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A N N U A L EEPOET

OF

THE

SECRETART OP THE TREASURY
ON THE

STATE OF THE FINANCES

THE

YEAR

1874.

WASHIXGTOE":
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.




1874.

I'-A"l'

I




A50

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Page
I . — R E P O R T OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY

iii

Tables accomx^anyiug the report

3

A P P E N D I X A.

Report of R. W. Tayler, First Comptroller, relative tp the Louisville aud
Portland Canal Company

49
APPENDIX B .

Wrecks and casualties rexiorted to have occurred on and near the coasts
and rivers of the Uuited States from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1874
Liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes, &c

54
563

I L — R E P O R T S OF TREASURY OFFICERS.

Architect, Supervising
—
Auditor, First
Auditor, Second
Auditor, Third
Auditor, Fourth
Auditor, Fifth
Auditor, Sixth.
Bureau of Statistics, Chief of
Coast Survey, Superintendent of
Commissioner of Customs
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
ComxHroller, First
Comptroller, Second
Comptroller of the Currency
Director of the Mint
Light:House Board
Register of the Treasury
^ Solicitor
Treasurer




f..

'.

:

:.....

:
,

am

723
229
235
257
273
281
325
517
599
219
105
209
213
121
185
605
423
579
347




REPORT. '
TREASURY DEPARTMENT^

Washington, B , C, December 1, 1874.
SIR : The Secretary is charged by law with the duty of preparing
and submitting to Congress annually a report on the subject of financ^^
containing estimates of the public revenues and expenditures, and plans
for improving and increasing the revenues, for the purpose of giving
information to Congress in adopting modes of raising the revenues
requisite to meet the public expenditures.
Pursuant to this duty, the Secretaiy submits the following report:
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30, 1874.
Receipts,
The moneys received and covered into the Treasury by warrants
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874, were as follows:
From customs
$163,103, 833 69
From internal revenue
102, 409, 784 90
From sales of public lands
1, 852, 428 93
From tax on circulation and deposits of national
banks
7, 030, 038 17
From, repayment of interest bv Pacific Eailway
Companies
1
1, 028, 895 56
From customs' fines, penalties, &c
651,271 76
From labor, drayage, storage, &c
741, 435 23
From sales of Indian trust lands
903, 439 50
From fees—consular, letters-patent, and land
1, 898,189 74
From proceeds of sales of Government p r o p e r t y . . . . .
1, 699, 017 63
From marine-hospital tax
352, 379 98
From steamboat fees.
274,490 91
From profits on coinage, &;c.
^.
447, 970 72
From tax on seal-skins . >
356, 610 42
From miscellaneous sources
—
1, 691,303 70
Total ordinary receipts
Premium on sales of coin
Total net receipts, exclusive of loans




,

,28'4, 441,090 84
. 5,037, Q^^ 22
289, 478, 756 06

IV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

Brought forward
$289, 478, 756 06
Payment by the British Government
of the award of the tribunal of arbitration at Geneva
$15, 500, 000 00
Excess of net receipts from certificates
of deposit of legal-tenders, &c.,
over redemptions
17, 207, 475 23
32, 707, 475 23
Total net receipts
322,186, 231 29
Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1873. .131,192, 028 50
Amount since received from late depositary, Cincinnati, Ohio
1, 038 78
131,193, 067 28
Deduct unavailable balances with depositaries carried to their debits on
liooks of the Eegister, and to the
credit of the Treasurer U. S
13, 730 18
131,179, 337 10
Total available cash

453,365, 568 39
Fxpenditures,

The net expenditures by warrants during the same xieriod were—
For civH expenses
$17, 627,115
For foreign intercourse
1, 508, 064
For Indians
6, 692, 462
For pensions
29, 038, 414
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements, ancl arsenals
42, 313, 927
For naval establishment, including vessels and machinery, and improvements, at navy yards..
30, 932, 587
For miscellaneous, civil, including public buildings,
light-houses, and collecting the revenue
50, 506,414
For interest on the public debt
107,.119, 815

09
27
09
66
22
42
25
21

Total net ordinary expenditures, exclusive of,
the publicdebt
285, 738, 800 21
Premium on bonds purchased
1,395, 073 55
Award of Geneva tribunal, investment account

287,133,873 76
15,500, 000 00

Total net disbursements
Balance in Treasury June 30, 1874.

302, 633, 873 76
150, 731, 694 63

Total

453, 365, 568 39

I t will be seen by this statement that the net revenues for the fiscal year were
$289, 478, 756 06
And the ordinary expenses
287,133, 873 76
Leaving a surplus revenue of




2,344, 882 30

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

V

During the months of July, August, and September of the fiscal year
1874, bonds to the extent of $12,936,450 were purchased for the sinkingfund account.
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30, 1875.
The receix3ts during the first quarter of the current fiscal year were—
From customs
$46, 651,200 10
From internal revenue
26, 314, 615 33
From sales of public lands
391, 465 8S
From tax on circulation, &;c., of national banks
3, 596,148 23
From repayment of interest by Pacific Eailways
217,941 97
From customs' fines, &c
30, 540 31
From consular, patent, and other fees
451,257 11
From proceeds of sales of Government p r o p e r t y . . . .
522,546 77
From miscellaneous sources
1, 255, 332 57
E"et ordinary receipts
*...
From premium on sales of c o i n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

79,431, 048 27
i, 453,237, 72

Total net ordinary receipts
Eeceipts from certificates of deposit of legal-tenders
and coin certificates in excess of redemptions . . . .
Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1874

80, 884, 285 99

Total available

5,247, 068 24
150, 731, 694 63
236,863, 048 86

The exp(3nditures during the same period were as follows:
For civil and miscellaneous expenses, including public
buildings, light-houses, and collecting the revenues. $20, 838, 410
For Indians
3, 032, 752
For pensions
8, 913, 407
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements, and arsenals
11, 618, 290.r
For naval establishment, including vessels and ma- .
chinery, and improvements at navy yards
8,122, 728
Por interest on the public debt, including Pacific Eailway bonds
32, 787, 899
Total ordinary expenditures
Balance in the Treasury, September 30, 1874
Total

....

77
93
18
99
17
38

85,313, 489 42
151, 549, 559 44
236, 863, 048 86

For the remaining three quarters it is estimated that the receipts
will be—
From customs
•.
$115,350, 000 00
From internal revenue
78, 784, 000 00
From sales of public lands
1, 000, 000 00




VI

From
From
From
From
From
From

REPORT O F T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

tax on national banks
Pacific Eailways
customs' fines, &c
consular, patent, and other fees . .
sales of public property
miscellaneous sources
Total

TREASURY.

$3,300, 000 00
500,000 00
200, 000 00
1, 200, 000 00 ^
1, 000,000,00
2,100,000 00
203, 434, 000 00

For the same period it is estimated that the expenditures will be—
For civil miscellaneous, including public buildings. $48,060,000 00
For Indians
5, 000, 000 00
For pensions
:
..
21, 442, 000 00
For militarv establishment
28,500,000 00
Foruaval establishment :
17, 000, 000 00
For interest on the public debt
70, 000,000 00
Total

190, 002, 000 00

For the current fiscal year, from the foregoing account of actual
receipts and expenditures for the first quarter, and of the estiniates of
the same for the remaining three quarters, the estimates being based
on the assumption that Congress will not increase the expenditures by
deficiency or other appropriations, it is expected that the revenues will
amount to $284,318,285 99, and that the ordinary expenses will be
$275,315,489 425 which wiU leave a surplus revenue of $9,002,796 57
to be applied to the sinking fund.
The sum of $31,096,545 will be required under the law for this fund,
and, therefore, unless the revenues shall increase beyond the amount
anticipated, there will be a deficiency in the sinking-fund account for
this year of $22,093,748 43.
ESTIMATES FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING- JUNE 3 0 , 1876.

I t is estimated that the receipts for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1876, will be—
From customs
$170, 000, 000 00
From internal r e v e n u e . . : . . .
106, 000, 000 00
From sales of public lands
1, 500,000 00
From tax on national banks
^
6,500, 000 00
From Pacific Eailways
:
1, 000, 000 00
From customs' fines, &c
500, 000 00
From consular, iiatent, and other fees
1, 500, 000 00
From sales of public property.
1, 500, 000 00
From miscellaneous sources
4, 500,000 00
Total




293, 000, 000 00

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREAURYS.

VII

It is estimated that the ordinary expenditures for the same period
will be—
For civil expenses
$17,000,000 00
For foreign intercourse
1,400,000 00
For Indians
...:....„.
7,500,000 00
For pensions
30,500,000 00
For military establishment, including fortifications,
river and harbor improvements, and arsenals . . . -.
38, 000, 000 00
For naval establishment, including vessels and machinery, and imxirovements at navy yards
22, 500, 000 00
For civil miscellaneous, including public buildings,
light-houses, collecting the revenues, mail-steamship service, deficiency in postal revenues, public
printing, &c
54, 000, 000 00
For interest on the public debt
98, 000, 000 00
For interest on Pacific Eailway bonds
:..::..
3, 878,000 00
Total ordinary expenditures

272, 778, 000 00

If these estiniates of the revenues and expenditures shall prove to
be approximately correct, there will be a surplus of revenue of about
$20,222,000. The amount necessary for the sinking fund is not
included in the above estimates of expenditures, and to provide for it
the sum of $32,140,914 will be required. The surplus revenues which
can be applied to this fund ($20,220,000) wiir be insufficient to the
extent of $11,920,914, and there will therefore be a deficiency of that
amount.
The estimates received from the several Executive Departments are
as follows:
Legislative Establishment
$2,963,342 10
Executive Establishment
18, 549, 048 03
Judicial Establishment
3, 605,250 00
Foreign Intercourse
1,344, 785 00
Military Establishment
31, 641, 526 50
Kaval Establishment
19,096,567 65
Indian Affairs.
6, 851, 681 96
Pensions
'
30, 500, 000 00
Public Works:
Treasury Department
.-. $6, 650, 943 81
War Department
17, 409,937 50
Navy Department
1, 791, 500 00
Interior Department
377,248 00
Department of Agriculture >
22,840 00
Department of Justice
47,000 00
^— . 26, 299, 469 31
Postal Service
9, 914, 378 00
Miscellaneous
12,591,169 58
Permanent Appropriations
146, 673, 551 76
Total




310,030, 769 89

VIII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

REDUCTION OF THE PUBLIC DEBT.

During the fiscal year the public debt was reduced by the sum oi
$5,762,447 65, as will appear by the following statement:
Principal of the debt July 1,1873 . . . . . . . . . . '
$2, 234, 482, 993 20
Interest due and unpaid, and accrued interest to
date
:
42, 356,652 82
Total debt.

2,276,839, 646 02

Less cash in the Treasury
Debt, less cash in the Treasury

131,179,337 10
2,145, 660,308 92

Principal of the debt July 1, 1874 . ,
$2, 251, 690, 468 43
Interest due and unpaid, and accrued interest to
date
...;.;....
;.......
38, 939, 087 47
Total debt
2, 290, 629, 555 90
Less cash in the Treasury
Debt, less cash in the Treasury

150, 731, 694 63
2,139, 897,861 27

Showing a decrease during the year, as above stated, of
This decrease is represented by the excess of receipts over expenditures
The interest due and unpaid June 30,1874, was less
than June 30, 1873, by.

$5,762,447 65
$2, 344, 882 30
3,417,565 35
5, 762, 447 65

By the monthly statement ofthe public debt issued June 30,1874, the
reduction of the debt was shown to be $4^730,472 41. The difference
between this and the preceding statement is thus explained:
The monthly debt statement is made up at the close of business on
the day of its date, and embraces only the moneys officially reported
tp the Department at the time of its issue, whereas the foregoing
annual statement of receipts and expenditures includes revenues
which were deposited at the different places of deposit throughout the
country within the period covered by the accounts, and unascertained at
the time of the issue of the monthly statement. The books from which
the annual statement of receipts and expenditures is prepared are
usually kept open for a period of forty-five days, so as to include at the
date of closing the accounts all the revenues which may have been
deposited within the year which the statement represents.
. - The difference between these two statements arises from the difference
of dates^at which they are made up, and by a comparison of them as
regards the cash in the Treasury at the commencement and close of




RfEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

IX

the last fiscal year, it will be seen that by the annual statement of
receipts and expenditures there was a gain of $1,031,975 24, representing revenues in excess of those known at the time of preparing the
monthly statement, which, added to it, or deducted from the annual
statement of receipts and expenditures, will show that no difference
exists, except in the manner of their preparation.
The tables accompanying this report furnish details of the foregoing
statements and accounts.
REFUNDING THE NATIONAL DEBT.

On assuming charge of this Department, June 3,1874, the Secretary
lound the balance of the five per cent, loan authorized h j the acts of
July 14,1870, and January 20, 1871, then unissued, to be $178,548,300.
During the month of June proposals were received from several
parties desiring to negotiate these bonds, but they were not deemed
satisfactory, and were consequently declined«
On the second day of July a circular was issued by the Secretary,
inviting proposals, and in response thereto bids from various parties,
at home and abroad, were received, the aggregate amount of which
was $75j933,550. Of this amount, $20,933,550 comprised the domestic
bids, and $55,000,000 the joint proposal of Messrs. K M. Eothschild
& Sons, of London, and Messrs. J. and W. Seligman & Co., of 'New
York. The domestic bids at par and above, which were accepted by
the Department, aggregated $10,113,550, and those at less, than par,
which were rejected, amounted to $10,820,000.
The proposal for $55,000,000 excluded the acceptance of ail other bids,
and provided that the parties should purchase ten million on or before
August 1, 1874, and the remaining $45,000,000 at their pleasure, in
several successive instalments, prior to February 1,1875, also that they
should have the option of the entire balance of the five per cent, loan,
$122,688,550, until the expiration of six months from January 31,1875,
and that the Secretary should keep an agent in London to deliver new
fives and receive payment therefor. This proposition was modified,
and on the 28th day of July a contract was entered into between the
Secretary and Messrs. August Belmont & Co., of JSTew York, on behalf
of Messrs. K M. Eothschild & Sons, of London, England, and associates, and Messrs. J. and W. Seligman & Co., of New York, for
themselves and associates, for the negotiation of $45,000,000 of the
five per cent, bonds, the contracting parties having deposited with the
United States Treasury two per cent, of the amouut subscribed for, as
a guarantee for the fulfilment of their agreement.




X

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

The conditions o f t h e contract are substantially as follows: The
contracting parties to have the option of the balance of the loan, viz:
$122,688,550, until January 31, 1875; to be allowed one-quarter of one
per cent, commission u]ion the amount taken* they agreeing to subscribe for fifteen millions of the before-mentioned amount—$45,000,000—
on the first day of August, 1874, and to subscribe for the remaining
aniount—$30,000,000—at their pleasure, in amounts of not less than
five millions each, prior to the thirty-first day of Januaiy, 1875. The
contract also allows the parties the exclusive right to subscribe for the
remainder or any portion of the five per cent, bonds authorizedliy the
acts of Congress aforesaid, by giving notice thereof to the Secretary
of the Treasury prior to January 31, 1875.
The agreement, on the part of the Secretary of the Treasury, with
the parties before mentioned, is to issue calls of even dates with their
subscriptions for the redemption of an equivalent amount of six per
cent, five-twenty bonds, as provided by the act of July 14, 1870. , The
subscribers agree to pay for said five per cent, bonds, par and interest
accrued to the date of maturity of each call, in gold coin. United States
coin coupons, or any of the six per cent, five-twenty bonds called for
redemption; they also agree, to defray all expenses incurred in sending
bonds to London, upon their request, and in transmitting bonds, coin
United States coupons, or gold coin, to the Treasury Department at
Washington, D. C.
On account of the subscriptions of Messrs. Eothschild and Seligman,
and their associates, and those of home subscribers; calls for six per
cent, five-twenty bonds of the loan of February 25, 1862, have been
made as follows:
August 1, 1874
.......;
$25, 000, 000
September 1, 1874
15, 000, 000
October 1, 1874
'.
10, 000, 000
. November 2, 1874
5,000,000
55,000,000
The excess of subscriptions over calls—viz: $113,550—has been
provided for by uncalled bonds which have been received by the
Department in payment for that amount.
The larger portion of the bonds subscribed for has thus far been
negotiated in Europe, where exchanges are still being made.
RESUMPTION OF SPECIE PAY-MENT.

So much has been spoken and written within the last decade, and
especially at the last session of Congress, on the financial questions re-




o
REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XI

iating to and growing out of our currency system, that further extended
discussion of the vSubject at this time would scarcely seem to be necessary. The opinions entertained and expressed by public men and communities of people, as well as the sense of Congress as heretofore indicated by the votes of the two houses, must be accepted as one of the
factors of the financial problem. Nevertheless the great and paramount importance of arriving at an ultimate solution of the matter
and of restoring to the Government and the people a sound and stable
currency, induces the Secretary to bring the subject again to the attention of Congress, and to ask that decisive sfeps be now taken by
the law-making power for return tb a specie basis.
To attempt an enumeration of the comxilicated mischiefs which flow
from an unstable or inconvertible currency would OSLTTJ this report to
inexcusable length, and, after all, would be but a repetition of what
has been often said. No nation can long neglect the wholesome maxims,
founded uxion universal experience, that uphold xiublic credit without
suffering financial disturbances and bringing serious consequences
upon its people. It will not be denied that the existing issue of legaltender notes, as a circulating medium, would never have been made
except in the great emergency of a war involving no less an issue than
the xireservation of the nation. Whether the argument in support of
the validity of the legal-tender acts be rested upon the war powers
conferred on the Government by the Constitution or on other xirovisions of that instrument, it is clear that Congress could not have been
induced to x^ass such acts under au}^ other circumstances than in a time
of the most xiressing and urgent iieed, such as a state of war only
produces. The most earnest defenders of the xiower to issue Government obligations, and make them by law legal tender for all debts,
Xiublic and xirivate, would scarcely be found to advocate the exercise
of the power except under circunistances of extreme necessity, and
then only for the time of the emergency; and there is abundant evidence in the debates and xiroceedings of Congress, and in the statutes
themselves, that it was not intended to make the legal-tender notes the
pernianent currency of the country. The acts authorizing the issue of
such notes provided for their conversion into bonds of the United
States bearing interest at the rate of six per centum x^er annum.
The act of March 18, 1869, in terms declares that ^'the faith of the
United States, is solemnly x^ledged to the payment in coin or its
equivalent of all obligations of the United States not bearing interest,
known as United States notes." The same act further, affirms that
^Hhe United States solemnly pledges its faith to ma;ke provision at the




XII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

earliest xiracticable period for the redemption of the United States
notes in coin."
The xiurpose of the act is well expressed in its title, whitjh declares
it to be " A n act to strengthen the public credit;" and that such was
the effect of the act cannot be doubted, for it is an unconditional assurance on the part of the Government, not only that its notes shall
be paid in coin, but that this shall be done at the earliest practicable
period. The faith of the Government could not be more clearly or absolutel}^ pledged than is done by this act of Congress, to say nothing
of previous legislation.
The length of time that has now elapsed since the final. overthrow
of the rebellion, as well as proper regard for the faith of the nation,
admonish us that initiatoiy steps towards the redemption of its
pledges ought not to be longer postponed. It is not unworthy of remark that the era of the war will not be Qlosed until the period of redemxition shall have been reached.
I t is sometimes urged by the advocates of a continuance of our xiapei
circulation that, its aniount being now definitely fixed by law, it is not
liable to the fluctuations in volume which attach to a currency that
may be increased or diminished at the will of the Secretary; but this
suggestion leaves out of view entirely the fact that it is of little consequence where the power to change the volume of currency rests, the
difference being only in the degree of probability of its use. The existence ofthe power at all, and the apxareh ension of its being called
into exercise, is the evil from which mischievous consequences are
likely to flow. The quality of flexibility governed by the law of trade
and commerce, and which regulates the increase or diminution of the
volume of the circulating medium according to the requirements of
legitimate business, is of value; but that which is controlled by the
legislative will and may depend uxion party exigencies or the suxixiosed
necessities of the Treasury, or the demands of sxieculative enterprises, is objectionable in the highest degree. Such a currency is liable
to sudden and violent expansion or contraction, having no necessary
connection with the legitimate demands of trade and commerce.
In a country like ours, with varied industries and extensive commercial relations among its different sections and with other nations
and x^Goples\ stability of the circulating medium is indispensable to
the general prosperity. Credit, which necessarily enters largely into
commercial transactions, can only be steady and secure when it has
for its foundation a stable currency. The quality of stability in money
attaches only to coin, which, by common consent of mankind, is the




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XIII

medium of exchange, and to a xiaxier currency^rexiresentative of coin,
because convertible into it at the will of the holder. The reason is
obvious; for coin, besides being recognized throughout the world as a
medium of exchange, has a high intrinsic value, can be xirocured only
by labor and in limited quantities which cannot be increased by statutory laws, nor suddenly by other means, while inconvertible xiaper
mone}^ may be xiroduced in indefinite quantities at a nominal cost, a
note of the highest denomination costing no more than the lowest, and
its volume dexiending solely on legislative enactment.
The history of irredeemable paper currency repeats itself whenever
and wherever it is used. I t increases xiresent prices, deludes the
laborer with the idea that he is getting higher wages, and brings a
fictitious x^i'osxierity from which follow inflation of business and
credit and excess of enterxirise in ever-increasing ratio, until it is
discovered that trade and commerce have become fatally diseased,
when confidence is destro^'cd, and then comes the shock to credit,
followed b^' disaster and dexiression, and a demand for relief by further
issues.
A dollar legal-tender note, such as is now in circulation, is neither
more nor less than the promise of the Government to pay a dollar to
the bearer, Avhile no express iirovision is made by law for xiaying the
dollar at any time whatever; nor is there any existing iirovision for
converting it into anything that stands in a tangible ratio to a coin •
dollar. As far as existing laws go, there is no reason why the legaltender note of the denomination of a dollar should ^a^s^ for one cent
of gold, except so far as the Government compels creditors to accept
it in discharge of obligations to xiay money, and obliges the w^ealth and
commerce of the country to adopt it as a medium of exchange. To this
may be added, as an element of the value of the legal-tender dollar, th©
hope that the Government will sometime or other redeem its paper
promises according to their import. The universal use of, and reliance
upon, such a currency tends to blunt the moral sense and impair the
natural self-dependence of the people, and trains them to the belief
that the Government must directly assist their individual fortunes
and business, help them in their personal affairs, and enable them to
discharge their debts by partial payment. This inconvertible paper
currency begets the delusion that the remedy for private pecuniary
distress is in legislative measures, and makes the people unmindful of
the fact that the true remed}^ is in greater production and less spending, and that real prosperity comes only from individual effort and
thrift. When exchanges are again made in coin, or in a currency con-




XIV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY,

vertible into it at the will of the holder, this truth will be understood
and acted mion.
I t is not intended to call in question the constitutional validity of
the legal-tender acts, nor the wisdom of those who, in the midst of a
rebellion which taxed the utmost resources and energies of the nation,
deemed the issue of such notes essential to success. Eepeated adjudications of the highest judicial tribunal of the land sustaining their
validity must be accepted as conclusive o f t h e question. All that is
now meant to be asserted is, that the exigencies which required the
issue of such notes have passed away, and the time has come for taking
such steps as may be necessary to redeem the. pledge then made. The
power to do so, as well as the selection of means to that end, is with
Congress. The Secretary can do neither more nor less than obey and
execute such laws as Congress may enact.
While it seems to be very generally conceded that resumption of
specie paynient is essential to the honor of the Government and to
the general welfare, the views of intelligent and well-informed persons
as to the best method of resumption are so widely divergent, and the
plans that have been suggested so multifarious, that the Secretary
feels embarrassment in suggesting a plan, the details of which will
commend themselves to Congress. But there are one or two fundamental ideas underlying the subject which, it is believed, must be the
basis of any practicable plan for resumxition, and are, therefore, submitted for the consideration of Congress.
It is obvious that there can be no resumption by the Government so
long as the volume of paper currency is largely in excess of the possible amount of coin available for that purpose which may come into
the Treasury in any year, and while no provision is made for the conversion of this xiaper money into anything having a nearer relation to
coin; nor is it xiossible for the banks or people to resume so long as
the large amount of irredeemable paper now in circulation continues
to be by law legal tender for all private debts with reference both to
the past and the future. While this state of things lasts gold will
continue to flow from us, and find employment where the natural laws
of trade, unobstructed by restraining legislation, make its daily use
indispensable.
The Secretary, therefore, recommends Congress to provide by law that
after an early and fixed day United States notes shall cease to be legal
tender as to contracts thereafter made. But this provision should not
apply to official salaries or to other ordinary expenditures of the Government under then existing contracts or appropriations. Between the day




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XV

thus to be fixed and the time of final resumption a sufficient period
should elaxise to enable the peoxile and banks to prepare for the
latter b}^ such gradual processes in business as will neither lead to
violent contraction in credit and values, nor suddenly increase the
obligations of debtors. The sudden and immediate appreciation of the
paxier dollar to its par value in gold is not only no necessaiy elemeni:
of redemption, but, as far as xiracticable, should be avoided.. If during
the period of the war the legal-tender acts operated ias a ba^nkrupt law,
compelling creditors to give acquittances ux)on the receixit of less than
the full amount of their debts, this is no reason why the law for resumption should now compel debtors at once to xiay essentially more than
they have contracted to pay. The adoption of such measures as will
not suddenly increase the obligations of debtors, will go far to allay
and disarm whatever popular oxiposition to resumxi tion of specie payment may now exist, and, besides, would be but just to the debtor
class. The day from which new contracts must be discharged in coin
should be fixed sufficiently far in advance to give the xieople and the
banks time to understand it and to prexiare themselves for it. It is
believed that not many months will be necessary for that purpose;
but, to avoid the mischiefs already indicated, this day should precede
the day of final resumption by a longer period. The time should not,
in the opinion of the Secretary, be extended beyond three years, and
might safely be made as much less as in the judgment of Congress
would sufficiently protect the interest of debtors and avoid^the evils of
too sudden contraction.
The law should also authorize the immediate conversion of legaltender notes into bonds bearing a low rate of interest, which, while
inviting conversion, should not be so high as to appreciate tl^e legaltender notes rapidly, and thereby operate oppressively on the debtor
class. As an additional inducement to the conversion of United States
notes into these bonds at a low rate of interest, authority should be
given for.making them security for the circulation of national banks.
The law should further provide the means for the redemxition of such
notes as may be xiresented for that purpose when the period of resumption shall have been reached. To this end, the Secretary should
be authorized to make a loan not exceeding the total amount of
notes remaining unconverted at the time of resumption, less the surplus
revenue to be made applicable to such resumption. It is probable that
the gradual and continued revival of business will so far increase the
revenues that a large loan will not be required for this purpose; but
it is. advisable that the Secretary.be authorized to make it in order




XVI

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY. OF THE TREASURY.

to meet the contingency of a failure of sufficient surplus revenues.
Such a loan should be made by issuing bonds to run for such time as
the wisdom of Congress may suggest, and to be disxiosed of from time
to time as the necessities of the case may require. In the oxiinion of
the Secretary, these bonds should run for a long period, and should
bear interest at a rate not exceeding the lowest rate which the Government may then be paying in refunding its six xier cent, securities.
Any substantial or useful movement for resumption necessarily involves supxilying the Treasury with increased amounts of coin, either
by increased revenues or an adequate loan. The xiresent condition of
the credit of the Government, which would be further enhanced by the
adoption of measures for return to a specie basis, leaves no room for
doubt that a loan for such purpose would be readily taken at a low
rate of interest. Measures should also be adoxited requiring the banks
to hold gold reserves preparatory to resumption on their part.
But. the Secretary does not deem it proper to pursue the matter
into further detail. If Congress shall conclude, as he earnestly hopes
it will, that the time has arrived for the enactment of a law having for
its object resumption of specie payments, its own wisdom will supply
the necessary methods. That which is of the highest importance is
the adoption of the definite policy of resumption. In view of the great
and pressing importance of the sxieediest return to specie xiayment consonant with steadiness of business and avoidance of violent and sudden contraction, discussion of mere details in advance becomes of little
practical consequence. What is demanded by the best interests of the
Government and the peoxile, and by the highest considerations of virtue and morality, is, that Congress shall undo that state of things
which oi^ly the necessities of war justified or required in this respect.
A wise modification of existing statutes, which neither enable nor permit the executive branch of the Government to effect the restoration
of a sound currency, will leave the laws of trade free to resuihe their
operations, and many matters of detail will adjust themselves. When
the Government shall have resmmed specie payment, it may be expected that gold will flow into the country in obedience to the law of
supply and demand; the export of our gold xiroduct will greatly diminish and the millions of gold which now constitute only a commodity
of trade will resume its xii'oper functions by becoming again a part of
the circulating medium. With the adoxition of the xiolicy of resumption, free banking may safely be allowed, and the deficit of the actual
amount of coin available for circulation can be supplied by bank notes
convertible into coin, in lieu of an inconvertible xiaper currency.




• REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XVII

The business of the country has not yet recovered from the disasters of the last year's financial panic, the causes of which it is by no
means difficult to trace. It was the direct and immediate result of
that excessive development of speculative enterprises, over-trading,
and inflation of credit which invariably follow large issues of inconvertible xiaper ciuTency. The almost boundless resources and energies
of the country must Compel the gradual re-establishment of business,
but capital, with its accustomed sensitiveness to danger, is slow to return to the avenues of trade. Yalues are fluctuating and uncertain.
Labor receives its reward in a currency that is unsteady, and whose
Xiurchasing xiower changes almost daily. Neither the reward of labor
nor the value of commodities is measured by any certain standard.
The enactment of a law having for its purpose the substitution of a
sound and stable medium of exchange for an irredeemable paper currency will tend to restore confidence, and thus cause a revival of industries and general business.
There will be no better time in the future to enter upon the work oi
returning to a sxiecie basis, and the Secretary feels that he cannot too
strongly, urge the adoxition of the measures he has indicated, or such
others as will more certainly lead to the desired end.
ECONOMY IN PUBLIC EXPENDITURES.

In connection with this subject, the Secretary deems it proxier to
suggest, for the consideration of Congress, the importance of the most
rigid economy in the public expenditures. Lavish outlay of money by
the Government leads to corresxionding habits bf extravagance among
the xieoxile. An era of inflation is always one of extravagance. A t
such a time costly public improvements of doubtful utility are likely to
be undertaken, and other unusual expenditures made. It is easier to
fall into such practices in a time of inflation than to abandon them
when necessity requires. The general depression following the late
financial panic has compelled the people to lessen their individual
expenditures, and the Government should not be slow to follow their
examxile.
The xiresent condition of the revenues requires the utmost economy
in public exiienditures, and the most careful scrutiny of the estimates
herewith transmitted is invited. So far as they relate to the Treasury
Department, the Secretary iias required them to be kept within the
appropriations of the last session of Congress, when a large reduction
was effected. He is gratified to be able .to express the opinion that
II F




XVIII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY

OF T H E TREASURY.

such reduction has not affected injuriously the public interests confided
to his care, nor has it tended to obstruct or delay the public business.
Not only is rigid economy required by reason of the present condition of the public revenues, but fidelity to obligations and a just
sense of responsibility to the people, to whom the Government belongs,
and who contribute of their means to its support, demand it. Governicgtent cannot long exist in a prosperous condition without the confidence
of the people, and that confidence will be given or withheld accordingly
a,s^the Government is faithfully, honestly, and economically adminisistered, or otherwise. When it is understood that not a dollar is taken
from^the xieople by taxation beyond what is needful for the legitimate
purposes of the Government, they will not withhold their confidence
or refuse to supxiort its financial measures. At such a time loans are
freely taken and taxes cheerfully paid. It is essential to the proper
strength of the Government at home, as well as to its credit abroad,
that no greater taxes be levied than are required to carry on its necessary operations and to maintain the national faith and honor«by prompt
payment of all its obligations, and when such revenues are collected it
is no less important that they be faithfully and exclusively applied to
the legitimate purposes of Government.
While the indebtedness of the Government is large, and the maintenance of the national honor requires the collection of large sums by
taxation to meet the accruing interest, besides other necessary public
<expenses, any appropriation for other purposes should be deprecated
as likely to affect injuriously the public credit, and increase the diffi
culties in the way of return to a specie basis.
THE NATIONAL BANKS.

The report of the Comptroller of the Currency contains full statistics
of the resources and liabilities, the reserves, dividends, taxation, and
earnings of the national banks since the organization of the system.
The recommendations and suggestions of the Comptroller in reference
to the distribution of the currency, redemption, and proposed amendments to the national-bank act are worthy of consideration. From this
rexiort it appears that 2,200 banks have been organized under the
national-bank act, of which number 2,028 are now in operation, and 2,004
were doing business on the 2d of October last; reports of their condition
at that date having been received. As appears by their returns of that
date, the aggregateo capital of these banks was $493,765,121, with
a surplus, in addition, of $128,958,106; circulation outstanding,
$333,225,298; individual deposits, $669,068,995; loans, $949,870,627;




REPORT

OF T H E

SECRETARY

OF T H E

TREASURY.

XIX

«Xiecie, $21,240,945; legal-tender notes, (including United States certificates of deposit,) $122,846,946; redemption fund with the United
States Treasurer, $20,349,950. The capital of the forty-eight national
banks of New York City was $68,500,000, with a surplus of $22,653,881;
net deposits,. $20.4^620,288; loans, $201,777,054, of which $4,721,638
were loans on UnitedStates bonds payable on demand; $51,478,691
were loans on other stocks and bonds payable on demand, and
$5,735,137 were loans paj^able in gold. The following table, exhibiting
the loans of the banks in New York City at corresponding dates for
the four years next precediug the current year, is given for the purpose
of comparison with the statement of October 2 of the present year:
New Yorlc City.
Oct. 8,1870.

Oct. 2,1871.

Oct. 3,1872.

Sept. 12,1873.

Oct. 2,1874:

54 banks.

54 banks.

50 banks.

48 banks.

48 banks.

Capital

^73, 435, 000

,$73, 235, 000

$71, 285, 000

$70, 235, 000

$68, 500, 000

Net deposits .

159, 751, 811

191, 304, 511

158, 034,121

172, 010. 594

'204, 620, 288

.Loans—
On U. S. bonds on demand..
On other stocks, bonds, &c.,
on demand

$9, 012, 964

$5, 661, 499

53, 809, 603

70,185, 331

Payable in gold
All other

105,146, 590

122, 806, 969

Aggregate.

167, 969,157

198, 653, 799

$3,180, 738

$2, 938, 876

$4, 721, 638

53, 409, 625 57, 916,1.30
3, 411, 738
4, 381, 571
123,183, 625 133, 924, 311

51, 478, 691
5, 735,137
139, 841, 588

199,160, 888

201, 777, 054

The aggregate call loans of these banks on the 2d of October last
were $56,200,329, corresponding very nearly in amount with the same
class of loans on October 3, 1872, which then stood at $56,590,363,
showing that the character of 4he loans of the New York City banks
has not materially changed since the panic of 1873. The net amount
on dexiosit with these banks by other national banks was $56,237,452.
I t thus apxiears that nearly the whole amount of the balances due to
other national banks is invested in loans payable on call. Interest is
paid on a large portion of the balances due to other banks, and they
must be so invested as to be readily available, such deposits being
subject to far greater fluctuations in volume than a similar line of commercial deposits. The banker thus makes the broker a convenience
for obtaining interest on money which he could not prudently invest in
commercial paper. The statistical table of the rate of interest in New
York City, prepared from daily reports, shows the following results, to
wit: The average rate of interest for the past year was 3.8 per cent, on
call loans, and 6.4 per cent, on commercial paper, and for the six
Inonths ending October 31, 1874, the average rate was 2.7 per cent, on
call loans and 5.6 on commercial paper.




XX

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

The attention of Congress has frequently been called by the Secretary and the Comptroller of the Currency to the evils arising from the
payment of interest on deposits, and efforts have been made by the
more conservative bankers to discourage the practice. The difficulty
in the way of legislation is, that, while Congress has the xiower to prohibit the payment of interest on deposits by the national banks, by the
imposition of penalties, it has no such power with reference to the
State banks and xirivate bankers. The only x>i'acticable legislation
upon this subject which would not discriminate against the national
banks would seem to be the imxiosition of a sxiecial tax upon all interestbearing deposits.
The act of June 20, 1874, limits the amountof legal-tender notes to
$382,000,000. The authorized amount of national-bank notes was not
changed, but remains at $354,000,000. This act provides, however, for
the transfer of circulation, from the Eastern and Middle States to the
Western and Southern States, as may be required to supply apxilications for circulation, uxion an axiportionment,based on x3opulation
and wealth according to the census returns of 1870. The act also
Xirovides for the deposit of legal-tender notes in the Treasury, and the
surrender of the bonds deposited with the Treasurer as. security for
,the like amount of circulating notes. Under this iirovision the banks
have voluntarily surrendered $7,714,550 of their circulation. $6,492,285
of the notes of banks in liquidation are still outstanding, and a small
amount ($2,072,754) of the $354,000,000 remains unissued. The^
whole, amounting to $16,279,589, is now at the disposal of the Comptroller," or will be hereafter available for distribution as this circulation
shall be redeemed; so that it is not'x'>robable that it will be necessary
to withdraw circulation from banks located in States which are in
excess for some time to come. The same [act repeals the |xiroyision
requiring reserves uxion circulation, and requires a deposit,equal to
five per cent, of the circulation, in the Treasury for the redemption of
such circulation. The effect of this law upon the reserves ofthe banks
as shown by their last report, (October 2,) is the release of-$20,350,748
of legal-tender notes, which is about one-sixth of the amount that would
have been required under the law previouslj^ in force. The amount of
cash reservies held by the banks at that time in excess of the requirements of the act was $55,102,487, and the amount held in excess by
the New York City banks was $17,145,406.
The Comiitroller suggests that the xirovisions of the act of June 20,
1874, in reference to the redistribution of the currency reserves and
redemption, be more fully tested before any changes shall be made.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

XXI

-and, accordingly, no amendments are recommended to that act, unless
modifications shall become necessary in adoxiting measures for a return
4o specie payment.
The foregoing tables and facts fully establish the conclusion that
there is a large amount of currency in excess of the legitimate needs
of business, and should serve to dispel the fallacy that greater expan•sion of currency is the proxier remedy for the general depression and
^contraction of the volume of business.
COINAGE.

The report of the Director of the Mint presents in detail the operations ofthe mints and assay offices, and contains valuable information
relative to coinage, foreign moneys, and international exchanges.
The amount of bullion operated upon during the fiscal year was—
Gold
'.
$68, 861, 594 97
Silver
15,122,151 31
Total

$83, 983, 746 28

Deducting redeposits, bars made at one institution and deposited
.at another, the deposits were—
Gold
,
$49,142, 511 06
Silver
:
11, 484, 677 78
The gold coinage, including worn pieces recoined, was $50,442,690;
-silver coinage, $5,983,601; gold bars stamped, $31,485,818; silver bars
.stamped, $6,847,79918.
•
.
Compared with the xirevious year there was an. increase in the gold
-coinage of $15,193,352 50; in silver coinage, $3,037,805 80; and in gold
aud silver bars, $10,816,086 57.
The trade-dollar has been successfully introduced into the oriental
markets with advantage to Americaii commerce.
A twenty-cent silver coin being required for the purpose of convenience in making change, the enactment of a law authorizing the
-coinage of a piece of that denomination is recommended.
The estimate of the Director of the Mint shows a gain in specie and
bullion in the last two fiscal years of about $38,000,000, and the stock
of specie in the country to be about $166,000,000.
The estimated increase of coin and bullion is gratifying, being one
-of the evidences of a gradual r,ecuperation of the country from the
effects of a destructive civil strife, and, in connection with an annual
"production of about $70,000,000 of the xirecious metals, affords encour^agement that a stock of coin may, within reasonable time and with




XXII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

favorable legislation, accumulate to an extent sufficient to enable
resumption of specie xiayments to be undertaken and maintained.
There would appear to be no doubt that bullion converted in,to coin
will, as a general rule, remain longer in the country than if left in an
uncoined condition to seek foreign markets. Our xiolicy should, therefore, be to encourage the coinage of both gold and silver.
With respect to the charge made under existing laws for the coinageof gold, which in this country is the standard metal, it no doubt tendsto create an adverse exchange, and causes bullion to be exported to
London, where no charge for coinage of gold is made.
The expediency of continuing the charge in the present financial
condition of the country may well be doubted.
The attention of Congress is invited to the explanations of the Director of the Mint in connection with the course of silver bullion.
With a view to the resumption of specie payments, it is important
to manufacture a large quantity of silver coin to take the place of the
fractional notes, and, as its preparation at the mints will require considerable time, it is recommended that authority be given the Secretary
to commence the manufacture of such coinage, beginning with the
smallest denomination, and to gradually withdraw the fractional notes..
The system of computing sterling exchange on the fictitious or assumed par of four shillings and sixpence to the dollar, and the equivalent, $4.44|- to the xiound, which had been in use for a long period,
ceased on the 31st of December last, under the provisions of the act ot
March 3,1873, which fixed the par of exchange between the United
States and Great Britain at $4.86,6J to the pound, that sum being the^
value in United States money of a standard sovereign, compared with
the pure gold contained in the standard gold dollar of the United
States.
The new system has many advantages over the old oue, especially
in simplicity, and having an absolutely correct basis.
REVENUE FROM CUSTOMS.

The past and present condition of .the receipts from customs constitutes the general guide to estimates and recommendations respecting"
that branch of the xiublic revenue.
For the year ending June 30, 1874, the decline in receipts from the
previous year was considerable—falling off from $188,089,522 to$163,103,833, a loss of nearly $25,000,000. The receipts for the first
quarter of the current fiscal year were two and a half millions less than
for the corresponding period of the last year. The receipts for the-




^REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXIII

months of October and November, 1873, were $21,243,333 25o For the
same months of the current year they were $22,755,811.
The act of June 6, 1872, admitted large classes of manufactures to
a reduction often per cent, of the duties prescribed by previous statutes,
without designating specifically the articles to which the reduction
should axixily, leaving much room for construction in the practical application of the act to articles of new design or of particular combinations of materials. This act was followed by a system of extreme
pressure for reduction, claimed through changes of classification of
articles, and advantage was sought to be taken of every doubtful construction of all parts of the act.
During the years 1873 and 1874 there was a good deal effected in
the way of reduction of duties through changes in form or component
materials of merchandise, intended to answer the same purpose in
consumption that articles and fabrics charged with a higher rate
duty had previously answered. Yery large substitutions of materials
other than wool have been made for fabrics previously paying the duty
charged on woollens. Silks, linens, and cottons have been similarly
imitated, while the true rate of duty was avoided in some cases, and
sought to be avoided in others, by claiming them as subject to rates
of duty prescribed in the acts of 1861-'62 as manufactures of mixed
materials.
Some portions of the reductions thus claimed are admitted in the
revision of the statutes of 1874, while others are rejected as not properly authorized. It has been ascertained, as the result of careful calculation, that a concession of the reduced classifications claimed in the
large number of appeals made to the Secretary during the year 1874
would have reduced the revenues so far as to seriously embarrass the
Treasury. This urgency for reduction is not now so great, and there
is more general acquiescence in reasonable and xiroper construction of
the statutes by those wlio would at any time be content with aii equal
administration of such lav^s. It is the purpose of the Department to
render them equal and uniform in their application, as fa.r as xiracticable and consistent with the letter of the law, and to administer
them with such energy as shall leave none in doubt as to their true
meaning. In the application of the revised statutes questions of construction often arise, but the Department has freely announced the
principles of construction believed to be applicable, and in this it has
had tlie support of recent decisions of the courts. No doubt is entertained that' the positions assumed by the Department in this respect
will bear any test of review to which they may be subjected—a raatter




XXIV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

here alluded to only in the hope of inducing acquiescence in the intent
of laws, which, if equally enforced, cannot operate prejudicially against
any class or section.
The general depression of business resulting from the panic of September, 1873, has been followed by unusual delay in forwarding the
crops. Prices in all the markets, foreign and domestic, have not been
sufficiently high to induce shippers to make the usual investment in
moving the crops, and the result is that the demand for consumption
of foreign merchandise usual in the West and interior at this season
is held in reserve. As a consequence of this absence of demand for
foreign merchandise, purchases for the interior and the West have
been greatly restricted, and with reasonable caution importers have
avoided assuming the burden of stocks of goods not likely to be
readily taken off their hands for consumption. In what rnanner or
at what time this constraint will be entirely relieved, it is not easy to
say; but it would be wholly without precedent to find such abundant
production as has marked the present year, without remunerative demand for consumption, for any considerable time. It is a reasonable
. inference that this state of things will yield as the wants of Europe
for our surplus crops are developed in the coming year, and that
general commerce, with the revenues to be received from jt, will revive accordingly. For the present, it is of the highest importance to
protect the revenue provided by law in the most faithful manner.
Through a uniform and thorough enforcement of existing law, much
may not only be saved in direct results, but many of the complaints
arising from supposed inequality and obscurity may be removed. The
actual receipts from customs are greatly affected by such vigilance,
and it is the interest alike of the Government and the merchant that
there shall be no uncertainty as to the meaning of the law, and that
settlements should be made promptly and justly. Those who most
directly represent the commercial interests have been right in demanding this course, and,no doubt is entertained that well-directed efforts
to that end will prove satisfactory, even if they do not at, once accomXilish all that may be ultimately done.
Eeferring to the suggestions frequentl}^ made in favor of modification of the laws imposing duties on imports, and treating the subject
purely as one of revenue, it is not safe to say that any reduction of
rates on particular classes of goods can be admitted while the demand
of the Government for gold is as large as at present, without comxiensation by increased rates on other classes. Experience has shown that
there is usually great loss and injury to individuals in readjustment ot
duties to which the commercial interests have become accustomed.




REPORT 01^' TI-IE SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXV

It is, however, undeniable that there are inequalities and incongruities in existing laws imposing duties on imports, and that there is
demand for their revision, which, in many respects, seems to be worthy
the consideration of Congress. Should it be the pleasure of Congress
to enter upon this work of revision, it is recommended, in order to
avoid the difficulties attending hasty and partial modifications, that
provision be made by law for the appointment of a commission to
prepare the details of a bill for this purxiose and to report to the next
Congress.
I t is certain that the aggregate amount now received from this source
is necessary for revenue to meet demands, which cannot he safely stated
at less than $160,000,000 in gold, besides the receipts from, internal
revenue and other sources. The imxiost statements for 1872-'73 show
how heavily the revenues from customs were depleted by the reduction of 1872, coffee alone having yielded $10,969,098 77 in 1871, and
$7,192,074 91 in 1872. On the importations of coffee, in 1873, the rate
of three cents xier pound would have yielded nearly $9,000,000, and
two cents per pound almost $6,000,000,
The following tabic exhibits the annual imports of coff'ee and tea
from 1871 to 1874, inclusive, with the total value thereof, and the
average price x^cr pound in the countries of their xiroduction:
Statement of imports of Coffee and Tea during the jour fiscal years (ended June 30,) 1871 to
1874, inclusive.
Coffee.
Fiscal years
e n d e d J u n e 30.
Pounds.

1871
1872
1873
1874

317, 992,048
•298,805r946
293,297,271
285,171,512

Tea.

Average cost
per pound
Aggregate
at p l a c e
c o s t at p l a c e of s h i p m e n t ,
of s h i p m e n t .
S30,992,869
37,942,225
44,109,671
55,048,967

9.74 c e n t s .
12.69
"
15.00
'•
19.34
"

Pounds.

51, 364,919
63,811,003
64,815,136
55,811 605

Average c o s t
per pouud
at place
Aggregate
c o s t at place of s h i p m e n t .
of s h i p m e n t .
$17, 254, 617
22,943,575
24,466,170
21,112,2.34

33 60 c e n t s
36.00
"
37 74
"
37.82
"

This record of foreign prices for coffee tends strongly to the conclusion, making due allowance for the effect of short crops on prices, that
the duty repealed by the act of 1872 was added to the selling price
abroad, with no advantage to consumers here, while the country, as a
whole, has paid more than before for the entire stock. The repeal of
the duty on tea caused little or no reduction of xirices to consumers
here, but an increase of xirices abroad.
The circumstances under which duties on imports are collected are
such as to bring into x^l^y the most xiowerful forces of self-interest.
The contest between regular importers for precedence in the market.




XXVI

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF

THE,TREASURY.

and, therefore, for success on the one hand, as against failure on the
other, often turns upon very small distinctions, apxiarently of little
consequence at the moment. A slight difference in the rate of duty
paid in one case, less than another, often becomes of the greatest practical importance to the importer. It is sometimes said that the interest
of the merchant to evade the duty is not great enough to iuduce the
attempt; but experience has shown that none other than the most
rigorous enforcement of law and the power to inflict i^-evere penalties
suffice to protect the interest of the Government and to meet the
efforts constantly made for evasion of the duties levied by law. For
this reason the laws of all countries where customs duties are imposed
have been uniformly and necessarily severe, declaring forfeiture and
penalty as the indispensable condition of the violation of revenue laws.
The history of legislation in this respect in Euroxie is unbroken. A
series of preventive and penal acts of the most decisive character may
be found everywhere, whatever may be the recent relaxation of the
rates of duty or the increase of the list of articles free of duty. In the
United States, the rates of" duty for some years past have been high,
much higher than are imposed in most other countries; but the^consumxition of foreign merchandise is large and the market eager and
undiscriminating, the quantity taken even at high cost being greater in
proportion to the population than in any foreign, country importing
from other countries.
At the last session of Congress measures were xiroposed, and, in xiarty
enacted, looking to the relief of merchants and others who comxilained
of what they claimed to be unnecessary severity of the revenue laws,
imposing penalty and forfeiture for violations thereof. Whatever
errors may have existed in the administration of these laws, or whatever extreme steps may have occasioned the legislation of the last
session, it is still true that the penal provisions, in most important
particulars, were no more stringent than those existing since the early
history of the country.
The earlier acts relating to duties on imports, perhaps, imxiosed the
severest penalties known to our statutes, and these laws remained
almost without material modification in this respect until the last session of Congress, but their administration was modified, by the xiower
of remission conferred upon the Secretary, so far as to rarely involve
forfeiture of vessels or the imposition of the extremest penalties. It
was the conspicuous character .of the xienalties recently imposed that
excited public attention and induced the modifications embodied in the
act of the last session.




REPORT OF TB[E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXVII

In the light of the exxierience of this and other countries in the collection of duties on imports, it must be considered that any material
change in the policy or manner of protecting the revenues by the imposition of penalties and forfeitures is necessarily tentative. It is absolutely indisxiensable that the revenues shall be collected, and in their
collection the interests of the Government and the honest imxiorter
are the same. Both require that whatever the law declares to be the
rate or amount of duty shall be equally and inflexibly enforced. Evasions of an apparently small proportion of these duties become the
means of serious injury, if not ruin, to the honest merchant whose busilUess is undermined by such competition, and often result in great.loss of
irev^enue. While it is not yet demonstrable that the present tendency
to decline in revenue from customs is sensibly influenced by any other
cause than the decline of importations, there are .grave reasons for
apprehending serious results, from any legislation depriving the Government of the most efficient means for the detection of fraud and
power to inflict .the severest penalties in extreme cases. It cannot be
doubted that the legislation of the last session of Congress has created
a popular belief that smuggling is less hazardous, and violatioiis and
evasions of the law less dangerous, than formerly, and it is not difficult to see to what results such a belief is likely to lead.
The sum placed at the disxiosal of the Secretary, by the act of the
last session of Congress, is inadequate for furnishing comxiensation
for the detection of frauds upon the revenue. The last section of that
act makes it the duty of the Secretary to make comxiensation to persons
who would, under former laws, have been entitled to share in the distribution of forfeitures, and, under this provision, a large proportion
of the sum placed at the disposal of the Secretary by that act became
unavailable for use in cases of future violations of the law.
The decline of receipts from customs is suggestive of the importance
of reducing the aggregate expenses of collection, and the attention of
the Department -has recently been given to this subject in a way that
has already xiroduced some favorable results, and still further reduction will be accomplished. It is, however, impracticable to make such
reduction exactly, or even approximately, proportionate to the falling
off in receipts, since the cost of maintaining the minimum organization at any given port is the principal part of the expense, and this
cannot be avoided, or diminished, without incurring danger of loss of
the revenue at such port.




XXVIII

REPORT

OF TFIE SECRETARY

OF T H E

R E C E I P T S FROM INTERNAL

TREASURY.

REVENUE.

The report of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue presents a satisfactory exhibit of the revenues in charge of that bureau.
The decrease from each source of internal revenue for the year ending
June 30, 1874, as compared with the fiscal year 1873, appears fom the
following statement:
Sources.
Spirits
Tobacco
Fermented liquors
Banks and bankers
Penalties, &c
Adhesive stamps
Back taxes under repealed laws

1873.

1874.

Decrease.
$2, 655, 281 m
1,143, 427 47
20, 258 12
383, 870 79
97, 436 72
1, 565, 532 21
5, 564, 901 86

114, 075, 456 08 102, 644, 746 98

Total

$52, 099, 371 78 $49, 444, 089 85
34, 386, 303 09
33, 242, 875 62
9, 324, 937 84
9, 304, 679 72
3, 771, 031 46
3, 387,160 67
461, 653 06
364, 216 34
7, 702, 376 85
6,136, 844 64
6, 329, 782 00
764, 880 14

11, 430, 709 10

The decrease in the receipts from spirits is due to the small production of brandy in 1874, in consequence of the partial failure of the
fruit crop in 1873; the earlier collection of special taxes in 1874 than
in 1873j the reduction in the value of warehouse, rectifiers', and
dealers' stamps by act of June 6, 1872, which reduction operated
during the whole of the fiscal year 1874, but during only eleven months
of 1873; and the smaller collections from repealed taxes relating to
spirits in 1874 than in 1873.
The falling off in the receipts from tobacco is owing chiefly to the
abolition of the system of bonded warehouses, under act of June 6,
1872, by which large quantities of manufactured tobacco were placed
upon the market during the fiscal year 1873, and to the increased
activity given during the early part of the same year to the movement
of plug tobacco by the reduction in the rate of tax from 32 to 20 cents
per pound.
The act of June 6, 1872, so far as it relates to a reduction of taxation
on banks and documentary stamxis, did not go into full operation prior
to the last fiscal year.
The number of brewers engaged in the production of fermented
liquors during the fiscal years 1873 and 1874 was as follows:
In 1873
In 1874
Decrease

: -.

3, 554
2, 524
1, 030

During the fiscal year 1873, over five millions were collected from
income a's back taxes, and five hundred thousand from gas, items no




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXIX

longer taxable, and collections of xiast-due taxes, under repealed statutes, are of course constantly decreasing.
The receipts from internal revenue for the first quarters of the fiscal
yea s ending June 30, 1874, and 1875, were as follows:
First quarter of 1874..•
First quarter of 1875

$25, 640, 454 41
26, 314, 615 33

Increase

674,160 92

The aggregate receipts for the months of October and November,
1873, were $13,863,029 97, and for the same months of 1874 they were
$17,476,202 99.
Without some unexpected interruption of the industries upon which
these taxes are imposed, the full amount of the estimate hereinbefore
presented will be realized. .
The suggestion of the Commissioner that the taxes now collected by
stamxis on bank checks, matches, perfumery, cosmetics, &c., may be
abolished, and compensation made therefor by increasing the tax on
spirits ten cents per gallon, is worthy the consideration of Congress.
By making this change the items of internal taxation would be considerably reduced, and the system simplified without loss of revenue.
The means now in use for the collection of tax on spirits will, it is
believed, secure the collection of the increased amount.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.

The comxiarative coin value of the exports and imxiorts of the United
States for the last fiscal year, as axipears from official returns to the
Bureau of Statistics, may be exhibited as follows:
Exports of domestic merchandise
$569, 433, 421 00
Exports of foreign inerchandise
—
16, 849, 619 00
Total exports
Imports
Excess of exxiorts over imports
Exports of specie and bullion

586, 283, 040 00
:

567, 406, 342 00
18, 876, 698 00
,$66, 630, 405 00

Imports of specie and bullion

28, 454, 906 00

Excess of exports over imports

38,175, 499 00

Total excess of exports of merchandise, specie,
and bullion, over imports of same
$57, 052,197 00
While these returns are believed to be reasonably accurate as
regards the exports by sea, it has been found impracticable to obtain




xxx

REPORT OF TIIE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

complete; statements of our exports to Canada, owing to the fact that
manifests, containing the quantities and values of merchandise exported
in railway cars, are not legally requirable. Detailed statements have
been received, however, from the Commissioner of Customs of the
Dominion of Canada, from which it apxiears that the coin value of our
exports to Canada during .the last fiscal year was $10,200,059 in excess
of that returned by the United States customs officers, which would
increase the exports for the last fiscal year as above stated, by that
amount.
It is proper to remark in this connection that merchandise of the
value of $17,878,225 was withdrawn from bond for consumption, in
excess of that entered for warehouse, during the year.
The export of coin and bullion was $24,952,138 less than for the preceding year, while the exports of domestic merchandise have increased
$63,803,118.
There appears to have been a decrease in imxiortations for the last
year of $74,729,868 as compared with the previous fiscal year, and of
$59,188,735 as compared with the fiscal year ended June 30, 1872.
The following imports show an increase in value, respectively:
Coffee, $10,941,570; molasses, $1,046,773; salt, $556,127; flax seed,.
$447,229; brass and other metals, $475,439; medicinal barks, $418,436;
coal, $.410,762; hair, $408,826; raw hemp, $328,994; indigo and cochineal, $353,474; unmanufactured wood, $384,810; articles exported
and returned, $1,287,622; opium, $561,726; spices, $586,642; barley,
$2,838,672; dress goods, $1,714,838.
Those exhibiting a decrease in imxiortation are xirincipally unmanufactured wool, $12,183,632; manufactures of wool, $4,149,298;
raw silk, $2,606,613; manufactures of silk, $5,893,253; fine linen,
laces, and other manufactures of flax, $2,955,636; cotton goods,
$7,007,455; kid gloves, leather, and manufactures of leather, $1,107,528;
furs, $379,427; hides and skins, $1,281,565; jute and jute butts,
$1,471,727; paper stock, $1,058,297; paper and paper hangings,
$734,872; horse-hair, $792,675; old and scrap iron, $5,148,370; copper
ingots, $2,347,626; manufactures of coxiper, $887,836; pig and bar
lead, $1,094,240; tin plates, $2,000,727; watches, $900,531; jewelry
and precious stones, $876,997; fancy goods and perfumery, $468,986;
tobacco, snuff*, and cigars, $1,304,002; wines and liquors, $622,000;
fruit and nuts, $1,392,044; sugar, $829,490; tea, $3,353,860; dutiable
chemicals, $873,711; chemicals, drugs, and dyes, $1,444,919; dye
woods, madder, argols, bleaching powder, ahd nitrate of soda, $713,083;
-Soda ash, $928, 448; earthen, stone, and china ware, $1,133,570; common




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF TFIE TREASURY.

XXXI

window glass,, and glassware, $1,399,341;: lumber, $2,694,327; crude
India rubber and gutta percha, $703,821.
There was a falling off 4n the importation of iron and steel and
their x^i'oducts of $20,366,536. in value, upon the following articles:
Eails, $8,982,267; steel and manufactures of steel, $3,324,513; pig
iron, $3,915,747; bar iron, $2,266,170; sheet, hoop, and band iron,"
$1,169,308; machinery, $400,192; anchors, chains, cables, castingSj and
hardware; $308,339.
There was also a decrease in the importation of live animals of
$702,381, and of provisions of $849,331 in value.
Of domestic xiroducts exxiorted, the following articles show an
increase in value, in currency: Wheat, $49,969,205; wheat flour,
$9,876,430; rye and rye flour, $1,440,999; corn and corn meal,
$1,029,829 ; cheese, $1,400,985 ; butter, $139,462 ; . pork, $801,677;
beef and tallow, $1,576,044; fish, $603,712; leaf tobacco, $7,710,046;
oil cake, $487,798; horned cattle, $454,900; hogs, $838,435; agricultural implements, $503,839; timber, wood, and manufactures of wood,
.$2,233,9.19; coal, $909,675; matiufactures of hemp, $691,021; iron and
manufactures of iron, $846,197; fire-arms, $1,158,269 ; sailing vessels
^old to foreigners, $371,407.
The decrease in the exportation of domestic products appears
principally in the following articles: Eaw cotton, $16,019,489;
bacon, hams, and lard, $3,576,025; hides, $1,044,641; furs and fur.skins, $391,185 ; leather and manufactures of leather, $518,976 ;
.sewing machines, $556,424; crude mineral oil, $910,354; crude, turpentine and rosin, $585,565; and silver ore, $969,303.
COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.

Little improvement is observable in the foreign carrying trade.
Over 72 per cent, of our imports and exports, during the last fiscal year,
was carried in foreign vessels. This ratio is, however, a somewhat
better exhibit than fbr the fiscal year 1872, when 76 per cent, of this trade
w^as transported in vessels of other nations. It is estimated that, prior
to 1860, from 75 to 80 per cent, was done in vessels of the United States.
From the report of the Eegister of the Treasury, the total tonnage
of vessels of the United States appears to be 4,800,652 tons, being an
increase over that of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, of 104,626
tons, notwithstanding the omission from the official returns, under the
act of April 18, 1874, of canal-boat tonnage amounting to 133,065
tons.
The tonnage of vessels built during the last fiscal year, as given in
the report of the Eegister, is 432,725 tons; which amount exceeds that




XXXII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

of the preceding year by 73,479 tons, and is greater than that of any
year since 1855.
From July 1 to November 10, 1874, official numbers have been
awarded by the Bureau of Statistics to 684 vessels, whose carryings
capacity amounts to 169,654 tons. Of these, 213 were new sea-going
vessels, varying from 100 to 5,000 tons, with an aggregate tonnage of
120,972 tons. Of this number, twenty-nine vessels measured over
1,000 tons, three over 2,000 tons, while two were iron steamships of
5,008 tons each.
REVENUE MARINE.

During the past year the three steani-vessels in process of construction for the Eevenue Marine at the date of the last annual report of
the Secretary have been comxileted and xiut in commission. They
are wooden vessels, of excellent model, thoroughly built of the best
material, strong and fast, and admirably suited to the work required of them. In the design of their steam-machinery special
pains were taken to introduce the latest well-established improvements to secure speed and economy of fuel. There being great differences of opinion among engineers as to the relative value of different types of engines, and it appearing that all operated successfully,
it was decided to use different engines in these steamers, the boilers,
screws, and hulls being the same. Upon their completion, at the request, and with the co-operation of the Navy Department, trials on
a scientific basis were made of their steam-machinery; the report of
which has been xiublished, and will, it is believed, be found of great
value.
These three vessels, are of about 250 tons each, and have displaced
four old ones having an aggregate tonnage of 1,320 tons. Their
completion xiractically accomplishes the reorganization of this branch
of the service, which has been in progress during the last three years
upon the xilan recommended by the commission appointed December
16, 1869, whose report was submitted to Congress May 26, 1870. (Ex,
Doc. No. 93, 41st Cong., 2d Session.) For nearly all the old slow and
unwieldy sailing craft, and the large steamers of heavy draught and complicated machinery, which were ill-adapted to the requirements of the
service and exxiensive to maintain, small steamers of ligiit draught and
good speed have been substituted, effecting a reduction in the tonnage
of the fleet of nearly 2,000 tons; reducing corresxiondingly the number
of men employed and otherwise lessening the expenses of maintaining
the service, while greatly increasing its efficiency. Equally important
changes have been made in th^ character of the official corxis, through




REPORT

OF TELE SECRETARY

OF TFIE TREASURY.

XXXIII

the removal of incompetent officers and the institution of a rigid professional examination of candidates for admission. Constant imxirovement has attended the progress of the reorganization, and the benefits
already derived indicate even better results than were anticipated.
The following comxiarative statements of the annual cost of maintaining the service, and of the services rendered by it before and since
the commencement of the reorganization, well illustrate the advancement that has been made:
Exxienses of the Eevenue Marine for the fiscal years ending—
June
June
June
June
June

30, 1865..... .$1, 229, 434 04
30, 1866
1,177, 230 ,70
30, 1867
1,167,125 41
30, 1868
1, 293, 661 67
30, 1869
1,185, 702 26

June
June
June
June
June

30, 1870
30, 1871
30, 1872
30, 1873
30, 1874

$1,133, 670 15
1,121, 026 43
930, 249 81
995, 308 88
903, 601 83

Previous to the year first named the expenses of the Eevenue-Marini
Service were kept with the accounts ofthe general expenses of collecting the revenue from customs, and cannot be easil}^ ascertained.
Statement of services performed hy revenue vessels during the years 1860-1870.
Vessels assisted in
distress.

Years.

Seized or reported tor Miles sailed. Boarded and L i v e s
violation
examined. , saved.
of law.
112, 939
159,574
147, 455
174, 111
99, 326
126, 5.52
192, 597
192, 313
155, 910
156, 910
105, 903

11, 095
12, 991
9, 728
9, 386
38. 815
17, 375
8, 607
10, 8.50
. 7, 923
7,927
9,386

5
20
23
19
3
7
33
14
25
• 25
18

.

Total
Average per year

-

i,""259

1, 623, 590

144, 083

192

• 1^^

147,599

13, 098

17

96
111
143
118
103
90
133
154
83
79
149

119

•

88
129
134
117
• 61
116
143
126
108
109
175
1, 306

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867 . - - • . . •
1868
•
1869
1870
.

'
• i
•
,

• [This statement is made by calendar years for thereason that the reports from which it is compiled
• were so made.]
Statement of services performed hy revenue,vessels during the fiscal years 1872-1874.

/
Fiscalyears e n d i n g -

J u n e 30,1872-*.
J u n e .30,1873
J u n e 30,1874

Total
Average per year

Yessels assisted in
distress.

•
Seized or reported for
• violation Miles .ailed.
of law.

219
210
153

1, 594
1, 605
1,810

166, 098
185, 668
169, 882

582

5,009

521, 648

194

1,669

173, 882

Lives

^ , ' ^ ^ ^ 1 : ^ saved.
24, 932
30, 543
27, 748
1

37
109
4

83,.223

150

27, 741

50

[Of the 5,009 shown in this statement as the total number of vessels seized or reported for violation
of law, 3,119 were returned by the two New York harbor-boats, which previous to 1871 naade no icturns.
Leaving this nuniber out of the account, the average during the last three years is 630.]

Ill F



XXXIV

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF TFIE TREASURY.

The number of vessels now in coiiimisson is thirty-four, of which
thirty are steamers and four sailing vessels. They are so distributed
as to embrace in their cruising grounds the entire coast of the United
States, with the exception of a portion of the Pacific coast, and afford
reasonable protection against the smuggling of goods into the country
by the cargo. For the portion of the Pacific coast alluded to, a vessel
was authorized to be built at the la;St session of Congress, and xilans
and specifications for her construction are now in preparation.
LIFE-SAVING SERVICE.

There have been erected during the xiast year twenty-two new lifesaving stations, as follows: Five on the coast of Maine, one on the
coast of New Hampshire, five on the coast of Massachusetts, one on
the coast of Ehode Island, three on the coast of Yirginia, and seven on
the coast of North Carolina. They are completely equipped, and were
manned for the winter^s service on the first of the xiresent inonth.
Contract has been entered into for the construction of six stations on
the coast of Maryland and Yirginia, between Cape Henloxien and Caxie
Charles, under authority of the act of June 20,1874, and arrangements
will be made for the erection of tAvo other stations between these capes,
on the coast of Delaware, as soon as xiossession of the sites selected
for them, which are the xiroxierty of the State, can be obtained.
When these stations are comxileted and put in operation, the Atlantic coast, from Quoddy Head to Cape Hatteras, with the exception,
perhaps, of the vicinity of Point Judith, will be well protected. South
of Cape Hatteras nothing is needed, except the houses of refuge xirovided for by the act above referred to. Early steps will be taken for
the building of these. Sites have been secured for the thirty stations
authorized for the great lakes, and xilans and specifications for the
buildings are being prepared. It is expected that these stations will be
completed in season for use during the autumn of next year. Measures
will also be taken to have the stations authorized for the Pacific coast
in readiness for occupancy next winter.
^ There have been in operation during the past year eighty-two
stations. They are all located in the three districts designated as the
Cape Cod district, Ehode Island and Long Island district^ and the New
Jersey district, which embrace the most dangerous portions of the
Atlantic coast.
The reports of the superintendents show that during the seasbn of
1873-74, forty-eight vessels, valued, with their cargoes, at $2,331,606,
and having on board 1,166 persons, were driven upon these shores.




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF THE TREASURI".

XXXV

In twenty-nine instances the life-saving apparatus was called into
requisition, and 303 persons were rescued by it. In the other cases
its use was not required, but assistance of some sort, in administering
to the comfort of the shipwrecked or in saving proxierty, was rendered
in nearly all by the force of the service. Of the amount of property
jeoparded, only $457,282 was lost, and the number of lives lost was but
two. Both of these were caused by the falling of the mast of a vessel
when she struck—a case in w.hich, of course, life-saving appliances were
not available. The number of days' shelter afforded shipwrecked persons at the stations was 494.
The life-saving service has now been in operation under the present
system three years on the coasts of Long Island and New Jersey and
two years on the coast of Cape Cod. The statistics of disasters upon
these coasts during this time are reported as follows:
Number of wrecks
.^
102
Number of lives imperilled...
1, 607
Number of lives saved
.i
1, 604
Number of lives lost.
'
3
Number of shipwrecked persons sheltered and succored at
stations
149
Number of days' shelter afforded
571
Total value of property imperilled
,
$3, 685, 936
Total value of property saved
2, 758,281
Total value of property lost
927, 655
Almost all the disasters which occur upon these coasts are from the
stranding of vessels, and it is against death and loss of x')roperty resulting from this class of disasters that the hfe-saving service, as thereon
established, is designed to afford xirotection. The success of the system,
which the foregoing statistics imxily, is certainly all that could be
hoped for. It is hardly to be exxiected that an equal measure of success will be attained upon the lakes, where the causes and character
of a large x^roxiortion of the disasters are of a differeij^ nature. That
the benefits to be derived from the extension of the service there, however, will amxily justify the expense involved cannot be doubted.
In the xirosecution of inquiries essential to comxiliance with the
recxuirements of the second section of the act of March 3, 1873, directing the Secretary of the Treasury to report to the House of Eexiresentatives ^^the points on the sea and lake-coasts of the United States at
which the establishment of life-saving stations would best subserve
the interests of commerce and humanity," valuable statistics of disasters to shixiping, which have occurred upon our coasts within the last
ten years, were gathered, with much trouble, from underwriters
wreck-commissioners, officers of the customs, light-house keepers, and




XXXVI

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

all other available sources, and all practicable means were taken to
verify them. Although important statistics of some disasters are lacking, it is believed that the information obtained is very nearly correct.
As these statistics afford information of considerable interest to shipowners, underwriters, and persons engaged in commerce generally, it
has been thought proper to have them arranged in tables with respect
to years and months, to classes of vessels, to kind and cause of disaster, to tonnage, to locality of disaster, &c. These tables may be found
in the appendix to this report.
Eeports of the statistics of disasters to shipping, important as they
are, were never authoritatively required by the Governnient until tlie
act of June 20, 1874, directed the owners and masters of vessels to
suxiply them. At the commenceinent of the last fiscal year, however,
the customs officers of tl^e various ports of the country were directed
to obtain and forward to the Department the xiarticulars of all disasters occurring to vessels within their collection districts, or to vessels
owned therein, where it was xiossible to obtain them. The returns received were very full. They have been tabulated, as above described,
and wrecking charts, uxion which is shown the exact locality of each
disaster, have been prepared. The tables may be found in the axipendix.
LIGHT-HOUSE SERVICE.

The Light-house Establishment, which exceeds in magnitude that
of any other nation, providing as it does for the necessities of a coast
line, including the great northern lakes, over ten thousand miles in
distance, besides an extent of four thousand seven hundred miles on
inland rivers—making a total of over fourteen thousand miles—
keeps x>ace with the demands for increased aids to commerce and
navigation.. ,^
Within the xiast year twenty-five light-houses, two light-ships, seven
fog-signals, eight beacons, and twenty-seven buoys, have been estab. lished. The total number of such aids to navigation now in use in
the United States, is 546 light-houses, 23 light-ships, 42 fog-signals,
382 beacons, and 2,865 buoys.
,
It appears from the. report of the Light-house Board that, from the
first, means have b(Ben adopted not only for introducing the improvements Avhich have been made in foreign countries, but also, by original
investigations, to add to the efficiency of the system. In the latter the
Board has recently been successful in the introduction of new materials
of illumination, and of greatly improved fog-signals.




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY. X X X V I I

Weekly meetings of the Board, instead of quarterly, as formerly,
have been held during the xiast year, affording increased oxiportunities for the discussion of new methods and deliberation upon xiroposed.
imxirovements, as suggested by recent scientific discoveries and the
Xiractices of foreign countries; and a series of sxiecial investigations
have been commenced, with the view to determine how far the changes,
suggested as possible by the late engineer secretary as the result of
his recent examinatioii into the systems in use abroad—alluded to in
the last annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury—may be with
advantage introduced into our own system.
COAST SURVEY.

s The operations of the coast survey within the present year again
illustrate the special utility of that work. Near several of the sailing
courses on the Atlantic coast and on the Pacific, dangers that would
elude ordinar^^ care in. hydrographic research have been developed,
and made known to navigators. The data, scientific and practical,
gathered in all branches of this imxiortant service, and on record
for future uses, and the experience of the officers employed, are now
sought by the governmental and other commissions for determining questions committed to them, whether in regard to boundaries,
measures for the preservation of harbors, special structures subject to
the action of tides and currents, or for increasing local facilities in
navigation. Several routes suggested for an interoceanic ship canal
have been traversed by officers of the survey, and one of them now
acts as a member of the commission for devising means to imxirove the
outlet of the Mississipxii river.
In the prompt issue of charts with exact delineation of the shores,
and of tables xiredicting the tides for each day of the year; the large
and steadily increasing number of xioints xirecisely determined in latitude and longitude; and develoximent of the law of magnetic variation
for the entire area of the United States, the survey well deserves the
wide rexiute which its organization has hitherto maintained for public
usefulness.
That not one, even of the oldest States in the Union, has at this day
a map of its surface sufficiently accurate for any other than xmrposes
of travel, is now an inconvenience severeh^ felt, but is not matter of
reproach as regards the .States or the General Government.
Kingdoms, restricted in shore line, and scarcely equal to either of
our States in area, but with resources comparativel}^ vast, enlisted
their ablest scientific men years ago in such work, and now have maps




XXXVIII

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY' OF T H E TREASURY.

adequate for geological surveys, or for any pther economical requirement. Our own Governnient, in haxixiy foresight of the xiresent needs,
oprovided for an exact and continuous survey of the Atlantic, Gulf, and
Pacific coasts of the United States, and that work, unrivalled in precision by any other geodetic survey, is now far advanced. While in its
Xirogress all requirements for commerce and navigation have been met,
much has been incidentally done for the future interests of the interior.
By connecting the surveys of harbors and tidal rivers, and proving
their geographical relation precisely, the States of the Union are furnished, for their ultimate surveys, with a basis of accuracy not attainable in any other feasible way. I t is evident that for such maps as
to other nations have proved indispensable in their industrial progress,
our States must found their final survey's on xioints well determined in
their relation to the coast. All available nieans, therefore, are due for
maintaining the xiresent scale and system of work in the survey of the
coast, both in regard to its main x)urpose, and in order that the States
may have collateral advantage in commencing their ultimate surveys.
Many years must elapse before the States are able to complete their
final maps, but the present need for them has been repeatedly brought
to the notice of this Dexiartment.
MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE.

Although the rate of hospital dues was doubled b^' the marinehospital act of 1870, the average yearly collection of such dues has
not yet been correspondingly increased, as compared with the average
of the three years preceding the passage of that act. And this, notwithstanding there has been, since then, an increase of about fourteen
and one-half xier cent, in American tonnage, exclusive of vessels
engaged in the fisheries, and of thirty-six per cent, in the amount of
hospital relief required.
According to the most reliable data obtainable for the ascertainment
. of the xiroxiortion of crew to tonnage, there are upwards of 157,500
seamen emxiloyed on American vessels subject to hosxiital dues. As
the actual xieriod of service in the merchant marine averages about
nine months per annuni, there should have been, instead of $346,676,
the amount received last year,- an aggregate of about $567,000, a sum
amxily sufficient to make the service self-sustaining.
An examination into the causes of this deficiency leads to the belief
that it is largely due to defects in the mode of collecting the dues.
The statute authorizes the master or owner of every vessel, subject to
hosxiital dues, to retain out of the Avages of each of his crew, the sum




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XXXIX

of forty cents xier month for each month of service, whi.ch sums he is
required to j)^j to the collector of customs at certain specified times,
accomxianied by a true statement of the number of men and the length
of service of each man since last payment of hospital dues; and the
Secretary of the Treasury is authorized, to direct the preparation of
^^all needful regulations for the mode of collecting the samel"
It is claimed that these regulations, although modified in 1873, still
entail, in the character of the hosxiital-dues return, an onerous amount
of clerical labor on masters and owners, men. not accustomed to such
work; that much of the information is useless, as for example, the rank
and name of each seaman emxiloyed, the seaman's name being seldom
satisfactory evidence of his identit}^, while upon the western rivers the
return of the names is imxiracticable, the members of a crew often
changing more than once on a single trixi; and, finally, that as there is
no mode provided for verifying the account, there is every inducement
to make loose and inaccurate returns. These defects are thought to
be sufficient to account for the disxiarity between the sum actually
received and that authorized to be retained from the seamen's wages,
and, in consequence of which disxiarity, either the relief facilities must
fall short of the requirements or the Government make good the
deficiency
A more direct and. efficient mode of collection would be, it is conceived, by assessing dues according to a schedule of the average number of men required to safely navigate vessels of various sizes, rigs,
ahd kinds of traffic. This assessment could be readily verified by the
ship's xiapers, now required for other purposes. If Congress shall see
fit to so modify the act, it is believed the returns may be much simplified and the receipts correspondingly increased.
The chief xioints of interest in the administration of this service,
during the past year, are the continued reduction of the mortality
rate and of the average stay in hospital, both fairly attributable
to increased efficiency in the modes of suxiervision, resulting from
greater experience. To these causes is due, also, the important
economic result that a larger number of persons, admitted under more
rigid inspection, have been furnished all necessary relief, at a less cost
per man, and in the aggregate, to the Government, than in any xirevious year. A statement of the operations of the service during the
year, together with a comparative economic exhibit for a number of
years, will be found in the accompanying rexiort of the Suxiervising
Surgeon.
At San Francisco the new pavilion hospital is rapidly approaching
completion; aud, although the change from the site first selected may




XL

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY" OF THE TREASURY.

make necessary some additional outlaj' to secure xiroxier drainage^
sewerage, &c., it is gratifying to know that the buildings will be completed for the sum originally a-ppropriated—a sum not exceeding oneseventh the average cost of the other hospitals of equal capacity now
owned by the Government. Early in Sexitember last, the hosxiital at
Pittsburg was vacated and turned over to the Supervising Architect
for sale, in accordance with the act of June 22, 1874. The sale, however, has not yet been effected, the highest price offered being considered by the Department inadequate. The needs and condition of
the other hospitals willbe found set forth in detail in the report of the
Supervising Architect; but the attention of Congress is respectfully
asked, in this connection, to the following considerations concerning
the maintenance of hosxiitals exclusively for seamen: Except at some
half dozen ports, there are at no time marine xiatients enough to
warrant maintaining a hosxiital staff and establishment. As a result,
the cost of relief in hosxiitals, maintained by the service at such xiorts,
is about twenty per cent, higher than the general average cost. I t
would be manifest economy to close all such hosxiitals and furnish
relief through municipal or private agencies under the supervision of
the service. This alternative, however, is not necessary. The hospitals
owned by the Government are generally of such a character, and so
eligibly located for general hospitals, that they may be advantageously
leased for such purposes. I t is recommended, after mature consideration of the subject, and as a measure in the best interests of the service, that authority be given, by statute, to lease any United States
marine hosxiital, xirovided the lessee shall furnish sufficient guaranty
for the proxier care of the marine patients ofthe xiort where such hospital
is located, under the supervision ofthe Department, and at a daily per
caxiita cost not to exceed fifty xier cent, of the average daily per capita
cost of the entire service for the year next preceding.
STEAMBOAT-INSPECTION SERVICE.

The rexiort of the Supervising Inspector General of Steamboats shows
thatthe average annual loss of life by accident to steam-vessels during
the four years preceding 1873, was 356, while for the year 1873 the loss
was 222, being a decrease of over thirty-seven per cent., and the loss of
ten lives only in 1873 resulted from explosions; the receipts from fees
for inspection and license, during the last fiscal year, exceeded those
of the years previous by $15,398 35, while the expenditures were only
$192 25 in excess of those ofthe xirevious year; the excess of receipts
over expenditures for the fiscal year was $52,38116.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY" OF THE TREASURY.

.XLI

TERRITORY OF ALASKA—THE SEAL ISLANDS.
Under the xirovisions of the act of Axiril 22, 1874, authorizing the
Secretary of the Treasury to axipoint a person qualified by experience
and education to visit the trading stations and Indian villages in the
territory of Alaska, seal islands, and the large islands in Behring Sea,
to collect authentic information relating to.the varied interests of the
Government in that territory and the adjacent regions, Mr. Henry W.
Elliott was designated as a special agent for that purxiose. The report
presented by him to the Department as the result of his labors contains
a comprehensive statement of the character of the country; the condition of the natives; the x^Tcsent state of the seal and other fisheries;
and the trade of the territor^^; with minute descriptions of the haunts
and habits of the seal and other fur-bearing animals, as also many valuable suggestions in regard to the management of the natives, the
Xireservation of the seal fisheries, and the economical collection of the
revenue.
No more 'satisfactory exhibit of the condition of the territory and of
its probable resources has hitherto been xiresented to the Dexiartment.
The Government has derived an income from the tax on seal-skins
and from the rent of the fur-seal islands, since the acquisition of the
territory, as follows:
Tax on seal-skins
$1,150, 219 75
Eent of fur-seal islands
=
170, 480 75
Sale of seal-skins taken by Government agents, under
section 6, act July 1,1870
29, 529 17
Making a total incomeof

....'.

1,350,229 67

THE LOUISVILLE AND PORTLAND CANAL.

In pursuance of the direction contained in section 2 of the actof
May 11, 1874, entitled^^ An act providing for the payment of the bonds
of the Louisville and Portland Canal Company," Mr. E. W. Tayler,
First Comiitroller of, the Treasury, was instructed to xiroceed to Louisville, Kentucky, to make the examination authorized by that section.
His report, hereto appended, shows in what manner his instructions
were carried out and the result of his examination.
- I t was ascertained that the company was indebted to its treasurer in
the sum of $307 81, which has since been paid. There are outstanding
bonds of the company amounting to $1,172,000, bearing six x^er cent,
interest, Iiayable semi-annually—January 1 and J u l y l in each year.
These bonds will mature July, 1876, July, 1881, and July, 1886. No




XLII

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

other debts were found to exist against the company, nor in their favor
from the directors, the trustees under the mortgage, or other persons.
The five shares of stock held by the directors have been transferred to
the United States, and the value thereof, including interest, amounting
to $813 50, has been paid at the Treasury. Public notice was given to
the holders of the bonds to present the coupons due July 1, 1874, at
the office of the Assistant Treasurer in New York for payment, and, of
the $35,160 due on that day, $34,920 have been xiaid. Coupons to the
amount of $390, xiast due at that time, but not xireviouvsly presented,
have since been x)aid at the Treasury.
DEMAND FOR PAYMENT OF THE FIVE P E R CENT. EARNINGS OF PACIFIC
RAILROAD COMPANIES.

By the sixth section of the act axixiroved July 1, 1862, to aid in the
construction of the Pacific Eailroad, and subsequent legislation, the
Central, Union, Central Branch of the Union, Sioux Cit}^ and Pacific,
Kansas, and Western Pacific Eailroad Comxianies are required, from
the date of the comxiletion of their several roads, to x>ay the United
States five per centum of their annual net earnings. Congress, at its
last session, by an act approved June 22, 1874, directed the Secretary
of the Treasury to demand of the treasurer of each of said comxianies
all sums due to the United States, and in default of payment for
sixty days thereafter, to certify that fact to the Attorney General, who
is required thereupon to institute such legal xiroceedings as may be
found necessary to enforce xiayment thereof.
The law, in the opinion of the Secretary, contemxilates that demands
shall be made for specific sums based upon the net earnings of each
road from its completion, and, for this purxiose, he has assumed that
the completion in each case, in the absence of more definite information., dates from the issue of the last instalment of bonds bythe United
States, under the act of July 1, 1862.
The 20th section of this act required the companies to make annual
reports to the Secretary of the Treasury, which, if made, would show
their annual net earnings, but by subsiequent legislation they were
directed to make this report to the Secretary of the Interior. They
have not, however, as it appears, fully complied with this requirement.
Upon correspondence with the Secretary of the Interior, it. is ascer^
tained that their reports were so imperfect as not to disclose the net
earnings of the several companies. A demand was thereupon made
b}^ the Interior Dexiartment uxion each of the comxianies for an immediate statement of its net earnings from a date specified to and including the xiresent year, but such reports have not been furnished.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY' OF THE TREASURY.

XLIII

Having delayed a reasonable time to give the companies an oxiportunity to furnish, the desired information, and failing to receive it,
resort was had to such other means of information as were within
reach, namely, to the annual rexiorts of the xiresidents of said comxianies to stockholders, and such further statements relating to the fiscal
affairs of the several comxianies as have from time to time been given to
the general xiublic. Uxion information derived from these sources, estimates have been made approximating as nearl}^ as xiracticable,the net
earnings of said companies respectively, and demands have been made
for the payment of the amounts thus ascertained. Demand in writing
has been served xiersonally uxion the treasurer of each comxiany.
The agregate amount now due from all the companies upon the best
data at hand, closely approximates three million dollars.
Should payment not be niade within sixty days the matter will be
reported to the Attorney General in conformity to the requirement of
the act of June 22, 1874.
REDEMPTION AGENCY FOR NATIONAL BANKS.

If Congress shall deem it expedient to continue the xiresent system
of redemption of national-bank notes, it is recommended that the number and comxiensation of the employes in the division organized under
the act of June 20, 1874, be fixed by law, and their appointment vested
in the head of the Dexiartment, in accordance with the constitutional
provision.
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING.

Careful consideration of the manner of preparing the bonds, notes,
and stamps issued by the United States, has led to the conclusion that
the work can be more satisfactorily and safely done in the Treasury
Department than elsewhere. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing
is now supplied with the best machinery, which has been acquired at
great cost, and the most skilful artists are emxiloyed by the Government without difficulty. The system of checks now in use in that
bureau, together with the special xiaper heretofore adopted by the
Dexiartment, furnish all xiroper and reasonable protection against
duplication and other frauds.
It is, therefore, recommended that provision be made by law for
Xireparing all securities, stamps, checks, drafts, &c., issued by the
United States, in the Bureau of Engraving and Printing now attached
to this Department, and that the cost thereof be regulated by law from
time to time.




XLIV

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF TIIE

TREASURY.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

The report of the Suxiervising Architect shows the xiresent condition
of the x^iiblic buildings under the charge of this Dexiartment. The
demands upon *the time of the Secretaiy are such that he can give
little attention to the progress of such buildings; so that, practically,
the responsibility and duty of devising plans, making contracts, and
suxierintending the construction and rexiairs of such buildings devolve
upon the Supervising Architect. Careful revision of the acts heretofore passed authorizing the construction of public buildings', is recommended, with a view to curtailing the cost of some and suspending
others, which, it is believed, may be done without detriment to the
public service. By this means there can be effected a saving of considerable sums of money which, under existing axipropriations, will be
exxiended during the current and ensuing fiscal years. Public buildings, xilain and simxile in design, constructed of substantial and durable
material, as nearly fire-xiroof as may be, and adaxited to the convenient
and xiroxier transaction of the X3ublic business, should be xirovided at
all places where they are requisite, from time to time, as the condition
of the revenues may xiermit, but the present is not a favorable time
for makin'g large approxiriations for this xiurpose, and much that is now
contemxilated may be xiostponed without serious inconvenience.'
CLAIMS FOR PROCEEDS OF COTTON.

The fifth section of the act of May 18, 1872, directs the Secretary
of the Treasury to ^£ij to the lawful owners or their legal representatives the net proceeds, actually paid into the Treasury, of all cotton
seized after the 30th day of June, 1865, by the agents of the Government unlawfully and in violation of their instructions.
The number of bales of cotton seized after that date, the proceeds
of which reached the Treasury, was about 50,000, and the net proceeds
thereof, averaging the same at $100 per bale, was $5,000,000. The
number of claims filed under this act was 1,336; the whole number of
bales claimed is 136,877, the net xiroceeds of which, at $100 per bale,
would be $13,687,700. v It is well known that a large nuniber of persons
from whom cotton was seized have made no claim whatever. Under
these circumstances the magnitude of the aggregate of claims xiresented
is worthy of attention.
I13, collecting the cotton to which it was suxixiosed the Governnient
was entitled, after June 30, 1865, various instructions were given from
time to time by the Secretary of the Treasury to the agents of the
Department, and in different forms as occasion for them arose. Some




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY

OF T H E TREASURY.

XLV

of these were issued as general regulations apxiroved by^the President,
some as circulars to general and supervising special agents to be by •
them communicated to their subordinates, and, in a few cases of emergency, explanatory letters were sent by the Secretary to individual
agents. These, however, were generally in harmony, and were usually
communicated in writing, or orally, to all agents, so that their action
might be uniform.
Of the claims presented to the Department, 650 have been subinitted
for decision, and acted on as follows:
Eejected
„
,
437
Continued fbr further evidence and still under examination
.. 188
Allowed
25
Of the aggregate nuniber of claims xiresented there remain, not yet
fully prepared or submitted for final decision, 686. The claims allowed
as aforesaid were for the proceeds of 1,346 bales, and the amount paid
out on such claims is $133,018 27.
The following table contains a suminary statement of the x^i'oceeds
of captured and abandoned property covered into the Treasury, and
claims that have been xiresented therefor under the several acts of
Congress relating thereto, viz:
Proceeds, of captured and abandoned property covered into the Treasury.'.
$20, 910, 656 44
Awarded to claimants by Court of
Claims under the act of March 12,
1863
.'
$9, 968, 950 35
Paid to claimants by the Secretary of
Treasury under the act of May 18,
1872
133,018 27
Paid on judgments against Treasury
agents under theact of July 27,1868.
39,188 17
Paid under various relief acts of Congress
- ...•
198,665 91
Disbursed for expenses under joint
resolution of March 30, 1868
75, 000 00
Total
Which, deducted from the total amount received as
above, leaves a balance of
Against which the following claims have been
presented:
Amount claimed in suits brought in
the Court of Claims prior to August
20,1868
$16, 517, 703 58
Amount claimed in cases in the Court
of Claims brought subsequent to
August 20, 1868
6,. 766, 374 89




10, 414, 822 70
10, 495, 833 74

XLVI

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF TPIE TREASURY. '

Amount claimed in cases xiresented to
the Treasury Dexiartment under the
act of May 18,1872, (axixiroximate).$13,550, 000 00
Total amount claimed
$36, 834, 078 47
Deducting from this sum the balance remaining as
above
10,495, 833 74
Leaves the aggregate amount of claims presented
in excess of the total amount covered into the
Treasury..

26, 338, 244 73

In exercising the authority given by the act of May 18, 1872, the
Department has felt bound by the plain letter of that act to reject all
claims where the seizure was not in violation of both the law and- the
instructions. Doubtless hardshixi has resulted in some cases from this
rule of decision; but the Secretary has not felt at liberty to depart
from the letter of the statute in order to avoid hardships in xiarticular
cases.
In the consideration of these claims, complicated and difficult
questions of law and fact are frequently encountered. The instructions
of the Department to its agents required the seizure of all cotton found
on the Confederate cotton lists as proxierty of the rebel government.
These lists include considerable amounts of cotton which, it is claimed,
the owners did not sell to the so-called Confederate States, as well as
some which it is averred was sold under duress; some by xiersons
claiming to be agents for the OAvners, but whose agency is denied; and,
in still other cases, it is claimed that the sales are void because made
by fiduciaries without requisite authority, and in violation of State
statutes. In disposing of these questions the Department necessarily
acts in most instances on ex parte xiroofs, which are often most unsatisfactory, even where made with no purpose to defraud.
It is submitted for the consideration of Congress that the Treasury
Department is not a suitable tribunal for the ultimate decision of such
questions. They belong more properly to the courts, which are armed
with power to ascertain the truth, -and are bettfer organized for this
Xiurx"^ose than an Executive Department of the Government.
REPORTS OF BUREAU OFFICERS.

Herewith are transmitted the reports of the different bureau officers,
viz: Firs> and Second Comptrollers, the Commissioner of Internal
Eevenue, the Comptroller of the Currency, the Commissioner of Customs, the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Auditors, and the




REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

XLVII

Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office Department, the Treasurer,
the Eegister, the Director of the Mint, the Chief of the Bureau of
Statistics, the Solicitor of the Treasury, the Superintendent of the
Coast Survey, the Light-house Board, and the Suxiervising Architect,
which are referred to as furnishing information in detail of the
business of the Department.
B. H. BEISTOW,
Secretary of the Treasury,
The Honorable JAMES G . BLAINE,

Spealcer of tlie House of Representatives,




TABLES

AOOOMPANimG THE REPOET.







REPORT

OF T H E

SECRETARY

OF T H E

TREASURY.

6

TABLE A.—Statement of the net receipts {hy ivarrants) during thefisoal year ended JwneW,
'1874.
CUSTOMS.

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

September 30, 1873
December 31, 1873'
March 31, 1874
J u n e 30, 1874

.-..

$49,195,403
31, 398, 449
43,665,331
38, 844, 649
•

.'
SALES OF Pu'feLTC

Quarterended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarter ended

68
18
40
43
$163,103, 833 69

LANDS.

September 30, 1873
December 31, 1873
March 31, 1874
J u n e 30,1874

573,768 07
501, 537 95
368,791 78
-408,33113 •
1, 852, 428 93
INTERNAL

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

REVENUE.

September 30,1873
December 31,1873
March 31, 1874
J u n e 30,1874

25,640,454
22,508,064
25,029,076
29, 232,189

41
.55
53
41
102, 409, 784 90

TAX ON CIRCULATION,

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
euded

DEPOSITS,

September 30,1873
Decemher 31, 1873
March 31,1874
J u n e 30, 1874

ETC.,

OF NATIONAL

BANKS.

3,490,743
32,187
3,467,090
40,016

^
.\.

66
63
21
67
7, 030, 038 17

REPAYMENT

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

OF I N T E R E S T

September 30,1873
December 31, 1873
March 31, 1874
J u u e 30, 1874

BY P A C I F I C R A I L W A Y

COMPANIES.

'.

198,970
243, 903
385, 353
200,668

i.
.

.56
35
00
65
1, 028, 895 56

CUSTOMS F I N E S , P E N A L T I E S ,

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

AND

FORFEITURES.

September .30,1873
December 31, 1873
March 31, 1874...
J u n e .30, 1874
.'

183, 6.54
144,974
256,928
65, 713

34
63
94
85
651,27176

FEES-CONSULAR,

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

ended
ended
ended
ended

AND

LAND.

September 30,1873
Deceraber 31,1873
March 31, 1874
J u n e 30, 1874

503,941
407, 281
435,066
551, 901
^
OF SALES OF GOVERNMENT

12
21
14
27

303, 765
375. 586
705,353
314, 312

PROCEEDS

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

LETTERS-PATENT,

32
60
23
48

1,898,189 74

PROPERTY.

Septemher 30,1873
December 31, 1873
March 31, 1874
J u n e 30,1874

1, 699, 017 63
P R E M I U M ON SALES OF

Quarter
Quarter
Quarter
Quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

COIN.

September 30,1873
Deceraber 31, 1873
March 31, 1874
J u n e .30,1874

:

2, 350, 818
92, 937
599,629
1,994,279

34
49
60
79
5, 037, 665 22

MISCELLANEOUS

Quarter ended
Quarter ended
Quarterended
Quarter ended

September 30,1873
December 31,1873
March 31,1874
J u n e 30, 1874

SOURCES.

1, 762, 791
816, 674
1,289,917
898,247

08
90
04
44
4,767,630 46

Total ordinary receipts, exclusive of loans
P a y m e n t by the British government of the a w a r d of the tribunal of arbitration at G e n e v a . .
Excess of net receipts from loans over redemptions.

289, 478, 756 06
15, 500, 000 00
17, 207, 475 23

Total net receipts
322,186, 231 29
" Balance iu T r e a s u r y J u n e 30,1873, (including $1,038.78 received from " u n a vailable ")
|131,193, 067 28
Deduct unavailable balances with depositaries carried to their debits on books
*
of the Register and to the credit of the T r e a s u r e r United States
13, 730 18
Available balance J u n e 30, 1873
Total

'




- 131,179,337 10
45.3,365,568 39

4

R E P O R T OF T H E

SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE B.—Statement of the net dishursements (hy ivarrants) during the fiscal year ended June
30, 1874.
CIVIL.

Congress
'.
Executive
Judiciary
Government of Territories
Sub-treasuries
Public land-offices
Inspection of steam-vessels
Mints and assay-offices

$5,942,104
6, 700, 311
3,344,817
300,789
390, 978
610, 807
222,109
115, 194

93
58
76
69
71
88
75^
79'

Total civil list

$17,627,115 09
FOREIGN

INTERCOURSE.

Diplomatic salaries
:.
Consular salaries
Contingencies,of consulates
Relief and protection of American seamen
^
Rescuing American seamen from shipwreck
American and Mexican claims commission
American and Spanish claims commission
American and British claims commission
Trib'unal of arbitration at Geneva
Capitalization of Scheldt dues
R e t u r n of consular receipts
International exposition at Vienna
*.......
S u r v e y of boundary between United States and British possessions
A w a r d s under iifteenth article of treaty between the United St.;tes and Mexico.
Contingent and miscellaneous

407, 899
371, 576
100, 330
40, 454
3, 877
25, 029
15, 690
.32, 612
6, 968
66,584
400
37, 791
160, 000
128, 875
109, 973

71
63
49
01
00
96
68
35
49
00
02
74
00
48
71

Total foreign intercourse

1,508,064 27
MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint establishment
1, 151,952 89
Branch mint building
577,309 42
Coast Survey
841, O O 00
O
Light-House Establishment
1, 767, 515 99
Building and repairs of light-houses
,
725, 669 20
Refunding excess of deposits for unascertained duties
4, 272, 702 .53
P a y m e n t s for coins, nickels, &c., destroyed at Chicago . . . :
65, 944 76
Revenue-cutter service
903, 601 83
Building revenue-cutters
202, 956 79
Life-saving service, (including building n e w stations).
180,164 32
Custom-houses, court-houses, post-offices, &c
6, 320, 458 23
F u r n i t u r e , fuel, &c., for public buildings uuder T r e a s u r y De'partment
462, 605 23
Repairs and preservation of public buildings under T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t . . .
371,193 54
Collecting customs-revenue
7, 319, 918 55
D e b e n t u r e and d r a w b a c k s under customs laws
•
1, 301, 977 98
Refunding duties erroneously or illegally collected
14, 0IT 56
Marine-hospitai establishment
409, 037 14
Distributive shares of fines, peualties, and forfeitures
317, 981 12
Assessing and collecting internal revenue
4, 573, 086 89
Punishing violations of internal-revenue laws
20, 287 13
Internal-revenue stamps, paper, and dies
793, 251 89
Refunding duties erroneously.or illegally collected
^.
225, 653 -29
Internal-revenue allowances and drawbacks
33, 004 29
Redemption of internal-revenue stamps
.:.
62, 816 72
Mail-steamship service
.•
500, 000 00
Deficiencies in revenue of Post-Office Department
4,214.044 71
Refunding proceeds of captured and abandoned property
2, 545, 375 45
E x p e n s e s national loan
1,878,569 55
Expenses refunding national debt
702, 726 85
Expenses natioual currency
128, 660 33
Suppressing counterfeiting and frauds
,
119, 612 22
Collection of captured aud abandoned p r o p e r t y
14, 573 00
Contingent expenses independent t r e a s u r y . . .
112, 548 24
Public buildings and grounds in Washington
508, 291 25
Capitol extension, repairs, &c
119, 000 00
Extension and grading of Capitol grounds
124, 950 00
State, W a r , and N a v y D e p a r t m e n t buildings
865,770 14
Columbian Institute for Deaf and D u m b
58, 697 46
Government Hospital for the Insane
176, 000 00
Charitable institutions in Washington
73, 500 00
Metropolitan police
204, 492 79
Support and treatment of transient paupers
14, 750 00
S u r v e y s of public lands
1, 262, 052 20
R e p a y m e n t s for lands erroneously Sold J
41, 757 23
F i v e per cent, fund, &c., to States:
72,100 70
E x p e n s e s of eighth and ninth censuses
.
108, 630 37
Penitentiaries in the Territories
38, 075 90
P a y m e n t s under relief acts
287,381 20
Expenses board of health of District of Columbia
61, 570 00




^

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
P a y m e n t s to teachers of public schools of the District of Columbia
I m p r o v e m e n t of streets and avenues around Government property
Inquiries into causes of steam-boiler explosions
•.
Refunding proceeds of cotton seized
Southern claims commission
Re-issuing of national currency
Postage
-o.....
Miscellaneous items

$97, 740
913, 497
60, 000
180,240
53, 800
45, 028
1,469,790
519, 080

5

50
26
00
06
00
50
53
52

T o t a l miscellaneous

$50, 506, 414 25
INTERIOR

DEPARTMENT.

ndians
Pensions

6,692,462 09
29,038,414 66

T o t a l Interior D e p a r t m e n t

35, 730, 876 75
MILITARY

ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay Department
Commissary D e p a r t m e n t
'
Quartermaster's D e p a r t m e n t
Ordnance D e p a r t m e n t
Medical D e p a r t m e n t
Military Academy
E x p e n s e s of recruiting
Contingencies
:
Signal service
Refugees, freedmen, and abandoned lauds
Bounties to soldiers
Re-imbursing States for raising volunteers
Claims of loyal citizens for supplies
P a y m e n t s uuder relief acts
F o r t s and fortifications
I m p r o v e m e n t s of rivers and harbors
Re-imbursing K e n t u c k y for militia during the rebellion
Suppressing Indian hoHtilities in Montana Territory
Allowance for reduction of wages under eight-hour law
Washington and Oregon volunteers in 1855 and 1856
Hor ses and other pioperty lost in service
Misce llaneous

12,018,441 41
2, 299,023 27
13, 783,172 08
2, 727, 013 55
349, 765 55
119, 523 82
77, 266 88
77, 487" 08
384,273 97
85, 716 90
1, 383, 387 99
64, 477 03
121, 575 74
250, 950 59
2. 263, 991 22
5, 511, 345 24
64, 927 57
88,343 00
72, 426 76
16, 272 23
105, 359 76
448, 285 58

'.

T o t a l military establishment

'

/

42,313 927 22

NAVAL E S T A B L I S H M E N T .

P a y and contingent of the N a v y
•
MarineCorps
Navigation
:
Ordnance
Provisious and Clothing
Medicine and Surgery
E q u i p m e n t and Recruiting
Construction and Repairs
Steam-Engineering
Y a r d s and Docks
P a y ments.under relief acts
S u r v e y i n g isthmuses of Tehuantepec and Nicaragua
Prize-money to captors
Miscellaneous

7,683,33197
1,681,644 41
434, 615 23
1, 425, 445 74
2,187, 012 30
304,686 39
2, 337, 722 12
7,818, 111 06
2, 779, 340 57 ,
2,655,727 17
6, 216 00
9,818 87
1,021, 680 04
587, 235 55

T o t a l n a v a l establishment

30,932,587 42

INTEREST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
T o t a l net ordinary expenditures
P r e m i u m s on bonds purchased
A w a r d of Geneva tribunal, investment account

107,119,815 21
285, 738, 800 21
'.

1, 395, 073 55
15, 500, 000 00
16, 895, 073 55 .

Total n e t disbursements
Balance in T r e a s u r y J u n e 30, 1874..
Total




302, 633, 873 76
150,731,694 63 '
453, 365, 568 39 '-

TABLE C.—Statement of the redemption and issue of loans and Treasury notes {hy warrants) for ilie fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Redemptions.

C h a r a c t e r of loans.

Loan of 1847, act of J a u u a r y 28,1847
Bounty-land scrip, act of F e b r u a r y 11, 1847
Loan of 1858, act of J u n e 14, 1858
Seven-thirties of 1861, a c t o f J u l y 17, 1 8 6 1 . . .
Old demand notes, acts of J u l y 17,1861, August 5, 1861, and F e b r u a r y 12,1862
Legal-tender notes, acts of F e b r u a r y 25,1862, J u l y 11, 1862, J a n u a r y 17,1863, and March 3,1863.
Fractional currency, acts of J u l y 17, 1862, March 3, 1863, and J u n e 30,1864
,
One-year notes of 1863, act of March 3, 1863
T w o - y e a r notes of 1863, act of March 3,1863
Coin-certificates, act of March 3, 1863, section 5
,
Compound-interest notes, acts of March 3,1863, and J u n e 30,1864
Seven-thirties of 1864 and 1865, acts.of J u n e 30,1864, and March 3,1865
Five-twenties of 1862, act of F e b r u a r y 25,1862
Five-twenties of March 1864, act of. March 3, 1864
,
Five-twenties of J u n e 1864, act of J u n e 30,1864
„...
Five-twenties of 1865, act of March 3,1865
.'..,
Consols of 1865, act of March 3,1865
Consols of 1867, a c t o f March 3, 1 8 6 5 . . .
,
Consols of 1868, act of March 3,1865
Three-per-eent. certificates, acts of March 2,1867, and J u l y 25,1868
;
,
F u n d e d loan of 1881, acts of J u l y 14,1870, J a n u a r y 20,1871
Certificates of deposit, act of J u n e 8,1872
Totals .
E x c e s s o f issues
Excess of redemptions
Net excess of issues charged in receipts and expenditures

)120,403,889 00
41,434,916 00
81,117,780 46

200 00
115,800,7.50 00
80, 515, 000 00

$400 00
200 00
606. 000 00
150 00
3, 235 00
403,889 00
352, 985 77
9, 880 00
4,600 00
752, 680 46
64, 190 00
45, 650 00
109,450 00
34.5,100 00
473, .300 00
933,100 00
198, 400 00
390, 350 00
861,500 00
25, 000 00
53, 485, 000 00

Excess~^of
issues.

C^

Excess of redemptions.
$400
200
19,606,000
1,50
3, 235

00
00
00
00
00

O

9, 880
4, 600
16, 634, 900
64,190
45, 650
94,109, 450
1,345,100
8, 473, 300
2, 933,100
4,198, 400
4, 390,150
861, 500
25, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

^
,
V^
g
ra
_
S
^
HH
K
T<
^
^

115, 800, 750 00
27, 030, 000 00

439, 272, 535 46 422, 065, 060 23
|.........
I
I 169,912,680 23
152, 705, 205 00

Kl

o
•rj

152,705, 205 00

17,207, 475 23

N O T E . — I t will be seen t h a t the increase of the principal of the public debt, as shown by this statement, appears to be $17,207,475.23. Congress, by act of J u n e 8,1872, (17 Statutes,
336,) provided t h a t national b a n k i n g associations might deposit United States l«gal-tender notes in the T r e a s u r y of the United States and receive therefor certificates of deposit bearing
no interest, and t h a t the notes so deposited should be set a p a r t and held as a special deposit for the redemptiou of said certificates. T h e certificates outstanding on the 1st day of J u l y ,
and included in the outstanding principal of the debt, amounted to $58,760,000, and the notes held as a special deposit for their redemption were included in the cash balance in the
T r e a s u r y on t h a t day. I t will be seen, therefore, t h a t while these certificates, as a matter of accounts, are treated as a p a r t of the public debt, they do not in reality form a n y portion of
it, in the usual sense of the w o r d , for the reason t h a t no revenue is required to be provided for their p a y m e n t ; the notes which they represent always being in the Treasury as a special
deposit for their redemption, and those notes being inchided in the outstanding legal-tender notes. Omitting these certificates of deposits as offset b y the notes held on deposit for their
redemption, the actual reduction of the principal of the debt w a s $41,552,524.77.




H

|)26, 000, 000 00
1,081,930 23

H
W
^

a

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

7

T A B L E D.—Statemeyit of ihe net receipts {hy ivarrants) for the quarter ended Septemher 30,
1874.
RECEIPTS.
Customs
Sales of public lands
I n t e r n a l revenue
T a x on circulation, deposits,&c., of national b a n k s
R e p a y m e n t of interest b y Pacific railway companies
Customs-fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Consular, letters-patent, homestead, and land fees
Proceeds of sales of Government property
Miscellaneous
P r e m i u m on sales of coiu

$46,651,200 10
391, 465 88
26, 314, 615 33
3,596,148 23
217, 941 97
30, 540 31,
306, 295 10
522, 546 77
1, 400, 294 58
] , 453, 237 72 .

T o t a l ordinary receipts, exclusive of loans
Receipts from loans, in excess of redemptions
Balance in T r e a s u r y J u u e 30, 1874

80, 884, 285 99
5,247, 068 24
] 50, 731, 694 63

Total

236,863,048 86

TABLE E.—Statement ofthe net dishursements {hy warrants) for the quartei' ended Septemher
30,1874.
Customs
I n t e r n a l revenue
Diplomatic service
Judiciary
Interior, (civil)
T r e a s u r y proper
Quarterly salaries

.,

T o t a l civil and miscellaneous
Indians
Pensions
i
Military establishment
N a v a l establishment
Interest on public debt

$5, 236, 648 00
1,178, 587 97
2, 278, 346 06
1, 040, 403 46
1, 292, 688 18
9, 693, 035 84
118,701 .26

?
•
i
.^

20,838,410 77
$3;032,752
8,913,407
11, 618, 290
8,122, 728
32, 787, 899

.'

93
18
99
17
38
64, 475, 078 65

T o t a l net ordinary expenditures
Balance iu T r e a s u r y September 30, 1874

85, 313, 489 42
151, 549, 559 44

-.

Total..

TABLE F . -

236,863,048 86

-Statement of the redemption and issue of loans and Treasury notes {hy warrants)
for the quarter ended Septemher 30, 1874.

Character of loans.

Redemptions.
$18, 325, 000
13, 786, 900
1, 325
30, 674, 401
9. 852, 576
2, 880
900
12,800
5, 200
49, 000
3, 029, 050
1, 650

Certificates of deposit
Coin certificates
Old demaud notes
Legal-tender uotes .One-year notes of 1863
T w o - y e a r notes of 1863
Compound-interest notes
Seven-thirties of 1864 and 1865
L o a n o f 1858
Five-twenties of 1862
Consols of 1867
F u n d e d loan of 1881.
T e m p o r a r y loan
T e x a n indemnity stock
Totals
"
Excess of redemptions
E x c e s s of issues
Net excess of issues




-

$15,915,000 00
17, 377, 400 00

00
00
00
00
76
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$2,410, 000 00
$3, 590, 500 00
1, 325 00
849,723 24
2, 880
900
12,800
5, 200
49, 000
3,029,0.50
1,650

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

6, 397,150 00

75, 500 00
2, 000 00
75, 819,182 76

Excess of re- Excess of issues.
demptions.

30, 674. 401 00
10, 702, 300 00

.
„.

Issues.

6, 397,150 00
75, 500 00
2, 000 00

81.066,251 00.
5,590,305 00
10, 837, 373 24
5, 247, 068 24

10, 837, 373 24

'

8

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE. TREASURY.

TABLE F.—Statemeyit of outstanding principal of the puhlic deht ofthe United States on the
1st of January of each year from 1791 to 1843, inckmve, and on the Ist/of July of each
, yeojr from 1844 to 1874, inclusive.

1791.
1792.
1793.
1794.,
1795-.
1796.,
1797..
1798..
1799..
1800..
1801..
1802..
1803..
1804-.
1805..
1806..
1807.1808..
1809..
1810..
1811.1812..
1813..
1814..
1815..
1816..
1817..
1818-.
1819..
1820..
1821..
1822..
1823..
1824..
1825..
1826..
1827..
1828..
1829-.
1830..
1831..
1832..
1833..
1834..
1835..
18.36..
1837..
1838..
1839..
1840..
1841..
1842..
1843..
1844..
1845.1846.1847..
1848..
1849..
1850..
1851-.
1852..
1853..
1854..
18.55..
1856..
1857..
1858..
1859-I860..
1861..
1862..
1863..
1864..
1865..
1866-.




$75, 463,476 52
77, 227,924 66
80, 352,634 04
78, 427,404 77
80, 747,587 39
83, 762,172 07
82, 064,479 33
79, 228,529 12
78, 408,669 77
82, 976,294 35.
83, 038,050 80'
60, 712,632 25.
77, 054,686 30
86, 427,120 88''
82,312, 150 5075, 723,270 6669,218, 398 6465,196. 317 9757, 023,192 09'
53,173, 217 52
48, 005,587 76.
45, 209,737 9055, 962,827 57
81.487, 846 24
99, 833,660 15127, 334,933 74
123, 491,965 16.
103, 466,633 83
95, 529,648 28
91,015, 566 15
89, 987,427 66
93, 546,676 98
90, 875,877 2&
90, 269,777 77
83i 788,432 71
81,054, 059 99"
73, 987,357 20
67, 475,043 87
58, 421,413 67
48, 565,406 50
39,123, 191 68
24, 322,235 18
7,001, 698 88
4, 760,082 03
37, 513 05
336, 957 83
3, 308,124 07
10, 434,221 14
3, 573,343 82.
5, 250,875 54
13, 594,480 7a
20, 601,226 28
32, 742,922 OO
23,461, 652 5(1
15, 925,303 01
15, 550,202 97
38. 826,534 77
47, 044,862 23
63,061, 858 69
63, 452,773 55 .
68,304, 796 02
66,199, 341 71
59, 803,117 70
42, 242,222 42
35, 586,956 56
31,972, 537 90
28, 699,831 85'
44,911, 881 03
58, 496,837 88
, 64,842,287 88
90, 580,873 72
412
• 524,176, 13
1,119, 772,138 63
1,81.5,784, 370 57.
869
2, 680, 647, 74
2, 773, 236, 69
173

R E P O R T OF TPIE SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

9^

TABLE F.—Statement of outstanding principal of the puhlic debt, cfc.—Continued.
Year.
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874

..

Amount.
...
--.

•
.
...

^2,678,126,103 87
2 611 687 851 19^
2.588,452,213 94
2,480,672,427 81
2 353 211 332 32
2,253,251,328 78
*2, 234, 482, 993 20
*2, 251, 690, 468 43

* I n the amount here stated as the outstanding principal of the public debt are included the certificates of '
deposit outstanding on the 30t.h J u n e , issued under act of J u u e 8, 1872, amounting to $31,730,000 in 1873 and
$58,760,000 in 1874, for which a like amount in United States notes w a s on special deposit in the Treasury for
their redemption, and added to the cash balance in the Treasury. These certificates, as a matter of accounts,
are treated as a p a r t of the p u b h c debt, b u t being oi^'set b y notes held on deposit for their redemption, should
properly be deducted from the principal of the public debt in m a k i n g comparison with former years. (See-.^note a t foot of T a b l e C, page 6.)




10

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
TABLE G.—Statement of the receipts of the United States from March 4, 1789, to June
Balance iu the
Treasury at
c o m m e ncem ent of year.

Customs.

1791
$4, 399, 473 09
I
,
1792
$973, 905 75
3, 443,070 85
1793
783,444 51
4, 255, 306 56
i
,
1794
753,661 69
4,80 065 28
1795
1,151,924 17
5, 588,
.,461 26
1796
516,442 61
6, 567, 987 94
'
,
1797
888, 995 42
7, 549,649 65
1798
1,021,899 04
7,106, 061 93
1799
617,451 43
6,610,
),449 31
1800
2,161,867 77
9, 080 932 73
1801 . 2,623,311 99
10, 750:778 93
1802
3,295,391 00
12, 438:235 74
1803
5, 020, 697 64
10, 479,417 6L
1804
4,825,811 60
11, 098:565 33
1805
4, 037, 005 26
12, 936:487 04
1806
3, 999, .388 99
14, 667,698 17
1807
4, 538,123 80
15, 845,521 61
1808
9, 643, 850 07
16, 363:550 58
1809
9,941,809 96
7,257.506 62
1810
3, 848, 056 78
8,583
1,309 3L
1811
2, 672, 276 57
13,313 222 73
•
181?2
3, 502, 305 80
8, 958,777 53
1813
3,862,217 41
13, 224,623 25
1814
5,196,542 00
5, 998,772 08
1815
1, 727, 848 63
7, 282,942 22
1816
13,106, 592 88
36, 306,874 88
1817
22, 033, 519 19
26, 283,348 49
1818
14, 989, 465 48
17,176, 385 00
1819
1, 478, 526 74
20, 283,608 76
1820
2, 079, 992 38
15, 005,612 15
1821
1,198,461 21
13, 004,447 15
1822
1,681, .592 24
17, 589,761 94
1823
4, 237. 427 55
19, 088,433 44
1824
9,463,922 81
17, 878,325 71
1825
1, 946, 597 13
20, 098,713 45
1826
5,201,650 43 , 23,341, 331 77
1827
6, 358, 686 18 I 19,712, 283 29
1828
6,668,286 10 i 23, 205,523 64
1829
5, 972, 435 81
22, 681,965 91
1830
5, 755, 704 79
21, 922,391 39
1831
6,014,539 75
24, 224,441 77
1832
4,502,914 45
28, 465.237 24
1833
2, Oil, 777 55
29, 032i508 91
1834
11,702,905 31
16,214, 957 15
1835
19,391, 310 59
1836 , 8, 892, 858 42
26, 749, 803 96
23, 409,940 53
1837
46, 708, 436 00
11,169, 290'39
1838
37, 327, 2.52 69
16,158, 800 36
1839
36, 891,196 94
23, 137,924 81
1840
33,157, 503 68
13, 499,502 17
1841
29, 963,163 46
14, 487,216 74
1842
908
. 18,187, 76
1843" 28,685,111 08
30, 521, 979 44
7, 046,843 91
1844
39,186, 284 74
•1845
26, 183,570 94
1846 ^ 36, 742, 829 62
27, 528, 112 70
36, 194, 274 81
1847
26,712: 667 87
38,261,959 65
1848
23, 747,864 66
.33, 079, 276 43
1849
31,757, 070 96
29,416,612 45
1850
28, 346,7.38 82
32, 827, 082 69
1851
39, 668,686 42
35,87,1,753 31
1852
49, 017,567 92
40, 158, 353 2d^
1853
47, 339,326 62
43. 338, 860 02
1854
58,931, 865 52
50,261,901 09
1855
64, 224,190 27
48,591,073 41
1856
53, 025,794 21
1857
47, 777, 672 13
64, 022T 863 50
1858
49, 108, 229 80
63, 875,905 05
1859
46, 802, 855 00
41,789, 620 96
1860
35,113, 334 22
49, 565,824 38
1861
33,193, 248 60
53,187, 511 87
1862
32, 979, 530 78
39, 582 125 64
1863
30, 963, 857 83
49, 056 397 62
1864
46, 965, 304 87
69, 059,642 40
1865
36, 523, 046 13
102,316: 152 99
134, 433, 738 44
84, 928,260 60




Internal revenue.

$208, 942 81
337, 705 70
274, 089 62
337, 755 36
47.5,289 60
575,491 45
644, 357 95
779, 136 44
809, 396 55
1, 048. 033 43
621',898 89
215,179 69
50, 941 29
21,747 15
20, 101 45
13,051 40
8,190 23
4, 034 29
7, 430 63
2, 295 95
4, 903 06
4, 755 04
1,662,984 82
678, 059 07
124, 708 31
678,100 77
955, 270 20
229, 593 63
106, 260 53
69, 027 63
67,665 71.
34,242 17
34, 663 37
25,771 35
21, 589 93
19, 8S5 68
17, 451 54
14, 502 74
12,160 62
6,933 51
11, 630 65
2, 759 00
4, 196 09
10,459 48
370 00
5, 493 84
2, 467 27
2, 553 32
1, 682 25
.3,261 36
495 00
103 25
1,777 34
3,517 12
2, 897 26
375 00
375 00

37, 640, 787 95
109,741,134 10
209,464,215 25

Direct tax.

$734, 223 97
534, 343 .38
206, 565 44
•71, 879 20
50, 198 44
21, 882 91
55, 763 86
34, 732 56
19, 159 21
7, 517 31
12, 448 68
7, 666 66
859 22
3, 805 52
2,219, 497 36
2, 162,673 41
4, 253,635 09
1, 834,187 04
264, 333 36
83, 650 78
31, 586 82
29, 349 05
20, 961 56
10, 337 71
201
fi, 96
2, 330 85
6, 638 76
2, 626 90
2, 218 81
335 05
11. 980 59
16, 506 01
10, 791 13
6, 394 12
19 80
, 263 33
728 79
, 687 70
'755'22'

1, 795, 331 7 3 4
1,485,103 61
475, 648 96
1, 200, 573 03

P u b U c lands.

Miscellaneous.

$10,478 10
9,918 65
21,410 88
53, 277 97
28, 317 97
$4,836 13
1,169,415 98
83, 540 60
399, 139 29
11,963 11
58,192 81
86,187 56
443 75
152,712 10
167, 726 06
34.^649 15
188, 628 02 1, 500, 505 86
165, 675 69
131, 945 44 •
487, 526 79
139, 075 53
540, 193 80
40, 382 30
765, 245 73
51, 121 86
466,163 27
38, 550 42
647, 939 06
21,822 85
442, 252 33
62, 162 57
696, 548 82
84, 476 84
, 040, 237 53
59,211 22
710, 427 78
126,165 17
835, 655 14
271,571 00
, 135, 971 09
164,399 81
, 287, 959 28
285, 282 84
, 717, 985 03
273, 782 35
,991,226 06
109,761 08
,606, 564 77
57, 617 71
274, 422 78
57,098 42
635,871 61
61,338 44
212,966 46
152,589 43
803,581 54
452, 957 19
916,523 10
141,129 84
984,418 15
127, 603 60
21.6,090 56
130,451 81
393, 785 09
94, 588 66
495, 845 26
018, 308 75 1,315,722 83
65, 126 49
517.175 13
112, 648 55
329, 356 14
73, 227 77
210,815 48
584,124 05
623, 381 03
270,410 61
967, 682 55
470, 096 67
857, 600 69
480, 812 32
757, 600 75
759,972 13
877.179 86
2, 245, 902 23
776; 236 52
730, 945 66 7,001,444 59
6, .41.0, 348 45
361,576 40
979, 939 86
41.1,818 63
2,567,112 28
365, 627 42
1, 004, 054 75
335,797 52
451,995 97
898,158 18
285, 895 92
059, 939 80
1, 075, 419 70
077, 022 30
361, 453 68
694, 452 48
289, 950 13
498, 355 20
220, 808 30
328, 642 56
612,610 69
688 959 55
685, 379 13
859, 894 25
2, 064, 308 21
352, 305 30
043, 239 58 1,185, 166 11
464,249 40
667, 084 99
988,081 17
470, 798 39
1,105, 352 74
497, 049 07
827,731 40
917,644 93
829, 486 64 1,116,190 81
1, 259, 920 88
513,715 87
756, 687 30 1, 352, 029 13
1, 454, 596 24
778,557 71
1,088, 530 25
870, 658 54
152, 203 77 1, 023, 515 31
167,617 17
915,-327 97
588, 333 29 3,741,794 38
996, 553 31 30,291,701 86
25,441,556 00
* For the half year from Jan

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. '

11

30. 1874, hy calendar years to 1843, and hy fiscal years {ending J u n e 30) f r o m that time.

N e t ordinary
receipts.

Interest.

Premiums.

Receipts from
loans aud Treasury uotes.

Gross receipts.

Unavailable.

$361, 391 34
$4,771,342 53
$4,409,951 19
5,102, 498 45]
8, 772, 458 76
3,669,960 31
1, 797, 272 01
6,450, 195 15
4,652,923 14
9,439,855 65
4, 007, 950 78]
5,431,904 87
9.515,7.58 59
3, 396, 424 00
6,114,534 .59 $4, 800 00
8; 740, 329 65
320, 000 00
8, 377, 529 65 42, 800 00
8, 758, 780 99
70, 000 00
8, 688, 780 99
8, 179,170 80
200, 000 00
7, 900, 495 80 78, 675 00
12,546,813 3lj
7,546,81.3 31
5, 000, 000 001
12, 413, 978 34
1, 565, 229 24
10,848,749 lOl
12, 945, 455 95|
12, 93.5, 330 95 'i6,'i25'o6
14,995,793 95
14, 995, 793 95
11,064,097 63
11,064,097 63
11,826,307 38|
11,826,307 38
13, 560, 693 20
13, 560, 693 20|
15,559,931 07
15,5.59,931 07
16,398,019 26
16, 398, 019 26
17,060,661 93
17, 060, 661 93
7,773,473 1^
7, 773, 473 12
2, 750, 000 00
12,134,214 21
9,384,214 28
14,422,634 09
14,422,634 09
22, 639, 032 76
9,801,132 76
12, 837, 900 00
40, 524, 844 95|
14,340,409 95
26,184, 135 .00
300 OOl
11,181,625 16
23, 377, 826 00
34, 559, 536 95
85 79
15,696,916 82 11,541 74
50,961.237
$32,107 64' 35, 220, 671 40|
47, 676, 985 66 68,665.16
57,171,421 82|
9, 425, 084 91
686 091
33, 099, 049 74| 267,819 14
33, 833, 592 33
466, 723 451
21,585,171 04
21, 593, 936 66
412 621
8, 353 00
24, 603, 374 37|
291 00
24, 605, 665 37
2,
17, 840, 669 55
20, 881, 493'68
3, 000, 824 13
324 col 19, 573, 703 72
14, 573, 379 72
5, 000,
20, 232, 427 94
20, 232, 427 94
20. 540, 666 26]
20, 540, 666 26
24,381,212 791
19,381,212 79
5, 000, 000 00
21.840,858 021
5, 000, 000 00
26, 840, 858 02
25,260,434 21
25,260,434 21
22, 966, 363 96]
22, 966, 363 96]
24, 763, 629 23
24, 763, 639 23
24, 827, 627 38
24, 827, 627 381
24,844,116 51
24,844,116 51'
28, 526, 820 82|
28, .526, 820 82
31,867,450 66
31, 867, 450 66
33, 948, 426 25
33, 948, 426 25
21,791,9.35 55
21,791,935 55
35,430,087 10
35, 430, 087 10
50,826,796 '
50, 826, 796 08
24, 954,153 04
2,992,989 15
27, 947,142 19
63, 288 35
26, 302, 561 74
12, 716, 820 86
39, 019, 382 60
31,482,749 6l|
35, 340, 025 821,458,782 93
3, 857, 276 21
19,480,115 3.3
5, 589, 547 51
25, 069, 662 84
37, 469 25
16, 860, 160 27
13,659,317 38|
30, 519, 477 65
19,976,197 25
14, 808, 735 64
34, 784, 932
11,188 00
20,782,410 451
8, 231, 001 26
71,700 83 12,479,708 36!
31,198, 5.55 73
1,877,181 351
29, 320. 707 78
666 60
29, 970,105 80|
29, 970.105 80
28, 251 90 •
29, 699, 967 74
29, 699, 967 74
26,467,403 16|
28,365 91 28, 872,399 45
55, 368,168 52!
35, 698, 699 21
37, 080 OOl 21,256, 700 00
56, 992, 479 21
59, 796, 892 98
30, 721, 077 501
487, 065 48 28, 588,750 OOl
47, 649, 388 881
43,592, 888 88
10, 550 00
4, 045,950 00
52, 762, 704 251
52; 555, 039 33
4, 264 92
203, 400 00
49,893,115 60
49,846,815 60
46, 300 00
61,603,404 181 103, 301 37
61,.587,03l 6«
16, 350 00
22 50
73,800,341 40
73, 802, 343 07
2, 001 67
800 00
65, 350, 574 68
65,351,374 68]
200 00
74,0.56,699 24
74, 056, 899 24
68,965,312 57
3, 900 oo'
68, 969, 212 57
46, 6.55, 365 96
23, 717,30O OOl
70, 372, 665 96
52, 777,107 92
28, 287,,500 00
81,773,965 64!
709, 357 72
15, 408 34
56, 054, 599 83
10, 008 00 20, 776,800 00| 76,841,407 8.3|
41,476,299 49
41,861, 709 74
83,371,640 13
33, 630 90
51,919,261 09
68, 400 00 529, 692,460 50 581,680,121 59
11,110 81
602, 345 44 776, 682, 361 57 889, 379, 652 52
112,094,945 51
6, 001 01
21,174,101 01 1,128,87.3,
,945 36 1,393,461,017 57
243,412,971 20
9,210 40
322, 031,158 19
11,683,446 89 1,472,224,740 85 1, 80.5, 939, 345 93|
6, 095 11
u a r y 1,1843, to J u n e 30,1843.

1791
17921
$8, 028 00
1793
38, 500 00
17941
303, 472 00
160, 000 00
17951
160, 000 00
1796
1797
80, 960 00
79, 920 00
1798
71, 040 00
1799
71, 040 00
1800
88, 800 00
1801
39, 960 00
1802
18031
1804
18051
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
202, 426 31
525. 000 00
1818'
675, 000 00
18191
18201 I, 000, 000 00
105, 000 00
1821
297, 500 00
]822l
350, 000 00
1823
18241 - 350, 000 00
367, 500 00
18251
1826 > 402, 500 00
' 420, 000 00
• 1827
455, 000 00
1828
490,000 00
1829
490, 000 00
1830
490, 000 00
1831
490, 000 00
1832
-474, 985 00
• 1833
234,349 50
. 1834
506, 480 82
18351
292,674 67
18361
1837
18381
1839
1840|
1841
18421
1843|
1844
18451
1846
1847
1848
1849
18501
1851
1852]
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
18601
]861
18621
1863
1864
• 1865




12

R E P O R T OF T H E

SECRETARY OF

THE

TREASURY.

TABLE G.—Statement of the receipts of the United States
Balance in the
T r e a s u r y at
c o m m e n cement of year.

Customs.

1866
1867

$33, 933, 657 89
160, 817, 099 73

$179, 046, 651 58
176,417,810 88

1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874

198, 076, 537
158, 936, 082
183, 781. 985
177,604,116
1.38,019,122
134,666,001
159, 293, 673

1
.

09
87 •
76
51
15
85
41

164, 464, 599
180, 048, 426
194, 538, 374
206, 270, 408
216, 370, 286
188, 089, 522
163,103, 8.33

I n t e r n a l revenue.

56
63
44
05
77
70 .
69

3, 548, 824, 433 87

Direct tax.

$;309;226,813 42 $1,974,754 12
266, 027, 537 43 4, 200, 233 70
191,087,589 41
158,356,460 86
184, 899, 756 49
143,098,153-63
130, 642; 177 7-2'
113.729.314 14
102, 409, 784 90

1, 788, 145
765, 685
229,. 102
580, 355

85
61
88
37

315, 254 51

Public lauds.

Miscellaneous.

$665, 031 03 $29, 036, 314 23
1, 163, 575 76 15, 037, 522 15
1,348,715
4, 020, 344
.3,350,481
2, 388, 646
2,575,714
2.882,312
1, 852, 428

41
34
76
68
19
38
93

17, 745, 403
13, 997, 3.38
12, 942,118
22,093,541
15, 106, 051
17,161,270
32, .575, 043

59
65
30
21
23
05
32

1, 978, 601, 738 09 27, 554, 926 93 199, 023, 927 58 285, 309, 404 39

I




* Amounts heretofore credited to the Treasurer as una

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY,

13

rom March 4, 1789, to June 30, 1874, ^-c—Continued.

\
Dividends.

1866
1867

Net ordinary
receipts.

$519, 949, ,564 38
462, 846, 679 92

Interest.

Receipts from
loans aud Treasury notes.

Premiurns.

Gross receipts.

Unavailable.

$38, 083, 055 68 $712, 851, 533 05 11,270,884,173 11 $172, 094 29
27, 787 330 35 640, 426, 910 29 1,131, 060, 920 56 721, 827 93
2, 675, 918 19

1868
1869
1870
1871
187'>
187?
1874

376, 434, 453
357, 188, 256
395, 959, 833
374, 431,104
364, 694, 229
322,177, 673
299, 941, 090

82
09
87
94
91
78
84

29, 203, 629
13,755,491
15, 295, 643
8, 892, 839
9,412,637
11, 560, 530
5, 037, 665

50
12
76
95
65
89
22

625, 111, 433
2.38, 678, 081
28.5, 474, 496
268, 768, 523
305, 047, 054
214,931,017
439, 272, 535

20 1, 030, 749, 516 .52
609, 621, 828 27
06
696,729,973 6 i
00
652, 092, 468 36
47
679, 153, 921 56
00
548,609,221 67
00
744, 251, 291 52
46

*2, 070 73
*3, 396
*18, 228
*3, 047
12,691

18
35
80
40

$9,720,136 29 6,049,034,567 15 $485,224 45 194, 022, 624 05 8, 0.53, 791, 647 84 14, 297, 334, 063 49 2, 661, 866 53

vailable, aud since recovered and charged to his account.




14

R E P O R T OF. T H E

SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE H.—Statement ofthe expenditures of the United Staies from March 4,1789, to June

Year.

1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
•1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818'•
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828 '
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
18.39
1840
1841
1842
1843*
1844
,1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855.
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862'
1863
1864

War.

$632, 804 03
1,100, 702 09
1,130,249 08
2, 639, 097 59
2,480,910 13
1, 260, 263 84
1,0.39,402 46
2, 009, 522 30
2, 466, 946 98
2, 560, 878 77
1, 672, 944 08
1,179, 1.48 25
822, 055 85
875, 423 93
712,781 28
1, 224, 355 38
1,288,685 91
2, 900, 834 40
3,345,772 17
2, 294, 323 94
2, 032, 828 19
• 11,817,798 24
19, 652, 013 02
20, 350, 806 86
14, 794, 294 22
16, 012, 096 80
8, 004, 236 53
5, 622, 715 10
6, 506, 300 37
2, 630, 392 31
4,461,291 78
•.3,111,981 48
3, 096, 924 43
3, .340, 939 Sf>
3,659,914 18
3, 943,194 37
3, 948, 977 88
4,145, 544 56
4, 724, 291 07
4, 767,128 88
4, 841, 835 55
5, 446, 034 -88
6,704,019 10
5,696,189 38
5, 759,156 89
11,747,345 25
13, 682, 730 80
12,897,224 16
8, 916, 995 80
7, 095, 267 23
'8, 801, 610 24
6, 610, 438 02
2,908,671 95
5, 218,183 66
5, 746, 291 28
10,413,370 58
35, 840, 030 33
27, 688, 334 21
14, 558, 473 26
• 9, 687, 024 58
12,161.965 11
8, 521, 506 19
9, 910, 498 49
11, 722, 282 87
14, 648, 074 07
16,96.3, 160 51
, 19,159,150 87
25, 679, 121 63
23,154, 720 53
16, 472, 202 72
23, 001, .530 67
389, 173, 562 29
603,314,411 82
690. 391. 048 66




'^Navy.

Indiaus.

$27, 000 00
13 648 85
27, 282 83
$6i,'468"97'
13, 042 46
410,562 03 ^ '
23, 475 68
274, 784 04
113, 563 98
382, 631 89
62,396 58
1,381,347 76
16, 470 09
2,858,081 84
20, 302 19
3, 448, 716 03
31 22
2, 111,424 00
. 9, 000 00
> 915,561 87
94,000 00
1,215,230 .53
60, 000 00
1,189,832 75
116,500 00
1, 597, 500 00
196, 500 00
1,649,641 44
234, 200 no
1, 722, 064 47
205,425 00
1,884,067 80
213, 575 00
2, 427, 758 80
337, 503 84
1, 654. 244 20
177,625 00
1, 965, 566 39
151,875 00
3, 9.59; 365 15
277. 845 00
6, 446, 600 10
167, .358 28
7,311,290 60
167, 394 86
8, 660, 000 25
530, 750 00
3, 908, 278 30
274,512 16
3, 314, 598 49
• 319,463 71
2, 953, 695 00
505, 704 27
3, 847, 640 42
463, 181 39
4, 387, 990 00
315.750 01
3,319,243 06
477,005 44
2, 224, 458 98
575,007 41
2, 503, 765 83
380, 781 82
2, 904, 581 56
• 429, 987 90
3, 049, 083 86,
724,106 44
4, 218, 902 45
743, 447 83
4, 263, 877 45
750, 624 88
3, 918, 780 44
705, 084 24
3, 308, 745 47
.576,344 74
3, 239, 428 63
622, 262 47
3, 856. 183 07
930, 738 04
3, 956, 370 29
1,352,419 75
3,901,356 75
1, 802, 980 93
.3, 956, 260 42
1, 003, 953 20
3, 864, 939 06
1,706,444 48
5, 807, 718 23
5, 037, 022 88
6,646,914 53
4, 348, 036 19
6,131,580 53
5,504, 191 34
6,182, 294 25
2, 528, 917 28
6,113, 896 89
2,331,794 86
• 6,001,076 97
2, 514, 837 12
8, 397, 242 95
1,199, 099 68
3,727,711 53
578,371 00
6,498,199 11
1, 256, 532 39
6,297,177 89
1,539,351 35
6. 4.55, 013 92
1, 027, 693 6 i
7, 900, 635 76
1,430,411 . 0
3
9, 408, 476 02
1, 2.52, 296 81
9, 786, 705 92
1, .374,161 55
7,904,724 66
1, 663, 591 47
8,880,581 38
2,829,801 77
8, 918, 842 10
3, 043, 576 04
11, 067, 789 53
3, 880, 494 12
10, 790, 096 32
1,550,339 55
13,327,095 11
2, 772, 990 78
14,074, 834 64
2, 644, 263 97
12, 651, 694 61
4, 354, 418 87
14,053,264 64
4, 978, 266 18
14, 690,-927 90
3, 490, 534 53
11,514,649 83
2,991, 121 54
12. .387,156 52
2,865,481 17
42, 640, 353 09
2,327,948 37
63,261,235 31
3, 152, 032 70 .
85, 704, 963 74
• 2,629,975 97

Pensions.

$175, 813 88
109 243 15 •
80 087 fil
ou, uo' O 1
.

81, 399 24
68, 673 22
100,843 71
92, 256 97
104, 845 33
95, 444 03
64,130 73
73, 533 37
85, 440 39
62, 902 10
80, <i92 80
81, 854 59
81,875 .53
70, 500 00
82, 576 04
87, 833 54
83,744 16
75, 043 88
91.402 10
86,989 91
90, 164 36
69, 656 06
188,804 15
297, 374 43
890, 719 90
2, 41.5, 9.39 85
3,208,376 31
242,817 25
1,948,199 40
1,780,588 52
1, 499, 326 59
1,308,810 57
1, 556, 593 83
976, 1.38 86
850, .573 57
949,594 47
1, 363, 297 31
1, 170, 665 14
1,184, 422 40
4,589, 152 40
3, 364, 285 30
1,954,711 32
2, 882, 797 96
2,672,162 45
2,156, 0.57 29
3, 142, 750 51
2, 603, 562 17
2, 388, 434 51
1, .378, 931 33
839,041 12
2, 032, 008 99
2,400,788 11
1,811,097 56
1, 744, 883 63
1, 227, 496 48
1, 328, 367 64
1. 866, 886 02
2, 293, 377 22
2,401,858 78
1, 756, 306 20
1, 232, 665 00
1,477,612 33
1, 296, 229 65
1, 310, 380 58
1,219,768 30
1,222,222 71
1,100, 802 32
1, 034,599 73
8.52, 170 47
1,078, 5 V3 36
4, 985, 47*3 90

Miscellaueou.f.

