View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

3#H CONGRESS, ) HOUSE OF KEPEESENTATIVE^. C Ex. Doc.
3c? Session. S
; / No. 2.

REPORT
<^

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY,

THE STATE OF THE FINANCES,"

THE YEAR ENDING JTJNE 30, 1856.

WASHINGTON
. CORNELIUS WENDELL, PRINTER,




1356.




REPORT

THE SECEETARY OF THE TREASURY
T H E STA.TE OE T H E

FINANCES,

DKCEMBEE 9, 1856.—Referred to the Committee of Ways and Means, and ordered to be
printed.
DECEMBER 17, 1S'5S:—Resolved, That 15, 000 extra copies of the report Of the Secretary of
the Treasury on the state of the Finances be printed for the use, of the members of
the House.
;
'

I

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,, Decemher 1,

1856.

9
I
S I R : In obedience to the act entitled ^^An act tcj establish the
Treasury Department/' approved May 10, 1800, the following report
is submitted:
The balance in the treasury on the 1st of July^
1855, was.
,

|18,931,9Y6 01

The actual receipts of the first quarter of the fiiscal year 1856, viz :
th& quarter ending September 30y 1855, were, as stated in. my former
report:
" .\
¥Tom customs
From lands
Miscellaneous...

:.....

,....
....«

|'l^,.085,238 28
• 2,355,725 81
333,495 98
19,774,460 13

The estimated receipts for the remaining three quarters were as follow:
i
From customs
$k:2,000,000 00
From lands
! 5,644,274 13
Miscellaneous
, 500,000 00




48,144,274 13

4

REPORT

ON THE

FINANCES.

Making the actual receipts for the first quarter, and
the estimated receipts, for the remaining three
quarters
\
Add JBalance in the treasury July 1, 1855

$67,918,734 26
18,931,976 01

Giving the estimated sum for the service of said
year

" 86,850,710 27

The actual expenditures of the first quarter of said year, viz: the
quarter ending September 30, 1855, were as follow:
Civil, miscellaneous, and foreign intercourse.........
Interior.....
,
War
Navy
^
Eedemption ofpublic debt, interest and premium..

$5,117,860
1,799,642
5,142,111
4,282,292
252,209

25
19
38
57
71

16,594,116 10
The estimated expenditures for the remaining three quarters weE.e
as follow:
Civil, mificellaneous, and foreign intercourse...
Deficiency in Boat Office
ZInterior, pensions, andlndians
War
,..
Navy
,
Interest on public debt
Eedemption of debt

118,651,974
2,669,368
3,532,033
8,773,523
10,956,030
2,299,800
7,750,000

85
00
92
31
73
00
00

54,632,430 81
Mating tbe actual and estimated expenditures $71,226,846 91, and
leaving an estimated balance in the treasury on the 30th of June,
1856, of $15,623,863 36.
The actual receipts into the treasury for the fiscal year ending SOth
of June, 1856, were, for the,
1st quarter.—Fromcustoms.....
Fromlands
Miscellaneous and incidental.

|17,0&5,238 28
2,355,725 87
333,495 98
19,774,460 18

2d quarter.—From customs
Fromlands
Miscellaneous and incidental .f.




$13,424,038 57
3,273,868 02
195,840 33
16,893,746 92

REPORT

ON T H E F I N A N C E S .

Sd quarter.—From customs
Fromlands.......
Miscellaneous and incidental

!

5

'$16,737,114 01
1,450,073 04
160,113 20
18,347,300 25

4th quarter.—Fromcustoms..
Fromlands
Miscellaneous and incidental

$16,776,472 64
1,837,978 00
288,183 52
18,902,634 16

Making......
,...,
Balance in the treasury 1st July, 1855
Total sum for the service of the fiscal year ending
30th June, 1856..
The receipts from customs were..
The receipts from lands were
Miscellaneous and incidental

$73,918,141 46
18,931,976 01
92,850,117 47
$64,022,863 50
8,917,644 93
977,633 03
^73,918,141 46

The actual expenditures of the year were as follow:
1st quarter
$16,594,116 10
2d quarter........
16,580,880 34
3d quarter
,
16,993,074 36
4th quarter
22,780,721 22
72,948,792 02
The expenditures were divided as follow:
Civil, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous
Interior, pensions, and Indians
War
Navy
;
Eedemption ofpublic debt, interest and premium..

$25,274,330
3,872,826
16,948,196
14,077,047
12,776,390

99
G4
89
12
38

72,948,792 02
Balance in the treasury 1st July, 1856,. as appears
in detail, per statement No. 1

$19,901,325 45

In my last, report the estimated receipts into the treasury, for the
fiscal year ending the 30th of June, 1857, were as follow:




6

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

From customs
From lands
Miscellaneous

$64,000,000 00
7,000,000 00
500,000 00

' ^
^
^
To this add the estimated balance in the treasury,
July 1, 1856

71,500,000 00
15,623,863 36
87,123,863 36

This gave $87,123,863 36 for the service of the fiscal year ending
the 30th of June, 1857.
The estimated expenditures for said year were as follow:
Balance of former appropriations to be expended
duringthe year
Perman-ent and indefinite appropriations, to be expended during the year
Appropriations asked for...

$16,696,689 99
'7,639,910 14
45,114,765 45
69,451,365 58

Making the estimated expenditures $69,451,365 58, less $12,000,000 not expected to be called for during the year, and leaving an
estimated balance in the treasury, on thd 1st of July, 1857, of $29,672,497 78, without any estimate forthe redemptionof the public
debt.
The actual receipts into the treasury, for the 1st quarter of said
year, viz: the quarter ending the 30th September, 1856, have been
as follow:
From customs
From lands
Miscellaneous

^

$20,677,740 40
892,380 39
355,310 57
21,925,431 36

Making the actual receipts for the first, and the
receipts for the remaining three quarters, as now
estimated:
2d quarter
3d quarter
:....
4th quarter
•

17,224,799 47
16,902.539 87
16,902,539 87

In all
And, with the actual balance in the treasury on the
1st of July, 1856, of

72,955,310 57

Making the sum of
^.....o.c.o,,.
for the service ofthe fiscal year 1857.

92,856,636 02




19,901,325 45

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

The actual expenditures for the first quarter ofthe
fiscal year 1857, viz: the .quarter ending the 30th
of September, 1856, being....
the estimated expenditures for the remaining three
quarters of the year, are set down as follow:
In the second quarter....
In the third quarter
In the fourth quarter
......o

7

$18,675,113 21

18,000,000 00
17,168,178 76
16,668,121 24

Making the actual expenditures for the first quarter,
and the estimated expenditures, for the remaining
three quarters

70,511,413 21

Which leaves an estimated balance in the treasury,
on the 30th of June, 1857, of
,.

$22,345,222 81

For the actual receipts and expenditures of the first quarter of the
year, viz: the quarter ending the 30th of September, 1856, see statement No. 2.
The actual expenditures of the first quarter, exhibit the sum of
$902,096 63 expended in theredemptionof the public debt, and i n p a y ment of interest and premium. A like amount is included in the
estimates, for the expenditure of each of the remaining three quarters.
Thereceipts into the treasury, for the fiscal year ending the 30th
of June 1858, are estimated, as follow :
From customs
$66,000,000 00
From lands
6,000,000 00
Miscellaneous
955,310 57
72,955,310 57
To which add the estimated balance in the treasury 30th June 1857..
Making the sum^pf
for the service ofthe fiscal year 1858.
The expenditures are estimated, as follow:
Balance of former appropriations, to be expended
this year
Permanent and indefinite appropriations
Appropriations asked for

22,345,222 81
95,300,533 38

15,336,464 60
7,498,510 14
48,469,848 02
71,304,822 > 6

Less the amount that may not be expended during
the year, estimated at
....:
Would leave an estimated balance in the treasury
on the 30th of June, 1858, of
'

20,000,000 00
43,995,710 62

The public debt, on the 4th of March, 1853, amounted to the sum
of $69,129,937 27, and was subsequently increased to liquidate the
debt of Texas, by the sum of $2,750,000 ; which gives the public debt



8

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

at, $71,879,937 27. It has since been reduced, up to the 15th day of
November 1856, the date ofthe Eegister's last report, to the sum of
$30,963,909 64. See statement No. 3. I n making this reduction,
t h e s u m of $40,916,027 63 has been paid for the principal thereofj
and $4,609,882 31, for premium on portions of it redeemed, before
maturity, saving the sum of $14,606,441 39 by paying in advance,
and leaving the public debt, on the 15th day of November 1856,
$30,963,909 64, as per statement No. 3, parts 1 and 2.
In addition to the public debt, as above stated, there is due under
treaties with various Indian tribes, payable on time, the sum of
$21,066,501 36, as per statement No. 4 of this report. This debt, as
it becomes payable, constitutes an item of annual expenditure, and is
estimated for, by the Interior Department. It is an incident, growing
out of the extinction of the Indian possessory title, to the public lands,
and is a charge on the annual sales. Besides this debt, the United
States have invested money in stocks, for several of the tribes, t a t h e
amount of $3,511,624 08, and hold the principal of the Smithsonian
fund, amounting to $515,169, under the act of the 7th July 1838, in
stocks for that institution, as per statement No. 5. The United States
having made these investments for the Indians, and of the Smithsonian
fund, annually provide fbr the payment of the interest, which interest
is or is not received on the stocks. The arrearages ofthe interest appear, in the tables, to the amount of $120,704 74 on the stocks held
for the Indians, and $437,731 92 on the stocks of the Smithsonia,n
fund. Statement No. 6 gives the balances of appropriations of trust
or special funds, on the books of the treasury, at the close of the fiscal
year 1856. Statement No. 7 gives the stocks belonging to the United
States, in the Dismal Swamp, Chesapeake and Delaware, Chesapeake and Ohio and Louisville and Portland, canals.
The estimated receipts for the fiscal .year 1856, with the actual receipts of the first quarter, and the balance in the treasury on the
1st of July, 1855, were $86,850,710 27; and the actual receipts with
the same addition $92,850,117 47, being an excess over the estimates
of $5,999,407 20.
The customs, actual and estimated, were $59,085,238 28, and the
receipts $64,022,863 50.
The lands, actual and estimated, were $8,000,000, and the receipts
$8,917,644 93.
Miscellaneous, actual and estimated, were $833,495 98, and the receipts $977,633 03.
The estimated expenditures for the fiscal year 1856, were $71,226,
846 91, and the actual expenditures $72,948,792 02, being $1,721,945 11, in excess of the estimates.
I t will be seen, from an examination of statement No. 1, that the
sum of $12,776,390 38 was expended during the year, in payment ot
interest, premium and redemption of the public debt, maldng the
expenditure upon all other objects, $60,242,401 64 ; the estimated expenditure for interest, premium and redemptionof the public debt, being
$10,301,009 71, and the payments $2,475,390 67 more than the estimate, making the expenditures upon other objects, less than estimated.




R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

y

In making estimates to be submitted to Congress, for the annual
expenditures, they present themselves in three classes.
In the first class, are thehalances of unexpended appropriations,
expected to be called for during the year.
In the second class, are the expenditures under existing standing
indefinite appropriations. This includes the redemption and interest
of the public debt, the expenses of collecting the public revenue, and
some pensions and other items.
In the third, are all moneys necessary to comply with existing treaties
and laws, including the expensesof Congress, the necessary public
printing, and moneys due under treaty stipulations, the payraent of,
the civil list, foreign ministers, consuls, and commercial agents, the
•expenses of the army and navy, Indian intercourse, the survey ofthe
public lands, the expenses of the United States courts, maintaining
lights in established light-houses, with a variety of other objects, provided for by law.
The several executive departments prepare estimates, for the branches
of the public service, respectively, committed to their charge, with reference to expenditures, arising underexisting laws, as in Class 3, and which
theycannot discharge, out of existing or standing appropriations. In
addition, the Secretaries estimate,for such appropriations, as in their
judgment, are required for their respective departments. This class
embraces the estimates printed and sent to Congress, at the commencement of each session; but each Secretary sends, during the session,
such additional estimates, as in his judgment, the exigency of the service under his charge requires.
There are other appropriations which the Secretary of the Treasury
has to consider, in his report on the finances. These are appropriations
by Congress, in addition to the existing and standing appropriations,
and in addition to the appropriations, for compliance with treaties,
and to pay demands arising under existing laws, and the additional
appropriations est-imated for by the respective departments, and include all appropriations for public and private claims, objects of internal improvement not estimated for, and all miscellaneous appropriations, originating with Congress during the session, although no
specific sum is set down, in the estimates.
The receipts from customs fluctuate, with the increase or diminution
of the imports of duty-paying goods, and the receipts from publio
lands, with increased or diminished sales; whilst the expenditures, to a
very considerable extent, depend upon the action of Congress, and the
delay in applying for, and settlement of, claims at.the treasury.
The legislative power is responsible for all wasteful, extravagant,
and unnecessary expenditures, authorized by standing, appropriations and required to comply with existing laws, as well as for all
guch as may, from time to time, be authorized; because with that power,
rests the right, to lop off all such waste and extravagance, by a repeal
or modification of the laws, or by a refusal to grant any such ap.propriations. The executive power is responsible, for a correct construction of existing laws, and an honest application of the funds
placed by Congress, at its disposal, in the execution of the laws, and
for the objects, for which the appropriations are made. The Execu


10

IIEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

>

tive has the right, to recommend the repeal or modification of laws, for
the purpose of lopping off all waste, extravagant or unnecessary
expenditures, and to recommend all such, as public interest may call
for, within the limits of the constitution; but the legislature is not
bound, by the recommendations, nor to await executive recommendation, as t o a repeal or modification of laws, or as to appropriations,
and has the right, by new enactments, to enforce the proper construction of the laws, and their economical administration. It is not necesssary to inquire, wliether the legislative power has the right to omit
appropriations, necessary to pay the charges accruing under existing
laws, but it is manifest, it would be better to. repeal or modify the law,
so as to make the expenditures conform to present views, ra^ther than
hazard the injustice and discredit, of failing to pay charges, accrued
and accruing, under existing laws. Economy is a legislative as well
as an administrative virtue, which it is easy to commend and prescribe
rules for, but which it is difficult to observe, with an overflowing
treasury and a strong outside pressure. The legislative and executive
branches should act in harmony, and work to the same end. If the
legislative branch fails, waste, extravagance and unnecessary expenditure, are the result. The executive branch is without the full pre' ventive power ; but if the executive branch fails, the legislature can
restrain and correct its abuses. The first step in the right direction, is
so to modify the revenue laws, that no more money shall be collected
from the people, than is required for an economical administration
of the government, in fulfilment of all its obligations and duties,
external and internal. The second, is the honest and faithful application ofthe moneys, to'the legitimate purposes of the government.
The actual rei^eipts fromcustoms into the treasury, for the first
quarter of the fiscal year 1857, viz: the quarter ending the SOth of
September 1856, have been $21,925,431 36, being $2,150,971 23 more
than the corresponding quarter, of the preceding year. The same
causes that operated to increase the revenue from customs, during the
' last year, may be expected to influence, in the same way, the receipts
of the succeeding three quarters, but probably not to the same extent. The estimate of receipts from customs has, therefore, been
advanced to $66,000,000. The receipts from lands, for the same
first quarter of the fiscal year 1857, have been $892,380 .39, being
$1,443,345 48 less than the receipts of the corresponding quarter, of
the preceding year. The large tracts of land, withdrawn from
market, for railroads, under acts of the last session, and the lands
which will be entered, under the land warrants, issued and being
issued, are calculated to reduce the receipts from lands, from what
they were, in the corresponding three quarters, of lastyear; on which
account, the estimate from lands, has been reduced to $6,000,000.
The receipts from miscellaneous sources, have been put at, $955,310 57,
as per estimate.
The advance, in the estimate of receipts from customs, is made,
with the knowledge of the large duty-paying imports, already in
warehouse, and under the expectation that the demand for provisions
abroad, at remunerating prices, will notbe equalto that of last year;
also, of the pressure in the European money-market, and the great



