized by law. It would seem, therefore, that an increase in the number
^of this force is needed for the prompt and speedy dispatch of the
additional business coming before them from the other ports.




* Not published.

INTERNAL R E V E N U E .

.

XXXVII -

The GeneraV Appraisers represent that the pay of the local appraiser
at IsTew York is inadequate, and that while he is held responsible for
the proper administration of this most important department of the
customs service, he is restricted by law to a nominal rather than actual
control of his chief subordinates.
Their recommendation that this office be reorganized and the salary
of the appraiser increased merits the early attention of Congress.
t

Special Agents,
The report of the Supervising Special Agent* presents a summary ,of
the work performed by this branch of the custoins service.
A tabular statement is appended to said report showing the business
transacted in each of the collection districts and ports, from which it
appears that the percentage of cost of collection for the last fiscal year
, was lower than ever before.
The Supervising Special Agent was detailed to attend thd conference
of consuls called by the JSecretary of State to meet in Paris in August
last. His report indicates the valuable results expected in the greater
efficiency and uniformity of i3ractice in the consular service, and more
harmonious relations between consuls and customs officers..
INTERNAL REVENUE.

The report of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, showing in de^ tail 'the operations of this Bureau, is transmitted herewith. The following summary will disclose at a glance the satisfactory condition of that'
branch of the public service, and the very efficient and economical
manner in which it has been conducted :
The receipts from all sources of internal revenue for the fiscal year
ended June 80, 1890, were
7.
:
."
$142,594,696 57
The receipts from the same sources lor the fiscal year ended June
30, 1889, were
,
130,894,434 20

\
}.

s

Making an increase in the receipts for the fiscal year just ended
/ of...
.;

The total cost of collection for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890,
was
;
,
,,....,
:.,
The total cost of collection for the fiscal year ended J u n e 30, 1889,
, was
..,..,....,.,
\
,,.
Making a reduction in the cost of collection for the fiscal year
just ended of.




* See Appendix, page 781o
*

11,700,262 37

4, 095,110 80
4,185,728 65

90,617,85

XXXVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. '

The amounts herein stated are the amounts actually collected during
the fiscal years mentioned, but in many cases the money collected on
the last day of June is not deposited until the first day of July, thus
causing a slight discrepancy between the collections and the deposits.
, The total production of distilled spirits for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1890, was 111,101,738 gallons; the total production fbr the fiscal,
year ended June 30, 1889, was 91,133,550 gallons, making, an.ihcrease.
" in the production of distilled spirits for the fiscal year just ended of
19,968,188 gallons.
.
>
'
The number of barrels of beer produced during the fiscal year ended
June'30, 1890, was 27,561,944. The number of bsbrrels produced:during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1889, was. 25,119,853, making anincreased production Tor the fiscal year just ended of 2,442,091 barrels.'
The total receipts from the taxes on tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, snuff,.etc., for the fiscal year ended June 30,1890, were $33,958,991.06. . The '
receipts from the same source for the fiscal year ended June ,30, 1889,''
were $31', 866,860.42, making an increase for the fiscal year just ended
of $2,092,130.64.
_
.\ .
.•-''
. " '. .
^During the fiscal year ended June 30, 189,0, 6,211 distilleries of all
kinds were in operation, while for the fiscal'year ended June 30,•1889, 4,349 distilleries of all kinds were operated, making an increase in the-'
number of ^ distilleries operated for the fiscal ^yearj^st ended of 1,862;;
The quantity of spirits gauged for the fiscal year ended June .30,
1890, was 324,175,208 gallons. The quantity gauged for the fiscaPyear
ended June 30, 1889, was 288,917,467 gallons, .making an increase of
the quantity of spirits gauged for the fiscal year just ended of 35,257,741-"'.
gallons.
The percentage of cost of collection for the fiscal year ended June 30,, ,
•
1889, was 3.2. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, the percentage;
of cost of collection was 2.82^
.^
/ .* •,''
^ From this brief summary it appears that while the'increase of busi-;
ness was yery large in all its ^ branches, resulting .in'^an .increase of
revenue amounting to $11,700,262.37 over the year 1889, yet there.was.
a saving of $90,617.85 in the actual cost of collection,
* . ,. . . \
•
Thcestimated receipts from-all sources of internal revenue for the "
current fiscal year will aggregate $145,000,000^
'
. . , ,
This estimate has carefully" kept in view the reduction/made in the
tax on tobacco and snuff, and the repeal of the law Imposing special
taxes,on dealers in tobacco, manufacturers of tobacco and: cigars/ and •
peddlers of tobacco. Upon the basis of the receipts for the fiscalyear
ended June 30, 1890, from the various sources of internal revenue




INTERNAL REVENUE.

XXXIX

kffected by the act of October 1, 1890, the following table has been
jprepared, which presents in detail the estimated decrease to be expected in receipts:
Fstimated reduction in receipts,
'pobacco, chewing and smoking:
Estimated receipts for six months ending December 31, 1890, tax
8 cents per pound
,
$9,162,740 68
Estimated receipts for six months ending, J a n e 30, 1891, tax .6
cents per pound
,...
6, 872, 055 51
Total estimated receipts from tobacco for fiscal year ending
June30, 1891
,
16, 034, 796 19
Estimated reduction in receipts from tobacco for fiscal year ending
June 30, 1891

2,290,685 17

Snuff:
Estimated receipts for six months ending December 31, 1890, tax
8 cents per pound
...:..
Estimated receipts for six months ending J u n e 30, 1891, tax 6
'. cents per pound

276, 649 22

Total estimated receipts from snuff for fiscal year ended June
30, 1891......
,

645,514 86

Estimated reduction in receipts from snuff for fiscal year ending
June 30,1891

92,216 41

Special tkxes:
Dealers in leaf tobacco
Dealers in manufactured tobacco
Manufacturers of tobacco
Manufacturers of cigars...
Peddlers of tobacco.
,

368,865 63

44, 492
1,331,118
5,197
122, 896
11, 776

,

40
24
50
49 '
51

Total estimated reduction in special taxes for fiscal year ,
ended June 30, 1891.
1,515,481 14
Recapitulation,

^

. .

Est] mated reduction in receipts from tobacco
Estimated reduction in receipts from snuff ..4
Estimated reduction in receipts from special taxes
Total estimated reduction in receipts from tobacco, etc., for fiscal
year ending June 30,1891.....,.,....,....,,.,.




. ,
2, 290, 685 17
92,216 41
1, 515, 481 14

3,898,382 72

XL

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The further reduction of $450,000 maybe expected under the operation of those provisions of the act of October 1, 1890, which authorize
the fortification of wines with grape brandy free of tax.
It is estimated that about two million ^Ye hundred thousand gallons
of wine will be fortified, and that about one-fifth of their bulk will be
required in grape brandy—say five hundred thousand gallons will be
used in the process, tax on which is $450,000. This would make the
total estimated reduction in receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1891, aggregate $4,348,382.72.
Increase in expenses for neoct fiscal year.
In connection with the estimate of expenses for the next fiscal year,
attention is called to the fact that section 231 of the act of October 1,
1890, provides as follows:
^
That on and after July 1,1891, and until J u l y 1,1905, there shall be paid, from any
moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, under the provisions of section 3689
of the Revised Statutes, to the producer of sugar testing not less than ninety degrees by
the polariscope, from beets, sorghum, or sugar-cane grown within the United States, or
from maple sap produced within the United States, a bounty of 2 cents per pound ; and
upon such sugar testing less than ninety degrees by the polariscope, and not less than
eighty degrees, a bounty of If cents per pound, under such rules and regulations as the
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury,
shall prescribe.

It is impossible at present to make even an approximate estimate of
the expenses necessary to carry into effect this provision of the law. It
is believed, however, that it will require a very considerable sum of
money to enable the Department to ascertain upon what sugars this
bounty shall be paid, and the rate of bounty to which claimants for
same may be entitled.
Congress also enacted a law authorizing the makers of sweet wines to
use grape brandy, free of tax, for the fortification of their wines, and I
have not yet been able to make an estimate of what additional sums
will be required to carry into effect the provisions of this law.
The ascertaining of the amount of bounty to be paid to the producers
of sugar is an entirely new feature in the internal-revenue system.
The Bureau has nohe of the machinery required to execute the law. It
is simply a collection office. It will be necessary to make a chemical
analysis in all cases where bounty is claimed.
It is not deemed practical to have samples sent to this office for
analysis, and rely upon the tests made here as to the entire production. '
The law requires that the tests shall be made by the polariscope, and
this will require the services of a large number of chemists of consid-




PUBLIC MONEYS. •

>

XLI

erable experience. Only one chemist and one microscopist are now
employed in the Bureau of Internal Eevenue. I am informed that the
Department of Agriculture now employs a number of chemists, and
gives much attention to the culture of sugar-producing plants and the
methods of manufacturing sugar.
In view of these facts, it is respectfully recommended that the law be so
amended as to require this bounty to be ascertained ai;id paid by the
Department of Agriculture.
If, however,' it shall be decided that this Department shall remain
charged with the duty of ascertaining and paying the bounty upon
sugar, the Secretary is compelled to ask the 'privilege of being allowed
to make a supplemental report upon these two subjects, and to ask for
such additional appropriations as may be necessary to give these laws
full force and effect, and to fully protect the interests of the Government in their executionc
PUBLIC MONEYS.

^^

The monetary transactions of the Government have been conducted
through the Treasurer of the United States, nine subtreasury officers,
and two hundred and seventy-five national-bank depositaries. The
number of such dei30sitaries on E'ovember 1, 1890, was 204.
The amount of public moneys held by national-bank depositaries,
including those to credit of the Treasurer's general account and disbursing officers' balances, on March 1,1889, was $48,818,991.63, which,
being largely in excess of the needs of the public service, I have endeavoured, as far as practicable, to reduce to the amount necessary to be
kept with such depositaries for the business transactions of the Government. To accomplish this purpose, without serio asly disturbing the busi.;
ness of the peoi3le, who may have been borrowers of these depositaries^
by any sudden withdrawal of large amounts, each depositary holding any
public money, in excess of that needed, was notified on I^ovember 30,
1889, to transfer to the subtreasury on or before January 15, 1890, an
amount equal to 10 per cent, of the excess, or, if preferred, the whole
amount could be transferred at once. Thisgave ample time for the adjustment of any business changes made necessary by the withdrawal of funds,
and resulted in a reduction of about $9,000,000. A similar notification
was given January 28, 1890, allowing until March 1,1890, to make the
transfer,-which resulted in a reduction of about $6,000,000. 'No further
notifications for withdrawals have yet been made, but the holdings of
the depositaries have been farther reduced by the purchase and redemption of United States bonds held in trust as security for deposits, and




XLII

'REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE. TREASURY.

the payment of the deposits, with these depositaries, from the proceeds
of the purchases or redemptions, so that on E^ovember 1, 1890, the
amount held by banks was $29,937,687.68, a reduction since March 1,
1889, of $18,881,303.95.
The entire amount thus withdrawn froin the banks was in excess of
the needs of the public service with those depositaries, and was used
in payment of United States interest-bearing bonds purchased either
from the banks relinquishing the deposits,«or from others, and resulted
in a saving to the Government, by reason of the purchase of these bonds,
and the consequent stoppage of interest, of about $400,000 per annum.
Such withdrawal also increased the circulation, for in no case was a
bank allowed to hold public funds to the amount of the market value
of the United States bonds furnished as security therefor. On fourand-a-half per cent, bonds a balance equal to par was allowed, and on
four per cent, bonds a balance equal to 110 per cent, of face value, so
that for each $100,000 withdrawn from the banks, payment from the
Treasury was made for like amount of bonds, with premium at an
average rate of 105 J for four-and-a-half per cent, and 127 for four per
cent. i3onds, thus returning to the channels of trade the amount of the
deposit, and from $5,000 to $17,000 additional on each $100,000. The
increase of circulation by these operations was about $2,000,000.
The amount now held by the national-bank depositaries is still in
excess of the requirements of the public service, and further withdrawals
will be made whenever it can be done without detriment to business
interests.
Some of the objections, believed to be conclusive, against this method
of restoring the surplus to circulation, were stated specifically in the
Secretary's last annual report. Subsequent experience has confirmed the
convictions then expressed, that this policy is unwise and inexpedient,
and should never be employed except as a last resort.
During the recent financial stringency the Secretary was frequently
urged to adopt this method of reducing the surplus, but he declined to
do so for the reasons stated in said report, and also for the further reason
that such relief was wholly impracticable to meet a sudden emergency.
The law does not permit the transfer of m^ney, once covered into the Treasury, to banks for commercial purposes, and it specificallj;^ forbids such
transfer of money received from customs duties. The only authorized
method of making such deposits is to designate certain banks as depositaries of public moneys, after which they may deposit United States
bonds to the amount designated, and then be authorized to receive such
funds as may be thereafter collected under the internal-revenue laws.




PUBLIC MONEYS.

XLIII

This is necessarily a very slow process, which would require several
weeks, if not months, to produce any substantial effect upon the cii;culation. Such a policy would certainly prove a most unsatisfactory way
of affording relief to the business interests of the country in an im-,
pending commercial crisis.
' ,
There are doubtless some defects in the independent-treasury system,
but an experience of forty-four years has, in my judgment^ fully demonstrated its superiority to the bank-deposit policy, which it sui3erseded.
In the annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury for the year 1857
will be found a very forcible statement of the relative -advantages of
the two systems in their ability to meet commercial crises, as illustrated in 1837 under the bank-deposit policy, and in 1857, when the
independent-treasury system was in full operation:
The operations of the independent-treasury system, in ordinary times, had been
found by experience eminently successful. The danger of loss from unfaithful and
inefficient officers, the expense of conducting its operations without the intervention of
bank agencies, its deleterious effects upon commercial progress and the general business of the country—all of which were apprehended by the opponents of the measure
at the time of its adoption—have been demonstrated to be unfounded. I t only re- .
mained to encounter a commercial crisis like the present to vindicate the justice and
wisdom of the policy against all cause of complaint or apprehension. A brief com-'
parison of the Operations of the Treasury Department during the suspension of 1837
and the present time will place the subject before the public mind in tlie most satisfactory manner.
On the 30th of June, 1837, immediately after the general suspension, the deposit
banks held tb the credit of the Treasurer of the United States, and subject to his draft,
the sum of $24,994,158.37—a larger amount, in proportion to the receipts and expenditures of the\Governi?ient, than there was in the Treasury at the time df the suspension <
by the banks the present year. The funds of the Government being then under the
control of the banks, and they either unwilling or unable to pay, the Government was
j)laced in the anomalous condition of having an overflowing Treasury, which it was
seeking to deplete by distribution or deposits with the States, and yet unable to meet
its most ordinary obligations.
*

-X-.

-K-

*

•

^

-3f

*

The effort of the Government to withdraw its deposits and get control of its funds
was felt as an additional blow aimed at the banks. Every dollar which could thus be^
drawn from the vaults of the banks diminished to that extent their ability to afford
relief to their customers. Their loans had to be contracted, and the demand made by
them upon their debtors for settlement increased the pressure already felt iii the money
market, and thereby added to the general panic and want of confidence, which are the
usual attendants of a monetary crisis. The Government was not only embarrassed for
want of its money, but in the effort to obtain it became obnoxious to the charge of adding to the general distress, which many persons thought it was its duty to 'relieve.
To avoid a recurrence of these difficulties, the plan of separating the Government from
all connection with the banks was suggested, and in. 1846 was permanently adopted.




XLIV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

The result is before the country in the occurrences of the last few weeks. The banks,
as ia 1837, have suspended specie payments, but the analogy ceases there, so far as the
operations of the Treasury Department in its disbursements are concerned. The Government has its money in the hands-of its own officers, and in the only currency known
to the Constitution. I t has met every liability without enibarrassment. I t has resorted to no expedient to meet the claims of its creditors, but with promptness pays
each one upon presentation. If the contrast between the operations of 1837 and the
present time stopped here it would be enough to vindicate the policy of the independent-treasury system; but it does not. The most remarkable feature distinguishing
the two periods has reference to the effect upon the commercial and general business
interest of the country produced by the present operations of the independent treasury.
I t is the relief which has been afforded to the money market by the disbursements in
specie of the General Government. In 1837 the demand of the Government for its
fands with which to meet its obligations weakened the banks, crippled their resources,
and added to the general panic and pressure. In 1857 the disbursements by the Government of its funds, which it kept in its own vaults, supplied the banks with specie,
strengthened their hands, and would thus have enabled them l^o afford relief when it
was so much needed, if they had been in a condition to do it.

This item of history, and the many subsequent operations of the independent-treasury system, under like circumstances, are commended
to the careful consideration of those persons who now insist upon its
repeal, and upon a return to the old bank-deposit policy. It is worthy
of observation, also, that the policy of affording ^'relief to the money
market," now so much criticized in certain quarters, is by no means a
new thing. It has been the uniform policy of the Government, when
possible, in all commercial crises from 1846 to the present time. The
difficulty which the Department has encountered during the last year
in withdrawing a part of our present bank deposits, even by the careful and conservative methods adopted, and at times when there was no
financial pressure, gives some conception of what those difficulties
would be in making such withdrawals in times of stringency and. commercial distress. The experiences of 1837, related in the above quotations, would be repeated, more or less, in every commercial crisis.
CIRCULATION.

The following tables exhibit the comparative amounts of the various
kinds of money in actual circulation at several different periods, I
have chosen the census years 1870, 1880, and 1890, because of the convenience afforded for comparing the amount of circulation with population. The various sums stated in the tables are all exclusive of money
in the Treasury. They represent, as nearly as is possible, the exact
amounts of the several kinds of money in actual circulation among the
people at the periods named. ,




XLV

CIRCULATION.

T A B L E N O . 1.—Comparative statement showing the changes in circulation during twenty
years from October 1, 1870, to October 1, 1890.

I n circulation
October 1,1870.

I n circulation
October 1,1890.

178,985,305 00

$386,939,723 00
62,132,454 00

Gold coin
s t a n d a r d silver dollars
Subsidiary silver and fractional
currency
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
Treasury notes, act J u l y 14,1890.
United States notes
National b a n k notes

38,988,995 00
28,511,000 00
329,489,221 00
294,337,479 00

Decrease.

Inci-ease.

$307,954,418 00
62,132,454 00

56,311,846 00
158,104,739 00
309,321,207 00
7,106,500 00
340,905,726 00
177,250,514 00 $117,086,965 00

17,322,851 00
129,593,739 00
309,321,207 00
7,106,500 00
11,416,505 00

770,312,000 00 1,498,072,709 00 117,086,965 00

Totals.

844,847,674 00
..$727,760,709
..
3,032,336.
,19.978
23.969

Net increase
Average net increase per month..
Circulation per capita in 1870
Circulation per capita in 1890

T A B L E N O . 2.—Comparative statement showing tlie changes in circulation during ten years
from October 1, 1880, to October 1, 1890.

I n circulation
9ctober\I,I880.
$261,320,920 00
22,914,075,00
48,368,543 00
7,480,100 00
12,203,191 00

S t a n d a r d silvBr d o l l a r s
Grold certificates
Silver certificates
T r e a s u r y n o t e s , a c t J u l y 14,1870
Uaited States notes
National-bank notes

•329,417,403 00
340,329,453 00

I n circulation
O c t o b e r 1,1890.

$386,939,723 00
62,132,454 00
56,311,846 00
158,104,739 00
309,321,207 00
7,106,500 00
340,905,726 00
177,250,514 00 $163,078,939,00

1,022,033,685 00 I,498,(y72,709 00

Totals

Decrease.

Increase.

$125,618,803 00
39,218,379 00
7,943,303 00
150,624,639 00
297,118,016 00
7,106,500 00
11,488,323 00

163,078,939 00

639,117,963 00

Net increase.
Average net increase per month..
Circulation per capita in 1880
' Circulation per capita in 1890

..$476,039,024
.. 3,966,992
..
• 20.377

T A B L E NO. 3.—Comparative statement showing the changes in circulation during period
from March 1, 1889, to October 1, 1890.

^

\
I n circulation
M a r c h 1,1889.
(xold c o i n
s t a n d a r d silver dollars
Subsidiarv silver
G o l d certificates
S i l v e r certificates
T r e a s u r y n o t e s , a c t J u l y 14,1890..
United States notes
National b a n k notes
Totals

379,497,911 00
57,581,904 00
51,944,751 00
130,210,717 00
246,628,953 00

In circulation
O c t o b e r 1,1890.

317,380,505 00
220,961,155 00

386,939,723 00
!52,132,454 00
56,311,846 00
158,104,739 00
309,321,207 00
7,106,500 00
340,905,726 00
177,250,514 00
1,498,072,709 00

43,710,641 00

Increase.

$43,710,641 00

1,404,205,896 00

Increase of circulation per capita in nineteen months, about $1.51.
Net increase
,.
Average net increase p e r month....;




Decrease.

,

$7,441,812 00
4,550,550 00
4,367,095 00
27,894,022 00
62,692,254 00
7,106,500 00
23,525,221 00
137,577,454 00

193,866,813
4,940,358

XLVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B L E N O . 4.—Comparative statement showing the changes in circulatton during peidod
from March 1, 1885, to October 1, 1886.

•
I n circulation
M a r c h 1, 1885.

i

Gold coin
Standard silver dollars
Subsidiary silver
Gt)ld cei'titicates
Silver certificates
United istales notes
National b a n k notes
Totals

$334,268,447 00
40,686,187 00
44,802,220 00
112,683,290 00
111,467,951 00
327,954,194 00
314,886,770 00
.'. 1,286,749,059 00

I n circulation
O c t o b e r 1,1886.

Decrease.

$364,894,599 00
60,170,793 00
48,176,838 00
84,691,807 00 $27,991,483 00
95,387,112 00
16, OSO, 839 00
310,161,935 00
17,792,259 00
301,406,477 00
13,480,293 00
1,264,889,561 00

75,344,874 00

Decrease of circulation per capita in 19 months, about 40 cents.
Net decrease
Average net decrease.per month
,

Increase.

$30,626,152 00
19,484,606 00
3,374,618 00

53,485,376 00
f
$21,859,498
1,150,500

0

T A B L E N O . 5.—Comparative statement showing the changes in circulation during period
'

from July 1 to October 1, 1890.

In circulation
J u l y 1, 1890.

Gold certificates
S i l v e r certificates
T r e a s u r v n o t e s a c t . T u l v l 4 1890
United States notes
National b a n k notes
T o t a l s ...

'

Net increase
Average net increase per month

I n circulation
O c t o b e r 1,1890.

$374,396,381 00 $386,939,723 00
56,166,356 00
62,132,454 00
54,069,743 00
56,311,846 00
131,380,019 00
158,104,739 00
297,210,043 00 ^ 309,321,207 00
7,106,500 00
334,876,826 00
340,905,726 00
177,250,514 00
181,619,008 00
1,429,718,376 00

1,498,072,709 00

Decrease.

"
$4,368,494 00
4,368,494 00
:

Increase.

$12,543,342 00
5 966 098 00
2,242,103 00
26 724 720 00
12,111,164 00
7,106,500 00
6,028,900 00
72,722,827 00
$68,354,333
22,784,778

Table No, 1 shows that during the last twenty years the net aggregate increase of money in actual circulation among the people was
$727,760,709. Average monthly increase during that period, $3,032,336.
Per capita increase, $3,991.
Table No, 2 shows that for the last ten years the aggregate increase
has-been $476,039,024. Average monthly increase for same period,
$3,966,992. Per capita increase, $3,592.
Table No. 3 shows that for the period of nineteen months froni March
1, 1889, to October 1,1890, the aggregate increase has been $93,866,813.
Average monthly increase on same period, $4,940,358. Per capita increase, about $1.50.
Table I^o. 4 shows that for the corresponding period of nineteen
months from March 1, 1885, to October 1, 1886, the aggregate decrease
in circulation among the people Avas $21,859,498. Average monthly
decrease for same iDcriod, $1,150,500. Per capita 'decrease, about 40
cents.
'




> SILVER.,

.

X:LVII

Table ^To. 5 shows that for the period of three months from July 1
to October 1, 1890, the aggregate increase of circulation in actual use
among the people was $68,354,333. Average monthly increase fbr
same period of three months, $22,784,778.
These various changes in the ainounts, in actual circulation among the
l^eople, were caused partly by the additions of new kinds of money,
]3artly by the retirement of certain other/ kinds, and sometimes, very
largely, by the policies pursued by the Treasury Department, The policy of hoarding, in order to show a very large surplus, accounts mainly
forthe heavy decrease of circulation shown from March, 1885, to October,
1886. The opposite policy of keeping the suri3lus as low as practicable by the purchase of United States bonds, and thereby saving interegt,
and at the same time returning the money to the channels of trade,
largely accounts for the remarkable increase in circulation during the
last nineteen months, as shown in tables ]^os. 3 and 5.
This fact will be more readily understood by the statement that from
March 4, 1885, to October 1, 1886, the total amount disbursed in redemption of bonds was $79,026,200, while for a corresponding period;
from March 4, 1889, to October 1, 1890, the totaV amount disbursed in
the redemption and purchase of bonds was $239,799,091.
SILVER.

In my last annual report, I presented, forthe consideration of Cofngress, a plan for the utilization of the silver product of the United
States.
.The measure proposed was briefly this: To purchase, at the market
price, the silver bullion product of our mines and smelters^ and to issue,
in payment, legal tender notes, redeemable in a quantity of silver
bullion equivalent in value, at the date of presentation, to the face of
the notes,^ or in gold, at the option of the Government, or in silver dollars, at the option' of the holder.
This measure was suggested with a view to i)romote the joint use of
gold and silver as money, to increase the volume of paper currency by
the annual addition of an amount equal to the value of our silver
product, to provide a home market for the American j)r'oduct of silver,
and, by so doing, enhance the value of that metal, until a point were
reached where we could with safety open our mints to the free coinage
of both metals at a fixed ratio.
A bill embodying, with some modifications, the measure suggested
Avas favorably reported in the House of Eepresentatives of the Fiftyfirst Congress from the Committee' on Coinage, Weights, and Measures,
and was adopted by the House.



XLVIII _ REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
The bill was amended in the Senate by the substitution of a free
coinage measure.
As the result of a conference between the two bodies, a bill was passed,
and approved by the President, July 14, 1890, the essential provisions
of which are: The monthly purchase by the Government of 4,500,000
ounces of silver, at the market price, to be paid for in legal tender
notes, redeemable in coin, and the repeal, after July 1, 1891, of the
^mandatory coinage of silver dollars.
The material points of diiference between the measure recommended
and the one adopted by Congress, are that the new silver law limits
the purchases of silver to 4,500,000 ounces per month, without distinction as to domestic and foreign iDroduction, instead of taking the entire
silver bullion product of the United States as proposed, and omits the
bullion redemption feature.
, Immediately on the passage of the law new forms of legal-tender
notes were designed, in denominations of one, two, five, ten, twenty,
fifty, one hundred, and one thousand dollars, and were engraved and
printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Owing to the fact
that the purchases under the act were to commence thirty days after
its passage, it was necessary that the larger denominations of notes
should be engraved first, but, at this time, a sufficient supply of the
smaller denominations of notes are being received, and it will be the
I)olicy of the Department to pay out small notes, as far as practicable,
in the purchase of silver.
•
.
Eegulations were also prej)ared inviting offers for the sale of silver
for consideration ut the Treasury Department, at 1 o'clock p. m., on
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays of each week, and the effort has
been to distribute the purchases as nearly as possible throughout the
inonth.
.
Under the operations of this law, the amount of silver purchased
from August 13, 1890, to December 1, 1890, aggregated 16,778,185
fine ounces, costing $18,671,075, an average of $1.1128 per fine ounce.
The price of silver advanced rax^idly after the passage of the new
law j indeed, the immediate effect of the law had been largely anticipated in the advance in price i^rior to its passage.
On the 1st of July, 1890, the price of silver was $1.04,6. To July
14, the price had advanced to $1.08 ; to August 13, $1.13, and to September 3, $1.21, the highest point reached.
Since that date there has been a decline, with some fluctuations, to
the present time, the price falling as low as $0.97.
, E'otwithstanding the fact that the advance in the piice of silver following the passage of the law has not been maintained, the Secretary




SILVER,

•

XLIX

ventures to express the belief that the new silver act is a great improvement over the law repealed, and that its beneficial results will
eventually commend it to general approval. As yet the period of
time'has been too brief to really test the merits of the law, and the
permanent effect which it v/ill have on the price of silver.
One thing is certain, that it has been the means of providing a
healthy and much-needed addition to the circulating medium of the
United States.
The amount of Treasury notes issued on purchases of silver bullion
from August 13 to NTovember 23, 1890, has been $18,807,000.
It must be apparent to any careful observer of the movement of silver,
that the recent violent fluctuations in price are mainly due to speculative operations in the large surplus of from eight to ten million ounces,
which has not been absorbed by Treasury purchases. This downward
tendency has been materially assisted by a severe and almost constant
stringency of the money market. This surplus was. accum°ulated, in
the first instance, by the withholding from the market, by producers
and speculators, for some months prior to the i^assage of the new silver
act, of the current product of American silver, in the hope of securing
a better price. It has been maintained and augmented both by importations of foreign silver and by a falling off in the export of domestic
silver, the latter occasioned doubtless by the fact that in the purchases
of silver under the new silver law, the Treasury Department has paid,
as a rule, a price considerably in excess of the price of silver in London.
The imports into the United States of foreign silver from May 1 to
November 1 of the present year have exceeded the exports of domestic
silver by some $7,750,000, while, for the corresponding period of last
year, the exports exceeded the imports by some $7,860,000, a difference
of $15,610,000, an amount in excess of the value of the present visible
stock of silver on the American market. So, too, in regard to the
movement of silver from San Francisco to the Orient ,• not^ one ounce
of silver bullion has been shipped since the first of May, against an
average export for prior years of from $5,000,000 to $10,000,000. So
that the present surplus stock of silver may, at anytime, be augmented
by imports or diminished by exports, and, as the current product of
silver from our mines does not differ very widely from the monthly
purchases by the Government, it is probable that the existing surplus
will remain for some time an impediment to the permanent and steady
advance of silver. Even if the present surplus should be purchased
by the Government, importations from abroad might, at any time, acouinulate an additional stock of silver, the manipulations of which by
FI 9 0 ~ I V .
- .




L-

REPORT. OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURYo

speculators would result in wide fluctuations in price. Had the law
13rovided for the purchase of only the product of the United States, this
surplus would have been absorbed ere this, and as none would have
been imported for speculative purposes no surplus would have been
accumulated. The withdrawal of the entire silver product of our
mines and smelters, which amounts to nearly one-half of the world's
annual output of silver, would probably soon create a shortage abroad,
and this in turn would cause a steady and permanent advance in
priceo
PRECIOUS METALSo •

Deposits and purchaseSo
The value of the gold deposited at the mints and assay offices, during
the fiscal year, 1890, was $49,228,823.56, of which $6,565,728.30 were re=
deposits. ° '
Of the gold deposited, $30,474,900.25 was the product of our own
mines;. $7,990,706.22, foreign coin and bullion; $655,474.96, lightweight domestic gold coin; and $3,542,013.83 old material.
The silver received aggregated 37,438,788.17 standard ounces, of the
coining value of $43,565,135.15, including re-deposits, $790,982.83
standard ounces, of the value of $920,416.38.
Of the silver received, 32,430,150,84 standard ounces, of the coining value of $37,736,902.64, were classified as. of domestic product;
2,057,950.60 standard ounces,.of the coining value of $2,394,706.15, as
foreign silver bullion; 1,056,846.28 standard ounces, of the coining
value of $1,229,784.75, as foreign silver coin; 511,228.22 standard
ounces, of the coining value of $594,883,74, as uncurrent domestic coins 5
6,884,32 standard ounces, of the coining value of $8,010.84, as trade
dollars; and 584,745.08 standard ounces, of the coining value of
$680,430.65, as old material.
Coinage,

,

The coinage of the mints, during the fiscal year, was the largest in the
history of the mint in this country, aggregating 112,698,071 pieces^
valued as follows:
Gold
Sflver dollars
,
Subsidiary sHver
Elinor coins
Total




,..,

,

\.,„.„„

....„„.o......„
122,021,748 50
, , „ . . . . . , 35,923,816 00
892,020 70
1,416,851 73
,

:,.„...,.,

60,254,436 9.3

, PRECIOUS METALSo'

•,

...

. Ll

BarSo
In addition to the coinage, gold bars were manufactured of the value
of $23,342,433,34, and silver bars of the value of $7,045,357,80, a total
of $30,387,791.14. '
Gold bars were exchanged for gold coin, under the provisions of the
act of May 26, 1882, of the value of $16,357,677.70.
Furchases of silver.
The amount of silver purchased, during the fiscal year, for the coinage
of silyer dollars was 30,912,111.17 standard ounces, costing $26,899,326.33, an average cost'of $0.96,68 per fine ounce.
The total amount of silver purchased under the act of February 28,
1878, to August 12,' 1890, the date the new silver law went into effect,
aggregated 323,635,576.19 standard ounces, costing $308,199,261.71, an
average of $1.05,8 per fine ounce.
••
.
,'• ' ^
The amount of silver |)urchased under the act of July 14,1890, from
August 13, the date it went into effect, to October 31,1890, was 12,281,=
145.86 fine ounces, costing $14,043,221.80, an average of $1.14,349 per
fine ounce.
The net seigniorage on the coinage of silver, during the twelve years
ended June 30, 1890, including the balance in the coinage mints on
July 1, 1878, has been $65,698,057.41. ^
^
Frice of silvero
The price of silver in London, at the commencement of the fiscal year,
was '42 pence, and, at the close, 47f pence, an advance of 5f pence,
equivalent to 12.6 cents per fine ounce.
The average price, during the year, was $0.96,883 per fine ounce.
Since the close of the fiscal year, the fluctuations in price have
covered a wide range. To July 14, the date of the passage of the new
silver law, the price had risen in London to 49i pence and in N&w York
to $1.08 per fine ounce. On August 13, the date the new silver law
went into effect, the price in London had reached 51i pence and in
NQ>W York $1.13 per fine ounce.
•
^
The highest price in London was reached, September 3,-^viz., 541
pehce, equivalent, at the par of exchange, to $1,191 per fine ounce, and
in.Kew York, on September 19, when silver touched $1,21, per fine
ounce. The present price is $1,065.
; Imports and exports.
The loss of precious metals by net export, during.the year, was:
Gold
,
..., 14,253,047
Silver.;.,,.,..,..,
'.
,..„
,..„„„o..'..„.,„.,o. 8,545,455 ,



LII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY,

Froduct of gold and silver.
The mines of the United States yielded, during the calendar year 1889,
precious metals as follows:
Gold:
Value
Silver:
Fine ounces
Commercial value
Coining value

$32,800,000
50,000,000
$46, 750, 000
$64,646,464

:

The product of gold and silver in the world is. estimated to have been
for the same year:
Gold.......
^•1
/ Commercial value
^^^^'^^^
- - t Coining value...

$121,162,000
116,674,000
161,318,000

'.

Wo7Ws coinage.
The coinage of the world, during the calendar year 1889, as far as
reported, was:
.
'
Gold
Silver

,
'.....

..;
.:

$168,901,519
135,602,064

Metallic stock.
The stock of gold and silver in the United States, on ISTovember 1,
1890, is estimated to have been $1,180,236,177, of which $694,865,680
consisted of gold coin and bullion, $380,988,466 of standard silver doUars,
$77,145,591 of subsidiary silver coin, and $27,236,440 of silver bullion.
Industrial consumption.
The value of the precious metals used in the United States in the
industrial arts was, for the calendar year 1889, gold, $16,697,000, and
silver, $8,767,000, of which $9,686,827, gold, and $7,297,933, silver,
were domestic bullion.
Legislation,
The attention of Congress is respectfully requested to the act of May
26, 1882, authorizing the exchange of gold b^rs for gold coin, free of
charge, at the coinage mints and at the United States assay office at
New York, I am of the opinion that this act has facilitated the movement of gold from this country, and have the honor to recommend its
repeal, or that it be so modified as to make the exchange of gold bars
for gold coin discretionary Avith the Treasury Department, and to allow




NATIONAL BAKKSo =

LIII

the imposition of a small charge equivalent to the cost of manufacturing the bars, when the bars are intended for export.
Legislation is also recommended looking to the re-coinage of the subsidiary silver coins in the Treasury. There were on October 25, 1890,
'subsidiary silver coins in the Treasuiy of the face value of $19,545,362,71, of which some $600,000 were actually uncurrent, and a considerable portion of the remainder consisted of coins no longer authorized to be issued. •
pf the balance, the large sum of $17,427,663.50 consisted of halfdollars, for which there is no demand.
If cauthority of law existed for the recoinage of these coins into new
coins of denominations for which there is a popular demand, it is believed that the very large cash asset of $19,000,000, at present unavailable, could be made an available asset.
Aside from the importance of relieving the Treasury from this incubus
of uncurrent coin, it is the duty of the Government to see that the people
are provided with a suitable amount of change money in an attractive
and desirable form. Instead of waiting for small annual appropriations ,
to accomplish this desirable end, it seems eminently proper that authority should be granted the Treasury Department to recoin this uncurrent
silver coin into new coin, and to pay the loss incident to such recoinage
from the very large profits which have been made by the Government
on the manufacture and issue of silver coins. I can conceive of no good
reason for hoarding, in the Treasury vaults, nineteen millions of useless
coin, which the i^eople will not accei^t, and denying to them the use
of this large amount of money in a form very much needed, A bill
was favorably reported from the. Committee oh Coinage, Weights, and
Measures of the Fifty-first Congress, and is now on the House Calendar,
authorizing such recoinage, and I have the honor to respectfully urge
its prompt and favorable consideration.
On February 18, 1890, a communication was addressed to the chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds of the House
of Eepresentatives, recommending the passage of the bill for the sale of
the present site and the purchase of a new site and the erection of a
suitable building for the mint at Philadelphia, The bill was favorably
reported from the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, and is
now on the House Calendar, and it is recommended that it be enacted
- into law at the present session of Congress.
NATIONAL BANKS.

The report of the Comptroller of the Currency contains full information in reference to the affairs of national banks, and covers the opera


LIV

REPORT .OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

'

tions of the Bureau for the twelve months ended October 31, 1890.
Daring this period 307 new associations have been organized, 50 have
gone into voluntary liquidation, and 9 have been placed in the hands
of receivers. The net increase is 248, constituting a larger growth
than during any similar period since 1865, The number of active banks
on October 31, 1890, was 3,567, which is an increase over any previous
date.
'
'
.
These banks have in capital stock $659,782,865; bonds deposited to
secure circulation, $140,190,900; and bank notes outstanding $179,755, 643,. including $54,796,907, represented by lawful money deposited to
redeem circulation still outstanding. The gro^s decrease in circulation
during the year, including notes of gold banks, and those of failed and
liquidating associations, was $22,267,772, and the decrease in circulation secured by United States bonds was' $5,248,549.
On October 2,1890, the date of the last report of condition, 3,540 banks
were opened for business. These associations report an aggregate
capital of $650,447,235; surplus, $213,563,895; and undivided profits,
$97,006,636. Gross deposits, including amounts due banks, are stated
at $2,023,502,067; loans and discounts, $1,970,022,687; an increase in
each of these items over any previous date. They held $195,908,859
in specie; $80,604,731 in legal-tender notes;,$18,492,392 in nationalbank notes, and $6,155,000 in United States certificates of deposit.
Accessions to the system have been most numerous in the States west
of the Mississippi Eiver, Texas being most prominent, with 63 new
associations.
The Comptroller again calls attention to the fact that the issue of
circulating notes has become unremunerative, on account of the high
premium commanded by the bonds of the United States, and renews
his recommendations of last year, in which I concur, that the obligatory
deposit of bonds be reduced, that circulation be issued equal in amount
to the par value of the bonds pledged, and that the semi-annual duty
thereon be fixed at one-fourth of one per centum per annum. He also
asks that Congress provide for the semi-annual publication of the detailed reports of national banking associations.
Eeports received and tabulated show that drafts were drawn by 3,329
national banks upon their correspondents during the year ended June
30, 1890, aggregating $11,550,898,255, at an average cost to the purchaser of 8 J cents premium on each one hundred dollars. An estimate
^of the amount of drafts drawn by other banks and bankers is also submitted, from which it'would appear that the domestic exchange drawn
by banking institutions in the United States during the last fiscal year
aggregated $17j 927,524,760.



ENGRAVING AND PRINTING.

. LV

The Comptroller has obtained and published returns exhibiting the
proportion of coin, paper money, checks, and drafts used in banking
operations, as shown by detailed^ statements of the receipts of the
national associations on July 1 and September 17,1890. '
^ For the first date reports were received from 3,364 national banks.
Their total receipts on that day were $421,824,726. Of this sum
$3,726,605 was in gold coin, $1,352,647 in silver coin, $6,427,973 in ,
gold. Treasury certificates, $6,442,638 in silver Treasury certificates,
$7,881,786 in legal tender. Treasury notes, $5,244,967 in national-bank
notes, $520,000 in United States certificates of deposits for legal-tender
notes, $189,408,708 in checks, drafts, certificates of deposit, and bills
of exchange, $4,391,177 in clearing-house certificates, $194,290,203 in
exchanges for clearing-houses, and $2,138,022 in miscellaneous items.
Of the total receipts 7.50 per cent, consisted of coin and paper money,
and the remainder, 92.50 per cent., was in checks, drafts, and other
substitutes for money.
The total receipts of 3,474 national banks for.Sep tember 17, 1890, is
stated at $327,278,251, of which coin and paper money constituted 8,96
per cent., and checks, drafts, etc., 91.04 per cent. The falling off in
total receipts on the latter date is due to the severe stringency in the
money market then prevailing.
Similar statistics were procured in 1881. A comparison shows that
. a larger proportion of coin and paper money enter into banking operations in 1890 than in 1881. These percentages for the two days in 1881
are 4,87 and 5,91 respectively ; in 1890, for similar dates, 7.50 and 8.96 '
[)er centum. The increased use of money here shown is deemed significant, when considered in connection with the present apparent insufficiency in the amount of coin and paper money in circulation.
Aside from the right to issue circulating notes the national banking
system seems to be more favorably regarded than heretofore, and is
rapidly extending its sphere of operations. The transactions of the
year have been attended by a more than average degree of success.
'

•

\

,

ENGRAVING AND PRINTING.

The wprk of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing during the past
year has been satisfactorily performed. The Bureau was able to meet all
demands upon it, every sheet of securities and stamps actually needed
in the work of the Departnient being'furnished. The new Treasury
notes authorized by act of July 14,1890, have been promptly furnished,
the denominations of $100 and $1,000 being ready for issue thirty days
from the passage of the act, and the other denominations following as
rapidly as possible thereafter. The preparatory work oh the new wing



LVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

of the building is being pushed forward with all possible dispatch, and
will be completed and fitted up for the occupancy of the Bureau at
an early day. This will greatly relieve the present over-crowding of
the employ 6s. There is still needed, to make the facilities for the execution of the Bureau's work complete, an out-building for the accommodation of the ink mills, laundry, carpenter-shop, stable, and storage
room. The necessity for this additional building has heretofore been
called to the attenMon of Congress, and I recommend that an appropriation be made at this session for its erection.
FOREIGN COMMERCE,

The value of our foreign commerce during the last fiscal year was
greater than for any previous year. It amounted to $1,647,139,093,
as against $1,487,533,027 during the fiscal year 1889, an increase of
$159,606,066.
•
.
The value of imports of merchandise also during the last fiscal
year was the largest in the history of our commerce, amounting to
$789,310,409, as against $745,131,652 during the fiscal year 1889, an
increase of $44,178,757.
The value of exports ,of merchandise during the same period was
$857,828,684, as against $742,401,375 for the previous year, 1889, an
increase of $115,427,309. .
The ex]3orts exceeded the imports of merchandise by $68,518,275.
The exports of domestic merchandise were $115,011,219 in excess of
the value of such exports during the preceding year. The greater portion of the increase occurred in the following articles, stated in the
order of magnitude of increase: Provisions, breadstuffs, raw cotton,
iron and steel and manufactures of, vegetable oils, unmanufactured
tobacco, and wood and manufactures of.. This increase was in the following articles: Breadstuffs, $31,049,266; provisions, $32,142,069;
cattle and hogs, $15,196,492; and raw cotton, $13,193,522; a total of
$91,581,349.
The value of the imports and exports of merchandise and specie
during the last three fiscal years has been as follows:
Merchandise.

Exports—
Domestic
Foreign.
Total
Imports
E x c e s s of e x p o r t s
E x c e s s of i m p o r t s




i

1888.

1889.

$683,862,104
12,092,403

,

$730,282,609
12,118,766

$845,293,828
12,534,856

695,954,507
723,957,114

742,401,375
745,131,652

857,828,684
789,310,409

28,002,607

2,730,277

1890.

68,518,275

FOREIGN' COMMERCE.'

LVII

specie:

Exports—
Gold
Silver

.

Total..
Imports—
Gold
Silver

. ..

$18,376,134
28,037,949

.-.

1890.

1889.

1888.

$59,952,285
36,689,248

$17,274,491
34,873,929

46,414,183

Total
E x c e s s of e x p o r t s . . . '
E x c e s s of i m p o r t s

52,148,420

10,284,858
18,678,215

12,943,342
21; 032,984

59,337,986

....:

96,641,533

43,934,317
15,403,669

28,963,073
67,678,460

33,976,326
18,172,094

12,923,803

I h e following tahle shows the distribution of the greater portion of oitr commerce hy countries,
continents, and grand divisions of the globe.
'
'
i
Exports.
Imports.

Countries a n d g r a n d divisions.
Domestic. Foreign.

Total

COUNTRIES.
Dollars.
Dollars.
Dollars.
Dollar
444,459,009 3,436,653 447,895,662 186,488,956
Great Britain and Ireland
84,315,215 1,248,097 85,563,31" 98,837.683
Germui^y
49,013,004
964,020 49,977,024 77,672,311
Fiance
32,183,671 1,013,551 33,197,222' 78,004,241
West Indies
British North American Pos38,544,454 2,959,358 41,503,812 39,396,980
sessions
11,902,496
69,718 11,972,214 59,318,"756
Brazil
22,487,588
170,207 22,657,795 17,029,233
Netherlands
-.
12,666,108
619,, 179 13,285,287 22,690,915
Mexico
26,140,377
490,067 26,630,444 9,336,482
Belgium
12,974,249
93,847 13,068,096 20,330,051
Italy
,
110,607,657 1,470,159 [112,077,816 180,204,801
' All other countries
Total.

Total exports and
imports.

E x c e s s of
exports +
a n d of
i m p o r t s —.

Dollars.
Dollarr.
634,384,618 -f-261,406,706
184,400,995 — 13,274,371
127,649,335 — 27,695,287
I I I , 201,463 — 44,807,019
80,900,792 -\71,290,970 —
39,687,028 +
35,976,202 —
35,966,926 -f33,398,147 —
292,282,617

2,106,832
47,346,542
5,628,562
9,405,628
17,293,962
7,261,955
68,126,985

845,293,828 12,534,856 857,828,684 789,310,409 1,647,139,093 + 68,518,275

GRAND DIVISIONS.
Europe
North America—
British North American
Possessions
Miquelon, Langley, and
St. P i e r r e I s l a n d s
Mexico, Central American States, a n d British
Honduras
West Indies
T o t a l IVorth A m e r i c a
South America
Asia a n d Oceanica
Africa...
All o t h e r countries.
Total

677,284,365 6,452,032 683,736,397 449,987,266 1,133,723,663 +233,749,131

1,544,454 2,959,358 41,503,812 39,396,980
446,844

.16,299

463,143

37,295

1,900,792 -t500,438 +

2,106,832
425,848

817,286 18,936,233 30,930,190
18,118,94'
32,183,671 1,013,551 33,197,222 78,004,241

49,866,423
111,201,463

89,293,916 4,806,494 94,100,410 148,368,706

242,469,116 - 54,268,296

37,745,002 1,007,646 38,752,648 90,006,144
35,920,452
236,637 36,157,089 95,863,401
23,575 4,613,702 3,321,477
4,590,127
8,472
468,438 1,763,415
459,966

128,758,792 — 51,253,496
132,020,490 — 59,706,312
7,935,179 + 1,292,225
2,231,853 — 1,294,977

845,293,828 12,534,856 857,828,684 789,310,409

+ 68,518,275

11,993,957
• 44,807,019

It will "be seen that our total trade in merchandise with Great Britain
and Ireland amounted to $634,384,618, of which the value of export's
was $447,895,662, and the value of imports, $186,488,956, showing an
excess in exports of $261,406,706. Our trade with Germalny showed
an excess of imports of $13,274,371; with France, of $27,695,287.




LVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE TREASURY.

In our total trade with Europe the excess of exports'over imports
was" $233,749,131.
Our commerce in merchandise with IsTorth America, including Mexico,
Central America, and West Indies, amounted to $242,469,116, of which
the value of the imports was $148,368,706, and of the exports,
$94,100,410, an excess of imports of $54,268,296.
Our total trade with South America in merchandise, amounted to
$128,758,792, of which the value of the imports was $90,006^144, and
of the exports, $38,752,648, an excess of imports of $51,253,496.
Exports,
The total value of exports of domestic merchandise was $845,293,828,
an increase of $115,011,219 over, the preceding year, and was greater
than that of any year except 1881.
The material increase or decrease in value of the principal articles
of export was as follows:
.
Increase.
Provisions
Breadstuffs
Animals.
Cotton, unmanufactured
Iron and steel, and manufactures of.....
Vegetable oil
Tobacco leaf.
Leather, and manufactures of.
Mineral oil, crude
Carriages and cars..;
Wood, and manufactures of.
;

.

.•

$32, 077,117
31,049,266
.,.. 15,263,323
13,193, 522
4,386,131 .
• 4,086,658
2,578,488
1, 691,141
1,661,103
1, 656,157
1,355,824

Decrease.

,

Hops
Copper ore
Clover seed
Fruits, including nuts

•.
,

$1,713,261
1,465,022
1,348,549
1, 012,^037

There was an increase in the value of domestic exports—'
To
To
To
To
To
To

tbe United Kingdom
Germany.......;
France
Soutb America
West Indies
Mexico

,
'.
:

$64,468,878
17,746,520
' 3,902,012
4,090,678
2, 242,146
1,779,820

And a decrease—
To Britisb'Nortb American provinces.......
To British Australia.......




$1,262,228
1,084,066

FOREIGN

hlX

COMMERCE.

The value of the principal iartides of domestic exports during the
three years ending June 30, 1890, was as follows:
1889.
Cotton, and manufactures of
,
Breadstuffs
.......'
,
f^rovisions, comprising meat a n d dairy products
Ore, mineral
Animals
,
Wood, and manufactures of.....
Iron and steel, and manufactures of, including iron ore
Tobacco, and manufactures of
Leather, and manufactures of
Oil-cake a n ^ oil-cake meal
Coal
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines
Copper ore
,
,
Fish
Furs, and fur-skins
Spirits of turpentine
Fruits, including nute
Total

1890.

;....

$260,968,069
154,925,927
136,264,506
514,030,089
' 33,638,128
28,274,529
25,542,208
25,355,601
12,438,847
7,999,920
6,856,088'
6,224,504
6,053,236
6,040,826
. 4,661; 934
4,590,931
4,059,547

631,599,762

'.

Value of all domestic exports
Per cent, of enumerated articles to total

$247,987,914
123,876,661
104,122,444
49,913,677
18,374,805
26,910,672
21,156,109
22,609,668
10,747,710
6,927,912
6,690,479
5,542,753
7,518,258
5,969,235
5,034,435
3,777,525
5,071,584
672,231,841

775,297,896

683,862,104
92.4

730,282,609
92.1

845,293,828
91.7

$236,029,949
127,191,687
93,058,080
47,042,409
12,885,090
23,063,108
17,768,028
25,514,541
9,583,411
6,423,930
6,295,380
5,633,972
5.064,687
4,177,930
4,777,246
3,580,106
3,510,208

The value of the domestic exports during the two years ending June
30,1890, classified by groups according to character of production, was
as follows:
1890.

1889.
Values.

Values.

Per cent.

|

$532,141,490
138,675,507!
19,947,518
26,997,127
7,106,388
5,414,579

72.87
18.99
2.73
3.70
.97
.74

$629,820,808
151,102,376
22,297,755
29,473,084
7,458,385
5,141,420

74.51
17.87
2.64
3.49
.88
.61

730,282,609

Products of agriculture
Products of manufacture
Products of mining (including mineral oils)
Products of the forest
Products of the fisheries
Other products
Total

Per cent.

100.00

845,293,828

ioo:oo

.;

Imports,
The total value of the imports was $789,310,409, an increase of
1,17.8,757 over the preceding year, of which the sum of $9,181,551
represents free merchandise, and $34,997,206 dutiable merchandise.
The material,increase or decrease in,value of the principal classes of
imports was as follows:
,
Increase.
Free of d u t y :
Silk, unmanufactured

,„,„„„„„„„

$4,998,638

Coffee

3,542,550

India rubber and gutta-percha, crude

2,467,381

Dutiable:

.

,

Sugar, tiiolasses, etc
Tobacco, and manufactures of.
Wool, manufactures of.,




8, 484, 839
,

7,099,464
4,017,490

LX

REPORT OF T.HE SECRETARY OF T H E

Dutiable—Continued.
Cotton, manufactures of
Flax, hemp, jute, etc., manufactures of
Vegetables....
"
Wood, and manufactures of.
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines

TREASURY,

|3,112,113
2,715,726
2,185,575
1,764,853
1, 758, 451

•.

Decrease.
Free of d u t y :
Hides and skins, other than fur-skins
Paper stock, crude....
Dutiable:
Wool, unmanufactured
Barley
Flax, jute, etc
Rice
• :
Seeds, not medicinal

3,245,864
663,599
2,710,432
2,093,989
2,091,818
963,151
907, 800

,
;

There was an increase in the value of our imports as follows.:
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From
From

Germany
Great Britain and Ireland
France
.'.
\
Netherlands
Japan
Italy
Spanish West Indies
Austria-Hungary
M:exico....

$17,095,237
8,219,889
,.
8,105,693
6,078,390
4,415,332
2,337,902
2,017,221
1, 689, 081
1,437,314

"

And a decrease as follows:
From
From
From
From
From

British North American Possessions
British Australasia
Uruguay
'.
British West Indies
:
Brazil,.'
,
,

3, 612, 493
1, 720, 535
1,232,061
1,120, 544
1,085,04.8

Imports entered for consumption.
The, value of imported merchandise entered for consumption and
the duty collected thereon, during the last five fiscal years, has been as
follows:
V a l u e of m e r c h a n d i s e .
F r e e of d u t y .

1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890




A v e r a g e rate collected o n .Duty
- collected.

Y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30—

$192,912,234
211,530,759
233,093,659
244,104,852
256,574,630
266,102,778

Dutiable.

$386,667,820
413,778,055
450,325,322
468,143,774
484,856,768
507,571,794

Dutiable.

$177,319,550
188,379,397
212,032,424
213,509,802
218,701,774"
225,522,304

P e r cent.
45.86
45.55
47.10
45.63
45.13
44.45

Free and
dutiable.
P e r cent.
30.59
30.13
31 02
29.99
29.50
29.16

•
-

•

^ TRADE WITH CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA.

LXI

TRADE WITH CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA.

Our total imports of merchandise from Mexico, Central and "South
American States, British Honduras, and the West Indies, during the
fiscalyear 1890, amounted to $198,940,575, or 25.20 per cent, of our
total imx3orts of merchandise.
The value of our exports of merchandise to these same countries during the same period was $90,886,103,^ or 10.59 per cent, of the value of
our total ex]3orts of merchandise.
Our total imports and exports of merchandise from and to these
countries, during the same period, amounted to $289,826,678, or 17.6
per cent, of our total imports and exports of merchandise.
It will be seen that the excess of our imports of merchandise from
these countries over our exports to them amounted to $108,054,472.
In other words, our imports of merchandise were 68.63 percent, and
exports 31; 37 of the total trade with these countries, and we imported
inerchandise to the value of $2,18 for every dollar in value exported to
these countries.
The excess of imports over exports of merchandise for the fiscal year
1889 was $117,917,883. For the fiscal year 1888 this excess was $109,120,785.




The following table shows the value of imports and exports of merchandise in the trade of the United States with 3Iexico, Central America, the West Indies,
and South America, and the excess of impiorts or of exports, during the years ending Jwne 30, 1888, 1889, and 1890.

ported and to which exported.

Total

E x c e s s of E x c e s s of
imports.
exports.

$9,897,772
326,494

$7,432,117

2,085,467
1,496,171
1,608,979
1,473,430
959,331

916,861
927,022
1,083,860
647,268
690,575

1,168,606
569,149
525,119
826,162
268,756

4,265,586

3,a57,792

53,731,570
12,550,940
5,283,156

12,023,178
7,611,533
8,234,391

41,708,892
4,939,407

71,565,666

Costa Rica....,
Salvador.........

Exports,
domestic
and
foreign.

7,623,378

C e n t r a l A m e r i c a n States—
Guatemala.

Imports.

$17,329,889
183,635

Mexico

1890.

1889.

1888.

27,869,102

43,696,564

4,393,258
.10,051,250

5,023,880
3,038,515

7,012.735

2,822,382
430,983
12,424

1,717,411
266,245
146,757

1,104,971
164,738

3,265,789

2,130,413

1,135,376

53,-710,234
2,711,521
5,902,159
2,894,520

7,137,008
1,459,332
6,643,553
2,433,221

46,573,226
1,252,189

Imports.

Exports,^
domestic
and
foreign.

E x c e s s o f E x c e s s of
exports.
imports.

Imports.

Exports,
domestic
and
foreign.

E x c e s s of
imports.

$22,690,915 $13,285,287
354,468
186,831
2,281,681
1,655,690
1,676,711
1,453,958
984,404

1,345,719
1,373,019
1,126,170
899,546
552,024

935,962
282,671
550,541
554,412
432,380

8,052,444

•5,296,478

2,775,966

57,855,217
14,865,018
5,284,006

ID, 381,953
•8,288,786
9,526,483

42,473,264
6,576,232

47,107,180

78,004,241

33,197,222

44,807,019

3,821,017
3,738,961

442,502
6,653,608

3,575,253
10,966,765

2,585,828
4,028,583

989,425
6,938,182

4,526,181
460,243
13,366

1,696,269
262,575
147,732

2,829,912
197,668

4,326,975
574,114
17,647

2,106,345
27.9,519
. 160,933

2,220,630
294,595

4,999,790

2,106,576

2,893,214

4,918,736

2,546,797

2,^71,939

60,403,804
2,986,964
5,454,618
2,622,625

9,351,081
2,192,848
9,293,856
2,972,794

51,052,723
794,116

59,318,756
1,754,903
5,401,697
3,183,249

11,972,214
3,351,874
8,887,477
3,226,364

O

$9,405,628

47,346,542

$21,253,601 $11,486,896
211,465
369,598

$9,766,705

2,346,685.
1,747,246
1,442,365
1,662,162
1,215,561

994,701
1,009,687
983,164
701,196
637,175

1,351,984
737,559
459,201
960,966
578,386

8,414,019

4,325,923

4,088,096

55,837,996
15,985,562
6,123,775

13,916,242
8,388,106
8,535,805

41,921,754
7,597,456

77,947,333

$142,859

E x c e s s of
exports.

30,840,153

4,263,519
10,392,569

$158,133

$167,637

tn

o

West I n d i e s British West Indies
Total
'South America—
Colombia . . .
Guianas:
British
Dutch
French

...

'.

Total Guianas

Brazil
Uruguay...
Argentine Republic
Chili




2,951, 235

• 630,622

134,333

741,394
461,299

2,412,030

134,366

3,839,238
350,169

K:
4,242,477

o

>
143,286

1 596,971
3 485 780
43,115

CC

."Bolivia
Peru
Ecuador

3b9,*040*
I,118,627

T o t a l S o u t h A m e r i c a . . 84,356,398
TotalofsrrouD

181,058,966

29,599
870,171
813,535

2,126
314,032
695,005

6,838
780,835
756,211

54,777,171

92,135,052

35,021,017

71,938,181 109,120,785

199,961,470

29,579,227

29 599
561,131
S05i0a2

4,712
466,803
61,206

11,002
1,427,301
715,208

90,006,144

57,114,035

30
351,695
535,060

38,752,648

10,972
1,075,606
180,148
51,253,496

198,940,575 ^90,886,103 108,054,472

82,043,587 117,917,883

T o t a l of i m p o r t s a n d e x p o r t s from a n d to all
723,957,114 695,954,507
P e r c e n t , of a b o v e g r o u p




25.01

10.33

28,002,607

745,131,652 742,401,375
26.84

11.05

2,730,277

789,310,409 857,828,684

•

25.20

10.59

68,518,275

.

o

IT'

t>

CO

O

a

o

LXIY

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE TREASURY.

A comparison of our commerce with the entire group of countries
for the years 1870,1880, and 1890, shows a gradual increase of both imports and exports of merchandise.
During the year 1870 the value of imports was $117,398,951 and of
exports $55,140,322, an excess of $62,258,629.'
During the year 1880 the value of imports was $178,985,906 and of
exports $61,546,474, an excess of $117,439,432.
The per cent, of our commerce with these countries, as compared with
our total commerce, in 1870, was 20.82- in 1880, 15,99; and in 1890,
17.60.
In the following table the imports from the several groups of countries
are given, showing what i3roportion of the imports of each were free
and what dutiable, with the per cent, of free:
Statement showing.the imports from countries south of the United States and tlie per cent, of
imports free of duty during the year ending June 30, 1890.
Imports.
Per cent, of
free.

Countries.
Free of dutj^
Mexico
•
Central American States and British HoU'
duras.....
West Indies
•
South America
.....'
Total of group

Dutiable.

Total.

$15,536,100

$7,154,815

$22,690,915

68.47

8,127,600
10,502,738
82,076,418

111,675
67,501,503
7,929,726

8,239,275
78,004,241
90,006,144

98.65
13.45
91.19

116,242,856

.82,697,719

198,940,575

58.44

The principal dutiable articles imported were sugar and tobacco.
' From the West Indies the imports consisted mainly of these articles,
and the per cent, of the A^alue of free merchandise was only 13.45.
, The principal articles iniported from the entire group free of duty,
in the order of their value, were: Coffee, India-rubber, crude; hides and
skins other than fur-skins, silver-bearing ore, and fruits.
The principal articles of domestic export from the United States to
the entire southern groui) consisted mainly of iron and steel and manufactures of cotton, manufactures of wood, manufactures of wheat flour,
mineral oil, and agricultural implements.
CANADIAN RAILWAY TRANSPORTATIONo

The Secretary's attention has been frequently directed to the unsatisfactory conditions of Canadian railway traf&c with the IJnited States, and
many complaints have been made that the rules and regulations of this
Department, touching the bonding and sealing of cars, discriminate against
our own people. I t i s manifestly unjust to accord Canadian railroads
privileges denied to our owuo It certainly was not the intent of Con,-




NATIGATIONo

LXV

gress to relieve those roads from obligations imposed, upon our own
transportation companies. Yet the practical working of the law, under the construction insisted upon by the Canadian companies, leads to
that result. If their construction be accepted, Canadian railroads, not
under bonds for the purpose, may transport dutiable merchandise from'
seaports in Canada to places within the IJnited States, with only nominal customs supervision, while our own railroads can not carry like
merchandise from Atlantic and Pacific ports, in the United States, to.
points wholly within our own territory, except under heavy bond and
strict customs control .
.
It is also urged with much earnestness and force that the combined
effect of the interstate-commerce act, and Treasury regulations, operate
greatly to the disadvantage of our own transportation interests in competition with Canadian lines. Those who make these complaints insist
that the conduct-of the Dominion Government towards our transportation and other interests, both on the land and water, does not suggest
any ground for the extension of favors on our part, and they protest
against such acts of international courtesy at the <expense of the very
interests which Canadian policy, has persistently sought to destroy.
Several hearings have been given to persons interested in this subject,
which will receive careful consideration with a view to removing, as
far as proper and practicable, any just cause of complaint against the
action of this Department.
NAVIGATIONo

The entire documented tonnage of the United States is reported by
the Bureau of JSFavigation to be as follows i
.
Documented vessels.

1890.
No.
Registered
Bnrolled and licensed
Total

.
V
.'...

Tons.

1,527
21,940

946,695.69
3,477,801.75

23,467

4,424,497.44

The registered tonnage of the United States has decreased 74,899
tons in the last year, and the enrolled and licensed tonnage in the same
period has increased 191,921 tons.
Our sailing tonnage has increased 10,235 tons, and our steam tonpage has increased 93,537 tons during the last yearo




LXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

The vessels built during the last fiscal year were as follows:
1890.
Class.
No.
Sailing vessels
Steam vessels..
Canal boats
Barges
'

Tons.

505
410
40
1,051

Total

102,873.03
159,045.68
4,346.03
27,858.02
294,122.76

' The following table shows the tonnage built, apportioned in respect
to the several grand divisions„ of the country:
G r a n d divisions.

A t l a n t i c a n d G u l f coasts..
Pacific coast
Northern lakes
Western rivers
Total

1888.

1887.

1889.

No.
540
73
152
79

Tons.
73,921.17
9,139.61
56,488.32
10,900.93

No.
604
104
222
84

Tons.
83,168.43
21,956.43
101,102.87
11,859.15

No.
657
112
225
83

844

150,450.03

1,014

218,086.88

1,077

Tons.
93,912.24
17,939.43
107,080.30
12,202.36

1890.
No.
663
93
191
104

156,755.99
12,334.92
108,525.87
16,505.98

231,134.33 1,051

294,122.76

TOTIS.

The iron vessels built in 1890 amounted to 80,378 tons. During the
fiscal year there were built at the lake ports 23 iron vessels, with a
tonnage of 38,602 tons, and on the Atlantic coast, 41,776 tons. The
documented iron tonnage on the lakes is 29,327 tons, and on the seacoast, 494,004 tons. The tonnage on the Northern lakes June 30,1890,
was 1,063,064 tons ; on the Western rivers, 294,446 tons; on the Pacific
coast, 428,392 tons 5 and on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, 2,638,595 tons.
The foreign-going tonnage, exclusive of that engaged in the whale
fisheries, is 928,062 tons, of which 193,706 tons are steam vessels, and
734,356 tons are sailing vessels.
Of our total documented tonnage, 1,859,088 tons are steam, and
2,565,409 tons are other than steam.
The registered vessels include the documented tonnage above mentioned, in the foreign sea-going trade, and 18,633 tons in the whale
fishery. GDhe enrolled or licensed vessels include 3,409,434 tons documented under the federal laws, and engaged in the ^ coasting trade'^
^
along the sea-coasts, the rivers, andthe great lakes of the UnitedStates,
and 68,367 tons licensed for the fisheries.
Besides the coasting vessels, there is a large number of inferior craft,
not required by law to be documented, consisting of barges and flatboats, which represent a tonnage of several hundred thousand, and
there is also a very considerable tonnage consisting of canal-boats, har-




NAVIGi^TION.

LXVII

bor-boats, lighters, and small craft of various sorts, unenumerated |inder
the laws of the United States, except once in ten years.'
The aggregate of all these vessels, documented and undocumented,
constitutes an immense fleet, which, while not so great as that of the
United Kingdom, is second thereto, and equal to a large portion of the
residue of the world's tonnage. It gives employment directly and indirectly to many persons, and keeps in existence a hardy set of men,
more or less inured to life upon the water, and who would undoubtedly
be of service in case of war between the United 'States and a foreign
naval power. It represents ho small portion of the nation's wealth.
The building, equipping, and navigating of the vessels, sailing and
steam, forms a flourishing industry, which would hardly be in existence, were it not for the protection afforded by the federal laws, reserving the business to citizens of the United States.' But for the
beneficent effect of these laws, the ships of aliens would speedily monopolize this trade, as they have already the unprotected foreign trade.
Values of the imports'and exports of merchandise of the United States carried, respectively,
in cars and other land vehicles, in American vessels, and in foreign vessels, during each
fiscal year from 1857 to 1890, inclusive, with the percentage carried in American vessels
{coin and bullion included from 1857 to 1879, inclusive, as method of transportation can
not be stated).
^
Imports and exports—
Y e p r e n d i n g J u n e 30—

1857
1858....
1859
I860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879.
1880
3881
1882
1883
1884 '.
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

9.
:




In cars a n d
other
land vehicles.

In American
vessels.

$22,985,510
27,650,770
27,869,978
23,022,540
20,388,235
18,473,154
17,464,810
20,477,364
19,423,685
20,981,393
25,452,521'
34,973,317
48,092,892
46,714,068
45,332,775
43,700,350
48,951,725
54,356,827
66,664,378
73,561,263

$510,331,027
447^191,304
465,741,381
507,247,757
381,516,788
217,695,418
241,872,471
184,061,486
167,402,872
325,711,861
297,834,904
297,981,573
289,956,772
352,969,401
353,664,172
345,331,101
346,306,592
350,451,994
314,257,792
311,076,171
316,660,281
313,050,906
272,015,692
258,346,577
250,586,470
227,229,745
240,420,500
233,699,035
194,8C5,743
197,349,503
194,356,746
190,857,473
203,805,108
202,451,886

I n foreign
vessels.

$213,519,796
160,066,267
229,816,211
255,040,793
203,478,278
218,015,296
343,056,031
485,793,548
437,010,124
685,226,691
581,330,403
550,546,074
586,492,012
638,927,488
755,822,576
839,346,362
366,723,651
939,206,106
884,788,517
813,354,987
&59,920,536
876,991,129
911,269,232
1,224,265,434
1,269,002,983
1,212,978,769
1,258,506,924
1,127,798,199
1,079,518,566
1,073,911,113
1,165,194,508
1,174,597,321
1,217,063,541
1,371,116,744

Total.

$723,850,823
607,257,571
695,557,592
762,288,550
584,995,066
435,710,714
584,928,502
669,855,034
604,412,996
1,010,938,552
879,165,307
848,527,647
876,448,784
991,896,889
1,132,472,258
1,212,328,233
1,340,899,221
1,312,680,640
1,219,434,544
I,142,904,312
1,194,045,627
1,210,519,399
1,202,708,609
1,503,593,404
1,545,041,974
1,475,181,831
1,547,020,316
1,408,211,302
1,319,717,084
1,314,960,966
1,408,502,979
1,419,911,621
1,487,533,027
1,647,139,093

Percentage
carried in
American
vessels.

70 5
73 7
66 9
66 5
65.2
50 0
41.4
27 5
27 7
32 2
83.9
35 I
x33 I
35.6
31 2
28 5
25 8
• 26 7
25:8
27 2
26 5
25 9
22 6
17.18
16 22
15.40
15 54
16.60
14 76
15 01
13 80
13.44
13 70
12 29

LXVIII

3E&EP0RT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY,

It is impossible to present a stronger argument than is contained in
the above figures for vigorous and efficient measures in behalf of our
rapidly vanishing foreign merchant marine. They show that the relative decline in our foreign carrying trade has been constant and alarming. This decline has averaged If per cent, per annum since 1857,'
until in 1890 the percentage of imports and exports carried in American vessels was less than in any year since the formation of the government. These figures appeal alike to our national pride and our national interests. The folly and the danger of depending upon our competitors for the means of access to foreign markets need not be stated.
The humiliation of witnessing the disappearance of our flag from the
high seas, without one effort to restore it to its former proud position,
can not be expressed. Surely no subject is of greater importance than
the enlargement of our foreign markets, and nothing will contribute
more to that end than the command of ample facilities for reaching
them. Aid to our merchant marine is not aid to a class, but to the
farmer, the manufacturer, and the merchant, as well as to the shipbuilder and ship-owner. ]^o interest is more thoroughly interwoven
with all others, or more worthy of the fostering care and protection of
the nation. E'one has been so vigorously and effectively assailed by
foreign Governments, nor so persistently ignored and neglected by our
own. The reasons for our present humiliating position are well known.
The remedy is plain and easily within our power. In the Secretary's
annual report for 1889'.are stated somewhat in detail the causes of
present conditions, and the practical remedy for them. These recommendations are now renewed and respectfully urged upon the prompt
and favorable consideration of Congress.
LIGHT-HOUSE SERVIOEo

°

'

The number of light-stations was iBsreased from 783 to 833. Three
mew lighf-ships are nearly ready for service, and designs are being prepared for four others, several of which are to show electric, revolving,
or other distinctive lights.
The number of buoys, spindles, and day beacons was decreased from
4,693 to 4,651, "owing, to the paucity of the appropriation for the expenses of buoyage. The other appropriations, for the support of the
Light-House Establishment have proved inadequate for its needSo
AppropriationB for new works have been increased out of proportion
to the appropriations for the maintenance of existing structures.
A contract has been made for the' establishment of a light-house on
Diamond Shoal, off Cape Hatteras, for which the contractor is to have




LIFE-SAVING SERVICE.

'LXIX

no pay until the light is erected, when he is to receive $485,000 for^
'this most difficult and dangerous feat of sub-marine engineering.
/
The wording of several of the general appropriations for the support'
of the Light-House Establishment, which were formulated in its early
days, appears to need revision, as the advances made in the arts and
sciences have somewhat affected the service. The need of these'changes
is fully set out in the Board^s annual report.
During the last fiscal year there were some 5,000 miles on 25 rivers
lighted by about 1,600 post-lights, at an average cost per year of $160
each. ;^o expenditure made by the Government has given more sat• isfaction than that spent in the lighting of rivers. It has revolution^
ized steamboat navigation, making it nearly as safe to run by night as
by day. Eiver navigation is increasing in consequence, and the Board
is unable to keep up with the reasonable demands for more lights,
because of insufficient appropriations for their establishment and maintenancCo • The estimate of the Light-House Board for an increase of the
appropriation for lighting rivers should receive attention. *
The Light-House Board, which is charged by statute with the respon- '
sibility of having bridges over navigable rivers properly lighted, states
in its annual report that it can not enforce the law, as no penalty is
prescribed for its' infraction.
The exhibition of private lights should be prohibited, and the Board',
should be empowered to temporarily show inexpensive lights to meet
emergencies,-the continuance of which should be subject to the action
of Congress. The reasons for this are cogently set out in the report, ol
the Light-House Boardo
LIFE-SATINa BERYIGEo

The operations of this service have been attended duxing the. year
with the usual beneficent results.
The number of stations in commission at the close of the year was
233. • The number of disasters to documented vessels reported by the
district officers is 384. The number of persons on board these vessels
was 3,197, of whom 3,159 were saved, and 38 lost. The value of the
property involved is estimated at $7,555,908, of which $5,451,843 was
saved, and $2,104,065. lost. The number of vessels totally lost was 76.
There were besides 145 disasters to- smaller craft (sail-boats, rowboats, etc.), on which were 299 persons, 289 of whom were saved, and
10 lost. The value of property involved in these- minor disasters was ^
$61,527, of which $59,102 was saved, and $2,425 lost.
In addition to the persons saved from vessels as above stated, 27
others were rescued, who had fallen into the water from piers, wharves,




LXr

REPORT OP ,THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

etc., and would probably have perished but for the timely aid of the
life-saving crews.
Assistance was rendered in saving vessels and their cargoes in 464
instances by the life-saving crews, in working them off when stranded,
repairing them when damaged, piloting them out of dangerous places,
etc. There were 227 instances besides in which vessels were Avarned
off by the signals of the patrolmen when in danger of stranding.
The cost of the maintenance of the service during the year was
$913,786.47.
Since the date of the last report stations have been established and
put in operation at Wallis Sands, I^ew Hampshire; Point Allerto'n and
Cutty hunk, Massachusetts; Oak Island, North Carolina; South Chicago,
Illinois; Point Adams, Oregon; and Point Eeyes and Fort Point, California. There are besides stations in process of construction at Knobb's
Beach and Great Neck (Nantucket Island), Massachusetts; Marquette
and Bois Blanc Island, Michigan; and Umpquah Eiver, Coos Bay, and
Coquille Eiver, Oregon.
The station at Humboldt Bay, California, has been rebuilt and enlarged, and new station-houses at Eye Beach, New Hampshire, and
Plum Island, Massachusetts, are approaching completion. Extensive
repairs and improvements have also been made to several stations on
various portions of the coast.
The telephone line on Long Island, in process of construction at the
date of the last report, has been completed, and a line has been extended
from station to station, along the coast of Cape Cod.
The insufficiency of the compensation of surfmen, referred to in the
last report, continues to embarrass the service in securing and retaining
the best ability, especially on the Great Lakes, where, during the past
year, over 30 per cent, of the force have left the stations to accept more
lucrative employment. The service is thus compelled at the approach
of winter to rely in a great degree upon raw recruits for the dangerous
work which attends the closing of navigation in this region, when training and experience in the methods of the service are most needed.
Similar trouble, though to a somewhat less extent, is experienced on
portions of the ocean coast. The hope is again expressed that appropriate action to remedy this difficulty, which is liable to occasion serious
results, may not be delayed.
STEAMBOAT-INSPECTION SERVICE.

There were upward of 7,000 inspections of steam-vessels during the
last fiscalyear, and more than 33,000 officers of such vessels were




REVENUE-MARINE

SERVICE.

-

' LXXI

licensed. There was a moderate increase of inspections and licenses,
and a decrease of more than one-fifth in the number of lives lost. Of
an estimated number of 500,000,000 passengers carried in the inspected
vessels during the year 65 lost their lives. ' There were 256 inspections
of foreign steam-vessels during the fiscal year.
The record of the service for the past twenty years exhibits a steady
progression in the number of vessels and passengers, and a constant
decline in the ratio of disasters and in the average cost of inspections
per vessel.
REVENUE-MARINE SERVICE. '

•

In the Eevenue-Marine Service thirty-six vessels have been in commission during the year. One new vessel has been constructed and
assigned to duty at Charleston, S. C , and two vessels are under construction, one for duty at New Berne, N. C , and the other at Galveston, Tex.
The record of the vessels in commission during the year shows nautical
miles cruised, 288,112 ; vessels boarded and examined, 23,161, of which
number 915 were found violating the law, by which they incurred fines
and penalties to the amount of $396,616. Eighty distressed vessels
were assisted, of the value, including their cargoes, of upward of ^
$2,500,000. Forty-three persons were rescued from drowning.
The revenue cutters during the year also rendered valuable aid to the
Life-Saving Service, cruising, while on that duty, a distance,of 9,883
miles.
The reyenue steamer Manhattan was assigned to the enforcement
of the anchorage regulations prescribed for the bay and harbor of'
New York. During the year 1,750 vessels were foaiid improperly,anchored; of this number 1,365 were assisted to a proper anchorage,
and the remainder moved upon notice to do so.
During the summer the revenue steamer Bear^ in her annual cruise
to the Arctic, rendered assistance to the whaling fleet in that region,
gave medical attendance and furnished medicines to more than
140 whites and natives of Northern Alaska, and conveyed to Point
BarrQw fuel, provisions, outfits, etc., for the refuge station at that
place. The officers of the Bear inspected the accounts and property of
the station, and the crew assisted in the erection of a small new
building to be used as a store-house. The Bear also visited t h e '
coasts of Siberia and distributed to the Esquimaux natives the
presents purchased by act of Congress of April 2, 1888, for acts of humanity to the crew of the wrecked whaling bark Napoleon,




LXXil

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 'OF THE TREASURY.

The commanding officer of the Bear was appointed an agent for taking the census in^ Northwestern Alaska, and for that purpose visited
native villages that could not otherwise have been readily reached.
Transportation was given to representatives of the geographical
society, and also to the Commissioner of Education for Alaska, and
assistance rendered him by the officers and crew in the erection of
Government school-houses at Cape Prince of Wales and at Point Hope.
Therevenue steamer Rush cruised from.July 9 to September 11 in
the vicinity of the seal islands, for the protection of the interests of the
Government on and around those islands and the sea-otter hunting
grounds. It also conveyed the United States commissioner with several prisoners from Western Alaska to Sitka for trial.
The Manhattan is not able to efficiently perform the service required
of her at New York, and should be replaced by a larger and more
powerful vessel.
The increased work required of the revenue cutters in Alaskan
waters demands the inimediate construction of a new vessel for duty
on the Pacific coast.
The expenditures on account of the service for the year have been
$937,033.67, of which $17,272.81 was spent in enforcing the law regulating the anchorage of vessels in the bay and harbor of New York.
The personnel of the service remains the same as last year—220 commissioned officers, 27 pilots, and 815 seamen.
MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE.

This Service is annually growing in importance and in the general
scope of its operations. The Surgeon-General reports that during the
last year there were 50,671 sailors treated in the various marine hospitals and dispensaries; that there were 1,245 pilots examined for colorblindness, of whom 41 were rejected; that there were 1,133 surfmen
examined physically for the Life-Saving Service, of whom 72 were
rejected for disease or disability; 536 seamen of the Eevenue-Cutter
Service were examined, of whom 37 were rejected; 22 light-house
keepers were examined, of whom 2 were rejected.
Seven quarantine stations have been maintained during the year and
two hygienic laboratories. There were 2,059 vessels inspected at the
national quarantines, of which 80 have been detained for fumigation.
There were 970 immigrants treated in the barge office, of whom 483 were
treated in hospital.
The total receipts of the Service from the tonnage tax, including repayments, were $574,697.53. There have been expended from this
source $566,848.31.



COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY. ~

LXXIII

For the prevention of epidemic diseases there have been expended
$38,103.28, and for the quarantine service $41,806.54.
The report of the Supervising Surgeon-General, besides an exhibit
of the general operations of the Service, contains interesting information concerning foreign hospitals visited by him while under detail as
a delegate to the tenth International Medical Congress. He also submits a special report on Immigration, as the result of his observations
abroad, and^ the experience of the Marine-Hospital Service in the
examination of immigrants at the port of New York, and recommendations are submitted for the more effective exclusion of undesirable
immigrants.
No general epidemic from preventable diseases has occurred during
the year, although several cases of yellow fever have been detained at
the several quarantines. The new quarantine station at San Francisco
is now under construction.
A cfrcular for the prevention of the introduction of lepers into the
United States was prepared by the Supervising Surgeon-General, and
• approved by me December 23, 1889.
' . .
COAST AND GEODETIC .SURVEY.

The report of the Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey
supplies many interesting and important details of the field, magnetic,
and hydrographic work of the highly accomplished corps under his
direction. An officer of the corps formed a part of the scientific company attached to the Eclipse Expedition to the west coast of Africa,
and brought home valuable results within his own sphere of investigation.
.
Publications of the Survey continue to grow in number and circulation, a fact which emphasizes the recommendations heretofore made
for increasing the office accommodations of the service.
It would be to the public advantage if statutory provision were made
for ascertaining and fixing a proper line of division between the hydrographic work of the Survey and that performed under the direction of
the Navy Department. Better results might naturally.be expected if
each service had the means of knowing the limits of its own field.
Standard weights and measures have been supplied to the recently
admitted States of the Union. Much service has been rendered in
verifying weights and measures used as standards in various parts of
the country. I recommend the conferring of statutory authority upon
the Executive to prescribe and regulate the manner of safely keeping
the metric standards furnished to the Government, of the United'States.




LXXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

from the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Paris
under the provisions of the internatiouartreaty of 1875. These prototypes are of extraordinary accuracy and finish, and are probably destined at no disf/ant day to become of very great practical importance
to our people.
The metric system of weights and measures was optionally established by law in 1866. Since that time it has become obligatory among
nearly all civilized peoples, and its use in this country was strongly
urged by the International American Conference lately in session at
Washington. Upon consideration of the matter, it is recommended
that the metric system be made obligatory in transactions at our custom-houses from and after the first day of the calendar year 1895. A
statutory provision to that effect would doubtless lead to the general
adoption of the system by the public, unaccomj)anied by serious inconvenience.
RECOMMENDATIONS OF UNITED STATES DELEGATES TO THE INTERNATIONAL MARINE CONFERENCE.

Pursuant to resolution of Congress, the Secretary has examined the
report and recommendations made by the delegates to the United States
International Marine Conference, dated February 20, 1890, so far as
they apply to subjects under the jurisdiction of this Department, and,
as required by said resolution, has prepared and will submit bills to
Congress for the carrying of said recommendations into effect.
IMMIGRATION.

The contract existing since 1882 between this Department and the
Board of State Emigration Commissioners at the port of New York
was terminated last April, because of a want of harmony between the
officers of this Department and the Commissioners, and because it was
believed thalt the Department could administer the service with greater
economy and efficiency through agencies under its own control.
These expectations have been fully realized. A temporary immigrant depot was established at the barge office, which, though not entirely satisfactory, has met the immediate requirements of the service.
Vigilance and economy have been exercised, and the expense for care
and maintenance of immigrants under the present management has
been only one-third of the cost for the corresponding period of the preceding year. From April 19 to October 1, 1890, $13,497.50 were expended, while calculated by a yearly average the same service would
have cost under the State board $38,256,12.




IMMIGRATION,

LXXV

The immigrant fund, made up from the head tax, was reduced during
the period from July 1, 1889, to April 19, 1890, when the Department's
own officers took charge, from $106,086.03 to $77,96L59, a decrease of
over $28,000, while during the much shorter time intervening to the
1st of November the fund has been increased to $119,863.06, an increment of nearly $43,000. In the course of a few months the permanent
depot at Ellis Island, in the harbor of New York, will be ready for
use. At the ports of Portland, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Key
West, New Orleans, Galveston, and San Francisco, the contracts with
the State authorities for the conduct of the immigrant business remain
in force.
The noticeable feature of our immigration in recent years has been
a change in the character of many of the immigrants, who do not readily
assimilate with our peopile, and are not in sympathy with our institutions.
So long as undesirable immigration was a matter of rare occurrence
and desirable immigration the rule, the rational policy was pursued of
permitting all to come to our shores who desired to do so. The conditions are now materially changed, and the tendency of Congress, as
shown by the Alien Contract, Pauper and Chinese Exclusion Acts, has
been to limit and restrict immigration.
It is a matter of public knowledge that transportation from any jpart
of Europe to our Atlantic ports is so cheap and easy as practically to
exclude none, and the consequence is that our asylums for the poor, the
sick, and the insane, and our prisons are crowded with strangers, whose
charge upon the public may be said to have begun with their landing.
Further legislation is needed to exclude persons unfit for citizenship,
and it is therefore recommended that all immigrants be required, as a
condition precedent to their landing, to produce evidence attested by
our consular officers of their moral, mental, and physical qualifications
to become good citizens.
Our country owes too much in greatness and prosperity to its naturalized citizens to wish to impede the natural movement of such valuable
members of society to our shores, and it is an additional argument in
behalf of the proposed plan of certification, that it would lend encouragement to the continuance of such additions to our population.
Alien Contract-Lahor Law,
With the administration, at New York, of the immigration laws entirely within the control of the Department, a more satisfactory and
effective enforcement has been possible of the laws against the intro-




LXXVI

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

duction into the United States of laborers who come under contract.
The inspectors appointed by the Department work under the direction
of, and in sympathy with, the superintendent of immigration, and in
a unity of interest to this end the object of the law is more surely obtained. From April 19, 1890, to October 1, 1890, one hundred and
twenty-three imported aliens were detected and returned, while during
the longer period, from March 1, 1889, to April 19, 1890, but forty such
persons were sent back. From all the ports less than fifty alien contract laborers were returned during the four years preceding March 1,
1889, while since that date two hundred have been so deported.
The defense of our wage workers against unfair competition is so
essential a part of the industrial protective system of the country, that
nothing should be left undone in legislation or administration to make it
effective. The law should, however, be amended, as suggested in my
last report, so as to relieve clergymen, .teachers, and scientists from its
prohibitive features.
Chinese Exclusion,
The Department has not relaxed its efforts to secure a strict enforcement of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Organized attempts have been
made by Chinese laborers to force their way into the United States by
way of Mexico, British Columbia, and Canada. These movements
have been efficiently met, and the unlawful immigration not only
checked, but in most instances wholly arrested.
A large number of prohibited Chinese that have found illegal entry
into the United States have been returned to China, as ^ the country
^
from whence they came,'^ rather than to the contiguous foreign territory through which they passed on their way hither, as was formerly
the practice, and which resulted in their ultimately finding a way to
re-enter the country in some other quarter.
This policy, coupled with the refusal of the Department to allow the
transshipnient, in our ports, of Chinese for British Columbia and Mexico, has had a salutary effect, and will be continued, if a sufficient appropriation is made for that purpose.
ALASKA.

There is an urgent necessity for legislation creating new ports of delivery in the Territory of Alaska.
The industrial development of the Territory has continued with all
the vigor and enterprise indicated in my last Annual Eeport,
. It is impracticable, even if it were advisable, to wholly arrest this
wholesome and natural progress of that section of the country until ar-




•

'

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

LXXVII

rears of legislation can be brought up, and the consequence is that a
revenue and navigation system is in operation which is less thd creation
of statute than of the necessities of the situation, and is open to most, ,
if not all, of the objections which belong to the grafting of improper
methods upon a settled and comprehensive system. These conditions,
involving violations to a greater or less extent, will continue in the
absence of needed legislation.
Lease of the Seal Islands,
The lease of the Seal Islands, in Behring Sea, to the Alaska Com- •
mercial Company, for a term of twenty years, having expired during
the year, a new lease, was made, pursuant to law, with the North,
American Commercial Company for a like term of twenty years, after
a public competition wherein that company proved to be the highest
and the best bidder. The pecuniary conditions of the lease are the
payment of an annual rental to the United States of $60,000, a revenue
' tax of $2, and royalty of $7.62 J for each fur-seal skin taken and shipped ,
from the islands of St, Paul and St. George, and 50 cents for each gallon
of oil taken from seals killed and sold.
The covenants' for the maintenance, care, and improvement of the
native inhabitants of the leased islands are also much more extensive
and liberal than in the preceding lease. The contract, as a whole, is
well adapted to promoting the public and native interests that the law
prescribes as primary objects of solicitude.
The Secretary may deem it advisable to communicate further on this
subject during the present session of Congress.
' •

PUBLIC BUILDINGSo

During the past year there were under the control of this Department,
and receiving the attention of the office of the Supervising Architect—
In course of construction, including extensions and repairs specially
appropriated for, 69 public buildings. Of which number, there were
completed during the year 21 public buildings.
There were previously completed and subject to repairs, etc., 229
public buildings.
Not yet commenced, 26 public buildings.
'
Congress during its present session has authorized the acquisition of
sites for and the erection of 27 public buildings.
At this date there are completed and occupied 250 public buildings.




LXXVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

There are in course of construction, extensions, for which sites have
been or are being selected, or which have not yet been commenced, 100
public buildings. .
The following statement shows the aggregate amount of money expended on public buildings during the past year:
For sites and in the construction of new public buildings
$3, 69lj 341 34
For repairs and preservation of public buildings
,
224, 394 12
For heating apparatus for new public buildings
18, 410 44
For heating apparatus for (completed) public buildings
91, 972 31
For vaults, safes, and locks for public buildings.
48, 929 78
For photographic duplication of plans for public buildings
4, 014 54
For vaults for storage of silver, New. Orleans, La., and San Francisco,
Cal
25,676 54
Total expenditure

4,104,739 07

The following recommendations of the Supervising Architect of this .
Department are concurred in:
First, The desirability of Congress, at this session, making the balances of the ai^propriations under the limits of cost which have been
prescribed by legislation, and which amounts have been asked in each
case in the ^'Estimates of Appropriations, 1891-1892," the same being
necessary to enable an uninterrupted progress of the buildings, and
secure expedition and economy by avoiding delays, and the consequent
additional expenses.
Second. The suggestion that an economical regard for the public interests involved in the proper preservation of structures erected for the
needs of the Government service makes it advisable that Congress
should do one of two things: either to make specific appropriations requested for special repairs to particular public buildings, or to materially increase the amount of the general appropriation for ^^Eepairs
and preservation of public buildings,''
Third. The advisability of Congress making the full amount of the
aijpropriation in the act authorizing the acquisition of a site and the
erection of a public building, when the limit of cost is an amount not
exceeding $300,000, in order that immediate action maybe taken in
selecting the site, and the best business methods adopted in making
contracts under such guarantees as will secure the continued prosecution of the work of erecting the building until its completion.
Fourth. The advance in lighting buildings by electricity has so thoroughly established the superiority and convenience of electric light that
a modern structure is incomplete without the system, and it therefore
becomes a necessary equipment in the completion of a public building;
and it is deemed advisable that an appropriation be made specific for




RECORD OF P R O P E R T Y — W O R L D ' S

EXPOSITION.

LXXIX

the purpose of placing electric wires in buildings. Serious delays have
resulted in the prosecution of work on new buildings in consequence of
the inability to proceed at the proper time to provide electric wiring.
The appropriation for ^ Fuel, lights, and water'' is found insufficient to
^
meet the demands upon it, and can not always provide for this ^expenditure. As no provision has .heretofoi*e been made by estimate in the
general appropriations, it is therefore recommended that a separate and'
distinct appropriation of $125,000 be made for electric, wiring to be used
in connection with the appropriations heretofore made forthe construction of the new public buildings.
Fifth. That a system of competitive designs for public buildings be
tried.
Sixth. That the appropriation for ^ Plans for public buildings " be
^
increased to $5,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892.
Seventh. That the appropriation for ^^Eepairs and preservation of
, public buildings" be increased to $300,000 for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1892.
Eighth. That the appropriation for '^Vaults, safes, and locks for
public buildings" be increased to $75,000 for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1892.
Ninth. That a specific appropriation of $10,000 be made for ^ Heat^
ing and ventilating appara,tus, marine hospitals and quarantine stations," for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892.
Tenth. That a specific appropriation of $20,000 for ^^Eepairs and
preservation of marine hospitals and quarantine stations" be made for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892.
RECORD OF REAL PROPERTY BELONGING TO THE UNITED STATES.

Your attention is invited to the need of some legislation for securing
a record of titles to real estate how owned or hereafter to be acquired
by the United States, tod for providing suitable means for examining
such titles, perfecting those which are defective, and for the recovery
of property wrongMly withheld from the United Stated.
THE W O R L D ' S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION.

Under the provision of the act of Congress, approved April 25, 1890,
entitled ^^An act to provide for celebrating the four-hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus by holding an international exhibition of arts, iDdustries, manufactures, and
the products of the soil, mine, and sea, in the city of Chicago, in the
State of Illinois," the Secretary of the Treasury is charged with certain
duties.




LXXX

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Section 12 appropriates $20,000, to be expended under the direction
of the Secretary of the Treasury, during a period ending June 30,1891,
^^for purposes connected with the admission of foreign goods to said
Exhibition." In pursuance thereof, the World's Columbian Comihission^have been authorized to employ such agents or agencies as they
raay deem necessary, subject to the Secretary's approval as to expenditures.
.
Plans for the building authorized by Congress are now in course of
preparation. It is intended to be of such dimensions as to provide
about 200,000 square feet of floor space, at a cost not to exceed the sum
named in the act.
In accordance with the provisions of section 18 of said act, there
have been approved, up to November 14, voucher^ for contingent expenses of the Commission amounting to $6,539.66, and for the Departmental Board authorized by section 16 amounting to $294.85.
The total expenditures for all purposes, to November 15,1890, are as
follows:
Traveling expenses
Subsistence
Contingent expenses
Expenses Departmental Board.
Salaries
Total.....

$11,366
l4,181
6, 539
294
8,128

91
25
66
85
73

40,511 40

• A large number of the Commissioners who have attended the meetings of the Commission have failed to submit any accounts. It is estimated that such accounts will aggregate $5,000. The total expenditures and liabilities to November 15 will be about $47,000.
Section 6 of the act authorizes and requires the Commission to appoint a board of lady managers, of such number, and to perform such
duties, as may be prescribed by the Commission. In compliance with
said section, the Commission appointed a board of lady managers consisting of two from each State and Territory and the District of Columbia; one to be appointed by each of the commissioners-at-large,
also nine from the city of Chicago, and a like number of alternates.
The principals of the board number 115 and the alternates the same. No
special provision is made bythe law forthe payment of the expenses of
traveling or subsistence for the members of said board, but as their appointment was authorized by law, the Secretary has, upon the recommenda=
tion of the Commission, authorized the president of the Commission to
notify the members of the board that they will be allowed the usual expenses of transportation, and $6 per day in lieu of subsistence, while
necessarily absent from home engaged in duties which may be pre-




•OFFICIAL FILES

SALE O F PAPERS.,

LXXXI

scribed by the Commission. Some definite provision should be made
by law for the expenses of said board which will make it unnecessary to
treat such disbursements as a ^^contingent expense."
The salaries of the officers of the Commission were fixed by a
unanimous vote of the Commission, and for that reason they were approved.
.
OFFICIAL FILES OF THE GOVERNMENT.

For years jiast the crowded condition of the files in the Treasury
Department has been a matter of earnest consideration, and various
methods have been, from time to time, suggested for their relief.
The First Auditor, early last spring, called my attention to the want
of uniformity that existed in the sizes of the blank forms which appear
in the accounts rendered to his office, and suggested that valuable filing
space might be saved, and the papers be better preserved, if they were
' reduced to a uniform standard. A committee of experienced officers
^ of the Department was accordingly appx)inted to investigate the matter,
with instructions to report to me the result of their inquiries. The
investigation of the committee, which was intelligent and thorough,
covered a period of more than four months, and the factsi ascertained
were both interesting and valuable.
^
The standards of sizes recommended by the committee were approved
by me, and a circular was recently issued instructing the officers and
employes of the Department to conform to them. •
It is believed- that with the promised co-operation of the other Executive Departments, and by careful watching on the part of the clerks
in the accounting offices, the adopted standards may be maintained so
far as the blanks entering into the accounts filed in this Department
are concerned; but it would seem advisable to apply the system, as far
as practicable, to all branches of the public service. Legislation by
Congress requiring all Departments of the Government to adopt the
Treasury or some other uniform practical filing standard is recommended.
SALE-OF USELESS PAPERS.

In accordance with the provisions of the act of Congress approved
February 16, 1889, about 400 tons of useless official papers have been
sold, from the files of the Treasury Department, at prices ranging from
$8.20 to $37.20 per ton. The total amount derived from such sale,
amounting to $8,070.76, has been covered into the Treasury. . The files
space gained by the removal of said papers is of great value to the Department, but files are accumulating so rapidly that it seems the
F I 90-:

VI




LXXXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

only feasible plan for permanent relief, in connection with files space,
will be the erection of a building devoted exclusively to the storage of
papers which it is deemed necessary to preserve, but which are seldom
referred to.
.
The space to be gained by the removal of such files can be profitably
utilized for the accommodation of clerks in this Department, who have
not now the proper rooms for the transaction of the public business.
• '

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. ^

The net expenditures on account of the District of Columbia for the
fiscal year 1890 were $5,677,419.52. The revenues deposited in the
Treasury on this account, for the same period, were $2,809,130.93,
There have been issued during the fiscal year 1890 $28,450 of the
3.65 per cent, bonds, in satisfaction of judgments of Court of Claims
against the District. There have been retired by'the operations of the
sinking-ftind during the same period $389,450 of the bonded indebtedness of the District, making a net reduction of $361,000, and reducing
the annual interest charge $23,200.
When the duties of the late commissioners of the sinking-fund were
assiimed by the Treasurer of the United States, on July 1, 1878, the
bonded debt amounted to $22,106,650, which has since been increased
$945,950 by the issue of 3,65 per cent, bonds in exchange for certificates of the board of audit and in payment for judgments of the Court
of Claims, There have also been issued $1,092,300 twenty-year 5 per
cent, funding bonds, to replace maturing bonded indebtedness. The
bonds retired during the same period amounted to $4,363,850. The
bonded debt July 1, 1890, was $19,781,050, showing a net reduction of
$2,325,600, and a reduction in the annual interest charge of $160,357.72.
Of the bonded indebtedness of the District $3,010,850 will be payable
in 1891, and $920,300 in 1892. As all of these maturing bonds bear 6
or 7 per cent, interest, provision should be made to refund them at a
lower rate of interest, and attention is invited to the plan submitted in
the Treasurer's annual report on the sinking-fund.
The amount realized from the sale of bonds in which the retentions
from contractors with the District of Columbia were invested exceeds
the sum necessary to pay the amounts originally withheld. The net
surplus ^t the close of the fiscal year 1890 was $30,676.18, and has been
deposited in the Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt to the credit of the
United States and District of Columbia in equal parts, as required by
the act of February 25, 1885o




CIVIL SERVICE.

LXXXin

, Detailed information in f ega^^d to the affairs of the District of Columbia will be found in the report to be submitted by the District Commissioners' and by the Treasurer of the United States, ex-officio commissioner of the sinking-fund of the District.
CIVIL SERVICE.

The past year's experience of the excellent \forking of the civil service law, supplemented as it is in this Department by a thorough system
of departmental examinations for promotions, adopted twenty years
ago, leads me to emphasize what was said on this subject in my last
annual report.
Inasmuch as the current year has included an active political canvass in all the States, it is deemed not inappropriate to say that so far
as this Department is concerned, there has been entire and uniform
compliance with the requirements of law respecting the collection of
money for political purposes from Government employes. All such
employes, regardless of political preferences, have been, and have apparently felt, quite as much at liberty as other citizens to contribute
or refrain from contributing for the benefit of the political party of
their choice. Attention is invited to the accompanying report of the
Board of Examiners of this Department,*
The several reports of the heads of offices and bureaus t are herewith
transmitted.
.
WILLIAM WINDOM,
Secretary of the Treasury,
The Honorable
'
T H E SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF EEPRESENTATIVES.
* See Appendix, page 790.




t See Appendix, page 3, etc.




TABLES ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT ON THE FINANCES.




LXXXV




T A B L E - A . — S T A T E M E N T OF T H E OUTSTANDING P R I N C I P A L OF T H E P U B L I C D E B T O F T H E U N I T E D STATES, J U N E 30,
Length of
loan.

1890.

When redeem- Kate of in- atPrice I Amount author
which
Amount issued, Amount o u i ized.
able..
terest.
standing.
Bold.

O

a

OLD DEBT.
5 and 6 per
' cent.

Indoflnit© . . .

^ of 1 4o ( Far.,
B
per cent.

$51,000,600.00

Par,

10,000,000,00

?5 687,800.00

5 per cent..

Par.

320,000,00

303,573.92

.ooooo

1 a>nd 2 yearsl 1 and 2 yearo 5§ and-@ per
from date.
oent.

Far.,

.....oo.

1 yoa^ ooonooj 1 year
year
date.

8 to-® per
cent.

Ffflff.,

H

$47,002,900,00

For detailed information in regard to the earlier loans embraced under
this head, see Finance Eeport for 1876..

On demand . .

$151,920..2<l

TEEASURY NOTES PKIOK TO 1846.
Acts of October 12,1837 (5 Statutes, 201); May 21,1838 (5 Statutes,
228); March 2,1839 (5 Statutes. 323); March 31,1840 (5 Statutes," 370);
February 15,1841 (5 Statutes, 411); January 31,1842 (5 Statutes, 469)j
August 31,1842 (5 Statutes, 581); and March 3,1843 (5 Statutes, 614),

1 and 2 years \ and 2 years
from date.

T E E A S U E Y NOTES OF 1846.
A c t o f J u l y 22,1846 (9 Statutes, 39)

o..oo..ooooo. = ». 1 yeaF o*oa,

Jl year
date.

0..00000.0......

:

from-, ^ of 1 to 5§
per cent.

% years from
date.

M

MEXICAN. INDEMNITY.
Actof August 10,1846 (9Statutes,94)

@y®S!i'@ooo

n

o

TEEASIJEY NOTES OF 1847,
A c t o f January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)

(*)

23,000,000.00 126,122,100,00

TEEASUEY NOTES OF 1857.
Aotof December 23,1857 (11 Statutes, 257)

,

BOUNTY-LAND S C E I P . ,

Act of February 11,1847 (9 Statutes, 1 2 6 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o .o o = . o . . . .Indefinit© .
LOAN OF 1847.
Aotof January 28,1847 (9 Statutes, 118)
^.
T E X A N INDEMNITY STOCK.
A c t o f September 9,1850 (9 Statutes, 4 47)s
LOAN OF 1858.
Act of J u n e 14,1858 (11 Statutes, 365)
000.....000
*Includedia "old debt."




Indefinite.

»T) •

a

§2,778,900.00

§33,075.00

•

n

t28, 280,350. 00

1,250.0®

10,000,000.00

5,000,000.00

20,000.00

20,000,000.00
Jan. lo 1874.... 5 per cent.o.I Averag© 20,000,006.00
prem'm
of 3^^%,
% Including conversion of Treasury notes.
t Including re-issues.

2,000.00

14years 000

o..»o...ooo. 15years . . .
'

A t the pleas- @ p e r c e n t ..j F a r .
ure of th©
Government.

Indefinit©

23,000,000.00

0..0000. 2® years .00
o....

from

Jan. 1,1868.... Sper ©eat o. 1^ to 2
percent,
prem'm.
5 per cent. o. Far
J a n . l , I860....

-Xi
<1

TABLE A.—STATEMENT O F T H E OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL O F . T H E P U B L I C D E B T , E T C — C o n t i n u e d .
Length of
loan.

Price
at which Amount author- Amount issued
ized.
sold.

When redeemable.

Eate of interest.

Jan. 1,1871.'

5per cent... P a r t o $21, COO, 000. 00
lx%%per
ct. pr'm.

Amount outstanding.

X
X
X

-<

LOAN OF I860.
A c t o f J u n e 22,1860 (12 Statutes, 79)

10 years

?
^

$7, 022, 000. 00

$10, 000. 00

o

LOAN OF FEBEUAEY, I86I (1881s).

Pi

AcftofFebruary 8,1861 (12 Statutes, 129)

10 or 20 years Dec.31.1880«,

=

6 p e r cent-

(Av.)89.03

25, 000,000.00

18,415, 000.00

6, 000.00

35,364,450,00

H
O

2,500.00

TEEASUEY NOTES OF I86I.
Act ofMarch 2,1861 (12 Statutes, 178)

. . . ' . . . . o . . . . . . . 60 days or 2
years.

1 days or 2
0
years alter
date.

fiper cent..

ct. pr'm.

OEEGON W A E DEBT,
Act of March 2,1861 (12 Statutes, 198)

oo=oo.. 20 years.

P a r t o Indefinite

J u l y 1,1881.., 6 per cent..

Par.

2,800,000.00

After June 30, 6 per cent... P a r I88L

250,000,000.00

1,090,850. 00

2,550.00

O

. LOAN OF J U L Y AND AUGUST, 1861.
Tbe act of J u l y 17, 1861 (12 Statutes, 259), authorized the issue of
1250,000,000 bonds, with interest at not exceeding 7 per centum per
annum, redeemable after twenty years. The act of August 5, 1861
(12 Statutes, 316), authorized tbe issue of bonds, with interest at 6
per centum per annum, payable after twenty years from date, in
exchange for 7-30 notes issued under the act of July 17,1861.

20 years.

189,321,350.00

82,900,00
O

K

LOAN OF J U L Y AND AU(3^UST, 1861.
Continued at 3^ per cent, interest, and redeemable at the pleasure of
the Government.

Indefinite-

Indefinite.

On demand .

36,250.00

At the pleas- 3^ per cent.
ure of the
Government.

H

56,032.50

Cl

- OLD DEMAND NOTES,
Acts of Julv 17, 1861 (12 Statutes, 259); A u g u s t s , 1861 (12 Statutes,
813); February 12,1862 (12 Statutes, 338).




None .

Par.

60,000,000.00

*60, 030, 000.00

SEVEN-THIETIES OF I86L
Aotof July 17,1861 (12 Statutes, 259) . . . . . . o

oo.ooooooooooo. 3 years.

Aug. 19 and
Oct. 1,1864,

7 ^ per cent. Av.pre.ofj Indeflnite .

Act of February 25,1862 (12 Statutes, 345); March 3,1864 (13 Statutes,
13), and January 28, 1865 (13 Statutes, 425).

139,999,750.00

10,800.00

514, 771, 600.00

251,850.00

looo*

FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1862.

5 or 20 years. May 1,1867.... 6 per cent... Av.pre.of 515,000,000.00

LEGAL-TENDEE NOTES.
Th© act of February 25,1862 (12 Statutes, 345), authorized the issue of
$150,000,000 United States notes, not bearing interest, payable to
bearer at the Treasury of the United States, and of such denominations, not less than five dollars, as the Secretary of the Treasury
might deem expedient, $50,000,000 to be applied to the redemption
of demand notes authorized by thie act of July 17,1861; these notes
to be a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private,
within the United States, except duties on imports and intere&t on
the public debt, and to be exchangeable for six per cent. United
States bonds. The act of July II, 1862 (12 Statutes, 532), authorized
an additional issue of $150,000,000 of such denominations'as the Secretary of the Treasury might deem expedient, bdt no such note
should be for a fractional part of a dollar, and not more than
$35,000,000 of a lower denomination than five dollars; these notes to
be a legal tender as before authorized. The act of March 3, 1863
(12 Statutes, 710), authorized an additional issue of $150,000,000 of
such denominations, not less than one dollar, as the Secretary of the
Treasury might prescribe; which notes were made a legal tender
as before authorized. The same act limited the time in which the
Treasury notes might be exchanged for.United States bonds to July
1,1863. The amount of notes authorized by this act were to be in
lieu of $100,000,000 authorized by the resolution of January 17,1863
(12 Statutes, 822).

Indefinite.

On demand . . . None <

Far

450,000,000.00

346.681,016.00

s
o

a

T E M F O E A E Y LOAN."
Acts of February 25, 1862 (12 Statutes, 346); March 17, 1862 (12 Statutes, 370); July 11,1862 (12 Statutes, 532), and June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 218).

Indefinite... After ten days' 4, 5, and 6
per cent.
notice.

Par.

150,000,000.00 716,099,247,16

2,960.00

Par =

No limit,

4,000.00'

JH

CEETIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
Acts of March 1, 1862 (12 Statutes, 352); May 17, 1862 (12 Statutes,
370), and March 3,1863 (12 Statutes, 710).

lyear,.

1 year
date.

after 6 per cent.

561,753,241. 65

FBACTIONAL CUEEENCY.
Acts of July 17, 1862 (12 Statutes, 592) j March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes,
711), sad J u n e 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 220).




Indefinite... On presentation.
® Including re-issues.

Non® o.ooo

Far-

50,000,000.00 '368,720,079.51

6,911,510.97

X
X

,x
X

X
o

T A B L E A.—STATEMENT O F T H E OUTSTANDING P R I N C I P A L O F T H E P U B L I C D E B T , ETC.—Continued,
When redeem- Eate of in- at Price Amonnt authorAmount outwhich
Amount issued.
able.
terest.
Btanding.
ized.
sold.

Length of
loan.
LOAN OF 1863.
The act of March 8, 1863 (12 Statutes, 709), authorized a loan of
$900,000,000, and the issue of bonds, with interest not exceeding 6
per centum per annum, and redeemable in not less than ten nor
more thaii forty years, principal and interest payable in coin. The
act of June 30,1864 (13 Statutes, 219), repeals the above authority,
except as to th© $75,000,000 of bonds already advertised for.
Bonds of this loan continued at 3^ per cent, interest, and redeemable
at the pleasure of the Government
ONE-YEAE NOTES OF 1863.

July 1,1881.

17 years

6 p e r c e n t . . . Average $75,000,000.00
premium of
4im.

$75,000,000.00

o
O

Indefinite.. A t the pleasure 8) p e r c e n t . . P a r .
of th© Government.

1,450.00

W

after

5 per c e n t . . . P a r .

400,000,000.00

44,520,000.00

33,965.00

2year8

2 years after
date.

5 per c e n t . . . F a r .

400,000,000.00

166,480,000.00

28^ 400.00

Indefinite..

On demand . . . Non© .

Far.

Indefinite

Acts of March 3,1863 (12 Statutes, 710), and J u n e 30,1864 (13 Statutes,
218).
TEN-FOETIES OF 1864.

3y©ar8

3 years from
date.

6 per cent,
compound.

Far.

400,000,000.00

266,695,440.00

Act of March 3,1864 (13 Statutes, 13)

10 or 40 years.

5 per cent.

Far to 7
perct.
prem.

200,000,000,00

106,118,300.00

56,600.00

6 p e r c e n t . . . Av.prem. 400,000,000,00
of2ym.

125,661,800.00

44,050.00

Aug. 15,1867)
J u n e 15,1868 > 7 ^ per ct. i Av.prem. '800,000,000.00 *829,992,500.00
J u l y 15,1868)

•130,200.00

CO

182,460.00

Actof March 3, 1863(12 Statutes, 710)

lyear

TWO-YEAE NOTES OF 1863.
Act of March 3,1863 (12 Statutes, 710)

, 1 year
date.

$11,800. 00

GOLD C E E T I F I C A T E S .
A c t o f March 3, 1863 (12 Statutes, 711)

167,542,979.00

COMPOUND-INTEEEST NOTES.

-

March 1,1874.
FIVE-TWENTIES OF JUNE, 1864.
A c t o f J u n e 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 218)

....;

. . . — . . . 6 or 20 years
Nov. 1,1869...

SEVEN-THIETIES OF 1864 AND 1865,
Acts of June 30, 1864 (13 Statutes, 218) ; January 28, 1865 (13 Statutes,
425), and March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468).

3 years...

NAVY PENSION FUND. She act of July 1,1864 (13 Statutes, 414), authorized the Secretary of




Indefinite... Indefinite.

8 p e r c e n t . . . Fax.

Indefliilt©

14,000,000.00

14. 000, 000. 00

o
^• W

Kj

o

d
w

the Navy to invest in regiwrsereft securities of the United States so
much of the Navy pension fund in the Treasury January 1 and J u l y
1 in each year as would not be required for the payment of naval
pensions. Section 2 of the act of July 23,1868 (15 Statutes, 170), fixed
the interest on this fund at 3 per centum per annum In lawful money,
and confined its use to the paynaent of naval pensions exclusively.
FIVE^TWENTUfi OF 1865.
Acts of March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12,1866 (14 Statutes, 31).

5 or 20 years

Nov. 1.1870... 6 per cent.

Av.prem. Indefinite.
of 2 x m

203,827,250.00

24,160.00

5 or 20 years. J u l y 1,1870... 6 per cent... Av.prem. Indefinite
of3f««^

332,998,050.00

142, 900.00

5 or 20 years. July 1,1872... 6 per cent.

J^9,618,000.00

O
•a
H
H

CONSOLS OF 1865.
^

Acts of March 3,1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12,-1866 (14 Statutes, 31).

Q -

CONSOLS OF 1867.
Acts of March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 (14 Statutes, 31).

Av.prem. Indefinite.,
oflx§g„

247, 550.00

6 or 20 years. J u l y 1,1873.:. 6 per cent.. Av.prem. Indefinite....

PC

o

CONSOLS OF 1868.
Acts of March 3, 1865 (13 Statutes, 468), and April 12, 1866 (14 Statutes, 31).

42,539,350.00

66, 700. 00

*85,155,000.00

6,000. 00

THEEE-PEE-CENT. CEETIFICATES.
Acts of March 2, 1867 (14 Statutes, 558), and July 25, 1868 (15 Statutes, 183).
FIVE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF I88I.

Indefinite..

On demand ... 3 p e r c e n t . . . P a r .

The act of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from timet© time
in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of, at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of
bonds of the United States described in the act of July 14,1870 (16
Statutes, 272), to the extent necessarv for the redemption of fractional currency in silver coins of the denominations of ten, twentyfive, and fiftv cents of standard value.
The act of March 3, 1875 (18 Statutes, 466), directs the Secretary of
the Treasury to issue bonds of the character and description set out
in the act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes, 272), to James B. Eads, or his
legal representatives, in payment at par of the warrants of the Secretary of War for the construction of jetties and auxiliary works to
maintain a wide and deep channel between the South Pass of the
Mississippi Eiver and the Gulf of Mexico, unless Congress shall
have previously provided for the paynient of the same by the necessary appropriation of money.




75,000,000.00

>d

a
w
o
td

•Including re-issues.

•

O

X
o

T A B L E A—STATEMENT O F T H E OUTSTANDING P R I N C I P A L O F T H E P U B L I C D E B T , ETC.—Continued.
Length of When redeem- Eate of in- atPrice
which Amount author- Amount issued. Amount outstanding.
loau.
, able.
ized.
terest.
sold.
The act of July 14,1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of 1^10 y e a r s . . .
$200,000,000 at 5 per centum, principal and interest payable in coin
of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States
Government, after ten years; these bonds to be exempt frora the
payment of all taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from
taxation in any form by or under State, municipal, or local authority.
Bonds and coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States.
This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the
United States. Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the
proceeds to be applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20's, or to
be exchanged for said 5-20's, par for par. Payment of these bondc,
when due, to be made in order of dates and numbers beginning with
each class last dated and-numbered. Interest to cease at the end
of three months from notice of intention to redeem. The act of Janr
uary 20, 1871 (16 Statutes, 399), increases the amount of 5 per cents
to $500,000,000, provided the total amount of bonds issued shall not
exceed the amount originally authorized, and authorizes the interest
on any of these, bonds to be paid quarterly.
The act of December 17,1873 (18 Statutes, 1), authorized the issue of an
equal amount of bonds of the loan of 1858, which the holders thereof
may, on or before February 1, 1874, elect to exchange for the bonds
of this loan,
FOUE-AND-ONE-HALF-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1891. (EEFUNDING.)
The act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of 15 years, ooo
• $300,000,000 at 4§ per centum, payable in coin of the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States Government, after
fifteen years; these-bonds to be exempt from the payment of all
taxes oi* duties of the United States, as weU as from taxation in any
form by or nnder State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and
coupons payable at the Treasury of the United States. This act not
to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the United States.
Bonds to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the proceeds to be
applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20's or to be exchanged
for said 5-20's, par for par. Payment of these bonds, when due, to
be made in order of dates and numbers, )eginning with each class
last dated and numbered. Interest to "ycase at the end of three
months from notice of intention to redeem.
FOUE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1907.

5 per cent..

Par.

$517,994,150.00

$45,150.00

O

ow
O

$1,500,000,000.00

O
Sept, 1,1891... 4^ per cent.. P a r .

185,000,000.00 U, 015,750.00

(EEFUNDING.)

The act of J u l y 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272), authorizes the issue of
$1,000,OOOjOOO at 4 per centum, payable in coin of the present standard




May 1,1881 .

30yearso.oo, July 1,1907

4 per cent..

Par to
me-half

710, 313, 600,00 571, 693, 500.00

val ne, at the pleasure of the United States Government, after thirty
years : these bonds to be exempt from the payment of all taxes or
duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any form by
or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and coupons
payable at the Treasury of the United States. This act not to authorize an increase of the bonded debt of the United States, Bonds
to be sold at not less than par in coin, and the proceeds to be applied
to the redemption of outstanding 5-20's, or to be exchanged for said
5 20's, par for par. Payment of these bonds, when due,, to be made
in order of dates'and numbers, beginning with each class last dated
and numbered. Interest to cease at the end of three months frora
notice of intention to redeem. See Eefunding Certificates, page 10,
FOUE-AND-ONE-HALF-PER-CENT. LOAN OP 1891. (EESUMPTION )
The act of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes theSecretary
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,
at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bondd of the
United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes, 272),
for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in coiu,
at the office of the assistant treasurer of the United States in New
York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.

per cent.]
p r e m i<
um.

©

a
H
H

CO

15 y e a r s . , . .




4^ per cent.

P a r t o Indefinite.
one and
one-half
per cent,
premium.

65,000,000.00] 65,000,000.00

Q

FOUE-PEE-CENT. LOAN OF 1907. (EESUMPTION.)
The act of January 14, 1875 (18 Statutes, 296), authorizes the Secretary 30 years.
of the Treasury to use any surplus revenues from time to time in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and to issue, sell, dispose of,
at not less than par, in coin, either of the description of bonds of
the United States described in the act of July 14, 1870 (16 Statutes,
272), for the purpose of redeeming, on and after January 1, 1879, in
coin, at the othce of the assistant treasurer of the United States in
New York, the outstanding United States legal-tender notes when
presented in sums of not less than fifty dollars.
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT.
The act of J u n e 8, 1872 (17 Statutes, 336), authorizes the deposit of
United States notes without interest by banking associations in sums
not less than $10,000, and the issue of certificates therefor in denominations of not less than $5,000; which certificates shall be payable
on demand in United Sta es notes at the place where the deposits
were made. I t provides that the notes so deposited-in the Treasury
shall not be counted as a part of the legal reserve, but that the certificates issued therefor raay be held and counted by the national
banks as part of their legal reserve, and raay be accepted in the
settlement of clearing-house balances, at the place where the deposits
therefor were made, and that the United States notes for which
such certificates were issued, or other United States notes of like
amount, shall be held as special deposits in the Treasury, and used
' only for t h e redemption ot such ceirtificates.

Sept. 1,1891:

>
>
July 1,1907... 4 per cent... P a r ,

Indefinite... On demand... None -

Indefinite.,

30,500,000. 00 80,500,000.00

o

Par.

No limit.

64, 780,000.00 12,280, 000. 00

a
r

to

X

•

X

T A B L E A.—STATEMENT O F THE OUTSTANDING P R I N C I P A L O F T H E P U B L I C D E B T , ETC—Continued.

a
Length of
loan.

Price
When redeem- Eates of inat which
able.
terest.
sold.

Amount'authorized.

On demand — None .

No limit.

Amount issued.

Amount outstanding.

SILVEE CEETIFICATES.
The act of February 28,1878 (20 Statutes, 26, sec. 3), provides that any
holder of the coin authorized by this act may deposit the same with
the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer of the United States in
sums not less than ten dollars and reeeive therefor certificates of
not less than ten dollars each, corresponding with the denominations
of th© United States notes. The coin deposited for or representing
the certificates shall be retained in the Treasury for the payment of
the same on demand. Said certificates shall be receivable for customs,
taxes, and all public dues, and, when so received, may b© re-issued.

Indefinite...

Par.

$301,539, 751. 00

*^
o
O
H

w

EEFUNDING CEETIFICATES.

00

The act of February 26, 1879 (20 Statutes, 321), authorizes the Secre- Indefinite..
tary of the Treasury to issue, in exchange for lawful money of the
United Slates, certificates of deposit, of the denomination of ten
dollars, bearing interest at the rate of four per centum per annum,
and convertible at anytime, with accrued interest, into the four-perceatum bonds described in the refunding act; the money so received
to b© applied only to th© payment of th© bonds bearing interest at a
rate not less than five per centum, in the mode prescribed by said act.

Convertible in- 4 per cent... P a r .
to 4 per cent,
bonds.

No limit.

$40. 012, 750. 00

103, 860. 00

H
t>

O

FUNDED LOAN OF 1881, CONTINUED A T T H E E E AND ONEH A L F F E E CEISIT.
These bonds were issued in exchange for five-per-cent. bonds of the
funded loan of 1881, by mutual agreement between the Secretary of
tho Treasury and the holders, and wer© made redeemable at the
pleasure of th© Government.
'

Q

^^
Indefinite..

At pleasure of 3^ per cent.
the Government.

Par.

29,450.00

H

w
H

LOAN OF J U L Y 12, 1882.
These bonds wer© issued in exchange for th© five and six per cent,
bonds which had been previously continued at three ana one-half
per cent., by mutual agreement between the Secretary of the Treasury and the holders, and were made redeemable at the pleasure of
the Government.




Indefinite.

At pleasure of 3 per cent..
the Government.

Par.

181, 000. 00

1, 552,140, 204. 73
*Exclusive of $64,623,512 bonds issued to Pacific railroads.

t>
oo
c:

OUTSTANDING PRINCIPAL O F . T H E PUBLIC DEBT.

XCV

TABLE B.—STATEMENT O F OUTSTANDING P R I N C I P A L O F T H E P U B L I C D E B T OF T H E
U N I T E D STATES ON T H E 1ST OF JANUARY OF EACH YEAR FROXM 1791 TO 1H48, I N CLUSIVE, AND ON T H E 1ST OF J U L Y O F BACH YEAR FROM 1843 TO 1890, INCLUSIVE.

Year.
Jan. 1, 1791.«,,
1792..o
1793...,
1794...
1795...,
1796...,
1797...,
1798...:
1799.. = ,
1800...
1801...
•' 1802...
'
1803...
, 1804...,
1805.-..
1806...
I8u7...
1808...
1809...
1810...
1811...
1812...
1813...
1814...
1815...
1816...,
1817...
1818...,
1819...
1820...,
1821...
1822...,
'
1823...,
1824...
1825...,
1826...,
1827...
1828...
1829...
1830...,
1831...
1832...
1833...
.' 1834...
1835 -.
1836...
1837...
1838,..,
1839...
1840...,

Amount.

Year.

$75, 463, 476.53 Jan. 1, 1841..
1842.
77, 227, 924.66
1843.
80, 358, 634.04
78, 427, 404.77 July 1, 1843.
1844.
747, 587.39
1845.
762, 172.07
1846.
82, 064, 479. 33
1847.
79, 228, 529.12
1848.
78, 408, 669.77
1849.
82, 976, 294.35
1850.
83, 038, 050.80
1851.
80, 712, 632.25
1852.
77, 054, 686.30
1853
86, 427, 120.88
1854.
82, 312, 150.50
1855.
75, 723, 270.66
1856.
' 69, 218, 398.64
1857.
65, 196, 317:97
1858.
57, 023, 192.09
1859.
53, 173, 217.52
18t)0.
48, 005, 587.76
1861.
45, 209, 737. 90
1862.
55, 962, 827. 57
. 1863:
81, 487, 846. 24
1864.
99, 833, 660.15
- • 1865
127, 334, 933. 74
1866.
123, 491, 965.16
1867.
103, 466, 633. 83
1868.
95, 529, 648.28
1869.
91, 015, 566.15
1870.
987, 427. 66
1871.
546, 676. 98
1872.
875, 877.28
1873.
269, 777. 77
1874.
788, 432.71
1875
054, 059. 99
1876.
987, 357.20
1877.
475, 043.87
1878.
421,
413.67
1879.
565,
1880.
123, 406.50
191. 68
18SI.
322,
1882.
001, 235.18
698.83
1883.
760,
1884.
37, 082.08
1885.
37, 733.05
1886.
336, 513.05
1887.
308, 957.83
1888.
434, 124. 07
1889.
573, 221.14
1890.

Amount,
$5,250,875.54
13, 594,
480. 73
20, 601,
226. 28
32, 742,
922. O l
f
652.50
23, 461,
303.01
15, 925,
202. 97
15, 550,
534,77 '
38. 826,
47,044,862.23
63,061, 858.69
63,452,773.55
68,304,796. 02
66,199,341.71
117. 70
59, 803,
42, 242.222.42
956. 56
35, 586,
31,972,537. 90
831.85
28, 699,
881. 03
44, 911,
58.496.837. 88
287. 88
64, 842,
873.72
90, 580,
524,176,412.13
119,772, 138.63
815, 784,
370.57
680, 647,
869.74
173.69
778, 236,
678,126,103.87
611,687,851.19
588, 452,
213. 94
480, 672,
427.81
353,211,332. 32
253,251,328. 78
234,482,993.20
468.43
251, 690,
531.95
232, 284,
180,395,067.15
392.10
205, 301,
892.53
256, 205,
482.04
349, 567,
120,415,370.63
569. 58
069, 013,
994.03
918, 312,
884,171,728. 07
830, 528,
923. 57
876, 424,
275.14
756,445,205.78
591.63
688, 229,
70.5,992,320.58
340i 23
640, 673,
585, 821 048. 73

* In the amount here stated as the outstanding principal of the public debt are included the certificates of deposit outstanding on the 30th of June, issued under act of June 8, 1872, for which a like
amount in United States notes was on special deposit in the Treasury for their redemption, and
added to the cash balance in the Treasury. These certificates, as a matter of accounts, are treated as
a part of the public debt, but being offset by notes held on deposit for their redemption should properly be deducted from the principal of the public debt in making comparison with former years.
t'Exclusive of gold, silver, and currency certificatos held in th© Treasury'® ©ash, and including
064,623,512 bonds issued to the several Pacific railroads.
*




T A B L E C — A N A L Y S I S O F / T H E P R I N C I P A L OF T H E P U B L I C D E B T O F T H E U N I T E D STATES FROM J U L Y 1, 1856, TO J U L Y 1, 1890,

Year.
1856
1857
1858
'...
1859
I860
1861
1862 ' " . . „ ° i r ° .
1863
1864
1865
1865 August 31
1806
1867
1868
. 1869
„
.-.,.. „.
1870 ... . ,
1871
1872 ...... .
1873
1874
1875
:
1876
,
.
1877
1878
3879
1880
1881
„
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890




3 per cents.

4 per cents.

3^ per cents.

c

$64, 000, 000. 00
66,125, 000. .00
59,550, 000. 00
45, 885, 000. 00
24, 665, UOO. 00
14, 000, 000. 00
14, 000, 000. 00
14, 000, UOO. 00
14, 000, 000. UO
14,000,000.00
14, OUO, 000. 00
14,000,000.00
14, OUO, 000. 00
14, OUO, 000. 00
14, 000, 000. 00 $460, 461, 050.00
318, 204, 350. 00
32, 082. 600. 00
288, 612,150. 00
208,190, 500. 00
158, 046, 600. 00
33,716, 500.00
14, 000, 000.00
14, 000, 000.00
14, 000, 000. 00
'•

$57,926,116.57
105, 629, 385. 30
77, 547, 696. 07
90,496, 930. 74
618,127. 98
121, 341, 879.62
' 17,737,025.68
801,361.23
678, 000.00
678,000.00
678, OUO. 00
678, 000.00
678, 000. 00
98, 850, 000. 00
741,522,000.00
739, 347, 800. 00
739,347,800.00
739, 349, 350.00
737, 942, 200. 00
737, 951, 700. 00
737, 960,450. 00
737, 967, 500. 00
737, 975, 850. 00
714, 315, 4.50.00
676,214,990.00
602, 297,860. 00

4^ per cents.

5 per cents.

$3, 632,000. 00
3. 489, OUO. 00
•23, 588, OUO. 00
37,127, 800.00
43, 476. 300. 00
33,022,200.00
- 30,488,000.00
30,483,-000.00
300, 213,480. 00
245,709,420.63
269,175, 727. 65
201,982,665.01
108, 533, 435. 01
221, 586,185.01
221, 588, 80U. 00
221,588, 300. 00
274,236,450.00
414, 567,300. 00
414, 567, 300.00
510, 628, 050. 00
607,132, 750. 00
711,685,800.00
703, 266,650. 00
$140,000,000.00
240, 000, 000. 00 703, 266,'650.00
250, 000, 000. 00 508, 440, 350. 00
250, 000, 000. 00 484, 864, 900. 00
250, 000, 000.00
439, 841, 350. 00
250, 000, OUO. 00
250,000, 000. 00
250, 000,000. 00
.250, 000,000.00
„
250, 000,000. 00
250,000,000.00
222, 207, 050. 00
139, 639, 000. 00
109, 015, 750. 00

6 per cents.

1^^ per cents.