$1,083,Q71 61
4, 672, 664 38
511,451 01
750, 350 74
1, 378, 920 66
801, 847 58
1, 259, 422 62
1, 1.39,524 94
1, 039, 391 68
1,337,613 22
1,114,768 45
1, 462, 929 40
1, 842, 635 76
2,191, 009 43
3, 768, 598 75
2,890,137 01
1, 697, 897 51
L 423, 285 61
1.215,803 79
1, 101, 144 98
1, 367, 291 40
1, 683, 088 21
1, 729, 435 61
2, 208, 029 70
2, 898, 870 47
2,989,741 17
3, 518, 936 76
3, 835, 839 51
.3,^067,211 41
2,592,021 94
2, 223,121 54
1, 967, 996 24
2, 022, 093 99
7,155, 308 81
2, 748, 544 89
2, 600,177 79
2, 713, 476 58
3, 676, 052 64
3, 082, 234 65
3,2.37,416 04
3, 064. 646 10
4, 577, 141 45
5,716,245 93
4, 404, 728 95
. 4, 229, 698 53
5, 393, 279 72
9, 893, 370 27
7,160, 664 76
5, 725, 990 89
5, 995, 398 96
6,490 881 45
6, 775, .624 61
3, 202, 713 00
5,645,183 86
5,911,760 98
6,711,283 89
. 6, 885, 608 35
5, 650, 851 25
12, 885, 334 24
16, 043, 763 36
17, 888, 992 18
17,,504,171 45
17,463,068 01
26, 672,144 68
24, 090. 425 43
31,794,038 87
28, 565, 498 77
26,400,016 42
23, 797, 544 40
27, 977, 978 30
23, 327, 287 69
21.38.5,862 59
23,198, 382 37
27, 572, 216 87

* For the half year from Janu

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

' 15

30,1874, hy calendar years to 1843 and hy fiscal years {ended June 20) from that time.

Net
ordinary
expenditures.

1791.
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
183r
18.32
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
18.58
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864

$1, 919,589 52
5, 896,258 47
1, 749,070 73
3, 545,299 00
4, 362,541 72
2, 551,303 15
2, 836, 110 52
4,651, 710 42
6, 480,166 72
7,411, 369 97
4,981, 669 90
3, 737,079 91
4, 002,824 24
4, 452,858 91
6, 357,234 62
6, 080,209 36
4, 984,572 89
6, 504,.338 85
7,414, 672 14
5,311, 082 28
5, 592,604 86
17, 829,498 70
28, 082,396 92
30,127, 686 38
26. 953,571 00
23, 373,432 58
15, 454,609 92
13, 808,673 78
16, 300,273 44
13,134, 530 57
10, 723,479 07
9. 827.643 51
9. 784,154 59
15, 330, 144 71
11.490, 459 94
13,062, 316 27
12, 653, 095 65
13, 296,041 45
12,641, 210 40
13, 229,533 33
13, 864, 067 90
16,516, 388 77
22, 713, 7.55 11
18,425, 417 25
17, 514,950 28
30, 868, 164 04
37, 243, 214 24
33, 849,718 08
26, 496,948 73
24, 139,920 11
840 29
26, ] 96,
24,361, 336 59
11, 256,508 .60
20, 650, 108 01
! 231 43
,
21,895, 369 61
26,418, 459 59
53, 801, 569 37
45, 227, 454 77
82, 865 81
39, 933, ,542 61
37, 16.5,990 09
69,713 19
44, 054, 717
170, 063 42
40, 389,954 56
420, 498 64
44, 078,156 35
51,967, 528 42 2, 877, 818 69
872, 047 39
56, 316,197 72
385, 372 90
66, 772,527 64
363, 572 .39
66, 041,143 70
574,443 08
72, 330,4.37 17
950 07
66, 355,
60, 056,754 71
62, 616,055 78
456, 379,896' 81
694, 004,575 56
811,283, 679 14

ary 1, 1843, to Juue 30, 1843.




Interest.

$1,177, 863 03
2, 373,611 28
2, 097,859 17
2, 752,523 04
2,947. 059 06
3, 239,347 68
3,172, 516 73
2, 955,875 90
2, 815,651 41
3, 402,601 04
4,411, 830 06
4,239, 172 16
3, 949,462 36
4,185, 048 74
2, 657, 114 22
3, 368,968 26
3, 369,578 48
2, 557,074 23
2, 866,074 90
3, 163,671 09
2, 585,435 57
2,451, 272 57
3, 599,455 22
4, 593,239 04
5, 990,090 24
7, 822,923 34
4, 536,282 5;
6, 209,954 03
5,211, 730 56
5,151, 004 32
5, 126,
073 79
5,172, 788 79
4, 922,475 40
4, 943,557 93
4, 366,757 40
3, 975,542 95
3, 486,071 5
3, 098,800 60
2, 542,843 23
1,912, 574- 93
1, 373,748 74
772, 561 50
303, 796 87
202, 152 98
57, 863
14, 996 48
399, 833 89
174, 598 08
284, 977 55
773, 549 85
523, 583 91
1, 833,452 13
1,040, 4.58 18
842, 723 27
1,119, 214 72
765
• 2, 390, 88
3, 565,535 78
3,782, 393 03
3, 696,760 75
4, 000,297 80
3,665, 832 74
3, 070,926 69
2,314, 464 99
1, 953,822 37
1, 593,265 23
1, 652,055 67
2, 637,649 70
3, 144,120 94
4, 034,157 30
13,190, .344 84
24, 729,700 62
53, 685,421 69

Public debt.

Gross expenditures.

Balance
in
Treasury at
the end of
the year.

§699, 984 23
$3, 797,436 78
$973, 905 75
693, 050 25
8, 962,920 00
783,444 51
2, 633,048 07
6, 479,977 97
753,661 69
2, 743,771 13
9, 041,593 17 1,1.51, 924 17
2,841, 639 37
10,'151, 240 15
516, 442 61
2, 577,126 01
888,995 42
8, 367,776 84
2, 617,250 12
8, 625,877 37 1, 021, 899 04
976, 032 09
8, 583,618 41
617,451 43
11, 002,396 97 2,161,867 7 7
1, 706,.578 84
1,138, 563 11
11, 952, 534 12 2,623,311 99
2, 879,876 98
12, 273,376 94 3,295,391 0 0
5, 294,235 24
13,270, 487 31 5, 02Q, 697 64
3, .306,697 07
11, 258. 983 67 4,825,811 6 0
3, 977,206 07
12, 615, 113 72 4, 037, 005 26
4, 583,960 63
13, 598, 309 47 3, 999, 388 99
15,021, 196 26 4, 538,123 80
5, 572,018 64
11,292, 292 99 9, 643, 850 07
2, 938,141 62
16, 762, 702 04 9,941,809 96
7,701, 288 96
13, 867,226 30 3, 848, 056 78
3, 586,479 26
13, 309, 994 49 2, 672, 276 57
241 12
4, 835,
13, 592,604 86 3, 502, 305 80
5, 414,564 43
1,998, .349 88
22, 279,121 15 3,862,217 41
7, 508,668 22
39,190, 520 36 5,196, 542 00
3, 307,304 90
38, 028,230 32 1,727,848 63
39, 582, 493 35 13,106, 592 88
6, 638.832 11
139 59
48, 244, 495 51 22, 033, 519 19
17, 048,
20. 886, 753 57
40, 877,646 04 14,989,465 48
247 59
15,086,
35, 104,875 40 1,478, .526 74
2, 492, 195 73
24, 004, 199 73 2, 079, 992 38
3, 477,489 96
21, 763, 024 85 1,198, 461 21
3,241, 019 83
19, 090, 572 69 1, 681, 592 24
2, 676,160 33
17, 676,592 63 4, 237, 427 55
15,31.4, 171 00 9, 463, 922 81
607, 541 01
31, 898, 538 47 1, 946, 597 13
11,624, 835 83
. 7, 728, 38
587
23, 58,5,804 72 5,201,650 43
24,103, 398 46 6, 358, 686 18
7, 065,539 24
6, 517,596 88
22, 656,764 04 6, 668, 286 10
9, 064,637 47
25, 459,479 52 5, 972, 435 81
9, 860,304 77 • 2.5,044,358 40 5, 755, 704 79
9, 443,173 29
24, 585, 281 55 6,014,539 75
30, 038, 446 12 4,502,914 45
14, 800,629 48
.34, 3.56,698 06 2,011,777 5 5
17, 067,747 79
24, 2.57,298'49 11, 702, 905 31
1, 239,746 51
24,601, 982 44 8, 892, 858 42
5, 974,412 21
328 20
17, 573, 141 .56 26, 749, 803 9 6
30, 868, 164 04 46, 708,436 00
37, 265, 037 15 37, 327, 252 69
21, 822 91
39, 455,438 35 36, 891,196 94
5, 590,723 79
37, 614, 936 15 33.157, 503 6 8
10, 718,153 53
28, 226, 533 81 29, 963,163 46
3. 912,015 62
5, 31.5,
712 19
31, 797,530 03 28,685,111 08
7, 801,990 09
32,936,876 53 30, 521, 979 44
338, 012 64
12,118, 105 15 ,39,186,284 74
11,158, 450 71
33 642,
010 85 36, 742, 829 62
7, 536,349 49
30, 490,4C8 71 36,194, 274 81
371, 100 04
27, 632,282 90 38, 261, 959 6 5
60, 520,851 74 33, 079, 276 43
5, 600,067 65
60, 655,143 19 29,416,612 45
1.3,036, 922 54
56, 386,422 74 32, 827, 082 69
12, 804, 478 54
335 14
44, 604,718 26 35, 871, 753 31
3, 656,
48,476, 104 31 40.158, 353 2 5
654, 912 71
46, 712,608 83 43, 338, 860 02
2,152, 293 05
54, 577,061 74 50,261,901 09
6,412, 574 01
896 95
75, 473,170 75 48,591,073 41
17, 556,
66,164, 775 96 47, 777. 672 13
6, 662,065
618 66
72, 726,341 57 49,108, 229 80
3, 614,
71, 274,587 37 46, 802, 855 0 0
3, 276.606 05
250 82
82,- 062, 186 74 35,113, 334 22
7, 505,
83, 678.642 92 33,193, 248 60
14, 685,043 15
250 00
77,055, 125 65 32, 979, 530 78
13,854,
85, 387,313 08 30, 963, 857 83
18,7.37, 100 00
.322 09 565, 667,563 74 46,965,304 87
96, 097,
181,081, 635 07 899, 815,911 25 36, 523, 046 13
134, 433, 738 44
4301, 572,014 o:i 1,295,541,.114

16

R E P O R T OF

T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
TABLE H.—Statementof the exxDenditures of the United

ar.

1865
1866

War.

Navy.

1867
1868 •
1869
1870
187 L
1872
1873
1874

3, 572. 260, 092
9.5,224,415
123, 246, m ^
78,501,990
57, 6.55, 675
35, 799, 991
35, .372,157
46,32.3,1.38
42, 313, 927

35
63
62.
61
40
82
20
31
22

4, 086, 698, 037 16

Pensions.

Miscellaneous.

$122, 617, 434 07
43, 285, 662 00

$1, 030, 690, 400 06
283,154, 676 06
3, 568, 638, 312 28
*3, 621, 780 07

Indians.

.

$5, 059, 360 71
3, 295, 729 32

$16,347,621 34
15, 605, 549 88

$42, 989, 383 10
40,613,114 17

717,551,816 .39
*77, 992 17

103,369,211 42
*53,286 61

119, 607, 656 01
*9, 737 87

643, 604, 554 33
*718,769 52

717, 629, 808
31, 034. Oil
25, 775, 502
20, 000, 757
21, 780, 229
19,431,027
21, 249, 809
23, .526, 256
30, 932, 587

103, 422, 498
4, 642, .531
4,100, 682
7, 042, 923
3, 407, 938
7, 426, 997
7,061,728
7, 951, 704
6, 692, 462

56
04
72
97
87
21
99
79
42

• 911.359,991 57

03
77
32
06
15
44
82
88
09

151,749,466 56 '

119, 617, .393
20, 936, 551
23, 782, 386
28,476,621
. 28, .340,202
34, 44.3, 894
28, 533, 402
29, 3.59, 426
29,038,414

88
71
78
78
17
88
76
86
66

342, 528, 295 48

644, 323, 323
51,110,223
53, 009, 867
56,474,061
53, 237, 461
60,431,916
60, 984, 757
73, 328,110
8.5,141,593

85
72
67
53
56
23
42
06
61

1,138,091,315 65
* Outstanding

N O T E . — T h i s s t a t e m e n t ' i s made from warrants p a i d b y the T r e a s u r e r up to J u n e 30, 1866. T h e
•balance in the T r e a s u r y J u u e 30, 1874, by this stateraent, is $173,833,339.54, from which should be
430, 1874, $150,731,694.63.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

17

States from March 4,1789, to June 30,1874—Contmued.

Year,

1865
1866

Net
ordinary
expenditures.

Premiums.

$1,217,704,199 28 $1,717,900 11
58, 476 51
38.5,954,731 43

Interest.

Public debt.

Gross expenditures.

Balance
in
Treasury at
the end of
the year.

$77, 395, 090 30 $609, 616,141 68 .$1,906,433,331 37 $33, 933, 657 89
133, 067, 624 91 620, 263, 249 10 1,139, .344, 081 95 165, 301, 654 76

5, 1.52,771,550 43
M, 481, 566 24
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874

7,611,003 56

502, 689. 519 27 2, 374, 677,103 12 8, 037, 749,176 38
*100 31
*4, 484, 555 03 *4, 484, 555 03
*2,' 888 48

5,157,253,116 67
202, 947, 733 87
229, 915, 088 11
190, 496, 354 95
164,421,507 15
157, 583, 827 58
153, 201, 856 19
180, 488, 636 90
194,118, 985 00

7,611,003 56
10,813,349 38
7,001,151 04
1, 674, 680 05
15, 996, 555 60
9, 016, 794 74
6, 958, 266 76
5,105,919 99
1, 395, 073 55

502, 692, 407 75 2, 374, 677.203 43 8,042,233,731 41 160, 817, 099 73
143,781,591 91 7.35, 536, 980 11 1, 093, 079, 655 27 198, 076, 537 09
140, 424, 045 71 692, 549, 685 88 1, 069, 889, 970 74 158, 936, 082 87
584,777,996 11 183,781,985 76
130, 694, 242 80 261,912,718 31
702, 907, 842 88 177, 604,116 51
129,235,498 00 393,254,282 13
691,680,858 90 138, 019,122 15
125, .576, 565 93 399, 503, 670 65
405, 007, 307 54 682, 525, 270 21 134,-666, 001 85
117, 357, 839 72
524,044,597 91 159,293,673 41
104, 750, 688 44 233, 699, 352 58
724, 698, 933 99 178, 833, 339 54
107, 119, 815 21 422, 065, 060 23

" 6, 630, 427, 106 42 65, 572, 794 67 1, 501, 632, 695 475, 918, 206, 260 86 14,115, 838, 857 42

V

outstanding warrants are then added, and the statemeut is by warrants issued from that date. The
deducted the amount deposited with the States, ^28,101,644.91, leaving the net available balance, Juue




18

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TA.BLE I.—Statement of the differences hetween the several accounts showing the outstanding
principal of the puhlic deht, with an explanation, thereof, so far as the examination of th.
accounts has xirogressed.
T h e stateraent of receipts (Table G) shows the araount which has been covered iuto the
,
Treasury, as derived from loans a n d T r e a s u r y notes, from the organization of the Government to and including J u n e 30, 1874, to have been
$8,053,791,647 84
T h e statement of expenditures (Table H) shows the payments from the T r e a s u r y for the
redemption and purchase of loans and T r e a s u r y notes for the same period to have been. 5, 918,206, 260 86
Showing the principal outstanding b y these tables J u u e 30, 1674 ....'
2,135, 585, 386 98
T h e actual outstanding principal at t h a t date, as shown by Tables F and O and by the
debt-statement of J u l y 1, 1874, w a s
2,251,690,468 43
Showing

•.

116,105, 081 45

more outstanding and unpaid principal by the debt-statement aud b y Tables F and 0 thau by t h e
receipts, a n d expenditures, T a b l e s G aud H.
This difference of $116,105,081.45 is thus e x p l a i n e d : T h e following stocks w e r e issued in p a y m e n t of
various debts and clairas, but in the transaction no money ever came into the Treasury.
W h e n the
stock matured, it w a s paid out of the general funds then in the T r e a s u r y . This showed an e x p e n d i t u r e
where there had been no corresponding receipt, and, of course, a statement of the debt made from the
receipts and expenditures on account of loans and T r e a s u r y notes would not be correct, unless these
items were added to the receipt side of the account. Tbis cannot be done until legislation has been
had authorizing i t :
French farmers-general loan
F r e n c h loan of eighteen million livres
Spanish loan of 1781
French loan of ten million livres
F r e n c h loan of six million livres
Balance of supplies due F r a n c e
Dutch loan of 1782
'
Dutch loan.of 1784
Debt due foreign officers
D u t c h loan of 1787
D u t c h loan of 1788
Interest due on the foreign debt
Domestic debt of the Revolution, estimated

;
\..
-.
•
•..

$153, 688
3, 267, 000
174,017
1, 815, 000
1,089,000
24, 332
2,000,000
800, 000
186, 988
400 000
400, 000
1, 771,496
63, 918, 475

89
00
13
00
00
86
00
00
78
00
00
90
44

4,282,151
11, 250, 000
1, 500, 000
7, 000, 000
711,700
5,000,000
303, 573
233, 075
1,000

12
00
00
00
00
00
92
00
00

T h e above are the details (so far as the progress of the examination has developed them)
of the item in the finance report of 1871. (page 20,) " R e v o l u t i o n a r y debt, estimated,
176,000,000"
Mis-sissippi-purchase stock
.'
J
Louisiana-purchase stock
Washington and Georgetown debt assumed by tha United States
tUnited States B a n k subscription stock
Six per cent. N a v y stock
•"Texas-purchase stock
Mexican inderanity stock
VBounty-land scrip
Tompkius fraud iu loan of 1798...

'. „

.•

iThe following amounts represent the discounts suffered iu placing the loans named.
Only the money actually received w a s covered into the T r e a s u r y . ^ T h e difference be• tween this and the face-value of the stock issued was the discount.
To make the
'receipts and 'expenditures on the loan-accounts correct, these discounts should be
• credited to the loans as receipts and charged to a discount account. This also requires
leigislation to en.able it to be done :
iLoan.of 1796
'Loan, of F e b r u a r y , 1813
^Loan of August, 1813
Ten-million loan of 1814
-Six-million loan of 1814
Undesignated stock of 1814
"Loan Of March, 1815
'Loan of F e b r u a r y , 1861

:....-.
\
'.

:The foregoing are the details of the difference of $116,105,081.45, so far as the examination of the public-debt accounts has prqgressed. T h e r e still remains to be explained
,
Which is the resultant error arising out of the differences yet to be discovered and reconciled. T h e full details of this item can only be given after the accounts have all beeu
examined and corrected, and the amount of it may be increased or diraiuished w h e n
the examination of the domestic debt of the Revolution shall have shown w h a t its
true amount is. This examination is still being continued, for the purpose of perfecting
the records.
Total




10,000
2,109, 377
998, 581
1, 983, 895
1. 076, 826
' 93, 868
588, 820
2, 019, 776

00
43
95'
25
97
95
93
10

942, 433 83

116,105,081 45

TABLE K.—Statement showing the condition of the sinhing-fund from its institution in May^ 1869, to and including June 30, 1874.
T H E S E C R E T A R Y O F T H E T R E A S U R Y I N A C C O U N T W^ITH S I N K I N G - F U N D .

DR;.

1, 1868. T o i of 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt,
being for the three months from April 1 to J u u e 30,
1868
J u n e 30, 1869- T o iuterest on $8,691,000, being amount of principal of
public debt purchased during fiscal year 1869 on this
account
Balance to n e w account

J u n e 30, 1869

July

i, 529, 219 63

CR.

By a m o u n t o f principal purchased, $8,691,000, includiug
$1,000 donation, estimated iu gold
,
By accrued interest on the amount of purchases in 1869.

196,590 00
672, 020 23
7, 397, 829 86

7, 397, 829 86
July

1, 1869- T o 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on J u n e
30, 1869, $2,588,452,213.94
T o interest on $8,691,000, a m o u n t of redemption in 1869..
T o iaterest on $28,151,900, araount of principal of public
debt purchased during fiscal y e a r 1870 ou this a c c o u n t . .

J u n e 30, 1870

$7,261,437 30
136, .392 56

25, 884, 522 14
521, 460 00
1,25-1,897 00

J u l y 1. 1869. B y balance
J u n e 30, 1870 B y amouut
in gold
B y accrued
B y balance

from last year
of principal purchased, $28,151,900, estimated
interest on account of purchases in 1870
to new account

,

672, 020 23
25, 893,143 57
351,003 54
744,711 80
27, 660, 879 14

27, 660, 879 14

W
L
J
O
W
H
O

S

a

02

o
K
H

July

1, 1870,

J u n e 30,1871

T o balance from last y e a r
,
T o 1 per cent on the principal of the public debt on J u n e
,30, 1870, $2,480,672,427.81
To iuterest ou redemption of 1869, $8.691.000
T o interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
,
T o interest ou $29,936,250, a m o u n t o f principal of public
debt purchased during fiscal year 1871 on this account.,

744,711 80

J u n e 30, 1871

24. 806, 724 28
521,460 00
1, 689,114 00

By a m o u n t of principal purchased, $29,936,250, estimated
in gold
B y accrued interest on accouut of purchases in 1871
B y balance to new account

1, 1871- T o balance from last y e a r
To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on J u u e
30, 1871, $2,353.211,332.32
J u n e 30, 1872. To interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
T o interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
To interest on redemption of 1871, $29,936,250
...
T o interest on redemption of $32,618,450, amount of priucipal of public debt purchased during fiscal y e a r 1872
on this account
T o balance to n e w account




c
^

1, 557. 264 50
29, 319, 274 58 .

29,319,274 58
July

28, 694, 017 73
367, 782 53
257,474 32

257,474 32.
23,532,113
521, 460
1,689,114
1,796,175

32
00
00
00

J u n e 30, 1872

B y a m o u n t o f principal purchased, $32,618,450, estimated
in gold
^
B y accrued interest ou account of purchases in 1872

32, 248, 645 22
430, 908 38

>Ul
a
^
K

2, 059, 325 50
2,823,891 46
32, 679, 553 60

32, 679, 553 60.
t—1

cc.

DR.

TABLE K.—Statement showing the condition of the .sinking-fund, <fc.—Continuecl.

CB.

INS

O
July

1, 1872. To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on J u n e
.30, 1872, $2,253,251.328.78
J u n o 30,1873. T o interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
T o interest on redemption of 1871, $29,936,250
To interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
To interest on redemption of $28,678,000, amount of principal of public debt purchased during fiscal JQAV 1873
on this account
T o balance to new account

$22, 532, 513 29
521,460 00
1,689, 114'00
1,796, 175 00
1, 957,107 00

J u l y 1, 1872. By balance from last year
J u n e 30, 1873. By amount.of principal purchased, §28,678,000, estiraated
in gold
By accrued iuterest on account of purchases in 1873

July




28, 457, 562
392, 385

O

1, 725, 881 50
1,451,588 95

o
31, 673, 839 74

31, 673, 839 74
1, 1873- To 1 per cent, on the principal of the public debt on J u n e
30, 1873, $2, 234, 482, 993 20
,.
J u n e 30,1874- To interest on redemption of 1869, $8,691,000
,
To interest on redemption of 1870, $28,151,900
T o interest on redemption of 1871, $29,936,250
T o interest on redemption of 1872, $32,618,450
To interest on redemption of 1873, $28,678,000
T o interest on redemption of $12, 936, 450, ampunt of principal of public debt purchased during fiscal year 1874
on this account

$2, 82.3, 891 46

22, .344, 829
521, 460
1, 689, 114
1, 796, 175
1, 9.57,-107
1, 720, 680

93
00
00
00
00
00

J u l y 1, 1873. By balance from last year
J u n e 30, 1874. By amountof priucipal purchased, $12, 936,450, estiraated
in gold
B y accrued iuterest on account of purchases in 1874
By balance to new account

Hrj

1,451,588 95

W

12,872,850 74
222, 586
16,305,421

>

823, 082 00
30, 852, 447 93

O

.30,852,447 93

O
1-3

TABLE L.—Statement showing the.pur chases of honds on account of the sinking-fund during each fiscal year from its institution in May, 1869, to and including
June 30, 1874.

Priucipal redeemed.

Year e n d e d -

P r e m i u m paid. Net cost in currency.

Net cost estimated in gold.

Balance of inInterest due at
terest due at
close of fiscal Accrued interclose of fiscal
est paid iu coin.
year.
year.

O
J U N E 30,

Pive-twenties of
Pive-twenties of
Pive-twenties of
Five-twenties of
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, ] 868

1869.

$1,621,000
70, 000
1,051,000
465, 000
461,000
4, 718, 000
305,000

1862
March, 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

Total

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

8,691,000 00

$253, 822 84
11, 725 00
161,946 45
74, 969 00
73, 736 80
749,208 08
49,442 50

$1,874,822 84
$1, 349, 970 02
• 81, 725 00
57, 552 82
1.212,946 45
873,205 61
539, 969 00
387, 566 28
534,736 80
387, 903 26
5, 467, 208 08 3, 948, 586 11
354, 442 50
256, 653 20

1, 374, 850 67 10, 065, 850 67

7, 261, 437 30

$16,210 00
700 00
10, 510 00
4, 650 00
13, 830 00
141,540 00
9,150 00

$7, 384 60
218 63
1,470 42
2, 683 54
429 04
116,032 35
8,173 98

$8, 825 40
481 37
9,039 58
1,966 46
13,400 96
25, 507 65
976 02

196, 590' 00

136, 392 56

60,197 44

O

K
Q

J U N E 30, 18-;0.

Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
March, 1864
J u u e , 1864
1865

,

3, 542, 050 00
85, 000 00
3,971,400 00
2, 790, 250 00
11, 532,150 00
5, 882. 550 00
348, 500 00
28,151,900 00

Total

49.3, 479 42 4, 035, 529 42 3, 263, 099 51
15, 742 87
100,742 87
75, 658 54
4, 477, 589 91 3, 647, 628 29
506,189.91
2, 606, 636 20
361,735 43
3,151,985 43
, 454, 778 37 12, 986, 928 37 10,681,736 97
861,763 73
6, 744, 313 73 5,309,810 90
308,573 16
53, 363 95
401, 863 95
3, 747, 053 68 31,898,953 68

25, 893, 143 57

.160,919 50
5, 350 00
165, 834 00
105, 257 50
495, 421 50
302, 734 50
19,380 00

45, 994 49
1,080 99
49, 946 00
37,113 53
145,518 29
66, 111 51
5, 238 73

114,925 01
4,209 01
115, 888 00
68, 143 97
349, 903 21
236, 622 99
14,141 27

351,003 54

90.3, 893 46

145,975 00
1,240 00
201,375 00
331,9.33 50
522,117 00
351,528 00
3, 096 00

30, 657 80
388 35
51.703 46
92; 259 58
109, 455 28
76, 745 93
572 13

109, 317 20
851 65
149,671 54
239, 673 92
412,661 72
274, 782 07
2, 523 87

1 557, 264 50
,

367, 782 53

H

1,254,897 00

>^

Pi

o

JUNE 30, 1871.
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
March, 1864
J u u e , 1864
1865

. T o t a l '.




2, 792, 950 00
29, 500 00
3, 967, 350 00
6, 768, 600 00
10, 222, 200 00
6,103, 050 00
52, 600 00
29, 936, 250 00

227, 607 56
2, 277 20
340,529 63
574, 923 00
850, 949 79
541,559 41
4,784 61
2,542,631 20

3, 020, 557 56
31, 777 20
4, 307, 879 63
7, 343, 523 00
11,073,149 79
6,644,609 41
57,384 61

2, 680, 209 05
28, 590 88
3, 847, 182 42
6,525,231 42
9, 762, 387 78
5,800,61.8 37
49,797 81

32, 478, 881 20 28, 694, 017 73

;>
d

1,189,481 97

to

TABLE L.—Statement showing the purchases of honds on agpount of the sinking-fund during each fiscal year from its institution, cfc—Continned.

Year ended—

J U N E 30,

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

32, 618, 450 00

of
of
of
of

Net cost estimated in gold.

Interest due at Accrued interclose of fiscal est paid in coin.
year.

Balance of interest due at
close of fiscal
year.

$764, 055
14, 959
438, 656
436, 8.38
1, 436, 989
833,-600
9,951

21
03
16
70
46
15
63

3, 935, 050 34-

$7, 181, 905
142, 059
4, 043, 306
4, 072, 038
13,225,889
7, 792, 500
95, 801

21
03
16
70
46
15
63

36, 553, 500 34

$6, 345, 391
126, 123
3, 573, 223
3, 594, 747
11.660,785
6, 863, 777
84, 595

98
46
63
85
89
39
02

32, 248, 645 22

$427, 849
8,894
246, 001
246, 562
707, 334
417, 534
5,151

00
00
50
00
00
00
00

2, 059, 325 50

$75,179
1,338
.57, 449
37, 817
149,248
108,487
1,386

43
70
80
37
21
92
95

$352, 669 57
7, 555 30
188,551 70
208, 744 63
558, 085 79
309, 046 08
3, 764 05

430, 908 38

1, 628, 417 12

-....
....

H
CQ
Q

1873.

1862
March, 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

Total

Net cost in currency.

o
$6,417,850
127.100
3, 604; 650
3, 635, 200
11,788,900
6. 9.58, 900
85, 850

Total
J U N E 30,

Premium paid.

1872.

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u u e , 1864
Pive-twenties of 1865
Consols, 1865...•Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

Principal redeemed.

IN2

to

7,137,100
50, 000
3, 741,150
1,959,850
10, 768, 250
4, 402,100
619,550

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

28, 678, 000 00

925, 783
7, 372
480, 684
250, 635
1,371,187
553, 610
81.983

87
50
37
93
17
89
44

3, 671, 258 17

8, 062, 883
57, 372
4,221,834
2, 210, 485
12,139, 4.37
. 4,955, 710
701,533

87
50
37
93
17
89
44

32, 349, 258 17

7, 089, 542
49,780
3, 715, 211
1, 943, 488
10, 668, 617
4, 373, 781
617,140

58
91
22
93
09
76
34

28, 457, 562 83

431,450
3, 500
223, 270
120, 266
646, 095
264, 126
37,173

50
00
50
50
00
00
00

1, 725, 881 50

101,960
813
42, 216
23, 744
14.5,069
69, 632
8, 948

57
70
46
47
.34
51
40

392, 385 45

329, 489 93
2, 686 30
181,054 04
96, 522 03
501,025 66
194, 493 49
28,224 60

Kj

O

^^

1,333,496 05

W
J U N E 30,

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of J u u e , 1864
Five-twenties of 1865.
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
Total
Grand t o t a l . ' .




1874.

1,421,700
2, 020, 550
1, 247, 250
3, 393, 650
4, 051, 000
802,300

00
00
00
00
00
00

12,936,450 00
141,012,050 00

161,219
218,457
135, 577
360, 964
432, 348
86, 505

79
39
95
62
18
62

1, .395, 073 55
16,665,917 61

1,582,919
2, 239, 007
1,.382, 827
3, 754, 614
4,483,348
888, 805

79
39
95
62
18.
62

1,415,391
2,012,051
1,241,571
3, 374, 934
4, 029, 975
798, 926

05
32
69
42
86
40

14,331,523 55

12,872,850 74

157,677,967 61

135,427,657 39

99, 519
141,438
87, 307
203, 619
243, 060
48,138

00
50
50
00
00
00

823, 082 00
7,617,040 50

31,743 95
48, 013 46
29,348 19
46, 489 33
55, 976 97
11,014 38
222, 586 28
1,901,058 74

67, 775 05
. 93, 425 04
57, 959 31
157,129 67
187,083 03
37,123 62
600, 495 72
5,715,981 76

02

d
Kl

TABLE M.—Statement showing the purchases of honds in excess of Ike amount required for the sinldng-fund during each fiscal year from the commcnci.ment of
the purchases in May, 1869, io and including June 30, 1874.

Principal redeemed.

Year ended—

Premium paid.

Net cost in currency.

Net cost estimated in gold.

Interest due at Accrued interclose of fiscal. est paid in
coin.
year.

Balance of interest due a t
close of fiscal
year.

O
JUNE

30,1870.

,

-.

Total

$9, 975, 250 00
597, 400 00
11,742,700 00
7, 620, 350 00
36,118,200 00
18,426,800 00
2,105, 500 00

$1, 438, 465 74
116,951 00
1,76^7,653 37
1,102,967 .36
5,242,087 61
2, 922, 445 22
364,879 14

$11,413,715 74
714,351 00
13,510,353 37
8. 723, 317 36
41,360,287 61
21, 349, 245 22
2, 470, 379 14

$9,026,361 36
532,078 21
10, 680, 518 21
7,051,018 61
32, 775, 094 65
16,374,250 02
1,869,116 40

.«502, 456 55
40, 948 00
589, 697 55
328, 437 85
1,861,918 50
1, 037, 727 00
123, 495 00

$110,968 99
9,621 13
146,031 16
94,005 47
483, 633 72
206, 748 21
23,141 27

$391, 487 56
• 31, 326 87
443,666 39
234, 432 38
1,378,284 78
830, 978 79
100, 353 73

86, 586, 200 00

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties, 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
'.
Consols, 1868

12,955,449 44

99,541,649 44

78, 308,437 46

4, 484, 680 45

1,074,149 95

3,410,530 50

H

o

J U N E 30,1871.

>

7, 695, 250 00
100, 500 00
7,145, 950 00
9, 117,750 00
24, 476, 800 00
10,741,5.50 00
163, 600 00

Total

725, 443 91
10, 862'25
657, 670 36
877,459 15
2,348,715 50
1,011,485 32
16, 802 01

7,517,031 86
8, 420, 693 91
111,362 25
100,135 51
7, 803, 620 36
6, 968, 994 28
9, 995, 209 15 8. 875, 458 67
26, 825, 515 50 23, 917, 450 48
11, 753, 035 32 10, 430, 837 44
180, 402 01
159, 625 18

315,865 00
1, 335 00
280, 772 50
362,211 00
988, 482 00
478, 047 00
6,813 00

88,115 14
196 94
88, 675 02
90,147 01
355, 280 .04
153,991 14
2, 780 76

227, 749 86
1,138 06
192,097 48
272, 063 99
633, 201 96
324, 055 86
4, 032 24

59, 441, 400 00

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
L
Five-twenties. 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
.'..-.

5, 648, 438 50

65, 089, 838 50 57, 969, 533 42

2, 433, 525 50

779,186 05

1, 654, 339 45

H

12, 364, 000 00
54,000 00
4, 299, 550 00
1, 868, 400 00
7, 909, 700 00
705, 750 00
.
8, 950 00

1,359,618 69
6, 549 90
495, 186 15
209, 232 93
• 999, 620 72
95, 071 84
1,170 36

13, 723, 618 69 12,317,868 38
60, 549 90
53,884 81
4, 794, 736 15 4, 279, 233 48
2, 077, 632 93 1,858,868 91
8, 909, 320 72 7, 875, 863 64
800, 821 84
703, 446 24
10,120 36
8, 918 01

354, 487 00
1,020 00
104,153 50
49, 536 00
237, 501 00
21,285 00
283 50

132,389 84
389 92
46, 626 09
16, 649 96
155,887 37
13, 956 70
486 94

222, 097 16
630 08
57,527 41
32, 886 04
81,613 63
• 7, 328 30
96 56

a

27, 210, 350 00

3,166, 450 59

30, .376, 800 59 27, 098, 083 47

768, 266 00

366, C86 82

'402,179 18

K^

O

J U N E 30,1872.

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
\ Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties, 1865
Con.sols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
Total




,

Ul

Kl

to
CO

TABLE M.—Statement showing the xmrchases of honds in excess of the amount.required for the sinking-fund during each fiscal year, cfc.—Continued.

Year ended -

J U N E 30,

Five-twenties of 1862
Five-twenties of March, 1864
Five-twenties of J u n e , 1864
Five-twenties, 1865
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868
Total
Grand total




Principal redeemed.

Premium paid.

Net cost in currency.

Net cost estimated in gold.

Interest due at
close of fiscal
year.

Accrued interest paid iu

Balance of iuterest due at
close of fiscal
ye'^r.

to

^

•

O

1873.

$3, 092, 200
6, .300
1,915,450
550, 700
2, 279, 7.00
8.57, 250
302, 200

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$435, 582
956
272,520
78, 272
.325, 646
131- 063
47, 386

12
16
18
53
23
53
90

$3, 527, 782
7,256
2,187, 970
628,972
2, 605, 346
988, 313
349, 586

12
16
18
53
23
53
90

| 3 , 052, 928
6,162
1, 895, 085
543, 974
2, 254,176
848, 313
297,854

79
53
70
45
05
40
98

$113,440
198
65, 666
18, 590
68,391
25, 717
9, 066

00
00
50
00
00
50
00

$56, 369
4
28,376
8, 259
25, 908
6,233
5, 970

39
14
89
43
86
17
88

9, 003, 800 00

1,291,427 65

10, 295, 227 65

8,898, 495 90

301, C I 00

131,122 76

182,241,750 00

23,061,766 18

205, 303, 516 18

172, 274, 550 25

7, 987, 540 95

2, 350, 545 58

157, 070 61
193 86
37,289 61
10, 330 57
42,482 14
19, 484 33
3, 095 12
169, 946 24
5, 636, 995 37

H
O
W
Zfl

o
to
H
Kj

O
H
W

t>
Kl

TABLE N.—Statement showing ihe purchases of honds from May, 1869, to Sex^temher 30, 1874.
« M rrS "•-=•

^

6 oii
(U fl ©

O O

^ft^.

'*^
"^H

D a t e of purchase.

?2 S

g.s o =

O

<
O

1869.
May

12
. 19
19
27
Juue
3
10
16
17
23
26
July
1
3
9
14
15.".
2i:
28
29
August
4
11
12
• 18
25
26
September 1
8
9
15
22
23
25
29
October
6
7
7
13
'
20

,

,

,

,
,




138i
142
142
139^?
138f
•138|
138
1,38^
137i
137^
137i
137
136
137-1
137
135i
•136-^
135f
136
135i
135i
133
133i
13.3f
133t
136
135i
1361137f
141t
133f
13.31
130
13U
131i
130i
130

$1, 000,000
70, 000
1,000, 000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000
1, 000,000

00
00
00
00
00
00

coo 00

i,oooi 000
1, 620,.00.0
1,000, 000
1, 000,000
3, 000,000
3, 000,000
3, 000,000
1, 000,000
3, 000,000
3, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
2, 000,000
2, 000,000
1,000, 000
3, 000,000
3, 000,000
2, OUO,000
1, 000,000
*153, 500
2, 000,000
000
2, 000,

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
CO
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$1, 155,070 00
81, 718 00
1,168, 512 10
1, 153,581 50
1.164, 058 90
1,161, 967 00
1, 155 00
1,152, 950 00
1, 870,402 50
1, 158,228 25
1,158, 098 75
3, 496,474 00
3, 518,044 00
3, 607,622 90
1, 201,850 00
3, 600,028 80
3, 604,859 00
1,201, 570 55
2,431, 136 80
2, 422,038 27
931 70
1, 198,
2, 378,781 81
2, 389,539 01
.1,196, 247 80
2,401, 991 00
2, 356.000 00
1, 183,972 53
2, 369,639 55
2, 337,657 62
1.165, 548 50
3, 537,158 16
3, 473,533 12
2,319, 1.39 18
1, 1.59,945 10
178, 187 69
2,318, 883 53
.2,314, 079 00

$2, 504 36

$1,152, 565 64
81, 718 00
1,168, 512 10
1,153, 581 50
1,164, 770 68
1,161, 967 00
1, 155 00
1,152, 950 00
1, 870,402 50
1,158, 228 25
1,158, 098 75
3,496, 474 00
3, 518,044 00
3, 607,622 90
1,201, 850 00
3, 600,028 80
3, 604,859 00
1,201, 570 55
2, 431,136 80
2, 422,038 27
1,198, 931 70
2, 378,781 81
2, 389,539 01
1,196, 247 80
2, 401,991 00
2, 356,000 00
1, 183,972 53
2, 369,639 55'
2, 337,657 62
1, 165,548 50
3, 537,158 16
3, 473,533 12
2, 319, 139 18
1,1.59, 945 10
187 69
• 178,
2,318, 883 53
2, 314,079 00

177-36
57, 548 45
822, 895 85
826, 940 14
842, 510 43
838, 208 84
835 44
833, 960 21
1, 364,012 76
842, 347 82
842, 253 63
2, 552,170 80
2, 586,797 06
2, 626, 113 12
877, 262 77
2, 664,221 12
2, 640,922 34
885, 134 84
1, 787,600 59
1, 787,482 12
887, 276 00
1, 788,5.57 75
1, 793,275 07
893, 555 78
1, 800,930 46
1, 732,352 94
871, 368 92
1,740, 782 04
1, 697,029 12
822 982 17
2, 647',078 14
2, 599,463 51
1,783, 953 22
884, 610 18
13.5, 891 47
1, 782,043 06
1,780, 060 77

15.26
16.74
16.85
15. 36
16.48
16. 20
15.50
15.30
15.46
15.82
1.5.81
16. 54
17.27
20. 25
20.18
20.00
20.16
20.16
21.56
21. 10
19.89
18.94
19.48
19. 63
20.10
17.80
18. 40
18.48
16.88
16.55
17.91
15.78
15.96
15.99
16.08
15.94
15.70

15.84

82.72
Ul

o
15.82

Pi
y<

o
85.93

Pi

>
Ul

d
Pi
K!

88. 53
89.10
89.00

to

TABLE 1^.—Statement showing the xDurchases of honds front May, 1869, to Sex^temher 30, 1874—Continued.

to
'6 o i i

S

.

3$

D a t e of purchase.

Pi

fcflO a

S'o in

> fcfl o

> fcXJO

21
27
November 3
4
4

§::::::;:::
10
17:
17
24
December
1
2
8
15
16
22
29.."!."....
30

130i
130i
I27f
1261
I26f
126^^
1264
126|
127i
127i
126f
122i
122i
123A
121-1
1211
120i
119f
119i

$1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
- 1,000, 000
1,000, 000
*201, 300
*433, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
3,000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
2, COO, 000
2, 000, 000
1,000, 000
2, 000, ooo
2, 000, 000
1, 000, 000

1191
122^
122i
12l|

2, 000, 000
*451, 700
*1, 342, 550
1, 000, 000
2, 000, 000
1, 000, coo
1,000, 000
50, 000
1, 000, 000
1,000, 000
1,000, 000
1, 000, 000
1,000, 000
1,000, 000
1, 000, 000
1,^)00, 000
1,000, coo

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

00
00
00

$1,1.52, 000
2, 292, 600
2, 257, 255
1, 126,843
1, 129, 090
227, 580
492, 158
2, 259, 000
2, 256, 513
1,129, 039
3, 382, 483
2, 206, 992
1,102, 6,59
2, 248, 236
2, 239, 710
1,118, 412
2,215, 985
2, 220, 427
1.110, 507

00
00
21
74
29
43
94
00
69
02
67
21
61
56
90
34
83
12
80

2, 246, 595
517, 400
1,539, 826
1,141, 010
2,281, 555
1,142, 872
1,126, 500
56, 325
1,115, 764
1,117, 488
1, 107, 377
1, 067, 347
1, 067, 480
1, 060, 440
1, 069, 985
1,070, 574
1, 073, 953

03
49
93
09
49
27
00
00
80
85
50
.35
27
34
26
91
37

$167 43
2, 917 87

$1,152, 000
2, 292, 600
2, 257, 255
1, 126, 843
1,129, 090
227, 413
489, 241
2, 259, 000
2, 256,.513
1.129, 039
3, 382, 483
2, 206, 992
1,102, 659
2, 248, 236
2, 239, 710
1,118, 412
2,215, 985
2, 220, 427
1,110, 507

00
00
21
74
29
00
07
00
69
02
67
21
61
56
90.
34
83
12
80

$885, 302
1,761, 844
1,768, 662
889, 906
891, 680
179, 773
386, 751
1, 780, 492
1,775, 035
888, 132
2,671, 260
1,807, 158
901, 971
1,818, 593
1, 839, 598
919, 557
1, 844, 733
1, 852, 285
926, 388

59
38
26
21
39
12
83
61
35
95
54
41
06
78
27
94
26
40
15

15.20
14.63
12.86
12.68
12.91
12. 97
12.99
12. 95
12. 83
12.90
12.75
10.35
10.27
12.41
11.98
n.84
10.80
11.02
11.05

2, 246, 595
517, 400
1, 539. 794
1,141, 010
2,281, 555
1,142, 872
1,126, 500
56. 325
1,115, 764
1,117, 488
1,107, 377
1,067, 347
1, 067, 480
1,060, 440
1,069, 985
1, 070, 574
1, 073, 953

03
49
35
09
49
27
00
00
80
85
50
35
27
.34
26
91
37

1, 876, 071
422, 367
- 1 , 256, 974
938, 137
1, 877, 823
936, 780
932, 919
46, 888
948, 577
950, 043
951, 5.59
961, 574
953, 107
942, 613
956, 411
9.55, 870
954, 625

01
75
98
79
45
55
25
66
94
66
61
19
39
63
41
46
22

12.33
14.54
14.69
14.10
14.08
14.29
12. 65
12. 65
11.57
11.75
10.74
6.73
6.75
6.04
7.00
7.06
7.39

Pi

O

1869.
October

O

17. 80

87.20

d
m

o
16. 97

H
K^

88.20

1870.
January

5
11
11
13
19
27
ebruary 10
.11
24
24
March
2
10
17...
24
.30
April
7.....
13




12U
122"
120f
120^
117f
117f
116§
111
112
121
1=:
IIU
112
112i

00
00
00
00
00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00'
00

00

88. 55
02

88.73

d
K
l

21
27
30
30...
May
5
12
12
19
26
Juue
2
9
1.6.
23
30
July
7
11
11
14
21
28
August
4
11
18.
25
September 1
8
15
oo
29.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.
October
6
13
20
27...
November 3
3
3
10
17
25
-December 1...-.—-...
8
15
22
29

113-i113^
1141
1141
114&
1151
1151
114^
114i
114i
113i
113i
lllf
lllf
112i
115i
115i
112f
121-1
121-1
12lf
116i
1161
1171
116t
114
114S
1131
113#
113
113^
112^
112

nof
llOf
llOf

not
113
112
1101

not
iiH
iiof
llOf

1,000, 000 00
1,000, 000 00
.*345, 400 00
*758, 800 OO2, 000,OOO CO
850 00
1, 000,000 00
2, 000, 000 00
1, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
1,000, 000 00
2, 000,000 00
1, 000,ooo 00
2, 000, 000 00
1, 000,000 00
*-690, 400 00
•-^1, 683,150 00
2, 000, 000 00
1, 000,000 00
2, 000, 000 00
l.OOO, 000 00
000
• 2, 000, 00
1,000, 000 00
000 00
2, 000,
1, 000,000 00
3, 000,000 00
2, 000, 000 00
3, 200,000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
2, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
*245, 850 00
*542, 250 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00
1, 000,000 00

1,078,778
1, lO0,i9O
390, '847
859, 029
2, 215, 447
2,074
1,118,-370
2, 230, 611
1, 108,910
2, 223, 786
1,109,976
2, 217, 755
1,104,612
2, 218, 005
1,107, 000
758,749
1,848,423
2,182,332
1,070,136
2,162, 085
1, 085, 712
2,191,414
1, 097, 329
2,181,093
1,091,038
3, 272, 957
2,183, 503
3,281,789
2,177, 057
2; 174, 300
2,170,465
2,170, 236
2,165, 529
1, 077, 698
265,173
584, 808
1, 072, 263
1, 064, 972
1,065,650
1,064,917
1, 063, 854
1, 065, 972
1, 064, 459
1, 064, 473

2, 000, 000 00
1, 000,. 000 00
2, 000, 000 0 0
1, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00

2,147, 345
1, 074, 257
2,144, 457
1,074,651
2, 173, 985
2,175, 643

•••••l,

7, 826 85
18, 099 70
3 85

1,078,778 18
1,100,490 79
383, 020 40
840, 929 55
2,215,447 70
2, 070 46
1,118, 370 86
2,230,611 87
1,108,910 71
2,223,786 41
1,109,976 64
2,217,755,94
1, 104,612 10
2, 218, 005 71
1,107, 000 00
758,749 60
1, 848, 423 98
2,162, 332 89.
1, 070,136 00
2,162, 085 83
1, 035, 71.2 21
2,191,414 93
1,097,329 29
2,181,093 02
1,091,038 65
3, 272, 957 77
2,18,3, 503 11
3, 281, 789 74
2,177, 057 86
2,174, 300 26
2, 170, 465 37
2,170, 236 48
2,165, 529 30
1,077,698 19
265,173 81
584, 800 55
1,072,263 90
1, 064, 972 36
1,065,650 15
1,064,917 08
1, 063, 854 32
1, 065, 972 75
1, 064, 459 26
1, 064, 473 95

951,513 28
7.88
966, 402 45
10. 05
333, 423 63
10.89
732, 038 78
10.82
1, 932, 778 80
10.77
11.92
1, 794 55
969,335 52 • 11.84
1,943,888 34
11.53
970, 600 18
10.89
1.942,171 53
11.19
977, 952 99
11.00
1,960,447 24
• 10.89
989,574 11
10.46
1,987.015 19
10.90
987, 290 97
10.70
659, 065 88
9.90
1, 605, 580 00
9.82
1,933,406 77
9.12
878,961 81
7.01
1, 777, 665 64
8.10
891,755 41
8.57
9.57
1,885,088 11
939,896 61
9.73
1, 850, 344 02
9.05
937,519 78
. 9.10
9.10
2, 871, 015 58
9.18
1,909,073 76
9.39
2. 881, 922 93
1, 911, 796 14
8.'85
8.72
1,924,159 52
8.52
1,906,006 91
8.51
1, 922, 690 12
8.28
1,933,508 30
973, 090 92
. 7.77
239, 434 59
7.86
528, 036 61
7.85
971, 473 52
7.-23
942, 453 42
6.50
951,473 35
6.56
' 962,636 91
6.49
961, 676 22
6. .38
958, 177 75
6.60
962, 223 06
6.45
961,150 29
6.45

'95 15
96 64
96.53
96.47
96 64
97.00
96.93
97 19
97.06
97.11
97 79
98.02
98.96
99.35
98.73
95.46
95. 39
96.67
87. 90
88.88
89.17
94. 25
93.99
92.52
93.75
95.70
95.45
96.06
95.59
96.21
95.30
96.13
96.68
97.31
97.39
97. 39
97.15
94.25
95.15
96. 26
96.17
95.82
96.22
96.11

'""l.5.'i6

89.'36

14.90

89. 76

Pi

o
14.65

90. 31

hrj

H
14.29

90.52

4
11...
18
25
February
1




t^
Ul

14.07

90.62
Q

13.71

90.98

H
P>
Pi

^.

O
13.44

9L24

" " i s . " 2,5

""9i.'39

Pi-

>
Ul

13.05

91. 53

d
Pi
Kl

1871.
January

H
O

1101
111
1101
llOf
lllf

03
50
32
96
90
46

2,147,345 03
1, 074, 257 50
2, 144, 4.57 32
1,074,651 96
2,173,985 90
2,17.5, 643 46

1,938,911 99
967, 799 55
1, 938, 492 49
971, 436 80
1, 943, 2^7 62
1, 946, 884 53

. 7.37
7.43
7.22
7.46
, 8.70
8.78

96. 96;
96. 78
96.9297.14
97.16
97. 34

12.85

9L72

to

TABLE N.—Statement showing the xmrchases of honds from May, 1869, to Sexitember 30, 1874—Continued.

to

'6
D a t e of purchase.
a

0

'5

O

O

<

.2 '^

o

o'o
tD
o .1=1

ll

to .
2 %

fee© c5

<

Average rate of
premium on total purchases to
date.

o

Currency value of
interest accrued
on bonds bought
"flat."

C/0.

pi

^

O
Pi .
H

<

O

1871.
February

April

May

Tune

July

August

15
21.
1
8
15
22- . . . . 29
3
12
19
26
3
10
17
24
31
7
14
21
28
5
12
10
26

IIU
llH
llOf
IIU
111-^

\m

noi
llOi

not
11 Oi
.

...

.nii
Illi
lllf

un

.

.

o

9
16
23
30
Septembe r 6
13
20
25
27
for October 11
FRASER 4

nil

llOf
Illi

..

Digitized


...

112i
112t
1121
113i
113*
112g
112^
112i
112i
112
1121
112^
113i
113t
113^
114i
115
1144114
114i

$2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
216,000 00
3, UOO, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000. 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, GOO, 000 00
1. 000, .000 0|)
1, 000. 000 00
1, OUO, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 CO
1,000.000 00
385, 600 00
1,000,000 00
162, 750 00
20, 100 op
1,000,000 00
1,000, coo 00
1,000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
2, oco, 000 00
4, 000, 000 00

$2,184,170 19
2,191,633 24
2,199,585-00
2,199, 570 48
2,191,702 96
2, 188, 826 83
2, 183,254 76
235, 807 20
3, 295, 500 00
2, 197, 018 24
3, 317, 193 80
2, 215,181 72
2,221,571 71
2, 223,162 54
2, 228, 989 07
2, 224,133 69
2, 225, 697 79
1,115,811 40
1,114,.175 30
1,116,587 05
1.118.691 60
• 1, 132, 384 49
1.122.692 96
433.278 38
1,122,086 99
182, 407 63
22, 509 99
1,122,127 56
1,121,011 54
1,125, 650 82
1,128,864 31
1, 125, 800 00
3, 375,135 99
3, 397, 836 15
2, 262, 400 68
2, 258, 747 45
4, 470, 310 00

$2,184,170 19
2,191, 633 24
2,199, 585 00
2, 199,570 48
2,191,702 96
2,188, 826 83
2,183,254 76
235, 807 20
3, 295, 500 00
2,197,018 24
3,317,193 80
2,215, 181 72
2,221,571 71
2, 223,162 54
2, 228, 989 07
2, 224,133 69'
2, 225, 697 79
1,115,811 40
1,114,175 30
1,116,587 05
1.118.691 60
1,132,384 49
1.122.692 96
433, 278 38
1, 122, 086 99
182,407 63
22. 509 99
1,122; 127 56
],.1.21, Oil 54
1,125;650 82
1,128,864 311, 125,800 00
3, 375,-135 99
3,397,836 15
2, 262, 400 68
2, 258, 747 45
4, 470, 310 00

$1,963,299 05
1,970,007 41
1,983,842 16
1,977,142 00
• 1, 967, 859 00
1,974, 139 19
1,980,276 42
213, 884 08
2, 985, 730 46
1, 995, 022 24
2,971,730 17
1,997,909 10
1,999,164 64
1, 998, 348 35
1,992,392 46
1, 992, 504 98
1,989,450 54
994,041 .33
991,479 69
993, 625 85
988, 898 65
997, 695 59
999, 059 35
38.5,136 33
999, 632 06
162, 682 39
20, 098 20
999,668 21
998, 673 98
993,952 16
991,318 82
988, 627 88
2, 957, 402 84
2, 954, 640 13
1, 975, 895 78
1,981,357 41
3, 917, 029 57

9.21
9.58
9.98
9.98
9.58
9.94
9.16-'
•
9.17
9.85
• 9.85
10.57 •
10.76
11.08
11.16
11.45
11.21
11.28
11.58
11.42
11.66
11.87
1.3. 24-•
12.27
12.36
12. 21
12.08
11.99
12.21
12. 10'
12.56
12.89
12. 58
12.50
13. 26
13. 12
12. 94
11.76

98.16
98.50
99.19
98.85
98.39
98.71
99.01
99.02
99.52
99.75
99.06
99. 90
99.96
99.92
99.62
99.63
99.47
99.40
99. 15
99.36
28. 89
99.77
99.91
99. 88
99.96
99.96
99.99
99.97
99.87
99. 39
99.13
98.86
98.58
98.49
98.79
99.07
97.93

12.68

91.99
P-i

12.52

92.34

Ul

a
Pi
12.41

92. 71

Pi
12.35

93.04

12. 34

93.16

12.34

93.26

O

Pi
Ul

a
12.34

93. 35

12. 36

93 59

po
Kl

18
18
25
November 1
8
15
21
December 6
13
20
27

112f
112*

,

IIU
112
111-1

1 u
1
^
:....

llOf
1091
109i.
108f
108'^

4, 000, 000 00
50, 000 00
2, 000. 000 00
1,^000,000 00
1, 000, 000 00
21,100 00
1. 000, 000 00
517, 450 00
43, 700 00
81, 000 00
240, 550 00

4,414,343
55,160
2,217,901
1,113,421
], 114,150
23, 452
1,107,389
568, 325
47, 734
88, 083
260, 908

08
00
51
29
87
74
47
56
84
15
91

566, 200 00
899, 750 00
1, 000, 000 00
1,000,000 00
1,000,000 00
1,000.000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1,000,000 00
1,000, 000'00
2, 000, 000 00
263, 850 00
691, 650 00
5, 000 00
4, 000, 000 00
3, 000, OOO 00 •
2, 000, 000 00
2, 000, 000 00
825, 950 00
47, 850 00
921,900 00
1, 084, 400 00
300,150 00
511,750 00
1,000,000 00
47, 200 00
1,000,000 00
2, 000, 000 00
7, 000 00
1,000,000 00
34, 300 00
5, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000, 000 00
1, 000. 000 00
3, 000, 000 00
1,000,000 00
3, 000, 000 00
5, 000, 000 00
94,100 00

617, 775 OQ
978, 713 38
1,091,919 01
1, 092, 584 13
1. 091, 388 34
1,092,821 91
1,095,961 25
1,097,435 25
1,100,721 08
2,213,295 42
294, 794 93
776, 203 34
• 5, 640 00
4, 519, 795 84
3, 395, 826 68
2,267,116 41
2, 274,174 67
945, 245 28
54, 486 79
1, 047, 373 04
1, 227, 634 17
342,155 19
581. 975 72
1,144, 063 85
53, 956 89
1,146,489 17
2, 296, 663 19
8, 038 80
1,145,208 63
.38, 996 39
5, 683 00
1,123,616 18
1,123,204 81
1,112,251 60
3, 343,-130 94
1,120, 993 75
3, 369, 121 78
5,641,797 44
106,178 24

4,414,343
55,160
2,217,901
1,113,421
1,114,150
23, 452
1, 107,389
568, 325
47, 734
88, 083
260, 908

08
00
51
29
87
74
47
56
84
15
91

16
39
84
15.
48
11
20
38
21
00
04

10. ,36
10. 32
10.89
11.34
11.41
11.11
10.74
9.83
9.24
8.74
8.46

97 88
97.84
99. 35 .
12.31
99.41
99 81
99.88
99.99
12. 30
99.96
99.99
99.99
99.97 '"""l2.'28'

566, 116 84
897, 902 18
994,914 81
991,006 01
984,341 23
992, 346 80
992,943 .37
998,803 41
998, 386 46
1, 996, 207 82
263, 503 85
691,495 18
4, 963 70
. ,3,977,818 12
2, 978, 795 34
1, 993, 069 37
1, 997, 079 84
824,641 46
47, 795 42
919,756 79
1,082,808 53
300, 795 77
511,627 01
999, 182 40
47,123 92
995, 864 64
1, 992, 766 31
6,975 10
998, 003 16
34, 132 50
4,974 18
994, 350 60
992, 888 23
984, 293 45
2, 926, 154 00
986, 573 14
2, 945, 680 25
4,992,741. 10
94,067 11

9.11
8.78
9.19
9.26
9.14
9.28
9.60
9.74
10.07
10.66
11.73
12.22
12.80
12. 99
1.3.19
13. .36
13.71
14.44
13.87
13.61
13. 22
13.73
13.72
14.41
14.32
14.65
14. 83
14.84
14.52
1 3 69
..
13.66
12. 36
12. 32
11.23
11.44
12.10
12. 30
12.84
12.84

99.99
99:80
99 49
99. 10
98.43
99.23
99.29
99.88
99.84
99.81
99.87
99.98
99.27
99.44
99.29
99. 65
99. 85
99.84
99.88
99'. 77
99. 85
99.98
99.98
99. 92
99.84
99.59
99.64
99. .64
99.80
99.51
99.48
99. 44
99.29
98.43
97.54
98.66
98.19
99.85
99.97

3,915,160
48, 922
1,986,921
994,126
•
998,119
21,081
999, 900
517,247
43,693
80, 996
240, 469

93. 82

93.90

93." 91

4
18
February
1
15...29
Blarch
14
28
April
3...
10
17
24
,
May
1
8
8
15
22
29
Juue
5
12...........
19.
26
July
2
10.
17..
24
31
August
7
7
14
21
22
28
September 4
11
18
25.
:..
October
2
7
16




o
pi

1872.
January

Pi

109i

109
1091

noi
llOi
llOi
110-^
1091
1101
110^

IIU

im
113t
1131

114
113f
113t
114t

114
113i
113f
113f
113f
114*
114i
115^
1151
115i
114f
114i
114i

113
113i

113
114i
113f
114S

113
112i .

617,775 00
978, 713 38
1,091,919 01
1,092,584 13
1,091,-388 34
1, 092, 821 91
1,095,961 25
1, 097, 435 25
1,100, 721 08
2, 213, 295 42
294,794 93
776, 203 34
5, 640 00
4, 519, 795 84
3, 395, 826 6 3
2, 267, 116 41
2, 274,174 67
94.5, 245 28
54,468 79
1,047,373 04
1,227,634 17
342,1.55 19
.581,975 72
1,144,063 85
53, 956 89
1,146.489 17
2,296,663 19
8, 038 80

1,145,208 63
38, 996 39 •
5,'683 00
1,123,616 18
1, 12.3, 204 81
1,112,251 60
3, 343, 130 94
1,120, 993 75
3,369,121 78
5,641,797 44
106, 178 24

12.27

93.95

O

12. 23

94.02

12.21

94. 05

m

12.18

94.15

Ul

a
.Pi
Pi

12.22

94.38

Kl

o
12.24

94.44

a12.26

94.49

Pi

>
Ul
12.29

94.57

s
Ki

1.2.27

94.64

to
CD

'OO

TABLE '^.—Statement showing the xmrchases of honds from May, 1869, to Septemher 30, 1874—Contiuued.

o

o 6S

D a t e of purchase.

pi
:= • c -^i
»

p p. A
>

113i
1121
112i
113*
113i
1121
il2f
lllf

October

23.
30.,
6.
13.
20.
26December 4.
26-

|1, 000, 000 00
359, 250 00
428,400 00
1, 000, ooc 00
2,000,600 00
489,150 00
560, 600 00
417,950 00

$1,126,635 51
403, 657 22
478, 902 16
1,126,009 23
2,250,861 59
5.51, 216 06
631, 947 79
466, 978 08

$1, 126,635 51
403, 6.57 22
478, 902 16
1,126,009 23
2,250,861 59
551,216 06
631,947 79
466, 978 08

$995, 920 89
359, 205 54
426, 638 90
992,078 62
1,989,711 90
488, 883 42
.560, 485 84
417,877 48

12. 66
12.36
11.79
12.60
12.54
12.69
12. 73
11.73

January

8.,
15.
22..
29..
F e b r u a r y 5..
12.,
19.
26.

IIH
112
113f
114
1.1
13114i
1141
1141
115
115-^
115J
115^
116"
118
117i

20, 850 00
197, 600 00
516, 400 00
169, 350 00
518, 250 00
000 00
1, 000,
000 00
1, 000,
000 00
1, 000,
1,000, 000 00
500, 000 00
1,000, 000 00
3,800 00
500, 000 00
500, 000.00
500, 000 00
500, 000 00
500, 000 CO
500, 000 00
500, 000 00
207, 850 00
15, 500 00
55, 850 00
11, 708,100 00
47, 000 00
741, 1.50 00
161, 000 00

23, 297 79
221,278 24
584, 824 36
192, 613 81
587, 510 76
1,138, 246 72
1,137, 351 75
1,137, 509 59
731 04
1, 135,
567, 161 07
1,133, 941 25
4, 332 00
572, 335 00
574, 095 97
575, 915 67
578, 944 55
579, 840 14
581, 790 70
578, 032 20
240, 737 77
17, 843 60
61, 944 08
12, 963,682 93
52, 038 40
817, Oil 04
178, 265 73

23. 297 79
221; 278 24
584; 824 36
192, 613 81
587, 510 76
,138, 246 72
1,
1,137, 351 75
1,137, 509 59
1,135, 731 04
567, 161 07
941 25
1, 133,
4, 332 00
335 00
572,
574, 095 97
575, 915 67
578, 944 55
579, 840 14
581, 790 70
578, 032 20
240, 737 77
• 17,843 60
61, 944 08
12, 963,682 93
52, 038 40
817, Oil 04
265'73
• 178,

20, 848 14
197, 569 86
514, 696 91
168, 959 48
516, 492 98
997, 368 43
992, 237 07
991, 293 70
987, 592 21
492, 648 05
983, 896 96
3,750 49
493, 392 25
486, 522 01
491, 186 07
493, 243 49
493, 480 97
493, 042 97
498, 841 17
207, 532 56
15, 462 51
680. 07
. 55,
,652, 748 70
46, 776 09
734, 341 95
160, 238 86

11.74
11.98
13.25
13.74
13.36
13 82
13.74
13. 75
13.57
13.43
13.39
14.00
14.47
14.82
15. 18
15.79
15.97
16. 36
15.61
15.83
15.12
10.91
10.72
10.72
10.24
10.72

99. 99
99. 98
99. 67
99.77
99.66
99. 74
99.22
99.13
98.76
98.53
98.39
98. 70
98.68
97.30
98.24
98. 65
98.70
98.61
99. 77
99.85
99.89
99.69
99. ,53
99.52
99. 09
99.53

April

June
July •
August
September 17
20,
20,
20
24,




323, 253, 800 00

363, 012, 332 71

362, 981, 483 79

307, 702, 207 64

r,

<

hj.

o

Pi

o

99. 49^

99. 95
99.98
99. 98

12.29

94.85

'12.29

94."86

Ul

O

im

May

C o
3

<

99.59
99. 99
99.59
99.21

1873.

Total .,

p. bit's

<

117i
118
115i
116
115i
Illi
Illi
IIU

nil
Illi

0, 848 92

94.89
K:
94. 94

O
H

12.32

94.97

'i2.'32'

*94.'98

12.34

'95.'CO

12. ,35
12. 36
12.36

95.01
95.01
95.01

H
Pi
c/2

d
^

•

Kj

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N BY L O A N S .

Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Five-twenties
Consols, 1865
Consols, 1867
Consols, 1868

of
of
of
of

1862
March, 1864
J u n e , 1864
1865

Total

$56,159, 350
1,119,800
43,459,750
35, 923, 350
118, 965, 550
62,831.950
4, 794, 050

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

32.3, 253, 800 00

$62, 955, 548
1,307,208
48,803,264
40,015,286
133, 457, 305
70, 963, 372
5,510,347

50
39
34
19
57
67
05

363, 012, 332 71

$938
12
4,024
53
24, 983
744'
91

14
48
32
48
68
92
90

30. 848 92

162,9.54,610
1,307,195
48, 799, 240
40,015,232
1.33,432, .321
70, 962, 627
5,510,255

36
91
02
71
89
75
15

362, 981, 483 79

87
67
61
08
08
27
06

12.10
16..74
12.30
11. ,39
12.18
12.94
14.94

96.43
91.98
95.47
96.12
95.30
93. 42
92.85

307, 702, 207 64

12.27

95.19

$54, 156, 833
1,029,967
41,492,330
34,529,031
113,374,317
58, 668, 585
4,451, 1.42

N O T E . — T h e bonded debt of the United States has been reduced b y the a m o u u t of these bonds, which h a v e ceased to b e a r interest aud have been- canceled and destroyed. T h i s
s t a t e m e n t does n o t include the six per cent, bonds converted into fives, nor the redemptiou of past-due and called securities, which have also ceased to bear interest and h a v e been canceled a n d destroyed. T h o s e i t e i u s ' m a r k e d (*) are the bonds b o u g h t with the proceeds of the iuterest collected on the bonds previously purchased. These " i n t e r e s t - p u r c h a s e s " w e r e
discontinued after the passage of the act of J u l y 14,1870, (16 Statutes, 272,) authorizing the refunding of the national debt and directing the cancellation aud destruction of the bonds
p u r c h a s e d . -All bonds, w h e t h e r purchased, redeemed, or received in exchange for other bonds bearing a lower rate of interest, either before or since the date of that act, h a v e ceased to
b e a r interest, a n d the a n n u a l interest-charge has been reduced b y the a m o u n t of interest t h a t would h a v e been p a y a b l e on the first two classes and the difference in r a t e on the last
• class, b u t for such redemption, purchase, or exchange.




Pi

o
pi

Ul

o
Pi

Kl

Pi
Pi

m
d
Kl

CO

TABLE O.—Statement of the outstanding x^rincixnil of thexmhlic deht of the United States, June 30, 1874.
L e n g t h of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

•Rates of iuterest.

to

Price
Amount authora t which
Amount is.sued.
ized.
• sold.

A m o u n t outstanding.

pi
OLD

DEBT.

>-o

Unclaimed dividends upon debt created prior to 1800, and .the principal
a n d ' i n t e r e s t of the outstanding debt created during the w a r of 1812,
and u p to 1837.

On demand

5 and 6 p e r
cent.

$57, 665 00

1 and 2 years 1 and 2 years
from date.

1 mill to 6
per cent.

Par

82, 575 35

m

o

T R E A S U R Y NOTES OF 1 8 4 6 .

T h e act of J u l y 22, 1846, (9 Statutes, 39,) authorized the issue of Treasu r y notes in such sums as the exigencies of the Government might req u i r e ; the a m o u n t outstanding at a n y dne time uot to exceed $10,000,000,
to bear interest at uot exceeding Oper centum per annum, ledeemable
one.year from date. These notes were receivable in p a y m e n t of all debts
due the United States, including customs-duties.

pi
1 year

1 year
date.

from

6 per c e n t . . . P a r

6, 000 00

$10,000,000 00

>

Pi

MEXICAN I N D E M N I T Y .

A proviso iu the civil and diplomatic appropriation act of A u g u s t 10, 1846,
(9 Statutes, 94,) authorized the p a y m e n t of the principal and interest of
the fourth and fifth installments of-the Mexican indemnities due April a n d
J u l y , 1844, b y the issue of stock, w i t h interest a t 5 per centum, p a y a b l e
iu five year.s.

pi.
H

O

T R E A S U R Y NOTES P R I O R TO 1846.

T h e acts of Octotser 12, 1837, (5 Statutes, 201;) May 21, 1838, (5 Statutes,
228:) March 31, 1840, (5 Statutes, 370;) F e b r u a r y 15, 1841, (5 Statutes,
411;) J a n u a r y 31, 1842, (5 Statutes, 469;) August 31, 1842, (5 Statutes,
581;) and March 3,1843, (5 Statutes, 614 :) authorized the issue of T r e a s u r y notes in various amounts, and with interest at rates named therein,
from 1 mill to 6 p e r centum p e r annum.

o

5 years

April and J u l y ,
1849.

5 per c e n t . . . P a r

350, 000 00

$303,573 92

1,104 91

H

K

W
H

T R E A S U R Y NOTES OF 1847.
Ul

T h e act of J a n u a r y 28, 1847, (9 Statutes, 118,) authorized the issue of
$23,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
per a n n u m , or the issue of stock for any portion of the amount, with interest at 6 per. centum per annura. T h e Treasury' notes under this act w e r e
redeemable at the expiration of one or two years ; and the interest w a s
to cease at the expiration of sixty days' notice. These notes were receivable in p a y m e n t of all debts due the United States, including customsduties.




1 and 2 years After 60 days'
notice.

6.per c e n t . . . P a r

23, doo, 000 00

950 00

d

pi

LOAN OF 1 8 4 7 .

T h e a c t of J a n u a r y 28, 1847, (9 Statutes, 118.) authorized the issue of
$23 000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
per a n n u m , or the issue of stock for a n y portion of the amount, with
interest at 6 per centum per annum, re-imbursable after December 31,
1667. - Section 14 authorized the conversion of T r e a s u r y notes under
this or a n y preceding act into like stock, which accounts for the a p p a r e n t
overissue.

20 years-

J a n u a r y 1,1868. 6 per cent . .

23, 000, 000 00

28, 207, 000 00

1, 250 00

Pi

^

O
Pi

BOUNTY-LAND S C R I P .

T h e 9th section of the act of F e b r u a r y 11, 1847, (9 Statutes, 125,) authorized
the issue of l a n d - w a r r a n t s to soldiers of the Mexican war, or scrip, at the
option o f t h e soldiers, to bear 6 per centum interest per annum, redeemable a t the pleasure of the Governraent, b y notice from the T r e a s u r y
D e p a r t m e n t . I n t e r e s t ceases J u l y 1, 1849.
TEXAN INDEMNITY

Indefinite .

J u l y l , 1849..

6 per cent . . .

H
O

Indefinite.

w

STOCK.

T h e act of September" 9, 1850, (9 Statutes, 447,) authorized, the issue of
$10,000,000 stock, w i t h interest at 5 per centum per annum, to the State
of T e x a s , in satisfaction of all claims against the United States arising
out of the annexation of the said State. This stock w a s to b e redeemable at the end of fourteen years.

14 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1865. 5 per ceut .

10,000,000 00

5, 000, 000 00

174, 000 00

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T R E A S U R Y NOTES O F 1 8 5 7 .

Kj
T h e act of D e c e m b e r 23, 1857, (11 Statutes, 257,) authorized the issue of
.$20,000,000 in T r e a s u r y n o t e s , $6,000,000 with interest at not exceeding
6 p e r c e n t u m per a n n u m , and the remainder with interest at the lowest
rates offered b y bidders, b u t uot exceeding 6 per centum per a n n u m .
These notes w e r e redeemable at the expiration of one year, and interest
w a s to cease at t h e expiration of sixty d a y s ' notice after m a t u r i t y . T h e y
w e r e receivable in p a y m e n t of all debts due the United States, including
-pustoms-duties.

1 year.

60 days' notice- 5 and 5 i per
cent.

Par.

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

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LOAN OF 1858.
T h e actof J u n e 14.1858, (11 Statutes, 365,) authorized a l o a n of $20,000,000,
w i t h interest at not exceeding 5 per centum per a n n u m , and redeemable
any time after J a n u a r y 1, 1874.

Pi
15 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1874. 5 per cent .

Par-

20, 000, 000 00

20, 000, 000 00

394, 000 00

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LOAN OF 1860.
T h e act of J u n e 22,1860, (12 Statutes, 79,) authorized a l o a n of .$21,000,000,
(to be used in redemption of T r e a s u r y n o t e s , ) with interest a t not exceeding 6 p e r centum per a n n u m , redeemable in not less than ten nor
more t h a n t w e n t y years.




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10 y e a r s .

J a n u a r y 1,1871, 5 per c e n t .

Par .

21,000,000 00

7, 022, 000 00

10,000 00

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TABLE 0.—Stateinent of the outstanding principal of the puhlic deht, cfc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

W h e n redeemable;

Rate of in' terest.

Price
at which
sold.

OO

Amount authorA m o u n t issued.
ized.

Amount outstanding.
t:d

LOAN OF F E B R U A R Y ,

1861,

(1881S.)

hj

T h e act of F e b r u a r y 8, 1861, (12 Statutes, 129,) authorized a , l o a n of
$25,000,000, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, reimbursable in not less t h a n ten nor more than t w e n t y years from the date
of the act.
TREASURY

WAR

Par .

$25, 000, 900 00

$18, 415, 000 00

$18,415,000 00

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i 2 years.
j 60 d a y s .

2 years after \
date.
{ 6 per ceut.
60 days after ('
date.
J

: 22, 468,100 00 135, 364, 450 00
12, 896, 350 00

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3,150 00

LOAN OF J U L Y AND AUGUST,

1861,

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20 y e a r s .

July

1, 1881

6 per cent .

Par

2, 800, 000 00

1, 090, 850 00

945, 000 00

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(1881S.)

T h e act of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 Statutes, 2-59,) authorized the issue of
$250,000,000 bonds,.with interest at not exceeding 7 per centum per annum, redeemable after tvventy years. T h e act of Augiist 5, 1861, (12
Statutes, 313,) authorized the issue of bonds, with interest at 6 per centum
per annum, payable after twenty years from date, in exchange for 7-30
notes issued under the act of J u l y 17, 1861. None of such bouds w e r e to
b e issued for a sum less than $500, and the whole araount of them was not
to exceed the whole a m o u n t of 7-30 notes issued uuder the above act of
J u l y 17. T h e amount issued in exchange for 7-30s was $139,321,200.
OLD DEMAND

H

1

DEBT.

T h e act of March 2, 1861, (12 Statutes, 198,) appropriated !$2,8O0,OOOfor the
p a y m e n t of expenses incurred by the Territories of Washington and
Oregon in the suppression of Indian hostilities in the years 1855 and 1856.
Section 4 of the act authorized the payment of these claicns in bonds redeemable in t w e n t y j'ears, with interest at 6 per centum per annum.

20 years

July

1,1881

6 per c e n t .

250, 000, 000 00

.50,000,000 00
139,321200 00

}139, 321, 350 00
GC

d

NOTES.

T h e act of J u l y 17, 1861, (12 Statutes, 259,) authorized the issue of
.$50,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, not bearing interest, of a less denomination




6 per ceut -

NOTES OF 1 8 6 1 .

T h e act of March 2,1861, (12 Statutes, 178,) authorized a l o a n of $10,000,000,
w i t h interest at not exceeding 6 per.cen.tum per annum, redeemable on
three months' notice after J u l y 1,1871, and payable J u l y 1,1881. If proposals for the loan were not satisfactory, authority was giveu to issue the
whole a m o u n t in T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per
centitm per a n n u m . T h e same act gave authority to substitute T r e a s u r y
notes for the whole or any p a r t of loans aitthorized at the time of the
passage of this act. These notes were to be received in payment of all
debts due the United States, including customs duties, and were redeemable at any time within t w o years from the date of the act.
OREGON

10 or 20 y r s . - J a n .

Ou demand

None.

60, 000, 000 00

;o, 000,000 00

76, 732 50

than fifty dollars and uot less t h a u ten dollars, and p a y a b l e on demand
b y the assistant treasurers at Philadelphia, New York, or.Boston. T h e
a c t o f A u g u s t 5, 1861, (12 Statutes, 313,) authorized the issue of these
notes in denominations of five dollars; it also added the assistant treasurer at Saint Louis a n d the designated depositary at Cincinnati to the
places w h e r e these notes w e r e made payable. T h e act of F e b r u a r y 12,
1862, (12 Statutes, 338,) increased the a m o u n t of demand notes authorized $10,000,000.
SEVEN-THIRTIES OF 1861.
T h e act of J u l y 17,1861, (12 Statutes, 259.) authorized a loan of $250,000,000,
p a r t of which w a s to be in T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at 7 3-10 per
ceutum per aunum, p a y a b l e three years after date.
--

3 years .

A u g u s t 19 and
October
1,
1864.

7 3-10 per ct

May 1, 1867 .

6 per cent - . .

140, 094, 750 00

140, 094, 750 00

19, 200 00

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FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1862..

T h e act of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 345,) authorized a loan of
$500,000,000, for the purpose of funding the T r e a s u r y notes and floating
debt of the United States, and the issue of bonds therefor, with interest
at 6 p e r centum per annura. These bonds w e r e redeemable after five
and p a y a b l e t w e n t y years from date. T h e a c t of March 3, 1864, (13
Statutes, 13,) authorized an additional issue of $11,000,000 of bonds to
persons w h o subscribed f o r t h e loan on or before J a n u a r y 21,1864. T h e
act of J a n u a r y 28, 1865, (13 Statutes, 425,) authorized a n additional issue
of $4,000,000.of these bonds and their sale in the United States or Europe.

5 or 20 years

515, 000, 000 00

514,771,600 00

169,516,150 00

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LEGAL-TENDER NOTES.
T h e a c t o f F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, .345,) authorized the issue of
$150,000,000 United States notes, not bearing interest, payable to bearer,
at the T r e a s u r y of the United States, and of such denominations, not less
t h a n five dollars, as the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y might deem expedient,
$50,000,000 to be in lieu of demand notes authorized b y t h e act of J u l y 17,
1861 ; these notes to be a legal tender. T h e actof J u l y 11,1862, (12 Statutes, 532,) authorized an additional issue of $150,000,000 United Stsites
T r e a s u r y notes, of such denominations as the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y
might deem expedient, b u t n o such note should be for a fractional p a r t of
a dollar, and not more than $35,000,000 of a lower denomination than five
dollars; these notes to be a legal tender. T h e act of March 3, 1863. (12
Statutes, 710,) authorized a n . additional. issue of $150,000,000 United
States notes, payable to bearer, of such denominations, n o t l e s s than one
dollar, as the Secretary'of the T r e a s u r y might prescribe; which notes
vA^ere made a legal tender. T h e same act limited the time at which Treasu r y notes might be exchanged for United States bonds to J u l y 1,1863. T h e
amount of notes authorized by this act w e r e to be in lieu of $100,000,000
authorized by the resolution of J a n u a r y 17, 1863, (12 Statutes, 822.)




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On demand

450, 000, 000 00

915,420,031 00

382, 000, 000 00

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TABLE 0.—Statement of the outstandingxyrincipal of thexnihlic deht, cfc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

Rate of interest.

Notlessthan
30 days.

After ten days'
notice.

Price
Amount author
at which
A m o u n t issued.
ized.
sold.

4, 5, and 6
per cent.

Amount outstanding. ,

TEMPORARY" LOAN.
T h e act of F e b r u a r y 25, 1862, (12 Statutes, 346,) authorized temporaryloan deposits of $25,000,000, for not less than thirty days, with interest
at 5 per centum p e r annum, payable after ten days' notice. T h e act of
March 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 370,) authorized the increase of temporaryloan deposits to $50,000,000. T h e act of J u l y 11, 1862, (12 Statutes, 532,)
authorized a f u r t h e r increase of temporary-loan deposits to $100,000,000.
T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized a further increase
of temporary-loan deposits to n o t exceeding $150,000,000, and an iucrease
of the r a t e of interest to not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, or a decrease of the rate of interest on ten days' notice, as the public interest
might require.

$78, 560 00

1.50,000,000 00

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CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS.
T h e act of March 1, 1862, (12 Statutes, 352,) authorized the issue of certificates of indebtedness to public creditors who might elect to receive them,
to bear interest at the rate of 6 per centum per annum, and payable ono
year from date, or earlier, at the option of the Government. . T h e act of
May 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 370,) authorized the issue of these certificates
in p a y m e n t of disbursing officers' checks. T h e act of March 3, 1863,
(12 S t a t u t e s , 710,) made the interest p a y a b l e iu lawful money.

1 year.

1

year
date.

after

6 per cent .

Pi

$.561,7.53,211 65

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On presentation.

T h e act of J u l y 17, 1862, (12 Statutes, 592,) authorized the use of postal and
other stamps as currency, and made them receivable in p a y m e n t of all
dues to the United States less than five dollars. T h e 4th section of the
act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 711,) authorized the issue of fractional
notes in lieu of postal and other stamps and postal currency ; made them
exchangeable in sums not less than three dollars for United States notes,
and receivable for postage and reveuue stamps, and in p a y m e n t of dues
to the United States, except duties on imports, less than five dollars ;
and limited the a m o u n t to $50,000,000. T h e Sth section of the act of
J u n e 30, 1864, (13 S t a t u t e s , 220,) authorized an issue of $50,000,000 in
fractional curreucy, and provided that the whole amount of these, notes
outstanding a t a n y one time should not exceed this sum.




•

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FRACTIONAL CURRENCY.

LOAN OF 1863.
T h e actof March 3,1863, (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized aloan of $900,000,000,
aud the issue of bonds, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum per
aunum, and redeemable in not less t h a n ten nor more t h a n forty years,
principal and .interest payable in coin. T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13

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50, 000, 000 00

223, 625, 663 45

45, 8§1, 295 67

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17 y e a r s .

J u l y 1, 1881 -.. 6 per cent - . . Average
premium of
4.13.

75, 000, 000 00

75, 000, 000 00

/75, 000, 000 00

s t a t u t e s , 219,) repeals so much of the precediug act as limits the authority
t h e r e u n d e r to the current fiscal year, and, also repeals the authority
altogether except as relates to $75,000,000 of bonds already advertised for.
ONJE-YEAR NOTES OF 1 8 6 3 .

T h e act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized the issue of
$400,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
p e r . a n n u m , redeemable iu not more than three years, principal and interest payat)le in lawful money, to be a legal tender for their face value.

1 year.

1 year
date.

after

5 per cent .

400, 000, 000 00

44, 520, 000 00

74,775 00

2 years.

2 years
date.

after

5 per cent .

400, 000, 000 00

166,480,000 00

Pi

52, 850 00

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T W O - Y E A R NOTES OF 1 8 6 3 .

T h e act of M a r c h . 3 , 1863, (12 Statutes, 710,) authorized the issue of
-§400,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, with interest at not exceeding 6 per
centum per annum, redeemable in not more than three years, principal
and interest p a y a b l e in lawful money, to be a legal tender for their face
value.

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COIN-CERTIFICATES.

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T h e 5th section of the a c t o f March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 711,) authorized
the deposit of gold coin and bullion with the Treasurer or any assistant
treasurer, in .sums .not less thau $20, aud the issue of certificates thereror
iu denominations the same as United States notes ; also authorized the
issue of these certificates in p a y m e n t of interest on the public debt.
I t limits the araount of thera to n o t m o r e than 20 per centum of the amount
of coin and bullion in the T r e a s u r y , and directs their receipt in p a y m e n t
for duties on imports.

562, 776, 400 00

On d e m a n d .

22, 825,100 00

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COMPOUND-INTEREST NOTES.

T h e act of March 3, 1863, (12 Statutes, 709,) authorized the issue of
1400,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, w i t h interest at not exceeding 6 per centum
per annum, in lawful money, payable n o t m o r e thau three years from date,
and to be a legal tender for their face value. T h e act of J u u e 30, 1864, (13
Sta,tules, 218,) authorized the issue of $200,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, of auy
denomination not less than $10, p a y a b l e not more than three years from
date, or redeemable at a n y time after three years, with interest at not
exceeding 7 3-10 per centum, payable in lawful mouey at maturity, and
made them a legal tender for their face value to the same extent as United
States notes; $177,045,770 of the amount issued was in redemption of 5
• per ceut. notes.

3 years

J u n e 10,1867. &. 6- per cent ,
May 15, 1868.
compound.

400, 000, 000 00

260, 595,.440 00

415, 210 00

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• T E N - F O R T I E S OF 1 8 6 4 .

T h e act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 bonds, a t uot exceeding 6 per centum per annum, redeemable after five and p a y a b l e not more than forty years from date, iu coiu.




10 or 40 years March 1,1874-. 5 per ceut .

P a r to 7
per c't.
prem.

200, 000, 000 00

196, 117,300 C
O

194, 567, 300 00
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OO
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TABLE O.—Statement of the outstanding princixial of thept^thlic deht, ^x.—Continued.
L e n g t h of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

Rate of interest.

Price
at which
sold.

A m o u n t authorAmount issued.
ized.

Amount outstanding.

Pi
FIVE-TWENTIES OF MARCH, 1864.
T h e act of March 3, 1864, (13 Statutes, 13,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 bonds, at not exceeding 6 per centtim p e r . annum, redeemable after five and p a y a b l e n o t more than forty years from date, in coin.

5 or 2 0 y e a r s . Nov. 1,18

, 882, 500 00

6 per cent . . . P a r .

$946, 600 00

FIVE-TWENTIES OF JUNE, 1864.
T h e act of J u u e .30,1864, (13 Statutes,218,) authorized a loan of $400,000,000,
and the issue therefor of bonds redeemable not less than five nor more
than thirty (or forty, if deemed expedient) years from date, witli interest
at not exceeding 6 per centum per annum, payable.semi-annually iu coin.

5 or 20 years

N o v . ] , 1869 .

3 years.

Aug. 15, 1867.)
J u n e 15; 1868. [ 7 3-10 per ct
J u l y 15,1868. )

6 per cent .

Par .

$4G0, 000, U O 00
O

125,561,300 00

58, 046, 200 00

800, 000, 000 00 829, 992, 500 00

228,450 00

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3 per c e n t . .

Indefinite.

Indefinite.

14,000,000 00

14, 000, 000 00




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FIVE-TWENTIES OF 1865.
T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds to be for n o t less than $50, p a y a b l e not
more than forty years from date of issue, or after a n y period not less
t h a n five years ; interest p a y a b l e semi-annually at not exceeding 6 per
centum per a n n u m when in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum per annum w h e n
in currency. I n addition to the amouut of bonds authorized b y this act
' authority w a s also given to convert Treastiry notes or other" interest-

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NAVY PENSION-FUND.
T h e act of J u l y 1, 1864, (13 Statutes, 414,) authorized the Secretary o f t h e
N a v y to invest in registered securities of the United States so much of
the N a v y pension-fund in the T r e a s u r y J a n u a r y 1 and J u l y 1 in each
y e a r as would not be required for the p a y m e n t of naval pensions. Section 2 of the act of J u l y 23, 1868, (15 Statutes, 170,) makes the interest
on this fund 3 p e r centum per aunum, in lawful money, and confines its
use to the p a y m e n t of n a v a l pensions exclusively.

H
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H
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SEVEN-THIRTIES" OF 1864 AND 1865.
T h e act of J u n e 30, 1864, (13 Statutes, 218,) authorized the issue of
$200,000,000 T r e a s u r y notes, of n o t l e s s than $10 each, payable a t n o t
more t h a n three years from date, or redeemable at a n y time after three
•years, with interest a t not exceeding 7 3.-10 per centum per annum. T h e
act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 408,) authorized a loan of $600,000,000,
and the issue therefor of bonds or T r e a s u r y n o t e s ; the notes to be of
denominations of not less t h a n $50, with interestin lawful money at not
more than 7 3-10 per centum per annum.

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5 or 20 years

Nov. 1,1870.

6 per cent .

203, 327, 250 00

203, 327, 250 G
O

1,52, 534, 350 00

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bearing obligati )ns into bonds authorized by it. T h e a c t of April 12,
1866, (14 Statutes, 31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligations of the United States,
w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, in exchange for a n y bonds authorized
by-it, or to sell a n y of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased t h e r e b y .
CONSOLS OF 1865.
' T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to a m o u n t s previously authorized ;• the bonds to be for not less than $50, payable riot
more than forty years from date of issue or after a n y period not less
than five years, interest p a y a b l e semi-annually, at not exceeding 6'per
centum per a u n u m w h e n in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum per annum when
in currency. I n addition to the amount of bonds authorized b y this act
a u t h o r i t y was also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes or other interestbearing obligations into bonds authorized by it. T h e act of April 12,
1866, (14 Statutes, 31,),construed the above act to authorize the Secret a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligations of the United States,
w h e t h e r beariug interest or not, in exchange for a n y bonds authorizecl
b y it, or to sell^any of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased thereby.

5 or 20 years

J u l y ] , 1870 .

6 per cent .

332, 998, 950 00

332, 998, 950 00

202, 663,100 00

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5 or 20 years

J u l y l , 1872 .

6 per cent . . .

379, 602, 350 00

379,616,0.50 00

310,624,400 00




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CONSOLS OF 1868..
T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13- Statutes, 468,) authorized the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y notes in addition to amounts previously authorized ; the bonds to be for not less than $50, payable not more
t h a n forty years from the date of issue or after any period not less than
five y e a r s ; interest payable semi-annually, at not exceeding 6 per centum
per a n n u m when in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum per annum when in curr e n c y . I n addition to the amouut of bonds authorized by this act
authority w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes or other interestbearing obligations into bonds authorized by it. T h e act of April 12,

O
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CONSOLS OF 1867:
T h e act of March 3, 1865, (13 Statutes, 468,) authorized. the issue of
$600,000,000 of bonds or T r e a s u r y n o t e s in addition to amounts previously authorized; the bonds to be for not less t h a u $50, payable
not more t h a n forty years from date of issue or after a n y period not
less than five y e a r s ; interest payable semi-annually, at not exceeding
6 per centum per a n n u m when in coin, or 7 3-10 per centum per
a n n u m w h e n in currericy. In addition to the amouut of bonds authorized b y this act authority w a s also given to convert T r e a s u r y notes
or other interest-bearing obligations into bonds authorized by it. T h e
act of April 12,1866, (14 Statutes, 31,) construed the above act to
authorize the Secretary of the T r e a s u r y to receive a n y obligations of the
United States, w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, in exchange for a n y
bonds authorized by it, or to sell a u y of such bonds, provided the public debt is not increased thereby.
.

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5 or 20 years

J u l y 1,1873 .

6 per cent .

42, 5.39, 350 00

42, 539, 350 00

37, 474, 000 00

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TABLE 0.—Statemeni of the outstanding xyrincixKcl of the x^Mic deht, <fc.—Continued.
Length of
loan.

W h e n redeemable.

R a t e of interest.

O

Price
A m o u n t author:
at which
Amount issued.
. ized. •
sold.

A m o u n t outstanding. -

pi

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o

1866,(14 Statutes, 31,) construed the above act to authorize the Secret a r y of the T r e a s u r y to receive, any obligations of the United States,
w h e t h e r bearing interest or not, iu exchange for a n y bonds authorized
b y it, or to sell a n y of such bonds, provided the public debt is .not increased t h e r e b y .

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THREE PER CENT. CERTIFICATES.
3 per cent -.

T h e act of March 3, 1867, (14 Statutes, 558,) authorized the issue of.
$50,000,000 in temporary-loan certificates of deposit, with interest at 3
per centum per annum, payable in lawful nioney, on demand, to be used
in redemption of compound-interest notes. T h e act of J u l y 25, 1868,
(15 Statutes, 183,) authorized $25,000,000 additional of these certificates,
for the sole purpose of redeeming compound-interest notes.

%15, 000, 000 00 $85,150, 000 00

$5, 000 00

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5 years.

Sept. 1,1875.

4 per cent -.

678, 362 41

678, ,362 41

678, 000 00




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FUNDED LOAN OE 1881.
T h e act of J u l y 14, 1870, (16 Statutes, 272,) authorizes the issue of
$200,000,000 at 5 per centum, $300,000,000 at 4 | per centum, and
$1,000,000,000 at 4 per centum, principal and interest p a y a b l e in coin of
the present standard value, at the pleasure of the United States Government, after ten y e a r s for the 5 per cents; after fifteen years for the 4^ per
cents; and after thirty years for the 4 per cents; these bonds to b'e exempt
from the p a y m e n t of all taxes or duties of the United States, as Avell as
from taxation in a n y form by or under State, municipal, or local authority. Bonds and coupons payable at the T r e a s u r y of the United States.
This act not to authorize au iucrease of the bonded debt of the United
States. Bonds to be sold at not less thau p a r in coin, and the proceeds to
be applied to the redemption of outstanding 5-20s, or to be exchanged for
said 5-20s, p a r for par. P a y m e n t of these bonds, when due, to be made

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CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS OF 1870.
T h e act of J u l y 8, 1870, (16 Statutes, 197,) authorized the issue of certificates of indebtedness, payable five years after date, with interest at 4
per centum per annura, payable semi-annually, principal and interest, in
lawful money, to be hereafter appropriated and provided for by Congress. These certificates w e r e issued, one-third to the State of Maine
and two-thirds to the State of Massachusetts, both for the use and benefit
of the E u r o p e a n a r d North American Railway Company, and were in
full adjustment and p a y m e n t of any and all claims of said States or railw a y company for moneys expended (or interest thereon) by the State
of Massachusetts on account of the w a r of 1812-'15.

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10 y e a r s .

M a y 1, 1881 .

5 per c e n t .

500, 000, 000 00

200, 000, 000 00

315,800,750 00

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in.order of dates and numbers, beginnrng with each class last dated and
n u m b e r e d . Interest to cease a t t h e end of three months from notice of
intention to redeem. T h e act of J a n u a r y 20, 1871, (16 Statutes, 399.)
increases the amount of 5 per cents to $500,000,000, provided the total
a m o u n t of bonds issued shall not exceed the a m o u n t originally authorized, and authorizes the interest on a n y of these bonds to be paid quarterly.
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT.
T h e a c t o f J u n e 8,1872, (17 Statutes, 336,) authorizes the deposit of United
States notes without interest by banking associations in sums not less
t h a n $10,000, and the I'ssue of certificates therefor iu denominations of
n o t less than $5,000; Avhich certificates shall be payable on demand in
tJnited States notes at the place w h e r e the deposits w e r e made. I t provides t h a t the notes so deposited iu the T r e a s u r y shall not be counted
as a p a r t of the legal reserve, b u t that the certificates issued therefor
m a y be held and counted b y the national b a n k s as p a r t of their legal
reserve, and m a y be accepted in the settlement of clearing-house balauces a t the places w h e r e the deposits therefor w e r e made, and t h a t
the United States notes for which such certificates were issued, or other
United States notes of' like amount, shall be held as special deposits in
the T r e a s u r y , and used only for the redemptiou of such certificates.




Pi
Indefinite .

On dermand.

137,675,000 00

58, 760, 000 00

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2,251,690,468 43

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0

Total amount of interest due the United States from
Pacific
railway
companies.

Balance of accrued
interest due the
United States on
interest account.

Balance due t h e
United States on
iuterest accouut,
deducting repayments.

Repayment of interest by transpor. tation of mails,
troops, &.C.

Total interest paid
by t h e United
States.

Amount of interest
due, as per Register's schedule.

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date, as per preceding statement.

Amount of bonds
outstanding.

•Aansyaax anx .^lo AHVxaaoas anx ao XH:o<iaH

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Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific
11, 002, 000 00

On J u l y 1,1867:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific •

235,.327 04

274, 879 74

510,2.06 78

00
00
00
00
00

287, 803
94, 630
117,672
. 10,099

37
93
74
74'

136,534
78, 654
147, 826
22, 408
8, 206

50
29
87
75
03

424,337
173, 285
265, 499
32, 508
8, 206

87
22
61
49
03

.$22, 849 07
27,414 40

50, 293 47

•

510, 206 78

393,630 44

903, 837 22

00
00
00
00
00

424, 337 87
173, 285 22
265, 499 01
32, 508 "49
8, 206 03

145,613
122, 580
210, 562
30, 325
9, 600

569, 951
295, 865
476, 061
62, 833
17, 806

20, 714, 000 00

W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

On J u l y 1, 1868 :
Central Pacific . . . . '
K a n s a s Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux Citv and Pacific

510, 206 78

.
Pi

4, 602, 000
3, 360, 000
5, 520, 000
960.000
-320,000

903, 837 22

518,681 87

7,
6,
12,
1,

569, 951
295,865
476, 061
62, 833
17, 806

.185,641
165, 258
288, 593
46, 974
9, 600
19, 603

14,762, 000 00

On J a n u a r y 1, 1868 :
Central Pacific
ICansas Pacific
Union Pacific .

.

6, 074, 000
4, 880, 000
8,160, 000
1, 280, 000
320, 000

83
26
28
50
00

$401, 488
145, 840
265, 499
32, 508
8, 206

• "

70
48
89
99
03

428, 026 31

755,592
461,123
764, 655
109, 808
27, 406
19, 603

86
64
75
26
03
76

2,138,190 30

401.488
145, 840
265, 499
32, 508
• 8, 206

80
82
61
49
03

853, 543 75

853,543 75

.540, 0.52
146, 930
226,869
62, 833
17, 806

29, 899 07
148, 935 26
249,191 98

1, 422, 519 09

80
82
61
49
03

540,
146,
226,
62,
17,

63
22
91
99
03

052 63
930.22
869 "91
833 99
806 03

994,49278

994,492 78

36, 949 07
266, 367 71
524,853 03

718,643
194,755
243, 802
109, 808
27, 406
19,603

718, 643
194,755
243,802
109 808
27,406
19, 603

828,169 81

1,314,020 49

.

00
00
00
00
00
00

29, 089, 000 00

W^estern Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific




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020, 000
080, 000
957, 000
600, 000
320, 000
1,112, 000

70
48.
89
99
03

1, 422, 519 09

16
16
86
27
00
76

715, 671 21

79
93
72
26
03
76

79
93
72
26
03
76

1,314,020 49

'
Ou J a n u a r y 1, 1869 :
Central Pacific . .
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific

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16, 684, 000
6, 303, 000
24, 078, 000
1, 600, 000
320, 000
. 1,112, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00

50, 097, 000 00

755, 592
461,1.23
764, 655
109,808
27, 406
19,603

86
64
75
26
03
76

2,138,190 30 .

347,193
184,599
549, 109
48; 000
9, 600
33, 360

73
45
77
00
00
00

1,171,862 95"

1,102, 786
645,723
1,313,765
' 157,808
37, 006
52, 963

59
09
52
26
03
76

46,158 10
368,406 97
719,214 87

3,310,053 25

1,133, 796 21

16 27

1, 056, 628
277,316
594,5.50
157, 808
37, 006
52,'947

49
12
65
26
03
49

2,1.76, 257 04

1,056,628
277,316
594, 550
157, 808
37, 006
52,947

49
12
65
26
03
49

2,176, 257 04

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• On J u l y 1,1869:
Union Pacific

If

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•" 53'fl
^ 5.t3
O '^O

Total amount of interest due the United States from
Pacific
railway
companies.

p

13'Ci

Balance of accrued
interest due the
United States on
interest account.

o

Balance
due
the
United States on
interest account,
deductiug repayments.

fl

Repayment of interest by transportation of mails,
troops, &c.

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date as per preceding statement.

TABLE P.—Statement of 30-year 6 x>6r cent, honds {interest payahle January and July) issued to the several Facific railway companies, (fc- -Coiitiuued.

.

.......

W^estern Pacific

$22, 789, 000
6, 303, 000
25, 998, 000
l,60OjOOO
320, 000
1, 628, 320

00
00
00
00
00
00

58, 638, 320 00
On J a n u a r y 1, 1870:
Central Pacific
Kausas Pacific
.
Union Pacific
Central B r a n c h Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific
.

59
09
52
26
03
76

$616, 429 59
189, 090 00
768, 104 37
48, O O 00
O
9, 600'00
43,514 93

3, 310, 053 25

1, 674, 768 89

$1,102,786
645, 723
1,313,765
157, 808
37, 006
52, 963

On J u l y l , 1870:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pa^cifie
.. .
...

772, 528 08
189, 090 00
809,859 96
48,000.00
26, 682 73
48, 849 60

64,135, 320 00

W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City aud Pacific

18
09
89
26
03
69

4, 984, 822 14

1, 895, 010 37

25,881,000
6, 303, 000
27, 075, 000
1, 600, 000
1,970,000
1, 628, 320

2,491,744
1, 023, 903
2,891-729
253, 808
73, 288
14.5, 358

2,5,881,000
6, 303, 000
" 27, 075, 000
1, 600, 000
1, 648, 000
1, 628, 320

...

00
00
00
00
00
00 .

00
00
00
00
00
00

1,719,216
834,813
2, 081, 869
205, 808
46, 606
.
96,508

26
09
85
26
76
29

64, 457, 320 00
On J a n u a r y 1, 1871:
Central Pacific . .
Kansas P a c i f i c . . Union Pacific
•.
Central Branch Union Pacific




6,879,832 51

25,881,000
6; 303, 000
27,236, 512
1,600,000

3,261,767
1,212,993
3,713,371
301,808

00
00
00
00

84
09
05
26

770, 023
189, 090
821,641
48, 000
57,908
48, 849

58
00
20
00
60
60

1,93.5,512 98

776. 430
189,090
817,095
48, 000

00
00
36
00

$1,719,216
834, 813
2, 081, 869
205, 808
46, 606
96, 508

18
09
89
26
03
69

$72, 666
546, 569
906,446
3, 490

99 ^
10
11
79

16 27

$1, 646, 549
288, 243
1,175, 423
202,317
46, 606
96, 492

$1, 646, 549
288, 243
1,175, 423
202, 317
46, 606
96, 492

19
99
78
47
03
42

19
99
78
47
03
42

4, 984, 822 14

1,529,189 26

3, 455, 632 88

3, 455, 632 88

2, 491, 744
1,023,903
2,891,729
253, 808
73, 288
145, 358

116, 765
631, 224
1,107, 427
5,301

2, 374, 978
392, 678
1,784,302
248, 506
73, 288
144,988

2, 374, 978
392, 678
1,784,302
248, 506
73, 28&
144, 988

26
09
85
26
76
29

86
99
54
92

369'46'

40
10
31
34
76
89

6,879,832 51

1,861,089 71
164,054
684,359
1, 239, 576
7,401

3,097,713
528, 633
2, 423, 794
294,406
131,197
193,811

5, 018, 742 80

5,018,742 80

3; 261, 767
1, 212, 993
3,713,371
301,808
131, 197
194,207

84
09
05
20
36
89

17
12
87
92

396 08 .

67
97
18 '
34
36
81

40
10
31
34
76
89

$155, 730
28, 717
67, 767
17, 857
4,274
5,154

40
58
69
43
71
20

3, 253, .444
557,351
2,491,561
312, 263
135,472
198,966

07
55
87
77
07
01

8, 815, 345 49

2, 145,788 16

6, 669, 557 33

279,502 01

6, 949, 059 34

4,0.38,197
1, 402, 083
4,530,466
349, 808

241, 638
768, 148
1,434,952
7, 401

3, 796, 559
63,3, 934
3,095,514
342, 406

326,995
56,879
194,389
35,410

4,123, 554
690,813
3, 289, 903
377,817

84
.09
41
26

70
66
33
92

14
43
08
34

81
25
56
83

95
68
64
17

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Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific .

1

1, 970, 000 00
1, 628, 320 00

131,197 36
194,207 89

59,100 00
48, 849 60
1,938,564 96

190,297 36
243, 057 49

.182,016 11
242,661 41

10,598 09
15, 762 43

192,614 20
258. 423 84

2,460,818 94

8, 293, 091 51

640, 035 97

8, 933,127 48

8, 281 25
396 08

64, 618, 832 00

On Jamiary 1, 1872 :
Central Pacific
^
..
Kausas Pacific
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

25. 881, 000 00
6, 303, COO 00
27,236,512 00
1, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 000 00
1, 628, 320 00

4, 038,197 84
1, 402, 083 09
4, 530, 466 41
349, 808 26
190,297 36
243, 057 49

776, 430 00
189,090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,100 00
48, 849 60

4, 814, 627 84
1,591,173 09
5, 347, 561 77
397, 808 26
249, 397 36
291, 907 09

343, 266 90
857, 330 93
1,755,303 15
9, 276 92
8,281 25
401 88

4, 471, 360 94
733,842 16
3, 592, 258 62
388, 531 34
241,116 11
291, .505 21;

64, 618, 832 00

On J u l y l , 1871:
Central Pacific
'.
Kansas Pacific
?
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
.,...
Sioux City and Pacific
...

8,815,345 49

10, 753, 910 45

1, 938, 564 96

12, 692, 475 41

2,973,861 03

25,881,000 00
6, 303, 000 00
27,236,512 00
1,600,000 00
1,970,000 00
1, 628, 320 00

4, 814, 627 84
1, .591,173 09
5,347,561 77
397, 808 26
249, 397 36
291, 907 09

422, 556 33
927, 829 30
1, 964, 8.50 08
9, 276 92
9, 350 25
401 88

64,618,832 00
On July 1, 1872:
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
•
Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

12,692,475 41




5, 591, 057 84
1, 780, 263 09
6,164, 657 13
445, 808 26
308, 497 36
340, 756 69

64, 623, 512 00
On January 1,1873 :
Central Pacific
Kansas Pacific
Union Pacific
.-.
Central Brancb Union Pacific
Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

25, 885,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
' 1,600,000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1, 628, 320 00

14,631,040 37

25, 885,120 00
6, 303,000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1,600,000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1,628,320 00
64, 623, 512 00

6, 368, 376 07
1, 969, 353 09
6,981,752 49
493, 808 26
367, 679 34
389, 606 29
16, 570, 575 54

10,753,910 45

449, 7.53 57
~ 76, 932 82
. 289,874 27
46, 725 32
16, 376 52
23, 515 13

4,921,114 51
' 810,774 98
3,882,132 89
435, 256 66
257, 492 63
315, 020 34

9, 718, 614 38

903,177 63

10, 621, 792 01

5,168,501 51
852, 433 79
4,199, 807 05
436, 531 34
299,147 11
340, 354 81

595, 968 12
100,272 17
402, 429 22
59, 783 02
24,078 92
32, 965 74

5, 764, 469 63
952, 705 96
4, 602, 236 27
496, 314 36
323, 226 03
373, 320 55

776, 430 00
189, 090 00
817,095 .36
48, 000 00
59,100 00
48, 849 60

5,591,057 84'
1.780,263 09
6,164, 657 13
445, 808 26
308, 497 36
340, 756 69

1,938,564 96

14, 631, 040 37

3, 334, 264 76

11, 296, 775 61

777, 318 23
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
59,181 98
48, 849 60

6, 368, 376 07
1,969,353 09
6, 981, 752 49
493, 808 26
367, 6~79 34
389, 606 29

527, 025 39
973,904 69
2,181, 989 43
15, 839 42
.9,350 25
825 60

5, 841, 350 68
995, 448 40
4, 799, 763 06
477, 968 84
358, 329 09
388,780 69

766, 898 68
128, 262 25
537, 973 22
74,538 53
33, 775 7 0
.
44,165 12

16, 570, 575 54

3, 708, 934 78

12,861,640 76

1, 585, 613 50

14,447,254 26

7,144, 929 67
2,158, 443 09
7, 798, 847 85
541,808 26
426, 796 14
438, 455 89

614,057 06
1, 067,179 03
2, 296, 875 90
17, 714 42
9, 3.50 25
825 69

6, 530, 872 61
1,091,264 06
5,501,97195
524, 093 84
417, 445 89
. 437, 630 20

963, 723 26
160, 631 78
696, 737 82
91, 093 42
45, 538 84
57,153 49

7,494, 595 87
1,251,895 84
6,198, 709 77
615,187 26
462, 984 73
494, 783 69

18, 509, 280 90

4, 006, 002 35

14, 503, 278 55

1, 939, 535 17

776, 553 60
189, 090 00
817, 095 36
4S, 000 00
59,116 80
48, 849 60
1, 938, 705 36

1,215,497 19

2,014,878 61

rt.
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12, 512, 272 80

6, 608, 249 36
1,123, 710 65
5, 337, 736 28
552, 507 37 392,104 79
432, 945 81

16, 518, 1.57 16

'

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R a i l w a y companies.

li
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fl;^.^.
fl
""
fl oT--^
2 s S •

<

Total amount of interest due the United States from
Pacific
railway
companies.

fl -

rC'73

'.a S

Balance of accrued
iuterest due the
United States on
interest account.

o

Repayments of interest by transportation of mails,
troops, «fec.

fl

Balance d u e
tbe
United States on
interest account,
deducting repayments.

Amount of interest
accrued and paid
to date, as per prec'ediug statement.

TABLE P.—Statement of 30-year 6 jjer ce?i/. honds {interestpayahle January and July) issued to the several Pacific railway comxianies, cf-c^—Coutinued.

rt

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On J u l y 1, 1873:

On J a n u a r y 1,1874 :
Central Pacific

00
00
00
00
00
00

$7,144, 929 67
2, 158, 443 09
7, 798, 847;85
541,808 26
426,796 14
438, 455 89

' $776, 553
189, 090
817, 095
48. 000
59,116
48, 849

64,623,512 00

Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific .

$25,885,120
6, 303, 000
27, 236, 512
1, 600, 000
1, 970, 560
1,628,320

18, 509, 280 90

1, 938, 705 36

On J u l y 1, 1874:
Central Pacific
Kausas Pacific
Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
8ioux City and Pacific .--

-




20, 447,-986 26

15
36
67
92
00
72

4, 223,140 82

$7,196, 446
1,265, .337
6, 232, 923
.571, 156
476, 545
482, 435

12
73
54
34
94
77.

16, 224, 845 44

$1,186, 138
197,874
881,268
109, 529
59, 428
71, 947

37
38
16
94
02
61

2, 506,186 48

$8,382,584
1 463 212
7,114,191
680, 686
535 973
554,383

49
11
70
28
96
38

18,731,031 92

•W

rtGO.

rt'
Pi

rt
00
00
00
00
00
00

7,921,483 27
2, 347, 533 09
8, 615, 943 21
589, 808 26
485, 912 94
487,305.49.

64, 623, 512 00

Union Pacific
Central Branch Union Pacific
W e s t e r n Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific

60
$7,921,483 27
00 ^ 2, 347, 533 09
36
8,615.943 21
00
589, 808 26
80
485,912 94
60
487, .305 49

$72.5,037
1, 082,195
2,383,019
18,651'
9, 367
4, 869

25, 885,120
6, 303, 000
27,236,512
1,600,000
1, 970, 560
"^ 1, 628, 320

20, 447, 986 26

25, 88.5,120 00
6, 303, 000 00
27, 236, 512 00
1-, 600, 000 00
1, 970, 560 00
1,628,320 00
64,623,512 00

•776,553
189,090
817, 095
48. 000
59,116
48, 849

60
00
36
00
80
60

1, 938, 705 36

87
09
57
26
74
09

776, 553 60
189,090.00
817, 095 36
48, 000 00
,59, 116 80
4.8,849 60

22,386,691 62

1,938.705 36

8, 698, 036
2, 536, 623
9,433,038
637, 808
545, 029
536. 155

8, 698, 036
2, 536. 623
9, 433, 038
6.37, 808
545, 029
536,155

87
09
57
26
74
09

808,671 30
1, 206, 0.33 28
2,613,-354 34
21, 893 27
9, 367 00
6, 735 54 .

22,386,691 62

4, 666, 0.54 73

9, 474, 590
2, 725, 713
10, 250,133
685,-808
604,146
585, 004

1, 099, 542
1,291,592
2,816,174
27, 549
9, 367
7,811

47 ^
09
93
26
54
69

24, 325, 396 98

23
26
10
50
00
29

5, 252, 036 38

7, 889, 365" 57.
1,330,589 81
6,819,684 23
615,914 99
535, 662 74
529,419 55
17, 7,20, 636 89
8, 375, 048
1.434,120
7, 433, 959
. 658, 258
594.779
577, 193

24
83
83
76
54
40

19, 073, 360 60

1,437,486
240, 274
1,090,997
129, 863
75, 507
88, 557

68
81
23
46
24
31

9,326.852
1,570,864
7,910,681
745,778
611, 169
617,976

25
62
4o
45
98
86

3,062,686 73

20, 783, 323 62

1,712,114
286, 568
1, 325, 779
152, 132
9§, 842
107, 084

10, 087,162
1, 720, 689
8,759,739
810,391688,621
684,278

.30
96
64
79
34
60

3,677,522 63

54
79
47
55
88
00

22, 750, 883 23

pi
Kj

H5

pi

rt
>• Ul
Kj

E E P O R T OF T H E

SECEETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

47-

TABLE Q.—Eeturns, hy award of the United States Court of Claims, of xiroceeds ofp>roxoerty
seized as caxotured or ahandoned under the act of March 12, 1863, j^aif? from July 1, 1873,
to June 30, 1874.

July
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct..
Oct.
Oct.
No,v.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
May
June

2
.3,
5
8
9,
17
24
26
3
3
3
4,
4,
5
6
6

1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
1873
., 1873
10, 1873
10, 1873
10 1873
10 1873
11 1873
11 1873
11 1873
12 1873
19, 1873
19 1873
2. 1873
18 1873
29, 1873'
15 1873
17 1873
17 1873
17, 1873
17, 1873
17, 1873
17, 1873
17, 1873
17, 1873
17 1873
'17 1873
17 1873
17 1873
17 1873
18 1873
22, 1873
11 1873
23 1873
8 1874
9 1874
9 1874
10, 1874
11, 1874
11, 1874
13, 1874
20 1874
22 1874
24 1874
25 1874
25 1874
25 1874
27. 1874
27 1874
29, 1874
27, 1874
23 1874

Abraham B. Mathews
Michael Slattery
:
.'
J a m e s Hunter's executrix
'
J o h u M. Powell'.
Thomas W . Keay's administrators
Thomas and Catharine MeDermott ;
E m m a P . Sykes
William W . Cones
Eliza Hans Chaplin's executor
Martin Tally
,
William M.'Wilson
Eliza Hardesty's executor
Matilda Johnson
Howell W . W r i g h t
John F. Pargoud
J. B. Christian's administrator
J. W e s l e y Vick
R. A. Rutherford and N. S. Rector
Freeman B u r r
W a r r e n R. Dent
Samuel Houston
L u c y C. Miirphy
Wil liam J. Poitevent
.'
Mathew Malsch
Brittain M. Odom
J a m e s Sheppard
Daniol O'Couner, use of J . B. Stewart
Leon Lippman, survivor of L. and M. L i p p r a a n . . :
H e n r y Brigham et al
J a m e s N. Cartwright
„
Samuel C. McPherson's executrix
Oakley H. B y n u m
John E. Moncure
J a m e s Cody's administrator
.Tames B. Johnson's administrator
J a m e s P . Ashford's executrix
•. ...
Abra.ham A. Solomons
Charles Hill
William Battersby
WiUiam Battersby aud Octavus Cohen
i.,
William Battersby and Andrew Low
Carl William Heinsius
Charles Green
E. W . Marshall, J. N. Beach, and S. Root
Augustus P. Wetter, trustee of Margaret Telfair
Charles Wilson, E d w a r d Padelford's executors, e t , a l . . . . ' . .
E d w a r d P . Scott, executor of Isaac Scott
E d w a r d P. Scott, executor of Isaac Scott
E d w a r d P. Scott, executor of Isaac Scott
H e n r y D . W e e d aud George Ccrnwell
J o h n Scudder's administrator
.'...
A n d r e w J . Miller
E. S. Lathrop, surviving partner of D. and E. S. L a t h r o p
Mary E. Ross, administratrix of Meshack Ross
Aaron Wilbur's executor
J a m e s Gallaudet
'.
William Battersby and Thomas S. Bletcalf's executor
J a m e s W . Burbridge.'.
William Rose, use of J. B. Stewai t
Rose and Arkwright, use of J. B. S t e w a r t
G a z a w a y B. L a m a r
Alfred L. T y l e r
'Martin L u h r s
Thomas B y r n e
Noble A. Hardee's administrator
Benjamin H. Zellner
Rosanna F r a n k
Robert P . Rayne's administratrix
:......
Richard L. North
i
Michele and Salvadovc Pichera
Lloyd Beall. use of Samuel Noble
Jules Massart's administrator
Total




,130 30
320 55
4, 375 00
1, 994 77
1,172 97
525 99
3, ,352 36
92, . 9 40
58
9, 432 12
678 72
9, 625 00
27, 339 56
15,195 52
1,820 10
15,266 81
7, 685 75
.1. 356 10
4,109 40
6, 336 00
17, 923 90
2, 225 47
6,528 00
1,631 27
8,218 80
6,392 40
28,231 84
2.317 90
4, 025 00
876 65
14,193 00
7, 680 00
. 4, 405 87
6, 638 11
4,558 58
30, 539 63
23, 589 43
4,7.33 97
37. 695 95
87, 013 67
7, 880 86
3.940 43
40,747 83
155, 554 89
31, 033 41
8.941 83
4,032 59
9, 629 49
18,234 32
62,242 15
249,4,37 18
9, 503 39
29, 553 42
5,610 56
34, 367 98
22,251 84
7,417 28
487, 242 07
1,617 56
5, 794 75
2,086 11
579,343 51
88,892 31
3,242 54•
10, 500 00
103,856 86
1, 760 30
1,1.58 95
• 27, 456 00
1, 303 30
876 65
10, 571 22
1,158 95
2, 545, 375 45

48

R E P O R T OF T H E ' SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY..

TABLE R.—Awards of the United States Court of Claims of proceeds of proxierty seized as
captured or ahandoned under the act of March 12, 1863, decreed hut not xoci^d during the
fiscalyear ended'June 30,1^1^.
D a t e of decree. '
Jan.
Mar
April
April
April
April
April
April
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May
May

; 1874
,
1,1874
1,1874
6 , 1874
13;,.1874
221,1874
27,, 1874
•
27,, 1874
11 ,1874
11 ,1874
15i 1874
,
18,, 1874
i
18,, 1874
18.. 1874
!
18,, 1874
18: 1874
,
18, , 1874
!
18,, 1874
,
18,, 1874
;
18,, 1874
;
181,1874
18,, 1874
;
18, 1874
\
18,, 1874
;

Name of claimant.

Margaret Roach, executrix of Benjamin Roach
John H . Nelson
John D . Grissett
H a w k i n s F . Price
'.
Mary B . Habersham, executrix of Robert H a b e r s h a m . . .
Searing Taylor, executor of Miles T a y l o r
Alzenath Laporte, widow of J e a u Laporte
:
Austin R. H a w k i n s
Elbert G a n t t
Julia A. Ventress, executrix of J a m e s N. B r o w n
Alexander Collie
T h o m a s W . W a t t s , jr., and wife
Lizzie Hamiltpn, administratrix of Charles D . Hamilton .
George W a t t -•
o,
Simon Witkow.ski
Benjamin C. Williams
H e n r y Peychaud, assignee of Bellocque, Noblom »fc Co . .
F . W . Boyd, executor of J a m e s Railey
-..
O. T . Morgan, executor of Oliver J . Morgan
Louise C. P u r d y , administratrix of Rice C. Ballard
Benjamin R. T h o m a s a n d T h o m a s W . Mason
'.
Allen Jones
Catharine Carson, executrix of J a m e s G. Carson
Johnson et al., representatives of O. J . Morgan
Total .




Amount
awarded.
$8, 911 83
11,441 49
11,746 02
16, 263 36
42, 845 58
12.7.36 91
7, 296 00
8, 064 00
14. 016 00
. 13, 862 00
950, 076 71
3, 076 54
7,064 66
21,307 94
45, 578 50
7, 000 95
296,064 00
37,350 92
21, 870 68
42, 513 48
25,184 50
4,899 68
843 00
11, 964 35
1,621,979 10

A P P E N D I X A.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
F I R S T COMPTROLLER'S O F F I C E ,

Nove7nber 20,1874:,
S I R : In compliance with the instractioiis contained in your letter of
J u n e 4, 1874, a copy of which is hereto appended, I arrived in LouiS:
ville, Ky., June 14, where I was joined the next morning by Mr. John
E. Garrison, of this Office, and Mr. James B. Cleveland, of the First Auditor's Office, who had been detailed to assist in the examination to be
made ofthe accounts and financial condition ofthe Louisville and Portland Canal Company. During the morning, in company with Colonel
Wharton, the Uuited States district attorney, who had been instructed
by the Attorney-General to give such aid as we might need, we called
at the office of the company, where we met Mr. Joshua F. Speed, president 5 Mr. J. H. Ehorer, secretary; Mr. J. W. Henuing, treasurer; and
Capt. .Enoch Lbckhart, superintendent, who, with Mr. John Caperton,
then absent, constituted the board of directors of the company. Each
of these gentlemen expressed entire willingness to furnish us all the information in their possession, and a desire to close their connection with
the a.ffairs of the company as early as practicable; and .we proceeded at
once to the examination, and continued it, without interruption, during
business-hours until noon of June 24.
.
Major Weitzel, as I learned, took possession of the canal and other
property of the company at midnight of June 10, and had returned to
Detroit, having placed Captain Adams, of the Engineer Corps, in charge.
A copy of Major WeitzeFs receipt for the property is hereto appended.
During the year 1867, under instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury, an examination of the affairs of the company was made by Mr. W.
D. Gallagher, whose report bears date June 24, of that year, and includes
the accounts to that date. That report constitutes House jkiscellaneous
Document No. 83 of the Fortieth Congress.
I did not deem it advisable or necessary to re-examine the accounts
embraced in Mr. Gallagher's examination, which appeared to have been
thorough, and which I had no reason to doubt was accurate; but, inasmuch as that report closed with the 24th of June, our examination:
extended back to January 1, 1867, so as to cover the whole fiscal year.
Under date of June 11, 1873, Mr. Gallagher made another report to
the Secretary of the Treasury on the management and affairs of the company.
The two reports of Mr. Gallagher enter so fully into the history and
management of the company that it is not necessary nor advisable for
me to repeat them, or do more than state the annual receipts and disbursements and the financial condition of the company at the date of
the transfer of the property to the United States.
I received from the secretary of the company, in print, a copy of the
several annual reports of the directors, from the year 1826 to the year
4F




50

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

1871, both inclusive, which I transmit herewith for your informatioD
and for the files of the Department.
The examination made of the accounts was thorough and careful; the
accounts of the treasurer were compared with the toll-sheets of the collector, and each disbursement was verified by the vouchers; the accounts
of the treasurer were compared with those of the secretary, and the computations and footings of both examined. The treasurer's accounts,
showed a balance of $405.98 due to him, which, by the correction of a
few errors in footings, was reduced to $307.81. This balance has since
been paid to Mr. Henning, the treasurer, and his accounts are closed.
A letter froin the Hon. James Speed, a copy of which is hereto appended,
shows the state of some litigation in which the company was involved,
from which some expenses may arise. I could not learn that any other
debts remained unpaid, and I believe that none exist aside from' the
bonded debt.
Each of the five directors owned one share of the stock of the comI)any of the nominal value of $100, which, with the interest as authorized
by the act of May 11,1874, $313.50, aggregated the sum of $813.50, which
has been paid at the Treasury, and the stock has been transferred, so
that th e entire stock, consisting of ten thousand shares, isnow the property of the United States.
The bonded debt ofthe company originally consisted of $1,597,000 in
bonds of $1,000 each, issued in four series, the first payable July 1^
1871; the second, J u l y l , 1876; the third, J u l y l , 1881; and the fourth,
July 1, 1886, bearing interest at the rate of 6 per ceut. per annuni^
payable semi-annually, January 1 and July 1, in each year. The first
serie was numbered from 1 to 398, inclusive; the second series was
numbered from 401 to 800, inclusive; the third series was numbered
from 801 to 1200, inclusive; the fourth series was numbered from 1201
to 15 99, inclusive, except that number 921 was not issued, and number
1468 was duplicated, making two of that number issued.
The whole of the first series has been redeemed, as have also twentyseven of the second series, leaving outstanding of the entire issue
$1,172,000.
The bonds redeemed and the coupons paid during the period covered
by our examination were received and transmitted by me to the DeI)artment. The coupons previously paid have since beeu received at the
Department, and, with those previously received, amount to $885,300.
A large portion of the first series was purchased previous to maturity
at a discount, as Avere those belonging to the second series, and the
coupons not due at the dates of the purchases remain attached to the
bonds.
In addition to the receipt and disbursement of the revenues of the
company, the directors, on their personal credit, borrowed various sums
of money, in the aggregate amounting to $304,420.50, which they exj)ended in the purchase of bonds and in the payment of interest when
the ordinary revenues were deficient.
The last of these loans had been repaid at the date of the surrender
of the canal to the United States.
Our examination brought us to the conclusion that the revenues had
been promptly collected and the liabilities paid without unnecessary
delay; that the expenditures were within the iDOwers and discretion of
the board of directors; and that no inoney is due to or held for the
company by the directors or by the trustees under the mortgage.
The following table exhibits the amounts annually received and
expended by the directors: .



51

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

Stateinent of receipts and dishursements of the Louisville and Portland Canal Company from
January 1, 1867, to June 10, 1874.
\
•

Dishursements.

Keceipts. '

\

1867.

1867.
$312, 358 81
. 117,875 35

B a l a n c e on h a n d
Keceints

$212,848 65
217,385 51

Disbursements
Balance
...

430, 234 16

430,234 16
1868.

1863.
217, 385 51
164, 058 78

B a l a n c e on h a n d
IvOcei p t s
.

^ .

137, 560 38
243, 883 91

Di.shursements
Balance

381, 444 29

381,444 29

1869.

1869.
243,883 91
171, 461 80

B a l a n c e on h a n d
Heceipts
...

150, 835 73
264,509 98

Disbursements
Balance

415.345 71

415, 345 71

1870.
0
B a l a n c e on h a n d
lieceipts

1870.
\
264, 509 98
265, 622 58

Disbur.sements
Balance
.

.. ..-

.530,132 56

530,132 56

1871.

1871.
111, 776 78
262, 574 22

285, 652 25
88, 698 75

374, 35i -00

374, 351 00

1872.
Balanceonhand
Heceint.s

1872.
329, 851 55
49, 545 32

?S, 698 75
290, 698 12

379, 396 87

379, 390 87
1873.
B a l a n c e on h a n d
lieceipts

1873.
49, 545 32
220,497 14

242,031 36
28,011 10

Balance

270, 042 46

270, 042 46

1874.

1874.

( F r o m J a n u a r y 1 to J u n e 10.)
B a l a n c e on h a n d
Keceipts

418,355 78
111 776 78

( F r o m J a n u a r y 1 t o J u n e 10.)
28, Oil 10
57, 594 52

86 Oil 60

85, 605 62
A m o u n t of e r r o r s a g a i n s t t h e c a n a l
c o m p a n y as p e r e x a m i n a t i o n of
hooks and accounts
B a l a n c e i n favor of t h e l a t e t r e a s u r e r of t h e c o m p a n y
'

98 17
.307 81
86,011 60

86, Oil 60

Total disbursements from January 1,1867, to June 10,1874
B a l a n c e o n h a n d January 1, 1867.
Total receipts, from January 1,1867, to June 10, 1874 . . . J
Amount of errors, as above
Balance paid treasurer
„
'.




:

$1, 863,147 30
$312,358
1, 550, 382
98
307

81
51
17
81

1,863,147 30

52

R E P O R T OF THE SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASUKY.

The cost of the canal and improvements-counected with it appear by
the books of the Department as follows :
Stock purchased under act of May 13, 1826
Stock purchased under act of March 2, 1829

:.

$100,000 00
133, 500 00
233, 500 00

For improvement of the falls of the Ohio River and Louisville Canal:
Actof Julv 10,. 1870
$250,000 00
Act of January 18, 1871
200, 000 00
Actof March 3, 1871..
250,000 00
A^tof July 10,1872
300,000 00
1,000,000 00
1,233,500 00
For completion of the canal:
Act of March 3, 1873

"

100,000 C
O
1,333,500 00

Under act of May 11,1874 :
For iuterest ou bonded debt
$35,310 00
For expenses of the '^Freasury Department under this
act
833 00 '
For balance due treasurer of company
307 81
For purchase of five shares of stock
813 50

^
'

..

37,264 31
1,370,764 31

Eespectfully submitted.
E. W. TAYLEE,
Comptroller,
Hon. B. H. BRISTOW,

Secretary of the Treasury.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C, June 4, 1874.
^ SIR : Referring to that portion of section 2 of the act entitled "An act providing for
the payment of the bouds of the Louisville and Portland Canal Company," approved
May l i , 1874, which authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Treasury to cause a
careful and full examination of all the receipts and disbursements of the said company to
be made, and to collect, and, if necessary, to sue for, any money due to or held for the
said company by tbe directors of said company, or the trustees under a certain mortgage mentioned iu said act, or by any xierson whatever, you are respectfully requested
to proceed to Louisville, Ky., for the purpose of conducting said examination, and rer
porting to me the result.
It is my desire particulary that you should report to me the precise status of the company, with regard to its liabilities and assets, a't the time the War Department takes
possession of its property.
Any assistance you may require will be furnished you, upon your notifying the Department as to the character of assistance needed.
Maj. Godfrey Weitzel, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., has been appointed by the honorable'the Secretary of War for the purpose of making the necessary arrangments for
taking possession of the canal, &c.. I think you will find him pretty thoroughly posted
as to the history of the company, and have no doubt but that he cau and, if you desire
it, will aid you much in your investigations.
A copy of the act of May 11,1874, is herewith inclosed.
I am, very respectfully,
B. H. BRISTOW,
Secretary.
Hon.

R. W.

TAYLER,

First Comptroller, Treasury Department.




REPORT OF T H E

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

53

LouiSAaLLE, K Y . , June, 1874.
Received for and in behalf of the United States of America, frora the directors ofthe
Louisville and Portland Canal Company, the following real and personal property pertaining to said canal, viz:
Louisville and Portland Canal, with real estate, as per deeds furnished.
1 steam tow-boat, (Walker Morris,) complete.
2 steam-dredges, complete.
4 mud-scows.
1 barge.
3 horses.
1 cart.
.
1 wagon, spring.
1 wagon, Jersey.
1 buggy.
3 sets of harness.
1 diving-armor.
1 blacksmith-shop.
1 car pen ter-shop.
1 iron safe.
G. WEITZEL,
Major of Engineers.
LOUISVILLE, June 6, 1874.

SIR : Under my care, as attorney for the. company, are the following cases : .
xi claim in the federal court against the steamboat Camelia (Colonel Wharton, the
district attorney, is familiar with the case, and will have no difficulty in getting the
money npon distribution.)
A suit of .Campbell's Heirs vs. The Company, in the Louisville chancery court. There
is a demurrer in, and the case briefed. Plaintiffs' attorneys have ]3romised me repeatedly to dismiss thfe suit. There is nothing in it.
In the common pleas court there is the case of Murphy vs. The Canal Company, and
Needy vs. The Same; the first case before Judge Stiles, on the submission of a motion;
the second recently brought. There is, I think, no danger in either case. They should
be watched, however.
. I have instructed the clerks to send in all fee-bills against the company to date.
Though I see but little danger from these cases, the Government should take charge
of them and save the company from loss, in the event I am mistaken.
Respectfully,
JAMES SPEED,
Per B.
The PRESIDENT of the Louisville and Portland Canal Company.




A P P E N D I X B.

WRECKS AND CASUALTIES REPORTED TO HAVE OCCURRED ON AND NEAR
THE COASTS i N D RIVERS OF THE UNITED STATES DURING TEN YEARS,
FROM JULY 1, 1863, TO JUNE 30, 1873. »

The following tables, relating to disasters to shipping during
the ten 3^ears from July 1, .1863, to June 30, 1873, are compiled from
copies of records obtained from underwriters, wreck-commissioners,
superintendents of life-saving stations, officers of the customs, lighthouse keepers, and all other available sources. These records, which
give the name'^of each vessel and other particulars not included in the
tables, have been carefully examined and compared, and the information
obtained from them has been arranged and filed in the Department, so
as to be readily referred to for the particulars of any disaster.
Although it is probable that the Department has failed to obtain information of some disasters which occurred during the period mentioned, it is believed that the number reported closely approximates
the actual number, and that such statistics as are given in the following tables are substantially correct.
As the information received from different localities Avas obtained
from persons having diverse motives in preserving records of marine
disasters, it will be found that some important statistics are lacking.
For instance, statistics of insurance are wanting'as respects the Atlantic
coast and the rivers, while upon the lakes it is not shown how many of
the casualties resulted in totalloss to vessels and cargoes and howmany in
partial damage, but the amounts of loss and insurance are generally given.
Disasters to vessels employed by the armies in the late war are not
included in the tables.
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS.

/

T.iBLE 1.—Numher of wrecks resulting in total loss, reported to have occurred on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during ten years, from July.l, 1863, to June 30,1873.
F i s c a l year—
Total.

Mouth.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.
July
August
September .
October : . . .
:N"O v e m b e r . .
Deceraber..
January
February...
March
April
May
June
Unknown...
Total

1
3
11
16
5
7
12
6
8
4
5
7
9

6
2
4
8
3
8
7
1
2
3
5
1
22

2
8
6
10
6
5
1
2
•73
14
7
12

1
3
2
2
3
4
5
1
13
6
3
6
8

3
3
11
3
5
5
7
6
12

1
12

3
5
1
6
3
5
1
1
11
2
2
1
16

56

57

. 94

72

83

57

61

3
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
11
5




4
2

2
9
10
11
9
4
3
4
6
10
3
2
31
104

2
12
4
4
5
11
9
6
22

3
8
3
8
15
10

7
9
24

8
6
2
5
4
24

26
57
56
72
58
63
55
36
98
42
48
40
158

122

103

809

n

•y

55

E E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

TABLE 2.—Numher of casualties resulting in partial damage, reported to have occurred on
the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l year—
Total.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

JulyAugust
September .
October
;N"Ovember..
December ..
January
a^ebruary . .
March
April
May........
Juue
-•
Unknown ..
Total

3
8
4
3
3
12
4
6
7
7
3
6
. 2

2
3
4
4
18
14
6
5
:LI
5
6
4
5 .

2
1
5
17
6
11
6
4
2
4
6
6
7

5
3
8
:O
L
4
10
6
10
8
4
11
5
13

3
11
7
.12
4
11
3
3
6
7
5
5
11

3
3
4
5
4
3
6
4
5
6
7
4
13

2
6
71
2
6
3
3
4
6
7
3
11
45

2
3
5
:i2
5
9
9
7
4
5
4
6
20'

5
4
5
7
17
3
7
8
1
4
4
9

68

87

77

97

88

67

169

91

74

1
9
2
3
5
10
10
9
11
5
4

a
9

23
52
114
73
62
100
56
59
68
51
53
54
134

81

899

TABLE 3.—Numher of ivrecks and casualties rep^orted to have occurred on the Atlantic 3bnd Gulf
coasts during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing, the nature of the
' disaster.

^
o
iFiscal y e a r enclinsj J u n e
30—

'i
o
f^

6
Ul

PH

1
o
O

20
11
40
35
34
20
35
56
36
29

1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
3870
1871
1872
i873
Total

65
85
78
98
95
83
117
102
119
122

8
10
7
4
3
5
4
10
4
4

10
10
9
9
11
6
21
7
4
15

316

964

59

• 102




fci)

a

o•
2
1

...

bi)

S '^

1

O o
cn
o
X
H
'ft

o

^

1

I

"' i
1

2
2
1
1
1

1

11

' 6

H

o

Ofl

o

bi)

a

^

r=)

>.bJ3
o

05
J3
O
03

i

g
"oi

3

cn

o

^

1

2

1
1

1

1
2
1

1
5

. E
=
o

4

3

a

^

4
2
9
6
8
3
34.
4
5
5

11
23
26
13
17
7
15
13
21
12

80

158

O

H

.

124
144
171
169
171
124
230
195
191
189
1,708

56

R E P O R T OF T H ^

SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE 4.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Atlantic and.Gulf coasts
during ten years from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, showing ihe numher of vessels, andi
distinguishing their description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30

-

D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels."
1864. 1865.
Brif>"s
Barks
Barges
B o a t s ..."
Canal-boat
Frigates
Fishing-smack
Ferry-boat
Gunboat
Pilot-boats
Schooners
Ships
Steamships
Steamers..
.
-Sloops
p
Yachts
Unknown

14
10

1866.

1867. 1868.

. . .

22
8

26
9
1

29
9

12
5
1

1

1

1873.

18
14
2
2

11
10

1872.
22
26
1
1

15
18
1
1
1

1

14
10

1

.

1869. 1870. 1871.

1

1
1

.

1
1
108

Total

15
7

124

.

90
6

144

2
16
8

98
9
4
16
6

116
2
1
6
8

1
86
8
2
7
2

171

169

171

18;$
119^
4
8
1
4'
li

3
132
3

10
157
5
5
14
10
4
1

'"'i4*
6

3
4
8
^ 3

......

76
8
1
6
8

"a
H

124

230

195

191

"i26'

1
126
11
1
10
4

1
1
IT
1,1095^
20
112
62
4
3

189

1 708-

2

TABLE 5.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on^the Atlantic and Gulf coastsduring ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, showing ihe numher of vessels and
distinguishing their tonnage.
F i s c a l y e a r en (ling J Line 30

-

B u r d e n of vessels.
1864.
N o t e y c e e d i n g 50 t o n s
51 t o 100 t o n s .
. .
101 to 300 t o n s
301 t o 600 t o n s
601 t o 900 t o n s
901 t o 1 200 t o n s
....
1,201 a n d u p w a r d
Unknown
Total




1865.

1866.

1

63

11
20
33
10
2
5
2
61

17
15
75
5
3

....

9
12
25
8
4
3

124

144

1867. 1868.

54

22
. 22
40
16
6
3
2
58

17
28
45
6
4
1
2
68

171

169

171

. . . . „

1870.

1871.

15
33
37
26
41
30
6
2
2
4
39 " " 9 8

35
38
55
14

1869.

J

124

230

1872. 1873.

2
50

18
41
48
26
2
1
3
52

35
35
47
21
6
6
1
38

212
274
43i>
128
33
23
18
581

195

191

189

1,708

......

67

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TEEASURY.

'TABLE 6.—Numher of foreign vessels reported lost or damaged on the Atlantic and Gulf
coasts during ten years, from July 1,1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing Jheir description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30—
D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.

TotaL.
1864. 1865.

Austrian brig
British barks . . .
British brigs
B r i t i s h boat
British ships . .
B r i t i s h schooners
British steamer
Dutch brigs
.
...
German ship
German brig
Italian brig
Italian frigate
. . .
Italian barks
Mexican schooners
M e x i c a n sloop
NorAvegian b a r k s
Norwegian ships
Prussian bark
P o r t u g u e s e b.ark
Portuguese ship
Spanisli b r i g s . .
'
.
Spanish ship

1
2

^1
1
2

2

2
1

1866. 1867. 1868. 1869. 1870. 1871.