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

11

demand for our cotton and tobacco, with the abundance of money in
this country, increased by the payment of the Texas debt and the
California war bonds; also the failure ofthe sugar crop of Louisiana,
acting in favor of increased sugar importation, and at an advanced
price. The ability ot the people of the United States to purchase
and pay, not only for necessaries, but for superfluities, may be relied
upon, forthe consumption of duty-paying merchandise, to an extent
sufficient to meet the estimated expenditures, and allow the cpntinued
redemption o f t h e public debt, as fast as, the holders of the stock ,
shall be willing to accept the principal and interest, witha reasonable
premium.
Statements from Nos. 8 .to 37, and frqm B No. 1 to B No. 9, are a
continuation of those, which accompanied my last report, ori the
finances, with the addition, where necessary, of the corresponding
items, belonging to the fiscal year 1856, and are again submitted.
Statement No. 11 gives, for the fiscal year ending 30th June 1856,
the domestic and foreign merchandise exported, at $326,964,918, and
our imports, for the same time, at $314,639,942, making the exports
$12,325,066, in excess o f t h e imports. The continued increase of
our population, and of iinports and exports, with that of our agricultural, manufacturing .and mining wealth, and our facilities for
internal and external commerce, as exhibited b y t h e combined tables
of this report, encourage me, again, to recommend a modification of
the tarifi* of 1846, and a reduction of the revenue from customs. I t
is assumed as a fact, beyond question, that a tariff on imports is a tax,
and that the tax is paid by the consumer of the imports, and that it
is undeniable, that no tax should be imposed or continued, not required^for an economical administration of the government, allowing
for the fulfilment of all its duties, present and prospective ; and that
the collection ofa greater revenue, is a wrong against the people, who
pay the tax, and imparts to the agents who administer the government,
a tendency to undue power, waste and extravagance.
Many believe, that the $6,000,000 or $7,000,000 annually expended,
out of the national treasury, for carrying the mails and for printing books,,
&c., has been caused by a redundant and overflowing treasury, and that
the same cause has operated to increase our expenditures, upon other
objects, and upon some .not called for, by the present or future exigency
of the government, nor by the justice of the claims provided for;
whilst but few, if any, believe there is any necessity for continuing to
increase our expenditures, with the continued increase of our revenue.
The tables of imports and exports, for the last ten years, exhibit a constant and continued, although not an annual increase, of our imports
and our exports, andj consequently, of our revenue fromcustoms. We
should consider the same causes, that have operated to produce this
increase, for the past years, will operate to continue it, in future years,
and place still larger sums, in the national treasury. The productions
of our planting and provision States, as well as our mining and
manufacturing States, continue and will continue to increase, with
the increased and increasing foreign and domestic demand; commerce
being the exchange of the productions of one country or nation, for
the productions of another, whether made indirectly, by sale and



12

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

purchase for money, or directly, by barter, the conclusion is irresistible, that both our domestic and foreign commerce have, generally, been
of equivalents, and profitable to all parties ; and as they have increased,
so they will, under the same circumstances, continue to increase and
justify a modification of the tariff, and a reduction of the revenue
firom customs. In the modification I have heretofore suggested, the
propriety of increasing our free list, by admitting the raw material
used in our manufactures, to free entry, and thereby giving to thecapital and labor of our people, equal competition with the capital and labor
of those countries, which have, for the beneflt of their manufactures,
admitted the raw material, without duty, and have recommended the
same articles to be admitted free, that are admitted free, by Great
Britain. This would reduce the revenue between $7,000,000 and
$8,000,000. I have also suggested, that some articles of general
consumption, such as salt, should be added to the free list, and the
tariff, on some other imports,^8hould be reduced sorae $7,000,000 or
$8,000,000. This, iipon the imports of last year, would reduce the
reveiiue, to about $50,000,000 from customs, which, with the receipts
from the public lands, is deemed all-sufficient for the necessary requirements of the government; the average expenditures of the
last five years, excluding the public debt and the $10,000,000 paid,
under the treaty with Mexico, having but little exceeded $48,000,000.
If, in future years, there should be increased demands on the government, the revenue from customs may be expected to increase, so aa
to meet them, without the imposition of additional duties ; but if not,
the propriety of taxation will then be, for the consideration of the
constituted authorities.
Instead of a modification of the tariff and the reduction of the revenue from customs, many persons suggest, that we should repeal all
tariffs, and establish the same free trade with foreign nations, that
exists between the States of the Union, particularly those who deem
the revenue now raised from imports, unjustly levied and extravagantly and wastefully expended. They urge, that the only remedy
applicable to existing evils, is the experiment of free trade with foreign
nations, and direct taxation on our people. I have considered that
foreign nations, are not prepared for the same free trade, we enjoy with
each other, and that we cannot have reciprocal free trade^ without
their consent; and that until they agree to admit our productions free,
itwould not be expedient, to admit theirs, free, and allow them to
tax our labor, when we do not tax theirs, in return. I have considered
that free trade, if expedient, should be approached gradually, and
p a r i passu with the advance to that end, by foreign nations, and that
the modification and reduction of the revenue, as proposed, would be
amovement in the right direction, which might be followed, when
experience and the condition of our commerce with other nations,
should justify it, and have contemplated the time, when the productions of each State, in exchange for the productions ofthe others, would
constitute an abundant supply for most of our wants, at cheaper rates,
than other nations could afford them, and make a resort, toother/
modes of raising revenue, a question of necessity ; but that, for many
years to come^ our national treasury would be supplied, from a tariff on



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

13

imports, and that in the modification and reduction, now called for, we
should make it, as equal and just as possible, to our own people, and
take away the discrimination now existing against us, principally
arising out of the legislation of other countries, in contravention of
the industry of our people.
The question ofthe tariff, and the propriety and mode of reduction,
have been the subject of remark, in my former reports, on the finances.
Further reflection has served to confirm me, in the views then taken,
and to which the attention of Congress is again called, in addition to
w h a t i s here said, and to what may be said, in response to the resolutions ofthe House of Representatives, of the 12th of August, 1856.,
calling for information of facts and suggestions, upon points connected
with the subject.
At the instance of the Committee of Ways and Means, the House, on
the 12th of August 1856, passed resolutions from A No. 1 to A No.
16, inclusive, and A No. 17, on the motion of a member. They
accompany this report, and call for information and suggestions as
specified in the resolutions.
The first resolution calls for a statement of the farming, planting,
and sugar crops of the United States, for 1840 and 1850, as given by ,
the census of those years, with an estimate of the crops of 1855, in
tabular form. Statements Nos. 39, 40 and 41, of this report, give
the information called for.
The second resolution calls for a statement, of the number of acres
devoted to the various crops, in 1840 and 1850, with an estimate of the
same for 1855]^ adding thereto such columns and figures, as may be
necessary to exhibit, the increase and decrease, in the number of acres
cultivated, in the principal crops in 1855, and the increased and decreased product per acre, with additional columns, showing the percentage of increase and decrease in acres, product per acre and aggregate product of each crop, together with such suggestions £QV the enlargement of the market, at home and abroad, as the Secretary of th^
Treasury may deem expedient. Statements Nos. 42 and 43 give th^
inforraation called for, in this resolution, as furnished by the census of
1850, there being no data in that of 1840, and none upon which to
make an estiniate for 1855 ; and no data from which to furnish the
other specified details. The suggestions requested, for the enlarge^
ment of the markets, at home and abroad, will be found in a subsequent part of this repdrt.
The third resolution calls for information, on the wool-growing interest of the United States. Statement No. 44 gives the woolen manufactures in the United States, as shown by the census of 1840 and
that of 1850, with an estimate for 18.55, upon the same ratio of increase ; and statement No. 45 exhibits the import and export of wool j
foi- each year, from 1840 to 30th June, 1856; also the annual import
and export of woolen manufactures,for the same period, with an estimate
of the value of the wool, in the manufactured goods imported, in order
to exhibit the quantityof wool, required for annital consumption, and
the pdrtion produced in the copntry. Statement No. 46 gives a.recapitulation of the foregoing tables on wool, w,i^h the allotment, p e r
capita, of the various exhibits therein contained, for the years 1840,



14

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

1850 and 1855 ; and statement No. 47 exhibits the number of pounds
of wool produced and its value ; the nuraber of pounds of domestic
wool exported and its value, and the home consumption ; the number
of pounds of wool imported and its value ; the number of pounds of
foreign wool re-exported and its value, and the home consumption,
with the value thereof; the value of iniported woolen manufactures,
and of those re-exported, and the home consumption, together with the
total number of pounds of domestic and imported wool consumed, and
the total value of domestic and imported woolen mariufactures consumed, in the United States, for the years 1840, 1850 and 1855.
The fourth resolution calls for a statemerit and estimate, ofthe capital employed, in manufacturing wool in 1840, 1842, 1846 and 1856,
designating the number of mills producing broadcloths, at said dates,
with such suggestions in regard to the revenue laws, as the Secretary
may deem expedient, for the permanent establishment of the woolmanufacturing interest, in thq United States. Statement No. 44 gives
the manufactures of wool, according to the census of 1840 and that of
1850, showing the rate of increase, between those periods, with an
estimate at the same ratio for 1855 ; but the number of establishments
in 1840, the census of that year does not give. There are no data in*
the department, from which the other specified details can be furnished. Suggestions upon the subject of this resolution, will be fourid
in another part of this report.
The fifth resolution calls for information, on the preserit condition
of the cottpn-manufacturing interesit, arid for suggestions,, how to promote the manufacture, of the finer fabrics in the United States, and
enlarge the market for cotton, at home and abroad. Statemerit No.
48 gives the amount of cottori manufactures, as derived from the census
of 1840 and that of 1850, with the estimate for 1855, at the same
ratio of increase; and statement No. 49 gives the annual export
of United States manufactured cottons, from 1840 to the 30th of
June 1856, and the export of cotton, from the United States, during
the same period; and statements Hos. 50 and 51 give an allotment,
per capita, of the inforriiation contained, in Nos. 48 and 49, for the
years 1840,1850 and 1855. These tables give the condition of the cotton manufacturirig interest, and of the cottori-growing interest, from
1840 to 1856. The suggestions called for, will be found, in another
part of this report.
The sixth resolution calls for information on the irori manufactures
ofthe United States, also the manufactures of steel and iron and steel.
Statements Nos. 52^ 53, and 54, exhibit the manufactures of these
"articles, as taken from the census of 1840 and that of 1850, with an
estimate for 1855, at the sanie ratio of increase, and statement No.
55 the ^^iportand import of iron and steel, and manufactures of iron
and steel, from 1840 to 30th of June 1856, and the export of iron
and steel arid manufactures of iron and steel; also, statements Nos.
56,and 57, recapitulating the above tables, with the percapita, of
the exhibits therein contained; and statements Ndos. 58 and 59 give
the prices of iron and steel, at the principal ports, for a.series of
years, which, combined, give the conditiori of the iron and steel interest, in the United States.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

15

The seventh resolution calls for information, as to articles not produoed in the United States, with, reference to the enlargement of the,
free list. Statement No. 60 gives a list of articles imported into, and^
not grown or produced, in sufficient quantities, in the United States.
Most, if not all, other articles imported, are also partially produced
or manufactured in the United States. The resolution also calls for
information, on the leather, and manufactures, of leather, in the United
States. The census of 1850 does not furnish any information on th-e
manufactures of leather. Statement No. 61 gives the export and import of leather, and the manufactures thereof, froni 1840 to 30th June
1856; and statement No. 62 gives a recapitulation o f t h e preceding
statement, with the allotment, per- capita, of the various exhibits
therein contained, for the years 1840,1850 and 1855. Statement No.
63 gives the annual importation of hides and skins, into the United.
States, from 1840 to 30th June 1856; and statement No. 64 giv.ea
a recapitulation of statement No. 63, and the various exhibits therein,
contained, for 1840, 1850 and 1855. The resolution also calls for
information, as to the manufacture of glass, porcelain and stoneware,
in the United States ; statements Nos. 65, 66, 67 and 68 give th,e.
annual importations of those articles, from 1840 to. the 30th June
1856, and the allotment, per- capita, of the home consumptiori, for
1840, 1850 and 1855. The -census of 1850 does not give these manufactures. It also calls for information, of the growth and nianufacture
of hemp and flax, in the United States. Statements Nos. 69, 70, 7 1 ,
72, and 73 give the importations of henap and flax, and the manufactures of hemp and flax, from 1840 to 30th of June 1856, and. the allotment, per capita, of the home consumption, for 1840, 1850 and 1855.
T h e census of 1850 does not give these manufactures. It also calls lor
information, as to the coal, lead and copper interest of the United
States. Statements Nos. 74, 75, 76, 77, 78 and 79, give the importa-r
tions of the same, from 1840 to 30th of June 1856, and the allotme.nt,
per capita, of the home eonsumption, for 1840, 1850 and 1855. The.
census of 1850 does not give these manufactures. It also calls for the
growth and manufacture of silk, in the United States. Statements Nos.
80 and 81 give the information according to the census of 1840 and that
of 1850, and the importations of silk and manufactures of silk, from
1840 to 30th June, 1856, and the allotment, per capita, of the home
consumption of foreign silk and manufactures of silk, for 1840, 1850,,
and 1855. The census of 1850 does not give these manufactures,
The eighth resolution calls for, information as to the shipping interest
of the United States, with a statement of the tonnage employed in
the foreign, lake, coasting and river trade, and the railway and carriage
tonnage. Statements Nos. 12 and 13 give the tonnage of the United
States for each year, from 1789 to 30th June 1856, and exhibit the sail
and steam registered tonnage, engaged in the foreign trade, and the
enrolled and licensed sail and steam tonnage, engaged in the coastings
lake, and river trade, and the States where the same is registered or
enrolled, and to which it belongs, for the fiscal year 1856 ; and states
ment No. 82 gives the number of railroads, with the length of the
road, capital invested, earnings, and profits, with the number Qt
persons and tons of freight carried, within the year.



16

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The ninth resolution calls for information, as tothe aggregate amount
of federal, State, city, county, railroad, canal and other corporate debts,
held in Europe, on the 30th of June, 1856 specifying thesame separately, as far as the same can be ascertained. Statement No. 83
gives an estimate thereof from the best data, within the knowledge of
the department.
The tenth resolution calls for a statement of gold and silver coined,
at the United States mint and branches, from 1793 to 1st July, 1856.
This information is„given in stat/ement No. 8 of this report. It also
calls for a statement of the entire cost of coinage, since the establishment ofthe mint, including buildings, machinery &c. This information is given in statement No. 84 of this report, showing the cost of
ground, buildings, machinery and repairs, separately, from that of
coining. It also calls for, an esbimate of the amount of gold and silver,
now remaining in the United States. This information is given in'
statement No. 85 of this report.
The eleventh resolution calls for, a statement of the export and import of gold and silver, from 1793 to the 1st July, 1856, with such
suggestions, to prevent and restrain the export thereof, as the Secretary may deem relevant to the establishment of a sound, stable, and
healthy hard-money currency, and to retire the small denominations
of bank bills, as fast as, gold and silver can be obtained and substituted. " This information, from 1820 to the 1st of July, 1856,is given
in statement No. 10 of this report. No account of the export and
import having been kept at the custom-house until 1820, the department has no means of giving it, prior to that year.
The twelfth resolution calls for suggestions, as to the method ol
stimulating and increasing the export of agricultural and other productions ofthe United States, with a view of preventing the export of
the precious metals, stocks and bonds, by requiring and making it
theinterestof foreign nations, to take our surplus agricultural and
other productions, instead of making it their interest, to take our gold
and silver, to purchase wheat, cotton, tobacco &c., irom other nations,.
Eemarks upon the suggestions, ealled for in the eleventh and twelfth
resolutions, wili be found in a subsequent part of this report.
The thirteenth resolution calls for a report ofthe frauds and undervaluations in customs, under the acts passed the SOth of August 1842
and SOth July 1846, designating the number of cases, and the amount
of frauds and under-valuations, which occurred under the respective
acts ; and the fourteenth resolution calls for a, report, as near as practicable, of the amount and proportions of imports, made by Americanborn citizens, on their own account, and the amount imported by
citizens of fpreign birth, aliens and citizens of other countries. The
regulations of the department did not require accounts and returns,
from which the information, called for in the thirteenth and fourteenth
resolutions, could be given. Circulars were sent to some of the principal
custom-houses, for the required information, but all did not appear on
their books, and it was found to involve too much labor to give what
did, and the disposable force in the custom-houses, could not have
furnished it, in time to be laid before Congress, at the present session.
Certain informatioii was then called for, to euable the department t^



EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

17

make a reliable estimate, which will be found in statements Nos. 86
and 87.
The fifteenth resolution calls for a report ofthe advantages and disadvantages of specific arid ad valorem duties, in reference to the interest of the country, and the frauds of, and under-valuations incident to,
the two classes or systems of duties ; and the sixteenth calls for a report
upon the advantages and disadvantages ofthe home valuation system, in
the collection of customs, as adopted and practised by the British governmerit, with reference to its incorporation into the revenue laws of
the United States. Eemarks upon the subject-matter of the fifteenth
and sixteenth resolutions, will be found in the after part of this report.
The seventeenth resolution passed by the House of Eepresentatives at the Fame time, calls for a report, under specific heads, of the
amount of appropriations and expenditures of every kind incurred by
the governinent, annually, since the 30fch of June, 1825, in the construction, repair^ rent and preservation of custom-houses; the cost,
expense and maintenance of revenue cutters and other vessels engaged
permanently and temporarily in the revenue service, and the amount
of all other expenditures incurred in, or resulting from, the collection
of the customs, or duties on imports, since the above date. The information called for is given in statement No. 88 of this report, with
the items separate on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.
Thes tatistical information called for in the first and second resolutions,
taken in connexion with the information given in the statistics of this
report, places before Congress the whole information, within the reach
of the department, upon the agricultural, planting and manufacturing
interests of the United States, as they e:s:isted in 1840 and 1850, and the
basis for an estimate as to the present condition thereof, sufficiently
^accurate, for any practical purpose.
The statistics upon the production and importation of wool,
and manufactures of wool, have been prepared with care, in order to
place the questions, connected with the production and iniportation of
wool and manufactures of wool, involved in the proposition, to admit
wool as a raw material free of duty, fully and fairly before Congress.
I t will be seen that in 1840, according to the cerisus of that year, we
manufactured woolen goods, to the value of $20,696,999, and that in
addition, we imported manufactures of wool, to the value of $8,652,785;
making our consumption of the manufacturesof wool $29,349,784,
and the consumption of $1 71YVO- ^^^ ^^^h person, then in the United
States. The census of 1840 does not give the number of factories devoted to, nor the capital employed in, the manufacture of
wool. The census of 1850, shows there were 1,559 factories in the
United States, with $28,118,650 ofcapital, devoted to the manufacture of wool, with the particular States, in which the factories
were situated; also, that the manufactures of wool amounted to
$43,207,545, and we imported manufactures of wool to the value
of $16,976,575, making our consumption of manufactures of wool
$60,184,120, and the consumption of $2 59^ for each person in the
United States. If we estimate the increased value of our woolen
manuiactures, since 1850, at the ratio of the increase between 1840
and 1850, it gives our manufactures of wool at $56,406,786, for
2



18

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

the year 1855; and we find the value of our importations of manufactures of wool, for the year 1855 $23,297,384, making our consumption
$79,704,170, and $2 93^-^0- as the consumption of each person, then in
the United States. These tables also show, at the periods of 1840,
1850 and 1855, the value of the wool produced in the United
States, and also the value of wool importedinto the United States, at
the same periods, less the exports of wool. They also show the value of
the wool, in the imported manufactures of wool, at each of those
periods, estimating the value of the wool, at one-third of the value
of the imports, and exhibit the value of the wool consumed by
each person, in 1840 at 71TOV cents, and in 1850, at 75YVO- cents, and
in 1855, at 93yV¥ cents ; and that we consumed, in 1840 $3,704,092
more than we produced, a n d i n 1850, $7,317,771, arid in 1855, $9,678,690. There are no data, from which to exhibit, the number of factories,
nor the amount of capital, employed in the manufacture of wool, in
1855, nor the character of the goods manufactured ; but it is represented that all our factories heretofore engaged in the manufacture of
broadcloths and the finer woolen fabrics, have been forced to abandon
that description of manufacture, and yield our markets for those
articles, to the foreign manufacturer. These.tables show that in 1855,
we consumed $23,297,384 of the manufactures of wool, more than we
manufactured, and that we consumed $9,678,690 of wool, more than
we produced, estimating the wool in the manufactured article, at onethird of the value. Now we import $1,940,697, of wool for our
manufacturers, who pay a duty of 30 per cent, upon i t ; and we import $23,297,384, of the manufactures of wool, on which we pay different rates of duty, viz : 30 per cent, on part, 25 per cent, on part, and20 per cent, on p a r t ; whilst with wool free of duty in other manufacturing countries, the duty operates a discrimination against the labor
and capital of our own people. This is peculiarly the case, as to the
coarser fabrics, which we admit at a less duty, than we impose upon
wool.
The climate ofthe United States is such, that manufactures of wool
are used winter and summer, in some of the States, and in the winter
months, in all, and the finer fabrics are used in all. I t is an article
for clothing and other uses, that our climate and our habits do not
permit us to dispense with, and which our people can and will manufacture for themselves, ifour tariff laws are arranged, so as not to discriminate against them, and in favor of other manufacturing nations.
When we first imposed a tax on foreign wool. Great Britain and
other manufacturing nations taxed it also, and as high as we taxed
it. We discriminated in the tax upon the manufactures of wool, imposing a higher tax upon the finer fabrics ; whereupon G-reat Britain
and other manufacturing nations repealed their tax on wool,and secured
to their manufacturers, the advantage of obtaining the raw material,
free of duty. This advantage over us they will continue to enjoy as
long as our tax is continued. The reasons why they, admit wool free,
areto be found in the fact,that theymanufacturemorethantheyproduce,
and it is necessary they should be able to sell cheap, in order to enter advantageously the markets ofthe world, and it may be, also, to secure the
market of the United States, to the suppression of manufacturing in



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

19

this country. We also manufacture more wool than we produce, and
consume more manufactures of wool than we manufacture, and continue our tax on wool. The duty on wool was imposed to promote its
production in the United States, and was expected to enhance the
price. It has failed to secure the object for which it was imposed.
The production has not kept pace with our population and consumption of woolen manufactures, and although the prices have been fair,
they have not been such as to make wool-growing as profitable a pursuit as many others in the country. In the trial of ten years under
the tariff of 1846, there is no greater production of wool, in proportion
to the population, than there was prior to that time. It is said we do
not produce the inferior priced wools, costing twenty cents per pound,
or less ; nor the higher priced wools, costing fifty .cents or more to the
pound, and that it is the lower and higher priced wools, that we import, for our manufactures, and that the duty has no effect, and does
not enhance the price of the wool that we produce. In consequence
of which, we are undersold in our own markets, in both the finer an
coarser fabrics, and that the repeal of the tariff on low and the higher
priced wools, would not affect the price of the wool we produce, and
would enable our manufacturers to use more of our wool, by judicious
mixture with foreign wool, and give them a fairer competition for the
home market, and induce the manufacture of the finer fabrics in this
country. There would be difficulty in the execution of such a tariff,
because it would be the interest of the importer, to put the foreign
value of his wool, above the fifty or below the twenty cents, to obtain
free entry. It is believed these causes would render the tax uncertain
and unpopular, and make free trade in wool more desirable and more
beneficial, to the wool-grower as well as the manufacturer. In Great
Britain, the tax on the foreign wool, when it was as much as sixperice
a pound, did not enhance the price to the English wool-grower, although it had been imposed and continued, as well to encourage the
growth of wool a home, as for revenue. The English prices current
%
and statistics show that the price of wool ranged higher, the very first
year after the duty was repealed, than it had for years before, and has
continued to range higher ever since. It is confidently believed such
would be the case in this country, if the duty on the importation of
wool was repealed, thereby giving our manufacturers wool, on the same
terms the foreign manufacturers obtain theirs, viz: by purchase in
the open markets of the world, and that they would be encouraged to
increase and extend their business, in order to enjoy the benefit ofthe
home market for their goods, the consequence of which would be, a
constant and greater home demand, at higher and better prices.
The ratio at which our population is increasing, will render necessary a continued increase, in the manufactures of wool required for
consumption. The importance ofa home-supply, of this useful iand
indispensable article of clothing, calls for the most careful investigation of the effects of our laws, and a prorapt reraedy by their repeal,
wherever they shall be found prejudicial, to a constant and cheap supply, from the capital and labor of our own people.
In 1790, but little manufacturing was done in the country, as a distinct business. Nearly all that was done was in private families, for



20

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

domestic use. Now manufacturing is a separate pursuit, and immense
capital is employed in its various branches. In 1840, the value of our
manufactures was returned in the census of that year, at $483,278,215,,
and in 1850, they were returned in the census of that year, at $1,055,595,899. The ratio of increase makes our manufactures for 1855
$1,391,031,293. In this result, we recognise thie fact that we have
become a great manufacturirig people, and the tables accompanying
this report prove, we are likewise a great agricultural and commercial
people. An impulse, in accordance with the national sentiment, was
given to manufacturing, by the imposition of duties on imports in our
first revenue laws, and tjie impulse was increased, from time td time,
by the imposition of additional duties. At first we manufactured the
coarser and more bulky articles required by our population : gradually
we have extended our operations, to a great variety of articles, and tosome requiring much skill in the execution, and now our manufacturers are in possession of the home market,, in a great variety of
articles. In 1790, our planters raised no cotton for exportatiori; now
it is the great crop of our planting States, and they furnish it, as a.
raw material to the manufacturing States, as well as to foreign nations,,
and now we manufacture the coarser cotton goods for the consumption
of our entire population, and export near $7,000,000 annually, to
foreign countries. Our manufacture of cotton in 1840 was $46,350,453, in 1850 $61,869,184, and the same ratio of increase in 1855,
•would give $70,964,712.
The history of the rise and progress of our manufactures, as given
in the tables of this report, together with that ofthe growth of cotton
and other productions, is suggestive of all that is required to extend
our cotton manufactures, to that of the finer fabrics, and to the enlargement ofthe horae and foreign market, for our cotton and cottonSy
and, indeed, for all branches of our manufacturing and agricultural
productions. Allow the incidental protection of a revenue tariff, and
place our manufactures and productions upon the same beneficial
footing, that foreign manufacturers and producers enjoy, in our own
and foreign countries, by taking off the duty we now impose on the
jiaw material, and give thera fair and equal corapetition, for the horae
.and foreign raarkets, and we may safely leave all the rest, to the skill
and enterprise of our people.
Iron and steel being articles of general use, in all our States and
Territories, and necessary in the prosecution of all industrial pursuits,
the annual consumption and the annual home production and import,
become .a matter of solicitude with many, and of interest to all. I t
appears from the cerisus of 1840, that we produced and manufactured
iron and steel, that year, to the amount of $29,909,162, and that
we imported iron and steel, and the manufactures of iron and steel,
to the amount of $7,088,739, and exported iron and steel, and the
manufactures of iron and steel, to the amount of $1,104,455,
leaving for consumption $35,893,446 ; and from the census of 1850,
that we produced and manufactured iron and steel, that year, to the
.amount of $60,485,653, and that we imported iron and steel, and
the manufactures of iron and steel, to the amount of $17,524,459^^
and exported iron and steel, and the manufactures of iron and steely



EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

21

t o the amount of $1,911,320 ; leaving for the consumption of the
year, $76,098,792. The same ratio of increase, in the production
and manufacture of iron and steel from 1850 to 1855, that is found to
exist between the years 1840 and 1850, gives the production and
manufaetures of iron and steel for 1855, at $78,40*6,538. To this
add $23,945,274, forthe amount of the imports of iron and steel,
and manufactures of iron and steel, for the year 1855, first deducting
the export of those articles, and there is iron and steel, and the
manufactures of iron and steel, to the amount of $98,598,340, for
the consumption of the year. The estimate of $78,406,538 for the
year 1855 is, no doubt, some ten or fifteen millions less than the
production.
•
A comparison of the population of 1840, with the production and
manufacture, import, export and consumption of iron and steel, and
inanufactures of iron and steel, and the like comparison of the population of 1850, with the production and manufacture, iraport, export
and consuraption of those articles in 1850, extended by estiraate, for
t h e production and raanufacture in 1855, and by the iraport and export and amount left for consumption of that year, places the subject
fairly before us, in connexion with our past and future supplies and
future wants. The table of prices at Boston, New York, Philadelphia
and Baltimore, for the last seventeen years, furnishes the fluctuations in
the prices of bar iron, and a criterion for the value of the other descriptions, and proves that this indispensable article, like all others, obeys
the laws of demand and supply, in affecting the proflts of the producer and manufacturer, operating favorably or unfavorably, upon the
amount prepared for general use.
We have in the United States more iron ore and raore coal, with the
usual fluxes, in convenient connexion and of cheaper access, than all
the other civilized nations of the world, aad have the necessary capital, skill and labor to produce all the iron and steely and manufactures of iron and steel, required for our consumption, or that may be
•required for our consumption, for centuries to come, and also to
enable us to supply the markets of other countries, in fair corapetition,
with the iron and steel of other nations. These tables show that our
production of iron and steel, and raanufactures of iron and steel, was
'greater, in proportion to population, in 1850, than it was in 1840, and
t h a t it was greater in 1855, than it was in 1850, giving us the right
to assume that, influenced by the same causes, it will be greater in
I860 than it now is, and in time, will be sufficient for oiir own conisumption, and then give us a surplus for export. But taking into
consideration our present population, and accumulated eapital, with
the amount of capital, annually, drawn from other eountries, in the^
course of emigration, and the great cost of carriage, to the interior of
our country, with the late improvements, in the modes of production
and manufacture of iron and steel, it would not be rash., to expect a
full supply for our own consumption, between this and the returns of
the census of 1870. •
^
The tax upon iron and steel, and the manufactures thereof, because
of their general use, in all sections and in all industrial pursuits, has
i3'een considered as equitable and fair a tax, as it was pas.sible to im


22 '

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

pose upon the country; consequently no material change has been contemplated or recomraended; but if continued at present rates, it is not
supposed the same amount of revenue will continue to be derived from
it, even should the use of iron, as no doubt it will, be extended to
many other purposes, and be consuraed in much greater quantities.
In comraercial intercourse with other nations, based upon equivalent
exchanges, as it raust always be, if profitable and continuous, we
may well look forward to the time, when we shall produce, within our
own limits, all articles that are essential to national defence, and the
use and comfort of our own people ; and of these there is none more
necessary to the defence ofthe country and the use and comfort ofthe
people, and of which* we have better means of producing in the country, than iron and steel, and the manufactures of iron and steel.
Tet the production should not be stimulated, by unequal and unjust
taxation, nor the period of an abundant supply, from our mines and
factories, retarded by impolitic legislation. The home production,
of iron and manufactures of iron and steel, is on the increase. The
tables prove the production arid raanufacture of these articles, have
increased with our increased population, and that we import less,
in proportion to our population and consumption, than formerly.
Statement No. 60 gives the articles not grown or produced in the
United States, as called for in the resolutions. They are not, all raw
material used for manufacturing purposes. The raaking such of them
free, as are so used, would not accomplish the object aimed at, in the
proposed reduction of the revenue, by that mode. There are several
articles partially produced in this country, but not in sufficient quantity, to supply the demand, which might be admitted to free entry,>
without prejudice to any home interest, and among them are wool,
silk, hides, .&c. Statements Nos. 61, 62, 63 and 64 give all the
information upon the subject of hides, skins, and leather and the
manufactures of leather, within the control of the department. The
demand and supply of hides, skins, and leather, and manufactures of
leather are matters of great and growing interest to the country.
Statements Nos. 65, 66, 67 and 68 give the annual importation of
glass, porcelain and stone ware, for the last seventeen years. The
census returns of 1850, give no account as to the production and
manufacture of those articles, in the United States, in consequence ol
which, the department is not able to furnish the additional inforraation called for, in relation to them. It is known, however, that these
articles are manufactured in the country—glass and stone ware to a
very considerable amount—and the manufacture is being rapidly extended, so as, more and more, to meet the home consumption. The
manufacture of porcelain, although introduced, has not increased much,
and may be expected to be among the last, that will fully supply the
home demand. Statements Nos. 69 and 70, in giving the growth and
manufacture of hemp and flax, in the United States, and the importations of hemp and flax, and the manufactures of hemp and flax,
show the home demand 'and home supply, and the foreign supply,
and prove that the home supply, is not adequate to the wants ofthe
country. Statements Nos. 71, 72 and 73 give the importation oi
these articles, for 1840 and 1850, with an estimate for 1855. The