$28,130, 761. 77
24, 971, 958.93
21,162,838.11
' 21,162,988.11
21,164,588.11
- 57, 358, 673. 95
154, 313, 225. 01 $122,582,485.34
431,444,813.83
189, 974, 485. 34
842, 882, 652. 09 189, 286, 935. 34
1,213,495,169.90
671, 610, 397. 02
1, 281, 736, 439. 33 830, UOO, 000. 00
1,195,546,041.02
813, 460, 621.95
1, 543,452, 080.02 488, 344, 846. 95
1, 878, 303, 984. 50
37, 397,196. 95
1,874,347,-222.39
1,7.65,317,422.39
1, 613, 897, 300. 00
1, 374, 883, 800. 00
1,281,238,650.00
1, 213, 624, 700. 00
1,100, 865, 550. 00
.
984, 999. 650. 00
854, 621, 850. 00
738, 619, 000. 00
283, 681, 350. 00
235, 780,400. 00
196, 878, 600. 00

X
o

Total interest,
bearingdebt.
$31, 762, 76L 77
28 460 958 93
44, 700, 888. II
58 ' ^ 0 788.11
-9
64, 640, 838.11
90, 380, 873. 95
365, 304, 826. 92
707, 531, 634.47
1, 359, 930, 763. 50
2, 221, 311 918. 29
2, 381, 530, 294. 96
2,332,331,207.60
2, 248,067, 387. 66
2, 202, 088, 727. 69
2,162,060, 522. 39
2, 046,455, 722. 39
1, 934, 696, 750. 00
1, 814, 794,100. 00
1, 710, 483, 950. 00
1, 738,930, 750.00
1,722,676,300.00
1, 710, 685, 450.00
1, 711, 888 500. 00
1, 794, 735, 650.00
1- 797, 643, 700.00
,
1, 723, 993,100.00
1.639,567, 750.00
1,463, 810, 400. 00
1, 338, 229,150. 00
1, 226, 563, 850. 00
1,196,150, 950. 00
1,146,014,100.00
1,021, 692, 350. 00
950 522 500 00"
, 829,853,990.00
725,313,110.00

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T A B L E C . — A N A L Y S I S O F T H E P R I N C I P A L O F T H E P U B L I C D E B T O F T H E U N I T E D STATES, ETC.—Coniiruod.

Year.
" 1856—JulylO 1857
^ 1858
a859
1860....O.....

, 1861....o
< 1862
1864.

Debt on which in Debt bearing no
interest.
terest has ceased,
$209,, 776.13
238, 872. 92
211,,042.92
206, 099.77
20 J, 449.77
199, 999.77
280, 195.21
473, 048.16'
416, 335. 86
245, 771.20
508, 020.09
935, 092. 05
840, 615. 01
340.89
, 197,
181. 00
» 260.
,
641.00
1 708,
,
902. 26
, 948,
926, 797.26
710.26
, 929,
216, 590.26
820. 26
, 425,
902, 420.26
648, 860. 26
560.26
' 594,
,
•,015, 630. 26
455. 26
, 021,
865.26
• 723,
805. 26
I 260,
,
415.26
, 831,
205. 26
I, 656,
100, 995. 26
445. 26
» 704,
,
115, 165.26
095.26
1,496,
911, 485,26
815, 805.26

$158, 591, 390. 00
511,767, 456.00
455, 437, 271. 21
458, 090, 180. 25
461, 616, 311. 51
439, 969, 874. 04
428, 218, 301.20
408, 401, 782. 61
421,131, 510.55
430,508, 064. 42
416, 565, 680.06
430, 530, 431. 52
472, 069, 332.94
509, 543, 128.17
498,182, 411. 69
465, 807, 196. 89
476, 764, 031.84
455, 875, 682. 27
410, 835, 741, 78
388, 800, 815.37
422, 721,954. 32
438, 244, 788. 77
538,111, 162.81
584, 308, 868.31
663, 712, 927.88
619, 344, 468.52
629, 795, 077. 37
739, 84.0,389. 32
787,287, 446.97
825, Oil,'289.47

Outstanding prin- Cashin the Treas Total debt, less cash Annual interest
charge.
in Treasury.
ury July 1.
cipal.
$31, 972,537,90
28, 699, 831. 85
44, 911, 88L03
58, 496, 837. 88
64, 842, 287. 88
90, 580, 873. 72
524, 176, 412.13
1.119,772,138. 63
1, 815,784, 370. 57
2, 680, 647, 869.74
2, 844, 649, 626.56
2, 773, 236,173. 69
2, 678, 126,103.87
2,811, 687,851.19
2, 588, 452, 213. 94
2, 480, 672, 427. 81
2, 353, 211, 332. 32
2, 253, 251, 328. 78
2, 234,482, 993. 20
2, 251, 690, 468.43
2, 232, 284, 531.95
2.180, 395, 067.15
2, 205,301, 392.10
2, 256, 205, 892. 53
2, 245, 495, 072.04
2.120,415, 370.63
2, 069,013, 569. 58
1, 918,312,994.03
I, 884,171, 728.07
628, 923. 57
1, 830,
1, 863,964, 873.14
063, 013. 78
1, 775,
602, 592. 63
1, 657,
858, 984.58
1, 692,
1, 610,052,922.23
140, 204. 73
1, 552,

$21, 006, 584.89
18,701,210. 09
7, Oil,689. 31
5, 091,603. 69
4, 877,885. 87
2, 862, 212. 92
18, 863, 659.96
8,421, 401. 22
106, 332, 093.53
5, 832. 012.98
88,218, 055.13
137,200, 009. 85
169, 974, 892.18
130, 834,437. 96
155, 680, 340. 85
149, 502, 471. 60
106, 217,263. 65
103, 470, 798.43
129, 020, 932. 45
147, 541, 314. 74
142, 243, 361. 82
119,469, 626. 70
186, 025, 960. 73
256, 823, 612. 08
249, 080, 167. 01
201, 088, 622.88
249, 363, 415. 35
243 289, 519.78
345, 389, 902. 92
391, 985, 928.18
488, 612,429. 23
492, 917, 173.34
482,433, 917. 21
629. 854, 089.85
643,113, 172. 01
661, 355, 834.20

$10, 965,953.01
9, 998, 62L 76
900,191. 72
. -37,
53, 405, 234.19
69, 964, 402.01
87, 718, 660.80
505. 312, 752.17
1,111, 350, 737.41
1. 709,452, 277. 04
2, 674, 835,856.76
2, 756,431, 571. 43
2, 686,036,163. 84
2, 508, 151,211.69
2, 480, 853, 413. 23
2, 432, 771,873. 09
2, 331, 169, 956. 21'
.994, 068. 67
2, 246,
2,149, 780, 530. 35
2,105, 462, 060. 75
2,104, 149,153. 69
2, 090, 041,170.13
2, 060. 925,340. 45
2, 019, 275,431.37
382, 280.45
1, 999,
1,996, 414, 905. 03
1,919, 320. 747.75
1, 819,650,154.23
1, 675, 023,474.25
1, 538, 781, 825.15
. 1,438,542, 995. 39
1,375, 352, 443.91
1, 282,145,840.44
1,175, 168,675.42
1, 068,004,894.73
975, 939, 750. 22
890, 784,370.53

$1, 869, 445.70
1,672, 767. 53
2, 446,670. 28
3,126, 106. 28
3, 443, 687. 29
5, 092,630.43
22, 048, 509. 59
41, 854, 148. 01
78, 853, 4h7. 24
137, 742,617.43 .
150, 977,697. 87
146,068, ]96.29
138, 892, 451.39
128,459, 598.14
125, 523, 998. 34
118, 784, 960. 34
111, 949, 330.50
103, 988, 463.00
98, 049, 804. 00
98, 796, 004. 50
96, 855, 690. 50
95,104, 269. 00
93,160, 643. 50
94, 654, 472.50
83, 773, 778. 50
79, 633, 981. 00
75, 018, 695.50.
57, 360, 110. 75
51, 436, 709.50
47, 926, 432. 50
47, 014, 133. 00
45, 510, 098. 00
41, 780, 529. 00
38. 991, 935. 25
33, 752, 3)4.60
29, 417, 603.15

1805.
1865- -August 31 .
1866- -July 1
1867.
1868.
1869.
1870.
1871.
1872.
1873.
1874.
3875.
1876.
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.
1885.
3886.
1887.
1888
1889.
1890.
N'OTE 1.—The annu.il interest charge is computed upon the amount of outstanding principal at the close of the fiscal year, and is exclusive of interest charge on Pacitic
railway bonds.
•
NOTE 2.—The figures for July 1,1879, were made up, assuming pending funding operations to have been completed.
NOTE 3.—The teinporary loan per act of July 11,1862, is included in the 4 per cents from 1862 to 1868, inclusive, with^the exception of the amount outstanding for August
31,1865, this being the dat© at which the public debt reached its highest point. This loan bore interest from 4 per ceut. to 6 per cent., and was redeemable on ten days* notice
after thirty days; but being constantly changing, it has been considered more equitable to include the whole amount outstanding as bearing 4 per cent, interest on an average
for the year.
NOTE 4.—In the recent monthly statements of th© public debt the interest accrued has been added to the principal, making the net debt larger in that amount than the
amount herein stated for each year.




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XCVIII

REPORT O F T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

T A B L E D . ^ S T A T E M E N T OP T H E I S S U E AND R E D E M P T I O N OF LOANS AND TREASURY
NOTES ( B Y WARRANTS) F O R T H E FISCAL YEAR ENDED J U N E 30,1890.

Issues.
Loan of July and Aug. 1861, acts of
July 17 and Aug. 5,1861
Old demand notes, acts J u l y 17 and
Aug. 5, 1861, and Feb. 12,1862 . . .
Pive-twenties of 1862, act of Feb. 25,
1862
Five-twenties of 1864, actof J u n e 30,
1864
Five-twenties of 1865, act of Mar. 3,
1865
Legal-tender notes, acts of Feb. 25
and J u l y 11,1862, Jan. 7, and Mar.
3,1863
:
Gold certificates, acts of Mar. 3,1863,
and July 12,1882..
One-year notes of 1863, act of Mar. 3.
1863.
Two-year notes of 1863, act of Mar.
3,1863..^
Compound interest notes, acts of
Mar. 3,1863, and J u n e 30,1864
Loan of 1863, acts of Mar. 3,1863, and
June 30,1864
Ten-forties of 1864, actof Mar. 3,1864.
Seven-thirties of 1864 and 1865, acts
of J u n e 30,1864, and Mar. 3,1865...
Consols of 1865, act of Mar. 3,1865...
Consols of 1867, act of Mar. 3.1865 . . .
Funded loan of 1881, acts of July 14,
1870, and Jan. 20, 1871, and Jan. 14,
1875
Certificates of deposit, act of J u n e
8,1872
".--•
Silver certificates, act of .Feb. 28,1878.
Refunding certificates, act of Feb.
26 1879 . . . . . . .
*
Loan of 1882° acVof Juiy"i2,1882! ^'.'.'.'.
Fractional currency, acts of July 17,
1862, Mar. 3,1863, and June 30,1864.
Funded loan of 1891, acts J u l y 14,
1870, Jan. 24,1871, and Jan. 14,1875..
Funded loan of 1907, acts J u l y 14,
1870, Jan. 20,1871, and Jan^ 14,1875..
Total.
Excess of issues
Excess of redemptions.
Net excess of redemptions charged
in receipts and expenditures




Redemptions.

Excess of
issues.

7,400.00

Excess of
redemptions.

7, 400.00

410. 00

410.00

1,'850.00

1, 850.00

50.00

50.00

3, 200.00

3, 200.00

78,132,000. 00

78,132, 000.00

49.070, 000.00

45, 555, 573.00

3,514,427.00

490.00

490.00

100.00

100. 00

3,290. 00

3, 290.00

4, 000.00
3, 000. 00

4, 000.00
3, 000. 00

300. 00
2, 750. 00
II, 450. 00

300. 00
2, 750. 00
11, 450.00

28, 285, 000. 00
55, 569, 995.00

4, 695, 000.00

10, OOC. 00
23, 590, 000. 00
/ 94,480, 000.00

38, 910, 005. 00

15, 780.00
47, 800. 00

15, 780. 00
47,800.00
5,179.50

5,179. 50

30,623,250.00

30, 623, 250. 0 0
21, 650. 00
245, 293, 650.00

73, 923, 500. 00
312, 206,367. 50

73,901,850.00.
42,424,432.00

109,337,149.50
42,424,432.00
109,337,149.50
66,912,717.50

TABLE

E . - -STATEMENT SHOWING T H E P U R C H A S E AND R E D E M P T I O N OF B O N D S ON ACCOUNT O F T H E S I N K I N G - F U N D DURING E A C H F I S C A L Y E A R
F R O M I T S I N S T I T U T I O N I N M A Y , 1 8 6 9 , TO A N D I N C L U D I N G J U N E 3 0 , 1 8 9 0 .

Principal redeemed.

Y e a r ended—

P r e m i u m paid.

N e t cost in
eurrency.

N e t c o s t estim a t e d in gold.

I n t e r e s t du©
a t close of
fiscal y e a r .

Accrued interest paid in
coin.

B a l a n c e of interest due at
close of fiscal
year.

o

.. J U N E 30, 1869.
$1, 874, 822.84
81,725.00
1, 212, 946. 45
539, 969.00
534, 736. 80
5,467, 208. 08
354, 442.50

$1, 349, 970.02
57, 552.82
873,205. 61
387, 566. 28
387, 903. 26
3, 948, 586. I I
256:653.20

$16, 210.00
700. 00
10, 500.00
4, 650. 00
13,830.00
141,540.00
9,150. 00

$7, 384.60
218.63
1, 470.42
2, 683. 54
429. 04
116,032.35
8,173.98

$8,825.40
481. 37
9, 039. 58
1, 966.46
13, 400.96
25,507.65
976.02

1,374, 850. 67

10,065,850.67

7, 261,437.30

196, 590.00

136, 392.56

1,197.44

3, 542, 050. 00
85, 000.00
971, 400. 00
790, 250. 00
532,150.00
882, 550. 00
348, 500. 00

493,479.42
15,742.87
506,189. 91
361,735. 43
1,454, 778.37
861,763.73
53,363.95

4.035,
100,
4,477,
3,151,
12, 986,
6, 744,
401,

529.42
742.87
589. 91
985.43
928. 37
313. 73
863. 95

3, 263, 099.51
75, 658. 54
3, 647, 628.29
2, 606, 636.20
10, 080, 736. 97
5,309, 800. 90
308, 573.16

160, 919. 50
5, 350.00
165, 834.00
105, 257.50
495, 421.50
302,734.50
19,380.00

45,994.49
1,080.99
49, 946.00
37,113. 53
145, 518.29
66, 111. 51
5, 238. 73

,114,925.01
4,269.01
115, 888.00
68,143. 97
349, 903. 21
236,622. 99
14,141. 27

28,151, 900. 00

Total

$253, 822.84
- 11, 725. 00
161, 946.45
' 74,969.00
73, 736. 80
749, 208. 08
. 49,442.50

3,
2,
11,
5,

.-

$1,621,000.00
70, 000. 00
1-, 051, 000. 00
465, 000.00
461, 000.00
4,718,000.00
805, 000.00
8, 691, 000. 00

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of M a r c h , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
Consols, 1865
oo
Consols, 1867....CO...-.
Consols, 1 8 6 8 . . .

3,7^7, 053. 68

31, 898, 953. 68

25, 893,143. 57

1,254,897.00

351, 003. 54

>
on

903,893.46

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J U N E 30, 1870.
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868. C
O
Total

1862
M a r c h , 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

.

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J U N E 30, 1871.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
C o n s o l s , 1868

of
of
of
of

2, 792, 950.00
29, 500.00
3, 967, 350.00
6, 768, 600.00
10, 222, 200. 00
6,103, 050.00
52, 600. 00

1862
-°.
M a r c h , 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865
..-.

Total........




...oc

oo.

227,607.56
2, 277. 20
340, 509. 63
574, 923. 00
850, 949.79
541, 559.41
4, 784. 61

3,020,557.56
31, 777. 20
4, 307, 879. 63
7, 343, 523. 00
11,073,149.79
6, 644, 609.41
57,384.61

2,680,209.05
28,590.88
3, 847.182.42
6, 525, 231. 42
9,762,387.78
5, 800, 618. 37
49, 797.81

145, 975.00
1, 240.00
201, 375. 00
331, 933.50
522,117.00
351, 528.00
3,096.00

36,657.80
388.35
51, 703.46
92,259.68
109, 455.28
76, 745. 93
572.13

29. 936, 250.00

2, 542,631. 20

.32, 478, 881. 20

28, 694, 017. 73

1,557,264.50

367,782. 53

109, 317. 20 .
851. 65
149, 671.54
239, 67S. 92
412, 661. 72
274,782.07
2, 512.87
1,189,-481. 97

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T A B L E E . — S T A T E M E N T SHOWING T H E P U R C H A S E AND R E D E M P T I O N O F B O N D S O N ACCOUNT O F T H E S I N K I N G - F U N D , ETC.—Continued.

Principal redeemed.

. Y e a r ended—

J U N E 30, 1872.
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
,
F i v e - 1 w e n t i e s of M a r c h , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
Consols,-1865
Consols, 1 8 6 7 . . . .
„.
Consols, 1 8 6 8 . . 0 . . . . 0
..o........

N e t cost in
currency.

N e t cost estim a t e d in gold.

I n t e r e s t due" A c c r u e d interest paid in
a t close of
fiscal yeai*.
coin.

B a l a n c e of i n terest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

J U N E 30, 1873.

$6,417,850.00
127,100. 00
3, 604,650.00
3, 635^ 200. 00
11,788,900.00
6, 958, 900. 00
85, 850.00

$764,055. 21
14, 959.03
438, 656.16
436,838. 70
1,436,989.46
833,600.15
951.63

18], 905.21
142, 059. 03
043,306.16
072, 038.70
225, 889.46
792, 500.15
95, 801. 03

$6,345, 391.98
126,123. 46
3, 573, 223. 63
3, 594,-747. 85
11, 660, 785. 89
6, 863,777. 39
84,595.02

$427,849,00
8, 894. 00
246, 001. 50
246, 562.00
707, 334.00
417,534.00
5,151.00

$75,179.43
1,338. 70
57, 449. 80
. ' 37,817. 37
149, 248. 21
108, 487. 92
1, 386. 95

$352, 669.57
7,555.30
188, 55L 70
208, 744.63
558, 085.79
309, 046.08
3,764,05

32, 618,450.00

Total.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols. 1868

P r e m i u m paid.

3, 935, 050. 34 36,553,500.34

32, 248,645. 22

2, 059, 325. 50

430, 908. 38

1, 628,417.12

=.
...^

.-

Total.
J U N E 30,
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862. .:
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
C o n s o l s , 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868 . . . . . oo

7,137,100. 00
50, 000. 00
3,741,150.00
1, 959, 850.00
10, 7G8, 250.00
4,402,100.00
619,550.00

925, 783. 87
7, 372. 50
480, 684. 37
250, 635. 93
1, 371,187.17
553, 610. 89
81, 983. 44

28, 678, qoo. 00

of 1862
of M a r c h , 1864
of J u n e ' , 1864
of 1865

1,421,700.00
2, 020, 550. 00
1, 247, 250. 00
3, 393, 650. 00
4,051,000.00
802, 300.00
12, 936, 450. 00

Total.

7,089,542.58
49, 780.91
3, 715, 211. 22
1, 943,488. 93
10,668,617. 09
4, 373, 781.76
617,140. 34

431,450.50
3, 500, 00
223, 270. 50
120, 266. 50
646, 095. 00
264,126. 00
37,173. 00

101, 960. 57
813. 70
42, 216.46
23, 744. 47
145,069. 34
69, 632.51
8,948.40

329, 489. 93
2, 686. 30
181,054.04
96, 522. 03
501, 022. 66
194, 493.49
28, 224. 60

3, 67.1, 258.17 32,349,258.17

28,457,562.83

1,725,881.50

12, 385.45

1.582,919.79
2, 239, 007. 39
1, 382, 827. 95
3, 754, 614. 62
4, 483, 348.18
888, 805. 62

1,415, 391.05
2, 012, 051. 32
1, 241, 571.69
3, 374, 934. 42
4, 029, 975.86
798,926.40

99,519.00
141,438. 50
87, 307. 50
203, 619. 00
243,060. 00
48,138. 00

31,743.95
48.013. 46
29, 348.19
46,489. 33
55, 976. 97
11.014. 38

67, 775. 05
93, 425. 04
57, 959. 31
157,129. 67
187, 083. 03
37, 123.62

14, 331, 523. 55

12, 872,850.74

823, 082. 00

222, 586.28

541, 973. 50

353,06L 56

188,911.94

161, 219. 79
218,457.39
135, 577. 95
360, 964. 62
432, 348.18
86, 505. 62
1, 395, 073. 55




fe

-H .

>> .

O
fe

W'
fe

Ul

d

J U N E 30, 1876.

Total.,

m.

fe
'm
fe
o

fe
-25.170, 400. 00

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865

I

©

600, 495. 72

25,170, 400. 00

O

1, 333, 496. 05

062,883.87
57, 372. 50
221,834.37
210,485. 93
139,437.17
955, 710. 89
701,533.44

J U N E 30, 1875.
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862.

O

5, 785, 200, 00
10. 86'), 600.00
i; 789, 250. 00

5, 785, 200. 00
10, 869, 600. 00
1, 789, 250.00

404, 964. 00
760, 872. 00
125, 247. 50

54, 745. 72
171, 966. 33
30,805. 86

350,218.28
588,905.67
94, 441. 64

18,444,050. 00

18,444,050.00

1, 291, 083. 50

257,517.91

1, 033, 565. 59

J U N E 30, 1877,
Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865.
oo...
Consols, 1867
«ooo.o..
'.,.....
Total.....ooooo......

."

_

J U N E 30, 1878.
Five-twenties of 1862
.',..
Five-twenties of June, 1864
J'ive-twen ties of 1865
Consols, 1865
ooo..^.
Consols, 1867....oooooooo
Consols, 1868.ooo.. o,.„o...oo
Total

81, 200. 00
178, 900. 00
180, 350. 00
6, 050; 00
1, 000, 00

.ooo....

81, 200. 00
178, 900. 00
180, 350. 00
6,050.00
% OGO. 00

'

447, 500. 00

447,500.00

'

17, 900. 00
15, 900. 00
2, 350. 00
23,600.00
5, 700. 00
8, 500. 00
73, 950. 00

4,352. 25
9, 943. 50
9, 519. 00
181. 50
30.00
24, 026.25

17, 900. 00
15, 900. 00
2, 350.00
23, 600.00
5, 700. 00'
8,500.00

_
*

73,950.00

18,249.73

5,776. 52

192. 65
78. 41
. 40.92
273. 35
134. 76
89. 83

773. 35
755. 59
88.08
1,142.65
'207. 24
420.17

4,197.00

809. 92

3,387.08

966.00
834.00
129. 00
1,416. 00
342.00
510. 00
'

S, 170. 58
8,619.90
6, 377.92
72.53
8.80

1,181. 67
1,323.60
3,141. 08
108. 97
21.20

p

J U N E 30, 1879,
Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of June, 1864
Five-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865 .-=...
..,
Consols, 1867 .OOOOOOOOO...........ooo..
Consols, 1868.ooooo 0.0000....0..00.
_

Total.oooooonoooo

J U N E 30, 1880,
givo-twenties of 1862
Mv©-twenties of June, 1864
Mve-twenties of 1865
...
Ten-forties of 1864
Loan of February, 1861
Loan of J u l y and August, 1 8 6 1 . . . . . . . .
Loan ofMarch, 1863
....=
Oregon war debt-.
„„
Funded loan of I88I .'...,.o
.oo....:
Fnndedloanof 1907.. CO.. oo
,.,....
^

O VouL o a a a o o a s e o a o S Q a o e s e d o o a o

aooc

J U N E 30, 1881.
Five-twenties of 1862
....o.......
Five-twenties of June, 1864 .-...oo..o = .
Five-twenties of 1865
Loan of February, 1861
.,
Loan of J u l y and August, 1861




O
fe
o

2, 650.00
3,150. 00
1,850.00
1,700. 00
9, 050. 00
100.00

2, 650. 00
3,150. 00
1, 850. 00
1, 700. 00
9, 050. 00
100.00

165.75
94. 50
85.50
102. 00
543.00
6.00

40.35
18.53
4L22
4L49
166. 62
56.00

125.40
75.97
44.28
60.51
376.38
'5.44

18, 500. 00

O

a

o
m

18,500. 00

996. 75

308. 77

687.98

100.00
100.00
• 250.00
676, 050. 00
2, 837, 000. 00
32, 064, 250. 00
12, 797,150.00
202, 550.00
23,575,450.00
1, 500, 000.00
73, 652, 900.00

3, 000. 00
50.00
100.00
7, 775, 000. 00
^ 16,712,450.00

fe
O
ffi
fe

-%\
4«;i'
74,161.95
1, 376, 085.04
549, 035.18
8, 273.02
662, 206. 97
- 125,558.26

100.00
100.00
250. 00
676, 050.00
2, 911,161. 95
33, 440, 335. 04
13,346,185.18
210, 823. 02
24, 237, 656. 97
1, 625, 558. 26

4.00
4.00
14.50
28,168.75
85,110. 00
1,165, 807.50
484, 747. 50
9, 787. 50
415,162. 70
15, 000. 00

2, 795, 320.42

76,448, 220.42

2, 203,806. 45

935,95L@0

-51, 277. 58
488, 876.11

3,000.00
50. 00
100. 00
7,826,277.58
17,201, 326.11

210. 00
3.50
7.00
462,390.00
1,002,747.00

3.33
3.51
8.65
15, 296.10
37, 569. 80
647, 658. 61
271, 568. 21
6,124. 94
284,813. 34
4, 808. 26

.67
.49
' 5.85
12,872.65
47, 540. 20
518,148.79
213,179. 29
3, 602. 56.
130, 349. 36
10,191. 74

,

31,267,854.85

80.22
. .25

L74
160,072. 88
200,043. 95

•

129.78
3.25
5.26
302, 317.12
802, 703. 05

^

W
fe "

T A B L E E . — S T A T E M E N T SHOWING T H E P U R C H A S E AND R E D E M P T I O N O F B O N D S O N ACCOUNT O F T H E S I N K I N G - F U N D , ETC.—Continued.

Principal redeemed.

Y e a r ended

P r e m i u m paid.

J U N E 30, 1 8 8 1 - C o n t i n u e d .

ITet cost i n
currency.

N e t c o s t estim a t e d i n gold.

Interest d u e Accrued intera t close of
est paid in
fiscal y e a r .
coin.

B a l a n c e of i n terest due at
close of fiscal
year.

•

$7,256, 614. 62
55, 658. 65
43, 089, 571. 82

$361,315.50
2, 584. 50
1,106,474.15

$83,330.51
551.11
263, 342.94

$277, 984. 99
2, 033. 39
843,130.-21

1,061,248.. 78

75, 432, 598. 78

2, 935,731. 65

707,423.60

55,215,850. 00
.2,637,850.00
1, 000. 00
2,224,450.00

1,368,894,-64
91,701. 75
23.33
115, 717. 53

679,493.12
25,771.80
2.78
6, 771. 83

789,401. 50
65, 929. 95
108 945 70

60, 079,150. 00

1, 576, 337. 23

612, 039. 53

964, 297. 70

100. 00
41, 300. 00
661, 750. 00
34,128,100'00
10, 019,400. 00

100. 00
41, 300. 00
661, 750. 00
34,128,150. 00
10, 019,400. 00

5.50
1, 716. 66
20, 760.25
1,171,034.37
233,862.12

14.18
138.13
5,293.40
186, 913. 66
137,402.11

44,850,700.00

44, 850, 700. 00

1,427. 378. 90

329, 761.48

200.00.
5,200. 00
422, 550. 00
566,250. 00
33, 221,450. 00
12, 553, 950.-00

200.00
5,200. 00
422, 550. 00
566,250. 00
33,221, 450. 00
12, 553. 950. 00

9.50
187, OS
14, 7i-9. 25
19, 818. 75
1, 018,176. 97
240,130.13

13.35
, 164. 24
2, 823. 94
7, 669. 86
276, 923. 93
31, 884. 61

11,
12,
741,
208

46. 769, 600. 00

46, 769, 600. 00

1, 293, 111. 68

318 879 93

974, 231. 75

fe

J U N E 30, 1882,
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
F u n d e d lonn of 1881
Total

F u n d e d l o a n of 1881, c o n t i n u e d a t 3 J p e r c e n t

..

Total

8 68
1 578 53
15, 466. 85
984 1^0 71
96, 460. 01
1,097,617.42

H

>
o

fe

w
w

J U N E 30, 1884.
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862'
Fnndfid loaiii of 1881
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3J p e r c e n t
L o a n of J u l v 12 1882




?d

K;

F n n d e d l o a n o f 1881 "
^
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t

.

i

o

fe

J U N E 30, 1883.

Xotal

w
o
w
o

2,228, 308.05

60, 079,150. 00

Total

$199,514.62
1,408. 65
320,171. 82

55,215,850. 00
2, 637,850. 00
1, 000. 00
2,224,450. 00

.•••......

$7,057,100. 00
54, 250. 00
42,769,400.00
74, 371, 350. 00

TJOJITI of M a r c h 1863
Oregon w a r debt
Fnndftd loan of 1881

o.

.-

——
-

.

3. 85
22 84
965. 31
748. 89
253. 04
245 52

Ul

J U N E 30,1885.
4,000. 00
100.00
1,100. 00
52. 250. 00
18, 000. 00
230, 500.00
45,282,200.00

80.00
4.00
36. 67
1, 269. 62
499. 62
5, 347. 70
1,153,460.88

701. 96
.49
50. 51
688. 85
87.92
1,416.28
268, 821. 31

616.
3.
13.
680.
411.
3, 931.
884, 639.

45, 588,150. 00

1,100, 703.49'

271, 667. 32

889,036,17

100.00
2, 500. 00
1,100. 00
" 67,500.00
4, 300. 00
300.00
14,250.00
15, 900. 00
26, 950.00
12,250.00
49, 800.00
44, 044, 800.00
4,100. 00
96, 750. 00
190.750.00

100.00
2, 500.00
1,100.00
67, 500.00
4, 300. 00
300.00
14,250. 00
15, 900. 00
26, 950. 00
12, 250.00
49, 800.00
r, 044, 800.00
4,100.00
96, 750. 00
190, 750. 00

1.50
53.25
31.50
1,425.00
85. 25
6.00
356.25
419.25
662.25
203.25
826. 50
435,942. 00
123. 00
2, 848. 50
4, 704.13

18.00
99.00
33. 00
14, 399.00
3L14
2.02
278.80
842.29
2, 070. 75
570. 04
868. 55
220, 617.44
31.32
1, 560. 76
1, 065.34

16. 50
45. 75
1. 5 0 .
12,974. 00
54. 11
3. 98
77. 45
423. 04
1, 408. 50
366. 79
42. 05
215, 324. 57
91. 68
1, 287. 74
3,638. 79

44, 531, 350.00

Total.

4,000. 00
100.00
1,100.00
52, 250. 00
18, 000.00
230; 500. 00
45, 282, 200. 00
45, 588,150. 00

F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1 8 6 4 . . .
F u n d e d loan of 1881
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t .
L o a n of M a r c h , 1863, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
L o a n o f J u l y 12,1882

44, 531, 350. 00

447, 687. 64

242, 487.45

205,200.19

47, 748,750.00
1, 300. 00
3, IOO. 00
28, 700. 00
650. 00
8; 000. 00
2, 000. 00
13,400. 00
18, 200.00
34, 000. 00
500. 00
1, 500. 00
8, 500. 00
25, 600. 00

47, 748, 750.00
" 1,306.00
3,100.'00
28, 700. 00
650.00
8,000.00
2, 000.00
13, 400. 00
18, 200. 00
34, 000. 00
500.00
1,500.00
8, 500. 00
25, 600. 00

1,375,653.00
84.17
110. 83
1,722.00
45.50
560. 00
120. 00
804. 00
1, 092. 00
' 2,040.00
'
30.00
52. 50
297.50
926.33

223,676. 38
119.50
166.80
861.00
58.12
473.92
60.00
402. 00
2,147.16
3, 333. 69
270. 25
22. 58
60.31
. 213.17

1,151,976.62
35.33
55. 97
' 861.00
12.62
86.08
60.00
402. 00
1, 055.16
1,293. 69
240:25
29. 92
237.19
713.16

47,894,200.00

1, 383, 537. 83

231, 864. 88

1,151, 672. 95

•

J U K E 30,1886.
Oregon w a r debt
:
L o a n o f J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
L o a n o f 1863
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
,
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
T e n - f o r t i e s of 1 8 6 4 . . . .
Consols of 1865
^.
..'
C o n s o l s of 1867
C o n s o l s of 1868
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881
*.
L o a n of 1882
L o a n of 1863, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
-• —
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t .
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881, c o n t i n u e d a t 3 | p e r c e n t
Total.
J U N E 30,1887.
L o a n of 1882
T e n - f o r t i e s of 1864
F u n d e d l o a n o f 1881
,
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
.',
L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861
L o a n of 1863
C o n s o l s of 1865
C o n s o l s o f 1867
C o n s o l s of 1868
.L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
L o a n of 1863, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t .
F u n d e d loan of 1881, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t . i
Total...oc...o.o..-..o...Beop..o..o..oo3ooo......




I 47,894,200.00

.-

a
>

Ul

fe
O. fe
o
iz!
O
Ul

fe
O
ffi
fe
Ul

12;

fe
a

T A B L E E . — S T A T E M E N T SHOWING T H E P U R C H A S E AND R E D E M P T I O N O P B O N D S ON ACCOUNT OF T H E S I N K I N G - F U N D , ETC.—Continued.

o
I—I

<5
Principal redeemed.

Y e a r ended—

P r e m i u m paid.

N e t cost i n
currency.

N e t cost estim a t e d i n gold.

Interest due
a t close of
fiscal y e a r .

B a l a n c e of i n A c c r u e d interterest due a t
est paid i n
close of fiscal
coin.
year.

J U N E 30,1888.
L o a n o f 1882
F u n d e d loan of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907

.

.„.=.,..
....„"

Total........ .,
.

•

•

.

,. ,

.o

$18,880,500.00
19, 455,400. 00
. 5, 389, 250. 00

$1,555,966.17
1, 296, 049. 71

43, 725,150.00

2, 852, 015. 88

J U N E 30,1889,

Oregon w a r debt . . .
"....
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
;...
L o a u of 1882
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
L o a n of 1863, c o n t i n u e d a t 3 i p e r c e n t
F u n d e d loan of 1891
,
F u n d e d loan of 1907 ..oo.ooo=.0=0=000.0=. = . . . . . . . .
Total.oo..000000000000000000000000000000.OOOO.000

1,150. 00
500.00
57, 900. 00
3, 000. 00
100. 00
12,153, 850. 00
26, 839, 650. 00
39, 056,150.00

$18,880, 500. 00
21,011,366.17
6, 685, 299. 71

_

.

Total
Grand total




$94, 660. 88
95, 098. 43
43, 817.79

46, 577,165.88

1, 658,170.^00

.233, 577.10

$565, 969.12
699 148. 57
159, 475. 21
1,424,592.90

844,918.01
7,672,222.29

1,150,00
500.00
57, 900.00
3, 000.00
100.00
12,998,768.01
34, 511, 872. 29

69.00
30. 00
1, 709. 25
105. 00
3.50
480, 076.12
1,011,368.00

39.00
15.00
354. 94
20. 42
.91
39, 397. 68
180,452. 69

8,517,140.30

47,573,290.30

1, 493, 360. 87

220,280. 64

119.25
35.00
137. 50
537, 523-. 68
1,045,804.50

1L39
16. 88
109.14
69,588.99
156,/655.13

107.86
18.12
28.36
467, 934. 69
889,149.37

30 00
- 15.00
' 1, 354.31
84 58
2.59
440, 678.44
830 915,31

•
4, 050.00
1, 000. 00
3, 000. 00
12,136, 750. 00
^27, 695, 600. 00

H
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1,273,080.23

-

J i m E 30, 1890.
L o a n of 1882
^ L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, c o n t i n u e d a t 3^ p e r c e n t
F u n d e d loan of 1881
F u n d e d l o a n of 1891
F u n d e d l o a n of 1907

$660, 630.00
794, 247. 00
203, 293. 00

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4, 050. 00
1,000. 00
3, 000.00
12, 847,416. 79
3.5,231,658.37

710, 666. 79
7, 536, 058.37

39,840, 400. 00

40,138, 368.15

48, 087,125.16

8, 246, 725.16

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 745,525, 550. 00

157,677,967.61

1, 583, 619.93

226, 381. 53

1, 357,238.40

763, 413, 607. 93

26,642,763.17

6,848,848.48

19, 793, 914. 69

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T A B L E F . — S I N K I N G - F U N D ACCOUNT F O R FISCAL Y E A R

1890,

DR.

CR.

[NOTE.—The annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury for th© fiscal year 1885 contains a statement showing the condition of th© sinking-fund from its institution in
May, 1869, to and including June 30,1885.1
^
July

1,1889

J u n e 30,1890

To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on
June 30,1889, less com and currency certificates held
in cash and cash available for reduction of the debt,
viz, $1,137,402,112.51
, $11,374,021.12
To interest on redemptions prior to fiscal year 1890...
35,363,042.49
To interest on $39,847,839.50, amount of debt ' ' p a i d "
during fiscal year 1890
1, 584, 064.15
To b alance -.
239.74




48,321,367.5,0

:
June 30,1890 By balance from, last year
' B y principal of bonded debt redeemed in 1890
By accrued interest thereon
•Premium on bonds purchased
By fractional currency and notes redeemed in 1890
By accrued interest thereon
;

$2L94
39,840,400.00
226,381.53
.8,246, 725.16
7,439.50
399.37

48,321,867,50

i2!

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T A B L E G . — S T A T E M E N T O F T H I R T Y - Y E A R 6 P E R C E N T , B O N D S ( I N T E R E S T P A Y A B L E J A N U A R Y AND J U L Y ) I S S U E D TO T H E S E V E R A L P A C I F I C
R A I L W A Y COMPANIES UNDER T H E ACTS O F J U L Y 1, 1862 (12 STATUTES, 492), AND J U L Y 2, 1864 (13 STATUTES, 359).

O
<

Balance due
the United
States on interest account,
deducting repayments.

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Railway companies.

J a n u a r y ! , 1890 s
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

Amount of
bonds
outstanding.

Amount of inAmount of
Total interest Repayment of
interest by
terest accrued intei^stdue, as
paid by '
transportation
and paid to
the United
per Register's
of mails,
date.
schedule.
States.
troops,* etc.

$25, 885,120.00 $32, 771,198.47
6,303,000.00
8, 398,413. 09
27,236, 512. 00
34,762,994.73
1, 600,000. 00
2,125, 808.26
1,970, 560.00
1,377, 650. 54
1, 628, 320. 00
2, 050, 492. 69

$776,553.60
189, 090.00
817, 095. 36
48, 000. 00
59,116. 80
"48, 849.60

$33,547, 752. 07
8, 587, 503. 09
35, 580,090. 09
2,173, 808. 26
2,436,767.34
2,099, 342.29

$5, 959, 039.37
3, 751, 289. 73
12,181,682.06
405, 418. 73
9, 367. 00
159, 523.19

$27,588,712.70
4,836,213.36
23, 398,408. 03
1,768,389.53
2,427,400. 34
1,939,819.10

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64,623,512.00
J u l y 1, 1890:
Central Pacific
,
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
,
,Sioux City and Pacific




82,486,557.78

1,938,705.36

84,425,263.14

22,466, 320. 08

61,"958, 943. i

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25, 885,120.00
6, 303. 000. 00
27, 236, 512. 00
1, 600, 000. 00
1, 970, 560.00
1, 628, 320. 00

33, 547, 752. 07
8, 587, 503.09
35,580, 090. 09
2,173, 808.26
2,436, 767. 34
2,099, 342. 29

776, 553.60
189,090. 00
817, 095. 36
48, 000.00
59,116. 80
48, 849. 60

34, 324,305. 67
8, 776,593. 09
36,397,185.45
2,221,808.26
2, 495. 884.14
2,148,191. 89

6, 066, 301. 54
3, 797, 091. 37
12, 346, 359. 22
426, 777. 77
9, 367. 00
165, 047.16

28,258,004.13
4, 979,501. 72
24, 050, 826. 23
1, 795, 030.49
2,486, 517.14
1, 983,144. 73

>
pt

64. 623, 512.00

84,425,263.14

1, 938, 705.36

86,363, 968,50

22, 810, 944. 06

- 63, 553, 024. 44

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CHANGES. IN INTEREST-BEARING DEBT.

•CVII

TABLE H.—-STATEMENT SHOWING T H E CHANGES I N T H E INTEREST-BEARING D E B T
OF T H E U N I T E D STATES DURING T H E YEAR E N D E D OCTOBER 31, 1890.
Rate of Outstanding Increase
raterest. Nov. 1,1889. duringthe
year.

Title of loan.

Per cent.
Funded loan of isoi
Funded loan of 1907
Refunding certificates.

-

Total

1
4

'

$126, 609,350
647,.288,850
113,460

* $18,850

774, Oil, 660

18, 850

' Decrease
during the
year.

Outstanding
Nov. 1,1890.

$62, 629, 500
$63,979,850
79,103, 850 ^ 568, 203, 850
13, 770
99, 690
141, 747,120

632,283, 390

" See statement which follows, showing conversions of refunding certificates, for an explanation of
the increase during the year in the interest-bearing debt.

< Since November^l, 1889, refunding certificates issued in 1879, under tlie act of Feb•
ruary 26, 1879, have been presented for conversion into 4 per cent, bonds as follows :
Principal
Accrued interest due thereon

-

..,

$13,770.00
6,040.30
19, 810.30

Total..L..

For which settlement was made as follows: ,
Four per cent, bonds issued on account of principal
Four per cent, bonds issued on account of accrued interest

.o..-.
...»

$13,770.00
5,080.00
18, 850.00
960.30

Interest paid in cash .
Total

19, 810.30

The certificates still outstanding amount to |99,690.
The reduction in the annual interest charge, by reason of the changes during the
year ended October 31, 1890, is as follows :
On bonds redeeined by purchase
Deduct the interest on $5,080 4 per cent.bonds issued .
Net reduction

$5,981,481.50
203.20
,

5,981,278.30

I n addition to the purchases and redemptions of United States 4 per cent, and 4 i
per cent, bonds during the year ended October 31, 1890, indicated in the foregoing
table and described more fully in the Secretary's report under the heading of * Pur^
chases of United States bonds," there were redeemed $175,100 United States bonds
and seven-thirty notes upon which interest h a d ceased. The total net reduction of
the bonded indebtedness of the United States d u r i n g t h e twelve months in question
was, therefore^ $141,908,450.







SILYER CQIN AND BULLION IN T H E

TREASURY.

CIX

T A ^ L E J . - - S T A T E M E N T O F T H E STANDARD S I L V E R D O L L A R S , S I L V E R B U L L I O N , AND^
r SUBSIDIARY S I L V E R C O I N I N 'THE T R E A S U R Y AT T H E E N D OF EACH-MONTH F R O M

:K D E C E M B E R - S I , . 1877,'TO; J U N E 30; 1890. \
Staiidard silver
dollars: i 1877—December 3 1 . ; . . . .
1878—January 3 1 . . . ^ . . .
February 28......
March 3 0 . . . . . . . . .
April 30.-....^....
.May 31..........:
June 291...
J u l y 31 . ^ . . . . . . . .
A u g u s t 31.S e p t e m b e r 30 . - . .
October 3 1 . . . . . . .
N o v e n i b e r 30 . | . . . 1
December 3 1 . . . . .
1879—January 3 1 . . - . . . .
, F e b r u a r y 28 . . . . .
' M a r c h 31 . . . . . . . . :
^April30..........
May 3 1 . . . ; . . ; . . . - ,
J u n e 30
July 31..„....-.,..,
A u g u s t 31 . . i . . . . ,
} ' S e p t e m b e r 30 . . . . .
October 3 1 . . . . . . . .
N o v e m b e r 30
,..
December 3 1 . . . . . .
1880 - J a n u a r y 31 . . „ . . . .
F e b r u a r y 28 . . . . . .
March 31..
April 3 0 . . . . . . . . . . .
May 31..
JuneSO...........
July31...;
A u g u s t 31 . . . , . : - .
S e p t e m b e r 30
October 3 1 . . . . . . . .
. N o v e m b e r 30 . . . . .
•
^
D e c e m b e r 3l
..
1881—January 3 1 . . . . . . . .
F e b r u a r y 28 . . . . . .
M a r c h 31
April30..
May , 3 1 . . . . . .
June 30......
July 3 1 .
A u g u s t 31 . . . . . . . .
SeptemberSO . - - . .
October 3 1 . .
November 30.......
D e c e m b e r 31
1882—January 3 1 .
...
F e b r u a r y 28
M a r c h 31
April30...
\
May 31.....
J u n e 30
/uly31
::
A u g u s t 31
S e p t e m b e r 30 . . . . .
October 3 1 . :
]&ovember30 . . . . .
D e c e m b e r 31
1883-r-January . 3 1 . . . . . . . .
F e b r u a r y 28 . . . . . .
M a r c h 31
April 30..
May31
June 30......
July3I...
A u g u s t 31 - . , , - - . .
S e p t e m b e r 29 . . . . . .
October 3 1 . . . . . . . .
November 3 0 . . . . . .
D e c e m b e r 31
1 8 8 4 — J a n u a r y 31 . - L
Februar3^29
M a r c h 31




$810,561
3,169,681
5,950,451
' 7,718,357
9, 550, 236.
11,292, 849
. 12,155,205
13,397,571
14,843,219
^16, 704, 829
17,874,457
19,505,767
21,558,894
23,694,563
26,181, 045
28,147, 351
^29,151, 801
30,678,464
, 3 1 , 559, 870
32,322,634
32,839,207
33,168,064
34,961,611
36, 972,093
38,780,342
40,411, 673
42, 778,190
- 44,425,315
46,192, 791
47, 495, 063
47,654,675
47, 084,459
/ 47,397,453
48,190,518
50; 235,102
52, 939,460,
• 55,176,158
58,044,826
60, 518, 273
. 62,544,722
64,246, 302
65,948,344
66.092,667
56; 576,378 ,
68,017,452
69, 589,937
72,421,584
75,138, 957.
78,178, 583
81, 595, 056
84, 606, 043
87,153,816
88,840,899
91,166,249
92,228,649
92,414, 977
92, 940, 582
94, 016,842
97,530,969
100, 261, U i
103,482, 305
106, 386, 348
108, 898, 977
111, 914, 019
113,057,052
114, 320,197
114, 587, 372
116,036,450
117,768,966
119, 440, 385
123,474, 748
126, 822, 399
129, 066,101

'

Silver bullion.

..'^N-

• '"..

S u b s i d i a r y silv e r coin.

• • • -. '

•• -

Total,;

$1, 736/984.89
•2,827, 368.-07
'• 2,955j 577.65
3,534, 480.53
7,350, 710. 68
5, 891, 204.95
7,341, 470.84
7,665, 760.19
8, 982, 239.07
9, 634, 034.48
8,352, 042.21
10,159, 491.41
9,439, 461.25

$5, 532, 283. 95
5,626, 541. 22
6, 261, 437. 76
7,139, 637.34
7,029; 306.77
8,103i 228. 02
6,860, 505.'97
7, 079, 667.36
• 6,478, 642. 22
6,'143, 903.02
, 6, 323, 132.31
6,009, 834.43
; 6, 031, 804 52

$7,260,268.84
8,453, 909.29.
9,217, 015. 41
. 11,484, 678.87
17,549, 698.45
19,944, 883. 97
21,920, 933. 81
24; 295, 663. 55
26,753, 730..29
27, 933, 142. 50
28, 072, 745.52
31,012, 544.84
32,176, 094.77

10,347, 889.50
9, 837, 402.62
8, 688, 260. 74
6, 949, 046. 43
5,672, 655.55
5,092, 565. 91
5,112, '223.82
4,904, 611:89
' 4, 557, 504.31
3, 537, 224. 31
4,323, 097. 69
4,492, 42L19
4,888, 035.97
.4,525, 306. 25
4,086, 839. 58
5, 007, 331.04
4, 853, 587.99
. 5,124, 536.42
6,081i 647.91
6,380. ,258.46
5, 557, 759.74
6,043, 367.37
6,255, 389. 81
6,183, 224.05
6,704, 197.36
5,356, 308. 00
4,017, 770.08
3,863, 582.74
3,457, 192.85
3, 309, 949.10
2,962, 277.52
2,732,
2, 632,, 184. 67
3,424,, 575.15
:
i 709.63
,
3; 607, 829.86
3,258, 926.18
2,806, 143.12
4,440, 661.97
3,239, 033.43
3, 793,664.11
3,230, 908. 36
2,816, 269. 83
2, 730,716. 27
3, 343,565. 26
(4, 012,503.27
3, 769,
219. 77
4,468, 193.10
3^761, 958.12
3,974,114.04
3, 943, 467. 30
3,478,750.15
4,157, 217.76
4,482,216.29
4,486, 638.23
4,694,559.45
5.107, 911.29
41936,364.86
4, 624, 279.34
4,534,372.93
4, 674, 432. 92,
4, 919, 912. .85
5, 043,824. 61

' 6,143, 449.13
6,278, 490.66
6,428, 185.06
6, 621, 940.39
6,813, 589.32
8,903, 401.36
12, 731, 765.97
15,236, 724.48
16,814, 308; 94
17,755, 986.76
'18,432; 478.13
18, 881, 629.15
20, 204, 809. 83
21,179, 312.32
21,989, 814.48
22,767, 672.95
23,577, 091.99
.24,350, 481.80
24,975, 713.,52
'25,152, 971. 89
24, 799, 925.40
24, 629, 489.89
24,653, 530. 37
24,769, 057.32
.25, 490, 914. 88
25,813, 058. 08
26,283, 891. 96
26,493, 612,56
26,841, 956. 74
27,247, 696.93
27,295, 486.63
27, 042, 806.63
26, 313, 113.63
25,984, 687.76
25, 918, 252. 00
25, 963, 64i.i48
26, 567, 873.37
26, 869, 906.26
27,187, 680.67
27,439, 183. 93.
27, 755, 923.33
28, 048, 630.58
28,153, 956.16
27,990, 387.75
27,426, 139:93
26,749, 432.45
26, 544, 544.43
' 26, 521, 692.20
27,135, 244.74
27,507, 275.78
27, 865, 993.79
28, 068, 628. 88
28, 303, 196.20
' 28,486, 001.05
28.058, 141. 67.
27,8i9, 711.70
26,750, 161.13
26,712; 424.15
26,969, 614.40
27, 224, 126.33
28, 014; 414. 76
28„490, 906. 91
28, 866, 456. 33

34,3,65,- 795.63
35,621, 660. 28
36,675, 339.80
37,265, 549. 82
38, 667, 289.87
42,143, 318.27
46, 995, 790i.79
"' 50,819, 800.37
52. 931, 683.. 2o
53,615, 845.07
55,594, 782.82"
56,542, 114.34
60, 054, 456:80
.62,676, 7] 1.57
64,856, 996., 06
68,186, 676.99 .
71, 208, 869.98
73,900, 333.22
77,250, 152.43 •
79,028, 293.35
78,012, 360.14
^ '77,757, 316.26
78, 306, 373.18
'79,142, 799. 37
82,430, 214.24
84,108, 826.08
' 85,477, 820.04
88,402, 0 2 L 3 0 /
90,817, 422.59^
93,102, 368.03
94, 504, 066.15
95, 724, 013.32
95,037, 965.30
95,985, 640.91
97,024, 413; 63
99,161i 408.34 "
102, 248, 383. 55
104, 815, 006.38
109,806, 925.64
112,273, 273. 36
116,155, 630.44
118; 433, 354.94
119, 811, 124.99
121,887, 353.02,
122,998, 354.19
123,176, 912. 72
123,254, 346. 20
12,5,006, 727,30
128, 428, 171. 86
131, 742, 833. 82
135, 291, 766. 09
137,913, 727.03
141,359, 390.96
144,882, 236.34
145,601^ 831.90 ,
146,834, 468.15;
146,445, 444.42 •
147,685, 239.01
149, 362, 859. 74
151, 207, 884.26
156,163,595.68
160, 233, 218.76
162, 916, 481.94

.\.

ex
'

REPORT O F T H E SECRETARY O F T H E TREASURY.

T A B L E J . — S T A T E M E N T O F T H E STANDARD S I L V E R ' D O L L A R S , S I L V E R BULLION, AND
. SUBSIDIARY S I L V E R COIN, Etc.—Continued.
Standard silver
dollars.

Silver bullion.

Subsidiary silver coin.

1884—April 30
May3I.
J u n e 30
...
July 3 1 . . . . . . .
August 30 . . . .
September 30 .
\
October 3 1 . . . .
:
November 29 .
December 31-.
1885-^January 31 . - Februa^y28..
March 31 . . . . .
April30 . ( . . . . .
May 29
June 30.......
July , 3 1 . . . . . ; .
. • August 30
September 30 .
/
October 3 1 . . . .
November 30 .
December 3 1 . .

.$130, 314,065
132, 626, 753'
135,560,916
137,692,119
140,615,722
l42, 058,787
142, 926,'725
144, 745, 075
-146, 502, 865
150,632,154
153,561,007
' 156,698,482
159,441,034
162,244,855
165,413,112
166,499; 948,
166, 854, 215
165,483, 721
163, 817, 342
165,568,018
165,718,190

$5,150,842.97
4,623,158.03
4,055,498.27
4, 003, 609. 95
4,723,420.00
4,934,404.86
4,646,496.89
4,778,848.90
4,716,055.33
4, 613, 582.23
3,991,129.93
3,, 887,493. 52
4,042,186. 86
4,098,143.86
4,038,885.52
3,944,837. 32
3,766,196.12
3, 916,122:84
3,840,536.45
3,583,956.42
3,797,040.84

$29,158,480.47
29,377,206.41
29, 600, 720.05
29,797,485. 76
29,659,003.38
29,474,100.89
29, 346, 757.24
29,143,283.48
29,194, 355.52
29, 901,104. 54
30, 244,836.12
30,632, 326.20
30,944, 048. 81
31,694, 364.80
31, 236,899.49
25, 355,020.23
24, 724,287.43
23, 641;893.79
22, 965,535. 70
27,920, 309.44
27,796 .430. 88

1886-January 30 . . .
February 27 . .
March 31 . . . . .
April 30 . . . . . .
May 29 .
June 3 0 . . . . . . .
J u l y 31 . . . . . . .
August 31 . . . .
September 30 .
October 30 . . . .
"
November 30 .
December 3 1 . .
1887—January 31 . . .
February 28 . .
March 31
April 39
May 31
June 30..
J u l y 30
August 31 . . . .
September 30 .
October 3 1 . . . .
November 30 .
J
December 3 1 . .
1888—January 31 . . .
February 2 9 . .
March 31
April 3 0 . . . . . . .
May31
June 3 0 . . . . . . .
J u l y 31
Angust 3 1 . . . .
September 30 .
October 3 1 . . . .
November 30 .
December 3 1 ; .
1889—January 31 . . .
Februarv28.-.
March 31 . . . . .
April 30
May 3 1 . . . . . . .
J u n e 30
J u l y 31 . . . . . . .
August 31
September 30.
October 31^....
Noveniber 30 .
December 3 1 . .
1890—January 31 . . .
February 28 . .
• March 31 . . . . .
AprilSO
M a y 31
J u n e 30.

169, 083, 385
171,805,906
174,700, 985
175, 928, 502
178,;/252, 045
181,253, 566
181, 523,924
181,769,457
181, 262, 593
182, 931,231
184,911,938
188, 506, 238
193, 963,783
198,112,760
201,672, 372
205,788,822
> 209, 052, 567
211,483,970
211,528,891
213, 212,448
213,043,796
214,175,532
215,882,443
218,917,539
223, 918,380
• 227,947,493
232, 037,274
236,156, 394
240,587,970
243,879,487
245,798,765
247,859,402
248,791,534
349,979,440
251,975,505
254,406,869
259,811,329
263, 514, 586
267,286,176
271,326,743
275,484,223
279, 084, 683
280,382,395
282, 583,864
282, 983, 550
283,539,521
286,101,364
288,535, 500
293, 229.364
•297,575,621
302,036,610
306, 429,289
309,988,092
313,259,910

3, 658, 783.44
2, 612, 968.08
2, 271, 104.42
2, 556, 522.03
1,947, 761.61
3,092, 198. 45
3,786, 069. 56
3,268, 940. 39
3, 758,
3, 807, 948.52
4, 091, 383.17
4, 739, 376.81
4,877, 039.10
4,700. 182. 85
4, 779, 858.28
4,171, 926. 35
3,248, 351. 93
3,982, 472,43
5,092, 355.94
,5,024, 420.16
4,910, 872.64
4,721, 996.19
4,026, 770. 01
3,232,

29,013,993.71
28, 811,037.49
28, 822,637.63
28, 864,482,89
28,912,277.^14
28, 904,681.66
28, 584,624.69
991.95
27, 956,
26, 899,745.20
26, 300,335.88
25, 808,067.32
25,660, 935.44
26,323, 524. 61
26,482, 472. 31
26; 601,613.74
26,801, 076.57
27,064, 742.87
26; 977,493.79
26, 691,105.74
26,148, 531. 34
24, 984,219.17
24, 468,135.17
24,158, 003.77
24,327, 528.62
25, 019,973. 04
25, 355,431.80
25,566, 279.65
25,750, 228.33
25, 878,872. 04
26, 051,741.19
26, 034,462.25
25, 746,758. 95
24, 738,q95.68
24, 088,768.91
23, 801,676.04
23,(B55,458.45
24, 449,597.49
24, 715,021.38
24, 921,003. 84
24, 975,567.45
25,125, 295. 22
25,129, 733.17
25, 012,876. 59
24, 766,455.36
23,864, 840.68
22,737, 899.90
22,133, 430.09
21, 927,927. 73
22, 506, 503.76
22,758, 529.68
22, 814, 564.75
22,989,474.29
22, 902, 557.92
22,805,225,99




3,559,522.81
3,656,130. 37
3,375,953.09
3, 324,419.45
2,802, 018.13
4,142,73L54
4,579,760.25
4, 572,910.18
4,284,730.17
4, 369,971. 76
'4,553,379.50
4,774i 441.16
4,522, 881.35
4, 679, 332. 62
4, 718, 131.24
4,671, 544. 23
4,208, 323.47
4,520, 153. 80
5, 776, 745.25
5,259, 602.20
5,203, 290. 79
4i 834, 633.61
no, 322, 869.50
'^10,729, 078. 00
*11, 557,759. 93
/11,156,95L75
-10,709,438.87
*9,432,626.74
*8,955,254.40
*10, 649;449. 76

* Including trade-dollar bullion.,

Total.
$164,623,388.44
166,627,117.44
169,217,134.32
172,093,214.71
174,998,145.38
176,467,352.75
176,-919,979.13
178,667,207.38
180,413,275.85
185,146, 840.77
187, 796,973.05
191,218, 301. 72
194,427, 269. 67
198, 037,363.66
200, 688,897. 01
195, 799,805. 55
195,344, 698.55
193,041, 737.63
190,623, 414.15
197.072, 283.86 ,
197, 311,661.72
201,756, 162.15
I 203,229,
911. 57
205,794, 727.05
207,34.9, 506.92
209,112, 083.75
213^, 250,
446.11
213, 894,618.25
212,995, 389. 34
211, 920,732. 09
213,039, 515.40
214.811, 388. 49
218,906, 550.25
,225,164, 346. 71
229,295, 415.16
233, 053,844.. 02
236,851, 824. 92
239,365. 661.80
242,443; 936.22
243,312, 352.68
244,385, 399.50
242,938, 887. 81
• 243, 365,
663. 36
244,067, 216. 78.
246,477, 704.28
2,52,497, 875.85
256,959, 055.17
260,979, 506. 74
265,231, 041,78
269,268, 860.17
274.073, 959.73
276,412, 987.50
278,179, 071.13
277,811, 959. 85
278,438, 180.67
280,330, 560.54
282,836, 768.61
288,783, 807.84
292, 908,940.00
296,925, 311.08
300,973, 854. 68
304,817, 84L69
308, 734,569.97
311,172, 016. 84
312, 609,921.56 ,
312,051, 68L47
311,115,054. 51
318,557, 663. 59
321,192, 505.73
327,293,627.69 '
331,491,102.43
335,560, 613.62
338, 851,390.03
341,845,904.32
346,714,585.75

T A B L E K.—STATEMENT SHOWING T H E A N N U A L APPROPRIATIONS MADE B Y C O N G R E S S F O R E A C H F I S C A L Y E A R F R O M 1863

T O . 1891, I N C L U S I V E .

2d s e s s i o n
1st s e s s i o n
1st session
2d session
1st session
1st s e s s i o n
1st session
2d session
2d s e s s i o n
47th G o n g r e s s . 47th C o n g r e s s . 48tli C o n g r e s s . 4 8 t h C o n g r e s s . 49th C o n g r e s s . 49th C o n g r e s s . 50th C o n g r e s s . 50th d o n g r e s s . 51st C o n g r e s s . ^
Fiscal year
Fiscalyear I
Fiscal vear
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscal year
Fiscalyear "
Fiscal year
• 1885.
1891.
1889.
1884.
1886.
1887.
1888.
1883*.'
1890.
T o s u p p l y deficiencies for
t h e s e r v i c e of t h e v a r i o u s
b r a n c h e s of t h e G o v e r n ment
$9, 853, 869. 30
F o r legislative, executive,
a n d j u d i c i a l e x p e n s e s of
the Government
-20, 322, 907. 65
F o r s u n d r y civil e x p e n s e s
of t h e G o v e r n m e n t
25,425,479.45
F o r s u p p o r t of t h e A r m y . . . 27, 032, 099.18
14, 903, 558. 98
For the naval service
5, 219, 603.91
F o r the Indian service
F o r r i v e r s a n d h a r b o r s . . . . . . 18,988,875.00
375, 000. 00
F o r forts and fortifications..
F o r s u p p o r t of M i l i t a r y
Academy
335, 557. 04
F o r s e r v i c e of Post-Office
Department
1, 902,177. 90
F o r invalid and o t h e r pensions; i n c l a d n g deficiencies
: 116, 000.000. 00
F o r consular and diplomatic
service
:
1, 256, 655. 00
F o r s e r v i c e of A g r i c u l t u r a l
427,280.00
, Department
F o r e x p e n s e s of t h e D i s t r i c t
3,496,060.47
of C o l u m b i a
5, 888, 993. 69
F o r miscellaneous
Totals .

251,428,117.57

$2, 832, 680. 04

$4, 385, 836.10

*$3, 332, 717.30

$137,000.00

$21,190, 995.61

$14,230,179.71

$34,137,737.96

20, 763,842.55

21, 556, 901. 65

21,495, 660. 70

20,809, 781.46

20,772,720.67

20, 924, 492.42

20, 865, 219. 93 .21,073,137.47

23,713, 404.22
24, 681, 250. 00
15, 954,2^7.23
5, 388,655.91

22, 346, 749.74
^ 4 , 4 5 4 , 450. 00
18,931,856.12
5,903,151.26
14,948, 300. 00
700, 000.00

'25, 961,904.12
24, 014, 052. 50121,280,766.93
5, 773,328. 56

22, 369,840.96
23, 724,718.69
25,786, 847.79
5, 234, 397. 60

26,316, 529.85
24,474, 710.97
19,938,281.05
5,401, 330. 51
22,397,616.90
3, 972, 000.00

25.527,641.65
24, 316, 615. 73
21, 675, 374. 98
8,077,453.39

725, 000.00

22, 650, 658. 49
23,753,057.21
16,489, 556. 72
5, 561, 262.84
14, 464, 900. 00
59, 876. 69

309, 902.14

297, 805. 00

670, 000.00
318,657.50

314, 563.50

Indefinite

Indefinite

§86, 575, 000.00

1120,810,000.00

60, 000,000.00

1, 296, 255.00

1, 225,140. 00

1,242,925.00

405, 640.00

480,190.00

580, 790.00

3, 505,494.97
I, 806,438. 75

3, 594, 255.-54
7, 800, 003.86

187, 911, 566.17

137,451, 397. 77

Indefinite

.. I n d e f i n i t e

419,936.93
Indefinite

315, 043. 81
Indefinite.....

1,233,594.00
902,766.69
Indefinite

29,760,054.47
24,206,471. 79
23,136, 035. 53
7,256, 758.27
25, l i 6 , 295. 00
4,232,935.00 ,
435,296.11
Indefinite.

>
{>"
Pt

o
Pt

83,152, 500.00

81,758,700.00

81, 758, 700. 00

98,457,461.00

;>

1, 429, 942.44

1,428,465.00

17980, 025. 00

1,710,725.96

o

654, 715.00

1,028,730.00

1, 715, 826.14

1, 669, 770. 00

1,796,502.85

Ul

3, 622, 683.20
2, 268, 383.15

3, 721, 950. 99
10,184, 570.90

4, 284, 590. 66
4, 694, 635. 33

5, 056, 678. 98
10,129, 501. 65

5, 682, 409. 91
10,186, 688. 81

5, 762, 236. 75
10,620,840.80

170,608,113.00

209,659, 382.91

193, 035, 861.13

245,020,172. 89

218,115, 439.80

287,722,488. 96

* N o t i n c l u d i n g $6,150,061.98 a p p r o p r i a t e d for t h e n a v a l s e i v i c e for s i x m o n t h s
e n d i n g J u n e 30,1885.
t F o r s i x m o n t h s e n d i n g D e c e m b e r 31,1884.




$13, 572, 882.61

76, 075, 200.00
1, 364, 065. CO

i I n c l u d e s $6,150,061.98 for s i x m o n t h s e n d i n g J u n e 30,1885.
§ A n d r e a p p r o p r i a t i o n of u n e x p e n d e d b a l a n c e s , e s t i m a t e d a t $38,000,000.
II A n d r e a p p r o p r i a t i o n of u n e x p e n d e d b a l a n c e s , e s t i m a t e d a t $66,000,000.

O
X

CXII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,

T A B L E L , — S T A T E M E N T OF T H E N E T R E C E I P T S ( B Y WARRANTS) DURING T H E FISCAL
YEAR ENDED J U N E 30/1890.
Customs;
V Quarter
,
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended September 30,1889
ended December 31,1889
ended March 31,1890
ended June 30,1890

^
,

^Internal revenue :
•Quarter ended September 30,1889
. Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1890

34,733,244.96
34,434, SJ6.71
31,834,715.29
41, 603, 888.85
i
142,606,705.81

i;
?

^Sales of public lands:
Quarter ended September 30,1889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890
Tax on circulation of national banks:
Quarter ended September 30,1889
Quarterended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890

$58,274,697.04
51,826,114.09
60,960,,89L 37
58,606,882.07
.
$229,668,584.57

.'

1,957, 706.51
2, 080, 867. 63
3,167,726.07
1,151,972.30

•
^ '

6,358,272.51
661, 392.98
5,964.51
629, 294.76
' 4,674.33

Repayment of interest by Pacific railroads:
Quarter ended September'30,1889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890

1,301,326.58

'

173, 821. 83
187,245.71
173,579.55
171,044.43
705,69L52

Customs fees, fines, penalties, and forfeitures:
Quarter ended September 30,1889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890
Fees—consular, letters patent, and lands :
Quarter ended September 30,1889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890

292,323.39
404, 035.82
282,974.59
319, .990.72
1,299,324.52

:
_

Proceeds of sales of Government property:
Quarter ended September 30,1.889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarterended J u n e 30,1890
.
, Profits on coinage ;
Quarter ended September 30,1889
Quarter ended December 31,1889
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarterended June 30,1890
Revenues of District of Columbia:
) Quarter ended September 30,1899
Quarter ended December 31,1889..
Quarter ended March 31,1890
Quarter ended June 30,1890
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
• Quarter

868,920.46
721,043.27'
760,278.74
796,449. 85
i

.a*
'

/

ended September 30,1889
ended December 31,1889
ended March 31,1890
ended June 30,1890

^

40, 070.41
41; 256. 60
63, 083. 83
47,713.15
1,473,940.83
2,743, 412.72
2,870,448.24
3,129,442.46

3,146,692.32

192,123. 89

10,217,244.25
295,145.61
1,185,785.71
231,47L88
1, 096,727.73

O

2,809,130.93
1,322,0G4. 66
1,203,638.82
1,174.380.33
1,075, 801.82
4, 775, 885. 63
Total ordinary receipts, exclusive of loans
Receipts from loans, certificates, and notes
Receipts trom ' * unavailable "

403,080, 982.63
245, 293, 650.00
731.11

Totalreceipts
Balance in Treasury J u n e 30,1889

648,375,363.74
673,399,118.18

Grand total




'.

1,321,774,481.92

J

.

,

NET DISBURSEMENTS^ 1890.

CXIII

T A B L E M . — S T A T E M E N T OF T H E N E T DISBURSEMENTS ( B Y WARRANTS) DURING T H E
,
F I S C A L YEAR E N D E D J U N E 30, 1890.
CIVIL.
Congress.
Executive
i
Judiciary
Government in the Territories
Sub-treasuries
Public land offices
Mints and assay offices

,
.:
^
•

Total civil

;
$6,498,052.70
11,293,860.28
4, 349,692.06
278,181.62
390,071.77
626,477.90
202,490.29

...»

$23,638,826,62

\ FOREIGN INTERCOURSE.
Diplomatic salaries
„
;
Consular salaries
Contingent expenses of foreign missions
Contingencies of consulates
Spanish indemnity
Relief, protection, and rescuing shipwrecked American s e a m e n . . . . . . .
. International exhibitions
Conference with South and Central American States
1 i..
International marine con%rence
Emergencies arising in the diplomatic and consular service.
Miscellaneous items
.Total fqreign intercourse . . .

i
327,042.41
622,875.30
73,995.58
170,431.77
29,302.34
42,622.49
81,299.82
122,400.00
44,500.00
21, 656.27
112,150.61
'.

^

, MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint estabUshment
Life-saving service
Revenue-cutter service
Steamboat-inspection service
Engraving ana printing
,
-.
Coast and Geodetic survey., i
Light-housei establishment
Marine-hospital establishment
Custom-houses, court-houses, post-offices, etc
Pay of assistant custodians and janitors for public buildings
Fuel, lights, and water for public buildings
Furniiure and heating apparatus for public buildings
Vaults, safes, locks and plans for public buildings
Collecting revenue from customs:
For the year 1890
.$6,556,142.81
For prior years
303,843.28
Detection and prevention of frauds upon the customs
revenue
12,573.93
Refunding excess of deposit, etc
Debentures and drawbacks under customs laws
Compensation in lieu of moieties
.'
Expenses of regulating immigration
Salaries, shipping service
:
,
Services to American vessels
,
Enforcement contract labor law
Chinese exclusion act
i
Revenue vessels
Interstate Commerce Commission
Expenses, seal fisheries in Alaska :
Assessing and collecting internal-revenue
Paper for internal-revenue stamps
Redemption of internal-revenue stamps
Punishing violations of internal-revenue laws
Refunds, reliefs, etc., under internal-revenue laws
Allowance or drawback under in ternal-revenue laws
.'
Payment of judgments, Court of Claims
Preventing the spread of epidemic diseases....
,..
Distinctive paper for United States securities
:
.^.
Suppressing counterfeiting and other crimes
Transportation and recoinage of silver coin
Propagation, etc., food-fishes
Expenses under Smithsonian Institution
Contingent expenses, independent treasury
Sinking funds. Pacific railroads
Mail transportation, !Pacific railroads
District of Columbia:
Expenses, 50 per cent, payable by the IJnited States.. $5, 390, 552.63
Water department, payable from the water fund
214,330.52
Special trust funds
.
»
72,536.87

1,144,152.46
993,050.72
931, 619.46
259,992.77
993,364.84
449,603.09
2,905,337.88
618,882.33
4, 377, 949.92
499,416.32
632,107.37,
357, 404. 98 •
58,720.07

6,872,560.02
3,971,308.37
2, 942,337.16
28,878.14
241, 362.52
59,761.10
23,788.70
32, 693.59
21,000.00
29, 000.00
169, 9'18. -71
10,747.71
3, 781, 788.70
31, 842.16
26, 800.25
25, 334.16
'15,460.35
47, 680.98
.536,671. 03
51,720.45
39, 887-14
63, 730.94
71, 813.52
310,927.59
95,757. 37
49,629.53
1,841,847.02
1,244,450.82

5,677,419.52

F I 90

VIII




3,648,276.59

CXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, ,

T A B L E M . — S T A T E M E N T O F T H E N E T DISBURSEMENTS ( B Y WARRANTS) DURING T H E
F I S C A L Y E A R E N D E D J U N E 30, 1890.,
MISCELLANEOTJS-Continued.
Buildings and grounds in Washington under Chief Engineer
Fuel, light, etc., State, War, and Navy Department building
Completion, maintenance, etc., of Washington Monument
Support and treatment of destitute patients
Increasing water supply, Washiugton, D. C
Department of Agriculture
Deficiency in the postal revenues
»
;
^
Capitol building and grounds
Building for Library of Congress
Interior Department building
Government Hospital for the Insane
"Columbialnstitutionfor the Deaf and D u m b . . .
Freedmen's Hospital and Asylum
Howard University
National Museum
Surveying public and private lands .•-...
Contingent expenses land offices
Geological Survey
Expenses Eleventh Census
Hot Springs Reservation, Arkansas . . . ^
Deposits by individuals lor surveying public lands
'.
Repayment for lands erroneously sold
Swamp lands and swamp-land indemnity
Depredations on public timber
,
Protecting public lands
Five, two, and three per cent, funds to States
Photolithographing for the Patent Office
Offi^cial Gazette, Patent Office..
Miscellaneous items

•

—

Total miscellaneous

$155,659.40
42,49a 91
20,441. 77
17,000.00
425,028.88
1,612,796.12
6,875,036.91 •
156,397,97
530,950.39
8,500.00
269,261.17
,
55,000.00
51,807.43
23,000.00
180,182.30
50,451.90
173,960.94
714,731.40
1,004j 644.20
5,220.35
84,8*74.77
57,632.48
24,187.68
71,653.34
103,800.57
353,859.48
106,284.54
59,997.70
343,572.92

,

^

$56,110,153.28

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.
Indians
T
Pensions
Total Interior Department

6,708,046.67
106,936,855.07
, , U3,644,90L74

,.
,
MILITARY E S T A B L I S H M E N T :

0

Pay Department
Pay Department, bounty and miscellaneous
.'
Commissary Department
Quartermaster's Department
Building for cavalry and artillery school. Fort Riley, Kans
Wharf at Fortress Monroe
Medical Department
Ordnance Department
'.
Armories and arsenals
Military Academy.
Improving rivers and harbors
Fortifications......'.
Cbnstruction of military posts, roads, etc
National cemeteries, roads, etc
Expenses of recruiting
Contingencies of the Army
;-'---Signal Service
'
".
Expenses of military convicts
Publication bf official records of the war of the rebellion
Support of National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
Support of Soldiers' Home
:
Soldiers' Home permanent fund and interest account
Support of military prison, Fort Leavenworth, Kans
Yellowstone National P a r k
Claims, re-imbursements,reliefs, etc
Miscellaneous items
Total military establishment




12,910,902.05
785,143. ,70
1,482,093.25
8,161,814.04
100,000.00
48,000.00^
512,948.97
1,858,017.86
815,966.45
233,106.35
11,737,437.83
467,785.39
747,507.67
280,677.72
100,206.37
13,864.95
575,957.93
-3,967.50
100,765.97
2,533,841.72 •
305,708.05
262,066.91
83,949.99
50,000.00
357,333.03
53,674.38

^

». o
..,.„

..^

44,582,838.08

NET BISBURSEMENTS5 1890e '

CXV

T A B L E M,—STATEMENT OF T H E N E T DISBURSEMENTS ( B Y W A R R A N T S ) DURING T H E
^ F I S C A L YEAR E N D E D J U N E 30, i890-=Continued,
NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.
Pay, etc., of the Navy
Contingent, Navy
i
Marine Corps
....'.
NavalAcademy
.
Navigation . » . .
Ordnance
Equipment and Recruiting
Yards and Docks
:
Medicine and Surgery. .J
Provisions and Clothing
^
Construction and Repair
Steam Engineering
.Increase of the Navy
!:
Extra pay to officers and men who served in the Mexican war (Navy)..
Commissions on new navy-yards
Relief of sufferers by wreck of United States steamers at Apia
Miscellaneous items and reliefs

$8,378,659.44
8,742.83
959,564.91
214,066.78
251,578.70
318,482.67
509,818.34
1, 513,406.45
203,225.66
1,801,769.21
1,004,395.85
661,468.17
6,831,803.03 ,
11,250.00
1,488.58
69,171.96
36,841.95

Total
Less repayments on account of advances

22,775,734.53
769, 528.29

Total naval establishment
Interest on the public debt
Premium on purchase of bonds

"

,

."
$22,006,206.24
36,099,284.05
20,304,224.06

U

Total net ordinary expenditures
Eedepaption of the public debt

r. = .

318,040,710.66
312,206,367.50

Total expenditures
Balance in Treasury J u n e 30,1890
Grand total

/

630, 24 7, 078.16
691,527,403.76
'.

,

1,321,774,481.92 .

T A B L E N.-TSTATBMENT O F T H E N E T R E C E I P T S AND DISBURSEMENTS ( B Y WARRANTS)
FOR THE Q U A R T E R E N D E D S E P T E M B E R 30, 1890,

RECEIPTS.
Customs...
Internal revenue
Sales of public lands
Tax on national banks
Repayment of interest by Pacific railroads
Customs, fees, fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Fees—consular, letters patent, and lands
Proceeds of sales of Government property
Profits on coinage, etc
Miscellaneous
Total net ordinary receipts
Issues of public debt in excess of redemption
Balance in the Treasury J u n e 30,1890

.'
»

$67,973,907.09
37,916,314.14
' 1, 023.621.48
615.178. 79
' 183, 805,14
. 236,105. 00
868,581.97
\
53,247.71
1,102,112.98
1,952.959.85

.1

i
.,,

Total

I l l , 925,834.15
90, 329,225.25
691,527,403,76

„,

,

893,782,463.16

DISBURSEMENTS.
Customs
•
Internal re v e n u e . . . . . . i
Diplomatic
Treasury
Judiciary...
Interior civil

-

CTotal civil and miscellaneous
Indians
.-.
Pensions
Military establishment
Naval establishment
Interest on the public debt
Premium on bonds purchased




..,... =0

„
«..
-.

,

Total net ordinary expenditures
Rdeemption ofpublic debt in excess of issues
Balance in the Treasury September 30,1890
Total.............

.^.

6,704,611.34
951,797.86
754,614.46
10,464, 57L18
• 1,029,150.43
3,374, 925.67

„o.„-.

..„«
^

104,251,601.58
77,799*860.00
711,731,001.58

...L
,,
.„...,...'.,....•

23, 279,670.94
985,963! 56
33,739,818.43,
11,164,820.90
5, 259,' 419. 26
21,513,488.59
8,308,419. 90

o ==.a.ooo.3».....oo

893,782,463.16

CXVI
,

REPORT-OP THE SECRETARY^ OF THE TREASURY.

T A B L E O . — S T A T E M E N T O F R E C E I P T S O F T H E U N I T E D " S T A T E S F R O M M A R C H 4,1789^
30) FROM

Balance in
the Treasury atl
commencement of year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
, 1813
1814
1815
1816
181,7
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843*1
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

$973,905.75
783,444.51
753,661. 69
1,151,914.17
516,442.61
; 888,995.42
1, 021,899. 04
617,451.43
2.161.867.77
2,623, 311.99
3, 295,391.00
5,020,697. 64
4, 825, 811.60
4,037,005.26
3,999,388.99
4.538.123.80
9,643,850.07
9,941,809.96
3.848.056.78
2, 670, 276.57
3,502,305.80
3, 862,217.41
5,196,542.00
1,727, 848.63
13,106, 592.88
22,033, 519.19
14, 989, 465. 48
1,478, 526.74
2,079, 992. 38
1,198,461.21
.1, 681, 592. 24
4,237,427.55
9.463.922.81
1,946,597.13
5,201,650.43
6,358,686.18
6,668,286,10
5,972,432.81
. 5,755,704.79
6,014,539.75
4,502,914.45
2, Oil, 777.55
11,702,905.31
8, 892,858.42
26, 749,803. 96
46, 708,436.00
37, 327,252.69
36, 891,196.94
33,157,503.68
29,963,163.46
28,685, 111. 08
30,521,979.44
39,186,284.74
36, 742,829.62
36,194,274.81
38,261, 959.65
33,079,276.43
29,416, 612. 45
32, 827, 082. 69
35,871,753.31
40,158, 353.25
43,338,860.02
50,261, OOL 09
48, 591,073.41
47,677,672.13
49,108,229.80
46, 802,'855. 00
35,113, 334. 22
33,193,248.60
32,979, 530. 78
30,963,857.83
46,965,304.87
36,523, 046.13
.134,433,738.44

Customs,

Internal revenue.

I)lrect tax.

PabMc lands. Miscellaneous,

$4,399, 473.09
$208,942. 81
3,443, 070.85
4, 255,306.56
337, 705.70
274, 089. 62
4, 801,065.28
461. 26
337, 755. 36
5, 588,
$4,836.13
987. 94
475, 289.00
6, 567,
83, 540.60
575,49L45
7, 549,649. 65
11,963. II
644, 357.95
7,106, 061.93
779, iSO. 44
6, 610,449.31
443. 75
9,080, 932.73
809, 396. 55 $734, 233. 97
167, 726.06
534,343. 38
10,750, 778. 93
1,048,033.43
206,565.44
188, 628. 02
12,438, 235. 74
621, 898. 89
71, 879.20
165, 675. 69
10,479, 417.61
215,179.09
50, 941.29
50,198.44
487, 526. 79
11, 098,505. 33
193.80
21,882.91
, 540,
21, 747.15
12, 936,487.04
55, 763.86
765, 245.73
20, lOL 45
17
14, 667,
34,732. 56
466, 163.27
13,.05L40
15, 845,521. 61
19,159.21
647, 939.06
8,190.23
16, 363,550.58
442, 252.33
4, 034.29 „
7,517.31
7,257, 506.62
7, 430.63 ' 12,448. 68
696, 548.82
8, 583,309.31
1,040,237. 53
7, 666.66
2, 295. C5
13,313, 222.73
710, 427.78
859. 22
4, 903.06
. 8,958,777. 53
835, 655.14
3, 805.52
• 4, 755.04
13, 224,623.25
1,135, 971.09
1, 662, 984.82 2,219,497.36
5,998, 772.08
4,678,059.07 2,162,673.41
1,287,959. 28
7,282, 942.22
5,124, 708. 31 4, 253, 635. 09
1,717,985.03
36,306, 874.88
2,678,100.77 1,824,187.04
1,991,226.06
26,283, 348.19
385. 00
2, 606,564,77
955, 270.20
264, 3331 36
17,176,
3,274,422.78
83,650. 78
229, 593.63
20, 283,608.76
1,635,871.61
31,586. 82
106,200. 53
15, 005,612.15
1,212,966.46
29, 349.05
69, 027. 63
13, 004,447.15
761. 94
20, 961.56
1.803,581. 54
67,6o5.71
17, 589,
10,337.71
916, 523.10
34,242.17
19,088, 433.44
325.71
984, 418.15
34,663. 37 • 6,20L 96
17,878,
2,330.85
1,216, 090.56
25, 771.35
20,098, 713.45
6, 638.76
1,393, 785.09
21,589.93
23,341, 331.77
2,626.90
1,495, 845.26
19, 885.68
19,712, 283.29
2, 218.81
17,45L54
1,018, 308.75
23,205, 523.64
11, 335. 05
3,517, 175.18
22,681, 965. 91
14,502.74
16,980.59
2, 329,356.14
12,100.62
21, 922,39L39
10,506. 01
3,210, 815. 48
6,933.51
24,224, 441.77
6, 791.13
11,630. 65
2, 623,381.03
28,465, 237.24
394.12
3, 967,682.55
2,759.00
29, 032,508.91
19.80
4, 857,600.69
4,196.09
16,214, 957.15
14,757, 600.75
4,263.33
10,459.48
19,391, 310. 59
728. 79 24,877, 179.86
23,409, 940.53
370.00
11,169, 290. 39
, 1,687.70
6, 776,236. 52
5,493.84
16,158, 800. 36
3,730, 945. 66
2,467.27
23,137, 924.81
7, 361,576. 40
2, 553. 32 ""°"'755.22'
13,499, 502.17
3,411,818. 63
1,682.25
627.42
14,487, 216.74
1, 365,
3,261.36
18,187, 908.76
1,335, 797.52
495. 00
• 103.25
898, 158.18
7,046, 843.91
1,777.34
2, 059,939. 80
26,183, 570.94
3,517.12
2,077, 022. 30
27, 528,112. 70
2,8971 26
2, 694,452.48
26,712, 667. 87
2,498, 355.20
- 375.00
23, 747,864.66
642. 56
375.00
3, 328,
31,757, 070. 96
959. 55
1, 688,
28, 346,738. 82
894. 25
1, 859;
39,668, 686.42
2,352, 305.30
49,017, 567.92
2,043, 239.58
47,339, 326.62
1, 667,084.99
58,931, 865. 52
8,470, 798. 39
64,224, 190. 27
53^025, 794.21
11,497, 049.07
644. 93
64,022, 863.50
8, 917,
486.64
63, 875,905.05
3,829,
715. 87
41, 789,620.96
3, 513,
49,565, 824. 38
1, 756,687.30
53,187, 511.87
1,778, 557.71
39, 582,125.64
870, 658. 54
49, 056,397. 62
152, 203.77
1, 795, 331.73
69, 059,642.40
167, 617.17
37, 640,787. 95 1,485,103. 61
588, 833.29
475, 648. 96
102,316, 152.99 109,741,134.10
996, 553.31
84,928, 260.60 209,464,215.25 1,200,573.03.




$10,478.10
9,918.65
21,410.88
53, 277:97/
28,317. 97
1,169,415. 98
399,139.29
58,192. 81
86,187. 56
152,712.10
345,649.15
1, 500, 505.86
131,945.44
139,075.53
40, 382.30
51,121.86
38, 550.42
21,822.85
62,162.57
84,476.84
59,21L22
126,105.17
271,571.00
164,398.81
285, 282. 84
273,782.35
109,76i. 03
57,617,71,
57, 098.42 1
61, 338.44
152, 589.43
452,957.19
141,129.84
127,603. 60
. 130,451.81
94, 588.66
1, 315,722. 83
65,126.49
112; 648. 55
"73,227.77
584,124.05
270,410.61
470i 096. 67
480, 812. 32
759,972.13
2,245, 902. 23
7, 001,444. 59
6,410, 34.8.45
979, 939.86
2, 567,112. 28
1, 004, 054.75
451,995. 97
285,895. 92
1,075,419. 70
,
361,453.68
289, 950.13
220,808. 30
612,610. 69
685, 379.13
2,064,308.21'
1,185,166.11
464,249.40
988, 081.17
1,105,352.74
827,731.40
1,116,190.81
1,259,920. 88
1', 352,029.13
1,454,596.24
' 1, 088, 530. 25
1, 023, 515. 31
915, 327.97
3,741,794.38'
30,291,701.86
25, 441, 556.00

*For the,half-y ear from J a a ;

RECEIPTS^ ^ 1789-1890

CXVII

„TO JUNE 30, 1890, BY CALSKDAE TEAKS TO 1843 AND BY. FISCAL YEARS (E'NDED JUNE •
IHAT TIME,
. . .

Dividends.

1791
1792
i793
1794
1705
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801.
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
18381839
1840
1841
1842
1843*
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

N e t ordinary
Interest.
receipts.

Premiums,

Eeceipts
froin l o a n s a n d G r o s s r e c e i p t s .
Treasury
notes.

Unavailable.

$4, 771, 342. 53
$361, 39L 34
$4,409, 951.19
8, 772,458.76
5,102, 498.45
$8, 028.00 3,669,960.31
6,450,195.15
1, 797, 272.01
38,1500. 00 4.6.52,293.14
9, 439, 855. Co
4, 007, 950.78
303,472.00 5,431,904.87
9, 515, 758. 59
3,390, 424. 00
160, 000. 00 6,114, 534. 59 $4,800.00
8, 740, 329. G5
320, 000. 00
160,000. 00 8, 377, 529. 05 42, 800.00
8, 758, 780. 99
70, 000.00
80, 960.00 8,688, 780,99
8,179,170.80
• 200, 000.00
79, 920.00 7,900,495.80 78, 675. 00
12,546,813.31
5,000, 000.00
71,040.00 7, 546, 813.31
12,413, 978. 34
71, 040.00 10, 848, 749.10
1,565, 229.24
12, 945,455.95
88, 800. 00 12, 935,330.95 10,125.00
14, 995, 793. 95
.39, 960. 00 14, 995, 793. 9.'
11, 064, 097.63
11, 064, 097.63
11, 82G, 307.38
11,826, 307. 38
13,560,693.20
13, 560, 693.20
15, 559,931. 07
15,559,.93L07
16, 398j 019. 20
16,398,019.26
17, 060, 661. 93
17, 000, 661.93
7,773,473.12
7, 773,473.12
12,134, 214.28
9. 384, 214.28
2, 750, 000.00
14,422, 634. 09
14,422, 634.09
22, 639, 032.
12, 837, 900. 00
9,801,132.76
40,524, 844. 95
26,184, 135. 00
300.00
14, 340,409.95
34, 559, 536. 95
23, 377, 826.00
11,181,025.16
85.79
50, 961, 237. GO
35, 220, 671.40
15,096,916.82 11, 541. 74
$32,107. 64
67,171,421.82
47, 676, 985.66 68, 665.16
9,425, 084.91
686.09
466, 723. 45
33, 833, 592. 33
^ 202,426.30 33. 099,049. 74 267, 819.14
2i; 585,171.04
21, 593, 930. GG
8, .353. 00
412.62
525, OOO. 00
24, 605, 665. 37
675, 000.00 24, 603,374.37
2, 291.00
20,881,493.68
1, 000,000.00 17, 840, 669.55
40,000.00
3,000, 824.13
19,573, 703.72
105,000.00 14, 573,379. 72
5,000, 324.00
20,232,427.94
20, 232,427. 94
297, 500. 00
20, 540, 666. 26
350,000.00 20,640,666. 26
19, 381,2] 2. 79
24,381,212.79
5,000, 000.00
350, 000. 00
367,500.00 21,840,858.02
5,000,000.00
26, 840, 858.02
25,260,434.21
402, 500.00
25,260,434.21
420, boo. 00 22,966, 363.96
22, 966, 363.96
455,000.00 24,763.629.23
24, 763, 629. 23
490, 000. 00 24,827,627.38
24, 827,627.38
490, 000.00 24,844,116.51
24, 844,116.51
490,000.00 28,526, 820.82
28, 526, 820.82
490, 000.00 31,867,450.66
31, 867,450. 66 $1,889,50
474,985.00 «3,948,426.25
33,948,426.25
234,349. 50 21,791,935.55
21,791,935. 55
506,480.82 35,430,087.10
35,430,087.10
292,674.67 50,826,796.08
50,826,796. 08
24,954,153.04
27, 947,142.19 63,288.35
2,992,989. W
26,302, 561. 74
39, 019,382. 60
12,716,820.86
31,482,749.^1
3,857, 276. 21 35,340, 025. 82
1,458,782.93
19,480,115.33
5, 589, 547.51 25, 069, 662. 84 37,469.25
16,860,160.27
13, 659, 317.38 30,519,477. 65
19,976,197.25
14,808,735.64
34, 784, 932.89 II, 188.00
12,479, 708.36 20, 782,410.45
8, 231, OOL 26
71,700.83
29, 320,707.78
31,198,555.73
1,877,181.35
29,970,105.80
29, 970,105. 80
28,251,90
,29,699,967.74
29, 699,967. 74
26,467,403.16
55,368,1(58.52 "30," 000.'66
872,399.45
28,1
28,365.91
85, 698,699.21
56,992,479. 21
256,700.00
37,080.00
21,;
59, 796, 892.98
30, 721,077.50
487,065.48
28, 588,750.00
{
47, 649, 388. 88
43, 592,888.88
045,950.00
10, 550.00
4,'
52, 762,704. 25
52, 555,039.33
203,400.00
4, 264.92
49,893,115. 60
49, 846, 815.60
46, 300.00
61,603,404.18 103,30L 37
61,587,031.68
16, 350.00
22.50
73,802, 343. 07
2, OOL 67
'73,800,3'4L.40
65,351,374 '
800. 00
65,350,574.68
74, 056, 899. 24
200.00
74,056,699.24
68,969, 212. 57
3,900.00
68,965,312.57
717,300. 00 70,372,665. 96
46, 655, 365.96
23,'
52,'777,107.92
J
709, 357. 72 . 28,287, 500. 00 81,773, 965.64
15,408.34
76, 841,407.83
776, 800.00
56,054,599.83
10, 008. 00 20,'
861, 709. 74 83, 371, 640.13
41,476,299.49
33,630. 90 41,1
51,919,-26L09
(
68,400.00 529, 692, 460.50 581,680,121.59
II, 110.81
112, 094, 945. 51
(
602,345.44 776, 682,361.57 889, 379,652. 52
6,000.01
873,
243,412,971.20
21,174, lOL 01 , 128, i 945. 361,393,461,017.57
9,210.40
323,031,158.19
11,683,446.89 1,472,224,740.85 1,805,939,345."^
.6,095,11

iiary l"to J u n e 30,4843.




•exVIII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE TREASURY,
TABLE 0.—STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS OP THE, UNITEB

Balance in
tbe Treasury a t
commencem e n t of y e a r .

1

1866 $33,933,657.89
1867 160,817,099.73
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

198,076,437.09.
1.58,936,032.87
183, 781. 985. 76
177, 604,116.51
138,019,122.15
134, 666,001.85
159, 293, 673.41.
178, 833,339. 54
172,804,061.32
149,909, 377.21
214,'887, 645. 88
286, 591,453. 88
386, 832, 588. 65
231,940,064.44
280,607, 668.37
275,450,903. 53
374,189, 081. 98
424, 941,403.07
521, 794; 026.26
526,848,755.46
512,351.434.36
659,449, 099.94
673, 399,118.18

^

Customs.

$179,046,651.58
176,417,810.88
164,464, 599. 56
180, 048,426.63
194, 538, 374.44
206,270, 408. 05
210,370,286.77
188, 089, 522. 70
163,103, 833.69
157,167,722.35
148,071.984.61
130, 956,493.07
130,170,680.20
137,250,047.70
186, 522, 064.60
198,159,676.02
220,410, 730.25
214, 706, 496.93
195,067,489. 76
181,471,939.34.
192,905*023.44
217,286,893.13
219,091,173.63
223, 832,741.69
229, 668,584. 57
6, 531, 564,175.16




Internal revenue.

Direct tax.

$309.226, 813.42 $1, 974,754.12
. 266,027,537.43 4,200, 233.70

Public lands. Miscellaneous.

$665,031.03 $29,036,314.23
1,163,575.76 15, 037, 522.15

191, 087, 5=9. 41 1, 788,145.85
1,349,715.41
158, 3.50,460. 86
765, 685. 61
4,020,344.34
184,899, 756.49
229,102.88
3,350,481.76
143, 098.153. 63
580, 355.37
2,388,646.68
130, G42,177. 72
-2, 575,714.19
113,729, 314.14 '"sis," 254.'si' 2, 882, 312.38
102.409, 784. 90
1,852,428.93
110, 007, 493. 58
1, 413, 640.17
116,700,732.03
1,129,466.95
93,798.80
118, 630,407. 83
976,253.68
110,581,624.74
1, 079,743.37
113,561,610.58
924,781; 66
124, 009, 373.92 " " " " ' z o ' . h h '
1,016,506.60
135.264, 385.51
2,201,863.17
1, 516.89
4,753,140.37
146.497, 595. 45
160,141. 69
144,720,368.98
. 7,955,864.42
108,156.60
121, 586, 072. 51
9, 810,705. 01
70,720.75
5,705.986. 44
112.498, 725. 54
116, 805,936.48 ""i68,'239."94* 5,630,999.34
9,254,286.42
118,823,391,22
32,892.05
124,296, 871.98
1, 565.82 11,202,017.23
130,881,513.8®
8,038,651.79
142, 606, 705. 81
6,358, 272. 51

17,745,403.59
13,997, 338. 65
12.942,118.30
22,093, 541.21
15,106, 051.23
17,161,270.05
32, 575,043.32
15,431,915. 31
24,070,602.31
30,437,487.42
15,614,728.09
20, 585, 697.49
21,978, 525. 01
25,154,850.98
31,703, 642.52
30,796,695.02
21,984, 881.89
24,014, 055.06
20,989,527.86
26,005,814.84
24,674,446,10
24, 297,151.44 1
24,447,419.74

3, 966, 074,548.17 28,131,990.32 276, 476,106.11 667,496, 845.47

* Amount betetofore credited to the Treasurer as

CXIX
STATES FROM MARCH 4, 1789, TO J U N E 30, 1890,-ETC.-~Coi3timied,

Dividends.

"Net ordiuary
receipts.

Interest

N
1866
1867

$519,949,564.38
462,846,679.92

1868
1869
1870 .
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
11887
1888
J 889
11890

1

— o

r

.

376,434,453.82
357,188,256.09
395,959,833.87
374,431,104.94
364,694,229.91
322,177,673.78
299,941,090.84
284,020,771.41
290,066,584.70 . . . . „ . . . , ,
281,000,642.00
257,446,776.40
272,322,136.83
333,526,500.98
360,782,292,57
403,525,250.28
398,287,581.95
348,519,869.92
323,690,706.38
336,439,727.06
371,403,277.66
379,266,074.76
387,050,058.84
403,080,982.63

Receipts
Premiums. from loans and Gross receipts.
Treasury
notes.

Unavailable.

$38,083,055.68 $712,851,553.05 $1,270,884,173.11 $172, 094. 29
27,787,330.35 640,426,910.29 1,131,060,920.56 721, 827.-93
29,203,629.50
13,755,491.12
15,295,043.76
8,892,839.95
9,412,637.65
11,560,530.89
5,037,665.22
3,979.279.69
4,029.280.58
405,776.58
317,102.30
1,505,047.63
110.00

2,675,918.10
625,111,433.20 1,030,749,516.52
238,678,081.06 ' 609,621,828.27 *2,070.73
285,474,496.00 696,729,973.63
268.768,523.47 652,092,468.36 *3,396.18
305,047,054.00 679,153.921.56 *18,228.35
214,931,017.00 648,669,221.67 *3, 047. 80
439,272,535.46 744,251,291.52 12,691.4©
387,971,556.00 675,971,607.10
691,551,673.28
397,455,808.00
348,871,749.00 630,278,167.58
404,581,201.00 662,345,079.70
792,807,643.00 1,066,634,827.46
211,814,103:00 545,340,713.98
113,750,534.00 474,532,826.57
120,945,724.00 524,470,974.28
,555,942,564.00 954,230,145.95
555,397,755.92 *1, 500.00
206,877,886.00
245,196,303.00 568,887,009.38 47,097. 65
116,314,850.00 452,754,577.06
154,440,900.00 525,844,177.66
7,997,64
^ 285,016,650.00 664.282,724.76
245,111,750.00 632,161,408.84
245,293,650.00 648,374,632.63
*731.11

$9,720,136.29 11,479,463,801.52 $485,224.45 204,259,220.83 12,886,184,118.84 24,570,392,365.64 2,714,730.71

unavailable and since recovered and charged to his account.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURYo

cxx

T A B L E P , — S T A T E M E N T OF E X P E N D I T U R E S OF T H E U N I T E D STATES FROM MARCH 4,
.
, '
J U N E 30) FROM

Year,

179I.,oo...
1792
oo
1793
1794
1795
o
.
1796
1797
^.
1798
1799
•.
.
1800...w.
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1.
1806
,
:.
1807
o
1808.
1809.
1810
:
1811..o
18I2...0.....

1813
1814..:
°
1815
.
1816
1817.....
Igl8...,
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
V
1826....
1827..
1828
1829
..
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
..,
1838
1839.....
1840
1841.
1842
1843*
:.
..
1844
1845........
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850.
1851
1852
1853.........
1854......:......:.
1855
1856......
18.57.
1858
1859 ...... ..
1860
1861,..
1862
1863
1864.oo

War.

$632, 804. 03
. 1,100, 702. 09
1,130,249. 08
" 2,639,097.59
2, 480, 910.13
1, 260, 263. 84
1, 039, 402.46
2, 009, 522.30
'
2, 466, 946. 98
2,560,878.77
1, 672, 944.08
1,179,148.25
822, 055. 85
875, 423.93
712,781.28
1,224,355.38
1, 288, 085.91
2,900, 834.40
^3,345,772.17
, 2,294, 323. 94
2,032,828.19
11, 817, 798.24
19,652,013.02
20, 350, 806.86
14,794, 294. 22
16, 012, 096.80
8, 004, 236. 53
5,662,715.10
6, 506. 300.37
2, 630, 392.3l
4,461, 291.78
3,111,981.48
3,096, 924.43
3, 340, 939. 85
3,659, 914,18
3, 943,194. 37
3, 948, 977.88
4,145, 544.56
4, 724,291.07
4, 767,128.88
4, 841, 835. 55
5,446,034. 88
6,704, 019.10
5, 696,189. 38
5, 759,156:89
11,747, 345.25
13, 682,730.80 '
12i 897, 224.16
8, 916, 995. 80
7, 095,267.23 ,
8,801,610.24
6, 610,438.02
2,908,671.95
5,218,183.66
5,746,291. 28
10,413, 370.58
35,840,030.33
27, 688, 334. 21
14,558,473.26
9, 687, 024. 58
12,161,965.11
8, 521, 506.19 <
9, 910, 498.49
11,722, 282.87
14,648,074.07
16, 963,160.51
19, 159,150.87
25, 679,121. 63
23,154,720.53
16,472, 202. 72
23,001,530.67
389,173, 562. 29
603, 314, 411. 82
690,391, 048.66




ITayy.

Indians.

Pensions.

Miscellaneous.

$175, 813.88 $1,083,971.61
$27, 000. 00
4,672, 664.38
109, 243.15
13, 648. 85
511, 451. 01
80, 087.81
27,282.83
750, 350.74
81, 399. 24
13,042.46
$61,408.97
1,378, 920.66
68, 673. 22
' 23,475.68
410, 562. 03
801, 847. 58
100,843.71
113,563.98
274, 784.04
1,259,422.62
92, 256. 97
382,631.89
62, 396. 58
1,139, 524. 94
104, 845. 33
16, 470. 09
1,381,347.76
1, 039, 391. 68
95, 444.03
20, 302.19
2,858, 081. 84
1, 337, 613.22
64,130.73
3,448,716.03
31.22
1,114, 768.45
73,533.37
9,000. 00
2, 111, 424.00
1,462, 929.40
85, 440. 39
94, 000. 00
915, 561.87
1, 842, 635. 76
62, 902.10
60,000.00
I, 215,230. 53
2,191,009.43
80, 092. 80
, 1,189,832.75
116, 500.00
3, 768, 598.75
81, 854.59
1, 597, 500.00
196, 500. 00
2,890,137.01
1.649,641.44
81, 875.53
234,200.00
1,697,897.51
1, 722, 064.47
'70, 500.00
205,425.00
1, 423, 285. 61
1,884,067.80
82, 576.04
213, 575.00
1, 215,803.79
2,427, 758.80
87, 833. 54
337, 503.84
1,101,144. 98
1, 654, 244.20
83, 744.16
177, 625. 00
1, 367, 291. 40
75, 043. 88
151, 875. 00
1, 965, 566.39
1, 683, 088. 21
91,402.10
3, 959, 365.15
277, 845. 00
86,989. 91
1, 729, 435. 61
167,358.28
6, 446, 600.10
90,164. 36
2, 208, 029.70
167, 394.86
7, 311, 290.60
2, 898,870. 47
69, 656.06
8, 660, 000. 25
530, 750. 00
2, 989, 741.17
188, 804.15
3,908,278.30
274, 512.16
297, 374.43
3, 518, 936. 76
3,314,598.49
319,463. 71
890,719.90
3, 835, 839. 51
2, 953, 695. 00
505,704.27
2, 415, 939. 85 3, 067, 211. 41
3, 847, 640.42
463,181.39
2, 592, 021. 94
3,208, 376. 31
4, 387, 990. 00
315,750.01
2,223,121.54
242,817.^25
3, 319, 243. 06
477, 005.44
1,948,199.40
1, 967, 996. 24
2, 224,458.98
575, 007.41
2, 022, 093. 99
1,780, 588. 52
2,503,765.83
380,781.82
7,155,308. 81
1,499,326.59
429,987.90
2, 904, 581. 56
724,106.44
1, 308, 810. 57 2,748,544.89
3, 049, 083.86
743,447. 83
2, 600,177.79
1,556, 593. 83
4,218.902.45
750, 624.88
2,713,476.58
976,138.86
4,263, 877.45
706,084.24
3, 676, 052.64
3, 918, 786.44
850, 573.57
3, 082,234. 65
3,308,745.47
949, 594.47
576, 344. 74
3,239,428.63
622, 262.47
1, 363, 297. 31 3, 237,416. 04
3, 856,183. 07
930, 738.04
3,064, 646.10
1,170, 665.14
3, 956,370.29
1,184,422.40 . 4, 577,141.45
1,352,419.75
3, 901, 356.75
5, 716, 245.93
4, 589,152.40
1,802,980.93
3,956, 260.42
4,404, 728.95
3, 364,285.30
1, 003,953.20
3, 864, 939. 06 1,706,444.48
1, 954, 711.32
4, 229, 698. 53
2, 882, 797. 96 5, 393, 279.72
5,037, 022. 88
5, 807, 718.23
2, 672,162.45
9, 883, 370. 27
6, 646, 914.53 4, 348,036.19
2,156, 057.29
7,180, 664.76
6,131, 580.53
5, 504,191. 34
3,142,750.51
5, 725, 990. 89
6,182,294.25
2, 528, 917.28
2, 603, 562.17
6,113,896.89
5, 995, 398.96
2,331,794. 86
2,388,434.51
6,490,881.45
6, 001, 076. 97 2,514,837.12
1,378, 931. 33
1,199, 099.68
8, 397,242. 99
6, 775, 624.61
3,727,711.53
839, 041.12
3, 202,713. 00
578, 371. 00
6,498,199.11
5, 645,183.86
1,256, 532.39 . 2,032,008.99
6,297,177.89
2,400,788.11
5, 911,760. 98
1,539,351.35
6,455, 013.92
6,711,283.89
1, 027, 693. 64 1,811, 097. 56
7,900, 635.76
1, 744, 883.63
6, 885, 608. 35
1,430,411.30
9,408,476.02
1, 227, 496.48
5, 650,851. 25
1,252,296.81
9,786,705.92 . 1,374,161.55
1, 328, 867. 64 12, 885, 334.24
7,904,724.66
1,866, 886. 02 16, 043, 763. 36
1,663,591.47
8, 880, 581.38
2,293, 377. 22 17, 888, 992.18
2, 829, 801.77
8, 918, 842.10
3,043, 576. 04 2,401, 858.78 17,504,171.45
1,756, 306. 20 17, 463, 068. 01
11, 067, 789. 53
3, 880,494.12
1, 232,665. 00 26, 672,144.68
10, 790, 096.32
1, 550,339. 55
13,327,095.11
2,772, 990. 78 1,477, 612.33 24,, 090,425. 43
14,074,834.64
2, 644, 263. 97 1, 296, 229. 65 31, 794, 038. 87
12, 651, 6,94.61 . 4,354, 418. 87 1, 310, 380.58 28, 565, 498.77
1,219, 768. 30 26,400, 016.42
14, 053, 264. 64 4, 978, 266.18
1,222,222. 71 23,797,544.40
14, 690, 927. 90 3,490, 534.53
1,100,802.32
11, 514, 649. 83 2, 991,121. 54
27, 977, 978.30
1,034, 599. 73 23, 327, 287. 69
12, 387, 156. 52 2,865,481.17
42, 640. 353. 09 2,327, 948. 37
21, 385, 862.59
852,170.47
3,152,032.70
63,261, 235.31
1,078, 513. 36 23,198,382.37
2,629,975.97
85, 704, 963.74
4, 985,473.90 27,572,216.87

* For the half year from Jan

EXPENDITURES, 1789-1890.
1789, TO J U N E 30, 1890,
THAT T I M E .

\

CXXl

B Y CALENDARS YEARS TO 1843 AND B Y F I S C A L YEARS ( E N D E D

Year. Net ordinary ex- Fremitims.
penditures.

Interest.

Public debt

Gross expenditures.

B a l a n c e in
Treasury at
> the end of
the year.

$973, 905; 75
919, 589:52
$3, 797, 436. 78
$699, 984. 23
$1,177, 863.03
783, 444. 51
258. 47
8, 962, 920.00
2,373,611.28,
693, 05(». 25
753, 601.69
070. 73
6,479, 977. 97
2, 097, 859.17| 2, 633, 048. 07
299. 00
9 041, 593.17
2, 752, 523.04
2, 743, 771.13
1,151, 924.17
541.72
10,1.51 240.15
2,841, 639. 37
2, 947, 059. 06
516, 442.61
303.1
8,367 776. 84
888, 905.42.
3, 239, 347.68, 2,577.126.01
110.52
8; 625, 877.37
2,617,250.12
1,021, 899.04
3,172,516.73
710.42
8, 583, 618. 41
617, 451.43
2, 955, 875.90
976, 032. 09
160.72
11, 002, 396. 97 2,161, 867.77 '
1,706,578.84
2, 815, 651.41
369. 97
11,952, 534.12
1,138,563.11
3,402, 601.04
2,623, 311.99
669. 90
2,879, 876.98
4,411, 830.06
12, 273, 376. 94 3, 295,391.00
079.91
5,294,235.24
13,270, 487. 31
5, 020,697. 64
4, 239,172.16
824.24
11, 258, 983. 67 4, 825,811.60
3, 949, 462. 36
3, 306, 697.07
858. 911
12,615, 113.72
4,037, 005.26
4,185, 048. 74
3, 977, 206.07
234. 62
3, 999.388.99
13, 598, 309.47
2, 657,114. 22
4, 583, 960. 63
209. 36
4,538, 123.80
3,368,968.26
572, 018. 64 . 15, 021 196.26
292.99
572. 89
9, 643,850. 07
11, 292,
2, 93«, 141. 62
3, 369, 578. 48
338. 85
809. 96
9, 941,
16,762, 702.04
7, 701, 288. 96
2, 557, 074. 23
672.14
3, 848,050.78
13, 867, 226.30
2,866, 074, 90
3, 586.479.26
082. 28
13, 309, 994. 49 2, 672,276. 57
3,163, 671. 09
4,835,241.12
604 .'86
13, 592, 604. 86 ' 3, 502,
305. 80
2, 58.5, 435. 57 5,414,564.43
498. 70
3, 862,217.41
22, 279, 121. 15
2, 451, 272. 57
1, 998, 349. 88
396. 92
520.36
5,196, 542.00 •
39,1
3, 599, 455.22
7, 508, 668. 22
686. 38
38^028, 230. 32 1, 727,848. 63
4,593,239.04
3, 307, 304. 90
571. 00
39, 582, 493.35 13,106, 592. 88
5,990, 090. 24
6, 638, 832.11
432. 58
7, 822, 923. 34 17, 048,139. 59 , 48,244, 495. 51 22, 033.519.19
609. 92
40, 877. 646. 04 14, 989,465..'! 8
4, 536, 282. 55 20, 886, 753. 57
673.7
1, 478,526. 74
16,086,247.59
35,104, 875.40
6,209,954.03
2,079, 992. 38
24,004, 199.73
273.44
' 5,211,730.56
2, 492,195. 73
21,763, 024. 85 1,198, 461.21
530: 57
3,477, 489. 96
5,151, 004. 32
19, 090^ 572. 69 1, 681,592.24
479. 0'
3, 241, 019.83
5,126, 073.79
17,676, 592.63
643. 51
2, 676,160.33
4,237, 427. 55
5,172,788.79
15, 314, 171.00
154.59)
9,463, 922) 81
4, 922,475.40
607, 541.01
31, 808, 538.47
144.71
i, 946,597.13
4, 943, 557. 93 11,624,835.83
450. 90|
5,201, 650.43
23, 585, 804.72
4, 366, 757.40
7, 728, 587.38
316. 27
6,358, 686.18
24,103, .?98.46
3, 975, 542.95
'7, 065, 539. 24
6,668, 286.10
22, 656, 764.04
6, 517, 596. ""
3, 486, 071. 51
095.65
25, 459, 479. .52 5,972, 435. 81
9, 064, 637.47
041.45
3, 098, 800.60
25, 044, 358. 40 5, 755,704.79
9,860,304.77
210.40
2, 542, 843. 23
9, 443,173.29
533.33
24, 585, 281. 55 6, 014,539. 75
1,912,574.93
067.90
30, 038, 446.12
4, 502;914.45
1, 373, 748. 74 14,800,629.48
34, 356, 698. 06 2, Oil 777. 55
388.77
772, 561.50
17, 067, 747. 79
24, 257, 298; 49 11, 702,905. 31
755.11
303, 796. 87
1,239,746.51
24, 601 982. 44
417. 25
5,974,412.21
8,892, 858. 42
202,152. 98
17, 573, 141.56 26, 749,803. 96
950.28
328. 20
57,863,08
30,868, 161. 04 46, 708,436.00
164.04
37,265, 037.15 37, 327,252.69
214. 24
21, 822. 91
39,455, 438. 35 36, 891,196. 94
718. 08
14, 996.481
5, 590,723. 79
37, 614, 936,15 33.157, 503.68
948. 73
10, 718,153. 53
28, 226, 533. 81 29, 963,163.46
920.11
174, 598.08
3,912, 015. 62
840. 29
31, 797, 530.03 28,685, IIL 08
284, 977. 55
5, 315,712.19
336.59
773, 549.85
32, 936, 876.53 30, 521,979.44
7, 801,990. 09
523, 583. 91
12,118, 105.15 39,186, 2,84,74
508.60
338, 012.64
108. 01
33, 642, 010.85 36,742, 829.62
1, 833,452t 13 11,158, 450. 71
369. 61
30,490, 408.71 36,194, 274.81
1,040, 458.18
7, 536,349.49
$18,231,431
459. 59
27, 632, 282. 90 38, 261,959.65
842, 723.27
371, 100.04
067.65
214.72
569. 37
60,520, 851. 74 33, 079,276.43
1,119,
5,600,
454.7
60,655, 143.19 29, 416,612.45
2, 390,765. 88 13, 036,922.54
478.54
535.78
542. 61
56,386, 422. 74 32, 827,082.69
12,804,
82, 865.8li • 3, 565.
990. 09
44, 604, 718. 26 35, 871,753. 31
3,782, 393.03
3, 656,335.14
760.75
48.476, 104.31 40.158, 353.25
654, 912. 71
717.66
69, 713.19
3, 696,
46, 712, 608. 83 43, 338,860. 02
2,152, 293.05
954. 56
170,063.42
4,000, 297.80
54, 577, 061. 74 50,261, 901. 09
6,412, 574.01
156. 35 420,498. 64
3, 665,832. 74
75, 473, 170.75 48, 591.,073.41
528. 42 2, 877, 818.69
3, 070,926. 69 . 17,556,896.95
464. 99
66, 164 775. 9S 47, 777,672:18
6,662, 065.86
197. 72 872,047.39
2, 314,
72, 726; 341.57 49,108, 229.80
3, 614,618. 66
527.64
385, 372. 90
1, 953,822. 37
265.23
71, 274, 587.37 46, 802,855.00
3, 276,606. 05
143. 70 363, 572.39
1, 593,
7, 505,250. 82
437.17
574,443.
82, 062, 186. 74 , 35,113,
1,652, 055. 67
334.22
72,
649. 70 14, 685,043.15
950. 07
83, 678, 642.92 33,193, 248.60
2, 637,
754.71
13, 854,250.00
77,055, 125.65 32, 979,530. 78
3,144,120.94
62,
055.78
85, 387, 313.08 30, 903,857.,83
4, 034,157. 30 18, 737,100. 00
"896. 81
565, 667, 563. 74 46, 965,304.87 '
13.190, 344. 84 96, 097,322. 09
456,
575. 56
899, 815, 911.25 36, 523,046.13
24, 729,700. 62 181, 081,635.07
694,
676.14
295, 541, 114.861 134,433, 738.44
53,685, 421.69 430,572, 014.03
811,
u a r y 1 t o J u n e 30, 1843.
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
]807
1808
1809
1810
1811,
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
18201821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843"
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864




CXXII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 'OF • THE TREASURY
TABLE P , — S T A T E M E N T OF' T H E E X P E N D I T U R E S OF THE U N I T E D

Year.

War.

ITavy.

Indians.

Pensions.

Miscellaneous.

.,o..o. $1,030, 690, 400. 06$122, 617,434. 07 $5,059, 360. 71 $16,347,621.34 $42,989,383.10
283,154, 676.06 43,285, 662.00
15, 605, 549. 88 40,613,114.17
3,295,729.32

1865
1866

3,568,638,312.28 717,551,816.39 103, 369. 211.42 119,607, 656. 01 643,604, 554. 33
*3,621, 780. 07
*718, 769.52
^*77, 992.17
*53, 286. 61
*0, 737.87
1867

,'..
....

1868

0..0....

1869
1870..
1871. .oo.a
1872.. .1

.0000.0

1873
1874..oo...
1875
1876
1877
•
1878...o..
ooo.
1870.......o.oo
1880
o oo..
1881 .oo
1882.....
1883
1884...O.O...

:

1885.1
1886.....
1887
1888
1889
1890...,

Total

3, 572, 260,092. 35
95,224,415.63
123,246,648.62
78,501,990.61
' 57,655, 675. 40
35, 799, 991. 82
35,372,157.20
46, 323,138.31
42, 313,927.22
41,120, 645.98
38, 070, 888.64
37,082,736. 00
32,154,147.85
40,425,660.73
38,116,016.22
40,466, 460.55
43, 570,494.10
48.911,382.93 .
39,420,603.36
42,670,578.47
34, 324,152.74
38, 561, 025.85
38, 522,436.11
44,435,270.85
44,582, 838. 08

717,620, 808.56 103,422, 498. 03 110, 617, 393. 88 644, 323, 323. 85
31,034, Oil. 04 4, 642, 531. 77 20, 936, 551.71 51,110, 223.72
25, 775, 502. 72 4, 100, 682.32 23. 782, 386. 78 53,009.86^.67
20,000,757.97
7,042,923. 06 28,476,621.78 56,474,061.53
21,78C, 229.87
3,'407,938.15
28, 340, 202.17 53, 237,461.56
19,431, 027.21
7,426, 9^7.44 34,443, 894.88 60.481,916.23
21,249,809.99
7,061,728,82
28,533,402.78 60,984,757.42
23,526,256.70
7, 951, 704.88 29,359,426.86 73,328,110.06
30, 932, 587.42
6, 692,462.09 29, 038,414.66 85,14i, 593.61
21,497,626.27
8, 384, 656.82 29,456,216.22 71,070, 702.98
18,963,309,82
5, 966, 558.17 .28,257,305.69 73, 599, 661.04
14, 959,935. 36 5,277,007.22
27,963, 752.27 58,926,532.53
17, 365, 301.37
4,629,280. 28 27,137,010.08 58,177, 703.57^
15,125,126.84
5, 206,109.08 35,121,482.39 65,741, 555.49
13,536, 984.74
5, 945,457.09 56, 777,174.44 54, 713,520.76
15, 686,671. 66 6,514,161.09 50,050,270.62 64,416,324.71
15,032, 046.26
0,736,747.40
81, 345,193.95 57,210, 750.08
15, 283,437.17 7,362,590.34
66, 012, 573.64 68,678,022.21
70, 920,433.70
17, 292,601.44
6,475,999,29 55,429,228.06
16, 021,079.67
6,552,494.'63 . 56,102,267.49 • 87,494,258.38
13.007,887.74
8,090,15a 17 63, 404, 864.03 74,166,929.85
15,141,126.80
6,194,522.69 75,029,101,79 85,264, 825.59
16,026,437.65
($, 249,307. 87 80,288,508.77 72,952, 260,80|
21, 378, 800. 31 6, 892,207.78 87, 624, 779.11 80,664, 064. 26
22,006,206.24
6,708,046.67 106, 936,855.07 81,403, 256.49

4,729,143,275.61 1,181,484,579.91

255,943,771.15 1,249,473,987.10 2,258,501,127.99
* Outstanding

NOTE.—This statement is made from°warrants pmd by the Treaaurer up to June 30,186(1.




The

EXI^ENDITURES, 1789-1890. ' ' •

CXXIII

STATES FROM' MARCH 4, 1789, TO JUNE 30, 1890, ETC.—Continued.'

Y e a r . N e t o r d i n a r y expenditures.

1865
1866

Premiums.

Interest.

Public debt.

G-ross e x p e n d i tures.

Balance in
Treasury at
t h e e n d of
tlie y e a r .

$1, 217,704,199. 28
$1,717, 900.11 $77, 395, 090.30 $609, 616,141. $1,906,433,331,37 $33,933,657.89
• 385,954,731.43
58, 476. 51 133,067, 624. 91 620, 263,249.10 1,139, 344, 081.95 165,301,654.76
6,152, 771, 550.43 7,611, 003.56 502, 689, 519.27
2,374, 677,103.12 8, 037, 749,176.38
*4,481, 566.24
*4, 484, 555. 03 *4,484, 555.03
*2, 888.48
*100. 31

1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

5,157, 253,116.
7,611,003. 56
202, 947, 733. 10, 813,3,49. 38
22.9, 915, 088.
7, 001,151. 04
190, 496, 354.
1, 674,680.05
421,
• 164, 507. 15, 990,555. 60
9, 016,
794.74
157, 583, 827,
6, 958,
266.
153, 201, 856,
5,105, 919.99
180, 488, 636.
1,395, 073.55
194, 118, 985.
171, 529, 848.
857,
. 164, 813.
144, 209, 963.
463,452,
134,
161, 619,934.
169, 090, 062.
2,795, 320.42
177, 142,897,
1,061, 248.78
,186. 904, 232.
206, 248, 006.
189. 547, 865.
208, 840, 678.
191, 902, 992.
220, 190, 602.
214, 938,951.
8, 270.842. 46
240, 995,131. 17,292, 362.65
261, 637, 202. 20, 304,224.06

502, 602,407.75
143, 781,591. 91
140, 424,045.71
130, 694,242.80
129, 235,498. 00
125, 576,565.93
117,357, 839.72
104,750, 688. 44
107,119, 815.21
103, 093,544.57
100, 243,271.23
97,124, 511. 57
102, 500,874.65
105, 327,949.00
95, 757,575.11
82, 508,741.18
71, 077,206. 79
59,160, 131. 25
54, 578,378.48
51, 386,256.47
50, 580,145. 97
47, 741,577. 25
44, 715,007.47
41,001,484.20
36,099,284.05

, 374,677, 203. 43 8,042, 233, 731.41 160, 817. 090.73
735, 536, 980.11 1, 093, 079, 65.5.27 198,076, 537. 00
1, 069, 889, 970.74 158, 936, 082.87
692, 549, 685.
584,777, 996.11 183,781, 985. 76
261,912, 718. 31
702,907, 842. 88 177, 604, 116. 51
393,254, 282.13
601,680, 858. 90 138, 019, 122.15
399,503, 670. 65
682,525, 270.21 134, 666, 001.85
405, 007, 307. 54
524, 044, 597. 91 •159,293, 673.41
233, 699, 352.58
724,698, 933. 99 178, 833, 339. 54
422, 065, 060,23
682, 000, 885. 82 172,804, 061.32
407, 377, 492.48
714, 446, 357. 39 149/909, 377. 21
449, 345, 272. 80
565, 299', 898.91 214, 887, 645.88
323, 965, 424. 05
590, 641, 271. 70 286, 591, 453. 88
353, 676, 944.90
966, 393, 692.69 386, 832, 588. 65
699,445, 809.16
700,233, 238.19 231, 940. 064.44
432, 590, 280,41
425, 865, 222.64 280,607, 668.37
165,152, 335.05
529, 627, 739.12 275, 450, 903.53
271, 646, 299.55
590, 083, 829,96 ,855,491, 967,50 374,189. 081. 98
504, 646, 934. 83 424, 941, 403. 07
,690.50
'260,520,,
471,987, 288.54 521,794, 026.26
211, 760, 353. 43
447, 699, 847. 86 '526, 848, 755. 46
709.36
205,216,
539, 833, 501.12 512, 851, 434.36
271, 901, 321.15
517, 685, 059.18 659. 449. 099.94
249, 760. 258.05
618,211, 390. 60 673,399, 118.18
318i 922, 412.35
630,247, 078.16 691, 527, 403.76
367,50
312, 206,

9, 674, 546, 741.76 115,296,793.04 2,644,528,634.81 11,441,778,061.56 23, 876,150, 231.17
warrants.
o u t s t a n d i n g w a r r a n t s a r e t h e n added,, a n d t h e s t a t e m e n t i s b y w a r r a n t s issued from t h a t d a t e .




CXXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

T A B L E Q . — R E C E I P T S AND DISBURSEMENTS B Y U N I T E D STATES ASSISTANT T R E A S URERS DURING T H E FISCAL YEAR ENDED J U N E 3 0 , ' L 8 9 0 .
BALTIMORE.
BalanccJune 30, 1889......

$11,658,15L98
RECEIPTS.

/

On accountof customs
On'account of internal revenue
On account of gold certificates
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8,1872
On account of Post-Office Department
On account of transfers. Treasurer's general account
On account of patent fees
r
...'..:...
On account of disbursing oflicers
On account of semi-annual duty
,.
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury.
,...._.>
On account of Treasurer's transfer account
—
On account of repayments
On account of redemption and exchange
Onaccountof miscellaneous

i
"....

—:.

$2, 981,19L 37
13
1.655,000.00
4, 900, 000.00
373, 395. 36
8,193,469. 68
^6.00
3,407, 728.37
12, 111. 74
1, 523.78
572,666.62
83,862.41
7, 906,964.00
5,962.52
^

^

30,093,881.98
41, 752, 033.96

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
On account of Post-Office drafts
On account of disbursing officers
On account of the Secretary of the Ti;easury.
On account of interest. .
-/— ^
On accoiant of redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates
..-'On account of Treasurer's transfer account
Ou account of transfers. Treasurer's general account
On account of bonds purchased
On account of certificates of deposit, act of June 8, 1872
On account of miscellaneous
Balance J u n e 30, 1890

29, 209, 264.90

o.o.y

• . 1
/

12,542,769.06

BOSTON.

Balance June 30,'1889
I

1

3,520,072.87
468,424.48
3,378,945.25
626.00
503,372.49
7, 903,224:. 00
1,460, 000. 00
1,479, 277. 20
5, 365, 966. 00
715, 552. 32
4,410, 000.00
3, 804. 29

..,.,
'

17,290,965.92

RECEIPTS.

On
On
On
On

account of customs ...•.
account of certificates of deposit; act June 8,1872
account of Post-Office Department
account of transfers:
Treasurer's
•.
Standard dollars
On accountof patent fees".
On account of disbursing officers
Oil account of semi-annual duty
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of redemption andexchange
On account of miscellaneous

21,050,690.11
1,040,000.00
2, 636,127. 60

,

13,484,685.59
1,981,100,00
9,195.20
21,002, 653.05
127, 394.98
3, 507.60
7,863,315.75
2,178, 061.63'

'

71, 376, 731.51
88, 667, 697.43
DISBURSEMENTS.

Onaccountof Treasurv drafts
16,281,397.43
Onaccountof Post-Office drafts
2,561,908.91
On account of disbursing officers
20,498,018, 50
On account of interest
^
3,2-^2,311.00
On account of redemption and exchange . . . . . . ' . .
10, 741,409. 84
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
,
3, 213.22
On account of silver certificates
• 1,338,600.00
On account of transfers
14,271,829.40
On account of United States notes mutilated
939, 670. 00
On account of certificates of deposit, act of June 8,1872
:
:..
1,040, 000.00
On account of fractional currency (silver and minor coins) redeemed..
1, 228, 580.75
On account of miscellaneous
i
2,669.76
.,
Balance J u n e 30,1890




^

72,129,608.81
16, 538,088. 62

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS BY SUB-TREASURIES.

CXXV

TABLE Q.—RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, ETC.—"Continued,

' •;

iCHICAGO.

Balance June 30,1889

.< •

...o..

,,
V

..^

$13,801,513.69 ,

RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
:
On account of internal revenue
,
Un account of sales of public lands
1.
On account of gold certificates
1
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department.;.
On account of Transfers: •
Treasurer's
Standard dollars
.<
On account of patent fees
On account of disbursing officers
On account of semi-annual duty
On account of the Secretary of* the Treasury
On account of repayments
On.account of redemption and exchange.
On account of miscellaneous

, $6,188,018.73
914,132.50
34,503.05
540,000.00
920,000.00
. 6,805,297.99

«

;
^
,.
.'.
i

,

'

27,591,845.74
,
4,145,575.00
. ,3,302.00
14,978,296.43'
21,817.56
34,777.52
130,345.69 ,
4,717,366.65 '
23,555.18
—
67,048,434.04
•

•^

80,849,947.73

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
Onaccountof Post-Office drafts
On account of disbursing accounts
.'
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of interest
.'
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates
On.account of silver certificates. -.
On account of transfers,
.i.
^
On account of TJnited States notes mutilated
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872

15,607,597.19
6,309,97L48
14,715,775,12
25,985.32
716,882.74
4, 708, 331. 65 '
1,294,000,*^pO
2,449,. 000.00
14,258,915.65
3,804, 000,00
330, 000.00

'
: '

.

'

i,
64,220,459,15

Ba,lance June 30, 1890

16,629,488.58

.

^

Balance June 30, 1889

•

• CINCINNATI,

;
'

-

•

.........:..

$13,176,033.03

"RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
On account of internal revenue
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department
On account of Transfers:
Treasurer's. - . . .
Standard dollars
On account of patent fees
"
....'
On account of disbursing officers
/
1
On account of semi-annual duty
Onaccountof the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of repayments
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of miscellaneous..
-

$1,954,911.39
44,018.50
1, 250,000.00
1,945,458.25

•
'

.:

:.
...:..

7, 303,700,'67
2,011,400.00'.
305.00
2,033,720.64
22,918.72
47,353.38
7,471. 81
3, 638,753. 50
339,974.74
20, 599, 986.60
33,776,019.63

DISBURSEMENTS,

On account of Treasury drafts
On account of Post-Office drafts
On accountof disbursing officers
^
On account of interest
On accountof redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates
On account of silver certificates
Onaccountof transfers
;.,....
On account, of United States notes mutilated
On accountiof certificates of deposit, act of June 8, 1872^.
On account of fractional currency (silver and minor coins) redtjjemed..
On account of miscellaneous
n
"
Balance June 30,1890.........oo.,o„..
'
•



•

'

1,910,817,90
.2,056,017.33
2,056,368.56
708,390.85
3,143,507, ,00
148,000,00
766,000,00
5,653,247.02
1,3?2,000,00
1,610,000.00
670,, 797.50
445,240.36
^

. l . . = ....o=ooi,.-....
-

.

.

'

~

•
^

/
i
N\

'
20,490,386.52
13,285,633.11
1

CXXVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF' THE TREASURYo
TABLE Q.—RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMEMTS, ETC.—Continued,
.1

Balance June 30,1889
X

N E W OKLEANS.

o.o.

.'.

'

o.ooo..=..o....

$16,854,944,33

RECEIPTS.

On account of customs..
'..
On account of internal revenue
v
On account of sales of public lands
On account of PosttOffice Department
On account of transfers:
Treasurer's
......'
Standard dollars
:
On account of patent fees
On account of disbursing officers
:
On account of assay office, bullion
On account of semi-annual duty
On account of the Secretary of the Treastiry
On account of repayments
:
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of miscellaneous
~

$2,908,333.61
168.52
60,515,66
1,148,044.18
'
12,755,516.15
6, 836, 290.00
260,00
3,497,153.68
845,96
12,247.60
11,021.42
201,364.76
7,456,336,50
21,979.82

-

.