1
9 '""5
1
2
5

3
1 ""6
3

1
4

1872. 1873.

3
3

5
4

1
6
1

1
1 ""'3'

2
3

2
5

3
1

1
2
1
1
1
1
.3
1

3
1

1

•.5'

«. 1

1
1

1
1

1
1
1
2

1

17

12

1

Total

9

9

2
23>
34
1
13.
24
1
2.
1
1
1
1
3;

10

14

19

9

8

18

1
3
2:
1
1
1
3;
1
125

TABT^E 7.—Statement of the numher of lives lost hy wrpcks and casualties to vessels on theAtlantic and Gulf coasts during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
Fiscalyear—
Month.

Total..
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.
•

Jnly
August
September .
October
!November
December.'.
January.
F e b r u a r y ..
March
April
May
June....
U n k n o w n ..
Total...

12
3
13
1
10
2
12
7
5

10
17
5
11

5
25

20
6
5
15

70
19
16
5

6
8
598

7

7

1

6

111

701

163

21
2
1
1
1
81
13
20




io"

8
32
15
18
3

1
5

23'
18
17
27
5
1
20

29"
88,
1
1
12
24
8
47
3
13
54

1.32

280.

5

5
19

12
13
4
67
5
8

22

28'
21

27"

94

157

s"

14
2

142

24
17
11 '
2
5
14
15
35
30
1
7
48
209

43
9'
2
31
1
11
11
23'
9
1
141

30'
144
107
.17024
142
108
106263
122.'
8066
7982,160

58

REPORT p p

T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

PACIFIC COAST.
TABLE

8.-

-Numher of wrecks resulting in total loss reported to have occurred on the Pacific
coast during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l year—

jVTon til

Total.
1863-'64. l864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

July
.A-Ugust
September .
October
]S[ovember..
December
January
F e b r u a r y ..
March
April
May
June
U n k n o w n ..
Total

2

1

1

2

1

4

4

2

3
1
1

i
8
2
21

6
3

i"
5
2

.

1
8
1
1

i

1

" " " Q

4
2
5
2
1

3
4'
4
10
. 2

i'

3
2

1
11

18

13

21

29

1
1
1
1
1
6
2
2

'"'. i

4
1
1
4
4
5
1
7
2

i
2

3
15
. 4
5
1
2

5
3
2

3
2

3'
4

2'

2'
1
1

21

30

38

17

•

9

3
8

n

27
58
22
21
10
17
13
18
2
219

TABLE 9.—Numher of casualties resulting in partial damage reported to have occwred on
the Pacific coast during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l year—
Month

Total.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'7L 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

July
August
September .
October
jSTovember.:
December..
Januarv
February .
Mfl.rnh , ' -.
April
May
:
Juiie . ..
. Total

1

1

2
1

1
2

2

1

1

1
2
1-

i'
1

0

2

2
1
2
2
1
2

3
1

5




11

6

5

2
3
2
6

1

3
1

2

13

10

1

2
2
2

2

20

3
12
3
4
2
2 "
3
3

i"

•

34

2'
1
1
4
3
3
1
2-

17

4
6
8
13
24
13
17
2
14
7
8
123

59

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

A m o u n t of loss t o
v e s s e l a u d cargo,
where reported.

tr. ft

N u m b e r of v e s s e l s
aud c a r g o e s rep o r t e d to b e insured, w i t h t h e
a m o u n t of insurance.

02 O

Is 3

.Fiscal y e a r e n d i n g
J l i n e 30—

> a

111

O C

a
o
g

1

Numberof vessels and cargoes, whether insured or
not, unknown.

T A B L E 10.— Wrecks and casualties rexiorted to have occurred on the Pacific coast during ten
years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the amount of loss to vessels and
cargoes and amount of insurance on the same.

P

i

g

g

<
1864
1865
-1866 . .
1867
1868
1869.
1870..
1871
1872
1873.. •

6
3
3

30, 000
18, 700
34, 000

7
2
30

Total

$154,627
252, 000
37, 900

1
4
4

.

73, 000
12, 500

20
9
16
12
21
28
16
30
35
15

10
5
6
12
8
3
20
30
16

612, 727

202

110

1

.

S ci p

2

115

52, 000'

222

2,500
26, 500

5

H (D

8
40
23
48
67
33

15, 000

1
2

is
•ss
cc

23
21
20
18
25
2
1
1
3
1

$8, 000

1

I.S

1

TABLE 11.—Numher of wrecks and casualties rexiorted to have occurred on the Pacific coast
during ten years, from July 1,1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the nature of each
disaster.
o
p

Fiscal year ending
J u i i e 30—

S

rp.
P
p
O

0

bJO

bi
c

p*

1

.2
"cn

9

p

i

'o
o

m

p t-*
O OJ

bi)
a

CO

1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870.
1871 .
1872
1873

6
3
1
1
1
3
2
3
5
1

"
..
--- Total

26

......

16
12
14

.

.1

n

1
2
2
3
2

26
28.
14
30
39
14
204

1
1
2

2

1
1

"'2'
2
1
2
4
2
5
16
1

26
22
24
18
34
40
22
51
72
33

16

35

342

'""i"
1

2
2

1

9

20

5

3
•

3

4
1
6

1

3
4
3
2
1

3
3
1

11

p 0
0

7

4

12

TABLE 12.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Paciiic coast during ten
years, from July 1,1863, to June 30, 1873, showing numher of vessels and distinguishing their
description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30-Total.

D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.
1864.

1865.

1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

2
1
1
9

2
4
1
8

2
2

1
6

4
7

1
9

3
5

4

3

4

3

4
16
1
8

1
3
1
10

3
9
1

2
5

3
12
1

1
2
1
6

5
6
1
8
3
9
2

4
22

4
4

6
32
1
1

9
31
3

6
12

26

22

24

34

40

- 22

51

72

33

Brigs
Barks
Barkentines
Ships
..
Steamships
Steamers
Schooners
Sloops
Pilot-boats
Total




......
18

25
59
5
58
2
41
142
8
• 2
342

60

REPORT

OF T H E SECRETARY

OF T H E TREASURY.

TABLE 13.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Pacific coast during tenyears, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, showing numher of vessels and distinguishing^
their tonnage.

-

F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30B u r d e n of vessels.

Total.
1864.

Total

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

4
1
4
2
4
4
4
3 •""4"
1
1
1 ""'2"
2
1
1
2
13
9
9

N o t exceeding 50 t o n s
51 t o 100 tons
101 t o 300 t o n s .
301 t o 600 t o n s
601 to 900 t o n s
901 to 1,200 t o n s
1,201 a n d u p w a r d s
Unknown

1866.

2
4
4
2
1

11
6

6

2
2
3
8
2
1
3
1

13
12
13
4
1

"5'

6
4
5
3
2
2
1
11

""4
4

13
13
17
8
6
3
6
6

5
4
3
5
4
5
4
3

62
35
23
16
23
67

22

18

34

40

22

51

72

33

342

1865.

26

24

^?
5

'""i'

61

TABLE 14.-—Numher of foreign vessels reported lost or damaged on the Pacific coast duringten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing their description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J n n e 30—
D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.

TotaL
1864.

Belgian b a r k
British ships
British steamer
British b a r k s
British brig'.
l^rench b a r k s
German ship
German brig
Italian bark . .
Italian ships
Mexican bark
2"tussiau s t e a m e r

1865.

1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1
2

1
1
1

1871.

1872.

1873.

1

4

4

1

1
13:
]

2

3
1
o1
1
1

1
2

i

1

1
1

1
1

0

7

. ..

7

28-

1
1

'
1

Total

1

2 1

2

4

1

.1

2

TABLE 15.—Statement of the numher of lives lost hy wrecks and casualties to vessels on theL'acific coast during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 3C
,

Total..

Month.
1864.

July
August
September
October
November
December
January ......
February
March
April
May
.

1865.

1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

200
150
1
8
2

40
9
• 6
.16
1
17

.

.

1872.

1873.

11

27
17 • " • 4 "

4
11
14

211

16
""'9'

6

L.

1871.

2
120
9

8

34
16
3
2

......

55

1

13
6

.
5

Total

:

166

289

50

17

29

9

147

32

150
61
55
85
164
20
19
19'
6
5
795

Besides the above, the reports.of twenty vessels stated " all hands lost," without giving the number.




REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

61

LAKE COASTS.
TABLE 16.—Numher of wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Great Lakes
during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l year—
Month.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73. T o t a l .
July
August
September .
October
November..
December.
January
February . .
March
A pril
May
June

55
55
49
108
81

21'
36
30
43

23'

2
10
30
31

16
2
le

Total...,.

421

164

22
25
38
37
42
17

20
35
61
34
99
17

6
15
29
45

14
42
25

323

263

95
35
75

37
45
41
103
74

37
29

17
85
104
22

17
41
80
82
61
13
1
4
4
15
37
33

345

•

107
60
63
65
78
4

28"
30
-21

22
•31
47
85
72
2
5
2
9
105
128
113
621

453

528

388

io'

20
29
87
30
75

.'o*
<

59
35.
341

.395
377
577
574
648
53
6
6
39
304
498
370
3,847

TABLE 17.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Great Lakes during ten
years, from Jidy 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the amountof loss to vessels
^ and cargoes, and the amount of insurance on the same.
Loss to vessels.
Fiscal year
ending
J u n e 30—

No. of
vessels.

I n s u r a n c e on vessels. I n s u r a n c e on c a r g o e s

L o s s ' t o cargoes.

Amount.

No. of
cargoes;

No. of
vessels.

Amount.

Amount.

No. of
cargoes.

Amount.

407 $2,1.56,221 23
160
525, 738 00
317
1, 014, 713 00
262
663,133 00
338
1, 330,180 50
611
1, 690, 656 00
442
1, 530, 741 00
515
2,321,943 25
385
1, 37.5, 652 00
291
1, 556, 224 00

199 $2, 337, 396 OS
60
457, 575 00
93
920, 236 00
96
540, 595 00
770, 940 00
105
1, 690. 007 00
164
132
1, 393, 825 00
128
7,129,160 00
167
1, 240, 919 00
141
1, 243, 950 00

" 365
104
174
175
192
459
310
318
255
221

$904,197
411,026
616,153
502, 427
91.5,017
1, 082, 456
1,063,719
755, 292
931, 083
1, 016, 330

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

192
$726, 003 00
53
322, 995 06
73
615 875 00
71
331, 455 00
91
476, 895 00
153 1, 072, 700' 00
120 1,299,965 00
353, 905 00
89
763, 070 00
127
766,280 00
323

3,728 14, 665, 201 98

1, 285 17, 72-4, 603 08

2,573

8,197, 700 00

1,092 6, 729,143 00

1864
1865
1866
1367
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
Total,...

In 119 casualties the amount of loss is not stated.
On 1,274 vessels the amount of insurance is not stated.

TABLE 18.—Numher of wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Great Lakes
during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the nature of each
disaster.
bi)

Fiscal year
endiiig
J u n e 30—

p

S

1

.2

p

1

1864.......
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1371
1872
1873

21
18
30
17
18
7
11
34
37
36

m
163
80
135
122
160
188
145
155
189
145

Total...

229

1,482

bo

.9
"Si

5
8
6
16
7
16
16
13
29
24
21
156

'0

0

c3
0

1
i

>^ bJD.

0

P .

P

0 p

1

i®

4
3
3 '""2'
3
2
5
4
3
16
1
9
7
5
4
10
2
2

70
23
58
36
42
147
112
120
56
56

50

720

p
0

67
• 24
58
45
55
153
90
91
29
43

13
1
4
4
4
12
6
12
10
6

21
2
1
2 ""3'
4
3
13
25
6
32
8
21
8
3

660

72

50




'o-

^

bi)

""'s'

110

m

5

12
6
10
19
26
32
22
21
21
22

30

191

5
2
1
2'
3
3
6
3

35

Total.

%^
35

......
2
1
1
'"'22'

62

421
164
323
263
345
• 621
453
528
388
341
3,847

62

REPORT OF T H E

SECRETARY

OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE 19.—Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Great Lakes during tenyears, from July 1,1863, to June 30, 1873, showing numher of vessels and distinguishingi
their description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30

Total.

D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.
1864.
Barks
Brigs
Barges
Canal-boats
Ferry-boats
Schooners
Stearaers
Scows
Sloops
S t e a m - b a r O'es

1865.

54
23
2

19
11

247
88
4
3

•93
36
4

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

45
17

36
12
4

47
11
3

84
14
16

70
13
7

74
15
13

29
9
18
1

16
6
25
1

1
182
. 59
18.

1.55
53
2

192
78
8
1
5

318
160
25

1
234
107
19.

•275
109
35
6

222
96
7
1
5

172
92
19
1
9

528

388

a4i

1866.

.

'

• 1
1

Small b o a t
Unknown

""3
1

......
1

1

Total

• .

421

164

263

:i23

345

621

453

474;
131
88'
2.
2
2,090878
141
7
30
21
I
3, 847

TABLE 20.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on tlie Great Lakes during ten
•years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, showing numher of vessels and distinguishing^
their tonnage.
1864.

B u r d e n of vessels.
N o t e x c e e d i n g 50 t o n s
.51 to 100 t o n s
101 t o 300 t o n s
301 t o 600 t o n s
601 to 900 t o n s
901 t o 1,200 t o n s
1,201 t o n s a n d u p w a r d s
U n k n o w n '.

o.

Total

186.5. 1866.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

15
31
134
113
.20
4
1
5

12
25
127
78
13
5
2
1

10
35
1.59
107
15
9
3
7

17
52
251
213
53
23
2
10

8
26
215
146
32
19
4
3

43
• 60
224
152
29
12
2
6

22
31
180
106
19
10
6
14

22
41
129
103
27
11
6
2

155
342"
1, 667
1, 247
245
99
30
62

323

263

345

621

453

528

388

341

3 84,7

4
29
173
170
29
5
2
9
421

2
12
75
59
81
2
5
164

1873. T o t a L

TABLE 21.—Numher of foreign vessels reported lost or damaged on the Great I^alces during
ten years, from July 1,1863, to June 30,1873, distinguishing their descrij
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30—
Total.

D e s c r i p t i o n of v e s s e l s .
1864.
British
British
British
British
British
British
British
British

barks
brigs
barges
schooners
steamers
. . . .
scows
sloops
steam-barges

Total




1865.

1866.

1867.

9
5
4
36
16

2

8

2
1

ii

26
7-

12
5

9

1
71

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

. 2
1

8
1

15
2

2
1

15
8.

18

20
22

9
2
1
24
6
2

5
2
1
15
18
3

1868.

1
22

41

20

27

3

1
47

59

44

'"25"
9
1

38

62
15
6
202
118
8
2
3

47

416.

REPORT

O*' T H E

SECRETARY

OF T H E

63

TREASURY.

TABLE 22.—Statementof the numher of lives lost hy wrecks and casualties on the Great Lalces^
during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
Fiscal year-Month.

Total.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. l866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869'-70. 1870-'71, 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

September .
October . . . .
November..

6
41
7
13
34

January ...
Februarv...
March
April...'.
May
June

7
11
5
124

28"
21
2
20

1

5
11
7
7

19
9
45

4
43"
17
2

11
16
7
4
7 """••'36''
5
71
1

8
50

84
1
17
37 • • " " 1 2 "

19

172

74

.......

4

30
2
10

2

Total.

7
107
16

1

July

92

212

''9,

2
78

103

8
3
6
71
34

1
4
63
10
61

38
210"
•184.
176
279
8-

6
I """"•"'i*
3
.1
132

141

138
.102
72
'1, 207

TABLE 23.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the Great Lakes during ten
yearfi,from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the lakes and adjacent waters on
rgliich they occurred.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30—
Locality.

Total.
1864.

L a k e Ontario
Lake Erie
Lake Michigan
L a k e Superior .
Detroit River
Maumee Hiver ,.
Niagara Kiver
Sagiiiaw R i v e r
S a i n t Clair R i v e r
Saint Lawrence River
Saint Mary's River .
.
S t r a i t s of M a c k i n a c
Beauharnois Canal
L a c h i n e Canal
.
....
S a u l t Ste. M a r i e Canal
Welland Canal
•
Unknown
Total"

1865.

1866.

51
105
1
57
42
11
11
1

18
.40
2
33
47
9
4

43
91
4
43
91
6
13

1
5
1
2
. 2

1
5
13
3
3
3

19
10
5
3
1

1867.

1868.

16
28
61
78
3
3
36
51
111
133
6
6
7
9
1
2
I
6 """5"
13
5
2
2
13
5

......

1869.

421




164

323

'"'i'

1
2
263

1871.

1872.

1873.-

36
51
137
79
1
78 ' " 6 2 '
194
278
20
8'
15
28
1
1
1
15
29
7
5
1
2
14

1
1
1

4

1870.

2

345

621

37
63
38
381"
93
74
140
898
2
3
19
69 ' " ' 6 3 '
538
46
171. 126
. 1,403.
110
19
10 • 21
• 116
133
18
15 '. 13
8
1
2
8
1
32
7
6
""is"
131
8
6
2
7
42
5
1
26
4
5
6
74
18
10
1
1
2
4
1
G
7'
4
22
1
1
3
1

""i"

453

528

388

341

3, 847

64

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

RIVERS.
"TABLE 24.—Numher of wrecks resulting in total loss, reported to have occurred on the rivers
of the United States during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30,1873.
F i s c a l year—
Month.

Total.
1863-'64. 1864-'65. l865-'66. 1866-'67. lS67-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

July
August ....
Septembei .
October
November
December..
January
February
March
April
Mav
.June
U n k n o w n ..
Total

1

1
1

2
5
1
2
1
3
2

1

i

1

1

1
1

4
5

1

1
5

•

•

•

•

-

-

-

2
5

7

10

i

3
1
4

1

i

1
3

14

'

9

3'
2

24

20

28

18

24

24

i

1
2
3
2
4
16
2
•5
4

1

1

2
3
2

13

i

2

1
4
9
1
2
1
3

1

3

9
2
1

2
3"

14
12
7
9
23
23
18
' 22
7
8
6
50

.3"
1
1
44

204

TABLE 25.—Numher of casualties resulting in i^artial damage, reported to have occurred onthe
rivers ofthe United States during ten years, from July 1, 1803, to June 30,1873.
Fiscal year—
Month; .

Total.
l863-'64. 1864-'65. l865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. 1868-'69. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-; 73.

July
August
September .
October
November
Deceniber
January
February ..
J^ l a r c h

1

"'"' i

i"

5
1

2

i

1

1
4

i'

May
June
Unknown

1

1
1

2

5

3

3

2

i

2
14
3

6

3

2

2

2

2
6
1
1
18

8

4

10

3

1
5

s

3

5
G
3
5
4
18
14

2'

i

i

2"
1
3

Total...

1
3
1
1

1

15

,8

27

88

1
1

1

TABLE 26.—Numher of wrecks and casualties rexiorted to have occurred on the rivers of the
United States during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, distinguishing the nature of each disaster.
bX)
P

F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30— ,

s
-p
p

fcb
p

-

Total




u

®

u

§
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871 '
1872
1873

0'

''3

S

'0

0

Id
p

^ 0

4
1
2
8
3
8
17
11
10
2

1
2
2
2
3

1
1
1
2

14

66

14

10

....

151

§)

.

ll i

^ p

1^
p
C/l

u
0.

6
5
8
20
21
9 "3
12
13 " 2 "
3
13
5
44

0
p

np

2
2
1
1

1
1
3

• >•

2

1
2
3
2
4
4
2
15
33

1

1
1

1

1^
8
13
34
30
93
36
33
-^o
71
292

65

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 27.— Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the rivers ofthe United States
during ten years, from July 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873, showing numher of vessels, and distinguishing their description.
F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30—
D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.

Total.
1864.

Brig
Barges
Canal-boats
Schooners
Sloop
Steamers

1865.. 1866.

1867,

1868.

1869.

1870,

3

1

1871.

1872.

1

1873.

" 2 '

1

12

8

12

34

24

22

33

25

12

8

13

34

30

23

36

33

32

'""3'
i

Total

1
15
10
9
1
256
292

1
1 '""8
1
2
1
2
1
28
'58

1

71

TABLE 28. — Wrecks and casualties reported to have occurred on the rivers ofthe United States
during ten years, from July 1, 1853, to June 30, 1373, shoiving numher of vessels and
distinguishing their tonnage.

-

F i s c a l y e a r e n d i n g J u n e 30B u r d e n of vessels.

Total.
1867.

1864.

1865.

1

1
1

1
2
G
1

3
8
14
3
2

11

6

3

4

12

8

13

34

30

1869.

4

1866.

1868.
1

N o t exGeedin*^^ 50 t o n s
51 to 100 t o n s
101 to 300 t o n s
301 to 600 tons
601 to 900 t o n s
901 to 1,200 tons
1 201 and u p w a r d
Unknown
.
Total

1871.

1870.

1
1
5
2
5
8
6
18
2
4
1
1
2 "'""3'

9
2

23

36

1872.

1873.

5
6
4
7
4
2
2
3

1
4
9
13
3

•8
5
25
9
13

17
26
77
83
32

'"'2'

1
10

4
48

33

32

71

292

TABLE 29. — Statement of thf. numher of lives lost hy wrecks and casualties to vessels on the
rivers of tke United States during ten years, from Jidy 1, 1863, to June 30, 1873.
F i s c a l year—

Month.

Total.
l863-'64. 1864-'65. 1865-'66. 1866-'67. 1867-'68. l868-'65. 1869-'70. 1870-'71. 1871-'72. 1872-'73.

January
Februaiy
March
April
May
June
Unknown.
Total...

1
11
7

1

July
August
.Septeniber
October
Noveniber

1

'
30
16

..

9




.

4

74
137
23
20
G

20
6
343

25

5 F

4

85
3'

^

%• •

25

12

74
1

10
7

46

352

38

5

6
76

6

18
19

15

91

37

4

IS
404
25

705

66

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

TABLE 30.—Summary of wrecks and casualties during ten years, from July 1,1863, to June 30,
1873.
be
P

Locality.

1
P
P
o
Cu

A t l a n t i c a n d G-ulf c o a s t s
Pacific coast
Great Lakes
Rivers
Total

. . . . .




bi)
p

cn

P
o

•is
Ul

O

i

- ^ cr

1%

rP

o

H

ll

H

316
26
229
151

964
204
1,482
14

102
9
660
14

326
103
1,476
113

1,708
342
3,847
292

2,160
795
1, 207
705

722

2, 664

785

2,018

6, 189

4,867

67

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

ABSTRACTS OF RETURNS MADE BY OFFICERS OF THE CUSTOMS, OF WRECKS
ANI) CASUALTIES TO VESSELS WHICH HAVE OCCURRED ON AND NEAR
THE COASTS AND ON THE RIVERS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND TO AMERICAN VESSELS ON THE COASTS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES, DURING THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1874.

The folio wing tables relating to disasters which have occurred daring
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874. are compiled from the returns
made by customs officers in compliance with instructions contained in a
circular issued from the Department August 2, 1873.
Great pains have been taken to obtain as complete information regarding every casualty as was possible, and the statistics will be found
to be generally quite full and accurate. These tables include disasters
to American vessels on the coasts of foreign countries, so far as reported,
as well as those to foreign vessels which have occurred upon the coasts
of the United States.
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS.
TABLE 31.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts
during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number and value of vessels and cargoes,
and amount of loss to same, where known.
p
r3

Total value
• of vessels.
Month.

T o t a l v a l u e of
cargoes.

o
13
CL>

aj^

ca

2
p

S

o
c
"A

^

<

a

H
p
125

6 $266, 000
July
A u g u s t . . . . 4f
350, 500
September..
71, .500
19
Octobo3r
37
400, 180
N o v e r a b e r .. 32
253, 300
D e c e m b e r . . . 29
400, 250
Januars'
40
84.5, 400
F e b r u a r y . . . 38 1, 843, 400
March
74
724,150
Api'il
116 2, 372, 500
May
49
634, 500
40
481,.500
June
T o t a l - . . 520 8, 643,180

2
2
1

::
1
3
1
7
6
5
4

3^

^
p

%l
05

CJ

p

p

o
21

<

6 $288, 700
V4
>
49, 620
10
44, 329
20 102, 973
17 301,525
22 264, 306
24 710, 058
28 676, 525
49 923, 238
85 1, .590, 075
39 278, 952
33 , 201, 785

Oil
O
C
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
74
00

35 357 5,432,086.74

O

^
1
6
1 4r
2 20
10 34
10 3-1
3 27
9 33
6 34
10 (5?
8 104
5 45
4 39

2J

i

o

a
<

|Z3

$92, 800
282, 433
89, 050
183, 230
194, 300
240, 600
588,945
299, .500
242, 755
487, 993
146, .557
83, 532

00
0(
00
75
0(
00
00
00
00
00
96
00

69 484 2,931,696 71

o
o
o

oP
o
"-A

-x
o

1
1
1

:;
7

o
A-

$6. 855
44 630
11,082
43, 604
122, 842
68, 400
297, 183
244, 875
267, 576
196, 843
38,231
48, IS I

64 244 , 1, 390, 302

«4-

a

o o
'-A

Ob

<

4
' ^A
7
4 20
1 13
2 17
9 14
5 17
10 27
18 56
f
2:
5 22

c)D..i

5 3

!-<P

o o

o

^
1

1

g$
C n
O

?r^

^

=5

H

^?

S 3 ' <^ p

^ bC
S^c %^ S
>

•-

-•

'rt c:

% "tf

^•
p

^

1
t-;

q3 P

cn p

%

P

o

Loss to cargoes

T' p ^ p
5 o

%
'CX}P

jj

%

L o s s to vessels.

O

HI a

.^
p
P

+»"

p
p
o

2
5
2
2
1
1
3
1

1
1
5
5
12
6'
18
16
29
37
2a
15

17 165

TABLE 32.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during the
year ending Jun e 30,1874, showing th e numher of vessels totally lost, the num /;<??' damaged, aggregate tonnage of vessels totally lost, numher of passengers and crew, and numherof lives lost:
ch bJDO
rt P - ^
^

CO

Month.
r P C PH ;>
O

S5 pS
July....
August
September..
October
Noveraber ..
Deoember...
January
February ..,
March
April
May
June
Total




I ®HO

40
21
38
35
30
43
39
81
122
54
44

434.
3, 222.
1, 578.
3, 759.
3, 212.
4, 337.
7, 227.
5, 725.
5, 244.
5, 039.
2,401.
444.

555 42,626.17

65
364
97
232
227
238
337
519
495
987
377
324

18
162
49
406
112
744

4,262

1,501

140
2
10
52
17
16
38
4
7

68

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 33.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during the year ending June 30,1874, shoiving the numher of vessels and cargoes insured a)id
uninsured, and the amount of insurance, where known.
N u m b e r of vessels a n d cargoes r e p o r t e d to b e • N u m b e r of
i n s u r e d , a n d a m o u n t of i n s u r a n c e .
v e s s e l s and
cargoes rep o r t e d as
uotinsured.
: Vessels.
argoes.

c

Month.

i
B

P

'A
Julv
Au'^ust
September
October
Noveraber
Deceinber
J a n u a r y .•
1^'ebruary
M a r c h .'.
April
May
June
Total

4i
P
P

1
S
'A

P

rP

o

a
<

p

-<

Total
a m o u n t of
insurance.

1
3
1
7
7
7
10
10
8
21
16
8

$23, 000
1,900
2,040
10,763
25.5, 690
167,600
445, 033
332. 8.50
669, 877
.564, 277
148, 056
37, 473

$40, 000
92, 077
7,240
27, 763
355,615
266, 400
7,59, 533
465, 550
809, 365
1, 451,127
331, 356
195, 497

150

....

$17, 000
90, 177
5, 200
17, 000
99, 925
98, 800
314,500
132, 700
139, 488
886, 850
183, 300
158, 024
2,142, 964

99

2, 658, 559

4, 801, 523

ci

c6

c/j

1

>

>

1
27
3
4
8
9
10
10
18
34
14
12

N u r a b e r of
vessels a n d
cargoes,
w h e t h e r ins u r e d or not,
unknown.

1
4
9
17
14
8
19
11
14
10
11
9
15
8
189
43 . 25
69
45
35
19
29
23
280

185

3
4
4
15
13
10
IS
11
20
.19
5
3
125

142

1
15
9
8
85
10
5
22
29
10
7

5
5
3
12
10
9
15
15
26
27
9
6

129

TABLE 34.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during ihe year ending June 30, 1874, distinguishing the nature of each casualty.

'

.is

tp

o

bJC

Month.

§

N

Total

1

o
rt

cn

O -

O

a

?^

o

s

12
6
6
9
3
3
8
7
21
•9
4

7
22
8
21
20
23
28
21
45
55
23
20

1
3
3
4
3
3
5
3
7
14
13
13

2
1

293

72

15

16




p

o

P

rt

O

CO _ ^

^-=^

1
3
3
1
3

88

^ cr7 .

^

Q

i

<'

<n

1

1
1
2

1
1

p
E:
o

p

p

bC

P
P

July
August......
September
October
Noveraber
Deceraber
JanuaT'y
Febraary
March
April
Mav
June

i

|%

p

$
>

t)

H

...

1

4

1

1
1
1

i

5
1

2
1
6

i

3
1
3
4

1
•

8

11

4

15

1
1
2
2
1
1

1
.1

8

23

7
8

1

4
1

2

8
40
21
38
35
30
43
39
81
122
54
44
555

EEPORT

OF T H E

SECRETARY

OF T H E

69

TREASURY.

TABLE 35.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels and cargoes on ihe Atlantic and Gulf
coasts during the year ending June 30, 1874, distinguishing the cause of each disaster.
1874.

1873.
Class a n d c a u s e of d i s a s t e r .
'p

33
p
bC
p

1

;-5
o

o
ai

S
rP

3
o
'A

1
a

Q
O

p

rt

14

11
p

di

1

p

H

C L A S S I . — A r i s i n g f r o m stress of weather.
12
20

Foundered
D r i v e n or r u n on b a r rock reef or shore
P a r t e d cables
Draff^ed a n c h o r s
DauTage to hull or r u d d e r , or loss of m a s t s ,
y a r d s , sails, &c
F a i l i n g t o raake h a r b o r , or s t r a n d i n g w h i l e
enterin""
Capsized w i t h o u t f o u n d e r i n g
S p r u n g a leak
'
Abancloned . . .

4
2

5
11
1
1

4
9

3
6

2
14

1
1

1

1

7
18

3

9
1

1

1
3

1

3

6

11

1

1

26

2
1

3
3

1

1

2

3
10
10
3

19

15

36

59

6

4

2
1

0

•

Total

32

8

23

43
111
1
12
4

1
1

1
1

2
20
2

1
9

15

13

1

C L A S S I L — 4 H s m ( 7 f r o m carelessness, inattention, ignorance, (&c.
N e g l e c t of pilot
E r r o r in s t e e r i n g
E r r o r in sailing
E r r o r in s o u n d i n g
Acciden t
^
Carelessness
Stood too n e a r reef or s h o r e

1

1 1

1
1

"i

2
1
1

4

1
2

1

Total

1

4

2

3

1
14

6

7

4

3

43

•

1
2

2
1

1

2
1
. •

4
1
14

1

2

1

3

1

4

0

3

7

C L A S S I I L — A r i s i n g f r o m defects of vessels or
equipments.
4
2

—

Total

0

6

Overladen or i m p r o p e r s t o w a g e
E r r o r iu c o m p a s s

6

4

C L A S S I V .—Arising f r o m other causes.
H e a v y seas or s t r o n g c u r r e n t s
T h i c k or fo^gv w e a t h e r
S t r i k i n g s u n k e n w r e c k s , reefs, &c
Stri k i n g on p i l e s or Avharves
S^irung a leak, s e t t i n g fire to l i m e
F i r e or l i g h t n i n g
...
.
S p r u n g a leak a n d s t r a n d e d t o s a v e from
foundering
P a r t e d c h a i n s or h a w s e r
''
Misstaved
. .
S p r u n g a l e a k .-.
. .T
N e v e r h e a r d from
.No lights
Mistook l i g h t s or b u o y s
"
C u t t h r o u g h b y ice a n d s u n k
A b a n doned '.
N e g l e c t to s h o w p r o p e r l i g h t s
C o m b i n a t i o n of c a u s e s
Total

1

1
4
1

G r a n d t o t a l - '..




2

1

2
2

2
9
1
4

1

3

2
4

1

3
1

1

5

14
3

6
2
5

3
7
4

1
2 "3

"2

1

1
1
3

i

2

1
1
6
1

2
1

3
1

1
8
2
1
4

9

8

5
8

1
40

21

12

~T

38

35

^

1

3

2

29

38

25

22

181

To"

19

19

IT

10^>

81 122 " 5 ^

44

555

'3
1
1

"i

1
4

7

1

1

1

6

0

i

1

1
2

31
44
13
5
3
13

30
5'
3
6
1
9.
1
10

1

Causes unknown
''

1
3

7

10;

14

11
30

43

39

70

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 36.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and.Gulf coasts during
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher of vessels and distinguishing their descrixjtion. •

D e s c r i p t i o n of
vessels.

1.1
1

p

1

P

<

^5

1
3

Barks .
Barkentines'
Bri"-s
Bri<^'antine.*>
Pilot-boats
Schooners
Ships

3

,,

1.

Steamers
Sloops
Scow
Yacht

6

. o

1
1

r=

s
>
o

1

4
1
1

2

4

4

2

1
2

5
1

1

2

5

2

3

p

ft

3

fl

o
H

<

15

25

23
1

•1
19
1

1

1
3

2

3
3

2
•1

.21

38

35

30

43

10
1
5

4

I

48
3

78
3

31
3

26
1

7
3

7
5
1

3
4

8
4

39

3
1

1
3

27
2
2
3

30
2

1
5

6

37

3
9

81

122

54

44

'""G

8

'7
42
1
41
2
14
1
362
16
2
41
24
1
1

3

1

Total

8

40

555

TABLE 37.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts dui'ing
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher of vessels and distinguishing their
cargoes.

1

Cai-goes.

bil
p

1
2
S

ft

<1Ballast
Coal
Coflee, s u g a r , tea, spices, molasses. &c.

...

1
3
2

Copner a n d wool
Drain-pipe
n vpsura
]^'r\iits
F i s h oil tallow &c
Hemp and sugar
Iron, wax, and honey
I r o n flour i^ind f u r n i t u r e
-Iron and metals
I r o n shingles a n d rai^'S
Ice
...
.
'~
Lvirabei", wood, fuel, railroad-ties, & c . . . .*. . . .
Lirae, p l a s t e r , c h a l k , s t o n e , slate, sand, &c ..
M a h o g a n y logwood cocoa-nuts &.c
M e r c l i a n d i s e and g e n e r a l cargo
Guano and m a n u r e . .
.
Machinery
,
Ovsters and t u r t l e s . . . :
Piling
•
R u b b e r and n u t s
...
Ixosin a n d t u r p e n t i n e
Salt
:
Sulphur and vitriol
Shooks
Ontfits for fishiu""
W o o l and h i d e s
•
Tob.acco
Unknown
Total




15
2

1
12
1

9
6

"i"

s
§
8
6
1

1
a
0

8
3

3
3 "2'

.1^ °.p

a

p

1

0

rt

ft

i

5
4
2
1

22
10
3
4

29
19
8
1

5
6

3
3

1
2
5

1
1

"i"

fl
5
4
1
2

^.'.

10
3

^
^

6
a

1

10
13
3

7
7.

129
80
20
10
1
I
1
2
35
34
1
1

4
5

'i'
1
4

1
1
1
1
2 "2
1

9
3
1

i

2
2
1
6
3

1
1
4
2
J
2

"3
2
"5

^
'

2

1
2' 2
3 10
4
2
5
4
1
1

....

21
10
8
2

'2"
5
3 ^5
5
4

5
2

"i
....

"1'

2
1

1

2

1

1

1

2
1
1

2
1

1
1

1

1

1
1
1

2

40 -21

38

6
8'

3

2

3

35

30

43

5
39

2

2

81 122

54

3

44

3
3
10
63
36
7
39
9
1
9
1
1
2
10
3
1
7
2
1
29

555

71

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 38.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher and' distinguishing their tonnage.
CD •
, P

B u r d e n of vessels.

'A

pi

p

bJO

<1
N o t exceeding5'Jtons
.50 t o 100 t o n s
101 to 200 t o n s
201 to 300 t o n s
301 to 400 t o n s
401 to .500 t o n s
. ..
501 t o 600 t o n s
601 t o 700 t o n s
701 t o 800 t o n s
801 t o 900 t o n s
901 t o 1,000 t o n s
1 001 to 1100 t o n s
1 101 to 1 200 t o n s
1,201 a n d u p w a r d

0

8'
3
5
2
3

9
23

"i"

2 "'"4
2
1
1.
1
1

5
11
10
7
4

a

1

>5

rt

1

1

10
7
6
6
4
1

1

1

p

7
6
10
15
5
5
2
5
5
3
3
1 " 1

17
22
17

^

16
9
27
13
40
12
12
8
. 8 '""'5"
1

9
11
9
4
2

'"'ai'

102
148
116
62
41
20
14

1
1
2
2
1

5

43

39

i

......

2

2
1
1
40

6

i

ft

<

4

6
6
6
4
2
1
3

1

8

Total

11

1 1

21

38

35

30

1
5
6
2
5
18
10

1
2

2
2
1 '"'3'

3
. 81

,54

122

44

555

TABLE 39.—Abstract of returns of disasters to foreign vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts
during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing numher of vessels and distinguishing their
description.

"1
N a t i o n a l i t y a n d rig.

p
be
p

fe

•a
%

<

h

0

i

1

p

a

i

fl

rJp

.p

1

Ul

Belgian s t e a m e r
British b a r k s
B r i t i s h bricks
B r i t i s h schooners
British ships
F r e n c h stearaer .
Grernian b a r k s
GrOrman briw

4
1

1
3
4

2

1

i ......
2

""2'
1

1.

0

P

1 (
1
1
7
1

1
5
6
1

1

1

i

Q
P

ft

"""i"
1

11
14
25

1
"""2"
1

1
1

^

• 1

1
Gruatemalan s h i p ..
Italian barks
Norwegian barks
Russian bark
Spanish b r i g
British steamers
Total.

1
1

2
1

1

2

3

2

1

. 1..

15

5

1
1
1
4

1

2

5

5-

10

5

TABLE 40.—SUMMARY—ATLANTIC

5

17

^

p

©

0

^
0

.

• 0u

0

>
0

03

"A
-




u 0

u-^^

1
0

ci
0

. a

Total

.

_;:;

p

M

t.1

rO

Founderings
Strandings
Collisions
Other causes

80

6

AND GULF COASTS. ^

'
N a t u r e of casualties.

1

X

B

H

S

cA

%
PH

^
a
p

. "A

88
293
72
102

10, 908.
133, 252.
39,177.
30, 768.

04
76
13
84

56
133
7
22

32
160
65
80

222
24
3
47

555

214,106. 77

218

337

296

72

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
^ PACIFIC COAST.

TABLE 41.—Ahstract of returns o f disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during the year
ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher and value of vessels and cargoes and amount
of loss to the same, where known.
cn

'

Total value
of vessels.
.

"3

Month.

1 o

l\
ol
feo

P
P
O

"A-

« +3

^ bJL

fe ®

p
P

. o

a
<

P o

"A

% p

art

p i>

%a

M O

o

ch

ll

P
o

11

O rt

"o

III

,a

03 +J

Loss to car- %
%
goes. • big

ii
ail

^

Or^-p
bl

p
p
O

§i p
p

a

j^-^

Piir^

July
August
September
October
Noveraber
February
M a r c h .'.

^^
a^

p
S • "A >

cn 4=

T o t a l v a l u e O . L o s s to ves>
' sels.
of c a r g o e s . o c

I
$770
5 123, 000
2 11, 500
4 35, 000
4 63,000
3 241, 000
5 53, 000

"?..

Mav
i r -^
June
Total

2

"\

2

65, 000

26 592, 270

1
$500
2 30, 000
1
2,000
2
3,280
3 17, 950
3 168, 675
4
3,895

1

2

91, 700

18 318, 000

1

1'
$500
1 10, 000
1
2,000
2
3,280
3 17, 950
3 163,175
3
1,895

.....

1
$770
4 103, 000
2 11, 500
4 35, 000
4 63, 000
3 102, 100
5 50, 920

1

2

61,000
1

25 427, 290

1

2

1

60, 600

16 259, 400

1

2

Month.

fep

p >>

o

So

r$

fe2

P o

^^

111

P Tf,

H

Ilo

ut-

c« © rt

Sort
H

"0

a,a

P bfi
- P"

2 '^

3-

a^

0
0

H

July
Au<'»"ust
September
October
Noveraber
December
Januai'v
February
March
April
May
.J u n e
Total.

Number of disast e r s resulting
in partial loss
to vessel.

8

Nuraber of disast e r s resulting
in total loss to
vessel.

TABLE 42.—Ahstract of returns of disasters fo vessels on the Pacific coast during the year
ending June30, 1874, showing the numher of vessels totally lost, the number damaged, aggregate tonnage of vessels totally lost, number of passengers and crew, and numher of lives lost.

1
4
2
4
4
2
5

.1

1
1

1
5
2
4
4
3
6

12. 81
1, 987. 80
. 126. 00
376. 91
1, 463. 64
1, 293. 00
568. 05

2
79
12
27
39
47
39

1
7
- 50
46

1
:..




1

2

892. 00

44

3

27

6, 720. 21

289

224

49

120

23

21
6

1

76

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

73

TREASURY.

TABLE 43.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher of vessels and cargoes insured and uninsured, and
the aniount of insurance, where known.
N u r a b e r of vessels and cargoes r e p o r t e d
to be i n s u r e d a n d a m o u n t o f i n s u r a n c e . N u m b e r of vessels N u r a b e r of vessels
a n d cargoes
i
a n d cargoes
reported, as n o t
whether insured
or not, u u k n o w n .
insured.
V'essels.
Cargoes.

Month.

ill

No. A m o u n t . No. A r a o u n t .
July
A.u<'"ust
September
October

1
2
3
4
1
3

Deceraber
January
February
March
May
Juue

$6, 000.
8,400
17, 000
29, 000
60, 000
32, 300

1

1
3

$6, 000
9,550
17. 000
29, 000
60, 000
32, 300

U , 150

3
2
1

1
1
2

1

1
I

3

1

1,150

.P

.2

>

8

40, 000

192, 700

Cargoes.

1
2

i'
9

0

2

10

1

1
2
1

1
3

1

193, 850

40, 000

15

Total

Vessels. Cargoes. V e s s e l s

2
pfH

2

1
8

TABJ.¥. A4. — .ihstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast duringthe year
ending June 30, 1874, showing othe number of vessels and distinguishing the nature of each
casualty.
o

1

Mouth.

o

•S3

o•

February
Maich
April
May
June
Total

.

.

.

....

1
4
1
2
4
3
4

. . .

.
'.
'

1.

. . .
.

i

fl

. . ~.
f

1

...




H

1
5
0

1

4
4
3
6

"2"
1

1
2

.

1
0

.

I

.

p

<

m

July
.
Aujiust
September
October
Noveraber
December

,0
p
0

1

21

2
3

1

1

27

74-

REPORT'OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 45.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during theyear.
ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels and distinguishing the cause of each
disastei\
CLASS

IL—

CLASS L—Arising iTom Arising from
carelessness,
stress of weather.
&c.

i

o

Month.
O

1 It
P

a«
CO

fl

CLASS IIL—Aris- CLASS IV.—Arising
ing frora defects from other causes.
of v e s s e l s or
equipments.

rP
o

i

o

bl

1

fl

1

3
o

bu

S2
o

t^

^

;.

ft 03

3

o
ft
P
M

ft

a

ofl
a . -P ,•

i

3-p

o

o
H

fl

H

s

H

July
August
September
October.
Noveraber
December

1
o

1
1

2
2
1
4

2
2

February ..
Maich
April

1

1

^

1

8

1

,1

1

o
H

S
rt

1
5
2
4
4
3
6

1

1

1
1

2

1
1
2

.

June
1

'rt

P
P
<o
p
rt
O

2

May

Total

P
o

13

-r! ®

a

1

CD

'

12

1 1

2

1

1

3

1

o

1

1.
2

6

7

27'

TABLE 46.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels ou the Pacific coast during theyear
ending June 30, 187i, showing the numher of vessels and distinguishing their descrixjtion.
o

Description of vessels.

p

a

a

O

|-

G,
Ul

a

p
p
rt
1-3

c

o
^25

o
O

CO

fl

'o
rt

o

'rt •
ft
<1

P
^-3

1

•2
2

2

4

1
2
1

1
1
1

3
1

2

2
1
2
15
7

1

Barks
Brig
Ships
Schooners
Steamers

5

2

4

4

3

6

2

27

1

Total

1
1

TABLE 47.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during the year
ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels and distinguisliing their cargoes.

i

1

Month.

1

p*
•§
Ct5

Jiuly
.
-•
Auf'^ust
September
October
November
December
January
February
March
Aprii
May
June
Total




a
o.
O

p'

g

6

M

CO
©

i'

u
o

a
p

a

ft

1 1

15
o
m

j

2

p
rt
rt

CD

p

fl

ft

ft

O
cJrj

bC

3

o
o

o
H

cn

1

\

1

1

2
1

2

1

1
1

1

-

1
1

1
8

'i'

1

2

1

2;

1
3

1

1

1

1

3

1
5
9,
4
4
3
6

1

1

1 1

1

1

2

27

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
TABLE 48.—Abstract'of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during theyear
ending June 30,1874, shoiving the number of vessels and distinguishing their tonnage.
p.

o
B u r d e n of vessels.
P

bfl
p

a

(0

"I io
Ul

'^

8
fl

0

1 1 1
<1

p
p
ci

6
p

1
1

"2"
1

1
2 '""2
1
1

1

0

^'

•O

1

Notexceed'gSOtons
51 t o 100 t o n s
101 t o 200 t o n s
201 t o 300 t o n s
301 t o 400 t o n s
401 t o 500 t o n s
501 t o 600 t o n s
601 to 700 t o n s . . .
701 t o 800 t o n s
801 t o 900 t o n s
901 t o 1,000 t o n s . . .
1,001 to 1,100 t o n s . .
1.101 t o I 200 t o n s
1,201 a n d u p w a r d . .
Unknown

h

a

3

2

1.

i

4

1
1

.

^

1

2

1

!

1
1

1
2
1

1
1

1

Total

5

2

4

4

3

i

6

2 1

'97

'p

be
p

S

<U

a

£

Ul

1

.0
0

3

0

,P

0

0

1

fl

February.

•

CO

Nationality and rig.

January.

TABLE 49.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Pacific coast during the yearending June 30,1874, showing the number of foreign vessels and distinguishing their description.

rP

rt

6
ft
1^

j?

-^
•

P

"rt

H

1

1
1
' I

1

3

1

British bark .
British stearaer
F r e n c h bri*^'

1
1

Total

1

TABLE 50.—SUMMARY—PACIFIC COAST.

Nature of casualties.

Founderings .
Stiandings . . .
Collisions
Other causes .
Total...




Partial or Number of
Nuraber Tot^al numunknown lives lust.
of vessels. ber ot tons. Total loss. loss.

7, 294. 09
1. 212. 85
27

45
• 9
22

8, 506. 94

76

76

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
LAKES.

T.ABLE 51.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vess.els on the Great Lakes during the year
ending June 30, 1874, showing the number and value of vessels and cargoes, and amount
of loss to same, where known.
rn

Total value
of vessels.

ll

P

^-

Loss to ves- %l
sels.
0 p

>-^

i

p >

A
July....
Au""ust.
September....
Ootobrr :
November ...
December
.
January
February
M a r c h '... .
Apr.I.
^•^y

;

Total

"A

feo

P
P

0

3rt
P -^
"A

a

37 11,129,000
1 22 $184,505
48 474, 000
2 33 329, 954
60 1, 507, 083
7 30 466. 532
93 1, 755, 900
4 73 642, 585
51 674, 480
75 2, 024, 100
3
70, 000
6 212, 000 " ' 2
' 1
14, 000
1
25, 000
22
14
12

308, 200
234, 200
142, 200

368 7,811,683

13
• 8
8

3
6
13
4
5

522, 268
163, 225
16, 345

2

i

16 242 3, 083, 894

K 43

CD - i J

u

Total value
of cargoes.

o j p

4-j

.Si
as
38
50
64
95
69
8 .
1
22
14
12

L a s s to
cargoes.

C P
O
m 0

P
P
0

a
<

'Hi

feSi

O P

Month.

June

-n

'

la
^§

a rt p

P1^

$52, 022
103, 490
230, 564
468, 058
233, 700
60,000
3, 500

fe^s

li

bUo

ii

11
P. a
0 <^

^ bDo
C rt JD

P
p •
0
P

S'P P

CO + =

p-2-^

-ea^

<

"A

"A

500
172
668
630
858
000
000

22
24
29
42
21
1

3,200
4,570
1,050

10

11 117 519,648

159

3
2
6
'•

3 $70,
15 21,
14 79,
35 145,
35 139,
2 44,
10,
1

15,555
23, 320
17, 390

5
3
4

34 373 1, 207, 599

5

TABLE D2.-r-Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Great Lakes during the year ending
June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels totally lost, the number damaged, aggregate tonnage of vessels totally lost, number of passengers and crew, and number of lives lost.

23

11

Mouth.

JS22
rP P C
O

ri2 P C
O

IA
July
•
August
gi^juQoniber
October

...
11
1

January
March
April
Mav
June
Total




fe^

.is
SI
-§ i

1^1

2
..

Total.

H

38
46
57
80
58
, 7
1

42

331

3
2
6

10

*
11

•

§.
ft
0

0

p ^fi

P

Hi

'rt

H

H

p »

P

3
H

38.
886. 66
50
67 1, 522. 56
97 4, 756. 62
75 1, 790. 63
8
652. 87
1

26
14

2

CO

0 ^

V rt

'A
4

. ...

^S-

'§ ^
ft?-

03-rt

». 0

404
402
667
903
740
51
19

180
45
110
• 82
37

79.00

27
1
11
20

22
14
12

149
126
103

30
50

130. 00

16
6
2

384

9,818.34

3, 564

534

83

77

REPORI' OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASUEY.

TAHLE 53.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Great J^akes during the year
ending June 30, 1874, showing nuniber of vessels and cargoes insured and uninsured, and
the amount of insurance, ivhere known.
N u m b e r of vessels a n d c a r g o e s r e p o r t e d
to be i n s u r e d a u d a n i o u n t of i n s u r a n c e .
Month.

Vessels.

•No. of vessels and
cargoes w h e t h e r
i n s u r e d or not,
unknown.

Vessels.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

$62, 000 $472, 670
122,142
602, 247
158, 33.)
795, 555
204, 360 I, 140, 510
352, 77i) 1, 192, 445
8,000
41,000
16, 500

18
15
23
30
25
5

20
24
/ 22
43
29
1

3

1, 0')0
102, 759

15
5
5

9
3
7

3

141

158

11

Cargoes.

No.

Amouut.

No.

20
3'4
41
67
48
2
1

$410,
480,
637,
936,
839,
33,
16,

670
105
175
150
675
000
500

4
14
10
29
23
1

4
9
6

61,000
114,000
57, 500

1
5

T o t a l .. 232

3, 585, 775

87

July
August
S e p t e m b e r ..
October
N o v e r a b e r ..
Deceiwber...
January
February
March ..
April
May
June...'.

N o . of vessels a n d
cargoes r e p o r t e d
as n o t i n s u r e d .

1f o
P o
p p

ii
31

Amount.

62, 000
216, 750

1,011,402 4, 539, 677

TABLE o'i.—Abstract of returns of disasters io
ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of
casualty.

'r^:

July
August
September
October
Noveraber
Deceniber
Jauuary.
.February
March
...
April
May
Juue

<...

3
9.
6
9
4
1

^

bo
^

2
'P
P
o

::;
o

Ul

5
21
26
32
28
0,

q
8

19
25
7
9.

np
o
bD
bl

o®
'p

c

"P
ci

Total




o

8
0

4
6
5

129

85

2
29

.a

Cargoes.

1

1
1
11
5
4

13
11
24
20
19
5

i
2
1

I

()

_
_

i

2

3

.31

108

p.9
rt P
P

O

«^

^

ft

S

.

_'^

icp

1
2
3
1
1

02

-

ca

o

o
a

^. ^

fl

1

3
2
6
15
4

3

1
3

?r,

pSi

«j

C!i

o
\ bl;
P

o

a .•
rS; P

Ul

Si

o

TrO

fl

"p.

B

.

1

2

...

1

2

i

'o
o

1
2

1

13
7
5
10
25
3

38
50
67
97
75
8
1

1

1

20
14
12

67

''

384

1
1

1

5

33

s

H

3

2

3
1

4
1
2
1

1
.. .

rt

on tlie Great Lakes during the year
and distinguishing the nature of each

-fi

Month.

OQ

8

8

2

4

3

TABLE 55.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels and cargoes on the Great Lakes during ihe year aiding June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels
and distinguishing the cause (f each disaster.
C L A S S I . — A r i s i n g from s t r e s s
of w e a t h e r .

1.

Month.

P
O

P ^
O
'

ii

.

Total....

'

^

1

d cn
ft

1.1

fl

1
3 4
3 10
1 19
1 17

4
1
8 56

i
2

a ^
1
4
2
15
9
3

._

3 1 34




^Irt
Ul

6
i

c

1

^

1
fl

•ft

^:

1
3

s
o

6
8
15
4 3
1 1 17
i 3 1 43
13 1 43
6

e
"A

CD

p

11

4i

o

"o

1

O

o
rt

s

5

p

'bl

o

1

bi.

ci

'a

rt
O

o
H

c

1

3
fl

1

1
2

3

1

P

C3 +- P-fr

1

•

to
0
0

SP

p

CO

2
2

Ts.

C^

bD
P

1

CZ2

H
1
1
1
1 "'2
3

' bJC
P

3 '^'

^i
^ ^
^
> ^ 'c P ^

o
H

""'i

.2

' p '^
P ^
CO co'

>•.•©

3

>
o

1 1
.2

0

0

^ §
«f:a

1

6

d blj
bji

2^

i

a

1

C L A S S I V . — A r i s i n g frora other causes.

2
2
3
1
1

1:

"0 cc
c >.

c

1

%

p

c
0 -P

1

ft

fl

M

i-

1
2
1

•

2

i

6 ll 5'26 4 144

2 1

—5 1 —

1
1
2

4
2
1

1
1
5

1

14

1

1
1
2 "2

3
1

2

1

4

6

24

4

17

12

13

5

1

-

2

P

3

P

3
-S

W

p

rt

cc
12
23
18
19
20
1
1

]6
11
25
34
12
1

38
50
67
97

3
4
2

22
14
12

8

1 3 2 14 114 108

384

1 1
1
1 1

....
1 10
2

2

5
6
9

1

1

P
0

X

4

1

"2

O
H
O

0

£

bl
c:

6i a

c
]A

C

"o

1c 1
'ft

1
5

1

p

bD

'p

B 1
fl

July
August
September
October
November
December
Januai'y
February
March
April
May
Jnne

bl
P

ri

6 o

s

C L A S S 11.—Arising from C L A S S I I L — A r i s i n g from
carelessness, i n a t t e n t i o n ,
defects in vessels or
ignorance, &c.
equipments.

1

3
3
3
4
1

8
1

o

H

O

a

79

EEPORT OP THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 56.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Great Lakes during the year ending June30, 1874, showing the number of vessels and distinguishing their descrix^tion.

D e s c r i p t i o n of vessels.

1
20
2

B i ' i **'S

Schooners
Ships
Ste.araship
Ste ara-bar O'es
Sloops

6
2
2
25
2

1

Barges
Barks

o6

p '
P

o
H

f-2

'""i"

6

11
5

51
3
3

6

^
^

ft

<1

1
2

7
1

22
21
6
206
22

2
4

5

3

1
9
2
95

22

14

12

384

1

12

13

18

16

17

6

!( •>.
J

38

Total

rt

'""l

I
1

2

rP

1

10
2
58
3

"..

1

P
p
ci
Ha

8
fl

o

o

7
5
1
28
6

2

P

©

s

Ul

<

a

.p

3'

p

bD

p

50

67

97

75

8

1

TABLE 57.—A.bstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the G^^eat Lakes during the year ending June 30, L874, showing the number of vessels and distinguishing their cargoes.

'p 6
p S

.P

July
August ....
September-October
Noveraber

7
14
11
25
16
1

8
1
4
87

p

1

37

'bD
P

2
4

8

2
1
2

3
o
H

fl

fl

2

18 1 78

p
P

1 1

IP

4
6
11
20
28
2
1

o

©

Ul

2
1
4
2
6

3
. 9
3
9

p

1

Ul

2
1

.....

1
3

Total...

^ c i O

M

I

6
5
5
11
6

January
February ...
March
April
May
June

.a'P
5ft

o P rt

o
u

Ul

i
3.§

CD

- P CDO

ci O
P

1
O

n

.^3

o
Month.

13
11
24
20
19
5

1

1

00

i

14
12

108

1

38
50
67
97
75
8
. 1

7
6
3

1

1

2
2
7
3

16

384

*

24

3

1
2

1

1

1

TABLE 58.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Great Lalces during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels, and distinguishing their tonnage. .

©

4i
cn
P
bD
p

B u r d e n of v e s s e l s .
t-3

4
1
10
7
5
8

N o t exceedin''',50tons
51 to 100 t o n s
101 t o 200 t o n s
201 t o 300 t o n s .
301 to 400 t o n s
401 to 500 t o n s
.501 t o 600 t o n s
2
601 t o 700 t o n s
701 to 800 t o n s .
801 to 900 t o n s . .
2
901 t o 1,000 t o n s . . .
1,001 to 1,100 t o n s . -1
1, IOI to 1,200 t o n s
1, 201 and u p w a r d
'""'3'
TJnknowu

<

12
11

1

a

©

ft

©
Ul

8

3
9
16
11
8
4
2
3
. . . . „

6
4
22
20
17
12

I

3
1
1
3
1 ""1
1
2
1

rP

rP

rt
P •

P
p

©

©

fl

"A
3
5
18
12
12
6
4
2
2

i

-

&
^

ft

<5
4
5
3
4

1
2
1
1

1
1

I

2
2
2

?
2
1
1

a3
p

"rt

I
1
2
2
6

......

1
'"'3"
2

1

......

4
2

1
3

27
34
84
76
54
34
17
12
7
6
6
8
2
11
fi

•

Total

38

50




67

97

75

8

1

22

14

J2

384

80

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

"^TABLE 59.—Ahstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the Great Lakes dnring the year
ending June 30J 1874, showing the number of foreign vessels and distinguishing their description.

©
Si
P

Nationality aud
rig."

P
bD
P

^
^

s
ft

a
>

o
'A

o
1

1

o1

1

Total

P

©

s

©
Ul

British schooners

1

©

s>

©

5^
p
p

s>

a

©

ci

P.

.

1

P
3

2
2

_
"
'

1
1

• This table does not include disasters to vessels on the Canadian coast.
TABLF. 60.—Nuniber of vessels lost^or damaged on the Great Lakes from July 1, 1873, lo
June 30, 1874, distinguishing<t!lie lakes and adjacent waters 0)i which they occurred.
• ©
p

©

P
©

p
CD
©

6

. 2
12
1
6
•.m

3
23

m

Lake Erie
Lake Saint Clair

3
1
4
21
1
2

.

Lake Superior
Detroit Kiver
Sagiuaw Kivei"
Saint Lawi'once Kiver
Saint Ma.Ty'.s KiA'cr
Saint Claii- Ri ver
Straits of Mackinac
Sault Ste. Marie Canal . . :

'.

2
1
2
1

2
8

's'
17
4
4
1
1
2
2
1

'.7

'A

©

s>

Locality.

"A

19'
39
4
2

3
7
1
6
49
1
5
1

s
©
fl

rt
P

p

0

-i

©

rP
©

ft

1

1
2

's'

I
2.
'2
1

13'

3
5

5

5

'3

12
53
3
4«
190
11
33
2

1

2
1
2

2

'.3'
1

1

2

22

14

1
5
6
8
1
I

1

Total

38

50

67

97 7.=i

8

1

12

.<84

TABLE 6 L - S U M M A R Y - G R E A T LAKES.

1

. CO
©

0

Nature of casualties.

II
P
p

Foundei'ings
Strandin «>s
Collisions
.
Other causes

.
...

Total




.

0 _

P -n

' p3

^

3

29
129
85141

H
10,601.84
45, 795. 55
27, 653. 48
44, 910. 89

384

128, 961. 76

©

'-^ 0

"A

•S"p
p

)A

^

CD

P .•

y

13
22
1
^6

16
107
84
135

54
3
26

42

342

83

81

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.
RIVERS.

TABLE 62.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the rivers of the United Slates during the year ending June 30,1874, showing the number and value of vessels and cargoes, and
amount of loss to sanie, where known.

.

Total value p
of v e s s e l s . ©

,

©

>

>

<4-l
O

o

ll
o P

o
o

-i p

Month.

i
ci

B
D

^ p
O p

4i
©
rP

g
p

.^
.Julv
Sentember
October
November
December
Januarv
February .
March
April
May
June
Total

L o s s to vessels.

Toft a l v a l u e
o cargoes.

1
6
1
6
fi
3
3
7
R
17
13
16

p
P

©
JD

a
p
^

P

a
<

p
.^
p

©
rP

o

$3.5, 000
92, 800
12, 000
97, 000
74, 522
54, 000
12, 503
115, 900
158, 850
342, 000
212, 700
235, 400

87 1, 442, 675

o

1

1
3
2
9
0

o
1
3

....
7

3
4
17
7
12

a

3
1
1
3
1
1

55 1, 457, 777

ro

14

P

^•p

P

;
>

o

^
o

a

.f^
1
3

$102, 000
30, 000
123, OOJ
102, 882
20, 000
36, 800
152 850
431, 085
277, 040
87, 200
94, 920

'S

a
p

\A

Ir IP
^ o

©
rP

p

a
<i

^
9

t-1
©

Z'

•

<j

1
fi
1
fi
6
3
3
7
8
17
13
16

$35, 000
•86, 400
12 000
65, 800
74, 272
19, 500
12, 503
83, 200
112, 300
112, 650
89, 500
94, 950

87 798, 075

L o s s t o cargoes.

^. v:

-or.

a p'
^ o

ro

M P
cn P

^ o ^•s
•s?^
PH ^'^ ?^ a
© . ^ i • Qi ?^

^a

"1
p

o
o
©
rP

© ^

yg o a
p rt

4i

^
a^ a - a
p
p
!zi
^ • 12i
r P \n . P '•^

bD^

^' J

'"^- © a
'^"^ ^p a
ao
p
a
<\ f25 ^
P

O

1 $50, 000
0

1
9
1
9,

1

4

3

3
1
1
1
1

90, 000
51, 441
5, 000
27, 000
60, 500
396, 000
129, 320
34, 650
38, 500

2
1
o
3
3
15
fi
9

1
1
5
1
4

44 882, 411

6

19

TABLE 63.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on therivers ofthe UnitedStates during
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels totally lost, the number damaged, aggregate tonnage of vessels totally lost, numbei' of passengers and crew, and number
of lives lost.
ro-"©•.;3

1Month.

li

fl

03 ro

.S3

3

g£5
July
August
Sexitember
October
November
December
January ....
Febi'uary
March
April
M!ay
JTune
Total

1
3
1
3
5
1
3
2
6
7
5
5

5
3
12
8
11

2

42

48

4

3
3
1
2

• Unknown.
^

6 F




ci

ft

©—'

3«
1^.

•gMg

11°

".5

ft^

ro ft^'

1

1

1.2

31
5^ 15
385

1
6
1
6
7
3
3
9
9
20
13
16

1 176 01
'309.11
805. 58
1, 418. 34
176. 56
181 88
1, 498. 58
1, 242. 89
1,102. 72
1,198. 96
1, 617.16

94

11,112. 94

'^p

.

^ .
t - l CD

a«
R OJ

3£a
ooa

1

'\

(*)

•

24
57
42
70
12
108
116
150
100
171
903

160
20
75

i
II
©+£

3
©

3
71
5

6
14
51
39
172
191

12
1
2
1

728

95

82

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 64.—AMtract of returns of disaster's to vessels on the rivers of the Vnited States dur- ing the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels and cargoes insured an^
uninsured, and the amount of insurance where known.
N u m b e r of A^essels a n d cargoes r e p o r t e d
t o be i n s u r e d a n d a i n o u n t of i n s u r a n c e .
Month.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

Total am't
of insurance.

N o . A r a o u n t . No. A r a o u n t .

N u m b e r of vessels
a n d cargoes rep o r t e d as n o t
insured.

N u m b e r of vessels
and
cargo,es
whether insured
or n o t u n k n o w n .

Total

1
3
1
1
2
1

$8, 000
37, 500
8,000
24, 000
48, 000
15, 500

Vessels.

Cargoes.

4
2
2
6
8

48, obb

31

$8, 000
37, 500
8, 000 .
24, 000
48, 000
26, 500

Vessels.

Cargoes.

1

3

1

1
2
1
2
2
1
5
3

1
3
1
2
1
7
3
3

32.
1
1
54'.

000
000
400
261
500

180,000
255, 000
340, 400
133, 727
92, 500-

602,161

1,153, 627

46

$11,000

000
000
466
000

2
2
6
5
5

132,
240,
135,
70,
13,

551, 466

21

15,
205,
63,
79,

53.

17

24

25

1
2
1
2
2
1
1

3
4
3
1
1
3
6
13
4
8

1

^P
CD

•
July
August
September
October
November
December
January
February .
March
April
May .«.
Jmie

1

2
7
5
24

TABLE 65.—Abstract of returns of disastei^s to vessels on therivers ofthe United States during'
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number' of vessels and distinguishing the nature
of each casualty.

u

^
np
©
©

Month,

1

©
R
ci

p

u

Ul

0

1
1

1

rP

©

"ro

2

1

1
""2
1
3
10

•.

16

1
1
1
1
7

2
1 """3
1
2
1
•2
2
1
1
4
1
4
2
2
16

15

as

P

S

R

1 1

0
P

ft
M

i-l

1

M
R

m

fl
1

1

3

1

September
October
Noveraber
December
January
February
M a r c h .'.
April
Mav
June




'p
©

5

July

Total:

©
bD

JD

&

1

2

1
1
4
3
1
4
3

2

18

2

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
6

5

13

......
1

1
6
7
3
3;
9
9
20
13
16
94

TABLE 66.—Abstract of returns of disasi&rs to vessels on the rivers of the United States during the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the numher of
and distinguishing the cause of each disaster.
CLASS I.—Arising

from s t r e s s of C L A S S I L — A r i s i n g from
carelessness, &c..
weather.

o

i

1

©
©

a

1

1

p

1
S

©

July

Total




p"
c •

i4"

.a
.*3

' ro

l»

1
a

p
IP

©

•a

1

3

o

1

a
©

©

'ro'.p
•§
©•

ft

1

Ul

September
October
November
December
January
February
March
April
May
June

i
i

CL.ASS I V . — A r i s i n g from o t h e r causes.
©

ft-

'ft
CM

IH.—Arising

from defects of v e s s e l
or e q u i p m e n t s .

©

i
Month.

CLASS

©

fl

3
o
H

1
o
H

' bJD
_P
"p

2
o

i

rt
bD

^i.

§
t.1
ft

fl

1 1
B

u

2

Ul

ft
bD
P

1

a
tl
1 §
il
SI % 1
1
>
ft

fl

Ul

1
3

1
1
5

......

4
2
' 1
4
2
2
2

I
4

2
1

6

2

2

9

1

3

ro SJ3
'P

18

7

7

2

1

p
©
ft
i73

-CD

a

1

2

3

1
2
3
1
2
9

1

1

"i
1

1

R
CD
P
i! •
"©
©

1.

2
1

fl

—

1

17

1
2
1

1

'rt

5

1

5

4

1
6
1
3
4
2
2
6
8
11
9
. 12
65

o

3

R

a 1

2

2

3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2

2
2
1

1©

1

^
1

1
5

o

ro

fl

1

O

ro
P
rP

-2

i

K

1

p
rt
Q

0

3
1

.....

1
6
1
6
7
3
3
9

ci

3

20
13
16

11

H

o •

94

w

(73

GO
C;5

84

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TABLE 67.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the rivers of the Uniied States
during theyear ending June 30,1874, shoiving the numher of vessels and distinguishing their
description.

D e s c r i p t i o n of v e s s e l s .

cn
P
-OR
P

<
Barges
Barks
Canal-boats

©
.p

©
JD

a

a
©
>

1

©

"ft

a

o
"A

P
p
a

_^

©
P

1

X

,

3

^?

6

1
6

10
3
18
7
1
1
2
52

13

16

94

2
1 "5"
2
4
2

"i' "i'

...
1

•

rt

1

1

Scow
Ship
Sloops
Steamers

p . rP
;-i

fl

1

1

t

2
1

..
1

Total

. .

5
6

5

1

3

6

1

1

'.....

1
4
7

3

6

6

9

2

9

20

TABLE 68.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the rivers of the United States during
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of vessels and distinguishing their cargoes.
'ro

it

rP

Month.

©

R

1

C!i

4^

1
fl
July
Auffust
September

1

November
December
January

©

1
0

March
April .,
May
June

"0

.

©

li

1

2

1

17

R
©
©

p

1
fl

^

©

R

43
cS
©
rP

4

2
1
2

1

. . . . „

19

R

"rt

1

1
2

"i

1
6
1
6
7
3
3
9
9
90
13
16

10

94

3

1
3
3

i

5

1 "2
1
2

•

0
R

fl

2
1
2
2
1

1
1
1
10
3
2

a
p
_©
"©

1^

p
Hi

i

1

5
3
25

Total

0

0

0

1
.

s

0

3.
2
1
1
5
4

....

1a
©

R

1

1

1
2
1
1

1
1

1

^

1

1
2
1

TABLE 69.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the rivers of the United States
during the year ending June 30,1874, showing the number of vessels and distinguishing
their tonnage.

4i
ro
P
bD
P •

B u r d e n of vessels.

1
a

<

I

2

Ul

©

N o t e x c e e d i n g 50 t o n s
51 t o 100 t o n s
101 t o 200 t o n s
201 t o 300 t o n s
301 t o 400 t o n s
401 t o 500 t o n s
501 t o 600 t o n s
601 t o 700 t o n s .
701 t o 800 t o n s
801 to 900 t o n s
901 t o 1,000 t o n s
1,001 to 1,100 t o n s
1,101 t o 1,200 t o n s
1,201 a n d u p w a r d
Unknown
Total




1

©
rP

1
a

p

fl

0

2
1
1

"i'

2

1

1

0
2
1

p

5
1

3
2
2
2
1
1

....

1

1
1

2
2

R
P

1-5

2

2
1
1

1 1
©

ft

1
1

1
2 "8
4
1
1
1
1
' 1
1
3
1

I

1
1

6

1

6

7

1

1
3

1
1

3

9

2
9

20

1

IT

•

7

9
5
6
4
6
1
1
1
1
7

1
1

'...

12
24
10

16

94

85

REPORT OF T H E SECRETARY OP T H E TREASURY.

TABLE 70.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on therivers ofthe United,States during
the year ending June 30, 1874, showing the number of foreign vessels and distinguishing
their description.
u

©
,p

cn

N a t i o n a l i t y a n d vig.

a

bD
P

^

©

1

1
o
O

a
^

>

©

f-

P

p

©

o

k;

>J

a
z
o

i

fi

?
&•

^

fl

British sbip
Italian bark

3

p
1-3

g

• o
H

1
1

Total

1

1

1
I
2

TABLE 71.—Abstract of returns of disasters to vessels on the rivers ofthe United States c
ing the year ending June 30, 1874, distinguishing the rivers upon ivhich they occurred.
©
JD

Rivers.

©
JD

11
a
>

C
D
P
bD
P

p

©

<

©

Ul

O

'

Arkansas
Champlain^ C a n a l
Chowan
Delaware
[Hudson
Illinois
Jaraes
Kentucky
M a u r a ee
. ...
Merrimac
Mississippi
Missouri
Ohio
. .
Potomac
Ked

©
JD

1

1"

p
©

rt

fl

©

fl

6

3
0

p
p

<1

H
1
1

1

i

2

0

1
8
16
1
5
1
3
1
20
3
22
3
2
2
1
1

1
1
1
2
I

1
1

1

1

1
1
1

1

2
1

9

3

1

2

1

8
2

2
1
2

1
1

1

4
3

2

1
4

4
6

3
1

3
1

20

13

16

1
1

1

Schuylkill
Unknown

1
1

Total

1

6

I'I

6

7

3

9

3

9

94

TABIS:: 72.—SUMMARY—RIVERS.

N a t u r e of c a s u a l t i e s .

icD

'si

• JD

Founderings
Strandings
Collisions
Other causes

..-

.

Total




a ^

ro

=^p

P !=5

3
0

a

ll

©
JD

•

H

ll

3

a
p

H

16
7
16
55

1,7.53.68
3, 003. 37
3, 742. 31
17,077.84

10
3
5
24

6
4
11
31

2
93

94

25, 582 20

42

52

95

86

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY O F T H E TREASURY.

• o

Nature of casualties.

si
si

P t>
"A

.22

Hi

ro^Cro

.2 bca

©Jl-^

111

^?3-

ro

©

K

P

u

f^

. rt >-43
O

Founderings:
Atlantic and Gulf coasts
G-reat lakes
Rivers

Aggregate
tonnage.

TABLE 73.—GENERAL SUMMARY.

. *

32

222
•45
54

80

54

321

133, 252. 76
7, 294. 09
45, 795. 55
3, 003. 37

133
18
22
3

160
3
107
4

24
9
3

450

189,345.77

176

274

36

72

39,177.13

7

65

3

85
16

27, 653. 48
3, 742. 31

1
5

84
11

2

173

70, 572. 92

13

160

5

102
5
141
55

30,
1,
44,
17,

768. 84
212. 85
910..89
077. 84

22
4
6
24

80
1
135
31

47
22
26
93

88
1
29
16

10, 908. 04
10, 601. 84
1, 758. 68

56
1
13
10

134

23, 268. 56

293
21
129
7

•

Total
Strandings:
Atlantic and G-ulf coasts
Facific coast
' Gi'eatlakes
....
Rivers
Total
Collisions:
Atlantic and Gulf coasts
Pacific coast
Great lakes
Rivers
Total
Other causes:
Atlantic and Gulf coasts
Pacific coast
Great lakes
Rivers
Total
Grand total




303

93, 970. 42

56

247

188

1, 060

377, 157. 67

325

735

550

TABLE 74.— Wrecks and casualties on and near the coasts and on the riDei'S of the United States, involving loss of life, during the year ending June 30, 1874, in
four divisions, viz: (1) Founderings; (2) Strandings ; (3) Collisions; and {4:) Casualties from other causes; showing in each case, when known, the
description of the vessel and her cargo, the number of lives lost, and the date and xilace of c'
(1) FOUNDERINGS.
CD .X

Date.

'

N a m e of vessel.

CO

M O O

D e s c r i p t i o n of

P o r t sailed from.

Cargo.

P o r t b o u n d to.

o

P l a c e of d i s a s t e r .

H
O
1873.
A u g . 22
22
24
24

F a n n i e H . Buckland. Schooner.
...do ....
Pyrola
, . . do . . . .
D a v i d VT'asson
...do ....
A n g l e S. F r i e n d

214.09
89.50
229. 65
49.72

24
24
24
24

Charles C . D a n e .
A . H. W o n s o n . . .
Center Point
Samuel Crowell.

do .
do .
.do .
.do

89.
63.
53.
61.

24
24
24
24

Royal A r c h
H e n r y Clay
J o h u ' G . T-^i-Y
Eldorado
'...
J a m e s P . E a t o n ..
I r o n s i d e s ...'
H e n r y Castoff
J o h n C. L i b b e y ..
M a r y C. D y e r
J a m e s Cook
Cundenamarco...
G i l b e r t Mollison .
C i t y of D e t r o i t . . .

..-.do
..-.do
....do
..-.do
....do ....
Propeller .
Schooner.,
.--.do
Bark
S t e a m e r ..
. . . . do
Schooner..
Steamer ..

61. 98
61.42
82.11
34.83
203. 00
,124.00
104. 00
161. 50
353. 91
20. 38
363. 00
30.5. 00
652. 87

Franklin Rogers
Manchu

Schooner.
S t e a m e r ..

45.61

Horace L
B. H . S m i t h
Ida H. Lee
R o b e r t "Wing .
Isaac N. Seymour.
Mary E. L i b b e y . . .

Schooner.
...do
Steamer .
Schooner.
...do
Bark

53.19
65. 26
18.00
184. 50
71. 85
469. 17

Oct.
Sept.
Nov.

Dec.
7
1874.
Mar.
Feb.
Axir.

17




L i n g a u , Cape B r e t o n
R o c k l a n d , Me
Castine, Me

41
68
74
66
Grand Banks
B a y of St. L a w r e n c e ,

Boston
CowBay,CapeBieton
Cura9oa, W . I n d i e s . F i s h i n g in B a y of
Saint Lawrence.
--.do
Fishing,George's B'k
--.do
F i s h i n g i n B a y of
S a i n t Lawi'ence.
...do

Total .
. . . d o ..
...do ..
.-.do ..

A t sea.
Do.
Do.
B a y of S a i n t L a w r e n c e .

w
GO

.-.do
.-.do
.-.do
...do

.-.
..
-.

...do...
.-.do . . .
..do .-.-.do . . .
..do ...
Partial.
Total..
..do .-..do...-.do . - .
..do ...
...do --.
..do . . .

W i l m i n g t o n , N. C .
Milwaukee
Baltimore
Bostou
New York
--.do
N e w Orleans
Chicago
. -.do

Fishing
•
Boston
Grand H a v e n . . - .
New York
St. D o m i n g o
Cuba
Highlands, N. J .
Santa Martha
Oswego
Port Huron

Chatham, Mass .
Nagasaki

Boston
Shanghai.

Elizabeth, N . J . . . ,
Gloucester, M a s s .

N e w H a v e n , Conn . . . - do
-.-do
Grand Banks ..
...do
A t Milwaukee
-..do
Boston
.-.do
Newport, R . I
...do
Portland
•

N ew Toi k
Elizabeth, N. J . .
New York

Coal
Lime . . .
Lumber .
Fish

.do .
.do .
.
.
.
.
.

.do
do
-do
.do

.
.
.
.

...do
...do
...do
.-.do
Lumber.
Wheat
Guano
A ssorted
Railroad-iron . . .
Ballast
...do
Corn
AVheat flour a n d
merchandise.
Fish
Coal
Iron
Fish
Unknown.
Coal
...do
...do

Do.
A t sea.
Do.
B a y of S a i n t L a w r e n c e .

pj
O
.

.

°Do.
A t sea.
Do.
Do.
Off" C a p e H a t t e r a s .
G r a n d H a v e n , Mich.
Between Capes Henry and H a t t e r a s .
A t sea.
* Do.
Lo-wer bay. N e w Y o r k .
A t sea.
L a k e Michigan.
Saginaw Bay.
F i f t e e n m i l e s e a s t Boston L i g h t .
A t sea, 130 m i l e s s o u t h w e s t b y w e s t
of Cape G r o t t o . '
Off" M e r w i n ' s P o i n t , L ' g I s l ' d Sound.
A t sea.
Milwaukee Bay.
A t sea.
Off Saybrook, Conn.
A t sea.

PO

?0

H

ai

00
T o t a l : Vessels, 29 ; tons, 5,287.03 ; laden, 26 j in ballast, 2 ; c a r g o u n k n o w n , 1 ; t o t a l losses, 2 8 ; p a r t i a l losses, 1 ; lives lost, 321.

OO
OC

Wrecks and casualties on andn-jar the coas's and on the rivers of the United States, i/c.—Continaed.

Date.

1873.
A u g . 26

N a m e of vessel.

D e s c r i p t i o n of
ve.-3se].

Scliooner

Ceylon

6.5. 81
242. 99
137. 47

P o r t sailed from.

67.00

....do
....do
. . . d o .-Scow

26
24
6
4

E . C. Smitli
J . WheeliuoJ o s e i i h AVax)ples . .
Sinai

7
17

Southerner
Robert Raikos

17

Sept.
Oct.
N 0 v.

Tons.

(2.) STRANDINGS.

Florence V . T u r n e r . . - . . d o

P o r t bound to.

F i s h i n g i n . B a y of
Saint Lawrence.
Fishino"

ro

AVhether resulting iu total or
partial loss.

.

©

Cargo.

O

O
1

B a y of S a i n t L a w r e n c e .

2
2
1
1

Mackerel . . .
Salt
Lumber
Unknown

: Schooner
.--.do
•

A m h e r s t Island.
G r a n d H a v e n , Mich.
G i l b e r t ' s Bar, F l o r i d a .
T l i r e e miles n o r t h of F r a n k f o r t ,
Mich.
Ocean G rove, N . J .
D r e a d L e d g e , n e a r Swamxiscott,
Mass.
S t r a t f o r d Shoal, L o n g I s l a n d S o u n d .

Buifalo
Ppusaeohi,
Milwaukee

K e y AVest . .
Lndington, Mich

Boston
D i g b y , N o v a Scotia

Philadelxihia
Total . - - Ice
P r o v i n c e t o w n , M a s s . . . . d o . - , . AA^ood

2
4

88.00

Bonacco Isl'd, Honduras.

New York

Cocoanuts

3

Unknown
Railroad-iron . . .
Hay
Miscellaneous ..

3
6
3
1

Ballast

2

'IVirnmilin Cnvp, l\'ln.<si^ Gloucester, M a s s . - . T o t a l . . - Fish
I n d i a n Rivp.r. Fhi,
Savannah.
...do ---. Turtles

1
4

Partial--

92.91
73. 75
363. 22
68. 35

Franklin
. . . d o . .Scliuoner
J. Wrightman
C h r i s t o p h e r Mitchell Bark
Schooner
Electric Spark

A p r i l 17

A'^ictoria

.-..do

14.5. 68

]\Iay

Sarah M. Saunders . . - . . d o
Rover
- . ....do

35. 33
5. 89

20

Portsmouth, N. H .. Bucksport, M e
S a n t a Cruz, Cal
San P e d r o , Cal
San F r a n c i s c o
P o r t Madison, AVash
N e w Y'ork
P o i n t Desire, P a t a
gonia. S . A m e r i c a
N e w London
New York

Total .. . . . do - - - .
...do .-..
...do ...
Partial-.

.

AVhitehead, M e ,
P o i n t Gorda, Cal.
D u n g e n e s s Spit, P u g e t Sound.
Canaries, m o u t h
of P a r n a h i b a
River, Brazil.
S o u t h xioint. of H a r t I s l a n d . LongI s l a n d Sound.
K i l l p o n d s Sboal, V i n e y a r d Sound. .
Sapelo shoals, G e o r g i a .

Total: Vessels, 15 ; tons, 1,767.01; laden, 12; in baljast, 1; cargo unknown, 2; total losses, 12; j)artial losses, 3; lives lost, 36.




Ul

O
H
K!

1S74.
16
March 2
9

O
H

a

300. 00
80.55

:.--

P l a c e of disaster.

II

Total . - Fish
do
do
. do
Partial.-

hj

.

O

W

Ul

d

w

Wrecks and casualties on and near the coasts and on the rivers ofthe United States, cfc.—Continuecl.
(3.) COLLISIONS.

©

Date.

N a m e of v e s s e l .

D e s c r i p t i o n of
vessel.

Tons.

P o r t sailed frpm.

P o r t bound to.

111
© p_rt

^.3 a
1873.
Sept.
7
Oct. 15
1874.
A p r i l 23
M a y 13

Josephine

Stearaer
Yacht . . . . . . . .

TampicoT i i i i e C. J e w e t t

Schooner
Steamer




...

3.00
68.97
133. 00
112.61

P l a c e of d i s a s t e r .

Cargo.
JD

P

H

5§

O

New York
do

Long Island Sound.. Partial-- Ballast
Cruising
..do . - . . Ballast

1
1

Hell Gate, N e w York.
H u d s o n R i v e r , n e a r J e r s e y City.

Rio G r a n d e do S u l
Southwest Pass

New York
N e w Orleans

1
2

Off" B a r n e g a t , N . J .
Bohemia Point, La.

. . do . . . . AVool a n d h i d e s .
Total . - - Unknown

hj
O

H

Ul

Total: Vessels, 4; tons, 317.58; latlen, 1; in ballast, 2; cargo unknown, 1; total losses, 1; partiaMosses, 3 ; lives lost, 5.

>
Pi

O

W
H
Pi

>
a
Ul
pi

OC

Wrecks and casualties on and near the coasts and on ihe rivers of the United States, #c.—Continuecl.

O

(4.) CASUALTIES FROM OTHER CAUSES.
Pi

OS'S <»
© ^ ca

Date.

N a m e of v e s s e l .

P o r t sailed from.

S c o

Port bound to.

® c'rt

P l a c e of d i s a s t e r .

Cargo.

N a t u r e of c a s u a l t y .

rP -r-l ' ^

^

1873.
J u l y 23
Auk.
8

Jennie Howell.
AVawasset

Stearaer
...do ...

385.15 NeAV Orleans
328. 90 AVashington, D . C

•

Total .
. . d o ..

G e o r g e C. Wolff"..

...do ....

533. 05 S h r e v e p o r t , L a . . . .

Saint Louis

Partial

Anna Powers .
Argo

Schooner
Sloop

New York .
A t anchor .

-do .
.do .

Oct.

Island City ..
Sparta .-.'-...
Mary E. Poe.

Schooner .
...do . . . .
S t e a r a e r ..

74.91 Y u c a t a n
George's
14.20 S a i n t
Island, Fla.
59.00 I n p o r t
74.
Frankfort, Me
421. 47 S a i n t L o u i s

Dec.

E . C. H u t c h i n s o n .
E. L. A n t h o n y . . .
May Hare....'
G u y R. P h e l p s . - .
Elida

Schooner.
Steamer .
Schooner.
...do . . . .
...do . . . .

64.00 San F r a n c i s c o . . .
266. 8' S a v a n n a h
179. 91 Coos Bay, O r e g . .

J. F.Allen
Ocean Belle
Fitz J. Babson.. .
Mat. Adams
Hattie Coombs...
Imxiulse

...do
...do
...do
Stearaer
Schooner
British b a r k .

69.00
29. 55
108.15
550. 00

HattieB. West...

Schooner . . .

Crescent City .

Steamer

J. Mora Moss.

Schooner

AYhite F a w n .
Burmah
Teliiinah

...do
British ship.
Schooner . . :

Sexit.

31
19

1874.
Jan.
20
F e b . 10
15
Mar.
7

Apr.

Welcome H o m e . . . British sch'r.




Chicago.

63.00 Gloucester, M a s s Westerii B a n k s . .
Grand Banks
B e a t t y ville
..
Richmond, V a . . .
Darien, Ga
,
George's B a n k s . .

589. 93 N e w O r l e a n s
40.94 S a n F r a n c i s c o . - -

Milwaukee ..
Boston
N e w Orleans."
Buff^alo
Milwaukee
H u m b o l d t , Cal .
New York
Sau F r a n c i s c o .

O

"

Cincinnati
Cone River, V a .

.-.do ..
. . . d o .Total .
Partial
..do .-.
Total . .
..do . . .
..do . . .

UnknoAvn
Merchandise..
U n k n o w n .....•'
.Fruit
...do
AVood
Unknown
Miscellaneous.
Flour
Unknown
Ballast
Lumber
Coal

'...

Fishing
Partial,
Gloucester
-.do . . .
..do . . .
do
AVinChester, K y . . T o t a l . .
Partial.
Boston
Total ..
Liverpool

Fish
...do
--.do
Assorted
Iron
Lumber

Gloucester

Partial.

Unknown

Saint Louis

Total ..

Miscellaneous.

Stewart's Point,Cal ..do . . .

Stone b a l l a s t - .

64.00 G l o u c e s t e r .
788. 00 P e n s a c o l a . .
230. 42 B a t h , M e . .

..do ...
Grand Banks
-.do .-Liverpool
F o r t Monroe, V a . - Partial.

Unknown
Lumber
Ice

107. 00 W e n t w o r t h , N . S .

New York.

.do.

nj
O
Pi

GyXisum

O f f S a l i n e R i v e r , 111.Off-Chatterton Landing, P o t o m a c R i v e r .
T e n miles a b o v e H e l ena, A r k .
S t r a i t s of F l o r i d a
Saint George's Island,
Fla.
Milwaukee Harbor
M a s s a c h u s e t t s B a y . -.
Sixty -miles
above
Memx)his, T e n n .
Lake Michigan
Milwaukee
A t sea
do
do
-

Near Irvine, K y
A t sea
L a t i t u d e 46° 35' n o r t h ;
l o n g i t ' d e 35° 28' west.
George's Banks
Four
miles
above
Friar's Point, Miss.
Six m i l e s . s o u t h w e s t of
S t e w a r t ' s P o i n t , Miss,
Unknown
A t sea
T e n miles southeast
M o n t a u k , L. I .
Off"Mount D e s e r t , M e .

Snagged and sunk.
Burned.
Explosion.

Ul
W

Caxisized.
Do.

o

Struck by lightning.
Capsized.
Burned.

>
Pi

L o s t m o s t of sail.
Boiler explosion.
Capsized.
Do.
Do.
Two men drowned.
M a n lost overboard.
Man wash'd overboard.
Boiler exploded.
Damaged.
M a n lost o v e r b o a r d ,
vessel abandoned.
C a p t a i n k n o c k e d overboard b y gaff.
Burned and sunk.
Capsized.
N e v e r h e a r d from.
Dismantled and abau'd.
Dismasted.
L o s t m a s t a n d sails.

Pi
Ul

a
pi

S a v a n n a h , G a -.

Ifarraouth, M e .

Partial.

Lumber.

liosana Itose.

Schooner .
S t e a m e r ..
Schooner .

Gerard Chestnut.
Alexander

...do .
Ship ..

11

E a r l P . Mason .

Schooner.

535.13 B o s t o n

13
14
June

B r i g ..
Sloop .
...do .

do
Sam. J . H a l e .
B. Y o u n g

May

Schoouer .

Adelaide..
Unknown.
do . . .

Gersh Banker.
Tawas

...do ....
Steamer .

147. 41 N e w Y o r k . .
88.00 P o r t H u r o n .

Zulette K e n y o n . . .
N a p l^on
Leafie Starkweather
S u n n y s i d e ..."
Lucy'M

Schooner..
...do
...do
S t e a r a e r ..
Schooner .

Elizabeth, N . J . . .
Manistee, Mich..
Cleveland
,..
New York
C e d a r .Keys, F l a .

Partial
do
do .
.do .
.do .
.do
do . . M e r c h a n d i s e .
.do . .1 H i d e s a n d toI bacco.

218. 44 P e r n a m b u c o . . .
4.00 S o u t h C h i c a g o .

498. 00 C i n c i n n a t i .
141.25 L u b e c , M e .
37.35 P l u m P o i n t .
1, 239. 00 L i v e r p o o l . . .

148. 8;
108. 60
23.84
800. 00
• 19.06

Fall River ..
Milwaukee .
Troy
Manatee, Fla.

- - do
New York
...do
Fishing.
Fi.'^hing B a n k s , off" . - . d o
Kenosha.
.do
do
.do
New Orleans
Boston
.do

. - - Sugar.
.-- Fish ..
.-...do .
.
.
.

...do
2 b a r g e s in t o w
Spruce piling.

Unk'n .
Partial.

Oysters .
Ballast..

A l e x a n d r i a , A^a.

.do .

Unknown

Savanilla,, S. A .
Lake Huron

...do ..
Total .

.do .
.do .

Baltiraore New York.

L a t i t u d e 3 5 6 1 4 ' ; lon- B o a t i o s t , m a n d r o w n ' d .
g i t u d e 74° 30'.
N o r t h of H a t t e r a s
L o s t sails, &c.
E n t r a n c e W o l f R i v e r , Capsized.
T h r e e miles off K e n Do.
osha, W i s .
do . ,
Do.
I s l a n d 21, M i s s . R i v e r B u r s t steam-xiipe.
N e a r M o u n t D e s e r t Capsized and dismasted.
R o c k , Me.
Capsized.
Chesapeake Bay
L a t i t u d e 54° 0' n o r t h ; B a d l y d a m a g e d .
l o u g i t ' d e 16° 30' west.
L a t i t u d e 39° 3 2 ' ; lon- M a t e l o s t o v e r b o a r d .
g i t u d e 73^ 05'.
Off"Sandy H o o k . . . . . . .
Do.
Off" S a n d B e a c h , L a k e Boiler explosion.
Huron.
HellGate, N. Y
M a t e lost o v e r b o a r d .
OftMV^hite-fish B a y . . . M a n lost o v e r b o a r d .
Cleveland
Do.
Troy, N . Y
Struck abutm't bridge.
S e v e n miles N . N . AV. S t r u c k b y l i g h t n i n g .
Egmont Light, Fla.

T o t a l : v e s s e l s , 4 3 ; tons,'9,925.53; l a d e n , 26 ; in b a l l a s t , 13 ; c a r g o u n k n o w n , 4 ; t o t a l losses, 15; p a r t i a l losses, 28 ; l i v e s lost, 188.




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92

REPORT

OF TLIE SECRETARY

OF TLIE

TREASURY.'-

Wrecks and casualties on and near the coasts and on the rivers of the United States, cfc.—Cont'd^
SUMMARY.

ro

ro

o

N a t u r e of c a s u a l t y .

-(J
. ro,

©
JD

"A

©

ro
P
o

o

"A

%
o
H

P

M

Total

C
M

^

1
4

2S
12
1
15

1
3
3
28

321
36
5
188

8

56

35

550

29
15
4
43

. ...

©
JD
P

cc

a

JD

<
A

H

©

i

p

5, 287. 03
1, 767. 01
317. 58
9, 925. 53

26
12
1
26

2
1
2
13

1

91

Founderings
Strandings
Collisions
O t h e r causes

^
^
ro

W h e t h e r laden or
in ballast.

r^

• ©

17, 297.15

65

18

TABLE 75.—List of places on the coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded
during the last ten years.
ATLANTIC COAST.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 30— .
Name of place.

ci
00

Absecom N J
Addison Me
Ajax Reef, F l a
American Shoal Reef F l a
Apalachicola Bay F l a
Apponaug, R. I
Atlantic City N J .
Aransas T e x .

.

1

00

00

d

oi

CO

g

00

1

£

.2

.....
.
.
^
2
2
.

2

...

2

....

1
1

,

1

o

4
4
1
1
X
1
2
5
I
2
1
X
25
1

1

1
2

Asylum Bridge, R. I
A v e r y ' s Rock Mass
Bangs Island, Me
Barnegat, N. J
Bartlett Reef, Conn
Bass River B r e a k w a t e r Cape Cod
B a t e m a n Point R I
B a y Shore, N. J
Beach Island, Me
Bearse's Shoal, Cape Cod
Beaufort Bar, N. C
Beaufort, S. C
Beaver Tail R . I . .
Biddeford Pool, Me
Black Bock, Block Island, R. I
Black Rock Long Island Sound . .
Blackwell's Island, N . Y
Block Island, R . I
Blue Hill Bay, Me Blue Rocks, R. I
Bodkin Bar, Cli«sapeake B a y
Body Island Light, N C
Bohvar Point, T e x
Boon Island, Me
Boothbay, Me
'.
Bostou Bay, Maps
Boston Neck, R. I
B r a n d y w i n e Shoals, Del
Brazos Bar, T e x . . . . . .
Brenton Reef, R. I
BrcAvster's Beach, Mass
Brewster's Reef F l a
Bridgeport C o n n . .
Brigantine Shoals, N. J
.:
B u n k e r ' s Ledge, Me
Buckarce Shoal, Va
Bullock's Point, R . I
Bull Rock, Boston B a y
Cape Ann, Mass
Cape Caruaveral, F l a




....

CO

}

1
1
1
1
9
1
9
2
2

2

1
1

]

..

2
3
1
I
1
]

2
,

1

-1

1
1

1
22
4
1"
2
1
7
1
1
3
16
1
1
1
1
X

a

R E P O R T OF TLIE SECRETARY OF TILE TREASURY.

93

List of x^lct'Ces on the coasts ofthe United States where vessels have stranded, <fc.—Continuedo
ATLANTIC COAST—Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 30—
Name of place.
CO

i 1

g g

1

i

g

1

oo

1

1

...

1

1

....

1

2

2

00

1

1

Cape Cod Mass (precise locality not stated)

1

Cape F e a r N. C
'Cape Hatteras, N. C
1
•

1

Cape Lookout, N. C
Cane Mav N J
1
1

C a n e Pornoise Me
Cape Small Point Me

-

.

3
1
1

4
1
1
1
1
2
1

1
1

"5'

3

1

1
3

1
1
2

1

.
1

"i"

1
5
1
1
10
7
2
12
6
2
5
2

L

Caroline Shoals, N. C
•Carson's Inlet N J

1
1

•Carvsfort Reef F l a
'Castle Hill R I
Cedar Island V a
C e d a r Keys, F l a
Charleston S C
.
•Charleston Bar S C

....

0

i

.

-

1
2

1
1

1
1
1
2

i'

Chesaneake B a v (^nrecise localitv not stated^
Chestitotic Shoal

2

...

2

"

1

1
1

....

6

1
2

1
14

1

1
2

1
1

1
1

1

1

1
1

Clear W a t e r F l a
Cliif Shore Mass
1

i
1

1
2
1
1

•Cold Spring Inlet, N. J
Common F l a t s Cape Cod, Mass
Conev Island. N. Y

1

^

Coral Reef F l a

1
2
1

2

2
1

....

1

1

Cox's Shoals N J
Crnh Mpadow Tjoner Island N Y

1
1

...
1

Crocker's Reef F l a

..-..
2

Oiiokolds Me
Cumberland Island G-a
Currituck Inlet N C
rentier Me

.

..
..,.-..
1

1
1

2
2 "4"
1

1
1

2

1
2

....
1
2
2
1
2
1

2
1

Deal Br>aoh N .1

1
1
.2

1

1
2
1
1

1

1

1
1
1

Dutch Island, R. I
1
1
1
1
"Rast Rivpr N Y
PiRton'^ Neck Loner Island N Y . .

1

...................
....................

E l b o w Reef F l a

»

1
P a l l River Mass

. ...............

1
1
2
1
1

2

......

1
1
F i r e Island, Loug Island, N . Y




—1

—

2

1

12

94

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

List of xilaces on the coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded, tf-c—Continued^
ATLANTIC COAST—Continued.

-

Fiscal y e a r ending J u n e 30Name of place.
CO

00

Fisher's Island L o n g Island Sound
F i s h e r m a n ' s Island, Me
.
Florida Beef, F l a
F o r t Adams R. I
F o r t Caswell N C F o r t P o n d B a y , L o n g Island, N. Y
F o x Island, Me
F r e n c h Reef, Pla
F r e s h W^ater Cove Mass
.
Frisbee Ledge, Me
F r y i n g - P a n Shoals, N. C
ftalveston. T e x
G a y Head Martha's Vineyard

.

..

00

00

00.

2

.....
1

g

00

1

2
1

i

oo

00

3
1
1

2

1
1
.1

•...'

1

....

'
1

..
1
3

1
-

2
1

....

2

1
1
(rilbert's Bar ' F l a

3

2

•.

1
1

Goat Island, R . I
Governor's Island N. Y .
Grace Point, Block Island

1
1

...

G r a n d Menan (off Maine)

.-^

1
1

i
1

2

2

1

.

1

3

.....
....

frrpat B a v Liffht N . J
G r e a t E g g Harbor, N. J
Great Point N a n t u c k e t
Green Island Ledge Me

.
.....

1

.....

....

4

1

2

1
1
I
1
1
1

1
1
Gross Island
Gull Rock, L o n g Island Sound

1
1
1

Hallett's Point Hell-Gate, N. Y

r.

bl

Handkerchief Shoal, Mass
Harrinorton Me
H a r t Island I^ong Island S o u n d
Hattprat? Inlet N C
.
TTaxvps's Shoal Mass .

..

1

1

1
1
1

3

........

1

....

2

2

1
5

....

4
1

1

/:

....

1
I
Hpll-Gafp N Y
. .
Hempstead, Long .Island, N. Y

1

3
1

.... ....

Hereford Inlet N . J
Herrine* G u t Me

-

1
3

1

..

Highland Light, Cape Cod
Hicrhlands N ,7
T-Tillshorouffh River, F l a
Hill's P o i n t Chesapeake B a y
HOP-Island Va
Holmes's Hole, Mass
Hone Island. R. I
Horses Race, Boston B a y
Horseshoe Shoal N a n t u c k e t Sound
Horton's Point N . Y
H u n t i n g Island, S. C
Huntington, Long Island

3

1
1

...
2

1

....

2

3

....

1

3

1
1
3
1

1
1
1
1
1

i

1
Indian River Inlet F l a
Tngrahani Point Me

1
2
..•

...

....

1.

1

1
1

....

1
1

1
2
Isle of Shoals Me
TPI'VV'S Point N H

1
1
1

Tuniter Liffht F l a .
K e n n e b e c River Me., (mouth of)
Kettle-Bottom Rocks R I
Killpond Shoal, Mass




3

4

1

2

1

1
3
4

1
4
1

3
1

....

1
1
1

1

1
1

REPORT OF T H E

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

95

List of places on ihe coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded, <^"c.—Continued.
ATLANTIC COAST—Coutinued.
Fiscal y e a r euding J u n e 30—
Name of place.

od
00

00

00

CO

00

g g

00

00

1
1

Kinnekeet, N . C
Lattimer's Reef, Long Island Sound
L e w e s Del
L ' H o m m e ^ Dieu Shoal, Vineyard Sound
L i b b y Island Me
"
.
.. . . . .
Little Beach, N. J
Little Cumberland Island, Ga
Little E g g Harbor N . J
Little Island, Vineyard H a v e n
Little Round Shoal, Mass
L o n g Beach Shoals N. J
. .

1

2

2
2
1

I
1

.....

o

00

1
1
1
1
1

1
1

....

1

1
1

1
2
1

1
4

3
1

]

1
2
1
1-

L o u g Island Coast, (precise locality not stated)
L o n g Island Sound (precise locality not stated)
Lowell's Point Me
L o w e r Hell Gate, Me
L y n n Haven B a y
,

1
1
1

2
6

1
2

1
6
2
1
1

1
Madison Point, Conn .'
Marblehead. Mass
Mark Islaud Reef. Me
Marquesas, Fla '.
Matagorda Bay, T e x

'

1
2
.

.

•

6

I

2

1
1
2

1

.

....

1
Micoinit Rip, Mass '.
Milk Island, Mass
Mishaum Point, Mass
Mispillion Creek, D e l . .•

1
1

1

1
Monoruov Point, Cape Cod
Montauk Point, Long Island .
.........
Mount Desert, Me
Muskeget Shoal. N a n t u c k e t Sound
Musquito Inlet F l a
..
. .
Mustang Island, T e x
Nag's Head, N. C
N a h a n t , Mass
Nantucket Mass
..
Nappertrice Point, Martha's Vineyard
N a r r a g a n s e t t Pier, R. I
Narragansett Bav, R. I
Nashawan Vineyard Sound
...i
Nash's Island, Me
Nassau Inlet, Fla
Nausett Cape Cod
Newburyport, Mass
1
N e w Haven, Conu
New Inlet, N. C
'
N e w J e r s e y Coast, (precise locality not stated)
New London, Conn
Newport, R. I
Nigg'^r Islaud, Me
No Man's Land, Martha's Vineyard
Norman's Woe, Cape Ann, Mass
North Brother, N . Y

1
1

1

1
1

1

I

.

1
1

2
1
1

1
3

2

2

3

1

1

1

2
1
1

....

1
1

2
1

:

1

2

1
1

2

1

1
1
9
1

1
1
1
3

....
1

2

"
*
1

2
1

1

2

1
1
1
1
1
1

Norton's Shoals, Mass
Nuckateesuc Point, Conn
Oaks Lpdge, M a s s . . . .
Ocean Grove, N . J
Ocracoke, N . C
Oldfield Point Light, Long Island.
01 d New ton Rock, Mass
Oregon Inlet, N. C
Orr-s Island, Me
Owl's Head Me.
Oyster Island N. Y
P a n Quogue, L o u g Island
P a s q u e Isle, Vineyard Sound . . . . . '
P a s s i I'Outre mouth of Mississippi River
Pass Cavallo, T e x
Pass Christian, Miss
Patience Islaud, R. I
^
Pavillion Bpach, Mass
P e a k e d Hill Bar, Cape Cod
P e c k ' s Beach. N . J




2
1
1
1
1
1
2

•

3

1
1

3

3

5

1
7
1

1

7

3

1

...

.
'...

....
1
1
]
2
1

...
1

1

1
1
1

3
X
25
21
2
6
1
1

1

1
1

"i

9
18
9
2
]

1
1
1
2
1
1
ll
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
3
I
1
1
15
1
2
1
2
1
1
14
1
2
7
10
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
I
34
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
I
I

I

96

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

•List of x^lcices on the coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded, ^-c—Continued
ATLANTIC COAST—Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 30—
Name of place.

id

ll

1i 1

Pellicau Shoals F l a
P e m a q u i d Light Me
Pensacola F l a
Perdido Inlet P l a
Petit Menan, Me

00

00

00

1

g2
oo

CO

g

i

3
0
2

1
1

...

1
1
1

1

2

....

1
1

....

P l y m o u t h Mass
P o i n t Alderton, Mass
P o i n t Gammon, Mass
Point Judith, R. I
'..
P o p l a r Point Light R I
Popasquash Point, R. I
.
.
P o r t l a n d , Me
1
Powder-Horu Bayou, T e x
Providence, R. I
Provincetown, Cape Cod
.^
Prudence Island R I
..
'Quogue Long Island
R a c e Point, Cape Cod, Mass
R a g g e d Islau d. Me
R a m Island, M e . .
... ...
Richmond Island, Me
R o c k a w a y , Long Island, N. Y
Rockport, Mass
R o c k y Point Mass .
Romer Shoals, N. Y
Rose Landing, L o n g Island
R y e Beach, N. H
.
.
R y e Point, L o n g Island, N. Y
Sachem's Head, Conn
"Sail Rock, Lubec, Me
•Sandy Hook, N . J
Santa Rosa Beach, F l a
Sapelo Shoals, G a
Sarasota, F l a
Satilla River, G a ,
i
Saugatuck, Conn
Saybrook B a r Conn.
....
... .. .
Scituate, Mass
Seaconnet, Conn
Seven Mile Beach N. J
S h a r k River, N. J
Sheep's Head B a y B a r , L o n g Island
Ship Island, Conn
.....
Ship Shoals, V a
;
Shippan Reef, Long Island Sound
•Shovelful Light, N a n t u c k e t Sound
•
Sinepuxent, Md
Smith's Island Chesapeake B a y .
Smith's Islaud, V a
Smith's Ledge, Conn
Smith's Point, Chesapeake B a y
Smith's Reef, Long Island Sound
Smithville, N. C
;.
S m u t t y Nose Island, Me
.'
Snow.'s Flats, Me
Southampton, L o u g I s l a n d .
South Dennis, Me
South Harbor, Me
Southport Bar, Conn .
......
....
Southport, Me
S o u t h River, Chesapeake B a y
Southwest Harbor, Me
;South Yarmouth, Mass
Sow and Pigs, Mass
'
Spouting Rock, R. I
•
Spruce Head, Me
Spruce Point Ledges, Me
Sqiian Beach, N. J
Squan Inlet Shoals, N. J
. .
Stage Island, Me
Stamford, Conn
Staten Island, N. Y
Stepping Stones, N. Y
Steuben, Me




CO

....

1
2
2
2

2

1
'1

....

1
1

1
1

1

'*i'

1
4
1
1

1

"i"

1

1

1
1

1
1 "3*

1

1
1
1
1
1
1

2

1
1
1
3

2

6

1

1

2

1
2

1

i

4

2

2
1

2
1

4
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

1

1

1

2

1
2

"i'
1

1
1

1

1

1
1
1

1
1

1
2

....

1

1
1
1

1
1
1
3

1
1

1
1
3
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

3

2

3
1

2

5

....

4
2

1
1
1

1
1
1
1 1

4
2
2
8
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
24
1
6
1
1
1
6
10
1
1
4
1
1
9
9
1
3
2
1
9
9
1
1
I
1
2
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
]

22
3
1
1
1
1
1

97

KEPOET OF THE SECRETAEX OF THE TEEASURY.

JJst of places on the coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded, ^-c—Continued.
ATLANTIC COAST—Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 30—
Name of place.

i 1 1
00

StirruD K e v F l a
••
Stratford Shoals, Conn
.

.
.

Saint Auffustine Lierht F l a
Saint Catharine's Sound Ga

00

00

,g ci
g

1

oo

1
1
1
.

. . ...

1

1

1

..
2

Saint .Tohn's Bar P l a
Saint Joseph's Island F l a .
Saint M a r k ' s F l a

1
1

"3'
2

1

Saint Vincent's Island F l a

....

1

'B
1
1
I
4
1
3
1
1
3
1
]

T a r p a u l i n Cove Vineyard Sound

.

1
1

........

1
1
1
1

Toos Point Va .
Townsend Inlet, N . J
T r u r o Mass
T u b b Inlet N C
Tucker's Beach Light-House, N. J
T u c k e r ' s Beach N J
'
T u c k e r n u c k Shoals N a n t u c k e t
T u p p ' s Inlet, S. C-.'.
T u r n e r ' s L u m p Va
T u r t l e Inlet Barj^N. J

....
. . .
-

1
1

....

Vineyard Sound, Mass
Virgiuia coast (locality u n k n o w n )

:

1
1

1
2

....
•

1

W a t c h Hill R I
.
.
Wellfleet. Cape Cod
Wells Beach, Me
W e s t Chop Mass
W^est Dennis Cape Cod
.
W e s t Harbor, Me
W e s t Quoddy Head Me
Whale's Head
Whale Rock,R. I
W h i t e Head Me
Wickford, R I
Wilkes's Ledge Mass
Willoughby Shoals C h P s a p e a k e B a y
Wilmin0"ton Bar \N C
Winter-Quarter Shoals, Md
W^inthrop Beach Mass
..
Winyah Bay S C
.

.

1

1

]

....

1
1
2
1
.

.

2
. 1
1
•"3'.
1
1
1
1

1

. .
.

•

1
1

1
1

1

.

1
1
2
1

...........
1
1
1

1

. .

....

1

York Ledges, Me
York Narrows Me

6
<>
n
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
4
1
1
1
3
2
1

"
^
1

2

W a r d ' s Island N Y
Warren Harbor R I
W a r w i c k Neck, R. I

Wood Island Me

....

.1

1

1
2
3
4
6

«
>
2

1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1

PACIFIC COAST.
Albion River, Cal
'
Anita Rock San Francisco B a y
A r c h Rock, Oreg
Arestabl6 Island Alaska
B a k e r ' s B a y Columbia River
Baker's Island San Francisco B a y
Black Point, San Francisco B a y
Bo wen's Lauding, Cal
Oape Blanco, Oreg
Cape Clialkeue Alaska
Cape Edgeeombe, Alaska
Cape F l a t t e r y , Wash- T e r
Cape Mendocino, Cal

7 F



3
.

.

1-

4
1
1
1

1
1
4
2

,
;

.7
\

1

1

2

......
1
1
1

i
1

1

2
3
1
1
1
3
1

98

R E P O R T OF T H E SECRETARY OF T H E

TREASURY.

List,-of x:)l aces on.the coasts of the- United States where vessels have stranded, <^^c.—Contin ued,^
PACIFIC COAST-Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u u e 30—
Name of place.

CO*

Cape Pinos Cal
Casper Creek Cal
Clarence Straits, Alaska
C<)lumbia River.
Cook's Inlet, Alaska
Coos Bay, Oreg
Coos B a y Bar, Oreg
Coos Bay Bar Oreg , (9 miles north of)
Coquilla River, Cape Arago Oreg .
Cre.<cent City, Cal '.
Cuffey's Cove, Cal

i 1gi

no

11 i

1

CO

g

' 1
3
1
j •3

1
3
1

.'

1

1

1

1
3

1

1

n

•'

1
1

1
1-

1
*

....;

1

1
1
1

.1
D u x b u r y Reef Cal

•1

F o r t Point, San Francisco B a v
Four-Fatboni Bank Cal .
Half Moon Bay, C a l . : . - . .
'
H u m b o l d t Bar; Cal
K a k e Island, Alaska, (north side of)
K a l w a c k , Alaska
Little A.lcatraz Rock Sau Francisco Bay
Little River, Cal
Mendocino Cal
Middle Bank Sau Francisco Bay

2
1

....

• Q

1

^

1
1

2
1

1

1

1

.
1

North Head
No vara River Cal

:::.::
...
i
....|.... ....
1

•

1

1
1
1
I

:.
2

Pigeon Point Cal
Point Arenas Cal
Point Bonita, Cal
Point Diablo Cal
Point F e r m i n
Point Gorda, Cal
' P o i n t Grenville W a s h T e r

1
.

.

....

...

.

•

-

•

1
1
1
1
1

.....

1

1
1

•
1
1

Point Lobos Cal
Point N e w Year Cal

1

P o i n t Reves Cal

....

1

1

1

5>and .Suit OreeSail Francisco Bay
Sau Pedro, Cal
4^anta Barbai'a Cal

]

.. 2
1
1
1

Roekv Point Cal
Rincon Rock San Francisco Bay
.Salmon Creek, Cal
-

. .

1

'

..i.

>
*

1
1

'•'i'

1
1
1

3

»

•

.

I

1

1

•1
1

Stewart's Point Cal

1
6
1

1
1

Tennessee Cove Cal

1

' TTmnoua River Orecr mouth of
Y a a u i m a B a v Ore"" . . . .
..




L .
•

.

^

2
1

1' 5
1
3
1
1
1
• 1
1
1

•o
- o.
- 1
I
1
1
I
1
2
2
2
3
1
o
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
I
8
1
.- 1
]

1
T o m a l e s Bar Cal

o

1
I
1

1
1
1

1
'.

•

• ]

1
Ocean .Side House, Cal
Orcus Islands W a s h . T e r
Pajaro Cal
:

3
' 1

]

• : ; . • , ! " : : '

1

1

7

1
1
•1
1
3
2
1
1
2
o
1

I

2

:
.

1
I

4

• ••

1
1
1

2

1
•..

Di'icovery Island Straits Juaii de F u c a
D r a k e ' s B a y Cal.

IMiller's Landing, Cal
Moro B a y C.al

o

1

1
.2

"i
1

- 1
•2
4
2
1

EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

99

.List of places on ihe coasts- of the United States where vessels have stranded, tjc—Continued.
^ LAKE COASTS.
Fiscal y e a r ending J u n e 3 0 Name of place.

Ahnapee, L a k e Michigan
Alabaster Reef, L a k e Huron
Alcona, L a k e Huron
Alexander Bay, Saint L a w r e n c e River .
Alpena, L a k e Huron
Amsterdam, L a k e Michigan
.'Apostle Island, L a k e Superior
Ashtabula, Lake Erie
Bailey's Harbor, L a k e Michigan
Bar Point, L a k e Erie
B a r k Shanty, L a k e Huron
i
B a y Point, L a k e Erie
B a y Q.uinte, L a k e Ontario
Beaver Island, L a k e Michigan
Belle Isle, Detroit River
Big Point au Sauble, L a k e M i c h i g a n . . .
Big Sodus, L a k e Ontario
Black Creek, L a k e Michigan
Black Lake, L a k e Michigan
Black River, L a k e Erie
Bois Blanc Island, L a k e H u r o n
B r a n t Pier, L a k e Michigan
Brockville, Saint L a w r e n c e River
Brown's Pier, L a k e Michigarf
Buffalo, L a k e Erie
Burlington Beach, L a k e Ontario
B u r y Inlet, L a k e H u r o n
Calumet, L a k e Michigan
Cape Hurd, L a k e Huron
Cape Vincent, L a k e Ontario
Carlton Island, Saint Lawrence R i v e r . .
Carlton, L a k e Michigan
Carp River, L a k e Michigan
Cedar Point, L a k e Erie
Cedar Rapids. Saint L a w r e n c e River . .
Cedar River, L a k e Michigan
Chamber's Island, L a k e Michigan
...
Cliantr}^ Island, L a k e H u r o n
Charity Island, L a k e H u r o n
Cheboygan, Straits of Mackinac
.rChicago, L a k e Michigan
Chickanore Reef, L a k e Erie
Chuckaluna Reef, L a k e Erie
Clay Banks, L a k e Erie
Cleveland, L a k e Erie
—....
Coburg, L a k e Ontario
Cockburn Island, L a k e H u r o n
Colchester Reef, L a k e Erie
Collingwood, L a k e H u r o n
Conneaut, L a k e Erie
Cove Island, L a k e Huron
Crow Island, Saginaw ^ i v e r
Death's Door, L a k e Michigan
Detour. L a k e Huron
Detroit Island, L a k e Michigan
Detroit River .
Devil's Nose, L a k e Ontario
Devil River, L a k e Huron
Donn River, L a k e Ontario
Dover Bay, L a k e Erie -.
D u c k Islands, L a k e Ontario
D u Luth, L a k e Superior
Dunkirk, L a k e Erie
Drumraond's Island, L a k e H u r o n
D u m m y Reef, L a k e Erie
Dykesville, Lake Micbigan
Eagle Harbor, L a k e Supei'ior.
Eagle River, L a k e Superior
East Sister Island, L a k e Erie
Eleven Foot Shoal, L a k e Micliigan
E l k Island, Saint Clair River
Ellsworth's River, L a k e Michigan
Elm Creek, L a k e Huron
Elm Reef, L a k e Michigan
Erie, L a k e Erie
'•Localities on the Canadian coast are included in this list.




•

2

•.•.•2
' 1
. 1
•4
1
1
3
10
18
1
1
6
1
•4'
1
1
6
6
I
•1'
1
15
4
1
- 3
1
1
-i'
• • ' 1

1'
• '4

'L
1
2
4
2'
31
1
•3
5
30
3
1'
9
1
. 5
4
1
5
16.
9
. L
1
1
2
-1
•4
1.
1
-L
6
2
7
1
2

I

1
• 1
16

100

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF TLIE TREASURY.

List of x^liioes on ilie coasts of the United States where vessels have stranded, cj'"c.—Continued.
*LAKE COASTS—Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 30—
Name of place.
cc
00

.

i 1

i

oo

1

2
3

False Ducks, Lake Ontario
1
False Presque Isle L a k e H u r o n
F e r r e r s ' Point, L a k e Ontario
Fighting Island Detroit River
Fitzgerald Island, L a k e H u r o n
Forest Bay Reef, L a k e Huroii
Forrester L a k e H u r o n
Forrestville, L a k e H u r o n
F o r t Niagara L a k e Ontario
F o r t Shoals L a k e Ontario
Forty-Mile Point, L a k e Ontario
Frankfort, L a k e Michigan
Frankfort, L a k e Ontario
F r e n c h m a n ' s Bay, L a k e Ontario
Gallop Rapids, Saint Lawrence River
Gallow Island, L a k e Ontario
.•
Garden Island, L a k e Ontario
Genessee River, L a k e Ontario
Genuessee, L a k e Huron
Georgian B a y L a k e H u r o n .
Gibraltar, L a k e Erie
Good Harbor, L a k e Micbigan
Goodrich, L a k e H u r o n
Graham Shoals, L a k e Michigan
Grand Haven L a k e Michigan
...
Grand Island, L a k e Superior
Grand River, L a k e Erie
Grand Traverse B a y L a k e Michigan
Gray's Reef, Straits of Mackinac
Green Bay, L a k e Michigan
Green Point L a k e Ontario
Green's Reef, L a k e Erie
Griffith's Island, L a k e H u r o n
Grimes Reef L a k e Michigan.
Grosse Island, Detroit River
•
Grosse Point, L a k e Michigan
Giill Island Reef L a k e Erie
Gull Point L a k e Ontario
Hamilton, L a k e Ontario
Hammond's B a y L a k e Huron
Harrisville, L a k e Huron
H a t Island, L a k e Michigan
H e n and Chickens, L a k e Erie
Herson's Islaud, Saint Clair River
Highland Reef, L a k e Michigan
Hog Island Reef, L a k e Michigan
Holland L a k e Michigan
Horns' Pier (locality unknown)
Houghton Center, Lake Erie
H o w Island, L a k e Ontario
Huron City L a k e H u r o n
Isle Royal, L a k e Superior
Kalamazoo River, L a k e Michigan
Kelderhouse Pier, L a k e Michigan.
;,
Kelly's Island, L a k e Erie
Kenosha Lake Michigan
Kettle Point, L a k e H uron
Kewaunee, L a k e Michigan
Kincardine L a k e H u r o n . . .

1

2
1

"l

1
1
1

1
1
1

1

1

,1

0

1

1

0

1
1
1
2
1

;.

1
1

1

1
1
9

1
2

1

1

1
1

4

3

3

"3'

1
1
1
2
2

2
•..;.'.,..
2

6

1
6

1
5

*.
1

1
1

1

1
1 . 3
2

4
1

1
2

I
3
I
1
X
0

1

0.3

1
1
• - - •

1

....

9

1
1
1
1
1

1
2
1
1

1
I
1
3

]

1

•.•.

1

2
7
R
1
0.

1
1

"i'
6
1
1
1

5
6
29
11

2
1

1 ,

1
1

1
1

1

3
2
. ...
•

1
.1

1

I

' 1
3
1

1
.1,

1

2

1

1
"1
1
I

1

1

1
1
1

=5J

•.

1
2
1
1

,

2

1

.... "i

1

1
1

1
1

2
1
1

L a t m a n Point, L a k e Ontario
Laugliing White-Fish Reef L a k e Supierior.
Leiand, L a k e Michigan

^

1
1
1

1
' 1
1 "2"
1

2
1
1
4

I

2
1
2

2
3

6
8
5
4

1

4

1

1

. . . .

6

1
1

1
".
2




«
>
2

1

2
1

.Kingsville, L a k e Erie

Lime-Kiln Reef Detroit River
Lincoln L a k e Michigan
Little B a y de Noque L a k e Michigan
Little Graham Shoals, Straits of Mackinac
Little Point, L a k e Huron

g

. 1
1

1
1

Evanston, L a k e Michigan

00

2

4

6

1

.

11

1
1
1

•• Localities on the Canadian coast are included in this list.
'

101

EEPOET OF TUE SECRETARY OF THE TEEASUEY.

List of places on the coasts ofthe United States where vessels have stranded, cfc—Continued.
*LAKE COASTS-Continued.
Fiscal year ending J u n e 3 0 Name of place.

in

•CO

•

1 1

CO

2

Little Point au Sable L a k e Micbip'an
Lrttle Sister Reef L a k e Michigan
Loug Point, L a k e Erie
Long Point L a k e Ontario
'
Louse Island, L a k e Michigan
Ludingtou, L a k e Michigan
i
Mackinac Straits of
Madison, L a k e Erie
Maiden Detroit River
Mammy J u d y Light Detroit River
Manistee, L a k e Michigan
jSlanitou, L a k e Michigan
Manitowoc, L a k e Michigan
Marble H e a d L a k e Erie
Marquette, L a k e Superior
Maumee Bay, L a k e Erie
Menominee, L a k e Michigan
....
Michapecoten Island, L a k e Superior
Michigan City L a k e Michigan
Middle Bass Island L a k e E r i e
Middle Island, L a k e Huron
Middle Sister Islaud L a k e Eiie
Milwaukee', L a k e Michigan'.
Minerv.e, L a k e Erie
Mission Reef, Lake Michigan
Mohawk Island, L i k e Michigan
Mohawk Reef L a k e Erie
Morffaii's Point L a k e Erie
Muskegon, L a k e Michigan
Napanee. L a k e Ontario
jSPeebish Rapids, Saint Mary's R i v e r .
New Buffalo, L a k e Michigan
Newcastle, L a k e Ontario
New London L a k e Michigan
New River, L a k e Huron
Niagara River, L a k e Erie
Nicholson Island L a k e Ontario
Nine Mile Creek L a k e Ontario
Noon Point, L a k e Huron
North BassJslaud, L a k e E r i e . . '
North Bay, L a k e Michigan
North H a r b o r Reef L a k e Erie
North Manitou, L a k e Michigan
North Point L a k e Michigan
North Port, L a k e Michigan
Numberg, L a k e Erie
Oak Point, La;ke Ontario
Old Mackinaw, L a k e Huron
Ontario, L a k e Ontario
Orchard Creek L a k e Ontario
Oswego, L a k e Ontario

1

i

•

1
1
4
1

2
1

7

3

1

2

1
t
2 . 5

1

. 2

1

16

....
1

3
1

1
. 2

5
i

2

1
1

"9'

2
1

-^

'
1

2
1

1

1

2

1
2 "'2*
1

1
2

1
1
2
5
1
4 • 2
1
3

1
1
4

"i"
1
"2'

2

1
1
1
3

1

1

1

.

1
1

....

3

1
2

....

4

1
1

...

1.

2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
3
1
3

"i'

1

1

P a n c a k e Shoal, L a k e Michigan
Papoose Island, L a k e H u r o n .
P e a c h Island, L a k e Saint Clair . .
Peninsula Reef L a k e Miehieran
P e n t w a t e r , L a k e Michigan
Peshtigo Reef, L a k e Michigan
P 6 r e Marquette, Straits of Mackinac
Pictou, L a k e Ontario

2
1
1

1

2

5

2

2
1

1
• 1
1
2
1

Pigeon Bay, L a k e Erie
Pigeon Island, L a k e Ontario

1
1

]

1

1

fi
5
3
1
1
1
1
18
2
1
1
3
1
7
1

...

"i"

1

0

1

'' Localities on the Canadian coast are included in this list.




n

0

'"
2

1
.1

1
3
1
3

3
1
4

2

1

.-.

0

1
5
3
2
1
1
5
1
2

1

Pillar Point, L a k e Ontario
Pilot and Detroit Island, L a k e Michigan
Pilot Island, L a k e Micbip'an
......

Plum Island, L a k e Huron
Point Albino, L a k e Erie

7
4
1
• 1
1

1

.,...

2
1

0

13
4
19
1
.1
1
1
3
18

cy

1
1

1

Pine Station Lake Miohie^an
Pinnepog, L a k e H u r o n
Pipe Island L a k e Michigan

1
1
98
9
1
4
3?
1
1
1
15
4
9
9
9
1
9
1
3

5
4
1
1

1

• 9

0

'2
1

3
1
1
3

S
0

g g g'
CO

00

2

2

6

102

REPORT O F

T H E SECRETARY OF TLIE TREASURY.

List of x^lctces on the coasts of the United States ivhere vesselshave stranded, cf-c—Continued^
*LAKE COASTS-Continued.
Fiscal y e a r euding J u n e .30—
Name of place.

od

c6

00

2
1

Point aux Barques L a k e Huron
Point a u x Pins L a k e Ei'ie

-

.

1
2

n

00

00

1
1

1

2
6

o
oo

oo

3
6

2

1
3

CO

00

g g

2
"5"
11
1.

1
4

2

1

0

7
. 4
3

1

i

...

"2'

•I

2
2

1
2
1

- ....

1
Point Permit, L a k e Erie
Point Peter L a k e Ontario
Point Sanilac L a k e Huron

1
....

1

....
1
1
1
. 1

1

1

1

1

1

P o r t Burwell L a k e l*jrie

4
2
. .

"s"

1
1
4

2
'"3"

"{

2
3

1 ....|
1 •.1

1
2

P o r t Maitland L a k e Erie

1
1

1

1
1

....
1

1

1
1

1
1

1

Presque Isle L a k e H u r o n . . . .

3
2

1

1

1
1
6

1
1

4

1

P u t in Bay L a k e Erie

3
1
5

1 • 1

1

1

I
1

2
1

6
1

1

i"

1

1
1
1

]^
0

1

1
X

1

2
3

1
Sault Ste Marie Canal

....

1
1
1

2
3

2

2

1

1

1

0

1

I
5

2

2
1

1
4

1
1

1

2
2

1

2




!•>
1

1
1

..

]
0

1

1

South Reef L a k e Michigan .
South River. L a k e H u r o n

0

IS

\

1

..

1
9-\
I

1
3
1
3

1

3

1

1

1

Sheboygan, L a k e Michigan

?
;
0

3 •o2

2

3
1

River Saint Clair

l.H
25
1

1

2

1

South Hampton Ijake Huron

I

0.

P o r t Austin Reef L a k e Michigaii
P o r t Bruce, L a k e Erie
.
"
.-

...

1
2

"2

Portage L a k e L a k e Superior

4
1
1
1
1
1
1

>
'1

2.

P o r t Hope L a k e Huron

14
40
1
0

1
1

Point au Sable L a k e H u r o n . .

"0

1
1

^ Localities on the Cana:dian coast are included in this list.
-

1

1
•1
1

3
6
1
1
1

lOc

EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY.OF THE TREASURY.

List of x^lctces on the coasts of the Uniied States where vesselshave stranded, cj-c—Coutinued.
^LAKE COASTS-Continued.
•

\

Fiscal year ending J u n e 30—
Name of place.
00

00

OJ

OJ
CO

00

o
00

g

1

CO

00

g

3

3

i ....

Spider Island, L a k e Michigan
Sqint Plair l?ivpr

1
Saint Joseph, L a k e Michigan
Saint Mary's River

•..
.

. . .

.

.

3
1

1

....

..... ....

2

..-..

4
1
1

1
2

2
2

1

2-

1

2

1
1

""3'
1
2

0
2
1

1

....
1
1
2

1
1

1
1

1
2.
1
1
2

1

1

1
2

2

.
1
1

1
1
1
1

Turtle Island 1 ake Erie

1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

Welland Canal
Hall L a k e Miohiffan
Lake Pier L a k e Michigan
River Tiakp Miohio'an
Shoals Straits of Mackinac

1
1
1
1
1

Windmill Point, L a k e Erie
W^olf Island TiHke Ontario
W^oodward's Bav L a k e Michicrau

'' Localities on the Cauadian coast are included in this list.




1
5
2
10
14
8
2
10
1
4
5
3
2
2
1
• 0
1
7
2
1
3
1
7
1
1
6
1
1
1

2

1
1
1

White
White
White
AVhite

^

"3'
2

. 1

"i

3
3
4
1
1
2
1
9
5
1
5
1
3
1
1
1




N.PETERS, PHOTO-LITHOGRAPHER, WASHINGTON. 0 C.




r-




REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.







REPORT
OF

THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENDE.
TREASURY^ DEPARTMENT,
O F F I C E OF INTERNAL E E V E N U E ,

'Washington, JSlovemher 18, IS74-.
S I R : r have the honor to transmit herewith the talmlaTstatements,
made np from the accounts of this Office, which the Secretary of the
Treasury is required to lay before Congress, a^ follows:
Table A, showing the receipts from each specific source of revenue,
and the aniounts refunded in each collection district, State, and Territory of the United States, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Table B, showing the number and value of internal revenue stamps^
ordered monthly by the Commissioner, the receipts from the sale ot
stamps, and the commissions allowed thereon ; also the number and
value of stamps for special taxes, tobacco, cigars, snuf, distilled spirits,
and fermented liquors, issued monthly to collectors, duriug the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1874.
Table C,-showing the territorial distribution of internal revenue from
various sources in the United States for the fiscal years ended June 30,
1864, 1865, 1366, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, and 1874.
Table D, showing the aggregate receipts from each collection district,
State, and Territory, for the fiscal years ended June 30,1863,1864,1865,
1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, and 1874.
Table E, showin^^ the total collections from each specific source of revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867,
1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, and 1874.
Table F, showing the ratio of receipts from specific sources tothe aggregate of all collections for the fiscal 3^ears ended Juue 30, 1864, 1865,
1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 3870, 1871, 1872,1873, and 1874.
Table G, showing the receipts from special taxes under act of Jime 6,
1872, in each collection district. State, and Territory, forthe special-tax
year ended April 30, 1873.
Table H, showing the receipts from special taxes under a(5t of June
6, 1872, in each collection district. State, and Territory, for the specialtax year ended April 30, 3874.
Table I, comparative statement showing the aggregate of special
taxes returned under act of June 6, 1872, from each collection district,
State, and Teiritory, during" the special-tax years ended April 30, 1873
and 1874, together with the increase or decrease.
Table K, an abstract of reports of district attorneys concerning suits
and prosecutions under the internal revenue laws during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1874.
•
Table L, an abstract of seizures of property for violation of internal
revenue laws during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
The aggregate receipts from all sources, exclusive of the duty upon
the capital, circulation, and deposits of national banks, and collections
made by contract under act of May 8, 1872,* for the fiscal year ended
^ $213,225.34 of these collections have been covered into'the Treasury, and will ap
pear in the statistical tables of the next annual report.



108

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

June 30, 1874, were $102,644,746.98, exceeding my estimate.by $2,644,746.98. This amount includes sums refunded and allowed on drawbacks.
My estimate of the receipts for the current fiscal year, under the
present law, is $107,000,000.
DRAWBACK.

The following is a statement of the amount of drawback allowed
during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1873 and 1874:
Fiscal year
.
1873.
On s p i r i t s . . . . . .
On tobacco
On 2,eneral m e r c h a n d i s e
Total . . . . .

•

. . . .

.

Fiscal year
1874.

$33, 700 20
1, 9.59 30
16,686 81
52, 346 31

...

$1 380 20
28,115 11
35, 495 31

From the above statement it appears there was a net decrease in the
amount of drawback allowed during the last fiscal year, as compared
Avith that of the year preceding, of $16,857.OOj being a.decrease of
$33,700.20 on spirits, and an increase of $5,400.90 on tobacco, and
§11,428.30 on general merchandise.
No spirits were exported for the benefit of drawback duiing the year
ended June 30, 1874, and the quantity of tobacco exported .for the benefit of drawback is very slight in comparison witb the quantity exported
in bond. It is evident, therefore, that, where the privilege of exportation before the payment of tax has been accorded, exporters have availed
themselves of such privilege almost to the exclusion of that authorizing
exportation for the benefit of drawback.
The amounts refunded duriug the last two fiscal years for taxes illegally assessed and collected were—
In 1873
In 1874

•

1618,667.77
239,749.42

,
SPIRITS.

The following statement show^s the receipts from the several sources
relating to^ distilled spirits for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1873 and
1874, together with the increase or decrease from each source:
Sources.

H e c e i p t s for E e c e i p t s for
Iiscal y e a r
fiscal y e a r
1874.
1873.

S p i r i t s distilledfroin apples, p e a c h e s , o r g r a p e s \$2, 014, 645
S p i r i t s distilled from m a t e r i a l s o t b e r t h a n
41,116, 419
a p p l e s , p e a c b e s , or g r a p e s
3, .531
W i n e m a d e in i m i t a t i o n of c h a m p a g n e
371,4.56
Rectifiers
5,016,904
Dealers, retail liquor
781, 663
D e a l e r s , Avbolesale l i q u o r
1,393
M a n u f a c t u r e r s of stills
3,2R0
S t i l l s or w o r m s m a n u f a c t u r e d
'..
7, 081
S t a i n p s for distilled s p i r i t s i n t e n d e d for export!
148,418
S t a m p s , distillery w a r e h o u s e
186, 100
S t a m p s , recti fiers'
73, 767
Stamps, wholesale liquor dealers'
A r t i c l e s a n d occupatious r e l a t i u g to s p i r i t s
2, 374, 709
formerly t a x e d b u t n o w e x e m p t
Total,




60

Increase.

$1,477,964 19

.1536,681 41

18 43, 270, 412 29 m , 153, 993 11
151 00
90
72
287, 825 92
10
.321, 505 35
82
596, 555 45
26
94.5.01
00
2, 500 00
50
12, 795 50
5, 714 00
116, 909 30
80
60
156, 730 80
00
61, 327 65
30

3, 380
83, 630
695, 398
185,108
448
780

90
80
75
37
25
00

31, 509 ,50
29, 369 SO
12, 439 35
2, 294, 959 13

79, 750 17

52,099,371 78, 49,444,089 85

Decrease.

2,159,707 11

4, 814, 989 04

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

10^

Net aggregate decrease, $2,655,281.93.
The above statement shows that, while there was a very considerable
increase in the tax on spirits withdrawn from bond and on export spiritstamps; there was quite a large falling off in the Receipts from brandy,
the special taxes of dealers and rectifiers, stamps other than tax-paid
stamps, and certain sources repealed by act of June 6, 1872.
The decrease in the tax on brandy is owing in great part to the partial
failure o f t h e fruit-crop in 1873. A glance at the receipts from this
source for the last four years exhibits the fluctuation to which this species of tax is subject. Thus, in 1870, the returns on brandy were
$611,915; in 1871,'$1,236,006; in 1872, $544,849; in 1873, $2,014,646,
and in 1874, $536,681. The annual product varies with the annual yield
of fruit from which it is distilled.
The apparent loss in the special taxes of dealers and rectifiers is due '
to the fact that, since the adoption of the system of paying special taxes
by stamps, these taxes have been collected a little earlier each succeeding.year. Formerly, a large part of these taxes were returned in July
aud August; scarcely any before May 1, when they became due. 1:^0w,
the time of payment is, to a large extent, anticipated, as the following
figures will show: In April, 1872, the receipts from special taxes uow
on the tax-list were $144,573 ; about the average of the receipts for three
or four months previous, lu Ax3ril, 1873, they increased to $566,988,
and in April, 1874, to $2,139,030. Thus, $422,416 more were returned
in April, 1873, and $1,994,457 more in April, 1874, than in April, 1872;
and collections which were formerly made in the first quarter of the
fiscalyear are now returnedin thelastquarter of theyear immediately preceding it. This being the case, a more correct method probably of ascer
taining theincrease or decrease of the receipts from special taxes would be
by a comparison by special-tax years. SucLi a comparison of the receipts
from rectifiers and dealers in liquors for the special-tax years ended
ApriL30,1873 and 1874, shows that, instead of there being a decrease of
$964,137, as api^ears from a comx:)arison by fiscal years in the aibove
table, there was an actual increase of $799,413 from those two sources
alone. What is here said concerning the special taxes of rectifiers and
dealers is also applicable to all other special taxes, the aggregate amount
of which returned in the special-tax year 1874 was $1,672,388 more than
the amount returned in the precediug special-tax year.
The act of June 6,1872, so far as it relates to spirits, did not go iuto
operation until August 1, 1872. During one entire month, then, of the
fiscal year 1873 the value of warehouse, rectifiers^ and dealers' stamps was
25 cents each, instead of 10 cents, their present value under the abovenamed act. This accounts, wholly or in part, for the decrease in revenue
from this source. Certain spirit-taxes were repealed August 1, 1872,
some of which, assessed at that time, were not collected prior to the
last fiscal year. Two million two hundred and ninety-four thousand
nine hundred and fifty-nine dollars less were received from those sources '
in 1874 than in 1873.'
'
^
,
PRODUCTION OF SPIRITS DURING- THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 3 0 ,

1874.
Total production from materials other than fruit
Total production from fruit
Aggregate production from all sources.:

Taxable gallons.
68, 805, 374
766, 688
69,572, 062

The following tabular statement shows the distribution of distilleries
in the several States and Territories:



110

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Stateinent showing the number of distillei-ies registered and opei'aied during the fiscal year
ended June 30. 187i.f
Grain.

;• •

6,
•So

6

1 i

States and Territories.

Fruit.

Molasses.

1

• 1'

5

2
1
6
5

•
.

ICansas
Iventuckv

.

-

27
1
38
27
5
4
225
5

22
1
36
. 27
5
1
213
5

•

9
2

• ..
. . . .

O

.
.'

.

27

389
35
58
3
4
178
1

411
I
71
85
8

34
29

34
29

417
1
73
85
10
8
409
6
1
43
' 37
2

11
60

12
90

11
85

2

2

2
108

2"
168

3
169

3
109

99
2-^8
34
3
77

96
273
34
3
74

108
343
903
151
1
11
133
4

105
334
90
3
144
1
11
lOS
2

1

«

25

2

Missouri
Montana

44
5
177
•• 6S
30

12
63

6

45
5
179
77
30

35
58
5
4
184
1

9
2
2

42
4
171
63
30

390

1
Marvland
Massachusetts

- o •

43
4
173
" 72.'
30

Delaware
Florida.
Idaho
Illinois
Ind iana

3.

'A
2
1
6
5

..

•-

§2.
B ^

A r k a n sas
'California

^

O :.

JD ci

'A .

"

2

•391
6
•

1

43
37
0

i
1

N e w tTersev
^ e w Mexico

.