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

23

census of 1850, does not give the home production of coal, lead and
copper, and the departraent is without the raeans of giving the
residue of the information called for, yet it is known that the country
contains coal, lead and copper, more than adequate to supply all the
w^ants of the country, and that the home supply, is on the increase.
Stateraents Nos. 80 and 81 give the growth and raanufacture of silk,
in the United States. The departraent has not the raeans of giving
the nuraber of establishments, engaged in the manufacture of silk,
nor the character of the articles manufactured; yet it is known there
are numerous establishments engaged in the manufacture of silk, on
moderate scale, and that sewing-silk, ribbons and various articles are
manufactured. The statement also exhibits the importations of silk,
and the manufactures of silk, for the last seventeen years. The extended and increased consumption of the manufactures of silk, induces
large and increasing importations, whilst the growth of silk, when
compared with population, is on the decline, and the horae raariufacture, on the increase. The tax on foreign raanufactures of silk, frora
the general and extended use thereof, is considered expedient, and as
just and equal, as can be iraposed on any importations, and peculiarly
proper, taken in connexion with our comraerce with the countries, frora
which we obtain our principal supplies. The admission of raw silk,
tve'e of duty, would injure no home interest, and might, in time, so
increase our manufacture of the article, as to reduce foreign importations. The manufacture of glass, porcelain, stone-ware, the mining ,
of coal, and productions of lead and copper, and the m.anufacture of
silk, may be expected to be increased, and extended, so as to take
possession of the home market, in less time, than it has taken the
production and manufactures of cotton, to gain their present prosper
OUS possession ofthe home market.
I t w i l l be seen by reference to statement No. 12, exhibiting the
United States tonnage, engaged in the foreign and coasting trade,
from 1789 to the 30th of June, 1856, that the tonnage on the 30th of
June 1856, is 340,349, less than shown by the statement for the SOth
of June 1855. This has arisen in part from a stricter examination
of the returns of former years, and a correction, by striking out vessels formerly'Sold without the United States, or lost by marine and
other casualties. This statement exhibits the sail and steam tonnage,
separately, and shows there has been a regular progressive increase,
with our increasing population and commerce, although retarded
at times by the accidents of war, the casualties of trade and commercial difficulties. It also exhibits the registered tonnage, which is
alone authorized to engage in the foreign trade, separately, from the
enrolled and licensed tonnage, which is only authorized to engage in
our coasting trade, with partial exceptions, on the northern lakes, and
of vessels in the coasting trade, authorized to touch at Cuba; and statement No. 13 exhibits the States and ports, in which the sail and steam
tonnage is registered, or enrolled and licensed, and consequently where
it is owned.
The use of steam tonnage, in the commerce between the United
States and other American nations, and Great Britain, France,
and other comraercial nations, raay, and it is thought by sorae will.



24

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

considerably, reduce the sail tonnage used in coraraerce, and that
cheaper capital in Great Britain, will give to that nation an advantage,
over the United States, in steara tonnage, and the carrying trade of
our own and other countries, and they attribute the reduction of our tonnage, to that cause. This may be so, to some extent, but no continued
reduction of our coraraercial tonnage is apprehended ; nor is it apprehended there is any just reason to suppose, our enterprising shipbuilders and raerchants will surrender, the navigation of the seas,.to
Great Britain, and place that nation in possession of the carrying
business of the world ; yet the subject is one of interest, and calls for
a careful exaraination of our tonnage laws, and the reraoval of all
impediraents, to an equal and fair corapetition, for our foreign trade
and the trade of other nations.
When our navigation laws were flrst enacted, in 1789, the registered tonnage of theUnited States was secured, against the protecting
navigation laws of other nations, by countervailing or protecting
provisions. Such provisions were, frora tirae to time, extended, so
as to countervail the prohibitory enactments, of the commercial
nations, with which we had intercourse. These comraercial restrictions have gradually yielded to the more liberal principles of free
trade, in the transportation of freight and passengers, until in t h a t
business, we have free trade with almost all the nations of the earth,,
only raarred, by the charge,of light-raoney to our vessels, where we
charge none. This reraoval of restrictions, in our coramercial intercourse with other nations, in the carrying business, has not been prejudicial to our foreign comraercial marine. The burden of lightmoney, to which our tonnage, in the ports of Great Britain and
other comraercial nations, is subject, should be removed by mutual
agreenient, or countervailing legislation on our part, and the tonnage
duty, now charged on our vessels, in the ports of France and some
other countries, and on their vessels, in our ports, should, by like
mutual agreement, be taken off, and port charges equalized.
The coasting trade of the United States has, from the beginning,,
been strictly reserved for vessels, built within the United States, and
owned by citizens of the United States, tothe exclusion of foreign-built
and foreign-owned vessels. The Americari tonnage engaged in foreign
trade and inthe coasting trade, hasbeen American-built, and has had
the absolute protection of our laws, and the licensed tonnage absolute
protection, in the carrying trade on our coast, and in our own w^aters.
The protection given to our foreign commercial and to our coasting
comraercial raarine, has secured a. large and efficient body of skilful
officers and sailors, at alltimes, ready for the defence of our cities and
coast, for repelling aggression on our commerce, and for manning our
ships of war. In the protection given to our shipping' interest, for
the purpose of having, at all times, the power to repel foreign aggression and protect our coast and trade, there appears to have been
but little division of sentiment, from the earliest times, to thepresent,
whilst the yearly increase of our tonnage, proves the wisdom of our
laws in this particular. We 'have no data to ascertain the annual
number of persons, or the annual tons of freight carried, in our coasting trade, nor the value thereof Each person must make his own



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

25

estimate of the tonnage employed, and the average number of trips
the vessels can make, combined withthe facts that capital constantly
tends to that business, and the growth of our enrolled and licensed
tonnage keeps pace, with our increasing population and wealth. To
exhibit in connexion wdth the tonnage employedin our coasting trade,
the passengers and freight transported on railroads, the department
has had prepared statement No. 82 accompanying this report,
of most of the railroads in the several States and Territories,
showing the capital invested, the length of road corapleted in each of
them, the annual number of passengers and tons of freight carried,
and other interesting statistics of said roads. The amount of coasting tonnage, and the annual number of tons of freight transported
on our railroads, with an estimate of that carried by other modes of
transfer, exhibit the magnitude of the means required for our internal
trade.
A reference to the table of production, taken from the census of 1840,
will show that our agricultural and raanufacturing production in that
year, araounted to $1,006,133,599 ; and a reference to the like table
of production, taken frora the census of 1850, will show the agricultural and raanufacturing production, for that year, to have been
$2,012,520,539, and the ratio of increase. A like ratio of increase, for the five succeeding years, gives $2,602,363,924 as the
value for the year 1855. Suppose $1,000,000,000 to be consumed at
the places of production,-and there is left $1,602,363,924 of production, as the basis of our foreign and internal trade, and the source
from which we derive profitable eraployraent, for our registered and
licensed tonnage and our railroads. Take fifteen per cent, of this for
our foreign trade, which is about equal to our exports, and there is
left $1,352,009,336 for our internal trade, constituting the commer,cial ligament, that binds us together, as one nation and one people.
There is no tax or tariff upon the transportation of the articles, of
which our internal trade consists, from one place to another, within
any of the States and Territories, nor upon the articles themselves ;
the cost of transportation is the only burden, on the free interchange,
over and above the cost of the article, and the profit of the producer
or dealer.
The effect of reciprocal free trade is shown by statement No. 29,
of our commerce with the British North American provinces, before
and since the reciprocity treaty, which w^ent into effect in 1854. In
1853, the exports of American produce to those provinces amounted to
$7,404,087, and our imports from, them to $7,550,718 ; whilst, in
1856, the exports of American produce to said provinces amounted to
$22,714,697, and our imports from thera to $21,310,421.
The corabined tables accorapanying this report, exhibit our population and eleraents of greatness in 1790, shortly after the adoption
of the constitution and the organization of the governraent under it,
making us, in many respects, one nation and one people. They also
exhibit our present population, with all the accuraulated wealth of
sixty-six years, and all the eleraents for increasing wealth and greatness, for years to corae. We have existed as States and a nation,
under wise and equal laws, justly and irapartially adrainistered, and
have been a constitution and law abiding people, with but occasional



26

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

State and individual exceptions. W h y raay we not hope the history
of the past, is to be realized, in our future progress ? Under State and
national constitutions, we have had free trade with each other, the products of one State supplying the wants of another,, and stiraulating
the industry, enterprise, and prosperity of all. Calls are made for suggestions, for the increase of our internal and foreign trade. Under a
conviction that we were collecting, under the existing tariff, raore
revenue, than a present econoraical adrainistration of the governraent,
and a wise and prudent outlay for the future, raade necessary or called
for, and also under the conviction that an overflowing treasury, would
induce wasteful and extravagant expenditures, a raodiflcation of the
tariff of 1846, and a reduction of the revenue frora custoras, was suggested in ray first report, on the finances, and renewed in both ray subsequent reports, and is now again repeated, with, if possible, a firmer
conviction ofits necessity and propriety, and for the same reasons,
and others that could be named.
The suggested reduction of the revenue, was, by an enlargement of
the free list, so as to adrait sorae articles of consuraption and the raw
raaterials used by our manufacturers, to free entry, and lessening the
duty on other imports. I t was thought that the duties frora custoras,
could well be reduced to sorae forty-eight or fifty raillions of dollars,
and leave an ample sum, for all the wants and requirements of the
government, including the redemption of the public debt, as it should
become due. I t seemed to me, that good policy required the raw
material used in our raanufactures, to be exerapt from duty, and
our manufacturers placed on an equality, with those of Great Britain
and other raanufacturing nations, who adrait the raw raaterial to
free entry. A tax upon the raw raaterial is calculated to increase the
cost of the production, by the profits of the iraporter on the tax on the
raw raaterial, and the profits of the manufacturer on his outlay for
that tax, and the importer's profit thereon, and of the merchant
through whora, it passes to the consumer, interfering with the manufacturers' enjoyment, of both the home and the foreign market, on the
same advantageous terms of the manufacturer of other nations, who
obt-ains the raw material, free of duty. A single example illustrates
the case: Great Britain admits wool, a raw material, free of duty, and
the United States impose upon it, a duty of thirty per cent. This enables the English manufacturer to interfere with the American manufacturer, in the American raarkets, and to exclude him, from the
foreign market. I t does raore: it surrenders the raarkets of the
countries producing the raw raaterial, to the nations who take it, free of
duty. Our raanufacturing and coraraercial States enjoy the markets
of our planting and provision States, because there exists no impeding
duty, giving preference to foreign nations; but our manufacturing,
comraercial and provision States do not enjoy the raarkets of Mexico,
Central and South America, and the West Indies, nor of other nations inhabiting the shores ofthe Pacific, because these nations do not manufacture, and have but little else for comraercial exchange, than the raw material, which we tax, and other nations take, free of duty, in exchange
for manufactures and other productions; and although we are raore
favorably situated for coraraercial intercourse, with them, we yield the



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

27

trade to the European nations. Had the suggestion for the admission
of the raw raaterial—the productions of those countries—free of duty,
received a favorable consideration at the first session of the thirty-third
Congress, we would have been iraporting the raw raaterial, the productions of those countries, in our ships, and those countries would
have been taking frora us, in exchange, the productions of all sections
ofthe Union. W i t h prejudices and antipathies lessening, we would
soon have becorae bound to thera, and they to us, in the strong and
enduring ligaraents, of rautual and beneficial comraerce. Additional
eraployment would have been secured to our tonnage, and additional
markets, for our manufactures of cotton and other products. Mexico, Central America, South America, the West Indies, and other
nations on the shores of the Pacific, would have been learning to confide in us, and we would have had an increased interest, in the stability and prosperity of their governments. The enlargement of the
free list, and the admission of the raw material, is suggested, as the
best and surest mode, of giving increased beneficial employment to our
tonnage, and increased beneficial markets, for our manufactures and
other products, and of cultivating araity and friendship, with our
southern neighbors, and also the best raode, of promoting our own
prosperity, next after the mutual free trade, we enjoy with each other.
Mutual beneficial comraerce is all that is required, to establish, with
these riations, lasting relations of peace and friendship, and remove
from their minds all apprehension, from our expansion. We should
seek comraerce, and not dominion. When they shall know and feel
that commerce, alone, is our object, and that it is as beneficial to them,
as to us, we shall win their confidence, arid our friendship will be
lasting.
It will be seen that the total gold and silver coinage of the United
States Mint, from 1793. when the mint was established, to SOth September, 1856, has been $549,341,914 14, and that the entire import
from 1820, when the account was first kept, has been $293,505,743,
and the export $436,587,354—there being no account of the imports
and exports, prior to 1820.
It is not deemed possible for an agricultural, manufacturing and
coraraercial nation, to prevent the export of gold and silver, because
in commercial transactions, gold and silver, besides being a measure
of value, constitute articles of comraerce, and raust obey the laws
of demand and supply. The export may be restrained, by having
gold and silver currency of a fixed value, and allowing the circulation
of no bank-notes, or no bank-notes not convertible into gold and
silver, on demand, and a foreigri comraerce that%calls for larger exports of other articles, than the wants of our citizens make it necessary to import; but whilst gold and silver continue products of
our mines, and remain articles of comraerce, internal and external,
requiring equivalent exchanges, the export and iraport of gold and
silver will continue, and should be no cause of alarra. The desideratum of a sufficient uniform currency, of a fixed value, in all the States
and Territories, is all that is required, sofar as currency is concerned,
tosecure a sound and healthy foreign and internal trade. A currency, partly composed of bank-notes, has a liability, and to some ex


28

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

tent a tendency, to excess, against which convertibility into gold and
silver, on deraand, is no security ; nor is the confining discounts to
notes and bills, representing real transactions, a security and never
will be, whilst there is such a thing as over-trading and over-production ; and for the sarae reasons, a pure raetallic currency, would not
constitute a perfect security, against a diraiuished or redundant supply. Coin vanishes under the influence of wars or apprehended wars ;
internal revolutions and strifes; political alarras and apprehended
political changes ; a deflciency in the grain crops, requiring large
importations from other countries ; the explosion of mercantile s|)eculations ; and a continued unfavorable course of foreign trade.
The establishment of a pure metallic currency, would require the
withdraw^al of the corporate authority, given by State charters, to
1,398 banks, to issue and circulate bank-notes as inoney, and the
consequent withdrawal of $195,000,000, now circulated by thera.
Congress has no power to act upon the charters, granted by theStates,
and the States may be without power, during the continuance of the
charters, and certainly would not agree to make a/surrender of the
power to Congress ; therefore, a pure metallic currency may be set
down, as impracticable, under our constitution and our laws, to say
nothing of the sentiment of our people. Statement No. 32 gives, as
expected, an increase, in the number of chartered banks in the United
States, and an increase, in the capital employed in therii. They constitute commercial agencies, with $344,000,000 of capital. They
maintain a circulation of nearly $200,000,000 of bank-notes, and
afford such valuable facilities, to alf branches of our industry, as to
to make it undesirable, now, to dispense with them. Their circulation .may be so regulated as to give it practical uniformity and stability, by withdrawing their smaller denominations, of notes, and
allowing the gold and silver coinage to take their place. The bank
reports do not give the several denorainations of notes, and araount
of each in circulation, but leave it to an-estiraate of those of $5
and under, which raay be set down, at one-fourth of the whole, or
$50,000,000.
In 1844, before the gold raines of California were discovered,
the araount of gold and silver in the country, was estimated at
$100,000,000. The imports, and the receipts of bullion at the raint
from our mines, after deducting the exports, up to the SOth September,
1856, have added atleast $150,000,000 to the amount ofgold and silver
in the country, without taking into consideration, theamount brought
in by emigrants and returning travellers, nor the amount carried out
by travellers and raerchants, riot entered at the custom-house, nor
the amount, used in our manufactures or employed in the arts. The
suferintendent of the mint estimates the gold and silver remaining
in the country at $200,000,000, on the data stated in his communication accompanying this report; and the department at $250,000,000,
upon the data and for the reasons, stated in my last report. But
whether it be the one or the other, there has been added to the gold
and silver from $100,000,000 to $150,000,000, since the working of
the mines in California. This affords satisfactory proof, t h a t the