34,910,077.86
51,765,022.19

DISBURSEMENTS.

On account of Treasury drafts
On account of Post-Office drafts
On account of disbursing officers
On account of interest.
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates
On account of silver certificates
On account of transfers
On account of United States notes mutilated
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of national-bank notes „

3,474,001.45
1,133,412.15
3,799,425.97
251,911.34
7,456,336.50
233, 500.00
2,107,000.00
11,081,191..77
1,448, 000.00
10, 843.52
1,141,000.00
^

•...
,.".
.'
'

Balance June 30, 1890

32,136,622.70
19,628,399,49

WEW YOBK.
Balance Jnne 30, 1889
. . .

.$200,365,528.70
-

RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
On account of internal re venue.....
On account of gold certificates, seiies 1888
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department...
.lo
On account of transfers:
Treasurer's .Standard silver dollars
r.---'On account of patent fees
»
On account of disbursing officers
On'account of assay office:
Ordinary expenses
BuUion
•
On account of semi-annual duty
Onaccountof theSecretary of the Treasury....
On account of interest
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of purchase of United States bonds
0 n account of special customs deposits
On account of purchase of Pacific railroad bonds.
On account of miscellaneous
' •

<

"

On account of Treasury drafts
,,
On account of Post-Office drafts
On account of disbursing officers
On account of assay offices: ;
Ordinary expenses
BuUion
On account of interest
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates




'$158,780,401,76
45,144,12
5,795,000.00
6,070,000.00
12,603,007.24
^

„„....
^
..

:

i

231,945,064,81
5, 089,677,00
3,298.60
230, 945, 950.80
151,148.88
15,834,740.20
176,884.09
75,747,32
27,466, 205.55
63,538,427.00
76,185,595,70
215,793,892.32
2,735,488,47
3,608,130.92

DISBURSEMENTS,

J
-o.

'

1,056,843,790.78
^

,

309,219,252.72
12,099,302.26
151,393,152.04
o
155, 918. 70
33,446,106.40
27,466,205.55
63,622,913.00
30,264,740,00

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS BY SUB-TREASURIES.

CXXVII

^ TABLE Q.—RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, ETC.—Qontinued. "
N E W YORK-Continued.
DISBURSEMENTS-Continued.

On account of sUver certificates
Onaccountof transfers
Onaccountof United States notes, mutilated
1
On account pf certificates of deposit, act Juue 8, 1872
On account of-fractional currency
.,=.
On account of national-bank notes.
On account of United States bpnds . . . . ' . . . .
'.
On account of special customs deposits.-...
On account of Pacific railroad bonds

$22,596,006.00
76,610,417.11
40,068,870.00
10, 660,000.00
1,155.00
:..
3,493,980.00
o 76,204,833.20
216,455,526.19
V
2,711,167.57
1,076,469,545.74

Balance June 30, 1890...

,

180.739,782.74

PHILADELPHIA.

,

!

Balance June 30, 1889...

$20,605,240.81
RECEIPTS.

Onaccountof customs i
Onaccountof internal revenue...
"
1
On account of gold certificates—
On account of certificates of deposit, act June 8, 1872
On account of Post-Office Department
'
On account of transfers, Treasurer's
Onaccountof patent fees
,
Onaccountof disbursing officers
On account of semi-annual duty
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of suspense account
On account of Treasurer's general account
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of miscellaneous

^

$24,124,166.64
120,495,61
8,710,000.00
8, 630,,000.00
3,157.429.31
2,422,245.56
2,182.25
14,533,045.76
33,142.78
1,517.30
13,866.16
17,625,764.64
20,063,186.00
1 2,474,922.29
.
101,931,964.30

^

-^
-

^

122,537,205.11
DISBURSEMENTS.
0

Onaccountof Treasury d r a f t s . . . . . . . . .
'.
On account of Post-Office drafts . . . . . . . \
On account of disbursing officers
On account of Secretary's sijecial account
On account of interest
.On account of redemption and exchange
On account of gold certificates
On account of suspense account
On account of transfers. Treasurer's
.'
On account of certificates of deposit, act of June 8,1872
On account of Treasurer's general account
Balance June 30, 1890

*

:

...>

,,

96,260,910,58
26,276,294,53

• SAN :e'RANCISCO.
Balance June 30,1889

$14,419,390,03
2,937,700,69
14,495,037.76
1,517.30
1,843,809,66
20,078,970.00
4^410,000.00
13, 934,05
1,649,156,81
9, 850, 000..00
26, 561, 394,28

^

,'

... = .

o..........

$62,954,74L15

RECEIPTS.

On accocSat of customsf
Onaccountof internal revenue . . I ,
On account of sales of public lands
On account of gold certificates
On account of Post-office Department
On account of transfers:
Treasurer's
......o.
Standard doUars
On account of patent fees
, On account of disbursing officers
On account of semi-annual duty
".
Onaccountof the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of miscellaneous




- $9,301,393.76
343,996.18
929,556.02
2,925,000.00
1,038,871.86

1
...-

o

:
...i

.; -

7,237,718.92
2,175,355.00
16,333.70
12,138,096.52
6,420,12
24,322,49
728,523,33

36,865,587.90
99,820,329.05

CXXVIII
.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

o TABLE Q . — R E C E I P T S AND DISBURSEMENTS, < ETC.—Continued,
Si^N EKANCISCO--Continued,
DISBURSEMENTS,

On account of Treasury drafts
.'
.On account of post-office drafts
On account of disbursing officers
On account of interest
,«
Onaccountof gold certiticates.....:
On account of silver dollars
^.'.
On account of transfers. Treasurer's
....:.
On account of United States notes and national-bank notes...
On account of fractional silver coin
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
.;
Balance June 30,1890

..-

/

$14,458,226.73
1,162,859. 84
12,097,594.95
210,757.81
930,000.00
1,606,595.00
29,528.31. *
341,505,00
738, 670,00
20,986. 35
'
31,596,723,99

,.
/

^

^

.".

68,223,605,06

ST. LOUIS.

Balance June 30,1889

$21,982,765.39
RECEIPTS.

On account of customs
"
On account of internal revenue
On account of sales of public lands
,
On account of certificates of deposit, act J u n e 8,1872
On account of Post-Ofiice Department
On account of transfers:
Treasurer's
Staudard dollars
On account of patent fees
•,
On account of disbursing officers
'
On account of assay office:
,
Ordinary expenses
Bullion
On account of semi-annul duty
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On account of interest
On account of repayment? ,
On account of redemption and exchange
On account of miscellaneous

V

''

^.......
.^
,

17,166,596.83
"' 2, 685, 800.00
3,639.50
17, 361, 894. 28
\'
'
5,887.'24
350,000,00
5,815.18
^ 8,478.37
'
31.00
148, 582,98
4, 530,814.00
,
77, 564,95

=

/

$1, 880, 997. 79
3, 636, 625,84
41,299.84
450, 000.00
2,749, 573.16

51.103,600.96

0

.
'

On account of Treasury drafts
Onaccountof Post-Office drafts
On account bf disbursing officers
.M
On account of assay office:
, Ordinary expenses
^
Bullion
•
On account of interest
On account of redemption and exchange
,
On account of gold certificates
'.
On account of silver certificates
"
On account of transfers.,
On account of United States notes mutilated
,
On accoun t of certificates of deposit, act of June 8,1872
On account of the Secretary of the Treasury
On accoun t of miscellaneous
:
"
' >

73,086,366.35

DISBURSEMENTS.

Balance June 30,1890

,-•"--

,,
L..
'..

'.
'.

-

16,757,077,07
2,718,166.81
16, 996,842.88
5,837,52
332,675.81
352, 039.00
4, 558, 579. 00
243,000. 00
284, 000. 00
6,909,412. 21
506, 000. 00
155, 000.00
8, 288.82
398,170.36
--.-

50,225,089,48
22,861.276.87

RECAPITULATION.
Totai receipts
Total disbursements

:
.•

*$I, 470,774, 064. 93
1,472,738, 611.87 '

"
^
Disbursements over receipts
....,
* Exclusive of balances from previous year.




1,964, 546.94

^L( N a m e s of t r e a t i e s .

Description of a n n u i t i e s , e t c .

X

Apaches, Kiowas,
and Comanches.
Do
Do
Do
Arickarees, Gros
V e n t r e s , and
•Mandans.
C h e y e n n e s and
Arapahoes.
Do
Do
Chickasaws
C h i p p e w a s of t h e
Mi8.sissippi.
C h i p p e w a s , Pillager a n d L a k e
Winnebagoshish
bands.
Choctaws

Do

T h i r t y installments, provided t o be expended
u n d e r t h e t e n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y o f O c t o b e r 21,
. 1867.
P u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g

N u m b e r of i n s t a l l m e n t s y e t unaj)propriated, explanations, etc.

Seven installments, unappropria t e d , a t $30,000 e a c h .

Reference'to
laws, Statutes a t
Large.

Vol. 15, p . 584 §10

......................

P r o v i s i o n s for s m i t h s e t c . . . . . . . . . o . . . . . .




Second a r t i c l e t r e a t y of N o v e m b e r 16,1805, $3,000'; t h i r t e - n t h
a r t i c l e t r e a t y of O c t o b e r 18,1820
$600; second a r t i c l e t r e a t y of
J a n u a r y 20,1825, $6,000.
S i x t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y of O c t o b e r 18,
1820; n i n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y of
J a n u a r y 20,1825.

Vol. 7, p . 99, § 2
vol. 11, p.614,§
13; vol.7,p.213
§13; voL7,p.
235, § 2 .
Vol.7, p 212, § 6
vol.7,p. 230, §9
vol.7,p.614,§13.

• sf

li

fl
<

Pt
Ul

2

$210, 000. 00 .

$11, 000. 00
T e n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t v of O c t o b e r . . . . d o . . .
21,1867.
4, 500.00
P a y of c a r p e n t e r , f a r m e r , b l a c k s m i t h , miller, F o u r t e e n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y of Oc- V o l . 15, p . 585,^,14
t o b e r 21,1867.
and engineer.
2, 500. 00
do
....do
P a y of p h y s i c i a n a n d t e a c h e r
30, 000. 00
A m o u n t t o b e e x p e n d e d i n s u c h goods, e t c . , S s v e n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y of J u l y 27, T r e a t y n o t p u b lished.
1866.
as t h e P r e s i d e n t m a y from t i m e t o t i m e determine.
T h i r t y i n s t a l l m e n t s , p r o v i d e d t o b e e x p e n d e d S e v e n i n s t a l l m e n t s , u n a p p r o p r i - Vol, 15, p . 596, 510
ated, a t $20,000 each.
u n d e r t e n t h a r t i c l e t r e a t y of Oct o b e r 28,1867.
12, 000. 00
.do
P u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g s a m e a r t i c l e
6, 500.00
P a y of p h y s i c i a n , c a r p e n t e r , farmer, b l a c k Vol. 15. p . 597,§13
o
s m i t h , miller, e n g i n e e r , a n d t e a c h e r .
V o l . 1, p . 619
P e r m a n e n t a n n u i t y i n goods . .
V o l . 9, p . 904, § 3,
F o r t y - s i x i n s t a l l m e n t s , t o b e p a i d t o t h e c h i e f s T w o i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $1,000 each
of t h e M i s s i s s i p p i I n d i a n s ,
due.
F o r t y i n s t a l l m e n t s : i n m o n e y , $10,666.66 ; F o u r i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $22,666.66 Vol. 10, p . 1168, §
3 ; vol. 13,p.694,
goods, $8,000 : a n d for p u r p o s e s of u t i l i t y ,
each, d u e .
§3.
$4,000.
Permanent annuities

STIPULATIONS.,
Amount held in trust by the
United States on which 5
per cent, is annually paid,
and amounts which, invested at 5 per cent., produce
permanent annuities.

o

Aggregate of future appropriations tbat will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities incidentally necessary
to efiect tbe payment.

CO

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

T A B L E R.—SxAiEMENr SHOwmo T H E P R E S E N T L I A B I L I T I E S OF T H E U N I T E D STATES TO I N D I A N T R I B E S U N D E R T R E A T Y

H

(—1

Ul

H
O
\-i
140, 000.00

O.
I—I

>

$3, 000.00
2,000.00

H
Pt
W

90, 666. ...4

Ul
.9,600.00

•

920. 00

o
X
X
HH

X

a

Choctaws
Creeks
Do
Do
Do..
Do

...do
. . . ...do.

Do
Do

C r o w s . . . . . . . . . .-

Do

Wheelwrighit, permanent

i!
ao

<

Vol. 11, p. 614, §13
Treaty of Au^-ust 7 1790
Treaty of June 16,1802
Treaty of January 24,1826
. do'
^
Trea y of January 24, 1826, and
August?, 1856.
Treaty of February 14, 1833, and
treaty of August 7, 1856.

$19, .512. 89

$390, 257. 92

Vol. 7, T>. 36 § 4
Vol.7, p. 69. § 2 - .
Vol. 7, p. 287, § 4 .
Vol. 7, p. 287, § 8 .
Vol.7,p. 287, §8;
vol. ll.p.700.§5.
Vol. 7, p. 419, § 5;
vol.ll,p.700,§5.

1,500.. 00
3, 000. 00
20, 000,00
1,110,00
6U0.00

400, 000. 00
22,200.00
12,000.00

Allowance, during the pleasure of the President, for black smiths, assistants, shops, and
tools, iron and steel, wagon-maker, education, and assistants in agricultural operations, etc.
Interest on $200,000 held in trust, sixth article Treatv of Auerust 7 1856
Vol.ll,p.700,§6.
treaty August 7,1856.
Interest on $275,168 held in trust, third article Expended under the direction of Vol 14 n 786 63
treaty June 14,1886, to be expended under the
the Secretary of the Interior,
direction of the Secretary of the Interior.
For supplying male persons over fourteen Treaty of May 7, 1868; eight in- Vol. 15, p. 651, §9.
years of age with a suit of good, substabtial
stallments, oE $15,000 each, due,
woolen clothing; females over twelve years
estimated.
of age a flannel skirt or goods to make the
same, a pair of woolen hose, calico, and domestic; and boys and girls under the ages
named sucho flannel and cotton goods as
their necessities may require.
For pay of physician,'carpenter, miller, engi- Treaty of May 7, 1868
....do
.
neer, farmer, aud blackstnith.
Blacksmith, iron aud steel, and for seeds and
Vol. 15, p. 651,^ 8.
agricultural implements.




Is

Amount held in trust by the
United States on which 5
per cent, is annually paid,
and amounts which, invested at 5 per cent., produce
permanent annuities.

Reference to
Number of installments yet unap- laws. Statutes at
propriated, explanations, etc.
Laige.

Interest on $390,257.92, articles 10 and 13,
treaty of January 22,1855.

Do

Do

Desciiption of annuities, etc.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities incidentally necessary
to effect the i)ayment.

Names of treaties.

Annual,amount necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

T A B L E R.—STATEMENT sitoWtNa tHE pRJisfiNt LiABtLtttES ol? T H S U N I T E D STATES TO INDIAN T R I B E S , iiTc.—Contintied.

Xl
X
X
Pt

-o
pt

H

o
h^

H
Wm
o

>
Pt

><

$840.00
270.00
600.00
1,000.00
2, 000.00

O
10, 000. 00

«

$120, 000.00

200, 000.00

13, 758.40

275,168. 00

w
H
Pt

>
Ul

Pt
4, 500.00
1,500.00

Do.
lowas.,
I n d i a n s a t Blackfeet A g e n c y .
Indians at
Fort
Belknap Agency.
Indians at
Fort
Peck Agency,
Indians at
Fort
Hall Agency,
Kansas —
Kickapoos.
Molels
Nez Perc6s .
Nortbern
Cheyennes and Arapahoes,
Do

Do.
Otoes a n d M i s s o u rias.
Pawnees... i
Do
Do.:....

Poncas
Pottawatomies .
Do
Do..-

Do

T w e n t y five i n s t a l l m e n t s of $30,000 each, in
c a s h o r o t h e r w i s e , u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of
the President.
I n t e r e s t on $57,500, b e i n g t h e b a l a n c e o n
$157,500.
T e n i n s t a l l m e n t s of a n n u i t y , a t $150,000 e a c h

S i x t e e n i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $30,000
each, due.

T e n i n s t a l l m e n t s of a n n u i t y , a t $115,000 e a c h .

...do

T e n i n s t a l l m e n t s of a n n u i t y , a t $16.5,000 e a c h
T w e n t y i n s t a l l m e n t s of a n n u i t y of $6,000
I n t e r e s t on $135,000, a t 5 p e r c e n t
I n t e r e s t o n $73,648.86, a t 5 p e r c e n t
P a y of t e a c h e r t o m a n u a l - l a b o r school, a n d
s u b s i s t e n c e of p u p i l s , e t c .
Salary of t w o m a t r o n s for schools, t w o assista n t teachers, farmer, carpenter, a n d t w o
millers.
T h i r t y i n s t a l l m e n t s , for p u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g ,
a s p e r s i x t h a r t i c l e of t r e a t y M a y 10,1868.
P a y of t w o t e a c h e r s , t w o c a r p e n t e r s , t w o
f a r m e r s , miller, b l a c k s m i t h , e n g i n e e r , a n d
physician.
I n t e r e s t o n $69,120, a t 5 p e r cent., for e d u c a tional purposes.
I n t e r e s t on $300,000, a t 5 p e r cent., t o b e p a i d
s e m i - a n n u a l l y , in m o n e y or s u c h a r t i c l e s a s
t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r m a y d i r e c t .
T w e l v e installments, last series, in m o n e y or
otherwise.
A n n u i t y goods a n d s u c h a r t i c l e s a s m a y b e
necessary.
S u p p o r t of t w o m a n u a l - l a b o r schools a n d p a y
of t e a c h e r s .
F o r iron and steel and other necessary articles
for s h o p s , a n d p a y of t w o b l a c k s m i t h s , o n e
of w h o m is t o b e t i n a n d g u n s m i t h , a n d comp e n s t a t i o n of t w o s t r i k e r s a n d a p p r e n t i c e s .
F a r m i n g u t e n s i l s a n d stock, p a y of f a r m e r ,
miller, a n d e n g i n e e r , a n d c o m p e n s a t i o n of
a p p r e n t i c e s t o a s s i s t ih w o r k i n g i u t h e m i l l
and keeping in repair grist and saw mill.
A m o u n t to be expended during the pleasure
of t h e P r e s i d e n t for p u r p o s e s of c i v i l i z a t i o n .
P e r m a n e n t a n n u i t y in m o n e y
...do..
:....
...do
--.do..,.




A c t of A p r i l 11,
1882.

480, 000.00

Vol.lO,p.l071,§9
Seven installments due .

J

do .

2, 875.00

57, 500.00

1,050,000.00

A c t of M a v 1,
1888.
...do

805,000.00
1,155,000.00

-do.

Pt

108,000,00

T r e a t y of D e c e m b e r 21, 1855.

Agreement
of
F e b r u a r y 23,
1889.
V o l . 9, p . 842, § 2 .
Vol.l0,p.l079,§2
V o l . 12, p . 982, § 2

3, 000. 00

T r e a t y of J u n e S>, 1863

Vol. 1 4 , p . 6 5 0 , § 5 .

- 6 , 000. 00

E i g h t i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $12,000 each,
due.

Vol. 15, p . 657, § 6

Estimated at

Vol.l5,p.658,§7

R e s o l u t i o n of t h e S e n a t e t o t r e a t y ,
J a n u a r y 2,1885,
T r e a t y of S e p t e m b e r 29,1865

V o l . 7, p . 242, § 6

3,456. 00

69,120.00

Vol.l4,p.687,§l.

15, 000, 00

300, 000.00

E x p e n d e d u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of
t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r ;
eighteen installments due.

Ul
6, 750,00
3,682.44

135, OOO. 00
73, 648. 86

»—1

$96, 000,00

t;;;'
HH

9,000.00

tt

UT

b

20, 000,00

Vol.l0,p.l039,§4

F o u r i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $5,000 e a c h ,
due.
T r e a t y of S e p t e m b e r 24,1857

Vol.11, p.729,§ 2.

...do .

Vol.11, p.729,§ 3

10, 000. 00

E s t i m a t e d for i r o n a n d s t e e l ,
$500; t w o b l a c k s m i t h s , $1,200;
a n d t w o s t r i k e r s , $480,

Vol.ll,p.729,§4.

2,180.00

Estimated

Vol.11, p.730,§ 4.

4, 400. 00

T r e a t y of M a r c h 12,1868.

Vol.12, p 998, § 2

18, 000. 00

A u g u s t 3,1795
S e p t e m b e r 30,1809.
O c t o b e r 2,1818
S e p t e n i b e r ?0,:1828.

Vol.
Vol.
Vol.
Vol.

H
O

30,000.00
^

H
Pt
Ul

7, p .
7, p .
7, p .
7, p .

51, § 4.
114, § 3 .
185, § 3 .
317, § 2 .

.357. 80
178.90
894. 50
715. 69

7,156.00
3, 578. 00
17, 890. 00
14,312.00

a
X
X
X

•

T A B L E R . — S T A T E M E N T SHOWING T H E P R E S E N T L I A B I L I T I E S O F T H E U N I T E D STATES TO I N D I A N T R I B E S , ETC.—Continued.

X
> O nj ^

1 ^ a ^
o « ^

;^.a
N a m e s of t r e a t i e s .

N u m b e r o f installments yet unappropriated, explanations, etc.

D e s c r i p t i o n of a n n u i t i e s , etc#

Reference t o
laws. Statutes a t
Large.

•fl P f c

••^ .r; 'ee © fl

'fl'>^ 2 ^

I'-^-g ...2

(D ©

«S"fl

fl p fl .r^. .o ••^
^3 Ofl.P q ' f l
.9 © <« O " fl
= J

P—.

fl tf S'^

!•-a<:

: <^ o o+=

.9 2
p a cs;=

-fl3.2flS2

:'::'=^^
^

fetich ' u (H ^ <Si

flP^

<1

tt

Permanent annuities
P e r m a n e n t provision for t h r e e b l a c k s m i t h s
a n d a s s i s t a n t s , i r o n a n d steel.

J u l v 29,1829
O c t o b e r 16,1826; S e p t e m b e r 20,
1828 ; J u l y . 2 9 , 1829,

Do
Do-...

P e r m a n e n t p r o v i s i o n for f u r n i s h i n g s a l t
P e r m a n e n t p r o v i s i o n l o r p a y m e n t of m o n e y
in li( u of tobacco, iron, a n d steel.
F o r i n t e r e s t on $230,064. 20, a t 5 p e r c e n t
For education, smith, farmer, aud smith-shop
d u r i n g t h e p l e a s u r e of t h e Pretjident
Permanent annuity

J u l y 29,1829
:
S e p t e m b e r 20,1828; J u n e 5 a n d 17,
1846.
J u u e 5 a n d 17,1846
$1,000 f o r e d u c a t i o n , $500 f o r
smith, e t c .
T r e a t y of N o v e m b e r 3,1804

156. 54
107. 34

3,120.80
2,146.80

11, 503.21

230, 064,20

Vol. 7, p . 85, § 3 . .

I n t e r e s t on $200,000, a t 5 p e r c e n t
I n t e r e s t on $800,000, a t 5 p e r c e n t
I n t e r e s t on $157,400, a t 5 p e r c e n t .

T r e a t y of O c t o b e r 21,1837
T r e a t y of O c t o b e r 21,1842
T r e a t y of O c t o b e r 21,1837

Vol. 7, p . 541, § 2
Vol. 7, p . 596, i 2 .
Vol. 7, p . 543, § 2 -

T r e a t y of M a r c h 6,1861
$25,000 a n n u a l a n n u i t y

Vol.l2,p.ll72,§5
Vol. 11, p , 702, § 8 .

D6

Senecas
Do
S e n e c a s of N . Y
Do...Do
Senecas and Sbawnees.
Do...
Sbawnees
Do

F o r s u p p o r t of school
I n t e r e s t o n $500,000, e i g h t h ai'ticle of t r e a t y
of A u g u s t 7,1856.
I n t e r e s t on $70,000, a t 5 p e r c e n t
Permanent annuity

S u p p o r t of schools, e t c
S e p t e m b e r 9 a n d 17,1817

:

$114,495.40
20,179. 80

$1, 500, 00

10,000.00
40, 000. 00
7, 870. 00

200. 000. 00
800, 000, 00
157,400,00

25, 000. 00

tt
o
pt
t^

H
P>
Pt

3, 500. 00
1,000.00

70, 000,00
20, 000. 00

•O
tt
H

500, 000. 00

W

tt

200,00

Vol. 14, p . 757. § 3
Vol. 7, p . 161, § 4 ;
vol.7,p.l79,§4.
Vol. 7, p . 349, § 4 . .
Vol. 4, p . 442
Vol. 9, p. 35, § 2 Vol. 9, p . 35, § 3 .

1,660.00
6, 000. 00
3, 750. 00
2,152. 50

33, 200.00
120, 000. 00
75, 000. 00
43, 050.00

F e b r u a r y 28,1821
F e b r u a r y 19,1841
A c t of J u n e 27,1846
...do

Vol. 7, p . 179, § 4 .

1, 000. 00

20, 000. 00

S u p p o r t of s m i t h a n d s m i t h - s h o p s
P e r m a n e n t a n n u i t y for e d u c a t i o n
I n t e r e s t o n $40,000^ a t 5 p e r c e n t

V o l . 7, p, 352, § 4 .
T r e a t y of J u l y 20,1831
A u g u s t 3,1795; S e p t e m b e r 29, J.817. Vol, 7, p . 51, § 4 -.
Vol. 10, p. 1056, § 3
A u g u s t 3,1795; M a y 10,1854

3, 000.00
2, 000.00

60, 000. 00
40, 000. 00




00

Kl

S m i t h a n d s m i t h - s h o p a n d miller, p e r m a n e n t . .
Permanent annuities.
I n t e r e s t o n $75,000, a t 5 p e r c e n t
I n t e r e s t on $43,050, tran.sferred from t h e Ont a r i o b a n k to t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s T r e a s u r y .
Permanent annuity

T r e a t y of S e p t e m b e r 17,1818

.'

H

g ' a ^ " ^ "" s-i
o ^ © flns ©
a p ft<:e © ft

Pottawatomies
Do...:

,

?^

fl 5 S cs^ I

ao
$5, 724.77
1, 008. 99

Sacs a n d F o x e s of
Mississippi.
Do.-..
Do
S a c s a n d F o x e s of
Missouri.
Do...
Seminoles

tt
O

' ^ ^ fl g »ft fl

3 p.2 o

Do
Quiipaws

x

tt

>

Ul

a.
Kl

S h o s h o n e s a n d Bannacks :
Shoshones
Do.
Do
Bannacks.
Do.
Six N a t i o n s of N . T
S i o u x of different
tribes, including
S a n t e e Sioux of
Nebraska.
Do.
Do
Do.
Do.
Tabequache band
of U t e s .
Tabequache, Muache. Capote, W e e minuche, Yampa,
G r a n d River, and
U i n t a h b a n d s of
Utes.
Do
Do.
Do.

"Winneba.goes .
Do......
Yanktoii
Sioux.

tribe

of

Nine installments due, estimated,
. a t $10,000 each,
Eetimated

Vol. 15, p , 676,«
Vol,15,p,676,§10|

5, 000. 00

-do .
N i n e i n s t a l l m e n t s d u e , estiruated,
a t $5,000 e a c h . . . .
Estimated

Vol. 15, p . 676. § 3
Vol. 15, p . 676, §9

1, 000. 00

T r e a t y N o v e m b e r 11,1794
Nineinstallments,of$130,000each,
due; estimated.

Vol. 7, p . 64, § 6
V o l , 1 5 , p . 6 3 8 , §10|

B l a c k s m i t h , a n d for i r o n a n d s t e e l
F o r s u c h a r t i c l e s as m a y b e c o n s i d e r e d necess a r y b y t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r for
p e r s o n s e n g a g e d in a g r i c u l t u r e .
P h y s i c i a n , five t e a c h e r s , c a r p e n t e r , miller,
engineer, farmer, and blacksmith.
P u r c h a s e of r a t i o n s , etc., a s p e r a r t i c l e 5,
a g r e e m e n t of S e p t e m b e r 26,1876,
P a y of b l a c k s m i t h
, ..&

Estimated
N i n e i n s t a l l m e n t s of $150,000 e a c h ,
d u e ; estimated.

...do
...do

Estimated . . . : . .

Vol, 15, p , 638, § 13|

...do .

Vol. 13, p . 675, § lOJ

720. 00

F o r iron a n d s t e e l a n d n e c e s s a r y t o o l s for
blacksmith shop.

...do .

Vol. 15, p . 627, §9

220.00

F o r t h e p u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g for m e n , w o m e n ,
a n d children, t h i r t y i n s t a l l m e n t s .
F o r p a y of p h y s i c i a n s , c a r p e n t e r , t e a c h e r , engineer, f a r m e r , a n d b l a c k s m i t h .
B l a c k s m i t h , a n d for i r o n a n d s t e e l for s h o p s .
F o r t h e p u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g for m e n , women,
and children, t h i r t y installments.
P a y of p h y s i c i a n , c a r p e n t e r , miller, t e a c h e r ,
engineer, farmer, and blacksmith.
P e r m a n e n t annuities in clothing, etc
P u r c h a s e of c l o t h i n g for m e n , w o m e n , a n d
children.

90, 000. 00

45, 000.00

Vol.l5,p.676,§10|
4, 500.00
1,170, 000. 00

90,000.00

Pt
Ul

K

,

...do .

2, 000. 00
1, 350, 000. 00

f>

tt
tt
H

10, 400. 00

I—*

Vol. 19, p . 256, § 5 . 950, 000.00

Ul

O
hH

T w o carpenters, t w o millers, two farmers, . . . . d o .
one blacksmith, and t w o teachers.
T h i r t y i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $30,000 each, t o be ex- E i g h t i n s t a l l m e n t s , e a c h $30,000;
pen'ded u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of t h e S e c r e t a r y
due.
of t h e I n t e r i o r for c l o t h i n g , b l a n k e t s , e t c .
Annual amount td be expended under the
d i r e c t i o n of t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r in
s u p p l y i n g s a i d I n d i a n s w i t h beef, m u t t o n ,
w h e a t , flour, b e a n s , e t c .
I n t e r e s t on $804,909.17, a t 5 p e r c e n t , p e r an- N o v e m b e r 1, 1837, a n d S e n a t e
num.
a m e n d m e n t , J u l y 17,1862,
I n t e r e s t on $78,340.41, a t 5 p e r c e n t , p e r an- J u l y 15, 1870
n u m , t o b e e x p e n d e d n n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of
t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r ,
T w e n t y i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $15,000 each, f o u r t h E i g h t e e n i n s t a l l m e n t s , of $15,000
series, t o b e p a i d t o t h e m o r e x p e n d e d for
each, d u e .
t h e i r benefit.

Total.




Vol.l5,p,622,§15|

*Z
tt

7, 800.00

Vol. 15, p . 622, §11

240, 000. 00

H
Pt-

Vol. 15, p . 622., § 12| 30, 000. 00

>—i

tt
V o l , 7, p . 546,^4;
vol. 12, p . 628,§4,
Vol. 16, p . 355, § I.

40, 245.45
3, 917. 02

Vol. 11, p . 744, §4

804, 909,17
78, 340.41

270,000.00
1,134,690.00

7, 441, 666. 64

ui^

322, 007. 35

5,479, 737.36

•O
X
X
X

T A B L E S . — S T A T E M E N T OF R E D E E M E D U N I T E D STATES SECURITIES R E C E I V E D B Y T H E O F E I C E OF T H E SECRETARY O F T H E
F I N A L COUNT, E X A M I N A T I O N , AND DESTRUCTION, D U R I N G T H E F I S C A L YEAR E N D E D J U N E 30,
1890.

TRE/SURY

FOR

o
X
X
X

Denomination.
T i t l e of s e c u r i t y .

Total,
I's.

2's.

U n i t e d S t a t e s notes, n e w i s s u e
$2, 764. 60
$3, 751. 40
U n i t e d S t a t e s notes, s e r i e s 1869 . .
10. 574; 50
13,729.80
U n i t e d S t a t e s notes, s e r i e s 1874 . .
6,224.10
6, 282. 80
U n i t e d S t a t e s n o t e s , s e r i e s 1875 . .
16, 488. 60
20, 862. 2U
U n i t e d S t a t e s n o t e s , series 1 8 7 8 . .
14, 970. 80
12, 583. 00
587, 152.10
637, 205. 60
U n i t e d S t a t e s notes, s e r i e s 1880 ..
Demand notes
One-year n o t e s of 1863
T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863
C o m p o u n d i n t e r e s t n o t e s of 1863.
C o m p o u n d i n t e r e s t n o t e s of 1864.
Sil%''er certificates, s e r i e s 1878
S i l v e r certificates, series 1880
S i l v e r certificates, series 1886
11, 473, 489. 70 6, 959, 904. 80
G o l d certificates, N e w Y o r k , ser i e s 1882
Gold certificates, W a s h i n g t o n , ser i e s 1882
K e fun d i n g certificates
N a t i o n a l c u r r e n c y n o t e s of failed
and liquidating b a n k s
3,734. 00
5, 087.00
National currency redeemed and
retired
326.00
210.00
Total

5's,

lO's.

$38; 734. .50
123, 769. 50

20's.

$75, 305
631, 566

203, 476. 00
308, 625
209, 448. 50
445, 471
20, 049,148 00 14, 432, 486
150
220.00
60

11, 552, 583. 50

•
14,
9, 538,
5, 412,

50
490
827
295
485

50's.

$15, 150
116, 250
510, 240
64, 200
567, 330
462, 075
1, 092, 472
10, 729, 716 3,411,100
40
50
' 400
100
100
680
1,550
.52, 450
41, 9.36
951, 500
8, 757, 624
29, 200
$85,138
812,240

990, 048
915, 540
.

815,195
784, 950

lOO's.

500's.

$21, 300
306,100

1, OOO's.

5,000's.

10, OOO's.
$252,143. ro
2,185, 229. 80
644,746.90
1, 795, 58L 80
4, 278, 090. 30
68, 976,207.70
410.00
510.00
200.00
150. 00
3, 220. 00
179.413.00
19, 962, 919. 00
35, 427,663,00

Pi

3,184, 643; 00

Cl

1, 880, 000 4, 620, 000 5, 070, 000 15,871,190.00
15, 740. 00

Pt
H
t>
Pt
Kl

$5,000
7,000
122, 000
464, 600
150, 000
55!), 000
844, 070
4, 048, 40U 3, 72d, 000 11,

$4, 00(
164,0,01
6-J8, 000
353, 000

$10,000

.... 100
500
46, 700
590, 000

10,500
82, 500

43, (>00

380, 900

284, 500

264, 000

1,151, 700 1,449, 000

15,740

2, 306, 610. 00

4, 230, 610

3, 239, 920

909, 450

1,110, 800

26, 000

6,707, 434. 00

6, 922, 140

4, 617, 790 1, 408, 400

2, 547, 350

13, ono

210,000 $240, 000

11, 838, 211. 00

1,500

6, 000

22, 205,150, 00

United
United
United
United
United
Unitevl
United

States
States
States
States
States
States
States

fractional
fractional
fractional
fractional
fractional
fiacfional
fractional

currency
c u r r e n c y second i s s u e .
currencv
c u r r e n c y, f o u r t h i s s u e ,
c u r r e n c y f o u r t h is.sue, atfPATid sp.rip.q
c u r r e n c y foui-th issue, t h i r d s e r i e s . .
c u r r e n c y fifth i s s u e

Total




$19.00
2(1. 00
108.00
218. 00

25c,

34.00

Ul

tt

50c.

573. 00

$9.00

9.00

of redeemed United States securities received for destruction

$10.00
16.00
8.00

15c.

w
w

w

led U n i t e d S t a t e s fractional c u r r e n c y .
10c.

O
tt

tt
H

Denomination.
5c.

•

O

12,117, 077.40 7, 658, 263. 60 41,191,424.00 42, 028, 300 31, 880, 074 9, 50.3, 760 11, 512, 520 6, 425, 000 14, 355, 000 4, 810, 000 5, 310, 000

?c.

^

tt
o
pt

$35. 00 • $61.00
30. 00
H7. 00
160.00
242.00
365. 00
71.00
$60. 00
- 334.00
379. 50
1, :i98. 00 1, 026. U
O

938. 00

60.00 1, 988. 00 2,150. 50

:

125, 00
103. 00
.527. 00
714. 00
334.00
379. 50
2,997. 00

jl89,103, 515.34

H
Pt
^

Ul

a
Pt

Kj

•

tJNiTED STATES BONDS, E T C . , ' D E C E I V E D

AND ISSUED,

CXXXV

T A B L E T . — S T A T E M E N T OF U N I T E D STATES BONDS AND OTHER OBLIGATIONS RE'C E I V E D AND ISSUED B Y THE O F F I C E OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E T R E A S U R Y PROM
N O V E M B E R 1, 1689, TO OCTOBER 31, 1890, INCLUSIVE.
'

'

T i t l e of loan.

R e c e i v e d for R e c e i v e d for
exchange
redemption.
and transfer.

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861, a c t s of J u l y
17 a n d Au "•list 5 1861
F i v e - t w e n t y b o n d s of 1862, a c t of F e b r u a r y
25 1862 "
..
.
B o n d s i s s u e d t o Pacific r a i l r o a d s , a c t s of
J u l y 1, 1802, a n d J u l y 2, 1864.
L o a n of 1863 (1881) a c t of M a r c h 3,1863
Gold certificates a c t of M a r c h 3,1863
Gold certificates, series of 1888
T e n - f o r t y b o n d s of 1864 a c t of M a r c h 3 1864
S e v e n - t h i r t y n o t e s of 1864 a n d 1865, a c t s of
J u n e 30 1864, a n d M a r c h 3,1865
F i v e - t w e n t y bonds of 1865, a c t of M a r c h 3,
1865
Consols of 1865 a c t of M a r c h 3,1865
Consols of 1867 a c t of M a r c h 3,1865
Consols of 1868 a c t of M a r c h 3 1865
F u n d e d loan of 1881, 5 p e r c e n t s , a c t s of J u l y
14 1870 a n d J a n u a r y •'O 1871
. . - ....
F u n d e d loan of 1891,4| p e r c e n t s , s a m e a c t s . .
F u n d e d loan of 1907, 4 p e r c e n t s , s a m e a c t s . . .
C e r t i t i c a t e s of deposit act»of J u n e 8,1872
3J p e r cent, b o n d s , a c t s of J u l y 14,1870, a n d
J a n u a r y 20,1871
3^ p e r ceiit. bonds, a c t s of J u l y 17 a n d A u g u s t
5 1861
3^ p e r c e n t b o n d s a c t of M a r c h 3,1863
3 n e r c e n t b o n d s a c t of J u l v 12 1882




Issued.

$6, 050

$6, 050

1,850

1, 850
.

$7,845,000
2,600
6,340
25, 660, 000
11, 000

$7,845,000
30, 300, 000

2,
62, 629,
79,103,
27, 830,

300.
500
850
000

15, 690, 000
2,600
6,340
55, 960, 000
11 000
450 •

450

3,200
2,700
31, 500
20 000

3, 200
2, 700
31, 500
» 20,000
6, 678, 950
58, 787, 850

Total.

6, 678, 950
58, 806, 700
21, 900, 000

2,300
75, 987, 400
196, 698, 400
49 730 000

5,200

'

73,31.1,800

5,200

1,000
1,800
85, 450

1 000
1,800
85, 450

195, 404,790 .

f25,530,650

394, 247, 240

APPENDIX TO THE REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

PI 90-

1







A.PPEND.IX:.
EEPORTS OF HEADS OF BUEEAUS AND OTHES.OFFiOEKS.
(E"o, 1.) •
EEPOET OF THE T.REABUEEE.
;

TREASURY OF T H E U N I T E D STATES,

';
Washington, Novernber 1,18^M},
SIR : I have the honor to submit the aunual report on the operations
and condition of the Treasurjo
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES. .

The net ordinary receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30,1890^
were $403,0805982.63, a sum but twice exceeded in. the history of the
Governmento: As compared with the preceding- year there was an increase of $16,030,923.79, of which $11,725,191.89 was derived from the'
internal revenue. The ordinary expenditures, including interest on the
public debt, but not premium or principal paid, were $297,736,486.60,
•an increase of $16,739,871 over those of the year before. The growth
of the revenues and expenditures was, therefore, almost the same, with
th'e .-axlvantage on the side of the revenues. But for the increase of the
disbursements for pensions there would have been a falling o& in the
total expenditures. The surplus of revenues over ordinary expenditures was $105,344,496,03, of which $20,304,224,06 was paid out in premiums on bonds purchased.
• . The receipts on account of the public debt, amongst which are
classed gold coin,' standard silver dollars, and United States notes
received or set apart in the assets of the Treasury for certificates of
..deposit issued, together with the amount of United States notes issued
and of principal and interest of refunding certificates converted into
"4 per cent,' bonds, amounted to $245,293,650. The expenditures on
the same account, comprising the amounts applied to the redemption
or purchase of the principal of bonds and to the redemption of certificates of depolsit, notes, and fractional currency, were $3125206,367,50,
According to the warrants, the postal revenues amounted to
$61,106,041.29, of which $25,325,842,57 was paid into the Treasury, and
$35,780,198.73 was handled by postmasters. Including a deficiency
appropriatioh of $7,200,000, of which, however, $324,963.09 was deposited in the Treasury from the revenues of a former year, the total
receipts were: $68,306,041,29, and the total expenditures $675011,263.64..
There was an increase of $5,411,809.76 in the revenues, and one of
$5,899^515.03 In the expenditures, as compared with the fiscal je%T 1889o



R E P O R T ON ^ THE

FINANCES.

The following statement shows the ordinary, receipts and expenditures
in comparison with those of the preceding year:
1889.
R e v e n u e from—
Customs
;. . . .

.o,<.co..o.....

Sale of p u b l i c l a n d s
Miscellaneous sources
Total
N e t increase

=

E x p e n d i t u r e s on a c c o u n t of—
Civil a n d m i s c e l l a n e o u s :
C u s t o m s , light-houses, p u b l i c
building's e t c
Internal revenue .
I n t e r i o r civil (lands, p a t e n t s , ,
etc.)
T r e a s u r y p r o p e r (legislative,
^
e x e c u t i v e , a n d Other c i v i l ) . .
D i p l o m a t i c (foreign r e l a t i o n s ) .
Judiciary .
.
.......
^Var D e p a r t m e n t . . . . . . . . .
Navy Department
Interior Department (Indians and
pension.s)
I n t e r e s t on p u b l i c d e b t
P r e m i u m on p u b l i c d e b t .
Total...
Net increase
Surplus

$223,832,741.69
130, 881, 513. 92
8, 038, 651. 79
24, 297,151. 44

1890.

$229,668, 584. 57 $5, 835, 842. 88
142, 606, 705.81 11,725,191. 89
6, 358. 272. 51
24, 447, 419.74
150, 268.V30

387, 050, 058. 84

403, 080, 982. 63

20,154,142.08
3, 941, 466.30

19,734,371.91
3, 928, 068.31

17,711,303.07
16, 030, 923. 79

Decrease.

$1, 680, 379. 28
1, 680, 379. 28

419 770.17
13, 397.99

7,359,790.25

8,442, 413.14

1, 082, 622'. 89

42,847,717.40
1,897,625.72
4. 463, 322. 51
44, 435, 270. 85
21,378,809.31

43,430, 561. 05
1, 648, 276. 59
4, 219, 565.49
44, 582, 838. 08
22,006, 206. 24

582,843.65
249, 349.13
243, 757. 02
147, 567. 23
•627,396.93

94, 516, 986. 89
113, 644,901.74 19,127,914.85
41, 001, 484.29
36, 099, 284. 05
17, 292, 362. 65 ' 20,304,224.06 ""3,"oii,'86i."4i'
299, 288, 978. 25

.„o„

Increase.

318, 040, 710.66

87, 761, 080. 59

85,040,271.97

24, 580, 206.96
18, 751, 732. 41

4, 902,200.24
5, 828, 474. 55
2, 720, 808. 62

•STATE OF THE TREASURYo

At the close of business on June 30,1889, the Treasurer stood charged
on the books of the Departoient with $673,399,118,18, being the balance
of the moneys of the Treasury shown by the accounts to be in his custody. To this were added the receipts of the ensuing year from the
revenues and on account of the public debt, in all $648,374,632.63, together with the sum of $731,11 recovered from a former depositary,
making an aggregate of $1,321,774,481,92, for which the Treasurer was
accountable during the fiscal year. Of this he disbursed upon the warrant of the Department the sum of $630,247,078,16 as the expenditures
of the year upon all accounts, leaving $691,527,403.76 charged to him as
the balance on hand June 30, 1890.
The balance at the beginning of the . year, however, included
$28,101,644.91 on deposit with .the States, which was not in any sense
in the Treasurer's .custody, and $1,415,433.91 of funds that had been
lost, at various times, and for which he was not responsible, so that
the true amount of cash for which he was accountable, according to the
books of the Department, on June 30, 1889, was $643,882,039.36. But on
that day he held also public moneys amounting to $728,342.40, of which
the Department had not yet taken account, and the further sum of
$116,033,489.50 on deposit with him fbr various purposes, which was
not treated by the Department as part of the cash of the Treasury,
The actual available assets of his office at that date were, therefore,
$760,643,871,26, as stated in his last report.
. ^
On June 30, 1890, the balance standing charged to the Treasurer was
subject to the same deduction for deposits with the States and for un»^
available funds, while $323,589.78 ofreceipts not yet covered by war-'
rant and $95^581^164.22 on deposit in the Treasurer's agency account



,

•

. TREASURER. . ' .

,

5

were to be added.to make tSe total sum in'his custody, which was
$757,915,078.94. The actual cash and other assets of the Treasury on-'
the two dates were as follows :
J u n e 30,1889,
$303, 387, 719. 79
315,160,779.58
51, 448, 508. 05
42,645,504.00
47,259,714.39
741, 645.45

Total

$320, 933,145. 02
340, 821, 006. 09
28, 248,130.30
31, 215, 033. 00
30, 659, 565. 32
37,533.21

760, 643, 871. 26

Gold.:
,
Silver a n d m i n o r coin
Notes
,
Certificates of - d e p o s i t . . . . . . .
D e p o s i t s in b a n k s
Public debt and interest paid

J u n e 30,1890.

757, 915, 078. 94

In the appendix will be found tabular statements showing in detail
the character and distribution of the various items of cash and credit
of which the foregoing is ai summary» From these the most minute
particulars deemed to be of any public interest, relating to the nieans
at the disposal of the Treasurer for meeting his accountability to the
Department, inay be gathered.
In considering the state of the Treasury with reference to .the financial operations of the Government, it seems,convenient to separate from
the other assets the gold and silver coin and United States notes on
deposit for certificates in circulation. These moneys are of importance
to the Treasury only as they afiect the currency, and they will be noticed
in connection with that subject. In this way and by omitting the items
of debt and interest paid, the following result is reached, exhibiting the
assets of the Treasury belonging t c the Government:
J u n e 30,1889.
Gold
Silver a n d m i n o r coin
Notes. ...
D e p o s i t s in b a n k s . . . . . . . . . o o
Total

.= . . o

-

"

•

.

....

J u n e 20,1890.

$180, 257, 490. 79
58.018, 214. .58
34, 493, 508.05
47, 259, 714.'39

$190,102,280.02
49, 204, 828. 09
16 358,136 30
30, 65;i, 505.32

326, 028, 927. 81

286, 384, 815.'73

These figures show the satisfactory change which, in spite of the
difficulties arising from the state of the revenues and of the bonded
debt, the Treasury underwent in the course of the year. The loss of
$40,000,000 in the net holdings was, under thu circnmstances; an advantage to both the Treasury and the public, while the nota,ble increase in the abiount of gold, not less than the substantial decrease in
the silver, notes, and bank deposits, was at once a gain in strength and
a proof of the confidence of the country.
The liabilities, on the same dates, according to the form .of statement
then in use, were as follows:
J u n e 30,1889.
Certificates of d e p o s i t
Public debt and interest
National-bank note redemption funds
Deposit and disbursing accounts . Balance
Total

'..'.




J u n e 30,1890.

$433, 873, 298. 00
12, 640, 036. 59
83,681,269.16
32, 352, 220.34'
19H, 097, 047.17

.$471, 492, 730. 00
11,581,087.33
61, 238, 857. 78
34, 342, 306. 44
179, 260, 097. 39"
L
757,915,078.94

760. 643, 871. 26

b

REPORT ON THE. FINANCES.

If the certificates of deposit be set aside, together with the items of
debt and interest paid, the net assets, liabilities, and reserve, sum up
thus:
June 30,1889.

\
A ssets . -.,
Liabilities
Reserve..:..

,
...

...:...
.

. .

.

June 30, 1890.

$326, 028, 927.81 $286, 384, 815. 73
...

127,931,880.64
198, 097, 047.17

107 124 718. 34
179, 260, 097. 39

For obvious reasons, tbe liabilities and reserve of the Treasury do not
admit of as clear definition as those of a private, financial institution.
In a bank, the receipt of money carries with it the obligation to repay
a like sum and thus creates a liability. The paying out of money cauicels a liability or creates a new asset. The one side of the account is
the direct consequence of the other, and of necessity they agree in the
aggregate. The reserve is composed of the whole amount of money at
immediate command. But with the Treasury, in the collection and disbursement of the public revenues, it is entirely different. Money is
received gratis, as it were, and is paid out for no value. In a strictly
commercial sense there are no liabilities of the Treasury, and prior to
1878 no periodical statement purporting to be an account of them was
ever published. In that year was issued the first of a series of monthly
statements, since continued with several changes of form, showing, on
the one hand, the cash and other assets, and, on the other, as liabilities,
in general, the balance of the deposits lodged in the Treasury for various purposes and the amounts due on account of the public debt and
interest. The difference l)etween the totals, of assets and liabilities,
whether with or without a reserve against the legal-tender notes, as
might be the jiractice for the time being, has been called the balance.
These statements have occupied an ill-defined and shifting position
between the accounts of cash in the Treasury and the total funded obligations of the Government, as shown in the debt statement. They have
only a relative value in determining the real condition of Che Treasury
. at any time, since they make no mention of actual or prospective receipts
and expenditures, and, while setting out with minute exactness so inconsiderable an item of running expense as the interest on the debt,
omit altogether, save as advances are made to disbursing officers, the
maturing obligations under appropriations of Congress, aggregating
perhaps ten times as much. That the field they occupy is vague and
the results they show are only partial has been recognized by Congress,
which by the act approved July 14, 1890, directed the fund for the retirement of national-bank circulation to be covered into the Treasury
and the amount to be reported in the debt statement as debt of the
Uuited States. This fund at the time constituted the greater part ol
the so called liabilities of the Treasury, exclusive of the outstanding
certificates of deposit, and formed a liability as direct as any carried on
the Treasurer's books, being for money deposited for the redemption ol
circulating notes on demand of the holders, a liability in discharge of
which upwards of $22,000,0.00 was paid out of the Treasury during the
last fiscal year.
These remarks are submitted, not for the purpose of detracting from
a useful set of public documents, each of which correctly represents the
facts admitted within its scope, t u t rather to show the difficulties in
the way of conveying a clear conception of the.obligations of the Treas


TREASURER.

7

ury, and to throw out the caution that, while the statements of assets
emanating from this office are true schedules of moneys and credits at
the disposal of the Department, any statement of liabilities must be
accepted with the qualifications imposed b y t h e limits to which it is
confinedo
UNAVAILABLE FUNDS.

There has been no change in these funds, the amount of which is
$1,415,433.91, and no authority has been granted by Congress to take
them off the books. A statement of them is contained, as usual, in the
appendix.
, .
•
The sum of'$731.11, remaining due from James D.'Reymert, formerly
receiver of public moneys and depositary of the United States at Falls
St. Croix, Wis., heretofore carried as unavailable on the books of the
Register of the Treasury, but not. charged to the Treasurer's account,
was recovered and taken up as a receipt.
;

THE PUBLIC 'DEBT.

In the month of July, 1890, the public-debt statement received a revision by which it was brought to exhibit, much more accurately than
before, the state of the obligations of the Government properly classified under this head. The alterations made were the exclusion of the
principal of the Eavy pension fund and of the bonds issued to the Pacific railway companies, together with all interest, whether matured or
merely accrued and not yet due, and the addition of the fund on deposit in the Treasury for the redemption of the notes of insolvent
national banks and of banks in liquidation or reducing their circulation. The Navy pension fund is in no sense a debt, the principal of
$14,000,000 being the property of the United States, derived from naval
prizes and certain penalties and forfeitures. The amount has been covered into the Treasury, under various acts of Congress, with the condition that interest thereon, fixed in 1869 at the rate of 3 per cent, per
annum, should be applied tp the payment of Navy pensions. In effect,
the legislation on the subject amounts simply to a x^t^^Tnanent annual
appropriation of $420,000 for certain objects, the employment of a
principal sum and a rate of interest being only a means of arriving at
the amount. The bonds issued to the Pacific railways were first taken
up as a debt of the United States in the statement, for March, 1885.
Provision has been made by law to secure the Treasury against.both
principal and interest. The fund for the retirement of national-bank
notes was carried from the liabilities of the Treasury to the publicdebt
in accordance with the act of Congress approved July 14,1890, as before stated. And it must be plain from any point of view that interest,
which, although an incident of the debt, has to be provided for out of
the annual revenues, like any other current expenditure, should not be
treated as standing upon the same footing as so much principaL
Tlie effect qf these changes is shown in the following summary stateme^nt of the debt, for June 30,1890, in the two forms:
Old form.
Tutere.st-beai'in"" d e b t
M a t u r e d <lebt
Dcbti beaviu"" u o i n t e r e s t
Interest
w
Total




.........

.

...

. .......^.

^
•

.

* N e w form.
•

$789, 936,622. 00
1, 815, 805.26
794, 068, 621. 47
9,765,282.07

$711,313, 110.00
1, 815, 805. 26
880, 630, 649.22

1, 595, 586, 330. 80

1, 593,759, 564. 48

8

REPORT 6 N T H E FINANCES.

Lest any possible ground for misconception should be left, it laay be
well to stiite expressly that the alterations apparent in the above figures were not made in consequence of changes of fact, but are due
merely to changes in a fdrm of statement. The various obligations of
the Government to pay money on demand or at some future time remain
the same; they have only been redisposed, some by Congress and others
by the Department, with a view of correcting their classification.
Since tlie published statements relating to the period covered by this
report are in the old form, a comparison of the debt and of the condition of the Treasury with relation thereto, for June 30, 1889 and 1890,
will h^e given on the same basis, to avoid needless confusion. By putting together all of the bonded and other obligations of the Government, w^ith the liabilities of the Treasurer upon deposit, redemption,
and other agency accounts, and deducting from the aggregate the gross
available assets of the Treasury, the following result is obtained: .
J u n e 30,1889.

J u n e 30,1890.

$894, 477, 502.00
56, 442. 50
346,681,016.00
6, 916, 690.47
433, '873, 298. 00
1,911,485.26
1, 294, 049. 82
9,434,501.51

$789, 930, 622.00
56, 032. 50
346, 681, 016. 00
6, 911, 510. 97
471, 492, 730. 00
• 1, 815, 805.26
1,184, 794.05
8, 580,488. 02

Total debt
Treasurer's agency account

1, 694, 644, 985.56
116, 03^, 489. 50

1,626, 658, 998. 80
95,581,104.22

Aggregate..!
j ^ s s e t s of T r e a s u r y ,

1,810,678,475.06
760, 643, 871. 26

1, 722, 240,163. 02
757,915,078.94

D e b t , less c a s h in T r e a s u r y

1, 050, 034, 603. 80

964, 325, 084. 08

Interest-bearing debt
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
United States notes
'.
Fractional currency, estimated
Certificates of d e p o s i t
Matured debt
Interest due and unpaid
Accrued interest
,

If the certificates of deposit and the interest items, against which a
like amount of cash is held, be set aside, together with the liabilities on
the Treasurer's agency account, the principal of that part of the debt
which rests solely on the credit of the Government may be brouo^-ht into
comparison with the available cash on hand. Condensed into the sim' plest form on this basis, the above statement is reduced to the following:
.
Bonded debt
Circulating notes
Total
Available cash
P r i n cipal. l e s s c a s h i n T r e a s u r y

J u n e 30,1889.

J u n e 30,1890.

$896, 388, 987. 26
353, 654,148. 97
.'

$791, 752, 427. 26
353, 648, 559. 47

1,250,043.136.23
200, 008, 532. 43

1,145, 400, 980. 73
181, 075, 902. 65

1,050,034,603.80

964, 325, 084.08

To produce the net reduction of $104,642,149.50 in the principal of
the debt proper, there had to be retired $5,870 more, for a lii^e amount
of new 4 per cent, bonds issued for interest on 4 per cent, refunding certificates converted, so that the total retirement of principal for the year
was $104,648,019,50. This was effected at the cost of $20,304,224.06 in
premiums, making a total application of $124,952,243.56 toward the extinction of the principal of the debt. Of this sum $105,344,496.03 was
derived from the surplus revienues of the year and $19,607,747,53 was
taken from the cash in theTreasuryo



9

TREASURER.

The fjollowing statement exhibits the ambunt of principal retired from
the^several loans, the cost for premiums, and the total cost:
Premium.

Principal.
P o u r a n d a half p e r c e n t s
P o u r p e r ceuLs . . . 1 . . .
Matuied dfht
.:
Old demniid n o t e s
Practioual currency

T o t a l cost.

$30,623,2.50.00
73, 923, 500. 00
95,680.00
410.00
5,179.50

:

Total

....„

$1, 427, 300. 87
18,876, 923.19

$32, 050, 550. 87
92,800,423.19
95, 680. 00
410. 00
5,179. 50

104, 648, 019. 50

20,304,224.06

124, 952, 243. 56

THE CURRENCYo •

Important changes again took place in the circulating medium, but
unlike those of the year preceding, they were not all of an unfavorable
character. In the fiscal year 1889 there was a loss of nearly twentysix millions of gold, a gain of thirty-four millions of silver, and a con' traction of forty-one millions in the national-bank circulation, resulting
in a net decrease of thirty-three millions in the effective stock. The
past year witnessed a recovery of fifteen millions of gold, an increase of
forty-three millions of silver, and a withdrawal of twenty-six millions of
bank notes—^ net increase of thirty two millions in the aggregate supply. The outstanding certificates of deposit, which are rather a vehicle
for exchanging the coin and legal-ten'der notes they represent than a
component of the circulation itself, were increased by about thirty-eight
millions, as compared with forty-seven millions added the year before.
According to the official estimate of the stock of the precious metals
in the country and the amounts of the outstanding issues of paper currency, including the certificates of deposit together with the coin and
notes held against them, the circulating medium.on June 30, 1889 and
1^90, was composed as follows:
J u n e 30, 1889.
Gold coin a n d bullicin
Silver d o l l a r s Jind liullion
F r a c t i o n a l sil ver coin

$680, 063, 505.00
343, 947, 093. 00
76, 601, 836. 00

Total paper currency

==.

$695, 563, 029. 00
385,718,003.00
77, 493, 856. 00

1,100, 612, 434.00

T o t a l coin a n d bullion
State-bank notes
Old d e m a n d n o t e s . - .
1
One a u d t w o y e a r n o t o s
C o m p o u n d - i n t e r e s t notes
Fractional currency, estimated
National-banlv notes
United States notes'
Certificates of deposit, a c t o f J u n e 8, 1872
Gold c e r t i ^ c a t e s ...':
Silver certificates ..;

Aggregate....

J u n e 30, 1890.

1,158, 774, 948. 00

201, 170,00
56, 442.50
62, 95.5. 00
185, 750.00
6, 916, 690.47
211, 378, 9 G : ) . 00
' 346, 681, 016.00
17, 195, 000. 00
154, 048, 552. 00
262, 629, 746. 00

197,484.00
56,032.50
02, 365. 00
• 1 8 2 . 460.00'
'
6,911, 510.97
590. 00
185, 748,
016.00
310, 681,
000.00
12, 390,
979. 00
157, 562,
751. 00
301, 539,

999, 356,1^84. 97 i 1, Oil, 332,188. 47
2, 099, 968, 718. 97

2,170,107,136.47

While the figures relating to the paper currency are subject to uncertain subtractions for loss frora wear and waste, they do not comprise
a dollar that will not be redeemed if presented at the proper place. The
State bank notes are cither the issue of responsible institutions which
report them as liainlities, or are provided for by deposits of lawful
money with public officers. They are occasionally met with and some of



10

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

them are redeemed every year. The old paper issues of the Government are reduced to small amounts, with the exception of the, fractional
currency, of which, according to the accounts of issues and redemptions, more than fifteen millions are outi^tanding. There are weighty
reasons for believing that by far the greater part of this sum is really
extant and that the estimate which placed the amount lost and destroyed
at eight millions was excessive. Upon the whole, the aggregate above
given can nat be far out of the way.
The complicated business of the Treasury and the intimate relations
subsisting between that business and the distribution of the circulating
medium, have given rise to erroneous notions, not only of what is actually done by the Department, but also of the effect produced thereby
upon the currency. But while there is much difficulty in conveying a
clear insight of the Treasury operations as a whole, embracing as they
do the collection and disbursement of moneys from.the revenues, the
handling of vast sums for the Post-Office Department and the national
banks, the custody of large amounts of coin and legal-tender notes
against certificates of deposit, and the application of surplus revenues
to the payment of the public debt, as well as the issue of currency, the
relations between the Treasury and the circulation are yet of the simplest kind. There is, first, the total volume of the circulating medium
in the country as shown in the foregoing statement. This consists not
of so-called funds, balances of book accounts, or any other immaterial
or abstra^ct conceptions, but, as nearly as can be ascertained, of gold,
silver, and circulating notes contained within the borders of the land.
l^ext there is to be considered what portion of the several kinds of this
money is in the Treasury; not what the Treasury could collect nor what
it owes; here again not funds nor balances nor mental abstractions,
but simply and only the sum total of what gold, silver, and notes are
in its vaults and cash tills. This is obtained from the count of the cash
itself, and is exactly known. If now the amount in the Treasury be
taken from the whole amount in the country, the remainder must be
the amount in circulation among the people.,
Ih the appendix are given tables showing, among other things, the
assets of each of the several offices of the Treasury and Mint, on June
30,1890, in which the amounts of each kind of money held are minutely
set out. These items are collected and aggregated in a succeeding
table, and the figures are carried thence iuto the statement of assets
and liabilities of the Treasury, where they appear in the form in which
these statements are published monthly. If the figures thus obtained
fOr June 30, lb89 and 1890, be deducted from those representing the
^otal stock of monetary material in the country, and the remainders
gCt out as amounts in circulation, the result will be as follows:
J u n e 30,1889.
In Treasury.
iS303 387 719 79
•314,935,151.52
1,094.76
4,150, 537. 75
National-bank notes
47, 296, 875. 54
TJnited S t a t e s n o t e s
.....
240, 000. 00
Certificates of deposit, a c t of 1872.
36,918,323.00
. 5,487,181.00
Silver certificates
G old
Silver..--

Total




I n circulation.

J u n e 30, IS'OO.
In Treasury.

I n circulation.

$376, 675, 785. 21 $320, 933,145.02
105,613,777.48 346, 626, 603.43
7,421,913.21
260. 21
207, 228,425. 25
4, 365, 837:45
299,384,140.46
23, 882, 038. 64
16, 955, 000. 00
500, 000.00
117, 1,30.229.00
26,732,120.00
2.57,142, 565. 00
3,983,513.00

$374, 629, 883. 98
116, 585, 315. 57
7 '109 592 26
181,382.752.55
322, 798,1)77. 36
. 11,890,000.00
130, 830, 859: 00
297, 556, 238. 00

712, 416, 883. 36 1. 387, 551, 835. 61 727, 023, 517.75

1,443, 083, 618.72

11

TREASURER.

I t appears, hence, that both the holdings 'of the Treasury and the
circulation increased during the year, the' latter to the extent of
$55,500,000.' To show the net amount of the gold, silver, and notes
belonging to the Treasury and to the public, as determined by actual
holdings or ;by the ownership of certificates of deposit, the certificates
in the Treasury cash' must be set aside, and those in circulation added
to the coin and notes in the hands of the public. Upon this basis the
virtual condition of the Treasury and of the circulation was as given
below;
I n circulation.

Outstanding.

In Treasury.

$680, 063, 505.00
420, 548, 929.00
565, 482, 986.97

$186,257,490.79
57,792, 586. 52
34,493, 508. 05

1, 666, 095,420. 97

278, 543, 585.36

1, 387, 551, 835. 61

695, 563, 029. 00
463,211,919.00
539, 839,458.47

190,102, 286; 02
49, 070, 365.43
16, 358,136. 30

505, 460, 742. 98
414,141, 553. 57
523, 481, 322:17

1,698, 614,406„ 47

255, 530,787. 75

1,443, 083,618. 72

J w n e 30, 1889.
Gold
Silver
Notes

o
-.
Total. ..

.

.

'

s$493, 806, 014.21
362,756,342.48
• 530, 989, 478.92

J u n e 30, 1890.
Gold
Silver
Notes

J
Total.

1

.. = o

o

'

These figures bring out the fact that'while the growth of the circulation was real, the increase of cash in the Treasury was only apparent,
having been due to the return of certificates of deposit in the revenues,
. A"s shown elsewhere, there was a decrease of $23,000,000 in the;net
amount of money in the Treasury.
In spite of the large increase of silver, there was a trifling increase
in the relative amount of gold. The net stock of gold, silver, and
notes, and the amounts in circulation at the end of each of the la'st
five fiscal years were as follows i
'
1887,

1886.
,Stoc1c.
Gold
:
Silver '.
Notes.....-.O...U......

$590,774,461
312,252,843
665, 891, 618

1889.

1888.

1890.

$654, 520,335
352,993,566
633,489, 036

$705, 818, 855
386, 572, 835
606, 512, 959

$680,063, 505
420, 548, 929
565,482, 986

$695, 563, 029.00
463,211,919.00
539,839,458.47

1,568,'918,922 ^ 1, 641, 002, 937

1, 698, 904, 649

1, 666, 095, 420

1,698,614,406.47

37.7

39.9

41.5

40.8

40.9

434, 263, 950
186, 958, 838
638, 988, 885

467, 766,118
246, 250,603
611,112, 655

512,208, 683
306, 649, 367
560, 775, 084

493,806,014
362, 756, 342
530,989,478

505, 460, 742. m
414,141,553.57
523,481, 322.17

'

1,260, 211, 673

i, 325,129, 376

1, 379, 633,134

1,387,551,834 .

1,443,083,618.72

P e r c e n t , of gold ,

•34. 5

35.3

37.1

Total
P e r cent, of gold
Circulation:
Gold
. .
Silver
.. ...:.<>.....
Notes
.........o.
Total

35.6

35.0

In view of the prominence to which the money circulation of the
country has risen in public discussion, the time seems opportune for
presenting such recent historical facts as would be useful in the forming
of an intelligent understanding of the subject. While the archives of
this office contain little that would throw light upon the economic or
industrial condition of the country or the changes occurring therein at
different periods, by which financial legislation may have been deter-




.12

'RliPORT ON,THE FINANCES.

mined, they do embrace the most important, and in some cases the
only records existing with relation to the amounts of the several kinds
of money in the Treasury and in circulation at various times. Since
the beginning of the creation of the present currency system, in 1861, all
of the coin and paper that have gone to the composition of the monetary
stock of the country have passed through the Treasurer's accounts, with
t4ie exception of national-bank notes only^ while as regards these he
has since 1874 been charged with their redemption and with other duties
relating to them which have required him to be kept informed of the
volume of them outstanding. Hence, these records, with some aid from
others in the Department, particularly the official estimates of the general stock of gold and silver at different periods, afford a complete view
of the actual conditions and changes through which the currency has
passed in the last quarter of a century.
In considering the period of time over which statistics of this sort
would be useful for present purposes, the end of the fiscal year 1878 is
suggested on various grounds. That is the time which marks approximately the origin of the currency of to-day. The restoration of the
paper issues to par, the resumption of specie payments, the return of
gold to the country, the re-appearance of the silver coins in circulp^tion,
the creation of the standard silver dollar and silver certificate, the
retirement of the fractional paper currency, and the fixing of the
amount of the legal-tender notes at /their present volume, may all be
said to date from that era. For these reasons, and because the space
of thirteen j^ears will furnish as much matter as it may be desirable to
present here, the date named has been selected as the first for which
figures should be given.
The tables which have been prepared to carry out this plan will be
found in the appendix. They consist, in the first part, of statements of
the issues, redemptions, and amounts outstanding, severally by denominations, of the United States notes, currency certificates, gold certifi/ cates, and silver certificates, comxMsing all the live paper issues, for
the end of each fiscal year, A final table in this series sums up the
amounts of these issues and of the national-bank notes outstanding,
thus presenting a complete record of the whole paper circulation of
the country for the years indicated.
There follow next a number of tables which show the amounts of the
several kinds of paper money and of gold and silver in the Treasury,'
and the amounts of paper money in circulation at the end of each
month 5 also the estimated total stock of gold and silver coin and bullion
in the country, the estimated circulation of gold and silver coin, the total
actual circulation of all kinds of money, being the total stock less the
amounts in the Treasury, and the total Treasury holdings and circulation for the end of each fiscal year from 1878 to 1885, and quarterly
thereafter. The insignificant amounts remaining of the earlier paper
currency arfe uniformly neglected. The tables showing the gold, silver,
and United States notes in the Treasury, in connection with the certificates of deposit outstanding, are reproduced, as heretofore published,
with.extensions to September, 1890,
Tl^ese tables, so far as they relate to the condition of the Treasury,
are compiled from the latest reports of the various Treasury offices at
hand on the'last day of each month, in the same manner as the debt
statements are prepared. Where the figures are found to disagree
with those relating to the same matter elsewhere in these pages, the
diiference is one of date, as has been explained in former reports.




'

^ J
:

TREASURER.

. '

, 13

UNITED STATES NOTES, ^

The redemption of legal-tender notes in kind at this office amounted
to $78,132,000, against $59,450,000 for the year preceding. The. redemptions in E"ew York, in gold,-were $732,386, making a t o t a l p f
$28,198,983 since the resumption of specie payments, A table of issues, redemptions, and amounts outstanding for each fiscal year, beginning with 1878, is given in the appendix.
In the earlier history of the issue of circulating notes by the Govern- '
ment, in tim'es when the rate of emission was limited bythe capacit}^ of
the press rather than the necessities of the Treasury, it was the practice, in some of the accounts, to treat as issues the daily receipts of new
notes from the printers. This had grown into a custom when afterwards
the Treasury acquired better control of its resources and when the
amounts of unissued notes in the reserve vault reached at time's as highas half of those actually circulating as money. The methods w^ere not .^
changed'until about 1875; hence the records of issues and refiemptions
I prior to that year.have to be studied with care if an exact separation^
between the effective currency'and the paper on hand awaiting issue .
be soughto 1^0 suspicion can be.cast upon the integrity of the accounts,
which exhibit all the details considered of importance at the time whenthey were kept; but less attention was then paid to the denominations
of paper in circulation than now, and it is not so^ea-sy to ascertain the
precise facts in this particular from the early as from the later recorcls.A table of annual issues .and redemptions of United States notes,
which first appeared in the Treasurer's report for 1886, and -was reprinted,'with extensions, in the next three years, ''presents the showing
'of these accounts a.s they stand, and consequently, to the end of tile
fiscal year 1874, the issues set out are those of the printing presses.
The amounts derivable from the issues and. redemptions as outstaodihg includei the notes in circulation, in the Treasury cash, and in tile
reserve vault unissued. They disagree with the^true volume outstanding, in the sense in which the term is ordinarily understood, for the
eleven years: beginning with 1864, in the manner here explainecl, by;
varying diffdrences, the greatest being in 1871, when the outstanding
notes were limited by law to $356,000,000, while the table would make
• out $534.,645,459 issued and not yet redeemed-. The accounts show
that at the time there were new notes on hand not yet put in circulation equal to the difference, and a statement of their denominations is
.made in the report for that yearo
In the belief that the table, even with this explan'atioin, would be,
misleading rather than useful as statistical matter, it is omitt(^d from
the present report, and the earliest figures relating to the issues aiid
redemptions: of legal-tender notes given are for 1878.' If the subject
^ be deemed of sufficient importance, a full statement of these transactions may be prepared hereafter.
•

;

- GOLD OERTIFICATES.

There was'a decline of activity in the issue and redemption of gold
certificates. The handlings were mostly of the large denominations,
w^hich are used in the collection of customs and the settlement of clearing-house balances in New York, But $275,140 of the series of 1863, which was discontinued in December, 1878, remained outstanding on
June 30 last, the "redemptions of the year heaving amounted to $9,740o



14

REPORT ON THE :^INANCES.

The circulation .of the current series payable to bearer, in denominations of from $20 to $10,000, was expanded to the extent of about
$10,000,000, while that of those payable to order, of the denomination
of $5,000 and $10,000, was contracted by some $6,500,000,
The table following exhibits the a,ggregate annual transactions in the
issue and redemption of these certificates:
Fiscal year.

1S66..
1.-67 . .
1868 . .
1809.1870 . .
1871.1872-1873 . .
1874-.
1875..
1876 -.
1877-.
1878..
J879..
.1880-.,
'ie81 . . .
3882...
1883 -.,
1884 ...
1885...
1880...
1887...
1888--.
1889...
r890...

Issued during
fiscal y e a r .

660. 00
109,121, 620.00
77, 900,
'400. 00
80, 663,160. 00
76, 731,000. 00
50, 577,000. 00
63, 229,500.00
55, 570,500. 00
81,117, 780. 46
70, 250,100.00
90, 619,100.00
58,141, 200.00
50, 342,400. 00
12,317, 400. 00

80,710, 000. 00
41,470,000.00
63, 000, 000. 00
1, 040, 000.00
85, 160,000.00
79, 275, 000.00
49, 050, OOO. 00

Total issued.

Outstanding at
close of
fiscal y e a r .

R e d e e m e d duri n g fiscal y e a r . T o t a l redeeined.

493, 660.00 $87, 545,800. 00
207, 61.5, 280. 00. 101,295, 900. 00
285, 575, 680. 00 79, 055,340. 00
366, 238, 840. 00 65. 255,620.00
442, 969, 900. 00 75, 270,120.00
499, 546, 900. 00 71, 237,820. 00
562, 776,400.00 •51,029, 500.00
618, 346, 900.00 48,196, 800.00
97,752, 680. 46
699, 464, 680.46
71, 278,900. 00
769, 714, 780.46
860, 333, 880.46 , 83,734,000. 00
45, 250,000.00
918, 475, 080.46
968, 817, 480. 46 47, 548,000.00
41, 270,700. 00
981, 134, 880.46
981, 134, 880. 46
7,409, 100.00
981, 134, 880.46
2,221, 680. 00
134, 880.46
981,
745, 800. 00
1,067, 844, 880. 46
9, 368,480. 00
1,109, 314,880.46
25,455, 980. 00
1.172, 314, 880.46
21, 069,620.00
10,188, 895. 00
1.173, 354,880.46
428.00
1,173, 354, 880.46
9, 687,
1, 258,514, 880.46
64, 623,667. 00
1, 337,789, 880.46 67, 249,598. 00
45,555, 573. 00
1,386, 839, 880.46

545, 800. 00
188, 841, 700. 00
267; 897, 040. 00
333, 152, 660.00
408, 422, 780. 00
479, 660, 600. 00
530, 690,100. 00
' 578,886, 900. 00
676, 639, 580. 46
747, 918, 480. 46
831, 652, 480. 46
876, 902, 480.46
924, 450, 480. 46
965, 721,180.46
973, 130, 280.46
975, 351, 960. 46
976, 097, 760. 46
985, 466, 240. 46
1,010, 922, 220. 46
991, 740. 46
1, 031,
1, 042,180, 635. 46
1,051, 868, 063.46
1,116, 491, 730. 46
1,183, 741,328.46
1, 229,296, 901. 46

$10, 947,860. 00
18, 773,580. 00
17, 678,040. 00
33,086, 180.00
34. 547,120. 00
39; 886,300.00
32, 086,BOO. 00
39, 460,000. 00
22, 825.100. 00
21,796, 300. 00
28,681, 400. 00
41, 572,600. 00
44, 367,000. 00
15, 413,700. 00
8, 004,600.00
5, 782,920. 00
• .5,037,120. 00
82, 378,640; 00
98,392, 660.00
140, 323.140.00
131,174; 245.00
121,'486, 817.00
142, 023,150.00
154, 048,552. 00
157,-542, 979. 00

• STANDARD SILVBR DOLLARS AND SILVER CERTIFICATES.

The absorption of legal-tender silver into the circulation, through the
vehicle of the certificate of deposit, has been kept in check only by the
limit of the means of supply at the disposal of the Treasury. The
fresh issues of certificates called for took up the yearns coinage and
$3,000,000 more. This currency now furnishes almost the entire circulating medium of the lower denominations. The whole amount of the
coins and certificates in circulation on the 30th of June was upwards of
$353,000,000, with only $16,000,000 in the Treasury to draw upon for
the supply always demanded in the autumn months.
The yearly coinage and ^movement of the dollars are shown in the
following table:

Fiscal year.

1878
1879
1880 .....
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889 . . . . .
1890

Annual
coinage.

Total
coinage.

$8, 573, 500
27, 227, 500
27, 933, 7.50
27, 637, 955
27, 772, 075
28, 111, 119
28,099,930
28. 528, 552
29, 838, 905
33, 266, 831
32, 434, 673
33, 997, 860
35, 979, 816

$8, 573, 500
35, 801, 000
63, 734, 750
91,372,705
119,144,789
147, 255, 899
175, 355, 829
.203, 884, 381
233, 723, 286
266, 990,117
299, 424, 790
333, 422, 650
369, 402, 466




Percentage Percentage
On h a n d a t N e t d i s t r i b u - O u t s tan d
of total
t i o n d u r i n g i n g a t close of a n n u a l
close of
coinage dis- coinage outyear.
year.
of year,
tributed.
standing.
$7,718,357
28,147, 351
44, 425, 315
62, 544, 722
87,153, 816
111, 914, 019
135,560,916
165,413,112
181, 253, 566
211,483,970
243, 879, 487
279, 084, 683
B13, 259, 910

$855,143
6,798, 506
11, 655, 786
9,518,548
3,162, 981
3, 350, 916
4,453, 033
—1,323,644
13, 998, 451
3, 036,427
39.156
— 1 , 207, 336
1, 804, 589

$855,143
7, 653, 649
19, 309, 435
28, 827, 983
31, 990, 964
35, 341, 880
39, 794, 913
38, 471, 269
52, 469, 720
55, 506,147
55, 545, 303
54, 337, 967
56,142, 556

24.9
41.7
34.4
11.3
11.9
15.8
46.9
9.1
0.1

9.9
21.3
30.2
31.5
26.8
24.0
22.6
18.8
22.4
20.7
18.5
16.3
15.2

;

TREASURER. .

. • .

15

C E R T I P I C A T E g O F DEPOSIT, ACT OF JUNE 8, 1872.

These certificates, variously known also as clearing house,certifieates,
legal tender certificates, or currency certificates, are issued in denomi- .
nations of $5,000 and $10,000, from this office and from the sub-treasuries in New York, Bostjn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Chicago, and'St, Louis, under section 5193 of the Revised Statutes, which,
authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to receive United States notes
on deposit, I without interest, from any national bank, in sums of not
less than $10,000, and issue certificates therefor, payable on demand, in'
United States notes, at the places w^here the deposits were made. The
notes received are required to be held as a special deposit for the redemption of the certificates, and the latter raay be counted as part of
the lawful-money reserve of the banks, and be used.in the settlement of
clearing-liohse balances at the place of issue. Being payable to the
order of the depositor and transferable by indorsement, these certificates afford a convenient means, jiarticukirly to national banks, of carrying oOr exchanging large sams. Although differing in some respects
from the ordinary circulating notes, they perform many important
functions of money, and no clear view of the complicated existing system of circulation can be obtained if they be left out of sight. They
^.are, therefore, included in the tables of circulation and Treasury holdings given in the appendix.
'
Little attention has been given to these certificates in former reports,
:and little relating to them can be gathered from printed documents,
more than the total annual issues and redemptions and the amounts
outstanding at various periods. To supply this lack, a statement of the
issues, redemptions, and amounts outstanding, by denominations,for the
end of each fiscal year since their issue began, is givetiin the appendix.
The figures will be found to differ at times from those heretofore published, the principal variation arising from the fact that $6,500,000 of
unissued certificates, destroyed in the fiscal year 1876, after the retirement of a Treasurer from office, and treated at the time as having been
issued and redeemed, were for a number of years, beginning with 1881, *
dropped/rem both sides of the account. The^^ are now replaced in order to reconcile the printed figures with the records of the Department.
The diff'erences between the denominational tables and the statements
of assets and liabilities, in the amounts outstanding, are due to the fact
that the former are compiled from weekly, and the latter from daily,
reports to this office.
FRACTIONAL SILVER COIN,

There has been a farther outfiow from the Treasury, without return
of between two and three millions in silver pieces of the value of 10
25, and 50 cents, indicating that the growth of this circulation has not^
yet been arrested,/ The decrease in the Treasury holdings of half-dollars, the stock of which is redundant, amounted for the fiscal year to
half of the total decrease. Doubtless, with judicious management and
the expenditure necessary for the recoinage of worn pieces, the whole
stock of the ihetal in these coins can, in the course of a few years more,
be given employment. Such a result would be a great advantage to
the Treasury, not only in relieving the vaults of a cumbersome asset,
but also in clearing the cash of a considerable SUDI of inconvertible currency of linii ted legal-tender value.



16

KEPORT O N - T H E

FINANCES.

The amounts of the different pieces in the several offices of the
Treasury and mint on June 30, 1890, were as follows
Office.

Twenty-five
cents.

T r e a s u r e r IT. S.,
$1,426, 790. 00
Washington
Assistant Treasu r e r TJ. S . :
359, 600. 00
Baltimore
317, 767. 00
Boston
»
781, 000. 00
C h i c a g o -.
183, 000. 00
Cincinnati -..
146, 490.00
N e w Orleans .
8, 3.27, 000. 00
New York
313, 000. (/O
Philadelphia .
San F r a n c i s c o 6, 260, 345. ,50
937, 300. 00
St. L o u i s
M i n t , U . S.:
21.00
C a r s o n C i t v -'.
Denver
N e w Orleans
Philadelphia .
4, 972. bb
San Francisco
U . S. A s s a y Office:
Helena
New York .. 1.50
St. L o u i s
.
50,000.00'
In transit ..-.--

Twenty
cents.

$563,460.00.

Fifty cents.

$40.00

46,150. 00
95, 220. 00
213, 000. 00
181,155.00
130, 070.00
699, 000. 00
49,000.00
120,134.75
. 114, 650. 00

T e n cents. F i v e cents.

Three
cents,

Unassorted.

$2,875. 00

$669.85

$62.73 $54,845.10

13, 600.00
10, 201.20
17, 000.-00
19, 000. 00
*"'*28.66'
11,265.00
117.60
. 42, 000. 00
7, 000. 00
300. 00
33,146. 60
363.00
50. 00' 17, 200. 00

50. 00
800.00

30.00 ' 16.358.10
102. 00 34, 656. 30
106, yH6.00
1, 594.00
28.00
4, 490.45
16. 53
,1.58,823.19
60.00 233,137.67
900 00
37, 0i8.15

100.00

509. 50

462.00
i, 330.40

i.ioo.oo
3, 276. 70
300. 00

902. 23

V

.28
645. 00
263, 531. 75

9, 434.63
39,652.49

"

•.

•

144. 69
11.75
327, 000. 00
2,803,537.75

19,107,287.00

Total

/
1

^

•

101.50
1.90
272. 05

.i. .\.

998. 60

223, 378. 65

7, 988. 95 1.199, 26 048, 328.18

MINOK COlNo
:

,

•

The atnount of copper and nickel coins in circulation throughout the
country is uncertaiUo No authoritative estimate of it exists, and the
difficulties of the subject are such that conjectures would be entitled to
little weight. The official record of coinages and remeltings shows that
some $20,000,000 of the pieces issued from the mint have not been returned, but this residue can only be taken as representing the sum of
the existing stock and the loss and wear of a century. In the estimates of the circulation given elsewhere in this report, the amounts
of these coins in the Treasury are alone included. The rapid coinage
made necessary of recent years by th<B demands of the public indicates a
spread of the use of the smaller coins to communities where they were
formerly unknown. The following table shows the amounts of the several denominations in the Treasury at the end of the fiscal year:
Three
cents.

Office.

Five cents.

T r e a s u r e r IT. S., W a s h i n g t o n
A s s i s t a n t T r e a s u r e r TT. S . :
Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boston
.
Chica<''0
.o.. -.,.
Cincinnati
i
N e w Orleans
New York . ;
:..
Phil.idelphia.,. . . . . . . .
San F r a n c i s c o
St. L o u i s
M i n t TJ. S-, P h i l a d e l p h i a
t r . S. A s s a y Office:
Denver
iNew York..^
St. L o u i s . . . . = . . . . . = „ „ , . .

$7,290.00

$90. 00

$20.00

$4,670. 00

$688.81

$12, 758. 81

2, 650.
6, 505.
16, 200.
3, 378.
4, 415.
33, 091.
11, 050.
6, 530.
4, 800.

30. 00
189.00
90. 00
4(J0. 00
7. 62
570.00
90. 00
43.23
30. 00

30.00
85. 00

6, 735. 00
676. 00
14, 740. 00
81.7; 00
668. 94
32, 680. 00
140 00
2, 582. 83
1, 250.00

232.46
252.49
400. 83
18.11
' .12
1. 017.06
5, 248. 01

9, 677.46
7,707.49
31, 430.83
4.783.11
5. 098. 64
67, 758. 06
16, 728 01
9, 282, 01
6,337.67
22, 869.49

T o t a l ..-=




00
00
00
00
00
00
00
45
00

T w o cents. One cent.

'"""iio.'oo
6.96
400. 00
200. 00
125. 50
20.00

237." 67'
22,869.49
.31
21.12
9.65

,
,95,909.45

Unassorted.

1, 599. 85

997. 46

64, 959.77

30, 996.13

Total.

^

31
21 12
9 65

194,462^66

17

TREASUKER, .

At present this coinage serves its purpose in a very satisfactory manner. It is perhaps in better condition and in more convenient supply
than any other part of the currencyo The recent act of Congress discontinuing the 3-cent nickle piece, it is to be hoped, will permanently
retire that vexatious denomination^ which, after three experiments, in
silver, paper, and base metal, has failed to perform the fanciful duty
for which it was designed, or to commeiid itself in any other way to
popular favoTc If is, in fact, out of place in a decimal system of money..
o, • RECOINAGE OF UNCURRENT COINS.o

The sum of $29,206.93, out of $30,000 appropriated % Congress, was '
applied to the recoinage of silver coins. For this purpose the following
lots were transferred to the mint, where they were melted and fabricated into dimes:
Denomination.
.Fifty cents
Twenty-five cents
Twenty cents
Ten cents
Five cents
Three cents

.•

Amount.
$333, 700. 00
213, 770. 00
1, 632. 20
. 43, 385. 00
11, 521. 25
898. 56

oo —

Total fractional,silver coin
-Standard dollars
Trade, dollars

604. 907. 01
43,181.00
614.00

Total..

648, 702. 01

There was also transferred $45,796.95 of minor coins to be recoined
or cleaned.
!
.
On tJune 30 last uncurrent gold and silver coins were held in the several offices of the Treasury as follows:
'

Washington....^Baltimore
.•
New York
Philadelphia
.Boston
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. L o u i s
N e w Orleans
San Francisco

Office.

Gold coin.

.......
.
^

I
o......
: '.

.;

'

Standard
Fractional
silver
d o l l a r s . s i l v e r coin.

$2.5, 385. 35

2, 9.55. 00

74

$47, 700. 00
15 600. 00
110, 000. 00
217 000 00
23, 500'. 00
854 00
105 000 00
36,400 00
4, 365. 65
257, 597. 93

939, 768. 35

4,624

818, 017.58

376, bbb. 66
1 491,873.00,.

$100
2,500
1,000

49, 555.00
950
^
^„

Total....

'Besides .these the 80,000,000 of 50-cent pieces in the sub-treasury at
San Franciscd arc all much worn. The appropriation of $20,000 for
this year will be sufficient for the recoinage of only $450,000 df silver,
leaving untouched all the gold and half the silver that were uncurrent
and on hand when the money became available. It would appear to
be wise policy not to neglect the coin circulation for any length of
time, but to provide each year for the expenses of keeping it in condition. To this! end a permanent appropriation • should b§ wade of a^
much a.s may be found necessaryo
FiOO-^——2
^ ••



18

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCESo

FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.

The amount of the old paper currency of less denomination than a
dollar shown by the accounts of this office to be outstanding on June
30 was $15,287,449.30. The annual redemptions since the issue ceased
have been as follows :
Fiscal year.
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881 . --•
1882
.
1883

Fiscal year.

Amount.
'

^ ,

:
-

.$14, 043, 458. 05
3, 855, 368. 57
705,158. 66
. 251,717.41
109,001.05
58, 705. 55
46, 556. 96

1884.
1885 '
1886
1887
3888
1889
1890

Amount.
.^
"
'...

$20, 629. 50
15 885.43
10, 088. 36
7, 123.15
7, 400. 00
5, .953. 35
5,179. 50

STOLEN AND COUNTERFEIT CURRENCYo

Counterfeit notes representing the aggregate value of $8,479 were
presented at this office, an increase of $2,200 over the year before. A
new counterfeit has appeared on the ten dollar notes of the Germania
IsTational Bank of New Orleans, series of 1882, of which two specimens
have been seen at the Treasury. A single example of a new counterfeit of the two-dollar silver certificate, unusually well executed and very
likely to deceive, and a photographic copy of the face of a thousanddollar note of the Fourth National Bank of New York, reduced to the
size of a visiting card and not dangerous, but coming within the x^i'ohibition of the law, have also been seen. The sum of $440 in nationalbank notes, whicb had been stolen while yet unsigned and fraudulently
put in circulation, were presented for redemptiouo Many of them were
sent in by holders who were aware of their character, but had received
the impression that the Treasury had undertaken their redemption.
The following table shows the counterfeit paper currency, by kinds
and denominations, rejected during the year:
Denomination.

One dollar
Fivedollars
.
°
.
...
.......
T e n dollars
..
. . . . . . . . . . . . „. . . . . . . . .
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total

United
states
notes.

Silver
certificates.

$13
40
305
650
'900
1,550
400

$32

3,858

242

National- Compoundbank
interest
notes.
notes.

200
10

$44
.595
760
680
. 150
800
1,000
4,029

$150
200
,

350

Total.

$45
84
1" 100
1 420
1 580
]• 850
1 400
1 000
.8, 479

There were also rejected 3,846 spurious silver coins, of which 2,473
were dollars, 656 half dollars, and 717 quarter dollars.
. An appropriation of $2,500, or so much thereof as may be necessary,
was made by the act of September 30, 1890, for the redemption of certain riotes of national banks stolen from the office of the Comptroller
of the Currency between the years 1864 and 1868, and put into circulation, with forged signatures. A former appropriation of $5,000 for the
same purpose proved to be insufficient. Although the amount stolen
and not yet returned to the Treasury is upwards of $12,000, it is esti


19

TREASURER.

mated that the sum now available will be sufficient for all of the notes
that have not been destroyed, and they will be redecDied at this office
in the order of their presentation. They are described as follows:
Denomination. Bank numbers. Treasury numbers. Amonnt
stolon.

Bank.

National City Bank, Lynn, Mass
First National Bank, jersey City, N. J . .
Third National Bank, New York, N. Y . .

121 to 150
671 to 750
9414 to 9428

50's & lOO's
50's & lOO's •
lO's &, 20's

66796 to 66825
19609 to 19688
644416 to 644430

$4. 500
12, oo6
750

No provision has been made for other notes stolen from the banks of
issue and circulated in the saine way as those in this list. Such notes,
bearing the titles of the Osage National Bank, of Osage, Iowa; the National Bank of Pontiac, III.; the Merchants^ National Bank, of Albany,
N. Y.; the National Bank of Barre, Vt.; tl;ie National Hide and Leather
Bank, of Boston, Mass.; and the First NationalBank, of Atchison,
Kans., will be rejected as heretoforCo
v
R E C E I P T S FROM CUSTOMS AT N E W YORK.

The following is the continued record of the amounts of the several
kinds of money received at the New York custom-house:

Period.

Fiscal
1884
Fiscal
1885
Fiscal

United
States
notes.

Per
Gold coin. P e r
ct.
ct.

Gold cer- P e r Silver cerr P e r
tificates.
c t . tificates. c t .

Silver
coin.

Per
ct.

Total
receipts.

year
$11, 791,000 8.8 $3, 556,000

$88, 750,000

. 4 $29,482,000 22.0 $134, 000

year
36,161, poo 29.9 1, 544, 000

42,779, 000 34.1 44, 660, 000 35.6

59, 549, Ooo 44.9

941, 000

54,343, 000 4 L 0 17, 404, 000 13.1

390, 500

39,939,500 27.3 1, -256,750

86, 887, 000 59.5 17, 564, 000 12.0

468,750

16, 768, QOO n.6 1, 313, 200

110, 227,484 76.4 15, 628, 000 10.8

470, 800

13,467, 210 9.2

370,010

125, 348,473 85.3

7, 501,173 5.1

203, 014

1, 434, 690 10.4
1, 373, 085 10.3
946, 000 7.9
894, 850 7.3
646, 290 5.8
590, 000 5.3

14, 812
21, 892
18, 334
16,727
15, 892
15, 783

11, 812, 014 85.6
11, 525, 61'6 86.5
10, 786, 732 1.7
11.039,559 90.,5
10,351,961 92.6
10,160, 975 92.4

519,910 3.
394, 830i 2 . 9
256, 650
240, 977
153, 220
223, 930

9,574
9,091
7,937
9, 793
8, 522

13, 791, 000
13, 324, 514
12, 015, 6.53
12, 2t) 1,906
11,-175,885
10, 997, 977

704, 750
425,350
336, 760
376, 190
383, 510
392, 900

13, 488
11, 998
13, 013
23, 337
22, 345
16,391

14, 077, 356 92.5
13,192, 840 95. 0
12, 033, 32595.
12, 997, 350195. 4
9, 992, 900.93. 6
13, 685, 260194. 5

420,'420
250, 920
180, 050
213,100
260, lOO:
390,7701 2; 7

7, 466
' 6, 967
6, 719
7, 880
6, 001
6,807

,1.5,223,480
13, 888, 075
12, 569, 867
13,617,857
10,671,516'
14, 492,128

8. 504, 375

204, 012

94, 706 0.1

153,969,858

158,000

year

Fiscal year
1887.;
Fiscal year
1888
Fiscal year
1889.:.....
1889.
July . . . . . .
August ...
September
"October . . .
November.
December.
1890.
January..
February
March..'..
April
May
June.
Fiscal
. 1890

year




3, 510, 877 2.3

20

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
CLEARING-HOUSE TRANSACTIONS.

The transactions between the sub-treasury and the clearing-house in
New York since 1884 are shown in the following table:
Checks sent to
clearing-hou^e.

Period.

Fiscal
Fiscal
Fiscal
Fiscal
Fiscal
Fiscal

year 1884
year 1885
,
year 1886.......
veari887
,
year 1888
year 1889
,

Checks received
from clearinghouse.

Balances due
assistant
treasurer.

Balances due
clearinghouse.

$116, 666, 000. 26
109,420,072.25
125, 782, 520. 53
116, 671, 928. 61
99, 399, 535.24
132,109,004.39

$295,541,948.32
278, 830, 720.11
276, 855, 487. 30
353,470, 901.64
337, 849, 743.13
424, 429, 65L 01

10, 092, 520. 35
10, 815, 812. 30
10, 837, 349. 39
11, 023, 505. 88
9, 899, 617. 36
II, 153, 958. 66

33, 567, 355. 63
39, 019, 021. 20
31, 835, 275. 71
33, 226, 585.,41
24, 743, 492.26
31, 951,429.43

23, 474, 835.28
28, 203, 208. 90
20,997,926.32
22, 203, 079.53
14, 843, 874. 90
20, 797, 470.77

9, 048, 455.32
9, 526, 330. 32
11, 419, 301. 33
10, 539, 627.16
11, 946, 677.40
10, 292,415.15

36,177, 804. 32
18, C20. 397.17
32,065, 422. 90
27, 869. 111. 99
21,869,115.82
29, 050, 033.43

27,129, 349.0©
8, 494, 066. 85
20, 646,121. 57
17,329,484.83
9, 955, 624.11
18, 757, 618. 28

126, 595, 570. 62

359, 395, 045. 27

$1, 331, 880.02 $180, 207, 828. 0&
694,284.08
170, 104, 931. 9^
1,643, 279. 86 152, 716,246.6^
181,409.57
236, 980, 382. 60-^
382, 681. 63 238, 832, 889. 52'
2, 268, 958. 36 294, 589, 604.98

1889.
July.
August
September
October
-iirovember ..,..
December

,
.,
.
1890.

January
February
March
April
May
June
Fiscal year 1890

33,185.69
33,185. 69

232, 832, 660. 34

NATIONAL BANKS.

On the 30th of June, 1889, the national banks had on deposit in this
office to secure circulation $148,121,450 in United States'bonds, and on
the 30th of June, 1890, $145,228,300, a.decrease of $2,893,150 during
fiscalyear.
' •
New banks to the number of two hundred and ninety-one were Organized and deposited bonds, and forty-live liquidating and failed banks
withdrew bonds.
The amount of bonds held for national banks designated as depositaries of public moneys June 30, 1889, was, $45,222,000. The amount
held for the same purpose June 30, 1890, was $29,713,000, a decrease of
$15,509,000. Depositary banks to the number of seventy-three were discontinued during the year, and eight new depositaries were designated ;
the holdings of all were reduced from $47,259,7.14.39 to $30,659,565.32,
The amount of each kind of bonds on deposit June 30, 1890, and the
purpose.for which they were held are shown in the following table:

Plass of bonds.

Bonds issued to Pacific railroads
Funded loan 1891
Funded loan, 1907
Total




Is
6

f

To secure
circulation,
face valne.

To secure public moneys.
Face value. Market value.

Total face
value.

$4, 913, 000
39, 486, 750
100, 828, 550

$1,175, 000
6, 874, 500
21, 663, 500

$1, 410, 000
7, 097, 921
26, 375, 311

$6, 088, 000
46, 361, 250
122, 492, 050

145, 228, 300

29, 713, 000

34, 883, 232

174, 941, 300

TREASURER.

•

,

21

The following table shows the number of banks and of depositaries,
together with the bonds held for them by the Treasury at the end of
each^ fiscal year: '
Bonds held
Bonds held
Number Number
of deposi- to s e c u r e cirto secure
of b a u k s .
culation.
taries.
p u b l i c funds.

Fif cal y e a r .

1863
1864
.1865
1866
1867
1808
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
•1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

'

.

26
467
1,294
1,634
1,036
1,640
1,619
1, 612
1,723
1,853
1, 968
1,9832,076
2,091
2,078
2,056
2,048
2, 076
2,115
2,239
2,417
2,625
2, 689
2, 809
3,014
3,128
3,262
3,508

,

204
330
382
385
370
276
148
159
163
158
154
145
143
145
124
127
131
130
134
140
135
132
160
200
290
270
205

$1, 185, 750
44, 266. 900
235, 989, 700
327, 310, 350
840, 007, 500
341,495.900
342, 8.51, 600
342, 278,-550
359, 885, 550
380, 440, 700
390,410,550
391,171,200
376, 314, 500
341, 394, 750
338, 713, 600
349, 546, 400
354, 2.54, 600
361, 652, 050
3ti0, 50,5, 900
360, 722, 700
356, 596, 500
334,147, 850
312,145,200
275, 974, 800
191, 966, 700
178, 312, 650
148,121, 450
145, 228, 300

.$30, 009, 750
32, 707, 500
38,177, 500
39,177, 950
38, 517, 950
25, 423, 350
16, 072, .500
15, 536, 500
1.5, 329, 000
15, 210, 000
15, 390, 200
14, 547, 200
14, 578, 000
15, 377, 000
13, 858, 000
14, 421, 400
14, 777,000
15,295,500
15, 925, 000
17,116,000
17, 060, 000
17, 607, 000
19, 659, 900
26, 485, 500
56,128,000
45, 222, 000
29, 713, 000

T o t a l of
bonds held.

$1,185, 750
74, 276, 650
268, 697, 200
365, 487, 850
379, 785, 450
380, 013, 850
368, 274, 950
358,351, 0.50
375, 422. 050
395, 769, 700
405, 620, 550
406, 561, 400
390, 861, 700
355, 972, 750
354, 090, 600
363, 404, 400
368, 676, 000
376, 429, 050
375,801, 400
376, 647, 700
373, 712, 500
351, 207, 850
329, 752, 200
295, 634, 700
218, 452", 200
234,440,650
193, 343, 450
174, 941, 300

Under section 5166 of the Revised Statutes, national banks are required: to examine and comYjare the bonds held to secure circulation
with the accounts of the banks, veritled by the Comptroller of the Currency, as often as once in each fiscal year. The bonds held for the depositary banks are always included in these examinations. As there are
3,713 lots of bonds on deposit, including those for depositaries, no less
than twelve examinations per day on an average are necessary, making
a continuous inventory of the contents of packages, of classes, and character of bonds held. The examinations are made by officers or agents
duly appointed, upon statements furnished by them without notice, and
a joint certificate is issued in duplicate, one of which is held by this
ofhce and one forwarded to each bank whose bonds have been examined. These examinations, with the exchanges, reductions, and new
deposits that are being continually made, involve a large amount of
exacting and responsible labor, for w^hich the vault where the bonds are
kept and the means provided are not adequate. An enlargement of the
vault, with facilities for properly filing the bonds of the banks and the
large miscellaneous trusts, is a great necessity.
SEMI-ANNUAL DUTYo

The national banks paid into the Treasury as semi-annual duty on
circulation for the fiscal year $1,254,839.65, a decrease of $155,492,19
from the amount collected during the preceding year. The decrease is
largely due to the purchase,and redemption of 4J per cent bonds by
the Department and the high prices of other Government bonds available as security for circulation. The largest amount of duty paid on.
circulation .for any one year w^as $3,404,483.11 in the fiscal year 1874.



22.

JiEPORT ON THE FlNAN^CESo

The whole amount of duty paid by the national banks since the organization of the system is $138,918,975.22. Of this amount $70,123,020.32
was paid on circulation; the remainder, on deposits and capital.
PACIFIC RAILROAD SINKING FUNDS.

In pursuance of instructions from the Secretary of the Treasury,
United States 4 per cent, bonds, amounting to $1,570,400, held for the
sinking fund of the Union Pacific Eailroad Company, have been withdrawn and sold, and the proceeds invested in first-mortgage Pacific
railroad bonds, as authorized by the act of March 3, 1887 (24 Stat., p.
488). First-mortgage bonds, including those purchased as stated, and
bonds purchased with funds derived from accrued interest on those
previously held, have been added to the Union Pacific sinking fund to
the amount of $2,648,500. As provided in the act named the firstmortgage bonds so purchased are those that have been made prior and
paramount to the mortgage lien, or other security of the United States,"
by which the advantage of first and second liens is'with the United
States to the extent of the bonds so held.
First-mortgage bonds, amounting to $343,000, purchased with accrued interest, have been added to the sinking fund of the Central Pacific Railroad.
^
The securities held June 30, 1890, for the sinking funds named, are
as given herewith:
^
,
Kind of bonds.

Kate Union Pacific
per sinking fund.

Currency 6s
Four per cent, consols
Union Pacific, lirst-mortirage
Central Pacific, first-mortgagee..
Central Branch, CTnion Pacific.
Eastern Division, Union Pacific.
Sioux City and Pacific
Western Pacific

$1. 043, 000
2, 908, 250
2, 635, 000
1,149,000
444, 000
197, 000
169, 500
72, 000

$2, 548, qoo
344, 000
645, 000
5, 000
10, 000
3,000
2,000

$3, .591, 000
2, 908, 250
2, 979, 000
1, 794, 000
449, 000
207, 000
, 172,500
• 74, 000

8, 617, 750

3, 557, 000

12,174, 750

Total.

Central Pacific
sinkino- fond.

Total.

A table in the appendix shows the movement of bonds, and the condition of the sinking funds at the close of each fiscal year from 1881 to
1890:
As stated under the head of National Banks, the vault in which these
bonds are kept is not large enough, and has not the conveniences for
entire safety and accuracy in the work of handling and for- prompt deposit and'withdrawal,
• INDIAN TRUST FUND.

The table below shows the amounts and kinds of bondSt and stock
held for the Secretary of the Interior, trustee of various Indian tribes,
tinder^the act of June 10, 1876.
Bonds of the State of North Carolina, amounting to $110,000, were
.paid November 6, 1889, and delivered to the State treasurer. The
amount received was paid into the Treasury to the credit of the fund.
A t the time of the payment the question arose as to the liability of the
Btate for interest upon the bonds after maturity, they having become
due in January, 1884, aiid April, 1885. '



23

TREASURER.

In accordance with an agreement between the Secretai*y of the Interior and the State of North Carolina,' bdnds of that State, amounting to
$42,000, were deposited in this office October 25, 1889, to be held pending the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in relation
to the liability of the State for interest upon the bonds after maturity,
the principal being unpaid at that date. The bonds so deposited were
held until June 10,1890, when they were surrendered, the court having
held that the State was not liable.
Bonds of ttie State of'Tennessee, amounting to $104,000, became due
July 1, 1890. On the 27th of June they were forwarded to the First
National Bank of Nashville, as requested by the Secretary of the Interior, and demand made by the president of the, bank for payment of
principal and accrued interest. The treasurer of the State, of whom demand was made, refused payment on the ground that no provision had
been made for it by the State; the bonds were returned to this office
and the Secretary of the Interior advised.
The bonds now held are as set forth in the following table:
Eegistered.

Class of bonds.

Coupon.

Total.

STATE AND CANAL BONDS.

$168, 000
132,000
37, 000

Arkansas, funded debt
Florida, State stocks.
Louisiana, State stocks . - .
Maryland, State stocks.
:
North Carolina, State stocks
^...
South Carolina, State stocks
Tennessee, State stocks
Virginia, State stocks
Virginia, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal bonds .

8, 350.17
191, 666. G6§
540, 000. 00

45, 000
122, 000
123, 000
1,000

$168,000.00
132, 000. 00
37, 000. 00
8,350.17
45,000.00'
122,000.00314, 666. 66|
540, 000. 00
1,000.00

UNITED STATES BONDS.

Bonds issued to Pacific railroads.

280, 000. 00
1, 020, 016. 83|

Total

280; 000. 00
628, 000 1, 648, 016. 83f

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TRUST FUNDS.

'

Securities, as described below, are h. eld for the District of Columbia
C o n t r a c t - Metropoliors' guai-- t a n police F i r e m e n ' s . M i s c e l l a n e ous.
relief fund.
fund.
a n t y fund.

Class of s e c u r i t i e s .

D i s t r i c t of Columt)ia 3.65 p e r c e n t s . .
United States 4 per cents
I J n i t e d S t a t e s 4h n e r c e n t s
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a 5 p e r c e n t s
U n s i g n e d D i s t r i c t o t C o l u m b i a 3.65
per cents
i
B o a r d of a u d i t certificates
C h e s a p e a k e a n d Ohio C a n a l b o n d s
Total

$26,000
168, 200
800
1,000

$29,000
1,550

$1,000
1, 250

Total.

$56, 000. 00
171,000.00
800 00
1, 000 00
$6,379, 550.00
20,134.72
84, 285. 00

196, 000

30, 550

2, 250

0, 379, 550. 00
20 134 72
84, 285.00

6, 483, 969.72

6. 712, 769.72

A complete statement of the District sinking fund will be found in a
separate report.
,
. MISCELLANEOUS TRUSTS.

• '<

Of the North Carolina bonds, the property of the United States, given
in the last report, $37,000 were paid by the State November'6,1889, together with the accrued interest to the date of their maturityo The



24

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

decision of the Supreme Court, referred to under the head of the Indian
Trust Fund, included the bonds paid, as stated above, and no interest
was received thereon after maturity. The amount received was paid
into the Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt.
The United States 4 per cent, bonds held tor the Alaska Commercial
Company as security for the faithful discharge of its contract wath the
UrM'ted States in reference to the Alaska seal fisheries'were surrendered
to I'^at company, upon the order of the, Secretary of the Treasury,
March 11, 1890, and $50,000 of the same class of bonds were received to
be held tor the North American Commercial Company for the same
purpose.
On December 11, 1889, $70,000 United States 4 per cent, bonds,
held for the Fidelity National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio, as security for
public moneys, were withdrawn and redeposited as a special deposit for
the Comptroller of the Currency for the benefit of the creditors of the
bank, the amount due the United States on account of public moneys
having been obtained from the disposal of other.bonds held for that
purpose.
United States bonds and other securities are held for these trusts as
follows:
American Printing House for the Blind, 4 per cents
PennsylvaDia Company, 4 | per cents
Manhattan Savings Institution, 4 per cents
North American Commercial Company, 4 per cents
Total

=

$250, 000
200^ 000
75, 000
50,000

....,

-

575,000

The securities held for the Secretary of the Treasury, and belonging
to the United, States, are as follows:
Arkansas State bonds . . . ^
Louisiana State bonds
North Carolina State b o n d s . . .
Tennessee State bonds
Virginia State bonds
Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad bonds
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal bonds
South Carolina State stocks
•.
Total

...oo=-^.o»

»»

\

$625, 000
545,480
13,000
21,000
41,800
500,000
12,000
3,000
1,761,280

REDEMPTION OF NATIONAL-BANK NOTES.

There was a contraction of $25,000,000 in the national-bank note circulation during the fiscal year, by W'hich the amount outstanding on June
30, including unissued notes in the custody of the banks, was left at a
little under $186,000,000. All but about $29,000,000 of this was in the
denominations of $5, $10, and $20. The law authorizing these notes
prohibited the issue of any below the denomination of $5 after the resumption of specie payments, and experience has shown that the denominations above $20 can not be circulated to advantage.
The redemptions at this office amounted to $69,856,022.70, a decrease
of upwards of $18,000,000 as compared with the year before. Of the
notes assorted and delivered, $12,590,880 fit for circulation w^ere returned to the banks for further use, and $56,908,894 went to the Comptroller of the Currency for destruction, $23,275,005 to be replaced .with
new^ notes and $33,633,889 to be retired from circulation. The expenses
incurred in'this work, including $19,862.65 for transportation charge's,
were $107,843.39, which sum will be assessed upon the banks at the




25

TREASURER,

rate of $1.56-^L6_ for each $1,000 of their notes delivered from this office
subject to assessment, amounting to $69,060,785,
Owing chiefly to the lower prices ruling for bonds,'the deposits for the
retirement of circulation upon all accounts reached an aggregate of
jonly $11,202,112 as against $32,484,415 deposited during,the xneceding
year. In ho nionth was the limit of $3,000,000 fixed by law for deposits
for the reduction of circulation approached. The net result of this
accretion to the fund accumulated from these deposits, and of the year's
redemptions therefrom, w^as a decrease of the balance of the fund in the
Treasury from $78,051,136.75, w^here it stood on June 30, 1889, to
$55,619,359.75. .
• /
An analytical statement of the fresh deposits is given below, exhibiting the amounts received each month for the retirement of the notes of
banks in the hands of receivers or in voluntary liquidation, for the reduction of the circulation of others still continuing in business, and for
the retirement of notes outstanding at the end of three years after the
expiration of the charters under which they were issued. The amounts
of the last class of deposits were immediately re-issued in* new notes of
the banks concerned, so that there was no resultant contraction of circulation. The table also shows the redemptions from the aggregate
fund and the balance of the fund remaining in the Treasury at the end
of each month6
Deposits.
Month.
F o r retirement.

1889July
September
October.
November
1390—
January
February
Marcb
April
May
Total

F o r reduction.

$135,520.00
$681, 650. 00
46,130. 00
184, 590. do
14, 850.00 1, 494,130. 00
.'.' 11, 250. 00 1,633,492.00
77, 660. 00 1 , 214, 995. 00
65, 415. 00 1, 980, 945. 00
67, 840. 00
55,250.00
; 145,477.50
77, 342. 50
75, 650.00
45,000.00

1, 537, 275. 00
198, 070. 00
373,500.00
336,150.00
, 457, 780. 00
130, 500. OJ

817,385.00 10, 223, 077.00

F o r retirem e n t and
re-issue.

$16, 450.00
28,810. 00
7, 220.00

14, 760.00
21,160.00
45, 000.00
28, 250.00

Redemptions.

Balance.

Total.

$817,170. 00 $3, 565,895. 00 $75, 302, 411.'75
247,170. 00 2, 373, 478. 50 73,3 76,103.25
1, 537, 790. 00 2, 756, 276. 50 71,957,610.75
1, 651, 962. 00 1,79.3/499.00 71, S16 079. 75
1, 292, 655. 00 3, 585, 066. 50 69, 523, 668. 25
2, 046. 360. 00 2, 738, 807.50 68, 831, 220. 75
1, 605,115. 00
268,080.00
540,137. 50
458, 492. 50
561,680.00
175, 500. 00

3, 240,423. 00
3, 281,128. 50
2, 582,176. 00
2, 558, .30]. 00
2. 579, 742. 50
2, 579, 035. 00

67,195,912.75
64,182, 864. 25
62,140, 825. 75
60, 040, 957. 25
58, 022, 894. 75
55, 019, 359. 75

161, 650.00 11, 202,112. 00 33, 633, 889.00

At this juncture, with important legislation pending in Congress
bearing on the subject, with the retirement of the last of the bonded
debt in immediate prospect, and with a divided public opinion relative
to the advantages of a national banking system, it is impossible to
foresee what changes will affect the bank circulation in the future.
Certain it is, however, that as the laws now stand this circulation is
destined to further contraction, more or less rapid, if not to extinction.
The subject will doubtless receive the earl^^ and careful consideration of
Congress. . :
Noteworthy changes in the relations between the Treasury and the
banks were made by the act of July 14,1890, Deposits of lawful money
for the redemption of circulation surrendered by the banks are now
required to be covered into' the Treasury, and the balance of them on
hand at the end of each month to be reported as debt of the United
States bearing no interest. By this enactment such deposits become



26

REPOET OK THE FINAl^CES.

revenues of the Treasury, and the lawful money paid out in redemption
of the surrendered circulation becomes a public expenditure. The
moneys accrued and accruing from the deposits become available for
the general uses of the Treasury, while the outstanding notes are
adopted by the United States and provided for by a permanent appropriation. The receipts,and expenditures on this account will be matter
for the annual estimates. Incidentally the principle first applied in the
act of July 12, 1882, to the notes of the banks outstanding after the
expiration of charters, that the profits arising from the failure of presentation for redemption shall inure to the IJnited States, seems to be
extended to the whole bank circulation.
The new legislation also changed the character of the Treasurer's
responsibility with regard to this bank-note redemption fund. Beginning in 1867, when the earliest deposits were made, the Treasurer received and disbursed, up to the close of business on July 25, 1890, the
following amounts of money on this account:
Deposits.

Insolvent banks
Banks in liquidation
......
IBanks reducing c i r c u l a t i o n . . . . . .
Total

Redemptions.

Repayments
and trausfers.

$13, 983, 423. 00
15.5,572,801.35
309, 429, 323. 00

$13,051,685.00
121, 272, 363. 00
269, 997, 860. 50

$182,768. 00
1,557,158.10
18, 5rJ5,237.00

$748; 970. 00
32,743,280.25
20, 896,225. 50

478, 985, 547. 35

Account.

404,321,908.50

20, 275,163.10

54, 388, 475. 75

Balance.

This work was done without accountability to the Department, the
successive heads of the office dealing independently with the banks on
the one hand and the holders of the notes on the other. I t was con-,
ducted without loss and to the satisfaction of the public. On the 26th
of July last the Tieasuier drew his check for $54,388,475,75, the
balance-of the fund remaining in his hands, and deposited it in the
Treasury. Henceforward the moneys and accounts of the fund will pass
through the same channels as those of the revenues.
RECOMMENDATIONS AND SUG-aESTIONS.

The condition of the vaults and safes in this office was brought to the
attention of Congress, during the last session, with such demonstration of their insecurity as would convince the most doubtful, and with
an urgent appeal for the means of providing others of modern design.
An immediate appropriation, estimated to be sufficient for the purpose,
was asked for, together with an additional force of watchmen. Congress, while granting the men, chose to postpone the renewal or improvement of the vault facilities, and authorized the appointment of a
commission of scientific or mechanical experts to report on the best
method of safe and vault construction. As this is a matter about whicb
the Treasurer feels great concern, he respectfully urges that the steps
necessary to the attainment of the object in view be pressed forward
without delay. He also urges the necessity of furnishing the cash room
with a t least the ordinary appliances of modern business officeSo
As the Treasurer is a bonded officer he should be allowed the privilege
of selecting his owm force of clerks without the restrictions of the civilservice law. That law might, however, be made to apply in all respects
to dismissals. This would insure the best i)ossible service and accord
to the Treasurer the selection of those for whom he stands responsible,




fREAStJRERo

2?

The recommendations made last year in relation to the watchmen and
messengers employed about this office or having access thereto are r©»
newed.
'
For the greater security of the contents of the vaults it is considered
essential to increase the present force of watchmen by ten-men, to b /
@
placed under the direction of the captain of the watch, in carrying out
the Treasurer's orders, with, pay at the rate of $1,000 a.year.
There are persons employed in the office as m^essengers, receiving a
messenger^s pay, who have faithfully served in that capacity for years,'
In the ordinary-course of their duties they are intrusted with the handling of large amounts of money, wMle on many occasions they are called
upon to perform the labor of clerks.. It is recommended that three
new places be provided for on the pay-rolls, with salaries of $1,000 a
year, to increase the efficiency of this force and to reward long and
meritorious service.
Attention is again called to the advantage in safety and convenience .
that could be secured by requiring messengers while on duty to wear some
distinctive uniform or badge. " It is a matter of special importance to
this office,'where messengers have to be intrusted with large siinis of
m'oney and papers of great value.
The suggestion is made that if some expedient could be devised by
which the handling of the silver coin in th'e various^offices of the Treasury could safely be avoided, whether upon the transfer of the funds to
a new custodian or in the periodical examinations, it would be an important advantagCo The repeated counting of this coin is attended witk
risk of loss and entails a considerable expenditurCo
Continued embarrassment has attended the work of-supplying th©
country with paper currency, from the delays and failures in filling the
Treasurer's requisitions for new'notes, caused, as he is informed, by the
inadequate, facilities of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. With;,
a large and growing circulation to provide for, with considerable profits
accruing from the loss and destruction of notes, and with the whole
business, as well as the attendant responsibility, centralized in the
Treasury, it seems puerile to allow so small a difficulty as the printing of a few thousand sheets of paper to become an obstacle in the discharge of public business, and an annoyance to the people in their money
matters. The annual demand for small notes, recurring with'each harvest, and as certain to come as that the yearly produce of the soil will :
•
have to be paid for, brings to the Treasury an annual surprise, with no
suitable preparation ready for it. Th.e Treasurer respectfully asks that
steps be taken to relieve him from this embarrassment, and to put the
Department in a position to deal with the currency question more freely
and effectually.
'
.
As a means of giving greater elasticity to the currency, and a hew resource to the Treasury, it might be well to consider the expediency of
issuing gold certificates of the denominations of $5 and $10.
Since July 1,1883, there has been no appropriation for the transportation of United Slates paper currency to Washington for redemption,
although the appropriation for the transportation of public moneys and
securities, rendered necessary to the collection of the revenues, has been
made annually. In consequence, the notes, as they wear out or become
inutilated, find their way to the large cities, and finally into the subtreasuries, where they are assorted from those in better condition, and
forwarded;to. Washington for redemption, the treasury of course paying
the cost of carriage., Small amounts are sent in by bankers and others,
at their own expensCo ^ During the last fiscal year the G-overnment paid



28

REPORT ON ' THE FINANCES.

$12,842.60 on this account, w^hile perhaps not more than $4,000 was
paid by private parties. Despite the refusal of Congrests to assume this
part of the expense of keeping the currency in condition, the Treasury
pays three-fourths of it. At the same time the Treasury denies to
private holders of its notes and certificates a privilege which the national banks are required to extend, and assumes the work of handling
the worn notes twice, once in the sub-treasuries and again in this
office. I t i s believed that an appropriation for the carriage of paper
currency unfit for circulation to Washington would be a benefit tb both
the public and the Treasury, The Government has now the advantage
of a liberal contract for its carrying business, and under the circumstances could well afford to 'take this step. With perhaps a trifling
increase of expense the Treasury could so keep the people supplied,
free of cost to them, with a good, clean, and fresh paper currency, thus
greatly lessening the chance of counterfeiting. Worn notes would be
sent in from every part of the country to Washington for redemption,
instead of being kept in circulation till they reach the large cities.
The labor of sorting them out would be assumed largely by the banks
instead of falling upon the sub-treasuries, as now.
The laws and practice thereunder relating to abraded or otherwise
uncurrent coins might be found capable of amendment in a way to
make the metallic part of the circulation more useful, popular, and
prominent. I t is known that holders of gold coin hesitate to offer it at
the Treasury for fear of having pieces found light, rejected, and marked.
The Treasurer is informed that banks in different cities hold large
amounts for this reason. The knowledge that light pieces are subject
to discount is wide-spread, but the prevailing notions ol the manner of
estimating the loss are mostly vague and exaggerated.. People can not ^.
all afford to buy coin scales or to acquaint themselves with fine-drawn c
regulations. Hence gold coins are regarded with more or less sus- •
picion, and their circulatipn is obstruct^ed. They are received'and paid ^
out by weight and not by lale. One of the primary objects of coinage,
that the stamp of the mint shall do away with the scale, is thus defeated. At a time when the part of the circulation based on silver or
on the credit of the Government is fast increasing, tMs matter may deserve serious attention,.
•

•

SALARIES.

The salaries paid to the officers of the Treasury are considered inadequate compensation for the duties performed, being not only less than
those paid in well-conducted private financial institutions for the same
kind of service, but less even than those paid in the sub-treasury in E^ew
York, In more than one instance has this circutustance worked detriment to this office by depriving it of the services of gentlemen whose
abilities have received better recognition at the hands of those with
whom their duties brought them in contact than could be offered b^^
the Department by which those duties were imposed. In many other
cases, while the officer remains and sees himself falling behind his friends
in j)rivate life, he does so with the feeling that he has made poor choice
of a calling, and that if he had. otherwise devoted the time and labor he
gave to the Government he would have made better advancemento
As regards the exaltation of an outlying office over the central one to
which it is tributary, there may have been some reason present to the
mind that conceived such an idea, but certainly none exists now. Since
that state of things was instituted many important changes have taken .



-

^

\

,

TREASURER

"

. • 29

place in th© Treasury system and in the relative importance ^of the
offices which compose it. At onetime the Was'hingtonoffice>as small
and its business' comparatively insignificant;. now it is not .only the
largest, but by far the most important of all. While the receipts and disbursements of money at ISTew York exceed those in this city, the Washington office now carries more cash.^ In all kinds of money and securities
its vaults contain between three and four times as much as those in
New York. But besides the handling of money, in which Washington
, is second only to I^ew York, the labors of directing the whole systeih are
performed here—labors.at least quite as im'portant as those of a purely
ministerial kind, which form the whole duty of the sub-treasuries. If
the Treasurer himself, through Ms iramediatie subordinates, receives
and pays out less money, he' handles the warrants and draws the drafts
.' by which all the revenues are passed through the Treasury. He must
keep accounts relating to his own immediate business, like the assistant
' treasurers ; but these are the least important part ofhis books, which '
must show the operations of the whole system. In fact, to the duties
of the kinds that are devolved upon the sub-treasuries, of which 'a larger
share is performed in his office than in any of the others, with one exception only, he joins much other labor of the same character, which is
assigned to him alone; but with all this, -h^is principal and most important duties are not of a',ministerial, but of an administrative character—duties with which the sub-treasuries'have nbthing whatever to
do. His office gives employment to nearly three hundr'ed persons,
while the largest sub-treasury has only one hundred, and all of them
together have less than two hundred and fifty.
To make a statement showing in detail the kind and quantity of work
done i'n the several dlBSces would require much time and space; but the
facts relating to the handling of mouey alone may conveniently be presented, and these by themselves go so far to illustrate what is heresaid that the Treasurer is content to rely upoii them" alone as proof of
the'justice of his contention, leaving' out of sight altogether the particulars of the other labors performed in his office, to which allusion has
been made.^ But even within this limitation of scope, the figures are
unjust to him, because the labor of issuing and redeeming paper currency, which is performed .in his office alone, is much greater, and attended with greater responsibility, than that of mere repeipt and disbursement, which'onlyis required of the sub-treasuries. For example,
there are never more than ten per.^ons employed directly in receiving
and countingjnto the Treasury the national-bank notes sent to Washington for redemptioij, but not less than twenty-five are required to ass'ort the notes aud put them in shape for delivery. Thus some thirtyfive pel sons are necessary in this office for work, which the figures
would make appear as equal to that of only ten in the sub-treasuries.
The same is true, to a somewhat less degree, of all th© paper currency
Jbandled ih this office.
^ .
" "In the table below'are shown the number of ^persons bf every rank
and grade authoiized-by law to bc employed in the several offices of
the Treasury system for the current year, their total and average pay,
the total amount of 'money handled last year, being the sum of the receipts and disbursements, 'and the total amount of money and securities
on hand on June 30 last. Tn order to bring th© Treasury into comparison with the other institution in the world nearest like it, similar statistics rehiting to.the li'duk of England are given, with the omission of tb©
fiandling of money, the figures for which are noi within r^acM




/30,-

REPORT ,ON,. THE FINANCES.
Nuniber
j Money and
T o t a l p a y . A v e r a g e M o n e y handled.! s e c u r i t i e s , o n
of
pay.
persons,.
, ,
I
hand.

Office.

-{-

Baltimore
B o s t on
..
Chicago .,
Cincinnati . . . . . . . = . . ' , . . . . . . - . .
N e w Orleans . . . . . .
..
iNew Y o r k - -•-.,..:
Philadelphia . . . .
i
St. L o u i s
...^
San F r a n c i s c o . . .
-.

14
24
18
12
12
103
26
12
15

$21,600
37,910
25, 900
16, 560
18, 09.0
181,490
36, 540
. 17,860
27,120

$1, 543
IT 580
1,439
1,380
1,507
1, 762
1,405
1,488
1, 808

' , T o t a l for s n b - t r e a s u r i e s
Waabington

279

383,070
338,162

1, 623
1,212

2,216, 056, 842 \ 376,114,054
966, 617, 548 | 675, 564, 759

515
1,160

721,232
1, 670, 000

1, 400
1,440

,1.
' 3,182, 674. 390 051, 678, 813
- 691,129,600

Totalfhr system
;Banlc of E n g l a n d

....

917,887
120, 489, 410
• 99,595,181
850, 680
, 37,
66, 169,403
i, 498,900, 856
198, 4.59,244
71, 136,921
64,537,260

$12, 643, 335
16, 538, 089
,'16.629,48913, 285, 633
18, 926, 548
180, 739, 783
26, 276, 295
22, 861,277
' 68, 213, 605

The following table sbows the salary of each chief officer, the number and pay of the intermediate officers receiving more than $1,800 a
year, and the number and pay of the clerks and other employes of th©
Treasury systeni,
'
I n t e r m e d i a t e officers.
P a y of
cbief
officer.

Office.

Baltimore
Boston.
..... =
Cbicago ..-,-..„.
, Cincinnati
IsTew O r l e a n s
New york'
,
.Pbiladelphia . . .
St. L o u i s
San F r a n c i s e o

No.

. . , . - . . $4, 500
-= = .*i o - . . - 5,000
4,500
4
-4,500
. . . = ».
4,000
.-'.
8,000
.........'..-.
4,500
4,500
4,500
i

$2,500
11, 200
2, 500
- 2, 000
6,250
72,800.
8,800
2,500
13,900

,. --

T o t a l for s u b - t r e a s u r i e s
Wasbington

50. 000

.o......... ..

Average
pay.

No.

Pay.

Average
pay.

$14, 600
21, 710
18, 900
10, 060
7,840
100,690
, 23,240
10, 860
8,720

$2, 500
2,240
2, 500
2,000
2,083
2, 427
2,200
2,500
2,317

$1, 217
1,206
1,181
1,006
980
1, 398
1,107
1,086
1, 090

122,450
54,200

44, 000,
6,000

T o t a l for. s y s t e m

Tay>

Clerks and employes.

73

2,355
2,581

175
2'57

216, 620
277,962

1,238
1,081

176, 650

2,420

432

494, 582

1,145

The data for tb© Bank of England are obtained from Hankey's ^ Prin^
ciples of Banking,'^ and relate to the year 1887a The persons employed
include '^ thos© at the branches, the porters, mechanics, machine-boys,
, etc.'? Besides their salaries and. wages, amounting to $1,450,000 a year,
there are, pensions to- superannuated officers of about $220,000=-a year
more, making a total of $1,670,000,,or an- average total of $1,440 per
person for the eff'eetive force, as shown above. How tMs outlay is regarded by those best qualified to judge of its wisdom,, may be inferreid
from the compliment which the^author of the book, a director of fifty-one
years'service, pays to the m'anagement, 'Ho whom,'' he says, ''the bank
are greatly indebted for th© very able maimer in which the whole business is arranged, so as to secure increased efficiency with the utmost
regard to economy." The business, including as it does the receipt and
disbursem©nt of the British revenues, the management of the public
debt, and the issue and redemption of circulating notes, may be said to
be almost exactly of the same kind as that of the Treasury, with th©
addition of one of private deposit and discount.
>
The American service knows neither superannuation nor pensions.
The old and worn-out di© in th© liarn©ss, on reduced pay, or, in cases of



•••-•-^';,_./

;••,'

-''v:;?'".V

TREASURER:;,-

•'•-•;

;:';^',

.

- 31

uncommon aggravation, ar© cut off witb a bonus of their salary for such
part, of the thirty days' leav© of absence as may be due on the year's
account. With this saving, in spite of the better pay allowed here for
the humblei? kinds of work, the Treasury service costs $40 a year per
man less than the Bank of England's. Taking ©v©rything into consideration, the difference is very small, and $1,400 a year is pointed out,
in a striking manner as the proper average compensation for such serv- >
ice in the estimation of the' English-speaking njations. The Washington office stands alone as underpaid according to this rating,'and
conspicuously so in comparison with som,© of the sub-offices. It^has
grown in importance without recognition. The Treasurer is not aware
that these facts have been presented before in this way, but their existence has long been felt, and they are sufficient to explain the dissatisfaction that has been expressed, publicly or privately, by ©very Treasiirer for the last thirty years.
No (jomplaint is here intended, and none is heard inany quarter, that
the assistant treasurers and their subordinates are paid too much.
They receive no more than they deserve, an^ it is not begrudged them.,
But relatively they all are better compensated than their superior, to
whom they report and upon whose orders they act. Some minor varia- tions of grading exist, which are made apparent in the table last given.
There are also inconsistencies in the relations between the several
offices. While the moneys in the sub-treasuries are charged to th©
Treasurer on the books of the Department, and by law are subject to his
draft, he has no direct control over them, and no means are at' his disposal for examining them. lt> would seem wise and proper, not to say just
or fair, to invest/Mm with authorityin thesame measuieas heis charged
^ i t h responsibility, and; to pi?ovide the small sum that would enable
him to make personal visits to the^e offices, or to cause examination to
be made of their condition and methods of doing business, whenever
the Exigencies of the public service may, in his judgment, require,
It is hoped that these matters, as well as the expediency of establishing offices in the new States of the Northwest, will receive early attention, and i n particular that the propriety, not to say the necessity, of
establishing the principal office in a dignity consonant with its duties
and position will be recognized.
•WORK; O F - T H E OFFIOE.