1

1

. . . .

9
65
56

9
61
56
70

2
60
3

2
55
1

9
73
1

9
73
1

27

23

1
14

1
13

10
900
1
88

10
897
1
,8i^

10
927
1
89
14

10
920
1
89
13

700

•• - -

1

74

^ o i ' t h Carolina
"Ohio
Ore<^on

. .

056

2, 880

2,841

3, 589.

3, 50.6

1

ilhode Island
Texas
Utah
Virginia
W^asbino'ton

. . . .

Total

9

1

9

From the above table it appears that during the last fiscal year 2,880
fruit-distilleries were registered and 2,841 operated; and that 709 distilleries other than fruit were registered, and 665 operated.
The following statement shows the number of grain and molasses distilleries in operation at the beginning of each month during the fiscal
year ended June 30,1874: . ,
N u m h e r of distilleries'. ,

Mouths.

Grain.

•
July....-

..--.

Septeniber

•....

November
December
January

....:..•..-..•.
. • ...:.....-..

March.
April
May
-^Juue .




301
i99
204
228
271
302361
407
473
495
.433
337

Ca.pacity of g r a i n
distilleries.

Molasses. B u s h e l s .
10
9
10
11
11
9
9
9
7
8
7

58, 607
•52, 237
60, 460
61, 715.
68, 569
62, 402
74,149
79, 444
•83, 563
77,911
63, 055
51, 781

Gallons.
203,110
171, 546
237,180
216. 795
239, 527
215, 390
256, 578
274,015
287, 625
268,117
216, 492
182, 914

Ca]»acity of molasT o t a l spirits e s distilleries.
producing
capacity.
Gallons. S p i r i t s .
11, 304
11,979
12, 712
14, 017
12, 678
11, 944
11, 943
12, 027
9,682
12,312
7, 751
7, 741

9,109
10,183
10, 804
11, 065
10, 776
10,151
10,151
10,223
8,228
10, 468
6,596
6,602

.212,219
181,729
247, 984
227, 860
250, 303
225, 541
266, 729
284, 238
295, 853
278, 585
223, 088
189, 516

COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

Ill

•,

Gallons.

Qi^antity of distilled spirits in bond June 30,T8f 3
12, 917,462
Quantity of distilled spirits exported, proof of landing not received J u n e
30,1873...
.,.
1,732,686
Quantity of distilled spirits produced during the year ended June 30,
1874
.-.,
68,805,374
:
Quantity
Quantity
year
Quantity
year..
Quantity
Quantity
Quantity

• •

•

;

.

•

" "•'83,-455,522

of distiUed spii'its witlidra\yn during year on payment of t a x . . 61,763,700
of distilled spirits exported, proof of landing received during
: . . . . : 3,647,782
of distilled spirits exported, proof of landing not received during
:........
t ^ 2,145,010
of distilled spirits lost by casualties
.76,435
of distilled spirits withdrawn for scientific purposes
4,886
of distilled spirits in ^,arehouse June 30, 1874
,15,817,709
83,455,52^

The number of gallons of distilled spirits produced anct j)iaced in ware-/
.
house duriug the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874, v^as
'6S, 805, 374'
The number of gallons of distilled spirits, produced and placed in ware- '
house during the fiscal year ended June .30, 1873, was
62, 877,554
Being an increase in the number of gallons of the production of 1874 over
1873 of
"
....:....
: • .5,927,820
The tax paid on spirits withdrawn from warehouse during the
year ended June 30, 1874, was
The tax paid on spirits wdthdrawn from warehouse during the
. year ended June 30, 1873, was
An increase in tlie receipts of 1874-over 1873 of

fiscal
..
^
$43,188, 870 40.
i ..'
4lt,102,921 10

fiscal
•.:...

2, 085, 949 ,30

The number of gallons of distilled spirits removed from warehouse for ex. ,
port duriug the fiscal year ended J une 30, 1874, was
-^....
4, 060,106
The number of gallons of distilled spirits removed from warehouse for ex- o
port during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873, was
, 2, 358, 630
Being an increase in the number ofgallons of distilled Spirits removed from
Avarehouse for export during 1874 over 1873 of

1,701, 476

The number of gallons of distilled spirits withdrawn from warehouse by - . '""
^
scientific institutions duriug the year ended Juue 30, 1874 was.
•
4, 836
The number of gallons of distilled spirits withdrawn from warehouse by:
scientific institutions during the year ended June 30, 1873, was
2, 865
Being au iucrease i n t h e number of gallons v^ithdrawn in 1874 over, that
withdrawn in 1873, of
^.
........:

2, 021

While the above figures show an increased activity in all operations
relating to bonded distilled spirits, it appears that the quantity produced during the year 1874 as compared with that produced cluring the
year 1873 is relatively greater than the quantity withdrawn for all purposes during the year 1874, as compared with the quantity withdrawn
for all purposes during the year 1873, leaving a balance of 15,817,709
gallons in warehouse June 30, 1874, which is 2,900,247 gallons more
than was iu warehouse June 30, 1873, the quantity in warehouse at that
time being 12,917,462 gallons. During the first quarter of the present
year the demand for distilled spirits has been active, and the quantity
witjidrawn from warehouse upon payment of tax has exceeded the quantity deposited, so that the balance remaining in warehouse September 30,
1874, has been reduced to 12,577,096 gallons ,• or,a decrease of 3,240,613
gallons as compared with the quantity remaining in warehouse June 30,



112

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

1874. The good prices obtained for spirits in the home market has had
the effect of diminishing the exportations during the same period, so
that whereas the quantity removed from warehouse for export and unaccounted for June 30, 1874, as shown by the above statement, was
2,145,010 gallons, the quantity remaining unaccounted for September
30, 1874, was 1,047,714 gallons, a decrease of 1,097,296 gallons during
the three months ended September 30, 1874.
FERMENTED LIQUORS.

The following is a statement showing the receipts from all sources
relating to fermented liquors during the fiscal years ended June 30,1873
and 1874, with the increase or decrease from each source:
Eeceipts for fis- Receipts for fis- Increase.
cal year 1873. cal year 1874.

Sources.
Fermented liquors, tax of $1 per barrel on
Brewers' special tax
Dealers in malt liquors' special tax .."

: 910, 823 33 $8, 880, 829 68
,
. 24.5,212 47
304, 650 21
' 178, 637 57 S69,173 77
109,463 80

Total

I 324, 937 81
,

9, 304, 679 72

69,173 77

Decrease.
$295994 15
59, 437 74
,431 89

The number of brewers engaged in the manufacture of fermented
liquors during the fiscal year ended June 30,1874, was 2,524, distributed
as follows : Alabama, 2 5 Arizona, 7 ; California, 195; Colorado, 20; Connecticut, 23; Dakota, 3 ; Delaware, 3; District of Columbia, 16; Georgia,
3 ; Idaho, 10; Illinois, 173; Indiana, 92; Iowa, 129 ; Kansas, 40; Kentucky, 34; Maine, 3 ; Maryland, 65; Massachusetts, 40; Michigan, 68;
Minnesota, 109; Missouri, 97; Montana, 23 ; Nebraska, 5; Nevada, 33;
New Hampshire, 2 ; New Jersey, 54; New Mexico, 7 ; New York, 349 ;
Ohio, 228; Oregon, 26; Pennsylvania, 346; Ehode Island, 6; South
Carolina,!; Tennessee, 2; Texas, 42; Utah, 29; Yirginia, 6; Washington Territory, 13; West Yirginia, 17 ; Wisconsin, 201; Wyoming, 2.
TOBACCO.

The total receipts from tobacco for the fiscal year ended June 30,1874,'
were $33,242,875.62. Compared with the total receipts for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1873, the following results are shown:
Year ended June 30, 1874, tobacco manufactured of all
descriptions, taxed at 20 ceuts per pound
$20,900, 509 67
Snnff of all descriptions taxed at 32 cents per pound.. 1, 038,445 92
121,938,955 59
Year ended Juue 30, 1873, total collections on all descriptions of manufactured tobacco, including suuft"
^

23, 397, 858 22

Showing a decrease of collections on manufactured tobacco of all descriptions of- - ^

1,458,902.63

Year ended Juue 30, 1874, cigars, cheroots, aud cigarettes
Year euded J u n e 30, 1873, cigars, cheroots, aud cigarettes

9,333,592 24
8,940,:391 48

Showing au increase on cigars, &c., of

393,200 76

Year ended June 30, 1874. received from sale of export stamps.
Year euded June 30, 1873, received from sale of export stamps.

" ^ 7 3 5 40
5,594 60

lucrease from sale of export stamps




I,140 80

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

113

Year euded Juue 30, 1874, collected from dealers in leaf t o b a c c o . . . . . .
Year euded Juue 30, 1873, collected from dealers in leaf tobacco

$115, 991 88
118,517 74

Decreased collections from dealers in leaf tobacco
Year ended June 30,-1874, collected from dealers in manufactured
tobacco
,
Year euded June 30, 1873, collected from dealers in manufactured
tobacco
,
Decreased collections from dealers in manufactured, tobacco

2,525 86
1,641,937 79
1,663,552 02
21,614 23

Year ended Juue 30, 1874, collected from special taxes of tobacco and
cigar manufacturers
Year ended Juue 30, 1873, collected from special taxes of tobacco and
cigar manufacturers

165, 091 27

Decreased collections from sjpecial taxes of tobacco and cigar manufacturers

4, 475 93,

Year ended June 30,1874, collected from special taxes of peddlers of
tobacco
Year ended June 30,1873, collected from special taxes of peddlers of
tobacco

50,694 96

Decreased collections from i)eddlers of tobacco

IbO, 615 34

44,671 30

6, 023 66

Year ended June 30,1874, collected from sales of cigars, leaf and manufactured tobacco, &c
Year ended June 30,1873, collected from sales of cigars, leaf and manufactured tobacco, &c
.•

44, 602 80

Decreased collections from sales of cigars, leaf and manufactured
tobacco, &c

44,226 72

376 08

Making a total of receipts from the manufacture and sale of tobacco,
snuff, and cigars, in all their forms, of $33,242,875.62; and showing, as
compared with the previous fiscal year, a decrease of $1,143,427.47.
As compared with the fi.rst quarter of the preceding fiscal year, the
collections made for the first quarter of the last fiscal year show a"
decrease to the amount of $1,537,423.60. This decrease was not unexpected, owing to the large quantities of tobacco put upon the market in
consequence of the closing out of the bonded warehouses by the ^ct of
June 6,1872, and the increased stimulant given for two or three months
to the movement of ]3lug-tobacco by the adoption of the uniform rate of
tax at 20 cents per pound by the same act. The decrease during the
second quarter, amounting to $1,144,607.53, all of which took place
during the months of October and November^ 1873, was undoubtedly the
result of the financial disturbance of the country. The loss in collections
during the two months named was $1,440,781.73. But from the month
of November, 1873, up to the present time, there has been a steady
increase of collections from this source over any previous corresponding
period. The largest amount ever collected in any one quarter from
tobacco was collected during the first quarter ofthe current fiscal year,
which reaches the sum of $10,162,954.35. Should corresponding relative collections continue to be made for the remaining three quarters,
the receipts from this source will aggregate for the current fiscal year,
in round numbers, $36,000,000.
PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

Taking the amount of taxes collected as the basis for computing the
8 F



114

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

.

product of manufactured tobacco for the year ended June 30, .1874, the
result is as follows:
Pounds.

Tobacco of all descriptions, taxed at 20 cents per pound
Snuff, taxed at 32>cents per pound

104, 502,548
3,245,143

:'

Total quantity ou whicb tax was paid
Adding tobacco, &c., shipped iu bond for export
. Gives a total production of

107,747, 691
10, 800,927

^.

118,548, 618

pounds for the year, being an increase over the annual production of
the preceding fiscal year of 2,107,684 pounds.
The number of cigars, cheroots, &c., on which taxes were collected
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874, Avas 1,886,697,498, being in
excess ofthe number on which taxes were collected the previous fiscal
year by 79,662,852. This number, however, does not show the actual
production ofthe country for the time speciilied, inasmuch as there are
included in this number the imported cigars which paid an internalrevenue tax in addition to the impost duty.
EXPORTATION OF MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

The quantity of tobacco shown by the records of the Internal Eevenue
Office to have beeu removed without the payment of tax, for exportation to foreign countries, was—
Pounds.

For the year ended June 30, 1874..
Exported after the tax had been paid with benefit of drawback

10,800,927
36, 901

Total quantity exported duriug the year

10, 837,828

This is in excess of the total quantity exported during ttie previous
fiscal year by 727,783 iDouuds.
From the preceding figures and comparative statements, it will be
seen that while the collections from tobacco show a falling off as compared with the previous fiscal year, the actual production of manufactured tobacco was in excess of any previous year by over two millions
of pounds, and the exportation to foreign countries was in excess of
any previous year by nearly three-quarters of a million pounds.
Upon the whole, the results for the year are highly satisfactory, and
indicate a prosperous condition of this great branch of national industry, and show it to be a reliable source of revenue to the National
Treasury, even duriug a season of general busiuess depression.
But to secure the best results from the tax now imposed by law upon
manufactured tobacco, snuff', and cigars, it is indispensably necessary
so to control the movements of raw or leaf tobacco as not to allow its
' direct consumption to diminish the demand for manufactured tobacco.
The enactment ofthe several leaf-clauses in the act of June 6, 1872,
while they most effectually accomplish this object, do not at all interfere with the sale, transfer, or shipment of leaf tobacco for the ordinary
purposes of trade and commerce. I therefore strongly urge the continuance of said leaf clauses Avithout amendment or alteration.
ABSTRACT OF CASES COMPROMISED.

The whole number of cases compromised, as provided under section
102, act of July 20,^ 1868, duriug the fiscal year ended Juue 30, 1874,
was 381.
Amount of tax accepted
Assessed penalty fixed by law
Specific penalty in lieu of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Total amount received by compromises



$30, 345 60
433 46
31, 900 07

,.

62, 679 13

COMMISSIONER

OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF DISTRICT ATTORNEYS

115

FOR THE

FISCAL

YEAR 1 8 7 4 .
Suits commenced.
Number of criminal actions
Number of civil actions in p)ersonani
Number of actions in rem

4,288
1, 030
292

^

Whole number commenced

,

5,610

^ Suits decided in favor of the United States.
Number of criminal actions
Number of civil actions in x^ersonam
Number of actions in rem

1, 694
321
213

'.

Total number of suits decided in favor of the United States

2,228

Suits decided against the United States.
Number of criminal actions
Number of civil actions inpersonam..
Number of actions in rem

•

430
68/
29.

Total number of suits decided a.gainst the United States

527

Suits settled or dismissed.
Numberof criminal actions
Number of civil actions in personam
Number of actions i^i re»i

1, 308
292
55

Total number of suits settled or dismissed

•.

•

1, 655

Suits i^ending July 1, 1874.
Number of criminal actions
4, 928
Number of civil actions in personam
1,979
Number of actions in rem
339
Total number of suits pendiug July 1, 1874
7,246
Amount of judgments recovered by the United States in criminal actions. |286, 598 38
Amount of judgments recovered by the United States iu civil actions in personam
961, 424 °55
Amount collected on judgments aud i3aid into court in criminal actions..
67, 607 44
Amount collected on judgments and paid iuto court in civil actions inx)er-.
sonam......
287,999 58
Amount collected ou judgments and paid into court in actions in rem or
proceeds of forfeiture
73, 074 02
ABSTRACT OF SEIZURES.

Seizures of property for violation of internal reveuue law during the
fiscal year ended June 30, .1874, were as follows:
118,034 gallons of distiUed spirits, valued at
1,571^ barrels of fermented liquors, valued at
88,244^ pounds of tobacco, valued at
585,747 cigars, valued at
".
Miscellaneous property, valued at
Total value of seizures




$122, 654
11,758
25,798
11,153
304,999

- -.,

».. - -

..,,,...

68
00
39
73
15

476,363 95

116

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

The following statemeut shows the receipts from all sources, other
than spirits, tobacco, and fermented liquors, for the fiscal years ended
June 30, 1873 and 1874, with the increase or decrease from each source:
1873.
Bank
Banlv
Bank
Bank

$1, 835,
1,173,
736,
24,

deposits
deposits, saAnngs, &c
cnpital
circulation

993
309
950
778

1874.
29
50
05
62

Decrease.

Adhesive stamps
Penalties
Articles aad occupations lonnerly t a x e d .
b u t uow exempt

77
49
15
26

1231,125 48

3, 771, 031 46

Total

12, 067,118
386, 425
916, 878
16, 738

Increase.

3, 387,160 67

411,053 58

7, 702, 376 85
461, 653 06

6,136, 844 64
364, 216 34

1, 565, .532 21
97, 436 72

6, 329, 782 00

764, 880 14

5,564,901 86

1786, 884 01
179, 928 10
8, 040 36
794, 924 37

THE NEW SYSTEM.

At the time the last annual report was prepared the system inaugurated by the act of December 24, 1872, by which the ofiice of assessor
was abolished and the Commissioner authorized and required to make
the various inquiries, determinations, and assessments of taxes, had been
in operation only .five months. Certain beneficial results besides the
great annual saving in salaries ($1,600,000) had already been obtained,
such as an increase iu the receipts from special taxes. It was observed,
also, quite unexpectedly, that the receipts of collectors for their lists
reached this Office earlier than when prepared by the local assessing
officers.
^
The additional beneficial results which have become apparent during
ttie past yeav have^been sufficient, taken in connection with those
already observed, to establish the fact beyond a doubt that the system
has secured returns from tax-payers more fully and promptly than heretofore, and consequently a larger amount of tax and a more prompt
payment thereof. These facts will more fully appear from the statenients subjoined, showing the relative assessments and collections during corresponding periods in 1872, 1873, and 1874.
The amounts assessed during the last special-tax year, commenced
May 1, 1873, aud ended April 30, 1874, were as follows:
Tax on deficiency in the production of distilled spirits
Deposits, capital, and circuhition of banks, &c
Distilled spirits seized or fraudulently removed
.
Fermented liquors removed from brewery unstaniped
Tobacco, snuff, and cigars removed from manufactory unstamped
Proprietary articles removed from manufactory unstpomped
Assessed penalties
Legacies and successions
Other taxes, omitted to be assessed b}^ assessors
Unassessed and unassessable penalties, interest, taxes previously abated,
conscience-money, and deficiencies in bonded accounts which have
been collected; also fines, penalties, and forfeitures paid to collector
by order of court or by order ofthe Secretary, and amounts of penalties and interest received for validating unstamped instruments
Special taxes, (licenses)
.'
Total

$163, 065
3, 427, Oil
168, 978
16^ 768
14,968
7, 534
168, 290
103, 025
38, 304

30
78
53
38
48
53
09
55
38

352,963 84
^324,756 59
4,785,667 45

The foregoing amounts do not show the whole amount of tax collected;
from each article, as, with the exception oi'the tax on deposits, capital,
and circulation of banks, &c., and the tax on deficiency in the production of distilled spirits,, the amount due from delinquent tax-payers only
is assessed.



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL

117

REVENUE.

Of the tax against banks and bankers, which remained unchanged by
law, there was collected during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873—
Capital
Circulation
Deposits

.$736,9.50 05
24, 778 62
1,835,993 29
• — — $2,597,721 96

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1874:
Capital
Circulation
Deposits

:

$916,878 15
16,738 26
2,067,118 77
3,000,735 18

Showing an increase of

^

• 403, 013 22

It is believed, that this increase may, in a great degree, be fairly
attributed to the new system of assessment, as the period in which the
increase occurs includes the fall of 1873, memorable for the great
financial disasters which occurred at that time. This opinion is further
sustained from the circumstance that during this year more than seventy
banks have been for the first time assessed, although doing business
and liable to be assessed during previous years.
The improvement is still more apparent in the collection of special
taxes. The amount collected from this source was, during, the last
quarter of the fiscal year 1872, $3,303,539.83; during the last quarter of
the fiscal year 1873, when the new system was first applied, $5,336,076.49';
and during the last quarter ofthe fiscal year 1874, $5,855,581.36; showing an increase in the last quarter of the iiscal vear 1874 over tlie corresponding periods of 1873 and 1872 of $519,504.82 and $2,552,041.50
respectively.
'
.
^ .
•
A similar result has been experienced in the collection of taxes troin
all other assessable sources. While thus the new system has led to a
steady increase of collections, it has also tended to make these collec-^
tions more prompt and regular.
By the act of June 6, 1872, the tax imposed upon banks and bankers
is assessable on the first day of June and December respectively, and
is payable semi-annually. The collections from this source, exclusive
of the tax on savings banks, which has since been reduced by law, was,
in the months of December, 1872, and January, 1873, $1,033,'669.57; the
amount assessed for the preceding half-year, ,$1,585,840.67, showing
that in the first two months after the tax became due 65.18 x)er cent, of
the total amount assessed was collected, while under the new system
the collections in June and July, 1873,. were $1,205,790.52 from a semiannual assessment of $1,498,795.45, giving a rate of 80.45 per cent, for
the first two months; and in December, 1873, and Jauuary, 1874, we
have a collection of $1,587,747.42, from an assessment of $1,928,216.33,
increasing the rate of collections to 82.34 per cent.
The law provides for the payment of special taxes on or before the
first day of May of each year.
The collections of special taxes duringthe months of April, May, and
June were as follows:
Year.
1872
1873
1874

Z

April.
•$144, 572 74
566,988 26
2,139, 029 m

May.
$1,487,966 35
3,796,740 82
3,236,082 79

June.
$1,671,000 74
972,347 38
480,468 91

•
A large yearlj^ increase of collections for the first two mbnths, and
consequent decrease for the third.



113

REPORT ^ON THE FINANCES.
MISCELLANEOUS.

For the past three years all spirit, tobacco, cigar, and beer stamps, with
the exception of the class denominated ^^strip-stamps," have been
printed in two colors, the borders, or tints, being printed by the Continental and ISTational Bank-ISTote Companies of New York, and the
second printing by the Bureau of Engraving ahd Printing of the Treasury Department. The strip stamps were also.printed by said Bureau.
The contracts with the ban]i-note companies having expired, it was
determined, after a full consideration o f t h e subject, to advertise for
13roposals for the printing of all the above stamps, and accordingly an
advertisement, dated July 21, 1874, was issued, and the bids w^ere
opened August 25, 1874.
The proposals submitted revealed the fact that, taking the issue of
stamps during the fiscal year ending June 30,1874, and the prices paid
to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and Continental and National
Bank-Note Companies for printing the same as bases, and having the
tints or borders printed b y t h e process known as " surface printing"
instead of by " plate printing '^ as heretofore, a saving might be effected
of about seventy-five thousaud dollars ($75,000) per annum. Contracts
were therefore made with the bank-note companies making the lowest
bids, and the work has been commenced.
It is suggested that inasmuch as a fully equipped Bureau of Engraving
and Printing is maintained by the General Government, that the head of
that office be required to submit estimates for the printing of all internal revenue stamps when bids for the same are advertised for, to be
opened and considered as are like bids by individuals or companies; or,
that the head of that Bureau be authorized and required, on requisition
by the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, to furnish all stamps necessary under the law, except proprietary and documentary. The latter
plan would seem to be the more convenient, inasmuch as the necessary
appropriations would all be made to the one Bureau, (Engravingand Printing.) It is greatly to be desired that Congress should make some posi^
tive provision in regard to this matter.
I respectfully call the attention of Congress to the recommendations
in my last annual report in relation to the pay of supervisors and collectors, and again urge that the rates therein proposed be provided for
by law, to apply to the current year and succeeding fiscal years.
House bill No. 3572, of the last session, provided in'several important
instances for the improvement of the internal revenue system, but unfortunately, in that respect, failed to pass the Senate. Several of those
provisions will be recommended again by this Office for adoption.
The total receipts from stamps on bank checks, &c., perfumery,
cosmetics, patent medicines, matches, &c., (being the remnants of what
was known under the revenue laws originally as documentary^ and proprietary stamps,) were for the last fiscal year $6,136,844.64. If Congress
should wish to abolish these remnants, and still are of the opinion that
the revenue could not be diminished with safety, an equivalent could be
had by increasing the tax on spirits 10 cents per gallon. This would
yield, estimating on the numberof taxable gallons produced during the
last fiscal year, $6,957,000.
An additional tax ou tobacco.of 4 cents per pound, estimating on a
corresponding basis, (excluding snuff*,) would yield $4,612,000.
Since the passage of the act of June 22, 1874, repealing so much of
the act of May 8,1872, as provides for the employment of persons to
assist the proper officers of the Government in discovering and collect


COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE.

119

ing monej^s withheld, various parties have from time to time given information which they assert shows, or tends to show, that the persons
and corporations named bj^ them have withheld money belonging to the
United States as internal revenue tax. This informatiom has usually
been accompanied by a claim to the general reward of (not to exceed)
ten per cent, of the amount which may eventually be realized by the
Government, a reward offered under the authority of section 39 of the
act of J une 6, 1872, entitled ^'An act to reduce duties on imports, and
to reduce internal taxes, and for other purposes." The information
thus obtained has been furnished by this Office to the proper internal
revenue officers, with instructions to make a prompt investigation of
each case, and to take the steps necessary for the" collection of all
amounts ascertained to be due. The parties from whom it was obtained
have been referred to those officers and have been requested to give
them such further information on the subject as they may possess.
Some amounts have already beeu realized in this way; but a large majority of the cases reported are still undergoing investigation and are
in different stages of advancement. Taxes due under repealed laws
have, however, been collected to a considerable amount by the internal
revenue officers without the aid of other parties. The sum thus collected during the last fiscal year was something over $625,000. During
the first quarter of the present fiscal year there was collected over
$184,000, and further collections are continually being made.
Respectfullv,
J. W.. DOUGLASS,
•
.
Gommissionefo
Hon. B. H. BRISTOW,

Secretary of tlie Treasury.







REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.







REPORT
OF

THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
TREASURY^ D E P A R T M E N T ,
O F F I C E OF COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY,

Washington, N'ovemher 23, 1874,
SIR : I have the honor to submit for the consideration of Congress
in compliance with section 61 of the national bank act, the twelfth an
nual report of the Comptroller of the Currency.
Since my last annual report two bills relating to the national banking
system have passed Congress. The first bill provided—
That the maximum amouut of United States notes is hereby fixed at $400,000,000.
That forty-six millions in uotes for circulation, in addition to such circulation now
allowed by law, shall be issued to national banking associations uow organized and
Avhich mAy be organized hereafter, and such increased circulation shall be divstributed
among the several Slates as provided in section lof t h e a c t entitled ''An act to provide
for the redemptiou of the three per cent, temporary-loan certificates and for an iucrease
of national-bank uotes," approved July 12, 1870. And each national ba^nking. association now organized, or hereafter to be organized, shall keep aud maintain, as a
]Dart of its reserve required by law, oue fourth part of the coin received by it as interest on bonds of the Uuited States deposited as security for circulating notes or Governmeut deposits, and that hereafter only one-fourth of the reserve now prescribed by law
for national banking associations shall consist of balances due to au association available for the redemption of its circulatiug notes from associations in cities of redemption,
and upon which balances no interest shall be paid.

This act failed to receive the signature of the President, and did not
become a law.
The second act was approved, and went into operation June 20, 1874,
This act provides—
That the ainount of United States notes outstanding and to be used
as a part of the circulating-medium, shall not exceed the sum of three
hundred and eighty-two million dollars, which said sum shall appear in
each monthly statement ofthe public debt, and no part thereof shall be
held or used as a reserve.
It further provides for the repeal of the reserve required to be held by
the national banks upon circuiatiou;
For the redemption of all national-bank notes at the Treasury in legaltender notes, for vvhich purpor.e the banks are required to keep on deposit with the Treasurer 5 per cent, of their circulation; which ampunt
is to be counted as a partof the reserve required to be held on deposits;
For the deposit by any national bank of lawful money with the Treasurer, in sums of not less than $9,000, and the withdrawal of the bonds
on deposit as 'security for such circulating-notes, providied that the
amount of such bonds shall not be reduced below $50,000;
For'the withdrawal of $55,000,000 from national banks in States whichhave received more thau their proportion, and its redistribution to national banks in States which have received less than their proportion,
updn an apportionment made on the basis of population and of



124

REPORT ON THE FINAISCES.

wealth, as shown by the returns of the census of 1870, not more than
$30,000,000 of which shall be withdrawn and redistributed during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1875.
Twenty-two hundred national banks have been organized since the
establishment of the national banking systein, under the actof February 2Sj 1863. < Thirty-five of these banks have failed, and one hundred
,
and thirty-seven gone into voluntary liquidation by a vote of two-thirds
of the shareholders, under section 42 of the act,,leaving 2,028 banks in
existence on the 1st day of November, 1874. During the past year,
seventy-one national banks have been organized, with an authorized
eapital of $6,745,500. Three banks have failed and twenty have gone
iuto voluntary liquidation.
The following table exhibits the resources and liabilities of the
national banks in operation at corresponding periods for the last tive
years:
O C T O B E R 8,

O C T O B E R 2,

O C T O B E R 3,

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1,615 b a n k s .

1,767 b a n k s .

1,919 b a n k s .

1,976 b a n k s .

2,004 b a n k s .

1712, 767,
3,160,
340, 857,
15, 381,
22, 323,
23, 614,
66, 275,
33, 948,
9, 202,

$827, 689, 625 1872, 520,104
4, 677, 819
3, 862, 585
364, 475, 800 382, 046, 400
15, 479, 750
28, 087, 500
12,142, 5.50
17, 753, 650
23, 533,152
24,517,059
80, 717, 071
86, 878, 609
34, 486, 594
43, 525, 362
12, 976, 878
12, 772, 670

1940, 233, 304
3,986,812
388, 330, 400
14, 805, 000
8, 819, 850
23, 714, 035
96,134,121
41, 413, 680
12, 022, 873

$949, 870, 628
4,524,164
383, 254, 800
14, 691, 700
13, 313, .550
27, 807, 827
83, 885,127
39, 695, 309
11, 196, 612

34, 661, 823.
6, 985, 437
7, 752, 844
11, 43.3, 913
88, 926, 004
16,103,842
2, 302, 775
19, 868, 469
92, 347, 663

38,112, 926
7, 658, 739
8, 376,. 659
12, 296, 417
97, 383, 687
18, 450, 013
2, 224, 943
21,240,945
80,016,946

20, 610, 000
175, 000

42, 830, 000

S E P T E M B'R 12, I O C T O B E R 2,

RESOURCES.

L o a n s and d i s c o u n t s
,
Overdrafts
U . S. bonds .for c i r c u l a t i o n
U . S. b o n d s for deposits
U . S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r s t o c k s and b o n d s
D u e from r e s e r v e a g e n t s . . . . . .
Duefioni national banks
D u e from S t a t e b a n k s
E e a l e s t a t e , f u r n i t u r e , a n d fixtures
Current expenses
Preniinra s paid
Cash items
Clearing-house exchanges
National-bank notes
Fractional cnrrency
Specie
.'
Legal-tender notes
T h r e e p e r cen t. certificates - TJ. S. certificates of deposit
C l e a r i n g - h o u s e certificates
R e d e m p t i o n - f u n d w i t h TJ. S.
Treasurer

Totals.

4.53
626
450
500
800
721
669
806
497

27, 470, 747
5, 871, 750
2, 491, 222
12, 473,107
79, 089, 688
12, 576, 433
2,078,179
18,460,011
77, 203, 577
26,330,000,

.30, 089, 784
6,153, 370
5, 500, 890
13, 984, 971
101, 16.5, 855
14, 270, 951
2, 095, 485
13, 252, 998
106, 987, 666
7,180, 000

19,136, 000

20, 322, 069

32, 276, 498
6, 310, 429
6, 546, 849
14, 916, 784
110,086,315
15,787,296
2,151, 748
10, 229, 757
102, 074,104
1, 555, 000
6,710,000
8, 632, 000

20, 349, 950
1,730,566,899 1,'755, 857, 098 1, 830, 627, 845

1, 877,180, 942

479, 629,144
110, 257, 516
46, 623, 784
333, 495, 027
1, 567, 143
3, 149, 750
613,290,701
7, 853, 772

491, 072, 616
120, 314, 499
54,515,132
339, 081, 799
1,188, 853
1, 402, 548
622, 635, 563
7, 829, 328

493, 765,121
128,958,107
51, 484, 437
333, 225, 298
964, 997
3, 515, 847
669, 068, 996
7, 302,154

4,
110,
33,
5,
6,

8, 098, 560
133, 672, 733
39, 298,148
5, 987, 512
5,480,5.54

3, 927, 828
125,102, 050
50, 718, 008
4,197, 372
4,'950, 727

1, 510, 713, 236 1, 730, 566, 899 1, 755, 857, 098 1,830,627,845

1, 877,180, 942

1,510,713,236

LIABILrriES.

C a p i t a l stock.
S u r p l u s fuTjd
t r n d i v i d e d profits
National bank circulation
State bank circulation
Dividends unpaid
I n d i v i d u a l deposits
TJ. S. deposits."
D e p o s i t s of TJ. S. d i s b u r s i n g
officers
D u e to n a t i o n a l b a n k s
D u e to S t a t e b a n k s a n d b a n k e r s
N o t e s a n d bills r e d i s c o u n t e d
Bills p a y a b l e
Totals

430, 399, 301
94,061,439
38, 608, 619
291, 798, 640
2,138, 548
2, 462, 591
501, 407, 587
6, 807, 978

458, 255, 696
101,112, 672
42/008, 714
315,519,117
1, 921, 056
4, 540,195
600, 868, 486
20, 511, 936

4, 550,143
,5, 393, 599
100, 348, 292 131, 730, 713
29, 693, 911
40,211,972
3, 843, 577
3, 964, 5,52
. 4, 592, 610
4,528,191

563,
047,
789,
549,
040,

834
348
084
432
.563

The following table exhibits similar data, showing the conditiouoof the
•national banks at the close of business on the 2d day of October, the
date of their last report; the returns from New York City, from Boston
Philadelphia and Baltimore, from the other redemption cities, and from
he remaining ba^nks being arranged separately :



125

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
New York
City.
48 b a n k s .

Boston, PhilCountry
adelphia, a n d Other redemption cities."
banks.
Baltimore.
88 b a n k s .
1,774 b a n k s .
94 b a n k s .

Aggregate.
2,004 b a u k s .

RESOURCES.

L o a n s and d i s c o u n t s
On TJ. S. bonds on d e m a n d . . .
On o t h e r stocks a n d bonds on
demand
On commercial a n d accommodation p a p e r
P a y a b l e in gold
Overdrafts
:
E o n d s for c i r c u l a t i o n
B o n d s for deposits
TJ. S. b o n d s on h a n d
O t h e r s t o c k s and bonds
D u e from r e s e r v e a g e n t s
D u e from o t h e r n a t i o n a l b a n k s .
D u e from o t h e r b a n k s a n d b a n k ers
E e a l e s t a t e , f u r n i t u r e , a u d fixtures...
Current expenses
Premiums
C h e c k s a u d o t h e r cash i t e m s . . .
E x c h a n g e s for c l e a r i u g - h o u s e . .
Bills of o t h e r n a t i o n a l b a n k s . . .
Bills of S t a t e b a u k s
Fractional currency
Specie.
."
Legal-tender notes
TJ. S. certificates of deposit
5 p e r cent, redem ption-fund
w i t h TJ. S. T r e a s u r e r
,.
A d d i t i o n a l a r a o u n t w i t h TJ. S.
Treasurer

$100, 360,154
14, 721, 638

$466, 295,198

3, 360, 597
266, 576, 850
10, 964, 700
3, 875,100
15, 048, 589
52,714,793
13, 454, 711

51, 478, 691

12,189, 780

139, 841, 588
5, 735,137
426,116
30, 899,100
6.50, 000
7, 635, 750
7, 089, 934

158, 418, 323
21, 685
68, 898
52, 027, 700
.57.5, 000
615, 800
2,401,944
16,162, 140
6,229,514

668, 553
33,751,151)
2, 502, 000
1,186, 900
3, 267, 360
15, 008,194
8, 059,182

2,006,414

1, 014, 402

2, 390, 850

8, 734, 927
1, 933, 801
1,437,170
2, 230, 570
76, 860, 065
2,191,418
1,947
263, 422
14, 406, 267
20,-874, 595
31, 555, 000

5, ,385, 650
749, 811
356, 953
956,101
16, 079, 945
3,929,591
1,472
260, 792
2, 776, 909
12, 098, 851
7, 530, 000

4, 367, 096
950, 320
900, 223
1, 088, 481
4, 443, 677
2, 626, 584
3,967
230, 074
1, 682, 477
14,146, 017
2, 970, 000

1, 464, 616

2,277,015

1, 421, 062

293, 845

359, 497

372, 401

424,7.33,914

Totals.

$949, 870, 627

$808, 433

303, 296, 206

6S, 500, 000
2,, 653, 881
12, 042, 089

78, 737, 085
22, 682,184
5, 566, 063

11, 951, 903

5, 784, 946
19,
3,
5,
8,

4, 524,.164,
383,254,800
14,691,700
13, 313, .550
27, 807, 827
83, 885, 127
39, 695, 310
11,196,612

625,
974,
682,
021,

253
807
313
265

9, 675,
19,
1, 470,
2, 37.5,
32, 897,
77.5,

225
809
655
292
483
000

38,112, 926
, 7,65^,739
8, 376, 659
12, 206, 417
97, 383, 687
18, 422, 818
27,195
2, 224, 943
21,240,945
80, 016, 946
42, 830, 000

11,891,414

17, 054,107

2, 270,100

3, 295, 843

946, 754,100

1, 877,180, 942

48, 305, 800
12, 484, 691
4, 369, 885

298, 222, 236
71,137, 351
29,504,401

493, 765,121
128,958, 107
51, 484, 438

29,124,
34,
139,
74, 554,
1, 386,

234, 770, 039
665, 630
1,869,982
278, 990, 581
5, 205, 041

333, 225,
964,
3, 515,
669, 068,
7; 302,

298
997
847
996
154

3, 927,
125,102,
50, 718,
4,197,
4, 950,

828
050
007
372
727

.LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
S u r p l u s fund
, -...
U n d i v i d e d profits
National-bank notes outstand-

Totals.

781
501
682
282
809

44,0.39,276
149, 838
1,2.59,331
114, 200, 822
288, 276

25, 788
68,189, 355
25, 230, 753
691, 993

33, 172
28, 854, 310
7,357,217
124, 000
2,632

645, 268
16, 984, 268
12, 438, <J16
534, 444
1, 395, 029

424, 733, 914

State-bank notes outstanding..
Dividends unpaid
I n d i v i d u a l deposits
TJ. S. deposits
D e p o s i t s of TJ. S. d i s b u r s i n g
otficers
!;.
D u e to n a t i o n a l b a n k s
Due toother banksand bankers
N o t e s a n d bills r e d i s c o u n t e d
Bills p a y a b l e

303, 296, 206

202, 396, 722

25, 291,
115,
246,
201, 323,
422,

202
028
852
311
028

3, 223, 600
11, 074,117
5, 691,121
3, 538, 928
2, 861, 073
946, 754,100

1, 877,180, 942

* T h e r e d e m p t i o n cities, i n a d d i t i o n to N e w Y o r k , Boston, P h i l a d e l p h i a , a n d B a l t i m o r e , a r e A l b a n y ,
P i t t s b u r g h , W a s h i u g t o n , N e w Orleans, L o u i s v i l l e , C i n c i n n a t i , Cleveland, Chicago, D e t r o i t , M i l w a u k e e ^
S a i n t -Louis, a u d San F r a n c i s c o .

DISTRIBUTION

OF THE

CUKRENCY.

The national-bank act authorized the issue of three hundred millions of
national-bank circulation. The act of July 12, 1870, authorized the issue
of fifty-four millions of additional circulation. Of this additional circulation there was issued to November 1,1871, $24,773,260; in the year ending
November 1, 1872, $16,220,210; in the year ending November 1, 1873,
$7,357,479. Duriug the ^year ending November 1, 1874, there has been
issued $5,817,316; and during the same year there has been witiidrawn
from circulation and destroyed $2,241,019, showing an actual increase of
national-bank circulation during the past year of $3,576,297.
Two national gold banks have been organized in California during the
year, with an authorized capital of $700,000. The total capital of the
national gold banks, all of which are organized in the State of California, is $3,650,000, to which banks circulation has been issued amounting to $2,150,000.



126

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

The following table exhibits the numberof banks organized, the number closed and closing, and the nuinber in operation, with their capital,
. bonds on deposit, and circulation issued, redeemed and outstanding, in
each State aud Territory, on the 1st day of November, 1874:

states and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Ehode Island
Connecticut

l..

'

Total Middle States...

$9, 840, 000 $8, 930, 750
5, 365, OOU .5, 342, 000
8, 362, 712 7, 755, 000
93, 039, 350 67, 491, 250
14,718,400
20, 504,
25, 484, 620 20, 229, 400

64
43
42
220
62
80

323
63
218
11
33

276 108,339,691 64, 963, 050107, 287, 415 47, 988, 366 59, 299, 049
62 13, 908, 350 12, 552, 650 16, 330, 820 5, 238, 010 11, 092, 810
205 53, 910, 240 47 645, 850 63,923,795 21, 831, OS'l 42,092,711
11 1, .523,185 i; 4.53, 200 1, 930, 965 644, 990 1, 285, 975
31 13, 790, 203 10, 391, 250 14, 236. 850 4, 954, 523 9, 282, 327

648

585 191,471,669 137, 006, 000
203, 709, 845 80, 656, 973123, 052, 872

162, 596, 482124, 466, 800 168, 522,150 58,817,132 109, 705, 018

District of Columbia
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama .•
Mississippi
• Louisiana '.
Texas
Arkansas,
Kentucky
Teunessee
Missouri
Total .Southern and
Southwestern States
Ohio..

Indiana
Illinois. -Michigan .,
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska

'

1, 852, 000
3, 935, 000
2,146,000
2, 200, 000
3,135, 000
2,'835, 000
80, 000
1, 625, 000
4, 450, 000
1,155, 000
205, 000
10, 018, 900
3, 560, 300
9,195, 300
252

2, 432, 800
4,820,230
3, 502, 270
2,130, 320
2, 363, 630
2, 927, 990
27. 000
1,687; 270
66, 000
2, 984, 000 4, 607, 320
914, 000 1,149, 740
205, 000
294, 000
9, 381, 650 10, 264, 670
3,116, 500 4, 044,1
3, 985, 350 8, 646, 565
1,620,000
3, 676, 750
2, 093, 600
1, 970,100
2, 010, 000
2, 526, 400
60, 000
1, 550, 000

. 170
98
142
HO
47
80
32
25
10

Total AVestern States.

57

474, 265
333, 075
296, 405
860, 400
878,130
984, 805
455, 000
820, 575
o-:o, 600

250, 000
7^0, 000
200, 000
100, 000
280, 000
60, 000
300, OOo
50, 000

131,700
280, 900
756, 260
575, 230
118, 500
310, 540
56, 500
317, 600
45, 540

, 986, 000 2, 592, 770

26

2,192

307, 267
61,124
1, 204, 845
332, 040
50,105
1. 929, 069
983, 748
2, 738,186

1, 462, 291
3, 615, 282
2, 385, 430
1, 824, 545
2,167, 420
2, 259, 575
27, 000
1, 380, 003
4,876
3, 402, 475
817, 700
243, 895
8, 335, 601
3, 061, 232
5, 908, 379

10, 868, 632 23.605,633
6, 427, 809 14, 905, 266
6, 661, 204 16, 635, 201
2, 470, 527 7, 389, 873
1, 646, 144 3,231,986
2, 381, 936 5, 602, 86Q
1, 001, 499 3, 393, 501
305, 954 1, 514, 621
895, 900
174,700

684 95, 439,150 83,131, 900109,173, 255 31, 998, 405 77.174, 850

250, 000
850, 325
450, 000
100, 000
350, 000
12.5, 000
300, 000
50, 000

• , Total Pacific States
and Territories.:

970, 509
1, 204, 048
1,116, 840
305, 775
196,210
668, 415

36, 093, 550 48, 964, 735 12, 069. 081 36, 895, 704

215

183
104
152
84
55
90
35
27
11

2s' evada*
Oregon
Colorado
Utali
Idaho
Montana
Wyoming
New Mexico
Dakota

Grand total

11,471,360 3, 524, 784 7, 946, 576
6, 71.5, 455 2, 008, 090 4, 707, 365
9, 889, 770 2, 991, 330 . 6, 898, 440
93, 218, 685 34,167, 666 59,051,019
19, 977,.410 6, 707, 590 13, 269, 820
27, 249, 470 9,417,672 17.831,798

66
44
44
223
62
83

Total Eastern States ..
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland

Bonds on Circula- Girculat'n Circulat'n
outstanddeposit. tionissued, redeemed. ing.

Capital,
paid in.

0.2

123, 836
55, 900
148, 070
175, 571
30, 200
43, 745
2,500
49, 700
540

7,864
225, 000
608,190
399, 659
88, 300
266, 795
54, 000
267, 900
45. OOo

630, 062 1, 962. 708

332, 684, 250532, 962, 805184,171, 653

2,021

Due to banks for mutilated notes destroyed

3,136, 094
351, 927, 246

GOLD BANKS.

Massachusetts
California
Total gold banks




3, 650, 000

120, 000
2, 737, 500 2, 228, 700

3, 650, 000

2, 348, 700

120, 000
78, 700 2,150, 000
198, 700 2,150, 000

127

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

The following table exhibits the apportionment to the different States
and Territories, upon the basis of population and wealth, of the whole
amount of circulation authorized by law, ($354,000,000,) together with
the excess or deficiency of circulation in each instance :
states

and Territories.

N e w Harapshire
Vermont
Massachusetts

Total

Apportio n - Apportionment
on
ment
on
population.
wealth.

Aggregate
apportionment.

Outstanding
circulation.

Excess.

$2, 877, 818
1, 461,138
1,517,376
6, 689, 889
997, 747
2, 467,152

$2, 0.53,
1, 486,
1, 380,
12, 549,
1, 752,
4, 566,

200
800
600
300
300
600

$4,931,018
2, 947, 938
2, 897, 976
19, 239,189
2, 750, 047
7, 033, 752

$7, 946, 576
4, 707, 365
6, 898, 440
.59, 051, 019
13, 269, 820
17, 831, 798

$3, 015, 5.58
• 1, 759, 427
4, 000, 464
39, 811, 832
10, 519, 773
10, 798, 047

16,011,120

23, 788, 800

39, 799, 920

109, 705, 018

69, 905,101

20,118,813
4,1.59, 382
16,167, 317
573, 873
3, 584, 651

38, 267, 400
5, 540,100
22, 425, 900
566, 400
3, 787, 800

58, 386, 213
9, 699, 482
38,593,217
1,140, 273 .
7, 372, 451

59, 299, 049
11. 092, 810
42, 092, 711
1, 285, 975
9, 232, 327

912, 838
1, 393, 328
3, 499, 495
145, 702
1, 9'09, 876

44, 604, 036

70,587,600

Deficiency.

Eastern

States

....

New York
Pennsylvania
Delaware
M a r ylan d
Total
Middle
States
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a

South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Louisiana
Texas
Tennessee
Missouri
Total Southern
and S o u t h western Statea
Ohio
Indiana
Illiuois
Michigan .
Wisconsin ..
Iowa
Minnesota
Nebraska
Total Western
States
Nevada
Oreo'on
Calitbrnia
Colorado
Utah •
Idaho
Montan a
Wyoming
N e w Mexico
Arizona
Dakota
Washington
Total
Pacific
States
and
Territories . . .
G r a n d t o t a l of
States and Tertories

604, 560
5, 624, 042
2, 029, 041
4, 918, 022 •
.3, 239, 045
5, 435, 587
861,846
4, 576, 646
3, 800, 529
3, 336, 863
3, 757, 640 •
2, 223, 936
6, 064, 027
5, 777,118
7,901,509

743, 400
2, 407, 200
1,115,100
1, 539, 900
1, 221, 300
1, 575, 300
265, 500
1,185, 900
1, 239, 000
1, 893, 900
938,100
920, 400
3,5.57,700
2, 938, 200
7, 557, 900

123,'052, 872

7, 861, 239

1, 347, 960
1, 462, 291
8,031,242
3, 615, 282
.3,144,141
2, 385, 430
6, 457, 922
1, 824, 545
4, 460, 345
2,167, 420
7, 010, 887 .
2, 259, 575
1,127, 346
27, 000
5, 762, 546
1, 380, 003
5, 039. 529
4,876
5, 230; 763
3, 402, 475
4, 695, 740
817,700
3,144,3.36
243, 895
9, 621, 727 • 8, 335, 601
3, 061, 232
8, 715, 318
5, 908, 379
15, 459, 409

114, 331

114,331

115,191, 636

$4, 415, 961
758, 7 i l
4, 633, 377
2, 292, 925
• 4 751 313
1,100, 346
4,382,543
5, 034, 653
1,828,289
3, 878, 040
2, 900, 441
1, 286,126
5 654 086
9,551,031

60,150, 411

29,098,800

89, 249, 2 U

36,895,704

12, 234, 726
7,714,871
11, 6.59, 230
5, 435, 357
4,841,403
5, 481, 081
• 2,018,445
1, 672, 754
564, 592

13,151,100
7, 469,400
12, 496, 200
4, 230, 300
4,141, 800
4, 230, 300
. 1, 345, 200
1,11.5,100
407,100

25, 385, 826
15,184, 271
24,155, 430
9, 665, 657
8, 983, 203
9, 711, 381
3, 363, 645
2, 787, 854
971, 692

23, 605, 633
14, 905, 266
16,635,201
7, 389, 873
3, 231, 986
5, 602, 869
3, 393, 501
1,514,621
895, POO

51, 622, 459

48, 586, 500

100, 208, 959

77,174, 850

195, 052
417, 377
2, 571, 783
182, 993
398, 386
68, 852
94, 540
41, 855
421, 742
44, 334
6.5, 096
109, 964

177,000
300,900
3, 752, 400
123, 900
88, 500
35, 400
88, 500
35, 400
194, 700
17, 700
35,400
88,500

372, 052
718,277
6, 324,183
306, 893
486, 886
104,252
183, 040
77, 255
616, 442
62, 034
• 100,496
198, 464

7,864
225, 000

4, 611, 974

4,938,300

9, 550, 274

1, 962, 708

385, 052

7, 972, 619

177, 000, 000

177, 000, 000

354, 000, 000

348, 791,152

78, 295, 579

83,504,427.




608, 190
399,659
88, 300
266, 795
54, 000
267, 900

52, 467, 842
1, 780,192
279 005
7,520,2.30
2 275, 784
5, 7.51, 217
4,108, 513

29, 856
1 273,233
75, 792
29, 856

23,063,966
364,189
493 277
6, 324,183

301, 297
87 227
15 952
83,755
23,
348,
62,
55
198

45,000

255
542
034
496
464

128

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

. The total circulation outstanding on November 1, 1874, including the
amount ($3,136,094) due to banks for mutilated notes destroyed, was
$351,927,246, leaving $2,072,754 yet to be issued of the $354,000,000 authorized.
Since the passage of the act of June .20, 1874, forty-six national banks
have been organized, with a capital of $4,019,000, to which circulation
has been issued amounting to $1,842,650. The amount of circulation
still due to these banks, and to other banks previously organized, is
$3,707,000.
Apxilications have been made for the organization of sixty-four other
national banks, with a capital of $5,110,000, and circulation ambuntiug to $4,509,000 has been assigned to these proposed organizations.
Under section 4 of the act bf Jnne 20,1874, $7,714,550 of legal-tender
notes have been deposited for the .purpose ot withdrawing from circulation the same amount of national-bank notes.
The foUowing table exhibits, by States, the amount of circulating
notes issued to national banks since the passage of the act of June 20,
1874* the amount authorized to be issued to banks already organized y
the amount authorized to be issued to i.)roposed organizations, and the
aniount of national-bank notes surrendered by the deposit of legaltender notes:
I s s u e d to
b a n k s since
J u n e 20,
1874.

States and Territories.

$48,
51,
18,
58,

..
...
...

000
800
000
500

$45, 000
50, 000
ISO, 000

27, 000
45, Opo

63, 000
45, 000

61, .500
1,142, 200
72, 000

118, 500
499, 350
198, 000

•>...

Alabama
..
-

. . .

210
070
000
000
.500
.500
900

452, 010
588, 900
432, 000
347, 640
49, 500
229, 500
107,100
112, 500

17, 000

Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska

trtah

$270, 000
180, 000
45, 000
135, O D
O
180, 000
45, 000
45, 000
90, 000
1, 395, 000
864, 000
495, 000
90,000
45, 000
• 315,000

189, 000

223,
645,
406,
136,
49,
211,
117,

Michigan
Wisconsin

Total.

A m o u n t surrendered by
d e p o s i t of legal-tenders.

$153,900
27, 000
2,135, 850
35, 200

Khode Island
'
Connecticut
New York
Pennsvlvania
D i s t r i c t of Colilrabia
Yirginia
W^est V i r g i n i a
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia

Texas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana

Authorized Authorized
to b e i s s u e d to b e i s s u e d
t o b a n k s al- to p r o p o s e d .
r e a d y or- o r g a n i z a ganized.
tions.

380,000
90, 000

$48, 000
96, 800
338, 000
238, 500
180, 000
45, 000
90, 000
' 90, 000
135, 000
360, 000
1, 686, 550
315, 000
90, 000
2, 070, 220
2, 097, 970
1, 333, Odo
573, 640
144, 000
756, 000
225, 000
292, 500
90, 000
206, 000 •

405, 000
45, 000
374, 000
67,500
2,320,050
140, 850
396, 000
989, 200
235, 300
76, 500
43,200
45, 000

225,000
45, 000

Dakota
Total

....

3, 330,180

3, 707, 000

45, 000

4, 509, 000

11, 546,180

7,' 714, 550

The Secretary of the Treasury has, upon the request of the Comptroller, as provided in section 8 of the act of June 20,1874, issued circulars
to the assistant treasurers, designated depositaries, and national-bank
depositories of the United States, accompanied with a list of all banks
which have failed, and which have gone into voluntary liquidation,
directing them to assort and return for redemption -the notes of those
associations. The following table exhibits, by States, the-amount of




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

129

national-bank notes outstanding of insolvent banksand of banks in
voluntary liquidation.
*
'
States and Territories.
Maine
Connecticut
"NewYork
Pennsylvania
Maryland
District of Columbia
Yirginia
West Virginia
Georgia
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee...
Missouri
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Kansas
Nevada
Utah
Montana

In. voluntary
liquidation.

Insolvent
banks.

$3, 206 25

.

907, 260
141,925
178, 427
38, .595
•123, 676
452, 432
4, 244

75
00
25
00
75
00
75

3, 485 00
261, 000 00

,

27, 000 00
342,341 00
239, 038 50
316, 655 10
60, 383 75
835, 168 70,
47, 463 00
109, 572 60
240, 763 90
8, 740 00
90, 000 00

,

S960 50
370, 068 25
57, 366 50
392, 596 00
579, 400 00
'•

1, 683 25
1,391 25
390, 324 50
4, 995 00

10, 768 00
12, 500 00

,

2,121 25

79, 500 66
39, 300- 00
. 2.5, 317 00
1, 351 00

83,"46o'66
7, 863 ^0

Total.

4, 454, 647 30

2, 037, 638 00

Total.
$3, 206 25
960 -50
1, 277,329. 00
199, 291 50 .
178, 427 25
431, 191 00 '
703, 076 75
452, 432 00
•
4 , 244 75
1, 683 25
4, 876 25
651, 324 .50
4, 995 00
27, 000 00
344, 462 25
239, 038 50
396, 155 10
. 99,683 75
860, 485 70
47, 463 00
109, 572 60
242,•114 90
8, 740 00
173, 400 00
7, 863 .50
,768 00
10,
,500 00
12,
6, 492, 285. 30

The amount of circulation now at the disposal of the Comptroller or
aereafter to be placed at his disposal, for distribution from these different
sources, is as follows:
The portion of tbe $354, 000, 000 authorizecl, remaining unissued
$2,072,754
Notes of banks wbicb bave deposited lawful money for witbdrawal of circulation
7,714,550
Notes in circulation of banks in liquidation
'
6,492,285
Total...

16,279,589

It is probable that of the notes of banks whose circulation is being
retired, a sufficient amount will be retiirned and destroyed to supply
all applications for new organizations for some months to come.
The Attorney-General, at the request of the Secretary of the Treasury, has, since the passage of the act of June 20, 1874, given an
opinion, in which he holds that all circulating notes not withdrawn under the operation of that act, may be redistributed, as provided by the
previous acts 5 and that it is the duty of the Comptroller to make requisition at such times and in such amouuts as may be necessary for
the purpose of supplying banks that have been organized in States
which are deficient. Upon this point the Attorney-General says:
As applications are duly made for circulating notes, tbat is, tbe banks baving filed
their bonds and otherwise complied witb tbe requirements of law, tbe ComiDtroller is
to issue and deliver tbe notes to tbera, and tben is to *' proceed fortbwitb'^ to make requisitions upon tbe banks pointed out by tbe act, to withdraw and redeem of tbeir
circulation so much as is necessary to equal tbe issues previously made. It is probable tbat tbis course of proceeding would result temporarily in a greater amount tbaii
$354, 000,000 of circulating notes, were it not for tbe sums witbdrawn and redeemed
under tbe fourth and eigbtb sections of tbe a c t ; these sums are so large, tbat there is
little danger of overstepping the limit fixed, by law.

When the amounts withdrawn and destroyed under the fourth
and eighth sections of the act of June 20, 1874, referred to. by the
9 F•



130

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Attorney-General, shall have been re-issued, it will be the duty of the
Comptroller to make requisition upon'banks organized in States having
an excess—first, by reducing in such States to $1,000,000 the circulation
of all banks having more than that amount; and secondly, by withdrawing from other banks having a circulation exceeding $300,000, their
circulation, pro rata^ in excess of that amount. The amount subject to
withdraAval under sections 7 and 9 of the act of June 20, 1874, in States
having more than their proportion of circulation, is as follows:
From four banks in New York City
$1,388,538
From seventeen banks in Providence.,
'...2,818,100
From fifteen banks in Connecticut
^
., 3, 034, 020
From thirty-eight banks in Boston
. . ^ *.:
12,853,750
From twenty banks in Massachusetts
"
..
2,553,225
From four bauks in Maine
668,000
From four banks in Vermont
..
595, 600
From twelve banks in Baltimore
:..:..:
2,112,876
From one bauk in Delaware
...'..'....
'
99,850
Froui lorty-oue banks in Pennsylvania
3, 967,195
From eleven banks in New Jersey
,
980., G O
G
Add.amouut of circulation remaining unissued andamouutto bewitbdrawn
as stated on the preceding page
16,279, 589
Total

47,350,743

The aggregate amount of circulation at the disposal, or hereafter to
be placed at the disposal, of the Comptroller for redistribution among
the States which are deficient, is therefore $47,350,743.
The Ibllowing comparative table exhibits, by States, tlie amountof
circulation outstanding, the amount per capita, and its ratio to wealth
and capital, prior to and since the organization of the national banks:
Comparative tahle, exhibiting by States the hanh circulation, the amount pe?' capita., and the
•ratio of circulation to wealth and to capital,previous to the organization of the national
banldng system and in 1874.

Bank circulation.

Circuiatiou per
capita.

States and Territories.
1862.

Maine
NeAV H a i n p s h i r e . .
Yermont
Massachusetts
Khode Island — .
'Connecticut
Total Eastern States.

1874.

1862. I 1874.

•^6, 488, 478
4,192, 034
.5,621,851
28, 957, 630
6, 413, 404
13, 842, 753

P , 946, 576
4, 707, 365
6, 898, 440
59.0.51,019
13,269, 820
17,831,798

$10 33 ^12 67
•12 86 14 79
20 87
17 84
40 . 2
5
23 52
61 05
36 73
33 18
30 08

Total Middle -States...
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virginia
-— .
VVest Virgitaia
,
N o r t h Carolina . . . . . .
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
•.
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
...




P e r ct. .Per ct.
3.4
2.2
2.6
1.0
4.6
2.9
3.5
2.0
4.7
4. 4
3.1
2.3

l*er ct. P e r c t
81.3
80.8
8.5. 3
•87.7'
143. 7 • 82. .5
42.8
63.5
30.7
64.7
63. 5
70.0

31 45

3.5

•2.7

51.7

67.4

13
12
11
10
11

53
24
95
28
88

2. I
1.7
1.9
.1.5
1.8

0.9
1.1
1.1
1.3
1.4

36.0
99.8
106.8
176.2
54.9

54. .7
79.8
78.1
84.4
67. 3

: 97
9

12 06

2.0

1,462,291
12 41
.3,61.5,282
2, 385, 430
1,824,545 " 5 2 6
2,167, 420
8 65
2,259,075
7 86
27,000
•3
8
1, 380, 003
5 24
•4,:876
3. 402, :475 'i2"54'
• \8n/700 1

n 13

82, 372,091 123, 052, 872

5,218,
6, 089,
8,311,
116,
5, 055,

1874.

10
12
9
6
9

59, 299, 049
11, 09-2, 810
42,092,711
1, 28.5, 975
9, 282, 327

19, 817,148

1862.

H a t i o of circulation to capital.

• 0 90
2

6.5,-516, 1.55 109,705,018

N e w Yoi'^c
New J e r s e y . . .
Pennsylvania.
Delaware
Maryland

K a t i o of circulation
to
wealth.

10
16
53
04
68

2 96
5.39
1 70
3 07
1 90
14
1 38
01
4 70

53.1

64.2
'79. 0
91. 9
111.2
.82.9
69.1
79.7
33.-7
84.9
0.0
76. 5,
•70.8

COMPTROLLER OF THE CtlRRENCY.

131

Comparative tahle, exhihiting hy States the banlc circulation'^', ^"c.—Continued.

Bamk "carcwlat.ion.
St«,t6S a n d T e r r i t o r i e s .
1S62.

J

l«7-4.

C i r c u l a t i o n p e r R a t i o of circiilation fco
.capita.
wealth.
1862.

1S74. . i€'62.
Per tt.

Arkanisas
^Kentucky
Tennessee
Missouri

.^243. 895
8, 335, 601 "*.$?'82*
^9,035,724
4 09
4, 540, 906
3, 061, 232
4, (537, 277 ": 5, 908, 37^^
•
3 42

^^

T o t a l Soutb-ern a o d
Southwestet-n Stages. 71,098,408
Ohi®
Indiana:
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsici
Iowa
'.
Minnesota
Kansas
Nebraska

36, 895, 704

"
^..
.1

T o t a l W e s t e r n S t a t e s . . 19, 684, 564
Nevada
Oregon
California
Colorado
Utah
Idaho
Montan,'?,
W^yoraing
N e w Mexico
.Arizona
Dakota

6 17.

23,605,633
1.4, 905, 266
16, 635, 201
7, 389, 873
3, 231, 986
5, 602, 869
.3, 393, 501
1,514,621
895, 900

3 87
5 02
36
17
2 12
1 85
1 15
03

77,174, 850

% 057, 837
6, 782, 890 •
019, 286
131,087
1, 643,.200
1, 249, O O
O
198, 494
2, 770

2 49

| 0 50
.6 31
2. 43
3 43
2 81
8
8
6
.6
3
4
7
4
7

86
09
55
24
06
69
71
16
28

'""I'Js
0. 9
.0.8

,

T o t a l Pacific S t a t e s a n d
Territories

• .

_

1S74,

Per 'dt. Bzr .dt. P e r ct.
0.1
118. 9
1 , 3 . "".65.'5' • 83.2
127.4
0.7
«6. 0
35.9
64.3
a4

1.1

0.7

..€6.3

719.5

1.0
1.1
0.8
1.0
0.4
0.7
l,o
0.8
1.3

159.6
150. 9
31.4

80^. 8
•81. 5
^1.8
72.0
84.7
89.4
76.3
8.5.1
•87. 4

0.9

6 86

' 0.6

18
2 47

—_=_».

608,190
399, 659
88,300
266, 795
.54,000
267, 900

15 26
4 60
5.90
12 95
5 92
2 91

45, 000
1,962,708

G r a n d t o t a l of S t a t e s
238, 671, 210 348,791,152
and Territories

1862,

0.7
1.3
0.1
0:0
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.0

7, 864
225,000"

,
. . .

1874,

IJ.atio of circnl a t i o n t o capi*
tal.

"' *53. ,8
1.56. 5
62.4
. 5.3
125.4
'"."•~~

80.8
0.0
'90.0

3.0
2.4
L3
1.7
0.7
.0;€

• 71.5
88. 8
88.3
76.2
43.2
.89.3

3 1.7

0. 7

90.0

•2.O0
7 59

0.4^

0.1

79,3

9 04.

•
'

:::::::;

1.0

1.1

58.9

69.9

^ The circulation of t h e S t a t e banks in the year 1862 has been obtained from page 210 of tke report of
the Secretary of the Treasury on th© condition of the banks at the commencement of the year 1863.
The returns from Delaware, Maryland, Louisiana, Tennessee, and Kentucky w^ere not complete. The
aggregate amount of State bank ck-culatiou i"epoit«d at that time was niuch greater than at any previous
period.

REDEMPTION.

The amount of legal-tender notes authorized is $385,000,000; the
amouut of national-bank notes, $354,000,000. The amount of legal-tender notes, under the act of June 20,, 1874, cannot be reduced, but muvSt
remain continually in circulation; the ainount of national-bank notes,
however, may be reduced at the pleasure of the banks. If the value of
the paper dollar be determined by the amount of such money in circulation, then the national-bank note is more valuable than the legale
tender note. The national-bank notes outstanding are secured by a
deposit of more than $385,000,000 of United States bonds, which are at
a premium of .more than 12 per ceut. If the U.nited States bonds
be not of sufficient value to pay the notes, the capital and surplus of
the banks, amounting to $622,000,000, as well as their entire assetsj
are available for that purpose. The stockholders are individually liahle
for the full amouut of their stock, in addition to the amount invested ih
such shares, and the United States guarantees the final payment of the
notes. There are, then;, absolute assets for more than three times the




132

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

amountof the national-bank notes outstanding, available for the redemption of these notes, and, in addition, the contingent liability, of the
shareholders and the guarantee of their final payment by the United
States. It is certain, therefore, that the demand ibr legal-tender notes
in exchange for national-bank notes is not based on the conviction that
the former are more valuable than the latter.
Individuals may desire to exchangee nationaibank notes for legaltender notes, for the purpose of obtaining a legal tender for the payment of debts. National banks may desire to exchange the notes of
other banks for legal-tender notes, either because, under the law, legaltender uotes m^j be held as a portion of their reserve, or for the.purpose of obtaining new notes in place of those which are soiled and
mutilated.
If an individual shall desire legal-tender notes for the purppse of
making a lawful tender of money, such notes can readily be pbtained
in any reasonable amount, without charge, of any of the two thousand
national banks which are located in the several cities and villages of the
Union.
The act of June 20, 1874, which provides for the redemption of
national-bank notes with legal-tender notes at the Treasury, also reduces the amount of legal-tender notes required for the reserves of the
banks more than $20,000,000, or about one-sixth of the entire amount
so required. It also fixes the amount of legal-tender notes at $382,000,000,
an increase of $26,000,000; the demand for legal-tender notes by the
banks being,-therefore, under the operation of that act, largely reduced,
while at^the same time the supjjly is increased.
The exchange of national-bank notes for new notes at the Treasury
is, therefore^ chiefly desirable on account of their mutilated condition.
The national banks have held in their vaults during the last five years
about one-third of the entire amount of legal-tender notes issued, while
the whole issue of national-bank notes has been continually in circulation. While, therefore, a large portion of the legal-tender iiotes has
been unused, or not in active circulation, the entire amount of the
national-bank notes has been performing the functions of currency.
These notes have therefore beconie worn out and mutilated, so that the
substitution of new notes therefor'has become necessary. .
Previous to the organization of the national-banking system, the Suffolk Bank, of Boston, compelled the redemption of the notes of the Kew
England banks at par, in Boston, by a system of assorting and returning the notes4;o the place of issue; and by a similar method, with the
aid of legislation, the notes of the State of-New York were redeemed
at the commercial center at a discount of one-fourth of 1 percent.
These notes were redeemed in specie funds, and their redemption was
frequently demanded because specie funds were more desirable, and,
being more desirable, the redemption was a source of profit, directly or
indirectly, to the redemption-agents. But there are now in circulation
morethan seven thousand different kinds of notes, issued by twenty-two
hundred national banks, amounting to $351,927,246, and the notes of
each denomination of all the banks are so nearly alike that the process
of assorting and redemption is too burdensome and expensive to be voluntarily undertaken by the banks at the commercial center. The act of
June 20, therefore, wisely provides for the renovation of the circulation,
the expense of transi)ortation and assorting to be at the expense of the
banks. The chief object of the law was the purification ofthe circuiatiou, rather than its redemption, in the proper sense of that word. If,
lor example, the bank circulation of New England, amounting to



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

133

$110,000,000, consisted of worn-out notes, and the bank-circuiatiou of
the Middle States, amounting to $124,000,000 of notes in good condition,
and if the law provided for the redemption of the notes of the New England States in the notes of the Middle States at the Treasury, and also,
that the notes ofthe banks in the Middle States should be counted as
a reserve by the New England banks when held by them, an exchange,
or redemption, so called, of circulating-notes would take place similar to
that uow in operation.
No real redemption can be expected so long as the amouut of notes
to be redeemed is less than the amountof notes in which they are to be
redeemed. If Congress should provide for the withdrawal of legaltender notes and for the issue of national-bank notes, as needed, in place
thereof when the amountof legal-tender notes should be reduced to, say
$300,000,000, the legal-tender notes would then be in demand; and in
proportion as they should be reduced in amount the demand for them
would increase, until, finally, when the amount of bank-notes issued
should be largely in excess of the amount of legal-tender notes outstanding, the national-bank notes would themselves be withdrawn at
certain seasons of the year, on aecount of the difficulty or expense of
obtaining lawful money with which to redeem them. The gold coin of the
country would then make its appearance in answer to the detnand for
an additional amount of lawful money, and specie payment would follow. Eedemption, in its proper sense, implies the exchange of a promise
to pay for the thing promised—namely, coin^ or its representative which
is convertible into coin on demand. The efiect of such redemption is to
confine banks of issue to a legitimate business, which is the discounting
of commercial paper. If banks of issue are obliged to pay their circulating-notes once in sixty or ninety days, they must discount such promissory-notes only as will certainly be paid within that time. If tlie payment of bank-notes be frequently demanded, banks of issue cannot safely
invest their capital in real-estate loans, in doubtful stocks or bonds, in
accommodation notes which require renewah or in loans on doubtful security, but must have their capital at all times invested in loans whi.ch
will be promptly paid at maturit}^ Such a condition indicates a healthful business, and promotes sound banking; and.the reduction of the
amount of legal-tender notes, accompanied with such increase of national-bank notes as may be required, will secure a i^roper system of redemption, render free banking practicable, and gradually restore specie
payments without necessarily decreasing the amount of the circulating
medium.
The Treasurer, on June 25th, last, issued a circular to the national
banks, requesting them to deposit 5 per cent, on their circulation with
him, as provided in section 3 of the act of June 20; and on the 1st day
of August nearly the whole amount (-$16,524,583) had been received,
since which time the banks have, with but few exceptions, promptly
responded to the requisitions of the Treasurer. Some delay occurred
in the office of the Treasurer at the outset, on account of a lack of
force and the difficulty of assorting, but the work of purifying the
currency is now iu successful operation, and. since the passage of the
act $19,773,220 of multilated notes have been delivered by the Treasurer
to the Comptroller for destruction.
Circulars have been issued to all the national banks,^ requesting them
to designate the denominations of new notes to be issued in place of
the notes destroyed, which new notes are promptly transmitted to the
banks immediately upon receiving notice from the Treasurer that he
has been reimbursed for the amount redeemed as required by law ; and



134

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

it is probable that duiing the next year about $120,000,000 wiH be
delivered to this Office for the same purpose, and new notes issued
therefor.
The redemption, or, more properly, tbe excbange of mutilated nationalbank notes for new issues will continue in large amounts until the
nationabbank notes shall have been rendered fit for circulation, i>vh,en
the demand for such exchange will depend almost entirely upon the
demand for legal-tender notes by the national banks as a reserve^
which demand, as has been seen,, has been largely reduced by the provisious of the new act.
The new notes are being issued with the charter-number conspicuously
printed upon them in two places, which will hereafter greatly Simplify
and^ lessen the labor of assorting them. Tn the course of about three
years the entire volume of national-bank notes will have been renewed,
after which, if the amount of legal tenders shall be reduced, a true system of redemption may be inaugurated, through which the notes w^ill
be assorted and returned to the place of issue by the banks at the commercial centers.
.
The following table exhibits the amount of mutilated notes returned
to this Office for destruction, yearly, during the twelve years since the
organization of the national banking system, from w^hieh it will be
seen that $185,354,386, or more than one-half of the whole amount outstanding, has been so returned for destruction, of which $167,520,535
has been destroyed during the last ^ve years:
Previons to Nov.ember 1, 1865
During t h e y e a r euding October
Dnrinj^ tlie year endin t^ October
During the year ending October
During'theyear ending October
During the year ending October
During tbe vear ending October
D u r i n g t h e yearending October
During tho year endiDg October
During the year ending October
Under act. June 20, 1874.
Additional amount destroyed of
Total.;...........*..

.
31, 1866
31, 1867
31, 1868
31, 1869..31, 1870
3l', 1871
31, 1872.
31, 1873
31, 1874

,

notes of banks in liquidation
..'.

:.

... . . . . . .

$175,490
1,050,382
3,401, 423
4,602, 825
' 8,603,729
14,305,689
24.344, 047
30,211,729
36,433,171
31,349,253
19,773,229
11,103,435
185,354,386

RESERYE.

The national-bank act required that the national banks in New York
City should hold, in lawful money, an amount equal to at least 25 per
cent, of their deposits and circulation as a reserve-fund ; tbat the banks
in the other redeeming cities should also hold 25 per cent, of their
deposits and circulation as a reserve, but that '^each of such associations may keep one-half of its lawful-money reserve in. cash-deposits in
the city of New York.'^ Every other association was required 'Ho have on
hand, in lawful money of the United States, an ainount equal to at least;
15 per cent, of the aggregate amount of its notes in circulation and of
its deposits/' three-fifths of which amount could consist of balances due
from approved associations in the redemption cities. The act of June
20, 1874, repealed the provision requiring the national banks to hold
reserve upon circulation. It also provides that the national banks shall
at all times have on deposit in the Treasury of the United States,-in
lawful inoney, a sum equal to 5 per cent, of their circulation, to be held
and used for the redemption of such circulation, which amount is
authorized to be counted as a part of the lawful reserve on deposits;
the circulation ofthe banks to be redeemed only at the counter of the



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

135

bank and at the Treasury. The act abolished the agencies at which the
circulation had been previously redeemed; and a strict construction
of its provisions would require national banks, not located in the redemption cities, to hold in their own vaults the whole amount of their reserve,
except the 5 per cent, upon circulation which is to be kept on
deposit in the Treasury. The banks in the redemption cities are, however, still authorized ''to keep one-half of their lawful-money reserve in
cash-deposits in the city of New York." The bill which passed the House
dimng the last session provided " that sections thirty-one and thirtytwo of the national-bank act be amended by requiring that each of the
said associations shall keep its lawful-money reserve within its own
vaults at the place where its operations of discount and deposit are
carried on.'' This bill, as subsequently amended and passed by the
Senate, contained substantially the same provision, but it was finally
lost in the House and went to a conference committee, which committee
reported the present law, omitting the clause last quoted. It is true
that the act, as approved, abolishes the redemption agencies; but as
banks located in the redemption cities are still authorized by the act previously in force to hold one-half of their reserve in the city of New York,
the Comptroller construed the intent and ineaning of the act to be to
abolish the reserve on circulation, and to authorize the 5-per-cent. deposit
in the Treasury to be counted as a part of the reserve on deposits, the
remainder of the reserve to be held, as formerly, in the vaults of the
banks and with their reserve .agents, as provided by sections 31 and 32
of the national-bank act.
3ince the passage of the act two reports have been made by.the
national banks of the country; one on the 26th day of June, a few" days
after its passage, and the other on the 2d day of October.
The reports of the condition of the banks on October 2,1874, vShow
that the amountof lawful-money reserve required under the actof June
20^ 1874, was, for country banks, $43,800,033, of which $12,763,448 was
required to be kept on hand, and $115891,414 in the Treasury to redeem
circulation. .For banks in redemption cities the necessary reserve was
f 53,738,050, of which $25,019,991 was required to be keptjon hand, and
$3,698,078 in the Treasury to redeem circulation; and for banks in New
York City the reserve required was $51,155,072, of which $49,690,456
was required to be kept on hand, and $1,464,616 in the Treasury to
redeem cireolation. Under tbe act of June 20,1874, therefore, the whole
amount of legal-tender notes required to be held was: in the vaults of the
banks $87,473,895, and in the Treasury $17,054,108—in all $104,528,003.*
*Iif:" the amount and the distribution of the reservoB held hy the national banks under the national
bank act bad beeu in precise accordance with the i equirements and provisions thereof, the minimum of
(Cash. rfSserve releaeed under the operation of the act of Juue 20,1874, would be, on the basis of tlie figpres of the report for October 2, 1874: for New York City banks, 25 per cent, of their circnlation, or
f.6,322,94.5; for banks in otber redemption cities, 15| i^ev cent, of their circulation, or $11,207,103; and
for .country Jjanks, 7 13.32 per cent, of their circulation, or $17,338,041; in all, 1^34,868,089.
For example;: If a bank'"in Ifew York had a circulation of, say, $1,000,000, it held thereon, under tho
nataon.al-bank act, a reeer^^e of 25 per cent., or $250,000, all of which ie now released.
If" ^ b a n k in any of the otlier redemption cities had a circulation of, say, $400,000, it held a reserve of
25 per cent., ,or .$ 100,000, but only one-ti.alf of thi^, or $.50,000, on hand, while the other half could have
been deposifced in Jfew Yopk, ttie Ifew York bank holding 25 per cent, of this half as reserve. Now,
there is released the $50,000 ^eld on ha.ud, and in addition tjje 25 per cent, reserve which the New York
bank would have held for the deposit made with it, or 25 per ce»t. of $50,000, which being added to the
first'Uamed $.50,000 makes $62,500, or 15| per cent, of tlje circulation of the redemption city bank. *
If a country bank had a circulation of, say, $100,000, it held thereon a reserve of 15 per cent., or
$15,000, but only ^2-5 of this, or $6,000, on hand ; wljile the remaining 3.-5 could have been deposited in a
redemption city bank. Thie latter bank would haye held a reserve of 25 per cent, of the amount deposited, one-half cin hand, and one-lialf in New York, and on the last portion the New York bank in tui-n
would have held a reserve of 25 per cent.; so that there is now released the 6 per cent., or $6,000, held
on hand by the country bank, the one-half of the reserve ibr the remainder held by the redemption city '
bank, equal to 1| per cent., or $1,125, and the reserve for the still remaining amount held by the New
York bauk, equ.sil to 9-32 pe;: iient,, Of f281,2;5; Jn ajl^ $7^406.25, or 7 X3.-32 pep .cent, of tlje .coun'tfy bank's
(girciiJation,




136

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Under the national bank-act previously in force, the ainount necessary for reserve would have been, at that date, (October 2, 1874,)
for country banks, $78,915,055, the proportion to be kept on hand being
$31,566,022 5 for bauks in the redemption cities $71,669,424^ the proportion to be kept on hand bein^' $35,834,712, and for banks in New
York City $57,478,017, all of which must have been kept on hand. The
whole amount of legal-tender money required to be held in the vaults of
the banks under the national-bank act would, therefore, have been
$124,878,751, from which, deducting the amount required to be keptJ^on
hand and in the Treasury, under the law now in force ($104,528,003), it
will be seen that legal-tender notes to the amount of $20,350,748 are released from the reserves of the banks, as is shown by the following
table, which also exhibits the whole amount of reserve held October 2,
1874, and the various items composing it.
•

E e s e r v e required.
L o c a t i o n of b a n k s .
A c t o f NationJ u n e al-bank
20,1874. a c t .

Legal-tender reserve required. Legaltender
reserve
KeA c t o f J u n e 20,1874.
released
^erve
Nation- b y a c t
held.
ai-bank of J u n e
In the
In
T r e a s - Total.
act. 20,1874.
bank. ury. '

Classification of reserve held.
Due
Other
from Specie. l a w f u l
ageuts.
money.

.mUiong-. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millions. Millioiis. Millions. Millions.

S t a t e s /and T e r r i tories
43.8
E e d e m p t i o n cities. "53.7
N e w Y o r k C i t y . . . 51.2
Total

148.7

78.9
71.7
57.4

100.4
74.7
68.3

12.8
2.5.0
49.7

11.9
3.7
L5

24.7
28.7
51.2

31.6
.35.8
57. 5

6.9
7.1
6.3

52.7
31.1

2.2
3.2
14.4

45.5
40.4
53. 9

208.0

243.4

87.5

17.1

104.6

124.9

20.3

83.8

19.8

139.8

The following table exhibits the amount of liabilities and reserve
held by national banks at three periods of each year, from 1870 to the
present time:
STATES AND TEREITORIES, EXCLUSIVE OE BEDEMPTION-CITIES.

Dates.

March 24,1870.......
J u n e 9,1870
October 8,1870
A p r i l 2.5,1871
J u n e 10,1871
October 2,1871
A p r i l 19,1872
J u n e 10, 1872
O c t o b e r 3,1872

Classification of r e s e r v e .
Liabilities.
NumR e s e r v e E e s e r v e E a t i o of
b e r of
r e q ' r e d . held. . r e s e r v e . D u e
Other
b a n k s . Circula- N e t de- Total.
from
Specie: lawful
tion.
posits.
money.
agents.

1,397
• 1, 396
1, 400
1,482
1, 497
1, 537

1, 616
1,'62<3
1,689
1, 732
A p r i l 2.5, 1873
1,737
J u n e 13,187.}
S e p t e m b e r 12,1873 . 1, 747
M a v 1,1874
1, 7.51
June'26,1874
1, 755
1,774
October 2,1874




Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Percent. Millions MiUions SliUions
60.822.8
189.0
216.1
92.4
50.1
39.0.
40.5.1
3.3
22.6
188.7
219.1
61.2
92.0
49.0
2.9
40.1
407.8
20.9
2.4
189.8
216.2
44.1
37.3
406.0
60.9
84.8
235.8
202.8
241.1
204. 2
210. 2. ; 257.4
267. 3
220.1
268.8
222.0
282.1
227.3

438. 6
445.3
467.6
487. 4
490.8
509.4

231. 9
232. 8
233.1

390.7
294. 9
303. 8

522.6
527. 7
536. 9

23.5.8
235.4
234.1

286. 2
237.4
293.4

522.0
522. 8
527.5

65.8
66. 8
70.1
73.1
73.6
70.4
78.4
79.2
80.6
78. 4 '
78.5
79.2

93.7
101.7
98.9
98.0
101.8
97.8
105.7
108.9
110.5

22.6
22.8
21.2
20.2
20.7
19.2

5.5.7
59. 3
55.6

112. 6
111.5
100.6

40.5
40.4
4L5

52.2
57. 852.5

2.5
2.0
1.8
2.6
1.9
2.0

20.9
20.6
20.6

59.0
62.3
63. 9

1.6
1.7
2 1

45.1
•44. f>
44.5

21.6
21.3
19.1

60.1
62.0
52.7

2.4
2.2
2.4

• .50.1
47.3
• 45.5

43.2
42.1
43.3

137

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
EEDEMPTION CITIES.

•|
Classification of r e s e r v e .

Liabilities.
NumE e s e r v e E e s e r v e E a t i o of
b e r of
req'red.
held.. r e s e r v e .
Circulab a n k s . t i o n . N e t de- T o t a l .
posits.

Dates.

Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Percent. Millions Millions •Millions
56.4
70.9
3L4
225. 7
23.3
8.2
. 39.4
69.3
156.4
59.3
75.3
237.1
31.8
25.6
44.3
69.0
5.4
168.1
54.2
63.7
216. 7
22.2
69.1
29.4
3.0
38.5
147.6
29.4
62.8
79.1
31.5
171
71.6
251.2
3.9
179.6
• 45.8
65 6
83.1
31.7
33.1
172
72.5
262.4
189.9
2.8
47.2
65.7
75.3
176 , '74.6
262. 7
28.7
31.2
188.1
42.6
1.5
71.4
27.4
260.5
651
29.9
176
76.6
5.1
36.4
183.9
274.9
79.1
.33.7
68.7
28.8
42.6
176
76.8
198.1
2.8
257.7
28.2
64.4
66.8
- 36. 7
179.6
25 9
L9
78.1
180
72.4
26.4
29.8
68.6
40; 4
78.2
196.0
274.2
2.2
181
28.0
288.7
72. 2
34.9
43.2
78.2
210.5
80.8
2.7
182
26.1
275. 3
68.8
36.3
77.8
197.5
32.3
3.2
. 181
71.8
33.7
2W.9
72.1
84.2
29.2
4.5.4
179
288.2
5.1
77.3
35 5
47.4
180
219.1
296.0
74.0
87.4
29.5
76.9
4.5
293.1
31.1
40.4
182
73.1
218.5
73.3
76.0
25 9
4.5
164
162
161

M a r c h 24,1870
J u n e 9,1870
October 8,1870
A p r i l 29.1871
J u n e 10,1871
O c t o b e r 2,1871

Due
> Other
from
Specie. lawful
money.
agents.

:

A p r i l 19,1872
J u n e 10,1872
O c t o b e r 3,1872
A p r i l 25,1873
J u n e 13. 1873
S e p t e m b e r 12,1873 .
M a y l , 1874
J u n e 26,1874
October 2,1874

N E W YOEK- C I T Y . '
Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Percent. Millions Millions Millions
220.3
72.3
' 32.8
24.5
34.2
186.1
55.1
47.8
223. 4
72.4
18.8
3.3.5
189. 9
55.9
32.4
53.6
192. 7
54.9
9.1
32.9
159.8
48.2
45 8
28. 5
53." 8 "
65 7
2.26. 9
.56.7
29.0
11.9
31.8
195.1
65. 276.6
31.7
242.0
60.5
11.4
31.0
211.0
.50.5
.59.2
26.7
22L9
55 5
8.7
30.6
191.3
5,3.4
200.6
26.6
11.9
41.5
50.1
28.6
172.0
65 6
29.1
225 2
15 2
50.4
196.9
56.3
28.3
45 4
24.4
158.0
186.1
6.4
39. 0 .
46.5
28.4

M a r c h 24,1870 . . . .
J u n e 9,1870
O c t o b e r 8,1870 . . . .
A p r i l 29,1871
J u n e 10,1871
O c t o b e r 2,1871
A p r i l 19,1872
J u n e 10,1872
October 3 , 1 8 7 2 . . . .

28.0
27.7
28.2
27.2
26.2
25 3

A p r i l 25,1873
J u n e 13,1873
S e p t e m b e r 12,1873
M a y 1,1874
J u n e 26,1874
October 2,1874

163.6
186.5
172.0
207.6
206.4
204.6

191. 6
214.2
• 200. 2
234. 8
232. 6 •
229.9

47.9
53.6
50.0

47.3
64.4
46.9

24.7
30.1
23.4

1,3.1
23.6
14.6

34.2
40.8
32.3

58.7
58.1
57.5

71.3
71.8
68.3

30.4
.30.9
29.7

25 0
15 5
14.4

46.3
56.3
53.9

SUMMAEY.

M a r c h 24.1870
J u n e 9,1870
O c t o b e r 8,1870 . . . .
A p r i l 29,1871
J u n e 10,1871
O c t o b e r 2,1871

1,615
1,612
1,615
1,707
1, 723
1,767

A p r i l 19,1872
1,843
J u n e 10,1872
1. 853
October 3,1872
1,919
A p r i l 25,1873
1,962
J u n e 13,1873
1,968
S e p t e m b e r 12,1873 . 1,976
M a y 1,1874
1, 978
J u n e 26,1874
1,983
2,004
O c t o b e r 2,1874

Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Percent. Millions Millions Millions
172. 3
27.7
126. 1
55P. 6
851.1
235 5
7.3.4
292. 5
36.0
176.3
27.6
138.1
577.2
868. 4
239. 8
291. 2
74.6
27.1
163. 8 • 203. 4
24.9
122.6
523. 5
815 3
291.8
14:5
66.3
916. 6
185. 3
243.5
140.1
306.1
610.5
26.6
85 1
18.3
261.4
641.9
949.7
192. 9
1.52. 8
307.8
27.5
92.4
16.2.
233.4
636.7
952.2
191.3
134.5
315.5
24.5
86.9
12:0
623. 2
948.5
188.4
23.5
121.2
325 3
222. 9
82.1
19.6
990.9
198.6
246.5
24.9
20.0
134.9
327.1
663.8
91.6
209.9
10.2
953.3 ' 187.4
22.1
119.0
333.5
80.7
619.8
338.1
338.8
339.1

988. 4
650.3
691.9 1, 030. 7
673. 3 1,012.4

340.3
338.5
332. 5

704.7 1, 045 0
713. 0 1,051.5
716.5 1,050.5

194.9
204.9
199. 5
209.1
210.6
210.0

225. 4
254.1
229.1

22.8
24.7
22.6

268.1
270.7
244. 9

25 7
25 7
23.3

.

.88.8
97.1
96.1

16.9
28.0.
19 9.

.119. 7
129. 0
113. 1

•93.8
97.5
83.8

32.5
22.3
21.3

141.8
1.50. 9
139.8

A table compiled from reports made to the New York clearing-house,
will also be found in the appendix, showing ih^ average liabilities and
reserves of the national banks in ISTew York Gity, weekly, during tbe
months of September and October for the past fLWii years.
These tables show that while the deposits of national banks have,
during thelast year, been much greater than the average since the
organization of the system, the amount of lawful money held by them
has also been much greater, the reserve in their own vaults being, at
the date of their last reports, $55,000,000, and the total reserve
$94,700,000, in excess of the requirements of the present act.



1S8

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

One result of a financial crisis is a temporary contraction of the business of the country, so that a less amount of currency is needed.
Hitherto, daring financial crises, a large number of banks of issue have
failed, and their circulating-notes have consequently been withdrawn 5
but no such reduction of currency followed the panic of September, 1873.
Since.that date fourteen national banks have failed, the aggregate capital of which was $4,075,000, but the notes of these banks have continued in circulation as previously; nnd as both the national-bank notes
and legal-tender ifotes have been increased, the volume of palmer currency in circulation is greater than previous to the panic. Until the
business of the country shall again resume its former activitj^, or a portion of .the circulation shall be withdrawn, there will continue to be a
redundancy, which is evident fromthe fact that, notwithstanding, the
amendment to the act releasing reserve upon circulation, and the low
rates of interest which have prevailed a t t h e commercial centers during
the year, the banks held at the date of the last report a larger amount
of cash than at any corresponding period for the last fiive years. The full
effect of the act of June 20, 1874, which releases the reserve upon circulation, cannot, therefore, be ascertained from the reports of the banks
until the business of the country shall be restored to its normal condition. A complete table showing the liabilities and the amount and different kinds of reserve of the national banks at ^ve different periods
since the date of the last annual report, and the aggregate amount held
at different periods since January 6,1868, will be found in the appendix.
TAXATION, EARNINGS, AND BIYIBENDS.

National banks pay the followitig taxes tothe Treasurer of the United
States: One per cent., annually, on circulation outstanding, one-half of
one per cent., annually, on deposits, and one-half of one per cent.,,
annually, on capital not invested in United States bonds. These taxes
are payable semiannually.
The following table exhibits the amount of taxes^* collected by the
Treasurer, annually, from the organization of the system to July 1,187 4:
• Year.
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
187.4.,

On circulation.

.•
:
,,..

Total

$.53, 009
733, 247
2,106, 785
2, 868, 636
2, 946, 343
2, 957, 416
2, 949, 744
2,987^021
3,193,570
. 3, 353,186
3, 404, 483

97
59
30
78
07 .
73
13
69
03
13
11

27,553,531 53

On deposits.

On capital,

$95,. 811
1,087,530
2, 633, 1U2
2, 650,180
2, 564,143
2, 614, 553
2, 614, 767
2,802,840
3,120, 984
3,196, 569
3, 209, 967

$18, 402
133, 251
406,947
321, 881
306,781
312, 918
375,962
. 385, 292
389, 356
454, 891
' 469, 048

25
86
77
07
44
58
61
85
37
29
72

26,590,. 451 81

•

Aggregate,

2!8
15
74.
36
67
68
2613
27
51
02

$161,310 45
1,954,029 605 146 735 81
5, 840, 698 21
.5, 817, 268 18
5,. 884, 888 99
5 940'473 70:
6,175,154 67
6, 703, 910 67
7, 004, 646 93
7, 083, 398 85

3, 574, 733 02

57,718,616 06

* The amount collected by the Coaimissiouer of Internal Revenue from State banks,
savings-banks, and private banks and bankers, during the fiscal year ended June 30,
' 1874, Was as follows:
«
.
'
Deposits
-..,.,
,..
, , : - . . . ^^2,067,118 77
Deposits of saviugs bauks having.uo capital
.^^
,
386,425 49
Capital'
,
916,878 15
Circulation
,.
,
„,,
^16,738 26
Total

'.

^.

,._..,.,

3,387,160 67

* Of this amount, $7,306.77 was derived from the tax of 10 per ceut. u^Don unauthorized circulation.



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

139

The national banks, prior to May 1,1871, paid to the Commissioner of
Internal Eevenue a license, or special tax, of two dollars on each $1,000 of
capital, and an income-tax on net earnings to December 31, 1871. The
special or license-tax, from May 1, 1864, to May 1', 1871, amounted to
$5,322,688 5 the income-tax, from March 1, 1869, to September 1, 1871,
amounted to $5,539,289. The total amount of tax paid to the Government bv the national banks, from the organization of the systein to Julv
1, 1874," is, therefore, $68,580,595.
•
The Comptroller, in his report for 1867, made a careful statement of
the taxes collected from national banks under State laws for the year
1866, the information being derived from specific returnsof about fourteen
hundred national bauks, the minimum rate in each State being estimated
for those banks which made no returns. A similar statement was also^
made for the year ending December 31, 1867, and for the year ending
September 30, 18695 from- which is derived the following summary:
State taxes paid in 1866..
State taxes paid in 1868 . . .
State taxes paid in 1869 - • . . . . . _ . . .

$7,949,451
8,813,126
8,271,734

The State assessors of New York, in their report for 1873, state that
^ a very small portion of the capital employed by private bankers is
^
assessed. The reason usually given the assessor in such cases is that the
capital is all invested in (a-overnment bonds. * * * Merchants and
those engaged in mercantile pursuits pay little or no tax on capital, usually holding that their indebtedness amounts to as much as their capital.
In the city of New Tork and a few^ other places the shares of national
banks are assessed at par value. In the city of Hudson one bank pays
tax on 120 j^er eent. of its capital. Two or three rates in the same
county are not unusual. The Bank of Commerce in the city of New
York paid more tax in 1872, on a capital of $10,000,000, than any one
of thirty-fi.ve counties in the State. * * * There are in the State sev•
eral banks or' banking-houses of foreign states and Canada, seeking
and,receiving protection by our laws and from our courts, police, and
citizens, that are not taxed. * ^ ^ The.amountof taxes paid by insurance companies in proportion to their capital and business is almost
infinitesimal.
Comparatively few 'make proper and legal returns
required of incorporated companies for purposes of taxation. It is estimated that the aggregate capital of incorporated companies doing
business in this State and subject to taxation is about $2,000,000,000.
A small percentage on this sum, if paid directly into the State treasury,
would relieve the real estate from all State tax. The amount assessed
to savings-banks is comparatively nothing, and found on the tax-rolls
of only two or three counties."
The same system of assessment and taxation described by the assessors of the State of New York prevails to a great extent in every other
State of the Union. The national banks make frequent returns of their
condition to this Office, and section 40 of the nationahbank act requires
that a full and correct list of the names and residences of all shareholdersof national banks shall be kept in the offices where their business is transacted, and shall be subject to the inspection of officers authorized to assess
taxes under State laws. While few corporations make correct returns
of their true condition for the purpose of taxation, the data for the
assessment and taxation of national banks can always be obtained.
The ratio of taxation under State laws during the last year upon bank
capital in New York City was about 2.80 per cent. 5 in Buff'alo, Albany
and Troy, 4 to 5 per ceut.^ Boston, 2.345 Baltimore, 2.535 Cincinnati,




140

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

2.57; Chicago, 2.34; Saint Louis, 2.44; Eichmond, 2.07; Saint Paul,
3 ; Charleston, 3.50 ; Memphis, 3.20.
The.aver age rate of taxation assessed upon the capital of the national banks of the 'country is estimated at from three to three and onehalf per cent. Eeal-estate and personal property generally are assessed
at not more than one-third of their actual value, but bank-shares are
usually assessed at their full value; and there is no doubt that the ratio
of taxation of the national banks is greater than that of any other
species of property.
The amount of internal-revenue tax derived from the sale of the twocent stamp affixed to sight drafts and checks was, for 1874, $1,502,549.
This stamp-taxis to a considerable extent evaded b y t h e banks, and
more frequently by depositors, by drawing post-notes, or bills of exchange at one day's sight, instead of on demand, and by substituting
receipts for checks. It is recommended that the two-cent stamp tax be
repealed; or if not repealed, that it be so amended as to require a
stamp-tax upon all checks and drafts, and upon receipts in place pf
checks drawn upon banks and bankers, with a penalty of twenty
dollars provided for each violation thereof.
The act of March 3, 1869, required specific returns to be made of the
dividends and net earnings of the national banks, after the declaration
of each dividend.
From these returns the following table has been prepared, exhibiting
the aggregate capital and surplus, total dividends,* and total net earnings
of the national banks, wdth the ratio of dividends to capital, dividends
to capital and surplus,, and earnings to capital and surplus, for each
half year, commencing March 1, 1869, and ending September 1, 1874 ;
from which it will be seen that the average dividends upon capital durin the last year were less than ten per cent., while the ratio of dividends to caijital and surplus was less than eight per cent.
* Th© following statemeut of the ten principal joint-stock banks of London, including their-branches, exhibiting the capital, reserve, deposits, net profits, and dividends
of each for the half year previous to July 1, 1874, has been compiled from balancesheets of the banks published in the London Economist of October 17, 1874.

No.

1
2
3
fl

6
7
8
9
10

Banks.

Capital
and
surplus.

Proportion of dividend to capital for half year e n d i n g ProporDeposits Net prof- tion of
and
its for net profJ u n e 30, Dec. 31, J u n e 30, Dec. 31, J u n e 30, Dec. 31,
acceptance.^. half year. its to
1874.
capital.
1872.
1873.
1873.
1872.
1871.

London and Westminster c£3,046,1.50 c£32,216.834 ^£223,370
1.705,283 21,870;615
139.221
London .Joint Stock
125,830
1,912,305 22,116,376
London and County
19,208,383 140,484
r, 84.5,000
7,1.50.056
31,215
770,000
City
2,670;419
26,989
755,000
Imperial, limited
London and Southwest175,180
856,406
7.200
905,000
3,108,930
Con-?olidated, limited
43,842
1]6,.500
711,832
5,5/0
Central, limited
970,000
2,484,863
35,722
Alliance, limited
Totals
Bank of England, Angust
31, 1874




P e r cent. P e r cent. P e r cent. P e r cent. P e r cent P e r cent, P e r cent.
2yer a n n . p e r a n n . •per a n n . ver a n n . per a n n . per a n n . 2)er a n n .
22 34
20
20
20
24
20
18
23.20
20
25
20
25
20
25 5-6
19.74
20
20
20
20
20
19
20.14
20
20
• 20
20
20
20
10.40
10
10
10
10
10
9
8.00
8
8
8
8
8
•G
8.66
10.96
11.14
8.93

7
10
8
8

12,200,418

112,394,714

779,445

17.30

*25,905,036

699,523

9.60

10

6
9
8
7

6
9
8
7

5
8
8
6

10

10

10

10

15.94

17,557,926

7
10
8
8

• Public and other deposits, October 14, 1874.
^

7 1-2
6
5

141

COMPTEOLLEE OF THE CUEEENCY.
•
P e r i o d of s i x No. of
m o u t h s end- b a n k s .
ing-

Sept.
Mar.
Sept.
Mar.
Sept.
Mar.
Sept.
Mar.
Sept.
Mar.
Sept.

1,1869.
1,1870.
1,1870.
1,1871.
1,1871.
1,1872.
1,1872.
1,1873
1,1873.
1,1874.
1,1874.

Capital.

1, 481 $401, 650, 802
1, 571
416, 366, 991
1,601
425, 317,104
1,605
428, 699, 165
1,693
445, 999, 264
1, 7.50 • 450,693,706
1,-852
465,676. 023
1, 912
475, 918, 683
1, 955
488,100,951
1,967
489,510,323
1, 971
489, 938, 284

Surplus.

T o t a l dividends.

Total net
earnings.

$82,105, 848 $21, 767, 831 $29, 221,184
86,118, 210 21, 479, 095 28, 996, 934
91, 630, 620 21, 080, 343 26,813,885
94, 672, 401 22, 205,150 27, 243,162
98, 286, 591 22,125, 279 27,315,311
99, 431, 243 22,859, 826 . 27, 502, 539
105., 181, 942 23,. 827, 289 30, 572, 891
314,257,288 24, 826, 061 31, 926, 478
118,11.3, 848 24,823,029. 33.122, 000
123,469, 859 23,. 529, 998 29, 544,120
128,364, 039 24, 929, 307 30, 036, 811

KATIOS.

Dividends to
caiDifcal.

Divid'nds
to capital
a u d surplus.

P e r ct.
5.42
5.16
4.' 96
5.18
4.96
,5.07
.5.12
5.22
5.09
4.81
5.09

P e r ct.
4.50
4.27
4.08
4.24
4.07
4.16
4.17
4.21
4.09
3.84
4.03

Earnings
to c a p i t a l
a n d surplus.

Perct
.

6.04
5.77
5.19
5.21
5.02
5.00
5.36
.5.41
5.46
4.82
4.86

The following tahle exhibits, in a coucise form, the ratio of dividends
to capital, of dividends to capital and surplus, and of net earnings to capitaL and surplus, of the national hanks in every State of the Union and
in the redeeming-cities, semi-annually, from March ,1, 1869, to September 1, 1874.




142

'

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.'

Table exhibiting, by States and redemption-cities, the ratios of dividends to capital, and
E a t i o s of d i v i d e n d s t o c a p i t a l , for si.x m o n t h s ending—

States, Teirito- 1869.
ries, and cities.

1870.

jsept. M a r .
1.

^ Maine
2 ]^ew H a m p s l i i r e
o
a V e rsma cnht u s e t t s . .
4 Ma s
Boston
5
6 I l h o d e Lsland . . .
7 Connecticut
8 New York
New York City
9
10
Albanv
N e w Jei'sey
11
12 P e n n s y l v a n i a . . .
13
Philadelphia..
Pittsburgh . . .
14
15 D e l a w a r e
16 M a r y l a n d
Baltimore
17
JO D i s t of Columhia
Washington ..
19
20 V i r g i n i a
21 W e s t V i r g i n i a . .
9:^> N o r t h C a r o l i n a . .
23 South C a r o " i n a . .
24 G e o r g i a
25 A l a b a m a
New Orleans..
26
07 T e x a s
28 A r k a n s a s
29 K e n t u c k y
Loui.sville
30
31 T e u n e s s e e
32 Ohio
Cincinnati
33
C lev elan t
34
35 I n d i a n a .
36 I l l i n o i s .
Chicago
37
,38 M i c h i g a n
Detroit
39
40 W i s c o n s i n
Milwaukee
41
42 I o w a
43 M i n n e s o t a
44 M i s s o u r i
45 . S a i n t L o u i s . . .
46 K a n s a s .
Leavenworth .
47
4ft N e b r a s k a
49
50
51
,53 (^'/Olorado
54 U t a h
.55
Idaho
57 M o n t a n a
58
59
Averages

\p'r ct.
5.2
4.9
4.9
5.4
5.5
4:4
5.0
4.9
.5.2
5.3
5.7
5.'5
6.1
5.5
.5.7
5.6
5.4

1.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1869.

1870.

1871.

S e p t M a r . S.ept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r
1.
1..
1.
L
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1. • 1.
1.

PV ct. P'rct P'r ct.
5.1 5.2 5.2
5.0 4.8 4.8
5.0 5.3 4.7
5.3 5.0 5.4
4.9 4.9 4.9
4.5 4.4 4.4
5.3 5.2 5.3
4.3 4.4 4.8
4.9 4.6 4.7
.5.1 5.3 .5.3
5.8 5. 4 5.6
5.6 5.6 •5. 3
6.0 5.8 4. 9
5.1 5.2 5.1
5.4 5.5 5.1
5.7 5.2 5.6
5.4 5.0 4.8

P'r ct.
5.1
4.7
4.8
•5.3
4.8
4.3
5.2
4.4
4.7
4.9
.5.1
5.2
5.7
.5.4
5.1
5.2
4.7

P'r ct.
5.1
4.8
4.S
5.4
4.7
4.4
5.2
4.7
4.9
4.1
5.7
5.4
5.7
5.4
5.1
5.1
5.1

5.0
4.7
5.3
4.3
6.0
9.3
4.7
6.1 G. 1 6.1
4.3 13.8 L 9

5.0
4.3
4.1
4.4
5.4
5.3
5.6
5.2
5.9

2.6
4.6
5.4
6.0
5.4
4.9
3.4
5.6
4.4

5.0 5.0
.5.1 .5.5
5.2 5.0
7.3 .5.6
5.8 13.6
6.4 5.7
5.0
6.7

1871.

E a t i o s of d i v i d e n d s t o

5.0
4.9
5.0
4.1
5.5
5.6

5.2 .5.2 5.0
.5.3 5.6 5. 3
7.9 10.3 5.9
5.8 5.1 4.8
6.4 5.7 5.7
5.7 5.6 3.8
5.6 5.4 5.2
7.0 6.3 6.6
6.3 3.2 2.7
7.4 0.1 5.6
4.6 5.0 5.0
6.5 6.2 5.9
5.7 4.3 4.68.0 6.4 5.4
6.9 7.0 5.5
6.2 5.2 6.3
5.1 4.2 3.7
5.4 6.4 7.6
10.0 10.0 22.4
7.5 7.1 •4.0
15.0 15.0

5.0 4.6 .4.2
5.0 11.0 5.4
8.6 5.6 5.8
5.7 5.6 5.8
4.8 5.4 4.9
3.0 3.9 4.2
0.0 5.6 5.4
6.3 6.1 5.7
4.8 5.0
6.1 5.1 6.5
.5.0 5.0 .5.3
9.8 4 . 1 4.9
.5.3 4.6 4.9
5.8 5.1 4.8
8.1 6.9 .5.2
17.3 5.3 5.2
3.1 3.3 3.2
6.1 5.6 4.6
8.0 5.0 10.0
6.2 6.2 7.1
4.0 6.0

5.7

4.0
8.6

2.9

0.8
7.0
2.5
50.0

P'r cl. P'r ct.
5.5 5.5
4.7 4.3
4.7 5.3
5. 5 5.4
4.4 4.9
4.4 4.5
.5.4 .5.2
5.1 4.6
4.8 4.7
5.4 4.9
5.3 5.4
5.0 5.2
5.8 5.8
5.5 .5.6
5.1 5.1
5.2 5.0
.5.1 5.0
4.0 4.0
5.0 4.6
4.8 4.1
5.3 5.4
5.3 5.5
4.2 4.8
5.3 5.2
4.3 .5.0
5 . 3 ' 3.4
11.2 3.9
3.3
4.8 4.9 4.7
5.0 5.1 4.5
6.0 .5.6 5.7
6.0 5.7 5.6
5.4 4.9 5.5
5.1 4.9 4.7
5.9 6.5 .5.2
5.5 5.6 6.2
•6.2 4.1 5.1..
6.1 6.2 .5.5
5.0 5.9 .5.5
4.9 5.5 5.3
19.0 ,5.9 5.9
14.1 5.3 5.6
5.9 4.7 6.5
4.7 6.0 5.9
3.2 3.6 4.0
5,5 6.7 4.9
P'rct.
5.2
4.6
4.6
5.4
4.5
4.4
5.3
4.4
4.7
.5.7
5.4
5.2
5.8
5.3
5.1
5.3
5.3
4. 0
•4.6
4.7
.5.3
5.0
5.1
5.3
6.4
5.5
7.7

6.6
6.0
5.0
7.0
3.3

6.8 9.8
6.0 6.0
5.0 3.0
5 R 5.0
7.0 6.5
4.5 2.8
15.0

P'r ct.
6.1
4.8
4.7
5.1
4.4
4.2
5.1
4.7
4.6
5.2
4.9
4.8
5.7
5.1
5.1
5.1
4.9
4.0
2.4
4.7
4.5
4.64.1
5.4
4.7
2.5
5.8
3.7
4.6
3.7
4.7
5.0
4.9
3.7
4.8
5.7
4.0
5.5
5.8
7.1
4.6
5.3
6.4
3.7
3.3
3.2
4.8
6.0
5.6
6 4
6.5
2.8
4.4

P'r ct.
5.4
4.9
4.6
.5.2
4.7
4.3
5.2
4.5
4.8
.5.0
5.1
5.1
5.7
5.4
5. 1
,5.2
5.7
4 0
8.0
4.3
4.3
4 7
4.3
5.3
5.8
3.6
9.3
3.3
4.8
5.0
5.4
5.35.5
4.9
5.6
7.0
3.7
4.8
5.5
5.0
4.9
6.9
5.8
3.9
3.7
5.7

\p'r ct. P'r ct.
4.5 4.4
4.4 *4. 4
4.4 4.4
4.4 4.3
4.-5 4.1
4.1 4.2
4.2 4.5
4.2 3.8
4.1 3.9
3.9 3.7
4.7 4.1
,4.6 4.6
4.4 4.3
.4.4 4.1
4.7 4.4
4.8 5.0
4.7 4.7

P'r ct.
4.5
4.2
4.7
4.0
4.1
4.1
4.3
3.8
3.6
3.9
4.4
4.5
4.1 .
4.1
4.6
4.5.
4.2

P'r ct.\
4.4
4.2
4.1
4. 3
4.1
4. 0
4.4
4.1
3.7
•3.9
4.6
4.3
•4.2
4.1

4.1 4 . 1
4.7 5.1
4.6 4.4
6-. 8 5.3
5.4 12.5
5.8 5.1

4.0
4.5
4.4
3.8
5.1
5.0

4.6

4.7
5.9

5 . 8 , 5.8
3.8 12.6

4.2 I
4.'7.|
4.1
4.3
4.7
3.9
5.4
8.2
4.6
5.7
1.7

...
4.8 4.7 4. .5 5.0 1
4.7 4.5 4.6 4.4
7.0 8.8 5.2 7.7
4.9 4.3 4.0 4.7
5.2 4.8 4.9 4.2
4.6 4.7 3.4 2.7
4.6 4.4 4.2 4.8
5.5 5.0 .5.1 5. 0.5.3 2.2 2.1 3.6
6.0 4.8 4.5 4.7
3.8 4.1 4.1 4.1
5.2 5.0 4.8 8.0
4.5 3.6 3.8 4.2
6.4 5.2 4 . 3 4.8
6.1 6.0 4.7 6.9
5.2 4.3 4.9 14.2
4.6 3.9 3.3 2.9
5.1 6.1 7.0 ' 5.6
8.3 0.7 17.2 6.2
17. 2 • 6.7 6.2 3.6 5.4
6.0 14.4 14.3
6.6
6.6
6.5
17.9
'4.'7' 2.'4'
2.7

1,5.0 1.5.0 14.0 16.0 15.0 14.0 13.0 1.5.0 12.0 23.0 26.6 14.7 14.3 13.3 14.9
12 0
3 9
3 4 11.8
2.9
3. 0
6.0 4.50
5.4




5.2

5.0

5.2

5.0

5.1

5.1

5.2

5.1

4.8

5.1'

4.5

4.3

4.1

4.2

COMPTEOLLEE OF TIJE CUEEENCY.
,•

,

I

.

'

i .

143

'

•'

of dividends and of earnings to capital and surplus, Miafc^'1,11869, to Septeinber 1, 1874
c a p i t a l a n d s u r p l u s , for s i x m o n t h s
endiug—
1871.

.1872.

1873.

1874.

E a t i o s of e a r n i n g s t o c a p i t a l a n d s u r p l u s , for s i x m o n t h s
endiug—
1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

•

1873.

1874.

S e p t . M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept.. M a r . Sept. Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. M a r . Sept. Mar. Sept.
J.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
L
1.
1.
1. . 1.
1.
1.
1. .
P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. PV ct. P ' r c t . P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P V ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r c t . P ' r ct. P ' r ct. P ' r ct.

4.4
4.0
4.2
4.2
.3.9
3.9
4.2
3.7
3.7
3.6
4.2
4.2
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.4
4.0
'4.0'
4.0
3.7
4.2"
5.0
4.8
.5.2
.5.0
5.4

4.3
4.1
4.2'
4.3
3.9
3.9
4.3
3.9
3.9
3.0
4.6
4.3
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.4
4.3

4.4
4.0
4.0
4.2
3.7
.3.9
4.3
3.6
3.7
3.9
4.3
4.2
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.5
4.5
3.7
2 . 1 ' 3.7
4.2 4.2
4.9 4.8
5.7 4.8
5.0 4.8
4.4 4.7
3.9 6.2
5.4 .5.3
4.0 7.0

*4.'3'
9.9
.5.2
4.6
4.6
3.5
4.5
4/9
3.8
4.1
4.1
3.4
3.7
4.2
5.9
4.7
3.0
5.3
3.7
5.4
3.9

4.6
4.0
4.0
4.2
4.03.9
4.3
4.2
3.7
3.7
4.2
4.0
4.1
4.3
4.0
4.4
4.2
3.6
3.9
4.2
4.7
.5.0
3.8
4.6
4.05.0
9.6

4.6
3.7
4.4
4.1
3.9
3.8
4.1
3.8
3.7
3.3
4.3
4.1
4.1
4.2
4.0
4.1
4.1
3.6
3.7
3.6
4.7
5.1
4.3
4.5
4. 6
3.2
3.1
3.0
' 4 . 5 ' 4.3
4.7 4 . 1
5.0 .5.1
4.7 4.6
4.1 4.5
4.3 4.1
5.2 4:2
4.5 5.0
3.2 3.9
5. 1 4.5
4.3 4.1
4.5 4.2
4.5 4.4
.4.4 4.6
4.0 .5.6
5.2 5.0
3.2 3.5
6.1 4.3

5.1
4.1
.3.9
3.9
3.5
3.6
4.0
3.8
3.5
3.5
3.9
3.8
4.0
3.8
4.0
4.2
4.1
,3.6
1.9
4.0
3.9
4.3
,3.1
4.7
4.3
2.3
4.8
3. 3
4.2
3.4
4.1
4.1
4.0
3.3
3.8
4. 6
3.0
4.5
4.3
5.7
3.3
4.3
5.5
3.2
2.9
2.8

4.4
6.1 6.0 5.8
4.1
6.1 6.2 5.7
3.8
6.0 6.1 5.6
4.0
6.3 6.4 5.3
3.7
,5.7 5.1 5.2
3.6
5.6 5.7 5.0
4.1
5.5 5.8 .5.2
3.7
.5.8 5.4 .5.0
3.6
5.4 4.8 4.2
3.3
6.1 5.7 4.1
4.0
6.3 6.1 ,5.9
4.0
6.1 6.3 .5.3
4.0
5. .3 5.1 4.7
4.1
.5.8 .5.2 5.1
4.0
5.4 4.8 5.3
4.2
6.4 6.5 5.9
4.7
5.9 6.4 5.8
3.5
6.2 "4'. 8 "5.2" 4.'3'
3.7
6.4 6.8 6.43.7
6.5 5.9 5.7
4.3 10.0 8.9 5.5
3.8
7.8 •9.8 8.7
4.6
7.6 7.9 8.2
.5.3
1.7
3.4 "i.i' 7.0 "8.6
7.6
6.4 6.9 16.5
3.0
4.3 '.6." 6' '6.9" '6.'9"
4.5
5.3 6.6 4.4
4.8
•8.2, 9.5 7.1
4.3
6.8- 6.4 5.5
4.5
7.9 6.3 4.8
4.3
.5.0 6.8 3.9
4.4
6.5 6.4 5.9
.5.6
8.0 7.9 6.7
2 . 7 , 8.2 5.6 5.3
3.9
8.0 7.9 6.9
4.0
6.3 6.8 .5.8
4.0
7.7 8.1 6.9
3.5
7.8 4.0 5.4
5.7
9.0 7.8 .5.7
5.0
7.7 8.0 6.1
3.3
8.6 9.7 9.4
3 . 3 . 5.4 •4.7 3.4
4.9
7.8 9.1 8.1
11.6 8.1 18.5
i.5.'2" 11. 5 7.8 .5.9
.5.0 14. 4 9.8 13.9
:6. 3
6.1
• 6.0
13.2
'•8." 3" 'i.5
2.3
1.4

.3.9" "4.5
4.9 4.6
.5.3 5. 5
4.7 4.9
4.2 4.6
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..... .5.0
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5.9 5.8 5.0
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19.7' 16." 8'
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10.9

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5.7
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5.2
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0.3
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5.7- 5.5 .5.2
7.1 7.8 .5.8
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4.0 5.7 5.3
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.2.8 18.9 16.7 7.6

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5.9
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1.7.4 13.4 11.7
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1
•2

3

4

5
6
7

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9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
•18
19
•20
21
22
23
24
25
•26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
3.4
35
36
:37
38
•39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
•47
48
49
50
51
52
•53
54
55
•56
57
58
59

144

*

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

INSOLVENT BANKS.

Since the last annual report, receivers have been ax3pointed for but
three natioual banks, having an aggregate capital/of $250,000. Dividends have been declared in favor of the creditors of these banks as
follows:
The First National Bank of Anderson, Ind
The First National Bank of Topeka, Kans
The First National Bank of Norfolk, Va

.'

15 per cent.
30 per cent.
30 per cent.

During the year dividends have been declared as follows upon banks
which had previously failed :
The First National Bank of New Orleans, 30 per cent., making total dividends
The First National Bank of Nevada, at Austin, 15 per cent., making total dividends
The Walikill NationalBank of Middletown, N. Y., 10 per cent., making total dividends..
The First National Bank of AVashington, D. C, 20 per cent., making total dividends
The Crescent City National Bank of New Orleans, 50 per cent., making total dividends .
The National Bank of the Commonwealth, N. Y., 100 per cent., making total dividends..
The Merchants' National Bank of Petersburgh, Va., 15 per cent., making total dividends.
The First National Bank of Petersburgh, Va., 60 per cent., making total dividends
The First National Bank of Mansfield, Ohio, 25 per cent., making total dividends
The First National Bank of Carlisle, Pa., 25 per cent., making total dividends
The Farmers and Citizens' Nat. B'k of Brooklyn, N. Y., 4 per cent., making total dividends..

65 per cent.
8V per cent.
(
85 per cent.
50 per cent.
50 per cent.
100 per cent.
15 per cent.
60 per cent.
25 per cent.
25 .jyev cent.
96 per cent.

The creditors of The ISTational Bank of the Commonwealth, The Waverly National Bank, and The Union Square ISTational Bank, have been
paid in full, and dividends have been declared during the past year of
25 per cent, in favor of the shareholders of The Waverly NationalBank,
and 10 per cent, in favor of the shareholders of The Union Square National Bank. Additional dividends will soon be declared in favor of the
creditors of The Merchants' National Bank of Petersbnrgh of 10 per
cent., of The Scandinavian National Bank, Ghicago, of 15 per cent., and
of The National Unadilla Bank of about 13 per cent. Small dividends
will also soon be declared in favor of the creditors of The First National
Bank of Washington, B.C., TheVenango NationalBank of Franklin, Pa.,
and The Merchants' National Bank of Washington, D. 0. Assessments
have been made under section 12 of the national-bank act, ou account
of deficiency of assets, upon the shareholders of the following banks:
The First National Bank of New Orleans, The Crescent City National
Bank of New Oiieans, The Eighth National Bank of New York, The
Atlantic National Bank of New York, and The Merchants' National
Bank of Petersburgh j and suits have been directed to be brought against
all delinquent shareholders for the enforcement of such liability.
The affairs of The Ocean National Bank of New York are still involved in litigation, but the receiver is of the opinion that the assets
of the bank will be sufficient to pay the claims of its creditors in full.
The Comptroller has endeavored as far as possible, by examinations
of the banks and by correspondence, to require all national banks to
take from their assets ail doubtful paper, and stocks and bonds which
suffered depreciation from the financial crisis; and it is a cause lor congratulation to the public that the prosperity of the national banks, since
the organization of the system, has resulted in the accumulation of a
large surplus to which such losses can be charged, thus preventing embarrassment both to creditors and shareholders.
Tables giving statistics in reference to insolvent national banks will
be found in the appendix.
SAVINGS-BANKS, TRUST AND LOAN COMPANIES, AND STATE BANKS,
ORGANIZED UNDER STATE LAWS.

In obedience to the act of Congress approved February 19th, 1873,
the Comptroller was able to obtain for his i eport of last year the necessary information from the State authorities of the condition of the savings-banks in only eight States, and of the State banks in no more than



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRl^NCY.

145

nine. Some improvement has been made in collecting the reports during the year now closed, as will appear by the statements in the appendix, but only to the extent of two additional States for savings-banks,
and six for the banks organized under State la|ws, making ten of the
former and fifteen, in all, of the latter. The returns received at this
office of the trust and loan companies are, as they were for the last year,
still too meagre to warrant any attempt at a practical or useful exhibit
of their agency in the monetary affairs of the country. Letters of inquiry were addressed early in the year to the eiecutive officers of all
the States and Territories, to which replies were received, but no rex?orts
available for use from any except those above | stated; and of these,
among the statements given in the appendix, thaf of the savings-banks
of California is unofficial, and that of Illinois in reference to the savingsbanks of Chicago only. Some of the States report considerable numbers of institutions bearing the name of savings-banks, but inasmuch
as they have capital and declare dividends to jstockholders, they are
here classed as State banks, without regard to their assumed titles. It
will be observed that the reports which are given of the condition of
the State banks and savings-banks are, for the inost part, dated at or
about the close of the calendar year 1873, and they may be generally
treated as preceding the date of my annual report by nearly a j^ear. The
reason of this is that the official returns of the several States are
made to their legislatures, whose sessions generally commence at or
after the meeting of Congress, and are not published or received at this
Office until my report for the current year hajS been presented. In addition to the letters asking for the reports of the States, directed to their
executive authorities, the Comptroller addressed a circular-letter to the;
governors of all the States failing to make sufficient returns of their banking institutions, urging them to recommend to their respective legislatures such measures as might be necessary to obtain, for. general as well
as for local publication, the statistics of all, banking institutions authorized by State laws; and he begs leave again to ask the attention of members of Congress to this subject, and for.the exertion of
their influence tothe same purpose upon the authorities of their respective States.* The Comptroller has received replies from several of the
governors addressed, warmly approving the reconfimendations and suggestions of the circular, and promising co-operatiOn.
_
The tables in the appendix to this report show that in the savingsbanks there given, there were, at the close of th0 ^^ear 1873, in the ten
States reported, an aggregate of 2,188,619 depositors' open accounts
with a total sum to their credit of $759,946,632, wliich averages $347.23
2)er capita of the depositors: and the State bauks of the same States
had at about the same time $69,000,000 on deposit.
In the savings-banks of these ten States, which had at the time an
aggregate popnlation of 11,733,800, it would appear that no less than
one in every five and one-third persons was a depositor. Making allow" The following amendment to tbe constitution of New; York Was ratified b y t h e
*
popular vote at the last election :
•
,
'' Tbe legislature sbali, by general law%-conform all charters of savings-banks, or institutions for savings, to a uniformitj^ of powers, rights, and liabilities ; and all charters
hereafter granted for such corporations shall be made to conform to such general law,
aud to such amendments as m a y b e made thereto. Aud I no such corporation shall
have any capital stock, nor shall the trustees thereof, or any of them, have any interest whatever, direct or indirect, iu the ]3r(»iits of such corporation ; aud no direofcor or
trustee of any such bank or institution shall be interested in any loan or use of any
money or property of such bauk or institution for savings. The legislature shall have
no power to pass any act granting any i3]3ecial charter for banking-purposes; but corporations or associations may be formed for such purposes tinder general laws."

10 F




^

^

146

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

ance for so many as may have been depositors in several savings-banks,
it is safe to estimate one in six of the men, women, and minors, as
more or less interested in the condition of these repositories of savings.*
It is not probable that the unreported States have an equal proportion of deposits and depositors to their aggregate populations ; but if ten
States show such an account of investments and so large a proportion of
the people interested in them as this, the other twenty-seven States, with
the Territories added, (and with such States as Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky,
Missouri, Lonisiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Maryland,
aild others among them as yet unreported,) must be taken to add inir
mensely to the numbers and amounts known and reported. No adequate idea of the importance of these institutions in the great money
and credit exchanges of the whole country can be formed, or approximately estimated, until accurate and complete statistics are at command.
Eight hundred millions of dollars is too low an estimate of the amount
of deposits at the close of the year 1873, in the savings-banks, State
banks, and loan and trust companies of the six New^ England States,
New York, and New .Jersey alone. According to the census valuation
of the real and personal property of these eight States, they were, in
1870, worth $11,481,692,575, which is but thirty-eight per cent..of the
value of all the States and Territories. It must be left to experts to
form their own estimate of the grand total of deposits held and employed in the Union by the banks and banking companies other' than
the national banks. The figures for comparison with these stand thus :
At the close of the year 1873 the deposits in the savings-banks of the
eight States last named amounted to $696,353,731, exclusive of those
of the State banks and trust and loan companies; inthe national bauks
of- the same States, the individual deposits at the same time were $308872,886. The progress made by the savings-banks of the eight States
already named, as shown by the oii\j statistics known to be reliable,
may be seen in the summary here given of their condition in the years
1872-'73 and 1873-'74.
Deposits.

ISTumber of d e p o s i t o r s .

A v e r a g e deposit.

1872-'73.
ISTew E n g l a n d
Ifew York
ISTew J e r s e y
Total

'l873-'74.

1872-;73.

1873-'74.

1872-'73.

$349, 39.5, 377
285, 286, 621
28, 562,181

$381, 207, 058
285, 520, 085
29, 626, 583

$1,109, 995
822, 642
*112, 003

$1,179, 484
839, 472
*89, 715

$314 77
346 79
255 01

$323 19
340 12
330 23

66.3,244,179

696, 353, 731

2, 044, 640

.2,108,671

324 38

330 23

1873-'74.

'^ Estimated.

More complete statistics, together with exact dates, will be found in
the appendix.
SPECIE AND SURPLUS.

The following table exhibits the amount of specie held by the national banks at the dates mentioned—the coin, coin certificates, and
* From official reports it is found that the amount due to depositors by the old savings-banks and post-office savings-banks of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Ireland was, at the close of the year 1873, $300,201,001; the number of open accounts
being 3,025,489, which gives a^^e?' capita average of $99.22, ($136.42 in the old savingsbanks, and $65.19 in the post-otfice savings-banks.) This is equal to one depositor to
ten and a half of the entire population. So loug ago as the year 1850, McCulloch
(Commercial Dictionary) gave the number of depositors in the old savings-banks at
1,092,581, the aggregate deposits $132,912,478, and the average to each deposito'rj
$121.65. The comparison here intended, both as to amounts invested aud rate of progress in the United States^ is obvious and striking.



147

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

checks payable in coin held by the national baiiks of the city of New
York, being stated separately:
.
• \
Held b y n a t i o n a l b a n k s in ISTew Y o r k C i t y .
i
Dates
* Coin.

Oct.
.Jail.
Apr.
•June
Oct.
Jan.
'Mar.
June
Oct.
Dec.
Mar.
Apr.
June
Oct.
Dec.
Eeb.
Apr.
Juue
Oct.
•Dec.
Eeb.
Apr.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Eeb.
May
Juiie
Oct.

U . S. coin
certificates.

5,1868. $1, 698, 623 24 $6, 390,140
4, 1869.
1,902,769 48 18, 038, 520
17,1869
1, 6.52, .575 21
3, 720, 040
12,1869
2, 542, 533 96 11, 9.53, 680
9, 1869.
1, 792, 740 73 16, 897. 900
22,1870
6, 196, 036 29 28,501,460
24,1870
2,.647, 908 39 21, 872, 480
9, 1870
2, 942, 400 24 18, 660, 920
8,1870.
1, 607, 742 91
7, -533, 900
28, 1870.
2.268,581 96 14, 063, 540
18,1871
2,982,1.55 61 13, 099, 720
29,1871.
2, 047, 930 71
9, 845, 080
10,1871-.
2, 249, 408 06
9,161,160
2,1871.
1,121,869 40
7,'590, 260
16,1871.
1, 4.54, 930 73 17, 354, 740
27,1872
1,490,417 70 12, 341, 060
19.1872
1, 828, 659 74 10,102, 400
10,1872 ' 3, 782, 909 64 11, 412,160
920, 767 37
3, ] 872
5, 454, 580
27,1872
1,306,091 05 12, 471, 940
28,1873.
1, 958, 759 86 11, 539, 790
25,1873.
1^.344,'940 93 11, 713, 310
13, 1873.
1, 442, 087 71 22,139, 090
12,1873.
1, 063, 200 .55 13, 522, 610
26,1873
1, 376,160 50 ; 18, 325, 770
1,167, 815 09 23.518,645
27' 1874.
1,1874.
1, 530, 282 10 23; 454, 660
26,1874.
1, 842, 525 00 13, 671, 660
2,1874.
1, 291, 786 56 13, 114, 480

.

Checks payable in coin.
$1, 536, 3.53
2, 348,140
1,469,826
975,015
1, 013, 948
2, 190, 644
1, 069, 094
1,163,905
3, 994, 006
3, 748, 126
3,829,881
4, 382,107
3, 680, 854
1,163, 628
4, 255, 631
3,117,100
4, 715, 364
4, 219, 419

66
49
64
82
72
74
30
88
42
87
64
24
92
44
39
90
25
52

Total.

$9, 62.5,116 90
22, 289, 429 97
6, 842, 441 85
15,471,229 78
19, 704, 589 45
36,888,141 03
25, 589, 482 ^9
22,767:226 12
13,135, 649 33
20, 080, 248 83
19, 911, 757 25
16, 275,117 95
15, 091, 422 98
9, 875, 7.57 84
23,06.5,302 12
16, 948, 578 130
16, 646, 423 99
19. 414, 489 16
6, 375, 347 31
13, 778, 031 05
13,498,-549 86
13, 088, 250 93
23, 581,177 71
14,585,810 55
19,701,930 50
24, 686, 460 ,09
24, 984, 942 10
1.5, 514,185 ,00
14,406,26f 56

H e l d by o t h e r
natio lal
banks.

$3,'378, 596
7, 337, 320
3,102, 090
2, 983, 860
3, 297, 81f
11,457,242
11, .507, 060
8, 3.32, 211
5, 324, 362
6, 227, 002
5, 857, 409
6. 456, 909
4, 833, 5313, 377, 240
6, 529, 997
8, 5.59, 246
7, 787. 475
4, 842,154
3, 854, 40f
5, 269, 305
t 279,123
3, 780, ,557
4, 368, 909
5i 282, 658
7, 20.5,107
8, 679, 403
7, 585, 027
6, 812, 022
6, 834, 678

Aggregate.

49 $1.3-, 003, 713 39
29 29, 626, 750 26
,30 . 9,944.532 15
70 18, 455, 090 48
38 23, 002, 405 83
69 j 48, 34.5, 383 72
75 ! 37, 096, 543 44
66 31,099,437 78
14 18, 460, Oil 47
76 26,307,251 59
39 25, 769,166 64
07 22, 732, 027 02
18 ! 19,924,955 16
33 13, 252, 998 17
44 29, 59.5, 299 56
72 25, 507, 825 32
47 24, 433, 899 46
98
24,256,644 14
42 10, 229, 756 79
40 19, 047, 336 45
17,777,673 53
67
81 16, 868, 808 74
01 27,950,086 72
90 19,868,469 45
08 26, 907, 037 58
49 33,365,863 58
16 32, 569, 969 26
27 22, 326, 207 27
67 21,240,945 23

The surplus of the national banks now amoni^ts, in the aggregate, to
nearly $129,000,000, which is a perpetual and in|creasiug fund to which
losses and bad debts may be charged. The Comptroller renews his
recommendation of last year, that the limit of the liabilities of any
association, person, company, or firm, for money borrowed, as provided
in section 29 of the act, be extended to 15 per cent, of capital and surplus for banks located in the redemption cities, and one-tenth of capital
and surplus for the other banks.
t
SMALL NOTES.

j

The issue of bank-notes of a less denomination than £ 5 was prohibited in England in 1827, and an act in 1829 pro^jided that no person or
corporation inany part of England should ''publish, ntter, negotiate,
or transfer" the notes of any Scotch or Irish bank, of a less denomination than £5, nnder heavy penalties.
'
The legislature of New York, by act of April 20,1830, prohibited the
circulation within that State of the notes of other States of a less
denomination than $5^ the penalty being the forfeiture o f the nominal
amount of snch bank-note, bill, or promissory nbte, with costs of snit;"
and on Mar.ch 31, 1835, the legislature passed 4n act making it unlawful "for any person or corporation to pay, give, or offer in ]3ayment, or
in any way circulate or attempt to circulate as money within this State,
at any time after the 1st of January, 1845, any bill, note, or other evidence of debt, purporting to be issned by any body-corporate, of a less
denomination than $5, or of a denomination between $5 and $10;" the




148

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

penalty for violation of the act being four tiines the nominal value of
such bill, note, or evidence of debt. Corporations having banking
powers were also prohibited from issuing or putting in circulation notes
of a less denomination than $5, under a penalty of $100 for each bill
put in circulation. This act was superseded by the act of Febl^uary 28,
1838, which contained still more stringent provisions against the issue
and circulation of notes below the denomination of $5.
The legislature of Pennsylvania also (April 16, 1850) prohibited the
issuing of notes of a denomination less than $5,. and another act (April
17,1861) authorized the issuing of notes of the denominations of one, two,
and three dollars to an amount not exceeding twenty per cent, ot the capital stock paid in.
The i:)roi)osi tion for the repeal of the acts ofthe legislature of New York
upon, the subject above cited, constituted oneof the principal issues ofthe
political canvass of 1838, Avhich resulted in the election to the gubernatorial ofhce of an eminent citizen of that State (since deceased) svho favored
theirrepeal; and these acts were repealed February21,1839. Theactsprohibiting the circulation of small notes in New Y^ork and Pennsylvania
(Could not be enforced while banks in New England and other neighboring
States had the right to circulate such issues, and they vvere therefore
generally disregarded. The whole circulation of the country is now,
however, under the control of Congress, and an act to prohibit the issue
of su^h notes upon the return to specie payments would apply to every
State in the Union. The principle is recognized in section 22 of the
national-bank act, which provides ''that not more than one sixth part
of the notes furnished to an association shall be of a less denomination
than $5, and that after specie payments shall be resumed no association
shall be furnished with notes of a less denomination than $5;" and also
in section 3 of the act of June 12, 1870, which prohibits the issue of cirvculating-notes to gold banksof a less denoinination than $5. These
provisions have had the effect to prevent the issue of any considerable
ainount of notes of a less denomination than $5, the whole amount of
such issues in circulation at the present time beiug $8,972,841.
The following table exhibits the number and amount of national-bank
notes of eaxjh denomination which have been issued and redeemed since
the organization of the system, and the number and amount outstanding on November 1, 1874:
Number.

Amouut.

Detionain ation..
Issued. .
16, 548, 259
5, 539,113
39, 243,136
13, 337, 076
10
3, 962, 109
20
666, 950
50
492, 482
100
500
'
17, 344
5, 240
1,000..-•...

I.
2

D

00
00
00
00
00
0)
00
00
00

Kedeemed.
11,143, 606
3, 75.5, 019
13, 041, 605
3, 912, 707
971, 608
231, .556
196i 572
11, 676
4, 683

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Outstanding.

Issued.

Redeemed.

5, 404, 653 00 $16, 548, 259 00 111,143,606 00
1, 764, 0?;4 00 11, 078, 226 00
7, 510. 038 00
26, 202, .53r 00 19,6,21.5,680 00 65, 208, 025 00
9,424,369 00 133, 370, 760 00 39,127, 070 00
2, 990, 501 00 79, 242, 180 00 19, 432,100 00
. 43.5,394 00 33, 347, 500 00 11,577,800 00
295,910 00 49, 248, 200 00 19, 657, 200 00
5, 668 00
8, 672, 000 00
5, 838, 000 00
557 00
5, 240, 000 00
4, 683, 000 00

Outstanding.
$5, 404, 6.53
3, 568,188
131, 007, 655
94, 243, 690
.59, 810, 020
21, 769, 700
29,591,000
2, 834, 000
557,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

79,811,709 00 33, 269, 032 00 46, 543, 677 00 532, 962, 805 00 184,176,899 00
D e d u c t f o r t V a g m e u t s of note J lost or d e s t r o y e d .
5,246 30'
A d d for f r a g m e n t s of u o t e s lo s t or d e s t r o y e d

348, 785, 906 00

148,171, 652 70

348, 791,152 30

5, 246 30

From this table it will be seen that the total amount now outstanding
of national-bank notes below the denomination of $5 is $8,972,841. The



149

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

total amount now outstanding of legal-tender notes:*- below the same denomination, (one and two dollar notes,) is $56,223,525;. and the amount
of fractional currency is $48,151,024.
The amount of national-bank notes in circulation under the denomination of $10 is $139,980,496; of legal-tender notes, $107,403,965. If
the whole issue of legal-tender and national-bank notes under the denomination of $5 should be witbdrawn, it would plaice $65,196,366 of specie
in the hands of the people; and if all the paper-money (including fractional
currency) under the denomination of $10 should be withdrawn, it would
require $295,535,485 of specie to take its place, i
SECURITY OF CIRCULATINa-NpTES.

The following statement exhibits the kinds and amounts of United
States registered bonds held by the Treasurer of the United States on
the first day of November, 1874, to secure the redemption of the circulating-notes of national banks:
T i t l e of loan.

E a t e of interest.

Authorizing-act.

L o a n of E e b r u a r y 8,1861, (81s)
E e b r u a r y 8, 1861
:
L o a n of J u l y and A u g u s t , 1861-, (81s) . . . J u l y 17 a n d A u g u s t 5, 1861
L o a n of 186-3, (81s)
^.. M a r c h 3, 1863
E i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1862
•
E e b r n a r y 25, 1862
i. ..
'fen-forties of 1864
M a r c h 3, 1864
:
E i v e - t w e n t i e s of M a r c h 3, 1864
M a r c l i 3 1864
E i v e - t w e n t i e s of J u n e , 1864
J u n e 30 1864
F i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1865
M a r c h 3, 1865
•.
Eive-t^^'erities of 186.5 2d series
M a r c h 3 1865
'
E i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1867
M a r c h 3 1865
. '
E i v e - t w e n t i e s of 1868
:
M a r c h 3.' 1865
.
.. i
Funded-loan of 1881
J u l y 14,1870, and J a n u a r v 20,1871
U n i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s issued t o Pacific J u l y ' 1,1862, a n d J u l y 2,1864!
railway-companies.

6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
6

Amount.

percent...
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
percent.:.
p e r cen t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
per c e n t . . .
percent...

Total

$3, 959, 000
55, 298, 050
30 371 0.50
288, 400
104. 463, 250
706 000
9, 430; 750
'• 9,231,200
6, 899, .500
12,7.32,200
. 3, 298, .500
134 976 850
13,767,000
385, 421, 750

From an examination of the table it will be found that these bonds
consist of $145,981,650 of 6 per cent, bonds anid $239,440,100 of 5 per
ceut. bonds. On October 1, 1870,t the Treasurer held as security for
the circulating-notes of the national banks $342,833,850 of United States
bonds, of which only $95,942,550 were 5 percent, bonds; from which it
appears that there has been during the last four! years an increase in. the
5 per cent, bonds of $143,497,550, and a decrease in the 6 per cent, bonds
of $100,909,650.
!
* Legal-tender notes outstanding, by denominations, \November 1st, 1874.

,.

Is
2s
5s--....
lOs
20s
.50s
100s
• 500s
1,000s

• \

'
•
:

•
L
L
i.
•
'
'
I
I

$27,444,403
28, 779, 122
51,180,440
•-. 76, 390, 525
72,014,810
22, 503. 700
34, 963, 000
14, 413, 000
.55,311,000

•
D e d u c t a m o u n t d e s t r o y e d in Chicago fire, ( d e n o m i n a t i o n s u n k n o w n )
;

383,000,000
1, 000, 000
.