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

29

$50,000,000 of small-note circulation, could be supplied from our own
mines, in the course of three or four years, without deranging our
currency, or oppressing any branch of productive industry. The only
difference would be the supply of a home demand, instead, of a foreign
deraand, and the consuraption of a less amount of foreign merchandise. This, a healthy operation of trade would soon accomplish. I t
remains to inquire, in what raanner, provision can be made to have
the small-note circulation withdrawn, and prohibited. In some of
the States, there are no chartered banks, and other of the States have
not authorized the issue of small notes ; whilst others, under a conviction of the ill effect upon the currency, and upon their productive
interest, have prohibited their issue and caused their withdrawal.
This is the result of a correct and corrected public sentiment, and may
be expected sooner, orlater, to extend itself to the other States, and thus
accomplish the entire withdrawal of small notes, and the sul)stitution
of gold and silver, in their stead, for all the small daily transactions, including the payraent of wages. This may not be accomplished for years;
but justice to those corapelled to use sraall notes, and to those States,
that have not used, or have prohibited their use, in connexion with
the losses, a failure to redeera thera on deraand, always inflicts upon
labor, or such a use of thera, as to render presentation for payraent
irapracticable, and the infliction of a like loss, raay w^ell induce an
araendraent ofthe constitution, giving Congress authority to prohibit
arid restrain their use, and induce such an araendraent to be called for
by the States that have not used, or have ceased, to use, them. At present, an attempt to prohibit and restrain the issue and circulation of
small notes,by a resort to taxation, or by applying bankrupt laws to these
corporations, would be premature. In my forraer reports, the subject
has beenbrought to the attention of Congress, with a view to the full
consideration of the evil and danger to our currency, from their conttinueduse, under the hope that Congress, or the States authorizing their
issue, would take action, to extend the restriction and make it general.
If the sraall notes are withdrawn and prohibited, it is believed the
operations of the treasury, in the collection and disburseraent of the
national revenue, would be as salutary a restraint upon the banks and
upon coraraercial transactions, as could be interposed, and all-sufficient
to secure as sound, healthy, and uniforra a currency, as it is ^practicable
to have.
An exaraination ofthe bank reports shows that the profits of banking, in the gre'at cities and coraraercial centres arise, principally, from
the use ofthe large deposites kept by raerchants, and capitalists in their
vaults, whilst the profits of banks, in the rural districts, arise, principally, frora the substitution of their notes for raoney, viz: frora circulation. The banks with large deposites, in prosperous times, rely that
the loss from withdrawals, will be supplied by other deposites; and the
banks of circulation, that the new issues on loans and discounts, will
give the means, for the redemption of returning notes. It requires
the sarae character of prudence and foresight, to be able to pay deposites, and to be able to pay returning notes. The new feature in banking, presented in the last bank report, showing the extent of capital
employed in unchartered banks, proves banking, a popular as wellas



30

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

a profitable pursuit, even without the privilege of substituting bank
notes for money. The chartered banks are mostly confined, by their
charters, to the legitiraate business of banking, viz: dealing in raoney;
and as they are joint-stock conipanies, they generally obtain raen of
integrity, prudence, and experience to conduct their business, and
encounter, only, the hazard of improvident losses and discounts, to their
customers ; whilst the unchartered banks, encounter the same hazard
from improvident discounts, and also the temptation to engage portions of their capital, in outside speculations. Banking, whether in
chartered or unchartered banks, confined to the legitiraate business of
dealing in raoney, with prudence and skill, encounters less hazards,
than raost other raercantile pursuits. The one thousand three hundred and ninety-eight chartered banks and branches, with a capital
of $344,000,000, and the private banks, with a capitaL of $118,000,000, constitute so many establishments, dealing in money, as
an article of trade and coraraerce. They are raanaged by a large
corps of intelligent, experienced, and practical men, who, in the
general, control them with great integrity, skill and judgraent, not
only for the interest of the stockholders and the proprietors, but for
that of the public. This conclusion is warranted by the few instances of bankruptcy, or erabarrassraent presented in the year, or a course
of years, and by the absence of great fluctuations, in the araount of
their circulation and discounts. However, great vigilance should be
bestowed, on.the operations of banks, and they should be rigidly confined, to the legitimate business of dealing in money.
The most objectionable feature, in contemplating these banks, arises
frora the fact, that raany of thera issue and circulate sraall notes, and
have not sufficient capital, to justify the eraployraent of intelligent,
skilful and experienced bankers, in their raanageraent. The States,
by appropriate laws, do prohibit individuals frora issuing and circulating notes as raoney, and raay prohibit the issuing ofsraall notes, or
the business of banking, without adequate capital, restrict their operations within prescribed limits, and make abstraction or diversion of
the funds, by the banks, or their officers, a criminal offence. Stateraents Nos. 32 and 35 exhibit these chartered and unchartered banks,:
in the aggregate, with a corabined capital of $462,000,000, and with
a combined circulation, for the chartered banks, of $195,000,000, (the
unchartered banks having no circulation,) and with deposites, in the
chartered banks, of $212,000,000, (the unchartered banks showing no
deposites, and no gold and silver.) The gold and silver, in the chartered banks, amounts to about $60,000,000. An estimate of one-half
that araount in the unchartered banks, in proportion to capital, would
give $10,000,000 raore, and raake $70,000,000 in both. An estiraate ,
of one-half of the amount of deposites in the unchartered banks,
in proportion to the ampunt in the chartered banks, Vould give at
least $38,000,000 in those banks, and make $250,000,000 of deposites
in the chartered and unchartered banks. The chartered banks have
an aggregate of $704,534,362, due on the bill and discount line,
maturing, on an average, in from one to ninety days, and bank and
other balances due to them, to the amount of $62,639,725, payable on
demand. The unchartered banks have an amount, in proportion to



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

31

their capital, and the daily demands of their business. The daily receipts from these sources, constitute the means of the banks to meet
the daily deraands, for the payraent of deposites, redemption of notes
and other outstanding claims, and for the purchase of bills and discount of notes. The gold and silver, upon which all this is based, is
but about $70,000,000. These banks, and their operations, are diffused
throughout the States, and excite but little attention, in their respective
localities, although exerting considerable influence, on the business
and trade of the country. In this aggregate view of their capital and
business, the volume of influence they may exert, upon the business
and prosperity of the country, is fairly presented for consideration.
An aggregateof the daily receipts and daily payments, at all these
banks, would satisfactorily prove that this $70,000,000 is not dead capital, but performs its full part, in our various coramercial transactions.
The money statements ofthe treasury, and statements of deposites
by disbursing officers, exhibit about $30,000,000, a t a l l times, in the
national treasury. The daily receipts and daily payments, covering
more than $73,000,000 of annual receipts, and more than $72,000,000
of annual payments, are daily drawing from banks and business raen,
large araounts of gold and silver, into the national treasury, in payraent of custoras duty, and in payraent for public lands, and controlling the banks and the traders, in their operations, whilst the daily
. payraents, at the national treasury, suppl}, the gold and silver, to new
channels of circulation,, without causing undue pressure in raonetary
affairs. For the weekly transactions of the national treasurv, see
stateraent No. 37. This $30,000,000 is not dead capital. " The
$10,000,000 or $12,000,000 of it allowed to the raint and branches,
for the purchase of bullion, is always active, being exchanged for
bullion and replaced by coinage, yet always ready for the wants of
the national treasury, whilst the balance constitutes the distributive
fund, that gives confidence in the ability of the treasury, to meet all
deraands.
. In the United States,'all real and personal property is saleable, as
well as the annual productipns of agriculture, manufactures and
comraerce, and in prosperous tiraes, can easily be exchanged for
raoney, and is the basis of enlarged and extended credits, and acts i n
conjunction with the bank credits and raoney in circulation, giving
increase to the value of real and personal estate, all articles of commerce, and the wages of labor, and thereby creating a demarid for
more money. It is upon this state of things that wars, or apprehended •
wars, internal revolutions and strifes, political alarras and apprehended political changes, deficiencies of crops, the explosion of large
raercantile speculations and unfavorable trade, act, destroying confidence, and with it.credit, inducing the hoarding the precious raetals,
the withdrawal of deposites, the return of bank notes for rederaption, the
consequent stagnation of coraraerce, in all its channels and operations,
the reduction of prices and wages, with inability to purchase and pay,
bank suspensions and general insolvency.
There are no raeans of
entirely preventing this destruction of confidence, credit, and commerce. The failure of a few banks, merchants, and dealers, occurs in
periods of the greatest prosperity, and occurs annually, without much



32

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

effect, upon the great interests of society, and serves to warn and direct
the raore cautious and prudent. The destruction of all confidence,
credit and coraraerce, affects, in its reraorseless march, every interest
arid almost every individual. For this, the reraedy raust be looked
for, in a sound currency, well raanaged banks, and prudent raerchants
and dealers. Under a systera of wise and just laws, giving security
to property, a fair reward to labor, and affording a teraperate and
timely control of the currency and all raercantile transactions, we may
confidently hope such a disaster will rarely occur. The independent
treasury, when over-trading takes place, gradually fills its vaults, withdraws the deposites, and, pressing the banks, the merchants and the
dealers, exercises that temperate and timely control, which serves to secure the fortunes of individuals, and preserve the general prosperity.
The independent treasury, however, may exercise a fatal control
over the currency, the banks, and the trade of the country, and will
do so, whenever the revenue shall greatly exceed the expenditures/
There has been expended, since the 4th of Mareh, 1853. more than
$45,525,000, in the redemption of the public debt. This debt has
been presented, from time to time, as the money accumulated in the
national treasury, and caused stringency in the money market. If
there had been no public debt, and no means of disbursing this large
sum, and agairi giving it to the channels of commerce, the accumulated sum, would have acted, fatally, on the banks and on trade. The
only remedy would have been a reduction of the reveriue, there being
no demand and no reason, for increased expenditure.
After determining to raise revenue, by a tariff or tax upon imports,
the question arises as to the best mode of fixing the amount. It may
be done, by levying a specific sum, with or without miniraums, on all
articles of weight or measure, or by a certain per cent, on the fpreign
value, or on the home value, or by a combination of the specific and
ad valorem principles. The first mode requires weighers, gaugers,
and measurers, for the ascertainment of the quantity, and with that,
the sum to be paid. The second requires not only weighers, gaugers,
and measurers to ascertain the quautity, but appraisers to ascertain
the foreign or home value, and with that, the sum to be paid. The
first has but one set of officers ; whilst the second has the same set, and
appraisers, in addition. The weighers, gaugers and measurers raay,
frora accident, want of knowledge, or design, fail in ascertaining the
true quantity, and so may the appraisers, the dutiable value. In the
^ first case, there may be errors to the prejudice ofthe government; in
the second case, like errors may, for like causes, exist in the appraisement ; and with the double set of officers, the chances of error and
fraud are doubled. The specific sum attaches alike to all quantities, and results in unequal and unjust taxation. The article that
costs a dollar, pays the same tax as the article, that costs five. A strong
sense of the injustice; resulting from levying a fixed sum, with or withouta rainiraum, upon all articles, no matter what the difference in value,
renders it inexpedient and unjust to resort to that raode of levying
duties. Those who favor a tariff, for protection, prefer a specific tax,
because the tax is generally higher,^and always the same, notwithstanding the fluctuations, in the foreign and home value. Those who



iliPO-R-T ^ON THE FINANCES.

83'

favor a tax, for revenue, desire ad valorem duties, as the most eqnal
and equitable mode, that a just government can resort to. If, to avoid
, the injustice and inequality resulting from specific taxation, it is provided, the value shall also be ascertained, and a specific sum attach,
pro ra^a, according to the value, it becomes ad valorera. There may.
be some twp hundred articles of coraraerce, to which specific duties
ini-ght be attached, according to weight or measure, but there are
inany, to which-specific taxation is not applicable. It is understoo'd
that Great Britain adopts specific taxation, upon iriost iniported artibles, riot admitted to free entry, and the home valuation, upon the
residue. There remains the questiori, between the home value arid the
foreign value. One objection to the home value, arises frora the difference in freight arid insurarice, frora foreign ports to the several ports
of the Uriited States, because freight and insurance would be a component part ofthe home value, and'result in-making a different home
Vaiue, in the different ports, to the benefit of one and the prejudice
of another. For this and other reasons, the home value is objectionable. The question was fully corisidered, and my suggestions
given to the committee of-the House of Eepresentatives, in a letter
under date of June 7,1856, which accompaniesthis report, andis now
referred to. In addition to what is there said, it is suggested, that the
ad valorem principie has been in force and practice, for ten years, is well
understood by the experts in the treasury and in the custom-houses, and
most of the questions which have presented themselves, duririg the ten
yearsof its operation, have had the decision of the department, and
mariv of them, thesanction of thejudiciary. I do not think it would be
expedient, now, to make a change, and give up the knowledge and experience of the past ten years.
The existing tariff laws might be so modified, as to be of more certain arid easy execution, and to the prevention of that fluctuation in
duties, of which the manufacturers and the friends of protection complain. The greater partof the revenue, now collected, is from iron
arid steel and manufactures of iron and steel, silk and manufactures of silk, wool and manufactures of wool, hemp and flax and the
inanufactures of hemp and flax, and the nianufactures of cotton, and
manufacturesoTwhichsilk,wool, herap, flax, arid cPtton are coraponent
parts, and brandies, wines, and sugars. The iraport of these articles
for thefiscal year 1856 araounted to $166,089,379, and the duties
on therri to $47,168,850 05, as per stateraent No. 28 of this report.
The present tariff laws place portions of these articles, in
different schedules, and impose different rates of duty, ori the
articles placed in the several schedules, according to value and use,
arid to the chief value of the article, composing the fabric. This
makes it the duty of the examiners and appraisers to examine,
classify, and place the article in its appropriate schedule, and
requires skill and time to accomplish it correctly. A part of this
skill and labor could be dispensed with, by putting all mariufactures
of silk, wool, hemp, flax and cotton, or of which any of said articles is a
component part, into one schedule, and at one rate of duty, and render
the duty more certain, and the law, inore practicable in the execution.
The fluctuation in prices, and consequently the fluctuation of duties,
3



34

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

could be greatly lessened, if not wholly removed, by authorizing and
requiring the appraisers, to flx the value at the time of exportation, at^
the average foreign value, for the last three or four years. The a p praisers must have knowledge of all articles of commerce, the countries of their production, and their quality and value, also of the
shipping and other charges, and must keep themselves inforraed
upon all these points, iri past years, as well as at, the current
time. If the law authorized them to go back, and take the average of
the preceding three or four years, in fixing upon the appraised value^
the extreme fluctuations in price and duties would be avoided, and
the temptation to invoice below value, lessened. The articles enumerated have been selected for illustration : the reasoning is applicable
to duties, on other articles, embraced in the schedules, but the difficulty
is not so great. The existing laws require the iraporter to produce
to the collector, his.invoice of iraported goods, prior to raaking entry,
and that invoice and entry is the iraporter's declaration of the-foreign
yalue, at the date of exportation, and gives the right to the iraporter
of purchased goods, to advance the cost, on raaking his entry, so as tobe
equal to the foreign value, at the tirae of exportation, and iraposes an
additional duty of 20 per cent, when the entered value of such goods, .
is found to be 10 per cent, or raore, below the appraised value, but
gives no such privilege of raising the value, to goods iraported by the
producer or manufacturer, and does not impose the duty of 20 per
cent, when such goods are appraised 10 per cent, or more, above the
invoice value. The department has considered, as to unpurchased
goods, the act of 1842 is in force, and that under said act, when found
10 per cent, or more below the appraised value, they are liable to
50 per cent, duty on the duty, under the provisions of said act, but
the inferior courts hold, that that act is also conflned to purchased
goods, and no case has arisen, in which the department has had the
question decided, by the Supreme Court. The provisions of the act
of 1846, should be made applicable to all imported goods. The attention of Congress was called to this subject, in a letter addressed to
the Speaker of the House of Eepresentatives and President ofthe Senate, under date of the' 22d day of July, 1856, and the proper raodiflcations of the law suggested. That letter accorapanies this report. It is
true, existing law authorizes the seizure and forfeiture of goods fraudulently entered below their value ; but when the duty is levied upon
the foreign value, at the date of exportation, such a difference, between
the invoice value and the appraised value, is not always such evidence
of fraud, without other circurastances, as will justif}'- seizure and conderanation; whilst ten per cent, or raore, in the case of purchased goods,
gives the additional duty, and raakes it the interest of the iraporter, to '
look well to his invoice and entry. The law, by not raaking it the interest ofthe importer of unpurchased goods, to look with like vigilance,
to his invoice and his entry,|places hira in a raore favorable condition,
thari the importer of purchased goods. It is alleged that more than
two-thirds of all imported goods are, on account of the foreign producer or. manufacturer. If they were placed on the sarae footing,
there would be fewer atterapts to enter goods, below their foreign