/

, No great changes have occurred in the routine business other than
those incident to the increase of the revenues.' The immense operations
of the year were accomplished by the moyement of $100,000,000 less
money in and out of t h e several offices than was found necessary th©
year preceding. Improvements of methodshave been introduced w:here
possible, as, for example, the use of a perforating punch for preventing
alteration of drafts and checks.
, .
=
Before closing this report .the. Treasurer desires to express the sens©
which be entertains of the high value of the services Tendered by th©
officers and employes associated withhim. To the honesty, competency,
and in dustry of the entire force it is due in a great measure that the vast
business of the year, including the work of supplying almost all th©
currency of 62,000,000 of people, was conducted without the loss of a ,
cent. ' Special acknowledgments are du© to Mr. J. W. Whelpley, Assistant Treasurer; Mr. E ; E . True, cashier 5 Mr., J. F. Meline, assistant
pashier J Mr. Tp B. Rogers, Superintendent of the National Bank B©-"



32-

'• ',-' ^ • REPORT,'ON^-THE ..l^^INANCES. ^ .
-

demption Agency 5 Mr. A. L. Rutter, chief clerk; Messrs. J. C. Burnett,
D. W. Harrington, O. L. Jones, Albert Relyea, and Ferdinand Weiler,
chiefs of division ; Messrs. W. H. Gibson and G. 0. Bantz, tellers; and
Mro Sherman Piatt, principal book-keeper. The statistical and other
matter contained in this report has been compiled and prepared for
publication witb the assistance of Mr. F . W. Lantz. ^:,
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient, servant,
'

,.

J A M E S N.

'
Hon. W I L L I A M . WINDOM,

'••

Secretary of the Treasury.




HUSTON,

Treasurer of the United States,
.

• '

\ ^ \

.

33

TEEASUEEE.

APPENDIX.
No. 1.—RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOB THE FISCAL YEAR 1890,

AS SHOWN

BY W A R R A N T S I S S U E D .

Repayments
Account.

Receipts.

Expenditures.

Custoins....................00..0....
Internal revenue
Lands
Miscellaneous
I n t e r i o r civil
...
...
Treasury proper
...-.
Diplomatic
Judiciary
War D e p a r t m e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navy Department
..............
Interior Department, Indians . . . . . . .
Interior Department, pensions
I n t e r e s t on t h e p u b l i c d e b t
'.....
P r e m i u m on t h e p u b l i c d e b t .

$229,668,584.57
142,606, 705.81
6,358,272.51
24,447,419. 74

$19,734,371.91
3, 928,068.31

Total, net.

Counter
f ™ - X a p ' - credits to appropriations. propriations.

$887,772.40
29,609.32

$78 467 26
323.68

8,442,413.14 ! 304,600.30
35, 669. 08
43,430,561.05 1 3, 266, 265.30
129 838 54
tid flQS 0 8
1 648 276 59 !
7 847 59
4 219 565,49 i
^4.«^ d.F,9 ^ ^ ! fin Rnfi r.ft
44,582,838.08 1, Oil, 199. 09
423, 923.91
22,006,206.24
200, 421. 60
7,368,403.32
6, 708, 046. 67
440,028. 38
26, 324. 84
106,936,v855.07 3,725,026.08
4,419.49
'36,099,284.05
289, 224.12
V 20,304,224.06
403,080,982.63

318,040,710.66

G o l d certificates
S i l v e r certificates
,
..........
Certificates of deposit, a c t of J u n e 8,
. 1872
E e f u n d i n g certificates
."
United States notes
T r a ctional c u r r e n c y
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
„
O n e a n d t w o y e a r n o t e s of 1863
Compound-interest notes
7-30'8 of 1864 a n d 1865
F u n d e d loan of 1907
....
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
L o a n of 1863
...^..
F u n d e d loan of 1891.
10-40'8 of 1864
C o n s o l s of 1865..
Consols of 1867
,
5-20's o f l 8 6 5
F u n d e d loan of 1881
L o a n o f J u l y 12,1882
5-20's of 1862
5-20's of J u n e , 1864

49,070,000.00
94, 480, 000.00

45,555,573.00
55,569,995.00

23,590,060.00

28,285,000.00
15,780.00
78,132, 000. 00
. 5,179.50
410.00
590.00
3, 29G. 00
300.00
73,923,500.00
. 7 , 400. 00
4, 000. 00
30, 623, 250.00
3, 000. 00
2,750.00
11, 450.003,200.00
10, 000. 00
47, 800.00
I, 850.00
50.00

Total....
E e c o v e r e d from a f o r m e r d e p o s i t a r y .

648,374.632.63
731.11

Total
B a l a n c e J u n e 30,1889
B a l a n c e J u n e 30, 1890

648, 375,363. 74
645, 297, 473.27

. „ .

THE PUBLIC DEBT.

Aggregate

Fi90.



.

78,132, 000. 00

2i,650.'00

•

630, 247, 078.16 10,407, 446.51

..............

'8,182. 574. 68

•

663,425, 758. 85
1, 293, 672, 837. 01

1,293,672,837.01 10, 407, 446. 51

8,182, 574. 68

34

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 2—RECEIPTS AND E X P E N D I T U R E S ON ACCOUNT O F T H E P O S T - O F F I C E D E P A R T MENT FOR THE F I S C A L Y E A R 1890, AS SHOWN B Y W A R R A N T S ISSUED.

Receipts from
Deficiency
postal revenues. appropriation. Total receipts. Expenditures.
$25, 325, 842.57
By the T r e a s u r e r . - . . . . ^
Bv nostmasters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,780,198.72

$7,200,000

$32,525,842.57
35,780,198.72

$31,231, 064. 92
35,780,198.72

61,106, 04L 29

7, 200, 000

68,306,04L29
4, 547, 941.46

67, Oil, 263. 64

72,853,982. 75

72,853,982.75

Total
Balance J une 30 1889 . . . . . . . .
Balance June 30 1890 .'

:

Aggregate

5,842,719.11

-

No. 3. -COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF BALANCES I N T H E TREASURY AT T H E CLOSE
OF

THE

F I S C A L Y E A R S 1889 AND

1890.

Balance as sbown by last report, June 30,1889 .
Net revenue 1890
Net expenditures 1890
:

$403, 080, 982.63
318,040,710.66

Excess of revenue over expenditures .

$645,297,473.27

85, 040, 271. 97
730,337,745.24

Public debt.

Funded loan of 1907 ..
Silver certificates . -.
Gold certificates......
Certificates of deposit, act June 8,
1872
TTnited States notes .
Refunding certificates |
Fractional currency
Old demand notes . .
Funded loan of 1891
Matured d e b t . .

Issues during
fiscal year.

Redemptions
during
fiscal year.

Excess of issues over
redemptions.

$21,650.00
94,480,000.00
49, 070, 000.00

$73, 928, 500. 00
55, 569, 995. 00
45, 55.5. 573. 00

$38,910,005.00
3,514,427.00

23, 590, 000. 00
78,132,000.00

28,285,000.00
78,132,000.00
15,780.00
5,179. 50
410. 00
30, 623, 250. 00
95,680.00

15, 780. 00
5,179. 50
410. 00
30, 623, 250.00
95, 680. 00

312,206,367.50

42,424,432. 00 109,337,149.50

Total
245,293,650.00
Net excess of redemptions over issues . . .

Excess.of redemptions
over issues.
$73,901,850.00

4,695,000.00

16, 912, 717.50
663,425,027.74

Recovered from a
former depositary..

731.11

Balance June 80,1890.

663,425, 758.85

No. 4.- -BALANCES S T A N D I N G TO T H E C R E D I T O F D I S B U R S I N G OFFICERS AND AGENTS
OF

THE

U N I T E D STATES, J U N E

Ofiice in which deposited.
Treasury United States, Washington . . . . .
Sub-treasury United States, Baltimore . . . Sub-treasury United States, Bo.ston . .
Sub-treasury United States, Chicago
Sub-treasury United States, Cincinnati . . .
Sub-treasury United States, New Orleans
, Sub-treasury United States, New York : : :
Sub-treasury United States, Philadelphia .
Sub-treasury United States, St. Louis : : . .
Sub-treasury United States, San Francisco
National bank depositaries
Total..




30,

1890.

Amount.
179. 84
$li 734,
418,757. 23
736,796.12
1,402,115. 99
192, 303.91
354, 030. 04
235.39
13, 471,
624,076. 66
1,174,647. 54
959,806.17
555. 97
3, 650,
24, 718,510.86

35

TEEASUEEE.

No. 5 . — R E C E I P T S AND D I S B U R S E M E N T S OF T H E S E V E R A L K I N D S O F C U R R E N C Y AT
THE T R E A S U R Y O F F I C E S , ON ACCOUNT O F R E V E N U E S , R E D E M P T I O N S , T R A N S F E R S ,
AND E X C H A N G E S , F O R T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.

National-bank
notes.

W a s h i n g t o n . -.
Baltimore
New York
Philadelphia...
Boston
Cincinnati
Chicago..
S t . Louis"
..
New Orleans...
San Francisco .

United States
notes.

G o l d coin.

$552,450
3, 348,879
59,852, 678
20,857,058
2, 681, 307
1,186, 032
2,956,560
776, 315
3, 610, 882
25,597, 804

$69, 743,817
462, 603
3, 562, 679
1,531,494
1,750,924
1,249, 835
2,448, 210
1, 328, 595
1,139, 727
275, 590

$180, 332,058
12, 943, 420
65, 822, 299
34, 209, 364
22, 694, 091
8, 530, 006
23,191,495
18, 373,134
13,728, 281
398, 956

83,433,474

380,223,104

Washington...
Baltimore
,
New York
Philadelphia--.
Boston
Cincinnati.....
Chicago.
St. L o u i s
N e w Orleans...
SanFrancisco.,

459,395
3,503, 000
I, 531,000
1,751, 000
1,252, 000
2,456,000
1, 335, 000
, 1,140, 000
270, 000

109, 715, 211
12,864,669
79, 079, 948
35, 594, 230
23,429,749
8, 769, 989
23, 009, 788
18, 358, 316
13,764, 076
430, 807

309, 649
2,680,554
54,367, 781
14, 889,456
3, 700, 698
200, 250
2, 044, 370
87, 915
3, 597, 220
20, 845,187

Total
,
Redemptions
R e t u r n e d t o b a n k s of i s s u e . ,

13, 697, 395
33, 633, 889
35, 865, 885

325, 016, 783
78,132,000

102, 723, 080

83,197,169
236, 305

403,148, 783

102, 723, 080
18,696,885

Total.

121,419, 965

Gold certificates.

$75, 026, 700
4,135,970
542, 786, 550
24, 571, 870
16, 573, 660
763, 020
5, 004, 850
1,491,750
2, 839, 660
4, 257, 420
677,451, 450

DISBUESEMENTS.

Total.....
I n c r e a s e of a m o u n t on h a n d .,
D e c r e a s e of a m o u n t on h a n d .

Washington...
Baltimore
New York.....
Philadelphia...
Boston
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. L o u i s
N e w Orleans .San Francisco.
Total.

Standard silver
dollars.

642,108, 580
45,555,573
687, 664,153
""io,'2i2,'703

22,925,679

S i l v e r certificates.

30, 095,160
3,776,350
555, 943, 660
24,797,120
15,154,970
80-5, 530
2,556,030
1,391,700
3, 360, 500
4, 227, 560

Fractional
silver and
mixed.

Total.

$151,863,376
6. 857, 266
53, 205, 592
14,476, 319
11,939,873
4,174, 689
11, 220, 499
9,251,751
8,481,789
412,159

$1, 014,959
1,112, 637
6, 225,189
3, 698,185
2, 955, 074
2,129, 821
4, 561, 296
3, 735,931
3, 927, 621
2, 636, 033

$1,284,918
1, 025,477
8, 315, 490
2, 629, 802
1, 282, 945
993, 227
- 1,802,980
1,050,249
743,459
1, 325,100

$479,818, 278
29, 886, 252
739,710,477
101, 974, 092
59, 877, 874
19, 026, 630
61,185, 890
36,007,725
34,471,419
34, 903, 062

271, 883,313

31,996, 746

20,453,647

1, 586, 861, 699

95,913,160
7, 073, 959
54, 473, 220
14, 536, 289
11, 970, 541
4, 254, 224
I I , 209, 483
9,325,695
8, 730, 905
, 338,509

639,852
1,055,767
3,001,988
1,954, 562
3,058, 879
2,546, 856
5,065, 660
3,281, 003
70, 730
1, 883, 659,

1, 368.896
1,120, 941
8,820, 782
3,182, 495
1, 545, 699
995, 201
2, 067, 960
1, 349, 567
I, 034,553
1,638,476

238,041,928
29, 031, 635
759,190, 379
96,485,152
60, 611, 536
18,824, 050
48,409, 291
35,129,196
31, 697, 984
29, 634,198

23,124,570

1,347, 055, 349
212,891,457
35, 865, 885

23,124,570

1,595,8x2,691

DISBUESEMENTS.
Washington...
Baltimore . . . . .
New York.
Philadelphia...
Boston . . . . . . . .
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. L o u i s
New Orleans...
San F r a n c i s c o .
Total
Redemptions
R e t u r n e d t o b a n k s of i s s u e .
Total
;...
I n c r e a s e of a m o u n t on h a n d . . .
D e c r e a s e of a m o u n t on h a n d .




217, 825, 985
55, 569, 995

22,558,956

273,395,980

22, 558, 956
9,437,790

""i,'5i2,'667

* "2,'670,'923*

36

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 6.—ASSETS AND L I A B I L I T I E S OF T H E TREASURY
J U N E 30, 1889.

OF THE

Liabilities.

Assets.
Gold.

154, 048, 552.00
36, 918, 323.00

Certificates.
Less amount on hand
Net gold
Standard dollars
Bullion . . . * . . . . . . .

STATES,

Balances.

$237, 586, 792.40
65,800,927.39

Coin

Silver.

UNITED

$303,387,719.79
$117,130,229.00

"......

Certificates
Leiss amount on h a n d . . .

$186,257,490.79

279, 087, 750. 00
4, 623, 69L 55
.

Net silver . . . . . . . . —
United States notes
...;.
Certificates
Less amount on hand:

262, 629, 746. 00
5, 487,181.00

283,711,441.55
257,142, 565.00

17,195, 000. 00
240, 000. 00

26, 568, 876.55

47,296,875.54
16,955,000.00

Net United States notes
Trade-dollar bullion National-bank notes
Deposits in national-bank depositaries ..

30, 341, 875.54
6, 083, 537.70
191, 319. 00
47,259,714.39

6,083,537.70
191, 319.00
47,259, 714. 39

Total.....L
Pnblio debt and interest*
Interest due and unpaid
Accrued interest
Matured debt
Interest an matured debt
..........
Debt bearing no interest
Interest on Pacific Railroad bonds
due and unpaid
Accrued interest on Pacific Railroad
bonds
l'

1,938, 705.36

Fractional currency redeemed
United States bonds and interest.,
. Interest^checks and coupons paid..

1,094.76
690, 519. 37
49, 690. 38

Total
Reserve for redemption of United States
notes, acts of 1875 and 1882
Fund for redemption of notes of national
banks "failed," " in liquidation," and
"reducing circulation"
Five per cent, fund for redemption of
national-bank n o t e s . . . . . . . . . . . . .
National-bank notes in process of
redemption . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post-Ofiice Departnient account.
Disbursing officers' balances
Undistributed assets of failed national
banks . . .
.Currency and minor coin redemption account
-.L....
Fractional silver coin redemption account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . .
Redemption and exchange account
Treasurer's transfer checks and drafts
outstanding
Treasurer U. S., agent for paying interest on D. C. bonds.-Interest on D. C. bonds paid
Total
Balance
Assets not available:
Minor coin
..-..-.,.....,....
Fractional silver coin
Aggregate




687,930,607.97 391,227, 794.00 296, 702, 813. 97
1,132,530.94
7,495,796.15
1,911, 485. 26
153, 988. 92
1,094.76

•

. 7,529.96

•

.

12,641,13L35
741, 304. 51
688,671,912.48 403,868, 925.35
100,000, 000.00

78,051,136.75
5, 630,132.41

4,511,197.86
23,921,599.93

3, 959, 218.75

1,143,261.45
83,681,269.16

700. 00
7,960.00
771, 962.09
1, 910,112.16
85,426.85
i, 435,70

692, 632, 566.93 619,902,414.85
225, 628. 06
25,. 140,172. 27 25,365, 800.33

72,730,152.08

32,352,220.34

25, 365, 800.33

717, 998,367. 26 619,902,414.85

98, 095,952.41

....

37

TEEASUEEE.
No. 7.-—ASSETS AND L I A B I L I T I E S O F T H E T R E A S U R Y O P T H E

U N I T E D STATES, J U N E

30. 1890.
Liabilities.

Assets.
Gold.—Coin
Bullion

.
-

.

Balances.

$255,673,526.35
65, 259, 618.67
$320,933,145.02

Certificatei
..
L e s s a m o u n t on h a n d

. . . . . . . 157,562,979,00
26, 732,120.00
$130,830,859.00

N e t gold
313,147, 717. 00
S i l v e r . — S t a n d a r d dollars
4, 611, 630.34
Bullion
- ....................

$190; 102,286.02
317, 759,347.34

Certificates
. . ..... ...
L e s s a m o u n t on h a n d

301, 539, 751.00
3, 983, 513.00

1

297,556,238.00
N e t silver
U n i t e d Staites n o t e s
Certificates
L e s s a m o u n t on h a n d . . . .
N e t United States notes.-Trade-dollar bullion
National-bank notes
......
Deposits in national-bank depositaries,..

20, 203,109.34
23,882,038.64
12,390, 000.00
500, 000. 00

^
.

Total

11, 890,000.00
11,992 038.64
6, 074, 537.70
162, 576. (JO
30, 659, 565.32

6,074, 537. 70
162, 576. O
C
30,659,565.32

699,471,210. 02 ©440, 277, 097.00 259,194,113.02

Public debt and interest:
Interest due and unpaid
Accrued interest
Matured debt
I n t e r e s t on m a t u r e d d e b t
D e b t b e a r i n g no i n t e r e s t . . . . . I n t e r e s t on Pacific R a i l r o a d b o n d s
due and unpaid
.
..>.
A c c r u e d i n t e r e s t on Pacific R a i l r o a d
bonds

1,026,602.34
6, 641, 782.66
1, 815, 805. 26
I49,13L75
260. 21
9,059.96
1,938,705.36
'^11,581,347.54

Fractional currency redeemed
United States bonds and i n t e r e s t . .
I n t e r e s t checks and coupons p a i d . .
Rejiistered and coupon interest
prepaid

260.21
.5,150. 00
30,383.21
35, 793.42

Total
R e s e r v e for r e d e m p t i o n of U. S. n o t e s ,
a c t s of 1875 a n d 1882
;
F u n d for r e d e m p t i o n of n o t e s of n a t i o n a l
banks "failed," " i n liquidation," and
''reducing circulation "
F i v e p e r cent, f u n d for r e d e m p t i o n of
national-bank notes
„
N a t i o n a l b a n k n o t e s in p r o c e s s of redemption
i.......
Post-Ofiice D e p a r t m e n t a c c o u n t
D i s b u r s i n g officers' b a l a n c e s
U n d i s t r i b u t e d a s s e t s of failed n a t i o n a l

699,507,003.44 451,858,444.54
100, 000, 000. 00
55, 619, 359. 75
5, 619, 498.03
4,203,26L45
5, 805, 621.79
24, 718, 510. 86
1,200,408.19

C u r r e n c y a n d m i n o r coin r e d e m p t i o n account
. ......
......
F r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin r e d e m p t i o n acRedemption and exchange account ..
Treasurer's transfer checks and drafts

61,238,857.78

400.00
7,835.00
501,428.19
2,014,992.83

T r e a s u r e r U . S., a g e n t for p a y i n g i n t e r e s t
on D . C b o n d s
i..

' '

93,109.58

I n t e r e s t on D . C. b o n d s p a i d

2, 000.00

Total
Balance
Assets hot available:

703,712,264.89 647,439,608.76
56,272,656.13

1 F r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin

194,462. 66
22,792,718.39
22,987,181.05

Aereresate.-

— .........




34,342,306.44

726, 699,445.94 647,439,608.76

22,987,181.05
79,259,837.18

38

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

N;6. 8.—-ASSETS AND L I A B I L I T I E S OF T H E TREASURY OF THE U N I T E D STATES, S E P TEMBER 30, 1889, AND 1890, I N THE FORM OP STATEMENT ADOPTED J U L Y , 1890.

September 30, 1889.

$241,537,116. 35
64,334,655.67

Gold.- -Coin . . . .
Bullion .
Silver.—Standard dollars . . . . . - . . . - Bullion...
.--.
-::.
Fractional silver c o i n . . . . . .
Trade-dollar bullion

282, 983,550. 00
5,203,290.79
23,864,840.68
6, 083, 537.70

$246,179, Oil. 80
59.907,459.38
$305,871,772.02

318,135,219.17

Standard dollars, act July 14, 1890 .
Silver bullion, act July 14, 1890....

September 30, 1890.

311, 704,925.00
4, 206,494.09
20,563, 708.87
5, 999,537.70
3, 790,887. 00
4,278,981.72

306,086,47L18

342,474,665.66
8,069,868.72,

United States notes. 'National-bank notes.
Fractional currency.

36,445,258.22
3,883,72L45
1,691.26

Gold certificates...
.. o
Silver certificates
Currency certificates
United States Treasury notes, act J u l y
14, 1890....

42,073,803.00
3,878,052.00
770,000.00

United States bonds and inferest purchased —
—.... 1
Interest checks and coupons paid
Interest on D. C. bonds paid

LIABILITIES.

Post-Office Department account
Disbursing officers' Ibalances , . . . . . . \ - . . .
Undistributed assets of failed national
banks.
.^.
Currency and minor coin redemption account —
.
Fractional silyer coin redemption account
Redemption and exchange account
Treasurer's transfer checks and drafts
outstanding.
......
Treasurer U. S., agent for paying interest on D. C. bonds
.~.
Five per cent, fund for redemption of
national-bank notes
„^.........




16, 058, 780.00
1,852,364.00
180,000.00

17,386,400.61

962,500.00
216, 980.50
4,048,384.46
5,112.66

894,552. 50
' 48,580.69
4,848.78
947, 981.97
233,497.07
47,746,882.39

19,053,644. 00

270, 477. 62
204, 546. 58
297, 111. 24
727,843,185.61

759,987,878.55

y

Reserve for redemption of U. S. notes,
acts of 1875 and 1882.. .5
Gold certificates, acts of March 3, 1863,
and July 12, 1 8 8 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Silver certificates, act of February 28,
1878
...........:......J
Currency certificates, actof J u n e 8, 1872.
United States Treasury notes, act July
14, 1890
-.-.
Public debt and interest:
Interest d ue and unpaid... , Accrued interest
Matured debt
.
Inteiest on matured debt
Interest on Pacific Railroad bonds
due and unpaid
,..-,........
Accrued interest on Pacific Railroad
bonds
.
. i....
Balance of interest anticipated by
Department circulars....

Total liabilities
Available balance .
Aggregate-.-.-o..»

40,330, 670.93

46,721,855.00

Minor coin
....
Deposits in national-bank depositaries.
Aggregate.
^

12,765,290,20
4, 620, 511.45

100,000,000.00

100,000,000.00

158, 749,152.00

174,163,519,00

280,497, 767. 00
16,045,000.00

311,173,571.00
7,170,000.00
8,069, 000, 00

857, 525.57
3, 030, 259.70
1, 750, 985.26
147, 958. 28

1,428,123.52
7,143,113.65
1,897,425.26
152,968.78
13,169.96

13,589.96
969,352.68
12,559,325.04

3, 534,690.95
35, 695, 728.61

11,604,153.85

1,273,920.88

19,328,996.49

4, 814, 202.69
31,567, 767. 89
1, 366,905.28

320.00

220. 00

3,160.00
441,536.20

880.00
521, 622.53

• ' 2 ,

3,476,916.56

4,371, 450.60

69, 616.77
44,495,889.97
5,993,841.22

105, 430.57
42,750,539.56
5, 396, 209.00

617,385,804.04
142,602,074.51

668,051,835.05
59,791,350.56

759,987,878.55

727,843,185.61

TREASURER.
N o . 9.-^UNAVAILABLE F U N D S

39

OF THE GENERAL TREASURY
OFFICE DEPARTMENT.

AND O F THE POST-

GENERAL TREASURY.
•

•

•

'

•

•

•

•

.

•

.

-

•

•

,

«

On deposit with/the following States under the act of
June 23,1836:
Maine...
„..^...,-.
' $955,838.25
NewHampshire
669,086.79
Vermont.-.
669,086.79
Massachusetts..
^.......
1,338,173.58
Connecticut.....
764,670.60
Rhodelsland
.-...
382,335.30
NewTork
4,014,520.71
Pennsylvania
2,867,514.78
NewJersey
764,670.60
Ohio
2,007,260.34
Indiana
,
:
..;...
860,254.44 >
Illinois
477,919.14
Michigan....
286,75L49
Delaware....
286,75L49
Marvland........
955,838.25
Virginia
2,198,427.99
North Carolina
1,433,757.39
South Carolina
,...
1,051,422.09
Georgia
..1,051,422.09
Alabama..
669,086.79
Louisiana
1...
477,919.14
Mississippi........
...;
382,335.30
Tennessee.....
1,433,757.39
Kentucky.
1,433,757.39
Missouri..........
....*.
382,335.30
Arkansas
286,75L49

'2

•

^

;
_

Total on deposit with the States : . . . . .....-.-.--.....$28,101,644.91
Deficits and defaults:
'
Sub-treasuries:
Default, sub-treasury U. S., New Orleans, 1867, May &
Whitaker...
675,325.22
Sub-treasury U . S . , New Orleans, 1867, May
property.
5,566.31
Deficit sub-treasury U. S., New Orleans, 1 8 8 5 . . . . . . . . . .
20, 959.81
Sub-treasury U . S . . San Francisco, 1886
i..
10,000.00
'
—
• $711,85L34
Mints and assay offices:
Deficits and defaults, branch mint U. S., San Francisco,
.'1857 to 1869
-..
4I3,.557.96
Default, branch mint U. S., Dahlonega, 1861
27,950.03
Branch mint U. S., Charlotte, 1861
32, 000.00
U. S. assay office, Bois6 City, 1885, N. H. Camp's
account-...
.
...
1I,61L03
-—r-^—•
485,119.02
°
National-bank depositaries:
Failure, Venango National Bank of Franklin, P a
.^
181,377.51
First National Bank of Selma, Ala . . . . . . . .
..
33, 383.87
___
214,76L38
Depositories, U. S.:
^
Default, depository U. S., Galveston, 1861
778.66
Depository U.S., Baltimore, 1866
547.50
s
Depository U.S., Pittsburgh, 1867 . . . . . . .
2,126.11
Deficit, depository U. S., Santa F6,1866, short in remittance
249.90
—
:—
3,702.17
Totaldeficits and d e f a u l t s . . - . . . . . . . . ^

1,415,433^91

Total general Treasury...

....'29,517,078.82
POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT.

Default,sub-treasuryU.S., New Orleans, 1861......
DepositorytJ.S., Savannah, 1861....
Depository U.S., Galveston, 1861...
Depository, U. S., Little Rock, 1861
Aggregate.*.,™--•n*,




" ,31,164.44
.205.76
83.36
5,823.50
-r—
:

o„...e.e,-.=«««.-.o..<.=-«o..—-.—.——--.;-

. . .
37,277.00
29,554,355.88

40

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 1.0—ASSETS AND L I A B I L I T I E S OF THE
Washington.

T R E A S U R Y O F F I C E S , J U N E 30,

Baltimore.

New York.

Philadelphia.

1890.
Boston.

ASSETS.

G o l d coin . .
-. $25, 877,090.35 $5, 853, 792.50 $124, 227, 684. 50 $14,871,287.50 $6, 927, 373.00
8,310,398.00
2,242, 378.00
28,986,201.00
S t a n d a r d s i l v e r dollars . - . . . 148, 722,100.00 3,975,398.00
2,048, 742.68
603,597.67
458,846.50
435,788.10 , 9,226,823.19
F r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin
144,590.00 1,11'8, 230. 00
288,320.00" 5, 787, 730,00
10, 911, 960.00
G o l d certificates
..
....
1, 768, 914. 00
286, 934..00
129,162.00
455.949.00
86, 527. 00
S i l v e r certificates
770,129. 00
1,777,403.00
6, 777,923.90
United States notes
- . 7,178, 817. 50 1, 067, 68.5. 00
4, 203, 261.45
19, 886.00
5,401.00
5, 641. 00
14, 626.00
National-bank notes
50.21
30.00
180. 00
16,728.01
67, 758.06
7, 707.49
M i n o r coin
12,758.81
9, 677.46
30, 000. 00
90, 000.00
60, 000. 00 • 270,000.00
C u r r e n c y certificates.
3,947.14
7,104. 63
368. 56
566.14
8,677.09
I n t e r e s t on U . S. b o n d s p a i d ,
2, 000. 00
i n t e r e s t on D . C . b o n d s p a i d .
189, 956, 643. 35 12, 643, 335.20
T o t a l cash assety
T r e a s u r e r ' s t r a n s f e r a c c o u n t 57,217„492.24

180, 739, 782.74

26,276,294.53

16, 538, 088. 62

247,174,135. 59 12, 643, 335.20

180,739,782.74

26,276,294.53

16, 538, 088.62

418, 757.23

13,471,235.39

624,076.66

736,796.12

9, 600. 00
77,631.79

155, 707.00
1, 410,183. 29

29,311.00
817,260.69

33, 690. 00
656,713.19

41,010.59

663,597.13

18I,93l29

108,543.83

546,999.61

15, 700,722. 81

1,652,586.64

1, 535, 743.14

Aggregate
LIABILITIES.

D i s b u r s i n g officers' b a l a n c e s
U n d i s t r i b u t e d a s s e t s of
failed n a t i o n a l b a n k s
.
Redemption and exchange
accounts
..
P. 0. Department account..
Interestaccount,D.C.bouds.
Treasurer's c h e c k s and
drafts outstanding.
National-bank redemption
funds
.'.-.

1,734.179.84
1, 200, 408.19
196,620.19
520,867. .74
93,109. 58
281,016.54

61,238,857.78
T o t a l Treasurer's
agency account
65,265,059.86
B a l a n c e t o c r e d i t of m i n t s
a n d a s s a y offices
Balance Treasurer's transfer a c c o u n t
B a l a n c e T r e a s u r e r ' s general account
....
181, 909, 075.73
Aggregate

•

15, 233, 5f>7. 24
2,471, 070. 61

7,477,102. 94

5,527,600.52

3,524,557.70

9,625,264.98

142, 328, 389. 75

19,096,107.37

11,477, 787.78

247,174,135.59 12, 643, 335. 20

180,739,782.74

26,276,294.53

16, 538, 088. 62

St.Louis.

N e w Orleans.

Cincinnati.

Chicago.

San F r a n cisco.

"ASSETS.

G o l d coin
$9,895,782.50 $6,495, 090. 00
206,465.00 1, 701, 000. 00
Standard silver dollars
385, 267. 00 1,117,986.00
F r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin
848,590.00 4, 745, 580.00
G o l d certificates
166, 376. 00
388,749.00
S i l v e r certificates
United States notes
. . . . 1,773, 952. 00 2, 089,106. 00
National-bank notes
3, 975. 00
5, 395.00
Fractional currency
..;.,
M i n o r coin
,
4, 783.11
31, 430.83
C u r r e n c y certificates
50, 000. 00
I n t e r e s t on U.S. bonds paid.
442.50
•5,151. 75

$7,189,200.00 $6, 793, 844. 50 S42, 526, 340.50
12,129, 584. 00 9, 565, 359.00 19,017,656.00
6,418,166.55
293,779.98
1,106,518.45
34, 760.00
1,043,950.00 1.779,910.00
156,485. 00
210,566.00,
193, 851. 00
44,070.00
1,173,446 00
293,984.16
6,845. 00
105.00
702.00

Total cash assets.
Unavailable

13, 285, 633.11 16, 629, 488. 58

22,861,276.87 18, 926, 548.15
701,85L34

68, 213, 605. 06
10, 000. 00

13, 285,633.11 16,629,488.58

22, 861, 276.87 19, 628, 399. 49

68,-223, 605. 06

Aggregate

6, 337. 67

5, 098.64

1,569.75

9, 282.01

18.87

LIABILITIES.

D i s b u r s i n g officers' b a l a n c e s
Redemption and exchange
accounts
P . 0. Department account ..
Treasurer's checks a n d
drafts outstanding
Total T r e a s u r e r ' s
agency account
B a l a n c e t o c r e d i t of m i n t s
a n d a s s a y offices
Balance Treasurer's transfer a c c o u n t
B a l a n c e T r e a s u r e r ' s general account
Aggregate............




192,303.91

1,402,115.99

1,174, 647.54

354,036.04

959,806.17

38, 380. 00
233,197.34

31,245.00
1, 233, 205,05

15,110.00
446, 667. 62

107,453.92

298,787.10

37, 816.82

127,843.46

70, 269. 38

74,973. 22

290, 092. 57

501,698. 07

2,794,409.50

1, 706,694.54

536,463.18

1,548,685.84

10,127, 080.13 10, 864,101. 77

10, 026, 767.44

8,227, 834. 54

56, 520. 813. 69

22, 861, 276.87 19, 628,399.49

68, 223, 605. 06

..

127,338.09

31,895.77
2,109,379.88

5,089,83L25<
11, 725, 699.20
7,694,103. 79
13.285, 633.11 16, 629,488.58

10, 995, 606.43

41

TEEASUEEE.
No.

11.—-COMPOSITION AND
°

DISTRIBUTION
J U N E 30,

OF T H E
1890.

, Dahlonega.
Gold c o i n . - . .
..
Gold bullion
..............
.
S t a n d a r d s i l v e r dolInrs
t
F r a c t i o n a l silver COiU
--- . . - - . . . . - . .
Silver bullion
Trade-dollar bars
......
United States notes
..
M i n o r coin
.'-...
B a l a n c e in s u b - t r e a s u r i e s a n d n a t i o n a l - b a n k
depositaries
..i.
'..'...'.

Denver.
. $29.00
42, 079.14

C a r s o n City. N e w O r l e a n s .

\
$971, 390. 00
1,565,947.25
. I, 270, 233. 00
1,432.73
558,733.93

$181,000.00
731 946 37
8,460,603.00
28
470,340.78

.31
71, 643,41

.127,338.09

181,516.82

113,75L86

T o t a l a v a i l a b l e - i -.
Unavailable
Afffirresrate

BULLION FUND, BY OFFICES,

4,495,075.00

10,025,407.25

113,75L86

4,495, 075.00

10,025, 407.25

$27,950.03

........................

27,950.03

Philadelphia.

San Francisco.

Bois6 C i t y .

Charlotte.

Gold coin
-. ^
....
G o l d bullion
„
...
.. Standard silver d o l l a r s . . . . . . .
^....
F r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin
Silver bullion
.
..............
Trade-dollar bars
...... .....
;
.......
United States notes
M i n o r coin
..
B a l a n c e s in s u b - t r e a s u r i e s a n d n a t i o n a l - b a n k
depositaries......
......................

$508, 427.00 $3,352,890.00
25, 982, 526.49 -1,830,221.86 ""$39,* 388." 81" '""$19,266." 90
39,448,758.00 28, 987, 782. 00
15, 051. 63
303,184.24
2,110, GOO. 55 1, 014, 299. 83
2, 579, 004. 70

191,472.19

59, 899. 53

,39,638.27

Total available
Unavailable....

.....

71,609,819.31 35, 679, 850.12
413,557.96

99, 288. 34
11, 611. 03

58,839.17
32,000.00

Afforeffate

......

. . . ^ . . . . . . . . . . 71, 609, 819.31 36, 093, 408. 08

110,899.37

90, 839.17

Helena.

St.Louis. .

965,450.94

New York.

Grolfl coin
. . ..
---* • . . « . . • • . . . . . . - - « Gold b u l l i o n . .
.
...;........
S t a n d a r d s i l v e r dollars
F r a c t i o n a l sil v e r coin
:
.........
Silver bullion
. . . . . 1 . . ._;-..-........

$2,305.00
$36,777.64 34, 981, 428. 72
1,175. 00
i44.69
- 114.75
457,120.57
3,495, 533. 00

United States notes
Minor, coin
...
.........
Balances in sub-treasuries and national-bank

21.12

$30,101.49

i.96
534. 68
30.00
9. 65

Total.
$5, 016, 041. OP
65, 259, 618. 67
78,168, 551.00
319,930.22
4,611,630.34
6,074, 537. 70
30. 00
31. 08

52, 760.88 13, 758,946.17

Aggregate




..

........

31,895.77

89, 683. 21 52, 696, 644.33

Total available
Unavailable.

62, 573.49 174,930,932. 08
485,119. 02

89, 683.21 52, 696, 644. 33

62,573.49 175,416,051.10

15,480,562.07

42

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 12—CHARACTER , AND DISTRIBUTION O F T H E ASSETS AND L I A B I L I T I E S
THE TREASURY, J U N E ' 3 0 , 1890.
Mints,
Treasury and Mints and as- other
say-offices,
sub-treasthan
bullion fund. bullion
uries.
fund.

Nationalbank and In transit
other depos- between offices.
itaries.

OF

Total.

ASSETS. '"

$250,657,485.35 $5,016,041.00
$255,673,526.35
65,259,618.67
65,259.618;67
Gold bullion
"•
" $'l22.'62"7'.66 313,147;717.00
234,856,539'. 66 78,168,551.00
Standard silver dollars .
319,930.22
377,272.05 22,792.718.39
Fractional silver coin... 22.095,516.12
4,611,630.34
4,611,630.34
Silver bullion
28,500.00 26,732,120.00
26,703,620.00
140,000.00 3,983,513.00
3,843,513.00
Silver certificates.......
897,992.08 23,882,038.64
22,946,516.56 " " " " z d . b b $37,5()()'66
United States notes
100,000.00
4,365,837.45
4,265,837.45
National-bank notes,....
260.21
260.21
Fractional currency . . . .
194,462.66
171,562.09
31.08 22,869.49
500,000.00
500,000.00
Currency certificates -..
';
United States bonds
5,150.00
5,150.00
and interest .
Interest on U n i t e d
30,383.21
2,536.78
States bonds paid
27,846.43
Interest on District of
2,000.00
' Columbia bonds paid..
2,000.00
6,074,537.70
Trade-dollar bars
6,074,537.70
Deposits in national
30,659,565.32
$30,659,565.32
bank denositaries . . . .
•

'

•

Total available as566,070,696.21 159,450,370.01 60,369.49 30,659,565.32 1,674,077.91 757,915,078.94
' sets.
1,415,433.91
485,119.02
711,851.34
Unavailahle
.;.. . . . .
218,463.55
Balance to credit of
15,480,562.07
15,480,562.07
mints and assay offices.
Treaisurer's transfer ac57,217,492.24
57,217,492.24
•

Aggregate

- - - . 624,000,039.79 175,416,051.10 60,369.49 30,878,028.87 1,674,077.91 832,028,567.16

.LIABXLITIEB.

Disbursing officers' balU n d i s t r i b u t e d assets
of failed n a t i o n a l
Bedemption a n d exchange account
Post-Office Department
Interest account District of C o l u m b i a
Funds for redemption
Treasurer's checks and
drafts outstanding....
Total Treasurer's
agency account..
Balance to credit of
. mints and assay offices.
Balance T r e a s u r e r ' s
Balance Tre a s u r e r's
general account
Aggregate




21,067,954.89

....

..

24,718,510:86

3,650,555.97

1,200,408.19

1,200,408.19

509,663.19

509,663.19

5,805,621.79

3,654.06

5,801,967.73
93,109.58

93,109.58

61,238,857.78

61,238,857.78

1,877,101.83

.''

91,789,063.19

3,792,101.03 "

15,392,801.10

87,760.97

57,217,492.24

2,014,992.83

137,891.00

—^..

95,581,164.22
15,480,562.0?
57,217,492.24

459,600,683.26 175,416,05L10 60,369.49 26,998,166.87 1,674,077.91 663,749,348.63
624,000,039.79 175,416,051.10 60,369.49 30,878,028.87 1,674,077.91 832,028.567.16

43

TEEASUEEE.
No.

1 3 — R E C O N C I L I A T I O N OF THE SEVERAL ACCOUNTS AND STATEMENTS OF C A S H
IN THE T R E A S U R Y , J U N E 30, 1890.
i

C a s h i n t h e T r e a s u r y , as s h o w n in t h e m o n t h l y d e b t s t a t e m e n t
$661, 355, 834. 20
A d d a m o u n t on deposit, T j e a s u r e r ' s a g e n c y a c c o u n t , a s k n o w n t o t h e T r e a s u r e r J u n e
30, n o t c o v e r e d i u t o t h e T r e a s u r y b y w a r r a n t
'...
97,815,825.14
A g g r e g a t e a s s e t s , i n c l u d i n g c e r t i f i c a t e s h e l d in t h e cash, as s h o w n i n t h e p u b l i s h e d
liionthly s t a t e m e n t of a s s e t s a n d l i a b i l i t i e s
L ..
A d d receipts prior to J u l y 1 not y e t reported to the T r e a s u r e r :
National-bank depositaries
$890,651.36
F o r certificates of deposit, a c t o f J u n e 8, 1872
110,000:00
F o r gold certificates, series of 1888
20,000100
\—

759,171, 659.34

1,020,65L36
760,192, 310. 70

D e d u c t e x c e s s of d i s b u r s e m e n t s o v e r r e c e i p t s , a g e n c y a c c o u n t , p r i o r t o
J u l y 1, n o t y e t r e p o r t e d
2,234,660: 92
A n d u n a v a i l a b l e f u n d s t r e a t e d i n t h e m o n t h l y s t a t e m e n t s of a s s e t s
,
a n d liabilities a s c a s h
42, 570; 84
2,277,231.76
A g g r e g a t e a v a i l a b l e a s s e t s , a s s t a t e d in t h i s r e p o r t
D e d u c t a m o u n t on deposit, a g e n c y account, a s finally a s c e r t a i n e d .

757, 915, 078. 94
95, 581,164. 22

A v a i l a b l e funds, g e n e r a l a c c o u n t , a s s t a t e d in t h i s r e p o r t .
A d d unavailable funds

662, 333, 914. 72
1, 415, 433. 91

B a l a n c e , g e n e r a l account^ a s s h o w n b y t h e T r e a s u r e r ' s b o o k s .
D e d u c t r e c e i p t s jirior to J u l y 1 n o t y e t c o v e r e d b y w a r r a n t :
Washington
B altim 0 r e
.-«
;.
New York
Philadelphia
Boston
Cincinnati
i
Chicago
....:
St. L o u i s
N e w Orleans
.San F r a n c i s c o
N a t i o n al-b a n k d e p osi t a r i e s
.,. =...

663, 749, 348. 63
90,
2l!
4,
1,
21,
22,
17,
32,
85,

899.^32
687. 48
474.^87
094.39
060.90
629.180
038.12
185.10
7i8.i.56
401.07
794.17
323, 589.78

B a l a n c e of covered m o n e y s , g e n e r a l a c c o u n t
A d d a m o u n t on d e p o s i t w i t h t h e S t a t e s , n o t b o r n e o n t h e T r e a s u r e r ' s b o o k s

;..

663,425, 758. 85
28,101,644.91

B a l a n c e s t a n d i n g c h a r g e d t o t h e T r e a s u r e r on t h e E e g i s t e r of t h e T r e a s u r y ' s b o o k s . - . .

691,527.403.76

No. 14.-

- S E M I - A N N U A L D U T Y ASSESSED UPON AND COLLECTED FROM
BANKS F O R T H E F I S C A L Y E A R S FROM 1864 TO 1890.

O n circulation.

Fiscal year.
1864
]865
1866
1867......
1868
1869
i
1870
1871.
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882 ......
1883
1884..
1885
.
1886 . . .
1887
1888
1889
1890

..:...

c
.
,
.

Total




.
„
. .= ...
„..ooo

$53,193.32
733, 247.59
2,106, 785. 30
2, 868, 636. 78
2, 946, 343. 07
2,957,416.73
2, 949,. 744.13
2, 987,'021. 69
3,193, 570. 03
3, 353,186.13
3, 404, 483.11
3, 283,450. 89
3, 091, 795.76
2,900, 957. 53
2, 948, 047. 08
3, 009, 647.16
3,153, 635.63
3,121, 374. 33
3,190, 981. 98
3,132, 006. 73
3, 024.668.24
2, 794, 584.01
2, 592, 021.33
2,044, 922. 75
1,616,127.53
1,410, 331.84
1,254,839.65
70,123,020.32

O n deposits.
$95. 911.87
1, 087, 530. 86
2, 633,102.77
2,650,180.09
2, 564,143. 44
2, 614, 553. .58
2, 614, 767. 61
2, 802, 840. 85
3,120, 984. 37
3,196, 569. 29
3, 209, 967. 72
3, 514, 26.5. 39
3,505,129.64
3,451,965.38
3, 273, 111. 74
3,309, 608. 90
4, 058, 710. 61
4, 940, 945.12
5,521, 927. 47
2, 773,790.46

O n capital.
$18,432.07
133, 251.15
406, 947. 74
321, 881.36
306, 781. 67
312,918.68
375, 962.26 •
385, 292.13
389,356.27
454, 891.51
469, 048. 02
507,417.76
632, 296.16
660, 784. 90
560, 296.83
401, 920. 61
379, 424.19
431,233.10
437,774. 90
269,976.43

•

60,940,067.16

7,855,887.74

NATIONAL

• Total.
$167, 537. 26
1, 954, 029. 60
5,140, 83.5. 81
5,840,698 - 3
^
5,817,268.18
5, 884, 888. 99
5,940, 474.00
6,175,154. 67
6,703, 910.67
7,004,646.93
7, 083 498. 85
7, 305,134.04
7, 229, 221. 56
7, 013, 707. 81
6,781, 455 65
6, 721, 236. 07
7, 591, 770.43
8,493, 552. 55
9,150, 684 35
6,175,773.62
3,024, 668. 24
2, 794, 584.01
2,592,021.33
2,044 922 75
1,616,127.53
1,410, 331.84
1, 254, 839.65
138,918,975.22

44

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 15.—STATEMENT, B Y L O A N S , OF U N I T E D STATES BONDS HELD IN TRUST FOR
NATIONAL BANKS, J U N E 30, 1890, AND OF CHANGES DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R

1890 IN T H E CHARACTER OF THE BONDS HELD.

Bonds
i s s u e d t o F u n d e d loan F u n d e d loan
of 1891
of 1907
Pacific
(4^ p e r c t . ) .
railroads
(4 p e r c t . ) .
(6 p e r ct.).

Account.

B o n d s h e l d in t r u s t J u n e 30, 1889:
F o r circulation
For public moneys
.....
Total

Total.

$4,324,000
1, 403, 000

$42, 409, 900
10, 849, 600

$101, 387, 550
32, 969, 500

$148,121,450
45, 222, 000

5, 727, 000

53, 259,400

134,357, 050

193, 343, 450

845, 000
256, 000

1, 986, 600
4, 909, 750

10, 220, 700
10, 779, 700

13, 052, 300
15, 945,450

400, 000
628,000

303, 000
4, 278, 000

3, 038, 000
14, 344, O O
U

3,741,000
19, 250, 000

4, 913, 000
1,175,000

39. 486, 750
6, 874, 500

100, 828, 550
21,663,500

145, 228, 300
29, 713, 000

6, 088, 000

...........

46,361, 250

122, 492, 050

174, 941, 300

=

D e p o s i t e d a n d w i t h d r a w n d u r i n g fiscal y e a r :
F o r circulation—
Withdrawn
F o r public moneys—
Deposited
Withdrawn
Bonds held in t r u s t J u n e 30, 1890:
F o r circulation
F o r puljlic m o n e y s
Total

o

No. 16- -RECEIPTS

AND DISBURSEMENTS OF P U B L I C M O N E Y S THROUGH NATIONALBANK DEPOSITARIES, BY F I S C A L Y E A R S , FROM 1864 to
1890.

Fiscal year.

Receipts.

F u n d s transF u n d s trans- ferred to Treasferred to deposi- u r y b y d e p o s i t a r y D r a f t s d r a w n on
depositary banks.
tary banks.
banks.

$153, 395,108.71
1864
987, 564, 639.14
1865
497, 566, 676. 42
1866
351, 737, 083.83
1867
225. 244,144. 75
18G8
105,160, 573. 67
1869
. . -120, 084. 041.79
1870 - . . .99, 299, 840.85
3871
106,104, 855.16
1872 . . . '
."-169, 602, 743. 98
1873
1874
91,108, 846.70
98, 228, 249.53
J 875
97, 402, 227.57
1876
106, 470, 261.22
] 877
99, 781, 053.48
1878
187q
109, 397, 525. 67
119, 493,171. 94
] 880
• 131,820,002.20
1881
143,261,541.41
1882
145, 974, 256.86
3883
129,100,449. 351
1884
119,0.56,058.94
1885
123, 592, 221.68
1.886..
128,482, 769. 20
3887
132. 591, 946. 77
1888
139. 316, 214.49
3889
147, 761, 566.81
1890

$816, 000.00
8,110, 294. 70
13, 523, 972. 62
8,405, 903.63
9, 404, 392. 00
10,052,199.44
2,466,521.06
2, 633,129.45
3,050,444.05
9, 004,842. 49
2, 729, 958.81
1, 737,445. 60
2,445,451.49
2, 353,196. 29
2, 385, 920. 38
6. 890, 489. 06
6.489, 634.17
5, 646. 092. 46
. 5, 256, 574.29
5.292,840.22
5, 501,161.18
4, 798, 782.35
8, 786, 546.55
11, 476, 372. 92
80, 082, 442. 39
20, 723, 547.15
20,285,150.91

4, 878,598, 072.12

260, 349, 305.66

Total




$85, 507, 674.08
$28,726, 695.88
583, 697, 912. 72
415, 887, 767. 81
363, 085, 565. 65
149, 772, 756.11
331, 039, 872. 57
37, 218, 612. 76
215,311,460.69
22,218,187. 92
114,748, 877.24
14, 890,463. 75
111, 123, 926.18
11, 818. 228.61
89, 428, 544. 04
13, 790, 961.01
94, 938, 603. 76
13, 635, 837. 49
108, 089, 786. 76
16,110,519.07
134, 869,112. 57
13, 364, 554. 52
82,184, 304. 05
13, 657, 678. 25
89,981,146.99
13, 909, 616. 83
94, 276, 400. 35
14, 862, 200.88
90,177, 963.35
12, 606, 870.60
100, 498,469. 29
15, 544, 058. 34
109.641.232.64 •
15, 525. 023.03
118,143, 724. 91
18, 388, 772. 82
129,131. 305. 07
18, 709,928. 56
132,075. 358. 80
18,771,472.81
116, 227, 722.17
17, 688.442.52
105, 952, 609. 09
17, 633,235. 03
112, 862, 815. 24
.16.464.462.15
. 118,372.954.27
16, 432, 743. 24
161,168, 708. 67
15, 782, 267. 54
152, 338, 700.22
19, 309, 039.25
163, 808, 952.13
20, 548, 812.80
4,108, 683,703. 50

1,003, 269, 209. 58

Balance.

$39, 976, 738. 75
36, 06.5, 992. 06
31,298,319.34
26,182, 821. 47
23, 301, 709.61
8,875,14L73
8, 483, 549. 79
7,197,015.04
7, 777, 873. 00
62,185,153.64
7, 790, 292. 06
11. 914, 004. 89
7, 870, 920.13
7, 555, 776. 41
0, 037, 916. 32
7,183,403. 42
7,999, 953. 86
8, 933. 550. 79
9, 610, 432.86
10, 030, 698. 33
10, 716,144.17
10, 985.141.34
14, 036, 632.18
19,190, 076.79
54, 913,489. 74
43,305, 511. 91
26, 994,464. 70

45

TREASURER.
NO.

17- - B O N D S

H E L D F O R T H E S I N K I N G F U N D S OF T H E P A C I F I C R A I L R O A D C O M P A N I E S A T T H E CLOSE OF E A C H F I S C A L Y E A R F R O M 1 8 8 1 TO 1 8 9 0 .

F u n d e d loan B o n d s i s s u e d
t o Pacific *
of 1907
railroads
(4 p e r c t . ) .
(6 p e r c t . ) .

Year.

F i r s t mortgage bonds
of Pacific
railroads
(6per ct.).

Total.

U.NION PACIFIC.
$32,650
3,123, 650
4, 218, 650
4,478, 650
4,478,650
4,478, 650
2, 908, 250

$361, 000
361,000
361, 000
1, 043, 000
1, 043, 000
1, 043, 000
1,043, 000

$360.000
1,195, 000
2,018,000
4, 666, 500

$393, 650
3,484, 650
4, 579, 650
5,881,650
6, 716, 650
7, 539, 650
8, 617,750

444,000
2, 548, 000
2, 548,000
2, 548, 000
2.548, UOO

1881 to 1884 .
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

42. OCO
352, 000
666,000
1, 009, 000

444, 000
2, 590, 000
2, 900, 000
3, 214, 000
3, 557, 000

CENTRAL PACIFIC.
1881 t o 1886 .
1887
18891890.

No.

18.—DATES W H E N

EACH

ISSUE

OF . U N I T E D
CEASED.

STATES C U R R E N C Y
;

BEGAN

Issue.
Old d e m a n d n o t e s .1
United States notes:
N e w issue
I s s u e of 1869
I s s u e of 1874
I s s u e of 1875
I s s u e of 1878
I s s u e of 1880
One a n d t w o y e a r n o t e s of 1863:
One-year n o t e s
Two-year notes
Two-year coupon notes
Compound interest notes
Fractional currency:
F i r s t issue
'
Second i s s u e
Third issue
,
F o u r t h issue
Fifth issue
Gold certificates :
A c t o f M a r c h 3,1863
A c t of J u l v 12,1882, series of 1882
Series of 1888
Silver certificates:
Sieries of 1878
,
.Series of 1 8 8 0 . . .
Series of 1886




AND

Ceased.
A u g . 26,1861 M a r .

5,1862

Apr.
Oct.
July
July
Mar.
Mar.

16,1870
30,1877
13,1877
20, ] 879
12,1884

2,1862
19,1869
25,1874
20,1875
4,1878
16,1£80

Aus-.
June
Nov.
June
May

F e b . 4.1864 J u n e 1,1864
M a r . 16,1864 M a y 30,1864
J a n . 12,1864 A p r . 20,1864
J u u e 9,1864 J u l y 24,1806
Aug.
Oct.
Dec.
July
Feb.

21,1862
10,1863
5,1864
14,1869
26,1874

Sept.
Feb.
Apr.
Feb.
Feb.

21,1866
23,1867
16,1860
10.1875
15.1876

Nov. 15,1865 D e c .
Oct. 2,1882
Nov. 27,1888

3,1878

A p r . 11,1878
M a y 26,1880
Sept. 7,1886

M a y 22,1883

46
No.

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

19,—UNITED STATES C U R R E N C Y O F E A C H I S S U E AND D E N O M I N A T I O N I S S U E D ,
R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE OF T H E F I S C A L YEAR 1890.

OLD DEMAIJTD NOTES.
Redeemed.

Outstanding.

Issued.

Denomination.

D u r i n g fiscal
T o J u n e 30,1890.
year.
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
»»Twenty dollars........«.... = ..
Total

J

Amount.

Per
cent.

$21, 800,000
20, 030, 000
18, 200, 000

$220.00
150. 00
40.00

$21, 777, 632. 50
20, 009, 415.00
18,186, 920.00

$22. 367.50
20; 585. 00
13, 080.00

0.10
0.10
0 07

60, 030, 000

. .410.00

59, 973, 967.50

56, 032. 50

0 09

UNITED STATES NOTES.
Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

Issued.

Issue and denomination.

D u r i n g fiscal T o J u n e 30,1890.
year.

Amount.

Per
cent.

New issue.
T w o dollars
=-...
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
-»»
Twenty d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars . . . . . . . . .
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
Unknown
....o..

$28, 351, 348
34, 071,128
101, 000, 000
118,010,000
102, 920, 000
30,055,200
40, 000, 000
5S, 986, 000
155, 928, 000

$2,764.60
3, 751. 40
38, 734.50
75, 305.00
85,138. 00
16,150. 00
21, 300.00
5, 000. 00
4,000.00

$27, 576,900. 80
33, 483, 488. 80
100,540,103.50
114, 647,480. 00
101, 043, 858. 00
29, 803, 920. 00
39,639, 200. 00
58, 765, 500.00
155, 731, 000.00
135, 000. 00

$774,447. 20
587, 639. 20
459, 896. 50
3, 362, 520. 00
1, 876,142. 00
251, 280. 00
360, 800. 00
220, 500. 00
. 197,000.00

2
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0

73
72
45
85
82
83
90
37
13

8, 090, 224. 90
135, 000. 00

Deduct unknown"destroyed...
669. 321, 676

Total

252,143.50

661, 366,451.10

7, 955, 224.90

3 19

42,456, 812
50, 511, 920
50. 581, 760
85, 221, 240
73,162, 400
30, 200, 000
37,104, 000
44, 890, 000
79, 700, 000

10, 574.50
13, 729.80
123, 769. 50
631. 566.00
812, 240. 00
116, 250.00
306,100.00
7, 000. 00
164, 000. 00

42,077,214.30
50.156, 615.00
49, 818, 773. 50
82, 757,007. 00
?0,141, 556. 00
29,407,625.00
35, 503,070. 00
44, 647, 500.00
78, 712,000. 00
865, 000. 00

379, 597.70
355, 305. 00
762, 986. 50
2, 464, 233. 00
3, 020,844.00
792, 375. 00
1,600,930.00
242, 500. 00
988, 000.00

0
0
1
2
4
2
4
0
1

I s s u e of 1869.
One d o l l a r
o„.
T w o dollars
Five d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .^....
T e n dollars
T wenty dollars
.".
Fifty dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars . . . . . . . .
Five hundred dollars,
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
Unknown
»

10, 6C6, 771. 20
865, 000. 00

Deduct unknown

\

Total

89
70
50
90
13
63
31
54
24

=

493,828,132

2,185, 229. 80

484, 086, 360. 80

9,741,77L20

1 97

791. 20
728. 60
280. 00
500. 00

126, 208. 80
93j271.40
I, 774, 720.00
201,500.00

0
0
7
0

644, 746. 90

85, 772,299.80

2,195, 700. 20

2 49

16, 488.60
20, 862.20
203, 476. no
308, 025. 00
567, 330. 00
64, 200.00
464, 600. 00
150, 000. 00

25,992,757.30
22,847,991.20
45, 262, 893.00
22, 695, 064. 00
23, 244, 724. 00
1,849,305.00
14, 325, 740. 00
27,345,500.00

219, 242. 70
188, 008.80
917,107. 00
964, 936.00
1, 755, 276. 00
150, 695. 00
1, 874, 260. 00
1, 054, 500. 00

1,795, 58L 80

183, 563, 974. 50

7,124,025.50

I s s u e of 1874.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i f t y dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars

18,
16,
24,
28,

Total
i

988,000
520, 000
460, 000
000, 000

6,
6,
510,
122,

87, 968, 000
•

•

224.10
282. 80
240. 00
000.00

18,
16,
22,
27,

861,
426,
685,
798,

66
57
25
72

^

I s s u e of 1875.
One dollar
T w o dollars
...............
Five dollars...
T e n dollars
Twenty dollars.....o=
F i f t y dollars
One'hundi'ed d o l l a r s
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
Total

ooo




26, 212, 000
23, 036, 000
46,180,000
23, 680, 000
25, 000, 000
2, 000, U O
O
i6. 200, 000
28, 400, 000
190, 688, 000

'

0
0
1
4
7
7
11
3

84
81
^S
08
02
53
57
71

3 73
, .fi

47

TEEASUEEE.
No. 19—UNITED STATES C U R R E N C Y O F EACH I S S U E AND DENOMINATION
R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING, ETC.—Continued.
|

ISSUED,

U N I T E D STATES NOTES-Gontinued.
Qutstanding.

Eedeemed.
Issue and denomination.

Issued.
During fiscal
To June 30,1890.
year.

Amount.

Per
cent.

Issue of 1878.
One dollar
Two dollars
Fivedollars
,
Ten dollars...
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars . .
Five hundred dollars .
One thousand dollars.,
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..
Total

$12, 512, 000
9, 352,000
30,160, 000
26, 000, 000
34, 800, 000
10, 500,.000
20, 200, 000
12, 000, 000
24, 000, 000
20, 000, 000
40, 000, 000

$14, 970. 80
12, 583.00
209, 448. 50
445,471.00
1, 092,472. 00
462, 075. 00
844, 070. 00
559, 000. 00
628, 000.00
10, 000. 00

$12, 365,373.70
9, 249,296.80
29, 308,592. 50
24, 583,652.00
31, 943,868. 00
9, 216,095. 00
17,152, 850. 00
10, 489,500. 00
21,475, 000. 00
19, 975,000.00
39, 990,000. 00

$146, 626.30
102, 703. 20
^51, 407. 50
1,416. 348. 00
2,856, 132.00
1. 283,905. 00
3. !047,150. 00
1,510. 500. 00
2,525. 000.00
000.00
I 25.
000. 00
• 10,
'

1.17
LIO
2.82
5.44
8.21
12.23
15.08
12.59
10.50
0.12
0.02

239,524, 000

4,278, 090. 30

225, 749, 228. 00

13,774, 772. 00

5.75

55, 384, 000
48, 216. 000
167, 360, 000
134, 920. 000
128. 720,000
26, 200, 000
36, 600,000
13, 400, 000
40, 000,000

587, 152.10
637, 205.60
20, 049,148. 00
14,432, 486. 00
10, .729,7ie. 00
3,411,100. 00
4, 048,400.00
3,728,000. 00
11,353.000. 00

53, 737,769.50
46, 670,048.80
112, 621,013. 50
52, 717,237. 00
26, 742,044. 00
8, 990,575. 00
10, 958,790. 00
5,301, 000.00
27,172, 000. 00

I, 646,230.50
951.20
1, ;545,
54,738, 986.50
82,202, 763. 00
101,977, 956. 00
17,209, 425. 00
25, 641,210. 00
8, 099,0t)0. 00
12,828, 000. 00

2.97
3.21
32. 71
60.93
79.22
65.68
70.06
60.44
32.07

650, 800,000

68, 976, 207.70

344, 910,477. 80 305,889,522.20

Issue of 1880.
One dollar
Two dollars
-.
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars.
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars...
Five hundred dollaxs..
One thousand dollars..
Total

47.00

ONE AND TWO Y E A E NOTES.
Eedeemed.
I s s u e and denomination.

Outstanding.

Issued.
D u r i n g fiscal T o J u n e 30,1890
year.

Amount.

Per
cent.

One-year notes.
Ten dollars. T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
Unknown

$6,200,000
16,440, 000 .
8, 240, 000
13, 640,000

$60
400
50

$6,193,225
16, 425, 840
8, 233,450
13,633,400
90

44,520,000

510

Total

34,085
90

44,486,005

0.11
0.08
0 08
0 05

33, 995

0.08

6,100
2,200

0.09
0.02

8, 300

0.05

'
!
j
i

1,900
8,200
1,500
19,000

0 03
0.06

i

30, 600
10,500

1

Two-year notes.
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars . . . . .

i

$6,775
14,160
6,550
6,600 -

;
Total

1
1

6, 800, 000
' 9, 680, 000

100
100

6, 793. 900
9, 677, 800

16,480, 000

200

16,471. 700

1
i

Two-year coupon notes.
Fifty dollars
F i v e h u n d r b d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars
Unknown ...^..........

5, 905,
14,484,
40, 302,
89, 308,

600
400
000
000

5,
14,
40,
89,

903,700
476, 200
300, 500
289, 000
10, 500

/

Deduct u n k n o w n destroyed
Total




150, 000, 000

149, 979, 900

20,100

0 02

0.01

48
No.

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.
19.—UNITED STATES C U R R E N C Y OF EACH ISSUE AND DENOMINATION I S S U E D ,

R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING, ETC.—Continued.

COMPOUND-INTEEEST NOTES.
Eedeemed.
Denomination.

D u r i n g fiscal
T o J u n e 30,1890.
year.
T e n dollars
Twenty
.....................
Fifty dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
Five hundred dollars......
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
Total

Outstanding.

Issued.

=

Amount.

Per
cent.

$23, 285, 200
30,125, 840
60, 824. 000
45. 094, 400
' 67, 846, 000
39, 420, 000

$540
680
1, 650
500

$23,261,530
30, 088, 050
60,756,300.
45, 059; 400
67, 833, 500
39, 414, 000

$23, 670
37, 790
67, 700
35, 000
12, 500
6,000

0.10
0 12
0.11
0.08
0 02
0.01

266, 595, 440

3,370

266, 412, 780

182, 660

0.07

'

FEACTIONAL CUEEENCY.
Eedeemed.
I s s u e a n d denomination.

Outstanding.

Issued.
D u r i n g fiscal T o J u n e 30,1890
year.

Amount.

Per
cent.

F i r s t issue.
Five cents
Teu cents
Twenty-five cents.
Fifty cents
Total.

$2, 242, 889.00
4,115,378.00
5,225,695.00
8, 631, 672. 00

$10.00
19.00
35.00
61.00

."BI, 214,709. 50
2, 871, 656. 57
4,186, 915.15
7, 661, 873. 25

$1, 028,179. 50
1, 243, 721. 43
1, 038, 780.85
969, 798. 75

45.84
30. 02
19.87
11.22

20,215, 635.00

125. 00

15, 935,154.47

4, 280, 480. 53

2L17

Second issue.
Five cents
Ten cents
Twenty-five c e n t s .
Fifty cents..
,
Total.

2,794,
6,176,
7, 648.
6, 545,

826.10
084. 30
341. 25
232. 00

16.00
20.00
30.00
37.00

2, 096, 353.38
5, 204,134. 91
6, 903, 214. 53
5, 795,197. 85

698,472. 72 24.99
911, 949. 39 14.77
745,126. 72 9.74
750,034.15 11.45
3,105, 582. 98 13.40

23,164,483.65

103. 00

20, 058, 900. 67

601, 923.90
657, 002; 75
16, 976,134. 50
1,3.52.40
31,143,188. 75
36, 735,426.50

9.00
8.00
108.00
160. 00
242. 00

511,673.55
524, 640.31
15, 925, 583.60
75.67
30, 242, 738. 77
35,931,181.35

QO, 250. 35
132, 362.44
, 050,550. 90
1, 276.73
900, 449. 98
804, 245.15

86,115, 028.80

527. 00

83,135, 893.25

2, 979,135. 55

34, 940, 960. 00
5, 304, 216. 00
58, 922, 256.00
77,399, 600. 00

218. 00
60.00
365.00
784. 50

33, 567,254. 03
5, 064,849.10
57, 898, 371.43
76,331,632.35
.
32, 000. 00

1, 373, 705.97
239,366. 90
1, 023, 884. 57
1, 067, 967. 65

T h i r d issue.
Three cents
Five cents
Ten cents
Fifteen cents
Twenty-five cents.
Fifty cents
Total

15.00
20.15
6.19
94.38
2.89
2.19

F o u r t h issue.
Ten cents
Filteen cents
T w e n t y five c e n t s .
Fifty cents
Unknown

L74
L38

; 704, 925.09
,
32, 000.00

D e d u c t for u n k n o w n d e s t r o y e d
Total

3.93
4.51

176, 567, 032. 00

1, 427. 50

19, 989, 900. 00
36, 092, 000.00
6, 580, 000. 00

573. 00
1, 398. 00
1, 026.00

19, 504, 560. 82
35, 512, 639. 83
6, 395. 374. 20

62, 661, 900. 00

2, 997.00

61,412, 574.85

172, 894,106.91

3,672, 925.'09

F i f t h issue.
Ten cents
Twenty-five c e n t s .
Fifty cents
,

Total.




485, 339.18
579, 360.17
184, 625. 80

2.42
LOO
2.80

1, 249, 325.15

L99

49

TREASURER.

No. 1 9 . — U N I T E D STATES C U R R E N C Y O F EACH I S S U E AND-^Bi^NO^jA^of?ts^u:^D,

R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING, ETC.—Continrie?^^^:;,.^^^.^^?^^^
GOLD C E E T I F I C A T E S .
Eedeemed.

Issued.
Series a n d denomination.

Outstanding.
During
T o J u n e 30,
1890.
fiscal y e a r .

D u r i n g fiscal
year.

T o J u n e 30,
1890.

Act M a r c h 3, 1863.
$960,000.00
20,234,300.00
32,844,000.00
121,88'l, 000.00
457,885,000.00
314,330,000.00
33,000,580.46

T w e n t y dollars
One hundred dollars . . . .
Five hundred dollars...One t h o u s a n d dol lars
Five thousand dollars...
Ten thousand dollars . - .
Account Geneva a w a r d .
TotaL

1,200
500
8,000

$959, 760.00
20,214, 400100
32, 827, OOOI 00
121, 828, ooo; 00
457, 850. 000' 00
314,180,000:00
33, 000, 580; 46

9, 740 980.859,740,46

981,134,880.40

$240
19, 900
17, 000
53, 000
35, 000
,150,000
275,140

Act J u l y 12, 1882, series 1882.
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars L
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . .
Five hundred dollars..
One -thousand d o l l a r s . .
Five thousand dollars.
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars .
•4>
f4^^ T o t a l

$2, 880,000 22,960,000.00
2, 200, 000 20,000,000,00
2, 000, 000 22,000,000.00
2,000,000 26,000,000.00
4, 000. 000 50,000,000.00
5, 000, 000 59,500,000.00
11,000,000|137,000,000.00

1, 905, 588
1, 600,145
1, 532, 600
1, 733, 500
2,144, 000
4, 830, 000
5, 310, O O
G

11,006.766.00
10, 956, 795.'00
9,906.600.00
14,675, .500.;00
26, 991, 500.00
39,100, OOO.'OO
106,450,000.00

11,953,234
9,043,205
12, 093,400
11, 324,500
23, 008, 500
20, 400,000
30, 550, 000

29,080,000 337,460,000.00

19, 055, 833

219, 087,16L 00

118, 372, 839

6, 350,000 24,505,000.00
13, 620, 000 43,740,000.00

9,120, 000
17, 370, 000

10,540,000.00
18, 810, 000.00

13, 965, 000
24,930,000v

19,970, 000 68,245,000.00

26,490,000

29, 350, 000. po

38, 895, 000

<^^ A c t J u l y 12, 1882, series 1888.
Five thousand dollars.
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars .
Total.

SILYEE CEETIFICATES.
Issued.

Eedeemed.

Series a n d d e n o m i n a t i o n .

Outstanding.
During
T o J u n e 30,
fiscal year.
.1890.

D u r i n g fiscal
• vear.

$2, 274, 000
2,746, 000
3, 250, 000
3,540, 000
4, 650, 000
14,490, 000

$14, 827.00
41, 936. 00
52, 450. 00
46, 700. 00
10,500.00
13, 000.00

$2, 236, 807.00
2, 643, 312. 00
3,091,700.00
3,38.5,400.00
4, 605, 000. 00
14,426, 000. 00

$37,193.00
102, 688.i)0
158, 300, 00
154,600.00
45,000.00
64, 000.00

30, 950, 000

179, 413. 00

30, 388, 219. 00

561,78L00

$800,000
2,600,000

86, 000, 000<
80, 760, 000'
9, 600, 000,
13, 200, 000'
9, 000, 000
9, 000, 000

9, 538, 295. 00
8, 757, 624.00
951, 500 00
590, 000. 00
82, 500.00
43, 000.00

65, 969,22LOO
54, 781, 312. 00
6, 503, 440. 00
9, 065, 480. 00
8, 791, 500.00
8, 893, 000.00

20,030, 779. 00
25, 978. 688.00
3, 096,560. 00
4,134, 520. 00
208, 500.00
107,000.00

3, 400,000

207, 560. 000

19, 962, 919. 00

154, 003, 953.^00'

53, 556, 047. 00

14, 700, 000
51, 800, 000
34, 480, 000
9, 280, 000
28,100, 000 119,100,000
39, 000, O O 100, 000, 000
O
240, 000

11,473,489.70
6, 959, 904. 80
11,552,583.50
5, 412,485. 00
29,200. 00

20, 665, 517.90; 31,134,482.10
11, 922, 239. 60 22,557,760.40
16,972,843.501 102,127,156.5.0
, 8, 596, 956. 00 i 91,403, 044. 00
40,520.00'
199, 480. 00

305, 620, 000

35,427,663. 00

58,198, 077. 00 247,421, 923. 00

T o J u n e 30,
1890.

Series 1878.
T e n dollars
-T w e n t y d o l l a r s
F i f t y rlollars
r--One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . .
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars'.
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s .
Total.
Series 1880.
T e n dollars
,
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d d o l l a r s .,
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars.
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s .
TotaL
Series 1886.
O n e dollar
T w o dollars . . . . .
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
,
Twenty dollars.
. TotaL

Fi90=



91, 080, 000

50
No.

E E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCESo

2 0 . — U N I T E D STATES C U R R E N C Y OF E A C H CLASS ISSUED, R E D E E M E D AND OUTSTANDING AT THE CLOSE OP THE FISCAL Y E A R 1890.

Eedeemed.

Issued.

Outstanding.

Class.

D u r i n g fisT o J u n e 30,1890.
N cal y e a r .

D u r i n g fiscal .
T o J u n e 30,1890.
year. •

$60, 030, 000. 00
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
$78,132, OOC 2, 332,129, 868. 00
United States notes
. 211, 000, 000. 00
One a n d t w o y e a r n o t e s .
Compound-interest notes
266, 595, 440. 00
368, 724,079. 45
Fractional currency
49,050,000 1, 386, 839, 880.46
Gold certificates ..".
544,130, 000. 00
.94, 480, 000
S i l v e r certificates

$410. 00
$59, 973, 967. 50
$56,032. 50
78,132, 000. 00 1,985,448,792.00 346,681, Old. 00
710.00
210, 937, 605. 00
62, 395.00
3, 370. 00
266, 412, 780. 00
182, 660. 00
353,436,630.15 15,287,449.30
. 5,179. 50
45, 555, 573. 00 1, 229,296, 901.46 157, 542, 979. 00
242, 590,'249. 00 301, 539, 751. 00
55, 569, 995.00

221, 662, 000 5,169, 449,207. 91

179,267, 237. 50 4, 348, 096, 925.11 821, 352, 282.80

Total

No.

21—FACE AND N E T V A L U E OF U N I T E D STATES C U R R E N C Y REDEEMEDJ
DEDUCTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF MUTILATIONS, TO J U N E 30,
1890.

D e d u c t i o n s on acc o u n t of m u t i l a t i o n s .

N e t value.
Class.

T o t a l face v a l u e .
E e d e e m e d during
fiscalyear.

$59,973, 967.50
Old dem a n d n o t e s
1, 985, 455, 030, 00
United States notes . . . .
210, 937, 605. 00
One a n d t w o y e a r n o t e s
266, 412, 780. 00
Compound-interest notes ..
853,436,667.11
Fractional currency
I 229, 296, 901.46
G o l d certificates
242, 593.449. 00
S i l v e r certificates
....

No.

$410. 00
78,132, 000. 00
710. 00
3,370. 00
5,179. 50
45, 555, 573.00
55,569,995.00

D u r i n g T o J n n e 30,
Eedeemed
to J u n e 30,1890. y e a r .
1890.
$59, 971, 836: 25
1, 985, 254, 201. 50 '$2,'695'
210, 937, 213. 00
266, 412, 300.00
353, 294, 752. 76
L 229, 296,129.46
57"
242, 587, 627. 00
1,093

4, 348,106,400. 07 179, 267, 237. 50

Total

AND

$2,131.25
200, 828. 50
392.00
480.00
141,914.35
772. 00
5, 822. 00

4.347,754, 059.97

352, 340.10

3,245

32.—UNITED STATES C U R R E N C Y I S S U E D , R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING, B Y
DENOMINATIONS, AT T H E CLOSE OF T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.

Old d e m a n d n o t e s .

^ Denomination.
Issued.

Eedeemed.

Outstanding

United States notes.

Issued.

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

$183,904,160 $180, 611, 806.80 $3. 292, 353. 20
181, 707, 048 178,834,169.20 2, 872, 878.80
$21, 800, 000 $21, 777, 632. 50 $22, 367.50 395, 281, 760 337, 551, 376. 00 57, 730, 384. 00
20, 030, 000 20,009,415.00 20,585.00 387,811,240 297, 400,440) 00 90, 410, 800. 00
T p n dollars
. . 18, 200, 000 18,186, 920.00 13, 080.00 364, 602, 400 253,116, 050.00 111, 486, 350. 00
T w e n t y dollars
123,415,200 101,952,800. 00 21, 462, 400. 00
F i f t v dollars -. 150,104, 000 117, 579, 650. 00 32. 524, 350. 00
Onp l i u n d r e d dollars
185, 676, 000 174, 347, 500. 00 11,328 500.00
Fiv^e h u n d r e d dollars
299, 628, 000 283, 090, 000. 00 16, 538, 000. 00
20, 000, 000
19, 975. 000.00
25, 000.00
Five thousand dollars.
40, 000, 000
39,990,000.00
10, 000.00
T e h t h o u s a n d dollars .
'
1,000,000.00
Unknown destroved
D e d u c t u n k n o w n deTotal

=




347,681,016.00
1, 000, 000. 00
60,030, C O 59, 973, 967.50 56, 032. 50 2, 332,129, 808 1, 985, 448, 792.00 346. 681, 016. 00
O

51

TKEASUEEE.
No. 2 2 . — U N I T E D

STATES C U R R E N C Y I S S U E D , R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING, BY.

DENOMINATIONS, ETC.—Continuedo
S i l v e r certificates.

Gold certificates.

Denomination.
Issued.

• Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

Issued.

Outstanding.

Eedeemed.

$51,800,000 $20, 665,517.90 $31,134,482.10
34,480, 000 11, 922, 239.'60 22, 557, 760.40
119,100, 000 16, 972, 843.50 102,127,156.50
188, 274, 000 76, 802, 984. C 111,471,016.00
C
83, 746,000 57, 465,144. O 26, 280, 856. 00 $23, 920, 000.00
C
T w e n t y dollars
12, 850,000 9, 595,140.00 '' 3, 254, 860. 00 20, 000, 000.00
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dolls . . 16, 740, 000 12,450,880.00 4,289,120.00 42. 234, 300. 00
O
253, 500. 00 58, 844, 000.00
F i v e h u n d r e d dolls - 13,650,000 13, 396, 500. O
O
171, 000.00 171, 881, 000. 00
One thousancl dolls . 23, 490, 000 23, 319, 000. O
541,890,000.00
F i v e t h o u s a n d dolls
495, 070, 000.00
T e n t h o u s a n d dolls
Account G e n e v a
33, 000, 580.46
One dollar
T w o dollars . . i
F i v e dollars . . . .

$11,966,526.00 $11,953,474
10, 956, 795. 00 9, 043, 205
30,121,000.00 12,113, 300
47, 502, 500. 00 11,341,500
148, 819, 500. 00 23, 061, 500
507, 490, 000. 00 34, 400, 000
439, 440, 000.00 55, 630, 000
33, 000, 580.46
•

O
t . 544,130, 000 242, 590, 249. O 301,539, 751. 00 1,386,839,880.46 1,229,296,901.46 157; 542; 979

Total

O n e - y e a r n o t e s of 1863.

T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863..

Denomination.
Issued.

OutEedeemed. standing.

$6, 200,000 $6,193,225
T e n dollars .
..
T w e n t y dollars
' 16,440,000 16,425,840
8, 240, 000 8. 233. 450
F i f t y dollars
13, 640, 000 13; 633, 400
One"liundred dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
Unknown
1
90^

$6, 775
14,160
6, 550
6,600

D e d u c t u n k n o w n de-

. Issued.

Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

:'
'
$12, 697, 600

34, 085
90
44, 520, 000 44,486, 005

Total

33, 995

\
$12, 705, 600
24,164,400
40, 302, 000
89,308, 000

$8, 000
10, 400
1 500
19, 000

24,154,000
40, 300, 500
89, 289, OOO
10,500

38, m
10 500
166.480.000

166. 451.600

• 9.R 4 0 0

!
Aggregate,

Compound-interest notes.

i

•

\

•

>

Denomination.
Issued.

One dollar
T w o dollars
Fivo do'lars

OutEedeemed. standing.

.=
-.
...o.....
.........

T w e n t y dollars
Fiftv dollars
..
One' h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . .
Five hundred dollars..
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
Five thousand dollars.
T e n thousand dollars.
A c c o u n t G e n e v a aw a r d
Unknown destroyed.
Unknown destroyed..

$23, 285,200 $23,261, 530
30,125, 840 30, 088, 050
60, 824, 000 60, 756, 300
45, 094,400 45, 059,400
67, 846, 000 67, 833, 500
39,420,000 39, 414, 000

•
•

266, 595,440 266,412,780




Eedeemed.

Outstanding.

$235, 704,160.00 $201,277,324.70 $34,426,8.35.30
216.187.048.00 190, 756,408. 80 25, 430, 639. 20
536,181, 760. 00 376,301,852.00 159, 879, 908. 00
625, 600, 440. 00 423, 667, 594.00 201, 932, 846.00
537, 034, 240. 00 387, 248, 530. 00 149, 785,710. 00
238, 034, 800. 00 204,192,085. 00 33, 842,715. 00
291, 977,100.00 242, 998, 330.00 48, 978, 770. 00
366, 318, 000. 00 343, 380, 500.00 22,937, 500. 00
623, 727, 000. 00 583,931, .500. 00 39, 795, 500.00
561, 890, 000. 00 527,465,000.00 34,425, 000. 00
535,070, 000.00 479, i30, 000. 00 55, 640, 000.00
33, 000, 580.46
33, 000, 580. 46
L 000, 000. 00
10, 590. 00

'•

D e d u c t u n k n o w n deTotal

$23, 670
37,790
67,700
35, 000
12, 500
6,000

Issued.

807, 075,423.50
1, 010,590.00

182, 660 4,800,725.128.46 3,994,660,294.96 806,064,833.60

52
Noi

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANCESo
2 3 , — U N I T E D STATES C U R R E N C Y OF E A C H I S S U E OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE O F
/ EACH F I S C A L Y E A R FROM 1862 TO 1890.
*' -

Fiscal
year.

Old d e m a n d
notes.

One and two.
year notes.

United States
notes.

Compoundinterest
^ notes.

Fractional
currency.

Total.

$147, 725, 235.00
1862
$51,105,235.00 '$96,620,000.00.
$20," 192," 456.'o6" 411, 223, 045. 00
1863
3, 384, 000. 00 387, 646, 589. 00
1864
789, 037.50 447, 300, 203.10 $172, 620, 550. 00 $6,060, 000.00 . . 22, 324, 283.10 649, 094. 073. 70
50, 625,170. 00 191,72L470.00 25, 033,128.76 698, 918; 800.25,
472, 603. 50 431, 066, 427. 99
1865
8, 439, 540. 50 172, 369, 941. 00 • 27, 008, 875.36 608, 870, 825. 46
272,162.75 400, 780, 305. 85
1866.....
1, 325, 889. 50 1.34,771,98L00 28,474, 623. 02 536, 567, 523.02
208, 432.50 371, 783, 597.00
1867
716, 212. 00„ 54, 608, 230.00 32. 727, 908.47 444,196, 262.47
143, 912. 00 356, 000, 000.00
1868
347, 772. 00" 3,'063,410.00 32,114. 637. 36 391, 649, 558. 61
123,739.25 356, 000, 000. 00
1809-....
253, 952. 00 ^2,191, 670. 00 39, 878, 684. 48 398, 430, 562.48
106, 256. 00 356 000, 000. 00
1870
O
205, 992.00
814, 280. 00 40, 582, 874. 56 397, 699, 652. 06
96,505.50 356, OUO, 000. G
1871
178, 222.00
623, 010. 00 40, 855, 835. 27 399, 245, 363..52
88, 296. 25 357,500,000.00
1872
.148,155.00
499, 780.00 44, 799, 365. 44 401, 527, 267. 94
79, 967.50 356, 000, 000. 00
1873
429, 080. 00* 45, 912, 003.34 428, 547, 693. 84
76, 732. 50 381,999,073.00 . ' 130,805.00
1874:-...
114,175.00
371. 470. 00 42,129, 424.19 418, 456, 756. 69
70,107.50 375,771,580.00
1875
331,260.00 34,446, 595. 39 404, 722, 461. 89
105,405. 00
66, 917.50 369, 772, 284. 00
1876
300, 260. 00 20,403,137. 34 • 380, 627, 976.84
96, 285. 00
63, 962. 50 359, 764. 332. 00
1877
274, 780. 00 16, 547,768.77 363,656,337.27
90,475.00
62, 297.50 346, 681. 016.00
1878
86, 845. 00
260, 650. 00 15, 842, 610.11 362, 9.32, 591.11
61,470.00 346, 68L 016. 00
1879
346, 681, 016. 00
82, 815.00
243, 310. 00 15, 590, 892. 70 362, 659, 008. 70
60, 975. 00
18S0
80. 715. 00
235,280. 00 15,481,891. 65 362, 539, 437. 65
'
60, 535. 00 346,681,016.00
1881
34'6, 681, 016. 00
^77,125. 00
223, 560. 00 15,423,186.10 362,464, 582.10
59, 695. 00
1882
71, 915.00
214,770.00 15.376,629.14 362,403, 315.14
58, 985.00 346, 681, 016. 00
1883.....
71, 335. 00
211.790. 00 15, 355, 999. 64 362, 378, 580.64
58,440. 00 346, 681, 016. 00
1884
68, 585.00
204, 970.00 15, 340,114. 2 1 , 362, 352, 635.21
57, 950. 00 346, 681, 016. 00
1885
346,681,016.00
66,755.00
199. 660. 00 15, 330, 025. 85 362, 334, 901.85
57,445. 00
1886
65, 645. 00
193, 310. 00 15, 322, 902.70 362,320, 003. 70
57,130.00 346,681,016.00
1887
63, 845.00
189,860.00 15,298,582.15 362, 290,110. 65
56, 807. 50 346,681,016.00
1888-....
63,105. 00
186,030.00 15, 292, 628.80 362, 279. 222.30
i
56, 442.50 346, 681, 016. 00
1889
j 346, 681, 016. 00
62, 395. 00
182, 660. 00- 15, 287, 449.30 362, 269, 552. 80
56, 032. 50
1890

NOTE.—The difference between this and other statements of the Treasurer's reports ^and the public
debt statements in the amounts of one and two year notes and compound-interest notes outstanding,
is due to the fact that the Treasurer's statements are compiled from the reports of destructions, while
the debt statements are made up from the reports of redemptions, and the method.of settling the
accounts of these interest-bearing notes does not permit their destruction until some time after the
redemption. The following will explain the difference on J u n e 30, 1890:

O n e a n d t w o Compound-inyear notes. terest notes.

•

O n h a n d n n d e s t r o y e d a t b e g i n n i n g of ftie fiscal y e a r
E e d e m p t i o n s d u r i n g t b e fiscal y e a r
J......
Total.

,....'.

i,=

$160
590
750

Total




'

I

'

3, 470

160
550
40

;

D e s t r o y e d d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r :
A c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n s d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e n r 1889
A c c o u n t of r e d e m p t i o n s d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r 1890
On h a n d u n d e s t r o y e d J u l y 1, 1890.

$180
3,290

180
3,190
100

' 750

3 470

53^

TREASUREBo

I

No. 2 4 . — U N I T E D STATES N O T E S OF EACH D E N O M I N A T I O N ISSUED, REI3EEBIED, AND
OUTSTANDING AT THE CLOSE OF EACH F I S C A L YEAR FROM 1878 TO 1890, INCLUD-

ING 11,000,000 OF UNKNOWN DENOMINATIONS DESTROYED.

Denomination.

I s s u e d durEedeemed
ing year. Total issued. d u r i n g year.

1878.
One doll'-tr
. . . . . . . . . . . . $7, 562, 351
6, 288, 000
T w o dolliirs
15, 820, 000
F i v e dollars
11, 380, 000
T e n doll a r s
9 200 000
T w e n t y dollars
3, 200, 000
F i f t y dollars
6, 408, 600
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
F i v e hu nd red d o l l a r s
. . . .4, 817, 000
One thousand d o l l a r s . , .
2,6oo;ooo
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
..
T e n thousand dollars . . . .
67, 275, 951

Total

1879.
O n e dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 503,133
5, 892, 000
T w o dollars
11, 060, 000
F i v e dollars
9, 280, 000
T e n dollars
7,400,000
T w e n t y dollars
2,400,000
F i f t y dollars
5, 007, 700
One hundred dollars
5, 650, 000
F i v e hundred dollars
3, 900, 000
One thousand dollars.
4, 005, 000
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars'.
3, 010, 000
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
64,107,833

Total

1880.
One d o l l a r
„
9, 057,863
8, 232. 000
T w o dollars
19, 680, 000
F i v e dollars
16, 520,000
Ten dollars
17, 360, 000
T w e n t y dollars
Fifty dollars
...
1, 400, 000
One h u n d r e d dollars
•. 3, 052, 700
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
2, 300, 000
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
700, 000
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
^ 1,000,000
Ten thousand dollars
2, 000, 000
Total

..O.O

Total
"1.882.
O n e dollar
T w o d o l l a r s ..'
Five dollars. 1
..'.
T e n dollars
"Twenty dollars
. ".
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars - .
Five hundred dollars...
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
F i v e thousand dollars
Ten tbousaud dollars:
Total..=«




'
1,434,145,551

80. 359, 267.00

122 179, 236
9.223,02'6. 50
125, 699, 048
8, 710, 295.00
205,60L760 11, 622,443. 50
236,371,240 10.193, 082.00
9, 649. 756. 00
207, 882, 400
4..059, 340. 00
90,115, 200
4, 593, 890. 00
100, 985, 500
3,959,000.00
160,276,000
2, 042, 000. 00
242,128, 000
5, 000.00
4,005, 000
50, 000. 00
3,010, 000'
1,498,253,384

64,107, 833. 00

141,126,133
142, 683, 048
240, 041, 760
262, 051, 240
231,482,400
92, 715, 200
100, 982, 500
163, 276, 000
243. 728, 000
5, 005, 000
5, 010, 000

347. 681, 016 00

103, 969, 255. 20
18,209,980.80
107, 606, 394. 80
18, 092, 653. 20
151,494, 647.00
54,107,113.00
171, 732, 678. 00
64, 638, 562.00
147.41L 513. 00
60, 470, 887. 00
64,591, 860. Ob
25, 523, 340. 00
68, 947, 020. 00 / 32, 038,480. 00
127, 706, 500. 00
32, 569, 500. 00
207,057, 500. 00
35, 070, 500. 00
5, 000. 00
4, 000, 000. 00
50, OOU. 00
2, 960, 000. 00
1,150,572,368.00

347 681,016 00

20. 332. 332.00
20, 352, 813 00
'65, 432, .548. 00
74,916,751 00
72,143,207.00
24 808 995 00
32, 797, 870. 00
19, 224, 000. 00
16, 532; 500. 00
680,000. 00
. 460, 000. 00

81,302,563.00 1, 231, 874, 931. 00

347, 681, 016. 00

7, 575, 604. 40
6,860, 690. 60
10,623,470.00
7,086,361.00
6,111,610.00
2, 306, 085. 00
2, 794, 510. 00
5, 354, 000.00
5, 408, 000. 00
225, 000. 00
200. 000. 00

118, 480,37L 40
120, 438. 925. 6()
170,472,682.-00
185. 060, 853. 00
159.210, 803. 00
69, 012, 290. 00
74, 034, 840. 00
148, 706, 000. OO
231,703, 506. OOi.
4.550.000. oo;
, 4, 750, 000. 00'

54,545,334.00 1,286, 420, 265. 00

152, 571, 657
8, 370, 332.00
153,155, 048
8, 093, 497. 00
254, 321, 760 16, 506, 538. 00
268, 731, 240 10, 885, 621. 00
237,162, 400
9, 294,126. 00
95, 915, 200
2, 711,140. 00
111, 510, 400
3, 006, 170. 00
165, 026, 000
1,444,000.00
245, 228, 000
1,189,000.00
10, 000, OUO 5, 030, 000. 00
20, 000, 000 . 12, 990, 000.00

79,520, 424 1, 713, 621,705

1,086,464,535.00

110, 904, 767. 00
113, 578, 235. 00
159, 849, 212. Od
177, 974, 489. 00
153,099,1.93. 00
66, 706, 205. 00
71, 240, 330. 00
143, 352, 000. 00
226,295,500.^00
4, 325, 000. 00
4, 550. 000.00

6, 925, 511. 80
131, 237, 099
5, 971, 840. 20
133, 93L 048
8, 354, 565.00
225, 281, 760
6, 241, 811. 00
252, 891, 240
225, 242, 400 . 5, 687, 680. 00
2,114, 345. 00
91, 515, 200
2,293,310.00
104. 038, 200
15, 645, 500. 00
162, 576, 000
242, 828, 000 19, 238, UOO. 00
4, 320, 000.00
5,005, 000
4, 500, UOO. 00
5, 010, 000

54, 545, 334 I, 634,101, 281

11. 445, 524
10, 472, 000
14. 280, 000
6, 680, U O
O
5, 680, 000
3,200, 000
4, 527, 900
1, 750, 000
1,500,000
4, 995, 000
14, 990, 000

Total redeemed. Outstanding.

$115, 676,103 $11,792, 775.00
$94, 746, 228. 70 $20,929,874.30
119,807,048 10, 746, 878.00
98,896,099.80
20, 910, 948. 20
194,541, 760 16, 111, 867. 00
139, 872, 203. 50
54. 609, 55^6. 50
227,091,240 13,763,063.00
161, 539, 596. 00
65 551 644 .00
200,482, 400
9, 086, 554. 00
137, 761, 757. 00
62^ 72U, 643. U
O
87, 715, 200
6, 267, 030. 00 , 60, 532, 520.00 • 27,182,'680 .,00
95, 977, 800
4,194,100. 00
64, 353,130.00
31,<624, 670. 00
154, 626, 000
4. 424, 000. 00
123, 747, 500. 00
30, 878, 500. no
238, 228, 000
3.973.000.00
205,015,500.00
33, 212, 500. 00

81, 302, 563 1, 579, 555, 947

1881.
One dollar
9,889,034
T w o dollars i . . . . . . . . i . . .
8, 752, 000
F i v e dollars
14, 760, 000
T e n dollars
9,160,000
T w e n t y dollars
6, 240, 000
F i f t y dollars
1,200,000
2, b44, 300
O n e h u n d r e d dollars.'
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
700, 000
O n e ' t h o u s a n d dollars
900, 000
Five thousand d o l l a r s . . . . . .
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

\ '.

126, 850,703.40:
128,532,422.60!
186,979,220.00'
195,946,474.00,
168,504,929.00
7L 723,430.00'
77, 041, 010.00
150,150,000.00
232, 892, 500. 00
9, 580, 000. 00
17, 740, 000.00 •

22, 645, 761. 60
22, 244,122. 40
69, 569, 078. 00
76,990,^387.00
72, 271, 597. 00
23, 702, 910. 00
32, 947, 660. 00
14, 570,4)00. 00
12,024,500.00
455,000.00
260, OOU. U
O
347,681, 016. 00

25 720 9.53. 60
24' 622, 625.40'
67, 342, 540. 00
72, 784, 766.00
68, 657,471. 00
24 191, 770.00
34,469, 390. 00
14, 876, 000. 00
12, 335,. 500.00
420, OUO. 00
2, 260, 000.00

79, 520, 424.00 1,365,940,689.00! 347,681, 016, 00

54

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCESo

No. 24.—UNITED STATES NOTES O F EACH DENOMINATION IBSUED, R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE O F BACH FISCAL YEAR, ETC.—Continued.

Denomination.

1883.
O n e dollar
o===.
T w o dollars
Five dollars:
...»
Ten dollars
T w e n t y dollars
^ F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . .
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars:.
F i v e thousand doUars.
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars .
Total.
1884.
Onfe dollar
T w o dollars
Fivedollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t v dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars . .
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
F i v e thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars..
Total.
. 1885.
Onedoll.ar
'.
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
-Teu dollars
Twenty dollars.Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars . .
Five hundred dollars..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars.
T e n t b o u s a u d dollars .
TotaL• 1886. :
O n e dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
Ten dollars
<....
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
- -O n e h u n d r e d dollars
Five hundred dollars......
One t h o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
Total.
1887.
O n e doUar
o..
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s . . .
Five hundred dollars-.
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars .
T e n thousand dollars .
Total.^




I s s u e d durT o t a l issued.
ing year.

986,114 $164, 557, 771
672, 000 162, 827, 048
860, 000 277,181. 760
240, 000 282, 971,240
000, 000 243,162,400
900, 000
99, 815, 200
356, 600 115, 867. 000
350, 000 167. 376, 000
400, 000 249, 628, 000
000.000
20, UOO, 000
000, 000
40, 000, 000

Eedeemed
during year.

Total redeemed. O u t s t a n d i n g .

$9, 970,610. 80 $136, 821,314.20 $27,736. 456. 80
137,302, 653, 80 25,524, 394. 20
8, 770,231. 20
71,150, 085.00
19, 0.52,455. 00 206, 031,675. 00
14, 291,880. 00 210,238, 354. 00 72, 732,886. 00
12, 210,562. 00
180, 715,491. 00 62,446, 909. 00
4, 205,875. 00
75, 929,305. 00 23, 885,895. 00
34, 302,390. UO
4, 523,600. 00
81,564, 610.00
2,127, 500. 00
152, 277,500. 00 15, 098,500.00
2, 407,000. 00 235, 299,.500. 00 14, 328,50U. 00
315, 000. 00
10,105, 000.00
19, 685,000.00
160: 000.00
22,100, 000. 00
39, 840,000. 00

109, 764, 714 1,823, 386, 419 109, 764, 714. 00 1, 475, 705,403.00 347,681, 016. 00

943, 236.
"8U8, 000
420, 000
160, 000
280, 000
200, 000
237, 000
900,000
000, 000

173, 501, 007
170. 635. 048
300.601,760
295,131. 240
252, 442, 400
104,015,200
121.104, 000
172, 276, 000
259f 628. 000
20, OUO, 000
• 40,000,000

85,948,236 1, 909, 334,655

187,153
856, 000
300, 000
640, 000
700,000
800, 000
600, 000
350, 000
000, 000

183. 688,160
181,491, 048
319, 901, 760
304. 771, 240
262, 202, 400
108, 815,200
126,704,000
174,626, 000
27L 628, 000
20, OUO, 000
40, 000, 000

10, 019,5tf8.00
8, 434,508. 00
19,017, 170. 00
15, 365,870.00
13, 672,280. 00
4, 877,UOO. 00
5, 898,400. 00
3. 084,500. 00
5, 294.000. 00
185, 000. 00
100, 000. 00

146, 840, 822.20
14.5, 737,161. 80
225, 048, 845. 00
225, 604, 224.00
194,387,771.00
80, 806, 305. 00
87, 463, 010.00
155,362, OOU. UU
24U, 593, 500. 00
19, 870, 000.00
39, 940, 000. 00

85, 948, 236.00 1, £61, 653, 639. 00

895, 276. 00
458, 817. 00
855, 110. 00
627, 630. 00
688, 120. 00
549, OUO.00
344, 200. 00
707, 000.00
O
318, 000. U
O
30, 000. U
. 20, 000. 00

IL
10,
18,
14,
12,
4;
6,
2,
2,

158, 736,098.20
156,195, 978.80
243, 903,955. 00
240, 231,854. 00
207, 075,891.00
85, 355,305.00.
93, 8U7,210. 00
158, 069,000. 00
242,911, 500.00
19,900, UUO. 00
39, 960,000. 00

26, 660,184. 80
24, 897.886.20
75, 552,915. 00
69, 527,016.00
58, 054,629. 00
23, 208,895. 00
33, 640,990. 00
16, 914,000. 00
19, 034,500. 00
130, UUO. 00
6U, 000.00
347,68L016.00

24, 952, OOL 80
25, 295, UG9.20
75, 997, 805. 00
64, 539, 386.00
55,126, 509.00
23} 459, 895.00
32, 896, 790. U
U
16, 5.57, UUU. UO
28. 716, 5 0 0 . 0 0
100, 000. 00
'40, 000. 00

84,493,153 ll, 993; 827, 808 84,498,153.00 1, 646,146, 792. 00 347, 681, 016. UU

18.3, 688,160 7, 348,139.40
18L 491, 048 7,090, 699.60
21,320,000 ^ 341,221, 760 11, 688,586. 00
9, 960, 000 314, 731, 240 7, 846,725. 00
7,120, 000 269, 322, 400 7,168, 130. 00
2, 000, 000 110, 815, 200 2,168, 630. 00
090. 00
6, 237.
4, 700, 000 131,404,000
400, 000 175,026, 000 4. 533,000.00
17,500, 000 289,128, 000 8,855, 000. 00
40, 000.00
20, 000, UOO
000.
' 30, 00
40, 000, UOO

166, 084,237. 60
163, 286,678.40
255, 592,541.00
248, 072,579.00
214,244, U21. 00
87,523, 935. 00
100, 044,300. UO
162, 602,OOU. 00
251, 766,500.00
19,940, 000. UO
39, 990,000. 00

17, 603,922. 40
18, 204,369. 60
85, 629,219.00
66,658, 661.UO
55, 078,379. 00
23, 291,265. 00
31,359, 700. 00
12,424, OUO.00
37, 361,500.00
60, OUO. 00
10, OOU.00

63, 000, 000 2, 056, 827, 808 63, 000, 000. 00 1, 709,146, 792.00 347, 681, 016. 00

26, 740, 000
22, 640, 000
16, 240, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 800, 000
3,648, 000

183. 688,160 8.806, 545.90
181,491, 048 9,195,797.60
367, 961, 760 17, 304, 368. 50
337, 371, 240 . 8, 927,190. 00
285, 562, 400 7,389, 018. 00
112, 815, 200 3, 382, 280.00
134,204, 000 4, 516, 300. 00
175, 026, 000 4,719, 500.00'
292, 776, 000 9, 812, UUU. 00
20, OOU, UUO
15, UOO. 00
40, 000, UOO

74, 068, 000 2,130,895, 808

174, 890,783.50
172, 482,476.00
272,896, 909. 50
256, 999,769.00
221, 633,039.00
90, 906,215. 00
104, 560,600. 00
167, 321,500.00
261, 578,500. 00
19, 955,OUO.00
39, 990,000. 00

74, 068, 000. 00 1, 783, 214, 792.00

8, 797,376. 50
9,008, 572. 00
95, 064,850. 50
80, 371,471. 00
63, 929,361.,00
21,908, 985.00
29, 643,400. 00
7, 704,500. 00
31,197. 500. 00
45, 000. 00
10, 000. 00
347, 681, 016. 00

S5

TKEASUREE.

No. 2 4 . — U N I T E D . S T A T E S N O T E S O F EACH D E N O M I N A T I O N I S S U E D , R E D E E M F D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT I H E CLOSE O F EACH F I S C A L Y E A R , ETC.—Continued,
I s s u e d durEedeemed
Total issued. during year.
ing year.

Denomination.

Total r e d e e m e d . Outstandingo

-

1888.
One dollar
o.„..„.
T w o dolla r s
Five dollars
$7, 300, 000
T e n dollars
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 000, 000
T w e n t \ dollars
,
28, 800, 000
•Fiftv dollars
2, 800, 000
One h u n d r e d dollars
4, 900, 000
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
l; 500, 000
One t h o u s a n d dollars
1, 352, 000
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
..
Ten thousand dollars.
•

Total

$183, 688,160 $3,617,144. 00 $178, 507, 927. 50
176, 514,112. 00
4, 031, 636. 00
181,491, 048
294, 206, 887. 50
375, 261, 760 2L 309, 978. 00
354, 371, 240 I L 107,070.00
268,106, 839.00
314,362, 400
229, 548, 476. 00
7, 915.437. 00
115,61.5,200
93, 744, 650.00
2, 838, 435. 00
139,104, 000
107. 999, 900. Q
O
3,439,300.00
176, 526, 000
1,136, 5UU. U
O 168, 458, 000. 00
294,128, O O 8, 246, 500. 00 • 269, 825, UOO. 00
U
20, 000, 000
19, 965, 000.00
10,000.00
40,000,000
39,990, 000. 00

„ . . . . 63, 652, 000 2,194, 547, 808

$5,180, 232. 50
4, 9'76,936.00
81, 054, 872.50
86, 264, 401.00
84, 813, 924; 00
21, 870, 550.00
31,104,100. 00
8. 008, 000. 00
24,303, 000.00
35, 000. 00
10, 000. 00

63, 652, 000. 00 L 846, 866, 792.00

347, 681, 016.00

179, 973, 632.10
178,139, 754. 40
316, 926, 799. 50
281, 506, 987.00
239, 829,154. 00
97, 372, 785. 00
111, 895,180. 00
169, 776, 500. 00
270, 941, OUO. 00
19,965,000.00'
39, 990, 000.06

3, 714, 527. 90
3, 351, 293.'60
58,334,960.50
86, 584, 253. 00
93,413, 246>00
24,242,415.00
34, 808, 820. 00
14, 499, 500.00
28, 687, 000. 00
• 35,000.00
10,000.00

. 1889.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
13, 720, 000
T w e n t y d.ollars . . . , „ „
18,880,000
F i f t y dollars
6, 000, 000
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
7, 600, O O
U
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
: 7,750, 000
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . . . - 5, 500, 000
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars . . .
T e n tliousand d o l l a r s
' Total....

1, 465, 704. 60
183, 688,160
1, 625, 642.40
181, 491, 048
375,26L760 22,719,912.00
3 8,091,240 13,400,148.00
333, 242,400 10, 280, 678. 00
3,628,135.00
121,615,200
3, 895, 280. 00
146, 704, 000
^L 318, 500. 00
184, 276, 000
1,116, UOO. 00
299, 628, 000
20, 000, 000
40, 000, O O
U

59, 450, U O 2,253, 997, 808
U

O
59, 450, 000. 00 1, 906, 316, 792. O 347, 681, 016. 00

1890.
One dollar
T w o dollars
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
Fiftv dollars
One'huiidred dollars
F i v e hundred dollars
One t h o u s a n d doll .ars:,
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n tliousand dollars
Total

216. 000
216, 000
20. 020. 000
' 19, 720. 000
,-31,360,000
' L 800, 000
3. 400, 000
L 400, 000

°.

183, 904,160
181,707, U48
395, 281, 760
387, 811, 240
364. 602, 400
123, 415, 200
150,104, U O
O
185, 676, 000
299, 628, 000
20,000,000
40, 000, U U
U

78,132, 000 2, 332,129, 808

638,174. 70
694,414.80
20, 624, 576. 50
15, 893, 453. 00
13, 286, 896. 00
4,580,015.00
5, 684, 470. 00
4,571,000.00
12,149, 000. 00
10, 000. 00

180, 611. 806. 80
3, 292, 353. 20
178, 834,169. 20
2, 872, 878. 80
337,551,376.00
57, 730, 384. 00
297, 400, 440. 00
90, 410, 800. 00
253,116,050.00 111, 486, 350. O
U
101,9.52,800.00^ \21,462, 4U0. 00
117, 579, 650. 00
32, 524, 350. 00
174, 347, 500.00
11, 328, 500: 00
283,090,000.00
16, 538, 000. 00
19, 975, 000. 00
25, 000. 00
39, 990, 000. 00
10, 000.00

78,132,000.00 1, 984, 448,792.00

347,681,016.00

u
No. 25—CURRENCY C E R T I F I C A T E S , . ACT O F J U N E 8, 1872, I S S U E D , R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE O F EACH F I S C A L YEAR, FROM 1873 TO 1890.
I s s u e d during year.

JDenomination.

Eedeemed
Total issued. during year.

Totai
redeemed.

Outstanding. ;

o

1873.
F i v e t h o u s a n d d ol 1 a r s . . . . . . . . . .
Ten thousand dollars.

1874.
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

$ n , 790, 000
45,450, 000

$3,310, 000
22,120,'OUO

$3,310,000
22,120,000

$8,480, 000
23, 330, 000

oc...

Total '

111, 790, 000
45, 450, 000
57, 240, 000

57, 240, 000

25, 430, 000

25, 430, 000

31, 810, 000

..o..

7, 895, 000
72, 770, 000

19,685,000
.118, 220, O O
U

8, 855, 000
44, 630, 000

12,165, 000
66, 750, 000

7,520,000
4L 470, 000

78, 915, 000

58, 990, 000

80, 665, 000

137, 905, 000

53, 485, 000

1875.
F i v e tliousand dollars . . . . o .
T e n thousand dollars

4, 525, 000
76,570,000

24, 210, 000
194, 790, 000

. 7, 550, 000
73,490, 000

19, 715, 000
4, 495, 000
140, 240, 000 . 54.550,,000

T o t a l . . = = » , ' . ooooo

81, 095, 000

' 219, 000, 000

81, 040, 000

159, 955, 000

59, 045, 000

28, 760, 000
53,640, 000

52, 970, 000
248,430, 000

19, 595, 000
89, 310, 000
88,710,000 . 228,950,000

13, 660, 000
19,480,000

82,400,000

301,400, 000

Total

a

1876.
F i v e t l i o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . ==»=o. ^Jl.
T e n t h o u s a n d doUars
=
..
Total

=.„„00000»^0.„0..




108,305,000

268, 260,000

33,140, 000

56

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES,

Np. 25.—CURRENCY CERTIFICATES, ACT O F J U N E 8, 1872, ISSUED, R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE O F EACH F I S C A L YEAR, ETC.—Continued.
Issued during year.

Denomination.

1877.
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars . . . . . . . . . . .
'

$7,135,000 -. $60,105,000
69,750,000
318,180, 000

'

Outstanding.

$11,625, 000
44,420, 000

$50,•935.^000
273, 370, 000

$9,170,000
44, 810, 000

76, 885, 000

378, 285, 000

56, 045. 000

324, 305, 000

53, 980, 000

7, 300, 000
79, 380, 000

67,405, 000
397, 560, 000

n , 125, 000
84,300,000

6L 990, 000
^356, 730, 000

•5,415,000
40, 830, U O
O

86, 680, 000

Total
.

Total
redeemed.

Eedeemed
Total issued. during year.

464, 965, 000

95, 425. 000

418, 720, 000

46* 245, 000

, 1878.

Ten thousand dollars
Total
1879.
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

•

7, 43.5, 000
72,330, 000

Total

Total

'.,.

525, 400, 000

29, 330, O O
U

78, 855, 000
522, 930, 000

5, 240, 000
56, 870, 000

76, 730, 000
510, 780, 000

2,125, 000
12,150, 000

601,785,000

62,110, 000

587, 510, 000

14, 27.5, 000

81,070,000
538, 280, 000

• 2,87.5.000
17, 350, O O
U

79, 605, 000
528,130; 000

1, 46.5, 000
10,150,000

619,350, 000

20, 225, 000

607,735,000

11, 615, 000

84, 020, 000
552, 240, 000

1. 875. 000
13, 290, 000

81, 480, 000
541, 420, 000

2, 540, 000
10, 820, 000

16, 910, 000

1882.
Five thonsand(dollars
Ten thousand d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . : . . -

106, 680, 000

2, 950, 000
13, 960, 000

o

554, 730, 000

17, 505, 000

' ' 1881.
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

3, 350, 000
25, 98U.000

2,215,000
15, 350, 000

Total

71, 490, 000
453, 910, 000

47, 055, 000

1880.
Five thou<'and dollars . . .
Ten thousand dollars
.........

9, 500. 000
97.180, 000

4, 015, 000
43, 040, 000

Total

74, 840, 000
479, 890, O O
U

89, 765, 000

...

'636, 260, 900

15,165, Q O
U

.622,900,000

13, 360, 000

s

1883.
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand d o l l a r s . . . . . . .

3, 470, 000
16,560,000

87,490, 000
568, 800, 000

3, 520, 000
16, 690, O U
O

85,000,000.
558,110,000

2,490, 000
10, 690, 000

20, 030. 000

6.56, 290, 000

20,210,000

643,110, 000

13,180, 000

4, 300, 000
22, 570, 000

91,790,000
591. 370, 000

. 4, .520,000
23, 300, 000

89, .520, 000
581,410, 000

2, 270, 000
9, 960, 000

26, 870, 000.

683,160, 000

27, 820, 000

670, 930, 000

12,230,000

5, 785, 000
50,770,000

97, .575, 000
642,140,000

4, 390, 000
35,110, 000

93, 910, 000
• 616, 520, 000

3, 665, 000
25, 620, 000

56, 555, 000

739,715,000

39, 500, 000

710,430,000

29. 285, 000

4, 630, 000
43, 020, 000

102, 205, 000
685,160, 000

o '6,08.5,000.
52, 740, 000

99, 995. 000
669. 260, 000

2, 210, 000
15, 900 000

. 47.650.000

787. 365, 000

58, 825, 000

769,255, 000

18,110, 000

28, 400. 000

102,20.5,000
713, 560, 000

1, 740, 000
35^750, 000

101,73.5,000
705, 010, 000

470, 000
8, 550, O O
U

28, 400, 000

815, 765,000

37, 490, 000

806, 745, 000

9,020,000

230, 000
30,170, 000

102,435,000
743, 730, 000

65, 000
24,490, 000

101,800,000
729,500,000

635, 000
14, 230, 000

30. 400, 000

846,165, 000

24, 555, 000

831, 300, 000

14,865.000

32, 650, 000

102, 435, 000
^776,380,000

90, O O
O
'
30, 230, 000

101,890, 000
759, 730, 000

545, 000
16. 650, 000

.

32,650,000

878, 815, 000

30, 320, 000

861, 620, 000

17,195, 000

1890.
F i v e thousand dollars . . . . . o
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars . . o . . . » . . . .

23,480, 000

102,435, 000
799, 860, 000

95, 000
28,190, 000

101, 985, 000
787, 920, 000

450, 000
11, 940, 000

23,480, 000

902, 295, 000

28,285,000

889,905; 000

12,390,000

Total
1884.
Five thousand dollars . . = = = o
Ten thousand dollars

Total

I

188.5."
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars . T e n thousand dollars

..
'

• •

Total
1886.
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

o.

1887.
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n thousand dollars . . . . . .
Total

o

1888.
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

0..0-.

1889.
Five thousand dollars.oo...
T e n t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s .oooo.
Total

?.

Total

o.^.




.

5T

TREASURER.

N O . 26.—GOLD CERTIFICATES O F EACH DENOMINATION IssuisD, R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT THE' CLOSE OF EACH F I S C A L . Y E A R F R O M 1878 TO. 1890,
SIVE O F $3:3,000,.^^80.46 I N IRREGULAR AMOUNTS. ISSUED AND R E D E E M E D
COUNT OF T H E G E N E V A A W A R D .
,;
'
^
I s s u e d during year.

Denomination.

1878.
T w e n t y dollars
Fiftj'^ d o l l a r s

T o t a l issuedl

Total

960, 000

. 12, 317, 400

i

891,449, 900

44, 367, 000

500

958, 500

948,134, 300

1, 500

962.200
19, 535,100
2, 348,OUO ^ 31, 634,000
118, 883, 000
4,945,000
7,175, 000 • 455,430,000
25,840,000
306, 280, 000
41,270, 700

•

932,720,600

699,200
1, 210, 000
2, 998. 000
2.455. 000
8. 050. O O
U

15, 413. 700

958,900

960,000

:
...\

o

188L
T w e n t y dollars . . . . . . . .
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars . .
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars-

'400

20, 234, 300
32, 844, 000
121, 881, 000
457, 885. 000
314, ^30, 000

291, 200
744, 500
1, 788, 000
1, 385, 000
3, 200, 000

19, 826, 300
32, 378, 500
120, 671, O O
U
456,815,000
309, 480, boo

408,000
465, .500
1,210,000
I, 070, U O
O
4. 850, 000

948,134, 300

F i v e thousand dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

7, 409,100

940,129, 700

8,004,600

1.100

—
'—
1

•

..

960, 000
"

20, 234, 300
32, 844, 000
12L881,000
^ 4.57, 885, 000
314. 330, O U
O

.

Total

948,134, 300

380

720

959, 280

139,300
207, 000.
485, 000
270, O O
U
1,120, 000

19, 96.5, 600
32. 585. 500 |
121,156,000 '
457, 085, 000 .
310, 600,000'

268. 700
* 258i 50U
725.000
800,000
3, 730, 000

2, 221, 680

942, 351,380

5, 782. 920

959. 280

720

1

1882.
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t l i o u s a n d dollars
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

960, 000

20,010,400
32, 635, 500
121,307,000
457, 295, boo
310, 890, poo '

223, 900
^208, 500
574,000
590, 000
3, 440, 000

• 745,800

943, 097,180

5, 037.120

10, 320, 000
9, 200, 000
29,134, 300
41, 094, 000
134, 881, 000
465, 885, 000
344, 330, 000

197,180
149,200
251,100
331,000
640, 000
1,160, 000
6, 640, 000

9.163, 540
1,156. 460
9, 050, 800
. 149; 200
20, 261, 500
a, 872, 800
32, 966, 500
8.127, 500
121, 947, boo ^ 12,934 000
458,455,000
7,430. 000
317, 530, G O 26, 800,000
O

L 034, 844, 300

9, 368, 480

952, 465, 660

82,378.640.

1, 328,180
L 231, 800
L 083, 000
1, 596, 000
2,132, 000
3,435, 000 i
14,650,000

2,484, 640
L 381, 000
21, 344,^500
34, 562, 500
19.4 070 nnn
461. 890 non
332,180,000

13, 355. 360
9,119,-000
9,189, 800
8 781. 500'
14, 802, 000
10, 995, 000
32,150, U O
O

25,455,980

977,921,640

20, 234, 300
32, 844, 000
121, 881, 000
4.57,885,000
314, 330, 000

Total..-;

44,800
50, 000
151, 000
210, 000
290,000

948,134,300
9, 360, 000
9, 200, 000
8, 900, 000
8, 2.50, 000
13, 000, 000
8, 000, 000
30, 000, 000.
86,710,000

'.

....'.
•
•^...'..
..."

Total

,

1884.
T w e n t y dollars-.
o..
F i f t y dollars .
..
.. "
O n e h u n d r e d doil a r s . . . . . . .
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One thousand' dollars
F i v e thousand dollars
T e n thousand dollars
Total

47, 548, 000

935, 816, 900

323, 400
20, 234, 300
536, 000
32, 844, 000
: L 738, 000.
12l,88L000
4, 230, 000
. 457, 885, 000
5,490, 000
314, 330, 000

...'-.

,
. 1883.
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y d o l l a r s -.' •
..
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
F i v e thousand dollars
T e n thousand dollars

L79L000
4, 422,000
8,870,000
31,150, 000 '

$i, sis, 000

1880.
T w e n t y dollars
Fiftv dollars •
One h u n d r e d dollars
...
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars"
.......

Total.'

, $2, 000
i- 338. 000
3,022,000
. 6,205,000
5, 400, 000
28,400, 000

•

19,910. 900
32; 308,000 '
120,143, 000
453, 655, 000
308„84U, O O
U

50, 342, 400

oo.......

1879.
T w e n t y dollars . . . . . o . o . o . . . .
F i f t y dollars
....>.
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
=
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollai'S

Outstanding.

$958, Q O
O
«

$1,448,400
1, 795, 000
4, 534. 000
8, 275, 000
34,290,000'

F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
F i v e thousand dollars
...
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars . . ' . . .

Total
redeemed. •

i s , 572, 900
29, 286, 000
113, ,938, O O
Q
448,255,000
280,440, poo

' $960,000

...........
..

Total

Eedeemed
during year.

EXCLUON AC-

.

oooooo.^.




5,520, 000
1, 300, 000
1, 400, 000
2, 250, 000
4, 000, 000
7, OOU, U O
U
20, 000, 000
41,470, 000

15, 840, 000
10,500, 000
30, 534, 300
43, 344, 000
138,88L000
472, 885, 000
364,330, 000
1, 076, 314, 300

98, 392, 660
—.

2—

58

REPORT ON 'THE PINA.NCES0

No. 26.-—GOLD CERTIFICATES O F ^ E A C H DENOMINATION ISSUED, R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING A T T H E CLOSE O F EACH FISCAL YEAR, ETC.—Continued.
Issued during year.

Denomination.
1885.
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hiiudred dollars
...
One thousand dollars . . . . . . . . .
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars
Total

Eedeemed
during year.

Total
redeemed.

Outstanding.

$16, 240, 000
13, 200, 000
32, 334, 300
49, 944, 000
147,881,000
480, 385, 000
399, 330, 000

$1.411,020
1, 375,200
1, 386, 300
1,189, O U
O
L 443, 000
. 3, 99,5, O G
O
10, 270, 000

$3, 89.5, 660
2, 756, 200
22, 730, 800
35,751,500
125, 522, 000
465,886, 000
342, 450, 000

$12, 344, 340
10, 443, 800
9,603,500
14,192,500
22, 359 000
14, 500, 000
56, 880, 000

21, 069, 520

998, 991,160

140, 323,140'

4, 903,110
3, 582, 045
23, 420, 900
36, 704, 000
129, 38.3, 000
46G, 565, 000
344, 620, 000

11,976,890
9,717,955
9, 013, 400
13, 440, 000
18,496,000
13, 820, 000
54, 710, 000

1, 009,180, 055

13L174, 245

6, 007, 938
5, 074, 645
24, 476, 9U0
38,113, 000
130, 50.5, 000
467,190. 000
347, 500, 000

10, 872, 062
8, 225, 355
7, 957, 400
12, 03!,'000
17, 376, 000
18,195,000
-51,830,000

' $400,000
2, 700, 000
1, 800, 000
6, 600, 000
9, 000, 000 •
7, 500, 000
35, OOU, 000

0

63, OUO, 000 1,139, 314, 300

1886.
Twenty dollars . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fiftv dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thou.sand dollars...ooo-•-Five thoasand dollars
'
Ten thousand dollars
Total

Total issued.

640,
100.
100,
200,

0

1887.
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars
Ten thousand dollars

000 '
000
OU
O
000

, L 040, 000

1890.
Twenty dollars
Fifty diollars . . . . '
One hundred dollars
Fivo hundred dolhirs
One thousan d dol lars
Five thousand dollars
Teu thousand dollars
Total




1, 007. 450
825, S45
690,100
952, 500
3, 863, 000
680, 000
2,170, 000 ,
10,188, 895

1, 104, 828
1, 49--i, 600
1, 056, O U
O
1,409,000
1,120, 000
625,000
2,880,000

.

1,140, 354, 300

9, 687,428

1, 018, 867, 483

121, 486, 817

4,160, O U
O
4, 5U0, 000
7, 800, 000
4, 700, 000
14, 000, 000
20, 000, 000
30, 000, 000

21, 040, 000
17, 800, 000
40, 234, 300
54, 844, 000
161,881,000
500, 385, 000
429,330,000

2, 070, 062
2, 480, 205
2, 088, 400
4,420, 000
5, 875, 000
9, 330, 000
38, 360, 000

8, 078, 000
7, 5.54, 850
26, 565, 300
42, 533, 000
130, 3S0, 000
476. 520, 000
385, 860, 000

12, 962, 000
10, 245,150
13, 669, 000
12, 311, 000
25, 501, 000
23,86.5„000
43, 470, 000

85,160, 000

1, 225, 514. 300

64, 623,667

1, 083, 491,150

142, 023,150

2, 000, 000
6, 000, 000
30,1.55,000
41,120, 000

21. 040, 000
17, 800, 000
40, 234, 300
56, 844, 000
167, 881, 000
530, 540, O O
U
470,450,000

1, 982, 898
1, 801, 800
2, 021, 900
3, 235, 500
10, 287, 500
17, 020, 000
30, 900, 000

10, 060, 898
9, 356, 650
28, 587, 200
45, 768, 500
140, 667, 500
493, .540, 000
416, 760, 000

" 79, 275, 000

1, 304, 789, 300

67, 249, 598

23, 920,000
20, 000, 000
42, 234, 300
58, 844, 000
17L881,000
541, 890, 000
495, 070, 000

1, 905, 628
L 600,145
1, 533, 800
1,734,000'
2,1.52,000
13, 950, 000
22, 680, 000

1, 353, 839, 300

45, 555, 573

1888.
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars
-.:
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars
One thousand d(»llars
Five thousan"d dollars
Ten tlaonsaud dollars
Total

Total

1,140, 354, 300

16, 880, 000
13, 300, 000
32, 434, 300
50, 144, 000 .
147, 881, 000
480, 385, 000
399, 330, 000

i

Total

1889.
Twenty dollars-.-.
Fifty dollars .. -.
Ooe hundred dollars
Five hundred doUars
One thousand dollars
Five thousand dollars'
Ten thousand dollars

16, 880, 000
13, 300, 000
32, 434, 300
50,144, 000
147,881,000
480, 385, 000
399, 330, 000

i.

,

2, 880, 000 •
2, 200, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000. 000
4, 000, 000 /
11, 350, 000
24. 620, 000
49, 050, 000

io,
8
IL
11,
21
37,
53,

979,102
443 350
647! 100
075, 500
213 500
000, 000
690, 000

1,150, 740,748 ' 154, 048, 552

11, 966, 526
10. 956, 795
30,121, 000.
47, 502, 500
148,819,500
507,490; 000
439, 440, 000

11, 953,474
9, 043, 205
1^ 113 300
,11.341, 500
23, 061, 50034, 400, O U
O
55, 630, 000

1,196, 296, 321 157, 542, 979

59-

TREASURER.

No.'^27.-—SILVER^ CERTIFICATES OF EACH D E N O M I N A T I O N ISSUED, R E D E E M E D , AND
OUTSTANDING AT T H E CLOSE O F EACH F I S C A L Y E A R FROM 1878 TO 1890. .

Issued
Total issued.
during jear.

Denomination.

Eedeemed
Total redeemed. Outstanding.
during year.

1878.
T e n dollars

.

..

. .\

>

J..

L 850,410

• 43.780
85, 760
131, 750
301, 300
2, 000, 000
6, 587, 000

167,000
^ 96,000
145, 000
481,000
2,268, 000
7, 843, 000

$3,170.00
580. 00

$3,170. do
580. 00

. 5,300.00
1,768,000.00
6, 683, 000. 00

1,768, 000. 00
6,-683, 000.00

163, 830. 00
95, 420. 00
145, 000. 00
475, 700. bo
500,000.00
1,160,000.00

9,149, 590

Total

$12'3, 220
10, 240
13„250
179, 700
268, 000
1,256, 000

1,850, 41^

Fifty dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars

$123,220
10,240
13,250
179, 700
268, 000
L 256,000

11, 000, 000

8,460,050. 00

8,460,050.00

2, 539, 950.00

$123,220.00
10. 240. 00
13. 250. 00
179 700. 00
268, 000 00
1, 256, 000. 00

.

L850,41p.,00

1879.
Ten dollars
T w e n t y dollars
'
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
F i v e h undred dollars
On e t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . . . . . .
Total.

-0..0

•5,366 06

•

1880.
T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i ft\^ <to ila.rs
One h u n d r e d dollars
"Five h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s

26,660.00
11,120.00
I L 050.00
25, 400. 00
1, 788, 500. 00 •
6, 781,000. 00

2,147, 340. 00
1, 974, 880. .00
1, 328, 950. 00
L 904, 600. 00
1,229, 500. G
O
3, 789, 000. U
O

2, 007, 000
1, 890, 000
1, 19.5, 000
1, 449, 000
750,000
2, 727, 000

2,174, 000
1, 986, 000
1, 340, COO
1, 930i 000
3, 018, 000
10, 570, 000

10, 018, 000

21, 018, 000

18, 700, 000
16, 560, 000
2, 310, 000
2, 410, 000
632, 000
300,000

20, 874, 000
, 18,546,000
3,650, 000
4,340,000
3, 650, 000
10, 870,000

40, 912, 000

61, 930, 000

2,119,740.00

12,240,000
9,040, 000
400, 000
800, 000
700, 000
L 120, 000

33,114, 000
27, 586, 000
4, 050, 000
5,140, 000
4,350,000
11, 990, 000

3,36L310.00
2, 241, 860. 00
598, 050. 00
808, 600. 00
612,000.00
1, 748. 000.00

— ...

24, 300, 000

86, 230, 000

9, 369, 820. 00

20,133,290.00

66,096,710.00

T e n dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
,
O n e hundired d o l l a r s . . . . . . . .
F i v e hundr.ed d o l l a r s
One t h o u s a n d dollars

11, 880, 000
13,360,000
1, 600, 000
2, 400, 000
L 800, 000
4,000,000

44, 994, 000
40,946, 000
5, 650, 000
7,540, 000
6,150, 000
15, 990, 000

4, 237,828.00
3,167.456.00
886,615. 00
1,173, 480. 00
1, 008, 500. 00
2, 046, 000, 00

8,106,108.00
5, 793, 216. 00
1,653, 065.00
2,292,780.00
3, 624, 000. 00
11,184, 000. 00

36, 887, 892.00
35,152, 784.00
- 3,990,935.00
5f>247, 220. 00
2,526,000.00
4, 806, 000.00

35, 040, 000

121, 270, 000

12, 519, 879.00

' 32, 653,169.00

88, 616, 831. 00

19, 000, 000
20,080, 000
.3, 200, 000
4, 000, 000
2, 500, 000
3, 500, O O
U

63,994, 000
61, 026, 000
8, 850, 000
11,540, 000
8,650,000
. 19,490,000

8. 397,180.00
7, 368, 260. 00
903, 300. 00
1,107, 900. 00
648, 500. 00
1, 580, 000. 00

52,280,000

173, 550, 000

20,005.140.00

14, 040, 000
12,160, 000
2, 2U0, 000
2, 600, 000
5, 000, 000
4, 000, 000

78, 034, O O
O
73,186, 000
' n , 0.50, 000
14,140, 000
13, 650, 000
23,490,000"

9, 783. 585. §0
8, 013.560.00
839, 600. 00
860, 800. 00
467, 500. 00
1, 025, 000.-00

40, 000, 000

213, 550, 000

20, 990,045.'00

Total

•

23,490.00
10, 540. 00
11, 050. 00
20,100. 00
20,500. 00
98, 000. 00

12, 374, 270.00

183,680:00

1,^43,730.00

480,310.00
372, 780.00
157, 350. 00
285, 300. 00
215, 000. 00 •
609,000. 00

20,367,030.00
506,970.00
18,162,100. 00
383, 900. 00
3,481, 6UU. 00
168, 400.00
4,029,300.00
310,700.00
2, 003, 500. 00 - 1, 646, 500. 00
3, 480, 000. 00
7, 390, 000.00

1881.
T e n dollars
=-==
T w e n t y dollars
=
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i ve h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
One thouj^aud d o l l a r s
"

Total

00-.