382,000,000

t O n October 1,1865, t h e t o t a l a m o u n t o f D u i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s w a s $276,250,-550, of w h i c h only $76,852,600
w e r e 5 p e r cent, b o u d s .




150

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
COUNTERFEITS.

^ From a report made to the Secretary of the Treasury by the chief of
the secret service, on August 27,1873, it appears that the $10 plate upon
which the national-bank notes are printed has been raore extensively
counterfeited than any other, the plates of twenty-four banks having
been thus counterfeited. Ten plates of the $20 notes and a snjall number of the $100 and the $2 plates have also been counterfeited; all of
•which plates have been captured and destroyed by theTreasury Department. A full set of lithographic-stones from which were printed notes
o f t h e denomination of $5, together with, a considerable amount of
notes, were also captured and destroyed; -since which time it is believed
that no fraudulent issues of this kind have been put iu circulation.
A very dangerous counterfeit, of the denomination of $5, upon The
Traders' National Bank, Chicago, has recently appeared, and the genuine notes of this issue are being retired in pursuance of law:, as they
are redeemed at the Treasury, and there are now but $50,555 of this
denomination remaining in circulation.
The statements contained in the report of the chief of the secret service have been confirmed by correspondence with all the banks whose
notes.are known to have been counterfeited; and it is believed that the
number of counterfeits of the national-bank issues has been continually^
diminishing since the capture .of the plates referred to. There is no
doubt that the large amount of engraver's work npon both the faces
and backs ofthe national-bank notes, and the similitude of-the designs
of each denomination, has tended to prevent the issue of connterfeits;
not more than forty-six of the whole six thonsand plates which have
been engraved for the national banks having been successfully imitated,
while under the old State system the counterfeit-notes were numbered .
by thousands.
A small number of impressions only has been printed from the plates
of the denominations of Is and 2s, and of the 20s, 50s, 100s, 500s, and
1000s. The average number of impressions printed from the $5 plate
does not exceed four thousand, while the number printed from the $10
l^late is considerably less. The Comptroller is informed by the engravers that the plates from which the national-bank notes are printed are
capable of printing thirty thousand impressions before they will be
rendere'd unfit for use. The plates of all the denominations are, therefore, with few exceptions, in good condition, and with care a large
number of impressions may be printed from them before evidence of
wear will become apparent.
The present system of assorting in the Treasurer's Office affords an
opportunity to withdraw from circulation, as anthorized by law, the genuine notes of all banks, of any denomination which may have been successfully counterfeited; and it is believed that the Comptroller, by
availing himself of this opportunity, will be able, in a great measure, to defeat the operations of those engaged in counterfeiting the
national-bank circulation. It is certain that a new issue of nationalbank notes, differing in design from the present, would tend to increase
the nnmber of counterfeits, and, as the plates are not worn to any considerable extent, a large expenditure of inoney for this purpose at present is entirely unnecessary.
My predecessor, in his reports for 1867 and 1869, called the attention
of Congress to the fact that $17,560 of the unsigned notes of national
banks had been purloined from this Office, and stated that the guilty
party was tried in the criminal court of the District and convicted; but



COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

'

151

that a motion in arrest of judgment was gr^tnted by the court upon
some defect in the indictment, and the criminal djischarged. It is believed that but a small portion of these notes was ever put in circulation, the larger portion having been subsequently destroyed. A few,
however, still remain in circulation with forged signatures, and are, from
time to time, received with genuine notes., their similarity prev^enting
prompt detection. The Comptroller recommends that an appropriation
of $5,000 be made for the redemption of such of these notes as are out-,
standing.
|
AMENDMENTS.

|

The act of June 20, 1874, has been in operation but a few months,
and its provisions in reference to the redistribution of the currency,
reserve, and redemption, should be thoroughly tested before any changes
are made, and accordingly no amendments thereof are now recommended.
I
The following amendments to preyious acts are r|ecommended: (1) An
amendment to section 1 of the act of March 3, 1873, providing that if
any shareholder or shareholders of banks whos^ capital-stock is impaired shall refuse, after three months' notice, to pay the assessment, as
provided in said section, a sufiicient amount of th0 capital-stock of such
delinquent shareholder or shareholders may be sold to make good the
deficiency. (2) An amendment of section 29 of the national-bank act, extending the limit of liabilities of any associatioil, person, company or
firm, for money borrowed, from 10 per cent, of thei capital paid in, to 15
per cent, of capital and surplus, for banks located in the redeinption
cities, and one-tenth of capital and snrplus for other banks; (3) also
prohibiting the deposit of more than 10-per cent, of the capital of a
national bank with any private banker, or with any| person or association
other than a national-banking association. (4) That no national bank
shall be liable to make good any deficiency which may hereafter arise
in any special deposit made with such bank, unless a receipt shall
be produced by the owner of such deposit, iu which the liability of
the bank shall be distinctly stated; (5) the repeal of the two-cent,
stamp-tax, or an act providing that all bill3 of |exchange, checks, or
receipts in place of checks, drawn upon any:baiik or banker, shall be
subject to a stamp-tax, with a penalty of $20 for ^ach violation thereof;
and (6) providing tor the enforcement of the individual liability of shareholders of national banks, which have gone into 1 voluntary liquidation
nnder section 42 of the national-bank act.
;
The Comptroller renews the recommendations icontained in his last
two reports, for the passage of an act to prevent 'the issiie and circulation of unauthorized currency, and requiring thie word ''counterfeit"
" altered," or "illegal," to be stamped on all counterfeit and unauthorized issues; also, his recommendation for the repeal of the fourth section of the act of June 1, 1870, so far as it applies jto the organization of
savings-banks in the District of Columbia, and for the enactment in its
stead of a general law in reference to such savings-banks, with judicious
conditions and restrictionSo
THE OFFICE.

\

The thanks of the Comptroller are due to the; Deputy Comptroller,
examiners of banks, chiefs of divisions, and the other employes of this
Office for the satisfactory manner in which their duties have been performed during the past year. The business of th^ Ofiice will be largely
increased dnring the coming year, aud it is expected that not less than



152

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

$120,000,000 of mutilated currency will be received, counted and destroyed, and a much larger amount of new currency issued to the banks.
The Comptroller and the Deputy Comptroller are required by law to
give official bonds for a large amount; and the responsibility for these
large sums of money must, of necessity, be delegated to a great degree
to the chiefs of divisions and others, whose comjpensation is at present
exceptionally meagre and inadequate, in no case exceeding eighteen hundred dollars. The passage of the bill for the reorganization of
the Treasury Department, and making x^rovision for an increase of the
compensation of those officers and employes who have fairly earned such
recognition by long and faithful service in responsible positions, is respectfully recommended.
THE APPENDIX.

Special attention is called to the carefull5'--prepared tables contained
in the appendix, exhibiting the aggregate resources and liabilities of all
the national banks, yearly, forthe past twelve years; also showing their
condition for the present year at five different xieriods, arranged by
States and redemption-cities, and separate statements of every bank in
the Union on the 2d day of October, ultimo ; also exhibiting the different kinds of funds held as reserve, and the percentage of reserve to
circulation and deposits ofthe nationalbanks in each of the States and
redemption-cities at twenty-four different dates duringthe years 1870 to
1874, inclusive; also a table, compiled from reports made to the New York
clearing-house, showing the average liabilities and reserves of the national banks of that city, weekly, during the months of September and!
October, for the past five years; also a table showing the amounts and
kinds.of loans of the New York City banks at corresponding periods for
the last five yiears ; the dividends and earnings of the national banks
by States and cities, semi-annually, during the past year; also lists of
insolvent banks, and banks which have gone into voluntary liquidation;
also a statement showing the aggregate nuinber of national-bank notes
issued, withdrawn, and outstanding, on November 1, yearly, from 1868 to
1874, inclusive ; and a statement ofthe condition ofthe State banks and
savings-banks organized under the laws of the difierent States, so far as
they could be obtained from official sources.
An index to the tables contained in this report will be found on the
following page. .
JOHN JAY KNOX,
Comptroller of the Currency.
Hon. JAMES G . BLAINE,

Sfjeaher of the Eotise of Representatives.




,

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

153

LIST OF TABLES CONTAINED IN EEPORT AND APPENDIX.

Page.
I. Table showing the resources and liabilities of the natioual banks in from 1870 to 1874.. • 124
II. Table showing the resources and liabilities of the national banlcs October 2, 1874
125
I I I . Table showing the number of banks in each State, with their capital, bonds, and circulation issued, redeemed, and outstanding
... T
126
IV. Table showing the apportionment of the circulation and the amouut outstanding, with
the excess or deficiency in each State or Territory
127
V. Table, ai-ranged by States and Territories, showing the amount of circulation issued.
and authorized and of legal-tender notes deposited to redeem circulation
128
VI. Table, arranged by States and Territories, showing the outstanding circulation of
liquidating and insolvent national banks
129
VII. Table showing the amount of circulation to be withdrawn from certain banks under
the act of June 20, 1874
130VIII. Comparative table, by States and Territories, showing the amount of national-bank
circulation, amount per capito,and ratio to wealth, &c
130
IX. Table showing the amount of mutilated notes destroyed, yearly, from 1865 to 1874
134
X. Table of reserve required .and held October 2, 1874, under the national-bank act aud
act of June 20, 1874; also, the amount released under the last-named act
136
XI. Table showing the reserve of the national banks, required and held, at three different
dates yearly from 1870 to 1874
136
X I I . Table showing tbe amouut of United States taxes paid by the national banks yearly,
from 1864 to 1874
'
138
X I I I . Table showing the araount of taxes collected by the Commissioner of In ternav Reveuue
from State banks, savings-banks, and private banks and bankers, for the fiscal year
endiug June 30, 1874
138
XIV, Table showing the dividends. &.C., of the principal joint-stock banks of London, and
of the Bank of England
140
XV. Table of aggregate dividends and earnings of national banks, with their capital and
surplus, (semi-annually,) irom September 1,1869, to September 1,1.874
l4l
XVI. Table showing the ratios of dividends to capital and to capital and surplus, and of net
earnings to capital and surplus, March 1, 1«69, to September 1, 1874
:
142
XVII. List of insolvent national banks upon which divi(;lends have been declared during the
year ending November 1, 1874
144
XVIII. Summary of savings-banks and their deposits, number of depositors, &c., in N'ew England, New York, and New Jersey, at similar dates in 1872-'73, and 1873-'74
146
XIX. Table showing the specie held by "national banks froni 1868 to 1874
147
XX. Table showing the number and amount of each denomination of national-bank notes
issued, redeemed, and outstanding.
148
XXI. Table showing the amount of each denomination of legal-tender notes outstanding
November 1,'1874
,
149
XXII. Table showing the amounta and kinds of United States bonds held as security fbr cir- '
cnlating notes *
i
149
X X I I I . Table showing the dividends and earnings of national banks for the year ending September 1, 1874, arranged by States, Territories,and redemption-cities.
154
XXIV. Table showing t>he liabilities and reserves of the national banks from 1868 to 1874
156
XXV, Table showing the percentage of reserve held to liabilities from 1870 to 1874
158
XXVI. Tables, arranged by States, Territories, &c., showing the liabilities and reserve the •
national banks at five difierent dates since September 12, 1873
160
XXVII. Table showing the average weekly liabilities and reserve of the national banks of New
York City in September and October, from 1870 to 1874, as reported to the clearinghouse
170
XXVIII. Table showing the v.arious kinds of loans of the New York city banks, together with
their capital and net deposits
170
XXIX. Table showing the aggregate number of notes issued, redeemed, aud outstanding from
November 1, 1868, to November 1, 1874
;
171
XXX. Table of the national banks in voluntary liquidation, their capital, circulation, &c... 172
XXXI. Table ."showing the national banks iu voluntary liquidation for consolidation with other
banks, with their capital, bonds, circuiatiou, &c
174
XXXII. Table showing the national banks iu the hands of receivers, with their capital, outstanding cii'culation, &c.,
175
X X X I I I . Table of insolvent Ijanks, with the date of appointment of receivers, amount of claims
proved, and dividends paid
176.
XXXIV. List ot national banks that have deposited legal-tendernotes to retire circulation
177
XXXV. Statistics of savings-banks, derived from ofiicial sources
178
XXXVI. Statistics of State "banks, derived from official sources
180




154

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES..

Table of the dividends and earnings of the national banhs, -with their ratios to caxntal, and to
capital and surplus-fund, for the six months from Sex)tember 1,1873, to March. 1,1874.
Ratios.
or::
States, Territories,
and cities.

C a p i t a l stock.

Surplus.

•^ Pl

Dividends. Net earnings.

CO ce

li es !J

Maine
,
New Hampshire ..
Vermont
Massachusetts...Boston
Ehode Island
Connecticut
New York
N e w York City
Albany
• New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia..
Pittsburgh ...
Delaware
,
Maryland..:
,
i3altiniore.i —
D i s t . of C o l u m b i a .
Washington ..
Virginia
,
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h Carolina . . .
South Carolina
G e o r g i a . . . ..•
Alabama
,
New Orleans..
Texas..:
Arkansas
Iventucky
Louisville
Tennessee
Ohio
Cincinnati
ClcA^eland
Indiana
Illinois
,
Chicago
Michigan
Dfetroit
Wisconsin
Milwaukee . . .
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint L o u i e . . .
Kansas
Nebj-aska
Oregon.
California
San .FranciscoColorado..........
Utah
N e w Mexico
Wyoming
Idaho...
D.akota
Montana
Totals

63
42
42
164
50
62
80
221
48
7
62
15'
29
16
11
19
14
1
3
22
17
10
12
13
9
8
7
2
30
6
23
157
5
6
91
116
18
74
3
40
4
75
32
29
7
25
9
1
3
6
3
2
2
1
1
5

$9, 040, 000 00 $1, 959,693 16
5,135, 000 00
947, 718 18
7, 862, 712 50 1, .574,034 5'
40, 672, 000 00 12, 584, 780 09
49, 900. 000 00 11,978, 121 16
20, .504, 800 00 3,731, 621 30
25, 327, 320 00 6, 938,890 56
35, 599, 691 00 S, 108,.392 34
69, 235, 000 00 21, 933,040 72
• 2, 6.50, 000 00 1,300, 000 00
13, 858, 350 00 3, 655,463 12
26, 775, 240 00 7, 207,493 04
16, 935. 000 00 7,105, 791 83
06
9, ooo; OUO 00 2, 983,604 58
185 00
425, 603
1, 523, 217 50
521, 663 27
2,398, 985 00
602 04
11,241, 000 00 2, 398,000 00
30,
252, 000 00
262, 000 00
900, 000 00
594, 653 58
3, 585, 000 00
377, 254 02
2, .596, 000 00
16.5, 690 59
2,300, 000 00
362, 3.58 40
3, 170, 215 00
437, 616 70
2, 840, 300 00
138, 315 64
1, 581, 000 00
283, 592 49
4,150, 000 00
195, 630 98
925, 000 00
22, 375 00
205, 000 00
649, 406 51
6, 076, 500 00
207, 264 75
2, 201, ,507 00
431, 332 23
3,175, 000 00
396 .37
20, 358, 000 00 4, 398,000 00
90.5, 815 25
4, 000, 000 00
612, 090 97
4, 550, 800 00
17, 662, 000 00 4, 413,860 77
11, 428, 000 00 2, 854,000 00
8, 650, 200 00 3, 01.5,432 65
8,142. 000 00 1, 746,000 00
680, 710 39
1, 9oo; 000 00
699, 836 54
2, 765, 000 00
283,
750, 000 00 1,304, 355 68
018 57
5f827, 000 00
669, 651 21
4,175, 000 00
476. 802 10
2, 68.5, 300 00
809, 573 91
6, 360,
291, 800 00
1, 866, ooo 00
163, 000 00
000 00
975,
50, 614 49
250, 000 00
22; 000 00
000 00
700,
200,' 500 00
2, 500, 000 00
202, 454 77
000 00
575,
49, 726 58
450, 000 00
18, 415 06
300, 000 00
000 00
5, 800 00
125,
16, 000 00
100, 000 00
000 00
2, 000 00
.50,
66,
350, 000 00

Perct. P e r

ct P e r (
5.07 5. i
4.10
3.92
3.90
3.52
3.57
4.03
3.82
3.49
.3.52
3.88
3. 76
4.04
3.83
4.01
4.19
4.06
3.57
1.89
4.01
3.92
4.33
3.07
4.66
4.32
2. .30
1.82
3. 30
4.20
3. 75 3.42
4.67 4.11
4.96 4.08
4.95 4.04
3.75 3.30
4:82 3.85
.5.73 4.59
4.02 2. 98
5.50 4.53
,5.79 4.26
7.10 5.67
4.60 3.34
.5.30 4.33
6.44 5. .55
3.72 3.16
3.30 2.93
3.24 2.80
4.82 4.13
6.00 .5.00
5.57 5.40
6.40 5.94
•2.78 2.06
4.44 4.00
6.50 6.12

$587, 379 75
249, 1.50 00
370, 135 62
2, 078,687 98
2,176, 928 00
86.5, 422 00
1, 300,107 90
1, 669,552 78
3,181,551 89
139, 000 00
367 50
• 680,
1, 276,651 30
972, 250 00
459, 000 00
78, 059 45
122, 243 88
553, 925 37
10, 080 00
22, 000 00
167, 695 00
116, 610 00
97, 500 00
130, 000 00
152, 646 69
74, 365 00
102, OOO 00
54, 000 00
7, 500 00
282, 800 00
82, 500 00
316 19
148, 942 43
1, 009,000 00
198, 500 00
170, 435 00
850, 268 98
654, 500 00
347, 852 58
447, 000 00
110, 306 43
196, .500 00
34, 706 25
308, 914 27
268, 000 00
100, 860 50
209, 400 00
60, 000 00
47, 000 00
15, 000 00
39, 000 00
160, 000 00
16, 000 00
20, 500 00
19,

$679, 985 88
384, 964 21
494, 118 24
2, 499,375 67
2, 718,914 54
1, 335,695 32
1, 569,650 30
1,971, 110 47
3, 731,978 16
211, 472 88
762, 964 95
1, 698,259 15
1,03.5,210 81
524, 023 69
82, 699 73
153, 134 78
738, 870 84
16, 130 55
57, 192 09
209, 243 77
141, 133 20
131, 935
172, 733 77
137, 275 98
67, 520 64
147, 681 53
77, 637 81
7, 632 22
367, 077 79
121, 062 51
169, 979 06
1, 348,414 85
268, 127 28
235, 211 13
1,144, 303 77
840, 433 33
661, 531 24
549, 122 99
167, 673 77
210, 605
52, 929 07
433, 197 91
311, 378 54
*74, 555 36
257, 296 22
112, 950 92
73, 382 91
35, 098 81
72, 559 52
192. 879 26
102, 297 26
22, 729 72
24, 996 44
•7 366 36
25,' 113 33
23, 000 00
3, 972 29
3,000 00
11,884 97
48, 436 67

6.09
4.85
4.71
5.11
4. 36
4.2?
5.13
4.69
4.60
5.25
4.91
4.77
.5.74
5.10
5.12
5.10
4.92
4.00
2.44
4.68
4.50
4.64
4.10
5.37
4.70
2.46
5.84
3.66
4.

23.00 19.69
6.00 5.77
•3.40 2.86

1, 967 489, 510, 323 00 123, 469, 859 22 23, 529, 997 51 29, 544,119 93




'' Loss.

4. 81

3. 84

4. 82

155

COMPTROLLEE OF THE CURRENCY.

Table of tlie dividends and earnings of the national hanks, with their ratios io capitah and to
caxrital and surx)lus-fund,for the six months from March 1,1874, to Sexitember 1, 1874.
Ratio.s.
Ore

States, Territories,
a n d cities.

C a p i t a l stock,

Surplus.

Dividends.

N e t earnings.

5? O C
O

Maine
New Hampshire ...
Vermont.
Massachusetts
Boston
Rhode Islaud
Counecticut
New York
N e w Y o r k City
Albany
NCAV J e r s e y

Penusyivania
Piiiladelphia . . .
Pittsburgh
Delaware
Maryland
iBaltimore
D i s t . of C o l u m b i a . .
W.ashington . . .
Virginia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h CaroUna
Georjiia
Alabama
New Orleans...
Texas
Arkansas
Iventucky
Louisville
Teunessee
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Indiana
Illinois
Chicago
Michigan
Detroit
Wisconsin...:
Milwaukee
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Saint Louis . . .
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
California
San P r a n c i s c o .
Colorado
Utah
N e w Mexico
Wyoming
I d a h o . . -'
Dakota
Montana
Totals

63 $9, 640, 000 00 $2, 141, 037 83
42
.5, 13.5, 000 00 1,019, 620 72
42
7, 862,712 ro 1, 670,155 29
166 40, 762,Oi:0 00 12,856, 634 65
51 .50, 200,000 00 13. Oil, 170 17
62 20, 504, 800 00 4, 051,494 09
80 25, 427,321) OOI 7, 227,990 o3
220 35,164, 691 00 8, 111,941 43
48 68, 500,OOO 00| 22, 653, 881 36
7
2, 650.000 00 1, 350,000 00
62 13, 858,350 OOl 3, 673,975 81'
1.56 26, 761, 590 00 7, 435,884 50|
29 16, 935,000 00 7, 189,152 36
16
9, 000,000 00 3, 0.5.5, 927 64
n
429, 492 11
1, 523,185 00
541. 575 49!
18
2, 298,2L7 50
15 11, .541,985 00 2, 434,466 94
1
32, 000 OOl
252, 000 00
3
268, 000 00
900, 000 00
(.00 00
63C, 247 20
21
3, .585,
399, 261 12|
17
2, 596,000 00
181, 445 71
11
2, 200,000 00
361. 760 351
3,135, 000 00
12
000 00
463, 339 40i
2, 835,
13
154, 895 281
9
1, 635,000 ro
8
4,150, 000 00 , 285,668 68
223, 173 17'
8
995, 000 00
23, 7.50 OOl
2
205. 000 00
711, 549 47
30
6,126, 000 00
241, 724 73
6
2, 401,500 00
444, 590 23
22
3, 275,300 00
157 20, 383, 000 00 4, 562,344 45
945, 000 00
5
4, 000,000 00
654, 879 41
4, 550,000 00
6
• 91 17, 613,800 00] 4. 532,842 38
118 11, 561,333 OOl 2, 984,860 09
8, 650,000 ool 3, 277,000 00
18
73 . 8,047,200 001 1, 828,691 87
720, 000 00
3
1, 900,000 00
754, 044 191
2, 935,000 ool
42
750, 000 00
288, 821 94
5, 867,000 00 1 .33-1, 516 93]
75
741, 763 86|
4, 300,000 00
31
2, 835,000 00
500, 509 74
28
831, 106 841
6, 360,300 00
7
285, 440 75
24
1, 7l.'5, 000 00
123, 463 33
925, 000 00
10
000 oo|
2.50, 000 oo|
50, 904
1
700. 000 00
27,
3
212, 000 ool
2
2, 500,000 ool
242, 500 00|
675, 000 00I
8
450, 000 00
66, 306 41
3
300, 000 ool
23, 2 4 8 681
2
125, 000 00I
2
10, 2 3 7 0 5
100, 000 00
18, 800 00
1
50, 000 001
1
2, 400 00
350, 000 00
69, 500 00
5
128,
489, 938, 284 00




364, 039 09|

$635,
277,
483,
2, 717,
2, 778,
1, 164,
1,.546,
1, 877,
4, 342,
154,
617,
1, 574,
1, 079,
605,
86,
•154,
651,
14,
55,
193,
127,
132,
101,
1.54,
103,
213,
107,
8,
359,
153,
216,
1,269,
255,
2.56.
1,197,
937,
536,
.530,
• 178,
226,
47,
428,
365,
172,
282,
101,
100,
30,
63,
179,
94,
29,
23,
9,
20, 000 00
21,
2, 250 00
2,
41, 462 93
3,

$.520, 079 75
251, 400 00
364, 135 62|
2,141. 275 30
2, 337,620 00I
891, 022 00
1,332, 474 90
1, 598,024 28
3, 264,.504 .50
133, 000 00
701, 367 50
1, 36.5,441 10
970, 500 00
489, 000 00
78, 409 451
792
• 120, 32!
660, 588 25'
10, 080 00
72, 000 00
155, 795 00
110, 610 00
103, 674 65
133, 875 00
151, 4.56 44
94, 355 00
150, 000 00
93, 000 00
t>, 875 00
025
• 296, 00
120, 075 (0
178, 466 73
1, 085,683 19
222, 000 00
222, 500 00
985, 935 00
811, 654 34
322, .500 00
389, 160 00
105, 000 00
147, 402 81
36, 500 00
. 408,025 00
2.50,050 00
110,•500 00
236. 860 50
97; 900 00
159, 500 00
1.5,000 00
46, 000 00
165, 000 00
121, 000 00
12, 000 00
19, 500 00

24, 929, 306 56 30, 036, 811 37

P e r ct. Per ct. P e r ct.
5.401 4.41 .5. 40
4. 90 4.08 4. 51
4.63 3. 82! 5.08
3. 99 5.07
5. 2 5
3. 70 4.40
. 4. 06
4.74
4. 35| 3. 63
4.08 4.74
5. 24
4. 54] 3.69 4.34
4.77 3. 58 • 4.76
5. 02 3. 33 3.87
.5. 06 4.00 3. .52
.5. 10 3. 99 4.61
5. 73 4.02 4.48
5. 43 4.(6 5.02
5. 15 4.02! 4.46
.5. 26 4.
.5.44
5. 72 4.. 731 4. 66
4.00 .3. 55 .5. 10
8.00 6.16 4.72
4. 35| 3.70 4. 58
4. 26! 3. 69 4.25
4.71 4.35 5. 55
4.27 3.83 2.90
.5. 341 .. 4. 59 • 4. «i9
5.771 5. 27 5.78
.3.61 , 3.38 4.81
9. 351 . 7. ("31 8.83
3. 3 5 | 3.01
3. 83
4. 83i 4. 33| 5.26
5. ool 4. 54 5.81
5.45I 4.801 5.83
5. 33 4.3;
5.09
5. 55 4.4!
5. 16
4. 27| 4. 93
4.
5. 601 4. 451 5.41
7.021 5.5!
6.44
3.73 2. 70| 4. ,50
4.84 3.94 5.37
5.50 4.01 6.80
.5.021 4. ool 6.15
4.87' 3.51 4.53
6. 9 5 | 5.67! 5.95
5. 82, 4. 96| 7.25
3. 901 3.31 5.16
3.72 3. 29! 3.93
5.74 4.92 5.10
17. 24 1.5. 21 9.63
6.00 5.00 10.07
6.5'
6.32 8.75
6. 60 6.08 6.63
17. 93| 13.191 10.29
2.67 2. 32| .5.75
6.50 6.03 7.40
6:85
20. 00 16. 83! 18. 35
5.09
4.50 4.2!
0.94
11. 80 9.81
5.09

4.03

4.86

156

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Table of tlie state of the lawful-money reserve of the national banlcs of the
STATES

Dates.

No. of C i r c u l a t i o n
banks. a n d deposits.

AND

R e s e r v e reRatio of
Reserve held.
quired.
reserve.

Per cent
Jan.
1868..
A p r i l 6 1868..
J u l y 6, 1868..
Oct. 5 1868..
J a n . 4 1869..
A p r . 17, 1869..
J u n e 12, 1869..
Oct. 9, 1869..
J a n . 22, 1870..
Mar. 24 1870..
J u n e 9, 1870..
Oct.
1870..
Dec. 28, 1870..
M a r . 18, 1871..
A p r . 29, 1871..
J u n e 10, 1871.,
Oct. 2, 1871.,
Dec. 16, 1871.,
P e b . 27, 1872.:
A p r . 19, 1872.,
J u n e 10, 1872.
Oct. 3, 1872.,
Dec. 27, 1872.
P e b . 2i 1873.
A p r . 25, 1873.,
J u u e 13, 1873.
Sept. 12, 1873.
Dec. 26, 1873.
F e b . 27, 1874.
M a y 1 1874.
J u n e 26, 1874.
Oct. 2, 1874.

1, 418 ,$405, .322, 366 $60, 798, 353
412,251,361
1,418
61, 837, 703
419,787,829
1, 414
62, 968, 177
414, 776, 428
1,422
62, 216, 475
406,128, 844
1,408
60,919,326
394. 615, 851
1,400
59, 192, 376
39.5, 378, 414
59, 306, 761
1,400
394, 376,119
59, 156,419
1, 398
401, 856, 063
1, 396
60, 278, 409
40.5,122, 511
1, 397
60, 758, 912
407, 788, 659
61,168,299
1, 396
40.5, 984, 755
60, 897, 713
1, 400
407., 721, 473
61,158,221
1, 430
426, .501, 897
1, 465
63, 975, 285
438, 555, 545
1,482
65, 783, 333
445, 27.5, 395
1,497
66, 791, .309
467, 619, 031
1,537
70,142, 8.55
465, 947, 077
1,564
69,892,062
484,197, 695
1, 586
72, 629, 654
"487, 394, 283
1,616
73,109,142
490,841,566
1,626
73, 626, 235
1, 689
76, 435, 968
509, 415, 295
1,707
503, 568, 806
75, 535, 321
.521, .394, 885
1,717
78, 209, 233
.522, 649, 052
1,732
78, 428, 804
,527,741,608
1,737
79, 204, 426
536, 92.5, 203
1,747
80, 593, 659
486, 180, F69
1,749
72, 985, 967
510, 946, 655
1, 748
76, 700, 872
521, 953, 283
1,751
78,351,858
43, 173,243
1,755
522, 874, 575
527, 506, 306 . 44,077,914
.1, 774

$96, 873, 050
94,143, 672
100, 782, 520
• 9.5, 252, 448
92; 999, 217
82, 523, 406
85, 673, 334
80, 965, 648
93, 426, 468
92,378,752
92, 037, 332
84, 777, 956
85, 723, 389
95,615,960
98, 698, 874
101, 706, 605
98, 946, 184
91, 728, 626
102, 275, 001
98, 012, 845
101,821,660
97, 76.5, 876
102, 069, 282
108,246,881
105,693,322
108, 935, 374
110, 456, 096
101,120,726
115, .577, 200
112, 6.37,-640
111, 4()4, 693
100, 641, 694

23.9
22.8

24
22.9
22.9
20.9
21.6
20.5
23.2
22.8
22.6
20. 9

.21
22.4
22.6
22.8
21.2
19.7
21.1
20.2
20.7
19.2
20.3
20.6
20.2
20/6
20.6
20.8
22.6
21.6
38.8
34.3

N O T E . — P r i o r t o J u n e 20, 1874, t h e r e q u i r e d r e s e r v e i u S t a t e s a n d T e r r i t o r i e s w a s 15 p e r
REDEMPTION

Jan.
Apr.
Julv
Oct^
Jan.
Apr.
June
Oct.
Jan.
Mar.
June
Oct.
Dec.
Mar.
Apr.
June
Oct.
Dec.
Peb.
Apr.
June
Oct.
Dec.
Peb.
Apr.
June
Sept.
Doc.
Feb.
Mav
June
Oct.

224
225
225
223
220
• 220
219
219
218
218
216
215
218
223
225
226
230
226
228
227
227
230
233
230
230
231
229
227
227
227
228
230

6,1868.
6,1868.
6,1868.
5,1868
4,1869.
17,1869.
12,1869.
9,1869,
22, 1870.
24,1870.
9,1870.
8,1870.
28,1870.
18, 1871.
29,1871.
10,1871.
2,1871.
16.1871.
27,1872,
19,1872
10,1872
3,1872
27,1872,
28,1873
25, 1873
13,1873
12,1873
26, 1873
27, 1874
1,1874
26,1874
2, 1874

439, 653, 338
429,084,929
493, 814, 023
440,170, 650
428,310,661
400, 006, 281
425, 263, 320
403, 632, 332
447, 831, 836
446, 089, 472
460, 563,192
409, 354, 636
423, 129,686
469, 716, 268
478, 079, 967
504,449,317
484, 634,132
456, 721, 899
475, 032, 357
461,111,331
500, 037, 031
443, 845, 782
462, 03.5, 037
478, 040, 388
465, 796, 482
502, 959, 230
47.5, 521, 916
45.3,081,026
518, 570, 014
523, 075, 980
528, 619,121
521,561,727

109,91.3,335
107, 271, 231
123,453,505
110, 042, 664
107, 077, 665
100, 001, 571
106,315,832
100,908,081
111, 9.57, 959
•111,522,368
11.5, 140, 797
102, ,338, 658
105, 782, 421
117,429,067
119,519,991
126,112,328
121,158,532
114,180, 474
118,758,089
115. 277, 832
125, 009, 257
110,961,445
115, 508, 759
119,510,097
116, 449,120
• 125, 739, 807
118, 880, 480
113, 270, 257
129,642,504
130,768,995
106,380,827
106,136,122

146, 041, 738
130,148, 347
160, 352, 080
139, 227, 396
140, .320, 761
11.5, 570, 842
125, 468, 496
127, 256, 666
155, 898, 260
143,139, 798
147, 754, 331
118, 633, 295
124, 066, 544
138, 670, 665
144,809,918
159, 704, 311
134, 463, 829
126, 916, 204
126, 440, 065
124, 840, 245
144, 672, 289
112,152,056
123,136, 887
122, 710, 780
119,676,330
145, 209, 534
118, (579,153
127, 402, 586
1.58, 940,175
1.55, 563, 677
159, 275, 638
14't, 307, 997

33.2
30.3
32.5
3i:6
32.7
28.9
29.5
31.5
34.8
32.1
32.1

29
29.3
29.5
30.3
31.6
27.8
27.8
26.6
27.1
28.9
25; 3
26.7
25.3
2.5.7
• 28.9

25
28.1
30.6
29.5
37.4

34

N O T E . — P r i o r t o J u u e 20, 1874, t h e r e q u i r e d r e s e r v e iu r e d e m p t i o u c i t i e s w a s 25 p e r




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

157

United States at various dates from January 6, 1868, to October 2,1874.
TERRITORIES.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
D u e from redeeming
agents..

Specie.

Five per
omp
Thre per
Legal tend- U. S. certifi- C i n t e roeusn d hClearing- cent, ecerti- ct. redeujpt
o u s e cercates of deers.
tiou liuid.
notes.
tificates.
ficates.
posit.

$43, 795, 478 $2, 565, 221 $36,138, 801
1, SO'4, 017 34, 735, 700
42,892,915
2, 058, 989 36, 247,- 168
51, 732, 763
1,781,317 39, 034, 570
47 060 54:
44, 639 871
2, 819, 665 40, 724, 681
1, 705, 877 37,213,372
39, 009,1.57
1, 597, 541 36, 232, 475
43,608,318
1,573,300 36,21.5,334
39, 382, 014
3,146,141 36, 855, 86.8
50,054,4.59
50,130, 338
3, 324, 052 35, 659, 362
49,017,317
2, 912, 275 36, 992, 740
44, 064, 185
2, 357, 856 35, 465, 915
43, 977, 006
2,359, 126 36, 842, 2.57
5.5, 360, 150
2, 420, 987 3.5, 589, 317
55, 647, 695
2, 504, 655 38, 506, 524
59, 307, 684
2, 032, 371 . 38, 481, 5.50
1,814,927 40, 139, 433
55, 636, 824
2,043,411 39, 380, 993
49, 244, 222
2, 816, 771 39, 792, 119
58,8.56,111
2, 600, 614 42, 485, 632
52, 236, 599
1, 890, 232 41,495,581
57, 830, 847
1, 950,142 42, 717, 294
52, 543, 440
1, 978, 383 43, 228, 892
56, 327, 007
1, 779, 651 41,605,799
63,286,431
1, 567,149 43, 202, 852
59, 018, .321
62, 284, 121
1, 715, 293 42, 800, 960
63, 854, 682
2, 071, 686 42, 279, 728
50,914,603
2, 286, 734 45, 904, 389
66, 814, 671
2, 475, 202 44.017.327
2,431,605 47,603,805
60,112,230
2, 256, 951 44, 633,1.55
61, 978, .337
52, 714, 793
2, 375, 290 32, 885,197

$12, 933, 550
11,806,040
6, 478, 600
2,131, 020

$220, 000
350i 000
1, 485, 000
1, 89.5, 000
2,125, 000
2, 250, 000
2,015,000
2, 270, 000
2, 49!), 000
'2, 585, 000
775, 000 .

1

$1, 440, 000
2, 90.5, (100
4, 265, 000
5, 245, 000
4, 815, 000
4, 595, 000
4, 235, 000
3, 795, 000
3,370,000
3, 265, 000
3,11.5, 000
2,890,000
2, 545, 000
2, 245, 000
2, 040, 0001, 88.5, 000
1,355,000
1, 060, 000
810, 000
690,000
60.5, 000
335, 000
18.5, 000
• 90,000
10, 000
10, 000

'

S

4
5
(i
7
R
q
10
11
l'>
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
''O
'M
00

^3
24
0=^

'>6
07

r i 1,2.50
11,891,414

'^R
9,0
30
31
3-:^

centum of circulation and deposits. Since that date it is 15 per centuin of deposits only.
CITIES.
18, 466, 810
18, 456, 737
24,101, 596
19,904,737
21,087, 196
18, 545, 227
19, .304 317
17, 287, 548
• 21,587,029
23 304 783
25, 618 085
22,211,484
20,-828, 058,
28, 449, 035
29, 413 318
33, 061, .561
31,241,785
28, 741, 375
30. 692, 217
29, 883, 416
33, 733, 421
28, 173, 633
30 074 456
32, 486, 648
29, 797, 236
34, 859, 208
32, 279, 437
21, 843, 566
34, 463, 818
33, 717, 715
35, 50», 075
31,142, .306

15, 538. 758
13,57.5,641
18, 696, 932
9, 686, 044
24, 458, 946
6, 768, 826
15, 882, 535
20, 415,157
43, 008, 597
32^ 703, 399
24, 205, 235
12,108,149
20,199, 998
19,416,341
15, 788, 997
14,181, 640
10, 226, 741
23. 273,114
19; 504, 567
17, 035, 006
18, 040, 032
8, 279, 613
17,068,9.54
15, 998, 022
1.5,301,6.59
26, 234, 795
17,796,781
24, 620, 304
30, 890, 661
30,138, 364
20, 069, 256
18, 865, 654

78, 167, 690
49, 6.54, 519
63,918,932
53,418,905
47,514,619
43, 661, 789
44; 701,- 644
47, 503, 961
49, 256, 634
44,720,616
53,718,011
41, 737, 662
41, 680, 488
.53,251,289
65,006,031
81,923,110
66, 848, 233
52, 633, 689
5.5,118, 281
60, 822, 823
78,001,2.59
59,356,810
57, 358, 477
54.816,110
56, 732, 435
63,205, .531
50, 067, 935
58. 943; 716
58, 620, 696
54, 062, 598
58.423, 307
47, 082, 343

27, 063, 480
27,111,450
12, 994, 620
2, 382, 710

'

6, 490, 000
12, 300, 000
16, 975. 000
16, 475, 000
20, .525, 000
18, 360, 000
21, 99.5, 000
34, 96.5, 000
37, 645, U O
O
45,195, 000
42, 055, 000

.

$17, 956, 000
19, 881, 000
21, 403; 000
19,136, 000
20, 498, 000
20, .599, 000
21, .581, 572
19, 248, 000
20, 322, 070
16, 633, 026
16,195, 000
13, 909, 000
12, 092, 577
8,632,000
5, 600, 000
2,115, 000
1, 370, 000
385, 000
175, 000

centum of circulation and deposits. Since that date it is 25 per centum of deposits only^




1
2
3
4
5
6
7
R
9
10
11

6,805,000
21,350,000
40, 640, 000
53, 835, 000
47, 260, O O
U
46, 595, 000
45, 580, 000
42, 050, 000
2'!, 090, 000
22, 530, 000
22, 810, 000
23, 440, 000
20, 860, 000
16, 955, 000
13, 020, 000
11, 290, 000
5, 825, 000
5, 635, 000
4, 930, 000
3,190, C O
O
•^2, 805, 000
1, 220, 000
775, 000
320, 000

!'>

13
14
15
16
17
IR
19
'^0
'^l
90

03
04
05

'>6
97
'JR

8O.,000
5,162, 694

oq
30
31
3'>

158

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Tahle showing for twenty-four different dates during the years 1870 to 1874, inclusive, tlie per
cities of

isri

1S70
States and Territories.
Jan.
22.

Maine
:..
N e w H.ampshire
Verraont
Massacbusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
,
Pennsylvania
Delaware
M.aryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Viiginia
West Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
;
Fhunda
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas . . . .
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
:..
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
.
Kansas.
Nebraska
Oregon
CaliTornia
Colorado
Utah
N e w Mexico.
AVyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

Mar. J u n e
24.

P e r c t P e r c t P e r ct.
22.5 22.6 22. (I
23.6 21.5 22.3
21.7 19.5 20.7
24.8 22.3 21.7
20.2 17.4 18.4
25.8 24.1 24. 6
23.4 22.1 21.8
24.9 22.7 24.2
22.4 24.0 22.5
25.1 24.6 19.5
27.5 28.2 30.6
17.8
1.8.9
21.5
21.4
28.1

Perct.
20.6
22.1
19.6
20.8
1.9.7
22.0
20.3
22.1
20.1
22.7
27.3

16.7
19.9
24.8
20.8
30.8

30.9
46.2

17.5 ! 1 0 . 7 17.9
49. 6 4.5.7 39.9
22.9 19.6 1 6 . 5
27.3 24.2 20.4
24.7 24.1 22.3
21.3 20.8 19.9
19.3 20.9 19.7
24.7 26.2 20.3
21.0 22.5 19.5
23.1 24.2 21.8
24.6 24.4 21.5
20.1 24.9 23.4
26.9 28.3 21. 2
18.4 23.2 20.1
30.0 33.3 28.0
22.0 32.1 24.1

27.2
26.9
21.2
18.4
22.3
23.5
24.4
22.9
16.8
24.3
21.3
30.4
29.2

Oct.
2.

Dec.
16.

P e r ct P e r c t
22.4
21.8.
•21. 2 25.0
20.6
20.6
22.6
20.2
18.3
18.3
24.2
22.7
24.0
19.5
23.6
22.1
21.8
20.5
20.7
19.3
26.0
27.5

P e r ct.
22.3
22.8
20.6
23.0
19.^1
25.8
22.3
22.8
22.1
20.6
24.1

P e r ct.
22.6
2.5.5
21.3
22.1
20.5
25.1
22.1
24.3
22.0
20.4
26.4

P e r ct.
•21.5
23.3
20.8
20.4
18.3
19.6
19.7
22.2
19.2
22.1
29.3

P e r ct.
18.2
21.0
18.4
18.6
16.5
21.6
18.2
21.2
18.4
17.9
24.5

15.4
17.4
22.8
21.1
29.1

18.0
17.1
18.6
21.6
28.0

17.5
16.2
22.2
24.5
25.5

16.4
16.9
20.7
31.9
30.4

17.6
17.3
21.9
23.1
28.5

16.8
20.1
18.0
18.9
19.4

18.9
20.0
21.4
17.3
19.3

61.5
34.5

22.4
24.9
20.9
18.8
23.3
21.8
23. 2
22.9
19.2
23.5
.19.6
24.1
24.3

40.0
41.4
14.4
20.0
21.9
21.1
20.0
22.1
24.6
22.8
21.9
17.1
20. 1
21.2
25.0
34.1

31.1
50.1
9.7
19.4
21.0
21.4
22.3
21.4
24.6
22.7
22.5
19.4
20.8
22.3
28.8
35.0

34.7
40.0
10.5
20.3
23.2
22.4
23.9
24.8
24.1
24.5
24.6
21.6
20.9
15.8
28.1
33. 1

15.8
38.0
20.6
22.8
19.2
21.5
22.7
22.0
24.2
22.3
23.9
24.4
18.4
21.2
24.9
27.4

27.7
10.4

27.1
15.0
^9.9
39.5
17.9

28.2
12,6
28.4
40.0
20.3

23.5
16.3
13.2
35. 7
16.0
18.2

13.8

Mar.
18.

32.3
6.4

J3.6

15.3

i5."i"

40.7

3.5 13.5

44.1

36.4
25.2

17.8

27.9

29.4

1.5.8

23.4
15.9
18.6
27.3
17.2

42.2

27.9

Averages.

June
10.

28.

16.0
19.6
25.3
26.6
30.1

8.6

Apr.
29.

Oct. D e c .

18.6

26.';V

30.'6'

13.2

22.2

15.1

22.8

29.0
31.0
31.3
41.8
27.2
29.0
34.0
33.5
30.0
32.6
28.3
32.0
32.0
34.6
28.8
26.8
109.5

31.7
29.9
30.6
48.7
27.6
30.1
34.4
30.9
27.8
34.2
29.3
35.0
36.2
40.5
32.3
19.2
74.1

26.7
27.1
25.0,
36.6
28.3
26.0
29.5
35.7
28.8
31.3
33.6
.31.0
30.8
18.7
17.1

30.3

31.7

27.4

18.7
21.7
21.0
19.6
22.1
22.4
23.0
21.6
19.1
^ 19. 3
20.4
24.0
20.9

20. t

22.4

22.8

27.2
31.1

11.4

Redem.ption cities.
N e w York.
Boston
Philadelphia
Albany
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Orleans
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
C hicago
Detroit...'.
Milwaukee
Saint Louis
Leavenworth
San Francisco
Averages.




,
,
,

37.8
31.7
32.3
41.6
27.7
31.3
26.6
43.2
28.4
28.4
29.7
30.4
29.9
32.1
31.5
34.7

.32.2
30.0
33.5
43.4
27.4
.31.1
27.5
28.8
31.4
29.0
28.7
30.6
28.3
31.5
31.6
35.7

32.4 28.5
29.5 29.6
35.0 28.9
44.5 38.2
28.6 29.2
31.5 26.1
27.4 27.3
28.8 2 2 . 1
27.6 32.0
28.9 27.9
27.5 26.3
29.4 30.7
33.3 32.2
37.4 32,9
32.5 27.1
38.4 123.8

29.0
28.9
29.9
41.2
27.2
29.2

123.9

28.1
.32.7
29.9
39. 6
27.3
28.1
28.6
32.3
27.0
28.9
31.0
29.4
36.7

32.5
28.2
30.8
26.4
30.1
30.4
26.8 23.3
25.0
27.7
25.5 !22.2
219. 0
29.3

29.5

24.3
22.0

27.6
26.6
26.9
34.0
24.3
27.2

24.0
14.9
25.8
27.5
28.7
38.5
29.5
25.3
26.4

22.6
57.5
27.8

159

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

centage of reserve to circulation and dej)osiis in each of the States, Territories, and redemption
the Union.
1873

1872
Feb.
27.

Apr.
19.

P e r c t . P e r ct.
21.5
18.4
22.2
20.2
18.7
16.9
20.6
19.4
17.7
17.0
24.0
20.7
21.0
19.9
22.2
22.1
21.4
21.2
21.6
16,8
24.6
21.7
30.8
18.4
'is.'6'
19.7
15.9
22.0
20.9
23.2
20.4
25.9
24.4

June
10.

Oct.
3.

Dec.
27.

Feb.
28.

P e r ct.
22.0
20.2
17.9
19.9
17.4
22.7
19.4
22.7
19.4
21.0
24.0
38.5
18.4
16.5
19.6
22.5
21.2

P e r ct.
19.4
21.6
17.6
20.2
17.6
20.3
18.5
20.8
18.9
20.3
24.2
32.7

P e r ct.
19.8
21.5
17.7
20.4
17.7
24.5
20.0
21.4
18.7
18.0
23. 4
28.1
17.7
19.1
21.4
19.0
31.0

Perct.
23.1
21.3
19.4
21.3
17.6
22.7
20.8
22. 3
19. 5
17.7
23.4
33.4
16.4
19.1
19.8
21.9
21.9

'^i'e'
31.6

14.2
16.9
18.7
17.8
21.5

'28.'9" ""'28.'6' " ' 2 8 . * 9' " i 6 . ' 5 '"•28.'2'
3.5.7
39.7
33.8
26.6
34.7
29.4
19.6
17.3
11.6
14.6
18.6
18.1
17.9
18.1
19.5
21. 1
21.3
21.6
16.5
19.3
20.8
19.4
20.5
18.1
19.1
19.0
20.6
22.2
19.4
18.7
22.8
20.5
23.9
19.3
20.2
21.2
19.5
19.0
18.8
19.8
22.4
20.0
21.1
22.1
22.0
22.0
22.6
23.8
18.6
19 8
17.0
16.5
21.7
19.7
19.5
19.9
19.6
22.9
16.8
19.3
18.0
21.9
23.7
22.2
18.7
16.9
21.0
27.0
.22.5
19.5
24.3
23.7
28.4
27.6
32. 5
20.5
32. 7
26.1
29.1
'21.'o' ' " 2 4 . " 6' " ' 2 4 . ' 7 '
17.3
7.4
9.3
6.9
11.6
21.5
7.8
12.1
17.2
16.3
25. 3
14.9
1 0 . 7 . 16.9 • 31.1
21.1
48.1 - 16.6
18.6
13.6

12.6

iiio

"i4i2

"24.'9

21.8
22.3
17.5
25.8
23.4

21.1

20.1

20.7

19.2

20.3

20.8

25.3
26.1
27.0
32.1
28.0
25.8
35.0
31.1

26.6
26.2
(27.7
30.8

29.1
• 27.4
31.4
34,7
25. 9
27.1
.34.9
26.4
25.9
28.1

24.4
24.5

25.7
25.9
27.3
3.5.7
25.3
27.5

24.8
26.0
27. 8
30.5
28.2
26.9
31.4

20.3
48.1

26.6

23.5

26-8
34.4
28.9
•24.2
2.5.1
39.9
29. 2
25.0

22.4
24.8

.13.7 "'ie.'o'

24.3
29.4
27.3
26.7
30.8

'35.'i * ' " 3 9 . ' 2 '
27.1

28.9

26.7
32.0

24.8
26.6

22.4
21.1
26.5
28.8
27.8
27.7
27.0
29.6

23.5
16 i i
25.3




17.0
24.8
24.1
30.6
27.3
30.9
30.0
29.3
28.6

Sept.
12.

Perct.
19.5
19.3
18.2
20.0
18.2
23.2
19.6
21.9
20.3
i7.1
23.6
34.2
16.4
18.2
17.2

Perct.
19.9
21. 2
18.6
20.2
18.6
23.5
19.0
22.0
19.3
18.1
22.6
30.7
18.3
18.4
22. 2
14.5 17.1
17.2 19.7

Perct.
21.4
20.3
18.7
20.0
18., 6
21. 9
20. 2
21.6
20.3
20.2
24.6
38.0
17.0
17.8
16.4
12.4
14.4

'22.'7' '24." 6'
33.0 40.1
27.4
17.9 18.5
20.8 22.9
19. 6 19.8
21.4 20.0
22.1 24.0
18.6 18.2
19.7 20.1
20.7 24.5
16.9 21.2
2 1 . 8 - 20.1
22.1 21.9
19.0 30.0
30.8 39.5
21.0 22.8
27.1 31.3
16.9 19.9
19.9 22.6
2.5.7 27.0
13.4 19.4
21.0 16.1
19.8 19.6

"is." 8' 29.'6"

20.2

20.6

24.8 24.7
24.9 25.6

2.5.2
26.8
26.1
38.5
28.1
27.9

26.3
32.1
25.2
24.6
16.4
22.5
27.3
26.2
30.9
31.5
28.7
25.5
25.9

21.1 21.1
26.7

Apr. J u u e
25.
13.

13.5 13.2
20.8
20.7
20.7
19.3
23. 1
19.9
20.8
20.2
17.1
20.2
19.3
22.3
29.3
28.4
24.7

25.7

1874

26.5
31.6
26.0
26.2
26.7

24,2
28.8
26.9
25.4
27.1
27.6
25.1
26.2

iyio
25.7

35.4
17.2
20.9
18.4
20.4
18.2
23.9
18.0
23.2
22.2
25.9
19.1
21.0
25.5
30.5
22.9
20.3

Dec.
26.

Feb.
27.

Perct. Perct.
20.0
24. 6
22.6
23.1
18.8
20.2
20.3
22.5
18.0
19.1
22.9 •24.7
21.0
24.4
23.8
26. 5
20.7 '22.0
19.8
18.4
22.6
25.9
34.1
35. 5
18.7
17.4
18.0
19.9
21.2
21.3
16.1
26.7
23.3
20.8
34. 5
20.8
18.5
23.3
19.2
18.5
22.9
19.5
23.1
21.2
19.1
18.1
16.7
17.0
34.6
27.1
30.7

13.4 14.8
11.3 21.0

Perct.
41.1
1
48.4
2
, 39. '8 3
38.0
4
38. 7
5
4.5. 5
6
30.7
7
36. 0
8
29.8
9
29.1 10
39.3 11
46. 5 12
23.9 13
31.4 14
28.0 15
33.8 16
35.4 17
18
"76." 2" '52." 8' 19
55.8 46.5 20
28.8 26.1 21
54. 7 43.4 22
35.5 30.6 23
35.8 .32.9 24
41.7 37.9 25
42.8 37.9 26
34.0 32.5 27
3 5 . 1 . 32.8 28
40.7 28.8 29
32.9 25.7 30
35.2 31.4 31
26.2 30.8 32
30.2 30.8 33
37.9 33.2 34
21.9 19. 0 . 35
40. 9 34.5 36
28.0 35.7 37
41.1 22.6 38
24.2 21.7 39
41.7 26.9 40
44.6 25 6 41
25.9 19.9 42

30.3
29.9
26.1
29.5

20.5

20.8

22.6

21.6

38.8

34.3

23.3 29.7
23.2 22.8

31.7
27.-8
32.1
42.3
28.9
30.5

30.4
27.6
29.4
35.7
27.1
30.0
29.7
33.9
26.2
30.8
28. 5
32.8
26.7
30.9
26.9

34.8
33.9
35.8
51.8
46.9
46.8
34.5
50.1
53.2
37.3
43.8
46.0
42.1
61.8
40.0

33.4
29.8
32.8
46.4
36.7
37.9
34.7
31.6
28.2
35.2
40.7
43.4
40.7
34.9
31.7

25.8
35.5
27.3

29.2
36.3
27.9
28.7
25.1

29.3
29.4
27.4
32.7
25.4

29.2
29.3
30.8
31.2
29.4
25.2

'3i.'4' '33.'s' 2 1 . 9
28.9

Oct.
2

17.7
15.5
25.3
29.8

24.9 22.5
31.6
29.6
35.3
25.2

Juue
26.

Perct. Perct.
22.9 47.9
22. 3 52.7
18.4 48.6
22. 4 . 42.3
18.2 43.7
21.8 54. 0
20. 2 31. 9
22.4 39.6
20.0 36.0
17.5 31.6
23.8 46.2
38.1 50.5
17.1 28.1
17.0 34.0
20.7 35.0
20:3 38.7
20.2 47.1

36.'i '36.3"
42.8 43. 8
26.2 16. 2
19.9 19.7
22.7 23.2
20.5 23.1
19.8 21.5
24.2 24.7
20.0 18.8
22.9 23. 3
21.8 23.7
18.5 •V9..O
19.6 22.0
17.4 19.7
21.7 23.5
27.8 .31.6
15.6 21.3
31.5 31.6
12.4 17.7
17.,0 13.2
22.2 27.9
21.2 22.8
1 4 . 2 19.1
21.9 19.6

24.7
18.8 17.5
23.6
26.3 23.2 23.9 26.6
23.9 26.2 24.8 27.4
29.7

May
1*

24.9

28.1

27.3
28.2
32. 0
30.2
29.9
26.4

2 4 . 2 2 2 i 3 '31." i"
30.6

29.7

37.4

19.6
33.9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

160

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

Lawful money-reserve of the national hanhs, as shown by the reports

States and Territories.

M.aine
New Hampshire
Veimont
Massachusetts'
.•
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Columbia
Virginia
W e s t Vii'ginia
N o r t h Car()lina
South C a r o l i n a
G-eorgia
...:...
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas .:
Ken tucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AVisconsin
Iowa
'
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
U t a h .,
AVyoming
Idaho...-'
Dakota
Montana

Number
Circuiatiou
of b a n k s . a n d deposits.

63
42
42
106
62
80
.221
62
1.56
11
19
1
22
17
10
12

Reserve
r e q u i r e d , 15 R e s e r v e . h e l d
p e r ceut.

9
7
2
30
24
157
91
119
74
41
76
32
29
25
10
1
3
2
6
3
2
1
1

$2,117, 884
1, 100,148
1, 603, 932
8, 439, 263
3, 138, 259
4,518,984
10, 994, 761
4,'0.52, 913
7, 624, 775
400, 324
600, 755
90, 643
1,179, 168
719, 993
652, 326
579, 426
665, 080
34.5,165
286, 662
.50, 499
1,181,297
'1,051,627
5, 551, 886
3, 790, 849
3,415,327
1, 810, 866
979, 687
1, 912. 965
1, 242, 919
820, 868
535, 948
413.692
158, 755
249, 906
69, 216
292, 596
126, 981
30, 604
32, 513
16,448
140, 057

486,180, 369

Totals

13

$14,119,224
7,334,318
10,692,879
56,261,751
20, 921, 7-?S
30,126, .560
73. 298, 407
27,019,417
,50, 831, 834
2, 668, 826
4, 005, 036
604, 287
7,861,123
4, 799, 954
4, 348, 841
3, 862, 842
4, 433, 866
2, 301, 098
1, 911, 077
336, 658
7, 875, 314
7, 010. 847
37, 012, 572
25, 272, 326
22, 768, 846
12,072,441
6, 531, 245
12, 753, 100
8,286,127
5, 472, 455
3, 572, 989
2, 757, 948
1, 058, 366
1, 273, 798'
461,443
1, 950. 638
846, 537
204, 025
216,7.55
109, 656
933, 715

72,- 985, 967

$2,830,410
1, 656,132
2, 006, 662
11,416.476
3, 770, 651
6, 896, 831
15,380,312
6, 439, 856
10, 503, 936
530, 692
904, 906
206, 34^
1, 472, 332
863,998
920, 008
620, 819
1, 033, 904
681, 485
6.59, 371
69, 955
1, 457, 368
1,632,617
7,107. 620
4, 663, 934
5, 218, 361
2, 353, 569
1,511,711
2, 707, 418
1,581,256
991,484
598, 247
• 468,250
366, 459
345, .589
96, 998
598, 592
125, 087
61,874
- 64,724
28,650
275, 844
101,120, 726

R a t i o of
reserve.

. 20.
22. 6
18.8
20.3
18.
22.9
21.
23.8
20.7
19.8
22.6
34. 1
18.7
18. •
21. 2
16^1
23.3
29.6
34. 5
20.8
18.5
23.3
19.2
18.5
22.9
19. 5
23.1
21.2
19.1
18.1
16.7
17.
34.6
27.1
21.
30.7
14.8
30.3
29.9
26.1
29.5
20.8

'• R e s e r v e r e q u i r e d iu California gold b a n k s o u t s i d e of S a u

Lawful money-reserve of the national banks—Coutinued.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
AVashington
N e w Orlean s
Louisville
Cincinn.ati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

Reserve
r e q u i r e d , 25 R e s e r v e held
per cent.

R a t i o of
reserve.

"

,...

'.^

San F r a n c i s c o




$84, 565, 376
9, 758, 791
55, 684, 041
16,117,419
19,2.50,214
1, 785. 230
8, 908,126
2, 774, 649
9, 690, 948
6, 278, 279
'22, .561, 9.32
. 4,202,304
3,106, 307
7, 881, 822

$21,141, 344
2, 439, 698
13,921,010
4. 029, 355
4, 812, 553
446, 308
2, 227, 031
693, 662
2, 422, 737
1, 569, 570
5, 640, 483
1, 050, 576
776, 577.
1, 970, 456

$19,249,115
3, 546, 877
16, 270, 389
4, 499, 579
5,538,117
448, 303
2,127,210
687, 402
2, 835, 868
1, 838, 785
6, 946, 654
1, 310, 629
912,803
1, 983, 934

22.8
36.3
29.2
27. 9
28.7
25.1
23.9
'24.8
29.2
29.3
30. 8
31.2
29.4
25.2

252, 565, 438

.

Totals
NewYork

Circulation
Number
of b a n k s . a n d deposits.

63,141,360

68,195, 665

27.0

195, 919, .362

48, 979, 841

58, 200, 494

4, 596, 226

1,149, 056

1,006,427

21.9

161

COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.
of their condition at the close of business on December 26, 1873.
Classification of r e s e r v e h e l d .
D u e from
redeeming
agents.
$1, 698, 825
1,050,165
1,183, 904
6, 656, 064 ,
2, 302, 911
4, 213, 233
9, 228, 981
3, 972,-689
4, 825, 342
• 262, 705
353, 239
28, ..560
681, 780
284, 552
517, 490
277, 193
488, 727
360, 220
147, 944
8, 515
638,149
617, 473
2, 583, 690
1, 612, 344
2, 521, 519
821, 428
618, 674
1, 086, 303
5.57, 811
4.35,489
196,554
115, 947
243, 074
42, 407
23, 067
154, 251
19, 905
14, 308

Specie.

$35, 000
32, 242
68, 835
179, 041
41,152
107, 200
234, 179
43, 755
102, 444
2,634
18, 908
3,778
13, 616
12, 216
31, 332
14, 761
37,189
15, 895
229, 759
"716
22, 516
48, 952
69,817
98, 656
56, 445
49, 299
10, 843
32, 668
26,126
14, 481
3,838
10,247
72, 585
303, 182
589
118, 553
12, 928
1,999
17,740

Legal-tenders.

086, 585
573, 725
593, 923
671, 371
421, 588
551, 398
287,1.52
368, 412
501,150
255, 353
532, 759
174, .000
776, 936
557, 230
371,186
328, 865
507, 988
305, 370
281, 668^
60, 724
736, 703
966,192
454,113
887, 934
640, .397
482, 842
882,194
588, 447
997, 319
541, .514
397, 855
342, 056
50, 800

5, 831
63, 340

90, 618
2,286,734

$10, 000
160, 000
910, 000
5,000
25, 000
630, 000
55, 000
7.5,000
10, 000

10, 000

60, 000

"6.5,'666

73, 342
325, 788
92, 254
45, ,567
46, 984
22, 819
121, 886

50,9.14,603

States and-Territories.

U . S.
c e r t i i i c a t e s of
deposit.

Maine
N e w Haraj)shire
Verraont
Massachusetts
•.
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New. Y o r k
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
'.^
Delaware..:
Maryland..
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virgiuia.
W e s t Virgiuia
N o r t h Carolina
S o u t h Carolina
Georgia
A l a b a m a ...•
Texas
Arkansas
..:..
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
:
Oregon
California
i^....
New Mexico
Colorado.'.
Utah
•.
Wyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

45, 904-, 389

Totals .

F r a n c i s c o , 25 p e r c e n t , on c i r c u l a t i o n a n d 15 p e r c e u t . on deposits.

CITIES, as shown by the reports of Deceniber 26,1873.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
D u e from
redeeming
agents.

Specie.

U.S.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o u .

Legal-tenders. certificates of
deposit.

$6, 039, 768
2, 295, 377
4, 052, 780
1,433,376"
2, 244, 092
75, 929
652, 563
269, 249
961, 788
750, 735
1, 630, 022
467,144
291, 847
678, 896

$2, 410, 734
112, 000
936, .542
38, 424
79,103
7,559
125, 037
737
44, 080
7,550
103, 587
3, 329
26, 847
16, 418

| 9 , 068, 613
679, 500
7,186, 067
2, 927, 779
2, 704, 922
364, 815
1, 349, 610
417, 416
780, 000
1,080,500
5, 213, 045
840,156
574,109
1, 288, 620

$1, 730, 000
460, 000
4,095,000
100, 000
510, 000

21, 843, 566

3, 911, 947

34, 475,152

19, 701, 930

24, 468, 564

14, 030, 000

1
o

7, 965, 000

1, 006, 427

11 F



1, 050, 000

20, 000

/

Boston^
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Washington
N e w Orleans
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

....

•3

4
'

6
7
Q

^

0
10
11
IO

13
14

New York

15

San F r a n c i s c o

16

162

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Lawful-money reserve of tlie national banlcs—Coutiuued.

States and Territories.

M.aine
N e w HamxJshire
Verraont
M a s s a c h u s e t t s ..Rhode Island
Connecticut
l^ew Y o r k
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
DelaAvare
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Colurabia
Virginia
AVest A^irginia . . i . . .
N o r t h Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Iventucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AViscolisiu
1
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
.
Oregon
California
1 ::='....
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
AVyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana
Tot.als

Number
Circuiatiou
of b a n k s . a n d deposits.

63
42
42
166
62
80
220
62
157
11
19
1
22
17
10
12
13
9
7
2
30
23
157
91
119
73
42
76
31
28
25
10
1
3
2

Reserve
r e q u i r e d , 15
p e r ceut. '

R a t i o of
R e s e r v e held. r e s e r v e .

$2,157, 962
1,138, 498
1, 642, 621
8, 706, 832
3,127,148
4, 818,113
11, 627, 075
4, 339, 826
7, 909, 052
428, 042
616, 452
92, 924
1,251,110
752, 800
662, 256
679, 702
659, 864
378,716
340,194
6.5, 175
1,231,493
1, 216, 707
5, 707, 929
3, 958, 035
3, 827, 610
1,869,185
1,011,905
2, 140, 963
1,271,338
880, 879
543, 365
451, 343
150, 342
*242, 818
. 72,917
368, 791
138, 953
30, 673
27, 992
13, 396
149, 870

$3, 542, 594
1, 752, 214
2,211,926
13, 051, 887
3, 984, 737
7, 919, 486
18, 950, 729
7, 670, 936
11,596.177
. 524, 515
1, 063, 747
219, 816
. 1, 452, 984
997, 701
939, 025
1, 209, 034
914, 096
912,107
970, 714
113, 931
1, 637, 076
1, 845, 299
7, 800, 420
5, 222, 208
6,178,150
2, 486, 672
1, .541, 597
3,110, 726
1,564,243
1,151, 914
628, 625
651, 734
279,168
191, 092
82, 800
775, 479
115, 236
45, 343
39, 602
12, 699
218, 761

24.6
23.1
20.2
22.5
19.1
24.7
24.4
26.5
22.
18.4
25. 9
35.5
17.4
19.9
21.3
26.7
20.8
36.1
42.8
26.2
19.9
22.7
•20.5
19.8
24.2
20
22. 9
21.8
18.5
19.6
17.4
21.7
27.8
15.6
17
31.5
12.4
22.2
21. 2
14.2
21.9

510, 946, 655

-'

$14, 386, 414
7, 589, 983
10, 950, 805
58, 045, 549
20, 847, 656
32,120, 756
77,513,832
28, 932,175
52, 727, 013
2, 853, 611
4.109, 679
619, 494
8, 340, 730
5, 018, 709
4,415,042
4, 531, 349
4, 399, 092
2, 5^4, 775
2, 267, 960
434, 501
8,209,951
8, 111, 381
38, 052, 862
26,386,901
25, 517, 401
12,461,231
6, 746, 035
14, 273, 087
8, 475, 585
5, 872, .527
.3,622,433
3, 008, 951
1, 002, 278
1, 226, 293
486,113
2. 458, 607
926, 351
204, 488
186, 616
89, 306
999,133

76, 700, 872

115, 577, 200

22.6

* R e s e r v e r e q u i r e d in California gold b a n k s , o u t s i d e of S a u

Lauful-money reserve of the national hanlcs—Coutinued.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

Reserve
N u r a b e r C i r c u l a t i o n , r e q u i r e d , 25
R e s e r v e h e l d . R a t i o of
of b a n k s . a n d dexiosits.
reserve.
p e r ceut.

Bostou
Albany
Philadelphia..
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
AVashington ..
N e w Orleans..
Louisville ...'.
Cincinnati.'..;
Cleveland
Chicago::
Detroit
Milw,aukee . . .
Saint Louis ...

$92, 806,140
10,316,071
57,194. 064
18, 277, 624
21, 431, 969
1, 839, 850
9, 638, 719
3,322.688
10, 40.5, 891
5, 95.5, 400
26, 768, 205
4, 670, 534
3,419,129
10, 449, 351

Totals ...
New York
San F r a n c i s c o




$23, 201, 535
2,579,018
14,298,516
4, 569, 406
5, 357, 992
459, 963
2, 409, 680
830, 672
2,601,473
1, 488, 850
6, 692, 051
1,167,633
854, 782
2, 612, 338

$25,
4,
18,
5,
6,

761, 928
363, 089
383, 697
274, 728
541, 555
434, 075
2, 568, 511
910, 768
2, 844, 956
1, 679, 837
8. 571,1.30
1,410, ,531
1, 021, 774
2, 759, 482

27.8
42.3
,32.1
28.9
30.5
23.6
26.6
27.4
27.3
28.2
32
.30.2
29.9
26. 4
29.1

276, 495, 635
43

69,123, 909

82j ,526, 061

237, 088,169

59, 272, 042

7,5, 208, 002

4,986,210

. 1, 246, 553

1, 206,112

24.2

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
STATES, as shown by the rexiorts of February 27,1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.

Due from
redeeming
agents.
$2,492,086
1,168,199
1, 406, 079
8, 426, 224
2,464,914
5, 269, 834
12, 988,189
5, 252, 024
6, 290, 910
270, 572
429, 911
79, 275
681, 588
432, 732
454, 172
482, 307
349, 699
539,143
235, 7.57
42, 513
901, 982
710, 048
3,- 535, 570
2, 337, 280
3, 657, 890
1,186, 261
740, 046
1, 432, 638
720, 979
603, 634
279, 208
357, 987
134, 522
13,320
22, 839
295, 387
26,174
5, 284

Specie.

$29, 918
78, 974
62, 536
335,297
37, .563
152, 202
223,012,
86, 895
72, 986
514
20,411
3,541
19, 397
13, 304
32, 188
18, 454
48, 584
21, 482
271,134
757
8,185
63, 596
83, 414
97, 791
64, 386
48,031
21, 960
32, 453
18, 509
17, 201
4, 351
6, 231
108, .326
177, 772
294
150, 671
7, 952
1,740
9, 602

2,841
94, 653

23, 558

66, 814, 671

2, 475, 202

Legal-tenders.

^1, 000, 560
500, 041
563, 311
3, 370, 366
1, 457, 260
2, 457, 450
4, 994, 528
2, 292, 017
5,157, 281
243, 429
613, 425
137, 000
751, 999
541, 665
452, 665
708, 273
515,813
351, 482
463, 823
70, 661
666, 909
1, 071, 655
4,181,436
2, 677,137
2, 455, 874
1, 242, 380
7.59, 591
1, 645, 635
824, 755
531, 079
345, 066
287, 516
36, 320

States and Territories.

U.S.
certificates of
deposit.
$20, 000
5,000
180, 000
920, 000
25, 000
40, 000
745, 000
.40, 000
75, 000
10, 000

10, 000

110, 000
10, 000
20, 000

59, 667
329, 421
81, 110
38, 319
30, 000
9,858
100, 550

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermout
- —
Massachusetts .......
Rhode Islaud
Connecticut
.New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvauia
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Virgiuia
AVest V i r g i n i a
N o r t h Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AVisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kausas
Nebraska
Oregon
Califoruia
NCAV M e x i c o . . . . . . . .
Colorado..'..
Utah
AVyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

44, 017, 327

F r a n c i s c o , is 25 p e r ceut. on c i r c u i a t i o u a n d 15 p e r cent, ou d e p o s i t s .

CITIES, as shown hy the rexiorts of February 27, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
• D u e from
r e d e e ra i u g
ageuts.

Specie.

$11,388,499
3, 092, 729
5, 802, 815
2, 303, 681
2, 406, 629
• 145,932
1, 023, 228
414,881
1, 354, 625
727, 705
3, 290,134
626, 331
578, 583
1, 308, 046

$3, 518, 678
8, 202
692, 779
44, 005
330, 940
4, 762
137. 375
i;266
72, 331
8,632
123,711
15,064
31,258
9, 086

34, 463, 818

4, 998, 089

Legal-tenders.

$7, 844, 751
762,158
6, 728,103
2, 827, 042
2,188, 986
283, 381
1, 407, 908
494, 621
758, 000
918, 500
5,157, 285
769,136
391, 933
* 1, 442, 350




$3, 010,
500,
5,160,
100,
1, 615,

000
000
000
OGO
000

660, 000
25, 000
20, 000

C i t i e s of r e d e m p t i o n .

Bostou
Albany
Philadelphia..
Pittsburgh...
Baltimore
Washington.,
NewOrleans.
Louisville
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee ...
Saint Louis ...

31, 974,154
26, 646, 542

1, 206,112

U.S.
certificates of
deposit.

23, 875, 000

New York ...,
San FranciscO;

163

164.

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

Lawful-money reserve of ihe national banlcs—Continued.

States and Territories.

Maine
New Hampshire
A^ermout
Massachusetts
.Rhode Islaud
Coni'ecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware —
Maryland
District of Columbia.
Virginia
AVest .Virginia
North Carolina
South Caroliua
Georgia
,
Alabama
,
Texas
Arkansas
. Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
ludiana
Illinois
Michigan
AVisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri...
Kansas
Nebraska.
Oregon
California
New M'exico
'Colorado
Utah
AVyoraing..:
Idaho
Dakota
Montana
Totals .

Reserve
Nuraber Circulation
Ratio of
of bauks. and deposits. required, 15 Reserve held. reserve
per ceut.

63
42
42
166
62
80
221
62
158
11
19
1
22
17
11
12
13
9
8
2
30
23
157
91

3
2
9
3
2
1
1
5

$2,147,139
1,131,.522
1, 638,170
9,169, 869
3, 208, 349
4, 833, 875
11,423,353
4,414,113
8,247,505
440,011
641,860
99, 502
1, 282, 376
745, 237
661,853
682, 994
662,131
369, 269
352, 659
. 67,403
1,238,824
1, 265, 857
5, 703, 708
4, 208, 2.32
3, 90,5, 905
1, 920, 726
1, 0.52, .324
2,247,217
1, 301, 235
894, 072
612,897
439, 596
161, 725
2.50,100
73, 423
433,148
141, 045
32, 657
26, 261
15, 635
158, 081

$3, 277, 618
1, 680, 047
2, COS, 190
13, 681,158
3, 890, 033
7, 034, 269
15, 387, 817
6, 604, 934
10, 944, 755
513, 360
1, 019, 481
252, 483
1, 465, 268
844, 067
912, 9.58
1,199, 944
892, 459
892,812
1, 030,189
. . .72, 589
1, 628, 704
1, 953, 699
8, 765, 073
6, 03.5, 861
6. 4.52,128
2, 407, 388
1, 633,164
3, 544, 225
648, 699
310, 065
805, 663
766, 960
340, 739
270, 998
64, 444
911,647
166, 456
60, 643
39, 880
19, 879
206, 894

22.9
22.3
18.4
22.4
18.2
21.8
20.2
22.4
20
17.5
23.8
38.1
17.1
17
20.7
26.3
20.2
36.3
43.8
16.2
19.7
23.2
23.1
21.5
24.7
18.8
23.3
23.7
19
22
19.7
23.5
31.6
21.3
13.2
31. 6
17.7
27.9
22.8
19.1
19.6

521, 953, 283

118
73
42
75
31
28
25
10

$14,314,2.57
7, 543, 477
10, 921,136
61,132, 459'
21, 388, 991
32, 22.5, 832
76,155, 690
29, 427, 418
54, 983, 365
2, 933, 410
4, 279, 068
663, 349
8, ,549,176
4, 968, 247
4,412.3.54
4, 553, 292
4,414,207
2, 461, 794
2,351,061
449, 353
8, 258, 827
8, 439, 044
38, 024, 719
28, 054, 882
26, 039, 364
12, 804, 840
7, 015, 494
14,981,445
8, 674, 902
5, 960, 483
4, 085, 978
3, 263, 971
1, 078,168
1, 274, 898
489, 486
2, 887, 654
940, 299
217,712
175, 070
104, 235
1, 053, 876

78, 351, 858

112, 637, 640

21.6

Reserve of California gold-banks, outside of San

Laivful money reserve of the national hanks—Coutiuued.

Cities of redemption.

Reserve
Nuraber Circulation
Ratio of
of bauks. aud dej)osits. required, 25 Reserve held, riBserve.
per ceut.

Bostou
Albany
,
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
..
Washington . . .
New Orleans—
LouisA'^ille
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Chicago
Detroit
Milwaukee
Saint Louis

$92,631,780
10,298,541
57,003,728
18, 522, 482
22, 471, 453
2, 246, 471
9, 933, 620
3,56.3,710
11,508,618
5, 901, 188
30, 697, 308
4, 940, 619
3, 397, 076
10,677,313

$23,1.57, 945
$25, .579, 848
2, 574, 635
3,671,991
14, 250, 932
16, 731, 600
4, 630, 621
5,016,450
5,617,863
6, 743, 317
561,618
667, 001
2, 483, 405
3, 371, 227
890, 927
934,155
2, 877,155 . 3, 539, 470
1, 47.5, 297
1, 683, 270
7, 674, 327
10, 080, 071
1, 235,155
1, 320, 874
849, 269
1, 049, 493
2, 669, 328
2, 869, 998

Totals

283, 793, 907

70, 948, 477

83, 258, 765

New York City

234, 842,113^

58, 710, 528

71,313,963

San Fr.ancisco .

4, 439, 960

1,109, 990

27.6
35. 7
29.4
27.1
30.
29.7/
33.9
26.2
30.8
28.5
32.8
26.7
30.9
26.9




29.3

22.3

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

165

STATES, as shown by the reports of May 1, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
D u e from
redeeming
ageuts.
$2,125, 721
1,107, 546
1,183,167
8, 785, 207
2, 202, 904
4, 299, 860
9,313,983
.4,01.5,140
5,'046, 946
211, 367
448, 893
115, 308
704, 731
342, 344
38.5, 364
578,128
274, 588
502, 220
423, 789
18, 244
8.57, 675
849, 063
3, 075, 208
B, 810, 928
3, 753,161
1,013,597
849, 642
1, 727, 843
763, 987
731, 904
394, 948
443, 704
185,616
44, 926
15, 917
383, 086
37, 086
25, 055

Specie.

$35, 919
81,141
52, 600
288, 232
31, 205
145, 667
206, 007
88, 308
69, 225
642
20, 024
4,175
20, 713
16, 494
36, 069
12, 264
42, 847
36, 249
220, 284
719
8,696
47, 763
82, 688
•QC, 832
64, .565
28, 586
19, 722
36, 786
35,143
21, 616
3, 703
5,916
97, 603
. 226,072
1,424
151, 623
47,130
749
21, 824

Legal-tenders.

$1,095, 978
481, 360
612, 423
572, 719
630, 924
538, 742
092, 827
451, 486
748, 584
271, 351
550, 564
133, 000
739,824
475, 229
491,525
609, 552
575,. 024
3.54, 343
386,116
53, 626
692, 333
056, 873
607,177
014,101
609, 402 •
35.5, 205
743, 800
779, 596
849, 569
556, 545
407, 012
317,340
57, 520

1,120
62, 314

30, 380
2, 431, 605

$20, 000
10, 000
160, 000
1, 035, 000
25, 000
50, 000
775, 000
50, 000
80, 000
30, 000

70, 000
120. 000
25, 000
• 10,000
20, 000

47,103
376, 938
82, 240
34, 839
18,0.56
18, 7,59
114,200

60,112, 230

States and Territories.

U.S.
certificates of
dep osit.

Maine
New Harapshire
Vermont
1
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
,
New Jersey
Pennsylvania . . . . . . , . ,
Delaware
,
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a .
Virginia
West Virginia
N o r t h Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkf\nsas
Kentucky
Tennessee
:
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
California
N e w Mexico
Colorado
Utah
AVyoming
Idaho
Dakota
Montana

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
.39
40
41

47, 003, 805

F r a n c i s c o , is 25 p e r cent, on circulation a n d 15 p e r cent, on d e p o s i t s .

CITIES, as shown by the rexiorts of May 1, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
D u e frora
redeeming
agents.
$12,
2,
4,
1;
- 2,

385, .585
409, 264
609, 748
630, 941
539, 388
378,513
1,900,255
397, 662
• 1, 624, 526
.581,402
2, 999, 622
477, 328
480, 863
1, 253, 934
33, 669, 031

Specie.

Legal-tenders.

!, 947, 8.52
6, 927
397, 856
48, 920
357, 622
11,514
.274,',560
2,841
17, 944
11,868
55, 441
23, 978
33, 230
20, 604

$7, 286, 411
755, 800
7, 083, 996
3, 236, 589
2,146, 307
276, 974
1,196, 412
533, 652
862, 0001, 065, 000
6, 490, 008
819, 568
515, 400
1, 595, 460

4, 211,157

33, 863, 577

U.S.
certificates of
deposit.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

Boston
Albany
Philadelphia.,
Pittsburgh...
Baltimore
,
AVashington .
N e w Orieaus.
Louisville .....
1, 035, 000" C i n c i n n a t i
25, OCO Cleveland
5.35,. 000 Chicago
Detroit
20, 000 M i l w a u k e e . .
Saint Louis ..

$2,960,
500,
4, 640,
100,
1, 700,

000
000
000
000
000

1
2
3
4
5
6
7.
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

11, 515, 000

24, 984, 942
48, 684

26,130, 000 NCAV Y o r k C i t y .

15

942, 265

San F r a n c i s c o . . .

16




166

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Laivful money reserve of the national banks—QontmwQ(\.
Number
of b a n k s .

States and Territories.

Maine
,

NCAV Y o r k

-ao
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
20
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

$6, 575, 377
2, 831, 607
3, 896, 645
26, 339, 370
8, 810, 554
15, 217, 696
46, 681, 568
18,172, 876
31, 736, 620
1, 530, 872
2. 220, 415
449, 285
5, 416, 729
2,664, Oil
2, 575, 206
1, 938, .525
-1, 748, 232
1, 020, 869
1, 575, 949
235,101
2, 770, 615
5, 319,189
21, 6.59, 666
12, 886, 955
17, 495, 027
7, 524, 687
4, 8.57, 574
10, 427, 809
7, 224, 652
3, 842, 414
2, 787, 546
2, 450,194
844, 294
*1, 236, 067
2, 527,157.
547, 980
205, 990
164, 977
101, 911
63. 756
855, 680

63
43
42
166
62
80
221
62
159
11
18
1
20
18
11
12
13
9
8
2
32
23
157
91
118
75
42
75
31
28
25
10
1
3
9
3
2
2
1
1

NCAV H a m p s h i r e

Averment
Massachusetts
Rhode Islaud
Connecticut

Deposits.

l^Qw J e r s e y
Pennsylvauia
DelaAvare
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Colurnbia.
Virginia
AVest V i r g i n i a
N o r t h Carolina
South Caroliua
Georgia
Alabama
Texas.
Arkansas
KentuckyTeunessee
Ohio..
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AA^'isconsin
loAva
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregon
Califoruia
Colorado
Utah
NCAV M e x i c o . . ^ .

Wyouiing
Idaho.....:
Dakota
Montana
Totals .

287, 431, 647

1,755

* I n c l u d e s circulation.

R e s e r v e required, 15 p e r
ceut.

R e s e r v e held.

$986. 307424,74!
584, 497
3, 9.50, 906
1,321, .583
2, 282, 654
7, 002, 235
2, 725, 931
4, 760, 493
229, 631
333, 062
67, 393
812, 509
399, 602
386, 281
290,779
262, 235
153, 130
236, 392
35, 265
41.5, 592
797, 878
3, 248, 950
1,933,043
2, 624. 254
1,128, 703
728, 636
1, 564,171
1, 083, 698
576, 362
418,132
'
367,529
126, 644
i 243, 906
379, 074
82,197
30, 899
24, 747
15, 287
'9, ,563
128, 352

$3,146, 915
1, 492, 703
1, 894, 799
11,134, 235
3, 847,199
8,221,740
14, 881, 736
. 7,196,573
11,424,216
484, 851
1, 026, 075
226, 676
1,521,746
904, 880
902, 374
749, 490
823, 964
716, 847
878, 727
67,619
1, 51.5, 079
1, 886, 395
7, 752, 980
5, 375, 992
7, 481, 952
2, 561, 094
1, 705, 299
4, 248, 359
2, 379, 096
1, 350, 766
730, 030
740, 370
320, 352
270,450
1,033,148
153,127
- • 84, 565
39, 993
42, 463
28, 421
221, 397

43,173, 243

111, 464, 693

R a t i o of reserve.

P e r cent.
47.9
52.7
48.6
42. 3
43.7
54.
31.9
39.6
'36.
31.6
46.2
50.5
28.1
34.
35.
38.7
47.1
70.2
5.5.8
28.8
54.7
35.5
35.8
41.7
42.8
34.
35. 1
40.7
32. 9
35.2
26.2
30.2
37.9
21.9
40.9
28.
4L1
24.2
41.7
44.6
25.9
38.8

.t ReserA'-e of California gold b a n k s o u t s i d e of

Lawful money reserve of the national banlcs—Coutinued.

Number
of b a u k s .

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

1 Boston
Albany
3 Phil.adelphia
4 Pittsburgh
Baltimore .
fi AVashington .
7 NeAV Orieaus
8 LouisA'^ille . . . .
9 Ciucinnati
10 C l e v e l a n d
11 Chicago
T> D e t r o i t
13 MilAvaukee
14 S a i n t L o u i s
0

•
^

Totals .
15 N e w Y o r k
16

San F r a n c i s c o . . . .




-.

Deposits.

Reserve required, 25 p e r
ceut.

R e s e r v e held.

R a t i o of reserve.

$16, 853, 8.55
2, 573, 994
11, 265, 691
.3,056,858
^3,719,013
351, 393
1, 596, 434
425, 353
2,124, 8.55
9.55,117
7,140, 033 .
881, 769
822, 792
1, 642,153

$22, 876, 042
,5, 330, 791
16,122, 820
5, 739, 604
6, 959, 928
485, 022
3,197, 781
90.5, 815
3,171, 269
1; 672, 041
13,126, 091
1, 485, 204
2, 035, 090
2, 630,168

P e r cent.
33.9
5L8
35.8
46.9
46.8
34.5
50. 1
53.2
37.3
43.8
46.0
42.1
61.8
40.0

• 51
7
29
16
15
3
8
6
5
6 •
18
3
4
7-

• $67, 415, 421
10, 295, 975
45, 062, 765
12, 227, 433
14, 876, 053
1, 40.5, 572
6, 385, 737
1,701,410
8, 499, 420
3, 820, 467
28, 560, 131
3, 527, 077
3,291, 168
6,568,613

178

213, 637, 242

. 53,409,310

8.5, 737, 666

40.1

48

206, 381, 830

51, 595, 458

71,828,550

34.8

*5, 504, 234

1, 376, 059

1,709,422

31,1

2

* In eludes circulation.

167

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.
STATES, as shoivn by the reports of June 26, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e h e l d .
Diie frora r e serve agents.

$2, 036, 829
934, 637
1, 063, 057
6, 402, 989
2,199, 149
5, 588, 813
8, 932, 094
4, 762, 588
5, 926, 090
193, 984
468, 845
93,411
737, 817
417, 815
302, 813
177, 683
247, 695
371, 382
;> 217,728
24, 545
803, 349
. -868, 797
3, 744, 263
2, 400, 568
4, 835, 208
1,266,849
937, 035
2; 464, 451
1, 397, 930
731,680
304, 922
391.395
148, 864
21, 933
418, 034
. 24, 989
37,998
6,000
1,000
44.
73, 064
61, 978, 337

Specie.

$28, 426
14, 946
36.103
204, 297
30, 088
132, 509
197, 229
82,366
62, 218
642
18, 877
4, 265
22, 331
1.5, 097
39, 795
14, 664
36, 769
21, 395
281, 726
904
10,169
34, 933
78. 362
106. 694
83, 664
17, 995
23, 592
35, 798
26, 291
19. 556
4, 775
4,764
70,188
248, .517
187, 847
23, 248
1, 341
1,019
13, 318

Legal-tenders.

$1, 061, 660
533,120
59.5,639.
3, 435,199
1, 582, 962
2, 450, 418
5, 002, 913
2, 301, 619
5, 360, 908
260, 225
538, 353
129, 000
761, 598
461, 968
559, 766
557,143
539, 500
324,070
379, 273
42,170
631, 561
982, 665
3, 930, 355
2, 718,.730
2, 538, 080
1, 266, 250
724, 672
1,748,110
954, 875
599,530
420, 333
344, 211
101, 3S0

20, 233

44, 633,1.55

$20,000
10, 000
200, 000
1, 085, 000
35, 000
50, 000
745, 000
50, 000
75, 000
.30, 000

150,
25,
10,
20,

$6, 750

'•4,'566'

000
000
000
000

427, 267
104, S90
45, 226
32, 974
28,145
23, 377
128,100

2, 256, 951

U . S. certifi- F i v e x ) e r c e n t .
redemption
c a t e s of defund.
posit.

States and Territories.

Maine
N e w Hamp.shire
Vermont
Massachusetts,
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
PennsylA'auia
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Colurabia . .
Virginia
W e s t A^^irginia
N o r t h Carolina
South Caroliua
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
?.
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio,
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AVisconsin
loAva
Minnesota
Missouri:
Kansas'.
Nebraska
Oregon
California
Colorado
Utah
•
N e w Mexico . . :
W.yoming
;
Idaho.,
Dakota
Montana

2, 585, 000 .

Sau F r a n c i s c o is 25 p e r cent, on c i r c u i a t i o u a u d 15 p e r c e u t . on deposits.

CITIES, as shown by the rexiorts of June 26, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.
D u e from r e serve agents.

$9, 057, 017
3, 889, 303
4, 630,112
2, 368, 972
2,710,124
261, 428
1,212, 9.52
395, 427
1, 592, 263
792, 444
5,107, 772
68.5,610
1, 398, 792
1 123,446

Specie.

$2,158, 426
7, 257
186, 622
40, 837
1,56,015
5,692
185, 983
1, 388 •
73, 006
9,097
239, 408
18, 089
33, 585
12, 657

Legal-tenders.

U. S. certifi- F i v e p e r cent,
c a t e s of d e
redemption
fund.
posit.

282,413

$3,785,000
675, 000
4,990,000
100, 000
1, 560, 000

3, 128, 062

34, 428, 942
23, 994, 365

32,240,000

1, 427, 009




Boston
Albany
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
AVashington

1

12, 955, 000

15,514,185

35, 225, 662

$7, 875, ,599
759, 231
6, 316, 086
3, 229, 795
2, .533, 789
217, 902
1, 798, 846
509, 000
731,000
845, 500
7,083,911
781, 505
482, 713
1, 264, 065

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

NCAV O r l e a n s

77.5, 000
2.5, 000
695, 000
126,006
230, 000

LouisA'^ille '.
Cincinuati
Cleveland . . . .
Chicao'o...
Detroit
MilAvaukee
S a i n t Louis

$80,000 , N e w Y o r k
San F r a n c i s c o

0

•

3
4
5
6
7
R
9
10

n

: . . . . . 19
13
14

15
16

168

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Lawful-money reserve ofthe nutional banks—Continued

States and Territories.

Maine
•
New Harapshire . : . .
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Islaud
,
Connecticut
NeAV Y o r k
'New J e r s e y
Pennsylvania
,
DelaAvare
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a
Virginia
'
,
AVest V i r g i n i a
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
A.labama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Tennessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
•....
AVisconsin
loAva
Minnesota
Miss.ouri
Kansas
•
Nebraska
Oregon
California
Colorado
Utah...,
N e w Mexico
AVyoming
Idaho .-!
Dakota
Montana

Number
of
banks.

64
43
42
169
62
80
221
62
159
11 '
, 17
1
20
17
11
12
13
1
9
9
2
34
24
158
93
125
76
43
75
32
28
24
10
1
4
9
2
2
2
1
1

Deposits.

$6, 826, 665
3, 249, 249
4, 233, 308
29, 802, 891
9,. 182. 823
14, 221, .380
48, 091, 443
18, 647, 876
31, 78.5, .579
1, 749, 878
2, 352, 095
482,087
5, 690,118
2, 265, 900
2, 430, 957
1, 701, 642
1, 699, 783
11, 382
978, 442
1, 274, 504
188,131
3, 417, 377
4,163, 209
22,245, 789
12, 940, 037
18, 669, 678
8,173, 031
5,183, 047
9, 503, 210
6, 734, 488
3,518,529
2, 702, 490
2, 869, 610
839,122
*1, 40.5, 936
2,415,132
249,141
182,614
190, .325
157, 302
50, 289
929, 673
293, 406,162

Totals

'' I n c l u d e s c i r c u i a t i o u .

Reserve
req u i r e d , 15
IDcr cent.

$1, 024, 000
487, 387
634, 996
' 4, 470, 434
1, 377, 423
2,133, 207
7, 21,3, 716
2, 797,181
4, 767, 837
262, 482
3.52, 814
72, 313
853, 518
339, 885
364, 644
255, 246
254, 967
1,707
146, 766
191,176
28, 220
512, 607
624.481
3, 336, 868
1,941,006
2, 800, 452
1, 225, 954
777, 457
1, 425, 482
1, 010,173
527, 779
405, 374
430, 442
125, 868
• 1277,880
362, 270
37, 371
27, 392
28, 549
23, 595
7,543
139, 451
44, 077, 913

R e s e r v e held.

R a t i o of
reserve.

$2, 803, 929
1, 573, 035
1, 685, 859
11, 333, 751
3,551,347
6, 471, 882
14. 747, 333
6, 720, 065
9,473, 274
508, 3.58
925. 364
223, 965
1,362, 420
711, 632
680, 037
575, 636
601, 646
15,169
516,141
592, 272
49,183
1, 502, 660
1\ 273, 451
7,320, 946
4,904,177
7, 079, 086
2, 6.55, 739
1, 702, 453
2, 736, 937
1, 729, 461
1,106, 44-8
833, 567
882, 823
278, 321
267, 791
833, 248
89,034
41,211
41, 307
42, 392
12, 894
185, 452

4L1
48.4
39.8
38.0
38.7
45.5
30.7
36.0
29.8
29.1
39.3
46.5
23.9
31.4
28.0
33.8
35.4
133. 3
52.8.
46. 5^
26.1
43.4
30.6
32.9
37.9
37.9
32.5
32.8
28.8
25.7
31.4
30.8
30.8
33.219.0
34.5
35.7
22.6
21.7
26.9
25.6
19.9

100, 641, 694

34.3

t R e s e r v e of Califoruia gold-baulks, o u t s i d e of

Lawful-money reserve of the national banks—Continued.

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

Boston
,
Albany
P h i l a d e l p h i a ..
Pittsburgh ....
Baltimore
AVashington..
N e w Orleans .
Louisville
Ciucinnati
Cleveland
Chica;^o
Detroit
Milwaiikee...
Saint Louis -..

Number
of
banks.

Sau F r a n c i s c o




R e s e r v e req u i r e d , 25
p e r ceut.

$68, 906, 810
11, 042, 970
45, 908, 051
12,126, 714
13, 854, 406
1, 364, 300
5,11)3, 086
3,211,996
8, 393, 167
4,781,233.
27, 940, 332
3, 554, 641
2, 624, 859
6,139, 671

48

R e s e r v e held.

R a t i o of
reserve.

• $17, 220, 977
2, 760, 742
11,477,013
3,031,678
3, 463, 601
341,075
1, 275, 772
802, 999
. 2, 098, 292
1,19.5, 308
6, 985, 083
888, 660
656,215
1, 534, 918

$20, 517, 703
.5,125, 527
15, 077,183
4, 444, 471
5, 250, 029
473,860
1,612.131
904, 701
2, 955, 081
1, 947, 607
12,134, 906
1, 446, 236
918,510
1, 943. 417

29.8
46.4
32.8
36.7
37.9
34,7
31.6
28.2
35. 2
40.7
43.4
40.7
34.9
31.7

214, 952, 236

51
7
29
16
14
4
7
9
5
6
18
3
4
7

Totals...
New York

Deposits.

53, 738, 059

74,751,362

34.8

204, 620, 288

51,155, 072

68, 300, 478

33.4

*6, 409, 984

1, 602, 496

I, 256,157

* Includes circulation.

169

COMPTROLLEE OF THE CURKENCY,
STATES, as shown hy the rexiorts of October 2, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e held.D u e from reserve agents.
$1,799,570
1, 086, 610
920,135
7,116, 628
2, 278, 525
3, 952, 296
8, 874, 774
4, 221. 364
4, 239, 534
'^61,931
438, 650
106,114
580,182
273, 079
235, 263
21.3, 865
144,219
6,169
203, 7.38
58,108
15, 732
693, 616
372, 469
2, 850, 890
1, 932, 709
4,144, 696
1. 214, .523
826, 695
948, 088
766, 225
461, 886
447, 479
523, 593
127, 382
61, 840
284, 557
9,201
5,546
5, 246
11, 666

Specie.

Legal• tenders.

$34,413
15, 352
31, 443
194, 078
31,173
132,110
257, 889
. 89, 913
66, 676
496
18, 835
4,101
18, 805
19, 756
32,124
15, 871
40, 508

$568, 972
234, 888
386, 999
2, 128, 896
5 ^ , 738
1, 473, 322
3, 879, 018
1, 824, 949
3, 946, 821
160, 340
375, 340
102, 500
615, 695
325,121
321, 300
237, 430
305, 544
9,000
213, 483
205, 582
23, 619
491, 870
729, 733
3, ,504, 711
2, 078, 314
2, 334, 362
1,127, 845
708,136
1, 473, 363
779, 339
501, 239
311,071
308, 399
. 49,200

29, 350
289. 057
632
9, 732
38,149
77, 660
100, 569
83, 734
27, 545
23, 822
53, 231
14, 970
24, 739
7, 292
5,831
90, 489
205, 951
. 224, 035
6,297
1,776
781
16, 489 •

230, 000
15, 000
320, 000
20, 000
40, 000
20,000

60, 000
15, 000
20, 000

"5,"666'

294, 956
66, 786
20, 389
37, 826
21, 403
5, 398
121, 300

39, 616
2, 375, 290

U . S. certifi- F i v e p e r .cent,
c a t e s of deredemptionposit.
fund.

32, 885,197

$395, 974
236,185
347, 282
1, 664,149
660,911
899,154
1, 41.5, 652
563, 839
1,180, 243
H5, 591
92, .539
11, 250
147, 738
93, 676
91, 350
108, 470
111, 375
69, 570
39, 525
9,200
"282, 442
133,100
887, 685
732, 585
501, 294
28,5,826
123, 800
262,255
168, 927
113, .582
67,725
45, 000
11, 250
29, 700
6, 750
13, 500
2.700
4,500
2,250
12, 870

States and Territories.

Maine
New Harapshire
Vermont
Massach u s e t t s
R h o d e Lsland
Connecticut
N e w York'
New Jersey
.
Pennsyh^ania
Delaware
Maryland
D i s t r i c t of Columbia
Virgiuia
W e s t Virginia
N o r t h Caroliua
Soutli C a r o l i n a . . .
Georgia
i...
Florida
Alabama
Texas
Arkansas
Kentucky
Teunessee
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
AA^'isconsin ^.
Iowa
Minnesota
Missouri
Kansas
Nebraska
Oregou
California
Colorado
'.
Utah
N e w Mexico
Wyoming
'
Id.aho
Dakota
Montana

3
4
5
6
7
8
"9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26'
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37 /
38
39
40
41,
42

775, 000

S a n F r a n c i s c o , is 25 jjer cent, of circulation and 15 p e r cent, on deposits..

CITIES, as shoivn by the reports of October 2, 1874.
Classification of r e s e r v e . h e l d .
U . S. certifi- F i v e p e r cent,
c a t e s of de- r e d e m p t i o n posit.
fund. .

D u e from reserve agents.

Specie.

Legaltenders,

- $9,130, 682
3, 644, 870
4, 93.5, 566
1, 549, 885 •
2, 095, 891
213, 513
209, 012
206, 496
1, 537, 543
903, 344
4, 622, 739
742, 876
462, 931
886, 958

$2,187, 770
7,266
372, 050
51, .323
217, 090
7,271
132,452
14, 415
57, 788
8,270
79,818
/ 27, 637
10, 489
29, 586

$5, 240, 019
457, 376
5, 376, 459
2, 412, 50S
1, 482, 373
209, 426
1,150, 912
562,178
575, 000
897, 500
6, 181, 784
608, 073
413, .590
640. 550

3, 203, 230

26, 207, 748

10, 500, 000

3. 698, 078

14; 406, 267

20, 874, 595

31, 555, 000

1. 464, 616

Cities of r e d e m p t i o n .

31,142, 306

1, 256,157




$2, 645,
925,
3, 790,
100,
1, 095,

000
000
000
000
000

625, 000
25, 000
1, 000, 000
295, 000

$1,314,232 • Boston
Albany
91,015
603,108
Philadelphia
.330, 750
Pittsburgh
359, 675
Baltimore
AVash injiton
43, 6.50
119.7.55
NCAV Orleaius
121,612
LouisA^ille
159, 750
Cincinnati
113, 493
Cleveland
• 2.50, .565
Chicago
67, 650
DetT'oft
31, 500
Milwaukee
91, 323
Saint Louis

New York

.'

19
S
4
5
C
^
7
R
q
10
11
13
14

15

in

170

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statenient showing the average weekly liabilities and reserve of the national banlcs in JVCW York
City for the months of Sexitember and October, in ihe years 1870 to 1874, inclusive, as re-Q
ported to the clearing-house.
Reserve.

Liabilities.
Week endingCirculation.

N e t deposits.

Total.

Ratio
of
reserve.

Specie.

Legaltenders.

Total.

S e p t e m b e r ' 3,1870 .
S e p t e m b e r 10,1870 .
S e p t e m b e r 17,1870 .
S e p t e m b e r 24,1870 .
October 1,1870
October 8,1870
October 1.5,1870
October 22,1870 . . . .
October 29,1870....

Dollars.
32,672,815
32, 833, 323
32, 686, 884
32, 669, 207
32, 654, 378
32, .529, 395
32, 458, 049
32, 453, 226
32, 356, 866

P(^ct. Dollars. D o l l a r s . D o l l a r s
Dollars.
DoUars.
172,31,5,962 204, 988, 777 29. 6726, 070, 522 34, 760, 841 60,831, 363
29.43
260. 859 42, 938, 351 .59, 199, 210 ,
168, 343,150 201,176,473
444, 365 44, 040, 077 57. 544 680
166, 312, 076 198, 998, 960 29.39
770, 922 44, 773, 7.58 58, 484, 442
163, 691, 615 196, 360, 822 29.31
427, 962 46', 321, 566 57, 749, 528
163, 874, 962 196, ,529, 340 29. 23
29.11
658, 402 45,149,713 55, 808, 115
159, 205, 353 191,734,743
29.05
064, 025 45, 618, 563 55, 682, .588
159,194, 742 191,652,791
160, 794,105 193, 247, 331 29. 75 296,819 47, 193,012 57, 489, 831
367, 009 48. 732, 435 60, 099, 444
164, 653, 818 197, 010, 684 30.05

S e p t e m b e r 2,1871
S e p t e m b e r 9,1871
S e p t e m b e r 16,1871
Septen:iber 23,1871
S e p t e m b e r 30,1871
October 7,1871
October 1 4 , 1 8 7 1 . . . . : . : .
O c t o b e r 21,1871
October 28,1871

29, 835, 300
30, 087, 200
30, 071, 600
29, 944,100
29, 992,1
30,199,100
30, 273, 000
30, 233, 400
30, 431, 800

212, 534, 300 242, 369, 600
213, 442,100 243, 529, 300
211, 537, 700 241, 609, 300
203, 048, 400 232, 992, 500
193, 691, 500 223, 684, 300
169, 277, 300 219, 476, 400
lg3,192,100 213, 46.5,100
172,343, r-~ 202, 577, 200
171, 737, 300 202,169,100

29.36
28. 21
27. 27
26.42
27. 49
26. 76
25. 23
26. 03
26.19

196, 600
193, 400
050,100
291, 700
554, 000
153, 400
025, 300
647, 600
249, 700

S e p t e m b e r 7,1872.
S e p t e m b e r 14,1872 .
S e p t e m b e r 21,1872 .
S e p t e m b e r 28.1872 .
October .5,1872 . . . .
October 12,1872
October 19,1872
October 2 6 , 1 8 7 2 . . . .

27, 487, 200
27, 580, 600
27, 622, 300
27, 689, 400
27, 551,100
27, 692, 900
27, 661, 300
27,641,000

183, 510,100 210, 997, 300
207, 346, 400
179, 765,1
171, 742, 500 199, 364, 800
16.5, 721, 900 193, 411, 300
1.58, 840, 300 186. 399, 400
161,816,200 189i 509,100
171, 11.5, 000 198, 776, 300
174, 086, 400 201, 727, 400

26. 30
26.10
28. 22
2.5.18
24.93
26. 77
28. 63
27.82

'619. 600
130, 700
851, 600
045, 900
469, 700
070, 200
657, 400
234, 300

S e p t e m b e r 6,1873
S e p t e m b e r 13,1873
S e p t e m b e r 20, 1873
S e p t e m b e r 27,1873
October 4,1873
October 11,1873
October 18,1373
October 25,1873

27, 323, 300
26, 351, 200
27, 382, 000
27, 295, 400
27, 393, 700
27,419,400
27,421,200
27, 390,100

182, 775, 700 210, 099, 000
177, 850, 500 204, 201, 700
168, 877,100 196, 259,100
1.50,171,300 177, 366, 700
131,8,5.5,500 159, 249, 200
131, 958, 900 159, 378, 300
129, 575, 800 156, 997, 000
125, 671, 300 153, 061, 400

25.66
24. 56
23.55
16. 54
11.61
1L64
10.72
12. 16

9.35, 900
655, 500
135, 200
448,100
240, 300
.506, 900
650, 100
433, 500

993,
5C0,
083,
883,
251,
049,
179,
187,

630, 500
701, 700
,595, 700
593, 900
387, 700
083, 900
028, 600
981, 600
025,100

202, 918,100 228, 548, 600
205,166, 500 232, 868, 200
204, 285, 600 229,881,300
187, 1-39, 700 212, 733, 600
202, 60.5, 300 227, 993, 000
200, 054, 500 225,138,400
197, 261, 900 222, 290, 500
193, 514, 600 218, 496, 200
193, 611, 700 218, 636, 800

31.41
31.05
31. 52
33. 27
30.01
29.61
29. 04
28. 82
27. 94

307,
589,
453,
799,
373,
517,
691,
457,
324,

878,100
715, 700
017, 300
977, 900
297, 600
1.52, 000
855,100
893, 900
773, OGO

S e p t e m b e r 5,1874 . . .
S e p t e m b e r 12,1874 . . .
S e p t e r a b e r 19,1874 . . .
S e p t e m b e r 26,1874 . . .
October 3,1874
October 10,1874
October 1 7 , 1 8 7 4 . . . . . .
October 24,1874
October 31,1874

957,
106,
847,
275,
933,
589,
835,
079,
694,

800
800
200
600
900
300
200
000
700

400
200
300
300
900
700
500
600
400
5, 4,S6,100
54,124, 000
56, 270,900
49, 697,600
46, 468,200
50, 74.5,300
56, 917,5110
56,119, 300

600 53, 929, 509
800 50,156, 300
800 46,219, 000
300 29, 331, 400.
900 18, 492,200
300 18, 556, 200
800 16,829, 900
300 18, 620,800
600
900
500
400
000
700
.500
800
900

Table showing the loans, caxntal, and net deposits of the national banks in New York City
comxnled from rexiorts made to the ComxDtroller of the Currency at the dates given.
1871.

1872.

SErTRMBERl2,
1873.

54 b a u k s .

54 b a n k s .

50 b a n k s .

48 b a n k s .

$9, 012, 964

$5, 661, 499

$3,180, 738

$2, 938, 876

$4, 721, 638

53, 809, 603

70,185, 331

53, 409, 625

57,916,130

51,4.78,691

4, 381,.571
133, 924, 311

5, 735,137
139, 841, 588

199,160, 888
70, 235, 000
172, 010, 594

201, 777, 054
68, 500, 000
204, 620, 288

OCTOBER

1870.

OCTOBER

2,

OCTOBER

3,

Loans:
On U n i t e d S t a t e s b o n d s on demand.
On o t h e r stocks, bonds, &c., on
demand.
P a y a b l e in gold
All other

105,146, 590

122,806,969

3, 411, 738
123,183, 625

Total loans.
Capital
N e t deposits

167, 969,157
73, 435, 000
159, 751, 811

198, 653, 799
73, 235, 000
191, 304, 511

183,185, 726
71, 285, 000
158, 034,121




OCTOBER

2,.

1874.
48 b a n k s .

Statement showing the aggregate numher of notes issued, redeemed, and outstanding, on Novefmber 1, I868-'74, inclusive.
Tens.

TAventies.

One-hundreds.

FiA^e-hundreds.

One-thousauds.

Ones.

Twos.

8, 896, .576
254, 754

2, 978,160
73,176

23,106,728
482,132

7,915,914
142, 359

2, 219, 322
36, 355

355,181
17, 256

267, 350
15, 583

13, 486
1,759

4 746
1 846

8, 641, 822

2, 904, 984

22, 624, 596

7, 773, 555

2,182, 967

337, 925

251, 767

11, 727

9 900

9, 589,160
904,013

3, 209, 388
232, 224

23, 676, 760
. 985,940

8, 094, 645
272, 495

2, 269, 764
71,655

363, 523
22, 859

274, 799
25, 968

13, 668
2,585

4 769'
2 415

8, 685,147

2,977,164

22, 690, 820

7, 321,150

2,198,109

334, 664

248, 831

11, 083

2 354

10, 729, 327
2, 568, 703

3, 590,157
667, 733

24, 636, 720
1, 737, 983

8, 413, 244
484,135

2, 370, 056
129, 185 „.

378, 482
. 47,845

284, 460
43, 599

13, 926
3, 952

4 779
3 263

8,160, 624

2, 922, 424

22, 898, 737

7, 929,109

2, 240, 871

330, 637

240, 861

9, 974

1 516

12, ,537, 657
5, 276, 057

4,195, 791
1, 493, 326

28,174,940
3, 276, 374

9, 728, 375
933, 445

2, 779. 392
24.5,' 361

433, 426
82, 972

321,163
76, 287

14, 642
6,017

4,843
4 005

7, 261, 600

2, 702, 465

24, 898, 566

8, 794, 930

2, 534, 031

244, 876

8, 625

838

14, 297, 360
7, 919, 389

4. 782, 623
2, 408, 389

31, 933, 348
5,960,667

11,253,452
1, 699, 702

3, 225, 683
438, 852

497,199
126, 180

367, 797
110, 989

15, 621
7,867

4, 933
4 315

6, 377, 971

2, 374, 239

25, 972, 681

9, 553, 750

2, 786, 836

371, 019

256,808

• 7, 754

618

15,524,189
9,891,606

,5,19.5,111
3, 120, 723

34, 894, 45o
9,141, 963

12, .560, 399
2, 573, 070

3, 608, 219
653,071

559, 722
168, 976

416, .590
144, 057

16, 496
9, 6.58

5, 148
4 530

5, 632, 583

2,074,388

25, 752, 493

9, 987, 329

2, 955, 148

390, 746

272, 533

6, 833

618

16, 548, 259
11,143,606

5, 539,113
3, 75;.; 019

. .39, 243, 136
13, 041, 605

13, 337, 076
3, 912, 707

3, 962,109
971, 608

666, 950
231, 556

492, 482
196, 572

17, 344
11,-676

5, 240
4 683

5, 404, 653

1, 784, 094

26,201, ,531

9, 424, 369

2, 990, 501

435, 394

295, 910

5,668

557

Fives.

F i Ities.

1868.
Redeeraed

.

..

Outstanding
1869.
Issued
Kedeemed

.- .

Outstanding"

.

....

O

1870.
Issued
Redeemed

o
o

..

OutstandinsT

....
1871.

Issued
Redeemed

.

..

. .

Outstanding

.

..

...

350, 454

1872.
Issued
Redeemed

.

Outstandin*^

....
1873.

Issued
Redeemed
Outstandin**"

, ....
1874.

Issued
Redeemed
Outstanding.'-




o

o

172

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES,

Statement shoiving the National Banks in voluntary liquidation, that have dex)osited lawful
money with the Treasurer of the United States to redeem their circulation, withdrawn their
honds, and closed husiness under the xirovisions of section 42 of the act; their caxntal, circulation issued, circulation suiTendered, circulation redeemed, hy the Treasurer of the United
States, and circulation outstanding on the 1st day of November, 1874..

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Columbia., M o
F i r s t N a t i o n a l Bar.k of Carondelet, M o
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l Banlc of I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d .
N a t i o n a l U n i o n B a n k of R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . ,
I ' a r r a e r s ' N a t i o u a l B a n k of Rich vn ond, V a . .
F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of AVaukesha, W i s .
N a t i o n a l B a n k o f t h e Metropolis, AA''ashingtou, D . C
.'..
N a t i o n a l S t a t e B a n k of D u b u q u e , I o w a
Ohio N a t i o n a l B a n k of C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w U l m , M i n n
F i r s t N a t i o n .al B a n k of Bluffton, I n d
N a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e B a n k of R i c h m o n d , V a .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of J a c k s o n . Miss
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S k a n e a t e l e s , N . Y...
A p p l e t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of A p p l e t o n , W i s .
N a t i o n a l B a n k of AVhitestoAvn, N . Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of C u y a h o g a Falls,
Ohio
:..:....
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B.ank of C e d a r b u r g h . W i s . .
Comraercial N a t i o n a l B a u k of Cincinnati,
Ohio.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of S o u t h W o r c e s t e r ,
N. Y . .
N a t i o n a l M e c h a n i c s a n d F a r m e r s ' B a u k of
Albany, N. Y
Second-National B a n k of D e s Moines, loAva
F i r s t Niitional B a n k of Danville, A^a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B.ank of Oskaloosa, I o w a . . .
Merchants and Mechanics' National B a u k
of T r o y , N . Y
N a t i o n a l S a v i n g s B a n k of AVheeling, W.A^a,
Fii'St N a t i o n a l B a n k of M a r i o n , Ohio
N a t i o n a l I n s u r a n c e B a n k of D e t r o i t , M i c h .
N a t i o n a l B a n k of L a n s i n g b u r g h , N ! Y .
N a t i o u a l B a n k of N o r t h A m e r i c a , NCAV
York. N . Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l Bank, of HalloAvell. M e . . . . .
Pacific N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y .
G r o c e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y
S a v a n n a h . N a t i o n a l B a n k , Sava-nnah, G a . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of F r o s t b u r g h , M d
F i r s t National. B a n k of L a Salle, 111
N a t i o n a l B a n k of Comraerce, G e o r g e t o w n ,
D.C.
,
M i n e r s ' N a t i o u a l B a u k of Salt L a k e City,
• Utah
"...
F i r s t N.atiofial B a n k of V i n t o n , I o w a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of D e c a t u r , 111
N a t i o n a l U n i o n B a n k of OAvego, N . Y . = . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Berlin, AA^s
C e n t r a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio
F i r s t . N a t i onal B a n k of Da.y tou, Ohio
Nation.al B a n k of C h e m u n g , E l m i r a , N . Y .
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of M i l w a u k e e ,
Wis.
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of S a i n t .Louis, M o
C h e m u n g C a n a l N a t i o n a l Biink of E l m i r a ,
N. Y
P i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of C l a r k s v i l l e , V a
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of L e b a n o n , Ohio
N a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e B a u k of L a n s i n g b u r g h ,
N.Y
"
.^....!'...
M u s k i n g u m N a t i o n a l B a n k of ZauesA^llle,
Ohio.'.
U n i t e d N a t i o u a l B a n k of AVinona, M i n n . . .
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a n k of D e s M."oines, loAA^a..
S a r a t o g a C o u n t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of AVaterford, N . Y . . -:
:
S t a t e N.ational B a n k of S a i n t J o s e p h , M o . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of F e n t o n , M i c h
Fir.st N a t i o u a l B a n k of AA^ellsburg,.AV. V a .
C l a r k e N a t i o n a l B a n k of R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . .




Capital.

C i r c u l a t i o n Circulation surissued.
rendered;

Circulation
redeeraed C i r c u l a t i o n
outstandb y U . S.
T r e a s u rer.

$100,000
30, 000
100, 000
400,000
100,000
100, 000

$90, 000
25, 500
85, 700
192. .500
85, 000
90,000

200, 000
1.50,000
500, 000
60, 000
50, 000
200, 000
100, 000
150, 000
' 50,000
120, 000

180, 000
127, 500
450, 000
54, 000
4.5,000
180, 000
,40,500
135, 000
45, 000
44, 500

63,100
14, 900
45, 100
11,800
3,770
7,880

50, 000
100, 000

45, 000
90, 000

12, 600
13, 000

29, 904 75
67, 497 00

500, 000

345, 950

175, 500

157,400

4,500

144, 34i 25

558 75

350, ooo'
.50, 000
50, 000
75, 000

314,
42,
45,
67,

950
500
000
500

48,410
2,200
10, 000
3,755

248,.800 25
37, 647 00
29, 000 00
59,727-85

739
653
000
017

75
00
00
15

300, 000
100, 000
125, 000
200,010
150, 000

184,
90,
109,
85,
135,

750
000
850
000
000

13, 900
22, 300
4,017
9,500
12, 000

163,141 20
62, 000. 00
99, 618 35
72, 013 75
•116,691 85

708
700
214
486
308

80
00
65
25
15

333, 000
,53,350
134, 990
85, 2.50
85, 000
45, 000
. 45, 000

65, 800
2,500
4, 715
45, 810

246, 060 65
47, 643 75
120, 362 25
34, 076 00
SO, 755 25
38, 322 75
30,000 00

139
206
912
364
244
427
200

.35
25
75
00
75
,
25
00

1, 000,
60,
422,
390,
100,
50,
50,

000
000
700
000
000
000
000

100, 000
150,
50,
100,
100,
50,
500,
150,
100,

000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000

10,100
2.550
8,500

6,585

000
500
250
250
000
000
000
000

100, 000
200, 000

4, 2.50
11, 800

87,200 00
104,443 75
370, 240 00
37, 210 00
38, 446 25
153, 205 00
37,015 00
120, 772 20
42, .583 85
41,513 25

59, 505 00

5,400
3,923
105,130
2,900

90, 000
179, 990

100, 000
50 000
100, 000

00
75
00
25
25
25

$565
651
300
841
916
179

00
25
00
75
75
75

700
156
660
990
783
915
485
642
416
986

00
25
00
00
75
00
00
80
15
75

495 25
503 00

328, 9.55 00

90, 000
135,
42,
85,
83,
44,
44.5,
135,
90,

$11,425
24, 848
67, 300
178,108
65, 583
87, 820

90, 000
27, 000
85, 000

79,
39,
81,
34,
37,
238,
124,
86,

232
523
274
206
985
615
381
598

00
75
30
5080
00
05
25

895 00
768
091
975
643
091
255
718
401

00
25
70
50
20
00
95
75

81, 002 50
164, 889 05

997 50
100 95

3, 500

81, 5.39 00
23, 655 00
79, 523 75

961 00
345 00
476 25

3, 800
875
700

78, 000 00
40, 375 00
83, 053 75

200 00
750 00
246 25

8,000
3,813

118, 575 05
81, 665 70
47, 023 25
82, 768 00
•135, 510 00

100, 000
100, 000
50, 000
100, 000

90, 000
45, 000
90, 000

1.50, 000
100, 000
100,000
100, 000
200, 000

13,5, 000
90, 000
. 49, 000
90, 000
180, 000

-

500
26,100

424 95
.521 30
976 75
32 00
0 00

il
l

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY. .

173

Statement showing the national hanks in voluntary liquidation, cfc.—Continued.

N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

C o m m e r c i a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of Oshkosh, W i s
F o r t M a d i s o n ISTational .Bank, F o r t Madison I o w a
N a t i o n a l B a n k of MaysA^ille, K y
F o u r t h N a t i o n a l B a n k of Syracuse, N . Y . . .
A m e r i c a n N a t i o n a l B a n k of N e w Y o r k , N . Y
A t l a n t i c N a t i o n a l B a n k of B r o o k l y n , N. Y .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of R o c h e s t e r , N . Y
Merchants and Farmers' National Bank
of Quincy 111
Lawrenceburgh National Bank, Lawrenceburgh, Ind
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of K n o x v i l l e , T e n n . . .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Goshen I n d

Capital.

$100, 000
7,5, 000
300, 000
105, 500
500,000
200, 000
400, 000

Circuiatiou
issued.

Circulation
Circulation .sur- r e d e e r a e d
r e n d e r e d . b y U. S.
Treasurer.

Circulation
outstanding.

$90, 000

$81 515 00

$8, 485 00

67, 500
270, 000
• 91,700
450, 000 ^•$152, 300
16.5,000
11,000
206,100

M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of D u b u q u e ,
Iowa
U n i o n N a t i o n a l B a u k of S a i n t Louis,°Mo
P i t t s t o n N a t i o n a l B a n k of P i t t s t o n P a
B e r k s h i r e Nation.al B a n k of A d a m s , M!ass..

180,
80,
103,
138,
90,
93,

000
910
.500
140
000
800

100,
100,
150,
100,

000
000
000
000

83, 250
31, 500
116,770
97, 500

12, 225

500, 000
• 50, 000

, 4.50,000
4.5, 000

11,2.50

225, 000

200, 000
500, 000
200, 000
100,000
200, 000
100, 000
100,000

180, 000^
1.50, 300

* Lawfal money not yet deposited.




18, 500 00
28,
16,
20
25
17,
19,

00
00
00
00

22,125 00
12 500 00
41, 170'00
85, 500 00

56, 900 00
. 5, 000 00

500

00
00
00
00
00
00

381, 350 ro
39, 400 00

131, 300 00

200, 000
100, 000
115, 000
154, 700
100,000
140,000

18, 343, 410

00
00
00
00
00
50

150, 600
64, 800
83, 100
113,000
73, 000
74, 000

135, 000

C i t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of S a v a n n a h , G a *"..'
..
C e n t r a l N a t i o n a l B a n k of O m a h a N e b r
N a t i o u a l B a u k of CraAvford C o u n t y , Mlead300, 000
ville P a
^
300, 000
K i d d e r N a t i o n a l Gold-Bank of Boston, M a s s
150,000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of SteubeuAalle, Ohio.
50, 000
C i t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of Green Bay, AVis
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Shelbin.a Mo
1-2.5, 000
Second N a t i o n a l B.ank of Nashville, T e n n
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a y n e s b u r g h , P a . t
125, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Oneida, N . Y . . :
50, 000
N a t i o n a l B a n k of Tecuiuseh, M i c h
250, 000
G a l l a t i n N a t i o n a l B a n k of S h a w n e e t o w n , 111
100,000
F i r s t Natinn.al B a n k of Brookville P a
C i t i z e n s ' N a t i o n a l B a u k ol' Charlottesville,
100, 000
Va.
50,000
F a r m e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of W a r r e n , 111
75,000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of M e d i n a Ohio
C r o t o n R i v e r N a t i o n a l B a u k of S o u t h E a s t ,
N. Y
200, 000
.50, 000
C i t i z e n s ' N a t i o n a l B a u k of Sioux City, loAva
C e n t r a l Na.tional B a n k of Baltimore, M d
200, 000
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of W e s t Virginia, W h e e l i n g , AV; V a
500, 000
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of L e a v e n w o r t h ,
• 100,000
Kans
T e u t o n i a N a t i o n a l B a n k of NCAA' Orleans, L a
300, 000
C i t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n .
170, 000
100, 000
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Cairo, I I I . . ' . . . .
Total

128. 005 00
182, 802 50

8, .500
27, 000
8, 565
297, 700
2.5,995
23, 297

116,500 00

150, 000

250, 000

S e c o n d N a t i o n a l B a n k of S y r a c u s e , N . Y . .
M e c h a n i c s ' N a t i o n a l B a u k of S y r a c u s e , N . Y
F a r m e r s aud M e c h a n i c s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of
R o c h e s t e r N. Y
.
.
M o n t a n a N.ational B a n k of S e l e n a , M o n t . .
N a t i o n a l B a n k of Cazenovia, N . Y
'.
Secoud N a t i o n a l B a n k of Chicago, 111
M a n u f a c t u r e r s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of Chicago,
111.
. .
E e l o i t N a t i o n a l B a u k of Beloit, W i s
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a u k of M e r a p h i s , '

.59, 000 00
243, 000 00
83,135 00

93, 700 00

48,
19,
74,
12,

900

900
000
700
000

900
110
400
140
000
800

00
00
00
00
00
00

15, 400 00 » 164 600 00
,16, .500 00
133 800 00

(t)
(t)
(t)
(t)
(t)
(t)
120. 000
13.5, 000
4.5. 000
90, 000
92, 920
72, 000
110,500
45, 000
225, 000
90, 000
90,000
4.5, 000
45, 000

120, 000'
' 21,500
3. 500
5, 600
8, 390
10,500
2, 655
7. 500
3, 000
7, 300
4,504
7,120
753

176, 550 . 10,000
45, 000
IbO, 000 • *4,000
4.50, 000
90,
270,
153,
90,

000
000
000
000

. 10, 000
9. 000
4; 999
4,800

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

113,500
41,500
84,400
84 530
58, 845
103,000
42, 000
213,196
82, 880

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

500. 00
,500 00

89 500 00
43, 747 00
45, 000 00

7, 000 00
500 00

159 550 00
44, 500 00
176, 000 00
440, 000 00
90, 000
261 000
148, 000
8.5,200

00
00
00
00

13, 051, 620 1,150, 792 7,446,180 70 4, 454, 647 30

t No circulation.

174

REPORT ON TPIE FINANCES.

Statement showing the national hanks in liquidation for the pxirpose of consolidating with
other hanks, their caxntal, bonds on dexiosit to secure circulation, circiilation issued, circulation surrendered and destroyed, and circulation outstanding November 1, 1874.
N a m e a n d location of b a n k .

F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of L e o n a r d s v i U e ,
N.Y
..,
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a n k of P r o v i d e n c e , P a .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of NcAvton, NeAVtouville, M a s s
F i r s t Nation.al B a n k of K i n g s t o n , N . Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Do wniugtOAvn,
Pg^
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of T i t u s v i l l e , P a .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a u k of NCAV B r u n s Avick, N . J
Second N a t i o n a l B a u k of W a t e r to Avn,
N. Y
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of P l u m e r , P a . . .
F i r s t N a t i o u a l B a n k of D o r c h e s t e r ,
Mass
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of Clyde, N . Y . .
N a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e B a u k of P h i l a d e l phia, P a . Fij'st N a t i o n a l B a n k of B u r l i n g t o n , V t
C a r r o l l C o u n t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of SandAvich, N . H
Second N a t i o n a l B a n k of P o r t l a n d , M e
JeAvett C i t y N a t i o n a l B a n k , J e w e t t
City, Conn
O r a n g e C o u n t y N a t i o n a l B a n k of Chelsea, V t
'.
,
Richmond National Bank, Richmond,
Ind* ....'
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of A d a m s , N . Y .
F i r s t N a t i o n a l B a n k of H a v a n a , N . Y .
M e r c h a n t s and F a r m e r s ' National
B a u k of ith.ac.a, N. Y
M e r c h a n t s ' N a t i o n a l B a n k of Ha'stings, M i u n
,




Capital.

U. S. b o n d s C i r c u l a t i o n
issued.
ou deposit.

Circulation
surrendered.

Circulation
outstanding.

$50, 000
100, 000

$28, 500
70, 000

$4,5, 000
90, 000

$26, 455
28, 250

$18, 545
61, 750

150, 000
200, 000

.58, 000
93, 000

130, 000
180, 000

78, 300
97, 700

51, 700
.82, 300

100, 000
100,000

48, OOd
47, 000

90, 000

49, 600
48, 685

40, 400
38, 065

86, 750

100, 000

57, O O
C

100, 000
100, 000

79, 000
70, 000

150, 000
50, 000

75, 000
36, 000

90, 000
87, 500
135, 500
44, 000

300, 000
300, 000

100, 000
179, 000

50, 000
ICO, 000

50, 460

90, 000
27, 320
32, 060

62,680
55, 440

68, 600
13, 609

66, 900
30, 400

175, 750
270, 000

91, 338
109, 493

84, 412
160, 507

38, 000
• 68,000

45, 000
81, 000

11,400
29, 700

33, 600

60, 000

40,000

48, 750

16, 500

200, 000

179, 000

180, 000

37, 710

230, 000
7.5, 000
50, 000

172, 000
60, 000
42, 000

207, 000
66, 900
45, 000

52, 300
16, 300
26, 500

142, 290
154, 700
50,100
18, 500
32, 300

50, 000

38, 000

45, 000

12, 700

100, 000

100, 000

90, 000

12, 800

2,715,000

1, 677, 500

2, 323,150

* N e w b a n k o r g a n i z e d Avith s a m e t i t l e .

51, 300
32,250

77, 200
1, 395, 799

175

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

Statement shoioing the. national banks that have been x^l^x^ced in the hands of receivers, their
caxntal, laivful money deposited to redeem circulaiion, circulation issued, circulation redeemed
hy the Ti'easurer ofthe United States, and the outstanding circulation November 1,1874.
O r - '^^

S.2a§

Name and location of bank.

I—( C S "J^
O

ce ©
r J OD

C" « r
^

$50, 000
First Natioual Bank of Attica, N. Y*...
300, 000
Veuango National Bank of Franklin, Pa
Merch?mts' National Bank of AVashing200, 000
ton, D. C
50, 000
First N.ational Bank of Medina, N. Y*..
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis,
100,000
Tenn*
First National Bank of Selma, Ala
, 100, 000
500, 000
First Natioual Bank of New Orleans, La
120, 000
National Unadilla Bauk, Unadilla, N. Y.
Farmers and Citizens' National Bank
300, 000
of Brooklyn, N. Y
Croton Nation.al Bank of NCAV York, N. Y'^ 200, 000
60, 000
First National Bank of Bethel, Conn*
First National Bank of Keokuk, Iowa*.. 100, 000
50, 000
National Bank of Vicksburgh, Miss
50, 000
First National Bank of Rockford. Ul
Fir.st National Bank of Nevada, Austin,
Nev
•
: . . 2.50, 000
Ocean National Bank of New York, N. Y. 1, 000, 000
Union Square National Bauk of NCAV
200, 000
York, N . Y
Eighth National Bank of New York, N.Y. 250, 000
Pourth Natioual Bank of Philadelphia,Pa. 200, 000'
Waverly National Bank, AA^averly, N. Y. 106, 100
50, 000
First National Bank of Fort Smith, Ark.
Scandinavian National Bank of Chicago,
250, 000
III
:
•..-.
Walikill National Bank of Middletown,
175, 000
N.Y
Crescent City National Bank of NCAV Or500, 000
leans, .La
•
AtlanticNational Bank of NCAV York.N.Y. 300. 000
First National Bank of AVashington, D. C. 500, 000
National Bank of the Commonwealth,
750, 000
NewYork, N. Y
Merchants' National Bank of Peters400,000
burgh, Va
First National Bank of Petersburgh, Va. 200, 000
First National Bank of Mansfield, Ohio.. 100, 000
NeAV Orleans National Banking Associa600, 000
tion, La
'
50, 000
First National Bank of Carlisle, Pa
Fii'St Niitional Bank of Topeka, Kans — 100, 000
50, 000
E'irst National Bank of Anderson, lud. ..
100, 000
First Natioual Bank of Norfolk, Va




O 03 3

^-^

b

$44, 000 00
85, 000 00

$44, 000
85, 000

$43, 406 50
83, 628 50

$593 .50
1,371 50

180, 000 00
40, 000 00

180,000
40, 000

175, 904 00
39, 306 75

4, 096 00
693 25

90, 000 00 . 90,000
8,5, 000
85, 000 00
180,000 00 180,000
100, 000
100, 000 00

87, 878
83, 316
175, 675
98, 014

75
75
,50
50

2,121 25
1,683 25
4, 324 50
1,985 50

253, 900 00
180, 000 00
26, 300 00
90, 000 00
25, 500 00
45, 000 00

253, 900
180, 000
26, 300
90, 000
25, ,500
45, 000

247, 5.50 25
177, 090 75
2.5, 339 50
88, 649 00
24, 108 75
43, 483 00

6, 349 75
2, 909 25
. 960 50
1,3.51 00
1,391 25
1,517 00

129, 700 00
800, 000 00

129, 700
800, 000

121, 836 50
736, 035 00

7, 863 50
63; 965, 00

- .50, 000 00
243, 393 00
179,000 00
71, 000 00
45, 000 00

50, 000
243, 393
179, 000
71,000
45, 000

4.5, 947 00
220,199 00
163, .505 00
62, 465 00
40,005 00

4, 053 00
23,194 00
15, 495 00
8, 535 00
4, 995 00

135, 000 CO

135,000

111, 20O 00

23, 800 00

118, 900 00

118, 900

450, 000 00
89, 975 00
113, 650 00

450, 000
100, 000
450, 000

.347, 000 00
78, 400 00
61,500 00

103, 000 00
21, 600 00
388, 500 00

94,110 00 ^ 24,790 00

44, 437 50

234, 000

22, 600 00

211, 400 00

58,187 .50
179, 200 00
90, 000 00

360, 000
179, 200
90, 000

30, 500 00
18, 800 00
10, .500 00

329, 500 00
160, 400 00
79, 500 00

112, 900 00
45, 000 00
90, 000 00
11,437 .50
95, 000 00

360, 000
4.5, 000
90, 000
4.5, 000
9,5, 000

77, 000 00
4, 500 00
6, 600 00
5, 700 00
5, 500 00

283, 000
40, 500
83, 400
39, 300
89, 500

00
00
00
00
00

8, 311, 000 4, 576, 480 50 5, 694, 893 3, 657, 255 00 2, 037, 638 00
" Finally closed.

176

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement showing the insolvent banks, with date of appointment of receivers, caxntal stock,
amount of claims proved, and dividends p)aid.

Name and location of bank.

First National Bank of Attica,N.Y.
'Yenango National Bank of Franklin, Pa
,
Merchants' National Bank of Washington, D.C
First NationalBank of Medina.N.Y,
Tennessee National Bank of Memphis, Tenn
First National Bank of Selma, Ala.
First National Bank of NCAV Orleans, La
National Unadilla B.ank of Unadilla, N. Y
,.:
Farmers and Citizens' National
Bank of Brooklyn, N. Y
Croton National Bank of NewYork,
N.AT
Fii'stNationalBank of Bethel, Coun
First Natioual Bank of Keokuk,
Iowa
Natioii^l Bank of Vick.sburgh, Miss.
First m t i o u a l Bank of Rockford, 111
First National Bank of Nevad
Austin, NcA^.....'
,
Ocean National Bank of NCAV York,
N. Y
Union Square National Bank of
NeAV York, N . Y
Eighth National Bank of New
York, N^.Y
Fourth National Bank of Philadelphia. Pa
Waverlv National Bank of AVaverly, N."Y
:.,
First National Bank of Fort Smith,
Ark
Scandinavian National Bank of
Chicago, III ..AVallkill National Bank of Middletowu, N . Y .
Crescent City National Bank of
New Orleans, La.
...
Atlantic National Bank of New
York, N. Y
First National Bauk of Washington, D. C
:

Appointment
of receiA^er.

Capital
stock.

Amount
of claim
proved.

Divi
dends
paid,

'er ct.
Finally closed.
58

Apr: 14,1865

$50, 000

$122, 089

May 1,1866

300, 000

349, 450

Cash on h a n d $102,597.

May 8,1866
Mar. 13,1867

200, 000
50, 000

170,165

*Ca!5h on hand $40,679.
Finally closed.

Mar. 21,1867
Apr. 30,1867

100,000
• 100, 000

376, 932
288, 932

May 20,1867

500, 000

Aug. 29,1867

120, 000

Sept. 6.1867
Oct. 1,1867
Feb. 28,1868
M a r . 3,1865
Apr. 24,1868
M a r . 15; 1869
Oct. 14,1869

1^^
35

Finally closed.
Cash on hand $17,606.

1,118, 613

65

127, 266

32

30 per cent since last
report.
Cash on hand $8,719.

300, 000

1,189, 000

96

200, 000
60, 000

170, 752
68, 986

88.>
98"

Finally closed.
Finally closed.

100, 000
50, 000
50, 000

205, 256
33, 110
63, 627

68^
35
25

Finally closed.

250, 000

169, 812

15 per cent, since last
report. Cash on hand
- $13,400.

Dec. 13,1871 1,000,000

1, 280, 328

70

Dec. 15,1871

200, 000

157,120

100

Dec. 15,1871

250, 000

378,772

60

Dec. 20,1871

200, 000

645, 558

106,100

77, 56S

100

Avealth, New YOTIC, N . Y

10 per cent, paid to
stockholders.
Cash on hand $34,390.

100

Apr. 23,1872

25 per cent, paid stockholders since last report.
Cash on hand $7,393.

2,1872

50, 000

8,933

100

Dec. 12,1872

250, 000

244,099

25

Cash on hand $27,253.

Dec. 31,1872

175, 000

157, 066

85

M a r . 18,1873

500, 000

640, 818

50

Apr. 28,1373

300, 000

521, 526

55

10 per ceut. since last
report.
Since last report. Cash
on hand $44,964:
Cash on hand $145,511.

Sept. 19,1873

500, 000

1, .591, 034

50

May

National Bank of the CommouMerchants' National Bank of Petersburgh, Va
First National Bank of Petersburgh, A'^a
First National Bank of Mansfield,
Ohio
New Orieaus National Banking
Association, La
First National Bank of Carlisle, Pa.
First National Bank of Anderson,
Ind
First National Bank of Topeka,
Kans

Remarks.

Sept. 22,1873

750, 000

745, 254

100

Sept. 2.5,1873

400, 000

962, 094

15

Sept. 25,1873'

200, 000

163, 826

60

Oct. 18,1873

100, 000

137, 300

25

Oct. 23,1873
Oct." 24, 1873

600, 000
50, 000

394, 428
59, 260

N o v . 23,1873

50, 000

144, 406

Dec. 16,1873

100,000'

49, 736

100,000

174, 056

First National Bank of Norfolk, Va. J u n e 3,1874

20 per cent, since last
report. Cash on hand
$73,134.
Since last report.
Since last report. Cash
ou hand $30,702.
Since last report. •
Since last report. Cash
on hand $23,524.
Cash on hand $52,082.
Since last report.
Since last rei)ort. Since last report. Cash
on hand $12,493.
Since last report.

* Also $50,000 United States 6 per cent, bonds on deposit with Treasurer United States.




177

COMPTROLLER OP THE CURRENCY.

Statement shoiving the amount of legal-tender notes deposited by.national banks for the purX^ose of retiring circulation, under act of June 20, 1874.
Amount
Total
deposited amount
by each for each
bank.
State.

Bauks.

State.
Connecticut
Rhode Islaud . . .
New York

Merchants' National Bank, NCAV Haven
Merchants' National Bank, Providence
$736, 600
Third National Bank, NCAV York City
80, 000
A merican Exchange National Bank, New York City
Bank of New York National Bankiug Association, New York. 405, 000
210, 000
Union National Bank, NCAV York
130, 000
Market National Bank, NCAV York
44, 100
First National Bank, AVestfield
62,100
National M-arine Bauk, Oswego
155, 000
First National Bank, Lockport
21, 100
Tioga Natioual Bauk, Owego
:.
20, 700
First National Bank, Ellenville
Union National Bank, Albany
:. 185,000
86,250
Niagara County Natioual Bauk, Lockport

PennsylA^ania..
South Carolina.,

First National Bank, Pittsburgh 1
Central National Bank, Colum bia
People's National Bank, Charleston

Georgia...
Tennessee
Louisiana.
Ohio

Georgia National Bank, Atlanta
Fourth National Bank, Memphis
Mutual Natioual Bank, New Orleans.
First National Bank, Napoleon
Marietta National Bank, Marietta
First National Bank, Tiflin
First National Bank, Millersburg

Indiana.

First National Bank, Fort Wajnie
Merchants' National Bank, Fort AVayne.
First National Bank, La Fayette...."

198, 000
4.5, 000
153, 000

Illinois .