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

35

value, and no advantage allowed to the foreign producer or raanufacturer, over the Araerican purchaser and iraporter.
In'answer to the call for the araount of United States and State
stocks, &c., held in foreign countries, the general summary from my
report of the 2d March, 1854, upon that subject, made in compliance
with a resolution of the Senate, under date of the 4th of April, 1853,
is given, of the araount of such debts, and the part held abroad, corrected, as to the United States stocks, by information in the Treasury Department, and as to railroad stocks by the actual returns of
railroads, as given in statement No. 82 of this report. There was
not tirae to resort, again, to the original sources, for the necessary inforraation, to raake a more authentic statement. The condition of the
European money market, during the recent war between Great Britain,
France, and Eussia, and since, has not been such, as to afford a market for additional American stocks, whilst many of them have been
returned to America and cashed. There can have been no increase
of American stocks, held in foreign, countries, since the report from
which the summary is t a t en. It will be seen that the United States
stocks, the State stocks, the stocks and.bonds of 113 cities and towns,
347 counties, 985 banks, 75 insurance companies, 360 railroads, 16
canals, and 15 miscellaneous companies, are all set down at $1,407,518,894 and the amount held by^ foreigners at $202,922,937.
Statement No. 88 gives the information called for in the 17th resolution of the House of Eepresentatives, and exhibits the aggregate
sum expended for construction, repairs, rent and preservation of custom-houses, from 1825 to SOth June, 1856, at $9,116,987 77, and the
aggregate cost and maintenance of revenue cutters and other vessels
for sarae service, at $7,670,045 68, and all other expenses incurred iri
the collection of custoras for sarae tirae at $48,299,168 30, the two latter sums making an aggregate of $55,969,213 98, expended in the collection. This statement gives $1,023,116,676 55, as the revenue collected from customs, for the same time ; and taking the whole expenditure of $55,969,213 98, the cost of collection has been less than 5^
per cent. The $4,738,968 17 expended in the collection, on the west
coast, part of the aggregate expenses of collection, has increased the
cost of collection, owing to the high prices there, and the large salaries heretofore allowed.
The reports of the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth
Auditors, and of the First and Second Comptrollers, the Commmissioner of Custoras, who acts as coraptroller of the revenue collected
frora custoras and accounts connected therewith, and those ot the
Treasurer, Solicitor and Eegister of the Treasury, accompanying this
report, lettered from A to L, inclusive, give the operations of their
respective offices, since my last report, which are highly creditable to
the incumbents. The current business has been, in the general, satisfactorily and proraptly attended to, but the arrearages have not beea
fully brought up, nor the condition of the departraerit all tfeat it
should- be, considering the various and coraplicated interests involved.
In my last report, it was stated there was still outstanding on the^



36

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

books ofthe treasury the sum of $24,739,133 41 of the $132,521,154 KO
found to be outstanding, on the 4th ot March, 1853. Since that report,, various corrections in the accounts have been made, and also
many collections, and accounts closed to the araount of $1,916,345 30,
and there has been added in adjustraent$l ,076,164 30. The balance now
outstanding is $23,898,952 41. The departraent, after a careful examinatiori and investigation, has ascertained that $6,213,345 69 of the
amount, now outstanding, is utterly lost to the government, by the
death of the parties, without leaving any estate, or by hopeless insolvency. Statement M, gives a schedule of the names and amounts,
under seven heads : No. 1 shows $lj415,631 55 lost in the Navy Department ; No. 2, $2,942,155 71 in the War Departraent; No. 3.,
$570,393 16 in the collection of customs; No. 4, $24,360 84 in foreign intercourse; No. 5, $89,490 40 on account of Indians; No. 6,
$290,627 13 on sales of public larids; and No. 7, $870,688 69 on
miscellaneous accounts. It is proposed, with the consent of Congress, to carry these balances to the account of profit and loss, on the
books of the several Auditors and Comptrollers, and on the books bf
the Eegister.
^
In the irivestigatiori of balances due to the United States, on judgments obi ained on customs bondSj against principals arid sureties, it
was ascertairied, riiany of the parties so indebted, had taken the benefit
of the late bankrupt law, and clairaed to be discharged frora the payment of these judgtnents, in favor of the United States, under their
certificates of discharge. The admission of this claim, would add
several hundred thousand dollars to the atnPunt lost, by insolvency, in
the collection of the customs. But not considering that these debts
to the United States were embraced in the provisions of the bankrupt
law, several executionis were issued, on such judgments, in the southern
district of New York, and placed in the marshaPs hands, for collection. The parties moved the court to quash the executions, because
of the discharge in bankruptcy. The circuit court sustained the motion, and quashed the executions. This did not constitute such a
case-, as could be brought to the Supreme Court, in consequence of
which, an action ofdebt was directed, upori one of the judgraents, for
the purpose of having the question finally settled, by the decision of
the Suprerae Court.
It was also aiscertained, that, of the outstariding balances due the
Uriited States, the sura of $1,609,072 32 was due, frora the late deposite
banks, or frora persons against whora, sorae of said banks had assigned
debts and deraands in payraent, or to secure said balances. An investigation has been carefully raade ofthe condition of those banks,
arid the assigned debts. The accorapanying statement N, upon the
subject, gives all the infofrnation the departraent has been able to
collect, in relation to thera, frora which it appears, that raost, if not all,
ofit is lost, by lapse of tirae arid insolvency. It is submitted, authority should he given, from tirae to tirae, to carry these balances to the
account of profit and loss, and relieve the treasury stateraents from
these, as well as other insolvencies. The better to prosecute the investittjation of balances due, an alphabetical list has been made and kept




REPORT ON' THE FINANCES.

37

in this office, for the purpose of its being able to retain the amounts,
whenever the parties should be entitled to receive other moneys at
the treasury. This list has saved ranch labor, and gives great facilities, in ascertaining the persons indebted to the United States. The
settleraent of the balances due on this list, was placed in the hands
of two clerks in the iraraediate office of the Secretary; and many of
these balances have been closed, by theproduction of additional vouchers, and by payments. The closing of these balances must necessarily be a work of much and continuous labor, and result in placing
many of them, in the account of profit and loss, owing to the hopeless
insolvency of theparties. The receipts into the national treasury froni
March 4, 1789, to SOth June, 1856, during which tirae these balances have accrued,have been $1,886,136,014 26, and the expenditures
$1,837,721,045 1 6 . .
In the systera adopted for the sale of the public lands, in 1796 and
1800, the price was fixed, and part required in cash and part on tirae,
and credits given for part of the purchase money, until 24th April,
1820, when Congress reduced the price to $1 25 per acre, and adopted
the cash system, and interposed for the relief of the purchasers of the
public lands, by allowing the concentration of the partial payments to
one or more tracts, and the surrender of the residue. This relieved
the purchasers, and freed the governraent frora the erabarrassraent of
an iramense and accumulating debt against purchasers. In the system adopted in 1789, for the collection of the revenue from customs,
importers, were allowed credit for the duties, upon giving bond arid
security, for the payment a t a future day. These bonds accumulated,
and during coraraercial difficulties, many ofthe parties failed, andthe
bonds were put in suit. This class of debt, also, became embarrassing
to the government, and the bonds unreliable as revenue. The system
was changed in 1842, when the cash system was introduced, followed
in 1846 by the addition of the warehouse system; and now, in the
Gollection ofthe revenue from customs and lands, there is no loss from
credit sales or credit duties. The only loss to be encountered is the
defalcation of collectors and receivers, who give security for the faithful discharge of their duties, and the due payment of all the public
money they receive. In the customs branch, the system of monthly
accounts and monthly settlements, • with daily deposite of receipts,
where there are assistant treasurers and depositaries, and prompt
drafts or orders to deposite, wdth an assistant treasurer or depositary,
when there are none, at the place, has been in force, for raore than
threeyears. And in the land branch, like drafts or orders to deposite, when the receipts accuraulate, beyond a certain sum, has also
been rigidly enforced, and has tended to lessen the hazards, in the
collection and receipt of the public revenue ; and with the practice of
examining, by an officer of the department, at a moraent's warning,
in connexion with the penalties for erabezzleraent, we have as great
practical security as can well be attained, if the proper care is taken
to appoint none but men of integrity and capacity to office, and to
dismiss all, who fail in the prompt, correct and honest discharge of
their duties. The receipt ofthe public revenue being thus provided




•38

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

for and secured, a system of laws, for its disbursement in accordance
with the appropriatio.ris, and for accounting and settling for the same
at the treasury, was also provided. These laws, except where the
disburseraent is confided to certain array officers, require from the
disbursing officers bond and security, for the safe-keeping, faithful application and proper accounting for the public money, confided to their
care. These laws also prohibit, under pain of felony for erabezzleraent,
from depositing the public money in banks, or loaning, or the application ofit to any private, or other use, than the public one, for which
it is placed in their hands. They also require disbursing officers to
pay out to the persons entitled, nothing but the gold and silver confided to thera, and prohibit thera, under like penalty, frora taking,
accepting, receiving, or transraitting to the accounting officers for
credit any voucher, without having paid the full amount named in
the voucher. I t is also made embezzleraent to fail or refuse to account
for the public money, and pay over the balance.
I t is deemed essential to the honest and faithful application of
money, by disbursing officers, and the correct accounting for the same,
that all accounts of disbursements, with the proper vouchers,'should
be made at fixed and short intervals. The periods of accounting and
settling with disbursing officers were fixed for the W a r and Navy Departments, and for some otherbranches ofthe service, quarter-yearly,
and the same provision was made for accounting by collectors of the
customs and receivers of public money, and for disbursing officers of
the treasury, but with authority to the Secretary of the Treasury, to
require accounts in his department, to be rendered as much oftener, as
he might deem proper. Considering, as stated in my last report,
that it was perfectly practicable, to have all disbursing officers of the
treasury, render and settle their accounts monthly, the system of
monthly accounts and monthly settleraents, was adopted at the
treasury, for all the accounts, to which the systera could be applied,
without a change of the existing laws. The result to be expected,
frora monthly accounts and monthly settlements, is fairly presented,
in the report ofthe Comraissioner of Custoras. The fact of but one
defalcation, since its adoption, speaks raore than voluraes, in its favor.
The systera, so far, has been successful, and no doubt is entertained
ofits entire practicability, not onlyin the treasury, but in other branches
of the public service, with ranch additional security for the faithful
application of, and accounting for, the public raoney. I t is true, each
officer will have to raake twelve instead of four accounts, and there
will have to be twelve instead of four settleraents ;' but the twelve accounts and twelve settleraents will involve the taking and examination, of no greater number of vouchers, than four accounts and the four
settlements, w^hilst the monthly accounts and settlements will, timely,
impart tP the officer, a knowledge of the payments, he is authorized to
make, and the character of the vouchers he must produce, and
the necessity of paying no raoney without a proper voucher. The
monthly accounts and monthly settleraents will, at once, enable the
• superintending officers to see and know^, how the duties are performed, and to displace incompetent and dishonest disbursing officers.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

39

It may, at first, require a few more clerks, in the accounting offices;
but after the system shall be in full operation, and the accounting and
settling promptly enforced, it will take less time and less labor, than
it did, under tlie^ system of quarterly accounts and quarterly settlements. Had monthly accounts and raontbly settleraents been regularly
enforced, and all failing disbursing oflicers promptly dismissed, the
large balances, now outstanding on the books of the treasury, could
not have accuraulated.
The Independent Treasury act, by prohibiting the deposite of public
money in banks, or its application by collectors, receivers, disbursing
agents and others, to any other use than that, for which it was collected or appropriated, made the declaration of a sound and correct
principle, and by authorizing the deposite thereof with the treasurer,
assistant treasurer, and designated depositories, placed it in the power
ofthe public officers, to have it kept safely, i n t h e government vaults,
without hazard to thera, or their sureties, and provided raeans, by
which, supervising officers could know, whether the funds were kept
always on deposite, and only checked out, in a due courseof disbursement, in favor of the persons entitled to it. All disbursing officers
should be required to make deposite of the funds intrusted to them,
with the treasurer, assistant treasurer, or designated depositories, and
to check only in favor of those entitled, and to make monthly returns
of the sums disbursed by theiri, with a statement of the balance on
deposite, except in that class of cases, where the party is not convenient
to a place of United States deposite. These depositories, however,
should be establishedin all sections, where thereis or shall be consid- .
erable public money collected, or to be disbursed. The regulations of
the War, and most ofthe other departments, require monthly statements from disbursing officers, of the amount disbursed, although
required only to render quarterly accounts to the treasury, for settlement. These monthly statements of disbursements, could readily be
converted into raontbly accounts, with proper vouchers for settleraent
at the treasury, and for the infoiraation of the supervising officers,
and thus a correct and prompt system of accounting and settling, be
established in all branches of the public service. The efficiency of the
provisions of the independent treasury act, will never fully manifest
itself, until the depositories are sufficiently diffused, so that collecting, receiving, and disbursing officers can deposite in their vaults,
and monthly accounting and settling,,at the treasury, is required and
enforced. The cash system, in the disposal of the public lands,and in
the collection of custora duties, has caused absolute certainty, in the
payments to receivers and collectors. The system of daily deposites,
where it can be done, and drafts arid standing orders to deposite, as the
amount accumulates, where there are no depositories at the place of
reception, with monthly accounts and settleraents, raakes the receipts
into the national treasury, almost certain. W h y will not the deposite
system, and monthly accounts and settlements, give the sarae certainty
in its disburseraent ? '
The systera of selling the public lands on credit, and giving credit
for the duties on imports, has yielded to the simple and better system




40

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,.

now in force, and quarterly accounts and settlements with the collectors of customs, has yielded to the better system of monthly accounts
and settlements; and in the treasury, raontbly accounts and settlements by disbursing officers, is taking the place of quarterly accounts
and settlements. The increased receipts and expenditures require a,
prompt rendition and settlement of accounts. Formerly, when the annual receipts and expenditures,were only $12,000,000 or $15,000,000,
the quarterly accounts only included some $3,000,000 or $.4,000,000 ;
now, they would include some $.15,000,000 or $16,000,000 of receipts
and i h e like amount of expenditures, and, now, the nionthly
accounts would exceed $5,000,000 of both; and if, as formerly,
the quarterly accounts were not rendered, until near the close of
the next quarter, and not settled at the treasury, until near the close
of the third quarter, the unsettled accounts at the treasury would exceed sorne $45,000,000 of receipts, and sorae $45,000,000 of disburser
nients, with alraost an irapossibility of the heads of departments
knowing whether receivers, collectors and disbursing officers were properly discharging their duties. The public raoney collected from the
tax-payers, for the exigencies ofthe government, in all well regulated
and well administered governments, should be safely kept and honestly
applied to the objects, fox which it was levied, and such a system, o.l
laws and accounting established, as to make it impossible for the officer^
intrusted, with its receipt and disbursement, to apply it to their own
use, or allow their friends, to have the use ofit. A strict examination:,
into the origin and history of the large balance, now outstanding at
t h e treasury, would make it manifest, that the public money was herer
tofore devoted to private use, and allow:ed to remain unaccounted for:
until, in many cases, the parties became insolvent, and in order to.
cover sums wasted and lost by private use, set up unfounded
claims, for credits and services. This habit of applying the public
inoney to private use, had become so established, as to be consideredi
allowable, and no disgrace to the officer—so much so, tlia;t the offices;
were sought, for the use of the public nioney, more than, for the honorof the office and its salary. The Independent Treasury act was iur
tended to rempve this practice, inculcate sound and honest principles,
as to the use of the public money, and brand the delinquent officer
with crime. To have this effect, the act must be rigorously enforced.,
and haye the active vigilance of the supervising officers, with the aidi
of monthly accounts and settlements, and the prompt dismissal of all
who violate the principle. In fa'ct, no one is worthy to have or retain
public office or situation,.who does not acknowledge that principle of
the Independent Treasury act, and give it practical effect, in all his
official transactions. An agent or officer of the government cannot,
without a sacrifice of principle, use the public money for his own purposes, nor allow others to use it, nor speculate upon the government,
whose interest he is appointed and paid, to guard and protect. Heads:
of departments are entitled to the most certain raeans of ascertaining
the conduct of persons, eraployed to receive or disburse public raoney,
arid it is believed none can be devised, tha.t would prove more efficacious, than monthly accounts and settlements..