10, 763,470.00

51,166, 5301 00

1882.
T e n dollars
„....
T w e n t y dollars
F i l t y dollars
... ,
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars..^....
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
r.
Total.......
1883.

Total

29,245,720.00
3,868, 280.00
24, 960, 240. 00
2, 625, 760.00
3, 283, 550.00
766,450.00
4, 020, 700.00
1,119, 300. 00
2, 615, 500. 00
1, 734; 500. 00
9.138, 000.00 ' , 2,852,000.00

• '

.OOOO

1884.
T e n dollars
T wen ty dollars
Fifty dollars
- .
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
O n e th o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . .
Total

o

16, 503,
13,161,
2, 556,
3,400,
4, 272,
12,764,

288. Ob 47,490, 712. 00
476.06
47, 864, 524. 00
365.00
6, 293, 635. 00
8,139, 320. 00
680.00
4, 377, 500. 00
500.00
000.00 . 6, 726, OOU. UO

52,658,309.00

120, 891, 691.00

26,286,873.00
21,17.5,036.00
3, 395,965. 00
4,261,480.00
4, 740, OOU. 00
13,789,000.00

51,747,127.00
52, 010, 964.00
7, 654, 035. 00
9, 878, 520.00
8,910,000.00
9, 701; 000.00

73,648,354,00

139, 901, (546. 00

1885.
Ten-dollars
T w e n t y dollars . . . . . . o
Fifty dollars
.......
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One thousand dollars
T o t a l .

.

o o » . o o . o o o .




60
No.

REPORT

ON T H E ^ FINANCES,

2 7 . — S I L V E R C E R T I F I C A T E S OF EACH DENOMINATION I S S U E D , R E D E E M E D , AND
AND OUTSTANDING A T T H E CLOSE O F EACH F I S C A L YEAR, ETC.—Contmued.

Eedeemed Total redeemed.
Issued
Outstanding.
during year. Total issued. during year.

Denomination.

,
1886,0
Ten dollars
0.0..000...
Twenty dollars
Fifty d-ollars

$3, 800, 000
800, 000

$81,834', 000
73, 986, 000
I L 050, 000
14,14(j, 000
13, 650, 000
23, 490, 000

$5. 277, 740. 00 $31,564,613. 00 $50,269,387.00
29, 028, 372. 00
7. 853, 336. 00
44, 957, 628.00
269,195. 00
3, 665,160. 00 ' 7,384,840.00
267, 700. 00
4, 529,180. 00
9, 610. 820. 00
7, 075, 000.00
11, 815, 000. 00
3,835,000.00
7,,78L000.00 , 21, 570. 000. 00
1.920 000 00

4, 600,000

218.150, 000

28,623,97L00

14,156,000
8.976,000
7, 760, 000
10,440, 000 '
S, 520, 000
1, 000, 000

14,156, 000
8,976.000
7, 760, 000
92,274, 000
83, 506, 000
12,050,000
14,140, 000
13, 650, 000
23, 490, 000

176, 503. 90
70, 003.60
31, 758.50
6, 508, 517.00
3, 848, 612.00
3,188, 740.00
5, 897, 390.00
1,166, 000. 00
L 399, 000. 00

5L 852,000

' 270, 002, 000

22, 286, 525.00

14,172, 000
' 10, 424, 000
44, 700, 000
36, 520, 000
80, 000

28, 328,000
19,400,000
52,460, 000
128, 794, 000
83,586,000
* 12,050,000
14,140, 000
13, 650, 000
23, 490, 000

L 419, 892.10
732, 758.40
818,38L50
10, 255, 360.00
6, 868, 856. 00
804, 500. 00
660,130. 00
188, 500. 00
199,000.00

L 556,396.00
802, 762. 00
85U„140.00
48,328,49u. 00
39, 745, 840.00
•7, 658, 400. 00
11, 086, 700.00
13,169. 500. 00
23,168, 000. 00

26,731, 604. 00
18, 597, 238. 00
51 609 860 00
80, 465, 510. 00
43 840 160 00
4 391 600 00
3 053 300 00
480* 500 00
322, 000. 00

105, 896, 000

375, 898,000

21,947, 378.00

146, 406,228.00

229,491, 772. 00

8, 772, 000
5, 800, O U
O
38, 540, 000
20, 480, O O
U
160, 000

37,100, 000
25, 200, 000
91, 000, 000
149,274,000
83, 746, 000
12, 050, 000
14,140, 000
13, 650, 000
23, 490, 000

7,595,632.20
4,159, 572.80
4, 570,120.00
13, 508, 887.00
8, 89,0, 544.00
932, 790. 00
727, 480. 00
. 134,000.00
95, 000.00

9,192,028.20
4, 962, 334.80
5,420,260.00
61, 837, 377.00
48, 636, 384.00
8, 591,190. 00
11,814,180.00
13, 303, 500. 00
23,2§3, 000.00

27, 907, 971. 80
20, 237, 665.20
85,579,740.00
87,436,623.00
35,109,616.00.
3,4.58,810.00
2, 325 820. 00
346 500 00
227, 000. 00

73, 752, 000

449,650,000

40,614,026.00

187,020, 254.00

262, 629, 746. 00

Five hundred dollars..0-...
Total

ooool....

102,172,325.00

115,977, 675.00

1887,
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars

o..
io.o.

F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
Five"^ h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
Total

000.0

176, 503.90
70, 003, 60
31. 758. 50
38, 073} 130. 00
32, 876, 984. 00
6, 853, 900.00
10, 426, 570. 00
12,981,000.00
22, 969, 000. 00

13.979,496.10
8, 90.5, 996.40
7, 728 241 50
54. 200, 870 00
50, 629, 016. 00
5 196 100 00
3, 713,430.00
669, 000.00
521 000 00

124, 458, 850. 00 ' 145, 54^, 150. 00

1888.
T w o d o l l a r s ....oooo
T e n dollars
F i f t y dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One thousand dollars
Total
1889.
T w o dollars
Fivedollars

,ci...

T w e n t y dollars . . ^
F i f t y dollars . .
O n e h u n d r e d dollars . . . . ; . .
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars . . . .
Total...'000

000,

1890.
One dollar
-. 00.....
T w o dollars .1
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
. .0
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars . . ' . . - . :
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
. .
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

-.0000..:




14, 700, 000
9, 280, 000
28.100, 000
39, OOU, 000
800, 000
2, 600, 000

94,480,000

51,800,000 11,473,489. 70
34,480, 000
6.959, 904. 80
119,100, U O 11, 552, 583.50
O
188, 274, 000 14, 965, 607. 00
83, 746, 000
8, 828, 760.00
12,850,000
L 003, 950. 00
16, 740, 000
636, 700.00
13, 650, 000
93, 000. 00
^ 23,490,000
56, 000. 00
644,130,000

55, 569, 995. 00

20, 665, 517. 90
31 134 482 10
11, 922, 239. 60
22, 557, 760.40
16, 972, 843. 50 102,127,156.50
76, 802, 984. 00 11L47L016.U0
57, 46.5, 144. 00
26 280 8"6 00
9, 595,140. 00
3, 254, 860. 00
12, 450, 880. 00
4, 289, 120. 00
13, 396, 500. 00
253.50000
23, 319, 000. 00
171 000 00
242, 590, 249.00

301, 539, 751. 00

61

TREASUEEE.

No. 28.—AMOUNT OF E A C H DENOMINATION OF U N I T E D STATES N O T E S , C U R R E N P Y ,
GOLD, AND S I L V E R CERTIFICATES, AND NATIONAL-BANK N O T E S OUTSTANDING AT

THE CLOSE O F EACH FiSCAL Y E A R , FROM 1878 TO 1890, INCLUDING | l , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 OF
^'

UNKNOWN DENOMINATIONS OF U N I T E D STATES N O T E S D E S T R O Y E D . :

United
States
notes.

Denomination.

•
Currency
certificates.

1878,
One dollar
T w o dollars.-o

$20, 929, 874
20,910,948
54, 669, 557
T e n dollars . . . . o o . o o o . . . 65, 551, 644
T w e n t y d o l l a r s . . . . . o . . . . 62, 720,643
27,182, 680
Fifty dollars
.
31, 624, 670
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
30, 878, 500
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d dollars . . . 33, 212, 500
Five thousand dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
Total

o o . o o . . . . 347, 681, 016

. 1879.
O n e dollar . . o o - o o . o o . o . o .
T w o dollars
..oo
F i v e dollars ..o-.o
T e n dollars .•.-., . . .
T w e n t y dollars
^..
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars Five hundred dollars...
One thousand dollars . . . .
F i v e thousand dollars
T e n thousand dollars
T o t a l oooo
1880,
O n e d o l l a r ...oooooo
T w o dollars.oo.eDo
F i v e d o l l a r s ..„ooooT e n dollars . . . o o o . . . . .
T w e n t y doUars—o
Fifty dollars
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
'.
^Five h u n d r e d d o l l a r s
One thousand dollars . . . .
F i v e t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s ..'.
T e n thousand dollars
T o t a l

. o o o o o o o o

1881,
Cteie d o l l a r ..oo.-ooooo.o-.
T w o dollars.oooooooooooo.
F i v e d o l l a r s .o-oooo.,ooo.
T e n d o l l a r s ooooooooooooo.
T w e n t y d o l l a r s -ooo-oooo.
Fifty d o l l a r s
,oo.o.
One hundred dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars . . . .
One thousand dollars
F i v e thousand dollars . .
Ten thousand d o l l a r s . . . .
Total.

347,68L016

o o o o o o o o o o o o . .

y

'

$123,220
10, 240
13,250
. 179, 700
268, 000
1, 256, 000

$2,000

$5,415,000
40, 830, 000

L 338,
3, 022,
6, 20.5,
5,400,
28,400,

000
000
000
000
000

46, 245, 000

44, 367,

000

,

3,350, 000
25, 980, 000
29, 330,

000

200
000
000
000
000

- =

15,413, 700

2,125, 000
12,150, 000

408, 000
465, 500
1, 210, 000 '
1,-070, 000
4, 850, 000

347,681,016

14, 275,000

8,004,600

22,645,762
22,244,122
69, 569, 078
76, 990, 387
72, 271, 597
23.702.910
32,947. 660
14, 570, 000
12, 024. 500
455, 000
260,000
681,616

25,720,954
24, 622, 625
67,342, 540
72,784, 766
68, 657,471
24,191, 770
34,469, 390'
14,876,000
12,335,500.
420, 000
2,260,000
347, 681, 016




Lloo

324,925,483

765, 008, 909

4,016,879
2, 800, 006
95, 977, 475
106, 420, 340
. 70, 571, 580
21,134, 350
27^ 044, 900
684, 500
316,000

22, 226, 860
20,892,659
150, 084, 588
171, 222, 732
131,139, 387
46,802,690
60, 258, 280
34, 904, 000
39, 544, 500
9, 805, 000
36, 990, 000

2,539,950

328,966,030

723, 930, 096

2,147,
1,974,
I, 328,
L 904,
1, 229,
3, 789,

340
880
950
600
500
000

2,687,022
1, 885, 960
lUO, 578, 275
113, 581, 040
74. 988, 440
21, 679, 300
27, 521, 500
702, 000
270, 000

23, 019, 354
22, 238, 773
166,010,823
190, 645,131
149,107, 6:7
47,817,245
62,631,970
21, 621, 000
21; 801, 500
3, 875: 000
17,460.000

12, 374, 270

343, 893; 537

'726i 228,423

1, 564, 390
1, 093. 334
99,962,365
119, 214, 320
79,255,640
23.051, 750
29,518,100
723, 500
'235,000

24,210,152
23, 337,456
169, 53L 443
216, 57L 737
169, 690, 057
5b, 236, 260
66,763,760
17,198, 500
16,404,500
2, 720, 000
14,140, 000

51,166, 530

354, 618, 399

770, 863, 865

29,245, 720
24,960, 240
3, 283, 550
4,020,700
1, 734, 500
2,852,000

912, 546
608, 08b
97,490,980
12L 436, 400
82,186, 56b
23, 395, 400
30,453, 300
880, 000
192,000

26,633, 500
25, 230, 705
164, 833, 520
223,466,886
175,804.991
50. 870, 720
69,167,290
17, 699, 000
15, 953. 500
3, 550, 000
16, 520, 000

66, 096,

357, 555. 266

789,

. . . . . i . . . . . .

\
20, 367, 030
18,162,100
3, 481, 600
268, 700
4, 029, 300
258, 500 . 1,646, 500
725, 000
3,480, 000
800, 000
3, 730, 000
720

1,^465, bbb
10,150, 000

I L 615, 000 - _ 5, 782,^920

720

2,540,000
10,820, 000

223,
208,
574,
590,
3,440,

13, 360,

5, 037,120

000

900
500
000
000
000

$4, 059, 836 ,$24,989,710
2, 820,132
23,731,080
93, 908, 525
148 578, 082
104,097, 270
169, 772,134
68, 632, 220
131, 365,103
21. 704, 900
48, 900, 830
28, 300, 600
61, 442, 970
' 35,265, 500
1, 097, 000
500^
305, 000 ' 40, 978,
10, 815, 000
1
69, 230, 000

163, 830
95,420
145, 000
475, 700
500, 000
1,160, 000

L500
699,
L 210,
2, 998,
2,455,
8, 050,

Total. .

L 850,410

20. 332, 332
20, 352, 813
65,432, 548
74, 916, 751
72,143, 207
24, 808, 995
32, 797,870
19,224, 000
16, 532, 500
680, 000
460, 000

347,

1882.
O n e d o l l a r .ooooo O.O«oa«o.
Two dollars.^.ooooooo
F i v e doUarSo-eo .^^
Ten dollars
OOOOBO
T w e n t y d o l l a r s 0=0000000.
F i f t y d o l l a r s . . . .oo«aoo
One hundred dollars .
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s
F i v e thousand dollars . . .
T e n thousand dollars
T o t a l

18, 209, 981
18, 092, 653
54,107,113
64, 638, 562
60, 470,
887,
25, 523, 340
32, 038, 480
32, 569, 500
35, 070, 500
4, 000, 000
2, 960, 000

NationalSilver
certificates. h a n k n o t e s .

G o l d certificates.

710

730,112

62

BJSPOET ON T H E FINANCESo

No. 28.—AMOUNT O F EACH DENOMINATION O F U N I T E D STATES N O T E S ,
GOLD, AND S I L V E R C E R T I F I C A T E S , ETC.—Continued.

i

United
States
notes.

Benomination,

Currency
certificates.

1883.
$27; 736,4.57
One dollar
^.....
T w o dollars
25, 524, 394
7L 150,085,
F i v e dollars
T e n dollars
:.
72, 732, 886
T w e n t y doUars •
- . 62,446,909
23, 885, 895
F i f t y dollars
84,302, 390
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
'. 15, 098, 500
O n e t h o u s a n d dollars /
14, 328, 500
315, 000 $2,490, 000
F i v e thousand d o l l a r s . . . .
160, 000 10, 690. 000
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
347, 681, 016

Total
1884.
One dollar
...
Two d o l l a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F i v e dollars
' T e n dollars . . . .
T w e n t y dollars
-1.
F i f t y dollars

13,180, 009

Gold certificates.

$9,163, 540
9, 050, 800
8, 872, 800
8,127, 500
12, 934, 000
7, 430, 000
26, 800, 000
32, 378, 640

Total

2,270, 000
9, 960, 000

13, 355, 360
9,119, 000
9,189, 800
8, 781, 500
14,802,000
10, 995, 000
32,150, OpO

12, 230, 000

98, 392, 660

Total.

$36, 887,892
35,152^ 784
3, 996, 935
5, 247, 220
2, 526, 000
4, 806, 000

$628, 203
393, 080
93, 593, 555
120,013,4^0
83, 700, 980
23, 831, 250
32,726, 900
965, 000
217, 000

$28,364,660
25,917, 474
164,>743,640
229, 034, 218
190, 364, 213
60, 864; 880
81,149, 310
26, 717, 000
32,285,500
10, 235, 000
37, 650, 000

88, 616, 831

356, 069,408

887, 925, 895

511, 564
298, 642
249, 585
311. 490
515, 720
752,100
983, 700
845, 500
221, 500

27,171, 749
25,196, 528
162.802,500
230,329,218
199, 790, 233
61, 373, 630
83 0.53 810
30; 918, 500
40, 783, 500
13, 395, U O
O
42,170, U O
O

120, 891, 691 ' 338, 689, 301

917, 884, 668

51, 747,127
52, 010, 964
7, 654, 035
9, 878, 520
8, 910, 000
9, 701, 000

455. 357
250, 976
81,172, 315
104, 951, 890
75, 721, 280
21, 261, 200
32,155,600
712, 000
172, 000

25, 407, 419
25, 546, 045
.157,170,120
221, 238, 403
195, 203, 093
62, 818, 930
84, 534, 410
40, 371, 500
60. 948. 500
18, 265, 000
82, 540, 000

139, 901, 646

316, 652, 618

974, 043, 420

50,269, 387
44, 957, 628
7, 384, 840
9, 610, 820
1, 835, 000
. L 920, 000

418,482.
220,796
83, 283,180
10L490,180
72, 906, 420
19, 266,100
30, 293, 600
445, 500
104, 000

18, 022,404
18, 425,166
168, 912, 399
218,418, 228
184, 979, 317
59, 660, IGO
80, 277, 520
28,144, 500
57.881,500
16, 090, 000
70, 620. 000

115, 977, 675

308, 488, 258

921, 431,194

'

26, 660,185
24, 897, 886
75, 552, 915
69, 527, 016
58, 054, 629
23, 208, 895
33, 640, 990
16, 914, 000
19, 034, 500
- 130, 000
60, 000
347,681,016

F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e thousand dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars

Silver
Nationalcertificates. h a n k n o t e s .

CURRENCY,

47, 490, 712
47, 864, 524
6, 293, 635
8,139, 320
4, 377, 500
6, 726, 000

87,
113,
80,
22,
32,

1885.
24,952,062
. . . . o . . . . . . 25, 295, 069
75, 997, 805
64, 539, 386
T e n dollars
55,126, 509
Twentydollars
23, 459, 896
F i f t y dollars
32, 896, 790
One h u n d r e d d o l l a r s .
16,557,000
28, 716, 500
One t h o u s a n d dollars
100,000
3, 665, 000
Five thousand dollars.
40, 000' 25, 620, 000
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
One dollar
T w o dollars

Total...

•.•

347,.68L016

12, 344, 340,
10,443, SOO
^ 9, 603,500
14,192, 500
22, 359, 000
14, 500, 000
56, 880, 000

29,285, 000 140,323,140

1880.
O n e dollar
T w o dollars•. . . . . . . . . . o .
Fivedollars
T e n dollars
Twenty-dollars--.-oo. ..
F i f t y dollars
One h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One ' t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . . s.
F i v e t h o u s a n d dollars
T e n thousand dollars .
Total

0 . . . 0 0 . . 347, 681, 016

1887.
One d o l l a r .-=-o = o „ o . . . o - .
T w o dollars . . . o o o . o o . . . .
F i v e dollars
. .
Ten dollars
T w e n t y dollars
F i f t y dollars
O n e h u n d r e d dollars
F i v e h u n d r e d dollars
One t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . .
F i v e t h o u s a n Q dollars
T e n t h o u s a n d dollars
T o t a l ,

17, 603, 922
18, 204, 370
85, 629,219
66, 658, 661
55, 078, 379
23, 291, 265
31. 359, 700
12, 424, 000
37,361, 500
60,000
10,000

O O O O . o o O O . . . .




8, 797, 377
9, 008, 572
95, 064,850
80, 371, 471
63,929, 361
21, 908, 985
29, 643, 40,0
7, 704, 500
31,197, 500
45, 000
10, 000
347, 681, 016

2, 210, 000
15, 900, 000

11,976, 890
9, 717, 955
"9,013,400
13,440, 000
18, 496, 000
13, 820, 000
54, 710, 000

18,110, 000 131,174, 245

470, 000
8, 550, 000

13, 979, 496
8, 905, 996
7,728, 242
. 54,200,870
10, 872,062
50, 629, 016
8, 225, 355
5,196,100
7, 9.57, 400
3, 713, 430
12, 031, 000
669, 000
17, 376, 000
521, 000
13,195, 000
51, 830, 000

• 9, 020, 000 121, 486, 817

145, 543,150

397, 856 / 23,174, 729
205, 062
18.119, 630
78,116, 275
180,909,367
91, 616, 850
226,189,191
65, 781, 220 ' 191 211 659
16, 378, 450
51, 708, 890
25, 990, 800
67, 305, 030
328, 000 ; 20,732,500
79, 000
49,173,500
13,710,000
60, 390, 000
278, 893, 513

902, 624,496

63

TREASURERo
No. 28.- -AMOUNT

O F EACH DENOMINATION OF U N I T E D STATES N O T E S , CURRENCY^

GOLD, AND S I L V E R CERTIFICATES, ETC.—Continued,
United
States
notes.

Denomination.

1888.
One dollar
..o.oo
Two dollars .,
Five dollars..
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars.
Onehundred dollars...
Five hundred dollurs ..
One thousand dollars..
Five thousand dollars .
Ten thousand dollars..
Total

Currency
certificates.

Gbld certificates.

i

Silver
NationalCertificates. bank note's.

180,233
$26, 731, 604
976, 936
18, 597, 238
054;872
51,609,860
264, 401
80, 465, 510
813, 924
$12, 962, 000 43, 840,160
870, 550
10, 245,150.
4, 391, 600
104,100
13, 669, 000
3, 053, 300
068, 000
12, 311, 000
480, 500
303, 000
25, 501, 000
322, 000
35, 000
$635, 000 23, 86.5, 000
10, 000 14, 230, 000 43, 470, 000

$391, 042
199, 784
72. 426, 835
81, 453, 460
59, 272,120
14, 501, 500
23,613,900
259, 000
62, 000

347, 681, 016 14, 865, 000 142, 023,150 229,491, 772 252,179, 641

Total.

$32, 302, 879
23, 773, 958
205, 091, 567
248,183, 371
200, 888; 204
51, 008, 800
71,440,300
2L 118, .500
50,188, 000
24, 535, 000
57, 710, 000
6,240,579

1889.
One dollar
Two dollars
Fivedollars .
Ten dollars.!
Twenty dollars
,
Fifty dollars
One hundred dollars ..,
Five hundred dollars .
One thousand dollars.
Five thousand dollars.
Ten thousand dollars.

714. 528
351, 294
334, 960
584, 253
413, 246
10, 979, 102
242, 415
8, 443, 350
808,820
11, 647,100
499, 500
11, 075, 500
687, 000
21, 213, 500
35, 000
555, 000 37, OUU, 000
10, 000 16,650, 000 53, 690, 000

Total.

\

377, 319
189, 562
59,166, 305
68, 091, 77b
51, 233, 920
1L,986, 650
19,851, 209
220,000
56, 000

347, 681,016 17, 205, 000 154. 048, 552 262, 629, 746 21L172,726

1890.
One dollar
Two dollars
Five dollars
Ten dollars
Twenty dollars
Fifty dollars.-,
One hundred dollars
Five hundred dollars . . .
One thousand dollars . . .
Five thousand dol 1 ars - . .
Ten thousand dollars...
Total...

27, 907,972
20, 237, 665
85, 579, 740
87,436, 623
35,109, 616
3, 458, 810
2, 325, 820
346, 500
227, 000

292, 353
872, 879
730, 384
410, 800
486, 350
462, 400
524, 350'
328, 500
538, 000
25, 000
450, 000
10, 000 11, 950. 000

...347,68L016




31,134, 482
22, 557, 760
102,127,157
11L471,016
26, 280, 856
11,953,474
3, 254, 860
9, 043,205
12,113; 300
4, 289,120
1],34L500
253, 500
23, 061,500
171,000
34,400, 000
55, 630,000

371,
185,
52, 014,
59,544.
45, 516,
10, 276,
17, 571,
192,
50,

3 L 999, 819
,23, 778, .521
203, U81, 005
242,112, 646
190, 735,884
48,131, 225
68, 632, 94U
26,141, 500
50,183,500
37, 590, 000
'70, 350, 000
992, 737, 040

34, 798, 323
25, 615, 949
2n, 871, 811
261, 425, 886
195, 237, 520''
44, 037, 365
66, 498, 370
23,116, 000
39, 820, 500
34, 875, 000
67, 590,'000

12,400, 000 157, 542, 979 301,539, 751 185, 722,'978: 1,004, 886,724

64

R E P O R T O N ' T H E FINANCES,

No. 29.—AMOUNT OF GOLD AND S I L V E R C O I N AND B U L L I O N I N T H E T R E A S U R Y AT
T H E E N D OF E A C H M O N T H F R O M J U N E , 1878, TO S E P T E M B E R , 1890.

Month.

1878—June.......
July
Augiist
September.
October —
November.
December..
1879—January . . .
February..
March.....
^April
May
June
July.,...-..
August
September.
' October....
November.
Deceqaber .
1880—January . . .
February..
March
April
May
June
July..i
August-i—
September..
October
November ..
December ..
1881—January —
February - -.
March
April
May..
J u n e .,
July
....
August
September..
October
November.
December .
1882—January...
February...
March
April.--0..
-

June
July
' August...September..
October...November.
, December..
1883—January 0-.
February..
March
April
May..
,
June'..
July . . . . . . .
August
September October
November December .
1884—January . . .
February...
March
April
,
May
June
oo
July
August
September.
October, oo..
.




Standard
Gold coin silver dollars
and bullion.
and silver
bullion.

Fractional
silver coin.

$128,460,203
$6, 860, 506
$15, 059,828
132. 014, 619
17,215,996
7, 079, 667
6, 478, 642
134, 548, 037
20, 275,088
6,143,903
136, 036, 302
21,789,239
140, 872,155
21, 749, 613
, 6, 323,132
.
142, 200,135
2.5. 002, 710
6, 009, 834
26,144, 290
6, 031, 805
135, 382, 639
6,143, 449
133, 756, 907
28, 222, 347
133, 265, 559
29, 343,170 ' 6,278,491
. 6, 428,185
30, 227,155
133, 416,126
6,621,940
134, 520,140
30, 643, 609
6, 813, 589
136,680, 260
31, 8.53, 701
8, 903, 401
135, 236,475
33, 239, 917
135, 517, 483
34, 264, 025 < 12, 731, 766
15, 236, 724
35,583, 076
141, 546, 391
36,117, 374
16, 814, 309
169, 606, 995
17,755. 987
171, 517, 714
35, 859, 858
160,443,437
• 37,162, 305 18,432, 478
18, 881, 629
157, 790, 322
37, 660, 485
39, 849, 647
20, 204, 810
153, 690, 026
41,497, 399
21,179, 312
146, 750, 758
42, 867,182
21, 989. 814
144, 010, 551
45, 419, 004
22,767,673
138,783.440
47, 631, 778
23,577,092'
128, 709,497
49, 549, 851
24,350,482
126,145, 427
52,274, 439
24, 975, 714
123,126, 646
53, 875,321
127, 679, 279
25.152, 972
53, 212, 435
135, 244, 834
24, 799, 925
53,127, 826
140,725,953
24, 629,490
151,362,519
24, 653, 530
53. 652, 843
156, 742, 096
54, 373, 742
24, 769, 0|7
56, 939, 299
25, 490, 915
154, 544,209
58,295,768.
25, 813, 058
173, 038, 253
59,193, 928
26, 283, 892
1/3, 668,163
61, 908, 409
26, 493, 613
170, 319, 755
63,975, 466
26, 841, 957
163, 770,158
65, 854, 671
27,247,697
]63,17L661
1.54, 911,475
67, 208, 580
27, 295,487
169, 495, 522
27, 042, 807 '
68, 681, 207
26, 313,114
174, 361, 345 . 68,724,852
172, 989, 829
70, 000, 953
25, 984, 688
178, 225, 303
7L 106.162
25,918, 252
73,197, 767
25,963,641.
172, 617,467
75, 680, 510
165,152, 789
26, 567, 873
77,945,100
26, 869, 906
173, 757, 874
82, 619, 245
27,187, 681
166, 457, 357
84,834, 089
27, 439,184
155, 069,102
88, 399, 707
27,755,923
153, 985, 545
90, 384, 724
28, 048, 631
148, 506, 390
91, 657,169
28.153, 956
145, 079, 030
93,896,965
27, 990, 388
149, 303', 921
27, 426,140
152, 739,106
95, 572, 214
26,749,432
159. 805, 744
96, 427,48026, 544, 544
96, 709, 802
164. 267, 585
98, 485. 035
171,504, 568
26, 521,692
173, 317, 834 101, 292, 927
27,135, 245
177, 661, 631 104, 2355 558
27, 507, 276
184, 752, 714 107, 425, 772
27, 865, 994
187, 837,442 109, 845, 098
28, 068, 629
193, 31 Oi 043 1.13, 056,195
28, 303,196
198, 078, 568 116,396,235
28, 486, 001
202, 774, 035 117,543, 690
28,058,142
204.172,975 , 119,014,756
27, 819,712
2U6,130,543
26, 750,161
119, 695, 283
26, 712, 424
209, 429,940 120, 972, 815
216,133, 328 122, 393, 245
26, 969, 614
219, 014, 740 123, 983, 758
27, 224,126
22L 813, 356 128,149,181
28, 014,415
221, 881, 633 131, 742, 312
28, 490, 907
211, 071, 507 134, 049, 926
28, 866, 456
196, 325, 626 135, 464, 908
29,158,480
201,132, 388 137, 249, 911
29, 377, 206
204, 876, 594 139, 616,4l4
29, 600, 720
29, 797,486
210, 539, 551 14L 695, 729
29, 659, 003
, 214, 483, 657 145, 339,142
29,474,101
217, 904, 043 146, 993.192
29,346,757
222, 536, 360 147,573,222

Total.

$150, 380, 537
156,310, 282
161,301, 767
163,969,444
168,944,900
173, 212, 679
167, 558, 734 '
168,122, 703
168, 887, 220
170,071,466
171, 785, 689
175, 347, 550
177, 379, 793
182, 513, 274
192, 366,191
222, 538, 678
225,133, 5.59
216, 038, 220
214, 332,436
213, 744, 483
209, 427,469
20^, 867, 547
206, 970,117
199, 918, 367
200,045, 760
200, 376, 799
206, 707, 572
213, 257,194
218, 483, 269
229,668,892
235, 884, 895
236, 974, 423
257.147, 079
259,145, 983
2.58,721,777
254, 587, 581
256, 274, 029
249, 415, 542
265,219,536
269,399,311
268, 975, 470
275,249, 717
271, 778, 875
267,401,172
278, 572, 880
276, 264,283
267, 342, 375
270,141,175
266, 939, 745
> 264, 890,155
271,191,274
275, 737, 460
282, 982, 656
287,521,931"
296, 511, 295
301,746,006
,309,404,465
320, 044,480
325, 751,169
334, 669, 434
342, 960, 804
348, 375, 867
351, 007, 443
352, 575, 987
357,11.5,179
365, 496,187
370, 222, 624
377,976,952
382; 114, 852
373,987.889
360,949,014
367, 759, 505
374,093, 728
382, 032, 766
389, 481, 802
394, 371, 336
399, 456,339

65

TKEASUBER.
No. 29.—AMOUNT O F GOLD AND S I L V E R C O I N
AT T H E E N D O F E A C H

Month.

1884—November
December
1885—January . .
February.
March
April.....
May
June
July......
August...
September
October...
November
December
1886—January . .
February.
March
April
May ......
Juue
July
August. -.
September
October
November
December.
1887—January . .
February.
March
April
May
...
June
July
August
September,
October—
November
December.,
1888—January . . .
FebruaiTy .
March ^....
April
May
'
June...—
July
August —
September
October....
November
December.
1889—January . .
February.
'
March....
April
May
June
iTuly
August .J.
September
October. -.
November
December
1890—January..
February .
March
^ April.
May . .
June
July August...
September

?! 90-




MONTH,

AND B U L L I O N I N T H E T R E A S U R Y
ETC.—Continued.

Standard
Gold coin s i l v e r dollars
a n d buUion.
a n d silver
bullion. .

Fractional
s i l v e r coin.

$231, 389,361 $149,52.3,924
151, 218, 920
234, 975, 852
155, 245, 736
237, 167, 976
157, 552,137
240, 029, 843
160, 585, 976
241, 440, 796
163, 483, 221
243, 162,195
166, 342, 999
244, 363, 544
169,451,998
247, 028, 625
170,444, 785
249, 367, 595
170, 620,411
250, 257,418
169, 399, 844
251, 251,115
167,657,878
251, 359, 349
169,15L 974
251, 945, 578
169, 515, 231
253, 351, 409
172,742,168'
251, 371, 562
174, 418, 874
249, 801, 088
176,972,089
242, 155,167
178,485, 024
240, 580, 533
180.199, 807
236, 424, 734
232, 838,124
184. 345, 764
233, 651, 522
185, 309, 994
235, 430, 635
185, 038, 397
242, 609, 018
185, 020, 987
246, 832,148
186, 739,180
254, 450, 854
189, 003,321
268, 128, 018
193,245, 615
274, 140, 469
198, 840, 822
275, 088, 626
202, 812, 943
275, 985, 862
210,311, 824
275, 336, 916
215, 923,183
277, 628, 750
218, 922,196
278, 101,106
222,401,405
281, 296, 417
223, 807,565
282, 039, 534
225, 390, 072
290, 702, 630
225, 049, 705
302, 544; 605
225, 858, 564
302, 661, 279
226,714,098
305, 342,187
228, 879,405
307, 809,155
234,137, 926
309, 567, 827
238, 252, 646
310, 772, 203
242, 062, 250
312, 80L 287
246,093, 836
309, 882, 859
249, 945, Oil
313, 753, 617
254, 499, 241
326, 551,392
256,864,819
331, 133, 430
2.58, 832, 606
332, 551,306
259,437, 367
331, 688, 233
260, 538. 554
328, 603, 361
262, 710, 088
324, 773,667
, 265,272,106
325, 641, 856
270, 418, 006
326, 456, 698
274, 277, 544
326, 700, 939
278, 087, 845
328, 203, 901
282, 081, 825
321,
285, 776,084
303, 297, 377
289, 688, 374
300, 504, 320
292, 242, 678
304, 759,573
293, 927, 004
305, 048,189
294f270, 378
308, 871, 772
294,457. 692
310, 509, 615
296, 424; 234
313, 979, 791
818, 941
299, 264, 578
316,
304,787,124
318, 043. 454
593, 752
308,732, 573
320,
225, 795
312, 746, 049
878, 412
315,86L916
,320,
318, 943, 346
321, 333, 253
612,423
323, 909, 360
321,
326.403,803.
316, 536, 823
325, 295, 284
310, 220,120
321, 910, 957
306, 086, 471

$29,143, 283 $410, 056, 568
29,194, 356
41.5,389,128
29, 901,105
422, 314, 817
30, 244, 836
427, 826, 816
30, 632, 326
432, 659, 098
437, 589, 465
30, 944,049
31, 694, 365' 442, 400, 908
447, 717, 522
31, 2.36, 899
44.5,167, 400
2.5, 355, 020
445, 602,116
24, 724, 287
444, 292, 853
23, 641, 894
441, 982, 763
22, 965, 536
27, 920, 309
449. 017, 861
27,796,431
450, 663, 071
29, 013, 994
453,127, 724
28, 811, 038, 453, 031, 000
28, 822, 638
447, 949, 894
28,864,483
447,930,040
28, 912, 277 •44.5,-536,818
28, 904, 682
446,088, 570
28, 584, 625
447,546,141
27, 956, 992
448,426,024
26, 899, 745' 454, 529, 750
26, 300, 336
459, 871, 664
25, 808, 067; 469, 262, 242
487, 034, 568
25,660,935'
499,304,816
26, 323, 525
504, 384, .041
26, 482, 472
512, 899, 300 26,60i;6!.4
518,151,176
26, 891, 077
27,064, 743 ' 523, 615, 689
527, 480, 005
26, 977, 494
531, 795, 088
26, 691,106
533, 578.137
26,148. 531
540, 736, 554
24, 984, 219
24, 468,135
552, 871, 304
24,158, 004
553, 533, 381
558, 549,121
24, 327, 529
566, 967, 054
25, 019, 973
573,175,905
2.5, 355, 432
578,400, 733 .
25, 566, 280
25, 750,228
584, 645, 351
585, 706, 742
25, 878, 872
594, 304, 599
26,051,741
609,45{>, 673
26, 034,462
61.5,712, 795
25, 746, 759
616, 727, 369
24, 738, 696
616,31.5,5.56
24,088,769
615, .115,125
23, 801, 676
613, 70L 231
23, 655, 458
620,509,459
24,449,597
625, 449, 263
24, 71.5, 021
629, 709, 788
24, 921, G04
635, 261, 293
24. 975, 567
632,198,756
25.125, 295
618, 322, 427
25,129, 733
618, 015,128
25, 012, 877
622, 741, 648
24, 766,455
23, 864, 841
624, 006, 991
22, 737, 900
625, 705, 207
22,133,430
629, 537,455
635, Oil, 447
21, 927, 928
643,337,082
22, 506, '504
22, 758. 530 : 650,084,855
22, 814. 565
65.5,786,409
22, 989, 474 ; 659,729,802
22, 902, 558
663,179,1.57
22, 805, 226
668,327,009
22, 333, 891 i 665,274,517
21, 858, 259 : 657,373,663
20,563, 709
648,561,137

Total.

66

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

NOo 30.—AMOUNT OF P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N T H E T R E A S U R Y AT T H E E N D OF EACH
!
M O N T H FROM J U N E , 1878, TO S E P T E M B E R , 1890.

Month.

Gold
United States Currency
notes.
certificates. certificates.

Silver ,
Nationalcertificates. b a n k n o t e s .

Total.

$570,000
$19,469,320 1 $1,455, 520
$12, 789, 923
$106,304,884
$72, 020,121
1878—June
Jaly..i
'18,170,420
2,647,940
77 105,859'
460 000
14,119, 544
112, 503,763
20, 794, 220
4,424. 600
116, 799, 903
78! 348, 254 | 1, 460, 000
11, 772, 829
August
73,049,340 j 1, 345, 000
9,392,920
1, 316, 470
9, 260, 764
94, 364, 494
September . . .
74,175, 606
180, 000
9, 901,.520
2, 639, 560
6, 370,449
93,267,135
October
73, 655, 404
2,120, 000
9, 845,120
1,907, 460
8,055, 844
95, 583, 828
November . .
69, 582, 505
1, 510, 000
391,420
2, 082, 770
8, 469.162
82, 035, 857
December . . .
71, 024, 531 ,
755,000
544, 020
2,170,840
12,374, 371
86, 868, 762
1879—January
81,169, 973
9,425,000
400, 220 ^ L 976, 320
10, 233,225
103, 204,738
February. . . .
75, 829, 669
2, 580, 000
50, 740 . 2, 070,^830 .
5,542, 552
86, 073, 791
March
70,444,823
1,140,000
62,140
1, 779, 340
7,762,196
81,188,499
April
May
1,922, 820
14, 661. 786
77, 550, 442
95, 323, 628
1,155,000
33, 580
2,052,470
8,286,701
1 450 000
86, 314, 955
J u n e . . . . . . ...1 74. 39L904
» 133,880
July
7,188,445
43, 800
2,014,680
73,628,391
63, 791, 466
' 590; 000
1, 976, 960
70.597, 606
5,138, 655
78, 793, 221
August.
960;000
120,000
48,173, 254
1, 975, 000
67, 700
3, 045,130
4, 321, 302
57, 582,386
September . . .
37, 522, 567
2, 315, 000
213,400
4, 531,479
3, 658,168
48, 240, 614
October29, 973, 454
685, 000
183,740, 5,173,188
3, 208, 277
39, 223,659
November . . .
22,660, 494
425, 000
740,960
4, 888, 658
3,242, 708.1
31, 957, 820
December . . .
24, 299, 562
215, 000
61,100 1 5,063,456
6, 885, 966
36, 525, 084
1880—January
26,149, 093
670, 000
327,300
4,797, 314
4, 242, 984
36,186, 691
Febrnary. . . .
24, 080, 081
175, 000
611, 500
5, 611,914
3, 606, 364
34, 084, 859
March
175, 000
37, 839,483
26 474,280
173, 800
5, 428, 354
5,588, 049
April..
.. 30, 833, 020
39, 800
6, 322, 731
8, 983, 508
46, 779, 059
600,000
May
7,090,250 '
47, 096, 210
33, 020, 559
6,584,701
360,000
, June
40, 700
5,758,331
7, 237, 795
34, 099,124
590,000
32, 600
47,717/850
July... .. ...
31, 649, 849
105,000 1
36, 800
5,518,821 !
4, 335, 906
41,646, 376
August
27,148, 613
90, 000
31, 600
6, 318, 769 I
3,575,440
37,164, 422
September
22, 418, 993
150,000
6,800
7.333,719
4,197, 224
34,106,736
October
19, 574, 937
75,000
19.120
8. 572, 294
3,702, 629
31, 943, 980
November . . .
15,741,818
25, 000
130.500
9,454,419
4, 242, 828
29, 594, 565
Deceruber . . .
19,181,616
50, 080
9,985,583
6, 342, 410
35, 559, 689
1881—January
312, 080 .10, 856, 463
22,206, 601 '""'325,'006l
4,144, 895
37, 845, 039
February. . . .
21,338,198
240, 000
142, 900 10,733, 085
4,321, 844
36, 776,027
March
22, 927, 086
40,000
1,400 11, 522, 208
5,988,259
40,478, 953
April
36, 320 . 11,988,710
7,784,186
26, 922, 305
46, 731,521
MB;y
275,000 1
23,400 12, 055, 801
30,' 204, 092
5, 296, 382
June.
.47, 854 675
1,700 11,181, 088
/July
29, 624,910
215,000
5,532,708
46, 555, 406
3, 800 11, 516,432
29, 320, 869
175, 000
4, 273, 541
45, 289, 642
August... . . .
27,130,132
210, 000
9, 600 11, 559, 730
4, 551,400
43, 460, 862
September . . .
26, 281, 769
35, 000
3,700
7.488, 900
4, 739, 547
38,548, 916
October
26, 401, 078
55, 000
8,300 .7,089,880
4,556; 305
38.110, 563
November . . .
25, 992, 800
50, 000
6, 359, 910
5, 677, 691
38, 080,401
December
1882—January
7," 966* 7,462,130
28, 714, 394
70, 000
7, 377, 995
43, 632,419
29, 701, 850
105, 000
15, 800
8,549,470
5, 484, 211
43, 856, 331
February
28, 371, 415
4, 516, 077
215, 000
8, 931, 930
42, 034,422
March
28, 827, 824
6,180, 209
1,660 8, 872, 790
April.!!
125, 000
43, 806, 823
2,500 10. 509,160
May ...oo
31,938, 690
265,000
7, 418 245
50,133, 595
8,100 11, 590, 620
34, 670. 589
75, 000
6,277i247
June......
.
52,621*556
L 5 0 0 12, 361, 490
34, 969i 590
510, 000
8,428, 411
July
56, 270,991
185, 000
35, 883, 941
11,700, 330
7, 287, 442
• August.'
55; 056, 713
130, O O
O
8, 364, 430
31, 948,158
6, 828, 786
September . . .
47,271, 374
29, 689,196
110, 000 '"i4,°996,"i76" 7, 987, 260
6,370,052
October
59,146, 678
10, 000
15, 950, 270
5, 752, 970
6,3U,110
58, 615, 742
November . . . . 30, 591, 392
28,454,395
10, 000
25,105, 030
4,406, 000
6, 532, 021
64, 506, 446
December . . .
33, 592, 237
60, 000
2.5,107, 300
4, 306, 650
10,486,291
73,552,478
1883—January
32, 744, 817
210, 000
32, 296, 270
5, 268,550
6,761, 527
77,28L164
' February- . . .
29, 878, 561
250, 000
31, 525, 210
6, 865, 340
4,199,135
72, 718, 246
March
79,190,318
30, 969, 623
55, 000
32, 935, 420
8, 887,260
6, 343,015
April.....
15, C^O
23, 869, 000
8, 305,940
33,471, 825
May
8, 36L 571
74, 023, 336
22, 571, 270 15, 996,145
36, 498, 839
315, 000
8, 217,062
June
83, 598, 316
23, 383,440 15, 542, 730
37, 632, 646
25, 000
8,^343, 000
84, 926, 816
Jui.y
37,791, 766
90,000
28, 445, 200 17,276, 820
6, 019, 802
89, 623, 588
August
37,194,420
75, 000
27, 480, 300 15,568,280
6, 017,710
86, 335, 710
September....
37,113, 037
75,000
3L 252, 760 14,214,760
.6,428,180
89, 083. 737
October...
39, 874. 644
100, 000
27, 035,300 13, 806, 610
7, 070, 474
87, 887, 028
November
39, 644, 249
80,000
27, 446, 780 13,180, 890
8, 955, 820
89, 307, 739
December
42,156,189
45,000
23, 788. 006 13,179, 020
14, 746,745
93, 914, 954
1884—January
45, 808, 632
90, 000,
30, 600, 070 13, 890,100
12,048, 941
102,437, 743
February
45, 904, .652
520, 000
35,424, 250 20, 488, 585
7,862,366
110,199, 853
March.'.
121,112, 804
45, 765, 833
105, 000
44,415, 395 20, 876, 250
9,950, 326
April
20, TOO
39, 686, 780 19, 936, 620
7, 533, 779
Mav . . .
38, 731, 841
105, 909, 020
oii-cty . . . . . .
195, 000
27, 246, 020 23, 384, 680
40', 183, 802
99, 819, 493
8, 809, 991
J u ny . .
-.
65, 000
26, 525, 830 25, 265, 980
Jule
42,727, 990
10, 529, 336
105,114,136
150, 000
29,'701, 980 26, 903, 230
11, 614, 068
40, 843, 554
109, 212, 832
August
September
36, 524, 873
315,000
33, 546, 960 26, 769,470
11, 078, 957
108,'235, 260
October.
33, 942,172
85, 000
32, 477, 750 30, 814, 970
10,171, 655
107,491, 547
November
32,200, 683
120,000
26, 70,1, 060 28, 951, 590
10, 525, 634
98,498,967
Pec§ml?pr . , , .
36,499,575
160, 000
^6,343,730 23,302,380
10, 339, 994 1
96,635,679




TKEASUEEK.

67

No. 30.—AMOUNT O F P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N T H E TREASURY AT T H E E N D O F EACH
M O N T H FROM J U N E , 1878, TO S E P T E M B E R , 1890—Continued.

Month.

1885—January....
February...
March
April
May
Juue
July
August
September..
October
November..
December . .
1886—January
. February...
March
April
May . . . . . . . .
June
July
August
September..
October
November . .
December . .
1887—January
February . . .
March
April
June...
July
August
September.
October
November.
December .
1888—January . . .
• February..
March.....
April..
May
".
June
July
August . . .
SeptemberOctober
November .
December .
1889—January...
' February..
March.....
April
June
July
August
September.
October
, November..
December .
1890—January . . . .
February . .
March . . . . . .
Apiil
,
May
June
July
August-...,
September.

Silver
NationalUnited States Currency
Gold ^
certificates. certificates. certificates. bank notes.
notes.

Total.

$43, 958, 469
$45, 000 $22, 299,150 $27, 337, 890 $13, 880, 648 $107,52L157 .
40,426,930 29,951, 880
9,774,141
48, 926, 822
380, 000
129,459, 773
37, 689, 990 30, 861, 615
46, 683, 288
1, 005, 000
7, 312, 940
123, 552, 833
50, 000
8,120, 660 . 115,802,780
46, 865, 690
28, 625, 290 32,141,140
315, 000 • 14,371,350 35, 575, 590
9, 806, 087
110, 485,136
50, 417,109
200, 000
9, 945, 711
107,157,200
45, 047, 379
13, 593, 410 38, 370, 709
260, 000
114,423,427
48,418,997
8, 081,130
17, 322, 32C 40, 340, 980
695, 000
55, 658, 656
7, 556,108
16, 606, 230 42, 712, 890
123, 228, 884
695, 000
6,196,408
51, 129, .3.32
22, 249, 240 31, 722, 990
U L 992, 970
410, 000
5, 438, 241
31,115, 850 31, 906,514
45, 695, 341
114, 565, 946
210, 000
5, 775, 356
34, 492, 968 32, 034, 464
43, 290, 643
115, 803, 431
265, 000
34, 350, 479 3L 164, 311
5, 347, 767
41, 731, 200
112, 858, 757:
260, 000
24, 060, 709 33, 978, 767
9, 951, 057
47, 890, 389
116,140, 922
385,000
33, 671, 010 34, 837, 660
7, 961, 334
47,197, 292
124, 052,296
840, 000
46, 797, 927 32, 410,575
3, 392, 203
42, 214, 485
12.5, 655,190
225, 000
52,396, 875 31,141, 055
3, 831, 002
125,197, 706
37, 603,774
585, 000
51, 735, 670 30,411, 016
40, 244, 098
4, 962,150
127, 937, 934
250, 000
55,129, 870 27, 861, 450
41,118, 317
4, 034,416
128, 394, 053 .
470, 000
52, 258, 360 27, 728, 858
3, 792,409
41, 044,142
125, 293, 769
48,693, 980 25, 571,492
2,878,520'
46, 774, 647 \, 510, 000
125,428,639
150, 000
40, 654, 320 22, 555, 990
2,104, 764
44,224,081
109,689,155
36,878, 458 17, 562, 302
3,192, 746
38,107, 305
20, 000
95, 760, 811
36,57,3,188
280, 000
34, 469, 694 14,137, 285 • 2, 522, 033
87, 982, 200
29, 679, 326
200, 000
27, 485, 804 7,338, 432
3, 012, 335
67, 715, 897
33; 003, 682
100, 000
18, 843, 632 6, 737, 388
4, 606, 322
63, 291, 024
33, 869, 202
' 250, 000 24, 256, 230 5, 466, 347
3, 072, 561
66, 914, 340
28,294,938
410, OOU
29, 757, 610 6, 212, 849
2, 558, 485
67, 233, 882
28,575,474
16U, OOU
28, 905. 040 5, 007, 700
3, 480, 653
66,128, 867
30,757,376
410, OOU
5, 289,164
32.101,358
3,927,245
72, 485,143
28, 783, 797
310, 000
30, 261, 380 3,425,133
65,142, 895 2, 362, 585
28, 093, 740
350, 000
18, 09?, 560 4, 209, 659
53, 894, 064
3,142,105
28, 287, 539
420. OOU
23, 008, 207 5, 996,443
3, 354, 726
61, 066, 915
24,145, 212
150, 000
29,1.54, 288 3, 919, 841
2, 938, 593
60, 307, 934
22, 476, 067
170, OUO
32, 858,158 3,45L494
4,157, 980
63,113, 699
23,153. 220 . 320, 000 39, 974,838 4,413,446
,
3,131, 864
70, 993, 368
130, 000
31, 010, 394 6, 339, .570
4,919,434
22, 409, 425
64, 808, 823
280, 000
20, 668, 210 14, 930, 517
7, 782,203
28, 660, 469
72, 321, 399
440, 000
26, 962, 168 21,166, 469
33, 482, 087
6, 355. 477
88, 406, 201
650, 000
33, 085, 623
29, 651, 464 19, 370, 425
5, 323, 787
88, 081, 299
100,000
39, 046, 614
20, 853, 500 18,316,109
.5,942,194
84. 258, 417
470, 000
46.158, 200
33, 574,110 20, 458, 423
6, 702, 811
107, 363, 544
250, 000
22,135, 780 29,104,396
52, 398, 204
110, 942, 601
7, 054, 221
100,000
30, 234, 688 23, 361, 286
55; 030, 740
8,218,834
116, 945, 548
56,22.5,393
90, 000
36, 591, 356 15, 528, 762
7,880,157
116, 315, 668
580, 000
25, 516, 410 9, 819,875
6,023,307 , 95, 298, 555
53, 358, 963
390, 000
26,163, 492 7, 404, 624
4,167, 954
48, 393, 320
86, 519, 390
1.50, 000
37, 441, 932 8, 834, 485
46, 562, 956
3, 381,456
96,370, 829
470, 000
36,127, 702 3, 958, 567
41,125,860
4, 06^8, 046
85, 750,175
43,361, 498
95, 000
25, 043, 518 4,717, 113
5, 439, 229.
78, 656, 358
45. 220, 511
5,717,898
280, 000
24,802,813
3, 433, 572
79,454, 794
39, 501, 231
510, 000
26, 586,125 4, 760, 236
3, 054, 267
74,411,859
110, 000
20, 783, 433 3, 451, 830
66, 382, 290 '
38, 350,137
3, 686, 890
270, 000
§, 205, 089
82, 468. 703
43, 940, 387
27, 350,140
4, 703. 087
240, 000
93, 497, 510
46,336, 085
37. 235, 793 5, 587, 301
4,1.58, 331
91, 923,115
47, 939, 366
30, 000
34, 669, 943 5, 651, 271
3, 632, 535;
99, 620, 399
46'6, 000
39, 557, 233 6,141, 570
48, 870, 935
4, 590, 661:
770. 000
42, 073, 803 3, 878. 052
36, 445, 258
3,883,721'
87, 050, 834
350, 000
34, 925, 823 X 328, 373
5.21L415
29, 813, 501
72,629, 112
610, 000
30, 668, 090 2,419,174
4,25L973' . 62, 908, 259
24, 959, 022
570, 000
3L 316,100
2, 252, 966
4,500,355
. 15,673,925
' 54. 313,346
20, 452, 870 3, 254,118
6,172, 760
19, 236. 224
90, 000
49, 205, 972
4, 339, 314
19, 823, 865
250, UUO
28, 222, 835 4, 063, 377
56, 699, 391
.3, 937,196
14, 579, 657
990, 000
24, 614, 210 3, 407, 891
47, 528, 954
16, 004, 411
140. 000
24,142, 200 4, 438, 605
3, 942, 536
48, 667, 752
340, 000
' 19,747,799
27, 473,120 4, 936, 023
4, 289, 295
56, 786, 237
450, 000
23,634,190
26,162, 960 . 4,329,708
4, 351, 767
58, 928, 625
23, 983, 412
40, 000 . 27; 577, 120 3, 442, 258
'
4, 766, 359
59,809,149
19, 393, 710
410,000
33, 00.5, 730 4,951,861
5, 063,228
62, 624, 529
12, 765, 290
180, 000
16, 058, 780 i;852,364
4, 620,511
35, 476, 945




68

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

No. 31.—AMOUNT O F GOLD, S I L V E R , AND P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N T H E T R E A S U R Y ,
IN EXCESS OF C E R T I F I C A T E S I N CIRCULATION, AT T H E E N D O F E A C H MONTH, FROM
J U N E , 1878, TO S E P T E M B E R , 1890.

Month.

1878—June
July
August . . .
September
October . . .
November.
December.
1879—January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
Augnst . . .
September
October . . .
November.
December.
1880—January...
February..
March
April......
May
June
July
August . . .
September
October...
November.
December.
1881—January...
February .
March
April
May
o
June
July
• August—
September
October . . .
November.
December.
1882—January...
February .
March..'...
April
May
June
July
August . . .
September
October . . .
NovemberDecember.
1883—January...
February..
March...,,
April
May
,
, June
Jnly August
September .
October . . .
November .
December.
1884—January —
February..
.March
April
May
June
July
August —
September.
October . . .
November.
December.




Gold.

$103, 562, 523
108, 161, 639
117. 325, 857
112, 602, 622
117, 965, 675
118, 282, 355
114. 193. 359
116, 674, 227
116, 886, 279
117, 162,166
118, 809,680
121. 300.140
119, 956, 655
120, 320, 583
126, 537, 691
154, 763, 795
157, 140,114
147, 247, 977
146, 194,182
143, 340, 026
.136, 995, 458
135, 766, 552
130, 726,640
120, 699.197
118, 181, 527
115, 274, 646
120, 018,179
127, 764, 734
133, 278, 253
143, 981.139
150. 213, 716
148, 0.52, 809
166, 808, 853
167, 639, 263
164, 358, .555
157, 893,878
157, 412.141
149, 163, 3.55
164, 098, 402
169, 122,025
167, 785, 609
173, 02.5, 683
167, 429, 347
159, 972, 569
168, 585, 554
161, 290,437
149, 997, 982
148, 932, 625
143, 477, 370
140, 062, 590
144, 311,881
147. 831, 666
148', 435,474
144,
131, 809, 315
125, 989, 758
135, 648,194
141. 107,' 161
139, 308, 204
133, 439,242
138, 718,103
142, 271.198
149, 705, 435
151, 625,435
157, 115, 603
1.57, 353, 760
155, 235, 708
144, 429, 600
144, 350, 736
142, 038, 203
139, 259. 357
142, 624, 821
133, 006, 908
119, 729, 954
122, 048,061
130, 465, 717
134, 514,383
138, 670, 790
141, 015,071

Silver.

$21,913,2.54
23, 316, 434
25, 044, 4.50
27, 221, 542
28, 003,956
30, 646, 485
31, 762, 735
33, 965,456
35, 289, 800
36, 423, 640
37, 067, 870
38, 223,150
41,728, 838
46, 224, 621
49, 514, 910
51, 754, 963
52,011,474
53, 700, 061
52. 717, 862
c56, 065, 003
58.104,106
58, 839, 990
61, 57L 311
65,157,331
68,110, 764
70, 319,193
71,409, 074
65, 809,169
57, 977, 075
5L 801, 387
43, 015,088
45, 615, 577
47,081, 029
46,032, 005
49, 244, 089
52, 032, 883
53, 991, 639
53,701,174
49, 662,135
42,447, 785
37,146, 871
37,450, 464
36, 846, 088
40, 710, 844
44, 689, 996
50, 383, 486
53, 364, 703
58, 928, 570
63, 927, 265
65, 053. 405
64,147,473
59,793, 574
57, 556,463
55, 911, 656
56, 563, 067
59, 989, 352
63, 715,414
64, 531, 775
66,029, 656
69, 632, 000
72, 261, 550
71,873,151
71,459, 307
67, 523, 483
62, 350, 858
61, 386, 659
54,490,163
59, 205, 565
63, 985,498
66,996, 906
69,125,407
69, 263, 646
72, 790,123
76, 954, 854
. 80, 769, 454
79, 976,102
76,178, 418
73,678, 676
65,547,365

NationalUnited States
bank notes.
notes.
$25,775,121
25, 985,859
30,533,254
33, 504, 340
38. 515. 606
38. 585, 404
36, 392, 505
30, 579, 531
44, 494. 973
50, 684, 669
39, 539, 823
51. 670, 442
45, 036, 904
23,541,466
36, 222, 606
18, 933, 254
17, 327, 567
16,388, 454
12, 570, 494
11, 614, 562
15, 054, U93
1.5,760,081
17, 489,280
18,183, 020
18,78.5, 559
19, 024,124
20,444, 849
17, 263, 613
13,793, 993
11,124,937
8. 761, 818
10, 55L 616
14, 566, 601
14,773,198
14, 672, 086
16, 062. 305
18,554,092
19, 099, 910
19, 870, 869
19, 025,132
18, 006, 769
17,411,078
16. 452, 800
-17, 384, 394
18,256,850
17, 446, 415
17, 637, 824
19, 873, 690
21,425, 589
22, 749, 590
24, 068, 941
21,408,158
19, 854,196
20, 756, 392
18,879,395
2 L 162,237
21, 614, 817
20, 413, .561
20; 919, 623
21, 681, 825
23, 438, 839
24, 747. 646
25, 736, 766
25, 324,420
24, 568, 037
25, 509, 644
25,164, 249
25, 321,189
27, 683,632
30, 949, 652
30, 845, 833
27,701, 841
27, 993, 802
29, 562, 990
26, 573, 554
20, 894, 873
16,172.172
9, 625,.683
11,739,575

$12, 789, 923
14,119, 544
11, 772, 829
9, 26J, 764
6, 370, 449
8, 055, 844
8, 469,162
12, 374,371
10,233.225
5, 542, 552
7, 762,196
14,661,786
8, 286, 701
7,188, 445
5,138, 655
4, 321, 302
3, 658,168
3,208. 277
3, 242, 708
6, 885, 966
4, 242, 984
3, 606, 364
5, 588, 049
8, 983,508
7, 090, 250
7,237,795
4, 335, 906
3, 575,440
4,197, 224
3, 702, 629
4, 242, 828
6, 342, 410
4,144, 895
4, 321, 844
5, 988,259
7, 784,186
5,296, 382
5, 532, 708
4, 273, 541
4, 551,400
4, 739, 547
4, 556,'-305
5,677,691
7, 377, 995
5, 484,211
4, 516, 077
6,188, 209
7,418, 245
6, 277, 247
8,428, 411
7,287,442
6, 828, 786
6, 370, 052
6,311,110
6, 532, 021
10, 486, 291
6, 761, 527
4,199,135
6, 343,015
8, 361, 571
8. 217, 062
8, 343, 000
6,019,802
6,017,710
6,428,180
7, 070,474
8,955,820
14, 746,745
12, 048,941
7, 862, 366
9, 950, 326
7, 533, 779
8, 809, 991
10,529,336
11,614,068
11, 078, 957
10,171, 655
10,525, 634
10,329,994

Total.

$164,040, 821
171, 583,476
184,676, 390
182, 589, 268
190, 855, 686
195, 570, 088
190, 817, 761
193, 593, 585
206, 904, 277
209, 813,027
203,179, 569
. 225. 855. 518
215.009,098
197,275,116
217, 413, 862
229, 773, 314
230,137, 323
220, 544, 769
214, 725, 246
217, 905, 557
214, 396, 641
213,972,987
215, 375, 280
213, 023, 056
212,168,100
211,855, 7.58
216, 208. 008
214,412, 956
209, 246, 545
210, 610, 092
206, 233,450
210,562,412
232, 601, 378
232,766,310
234, 262, 989
233, 773, 252
235, 254, 254
227, 497,147
237, 904, 947
235,. 146, 342
227, 678,796
232, 443, 530
226,405, 926
225.445, 802
237,01,6,611
233, 636,415
227,188, 718
235,153,130
235,107,471
236, 293. 996
239, 815, 7.37
235, 862.184
232, 216,185
227, 788,473
213, 964,241
217,286, 074
227,198, 919
230,452,675
232,731, 536
233, 393, 499
242,188, 649
247, 669, 232
252, 841, 310
249, 981, 216
250, 700, 835
251, 202,485
244, 039, 832
243, 624, 235
247,756, 274
248, 068, 281
249, 546, 387
246, 506,174
243, 323, 870
236, 095, 241
241, 422.793
242,464,315
237.193, 035
231,845, 064
829p 305,366

69

TEEASUEER.
No.

31.—AMOUNT OF GOLD,

S I L V E R , AND P A P E R

CURRENCY IN THE

TREASURY,

ETC.—Continued.
Month,

1885—January...
February .
March
April
May
June
July
August ...
September
October . . .
November.
Decemljer,
1886—January...
February .
March
April
May
June
July
o August ...
September
October . . .
November.
December.
1887—January-..
February'-.
March
April
May
Juue
July.
/?
August
September
Gel o b e r . . .
November.
December .
1888—January...
February..
March
:
April......
May
June
July
August
September.
October....
November.
December .
1889—January...
February..
March
April
May
Juue
July.......
August
September.
October . . .
November.
December .
1890—January...
February..
March
April
May
June
July
August-...
Sex)tember-




Gold.

$125, 187, 596
127, 346, 553
125, 473, 256
117, 927, 395
115, 810,534
120, 298, 895
126. 078. 595
126, 371, 928
133, 113,325
142, 338, 589
146, 391, 486
147, 991, 808
136, 086, 611
144, lf)4,038
151, 379, 524
155, 865, 308
156, 304, 709
156. 793, 749
158, 933, 005
157, 732, 288
157, 917, 211
158, 537,179
163, 930, 221
170, 912,413
168, 475. 362
175, 130, 261
18L 939, 847
180, 902, 431
186, 667, 773
186, 87.5, 669
186, 306, 330
193, 274,194
192, 717, 947
202, 859, 832
211, 880,526
208, 608,130
202, 955,184
212, 869, 914
218, 818, 254
213, 239, 994
200, 301,129
193, 866, 247
194, 592, 280
206, 383, 036
197, 713,116
191, 074, 575
199, 339,133
203, 885, 219
194, 655, 264
196, 245,981
197, 874, 422
19L 589,112
192, 252, 715
186, 71L 561
182, 218,164
180, 654, 670
189, 196, 423
187, 572, 386
187, 496, 672
190, 833, 052
177, 386, 285
187, 988, 948
185, 287, 716
186, 235, 573
190, 544, 854
190, 232, 404
092, 074
184, 837, 581
185, 981, 732
147,

Silver.

United States
notes.

$71,288,030
$13, 873,
76, 329, 022
18, 726,
20,473,
78, 718, 076
21, 465,
84, 983,324
23,492,
92, 952,178
15,462,
99,157, 951
96, 907, 700
16, 998,
99,265, 403
24, 793,
99, 385, 022
27, 944,
97,476, 642
27, 550,
104, 369, 642
25, 735,
104,132,197
27, 941,
33, 300,
111, 994, 553
32,277,
114, 839, 096
30, 289,
115, 672, 306
116, 616, 366
26, 088,
119, 927, 955
26, 289,
125,134, 221
22,868,
126, 330, 574
21, 939,
123, 973, 629
35, 579,
116, 533, 620
36, 519,
30, 967,
112, 732, 715
109, 29L 571
29, 548,
101,659,880
23.169,
106, 848, 633
24, 283,
108,164, 660
25, 689,
2L159,
104, 982, 949
105, 073, 830
20, 225;
106, 843, 611
21, 767,
107,260,882
20, 013.
106, 332, 529
19, 633,
103, 662, 219
21,157,
17, 610,
95.679,098
89, 612, 742
15, 261,
82, 722, 828
16, 318,
76, 351, 511
15, 424,
79, 836, 846
18, 015,
79,155, 419
. 22,267,
76,102, 085
24.170,
77,417,133
28,491
79, 178, 478
33, 928,
80,163, 607
37, 983,
79, 218, 602
39, 825,
74, 920, 399
41, 580,
65, 614, 462
40, 628,
36, 813,
54, 844,170
35, 202,
49, 095, 975
30, 875,
42, 707, 565
29, 446,
49, 530,165
52, 363, 612
' 29,300,
51, 745,170
25. 051
52,118,189
23, 770,
55, 363, 569
27. 790,
57,71.5,663 ' 29, 601,
57, 698,430
30, 364,
.50,112, 833
32, 32.5,
41,515,504
21,170,
39, 875, 648
17, 303,
41, 763, 278
14, 819,
38, 243, 433
6,673,
45, 961, 857
7, 606,
47, 314. 840
9, 593,
44, 955, 052
6, 919,
7,209,
45. 928, 042
47,189, 821
9, 892,
49, 504, 543
11,804,
49,988, 781
12,163,
43, 682, 332
10,573,
33,153,459
5, 775.

Nationalbank notes.

Total.

$13, 880,648 $224, 229, 743
232,176, 538
9, 774, .141
23L977,560
7,312,940
232,497, 069
8,120, 660
9, 806, 087
242, 060, 908
9, 945, 711
244, 864, 936 ,
' 8,081,130
248, 066, 422
7,556,108
257, 987, 095
6,196,408
266, .639, 087
272, 803, 813
5.438, 241
282, 272,127
5, 775, 356
285, 412, 972
5, 347, 767
291, 332, 610
9, 951, 057
7, 961, 334
299, 241, 760
3, 392, 203
300, 733, 518
3, 831, 002
302, 401, 450
307,483,912
4, 962,150
4,034,416
308, 830, 703
3, 792, 409
310,995,130
2,878, 520
320,164,084
313, 074, 676
. 2,104, 764
305, 429, 945
3,192, 746
305, 292, 013
"2, 522, 033
298, 753, 954
3, 012, 335
. 4,606,322
304, 213, 999
3, 072, 561
312, 056, 684
310, 641, 219
2, 558,485
3,480, 653.
309, 682, 388
3, 927, 245
319, 206, 005
316, 512, 933
2, 362, 585
315, 414, 704
3,142,105
32L448, 678
3, 3.54, 726
308, 945, 850
2, 938, 593
31L 891, 621
4.157, 980
314,053,438
3,131, 864
4,919,434
305, 303, 500
7, 782, 203
308, 589, 702
6, 355, 477
320, 647, 897
•5, 323, 787
324, 414, 749
325, 090, 935
5, 942,194
320,110,618
6, 702, 811
319, 067, 279
7, 054, 221
32L855.456
8, 218, 8:^4
7,880,157. • 330,763,985
6,023,307
309, 979, 843
4,167, 954
286, 900, 019
3, 381,456
287, 019, 520
4, 068, 046
281, 536, 690
279, 071,156
5.439, 229
281, 343, 676
3, 433, 572
277, 725. 090
3, 054, 267
271,164, 328
3, 686, 890
280,109, 758
4, 703, 087
278,186,640
4,158,331
273,913,495
3, 632, 535
267,684. 099
4, 590, 661
255, 765, 906
3, 883, 721
• 5, 211,415 249, 962, 950
4, 251, 973
248, 330, 945
4, 500, 355
240,250,765
6,172,760
237,127,126
4, 339, 314 . 249,236,967
3, 937,196
241, 099,621
3,942, 536
243, 315, 562
251, 916, 769
• 4,289,295
255,892,904
4,351, 767
251, 010, 626
4, r66, 359
245,156, 851
5, 063. 228
191, 530, 992
4,620, 511

70

REPORT Olsf T H E FINANCES,

No. 32.- - AMOUNT

Month.

1878-June
July
August
SepteVnber.
October....
November .
December..
1879—January . . .
February . March
April..
May
June
July
August
September .
October
November .
December..
1880—January . . .
February..
March . . . o .
April
May
June
July
August
September.
October
November .,
December..
1881—January . . . .
February . .
March
April
May
,
June
July
' August
Septeoiber• October
November .
December..
1882—January . . .
February . .
March
April......
, May
June
July
August
- September.
October.-..
November .
December..
1S83—January . . .
February..
March
April
May
June
July.......
August
September .
October
November .
December..
1884^-January . . .
February.^
March
,
April
May
June
July
August
September..
October
November..
December . .




OF P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N CIRCULATION AT T H E END OF EACH
MONTH FROM J U N E , 1878, TO SEPTEMBEJI, lb90.

United
States
notes.

Currency Gold certificates.
certificates.

$274,660, 895 $46,245, 000
51,120, 000
269, 575,157
47, 815, 000
268, 332, 762
39, 545, 000
273, 631, 676
272, 505, 410 35, 660, 000
273, 025, 612 35, 070, 000
33,190,000
277,098,511
40,445, 000
275, 656,485
36, 675,000
265,511,043
25,145, 000
270,851,347
30, 905, 000
276,236,193
25, 880, 000
269,130, 574
29, 355, 000
272,289,112
282, 889, 550 40,250, 000
276, 083, 410 34, 375, 000
298, 507, 762 29, 240, 000
20.195, 000
309,158,449
316, 707, 562 13, 585, 000
324, 020, 522 ' 10, 090, 000
322, 381, 454 12, 685, 000
320, 531, 923 11, 095, 000,
8, 320, 000
322, 600,935
8, 985, 000
320, 206, 737
315, 847, 997 12, 650, 000
313, 660, 457 14, 235, 000
312, 581, 892 15, 075, 000
11, 205, 000
315, 031,167
9, 885, 000
319, 532, 403
8. 625. 000
324, 262, 023
8, 450, 000
327,106, 079
.6, 980, 000
330, 939,198
8, 630, 000
327, 499, 400
7, 640, 000
324, 474, 415
6, 565, 000
325, 342, 818
8, 255, 000
323, 753, 930
31.9,758, 711 10, 860, 000
316, 476, 924 11,650,000
10, 525, 000
317, 056,106
9, 450, 000
317, 360,-147
8,105, UUO
319, 550, 884
8, 275, 000
320, 399, 247
8, 990, 000
320, 279, 938
320, 688, 216 ~ 9,540,000
317, 966, 622 11, 330, 000
11, 445, 000
316, 979,166
318. 309, 601 10, 925, 000
10, 990, 000
318, 053,192
314, 742, 326 12, 065, 000
312, 010, 427 13, 245, 000
31L 711, 426 12, 220, 000
310, 797, 075 11, 815, 000
314, 732, 858 10, 540, 000
9, 835, 000
316, 991,820
9, 835, 000
316, 089, 624
9, 575, 000
318, 226, 621
313, 088, 779 12, 430, 000
11,130. COO
313, 936,199
9,465,000
316, 802,455
10, 050, 000
315,711,393
11,790,000
313,209,191
13, 060, 000
310,182,177
309, 048, 370 12, 885, 000
308, 889, 250 12,05.5,000
309, 486, 596 11, 870, 000
309; 567, 979 12, 545, 000
306, 806, 372 14, 365, 000
307, 036, 767 14,480, 000
304, 524, 827 16, 835, 000
300, 872, 384 18,125, 000
300, 776, 364 14, 955, 000
14, 920, 000
300,915,183
11, 030, 000
307, 949,175
12,190, 000
306,497,214
303, 953, 026 13,165, 000
305, 837, 462 14, 270, 000
15, 630, OUO
310,156,143
312, 738, 844 17, 770, 000
22, 575. 000
314,'480, 333
24, 760, 000
310,181, 441

Silver certificates.

$24, 897, 680
$7,
23, 852, 980
979,
17,222,180
1,709,
23, 433, 680
711
22, 906,480
68,
366,
24,117, 780
413,
21,189. 280
400,
17,082, 680
331
16,379,280
25i;
16, 253, 960
197,
15, 710,460
444,
15, 380,120
414,
15, 279, 820
771.
15,196, 900
1,304,
. 15, 008,700
14,843,200
1,176,
1, 604,
14,377, 600
1, 894,
13,195, 460
3, 824,
11, 596,140
3,989,
10, 350, 000
4, 572,
9, 755, 300
6, 017,
8,244,000
6, 615,
8, 056, 800
6, 051,
8, 010, 300
5, 789,
7, 963,900
6, 930,
7, 852, UOO
7, 619,
7, 661,100
12, 203,
7, 480,100
19, 780,
7,447, 700
7, 381, 380 26, 504,
6,528, 380 36,127,
6,491, 400 36, 814,
6, 229, 400 37, 027
6, 028, 900 39,445;
5, 961, 200 39,157,
5, 876, 280 38, 784,
5, 759, 520 39,110,
5, 748,120 40, 802,
5, 397,120 46, 061
5, 239, 320 52, 590,
5,204,220
58, 838,
5,109,620
59, 573,
62, 315,
5,188,120
.5,180, 220 61, 537,
60,125,
5,172, 320
59, 423,
5,166, 920
58, 908,
5,071,120
5, 052, 920 57, 227,
5, 029, 020 .54, 506,
54, 757,
5,016,440
4, 992, 040 57, 739,
4, 907, 440 63, 204,
65, 620,
11,370, 270
19,458,270
67, 342,
39, 514, 810 68, 443,
47, 669, 640 68, <*38,
42, 554, 470 68,027.
43, 444, 510 70,759,
48, 398, 200 71, 884,
59, 591, 940 71,727
59, 807, 370 72,620,
73,728,
60,068,600
54, 547, 540 75, 375,
55, 014, 940 78, 921
85, 334i
52, 076,180
58, 897, 620 87, 976,
96, 717,
63, 585,140
77, 462, 620 96, 958,
77,843,430
96, 247,
68,812,150
95, 919,
56, 700, 805 95, 497,
59,125, 480
97, 363,
71,146, 640
96, 427,
95,138,
91, 491,490
92, 017, 940 94, 228,
87, 389, 660 96, 491,
87, 865, 570 100, 741,
93, 374, 290 104, 988,
93, 287. 420 114, 865,

Nationalbank notes.

Total.

$310,129, 887 $655, 940, 542
307, 825, 871 653, 353, 238
309,868, 704 644, 947,926
311, 500, 886 648, 822, 842
314, 750, 592 645, 891, 272
313, 976, 518 646, 555, 970
314, 339, 398 646, 230, 549
311,034,824 644, 619, 329
314, 803, 251 633,700, 434
320,550, 850 633, 052, 857
320, 680,770 643, 730,103
314„0L4,961 624,849, 795
320, 675, 372 638, 013, 784
322,056,448 661,164, 068
324,924,058 651, 696,058
329, 328, 434 673,096,116
332, 923, 456 678, 258, 876
336, 285, 797 681, 668, 541
338, 609, 534 688,140,448 •
336, 301,464 685,707, 372
338, 998, 267 684, 953, 096
340, 343, 037 685, 524, 978
338,950, 535 682, 814, 438
335,694,719 678, 254, 555
336, 800, 651 678,449, 577
336,543,916 678, 983, 767.
339, 322, 041 680, 838, .527
339, 872, 302 688, 972, 996
339,182,172 699, 297,136
339,594,531 709, 036, 976
339, 550,004 720,125, 293
337, 508, 713 716, 944,150
339,097, 583 714, 469,195
343.732, 318 721,114, 851
346, 058, 838 723,186,900
345, 820, 707 721,100, 238
349, 320, 733 722, 317, 906
351, 380, 525 725, 512, 643
353,176, 365 731, 445, 510
353,854,240 739, 339,624
355,123, 453 747, 840, 690
3.56, 953, 345 750,996, 853
356,179,777 753, 911,433
354, 502, 769 750, 517,151
355,611,439 749, 332.935
356, 399, 710 750, 224, 671
354,183, 680 747, 206, 562
351, 606, 809 740,694,115
351, 275,317 736, 065,8.54
349, 545, 731 733,251, 317
352, 546, 988 737, 890, 983
355,427, 876 748, 812, 954
355,409, 283 759,226,823
355, 380, 459 768,106, 043 ,
355,350, 769 791, 110, 860
350, 824, 557 792, 451, 796
353, 662, 570 789, 310, 659
354, 992, 868 795,464, 824
352, 203,939 798, 247, 603
349, 095, 679 805, 414, 201
347, 855,146 803, 525, 379
346, 770, 823 802,501,474
347, 887, 072 798, 754, 023
346,710, 404 802, 003, 901
345,100, 24u 804,623, 780
343, 230, 410 81L 275, 603
340, 993, 531 822, 813,159
333, 934, 061 829, 714, 539
333, 736, UUO 826, 824, 535
336,173,139 816,636, 229
332, 266, 201 800, 300,170
332,484, 730 807, 952, 856
329, 882, 621 816,143,486
326, 536, 019 830,283, 896
324,517,896 830, 871, 989
323, 964, 981 833, 632, 035
322, 836,117 841, 9?^2, 090
320, 254, 849 855, 673, 003
318, 062, 338 86L157,112

71

TEEASUEER,

No. 32.—AMOUNT O F P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N CIRCULATION AT T H E E N D O F EACH
M O N T H FROM J U N E , 1878, to SEPTEMBER, 1890—Continned.

Month.

1885^ January
February...
March.......
April .o
May
June..-.
July
August
September..
October
November . .
December . .
1886—January
February...
March
April.
May
June
July
August
September..
, October
November .,
December ..
;j887—January —
February..,
March
April
. -.
May...
.
June
July...:...
August
September ,
October
November .,
December..
1888—January —
February . .
March,.....,
April
,
May
•Tune ,
Jnly
August
September.
October
November .
December-.
1889—January . . .
February...
March
April
May
June
July
Augnst
September .
October
November.
December ..
1890—January...
February ..
March......
April
,May.......
June
July
August
September .

United
States
notes.
$302, 722, 547
297, 754, 194
299, 997, 728
299, 815, 326
296, 263, 907
301, 633, 637
298, 262, 019
291. 022, 360
295, 551, 684
300, 985, 675
303, 390, 373
3U4, 949, 816
298, 790, 627
299, 483, 725
304, 466, 531
309, 077, 242
306,436,918
305,562, 699
305, 636, 874
299, 906, 369
302, 456, 935
308, 573, 711.
310,107, 828
317, 001, 690
313, 677, 334
312,81L814
318,386, 078
318,105, 542
315, 923, 640
317,897,219
318, 587, 276
318, 393, 477
322, 535, 804
324,204, 949
323, 527, 796
324, 271, .591
318j 020, 547
313,198, 929
313, 595, 393
307,634,402
300, 522, 816
294,282, 812
291, 650, 276
290, 455, 623
293, 322, 053
298. 287, 696
300,118, 060
305, 555,156
303, 319, 518
301,460, 505
307.179. 785
308, 330, 879
302. 740,629
300, 344, 931
298, 741, 650
297,810,081
310, 235, 758
316, 867, 515
321, 721, 994
331, 007, 091
327, 444, 792
326, 857,151
332,101.359.
330. 676, 605
326, 933, 217
323, 046, 826
322, 697, 604
327, 287, 306
333,915, 726




Currency Gold certificertificates.
cates.

Silver certificates.

National
bank notes.

Total.

$30,085, 000 $111,980,380 $113,858,811 $312,169,259 ;870, 815, 997
30. 200, 000 112, 683, 290 IIL 467, 9.51 313,861, 979 865, 967,414
26, 210, 000 115,967,540 112, 820, 226 313,584, 455 868, 579, 949
25,400, 000 125. 234, 800 109, 443, 946 311, 295,144 871,189, 216
26, 925, COO 128, 553, 010 105, 085,186' 307,183,159 864, 010, 262
29, 585, 000 126, 729, 730 101, 530, 946 306, 911, 370 866,390,683
31,420, 000 123, 289, 000 98, 872,106 307, 297, 711 859,140, 836
30, 865, 000 123. 885, 490 96, 079, 296 307, 875, 599 849, 727, 745
23,185, 000 118,137, 790 93, 656, 716 310,151,714 840,682, 904
18,145, 000 109, 020, 760 93,146, 772 309, 840,846 83L139,053
17, 555, 000 105,554, 092 92, 702, 642 310, 973, 491 830,175, 598
13,790, 000 105, 359, 601 9:s 179, 465 311,16i, 536 828, 443, 418
14, 590, 000 115, 284, 951 89, 761, 609 .307, 049,105 825,476, 292
14, 920, 000 105, 637, 050 88. 390, 816 309,039,918 817,'471, 509
11, 925, 000 90, 775, 643 90,122, 421 311,758,186 809,047.78111, 515, OUO 84, 715,225
90, 733,141 309.430, 872 805,471, 480
13, 955, 000 80,120,025
89,184,129 306, 206, 015 795, 902, 087
18,-250, 000 76, 044, 375 88,116,225 304,476, 475 792,449, 774
74,718,517
19,105,000
87, 564, 044 302, 446,129 789, 470, 564
77,- 698, 347 89, 021, 760 301, 371, 095 779.192, 571
11.195,000
7, 705, 000 84, 691, 807 95, 387,112 300, 995, 048 791, 235, 902
7, 740, 000 88, 294, 969 100, 306, 800 298,116, 544 803, 032, 024
7, 025, 000 90 520,633 105,519,817 296, 622, 243 809, 795, 521
6, 510, 000 97, 21.5, 605 117, 246, 670 293, 559, 737 831,5.33,702
8, 720, 000 105, 665,107 118,183, 714 288,176, 405 834. 422, 560
8,180, 000 99, 958, 365 121,130, 755 285, 792, 236 827, 873,170 .
7,135, 000 94, 046, 015 131, 930,489 284, 392, 226 835, 889, 808
8, 350, 000 94, 434,485 137, 740, 430 281,312,658 839, 943,115
8, 990, 000 90, 960, 977 139,143,328 278, 055,162 833, 073,107
8, 770,000 91, 225, 437 142,118, 017 276, 554, 488 836,565,161
8, 460, 000 94, 990, 087 144,166,141 273,146,207 839, 349, 711
7,130,000
88, 765, 340 147,.876, 385 270,774,103 832,939.305
6, 535, 000 97, 984, 683 154, 354, 826 269,782,937 851.193, 250
7, 215, 000 99, 684, 773 160, 713, 957 267, 757, 278 859, 575, 957
6, 835, 000 90, 780, 753 168,149, 274 266, 558. 514 855,851,337
6, 985, 000 96, 734, 057 176,855,423 263, 444, 420 868,290,491
10, 645, 000 104, 853. 971 179,321,053' 257,920, 431 870, 761, 002
11, 215, 000 96, 697, 913 184, 452, 659 256, 097,116 861. 661, 617
254, 673, 417
8, 915, 000 91, 953,949 191, 526, 445 252, 484,307 860, 664, 204
10, 555, 000 99, 561, 293 194,426, 932 248, 878,462 864, 661, 934
12, 230, 000 109, 581, 730 196, 645, 405 245,149, 720 867,858,413
14, 415, 000 119, 887, 370 200, 387, 376 241,234, 901 874,122, 278
15, 205, 000 131, 9.59, 112 203, 680, 679 238.466, 870 883, 729, 968
14, 645, 000 124, 750, 394 209, 658, 966 237,505,695 877, 976, 853
12, 730, 000 134, 838,190 218,56L60I 235,090, 263 896, 957. 539
11, .580, 000 140, 613, 658 229, 783,152 232, 945, 416 915, 354, 769
11,360, 000 129, 264, 228 237,415, 7e9 229,486,146 91LI03,493
10, 250, 000 120, 888, 448 246, 219, 999 223. 602, 595 912, 399,749
,13, 915, 000 130,986,592 245, 337,438 220,815,013 917,161,143
15, 920, 000 130,210,717 246, 628, 953 217, 97^, 354 915, 035,188
14, 450, 000 128, 826, 517 251, 263, 379 214, 819, 583 919, 694, 035
14, 580, 000 136, 614; 789 254, 939, 203 210,583,650 929,284,454
16,150,000 129, 044. 662 255, 537, 810 207, 039, 352 914,056,751
16; 735, 000 116, 792, 759 257,102,445 204, 361,154 898,014,487
17, 575, 000 118, 541,409 259, 557,125 201.172, 710 898, 776, 338
16, 545, 000 ,123, 393, 519 268, 580, 626 199, 684, 081 907,501, 936
15, 275, 000 116, 675, 349 276, 619, 715 196, 714,410 918, 489, 903
12, 510, 000 120, 937, 229 277, 319, 944 195, 294, 664 924, 349, 098
: 10,140, 000 123, 483.119 276, 794, 386 192, 587, 030 927,434,163
9, 000, 000 122, 985, 889 282, 949, 073 188, 274, 4.59 938, 529, 083
11, 630, 000 138, 657,169 281,331,771 187, 661,139 947,338,191
10, 230, 000 130, 604, 804 284,176, 262 186, 337, 406 939, 529, 356
7, 660, 000 134, 938, 079 290, 605, 562 185, 322, 364 951, 642, 406
8, 795, 000 134, 642, 839 292, 923, 348 183,072,228 952,360.150
9,855,000 130,788,399 294, 656, 083 181,396,823 945, 3U4, 927
11, 830, 000 13L380,019 297, 210, 043 179, 487, 509 944. 863, 711
IL 820, 000 132, 444,749 298, 748, 913 178, 071, 525 945,198, 775
8,820,000 124, 382, 539 303,471, 210 176, 982,404 942, 032, 580
6, 990, 000 158,104, 739 309,321,207
985, 314, 076

^2

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 33—.ESTIMATED. STOCK O F G O L D A N D S I L V E R C O I N AND B U L L I O N O N ' J U N E
30, I N E A C H Y E A R , F R O M , 1878 T Q 1885, A N D Q U A R T E R L Y T H E R E A F T E R T O S E P ' T E M B E R , 1890.

Date.

June 30,1878
Juue 30,1.879
Juue SO, 1880
June "30,1881
Juno 30,1882
June 30,1883
June 30,1884
June 30,1885
Sept. 30.1885
Dec. 3L1885
Mar. 31,3880
June 30,1886
Sept, 30,1886
Dec. 3L1886
Mar. 31,1887
June 30,1887
Sept. 30,1887
Dec. 31,1887
Mar. 31,1888.
June 30,1888
SepL 3U,18S8
Dec. 3L1888.
Mar. 31,1889
June 3U, 1889.
Sept. 30,1889.
Dec. 3L1880.
Mar. 31,189U.
June 3U, 1890,
Sept. 30,1890.

Standard
Gold coin silver dollars Fractional
and bullion. and silver
silver coin.
bullion.
$213, 199, 977
245, 741, 837
351, 841,206
478, 484, 538
500, 757, 715
542, 732, 063
545, 500, 797
588, 697. 036
597, 935, 355
607, 173, 674
598, 974, 068
590, 774, 461
608, 604,164
641, 626, 649
649, 194, 324
654, 520, 335
681, 793, 520
704, 703, 330
708, 518,186
705, 818, 855
709, 881,170
704, 608,179
704, 77.3, 319
680, 063, 505
681, 819,487
524, 863
850, 282
563, 029
695,
690, 590, 353

$16,269, 079
41, 276, 356
69,660,408
95,297, 083
122, 788, 544
152, 047, 685
180, 306, 614
208, 538, 967
214, 675, 554
222,873,593
228, 230, 865
237,191, 906
245,039, 680
254,421,187
267,21L 642
277,445, 767
285, 664, 229
293, 257, 224
301, 480, 765
310,166, 459
317,336, 723
326,151, 427
334, 898,184
343, 947, 093
351, 824, 479
360, 667, 079
370,735, 705
385, 718, 063
398, 672, 276

$71,778, 828
76,249,985
78, 862, 270
80, 087, 061
80,428, 580'
80,96d. 300
75,261,528
74,939, 820
74,986, 960
75, 034, 111
75,047, 524
75,060, 937
75,117,827
75,174, 657
75,128, 324
75,547, 799
75,398, 925
76, 295, 886
76, 333, 888
76,406, 376
76, 759, 671
76, 889, 983
76, 628,116
76, 601, 836
76, 796,193
76, 697,331
76, 799, 537
77,493, 856
76, 875, 555

Total.

$301, 247,884
363, 268,178
500, 366,884
653, 868, 682
709, 974, 839
775. 740,048
801, 068, 939
872, 175, 823
887, 597,869
905, 081,378
902, 252,457
903, 027, 304
928, 761, 671
971, 222, 493
991, 534,290
513, 901
1, 007,
1,042!,856, 674
256, 440
1, 074,
1,086, 332, 839
1, 092,391, 690
1,103, 977,564
1,107, 649, 589
1,116, 299,619
LlOO, 612, 434
1,110, 440,159
1,126, 889,273
1,141, 385, 524
1,158,774, 948
1,166, 138,184

NO. 34.—ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN CIRCULATION ON J U N E
30, I N E A C H Y E A R , F R O M 1878 T O 1885, A N D Q U A R T E R L Y T H E R E A F T E R T O S E P T E M B E R , 1890.
^

Date.

June 30, 1878.
J u n e 30,1879.
June 30, 18S0.
June 30,1881June 80,1882.
June 30,1883.
June3U, 1884
June 30, 1885.
Sept. 30, 1885.
• Dec. 31, 1885.
Mar. 31, 1886
June 30. 1886.
Sept. 30, 1886
Dec. 31, 1886.
Mar. 31, 1887.
June 30, 1887
Sept. 30, 1887.
Dec. 31, 1887.
Mar. 31, 1888
June 30, 1888,
Sept. 30, 1888.
Dec. 3L 1888
Mar. 31, 1889
Juue 30, 1889.
Sept. 30, 1889
Dec. 31, 1889.
Mar. 31, 1890.
June .30, 1890.
Sept. 30, 1890.




Gold coin.

$84, 739, 774
110, 505, 362
225, 695,779
315,312,877
358, 251, 325
344, 653,495
340, 624, 203
341, 668, 411
346, 684, 240
353, 822, 265
356,818,901
357, 936, 337
365, 995,146
373, 498, 631
373, 208, 462
376,419, 229
391, 090, 890
399,361,143
397, 745, 983
392, 065, 2.38
377, 329, 864
379, 834, 512
378, 072, 380
376, 559,185
375, 947, 715
375,705,922
373, 624, 487
373, 950, 606
384, 503, 882

Standard silver dollars Fractional
and silver
silver coin.
bullion.
$1, 209, 251 $64, 918, 322
8, 036, 439
67, 346, 584
.20,110, 557
54, 511. 788
29,442,412
52, 839, 364
32, 403, 820
52, 379, 949
35, 651,450
52,474,299
40, 690, 200
45, 660, 808
39, 086,969
43, 702, 921
45, 275, 710
51, 345,066
53, 358, 362
47, 237,680
51, 2.58, 776
46, 224, 886
52, 846,142
, 46,156,255
60, 018, 693
48, 218, 082
61,175, 572
49, 513, 722
56, 899,818
48, 526, 710
55, 044,362
48,570, 305
60, 614, 524
50,414,706
64,377,819
5L 968, 357
59, 418, 515
50, 767, 608
55, 687, 218
50, 354, 635
57, 899, 356
52, 020, 975
60, 879, 321
53, 234, 525
56, 810, 339
51, 707,112
54, 258. 719
51,472,103
52, 931, 352
57, 554, lOi'
61,402, 501
54, 769, 403
57,989,656
53, 984, 972
61, 808, 703
54, 688, 630
76, 761, 319
56, 311,846

Total.

$150,867,347
185, 888, 385
300, 318,124
397,594, 053
443, 035,094
432,779, 244
426, 975, 211
424,458,301
443,306, 016
454,418, 307
454, 302, 563
456, 938, 734
474,231,921
484,187. 925
478, 634, 990
480,033,896
502,120,120
515, 707, 319
507, 932,106
498, 087, 091
487, 250,195
493, 948, 358
486, 589, 831
482,290, 007
486,433,168
491, 877, 826
485, 599,115
490, 447, 939
617,577,047

73

TEEASUEEE.

No. 35.—ESTIMATED AMOUNT O F G O L D , S I L V E R , AND P A P E R C U R R E N C Y I N C I R C U LATION ON J U N E 30, I N E A C H YEAR, FROM 1878 TO 1885, AND QUARTERLY T H E R E AFTER TO S E P T E M B E R ,
1890,

Date.

June
June
June
June
'June
June
June
Jnne
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Doc.
Mar.
Juno
SepL
Dec.
Mar.
June
SepL
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.

30,1878.
30,1879.
30,1880.
30,1881.
30,1882,
30,1883.
30,1884.
30,1885.
30.1885.
3L18B5.
31,1886.
30,1886.
30,1886.
31,1886.
3L1887.
30,1887.
30,1887.
31,1887.
31,1888.
30,1888.
30,1888.
3L1888.
31,1889.
30,1889.
30,1889.
31,1889.
31,1890.
30,1890.
30,1890.

United States
[Gold a n d gold Silver a n d
notes and /
s i l v e r certificertificates.
currency
cates.
certificates.
$109, 637,454
125, 785,182
233, 659, 679
321, 0r2, 397
363, 280, 345
404, 460, 865
411, 770,843
468, 398,141
464, 822, 030
459, 181, 866
447, 594,544
433. 980, 712
450, 686, 953
470, 714, 236
467, 254, 477
467, 644, 666
489, 075, 573
496, 095, 200
489, 699, 932
511, 952, 608
512, 168,054
500, 722, 960
506, 898,897
493, 351, 944
492, 623, 064
498, 691, 811
508, 562,566
505, 330, 625
542, 608, 621

$66,134, 653
75, 797, 503
80,411,914
121, 392, 505
139, 289, 859
160, 746.435
182,778,019
184,320,836
190, 277, 492
193, 775, 507
187,606,083
187,118,622
203, 623, 887
227, 935, 964
237, 857, 017
245,732, 684
265, 384, 056
293, 201, 599
301,712, 568
306,409, 229
328,481, 932
360, 333, 845
359,780, 830
362, 833, 267
387,105,168
399,120,977
402, 580,190
413, 707, 376
442, 394, 372

$320, 905, 895
301, 644,112
327, 895,457
328,126, 924
325, 255,427
323. 242,177
318, 687,214
331, 218, 637
318,736,684
318.739,816
316, 391, 531
323, 812, 699
310,161, 935
323, 511, 690
325, 521,078
326,667,219
329,070,804
331, 256, 591
322, 510, 393
308, 697, 812
306, 052, 053
315, 805,156
321, 629, 785
317,079,931
325,510,758
340, 007, 091
339, 761, 359
334, 876, 826
340, 905, 726

National,
b a n k notes.

$310,129,887
320, 675, 372
336, 800, 651
349, 320, 733
35L275,317
347, 855,146
329, 882, 621
306,911,370
310,151,714
311,164, 536
311, 758,186
304, 476,475
300,995,048
293, 559, 737
284, 392, 220
276, 554, 488
269, 782, 937
263, 444, 420
254, 673, 417
245,149, 720
237,505, 695
229, 486,146
217, 974, 354
207, 039, 352
199, 684, 081
192,587,030
186, 337,406
181, 396,823
176,982,404

Total.

$806, 807, 889
823, 902,169
978, 767, 7U1
1,119, 912,5.59
1,179. 100, 948
1, 236,304, 623
1, 243,118, 697
1, 290,
848, 984
1, 283,987, 920
1, 282,861, 725
1, 263,350, 344
1, 249,388, 508
1,265, 467,823
1,315, 721, 627
1,314, 524, 798
1, 316,599,057
1, 353,313, 370
1, 383,997,810
L 368, 596, 31U
1, 372,
209, 309
L 384, 207, 734 ,
1,406. 348,107
L406, 283, 866
1, 380,
304,494
1, 404,923, 071
1,430, 406, 909
1, 437,
241, 521
1,435, 311, 650
L502, 89L123

No. 36.—AMOUNT OF ALL KINDS OF M O N E Y I N T H E T R E A S U R Y AND IN CIRCULATION AND TOTAL STOCK ON J U N E 30, I N E A C H ,YEAR, FROM 1878 TO 1885,
AND
Q U A R T E R L Y T H E R E A F T E R TO S E P T E M B E R , 1 8 9 0 .
i

Date.
J u n e 30, 1878 .J u n e 30, 1 8 7 9 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 0 . .
J u n e 30, 1881 . J u u e 30, 1 8 8 2 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 3 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 4 . .
J u n e 30, 1885 . .
S e p t 30, 1885 . .
Dec. 31, 1885 . .
M a r . 31, 1886 . .
J u n e 30, 1886 . .
SepL 30, 1 8 8 6 . Dec. 3L 1 8 8 6 . .
M a r . 31,, 1887 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 7 . Sept. 30, 1 8 8 7 . D e c . 31, 1887 . .
M a r . 31, 1 8 8 8 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 8 . .
S e p t . 30, 1 8 8 8 . .
Dec. 31, 1888 . .
M a r . 31, 1889 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 8 9 . .
SepL 30, 1889 . .
D e c . 31, 1889 . .
M a r . 3 1 , 1890 . .
J u n e 30, 1 8 9 0 . .
S e p t . 30, 1890 . .




Belonging
to '
Treasury.
$164, 040, 821
21.5, 009, 098
212, 168,100
235, 254, 254
235, 107,471
242, 188. 649
243, 323, 870
244, 864, 936
266, 639, 087
285, 412, 972
300, 733, 518
308, 830,703
313, 074, 676
298, 753, 954
310, 641, 219
316, 512,933
308, 945. 850
305, 303, 500
324, 414, 749
319, 067, 279
309, 979, 848
• 281,536, 690
277. 725, 090
278, 186, 640
255, 765, 906
240, 250, 765
.241, 099, 621
255, 892,904
191, 530,992

On d e p o s i t
for
certificates.

Total in
Treasury.

$92,644, 600 $256, 685, 421
48, 685, 650 263, 694, 748
34,973, 870 247,141, 970
68, 874.450 304,128, 704
84, 453, 830 319, 561, 301
184, 370,471 426, 559,120
230, 589, 351 473,913, 221
310, 009, 786 554,874, 722
289, 646, 736 556, 285, 823
278.108, 856
563, 521, 828
272, 871. 566
573, 605, 084
265, 651, 920
574,482, 623
251,144, 229
564, 218, 905
255, 996, 511
554, 750,465
269,49L963
580,133,182
276.109. 967 592, 622, 900
292, 098, 638 601, 044,488
623, 357, 944
318,054,444
342,067, 283 666, 482. 032
386,179, 922 705, 247, 201
402, 046, 076 712, 025, 924
417, 914, 716 699,451, 406
426, 396,557 704,121, 647
433, 633, 298 711, 819, 938
711, 057, 825
455,291,919
449,074, 028 689, 324, 793
462, 215. 742 703,315,363
471. 362, 730 727,255, 634
684,.038,'082
492.507,090

In
circulation;

$806,807, 8F9
823, 902,169
978, 767,701
L 119, 912, 559
1,179, 100,948
1. 236,304, 623
1, 243,118,697
1, 290,848, 984
L 283, 987, 920
L 282, 861, 725
1,263, 350, 344
1,249, 388, 508
1,265, 467, 823
L 315, 721. 627
1, 314,524, 798
1,316, 599, 057
1, 353,313, 370
1,383, 997, 810
1, 368,596,310
1, 372,
209, 369
1,384, 207.734
L 406, .348,107
1,406, 283, 866
L 380, 304,494
1,404, 923, 071
1, 430,406, 909
1,437, 241. 521
1, 435,311, 650
1, 502,891,113

Total stock.

$1,063, 493,310
1, 087, .596,917
1,225, 909,671
1,424, 041,'263
1, 498, 602, 249
1,662, 863, 743
L 717, 031,91.8
1,845, 723, 706
1, 840, 273, 743
1, 846, 383, 553
1, 836, 955, 428
1, 823, 871,131
1, 829, 686,728
1, 870, 472, 092
1, 894, 6.57, 980
1, 909, 221,957
1,954, 357,858
2, 007, 355, 754
2,035, 078, 342 .
2,077, 456, 570
2, 096, 233, 6.58
2,105, 799,513
2,110, 405, 513
2, 092, 124, 432
2,115, 980, 896
2,119, 731, 702
2,140, 556, 884
2,162, 567, 284
2,186, 929,195

•74

REPORT

ON THE

FINANCES.

No. 37.—AMOUNT OF GOLD C O I N AND B U L L I O N I N T H E T R E A S U R Y , AND OF GOLD
CERTIFICATES OUTSTANDING, AT THE END OF EACH MONTH, FROM MARCH, 1878,
TO SEPTEMBER, 1890.

Month.
1878—March . . . .
April.'.
May
June
July
August —
September
' October
- November
December
1879—January..,
February.
March
April
,
May
June
July
Augu.st —
September.
October...
November
December
1880—January -..
February ;
^ March
April
May
June
July
August...
September
October...
November
December
1881—January.'.
February .
March
April
May ......
June
July
A u g u s t . -.
September
October...
November
December
1882—January . .
February-,
March.-..
April
May
June
July
^
August —
September
October.-November
December
1883—January..
February.
, March
April
May.:
June.
July
,
August —
September
October...
November
December
1884—January...
February.,
March
April.- —
May
„,




T o t a l gold
in T r e a s u r y , coin Gold certificates
in'Treasury.
a n d bullion.
$120,
120,
122,
128,
132,
134,
136,
140,
142,
135,
133,
133,
133,
134,
136,
13.5,
a35,
141.
169,
17L
160,
157,
153,
146,
144,
138,
128,
126,
123,
127,
135,
140;
151,
156,
154,
173,
173,
170,
163,
163,
154,
169,
174,
172,
178,
172,
165,'
173.
166,
155,
153,
14.?,
145,
149,
152,
159,
164,
171,
173,
177,
184,
187.
193,
198,
202,
204,
206,
209,
216,
-219,
221,
221,
21L
196,
'201,

., 317.17
1,781.64
', 907. 88
I, 202. 87
.,619.41
;, 036. 53
;, 302. 20
•, 154. 79
1,135. 29
:, 639.42
i, 906. 65
i, 559. 43
, 125. 85,
.,140.48
I, 260.14
1,474.62
', 483. 25
i, 390. 52
1, 995. O
H
',713.65
1,436.80.
. 321.84
I, 026. 43
> 758. 04
,
», 551. 50
:, 440. 08
I, 496'. 51
i, 427.20
1, 045. 54
I, 279.45
,833.65
> 952. 74
,
i, 519. 38
:, 095. 77
:, 209.15
,253.01
i, 163. 08
', 754. 53
1,158.17
, OOL 25
, 475. 21
i, 521. 94
, 344.52
', 829.17
', 303. 41
, 467. 38
:, 788. 62
', 874. 07
, 356. 93
1,102.18
< 545. 28
,
1, 389. 95
), 030. 31
I, 920. 69
1,106.43
\ 743. 54
, 584. 64
:, 5(.i8. 39
•, 834. 35
, 630. 86
,, 713. 90
,441.93
, 043. 00
i, 567. 68
, 035,16
!, 975.33
I, 543.10
I, 939. 90
!, 327. 54
, 739. 63
1,356.49
,633.11
506. 97
., 625. 72
1,388. 01

$7,179, 200
9, 032, 660
31,235, 300
19,469, 320
18,170,420
20, 794, 220
9,392,920.
9, 901, 520
9, 845,120
391, 420
• 544,0'/O
400, 220
'50, 740
62,140
33, 580
133, 880
43, 800
120, 000
67, 700
213, 400
183,740
749, 860
61, 100
327, 300
611, .500
173, 800
39, 800
40, 700
32,600
36, 800
31, 600
6,800
19,120
130, 500
50, 080
312, 080
142, 900
L400
36,'320
23,400
1,700
3,800
9,600
3,700
7,900
15, 800

"i'bbo
2,500
8,100
1,500
14, 990,170
15, ^50, 270
25,105, 030
25,107, 300
32, 296, 270
3L 525,210
32, 935,420
23, 869, 000
22, 571, 270
, 23, 383. 440
28, 445, 200
' 27,480, 300
31, 252, 760
27, 035, 300
27, 446, 780
23, 788, 000
30, 600, 070
35, 424, 250
44, 415, 395
39, 686, 780

Goldcertfi.
c a t e s in circulation.
•$50,, 704, 200
I
45, 948, 840
i
21. 246, 300
.
,
24, 897, 680
23; 852, 980
,
17, 222,180
23 , 433, 080
;
22, 906, 480
:
24,
,117.780
21 , 189, 280
17' 082, 680
,
16i 379, 280
,
16i 253. 960
,
15 ,710,460
15, 380, IJO
.
,
15. 279, 820
,
15.,196,000
15. 008, 700
,
14 ,843. 200
14, 377, tiOO
13, 19,5.400
;
,
11 , 596, 140
10I 350,1)00
,
9I 755, 300
,
! 244, 000
,
! 056, 800
,
! 010, 300
,
• 963, 900
,
' 8.52, 000
,

',661,.too
,480,100
' 447, 700
,
',381,380
i 528, 380
,
i,49L400
; 229, 400
,
i 028, 900
,
i 961, 200
,
. 876, 280
,
. 759, 520
,
i 748,120
,
,397,120
, 239, 320
i 204, 220
,
-5,199,620
5, 188,120
5,180, 220
5,172,320
• 5,166,920
5,071.120
.5, 052, 920
5, 029, 020
5,016,440
4, 992, 040
4, 907, 440
11,.370, 270
19,458,270
39,514,810
47, 669, 640
42, 554, 470
43,444. 5? 0
48. 398, 200
59, 591, 940
59, 807, 370
60, 063, 600
54, 647, 540
55, 014, 940
52, 0715,180
58, 897, 620
63, 585,140
77, 402. 620
77, 843, 430
68, 812, 150
56, 700, 805
59,125,480

N e t gold i n
T r e a s u r y , coin
a n d bullion.

'

$69, 402,117.17
74, 063,941. 64
101, 671,607. 88
103, 562, 522. 87
108, 161. 639.41
117, 325, 856.53
112, 602, 622.20
117, 965, 674. 79
118, 282, 3.5.^.. 2 9
114, 193, 359.42
116, 674, 226.65
116, 886, 279.43'
117 102, 16.5. 85
118, 809, G80.48
121 300, 140.14
119, 950, 654.62
120, 320, 583.25
126, 537, 690. 52 .
154, 76.-!, 7H5. 03
157, 140, 113.65
147, 247, 970. 80
146, 194, 181.84 •
143. 340, 026.43
136, 995, 458. 04 '
135, 766, 551. .50
130, 726, 640. 08
120. 699, 196. 51
118, 181, 527.20
115, 274, 645. 54
120, 018, 179.45
127 764, 733. 65
133, 278, 252. 74
143, 981, 139.38
^150, 213, 715. 77
148, 052, 809. 15
166. 808, 853.01
167, 639, 263. 08
164 358, 554. 53
157, 893, 878.17
157, 412, 141.25
149, 163, 355. 21
164, 098, 401. 94
169, 122, 02L 52
167, 785,
17)1 02.5, 609.17
167 429, 683.41
159, 972, 347. 38
168, 585, 568.62
161 290, 554. 07
149; 997, 436. 93
148, 932, 982.18
143, 477, 625.28
140, 062, 369. 95
144, 311, 590. 31
147. 831, 880. 69
148, 435, 666.43
144 809, 473. 54
Ul 989, 314.64
125, 648, 7.58.39
135, 107, 1,94. 35
141 308, 160.86
139, 439, 203. 90
133, 718, 241. 93
138, 271, 103.00
142, 705, 197. 68
149, 625, 435.16
151 115, 435.33
157, 353, 603.10
157 235, 759. 90
155, 429, 707. 54
144, 350, 599. 63
144, 038, 736.49
142, 259, 203.11
139, 624, 356.97
142, 006. 820. 72
908. 01

75

TEEASUEEE.
No.

37.—AMOUNT O P G O L D C O I N AND B U L L I O N I N T H E T R E A S U R Y , AND OF GOLD

CERTIFCATES OUTSTANDING, ETC.—Continaed.

Month.

1884—ti u n e
,
July
August
September-,
* October....,
•'
Noveniber.
D e c e m b e r ..
1885—January - . . ,
February..
March
April.
May
,
June
July..-.'.-.,
August
September.,
October
November.
D e c e m b e r .,
1886—January.. February..
March.....
April
May
June
July
• August
September.
October
November'.
December .
1887—January - . .
' February..
March
April
June
July
August
September.
October
November.
December .
1888—January - - .
February..
March
April
May...
June
July
August
September.
October
November .
December .
1889—January.. February..
March
April
May
June
July
August.-..
September,
October
November.
December .
1890—January...
Februarj'^..
March
April
'..
May...
June
July
August
September,




T o t a l gold
in T r e a s u r y , coin
a n d bullion.
$204,876, 594.15
210, 539, 5.50. 98
214,483, 657.17
217, 904, 042. 81
222, 536, 360.43
231, 389, 360. 85
234, 975, 851. 95
237,167, 975. 84
240, 029, 843. 24
241, 440, 796. 37
243,162, 194. 81
244, 363, 543.59
247, 028, 625. 25
249, 367, 595. 20
250, 257, 417.89
2.5L 251, 114.54
251, 359, 349. 29
251,945, 578.13
253, 351, 409.48
251, 371, 561.58
249,801, 087. 53
242,155, 167.40
- 240, 580, 532. 67
236, 424, 734. 21
232, 838, 123. 91
233,651, 522.45
235,430, 635.24
242, 609, 018. 37
246, 832, 148.40
254, 450, 853. 57
268,128. 018.47
274,140, 468. 85
275, 088, 626.45
275, 985, 862.15
275, 336, 91.5.90
277, 628, 750. 47
278,101, 106. 26
281,296, 417.45
282,039, 533.67
290, 702, 629. 70
302, 544, 605.45
302, 661, 278. 68
305, 342, 187. 07
307, 809, 155. 27
309, 567, 826.-88
310, 772, 202. 63
312, 801, 287.15
• 309,882, 858. 81
616. 89
313,753, 392. 34
326, 551,
33L 133, 430.44
332, 551, 305. 52
331, 688, 233.11
328, 603, 361.29
324, 773, 666. 56
325, 641, 856.12
326, 456, 697. 81
326, 700, 938.96
328,203, 900. 80
321, 297, 376. 96
303, 504, 319. 58
300, 759, 572.98
304, 048, 189. 30
305, 871, 772. 02308, 509, 615. 21
310, 979, 791.06
313, 818, 941.47
316, 043, 454.19
318, 593, 752.14
320, 225, 794. 87
320, 878, 411.60
321,333, 253.10
321, 612, 423.49
316, 536, 823.28
310,220, 120. 43
306, 086, 471.18

Gold certificates
in Treasury.

$27,246, 020
26, 525, 830
29, 701, 980
33, 546, 960
32, 477, 750
' 26,701,060
' 26, 343, 730
22, 299, 150
40,426,030
37, 689, 990
28, 625,290
14, 371, 350
13, 593,410
17, 322, 320
16, 606, 230
22, 249, 240
31,115, 850
34,492, 968
34, 350, 479
24, 060, 709
33,671,010
46, 797,927
52, 396, 875
51, 735, 670
- 5.5,129,870
52, 258, 360
48, 693, 980
40, 654, 320
36, 878, 458
34,469,694
27,485, 804
18, 843, 632
24, 256, 230
29, 757, 610
28, 905, 040
32,101,358
30, 261, 380
18, 098, 560
23, 008, 207
29,154, 288
32, 858,158
39, 974, 838
3L 010, 394
20. 6(;8, 210
26. 962,168
29,651,464
20, 853. 500
33, 574,110
22,13.5, 780
30, 234, 688
36,591,356
25,516,410
26, 163, 492
37,441,932
36,127,702
25, 043, 518
24, 802, 813
26, 586, 125
20. 783, 433
27,350,140
37, 235, 793
34, 669, 943
39, 557, 233
42, 073, 803
34, 925, 823
30, 668, 090
31, 316,100
20, 452, 870
28, 222, 835
24, 614, 210
24,142, 200
27, 473,120
26.162, 960
27, 577,120
33, 005, 730
16, 058, 780

Gold certificaabes i n circiilation.

N e t gold i n
T r e a s u r y , coin
a n d bullion.

$71,146, 640
$133, 729,954.15
9L49L490
, 119,048. 060.98
•
122,465, 717.17
92, 017, 940
.130, 514,
87, 389, 660
382.81
134, 670,790.43
87, 865, 570
138, 015,070.85
93, 374, 290
93, 287, 420
141, 688,431.95
111, 98U, 380"
125,187, 595. 84
112, 083, 290
127, 348,553. 24
115, 967, 540
/125„473, 256.37
125, 234, 800
117,927, 39L 81
128,5.53,0.0
115,810, 533. 59
120,298, 895.25
126, 729, 730
123, 289, 000 • 126, 078.595. 20
126, 371,927.89
123, 885, 490
133,113, 324. 54
118.137, 790
109, 020, 760
142, 338,.589.29
105, 554, 092
146, 391,486.13
105, 359, 601
147,991, 808.48
115,284, 951
136, 086.610.58
105, 637, 050
144,164, 037. 53
90, 775, 643 . 1.5L379.524. 40
155, 865,307. 67
84,715,225
80,120, 025
156. 304,709. 21
156, 793,748. 91
76, 044, 375
158, 933,005. 45
74, 718, 517
77, 698, 347 • 157,732,288.24
157, 917,21L37
84,691, 807
158, 537,179.40
88. 294, 969
163, 930.220. 57
90. 520,633
170, 912,413. 47 .
97, 215, 605
168, 475,361.85
105,665,107
175,130, 261. 45
99, 958,365
181, 939,847.15
94. 046, 015
180, 902,430. 90
94,434,485
186, 667,773. 47
90, 960, 977
186, 875,669. 26 '
91,225,437
186, 306,330. 45
94, 990, 087
193, 274,193. 67
88, 765, 340
97, 984, 683
192, 717,946. 70
99,684, 773
202, 859,832.45
211, 880,525.68
90, 780, 753
208, 608,130. 07
96,734,057
202, 955,184.27
104,853,971
212, 869,913.88
96, 697; 913
218,818, 253.63
91, 953, 949
99,561,^293
213, 239,994.15
200, 301,128.81
109, 581, 730
193, 866,246.89
119, 887, 370
280.34
131, 959,112
194, 592,
206, 383,036.44
124, 750, 394
• 197,713,115.52
134, 838,190
191, 074,575.11140, 613, 658
199, 339,133. 29
129, 264, 228
203, 885,218. 56
120,^88,448
194, 655,264.12
130, 98G, 592
190,245, 980.81
130, 210, 717
197, 874,421.96
128, 826, .517
136,614,789
191, 589,111.80
129,044,662
192, 252,714. 96
116,792,759
186, 711,560.58
118, 541,409
182,218, 163. 98
123, 39.3, 519 - 180,6.54,'670. 30
189,196, 423. 02
116, 675, 349
120, 937, 229 ' 187,572,386. 21
187,496, 672. 06
123, 483,119
122, 985, 889 . 190,833,052. 47
138, 657.169 ' 177,386,285.19
948.14
130, 604,.804
I 187, 988,
134, 938, 079
' 185,287,715. 87
134, 642, 839 ' 186,235,572. 60
130, 788, 399 ; 190,544,854.10
131, 380, 019 ' 190,232,404.49 •
132, 444,749
184,092, 074.28
124, 382, .539
185, 837,581.43
158,104,739
147, 981,732.18

76

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 38.—AMOUNT OF STANDARD S I L V E R DOLLARS COINED, I N THE TREASURY, AND
IN CIRCULATION, AND OF SILVERS CERTIFICATES OUTSTANDING, AT THE E N D OF
BACH MONTH FROM MARCH, 1878, TO SEPTEMBER, 1890.

Month.

Silver
Standard
SUver
Standard
certificates
s i l v e r d o l l a r s s i l v e r d o l l a r s certificates i n i n circulain Treasury.
Treasury.
coined. •
tion.

1R78 M a r\JkJL • > • • * •
ch
$1, 001, 500 ^ $810,561
X O f t/'~"~JULC*X
3 169 681
3 471 500
April-.
6,' 486,' 500 ^ 5,950,451
May.o„
June
8, 573, 500
7, 718, 3.57
July...:-...
10, 420, 500
9, 550, 236
August
13, 448, 500
11,292, 849
September..
16, 212, 500
12,155, 205
October
18,282, 500
13, 397, 571
November..
20,438,550
14, 843, 219
22, 495, 550
16, 704,829
D e c e m b e r -.
1879—January.-..
24, 555, 750
17,874, 457
February...
26, 687, 750
19, 505, 767
March
28, 774, 950
21,558, 894
April
o.
31,155, 950
23, 694, 563
33,485,950
26,181, 045
May..»c,...
June,
35, 801, 000
28,147, 351
37,451, 000
29,151, 801
July
40, 238, 050
30, 678,464
August
September-.
42, 634,100
31,559, 870
October
45,206, 200
32,322,634
November-o
47, 705, 200
32, 839, 207
D e c e m b e r -.
50,055, 650
33,168,064
52, 505, 650
34, 961, 611
1880—Janua.ry
February.-.
54, 806, 050
36,972, 093
March
57,156, 250
38,780, 342
April
59,456,250
40, 411, 673
May
61, 723,250
42, 778,190
63, 734, 750
44,425, 315
June...
July
66, 014. 750
46,192, 791
August
68, 267, 750
47,495, 063
September-.
70, 568, 750
47. 654, 675
October
72, 847, 750
47, 084, 450
N o v e m b e r -.
75,147, 750
47, 397, 453
D e c e m b e r -.
77, 4.53,005
48,190, 518
1881—January..-.
79,753, 005
50,235,102
February.-82, 060, 005
52, 939, 460
March
84, 359, .505
55,176,158
April
86, 659, 505
58, 044, 826
88, 959, 505
60, 518, 273
May
Jnne
91, 372, 705
62,544,722
93, 622, 705
64, 246, 302
.
July
August....
95, 922, 705
65, 948, 344
September..
98, 322, 705
66, 092, 667
October
100,672, 705
66, 576, 378
102, 972, 705
68, 017, 452
November..
D e c e m b e r -- 105,380, 980
69, 589, 937
1882—January
107, 680, 980
72, 421, 584
F e b r u a r y . . . 109,981.180
75,138,957
March
112,281,680
78.178, 583
81, 595, 056
April
: . 114,581,680
.116,843,680
84, 606, 043
May
June
119,144,780
87,153, 816
121, 304, 780
88, 840, 899
July
August
123, 729, 780
91,166, 249
September..
126,029, 880
92, 228, 649
October
128, 329, 880
92,414, 977
November..
130, 629, 880
92, 940, 582
D e c e m b e r -- 132,955,080
94, 016, 842
1 8 8 3 — J a n u a r y . - . . 135,405, 080
97, 530, 969
" F e b r u a r y - -. 137,805,080. 100, 261,444
March
140, 205, 699
103,482, 305
April
142, 555, 699
106, 366. 348
May
144, 905, 699
108, 898, 977
June
147, 255, 899
111, 914, 019
July.
.149,680,899
113,057,052
A u g u s t -- . . 152, 020,899
114, 320,197
September..
154, 370, 899
114, 587, 372
October..:..
156, 720, 949
116,036,450
November..
159, 070, 949
117, 768, 966
D e c e m b e r . . 161,425,119
119,449, 385
1884—January
163, 775,119
123, 474, 748 •
February.-166,125,119
126, 822, 399
March
168,425,629
129, 006,101
April
170, 725, 629
130, 314, 065
May.o
173,035,629
132„626, 753




Standard .
Net
standard
sDver dollars
s i l v e r d o l l a r s in oircula-,
in T r e a s u r y .
tion.

$810, 561
$190, 939
3,106, 681
*°°"°§63,'6oo"
301, 819
27, 330
5,923,121
536^049
1, 455, 520
7, 080
7,711,277
855, 143
2, 647, 940
• 979,230
8, 571, 006
870, 264
4,424, 600
1,709, 280
9,583, 569
2,155, 651
1, 316, 470
711, 600 . 11,443, 605
4, 057, 295
2, 63.9, 560
68,790
13, 328,781
4, 884, 929
1, 907,460
366, 060
14,477,159
5, 595, 331
2, 082, 770
.-413,360
16, 291, 469
5, 790, 721
2,170, 840
400, 340
17, 474,117
6, 681, 293
1, 976, 320
331,860
19,173. 907
7.181, 983
2, 074, 830 '
251, 700
2L 307,194
7,216,0.56
L 779, 340
197,680
23,496, 883
7,461, 387
L 922, 820
^444,140
25, 736, 905
7, 304, 9U5
2, 052, 470
414, 480
27, 732,871
7, 653, 649
2, 014, 680
77L 170
28,380, 631
8. 299,199
1,976, 960
1, 304, 890
29, 373, 574
9, 559, 586
3, 045,130
1,176, 720
30, 383,150
11, 074, 230
4, 531,479
1,604, 371
30, 718, 263
12, 883, 506
5,173,188
1; 894, 722
30, 944, 485
14, 865, 993
6, 888, 658
3, 824, 252
29, 343, 812
16, 887, 586
5,063,456
3, 989, 454
30, 972,157
17, 544, 039
4, 797, 314
4, 572, 606
32, 399, 487
17, 833, 957
6, 611, 914
6,017,006
32, 763, 336
18, 375, 908
5,428,354
6, 61.5, 366
33, 796, 307
19, 044, 577
6,322, 731
6, 051, 539
36, 726, 651
18, 945, 060
6,584, 701
5, 789, 569
38, 635, 746
19, 309, 435
5, 758, 331
6, 930, 959
39, 261, 832
19,821,959
5, 518, 821
7, 619, 219
39, 875, 844
26, 772,687
6,318,769
12, 203,191
35, 451, 484
22, 914, 075
7, 333, 719
19,780,241
27, 304, 209
25, 763, 300
8, 572, 294
26, 504, 986
20,892,467
27, 7.50. 297
9, 454,419
36,127, 711
12,062, 807
29, 262, 487
9, 985, 583
36,814, 637
13, 420, 465
29, 517, 903
10, 856, 463
37, 027, 797
15, 911, 663
29,120, 545
10, 733, 085
39,445,815
15, 730,343
29,183, 347
11, 522,208
39,157, 932
18, 886,894 , 28,614,679
l l i 988,710
38, 784, 540
21,733,7.33
28,441,232
12, 055, 801
39.110, 729
23.433. 993
28, 827, 983
11,18L088
40, 802, 892
23, 443,410
29, 376, 403
11, 516, 432
46, 061. 878
19, 886. 466
29, 974, 361
11,559, 730
52, 590,180
' 13,502,487
32, 230, 038
7,488, 900
58, 838, 770
7, 737, 608
34, 096, 327
7, 089, 880
59, 573, 950
8, 443,502
34, 955, 253
6, 359,910
62. 315i 320
7, 274, 617
35, 791, 043
7, 462,130
61, 537, 540
10, 884, 044
35, 2.59, 396
8,549,470
60,125,010
15, 013, 947 , 34,842^223
8,931,930
.59, 423, 440
18, 75.5; 143
34,103, 097
8, 872, 790
58, 908, 570
22,686,486
32, 986, 624
10, 509,160
57, 227, 060
27, 378, 983
32, 237, 637
11, 590, 620 . 64,506,090
32, 647,726
31, 990. 964
12,36L490
54,7.57,720
34, 083,179
32,463,881
11, 700, 330
57, 739, 880
33,426,369
32, 563. 531
8, 364, 430
63, 204, 780
29, 023, 869
33, 801, 231
7,987,260
65, 620, 450
26, 794, 527
35,914,903
5. 752, 970
67, 342, 690
25, 597, 892
37,689, 298
4,405, 000
68, 443, 660
25, 573,182
38, 938, 238
4, 306, 650
68,438, 820
29, 092,149
37, 874, 111
5,268, 550
68,027,420
32, 234, 024
37, 543, 636
6,865, 340
70, 759, 991
32, 722, 314
36, 723, 394
8, 887,260
71, 884, 071
34, 482, 277
36,189, 351
8,305,940
7L 727,391
37,171, 586
36, 006, 722
15, 996,145
72, 620, 686
39,293,333
35, 341, 880
15, 542, 730
73, 728, 681
39, 328, 371
36, 623, 847
17, 276, 820
75, 375,161
38, 945, 036
37, 700. 702
15, 568, 280
78, 921, 961
35, 66.5, 411
39, 783, .527
14.214, 760
85, 334,381
30,702,069
40, 684, 499
13, 806, 610
87, 976, 201
29,792, 765
41, 301, 983
13,180, 890
96, 717,721
22,731,664
4L 975, 734
13,179, 020
96,958,031
26,516,717
40, 300, 371
13,890,100
96,247,721
30, 574, 678
39, 302, 720
20, 488, 585
95,919, 576
33,086,525'
39,419, 528
20, 876, 250
95,497,981
34, 816,084
40,411, 564
19. 936, 620
97,363,471
35, 263, 282
40, 408,876

$3i4,'7io*

TREASURERO ^

^ 77

No. ;38,—AMOUNT OF^ STANDARD SILVER DOLLARS COINED, ETC.—Continned.

Date,

Silver
Standard
Silver
Standard
certificates
s i l v e r doUars s i l v e r d o l l a r s certificates
i n circulain ^Treasury. i n T r e a s u r y .
coined..
tion.

^ Standard
Net,'
silver dollars
standard
s i l v e r dollars i n circulation.
in Treasury.