First National Bauk, Jacksonville
Commercial Natioual Bank, Chicago
Merchants' National Bank, Chicago
German National Bank, Chicago
Home National Bank, Chicago
Fourth National Bank, Chicago
Cook County National Bank, Chicago

80, 400
311,200
79, 200
144, 000
45, 000
103, 500
225, 900

$27, OOO
153, 900

2,135, 850
•35, 200
45, 000
360, 000
40.5, 000
45, 000
67, 500
374, 000

,

.•

45,
45,
23,
27,

'

000
000
8.50
000
140, 850

396, 000

,
,

989, 200

Wisconsin .

N.ational City B.a,nk, Milwaukee
Mihvaukee National Bank of Wisconsin, MilAvaukee.

. 31, 500
45, 000

Michigan ..

Second National Bank, Lansing
First National Bank, Grand Rapids .
First Natioual Bank, Bay City
First National Bank, Monroe
;

36, 000
90, 000
100, .300
9,000

Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri..

First National Bank, Dulutli
National Bank of OttuiuAva
,
Saint Louis Natioual Bank, Saint Louis
Valley National Bank, Saint Louis
Second National Bank, Saint Louis
National Bauk State of Missouri, Saint Louis.
First National Bauk, Kausas City

192, 000
74, 250
225, 000
1, 648, 800
180, 000

Utah .

Deseret National Bank, Salt .Lake. City
First National Bank of Utah, Salt Lake City.

135, 000
90, 000

76, 500

235, 300
45, 000
43, 200

2, 320, 050

Aggregate

12 F




225, 000
7, 714, 550

178

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement of the resources and liabilities of savings-banks organized under State laws.
R e s o u r c e s a n d liabilities.

Maine,
November,
1873.

New Hampshire. May,
1874.

Vermont,
J u l y , 1874.

Massachu- Rhode Islaud
s e t t s , Decem- D e c e m b e r ,
ber, 1873.
1873.

RESOURCES.

Loan.s on real e s t a t e
Loan.s on p e r s o n a l a n d coll.ateral s e c u r i t y
U n i t e d S t a t e s bonds
State, municipal, and other
bouds and stocks
Railroad bonds and stocks
Bank stock
Real estate'
Other investments
Expeuses
D u e from b a n k s
Cash

$7, 319, 777

$6, 867, 044

$3,168, 084

$100, 406, 767

$24, 338, 982

6,123, 002
974,104

10, 336, 003
1, 626, 253

1,168, 586
357, 312

53,173,810
9, 215, 430

12, 8.56, 776
950, 000

8, 086, 219
4, 566, 200
660, 6.53
231,,581
793, 244
33, 602

3, 902, 980
4, 631, 415
1, 070,000
• 255,497
334, 920
25, 819
533,104
131, 507

100, 840
7,800
59, 232
30, 289
56, 247
2, .320
4,443
261, 403

768,141

Total.

29, 715, 442

8,
6,
21,
2,

31.5,
098,
733,
273,

210
436
490
750

5, 791, 860
1,410,929
2, 398,133
216, 534
964

547,519
2, 367, 824
2,125, 490
206, 257, 726

LIAlilLlTIES.

Deposits
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits .
Other liabilities . . .

28, 2.52, 932
376,124
927, 467

5, 000, 409
123. 379
87, 466
5,302

29, 715, 442

Total.

28, 352, 447
1,191,421
72,090
99, 484

202,19.5,343
3,159, 593

5,216,556

*902, 790

46, 636, 519
1, 780, 430
196, 020

Resources and liahilities of savings-banks, cfc.—Continuecl.

R e s o u r c e s a u d liabilities.

N e w Jerse;^,
I n d i a n a , J.anConnecticut, N e w York,
February,
J a n u a r y , 1871 J a n u a r y , 1874.
u a r y , 1874.
1874.

t California,
J u l y , 1874.

•

RESOURCES.

$47, 226, 893

$110, 753, 559

$14, 868, 200

$338,782,

8, 596. 818
4, 0.39, 565

8,15.5, 240
46, 543,156

4,156, 036
2, 708, 809

285, 595

6, 817, 955
1,254,707
3, 622, 663
519, 841
162, 562
33, 555
1, 048, 234
354, 789

106, 812, 508

8, 615,159
12, 320

13, 500

7, 435, 328
7, 017, ^60

9,900
4,824

. 14,158,075
6, 714, 404

405, 644
292,140
8,910
320.166
801, 861

72, 2.53

3, 836, 495

73, 677, 582

307, 589, 730

32,189, 245

724, 854

67,691 097

Deposits
S n r p l u s fund
UmiiAnded profits
O t h e r liabilities

70, 769, 408
2, 756, 767

285, 520, 085

588
869
391
397

62 933, 054
4, 758, 043

151, 407

29, 626,
224,
2, 272,
65,

659, 847

21, 448, 796
620, 849

Total

73, 677, 582

307, 589, 730

32,189, 245

724, 854

L o a n s on r e a l e s t a t e
L o a n s on personal a n d collatU n i t e d State.s b o n d s
State, municipal, and other
bonds and stocks
Railroad bonds and stocks
B a n k stock
Real estate
O t h e r iuA'CStraents
Expenses
'...
D u e from b a n k s
Cash
...

Total

+$63, 456, 466

*117, 902
280, 234

LIABILITIES.

35, 210
29, 797
67 691, 097

* A d d e d to b a l a n c e .
t T h e s t a t e r a e n t of t h e Califiu-nia b a n k s Avas compiled b y t h e San F r a n c i s c o H e r a l d , a n d t.aken frora
t h e B a n k e r s ' M a g a z i n e for S e p t e m b e r , 1874.
X All loans.




COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

179

Aggregate resources and liabilities of savings-banks.
Resources aud liabilities.

1872-'73.

1873-'74.

RESOURCES.

Loans on real estate
Loans on personal aud collateral security
United States bouds ..'
State, municipal, and other bonds and stocks
Railroad bonds and stocks
Bauk stock
Real estate
Other investments
Expenses
Due from banks
i
Cash

$315, 288, 088
168, 308, 332
66, 414, 629
148, 456, 231
17, 981, 807
29, 545, 071
11, 378, 364
8, 780, 263
931, 959
18,431,846
15, 715,134

701, 229, 392

Total

$287, 357, 693
107, 391, 457
80, 576, 088
143, 543, 487
16, 793, 388
24, 360, 653
10, 3.50, 716
6,519, 359
634, 492
15, 465, 474
236, 580

801, 231, 724

669, 329, 917
10, 468, 764
20, 879, 425
551, 286

759, 946, 632
12, 590, 196
26, 623, 850
• 2,071,046

701, 229, 392

801, 231, 724

LIABILITIES.

Depo.=^its
Surplus fund
UndiA^idcd profits
Other liabilities
Total




180

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement of the resources and liabilities of State banks, including savings-hanks having
caxntal stock.

R e s o u r c e s a n d liabilities.

Maine,
October,
1873.

N e w H a m p - Rhode Island, Connecticut,
shire, M a y ,
December,.
January,
1874.
1873.
1874.

N e w York.
Citv, March
23, 1874.

RESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
U n i t e d States b o n d s
O t h e r bonds, stocks, a n d m o r t gages
.-.
D u e from b a n k s
'.
Real estate
O t h e r iuA^estments
Expenses
Cash items
Specie
C a s h — legal • t e n d e r s , b a n k notes &c. .
Total

$55, 834

$4, 451,1.53

$2, 754, 632
2, 868
59, 250

$47,810,219
32 660

136, 626
200,140
40,194
6, 094
4, 748
2, 494

35, 789
609. 240
92; 400
16
4, 9.50
53, 9.56
9, 903

1 642 579
3, 294, 604
1, 595 927
261, 628
376, 420
9, 979, 783
3,021,462

246, 764

$308, 722

93, 690

7, 317, 695

4,000
700
40, 826
4, 000

10, 816
1, 854

941

2, 545

81, 501
436, 690

75,049

5,088,213

3, 716, 694 .

75, 332, 977

225, 000
3,633
6,500
24, 600
1, 535
174, 759
663

50, 000
1,334
11, 013

3,187, 550
22, 033

1, 450, 000
29, 425
323, 364

17, 285, 200
37, 990

300, 904
21,841
1, 348, 000
133, 525
74, 360

3,
1, 525,
333,
1,

052
975
345
533

45,941 340
5, 263, 922
575,151

5, 088, 213

3, 716, 694

75, 332, 977

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circulation
....
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits
DiA'^idends u n p a i d
Dei30sits
D u e t o bank.s
O t h e r liabilities

Total

436, 690

^

2,727
9, 975

75, 049

6, 224, 374

Eesources and liabilities of State banlcs, including savings-hanks, ^"C.—Continued.

R e s o u r c e s .and l i a b i l i t i e s .

New York
NCAV Y o r k
New York,
C i t y , J u n e City, Septem- M a r c h 28,
20, 1874.
b e r 26, 1874.
1874.

New York,
J u n e 20,
1874.

$27, 430, 512
93, 323

New York,
S e p t e m b e r 26,
1874.

$27,117,822
104, 692

RESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
- ...
Xlnitecl S t a t e s b o n d s
•Other bonds, stocks, a n d m o r t gages
D u e trom b a n k s
,
Real estate
Other investments
Expenses
Cash iteras
Specie
C a s h — legal - t e n d e r s , b a n k n o t e s , &c

Total.

$45, 333, 932
29, 987
1, 726, 201
4, 476, 070
1,596,274
103, 451
377, 333
8,169, 006
1, 858, 281

$44, 246,101
29, 369
1, 945,107
3, 8.51, 215
1, 606, 422
90, 639
416, 098
8, 868, 015
1, 819, 554

1, 696, 511
3, OSO, 762
539, 438
1.52, 808
108, 812
610, .566
33, 312

• 1, 885, 205
3,162, 898
,541, 273
157, 052
163,281
580,115
31, 760

$26, 634, 596
107, 352
1, 846, .564
4, 452, 831
• 569,191
146, 567
103, 718
489, 838
29, 605

987, 324

1, 026, 879

1, 065, 673

34, 733, 418

34, 770, 977

35, 445, 935

16, 635, 200
37, 939

9, 803, 690
44,164

9, 488, 690
40, 863

9, 671, 090
40, 834

9, 561,149

12, 7S0, 776

73, 236, 684

75,653,296

16, 785, 200
37, 956

LIABILITIES.

.Capital stock
Circulation
S u r p l u s fund
Undivided profits..
DiAddends u n p a i d .
Deposits
D u e to b a n k s
O t h e r liabilities . . -

3, 224, 441

3, 699, 399

3, 438, 355

44,255,196
4, 614, 326
904, 587

44, 608,146
5, 080, 878
• 2,977,278

18,798,308
1, 428, 910
1, 433, 905

17, 612, ,590
1, 39.5, 751
2, 533, 684

17, 817, 032
1, 271. 724
3, 206, 900

Total-

73, 236, 684

75, 653, 296

34, 733, 418

34, 770, 977

35, 445, 935




6, 639, 419

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

181

Eesources and liahilities of State hanks, including savings-hanks, c^^c.—Continued.
N e w J e r s e y , P e u n s y l v a n i a , D i s t r i c t CoNoA'eraber, lumbia, OctoFebruarv,
ber, 1874.
1874. "
1873. .

R e s o u r c e s a u d liabilities.

*Virginia, t l l l i n o i s , C i t y
of Chicago,"
J u l y , 1874. lOctober, 1874.

RESOURCES.

464, 629
. 1,145,078
145, 812
22, 917
12,152
• 23,914
2, 385

+6, 896, 796
1, 921, 278
1, 012, 716
471, 870
-362, 322
38, 488
72, 970

3.53, 366

34, 964,177

$5, 502, 794
7,269

2, 060, 609

1, 741, 370
14, 076
64, 291
178, .545
29,321
3, 562,184
161, 606
30, 674

Total

$22,127,128

$522, 816
50, 250

$3, 527, 395
1, 288
83,131

5, 782, 067

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
O t h e r bonds, .stocks, and mortgages
DuelVom banks
Real estate
Other investraents
Expenses
Cash iteras
Specie
C a s h — legal t e n d e r s , banknotes,' &c

89,167
11, 773
31, 900
15,198
7,072

488,
417,
74,
122,
40,

565
976
805
959
286

$6, 376, 306

1, 998, 283
'"794," 619

361
464, 742

1, 777, 308

774, 321

7,119, 757

10, 946, 516

8, 370,168
329
1, 202, 046
674,168

73, 430

2, 407, 316

2,339,618

23, 395, 439
472, 091
849, 936

'688," 338

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circuiatiou
Surx)lus fund
U n d iAQcled profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
D u e to b a n k s
O t h e r liabilities

•
•.

Total

4,146

8,357

147,
225,
13,
4,191,
87,
47,

041
023
804
798
507
268

7,119, 757

5, 782, 067

8, 606, 898

10,946,516

Eesources and Uabilities of State banks, including savings-hanks, ^"c.—Continuecl.
Missouri,
J u l y , 1874.

R e s o u r c e s a n d li.abilities.

§ Kansas.
J u l y , 1874.

Iowa, September, 1873.

Michigan,
J u l y , 1874.

Wisconsin,
J u l y , 1874.

RESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
U n i t e d State.s b o u d s
O t b e r bonds, stocks, a n d mortgages
.
..
. . . .
Real estate
Other investments
Expenses
".
Specie
Cash — l e g a l
n o t e s , &c

tenders,

$22, 079, 295
40, 736
2.54, 711
1,764,372'
2,196, 033 '
,573, 416
231,128
223, 416
616, 549
17,120

$1, 060. 5.57
13, 302
26, 928
210, 511
80, 284
16,617
21,649
55, 372

$2, 968,162

383, 981
139, 930
26, 571

$5, 568, 438
34, 603

$5,172, 825
95 653
] 409

736, 784
953, 384
82,629

1, 292, 925
2,538,530
107, 324
1 270
2, 550
276, 615
21, 606

55, 070

bank3, 948, 076

152, 339

360, 388

. 943, 270

623,153

.31,944,857

Total

1, 637, 559

3, 879, 032

8, 424,183

10,133, 860

8,156, 650
2,425
851, 355
674, 402
265, 010
20, 912, 319
440, 569
642,127

626, 711

1, 01.5, 956

1, 932, 735

219, 909

219, 838
170,188

862, 688
1 404
56 195
6,465

870, 965
6,061
17, 754

2, 555, 412
87, 755

6,101, 422

31,^944,857

1,637,559

3, 879, 032

LIABILITIES.

C a p i t a l stock
Circulation
S u r p l u s fund
U n d i v i d e d profits
Dividends unpaid
Deposits
D u e to b a n k s
O t h e r liabilities

.

...

Total

-.

52, 064
64, 004

6, 618, 780
2, 588, 328
8, 424,183

10,133, 860

• E l e v e n b a n k s ( h a v i n g c a p i t a l stock, $644,645; l o a n s , $1,173,746 ; deposits, $978,488, on t h e 1st of Octo^
oer, 1874) a r e n o t i n c l u d e d in t h e s t a t e m e n t for V i r g i n i a , t h e i r r e t u r u s b e i n g iucomj)lete.
\ T h e s t a t e r a e n t of t h e C h i c a g o b a n k s is d e r i v e d from t h e Chicago T r i b u n e .
t United States bonds included.
§ T h e r e t u r n s from K a u s a s do n o t i n c l u d e six b a n k s , w h i c h r e p o r t e d i n J a n u a r y l a s t as follows, v i z :
c a p i t a l stock, $215,000 ; loans, $271,000 ; deposits, $265,000.




182

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Eesources and liahilities of State hanks, including savings-banks, cfc.—Continued.
Minnesota,
October, 1874.

Resources.

$1, 020.
24,
29,

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds
Other bonds, stocks, and mortgages.
Due from banks
Real estate
Other investments
Expenses
Cash items
Specie
,
(Jash—legal-tenders, bank-notes, &c.

106,
14,
13,
30,
7,
4,
128,

Total

1, 379, 882

Minnesota,
October, 1874.

Liabilities.
Capital stock
Circulation'
SuT'plus fund
Undivided profits.
DiAndends unpaid.
Deposits
Due to banks .
Other liabilities . . .

$560, 000
9,000
68, 641
708, 941
14, 458
18, 842

Total .

Aggregate resources and liabilities of State banks, inclyding savings-banks, cj-c.
Resources aud liabilities.
RESOURCES.

Loans and discounts
OA'crdrafts
United States bonds
Other bonds, stocks, aud mortgages
Due from banks
Real estate.
Other investments
Expenses
Cash items
Specie
Cash—legal-tenders, bank-notes, &c

$119,332, 341
237,104
1,544, 296
9.617, 667
12, 605,100
3,269, 233
944, 079
886, 348
977, 324
020,139
447, 776

Total

$154, 377, 672
212, 772
1, 961, 447
16, 437, 815
19, 050; 046
5, 372,186
1, 164, 999
1, 234, 344
10, 434, 018
1, 980, 083
25,126, 706

178, 881, 407

237, 402, 068

42, 705, 834
174,714
2,109, 732
10, 027, 668
33, 492
110, 754. 034
8, 838, 355
4, 237, 578

59, 305, 532
153, 4 3
.2
• 2, 942, 707
12, 363, 205
337, 290
137, 594, 961
^ 14,241,604
10, 463, 357

178, 881, 407

237, 402, 088

LIABILITIES.

Capital stock
Circulation
Surplus fund.^.
Undivided profits
DiA^idends unpaid
Deposits
Due to banks
Other liabilities
Total




.'

COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY.

183

Names and comxiensation of officers and clerks in the Office of. the Comptroller of the Currency.
Name.

Class.

Salary.

COMPTROLLER.

John J a y Kuox

$5, 000
DEPUTY COMPTROLLER.

J o h n S. Lau<^worthy
J . Frankliu Bates
E d w a r d Wolcott
J o h u D. Patten, j r
Greorge W . M a r t i n
J o h n W. M a g r u d e r
J o h n AV. G-rirtin
E d w a r d s . Peck
Oeorcre H . AVood
AVilliara E l d e r
.
Charles H Norton
..
F i s h e r A l b e r t Sirakins
C h a r l e s A. JcAvett
W a t s o n AV. E l d r i d g e
F e r n a n d o C. C a t e
Charles H. Cherry
Nathaniel 0. Chapman
Theodore 0. E b a u g h
AVilliara P G-reene
AVilliam H . O l a s c o t t
•John A . K a v s e r
•
ALanson T. K i n n e y
Edward Myers
AVilliam H". M i l s t e a d
F r a n k A. Miller
AVa.shingtou K . McCoy
AVilliam Sinclair . .
Williani D Swan
J o h n J . Sanborn
DaAud B. V e n t r e s . . .

...

2,500

.

•
. . .
„

1
1
l',
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

.^...

T h i r d class clerk
do
do
do
......do'
do
do
do
......do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do . . :

,

J a m e s C. B r o w n
Charles E. Brayton
AVilliara C r u i k s h a n k
Richard T J. Falconer
John A. Hebrew
E d w a r d W. Moore
Cliarles Scott
Erskine M Sunderland
A\^alter Taiyl<")r
AVilliam H . W a l t o n
D.avid B . B r e n n e r
T h o s Brou sou J e w e l l
I s a a c C Miller
John J. Patton ..
AVilliara A . P a g e
P h i l i p T . SnoAvden
F r e d e r i c k AVi ddoAvs
M a t t h e w n\ Wallnp.ft
AValter S J o h n s t o n / . .

F o u r t h class c l e r k
do
do
......do
do
do
......do
do
do
do
do
do
do

^.
•

.

.

.

.
..

. .
.;
. ,

Eliza M B a r k e r
EA'a C B a t e s
Harriet M Black
M a r y L. C o n r a d
J u l i a R Donoho
M a r g a r e t DoAA'^uin^'"
Sarah F . Fitzgerald
Celia N F r e n c h
Flora M Fleming
M a r g a r e t E G-oocling
Eliza R . H y d e
^
Lizzie H e n r y
L o u i s a AV. KnoAvlton
A1 i p.p. M Kf.n np.dy
M a r y L. M c C o r m i c k
Mao-o'ie B . Miller

EtlilTE. Poole




...

,

1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1,600
1,600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1 600
1, 600

Secoud class c l e r k
do
do
do
do
do
do
:do
do
do....^.
do

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

F i r s t class c l e r k
do
do
, do
do
do
do
do
do
F e m a l e clerk
..
do
do
do
do
•
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
. . do
do

800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
800

,

1,200
1 200
1 200
1 200
1 200
1,200
1,200
1 200
1 200
•
•

-V
^

400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400
400

900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900
900

184

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Names and comxiensation of clerks, cfc.—Continned.
Name.

Salary.

Class.

Emily H. Reed
Maiia Ricliardsou
Marie L. Sturgus
Fayette C. Snead..'...
Carrie F . B. Stevens .
Annie AV. Story
Amelia P . Stockdale .
Maggie L. Simpson...
MartliaM. Smith
Julia C. ToAVUsend . .
Annie E. AVheat
Saddle E, FoAvler
Lillian D. Massey
Nettie Morgan ..'
Maria F. Robinson . . .
Aunie E. Ober
Sarah A. W. Tiffey . .

Female clerk.
do
do . . . . . .
do......
do
do
do . . . . . .
.do
do . . . . . .
do......
do......
do . . . : . .
do......
do
do . . . . . .
do . . . . . .
do . . . . . .

J. Eddie De Saules.
Harry R. Hughes ...
James D. Burke
Henry Sanders

Messenger.
do"
do . . . ;
do....

Charles B. Hinckley .

Assistant messenger.

Philo Burr
AVilliam H. Romaine.
Robert LeRoy Livingston.
Henry Mathews
Charles McC. Taylor

Watchman .
do . . . .

720
720

Laborer.
do .
do .

720
720
720

$900
900
900 •
900
.900
900
900
900
900
900
900.
. 900
900
900
900
900
900
840
840
840
840

Expenses of the Office of Comptroller of the Currency for the fiscal year ending June 30,1874.
For special dies, plates, paper, printing, &c
For salaries
Total

—

$116, 021 11
118,500 00
234,521 ]1

The contingent expenses of the Office were paid ont o f t h e general appropriation for
contingent expenses of the Treasury Departnient, and, as separate acconots are uot kept
for the different Bureaus, the amount cannot be stated.




•/

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.







EEPORT
OF

THE DIRECTOR OF THE MINT,

O F F I C E D I R E C T O R OF THE MINT,

Treasury Dejpartment.^ October ISth, 1874.
S I R : In compliance with the provisions o f t h e coinage act of 1873,
I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the
mints and assay-offices for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
The amounts of gold and silver deposits and purchases, coins struck,
and bars manufactured, were as follows:
D E P O S I T S AND P U R C H A S E S .

Gold deposits
Silver deposits and purchases

|68,861,594 97
15, 122,151 31

Total amount received and operated upon

83,983,746 28

Deducting redeposits, bars made and issued by one institution and
deposited at another—the deposits Avere—
Gold
Silver

•

$49,142, .511 06
11,484,677 78

Total

.60,6.27,188 84
COINAGE.
Pieces.

Gold
Silver
Miuorcoinage

Value.

3,186,699 |50, 442, 690 00
13,273,380 5,98.3,601 30
19,668,500 ' 411,925 00

:

Total

36,128,579 56,838,216 30
BARS.

Fine gold
Unparted gold
Bars from standard British gold coin
Bars from light United States gold coin

$5,037,503
10,584,705
5,.922, 836
9, 940,773

20
41
23
16
31,485,818 00

Fine silver
Unparted silver

5,937,490 68
910,308 50
6,847,799 18

Total gold and sii ver

38,333,617 18

The distribution of the gold and silver bullion deposited and purchased, including redeposits, was as follows :



188

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

M I N T U N I T E D STATES, P H I L A D E L P H I A .

Gold deposits, (including abraded coin)
Silver deposits and p u r c h a s e s . . . .
Total

$24, 886, 452 59
3, 060, 829 66
,

27,947,282 25

M I N T U N I T E D STATES, SAN FRANCISCO.

Gold deposits
Silver deposits and purchases

$22,066,181 66
2, 868, 607 77

Total

24,934,789 43
M I N T U N I T E D STATES, CAESON.

Gold deposits
Silver deposits and purchases

$2,213,041 96
2, 875,116 82

,

Total .

5,088,158 78
M I N T U N I T E D STATES, DENA^ER.

$962, 803 82
26,969 27

Grold deposits.
Silver deposits .

989,773 09

Total .
^

U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFEICE, N E W YOEKo

€old deposits

$18,611,959 54

Silver de^DOsits and purchases

6, 288,761 .58

Total

24,900,721 12
U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFFICE, B O I S E , I D A H O .

Ool d deposits...
Silver deposits .

$112,466 54
1,791 52
114,258 06

Total .
U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFFICE, CHARLOTTE, N . C.

$8, 688 86
74 69

Gold deposits...
Silver dei^osits ,
Total

8.763 55

The coinage at the different mints for the fiscal year was as follows:
Description.

Pieces.

A^alue.

MINT UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA.

Gold coinage
Silver coinage, (trade-dollars)
Silver coinage,' (subsidiary coiu)
Minor coinage
".

1, 917,160
1, 058, 200
7, 948, 500
19, 668, 500
30, 592, 360

•

29, 842, 390

1,168, 000
2,121, 000
1, 593, 000

22, 302, 500
2,121, 000
429, 500

4, 882, 000

Total .

$26, 467, 330
1, 058, 200
1, 904, 935
411, 925

24, 853, 000

mNT UNITED STATES, SAN FRANCISCO.

Gold coinage
J
Silver coiuage, (trade-dollars)
Silver coinage, (subsidiary coin)

.''.

Total.
MINT UNITED STATES, CARSON.

Gold coin,age
Silver coinage, (trade-dollars)
Silver coinage, (subsidiary coiu)
Total
Total coinage .




101, 539
409, 700
142, 980

1, 672, 860 00
409, 700 00
60, 266 30

654, 219

2,142, 826 30

36,128, 579 56, 838, 216 30

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT. '

189

The bars made and issued at the mints and.assay-ofiSces w^ere as follows :
M I N T U N I T E D STATES, P H I L A D E L P H I A .

Fine'gold bars.'
Fine silver bars

'

$95,3.16 21
319,821 49

Total

415,137 70
M I N T U N I T E D STATES, SAN FRANCISCO.

Unparted gold bars
Unparted silver bars

'

$9,025,309 58
209,071 53

Total

9,234,381 11
M I N T U N I T E D STATES, CARSON.

Unparted> gold bars
Fine silver bars
Unparted silver bars

^$475, 436 61
$1,672,198 06
672,401 49
—
;
2,344,599 55

:

Total

2,820,036 16
U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFFICE, NEAV YORK.

Fine gold bars
J
Bars from standard British gold coin
•Bars from light United States gold coin

$4,942,186 99
5, 922, 836 23
9,940,773 16

Fine silver bars

...•

Total

20,805,796 38
3,945,471 13
24,751,267 51

M I N T U N I T E D STATES, D E N A ' E E .

Unparted gold bars

$962,803 82

Unparted silver bars

^

Total

26,969 27

.'.

989,773 09

U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFFICE, B O I S E , I D A H O .

Unparted gold bars
Unparted silver bars
Total.

.*..

$112,466 54
1,791 52
114, §58 06

•

U N I T E D STATES ASSAY-OFFICE, CHAELOTTE, N . C.

Unparted gold bars
Unparted silver bars

$8,688 86
74 69

.•

Total

:

8,763 55

The amount in bars transmitted from the United States assay-office,
New York, to the mint at Philadelphia for coinage Avas—
Gold
•Silver

,
Total

•

$18,704,101 70
2,613,636 03
21,317,737 73

Compared with the previous year, there was an increase of $8,924,165.52
in the amount of gold operated upon, $2,804,761.88 in silver operated
upon, $15,193,352.50 in gold coinage, $3,037,805.80 in silver coinage, and
$10,816,086.57 in bars prepared.




190

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

EARNINGS AND E X P E N D I T U R E S .

The following summary exhibits the earnings and expenditures for the
fiscal year:
"
•
EARNiiN^as.

:
Assay-offices.

Mints.

8
"o

Of

H

2
Coinage cliarge
$22, 646
P a r t i n g & o t b e r c b a r g e s .5, 816
G a i u b y coinage of sub- 79, 270
s i d i a r y silver coiu.
M i n o r coiuage profits . . 271, 612
688
Sale of b y p r o d u c t s a n d
old n i a t e r i a l .
1,043
R e s i d u e Ifl a x e s
and
sweepings.
4,018
Medal proiits
S u r p l u s bullion, (melter
ancl refiner.) .
A s s a y of ores
147

i

1

6
'o

1

fi

O

^25

$82, 475 98
10 $54, 560 92 $5, 268 96
06 12, 212 34 47, 547 84 $1, 237 20 $79, 078 98 $267 51 $287 16 146, 447 09
111, 175 48
92 28, 653 79 3, 250 77
18, 720 40

83

17, 613 40

7, 871 29

1,178 31

271, 612 58
37, 022 36

324 59

10, 418 02

22,142 16

58
56

4, 018 80
22,142 16

80
75

447 75

300 00

385, 244 60 95, 427 05 82, 659 26

Total earnings

Total.

6

o

i
s

2, 415 51 119, 459 13

267 51

287 16 685, 760 2-^

EXPENDITURES.
Assay-offices.

Mints.
d
o

s
i

Total.

1
>
O

o
fi

o

6
"o

KEGULAR ORDINARY
ACCOUNT..

Salaries
"Wages
Contingent
Ereigbt
Ores a n d coins

$34, 300 00 $26, 000 00 $16, 593 56 $9, 679 35 $20, 700-00 $2, 700 00 $.5, 400 00 $11.5, 372 91
292 00 3, 000 00 581, 785 36
143, 476 20 252, 907 98 81,491 12 15, 313 00 85,305 06
908 24 2, 464 90 291,325 85
53, 977 80 70„411 97 103, 5(J2 94 5, 000 00 55, 000 00

'

207 15

207 15

MINOR COINAGE ACCOUNT.

Wages
Incidentals
Cent-metal
Ereigbt
Diffel-ence b e t w e e n
a s s a y A'-alue of
s w e e p s sold a u d
aniount realized..
Wastage

120,
30
40,
13,

120,
30,
40,
13,

454' 83
529 96
992 48
358 16

1, 487 05
*29, 393 06

6, 717 12

2, 320 24
5, 906 02

4, 201 79

454
.529
992
358

83
96
48
16

8, 009 08
42, 016 20

T o t a l expendi- 468,176 69 356, 037 07 209,873 88 29, 992 35 165,1206 85 3, 900 24 10, 864 90 1,244,051 98
tures.
•

* Tins item embraces Avastage at Pbiladelpbia Miut for fifteen montbs.

A moderate increase iu the expenditures of the mints having taken
place iu the last two years, it is deemed necessary to explain the cause
of the same, aud which will appear from an examination of the annexed



DIRECTOR

OF T H E

191

MINT.

table, presenting the operations on gold and silver during the last fiscal
year, and the average of the ten years ended June 30,1872:
A m o u n t operated upon.

Coinage.

Period.
Gold.
E i s c a l y e a r e n d e d JTune 30 1874
A v e r a g e for t e n years, e n d e d J u n e 30,
1872

Silver. •

Gold.

Silver.

$68, 861, 594 97

$15,122,151 31

$50, 442, 690

$5, 983, 601 30

31, 935, 284 25

3,042,346 36

22, 786, 289

1, 275, 623 90

Bars prepared.
Period.

F i n e gold a n d
b a r s of .stand- U n p a r t e d gold.
a r d or a b o v e .

E i s c a l y e a r e n d e d ' J u n e 30,1874
A v e r a g e for t e n y e a r s , e n d e d J u u e 30,
1872.....:
.....'

F i n e silver.

Unparted
silver.

$20, 901,112 59

$10, 584, 705 41

$5, 937, 490 68

$910,308 50

6, 408, 656 35

2, 401, 603 43

834, 516 57 ' 567, 492 50

A comparison of the operations for the.last fiscal year with the aver
age result of the ten years ended June 30, 1872, will show the follow'
ing percentages of increase :
Per cent.

In
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

gold operated upon, about.
silver operated u]3on, about
gold coinage, about
silver coinage, about
line gold bars, abont
unparted gold bars, abont . ^
fine silver bars, about
unparted silver bars, about

^

115
397
121
369
226
340
611
60

.-

The above statement exhibits a great augmentation of business under
the coinage act, and shows that the usefulness of the mints has been
verj^ much increased under the new organization.
RECOINAGE OF LIGHT GOLD COIN.

The recoinage of light gold coins, under the provisions of the fourteenth section ofthe coinage act, was continued at intervals during, the
fiscal year.
The following statement exhibits the recoinage from the 1st of July,
1872, to the 30th of June, 1873 :
Weigbt.

Percentage of loss.

Loss.
6

T a l e v.alue.

^N'et v a l u e .

C3

Standard.

Before
melting.

After
melting.

a
*o
o

r

bi)

O

.9
a
M

i

DoUars. Ounces. Oz. Oz
Ounces.
Dollars.
Ounces.
Ounces.
Dollars.
32, 717,189 50 32, 523, 620 52 1, 758, 548. 93 1, 748, 879. 85 1,748,379.76 193, 568. 98 9, 669. 08 500. 09 249




* Over one-lialf per ceut.

'o

2

1

1

11
=
M

(*) (*)

192

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The loss by abrasion is shown to have been but little over one-half of
one per cent., and much less than the rate given by the best writers as the
average loss on coins from that cause.
The renovation of the gold coins is now about complete, except as to
the light or worn i^ieces in circulation in the Pacific coast States and
Territories; and if some provision were made for their withdrawal, the
entire gold coinage Avould then be in good condition. It would appear
to be true policy to have the coins referred to withdrawn from circulation ; and if such withdrawal is to be at the expense of the public Treasury, as recommended in my last annual report,-they should be received
only at the mints, where the necessary time and means can be taken to
detect and exclude such coins as have been artificially reduced in
weight.
Provision should be made for their withdrawal before the resumption
of specie payments, as after resumption such coins will naturally find
their Avay east and enter into circulation, and when a loss is sustained
upon any of them it will fall upon individuals who may not have the
means of ascertaing their actual weight.
In connection with this subject, it should be remarked that the reduction in the weight of coins for fraudulent purposes has not been carried
on to any extent in this country.
COINAGE FOR FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS.

Under the provisions of the act approved January 29, 1874, authorizing coinages to be executed at the mints for any foreign government
applying for the same, applications for the execution of certain coinages
have been received from two governments, and are now under consideration by the proijer authority.
TRANSFER OF STAMPED MINT-BARS TO THE TREASURY.

An act authorizing in effect the keeping of part of the funds in tbe
Treasury in the form of stamped mint-bars, and the application of the
same to the redemption of coin-certificates or in exchange for gold
coins at not less than par, and not lessthan the market-value, having
been passed at the last session of Gongress, an amonnt of such bars
sufiicient for any probable demand that may arise was by your order
transferred from the bullion-fund of the assay-ofiice in New York to the
office of the assistant treasurer in that city. These bars, if not required
bythe public for commercial purposes, will be convenient fbr the Treasury to have coined into the smalle? denominations of gold coin, should
it at any time require the same, and which may be probable, as the gold
coinage of late years, or since the suspension of specie payments, has
been mainly in double eagles, aud that denomination constitutes almost
entirely the amount now in the Treasury.
PROBABLE DEMAND FOR COINAGE OF SMALL GOLD COINS.

Whenever the specie basis shall have been reached, a large coinage
of the half and quarter eaigies, will be necessary, but the mints can manufacture the same as rapidly as would be required or the bullion could
be supplied for the purpose. We have now six diff'erent denominations
of gold coin, which is a greater variety than is required. This being
the case, and the three-dollar piece corresponding so nearly, as to weight,
value, and size, with the quarter-eagle, and rarely used, its coinage



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

193

should be discontinued. The gold dollar is not a convenient coin, on
account of its small size, and it suffers more proportionably from abrasion than larger coins. Its issue should, therefore, be confined to actual
demands for it by depositors of bullion, and the requirements for change
and retail transactions should be met with silver coin.
THE TRADE-DOLLAR.

The coinage of trade-dollars during the fiscal year amounted to
$3,588,900, the greater portion of which were exported to China, where
they found a ready market, and continue to grow in favor for trade and
exchange purposes. Owing to the limited capacity of the mints on the
Pacific coast, we have not been able to meet the demand for these coins.
The increased capacity of the new mint in San Francisco, to which
operations wdll soon be transferred, and the addition of new machinery
and appliances at the Carson mint, will enable us to meet the demand
for all the coin, both gold and silver, which may be required on that
coast for circulation and export.
The total issue of silver dollars from the organization of the mint to
the 1st of April, 1873, at which time, under the provisions of the coinage
act, their coinage was discontinued, amounted to a little over $8,000,000.
x4.dding $1,378,500, the amount of trade-dollars coined/during the first
quarter of the current fiscal year, to the coinage for the year ended
June 30,1874, gives the issue as more than half of the total coinage ofthe
old silver dollar during a period of nearly eighty years. Attention is
invited to a memorandum in the appendix from the superintendent of
the San Francisco mint, containing some interesting information in
relation to the course of the trade-dollar.
PROPOSED ISSUE OF A TV7ENTY-CENT COIN.

A bill authorizing the coinage of a twenty-cent silver piece passed
the Senate at the last session of Congress, but was not considered
in the House of Eepresentatives for want of time. The issue of a
coin of that denomination will not only be in accordance with our
decimal system of money, but will remove a difficulty in making
change which now exists upon the Pacific coast and in Texas, where
the five-cent copper-nickel coins do not circulate, and where it was
formerly the practice to apply the term '^bits,'' ^' two bits," and ''four
bits,'^ respectively, to the fractions ofthe Spanish dollar which circulated
there. The custom appears to continue, notwithstanding those coins
have disappeared from circulation. Accordingly, if a payment of one bit
is to be made, and a twenty-five cent coin be used for the purpose, a tencent coin (one bit) is returned as the proper change, five cents being lost
in the transaction by the purchaser. Theissueof a twenty-cent coin
will no doubt remove this difficulty. It may be added that, although
this ''bit" system appears to be quite an unimportant matter, few visitors to the Pacific coast fail to suff'er some vexation at least from its
existence.
Inquiry is occasionally made as to why the coinage of the silver fivecent piece was discontinued. The reason appears to have been that it
would, on the resumption of specie payments, be likely to. expel from
circulation and drive into the Treasury for redemption the five-cent
copper-nickel coins. At first glance this may appear improbable, but
when it is considered that the original law authorizing the issue ot
13 F



194

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the copper-nickel five-cent coin j)rovided for its redemption in lawful
money ofthe United States, it will be seen that there must come a time
when it will be superior to the five-cent silver coin, and for the reason
that it will be exchangeable for notes redeemable in gold coin. The
silver coin, which would have a greater nominal than intrinsic value,
and not redeemable in lawful money, or gold coin, would become the
inferior currency.
The five-cent copper-nickel coin having been issued to the extent of
over $5,000,000, and the amount being sufficient for a token coin of that
denomination, the provision of law discontinuing the issue of the fivecent silver coin appears to have been proper.
THE ACT FIXING THE CUSTOM-HOUSE VALUATION OF THE POUND
STERLING AND PAR OF EXCHANGE WITH GREAT BRITAIN.

Thepresent report being the first one made since the act of March 3,
1873, establishing the custom-house valuation ofthe sovereign or pound
sterling, and fixing the par of exchange with Great Britain, went into operation, some reference to the provisions, operation, and eff'ect of the
same would appear to be proper.
The first section prescribes as a rule that the value of foreign coin
expressed in the money of account of the United States shall be that
of the pure metal of such coin of standard value, and that the value of
the standard coins in circulation of the various nations of the world
shall be estimated annually by the Director of the Mint, and be proclaimed on the first day of January by the Secretary of the Treasury.
The second section declares that in all paymeuts by or to theTreasury,
whether made here or in fbreign countries, where it becomes necessary
to compute the value of the sovereign or pound sterling, it shall be
deemed equal, to four dollars eighty-six cents six and one-half mills, and
that the same rule shall be applied in appraising foreign merchandise imported, where the value is by the invoice in sovereigns or pounds sterling, and in the construction of contracts payable in sovereigns or
pounds sterling. It also declares that valuation to be the par of exchange between Great Britain and the United States.
The third section repeals all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with
the foregoing provisions.
In order to comply with the provisions of the first section, it became
necessary to obtain accurate information in relation to the standard coins
of the various nations of the world, and for that purpose inquiries as
to the unit of the money of account of foreign countries respectively,
and the amouut of pure gold or silver declared by law to represent
the same, were made in. the form of a circular-letter addressed through
the Department of State to the representatives of the United States
in foreign countries. The information asked for was courteously furnished by the proper official authorities of the diff'erent nations; and after
being received, the estimation of values by the Director of the Mint,
and proclamation of the same by the Secretary of the Treasury, were
made.
In converting invoices of foreign merchandise stated in foreign
moneys of account, into the money of accountof the United States, it
became necessary to make such conversion according to values ascertained under the rule so broadly laid down in the first section of the
law. The einployment at the custom-houses of the values thus ascertained led to some dissatisfaction, the duties being increased, not in
proportion to the slightly-enhanced valuation of the coins, but; by an



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

195

artificial rule in laying duties, and appeals in certain cases were taken,
one of which, involving the value'of the franc, was recently tried before
the United States district court ofthe southern district of New York, and
decided adversely to the United States, thecourt holdiugthat the firstsection of the act of March 3,1873, and the act of March 22, 1846, fixing the
value of the franc at 18.6 cents, do not cover or embrace the same subject, and that the last-named act is not repealed. The case has been
appealed, and, should the decision be affirmed by the Supreme Court, a
return to the old valuation on all foreign coins except the pound sterling would necessarily^ follow. It is probable, however, that Congress
would, in that event, pass an explanatory law or revise and correct the
undervaluations. The question being one of a technical character, a
brief reference to the history of the old valuations and the principle on
which the new rule of valuation is based appears\to be proper.
The valuations under forraer laws were based upon the assay of actual coins which had been in circulation for a number of years, and were
reduced by the attrition of circulation so as not to represent the values
they were originally intended to denote. The valuation of coins under
the system of assays controlled the subject for the first forty years of
the Federal Government, during which time foreign coins were a legal
tender at their intrinsic value, and receivable for duties. When received by the United States, however, it was provided that they should
be sent to the Mint for coinage under our monetary system, and this
being the case, it was necessary that the value fixed on such coins
should not exceed the actual value of the bullion they contained, or
otherwise a loss would have occurred in the recoinage. This was the
starting point of undervaluation in connection with the collection of
customs-duties. When, in>1857, all acts making foreign, coins a legal
tender in this country were repealed, and we no longer had to deal with
such coins as money.^ the system at once became defective.
Under the new act, the basis of valuation being the quantity of pure
metal contained in foreign coins of standard value, expressed in the
money of account of the United States, it is necessary, before proceeding
further, to explain the true meaning of the words "coin of standard
value." Briefiy stated, a cdin of standard value is one representing the
unit of the money of account, or its multiples and divisions, and containing the exact quantity of pure metal prescribed by the law authorizing
its issue. The term also applies to a coin, the bullion and nominal value
of which.are the same, as against a coin from which seignorage has been
taken, and whose nominal value exceeds its bullion value. In estimating
the value ofthe standard coins of the world, we are therefore practically
required to deal with legally-established standards, and not, as under
former laws, with individual coins, which may be more or less diminished in weight.
Under former laws, the undervaluation of the soverign or pound sterling was only about one-half of one per cent., while in the case of the
franc of France it was much greater, amounting to nearly four per cent.
The fact that so greaj: a difference existed between the va/luation of
coins of diff'erent countries showed conclusively that legislatiou, was
necessary, and the establishmentof a rule for ascertaining values, based
on sound principle and universal in its' application, appeared to be the
most simple and gust remedy.
It will, of course,'be understood that the undervaluation of foreign
coins leads to a corresponding reduction in the proper assessa;ble surface of invoices of foreign merchandise, and diminishes the duties to be
paid to the Governmeut. The increase of the assessable surface of in


196

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

voices under the new law is the real and only cause of complaint on
the part of importers, who claim that it exacts from them duties in excess of the amount contemplated by the laws under which they are
assessed.
^'
n Under the old laws, the sovereign or pouud sterling was converted
into United States money at the rate of $4.84, while under the new law
the rate is $4.86.65. Invoices stated in francs, under the act of March
22, 1846, were converted at the rate of 18.6 cents to the franc, while
under the new law the rate is 19.3 cents. The value of the sovereign
and franc of the present day, as determined by recent United States
Mint assays, is as follows:
New sovereign
Average worn pieces
Twenty francs

$4 86J
4 85y^Q
3 84^^.

which gives the assay-value of the franc* as 19 cents 2^^ mills.
These values correspond very nearly to the value as estimated on the
basis of declared standards, and show that the objections which have
been raised against the new law would not be removed if the values
were to be fixed on the average assays of existing individual coins.
Eeference should here be made, in connection with this subject, to
the important changes which have taken place duriug the last three
years in foreign money standards, and the complications likely to arise
therefrom in the collection of customs duties. The new monetary unit
of the German Empire is the gold mark, and which must, according to
law, soon take the place of the monetary units long known as the thaler
of North Germany, fiorin of South Germany, marc banco of Hamburg, and lonis d'or thaler of Bremen, and in which invoices of merchandise exported to the United States continue to be stated. It is a
well-known fact that monetary systems and monetary terms to which
tbe people of any country have long been accustomed do not readily
give way to new ones, even when penalties may be enforced, and it must
be expected that invoices of merchandise exported from Germany will
continue to be made for some time to come either in thalers or florins,
unless exporters be required to make out their invoices in marks, on
and after the law declaring fhe mark to be the unit of account becomes
operative in all the states of the German Empire. The same remarks
will apply fo Spain, where the peseta has superseded or is to supersede
the piece of eight reals as the monetary unit. These changes afford addition alfreasons in favor of a general rule of valuation based upon declared
standards.
Much stress has been laid upon the fact that the second section of
the law specifically fixes the value of the sovereign or pound sterling,
and the inference has been drawn that the intention of Congress was to
change only the valuation of that coin, and not alter the value of other
foreign coins as fixed in the then existing laws, and this notwithstanding the fact that while, as before stated, the sovereign was undervalued only one-half of one per cent., some other*coins, and notably the
franc, were undervalued nearly four per cent.
When the reason for the special enactment relative to the sovereign
or pound sterling is explained, it will be seen that the inference above
.referred to is incorrect. The old fictitious par of $4.44| to the pound,
and the complicated mode of computation which it rendered necessary,
were objectionable and disadvantageous in many respects, and few per-




*No gold piece of one franc coined.

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

197

sons outside of dealers in foreign exchange understood the meaning of
the quotation " sterling exchange, 109i-," while every one of ordinary
intelligence readily comprehends the meaning of " sovereigns, $4,861,"
the former having been under the old system the equivalent of the latter under the new. The quotation of 109J meant 9J per cent, on and
added to $4.44|-, the latter having been the value, at an early period
of our colonial history, in Spanish silver dollars, of 240 pence British
money.
The fictitious par of exchange on Great Britain above referred to had
long been in use, and its voluntary abandonment appearing to be very
improbable, prohibitory legislation, the intention of which should be
clearly expressed, was deemed necessary. A separate section, embracing the necessary provision, was therefore enacted.
By reference to the following extract from the report of the Finance
Committee of the Senate, on the bill reported by it, and which passed
both houses without amendment, it will be seen that the committee
ascertained the value of the sovereign under the rule laid down in the first
section of the act to determine the value of foreign coins generally^ and not
from the assay of coins.
#
*
#
*
# . *
#
As 23.22 grains troy is the weight of the pure gold in the standard dollar, and 113.006-F
grains troy the weight of the imre gold iu the standard sovereign, the quotient resulting from dividing the second number hy the first is the value of pure gold in the
standard sovereign, as expressed in dollars and cents, which gives us $4.86656-|-. This
is the true or intrinsic value of the sovereign or pound sterling, as expressed in the
standard dollar of the United States at the present time.
By what has heen stated it will be seen that the true or intrinsic value of the sovereign of Great Britain, as expressed in the money of account of the United States, is
$4.86656 ; that the congressional valuation is |4.84 ; and tbat the commercial valuation,
known as the j:)flr of exchange or technical par, is $4.44^.
The first is the value of the pure gold in the sovereign, as expressed in dollars and
c e n t s ; and, as a measure for the coiiiparison of the moneys of the two countries is
sought, that wiiich will give the true value of the pure gold in their standard coins
would seem to fill the requisite conditions.
The second is the valuation given by Congress, it being the average value of those
actually tested in 1842. It isfcobe observed that it was the av^erage worn or abraded
British coin with which our standard coin was compared. Would it not be wiser to
compare our standard coin with the British standard coin? If the British worn or
abraded coin is taken as a standard, ought not our own worn and abraded coin to he
compared with it?
It is the opinion of the committee that such a valuation should not be recognized by
any of the Departments of the Government; and that they should use every means in
their power abroad, as well as at home, to attain a system of exchange based on true
or intrinsic values.
*

*

a.

a

*

.

*

^f

It therefore appears that the intention of Congress was to provide
a general rule, of valuation which should be applicable in all cases,
and the value of the sovereign which was specifically fixed, but in accordance with the rule, was fbr the purpose of making the provision in
relation to the par of exchange perfectly clear.
If the revenue system is so defective as not to admit of a correct valuation of foreign coins and moneys of account according to a just rule,
applying equally in the case of all countries, and subject to alteration
only when the money standard of a country is changed by law, it will
be well to consider whether the remedy should not be found in the revision and correction of that system, rather than In a return to the old
undervaluation of foreign coins.
The second section of the act prescribed the close of the year 1873
as the term for the discontinuance of the old rating of exchange, and
prohibited contracts based upon the old fictitious par, but did not prescribe a rule for the quotation of sterling exchange..



198

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

In view of the important alterations in quoting sterling exchange,
which the law contemplated, the Secretary of the Treasury, on the 17th
of September, 1873, issued a circular inviting the attention of importers, exchange dealers, and the public generally to the provisions of the
act, and recommended that exchange should be quoted in dollars and
cents to the pound sterling, or in pence and fractions to the dollar; and
as it was desirable that the change then about to be made in the United
States should be adopted in Great Britain, copies of the circular, with
an explanatory letter, w^ere sent, on the Oth of October, 1873, to the
Hon. A. G. Cattell, confidential agent of the Treasury Department in
London, with a view to have the subject brought to the attention of
the London Stock Exchange and bankers dealing in American securities. ' Copies of the letter and circular referred to, also the correspondence of Mr. Cattell with the London Stock Exchange, are given in the
appendix, and furnish a complete history of the origin and effect ofthe
old system and the reform lateh^ eff'ected in quoting American securities in London.
It will be seen from the papers referred tc, that Mr. Cattell discharged
the duty intrusted to him with Zealand fidelity, and with a very intelligent understanding of the subject, and that the suggestions of the
Treasury Department received attentive and liberal consideration on
the part of the London Stock Exchange.
The change contemplated by the law in quoting sterling exchange in
the United States was brought about on the 1st of January last, and
without affecting injuriously or embarrassing any interest.
' The reform in the quotation of United States securities on the London Stock Exchange is certainly a long step toward a correct system,
but is still somewhat defective. The change made was from valuing
the dollar at 54 pence to its valuation at 48 pence, that is, $.5 per pound.
Estimating by the standard of the coirfs, (pound sterling and dollar,)
the pound is $4.86656, and our law fairly fixes the ratio at $4.8665.
Manifestly, therefore, the stock exchange basis is an overvaluation of
the pound, say 13J cents, or about 2f per cent. On such a basis, a
United States security sold at true par must, be quoted at 2f per cent,
premium, since $4.8665 plus 2 | per cent. ($0,133) gives $5, the assumed
par.
There appears to be no reason why London should i^x a par atall,
or why United States bonds may not be quoted, as our exchange now
is, in dollars and cents to the pound, or in pence to the dollar,«or, if a
par must be established, an almost absolutely accurate one would be
jei5 = $73.
.
^
THE COURSE OF SILVER BULLION.

At the time of the monetary disturbances, and consequent derangement of foreign exchanges in this country last autumn, the price of silver
bulhon, which had previously exhibited a declining tendency, suddenly
fell from about 116J to 112J cents per standard ounce, gold, and the
occasion was embraced to make such addition to the silver-bullion fund
of the mints and assay-office in NewYork as was required for their
NOTE.—In projecting the law in relation to the par of exchange, value of sovereign,
.&C., and in the preparation of various documents explanatory of the same, I received
valuable assistance from Robert Patterson, esq., of Philadelphia, for a number of years
connected with the mint in that city, and which it affords me great pleasure to acknowledge.




DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

199

operations, and to enable them to prepare and keep on hand a supply
of silver coins sufficient to enable deposits and x>urchases of silver bullion to be promptly paid for, and to supply the Treasury witli such sums
as it might require in making its payments. AYhen, a few inonths afterward, the exchanges became restored to theirnormal condition, the price
of silver recovered to some extent, but has latel}'receded in the London
market to 5 7 | pence, against 61J pence, average rate in 1864. The price
here is about 112J cents per standard ounce.
Although the decline in the value of silver, measured by gold, has
been considerable, any appreciation beyond that arising from an advance
in the rates of exchange on London, the principal bullion-market ofthe
world, and which must be temporary, is not to be expected. It cannot
recover its former relative value to gold while the mines of the United
States aud Mexico continue to yield so largely, and the large quantity
existing in the form of demonetized coins in Germany remains undistributed.
The amount placed upon the market by Germany during the last year
does not appear to have been large, and that sales in future will be so
managed as to weaken the market as little as possible is quite certain,
especially as any considerable further depreciation in value would make
it impossible to carry out, without heavy loss, the German plan of the
substitution of gold for silver as the standard of value and of overvalued or subsidiary silver coins in the place of the silver coins which
were formerly the legal-ten der money.
The relative value of the two metals will, of course, vary with the
supply and demand, but the indications are that a new rate or proportion of, say, 16^ to 1, will be practically established and continue with
unimportant variations for some time to come, and this notwithstanding
the fact that the proportion of 15^ to 1 is the legal rate in the gold and
silver, or double standard of the states of the Latin union, and at which
provision is made for the withdraw^al of the old silver coins formerly
issued by the states now composing the German Empire. The relative
value of 16^ to 1 would enable us to purchase silver for coinage into half
and quarter dollars and dimes at, say, 112J cents, gold, per ounce standard,
and the coining rate under the law being 124 4 10 cents (or, to be exact,
$1.24416) per standard ounce, the gain or seignorage to the Treasury
would be a fraction over 11.9 cents per ounce, or about 10^ per cent, on
the amount of gold employed in the purchase. This estimate excludes
the cost of coinage, which, including wastage, may be stated at about
2 per cent., although 1 per cent, would probably cover all actual necessary expenses, as the miuts could, when not otherwise engaged, execute
the silver coinage without any increase in the working force ordinarily
required and retained.
The above-stated facts show that the Government can at any time,
unless there should be a material advance in the value of silver or
depreciation in the gold-value of the paper dollar, (91.3' at this date,)
supply itself with such an amount of subsidiary silver coin as it may
require to pay out, at its nominal value, at about the same terms as a
corresponding sum in paper currency could be obtained by the sale of
gold coins. The bullion or export-value of subsidiary silver coins, with
the price of silver bullion at 112^ cents per ounce, standard, would be
90^ cents to the dollar. Nothwithstanding these coins are only worth,
as bullion, 90J cents, gold, and about par, currency, the marhet-rate for
them is 95 cents gold and 104^ cents currency to the dollar. The difference is due to the demand being in excess of the supply, and would
rapidly disappear if the market were freely supplied. The demand fbr



200

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the coins appears to come from the Pacific coast and Texas, where they
circulate as money. The first eff'ect of any considerable issue of subsidiary silver coin would be the disappearance in the New York market
of the difference between the bullion and market value of these coins.
They would next be sent to the Pacific coast and Texas in such amounts
as to compel merchants and others to avail themselves of the provision
of law limiting the legal tender of such coins to $5. After a time they
would begin to enter more or less into general circulation in other sections of the Union, and, as the paper money approached parity with gold,
gradually expel the fractional notes. Thelatter, being redeemable in
United States legal-tender notes, will of course become as to subsidiary
silver the superior currency, whenever the legal-tender uotes become
exchangeable at par for gold coins. They would even become a superior currency as to silver coins before the greenback had reached a parity with gold.
i have been particular to refer to the subject of the course of silver
bullion, and its issue in the form of subsidiary silver coin, for the reason
that the provision of the coinage law which authorizes the payment
in silver coins for silver bullion purchased for coinage by the mint at
Philadelphia and assay-office, New York, expires by its own limitation
on the 12th day of February next, after which subsidiary coins can be
procured from the mints only in exchange for gold coins at par. The
provision of law above referred to should not, in my opinion, be reenacted or extended. The issue of subsidiary and token coins should
be entirely under the control of the Government, and kept within such
limits as will protect the public from the inconvenience and loss which
would attend a redundant issue.
Whenever subsidiary or overvalued silver or token coins of any
description are issued, two things are of vital imi^ortance, and should
be observed:
First. A proper limitation as to the amount for which they are to be a
legal tender.
Second. The ainount of issue limited to the requirements of the public for change.
The latter is the only purpose for which such coins are designed to
be used, and this can be effectually attained by their issue only in
exchange at par for coin of the standard metal, (in this countrj'^, gold.)
The restriction as tb the mode of issue applies particularly to times
when gold, and not notes based upon debt, as now, shall form the basis
of, currency. Before we reach that basis, however, the Government
may manufacture on its own account, and under favorable circumstances pay out, silver coins, at its pleasure and convenience, to the
extent required to meet any legitimate demands for the same. In Great
Britain subsidiary silver coin is manufactured exclusively on government account, and furnished to the public in exchange for gold coins
at par, and in Germany and the countries of the Latin and Scandi
navian money unions the manufacture is also exclusively on govern
ment account, but the issue is fixed j^^^r capita.
It is not within the province of this report to consider the question
of the withdrawal of the fractional notes and the substitution of subsidiary silver coins in their place. The withdrawal would be the payment of a loan without interest and the substitution of money having
intrinsic value. The determination of the proper time to commence
the preparation in that way for a specie basis, as well as the policy and
expediency of the measure, will no doubt receive due consideration by
the proper authority. As to the amount of subsidiary silver coins



DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.

201

which would probably be required, some idea may be obtained from the
experience of other countries.
The issue in Germany is to be 10 marks, equal to about $2.38, ^^er
capita—iDopulation, 41,060,695; in France, 6 francs per capita., exclusive
of the five-franc piece, which is a full-valued coin and an unlimited legal
tender. Having presented the subject, as I trust, in a manner sufficiently
clear, so far as it is of a technical character and connected with the
course of silver bullibn, I dismiss it with the remark that the mints are,
or soon will be, in condition to meet in a reasonable time all the requirements of the country for coin, and which of course would be augmented
when it shall be determined to withdraw the fractional currency.
MONENTARY STANDARDS.

No change in monetary standards has taken place since my last annual
report, although the question of changing from silver tothe single gold
standard has been discussed in the Netherlands. It may also be mentioned that one or more members of the Latin monetary states union appear to favor the same change, and, as a concession thereto, some restrictions have been placed on the issue of the five-franc silver coins. The
Latin union has the double standard of silver and gold, valued in the
coinage as 15J to 1, but the only silver coin issued under that valuation
is the five-franc. The relative market-value of the two metals being
nearly 16J to 1, inevitably leads to some derangement of exchanges.
In this connection it is proper to note the issue of a new gold coin by
the Austrio-Hungarian Empire, and stamped "eight florins—twenty
francs." It is of the same value as the twenty-franc coins of the states
of the Latin union. As the silver florin continues to be the coined representative ofthe monetary unit ofthe empire, the " eight florin—twentyfranc piece" must be regarded as a trade coin, even though it'practically regulates exchanges and measures the depreciation of the paper
florin. The issue of the new gold coin would appear to indicate the
adoption at no distant day of the gold standard by that empire and
an assimilation of its coinage to that ofthe Latin union.
Official notice was published by the Danish minister, on the 1st of
September, 1874, that the terms of the common-money system of the
three Scandinavian kingdoms, and which is based upon a common gold
standard, will take eff'ect in Denmark on the 1st of January, 1875, and
that all financial obligations entered into on and after that date shall
be done on the basis of the new-money system, and all public and private payments shall be in accordance with the unit of value of that
system, viz, the gold crown of 100 oere, ($0.26.8.)
The custom of assaying at our mints such foreign coins as come under
notice has been continue-d, and the results embraced in the tables of
foreign coins in the appendix. These tables embracing only what may
be termed coins of commerce, a separate table is appended, giving the
coins representing the monetary units, divisions, and multiples, as well
as subsidiary issues of all countries as far as we have been able to obtain accurate information. All the replies to the circular in relation to
the money of account and coins of foreign countries which were not received in time for my last annual report, are embraced in the appendix.
ANNUAL ASSAY AND TEST COINS.

The rigid care observed in the issue of the coinage is probably unknown to the general public, and a reference to the tests adopted to in


202

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

sure conformity to the lawful standard of weight and fineness, and as
exhibiting the responsibilities of the officers intrusted with the coinage,
appears to be proper.
It willbe sufficient to state that, when coins are ready for delivery,
a certain number of pieces are indiscriminately taken and immediately
sealed up and placed in a box or chest, denominated the "pyx," closed by
two diff'erent locks, the keys of which are in the possession of the superintendent and assayer, so that neither can have access to its contents
without the presence of the other. These reserved coins, after the close
of the year, are submitted to a critical examination by a commission
constituted by law for that purpose. The details'"of the examination of
coins reserved during the calendar year 1873 appear in the extract from
the report of the commission appended to this report.
In addition to the test above described, sarnple pieces, taken indiscriminately from certain deliveries in each month, are assayed under
the instructions ofthe Director, and the result reported to him, and the
officers whose work is under trial, one mint assaying upon another.
This last check on the coinage, and which ascertains whether the weight
and fineness conform to the legal standard, also embraces the testing of
the gold coins for silver, and silver for gold, and was inaugurated under
the new organization of the mints. Under this system of test assays
w^e satisfy ourselves, from time to time, that nomore silver passes off* in
the alloy of gold coins than is allowed by law, and gold contained in
silver bullion, and silver in gold bullion, is separated as closely as can
be done at a profit.
i
In order to make this subject clear to those not familiar with mintterms, it may be stated that nearly all gold bullion as it comes from the
mines contains more or less silver, which has to be separated before
the gold bullion can be alloyed with copper to bring it to the legal
standard for coinage. As the silver cannot, however, all be parted at a
profit from the gold, the law permits it to constitute one-tenth of the
alloy of gold coins, but without valuation. In the case of silver bullion
containing gold, the regulations require it to be separated from the
silver to the extent to which it can be done with advantage to the depositor or the Government 5 that is to say, the gold is separated from the
silver in all cases where its value equals or exceeds the expense of the
operation. Th'e test made, as described, shows that the gold coins contain ouly a sraall portion of the silver allowed by law to remain as alloy,
and that where gold is present in the silver coins it amouuts to only a
trace.
It should also be added, that in assaying fine gold before adding the
alloy (copper) and gold ingots for coinage at the diff'erent mints, and in
the test assays of coins by the assay commission, the gold is reported
to the one-ten-thousandth part, while in the case of crude bullion fractions between the whole and half thousandths are disregarded.
The reason for the distinction in reporting fine and crude bullion is,
that the one is free from all base metals, while the other may, and often
does, contain base metals and foreign substances, and which render it
proper to disregard the minute fractions as stated.
In making assays of gold only a small quantity, but such as will represent the whole mass to be tried, is taken fbr the purpose. The normal weight now generally adopted for a gold assay is the demigram; not
quite eight grains troy. This stands for one thousand, and there is a
series of lesser weights down to one-thousandth or degree, and which
is again divided into tenths. In the French mint gold is reported to
the one-ten-thousandth degree; also at the mint at San Francisco, as re


DIREJDTOR OF THE MINT.

203

spects deposits of fine gold. Some discretion is usually exercised by
assayers in this and other countries as to the reporting or disregarding
of the last division or smallest weight. The assay-beam used in weighing is so constructed as to be of the utmost precision and delicacy, and
so fine is the adjustment, that it is sensible to less than the twentieth of
a milligram, or the one-tenth of a .thousandth of the unit or normal
weight of the assay.
;
.
SPECTROSCOPIC ASSAY.

As the question of assaying by the aid of the spectroscope has lately
engaged the attention of the assay department in the Mint at Philadelphia and assay-office New Y'ork, as also ofthe royal mint in London, and
elsewhere, it gives me pleasure to place in the appendix interesting statements on the subject, prepared at my request by Wilham E. Du Bois, esq.,
assayer of the Philadelphia Mint, and Herbert G. Torrey, esq., assayer
of the New York assay-office,- and obligingly transmitted by the superintendents of those institutions.
It may also be interesting to state that a number of assays, made at
the Philadelphia Mint of the| fine gold used for proofs in the London
mint, lately sent for that purpose with acourtesey and confidence which
it is very pleasant to acknowlledge, have proven the exact correspondence of their proof-gold with purs. The same thing is occasionally done
among our own mints, and with a like result.
It is gratifying to find in the ample and able reports of t h e London
mint that they do not confine ithemselves to details of their own work,
but look abroad and collect whatever is important of the doings of other
mints or of the coinage-enactmjents of other countries. The same course
is pursued here.
j
The precious* metals being Universal standards of value, changes of
coinages and in monetary systems must be regarded as of interest to
all commercial countries,
i
AMOUNT OF SPECIE IN THE COUNTRY.

According to the official reports of the Treasurer of the United States
and Comptroller of the Currency, there were held by the Treasury and
national banks at the close of tihe fiscal year ended June 30, 1872—
In coin
i
$98,389,864 49
^Estimated amount of coin in Pacific! coast States and Territories at
that time
•.[
20,000,000 00
And in the hands of bankers and people elsewhere.-.
10,000,000 00
Total specie fiscal year 1872-73 1
Add to this two years' product of United. States mines, at $70,000, 000.
Imports of coin and bullion for two yel|ars

128,389,864 49
140,000, 000 00
49,695,343 00

1
'
Deduct amount exported during the two years ended June 30, 1874..

318,085,207 49
151,238,979 00

Total estimated stock, June 30/1874

166,846,228 49

The above estimate shows a gain in specie and bullion in the last
two fiscal years of $38,456,364, 'and the stock of specie to be about
$166,846,228.
i
*The estimate of the amount of coini and bullion in the States and Territories of
the Pacific coast June 30, 1872, Avas prepared at my request by Mr. Louis A. Garnett, of
San Francisco, one of the most intelligent and reliable authorities of the present day
on the subject of the precious metals. \ His estimate was |20,000,000 to $25,000,000.
I have taken the minimum amount.




204

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The coinage of the mints from the 30th of June to 30th of September, 1874, amounted to $13,192,332, mostly from bullion of domestic
production.
It is impossible to estimate, even approximately, the amount of specie
finding its way out of or into the country by private hands, and not
embraced in the custom-house returns. It would be safe, I think, to
offset one against the other.
The amount carried out of the country by persons visiting Europe is,
there are reasons to believe, generally estimated too high, especially since
the system of letters of credit has become so widely extended, and
which, with bills of exchange, have rendered the carrying of coin from
one country to another entirely unnecessary, particularly as respects
the several countries which are associated in modern civilization.
On the other hand, the amount of coin brought into the United States
by emigrants is probably underrated. That class of people are always,
disposed to carry a portion of their effects in the form of gold and silver coin, with the value of which they are familiar, and with the knowledge that the same will be freely received everywhere in exchange for
any article they may require.
AMOUNT OF GOLD AND SILVER COIN AND BULLION IN THE WORLD.

Inquiries are frequently made as to the amount of gold and silver existing in the world in the form of coin and bullion, and as to the increase
since the discovery of the mines of Californa and Australia. Anything
like an accurate estimate upon the subject is utterly impossible, for although the annual production for several decades and the total coinages
of different countries may be approximately stated, the fact that the
amount of recoinages, and of precious metals used in the arts duriug
even the last twenty-five years, cannot be reliably ascertained, would
render the estimate of no practical value. Such information as we have
been able to obtain upon the subject will be found in the appendix, and
which, includes a communication and statements from E. W. Raymond,
Commissioner of Mining Statistics. When all the replies to our circular
of last year shall have been received the amount of the present production can be arrived at with reasonable accuracy. The opinion has often
been advanced that the large amount of gold yielded by the mines of
the United States and Australia has produced an engorgement in the
markets of the world. That such was the effect during the first five
years after these mines w^ere opened and during which period the maximum production was reached, and that a general advance in prices-followed, may be safely admitted; but the undeniable fact that leading countries, like the United States, Russia, Austria, France, and Italy, are compelled to use inconvertible paper-money, not from choice, but because
they have not sufficient coin for a specie basis, would appear to show conclusively that there is not too much gold, and especially as no one country appears to possess a redundancy. This fact, and particularly when
itis considered that the annual production of gold is gradually decreasing, vShould dispel any fears which may be entertained of its future
decline in value relatively to land, labor, and commodities.
The world^s stock of precious metals is generally estimated at from
ten to twelve thousand millions of dollars^ nearly equally divided as to
the two metals. The estimate appears to be based on the assumption
that the stock at the commencement of the fifteenth century amounted to
two thousand millions, and that from eight to ten thousand millions have




DIRECTOR OF T H E MINT.

205

since been added, principally from the mines of North and South
America and Australia.
The present production of glold being estimated at one hundred millions and silver eighty millions, would give an annual addition to the
accumulated stock of I J per cent. The estimates of the earlier writers
must be taken with a good many grains of allowance 5 and generally in
connection with this subject, and its practical bearing upon the affairs
of the present period, it may be proper to observe that there have been
so many important changes inj monetary systems and in the financial
and industrial condition of different countries, as well as redistributions
of specie, during the last half|century, as to render the statements and
conclusions on various points connected therewith contained.in the old
standard works comparatively!useless.
The period referred to has been oneof unparalleled activity and prog• ress, and the utilization of stdam and electricity in the intercourse of
nations, and the great extension of international credits, have eff'ected
a comx)lete revolution in the commerce of the world. These important
changes have not, however, Enabled the world to dispense with the
precious metals as the common measure of value and medium of exchange. On the contrary, those metals remain in that respect, the same
as they were at the commencement of authentic history, the only money
of universal recognition and uinlimited acceptance.
In this connection it affords ine pleasure to acknowledge the courtesy
of Baron Bussirr^, director of the mint at Paris, who furnished this
Office with valuable information in relation to the amount of coin in
France.
i
In concluding this report, li desire to express my acknow^ledgments
to the officers, clerks, and eniploy6s of the several mints and assayoffices, and to the clerks of the Bureau, for the faithful performance of
their duties, and to which the satisfactory results of the largely-increased
business ofthe Mint Establishment may be mainly attributed.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully,
\
H. K. LINDERMAN,
j
Director of the Mint
Hon. B. H. BRISTOW,

j

Secretary of lhe Treasury,

Statement exhihiting the average weight,\ fineness, and value of foreign coins as determined hy
United), States Mint assays.
EXPLANATORY R E M A R K S .

^ I
\
1. The weight is expressed in fractions of an ounce troy, agreeing with the terms used in
the United States mints.
.!
If it is desired to have the weight ofi any piece in grains, regard the thousandths of an
ounce as integers, take their half, from iwhich deduct four per cent, of that half, and the remainder will be grains.
. . The fineness is expressed in thousandth parts ; ?. e,, so many parts of pure gold or silver
in ] ,000 parts of the coin. The old carat system is generally abandoned, (except for jewelry,)
but it may be worth while to say that 4 l | thousandths equal one carat.
3. The valuation of gold is at the legal rate of 25.8 grains, 900 fine, being equal to one
dollar ; or $20,672 (nearly) per ounce of fine gold; with the deduction of coinage charge,- i of
one per cent.
^^
4. For the silver there is no fixed legal valuation, as compared with gold. The price paid
at the mints varies according to demand and supply, but is stationary for considerable periods
at a time, and is now 118 cents per ounce 900 fine, payable in subsidiary coin, at which rate
the values are given in the table.



206-

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

5. These tables generally give the one principal coinof each country, from which the
other sizes are easily deducted. Thus when the franc system is used, there are generally
gold pieces of 40, 20, 10, and 5 francs, all in due proportion. But in silver, the fractional
coins are very often of less intrinsic value than the normal coin, proportionally. These are
seldom exported.
GOLD COINS.

Country.

Austria
Do
Do
Belgium
Brazil
Cential America
Do
Chili
Colombia a n d S o u t h
America generally.
Colombia
Do
Do
Costa R i c a ..'
Denmark
Do
Egypt
England
Do
France
German Empire
Do
Greece
I n d i a , (British)
Italy
Japan
Mexico
Do
Do
IsTetherlanda
New Granada
Norway
P e r u .'.
Portugal .:
Eussia
Spain
Do
Do
Sweden
Do
Do
Tunis
Turkey

Denomination.

Fourfold d u c a t
Souverain, (no l o n g e r coined)
4- florins, (new)
25 francs
20 milreis
2 escudos
4 reals
10 pesos, (dollars)
Old doubloon *
20 pesos, " Bogota "
20 pesos, " Medellin "
20 pesos, " P o p a y a n "
10 p e s o s
20 c r o w n
Old t e n - t h a l e r
Bedidlik, (100 p i a s t e r s ) . . : . . .
P o u n d , or sovereign, (new) t.
P o u n d , average,^(worn)
20-franc
N e w 20 m a r k s
Old ten thaler, ( P r u s s i a n )
20 d r a c h m s
M o h u r , or 15 r u p e e s J
20 l i r e
20 y e n
Doubloon
20 pesos, (empire)
20 pesos, (republic, n e w )
10 g u i l d e r s
10 pesos, (dollars)
20 c r o w n s
,
20 soles
Coroa. (crown)
5 roubles
100 r e a l s
80 r e a l s
10 escudos
Ducat
Carolin, (10 francs)
N e w 20 crowns, (krone)
25 p i a s t e r s
,
100 p i a s t e r s
,

Gross
weight.

Vahie in United
States
gold
coin after coinStandard
age c h a r g e of
Fineness. weight.
1-5 of 1 p e r
cent, has b e e n
deducted.

Ounces. Thov^'ths.
0.448
986 .
0.363
900
0.104
900
0.254
899
0.575
916.5
0.209
853.5
0.027
875
0.491 ;
867
033
034
029
476
288
427
275
2568
2563
207 .,
256
427
185
375
207
072
86735
086
084
215
525
288
0357
308
210
268 .
215
27045
111
104
288
161
231

870
887
891.5
891.5
858.5
900
895
875
916.5
916.5
899
900
903
900
916.5
899
900
870. 25
875
873
899
891. 5
900
898. 75
912
916
896.5
869
897
975
900
900
900
915

Ounces.
0. 4908
0.363
0.104
0. 2537
0. 5855
0.1982
0. 0262
0. 4899
0. 8381
1.018
1. 0242
1.0192
0.454
0.288
0. 4246
0. 2673
0. 2615
0. 2609
0. 2067
0.256
0. 4284
0.185
0.3818
0. 2067
1.072
0. 8386
1. 0558
1. 0514
0. 2147
0. 520
0.288
1.034
0.312
0. 2137
0. 2668
0. 207
0. 2695
0.1202
0.104
0.288
0. 161
0. 2348

Dolls,
9
6
1
4
10

cts. mills.
11 3
74 1
93 2
71 0
87 A
68 1
48 7
9 09 6

15
18
19
18

19
15
19
19
3
9
5
19
5

56
90
01
92
43
34

1
2
6
2
0

96
85
84
83
75
95
43
08
83
90
56
60
52
98
65
34
20

3
6
3
8
3
5
5
9
8
4
9

98 9
35 9

* T h e douhloon (doblon, or moi'e p r o p e r l y onza, t h o u g h n o t r e a l l y an o u n c e Spanish) is n o w g e n e r a l l y
d i s c o n t i n u e d , a n d is seldom seen h e r e . T h e s e figures ausAver as well for t h e doubloon of P e r n , Chili,
Bolivia, &c., and t h e r e f o r e t h i s i t e m s t a n d s for all. P o p a y a n pieces w e r e r a t h e r inferior.
. 1 T h e s o v e r e i g n s coined a t M e l b o u r n e a n d S y d n e y , in A u s t r a l i a , a n d d i s t i n g u i s h e d only b y t h e mintm a r k s M a n d S, a r e t h e s a m e as t h o s e of t h e London m i n t . Sovereigns g e n e r a l l y a r e up to t h e legal
fineness, 916§, (or 22 carats,) b u t w e r e p o r t to t h e half in all cases.
X T h e l a s t coinage of m o h u r s w a s in 1862.




207

DIRECTOR OF THE MINT.
SILVER COINS.

Country.

Denomination.

Gross
Standard
weight. Fineness. weight.

Ounces.
Austria
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Belgium
Do
Boli.via
Brazil
Canada
Do
Central America
Chib
Do
China
Do
Denmark
Eg.ypt..:
England
Do
Do
France
Do
North German atatee
Do
South German states
German Empire
Greece'
Hindostan
Italy
Do
Japan
Do
-.
Mexico
Do
Do
Netherlands
Norway
New Granada
Peru
Do
>.-.
Do
Do
Portugal
,
Roumania
Russia
Spain
Do
Sweden
Switzerland
Tunis
Turkey
.'

Old rix-dollar
1
.
Old scudo crown ... L
Florin, before 1858 . L
New
florin
|.
New union dollar ..;
Maria Theresa dollar, 1780.
5 francs
I
2 francs
New dollar
L
Double milreis
L
20 cents
;25 cents
'
Dollar
L
Old dollar
I
New dollar
j
Dollai', (English mint)
10 cents
L
2 rigsdaler
{
Piaster, (new)
i
Shilling, (new)
I
Shilling, (average) . j
Florin
|
5 franc
L
2 franc
!
Thaler, before 1857.j
Thaler, (new)
'
Florin
;
5 marks, (new)
L
5 drathms
;
Rupee
.'.
5 lire
I
Lira
j
lyen
I
50 sen
'
Dollar
L
Half-dollar.
]
Pesto of Maximilian
2^ guilders
'
Specie daler . r..
L
Dollar of 1857
i
Old dollar
i
Dollar of 1858
i
Half-dollar of 1835-138
Sol.
500 reis
u
2 lei, (francs,) new .
L
Rouble
I
.
5 pesetas, (dollars).!.
Peseta, (pistareen) ..
J
Ricksdaler
L.
2 francs
L
5 piasters j
.
20 piasters
i
.




902
836
451
397
.9
56
895
803
320r
801
8187
150
1875
866
864
801
866
087
927 .
040
1825
178
365
8018
320
712
595
340
804
719
374
802
160
8667
402
870
435
861
804
927
803
866
766
433
802
400
322
667
800
160
273
320
,1
51
770

Value in subsidiary silver
coin at 118cts.
per standard'
ounce.

Ounces'. Dolls, cts. mills.
833
902
833
900
900
838
897
835
900
917. 75
925
925
850
908
900.5
901
901
877
755
924.5
925
925
900
835
750
900
900
900
900
916.5
900
b35
900
800
903
898. 5
902.5
944
877
896
901
900
650
900'
912
835
675
900
835
750
835
898.5
830

0. 8348
0. 8378
0. 4174
0.397
0. 596
0. 8334
0. 8003
0. 2968
0.801
0. 8348
C. 1 5 1
.4
0.1927
0. 8178
0. 8716
0. 8014
0. 8669
0. 08709
0. 90331
0. 0335
0.1874
0.1829
0. 3751
0.8018
0. 2968
0. .5933
0.595
0.340
0.804
0. 7198
0.380
0. 802
0.1484
0. 8667
0. 3573
0. 8729
0. 4343
0. 8633
0. 8433
0. 9033
0. 7994
0. 8669
0. 766
0. 3127
0.802
0. 40.53
0. 2987
0. 6484
0.800
0.1484
0. 2275
0. 2969
0. 5101
0. 7101

0 98 5
0 98 8
0 49 2
3
3
4
0
5
5
1
7
5
1 02 8
0 94 6
1 02 3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

98
94
35
94
98
18
22

0 10 2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

06
03
22
21
44
94
35
70
70
40
94
84
44
94

5
9
1
5
2
6
0
0
2
1
8

0 17
1 02
0 42

0
0
0
0
0

90 3
36 9
94 6
47
35
76

0

35 0




REPORT OF THE FIRST COMPTROLLER,

14 P







REPORT
OF THE

FIRST COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

First Cornptroller^s Office, JSFovember 5, 1874.
SIR : The following report, whicli embraces the operations of this
office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874, is respectfully submitted.
'
The number of warrants examined, countersigned, entered upon blotters, and posted into ledgers was as follows, viz :
Treasury proper
Publicdebt
Quarterly salaries
Diplomatic and consular
Customs
Internal revenue
:
Judiciary.
War pay
War repay
Navy pay
Navy repay
Interior civil
Interior pay
Interior repay
Appropriation
Customs (covering)
Land (covering)
Internal revenue (covering)
Miscellaneous (covering)
Miscellaneous repay (covering)

"
,

2, 352
184
1,274
2,206
5,081
6,767
2,109
6,693
1, 066
1, 874
188
3,066
2,176
270
110
1, 420
748
2,467
6,883
- 1, 519

The following accounts were received from theFirst and Fifth Auditors
of the Treasury and the Gommissioner of the General Land-Oflice, and revised and certified, viz:
Judiciary, embracing tbe accounts of United States marsbals for their fees and
for tbe expenses of the United States courts, of the United States district
attorneys, and of the commissioners and clerks of the United States courts. . 2, 275
Di}3lomatic and consular, embracing the accounts arising from our intercourse
with foreign nations, exxienses of consuls for sick and disabled seamen, and
of our commercial agents in foreign countries
,
2, 024
Public lands, embracing the accounts of the registers and receivers of landoffices, and surveyors-general and their deputies, and of lands erroneously
sold
2,755
Steamboats, embracing acconnts for the expenses of the inspection of steamvessels, and salaries of inspectors..i
374
Mint and its branches, embracing the accounts of gold, silver, and cent coinage,
of bullion, of salaries of the officers, and general expenses
135
Public debt, embracing the account of the Treasurer of the United States, and
the-accounts of the assistant treasurers for the redemption of United States
stocks and notes, and for the payment of the interest on the ]3ublic debt . . .
708
Public printing, embracing accounts for printing, for paper, and for binding...
63




212

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Territorial, embracing accounts for the legislative expenses of the several Territories, and all the expenses incident to their government
38lJ
Congressional, embracing accounts for salaries, for contingent expenses, and
for other expenses of the United States Senate and House of Representatives.
T
82i
Internal revenue collectors' accounts of the revenue collected, the expenses of
collecting the same, their own compensation, and fche expenses of their
offices
•
,....
•-...
5,089
Internal revenue stamp agent's accouiits for the sale of stamps
557
Internal revenue miscellaneous accounts for salaries ahd incidental expenses
of supervisors, surveyors, detectives, &c
1, 367
Internal revenue assessors' accounts for the expeuses of levying the taxes, and
for their own compensation
'.
\
381
Census, accounts for compensation of assistant marshals for taking the eighth ^
census
977
Public buildings, embracing accounts for the erection and repair of pnblic
buildings
^
340
Miscellaneous, embracing accounts for the contingent expenses of all the Executive Departments at Washington, the salaries of judges, district attorneys,
marshals, <fec
^
2,153
Number of letters written from this Office on official business
12,254
Number of receipts for tax-lists given by collectors, examined, registered, and
filed
:
2,852
Numberof books of tax-paid spiritj tobacco, and special stamps, counted and
certified
10,087
Number of requisitions examined, entered, and reported, viz :
Diplomatic and consular
;
1,101
Collectors of internal revenue
2,714
United States marshals
285
United States deposifcaries
150

The above details furnished but a portion of the duties appertaining
to this Office. In addition thereto must be added the examination, registering, and filing of official bonds ; the examination, filing, and registering of all powers of attorney for the collection of interest, and the collection of money due to public creditors from the Department; the ex' amination and decision of applications for the re-issue of securities in
place of those lost or destroyed, and a variety of miscellaneous business occurring daily, which it is impossible to enumerate.
The business of the Office continues steadily to increase; the work has
been performed as promptly as the force allowed the Office could perform it. The persons employed in the Office have been faithful and
efficient; but their numbers are below those required, and consequently
some accounts have not been examined and certified as early as was desirable, and others, not pertaining to the daily current business, have
not been examined.
Eespectfully^ submitted.
E. W. TAYLEE,
Comptroller.
Hon.

B. H.

BRISTOW,

Secretary of the Treasury.




REPORT OF THE SECOND COMPTROLLER.







REPORT
THE SECOND COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Comptroller's Office, Octoher 6, 1874.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations
of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874.
The aggregate number of s^ccounts of disbursing officers and agents
which have been received, as well as those which have been finally adjusted, is as follows:
;

Prom—

Second A u d i t o r
Third Auditor
Pourth Auditor

ReceiA^ed. R e v i s e d .
.

Total

.

-

Araount.

3,859
.6,051
566

.

4, 030
7,229
551

$32, 57.5, 600 00
127,157 182 07
24,140, 987 00

10, 476

-

11, 810

183, 873, 769 07

The above accounts have been duly entered, revised, and the balances
found thereon certified to the Secretary of the Department in w^hich the
expenditure has been incurred, viz : Those from the Second and Third
Auditors to the Secretary of War, (excepting the accounts of Indian
agents, which are certified to the Secretary of the Interior;) and those
from the Fourth Auditor to the Secretary of the ISTavy.
Character of accounts.

Received. Revised.

A m o u n t involved.

FROM THE SECOND AUDITOR.

Accounts of disbursing officers of the War Department under
the acts for collecting, organizing, and drilling volunteers
Accounts for Army recruiting officers for the authorized expenses
of the regular recruiting service
Accounts of Army paymasters for pay of the Army, including
mileage to officers and general expenses
1
Special accounts settled by the paymasters' division
Accounts of disbursing officers of the Ordnance Department for
the expenses of the ordnance service, and for ordnance, ordnance stores and supplies, armories, and arsenals
Accounts of agents of Indian affairs for the current and contingent expenses of the Indian service, including annuities and
installments undier treaties
Accounts of disbursing officers of the Medical Department for
medical and hospital supplies, medical services, and other
authorized expenses
—
Accouhts of disbursements for contingent expenses of the War
Department, including expenses for military convicts, contingencies of the Army, &c
.'
Accounts of disbursing officers of the Freedmen's Bureau for
pay and bounty to colored soldiers
Accouhts of moneys received and disbursed for the Soldiers'
Home
."
•Accounts of moneys received and disbursed for the support of
the National JEome for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
Total^




12

13

$289,280 00

174.

163

1,374,743 00

902
814

1,104
814

17,169,113 00
1, 367, 815 31

1.56

156

3, 735, 729 00

1,244

1,223

.5,908,592 00

447

447

473,281 00

71

71

130, 237 00

1

1

1, 516, 921 00

11

11

173,430 44

27

27

436, 462 25

3,859

4,030

32, 575, 600 00

216

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Character of accounts.

Received, Revised.

Amount involved.

FROM THE THIRD AUDITOR.

Accounts of disbursing officers of the Quartermaster's Department for the regular supplies and incidental expenses of the
Army, Army transportation, barracks and quarters, clothing
and equipage, the construction and repair of hospitals, the purchases of. horses for cavalry and artillery, and of heating and
cooking stoves, including moneys transferred to disbursing
officers, personal charges, and suspensions removed, allowances
under the act of June 23, 1870, continued June 7, 1872, allowances unde.r the eight-hour law, and claims for services pertaiuing to that department
Accounts of disbursing officers of the Subsistence Department
for the subsistence of the regular troops and ludian scouts, including rations to ordnance men and sergeants in the ordnance
and general service, to hospital stewards, laundresses, and employes of Quartermaster's Departraent and subsistence claims..
Accounts of disbursing officers of the Engineer Department fbr
military surveys, the constrnction of fortifications, river and
harbor"surveys and improvements, and the expenses of that
department, torpedo experiments, and engineer claims and
allowances under the eight-hour law
Accounts of pension-agents for the payment of pensions to invalid,soldiers, their widows and depeiident relatives, including
soldiers of the war of 1812, furnishing artificial limbs and
transportation or commutation therefor, compensation to the
agents, and for other authorized expenses in that service, and
pension-claims presented fbr adjustment
Accounts for disbursements made for the relief of destitute
freedmen and refugees

,665

5,877

$80, 437, 333 07

4, 706, 590 00

73

C, 574, 410 00

313

338

35, 337, 529 00

14

14

101,315 00

7,229

127,157,182 07

Total.
FROM THE FOURTH AUDITOR.

Accounts of the disbursing officers of the Marine Corps, for the
pay of officers, and pay and rations of the marines,- and for the
supplies of clothiug, fuel, military stores, forage for horses,
rent.and repair of barracks and quarters, and hire of offices,
the transportation and recruiting of the corps, and other
authorized contingent expenses
Accounts of the paymasters of the Navy proper, for the pay
and rations of the* officers of the ISTavy, and seamen, for supplies of provisions, and clothiug, and the expenses for the
repairs of vessels on foreign stations, including the crew of
the ship, and other authorized contingent expenses pertaining
to that Department
Accounts of paymasters of the Navy Departraent, at the navyya.rds, in the construction and repairs of vessels, for the pay
of mechanics and laborers on the A'-arious works, including the
pay of officers on duty at the yards, and on leaves of absence ..
Accounts of paymasters of the Navy, acting as navy-agents and
disbursiug officers, in the purchases of timber and materials,
provisions, clothing, naval stores and outfit, including advances
to paymasters of the Navy proper
Accounts of Navy pension-agents, for the payment of pensions
to the invalids of the Navy and Marine Corps, their widows
and dependent relatives; compensation to the agents and
expenses of the agencies

937, 419 O
O

375

358

8,416,139 00

9, 016, 691 00

23

20

C8

73

Total

5,241,579 00

529,159 00
24,140, 987 00

Naval-prize lists -.

59

60

9, 365
1,407
1,594
.327
620
166

9,555
1,419
1,439
330
620
166

1,183, 807
219, 839
210, 451
53, 905
286, 571
643,971

00
00
00
00
39
83

62
70
9
•487

€2
70
9
487

43, 565
89,208
603, 633
26, 015

62
78
09
00'

14,107

14,157

CLAIMS REVISED DURING THE YEAR.

Soldiers' pay and bounty
i
Sailors' pay and bounty
Prize-money
'.
.-^
iiOst property under act of March 3, 1849
Quartermaster's stores under act of July, 1864
Awards of Southern Claims Commission .'.
Oregon and Washington Territory and Rogue River Indian war
claims
Montana ludian war claims of 1867 certificates
State claims
Duplicate checks approved under act of February 2, 1872
Total
Referred cases adjusted




4, 219

3, 360, 967 71

SECOND COMPTROLLER.

217

Settlements recorded durlDg the fiscal year
Requisitions recorded during tbe fiscal year
Accounts on band at tbe commencement of tbe fiscal year
Accounts on band at tbe close of the fiscal year
Letters written on official business—pages
Copying differences on adjustment of accounts—pages
Pensioners recorded

10, 063
11,813
4,083
2, 699
953
2,586
342

ISTumber of contracts filed, classified as follows:
Quartermaster's Department
Engineer Department
Indian Department
Ordnauce Department
Navy Department
Adj utant Department
Commissary-General of Subsistence
Ijeases
Official bonds

-

L
,.

filed
filed.

607
99
91
12
122
55
320
53
117

In closing this brief report, simple justice requires that I should bear
testimony to the fidelity and ability with which the clerks, and especially
those having charge of the several divisions in the oifice, have performed their official duties.
Yery respectfully, your obedient servant,
J. M. BEODHEAD,
Comptroller,
Hon.

B. H.

BRISTOW,

Secretary of the Treasury.







REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.




\




REPORT
OF THE

COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Office of Gommissioner of Customs,
Washi7igton City, D, C, October 28, 1874.
SIR : I have the honor to submit my report for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1874.
The number of accounts on hand July 1, 1873, was
.363
Tbe number of accounts received from the First Auditor during the year w a s . . . 6, 308
6,671
The numher of accounts adjusted during the year
The number of accounts returned to the First Auditor during the year

6, 490
22
6,512

The numher of accounts on hand June 30, 1874

1

159-

The amounts paid into the Treasury of the United States from sources
the accounts of which are settled in this Office, are as follows:
O n a c c o u n t o f customs
On account of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
On account of steamboat inspections
On account of labor, drayage, storage, &c
On account of marine-hospital t a x
The amount of official fees earned by collectors

$163,103,833
651,271
274,490
463,684
352,379
634,841

69
76
91
83
98
99*

165,480,503 16

And there was paid out of the Treasury—
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
Ou
On
On

account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account
account

of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of

expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
refunding excess of deposits for duties
i
debentures
public buildings
construction and maintenance-of lights
construction and maintenance of revenue-cutters
marine-hospital service
distributive shares of fines, penalties, and forfeitures..
preserving life and property from shipwreck
miscellaneous accounts

$7,319,487
4,295,701
1,301, 977
4,783,054
2,480,-362
1,106,558
409, 037
317, 981
180,164
170,933

88
24
78
15
42
62
14
12
32
65

22,365,278 32•
The number of estimates received
The number of requisitions issued
^
Tbe amount involved in said requisitions
The number of letters received
The number of letters written
The value of postage-stamps used
The number of letters recorded
The number of returns received and examined
The number of oaths examined and registered
The number of appointments registered
Average numher of clerks employed
Amonnt involved in above statement




2,837
2, 801
$12, 657,768 76
9, 305
10, 368 $328 65
9,923
4,759 •
6, 410
3,146
30
$200,503,878 89-

222

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The act of Congress entitled ''An act to amend the customs-revenue
laws and to repeal moieties," approved June 22,1874, is a wide departure
from the settled policy of the Government from the organization of its
customs system in 1799; but, whether for better or worse, is a matter
Avhich has-been fully discussed by the ablest minds of the country, and
can only be determined by the test of an earnest endeavor to faithfully
administer the law as we find it, and the teachings of a carefully observant experience under its workings.
The evils of the moiety system, in its practical administration, were
undoubtedly, great, and by its enactment of repeal, June 22, 1874, Congress axipears to have rendered its judgmenti that they were greater
than the evils the system was designed to prevent.
.So far as a faithful and zealous execution of the new law by this Bureau can effect that object, the judgment of Congress against the moiety
sj^stem shallbe sustained; but it is yet too early to state what the result
has been, or to predict intelligently what the. ultimate result willbe,
upon the revenue and the mercantile classes.
While the now-repealed laws relating to the enforcement of fines, forfeitures, and penalties, and their distribution, Avere on the statute-books,
it Avas undeniable that thiere was a separation oif interests between the
Government and its employ^, the custom-house officer. The Government interest required the prevention of fraud on the revenue by the
swift, certain, and s.evere punishment of offenders, whenever and whereever detected 5 but the interest of the custom-house officer lay, not in
the suppression of fraud, but in its subsequent discovery, and its punishment by civil instead of criminal process, so that there might be a
resulting sum of money, in the distribution of which he was t o share.
The consequence of such' a condition of things was, that customs
. officials were often oppressively zealous in their pursuit of evidence
that might be turned into iDecuniary profit, sometimes unscrupulous as
to legal forms and ethical rules in getting at their information, and too
often indiscriminate in their x>iirsuit of so-called offenders. The mercantile community came to regard the customs-service rather as an
agency of iDcrsonal iirofit to those w^ho obtained admission into it than
as a part of the machineiy of a popular government for collecting the
revenue necessary to its support, and to look upon the customs officer
rather as a parasite, unlawfully living upon themselves, than as a public servant in honorable service. In the Treasury Department, likewise,
embarrassment was caused by the pecuniary relation' of local customs
and law officers to cases of alleged violations of law. The Secretary
and Solicitor, anxious to do justice between the Government and the
importer, were liable to be misled, and were constantly apprehensive of
misstatement as to the true facts of any case wh0rein the contingent interest of the officers in immediate charge of it Avas opposed to an open
and prompt prosecution, discontinuance, or compromise.
It is not an overstatement of the case to say that, owing to the multiplicity and obscurity of the revenue-laws prior to their late codification,
the complexity of the machinery for their execution, and the unhealthy
stimulus to greed due to the continuing existence of great frauds, and
the means taken for their prevention and discovery, a large, intelligent,
ahd public-spirited class of citizens had, to a lamentable degree, come
to look upon their Government as alien in interest and hostile in feeling
to themselves.
>
What Congress has done to rempA^e so unjust and dangerous a sentiment may be seen from a summary of the pertinent provisions of the
recent act. In the abolition of moieties thelaw takes from the customs


COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.

223

)fficer his pecuniary incentiA^e to distort or magnify innocence or heedessness into crime, and remove from him the reproach under which all
ipies and informers, for contingent rcAvards, labor in. popular estimation. In abolishing the seizure of books and papers, and substituting
}herefor their production by due and regular process in open court, it
removes from the importer one of his best-founded causes of complaint;
:hat is, the complaint of business interrupted and broken np and the
violation of his constitutional right of exemption from unreasonable
search and seizure. In establishing a fund to compensate informers
against undervaluations aud false invoices, who are not in public employ, it adds Avhat seems to be a reasonable auxiliary to the watchfulness
of regularly-]3aid officers. And it may be appropriate to suggest here
that, as the ncAV laAv leaves so much to the honor and honesty of the
importers themselves, it is not unreasonable to expect some service from,
bhem in the detection of frauds, both from motiA^es of patriotism and
of that self-interest that AvJll not quietly permit the breaking up of
an honest business by the dishonest competition of perjurers and smugglers. In the continuation of rewards to customs-officers for the detection of smuggling, recognition is given to the unquestionably arduous
and protracted nature of the detectiA^e-service on coast and frontier,
which has not itself been a cause of great complaint, like the detectiveservice, connected with the undervaluation of goods and fraudulent invoices.
Other sections of the act require only the forfeiture of the package with
Avhich a fraud is connected, instead of the entire in\^oice, as formerly;
lorovide exemption from forfeiture in cases where any costs, charges,
and commissions have been omitted from an invoice by mistake or neglect; require the question of an.intent to defraud to be passed upon
separately and distinctly, and affirmatively decided by a judge or jury,
before any fine or forfeiture can accrue in any case; grant to an alleged
offender a summary judicial inquiry on demand, in order that the remitting or mitgating poAver of the Secretary may be immediately exercised in ascertained cases of technical offense; forbid compromises by
auy official other than the Secretary of/the Treasury; settle forever
every custom-house transaction, wherein there is no fraud discovered,
Avithin one year from its occurrence; and put an estoppel upon suits of
any kind within three years after the transaction, if the parties or goods
haA^e not been out of reach in that time.
Upon contrasting the act of June 22,1874, with acts which it expressly
or by implication repeals, it is easy to perceive A ^ y some experienced
Ah
and trusted officers of the customs are alarmed at the extent of the reaction indicated by its provisions. In this connection, permit me to call
attention to the following vigorously-expressed extract from the very
able annual report, for the fiscal year ending June 30,1867, of the Hon.
Nathan Sargent, one of my predecessors:
By the act of March 2, 1799, he who gives information upon which forfeitures are
made for violations ofthe revenue-laws is entitled to one-fourth of the amount of such
forfeitures, after deducting necessary expenses. It has heen by means of this incentive
that so large an amountof smuggled goods have been seized during the past year;
withdraw it, and smuggling will become not only a profitable business, but one that
may he prosecuted with comparatively little risk. I t is this hope of gain, thus held
out, which induces the inhabitants, farmers and others, along, the frontier to give information, to special agents and otber officers of customs, of smuggling going on near
them, or which is intended to be effected. They give this information, invariably, under an assurance that their names are not to be made known, otherwise their property,
if not their lives, would be in peril. AVithdraw this iuducemenfc, and their lips would




224

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

It is earnestly hoped, however, that these apprehensions of increased
smuggling and enormous frauds may not be realized, but that both
officials and importers, by being on a better footing toward each other,
may act together for the prevention of such frauds and abuses as might
necessarily lead to the re-enactment of, stringent legislation; for it is
not to be supposed that Congress Avill suffer the revenue to be diminished, the protective features ofthe tariff tobe impaired, or honest taxpaying-merchants to be driven out of business by smuggling, or its
kindred crimes.
Inasmuch as the frauds on the-customs-reA^enue are mostly those of
undervaluation, not always discernible a t t h e time, and requiring for
their detection the skilled judgment of experts, to be exercised with
much patience and perseverance, it may turn out by experience to be
necessary to devise some means of rewarding customs-officers who may
be instrumental in securing either criminal convictions or ciAil penalties,
though such a necessity, if developed, would not imperatively require
the restoration of moieties. But, in the mean time, till such necessity
is conclusively shown, the officers under the supervision of this Office
wiU Iiot be allowed to plead the absence of special reward as a justification for indifference or neglect in the discharge of their duties, viz, the
detection and preA^ention of frauds upon the revenue.
In order to gi\"e the law an ad\"antageous trial, and prevent the
diminution of the revenue, as apprehended by maiiy, it will be necessary to sustain it with all the adjuncts of success suggested by experience. In this connection, it may be stated that thebest mode of arresting the evil of undeff aluation of goods has occupied the thoughtful
attention of some of our largest importing merchants, whose feelings
and interests are thoroughly in accord with those of the GoA^ernment
One of the niethods suggested is to raise the standard of qualification
of examiners, and increase their pay, so as to command the services of
thoroughly competent meii. This much having been accomplished, and
the existing laws having been so amended as to require a more thorough inspection, it is proposed to have the entries aud merchandise
examined with reference to quality and value by the official with the
same care as they would be by a person intending to purchase the
goods. By appointing examiners of integrity and fitness in sufficient
numbers, it is belieA^ed that the appalling encroachments of undervaluation can be successfully combated, and that the expenditure of a
few thousands in this way will be compensated by turning many millions into the E'ational Treasury. This theory is sustained by our merchants with but few exceptions,, and approved by our most experienced
customs officials.
I t appears that the laws of the General GoA^ernmeht, authorizing
warrants of search for smuggled goods, are defective, and often inoperative, inasmuch as there is no United States official who i s empowered
to issue these writs. The,act of March 2, 179"9, section 68,.provides
that '•'any person appointed by the surveyor, collector, or naval officer,
shall be entitled to a warrantirom any justice of the peace, upon proper
application on oath, to enter and search for smuggled goods any particular store, dwelling-house, building, or other place.'^ Justices of the
peace are officers of local jurisdiction, acting under authority of State
laws, and as such are not now, nor can they be, compelled to perform
as a duty the function contemplated by this act, and it is often the case
that they delay of wholly refuse these warrants of search to officials of
the revenue. It is; therefore, thought .ad\qsable to call the attention of.
Congress to this matter for further legislation. " If commissioners of the



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225

United States were authorized and required, under proper safeguards,
to perform these duties, it is thought that the difficulties complained of
would be obviated.
I t is estimated by many that the American tourists returning from Europe
during the year (finding Juue 30, 1873, numbered 36,830, and that each
person brought, on an average, seven trunks filled with dutiable goods
claimed to be piersonal baggage not dutiable. We haA^e thus an aggregate of 257,810 trunks filled with articles claimed as duty free, representing, on a valiiation df five hundred dollars for each ttunk, the enormous sum of $128,905,000. I t is Avell known that much of this baggage is ih reality intended to be put upon the market as merchandise,
and that still other portions of it are brought ovei: for third parties,
who haA^e remained at home. Most of those engaged ih this form of
importation are.people of wealth, who should cheerfully bear their just
proportion of the national indebtedness^ and when they fail to do so
by this incipient form of smuggling^ the burden falls more heavily on
others, and discourages the honest merchant, who is vFilling to carry
on a legiti tn ate trade, and observe thelaWs and customs regulations.
Thepresent practice of allowing the free entry of personal effects of
passengers—the inspectors using their discretion, and judging a^ to
A^^hether the amoiint of baggage is or is not in excels of what is a suitable wardrobe, acbording to the passehger's station iri life^furnifehes
an inducement to the rich and those in easy circunistances to take
pleasure trips abroad which are made pecuniarily profitable by this
fashionable infraction of the reA^enue. As a large prbportion 6f the
baggage of j)assengers is passed and delivered by our officials without
a proper exahiihation, more stringent regulations should be adopted to
secure the collectioh of the lawful duties on goods thus impbrted. A
ehange in forms seems to be necessary, so as to require a;ll £lrticles of
baggage to be eiitered oh the declaration of the passenger, ahd the duties
thereon deterihiiied by the proper Officer, instead of leaving all to be
disposed Of by the passenger oh his mere aMeveration. The A^erificatioii
thereon should be in the form of an oath or affirm ation sufficiently comprehensive in form and substance to protect the interests Ofthe Government, and an officer should be aii thorized to administer such oath or
af&rmation. To this end legislation hiay be necessar5> Many of the
difficulties Avith respect to passengers' baggage might be avoided by the
passage of a law limiting the value to be broiight in by any one person
to a rea;Sonable sum certain.
By the provisions of the ^ct of Jiiiy 14, 1870, the ambunt of household effects Avhich cOuld be iraported by an immigrant free of duty was
limited to $500, but unfortunately this limitation was inadvertently
removed by the codification of 1874, under which siich effects to any
amount may be brought in free; and l a i n informed that since,the codification Avent into operation large impoi'tations are being made in effects
of this kind.
The statute laws contemplate that ah importatioil, to be legal, must
be made thrbiigh the custom-house, arid landed by authority of a permit
from tbe cbilectof, and that all importations illegally made shall be liable
to seizure ahd forfeiture. But, under the cohstrriction given to certain
\ j>ostal treaties betweeii the Government and foreign powers, not only
i are such dutiable articles as books, maps, plans, prints, ehgravings,
drawings^ photographs, sample patterns of merchandise, seedSj and
ctittings, held to be.legally transmissible through the mails^ but many
Other articles not specifically named in treaties may be put up in a
sealed package, prepaid, registered, or otherwise treated as a letter,
1 5

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226

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

and sent through the mails to the United States. It seems to be a wellestablished fact that this system of importing goods is increasing, it
being found to be a safe, rapid, and economical mode of obtaining from
abroad small and A-aluable parcels of goods. As the laws are silent on
this subject, there are no means of preventing the practice.
With regard to the mailable matter commonly described as bookpackets, newspapers, and sample-packages, no difficulty arises that
administrative regulations may not remove, as such matter does not
possess the attribute of inviolability, but is expressly subjected to
inspection by the postal authorities, who, on finding unauthorized dutiable articles therein, are required to turn, them over to the revenue
officers. The case is different, however, with respect to letters and
other sealed packages which are inviolable, and not to be unnecessarily detained on the route to destination, and no course is open to the
customs authorities other than to induce the owner of such package to
come forward without delay at the place of first arrival and open it in
the presence of a customs officer, or, failing in that, to let it go^forward
to the office of destination, and haA^e a custoins officer present a t t h e
opening there. If the owner declines to come forward or to open the
letter, he of course loses the possession and use of his goods, and the
Government loses the duty thereon. If the office of destination be distant from a custom-house or station, it may not be possible to have a
customs officer present, in which case there is no one to secure or collect
the duties, or ascertain whether the law is being broken. Some legislation would seem to be necessary on this subject, and it is suggested that
postmasters should be made ex-officio officers of the customs to inspect
the goods and estimate and collect the duties thereon in case of importations through the mails of small parcels of limited A^alue.
Great care has been taken and much expense incurred to secure cars
with locks which could not be opened without leaving indubitable
evidence of fhe fact; and to this end the glass-seal lock was adopted,
after an examination by scA^eral boards of survey. Assuming these
locks to be all in point of excellence that is claimed for them by the
owners, the A^ery important fact seems to have been overlooked that
the cars them sel A^es might be opened without in the least disturbing
the locks. For example, a staple might be drawn by which the lock
could be released or replaced, and the car door thrown open or closed
at will without breaking the glass seal i n t h e lock, or the door might
be entirely removed from its hangings by simply displacing a few
screws; or by the same means boards could be taken out, affording
ingress and egress Avith facility, for the purpose of, ad ding to or subtracting trom the lading. These points are suggestiA'-e of the fact that
the glass seal is of little availunless the car itself is made as secure as
the lock by which it is fastened.
The regulations governing the'transit trade pro Aide that the shipper
shall prepare triplicate manifests, giving a particular description of
the merchandise by packages, marks, numbers, and contents, to whom
consigned, distinguishing articles of flatiA^e from those of foreign
growth, production, or manufacture, and those free of duty or dutypaid from goods in bond subject to duty. I am informed that, as a
general rule, these requirements are not complied with in any one j
respect, except in the presentation of the manifests, which do not
contain any of the required particulars. Customs officials on the
frontier recommend the enforcement of'these regulations, and that
merchandise should be carefully inspected either at the port of shipment or at the port of exit to Canada. The inspection should be



COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.

221

sufficiently thorough to enable the officer to determine whether the
goods correspond in quantity, quality, and description with the manifest. By this it is not meant that the merchandise shall be actually
measured or weighed, or critically appraised, as in the case of entry for
Avarehouse or consumption, but the examination should be sufficient
to satisfy the inspector of the identity of the goods. A like inspection should be made at the port of return to the United States. A
complete record should be kept both at the port of exit and return of
all the shipments, setting forth at the port of exit the date of exit
the number and description of the car, place of inspection, contents,
destination, port of return, name of consignee, and place of final
destination. At the port of return the same particulars should be
recorded, and, in addition, the date of arrival and inspection at port
of return, and result of said inspection as to contents and condition
of seals. A full report should be made weeklj or monthly from each
office to the Commissioner of Customs.
The act of June 27,1864, and the customs regulations of 1874, provide
for the importation of dutiable merchandise from foreign contiguous territory in railway-cars under consular seal.
If the seal is found to be intact on reaching the first port of entry in
the United States, the car is permitted to proceed by continuous gauge
of railway to any port of entry in either of the States or Territories
without entry, bond, or inspection.
This law is understood to have been enacted to facilitate importations
from Montreal in Canada, via the Grand Trunk Eailway, into the collection-district of Portland, Me. Under the provisions of the law, however, cars may be loaded at Montreal for New Orleans or even San
Erancisco, ajid if, oh reaching the first port of the United States, the
seals be in perfect condition, they must be allowed to proceed to their
destination. Many of these cars are never heard from at the first port
of entry as required by the regulations.
This system is so imperfect in theory and practice as to lead to great
irregularities and abuses, and the promiot repeal or amendment of the
law is earnestly recommended, i
By referring to a list of custom-houses in the United States, exhibiting the transactions and cost of each, it will be found that there are
many doing little or no business, but which are maintained at considerable expense of salaries to officials, and the construction and repair of buildings, with the usual incidentals of such establishments.
In some instances it appears that there are no duties to be performed
worth mentioning, aside from the disbursement of salaries, and that the
official papers are limited almost Avholly to accounts of this character.
Ports of this kind have been created, in times past, without the Avarrant of necessity, while others have dwindled from places of comparative importance to this condition through changes in the currents of
commerce. By the abolition of such districts, and incorporating them
with others, large sums may be saved to the Government, but in most
instances legislation will be required for this purpose.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HENEY C. JOHNSON,
Commissioner of Customs.
Hon.

B. H.

BRISTOV^,

Secretary of the Treasury.







REPORT OF THE FIRST AUDITOR.







REPORT

THE FIRST AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

First Auditor's Office, September 30, 1874.
S I R : I have the honor to submit the following statement ofthe business transacted in this Office during the fiscal year ending June 30,1874,
as requested in your letter of the 28th ultimo :
Accounts adjusted.

No. of
accounts

EECEUPTS.

$102, 375, 274 84
259, 453 66
681,164 82
230 65
304, 956 12
1, 636, 250 ,23
880 00
26, 875 36
22, 707 86
598, 065, 013 73
463,131 27
111, 8.56, 733 17

Collectors ot customs, for duties onmercbandise and tonnage received.
Collectors, for fees received under the steamboat act
Fines, penalties, and forfeitures
AVages of seamen forfeited
,
Marine-hospital money collected
Official emobiments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors received.
Moneys received on acconnt of deceased passengers
*
Moneys received from sales of revenue-cutters
Moneys received from captured and abandoned property
Treasurer of the United States, for moneys recei ved
'
Miscellaneous receipts
.'
Mints and assay-offices
Total.

6,586

875,692,671 71

1,243
1,444
211
111
453
879
549
4
357
15
10

$6, 557, 500 52
2, 019, 379 48
4, 790, 575 67
1, 279, 323 55
539, 827 53
376, 659 64
828, 460 84
229 90
668, 265 47
167, 881 36
1, 723 07
335, 666 21

DISBURSEMENTS.

. Expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
Official emoluments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Excess of deposits repaid for unascertained duties
Debentures, drawbacks, bounties, and allowances
Light-house establishment
Marine-hospital service
.
Revenue-cutter disbursements
Additional compensation to collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Distribution of fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Drawbacks under the Chicago-fire relief act
Payments of fishing-bounties
Internal and coastwise comraercial intercourse
Duties illegally exacted, fines remitted, judgments satisfied, and net proceeds of unclaimed merchandise paid
Judiciary expenses, embracing accounts of United States marshals, district attorneys, commissioners, and clerks, rent of court-houses, support
of prisoners, &c
Mints and assay-offices
Territorial accounts, embracing salaries of officers, legislative and contingent expenses
Salaries of the civil list paid directly from the Treasury
Disbursements on account of captured and abandoned property
Refunding X)roceftds of cotton unlawfully seized
;
Defense of suits in relation to captured and abandoned property
Defending suits for cotton seized
Civil-Service Commission
Treasurer of the United States, fpr general expenditures
Salaries and mileage of Senators.
Salaries of officers of the Senate
•Contingent expenses of the Senate
S.ilaries of officers of the House of Representatives
'Contingent expenses of the House of Representatives
Salaries Congressional Library




•

1

1,247

1, 903,141 68

2,514
121

3, 575, 607 33
112, 099, 533 49

1,270
9
23
12
33

149,771 32
604, 858 04
35, 300 89
181, 503 24
30, 740 95
9, 612 19
3, 095 00
563, .578, 545 51
715, 203 00
103, 761 24
202, 622 21 .
250, 572 19
334, 725 23
14, 430 57

232

R E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

Accounts adjusted.

'No. of
accounts.

Amounts.

DISBURSEMENTS—Coutinued.

Salaries Congressional Printer
'
I
Salaries employ §s Executive Mansion
.;
Salaries metropolitan police.
1
. Salaries of officers and employes in Independent Treasury
.;
Contingent expenses of the Independent Treasury ......".
J
Disbursing clerks, for salaries ofthe Departments of the Government at
AVashington
J
Contingent expenses of said Departments
.;
Standard weights and measures
Survey of the coasts of the United States
'
Redemption ofthe public debt, including principal, premium, and Interest
Payment of interest ou the outstanding public debt
\
Re-imbursement of the Treasurer of the United States for legabtender
notes and fractional currency destroyed by burning
<
Construction and repair of light-houses
Construction of custom-houses
;.
Construction of court-houses
.:
'.
Construction State, War, and ISTavy Departments building
,
Construction branch mint at San Francisco
'.
Construction of appraisers' stores
I
Construction of appraisers' stores at Philadelphia
Construction of new jail. District of Columbia.
|.
Construction of penitentiary at Olympia
i
Construction of marine-hospitals'
Fuel, lights, and water for public buildings
I
Repairs and preservation of public buildings
i
Purchase of land for public buildings
:
Heating-apparatus for public buildings
1
Furniture and repairs of furniture
!
Vaults, safes, and locks
i
Custodians and janitors of public buUdings
Government Hospital for tl)e Insane
J
Maryland Institute for Instruction of the Blind
;
Providence Hospital, for care, support, and medical treatment of trainsient
paupers'
:
:
Cpliimbia Institution for Deaf and Dumb •.
^
Columhia Lying-in Asylum
Supervising and local inspectors of steam-vessels, for traveling ancl incidental expenses, &.c
Preserving life and property from shipwrecked vessels
Salaries of officers of Refbrin-School of District of Columbia
!
Commissioner of Public Buildings and Grounds
,
Geological survey of Territories and mining statistics
- -..
Statistical atlas of United States
'
Detection of counterfeiters, &.c
Pish-cultiire
•
..'
!
Postage-accounts
i
Expenses of Department of Agriculture
^
•.
Expenses of national loan, national currency, <fcc
Payments to District of Columbia for improvements around buildings and
reservations belonging to United Slates
...',.....
I
Construction, equipment, and repairs of revenue-cutters
•.
'
J'udgments of Court of Clairas paid
1
Outstanding liabilities paid
i
Cotton-claims p a i d . . . 1
;
ExiDienses of board of health District of Columbia
1
Public printing and binding
i
Warehouse and bond accouiits
\
Misxjellaneous accounts
J
Total.

4
2
7
63
40

$13, 564 00
11,475 00
207, 447 81
358, 414 71
27, 506 OS

243
281
3
30
115
238

4, 986, 4"^ 9&
1, 088,192 53
10, 426 29
960, 085 92
279, 661, 668 86
113, 259, 736 60

27
256
160
84
4
18
16
1
16
4
15
86
81
6
6
10
8
7
20
4

140, 866, 892 67
817, 598 7a
949, 666 59'
1, 720, 856 50'
1, 018, 730 32
547, 602 68
125, 448 80'
10, 590 82
162, 773 24
• 39, 800 00
38, 030 42
169, 673 00
526,174 19
183, 752 60
91, 841 64
38,160 84
140, 013 32
67, 637 95
154, 868 22
2, 412 50'

12
4
8

1 5 000 00
.,
48, 625 00>
22, 949 96

265
47
11
51
3
4
6
32
6
49
151

219, 532 14
120, 050 44
5, 744 80
441, 529 81
73, 796 25
9, 913 02
128, 449 90
33, 215 89
43, 449 10
189,195 07
3, 378, 336 00

5
97

915,234 92
394, 520.93
608, 932 62
13,407 42
2, 437, 723 77
69, 300 00
1, 571, 322 OS

1,337

71
09
2
60
1, 599

796
7,237

23, 429, 894 10

• 1, 283, 786, 759 33

Reports aud certificates recorded
L
13,776
Letters written
i
1,905
Letters recorded
.'
1,905
Acknowledgments of acconnts written
L
13, 309
Powers of attorney for collecting interest on tbe public debt registered aud
med.
5,362
L
668
Requisitions answered
,
466
Judiciary emolument-accounts registered.

The business ofthe Officein the current fiscal year has been kept up
with the aid of four additional clerks transferred here on the 1st of July
last, and by this means all arrearages anticipated from the reduction of




FIRST AUDITOR.

233

the clerical force of the Office by the legislation of the last session of
Congress have been obviated.
The business of the First Auditor's Office is permanent in its character, and steadily increases in amount with each successive year. A
reference to the reports for fourteen fiscal years, commencing July 1,
18C0, and ending June 30, 1874, including the entire period of the war,
will exhibit an average increase of nearly one thousand accounts a
year, the greatest actual increase accruing since the close ofthe war.
The number of accounts received, examined, and adjusted in the •
Office during the last fiscal year largely exceeds that of any preceding ito
These facts render it necessary that the permanent force of the Office
should be increased, at least to the number employed prior to July last..
I beg leaA^e to commend the clerks and employes in the Office generally for fidelity and honesty in the discharge of their official duties.
Eespectfully submitted.
D. W. MAHON,
Auditor.







V.

REPORT OF THE SECOND AUDITOR.







EEPORT
OF

^HE SECOiND AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Auditor's Office, November 3,1874.
SIR : I have.the honor to submit the following report, showing in deail the amount and nature of the business transacted in each division
f this Office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874:
ROOK-KEEPER'S DIVISIOIs^.

Eequisitions registered, journalized, andposted.
On what account drawn.

No.

Amouut.

D E B I T REQUISITIONS.

$6, 810, 307 20
14, 267, 888 18
2, 911, 559 47
316, 990 52
15 66
154, 973 48
151, 261 65
5, 000 00
440. 889 -57
216, 709 33

ayments on account of the Indian Department
ayments on account of the Pay Department
ayments on account of the Ordnance Department
ayments on account of the Medical Depaitment
ayments on account of the Quartermaster's Department
ayments from appropriations under control of the Adjutant-General
ayments from appropriations under control of the Secretary of AVar
ayments from appropriations under control of the General of the Army . . . 1 .
ayments to the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
ayments to the Soldiers' Home
ayments to the Treasurer United States on account of internal-revenue
fund .
ayments under special acts of .relief by Congress
ransferring amounts from appropriations found to be chargeable to such as
are entitled to credit on the books of the Second Auditor's Office
ransferring amounts as above to the Tliird Auditor's books
ransferring amounts as above to the Fourth Auditor's books
ransferring amounts as above tothe books of the Register of the Treasury..
Totai debits.

307 28
3, 934 29
225, 063 63
202, 808 48
20, 879 12
351 48
2, 693

CBEDIT REQUISITIONS.

eposits in favor of the Indian Department
eposits in favor of the Pay Department
eposits in favor of the Ordnance Department
eposits in favor of the Medical Department..'.
eposits in favor of the Adjutant-G-eneral's Department.
eposits in favor of the Quartermaster's Department
:
eposits to the credit of appropriations under control of the Secretary of War.
eposit to the credit of the appropriation under control of the General of the
Army .
ounter-requisitions transferring amounts to appropriations entitled to credit
from appropriations found to be chargeable on the books of the Second Auditor's oifice
"."••",••
Duuter-requisitions transferring amounts as above fromthe Third Auditor's
books to the Second Auditor's books
r -. - - hunter-requisitions transferring amouuts as above from the Eourth Auditor's
'books to the Second Auditor's books
Total credits
Aggregate debits and credits
Deducting the credits from the debits shows the net araount drawn out
to be




25,728,939 34

48

121, 582 16
1, 629, 254 54
153, 944 29
81, 770 40
6,139 46
2, 498 81
' 48, 550 75

.

58 15
225, 025 72
22, 610 59
7, 037 34
568

2, 298, 472 21
!, 027, 411 55
23, 430, 467 13

238

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Eequisitions registered, journalized, and ^^os/ec^—Continued.
On w h a t a c c o u n t d r a w n .

No.

Amount.

APrROrillATION WARRANTS.
Credits.
In
In
In
In
In
In
In

favor
favor
favor
favor
favor
favor
favor

$4,198, 42.:
f 12,845,80£
I 2, 304, 50C
380,. O C
O
216, 99C
166, 96C
5, O C
O

of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e I n d i a n D e p a r t r a e n t
of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e P a y D e p a r t m e n t
of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e O r d n a n c e D e p a r t r a e n t
of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e M e d i c a l D e p a r t m e n t
:...
of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s of t h e A d j u t a n t - G e n e r a l ' s D e p a r t m e n t . . . . . . .
of a p p r o p r i a t i o n s u u d e r control of t h e S e c r e t a r y of W a r
L...
of t h e a p p r o p r i a t i o u u n d e r control of t h e G e n e r a l of t h e A r m y .

20,117, 68E

Total credits.
Debits.
Transfer-warrants
Transfer-warrants
Transfer-warrants
Transfer-warrants
Transfer-warrants

175, O C
O
60C
179, 42fi
10, O C
O
40, O C
O

Indian Department
Pay Department
Ordnance Department.
Medical D e p a r t m e n t
Adjutant-General's Department.

Total debits

405, 02S

Aggregate debits and credits .

20, 522,='71£

E x c e s s of c r e d i t s over d e b i t s . .

19,712,.65e

CONDENSED BALAN(JE-SHEET OE APPROPRIATIONS.
Indian
Departraent,

W^ar
Departme

Credit.
B a l a n c e to t h e c r e d i t of all a p p r o p r i a t i o n s on t h e b o o k s of t h i s oiiice J u n e
30,1873 '.
1^7, 539, 295 43 |$35, 893,17(
A m o u n t c r e d i t e d b y a p p r o p r i a t i o n - w a r r a n t s d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r e n d i n g
J u n e 30,1874
4,198, 425 79 15, 847, as?
A m o u n t c r e d i t e d b y deposit a n d t r a n s f e r r e q u i s i t i o n s d u r i n g sarnie p e r i o d .
2,176,89C
121, 852 16
A m o u n t c r e d i t e d t h r o u g h T h i r d A u d i t o r ' s Office t o approiDriations u s e d i n
c o m m o n b y b o t h offices
1, 576, 74C
Total .

11,859,5.73 38

55, 494, 64^

175, 000 00
6,810,307 20

230, 02f
18, 918, 63S

4, 874, 266 18

34, 459, 43'

11, 859, 573 38

55, 494, 64^

•Debit.
A m o u n t d e b i t e d to .appropriations b y t r a n s f e r - w a r r a n t s d u r i n g fiscal v e a r
e n d i n g J u n e 30,1874
.'
."
A m o u n t d r a w n from a p p r o p r i a t i o n s b y r e q u i s i t i o n i n sarae period
A r a o u n t d r a w n t h r o u g h T h i r d A u d i t o r ' s Office from a p p r o p r i a t i o n s u s e d
i n common b y both, offices
,
B a l a n c e r e m a i n i n g t o t h e c r e d i t of all a p p r o p r i a t i o n s on t h e b o o k s of t h i s
oftice J u n e 30,1874
•
Total .

1, 886, 54C

SETTLEMENTS MADE.

On what account.
Transfer-settlements for the adjustment of appropriations .
MisceUfineous settlements
Total




No.

Amount.

5
. 7.

$64, 677,153
3 68S

12

64, 680, 84S

SECOND AUDITOR.

,'

239

-SETTLEMENTS ENTERED.

Paymasters'
'. - ....'.
= 240
Recruiting
.»-........
132
Ordnance
— .---.
^
46
Medical
^
:.....
--^--13
Contingencies of the Army and Adjutant-General's Department.-..-.
30
Soldiers'Home...
...„28
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers
11
Charges aud credits to officers for overpayments, refundments, & c . . . - 619
Charges to disbursing officers for canceled checks.„
..,«..
---..
35
Arrears of p a y . . . . . . . - - .
,.....
»...-.
....
...-i
...
17
Proceeds of Government property»
^ .>.....,..
11
Special acts of relief by Congress
17
Transfers to the books of the Register, Treasurer, First, Third, and Fourth Auditors'Offices..
..,...,.»-..
33
Transfer settlements for the adjustment of appropriations oh the books of the
Second Auditor's Office
7
Minors' and deserters' money, (local bounty accounts)
43
Freedmen's hranch of Adjutant-General's Office - - . . . o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
Indian disbursing accounts,
„....-.
...».,'.
.1...^. ..............
126
Miscellaneous. = .-oo
.,...„
8
Claims, w a r . . . .
„ 333
Claims, Indian
„ 1,092
Total.:...

2,855

Fifty transcripts of accounts Avere prepared for suit; 680 certificates
as to the indebtedness or non-indebtedness of officers having claims
against the United States Avere given for use in this and the Third Auditor's Office, and 1,060 letters Avere written during the year.
PAYMASTERS' DIVISION.

' The number of accounts examined and settlements made in this division was 1,778, as follows:
Paymasters' accounts audited and reported to Second C o m p t r o l l e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 008
Paymasters'accouhts finally adjusted.43
Charges raised against officers and enlisted men oh account of o v e r p a y m e n t s . . . .
177
Charges raised against officers on account of double p a y m e n t s . . . . . , . . . = . . . . » . i»
15i7
Credits to officers and enlisted men for overpayments refunded..
„-,.. . „ « . . . .
204
Credits to officers for double payments refunded.. . - » o . . . , . » . . . - o o . . . ^»=.
«
46
Credits to officers for amounts erroneously charged to t h e m . . . . . . . . . . «
,
32
Lost checks paid under act of February 2, 1872.
.^
...................
19
Transfers to books of Treasurer's office on account of "outstanding liabilities"
(act May 2, 1 8 6 6 ) . . . . . . . . , . . . . . .
15
Transfers to books of Third Auditor
,.........-„,.....
,...,..,,
24
Payments to National Honae and Soldiers' Home, (12 e a c h ) . . . . . .
24
Payments to civilians under the reconstruction a c t s . . . . . . . . . . . o .
5
Payments to civilians for property destroyed by United States soldiers..
...
2
Miscellaneous
'^.......,
- . 22
\^

Total..........

\

.

-..-..

1,778

The amounts involved in the a)boA^e are as folloAVS:
\

Paymasters' accounts

,.,..'.

.

117, 257, 093 25

\ Amount of fines by sentence of courts-martial, forfeitures by desertion,
\ arrears of pay and bounties disallowed, found to have accrued to the
\^ benefit of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers from
i the special examination of paymasters' accounts, instituted Novem^
iber, 1869, and paid to the president of said home, by requisition on
the Treasury, as follows :
\873.
,
.
l^ust-2.
jtember4-..
ober I
Jember 1
smberl




'

>

-'....$33,520 .58 ' '
36,16043
,
..22,570.17
23, 562 37
35,224 42

'

240

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

1874. .
-January 1
February 1 . . . - - .
.March2
Apiil 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.-.---.
May 2
--.June 2
.June 30
--. .--

$48,114
24,671
25,111
39,937
73,744
43,307
: 24,028

-.
-.---.

22
51
70
20
70
99
6S
953 97

Amount of fines, forfeitures, stoppages, «fec., for the support of the Soldiers' Home, found to be due in the current examination of paymasters'accounts, and paid to the treasurer of said home, in accordance
with the act of Congress of March 3,1859, as follows:
-I Qi^q

August 2 . - • - - . . . . . - ......'.
12-9,765 78
September4
...:......
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . 15,306 83
October 1
..^ 1 7 , ^ 32
November 1
^.
6,966 55
December 1
8j 154 63
1874.
.Janu£iryl.......:.....................:.....^.^.:...-.
8,178 05
February 1.
9,101 65
March 2 . . . . . . . . .
17^529 82
April 1
9,591 23
May2....
.1............ . - . . - . : . : . i . . . 28,659 33
June 2 . . . . . . .
8,656 15
June 30...:.... 17,968 89
• 177,276 23-.
Amoiiht transferred froin the appropriaition for " pay of the army " t o
t h a t for " ordnance, ofdnance stores, and supplies," on accountof
deductions from the j)ay of officers and soldiers for ordnance and
ordnance stores, in accordance with paragraph 1380, Army Regulationsof 1863
Amount transferred frbm appropriation for ' ' p a y of the a r m y " to
that of the Subsistence Department on the books of t h e Third Auditor's Office, on account of deductions from the pay of soldiers for
tobacco, pursuant to General Orders No. 63, AVar Department, Adjutant-General's Office, J u n e 1 1 , 1 8 6 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . , . . . . » .
Amount transferred t o the books.of the Third Auditor's Office, oh account of stoppages against officers fpr subsistence stores, quartermaster's stores, transportation, & c . . . - . i - - ^ . .
.--.....,.-..
Amount charged. to officers and enlisted men on account of overpayments
....,...,...-.-:...
Amount charged to officers on account of double p a y m e n t s . . . . ; . . . . .
Amount credited to officers and enlisted men on account of overpayments refunded
-..--..-.-.---.-.-.-.-.-.........
Amount credited to officers on account of doui)le payments refunded..
Amount credited to officers on account of erroneous charges raised
against them
,.
--........-.-..-Amount of lost checks paid under act of February 2 , 1 8 7 2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Amount transferred to the books of the Treasurer's Office on account
of "outstanding liabilities," (act May 2,1866) . . . . . : . . , . . . - . . . . . . . . . .
Amount paid to civilians under the "reconstruction a c t s " . .
.....
Amount paid to civilians for property destroyed by United States
soldiers...
Miscellaneous payments.-.-".. r . . . . . . 1 . : \ . . : . . . . - . , . . : . . , : - - : . . - . . . Total

-

2,010 11

148,1^8 98
1,49127
.5i7i8l 27
34,042 65,
"^j XQ5 31
8,. 920 31
4,307 55
2,031 73
7^ 586 78
309 46
233 17
1,033 15
18,087,^72 19/

Payirias- Uraffc-r^
ters'ac- ; dezvoi'
counts. accouT
Number of accounts on band June 30, 1873
Number received during tlie year . . . . . . . . : . . .
Total
Number audited and reported to Second Comptroller during tbe year.
Number on hand unsettled June 30,1874




y

634
552'
1,186
1, Qb§

SECOND AUDITOR.

241

During the year the accounts of 43 paymasters have been finally adjusted with the following result: In 33 cases balances were declared
due the United States^ aggregating $50,821.39, of which $37,503.65 was
recovered by suit, and in 10 cases the paymasters were found to be
creditors to the amount of $3,836.28, which was paid to them.
Twenty-nine accounts have been prepared for suit, on which there is
due the CTnited States $117,690.
-N'umber of letters written, 59,144.
MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION.
Number of accounts on hand June 30,1873
Number received d u r i n g t h e year

1,458
2,332

Total
Number of accounts settled during the year

3,790
,

2,708

Number on hand unsettled June 30,1874

1, 082

Number of letters written

2,579

The amount of disbursements covered by the settlements made this
year is $7,127,112.73, as shown by the following details:
Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous:
Ordnance Department
| 5 , 423, 492 41
Medical Department
„
391,921 46
Expended by disbursing officers out of Quartermasters'
fund, not chargeable to said fund, but to certain appropriations oh the books of this Office
55,895 85
Contingencies of the Army
70, 351 74
JExpenses of military convicts
51,987 86
Freedmen's Hospital and Asylum
39,482 07
Bronze equestrian statue of Lieutenant-General AV^infield Scott
40,000 00
Medical and surgical history and statistics
19,354 13
Medical Museum and library
i
5, 432 99
Expenses of the Commanding-General's Office
4,68166
Contingencies of the Adjutant-General's Department..
3,714 15
Expenses of recruiting
1
2,605 80
Trusses for disabled soldiers
2, 059 35.
Payment to Benn Pitman for copy of record in case of
General D. C. BueU
1,200 00
Judgment against Grenville M. Dodge and others
500 00
Appliances for disabled soldiers
527 62
Providingfor the comfort ofsick and discharged soldiers.
273 92
Pay of the Army
230 84
Medals of h o n o r . . . .
•.
18 00
Keeping and transporting prisoners of war
15 66
Relief of H. G. Ankeny, act June 8,1872
299 50 .
Relief of Robert McKee, act January 30,1873
175 14
Relief of Kitty Ann Smith and James A. Stevens, act
February 19,1873
280 79
Relief of P. AV. Stan defer, act March 3,1873, and amendment January 3,1874
600 00
Relief of David Braden, act March 11, 1874
1, 058 00
Relief of Susan D. Galloway, act of March 21,1874....
2, 241 35
Relief of Henry C. Smith, of Indianapolis, Ind., act
April 9,1874
458 57
Relief of Victor Mylius, act April 13, 1874
1, 984 87
Relief of W. W. Elliott, act April 13, 1874
1, 111 54
Relief of William J. Scott, late aid-de-camp to General Spear, actMay 5,1874
676 07 •
ReUef of Dewight Desilva, act June 8,1874
. 332 00
To compensate D. R. Haggard for six months' service as
colonel Fifth Kentucky United States cavalry volunteers, act June 20,1874
,
1,422 00
Relief of Henry Sullivan, Company G, Fourteenth New
Hampshire Tolunteers, act June 20, 1874
256 86
ReUef of OUver P. Mason, act June 23,1874
787 50
$6,125, 429 70

16 F



242

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Regular recruiting:
Expenses of recruiting
Bounty to volunteers and regulars „
Pay of theArmy
Medical and Hospital Department

$88, 886
925
78
75

07
00
00
00
$89,964 07

Volunteer recruiting:
Collecting, drilling and organizing volunteers
Bounty tb volunteers and regulars
Draft and substitute fund

104,193 10
26,025 00
307 58
—

130, 525 68

. Local bounty:
Pay of two and three year volunteers

3,190 00.

FREEDMEN'S BRANCH ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE.

Pay, bounty, & c . :
Bounty, act July 28,1866
Bounty to volunteers and legal heirs ..
Pay of two aud three year volunteers
Pay of theArmy

$187,167
281, 360
145, 367
. 1,171

77
61
89
94
— $615, 068 21

Expenses of collection and payment of bounty, &c.:
Support of Bureau
56,168 34
Expenses, pay, & c - . .
106,766 73
— 162,935 07
$778,003 28
Total

7,127,112 73

In continuing the compilation of a complete record of payments to
oflQcers ofthe regular and volunteer forces, 609 paymasters' accounts were
examined for the necessary data, and 344 double payments were discovered and charges raised against the payeeSo
INDIAN

DIVISION.

There is an increasing tendency on the part of the Office of Indian
Affairs to make disbursements through this Office by means of certi Lied
vouchers, which adds largely to. the duties of this division. These
vouchers are reported under the general head of claims, of which there
was an increase of 199 as compared with last year.
Under various calls for information, and instructions from the Second
Comptroller to prepare transcripts of the accounts of delinquent agents
for suit, a large amount of copying has been performed, covering 643
pages of folio post and 110 pages of legal cap.
The number of money accounts and property returns of Indian agents
and of claims for goods supplied and services rendered that have been
settled during the year are sbown in the following statement:
Money Property
a c c o u n t s . •returns.
^ A c c o u n t s , r e t u r n s , a n d claims on b a n d J u n e 30,1873
A c c o u n t s , &.C., r e c e i v e d d u r i n g t b e y e a r
Total
A c c o u n t s , &c., disposed of d u r i n g t h e . y e a r
A c c o u n t s , &c., on b a n d u n s e t t l e d J u n e 30,1874




Claims.

718
520

873
261

1
1,124

1,238
.547

1,134
292

1,125
1,101

691

842

Amount involved in money accounts audited
Amount involved in claims settled
^.
Total

$1,924,313. 49
3,050,552 94

.^

- - - ^

-

4,974,866 43

Number of letters Avritten

1,853
PAY AND BOUNTY DIVISION.

The following t a b u l a r statements exhibit in detail t h e operations of t h e two branches of this division during t h e y e a r :
E X A M I N I N G BRANCH.
Claims in cases of white soldiers.
A d d i t i o n a l b o u n t y , a c t J u l y 28, 1866, a n d a m e n d m e n t s .

A r r e a r s of p a y a n d o r i g i n a l b o u n t y .

03

1

ll
li a Ill
i.2

o

1873.
July
Auffust
.
September
October
N o v e m b e r ..'
December
1874.;
January
February
Marcb
April'-.

. . .

June

. .
Total

5
1
3
2
1
12

127
93
116
104
78
186

290
101
52
75
2
391

7
3
3
3

214
49
23
49

2

2, 029




. .9 ©
o

a^g

r- o 2

213
148
179
152
136
290

PL,,0

^•
a
40
18
31
22
16
52

0

.n

0+= £

1-

O r i g i n a l claims.

a
n3

1
a

1

h

>5

1

pi

03

M

1
fl
a

a

M

.9§

11

cn

Suspended claims.

fl
a

® ^

p s

1.11

'0

p ni 0

!25

.

Number again suspended; additional evidence insuf
ficient.

1
.

Date.

. 02

Pi

o

Number a,g.ain suspended; additional evidence insuf
ficient.

S u s p e n d e d claims.

Original claims.

a

o
o

'0

1

t. rt
ro a

S p

•^-

1
a'

a

p •

41
36
29
24
41
40

2,064
1,763
2,119
2, 245
1,094
756

211
137
166
145
147
139

1,382
1,292
1, 585
1, 484
680
512

471
334
368
616
267
105

2,277
1,911
2, 298
2,397
1,230
1,046

3,127
2,433
3,066
3, 330
2,030
1,597

396
384
537
359
307
510

11
4
3
3
5
5

236
234
296
219
186
300

63
53
79
21
15
88

8(5
93
159
116
101
117

1, 8.01
1,603
1,483
1,053
1,.813
1,917

256
227
220
134
222
181

1,312
1,179
1,145
803
1,318
1,493

323
197
118
116
273
243

2,287
1,987
2,020
1,412
2,120
2,427

3,110
2,646
2,620
1,929
2,772
3,265

11
7
2

1,054
788
687
400
116
392

161
]56
126
164
39
68

757
551
530
284
64
287

1.36
81
31
12
13
37

1,344
889
739
475
118
783

2, 026
1, .399
969
790
292
692

603
436
552
90
812
658

4
8

372
283
346
72
440
461

42
99
26
7
38
6

185
46
173
8
333
191

2, 041
2,639
2,575
1,192
2,532
2,159

192
187
184
79
198
202

1,516
1,824
1,885
273
3,732
1,569

333
628
506
840
602
388

2, 644
3,075
3,127
1,282
3,344
•2, 817

3,289
3, 942
3,772
530
3, 814
3, 539

9,408 2,471

15, 507

H
O

320

58
42
24'
23
2
• 32

"37'

42 1,359

360

268

13, 478 1,599

21, 751 5,644

I
1

54 3,445

537 1,608

22, 898 2,282

16,049 4,567

28, 542 35, 228
00

244

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Bounty claims under the att of Axiril 22, 1872.

'

i

S u s p e n d e d claims.