REPORT! O-N THE FINANCESr.

4t

In this connexion, attention is called to the various, and complicated duties of the accounting officers of the treasury, who state
and settle the annual accounts of receivers and collectors, to over:
$.73,00:0.,000, and the annual accounts of claimants, and disbursing
agents, to more than $72,0.00,000. This subject was referred to, in my
last annual report, with a statement of the raanner and principles of
acGOuntingi, at the treasury, representing the high qualities required
and essential to the proper discharge of the duties, confided to these
treasury officers, and especially so, as to the chief's; of bureaus and
heads of divisions. A further consideration of the subject, and its
great importance, confirm me in the statements there made, that bothwisdpra and econoray call for'the soundest and ablest lawyers, of integrity and adrainistrative qualities, that can be secured for those,
positions., and that the salaries, of those officers:, should be revised and
increased. The change in the value of money, mode of living, price
of provisions, and other necessaries, since Congress passed upon their
compensation, with the great increase in the receipts and expenditures, and' consequent increase of responsibility, justify a revision and^
increase of compensation. The salaries now given, are far less, than:
many of the banks, manufacturing- and mercantile establishments',
f^f their confidential, competent, and skilful officers, whilst thaamount involved and passed' upon, is not a tithe of the government;
receipts and expenditures'. The persons competent to take these posi-r
tio.us., are necessarily raen in the meridian of life, of established character, and should posses? the high qualities.indicated. The servicesi
of such men, ought .to command salaries, sufficient to enable them tomaintain a proper position., for themselves and families, and the education of their children, without exhausting their private fortunes, or;
irivolving themselves, in speculating and money-making schemes.
They are in the position of judges, whose duty it is to guard the interest; of the treasury, without prejudice to t h e r i g h t of individuals.^
and sho.uld have competent salaries, and be able to devote themselves^,
to, the speci al duties of their offices, without, distracting interest. They
should be always in place, and: know t h a t t h e accountants, and clerks..
are. capable, and- attentive to their duties; t h a t all arrearages are.
braught up, the records and files: in good order, and the current busi-:
nesS: promptly and correctly disposed of They should also feel a a
active zeal and pride, in the proper discharge of the duties of their
offices, and inspire like zeal and pride, in all officials under, them.
Such officers are essential to just and prompt settlements at thetreasury, and the proper condition of that branch of thepublic service. The government cannot afford to appoint, or to retain men, in
these offices, who do not possess these qualifications, or who fail to
give their whole tirae, to. the duties confided to their charge, or who>
dre indifferent to the condition of their offices, and the manner ia
which the duties are discharged, or to the qualification, inte.grity a n i
attention of their assistants.
Attention is called to the remarks of the Third Auditor, upon t h a
act of-the last session; providing for the payment of the California^.
"War bonds, and the departure, in that instance, from the hitherto^




42

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

almost universal practice of the government, in causing all claims of
that kind, tobe passed upon, bythe accounting officers ofthe treasury,
after an investigation of the facts, or by authorized comraissioners, for
the investigation of the facts. If the departure, in this instance, is
made a precedent, for the payment of such expenditures, by the States
and Territories, bordering on the Indian territory, and by the States,
in time ofwar and insurrection, the national treasury would be placed
at the will of State and Territorial officers, over whom, the government that pays, has and can have no control. The precedent, if
established in this class of cases, would soon be exterided to other
classes of clairas, where the claimants desired to avoid the examinations, by the experts of the treasury." This established. Congress
itself would be the investigators and accountants, where everything
would be, exparte. In this connexion, I would call the attention of
Congresis, to a species of special legislation, that has lately had its
sanction; that is, the reference of a particular claim, to a named
officer, whose award is made conclusive. The case of Glover &
Mather, referred by act of Congress, to the First Comptroller, at the
second session of the thirty-third Congress, and the case of Carmick
& Eamsay, at the first session ofthe thirty-fourth Congress, are cases
of this description. The clairaants, in both these cases, set up large
demands against the United States. The claims are based upon
alleged breaches of contracts; which fact being assuraed by Congress,
the araount of damages against the government, is the only question
referred, where, if referred to the accounting officers, both questions
would be open. The action of the Auditor is dispensed with. The
action of the Comptroller is not upon appeal, but that of an arbitrator,
whose decision, no one can revise. The objection to this system of
legislation is, that it takes the particular case out of the operation of
the general law, and gives an easier and more favorable mode of
reaching the national treasury, and takes from the selected officer, the
responsibility of his official position. If the system adopted and enforced, from.the beginning of the government was, andis, expedient
and just, for one class of demands against the governraent, it is equally
expedient and just, in all like cases, and should be adhered to; but if
not, the mode of settling and adjusting claims against the treasury,
should be changed, so as to afford equal benefits and advantages
to all.
The Independent Treasury act has been carried into effect, the past
year, as far as it has been practicable, for the department to enforce it.
Most ofthe disbursing officers ofthe government, w^here conveniently
situated, have, and continue to avail themselves of the convenience
and security of depositing, in the vaults of the treasurer, assistant
treasurers, and public depositories, as will be seen by statement No.
89 of this report. Those who have not deposited, in the vaults of
the government, although convenient, construe the act of 1846, as
allowing the officer, a discretion upon the subject. This they sometiraes exercise, by raaking what they terra special deposites, with chartered and unchartered banks. The security of the public nioney,
and the prevention of its application, to any other than public use.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

43

calls for explicit legislation upon the subject, and the extension of
the penalties ofthe act of 1846 to those receiving public money, from
disbursing agents and others, who have public money in their hands.
The courts have found difficulty in applying the act, to all cases
within its spirit, because thought not to be, technically, within its
terms.
The amount transferred for disbursement, during the past fiscal
year, was $38,088,113 92, at a cost of $12,945 87, whilst the prenaiuras paid on sale of treasury drafts, have been $54,924 16, leaving
$41,978 29 over and above the expenses. I t is believed that, with
care and vigilance, the trarisfer of public money will hereafter be
made, through the agencies of the treasurer, assistant treasurers, and
depositaries, without charge and without risk, except under extraordinary circumstances, and in peculiar times. The receipts and
expenditures, during the past fiscal year, have amounted, in the aggregate, to $146,866,933 48, and have all been, in the constitutional
currency of gold and silver, without any disturbing effect upon the
currency, the banks, or business ofthe country. However, the withdrawal and prohibition of the small-note circulation of the banks is
still deemed essential, to a sound and stable currency, and to be called
for, by the best interest of all the States.
The accounts of collectors of the customs continue to be rendered,
at the close of each month, and to be adjusted at the treasury, within
the succeeding month, with but few exceptions^ and those principally
on the Pacific coast, which require a few weeks longer, for their receipt and adjustraent. The systera of monthly disbursement and
•eraoluraentaccounts, withlike raontbly adjustraents at the treasury, has
been introduced, since the date of ray last report, and promises to be
equally, if not raore, beneficial than the system of accounts and
adjustments, established for customs. The system adopted for keeping
books, raaking entry for consuraption, warehousing, and tiansportation and exportation of raerchandise, and of making returns to the
departmerit, mentioned in my last report, has been attentively continued and enforced, with certainty and uniforraity, in the returns of
the collectors of the public revenue. The stateraent No. 30 contains
a full exhibit, of goods in warehouse, on the 1st of July, 1855, and
on the first of each succeeding raonth, until the 1st of July, 1856,
with the araountof raerchandise, entered for consuraption, during
each raonth, whether in the original entry, or frora warehouse, and
the goods entered for transportation, to interior ports and for exportation, during each month, and the amount received, during each month,
from other ports. These returns are made direct to the Treasury
Departraent, and are confided to a clerk, whose duty it is to keep the
files, enter the returns and raake up the raontbly stateraents. He
also keeps the abstracts required to be sent to the departraent, of
goods entered and bonded for transportation, and the acknowledgments, of the receipt of the merchandise, at the ports of destination,
and enforces the sending the abstracts and acknowledgments, and
the due cancelment of the transportation bonds. The returns thus
required, enable the departraent to understand, how the business is




44

REPORT ON TH-E FINANCES.

being conducted, and when it is necessary to have the books of the
port examined, and its business investigated. The statement exhibits
the movements of merchandise, during each month ofthe year.
The revision of the revenue laws, prepared by the department, under
a resolution of the Senate, and sent to that body, at the first session of
the thirty-third Congress, and referred to, in my last report, still remains for the action of Congress. The revenue laws consist of various
acts of Congress, comraeneing with the organization of the government, with so many amending, repealing and conflicting provisions,
that it is exceedingly difficult to ascertain what is, and what is not,
in force—consequently, what is the law upon, any particular point.
The department, in making this revision, confbrraed to existing laws,
with such raodifications and new provisions, as were deemed proper to*
make the law conform to the present condition of things, and the
wants of thie service. • This revision has been again considered b.y
the department, and sundry amendraents and additions recoraraended,
which had the sanction of the Coriiraittee on Coraraerce in the House
of Eepresentatives, at its late session, and, with the revision, now. rcrmain for the consideration of Congress. It was hoped Congress
would have passed upon this revision, at its late session, and that the
department could have conformed the revision of the circulars, then
being made, to the revised act. The enforcement of the revenue laws,
as now existing, called for a revision and raodification ofthe circular
instructions of the department, upon the subject. The collection and
revision of the circulars, as one code, is; now riearly coraplete, and wilt
soon be put in force. If Congress should pass the revision o f t h e
revenue laws, the instructions can readily be raade to conforra to t h e
revision they may adopt. I t i s believed that the enactment o f t h e
revision, would result in great advantages to the revenue, and great
convenience, to those engaged in commerce and navigation, and place
the revenue law^s before the people, so as to be easily understood by
those, whose duty it is to carry them into effect, and by those whose
interest and rights, are involved in their enforceraent. There are nopenalties or forfeitures, on iraporters and freighters, in the revision
that are not, now, in the existing laws, and none which are not be^
lieved necessary and proper, for the due collecting the revenue. The
revenue laws require revision on raany accounts, but upon none raore
than upon the subject of invoices, entries, appraiseraents, corapensation to officials, and in relation to enrolling and licensing vessels forthe coasting trade. There are suits against collectors involving questions upon all these subjects. The conflicting decisions.of the departs
ment and the circuit courts, in most of these cases, cannot be reviewed^
in the Supreme Court, owing to the amount involved.
The report of Captain A. H. Bowman, No. 90, who is in charge of
the construction and repair of buildings, confided to the Treasury Department, exhibits, in detail, the operations ofthe department, sinc<a
the date of my last report. The plans and specifications for these
buildings.and repairs are prepared in the department. The work is
contracted for, and let to the lowest bidder, except in a few instances
where it is done by days' work, as stated in the report. When a con-




REPORT ON THE FINA-NCES.

45

tract is made, a competent person is appointed to superintend the constructiori, and to be present and see that the materials and work are
such, as the contract calls for. An account of work done and materials
furnished is made at the close of each month, and returned to the department, and payments made according to contract; and when necessary, the works are visited by Captain Bowman, or an agent of the
department. The buildings are all constructed fire-proof, and of the
most durable materials. The regulations for these buildings accompanied my first report, with directions for keeping and rendering the
accounts. The report is accompanied by a list of all custora-houses
purchased, all constructed by the United States, and those in the
course of construction; also, with a similar list of the marine hospitals ; also court-houses and post offices in charge of the departmento
For further inforraation upon the subject of custom-houses, reference
is made to the letter of the department, No.
, under date of the
3d day of July, 1854, published with this report. Stateraent No. 9 1 ,
made out froiri the hpspital returns, exhibits the nuraber of sick sailors,
who have had the benefit of the hospital fund, and the expense, at each
place. The econoraical administration of the hospitals, to the proper
relief of the sailors, who contribute to the fund, is one of much interestj and has given the departraent considerable anxiety, because of
the tendency^ to iraproper and wasteful expenditure. It has been considered necessary, to give new instructions, as to the collection and
proper accounting for the hospital fund; the provisions, medicines,
and other supplies; the employment of stewards, nurses, and other
servants ;• and the government and supervision ofthe hospitals. These
instructions have been published, and are now being enforced. They
will be found in the revised code of circular instructioris, heretofore
mentioned. The furnishing sick sailors relief, under the contract systern,as mentioned in my last report, is now in force at New York,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and other places, as will be seen in the table
of sick sailorsMri hospital, and affords the same necessary comfortable
relief to sick sailors that is furnished inthe governraent hospitals, and
at less cost. It is believed, that the contract systeni could be beneficially
extended, to raany places where the governraent has hospitals, by
allowing the use of the hospital and grounds, and a certain per diem
for the sick; and that under the contract system, sick sailors cari be
just as well, if not better, provided and cared for, than they cari be iri
the hospitals, under charge of persons appointed by the department,
and it is suggested, that authority be given to make such contracts.
Eeport No. 92, with the accorapanying docuraents, gives the operations of the Light-house Board, since the date of my last report, with
the condition of the works under their charge. The duties of the
board have been performed with commendable vigilance and ability.
The great facilities afforded to our cpmmerce, by the operations of
this board, impart interest to the subject, and recommend it to the
continued favor of Congress.
The Coast Survey continues to engage the constant an^d vigilant attention of the Superintendent in charge, and it is believed, the money
appropriated is beneficially and economically applied, to the early ac


46

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

complishment ofthe survey. The fullest and most reliable information,
as to our extensive coasts and nuraerous harbors, cannot be obtained^
without such a survey. I t is believed, the iraportance of the survey to
national defence, and to comraerce, and the publication of all the ascertained facts, will continue, as heretofore, to recoraraend the survey to
the favor of Congress, until it shall be fully accoraplished. The report
of the Superintendent will, as usual, be raade to Congress during the
session.
The report of the Supervising Inspectors, No. 93, also accompanies
this report, and gives the operations ofthe law, under which they are
appointed, for the past year. I consider the law requires revision, in
the particulars set out in my last report.
I t is also recommended, there should be an amendraent of the law, in
relation to payments at the treasury, for the reasons stated in my letter
and accorapanying papers upon that subject, to the Finance Comraittee
of the Senate, under date of the 28th of April, 1856, which accompanies this report. Attention is also called, to the recommendations
of my letter, to the chairman of the Coraraittee on Eetrenchraent of the
Senate, under date ofthe 17th of April, 1856.
I t will be seen frora exaraination of stateraent No. 6, of the State
bonds, held in trust for the Indians and for the Sraithsonian Institution, that in some cases, the States have made no provision for the
payraent of iriterest, and raay not provide for the payment of principal: The United States having made the investments for the
Sraithsonian Iristitution, have to provide for the payraent of interest,
and will have to provide for the payraent of principal, if ever that
becoraes payable. The action of the United States, in carrying out
the special powers vested in it, raight be kept distinct frora the action of the State governraents, and without the relation of debtor and
creditor, and the irritation growing out of that relation and defaults.
I t is suggested that good policy requires that course, and that the
United States should dispose of the State bonds, now held in trust,
and realize the loss, assurae these debts, and by a general law provide, when raoneys have or shall becorae payable on time, under Indian treaties, with or without interest, that the treaty obligations
shall have the same force as United States stocks on time, or interestpaying stock, and interest and principal payable, as it matures, without other investraent. It wdll also be seen by reference to stateraent
No. 7, that the United States hold stocks in corporations, in sorae of
the States. It is subraitted, that it is not well, for the United States
to reraain a stockholder, in these institutions, and exercise a control,
or infiuence, in the raanageraent and direction of their affairs, and
that authority should be given, to dispose of these stocks, at the
market value, or otherwise dispose of theUnited States share, in these
corporations. These recoraraendations are made, because it is believed, for reasons that readily suggest themselves, the United States
ought not tobe, in the relation of creditor to any ofthe States, nor
that of stockholder, in any of the corporations, created by a State.
The Louisville and Portland canal, now the sole property of the
United States, has been under the direction of the Treasury Department, the past two years. The tolls, by direction of the department.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

47

were reduced one-half, and the receipts, forthe past two years, have
been expended in the repair of the locks and enlargement of the
canal, improvement of the bridges, &c. The report of the operations
will be laid before Congress, as soon as received.
All which is respectfully submitted.
JAMES GUTHEIE,
Secretary of the Treasury,
Hon. JESSE D . BRIGHT,

President pro tem of the Senate U, S.