$39,133,905
$39, 794,913
$175, 355,829 $135, 560,916
$23, 384, 680 $96,427,011
1884-June..
July
177,680, 829
137, 692,119
2.5,26.5,980
95,138,361
42, 553, 758
39, 988, 710
August
180, 030,829
140, 615, 722
26, 903, 230
94,228,691
46, 387, 031
39, 415,107
September..
182, 380, 829
142, 058, 787
26, 769,470
96, 491, 251
45, 567, 536
40, 322, 042
October
184, 730, 829
142, 926, 725
30, 814, 970 100,741, 561
42,185,164
41, 804,104
November..
187,180, 829 144, 745, 075
28, 951, 590 104, 988, 531
39, 756, 544
42,435,754
D e c e m b e r . . 189,561,994
146, 502, 865
23, 302, 380 114, 865, 911
31, 636, 954
43, 059,129 •
1885—January
191, 947,194
150, 632,154
27, 337, 890 113, 858, 811
36, 773,343
41,315,040
F e b r u a r y . . - 194, 247,194
153, 561, 007
29, 951, 880 111, 467, 951
42, 093, 056
40, 086,187
March
196, 697, 394
156, 698,482
30,861, 615 112, 820, 226
43,878,256
39, 998, 912
April
o- 199,107, 394
159, 441, 034
49,997,088
39,666,360
32,14L140 109, 443, 946
May
201, 509, 231
162, 244, 855
35, 575, 590 105, 085,186
57,159,669
39,264, 376
June
.--- 203, 884, 381
165, 413.112
38, 370, 700 101, 530, 946
63, 882,166
38.471,269
July
205, 784, 381
166,499,948
40, 340, 980
98, 872,106
67, 627, 842 . 39, 284,433
August
208, 259, 381
166, 854, 215
42, 712, 890
96, 079, 296
70, 774, 919
41, 405,166
September..
210, 759, 431
165,483, 721
31,722,990
93,656,716
71, 827, 005
45, 275, 710
October
213, 259, 431
163, 817, 342
31, 906, 514
93,146,772
70, 670, 570
49, 442,089
N o v e m b e r . . 215, 759,431
165, 568, 018
32, 034, 464
92, 702, 642
72, 865, 376
50,191,413
D e c e m b e r . . 218, 259, 761
165, 718,190
3L 164, 311
93,179,465
72, 538, 725
52, 541, 571
1886—January
220, 553, 761
169, 083, 385
33, 978, 767
89, 761, 609
79,321, 776
51, 470, 376
February...
223,145,761
17L 805, 906
34, 837,660
88, 390, 816
. 83,415, 090
51, 339, 855
March
225, 9.59, 761
174,700, 985
32,410,575
90,122,421
84, 578, 564
5L 258, 776
April
228, 434,121
175,928, 502
31,]4L055
90,733,141
85,195,361
52,505,619
May
231,160,121
178, 2.52, 045
30,41L016
89,184,129
89,067,91.6
52, 908, 076
June..
233,723,286
181, 253, 566 • 27,80L450
88,116,225
93,137, 341
52,469, 720
July
235, 643, 286
181, .523, 924
27, 728, 858
87,564,044
93, 959, 880
54,119, 362
August
238,573,286
181, 769,457
25, .571, 492
89, 021, 760
92, 747, 697
56,803, 829
September..
241, 281, 286
181, 262, 593
22. 555, 990
95, 387.112
85, 875,481
60, 018, 693
October-...;.
244, 079, 386 • 182, 931; 231
17, 562, 302 100, 306, 800
82,624,431 - 6L 148,155
' N o v e n i b e r . . 246,903, 386
184,911,938
14,137, 285 105, 519, 817
79. 392,121
61, 991,448
D e c e m b e r . . 249, 623, 647
188, 506, 238
7, 338, 432 117, 246, 670=^
71, 259, 568
61,117, 409
1887—January
252, 503, 647
193,963,783
6,737,388 118,183, 714
,75,780, 069
58,539,864
February...
255,453, 647
198,112, 760
5,.466, 347 121,130, 755
76, 982, 005
^57,340,887
March
258, 474, 027
201, 672, 372
6, 212, 849 131,930,489
69, 741, 883
56, 801, 655
April
261, 524, 027
205,-788, 822
5, 007, 700 137, 740,430
68, 048, 392
55, 735, 205
May
264, 474. 027
209, 0.52,567
5, 289,164 139,143. 328
69, 909, 239
55,421, 460
June
266,990,117
211,483,970
3, 425,133 142,118,017
69, 365,953
55, 506,147,,
July-.
'267,440,117 -211,528,891
4, 209,659 144,166,141
67, 362, 750 ' 55,91L226
August
270,250,117
213,212, 448
5,996,443 147, 876, 385
65, 336,063
57, 037, 669
September..
273, 390,157
213, 043, 796
3,919, 841 154,354,826
58, 688, 970 ~ 60,346,361
October
276, 816,157
214,175, 532
3,451,494 160,713,957
53,461,575
62, 640, 625
N o v e m b e r . . 280,144,157
215. 882, 443
4,413, 446 168,149, 274
47, 733,169
fi4,26L 714
D e c e m b e r - . 283,140,3.57
218, 917, 539
6,339, 570 176, 855, 423
42, 062,116
64, 222, 81«
1888—January
285, 845, 357
223, 918, 380'
14, 930, 517 179, 321, 053
44,597,327
61,926,977
February-..
288, 545, 357
227, 947, 493
21,166,469 184,452,659
43,494,834
60,597,864
March
29L 355, 789
2.32, 037. 274
19, 370,425 191, 526, 445
40,510,829
59,318,515
April
294, 039, 790
236,156, 394
18, 316,109 194,426. 932
41,729,462
57, 883, 396
May
297, 037, 790
240,587,970.
20,458,423 196, 645,405
43,942,565
56.449.820
June,
299,424, 790
243, 879,487
29,104, 396 200,387,376
43,492,111
55, 545, 303
July
300, 708, 790
245, 798,765
23, 361, 286 203, 680,679
42,118,086
54,910, 025
August
303,320,790
247, 859, 402
15, 528, 762 209, 658,966
•38,200,436
55, 461, 388
September.:
306, 542, 890
248, 791, 534
9, 819, 875 218, 561, 601
30, 229, 933
57, 75L 356
October
309, 670, 890
249, 979, 440
7,404, 624 229,783,152
20,196,.288
59,691,450
November:.
312,450,890
251, 975, 505
8, 834, 485 237, 415, 789
14, 559,716
60, 475, 385
December..
315,186,190
254, 406, 869
3, 958, 567 246,219,999
8,186, 870
60, 779, 321
1889—January
318,186.190 . 259,81L329
4, 717,113 245, 337,438
14,473, 891
58,374, 861
February--.
320,946,490
263, 514, 586
5,717,898 246,628, 953
16, 885,'633
57,431, 904
March
323,776, 515 . 267,286,476
4,760,236 251, 263,679
16, 022,497
56, 490, 339
April.......
326, 974, 515
271,326, 743
3,45L830 254, 939, 203
16, 387,1540
55, 647, 772
May
330,188, 540
275,484, 223
6, 205, 089 255, 537,810
19,946,413
54, 704,317
June
333,422,650
279,084, 683
5,527, 301 257,102,445
21, 982,: 238
54,337,967
July
334, 602, 650
280, 382, 395
5, 651, 271 259, 557,125
20,825,270
54, 220, 255
August
337, 502, 650
282, 583, 864
6,141,. 570 268, 580, 626
14,003,238
54, 918, 786
September-.
340,357,650
282, 983, 550
3, 878, 052 276, 619, 715
6,363,835
57, 374,100
O c t o b e r . . . - 343. 428, 001
283,539,521
2, 328. 373 277,319,944
6, 219, 577
59, 888,480
November..
346,798, 001
286,101, 364
2, 419,174 276, 794, 386
9, 306, 978
60, 696, 637
D e c e m b e r ... 349, 802, 001
288,535, 500
2,252, 966 282. 949, 073
5. 586,; 427 1 61, 266, 501
1890—January....
352, 536, 001
293,229, 364
3, 254,118 281, 331, 771
I L 897,'593
59, 306, 637
February...
355, 948, 001
297, 575, 621
4, 063, 377 284,176, 262
13,399,359
58,372, 380
March
359, 884, 266
302,036,610
3,407, 891 290, 605, 562
I L 431, 048
57, 847, 656
April
363,424, 266
306,429, 289
4, 438, 605 1 292, 923, 348
13,505.941
56,994, 977
May
366, 336, 266
309, 988, 092
4, 936, 023 294,656,083
1.5,332,009
56, 348,174
June
369,402, 466
313,259, 910
4, 329,708 297, 210, 043
16,049,867 ' 56,132, 556
Jnly
371.146,466
314, 744, 988
4,442. 258 298, 748,913
•1.5,996.085
56.401,4ti8
August
372, 528, 466
314,491,592
4,951,861 1 303,471,210
11,020,382
58, 036, 874
S e p t e m b e r . I 373,278,406
31L704,925
1,852, 364 j 309,321, 207
2,383,718
61, 573, 541




78

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No.' 39.—UNITED STATES N O T E S I N THE T R E A S U R Y AND C E R T I F I C A T E S OF D E POSIT, A C T OF J U N E 8, 1872, I N T H E T R E A S U R Y AND I N CIRCULATION, AT T H E
E N D OF EACH M O N T H , F R O M M A R C H , 1 8 7 8 , TO SEPTEMBER, 1 8 8 9 .

Month.

1878—March
April ..
May
June.'July ......
August —
September
October —
Noveniber
December.
1879—Januaty . .
February.,
March'
;
April
May
June
July
_
.
August —
September,
October —
November
December.,
, 1880—January . F e b r u a i - y ..
March
April
M a y . -:
June
July.-.-...
August —
September
October—
November
December.
1881—January .February.,
March :
April
May.June
July
. August —
September
October—
November
December.
1882—January . .
February .
March..-.
April
.,
May
June
Jnly
August.-.
September
October —
November
December.
1883—January..
February.,
M a r c h . T-.
April
May
June
July..--..
August...
September
October.-November
December.
1884—January..
F e b r n a r y .,
March
April
M a y oopooo




Total United
States notes in
Treasury,
$47,327, 341.75
49, 521, 372.12
56, 695, 892. 66'
62, 020, 120. 73
67,105, 859.19
68, 348, 254. 36
63, 049, 339.67
64,175, 605. 84
63, 655, 404.16
59, 582, 505. 38
62, 463, 706. 94
72, 650, 231. 65
67, 370, 677.54
61, 998, 485.16
69,142, 335.67
66, 015, 969.62
63, 791, 465. 73
70, 597, 606. 37
48,173, 254.41
37,522, 567. 20
29, 973, 454.09
22, 660, 493. 88
24, 299, 562. 45
26,149, 093.12
24, 080, 080. 79
26, 474, 279. 79
30, 833, 019. 9?
33, 020. 559.11
34, 099, 123.52
31, 649, 849. 33
27,148, 612. 89
22, 418, 992. 71
19, 574, 937.36
15, 741, 818. 06
19,18L 616. 35
22, 206, 600. 52
21, 338, 197.63
22, 927, 086. 33
26, 922, 304. 87
30, 204, 092.45
29, 624, 909. 88
29, 320, 869.01
27,130, 132. 07
26, 281, 768. 66
26,401, 078.19
25, 992, 799. 99
28, 714, 39L46
29, 70L 850.17
28,371, 415. 21
28, 627, 824. 31
31, 938, 690.18
34,670, 589. 08
34, 969, 589.86
35, 883, 940. 65
31, 948, 158.41
29, 689, 196.17
30, 591, 392. 21
28, 454, 394.86
33, 592, 236. 55
32, 744. 817.28
29, 878, 561. 26
' 30,969, 623. 27
33,471, 824. 57
36, 498, 839. 42
37, 632, 646. 03
37, 791, 765.88
37,194, 420. 01
37,11.3, 037. 33
39, 874, 644.35
39, 644, 248. 72
42,156, 188. 89
45, 808, 632. 26
45, 904, 652. 22
45, 765, 833. 28
38, 731, 840.75

Certificates
of d e p o s i t i n
Treasury.
$2, 810. 000
920, 000
235, 000
570, 000
460, 000
1,460, 000
1, 345. 000
180, 000
2,120, 000
1, 510, 000
755, 000
9, 425, 000
2, 580, 000
1,140, 000
1,155, 000
1,450, 000
590,-000
960, 000
1, 975, 000
2, 315, 000
685, 000
425, 000
215. 000
670. 000
175, 000
175, 000
600,000
360, 000
590, 000
105, 000
90, 000
150, 000
75, 000
25,000
325, 000
240, 000
40, 000
275, 000
215, 000
175, 000
210, 000
35, 000
55, 000
50, 000
70,'O00
105, 000
215, 000
125,000
265, 000
7.5,0.00
510, 000
185,000^
130, 000
. 110, 000
10, 000
10, 000
60, 000
210, 000
250, 000
55, 000
15,000
315, 000
25, 000
90,000
75, 000
75,000
100, 000
80,000
45, 000
90, 000
520, 000
105, 000
20, 000

Certificates
of d e p o s i t in
circulation.

Net United
S t a t e s n o t e s in
Treasury. .

$22, 585, 000 $24,742, 341. 75
27,835,000.
2L 686, 372.12
36, 95.5, 000
19, 740, 892. 66
15,775,120.73
46, 245, 000
51,120, 000
15, 985, 859.19
47, 815, 000
20, 533, 254.36
23, 504, 339. 67
39, 545, 000
28, 515, 60.5.84
35, 660, 000
28, 585,404.16
35, 070, 000
26, 392, 505.38
33,190, 000
40, 445, 000
22, 018, 706.94
36, 675, 000 , 35,975,231.65
25,145, 000
42, 225, 677.54
30, 905, 000
31, 093,485.16
25, 880, 000
43, 262, 335.67
29, 355, 000
36, 660, 969. 62
40, 250, 000
23, 541,465.73
34, 375, 000
36, 222, 606.37
29, 240, 000
18,933, 254.41
20,195,000
17, 327,567.20
16, 388, 454. 09
13, 585. 000
10, 090, 000
12, 670, 493. 88
12, 685, 000
11, 614, 562.45
15, 054, 093.12
11, 095, 000
8, 320, 000
15, 760, 080. 79
17,489, 279. 79
8, 985, 000
18,183, 019. 97
12, 650, 000
14, 235, 000
18, 785, 559.11
15, 075, 000
19, 024,123:52
11, 205, 000
20,444,849.33
9, 885, 000
17, 263, 612. 89 ,
8, 625, 000
13, 793, 992. 71
8, 450, 000
11,124, 937. 36
6, 980, 000
8, 761, 818. 06
8,630, 000
10, 551, 616. 35
7, 640, 000 • 14,566,600.52
6, 565, 000 14,773,197.63
8, 25.5, 000 14, 672, 086.33
10, 860, 000
16, 062, 304. 87
11, 650, 000
18, 554, 092. 45
10, 525, 000
19, 099, 909. 88
9,450, 000
19, 870, 869. 01
8,105, 000
19, 025,132. 07
8, 275, 000
18,006,768.66
8, 990, 000
17, 411, 078.19
9, 540, 000
16,452, 799. 99
17,384,394.46
11, 330, 000
18,256,850.17
11,445, 000
17,446, 415. 21
10, 925, 000
10, 990, 000
17, 637, 824. 31
19,873, 690.18
12, 06.5, 000
21,425, .589. 08
13, 245, 000
22, 749, 589. 86
12,220,000
IL 815, 000
24, 068, 940.65
10, 540, 000
21,408,158. 41
9, 835. 000- 19, 854,196.17
9, 835, 000
20, 756, 392. 21
9, 575, 000
18, 879, 394. 86/
12,430, 000
21,162, 236. 55
11,130,000
2L 614, 817. 28
9,465,000
20,413,561.26
10, 050, 000
20, 919, 623.27
11, 790, 000
21, 681. 824. 57
13, 060, 000
23,438, 839.42
12, 885, 000
24, 747, 646.03
-12, 055, 000
25, 736, 765. 88
11, 870, 000
25,324,420.01
12, 545, 000
24, 568,037. 33
14, 365, 000
25, 509, 644. 35
14, 480, 000
25,- 16L 248. 72
16, 835, 000
25, 321; 188. 89
18,125, 000
27, 683, 632.26
14, 955, 000
30, 949, 652. 22
14, 920, 000
30, 845, 833. 28
11, 030,000
27, 701, 840. 75

79

TEEASUEEE.
No.

3 9 . — U N I T E D STATES N O T E S I N T H E T R E A S U R Y

AND C E R T I F I C A T E S

OF D E -

POSIT, A C T O F J U L Y 8, 1872, ETC—Continued,

Month.
1884—June
July
August
September..
October......
N o v e m b e r .'
December...
1885—January -.-',
February ...
March
:
April
May
June
July
August
September..
October
N o v e m b e r ..
Deceinber...
1 8 8 6 — J a n n a r y . ...
, February...
March
April
May
,
Juiie
July
August
September:,
October
November..
December...
1887—January
F e b r u a r y ...
March
,
April
,
,M.ay-.:'
Juue
July
August
September.,
October
November.,
D e c e m b e r ..
1888—January
February..
March.
April . -. —
May
' June
July.-..—
August
September..
October...-.
November.
December .
1889—January.'..
F e b r u a r y .March
April
,
May
June
.July
August
Sep tern b e r October
November .
December .
1890—January . . .
February..
March
April
May
. June
Jnly
August
September.




Total United
States notes in
Treasury.
183, 801. 75
727, 989. 53
843, 553. .52
24, 872. 86
942, 171.85
200, 683.43
499, 575. 42
958, 468. 83
926, 821.53
683, 288. 39
865, 690.08
417, 109.15
047, 378. 94
418, 996. 74
658, 656. 00
129, 332.35
695, 341.31
290, 642.91
731, 200.11
890, 388.92
197, 291. 92
214, 484. 54
603, 774.09
244, 098.33
118, 316.79
044, 142. 44
774, 647.22
224, 080. 83
107, 305. 27
573, 188. 34
679, 325. 78
003, 681.60
869, 20L 91
294, 937. 58
575, 473. 87
757, 376.30
783, 796.79
093,
287. 739.92
145, 538. 90
476. 212.17
153, 066. 74
409, 220.39
660, 424. 94
482, 468. 63
08.5, 086. 72
046, 622. 59
158, 614.30
398, 199.81
030, 204. 07
225, 739.84
358, 392.78
393, 963. 25
562, 320.20
125, 956. 22
361, 859. 86
220, 498.18
501, 510.98
350, 231.12
940, 136. 89
336, 387.13
939, 085. 23
870, 366. 31
445, 935. 08
813, 258. 22
959, 500. 60
673, 022.26
236, 925.19
823, 223. 86
579, 865.20
004, 656.93
747, 410.61
634, 798. 81
983, 189.96
393, 411.56
765, 710. 32
290.20

Certificates
of deposit in
Treasury.
$195, 000
6.5, 000
150, 000
315, 000
85.000
120,000
160. 000
•45. 000
380, 000
1, 00.5, 000
50, 000
315, 000
200, 000
260, 000
695, 000
695, 000
410, 000
210,000
265, 000
260, 000
385, 000
840, 000
225, 000
585, 000
250, 000
470, 000
1, 510, 000
150, 000
20, 000
280, 000
200,000
100, 000
250, 000
410, 000
160, 000
410, 000
310, 000
350, 000
420,000
150, 000
170, 000
320, 000
130, 000
280,000
440, 000
650,000
100, 000
470, 000
250, 000
100, 000
90, 000
580, 000
390, 000
150, 000
470, 000
•95, 000
. 280,000
510, 000
. 110, 000
270, 000
240, 000
30, 000
460, 000
770, 000
350, 000
610,000
570, 000
90, 000
250, 000
990, 000
140, 000
340, 000
- 450,000
40,000
410, 000
180, 000

Certificates '
of d e p o s i t i n
circulation.

N e t Unitecl
States notes in
Treasury.

$12,190,000
$27, 993, 801. 75 .
13,165, 000
29,562, 989.53
14, 270, 000, 26, 573, 553. 52
15, 630, 000
20,894, 872.'86
17, 770, 000
16,172, 17L85
22, 575, 000
9,625, 683. 43
11, 739, 575.42
24, 760, 000
13.873, 468. 83
30,085, OOO
18, 726, 821.53
30, 200, ooo!
20,473, 288. 39
26, 210, 000
21,465, 690. 08
25, 400, 000
26, 925, 000- 23, 492, 109.15
15, 462, 378. 94
29, 585.000!
16, 998, 996. 74
31. 420, 000
30. 865, 000; 24.793, 656.00
27,944, 332. 35
23,185, 000
27,550, 341. 31
18,145, 000
25,735, 642. 91
17, 555, 000'
27, 941, 200.11
13,790,000
33, 300, 388. 92
14, 590, 000
14, 920, 000
32, 277, 291. 92
30, 289, 484. 54
, 11,925,000
26,088, 774. 09
I L 51.5, 000
26, 289, 098. 33
13, 955, ooo;
22, 868, 316. 79
18, 250, 000
21, 939, 142.44
• 19,105,000
11,195, 000
35, 579, 647.22
7, 705, 000'
36, 519, 080. 83
7,140. 000
30, 967, 305. 27
7, 025, 000
29, .548, 188. 34
6, 510, 000
23.169, 325.78
8,720,000,
24, 283, 681. 60
8,180, O O
Oi
25, 689, 201. 91
- 7,135,000
21,159, 937.58
' 8, 350, 000
20, 225, 473. 87
21,767, 376.30
8, 990, 000
20,013, 796. 79
8, 770, 000
8,460, 000^
19, 633, 739. 92
7,130, 000
21,157, .538. 90
17, 610, 212.17
6, 535, 000
7, 215, 000
15, 261, 066. 74
6, 83.5, 000
16, 318, 220.39
15, 424, 424. 94
6, 985, 000
10,645, 000
18, 015, 468. 63
11,215,000
22,267. 086. 72
8,915,000:
'24,170, 622.59
10,555,000'
28,491, 614.30
12, 230, 000'
33, 928, 199.81
14, 415, 000
37, 983, 204.07
39„825. 739. 84,
15,205, ooo;
4L580. 392'. 78
14, 645, 000,
.40, 628, 963. 25
12, 730, 000
36, 813, 320.20
I L 580, 000
35, 202, 956.22
11, 360. 000
30, 875, 859. 86
10,250, ooo;
29, 446, 498.18
13,91.5,000
29, 300, 510. 98
15, 920, 000
25,051, 231.12
14, 450, 000
23,770, 136. 89
14, 580, 000
27, 790, 387.13
16,150, 000
29,601, 085. 23
16, 735, 000
30, 364, 366.31
17, 575, 000
32, 325, 935. 08
16, 545, 000
21.170, 258. 22
15, 275, 000'
17, 303, 500. 60
12, 510, 000
14,819, 022. 26
10,140. 000
6, 673, 925.19
9, 000,000
7, 606, 22,3.86 '
n , 630, O O
Oi
9, 593, 865.20
10, 230, 000
6,919, 656.93
7, 660, 000,
7, 209, 410. 61
8, 795, 000
9, 892, 798.81
9, 855, 00011, 804, 189. 96
11, 830, 0001
12,163, 41L56
11,820, ooo:
10, 573, 710.32
8,820,000,
. 5,775, 290. 20
6,990, ooo;

80

'

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCESo

.

No. 4 0 . — S E V E N - T H I R T Y NOTES ISSUED, R E D E E M E D , AND OUTSTANDING.
Eedeemed.
T o t a l issued.

Issue.

Outstanding.
T o J u n e 30, D u r i n g fiscal
year.
1889.

$140.094, 750
299, 992,500
331, 000, 000
199, 000, 000

-.

$140,083, 950
299. 942. 350
330, 967, 450
198* 952, 200

$50
100
150

$140,083,950
299,942,400
330,967, 550
198, 952, 350

$10 800
50,100
32,450
47, 650

970,087, 250

' J n l v l 7 1861
' A u g u s t 15, 1 8 6 4 . ^ . . . . . . .
J u n e 15, 1865 -. - J u l y 15, 1865..

To J u n e 30.
1890.

969,945, 950

300

969,946,250

141,000

p

Total

No.

41,—COUPONS FROM U N I T E D STATES BONDS AND I N T E R E S T N O T E S P A I D DURING T H E F I S C A L YEAR 1890, CLASSIFIED B Y LOANS.

j
!
'

Amount.

T i t l e of loan.

Bonds:
L o a n of J u l v anfl A u g u s t , 1861 — -.
5-208 of 1862^
•
10-40fi of 1864
5-20s of 1865
o
Consols of 1865
Consols of 1867
Consols of 1868 '.

No.

T i t l e of loan.

$15. 00
2.53. 50
12. 50
45.00
43.50
267.00
L50

Bonds;
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881
„
F u n d e d loan of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907
Interest notes:
S e v e n - t h i r t i e s of 1864 a n d 1865. - . . .
Total

o

F u n d e d l o a n of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907

Number.

..oo= = o . . . a . . . . . . . . . .
„

10 94
4, 803, 919.69

Total

o

$4, 395,912.80
22, 265, 630. 50

»
o

29. 926
128,744
158,670
4,354

26, 661, 543. 30
3, 877, 410. 72

163,024

30, 538, 954. 02

„

43.—INTEREST ON 3.65 P E R C E N T . B O N D S OF T H E D I S T R I C T OF
P A I D DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.
W h e r e paid.

Coupons.

Treasury United States, Washington
Sub-treasury United States, N e w Y o r k
To;tal..„a.

...,.

Amount

.-

Total
B o n d s i s s u e d t o Pacific r a i l w a y s

No.

„„.,

$128. 75
1,134. 506. 00
3, 668, 636. 00

42.—NUMBER AND AMOUNT O F CHECKS ISSUED FOR I N T E R E S T ON R E G I S T E R E D B O N D S OF T H E U N I T E D STATES DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.
T i t l e of l o a n .

No.

Amount.

'

» . . . . . „ „ = ..

Checks.

COLUMBIA

Total.

$15,682.20
57, 903. 60

$55,151.50
398,872.00

• $70,833.70
456, 775. 60

73,585.80

454, 023.50

527,609,30

4 4 . — R E F U N D I N G C E R T I F I C A T E S I S S U E D UNDER T H E ACT OF F E B R U A R Y
1879, C O N V E R T E D INTO B O N D S O F T H E F U N D E D L O A N OF 1907,

26,

Converted.
• Issued.

Outstanding.
T o J u n e 30,
1889.

D u r i n g fiscal T o J n n e 30,
year.
1890.

P a y a b l e to o r d e r
Payable to bearer

$58, 500
39, 954,250

$58.080
39, 835,030

$40
15, 74C

$58,120
, 39,850,770

$380
103,480

Total

40, 012, 750

39, 893,110

15,780

39,908,890

103,860




81

TEEASUEER.
No.

45.—TOTAL AMOUNT O F U N I T E D STATES B O N D S AND S E C U R I T I E S R E T I R E D FOR
THE S I N K I N G F U N D , FROM M A Y , 1869, TO J U N E 30,
1890,

To J u n e
1889.

H o w retired.

T i t l e of l o a n .

TiOan of Ffiliniarv 1861 > « . .

Total

10, 614,000. 00

...........

Purchased
Kedeemed

Total...

Total
-

•

•-

•

256, 800 00
1,250.00
258, 050.00

^ 48,776,700.00
31, 700. 00

48, 776, 700.00
31, 700.00

1

'

i . . 48 808,400.00

24, 029,150. 00
30,036,400.00

24, 029,150. 00
30, 036,400.00
54, 065, 550.00

19, 854, 250. 00
14,500.00

19, 854, 250.00
14, 500.00

j

19, 868, 750. 00

1...

19, 868, 750.00

691, 600. 00
361, 600. 00

..

Redeemed
Purchased
. . . do
Kedeemed

5-20s of J u n e , 1864

10,614, 000.00

54, 065, 550. 00

...........

««..a..«.easi«...«. P u r c h a s e d . . . . . . «
Hedeemed .....<>....

10-408 of 1864
5-208 of M a r c h , 1864

'

25.6, 800.00
1,250.00

48,808, 400. 00

Total

Tjoan of 1863

$10,612, OUO. 00
2, 000. OC

258, 050. 00

Total
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1 8 6 1 . . . P u r c h a s e d . . . . . s o .
Kedeemed

=.-'.,1,.

D u r i n g fiscal To J u n e 30,
year. ;
1890.

Purchased
$10, 612, 000. 00
2, 000. 00
Redeemed . . . . . . . . . . . .

OrAfTOTi w a r d d b t .«...<.««••••..•• »• P u r c h a s e d

5-208 of 1862 . =

30,

691, 600. 00
361, 600. 00

18,356,100.00
I L 072, 100. 00

18, 356,100.00
11, 072,100.00

Total

29, 428, 2O0 00

29 4'>8, 200, 00

Purchased
Kedeemed

5-20sof 1865

16, 866,150. 00
1, 982, 450. 00

16,866,150.00
1, 982, 450. 00

f

Total

18,848,600.00

18, 848, 600. 00

P u i chased
Hedeemed

48,166,150. 00
65,450.00

48,166,150. 00
65, 450. 00

48, 231, 600. 00

..i 48,23L600.00

32,115, 600.00
76, 700. 00

32,115, 600. 00
76, 700.00

0

Consols of 1865

-

......

Total
Consols of 1867

=

Purchased
Kedeemed

.......

B

32,192, 300. 00

Total

Total

Total
Purchased
....do

3,000. 00

68,672,800.00
43,746,000.00
6L 424, 500.00

56, 597, 350.00
37,219,250.00
43, 688, 700.00
168, 568,100.00

Kedeemed
....do
....do
.-..do
Bonds purchased
Bonds redeemed

L 000.00

56, 598, 350.00
37, 219, 250.00
43, 688, 700. 00
4, 050. Ob 168,572,150.00

330, 545,450. 00 39,832, 350.00 370, 377, 800.00
375,139,700. 00
8, 050. 00 375,147,750.00
705, 685,150.00 39, 840, 400.00 745, 525, 550.00

^ T o t a l bonds




$3, 000. 00

43, 599, 000.00
25, 073, 800. 00

31,60^,2.50.00 12,136, 750.00
33. 728, 900.00 27, 695,600. 00

Purchased........
Kedeemed
.-....-.

FI90-

2, 235,150. 00

43, 599, 000.00
25, 070, 800. 00
68, 669, 800. 00

F u n d e d l o a n of 1 8 8 1 . o . . .

Treasury notes, issued prior to
1846
C e r t i f i c a t e s of i n d e b t e d n e s a of
1870
o
One-year n o t e s of 1863 . . . . . . . . . . .
T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863
Compound-interest notes

2,213, 800.00
21, 350. 00

2,235,150. 00

Purchased
Kedeemed

F u n d e d l o a n of 1891
F u n d e d l o a n of 1907
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861—
continaed
L o a n of 1863—continued
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881—continued..
L o a n of J u l y 12,1882

32,192, 300.00

,

2,213,800.00
'
21,350.00'

Consols of 1868

Kedeemed
....do
....do
.._do
c.do

..==.

100. 00
678, 000. oo'
1, 780.00
350. 00
8,200.00

100 00
280.00
L 930.00

678, 000. 00
2, 060.00
350. 00
10,130.00

82

REPORT ON T H E FINANCESo

No. 45.—TOTAL AMOUNT OF U N I T E D STATES BONDS AND .SECURITIES R E T I R E D F O R

THE SINKING F U N D ,

ETC.—Continued.

T o J u n e 30,
1889.

Kedeemed .
...do
do:
.do.
.do .

7-.30sofl861
7-30S of 1864-'65
Fractional currency .
United States notes..
Old d e m a n d n o t e s

D u r i n g fiscal
year.

$50.00
4,300.00
26,199,192. 46
29, 090, 564. 00
820. 00

H o w retired.

T i t l e of loan.

$50.00
5,179. 50

T o J u u e 30,
1890.
$50.00
4, 350. 00
26, 204, 371. 96
29, 090. 564.00
820.00

761,^668,506.46 39, 847, 839.50 80L 516, 345.96

Aggregate.

No. 46.—TOTAL AMOUNT OF U N I T E D STATES BONDS R E T I R E D , „FROM MAY, 1869, TO
J U N E 30, 1890.
\ :;:
Kate
H o w r e t i r e d . of interest.

T i t l e of loan.

P e r ct.
6
6

Purchased
Redeemed

L o a n of F e b r u a r y , 1861

T o J u n e 3.0,
1889. ,

18,409, 000

18. 409, 000

,6
6

256, 800
685, 650

256, 800
685. 650

48, 776, 700
12, 860, 450

$1,100

48 776 700
12,864,550

61. 637,150

4,100

61, 641, 250

57,155,850
430, 271, 550
27, 091, 000

1,850

' 57,155,850
430, 273,400
27, 091, 000

514, 518,400

L850

. 514, 520, 250

19,854,250
4, 673,500

2, 500

19, 854, 250
4,676, 000

24, 527, 750

2,500

24,530,250

T o t a l . - -.
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1 8 6 1 . . P u r c h a s e d
Kedeemed

942,450

Total
Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted . - . .
Total

6
. 6
6

-.

Purchased
Kedeemed

L o a n of 1863

6
6

Total.-..
5-20sof M a r c h , 1864

o . . . . . . Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted

6
6
6

5-208 of 1865..

&
Consols of 1867




Total

43,459, 750
69, 838, 800
12, 218, 650

3. 882, 500

•

50

43. 459, 750
69, 838, 850
12,218,650

50

125, 517, 250

36, 023, 350
157. 689, 950
9,586,600

3, 200

36. 023, 350
157,693,150
9,586,600

203,299, 900

6
6
6
6

3,200

203, 303,100

118. 950, 550,
205,199,150
8, 703, 600

2, 750

118, 950, 550
205, 201, 900
8,70% 600

332,853, 300

6
6
6

Total
Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted
Exchanged...

•

125, 517, 200
6
6
6

Total....
Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted

Consols of 1865

1,119, 800
2.382,200
380, 5U0

3,882, 500
6
6
6

" Total
Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted

942, 450

1,119, 800
2, 382, 200
380, 500

Total
Purchased
Kedeemed
Converted

5-20s of J u n e , 1 8 6 4 . . . . . . . „ „

$10, 612, 000
7, 797, 000

6
6

.'.... Purchased
K e d e e m e d . . -.'

5-20s of 1862

T o J u n e 30,
1890.

$10, 612, 000
7,797,000

T o t a l - -.
Oregon w a r d e b t

D u r i n g fiscal
year.

2,750

332, 856, 050

62,846,950
309,943,450
5, 807, 500
761,100

11,450

62, 846, 950
309, 954, 900
5, 807, 500
761 100

379,359, 000

11, 450

379, 370.450

83

TEEASUEEE.

No. 46.—TOTAL AMOUNT O F U N I T E D STATES BONDS R E T I R E D , FROM M A Y 30, TO
y
J U N E 30, 1890—CoutmnecL,
• i

Kate
H o w r e t i r e d . of i n t e r
est.

T i t l e of l o a n . '

Consols of 1868

Purchased....
Kedeemed
Converted..-.
Exchanged . . .

*.

>
-

P e r ct.
6
6
6

Total - .

t

T o l a ] of 6 p e r c e n t s

T o J u u e 30,
1889.

D u r i n g fiscal To J u n e 30,
1890.
year.

, $4,794,050
37,421,9,50
211,750
44, 900

$4, 794, 050
37,421,9.50
211, 7.50
44 900

42. 472, 650

-

42,472, 650

L 707, 419, 300

$25,900

1,707,44.5,200

T e x a n Indemnity S t o c k . . . . . . . . . Kedeemed

5

232, 000

Redeemed
Converted

5
5

6, 041, 000
13, 957, 000

5
5

192,418,200
2, 089, 500

3, U U
U

192,421 200
2, 089, 5UU

194, 507, 700

3,000

194, 510, 700

43, 599, 000
72,840,300

4,800

43, 599, O O
U
72,845,100,

4, 800

116, 444, lUO

7,800,

331,184,8U0

L o a n o f l 858
A

Total....
10-408 of 1864

19, 998, 000

Kedeemed
Exchanged . . .

F u n d e d loau of 1881

Pnrchased . . .
Kedeemed

T o t a l . - -.
5
5

T o t a l . - -.

19, 998, O U
U

116, 439, 300

T o t a l of 5 p e r c e n t s : .

331,177, 000

F u n d e d loan of 1891

Purchased —

F u n d e d l o a n of 1907

Purchased
Kedeemed . - . .

.

110, 361, 000

30, 623, 250

140, 984, 250

4
4

63, 277, 750
L 418, 850

73,923, 500

137,201,2.50
1, 418, 8507

73,923,500

138, 620,100

3^

127, 557, 650

3, 300

127, 560, 950

^

37, 223, 350
13, 231, 6.50

L5Q0

50,455, 000

L 500

5U, 456, 500

It

109,120,650
292, 349, 600

.5,200

109,125,8.50
292, 349, 6U0

401,470,250

5.200

401, 475, 450

579, 482, 900

10, 000

579, 492, 900

30.5, 352, 450

47, 800

305, 400, 250

621,087,800
2, Oi30, 968,100
77, 956, 600
308, 476, 750

104, 546, 750
91, 500

725,634, 550
2,091,059,600
77, 956, 600
308, 476, 750

3, 098, 489, 250

104, 638, 250

Total

64. 696, 600

L o a n of J u l y a n d A^ugust. 1861— K e d e e m e d
continued.
L o a n of 1863—continued . ' . - . . K e d e e m e d
Exchanged . . .
Total
F u n d e d l o a n of 1881—continued. K e d e e m e d
Exchanged . . .
T o t a l . - -.
T o t a l of 3 ^ p e r c e n t s
L o a n of J u l y 12, 1682
Total
Total
Total
" Total

23"' O O
U
6, 041, 000
1,3, 9.57, O O
U

Kedeemed

3

purchased . . . . - .
redeemed....-....--.
converted
exchanged
•

"

Aggregate

'

/•

37, 224, 850
13,231 650

* •

3,203,127.500

No- 47.—BONDS O F T H E . L O A N S G I V E N I N STATEMENT N O . 46, R E T I R E D PRIOR TO
MAY.

Title of loan.

Texan Indemnity StockOregon War Debt.
10-40sof 1864.---.-,
Total.




1869.
How retired.

Purchased aud
redeemed.
Purcha.sed....
Purchased

Kate of
interest.

Amount.

Per cent.
5

$4, 748, 000
145, 85t)
1, 55L 000

84

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCESo

No. 48.—CALLED BONDS R E D E E M E D AND OUTSTANDING J U N E 30,1890.

o Kedeemed.
Call..

Loan.

5-20sof 1 8 6 2 . . „ „

Total

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

TVhen
matured.

Dec.
Mar.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Nov.
Feb.
Sept.
Sept.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
May
June
June
July
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.

24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

600

1,000

I, 850

946, 600

13,1875
1,1875
1,1875
17,1875
1,1876
1,1876
15,1876
15,1876

31 F e b .
32 D e c .
33 Dec.
34 Dec.
35 Dec.
36 J a n .
37 A p r .
38 A p r .
39 M a y
40 M a y
41 J u n e
42 J u u e
43 J u n e
44 J u n e
45 J u l y
46 A u g .

9,104, 500
8, 043, 900
5, 024, 750
5, 012, 900
5,020,500
10, 012, 650
12,802, 950 ...2
3, 024,050

50

50

...........

15,1876
1, 974, 700
1,1876
10, 032, 300
6,1876
9, 996, 300
12,1876
10, 012, 250
21,1876
10, 053, 750
6,1877
10, 008, 250
10.1877
10,026,900
24,1877
10,155,150
12.1877
10,138, 300
28,1877
9, 904, 300
3,1877
10,041,050
10,1877
10, 003, 250
15,1877
10,048, 3U0
27,1877
10,00.5,500
5,1877
•10, 019, U O
U
5,1877 , 10,114, 550

Total

1,000
200
1,000
1,000

152, 533, 85Q
".

'

47
48
49
50
51
52
,53
54
55
56
57
58
59
.60
61
62
63
64
65

Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Mar.
July
Auk.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct:^
Nov.

21,1877
28,1877
11,1877
5,1877
16,1877
19,1877
27,1877
3,1877
6,1878
30,1878
6,1878
22,1878
5.1878
20,1878
11,1878
17,1878
23,1878
30,1878
5,1878

10,160, 650
10. 018. 6.50
15, 000, 500
10,003,300
10,014,050
10,006,150
- 10,012,600
1O,U63,7U0
10, 032, 250
5,084,850
5, 006, 850
4, 973,100
5. 001,100
4, 793, 750
4, 945, 000
4, 989, 850
.5, 08'., 800 ^
5, 253, 3*10
4, 966, 500

T o J u n e 30,
1890.

Out^tanding.

$99,940,500
16,218,850
20,083,150
49, 814, 700
20, 026, 350
. 14, 328, 000
4, 992, 300
.5, Ulfi, 8.50
1, 003, 950
24, 986, 200
14, 800, 850
10,1.5.5,550
5, 086, 000
15. UU8, 700
5, U05. 0.50
29, 980,150
5, 005, 600
,5,001,450
5, 002, 250
9, 995. 350
5. 003,050
10, 001, 450
14, 891, 850

$19,100
3,400
22 350
63, 950
15. 7.50
6, 750
2, 350
3 250
1,UU0
31, 500
6, 850
12, 750
5,700
19, 650
550
18, 550
700
400
1,300
5, 600
2,150
3. 350
.. 4,900

391, 348, 750

251,850

946, 600

58, 046, 200,

Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

Total
5.20s of 1865




$150
100

391, 6UU, 6UU
' 24 N o v , 13,1875

5-20S of J u n e , 1864

*

D u r i n g fiscal y e a r .

1,1871 $99, 959, 600
7,1872
16, 222, 250
20,1872
20,105, 600.
1,1873
49,878,6.50
6,1873
20,042,100
16,1873
14, 335, 350
1,1874
4,991,6.50
3,1874
5, 020,100
5,1874
1,001,9.50
1,1874
25,017,700
1,1874 . 14, 807. 700
1,1875
10,168, 300
2,1875
5,091,700
1,1875
15, 028, 350
1,1875
5, 005, 600
11,1875
29, 998, 700
20,1875
5, 006, 300
1,1875
5, OUl, 85U
1.5,1875
5, U03, .550
1,1875
10, 000, 950
24,1875
5, 005, 200
14,1875
10, 004, 800
28,1875
14, 896, 750

=

5-20s of M a r c h , 1864

C-ousols of 1805

Amount
called.

3,200

9, 093, 900
8, 043, 900
5, 020, 650
4, 992, 800
5, 018, 500
. 10,010,6UU
12,797,750
3, 024, 050

10, 600
4,100
20,100
" 2,000
2,050
6,200

58,002,150
1. 974.150
10. 032, 300
9, 993,100
10, 000, 850
10, 052, 650'
10, 006,150
10, 026,100
10,153,650
10,137, 800
9, 902, 800 •
10, 041, 050
10,003, 250
10, 048, .300
10, 004, 500
10, 018, .500
10,114,550
152, 509, 700

10,151,100
•
10,012,650
14, 990, 700
200
' 9, 997, 550
9,999,600' .
250
9, 998, 6.50 ^
9. 999, 950
10,053,2.50
1(1, 029, 200
306' • 5, 080. 500
5, <505, 350
- 4, 970, 350
4, 999, 950
4,787, 2U0
4,929,6.50
4,98.5.-700
1 , OOQ
5, 081.400
5, 246, 200
4B 903, 050
, . . « O ^ O P

•

44, 050
550
3,200
11,400
1,100
2,100
800
1,500
500
1, 500

1,000
.500
24,150
9,550
6, 000
9,800
5,75U
14,4.5.U
7,500
12 650'
10,4.50

3, or.u
4, 350
I, .5UU
2, 750
1.150
6. 550
15 350
4,1.50
400
7 100
3,450

85

TREASURER.

No. 48.—CALLED BONDS R E D E E M E D AND OUTSTANDING J U N E 30, 1890—Cont'd.

^
• ' •

^

Kedeemed.

•

Call.

Loan.

'

•'-.

o

• ti

Total

When
matured.

66,
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75

Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Deo.
Deo.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.

7,1878
10,1878
16,1878
26,1878
4,1878
16,1878
16,1879
27,1879
9,1879
18,1879

76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95

Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
May
May
May
May
May
June
June
June
July
July

1,1879
4,1879
6,1879
8,1879
11,1879
14,1879
18,1879
21,1879
24,1879
28,1879
1,1879
6,1879
12,1879
17,1879
24,1879
4,1879
12,1879
29,1879
3,1879
4,1879

Amount
called.

$5, 088, 850
4,991,200
5,072,200
4, 996, 300
4, 620, 650
. 5, 003, 200
5, 059, 650
5,010,400.
5,006,400
12, 374, 950

D u r i n g fis- T o J u n e 30,
cal year.
1890.

""$i,'ooo"

Outatancl*
ing.

$5, 085, 300
4,991, 050
5, 071, 800
4,994,100
4, 619, 900
5, 001. 700
5, 057, 450
5, 009, 600
5,004,800
.12, 371,150

$3, 550
150
400
2, 200
750
1,500
2,200
800
1,600
3. 800

202,631,750

-

Consols of 1867

r

• G

„

2,750

202,488, 850

142, 900

9,983, 700
9, 893, 300
10,314, 700
10, 006, 650
9, 389, 600
20,104,700
19, 604, 800
18,579, 500
21, 622, 950
20, 253, 900
20,161, 250
20, 044, 250
19, 858, 600
20,219,200
19,407,450
10,674,400
10, 464, 650
10, 076, 700
9, 972, 800
19, 213, 050

500
1,500

50

9, 964, 050
9, 874, 750
10, 309, 550
9,996,100
9, 372. 250
20, 080, 350
19, 592, 800
18, 559, 750
21, 608,450
20, 245, 050
20,154,350
20,036,900
19, 839, 200
20, 213,050
19,400, 300
10, 666, 200
10, 461, 900
10, 059, 750
9,963,450
19,200,400

19, 650
18, 550
" 5,150
10,550
17, 350
24,350
12, 000
19, 750
14, 500
8,850
6,900
7,350
19,400
6,150
7,150
8,200
2,750
16, 950
9,350
12, 650

11, 450

100
600

1,566
2, 000
100
300
1,600
700
2,000
300
100

aoo

309, 598, 600

247 550

Consols of 1868

96

July

4,18'-9.

37, 420, 300

37, 353, 600

66, 700

10-40sof 1864

97
98
99

J u l y 9,1879
J u l y 18,1879
J u l y 21,1879

10, 294,150
157, 607, 600
24,575,050

3,000

10, 290, 550
157, 554, 600
24,575,050

3,600
53, 000

192, 476,800

3,000

192,420, 200

56, 600

L o a n of 1858

100

J u l y 23,1879

260, 000

F u n d e d loan of 1881

101 M a y 21,1881
103 A u g . 12,1881
104 O c t : 1,1881

25, 030,100
10,121, 850
28,184, 500

2,100
2,700

25,024,100
10, 086, 800
28,180, 400

63, 336,450

4,800

63,291, 300

45,150

12, 947, 450

4,100

12, 864, 550

. 82,900
11,800

309, 846,150

Total

Total

Total

260, 000

102

July

1,1881

L o a n of 1863

102

July

1,1881

4, 687, 800

2,500

4,676,000

L o a n of J u l y a u d A n g u s t ,
1861—continued- a t 3^ p e r
cent.

105 Dec. 24,1881
106 J a n . 29,1882
107 M a r . 13,1882'
108 A p r . 8,1882
109 M a y 3,1882
110 M a y 10,1882
111 M a y 17,1882
112 J u n e 7,1882
113 J u l y 1,1882

20, 031, 550
20,184, 900
19, 564,100
20, 546, 700
5, 086, 200
.5, 010, 200
5, 096, 550
15,109. 950
11, 227, 500

1, 000
1,000

20, 031, 550
20,183, 900
19, 564,100
20, 537, IOO
5, 086, 200
5, 007, 200
5, 090, 550
15,090, 300
11, 224, 500

L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t ,
1861.

0

121, 857, 650

Total
L o a n of 1863—continued a t
3^ p e r c e n t .
Total....CO




114
115
116

A u g . 1,1882
Sept. 13,1882
Oct. 4,1882

1,300

6,000
35, 050
4,100

"'"•'i,"666
9 600
3,000
19, 650
3, O O
U

3,300

121, 821,400

36 250

15, 024, 700
16. 304,100
3, 269, 650

i,'566

15, 024, 650
16, 303, 500
3, 268,850

50
600
800

34,598, 450

1,500

34, 597, 000

1,450

86

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 48.—CALLED BONDS R E D E E M E D AND OUTSTANDING J U N E 30, 1890—Cont'd.

Kedeemed.
Loan.

Call.

F u n d e d loau of 1881—con
t i n n e d a t 3^ p e r cent.

Amount
called.

When
matured.

Dec. 23,
Jan. 18,
Feb. 10,
M a y 1,
N o v . 1,

1882
1883
1883
1883
1883

Total
L o a n o f J u l y 12, 1882.

122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149

Dec: 1, 1883
Dec. 15, 1883
F e b . 1, 1884
M a r . 15, 1884.
M a y 1, 1884
J u n e 20, 1884
J u u e 30, 1884
A u g . 1. 1884
Sept. 30, 1884
N o v . 1, 1884
F e b . 1, 1886
M a r . 1, 1886
A p r . 1, 1886
M a y 1, 1886
J u n e 1, 1886
J u l y 1, 1886
A u g . 1, 1886
Sept. 1, 1886
Sept. 1.5,
Oct. 1,
Oct. 16, 1886
N o v . 1, 1886
Dec. 1, 1886
F e b . 1, 1887
M a r . 1, 1887
A p r . 1, 1887
M a y 1, 1887
J u l y 1, 1887

Total.'

$25, 822, 600
16,119, 850
15, 221, 800
15,215,350
30, 753, 350
103,132, 950

117
118
119
120
121

Outstanding.

D u r i n g fis- T o J u n e 30,
cal y e a r .
1890.
$200-

5=000

$1, 650
1,100
7,800
SOU
18,100

5,200

15, 272,100
15,133, 650
10, 208, 850
10. 047, 850
10, 093,100
10, 010, 250
10,151, 050
10,040,800
10, 050,100
10, 330, 750
10, 098,1.50
10, 000, 250
10,012,750
10, 009, 850
10,002,900
4,UUl,850
4, UU7, 700
4, 004, 950
10, 003, 650
15, 005, UOO
15,122, 400
15, 0U8, 3U0
10, 005, 350
10,010,900
13, 887, 000
10, 007, 750
10, 014, 250
19. 717, 500

$25, 820, 950
16,118,750
15, 214, OOU
15, 214, 550
30, 735, 250
103,103, 500

29,450

5,150
1,000
20, 000
250
1,000
1,000

500
"200

8,850
1,000
550
100
5,000
1,200
1,000
1,000

302,259,000

47, 800

15, 270, 700
15,133,300
10, 207, 850
10, 047, 850
10, 092, 200
10. 009, 850
10,147,450
10, 040,100
10, 050,100
10, 329, 450
10,092,150
9, 990,250
10, 002, 650
10, 009, 750
10, 002, 900
4, 001, 250
4, UU7, 600
, 3, 999, 350
10, 002, 950
15, 005, 000
15,117, 600
15, 004, 900
10, 004, 200
10, 010, 400
13, y»l, 400
10; 007, 050
10, 013, 850
19, 632, 900
302, 078, 000

1,400
350
1,000
900
400
3,600
700
1,300
6,000
10, 000
10,100
100
600
100
5,600
7.0
4,800
3,400
1,150
500
42, 600
700
400
84,010
181, 000

KECAPITXJLATION B Y LOANS.

Kedeemed.
Ontstand-,

A m o u n t called.

Loan.

D u r i n g fis
cal y e a r .
5-20sof 1862
5-20sof M a r c h , 1864
,
.5-20sof J u u e , 1864
-..
5-20sof 1 8 6 5 . . . . :
,
C o n s o l s o f 1865
Consols of 1867
Con.solsof 1868
10-403 of 1864
L o a n o f 1858
F n n d e d l o a n o f 1881
L o a n of J u l v a n d A u g u s t , 1861
L o a n o f 1863.
'.
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861—continued a t
3^ p e r c e n t
L o a n of 1863—continued a t 3^ p e r c e u t . .
F a n d e d loan of 1881—con t i n n e d a t 3 | p e r c e n t .
L o a n of J u l y 12, 1882

Total




-.

$391, 600, 600
946, 600
58, 046, 200
152, 533, 850
202, 631, 750
309, 846,150
37, 420, 300
192,476, 8UU
26U, U O
U
63, 336. 450
12, 947, 450
4, 687, 800

$1, 850

T o J u n e 30,
1890.
$251, 850

4,800
4,100
2,500

$391, 348,
946.
58, 002,
152, 509,
202, 488,
309, 598,
37, 353,
192, 420.
260,
63, 291,
12, 864,
4, 676,

121,857,650
34, 598, 450
103,132,9.50
302, 259, 000

3,300
1,500
5,200
47, 800

121,821,
34, 597,
103,103,
302, 078,

36, 250
1,4.50
29, 450
181, 000

1, 988, 582, 000.

91, 500

50
3,200
2,750
11,450
3,000

1, 987,360, 200

44,
24,
142,
247,
66,
56,

050
150
900
550
700
600

45, 150
, 82,900
11, 800

1, 221, 800

TREASURER.
No.

49.—BONDS P U R C H A S E D DURING THE F I S C A L Y E A R

lioan.

Coupon.

For sinking fund:
F u n d e d l o a n of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907

Total

Total
principal.

Interest
accrued.

1890.

Average
price.

, Net
premium.

$710, 666. 79
7, 536, 058.37

105. 855
127. 210

7, 892,200

^

Aggregate

31, 940,150

39, 832, 350 226, 244 12

3, 319, 450
5, 453, 450

8, 246, 725.16

15,167, 050
40, 774,450

716, 634.08
18, 486, 500 99, 341. 63
46,227, 900 241,643.68 11,340, 864. 82

103.877
124. 533

\'
...... ,661
104.

8,772,900

55, 941, 500

64, 714,400 340, 985.31 12,057,498.90

5,055, 400
11, 609, 700

T o t a l funded l o a n of 1891
T o t a l f u n d e d loan of 1907

No.

Kegistered.

$1, 735, 950 $10,400.800 $12,136, 750 $69, 588. 99
6,156,250 21,539^3.50 27,695, 600 156, 655.13

N o t for s i n k i n g f u n d :
F u n d e d loan of 1891
F u n d e d loan of 1907
Total..-.'

87

25,567,850
62, 313,800

30, 623, 250 168, 930. 62 1,427,300.87
73, 923, 500 398, 298. 81 18, 876, 923 .19

- . . . - 16,665,100

125. 536

87, 881, 650 104, 546, 750 567,229.43 20,304, 224.06

50.—CHANGES D U R I N G THE F I S C A L Y E A R 1890 IN T H E P R I N C I P A L OF THE
TEREST-BEARING D E B T AND D E B T ON W H I C H I N T E R E S T HAS C E A S E D . '

Kate per
c e u t . of
interest.

T i t l e of loan.

Outstanding
J u n e 30,1889, a s
per debt state- Increase.
ment.

IN-

Outstanding
J u n e 30,1890,
as p e r d e b t
statement.

Decrease.

I n t e r e s t - h e a r i n g deht.
F u n d e d loan of 1891..,;
F u n d e d loan of 1907
K e f u n d i n g certificates
«.
N a v y pension fund
.
K o u d s i s s u e d t o Pacific r a i l r o a d s . .
.

f
4
3
6

Total

$139, 639, 000 00
676, 09.5, 350 00
119, 640. 00
14, OOU, 000 00
64, 623, 512. G
O
894, 477, 502 00

D e b t on which interest h a s ceased.

f.
f

21, 650 104, 562, 530

789,936, 622. 00

151, 920. 26
1, 250 00
20,000.00
2, 000 00
10, 000 00
253, 700 00
44,100 00
27,350 00
59. 600.00
145, 650. 00
259, 000. 00
66, 700.00
6, 000. 00
49, 950. 00
34, 650. 00
2, 550. 00
87, 000. 00
39, 550. 00
14, 3U0. 00
2, 950.00
228, 800. 00
2, 500. 00
10, 800.00
34, 455. 00
28, 500. 00
185, 750. 00
130, 500. 00
4, 000. 00
2, 960. 00
5, OUO. 00

1,850
50
3.200
3,000
2, 750
11,450
4,800
5,200
4,100
3,300

2, m
1,500
47, 800

•••

490
100
3, 290
3U0

151, 920.26
1,250. 00
20,000.00
2, 000. 00
10,000.00
251, 850.00
44, 050.00
24,150. 00
56, 600.00
142, 900. 00
247, 550.00
66,700.00
6, 000. 00
45,150. 00
29, 450. 00
2, 550. 00
82, 900. 00
36, 250.00
11, 800. 00
1, 450. O
O
181, UOO. 10
2, 500. 00
10, 800. 00
33,965.00
28, 400. 00
182, 460. 00
130 200. 00
4 000.00
2, 960.00
5, 000.00

1,911,485.26

Total




$109, 015, 750. CO
602,193, 500.00
, 103,800.00
14, 000, 000. 00
64,623,512.00

•

1-10 t o 6
Old d e b t
6
L b a n o f 1847
5
Texan indemnity stock
5
L o a n of 1858 . . . . . .
5
L o a n of 1860
6
5-20sof 1862
6
5-20sof J u n e , 1864
6
5-20sofl865
5
10-408 of 1864
6
Consols of 1865 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
6
Consols of 1867
6
Consols of 1868 ,
6
L o a n o f F e b r u a r y 1861
5
F u n d e d loan of 1881
F u n d e d loan of 1881—continued —
Oregon w a r debt .
.
.
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861
6
L o a n of J u l y a n d A u g u s t , 1861—
continued . . - .
.-.
L o a n of 1863 (18818)
L o a n of 1863 c o n t i n u e d
• 3^
L o a n of J u l y 12,1882
3
T r e a s u r v n o t e s of 1861
6 '
7-30sofi861
7 3-10
O n e - y e a r n o t e s of 1863 .
...
5
T w o - y e a r n o t e s of 1863
5
Compound-interest notes
6
7-30s of 1864-'65
7 3-10
Certificates of i n d e b t e d n e s s . . - 6
T e m p o r a r y loan
4 to 6
T h r e e p e r cent, certificates
3

AffsrreL'ate . . . o . .

$30, 623, 250
73, 923, 500
15, 780

$21,650

-

95, 680

1, 815, 805.26

896, 388, 987. 26

21, 650 104, 658, 210

791,752,427.26

88

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

N o . 51.—RECAPITtJLATION OF THE PUBLIC D E B T STATEMENT FOR THE CLOSE OF
EA:CH F I S C A L Y E A R FROM J U N E .30, 1883, TO J U N E 30, 1890, I N T H E F O R M U S E D

SINCE J U L Y 1, 1885.
J u n e 30,1883.

J u n e 30,1884.

J u n e 30,1885.

June 30,1886.

Public debt.
Interest-bearing debt—
$1,402, 852, 662. 00 $1,
Principal
13, 886, 662. 95
Interest
M a t u r e d debt—
.
7,831.415.26
Principal
-..
366,824.74
Interest
.
. ...
Debt bearing no interest—
58, 985.00
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
346,681,016.00
Legal-tender notes
13, 060, 000. 00
C u r r e n c y certificates
59, 807. 370.00
Gold certificates
72, 620, 686. 00
S i l v e r certificates
7,000,690.81
Fractional currency
Total debt
Oash i n the T r e a s u r y .
"Available for r e d u c t i o n of d e b t Gold h e l d for gold certificates actually oute tan ding.
Silver h e l d for s i l v e r certificates actually outstanding.
, TJ.;S. n o t e s h e l d for c u r r e n c y
certificates a c t u a l l y outstanding
C a s h h e l d for m a t u r e d d e b t
and interest accrued aud
unpaid
.'.-.
Fractional currency .
C a s h h e l d for b o n d s called,
not matured
T o t a l a v a i l a b l e for r e d u c t i o n of d e b t
K e s e r v e f u n d held for r e d e m p t i o n of TJ. S. n o t e s
U n a v a i l a b l e for r e d u c t i o n of
debiF r a c t i o n a l s i l v e r coin
M i n o r coin
Certificates h e l d a s c a s h Legal tender
Gold
o
Silver
N e t cash b a l a n c e o n h a n d
Total cash in Treasury, as
shown b y Treasurer's
general account
Debt less available cash i n the
Treasury

291,187,362.00 $1, 260, 774,462.00 $1, 210,637,612.00
13.]08,45L71'
12, 925, 629.09
12, 860, 514.88
19, 656, 205.26
347, 214.06

4,100, 995. 26
227,199. 52

9,704,445.26
224,020.42

58,440.00
346, 681, 016. 00
12,190, 000. 00
71,146,640.00
96, 427, Oil. 00
6, 980, 061. 31

57, 950.00
346, 681, 016. 00
29, 585, 000. 00
126,729,730.00
101,530, 946.00
6,964,175,88

57,445.00
346, 681, 016.00
18, 250, 000.00
76,044,375.00
88,116,225.00
6, 954, 087.52

1, 924,166, 312.76 1,857,782,401.34 1, 889, 577,103.75 1,769, 529, 74L 08

59, 807, 370.00

71,146,640.00

126.729, 730.00

76,044; 375.00

72, 620, 686.00

96,427, OU. 00

101, 530, 946.00

88,116,225.00

13, 060, 000. 00

12,190, 000. 00

29,585,000.00

18,250, 000.00

22, 084, 902.95
4, 657. 64

• 33,111,87L03
7,027. 28

17,253, 823.87
3,285.91

22,788,-980.56
2, 667.17

167, 577, 616. 59

212, 882, 549. 31

275,102, 785.78

205,202,247.73

100,000, 000.00

100, 000,000. 00

100,000,000.00

100,000,000.00

28, 486, OOL 05
674,170. 85

29,600,720.05
768, 988. 75

31,236,899.49
868,465.64

28, 904,681.66
377,814.00

315, 000. 00
22,571,270.00
15, 996,145.00
9, 869, 699. 43

195, 000. 00
27,246,020.00
23, 384, 680. 00
*2,092, 029.93

200,000. 00
13,593,410. 00
38, 370, 700. 00
29, 240,168.32

250 000.00
55,129, 870. 00
27,861,450.1)0
75,191,109.95

345,389,902.92

391,985,928.18

488, 612,429.23

492,917,173.34

1, 646,718, 996. 74 1, 546, 991, 881. 96 1,485. 234,149. 65 1,389,136,383.40

Decreaseof interest-bearing debt.
D e c r e a s e of m a t u r e d d e b t
D e c r e a s e of d e b t b e a r i n g n o interest, excluding certificates...
I n c r e a s e of m a t u r e d d e b t . .
..

125,581,250.00
8,429,390. 00

111, 665,300. 00

30,412, 900. 00
15, 555, 210. 00

50,136, 850. 00

47,266. 96

21,174. 50
11, 824, 790. 00

16, 375.43

10, 593. 36
5,603,450.00

N e t d e c r e a s e of p r i n c i p a l of d e b t .
D e c r e a s e of i n t e r e s t d u e a n d accrued

134,057, 906. 96

99, 861,684. 50

45,984, 485.43

44. 543, 993. 36

1, 580, 974.14

797, 821. 92

302,837.16

68,293.31

T o t a l d e c r e a s e of d e b t
I n c r e a s e of a v a i l a b l e cash, exc l u d i n g f u n d s h e l d for r e d e m p t i o n of certificates
D e c r e a s e of a v a i l a b l e cash, exc l u d i n g f u n d s held for r e d e m p t i o n of certificates

135, 638, 881.10

100, 659, 506. 42

46, 287,322.59

44, 612, 286. 67

15,470,409.72

51,485,479.58

D e c r e a s e of d e b t , less a v a i l a b l e
cash
:
A n n u a l i n t e r e s t c h a r g e on p u b l i c
debt
D e c r e a s e of a n n u a l i n t e r e s t
cbarge
i
-




1,621,273.30
932, 391. 64
137, 260,154.40

99, 727,114. 78

61, 757, 732.31

96. 097, 766.25

55,314,120.22

51, 803, 843.22

50, 891, 543.72

49,387,508. 72

5, 923, 401.25

3,510,277.00

912, 299.50

1, 504, 035. 00

* Overdrawn.

TREASURER.

,

89

No. 51.—RECAPITULATION OF THE PUBLIC DEBT STATEMENT, ETC.—Continued.
°

J u n e 30, 1887.

J u n e 30, 1888.

J u n e 30,1889. "

J u n e 30, 1890.

$894,477,502.00
10, 574, 562.41

$789,936,622.00
9,616,150.32

1,911,485.26
153, 988.92

1,815,805.26
149,131. 75

56,442. 50
346, 681,016. 00
16, 735, 000. 00
116,792,759.00
257,102,445.00
6, 916, 690.47

> 56, 032. 50
346,681,016.00
11, 830, 000. 00
131, 380, 019. 00
297, 210, 043. 00
6, 911, 510. 97

^ P u b l i c debt.
Interest-bearing debt—"
$1,086,315,862.00 $1,015,146,012.00
Prinoinal
12,361,603.18
11,624,206. 28
Interest
Matured d e b t ^
6,115,165.26
2,496,095.26
Principal
190, 753.87
168, 267. 86
Interest
Debt bearing no interests56,807.60
57,130. 00
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
346,681,016.00
346. 681,016.00
L e g a l - t e n d e r notes . - - . . . . . . .
14,415,000.00
8,770, 000. 00
C u r r e n c y certificates
119, 887, 370. 00
91, 225,437.00
Gold certificates
200, 387,376. 00
142,118,017.00
S i l v e r certificates
6,946,964.37
6,922, 643.82
Fractional currency . . . . . . . . .
Total d e b t . .

1,700,771, 948.68 1, 717, 784, 793.72 1, 651,401, 891.56 1, 595, 586, 330.80

Cash i n the T r e a s u r y .
A v a i l a b l e for r e d u c t i o n of d e b t :
Gold h e l d for gold certificates actually outstanding.
Silver h e l d for s i l v e r certificates actually outstanding.
V . S. n o t e s h e l d for c u r r e n c y
c e r t i f i c a t e s a c t n a l l y outstanding
C a s h h e l d for m a t u r e d d e b t .
and interest accrued and
unpaid
Fractional currencv
C a s h h e l d for b o n d s called,
not matured
T o t a l a v a i l a b l e for r e d u c t i o n of d e b t . - - R e s e r v e fund held for r e d e m p t i o n of TJ. S. n o t e s
U n a v a i l a b l e for r e d u c t i o n of
debt:
F r a c t i o n a l silver coin
M i n o r coin
Certificates held a s c a s h :
Legal tender
Gold
Silver
;
N e t cash balance on hand
T o t a l cash in Treasury, as
shown b y Treasurer's
general account
Debt less available cash i n the
Treasury

91,225,437.00

119,887,370.00

116, 792, 759. 00

131,380, 019. 00-

142,118,017.00

200,387,376.00

257,102, 445. 00 i

297,210,043..00

8,770,000.00

14, 415, 000. 00

16,735, 000. 00

11, 830,000. 00
i

18,657,522.31
2,366. 07

12,640, 036. 59 '
987.13

14,2'88.568.40
1, 357. 97

11, 581, 087. 33
260. 21

19, 716, 500.00
280,489,842.38

348,979,672.37

403, 271, 227. 72

452, 001,409.54

100,000,000.00

100, 000,000.00

100,000,000.00

100,000,000. 00

26,977,493.79
116,698. 76

26,051,741-19
112,035.58

25,129, 733.17
225, 074.73 !

22, 805, 225. 99
196, 782. 01

310, 000.00
30, 261,380.00
3,42.5,1^3. 00
40,853,369.28

250, 000. 00
22,135, 780.00
29,104, 396.00
103,220,464.71

240, 000.00
37,235, 793. 00
5, 527, 301. 00
71, 484, 042. 39

450, Of'O. 00
26,162, 960. (.0
4, 329, 708. 00
55,409,748.66

482,433,917.21

629,854,089.85

643,113,172. 01 1 661,355,834.20

1,279,428,737.02 1,165, 584, 656.64 1,076. 646,621.45

988,175,172. 60

120, 668, 510.00 • 101,540,8^0.00
95, 0^0. OJ
584, 610. 00

D e c r e a s e of i n t e r e s t - b e a r i n g d e b t
D e c r e a s e of m a t u r e d d e b t . . ^ . . . .
D e c r e a s e of d e b t b e a r i n g n o interest, excluding certificates...
I n c r e a s e of m a t u r e d d e b t

124, 321, 750. 00
3, 589,280.00

71,169. 850.00
3, 619. 070. 00

7,438.15

24,643.05

N e t d e c r e a s e of p r i n c i p a l of d e b t .
D e c r e a s e of i n t e r e s t d u e a n d accrued

127,918,468.15

74, 813, 563.05

542,178.25

749, 883.91

1, 063, 921.81

963, 269.26

T o t a l d e c r e a s e of d e b t . . . . . . . - I n c r e a s e of a v a i l a b l e cash, exc l u d i n g f u n d s h e l d for r e d e m p t i o n of certificates
D e c r e a s e of a v a i l a b l e c a s h , exc l u d i n g f u n d s h e l d for r e d e m p t i o n of c e r t i f i c a t e s

128,460,646.40

75, 563,446. 96

122, 323, 360.16

105, 605, 418. 70

33, 385,324. 97

17,133,969.91

88, 938, 035. IS

88,471,448.85
33,295,013.87

D e c r e a s e of d e b t , l e s s a v a i l a b l e
cash
A n n u a l i n t e r e s t c h a r g e on p u b l i c
debt
D e c r e a s e of a n n u a l
interest
charge
„.




0,318.35
121, 259,438.35 '

5, 589. 50
104,642,149.50

38 280,633.42
,

18,753,000.02
109,707,646.3?

113, 844, 080. 38 '

45,657,939.75

42, 869, 345.97

37, 629, 765.32 j

2,788,593.75

5,239,580.65>

3,729,569. O
C

4,334,751.45

90

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 52.—NATIONAL-BANK N O T E S R E C E I V E D FOR R E D E M P T I O N EACH M O N T H OF THE
FISCAL YEAR 1890 FROM T H E P R I N C I P A L C I T I E S AND OTHER P L A C E S .
New York.

Month.

$2, 859,
2, 472,
1, 663,
2,114,
2, 018,
2. 343,
3; 631,
2, 064,
1, 997,
2, 215,
2. 884,
2, 835,

1889—July
Augnst
September.
October
November .
December .
1890—January . . .
February . Marcl^
April
May
June

29,100,046

Month.

Baltimore. °

Cincinnati.

Total

$757, 000
465, 000
454, 000
740, 600
712,000
913, 000
1, 474, 000
482, 000
478, 400
392, 000
482, 500468, 000

$426, 400
409,353
359,000
406,812
368, 583
415, 380
434, 706
333, 000
365, 014
413 900
344, 914
363, 000

$432, 600
336, 500
450, 000
384, 000
419,000
431,.500
' 417,000
393, 000
413, 500
421, 000
607,000
482, 500

$136, 500
117,500
134, 000
135, 500
113,500
118,500
95,432
89, 000
117, 500
116, 939
122, 500
128, 500

$223,140
199, 500
16.5. 000
167, 000
171, 500
182, 402
126, 000
112, 707
100, 500
125, 500
122, 000
96, 500

4,640, 062

5,187, 600

1, 425, 371

1, 791, 749

N e w Orleans.

Provi- •
deuce.

PittsOurgh.

$62, 000
61, 000
54, 000
58, 000
64, 500
64, 000
52, 000
56, 985
57, 000
55, 000
48, 890
53,000

$43, 500 $1, 247,161 $6, 510, 302
49, 811 1, 230, 614 5,644,911
54,400
1,022, 479 4.710.379
60, 000 1, 225,661 5, 579, '573
41,791
1, 209, 630 5, 394, 524
56,845
I, 076, 446 5, 848, 455
44,819
1, 696, 335 8, 206, 222
51,395
1, 238, 947 5,001,433
44,100
1, 513, 669 5, 273,365
54, 821 1, 371, 638 5, 445, 498
53, 921 1,438, 749 6,417, 309
44,115
1,366,397
6,164, 976

|2, 013, 000 1,357, 000 686, 375

Other
places.

Total.

Claimed b y owners.

Fiscal year.
:
'...

1

---..Total
Fiscal year.

1875
1876
1877
1878....
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883.-.
1884
1885
1886..
1887
1888
1889
1890

:
-

.

..

-

Total




$1.54, .526, 760.16
210,032.975.26
242, 885, 375.14
213,151,458.56
157, 655, 844.96
^...
61,586,475.68
59,650,259.43
76,089,327.48
102, 582, 656. 73
1.
126, 220, 881.34
150. 2.57. 840. 01
130, 296, 606.82
87, 689, 687.15
99. 046, 534. 34
. 89, 037, 811. 75
70, 242, 489.45
2, 030, 952, 984.26
Eejected.

Pack1,514
1,530
1,399
1,571
1,451
1, 536
1,743
1,357
1,557
1, 518 ^
1,631
1,475

599, 518 15, 637, 726 70, 256, 947 18,282

53.—RESULT OF THE COUNT OF NATIONAL-BANK N O T E S R E C E I V E D
DEMPTION, BY F I S C A L YEARS, Tb J U N E 30,
1890.

1875'.
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
U85
1886
18871888
1889
1890

St. Louis.

$202, 000 $121, 000
192. 000 111, 000
174, 000 180, 000
139, 000 149, 000
169, 000 107, 000
165, 000
82, 000
217, 000
77, 000
94,000
86, 000
96, 000
90, 000
138, 000 141, 500
186,000
126, 000
241, 000
86, 500

1889—July
August —
September
October —
November.
December.
1890—January—
F e b r u a r y .,
March
April.
May
June

No.

Chicago.

7, 818, 500

001
633
500
000
020
382
930
399
682
200
835
464

Total

Philadelphia.

Boston.

"Overs."

"Shorts."

$24, 644.85 $20, 223.50
16,491. 42
16,175.26
24, 996:58
29, 704.43
37,649.20
16, 394. 60
22,148.42
9, 906. 35
6. 461.30
9, 868. 97
13,23L38
6, 618. 25
11, 222.13
13, 405.13
8, 092. 09
10, 103. 35
6,066.30
3, 785. 60
17, 060. 07
6, 445. 25
25, 528. 97
8. 246. 65
16, 404.07
22, 356.00
14, 749.28
2, 741. 70
4, 048.62 .
6, 836.85
8,540.90
4,954.55
257, 335. 58

Counterfeit.

187, 766. 44

FOR

RE-

Referred a n d
returned.
$1, 620, 557.39
1, 065, 002. 20
1,278 903 86
384 372. 22
329, 323. 34
30.5, 432.14
569, 971. 06
672,427 09
727, 282.98
455, 333. 05
329, 249.19
277,194.78
464 413.45
'
806, 396. 48
811 835.55
383 993 35
10,481,688.13

Express
charges.

N e t proceeds.

$15,028.12
7, 709. 22
4,7!:..5.91
3,997.13
6, 282. 58.
7, 870. 23
22, 763. 37
3, 832. 35
4, 337.62
3, 365. 77
3, 636.49
. 3, 822. 28
2,554.23
1,979.40
2,178.72
3, 111. 50

$3, 741.00
5,188. 00
5, 634.00
4, 008.00
3, 016. 00
3, 846. 75
4, 324.50
4,1.51.00
4,559. 50
3,770.50
3, 560. 00
2, 720. 00
2, 924. 00
2, 722. 00
2,191.50
2,634.50

$25, 842.15
9, 938.41
•3, 345. 03
1,152. 09
725. 84
523.54
612. 25
526. 96
573. 58
716. 62
957.18
313.75

$152,891,855.00
208, 955, 392. 00
241 591 373 .52
212i 780; 335.'81
157,303, 622. 96
61, 255, 980. 48
59, 056, 468. 60
75,405, 581. 95
101,843, 739. 53
125, 760,169. 18
' 149,931,396.90
130,029,625.12
87,213. 269.96
98, 246, 727.42
88, 217, 860. 57
69, 856, 025^. 70

97, 224.92

58,99L25

45,227.40

2, 020,339,421.70

91

TREA.SURER.

N o . 54.*r~MODE OF PAYMENT FOR NOTES REDEEMED BY THE NATIONAL B A N K , R E DEMPTION A G E N C Y , B Y F I S C A L Y E A R S , T O J U N E 30,

Transfer
checks

Fiscalyear.

1875
1876
;..
1877
-.
1878
1879
1880
1881.
^. 1882
1883
1884.-...
1885 . . .
1886.
1887.-.
--..
1888
1889.
1890
:
,
Total

.^

$58, 825, 756. 00
92, 374, 801. 00
95, 212,743.45
75, 361,427.23
51, 718,253. 06
10,852,505.53
22,415,972. 28
'--. 32, 992,144. 72
56, 018, 447. 71
77,991,916.83
. . ; 105, 840, 234.80
74,149, 555. 26
39,996,984.07
53,463, 333. 36
49,669,676.83
30, 271, 993. 55

$.50,858,842.00
40,120, 338.00
34, 588,129.15
23,046,418.44
14, 617, 619. 41
21,174,826.66
19, 567, 744.21
23, 222, 831.83
23, 668, 064. 66
24, 080, 304.62
19, 236, 730.27
9,204,752.76
15, 657, 293. 62
19, 280, 725.65
18,289,439.13
21, 819, 638.05

927,155, 745. 68

378,433,703.46

1

-. - - - .
=

C r e d i t i n general account.

:
-1.
.. . .-

o
-..-....

' Standard
silver dollars.

2,466,367.78

Counter
redemptions.

--

Credit in
redemption;
accounts.

$468. 974.00
549. 645.40
52,178.90
28,230. 59
85,164. ,56
246,447.42
296,257,79• 158,127. 60
135, 773.22
103, 843. 62
97,670.41
• 90,684. 97
91,265.70
62,103. 60

$100,000.00 $24. 066, 844.00 $19, 040,413.00
4,738,979.00
19,078,209.00
52, 643, 065. 00
6, 675, 000.00
12,789,757.00
91,856,769.92
2, 661, 021. 00 , 12,609,083.76
98,552,739.98
5, 089, 222.80
35,148,181.38
50,581,484.09
3,88,3, 417. 60
18,218,070.37
6, 924. 097. 88
3, 522, 607. 00
.8,936,232.92
4, 313. 702. 36
4,033,402.40
10,106, 238.45
4, 534, 598. 69
3,941,638. 00
12,428, 692. 86
5, 248,120.14
3, 826, 293. 00
12, 960, 221. 66
5, 727, 786. 37
3,-848,09O.5O
1'3, 944, 370. 50
6, 443, 697. 26
8, 385,485. 00
31, 007. 087. 30
6, 727, 706. 96
4,200,654.50
24, 768, 344. 79
2, 243, 346. 65
3, 229, 772. 00
20.149, 324. 00
1, 830, 349. 65
3, 280, 275. 50
15, 589, 994.27
1,152, 890. 95
2, 912,686. 00
14,025,166.30
. 660.177.30
64, 328, 544.30

Total

No. 55.-

Fractional i
s i l v e r co n.

United States
currency.

:

Fiscal year.

1875
1876
1877
....
1878.1879
1880.. -•
1881 . . .
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886....
1887...':1888.../....
1889
1890..

1890.

285, 825, 818. 56

$96 683.32
174, 831. 85
21.5,04^.27
269 918.44
242 518 37
1,015,519.10
482 500 35
451,194.22
248, 970. 92
202, 537. 79
144, 318.19
104, 257. 90
3, 648, 295.72

Total.

$152,891,855.00
208, 955, 392. 00
241, 591, 373. .52
212,780,33.5.81
157, 303, 622. 96
61, 255, 980.48
59, 056, 4(58. 60
75 405, 58L 95
101,843, 739. 53
125, 760,169.18
149,931, 396. 90
130 029 625.12
87,213,269.96
98,246.727.42
88, 217, 860. 57
69,856, 022.70

358,480,946.20 2,020,339,421.70

- D I S P O S I T I O N MADE OF THE N O T E S R E D E E M E D B Y THE NATIONAL
R E D E M P T I O N A G E N C Y , B Y F I S C A L YEARS, TO J U N E 30,
1890.

BANK

D e l i v e r e d t o t h e C o m p t r o l l e r of t h e C u r r e n c y .
Fiscal
year.

Returned
to banks
of i s s u e .

Five per
c e n t , account.

Reducing
account.

Liquidating
account.

Failed
account.

D e p o s i t e d in
Treasury.

B a l a n c e on
hand.

TH

$17, 532, 008. 00 $5, 036, 902. 00
$15,213, 500 $115,109,445
1875
29, 927, 900. uO 7, 942, 539.00
1876
: . « 97,478,700 78,643,155
24,439,700.00 11 50;'> 312. .'52
151, 070, 300 62, 518, 600
1877
11,852,100.00 8 410, 848.33
152, 437, 300 51, 585,400
1878
9,313, 382. 00 3, 784 589. 29
112, 411, 800 40, 204, 700
1879
7,100.386.00 3, 097, 983.77
24, 980, 500 29, 861, 700
1880
12,466, 045.00 2, 844,107.37
6, 763, 600 40, 080, 700
1881
16,978,700.00 3, 630, 989. 32
3, 801, 500 53, 838, 500
1882.
4,674,927.00 6 562,943.85
15, 572,100 59,875,000 $17, 642, 869. 00 $1,146. 889. 00
1883
3, 589. 808.00 6. 861. 741. 03
1884 . . . . 26, 255, 500 72, 260, 700 20, 486. 304. 00 2, 869, 060. 00
5,769,080.00 6. 791, 087. 93
1 8 8 5 . . - . . - . 45,634,800 72, 669, 700 20, 692,213. 00 5, 236, 257. 00
46, 701,100 54. 532, 935 14,311,170.00 13,412, 608. 50
4, 022, 497.50 3, 840, 402. 05
1886
1RR7
20,786, 640 30, 506, 030 19, 647, 970.50 16, 687, 549. 50
1,259,942.60 2,165, 539.41
17, 453, 780 25, 843, 765 29, 008,271.00 20, 662,140 25 $398, 580. 20
275. 350. 30 6, 770, 380.08
114, 970. 00 3, 9.=)9,218. 75
17. 084, 590 27,^443,340 28,159,373.50 17. 807, 773.90 418, 974. 50
112,206.00 4, 203, 261. 45
12, 590, 880 23,275,005 22, 021, 661.50 11,327,772.00 284, 455.50

rH rH •

T o t a l . . . 766, 236, 590 838, 248, 675 171, 969, 832. 50 89,150,050.15 1,102, 010.'20 149,429,002.40




92
No.

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

56.—DEPOSITS, R E D E M P T I O N S , AND T R A N S F E R S AND R E P A Y M E N T S , ON ACCOUNT
OF NATIONAL BANKS F A I L E D , I N LIQUIDATION, AND R E D U C I N G CIRCULATION, BY
F I S C A L YEARS, TO J U N E 30, 1890, AND BALANCE O F T H E D E P O S I T S AT THE CLOSE
OF EACH Y E A R .

Fiscalyear.

Deposits.

Redemptions.

Transfers and
repayments.

cBalance.

Failed.
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872.
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890

•

-

,
.'
...

:.

-

.

'

.

'
o

.

$87, 230. 00
$44, 000.00
584, 752. 65
648,17L95
419,978. 90
653, 220. 20
122, 227. 60
27, 732.00
104,459. 50
.96,209.60
842, 369. 35
1,473,459.25
818, 627. 00
474,70L25,
458, 510. 00
724,126. 54
1,115, 693. 00
1,434, 065. 96
770, 818. 80
586, 535. 00
773,915.00
855,988.25
752,497. 50
598,104.50
636,613.50
814, 870. 25
382,116.50
217, 008.00
426, 888. 50
325, 62. 50
.533,504.50
975, 729. 25
722, 808. 00
452, 787.50
62.5, 212. 00
634,780.00 .
703, 785. 50
837,413.00
608, 707. 00
885,440. 00
406, 773. 50'
297, 890. 00
437, 793. 20
581, 338.00
418, 974. 50
217, 880. 00
284, 455. 50
126, 410. 00,

''

$99, 323. 00
83,445.00

"

182, 768. 00

13, 983,'423. 00
37, 490. 00
92,198.25
112, 500. 00
758, 428. 00
2, 920, 861. 00
1, 999, 645. 00
1, 858, 620.00
2, 561, 283.00
3, 316, 721.00
2, 607, 643. 00
1, 878, 016.00
2, 561, 039. 50
2, 569, 228. 00
1, 056,183. 00
1, 281, 961. 00
7, 957, 752.00
7, 284, 980. 00
5,015,950.50
12,<684, 354. 00
35, 202, 542. 75
31,435, 378.25
25,539,318.10
3, 386,676. 00
1, 306, 313. 00

„

13, 038, 411.50
5, 600.00
17, 427.75
38,430. 50
80, 527.65
i; 203, 367. 50
2, 531, 784. 55
2,423,151. 00
915, 990. 00
1, 974, 954. 00
2, 509, 456. 50
2,405, 317.00
1, 810, 7.52. 00
1, 554, 086. 50
1, 058, 414. 50
1,144, 906.40
• 1, 769, 756. 00
4, 595, 593. 00
5, 746,173. 5C
7, 066, 226. 50
14, 637, 711. 00
17, 313, 545. 00
20,717, 893. 25
17, 807, 773. 90
11,327, 772. 00

531,900.00
109, 793. 00
143,596.00
91, 229. 00
255, 897.60
21, 660. 00
c 9,740.00

155,425, 08L 35

Total

120, 656, 610.00

1, 557,158.10

7, 822, 019. 00
21,164, 854. 00
21, 044, 412. 00
29, 300, 469. 00
21, 871, 523. 00
9, 985, 065. 00
6,080,650.00
9,446, 626.00
7, 222, 805. 00
5, 866,001. 00
13, 042, 896. 00
4, 961, 385.00
26, 063, 959.00
10,773,004.00
15, 522, 365. 00 ' 14,505,346.00
1'6, 200, 398. 00
18, 233,878.50
25, 389, 470. 00
20, 486. 304. 00
17, 927, 785. 00
20, 692, 213. 00
16,514,285.00
14, 311,170. 00
44,396, 630. 00
19,647,970.50
20, 400, 030. 00
29,008, 271. 00
29. 578, 580. 00
28,159, 373. 50
10, 217, 387. 00 , 22, 021,661.50

624,920. 00
401, 266. 00
619.652.00
260, 337. 00
572, 060. 00
17-2, 611.00
1, 517, 446 00
3,719,612.00
1,284,705.00
440, 400. 50
3, 550, GOO. 00
1, 248, 710. 00
842,723.00
2,140, 905. 50
• 677,061.00
438, 258.00

268, 851,158. 00

18, 510, 667.00

I n liquidation.
1867
1868
..
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875-..
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881....'^1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888 « . .
1889
1890

..

-.

-

-

'.'

-

;

Total
E e d u c i n g circulation.
18751876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887...
1888
1889
1890

•.
-

•

-

..''
-.

•
-----

Total . . . „ _ . ^ o = = „ „ „ „




$20,189. 30
253, 430. 60
158, 935.00
150, 9;<5.10
782, 075. 00
438,149. 25
703,765.79
1, 022,138. 75
837, 854. 95
919, 928.20
'765,535.20
943, 79L95
778, 683.45
677, 357.45
1,119,582.20
849, 561. 70
859,129.70
893,434.20
1,170,167. 20
977, 838. 70
1,121,383.50
920, 289. 00
762, 243. 50

==.. 309, 007,628.00

900. 00
2, 000. 00
29, 662.00
163, 429. 50
179, 594.00
17, 757.00

31, 890.00
106, 660.50
180, 730.00
858, 630. 35
2, 576,123. 85
2,043,984.30
1,47^. 453.30
3,123. 846. 30
4. 463, 613. 30
4, 561, 799.80
4, 004, 836. 80
4, 591, 694.80
5, 427, 242: 30
5,425,010.80
5, 56^:, 065. 40
11, 732, 304.40
14, 421, 691. 40
13,159,568.40
18, 667, 902. 90
39, 089,138. 65
53,119,742.90
57, 685, 270.15
43. 242, 512.25
33, 211, 313. 25

12, 717, 915. 00
20. 572, 706. 00
^066,596.00
4,440, 283. 00
5, 225, 027. 00
13,133, 927. 00
26, 907, 436.00
24, 204. 843. 00
20, 886, 657.50
2.5, 349, 423. 00
19, 034, 99.5. 00
19, 989, 400, 00
43, 895, 336.50
33,146,190. 00
33,888, 335. .50
21, 645. 803.00

93

TREASURER.
NO.

56.- - D E P O S I T S ,

R E D E M P T I O N S , AND T R A N S F E R S AND R E P A Y M E N T S , ON ACCOUNT
° OF NATIONAL BANKS F A I L E D , ETC.-:-C6ntmiie,d.

Fiscal year.

Deposits.

. Kedemptions.

Transfers and
repayments.

Baldnce.

Aggregate.
1867. „„
1868
=o
1869
1870
1871—
1872
1873.-o
1874
1875... = . . . .
1876...o=
1877
1878
1879-oo.oo
1880
1881
o
1882..-ooo
1883
1884
1885
1886
o
1887
o
1888
1889
1890
o

o
..:

-

:....,

-•
»..

T o t a l .-

-

-'-.

$81,490.00
740, 370. 20
765,-720.20
786,160.00
3, 017, 070. 60
3,473,104.25
2, 333, 321. 25
3, 285, 409. 54
25,915.640.96
32,494,647.00
12,719,069.25
9,239, 794.00
10,606,903.25
14,316,087.00
27,671,482.50
24, 455, 846. 25
23, 938,165.50
31,040, 200. .50
31,419,552.00
52. 602. 267.75
76,129, 898. 25
46, 520, 686.10
33,183,136.00
11,050,110.00
478.416,132.35

..-„.

$92,830.00
602,180.40
458, 409.40
202, 755. 25
1,307,527.00
3, 374,1.53.90
3, 241, 778. 00
1, 374,500. 00
10, 912, 666.00
24, 324, 687. 30
25, 050, 755.00
12,009, 875.50
8,056,70LOO
6,401, 916. 00
12, 344, 798.90
16,808,606.50
23, 552, 279. 50
26, 857, 689. 50
28, 462, 225. 00
29, 557, 588. 00
37, 368, 289. 00
50,163, 957.45
46, 386.121. 90
33.633,889.00

$900. Oo
626, 920. 00
401, 266. 00
649, 314. 00
423, 766. 50
751,654.00
172,611.00
1, 517, 446. 00
3, 737, 369. 00
1, 284, 705.00
972. 300. 50
3,759,116.00
1, 392, 306.00
1, 017, 397. 00
2, 396, 803.10
698,721.00
447, 998. po

402, 546,179. 50

20,250,593.10.

-,.

$126, 849.80
434 160 60
1, 017, 565.35
2, 727,108. 95
. 2, 826, 059. 30
1, 917,602. 55
3, 827, 612.09
18, 203,667.05
25 972 360 75
12,991,361.00
9 797 513 O
O
11, 596 061.26
19, 337, 621. 25
33,146, 858. 85
37, 056, 729. 60
36 157, 910 60
39 368,12L10
38, 596, 332.10
60, 248, 705. 85
97,992,918.10
91,952,843.65
. 78, 051 136. 75
55,619,359 75

1

No. 57.—DEPOSITS, R E D E M P T I O N S , ASSESSMENTS F O R E X P E N S E S , AND T R A N S F E R S
AND R E P A Y M E N T S , ON ACCOUNT O F T H E F I V E P E R C E N T . R E D E M P T I O N F U N D O F
NATIONAL BANKS, B Y F I S C A L Y E A R S , TO J U N E 30, 1890, AND BALANCE O F T H E
D E P O S I T S AT T H E CLOSE O F EACH YEAR.

Fiscal year.

Deposits.

$140,874, 563.53
177,485,074.44
215, 580,271. 83
205, 308, 371. 37
....--.
156, 670,138.19
56, .512, 201.10
1880.0000 0
48, 831, 326. 63
1881. -o. ooo.'-...
58, 041, 777.64
1882 .- =
i
76,307,727.55'
1883
98, 883, 599.17
1884..^.ooo...-o.
117.172, 640.^18
1885
103, 359, 393. 61
1886
--..-..
52,522,359.27
1887
.;...
<...
43, 290, 223.72
1888 .-•
. 44, 916,163.37
1889
36, 424, 560.95
1890
1875
I876.0...,
1877.,oo.= . . .
1878
o.
1879 .o

Total

-. '

1, 632,180,392.55

Eedemptions.

$130, 322, 945. 00
176,121,855. 00
214,361,300.00
203,416,400.00
152, 455, 000.00
54, 837, 600. 00
46, 844, 300.00
57, 644, 500.00
75, 452,100.00
98,553,100.00
118,745,200.00
100, 794, 895. 00
51,261,200.00
43, 379,185.00
44, 491, 370. 00
.35, 890, 235. 00

A s s e s s m e n t s . T r a n s f e r s arid
repayments.

Balance.

$290, 965. 37
365,193. 31
357,066.10
317, 942.48
240, 949.95
143, 728. 39
126,212.12
142, 508. 72
150,611.53
178, 579. 34
175, 522.15
. 160,611.15
135,180.53
139,719.98
129, 207.10

$1,000,262.76
1,634,644.11
782, 797. 06
530,180. 92
580,732. 28
789, 96L25
1, 415, 570. 04
978, 047. 03
1,136,352. 83
1,314,180.15
1,077, 584. 73
1, 552, 680.34
3,327,246.34
1,219, 495. 34
1,390,770.35
504, 386. 92

1, 604,571,185. 00 3, 053, 998. 22

19, 234, 892.45

No. 58«—PACKAGES O F NATIONAL-BANK N O T E S D E L I V E R E D
Y E A R 1890. ^

DURING

$9, 551, 355. 77
8, 988, 965. 73
9, 059, 947.19
10, 064, 671. 54
13, 381,134.97
14, 024, 824. 87
14, 452, 553. 07
13, 745, 571. 56
13,322 337 56
12,188, 045. 05
9, 359, 321.16
10,19.5, 617.28
7 968 919 06
6, 525, 281. 91
5, 419, 584. 95
5, 320, 316. 88

T H E FISCAL

Packages of assorted national-bank notes, fit for circulation, forwarded by express tb national
banks...
--.
r
12,290 *
, Packages of assorted national-bank notes, unfit for circulation, delivered to the Comptroller df
th^ Currency
.-...
...^...i
62,250 .
Total
o
..OOP.ooooo ooo
oo
o
; . . . o = . o . . 74,540




94

REPORT ON T H E FINANCESo

No. 5 9 . ~ B A L A N C E D STATEMENT OF R E C E I P T S AND D E L I V E R I E S OF MONEYS BY T H E
NATIONAL BANK REDEMPTION AGENCY FOR THE , FISCAL YEAR 1890.
'

Amount.

Dr.
To cash balance June 30,1889.. To packagres on hand with unbroken seals, June 30,1889
To national-bauk notes received
for reflemption
To "overs"reportedin nationalbank notes received for redemption

/
/.
/ >

/

/

/

/

/

/

/

/
//

1

$3,959,218. 75
77.00
70,256,947.45
8, 540. £0

/

(•
<

/
Totail.--

Cr.
By national-bank notes, fit for
circulation, forwarded to national banks by express
By national-bank notOvS, unfit
for circulation, delivered to the
Comptroller of tbe Cuxi ency..
By IJnited States notes deposited in the Treasury ot the
United States
By packages referred and moneys returned
.
.. •
By express charges deducted ..
By counterfeit notes rejected
and returned
.'
By national-bank note.s—less
than three-fifths, lacking signatures, and stolen—rejected
and returned, and discount on
United States currency
Bv " s h o r t s " reported iu national-bank notes received
for redemption
By unfinished packages in
counters'hands
By packages with unbroken
seals
..
By cash balance June 30,1890 .

74,224, 784.10 1

...

Amount.

Total

'.

$12, 590,880. 00
56, 908, 894. 00
112, 206. 00
383, 993.35
313. 75
2,634.50

3,1U.50
4. 954. 55
500. 00
14, 035. 00
4, 203, 261. 45
74,224, 784.10

1

No. 60.—BALANCED STATEMENT OF R E C E I P T S AND D E L I V E R I E S OP MONEYS B Y THE
NATIONAL BANK R E D E M P T I O N AGENCY FROM J U L Y 1, 1874, TO J U N E 30, 1890.

Dr.

To national-bank notes received
$2, 030, 967, 519. 26
for redemption
To ." overs" reported in national-bank notes received
for redemption
257,335. 58

/
/
/
•

•

Cr.

Amount.

/

/

/ .
/
/
Total




2, 031,224, 854. 84

Amount.

By nationalbank notes.fit for
circulation, deposited in the
Treasury and forwarded', to
national banks by express ..
$782,189,381 00
By national-bank notes, unfit
for circulation, delivered to
the Comptroller of the Currency
1,100,470, 567. 85
By notes of failed and liquidating national banks arid
United S tates n otes deposited
in the Treasury of the United
States
133,476,211.40
' By packages referred and mon-,
evs returned
- - ..
10,481,688.13
By express charges deducted..
45, 227.40
By counterfeit notes rejected
and returned
58, 991.25
By national-bank notes—less
than three-fifths, lacking signatures, and stolen—rej ected
and returned, and discount on
United Statescurrency
97,224.92
1 By " shorts " reported 'in na1 tional-bank notes received
for redemption - - . . . - .
187,766.44
By unfinished packages in
counters' hands
500.00
By packages with unbroken
seals 14, 035.00
By cash balance June 30,1890 - 4,203,261.45
Total-

..-

2, 031, 224, 854. 84

95

TREASURER;
No. 61. - E X P E N S E S

I N C U R R E D I N T H E R E D E M P T I O N O F NATIONAL-BANK
DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.
•
\

Charges for transportation
Costs for assorting:
Salaries
Printing and binding
Stationery
Contingen t expenses

NOTES

. $19,862.65
'
-

$83,84L30
2,465.53
692.00
981. 91

^
•

.-...:...

87,980.74
Total

-

o

107.843.39
I

•

No. 62.—MONTHLY R E C E I P T S F R O M CUSTOMS AT N E W YORK FROM A P R I L , 1878, TO
SEPTEMBER, 1889, AND P E R C E N T A G E O F E A C H K I N D OF M O N E Y R E C E I V E D .

Eeceipts.

Month.

P e r cent.
0.1
0.8
0.1

P e r cent.
95.4
7,5.7
60.1

15,737,329

4.8

0.4

8, 201, 698
10. 249, 459
9,199, 455
8, 387, 976
6, 824, 556
6, 264, 674

4.6
4.3
4.7
5.2
5.9
60.3

49,127, 818
7, 659, 000
8, 236, 000
9, 339, 000
8,190, 000
7, 584, 000
7, 208,000

$3,054,364
6,617,137
6, 065, 828

Total
July
Sentember

--.

December
Total
Februarv
March
..............
.
-o

- -...

....-..--

October
^November
December . . . . . . . . . . .
Total
1880

73.3

19.9

L6

0.1
0.3
0.3
. 0.4
0.3
0.3

65.0
7L0
75.1
64.6
63.7
13.1

29.1
23.5
18.2
28. 6
28.6
24.9

l-o2
0.9
1.3
1.2
1.5
L4

12. 0

0.3

6L3

25.2

L2

6.1
2.2
0.6
L3
0.9
0.6

0.1
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.2

3.9
0.5
0.1
0.2
0.1

20.4
6.1
•2.7
3.3
4.7
6. 2

69.5
90 9
96.4
95.1
94.1
93 0

0.8

1.9

0.2
0.1
0.3
0.2
O.I
0.2
. 0.2

58, 993, 000

19.8

0.2

68.3
63.2
69.0
62.2
52.1
48.8

0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

9,33.5,000
10, 565, 000,
11,472,000
• 10, 979, 000
8, 467, 000
8,175, 000

..--.

Januarv
March
A p r i l -May
Total
July
Auffust

P e r cent.
L3
1.5
1.8

0.3
0.4
0.5
19.5
46.4
66.9

48,216,000

.............

October
^
-.
November
. - -.
December...... ......
Total......

s

..

90.1

'?' ^

0.3
•

84.5
80 7
78.5
58.6
24.1
9. 5

2i.o

58.7

16.5
2L8
24.9
29.7
27.1
32.9

L9

15.1
18.6
2p.8
21.8
27.4
23.4

15.0
14.9
6.0
8.0
20.6
- 18.2

71, 075, 000

6L4

0.1

25.3

13.2

13,301,000
14, 403, 000
12, 859, 000
10,575,000
9, 081, 000
9,234, 000

57. \7
55.9
49.9
42.4
45.0
46.2

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2

. 31.4
37.8
44.6
51.9
50.0
47.8

10.8
6 2
5.4
5.6
4 9
5.8

42.9

6.6

45.1
44.1
. 47.1
5115
50l9
57; 0

7 3
11.3
5.2
3.9
3.1

69,453,000

1881 J a n u a r v . . . . . . . . . - . - . .
February
March
April
, May..
June ........... .....

10,573,000
11. 221,-000
13,196. 000
,11, 684, 000
11,051,000
11,013,000

Total

68, 738, 000




United
States
notes.

P e r dent.
;2.6
1.5.8
32.6

11,969,000
12, 258, 000
14, 477, 000
11,818,000
9, 852, 000
10, 701, 000

Total
JulyAuf'ust

Gold
Silver
certificates. certificates.

P e r cent.
"^O.Q
6.2
5.4

1878—April (18th t o 3 0 t h ) . . .
May .-

Mav
June

G o l d coin. S i l v e r coin.

50.4
47.5
44.5
.
47.6
, • "^ 44. 5
45.9
39.3
45.0

•

0.1

.

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.10.1
.0.1
0.1

•

49.3

•

5 fi

5. 6

96

R E P O R T ON T H E F R A N C E S .
NOo 62.—MONTHLY R E C E I P T S FROM CUSTOMS, ETC.—Continued,

Gold
Silver
G o l d coin. Silver c o i n . certificates. certificates.

Month.

Keceipts.

1881 J u l y
.0..-0.
August
......
Sentember............
October
November
....."
December -. .--.....

$12,082,000
15, 206, 000
14,108, 000
13. 019, 000
9,718. 000
10, 973,000

Percent.
, 38.8
43.5
37.1
35.8
62.9
77.1

Percent.
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

Total

75,106,000

47.6

13, 393,000
13,589,000
14, 000, 000
10,528,000
11, 986, 000
11,434,000

72.9
66.5
75.6
73.5
70.7
68.7

1882 J a n u a r v . February
March
April
May-.
June
• o .=

P e r cent.

United
States
notes.

Per cent
57.9
52.8
60.7
62.1
,33.8
18.7

P e r eent.
3.2
3.6
2.1
2.0
3.2
4.1

0.1

49; 3

3.0

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.,1

20.3
24.8
19.8
. 22.2
23.4
23.4

6.7
8.6
4.5
4.1
5.7
7.8

74.930, 000

72.9^

0.1

2L2

5.8

July
Angust...............
September
October
*
November . o . . . . . . . . . .
December . o .
'.

13. 730, 000
16, 487, 000
14, 695, 000
13,101,000
9, 939, 000
10,381, 000

66.^5
46.1
38.8
18.2
10.3
5.3

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

42.2
63.9
69.1

24.8
48.2
55.5
32.1
16.2.
18.7

8.6
5.6
5.6
7.4
9.5
6.8

Total,...

78, 333,000

33.6

0.1

24.3

34.8

7.2

1883—Januarv
F e b r u a r y „.o,
March,.--...-.
April
M&y .June
==ooa o o - . . . „

12, 574, 000
12,194, 000
12, 435, 000
9,199, 000
8,155, 000
13, 630, 000

4.2
3.9
6.5
10.8
4.7
3.3

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

72.1
75.1
73.7
65.5
62.2
69.4

15.7
15.9
13.1
17.7
26.1
20.2

^ 7.9
5.0
6.6
5.9
6.9
7.0

Total

68,187,000

5.3

0.1

70.5

17.7

6.4

14, 609, 000
.13, 290, 000
12, 050, 000
11, 616, 000
8, 928, 000
9,338,000

2.3
2.7
3.2
2.9
3.1
2.8

0.1
0.1
0.1
O.I
0.1
0.1

79.1
73.2
77.8
75.8
67.6
71.3

13.0
18.0
33.9
16.4
22.5
19.4

5.5
6.0
5.0
4.8
6.7
6.4

Total

Jmly
August
September
October
^
November.--.
December
Total.._.

69, 831, 000

2.8

0.1

74.7

16.7

5.7

Januarv
February
.-..
M a r c h - ^ ^. r - April
May
June

11,768,000
12,069,000
11,447,000
9, 850, 000
9, 289, 000
9,459, 000

2.4
2.1
1^.8
2.5
. 3.3
3.1

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

" 66.2
67. 5
60.7
56.9
46.5
40.0

23.7
22.0
26.4
26.8
35.3
35.6

7.6
8.3
11.0
13.7
14.8
2L2

Total.,o=.

63, 882, 000

2.5

0.1

57.3

27.8

12.3

July
o
August -.-o.
-.
September............
October
November
December

1884

13,111,000
12, 828, 000
11,992, OOO
10, 369, 000
7, 717, 000
8, 087, 000

L6
L3
L6
L8
L9
L7

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
O.I-

48.1
44.4
32.4
23.6.
18.3
17.9

32.4
32.3
3L4
32.1
42.2
44.0

17.8
21.9
34.5
42.4
37.5
36.3

64,104, 000

L6

Total

=:

1885 J a n u a r v . . . . . . . . o
February...--........
March...,
April
Mav
-o-oo.
June ...ooe............
Total

.'.....

61,198,000

July
„
August -..-.
September.--.
... October
November......... .
December
oo.,..

11, 821,000
12,700, 500
12,167, 000
10,771,000
8, 730,000
9,935, 000

Total.0.0

66,124,500




LO

33.1

34.8

30.4

1.3
0.8
. 0.7
0.9
,0.7
: 0.7

10,306,000
10,461, 000
11, 281, 000
9, 983,000
9, 523,000
9,644,000

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2

26.6
3L4
39.7
3&1
43.0
32.5

40.5
32. 3
34.5.
4L3
37.4
33.3

31.7
35.4
25.0
19.6
18 8
33.3

0.8
'

0.1

35.2

36.5

27.4

• 0.7
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
0.7

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.4
0.3

28.8
47.4
63.4
70.8
56.9
60.5

23.6
13.5
9.8

46.7
38,2
25.8
16.9
28.4
24.7

.0.7

0.3

54.6

n.3
13.4
13.8
14.3

30.1

97

TEEASUEEE,
No. 62.—MONTHLY R E C E I P T S FROM CUSTOMS, ETC.—Continued,

Silver
Gold
Gold coin. Silver coin. certificates. certificates.

Month.

Receipts.

February .
Maich
.0,0-00
April
Mav
'
June
-i

$10, 929, 000
11,704,000
12, 512, 000
10, 442, 000
9, 029, 000
11, 887, 000

P e r cent.
0.6
0.4
0.6
LO
0.8
0.7

P e r cent.
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2

P e r cent.
53.3
43.3
31.5
20. 2
12.2
4.8

Total

66, 503, 000

0.7

0.3

12, 606, 000
14, 834, 000
12, 944, 000
11,583,000
10,175, 000
10, 546, 000

0.7
0.7
0.6
• 0.7
1.1
L2

0.3
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3

72, 688, 000

0.8

11, 808, 000
13,112, 000
14, 212, 000
11, 5.56,000
10, 900,000
11, 840, 000

0.9
0.4
0.8
Ll
1.0
L3

73, 428,'000

0.9

July
A u "ust
September.,-.'.. . . . . . .
October
N6%'ember .
December

Total-J1887—January
February
March
April
May
June ...........

-.

Total
July
A u g u s t .-September - - . . . - . - . - .
October
November
D e c e m ber
.......

Total

12, 714, 000
15, 612, 000 .
13, 833, 000
12, 392, 000
10,187, 000
9, 789, 000

L4
0.8
Ll
L2

• \x

United
States
riotes.

P e r cent.
14.8
8.8
9.2
12. 3
' 15.3
; 12.6

P e r cent.
31.0
47.3
58.4
66.2
7L4
8L7

27.5

12.2

59.3

2.9
16.5
67.3
70.8
69.3
66.7

1L3
8.9
9.3
12.0
12. 2
: 15.5

84.8
73. 5
22.5
16.2
17.1
16.3

0..3

46.5

: 11.3

4L1

0.4
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.3

67.8
74.2
74.5
7L6
72.4
72.6

' 16.2
10.1
' 11.4
1.3.4
: 14.1
12. 0

14.7
15.1
13.0
13.6'
12.1
13.8

0.3

72.3

12.8-

13.7

0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.5
0.4

76.2
79.9
79.9
78.1
75.4
74.8

; 10.4
8.8
8.4
9.1
' 10.8
ILO

11.6
10.3
10.4
11.3
12.1
12.7

1'

n.3

74, 527, 000

Ll

0.3

. 77.7

9. 6

13, 509, 000
13, 150, 000
11,0.59,000
11,176. 000
9, 990, 000
10,996,484

0.7
0.6
0.6
0.7
0.9
0.7

0.3
0.2
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.3

77.6
75.8
78.7
73. 1
69.6
73.5

' 11.0
: 10.3
9.2
12.5
16.1
' 14.4

• 10.4
13.1
11.1
13.4
13. 0
11.1

69, 880, 484

0.7

0.3

74.9

12.1

12.0

14,163,486
13, 860, 960
12,138. 688
11,978,438
9,610,437
10, 966, 445

0.4
0.5
0.4
0.4
flO.3
0.2

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2

83.0
87.6
89.1
89.5
87.2
86.3

8.3
5.5
4.4
3.6
5.4
4.1

8.1
5.3
5.9
6.3
6.9
9.2

Total

72,718,454

0.4

0.2

87.0

1889—Januarv
February 0
........
March
-.
AprU...-o- —

14, 037, 625
12, 954, 630
13, 422, 511
11,962,153
11, 096, 791
10, 697, 716

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

O.I
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
9.1

83.0
85.1
87.5
88.8
81.5
74.5

Total.......

74,171,426

0.1

0.1

July....oo
0.-..
August..........0.0-.
September
:
October
-oooo
November ,.,.o..-.o-> December
-o.,...

13, 791, 000
13, 324, 514
12, 015, 653
12,201,906
11,175, 885
10, 997, 977

0.1
0.2
0.2
O.I
0.2
0.2

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1

73, 506, 935

. 0.2

0.1

89.3

0000=0......

15, 223,480
13, 888, 075
12, 569, 867
13,617,857
10,671,516
14, 492,128

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1

0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0

92.5
95.0
95.7
95.4
9.3.6
94.5

00.

80,462,923

0.1

p.l

94.4

1888—January
February:
March
April
Mav
0
June
.00

Total
July
..
August
September
October
November
December

....

May

June,—000

Total

000.

1890—January
=-,
February . . . 0 . . . . . . . . .
March
April.

May

Jisme
Total

M
 90=—7


.

i
;

'

5.3

7.1

6.2
5.3
3:1
2.7
5.9
6.5

10.4
9 2
9.3
8.3
12.3
18.8

83.7

4.9

1L2

8.5.6
86.5
89.7
90.5
92.6
92.4

3.8
2,9
2.1
2.0

;

2.0

10.4
10.3
7.9
7.3
5.8
5.3

2.4

8.0

2.8
L8
L4
L6
2.5
i ,2.7

4.6
3.0
2.7
2.7
3.6
2.7

2.1

3.3

i

1

•

L3

98

REPORT ON T H E

No. 63.—MOVEMENT, AND

E X P E N S E OF M O V E M E N T O F STANDARD S I L V E R DOLLARS,
BY Q U A R T E R S , TO J U N E 30,
1890.

•

Amount
moved out at A m o u n t
Q u a r t e r e n d i n g — e x p e n s e of m o v e d i n t o
t h e Govern- Treasury.
ment.
1878—March 31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 31.
1879—March 3 1 . - . . .
J u n e 30
September30DecemberBl-1880—March 31
June30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
D e c e m b e r 31 .
1881—March 31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 3 1 .
1882—March 3 1 . . . . .
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30
December 3 1 .
1883—March 31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 3 1 .
1884-March31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
D e c e m b e r 31 1885—March 3 1 . . . . .
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 31..
1886-March31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
DecemberSl-.
1887—March 31
' J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 31..
1888—March 31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 31..
1889—March 31
J u n e 30
S e p t e m b e r 30.
December 31..
1890—March 31
JtmeSO
Total

$570,939
6,468,122
8,'642, 540
8,269, 319
4, 829. 295
10,878, 058
7, 639, 033
9, 927, 739
6, 236, 378
7,775, 649
9,993, 817
11, 094,984
5, 086, 738
6, 612, 802
8, 233, 796
10,114, 981
6, 296,132
4, 332, 536
8,884, 766
18,491,704
10, 909, 534
10,121, 889
14, 945, 567
13, 711, 358
10, 626, 842
14, 676, 051
12, 894, 001
15, 865, 361
12,100, 366
9,869, 868
28, 932, 564
39, 758,456
9, 912, 681
14, 397,268
17, 033, 783
14, 818,483
15,437,44111, 827,983
19,953,100
14,802,610
12, 917, 794
7, 835, 852
22, 063, 240
48, 619, 746
37, 039, 971
6,480,276
9, 948, 678
12, 058, 784
5,369, 276
6,414, 696
640,722,847




FINANCESo

$380, 000
5,803, 918
5,440, 388
6, 535,893
3,403, 960
10,440,465
.4,218,452
4,114, 383
4, 748, 056
6, 842,122
6, 389,177
4, 746, 572
5,165,878
6, 968,166
4, 831, 741
6, 553, 976
6,984, 078
6, 444, 669
7, 074, 499
13. 354,697
13,124, 378
11, 503, 403
10,503.920
11, 519,151
13,183, 048
14, 300, 666
12, 366, 872
13,128,274
15,160,583
11, 397, 311
22,128, 323
32,492, 595
11,095,116
13, 286, 634
9,484, 810
13, 719, 767
19, 753,195
13,123, 491
15,112, 886
10, 926,153
17, 822, 097
U , 609, 064
19, 857,187
45, 591, 781
41, 328, 953
8, 632, 648
(8, 912, 545
8,166,383
8, 788,121
8,119, 796
584,580,291

Amount
in circulation at
e n d of
each
quarter.

E x p e n s e of
movement
out.

$190,939
855,143
4, 057, 295
5, 790, 721
7,216,056
7, 653, 649
11, 074, 230
16, 887, 586
18, 375, 908
19,309,435
22, 914, 075
29, 262,487
29,183, 347
28; 827, 983
32, 230, 038
35, 791,043
34,103,097
31, 990, 964
33, 801, 231
38, 938, 238
36, 723, 394
35, .341, 880
39, 783, 527
41,975, 734
39, 419, 528
39, 794, 913
40, 322,042
43, 059,129
39,998, 912
38,471, 469
45, 275, 710
52, 541, 571
51,359,136
52,469, 720
60, 018, 693
61,117, 409
56, 801, 655
55, 506,147
60, 346, 361
64, 222, 818
59,318,515
55,545,303
57, 751, 356
60, 779,321
56,490, 330
54, 337, 967
57, 374,100
61, 266, 501
57,847,656
56,142, 556

$2,100. 70
15, 625.23
18, 884.37
70, 376.43
23, 216. 84
5, 516.14
12, 543. 38
24, 633.05
9, 995. 88
11, 856. 02
21, 433.28
29, 062. 23
9,415. 21
11, 436.12
21, 278. 34
22, 727. 72
9, 364.29
11, 432.45
20, 781.51
20,03L 60
13, 707.87
11, 284.14
.18, 794.75
18, 784.99
9, 200.89
15, 768. 83
14, 061. 98
20,914. 33
11, 296. 50
23, 922. 00
17,861.59
. 167, 268. 87
23,136.16
18, 685.33
18,359.90
19, 357. 93
16, 929.27
14,196.36
19,106.94
19,88L87
14,372.08
10, 012.18
31,167.78
56, 308.15
32,926.03
11,515.00
17,401.86
19,374. 57
6, 597.17
9,724 00
1,073,630.11

ExE x p e n s e of
Esmovement pouse pense
per
t o e n d of
per
e a c h q u a r - $1,000 $l,000in
moved. circulater.
tion.
$2,100.70
17, 725. 93
36, 610. 30
106,986.73
130, 203.57
135. 719. 71
148, 263. 09
172,896.14
182, 892. 02
194. 748. 04
216,181.32
245, 243. 55
254, 658. 76
266,094. 88
287, 373.22
310,100. 94
319. 465. 23
330, 897.68
351, 679.19
371, 710.79
385,418.66
396, 702. 80
415, 497.55
434, 282. 54
443,483. 43
459, 252.26
473, 314.24
494, 228.57
505,625.07
529, 447.07
547, 308. 66
714,577.53
737,713. 69
756, 399. 0^
774, 758.92
794,116.85
811, 046.12
825,242.48
844,349.42
864, 231.29
878, 603. 37
888, 615. 55
919, 783.33
976, 091.48
1,009,017.51'
1, 020, 532.51
1, 037,934.37
I, 057,308. 94
1, 063, 906.11
1, 073,630.11

$3.68
$11.02
2.42
20.73
2.18
9.02
8.51
•18.47
4.81
18.03
5.08
17.73
L64
13.39
2.48
10.24
L60
9.95
L52
10. 09
2.15
9.43
2.62
8.38
L85
8.73
L73
9.23
2.58
8.92
2.25
8.66
L77
9.37
2.64
10.34
2.34
10.40
1.08
9.55
L25
10.50
Lll
1L22
L26
10.44
L37
10.35
. .87
I L 25
L07
1L54
LOO
1L74
L32
1L48
.93
12.64
2.42
13.76
.62
12.09
4.21 . 13.60
2.23
14.36
L29
14.42
L07
12.93
L31
12.99
LIO
14.28
L20
14.87
.96
13. 99
L34
13.46
Lll
14.81
L28
16.00
L41
15.93
16.06
L16
.89
17.86
1.78
18.78
1.83
18.09
L61
17.26
L23
18.39
L51
19.12
L67

99

TREASURER.
NOo 64.—SHIPMENTS OF S I L V E R C O I N SINCE J U N E 30,

.rc^;
1885|$F^^^ffep2^TREAsuRY
.i^^Qa^T. /'-'

O F F I C E S AND M I N T S , AND C H A R G E S T H E R E O N F O B TRANSPORTATIONO
F r o m T r e a s u r y offices e a s t of t h e
Kocky Mountains.

From mints.

Period.
Charges.

F i s c a l y e a r 1886.
F i s c a l y e a r 1887.
F i s c a l y e a r 1888.
•1888-July
,
August,-.
September
October...
November
December
1889—Jauiiary . .
February .
March
April
May
June

1, 657, 057.60
2,361, 917.73
3,141, 210.62
3,125, 278. 28
2, 046, 179. 77
2,144, 713.60
721, 822.52
L 083, 935. 87
1,'440, 421.39
1, 449, 200.45
1,495, 679.80
1, 789, 547.35
22,456,964.98

34, 860.22

1889—July
August. -September
October...
y^^ovember
^^Tlecember
1^00—.Tauuary . .
^
Febrnary „
^
March....
April
.
May
.o
June

1, 762, 695.15
2,424,919.70
3, 038, 619. 55
3,404, 617.15
2. 038,105. 80
2, 287, 831.90
839, 768.10
1,177, 256.15
1,732,025.25
1, 517, 544.95
1,759, 726.75
1,882,116.80
23,865,227. 25

38,938.91

$10,960,927.76
9, 973, 642.82
10. 596, 043.10

2, 506. 63
3.704.51
4, 861.23
5, 264.16
3, 784. 98
3, 576. 21
1, 217. 97
1, 835.41
2,676.03
2, 352.12
2, 689.48
4,470.18

F i s c a l y e a r 1890.

Amount. -

2,076.42
3,129.16
5, 204.91
5,173. 59
2,882.74
3.105. 61
2, 080.48
1,349.66
1,926.67
3, 993. 97
1, 795. 53
2,141.48

F i s c a l y e a r 1889.

y -

$21,805,109.81
23,112, 760. 02
23, 260,809. 83

Per
$1,000.
$L36
1.36
L46

Amoont.

Charges.

$3.06
.L81
L51

329, 996. 50
606, 495.70
1, 604, 496. 00
1, 790, 539.40
1,327, 490.15
1, 396, 995.20
306, 997.40
351, 499.00
420, 495. 00
371, 996.35
480, 997.70
420, 497. 30

L65

431.43
986.05
2, 763. 61
2, 980. 24
2,014.10
2,281.75
408.34
518. 85
581. 50
479. 58
586. 26
553.31

9, 408,495. 70

14,585. 02

347,491. 30
717,998. 35
2, 042, 996. 85
2, 222, 498.50
1, 333, 997. 60
1,280, 999.10
341, 497. 95
364, 997.40
367, 258.15
478, 497.35
515, 496. 50
564,499.10

L55

Per
$1,000.

524. 50
1,218.97
3,158. 42
3, 265. 42
2, 290. 51
2, 085.46
507.04
539.70
700. 97
1,176. 37
1,607.33
1,860.93

10,578,228.15

F r o m sub-treasury a t Saa Fran-

18, 936. 6^

L79

TotaL

OiSGOo

Periodo
Amount.

F i s c a l y e a r 1886..
F i s c a l y e a r 1887.
F i s c a l y e a r 1888.

$795, O O 00
Oo
2,110, 500. 00
3, J 29, 855.00

1888—July
August
September,
October
November .
December..
1889—January...
February.,
March
April
May
June

Charges.

Per
$1,000.

297, 980.00
317,040.00
314,110.00
298, 930. 00
240, 810.00
209, 800.00
125,480. 00
176, 920.00
180, 050.00
215,180. 00
212, 255. 00
305, 259.00

F i s c a l y e a r 1889.
1889—July.--....
August
September.
October
November .
December .
1890—January . . .
Febraary..
March. -...
April
May
June
F i s c a l y e a r 1890. -




2,893,814.00
334, 080.00
421, 380. 00
336, 750. 00
280, 000. 00
259, 590. 00
171, 940.00
90, 060. 00
96, 670. 00
86,615.00
41, 335. 00 I
53,910.00
72,900.00
2,245,230. 00

$5.67
6.08
6.37

Amonni

Charges.

$33, 561, 037. 57
35,196, 902. 84
36, 986, 707.93

$2. 02
1.77
L89

2,285,0.34.10
3, 285, 453.43
5,059,816.62
5,214,747.68
3, 614,479. 92
3, 751,508.80
1,154,299.92
1,612, 354.87
2, 040, 966.39
2,036,376.80
2,188, 932.50
2, 515, 303.65
19,864.10

15,170.20

6.76

4,541.20
6,165. 31
10,126. 22
10, 632.18
6, 674. 59
6, 853. 21
3, 279.17
2, 968. 06
i 3,589.37
5,846.85
i 3,883.34
4,749.84

34, 759. 274.68

19, 309. 34

2,444. 266.45
3,564, 298. 05
5,418, 366.40
5, 907, 115.65
3, 631, 693.40
3, 740, 771.00
I, 271, 326. 05
1, 638, 923. 55
2,185, 898.40
2, 037, 377.30
2, 329, 133. 25
2, 519, 515.90

6.86

2, 065.50
2, 831.45
2, 509. 20
2, 067. 05
1, 775.30
1, 389. 50
515. 75
600. 95
500.40
209.60
28L 10
424.40

Per
$1,000,

5,096.63
7,754.93
10, 528. 85
; 10, 597. 63
• 7,850.79
7,05L17
2,240.76
• 2,976.06
'
' 3,877.40
3,'738. 09
• 4,577.91
6,755.51

36, 688, 685.40

73, 045.73

100

REPORT

ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 65.—SHIPMENTS O F S I L V E R C O I N FROM T R E A S U R Y O F F I C E S AND MINTS, FROM
J U L Y 1, 1885, TO J U N E 30, 1890.

F r o m J u l y 1, 1889, t o J u n e 30, 189u.

S i l v e r coin
s h i p p e d from
J u l y 1, 1885,
t o J u n e 30,
1889.

Office.
S t a n d a r d dollars.
W ashin gton . . - . - . . . . . .
Baltimore
. . . . . . . . .----New York
'.
Philadelphia
Boston
Cincinnati
C hicago
. -.
St.Louis
,
N e w Orleans

Mint,
Mint,
MintMint,

TotaL

$806,647.45 $4, 020, 402.24
2, 019,158.93
471,125.00
3, 303,396.05 17, 339, 759.87
4, 008, 808.46
1,200,494.60
3,226,981.40 13,869, 409. 75
3, 287,285. 30 12, 017, 345. 91
6,451,974.70 20, 345, 347.47
4,168,934.90 13,243,12L09
3,772,290. 92
948,387.85

$285, 399.55
187,060.00
1, 559,976.05
1,197,664. 60
917,792.40
907,492.20
1,709, 225.45
1,060,639.40
939,807.85

Total.

$4, 827,049.69
2, 490, 283. 93
20, 643,155.92
5, 209, 303. 06
17, 096.391.15
I5,304.63L21
26,797. 322.17
17,412 055.99
4,720.678, 77

15,100,169.75
. . .....

Philadelphia
N e w Orleans
San Francisco
Carson City

8,765,057.50

23.865,227.25

90,635,644.64

114, 500, 871. 89

1, 607, 560. 00

637,670.00

2, 245, 230.00

8,929,169.00

11,174, 399.00

2,691,469.15
7,336,499.00
503,630.00
44,130.00

Total
San Francisco

$521,247.90
284,065.00
1,743,420.00
2,830.00
2,309,189.00
2,379,793.10
4,742,749. 25
3,108, 295.50
8,580. 00

Fractional
silver.

2,500.00

2, 693,969.15
. 7,336,499.00
503, 630. 00
44,130.00

10,575, 728.15

2,500.00

T o t a l s h i p m e n t s . . . 27,283,457.90

9,405,227.50

Total

11, 381,467.83
14, 075,436.98
26,093,141.55 • 33,429,640.55
3, 968 130. 00
3,464. 500.00
44,130, 00
40,939,109.38

51 517,337.53

36,688, 685.40 140,503,923.02

177,192, 608.42

10, 578, 228.15

No, 66.—CHANGES DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890 I N T H E F O R C E
THE T R E A S U R E R ' S O F F I C E O
Total force in Treasurer's office J u n e 30,1889
Appointed
Transferred to Treasurer's office

EMPLOYED IN

282"
o-,

12
9
21

Died
,
Resigned
Eemoved
.,
Transferred from Treasurer's office - , ,

.,

oo

1
12
8
4
25

Total force in Treasurer's office J u n e 30, 1890
No.

278

67«—-APPROPRIATIONS MADE F O R AND SALARIES P A I D TO T H E F O R C E E M P L O Y E D IN T H E T R E A S U R E R ' S O F F I C E D U R I N G T H E F I S C A L Y E A R 1890.

EoU on which paid.

NOo 68o-

-NUMBER

Expended.

$273,361.60

$270, 655.37

70,800.00

67, 618. 07

3,181. 93

344,161.60

Eegular roll
. . . , '.
Ee-imbursable; force employed in redemption of nationalbank notes
o
:
Total.ooc^oooo.o

Balance
unexpended.

Appropriated.

338,273.44

5,888.16

•.

O F D R A F T S I S S U E D ON .WARRANTS

$2, 706. 23

DURING T H E F I S C A L Y E A R

1890.
Class.
"War.--....\.
Navy
Interior Indians.
Interior pensions,
Interior civil
Customs




No.
3,770
1,928
3,447
1,229
2,430
4,119

Class.
Treasury
Diplomatic
Public debt
Internal revenue
Judiciary
Total

No.
6,922
2,716
24
2,802
4,192
33.579

TREASURER.
No.

69.—LETTERS,

101

TELEGRAMS, AND M O N E Y PACKAGES RECEIYKD A N D TRANSM I T T E D DURING THE FISCAL Y E A R 1890.

Eeceived by mail:
Letters containing money, registered
Letters containing money, not registered

:

.^.....

.---

...

16 783
4,940

i
Letters not containing money

-

21,723_

-

135,516

Total
Transmitted by mail:
'
Manuscript letters
Kegistered letters containing money
Printed forms filled in, inclosing checks
Printed forms filled in, indorsing drafts
Draftsmailed withoutforms
Printed forms filled in without inclosures
,
Printed notices inclosing interest checks..
Certificates of deposit without forms
Printed forms, notices, circulars, and reports...
Total

157,239
'
...*

Telegrams received
Telegrams sent
Money packages received by express
Money packages sent by express
....'.
Post-ofiice warrants signed and registered
Transfer orders issued
Money packages delivered to Comptroller of the Currency
Treasurer's transfer checks issued
" Geneva award " checks issued
^..
Certificates of deposit issued




•
5,921
4,094
. . i . 14,793
.- 25,386
11,193
148,605
163,024 <
30,097
64,700
457,813

1

:

i
-

-

L......:
;.
L

607
784
30,849
33,900
103,083
1.133
62,250
9,706
271
57,816

EEPOET OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE MIHTo

TREASURY DEPARTMENT^
B U R E A U OF THE M I N T ,

Washington^ B, G,^ November 1,1890*
S I R I As required by section 345 of the Eevised Statutes^ I have the
honor to lay before yon a report of the operations of the mints and assay offices of the United States for the fiscal year ended Jane 30^ 1890,
being the eighteenth annual report of the Director ot the Mint and the
second of the same series signed by meo
DEPOSITS AND PURCHASES OF GOLD AND SILYERo

Gold,-^The total amount of gold deposited at the mints and assay
offices of the United States during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890,
including the gold parted from silver deposits and purchases, was
2,646,049.269 standard ounces, of the value of $49,228,823.56, against
2,628,413.276 standard ounces, of the value of $48,900,712.04, received
during the preceding fiscal year.
Of the gold deposited, 2,293,141.373 standard ounces, of the value of
$42,663,095o26, consisted df original deposits, while 352,907.896 standard
ounces, of the value of $6,565,728.30', were re-deposits.
Of the redeposits, $3,132,150.72 consisted of fine bars bearing the
stamp of the United States assay office at E"ew York, and the remainder
of unparted bars, mainly deposits at the minor assay offices, shipped to
the mint at Philadelphia for refining and coinage.
Of the gold deposited during the year, $30,474,900.25 was domestic
bullion, the product of the mines of the United States, against $31,440,778.93 of the same class of bullion deposited in the preceding year,—a
falling off in deposits of domestic gold of nearly $1,000,000.
Of the gold of domestic production deposited, $15,974,017.70 consisted
of fine bars manufactured by private refineries in the United States, and
$14,500,882.55 of unrefined gold.
The distribuliion among producing States and Territories o^ the unrefined gold deposited at the mints and assay offices will be found in a
table in the Appendix to this reporto
Foreign gold bullion of the value of $2,691,932.29 and foreign gold
coin of the value of $5,298,773.93, were received, a total of foreign gold
of $7,990,706.22, against $6,583,992.65 in the preceding year.
Light-weight domestic gold coins were melted at the mints of the value
of $655,474.96 and old jewelry, plate, etc., of the value of $3,542,013.83.
Silver.—Th^ deposits and purchases of silver, including silver contained in gold deposits, aggregated, during the fiscal year, 37,438,788,17
standard ounces, of the coining value ($1.16y^y per standard ounce) of
$43,565,135.15, against 35,627,273.69 standard ounces, of the coining
value of $41,457,190.97, in the preceding year.
Of the silver received at the mints during the last fiscal year,
790,982.83 standard ounces, of the coining value of $920,416.38, con


102

103

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT„

sisted of re-deposits; so that the original deposits of silver, that is^^ all
the silver received exclusive of re-deposits, aggregated 36,647,805.34
standard ounces, .of the coining valu© of $42,644,-718,77o
Of th© silver received during theyear, 32,430,150.84standard ounces*
of the coining valu© of $37,736,902.64, were classified as domestic bullion.
Of this 29,467,361.06 standard ounces, of the valu© of $34^,289,292.83,
consisted of fine silver bars manufactured at private refineries in the
United States.
These fine bars were all classified at the mints as of domestic production.
I
As a matter of fact, private refineries in the United States manufacturing silver bars handle th© for©ign silver product which comes to this
country in the shape of base bars and miscellaneous ores ;' so that the
fine bars which they manufacture are not exclusively of domestic silver,
and the classification of these bars at the mints as of domestic production is necessarily inaccuratCo
Of domestic silver deposited at the mints, 2,962,789o78 standard
ounces, of the coining value of $3,447,609.81, owas unrefined silver, the
product of mines of the United States,
'
The distribution among producing States and Territories of the unrefined silver received at the mints is exhibited in a table in the Appendix,
,
•
Foreign silver bullion, distinctively known as such, was received
during the year, containing 2,057,950.60 standard ounces, of the coining value of $2,394,706.15o
Foreign silver coins wer© melted, containing I3O565846.28 standard
ounces, of the coining value of $1,229,784075.
i
Silver coins of the United States, consisting principally of worn and
uncurrent subsidiary coinfs transferred from the Treasury of the United
States to the mints for recoinage, were melted during the year, containing 511,228.22 standard ounces, of the coining value of $594,883.74.
In addition, trade dollars, sold as bullion, were melted, \ containing
6,884.32 standard ounces of silver, of th© coining valu© of $8,010,840
Old plate, jewelry, etc., was melted down at the mints,, during the
year, containing 584,745o08 standard • ounces of silver, of the- coining
value of $680,430.65o
The coining value of the gold and silver (not including re-deposits)
received at the mints and assay offices of the United States, each year
since 1880, is exhibited in the following table i
VALUE OF THB GOLB AND SILVER (NOT INCLUDING RE-DEPOSITS) RECEIVED AT THE
M I N T S AND ASSAY O F F I C E S DURING T H E F I S C A L YEARS 1880-'1890.
Fiscal y.ears.

1880

.0000

1881.....00...

1882

.„

1883

.0.

1884
=„.
1885...0..0...
1886.....o=o_.
1887
„„o

1890.




Gold.
$98,835, 096
130,833,102
66,756,652
40,347,106
m, 326,678
52,894,075
M, 909,749
68,223,072
72,225,497
d2,136,436
42,663,095

Silver.
Coining value.
$34,640,522
30,791,146
33,720,491
36,869,834
36, 520,290
36,789,774
35,494,183
47,756,918
41,331,014
41,238,151
42,644,719

Total.
$133,475,618
161, 624,248
100,477,143
83,216,940
82,846,968
89,683,849
80,403,932
115,979,990
113,556,511
83,374, 587
85,307,814

104

REPORT

ON

THE

FINANCESo

COINAGE.

Coinage was resumed at the mint at Oarson in October, 1889o
The coinage executed during the year at the four coinage mints,
located at Philadelphia, San Francisco, Carson City, and Isfew Orleans,
was the largest in the history of the mint in this country, aggregating
112,698,071 pieces, of the nominal value of $60,254,436.93, against
93,427,140 pieces, of the nominal value of $60,965,929.61, struck in thepreceding fiscal year.
The gold coinage consisted of 1,257,207 pieces, of the value of $22,021,748.50, of which $19,547,860 were in double eagles; $2,398,700 in eagles ;
$37,995 in half-eagles; $7,122 in three-dollar pieces; $167.50 in quartereagles; and $29,904 in gold dollars.
The coinage of the three-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces has been
discontinued by act of Congress approved September 26, 1890, and no
pieces of these denominations were struck during the calendar year 1890.
The silver coinage consisted of 35,923,816 standard dollars and
8,850,269 pieces of subsidiary coin, of the nominal value of $892,020.70, of
which $6,358 were in half-dollar pieces; $3,179 in quarter-dollar pieces;
and $882,483.70 in dimes.
The minor coinage, executed exclusively at the mint at Philadelphia,
'aggregated 66,666,779 pieces, of the value of $1,416,851.73, comprising
$937,259,90 in five-cent nickel pieces-; -$564,03 in three-cent nickel pieces;
and $479,027.80 in one-cent bronze pieces.
The coinage of the three-cent nickel piece has been discontinued by
act of Congress approved September 26, 1890, and none were^ struck
bearing date 1890.
• The coinage of the mints is exhibited in the following table t
,
^
Gold

COINAGE, F I S C A L Y E A R 1890,

Description.