O r i g i n a l claims.

fl

'a

d
o

a
a

'B^

ci

Prt3

Date.

«« «•

'^
ft
fl 02.

1
P
P

1

o

rCi.
t.. fl
® C^

^

- u
o
rQ

^

^

70
48
68
37
50
56

1874.
January
February
Marcb
April
May
June

53
65
63
640
44
40

1
2^
3
1

1,234

19

!^-

Is

o

• a-S

1

• ®-l^
t^ o

P
fl

•

rS §
ITI! o
fl_fl

a

ft©
P

o

fl

GO (B

fd

cfl ©

©
5*.*

fl

^ o

^1
\^

^

^
^

©

-^^-2
3

cS

a
fl

ft

Jz;

J2i'

26
8
22
7
7
13

474
383
222
248
362
328

96
87
62
52
61
,66

335
285
142
168
273
230

43
11
18
2828
32

43
43
34
626
44
31

4
9
8
8

5
11
18
5
9

368
305
583
2,370
449
486

65
71
93
161
74
54

284
202
430
2,187
308
288

991

93

131

6,578

942

5,132

i
2

a

.Q

9
7
17
9
17
5.

28
31
29 .
20<
24
38

7.
2

•^
^

1 •

1'^ • 1

^

^g

o
rfl;
•

fl
- < j

®'-l3 «?•

a
p

"

f.-'^

rfl.

a
p

a
p

187a
July
AugustSeptember
October
November
December

.u
u
.a

^^1

a.

fl 02

^

.Q

-'S
ce ?

fl

|S

P

a
p

Total

^

a .

o
9

1

p

3
H
o

O
;-l
©
riS

3:
P
15
2

54.4.
431
290
285
412
384

74©'

19
32
60
22
67
144

421
370
646
3, 010 .
493
526

491"^

504

7, 812

444
409
390-

496
426;.

558
866-

4,145
619
498
10, 082

Claims in cases of colored soldiers, including hoth appears of pay and bounty.

©
fl

Date

a

1

^.
©

1

©

rc>-

a

PU

fl

©
o
rfl-

1873.
July
August
September
October
November
December

46
98
302
30
87
52

1874.
Jauuary
Pebruary
Marcb
,
April.....
May
June
Total

'^..i-

ft

fl

a .
cSV.

a

^ r ^

flnd-

n3

nS ft
fl
^
fl =3
f-i fl
©

• M-

.^

1
'ft.

c

a- a
fl
t^i^
p

ft-M
fl 03

©
M
©
rQ-

f^

O

a- a
fl-.
^ ^

1
fl
' 1

fl

^

4',
o
1'

3

15
6
5
2
8
4

116
162
93
136
57
9&

1
1
1
2
4
7

101
155
87
128
51
85

10
6
3
3
1
5

•2
3
1
2

1, 078

23

965

68

22




g
s
©

rQ

27^
86
96
28
77
44

4

r3
©

Suspended claims.

Original claims.

928^
1, 854.
735
1, 024947,
2
1' • 1,263
4i

I, 353
82T
1,298
1, 264:
1,602
1,352
14, 447

ti
^ o

V.^
© o

©
03

a

fl fl
ft©

"ci

n '^.

a§
f3'4^

^

^

2

.11

^1

H

1

S

i-:-

©
•5?
u

.52 05

^
a
^

^s^
a:§^
f^.O

ft

}5
Z

+3

i
fl

•

fl

'^

3
o
H

r^

^
a

r^

p

t^i

682
892
638
745
520
815

224
511
29
222
404
397

974
1,952
. 837
1,054
1,034
1,315

2,537
4,001
2,077
1,158
3,239
1,112

59
25
65
72
75
74

1,124
705
1,159
1,084
1,233
1,165

170
97
74
108
294
113

1,469
989
1,391
1,400
1, 659
1,451

1,115
1,238
2,111
1,204
1,220
1, 210

1,042

10, 762

2,643

15, 525

22, 222

22
451
6857
23'^^
51

SECOND AUDITOR.

245

Bounty claims in cases of colored soldiers under the act of March 3, 1873.

su s p e n d e d

Original claims.

1

r6
©
fl

g

s
1

Date.
53
rQ

o

a
fl

p
©
rQ

o

1874.
January
February
Marcb
April..
May
June
Total

.1. •

.

&

a .

© ©

•31
©

'd

cS ""

•5?

^fl ft
fl ^
p '^

©

^nzi
P fl
© a

a

1^

u

©
rQ

fl
fl

fl

si •

1873.
July
August
September
October
November
December

"ft

ft

4J

.

a

fl

•+f'fl
?^ fl

a

i

•^%

ft=S

fl 03
' ^ fl

©

rQ

^.2

a
a
fl

•u g
©

^

,Q

'o

a

rfl

claims

fl

1

ii
^•1 •^%

<^ S

C ©
D

-d

§?
•^ ^
f- S

^le

•s?

^

O'-i

fl
P o
<33*.I3 ^<

a§

'^iSS
a:§S

flrS

a

-t^

a
"^
o

rQ O

fl' fl

fl

©

•Xi o
fl a

*p

^

©

fl.ft

'r-,
P

©
rQ

a
fl

1

© VJ

©

©

•

a

sw

fl
fl

u
©
rQ

a

o
H

fl
[2;

321
392
164
154
594
174'

1
14
6
12
6
3

239
229
79
58
477
101

81
149
79
84
111
70

751
811
653
740
915
. 607

125
333
378
595
516
76

575
571
^ 89
. 75
280
369

51
107
186
70
119
162

1,072
1,203
817
894
1,509
781

468
301
220
1,020
650
852

71
437
157
161
104
122

2
16
12
8
5
7

55
253
110
133
85
48

14
168
35
20
14
67

540
448
413
260
174
340

313
142
173
116
98
41

158
250
150
39
56
164

69
56
90
105
20
135

611
885
570
421
278
462

1,130
1,020
520
1,203
1,101
1,010

92 l,-867

892

. 6, 652

2,706

2,776

1,170

9,503

9, 495

2, 851

SUMMARY.

S u s p e n d e d claims.

O r i g i n a l claims.

^
.9 •
'

Date.

i

.

rS
•ft
43

fl

fl
o
u
®

eg""
^'fl

©
rQ

a
p
fl

rQ

o
rfl

a
fl

^

1873.
July.
August
September
October
November
December

1,046
24
25
1,070
12
1,050
732 • 1 8
1,174
14
1, 082
23

1874.
January
February
Marcb
April
May
June

1,133
1,201
917
1,102
1,019
1,310

Total

12, 836




.^
^

•r^

ft

73

a .

8

p p
U fl

rQ

o
©
"5?
u
©
rQ

S
s
^

i>

•

a
p

^

.2P

^--2

©

.

.a

.

i

'1

.Q

^ 2
Ug

fl

a
a

rQ

a
fl

rfl

Y
<
-

^

o

©
02

© o
fl fl

©

a

CD-r-l

ft©

r^

03 O

T3

©

nfl fl

A
'

'fl a

il^
"
p "^

"^'^3

^g
P'43
[25

.ap
l^?
" -^ fl

u o

1
©

u

p

<i^'43 ^:; .

'^5-S
fl

J2;

« ^

1
a
fl
fl

,Q

a
p
^

^-K

u
rQ

1

B

fl

"A

657
673
616
429
842
669

208
233
211
138
167
219

157
139
211
147
151
171

6,108
6,414
5,212
5,310
5,131
4,871

710
1,035
894
983
969
513

4,286
4,219
3,599
3, 275
3,071
.3, 419

1,112
642
719
1, 052
1, 091
939

7,154
7, 484
6, 262
6, 042
6, 305
5,953

9,982
9, 825
8,392
7,827
9,187
7,252

15
785
30
783
26
600
17 1,008
620
10
16
945

128
324
96
61
55
110

205
64
195
16
334
239

5,356
5,007
5, 556
5,486
4,873
4,729

790
581
641
532
484
439

3,839
3,532
4,154
3,867
3, .393
•3, 473

727
894
761
1,087
996
817

6,489
fi, 208
6,473
6,588
5, 892
6,039

8,051
8,1.57
8, 238
7,872
7,046
6,949

230 8,627 1,950 2,029

64, 053

8,571

44,127

10, 837

76, 889

98, 778

246

REPORT

ON

THE

SETTLING

FINANCES.

BRANCH.

The following tables show the work performed by this branch :
Claims in cases of white soldiers..
Additional bounty, act of Julv :
1866.

Arrears of pay, &c., act of July 22
1861.

Number of claims.

Number of claims.

Date.
fl ®
^ CB
© O
rfl.;^

July
August
September.
October
November .
December..

171
167
179
165
279

255
164
172
138
,205
150

40
65
87
74
100
55

295
229
259
212
305
205

January . .
February.
Marcb
April
May
June

394
16
6
2
9
406

195
170
143
126
99
81

104
46
24
20
3
5

299
216
167
146
102
86

2,002

Total .

00
00
00
00
60
.50

412
420
549
436
402
507

390
215
244
247
250
285

14
37
95
130
85
101

404
252
339
377
341
386

$50, 433 42
28, 751 46
33, 530 57
37, 110 19
36, 033 87
35,192 51

21,157 54
17, 825 00
17, 345 00
13, 635 27
10, 500 00
10,650 00

691
536
685
564
587
669

278
226
.266
254
225
226

115
83
52
17
40
20

393
309
318
271
265
246

38, 216 45
33, 336 55
34, 743 90
36,190 54
47, 673 05
28, 927 96

$26,075
18, 950
17. 700
16. 050
21,100
15, 788

2, .521

206, 776 91 6,458

789 3,901

440,140 47

Bounty claims under the act of Axiril 22,1872.

N u m b e r of c l a i m s .
Date.
Keceived.

Allowed.

Rejected.

Wbole numb e r disposed
of

volved.

1873.
July
August
Septeinber
O c t o b e r ..
November
December

.

.

,

104
133
50
35
40
35

80
51
71
41
31
45

84
116
43
26
30
30

20
17
7
9
10
5

60
62
. 63
48
50
40

52
38
49
45
53
43

9
4
5
20
3
4

61
42
54
65
56
47

642

609

113

722

$8, 400 00
10, 700 00
4,300 00^
2, 600 00
3, 000 00
2,100 00

1874.
January
February
March
April
May
June
i

-.

Total




5, 300
3, 770
4, 900
4, 600
5, 346
4, 287

00
00
00
00
00
87

59, 503 87

24-7::

SECOND AUDITOR.
Claims in cases of colored soldiers, including hoth arrears of x^(^y <^'^^(i hounty.
Number of claims.
Date.
Received.

Allowed.

Rejected.

Amount involved.

Whole number disposed
of

1873.
July
August
September
October
November
Deceniber

$18, 559
8, 273
13, 813
39, 985
52, 731
67, 313

64
10
02
87
58
21

1,648
2,467
725
469
104
286

131
56
110
304
464
549

310
89
67
92
67
150

441
145
177
396
531
699

718
417
467
400
380
399

593
453
356
385
340
337

81
134
111
100
43
33

674
587
467
485
384
370

73, 735 29
59, 668 01
49,159 22
.51, 696 94
44, 489 78
44,981 03

8,480

4,078

,5, 356

524, 406 69

1874.
January
February
March..'.
April
May
June
Total

SUMMARY.

Number of claims.
Date.

Wbole numReceived, Allowed. |Rej ected. ber disposed
of

Amount involved.

Num b e r :
of letters
written.

1873.
July
August
September
October
November
December

06
56
59
06
05
22

1,409
1,262
604
1, 095
1,764
2,475

138, 409 28
114, 599 56
106,148 12
106, 322 75
108, 008 83
88, 846 86

1,443
1,640
1,307
1, 441
1, 292
1 085

12, 499 1, 230, 827 94

16, 817

2,348
.3,109
1, 512
1,125
702
1,117

860
551
569
715
955
1,014

384
208
256
305
262
311

1,244
759
825
1,020
1,217
1,325

1,863
1,031
1,221
1,014
1,026
1,514

1,118
887
814
810
717
687

309
267
192
157

1,427
1,154
1,006
967
806
749

17, 582

9,697

$103, 468
66, 674
69, 343
95, 746
112, 866
120, 394

1874.
January
February
March .".
April . May
June
Total




248

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

Consolidated statenient showing the oxierations of entire division.
1

1

N u m b e r of c l a i m s .

Date.

fl b3

1 ?

©

© ^

'Q

i
i

fl
•'^

1

^

CH3

rfl

0 s

o

M
a

o

s

1

1

i|

.2

ro"'ft

•43

r^

1

II •

!1

f
a

fl
!25

]

1873.

...

860
.551
569
715
955
1,014

1,861
1,750
1, 397
1,552
1,671
1,191

2,721
2,301
1,966
2,267
2,626
2, .205

1,118
887
814
810
717
687

1, 369
1,550
1,254
1,321
1,474
1,228

2,487
2,437
2!, 068
2, 131
2,191
1,915

17, 582

•.

2,348
3,109
1; 512
1,125
702
1,117
1,863
1,031
1,221.
1,014
1,026
1,514

July
August
September
October .
November
December

9,697

17, 618

27, 315

1874.
January
February-.
March
April
Mav
June
Total

11, 391
11, 087
8,996
8,922
10, 951
9,-727

866
843
464
533
899
715

28
56
12
75
83
86

9,494
9,797
9, 545
9,313
8,338
8,034

1,309
1,004
826
990
709
779

1, S30, 827 94

115, 595

9,937

$il03, 468 06
1 66, 674 56
169,343 59
1 95, 746 06
112, 866 05
120, 394 22
1

|l38, 409
114, 599
106,148
!l06,322
il08, 008
; 88, 846

There were also made in this division seventeen settlements on account of unclaimed amounts due deceased soldiers, of the Eegular Army,
upon which the sum of $35,987.69 was paid to the treasurer of the Soldiers' Home, in accordance with.the acts of Gongress of March 3, 1851,
and March 3, L859, making the total number of settlements 9,714, and
the total disbursements $1,266,815.63.
C l a i m s on h a n d .
J u n e 30,1873. June.30,1874.
•

•

•

•

•

]

. . ' . . .

T o t a l n u n i b e r of c l a i m s on h a n d

5,589
16, 543
10, 934
1,705

1,961
12, 387
9 793
897

34, 771

C l a i m s u n d e r a c t of J u l y 28,1866 (white)
C l a i m s for a r r e a r s of p a y a n d o r i g i n a l b o u n t y , (white)
Claims of colored soldiers
.
B o u n t y - c l a i m s u n d e r a c t of A p r i l 2 2 1872
..1

25, 038

The condition of the claims on hand June 30, 1874, is as follows:
Suspended, awaiting evidence to be filed by claimants, or tbeir attorneys
Ready lor settlement
1
Unexamined, June 30, 1874
Total

.....,..,

23,391
1, 073
574
25,038

PROPERTY DIVISION.
Property retnrns on hand, J u n e 30, 1873
Property returns received during tbe year
Total
Number of returns settled during tbe year
Number of returns on hand June 30, 1874
Number
Number
Nuraber
Number

J
^»
,

9, 401
3,982

:
„

13,383
8,957

j...-,

of certificates of non-indebtedness issued to officers;
of returns registered
,
of letters written
I
of letters recorded
„ ..o„
„,
....„„.




.,^
.. ^,.»
,,,
.."...
,

4,426
444
3, 982
3, 857
2,083

SECOND

249

AUDITOR.

During the year the sum of $16,637.57 has been charged to officers
for Iiroperty for which they have failed to account, and 22,181 property
returns rendered in former years, but not included In previous reports,
have been closed under the act of June 23, 1870.
DIVISION OF I N Q U I R I E S AND

REPLIES.

0
The subjoined tabulated statement exhibits the work'of this division:

r e 00

Office making inquiry.

©
© P^

T3

b 5
^
. ©

<\
9,688 10,210 9,045
522
926
928
928
,2
245
254
258
13
196
196
198
2 1,479
1,481
1,442
2 2,102
2,426
2,167
324
39
61
59
22 3,767
8, 735
9,126
5,359 19, 692 31, 278 12, 093
11, 586
769
769
728

Total.

39
259
2
391
19,185
41

17, 832 38, 903 56, 735 35, 647

Adjutant-General
Pay master-Oeneral
Quartermaster-General
Commissary-General of Subsistence ..
Commissioner of Pensions
Third Auditor
Fourth Auditor
Second Auditor, (local bounty-cases) .
Second Auditor, (deserter-cases)
Miscellaneous

21, 088

Rolls and vouchers copied for the Adjutant-General and Pay master-General ..
Rolls and vouchers copied for preservation in this Office
Rolls and vouchers partially copied and traced for preservation in this Office.
Number of letters written
Number of signatures verified
Number of cases briefed
-,

840
289
1,117
19,826
4, 956
19,172

In addition to the foregoing, 389 affidavits, 191 applications, 658 final
statements, 363 letters, and 592 miscellaneous documents have been
copied; and a copy of the register of paymasters^ accounts was made
for the purpose of checking amounts credited to the National Home for
Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. Two hundred and fifty cases of overpayments and double payments were discovered and reported, in order that
charges might be raised against the payees. In 26 cases, involving
$2,594.94, overpayments to enlisted men, where it would be ihipracticable to recover at present, the proper steps have been taken to stop the
amount from any arrears of pay, &c., that may be due them.
DIVISION FOR T H E INVESTIGATION

OF

FRAUD.

This division has had 6,181 cases under investigation during the year,
of which 758 have been finally disposed of. Abstracts of facts have
been made in 344 cases, 214 cases have been prepared for suit in the.
various United States district courts, and 5,668 letters have been written.
The number of cases on hand June 30,1873, was
Number received during the year

4,749
1, 432

Total
Number of cases finally settled during the year

6,181
758

Leaving now on hand




:

i.

..„

5,423

250

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

The cases now under inves bigation involve foi|gery, fraud, overpayments, unlawful withholding of money, &c., as follows :
Claims in cases of white soldiers in which notice of fraud or wrong has been
presented subsequent to settlement of tbe claims
Unsettled claims in cases of white so|ldi6rs involving fraud or wrong
Settled claims in cases of colored soldiers involving fraud or'wrong
Unsettled claims in cases of colored soldiers involving fraud!or wrong
Cases of officers charged with overdrawing pay while iu the{military service..

Total
1
^
The amounts recovered by suit and otherwise aire as follows :

1,648
648
1, 525
1, 362
240

5,423

Recovered by draft., certificate of deposit, and in current fudds, in cases of
white sokliers
I.
:
'
$10,574
Amount secured to the United States assistant treasurer ai New York
431
Amount of certificate and check recovered and canceled.. ..'
240
108
Amount recovered and turned over to a paymaster, United Istates Army..-..
2, 086
Amount secured to claimants from igents wbo had withheld the same

40
50
69
27
17

|
13,441 03
Total amount recovered in w bite casesAmount secured and returned to the Treasuiy through the Freedmen's Branch
'.
L
38,269 04
ofthe Adjutant-General's Office
Total

J

L„

51,710 07

L

Bond of indemnity on hand

|

$1,700 00

Notwithstanding the satisfactory report and the earnest effort of this
branch of the Office, it will be seen that the nuinlier of cases requiring investigation and prosecution is yet on the increase.j This may be accounted
for by the fact that since thb transfer of the Freedmen's Bureau to the
Wa>Y Department, many frauds and malpractices have been discovered
in the payment of colored sUdiers, or. their heirs, by the subagents of
the late Commissioner of the Bureau, and freshi complaints continue to
be made, which require investigation.
\
All that could reasonably! have been expected, has been done by the
officers and agents of the Adjutant-General's Office, Solicitor ofthe Treasury, and United States distHct officers, to aid this Office in the recovery
of money, the suppression of wrong, and the vindication of law; and
with their continued co-operation and the enacllment of a law extending
the limitation created by ttie act of April 30, 1790, in forgery cases, and
affording proper facilities for investigating cases and examining witnesses in localities where frauds are suspected, preliminary to action by
the Department of Justice,!it is believed that t|he Office can more effectually resist and punish attempts at fraud in the bounty-claim busiuess.
ARCHIVES DIVISION. I

The details of the work of this division are as follows :

I

!

Number of accounts received frqm the Paymaster-General
^ 573
Number of accounts on file, awaiting settlement
j
178
Number of confirmed settlements received from the Second Comptroller, verified, briefed, and transferred ilo permanent
files:
!
Paymasters'
J
....i
243 o
Indian
!
L
1,394
Miscellaneous...
'1
1,223 2,860
Number of paymasters' settlemlents re-examined
|
1, 606
Number of settlements withdrajwn and returned to
files!
1,736
Number of vouchers withdrawn and returned to accounts
57, 607
Number of abstracts of accounts bound in covers
'
101
Number of mutilated muster and pay rolls rej)aired
!
-^- --13,768
Number of letters written
:,.
.
~
600



SECOND

251

AUDITOR.

The miscellaneous work of this division consists in keeping the record
of payments to the Regular Army, the care and distribution of all printed
forms and blanks used in the Office, &c.
. REGISTRY AND CORRESPONDENCE DIVISION.

The following is the record of work pertaining to this division :
Number of letters received
'.
Number of letters written
.•
Number of letters recorded
Number of letters referred to other bureaus
,
Number of dead-letters received and registered
Number of miscellaneous vouchers received, stamped, and distributed
Number of letters, with additional evidence in the case of suspended claims,
received, briefed, and registered
Number of pay and bounty certificates examined, registered, and sent to the
Paymaster-General, in accordance with joint resolution of April 10, 1869
Number of claims received, briefed, and registered
Number of pay and bounty certificates examined, registered, and mailed
Numbier of reports calling for requisitions sent to the War Department

23, 072
27,303
2, 022
1, 938
4, 051
116,948
21, 538
5,939
20,975
9, 935
537

For convenience of refereoce, and for the purpose of showing at a
glance the number of accounts received, examined, and remaining on
hand, the number of settlements made, and the amount involved in each
class of accounts and settlements, I annex the following
Consolidated statement.

•

CM

111

C3

O

Description of accounts and settlements.

©
03
if. © - 03
p a <x) 0
o ^-M ©

.

© -ti

<
ACCOUNTS.

194
552 1,008
650
Paymasters'
691
520
547
Indian agents' disbursing accounts
718
842
261
292
Indian agents' xiroperty accounts
873
24
1,101
Indian claims
1 1,124
25, 038
Bonnty, arrears ol: pay, &c
:..
34, 771 17, 582 27, 315
Ordnance,.medical and miscellaneous
Regular recruiting
,
'
Volunteer recruiting
)• 1,458 2,332
2, 708
Claims for return of local bounty
Freedmen's brancb, Adj utant-General's Office
Ordnance and Quartermaster's Departments'
property returns
3,982
8,957
Ordnance and Quartermaster's Departments'
property returns not included in former
reports .. .•
Total accounts.

47, 872 26, 353 64,109

32, 297

$17, 257, 093 25
1, 924, 313 49

59,144
i 1,853

3, 050, 552 94
1, 230, 827 94 115, 595
( 6,12.5,429 70 1
I
89, 964 07 I
{
130, 525 68 > 2,579
I
3,190 00
I 778, 003 28
3,857

30, 589, 900 35 183, 028

SETTLEMENTS.

Payments to Soldiers' Home
Payments to Natioual Home
Transfers, cbarges and credits to officers,
<fec., not included under "Accounts"

$213, 263 92
429, 953 97

758

64, 903, 791 64

Total settlements
A ggregate...:

65, 547, 009 53
47, 872

32, 297

96,136, 909 88

183, 028

In addition to the foregoing, 54,457 letters were written relating to
the miscellaneous business of the Office, making a total of 237,485
letters.
The average number of clerks employed during the year was 248.
The following statements and reports were prepared and transmitted:



252

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Annual report to the Secretary of the Treasury of the transactions of
the Office during the iiscal year.
I
Annual statement of the recruiting fund^ prepared for the AdjutantGeneral of the Army.
|
Annual statement of the contingencies of the Army, prepared for the
Secretary of War.
|
Annual statenient of the clerks and other persons employedin this
Office during the fiscal year, or any part thereof, showing the amount
paid to each on account of salary, with place; of residence, &c., in pursuance of section 11 of the act of August 12, 1842, and resolution of the
House of Eepresentatives of January 13, 184|6, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
|
List of employes in this Office on September 30, 1873, showing the
State or Territory from which each person was,appointed to office, the
State or country in which he was born, and t|he compensation given to
each, transmitted to the Eegister of the Treasury in accordance with
the acts of Congress of September 5, 1859, and March 2, 1861.
Monthly ^tabular statement showing the business transacted in the
Office during the month, and the number of accounts remaining unsettled at the close of the month, transmitted to the Secretary of the
Treasury.
i
Monthly report of absence from duty of employes, with reasons therefor, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury..
Pay-rolls upon which payment was made to tjhe employ6s of this Office,
prepared semi-monthly.
i
The results of the past year's labors show ku encouraging reduction
of accumulated business in some of the branches of the Office, but there
still remains much unfinished, that cannot be iexecuted with the present
diminished clerical force, which is scarcely sufficient to perform the current work. Some portions of this business may not be regarded as pressing, but, if it is necessary to be done at all, it ?kVould seem to be wiser to
dispose of it now, than to leave it to the chances of aii indefinite and
uncertain future. Of this character, I will refer to the repairs that are
necessary for the preservation of the muster ajnd pay rolls ofthe Army,
that are the' only vouchers, in the accounts ojf paymasters, for the disbursement of hundreds of millions of dollars, and which, by reason of
the poor quality of paper used, and of their ifrequent handling in the
settlement of those accounts and of the claims i)f soldiers and their heirs,
and for the purpose of answering inquiries I from other offices, have
become so torn and otherwise injured, as to Ipe almost unfit for use as
official papers. There are about 200,000 of them.requiring careful repairs and many will need to be copied.
I
For the jjurpose of showing the frequent |reterence that is made to
these rolls, I will here state, that 74,108 were withdrawn from and returned to the files during the last fiscal year.
Since July 1, 1874, the division of inquiries and replies has fallen in
arrears 8,961 cases, notwithstanding it has been allowed all the clerks
that could possibly be spared to it. To briig up the arrears of this
division and perform the current work during the present fiscal year
more clerks are needed than can now be assigned to that duty.
The investigations and reports of this brancli. are important, being for
the information of the various Offices of the War Department,the Pension
Office, the Third and Fourth Auditors, and inj aid of the settlements of
the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers.




SECOND

253

AUDITOR.

The following tables exhibit, as well as figures may do, what has been
the work of this Office, and furnish valuble statistical information. The
first is a condensed statement of all the settlements of money accounts
and claims, from March 4, 1817, when the O.ffice was organized, until
June 30, 1861, a period of forty-four years, which is subdivided into two
periods : prior and subsequent to the Mexican war. The second table
is a condensed statement of the number of money settlements made by
the different divisions of the Office, with the amounts involved, the
property accounts adjusted, the nuinber of claims rejected, the number
of examinations and certificates furnished to the Paymaster Greneral and
Commissioner of Pensions, and other incidental work performed in each
year, from June 30, 1861, to June 30,1874.
Number of accounts settled from March 4,1817, to Jiine 30, 1861.

2^
.CO

©oo

Accounts*

2 ®

^1
Ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous
Recruiting and disbursing officers . . .
Arrears of pay, &c
„
Paymasters'."
'
Indian agents
Total




o o

13,232
6,695
12, 880 6,097
6,283 21, 361
1.759
1,427
3:254
5,562

19,927
18,977
27, 644
3,186
8,816

41,142

78, 550

37,.408

Statement of accounts settled and amounts involved fr(xni Juiie 30,1861, to June 30, 1874.

P a y m a s t e r s ' accounts.
T o r t b e year
endingNo.
J u n e 30 1862
J u u e 30 1863
J u n e 30 1P64
J u n e 30 1865
J u n e 30 1866
.Tune 30 1867
J u n e 30 1868
J u n e 30 1869
J u n e 30, 1870
J u n e 30 1871
J u n e 30 1872
J u n e . 3 0 , 1873.
J u u e 30, 1874

141
645
773
738
981
1,451
1,038
1,216
1,083
843
2,350
1,033
1,008

Amount.

di
'
O r d n a n c e , m e d i c a l , a n d I n b ua n i na g e n tcsc o udisrs g a
nts
miscellaneous.
and I n d i a n claims.
No.

Amount.

$4,181, 276 33
4,017 $29,128, 526 30
47, 875, 231 36 11, 802 38, 847, 899 20
88, 944, 415 39 15, 988 55, 539, 537 64
90, 094, 847 46 22, 0.59 42, 647, 077 68
110, 209, 718 62
7, 228 26, 902, 784 54
183.041,476 09 . 3,206 23, 050,181 18
1, 897 20, 484, 802 13
146,305,528 14
8, 598, 706 04
1,990
183, 052, 989 46
3, 571, 107 13
1,708
141, 438. 680 99
2, 023, 703 26
2,394
124, 063; 652 23
1, 566, 924 96
1,805
131, 057, 413 02
1, 968,183 01
27,116, 621 39
2, 567
6,125, 429 70
2,708
17, 257, 093 25

T o t a l . . . . 13, 300 1, 294, 638, 943 73

No.

Amount.

B o u n t y , a r r e a r s of
p a y , &c.

No.

616 $3, 335, 885 23
3,328
590 2, 099, 257 87 19,191
501 2, 242,154 74 80, 756
866 3,231,449 00 84, 517
448 2, 881, 256 33 78, 335
821 4, 273, 208 91 59,121
962 5, 301, 722 89 203, 980
1,169 4,715,039 43 85, 279
1,172 3, 033, 827 41 53, 826
1,482 8,194, 634 63 40,078
1,649 5, 351, 816 32 22,170
1,871 8, 329, 188 21 32, 420
1,648 4, 974, 866 43 27, 315'

Amount.
1249,180 64
2, 443, 293 39
10, 970, 528 91
14, 047, 599 35
16,189, 247 17
10, 638, 782 78
19, 598, 445 88
8, 355, 618-22
4, 160,776 31
2, 348,164 42
1, 278,160 29
1, 664, 985 64
1,230,827 94

79, 369 260, 454, 862 77" j 13, 795 57, 964, 307 40 790,316 93,175, 610 94
1

R e g u l a r a n d volunt e e r r e c r u i t i n g accounts.
No.

Amount.

Ol

Freedmen's Bureau accounts.

No.

Amount. •

Total.

No.

• 9, 606
33, 584
99, 898
110, 774
91, 309
68, 364
210, 293
91, 132
58, 736
44, 797
27, 974
%8, 541, 725 08 37, 861
778, 003 28 .32, 679

1,504
1217, 088 97
1.356
398, 785 94
i;880 2, 220, 744 15
2,594 8, 019, 33a 56
4,317 21, 353,127 68
3, 765 19,891,437 .59
2,416 5, 262, 140 63
1,478 2, 841, 079 24
946 2, <I43, 906 48
9.57, 010 35
657,266 02
405, 060 44
220, 489 75

Amount.
§37, 111, 957 47
91, 664, 467 76
1.59,917,380 83
158, 040, 305 05
177, 536,134 34
240, 895, 086 55
196, 952, 639 67
2p7, 563, 432 39
154. 648, 298 32
137 587 164 89
139 911 .580 61
48,025,763 77
30, 586, 710 35

9,319,728 36 917, 007 1, 780, 440, 922 00

20, 256 64, 887, 468 80

NOTE.—The " r e g u l a r and volunteer recruiting accounts" subsequent to 1870, and tbe " Freedmen's Bureau accounts" are included in " ordnance, medical, and miscellaneous."




.

.

O

o
H
hj
H-l

>
. a

SECOND

255

AUDITOR.

Statement of property accounts and miscellaneous ivorlc performed in conneciion with the settlement of accounts. ^

If
o cn

1^'

©
•'-'

©

F o r tbe year e n d i n g -

Od

^

P.- fl

^
^
'.

Total

r^

^

•

^g

.o o
5 ce

30,1862
30,1863
30,1864
30,1865
30,1866
30 1867
30,1868
30,1869
30,1870
30 1871
30,1872
30 1873
30 1874

.
n

O f-l
•

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

©"^'

^

^

1^

.rl-'CJ

8%

t- fe
ri2

a
• 0\^

a3T3
f^ ©
-

S5i
f-i ? ©

X5-S.2

32^

^,

CCrri C
C

icate
ishe
eral
es.

M
©

^ f-i © .;ra
•+3 a a ©
QJC«-|^ O
© M .^^ 'H
© .
; j f-i ' O
© 03 ©

-^ S ^
2 o§

• 3-p ft
f2;

°^ iS+S
fl M i-^
-^ a-0-5

ll^l

^

5, 021
7, 368
29, 745
163, 429
176, 263
141 698
129, 463
91,322
43, 689
39 171
237, 675
41 775
31,138

822
1,470
2,374
2, 210
19, 099
27, 236
41 217
26, 526
22, 865
22 955
. 13, 873
18, 346
17, 618

14 584
40, 651
108, 373
126, 569
370, 020
478, 477
603 698
40.5, 745
363, 556
233 129
202, 658
265, 544
237, 485

37, 473
134, 816
254, 690
170, 340
245, 903
486, 305.
220, 209
171 931
173, 487
237 754'
133, 9.57
194, 574
186, 584

5,589
.5,144
5, 410
5 995
2,698
2,401
1 868
2,709
2, 842
2 519
2, (i06
2 679
3, 261

38, 904
74, 041
134, 328
320, 408
125, 315
16, 4.35
18,138
29, 309
42, 309
35, 647

^ 1,137, 757

216, 611

3, 4.50, 489

2, 648, 023

45, 721

834 834

From these tables it appears that the whole number of claims and
mouey accounts settled, from March 4, 1817, to June 30, 1861, was
37,408, and that from June 30, 1861, to June 30, 1874, the number of
suchsettlementswas917,007,involving$l,780,440,922.00. If to this number is added the clairas examined and rejected, 216,611, it appears that
1,133,618 claims and money accounts have been settled and disposed of
in the last thirteen years.
The tables also show that, in the same time, 1,137,757 property accounts
have been adjusted, 3,450,489 letters have been written, and that 834,834
certificates from the rolls have been made to the Paymaster-General and
other officers.
It affords me great pleasure to bear testimony to the ability and fidelity of the gentlemen employed in this Of^ce.
I am, sir, very respectfully,
E. B. FEENCH,
Auditor:





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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

.REPORT OF THE THIRD AUDITOR.

17 P







REPORT
OF

THE THIRD AUDITOR OF THE TREASURYTREASURY DEPARTMENT,

1,148
279
331
• 561
62
9

Quartermasters' money
Quartermasters' property...
Coramissarys' money
Pension agents' money
E n g i n e e r s ' uioney
S i g n a l officers' nioney
Signal officers' p r o p e r t y
Claims l o r h o r s e s lost."
Claims for s t e a m b o a t s destroyed
Oregon w a r claims
M i s c e l l a n e o u s claims
State war-claims
Total

5,004
68
825
8,052 •
4
16, 343

Number of monthly and
quarterly accounts received in fiscn.l year
endiug June 30, 1874.

D e s c r i p t i o n of a c c o u n t s .

Nuniber of monthly and
quarterly accounts remaining'ou hand June
30, 1873.

Third Auditor^s Office, September 12, 1874.
S I R : Pursuant to the requirements of law, and in compliance with*
instructions from your Office, I have the honor to transmit herewith a
report of the operations of this Office forthe fiscal vear ending. June 30,
.1874.
.•
'
The following statement shows, in a tabular form, the principal items
of business transacted, and the number and amount of unsettled accounts
and claims on hand:

3, 972
4,476
1,085

N u m b e r of a c c o u n t s set• tied i n fiscal y e a r endi n g J u u e 30, 1874.

N u m b e r of a c c o u n t s u n settled J u u e 30, 1874.

J>^©
5 => "
o cn

<

4,077 $16,134,^13 94
4,473
.1,011 " 4,166,'446 16'

Vi .
$3,709,310 37

179
50
497
467

182
46
497
403

8, 363, 072 62
320, 632 55

1,043
232
405
639
59
13

76, 350 54

5,068

946, 506 98

g
107
8,938
. 15

5
117
5,419
"9

37, 470 63
7, 386 84
4, 077, 976 09
603, 633 09

71
815
11, .571
10

710,296 37
67. 574 34
4, 720, 553 87
. 990 760 54

19, 794

16, 239

33, 787, 680 46

19,976

36, 339, 964 33

790, 247 70
19, 426, 378 75
4 841 286 88
137, 043 53

The general work of the Office is in charge of the following divisions:
BOOK-KEEPERS' DIVISION.

The duty devolving upon this division is to keep all the appropriation and money-accounts of the Office.
The average number of clerks engaged iu this division during the
period embraced in this rei3ort has been nine, and that number now constitutes its active force..
The annexed statement (with the exception of those of the Engineer
Department, which are consolidated under the general head of'^Sundry
Engineer Appropriations") shows the amounts drawn out of certain of
its appropriation accounts, and also the re-payments made through this
Office into the Treasury, and is a full exhibit of its financial operations
for the fiscal year.



Statement shoiving tlie financial ox)erations of the Third Auditor^s Office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874.
O
Transfers.

5s q

is:?

> cJ3c3
re: 03 O

N u m b e r of r e q u i s i t i o n s d r a w n by t h e S e c r e t a r i e s of W a r a n d of t h e I n t e r i o r u p o n
t h e S e c r e t a r y of t h e T r e a s u r y i n favor of s u n d r y p e r s o n s , 6,090, a m o u n t i n g t o
$58,815,571.71.
P a i d o u t of t h e follow:ing a p p r o p r i a t i o n s , a n d in t h e m a n n e r h e r e i n s e t f o r t h , v i z :
P e g u l a r supplies. Q u a r t e r m a s t e r ' s D e p a r t m e n t .
Incidental expenses. Quartermaster's D e p a r t m e n t
Earracks and quarters
.'
A r m y t r a n s p o i t a t i o n ..-.
Officers' t r a u s p o r t a t i o n
Cavalry and artillery horses
C l o t h i n g of t h e A r m y
P r e s e r v a t i o n of c l o t h i n g a n d e q u i p a g e
Natioual cemeteries
H e a d s t o n e s for g r a v e s in n a t i o n a l c e m e t e r i e s
—Cousta:uction_and_re.palrs^yl'_li,ospitals_._...,._-._._._. - . -_._-.. .^._-_... ^-_- T_-.-^-.-.-_-^-_-_-__-J-. •^•^•J-HLi-.•
C o n t i n g e n c i e s of t h e A r m y
•
".
P u r c h a s e of s t o v e s
A l l o w a n c e for r e d u c t i o n of w a g e s u n d e r e i g h t - h o u r l a w
M i l i t a r y r o a d from S a n t a F 6 t o F e r n a n d e z d e T a o s , N e w M e x i c o
C o n s t r u c t i o n of m i l i t a r y t e l e g r a p h from S a n D i e g o , Cal., t o P r e s c o t t , A r i z o n a
G u n b o a t s on W e s t e r n r i v e r s
'
.•
K e e p i n g , t r a n s p o r t i n g , a n d s u p p l y i n g p r i s o n e r s of w a r
Collecting, o r g a n i z i n g , a n d d r i l l i u g v o l u n t e e r s
Clainis of loyal citizens for s u p p l i e s f u r n i s h e d d u r i n g t h e rebellion, ( S o u t h e r n C l a i m s
Commission)
.•
P a y of Oregon a n d W a s h i n g t o n V o l u n t e e r s , 1855-'56
S e r v i c e s of Oregon a n d W a s h i n g t o n V o l u n t e e r s , 1855-'56
Pogue liiyer Indian war
K e f u n d i n g t o S t a t e s e x p e n s e s i n c u r r e d , &c., w a r of r e b e l l i o n
S u p p r e s s i n g I n d i a n h o s t i l i t i e s i n T e r r i t o r y of M o n t a n a
P e - i m b u r s i n g K e n t u c k y for e x p e n s e s , &c.', w a r of rebellion
Military Academy, W e s t Point
gignal Service
:
,.
Qljservation a n d r e p o r t of s t o r m s
3j]gtablishing
FRASER s i g n a l - s t a t i o n s a t l i g h t - h o u s e s , &c

Digitized for


W
$4,
1,
1,
3,

353,
275,
670,
463,

865
905
927
943

72
14
84
40

355, 064
1, 538,859
50, 000
378, 628
50
98, 029
'i; 287

50
00
00
39
00
94

TP

$630, 918 33
63, 612 02
308,185 59
826, 059 59
6, 743 66
77, 906 54
3, 604 .50

$454 58
827 76
102 .50
4, 083 09
116 09

$101, 344 09

1, 184-23
2, 774 96
100, 934 22
15,015 70

16 22

?5, 036, 582 77
1,346,529 151,981,990 89
O
4, 395, 025 30
21, 875 45
432,971 04
'H
1, 542, 479 72
50, 000 00
W
379, 773 24
.50 00
98, 029 94
t—(
- -17,-309-95- 70 15
72, 394 53
Z
25, 000 00
50, 311. 80
CfJ
650 00
123, 926 47
200, 083 08

K

1,144 85
•-I6r0'22--8470 15

-'^>
a

394 53
000 00
311 80

w

123, 926 47
200, 088 68
122, 025 24
5, 047 60
11,224 63
31, 725 29
64, 477 03

88, 343 00
64, 927 57

123, 938 06
12, 500 00
341,825 00
30, 000 00

w
^
oO
i
r

122, 025 24
5, 047 60
11,224 63
31, 725 29
64, 477 03
88, 343 00
64, 927 57 '
123, 933 06
12, 500 00.
341, 825 00
30, 000 00

7, 874, 720 08
S u b s i s t e n c e of t h e A r m y , ($35,000 of t b i s a m o u n t a d v a n c e d to e x p l o r i n g e x p e d i t i o n ,
fortietli parallel)
A r r a y pensions
.
..
...

12,107 12
109, 443
4, 370
1,030
3, 9.58
303

2, 631, 561 14
30, 650, 705 09

P e n s i o n s to w i d o w s a n d o t h e r s
P e n s i o n s WSLV of 1812

.

C o m m u t a t i o n of ^'ations t o p r i s o n e r s of w a r
P u r e a u of Kefugees, F r e e d m e n , &:-c
UoT'ses a u d o t h e r p r o p e r t y lost a c t M a r c h 3 1849
P e l i c f of p e r s o n s s u t t e r i n g fi'om overflow of M i s s i s s i p p i P i ver
P e l i e f of C h a r i t y L o d g e , H a r p e r ' s F e r r y , "W. V a
P e l i e f of AVilliam J o h n s o n of P i p l c y C o u n t y I n d
P e l i e f of e s t a t e s of A b e l (Gilbert a n d W i l l i a m (3-errish
•.
P e l i e f of heii'H a t law &c J a m e s P Armstrou'^" deceased
P e l i e f of AVilliam S t o d d a r d (late c a p t a i n a n d a s s i s t a n t q u a r t e r m a s t e r )
P e l i e f of G e o r g e S. W r i g h t a d m i u i s t r a t o r , &,c
P e l i e f of h e i r s of S. L a m b
P e l i e f of E d w a r d H C a l v e r t
.
.
P e l i e f of J o h n M. M c P i k e
P e l i e f of J o n a t h a n D . H a l o
P e l i e f of J o h n F L J o n e s
.
.
P e l i e f of Tieirs a t l a w &c Col W^illiam N o r t h e d o ' e
P e l i e f of E a s t T e n n e s s e e U n i v e r s i t y
Total pay requisitions

'

.
•.

'.

7, 000 66
'

8,237,135 16

350, 307 96

32
40
96
75
32

344 25

299 13
. 125,053 86

2, 755, 515
30, 655, 301
1,159
30, 437
11,185
7, 000
24, 674
125, 053
150, 000

14,166 72
225 75
128 50
26, 479 21
10, 881 79
24,375 56

150, 000 00

.

• ^

..

. .
55, 244, 864 74

•

•

2, 495, 912 34

5, 944 49

971, 833 84

$767
130
20, 250
11,711
360
2, 758
490
1,.500
19, 473
3, 425
4,000
1.50
7, 500
13, 500

43
24
46
96
11
00
69
86
00

39
00
00
96
00
45
00
00
.50
00
00
0000
00

97, 016 30

77,016 30

58,815,571 71

w
•—I

P E P CONTPA.
0

JD

.

i

<xi

©*

P
T h e n u m b e r of c r e d i t a n d c o u n t e r r e q u i s i t i o n s d r a w n b y t h e S e c r e t a r i e s of W^a.r
a n d of t h e I n t e r i o r on s u n d r y i^ersons i n f a v o r of t h e T r e a s u r e r of t h e U n i t e d
S t a t e s , is 737.
.
"
On whicli r e p a y m e n t s i n t o t h e T r e a s u r y Avere m a d e d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r endingJ u n e 30, 1874' t h r o u g h t h e T h i r d A u d i t o r ' s Office, as follows
;.. -




$2, 854, 367 86

©
©

p
a
C
O

cn
3
^

>

c!
U
l-H
H
O

H
©
S C
O

C
O
©

ft
©

<

It
o
H

u
H

$183, 523 43 $988, 533 40

S5.65'66

$23, 300 20

$4, 0.50, 296 .55

at)

262

REPORT

ON

THE

FINANCES.

The number of requisitions paid through this Office during the previous
fiscal year was 4,654, amounting in the aggregat;e to $61,693,170.22. The
number issued during thefisoal year ending Jun^ 30,1874, as shown above,
was 6,090, an increase of 1,436 in nuraber, but aggregating $2,877,598.51
less in amount than in the previous year.
•
'
QUARTERMASTER'S

DIYISION.

The accounts of Quartermasters cover a wide range of moiiey and
property responsibility. The former embrace^ disbursements for barracks and quarters, hospitals, store-houses, offices, stables, and transportation of Army supplies; the purchase 6f Army clothing, camp
aud garrison equipage, cavalry and artillelry horses, fuel, forage,
straw, material for bedding, and stationery; ;pay.meiits o'f hired men,
and of '^per diem" to extra-duty men; expenses incurred in the
pursuit and apprehension of deserters; for tlie burial of officers and
soldiers; for hired escorts, expresses, interpreters, spies and guides;
for veterinary surgeons, and medicines for hoijses; for supplying posts
with water; and for all other proper and auth|brized outlays connected
with the movements and operations ofthe Ariinj^ not expressly assigned
to any other Department.
'
Property purchased with the funds of the j Quartermaster's Department is accounted for upon '^ returns" transmitted through the Quartermaster-General to this Office, (with the exception of " returns of clothing, camp and garrison equipage," which conje under the supervision
of the Second Auditor,) showing that the disposition made of it is in
accordance with law and Army Eegulations. !
! cn

«

Money accounts.

i ^

Supplemental settlements.

1^
ll
©

a

il •

1

!l

11 •

©
PI

o

<5

1,148
3, 972

Peported during the fiscal year
lii^inaiuing unsettled
,

...

$3, 4.58, 919 06
16, 385,105 25

1 279
^,476

81

1,779

$12, 554, 278 64

5,120

Total

Total

il

1

On hand per last report
Peceived during the fiscal year

iPH

19, 844, 024 31

l4, 755

81

1,779

12, 554, 278 64

4,077
1, 043

16,134, 713 94
3, 709, 310 37

J4, 473
1 282

81

1,779

12, 554, 278 64

5,120

19, 844, 024 31

14, 755

81 • 1,779

12, 554,278 64

J_
Signal a c c o u n t s .

Total.

c ©
p >

On h a n d p e r last r e p o r t
P e c e i v e d (iuring t h e fisca,! y e a r .
Total
P e p o r t e d d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r .
Pemaining unsettled
Total.




497

$192, 650
i 265, 025

1,436
10, 855

$3, 651,.569 27
29, 204, 409 81

! 457, 676 13

12, 291

32. 855, 979 08.

! 320, 632
i 137, 043

10, 9.53
1,333

29, 009, 625 13
3,816,353 95
32, 855, 979 08

THIRD AUDITOR.

263

JSTumber of letters written, 11,597; average number of clerks employed, 59^-; number of pages of manuscript WTitten, 14,535; number
of vouchers examined, 338,657; number of claims under eight-hour law
examined, 2,132—involving $62,664.26.
It will be observed that during the year 10,953 settlements were
made, viz:
.,..,.
' 4, 077 quartermaster acconnts, (regular settlements,) i n v o l v i n g . . . . . . $16,134, 713 94
1,779 quartermaster accounts, (supplemental settlements,) involviug. 12,554,278 64
46 signal accounts, (regular settlements,) involving
.^...
320, 632 55
. 5,902 money settlements, involving
'
29, 009,625 13
4, 473 returns quartermaster stores, regular settlements.
81 returns quartermaster stores, supi)lemental settlements. .
. 497 signal-property settlements.
5, 051 property settlements.
10,953
and tbat 1, 043 quartermaster accounts, involving
and
13 signal accounts, involving
Total, 1,056 accounts, involving . . . „

. . . . $3,709,310 37
137, 043 58
3,846,353 95

aud 282 returns of quartermaster stores remain on hand. Only 7 of
the quartermaster accounts on hand were received prior to July 1,1873.
The regular work of the division has been kept up to its full standard notwithstanding the fact that-the average number employed in the
division since March last was 55, and during the year 5%, being ten
less than for the fiscal year immediately preceding.
In addition thereto, a large amount of labor has been performed in
the adjustment of claims of employes of the Quartermaster's Department, for extra compensation, as authorized under section 2 of the act
of Congress approved May 18, 1872. (Chap. 172.)
The tabular statement below exhibits the number and amountof such
claims received and the findings thereon, although, on account of their
peculiar nature, and the difficulty experienced in obtaining definite information from many of the officers under whose direction the services
Avere rendered, without which a proper adjustment could not be made,
it affords only an imperfect idea of the whole labor performed in coniiection with them.
Number and amouut of claims of employes of the Quartermaster
Department, for additional compensation under section 2 of the act of
Congress approved May 18, 1872, (Chap, 172,) and the findings thereon :
Received, 8,160 claims, amounting to
Adjusted. 2,132 claims, amounting to
Under examination, 1,062 claims, amountingto
Disallowed, 4,966 claims, amounting to

$296,142 11
|62, 664 26
43,500 82 ,
189,977 03
296,142 11

' The above claims were prepared and presented by officers of the
Quartermaster's Department, in compliance with instructions of the
Quartermaster-General, and at the request of the accounting officers of
the Treasury.
A large amount of work has also been done in furnishing the Secretary, of the Treasury with the proper data, to enable him to comply
with a resolution of the House of Eepresentatives, dated February 14,
1874, calling for information as to the amounts paid to '' land-grant railroads" for transportation furnished the United States. A statement
showing the amounts paid during the years 1872 and 1873 has already
been forwarded to him, and a further one covering the remainder of the



264

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

period mentioned in the resolution, it is hoped, will be completed by the
first of next December.
SUBSISTENCE DIVISION.

This division examines the accounts of all commissaries and acting
commissaries in the Army, whose duties are to purchase the provisions
and stores necessary for its subsistence, and to see to their proper distribution. These commissaries render monthly money-accounts, with.
Xiroper vouchers for disbursements of the funds intrusted to them ;
together with a provi{?ion-returu, showing the disposition of provisions
and stores j)urchased or derived from other sources. These accounts
are received through the Commissary-General of Subsistence, and are
examined and audited in this division. The money accounts and
vouchers, together with a certified statement of the result of said examinations, are then referred to the Second Comptroller of the Treasury for revision. Upon their return from the Comptroller, with the
settlement approved, the officers are notified of the result, and called
upon to adjust or explain any omissions or errors that may have been discovered. The money and provision accounts, together with the vouchers
and papers belonging thereto, are then placed in the settled-files for
future reference, and remain permanently in the custody of this Office.
Money-accounts.
ISTumber.

o cn

Amount involved.

On hand, per last report, June 30, 1873
Peceived during the fiscal year

331
1,085

$674. 479 26
4, 282, 214 60

328
1,085

Total
:..:
Audited during the fiscal year

1,416
1,011

4, 956, 693 86
4,166, 446 16

1,413
1,113

Pemaining on hand June 30,1874

Number of vouchers examined, 51,240; number of letters written,
1,134; numberof ^'differences" written, 673; number of ''queries''answered, 887 ; average number of clerks, 6.
ENGINEER

DIYISION.

This division is employed in the examination of the accounts of the
officers and agents of the Engineer Department, who, under direction
of the Chief of Engineers of the Army, (except the Superintendent of
the Military Academy at West Point, whose disbursements are directed
by the inspector-general,) disburse moneys out of the various appropriations—now 248 in number—made from time to time by Congress,
for works of a public nature, which may be classed under the following
general heads, viz:
The purchase of sites and materials for, and construction and repairs
of, the various fortifications throughout the United States.
-Construction ahd repairs of roads, bridges, bridge-trains, &c., for
armies in the field.
Surveys on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.
Examination and surveys of the northern and western lakes and
rivers.
Construction and repairs of breakwaters.
Eepairs and improvement of harbors, both on sea and lake coasts.



I

THIRD

265

AUDITOR.

Improvement of rivers and purchase of snag and dredge boats for
the same; and
The expenses of the Military Academy at West Point.
The transactions of the division for the fiscal year are shown by the
following statement, viz:
Accounts.
N u m b e r of
q u a r t e r s . A m o u n t involved.
On h a n d , p e r l a s t r e p o r t .
Peceived during the year

.-

.
•..

62
179

..

.'

.

.

.

.

Total

, '^8, 362. 072 62
4,841,286 88

241

Peported during the year
P e m a i n i n g on h a n d J u n e 30 1874

13, 204, 359 50

182
59

Total

$4, 595, 777 47
8, 608, 582 03

241

:

13,204,359 50

Iiumber of letters written, 2,910.
One hundred and ninety-eight ''eight-hour" claims have been settled,
involving $7,271.98. Also a large amount of miscellaneous work under
this law hasbeen done, but so varied in character that it w^oiild be
difficult to report in detail.
STATE WAR-CLAIMS DIVISION.

This division has in charge the settlement (under the various acts and
resolutions of Congress relating thereto) of all claims of the several
States and Territories for the costs, charges, and expenses properly
incurred by them for enrolling, subsisting, clothing, supplying, arming,
equipping, paying, and transporting their troops while employed by
the Government iu aiding to suppress the recent insurrection against
the United States; also, of all claims arising out of Indian and other
border invasions.
Original account.
Is^o.

Amount.

4
15

$280,160 68
1, 314, 233 95

19
9

1, 594, 393 63
603, 633 09'

P a l a n c e r e m a i n i n g on h a n d J u n e 30,1874. 10

No.

Amount.

57
5

| 4 , 751, 873 91
49, 090 01

70

189, 208 78

is'

,4, 800, 963 92
. 88, 933 70

70
70

89, 208 78
89, 208 78

990, 760 54

On h a n d J u n e 30 1873
P e c e i v e d d u r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r

Total
P e p o r t e d d n r i n g t h e fiscal y e a r

M o n t a n a warclaims.

Suspended account.

No.

Amount.

4, 702, 030 72

Number of letters written, 94; number of clerks employed, 3.
CLAIMS DIVISION.

I

This division has the settlement of claiais of a miscellaneous character arising in the various branches of service in the War Department,
and growing out of the purchase or appropriation of supplies and stores
for the Army ; the purchase, hire, or appropriation of water-craft, railroad stock, horses, wagons, and other means.of transportation; the
transportation contracts of the Army;, the occupation of real-estate for
camps, barracks, hospitals, fortifications, &c.; the hire of employes;




266

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

mileage, court-martial fees, traveling expenses, commutations, &c.;
. claims for compensation for vessels, railroad-cars, engines, &c., lost in
the military service; claims gowing out of the Oregon and Washington
war of 1855 and." 1856, and other Indian wars; claims of various
descriptions under special acts of Congress; and claims not otherwise
assigned for adjudication.
-MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS.
N u m b e r . A m o u n t claimed. A m o u n t allowed.
On h a n d J u l y 1 1873..
Peceived during t h e year
Total.
Disposed of

'.

,.
.
'.'...'.
.

•:......:..•:...
1

O n h a n d J u l y 1, 1874

'...
..

..::

• 8, 0.52
• • 8, 938

•*$4,'658,284 32
t4, "140, 250 64

16; 990'
5,419

• • 8, 798, 534 96
t4, 077, 976 09

11, 571

$2, 681, 530 22

§4,720,558 87

• * This is the amount claimed iu 6,.561 cases, thearaounts claimed in the others (1,491) not being stated.
t Tliis is the amount claimed in 8,596 cases,.the amounts claimed in the others (343) not being stated.
'"X This is the amoiint claimed in 4,898 cases, the amounts claimed in the othei'S (521) not being stated.
§ This is the amount claimed in 10,259 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (1;312) not being
stated.
,
..
•

It will be seen that 2,922 more claims were filed during the present year
than were received during-the-preceding fiscal year; that 669 claims
more were disposed of, and that the aggregate amount allowed fell
short of that of the year preceding in the ,sum of $222,550.85. Three
thousand and seventy^six lettervS' were written; showing an increase of
404 letters in the correspondence.; ,
Oregon and Washington Indian war-claims. 1855- -'56.
Amount
claimed.

No.

On h a n d J u l y 1, 1873
P e c e i v e d d u r i n g t h e year.'.

,
'.

*s$69, 664 61
t5, 296 57

..

932
117

74, 961 18
XI, 386 84

•815

Total
D i s p o s e d of d u r i n g t h e y e a r . . . . .

825
107

Amount
allowed.

§67, 574 34

On b a n d J u l y 1, 1874 •.

•.
S13, 774 30

*T]iisis the amount claimed in 425 cases, the'amounts claimed in the others (-IOO) not being stated.
tThis is the amouut claimed in 22 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (85) not being stated.
X This ia the amount claimed in 57 cases, the amouuts claimed in the others (60) not being stated.
§ This is the amouut claimed in 390 cases, the amounts claimed in the others (425) uot beiug stated.
Lost vessels, cJ-c, act March 3, 1849.

•

Nd.

On h a n d J u l v 1,1873 . .-.
Peceived during the year

.'..'..'.
..

.

.

68
8

Amount
claimed.

Amount
allowed.

^556, 480 00
191, 287 00

Total
D i s p o s e d of d u r i u g t h e y e a r

76
,5

747, 767 00
.37,470 63. , $28, 526 19

Ou h a n d J u l y 1, 1874

71

710,296 37

HORSE-CLAIMS DIVISION.

This division is engaged in settling claims for compensation for the
loss of horses and equipage sustained, by officers or enlisted inen while



\

THIRD

267

AUDITOR.

MU the military service of the United States; and for the loss of horses,
mules, oxen, wagons, sleighs, and harness while in said service by impressment or contract.
The number of claims received and docketed during the year is 448,
in which the aggregate amount claimed is $100,114.9-4. The number
settled and finally disposed of during the same period, (including those
received prior to, as well as during, the year,) is 403, in which the aggregate amount claiined is $76,350.54, and on which the aggregate amount,
allowed,is $55,668.89.
There have been during the year 635 briefs made; 2,888 claims
examined and suspended; 1,917 letters received and docketed, and 5,841
letters written..
,
The folio wing, table presents the condition of the. business of this
division :

Claims on hand July 1, 1873
Claims received du ri n '^ the year
Claims reconsidered during the year
Total
Claims allowed durino" the year
Pejected on same
'
Amount claimed
Claims disallowed durin*'' the year

Amount.

•

.

.

.

...

.

:,
.

.

.

326 $55, 663 89
7, 513 07
77

No.

Amount.

5,004
448
19

No.

$919,037 58
100,114 94
.3, 705 00

5,471

1, 022, 857 52

• 63, 131 96
13,168 58
403

Claims on hand July 1, 1874

PENSION

76,350 34

5,063

Deduct as finally disposed of during the year

946 506-98

DIVISION.

This division has charge of the settlement of all accounts which, pertain to the payment of Arm^^ pensions.
The Commissioner of Pensions reports monthly to this Office the name
of each pensioner, with the ntimber of certificate, rate and date of commencement ofeach pension granted; also, all transfers of pensioners from
one agency to another.
"
These reports are recorded on roll-books prepared for each agenc.y, in
which are noted opposite the name of each pensioner any increase or
reduction of rate, or date of termination of pension by death or remarriage, &c., as may be necessary.
Pension agents forward their accounts at the end of every month
directly to this Office, where they are audited as soon as practicable, and
reported to the Second Comptroller for revision. Upon his approval,
they are returned and placed in the settled files of this Office, the agents
being duly notified of any errors existing in them, and required to correct them. The accounts of each fiscal year are audited separately, and
unexpended balances in the hands of agents at such periods are to be
deposited in the United States Treasury, as provided for under act of
July 12, 1870.
In case any defalcation occurs, the transcripts and papers necessary
for suit are prepared and sent to the Second Comptroller, who, by law,
directs the prosecution.
Under act July 8,1870, pensioners are paid quarterly, instead of semiannually, as heretofore, which more than doubles the labor in the examinatiou and auditing of the accounts. Act February 14, 1871, granted




268

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

pensions to the survivors of the war of 1812 who served sixty days, and''
to widows who married prior to the treaty of peace.
The number who have received pensions under this act is 24,695.
The act of June 6, 1866, which granted disabled soldiers fifteen,
twenty, and twenty-five dollars per month, was amended by that of
June 8, 1872, so that they are now entitled to eighteen, twenty-four, and
thirty-one and twenty-five hundredth dollars per month. The number
receiving this increase is 23,568.
Nuniber of loensioners added to the roll during the year.
Invalids
Widows and otbers
W a r 1812

-

:
•

:

5,514
2, 966
1.376

Number of increases.
Invalid
Widows and otbers

8,063
12,9,32

Number of pensioners on the roll.
Invalid, (act July 14,1862)
AVidows and otbers
War 1812, (act February 14,1871)

102,457
107,361
22,280

Nuraber of pensioners who bave received artificial limbs
Number of pensioners wbo bave received commutation iu lieu tbereof

1, 4.38
9,995

Amount appropriated to pay Army pensions for the fiscal year ending
June 30,1874.,
'
$30,300,000 00
Amount drawn from the Treasury to pay pensioners during tbe fiscal year 30, 298,226 99
Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the appropriation

1,733 01

Amount paid to pensioners during the fiscal year ending June 30,1874,
as appears from tbe accounts rendered, and more fully from tbe tabular statement herewith
30, 050, 852 41
Unexpended balance to be refunded and deposited

247, 374 58

The following tabular statement shows the amount of business disposed of during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1874:
No.
A c c o u n t s on h a n d J u n e 30, 1873
A c c o u n t s received d u r i n g t h e y e a r
Total

561
864
:

Accounts reported during the year
Accounts remaining unsettled
Total

Amount.
$16,150,003 20
•29, 708, 332 26

1, 425

45, 858, 335 46

786
639

$26 431 956 71
19, 426,.378 75

1,425

45, 858, 335 46

The accounts on hand unsettled are divided as follows, viz :
Accounts belonging to the fiscal year ending June 30, 1873
Acounts belonging to the fiocal year ending June 30,1874
Total .
Pensioners recorded, increased, and restored
Pensioners transferred
Changes and corrections . i
Pension-vouchers examined



44
595
639
21,590
1, 628
2, 544
753,379

THIRD AUDITOR.

269

Payments entered
751,799
Pages of abstract added
1
. 27, 540
Pages of difference and misceUaueous copied
4,185
Copies of surgeon's certificates of examination furnished Commissioner of
Pensions
2, 069
Number of letters received
.•
'.
4,968
Number of letters written
4,772
Number of letters copied
1,762

Twenty-four special settlements were made, not included in the
tabular statement above, being supplemental to accounts previously
examined.
Act February 2, 1872, provides that where checks, issued by a disbursing-officer, have been lost or destroyed, and remain outstanding
more than six months, the claimant can obtain payment from the Treasury on filing bond of indemnit^^
The number of settlements of this class during the year was 114,
amounting to $5,202.
In addition to auditing accounts and attending to current duty, it
became necessary to copj^ and transcribe the names of all pensioners
into new books, Accordingly, 120 new books, of 300 pages each, were
prepared, and arranged for transferring these names. It required considerable time and labor to space-off and divide the books for the different agencies. So far, 73 books have been copied, involving the transscribing of over 140,000 names.
The force of this division duriug the year averaged fifty-two clerks
and two copyists.
The following tabular statement exhibits the amount paid at the several agencies during the year ending June 30, 1874:




Statement exhihiting the amounts paid at tlie several .x^ension agencies during the year ending June 30, 1874.
O

state.
Arkansas
.'
Connecticut
California
Do
District of Columbia .
Delaware
Do
Indiana
Do
Do
Ulinois
Do
Do
Do
Do
Iowa
Do
Do
Do
Kansas
Kentucky
Do
Do
....
Do
Louisiana
Maine
--Do
Do
Massacliusetts
Do
Maryland
Michigan
Do
Missouri
Do
Minnesota
Mississippi
New Hamj)shire
Do'
New York
Do
Do
Do
Do




Agency.
Little Pock
.
Hartford
San Prancisco"..
...do
AVashington
Wilmington
...do
Port Wayne
Indianapohs
Madison
Chicago....
— do
Quincy . . .
.
Springfield
Salem
Des Moines
Pairfield
Marion
Dubuque
Topeka
Lexiugton
— do
...do
Louisville
New Orleans
Augusta
Bangor
Portland
Boston
Pitchburgh
Baldmore
Detroit
Grand P a p i d s . . .
Macon City
Saint Louis
Saiut Paul
Vicksburgh
Concord
Portsmouth
Albany
Canandaigua....
Brooklyn
...do ."
,..
New York City.

Agent.
A. D. Thomas
D. C. Podman
Henry C. Bennett
Heur'y P . Peed
David C. Cox
Ed. D. Porter
Daniel Burton
Hiram Iddings
W. H. H.Terrell
Mark Tilton
David Blakely
Ada C. Sweet
Benjamin M. Prentiss
Jesse H. Moore
W. E. McMackin
P . P . Gue
DavidB. Wilson
Joseph B.. Young
Jacob Pich
Charles B. Lines
A. H. Adams
D. S. Goodloe
J. A.Prall
Pobert M. Kelly
P. H. Isabelle
Franklin M. Drew
S. B. Morison
George L. Beal
Charles A. Phelps
J. W. Kimball
Harrison Adreon
Samuel Post
Thaddeus Poote
Wilham C. Ebert
A. P . Easton
Ephriam McMurtrie
John T. Paukin
Alvah Smith
D. J. Vaughan
S. H. H. Parsons
L. M. Drury
John Hall.'.
James McLeer
S. B. Dutcher

Artificial
limbs.

$352 25
50 00
5U 00
1, 900 00
75 00
75 00
1.50 00
477 00
403 00
475 00
50 00
300 00
775 00
153 27
450^ 65
425 00
22 00
50 00
115 64
75 00
50 00
353 50
150 00
1, 225 00
150 00
150 00
1, 325 00
75 00
775 00
650 00
50 00
275 00
654 00
477 40
75 00
100 00
175 00
1, 975 .00
804 20
450 00
4,175 00

Invalids.
126, 021 19
139, 680 94
10, 204 83
19, 627 51
259,956 44
16, 760 08
13, 885 04
187, 594 04
483, 565 03
139,456 61
289, 639 33
103, 210 72
180,048 72
230, 237 90
246, 452 94
119,035 41
147,541 01
74, 398 27
69, 907 80
153,211.50
14, 019 78
31, 635 58
13, 857 69
126. 516 27
30, 850 42
164, 707 62
141,433 12
177, 167 76
436, 906 23
57, 581 20
135, 050 48
390,514 93
101, 255 21
134, 098 83
183, 958 21
129, 276 39
4, 020 66
17.1, 363 67
38, 707 57
574, 917 47
568, 018 82
1, 808 23
95. 003 77
440, 580 80

War of 1812. Widows and
others.
$24, 860 16
22, 977 01
1, 661 33
3, 433 39
181, 506 24
1,150 93
1, 301 33
16,158-28
65, 905 45
26, 055 39
21, 395 16
6, 231 33
21, 714 29
25, 408 48
27,186 51
12, 994 58
15, 774 82
8, 584 77
6, 784 00
7, 876 24
14, 378 63
23, 621 05
11,948 25
56, 678 21
39,212 01
26, 023 45
11, 357 86
26, 938 66
37, 792 40
3, 945 07
42, 830 79
60,. 820 72
10, 236 53
34,138 71
53, 799 65
6, 835 46
26, 897 29
24, 082 65
6, 870 .39
• 124, 332- 88
116,091 04
1,212 46
34, 859 44
76,155 38

$72,
,,588 62
300,
,213 10
, 672 35
,
6,
,
16, 834 10.
i 106 45
,
275,
,,006 15
23,
; 909 01
,
22,
.
,
253, 484 00
831 ,945 72
,511 39
287,
!
,
323; 783 42
\,
94, 605 19
i 410 55
,
228,
I
,
359, 349 22
;
,
646, 202 38
i
,
188, 569 01
,237 59
216,
;
,
102, 929 25
.
,
11.5, 141 65
151 ,575 37
,961 07
54,
,177 25
120,
,438 56
51,
'
,
357, 610 43
i,678 74
39,
;
,
226, 023 78
I
,
219, 276 46
251 ,412 18
1,169 02
769,
\,
93, 367 28
!
,
193, 11.1 77
'
,
617! 961 74
: 571 78
,
142,
,429 00
256,
,623 54
416,
,
173: 378 89
23 ,387 05
,490 95
237,
,040 72
73,
,
827. 173 49
: 620 50
713:,
,960 52
1
1 263 30
,
166,
! 864 70.
,
573,

Total.
$123, 469 97
. 463,223 30
18, 588 51
40, 000 00
718, 469 13
40, 992 16
38, 170 38
457, 386 32
1, 381 893 20
453, 426 39
640, 297 91
204, 147 24
430, 473-56
615, 770 60
919, 995 10
321 049 65
379, 978 42
18.5, 934 29
191, 883 45
312, 778 75
83, 434 48
175, 433 88
77, 244 50
541, 153 41
109, 891 17
417, 979 85
372, 217 44
455, 668 60
1, 295,192 65
154, 963 55
371, 318 04
1, 069,947 39
254, 113 52
424 941 54
' 655,035 40
309, 968 14
54 980 00
433, 542 27
118, 793 68
1,.528, 903 84
1, 393,534 56
•4, 931 21
296, 576 51
1, 099,775 88

O
H
O
H

w

o
t=j
Ul

l^ew J e r s e v
- .
N o r t h Carolina
Do
N e w Mexico
Ohio
Do
Do
Ore<^on
Pennsylvania
Do
Do
P h o d e Island
Tennessee
Do
Vermont"
Do

..
. •,..
.... -

. .- -. .
,
...

.,
,

,...
,
,

, , , . . . , . ^,

"West V i r g i n i a
Wisconsin
Do
Do
W ashin o^ton T e r r i t o r y
^

...
.,

Total




.

.
,

Trenton
,
Paleigh
Omaha
...do
Santa P6
...
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus.
Oregon City
Philadelphia
.
do
.'...,..,
Pittsburgh
Providence
Kjjoxville
, . . . Nashville
,
. Burlington
Montpelier
.
Pichmond
Wheeliug
, . , , . . L a Crosse
Milwaukee
Madison
Vancouver
,

,

,.,
,,
,

^
,
,
,
,,

James P. Pusling . . . . . . . . . . . .
Charles H, Belvin
S. S. C a l d w e l l
C. L . B r i s t o l
E. W . Little
Charles E. B r o w n .
S e t h M. B a r b e r
John A. Norris
,
Henry W arren
H . G . Sickel
D. P . B.Nevin
James McGregor
Charles P . Brayton
D a n i e l T, B o y n t o n
W. y . Elliott
'.
John L. Barstow
Stephen Thomas
Andrew Washburn
T.M.Harris
J o h n A. Kellogg
Edward Ferguson
Thomas Peynolde.,
,
S. W , B r o w n

477 15
125 00

1, 692 45
875 00
613 60
3, 076 65
1,100 00
175 00
75 00
433
13
200
275
100
401
100

84
40
00
00
00
50
00

233, 086
11, 936
21, 3.54
14, 727
3, 230
490, 428
324, 550
293, 459
6, 340
997, 652

52
23
27
16
47
30
68
45
68
35

373, 878
51, 744
68, 951
36, 366
92, 867
124, 095
23, 669
152, 756
64. 004
173, 474
124, 673
3, 605

53
41
92
98
07
91
81
03
94
64
70
36

3.0, 271 '50 10,821, 646 "43

43, 770
40, 672
1,060
984
96
72, 393
52,1.58
.59,137
3, 205
72, 692
40, 548
43,190
5, 993
47, 999
78, 265
36,316
19, 816
140, 946
. 53, 715
-8,185
13, 537
14, 319
238

06
82
27
00
00
34
99
79
32
77
61
51
33
47
76
49
79
29
12
94
83
97
00

345, 622
54, 931
9,051
9,179
3, 173
758, 507
419,765
506, 519
4, 827
16, 506
1, 437, 976
512, 709
105, 475
296, 479
145, 581
140, 634
• 161, 748
44, 045
276, 977
101, 245
303, 427
210, 877
1, 565

66
48
43
37
53
14
31
71
29
03
67
68
54
90
57
45
53
32
45
36
14
28
26

2, 204, 919 14 16, 994, 015 34

622, 956
107, 665
31 465
24, 890
6 500
1,323 021
797, 349
864 730
14 373
1, 089, 937
1, 478, 525
930,878
163, 388
413,506
260, 214
250,251
305, 674
208, 861
488, 723
173, 536
495,841
349,970
5, 458

39
53
97
53
00
23
98
55
29
80
28
72
28
29
31
85
63
42
60
24
11
95
62

30, 050, 852 41

a
t—(

H
O

272

E E P O R T ON THE FINANCES.
COLLECTION DIVISION.

-

The following statement shows the work of this division in the months
named:

s

1
1

Month.'

Special cases.

'So
o

P ®
CD

ft

la
>

'©

P

i

^^

.

O

'S

a

.o
r:i
o

IS.
g
ro

a

1 •

1873.
July
August
September
October
November
December

.

208
321
211
107
161
86

215
279
330
222
165
165

4,997
679
700
376
2,407
2,543

333
312
423.
360
384
317

600
102
'82

..

338
201
263
213
289
203

283
220
307
231
151
177

6,835
2, 066
933
533
355
582

• 565
425
406
314
246
391

792

2, 601

2, 745

23, Oil.

. . .

'.

i
1

2

94
135
54
54
66
56

1874.
January
February
March
April
IMav June

•

8
.

...
,

Total

. .

4,476

27
16

126
94
88
155
131
84

"i

91
99
233

BOUNTY-LAND AND PENSION DIVISION, WAK 1812.

5

1 137

.

During the fiscal year ending SOth June, 1874, 2,823 claims for pension, under act of Gongress approved February 14, 1871, have been examined in connection with the rolls of war of 1812, and properly certified
to the Commissioner of Pensions for his action. Four hundred and
twelve claims for bounty-land have been examined and reported to the
Commissioner of Pensions. Four hundred and sixty-three letters have
been written on subjects relating to the w^ar of 1812, and the war of
the Eevolution.
There are ten lady copyists assigned to this OfSce, and tbey have
been usefully einployed. The number of pages of difference copied was
4,089, miscellaneous papers 7,870, letters recorded 5,593 j total, 17,552;
an increase of 2,679 pages over the numberof last year. Numberof
pages compared, 20,359 5 differences registered, 1,045; miscellaneous
papers registered, 1,331; names indexed, 38,637.
The new settlements placed on file during the fiscal year number
10,612, being 386 more than were settled in the year previous. Of these,
7,980 were settlements certified by the Second Comptroller, and 2,632
were settlements of property-returns. The files are generally in good
condition, but some of the pension abstracts, from frequent examination, are becoming somewhat mutilated.
The business of this Oifice has been regularly performed by the clerks
employed, and it gives me pleasure to commend them for their general
faithfulness and fidelity in the discharge of the duties assigned to them.
Eespectfully submitted.
ALLA]:^!" EUTHEEFOED,
Auditor,
Houo BENJAMIN H. BPISTOW,
Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORT OF THE FOURTH AUDITOR.

18 P

/






REPORT
THE FOURTH AUDITOR OF THE TKEASURY.
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

Fourth Auditor^s Office, October 17, 1874.SIR : In accordance with your request, that I should forward to you
the annual report of the operations of this Office for the.fiscal year ending June 30, 1874, I have the honor to transmit the following tabular
statements, in which is embraced the information desired : ,
1.—PAYMASTERS^ D I V I S I O N , ^aEORGE L. CLARK, CHIEF.
Statement of accounts, including marine, received and settled in the Paymasters' Division from
July 1, 187.3, to June 30, 1874, with the amount of cash dishursed in those settled and the
number of letters received and avritten in relation to the same.
PAYMASTERS' AND MARINE ACCOUNTS.

Date.

July...
August
September
October .
November
December
January
February .'
March.."
April
May
June.-..

1873.
....
.....
.-

Accounts Accounts Letters Letters
received. settled. receiveid. written.

Cash disburse. ments.

117
135
98
100
137
94

161
220
184
148
167
99

$393, 939 97
286, 402 36
939, 333 49
1, 019, 565 58
1, 874, 859 99
2, 819, Oil 51

169
126
•128
154
155
147

177
118
155
170
183
192

1, 896, 756 56
2,689,861 91
1,996,197 17
1, 868, 030 38
1, 966, 610 04
3, 307, 258 24

1874.
•,

Total.....

1, 560

1, 974

21, 057, 827 20

Number of unsettled accouhts on hand July 1, 1873, 11; number of
unsettled accounts on hand June 30,1874, 69,; number bf cash vouchers
Wamined, exclusive of pay and mechanics^ rolls, bills of exchange, &c.,
"^3,865; number of accounts prepared for suit and sent through th^ Secnd Comptroller to the Solicitor of the Treasury, 9 s average number
J clerks employed i n the division, 14e




276

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

II.—PENSION DIVISION, RICHARD GOODHART, C H I E F .
Statement shoiuing the amounts dishursed,at the different agencies on account of Navy xjensions
and the tvorlc performed hy the I^avy Fension Division during the fiscal year ending June
30, 1874;
PENSION ACCOUNTS.

o ro

SP.

Location. ~

w C^
r2 «•

S ro+=
^

B fe ^
40
249
294
39
37
12
15
3
6
8
13
204
58
33
12
21
15
19
I
27
93

Baltimore, M d
Boston, M a s s
Brooklyn, N . Y . . . ,
Cincinnati, Ohio . .
Chicag6, 1 1 1 . . . . . . .
Detroit, M i c h . . . . .
H a r t f o r d , Conn
Louisville, K y . . 1-.
Milwaukee, Wis ..
N e w Orleans,. L a . .
Pittsburgh, P a . . . .
Philadelphia, P a . !
P o r t l a n d , M e . . . . -.
Portsmouth, N . H .
P r o v i d e n c e , P.. I . .
Richmond, V a
San F r a n c i s c o , Cal
Saint Louis, M p . ,.
Saint Paul, Minn-.
Trenton, N. J .
Washington, D.C.
Total

1,199

85
340
419
113
,29
30
35
919
11
35
331
90
35
32
40
7
11
5
52
156

125
.589
713
152
66
42
50
12
25
19
48
535
148
68
44
61
22
30
6
79
249

1,884

$26, 773 10
101, 763 45
126, 972 25
23, 993 27
12, 003 03
6,132 68
9, 975 74
3, 452 63
2,701 54
6, 050 51
14, 526 41
P 8 911 93
',
23,411 52
9.541 68
.6, 212 55
10,-787 22
4,091 40
- 8, 890.26
• 778 52
16, 407 68
51, 812 77

3,083

555,195 14

During this time there were 236 accounts received; 314 accounts
settled, involving an expenditure of $660,392.66. Also there were 491
letters received and 506 letters written. Average number of clerks
employed, IJ.
III.—^RECORD DIVISION, CHARLES COOK, CHIEF.
Statement of correspondence of the Fourtli Auditor^s Office for the fiscal year ending June SO,
1874, and the work of the Eecord Division.

03,;-3

a o

' Date.

ro

gfl
0 3 <P

CJ

o o

1873.
July
August
September ,
October . . . :
November..
December .
1874.

1,209
1,080
1,038
1,097
1, 085
1,300

1,407
1, 263
1, 438
1,791
1, .394
1, 428

1,275
1,326
1,266
1, 528
1,567
1,282

915
775
870
739
770
868

567617
96
692
376

January
February..;
MaTCh . . . . .
April-...
May
June .
..

1,524
],465
1,543
2,307
1,831
2,010

1,673
1, 592
1, 7.55
2, 383
1,957
2, 371

1,173
563
245

934
920
1,100
1, 535
1,214
1,251

232
2,001
3,037
.3, 948
3,552
1,071

Total.

17,489

10,217

11,891

39
39
28
59
10
39/^

/

20,452

Average number of clerks employed, 4.



1^075
1,137
170
1,080
779
415

16, 457

3, 26&I
6, 303
6,569
5,971
1, 811
29, 459

FOURTH

277

AUDITOR.

IV.- -PRIZE-MONEY AND MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION, BENJAMIN P . DAVIS,
CHIEF.
Stateinent of the loorlc xierformed hy the Frize-Money and Miscellaneous Division during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1874.
Prize-lists.

r6
o

Date.

o

3

p

1-1

a

•i

§
o

1

Letters.

§
>

o
a
o

3
<1

cn

1

1

217
238
224
246
243
435

239
268
348
803
452
445

o
yA

Claims.

?
a

1

ro
a
'3 •
= a
=

'Xi

o
o
.a
Q

®

B

^ a
a o
a g
o

i

cn
To

a
o .

o
ro

A m o u n t paid.

,

S3

o

P

¥

1873.
July
August
September
October....
November
December

1
14

$1, 586 77
93, 423 04

20
102
489
290
43
69

18
95
•487'
272
26
13

$2,823 96
6, 709 "27
31,'900 97
" .33,912'13
2, 864' 11
285 79

24
24
35
43
17

19
13
8
14
13

00
69
71
.53
62
46

23
20
19

10
14
oo

240, 023 24

205

113

)

1874.
January . . .
February
March
April
May
June

1
14

.

.

Total

44
44
1

88

104

103

467
509
481
541
445
575
621, 601 04 1,, 074 1,058
775
821
961 1,183

35
105
27
6
111 ' 29
2.5
244
33
223
449
583

716, 610 85 5,806 7,242 2,285 1,50,9

14,508
2,441
3,174
3, 319
8, 523
129, 559

In addition to the above, this division is charged with the duties of
preparing tabular statements and reports called for by Congress and
the Secretary of the Treasury; keeping a record of appointments, resignations, removals, and absences; receiving and distributing the stationery used by the Office, and the payment of salaries to employes.
Average number of clerks employed, 2J.




278

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

v . — G E N E R A L CLAIM DIVISION, ROBERT KEAROIJ, CHIEF.
Statement of the worlc performed hy the G-eneral Claim Division for the year ending June
30, 1874.

> c n ^

S ro
ftp

H^

Date.

Csi )_^

rJ

^'d
1873.
On hand June 30
July
August
September
October
November
December

197
133
117
140
155
148
176

190
128
177
152

$15, 711 22
9, 730 16
11, 688 80
16, 261 63
10,116 97
18,395 15

518
396
516
411
402
425

177
171
195
161
134
138

147
185
200
186
144
134

27, 805 87
31,581 75
18, 850 64
23, 598 13
16, 802 99
20, 342 82

473
508
664
.581
457
404

2,042

1,868

220, 886 13

1874.
January
February
.March
April
May
June

,

Total.....:...

446

26

Average number of clerks employed, 8.
VL—NAVY-AaENTS' DIVISION, WILLIAM F . STIDHAM, CHIEF.
Statement of the ivorlc performed hy the Nd^ij-Agents' Division for the fiscal year ending
Jtme 30, 1874.
Date.

Accounts
received.

Accounts
settled.

Amount involved.

Letters Letters
received. written.

1873
$1, 383, 566
176, 053
2, 082, 373
. 432, 984
1, 229. 070
159, 068

•July
August
September
October
November
.December

21
23
22
12
65
87

163
1.50
126
138
118
113

154
104
140
139
126
87

179
169
162
281
210

158
149
1.38
239
159
182

1874
January
February
March
April
May
Julie

,.

Total




662, 078 79
608,119 26
643, 3.57 62
2, 900, 931 36
145, 284 54
270,117 51
10, 693, 005 38

1,775

FOURTH

279

AUDITOR.

ALLOTMENT ACCOUNTS.
ro

•bC^

f.*

«g

|§l

o

o o

<

Date, 1873.

'^r-:

S'O

:5 1

Jnly
August
Septemher .
October
November ,
December..

31
31
24
52
118
52

Total

313

80
42
78 ^
63
44
30

<a ca

Date, 1874.

.11 5 a

-I
176
58
92
70
30
55

January...
February.
March ."..
April
May
June

77
53
43
• 85
108
75

Total

339

Statement ofthe amounts paid hy Navy agents for allotments during theyear 1873.
NewYork
Boston
Pbiladelpbia
•
Wasbington
Baltiraore
...•
PortsDnonth...
SanFrancisco

•.

$69,412
44,631
43,155
21, 002
20,178
4,529
1,489

,
.....:
•.
:
:

Total.

72
00
75
50
00
00
00

204,397 97

Accounts remaining on hand June 30, 1874, 10 ; number of voucbers
examined, 25,894. Average number of clerks employed, 6.
VIL—BOOK-KEEPERS' DIVISION, PARIS H. FOLSOM, CHIEF.

ro
• a

ro
fl
o

.2

*ro

'B

•_ro

Date.

c^
9

?l .

2

1
ro

•

cn

1

o

o
6
1873.
Julv
August
September...
October
November .
December
1874.
.January
.irebruary
March
April
May
June
,

li

repay-requisins, araount.

Statement of the ivorlc performed in the Boolc-lceepers' Division for thefisoal year ending June
30,1874.

5•

• 1

0?
"fl
fl

>

SI
fl
cno

1

g
&
(^

S252, 051
289, 699
538,108
1,941,211
122, 499
408, 349

56
62
96
40
24
53

149
123
133
122
100
112

242
200
268
207
248
274

171
71
88
58
111
41

43
79
33
35
39
39

246
165
126
62
56
36

34
17
75
55
65
21

22
15
26
23
20
8

641,784
742,980
819,190
815, 988
392 201
637, 734

65
90
85
73
87
25

162
132
146
169
135
158

253
189
210
244
23)
274

43
51
102
63
75
, 7-,

86
46
62
105
47
45

T o t a l . : . . 1, 983 38, 807, 099 15

199

7, 601, 801 56 1,641 2,840

. 951

6.59

193
1.59
135
157
158
194

4, 310, .338
2, 979, 474
2, 812, 971
2, 946, 372
1, 817, 420
2,123, 960

a
fl

fl

i1

1

<

8
22
16
19
12
8

176 $3, 799,145 16
136 1,819,986 88
151 5, 315, 830 92
129 3,027,451 15
181 3, 060, 584 51
214 4, 796, 562 86

s
1 1
o

i

l§l1

fl
c

55
54
83
60
66
62

1
4
7

1
4
7

3

3

63
94

3
4
15
1
9

3
4
15
1
9

38
34

848

40

40

4.52

Average riumber of clerks employed, 5^.
The system and order in the arrangement of files and papers which
prevail in the Office, the modes of transacting business, the keeping of
the books, the promptitude with which claims and accounts have beensettled, and the amount of work accomplished, may be mentioned with




280

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

satisfaction. 1 am pleased again to acknowledge the co-operation I have
received from Mr. Moore, my chief clerk, and from other able and faithful clerks.
In consequence of the reduction made in the clerical force of this
Office at tiie last session of Congress, 1 have been obliged to make a corresponding reduction in some portions of the work; but have, neverthe- .
less, endeavored to keep up with the current business. I must also say
that this Office, in common with others in the Department, suffers for
want of sufficient room. In consequence of having lately been deprived
of one room, the Record Division is very inconveniently divided 5 it is
severed from its necessary files, and its efficiency is impaired.
I have the honor to be, sir, with esteem and respect, very respectfully,
your obedient servant,
STEPHEN J. W. TABOE,
Auditor,
Hon.

B. H.

BRISTOW,

Secretary of Treasury.




REPORT OF THE FIFTH AUDITOR,







REPORT

THE FIFTH AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, F I F T H AUDITOR'S O F F I C E ,

Washington, October 31, 1874..
S I R : Herewith are submitted tabular statemicnts of the operations of
this Office for the year ended June 30,1874. There have been five thousand nine hundred and thirty-five letters written, two hundred and
eleven thousand one hundred and forty-nine vouchers examined, and
thirteen thousand seven hundred and sixty-eight accounts adjusted.
Very respectfully,
J. H. ELA, Auditor. .
Hon.

B. H. BRISTOW,

Secretary of the Treasury.

A.—Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad for salaries, contingencies, and loss hxj
exchange, from Jnly 1, 1873, to June 30, 1874, as shown hy accounts ad/justed in this office.
Mission.

No.

Salary.

Contingencies.

L o s s b y exchange.

Total.

ARGENTINE R E r U B L I C .

1

^4, 395 83
2, 791 67

1140 93
39f 52

7, 187 .50

180 45

12, 000. 00
1, 500 00
1, 350 00

905 31
568 91

14,850 00

1, 474 22

16, 324 22

7, 500 50

555 81

8, 055 81

12, 000 00
1, 800 00

401 18

13, 800 00

T . 0 . Osborn, n i i n i s t e r

401 18

14 201 18

6, 862 50

245 05

7,107 55

9,912 90

1,185 07

$7, 367 9:>

AUSTRIA.

3
4

John Jay, minister
J. F . Delaplaine, charg6
J r D e l a p l a i n e s e c r e t a r y of legation

^.

BELGIUII.

6

J. Ii. Jones, minister

_..

BRAZIL.

7
8

K. C. S h a n n o n , s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n

BOLIVIA.

<
)

J . T . Croxton, l a t e m i n i s t e r
CENTRAL AMERICA.

10

George Williamson, minister




$177 84

11,275 83

28 i

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
A.—Statement of the exxienses of all missions abroad, cfc.—Continued.
Loss b y exchange.

$10,000 00

,$699 45

!$461 02

7, 836 95
2, 608 69
326 09

500 00

1, 752 24
370 06

500 00

2,122 30

13, 394 03

7, 500 00

469 75

50 75

8, 020 50

7, 500 00

361 37

188 69

8, 050 56

7, 500 00

Mission.

Contingencies.

10,771 73

No.

130 77

569 70

8, 200 47

Salary.

Total.

CHILI.

11

C. -A-i liOgau m i n i s t e r

.

.

.

.

.

$11,160 47

CHINA.

I''
13
14

F . F . L o w , l a t e rainister
S. W . W i U i a m s , cliarge
S. W . W i l l i a m s , s e c r e t a r y a n d i n t e r p r e t e r

COLOMBIA.

15

W^illiamL. Scru""gs, m i n i s t e r

...

DENMARK.

16

M. J . Cramer, minister
ECaADOR.

17

E . I i . W^in"" m i n i s t e r

18
19
20

E. B. W a s h b u r n e , m i n i s t e r
W . Hoffinan s e c r e t a r y of legation
G. "Washburne, a s s i s t a n t s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n . .

FRANCE.

17, 500 00
2, 625 00
2, 000 00

' 4, 451 .51
430 44

22,125 00

4, 887 95

17, 500 00
2, 625 00
2, 091 00

4,031 56
166 44

22, 216 00

4,198 00

17, .500.00
1, 674 90
3,139 53
2, 000 00

10, 805 51

24, 314 43

10, 805 81

2, 649 45
4, 850 54

94 46

7, 499 99

94 46

7,594 45

7, 500 00

104 92

. 7, 604 92

7,500 00

192 60

7, 692 60

12, 000 00
1, 800 00

488 51

13, 800 00

488 51

11,423 80
2, 255 98
1, 875 00

276 85

382 G7
82 59
59 65

15,554 78

276 85

524 31

27, 012 95

GERMAN E M P I R E .

21
90

0'-{

G e o r g e Bancroft, l a t e m i n i s t e r
A . Bliss, s e c r e t a r y of legation
N . F i s h a s s i s t a u t secretai'y of legation

...

•

7 51
7 51

26, 421 51

GliEAT BRITAIN.

24
25
26
27

K o b e r t C. Scheuclc, m i n i s t e r .
•
B e n i a m i n Moran s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
B e n i a m i n M o r a n chai'ge
Win. H . Cheesebrough, s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n . . .

35 120 24

GREECE.

•28
29

J . M . F r a n c i s late minister
J . M. Read, m i n i s t e r

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS..

30

U A. Peirce minister

.

.

HAYTL

31

E . D . Bassett, m i n i s t e r
ITALY.

3«>
33

George P . Marsh minister
G e o r g e W . AVurts, s e c r e t a r y of l e g a t i o n
•

14,288 51

JAPAN.

34
35
36

John A. Bingham, minister
D . W . S t e v e n s , seci'etar'y of le<^ation
N . E . liice, i n t e r p r e t e r




16, 355 94

FIFTH

285'

AUDITOR.

Statement of the expenses of all missions abroad, ^-c.—Continned.
No.

Salary.

Missiou.

C o n t i n g e n - L o s s b y excies. •
change.

Total.

LIBERIA.

37

/.

$4, 248 54

$4, 000 00

$248 54

12, 000 00
1, 800 00

1,664 06

13, 800 00

1, 664 06

7, 500 00

486 80

$10 26

7, 997 06

4, 840 35

19 10

110 80

4, 970 25

18, 942 30
2, 088 35
1,773 98

2, 784 56

22, 804 63

J . M. T u r n e r , m i n i s t e r

2, 784 56

MEXICO.

•

33
30

J

W Foster minister

15,464 06

NETHERLANDS.

40

Charles T. Gorham, minister
PARAGUAY AND URUGUAY.

41

J . L . Steven.s, m i n i s t e r
•RUSSIA.

42
43
44

M Jewell

minister

25, .589 19

SPAIN.

45
46
47
48

7,166
5, 733
1, 500
789

8, 680 97
727 26
41 36

79 23

9,449 59

. 1, 058 91

25, 697 50

7, 500 00

A. A. Adie, charg6

66
33
00
01

15,189 00

Caleb Cnshin<^ m i n i s t e r

2, 003 35

292 07

9, 795 42

898 28
81 40

SWEDEN.

49

C. C. A n d r e w s , m i n i s t e r
SWITZERLAND.

50

•

7, 500 00.

H. Rublee, minister

7,821 72

321 72

TURKEY.

51

2, 908 25

2, 000 00

67,138 69

10, 456 04

.5,992 01

386, 659 51

60,592 17
266, 913 27

20, 000 00

313, 528 81

47 79

209 24

7, 500. 00

G e o r g e H . Bolvcr m i n i s t e r
UNITED STATES DISPATCH-AGENT.

52
Grand total

22, 000 00

UNITED STATES BANKERS, LONDON.

53
54

Clews H a b i c h t Sc Co l a t e b a n k e r s
M o r t o n R o s e &. Co b a n k e r s

•

327, 505 44

REMARKS.
9. Accounts of new minister to Bolivia not yet received.
21. Inclusive of exjienses for San Juan treaty.
24. Salary of private amanuensis included.
34. Salary while receiving instructions, and for transit, included.
42. Salary while receiving instruciions, and for transit to post, included.
45. Expenses of cable-telegrams included.
46. Salary.while receiving'instructions, and for transit, included.
49. Inclnsive of expeuses attending coronation of King.
.52. Accounts since February, 1874. Suspended by State Department. Contingent expenses for four
raonths estimated.




286

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

-Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, and loss by-exchange, for tlie fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Consulates, con&ular Salary and
emoluments.
agencies, &c.
Acapulco
•
Tehuantepec a n d
Salinas Cruz.
•Aguas Calientes
Aix-la-Chapelle
• Cologne
Algiers

$229 74
95 64

2, 866 84
1, 880 78
750 00

1,950 50
1,905 00
24 50

77 69
349 73
500 00

77 69
349 73
14 63

Amoy
Amsterdam
Nieuwediep.
Ancona
Antigua
Antwerp .•
Apia
Archangel
Asuncion
Aspinwall
Aux Cayes
Bahia...
Bangkok
Barbadoes
St. Lucia . . .
St. Vincent .
Barcelona
Tarragona ..
Barmen..'.'

3, 640
1, 000
135
112

2, 500
500
1, 000
3, 000
2, 500
9
25
1, 710
323
2, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
87
54
19
00

Crefeld
Dusseldorf.
Basle
Olten
Batavia
Scerabaya..
B a t h u r s t . . . . ..
Bay of Islands .
Beirtt

2,
1,
2,
2,
1,

48
96
00
38
00

Bremen
Bremerhaven .
Brindisi
Bristol
Gloiicester




Remarks.

Loss.

$2, 000 00
95 64

Alicante
Amapala
Amoor River .

Aintab
Aleppo
Alexaudretta...
Caipha
Damascus
Haifa aud Acca.
Homs and Hama
Latakia
Marash
Sidon
Tarsus and Mersina
Tripoli
Tyre
Belfast
Ballymena
Belize
Bergen
Berlin
Bilbao
Birmingham.:
Leicester
Redditch
Kidderminster..
Wolverhampton
Bogota
Bombay
Bordeaux
Pan
Bayonne
Boulog'ue
Bradford

Fees.

98
00
33
32

"sg'ss'

3, 500 44
141 45

027
019
000
009
000

40 37
" 3," 423'91'

7 00

• 4, 272 11
805 39
1,036 82
215 39
2, 550 98
9 00
25 87
.330 92
323 19
6,591 50
3,
1,
2,
2,

649
080
606
347
633

00
50
01
50
26

No returns.
Inclusive of instruction aud transit salary.
Returns for first and secoud quarter.s 1874
notreceived.
Returns for first and second quarters 1874
not received.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salai-y.

1, 699 49
1, 267 57
135 33
112 32

2, 500 00
750 00

$21 80

No returns.
Returns for second quarter 1874 not received.
No returns.
Do.

696 14

73 75

Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.

"49'76

Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000 per annum.

3 44
"1456

40 37

No returns.
Do.
Inclusive of consular clerk's salary and
instruction and transit salary.
No fees.
Do.

'226'56'

7 00

No returns.

'16*56"

No fees.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

15
2
2, 228
300
781
298
4, 238

00
00
26
25
22
50
04

15
• 2
10,140
300
781
298
7, 925

00
00
91
25
22
50
25

2, 500
1, 631
1,141
1, 067
583

00
25
50
50
50

9, 381
1,631
1,141
1,067
583

04
25
50
60
50

789
2, 000
170
21
1, 802
3, 963

45
00
50
00
79
34

789
5, 863
170
21
36
16, 269

45
60
50
00
00
00

3, 505
1,554
1,741
1, 728
501

43
93
02
36
01

3, 644
1, 554
41
1, 728
501

00
93
02
36
01

.

Inclusive of transit salary.
No fees received at agencies.
Inclusive of clerk-hire and oflQce-reut.
No returns.

Do.

Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.
Accouuts for contingent-expenses suspended.
Inclusive of instruction aud transit salary.
6 30

Do.

i

FIFTH AUDITOR.

287

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cfc.—Continued.
Salary and
emoluments.

Consulates, consular
ageucies, &c.

$2, 328 25
3, 099 00

Brunswick
Brussels

31 00

Bucharest
Buenaventura

27 50

Buenos Ayres
Cadiz
San Lucas
Cairo

3, 231
. 1, 500
34
5, 191

Calcutta
Akyab; -.
Madras
Bassein
Coconado
Chittagong
Maulmain
Rangoon
Callao
Mollendo and Islay.
Camargo . . .
Canea
Canton
Cape Haytien
Gon aives
Port de Paix
Cape Town '
Port Elizabeth... .
Cardiff
N ewport
Swansea
Llanelly
Milford Haven
Carlsruhe
Kehl
Mannheim
Carrara.
Carthagena, U n i t e d
States of Colombia.
Carthagena, Spain
Ceylon
Chemnitz
•
Chihuahua
Chin Kiang
Christiania
Christiansand
Ciudad Bolivar
Clifton
St. Catharine's
Coaticook

$2, 328 25
3, 099 00

5, 044 18
1, 601 19
34 15
315 11

5, 000 00
• 172 49
. 12 50
83 60
15 00
28 57
256 63
214 14
3, 971 14
267 33
301 07
1,000 00
3, 697 80
1, 000 00
374 52
96 50
1,000 00
756 29
2,197 91
324 97
243 12
45 00
26 28
2, 500 00
486 50
348 50
693 50
500 00

4, 762 84
172 49
12 50
83 60
15 00
28 57
256 63
214 14
2, 868 46
267 33
301 07
4 00
1,133 21
651 57.
374 52
96 50
536 .53
756 29
2,197.91
324 97
. 243 12
45 00
26 28
2,727 00
486 50
348 50
693 50
716 11

750
2, 663
454
2, 625

441
6, 020
454
587

84
00
00
32

250 02
8 00
300 00

.

Lineborough
Stanstead
Georgeville
Hereford
Potton
Cobija:
Colonia
Pavsander
Constantinople
Rustchuk
Copenhagen
Coquimbo .
Caldera
Cordoba .'1
Cork.
Waterford
Corunna
Curacoa
Bonaire
Cyprus
Demerara
;
Denia
Dresden
Dublin
, Limerick — :




The fees in excess of $2,500; balance by
clerk-hire and ofiice-rent.

31 00
27 5 0 .

4L
00
15
57

00
04
00
00

Remarks.

Loss.

Fees!

50
00
00
50
00
19
63
99
00
00
12
00

1,009
276
265
208
180
84
6
105
. 558
1
384
. 28

50
00
00
50
00
19
63
99
92
00
12
00

2, 000
39
87
, 2, 500
109
1, 000
2, 000
48
3, 820
2, 266
18

00
29
54
00
98
00
00
05
73
30
48

1,375
39
87
2, 638
109
31
1,722
48
5, 534
2, 266
18

02
29
54
13
98
58
91
05
00
30
48

45 00

Returns incomplete.
Inclusive of consular clerk and ti'ansit
salary.
1

Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.
Returns incomplete.
99 60
222 19

Half salary from May 7 to June 30.

32" si'

No returns.
Returns for second quarter 1874 notreceived.
6 53 Inclusive of transit salary.
129 09

1, 781 50
201 25
5, 645 25

1, 009
276
265
208
180
84
6
105
3, 000
1
384
28

$9 00

250 02
8 00
300 00

1, 500 00
201 25
2, 000 00

Returns for fourth quarter 1873 and first
and second quarters 1874 not received.
Inclusive of instruction and tran.sit salary.

Half salary for second quarter 1874 unadjusted.
Returns for first and second quarters 1874
not received.
Inclusive of additional salaiy allowed
when fees reach $3,000 per annum.

Returns incomplete.
244 09
Do

Returns for first and second quarters 1874
not received.
11 68

Do

No fees received at agencies.

Inclnsive of office-rent and clerk-hire.

288

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, <f'C.—Continuecl.
C o n s u l a t e s , consular
agencies, &c.

Salary and
emoluments,

Fees.

$2, 000 00
1, 077 75
1, 722 02
4 00
429 16

$7,148
1, 077
93
4
429

28
75
75
00
16

Dundee
Aberdeen
Elsinore
Fano
Falmouth
Scilly I s l a n d s .
Fayal.
Flores
Graciosa
St. G e o r g e ,
Serceira
St. M i c h a e l
Florence
Cagliari
Foo-Chow
Fort Erie
,
P o r t Stanley and
St. T h o m a s .
P o r t Rowan
F r a n kfort-on-th e-Main
Mayence
Funchal
Gaboon.,....,
Galatza
Gaspe Basin ..
Geneva
Genoa;
Milan
Turin
Ghent
Gibraltar
Glasgow......
Greenock.
Goderich
Stratford .
Gottenburg...
Grand Bassa..
Guadaloupe
Basse T e r r e .
Guatemala
Guayaquil

Remarks.

$2 06
'45'53'

I n c l u s i v e of i n s t r u c t i o n a n d t r a n s i t s a l a r y .
N o fees.

7.50
106
15
44
53
124
2,174
66
3; 500
1, 500
929

00
01
00
00
17
24
75
95
00
00
00

360
106
15
44
,53
124
2,174
66
1,113
1, 881
929

35
01
00
00
17
24
45
95
47
25
00

585
000
708
500
000
2

00
00
00
00
00
00

585
2, 826
2,135
210
43
2

00
03
50
06
55
00

1
1, 500
1,500
259
98
223
1, 500
3, 715
760
1,500
2,116

00
00
00
50
75
00
00
01
86
00
22

1
1,291
1, 639
259
98
223
1, 041
9, 793
760
769
2, 891

00
75
29
50
75
00
56
64
86
87
50

26 02

291 03

I n c l u s i v e of c o n s u l a r c l e r k ' s s a l a r y .
64 49
R e t u r n s for first a n d second q u a r t e r s 1874
not received.
9 22
3 41

I n c l u s i v e of t r a n s i t salaries.

No returns.
R e t u r n s for t h i r d
ceived.

26 02

q u a r t e r 1873 n o t

re-

893 62
479 50
562 50

Guaymas
Guerrero
Hakodadi
Halifax
Hamburg
Harl)urg
Kiel
Cuxhaven..
Lubec
Hamilton, B e r m u d a —
St. George's
,
Hamilton, Canada
.Paris
Guelph
Hankow
Kiu-Kiang
Havana
•
San J u a n de los
Rem.edios.
Gibara
Nuevitas
Havre
Dunkirk
Rouen
Brest
Dieppe
Honfleur
Cherbourg
Helsingfora
Wvborg
Hobart Town

1,000
100
2, .500
2, 000
2, 000
1.633
104
56
39
2,105
927
2, 983
1,416
1, 362
3, 000
392
8) 000
1, 457

Hong-Kong .
Honolulu . . .
Hilo . . . .
Jerusalem ..

3, 500 00
4, 000 00
6 33
1, 813 84




Loss.

00
00
00
00
00
15
50
80
50
70
93
51
00
50
00
11
00
08

100 61
7, 255
328
211
201
41
10
8
30
1
•15

44
47
50
50
34
.50
00
74
87
99

N o fees.
N o r e t u r n s from agencies.
R e t u r n s for second q u a r t e r 1874 n o t r e ceived.

479 .50.
294 00
867
100
281
3, 795
8,731
1, 633
104
56
39
.2,105
927
3, 595
1, 416
1,362
1,160
392
24, 732
1, 457

23
00
82
46
75
15
50
80
50
70
93
25
00
50
54
11
29
08

191 48
2 60

Retui-ns froni a g e n c i e s n o t r e c e i v e d .

I n c l u s i v e of c o n t i n g e n t e x p e n s e s .

I n c l u s i v e of c o n s u l a r c l e r k ' s s a l a r y .

100 61
6,394
328
211
201
41
10
8
30
1
15

N o fees.
I n c l u s i v e of i n s t r u c t i o n a n d t r a n s i t s a l a r y .

84
47
50
50
34
.50
00
74
87
99

10, 850 63
3, 598 86
6 33
102 70

R e t u r n s for first a n d second q u a r t e r s 1874
not received.

176 52

I n c l u s i v e of i n s t r u c t i o n a n d t r a n s i t s a l a r y

i

FIFTH AUDITOR.

289

B,^—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cfc—Contmned.Consulates, consular Salary a,nd
emoluments,
agencies, &c.
Kanagawa
Kingston, Jamaica...
St. Ann's Bay . . .
Mon tego Bay
Falmouth
Black River
Port Antonio
Savaunah la Mar.
Grand Caymans..
Old Harbor
Kingston, Canada
Bell ville .;
Napanee
Pictou
Ganauoque
Laguayra
,
Laguna
Lambayeque
Lanthala
La Paz, Bolivia
La Paz, Mexico
San Jos6
La Rochelle
•Cognac
Limoges
Rochefort......:.
La Union
Leeds
Huddersfield
Hull
Leghorn
Leipsic

Loss.

Fees.

$2, 917 45
2, 213 73
186 40
157 36
260 48
70 40
289 22
110 24
58 82
103 84
1, 633 33
1, 398 66
1.039 00
356 50
37 25
1, 691 58

$4, 879 08
2, 624 73
186 40
1.57 36
260 48
70 40
289 22
110 24
58 82
103 84
870 04
1, 479 50
1,039 00
356 50
37 25
1, 078 01

78 50
1, 000 00

78 50
31 50

603 76
15 00
1,614 66
1, 689 00
9R6 50
25 26.
4.58 48

603
15
323
1,689
936
25
458

76
00
77
00
50
26
48

1, .500 00
3, 000 00
2, 996 36
1, 900 00.
375 00
8, 500 00
2, 058 76
7, 500 00

6.53 40
167 29
320 92

23, 868 99
1,167 29
320 92

Manchester
Manila
Manzanillo, Mexico .
Maracaibo ..
Maranham..
Marseilles ..
Cette . . .
Toulon .
Maruata....
Matamoras .

\

Santa Cruz Point .
Matanzas
Cardenas
Sagua la Grande..
Mazatlan
Medellin
Melbourne
Albany
Port Adelaide
Merida
Progreso
Messina
Mexico
Mier
Minatitlan
Monterey
Montevideo

19 F

i

Do.
12 00

Do.
Do.
Do.

15 00
401 16

1, 451 50
8, 949 00
2, 614 50
1,762 24
15 24
232 75

73 16

37, 737 85
3, 097 53
45, 574 70

15 00
401 16
1, 451 50
2, 750 00
2, 213 65
1, 500 00
15 24
1, 830 16

Do.
No-returns.

3,181 81
1, 900 00
182 53

Liverpool
St. Helen's .
London
Ramsgate...
Dover
Londonderry . . .
Ludwigshafen ..
Lyons
§t. Etienne .
Malaga
Almeria
Malta

$392 56
5 57 Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.

2, 378 90
7,169 53

Leith
Dunfermline.
Lisbon




964 69
1, 054 95
2, 895 44
906 47
40 00
2, 081 82

964
260
3,180
906
40

69
25
93
47
00

869 56

2, 000
2, 897
2,167
2, 067
834

00
25
30
65
05

2, 620 00
5, 774 70
5, 350 96
3, 290 16
834 05

4, 000
141
72
799
425
1,500
1, 000
415
616
141
1, 000

00
65
27
45
01
00
00
.0
5
21
50
00

3, 295 96
141 65
72 27
799 45
425 01
2, 432 47
246 00
415 .50
616 21
141 50
2, 035 08

Remarks.

Inclusive of consular clerk's salary and
• additional compensation allowed "when
fees reach $3,000 per annum.
Inclusive of contingent expenses.
For third quarter 1873 only; returns for
• other quarters nof received.
Inclusive of consular clerk's salary.
No fees.

88 73

Inclusive of consular clerk's salary, $750.

'i6"76'

"66'40 Inclusive of $480.98, vice-consul's salary in

1869.
Inclusive of transit salaries.
No returns from agencies.
Returns for second quarter 1874 not- received.
Do.
..
Inclusive of instruction salary. • •
Inclusive of transit salary.
No returns.
Inclusive of $81.82, salary of late consul in
1868.
- •
Inclusive of instruction and transit salary..

No returns.

No returns from agencies.

290

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, fc.—Continued.
Consulates, consular Salary and
Ifcmoluraents.
agencies, &,c.

Fees.

$4, 000 00
983 00
401 51
121 .50
312 50
227 50

4,241
-983
401
121
312
227

1, 500 00
.3, 000 00
1, 504 07
71 35
92 50

1, 299 00
897 30
198 00
71 35
92 50
1, 304 44
1,501 7L
337 23
57 09
118 45

Montreal
Lachine
Hemmingford
Huntington
Three Rivers
Sorel
Moscow;
•
Mozambique
Munich
Nagasaki
Nantes . . :
St. Nazaire
....
L'Orient
Naples
Nassau,NewProvidence
Dunmore Town
Green Turtle Bay..
Mathewtown
Governor's Harbor.
San Salvador. ....'..
Newcastle-upon-Tyne..
Carlisle
Sunderland
Hartlepool
New C.hwang
Nice
Mentone
Monaco
Ningpo
Nuevo Laredo
Nuremberg ..,
Bamberg
Oajaca
'...

Remarks.

49
00
51
50
50
50
N o returus.

1, .500 00

2, 000
337
57
118

00
23
09
45

Do.
$23 84
260 73
35 04
20 82

No fees.
Do.

1, 500 00
724 50
654 22
51 18
1.33 09
1, 500 00
151 40

1,304
724
654
51
133
397
151

50
50
22
18
09
50
40

7.58 18
932 50
4,173 22

758
932
5,141
1,084
28

IS
50
00
50
00

1, 084 50
28 00
2, 000 00

Odessa.
Nicolaieff......
Port Baltic
Patt and Fife-.
Rostoff
Taganrog
Omoa and Truxillo.

.22 50
57 50
1, 000- 00

Oporto
Osaka and Hiogo .
Ostend

1,500 00
3, 000 00
16 50

' Padang.

Loss.

171 72

Do.
Inclusive of clerk-bire and office-rent.
Returns for second quarter 1374 not received.
273 17
N o fees.

Do.
Do.

86 85

22 50
57 50
4 50
1C8 39
2, 089 09
18 50

Returus of fees for first quarter 1874 not
received.
92 63
121 64

Returns for first and second quarters 1874
uot received.
Returus for third quarter 1873 and first
eiuarter 1374 not received.
Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.

86 85

Palermq^
Trapani
Girgenti
Man sala
Licata
Panama
Para
,
Paramairibo
Paris
Lille
Calais
,
Passo del Norte.
Patras

1,746 04
116 55
58 68
56 02
31 98
3v317 31
1, 000 00
1, 375 74
6, 944 39
804 50
316 70
.500 00
132 50

Payta
Pernambuco
Ceara
,
Maceio
Paraiba
Pictou, Nova Scotia.

500 00
2, 000 00
32 87
44 53
375 00

33T 15

Arichat
Cape Causo
Cow Bay
Glace Bay ..
Guysborough . . .
Lingan
North Sydney ..
Port of Sydney .
Pug wash

17 . 0
5
38 00
404 67
796 92
88 00
175 92
56 75
295 25

17 50
88 00
404 67
796 92
8 8 00
'
175 92
56 75
295 25

513 . 0
5
1,269 92

513 50
19.00

Piedras Niegras
Piraeus




1, 653 16
116 .55
58 63
56 02
31 98
2, 234 05
2, 299 23
1, 375 74
48, 935 50
804 50
316 70
55 00
132 50
313
1,283
32
44

Inclusive of consular clerk's salary.

Returns for fourth quarter 1873 not re««ived.

31
13
87
53

No fees.
No returns from Pictou or its agencies
since September 30,1873.

No fees.
69 10

Ihclusive of iiastractiou and transit salary

i

FIFTH AUDITOR.

291

"B:—'Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to offieers, cfc.—Continued.
C o n s u l a t e s , Consular
a g e n c i e s , &c.

Salary and
emoluments.

Sv^ra.
Plymouth
Brixham
Dartmouth
,
GuerusQy
Jersey
:
P o r t Louis, M a u r i t i u s . .
Port Mahon
P o r t Said
P o r t Sarnia
London
Port Stanley
Prague
Prescott
Ottawa
Brockville
Morrisburg
Cornwall
P r e s i d i o del N o r t e
Prince Edward Island.
Cascumpec
Georgetown
,
Summerside
P u e r t o Cabello
Quebec
Rheims
,,
R i o G r a n d e do S u l
Rio H a c h a
R i o de J a n e i r o
Rome
Rosario
Rotterdam
Scheidam
Flushing
Sabanilla
Samana
San A n d r e s
San B i a s
San D i m a s
Sau J o s 6 a n d C a p e St,
Lucas.
San J o s 6
P o r t Limon
Punta Arenas...
S a n J u a n del N o r t e .
S a n J u a n del S u r . . .
San J u a n , P o r t o R i c o . . .
Aquadilla
• Arecibo
Fajardo
Guayam a
Mayaguez
Naguabo
Ponce...
Viegues .:
San S a l v a d o r
La Lihertad
S a n t a Cruz,AVest I n d i e s
Fredericksted ...
Santa Martha
Santander
Gijon
Santarem
Santiago, Cape V e r d e
S a n t i a g o de C u b a —
Baracoa
Guantahamo
Manzani^llo
S a n t a G'ruz
Santos
SevUle
Seychelles
Shanghai. . . i
Shetlield
Nottingham
Sierra Leone
,
Singapore...
Peuang .




Loss.

Fees.

$67 50

$67 50

139 00

Remarks.

139 00

Returns for second quarter 1874 not received.
N o fees.

16
18
22
2, 833
1, 500
2, 000
1,500
1, 798
1, 208
1,462
1, 500
1, 968
1,167
879
618

00
00
00
43
00
00
00
75
33
23
00
50
08
00
50

16
18
22
367
44
11
1,116
1, 798
121
1, 520
1,157
1, 963
1, 349
879
618

00
00
m
25
86
00
50
75
82
50
00
50
00
00
50

1, 500
47
24
136
1,143
1, 240
1, 647
1, 502
17
6, 000
2, 422
621
2, 000
1, 795
40
500

00
50
77
00
52
.38
00
78
22
00
77
71
00
67
42
00

832
47
24
136
1,143
695
1, 647
635
17
8,112
847
621
2, 090
1, 795
40
2,192

89
.50
77
00
52
23
00
58
22
97
75
71
93
67
42
57

$92 67
85 08
121 86
27 91

I n c l u s i v e of i n s t r u c t i o n a n d t r a n s i t s a l a r y .

I n c l u s i v e of t r a n s i t s a l a r y .
Partial returns.

""2'82

No returns.
3 35

S a l a r y for second q u a r t e r 1874 unadjusted.,
I n c l u s i v e of I n s t r u c t i o n a n d t r a n s i t salary..
lOa 71

I n c l u s i v e of c o n s u l a r c l e r k ' s salar3^

"'g'eo'
No returns.

172 S I
156 98

172 87
156 98

N o r e t u r n s f o r second q u a r t e r 1874'receiyed..
No returns.

78 00
6 00

R e t u r n s for first a n d second quarters^lCT^
not received.
No returns.
Do.

6 00

2,,016
2, 000
2, 000
136
415
193
545
1,365
236
1,132
25
1.52
106
1, 500
214
401
80

25
00
00
44
53
n
15
50
62
59
14
00
00
00
57
78
41

357 62
640 64
796 37
136 44
415 53
193 11
.545 15
1, 365 50
236 62
1,132 59
25 14
1 5 00
.2
106 00
108 42
214 57
401 78
80 41

750
2, 500
1, 083
482'
139
28
196
508
1, .500
5, 680
4, 309
2,116
78

00
00
72
90
61
49
81
97
00
60'
29
98
22

78 16
812 07
1, 083 72
482 90
139 61
28 49
196 81
508 97
155 76
8, 946 29
7, 209 00
7, 377 50
• 78 22

73 93

2, 500 00
179v29

1, 673 10
179 29

21 01

N o fees.
No returns..

67 19
I n c l u s i v e of c o n s u l a r c l e r k ' s s a l a r y .
I n c l u s i v e of clerk-hire a n d ofiice-rent.
R e t u r n s for first a n d second q u a r t e r s 1874
not received.

292

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries and emoluments to officers, cfc.—Continu'ed
Consialates, consular Salary and
emoluments.
agencies, &c.
Smyrna
Sonneberg
Sonsonate
Southampton
Portsmouth
Weymouth
Cowes
Spezia
St. Bartholomew
St. Catharine's
St. Christopher
St. Domingo....
Puerto Plata
Azua
.:
St. Helena
St. John's, Canada
St. John's, Newfoundland.
St. John, New Brunswick.
St. Stephens
St. Andrew's
Frederic ton
,
St. George
McAdara Junction.
Miramichi ..•
St. Marc
St. Martin
St. Eustatius
St. Paul de Loando
St. Pierre, Martinique..
Fort de France
St. Pierre. Miquelon ..
St. Petersburg
St. Thomas
Stettin
Konigsburg...
Dantzig
Memel"
Swinemunde
Stockholm
Stuttgart
Swatow
Sydney

Fees.

$2, 000 00
3, 8^5 77
367 34
2, 000 00'
35 75
13 50
17 00
1, .500 00

$1, 406 71
4, 944 00
367 34
593 09
35 75
•13 50
17 00
5 50

1, 500 00
225 19
1, 500 00
907 90
113 48
1, 500 00
1, 500' 00
740 17

48 76
225 19
659 62
907 90
113 48
633 60
1, 737 00
740 17

4, 040 50

5, 645 58

1, 072 99
472 29
342 00
298 94
240 75
60 38
376 07
275 65

1, 072 99
472 29
342 00
298 94
240 75
60 33
376 07
275 65

1, 000 00
1, 034 92

1, 034 92

193 87
2,000 00
4, 000 00
1, 000 00
201 60
. 89 24
21 00
16 00
373 75
813 39
3, 500 00
938 36

193 87
547 50
2, 038 92
356 90
'201 60
89 24
21 00
16 00
373 75
533 00
456 48
938 36

1, 016 53
500 00
1, 000 00
1, 000 00
2, 000 00
1, .5ap 00
567 80
3, 000 00

1,016 53
277 29
409 23
304 49
27 24
424 42
567 80
13 01

295 11

295 11

NcAvcastle
Tabasco
Tahiti
Talcahuano
Tamatave
Tamnico
Tuxpan
Tangier
Taranto
'Tenerifte
• Lanzarotte
Grand Can ary.
Orotava
Palma
Tetnan
"Tien-Tsin
CheFoo
Toronto

3,500 00
537 36
2, 000 00

351 56
537 36
3,136 50

Cobourg
Port Hope
AVhitby
Trieste
Fiume
'Trinidad de Cuba.
Cienfuegos
'Trinidad, (island)..
Tripoli

987 00
2, 061 50
482 50
2, 000 00
40 47
2, 793 32
2, 000 00
125 32
1,500 00

987 00
2,061 50
432 50
1, 302 37
40 47
700 45
3, 335 15
125 32

Tunibez .
'Tunis
Tunstall.

597 B6
3, 000 00
2, 000 00

96 74
53 00
5, 519 82

'Turk's M a n d
Cockburn Harbor.
Salt Cay

'2, 000 00
233 30
279 50




Remarks.

Loss.

$65 85
Inclusive of clerk-hire and office-rent."

No returns.
Returns for first quarter 1874 not received.
From October 1, 1873, to June 30, 1874.'
3 82

5 62

Returns from agencies not received.
Inclusive of clerk-hire and officC-rent.

Returns for first quarter 1874 not received.
No returns.
No fees.
183 81
6 52
32 17

Partial returns.
454 55

Returns for second quarter 1874 nob received.
Do.

168 78

No fees.
Do. •

38 85

Do.
228 88

No returns.

500 75
233 30
279 50

645 71

To March 31, 1874.
Inclusive of additional compensation allo\Ved when fees reach $3,000 per annum.

Inclusive of instruction and transit salary.
Inclusive only of third quarter, 1873.
Returns for first and second quarters 1874
not received.
13 54 Inclusive of iustruction and transit salary.
Inclusive of additional compensation allowed when fees reach $3,000 per annum.
59 95

F I F T H AUDITOR.

.

•

293

B.—Statement of consular fees, consular salaries, and emoluments to oificers, 4'C.—Continued.
Consulates, c o n s u l a r
a g e n c i e s , &c. .

Salary and
emoluments.

Valencia
Valparaiso
Venice

$3, 000
750
3, 500
1,137
2, 725
5, 000
331
236

Loss.

Kempt
Cornwallis
AVolfville
Annapolis
Digby
VP'indsor, C a n a d a
Cliatham
AVallaceburg
Amherstburo- ..
Duart:
"Winnepeg
Zacatecas
.
Zante .
-

00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00

$1, 908
529
1, 966
1,137
3, 352
4, 236
• 381
236

95
43
70
00
15
25
50
00

1, 000 00
432 76
255 02
202 50
82 50
39 50
15'001, 622 27
1,409 50
979 00
76 50
62 50
1, 500 00
24 00
13 50

Verviers and Liege
Victoria
Vienna
Brunn
Pesth
Warsaw
TViudsor N o v a Scotia

Corfu
Cephalonia
Zanzibar
."
Zurich . . . . .

Fees,

1,019
432
255
202
82
39
15
2, 086
1, 409
979
76
62
467
24
13

125 32
4,162 00

$28 76
6 27

,

I n c l u s i v e of i n s t r u c t i o n -salary.

>
R e t u r n s for f o u r t h q u a r t e r 1874 n o t r e ceived.
. .

3 00

694 45
2, 000 00

...

^

44
76
02
.50
50
50
00
50
50
00
50
.50
60
00
50

3 00
.

Remarks.

St. G a i l

2, 017 45
562, 328 28

715, 202 94

N o fees
Partial returns.
I n c l u s i v e of a d d i t i o n a l c o m p e n s a t i o n all o w e d w h e n fees r e a c h $3,000 p e r a n n u m .

2, 910 75

Total

142 27

8, 292 94

"

RECAPITULATION.
Total fees received
Salaries, &c., to officers
Loss by exchange

1

Excess of fees over salaries and loss by exchange

.•

$562, 328 29
8, 292 94

$715,202 94
,
570,621 23
144, 581 71

B i.—Expenditures on account of sundry appropriations, as shoum.by adjustments in this office, from July 1, 1873, to June 30^ 1874.
For interpreters to the consulates in Cbina, Japan, and S i a m . . . $6, 867
For salaries of tbe marshals of the consular courts in Japan, including that
ab Nagasaki, and in China, Siam, and Turkey
4,449
For rent of prisons for American convicts in Japan, China, Siam, and Turkey, & c . . . .
....,;::...--.
9,144
For expenses of the consulates in the Turkish dominions, viz, interpreters,
guards, and other expenses of the consulates at Constantinople, Smyrna,
Candia, Alexandria, Jerusalem, and Beirilt
4,122




52
42
57
49

294

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

C.—Statement showing the amount expended by the consular officers of the United States for
the relief of Americaii seamen, the money received by said officers for extra ivages, f c , and.
the loss by exchange incurred by them during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Expended.

Consulate,

Acapulco
Amoy
Amsterdam .
Antwerp
Aspinwall
A u x Caves
Bahia .
Barbadoes
Batavia
Belfast
^
Bermuda
Bombay
Bradford
Brenieu
..
Bristol
:
Buenos Ayres
Cadiz '.
Calcutta
Callao

$292 00
11 75
540 45
260 50
32 75

•
. . . .

137 ro
2,143 04
19 74
204 06
16 23
136

. . .
-..

...
.

.

.

...

Cardiff'
Cartagena
Ceylon
.
.
Che Foo
Cape Town
Constantinople
Copenhagen
Cork
Demerara
Dublin
Dundee
Elsinore
Fayal
Falmouth
Genoa
Gi b r a l t a r
Guayaquil
. .
...
Guaymas
Hakodadi
•..'
Hahfax
Hamburg
Havana
Havre
Hong-Kong
Honolulu
Kino"ston, J a m a i c a
Kanagawa
i . . .•
L a Paz Mexico
L a Union, Salvador
Leghorn
Leith
Liverpool
London
,
Malao'a
.
. . .
Madagascar
Manila
Maracaibo
Manchester
Maranham
Marseilles . .
M a t a n zas
Mauritius
Melbourne, Australia
Montevideo
Nagasaki

'

34
60
37
80
16

.. .

56 88

'

Loss-by exchange, '

$37 20
20 00
684 04
259
238
203
• 50
147
75

70
08
99
00
86
45

488
524
380
337
456
1,622

44
27
07
74
67
45

$170 6

.
54 97

63 05

. .

355
54
1, 662
11
217
154
• 202

:

94
67
49
27
70
95
15

26
372
50
253
283
907
794
165
877

92
37
16
25
94
55
32
32
12

"124
^

8 03
83
•1 18

100
136
153
43
40
67
989
150
150
98

00
23
68
59
00
42
93
00
53
70

•

82 40

i..
•.
.

•

55 50
1, 251
398
2,314
15
1,325
59
5
68
880
2
415
815
786

."

^.
•

.-

82
54
18
60
33
00
16
50
75
50
64
93
24

2, 869
5^3
1, 632
3,241
3, 693

-. . ..

Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Panania
Paramaribo
Pavta
:
Pernambuco
Pictou
Quebec
R i o de J a n e i r o
R i o G r a n d e do Sul B r a z i l
„ .
Santiago, Cape Verde Islands
S a n t i a g o de C u b a
San J i i a n del N o r t e




--

25
36
90
00
75
00
10

5
44
40
11
159

.

50
'358
873
120
3,691
5
176

Received.

10
79
10
96
35

2, 997
52
14
62
336
228
88

23
72
00
30
66
25
00

668 66
1,110
105
534
• 3,1.58
171
201
35
60
70
638
23, 718
1,711

89
00
62
57
20
35
00 •
00
00
25
77
02

228 87

124
75
241
.1,929
671
295
365
435
• 312
90
940
30
245

02
00
75
23
87
40
00
00
50
00
00
00
00

6 76
12 11
30 48

156 71
2-34
172 23

7 02
18 25
60
1 40

13 76
42

186 77
. 80 00
37 24
90 00

FIFTH AUDITOR.

295

C.—Statement showing the amount expended hy the consular offi.cers, cj'-c—Continued.

Expended.

Consulate.
San Juan del Sur
8an Juan, Porto Rico
Santa Cruz, West Indies
St. Catharine's, Brazil
St. DoTuingo City
St.Helena.
St. John, New Brunswick
St. John's, Newfoundland
St. Petersburgh
St. Pierre, Miquelon
St. Thomas, West Indies
. Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Shanghai
Stockholm
Southampton
Sydttey, Australia ..-.
Tabasco
Tahiti
. Talcahuano
Tampico
:
Teneriffe
Toronto
Tdeste
Trinidad de Cuba
Tumbez
Turk's Island
Valparaiso
Vera Cruz

$313 50
288 74
685 20
427 63
158 .50
92 65
85 68
22 19
2, 543 46
261 30
73 92
354 69
214 60
65 29
189 68
196 23
404 37
3, 385 60
3, 590 37
168 98
25 00
5 90
724-25
73 00
1, 08.0 18
387 25
1 00
80 80
18 00
3 3 00
-

,

Victoria, Vancouver's Island.
•Windsor, N o v a Scotia
AVinnepeg
,
Zanzibar
Total.

53, 794 27

Loss by exchange.

Received.
$245 00
3.55 44
90 83
20 00
90 00
,503 40
908 82

$2 .58
180 52
283 50
80 00

.5 03

1,665 55
1 801 40

il6 93
263 88
120 00
635 00
90 60
7 28
80
150
129
45
621
157
30

17 96

90
00
72
50
71
00
CO

55,311 43

RECAPITULATION.
Amount expended by consuls for.relief of seamen
A mount expended by consuls for loss in exchange
Amount paid for passage of des^tute seamen, (see Schedule F)

$53, 794 27
750 64
10, 095 81

• Total amouut of expenditures
Amouut of extra wages, &c., received by consuls
Excess of exxDenditures over receipts

,.

64, 640 72
55, 311 43
, 9, 329 29

D.—Statement showing the amount expended in bringing to the United States Americaii seamen charged ivith crime during the fiscal year ended June 30,1874.

N o . of
seamen.

Consulate.

B a y of I s l a n d s N e w Z e a l a n d
Cork
..'
Palermo
Pernambuco
Total

..;
•




•
-

-

-

1
1
1
1
4

Amount.

$105
.594
50
100

25
11
00
00

849 36

296

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

E.—Statement shoicing the amount refunded to citizens, seamen, or their
representatives, directly from the United States Treasury^ the several
sums having been previously paid therein by consular officers, during the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Arnt J. Amble, seaman, estate of
Albert A. Brownell, seaman, estate of
Frank H. Dyer, seaman, wages refunded .•.
.^
A. W. Enigren, seaman, estate of
^
,..:
:
Giistav Holz, seamau, wages refunded -.'
-•-.....•.".....•:._.."....
Charles Edward Johnson, seaman, wages refunded
E. J. Marshall, jr., seaman, estate of.
-.^
David Teamer, seaman, estate of
Jesse Vansant, seaman, wages refunded
Harold Walner, seaman, estate of
:
Total

:......'

$80
117
20
53
93
91
31
45
250
71
:

80
00
00
34
28
37
16
98
98
74

855 65

F._—Statement showing the number of destitute American seamen sent to the United States
from the following consulates, and the amount paid for their passage, during the fiscal year
ended June 30,1874.
• Consulate.
Acapulco
Antigua
Aspinwall..'
A u c k l a n d , (sick)
A u x Cayes
Bahia
Baracoa
Barbadoes
B a y of I s l a n d s , N e w Z e a l a n d
Bei'iuuda
Cadiz
Calcutta
Callao
Cascumpec
Charlottetown, Prince E d w a r d ' s
Island
,
•
:..
Cow Bay, N o v a Scotia
C^urag'oa
Fayal
Genoa
J
Gibraltar
Grand Cayman
Guadaloupe
Hakodadi
Halifax
Havana
Havre
Hong-Kong
Honolulu
Hudson's Bay
Kanagawa
Kingston, Jamaica
T>asuayra
Liverpool
London
.Malaga
,
Manila
Marseilles
Mazatlan
Me.4sina
M.elbourne
Montevideo
Nassau, Bahamas
N o r t h Sydney, Cape B r e t o n Island:
Ouchat
".




Seamen.

Amount.
$180 00
10 00
850 00
200 00
10 00
30 00
20 00
100 00
10 00
410 80
30 00
10 00
30 00
60 00
54 00
260 00
60 OD'
674 00
10 OO

50
60
10
10
214
530
20
190
1.50
990
180
140
4i)
130
60
10
80
30
20
10
10
55
390
10
20

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
01)
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Consulate.
Panama
Para
Paramaribo
P o n c e , P o r t o Rico
P o r t a u P r i n c e , H.ay ti
P o r t H a s t i n g s , N o v a Scotia
P o r t Caledonia
Port Limon
Pm-t L o u i s , M a u r i t i u s
P u n t a A r e n a s , Costa R i c a
R i o de J a n e i r o
Rio G r a n d e do Sul, B r a z i l
S a g u a la G r a n d e
San J u a n , P o r t o Rico
Santiago, C a p e V e r d e I s l a n d s
S a n t i a g o de C u b a
Singapore ...,.
Sierra Leone
St. D o m i n g o C i t y
St. H e l e n a
'
St. J o h n , N e w B r u n s w i c k
St. John's.'^Newfoundland
.-...
St. P i e r r e , M a r t i n i q u e
St. P i e r r e , M i q u e l o n
,
St. T h o m a s , AVest I n d i e s
Sydney, A u s t r a l i a
,
S y d n e y , Cape B r e t o n I s l a n d
Tabasco
Tahiti
Talcahuano
,
Trinidad Island
Turk's Island
,
Vera Cruz
A'^ictoria, V a n c o u v e r ' s I s l a n d . . . . .
W i n d s o r , N o v a Scotia
1
T o t a l from c o n s u l a t e s
P i c k e d u p a t sea a n d b r o u g h t t o
the United States
—
Relief afforded b y n a v a l p a y m a s t e r s to d e s t i t u t e A m e r i c a n seamen :
,
G r a n d total

Seamen. Amount.
35
4
2
1
1
119
3
5
1
1
5
1
2
4
3
4
2
2
7
12
15
4
1
6
17
4
2
16
18
2
1
1
5
11
1

$350
40
35
10
10
,190
30
50
50
10
50
10
20
44
30
40
20
20
75
120
93
64
10
60
170
40
20
288
450
20
10
10
50
57
10

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00 •
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

844

.4

84 00

3

38 01

FIFTH AUDITOR.

297

G.—Bepartment accounts received and settled for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1874.
Department of S t a t e :
Publishing the laws in pamphlet form
$72,701 56
Proof-reading and packing
2, 519 70
Rescue of American citizens from shipwreck
3, 662 ,56
Expenses under the neutrality act
500 00
Stationery and furniture, &c
,
3, 648. 30
Contingent expenses of fbreign intercourse and missions abroad22, 057 41
Contingent expenses of consuls
$43,189 75 •
The same settled on Department of State approval
73, 083 66
116,273 41
Books and maps
2,132 08
Litbugrapbing
^
.•
.J.. ....
.1,736 36
Postage appropriation
23, 012 04
Salary and expenses of Northern Boundary survey
1.23, 266 75
Salary and exyjenses of United States and British claims commission
224,837 09
Salary and expeuses of Uuited States and Spanish claims commission
18, 500 68
Salary and expenses of Uuited States and Mexican claims commission
4, 248 04
Salary and expenses, of United States comniission to Texas
10, 742 33
Salaiy and expenses of tribunal of arbitration
31, 408 00
Salary and expenses of Vienna Exposition
29,151 94
690,398 25
Interior Department:
Seventh census
Eigbth census
:
Ninth census
Maps to illustrate quarto volumes of ninth census
Miscellaneous expenses of Patent-Office
Pboto-lithographing
Rates for Patent-Office Official Gazette
Expenses for copies of drawings in the Patent-Office
,
Expenses for packing and distributing congressional documents . . . , , , . . . ,
Expenses of building ball in Smithsonian Institution
,
Expenses of Smithsonian Institute building
Preservation of collections of United States exploring expeditions

$1,500
82,329
50, 854
3,724
92, 410
27,700
35,564
47,209
7, 076
9,925
27, 017
15, 359

00
57
50
00
71
83
22
43
14
00
46
91

405,87177
Post-Office Department:
Contingent expenses of Post-Office Department




,

, » . , , , $50, 549 64

H.—Supplemental statement of expenses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, adjusted since last report, including the
salaries, commissions, and alloivances of the assessors, their contingent expenses, and the compensation of assistant assessors and store-keepers, from July 1
1872, to June 30, 1873.

i

P

t

11

District.

©

5

{25

si

o
c/2

i)

f3'S S
o cc 2

*
^
cn

o o

1-

S

G
3

,2

N)
"^

GO

"g.S

§^i

•

o o <
u

:§i
{25

.1

ALABAJIA,

First distiict
Second distiict

s$999 95
138 61

694 00

97 97
89 30

m

$694 00

1, 188 56

Total

40 00

$4,410 84
1 243 10

3,771 38

5, 653 94

468 00
700 23

704 52
129 30
700 23

1,168 23

1 5.34 05

84 18

1 254 35
499 59
196 47

O

1, 866 23

. . ..

• $2, 716 89
1, 054 49

1, 254 .35
499 59
112 29

-

84 18

1 950 41

Ul

100 30

183 83
44 40
100 30

100 30

323 53

483 75

487 50

~
_

AKKAXSAS,

First district
Second district
Third district

--

-

_.

Total

$37 50

$41 05

$60 00

.
187 27

40 00

37 50

41 05

60 00

First district
Third di strict
Fourth district
Total
COXNECTICUT.

^

Total

\
183 83
44 40

--228 23

DAKOTA.

Dakota




H
O

H-l

CALIFORNIA.

First district
Second district
Fourth district .,

o

$3 75

.:==:

W

DELAWARE.

Delaware

,

.

.......

36 76

36 76

FLORIDA.

Florida .

1,410 00

1,410 00

50 82
96 00

50 82
96 00

146 82

146 32

GEORGIA.
•

Total

r.

inAHO.
300 54

45 50
ILLINOIS.

346 04

'

First district

7, 668
25
347
434
2, 736
2, 997

Fifth district
SiKth d i s t r i c t

$125 00

95
07
35
86
40
05

•

108 00
26 54

600 99
220 82

83 33

400 00

2,091 13
149 83

Fio'htli d i s t r i c t

100 00
102 75
605 02

T w e l f t h di.strict

16 13

1.55 00

•

64 00
17 00

17, 158 41

Total

16 13

1 00

43 54

1 00

976 81

83 33

797 O
Q

7, 793
25
347
542
2 736
4, 107
220
2, 091
.i49
100
273
669
18

95
07
35
86
40
51
82
13
83
00
88
02
00

2
d
U
I—(

H
.O

19 076 22

liVDIANA.

•
F o u r t h district

.

.

SiKth d i s t r i c t
Eio'hth district

1, 564
81
381
2, 272
.30
321
1, 057
594

68
53
80
70
51
74
73
93

. 284 00

<
4 00
127 86

20.5, 00

127 86

50 00

493 00

' • •

1, 848
81
331
2,270
30
321
1, 440
594

68
53
80
70
51
74
59
93

*•

Total




6, 305 62

50 00

__

-^
.—

6, 976 48

to

H.—Supxjlemental statement of exxienses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, cf-c.^Continued.
ca

o

CD

ft

District.

a

•.

u

•

•

i

i

cp

1

a
m

III

a- ,
0 0 a

'rt

a
0

.0
PH

CO

O
O

IOWA.
$8 55
222 56
7 10

$407 22
$4 50

238 21

Total

$163 71

4 50

Sixtli d i s t r i c t

163 71

407 22

$8
2^2
411
168

55
56
32
21

813 64

KENTUCKY.
302
853
23
837
1,377
2, 027
1, 235
217

F i r s t district
T h i i d "district

'.