.

=

=.....,.==.o

1,257,207
35, 923, 816
8,850,269
*66, 666, 779

M i n o r CO'TIS-

o.-..

---.=

$22, 021, 748. 50
35, 923,816. 00
892,020.70
1,416,851.73

112, 698, 071

0...0

Subsidiary silver coins
Total

Value.

Pieces.

60,254,436.93

In the Appendix will be found tables exhibiting, by institutions and
by denominations of pieces, the coinages executed during the fiscal year
1890, and the calendar year 1889..
A table is also presented in the Appendix exhibiting the coinage of
the mints, each calendar year from the organization of the mint in 1793,
to the close of the fiscal year 1890.
. ^
GOLD A.ND- SILVER BARS MANUFACTURED.

'

.

.

In addition to the coinage, gold and silver bars were manufactured
at the mints and assay offices during the fiscal year of the value of
$30,387,791ol4, as'follows s
BARS MANUFACTURED, 1890.
Description.
Gold......

000=.»0 = „ 0 . . 0 0 . . , o

S i l v e r ...000.000=0000.000000
Total.-

0.




O.O..

.....==.00,.
........0.0....

Value.
.000.000,..-.=
....o..,..
....00

0

0-.

$23. 342,433. 34
7, 045,357. 80
30, 387, 791.14

105

DIRECTOR OF T H E . MINTo

MEDALS AND DIES MANUFACTURED.

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, there werei prepared in
the engraving department of the mint at Philadelphia, as authorized
by section 3510 of the Eevised Statutes, 1,266 dies.
The following table exhibits the number of each class of dies engraved:
D I E S MANUFACTURED,

1890,

Description.
For
''
*'
•'
"
"
''
"
"

gold coinage
...ooi
silver coinage
minor coinage
proof coinage
annual assay medal
Presidential medal, Benjamin Harrison
Joseph Francis medal
army marksmanship medal
Ilfathaniel Green medal (reproduction) '.
Total.....

iN'umber.
....
.,
»„.

^

394
733
21
2
2
2
24

,
1

•:
i

.^

2

1, 266

O

The number of medals manufactured was as follows
MEDALS MANUFACTURED,

1890.

Description.

Number.

Gold
Silver
Bronze

133
2,199
368
2,700

Total.

The accompanying table shows the number of medals and proof coins
sold during the year and the amount realized from such sale; also the
net profits.^on the sale of medals and proof coins..
'
'0}-

•

o

MEDALS AND P R O O F COINS SOLD,

'

1890.

Description.
Medals:

/ .

G o l d

1

Number.

. 0 0 . . 0

Silver
Bronze

O.O. . o o .

o o o o

.
o o o .

0 0 , 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . o o o . . „

oo......
oo-ooo
......;............0-..-....0-......0....00.00...00-0............

T o t a l

0 , , 0

Proof sets:

0 . . 0

0 0 , .

0 . 0 . . - . . 0 0 .

"

G o l d

SUver

ooo.

•

00 o . o o 00

0 0 .

. . , . . 0 0

-

. . o o o o . . .

oo

o o o . . .

=

M i n o r . . . . . . . . . . . o o o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O O O . O O . . O O . . O . . . O Q . . . O . , O O O ».>....

T o t a l

....000.ooooooooooo.oo.oo.o.oo.ooooo.oooooo..ooooooooooo......

Single proof pieces:
Gold proof pieces...




93
. 1,896
249

$4, 428.70
2, 230. 29
217.29

2, 238

6, 876. 28

29
564
2,287

1,148. 00
1, 692.00
219.42

2,8S0

3, 059.42 1

1,345

2,990.25

^
.=. 0

.'

Value.

00....000.oo,.oo.„„„o00.^.,0000oooooooooo.

106

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

NET PROFITS.

Quarters,
Quarter ©nding—
Sentember 30 1889
. . . . o . 00..00. .» . = December 31,1889
...o
March 31,1890
=.
00.......-.o
June 30,1890
......o
.oo.............
Total

Amount.

.-..o
......o

-

$528.25
514.20
185.21
585. 50

.

-

ooo.oo.

'..

1, 813.16

In accordance with the requirements of the joint resolution of Congress approved August 27, 1888, a gold medal was prepared at the mint
at Philadelphia and presented by the President of the United States to
Joseph Francis, in recognition of his services in the construction and
perfection of life-saving applianceSo
The medal is of fine gold (.999) and weighed '36,79 troy ounces-, of the
intrinsic value of $760.
On the obverse is a portrait of Joseph Francis, surrounded by thirtyeight stars, and the following inscription:
The United States of America, by act of CoDgress, 27tli Augnst, 1888. T8 Joseph
Francis, inventor and framerof the means for the Life-Saving Service of the country.

On the reverse is represented a ship in distress; a heavy sea is running and dashing over her deck. In the rigging, figures are seen clinging; on the storm-beaten shore, the life-saving crew are in full view.
The light-house is in the distance. The crew have the life-saving boat
on wheels, ready to run out when needed. To the right of the boat are
seen three sturdy men with mortar and other appliances used in the
Life-Saving Service. They have already shot their line to the ship and
have made fast, and are hauling a life-car of the kind invented by
Joseph Francis,
The scene is encircled by a row of pearls on the minor circle, then an
oak-leaf wreath, and the outer circle is an egg and tongue border.
The design of the medal bears the name of Zeleima Bruff Jackson.
The dies were engraved at the mint at Philadelphia. The engraving
of the dies commenced ^December 4, 1889, and. occupied seventy-four
days in their preparation. It required thirty-two blows of the press
(each blow estimated at 300 tons) to obtain a perfect impression of the
• dies.

The medal is not only the most valuable, but is considered the most
beautiful and artistic ever struck at the United States Minto
aOLB BABS EXCHANG-ED FOB GOLD COINo
During the fiscal year fine gold bars were exchanged for gold coin,
free of charge, under the provisions of the act of May 26, 1882, at-the
mint at Philadelphia, of the value of $653,058.94, and at the assay office
at New York, $15,704,618.76, a total of $16,357,677.70.
The value of the gold bars exchanged each month is exhibited in the
following table i




.BIRECTOR OF THE MINT.
FINE BARS EXCHANGED FOR GOLD COIN FROM JULY
Philadelphia.

Months.

•

1,1889,

'
TO

. ' 107

Juira 30, 1890.'

"NQW York.

Total.

1889.
OXIk^

oooooo oooooo

$30,144.94
50,185.01
40,153.52
70,326.71
45,222. 53
35,205.05

$5, 017, 680. 02
539, 924. 36
649,020. 91
2, 230, 781.30
575, 598. 04
376,924.24

$5, 047,'824.96
590,109. 37
689,174.43
2, 301,108. 01
620, 820.57
412,129.29

50,251.51
60,275.15
65,283.71
80, 384.23
60,303.05
65,323. 53

eoooai

August;
=
„.
September, ooooo = o ===,
October...0.000.00...
November
„oo,
December ...oo = .oo„„.

435,397.62
510. 497. 85
691, 368. 21
583, 374.13
588, 892.95

485, 649.13
570, 773. 00
756, 651. 92
663,758. 86
649,196. 00
i 3,570,482.66

1890.
January
o
February ..^
o.o
March
April
:
May
June
Total

O.O

3, 505,159.13
15,704,618.76

653, 058.94

; 16, 357, 677.70

Under a separate heading in this report, I have presented the reasons
which have led'me to recommend a repeal or modification of the act of
May 26, 1882, authorizing this exchangCo
WOKK OF GOYEENMENT R E F I N E R I E S .

'^

The acid refineries of the coinage mints and of the assay office at
New Tork^ operated, during the last fiscal year, on bullion Icontaining
6,730,229.6^9 standard ounces of gold and silver^ of the value of
$27,025,982.94, as exhibited in the following table i
'
P R O D U C T OF A C I D R E F I N E R I E S ,

OO

oo.oo

Silver

oooooooo.

oooo.o

.oooooo
T o t a l

oooooooo

i

Standard ounces.

Bullion.
G o l d

1890.

o.l.oo.

oooooooooooo,oooooooo. oooooooooo.

;

Value.

1,10b, 534. 759
5, 629, 694. 870

$20,475, 065. 28
6,550,917.66

6,730, 229. 629

; 27, 025, 982. 94

The weight and value of the precious metals treated in the refinery
of each of the institutions named, is exhibited in the following tables
REFINING (BY ACIDS), FISCAL YEAR 1890.
Silver.

Gold.
Institutions.

'
'

Gross ounces.
Standard
ounces.

852, 084. 368
Philadelphia
San Fran Cisco, oo.. 1,038, 310.660
Carson
o.... 1, 527, 526.800
18,007.890
New Orleans.
NewYork.oooo... 3, 240,283.000

241, 637.069
197, 319.042
85, 350. 570
5,459. 078
570, 769. 000

Value.

Standard
ounces.

Total value.
Value.

$4, 495, 573. 37 638,239.92 $742, 679.18 $5, 238, 252.55
3,671,051.94 898, 514.23 1, 045, 543. 83 4, 716, 595. 77
1, 587, 917. 58 1, 537, 941. 63 1, 789, 604. 80 3,377,522.38
13,423.81
11, 526. 09
101, 564. 25
114,988.06
10,618,958.14 2,543,463.00 2,959,666,04 13,578,624.18

TotaLoooooo.. 6,676,212.718 1,100,534.759 20,475, 065.28 5,629,694.87 6, 550,917, 66 27,025,982,94

•



108

REPORT' ON T H E

FINANCES.

PURCHASE OF SILYER BULLION.
[Act of February 28, 1878.1

The purchase of silver bullion for the mandatory coinage of silver
dollars, as well as the coinage of the same, was confined during the first
quarter of the fiscal year, as for the four years prior, to the mints at
Philadelphia and S"ew Orleans, but early in November, 1889, the purchase of silver and the coinage of silver dollars was resumed at the
mints at San Francisco and Oarson.
The amount of silver delivered during the fiscal year on purchases
by the Treasury Department was 26,737,601.46 standard ounces, costing $23,205,926.35, an average cost of $0.86787 per standard ounce, or
$0.9643 per fine ounce.
In addition to the purchases by the Treasury Department, the superintendents of the ttiiuts at Philadelphia, New Orleans, ISan Francisco,
and Oarson purchased, in lots of less than 10,000 ounces, at prices fixed
from time to time by the Director of the Mint, an aggregate of 4,075,954.39 standard ounces, costing $3,607,530.28,
Small quantities of silver contained in gold deposits and remnants
of silver iu bars were also purchased, aggregating during the year
98,555.32 standard ounces, and costing $85,869.70.
The total amount of silver purchased for the coinage of silver dollars during the fiscal year was 30,912,111.17 standard ounces, costing
$26,899,326.33, an average cost of $0.87 per standard ounce, or $0.9668-f
per fine ounce.
The amount and cost of the silver bullion acquired by purchase during the fiscal year is set forth in detail in the following table:
BULLION D E L I V E R E D ON PURCHASES F O R THE SILVER-DOLLAR COINAGE.
Standard
ounces.

Mode of acquisition.

Cost.

Purchases by Treasury Department (lots of over 10,000 ounces)
Purchases at mints (lots of less than 10,000 ounces)
Paftings, bar charges, and fractions
.o.ooo.

26,737,601.46 $23, 205,926.35
4, 075, 954.39
3, 607, 530. 28
98, 555. 32
85 869. 70

Total delivered on purchases
Balance July 1,1889.

30, 912, 111. 17
4, 413, 423.81

26 899.326.33
3, 699, 7.50. 66

35, 325,534. 98

30,599,076.99

o.-oooo.ooo
„.

Available for coinage of silver dollars during fiscal year 1890

The following table exhibits the amount and cost of the silver purchased during the year at each of the coinage mints i
D E L I V E R I E S AT EACH M I N T ON S I L V E R PURCHASES, F I S C A L YEAR

•

Standard ounces.

Mints.
Philadelphia
„
New Orleans
oo'o
'.
San Francisco ..00000.0000..0....-...0.0
C arson
-o,...Total

„ooo.o„
oo..
o-.o 0..00000000.
--.

1890.

Cost.

14,773,155.54
9, 336,472.60
5, 044,144.72
1, 758, 338.31

$12,867, 575. 91
8, 048, 594. 84
4, 446, 787. 75
1, 536, 367. 83

30, 912, 111. 17

26, 899, 326. 33

The stock of silver bullion available for the silver dollar coinage, on
hand July 1,1889, was 4,413,423.81 standard ounces, costing$3,699^750.66.



109

BIRECTOR OF THE • MINT.

Adding the amount purchased, during the year, 30,912,111.17 standard
ounces, costing $26,899,326.33, gives a total stock of silver available
during the year for the silver dollar coinage of 35,325,534.98 standard
ounces, costing $30,599,070.99.
From this stock of bullion there were manufactured, during the year,
35,923,816 silver dollars, containing 30,872,029.36 standard ounces of
silver, which cost $26,538,399.43.'
;
"
The amount of silver wasted in the operative departments, in executing this coinage, was 9,853.99 standard ounces, costing $9,032.89, while
the silver sold in sweeps amounted to 28,406.97 standard ounces, costing $23,810.87, making the gross consumption of silver incidental to
the silver dollar coinage 30,910,299.32 standard ounces, costing
$26,571,243.19. .
The seigniorage on the silver dollars coined during the year, being
the difference between the cost of the silver used in the coinage and the
nominal value of the coin struck, amounted to $9,385,416.57.
The quantity and cost of the silver bullion available for the silver
dollar coinage on hand at the coinage mints on June 30, 1890, is shown
in the following table:
,
. Mints.
Philadelphia
San Francisco
New Orleans

oo

ooooo.

ooo.o..„o oooooo ooo
oo.oo.
..o
oooo.o.-o
ooooo..-o-o.=oooo.oooo.ooo

Total

Standard ounces.
o

Cost.

2.141,370.76
1,150, 837.08
517, 020. 94
606, 015. 88

$1,979,020.11
1, 031,455.97
475,162. 34
542,195. 38

4,415,244.66

4, 027, 833.80

The total amount of silver purchased under the act of February
28, 1878, to the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 1890, was 320,527,376.72 standard ounces, costing $305,149,834.25, being an' average of
$0.95202425 per standard, ounce, or $1.05780474+ per fine ounce.
From the close of the fiscal year to August 13,1890, the date the new
silver act, approved July 14, 1890, went into effect, the purchases, of silver bullion under the act of February 28, 1878, aggregated S,108,199.47
standard ounces, costing $3,049,426.46. Adding to this the amount
purchased as-heretofore stated from March-1, 1878, to June 30, viz,
320,527,376.72 standard ounces, costing $305a49,834.1.'5, wbuld give a
grand total of 323,635,576.19 standard ounces, costing $308,199,261.71,
an average of $0.9523034 per standard ounce, or $1.05811488-|- per
ounce finCo
The provision of the act of February 28, 1878, requiring the monthly
purchase and coinage into silver dollars of not less than $2|000,000 nor
more than' $4,000,000 worth of silver bullion, was repealed by the act
of July 14,1890 (which was to take effect thirty days after its passage),
but there remained on hand at the close of business August 12,'1890—
the date that purchases ceased under the act of February 28, 1878:—
5,161,898.05 standard ounces of silver, carried at a cost of $.4,871,174.52o
Of the uncoined silver purchased -under the act of February 28, 1878,
1,771,039.66 standard ounces have, since August 12, 1890, been coined
into silver dollars (in addition to the coinage of silver dollars required
by the act of July 14,1890), and the balance is being coined as fast as
the business of the mints will permit.
The balance of silver bullion purchased under the act of February
28, 1878, onhand uncoined at this date (November 1, 1890), amounts to
3,390,858.39 standard ounces, carried at a cost of $33211,167c91| and is
located.at the following mints? •



110.

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.
Staudard o^unces.

Mints.
Carson
SanFrancisco
New Orleans

=
-

--_...

.. .

141,832.76
341,493.03
2, 907, 532.60

$130,894.53
317,514.50
2, 762, 758. 88

3,390,858.39

000....00
a..

..i

Total

Cost.

3,'211,167.91

Instructions have been issued to the superintendents of the mints at
San Francisco and Carson to coin into 'silver dollars, this month (November), the entire balance of silver bullion acquired under the act of
1878, but it will not be practicable to coin the entire balance, at ]^ew
Orleans before the .end of Febrfiiary nexto
.

^;

PURCHASE OF SILVER BULLIONo
[ A c t of J u l y 14,1890.]

The act of July 14, 1890, requiring the purchase monthly by the
Treasur3^ Department of 4,500,000 ounces of silver, or so much thereof
as may be offered, went into effect August 13, 1890.
The amount of silver purchased under this art from August 13 to
October 31, 1890, was 12,281,145.86 fine ounces at a cost of $14,043,221.80, an average of $1.14348 per fine ounce.
The amount offered and purchased each day, as well as the total purchases, are exhibited in the following table :
S I L V E R O F F E R E D , P U R C H A S E D , AND COST O F SAME, UNDER T H E A C T O F J U L Y 14,1890.

Date.

A u g . 13

F i n e ounces.
882, 000
704, 770
590,000
1,364, 000

ooo.oooo.o

A u g . 15
o
A u g . 18 . - o o o o . . . . .
A u g . 20

.-.

A u g . 22

1,520,000
1,020,000
1, 946, 000
1, 453, 000

o.oo. .oooo.o

A u g . 25.oooo
A u g . 27
0..0

Offers.

o.

Aug.29

Amount
purchased.

Cost,

F i n e ounces.
310, 000.00
417, 770. 00
5i0, 000. 00
516; 000. 00
425, 000.00
450, 000.00
613,s000.00
. 358, 000. 00

$350, 300.00
478, 957. 80
640, 650.00
619, 530.00
507, 575. 00
538, 365.00
730, 470.00
428, 445.00

oo.

9,479, 770

3, 629, 770. 00
175, 336. 06

4, 294, 292.80
209, 732. 56

Total for A u g u s t .

9,479, 770

3,805,106.06

4, 504, 025. 36

Total
Local purchases

Sept.

I . O . .0000000000000.00.

S e p t

3.-ooo.oooo-o.ooo.oo.

S e p t .

5

ebepu.

O . o o o oo o o o o o o o o o o oooo c

Sept. 10

o o o o o o 0<>0 o o o o o o o o o o o .

.000000000.000000.00.

S e p t . 1 2 . OOOOOOOOO.

S e p t . 15 .-oooo
Sept.17

O.

-

-..

.00000000-00000.0000.

geptl9o-ooooooooo.ooo
S e p t . 2 2 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO.
S e p t . 2 4 .OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO,
S e p t . 2 6 .OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO.
.LOl}aA

. « . - o D CK300 a o o o o O I

Local purchases

150,500.00
300,000.00
250,000. 00
255,000.00
210,000.00
321,000.00
360, 000. 00
326, 000.00
470, 000. 00
250, 000. 00
140,000.00
105, 000. 00

179, 808. 75
358, 050. 00
293,087.50
298, 993. 00
-246, 750. 00
371,428.50
416, 830. 00
380,061.25
546, 988.00
28,9, 000.00
159,100. 00
118, 812. 50

9,703,687

3,137, 500.00
621, 728. 04

3, 658, 909.50
661, 421. 96

9, 703,687

3,759,228.04

4,320,33L46

o.oo

T o t a l for S e p t e m b e r . ,




003, 500
368, 000
077, 500
804, 000
640, 000
431, 000
500,000
519, 000
820,000
035, 000
338,925
166,762

DIRECTOK OF T H E MINTo

.

I l l

SILVER O F F E R E D , PURCHASEB, AND COST OF SAME, ETC.—Continued,

Oct.

1..0

Oct.

3 . ooooooo-

Oct. 6
Oct. 8 .
Oct. 10
Oct. 13
Oct. 15
Oct.l7
Oct. 20

ooo.

..o.
o
o

Oct. 22..----O.O

o
O.O,

Total
o
Local p u r c h a s e s

Cost

Five ounces,
Five ounces:
375,000
225, 000.00
510,000.00
957,000
300, 000. 00
780, 000
280, 000. 00
733,000 300, 000.00
843, 000
420,000.00
871,000
275, 000. 00
436, 000
148, 000.00
424, 000
647, 000.00
1,217, 000
515, 000.00
1,274,000
200, 000.00
1, 050, 000

OOOOOOOOO.

O c t . 24

Amount
purchased.

Offers.

Date.

8, 960, 000

,

3, 820,000. 00
896, 711. 76

$256, 375. 00
580, 238. 50
^^336, 650. 00
312,722.50
332, 400. 00
,465,151. 00
301, 572.50
163, 392. 00
709,267. 00
563,487.50
209, 960. 00
4, 231, 216. 00
987, 642.98

8, 960, 000

Grand total.

4, 716, 711. 76

5, 218, 864.8

28,143,457

T o t a l for October.,

12, 281,145.86

14, 043, 221. i

DISTRIBUTION OF SILVER DOLLARS,

I

The following comparative tables show the distribution of silver dollars from the mints, during the last two fiscal years.
DISTRIBUTION O F S I L V E R DOLLARS, 1889.

Philadelphia.

• Period.

San
Francisco.

Xew Orleans.

Carson.

^ Total.

I n the mints July 1,1888.. o Coinage of fiscal year
o.oo-..

47, 016,836
21,385,860

25,142,074
108, 000

11,850, 034
12,300,000

5,315

84,014, 259
33, 793,860

Total
-oooo-o....
Transferred to Treasury

68,402, 696
42, 000, 000

25, 250, 074

24,150, 034
8, 000,000

5,315

117. 808,119
50, 000,000

Available for distribution..
In mints June 30,1889.0
oooo.

26,402, 696
23,445,618

25, 250, 074
25,128,000

16,150, 034
5, 090,418

5,315
2,764

67, 808,119
53, 666, 800

2,957,078

122, 074

11, 059, 616

2,551

14,141,319

Distributed from mints

DISTRIBUTION O F S I L V E R DOLLARS, 1890.

Philadelphia.

Period.

San
Francisco.

New Orleans.

Carsoii.

Total.

I n the mints July 1,1889.ooooooo.
Coinage of the fiscal y e a r . . . . . . . .

23,445,618
18,960,816

25,128,000
4,600,000

5,090,418
10,925. 000

2,764
1,438,000

53, 666, 800
35,923,816

Total available for distribution .
..00-..0......
I n the mints June 30,1890

42,406, 434
39,448,758

29, 728,000
28,987,782

16,015,418
8,459,974

1, 440,764
1, 270, 233

89,590,616
78,166, 747

2, 957, 676

740,218

7,555,444

170,531

11,423, 869

liistributed

0,00-0..-..




112

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCESo

CIRCULATION. OF SILVER

DOLLARSo

The total number of silver dollars coined, the nuuiber held by the
Treasury fbr the redemption of certificates, the number held in excess
bf outstanding certificates, and the number in circulation, on November
1 of each of the last five yearSj are shown in the accompanying comparative statements
COINAGE, OWNICRSHIP, AND CIRCULATION O F S I L V E R DOLLARS.
0

:i[n t h e T r e a s u r y .
T o t a l coinage.

Date

E'ovember
November
jSTovember
'November
November

1,1886
1 1887
1 1888
1,1889
1,1890

$244,433, 386
277,110,157
309, 750, 890
343, 638, 001
380, 988, 466

...-.--o

H e l d for payIn circulation.
m e n t of certifi- H e l d i n excess
of ceitificates
cates
outstauding.
outstanding.
$100, 306, 800
160,713,957
229, 783,152
277, 319, 944
308, 206,177

SUBSIDIARY SILVER

$82, 624, 431
53,461, 575
20,196, 288
6, 219, 577
7, 072. 725

$61, 502,155
62, 934, 625
59, 771,450
60, 098, 480
65, 709. 664

COINAG-E.

The stock of silver bullion on hand at the commencement of the fiscal
year, available for the coinage of subsidiary siPver pieces, was 2,520,527.81
standard ounces, carried at a cost of $2,916,539.06, All of this silver
was stored at the mint at Philadelphia and consisted principally of bullion acquired from the redemption and subs.equent melting iuto bars of
trade dollars. Worn and uncurrent silver coins of the nominal value
of $648,702.01 were^transferred during the year from the Treasury of
the United States to the mints at Philadelphia and San Francisco for
recoinage. They were of the following denominations:
Denominations.

Silver dollars of 1873 and prior years
Standard dollars . . . - o o . - - - - - . Trade dollars
-oooo.-Half dollars..--oo.oooo. O.O.O.O...ooo.
Quarter dollars.„
Twenty-cent pieces
o-oo......
Dimes ...o.o
=
¥ive-cent silver pieces
.ooooo...
Three-cent silver pieces
Total

OOOOOOOOO

O

Philadelphia.

$31, 204. 00
11, 977. 00
614. 00
238, 700. 00
208, 770. 00
1, 632. 20
43, 385. 00
11, 521. 25
898. 56
548, 702. 01

San
Francisco.

Total nominal
value.
$31, 204. 00

$95, 000
5,000

11, 977. 00
614.00
333,700. 00
213,770.00
1, 632.20
43, 385. 00
11, 521. 25
898. 56
648, 702. 01

These coins produced in bullion, after melting, 498,613.95 standard
ounces, of the value, at subsidiary coining rate, of $620,359.47, a loss to
the Treasury of $28,343.54, which loss was reimbursed from the appropriation for recoining uncurrent gold aud silver coins. All of the above
silver was recoined into pieces of the denomination of dimeSo




113

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINTo

Melted assay coins were also recoined containing 224.33 standard
ounces of silver of the nominal value of $279.10.
The total stock of silver, therefore, available for the subsidiary coinage
during the year was 3,019,366.09 ounces, costing $3,537,177.63*.
The stock and cost of the silver on hand July 1, 1889, available for
the subsidiary silver coinage, the amount obtained, the amount used
during the year, and balance on hand^ at the close thereof, are shown in
the following table:
SILVER FOR SUBSIDIARY COINAGE, 1890.
Mint at Philadelphia.
Dates.

Stanciard
ounces.

Cost.

|

Mint at San Francisco
Standard
ounces.

Cost.

Total.
Standard
ounces.

Cost.

Balance, July 1, 1889 . . . . 2, 520, 527. 81 $2, 916, 539. 06
2, 520, 627.81 $2, 916, 539.06
Worn and uncurrent coin
transferred from the
422, 408. 45
525, 547.07 76,205.50 $94,812.40
Treasury
498,613.95
620, 359.4T
Melted assay coins pur224. 83
279.10
224.33
279 10
Total stock acquired 2, 943,160.59
Coined during fiscal year
640, 756.14
1890
Balance on hand
June 30, 1890 . . . 2,302,404.45

3, 442, 365.23 76, 205.50
796. 422.89 76, 205. 50

94, 812.40 3, 019, 366.09
94,812.40

3, 537,177.63
801 235 2Q

2,302,404.45

2,645.942.34

716. 961.64

2, 645, 942. 34

The amount, cost, and nominal value of the subsidiary silyer coinage,
during the fiscal year, and the sources from which the bullion for such
coinage was obtained are shown in the following table:
NOMINAL VALUE AND COST OF MATERIAL USED I N T H E SUBSIDIARY SILVER COINAGE, 1890.

Sources from which bullion was obtained.

Standard
ounces.

Costii

Coinage.

MINT AT PHILADELPHIA.
Worn and uncurrent coin
..--oo
Trade dollars melted
...-..oo-oo.ooooo.
Bullion purchased . . . - -'---ooooo

633,033. 25
7,233.75
489.14

$786,735.31 $787,599.70
8, 313.71
9, 000. 00
509.48

640, 756.14

795,558.50

797, 208.30

o.-o-.o

76,205.50

94,812.40

94,812.40

Worn and uncurrent coin
.-o-oo
Trade dollars melted. . . . . . . - . . - o . - o Bullion purchased .-.'o
--oooo

709,238.75
7, 233.75
489.14

881, 547. 71
8,313.71
509.48

882,412.10
9,000.00
608.60

716, 961. 64

890, 370.90

892, 020.70

T o t a l

.-o-

oooo

oooooo

MINT AT BAN FRANCISCO.
Worn and uncurrent coin..-SUMMART.

Aggregate..-..-oooooooooo

FI 9 0 — 8




114

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

The coinage of subsidiary silver pieces, during the year, was as follows:
Denominations,
Halfdollars
Q

U a r t e r

0 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

=0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = l o O O O O . -

Total..-..00.ooo

Valae.

12,716
12, 716
8, 824, 837

$6, 358. 00
3,179. 00
882, 483.70

8, 850, 269

oo

d o l l a r s

Pieces.

892,020. 70

The seigniorage on the subsidiary silver coinage, during the year,
was $1,649,80, derived as follows:
From trade dollars melted.„o„oo oooooo oooooo o.--= 00 o-oooo .-oo.o
" silver bullion purchasedoo-=,oo .-ooo
«* uncurrent silver oooooooooooooo-o-o
oo--o.

00 = 0. $686.29
99.12
864.39

-0-0 = 0-

^ \ } VMti. o o o o o o o o o o o o 9 0 0 0 0^100 o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o e o o o o o • o o o o o o o o o e o o X j U^«y« o u

TRADE-DOLLAR REOOINAGEo

The stock of silver bullion derived, from theredemption and melting
of trade-dollars on hand, at the commencement of the fiscal year, was
5,346,527.64 standard ounces, costing $6,147,700.90, of which 2,307,048.03
standard ounces, costing $2,652,167.90, were stored at the Mint at Philadelphia, and 3,038,879.61 standard ounces, costing $3,495,533, at the
assay office at New York. Of the stock at Philadelphia 7,233,75 standard ounces, costing $8,313.71, were used in subsidiary coinage during
the yearo
The number of trade-dollars redeemed under the act of March 3,1887,
and transferred to the mints at Philadelphia and San Francisco and the
assay office at New York for storage, the amount used in subsidiary
coinage to the close of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, and the uncoined balance on hand at that date are exhibited in the following table:




T R A D E DOLLARS R E C O I N E D INTO SUBSIDIARY S I L V E R .

1888.

1887.
Institutions.

standard
ounces.

Standard
ounces.

Value.

Standard
ounces.

Value.

Total.

1890.

1889.

Standard
ounces.

Value.

Value.

Trade-dollars redeemed at Treasury and

Mint at San Francisco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assay office at N e w T o r k .
Total

Value.

-

STibtreasuries and transferred t o Mint at Phnadelphia

Standard
ounces.

2,475,462.00 $2,844,813.00

C506,702.00
( *1,626.90

.

$582,556.00^
1,871.00)

2,983,790.90 $3,429, 240.00

'"""""•^""

524,636.70

603,000.00

140,383.50

161,263.00

665, 020.20

764, 263.00

2,781,877.21

3,200,000.00

257,002.40

295,533.00

3,038, 879.61

3,495,533.00

905,714. 80 1, 041, 223.00

6, 687, 690.71

7, 689, 036.00

5,781,975.91 6,647,813.00

O
H
O

o

Kecoined—
Mint at Philadelphia
Mint at San Francisco




19.51

16.97

19.51

1, 348, 396.82

1, 677, 630. 51

421, 000.00

131,200.37 $163,235.30

409, 848,45

509, 920.30

214,967.28

7,233.75

$8,313.71

«

0

*

827, 375.70

338,378.75

60,000.00

16.97

count, San Francisco

Uncoined June 30,1890—
Mint at Philadelphia
Assay office at New York

850, 235. 30

665, 003.23

257,000.00

40,187.50

Transferred to silver-dollar bullion ac-

Total recoined

683, 376. 62

267,455.40

206,563.75

246,751.25

307, 000. 00

1

7, 233. 75

346,184. 62 430, 710.21

93 0, 920. 30

748, 227.20
1

1

1

-

1

8,313.71
1

_

2, 300,414. 28 2, 643, 854.19
z

o

3, 038, 879.61

3, 495, 533. 00

5, 339, 293. 89 6,139, 387.19

* Transferred from mint at N"ew Orleans October, 1887.
Ol

116

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo
SEIGNIORAaE ON SILVEBo

The seigniorage on the coinage of silver dollars during.the fiscal year
1890 aggregated $9,385,416,57j and on subsidiary, coinage $1,649.80, a
total of $9,387,066.37.
Erom the gross seigniorage there was paid for distributing silver coins
the sum of $27,475.89, and for operative wastage and loss on sale of
sweeps , $11,270.64, a total of $38,746.53, leaving as the net- profits on
the coinage of silver, during the year $9,348,319.84,
Of the net profits the sum of $9,120,933.63 was covered into the Treasury, during the fiscal yearo'
The net profits on the coinage of silver during the twelve years ended
June 30,1890, including the balance in the coinage mints on July 1,
1878, has been $65,098,057.41.
In the Appendix will be found the usual tables showing the seigniorage each month on the silver dollars and subsidiary coinage separately, and the disposition of the profits.
A table will also be found showing the expenditures from the silverprofit fund on account of transportation of coins, the amount paid for
transportation being separate from the amount paid for incidentals.

ina^oR coiNAas.
The amount of minor coins manufactured during the fiscal year 1890
was the largest in the history of the Mint, no less than 66,666,779
pieces, of- the value of $1,416,851.73, having been struck.
The demand for these coins—that is, for the five-cent nickel and onecent bronze pieces—has been such as to tax the plant of the mint at Philadelphia (the only mint authorized to manufacture minor coins) to its
utmost capacityo In order to save labor upon t h e part of the Mint in
the manufacture of these coins, it has been found necessary to purchase
the blanks already prepared for striking. Early in October, 1889, a
contract was made for 100,000 pounds of five-cent nickel blanks, at 40
cents per pound, and 200,000 pounds of one-cent bronze blanks, at 26
cents per pound; but it was found that this would not be sufficient,
and proposals wer© invited by public advertisement for an additional
•supply, and in February, 1890, a contract was entered into with the
Scoville Manufacturing Company to furnish 600,000 pounds of one-cent
bronze blanks and 200,000 pounds of five-cent nickel blanks, the rates
being very favorable, viz, $0.1994 per pound for the one-cent blanks,
and $.3194 for th© five-cent nickel blanks, against $0,423^ per pound
for nickel blanks, and $0.34y9^ per pound for cent blanks paid the same
company by contract of October, 1887, and extension of November 17,
I8880
The following table exhibits the number of pieces and the nominal
Yalnie of the minor coins struck at th© Philadelphia mint, during the
fiscal year 1890,
Denominations.

Pieces.

Value.

FiTo-cent nickel..0000=000-===00=00 oooooo 0=0000 0000== «»ooo oooooo .«»=oo 00. 18.745,198
Three-cent nickeJ
=000=00000=0
0000.0=0=00=0
==
00..=
. 18, 801
One-cent bronze..==== ==00=0oooooo00000=0=====..=
===.= ,====
00 = 00.00. 47, 902, 780

$937, 259. 90
564.03
479,027.80

66,666, 779

1,416.851.73

T o t a l

.ooooo

000.00000




x,o=o = = = = = o o o o o o .

0

oooo.oooo-o

DIRECTOR . O F T H E MINT.

The accompanying table shows the amount and cost of one-cent
bronze and five-cent nickel blanks purchased, during the years
Blanks,
One-cent bronze blanks ..-^
Five-cent nickel b l a n k s . .

Pounds.

'--

Cost.

287,611.74
167,284.42
454, 896.16

Total

$86,922.00
72, 293.54
159,215.54

MINOR COINS FOR RECOINAGEo

:
^ T,,!..
The amount of minor coinage metal for recoinage on hand July, -n
Ij
1889, and the amounts and denominations of minor coins transferred by
the Treasurer of the United States to the mint, and the coins struck
therefrom, and the gain by recoinage are shown in the following table s
mu^

«,^^,-.^^

^c

M I N O R COINAGE METALS FOR RECOINAGE F O R FISCAL Y E A R 1890.
fMint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa.]
Balance on hand July 1, 1889 ..o.oos«o«.«.oo
=00.00=0000000
o
..ooo... $52,726.59
Transferred by Treasurer of United States for recoinage
=
=
o. =.= =».. 43, 696.95
I n order to use the 1-cerit nickel coins it was necessary to add new nickel for aUoy,
costing
o
...-•
...o
1,462.50
In order to use the old copper cents it was necessary to add tin and zinc for alloy,
costing
=.00
==0.0
o
.79.49
I n order to use the nickel 3-cent coin it was necessary to add additional metal of the
same alloy, costing
........o.....=000000.0=000000.=.00=000=00.0=0.0000.0.000.00.
581.60
Total for recoinage
.000=00.0000000.000000000=000=00000000000.000000000===. 98, 547.13
Deduct from same, loss on recoinage....o==oooooo.-=oo=.=0000=
=.000=000=000.oi== = < 2,409.30
Net value of metal for recoinage
.0.0.000.0
00=0=0000. = = ..=»o.i = = o. 96,137. 74
Deduct balance remaining uncoined at the end of the fiscal year
==0000000..=00000=. 28,012.48
Cost of metal r e c o i n e d . . . . . . o . . . . = o.=.=..=...= =00=00=0====0000==00000000000= oaoooc
Coin manufactured from same (nominal value) t
Bronze 1-oent
....=
=..
.-0000=0.0.0000=00 ooo... $24,630.14
' N'ickel 3-cent
»»-oo
=0-00.o««ooooooo.==00=0000000=0000
556.50
Nickel 5-cent
00.00.000
0.0
0.0.00000=00000000.0000.0=... 111,379.10

68,125.28

136,565.74
Gain by recoinage.

68,440.46

The amount of the several types and denominations of minor coin
issued from the mint at Philadelphia since its establishment, the amount
remelted by the mint, and the amount apparently outstanding June 30,
1890, are set forth in the following exhibit:
Denominations.

Copper cents
Copper half cents. - . .
Copper-nickel cents;.
Bronze cents
Bronze 2-cent pieces .
Nickel 3-cent pieces..
Nickel 5-cent pieces..
Total

oooo.

Coined.

Remelted.

Outstanding
J u n e 30, 1890.

$1, 562, 887. 44
*39,926.11
2, 007,720.00
5, 672, 874.42
912, 020.00
905, 768.52
10, 878, 310.80

$376,017,34

$1,186,870.10

758,138.73
37, 871. 73
312, 327.82
216, 636. 79
109, 205. 60

1,249, 581. 27
5, 635, 002. 69
599, 692.18
689,131.73
10,769,105.20

21,979, 507. 29

1, 810,198. 01

20,129,383.17

* There is no record of the melting of any old copper half cents, but it is believed that few, if any,
are in circiilatioiii.




118

REPORT ON T H E FINANCESo

The distribution by the .mint of minor coins during thefiscalyear
1890 is set forth in the following table i
M I N O R COINS DISTRIBUTED FROM T H E M I N T AT P H I L A D E L P H I A DURING T H E FISCAL
Y E A R 1890.

State or Territory.
Alabama
«,..
Arizona
.o.
Arkansas
•
California
Colorado
,
Connecticut
o.
Dakota
.o..
Delaware
District of Columbia,
Florida
Georgia
.o.oo.....
Idaho
oooooooo.
Illinois
oooooo..
Indiana
o = .ooo.
loWa

o

=.

Kansas
Kentacky...
.o,
Louisiana
=,
Maine
o..
Maryland .000.000 = = .,
Massachusetts
o.
Michigan
o.
Minnesota
,
Mississippi
0..=

5-cent
nickel.

1-cent
bronze.
$1,693

$8,110
240
3,960
1,240
3,800
11,885
2,320
360
20
4,630
5,335
180
44, 210
16, 040
13, 025
7,555
23, 055
18, 080
2,360
4,050
23, 255
12,180
14,560
2,340

5-cent
nickel.

State or Territory.

165
740
980
8,091
1,365
50
620
1,180
3,680
53,150
9,730
9,200
6,305
2,830
205
3,200
1,150
14,635
14,635
10,030
140

Missouri 000=00 oo.oo.
Montana
-o,
Nebraska
,
New Hampshire...,
NewJersey
=.
New M e x i c o . . . , . =.
New York l....o=o = .
North Carolina.
Ohio

14, 630
4,120
8,335
2,645
12, 855
- 400
63,980
5, 305
25, 525
1,840
69, 2G9
' 1, 920

00.00=0 = 00,

O r e g o n .000 = 00000==

Pennsylvania
Rhode Island .== = = 0
South Carolina
Tennessee
= .0
Texas..o= = o.--oo.oo

4,8ct0

18, 705
21, 885
4,260
1,430
4,800
7,825
2,210
12,465
100
20

Utah....00..0,0.0=.

Vermont, oo.
Virginia

=00,

•Washington
West Virginia .===0
Wisconsin 000=0.0==
Wyoming
-o.-oIndian Territory===
Total

,..0

512,144

1-cent
bronze.
7,130
6,315
3,340
11, 085
20
66, 530
1,555
22, 295
80
22,380
8, 470
2,115 ^
4,460
775
2,120
2,820
545
1,770
10, 995

318,764

M I N O R COINS DISTRIBUTED FROM T H E M I N T AT PniLADELPHiA—Continued,

RECAPITULATIONo
Denomination.
Five-cent pieces0 = 000 = = . . ==.===o.o.o...o.
One-cent pieces
Total

.=




Pieces.

Value.

==o== === = oo...ooo».==..-. 10,242,880
31, 876,400

$512,144
318 764

42,119,280

830,908

DIRECTOR OF THE MINTo

119

T H E COURSE OF SILVEBo

There was a marked improvement, in th© pric© of silver! during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1890o
At the commencement of' the fiscal year, the price in London was 42
pence, and at the close 47f, an advance of 5f pence, equivalent to 12.6
cents per fine ounce.
Several causes contributed to this advance, th© principal being the
very general belief,,which was justified, that there woukl be additional ,
legislation favorable to silver by the Congress of the IJnited States.
The very large silver coinage by G-reat Britain for home aind colonial
use also stimulated .the price.
, The exports of silver to India were largely in exce.ss of the previous
year. For the fiscal year 1889, the exports of silver from London to.
India aggregated £5,530,814,-while, for the fiscal year 1890, they were
£9,010,793, an increase of £3,479,979, or over $15,000,000. ;
., The rise in the price of silver was slight to October 1,1889. At that
date, it had reached 42f pence. After that date the advance was more
rapid, the price reaching, October 31, 43J pence; November 30, 44j3pence, and December 31, 44-pence. In January, the price rose so as to
make the average for that month 44J pence. Early in March, the Indian council announced that the amount of council bills to be awarded
weekly would be increased from 35 to 40 lacs,^ and as no favorable legislation upon the part of the United States had as yet been enacted
the price of silver declined, the average for the month ofMarch being
43.9 peuce, and the closing price March 31 being 43^. Early in April,
the price rose again and by the 25th had reached 48 pence, but as
rapidly declined, closing, on the 30th, at 46y\ pencCo ' In May, the pric©
fluctuated between 46y9_ ^nd 47J pence, the average for the month being 46,97 pence. In June the price again fluctuated, opening on the
1st at 46|^g- pence, while on the 9th it had reached 49 pencCo ; From this
price it declined until on the 14th, it was 47f pencCo On the 18th and
19th it rose to 48^ pence, and, from that point, declined ,until it closed
on the 30th at 47f pence^ th© averag© pric©' for th© month being 47.727
pence.
The lowest price of silver, during th© year, was at the beginning,-42
pence, equivalent to $0.92068 perfin©ounce, and the highest, 49 pence,'
on June 9, equivalent to $l,0741o The average price of silver in
London, during the fiscal year, was 44.196 pence, equivalent,, at the par
of exchange, to $0.96883 per fine ouncCo The average monthly New
York price of fine bar^ silver was^ for th© sam© p©riod, $0l96804.per
ounce.
•
'
.
. i
At the equivalent of the average London price,- during the year, the
commercial value of th© silv©r contained in a silver dollar, was 74.93
cents, at the. lowest price 71.2 cents, and at the^ highest price 83.07
centSo
•
'
The highest, lowest, and mean price of silver in London, each month
during the fiscal year 1890 and the calendar year 1889, 'according
to daily cablegrams to this Bureau, and the' equivalent value.of an
ounce of fine silver, are set forth in the following tables i




^A lao is 100,000 rupees.

\

120

REPORT ON THE

H I G H E S T , L O W E S T , AND

AVERAGE P R I C E

OF

FINANCES.
S I L V E R B U L L I O N AND V A L U E OF A

F I N E OUNCE EACH MONTH DURING THE F I S C A L Y E A R

Months.

Highest.

1889.

Pence.

Equivalent
A v e r a g e v a l u e o f a fine
Average
Equivalent
Average
ounce, based
p r i c e p e r v a l u e o f a fine m o n t h l y
monthly
price at
on a v e r a g e
ounce,
o u n c e w i t h N e w Y o r k m o n t h l y price N e w YoVk
British
exchiiuge a t of exf-hange a n d a v e r a g e p r i c e o f fine
standard,
b a r silver.
p a r , $4.8665. on L o n d o n . r a t e of ex.925 fine.
change.

Lowest.

Pence..
42
42i
42i
42§
43f
431

July

42T:\

August
September
October.November
December

42^

1890.

Pence.
42.159
* 42.349
42. 522
42.944
43. 923
43. 967

$4. 8776
4. 8731
4. 8798
4. 8612
4. 8500
4.8419

$0.92638
0.92959.
0. 93477
.0.94036
0.95956
0.95894

$0. 92558
0.92843
0.92589
0. 94120
0.96100
0.95880

44. 502
44. 042
43. 908
45.451
46. 971
47.727

0.97554
0.96545
0. 96251
0. 99634
1. 02966
1.04623

4.8612
4. 8674
4.8550
4. 8722
4. 8596
4.8737

0.97447
0. 96563
0. 96024
0.99751
1,02820
1. 04778

0.97510
0. 96608
0 96149
1 00538
1.04890
1.05750

44.196

43^.
44-1
44g

$0. 92417
0.92834
0. 93213
0.94382
0.96284
0. 96381

0. 96883

4.8643

0. 96839

0. 96804

1890.
January
February
March
April
May
. June

44|
441
44|
48
47^
49

m
43|
43|
46
46i

Average

H I G H E S T , L O W E S T , AND A V E R A G E P R I C E

OF

SILVER

B U L L I O N AND

F I N E OUNCE EACH MONTH DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR

Months.

Highest.

Lowest.

1889.
January
February
March
. - .. April

Pence.
421^
42|
421
42^
42i
42A
'
42^
42^

Average
price per
ounce,
British
standard
.925.

Pence.

Mav
Julv
Angust
September
October
November
December

42H
43i
44f
44t

Averftg6




Pence.
42.544
42. 594
42. 521
42.185
42.162
42.034
42.159
42. 349

m
42§
42i
42^
41H
42
42 '
42i
421
43f
431

•

42. 522
42.944
43.923
43. 967
42iS

Equivalent
Average
v a l u e of a
monthly
fine o u n c e
price at
w i t h exNew York
change at ofexchange
par, $4.8665. on L o n d o n .

$0.93261
0.93371
0. 93211
0. 92474
0. 92424
0.92143
O;92417
0.92834
0. 93213
0. 94382
0. 96284
0.96381
0. 9 3 5 7 6 ^

$4.8810
4.8872
4. 8894
4.'8895
4. 8900
4.8879
4.8776
4. 8731
4.8798
4. 8612
4.8500
4. 8419
4.8757+

VALUE OF A
1889.

Equivalent
v a l u e of a fine
o u n c e , based A v e r a g e
monthly
on a v e r a g e
monthly price New Y o r k
a n d a v e r a g e p r i c e o f fine
b a r silver.
r a t e o f exchange.

$0.93616
0.93752
0. 93652
0.92918
0.92893
0.92547
0. 92638
0. 92959
0. 93477
0.94036
0. 95956
0. 95894
0.93753-f

$0. 93644
0. 93750
0 93769
0 9^865
0.92865
0 92595
0 92558
0.92843
0. 92589
0. 94120
0. 96100
0.95880
0. 936314-

DIRECTOR OF THE MINTo

121

As stated, the price of silver in London at the close of the fiscal yeai
was 4 7 | pence, equivalent at the par of exchange to $1.04673+ per fine
ounce.
Since the close of the fiscal year, the fluctuations in the price of silver
have assumed a very wide range. To July 14, the date of uhe passage
of the new silver law, the price had advanced in London to49i pence, and
in New York to $1.08, per fine ounce. To the 13th of August, the date
the new silver law went into effect, the price advanced to 51J pence in
London, and, in New York, to $1,13 per fine ounce.
The highest price in London was reached on the 3d and 4th of
September, viz, 5 4 | pence, equivalent, at the par of exchange, to $1.1975
per tine ounce. Tlie highest point reached in New York was on August
19, ranging from $1,195 ^^ $1.21 per fine ounce.- The price in New York
did not vary materially from the 19th of August to the 3d o'f September,
when a decline commenced, extending, with some fluctuations to the
present time, the price at this date, November 1, being, in New York
$1.06f, and, in London, 48f pence, equivalent at the par of exchange to
$1.06f.
The price of silver in London, at the date of t h e passage :of the act of
February 28, 1878, remonetizing the silver dollar and requiring the
monthly purchase and coinage, of not less than $2,000,000 nor more
than $4,000,000 worth of silver, was 55 pence, equivalent to $1,205 per
fin© ounce, at which price the commercial value of the silver in the
standard dollar was 93J cents.
From that time until May 19,1888, when the lowest price was reached,
the decline was, with some intermissions, uniform, the lowest price
reached being 41f pence, equivalent to $0.9124 per fine ouiice^ at which'
rate the value of the silver in the silver dollar was $0.70,57o
AFFBOPEIATIONS AND EXPENDITURESo

. The appropriations made by Congress for the support of the mints
and assay offices of .the United States, for the fiscal year ended June
30,1890^ aggregated $1,094,650.
There was expended from these appropriations $1,086,485.12, leaving
in the Treasury the sum of $8,164.88.
|
In addition to expenditures from regular appropriations, there was
expended at the coinage mints from the general appropriation contained in the act of February. 28, 1878, the sum of $232,027.13, making
the total expenditures on account of th© mints and assay oflSicesforthe
fiscal year $l,318,612o25o
In addition to th© expenditures for the support of th© mints and
assay offices, there was paid to th© Gold and Stock Telegraph Company,
at the Treasury Department, frotu the appropriation for the coinage of
silver dollars^ the sum of ®924 for cablegrams from London giving
the daily price of silvero
The total expenditures, therefore, for th© mint service' for the last
fiscal year aggregated $1,319,436,25 e,gainst $1,219,261.36 expended in
the previous year, an increase of $100^174.890
The abov© expenditures for the fiscal year ©nd©d Jun©:30, 1890, in=
clud© th© sum of $1,500 spent for repairs of building and' renovating
the grounds at the assay office at Bois6 City, as well as th© entire cost
of the extensive and valuable improvements to the building and plant
made at th© Mint at Philadelphia, and exhibited in detail in the article
in this report under th© head of ^' Mint at Philadelphiao^ •



122

E E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES,

They also include the increased cost of the mint at Carson, conducted
as a coinage mint during the last fiscal year.
I t will be remembered that the mint at Carson was closed to coinage
during the four previous years, but was reopened with a fulL cori3S of
officers on July 1, 1889. The expenses of this institution conducted as
a coinage mint aggregated during the last fiscal year $124^928.52, against
$61,706,99 expended in the prior year, when its business was limited to
the manufacture of barSo
It will also be borne in mind, as exhibited elsewhere, that the coinage
of the United States mints during the last fiscal year was the largest
in the history of the Mint service, aggregating the enormous sum of
112,698,071 pieces against 93,427,140 pieces struck in the preceding
year, an increase of 19,270,931 pieces at an increased cost of $100,174.89.
That due economy has been exercised in the' administration of the
Mint service is forcibly exhibited by a comparison of the force and business of the mint at Philadelphia during the last two fiscal years.
When I took charge of the-Mint service, I found that the force of the
mint at Philadelphiag exclusive of salaried officers and clerks, numbered
520 persons, and that, notwithstanding this excessive force, considerable overtime was allowed and paid foro
By the 1st of July, 1890, under orders issued by me and approved by
the Secretary, the force of this mint was reduced to 461 employes and
overtime was entirely discontinued.
Notwithstanding this large reduction, of force and discontinuance of
overtime, the coinage executed at the Mint at Philadelphia, during the
last fiscal year, aggregated 93,707,137 pieces against 77,544,801 pieces
struck in the preceding year.
The appropriations "and expenditures of the Mint service, exclusive of
the amount paid at the Treasury Department for cablegrams^ are exhibited in th© following table i
APPROPRIATIONS AND IEXPENDITURES, 1890O,
APPKOPRIATIOlSrS.

Institutions.

Sal&ries,

Wages.

Coinage of
standard
silver dolEepairs of lars, act of
Contingent. buildings.
February
28,1878
(indefinite).

Total.

MINTS.

Philadelphia, ooo 000000,00.. $41,550.00 $293,000.00 $100,000.00
San Francisco oooooo .ooooo- 41,100. 00 170,000. 00 40,000.00
C arson
oo.oooo.oo.ooo,. 29, 550. 00 60, 000. 00 25,000.00
74,000.00 35,000.00
New Orleans.ooooo.oooooo. 31,950.00

$434 550.00
251,100. 00
114,550. 00
140, 950.00

•

.„,.,„

ASSAY OFFICES.

Kew Torkoooo.oooooooooo"., 39,250. 00
Denver...oooooooooooo..oo. 10,950. 00
Helena..-,.ooo ooo ooo o.oo... 7, 700.00
3,200.00
Bois6 City,,ooooooooooo.,..
2, 750.00
Charlotte,ooo ooooooooooo,,.
3, 500. 00
StLOUiSoooooooooooooo

25, ©00.00
14, 750.00
12. 000.00

211,500.00

648,750.00

T o t a l , 000000000,00=..




10,000.00
6,000. 00
5,000.00
7,500.00
2, 000.00
2,400.00
232,900,00

-oooooooooo.

.
$1,500.00

1,500.00

.ooooooooooo

74,250. 00
31,700.00
24, 700.00
12, 200.00
4,750.00
5,900.00
1, 09i, 650. 00

DIEECTOK

123

O F T H E MINT.

APPROPRIATIONS AND E X P E N D I T U R E S , 1890—Continned,
EXPE]^DITUilES.

Salaries.

Institutions.

Wages.

Coinage of
standard
K e p a i r s of s i l v e r dolC o n t i n g e n t . b u i l d i n g s . l a r s , a c t bf
February
28, 1878
(indefinite).

Total.

MINTS.
$41,550. 00 $292, 804.56
40, 976.18 168, 817.15
59,999.89
29, 503.82
73,941.31
31, 950. 00

$99,889. 81
39,552. 97
24,279.71
34,987.30

39, 250. 00
10, 840.11
7,700.00
3,200.00
2, 750. 00
3,500. 00

24, 208.50
13,551.25
11,930.00

9, 867.40
3,439. 27
4,955. 51
7,141. 37
1, 999. 75
2, 399. 26

211, 220.11

Philadelphia....,...,
San Francisco
Carson
o,
N e w Orleans
,.,,

645, 252. 66

$146, 837.76
14,751.50
11,145. i o
59,292.77

$581,082.13
• 264,097.80
124, 928. 52
200,171.38

ASSAY OFFICES.
New York
...oo,,
Denver
o
Helena . . , , . , . , , 0 0 . . .
Bois6 C i t y
,
Charlotte
..o
St. L o u i s . , o . . , , o
o.
Total.,0

228, 512.35

73,325.90
27, 830.63
24, 585. 51
11,841.37

$1, 500. 00

4. 749. 75
5, 899. 26
1, 500.00

232, 027.13

1, 318, 512. 25

The unexpended balances of appropriations, for the fiscal year ISOOj
are shown in detail in the following tables •
!
U N E X P E N D E D BALANCES O F A P P R O P R I A T I O N S , F I S C A L Y E A R !1890.

Institutions.

Salaries.

Wages.

Contingent
expenses.;
r\

Total. ^

j

MINTS.
Philadelphia

$195.44
1,182.85
.11
58,69

$110.19
447. 03
720.29
12,70

$305.63
1,753.70
v
> 766.58
71.39

109.89

791.50
1,198. 75
70.00

132. ^0
2,560.73
44.49
358.63
,?5
.74

924.10
3,869.37
, 114.49
358. 63
.25
.74

279.89

3,497.34

4,387.65

8,164.88

,00,00,000.0,000000000000000000.

S a n Francisco.oooooooooo,.oooooo.oooo.000,".
Carson
o..,,.=0,0.000000 000000,0
N e w Orleans . . , . . , . 0 0 , . , , , , . , 0 , 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 , . . . .

$123.82
46.18

'

ASSAY OFFICES.
N e w York.....ooooo00
„.000,0000.,000,.
Denver .i
000.oooo,,oo,,,,
000
Helena
00,0000,000.0=000, .ooo,,000. oooo,.
Bois6 City .,000 = 0
.,ooo»
,0000=.
Charlotte.,
. o , . . , 0=00=0 000=00,000=00
St. Louis

,,oooo,0=0,=

T o t a l

. =ooooo«,o = ooo.ooooooooo = .

. o o o o o . =0 0 0 ,

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO,

The expenses of the oiBSce of the Birector of the Mint,, including the ,
salaries of the Director and clerks, which are fixed by law^ the examinations of mints and assay offices, the purchase of books ;and periodicals, maintenance of laboratory, the expenses of collecting and compiling the statistics of the production of the precious metals, and incidental and contingent expenses, aggregated |34,444o61,'lea|ving an .un«
expended balance of appropriations for these purposes of $2,045,39,
The appropriations and expenditures of the ofiice of the iDirector of
the Mint are shown in the following table s



124

R E P O E T ON T H E FINANCES.

APPROPRIATIONS AND E X P E N S E S OP T H E O F F I C E OF T H E ^DIRECTOR O F T H E M I N T
FOR T H E F I S C A L YEAR 1890.

Purposes for which appropriated.

Appropriated.

Unexpended.

$28, 740. 00
2, 500. 00
4,000. 00
750.00
500.00

$27, 676.06
2,100.15
3,423.49
749.36
495. 55

$1, 063. 94
399.85
576.51
.64
4.45

36,490. 00

Salaries.
=
o
Examination of niints -..=o
ooo,,,00, = ,.==...
Mining statistics..,..== =
oo.ooo,
Laboratory
,
-»
oo=.,, = o
Bookb, pamphlets, and incidental expenses..0..0--...
Total

Expended.

34, 444.61

2,045.39

=

The appropriations made for the support of the mints and assay
oflices, for the fiscal year ending June 30,1891, are as follows s
APPROPRIATIONS F O R M I N T S AND ASSAY O F F I C E S , 1891.

Institutions.

Contingent
expenses.

Salaries.

Wages of
workmen.

$41,550.00
41,100,00
29, 550.00
31,950.00

$293,000.00
170, 000. 00
30, 000. 00
74, 000.00

$80,000.00
40, 000.00
12, 500.00
35, 000.00

$414. 550.00
251,100.00
72, 050.00
140, 950. 00

39.250.00
10,950.00
7,700.00
3,200.00
2,750.00
3,500.00

25,000.00
13, 750.00
12,000.00.

10, 000.00
6, 000.00
5,000.00
7, 500. 00
2,000.00
2,400.00

74,250. 00
30,700.00
24,700.00
10, 700.00
4, 750.00
5,900. 00

211,500.00

617,750.00

200,400.00

1,029,650.00

Total.

MINTS.

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Carson
New Orleans

'=„ =

=..

ASSAY O F F I C B d .

New York
Denver
^
Helena
,
Boi86 City
Charlotte
St. Louis
Total

=0=00.,=
,
,=^.=..,,
.\.
,

On the 1st ultimo I had thehonor to submit estimates of appropriations
required for the support of the Mint service, for the fiscal year ending
June 30,1892, These.estimates, including the usual appropriation for
« freight on bullion and coin,'^ aggregated $1,181,210, against appropri^
ations, for the current fiscal year, amounting to $1,076,360, an increase
of $104,850.'
The increase in the estimates above current appropriations is explained very largely by the fact that the appropriations for the current
fiscal year, were reduced by Congress $62,900 below the estimates for
that .year, notwithstanding the fact that the estimates which I had the
honor to submit for the fiscal year 1891, and which met your approval,
were less "by. $1,880 than the amounts actually appropriated for the
fiscal year 1890.
EAKNINGS AND EXPENSES OF THE R E F I N E R I E S OF T H E
MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW .YORK,

COINAGrE

The total amount collected of depositors at the coinage mints and
the assay office at New York, during the fiscal year 1890, as charges for
parting and refining bullion, amounted to $166,4720300



125

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

Tlie law requires that the charges collected of depositors shall be
used to defray the expenses of- the refinery (paragraph 8, chapter 329,
volume 1 of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes)o
'
The total amount expended was $180,398.91o
There was realized, however, from the sale of by-products from the
acid refineries (blue vitriol and spent acid), during the year, the sum of
$15,023019, which is a legitimate gain to the refinery, and which prior
to the fiscal year 1885 was-used in offsetting i)aymeuts for acids.
Under a decision of the First Comptroller, the proceeds of these sales
have since that date been= no longer available for reducing the expenses of the refineries, aud must be covered into the Treasury.
Deducting the amount realized from these sales from the gross expenditures, the net expenditures for parting and refining bullion during
the year, were $165,375.72^ or $1,096.58 less than 'the charges collected.
Under a separate heading-, i have invited your attention ;and that of
Congress to the advisability of changing existing law, as construed by
the accounting officers of the Department, so as to allow the use of
moneys received from the sale of by-products in reducing the expenses
of the acid refineries.
The.purpose of the law was evidently to make these refineries selfsupporting, and it seems to me that this purpose is defeated by diverting
legitimate gains which in any metallurgical establishment would be used
in offsetting losses and expenses.
The total receipts for parting and refining bullion, since July 1,1876,
the date at which the refineries were made self-supporting, have exceeded
the gross expenditures for the same period by the sum of $126,502.38,
the latter amount standing to the credit of the appropriation: for parting
and refining bullion on July 1, 1890.
The receipts and expenses of the refineries for the fiscal year, 1890, are
exhibited in the following table s
CHARGES COLLECTED AND E X P E N D I T U R E S FOR FARTING AND R E F I N I N G BULLION,

1890.
Charges collected.

Institutions.
Mint at Philadelphia...=o=. = , . .
====oooc=o=.
Mint at San Francisco
= .==
,
. = 00.000==,
M i n t a t Carson
==00 = 00= ===.
M i n t a t N e w Orleans
,.,==«==,=oo==
A s s a y ofl&ce a t N e w Y o r k
=
,,,o====, ==.ooo= = .
Total

=00.=.., = = .,==

=o. ==.=ooo==

Gross expenditures.

Net expenditures.

$17,673.60
33,173.46
33,972.88
765.68
80,886.68

$20,270.51
52, 335. 94
25, 492. 34
. 465,15
81,834.97 :

$20,270.51
51,547.06
23, 571.50
465.15
69, 518.50

166,472.30

180, 398. 91

165,375.72

EARNINGS AND EXPENDITURES OF T H E MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES.

The total earnings of the mints and assay offices, during the fiscal
year aggregated $10,809,857.01o
Of this sum $9,385,416.57 arose from seigniorage on the coinage of
standard silver dollars, $1,649.80 from seigniorage on subsidiary silver
coinage, and $1,188,877 from seigniorage on minor coinage.
The remainder of the earnings were derived from charges collected
from depositors, from surplus bullion returned by operative officers and
recovered from the deposit melting room, and from the sale! of old material and by-productSo



126

R E P O R T ON- T H E FINANCES.

The total expenditures and losses of all kinds, including the entire
expenses for the support of the mints and assay offices and acid refineries, the wastage of the operative departments and losses on the sale
of sweeps, the expenses of distributing silver dollars, subsidiary silver
coins, and minor coins, aggregated $1,576,927.99, leaving a net profit of
earnings over expenses during the fiscal year of $9,232,929.02o
In the Appendix will be found a table exhibiting in detail the earnings and expenditures at each of the institutions of the Mint service.
CLASSIFIED STATEMENT OF E X P E N D I T U R E S . ',

The following table has been prepared for the purpose of exhibiting
the expenditures for the different classes of supplies (together with salaries and wages) at the mints and assay offices of the United States
during the fiscal year 1890, the expenses of the acid refineries being
separated from the ordinary expenses of the mints s
CLASSIFIED STATEMENT OF E X P E N D I T U R E S AT T H E M I N T S AND ASSAY O F F I C E S DURING THE F I S C A L YEAR 1890O

Supplies.
Acids
,= = ,.=,o,=
==ooo==,,.,o.,,.
Advertising
,
=,.,...
Assayers' materials
,
, , , , = = .o=»=o ,===,,,,,
Balances
,,,. =
= ,00-= = ,,,== = = .-==,,
Belting
= = = ,.=, ==0
====. = . ==,.=====.,»..,,
Charcoal ..=.,=
,,- =
,0 = 0.,-,===,.,
Chemicals . . . ===..0.,. = = = = . = =
. . = ,==.0===...
Coal.
,.0
o==o. = , . „ = = .
Coke
==,,====.,.
Copper (includes $20 for silver discs)
==.=== = =, = .
Crucibles
— ,oo ==o..oo.,,.==oooo,,=
Cooperage
= = .,-,=o. = o,.,o..,.,.==ooo. = = ooooo,o = .
Dry goods...==o.,.,o=,=oo,a,=o=oo,=,===,=0000•=.....
Electric light and gas
===o=oc.o===c=oooo = ooo,== = .
Firebricks
,===00.====a.oooooc.==oo=, ==.„=====, = = .
Jj l U . X 6 S • - • e a o « * a e o « O O O o o o *

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Freight and drayage
====, = = .,oo==oo. = o
Furniture
,====.,00,0=000000000.00000,0==,
Gloves aud mittens
, . , = ==00=000=
0=00000===,
J Q . O I T Q . W W I T6 0 O O Q O O O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o o o o o o o o o o o
I c e
i r o n

, , , , . , « o

0 0 0 . . . =..====0, == . , = = 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . , - . .

anO. S r e e i . . . . . . o o o o s o o o , e o o D =o o o o , o o o a o o o , o o . o =a

Labor andrepairs.,===o.==ooo,ooooo,=oooo =000000=== =
Lead (sheet and pipe).==000000 = 0=000.=00000=000,== = =
Loss on sale of sweeps..=0=0000=0000000=0.=00,==,.-.
Lumber
= = .===00 0=0=00.»=-, = ,,oo
Machinery and appliances
= 0000==.,==000 ===..,.
Metal work and castings.oooo=====o.,,,0=0=0000=0=0,
Oils. = =,. = 0. = = 00, = = = =
= ,000.,,., = = 0.. = 0000.
Rent . . , ===,
,== ==0
,o===o.-,
==0. ==.==«
Repairs of building and renovation of grounds.. = ,= =
Scales.,=000=0== = , , 000
= 0,,== = ,= .
, ==.,.=='"- =
Sewing. 0 000 = 0 0 , . . , . . , = . = , , , , = .=== = = o===oo,==000
Stationery, printing, and binding
=0000,o« 00=0=0




Ordinary.
$1,904.50
103.20
1,356.13
464.05
1,600.71
6,476.32
5,742.34
20, 692. 85
4, 537.67
26, 682.40
7,134.78
2,951.11
16,188.74
2,840.13
1,487.52
271.93
31,553.51
5,214.78
3,122.51
1,368.09
19,964.39
407.77
3,199.40
6, 775.62
9,931.48
2, 754. 92
480.00
1, 500. 00
14 72
345.00
1,437.99
2, 812.30

Eefinery.
$41,014.67
14.50

1, 535. 71
248.43
4, 825.71
325.95
II, 779.26
2,888.17
834. 50
1,124.94
1,105.74
117.62
5,620.99
2,015, 85
719.61
55.08
63.72
Lll
822.31
1,895.05
1,610.79
218.27
1,656.48
886.19
122. 71

569.30
75.50

Total.
$42, 919. 23
103.20
1, 370. 63
464.05
1, 600. 71
8, 012. 03
5, 990. 77
25, 518. 56
4, 863. 62
38, 461. 66
10, 022. 95
834.50
4, 076. 05
17,294. 48
117. 62
8,461.12
3,503.37
27L93
12,273.12
5,269.86 "
3,186. 23
1,369.20
20,786.70
1,895.05
2,018.56
3, 417.67
8,432.10
10, 817,67
2, 877.63
480.00
1, 590. 00
584. 02
345. 00
1, 513. 49
2, 812. 30

127

DIRECTOR O F T H E MINT.
CLASSIFIED STATEMENT OF E X P E N D I T U R E S , ETC.—Continued.

Supplies.

Ordinary.

Steam
»
Sundries......••...••=•.,.•,.=,...•... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telegraphing and telephone service , . . . . . . ^ . . , . . . . . .
Tools

Total.

o....

Total
^.-..
Salaries.-.-....
Wages of w o r k m e n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aersrreffate

$1, OOL 48
31, 860. 66
730.05
247.46
1,535.60
4,148. 75
15,778.40
8.65

$5,215.13
95L08

226, 687.97
211, 220.11
880,604.17

91,^113.56;
89,285.35

317 801. 53
211 220.11
969, 889. 52

1,318,512. 25

..a

Washing
Water
Wood
Zinc

Eefinery.

180,398.91

1,498, 911.16

287.90|
862.20:
1,649.09

$6, 276. 61
32, 811. 74
730. 05
247. 46
I, 535.60
4, 436. 65
16, 640. 60
1, 657. 74

REGULATIONS FOR T H E TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS AT T H E MINTS
AND ASSAY OFFICES.

A revised edition of the regulations for the transaction of business
at the mints and assay offices was issued under date of October 1, bearing the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to take effect November 1, 1890.
.
^
YALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.

In accordance with the requirements of section 3564 of the Eevised
Statutes of the United States, the values of the standard boins in circulation of the various nations of the world were estimated by me and
proclaimed by the Secretary of the Treasury on the 1st day of January,
1890, to be as follows:
VALUES O F F O R E I G N COINS, J A N U A R Y 1, 1890.

g-tc

Country.

Standard.

Argentine Republic.

Gold and silver.

Peso

Austria-Hungary. Silver!

Florin . . . . . . . . . . . .

IBelsiuin •••>•••>.• Gold and sil
ver.

Franc t,i,.,,--,




j
Coinai

Monetary unit.

$0.96,5

0.34, 5

.19,3

;

Gold: argentine ($4.82,4) and I argentine. Silver: peso and divisions,
i
Gold: 4 florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins
($3.85,8), ducat ($2.28,7), and 4,
ducats ($9.15,8). Silver: 1 and 2
florins.
Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver; 5
franca.

128

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS, JANUARY 1, 1890—Continued.

^1
IS
Country

Standard.

Monetary unit.

Coins.

m
Bolivia
Brazil

S i l v e r . . . . . . . Boliviano
Gold
Milreis

$0.69, 8
.54,6

Dollar
British Posses- !&old
s i o n s. N o rth
A m e r i c a (except Newfoundland).
C entral Ariierican
StatesCosta Rica.."!
Guatemala..
flonduras
> Silver
Peso
Nicaragua.. |
Salvador. . . J
Gold and sil- Peso
Chili
ver.

Gold :. 5,10, and 20 milreis. Silver:
i, 1, and 2 milreis.

LOO

s '

.'69 8 Silver: peso and divisions.

.91,2

L03,l
1.14,8

Colombia

Silver

r Shanghai..
Tael.<^ H a i k w a n
((Customs).
Peso

Cuba

.92,6

Denmark
Ecuador

Gold and sil- Peso.ver.
Gold
Crown..'.
Silver
Sucre.............

EsrvDt

Gold

Gold: escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon i
($4.50,1), and condor ($9.12,3).
Silver: peso and divisions.

China...

SUver

Pound (100 piasters).

Gold and sil- Franc •
ver.
German E m p i r e . . Gold
Mark
Great Britain
Gold
Pound sterling . . .
France

Greece
Hayti....
India

Gold and sil- Drachma
ver.
Gold and sil- Gourde
ver.
Silver
Rupee . . . . . a . . . . . .

Italy

Gold and sil- Lira
ver.

Japan

•Gold and
silver.




-,

i SUver....

.69,8

.26,8
.69,8

4.94,3

.19,3
.23,8
4.86,6§
.19,3
.96,5
.33,2

Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and doublecondor. Silver: peso.
Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver:
peso.
Gold: 10 and 20 crowns.
Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and doublecondor. Silver: Sucre and divisions.
Gold: pound (IOO piasters), 50 piasters, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and
5 piasters. Silver: 1,2, 5,10, and
20 i>iasters.
'
Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs.
Silver: 5 francs.
Gold: 5,10, and 20 marks.
Gold: sovereign (pound sterling)
and ^ sovereign.
Gold: 5,10,20,50, and 100 drachmas.
Silver: 5 drachmas.
/
Silver: gourde.
Gold: mohur ($7.10,5). Silver: rupee and divisions. >
Gold: 5,10,20, 50. and 100 liras. Sil"ver: 5 liras.
Gold: 1,2,5,10, and 20 yen.
Silver: yen.

.19,3
.99,7
.75,2
1

129.

DIEECTOR OP T H E MINT.
VALUES OF F O R E I G N COINS, J A N U A R Y 1, 1890—Continued.

•

Country.

Standard.

Coins.

Monetary, unit.

1^1
G o l d . . . . : . . . . Dollar
Silver
Mexico

Liberia

Newfoundland
Peru
,
Portuo'al
Russia..,..,.. .

LOO
.75,8

Gold and sil- Florin
ver.
Dollar
Gold
Gold
Sol.^
Silver
.Milreis
Gold
Rouble
Silver

40,2

..........

1.01, 4
.26,8
.69,8
1.08
.55,8

Gold and sil- Peseta
ver.
Crown
,..•...
Sweden . . . . . . . . . Gold..
Switzerland
Gold and sil- Franc
ver.
Mahbub of 20 piTripoli
Silver
asters.
Piaster . ,
Turkev
Gold

.19,3

Veneisuela

.14,0

Spain

Silver

Bolivar

.26,8
.19,3

Gold: dollar ($0.98,|3), 2^, 5, 10, and
20 dollars. Silyer: dollar (orpeso)
and divisions. . ,
Gold: 10 florins. Silver: ^, 1, aud
2^ florins.
Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7-f). •
Gold: 10 and 20 crowns.
Silver : sol and divisions.
Gold: 1,2, 5, and 10 milreis. „
Gold : imperial ($7.71,8), and * imperial t ($3.86,0), Silver: i , i , and
1 rouble.
i
Gold: 25 pesetas. !Silver: 5 pesetas,
j ,
Gold: 10 and 20 crowns.
Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and lOO francs*.
Silver: 5francs.

•

.62,9
.04,4

Gold: 25,50, 100, 250, and 500 piasters.
Gold: 5,10,20, 50, and 100 bolivars.
Silver; 5 bolivars:

* Gold the, nominal standard. Silver practically the standard.
t Coined since January 1,1886. Old half-imperial = $3.98,6.

^

In estimating the value of foreign coins, the value of th^, monetary
unit of countries having a gold or double standard was ascertained by
comparing the amount of pure gold iu such unit with the pure gold in
the United States dollar, and the silver coins of such countries were,
given the same valuation as the corresponding gold coins with which
they were interchangeable by law.
'
In countries having a silver standard the values of the silver coins
were reckoned at the commercial value of the pure silver contained in
such coins.
, In ascertaining the commercial value of silver, for the purpose of this
estimate, the average price of silver for the month of December, 1889,
based upon daily cablegrams from London, was taken as being a closer
approximation to the price on January 1, 1890, than the average for the
three months preceding, which had been the period usually taken.
The average price of silver in Loradon, for the month of December,
1889, was 44 pence, equivalent, at the par of exchange, to $0.96,45, an
increase of $0.02,45 above the value used in estimating foreign silver
coins for the preceding year, based, as stated, upon the average price
of silver in London for the three months preceding Januarj^i 1, 1S8^.
This increase is worthy of oote for the reason that th(5 circulars of tliQ



130

R E P O R T . ON ^THE

FINANCES.

values of foreign coins have, prior to the last one, shown, each year, reduced values from the preceding year, for foreign silver coins, and this
is the first circular which has shown an increase.
The increase in the. price of silver occasioned a change in the estimated value of each of the following coins:
CHANGES I N T H E VALUES O F F O R E I G N . C O I N S FROM 1889 TO 1890.
Value
January 1,
1889'.

Coins.

Value
January 1,
1890".

$0. 33, 6 .
.68,0
.68,0
, .68,0
.68,0
. 68, 0 .
.32,3
.73,4
, . 73, 9
.68,0
.68,0
.54,4
.61,4
.13,6

Florin of Austria
t
Boliviano of Bolivia
Dollar (or peso) of Colombia
Sucre of Ecuador
Peso of Guatemala
Peso of Honduras
• Hupee of India
"...
Silver yen of Japan.»
Dollar (or peso) of Mexico..
Peso of Nicaragua
Sol of Peru
Rouble of Russia
Mahbub of Tripoli
Bolivar of Venezuela

$0.34, 5
. 69, 8
.69,8
.69,8
.69,8
.69,8
. 33, 2
.75,2
.75,8
. 69, 8
. 69, 8
. .55,8
.62,9
.14,0

Section 52 of "An act to reduce the revenue and equalize duties on
imports, and for other purposes,^^ approved October 1, 1890, commonly
known as the ^^McKinley tariff act," contains the following provision of
law:
^
T h a t t h e valne of foreign coin as expressed in t h e money of acconnt of the Unitecl
States shall be t h a t of t h e pure metal of such coin of standard v a l u e ; aud t h e values
of the standard coins in circulation of t h e various nations of t h e world shall bo estimated quarterly by the Director of t h e Mint, and be proclaimed by the Secretary of
the Treasury immediately after t h e passage of this act and thereafter quarterly on
t h e 1st day of J a n u a r y , April, J u l y , and October in each year.
^

In accordance with this requirement, the values of foreign coiihs were
estimated by me and proclaimed by the Secretary of the Treasury on
October 1, 1890, to be as follows:
'
VALUES O F F O R E I G N COINS, OCTOBER 1, 1890.

»1
Country.

Standard.

Monetary unit.

n

Coins.

pi
Argentine Republic.

Gold and sil- Peso
ver.

Austria-Hungary.

S i l v e r . . „ . , . Florin \




$0. 96,5 1 Gold: argentine ($4.82,4) and ^argentine. Silver: peso and divisions.
. 42, 0 Gold: 4 florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins
($3.85,8), ducats ($2.28,7) and 4
ducats ($9.15,8). Silver: l a n d 2
florins.

'

131

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

VALUES O F F O R E I G N COINS, OCTOBER 1, 1890—Continued,

05 fcC

Country.

; Belffium .
Bolivia
.-Brazil . . . . . . . . .

Gold and sil- Franc
ver;
Boliviano
Silver
Milreis
Gold

Dollar
British P o s s e s - Gold
s i o n s , North
America ( e x cept Newfoundland).
Central A m e r i can S t a t e s Costa Rica..}
Guatemala..
Honduras... > S i l v e r . . . . . . . Peso
Nicaragua..
Salvador . . . ,
Ohili
I . . Gold and sil- Peso
ver.

Silver

China

Silver

.

rShanghai . .
Tael< H a i k w a n
i (customs).
Peso

Gold aud sil- Peso
ver.
Gold
Crown
Silver
Sucre.-.. .

Cuba
Denmark
Bcuador

Coins*

Money unit.

Standard.

$0.19,3
.85,0
.54,6
LOO

• "
,
'

Gold

Pound (100 piasters).

.

J. .<..-..
Gold and sil- Franc
ver.
Mark
German Empire .. Gold
Pound sterling
Great Britain . . . . Gold

France

Greece
Hayti
India
Italy

\

•

'

•

1

.85,0

Silver: peso and divisions.

.91,2

Gold: 'escudo ($1;82,4) doubloon
($4.56.1), and condor ($912,3). Silver : peso and divisions.

1. 25, 6
L40
.85,0
.92,6
.26,8
.85 0

. ,
Effvnt

Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver; 5
francs.
Silver: boliviano and divisions.
Gold: 5,10, and 20 milreis. Silver:
^, 1, and 2 milreis.

4. 94, 3

.19,3
.23;'8
4. 86, 61

Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and doublecondor. Silver: peso.
Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver:
peso.
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns.
Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and doublecoadpr. Silver : sucre and divisions.
Gold: pound (IOO piasters), 50 piasters, 20 piasters, 10 piasters, and
5 piasters. Silver: 1, 2, .5,10, and
20 piasters.
;
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs.
Silver: 5 francs. 1
Gold: 5,10, and 20 marks.
Gold: sovereign (pound sterling)
and ^ sovereign, i
Gold: 5,10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas.
Silver: 5 drachmas.
Silver: gourde.
i

Gold and sil- Drachma
.19,3
ver.
Gold and sil- Gourde - . . . . . . .
.96 5
ver.
• . 40, 4 Gold: mohur ($7.10,5). S i l v e r :
Rupee
Silver
rupee and divisions.
. 19,3 Gold : 5,10,20, 50, and 100 hras. SilGold and sil- Lira
ver: 5 liras.
ver.




132

""

REPORT ON THE'FINANCES. ' ~.
VALUES OP FOREIGN COINS, OCTOBER 1, 1890—Continued.

CO b e

•Standard.

Country.

Monetary unit.

i|

4-

Coins.

>
Japan

....

Liberia.
Mexico . . . . . . . -

Gold and silver.
Gold
Gold
Silver
Gold
Silver

Florin

Gold and silver.
Gold
Gold and silver.
: . . . Silver

Peseta

Netherlands
Newfoundland
Norway . . . . .
Pern
Portugal . . . . . . . .
Russia

Spain
Sweden
1 Switzerland

^
(Gold....
* G o l d and
^^"•jsilver...
silver.
Gold
Dollar
Silver
Dollar

Dollar
Crown .Sol
'.
Milreis
Rouble

Crown.
Franc

i

..
.

Turkey

Gold

M a h b u b of 20
piasters.
Piaster

Venezuela

Silver

Bolivar

Tripoli

$0 99,7
.91,7

Gold: 1, 2,5,10, and 20 yen.
Silver: yen.

1 00
•. 92, 3 Gold: dollar ($0.98,3), 2^, 5, 10 and
20 dollars. Silver: dollar (or peso)
and divisions.
^
.40,2 Gold:.10 florins. Silver: ^, 1 aud
2^ florins.
1.01,4 Gold : 2 dollars ($2.02,7+).
. 26,8 Gold : 10 and 20 crowiis. •
.85,0 Silver: sol and divisions.
Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis.
1 08
?
.68,0 Gold: imperial ($7.71,8), and ? imperialt ($3.86,0).' Silver: i-Vand
1 rouble.
.19,3 Gold': 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas.
. 26, 8 Gold: 10 and 20 crowns.
.19,3 Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs.
Silver: 5 francs.
.76,7
.04,4
.17,0

Gold: 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 piasters.
Gold: 5,10,20,50, and 100 bolivars.
Silver: 5 bolivars.

*Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard,
t Coined since January 1,1886. Old hattamperial = $B.98, 0.

The values of the silver coins of countries of the single silver standard were fixed at the commercial value of the pure silver contained in
such coins, based upon the average price paid by the Treasury Department for silver purchased under the act of July 14, 1890; that is, from
August 13, the date the ^ new silver law went into effect, to September
30, 1890.
•^ •
The average price paid for the silver purchased by the Treasury Department during this period was $1.17,5, against $0.96,45, the value of
used in estimating foreign silver coins on the 1st of January, 1890, an
increase in the value of silver of $0.21,05.
The advance in the price of silver occasioned a change in the estimated value of each of the following coins :




133

DIEECTOE OP THE MINT.

CHANGES I N T H E VALUES OF F O R E I G N COINS FROM J A N U A R Y 1,1890, T O OCTOBER

1,1890.
Coins.

Florin of Austria-Hungary
Boliviano of Bolivia
Peso of Central American States
Shanghai tael of China - . .\
Haikwan tael of China
Peso of Colombia
Sucre of Ecuador
Rupee of India
Dollar of Mexico
Sol of Peru
. . . . ' . '.
Rouble of Russia
Mahbub of Tripoli
Bolivar of Venezuela
..
Yen of Japan

Value
January 1,
1890.;

'

-i

.

....

$0.42
.85
.85
1. 25, 6
1.40
. .85
.85
.40,4
.'92,3
.85
.68
.76,7
.17
. 91, 7

$0.34, 5
.69,8
.. 69,8
1.03,1
1.14,8
^69,8
,: 69,8
.33,2
.75,8
.69,8
'. 55,8
.62,9
.14
.75,2

.^
..

Value
October I,
1890.

.

:

.

ANNUAL TRIAL' OF COINS.

The following commissioners were appointed under the provisions of
section 3547 of the Eevised Statutes to test the weight and fineness
of the gold and silver coins of the coinage of the'calendar ^year 1889^
reserved for that purpose by the coinage mints, viz: Hon. John P .
Jones, United States Senate; Hon. Edwin Ho Conger, House of Representatives 5 Messrs. William Ao SackettJ ^ e w York; Francis Ao Walker,
Massachusetts; Wo-Do Wheeler, Montana; William Lillys Pennsylvania; William Wo Folwell, Minnesota; Daniel Wo Fisher, Indiana;
Byron Eeed, ivebraska; Thomas Price, Galifornia; John J a y Knox,
New York ; George F, Barker, Pennsylvania; T. C. Mendenhall, Washington, D. C ; Eliot' Co Jewett, Missouri;' Henry. Mitchell, Massachusetts ;. Stephen Jo Young, Maine.
I ', "
The Commission met in Philadelphia on February 12,1890, all of the
commissioners appointed being present, together with the following
ex officio commissioners: Hon. William .Butler, United States judge
for, the eastern district of Pennsylvania, and Herbert C Torrey,^assayer of the United States assay office at New York; the cinly officer
absent was the Comptroller of the Currency.
i
The committeeon counting reported that the packages containing
the pieces reserved by the several mints for the trial of coins, |in accordance with section 3539 of the Eevised Statutes, delivered to them by
the superintendent of the mint at Philadelphia, corresponded with the
record kept by the Director of the Mint and with the transcripts sent
h j the several superintendents. The coins reserved were as follows:
P I E C E S R E S E R V E D F O R ANNUAL T E S T ,
Mints.

Value.

Pieces. '

GOLD.

Philadelphia...
San Francisco
New Orleans
Carson

129'
1,203

........
- -

Total




-

...o

i
31

" '

$1, 202. 50
19, 800. 00

I, 363

•

620.00

21, 622. 50

134

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES,

, ^

P I E C E S R E S E R V E D Foe ANNUAL T E S T , 1889—Continued.
Mints.

Prices.

,

Value.

SILVER.

Philadelphia
\
San Francisco...... . .
New Orleans .-1
Carson
i

.
--

-

-

21, 548

Total
•

-

14,589 $11,247.60
399.60
846
5,938
5.938.00
175.00
175

Total gold and silver

-

^

17, 760. 20

22, 911

39,382.70

The committee on assaying reported that—
No coin among those examined was found to deviate from the standard fixed by
law beyond the legal tolerance, b u t they were in aU cases far within the legal allow-'
ance.

The committee on weighing reported—
The examination of t h e weights of the coinage of t h e various mints d u r i n g t h e
year 1889 to be satisfactory.

, The result of the annual test is contained in the following resolution
adopted by the Commission i
Eesolved, That t h e Assay Commission, having examined and tested t h e reserved
coins of the several mints for the year 1889, and it appearing that these coins do uot
differ from the standard fineness and weight by a greater quantity than is allowed by
law, t h e trial is considered and reported satisfactory.

, The following additional resolutions were adopted by the Commission:
Whereas the customary inspection of t h e Troy pound of 1827, the standard of mass
prescribed by law for the regulation of t h e coinage of the United States, together
with an examination of original documents relating to its history and construction,
has convinced this Commission t h a t in form, in material, and in construction it is
unsuitable for the purpose for which it was originally designed, and t h a t i t falls far
short of t h e requirements of modern metrology: Therefore,
Resolved, That t h e honorable the Secretary of .the Treasury is respectfully urged to
provide against t h e danger arising from accident to or deterioration of the mint
pound, by arranging a t an early date for its definition in terms of the standard mass,
bf the highest rank and authority, both national and international, thus assuring the
preservation of its value and a t the same time fixing more definitely its relation to
standards regulating the coinage of the civilized world.
Eesolvedj That the present Assay Commission of 1890 renews t h e recommendation
of its predecessors of .1887 and 1889 as relating to (1) the place of meeting, (2),reservation of coin for test, (3) ex o # a o membership, and (4) use of standard weights.

IMPORTS ^ND EXPORTS OF THE PRECIOUS METALSo

Qold,—The value of the foreign gold bullion imported into the United
States during the last fiscal year was $2,391,395.
Of the gold bullion imported, $902,774 came from. Mexico, $457,930 •
from British Columbia, $370,493 from Colombia, $366,092 from Germany, $185,560 from Australia, and the rest mainly from countries in
South and Central America, with a small amount from the British Possessions in E"orth America.
In addition to the imports of foreign gold bullion, foreign gold ores
of the invoiced value of $91,679 were brought to this country for reductiouo
Gold of the value of $62,125 was also contained in silver-lead ores
imported from Mexico and Colombia.
Foreign gold coins were imported of the face value of $8,602,395^ of



DIRECTOR.- OF THE MINTo

'''

135

which $3,782,198 came from Australia, $2,055,759 from France, $1,390,792
from' Germany, $768,567 from Cuba, $228,759 from Engla.ibid, $171,119
from Mexico, $141,410 from Colombia, and the remainder from various'
countries, principally of South Americao
• "' '
'Our own gold coins of the,value of $1,949,552 were re-importedo ^'
The imports of gold into the United States during thfe iiscal year .
were as follows s
• .
.
• ,
'
GOLD IMPORTS, 1890.

Foreign bullion
=..
Foreign' coin
Foreign ores
Foreign gold in silver-lead ores.

$2,391,395
8, 602, 395
91, 679
62,125

Total foreign
United States coin

11,147, 594
I, 949, 552

,

Total imports

• 13,097,146

There was exported from the United. States during the fiscal year'
gold bars bearing the stamp of a'United States mint or assay office
of the value of $9,296,309- and. ^^other^^ domestic gold bullion of the''
value of ^$155,587, a total domestic gold bullion of $9,451,896o
Of the gold bars exported, $5,431,373 were consigned,to France,
$2,292,135 to Germany, $1,656,494 to England, $60,000 to iHaytij.and
$11,894 to Hong-Kongo
\
Gold was exported in domestic copper matte of the value of $73^7509
and foreign gold ores of the invoiced value of $l,952o
Foreign gold bullion was re-exported of the value of $13,i800o '
Foreign gold coin was re-exported of the value of $3,857,059, the bulk
of it going to Cubao
•'
United States gold coin was. exported of the value of $3,951,736, of
fwhich $1,132,205 went to the Hawaiian Islands, $1,021,335 to Hayti,
$1,143,050 to Yenezuela, aiid the remainder to various countries,, principally of South America.
i
| '
The movement of gold from the United States may be summarized
as followss
,.
GOLD E X P O R T S ,

United states bars
Otlier domestic bullion
Gold contained in copper matte
United States coin

:

Total d o m e s t i c . . . . . . . . . .
Foreign bullion re-exported
Foreign coin re-exported
Foreign ores re-exported
. Totalforeign
Total gold exports

1890.

.o>=o. $9,296,309
.;
155,587
73,750
3, .951, 736
. . . . . , . ! . . 13,477,382
$13,800
3, 857,659
1,952

'...

.._.
J

3,872,811
17,350,193

From' the above tables it will be seen that there 'was • a; net loss of
gold to the United States during the year, by excess of exports of gold
over imports, of the value of $4,253o047o
. ' . - ' •
Silver.—Th© commercial^ or custom-house value^ of the foreign silver



136

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

bullion imported into the United States during the fiscal year 1890 was
$7,085,684o • •
This bullion consisted principally of unparted bars, of which $4,796,335
cam.e from Mexico, $1,378,339 from England, $532,827 from Germany,
$292,831 from Colombia, and the remainder from various countries,
principally of South and Central Americao
^ III addition to the imports of silver bars, silver ores were imported
into the United States of the invoiced value of $7,748,572.
Most of these ores were what is known as argentiferous4ead ores, containing, in addition to the silver contents, large quantities of metallic
lead, with some gold and coppero
The bulk of them ($7,515,262) came from Mexico, and most of the
remainder ($174,389) from-British Possessions in I^orth America.
The following table, comiiiled by the Chief of the Bui?eau of Statistics,
from special reports by custom officers, exhibits approximately the
quantity and value of the different metals contafned in these ores:
STATEMENT SHOWING, B Y CUSTOMS DISTRICTS, T H E QUANTITIES AND V A L U E S OF
S I L V E R O R E IMPORTED INTO THE U N I T E D STATES DURING THE YEAR ENDING
J U N E 30, 1890, W I T H THE QUANTITIES AND VALUES OF GOLD, SILVER, L E A D ,
AND C O P P E R CONTAINED I N T H E O R B , SO FAR AS COULD B E ASCERTAINED.
Contained i n o r e .
Customs districts
and ports.
Gold.

Silver.

Lead.

, Copper.

Boston
and
Invoiced
value. Ozs. Value. Ounces. Value. P o u n d s . Value. Lhs. Value
Pounds.
Charlestown,
. Mass
*$2, 000
Buffalo Creek,
. 78,000
3,401 ||$2, 905
30,162 ||$754
•N.T
3,659
Cbamplain 'N.Y..
noo
Corpus C b r i s t i ,
Tex
. . . 36, 328, 351 1,393, 054 1,947 $37,130 1,567, 716 1, 434, 203 1, 405, 333 23, 776 14,411 $1,442
7,800 I
128, 800
7, 896 5 7,800 I
Duluth Minn .. \
450 3
|6, 720
\
450
s
*200
Huron, Mich
..
15, 000
5 15,000
127, 730
1,696
75
2
Minnesota, Minn. <
39
11, 500
I 1,271 \.
it)
*49, 028
N e w Orleans, L a . .
346, 435
11200
N e w York, F . Y . .
8,017
1,750
Omaha, N e b r
.'...',.. 2,007 1,750
+119, 430
119, 430
Oswegatchie„N. Y .
Paso del Norte,
3, 694, 944 24, 308, .718 711, 900 388, 645 19, 540
T e x . a n d N . M e x . 114, 328,601 4, 428, 933
Puget Sound,
Wash
*76
721,121 6, 925, 071 168, 838
Saluria, T e x
31,442, 000 918,398
24, 920
i.
482, 289
San Francisco, C a l .
M82, 289

} *

Total

..

7, 780,102

62,125

6,491,163 32, 677, 340 905, 470 403, 05G 20, 982

* No details obtainable.
II Estimated.
,
,
t Six months ending December 31,1889.
I Six months ending June 30,1890.
\ Practically free from metal other than silver.
^
NOTE 1.—The data in tbis table bave been obtained from special reports by the collectors of customs,
and, although necessarily incomplete in .«"0D3e details, arn believed to be valuable. This table will not,
in the total Value of the ore, compare with the stated publications of this Bareau, which latter represent the value only of the ore in which the value of silver predominates, and excludes dutiable contents,
such as copper.
NOTE 2.—The difference of $300,362 between the total value of tbe ore and the sum of the values of
the contents is mainly due to the absence of detailed data from the customs districts designated in the
table as wanting in details.




.DIRECTOR "OF THE. MINTO

,

137

From an examination of this table,* it will, be seen that the value 'of
the silver contained in these ores, so far as the Departnient has been
able to ascertain their contents, was $6,491,163, and that chey contained,
in addition, 32,677,340 pounds of'metallic lead of the value 0f $905,470,
Foreign silver coins, principally Mexican dollars, were imported into
the United States of the value of $13,740;527, of which $12,085,189
were from Mexico..
^
'
'
United States silver coins, principally subsidiary pieces, were re-imported of the value of $206,773.
- ,
The imports of silver ^into the United States may, thjerefore, be
summed up as follows:
IMPORTS O F SILVER, 1890,
Foreign bullion (commercial value)
Silver in foreign ores (commercial value).
Foreign silver coin

$7, 085, 684
6,491,163
13, 740, 527

Total foreign
TJnited States silver coin ...„.=

27, 317, 374
206, 773

Total silver imports

27,,524,147

Domestic silver bars of the commercial value of $22,291,911 were
exported from the United States during the fiscal year, of which '
$17,628,119 were consigned to England, $2,252,100 to Japan,i$l,181,800
to Hong-Kong, $380,252 to China, $374,500 to the British East Indies,
$369,000 to Brazil, $104,160 to France, $1,480 to Colombia, and $500 to
the British Possessions in I^orth America,
" '
In addition to the exports of domestic silver bullion, ores classified
"as ^ silver ores ^ (principally copper matte and argentiferous matte con^
^
taining silver and gold) were exported to England for reduction of the
invoiced value of $1,973,976. These ores were exported mainly from
the port of Baltimore, the exportation commencing about the beginningof the calendar year 1890.
It has been ascertained from the collector of the port at • Balti more
, that, these exports, reported as silver ores, consist of cop>per matte
shipped by the Baltimore Copper Smelting and Rolling Company, being
the-product of the Anaconda Mining Company, of Montana.;
This matte consisted of two classes i
(1) Copper matte carrying about 60 per cent, of copper, 32 ounces of
silver, and 0.10 of an ounce-of gold to the ton of 2,000 pounds. .
(2) Argentiferous matte containing about 60 per cento of copper, 40
ounces of silver, and 0.12 of an ounce of gold.
•, •
,
The following letter from the collector of the port will explain the
character of these ores:
•
;
CusTOM-HousE, BALTIMORE, M D . ,

^.
.
.
.
Collector's Office, Octoher 25, 1890.
Birector of the Mint, Washington, JD, C s
SIR : Your favor of 21st instant, and telegram of this morning with reference to
exportations of silver ores, have been duly received.
>
I have the honor to advise you t h a t the manifest values of t h e exports of silver
ores include t h e value of t h e copper as well as t h e value of t h e gold and' silver.
The records of this office show t h e number of tons of such ores which have been
exported, and the proportion of gold and silver contained therein has been ascertained
by inquiry of the Baltimore Copper Smelting and Eolling Company, the only shippers
of the ore, which is understood to be the product of the Anaconda mine, as follows:
Copper matte, J u l y 1, 1889, to J u n e 30, 1890, 23,898 tons, contaitiing 32 ounces silver
per ton, equals total, 764,736 ounces silver; 3^^ ounces gold p e r ton, equals total,
2,389o8 ounces gold.
,



138

_ BEPORT ON THE PiNANCESi

..

Silver-copper matte, J a n u a r y 1,1890, to J u n e 30,1890,9,823 tons, containing 40 ounces
silver per ton, equals total, 392,920 ounces silver; 0.12 ounces gold per ton', equals total,
1,178.76 ounces gold.
'
The exportation of i' silver-copper matte'^ began J a n u a r y 1, 1890.
Yours, respectfully,
..
W M . M . M A R I N E , .Collector,

The quantity of silver contained in this matte was approximately
1,157,656 fine ounces, worth, at the average price of silver for. the year,
about $1,120,000, and of gold 3,568J ounces of the value'of $73,750.
Our own subsidiary silver coins were exported of the value of $86,646,
Foreign silver bullion was re-exported to England during the year of
the value of $94,538.
Foreign silver coin (Mexican dollars) were also re exported of the value
of $12;400,834, of which $8,209,089 were consigned to Hong-Kong,
$2,835,816 to England, $569,000 to Japan, $290,000 to China, $225,076
to Mexico, and the remainder to various countries.
' Foreign silver ores were re-exported containing silver of the invoiced '
value of $75,673,
The exports of silver during the fiscal year may be recapitulated as
follows s
E X P O R T S O F SILVER, 1890.
Domestic bars (commercial value)
Sil ver contained in copper matte
United States subsidiary silver coin
Total d o m e s t i c
Foreign silver coin re-exported
Silver in foreign ores re-exported
Foreign silver bullion re-exported
Totalforeign
Total silver exports . . . , . . . . *

$22,291,911
1,120,000
86,646
-'
^

23,498,557
.

$12,400,834
75, 673
94,538
=
„..oo.

12,571,045
36,069,602

From the above figures it will be seen that there was a net loss of
silver to the United States during the year, by excess of exports over
imports, of the) value of $8,545,455.
In the.appendix will be found the usual tables showing, by customs
districts, the movement of the precious metals to and from the United
States each month during the fiscal year 1890,
Valuable tables, compiled by the Bureau of Statistics, will be found
showing the countries from which the precious metals were shipped to
the United States during the year, and the countries to which the exportations of the precious metals from the Cfnited States were consignedo
,
,
MOYEMENT OF GOLD FROM THE UNITEB STATES.
In my last fiscal report attention was directed to the heavy drain of
gold from the United States, which commenced in May, 1888, and continued, with some interruptions, up to the end of July, 1889, during
which period we lost by export $61,435,989 in gold bars.
These bars were invoiced to-three countries^ viz; France^ England,
and .Germany in the following proportions s
•
Franc©
England
Germany—

$27,692, 855
18, 717, 087
15, 026, 047

Total.

61,435, 989




139

.DIRECTOR OP T H E MINT.,

In the article treating of this movement I showed that, in addition, to
the.bars directly consigned-to France,'the bulk of the other gold shipments were intended,for the Bank of France. I also set forth at,some•
length the causes which seemed to' have operated ih jyroducing this
drain of gold from the United States, mentioning among others the
large expenditures by Americans at the Paris Exposition, \ ' •
In the summer of 1890, another outward movement of ;.gold commenced, which, although by no means so serious, was somewl].at remarkable.as a monetary transaction, considering the low rate of-Sterling ex- ^'
change^ and which, while it lasted, was quite heavy.
•
The folloVing table, which has.been very carefully prepaired by the
superintendent of the assay office at Kew York, exhibit's the value of
the gold bars exchanged for gold coin by the United States assay office
at E"ew York, and shipped to Europe from June 14 to August 5, 1890,
the period of the movement; also the rate of exchange at-the date of
each shipment^ the-names of the shipjjers and consignees i \
STATEMENT OF GOLD BARS EXCHANGED F O R GOLD COIN AT THE U N I T E D STATES
'o ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK AND S H I P P E D TO E U R O P E FROM JUNE: 14 TO A U GUST 5, 189G)o

ifame of shipper.

Date.
June 14
17
IS
18
20
26
J u l y 11
12
12
15
18
18
23
25
30
30
30
30
Aug. 1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5

Value.

Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co.. $1, 006, 697.82
503, 830.30
...do..„.o
259, 391.16
...do-.„„:
502,835.99
Speyer & Co
255, 045.16
Heidelbacb,Ickelheimer & C o . .
504, 566.29
. : do
-.-...
Kidder, Peabody & Co
^. 1, 008, 679.19
Lazard Freres
- - 506, 049.91
493, 046.35.
Watson & Lang
:
505,263.51
Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & C o . .
517,494.94
. . .do
...
382, 042.42
L. Von Hoffman & Co
634, 927.25
Lazard Freres
274, 057. 93
,L. Von Hoffman & Co
507, 386. 50
Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co..
515, 333. 35
Morton, Bliss & Co
691,852.37
L.Von Hoffman & C o . : . . . .
822,241.02
Lazard Freres i . . . .
501,170.25
Brown Bros. «feCo.....
L. Von Hoffman & Co
. I,007,47L36
Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co.. 1, 002, 753. 57
505,287.84
J. & W. Seligman & Co
500,529.19
Morton, Bliss & Co .===.0=
501, 803. 63
Arbuckle Bros.=0=„ =
Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & C o .
Brown Bros. & Co
L. Von Hoffman & Co
Total............

754, 256.53
503,665.08
505,303.15

R a t e of
exchange.
$4,871
4.871
4.88
4.88
4.87f
4.88
. 4.89
4. 881-4.89
4.881-4.89
4.8S|
4.88i
4.88i
4.881
4.881
4.881-4. 89
4. 881-4. 89
4. 881-4. 89
4. 881-4. 89
4.89
•. 4.89
4.89
•4.89
4.89
4.89
4.89
4.89
4.89

Consignees.
Imperial German Bank.
Do.
Do.^
;' '
' '
Do.
Bank of France.
•Do.

•

;

'

"

Baring Bros., London.
Lazard Bros., Londou.
Bank of Montreal, London.
Bank of England.
Do.
R-aphael & Sou si London.
^
Lazard Bros., London.
Eaphael & Sons, London.
Bank of England.
<
Morton, Hose &; Co., London.
Raphael & Sons, London.
Lazaird Bros., London.
Brown, Shipley life Co., London.
Raphael & Sons, London. •
Bank of England.
Seligman Bros., London.
Morton, Rose &• Co., London. .
London and Westminster Bank,
Limited, London.
Bank of England,
Brown, Shipleyj <fe Co., London.
Raphael & Sons, Loudon.

15, 672, 982. 06

In addition to the,, above, Messrs. .Heidelbach, Ickelheiiner & Co.
.shipped, July 2, $200,000 in gold, coin to Paris. (Exchange, 4.87^- to
4.87|.)
.
;



140

• ' • REPORT'ON T H E FINANCES. •
<

The above exchanges of bars and tlie custom-house manifests of shipments agree in amounts, and almost all in datje, a few being forwarded
one day later.
. .
'
. .
•it will be seen that during the brief ^period of less than "two months
$15,672,982006 in gold bars were 'Obtained from the New York assay
office, in exchange^ for gold certificates deposited at the sub-treaso.ry at
New York, and were shipped to Europe, and that a large portion of these
shipments, especially the early ones, were made at a time when sterling
exchange was quoted at $4,871 to $4.88, As I pointed out in my last fiscal report, it is not profitable as a ^business transaction to'ship gold
rather than to buy exchange when the price of sterling exchange is below $4.89. So that these shipments were not based on the rate of exchange, between London and New York^ but on the relationship between continental and London exchanges. The demand for gold in South
America, had largely to do with the movement.
Some of the causes for the movement of gold from the United States
this summer were these:
' - ' ' '
(1) Importations of merchandise were heavy in view of possible
changes in the tarii^^ so that exchange was in demiand to pay for im- o
'•ported goods.
^ (2) The South American disturbances had affected the London
market.
(3) The rate of discount was higher in London than "in New' York.
It is probable that the movement of gold was facilitated by the
readiness with which gold bars of recognized weight and purity can
be obtained at the Government assay office in New York city; at least
such is my belief, and in another portion of this report I have recommended tbat the act of May 26, 1882, which requires the Grovernment
to give in exchange, free of charge, gold bars for United States gold
coin, be either repealed qr modified to the extent of making the exchange discretionary with the Treasury Department, and the imposition of a slight charge.
COINAG-E LEG-ISLATION OF THE. F I F T Y - F I R S T CONG-KESSo
SILVER LEGISLATION.

'

'

The silver legislation of the first session of the Eifty-first Congress
will mark an epoch in currency legislation in the United States.
Upon the assembling of Congress the Secretary of the Treasury presented in his annual report an elaborate plan for the utilization of the
silver product of the United Stateso
The measure recommended by the Secretary was in substance a
proposition to receive on deposit at the United States mints the domestic
product of silver bullion, to be paid for in Treasury notes at the market
price of silver at the time of deposit, such notes to be redeemable in a
quantity of silver bullion equal in value at the market price of silver
at the date of presentation to the number of dollars expressed on the
face of the notes, or in gold coin at the option of the Government, or in
silver dollars at the option of the holder.
• • This measure, as well as various modifications of it, and also measures
looking to the free coinage of silver, occupied the attention of pongress
for many months, the result being the enactment of the following law:
AN ACT directing the purchase of silver bullion and the issue of Treasury notes thereon, and for other
purposes.

: Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Eepreseniattves of the^ United States of America
in CongresssassemMed, That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby directed to pur


B I E E C T O E OF T H E MINTo '

141

chase, from tim© to time, silver bullion to the aggregate amount of four million five
hundred thousand ounces, or iso much thereof as may be offered in each month, at the
market price thereof, not exceeding one dollar for three hundred and seventy-one and
twenty-five hundredths grains of pure silver, and to issue in payment for such purchases of silver bullion Treasury notes of t h e United States to bo prepared by the
Secretary of the Treasury, in such form and of such denominations, not less than one
dollar nor more t h a n one thousand dollars, as he may prescribe, and a, sum sufficient
to carry into effect the provisions of this act is hereby appropriated out of any money
in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.
' .
.
, SEC. 2. That the Treasury notes issued in accordance with the provisions of this
act shall be redeemable on demand, in coin, at the Treasury of the United States or
a t , t h e office of any assistant treasurer of the United States, and when so redeemed
may be reissued; b u t no greater or less amount of such notes shall be putstandiog at
any time than the cost of the silver bullion and the standard silver ;dollars coined
therefrom then held in the Treasury purchased by such notes; and such Treasury notes
shall be a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract, and shall be receivable for customs, taxes,
and all public dues, and when so received m a y b e reissued; and such notes, when
held by any national banking association, may be counted as a part of its lawful reserve. That upon demand of the holder of any of the Treasury notes herein provided
for, the Secretary of the Treasury shall, under such regulations as he may prescribe,
.redeem such notes in gold or silver coin a t his discretion, it being the established
policy of the United States to maintain the two metals ou a parity with each other
upon the present legal ratio, or such ratio as may be provided by law^
SEC. 3. That the Secretary of t h e Treasury shall each month coin two million
ounces of the silver bullion purchased under the provisions of this act into standard
silver dollars until the first day of July, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and after
t h a t time he shall coin of the silver bullion purchased under the provisions of this
act as much as may be necessary to provide for the redemption of the Treasury notes
herein provided for, and any gain or seigniorage arising from such coinage, shall be
accounted for and paid into the Treasury.
SEC. 4. That the silver bullion purchased under the provisions of this act shall be
subject to t h e requirements of existing law and the regulations of t h e mint service
governing the methods of determining the amount of pure silver contained, and t h e
amount of charges or deductions, if any, to be made.
S E C 5. That so much of the act of February twenty-eighth, eighteen hundred and
seventy-eight, entitled **An act to authorize the coinage of the standard silver dollar
and to restore its legal-tender character," as requires the monthly purchase and coinage of the same into silver dollars of not less than two million dollars, nor more than
four million dollars^ worth of silver bullion, is hereby repealed.
1
SEC. 6. T h a t upon t h e passage of this act the balances standing witli the Treasurer
of the United States to the respective credits of national banks for deposits made to
redeem the circulating notes of such banks, and all deposits thereafter received for
like purpose, shall be covered into t h e Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt, and the
Treasury of t h e United States shall redeem from the.general cash in the Treasury the
circulating notes of said banks which may come into his possession subject to redemption, and upon the certificate of the Comptroller of the Currency t h a t such
, notes have been received by him and t h a t they have been destroyed and that noiiew
notes will be issued in their place, re-imburseinent of their amount shall be made to
t h e Treasurer, under such regulations as tbe Secretary pf the Treasury may prescribe,
from an appropriation hereby created, to be known as national-bank notes: Redemption account, b u t the provisions of this act shall not apply to the deposits received under section three of the act of J u n e twentieth, eighteen hundred and
seventy-four, requiring every national bank to keep in lawful money with the Treasurer of the United States a sum equal to five per centum of its circulation, to be held
and used for the redemption of its circulating notes; and the balance remaining of
the dexjosits so covered shaU, at the close of each month, be reported on the monthly
public debt statement as debt of the United States bearing no interest. .
SEC. 7. That this act shall t a k e effect thirty days from and after i t s passage.
Approved, J u l y 14, 1890. /
^
'.

The essential provisions of the new silver law are these (
(1) The Secretary is instructed to purchase 4,500,000 ounces of silver,
or so much thereof as may be, offered in each month, at the market
price, not to .exceed our coining ratCo
'
[
(2) Payments for, silver purchases are to be made in a:ne\v form of
paper money denominated Treasury notes.
'
i
(3J Tbe Treasury notes are to be a full legal tender for all debts,
public and' private, and.may be held by any national bank association
as a part of its lawful reserv©o



142

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES,

(4) I t is declared to be the policy of the United States to maintain
the two metals on ,a parity with each other at the present legal ratio, or
SRch ratio as may be provided by law,
'
(5) Two million ounces of silver bullion purchased shall be coined
monthly into sil ver. dollars until July 1,1891,,
(6) After July l,'189l3 the compulsory coinage of the silver dollar
ceases except as may be necessary to provide for the redemption of the
Treasury notes,
(7) The. provision in the act of February -28, 1878, requiring the
monthly purchase and coinage into silver dollars of, not less than
$2,000,000 nor more than $4,000,000 worth of.bullidn is repealed.
(8) The moneys on deposit with the Treasury for the redemption of
national bank notes, are covered into the Treasury and retired bank
notes are to be redeemed from the current cash.
Immediately upon the passage of the act, regulations were prepared
with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, looking to the pur. chase of 4,500,000 'fin© ounces of silver monthly by the Treasury Department.
The following are th© regulations issued s
' •
•REGULATIONS F O R T H E PURCHASE OF SILVER BULLION.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of the Mint, August 1, 1890.
Purchases of silver bullion under the act of February 28,1878, will cease a t the close
of business ori t h e 12th instant.
The superintendents of the coinage mints will proceed, as fast as t h e current business of each mint will permit, to coin t h e silver bullion on hand a t t h a t date, purchased under the aforesaid act, into standard silver dollars, and the account of silver
purchases and coinage under the act of February 28, 1878, will be closed.
On and after the 13th instant offers for the.sale of silver bullion, under the provisions of the act of July 14, 1890, in lots of not lessthan ten thousand (10,000) ounceSj
and its delivery at one of the coinage mints of the United States, located respectively
at Philadelphia, San Francisco, Carson City, and New Orleans, will be received by
telegraph or letter and considered at the Treasury Department on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays of eactf week at 12 ofclock m.
e
All bids should be addressed to the Director of'the Mint, and should state the quantity in fine ounces, the price per fine ounce, and the mint at which the silver is to be
delivered.
Bidders will be notified by telegraph of the acceptance or rejection of their offers.
The right to reject any and all bids is reserved, and also to accept any portion of
the amount offered instead of the whole.
No silver coin, except mutilated and uncurrent coin of the United States, will be
received on account of purchases.
The delivery on purchases must be completed within ten days after the acceptance
of the offer, unless otherwise specified.
Payment will be made by check drawn by the Superintendent of the Mint on an
assistant treasurer of the United States to the order of the seller, payable in Treasury
notes.
When the bars delivered bear the stamp of well-known refineries, such approximation of t h e value of the bullion delivered as in the discretion of the Superintendent
may be regarded safe and proper will be paid, pending melt and assay.
When the bullion delivered on purchases requires parting or refining, the usual"
mint charges for these operations will be imposed.
Bars improperly manufactured, or lacking solidity, will be subject to a melting
charge.
No bars weighing over twelve hundred (1,200) ounces will be received.
The record of the purchases of silver bullion will be kept in the office of t h e
Director of the Mint, and all correspondence in regard to the same should b e a d - ,
dressed to himo
The superintendents of the mints at Philadelphia, San Francisco, Carson City,
and New Orleans are authorized to purchase, under the provisions of the act of July
14, 1890, silver bullion in lots of le^s than ten thousand (1'0,000) ounces, a t a price to
be fibred from time to time by the Director of the Mint,



;,^

' D I R E C T O R O F T H E MINT.

,

' •

• 143

Silver contained in^ gold deposited a t any of t h e institutions of the mint service
will be purchased a t a rate to be fixed from time to time by the Director of the Mint
and .treated as a purchase of silver bullion under the provisions of t h e act of July 14,
1890,
, ;
Silver received in payment of charges on silver bullion deposited for bars, and in
bar fractions, will be purchased at a rate to be fixed by the Director of t h e Mint, and
will be treated as a purchase of silver bullion under the provisions of the act of J u l y
14,1890,
EDWARD O. LEECH,

Director of the Mint,
Approved:
WILLIAM WINDOM,

'

Secretary,

i

T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , O F F I C E O F T H E SECRETARY,

Washington, D, 0., Augusts, 1890.
On and after t h e 13th instant, offers for the sale of silver bullion in lots of not less
than ten thousand (10,000) ounces, will be considered a t the Treasury Department a t
I o'clock p, m., on Mondays, Wednesdays, aud Fridays of each week, instead of a t 12
o'clock m., as stated in Department circular of the 1st instant.
^
.
WILLIAM WINDOM,

(

Secretary,

D I S C O N T I N U A N C E O F T H E C O I N A G E O F THB THREE-DOLLAR AND ONE=pOLLAR GOiD
PIECES A N DT H E THREE-CENT NICKEL PIECE,
'

In my last fiscal report, I had the honor to recommendi legislation
looking toward the discontinuance bf the coinage of the 3-dollar and
1-dollar gold pieces, and the 3-cent nickel piece, for the reason that these
coins serve no useful purposCo
This recommendation met the approval of the Secretary of the Treas°
ury, and bills were introduced in each House of Congress to that effecto
The following is the text of the bill which became a law i.', ^
jpe it enacted hy the Senate and Hoiise of Eepresentatives of ihe United StOftes of America
in Congress assembled^ That from aud after the passage of this act t h e coinage of t h e
three-dollar gold piece, the one-dollar gold piece, a n d t h e three-cent nickel piece be,
and t h e same is hereby, prohibited, and t h e pieces named shall not be struck or. issued by t h e Mint of the tjnited States.
'
S E C 2. That as fast as the said coins shall be paid into t h e Treasury of t h e United
States they shall be withdrawn from circulation and be recoined into other denominations of coins.
SEC, 3. That all laws and parts of laws in conflict w i t h ' t h i s act are hereby repealed.
Approved, September 26, 1890o

- In view of the probable passag© of this bill, and in order'; to prevent
speculation in .the coins on account of their rarity, n c 3-dollar nor,
1-dollar gold pieces nor 3-cent nickel pieces were coined ait the mints
during the calendar year 1890.
NEW D E S I G N S O F UNITED STATES COINS.

. Ill the reports of this bureau for the fiscal years 1887 and 1888, attention was directed tq the inelegance of the designs upon some of the
coins of the United States, and the absence of any authority of law to
change an existing design.
'
The statutory laws in respect to the devices, and designs^ of coins of
the United States were as follows:
SEC, 3510. The engraver shall prepare from the original dies already authorized all
the working dies required for use in t h e coinage of the several mints, and, when new
coins ov devices are authorized, shall, if required by the Director of the Mint, prepare



144

•

.REPORT ON T H E FINANCESo.

the devices, models, moulds, and matrices, or original dies, ibr the same: but tho
Director of the Mint shall nevertheless have power, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to engage temporarily for this purpose the services of one or
more artists, distingnished in their respective departments of art, who shall be paid
for such service from the contingent appropriation for the mint at Philadelphia.
SEC. 3517. Upon the coins there shall be the following devices and legends: Upon •
one side there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of
the word ^* L i b e r t y " and the year of the coinage, and upon the reverse shall be the
figure or representation of an eagle, with t h e inscriptions ^^ United States of America"
and " E Pluribus Unum," and a designation of the value of the coin ; but on.the gold
dollar and three-dollar piece, the dime, five, three, and one cent piece, the figure of
the eagle shall be omitted. » « »-

The effect of the two sections was to render mandatory the retention
of present designs as well as present devices.
I The designs upon many of our coins date back a period of half a
century. Indeed, with the exception of the addition of the motto ^^In
God We Trust,^^ there .has been no material change in the representations upon any of our coins since the following dates:
Gold coins—
Double-eagle
=
Eagle
....... ===
Half-eagle
.Three dollars
o,„, = o .o
Quarter-eagle
Dollar ..»
o...:.
.....,„
Silver coins—
Dollar
o»
:
Half-dollar
.„
Quarter-dollar -=»o«o = ,»o
o.ooo=o
! Dime
,
»o,„-oo
„.
Minor coins—
Five-cent nickel .:.,
».:
„ = oo . = „= „o=- =
Three-cent n i c k e l . . . „
ooo
o
o„»„
One-cent bronze
-^^^
oo.
»

„«o
„
'
..„

1849
1838
1839
1854
1840
1854

1878
1838
1838
» o _ _ . 1838

_
„
:

.;..„„ 1883
1865
1884

Bills were introduced in tbe Forty-eighth and Fiftieth Congresses,
looking to a modification of the law in this respect, and although these
measures met with no opposition—indeed in more than one case they
received the favorable action of one or the other House of Congress—
none of them became a law.
The following bill, introduced at my request in the Fifty-first Congress and which met with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, became a law^ September 26,1890,
Be it enacted hy ihe Senate and Souse of Eepresentatives of the United States of America
in Congress assembled, That section thirty-five hundred and teu of the Revised Statutes
of the United States be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to read as follows :
" S E C 3510. The engraver shall prepare from the original dies already-authorized
all t h e working-dies required for use in the coinage of the several mints, and, when
new coins, emblems, devices, legends, or designs are authorized, shall, if required by
the Director of the Mint, prepare the devices, models, hubs, or original dies for the
same. The Director of the Mint shall have power, with the approval of the Secretary
of the Treasury, to cause new designs or models, of authorized emblems or devices to
be prepared and adopted in the same manner as when new coins or devices are authorized. But no change in the design or die of any coin shall be made oftener than
once in twenty-five years from and including the year of the first adoption of the
design, model, die, or hub for the same coin i Frovided, That no change be made in
the diameter of any coin: And provided further^ That nothing in this section shall prevent the adoption of new designs or models for devices or emblems already authorized
for the standard silver dollar and tbe five-cent nickel piece as soon as practica,ble
after the passage of this act. But the Director of the Mint shall nevertheless have
power, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to engage temporarily for
this purpose the services of one or more artists, distingnished in their respective departments of art, who shall be paid for such service from the contingent appropriation for the mint at Philadelphia."
.
Approved, September 26, 1890



DIRECTOR O F T H E MINT.

145

In the early furture, I hope to present for your consideration some
suggestions looking to an improvement in the designs of some of the
coins of the United States.
VALUATION OF FOREIGN COINS.

The provision of law, in force since 1873, in regard to the valuation
of loreign coins is contained in section 3564 of the Eevised Statutes,
which reads as follows. ^
The value of foreign coin as expressed in the money of account of the United States
shall be t h a t of the pure metal of such coin of standard value; aud the value of the
standard coins in circulation of the various nations of the world shall be estimated
annually by t h e Director of'the Mint, and be proclaimed on the first day of January
by the Secretary of the Treasury,
:

^ This statute, was originally enacteji in the act ofMarch 3, 1873, entitled ''An act to establish the custom-house value of the sovereign or
pound sterling of Grreat Britain and ^x the par of exchange,'' the
language of section 3564 being the same as that of the first section of
the act of March 3, 1873.
,
'
Since January 1, 1874, it has been the practice of the Department to
estimate and proclaim the value of foreign coins annually oii the 1st of
January,
,
•
Section 52 of an a c t ' ' to reduce the revenue and equalize duties on
imports, and for other purposes/' approved October 1, 1890, contains
the following provision:
That the value of foreign coin as expressed in the money of account of the United
States shall be t h a t of the pure metal of such coin of standard value ; and the values
of the standard coins in circulation of the various nations of the world shall be estimated quarterly by the Director of the Mint, and be proclaimed by the Secretary of
the Treasury immediately after the passage of this act and thereafter quarterly on
the first day of January, April, July, and October in each year.
'
.

In accordance with this requirement of law, the values of foreign
coins were estimated by the Director of the Mint, and proclaimed by
the Secretary of the Treasury, on October 1,1890, and hereafter will be
estimated and proclaimed quarterly.
i
.
LEGISLATION

RECOMMENBEDo

i

REPEAL OF THE ACT OF MAY 26, 1882, AUTHORIZING THE EXCHANGE OF GOLD BARS
FOR GOLD COIN.

The heavy drain of gold from the United Stp^tes which commenced
in May, 1888, and continued, with some intermission, to the end of Jul}-,
1889, as well as the very remarkable movement which took place in the
summer of 1890, were, in my judgment, largely facilitated by the readiness with which gold bars could be obtained in New York under the
provisions of the act of May 26^ 1882, which requires the Government
to give in exchange for United States gold coin, when presented in sums
of not less than $5,000, gold bars equaling such coin in value.
The act referred to (volume 22, Statutes at Large, page 97) reads as
follows^
'
A N ACT to authorize the receipt of United States gold coin in exchange for gold hara.

That the superintendents of the coinage mints, and of the United States assay office at New York, are hereby authorized to receive United States gold coin from any
holder thereof in sums not less than five thousand dollars, and to pay aiid deliver in
exchange therefor gold bars in value equaling such coin so received. (May 26,1882.}
FI90—^IQ
•
_ - • > • . ; . .
^




146

•

EEPORT OH THE FINANCESo'^

This law was enacted 'on the recommendation of Mr. H. Oo Burchard,
the then Director of the Mint, for the purpose of preventing the exportation and melting down of United States gold coin. Recent monetary
events have shown, however, that it has rather facilitated than retarded
the movement of gold from this country.
As I endeavored to show in my last fiscal report, the movement of
specie from one country to another does not always occur only in the
settlement of balances of trade, but that other causes operate to produce such a movement, and that, when gold is needed, it is generally
drawn from countries where it can be most readily and economically
secured. Among these special causes which operate to cause a shipment
of gold may be mentioned the necessity of sustaining bank reserves, the
placing of new loans, as illustrated in the cases of Brazil and the Argentine Eepublic within the last year, and the resulnption of specie payments. At such times, now that odean transportation is so cheap, the
gold nieeded is naturally obtained where it can be most readily and
economically secured, and without creating financial disturbances.
The cost of transportation and insurance on gold between E"ew York
and Europe, taken in connection with the difference of 1^ pence per
ounce between the purchasing and selling price of gold at the Bank of
England, renders it unprofitable as a monetary transaction to ship gold
from this country to London except the price of sterling exchange approximates $4.89. And yet during the present summer we have witnessed the remarkable occurrence of large shipments of gold from Kew
York to London when sterling exchange was as low as $4.87f, showing
that gold was needed for specific purposes, and that it was obtained
from the United States because of the readiness and economy with
which it could be secured.
The shipment of gold, rather than the purchase of exchange, is, as a
rule, decided on a very narrow margin of profit, and it is my belief
that the decision of the question whether it is more profitable to buy
exchange or ship gold is solved largely by the facility with which gold
can be obtained in New York City and the net result of such shipments
on the other side of the water. Undoubtedly it is cheaper to ship bars
than coin, if for no other reason for the very simple one that bars are
of full weight and lose nothing by abrasion in transitu. The fact that
gold bars are generally at a premium in l^ew l o r k over coin shows
conclusively that they are preferred for export. I t would seem to follow, therefore, that when the margin of profit between the shipment of
gold and the purchase of exchange is small, shipments might be deterred if shippers were required to obtain coin or pay a premium for
bars.
In other countries, every legitimate effort is make to retain gold, even
to the extent of charging a premium for it when required in large quantities, as is done by the Bank of France, or raising the rate of discount,
as is done by the Bank of England.
I believe that it is bad public policy for the United States Government to be placed in a position where it is not only powerless to stop a
serious drain oh the gold stock of the countrj^, but is absolutely compelled to facilitate its exportation by furnishing full-weight bars, in the
most convenient form and of recognized purity, bearing the stamp of
the Grovernment as to both weight and fineness, in exchange for coin or
coin certificates, free of charge,
I have the honor, therefore, to recommend legislation • looking either
to* the repeal of the act of May 26, 1882, or that it be so modified as to
make the exchange of gold bars for gold coin discretiouary with the



• .
-

'

. M R E Q T O R O F ' T H E MINTo

' •

,.147

Treasury Department, and allowing the imposition of a small charge
equivalent t o t h e cost'of inaking bars, when the bars are intended for
export.
^
RECOINAGE OF THE SUBSIDIARY COINS IN THE TREASURY.

I,

• On February 6,1890, a bill was introduced in the House of Eepresentatives authorizing the recoinage of the subsidiary silver coins now
in or which may be received into the Treasury, which through abrasion
or mutilation are unfit for circulation, or of denominations for which
there is no demand, ipto denominations of silver coins for which there
is a popular demand, and the payment of- the loss incident to such
recoinage from the silver-profit fund of the Mint,
This bill was favorably reported from the Committee oni Coinage,
Weights, and Measures, with slight.amendments, on April 9,i 1890, and
is now on the House Calendar,
The following is the text of the bill and the report: .
f
•

^

A BILL authorizing the recoinage of the subsidiary coins of the United States.''

i

j

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Eepresentatives of the United States of America
ip Congress assembled,' That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized to eause the subsidiary silver coins of the United States now in, or which may
hereafter be received into, theTreasury and subtreasuries of the United States, which
' are abraded, worn, mutilated, defaced, or otherwise unfit for circulation, or are of
denominations.for which there is no current demand, to be recoined at the mints of
the United States into such denominations of silver coins now authorized by law as
'may be required to meet the demand therefor.
SEC. 2, That the loss incident to the recoinage of such uncurrent silver coins into .
new coins shall be paid from the gain arising from the coinage of silver bullion into
coin of a nominal value exceeding the cost thereof, denominated '^the silver profit
fund."
SEC. 3. That the silver coins of the United States of less denominations than one dollar
^ shall hereafter be a legal tender in sums not exceeding twenty dollars in all payments of
jmhlic and private debts, and lOhen held by any national bank.shall be counted as a p a r t of
its lawful reserve.
t^ouse Eeport No. 1350, Fifty-first Congress, first session.]

;

The Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures, to whom was referred the bill
(H. R. 6423) authorizing the recoinage of the subsidiary coins of the United States,
submitted the following r e p o r t :
Tliere is now in the Treasury of the United States subsidiary silver coinamountihg
to $22,774,257.95, consisting of $19,011,566.50 in half-dollars, $2,948,731 in quarterdollars, $331,960.20 in dimes, and $482,000.25 in unassorted coin. A very large ^TOportion of this coin is undercurrent by reason of abrasion, much of it is of a denomination for which there is practically no demand, and the whole of it is carried on the
books of the Treasury as an unavailable asset. I t has been accumulating for years,
and it seems impossible to put it into circulation in its present form and condition.
The main purpose of this bill is to enable the Treasury Department toi make this •
coin available and give the people the benefit of it by its recoinage into such denominations as are in demand, at the same time ^restoring the weight lost by abrasion.
The recoinage involves no expense except the value of the metal necessary to reestablish the full legal weight of the coins. This, we are advised, will pi^obably not
exceed 4 per cent., and it is a loss t h a t should properly be borne by the Government.
We believe t h a t the advantage of p u t t i n g this large amount of coin into available
and convenient form for circulation will fully justify the expense.
The third section, which is amendatory of the original bill, increases the'legaltender functions of such coins to $20, and provides that when held by any national
bank they shall constitute a part of its lawful reserve. The purpose of this section
is to make these subsidiary coins more desirable for general use a n d t h u s check their
future accumulation in the Treasury. It seems well calculated to promotfe that,end.
We therefore beg leave to report back t h e bill as amended, with the r ecommendi^tion

that it do pass.

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148

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

I have the honor to direct attention to this bill aiid to urge favorable
action upon it.
There are, at present, subsidiary silver coins in the Treasury of the
United States of the value of $19,545,362.71, as shown in the following
table compiled from the records of the Treasurer's Office:
SUBSIDIARY S I L V E R C O I N I N THE T R E A S U R Y , FROM T H E X A T E S T R E P O R T S R E C E I V E D .

3-cent.
Waahingtou*
Baltimore
New York
Piiiladelphia
Boston
:Cinchinati
,.
C h i c a g o . . -:
St. L o u i s
N e w Orleans
Sau F r a n c i s c o
Mint, Philadelphia
M i n t , San F r a n c i s c o
M i n t , Carson City
A s s a y Office, N e w Y o r k .
Total .

Half-dime

Dime.

20-cent.

25-cent.

50-cent.

8, 507. 59
818.53
102.30

$77.82
30.00

$810. 45
200.00

60.00
126.00
28.00

500. 00
I, 200.00
662. 00

18.15
15.00

350.00
1, 474. 00
3, 390. 20

354. 97

8, 586. 05

$474, 030. 00 $1, 392, 220.00
17, 000.00
259, 200. O
O
133, 000. 00
8,152,000.00
100. 00
40, 000. 00
133, 000. 00
100. 00
123, 790. 00
226, 714.00
28. O
C
70, 500.00
• 48,499.00
104, 000. 00
575,000.00
100. 00
67, 000. 00
719,950.00
121. 00
38,910.00
' 19, 260. 00
378. 00
17,488. 50
5,898,231.50
142. 00
3, 509.00
228, 623. 50
5, 223. 00
123. 75
.80. 00

119, 701. 71

922. 80 1, 310, 430. 75 17, 427, 663.50

$4, 005. 00
9, 350. 00
13,000.00
7, 000. 00
. 10,688. 90
19, 700. 00
3, 000.00
19, 800. 00
2, 270. 00
21,251.00
268. 39

$45. 80
50. ob

Uncurrent.
W a s h i n g t o n ...
Baltimore
New York
Philadelphia..
Boston
Cincinnati
Chicago
St. L o u i s . - . ^ . . New Orleans..
San Francisco.

$57,700.00
26, 700. 00
132, 000. 00
38, 000. oo'
29, 200. 00
3, 854.00
119, 000. 00
50, 250.00
4, 810.00
130, 038. 60

Total .

591,552.60

Unassorted.
$5,568.00
404.70
63.461. 79
12, 272.10
389. 85
310. 00
1, 533, 00
2, 013.16
137.13

i, 089. 73

* P r o o f coins, $255.
T o t a l , $19,545,362.71.

Of these pieces, it will be noticed that nearly $600,000 are actually
uncurrent, being so abraded or disfigured as to render them unfit for
circulation, while a considerable portion of the remainder consists of
coins no longer authorized to be issued, viz, 20-cent, 5 cent, and 3-cent
silver pieces.
The great bulk of the balance, viz, $17,427,663.50, consists of halfdollars, for which there is no current demand. The records of the Department show that the tendency for some years has been for half-dollars to accumulate in the Treasury and its branches.
The total coinageof half-dollars, from the organization of the Mint
to June 30, 1889, was $122,822,414.50, but no record has been kept, except for the. last few .years, as to the different deuom in actions of silvej*
coins melted for recoinage.



DIRECTOR. O F T H E MINT.
•

•

•

•

'

>

»^

•

149.

.

I t will be remembered that the coinage of half-dollars commenced in
1793,, and that it was not until 1853, when the iractional silver pieces
were reduced in weight in order to secure their retention in,;ciiculation,
that the paying quality of these coins was changed from a full legal
tender to a limited tendero ^
•
..• • .
It may be safely said that the bulk of the half-dollars coined prior to
1853 have either been, exported- from the country or remelted.. T h e ,
same remark applies to the half-dollars coined between 1853.and 1873,.
although many of the pieces coined during that period have been returned to the United States and are' seen in circulatioUo' The -great
bulk of the half-dollars coined since 1873 are believed to be in circulation or in theTreasury. As a mere approximation I would say that the
stock of half-dollars in the United States at the present time, including
those in the Treasury, may be placed at something between'$40,000,000
and $50,000,000. Of this, over $17,000,000 remain in the Treasury and
serve no useful purpose. .There is, however, a pressing demand for
dimes, and lately a demand has sprung up for quarter-dollars, and it
authority of law existed to recoin the silver coins in the Treasury into
new coins of popular denominations it is believed that the very large
unavailable cash asset of the, Treasury, $19,545,362.71, now consisting
of subsidiary silver coins, could be made an available asset and put in
circulation ih exchange for lawful money.
Aside from the importance of relieving the Treasury from this incubus
of uncurrent coin, it is evidently the duty of the Government, a duty
recognized by annual appropriations for recoinage, to see that its subsidiary and token coins are kept in first-class condition and that the
people be provided with a sufficient quantity of change money in an
attractive and desirable form. The difficulty of accomplishing this lies
in the fact that recoinages can be undertaken only when Congress makes
appropriations to pay the loss incident to such recoinage, that is, the
loss of metal corresponding to the difference between the actual weight
of the coins in the Treasury and full-weight new coins.
As the appropriations for this purpose are very limited, amounting
annually to only about $30,000, which sum includes the recoinage ot
light-weight goid coins in the Treasury, it is impossible to effect any
considerable recoinage of the fractional siver coins in the Treasury. I t
seems eminently proper that, instead of waiting for small annual appropriations to accomplish this desirable re^sult, a law should be enacted
making it legal to pay the loss incident to this recoinage from the large
profits which have been made by the Grovernment on the manufacture
and issue of silver coinSo
A M E N D M E N T T O T H E L A W R E Q U I R I N G P A R T I N G A N D REFINING OF BULLION AT THE

MINTS AND ASSAY OFFCIE AT NEW YORK.

The provisions of law relative to parting and refining bullion at the
coinage mints and the assay office at New York are contained in paragraph 8, chapter 327, bf volume 1, Supplement to the Eevised Statutes
of the United States, which reads as follows:
;
. And refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on a t the mints of tbe United
Staties and at the assay office a t New York. '
,
And it shall be lawful to apply t h e moneys arising from charges ciollected from
depositors for these operations pnrsuant to law, so far as may be necessary, to the
defraying in full of the expenses thereof, including labor, ma terials,/and wastage?
. but no part of the oioneys otherwise appropriated for the support of the mints and
the assay office a t New York shall be used to defray the expenses of refining aud parting bullion.
„



150

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

;,

Under this provision of law, which was enacted originally in an appropriation act a])proved August 15, 1876, the charges to depositors for
parting and refining bullion were fixed so as to equal as nearly as possible the expenses of the operations.
These charges have been reduced, from time to time, with the reduction in the cost of acid and other materials, and as rendered practicable
by an extension of the operations of Government refineries.
Since July 1, 1876, the charges collected Of depositors for these operations have been deposited in the Treasury of the United States to the
credit of an approxniation denominated '^ parting and refining bullion."
Monthly advances are made from this appropriation to the officers in
charge of the coinage mints and the New York assay office, and monthly^
accounts of expenditures under this head are rendered the Government.
On the 24th of October, 1885, the First Comptroller of the Treasury
decided that the receipts from the sale of spent acid and blue vitriol,
by-products of the acid refineries, should be considered as sales of old
material and deposited in the Treasury of the United States as a miscellaneous receipt, as provided in section 3618 of the Eevised Statutes.
Prior to this ruling it had been the practice to credit the sales of
these by=products in part payment of the bills for acid purchased for
the refinery, thus reducing the expenses of the refinery by a sum varying from $15,000 to $20,000 annually.
*
On the 20th of January, 1887, letters of the Director of the Mint and
First Comptroller of the Treasury were transmitted by the Secretary
of the Treasury to the House of Eepresentatives, recommending legislation by which the amount received from the sale of by-products frqm
o acid refineries could be applied to the reduction of the expenses of the
refineries, as follows:
[Ex. Boo. No. 96, House of Representatiyes, Forty-ninth Congress, second session.]
T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , January 20, 1887.

S I R : I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the consideration of Congress, copy
of letter of the Director of the Mint, of the 12th instant, and inclosure, recommending certain legislation in the matter of parting and refining.bnllion by w^hich the sale
of t h e bj^-products of acid refineries can be applied to thereduction of the expenses
of such refineries.
Respectfully, yours,
^
'
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B . MANNING,

Secretary.
The S P E A K E R O F T H E H O U S E O P R E P R E S E N T A T I V E S .

' '"

T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , BUREAU OF THE M I N T ,

Washin,gton, D. C , January 12, 18S7.
S I R : Paragraph 8, page 3T9, of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes of the
United States, provides:
*^And refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on at the mints of the Uuit( d
States and at the assay office at New- York.
**And it shall be lawful to apply the moneys arising from charges collected from
depositors for these operation pursuant to law, so far as may be necessary, to the defraying in full of the expenses thereof, including labor, materials, and wastage.
'^ But no part of the moneys otherwise appropriated for t h e support of the mints
and the assay office at New York shall be used to defray the expenses of refining and
parting bullion."
Under this provision of law, which was passed originally in the appropriation act
approved August 15, 1876 (19 Stats., 156, 157), the charges for parting and refining
bullion were so fixed at t h e several coinage mints and the assay office at New York
, t h a t the receipts should equal, as nearly as possible, the. expenses of the operations.
The spent acid and blue vitriol resulting from the processes.of refining, prior, Octo


D I R E C T O R ' O F T H E MINT.

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151

, ber 24,1885, have been, credited on the bills for acid, thereby reducing the expenses
' of the refinery at the New York assay office.some $20,000 a year. On the 24th October,
1885, the First Comptroller decided t h a t the receipts from spent acid and blue vitriol
must be considered as old material and, under section 3618, Revised Statutes, deposited
in the Treasury. In the report of this Bureau for t h e last fiscal year, pages 6 and
7,1 have referred to the effect of this ruling in the accounts of the assay office at New
York. A similar effect will be produced upon the accounts of the whole mint service,
in t h a t the expenditure will not appear to have been diminished by regular manufacturing assets.
'
•
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A still more important effect of this ruling is to render the acid refineries of the
mint service, under the present schedule of charges, no longer able to be self-supporting, as the law requires.
, .
I
'
I t will be necessary, therefore, either to increase t h e schedule of charges imposed
upon depositors of bullion or modify the law so as to explicitly provide for the application of t h e proceeds of the sale of the by-products of the acid refineries of the
mints and assay offices of the United States to the reduction of the expenses of the
operations of such acid refineries.
,
I h a v e the honor to recommend the latter alternative, and beg to suggest that
paragraph 8, page 379, of the Supplement to the Revised Statutes, be re-enacted in
tbe legislative appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1888, so as to read as follows:
"And refining and parting of bullion shall be carried on at the mints bf the United
States and at the assay office at New York.
"And it shall be lawful to apply, pursuant to law, the moneys arising from charges
collected from depositors and from the proceeds of the sale of by-products resulting
from the operations of the refinery, so far as may be necessary, to the defraying in
full of the expenses thereof, including labor, materials, and wastage.
" B u t no p a r t of t h e moneys otherwise appropriated for the support of the mints
and the assay office at New York shall be used to defray the expenses! of refining and
parting bullion."
•
,
,
Hoping t h a t you will be pleased to present this matter to the consideration of
Congress,
I am, very respectfully, yours,
J A M E S P.

KIMBALL,

Director of the Mint.
The SECRETARY OF THE T R E A S U R Y .
T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , J a n u a r y 14,

Respectfully referred to the First Comptroller for report.

-

1887.

^

H U G H S . THOMPSON,

Assistant Secretary,
T R E A S U R Y D E P A R T M E N T , F I R S T COMPTROLLER'S O F F I C E ,

Washington, D. C , January 15, 1887.
SIR : I have examined the letter of the Hon. James P, Kimball, [Director of the
Mint, to you, of J a n u a r y 12, 1887, in regard to appending a clause to the bill making
appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the Government, for the fiscal year ending J u n e '30, 1888, containing a provision similar to
t h a t which was i n the bill for 1876, found in 19 Stat., 156-7, which letter you have
referred to me for report.
'
,
i
In reply, I will say I see no good reason why such a clause should not be appended
to the bill in question.
The letter of the Director of t h e Mint is herewith returned,
,
.
Very respectfully^
,

.

M. J .

DURHAM,

:, Comptroller,
The

SECRETARY OF T H E T R E A S U R Y .

The above communications were referred to the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures on January 21, lS87,'and ordered to be
printed, but no further action was taken.
It is important to remark in this connection that the utilization of
the by-products of the acid refineries was the principal reason for the
change from the nitric-acid to the sulphuric-acid process.
The nitric-acid process was formerly, used in the parting process for
dissolving the silver, copper, and other metals (the gold being left
undissolved).
'
.', From this solution the. silver was afterwards precipitated, as chloride



152

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

of silver by the use of salt. The remaining solution, consisting of free
acid, nitrate of copper, etc., was conveyed into the sewer.
The chloride of silver was treated with zinc and converted into
metallic silver and chloride of zinc, the solution containing the zinc being also sent to the sewero
,
Thus the acid, salt, and everything in the deposits except the gold
and silver were lost.
In the sulphuric-acid process, the metallic silver is precipitated from
the solution of sulphate of silver, sulphate of copper, etc., by the use of
copper plates, and a portion of the copper^(which is purchased from the
parting and refining appropriation) replaces the silver in the solution.
This copper is syphoned into a concentrator, run into vats, and re=.
covered and sold in the form of sulphate of copper (blue vitriol). The
remaining liquid, which consists of weak sulphuric acid, is also sold,'
The value of the blue vitriol recovered is greater than the cost of the
copper used as a reducing agent, and the value of the waste acid recovered constitutes about one-fourth of the cost of the original acid.
From this statement, it must be obvious that the value of the copper
used as a reducing agent and of the acid purchased can not be considered as the legitimate cost of the parting process and that the main
purpose of changing from the nitric to the sulphuric acid process, as an
effective means of rendering the refinery self-supporting, without increasing the cost to depositors, is defeated by requiring the money
realized from the sale of the by-products to be covered into the Treasury as a miscellaneous receipt,
A NEW MINT AT PHILADELPHIA.

On January 6,1890, a bill (H. E. 3910) was introduced in the House
of Eepresentatives by Hon. H. H. Bingham, of Philadelphia, providing
for the purchase of a^ new site and the erection of a new building for
the Mint at Philadelphia.
On May 2, 1890, the following bill (H, E. 9957), introduced by the
same member for the same purpose, was substituted for the bill originally introduced by him.
A BILL to provide forthe purchase of a site and the erection, of a public huilding thereon at Phila
delphia, in the State of Pennsylvania.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Eepresentatives of the United States of America
in Congress assembled. That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to acquire, by purchase, condemnation, or otherwise, a site and
cause to be erected thereon a suitable building, including fire-proof vaults, heating
and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, for the use and accommodation
of th0 United States Mint, in the city of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvaniaj the
cost of said site and building, including said vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches, complete, not to exceed the sum of two million
dollars.
^
So much of the appropriation as may be necessary to defray traveling expenses and
other expenses incident to the selection of the site, and for necessary survey thereof,
shall be immediately available.
So much of said appropriation as may be necessary for the preparation of sketchplans, drawings, specifications, and detailed estimates f o r t h e building b y t h e Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department shall be available immediately upon
the selection of the site by the Secretary of the Treasury.
No money appropriated shall be available, except as hereinbefore provided, until a
valid title to the site for said building shall be vested in t h e United States, nor until
the State of Pennsylvania shall have ceded to the United States exclusive jurisdiction over the same, during the time the United States shall be or remain^ the owner
thereof, for all purposes except the administration of the criminal laws of said State
and the service of civil process therein.



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DIRECTOR OF T H E M I N T /

•

153

After the said site shall havebeen paid for and the sketch-plans and detailed draw-,
ings for the buildings shall have been prepared by the Supervising ArchI tect, aud approved by the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the Mint, the /balauce of
approi)riation shall be available for the erectiou and completion of the building, including fire-proof vaults, heating and ventilating apparatus, elevators, and approaches,
and such balance of the appropriation ^as may remain available after the building
shall have been completed shall be applied to and used in the purchase of apparatus
for the purposes of the mint.
'
The building shall be unexposed to danger from fire by an open space of at least forty
feet on each side, including streets and alleys.
That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, further directed, when the
new buildinjr herein authorized to be erected'shall have been completed, to dispose of
the present United States Mint building in the city of Philadephia and State of Penn-,
sylvanla, at private or public sale, and to give a quit-claim deed to the purchaser
tiiereof, apd to deposit the proceeds of the sale to the credit of the Treasurer of the
United States in the manner prescribed by sections thirty-six hundred and seventeen
and thirty-six hundred and eighteen, United States Revised Statutes.

The original'bill (H. E. 3910) having been referred by the Committee
on Public Buildings and Grounds to the Treasury Department for
report, the following communications from the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director of the Mint and the Supervising Architect of t h e ,
Treasury were .transmitted to the Committee on Public Buildings and
Grounds, on February 18,1890 i
,
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T , O F F I C E OF THE SECRETARY,

Washington, D. C , February 18, 1890,
SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from the Committee
on Public Buildings and Grounds, asking for the views of the Depa(rtment upon bill
H. R. 3910, a copy of which is inclosed, providing for the purchase of !a site and the
"erection of a new building for the mint at Philadelphia.
,
In reply, I desire to call attention to the statements made in the accompanying
papers from the Director of the Mint, the Supervising Architect, audi the principal
mint officers at Philadelphia, showing the total inadequacy of the present quarters
and setting forth specifically the reasons, which are apparent to those most familiar
with the subject, for an enlargement of the present facilities for coining purposes.
Every consideration bearing upon an effective and correct working of the mint service points to the necessity of providing at once a sufficient and suitable building.
While our legislators of over half a century ago no doubt attempted to make provision for the then immediate future, they never for a moment intended to erect a building which would accommodate itself to the needs and purposes of the present time,
when the number of coins struck at this particular mint is eight timeis as great as it
was then. Every department of the building is crowded' to its utmost capacity with
machinery and employes. I t i s impossible to put in force systematic methods, and
much confusion and delay is occasioned by the want of space in which to arrange, in
an orderly and natural relation, t h e several processes of the different operations
through which the metal has to go in order to produce the perfect coin. The very
limited area t h a t can be assigneil to the furnaces and other branches requiring the
employment of artificial heat makes the temperature at all times almost iinbearable,
and the upper floor, the ceiling of which is in close proximity to the roof,.is filled
with lady operatives, who in the summer find in the stifled condition of the atmosphere abundant cause for absence and ill-health.
'
Upon a recent personal inspection of the premises I was fully convinced of the
serious difficulties under which all the employes labored, and I am sure t h a t any one
who visits the mint can not fail to be impressed in the same way. In this connection I beg to refer to the recommendation of the assay commission in resolutions herewith transmitted. The members of this commission were gentlemen of high professional attainments and prominent in matters kindred to coinage., They have made
manifest the results of their personal observations and have unanimously expressed,
the opinion t h a t the only remedy for the present disabilities lies in the erection of a
more spacious building. An appropriation from last year is available fpr the enlargement of the present building, but it would be very doubtful economy, if not altogether
waste, to expend any large amount in attempting to make the present structure ineet
the requirements of the service. The walls are of marble, very heavy, and covernearly all of the ground at t h a t point which belongs to the Government. The heavy
machinery and large amount of metal to be handled, as well as the delicate operations connected with the finer work of coinage, maices it impracticable to use a.
building many stories in height, and it is very doubtful if any good; results wouldi




154

REPORT ON. THE FINANCES.

follow the placing of additional stories on the present building. Good public policy
at once suggests facilities to be had only in a building of ample proportions, and I
most earnestly recommend the subject to the favorable consideration of Congress. I
think it would be better, however, to amend the proposed bill in such a way as to
make a specific appropriation of |2,000,000 to purchase a site and erect the building,
and after it is finished to provide for the sale of the present site and building, the
proceeds of such sale to be covered into the Treasury under the head of /^Miscellaneous receipts."
Respectfully yours,
WILLIAM WINDOM,

Secretary, .
H o n . S. L . MiLLIKEN,

Chairman of Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, ^
House of Eepresentatives.
T R E A S U R Y DEPARTMENT, B U R E A U OF THE M I N T ,

Washington, D. C , February 7, 1890.
S I R : Referring to House bill 3910, authorizing the sale of the present site of the
mint at Philadelphia and the purchase of a new site, and the erectiou of a new building for the mint in t h a t city, I have the honor to present herewith my views in regard to the necessity and expediency of enacting the same into law!
The act establishing the Mint of the United States was approved by President
Washington, April 2, 1792. The same year the structure for the mint, a plain brick
edifice, was erected on Seventh street near Arch, in the city of Philadelphia. The
following October, the building was occupied for coinage purposes, and was so used
for a period of over forty years. This was the first public building erected in the
United States under the authority of the Federal Government.
By act of May 19, 1829, the mint was permanently located in Philadelphia, and the
present mint edifice, which stands at the corner of Chestnut and Juniper streets on
a lot fronting 150 feet on Chestnut street and extending back 204 feet t o P e n n Square,
was authorized'. The corner stone was laid J u l y 4, 1829, and the building was completed and occupied for coinage purposes in 1833. This building has been used continuously, without any material enlargement, for a period of fifty-seven years, as the principal coinage institution of the United States, although the growth and coinage
requirements of the country have long since outgrown its capacity. I t will be remembered t h a t this building was planned and erected twenty years before the discovery of gold in California and nearly forty years before the immense silver discoveries
of Nevada. The> product of the precious metals in the United States in 1833 was in-,
significant, the total product for the ten years 1834-'44 being only $7,750,000. The
present product approximates annually $100,000,000.
The coinage executed at the mint in 1833 was 10,370,700 pieces of the value of
$3,765,710;' t h e coinage of the same institution for the last calendar year (1889) aggregated 94,012,194 pieces of the value of $24,804,854.84.
In addition to the coinage of gold and silver in common with the other mints of
the United States, the mint at Philadelphia is the only institution in the United
States authorized by law to execute minor coinage, the demand for which has become
so pressing t h a t for several years past the Government has been obliged to buy the
blanks ready for stamping, and for several months past nine large presses have been
used exclusively in t h e stamping of minor coin.
Moreover, the mint at Philadelphia is the only one in the country which has connected., with it an engraving department, where, by statutory requirement, the
devices for our coins are engraved, and the dies, both original and working, for all
our mints are made, and medals of a national character are executed.
The building was not planned with any. idea of adaptation for many of the mechanical and metallurgical operations at present carried on in it. When ic was
erected many of the processes of metallurgy now employed were unknown. The'
area in the center of the mint, originally intended for a stack through which the
fumes of acid, smoke, etc., could pass off, is now filled to the very roof with wooden
structures, which are not only objectionable in themselves but increase t h e liability
to fire, and take away ventilation and l i g h t ; while the erection in the immediate
vicinity of much higher buildings prevents the free escape of the fumes from the
acid refinery, to the great annoyance of the public.
The process of striking coin was by the screwrpress worked by hand, and the introduction of steam for coinage purposes did not t a k e place until 1836, three years
after the building was completed.
' It is not my purpose to enumerate in detail the insufficiency of the present building for the proper and safe execution of the immense amount of work now turned
out. For detailed information on this point reference is made to the letters of the
. superintendent and operative officers inclosed. Certain it is t h a t no private manufacturing establishment would have worked continuously for fifty-seven years in the



DIRECTOR OF THE MINl^.

',

155

same building, with an increas© of 800 per cent, in its annual output (as shown by
the coiu age of pieces at this mint in 1889 as compared with 1833), without largely increasing its capacity.
.
It has not been practicable to remedy the inadequacy of working space in the mint
a t Philadelphia by alterations and enlargements of the present building, owing to the
fact that there is not sufficient area.
'
^
'
It is essential for the efficient execution of the delicate and important lirocesses-of
coinage that the mechanical operations of each department be conducted on the same
floor. The work rooms of the coiner^s department, for instance—that is, all the rooms
for cutting, rolling, milling, and the other coinage operations—should be ou one floor.
I n 1882 the attention of Congress was directed to the insufficiency of the ground
' area for the business of the mint, and a bill was favorably reported from the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures authorizing the purchase of adjoining
property covering a surface of 100 feet on Chestnut street and extending north 204
feet on Broad street.
Unfortunately this bill failed to become a law, and the magnificent building now
occupied by the Girard Life Insurance, Annuity and Trust Company, valued at
$1,000,000, has been built upon it, thus precluding the Government from obtaining,
possession of it. Nor is there any other property adjoining which it is possible for t h e '
Government now to^secure; so t h a t it is impracticable to extend the area of the mint
in its present location.
'
.
If therefore anything is to be done in the way of providing enlarged facilities for
the mint at Philadelphia the matter resolves itself into one of two alternatives : either
the enlargement of the present'building by an attic story or an extension of the
building to the line of the portico, or b o t h ; or, as the other alternative, the erection
of a new mint. I
In accordance with estimates prepared by the Supervising Architect an appropriation of $220,000 was included in the sundry civil bill, approved October 2, 188b, " for
the United States Mint at Philadelphia, P a . ; for an additional story to and. enlarging the building, including vault, alterations, and other necessary work." Of this
appropriation the sum of $43,399.70 has been expended for the construction of new
vaults, leaving $176,600.30 available for the enlargement contemplated.
Since this appropriation was made further plans and drawings have been prepared
by the Supervising Architect contemplating an extension of the floor area by extending the building front to the line of the portico.
In my annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1889, I had the honor to
recommend that the appropriation available, viz, $176,600.30, be increased to the sum
of $420,000, t h a t being the estimate of the Supervising Arcliitect of the cost of t h e
extension designated in the last plans. If, then, the mint remain op:its present site,
an immediate expenditure of $420,000 will be necessary to afford proper room for its
business. The expenditure of even this large sum will remedy the existing state of
things to only a limited extent, b u t will not accomplish the main purpose'desired,
viz, sufficient ground area for the location of the work rooms of the mechanical departments on one
floor.
'
' The objections to an additional story are so forcibly pointed out in the letter of
Superintendent Bosbyshell t h a t I shall not repeat them.
The present time is opportune for the purchase of a convenient site for a new mint
building in Philadelphia. I t is believed t h a t a suitable one, in a convenient section
of the city, on one of its most prominent streets, can be procured a t a cost not exceeding $500,000 and t h a t the present site and edifice will sell for a sum approximating
$800,000; so that if this bill should become a law about $300,000, the probable excess
of the amount received for the present site above the cost of a new site, would be
available towards the erection of a new rhint.
Estimates as to the cost of a new building suitable for the requirements of the
mint at Philadelphia will of course be furnished by the Supervising Architect, but
I may remark t h a t the mint a t San Francisco, finished in 1873, which is a large 'granite building, one of the most beautiful in t h a t city, perfectly adapted to its purposes,
was erected a t a cost of $2,130,512.15 (not including the cost of site, $100,000). Making allowance for the reduced cost of labor and material at the present date as compared with 1873, and especially in Philadelphia, as compared with San Francisco,
it would seem reasonable to say t h a t $1,500,000 would be'the outside cost of a suitable building in Philadelphia, or a net cost of $1,200,000, against ^n appropriation
of $420,000 already asked for the enlargement of the mint if it remains in its present
location.
>
.
,
,
I can not too strongly urge upon Congress the advisability of purchasing a new site
and erecting a new mint, especially, as tlie opportunity which now presents itself for
securing a convenient and suitable location for a reasonable consideration maj^ not
soon occur again. .
.
i
Surely this great Government, with its growing wealth and population, producing
annually from it mines $100,000,000 of/the precious metals, can afford to have the



156

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

very finest buildings as w e l l a s the best appliances and machinery for the important
ancl delicate operations of coining money, and it would seem as if an appropriation
of $1,200,000 for the erection of a suitable structure for its most important mint
should not be considered a piece of extravagance, but rather as an act demanded by
our national character.
I inclose herewith letters from the superintendent and operative officers of t h e
mint a t Philadelphia, to which attention is invited.
Trusting this matter will receive your favorable recommendation,
I am, very respectfully,
E.

O.

LEECH,

Director of the Mint,
Hon.

WILLIAM WINDOM,

Sec/retary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C,

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, O F F I C E OF THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT,

. '
Washington, D. C , February 17, 1890.
S I R : I have the honor to acknowledge" the receipt by reference from you of the
letter of the 13th instant, addressed to you by the Committee on Public Buildings
and Grounds, House of Representatives, requesting to be informed as to the present
condition of the United States Mint building at Philadelphia, Pa., in regard to size,
convenience, etc., for transacting the public business, the need of a new building for
the purposes of the United States Mint, a,nd such other information in regard to the
subject as may be deemed of use to said committee in connection with H. R. bill
3910, introduced January 6, 1890, by Hon. Henry H. Bingham, to provide forthe sale
of the present United States Mint building and site, the purchase of land suitable
for a site, and the erection thereon of a new public building for carrying on the business of the mint in Philadelphia, Pa., the proceeds of the sale of the present United
States Mint property, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to be used for the purpose of purchasing a new site and erecting thereon a new building for said purpose,
and to submit the following:
.
I invite attention to the statements made on pages 62 and 63 of th© Annual Report of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department, 1889.
The mint building in Philadelphia has been changed in arrangements and enlarged
by minor additions from time to time to meet the demands of the present public business, and practically all of the available ground within the metes and bounds of th©
site IS now occupied by the building.
With the appropriation made by act of Congress approved October 2, 1888, viz,
$220,000, and the additional appropriation of $200,000 asked for in the annual estimates, it is proposed to build a third story to the present building and extend th©
wings on each side of the entrance portico out to the street front as further additions
to the structure.
^
By making a new assignment of the old portion of the structure with the additional floor area to be obtained by such improvements there would be better facilities
for the conduct of the business of the mint than there is now afforded in tfie building.
These improvements, however, would not provide the convenience needed for the
proper conduct of the work of the mint, nor secure full economy in the management
t h a t ciould be applied if a structure with sufficient ground area was erected t h a t
would enable the work of the coinage of metals to be done continuously on one floor .
without the necessity of irregular transfers of the metals during the process of its
Coinage between working rooms not continuously arranged, and would prevent the
inconvenience and delay incident to the necessary use of elevator service between
the diff'erent stories of the building.
The metals should be delivered at one station and pass regularly from t h a t point
through the several apartments contiguously arranged, properly equipped with the
necessary furnaces, machines, plants, etc., and assigned to the different branches of
the work incident to its completion, so t h a t after the metals shall have reached the
apartment in which the last branch of work thereon is to be don© th© coins will be
perfected and ready for storage or distribution.
The actual cost of the present United States Mint building in Philadelphia, including the cost of alterations and repairs to J u n e 30, 1889, is $432,871.48 plus the cost of
site—$31,666.67—which aggregates $464,538.15, in connection with which must be
considered the work now being done under the appropriation of $220,000 made by
act of Congress approved October 2, 1888, and the appropriation asked for in the
annual estimates.
From computations mad© in the office of the Supervising Architect of this Department, based upon information received, it is found that, to construct such a building,
with proper lighting, ventilating, and heating facilities, t h a t would afford proper ac


DIRECTOR P F T H E MINT.

•

157

commodations f o r t h e present and prospective needs of the m i n t in said city, $1,500,000
will be required in addition to such amount as may be n ceded for the purchase of
land suitably and adaptably located for the purpose.
After duly considering th© subj©ct, I am of the opinion t h a t the convenience of the
public business done at the mint and the economy of the public service would be
best consulted by the acquisition of a new site and the erection thereon of a new
suitable building for the exclusive use of the United States Mint.
:
I would therefor© sugg©st that, tb facilitate a speedy compliance with the provisions of the bill, should it become a law, said H. R. bill should be so modified as to
make a specific appropriation for the purchase of land for a site and the erection of
th© building in addition to the sale of the present site and building, after the completion of the new building, and that the proceeds from such sale be deposited with
the Treasurer of the Unitecl States as miscellaneous receix^ts derived from the sale of
Government property.
;
Respectfully, yours,
JAMES H . WINDRIM,

^ Supervising Architect,
Hon.

WILLIAM WINDOM,

•

Secretary of the Treasury,

On ^June 5, 1890. Mr. Darling to n^ from the Committee: on Public
Buildings and Grounds, submitted the following report:
[House report Ko. 2326, Fifty-first Congress, first session, j
The Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds, having had under consideration
, the bill (H. R. 9957) to provide for th© purchase of a site and the erection of a public
building thereon at Philadelphia, submits th© following report:
The necessity for the enlarg©m©nt and improvement of the Mint of the United
States at Philadelphia, for which this bill provides, has been a matter of consideration by Congress since 1880. The Hoiise ancl Senate committees of the Forty-sixth
Congress reported favorably upon a similar measure, and the House Committee on
Coinage, Weights, and Measures of the Forty-seventh Congress unanimously reported a bill which had originated in the Senate of like import.. The necessity fbr
increasing the facilities of the Philadelphia Mint has never been questioned, but
from various causes the bills to which reference is made failed of final action in the
House.
1
In considering the bill submitted, your committee has been greatly aided by information furnished by th© Secretary of the Treasury and t h e Director i of the Mint,
re-enforced by th© clear, concise, and intelligent statement of the siiperinten|ient
and operative officers of the Philadelphia Mint, as well as by a memorial sign©d)by
the commissioners appointed by the President to conduct the annual trial of the jiyx
*for the coinage of all the mints during th© y©ar 1889. From these various authorities, all in substantial agreement as regards the embarrassments to which the officers
in charge are subjected by reason of confined quarters, entailing lack of machinery,
imperfect ventilation and sanitation, your committee is clearly pf the opinion t h a t
the provisionfor the enlargement of the present mint building included in the sundry
civil bill of 1888 ($220,000) signally fails to meet the requirements of effective public
service. That provision was *^for an additional story to and enlarging the building,
including vaults, alterations, and other necessary work." Of this proposed enlargement of t h e building Supervising Architect J. H. Windrim says that, while it would
afford somewhat better facilities for the conduct of business than at present exist, .
it would not provide the conveniences needed nor secure economy in management
t h a t could be secured by a structure with proper ground area. Nor can the enlargement already authorized b© mad© without an additional appropriation.
The present mint was erected and completed for coinage purposes in 1833, and
has been used, without, material enlargement, fifty-seven years. Thei coinage executed in 1833, at which time the production of the precious metals in the United
States w a s insignificant, was 10,370,700 pieces, of the value of $3,765,710y and the total
value of the gold and silver product for the ensuing ten years was only $7,750,000.
The present annual product of the precious metals in the United States .approximates
$100,000,000, and the coinage of the Philadelphia Mint for the calendar year 1889
^ aggregated 94,012,194 pieces, of the value of $24,804,854.84. In additicin to the coinage of gold and silver the mint at Philadelphia is the only institution designated by
, law to execute minor coinage, for which the demand for small exchanges is cumulative and pressing. So great is t h e demand for these small coins that the Government has been obliged to purchase the blanks ready for stamping, while nine presses
have been kept busy for matiy months in th^ execution of this coinage to supply pub-




158'

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCED,

lie demand, ^The work demanded of this mint has increased 800 per cent, since the
completion of the present building in 1833, as is shown by its annual output.
Your committee finds a consensus of opinion among the officers familiar with coin
age matters as respects the remedy, which is increased ground area. This is necessary for the efficient ^and proper conduct of the delicate and important processes of
coinage, which, whether scientific or mechanical, are to be ranked as works of precision. The entire mechanical operations should be on a single floor, the subdepartments of each operative officer being contiguous and continuous. In default of this
the work is hindered and the risk greatly increased. This is particularly true in the
coining department, where the various processes for converting the ingot into coin
have to be carried on in rooms often widely separated, however related the processes
may be, the metal in its several stages passing from ground floor to second story,
from second story to basement, and thence to^ the presses on the ground floor. It is
evident t h a t processes so important stud so necessarily connected with national credit
should be divested of all unnecessary risks. That is a desideratum; and it can be
secured only by such an arrangement of the coining department as will admit of the
carrying forward of the work continuously in rooms contiguous and at grade, so t h a t
the officer in charge may have the metal in its various stages under his eye.
Such necessary supervision of the processes of coining can not be secured in thepres-.
ent structure, even if the entire available ground space should be given up to th©
coiner. But the processes through which the metals pass before they can go to the
coiner are many, and necessarily of absolute accuracy. The coinage laid upon
this mint' requires the melter and refiner to melt daily from five to seven net tons
of silver. This important work, on the accuracy of which the integrity of our coin
largely depends, has to be carried on in cramped quarters"and at a ctisadvantage t h a t
greatly increases the labor and risk of that officer. The entire Treasury purchases of
bullion assigned to this mint for conversion into coin have to be passed in at a window of a department not under the control of the melter and refiner, and no modification of the structure yet proposed would remove this difficulty. The room referred to
i s t h e deposit melting room, where the bullion of depositors is melted, a room that
should be absolutely isolated from every other and from the public. The melter and
refiner is, by courtesy and necessity, allowed to receive the Treasury purchases through
the window of this room, and through the same window must be taken the fuel for
its furnaces. This involves constant interruptions of the processes, and more or less
confusion, alike unjust and detrimental to"the operative officers concerned, the effi•ciency of public service, and to depositors, whose deposits are there prepared for assay.
The exigencies of the other operative departments of this mint confine th© melter
and refiner to a single room, in which he is required'to melt and x^repare ingots of gold,
silver, nickel, and bronze. It is believed that conditions so incompatible with work
t h a t miist be absolutely accurate or fail altogether do not exist in any mint of modern
structure. No subdivision of any space available in the building can remedy this
disai^jlity. Beyond these de^fects the chimney-stacks of the melter and refiner^s department are overtopped by the walls of the adjoining buildings to the extent of fivestories.. This leaves the draught of the melting-furnaces at the caprice of the winds, t
which from the west impair the draught and from the east drive the fumes and product of combustion into the windows of neighboring residents. It may be regarded
as merely a question of time when the neighboring residents will complain of this
annoyance as a nuisance.
When the present structure was planned many of t h e processes of metallurgy now
employed were unknown. Some improved machinery, operated by steam, was introduced'in 1'836. Improved appliances have been added from time to time, until now
this mint lags behind a quarter of a century in the race of improvement simply because every inch of available space has been exhausted. Machinery of the most advanced order has become a necessity, and it awaits the purchaser who has space for
its accommodation and operation. The mint at Philadelphia can not avail itself of
such desirable and necessary appliances because its ground space is fully occupied
already. The central area, originally intended for ventilating, purposes and working space, has, from time to time, as the exigency demanded, been occupied by structures t h a t impair ventilation and lighting and endanger the health, as they decrease
the comfort and convenience, of the working force. The high modern structures on
either hand prevent the escape and diffusion of th© acid fumes from the refinery and
cause them to pervade the entire building.
I t is proper to note t h a t certain operations by law authorized t o be performed at
the Philadelphia Mint are not performed at any of the other mints. The dies forthe
coinage of all the mints and for national medals are all designed and prepared atthis mint, aud all medals of a national character are executed in the same institution.
The.engraving department, one of the most iitiportant of all, because it must maintain uniformity of design in coinage, at present is indifferently accommodated. I t
can not be relieved by any modification of the present structure,.. The assayer ancl
the milter and refiner perform intimately related functions, yet they are necessarily



• ^ •

• '

'DIRECTOR OF T H E MINTo

" -

159'

located on different floors at present; nor would alterations of th© structure enable
them to occupy communicating apartments. The assay department of the Philadelphia Mint enjoys, and has from an early day enjoyed, an enviable repute for accu-i
riacy throughout the commercial world. Such repute is of incalculable value to the
nation, since it goes to establish the very foundation of national credit through the
known and invariable integrity of its coinage.
"
Your committee finds t h a t it is impossible to put systematic methods in force in the
present structure. Yet such methods are undoubtedly necessary to secure the highest
results at a minimum risk and with economy. I t is the parent mint, established early
in the nation's career, and' located a t Philadelphia for reasons quit© obvious. The
location is near the sea-board, yet not exposed to the hazards of invasion ; in a great
commercial "and rrianufacturing metropolis, and within easy communication of the
trade centers of the Atlantic slope. The location is in itself a guaranty of safety
for the treasure t h a t naturally flows to the mint. And this is t h e foremost and richest nation of the world, the greatest producer of the money metals of all, and now,
as for years, requiring more service from its mints than any other nation. Your committee submits t h a t the parent mint of the foremost nation on the globe should not
be second to any either in working space, appliances, or in that structural excellence
and design which conjoined crystallize the history of national progress i n adamant.
While your committee fully discriminates between what is necessary and appropriate
and what is extravagant and lavish in expenditures, it recommends such a reconstruction of the parent mint at Philadelphia as shall respond to public exigencies
and redound to the credit of the nation.
In this connection it is proper again to refer to the fact t h a t the commission appointed by the President to conduct the annual assay last February, was composed
of men eminent in the business, political, and scientific world, many of them distinguished physicists and metallurgists, and t h a t this commission, becoming impressed
with the crowded condition of the mint building and its processes, unanimously
memorialized Congress in favor of a new structure with greater ground space and
approved modern appliances. The gentlemen of t h a t commission represented evety
section of the Union, from Maine to California, and their unanimous testimony has
value accordingly.
After giving full consideration to th© facts submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury, th© Director of th© Mint, th© superintendent of the mint at Philadelphia, and
his operative officers, together with the statements of the Supervising Architect of
the Treasury Department, the committee is enabled to conclude—
First. The present mint building at Philadelphia is entirely inadequate to the serv- .
ice required both as regards area and appliances.
.|
Second. No enlargement of ground area is possible ; to increase height will not remove t h e disadvantages under which the operations are performed.
Third. To remedy the disabilities so clearly set forth, a new site with aruple ground
area is absolutely necessary, and a new building on modern lines, with such modeirn
appliances as experience has proved necessary for good work and precision, ,be
erected and equipped.
, >
The Director of the Mint states t h a t of the sum of $220,000 appropriated by the sundry civil bill of 1888 for improvements, the sum of $176,600.30 remains available, and
t h a t he has recommended, upon an estimate of the Supervising Architect, an increase
of this balance to $420,000. If then the mint remains at its present location, an immediate expenditure of $420,000 will be necessary.
The bill submitted with this report provides for th© purchase of a site and the
erection of a new building at Philadelphia, at a cost not exceeding $2^000,000, and,
the sale of th© present building and site. Th© committee believes that a new site
with ample ground space and i n a desirable location can be procured at a cost of
$500,000, and t h a t the property now occupied can be sold for at least $800,000. The
net cost therefore of the property would be $1,200,000, against an * appropriation of
$420,000 already asked and in part appropriated for the enlargement of the mint if
it remains at its present location. I t is probable t h a t the Government can at this
time purchase a desirable site at a less cost than at any future time. ; I t failed to
avail itself of the option of the entire area from its v?^estern foundations to Broad street
at a moderate price som© years ago, and again in 1882, when the land; might have
Veen had for $400,000, and probably less. The same land can not be purchased t()-day
for less than $2,000,000 with the improvements.
,
'
The committee assumes t h a t the mint will be permanently located at Philadelphia,
and as ©nla-TTgement is a certainty, true economy points at the present as the proper
time to provide therefor. The Piiiladelphia Mint was the first public building erected
in the United States under Federal authority, and the act creating it vvas approved
by President Washington. Its' history and the coinage of the nation is one of the
many historical associations t h a t cluster around ;the city of Philadelphia—memorable
in every patriotic impulse and action.




160

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

The committee recommend the passage of the bill with t h e following amendments:
In line 12 strike out all after the word ' ' d o l l a r s " down to and including line 15,
which is th© appropriating clause.
I n line 26 strike out t h e words '^by this act."
In line 38 strike out th© word ^^said."
I n lin© 41 strik© out th© word *'said."

F o action was taken, during the first session of the Fifty-fiirst Congress, by the House of Eepresentatives, on the favorable report, from
the Committee on Public Buildings .and Grounds on the bill providing
for the purchase of a new site and the erection of a new mint^at Philadelphia, and the bill remains on the House Calendar.'
The foregoing documents so fully present the pressing necessity for
a new and modern building for the immense and important business of
the mint at Philadelphia that I feel that 1 can add nothing to their
force, but I take this opportunity to most earnestly urge the importance
of the measure and the advisability of prompt action. The time is
opportune for the profitable sale of. the present valuable site, which is
entirely insufficient in ground area for the erection of a suitable building, and which can not be added to by the purchase of adjacent land,
except at enormous expense.
STOCK OF MONEY IN T H E UNITED

STATES.

The following estimate of the stock of United States coin in the countryj
based upon previous tables, is presented for the date July 1, 1890:
O.FFICIAL T A B L E OF STOCK O F COIN I N T H E U N I T E D STATES J U L Y 1,. 1890.
Items.

Gold.

Estimated stock of coin July 1 1889
Coinage fiscal vear 1890
.. .
Net imports of Unitecl States COID, fiscal year 1890...

Total.

$614, 068, 360
22, 021,748

$1, 024,172, 846
58, 837, 584
119, 939

636, 090,108

, Total

$410,104, 486
36,815,836
119, 939
447, 040, 261

1, 083,130, 369

Loss:
Net exports of United States coin, fiscal year 1890.
United States coin melted for recoinage, fiscal
year 1890'
United States coin estimated to have been used
in the arts, fiscal year 1890
o
Total

Silver.

2,002,184

2, 002,184

655, 475

588, 490

1, 243, 965

3, 500, 000

200, 000

3, 700, OOO

6,157, 659

788,490

6. 946,149

629, 932,449

446,251,771

• I, 076,184, 220

;...oo<,.=o = = o.===o = .,=0000.0=0

Estimated stock of United States coin July 1, 1890...

The value of the silver coin deducted, as melted for recoinage, represents the face value of uncurrent subsidiary coins transferred from the
Treasury to the mints for recoinage, and of mutilated and defaced pieces
of the same class of coin sold the mints by individuals.
In addition to the stock of gold and silver coin in the country July 1,
1890, the cost value of the gold and silver bullion in the mints and
assay offices belonging to the Government at that date was as follows:
GOLD AND SILVER BULLION I N M I N T S AND ASSAY O F F I C E S J U L Y 1, 1890.
Metals.
Gold
Silver fcost)
Total




............

.........

Value.

.
o..

.......' .

........,..'

$65, 630, 580
10,' 65C), 838
76, 287, 418

161

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

. In addition to the stock of silver bullion in the mints belonging to
the Government, there was known to have been a considerable stock of
silver bullion in New York City. I have no official information as to
the stock of silver bullion aside from the bars on deposit with the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company, which the treasurer of that company
informs me amounted, on June 30, 1890, to 6,003,153 ounces, against
which 6,001 certificates of deposit had been issued.
;
The market price of silver at that date being $1.05 per fine ounce,
this stock corresponds in value to $6,303,310.
Adding the value of the bullion in Government institutions and^ the
silver in the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company to the stock
of coin, the total metallic stock of the United States July J, 1890, was
as follows:
METALLIC STOCK, J U L Y 1, 1890.

:

Coin and bullion.

^

:

Gold.
Silver (bullion in mints and Mercantile Safe Deposi t Company at cost value)
Total . . ,

...„

,...,

Value. :
$695,563,029
463,211,919
1,158,774,948

The estimated metallic stock, at the commencement of the fiscal year,
was as follows :
:
METALLIC STOCK, J U L Y 1, 1889.
Coin and bullion.
Gold
Rilvp.r ^hnllioTi in m i n t s Ji.t", nnst valiiA^
Total

Value.

.„.,!

$680, 063, 505
420, 548, 929

.

o

o,.'

1,100,612, 434

From a comparison of these totals it will be seen that, notwithstanding the large export of gold in the fall of 1889 and the summer of 1890,
the stock of gold in the United States increased during thfe last fiscal
year $15,499,524, and the stock of silver $42,662,990.
The ownership of the stock of coin and bullion is exhibited in the following table:
O W N E R S H I P OF GOLD AND S I L V E R I N THE U N I T E D STATES J U L Y 1,1890,
Silver coin and bullion.
Ownership.

Gold coin
and bullion.

United States Treas'$190,473,247
ury
National banks (July
18,1890)
+151,420,192
Banks otlier tban national (gold coin
holdings reported
to Director of the
Mint January I,
1890)
31,212,417
Banks other than national (Dot reporting) and in private
322,457,173
hands
Total

695, 563, 029

Subsidiary Silver bullSilver dollars. silver coin.
ion.

Total silver. I

t$15,591,479 $22, 792,718 $10,656, 838 $49, 041, 035
§22,659,070

Total gold
and silver,coin
and bullion.

$239, 514, 282

4,524,801

27,183, 871

178, 604, 063

> 331,175,917 49, 507, 786

6, 303, 310 386,987,013

740, 656, 603

16, 960,148 463, 211, 919

1,158, 774, 948

369,426,466

76, 825, 305

•Gold coin and bullion in the Treasury, exclusive of $130,830,859 gold certificates outstanding.
] Silver dollars in the Treasury, exclusive of $297,556,238 silver certificates outstanding,
t Includes Treasury and clearing-house gold certificates, $77,431,100.
§ Includes $15,865,318 silver certificates held by uatio&al banks.
I

F I 9 0 - -11



162

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The following table exhibits the stock of metallic and paper money
in the United States, and the location of the same, July 1, 1890:
LOCATION OF THE M O N E Y S OF THE U N I T E D STATES, J U L Y 1,

In Treasury.

Moneys.

I n national
banks (July
18, 1890>.

1890.

I n other banks
and general
circulation.

Total.

METALLIC.

Gold b u l l i o n
Silver bullion . . . . . i , . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . . .
Gold coin

$65, 630, 580'
10, 656, 838
255, 673, 526

$6,
295,
49,
49,

303,
806,
484,
507,

$65,
16,
629,
309,
76,

310
831
997
786

630, 580
960 148
932. 449
420,466
825, 305

' 313,147, 717
22, 792, 718

.,.

89, 770, 645

401,102,924

1,158,774,948

123,882,039

92, 480, 469

230, 318, 508
56, 032

500, 000
26, 732,120
3,983,513
+4, 365, 838

11, 890, 000
72,968,100
15, 865, 318
§24, 250, 697

57, 802. 759
281,690,920
157, 354, 240

346,681,016
56, 032
12, 390, 000
157, 562, 979
301, 539, 751
• 185,970,775

59, 463, 510

Total

*$78, 452, 092
6, 793, 752
4,524,801

667, 901, 379

Silver doll^^rs
S u b s i d i a r y silver coin

217, 454, 584

727, 282, 459

1,004 200 553

PAPER.

Legal-tender notes
Old d e m a n d n o t e s
Cei tificates of d e p o s i t
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
National-bank notes

.............

Total

* Includes $4,463,000 clearing-house gold ceitificates.
tlnc'udes $11,890,000 held for the redemption of certificates of deposit for legal-tender notes, act
June 8, 1872.
t Includes $4,203,261 in process of redemption.
§ Includes $3,066,269 of their own notes held by different national banks.

For the purpose of comparison, a similar table is presented for July
1, 1889: .
LOCATION OF THE M O N E Y S OF T H E U N I T E D STATES, J U L Y 1,

Items.

In Treasury.

In national
banks (July
12, 1889).

1889.

In circulation.

Total.

JMETALLIC.

Gold bullion
Silver bullion
Gold coin
Silver dollars
=...
Subsidiary sUver coin .

*$82,651,610
6, 786,730
4, 495, 681

618,196,403

Total...

$65, 995,145
10,444,443
237i 586, 792
279,045,351
25,124, 672

13, 934, 021

388,482.010

t47,196,825

97,456, 832

202, 027, 359
56, 442

$293, 829, 958
47, 670, 569 t
46,981,483

$65, 995,145
10,444, 443
614,068.360
333, 502, 650
76, 601, 836
1,100, 612, 434

PAPER.

Legal-tender notes
Old demand notes
Certificates of deposit • Gold certificates
Silver certificates
National-bank notes . . .
Total.

240, 000
36, 918, 323
5,474,181
4,158, 330

16,955,000.
69, 517, 790
12, 452, 057
J27, 715, 587

47, 612,439
244, 703, 508
179, 505, 046

346, 681. 010
56, 442
17,195, 000
154,048, 552
262, 629, 746
211, 378, 963

93, 987, 659

224, 097,266

673, 904, 794

991, 989, 719

* Includes $8,744,000 clearing-house gold certificates.
tIncludes $16,955,000 held for the redemption of certificates of deposit for legal-tender notes, act of
June 8, 1872.
J Includes $3,954,100 of their own notes held by the different national banks.




DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

163

Of the stock of gold shown by of&cial tables to have been in the
United States on July 1, 1890, the Treasury and its branches held
$321,304,106, leaving $374,258,923 in banks and among the people, i
An effort was made by this Bureau to ascertain the amount of gold
coin held by private and State banks, at the commencement of the calendar year 1890. The results of this census were presented in detail
in my report on the ^ Production of Gold and Silver in! the United
^
States, 1889.'^,
I
Out of 7,472 banks addressed, including all the state banks, savings
banks, trust, deposit, and guaranty companies, and private banks and
bankers in the United States, reports were received from 6,693, of which
number 1,013 reported ^'No gold coin held.''
Of the banks addressed, 36 had been merged into national banks, 95
had gone out of business, and the letters to 38 were returned by postmasters as unclaimed, leaving 741 as the number of banks reached
wnich did not favor the Bureau with the information sought.
If the gold holdings of the banks which reported are a fair indication, proportionately, of the gold coin held by the banks which did not
report, the amount of gold coin held by all the banks in the" United
States, exclusive of national, may be placed at $34,000,000;
The following is a tabulation of the replies arranged by States:
T A B L E OF THE GOLD COIN HOLDINGS OF BANKS OTHER THAN NATIONAL I N THE
U N I T E D STATES, D E C E M B E R 31,1889.
State banks, privaite banks, and bankers!

States and Territories.

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
.a.....
California
Colorado
Connecticut
,
Dakota
Delaware
*
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Idaho—'.
Illinois
Indiana
Indian Territory
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
, Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
u.......




No
coin
Num- Num- held by
ber ad- ber re- those
dressed, plying. reply.

60
11
51
165
96
30
278
7
10
.27
96
16
494
197
5
526
•583
137
24
16
51
83
267
234
36
347

9
37
153
88
17
258
5
5
24
49
10
445
186
5
505
530
125
13
13
34
50
253
220
32

ReMerged
turned
into na- Out of by post- Unan- Gold coin held
ofbce swered. December 31,
tional busi'
1889.
banks. ness. as unclaimed
$149,186. 00
71, 295.00
59, 005.00
8, 862, 673. 50
310, 218.50
99, 699. 50
172,942.00
11, 605.50
9,659.50
32,793.00
178, 227. 00
47 141. 50
985,675.00
432, 810.50
19, 358.00
703,159.00
. 470,794.00
369,139.00
49, 911. 00
1, 078.50
25, 953. 50
$3,812.50
418, 290. 50
729, 034. 50
49,188.00
. 1, 060, 004. 00

164

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
T A B L E O F T H E GOLI3 C O I N HOLDINGS, ETC.-r-Continued.

State banks, private banks, and bankers.
No
coin
NumNumheld by
b e r ad- b e r redressed. p l y i n g . t h o s e
replying.

States and Territories.

Montana . . . . . . . . . o . . . . . . . .
Nebraska
..............
Nevada
....^..........
N e w Hamnahiris . . . . .

21
486
13
10
22
10

N e w Mexico
New York
No rth Carolina
Ohio
Oreeron
.e................
Pennavlvania . . . . . . . . . . . . .

394
39
286
30
276
18
43
78

Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tenneas6e ••••••••o.o..«
Texas
Utah
V^ermont . . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . .
Virginia
"West Y i r g i n i a
"Washington
Wisconsin................
"Wyoming

147
10
2
76
31
31

16
450
9
6
15
7
337
31
260
28
240
15
29
75
129
8
2
62
28

ReM e r g e d O u t of t u r n e d
Gold coin h e l d
i n t o na- busi- b y post- U n a n - D e c e m b e r 31,
otlice s w e r e d .
tional
1889.
n e s s . as unbanks.
claimed

19

12

5

4

2
2
6

48
5
36

3

1

40
7
5
5
13

3
3

6

5
32
4
4
7
3
56
8
24
2
35
3
14
3
18
2

256 580 00
349, 006. 50
324,067. 50
1,850. 00
23,020.00
7, 380. 00
2, 274. 513. 50
42, 885. 50
535,339.50
703, 425. 00
1,108, 628. 50
3, 716. 50
18, 814.'50
157, 012. 50
541, 807. 50
192, 772. 50
120.50

11

1
10
1
2
6
1

6,053

• 5, 386

*579

*28

*90

36

631

23, 337,119. 50

6,053
1,419

5,386
1,307

579
434

28
8

90
5

36
2

631
110

23, 337,119. 50
7, 875,297. 50

36

95

38

741

31, 212, 417. 00

172
11

Total
S t a t e a n d p r i v a t e b a n k s . .^
Savings-banks, etc
Total

7,472

27
168

6,693

3
1

1,013

14
3
4
4

I
2

82,363. 00
82,180. 00
506, 407.50
728, 919. 50
73, 655. 50

2

States and Territories.

u bb

.22
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
.......
Delaware
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois

11
1
2
42

n.

11
1
1

13
25

24

CQ

li
o

O ' P (H

41
7
93
22
3
2
3
9

7
102
29
3
2
6

lis

Returned
by post-office as unclaimed.

S a v i n g s - b a n k s , t r u s t , deposit, a n d g u a r a n t y coinpanies, a n d cleari n g - h o u s e associations.

1
a

$49, 280. 50

1

3
3
39
13
2

I
1
I

1
1

I

9
6

3
4

o




T o t a l gold
coin hel'i b y
banks other
Gold coin t h a n n a t i o n a l
held Decem- D e c e m b e r 31,
b e r 31,1889.
1889.

1

* Included in number replying.

1

$198,466.50
72, 470.00
1,175. 00
405. 00
69,410.00
2,611,743.00 11,474,416. 50
36, 960. 00
347,178. 50
76,312.50
176, 012.00
10, 217.50
183,159.50
390.00
11,995.50
10,109. 50
450. 00
33,135.50
342.50
187, 590. 00
9, 363. 00
47,141. 50
412, 930. 50 1,398,595.50

BIRECTOR

165

O F T H E MINT.

T A B L E O F T H E GOLD C O I N HOLDINGS, ETC—Continuecl.

'6

S t a t e s a n d Territories.

2 .

Ill
p ^

% .

>-.

pp
O

OrP u
^

•

Returned
by post-office as unclaimed.

S a v i n g s - b a n k s , t r u s t , deposit, a n d g u a r a n t y companies, a n d cleari n g - h o u s e associations.

1

T o t a l gold
coin held b y
banks other
3han n a t i o u a l
Gold coin D e c e m b e r 31,
held Decem1889.
.
b e r 31, 1889,

1
I

I

9

6

79
51
12

65
44
12

17
29
3

3
62
25
200
52
12

2
62
18
199
52

18
9
92
3

9
" 3
69

4
1
12

3

3
73
I
22

I
18

4

4

19, 517. 50
4, 997. 00
251, 598.50
285, 768. 00
16,130. 00
3, 578.00
401, 38(). 00
38,136. 00
8,587.50

70
34

29
11
1
62

1
2

22, 273.00
36.419.50

1
175
4
43
4
93
36
12
21

69
32
1
162
3
43
4
88'
35
12
14

9

4

1

1
33
16
3
7
10

1
29
13
3
7
10

Indian Territory.....
Iowa
....;.......
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana............
j^aihe
Maryland
Massachusetts
Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .
Mississinni
Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . .
Montana
.........
Nebraska............
Nevada
..
NewHampshire
N e w fJeraev

Ohio
Oregon
............
Pennsylvania . . .
Rhode Island
South Carolina.
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Yermont . . . . . . . .

Total

$10,272.50

$443,083.00
19 358 00

14
7

172, 774.00

875,933. 00
494, 804 50
473,434 00

1
I
.7
1

1

1

4

24, 010. 50
104,295.00
6,867.50

-. •

N e w Mexico
New York
N o r t h Carolina

Yirginia . . . - .
W e s t Yirginia
Washington
Wisconsin
Wyoming

2

.

1, 419 1,307

2

1

2

I

13
1

7
10
25
6
3

5
1
7
5
4
3

10
5
1

6, 750.00
50,00b.00
10, 406. 50
13, 342. 00
6,445.00
45, 835. 00
109, 26*4. 50

1
*434

553, 292.00
767. 50
108, 376.00
276, 900. 00
1, 976, 086. 00
34, 562. 00
37, 258. 50
29, 848.50

*8

*5

2

110

56, 778. 50
20, 596. 00
30, ^50. 50
255, 411. 00
704, 058. 50
745 164 50
52
1 461
294,
357,
324

766 00
384 00
716. 00
.594. G
O
067 50

24 123.00
59, 439. 50
7, 380. 00
2,827,805 50
43, 653. 00
643, 715. 50
980, 325. 00
3, 084, 714. 50
38, 278.50
, 56, 073. 00
186,861.00
548 557 50
242,772.50
10,527.00
95 705 Ofl
88,625. 00
552, 242.50
838,184. 00
73, 655. 50

7, 875, 297.50 31, 212, 417.00

* Included in number replying.

The number of silver dollars in circulation, that is, outside of the
Treasury vaults, was on June 30,1890, $56,278,749, against $54,457,299
at the commencement of the fiscal year, while the number of silver
dollars owned by the people, that is, silver dollars and silver certificates
in actual circulation, aggregated $353,834,987, against $311,612,864 on
July 1, 1889. The number of silver dollars owned by the Treasury on
July 1, 1890, was $15,591,479, against.$21,889,786 on July 1, 1889.,
The total amount of metallic and paper money in the IJnited States,
July 1,1890, exclusive of the holdings of the United Sta^tes Treasury



166

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

arid of the silver bullion in the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit
Company, was $1,429,307,302, Sbper capita^ reckoned upon a population
of 63,000,000 people, of $22.68, against $1,380,418,091 at the commencement of the fiscal year, an increase of money in circulation of $48,889,211.
The following table exhibits approximately the stock of United States
gold and silver coins in the country on November 1, 1890:
STOCK O P GOLD AND S I L V E R C O I N I N T H E U N I T E D STATES N O V E M B E R 1,1890.

Silver coin.
Gold coin.

Date.

Silver dollars.
$629, 932, 449
4, 077, 836

S t o c k N o v e m b e r 1,1890.

$369,426,466

$76,825, 305

634, 010, 285

s t o c k J u l v 1 1890
Gain since t h a t date

Subsidiary.

380, 988,466

11, 562,000,

Total silver
coin.

T o t a l gold a n d
s i l v e r coin.

320, 286

$446, 251, 771
11,882,286

$1,076,184,220
15, 960,122

77,145, 591

458,134, 057

1, 092,144,342

The value of the gold and silver bullion in the mints and assay offices
at the same date was approximately'^ as follows:
GOLD AND S I L V E R BULLION I N M I N T S AND ASSAY O F F I C E S NOVEMBER 1, 1890.

"
Gold

Cost value.

Metals.
.. .

.i

Total

ii.i.i

ii.

. . . . . . i . . . . ii* . . , . i . . . . s i . i ^

i .ii.

i...i*.

i...i

$60, 855, 395
17, 736,440
78, 591, 835

The amount of silver bullion in the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company in New York, at the close of business October 30, was
7,072,261 ounces.
It is estimated by competent authorities in New York that there was,
in addition to the silver deposited with the Mercantile Safe Deposit
Company, a stock in the city of from 1,500,000 to 3,000,000 ounces.
The superintendent of the assay office in New York thinks, from inquiry that he has made, that it would be safe to fix the amount of silver
In that city outside of the vaults of the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company at 2,000,000 ounces, which would make about 9,000,000 ounces of
mlver in New York, or about $9,500,000 worth at the present price.
Adding the visible stock of bullion, that is, the gold and silver bullion
in the mints and the silver bullion in New York City, to the stock of
coin, the total metallic stock on November 1, I89O5 was approximately
as folio wss
«
TOTAL METALLIC STOCK N O V E M B E R 1, 1890.

Gold...
Silver.,




$694, 865, 680
485, 370,497
1,180, 236,177

I6f

DIEECTOR OP T H E MlNT.

The following table exhibits the amount of j)aper and metallic money
in the United States, and the location of the sam'^e on November 1,1890:
LOCATION O F THE MONEYS OF T H E U N I T E D STATES NOVEMBER 1, 1890.

Moneys.

In Treasury.

Out.side of
Treasury^.

Total.

METALLIC.
Gold bullion
Silver bullion
Gold coin
Silver dollars
Subsidiarv silver coin

= .........0..0

=

$60, 855,395
27, 236, 440
634, 010, 285
380, 988,466
77,145,591

647,056, 354

533,179, 823

1,180, 236,177

20, 000
36, 482,690
2,443,197
3,662, 637

334,417,753
II, 467, 3|51
56, Q32
6,910,000
138,173, 979
308, 206, l'77
176, 093, 006

346, 681, 016
13,949,000
56, 032
6, 930, 000
174, 656, 669
310, 649, 374
179, 755, 643

57,353,436

,

$9,500, 000
400, 376, 078
65, 709, 564
57, 594,181

12, 263, 263
2,481,649

Total..

$60, 855, 395
17, 736,440
233,634, 207
315,278,902
19, 551, 410

975,324, 298

1, 032, 677,734

PAPEB.
Legal-tender notes
Treasury notes (act July 14 1890)
Old demand notes
Certificates of deposit
Gold certificates..,
Silver certificates
National bank notes

. - ..

...........

T o t a l . ..00

, From an examination of this table it will be seen that the total amount
of metallic and paper money in circulation, that is, outside of the Treasury, on November 1, 1890 (exclusive of the visible stock of silver bullion in New York), was $1,499,004,1219 a per capita, reckoned upon
63,000,000 people, of $23.80 against $1,414,121,120 in circulation at the
same date of last year, showing an increase in the amount of monev in
circulation between these dates of $84,883,0010
^
GOLD AND SILVER USED IN THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS.

The institutions comprising the Mint service are requiredl to ascertain
the uses for which gold and silver bars paid out are intended, and the
accounts are kept so as to show not only the value of the bars .furnished
fbr industrial purposes, but the character of the material' used in the
composition of such bars.
The following table exhibits the value of the gold and silver bars furnished manufacturers and jewelers by the United States assay office at
New York during the calendar year 1889 t
BARS MANUFACTURED F O R USE I N T H E INDUSTRIAL ARTS, ISSUED B Y THE UNITED
STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK, DURING THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31,

1889.

'
Gold.

•

.
Silver.

Material used.
Fine ounces.

Domestic bullion
United States coin
»
Foreign material
Old plate, jewelry etc
Total




389, 930. 624
.'
13,966.163
90, 892.418
494, 789.205

Value.

Fine ounces.

Value.

$8, 060, 581 3,171,567. 81 $3. 523, 964
797. 80
887
288,706
589,579.38
655, 088
1,878,914
2G8, 99fi. 49'
298, 884
10, 228, 201 4,030,941.48

4,478,823

168

REPORT DN T H E FINANCES.

The following table exhibits the value and material employed in. the
manufacture' of bars of gold and silver, issued for use in the industrial
arts by the mint at Philadelphia, during the calendar year 1889:
BARS MANUFACTURED FOR USE I N THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS B Y THE U N I T E D STATES
M I N T AT P H I L A D E L P H I A DURING T H E YEAR ENDED D E C E M B E R 31, 1889. \

Silver.

Gold.

.

Material used.
Fine ounces.

Value.

Fine ounces.

908.471 $18,779. 00
28,661.009 592,476. 00
4,199,785 . 86,817.00
96.00
• 4.645

United States coin
Domestic bullion
Old plate, jewelry, etc
Foreign material

33,773.910

Total

Value.

10, 849. 86
10, 849. 86

698,168.00

$12, 055.00
12, 055. 00

For the purpose of ascertaining the amonnt of gold and silver contained in bars furnished directly by private works in the United States,
for industrial consumption, a circular letter, inclosing a form of report,
was addressed to forty-seven firms, believed to comprise all in the
United States engaged in the business of manufacturing bars of gold
and silver; Eeplies were received from thirty-eight of the firms addressed, of which twelve reported that no bars were manufactured by
them during the year, while twenty-six furnished the Bureau with statements in detail showing the value and composition of the bars they
made. I t is thought that the nine not replying made no bars during
the year for industrial use, and that the returns on the part of private
works may be said to be complete.
The result of this inquiry is exhibited in the following table:
BARS F O R INDUSTRIAL U S E FURNISHED GOLDSMITHS AND OTHERS B Y P R I V A T E
R E F I N E R I E S DURING T H E CALENDAR YEAR 1889.

Gold bars manufactured. Silver bars manufactured.
Material used.
Fine ounces.
United States coin
,
TJnited States b a r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domestic bullion other than United States bars..
Forei^'n coin and b u l l i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Old plate, jewelry, and other old material

Fine ounces.

Value.

.^.

19,742
81,159
50,009
119
60,625

$408,100
1, 677, 715
1, 033, 770
2,456
1,253, 240

1,149
372.105
2, 918, 929
2,249
232, 090

$1,486
481,105
3, 773, 969
2,909
300,076

211, 654

Total

Number of firms addressed
Number replying

Value.

4,375, 281

3, 626, 522

4, 559, 545

J

12
26

47 1 Number not manufacturing
38 Number manufacturing

I t will be noticed that "United States bars" were furnished by private refiners to goldsmiths and others during the year containing gold
$1,677,715, and silver $481,105.
As these bars are included in those issued by the United States Assay
Office at New York for use in the arts, they should, to prevent duplication, be deducted from the amount reported by private refineries.



169

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

Eliminating, therefore, " United States bars," the following table exhibits the work of private refineries in this line:
BARS F O R INDUSTRIAL U S E (EXCLUSIVE OF GOVERNMENT B A R S ) FURNISHED GOLDSMITHS AND OTHERS B Y P R I V A T E R E F I N E R I E S DURING T H E CALENDAR YEAR 1889.

Gold bars manufactured. Silver b^rs manufactured.
Material used.
Fine ounces.
United States coin
;. -. -.
Domestic bullion other than United States bars.
Foreign coin and bullion
Old plate, jewelry, and other old material
Total

.0

0

Value.

Fine ounces.

Value.

19,742
50,009
119
60, 625

$408,100
1,033,770
2.456
' 1,253, 240

i, 149
2,918, 929
2^249
232, 090

$1,486
3, 773, 969
2, 909.
300, 076

130, 495

2, 697, 506

3,154,417
i

4,078, 440

The following table is a summary of the work of Government and
private institutions in the preparation of bars for industrial use during
the calendar year 1889:
GOLD AND S I L V E R BARS FURNISHED F O R U S E I N MANUFACTURES AND T H E ARTS
DURINGTHE CALENDAR Y E A R 1889 BY GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS,
AND

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MATERIAL

USED.

Material.
United States coin . .
Domestic bullion . . . . . . . . .
Foreign coin and bullion
Old material
Total

Gold.

„.
.........o....................
......;..
-

$426, 879
9, 686, 827
291,258
3,218,971

o.... 13,623,935

Silver.

Total.

$2, 373
7, 297, 933
657, 997
611, 015

$429, 252
16, 984, 760
949,255
3, 829, 986

8, 569, 318

22,193, 253

Comparing the totals of this table with the results of a similar inquiry for the preceding year, it appears that there was an increase in
the amount of the precious metals used in the industrial arts, the value
of the gold bars used being $13,623,935, in,1889, against $13,324,025 in
1888, and of the silver bars $8,569,318 against $7,908,148.
The amount of domestic gold bullion used in the composition of bars
furnished jewelers, during the calendar year 1889, was $9,686,827, and
silver $7,297,933, the latter corresponding to 6,090,496 fine ounces.
The amount of United States gold coin reported to have been melted
for use in the composition of bars furnished for industrial uses, during
the calendar year, was $426,879, against an estimated annual melting
down of $3,500,000 of United States gold coin for industrial use, based
on four censuses taken by the Bureau of the Mint for different years as
to the direct employment of the precious metals by jewelers and others
in the manufacture of watches, jewelry, and in gilding, while the amount
of United States silver coin reported as melted in the composition of
bars during the year was $2,373, against a reported melting down; by
jewelers and others in the censuses referred to of $200,000 of United
States silver coin.
I
Assuming that the melting of coin for use in manufactures and repairs has not diminished, the value of the precious metals used in the



170

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

industrial arts in the United States, during the calendar year 1889, was,
approximately: Gold, $16,697,000; silver,$8,767,000(coining value).
It has not been the practice of the Bureau to solicit information from
private works as to the preparation of bars of gold and silver during
fiscal years.
The following tables exhibit, however, the value of the bars of gold
and silver issued by Government institutions fpr industrial uses during
the last fiscal year:
BARS MANUFACTURED F O R U S E I N T H E INDUSTRIAL ARTS, ISSUED B Y THE U N I T E D
STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK DURING T H E F I S C A L YEAR ENDED J U N E

30,1890.
Gold.

Silver.

Material us^d.
Fine ounces.
TJnited States coin
Domestic bullion
Foreign material
Old plate, jewelry etc
Total

Fine ounces.

'; 418,186. 688
14, 920.983
93, 688. 814

„

Value.

$8, 644, 686.06
308,444.09
1,936, 719.66

. 1,157.68
2, 940,460.29
792, 854.52
277,198.42

$1,496.80
3, 801, 807! 24
1, 025,104.84
358, 397. 95

10, 889,849.81 4, Oil, 670.91

5,186,806.83

526,796.485

Value.

BARS MANUFACTURED F O R U S E I N T H E INDUSTRIAL ARTS, B Y T H E U N I T E D STATES
M I N T AT P H I L A D E L P H I A , DURING THE F I S C A L Y^EAR E N D E D J U N E 30, 1890.
Silver.

Gold.
IVTatiBrial nspd
Fine ounces.

Value.

Fine ounces.

Value.

Total

870.050
31,59L725
4. 645
3,821.163

$17,985.53
653, 058. 92
96.02.
78,990.45

232. 24
. 99,670.86
191. 83
12, 893.75

$258. 05
110, 745.40
213.14
14, 326.39

36,287.583

United States coin
Domestic bullioo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foreign material.. . . :
Old plate jewelry, etc

750,130.92

112, 988.68

125, 542.98

The following table is a recapitulation of the work of the two institutions, the assay office at New York and the mint at Philadelphia (being the only Government institutions which furnished bars of gold and
silver for industrial use during the fiscal year):
BARS MANUFACTURED F O R U S E I N T H E INDUSTRIAL ARTS, ISSUED B Y THE U N I T E D
STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK AND T H E U N I T E D STATES M I N T AT P H I L A DELPHIA, DURING THE FiSCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1890.
Gold.

Silver.

Material used.
Fine ounces.
United States coin...
Domestic bullion
Foreign m aterial
Old plate jewelry, etc
Total

»

i




......'

870. 050
449,778.413
14, 925.628
97, 509. 977
563, 084. 068

Value.

Fine ounces.

Value.

$17,985. 53
1,389.92
9, 297, 744. 98 3, 040,131.15
308; 540.11
793, 046. 35
2, 015, 710.11
290,092.17

$1, 754. 85
3, 912, 552.64
1, 025, 317. 98
372, 724. 34

4,124, 659. 59

5, 312, 34S. 81

11,639,980.73

171

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

Comparing the totals of the above table with the work of the preceding fiscal year, it appears that the gold bars paid out at these two
institutions for use in the industrial arts, during the last fiscal year,
aggregated $11,639,980, against $10,324,840 in the preceding year^ and
silver bars $5,312,349, against $4,156,829. So that notwithstanding
the enormous sura of $25,464,000 of gold and silver was consumed in
industries and manufactures in this country during the calendar year
1889, the consumption has increased since then.
PRODUCT OF a O L D AND SILVER.

The statistics of the production of gold and silver in the United States
for the calendar year 1889, were presented in a special report to Congress, 10,000 copies of which were printed by resolution of Congress
under the title " Production of Gold and Silver in the United States,
1889."
i The statistics of production are collected only for calendar years.
The total product of gold and silver from the mines of the United
States, exclusive of foreign bullion and ores smelted or refined in this
country, was estimated to have been, during the calendar year 1889, ais
follows:
I
Metals.
Gold

o

Silver

=

...o.
Total

Commercial
value.

Coining
value.

.o

o..

$32, 800, poo
46, 750, 000

$32,800, Obo
64,646,464

79,550,000

1, 587,000
60, 000,000

oo..O.O...o.oo..,.ooo.o

o....
0....0

Fine ounces.

97,446,464

oo

The following tables exhibit, approximately, the total product of gold
and silver from the mines and smelters of the United States during the
calendar year 1889, including the amount obtained from foreign material treated, being the product in fine bars reported by private refineries
together with the unrefined gold and silver bullion deposited at Government institutions.
It must be distinctly understood that, in these tables, th;e quantity
of gold and silver obtained from foreign ores and bullion smelted or
refined in the United States is included:
GOLD PRODUCT OF R E F I N E R I E S I N T H E U N I T E D STATES, 1889.
Fine ounces (troy).
Domestic.
Reported product of private refineries in the United States
Unrefined gold deposited at Government institutions.«o....ooo..
Total'., e......

0..0.0..0

O.O.

Foreign.

847, 865
689,658

63,8il
926, 558

1, 537, 523

990, 369

Total.
911. 676
1,616,216
'2,527,892

S I L V E R PRODUCT OF R E F I N E R I E S I N THE U N I T E D STATES, 1889.

Eeported product of private refineries in the United States
Unrefined silver deposited at Government institutions
Total




,

47, 864, 982
2, 024, 700

9, 214, 419
l; 132, 368

57, 079,401
3,157,068

49, 889, 682 10, 346, 787

.60,236.469

172

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

The distribution of the product of our own mines among the producing States and Territories was approximately as follows:
A P P R O X I M . \ T E DISTRIBUTION, B Y PRODUCING STATES AND T E R R I T O R I E S , OF T H E
P R O D U C T OF GOLD AND S I L V E R I N THE U N I T E D STATES FOR THE CALENDAR
Y E A R 1889.
Silver.

Gold.

Total value.

s t a t e or T e r r i t o r y .
F i n e ounces.
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Dakota
Georgia
Idaho
Michigan
Montana
Nevadia
N e w Mexico
N o r t h Carolina
Oregon
S o u t h Carolina

—

.".......

Texas
Utah
."
Washington
*
Alabama, Maryland, Tennessee,
Virginia, Vermont;'
and Wyoming
Total

Value.

43,537
43,537
628, 875
169, 312
140, 287
5,176
96, 750
3,386
169, 312
145,125
48, 375
7,014
58, 050
2,177

$900, 000
900, 000
13, 000, 000
3, 500, 000
2, 900, 000
107, 000
2,000,0.00
70, 000

24,187
8,466

500, 000
175, 000

25, 000
1, 594, 775

F i n e ounces. Coining value.

32, 967, 000

3, 500, 000
3, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
145, 000
1, 200, 000
45,000

$10, 343

8,000
1,500,000
800, 000
16, 000, 000
50, 000
360
3, 400, 000
60, 000
15, 000, 000
4, 800, 000
1,130, 000
3,000
30,000
180
232, 031
7, 000, 000
80, 000

I, 939, 393
1,034,343
20, 686,868
64, 646
465
4, 395, 959
77, 575
19, 393, 939
6, 206, 060
1, 461, 010
3,878

• $910,343
2,839,393
14, 034, 343
24,186, 868
2, 964, 646
107,465
6. 395, 959
147, 575
22,893,939

38, 787
232
300, 000
9, 050, 505
103, 434

9, 206, 060
2,461,010
148,878
1, 238, 787
45, 232
300, 000
9, 550, 505
278, 434

1, 000

1,293

26, 293

50, 094, 571

64, 768, 730

97, 735, 730

The product of gold and silver from the mines of the United States,
exclusive of foreign material smelted or refined in the United States,
has been, since 1878, approximately as follows:
PRODUCT OF GOLD AND S I L V E R FROM M I N E S I N THE U N I T E D STATES SINCE
Gold.

1878.

Silver.

Calendar years.
Fine ounces.

1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883.
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888,
1889




2, 476, 800
1,881,787
1, 741, 500
1, 678, 612
1, 572,187
1,4,51,250
1,489,950
1, 538, 325
1, 693,125
1,596,375
1, 604, 841
1, 587, 000

Value.

$51,200,000
38, 900, 000
36,000, 000
34, 700,000
32,500,000
30, 000, 000
30, 800,000
31, 800,000
35, 000,000
33, 000, 000
33,175, 000
32, 800, 000

F i n e o u n c e s . Commercial
value.
34,
31,
30,
33,

960,
550,
320,
260,

000
000
000
000

36, 200, 000
35, 730, 000
37, 800, 000
39, 910, 000
39, 440, 000
41, 260, 000
45, 780, 000
50, 000, 000

$40, 270, 000
35, 430, 000
34, 720, 000
37, 850, 000
41,120, 000
39, 660, 000
42, 070, 000
42, 500, 000
39, 230, 000
40, 410, 000
43,020,000
46, 750, 000

Coining
value.
$45, 200, 000
40, 800, 000
39, 200, 000
43, 000,000
46, 800, 000
46, 200, 000
48, 800, 000
51, 600, 000
50, 000, 000
53, 350, 000
59,195,000
64, 646,464

173

DIRECTOR O F T H E MINTo

In the Appendix will be found a table showing the value of the gold
and silver produced annually in the United States since 1792.
A table will also be found, compiled principally from statistics furnished by foreign governments at the instance of this Bureau, and revised from latest reports received, exhibiting the quantity and value of
the gold and silver produced by the principal producing countries of
the world, during the calendar years 1887, 1888, and 1889.
I n the preparation of this table, in cases where official estimates or reports were not at hand, either the product officially reported for the preceding or some near year has been used, by way of estimate, or the
product as ascertained from other reliable soarces; but in all cases
where the product credited a producing country is not the official estimate, this fact, as well as the data upon which the estimate is based,
has been stated in a foot-note.
The value of silver in this table, as in similar tables for other years
published in the reports of this Bureau, has, for purposes of uniformity .
and comparison, been reckoned at the coining rate of silver, viz, $1.29^9
per fine ounce.
|
The following table exhibits the product of the precious metals in the
world for each calendar year since 1873. It gives the silver product at
ts commercial value, calculated at the average market price of silver
each year, as well as its coining value:
I
P R O D U C T OF GOLD AND S I L V E R I N THE W O R L D F O R T H E CALENDAR YEARS 1873-89.

Silver.
Calendar years.

;

Gold.
Fine ounces
(Troy).
$96,200, 000
90, 750, 000
97, 500, 000
103, 700, 000
114, 000, 000
119, 000,000

1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879

:

63,267,000
55, 300.000
62, 262, 000
67,753,000
62,648,000

$82,120, 000
70, 673, oop

. 102,000,000
95, 400, 000
. . 101, 700,000
108,400, 000
106, 000, 000
105, 775, 000

73, 476, 000
74, 250, 000
74, 791, 000
78, 890, 000
86,470, 000
89,177, 000
81, 597, 000
91,652,000
93, 276, 000
96,141, 000

110, 244, 000
121,162, 000

108, 888,000
124, 769, 000

109, 000, 000
106, 500, 000
103, 000, 000

1880
1881
1882
1883 •
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889

Commericial
value.

-

-

77, 578, OO'O
78, 322, oop
75, 240, O Q
O
84, 644, oop
83, 383, 000

Coining
value
$81, 800, 000
71, 500, 000
80, 500, 000
87, 600, 000

- 81,-000,000
95, 000, 000
96, 000, 000
85, 636, 000
96, 700, 000
89, 777, 000
102, 000, 000
98, 230, OOO
111,800,000
98, 986, 000
115.300,000
90, 817, 000
105, 500, 000
97,564,000!
118, 500, 000
92, 772, OOOi. 120, 600, 000
94,048,000'
124, 304, 000
102,243,000 , 140, 784, 000
161, 318, 000
116,674,000

WORLD'S COINAGE.

In the Appendix will be found a table exhibiting the value of the
coinageof gold and silver by each of the nations of the world, so far
as reported, during the calendar years 1887, 1888, and I889e!
The following summary is presented;




174

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES,

W O R L D ' S COINAGE.

Calendar years.

Silver, coining value.

Gold.

1887
1888
1889

$124, 992,465
134, 828,855
168,901, 519

."

$163,411,397
134. 922, 344
135,602,064

The gold coinages executed during the y6ar.l889 were unusually large,
comprising, in addition to a gold coinage by this country of $21,413,931,
a gold coinage of $48,166,214 by Germany, $36,502,536 by Great Britain,
$29,325,529 by Australia, and $18,855,097 by Russia, the others not
being so important.
I t will be understood that the value of the coinage executed does not
represent the amount of gold and silver of current production used for
this purpose, for the reason that the coinages reported include the recoinage of both domestic and foreign coins, as well as old material used
in coinage. Notwithstanding each government was specifically requested to report the amount of recoinage as well as the total coinage,
the data covering recoinages are not sufficiently complete to afford a
fair presentation of the total amount of old coins melted down, probably for the reason that the information was not accessible.
The following table of recoinage for the calendar years 1888 and
1889, however, have been prepared from the information furnished by
foreign governments:
RECOINAGES R E P O R T E D B Y CERTAIN COUNTRIES; CALENDAR YEARS 1888 AND 1889^
1888.

1889.

Countries.
Gold.
UnitedStates
Great Britain
Canada
,
Australia
India
France....
Switzerland.
Spain
Italy
Portugal
Ifetherlands
Germany
Austria-Hungary .
Denmark
Turkey
Norway
Sweden —
Egypt
Russia
Mexico
Colombia
Brazil
Japan
Total




Silver.

$507, 916
.8,163, 388

$460,300
1,146, 941
17,174

483,433
2,848

2, 949, 848
1,112, 379

Gold.

Silver.

$4, 666, 442
2, 937, 084

$1,173, 526
1,129,476

658, 982
1,148
1,596,801

4, 731, 944

16, 984

217,125
4,436, 804
60, 208
1, 036, 800

16,321, 492

989,127

66, 000

8,040
74,448

7, 946, 065
9,229

132, 660
177, 079
27, 607
23, 718
127 389

81,483
762 480
337,558
663, 069
202, 278

65 .16
15

25, 562, 061

13, 516, 249

23, 539

17, 815, 766

8, 651, 907

175

DIRECTOR OF , THE MINT.

SUMMARY OF THE OPERATIONS OF THE MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES.
The precious metals received at t h e mints and assay offices of the U n i t e d
S t a t e s , d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r 1890, a g g r e g a t e d in value $92,793,958, an
increase of $2,436,055 over t h e deposits of t h e preceding fiscal year.
T h e value of t h e precious metals deposited b u t partially measures t h e
operations necessary for their metallurgical and mechanical t r e a t m e n t
a n d final manufacture into coin or b a r s .
.
|
T h e m a g n i t u d e of t h e operations of t h e melting a n d refining departm e n t s of the. coinage mints a n d of t h e assay office at New York, d u r i n g
t h e p a s t year, is exhibited in t h e following t a b l e :
,

BULLION OPERATIONS OF THE MELTING DEPARTMENTS,

1890.

Standard
ounces. Coining value.

Metals.

4, 293, 619
75, 072, 323

Gold...
Silver..

$79, 881, 282
87,356, 883

Total .

T h e a m o u n t and value of t h e precious metals operated upon in t h e coining d e p a r t m e n t s of t h e four coinage m i n t s in t h e manufacture of finished
coins from ingots p r e p a r e d by t h e m e l t i n g d e p a r t m e n t s w e r e as follows:
BULLION OPERATIONS OF THE COINING DEPARTMENTS, 189,0.
Standard Coining value.
ounces.

Metals.
Gold
Silver

Total

-

2,521,361
65, 293, 056 •

..-.....,..o

1

$46, 909, 041
75, 977, 373
122, 886,414

T h e work of t h e minor assay offices, which consisted in t h e manu0 facture of u n p a r t e d b a r s of gold a n d silverj w a s as follows i \
OPERATIONS OF MINOR ASSAY OFFICES, 1890.
-

Gold

Standard
ounces.

Metals.

o

.....o

Silver

^ Coining value.

192,625
68,544

O.O

.......o.....

•Total

;

.o.ooo

$3,583,723
79, 761
3,663,484

T h e following t a b l e is a s u m m a r y of t h e t h r e e preceding tables, intended to exhibit t h e work of t h e m i n t s a n d assay offices so far as relates to t h e precious metals d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r :
BULLION OPERATED UPON IN THE MELTING AND COINING DEPARTMENTS OF ALL
THE MINTS AND ASSAY OFFICES, 1890.
:
Standard I Coining value.
ounces.

Metals.
Gold
Silver

oo

o

Total




7, 007, 605' $130, 374, 046
140; 433, 923 > 163,414,017
a

.,

293, 788, 063

176

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The quantity of precious metals operated upon in the mints and assay
offices of the United States, during the last fiscal year, aggregated 240
tons of gold and 4,817 tons of silver.
The value of the gold and silver wasted in operating upon this vast
quantity of bullion was only $10,349. In addition, however, to operative wastage, a loss of $15,792.05 was incurred, being the difference
between the value of the precious metals in sweeps recovered in the
operative departments as ascertained by mint assay and credited the
operative officers, and the amount realized to the Government from the
sale of the sweeps which are of too base a character to be worked advantageously in Government refineries. The value of the operative
wastage and loss on sale of sweeps was $26,141.05,
Against these losses there were incidental gains in the operations on
bullion as follows:
Valueof surplus bullion returned by operative oflS cers
Value of precious metals recovered in grains and deposit melting-room sweeps
Gain on bullion shipped from tbe minor assay offices to tbe mint at Pbiladelpbia for
coinage
Total operative gains

....1

„

$25,876. 94
5,945.43
4,861. 50
36, 683.87

Deducting the value of the total operative wastage and loss on sale
of sweeps from the value of the incidental gains of bullion, there was a
net gain in the operations of the mints during the year of $10,542.82,
The relative cost of the coinage executed at the four coinage mints,
during the year, is exhibited in the following table:
COST OF COINAGE AT EACH MINT,

Location of Mint.

Pbiladelnbia
San Francisco
New Orleans
Carson

.........^

Total and average

1890.

Pieces
Expenses for Cost per
Cost per
salaries,
includexcluPieces coined. coined, ex- wages, and piece, minor piece,of miclusive of
ing
sive
minor coins. indidentals.
coinage. nor coinage.
93,707,137 27,040,358 - $581, 082.13
6, 535,474 6,535,474'
264, 097. 80
10, 925,000 10,925,000
200,171.38
1, 530,460 1, 530,460
124, 928. 52

$0.0062+

$0.0215.0404
. 0183+
.0816+

112, 698, 071 46, 031, 292 1,170,279.83

0.0104-

. 0254+

I t is inequitable to draw comparisons between the relative cost of
coinage at the various mints, as exhibited in the above table, for the
reason that the character and amount of the coinages executed at them
is so dissimilar. At the Philadelphia mint, in addition to a great variety of gold and silver coinage, all the minor coinage is executed, the
blanks for which are purchased under contract ready for striking, so
that the only mechanical operations necessary to convert them into
coin consist in heating and cleaning the disks and striking the coin.
At the mint at San Francisco, on the other hand, the bulk of the gold
coinage is executed, which requires greater care and skill. At the mint
at New Orleans, where the coinage consists exclusively of silver dollars, a
fair estimate of the cost of coining silver dollars may be obtained—1.8
cents per piece* The expense per piece of coinage at the mint at Carsou



177

DIRECTOR O F T H E MINT.

is very much greater than at the other mints, partly because the operations are very limited on account of lack of machinery as well as a stock
of bullion, but also for the reason that the cost of repairs and renovating
of the building, which has been closed for coinage purposes for four
years, is included in the cost of coinage.
The following table exhibits the proportion of good coins produced
from ingots operated upon at each of the coinage mints, during the year:
PEIICENTAGE OF GOOD COIN PRODUCED FROM INGOTS OPERATED UPON F O R T H E
F I S C A L YEAR 1890.

Coinage mints.

Silver,

Pbiladelpbia...
San Francisco .
New Orleans . .
Carson

MINT AT PHILADELPHIA.

The value of the gold and silver deposited at the mint at Philadelphia, during the fiscal year 1890, was:
•
Gold...
Silver

•

|4,40a, 858. 75
17,827,987.76

In addition, 430,894 pounds of minor coinage metal were received. .
In the assayer's department the number of assays made, during the
year, was, approximately:
Gold
Silver

-

•.

. . . . . . i . . . ^ . 15,100
. . . . . . . 42,800

...•

The quantity of the precious metals operated r.pon by the melter and
refiner was:
'
!
standard ounces.

Gold.....i.....
Silver

i.
864,019
: . 37,429,865

This officer returned in settlement, at the close of the fiscal year, a
surplus of 197.040 standard ounces of gold and 322.40 standard ounces
of silver over and above the amount with which he was charged.
The number of melts made in the same department and the number
condemned, during the year, were as follows:
MELTS O F GOLD AND SILVER,

1890.

For ingots.
Metals.

For bars.
Made.

Gold
Silver......

..^
^

Total

PI 90-

-12




i
--

310
1,116

83
11, 732

3
111

1,426

--

,
—--

Condemned.

11,815

114

178

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

The operations of the refinery are exhibited in the following table:
Bullion.

Gold.

Sent to refinery:
Gross weigbt
Standard ounces by assay,
Returned from refinery

Ounces.
402, 754.798
241, 637.069
241, 730.231

Silver.
Ounces.
449, 329. 57
638, 239. 92
641, 641. 97

The minor coinage metal for recoinage passing through this department, during tbe year, aggregated 237,239 pounds.
The operations of the coining department, comprising gold, silver,
and minor coinage metal, are exhibited in the following tables:
Metals received.

Ounces.

Gold
Silver
Minor coinage metal

285, 599.07
35, 425,055. 56
8, 062, 659.84

In the aggregate about l,500f tonSo
The coiner's w^astage for the year was:

The coinage executed was as follows:
Number of
. pieces.

Description.
Gold
Silver
Minor coins .•
Total

,

=
»
i.=o.ooo..

.......oo

oo.....

..O.O...

Value.

177, 397
26, 826, 961
66,666, 779

$2, 209, 548.50
19,758,024.30
1, 416, 851.73

93,707,137

23, 384, 424. 53

The percentage of coins produced from ingots operated upon was as
follows: Gold, 41.9 per cent; silver, 48 per cent.
The number of medals struck in the same department, for the year,
was as follows:
Gold..00
Silver
Bronze...
Total

o

o_.
,"....,.._
,

o

3...o„..o»

o-o.o.oooe

133
2,199
368

0 - . . . . . . . . . . 2,700

CTndertheefficient management of the present superintendent, Mr. O.
0. Bosbyshell, the mint at Philadelphia has been materially improved,
both as regards comfort and convenience, and especially in the impor


DIRECTOR OF THE MINTo

179

tant particular of appliances to insure more effective service in several
departments. The rooms in the basement, long devoted to an accumulation of cast-off material, have been reclaimed by the removal and sale
of the d6bris, the proceeds being deposited in the Treasury; Considerable new space has thus been made available, and has been occupied to
great advantage. The engine-rooms have been renovated, safeguards
against accident provided, and new pumping apparatus added, by
which a full supply of water is now distributed through the upper build-'
ing. The dressing-rooms of the employes have been greatly improved
by new closets, extending space and light and improved lavatory. New
granolithic floors have been laid in the transfer weigh-room, the coinroom, and the courtyard, permitting heavy trucks to move easily at
grade. A new apparatus for heating blanks has been erected in the
coining-room. The weigh-room has been shut off from the public by a
glazed partition, and that department'is now properly isolated. A new
stone floor has been put in. It has also been refurnished and all space
utilized for working to advantage. The obstructions in the south corridor have been removed, giving spaciousness and light.
The cashier's room has been considerably improved by re-arranging
the counter, but more important improvements, intended to double ^he
working space, are contemplated. Important and valuable improvements, both as regards efficiency and careful and econonaic working,
have been introduced in the assay department of the mint, consisting
in an entire renovation of the old and dilapidated quarters pf that most
important branch' of the mint; the old coke furnaces have been tbrn
out and replaced by modern gas furnaces of more approved constructions! the floor has been tiled, and the walls lined with glazed brick;
a skylight has been set in the roof, which affords largely increased
light, and an eight-horse power electric motor has been placed in the
attic. The assayer's laboratory is, at present, probably as well appointed
as any in the country for the work required. The entire mint building
and the vaults are now lighted with incandescent lights connected with
the mains of the Edison Company.
^
Such part of the court-yard as is inclosed has had the gravel roofs
removed and skylights substituted, by which artificial light is superseded and ventilation secured for the dressing-rooms ami the rollingroom. Portions of the brick arches have been removed itrom the balconies overlooking court-yard and Hyatt vault lights jsubstituted,
giving a flood of light to the lower passages. The iron water-tanks
have been removed and new wooden ones placed on the roof on either
side, giving light to the assayer and adjusting room, and two rooms
have been erected on the inner roof slopes, one for the master mechanic
and the other for the melter and refiner's laboratory. Access to these
new rooms is afforded by iron stair-cases. A new room forthe adjuster
of scales and weights has been provided and better quarters for the
plumber, painters, and house-cleanerSo
Among the most important improvements to secure light and ventilation are the eight skylights erected in the adjusting room, by which
artificial light is rendered unnecessary during ordinary weather. The
same improvement has been made in the machine-shop aiid in the diemaking room. The chief clerk's room and t h a t of the book-keeper's; adjoining have also been furnished with large skylights and ventilating
appliances.
The expenditures for the different classes of supplies for the mint at
Philadelphia during the fiscal year^ were as follows I




180

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

E X P E N D I T U R E S AT T H E M I N T AT P H I L A D E L P H I A , F O R T H E F I S C A L Y E A R E N D I N G
J U N E 30,1890.
General department.

A s s a y e r ' s Coiner's
departdepartment.
Mechanment.
ical.

E x p e n d i t u r e s for s u p p l i e s .
Proper.
A id
Beltino-

$97. 90
1, 051. 90

„.

nhfliTCoal
Dhftmicala

-«

. ...o.
.•«...

$181. 34
20.97

154.24
4, 784.06

$2.08
33.00

158. 42
66.92

1,352.05
82.13

23.27

Coal

10.29

45.94
6.83

84. 83

C r a o i b l e s , covers, s t i r r e r s ,
and d i n n e r s . . . . . . . . . . • . . .
D r y goods
ITluxes
•
.•• - - - . .
Freight and drayage
G-asl
Gloves a n d gauntlets
Hardware
............
Iron and steel

.

.....

Labor and repairs
L o s s o n sale of s w e e p s
Machinery and appliances.
Metal-work and castings. .
Oils
Salt
Stationery, printing, and
bindin^ . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sundries................
Teleffraphing
Washing
Water

$21. 25

14.72
7, 904. 50
219. 07
1, 526.21
662.38

$455. 56 $3, 975.05
3L56
584.13
951.08
2, 022.72
14,100. 00
2, 723. 50
128. 64
2, 621.80

114. 70
42.55
3, 529. 43

67.73

• $0.60
98 11
21 85

5.50

4,782. 22

2,074. 33

1.50

376. 26

74.67

54.88

101. 22
388. 01

67
5 29

63.72
70.98

2, 675. 46

363 82
871.77

10.20

1, 218. 20
589. 53
L04
L02

1,104. 08
12, 613. 43

Engraver.
Proper.. Refinery.

3.22
55.45

276. 85
6, 583. 30
407. 77
1,788. 91
1,190. 97
1, 727. 01
359. 08

M e l t e r a n d refiner's
department.

87.57
1, 466. 00
1, 433. 08
260. 55

27.40

.60
4L59

3, 558. 89

12.00

1, 603. 98
214. 39

134.36

.90

5, 083. 51

94. 74
76

537. 07

78.97

287 39

9.75

,

•^
'

112.82

'.

548. 00

Wood

4, 079. 32

Zinc

1. 635. 58
Total

Salaries
W a g e s of w o r k m e n
Total

43,160.22

152. 61

5, 924. 80 21, 839. 71 28, 056. 83 11,115.49

23, 550. 00
5, 000. 00 5, 000. 00 5, 000. 00
108, 000.72 14, 306. 34 11,677. 04 234. 832.27 59, 277. 86

873. "23

3 000 00
9,155. 02 11,430.50

174, 710. 94 14, 458. 95 22, 601. 84 261, 671. 98 92, 334. 69 20. 270. 51 15 303.73

SUMMARY.
Expenditures for supplies.

Total.

Acids
Belting
Charcoal
Chemicals
,
Coal
Copper
'.
Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers
• Dry goods
Fluxes
Freight and drayago




.....,-...

•

709. 85
126.28
633.32
688. 64
994. 33
100. 00
884.14
296.41
151.23
14.72

Expenditures for supplies.
Gas
Gloves and gauntlets
Hardware
Ice
Iron and steel
Labor and repairs
Loss on sale of sweeps —
Lumber
Machinery and appliances
Metal-work and castings..

Total.
$7, 904.50
7,147.24
2, 039. 38
726.10
796. 77
9, 717. 75
1,279. 54
1,876.48
3,902.57
5,460.34

181

DIRECTOR OF THE MINTo
EXPENDITURES AT THE MINT AT PHILADELPHIA, 1890—Continned.
SUMMA RT—Continued.

E x p e n d i t u r e s for s u p p l i e s .
Oils
Salt

Total.

E x p e n d i t u r e s for s u p p l i e s . '

$846.02
.

..

135. 38
1,105. 58

Stationery, printing, and binding
Teleeranhine'
Washing
Water
Wood

22, 200. 85
9.75
112.82
548. 00
4, 079.32

^.....^t,
^.6
.....-.:

H e f l n e r y e a r n i n g s for t h e n e r i o d

..

». -

Zinc

o

o = »o.=oo = io = . . $1,635.58

Total
Salaries

o
«,

Total

.6

. . . .

Total

!,

-

*
-

41, 550.00

. ; . . . . 448, 679. 75
i..*....

6

••••**

601,352.64
$17 673. 60

*... . . i i
-

»

N o . of p i e c e s .

. . . .

Silver
M i n o r oo^ns

111,122.89

,

W a g e s of w o r k m e n

Coinage.
Gold

Total.

ni..
-

177,397 '
26, 862, 961 :
66,666,779

Value.
$2,209, 548: 50.
19, 768, 024.; 30
1,416, 851.73

93, 707,137 ; $23, 384, 424; 53

.0

REMARKS.—"Assayer'smaterials" include matrasses, pipettes, dishes, etc; " D r y goods" include cost
of materia] for mittens, sleeves, toweling, coin-sacks, scale-cover.«>, e t c . ; " Laborand repairs" includes
only temporary labor on repairs:?; " S e w i n g " includes the making of mittens, sleeves, coin-sacks,
BCale-covers, towels, etc.; " Sundries " includes only such items as can not readily be classified.

At the close of the fiscal year, the bullion and coin in the mint a t
Philadelphia were weighed under the supervision ot* Mr. Cabel Whitehead, the assayer of this bureau, who reported that he found on hand
all the public money with which the superintendent was charged.
MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO.

The deposits at the mint at San Francisco, duringthe fiscalyear 1890,
were as follows:
Standard
ounces.

Metal.

Gold
Silver

,
Total..

.

Value.

1, 010, 891. 532 1 $18, 807, 284.86
5, 266, 922. 87 ' 6,128, 782. 93
24,936,067.79

The melter and refiner received, during the year, bullion containing
2,064;228.459 standard ounces of gold.
He made 717 melts of gold ingots, of which 3 were condemned.
He returned to the superintendent, at the close of the year, in settlement Qf his accounts an excess of 638.776 standard ounces of gold, valued at $11,884.20.
He received, during the year, bullion containing 95558,586i50 standard ounces of silver. He made 5,189 melts of silver ingots, of which
2 were condemned, and returned in settlement to the superintendent
at the close of the year 222.13 standard ounces of silver, valued a t
$199o08.



182

REPORT ON THE FINAKCES.

196,447 standard ounces of gold and 878,399 standard ounces of silver
were operated.upon in the refineryj during the year.
The number of. melts of ingots made and condemned at this mint
from 1874 to 1890 were as follows:
MELTS

OF INGOTS M A D E AND CONDEMNED

AT T H E M I N T AT S A N F R A N C I S C O , FROM

1874 TO 1890.
Gold-ingot melts.

Silver-ingot melts.

Fiscal year.
Made.

1874

..6..6*.6

..•

.

1877

i* . . - i i . , „ . „ „ . i

1878

i . . .

1879

iiii

.

.

. ... ..

- . i .. i . . iii.ii..i.*..i

1882...i.,..iio........i.ii-.ii.ii.--i
1883

i.

1884

i...o

1885.

,

•.

i
.ii.i...iii

11

3

13, 210

8

19

13, 610

14

4

12, 789

14

3

8,104

14

8

12, 617

38

8

10, 719

20

10

i *...

901

7,509

12

i i . . .

767

4

5,539

1

i.i*

677

1

2,619

i.iii...

935

i... iii. i

...i.i.i..

i.. ii

1886. „ i i i

. . .

9,454

1, 033

i.i.i..i4

15

6

931

di.

i

4,378

981

*

.b...i....

1880-00.ioii
1881

.6..i

ii.....i.i,.iii-^i.....

"2,648

1,393

...

5
13

1,141

. .

925
942

.6.

66

Condemned.

813

O..CO.

6s

1876

Made.

958

^^...^^..

1875

Condemned.

i i . i .

.i.iii...iiii

958

2

1, 086

1888....ii...i............^..-i..i.i...,....ii....iii.

890

3

2,821

1889

777

.1887

ii ..6ii.

.

..ii- ..a...

1890

..

.-

iii .ii.i.

o......

ii

714

i iii.. i. i
Total....i.

.ii

4

319

ii.

3

5,187

2

15, 736

91

112, 609

163

.005x«5

.OOlxV

l^he melter and refiner also manufactured during the year 110 fine
silver bars, valued at $146,794.78.
The coiner received from the superintendent 2,043,040.300 standard
ounces of gold and made into coin $16,179,000 in double eagles and
$1,784,000 in eagles, a total of 987,350 pieces of the value of $17,963,000.
The proportion of gold coin produced from ingots operated upon was
47.8 per cent.
The wastage in the mechanical operations was 52.780 standard
ounces of gold, valued at $981.95, being about 5 per cent, of the legal
allowance.
The coiner received from the superintendent 8,644,912.37 standard
ounces of silver and coined 4,600,000 silver dollars and $94,812.40 in
dimes, a total of 5,548,124 pieces of the value of $4,694,812.40.
The proportion of silver coin produced from the ingots operated upon
was 47.3 per ceut.
The silver wastage in the mechanical operations was 1,602.59 standard ounces, valued at $1,436.35, about 19 per cent, of the legal allowance.
The operations of the coining department of the mint at San Francisco for a series of years are exhibited in the following table?




DIRECTOR OF T H E

183

MINT.

OPERATIONS I N T H E C O I N E R ' S DEPARTMENT, OF THE M I N T AT SAN FRANCISCO FOR
THE "EIGHT YEARS E N D I N G J U N E 30, 1890.

Fiscal years:

Coinage.

Per
cent, of
good coin A c t u a l w a s t e
produced

Gain.

•

GOLD,

lS82-'83....

„

1883-'84

..ooo»

...,

1884-'85
1885-'86....

.0..00....

.„.o

=
„

1886-'87
1887-'88..o^
1888-'89
1889-'90..»

„..

....

Total

=

$26,760, 000.00
23, 543, 500.00
20, 857, 500. 00
27, 080, 000. 00
22,360, 000. 00
22, 810, 000.00
23, 358, 500. 00
17,963,000.00

54.7
54.3
54.7
52.0
47.5
47.2
52.1
47.8

S t a n d a r d ozs S t a n d a r d o z s .
134.715
120.300
70.337
. 47.018
19. 540
64.248
. 73.942
52. 780
563.340

184, 732, 500. 00

19.540

/

BILVEE.

1882-'83
1883-'84
1884r-'85
1885-'86..

„,„„
. .
.

1886-'87
l887-'88
1888-'89
1889-'90
Total

„

$7,350,000.00
4,850, 000.00
2,908,799.70
49, 066.20
855,812.60
2, 891, 284.80
375,455.40
4,694,812.40

51.5
62.5
53.3
52.8 ^
53.9
47.8
54.0
47.3

23,975,231.10

638.76
618.13
192. Op
.58
140.80
851.91
137.94
1,602. 59

'

4,182.71

The act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year, 1890, contained an appropriation of $60,000
for the "construction of vaults for the storage of silver at the mints at
San Francisco, Oalo, and New Orleans, La.'^'
Under plans prepared by the Supervising Architect of the Treasury
and proposals submitted, a contract was made February 24, 1890, for
the construction in the mint building at San Francisco, of two vaults,
each 29 feet 4 inches long, 11 feet 10^ inches high, 17 feet 9 inches wide,
the cubic contents of each being 6,161 cubic feet.
One of the vaults is now being placed in the building. The other
can not be placed until the first is completed.
The capacity of each of these vaults for the storage of silver dollars is:
In boxes ($1,000 each)
._„oooooo = ,oo ..=..=0 o = = »o.«.o,oo
I n bags ($1,000 each).0 = 00
0.00000
o..o„o.
= ,_o.o

$17,000,000
» 25,000,000

These vaults are to be lined with three layers of |-inch Steel, 5-ply
welded steel and iron, and Bessemer ductile steel and furnished with
outer and inner doors.
The outer door is to be single, made of six layers of J-inch thick welded
steel and iron and Bessemer ductile steel, fitted with bolts made of 7-ply
welded chrome steel and iron.
:
The innerdoor is to be folding, made of four layers of same material as
above, all hardened drill, saw, ^nd file proof.
Both inner and outer doors are to be fitted with four-tumbler combination lockSo
Cost of the two v a u l t s . o»»Cost of inspection o»..,, o e o =

TotaU.„»



$23,936.00
1,260.00
25,196.00

184

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

The exi)enditures at the mint at San Francisco for the different
classes of supplies purchased during the fiscal .year 1890 were as follows I
E X P E N D I T U R E S AT T H E M I N T A T S A N F R A N C I S C O F O R T H E YEAR ENDING J U N E 30,1890.

General department.
Expenditures for supplies.
Proper.
A cids
Assayer's materials
Belting
Charcoal
Chemicals
Coal
Coke
:.
Copper
Crucibles, covers, stirrers,
and dippers
Dry goods '.
Freight and drayage
Gas..o.,
Gloves and gauntlets
Hardware
Ice
».
Iron and steel
Labor and repairs
Loss on sale of sweeps
Lumber
Machinery and appliances. •-.
Metal work and castings
Oils
Salt
Sewing
o
Stationery, printing, and
binding
Sundries
=
Telegraphing
Washing
Water
Wood
Tools....
Lead

Mechanical.

Assayer's
department.

$494.63
168. 31

85.59

783.56

Melter and refiner's
department.
Proper.

$129.48

Refinery,
$11. 048. 50

$418.07
$127.87
338. 40

220.65
8,865. 86

$1,356.66
1, 588. 43
1, 550. 62
3,712.40

111. 85
2, 414.16
325.95
3, 712.50

1,452, 08
218.97

92.70
299.90

1,959.50
7.25

107. 50

213; 00
169. 89
7.50

1.90
37.39

50.53
495.81

10.60
1,185.23

3.51

12.60
519.19
101.90

347.42
170.77

23.80

16.50
167. 22
639.65
2,195. 00
118.00
240. 27
445.56

34.94

1,084. 06

322. 30
661.30

121.10
101.25

211.14
205.35
L75
194. 77

4.60

. 1.11
598.55
622.06
173! 85
1, 000. 00
33.50
15.00
284. 94

1,176.07
378.49
493.98
253.67
752. II
400.00
496. 08

46.70

.75
32.25

32.55

340.40

182. 30

2,554. 02
78.00

570.25
187.20
72.58

18.72

66.00
234. 00

6, 764. 93
5,000.00
72, 739.60

13, 320. 85
5, 000. 00
23,134. 25

29, 833. 75

84, 504.53

41,455.10

52, 335. 94

894. 93

Total
Salaries
Wages of workmen.

8, 606. 43
24, 376.18
47, 946. 75

11, 977. 92
17, 025. 00

867. 39
6,600. 00
20,738. 50

Total.„...O.O.

80, 929.36

29, 002.92

28,205.89




Coiner's
deiiarfcment-

22, 502.19

185

DIEECTOE OP THE MINT.
EXPENDITURES AT THE MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO, 1890—Continned.
SUMMARY.
Expenditures for supplies.
Acids
Assayer's materials
Belting
Charcoal
Cheinicals
Coal

Expenditures for supplies.

Total.

|$11, 672. 61
168.31
418,07
1,356.66
-.
2,917.95
11,618.42
Coke
o....
0..-0....C...
1,876.57
Copper ..,'.
,.
7, 451. 40
Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers. 1, 561. 28
730.99
Dry goods
639.65
Freight and drayage
...^
2, 408.00
Gas..
.,
2, 354.89
Gloves and gauntlets . .
255.02
Hardware
.=.
445.56
Ice
386.44
Iron and s t e e l . . * . . . . . . .
4,062.34
Labor and repairs
622.06
Loss on sale of sweeps.
384. 99
Lumber
-

Machinery and a p p l i a n c e s . . . . . . . .
Metal work and castings
'..
Oils
Salt.
=o
>.
Sewing
,.
Stationery, printing, and binding.
Sundries
ooo......
Telegraphing
Washing . . . =
Water
...„
Wood
Tools
6.*
*.*
.,
Lead
*...
'.....

217.95
026.47
583. 69
289.54
405. 99
379.24
128.18
253. 67
752.11
036. 25
490.02
247.46
894. 93

Total..........
Salaries
Wages of workmen.

039.71
976.18
41-7.85

Total

o

316, 433. 74

. $33,173.46

Refinery earnings for the pisriod .
Coinage.
Oold

Total

No. of pieces;

Value.

...O

.-»r -

OO.O.O.

- -

......

987,356
5,548,124

$17, 963, 000. 00
4, 694, 812. 40

6, 535,474

0=.

Silver -

Total.

22,657,812.40

At the close of the fiscal year, the bullion and coin in the mint were
weighed under the supervision of Mr. H. Clay Stler, of the office of the
First Auditor of the Treasury Department, who reported that he found
on hand all of the public money with which the Superintendent was
charged.
MINT AT NEW ORLEANS.

The precious metals received at the mint at New Orleans, during the
fiscal year 1890, were as follows i
Standard
ounces. \

Metal.

Gold

0..0.......0.,

Silver

O.O

= .«.,.
Total

CO..

o
-

000.0..00.0

=

6, 575. 613
9, 335, 567. 23Q

Value.
$122, 336.98
10, 863, 205. 50
io, 985, 542.48

The work of the assay department consisted of 20,278 silver assays
and 608 gold assays, a total of 20,886 assays.
The melter and refiner received during the fiscal year 40,040 standard
ounces of gold and returned in settlement a surplus of 8.935 ounces.




186

^

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The same oificer operated upon 19,239,543 standard ounces of silver.
He made 2,296 melts of silver ingots, of which 4 were condemned.
He returned in settlement a surplus of 714.58 standard ounces.
The operations of the coiner's department, during the fiscal year, were
confined exclusively to the manufacture of silver dollars.
This officer operated upon 18,800,244 standard ounces of silver ingots
and delivered to the superintendent 10,925,000 silver dollars, being
49.93 per cent, of good coin produced from ingots operated upon.
He had a wastage of 3,322.44 standard ounces, about 17.67 per cent,
of his legal allowance, less than one-half of the amount wasted in the
preceding year.
The mint at New Orleans works to some disadvantage as compared
with the other coinage mints for the reason that the machinery is of
very old style and pattern, and much of the apparatus is worn out or
no longer fit for use 5 at least is very unreliable.
In the coiner's department the machinery is run by a system of cog
and miter wheels which impart a vibratory motion to the rolls.
A new burglar-proof steel vault, with a capacity of 5,286 cubic feet,
is in process of erection in connection with the mint at New Orleans.
Owing to the peculiar condition of the foundation of the mint at New
Orleans considerable preparatory work was necessary, consisting of
removing stairs and second-story floor in west wing, bricking up openings of doors and windows, piling for foundation, brick work, concreting,
etc. This preparatory work is nearly completed.
Cost of preparatory work
,
Superintendent's commission of 5 per cent
Total

|4,782. 00
239.10

1
o.

5,021.10

The vault is to be steel-lined,31 f e e t i l j inches long, 23 feet5J inches
wide, 11 feet 6^ inches high, divided into six iron lattice compartments,
with lattice door to each, a 4 foot 6 inch wide corridor through center, •
and a narrow walk, 2 feet wide, all around. .
Four of the compartments, 6 feet 2 inches by 11 feet 1 Of inches by 11
feet 6J inches.
Two of the compartments, 6 feet 11 inches by 11 feet 1 0 | inches by 11
feet 6J inches.
Cubic contents of compartments, 5,286 cubic feet.
The storage capacity for silver dollars will be:
In boxes ($1,000 each)
In bags ($1,000 each)

„

$15,000,000
22,000,000

The construction of the vault lining and outer and inner doors is to
be the same as for the vaults at the San Francisco mint.
Cost of vault
Cost of preparatory work
„
„
Superintendent's commission of 5 per ceut
Total

o

,

„. . „ . . $29,000.00
4,782. 00
239.10

„
„

34,021.10

The expenditures of the mint at New Orleans for the different classes
of supplies, during the fiscal year of 1890, are exhibited in the following
table:




187

DIRECTOR O F T H E MINT.
E X P E N D I T U R E S AT T H E M I N T AT N E W ORLEANS, L A . , F O R T H E Y E A R
J U N E 30, 1890.
'
General department.
Expenditures for sUpplies.
Proper.

Mechanical.

Assayer's
department.

Coiner's
department.

ENDING
'

Melter and refiner's
department.
Proper.

Eefinery.

•

Acids . . . . . i . . ^ , . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assayer's materials
Belting
Charcoal
Chemicals
,.
Coal
.".,.,
Coke
Copper
.r=
Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and
dippers.
Drv ffoods .
.. ......
Ereisrlit and dravasre
Gas
o. - . .
Gloves and gauntlets
Hardware
„„... .
Ice
Iron and steel
Lahor and repairs
i
liOss on sale of sweeps »=.
Lumber
Machinery and appliances . . . . . .
Metal work and c a s t i n g s . . . . . .
Oils
o
Salt
=.. =
„
Sewing
Stationery, printing, and binding.
Sundries
Teleoraphing . . . . . . . . . . . . , « > . . . .
Wasting
„
Water
,
Wood...
Zinc
...... =.,o............
Total
Salaries
Wages of workmen

„

Total..

-

$78.31
71.25

$293 18

$18.64

$20.79
825.01

$792 00
i 42.25

3, 762. 50
1,749.85
5, 920.50
1,624.49
$125.98
112. 35
2,077.40

527.77

271.25

984.00
5.00
556.30
30.60
1, 763.22

; 12. 00
' 9.95
303.45

'
6.40
85.98

884.41
546. 20
128.28
• 356.74

569.27
116^ 96

30.44
317.22
1,836.53
609. 59

156.13
1, 050.00

K

•

859.53

5.50

15.00

. J . -.
27.00
1, 500.00
3,205.20
7.84

5, 760. 54 8, 549.93
17,150. 00
41,053.48
63,964.02

•

371. 00

162.32

31. 35
439. 45
1,3:S3. 65
55.25
154. 50

i

581.50
26.08
6.60

8, 549.93

'

.. .

21.00
13.51

241.94
6, 000. 00
4,254.00

10,170. 72
4, 400.00
64,570.45

12, 280.19
4, 400.00
21, 340.13

465.15

10, 495. 94

79,141.17

38, 020. 32

465.15

StTMMARS".
Expenditures for supplies.
Acids
,.
Assayer's materials
Belting
„=.,.6.
Charcoal
..ooo = e.
Chemicals .o«ooo.^*.
Coal

Coke
C o p p e r

0...0.0-..

^...
.„.„».66-oao.




Amount.
$390.13
71.25
20.79
792.00
867.26
3, 762.50
1,749.85
5,920.50

Expenditures for supplies.

Amount.

Crucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers] $1,624.49
Dry goods
925.00
Freight and drayage
112.35
Gas
2,077.40
Gloves and gauntlets
o..o......
996.00
905.76
Hardware
i...
1,491.93
Ice
oo158.88
Iron and steel
,,

188

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
EXPENDITURES AT THE MINT AT NEW ORLEANS, 1890^Continued.
SUMMARY—Continued.
Expenditures for supplies.

Expenditures for supplies.

Total.

Labor and repairs
Loss on sale of sweeps
Lumber
Machinery and appliances.......
Metal work and castings
Oils
Salt
Sewing
Stationery, printing, and binding
Sundries .... *
**

Total.

Tele grapbing
Washing
Water
Wood.......
Zinc

$2, 689.23
116.96
186.57
.1,367.22
2,398.03
797.99
12.10
3L35
439.45
2,579.18

$55.25
181.60
1, 500. 00
3, 226.20
21.35

Total
Salaries
Wages of workmen

37,468.47
31, 950. 00
131, 218.06

Total.........

200, 636. 53

Refinery earnings for tbe period, parting and refining charges, $765.68; alloy charges, $7.67; total
$773.35.
Coinage.
Gold

i.. ....

Silver

.6-

ii

.......^^
Total

No. of pieces.

Value.

.

...i-i

.*.

i

i

* ..

10, 925, 000 $10, 925. 000

il

.i64.-„

10,925, 000

10, 925,000

At the close of the fiscal, year the bullion and coin in the mint was
Weighed by Mr. B. F* Butler, computer of this Bureau, who reported
that he found in the mint all the bullion and coin with which the superintendent was charged.
MINT AT CARSON.

The mint at Carson was re-opened for coinage on July 1, 1889, but,
owing to the dilapidated condition in which the building and machinery
Was found, after four years of idleness, repairs and betterments of the
building and overhauling and repairing the machinery were necessary,
and consequently the coinage of gold and silver was not commenced
until October 1, 1889.
The deposits at this mint, during the fiscal year 1890, wei'e as follows:
Standard
ounces.

Value. '

77,447. 819
1,757,211.80

Metals.

$1, 440, 8S9. 65
2, 044, 755. 53

•

Gold
Silver
Total

.

.

...

3, 485, 645.18

The melter and refiner received, during the year, bullion containing
183,635.672 standard ounces of gold.
; He made 83 melts of gold ingots, of which 6 were condemned.
He returned to the superintendent in settlement, at the close of the
fiscal year, an excess of 3.322 standard ounces of gold.
The same officer received, during the year, bullion containing 1,812,222.15 standard ounces of silver.
He made 1,358 melts of silver ingots, of which 39 .were condemned.



189

DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

He returned to the superintendent in settlement, at the close of the
year, an excess of 921.80 standard ounces of silver.
The coiner received from the superintendent 192,722.350 standard
ounces of gold. There were coined in his department and delivered to
the superintendent 92,460 double eagles of the value of $1,840,200, being
51.5 per cent, of good coin produced from ingots operated on.
He had a gold wastage of 6.689 standard ounces.
I
The same officer operated upon 2,331,896 standard ounces of silver
and delivered to the superintendent 1,438,000 standard silv^er dollars,
being 54 per cent, of good coin produced from ingots operated upon.
He had a silver wastage of 378.98 standard ounces.
The expenditures Ibr the different classes of supplies for the mint at
Carson, during the fiscal year, were as follows:
i
E X P E N D I T U R E S AT THE M I N T AT CARSON EOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING J U N E 30,
General department.
E x p e n d i t u r e s for s u p p l i e s .
Proper.

AssayCoiner's
e r ' s dedepartpartment. ment.
Mechanical.

A ssayer's materials
Bel tin S
T ....................
Chemicals
Coal

-

Coke-.
Copper
C r u c i b l e s , covers,
and dippers

Total;
Proper.

Refinery.

$14,085.87 $14,085.87
148 93
14.50
$16.75

28.00
101.40

16 75
$1,760.00
185.19

346. 08
81. 50

3,480.12
444 '49

97.72

195 44

761.37
2, 900. 00

1, 450. 00

1,016.:50
4, 350. 00

stirrers,

Ereigbt and drayage

......

Gas
Gloves a n d g a u n t l e t s ..,
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ice
.......................
Iron and steel . . . . . .
.....
Labor and repairs
Lumber
Machinery and appliances...
Metal work and castings
Oils..
Salt
Stationery,

M e l t e r a n d refiner's
department.

$134.43
$1,346.04
76.40
97.72
255.13

Charcoal

1890.

printing,

401.08
723. 23
624.47
747. 73
455.00
1,41'!. 66
211. 71
4.66
80.67
247. 78
43.50
230.17
266.81

67.28
142.82

89.16
6.00

.........
,.
i

264.71
421. 39

24.51
1, 772.10

•

•

511.50

.

...

253.50

135.00

379.17

73.90

41.53

47. 58

5.61

3.04

3.60

137.61

.50
12.05
OLOO
2.50

LOO
291. 38
39.43

277. 07
992. 97
157.32
429.62
832.50
4, 021. 60

6,00
63.70

n.90
209.49

13, 937. 84
29, 503.82

582.14

144.00
44.42

° " '

436. 80

173.98

48.25

3.00
144.50

822 '^3
1 317 95
2 396 57
747 73
1 355 00
1 956 84
211 71
13 31
224. 67
433. 31
45.09
1 144 38
418 49
147.00

and

binding
Sundries
Telefirranhinff
Washing
Water
Wood
Lead . . . o . -

7.75
150.04

" • 640'. 00

1Q4.13

383.20
617.97

302. 72
1,520:33
157.32
429 62
832.50
5, 044. 80
617. 97

1

Total
Salaries
W a g e s of w o r k m e n

T o t a l . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 441. 66

Eefinery earnings for the period,..


$34,817.37
34,817.37

2,453.94'

7; 331. 29 19,572.34

4, 992.25 22,721.12 '8,588.75

5, 920.00

43,877:55
29, 503,82
77, 039.49

5, 574. 39 25,175. 06 15,920.04 25,4Q2.34 150, 420:86

i

$33,972.1

190

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
E X P E N D I T U R E S AT T H E M I N T AT CARSON, 1890—Continued.
Coinage.

Gold
Silver.

1^0. of pieces.

o

Value.

92,460
1,438, 000

Total

$1,8^9,200
1,438,000

1,530,460

:

3,287,200

At the close of the fiscal year, the bullion and coin in the possession
of the superintendent were weighed under the supervision of Mr. H.
Clay Stier, of the ofiice of the First Auditor, Treasury Department,
who reported that he found in the mint all the bullion and coin with
which the superintendent was charged.
ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW YORK.

The work of the United States assay office at Few York, during the
fiscal year 1890, is exhibited in the following table:
OPERATIONS AT T H E U N I T E D STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK DURING T H E
F I S C A L YEAR, 1890.
Gold.
Standard
ounces.

Silver.

Bars prepared by melter and refiner:
Fine
--Mint
Standard
Tin Darted
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total

1, 044, 308. 570 $19,428,996.65
77, 654. 391
1,444, 732. 82

5,563,520.83
125, 980. 28

$5, 563, 520.83
108, 259.76

20, 873, 729.47

5, 689, 501.11

5, 671, 780.59

964, 371. 306
57, 326.165

17, 941, 791. 70
1, 066, 533.30

5,110, 278. 26
123, 202. 95
25,861.12
454,266.19

5, 510,278.26
105, 520.85
25, 861.12
454,266.19

1,021,697.471

Total

Cost value.

1,121, 962. 961

Bullion deposited
»-.
Partings . . . . . • . . . . • . > . • • . . . . • « . . . . . . . .

Standard
ounces.

19, 008, 325. 00

5, 713, 608. 52

5, 695, 926. 42

Value.

Character.

Total
Payments to depositors:
Bars
.....p
Coin
Total

o=

Silver.

$8,869.87
1,258. 54
54,127.55
1, 087. 70

$3, 331. 39
• 2,298.30
9, 640. 81

65, 343. 66

Charges collected:
For unparted bars payable in gold coin
For melting
For manufacturing bars
For toughening, parting, and refining
For alloy
=

Gold.

15, 270. 50

7, 562,454. 33
13, 245, 931. 48

5, 548,250. 33
108, 259. 76

20,808,385.81

5, 656, 510. 09

$1, 360. 22

.'........

The value and classification of the foreign gold coins deposited and
melted at the a'ssay office at New York are exhibited in the following
table;



191

DIEECTOR OP THE MINT,

F O R E I G N GOLD AND SILVER COINS D E P O S I T E D AT T H E UNITED STATES ASSAY O F F I C E
AT N E W YORK DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1890.

GoldJ

Countries.
Germany
.........a><..o.9.a,«B>o.a.a....D..................0..;............
Spain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M e x i c o

Colombia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . < . . . . . . .
Mixed Soutb American
."
Costa Rica
0
Mixed Central American
Mixed.......
0

.0.

...

.............
,

.

$79, 263.16
1,581,662.67
66,861.24
4,592.43
13, 795. 93
4, 042. 27
4, 570.11
188, 960. 90

..

... .. .

o..o.,.o

$1,445.05
6.49
100. 79
32.11
18.01
98.60
125.60

1, 943, 688, 71

. . . . . . see... . o . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Total .0..

Silver,

1, 826.65

The work of the assay department, in addition to the assaying of
10,062 deposits, embraced 1,200 melts of refined metal, th4 testing of
420 barrels of sweeps, and 453 assay s of samples of watch-cases, plate, jewelry, etc. The whole (involving numerous re-assays) necessitated about
130,000 weighing sand the manufacture and use of about 60^000 cupels.
The apparatus in the laboratory has been largely remodeled, and. a
larger shaft introduced. A 36-inch exhaust-fan has replaced the ordinary ventilators.
In the melting and refining department 3,197,248.05 gross ounces,
containing 572,828.87 standard ounces of gold, and 2,481,234.89 standard ounces of silver were refined by acid. This required the use of
1,334,720 pounds of sulphuric acid and 60,427 pounds of copper. The
sulphate of copper and spent acid obtained from these two materials by
chemical reaction and crystallization in the parting process, and called
by-products, sold for $9,488 and $2,828.47, respectively,! a total of
$12,316.47. A quantity of old iron was sold for $59.95o
The melter and refiner operated upon 1,045,957.869 standard ounces
of gold, and returned a surplus of 404.510 standard ounces. He also
operated upon 5,941,655.73 standard ounces of silver, and returned; a
surplus of 542.12 standard ounces.
i
At the close of the fiscal year, the bullion and coin in the; possession
of the superintendent were weighed, under the supervision bf Mr. F. P
Gross, adjuster of accounts of this Bureau, who reported that he found
in the assay office all the bullion and coin with which the superintendent was charged.
The following table exhibits the denominations and value of the uncurrent gold coins of the United States deposited and malted at the
assay office at New York during the fiscal year 1890,
APPROXIMATE STATEMENT, B Y DENOMINATIONS, OF UNCURRENT ^UNITED STATES
GOLD COINS D E P O S I T E D AT T H E U N I T E D STATES ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK
DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1890.
I
Denomination.
Double-eagles
£agles
Half-eagles
Three-dollars
Quarter-eagles
Gold dollars

o

j

I

,

=

0..0..
^

,

:..

o

Total.....o.oo




-

'•---

Value.
$121, 240. 00
117, 660. 00
191, 795.00
834 00
24, 500. 00
345. 00
456, 374. 00

192

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

The expenditures of the assay office at Kew York for the different
classes of supplies are exhibited in the following table:
E X P E N D I T U R E S AT THE ASSAY O F F I C E AT N E W YORK FOR THE YEAR ENDING J U N E

30, 1890.

Expenditures for supplies.

General
department.

Assayer's,
department.

Melter and refiner's
department.
Total.
Proper. | Refinery.

Acids
Assayer's materials
Belting
Charcoal
Chemicals
Coal
Copper....
('rucibles, covers, stirrers, and dippers.
Dry goods
Fluxes
•...
Freight and draj^age
Gas
Gloves and gauntlets.
Hardware
Ice
- Lead, sheet, and pipes
Labor and repairs
Machinery and appliances
Metal-work and castings
,
Oils
Sewing
stationery, printi