Fifth district
Sixth district
^^Tinth d i s t r i c t

15
31
15
87
31
36
63
49

284 00
136 74
$330 00
138 16

6, 374 77

Total

100 00

380 00

498 00
496 00

274 90

1, 378 00

302
1 137
159
837
1 357
2, 027
1 733
851

15
31
89
87
81
36
63
65

8, 907 67

Total

604 26
486 29

^
.

$6 50

397 02
296 66
749 44

.




604 26
1 829 41

1, 336 62

2 433 67

.

MARYLAND.

Total

1, 336 62

6 50

1, 090 55

•

F i r s t district . . .
T h i r d district
Fifth district

H
O

W

>
O

LOUISIANA.
F i r s t district
Tbird district

o

.

. .

$16 49

-

•

-

-

-

-

"

•

-•

397 02
296 66
771 99

16 49

1, 443 12

•

6 06
6 06

1 465 67

MASSACI-lUSETl'S.

200
181
106
271
74
141

Fourth district
Fifth di.striot

600 00

Total

56
20
70
88
65
33

600 00

17 00

800
181
106
271
74
158

1,593 32

$17 00

976 .32

Thirrl flistiMrh

56
20
70
88
65
33

'

MICHIGAN.

406 36
28 21 ^

Total

323 54

. . . 208 00

937 90
28 21

434 57

First district

323 54

208 00

966 11

MI.SSISSlP.ri.

757 93

Second district

. 757 93

MISSOURI.

134 61

132 00

2, 562 08
2, 284 23

Second-district
Fifth distript
Sixth district

18 00

697 i e

Total

840 10
298 41
332 40

75 00

75 00

5, 543 47

132 00

18 00

134 61

352 00
76 00
100 00

2,828
3 551
374
1,147

69
33
41
56

1, 470 91

528 00

7, 901 99

.

MONTANA.

t-H

O

226 64

71 50

298 14

1,205 14

48 39

1,253 53

NEIiRASKA,

NEVADA.

116 73

91 00

First district
Total

86 52
93 50

*




206 00

413 73

—~'

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

• 130 02

^
-

;-

:

S'O 5^5
93 50
180 02
CO
O

H.—Supplemental statement of exp)enses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, cfc—Continued.

CO

o

"i

1.

rt.2

1.1

District,

tN3

1
C4-I (U

.rl

ci

.s ^

s

o
[25

cn
o

PH

(n

lis

•PH

^ cn
o
P^

• 1

"o
H

. NEW JERSEY,

First district

-

$205 70
•^•.

N E W YORK,

Sixtli district
Tenth district
Fleveuth district
Twelfth district
Thii'teenth district
[Nineteenth district
Twenty-second district
Twenty-third district
Twenty-hfth district
Twenty-seventh district
^^wenty-ei'^'l^h district

.

-

•-

i

Total

-

1, 366
71
274
28
26
82
35
82
114
37
250
109

04
08
63
76
05
42
96
32
05
82
49
14

2, 453 76

NORTH CAROLINA.

Second district
Third district

-.

Fifth district
Sixth district

•

63
33
28
63
103
123

76
29
10
21
67
43

$205 70

,-

1 366 04
71 08
335 23
28 76
26 05
171 70
15 96
82 32
315 82
37 82
250 49
109 14

$60 65
19 73

$12 00

$57 50

102 52

182 95

99 25

12 00

1.56 75

First district
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district


782 80

$532 00

415 46



.

...

7, 244 04
2, 057 61
132 74
79 15

H-l

!^
O
rt

.

814 16

532 00

63
816
28
63
103
655
31

76
09
10
21
67
43
36

1 761 62

OHIO.

.

O

2, 810 46

31 36

Total

O

$16 99
50 66

7, 244 04
2, 074 60
132 74
129 81

02

83 33

1,111 82
603 03

^

173 66

100 00

Sixth district
Sevenlji district
Eie^hth d i s t r i c t
iNinth d i s t i i c t

48 07
180 00

867 50
224 11

F l e v e n t h district
Thii'teenth district
28
31
31
244

Sixteenth district
Seventeenth district

48 •
96
66
30

12, 656 45

Total
•

OREGON.

3 00

12 72

$13 82

4 00

1, 372
603
148
1 047
224
115
54
234
223
31
244

115 98
54 00
176 67
192 00

133 33

19 99

12 72

13 82

799 04

196 00

81
08
07
50
11
98
00
69
96
66
30

13, 831 35

• •

12 15

12 15

PENNS^'LVANIA.

^

98 50
1 14
54 4Q

Fifth district

98
1
54
110
200
7
21
305
1 111
16
17
86
41
925
444
711
419

110 21
200 00

F i ^ h t h district
7
21
105
1, 045
16
17
22
41
817
444
711
419

'S^hirtiftRnth d i s t r i c t
Fotirteenth district

'^i^wentv-third d i s t r i c t

82
39
10
07
25
94
01
13
46
14
16
83

26 92
64 00

•

108 00

39 00

3, 823 34

Total

54

39 00

54

26 92

110 21

372 00

50
14
40
21
00
82
39
10
53
25
94
01
13
46
34
16
83

rt

w
d
>—I

H
O

4,372 01

SOUTH CAROLINA.

Second d i s t r i c t
Third district

•.

•.

130 49
144 23
420 00
274 72




420 00

130 49
144 23
420 00
694 72

.

TENNESSEE.

Thirddistrict
F o u r t h d i s t r i c t .•

'

...^.

...:•.
^

200 95

130 do
163 20'

2, 612 96

130 00
2. 982 11

CO
O
CO

CO
O

tp

District.

3-1

'rS

i

>^ -

o
a
.2

1

Printing and advertising.

H.—Suppletnenial statement of expenses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, cfc—Continued.
X

i

CO

Hi

1

•So
^

fl C
O
O <D

'rt
o

_o-+J rt

m

"A

H

TENNESSEE—Continued.
Fifth district
Sixtli district
SBventh district
Eighth district

$63 68
.1, 075 37
168 00

Total

%9 90

'

$99 07
527 28

-

..

1,508 00

$143 77
937 75

9 90

1,379 72

3,239 31

1252 74
1 5''8 71
1,075 37
168 00
6 136 9 3

rt
rt
o
H

TEXAS.

First district
Second district
Third district

$125 00
27 47

138 19

$71 24

$.68 89

781 80
210 87
1,249 .50

1 070 38
210 87
1 290 16

23 45

71 24

68 89

2, 242 17

2, .571 41

968 40

o

1 193 40

13 19

27 47

Total

$23 45

H
rt

UTAH.

Dtah

225 00
VERMONT.
,

•

Third district

86 07

86 07

w.

VIRGINIA.

JFirst district
Second district
Third district
"
Fifth district
Sixth d j strict
Seventh district
.'

35 00

'

Total

,

^

23
931
735
169

18
23
59
87

1, 8.59 87

1, 617 12
263 33
£0 25

35 00

9 35

17 20

20 25

9 35

17 20

•

100 op

135 24

23 76

2, 015 69

. 123 76

1 652 12
363 33
23 18
931 23
941 39
169 87
4,081 12

WASHINGTON,

Washington




o
rt

31 68

31 08

WEST VIRGINIA.
First district...
Secoud d i s t r i c t !
^

Total....

58 56
579 81

58 56
579 81

'

638 37

638 37

rt

.

WISCONSIN:
F i r s t district . . .
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
'
Sixth district . . . - -

869
335
47
20

:

Total

86
56
26
07

869
335
57
20

1.0 45

1, 272 75

86
56
71
07

1, 283 20

10 45

•
RECAPITULATION.
Alabaina
Arkansas
California
Connecticut
Dakota,
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Dlinois
.;
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky!.. ..
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
^N^ebraska
j^evada
ISTew J e r s e v
JSTew Y o r k
jSTorth C a r o l i n a
Ohio
Orecon
Pennsylvania
Soutb Carolina

'.

1,188
137
1, 866
228

694 00
40 00

56
27
23
23

41 05

$37 50

3,771
1,168
84
. 100
483

3 75

.
. . . .
:..

50
41
62
21
77
55
12
32
57

16 13
50 00

.
....




1 00

83 33
330 00

6 50

75
71
48
91

00
50
39
00

00
00
22
00

600 00
208 00

18 00

182 95

19 99

39 00

54

206 69

13 82'

156 75
814 16
799 04

532 00
196 00

110 21

372 00

12 00
12 72

134 61

323 54
757 93
1, 470 91

116 73

132 00

183 33
420 00

797
493
407
1, 378

6 06

16 49
17 00

'
02
70
76
46
45
15
34
72

- 43 54
4 50

5, 543 47
226 64
1,205 14
180
205
2, 458
415
12, 656
12
3, 825
•
274

00
82
54
81
86
Jl
90
62

•

36 76
45
17,158
6, 305
233
6, 874
1,090
1, 443
976
434

33
23
18
30
75

1,410
146
300
976
127
163
274
1, 336

60 00

26 92

.,

528 00

5, 653 94
n,534 05
1 950'41
328 53
487 50
36 76
1,410 00
146 82
346 04
19, 076 22
6, 976 48
813 64
8, 907 67
2, 433 67
1, 465 67
1,593 32
966 11
757 93
7,901 99
298 14
1, 253 53
413 73
180 02
205 70
2, 810 46
1, 761 62
13,881 35
12 15
4, 372 01
694 72

O

CO

O

CO

H.—Supplemental statement of expenses of assessing the internal-revenue taxes in the several collectionHlistricts, fc.—Continued,
RECAPITULATION—Continue!.

1

-6

s
District,

i

8-2

'rfl

5
Tennessee
Texas
Utah ,
Vermont..'
Virginia....
Wa.shin gton
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Total




$1, .508 00
27 47

.
.

1, 359
31
638
1,272

cn
e+-l

O cn
o

1
J/2

rJ

P^

fl

o
P^

$9 90
$138 19
225 00

87
68
37
75

35 00

70, 414 11

2, 237 49

$71 24

$23 45
20 25

9 35

$68 89
17 20

Net compensation of assistant assessors.

•

Survey of distilleries.

•

o

$1, 379
2, 242
968
86
2,015

^ 9
cn --^

§-2
a» .
o oS
^flg^

$42 00

.167 67

907 56

20 35

21, 675 69

O

H

'A

72
$3, 239 31
17
40
07
69 ' " ' " 1 2 3 'ie'

10 45
303 20

r-5

8, 874 29

$6,136 93
2, i^71 41
1 193 40
86 07
4,081 12
31 63
638 37
1,283 20
104, 692 .36

rt
rt
rt

o
rt
H
O
"y^

H
td
rt

o
rt
Ul

2 S q
•.13 rt o

fl fl

ComiDensation b y special
allowance.

District,

be

g

II

1 •
>
<

Total expense
of collecting.

I,—Statement of the expenses of collecting internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, showing the salaries, commissions, and sxiecial allowances ofthe
collectors ; the office-expenses which are x^aid out of the commissions and sxiecial allowances ofthe collectors ; the assessments and collections ; and the amount
paid to store-keepers, from July 1, 1873, to June 30,1874.
O fl

cn'i

ll

G
O

i

•1

5-

<o
'0
0

S 9

fl ;>.o

Salary.

*$168 95
*4, 371 39

$3, 000 00
3, 000 00
2, 500 00

$5, 952 76
7, 070 69
4, 093 55

$194 06
207 93
101 99

$13 75

$3 00
5 65
11 95

$239 50
223 50
170 25

$9, 389 32
10, 695 52
11, 249 13

$5, 952 76
7, 326 06
*9, 699 51

$103, 698 20
71, 630 76 .
34, 845 32

$52, 043 19
42,51102
35,183 26

$1, 268 00

4,540 34

8, 500 00

17,117 00

504 03

13 75

20 60-

638 25

31, 333 97

22 978 33

210, 174 28

129, 737 47

1, 268 00

Expenses.

1

1^1

ALABAMA.

Third districtTotal

rt
H

ARIZONA.
0

2, 500 00

1, 550 09

71 70

2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00

3, 250 00
3, 409 00
3, 214 00

113 15
.37 21
. 63 83

42 SO
11 34

19 95
2 25
7 40

1,051 18

7, 500 00

9, 873 00

214 19

54 14

29 60

First district

*2, 337 10

4, 500 00

38, 200 00
2, 310 47

391 44

42 09

Fifth district

*199 98

3, 000 00
3, 000 00

10,130 00
8, 280 00

229 93
156 81

2, 537 08

10, 500 00

58, 920 47 .

2,500 00

6, 324 00

125 00

4, 246 70

1, 550 00

14, 875 65

11,234 59

62 00
97 00

6, 242 01
6,3.55 90
6, 283 20

3,310 00
3, 789 00
3, 214 00

26. 633 60
33; 204 92
33,103 08

18, 984 82
26, 402 93
30, 405 15

240 00

159 00

18,881 11

10, 313 00

97,946 60

75, 792 90

240 00

.300 33

820 33

46,591 29
2, 310 47

38, 320 17

2, 403, 880 06

2, 262, 713 81

12, 405 00

25 00

129 34
90 49

464 95
219 44

13, 954 22
11,971 72

11,661 00
8, 755 00

276, 411 67
129, 652 24

535 65
146, 880 31
72, 247 36

778 18

67 09

520 16

1,504 72

74, 827 70

58, 736 17

2, 809, 943 97

2, 482, 377 13

107 59

4 45

299 00

9, 235 04

6, 349 00

90, 989 66

64, 855 39

ARKANSAS.

First district

Total

*254 11
*396 10 .
*400 97

'

O
I—(
H
O
rt

CALIFORNIA.

Total

12, 405 00

COLORADO.

....

* Compensation which belongs to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.
+ This item includes all kinds of stamps furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to the assessment lists.




CO

O

-a

l.—Statement of the exxienses of collecting internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, ^c—Continued.

CO

o

GO
fl'^ (
W
OOrt

•.^3 rt o
District.

III

=« bD

C o m p e n s a t i o n b y special
alloAvance.

o_a

o a
fl.-rs

"fl

c ^

©

5?.rt a

Salary.

*$387 93
M15 88

$3, 500 00
3, 000 00
835 60

$7, 950 00
6, 699 57
1,133 33

803 81

7, 335 60

15,782 90

*2,128 63

1,800 00

1, 86.6 75

3, 000 00

5, 900 00

Expenses,

o

©•fl ®

P

1

1^

•

fl

cn-^

5-

Ho

p cn cn

1

CONNECTICUT.

First district
Second d i s t r i c t
Total

$7 46
8 64

$46 50
47 17

$12, 068 72
10, .347 35
1,968 93

$7, 950 00
7,281 74
1,141 67

$484, 423 17
320, 353 73
16, 844 65

$367, 211 47
192, 037 63
21, 079 93

$5,360 00

352 92.

16 10

93 67

24, 385 00

16,373 41

821,624 55

580, 379 03

5, 360 00

38 53 ,

23 65

172 50

6, 030 06

*2, 447 45

20, 790 42

11, 592 41

$176 83
176 09

DAKOTA.

Dakota

'.J

rt
rt
rt
o
rt
H
O

DELAWARE.

43 54

$0 60

8 32

8, 952 46-

5, 989 41

361, .571 17

357, 653 97
•

.

. 0

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

D i s t r i c t of C o l u m b i a

*619 30

,3, 000 ocT

4, 930 00

88 50.

46 77
•

8, 684 57

• 4, 930 00

129, 316 50

115, 573 57

"^

•

t>

FLORIDA.

Florida

i^
*1, 828 29

3, 000 00

6, 723 13

31 44

156 01

9 75

323 75

12, 072 37

6,723 13

116,117 21

4, 772
•7, 772
8,161
8, 571

104,285
96, 678
97, 974
203, 716

o
rt

121, 242. 49

Ul

GEORGIA.

First district
Second d i s t r i c t
F o u r t h district
Total

*313 53
313 53

3,
3,
3,
3,

000
000
000
000

00
00
00
00

4,749
7, 772
8,131
8, 571

99
38
.50
48

77
108
61
179

12, 000 00

29,225 35

2, 500 00

.3, 580 00

1 50

150 30

144
139
15
37

182 35

336 37

42, 491 02

29, 278 00

27 10

4'7 39

32 05

6 40

427 02

87
,50
00
00

64
38
50
48

4 90

48
30
79
45

.197 00

6, 351 49

3, 580 CO

7, 972
11,057
11,208
12, 253

34
13
29
26

16
68
16
92

5.5,610
71,031
87, 595
176, 573

72
91
98
69

8, 322 00

502, 654 92

390, 812 30

8, 322 00

22, 496 30

18, 742 44

. 1, 565 00

IDAHO.

Idaho




rt
rt
)—(

-

ILLINOIS,

First district
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district . . .
Eighth district
Ninth district
Tenth district
.Eleventh district—
Twelfth district
:
Thirteenth district.
Total.

25,118 92
*641 41
*232 61
*2, 833 05
*954 20
*247 24
*6, 214 27
*1, 578 02
• 1,123

2,500 00
3, 500 00
4, 500 00
4,500 00
3, 000 00
2, 500 00
4,500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 000 00
3,000 00
2, 000 00

2, 865 72
4, 582 62
5, 866 85
10. 128 18
3, 365 05
3,155 64
7,520 13
3, 409 50
4, 427 06
2, 250 80
3, 975 75
3,150 00

37, 000 00

3, 500 00

30 30

9 00
96 68

145 93

54, 697 35

2, 500 00

38, 943 20

418 89
31 73
192 99
112 76
225 61
33 63
54 63
162 56
72 30
126 91
41 71
56 09
55 97

8
5
12
1
1
14
3

23
33
07
88
98
24
21

77 29

54 00
36 60
56 00
110 25
62 00
77 25
84 10
130 51
103 75
112 50
72 50
155 15
126 00

25, 622 11
6, 075 51
8, 591 70
10, 595 24
14, 936 86
9, 412 54
6, 750 60
12, 327 49
6, 336 00
13, 380 74
5, 943 03
7.136 99
6, 476 45

1,180 61

133, 635 26

20, 618 92
2, 865 62
4, 834 31
5, 866 88
10,128 78
3, 495 05
3,157 50
7, .520 18
3, 259 50
4, 427 06
2, 250 80
3, 975 75
3,150 00

904 57
6, 876,
311
• "0, 54
•.384,839 83
1,129, 608 80
5, 309,645 25
316, 348 93
53, 480 51
1, 897,572 71
61, 378 80
73, 207 84
25, 489 79
658, 697 20
58, 212 03

6, 579,
587 31
56, 279 56
314, 715 24
984, 958 64
4, 683,980 05
355, 221 65
72, 070 48
1, 609,774 65
52, 352 11
58, 237 49
23. 354 85
523, 172 63
37, 667 27

18, 505 00
2, 480 00
4,5.50 00
18, 406 00
1, 788 00
2, 896 00
8, 438 00
1, 358 00
1, 328 00
. 464 00

75, 550 35 16, 925, 697 82 15, 351, 371 93 60,213 00

INDIANA,

First district
Second district—
Third district
Fourth district—
Fiftbdistrict. ....
Sixth districtt....
Seventh district ,
Eighth district...
Ninth district —
Tenth district
Eleventh district.

-10,392 80

Total

51, 861 77

750
240
549
155
332
430

00
47
10
73
01
89

2, 000 00
1502 75

1, 624 75
t550 00

*10 77

2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00

2, 980 00
2, 600 00
2, 799 75

170
118
132
123

64
93
96
78

4 80
'i"28'

4
100
5
3

49 46
141 96
229 41
119 22
61 36
2 60
95 38

4
27
4
4

98
10
75
53
50
36
55
61
00

2 50

199 00
67 50
• 167 00
84 00
33 00
109 75
121 37
152 30
79 38
113 75
60 00
1,187 05

6 58

10, 767 42
6, 291 33
8, 055 71
11, 453 06
4, 256 81
7, 464 55
9, 710 34
6, 707 52
5, 624 74
5, 227 12
5, 457 63
81, 016 23

5, 892 80
770, 865 82
3,500 00
66, 072 62
3, 272 00
473, 876 50
6,740 47 2, 267, 829 67
1. 730 00
51, 052 20
287, 932 60
3, 525 00
4, 656 65
491,518 50i,930 89
459, 073 01
2, 980 00
88, 717 17
2, 640 00
76, 828 26
2, 799 75
491, 518 50

750, 490 29
54, 695 22.
451,974 86
, 975, 007 61
30, 173 29
308, 239 86
687,144 28
390, 427 45
79, 666 37
63, 742 12
687,144 28

4,904 00
3, 512 00
2, 532 00
10, 224 00
482 00
1, 453 00
5, 030 00
1, 292 OU

100 00
5, 030 00

39, 667 56 5, 525, 284 85 5, 478, 705 63 34, 559 00

rt
H-(

rt

y
l—l
H
O
rt

IOWA.

First district...
Second district.
Third district..
Fourth district.
Fifth district. .
Sixth district. ..
Total .

Kansas .

2,
3,
4,
3,
3,
3,

705
543
007
950
373
035

74
64
55
45
10
00

106
111
245
90
96
93

67
99
39
85
51
52

*370 58
*2, 623 95
*1, 031 77

2,500 00
2, 500 00
3, 000 00
2, 250 00
2, 500 00
2, 250 00

5, 471 85

15, 000 00

20, 615 48

3, 000 00

7 , 359 95
-

214 89

23 72
5 30

16 63
36 80
117 63

6 40
46 40
5 28

92
105
194
156
234
739

50
20
50
75.
50
15

6,934 IS
6, 266 94
7 447 44

193 54

8, 911 26
7, 272 35

3,314 91
3,551 97
4, 755 00
3, 939 20
3, 373 10
3, 69ii 53

1, 522 60

744 93

30, 225 37

60 00
81

43, 673 83

22, 626 71

323 00

14, 205 93

9,101 58

6 841 -66
,

* Compensation which belongs to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.
t Two collectors in office during the fiscal year, the first receiving salary and commissions and the second salary and expenses.
+ This item includes all kinds of stamps furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to tbe assessment lists.




239,
372,
372,
75,
90,
117,

819
587
771
607
617
743

14
27
26
26
83
93

249, 630 88
208, 426 28
344, 374 02
59,110 18
91, 707 35
78, 062 84

412 00

1, 319,146 69 1,031,311 55

287, 745 •

214, 681 66

225 00
CO

o

CO

I.—Statement of the expenses of collecting intmmal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, ^c—Continued.

ill

District.

H f" a

"

C o m p e n s a t i o n b y special
allowance.

^ fl .
©
bfi

Salary.

Expenses.

si

1c

"a

§1

P
o

111

>

"^ ft

<

'o
O

X'C«
p^rtO

o

II

CO

a

C %
O
© cn

© ©

©

© ,

O
PH

| 3

-bb

ba
p
"m

i

m

KENTUCKY.

First disti'ict t
Second districtt

06
17
49
95
11
90
93
10
27

$16 05
65 20

45, 764 74

2,231 98

4, 500 00
3, 000 00
3, 000 00

14, 614 14
5, 738 00
6,150 00

10, 500 00

26,552 14

$1,875 00
15, 413 18 " $ i , ' 7 4 7 ' 2 5 "
2, 500 00
*387 36
*8, 603 52
4, 500 00
*18, 461 96
4, 500 00
4, 500 00
*1, 715 89
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
46, 069 55

. 4,616 74

Ninth district
Total

23,134 61

*2,. 359 57
••^2,257 17

F'ourth districts
Fifth district
Sixth district .
Seventh, district

$3, 304 00
3, 045 82
2, 385 00
*693 77
8, 572 00
9, 995 75
7, 918 99
5, 050 00
4, 799 41

$168
112
68
308
156
630
351
368
117

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$5, 375 '36
20, 420 82
4, 987 49
10, 858 82
31, 777 07
1.5,174 65
14, 601 81
7, 955 35
7,621 75

$3, 319 55
4.849 32
2, 385 00
5, 523 82
t34, 975 90
9, 995 75
t i l , 257 54
5, 050 00
4, 986 02

$164, 767 65
292,184 32
33, 371 34
676, 926 70
2, 086,137 38
2, 243, 800 61
1, 639, 663 91
208, 229 39
173, 031 91

$127,059 16
1.52, 755 17
24, 550 15
558, 599 91
2, 004, 996 72
2, 003,132 06
1, 434, 405 34
167, 206 54
137, 914 67

54, 463 00
26, 302 00
34, 781 00
67,646 00
31, 133 00
3, 692 00

rt
o

6,670,619 72 235, 980 84

c

$12 25
37 20

$2, 504 00
15,459 84

3 02

538 20

\9

7 30

5 02

2 25
148 05

$34
324
87
40
115
35
52

89 99

745 25

687 00

118, 773 12

82, 342 90

7, 568,113 21

64 14
90 11
60 20

7 10
7 87
10 60

3 42
270 14
633 71

190 25
393 20
410 50

19, 379 05
11,908 89
12, 522 18

1.4, 619 34
8, 004 73
17, 849 89

940, 597 82
107, 084 96
76, 548 96

886,595 15
57,231 93
48, 040 32

7, 890 00

214 45

25 57

907 27

993 95

43, 810 12

30, 473 96

1,124, 231 74

991,867 40

7, 890 00

28 41
6 00

1
2
2
3

rt-

• LOUISIANA.

First district
Second distiict.
Third district
Total
MAINE.

Second district
Third district
Foui'th district
Fifth district..

*175 00
*150 04

Total

325 04

2,
2,
2,
2,
2,

500
000
000
000
000

00
00
00
00
00

1, 850 00
2, 305 02
1,318 75
1,500 00
1, 361 85

10,500 00

8, 335 62

82
26
29
43

11
51
92
50

50
40
47
50

00
63
81
73
89

1, 856 25
2, ,381 68
1, 318 75
1, 500 00
1,361 85

140 08

19, 527 06

8, 418 53

13,021 10
22, 203 83
6, 896 80
8, 961 91

9, 432
16,500
3,925
5, 600

60
00
50
00

860, 889 28
1, 459, 938 81
97,873 99
121-, 271 84

748,226
1, 399, 544
79, 261
127, 819

51, 083 64 •

35, 458 10

2, 539, 973 92

2, 354, 8.52 94

17
40
22
29
31

00
00
74
34
00

182 04

34 41

9 87

338
141
117
79

85
90
67
93

1 45
4 50

50
10 00
29 90
54 10

247
66
54
146

678 35

5 95

94 50

515 37

4, 367
4, 428
3, 398
3, 742
3, 589

75,316
25,184
17, 879
24, 391
17, 007

04
43
77
72
74

159, 779 70

- 65j 908
20,341
12, 367
14, 044
15, 346

59
71
78
10
93

240 00

128,009 11

240 00

Total

*294 56
*77 13

:




3,
4,
2,
3,

000
500
500
000

00
00
00
00

371 69 , 13, 000 00

9, 432
17,485
3, 900
5, 600

60
18
00
00

36, 417 78

70
75
67
25

32
74
93
95

>
o
rt
Ul

MARYLAND.

First district
Third district.
Fonrth district
F'ifth district

rt •

5,
5,
3,
3,

740
655
072
225

00
00
00
00

17, 692 00

MASSACHUSETTS.
First district
Second district

*256
*874
*446
*591
*217
*410
*355
*871
*23

•2,'500 00
2, 500 00
4, 500 00
3, 500 00
3, 500 00
3, 500 00
2j 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
3, 500 00

63
80
00
36
91

Fifth district
P^ncrhth district
Ts^inth district
Total

4, 048 14

2, 524 15
2, 897 63
9, 771 05
9, 453 34
4, 000 00
6, 220 80
5, 000 00
2, 780 13
4, 900 00
5, 000 00

31,000 00

58
93
72
16

52, 547 70

42
106
136
7i

08
08
19
83

33
33
92
55
151

44
14
55
25
51

722 07

6 00

5.96
3 89
7 93
3 97

L91
7 31
6 51
6 79
6 00

44 27

36
48
69
85
24
26
24
36
- 33
28

00
87
00
75
00
00
37
00
87
20

412 06

5, 365 376, 437 40
14, 930 89
13, 706 05
7i 524 00
9, 999 83
7, 975 62
5, 763 68
8, 366 99
8, 710 41

2, 524 75
38, 625 14
35, 028 30
2, 897 63
25, 627 83
22, 332 88
10, 631 85 1, 259, 292 38 1,104, 074 57
9, 453 34
417, 712 56
355, 493 69
4,100 00
390, 620 13
312, 272 40
6, 220 80
600, 456 94
549,211 74
5, 063 15'
54,197 29
46, 438 75
2, 842 63
61, 719 92
54, 258 51
.4, 950 00
31, 726 38
32,825 61
5,000 00
283, 439 17 , 268, 948 97

88, 780 24

53, 684 15

3,163,417 74

7,
1,
2,
4,

300
800
592
854

00
00
00
00

2, 505 00

2, 780, 885 42 19, 051 00

m'CHIQAN.

Third district

*1,107 56.
*439 41
*506 84

Fi fth district

*1, 392 32

First district

Total...

44 86
• 7 80
112 12
42 86
75 26
84.55

90
50
35
50

12, 477 42
5, 860 99
7, 600 15
6, 092 38
6, 334 40
7, 848 79

,57 47

403 95

46, 214 13

40

15 00

229 50
271 30

40

15 00

236 45
189 32
257 91

29^0 *5, 374 03

683 68

82 49

5, 374 03

15 00

15 50
44 38

4,500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
. 2, 000 00
2,500 00

6, 825 00
2, 737 63
4,325 00
3, 413 57
2, 700 00
5, 228 60

16, 500 00

25, 229 85

367 45

159 28

2, 500 00
2, 500 00

4, 950 00
5, 575 00

38 37
201 95

178 30

5, 000 00

10, .525 00

240 32

*419 30
*351 42

2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00

.3,562 12
6, 290 67
4, 250 00

770 72

7,500.00

14,102 79

4,500 00
2, 500 00
• 2, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00
3, 000 00

18, 895 72
5, 588 50
3, 232 50
3, 377 80
7, 014 16
8, 200 00

442
37
40
90
195
. 215
.

17, 500 00

46, 308 68

1, 022 41

3, 496 13

49 00
17 81
92 47

40
4
1
6

40
48
45
00

5 14

7,
3,
4,
3,
3,
5,

413
312
325
413
197
228

.36
68
00
57
75
60

2,192 00
116, 823 73
330, 640 73
103, 520 08
115,407 95
183, 677 58

77,
270,
90,
63,
155,

26, 890 96

900, 070 07

656, 353 84

7, 717 87
8, 741 95

4, 950 00
6, 600 00

84, 500 32
153, 067 97

77, 564 72
151, 927 30

500 80

16,459 82

11, 550 00

237, 680 29

229, 492 02

230 00
420 94
348 75

12, 351 70
9, 400 93
7,760 77

13,834 62
6, 453 18
4, 635 26

23,120 51
19, 962 70
46, 670 74

18, 316 98
31, 927 47
29, 243 77

999 69

29, 513 40

14,923 06

89, 753 95

79, 488 22

114
312
115
148
863
220

75
90
12
50
50
00

23, 983 22
10, 533 88
5, 895 56
6,172 23
15,112 84
11,733 68

20, 452 99 2, 977, 825 16 2, 568, 715 48 11, 465 00
111,094 74
1,180 00
7,010 76
148, 066 90
93, 481 66
2, 052 00
3, 232 50
117, 633 09
199, 287 37
3,390 30
27.5, 620 97
121, 367 44
584 00
136, 562 62
10, 050 72
349,974 19 10, 871 00
353, 765 66
8,436.43

1, 774 77

73, 431 41

52,573 70

36 70

133
134
68
30

235
283
644
095
094

17
83
87
74
23

1, 064 00

*J
^
3,256 00'

MINNESOTA.
l^irst district
*178 30 •
Total

Total

d
rt
O

MISSISSIFPI.
First district.
Second district
Third district

>

52 69

MISSOURI.

Fir.st district
Second district
Third district
Fourth district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Total




n , 944
*5
*4l
*4,210

42
22
36
80

6 201 80
,

25
S3
83
15
69
66

105
1
10
312
87

.35
89
50
14
00

3 92
16 55
11 02

531 88

91 87

4, 009, 474 40 3,448,920 88: 24, 652 00

*Compensation which belongs to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.
fAccounts for the whole fiscal year not received up to Ncvember 1,1874.
^ T h i s item includes all kinds of stanips.furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to the assessment listSi
^ T w o collector.9 in office during theyear, the first receiving salary and commission, and the second salary and expenses.

CO

CO.,

1.—Statement of the exxienses of collecting internal-revenue taxes in the several collection-districts, fc.—Continued.

to

©

2 fl a

pl

District,

fl >3

C o m p e n s a t i o n b y special
allowance.

.5

©-9

Salary.

1

Expenses.
- Ul

fl a
o o

It

bJo

fl
©
©.2

y\ ©
©_©

©

lis

6-

fl

•

•

.2
o

<
++

'o
O

if

3^©

MONTANA,

$3, 000 00

$5, .700 00

$197 47

3, 000 00

Montana

8, 716 85

317 69

$7 80

$71 01

$120 50

$9, 090 78

$5, 631 00

$50, 388 92

$29, 027 76

$1,170 00

74 00

12,108 54

8,844 45

386,039 80

275, 868 28

• 2, 005 00

.207 35

293 50

15, 804 25

8, 836 34

57, 946 67

59,028 65

NEBRASKA.

NEVADA.

^

,

3, 500 00

5 00

H
.

6, 552 00

50 61

2, 075 00
1,700 00

59 53
32 55
47 09

3 86

33 50
18 00
37 75

5, 406 13
4, 625 55
3, 783 70

2, 340 00
2, 093 63
1,700 00

190, 528 21
58, 704 00
27, 436 60

172,170 39
58, 272 93
20, 098 33

1, 2.52 00

2, 500 00
2, 000 00

*$.5,195 70

"NTAvada

4, 500 00

. 3, 775 00

139 22

3 86

89 25

13, 820 38

6,133 63

276, 668 81

250, 541 70

1, 252 00

3 19

51 25
37 33
45 65
45 75

3, 700
3, 850
7,401
4, 276
14, 250

00
139, 061 32
00 • 102, 018 52
84
307, 742 73
45
203, 224 88
00 1,102, 597 15

119, 205 74
118, 159 04
286, 863 90
198, 227 38
1, 025, 859 71

180 00

47 16
3 65

6, 344 91
7,130 63
10,912 56
7, 488 52
19, 783 05

180 00

.5, 313 05

5, 313 05

Total

o

-

N E W HAMPSHIRE.

NEW

w

rt

JERSEY.

Second district

*156 43

Fifth disti'ict

*831 54

Total

2,
3,
3,
3,
4,

500
000
500
000
500

00
00
00
00
00

3,
3,
7,
4,
14,

700 00
t50 00
338 50
276 45
250 00

90
86
22
91
152

47
22
06
00
11

60'
52 00
28 26

988 02

16, 500 00

33, 414 95

441 86

80 86

54 00

179 98

51, 659 67

33, 478 29

1, 854, 644 60

1,748, 315'77

*1, 66^ Q8

2, 500 00

4, 450 00

40 62

10 16

10 31

270 00

8, 943 77

5, 452 62

36, 597 71

17, 717 84

*125 00

4, 500 00
4, 500 00
•4, 500 00
1,125 00

29, 746 87
23, 947 98
27, 744 99
4,787 89

324 87
236 52
308 78
i 0^

9 60
4.78
55 30
19 50

3, 808, 804 13
2, 009, 520 42
1, 895,155 41
470, 682 77

3, 738, 344 34
1, 921, 752 54
1,798,897 10
402, 928 47

N E W MEXICO.

]N^ew M e x i c o
N E W YORK.
F i r s t district
Third

rt
rt
o
rt

di^ti'iot

Fourth district




44
62
58
57

30
40
50
60

34,
28,
32,
5,

750
751
667
991

64
68
57
01

29,
23,
27,
4,

746
948
744
787

87
06
99
89

9, 600 00

o
rt
Ul

Eierhth di<^tnrf,
Ninth district

3,
•3,
3,
2,
2,

Twenty-seventh district
Twenty-eighth district..
Twenty-ninth district . .
Thirtieth district
Thirty-second district

6, 466 14
^52 89
*133 77
9, 422 86

8, 087 79
*92 71

26, 838 45

Total
'

3, 001 78
12, 038 78
21,889 22

70, 326 41

*265 66
Twentieth district
Twenty-first district
Twenty-second district .
Twenty-third district...
Twenty-fourth district..
Twenty-fifth d i s t r i c t '

2, 067 64
3, 493 90
4, 655 69

197, 835 54

3,
3,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,

'•68 22
305 53
*1,100 89

Seventeenth district
Eif'hteenth district

. 2, 449 29
4, 936 29

2, 500 00
4, .500 00
4, 500 00

Eleventh district
T w e l f t h di ^striat

8,176 53
10, 073 10
7,841 67
4, 676 25
4, 287 50
972 61
6, 452 28
3,547 90
2, 037 04
2,101 34
3,140 00
1.619 00
2,150 00

2, 000 00
2, 500 00
2, 750 00

*226 60
*490 39

00
00
00
00
00
41
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2, 000 00
3, 000 00

...

000
000
500
500
500
951
500
000
000
000
000
000
000

126
64
54
103
90

40
52
29
63
01

1-12
58
61
60
63
83

55
39
13
01
93
79

58
61
58
^96
51
111
48
23
124
155
182

99
19
12
22
40
48
24
85
03
65
21

2, 725 20

1 52
25 00
1 60
80

3 00

2
1
4
51
14
4
8
2
7
2
14
14
31
4
3
3
6

65
70
07
39
13
40
90
62
75
97
55
09
30
23
38
31
56

32 19
1-72
30 30
1 49
3 13
14 69
1 36
65 13

320 37

34
89
00
75
75
36
25
13
25
00
50
50
00
75
50
00
25
50
00
00
40

11, 305 58
13, 367 44
11,890 42
7, 407 61
6,917 13
1, 954 22
10,172 70
6, 638 66
4, 438 31
5,296 46
5, 288 61
4, 021 79
4, 213 30
6, 543 86
• 4, 595 25
8,144 49
9, 554 39
4,180 73
6,134 10
7, 532 48
8,140 63
5, 749 65
16, 730 12
26, 602 69

873 92

298, 985 02

46
23
25
30
29
27
26
70
39
32
19
28
13
28
29
27
43
27
28
21
29

n > \ 907 03
8, 226 53
10, 073 10
675, 858 89
7, 841 67
311, 754 80
4,874 39
72, 828 37
4,287 50
195, 426 70
972 61
59, 332 SO
6, 4.52 28
516, 462 37
3, 547 90
211,910 23
31, 725 04
2, 039 20
32,210 36
2,101 34
76, 062 19
3, 515 00
44. 109 90
1,662 40
58, 224 64
2,150 00
2, 907 23
308, 244 26
2, 532 63
51,102 20
272, 032 08
4, 936 29
624, 870 01
4, 922 86
54, 296 35
2, 067 64
201, 470 06
3, 493 90
167, 690 01
4, 655 69
427, 432 72
3,909 11
65, 413 50
3,001 78
12, 038 78 1, 462,152 53
21, 889 22 1, .747, 860 43

178, 522 76
631,157 86
287, 156 53
80, 678 91
191,902 76
34,100 39
496, 426 13
188,170 63
22,158 75
22, 603 84
65, 522 35
27,341 14
46, 562 54
299, 537 30
36, 522 85
234, 265 79
573, 567 29
63, 229 53
185, 051 89
150, 716 05
436, 504 91
55, 960 53
1, 340, 034 31
1, 643, 375 49

210, 376 86 15, 729, 640 25 15,153, 043 03

992 00
2,505 50
1, 068 00
1,100 00
7, 455 00<

rt

22, 720 50

a
rt

N O R T H CAROLINA.

First district
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district .
F o n r t h district
Fifth district

2, 500
2,750
2, 500
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
2, 500

*3, 428 27
*1, 096 56

Seventh district
4, 524 83"

Total

3, 957
3,876
6, 086
11,949
10,132
10,140
5, 850

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

73
64
50
50
17
27
00

124 42
137 57
127 48
276 40
123 22
313 99
. 60 70

20 00
23
13
/I
13
15

41
53
29
50
00

4 60
24 60

51,992 81-

1,163 78

66 73

19, 769 44

19, 250 00

292
157
64
50
159
71
42
55

42 00
2 37

H-l

50
00
00
00
00
50
00

6, 646 65
6, 831 21
12, 264 66
16, 451 99
13, 307 68
13, 542 26
8, 511 30

3, 971
3, 878
8, 434
12,194
10,259
10,140
6, 379

77
89
97
S3
67
27
35

53, 085 68
56,104 92
102,192 25
534, 777 31
621,479 48
. 280, 213 69
28.145 93

19, 330 24
27, 423 45
45, 490 86
500, 0.54 31
603, 496 36
223,285 12
33, 546 14

533 00

77, 555 75

55, 259 75

1, 675, 999 26

1, 457, 626 48

42,610 00

48 00
115 80
62 75
40 00
132 00
63 25
' 82 50
82 00

24, 656 18
14, 945- 03
8, 005 75
5, 720 44
10,531 15
8, 594 40
4, 540 45
8, 938 33

19,769 44
10,127 00
3, 340 *80
1, 850 00
4, .557 40
3, 955 71
1,875.20
4, 300 00

7, 813, 591 40
1,742,030 19
786, 838 66
182, 937 16
946, 993 01
782,591 17
44, 621 50
764, 746 03

7, 208, 887 51
1, 645, 558 53
699, 953 90
158, 053 44
832, 498 99
744, 598 17
31, 538 65
651,007 04

20,965 00
13,456 00
5, 342 00
1,034 00
4,696 00.
3, 864 00

44
67
99
116
51
74
81

O
5,
8,
22,
5,

673 00
558 00
507 00
872 00

OHIO.

F i r s t district
.
Third district
F o u r t h district
Fiftbdistrict
Sixth district
Seventh district
E i g h t h district'
IS^inth d i s t r i c t

..

•

.
14, 668 59
7. 377 10
5, 628 75
10,182 40
8, 454 28
*540 52
8, 800 00

4, 500 00
•

2, 000 00

1,875 20

69
07
50
27
65
87
23
23

51 96

4
1
1
1
5

05
20
40
42
14

110

4, 708 00

* Compensation which belongs to previous fiscal years not before adjusted.
^
t Accounts for the w^hole fiscal year not received up to ISTovember 1, 1874.
I Tbis item includes all kinds of stamps furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to the assessment lists.




CO
I—^
, CO

i.—Statement ofthe expenses of coUecting internalrevenue idx^s in the several cotlection-districts, ^-e.—Continued.
^'
o
•^
eS

^ aa
fl a
c^ o
>^"cn

CO i -

Co

C o m p e n s a t i o n b y special
allowance.

00

© .A

District.

.1-3

fl ^ 2
Salary.

Expenses.

P-©

©fl©

in

1^

f4«®

OHIO—Continued.
Tenth district
Eleventh district . . . .
Twelfth district
Thirteenth district ..
F'ourteenth district..
Fifteenth district
Sixteenth district . . .
Seventeenth district .
Eighteenth district..
i^inetcenth district..
Total .

Oregon.

^§157
7, 717
7, 396
*1,568
*432

98
61
90
46
09

*344 32
*9 67
*49158
74, 270 25

509 89

$4,500 00

2, 500
2, 500
2, 500
2, 500
2, 500
4, 000
2, 500

$5, 600 00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2, 910 00
1,975 00
2, 624 70
3,174 75
2,611 14
8, 462 75
3, 350 00

30, 000 00

52, 352 98

$100
429
52
128
50
65
161
84
28
115

56
83
38
08
97
93
73
92
18
45

$50 40
71 34

$1 09
2 00
50
1 90
1 73
31 79

00
25
00
00
50

64
66
65
55

40
25
75
00

54 12

2,111 54

5, 374 68

. $10, 428 63
8,245 69
7, 593 18
7, 288 88
5, 012 46
5,192 41
6, 276 99
5, 268 81
12, 566 35
6, 512 78

$5, 600 00 $990, 624 33 $9.57,'426 61 $2, 392 00
595, 442 33
3,217 61
556,025 06 1, 464 00
518,560 04
2, 896 90
429, 742 72 3, 256 00
195,115 59
90, 701 52
2, 957 92
64, 410 85'
56,103 71 2, 504 00
1, 975 63
95, 394 69
2,624 70
84, 068 09
3,177 40
91,165 04
83, 450 65 3, 908 00
2,611 14
137, 560 30
109, 331 60 1,144 00
8, 462 75 749, 798. 82
791,989 06 2, 096 00
76, 079 13
3, 350 00
65, 937 80 1,160 00

160,317 91

$69
96
93
111
52

86, 649 60 16, 578, 550 7415,196, 871 05 71, 989 00

7 25

I 502 95
,

50 40
63 60
56 75
20 12
26 50
16 04
12 00
30 50
80 75
40 75
16 00
52 13
31 25
60 80
43 10
47 25.
71 50
53 83
51 25

25, 719 55
23. 627 56
11,319 70
11, 933 77
4,164 12
8, 565 28
10, 262 96
7, 783 90
7,260 60
7, 628 62
5, 122 72
7, 215 68
11,891 95
7, 330 83
4,640 31
4,-314 28
• 7, 684 29
6, 901 81
8, 387 08

5, 937 47

99,994 79

49, 665 56

PENNSYLVANIA.

First district
Second district
Fifth district
Sixth district
Seventh district
Eighth district
^sTinth disti'ict ^
Tenth district
Eleventh district
Twelfth distirct
Thirteenth district
Fourteenth district
Fifteenth district
Sixteenth district
Seventeenth district
Eighteenth district
Nineteenth district
Twentieth d i s t r i c t . . . . . .
Twenty-first district




rt
rt
rt
O
rt
H
O

)—(

>
*1,2S9
*2,ai6
*324
*451

19
56
98
09

*386 56

*652
*171
*311
*222
*15
*77

65
49
40
34
68
64

4,500 00 19, 700 00
4, 500 00 16,682 50
3, OCO 00 7, 900 00
3, 000 00 8, 364 44
2. 000 00 2, 067 00
2, 750 00 5, 316 25
3, 000 00 7,150 00
5,155 95
2, 500 00
2, 500 00 4,589 73
2, 500 00 4. 824 50
2, 000 00 2, 300 00
4, 462 83
2, 500 00
3, 000 00 8, 427 25
2, 500 00 4, 336 50
2, 000 00 2, 507 30
2, 000 00 2, 650 00
2, 500 00 4, 938 38
2, 500 00 4, 300 00
3, 500 00 4, 824 36

174 62
256 95
27 97
92 63
65 57
94 20
100 96
94 60
90 12
241 76
84 57
24 23
119 4\
203 32
72 37
33 26
170 39
47 98
1 60

1 00
1 40
10 00
5 44
5 05
1 93
2 85

14 00
69 50
50

75

"i'oo

7 61

4 50
2 64
7 87
1 86
5 38
4 02
8 87

19, 700 00 1, 244,730 56 1, 286,256 60 3, 280 00
828, 760 93
16, 682 50
771, 922 24 2, 940 00
7, 900 00 229, 837 89
215, 929 36
8, 364 80 282, 765 35
266, 250 19
29, 227 97
2,192 00
20, 872 51
5, 316 25 232, 672 28
232, 609 .58 4,176 00
845
339, 802 20 . 342, 96 3, 432 00
7,150 00
183, 509 62
5,155 95
173, 042 20 3, 056 00
4, 589 73 137, 119 82
119, 3.59 24
4, 837 00 293, 706 75
228, 205 43 1, 284 00
2, 305 84
34, 014 28
-26, 622 42 3, 431 00
4, 538 45
106, 807 80
103, 662 58 4, 292 00
8, 427 25 365, 509 58
315, 129 78 6, 024 00
4, 834 68 161, 017 66
136, 859 18 13, 250 00
2, 511 05
48, 925 46 1, 836 00
54, 605 17
2,666 50
73, 580 93 3,100 00
90, 380 98
4, 938 38 122, 958 51
84, 598 05
4,300 00
118, 088 15
92, 272 66 2, 715 00
680 62
5,124 36
431,
411, 014 34 12, 748 00

O

rt
Ul

Total

*130 75
*1-, 423 78

4.000 00
3, 500 00
2, 500 00

8, 315 04
6, 036 44
4, 593 66

134 20
122 37
142 97

7 80

7, 574 11

62, 750 00

139, 442 13

2, 396 10

106.25

3, 000 00
750 02

T w e n t y - t h i r d d i s t r i c t . -.
T w e n t y fourth d i s t r i c t . .

5, 063 80
531 25

25 73

3, 750 02

5, 595 05

25 73

*454 69

2, 500 00
3,000 00
2, 500 00

3,135 00
4, 818 33
3, 597 60

187 43
24 63
57 12

14 79

454 69

8, 000 00

11, 550 93

269 18

24 95

97
12
46
263
241
177
23
95

5
34
11
6

105 48

.57 00
60 00
24 19

12, 506 24
9, 857 36
8, 790 08

8, 315 04
6, 036 44
4, 593 66

777, 358 SD
629, 288 49
196, 518 63

753, 709 43
499,109 71
163, 721 19

2,152 O
O
8, 344 00
9, 580 00

174 39

965 71

213,408 69

140, 479 88

6, 890, 361 54

6, 366, 499 04

85, 640 00

4 50

51 95

8,145 98
1, 296 83

5, 063 80
563 42

263, 277 00
5, 710 08

222, 789 07
10, 375 83

730 00

15 56

4 50

51 95

9, 442 81

5, 627 22

268, 987 08

233,164 90

7.30 00

10 16

74 00
4 20

432 50
182 50
322 39

6, 339 09
8, 029 66
6, 946 59

3,135 00
4,813 33
3, 747 35

31, 644 65
61, 920 19
45, 988 59

16, 672 51
56, 414 10
35, 930 18

260 00

78 20

937 39

21,315 34

11, 700 68

139, 553 43

109, oio 79

2oO 00

63 00
50
00
25
50
00

5, 581 60
6, 482 46
8, 352 45
8. 346 76
12, 286 39
7,301 67
6, 933 76
9, 032. 68

3,132 40
3, 970 00
2, 165 50
5, 423 97
9, 066 92
4,554 39
*3, 921 46
5, 537 99

28, 915 37
54,216 11
1,792 57
241, .577 17
403, 756 53
121,079 32
99,185 83
106, 858 33

16, 954
42, 263
6, 642
149, 561
296, 915
37,361
61, 285
76, 463

704 25

64,317 83

37, 772 63

1, 057, 381 23

133, 532
26. 992
121,086
72, 599

RHODE ISLAND.

Total -

15 36

•SOUTH CAROL[N.\.

F i r s t disti'ict
Second d i s t r i c t
Third district
Total
TENNESSEE.

First district
Third districl t
F o u r t h di.strict.
Fiftbdistrict
S i x t h disti'ict
Eighth district
Total

*283 13
*4, 449
*1, 441
^750
*755
*1, 463
*233

45
22
82
03
08
34

9, 376 07

00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

3,1.32 40
3, 970 00
2, 163 50
3, 929 74
8, 177 26
4, 018 75
3, 075 00
5, 537 98

19,187 50

34, 004 63

2, 000
2, 500
• 1,687
2, 500
3, 000
2, 250
2, 250
3, 000

13
46
87
25
71
39
18
41

957 40"

6 00
13
40
.50
00

10 65
4 10
7 25

63 03

24 95

2 95

167
101
37
122
163

55
776 00
59
1 2.52 00
58
'540 00
.36 34, 693 00
22 14,312 00
15
1, 252 00
89.
82

687, 448 16

52, 825 00

O
P3

•

TEXAS.

*-123 92
Second district
Third district
F o u r t h district

*1, 792 64

,3,
2,
3,
3,

000
500
000
000

00
00 .
00 •
00

7.
4,
6,
6,

479
867
350
600

2,216 56

11,500 00

2.5, 296 65

2, 500 00

Total

31
19
65
80

4 11
46 70
30 17

1, 691 95

8.57
139
518
176

65
00
00
00

3, 613 67

2 80
39 53
268 80

247
34
375
35

00
50
00
50

12,011 99
7, 590 19
10, 313 .35
11, 873 74

7,998 35
5, 606 08
6, 478 14
6, 699 74

80 98

311 13

692 00

41, 789 27

26,782 31

354,210 18

4 40

98 00

121 00

6, 436 65

3,613 67

60,110 09

20
13
32
53

92, 542
25.371
80, 045
67, 474

97
65
04
13

265,453 79

352 00
352 00

UTAH.

Utah

•

99 58

.

42, 831 46
•

* Compensation which belongs to previous fiscalyears not before adjusted.
t Accounts for the whole fiscal year not received up to November 1, 1874.
.
.
X This item includes all kinds of stamps-furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to the assessraent lists.




CO

or

1.—-Statement of the expjenses of collecting internal-revenue taxes in the severat collection-districts, fc.—Continued.

1 §1S
• District.

Pi

C o m p e n s a t i o n b y special
allowauce.

Salar5^

Expenses.

fl >->

©r^

9

©
bO

••11

© .
fl a
©.2

bi

.2
u
cn^

- U

1

0

CO

cn

if.

•

©

fl-S.«

•18

1

©

..3 .

flL.2

it

0

<

Ul

.

© o0©
O

'0

VERMONT.

Third district

$1,172 00
2, 000 00
2, 200 00

$700 00
1, 380 00
1,889 20

$6 11
21 66
52 11

$10 33

$46 00
59 25

$1, 878 11
3, 447 66
4,210 89

" Total

5, 372 00

3, 909 20

79 88

10 33

105 25

9, 536 66

$700 00
1, 330 00
1,889 20
.

$12, 469 16
26, 683 37
54, 224 68

85, 463 54
22,090 45
30, 598 24

3, 969 20

93, 377 21

58, 752 23

rt
rt
O

VIRGINIA.
*$3, 437 98
Fourth district
Fifth district.. ^
Sixth district

*440 13
*80 84
*398 22

Fiifhtli disti'ict

Total

4, 357 17-

2, 000
4, 500
4, 500
2, 500
4, 500
3, 000
2, 500
2, 500

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

3, 566
10, 367
13, 078
7,640
16, 235
8, 073
4,125
4, 300

65
81
33
00
93
25
00
00

18
136
219
121
609
223
110
77

29
55
02
96
57
55
53
62

$16 02
2 17
4 17

109 03

26, 000 00

67, 386 97

1, 517 09

2, 500 00

3, 775 00

'*i, osi 76

3, 000 00
2, .500 00
2, 000 00

1,099 59

*431 65
*1,634 20

7 09
79 58

28
1
2
20
14
6
10
24

17
69'
S3
13
95
58
70
60

4
68
100
30
• 108
81
126
33

00
75
00
00
50
50
25
25

9, 071
15, 076
17, 904
10, 312
21, 916
11,545
7, 270
6, 935

11
97
35
09
17
30
70
47

*5, 751
10,417
13, 078
7, 641
16, 244
8, 073
4,125
4, 300

14
81
33
SO
83
25
00
00

44, 063
755, 020
3, 071, 514
83, 075
2, 337, 887
174, 517
83, 079
43, 377

14
20
54
27
67
03
38
42

20,301
722,971
3, 035, 533
86, 689
2,192,431
161, 960
66. 333
3.5,190

01
95
17
31
97
33
67
06

$i, 448 66

.

732 00

18, 472 00
4, 847 00

109 65

552 25

100,032 16

69, 632 21

6, 592, 534 65

6,321,461 47

82 51

85 56

70 00

6, 513 07

4, 092 50

33, 865 13

18, 464 39

4,566 66
3, 990 85
2, 482 38

78 85
271 62
100 67

16 35

149 00
60 00
93 50

7, 828 69
6, 822 47
5, 758 31

4, 591 66
3, 990 85
2, 482 33

285,110 38
240,697 19
30, 252 09

270,123 40
226, 790 80
19, 427 77

1, 252 00

7, 500 00

11, 039 89

451 14

16 35

302 50

20, 409 47

11, 064 89

556, 059 66

516, 341 97

1, 252 00

4, 500 00
2, 500 00
2, 500 00

7, 395 17
5, 700 00
7, 392 50
512 00-

101 72
140 40
118 01

30

59 75
83 70
168 50

12, 056 64
8, 858 73
11,813,51
512 00

7, 428 50
5, 700 00
7, 392 50

2, 000, 401 00
223, 100 54
223,481 01

1,837,241 09
167, 721 72
19ji, 730 25

10, 564 00
1,664 00
1, 456 00

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25 499 00

WASHI:NGTON.

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WEST VIRGINIA.
*17 83
Second district-

Total
WISCONSIN,
l^irst d i s t r i c t
Second disti'ict

H
O

...

Fifth district




2 98

2, 500 00

. . ...
2, 065 85

Total

4, 625 00

118 88

12, 000 00

25, 624 67

479 01

1, 800 00 . 1, 452 29

Sixth district

23 86

3 48

118 95

7, 366 31

3 78

430 90

40, 607 19

7 60

2 98

38 40

4, 625 00

3, 327 15

25,-146 00

100, 872 93

83, 554 13

2, 547, 855 48 2, 281, 247 19 13, 684 00

WYOMING.
1, 537 09

22, 371 23

11, 737 48

RECAPITULATION.
4, 540 34

Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Dakota
Disti'ict of Columbia
Florida
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa.
Kansas
Iventucky
Lonisiana
Maine
'
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada.. .
N e w Hampshire
N e w iJersev
N e w Mexico
N e w York
Ohio
Oregon
Fennsvlvania
Khode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee




'
.

3, 500 00 17,117 00
1, 550 00
2, 500 00
7, 500 00
•9, 873 00
10, ,500 00 58, 920 47
6, 324 00
2, 500 00
7, 335 60 15, 782 90
803 81
1, 800 00
1,866 75
2,128 63
5, 900 00
3, 000 00
4, 930 00
3, 000 00
619 30
3 000 00
6, 723 13
1, 828 -29
29, 225 35
12, 000 00
313 53
3, 580 00
2, 500 00
54, 697 35
38, 943 20 37, 000 00
14, 054 50
51, 861 77 12, 502 75
20, 615 48
15, 000 00
5,471 85
3, 000 00
7. 359 95
3, 0-25 37
45, 764 74
4(i, 069 55 23,134 61
10, 500 00 26, 5.52 14
4,616 74
10, 500 00
8. 335 62
325 04
.371 69 13, 000 00 36; 417 78
4, 048 14 31, 000 00 52, 547 70
25, 229 85
16, 500 00
3,496 13
5, 000 00 10, 525- 00
178 30
7, 500 00 14,102 79
770 72
46, 303 63
6, 201 80 17, 500 00
3. 000 00
5, 700 00
3; 000 00
8, 716 85
6, 5.52 00
3, 500 00
5, 195 79
3, 775 00
4, 500 00
5,313 05
33,414 95
16, 500 00
988 02
4, 4.50 00
2, 500 00
1, 662 68
26, 838 45 70, 326 41 197, 835 54
19, 250 00
51, 992 81
4, 524 83
52, 352 98
74, 270 25 30, 000 00
5, 374 68
2, .500 00
509 89
62, 750 00 139, 442 13
7,574 11
5, 595 05
3, 750 02
454 69 • 8, 000 00 11,550 93
9, 376 07 19,187 50 1 34, 004 63 1
i, 051 18
2, 537 08

504 03
13 75
20 60
71 70
214 19
54 14
29 66
773 18
67 09
520 16
107 59
4 45
352 92
' ' i6'i6'
*
33 53
23 65
3 32
43 54
60
46 77
156 01
31 44
9 75
427 02
• 6 40
182 35
47 39
27 10
1,590 38
145 93
77 29
1,245 70
6 58
157 88
744 93
231 87
87 10
214 89
193 54
89 13
2,231 98
89 99
745 25
214 45
25 57
907 27
182 04
34 41
9 87
678 35
5 95
94 50
722 07
6 00
44 27
367 45
159 28
57 47
240 32
40
15 00
683 63
• 82 49 5, 374 03
531 88
1, 022 41
91 87
197 47
7 80
71 01
•317. 69
207 35
50 61
5 00
3 86
139 22
54 00
441 86
80 86
10 31
10 16
40 62
65 13
2, 725 20
320 37.
1, 163 78
66 73
24 60
224 57
54 12
2, 111 54
14 14
93 99
3 00
106 25
2,396 10
174 39
15 56
4 50
25 73
24 95
73 20
269 18
24 95
957 40 1 • 63 03

638 25
125 00
159 00
1,.504 72
299 00
93 67
172 50

31,333 97
22, 978 33 ! 210,174 28
129, 737 47
1, 268 00
4, 246 70
1,550 00
14, 875 65
11,234 59
13,881 11
10, 313 00
97, 946 60
75, 792 90
246 66'
74, 827 70
58, 736 17 •2, 809, 943 97 2, 482, 377 13 12, 405 00
9, 235 04
6, 349 00
90, 989 66
64, 855 39
24, 385 00
16, 373 41
821, 624 55
530; .379 03 5 360 00
6, 030 06
2, 447 45
20, 790 42
11,592 41
8, 952 46
5,989 41
361, 571 17
357, 653 97
88 50
8, 634 57
4, 930 00
129, 316 .50
115, 573 57
323 75
12, 072 37
6, 723 13
116,117 21
121, 242 49
336^37
42,491 02
29, 278 00
502, 654 92
390, 812 30
8, 322 00
197 00
6,351 49
3, 580 00
22, 496 30
18, 742 44
1 565 00
1,180 61
133, 635 26
75, 550 35 16, 925, 697 82 15,351,371 93 60,213 00
1,187 0 5 '
81,016 23
39, 667 56 5, 525, 284 85 5, 478, 705 63 34, .559 00
43, 673 83
22, 626 71 1, 319,146 69 1,031,311 55
1,522 60
412 00
323 00
14, 205 93
9,101 58
237, 745 48
214, 681 66
225 00
637 00
118, 773 12
82, 342 90 7, 568,113 21 6, 670, 619 72 235, 980 34
993 95
43,810 12
30, 473 96 1,124,231 74
991, 867 40 7,890 00
140 08
19, 5-27 06
8,418 53
159, 779 70
128, 009 11
240 00
515 37
51,083 64
35, 458 10 2, 539, 973 92 2, 354, 852 94 17, 692 00
88, 780 24
412 06
53, 634 15 3,163, 417 74 2, 780, 885 42 19 051 00
46,214 13
403 95
26, 890 96
900, 070 07
656, 353 84
3, 256 00
16, 459 32
500 80
11, 550 00 • 237, 568 29
229, 492 02
29,513 40
999 69
14, 923 06
89, 7.53 95
79, 483 22
73,431 41
1,774 77
52, 573 70 4, 009, 474 40 3, 448, 920 38 24 652 00
120 .50
9, 096 78
5, 7^1 00
50. 388 92
29, 027 76 1.170 00
74 00
12, 108 54
8, 844 45
386, 039 80
275, 868 28 2, 005 00
293 50
15, 304 25
8, 836 34
57, 946 67
59, 028 65
89 '25
, 13, 820 38
6, 133 63
276, 668 81
250, 541 70
1, 2.52 00
• 179 98
33, 478 29 1, 854, 644 60 1,748,315 77
.51, 6.59 67
180 00
270 00
8, 943 77
5, 452 62
36, 597 71
17, 717 34
873 92
298, 935 02 . 210, 376 86 15, 729, 640 25 1.5,153, 043 03 22, 720 50
533 00
77,555 75
55, 259 75 1, 675, 999 26 1, 457, 626 48 42, 610 00
1,304 45
160, 317 91
86, 649 60 16, 573, 5.50 7415,196, 871 05 71 989 00
7 25
8, .502 95
5, 937 47
99,994 79
49, 665 56
965 71
213,408 69
140, 479 88 6, 890, 361 54 6, 366, 499 04 85,640 00
51 95
9, 442 81
5, 627 22
268, 987 08
233,164 90
730 00
937 39
21, 315 34
139, 553 43
11, 700 68
109,016 79
260 00
704 25 1
64,317 33
37, 772 63 1 057, 381 23
1,
687, 448 16 52, 825 00

mpensation which belongs to previous fiscal years, not before adjusted,
includes all kinds of stamps iu -ni.shed to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addit on to the assessment lists.

tTl, is item

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CO

I.—statement of the expenses of collecting internal-revenue taxes in the several col lection-districts, fc.—Coutinued.
^

-CO

RECAPITULATION—Continued.
bo •
O.fl

CH

«x >-.*5

Coinpensation by special
allowance.

•r'

^

District.
Salary.
Texas
Utah..
Vermont
Yii'ginia
Wasliiiititon . . .
West Virginia.
AVisconsin
Wyonjing
'.
Total .

$2, 216 56

1, 099 .59
2, 065 85

$11, 500 00 $'25, 296
2, 500 00
3,613
.5, 372 00 • 3, 969
26, 000 00 67. 386
2, 500 00
3, 775
7, 500 00 11, 039
12, 000 00 25, 624
1,800 00
1,452

325, 649 46 584, 203 89

y ©

Expenses.

C--+-I
^

<
,691 95
99 53
79 88
,517 09
82 51
451 14
479 01
'28 86

80 98
4 40

pn 1
3
98 00
10 33
109 65
85 56
16 .35
3 78
7 60

$692 00
121 00
105 25
5.52 25
70 00
302 50
430 90
33 40

$41,789 27
6, 436 65
9, .536 66
100, 032 16
6, 513 07
20, 409 47
40, 607 19
3, 327 15

rt

O

$265, 453 79
732 31 $354,210 18
$352 00
42, 331 46
613 67
60, 110 09
969 20
58, 752 23
93, 377 21
632 21 6, 592, 534 65 6,321,461 47
092 50
13, 464 39'
33,865 13
064. 89
516,341 97
.556, 059 66
1, 2.52 00
146 00 2, 547, 855 48 2,231, 24-< 19 13, 634 00
537 09
22,371 23
11, 737 43

23, 296 14 2, 201, 546 99 1, 400, 327 75104,411,897 55 94, 926, 579 00 755,499 34

NOTE.—Special allowances were made to the collectors of each district; but in a few districts the salary and commissions provided by law were more than the amount
covered by the alloAvance, in Avhich cases the special allowances have beeu set aside and the collectors credited with the regular salary and .commissions, as shown by the first
(jolumn.
1 Tbif^ iteni includes all kjuds of stamps furnished to collectors, except adhesive stamps, in addition to the assessuient lists.




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52J

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F I F T H AUDITOR.

319

K.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Bevenue for internal-revenue
stamps {adhesive) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
DR.

To
To
To
To
To

amouut
amouut
amouut
amouut
amount

of
of
of
of
of

stamps iu bauds of Commissioner June 30, 1873
stamps ordered froui xirinter
stamps returned by ageuts
stamps received for redemxition
discount witbheld in excbans^e

fiS, 134
6,112, 230
491, 217
51, 211
2

:....:

25
73
63
82
58

6,659,797 01
CE.

By
By
By
By
By
By
By

amount
amouut
amount
amount
amouut
amount
amount

of casb deposited with United Sfcates Treasurer
2, 374, 207 70
allowed as commissions
151, Oil 54
of stamps sent to ageuts
3, 501,244 99
of stamps destroyed
630, 696 25
allowed ou certiticate of Commissioner
446 12
of stamps canceled and returned
2, 085 15
ofstamps remaining in bands of Commissioner June 30,1874.
105 26
6,659,797 01

L.—Statement of amountsx^aid for engraving andxjrinting stamxis, and for stamx>paper, f c ,
for the Office of Internal Eevenue for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
To tbe Continental Bank-Note Company
To tbe National Bank-Note Compauy .".
To tbe American Phototype Comxiany
To Josexih R. Carpenter
To Skidmore & Company
To tbe Bureau of EngraAdng and Printing
To James M. Willcox & Co.,'(x3aper)
*ToA. Trochsler
To Cbarles Magaro-e & Co

...-

.;,..

$42, 344
22,766
4, 582
86,055
5, 449
144,151
76,213
191
2,735

04
61
34
03
75
84
44
52
47

384,490 04
Statement of amounts p>ciid for the redemxytion of internal-revenue stamxis during thefisoal
year ended June 30,1874.
For stamps returned ,
$60, 358 04
For stamps destroyed
608 10
For stamxis unnecessarily used
3, 604 78
• 64,570 92
M.—Statementof accounts ofthe Commissioner of Internal Eevenue for internal-revenue heerstamps for the fiscal year ended Jime 30, 1874.
DR.

To amount of stanips in hands of Commissioner Juue 30, 1873, as per
last report
$5,117,903 29^
To amouut of stamps received from printers
7,986,209 1 6 |
To amouut of stamps returned by collectors
10, 666 66|To amount of stamps received for redemption
309 75.
13,115,88 87f
CK.

By amonnt of stamps sent to collectors
By amount of stamxis destroyed
'.
By amouut of stamps remaining iu bands of Commissioner J u u e 30,
1874
:




9, 482,465 00
10, 054 66^
3, 622, .569 20-§
13,115, 088 87f

" Account for Juue uot included.

320

. REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

N.—Statement of accoimts of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue for internal-revenue
stamps for distilled spirits for the fis cat year ended June 30, 1874.
DK.

;

To amouut of stamps iu hands of Commissiouer Juue 30,1873, as per
last report
$34,418,701 00
To amount of stamps received from x^rinters
- 52, 457, 385 00
To amount of stamxis returned by collectors
49, 302 90
To amount of stamps received for redemx')tiOu
46 00
86,925,434 90
CK.

By amount of stamps sentfcocollectors
49, 091, 952 00
By amount of stamps destroyed
3,295,323 90.
By amount of difference of 185,200 exportation-stamps, (reduction iu
value as per act of Cougress)
27,780 .00
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissiouer June 30,
1874
:
34,510,379 00
86,925, 434 90
0.—Statement.of accoimts of ihe Commissioner of Internal Bevenue for internal-revenue tohacco, snuff, and cigar stamps for thefisoal year ended June 30, 1874.
DR.

To amount of stamps in hands of Commissioner J u n e 30, 1873, as per
last r e p o r t . . .
$8,143,184 13
To amount of stamps received from printers.
31, 373, 533 37
To amouut of stamps returned by collectors..,
28,458 45
To amount of stamps received for redemption
1, 364 32
To amount of stamps returned for exchange
•
20 56
39,546,560 83
CR.

By amouut of stamps sent to collectors
31, 306,794 69
By amount of stamps destroyed
24,250 85
By amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissiouer J u n e 30,
1874
:
8,215,515 29
39,546, 560 83
P.—Statemeni of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Bevenue for internal-revenue
special-tax stamps for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
DR.

To amount of stamps remaining in hands of Commissioner Juue 30,
1873
To amouut of stamps received from printer
Td amount of stamps returned by collectors

. $660,710 00
11,772, 490 00
820,200 00
13,253,400 00

CR.

By amount of stamps sent to collectors
,.".... 10, 005,700 00
By amount of stamps remaining iu hands of Commissioner June 30,
'1874
-3,247,700 00




13,253, 400 00

FIFTH

321

AUDITOR.

<5.—Statement of accounts of the Commissioner of Internal Bevenue for internal-revenue
stamped foil ivrappers for tohdcco for thefiscalyear ended June 30, 1874.
DR.

T o amount stamped foil wrappers received from xirinter

$486,589 50

CR.

By amount stamx^ed foil wrappers sent to collectors
486,589 50
Number of stamp-agents' accounts adjusted during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1874
....'.
659
Amount involved
^101,924 35
R.—Statement showing the amounts paid for salaries in the Office of the Commissioner of Internal Bevenue; also salaries and expenses of supervisors, agents, and surveyors of distilleries,
fees and exxienses of gaugers, miscellaneous exxienses, counsel-fees, cfc, and taxes erroneously
assessed and collected refunded during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Name.

Salary.

.K. R. Cobb
L.M.Eoolke
.Lucian H a w l e y
J . .M. H e d r i c k '
John McDonald
D. W . M u n n
P.W.Perry
.. ,
S.T. Powell
E. D. Sewall*
W . A . Siinnions *
Alexander P. Tutton

$3, 000
3, 000
3,000
3, 000
. 3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
3, 000
866
2, 075
3, 000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
65
03
00

29, 941 68

E x p e n s e s . Clerk-hire.
$8, 280
4, 022
6,031
3, 858
1, 721
3, 667
8,104
3, 063
2, 495
.3, 658
4,271

90
78
11
02
07
86
51
17
67
98
30

49,175 37

$3,123
2,154
7, 806
1, 520
2, 997
3, 324
3, 662
1, 987
1, 104
2, 518
4,133

18
46
63
31
27
00
83
65
95
88
86

34, 334 02

Furniture.

$72 97
7 00
4 65.
166 50
251 12

Rent.

TotaL

$480 00 $14, 884
999 21^ 10 176
16, 837
100 00
8, 478
720 00
8,511
9,991
500 04 15, 274
106 00
8,161
433 32
4, 900
866 65
9, 286
11, 405

06
45
'74
33
31
86
38
47
.59
04
16

4, 205 22 117,907 41

A d d to this a m o u n t s t a t i o n e r y
f u r n i s h e d s u p e r v i s o r s a n d all o w e d in. T r e a s u r y D e p a r t ment accouuts

1 028 84

Total

118, 936 25

*In office a fraction of the year.

S. —Internal-revenue agents.
Name
Oeorge C. Alden*..
J. N. Beach
B. P. Brasher
James J. Brooks...
A.E.Burpee*
Hiram Brownlee...
Charles P. Brown..
E. T. Bridges
•John C. Bowyer . . .
A. M. Crane*
S.J. Conklin*
Oeorge L. Douglass
William A. Gavett
Arthur Gunther...
C M . Horton
:F.S.Hill
:
.John T. Hogue
John A.Joyce
.Robert Lowry*
D. H. Lyman*
,
J. H. Manley
John Mitchell
T. D. McAlpine*...
J o h n B . Miller*

$1, 040 00
2, 496 00
1, 694 00
2, 480 00
2,165 00
1, 649 00
2,199 00
2,191 00
2,191 00
.588 00
1.32 00
1, 776 00
2, 462 00
1, 976 00
2, 091 00
1,794 00
2, 271 00
2,504 00
25 00
1, 368 00
2, .504 00
1,936 00
1,1.58 00
150 00
230 00
2, 229 00
520 00
2, 358 00
2,154 00
1, 422 00
130 00
2, 504 00

.J. C. Napier*
Zenas Rogers
E. D. Sewall*
A. M . C . Smith, jr...
J. E. Simpson
Isaac S. Stewart* .,.
A . M . Tinker*
H.T. Yaryan

52, 387 00

Total

* In office a fraction of the year.

21 F



Salary.

Expenses.
$581 52
1. 292 ,58
2, 048 85
954 71
1, 076 88
1, 505 47
1, 988 61
835 25
1, 037 25
465 67
47 15
262 25
1, 594 00
2, 936 30
935 26
725 25
1, 274 33
1, 777 44
38 55
1, 503 ,53
1, 364 90
992 98
i,278 90
127 20
175 48
1, 495 04
589 00
464 92
1, 743 70
1,126 79
162 35
1, 915 29
34, 317 40

Total.
$1, 621 52
3, 788 58
3, 742 85
3, 434 71
3,241 88.
3,154 47
4,137 61
3, 026 25
3, 228 25
1, 053 67
17,9 15
2, 038 25
4, 056 00
4, 912 .30
3, 026 26
2, 519 25
3, 545 33
4,281 44
63 55
2, 871 53
3, 868 90
2, 928 98
2, 436 90
277 20
405 48
3, 724 04
1,109 00
2, 822 92
3, 897 70
2, 548 79
292 35
4, 419 29
6, 704 40

322

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

T.—Surveyors of distilleries.
Salaries
Expeuses

;

,

'

Total

$11,896 0910,715 46
-•

22,611 55

Fees and expenses of Gaugers from Fehruary 1 to June 30, 1873.
Fees
Traveling exx>enses

-

453,490 81
31,134 61

Total

484,625 42'
Fees and expenses of Grangers for fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.

Fees
•
Traveling expeuses
^

847,825 58
56, 060 29

Total

903, 885 87
U.—Salary of Office of Commissioner of Internal Bevenue.

Salary, (15 months)
Miscellaneous expenses:
Salary
Traveling expenses
Expenses
Telegrams
•
Rent
:.
Stationery
Exx^ressage

443,918 47

:

'

$2,244
9, 342
23, 694
1,885
6, .500
26,011
59, 862

.50
32
.53
34
00
60
82
129,541 11

Counsel fees aud exxienses, moieties, aud rewards :
Fees and expeuses
•
Moieties
Rewards
•

24, 027 81
5,989 14
9,733 35
.
,
_

39,750 30
613,209 88

Taxes erroneously assessed aud collected iefunded

207, 994 69

Statement of fines, xienalties, and forfeitures.
Balauce ou deposit to credit of the Secretary of the Treasury, per last report
\
- - . . , 159,785 69
Amouut deposifced
72, .270 75
Amount disbursed

232,056 44
104,165 31

Balance ou deposit to credit of the Secretary of the Treasury July 1, 1874.

127, 891 13

V.—Moneys refunded on lands sold for taxes and redeemed.
Arkansas
Tennessee
Yirginia
Total




:

15, 456 67
1,293 27
27, 860 00
44,609 94

FIFTH

AUDITOR.

323

Moneys illegally collected in insurrectionary districts refunded during the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1874.
Amouut refunded

$4.30 08

Statement of {dishursements of South Carolina Free-School-Fund Commissioners for salaries
of teachers, repairs of school-houses, fc.
Amouut disbursed

$6,372 44

Statement of certificates issued and allowed for drawhacks on merchandise exported for the
fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.
Number of certi ficates received aud allowed
Amount allowed

'

454

V.—Moneys refunded under xyvivate acts of Congress.
W. A. Saylor
Nathaniel McKav
John Paine
1
Total




.-.

|1,871 53
6, 574 00
410 00
8,855 53




REPORT OF TIE SIXTH AUDITOR.




r




REPORT
OF

THE SIXTH AUDITOR OF THETREASURY.
O F F I C E OF T H E A U D I T O R OF THE TREASURY
F O R THE P O S T - O F F I C E DEPARTMENT,

Octoher 10, 1874.
S I R : I have the honor to submit the following report of the business
operations of this Office for the fiscal year ended June 30,1874. My annual report to the Postmaster-General, now in course of preparation, will
exhibit in detail the financial transactions of the Post-Office Department for the past fiscal year.
<
^
A comparison of the tables and statements of the present report with
those contained in my report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1873,
shows a large increase of business in ea'ch division of this Bureau, especially in the money-order division.
EXAMINING DIVISION—BENJAMIN LIPPINCOTT, PRINCIPAL EXAMINER.

This division receives and audits the quarterly accounts current of all
post-offices in the United States. It is divided into four 'subdivisions,
viz, the opening-room, the stamp-rooms, the examining corps proper,
and the error-rooms.
1. The opening-room: All returns, as soon as received, are opened, and
if found in order according to regulations, are entered on the register,
carefully folded and tied, and then forwarded to the stamp-rooms.
The number of quarterly accounts-current received during each quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874, was as follows :
Third quarter 1873
Fourth quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874
Total

32,578
33,106
33,678
33, 425
132,787

Excess over last fiscal year, 6,180.
2. The stam'p-rooms: The quarterly returns received from the openingroom are divided alphabetically among eight stamp-clerks, whose duties
-consist in comparing the stamp-statements of the iiostmasters in the accounts-current with their own books, and the returns made to them from
the stamp-division of the finance office, whence stamp-orders are issued
and receij)ts for the same received and forwarded to the stamp-clerks.
The returns thus approved or corrected are passed to the examiners.
All accounts from offices of the first and second classes are passed
through the various subdivisions of the Office in advance of other returns,
;so that they may reach the chief examiner aud his assistants with as
little delay as possible.



328

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The number of accounts, exami ned and settled b y t h e stamp-clerks
for each quarter of the fiscal year was as follows :
Third quarter 1873.
Fourfch quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874

32,21332,933
• 33,17232,981

;

Total

:

.--- 131,299-

Excess over last fiscal year, 6,160.
3. The examining-corjjs proper is composed of seventeen clerks, among
whom the returns received from the stamp-rooms are divided by sections, each comprising several States or parts of States.
The average number to each section is about 1,900. After the examination of the accounts-current and the stamp-account, reviewing and
refooting the transcript of mails received, aud examining all vouchers
belonging to that portion of the work, the balance is drawn on all accounts of the third, fonrth, aud fifth classes. The returns thus examined
and completed are forwarded to the registering division to be entered
upon its books.
The number of acconnts examined and sent to the registering division
for the fiscal year was as follows:
Third quarter 1873
Fourth quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874
Total

,.

.32,213
32,933
.33,172
32, 981

^
-

131,299

Excess over last fiscal year, 6,160.
4. The error-rooms contain five clerks, who review and re-examine.
the error accounts received from the registering division, and forward
to each postmaster a copy of his account as stated by him, and as audited
and corrected by this Office.
The number of accounts so corrected and copied for the fiscal yearwas as follows:
Third quarter 1873..
Fourth quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874
Total

:

6,146
5,813
5, 8584,981
22,598-

Each subdivision reports weekly to the chief examiner, and monthly
through that officer to the chief clerk, the progress of the work, so that
the exact amouut of labor done by each clerk is clearly ascertained.
All vouchers relative to allowances made by the Post-Uffice Dei)artment for clerk-hire, lights, fuel, rent, stationery, &c., at post-offices of
the first and second classes, are forwarded at the beginning of each
quarter to the chief examiner and his assistant for examination. A
statement is then prepared, showing the vouchers received, the amount
allowed, and the amount suspended^ when found to be in excess ofthe
allowance.
On receipt of the returns from the examiners, these accounts are
reviewed, and the amount allowable added, and the balance drawm by
the chief examiner.
The number of post-offices ofthe first and second classes which have^
received allowances for clerk-hire, rent, &c., was 352.
The number of offices of the second class having an allowance for
clerk-hire only was 195.



SIXTH AUDITOR.
329
)
The number of offices having an allowance for clerk-hire to aid in
separating the mails, (independent of thenumber above stated,) was 480.
Totalnumber of offices of all classes receiving allowances and approved by the chief examiner was 1,027.
The expense accounts of the offices of the first and second classes
were regularly entered by the chief examiner and his assistant on the
expense register, and show quarterly the amount of vouchers received,
amount allowed, and amount suspended, copies of Avhich were forwarded
to each postmaster.
Attached to the examining division is a corresxionding clerk, whose
duty consists in corresponding with postmasters relative to errors in
their accounts-current,vand in making day-book entries, &c.
The amount involved in the settlement of the quarterly accountscurrent of postmasters during the fiscal year was as follows:
Third quarter 1873
Fourth quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874

'.

$6,053,606
6,027,264
6,434,903
6,151,084

Total

50
17
86
49

24,666,859 02

Excess over last year, $1,785,203.30.
The labors of the examining division for the fiscal year ended June
30, 1874, have been fully completed. All accounts received in proper
form have been examined and passed to the registering division. At
no period has the work been more perfect in all its details. Not only
has there been a decided improvement in the preparation of returns by
postmasters, particularly those of first and second class offices, but, by
judicious changes in the office, the efficiency of the examining corps
has been greatly increased.
, REGISTERING DIVISION—F. L SEYBOLT, PRINCIPAL REGISTER.

This division receives from the examining division the quarterly
accounts of postmasters, re-examines and registers them, placing each
item of revenue and expenditure under its appropriate head, adding
and recapitulating the same, and showing in the second quarter register
of each year the total amount of receipts and expenditures for the fiscal
year.
Thirteen clerks are employed upon this division, and during the fiscal
year ended June 30,1874, the number of accounts registered aud amounts
involved therein were as follows:
Third quarter 1873
Fourth quarter 1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874

'
°
•.

32,213 $6,0.53,606 50
32,933 6,027,264 17
33,172 6,434,903 86
32,981 6,151,084 49
131,299 24,666,859 02

Increase over last iiscal year

5,167

$1,688,931 62

This division also notes in books, prepared for the purpose, all changes
of postmasters, establishment, re-establishment, discontinuance, and
change of name of post-offices reported from the appointment-office,
and the number thus noted during the fiscal year was as follows:
Third quarter 1873
Fourth ([uarter .1873
First quarter 1874
Second quarter 1874

•

Total-

Increase over last fiscal year, 542.



----.-.

2,255
2,552
3,307
3, 40(>
11,514

REPORT

ool

ON T H E

FINANCES.

New change-books for this purpose have been prepared for the next
two years, which contain also the salaries alloAved each office of the
first, second, and third classes as a check upon the settlement of accounts
of such offices.
The work of this division is fully up to the requirements of the Office,
the quarterly accounts received from each office having been registered
to the 30th of June, 1874, the footings and recapitulations made, and
the books prepared for the registration of accounts for the third quarter
of 1874.
BOOK-KEEPERS' DIVISION—F. B. L I L L E V , PRINCIPAL

BOOK-KEEPER.

T To this division is assigned the duty of keeping the ledger-accounts
of the Department, embracing postmasters, late postmasters, contractors, late contractors, and accounts of a general, special, and miscellaneous character.
This work requires the services of fifteen clerks, who are employed as
follows, viz : One principal book-keeper, in charge of the division and the
ledger of general accounts; one assistant principal, in charge of cashbook, deposit-book, stamp-journal, ledger of warrants and deposits, and
day-book entries on reports approved by the Audi to t^; one clerk ia
charge of the transfer-journal and miscellaneous duties; nine bookkeepers of postmasters' accounts', and three of contractors' accounts.
The auxiliary books, from which the postings are made quarterly are
as follows: 13 registers of postmasters' quarterly returns, 35 pay-books,
9 journals, 1 register of warrants, 3 registers of Postmaster-Greneral's
drafts, 1 stamp-journal 1 cash-book, 1 deposit-book, 1 Auditor's draftbook, 1 transfer-journal, 1 money-order transfer-book, 12 registers of
mail, messenger, and special mail-service, 1 route-agents' book, 1 lettercarriers' book, 1 special agents' fare-book ; total, 82 books.
'
Accounts of the first, second, and third classes, and all contractors'
accounts, are balanced quarterly; all others at the end of the fiscal year.
For a detailed statement showing the number of accounts by sections,
and to a limited extent the labor performed in the preparation of auxiliary books, reference is made to the following tables.
The work of the division is in. a satisfactory condition, and fully up
to the requirements of the Office.
Ledger of ma'd-contractors'accounts.

m
a

1

1

States.
5

o

Maine, NewjHaDipshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhodelsland
Counecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, and W est Virgiuia
No. 2 Maryland, North Carolina, South Caroliua, G-eorgia, Floi'ida,
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee
Illiuois ludiana, and Wisconsin
. .
.
J^o.-d Ohio, Kansas, Michigan, Kentucky, Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota,
Califoruia, Oregon, Nebraska, Nevada, and Territories

t

a o
o5

S5 <
D

S9.S

§SI

No.l

Total

.-

.

Increase over last fiscal year




4

1, 9.50

1,914

8,970

4

2,015

2,270

12, 680

4

2,012

2,144

10, 957

12

.5, 977

6, 328

32, 607

1,986

3,892

315

SIXTH

331

AUDITOR.

Ledgers of postmasters^ accounts.

States.

No.l
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
No. 5
No. 6
No. 7
No. 8
No. 9

Maine, Now Harapshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Ilhode Islaud, Connecticut, and Mississippi
NCAV York and New Jersey
'
Pounsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and District of Columbia
Virginia, West Virginia, North Caroliua, South Carolina, and Georgia..
Ftgjida, Alabama, Louhsiaua, Texas, Arkansas, and Missouri
Kentucky, Tennessee, and Illinois
Ohio and Indiana
Michigan, Wisconsin. aud Iowa
California, Oregon, Minnesota, Kan.'^,as, Nebraska, Nevada, and Territories
''.'

3,542
3,415
4,073
4,123
4, 184
3, 909
3,631
3,652

556
432
600
935
965
870
740
125

4,226

Total

.34, 755

5,790

Increase over previous year'.
Miscellaneous.
Number
Number
Number
Nuraber
Number

of entries in
of day-book
of entries iu
of en tries iu
of entries in

stamp-journal
entries
deposit-book
casb-book
transfer-journal

Total..-Increase over previous year
STATING

I

5, 500
1, 551
10, 300
5,207
3,040
25,598
1, 969

DIVISION-

The general postal accounts of postmasters, and those of late postmasters, until fully stated, are in charge of this division. The number
of accounts is 50,749, an increase of 4,978 during the year, and an
average of 3,625 to each of the fourteen sections.
The offices of the first, second, and third classes are called ^ presiden^
tial,^' and from them are derived nineteen-twentieths of the postal
revenues. I t is therefore necessity that the accounts of postmasters at
these offices should receive early attention, that any failure to pay
indebtedness, or to comply with instructions, may be promptly ascertained and acted upon. During the first two months of each quarter,
the items of the *' presidential" accounts for the preceding quarter have
beeii stated from the earliest records made in the Office, then compared
Aviththe statements rendered by postmasters, the differences investigated,
and special instructions given, that the postmaster may use the audited
balance in making his payments, and in rendering his accouut for the
current quarter.
.
Those of the general postal accounts of postmasters at offices of the
foiirtli class, showing debit balances of $10 or more, as stated from the
ledgers each quarter, have had the items of the succeeding quarter
added, as in the case of ^^presidential" offices; if such sums were still
due, special instructions were given to include the amounts in the payments for the current quarter. The items of the remaining accounts of
t\\^ fourth class were stated as soon as thc}^ could be obtained from the
ledgers. Statements of such of them as showed debit balances of $1 or
more, when stated and balanced with the ledgers to the close of the



332

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

fiscal year ended June 30,1873, were sent to the postmasters, with instructions, before the 31st of December, 1873.
The accounts of late postmasters have been revised monthly to secure
an early adjustment; and all such accounts have recently been fully
stated, to the latest dates, for use in the annual report of this Office to
the Postmaster-General.
The keeping of the record of statements rendered, each quarter, by
the ''presidential" offices, the preparing of circulars of instructions to
postmasters, and various other duties, are assigned to a miscellaneous
clerk. To the principal clerk is assigned the general supervision of the
division, the correspondence on the general postal accounts of postmasters at ''presidential" offices, and on such special cases as may be
referred to him.
Although the work of the division -has been unusually heavy, itscondition is entirely satisfactory. The details are more fully shown by
the following statements:




Statement of the numher of general x^ostal accounts of x^ostmaste

_s

the increase in the niimhe'*', and the classification of the offices, for the fiscal year ended
June'SO, lS7i.
•
' .
•

Presidential offices.

1

States aud Territories.

1

1

Maine
New Hauipshire

4
4
6
5

Totals
0

New York, A to'S . . . .

s

i

o

P

c
s

9
o

o

P

•

M

"o

o

6
'5
o
ft

P

o
H

3
4
o
23

28
23
21
103

4
0
2
11

716
358
394
526

98
46
()4
92

19

124

32

175

17

1,994

18"

• 114

24

156

20

1,763

18

114

24

1.56

20

7

73

19

99

13

7

73

19

99

Connecticut

3
1
1
3

49
9
6
28

4
0
4
13

56
10
11
44

Totals

8

92

21

2
0
2
2

12
10
16
10.

6

Totals

Totals......
4

Wisconsm
West Virginia

5

Totals
6

Idaho




1
2
0
0
1
0
0

c.2

.si

III.

&

1

21
15
13
75

3 Pennsylvania, A to'R

u

F o u r t h cla ss.

?
o
H

28'
9
16
24

842
413
474
642

2
10
13

300

77

2,371

1^7

2, 264

6

1, 763.

314

187

2,264

161

10

2,288

42

13

2,117

161

10

2,288

1,003
619
76
293

104
62
15
85

45
7
2
19

1,1.52
688
93
397

29
37
1
7

121

17

1, 901

266

73

2,330

16
13
20
14

7
1
*2
0

906
413
502
665

. 25
6
46
40

24
0
38
18

955
425
646
723

39
43
50
24

48

9

63

6

2, .546

U7

86

2, 749

36
20
0
3
7
2
1

38
23
0
3
9
2
2

6
•5
0
1
0
0
0

869
675
0
29
141
114
62

-.2
36
3
0
11
0
1

22
55
0
3
14
2
3

963
766
3
32
166
116
66

117
23
* 0
1
25
23
10

55

1, 208
698
104
441

38
39

971
.438
666
737

46
44
48
24

1,001
789
3
35
175
lis
68

123
28
0

1.56

1
1
0
0
1
0
1

2,387

. 74

o
3
2
2

26

42

9
o
1
5

2, 420

* Decrease.

'

1

6
10
15
9

6

2,117

870
436
495
745

23

314

ill

2, .546

40

2,420

26

2, 387

55

2, 451

91

2,812

162

12

25
23
10

Statement of the nimiber of general postal accounts of postmasters, fc.—Coutinued.
Presi lential offices.

.2
o

States and Territories.
O

45

2
P

S

1 1

Q

"A
Montaua
N e w Mexico . . .
Utah
Washington
W y o m i ng

1 1

2
P

'o
O

4
3
3
3
3

4

81

8

93

10
0
0

.•

Total s
Ohio
Oregon

0
0
1
0
3

0
1
0

I

1
3
2
3
0

92
8
7

11
0
1

0
. .
•

1

• a c
A

a

.2

6

1

7

F o u r t h class.

%

CP

a5U

P

i

80
55
154
141
16

0
0
7.
1
11

15

2,326

113
8
.8

16
3
0

1, 628
240
67

o
H

o
ceo
oiri

'^

«.«

i•

1

6

OO

9.

1

1—i

8
1
10
5
3

88
56
161
147
30

*2

142

126

2, 594

101
7
2

2, 045
252
82

53
27
13

92
59
•164
1.50
33

20
3

2.158
260
90

Totals

10

107

12

129

19

1,935

334

110

2, 379

69
30
lo

Illiuois
N e w .Jersey

5
2

127
. 29

4
15

130
46

16
4

1,487
476

181
87

39
'33

1, 707
596

38
19

1,843
()42

54
23

9

California
Missouri

680
1,460

53
17

iT
*2
21
4
2, 687

Totals

7-

10

Mississippi
Kentucky
T e x a s ..'.

'.

Totals
II

Virginia
Maryland
N e w Y o r k , T to Z
Nebraska

Totals




20

1,963

268

72

2, 303

10
3

561
1,287

66
64

21
63

648
1, 414

43
14

• 70

8

78

13

1,848

130

84

2, 062

0
3
2

5
25
27

18
0
1

23
28
30

4
6
10

485
867
681

18
49
43

13
119
86

516
1,035
810

33
24
89.

57

19

81

20

2, 033

110

218

2,361

2
3
2
2

24
14
24.
14

2
2
4
6

1,183
475
283
451

116
90
51
31

36
6
27
24

1,335
571
361
506

83
15
3
81

9

76

14

2, 392

288

93

2, 773

4

O

^^

539
1,063
840

.

166

2, 849

182

1

..

/

.

70

2, 442

146

21
11
20
11

.

-

. ,-^

2,140

57

112

2, 485

57

32
46

1
0
2

...•

182

6
2

5

Totals

19

26
44

0

.. .

1.56

0
0

....

243

2, 508

93

8

a

• *2

' 228

316
5
13

lii

s

2^-3 •
P

"A
-

190

37
30
99

85
17
7
87

1, 359
585
385
520
:

„

12

1
0
6
4

Delaware
Indiana
P e n u s y i v a n i a , S. to Z

;

Tennessee
Arkansas
Florida. .
Louisiana

6
2
67
33

2
0
12
6

89
3
1, 279
609

6
0
63
64

1
U
61
9

96
3
1,403
682

0
13
3

11

15

108

20

1, 980

133

71

2,184

10
9.

80
70

17
4

1,138
955

69
82

63
71

1, 270
1,108

105

19

150

21

2, 093

151

134

2, 378

15
7
2
5

1
1
3
0

19
9
6
6^

2
4
1
0

805
562
151
'^77-

los"
31
23
21

71
16
5
16

984
609
179
314

44
33
3
• 2

6

• 29

5

40

7

183

108

2, 086

82

102
5
1,470
715

.

1
0
25
9

34

3
1
1
1

:

82
55
50

26

Iowa . . ...
Michigan
Totals

14

0
2
7
6

15
11

Totals
13

5
0
54
23

1,795

15
"•'••27

61

2, 292

55

no

1,003
618
185
320

35

2,528

1,.350
1, 178

46
37
4
2

65;

.. .

2,126

89

34, 673

Totals

1,417

*D eer ease.
Nuuiber of general postal accounts, first, second, and third classes.
Number of general postal accounts, fourth class

1, 551
33 122

Whole number of general postal accouuts for the fiscal year
"Whole number of general postal accounts for the fiscal year euded June 30, 1873 .
Increase during fiscal year
Increase during fiscal year ended June 30, 1873
lucrease duriug fiscal year ended June 30, 1872

34, 673
33,254

a

1,419
1, 189
1,741

o




HH

CO

336

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

StaiemenCshowing the number of changes and the condition of general x?osial accounts of late
X)ostmasters for and during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1874.

1 •
Totals.

erg

C h a n g e s r e p o r t e d to t h i s Office w e e k l y b y t h e F i r s t A s s i s t a n t Postraaster-G-eneral, r e c o r d e d for t h e fiscal y e a r . •

is
Ul

Established
Ke-established
Discontinued
N e w bon d s .
Miscellaneous

. . . .

Totals

424
121
228
116
1,423

368
106
233
148
1 746

464
109
286
233
2 20/

580
143
226
510
1,782

1, 836
479
973
1 007
i 158

2,312

'
-

2, 601

3 299

3, 241

11 453

a CO

C o n d i t i o n of g e u e r a l p o s t a l a c c o u n t s of lata p o s t m a s t e r s for
t h e fiscal y e a r .

1

IS

.a C
D

o

Ul

N u m b e r of a c c o u u t s of l a t e p o s t m a s t e r s ad'j usted
N u m b e r of a c c o u u t s of l a t e p o s t m a s t e r s i i n a d i u s t e d

2,008

2, 728

1,782

1,944

8, 462
7, 614
10, 076

W h o l e n u m b e r of a c c o u n t s of l a t e p o s t m a s t e r s

Increase iu nuaiber of late accounts over last year
lucrease in number of late accounts adjusted over last year

3,559
1,939

St'diement of miscellaneous husiness.

Correspondence, &.c.
5 ©
Ul

Letters received
Letters written
Statements, &c., received from postmasters
Reports made to Post-Office Dex)artment—delinquencies
Circulars i>repared
Offices supplied with blanks
A'^'ouchers filed

546
134
1,380
154

(*)
(*)

738
309
1, 8.34
307
3, 673
663
4, 623

762
331
1,530
172
2, 698
551
5,001

595
239
1,690
138
3,803
231
1, 219

2, 641
1,013
6, 4-34
771
10,174
. 1, 445
10, 843

"' No record.
•
COLLECTINa DIVISION—-EDWARD J. EVANS, P R I N C I P A L

CLERK.

To this division is assigned the collection of balances due from ail
postmasters, late postmasters, and contractors 5 also the payment of all
balances due to late and present postmasters, and the adjustment and
final settlement of postal accounts. The number of clerks einployed is
eighteen, and the work of the division is apportioned as follows:
On correspondence, 4.—Their duty is to insure as far as possible the
collection of all moneys due to the United States on postal and contractors' accounts, to examine the same carefully, and explain by letter,
when necessary, the correctness of the balances due thereon, and to submit for suit or criminal prosecution accounts of defaulting postmasters
and contractors.
Continued daily attention, good judgment, and clever discrimination
arexequired on this branch of the division, as is also a thorough knowledge of the entire business of the Office, and, to a degree, that of the



337

SIXTH AUDITOR.

Post-Ohice Department. How well the gentlemen of the division have
j)erformed their duties may be inferred from the sinall amouut closed
as uncollectible this year as compared with former years.
On drafts, 1.—His duties are to locate and issue drafts for the collection of balances due by postmasters and contractors; to record the
same in draft-registers, and report to tbe Post-Office Department for payment all balances due to late postmasters, and record the same.
This work, which involves the disbursement as well as collection of
Department moneys, and is therefore one of great responsibility, has
been performed by the gentleman in charge for several years, to the
<eatire satisfaction of the Office. .
Oil changes, 1.—His duties are to record all changes of postmasters
reported to this Office from the Post-Office Departmei^t; to enter and
file drafts paid; to record all'accounts of late postmasters in the book
of balances, and to state the final action thereon.
Great care and constant watchfulness are required in the proper discharge of the labors of this desk, and the gentleman in charge has proved
himself, during several y(^ars of service, eminently qualified, and wholly
reliable in the performance ofthe trust confided to him.
On letter-lyoohs, 2.—Their duty is to transcribe into their respective
books all letters written by the several divisions of the Office, and transmit the same, together with all circulars relating to postmasters' accounts.
This Avork has been performed promptly and satisfactorily.
On miscellaneous, 1.—His duties are to examine and compare with the
ledg^TS all accounts of late postmasters, and close as '' uncollectible,''or
by '-'• suspense,".all accounts so designated, and to assist in the preparation of the annual report to the Postmaster.-General, and other duties of
a miscellaneous character.
On copying, 8.—Their duties are to copy and revise all accounts of postmasters and others ; to transmit in their respective circulars all accounts
of late postmasters; to copy changes of postmasters ; to prepare salarybooks of the several post-offices, and to furnish a portion of the material
for the [Jnited States Official Register. This branch of the division is
in excellent condition, and the work performed is of a superior character.
The regulation of the Department, requiring current business to be
dispatched on the day received, is duly observed by this division.
I refer to the following tables for a more detailed statement of the
worl^ performed in this division during the fiscal year ended June 30,
1874:
^
Accounts of postmasters aud contractors.
.Accounts of postraasters becoming late duriug the period from Juh'^ 1, 1871, to
June 30,1873, in charge of the division
"
Accounts of postraasters becoraiug late during the fiscal year:
^Quarter ended September 30, 1873
Quarter euded December 31,1873
.'...
Quarter ended March 31,1874
Quarter euded June 30,1874
- Total.'.

16, 443
1,707
2, 240
2,560
2, 630

Amount.

%66, 346 73
51,
60,
67,
64.

891
330
821
482

00
00
18
66

310, 871 57

Accounts of contractors received from the pay-division for collectiou, upon
• AvMch dr'afts were issued:
Quarter ended September 30, 1873
Quarter ended December 31, 1873
Quarter euded March 31,1874
Quarter ended June 30,1874
Total

22 F '•

ISTumber.

3, 778 36
400 95
2, 054 79
1,086 41 7, 320 51

.




-- -

.- .

338

REPORT

CIS T H E

FINANCES.

Accounts of postmasters and contractors.

iS^umber.

Accouuts showing balances due late aud present ijostmasters, aud reported to
the Post-Otfice Dep.artment forfpayraent:
Quarterended September 30 1873
X Quarter ended Dt-cember 31,1873
Quarter ended March 31, 1874
.'
- Qnarter ended June 30,1874

322
337
612
885

$12,7,41 2218,636 17
27, 737 15
27, 420 21

2,'156

86, 534 7.5

431
481

Total
Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, showing balances
in their favor and closed by " suspense:"
Quarter euded Septem ber 30 1873
'.
Quarter ended Decem ber 31,1873
Quarter euded March 31 1874
Quarter ended Juue 30 1874
Total

Amounts

160 .591, 296 57

547

7 261 58

1, 4.59

•

8, 718 74

1
454

3 00'
354 45

Accounts of postmasters becoming late during the fiscal year, leaving balances
due the United States aud closed by " suspense:"
. '
Quartei'ended December 31, 1873
Quarter ended March 31,1874
Quarter ended June 30 1874

.

.

.

110

Accounts of late postraasters closed by "compromise:"
" Quarter euded Seyjtember 30. 1873
Quarter ended Deceu.iber 31,1873
'
Qaarter euded March 31 1874
Quarter ended Juue 30,1874

2

83 25
9.56 10

1
2

15 506 97
7, 280 07
189 435 70
18, 088 50

105

Total
Accounts copied duriug the fiscal year:
Quarter ended Septeraber 30,1873
Quarter euded Deceraber 31,1873
Quarter ended March 31,1874
Quarter ended June 30,1874

51 245 69

25
14
38
28

Total

939 30
50, 306 3!>

3

.....

Accounts of late postmasters and contractors submitted for suit:
Quarter ended September 30 1873
Quarter euded Deceraber 31,1873
Quarter ended March 31, 1874
Quarter ended June 30,1874

230 311 24

806
735
847
751

J

Total....:

3, 139

Drafts issued on present and late postraasters during the fiscal year:
Quarter ended Septeraber 30,1873
Qnarter euded Deceiuber 31,1873
Quarter euded March 31, 1874
•
Quarter ended June 30,1874

98, 455
94,836
97, 343
98, 900

67
86
45
69

390, 036 67

5,517
6, 085
5,998
4,876

Total '.

22, 476

Letters received duriug tbe fiscal year:
Qaarter ended Septeaiber .30,1873
Quarter coded December 31,1873
Qaarter ended Marcb 31,1874
Quai'ter ended J u n e 30,1874
Total




738 47
134 38

20

.Total

Lottera sent during tbe fiscal year :
Qaarter ended Septeraber 30, 1873
Quarter ended December 31, 1873
Quarter ended Marcb 31,1874
Quarter ended J u n e 30,1874
Total

1, 479 72v

8
10

Accounts of postraasters becoming late during the fiscal year,showing balances
due the Duited States found uncollectible:
•Quarter ended September 30,1873
Quarter ended December 31 1873
Quarter ended March 31 1874
Quarter ended June 30,1874

1 131 27

565

Total

.*,
."

.,
„

• 76, 474
73,267
73; 6.^2
75, 2.59
298, 652
40, 527
38,014
46,147
" 40, 686
165, 374

. SIXTH AUDITOR.

339

Letters recorded daring tbe Iiscal year :
Quarter ended September 30,1873
Qaarter ended December 31, 1873
Quarterended March 31, 1874
Qaarter ended June 30,1874
Total
Letters written to
^ Quarterended
Qaarter ended
Quarter ended
Qaarter ended

'2,488
2,765
3,268
2,546
11,067

postmasters and otbers duriug the fiscal year :
September 30, 1873
December 31,1873
March 31, 1874
June 30, 1874
'.

..'

3,160
2, 576
2, 324
908

'

Total

8,968

Pages of post-office changes reported by the Post-Office Department during
tbe fiscal year recorded in the change-books :
Quarter ended September 30,1873
.Quarter ended December 31, 1873
Quarterended March 31, 1874
,
Quarter ended June 30,1874
Total
Pages of'^ balance-book'^ recorded during fiscal year :
Quarter ended September 30,1873
Quarter ended December 31,1873
Quarterended March 31,1874
Qaarter ended June 30,1874

171
224
267
260
922

.'

143
166
218
208

Total

735

Pages of draft-registers recorded during fiscal year :
Quarter euded September 30,1873
Quarter ended December 31,1873
Quarter ended March 31,1874
Quarter ended June 30, 1874
Total
,
Pages of letter-book recorded during fiscal year :
Quarter ended September 30,1873
Quarter ended December 31,1873
Quarter ended March 31, 1874
,.
Quarter ended June 30, 1874

44
40
45
41

:
.•:

170
1,191
1, 472
1,514
1,503

Total

5,680

LAW DIVISION—J. BOZMAN KERR, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

To this division is assigned the duty of preparing for suit the acco unts
of defaulting late postmasters and contractors.
The number of accounts and the amounts due thereon, certified for
suit during the fiscal year, was as follows :
Quarter ended
Qaarter euded
Quarterended
Qaarter ended

September 30,1873
December 31, 1873
March 31, 1874
June 30,1874

Total.

25 $15, 506
14
7,280
38 189,435
28 18,088

97
07
70
50

105 230,311 24

Amount of collections on judgments, and interest thereon, and penalties.'.

$43, 369 76

All accounts receivedfrom the collecting-division have been prepared
for suit and transmitted to the Department of Justice.




340

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

POREiaN-MAIL DIYISION—ISAAC W. NICHOLLS, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

This division has charge of all postal accounts between the United
States and foreign governments, and the accounts of steamship companies for ocean transportation of mails when not paid by subsidy.
Settlement of foreign postal accounts during fiscal year.

A m o u n t involved.

N a m e of c o u n t r y .

T h e U n i t e d K i n g d o m of G-reat B r i t a i n a n d I r e l a n d
E m p i r e of G e r m a n y
!
K i n g d o m of B e l g i u m
Kingdonn of N e t h e r l a n d s
.'
Confederation of S w i t z e r l a n d
K i n g d o m of I t a l y
,
K i n g d o m of Deurnarlc, fbr e x t r a n a t i o n a l x>ostage..
K i n g d o m of Sweden

f991, 043 59
401, 592 83
31, 074 03
25, 467 10
43, 950 86
32, 168 19
2, 240 10
11, 891 10

. Total..,

1, 539, 927 86

Number of duxMcates registered in the fiscal year.
T:

Received from-

CO

S e n t to—

^
The United Kingdom
Grerraan E m p i r e
Belgium
Switzerland
-Netherlands
Denmark
Erance
Norway
Sweideu
Italy
W e s t I n d i e s , &c
N o v a Scotia, &c
Total

358
200
109
• 80
41
54
49
42
77
39
117
40
1,206

321
190
101
74
37
50
25
58
79
37
126
27

314
181
108
76
38
50
53
48
69
38
137
13

342
216
116
80
41
54
66
57
68
41
174
38

1,125 1,125

TheUnited Kingdom
German Empire
Belgium
Switzerland
Netherlands
Denmark
Erance
'...
Norway
Sweden
Italy
W e s t I n d i e s , &c
N o v a Scotia, &c ,

Total

267
195
•86
70
41
40
43
51
51
43
128
39

307
177
103
81
49
54
44
57
57
50
167
12

314
214
100
91
51
63
46
56
55
52
172
48

1,046 1, 054 1,158

1,262

268
201
85
74
43
45
38
42
41
43
126
40

T o t a l n n m b e r of d u p l i c a t e s r e g i s t e r e d , 9,269.

Amounts reported for x)ccyment of halances due foreign governments on settlements of the accounts for the quarters named, together with- the costs, in currency.
Quarter
ended—
U n i t e d K i n g d o m Of G r e a t B r i t a i n a n d I r e l a n d .

Dec.
Mar.
June
Sept.

31,1872
31,.1873
30,1873
30,1873

Total

A m o u n t in
gold.
$15,179
20, 443
24, 6,52
23,297

24
29
76
13

83, 572 42

Costing in c u r r e n c y .
E m p i r e of G e r m a n y .'

J u n e 30,1873
Sept. 30,1873
D e c . 31,1873

27, 973 33
18, 489 80
16,186 70

Total

62, 649 83

C o s t i n g in c u r r e n c y .

69,606 36




SIXTH AUDITOR.

341

Amounts reported for xiayment of halances due foreign governments, c^-c.—Continued.
Quarter
ended—

To-

Mar.
.June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.

Belgium

\

31,1873
30,1873
30,1873
31,1873
31,1874

Amount in
gold.
$2, 339
1, 978
1,971
2,194
2, 425

02
16
40
62
95

Total

10, 909 15

Costing in currency

12,171 20
M a r . 31,1873
J u n e 30,1873

D e n m a r k , for e x t r a n a t i o n a l p o s t a g e

1, 086 94
938 06
2, 025 00

' Total

2, 387 56

C o s t i n g in c u r r e n c y
Sweden

Sept. 30,1873

3, 996 52
5, 063 62

Total amount reported

. . •

. . . .

.

163,152 92

........

183, 603 89

C o s t i n g in c u r r e n c y

The following amounts have been paid in gold by the governments
named:
Quarter
ended—

By-

Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.

Switzerland

Total

..

.

31,1873
30,1873
30,1873
31,1873
31,1874

.
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
Mar.

31,1873
30,1873
30,1673
31,1873
31,1874

Total /
Dec.
Mar.
Juue
Sept.
Dec.

,31,1872
31,1873
30,1873
30, 1873
31,1873

866
972
1,108
1,200
1,162

40
71
49
18
47

1 184 76
2, 277 76
1, 600 89
619 30
1,136 6'6
6,819 37

Total
Sept. 30,1873
D e c . 31,1873

D e n m a r k , for e x t r a n a t i o n a l p o s t a g e

75 02
15 58
90 60

Total




93
00
97
60
94

5, 310 25
:

T o t a l a m o u n t r e c e i v e d in •'•old

$1, 896
1,996
3, 757
2,165
2,177

11, 994 44

Netherlands

Italy

Amount.

-.

\...

24,214 66

342

REPORT ON T H E

FINANCES.

Numher of rexiorts of ocean postages to the Postmaster-General and amounts repforted.
Quarter ended September 30,1874.
|17, 236 33
13, 018 82
11, 825 94
9,636 63
7, 782 58
5, 893 85
4, 981 13
4, 751 88
1, 761 91
1, 673 64
376 39
334 07
333 27
307 93
206 13
193 34
171 61
167 09
96 18
93 07
73 08
64 82
42 77
1« 83
18 20
14 78
12 07
10 84
7 41
5 88
4 80
1 06

1
• 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

32

81,116 33

Quarter ended December 31,1873.
$19, 688 95
13, 093 75
11,125 04
10, 288 14
8, 217 96
7, 321 10
4,195 25
2,296 25
1, 764 49
1, 510 81
1, 409 13
391 48
293 65
262 62
230 16
218 40
215 04
171 22
138 74
111 86
109 50
106 07
96 23
84 54
45 40
44 59
26 15
13 93
9 82
3 64
1 22

1

1

31

83, 485 13

T o t a l n u m b e r of r e p o r t s m a d e , 150.

Quarter ended March
31, 1874.

Quarter ended June 30,
1874.
111,132 09
11,103 90
10, 087 84

$13, 390 54
11,910 36
10, 554 84
9, 919 48
8, 969 73
7, 930 77
6, 317 38

8, 8.58 52
8, 217 16
7, 088 31
6, 824 17
4,741 96
2, 274 74
1, 722 21
1, 554 87
1,505 54
1,186 19
772 66
580 04
492 63
447 57
397 31
383 32
362 76
350 11
293 59
273 53
186 24
180 74
175 21
174 96
172 34
159 04
83 23
• 77 45
74 83
49 11
46 96
31 99
31 78
17 74
14 44

5,118 10
1, 787 66

^

1

1, 754 .53
1,411 36
1,188 23
939 63
768 46
557 69
349 65
341 88
324 66
263 82
253 60
228 27
165 41
1.57 15
135 73
133 07

/

117 81
104 37
99 75
80 92
67 62
56 77
53 62
49 49
45 85
26 67
23 10
21 76
15 26
13 72 =
11 35
10 92
8 75
6 20
5 67
2 26
45

85, 693 86

10
8
5
3

16
21
79
72

82,154 96

42

T o t a l a m o u u t r e p o r t e d , $332,450.28.

PAY DIVISION—ALBERT E. BOONE, PRINCIPAL CLERK.

This division has in charge the settlement and payment of all accounts
for transportation of the mails, including railroad companies, steamboat
companies, and other mail contractors, special mail-carriers, mail-messengers, railway postal clerks, route-agents, mail-route messengers, bag- ^
gage-masters, special agents, letter-carriers, and all miscellaneous payments.
To this division is also assigned the registration of all warrants and
drafts countersigned by the Auditor and the custody of the archives of
the offi.ce.
Accounts of mail-contractors settled during thefisoal year ended June 30, 1874.
Quarter.
In
In
In
In

the
the
the
the

quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter

ended
ended
ended
ended

S e p t e m b e r 30,1873
D e c e m b e r 31, 1873.
M a r c h 31, 1874
J u n e 30,1874

Total




Number.
7,815
7,782
7,765
7, 751
31,113

Amount.
$3,
3,
4,
3,

587,
642,
068,
849,

442
563
662
035

83
43
24
25

15,147, 703 75

SIXTH AUDITOR.

34S

Accounts of mail contractors settled during thefisoal year, c^x.—Continued.
Quarter.

Number.

I n c r e a s e - o v e r l a s t fiscal j-ear

$1, 674,147 96

F o r e i g n mail a c c o u n t s s e t t l e d .

1, 005, 052 26

D e c r e a s e from l a s t fiscal y e a r .
In
In
In
In

49,001 63

Collection o r d e r s s e n t t o c o n t r a c t o r s :
t h e q u a r t e r euded S e p t e m b e r 30,1873 . . .
t h e q u a r t e r e u d e d D e c e m b e r 31,1673
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d M a r c h 31, 1874
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d J u u e 30,1874

25,
26,
26,
23,

Total

In
In
In
In

944
173
764
880

102, 761

l u c r e a s e o v e r l a s t fiscal y e a r
Mail
quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter

Amonnt.

862, 244
938, 909
1, 024, 774
814, 739

19
71
32
74

3, 640, 667 96

2, 296

141, 800 67
142, 500 63
151, 399 33
149,304 39

14, 338

Total
I n c r e a s e o v e r l a s t fiscal y e a r .

626, 704 97

3,508
3, 585
3,653
3,592

messenger acconnts settled :
e n d e d S e p t e m b e r 30,1873 . . .
e n d e d D e c e m b e r 31, 1873
e n d e d M a r c h 31, 1874
e n d e d J u n e 30,1874

535, 005 02

1, 429

Accounts of railway xyostal clerks, route and other agents settled during the fiscal year.
Number.
In
Tn
In
In

the
the
the
the

quarter
quarter
quarter
quarter

ended
euded
euded
ended

S e p t e r a b e r 30,1873
D e c e r a b e r 31,1873
M a r c h 31,1874
J u n e 30,1374

2,137
2,143
2.339
2, 349

\

Total

Amount.
$506, 492
521, 409
539,483
549, 379

8,968

Miscellaneous p a y m e n t s :
the quarter ended September 30,1873...'.
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d D e c e m b e r 31,1873
t h e q u a r t e r e u d e d M a r c h 31,1874
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d J u n e 30, 1874

1.55
238
234
221

In
In
In
In

254, 458 28
404, 567 57
267, 422 09
279, 468 44

848

Total
I n c r e a s e o v e r l a s t fiscal y e a r
Special a g e n t s '
the quarter ended
t h e q u a i t e r ended
tlie q u a r t e r e n d e d
t h e q u a r t e r ended

1, 205, 916 38

,

accounts:
Septem ber 30,1873
D e c e m b e r 31, 1873.
M a r c h 31,1874
J u n e 30, 1874

203, 820 74
154
221
205
284

37

Special m a i l c a r r i e r s ' a c c o u n t s :
t h e q u a r t e r e u d e d S e p t e m b e r 30,1873
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d D e c e m b e r 31, 1873
t h e q u a r t e r ended M a r c h 31,1874
t h e q u a r t e r euded J u n e 30,1874
Total

D e c r e a s e from l a s t fiscal y e a r
In
In
I In
In

.'
•
:

S a l a r y of t w o special a g e n t s p a i d o u t of a p p r o p r i a t i o n for l e t t e r - c a r r i e r s




1,317
1, 552
1, 4(:6
1,452

10, 998 64
11,975 66
11, 164 23
10, 860 76

5,787

44, 999 29
4, 304 09

,

Letter-carriers' Accounts:
t h e q u a r t e r eudpd S e p t e m b e r 30,1873
t h e q u a r t e r e n d e d D e c e r a b e r 31, 1 8 7 3 . . .
t h e q u a i t e r e n d e d M a r c h 31,1874
t h e q n a r t e r e n d e d J u n e 30,1874

Tot^l

39, 556 87
55,031 44
52, 390 25
70, 806. 46
217, 785 02

Total
'' I n c r e a s e over l a s t fiscal y e a r
In
In
In
In

2,116,764 83
285, 870 45

I n c r e a s e over l a s t fiscal y e a r
In
In
In
In

08
07
72
96

2,055
2,122
2,128
2,188

435,
454,
454,
452,

388
286
296
901

23
31
11
93

1,493
2

1,796,872 58
5, 823 83

8,495

1, 802, 696 41

344

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

Accounts of railway x^ostal clerks, <j'c—Continued.
Number.
Increase over last fiscal year
Increase over last fiscal year, special ageuts
Warrants paid by the Postmaster-Gen era! and countersigned by the
Auditor, passed and registered :
In the'quarter euded September 30,1873
•
In the quarter ended December 31, 1873
In the quarter ended March 31,1874
'.
In the quarter ended June 30, 1874
Total

'

2,452
2,647
2,970
2,582

2,
2,
2,
2,

907, 737
857, 577
921, 840
807, 620

99
77
32
25

10, 651

;

Drafts issued by the Third Assistant Postmaster-General and countersigned l3y the Auditor, passed and registered :
the quarter ended September 30,1873
the quarter ended December 31, 1873
-.
the quarter ended March 31, 1874
the quarter ended Jjiue 30,1874

11, 494, 776 33

. 2, 682

'.

Increase over last fiscal year

in
In
In
In

$377,097 45
3 , 103 48
'

1,886
1

1, 784, 025 59

4,403
4,448
4, 338
4, 695
17,884

Total
Decrease from last fiscal year

603, 947
• 582, 276
589,865
569, 749

90
39
77
26

2, 345, 839 32

1,014

409, 052 31

Bep^ort ofthe archives clerk for thefisoal year.

II
u c
o J§

S e p t e r a b e r 30 1873
D e c e r a b e r 31,1873
M a r c h 31, 1874
J u n e 30, 1874

..

I'll

'MCrt

I n the quarter euded—

-

a s =«

ill

•...

Total

774
1, 5.50
1, 934
653

3,945
3, 589
3,126
3,846

28,160

i

6,167
7,186
7,275
7, 532

4,911

14, 506

3,531
2, 333
3,241
2 334
11 439

I n c r e a s e over l a s t fiscal y e a r

.

2,002

This division has in charge the settlement of postmasters^ money-order accounts, and the collection of balances due from late postmasters
on money-order account.
The work of the division is fully up to the requirements of the Department, notwithstanding the iramense increase of the past fiscal year,
as shown by the report to the Postmaster-G-eneral.
Increase.
Number.

Amount.
Number.

Domestic money-orders issued during the fiscal
year ended June 30,1874
4, 420, 633 $74, 424, 854 71
Swiss international money-orders issued during
the fiscal year
2,721
72, 287 28
British international money-orders issued during the fiscal year
77, 351
1, 491, 320 31
German international money-orders issued duriug fche fiscal year
32, 542
701, 634 73
* Decreases.




Amount!.

1, 064, 947 $16, 908, 640 02
*80

*5, 026 65 •

7,759

126, 843 ,99

13, 088

^ 280, 912 61 .

345

SIXTH AUDITOR.
Increase.
Number.

Amount.

1

Number.

Domestic money-orders paid, received, exam, ined, assorted, checked, and filed duriug the
fiscal year
Swissin'ternational money-orders paid, received,
examined, assorted, checked, and filed during
the fiscal year
British international money-orders paid, received, examined, assorted, checked, and filed
during the fiscal year
..'
German international money-orders paid, received, examined, assorted, checked, and filed
during the fiscal year
Certificates of deposit registered, compared, and
entered during the fiscal year.. .*
Transfers registered, compared, and filed during thefisoal year
;
Drafts registered and checked during the fiscal
yea,r
Money-orders returned for correction during
the "fiscal year

..

Amount.

1, 301,296 . $16, 836, 083 78

4,416,114

$73, 736, 435 01

793

21, 222 16

193

4, 412 58

15, 992

303, 773 66

5, 506

88, 686 05

20, 607

535, 216 72

8,994

225,108 46

218, 509

60, 408, 730 41

43, 203

11, 359, 227 13

6, 036

1,196, 910 70

.*673

*5, 275 98

11, 883

6, 031, 363 00

1,814

1, 028, 618 oa

30,146
Decrease.

lo, 031
n •

flS

© "

1^

ee c3

&^

PX)
<0 - H

fs
03

j3

§^

Domestic money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the fiscal jenr ended
June 30, 1874
, 36, 804 36, 804 36, 804 36, 804 147, 216
Swiss international money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the
fiscal year
1,812
1, 992 1,992
7,788
1,992
British international money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the
fiscal year
11, 561 11, 604 11, 604 11, 604 46, 373
German international money-order statements received, examined, and registered during the
fiscal year
'.
6,277
6,804
6,804
6,804 26, 689
512.
Letters written during the fiscal year
701 1,072
1,035
3,320

12, 737
389
3,395
8,653
1,183

In conclusion, I am pleased again to acknowledge the co-operation I
have received from Mr. McGrew, my chief clerk, from the principal
clerks of the several divisions, and from other efficient and faithful
clerks in.this Bureau.
.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully.
J. J. MAETIN,
Auditor,
Hon.

B. H. B R I S T O W , ^

,

Secretary of the Treasury.







REPORT OF TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES.







REPOET
OF THE

TRSEASURER OF THE UNITED STATES,
TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES,
Washington, Novemher 3, 1874.
SIR : Again, and for the fourteenth time since this Office was given
me in charge, it has become my duty to make to the honorable the Secretary of the Treasury the annual statement of the condition of the
Treasury of the United States. The statement is accompanied by remarks in regard to the present conduct of the Office, and suggestions as
to its future needs.
The tables that are appended will fully exhibit the transactions of the
Office in detail for the year ending with June 30,1874.
A comparison of the tables of receipts with those of the year preceding
shows a falling off from customs of $24,985,689.01, and of'$11,319,529.24
on account of internal revenue. IS'early if not the whole of the decrease
of receipts from the latter source is due to recent changes in the law,
while the^ falling off in the customs-duties seems to have been caused
solely by the panic that occurred learly in the fiscal year, and made
itself felt to the end. The people, in consequence of the stringency in
the money-market, became more economical in their expenditures for
foreign goods.
The expenditures, exclusive of those on account of the public debt, as
compared with the year before, have been decreased $1,869,652.49. Commendable as this retrenchment is, it is believed that it will be still
greater at the end of the current year.
I N C R E A S E ^ O F THE LABOR IN THE OFFICE.

By many members of Congress, and by other persons who have not
looked into the matter, it is supposed that the reduction of taxes, and
the consequent small decrease in the receipts and expenditures, must
necessarily have reduced the araount of labor required to be done fbr
the transaction of the public business of this Office. But such is far
from being the case j and, on the contrary, it has been largely increased.
All the machinery for the collection aud the disbursement of the public"
revenue remains.
The various offices of assistant treasurers, of designated depositaries, and of national banks designated as dei^ositaries of the public
moneys of the United States, whose duty it is to receive and to disburse
the public revenues, remain, and, as the country has grown, have been
increased, and extended. With all of these offices separate accounts
must be kept and settled. While, therefore, the gross amount of receipts and expenditures has fallen off, the number of accounts and the
number of items in the several accounts not only remain, bnt have been
increased.



350

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

This, the principal office, while it keeps accounts with one hundred
and fifty-three offices of assistant treasurers, designated depositaries^
and national banks acting as such depositaries, has in addition its own
accounts with disbursing officers. The labor in this branch has been
very largely increased by several provisions of law enacted by Congress
at its last and other recent sessions.
By the act of June 23, 1874, making appropriations for '^ sundry civil
expenses," an appropriation of $1,300,000 was made for the District of
Colurabia; in which act it is provided, " t h a t all sums due any party^
exceeeding $100, shall be paid only oh checks on the Treasury, issued
directly to the party to whom the same is due."
By an arrangement with the commissioiiiers, all their receipts from
taxes and from other sources are deposited, and all their disbursements
are made through the Treasury in the same way.
The same act provides: " That all moneys hereafter appropriated for
the aid, use, support, or benefit of any charitable, industrial, or other
association, liistitution, or corporation, shall be placed to the credit of
the proper fiscal officer of said association, institution, or corporation, by
warrant of the Secretary of the Treasury, on the books of the Treasurer
of the United States, or of an assistant treasurer or clesignated depositary of the United States, other than a national bank, and shall be paid
out only on the checks of such fiscal officer, drawn payable to the person to whom payment is to be made."
Similar provisions have, by prior but recent legislation, been applied
to the disbursing officers of the various departments of the Government, both civil and military, including payments to pensioners.
By the act of June 20,1874, '' amending the charter of the Freedman's
Savings and Trust Company," it is provided that "said cominissioners
shall deposit all sums collected by them into the Treasury of the United
States."
As the deposits of all receipts under this act are made in the Treasnry, so all expenditures by the commissioners are made by dralfts on
the same. When it is understood that the number of persons who have
deposits in this institution and its branches in the different States of
the Union exceed seventy thousand, and that the dividends to be made
from time to time will be made by checks payable to each of the several
depositors individually, some idea may be formed of the additional labor
that will be thrown upon this Office.
The act of June 20,1874, entitled ''An act fixing the amountof United
States notes, providing for the redistribution of the national-bank currency, and for other purposes," has, independently of the creation of an
entirely new division, thrown a vast amount of additional labor upon
the old divisions of this Office.
The national-bank-note redemption agency is required to have its
funds deposited in the Treasury of the United States. The 5 per cent,
on the circulating notes of the national banks so required to be deposited amounts to about $17,000,000. This amount, and all amounts received to reimburse the Treasury for the notes of national banks redeemed, are received, counted, and accounted for, and all legal-tender
notes remitted in payment for national-bank notes sent here for redemption, must be remitted for through the cashier's office of the Treasury
proper. All this is independent of the work of counting, examining,
assorting, distributing, and delivering to the Comptroller, the currency
of national banks, that takes place in the national-bank note redemption agency.
The increase of national banks, and the constant exchange of one kind



TREASURER.

351

of United States stocks for another kind held by the Treasurer intrust for
the redemption of their circulating notes, and to assure the prompt payment of United States deposits with them, is another source of the increase.of the labor of the Office. So, too, the substitution of the new 5
per cent, for the old 6 per cent, stocks.
^^^•--^;:p.:...z--rz:.-^y.\
One hundred and eighty-four national banks have failed, or gone
into voluntary liquidation, or deposited United States notes and have
taken up a part of their stocks of the United States. The circulating
notes of these banks are required by law to be redeemed at the Treasury, and add thus much to the other redemptions of the Office.
All amouuts of interest due on. United States stocks that remain unclaimed for ninety days at the AT^arious offices where they are made payable are returned to this Office and are then payable here. These have
increased, and are constantly increasing in number.
The interest on the new 5 per cent, stocks is not only payable quarterly, instead of semi-anifually, as formerly, and on other Government
stocks, but on that part that is registered is payable by draft issued at
this Office to each individual holder of such stocks. These drafts are
Iiayable in gold by any assistant treasurer or designated depositary, and,
when properly indorsed and paid, are returned here for settlement.
This, with the fact that the number of coupons is by this change necessarily doubled, and therefore requires twice the force to examine and
arrange them and to account for them, has required another increase in
the force of the Office.
The kinds of paper money issued by the United States, including
fractional currency, have been largely increased, and continue to be
increased as dangerous counterfeits are discovered. As all the various
kinds must be assorted by series as well as by denominations, the work
of redemption and destruction is necessarily increased to just the extent
that the kinds are increased.
For years there were but sixteen kinds. The number has increased,
until now there are forty-six different kinds that require to be assorted
seiiarately, thus increasing this kind of w^ork nearly threefold.
But these new duties are not the only ones that add largely to the labors
of this Office and a consequent necessity for a greater number of employ<^s to perform the business duties required. But enough has been
said. I will mention only one other cause of increase of force. Since the
large defalcations by disbursing officers, an entirely new system of
checks between all the Departments ofthe Government and this Office
has beeu introduced. Under this new system reports of the balances
hehl by every disbursing officer of the Government are made weekly, or
oftener, to chiefs of the Departments or Bureaus to which they respectively belong. From all of these officers they are immediately transmitted to this Office. Here they are carefully examined and compared
with the books ofthe Office, and with the weekly and monthly reports
made to this Office by all the assistant treasurers, designated depositaries,
and national banks designated as depositaries.
The amounts standing to the credit of a disbursing officer are stated
on his report, and aiiy discrepancy that maj^ exist between the report
of the disbursing officer and returns from the office where he keeps
his accounts is noted and certified, and the report is then immediately
returned to the Department or Bureau to which the disbursing officer
belongs. This has compelled not only the appointment of quite a number of additional clerks to make the proper examinations and reports,
but has necessitated the inauguration of a new and more elaborate
system of book-keeiiing, which also requires the work of additional



352

REPORT ON TIIE FINANCES.

clerks. Since the inauguration of this new system no defalcations have
taken place, and it is believed that the guards against them are now so
perfect as to be a bar to them in the future. The very large extra labor
and, to some extent, consequent expense in this case, as in most of the
others named, are, therefore, well bestowed.
PAY OF EMPLOYES. ,

Without any change of opinion, as expressed in reports of former years
in regard to the inadequacy of the salaries now paid to departmental em
ployes of the Government, I have, after mature thought and reflection,
and from some little experience in the nationabl-bank-note redemption
agency, come to the conclusion that if Congress would appropriate to
each Department and its Bureaus a round sum, not exceeding that now
appropriated, to be expended, in the discretion and under the direction
of the heads of the several Departments, in the payment of the clerks
and other employes of the Departments and the Bureaus thereof, in
sums of any amount, say, for clerks from one to two thousand dollars,
and for grades higher or lower tlian clerks, in proportion, with the right to
adjust the payments from time to time, according to the work performed
by each, very much more and a great deal better service'^ would be had by
the Government than under the present system, with the grade, classification, and rate of compensation, fixed by the iron rule of compulsory
law.
In this connection I desire to say that, had the reduction of the
force of this Office, as contemplated by the bill introduced in the
House of Eepresentatives, at its last session, for that purpose, been
passed into a law, it would have been impossible to do the work necessary for the proiDcr transaction of the public business. Even with
the amendments made to it in the Senate, and as compromised in
the committee of conference, the appropriation would not have sufficed.
With the $20,000 additional appropriation made afterward, there was
barely money enough to pay for the Vork done, and it was only effected
by overw^ork and by denying the usuarthirty days' summer vacation to
many of the emi^loycSs. Little, however, was gained by these expedients, as the unusual loss of time by reason of sickness proved.
The reduction made by act of Congress at its last sessioii ofthe number of females acting as sweepers and dusters from thirteen to seven in
number, and the decrease of the pay of the remaining ones from
thirty-six to twenty dollarsper month, greatly inconvenienced the Office,
brought great distress upon the poor widows who were either deprived of
their places or compelled to w^ork.for pay inadequate to their services,
and for their and their families'support. When it is recollected that
these persons are mostly widows, with families of helpless children, who have the alternative often offered between seeing the suffering of their
children for the want of bread and taking the money that is exposed to
avert it, the impolicy, if not wickedness, of placing such a temptation
-in their way will be realized and corrected. I know that the number
employed in former years, being one to thirty employes, was none too
many to. keep the rooms in decent order and cleanliness, and think no
one believes that $36 a month for services rendered early and late, under
such circumstances, is too miich pay. It is, therefore, hoped that, un- ,
less a round sum sufficient for the safe conduct of this Office is appropriated, the old roll, in its entirety, will be restored, with such additions
hereto as the increase of the work of the Office has made necessary.



TREASURER.

353

!N"o reduction of the number of persons now employed can be made without putting the public interest and my own in peril.
UNAUTHORIZED PAI^ER MONEY.

Constant complaints have been and are being made that the laws
made to restrain the issuing and circulation of notes other than those
authorized by acts of the Congress of fhe United States, are evaded in
la:rge sections of the country, and in many localities they are utterly
disregarded. The latter is'particularly true as of the South, and especially so in the States of Georgia and Alabama. Most of these violations of law are by municipalities and by manufacturing companies.
I can speak of this evil from personal experience and observation. In
localities at the South almost the entire circulation consists of such local
issues that are put upon everybody in change, and unless used in the
place of issue are w^orthless to the holder. This is particularly true of ^
the fractional currenc}^ For this there has never been the poor excuse
that there was "'not currency enough," as the amount authorized by
law has never been issued from the Treasury, beiug restricted aud reduced by the issue and circulation, in violation of law, of this illegitimate and almost worthless currency. Now that banking under the
national system is measurably free, that excuse wilknot hold as to the
issues of notes of $1 and upward.
By the act of March 26, 1867, it is enacted, "That every national
banking association, State bank or banker, or association, shallpay a*
tax of 10 per centum on the ainount of notes of any town, city, or municipal corporation paid out by them." This enactment does not reach the
root of the evil. The law should be so amended and changed as to compel the payment of the tax by the municipalities, companies, or individuals who make the original issue of such unauthorized circulatingnotes. Bankers and business men at the Sonth assured me that even
such a tax w^ould not prevent the issue of this kind of currency, audi
that the only effectual way to abolish the nuisance would be to declare
the issuing of any kind of obligation, with a view to its circulation as
money, a misdemeanor, punishable by fine or imprisonment, or both, by
any court having cognizance thereof.
DELINQUENCIES IN THE PAYMENT OF DUTY BY NATIONAL BANKS.,

Section 41 of the " act to provide a national currency," approved June^
3, 1864, makes it " the duty ofeach association, within ten clays from the^
first days of January and July of each 3^ear, to make a return under
the oath of the president or cashier to the Treasurer of the United'
States, in such form as he m^j presciibe, of the average amount of its
notes in circulation, and of the average amount of its deposits, and of
the average amount of its capital stock beyond the amount invested in.
United States bonds, for the six months next preceding said first days
of Jauuary and July as aforesaid, and in default of such return, and
for.each default thereof, each defaulting association shall forfeit and
pay to the United States the sum of two hundred dollars."
The law then goes on and provides an effective mode for collecting
the penalty that may be incurred by any bank for any default in .making the return at the time, and in the manner as thereinbefore specified.
The same section provides that "in lieu of all existing taxes, every
association shall pay to the Treasurer of the United States, in the
months of January and July, a duty of one-half of one per centuua each
23 F



354

^ ,

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

half year npon the average amount of its notes in circulation, and a
duty of one-quarter of one per centum each half year upon the average
amount of its deposits, and a duty of one-quarter of one per cientum
each half year as aforesaid on the average amount of its capital stock,
beyond the amount invested in United States stocks, and in case of default in the payment thereof by any association, the duties aforesaid
may be collected in the manner provided for the collection of United
States duties of other corporations, or the Treasurer may reserve the
amount of said duties out of the iuterest, as it may become due on the
bonds deposited with him by such defaulting association."
I t will be seen by inspection of the above quoted extracts, from the
national-currency act, that while there is-a penalty of $200 for any default in making proper returns within ten days after each first day of
January and July, there is no penalty whatever for making default in the
payment of the duty to this office, within the months nkmed, as it is
made the duty, by law, for each bank to do.
Quite a number of the banks take advantage of this defect in the
law. "They make their returns regularly within the ten days as prescribed by law, and thus avoid the penalty of $200. Having thus complied with the comparatively immaterial part of the law, for the noncompliance with which there is a penalty attached, they then entirely
neglect the material part, by refusing to pay the duty within the mouthy
and for which neglect there is no penalty.
As most of the interest of the stocks, held by the Treasurer in trust
for the natioual banks, is payable semi-annually, in January and July,
there is no way provided by which the duty, in such cases, can be collected compulsively within ^ve months, when the next interest on their
stocks is payable.
The use of large sums of money, for a long time due to the United
States, is lost to the Treasury.
In cases of single banks, the loss in interest for a single term of six
months amounts to hundreds of dollars. The aggregate aniount thiis
lost to the people is very large.
This not only works a great injury to the public revenue, but does
injustice to the majority of the national banks, that pay their duty regularly with commendable promptitude.
To obviate this evil, and to force a ready compliance with the terras
ofthe law, the act should be so amended as to attach a penalty for the
non-payment, within the time prescribed by law, of the duty due from
any national bank, of an additional penal sum, at the rate of one per
centum per month ujion the amount due aud unpaid, due from and by
such defaulting bank, until the whole amount of such duty, with the
accrued penalt^^ shall have been paid by such defaulting bank. And
if not paid before, the whole amount, including the penalty, may be retained from the next interest due on its stocks held for it in trust for
the redemption of its circulating-notes, by the Treasurer of the United
States.
UNSIGNED NATIONAL-BANK NOTES.

The Comptroller of the Currency, in his annual report for the year
1867, stated that " i n the sumraer of 1864 it was ascertained that packages of notes forwarded to certain western banks were each found to
be short of the required araount by one impression, (a sheet containing
four notes.) This happened at intervals for several months. Then, for
nearly a year, no losses occurred. But in the fall of 1865 impressions




TREASURER.

355

began to be missed from the packages of notes in the counting-room of
the offic^e; and in December a package containing $4,500 in fifty and
one hundred dollar notes, of the National City Bank of Lynn, Mass.,
was missed. From this time there was a cessation in the thefts, until
the 1st of May, when a package containing $12,000 in fifties and hundreds, of the First National Bank of Jersey City, N. J., was stolen."
The aggregate of the several amounts thus taken from the Office of
the Comptroller of the Currency was $17,560.
The Comptroller now states it as his opinion that very few of the
notes of the First National Bank of Jersey City, amounting to more
than two-thirds in amount o