^

TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page. .

1. TheSecretary's report---.-.
.--..-.-^.—
..^
2. Statement No. 1, of the receipts and expenditures for the year ending the
SOth June, 1856
---.
•_--.-...3. Statement No. 2, of the receipts and expenditures for the quarter of the fiscal
year 1857, endingSOth September, 1856.,-----4. Statement No. 3, exhibiting the public debt 4th 3Iarch, 1853, and on the
^ 15th November, 1856, stating the amount redeemed and premium paid,
with the amount saved by paying before due- „
5. Statement No. 4, amount due under treaties with various Indian tribes payable on time
---.
------.-.,
6. Statement No. "5, amount of stocks held in trust by the United States for
several of the Indian tribes and Smithsonian Institution
- - -^
«
7. Statement No. 6, balance of various other trust funds
8. Statement No. 7 exhibits the stock belonging to .the IJnited States in the Plsmal Swamp, Chesapeake and Delaware, and Chesapeake and Ohio canals,
and in the cities of the District of Columbia-.—
-•
,_
9. Statement No. 8 exhibits the,gold and silver coinage a t . t h e Mint of t h e
United States in the.several years from its establishment in 1792,,and including the coinage of .the branch.mints and the assay .office (New York)
from their organization to September 30, 1856._---- — . .
..
-.-.
10. Statement No. 9 exhibits the deposites and coinage at the: Mint of the IJnited
States, branches, and assay office, .during the fiscal year .en(ii.ng June,30,
1856
-..-.
--------.....--.-,_.11. Statement No. 10 exhibits the amount of coin and bullion impprted and.exr
ported annually from 1821 to 1856, inclusive, and also the amount of
importation over exportation, andof exportation over importation, during
the same years
12. Statement No. 11 exhibits the gross value of exports and imports from, the
beginning of the governnient to the .30th June, 185613. Statement No. 12, exhibiting the amount of the. tonnage of the United
States annually from 1789 to 30th June, 1856; also the registered .and
enrolled and licensed tonnage employed in steam navigation
14. Statement No. 13 exhibits the registered sail and steam tonnage and carolled and licensed sail and steam tonnage, in each State and coUection
district separately
.
15. StatementNo. 14 exhibits the revenue collected from the beginning of the
government to June 30, 1856, under the several heads of customs, public
lands, and miscellaneous sources, including loans and treasury'^notes;
also the expenditures during the same period, and the particular tariff and
price of lands under which the revenue from those sources was collected16. Statement No. 15 exhibits thevalue of manufactured articles of domestic
produce exported to foreign countries from the 30th day of June, 1845, to
June 30, 1856
».- — . —
---,
-.--

4



,

S
60
65

65
67
77
78

79

..79

Sl

83
84

85

87

96

99

60

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.
Page.

17. Statement No. 16 exhibits the value of' foreign merchandise imported, reexported, and consumed annually from 1821 to 1856, inclusive, and also
the estimated population and rate of consumption per capita during the
same period
__^_
_
_
_
101
18. Statement No. 17 exhibits the total value of imports and the imports consumed in the United States, exclusive of specie, during each fiscal year
from 1821 to 1856, showing also the value of foreign and domestic exports, exclusive of specie, and the tonnage employed, during the same
periods
^
102
19. Statement No. 18 exhibits a summary view of the exports of domestic produce, &c., of the United States during the years ending on the 30th June,
1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, and 1856
103
20. Statement No. 19 exhibits the^value of certain articles imported during the
years ending June 30,1844,1845,1846,1847,1848,1849,1850,1851,1852, .
1853, 1854, 1855, and 1856, (after deducting the re-exportations.) and the
amoimt of duty which accrued on each during the same period, respectD

ively
._
'.^
21. Statement No. 20 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise and domestic
produce, &c., exported annually from 1821 to 1856
22. Statement No. 21 exhibits the quantity of wine, spirits, &c., imported annually from 1843 to 1856 inclusive
23. Statement No. 22 exhibits the value of imports annually from 1821 to 1856.
24. Statement No, 23 exhibits the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported annually from 1821 to 1856 inclusive, and showing also the value re-exported
from warehouses under the act of August 6, 1846=^
.25. Statement No. 24 exhibits the aggregate value of breadstuffs and provisions
exported annually from 1821 to 1856
_
_.
26. Statement No. 25 exhibits the quantity and value of cotton exported annually from 1821 to 1856 inclusive, and the average price per pound
27. Statement No. 26 exhibits the quantity and value of tobacco and rice exported
annually from 1821 to 1856 inclusive
28. Statement No. 27 exhibits the values of iron and manufactures of iron, and
iron and steel, steel, wool and manufactures of wool, manufactures of cotton, silk and manufactures of silk, flax, linen and linen fabrics, hemp
and manufactures of hemp, manilla, sun, and other hemps of India, and
silk and worsted goods, imported from and exported to foreign countries
. from 1840 to 1856, both years inclusive; and also showing the domestic
exports of like articles for the same periods
_
29. Statement No. 28 exhibits the value of iron, manufactures of iron, and iron
and steel, steel, sugar, wines, and all fabrics of which wool, cotton, silk,
flax, or hemp is a component part, imported annually from 1847 to 1856,
both inchisive, with the duties which accrued thereon during each year
respectively.
_
30. Statement No. 29 exhibits the exports to and the imports from Canada and
other British possessions in North America, from the 1st day of July, 1851,
to the 30th dayof June, 1^856
31'. Statement No. 30 exhibits the amount of goods in warehouse on July 1,
1855,and on the 1st ofeach succeeding month, until July 1,1856..-.--




104
107
109
Ill

112
113
114
115
*

117

123

126
126

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

51
Page.

32. Statement No. 31 exhibits a synopsis "of the returns of the banks in the different States at the dates annexed
33.. Statement No. 32 exhibits a comparative view of the condition of the banks
in different sections of the Union in 1853-'54, 1854-'55; and 1855-'56.34- Statement No. 33 exhibits a generahstatement of the condition of the banks
according to returns dated nearest to January 1,1856- —
-

133
136
139

35, Statement No. 34 exhibits a comparative view of the condition of the banks
of the United States, according to returns nearest to January 1, 1837, ^ 1843, 1851, 1854, 1855, and 1856
--.140
36^. Statement No. 35 exhibits the amount of capital employed by bankers banking without charters, and by money and exchange brokers, in the different States
_
141
37. Statement No. 36 exhibits the population of the different States and Territories, and the value of the real and personal estate therein ; it having
been prepared in part from official enumerations and valuations, and in
part upon e s t i m a t e s . - - . -.-.
3S. Statement No. 37 exhibits the amount of^ moneys in the United States
treasury ; amount of drafts outstanding ; amount subject to draft; amount
of receipts, and amount of drafts paid, as shown by the Treasurer's weekly
exhibits rendered during the year ending 30th June, 1856
Statement B No. 1, showing the annual average export price of flour at New
York from 1800 till June 30, 1855 ; also the annual average price of flour
in the cities of ]3oston. New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans,
and St. Louis, from 1800 tiU June 30, 1855—
Statements B No. 2 to B No. 6 inclusive, exhibiting the population of the
several States and Territories, with certain statistical information, taken
from the censuses of 1790, 1800, 1810, 1820, 1830, 1840, and 1850
Statement B No. 7, recapitulating the previous statements, and giving the
population of the United States according to said census returns
Statement B No. 8, ex:hibiting the population of each State and Territory
according to census of 1840, and the amount of the agricultural and
manufacturing productions of each ; to which is added a column exhibiting the amount said production would give to each person in said States
and Territories, &c
_.
Statement B No. 9, making same exhibits from the census returns of 185039. From A No. 1 to A No. 17—No. 38—are sundry resolutions of the House
of Representatives calling for certain statistical information in connexion
with a proposed modification of the tariff of 1846, and a reduction of
the revenue by enlarging the free list, and calling for suggestions upon
that subject, and in relation to the currency
^_--'
[The accompanying tables are prepared in response to the resolutions.]

146

149-

154

158
168

169
172

151

4t). Statement No. 39 exhibits the population of the States and Territories, and
the agricultural productions of each, w i t h t h e value thereof; the total
value of all the products of each State and Territory for the year 1840--

174

41. statement No. 40 exhibits the population of the States and Territories, and
the agricultural productions of each, with the value thereof; the total
value of all the products of each State and Territory for the year 1850..

°
182




52

; R E P O R T :0N : T H E JFIN^A3?fCES.
Page

42. Statement No. 41 exhibits ;a-recapitulation of. statements Nos. 39 and 40,
'exhibiting the quantities and values of the agricultural productions of
•the United States-for the decades of 1.840-and 1850, with an = estimate
thereof for 1855, and the total amount ^ofthe productions for all the
States and .Territories, for 1840 and 1850
M96
43. Statement No. .42 es:hibits'.the .number of acres employed -in the production
.of the ^different '.crops in the States ,and Territories, their total .product
:and value,.together with the.product and value, per acre, for the year 185.
Statement No. 43 exhibits the number:of farms, plantations, &c., nuniber
of acres of improved and unimproved land ; average number of acres to
each farm ; cash value of farms ; value of farming implements and machinery ; average value of farms; average value of farming implements
apd machinery ; average value of farms, implements, and machinery, for
each State and Territory, and the average in all the States and Territories, in 1850, as taken from the last census
•
_
199
45. Statement No. 44 exhibits the number of establishments, capital employed,
raw material used, hands employed, ayerage wages per month, and product of the manufactures • of wool-for 1850, as taken from the census for
that decade ; also the product of ^the manufactures of wool rfor 1840, the
increase for ten years, the decrease for ten years, and an estimate for 1855.
201
4i3. Statement No. -45 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exportations and home consumption of foreign wool, the foreign
importations and exportations, and home consumption of foreign woolen
manufactures, the estimate- of the raw material contained in the foreign
•mamifacture-of-wool consumed in-the United States, the numberof pounds
6{ domestic-wool consumed, andean estimate-of the total consumption of
•"wool consumed in-the United ^States of domestic growth, -foreign import• ations, and one-third^ of the --foreign manufactured article
203
-^7. ^Statement -No.-46 exhibits 'the -population* manufactures of wool in the
United-States, with an allotment per -capita thereof; the domestic wool,
and an allotment-per capita ; home-consumption of foreign wool, and the
ailotment'per capita ;-total home consumption of foreign and domestic
wool,-and-an -allotment per capita ; - manufactures of foreign wool imported
-and consumed in the United States, an'd an allotment per capita thereof;
total consumption of foreign and domestic woolen manufactures, and the
• allotment per capita ; aird^'the total consumption of foreign and domestic
;Wpol, and one-third .the-«value of :the foreign woolen imports, (which represents the.estimated valueof.the,raw.material therein,) together with an
-jallotment .per capita thereof, for .the lyears; 1840, .18=50, and 1855 _ _ 204
'AS. Statement No..47 exhibits the -number of pounds of wool -produced, and its
value ; the .number pf pounds ..of dpmestic wpoL expor.ted,..and its value,
and the home consumptipn; jthenumber of pounds.of wool imported, and
its value; the number plTpounds of fpreign wool re-exported, and its
value ; and the home consumption, with,.the value .thereof; .the value of
I imported woolen manufactures, and those re-exported, and the home
-consumption, together with the total number of pounds of domestic and
imported wool consumed, and the total value of domestic and imported
wool and imported woolen manufactures consumed in the States and "
Territories, for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855
205



R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

53
Pago.

49. Statement No. 48- exhibits the number of establishments, capital employed,
raw material used, hands employed, average wages per month, and the
product.of the manufactures of cotton, for 1850, as given by the census
for that decade ; also the product of the-manufactures of cotton for 1840,
increase in:ten years, decrease in-ten years, and; an; estimate of the manu^
factures:of cotton for 1855 i.. - - -. .
—..---,
--^

207

60. Statement No. 49 exhibits the foreign importations and' re-exportations,
domestic exportations. and- home consump.tion of foreign cotton goods;
together with-the consum-ption-of-foreign-cotton goods-over domestic ex^
portations; also, the number of pounds of Sea Island^ and other cotton annually, exported, with .the^value thereof, and average cost per pound, and
the yearly average of the imports and-exports^, value: in. gross-, and per
pound of cotton exported, for the last seventeen years. - ^ —
. -. --.

209

51. Statement'No; 50 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations; domestic exportations ; home consumption of foreign cpttpn=good^ ; home consumption-of foreign-cotton goods, less domestic exportations^ the number
of-pounds of Sea Island ^and other cottoa exported, the value thereof, and ,
the average cost per pound-; manufactures of cotton in the United States;
home consumption of doniestic cotton goods ; total home consumption of
foreign a;nd domestic cotton goods, and thie total product of manufactures
of cottpn; andexports of raw cotton, for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855-.

210

52. Statement No. 51 exhibits the population, total product'of manufactures of
cotton and exports of raw cotton, and the allotment per capita thereof;
manufactures of cotton in the United States, and the allotment per capitar,
home consumption of domestic goods, and the allotment per capita ; home .
consuniption of foreign goods, and the allotment per capita ; and the total
home consumption of foreign and domestic cotton goods, and the allotment per capita, for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855
1
,
211
53. Statement No. 52 exhibits the number of establishments, capital employed, .
raw material used, hands emplpyed, average wages per month, annual product and total value of pig iron produced in the United States in 1850, as
taken from the census for that year ; together with the value of the production of the same article for 1840, the increase in ten years, the decrease in
ten years, and an estimate of the amount produced in 1855
212
54. Statement No. 53 exhibits the number of establishments, capital employed,
raw material used, hands employed, average wages per month, and total
value of iron castings produced in the United States in 1850, as taken
from the census for that year ; together with the value of the production
of the same article for 1840, the increase in ten years, the decrease in ten''
years, and an estimate of the amount produced in 1855

214

65. Statement No. 54 exhibits the number of establishments, capital employed,
value of raw material, hands employed, average wages per month, and
total value of wrought iron manufactures produced in the United States
ih 1850, as taken from the census for that year ; together with the value
of the production of the same-article for 1840, the increase in ten years,
the decrease in ten years; and an estimate of the amount produced in
1855
-1

2ia




-•• - - • - - • • - ' - - — — - - - ^ ^ ^ - r r i i T i i i T f i t f i ^

54

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.
Page.

56. Statement No. 55 exhibits the yearly value of iron and manufactures-of
iron and iron and steel, cast} shear, German, and other steel, imported
fi'om and exported to foreign countries ; domestic exports of the like articles ; home consumption of foreign iron, and manufactm-es of iron and iron
and steel; home consumption over the domestic export of the same articles, and the total consumption of foreign iron, manufactures of iron and
iron and steel, cast, shear, German, and other steel, over domestic exportations for the last seventeen years, and the yearly average for the aforesaid period
_
-

217

57. Statement No. 56 exhibits the value of the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exportations, home consumption of foreign importations,
and home consumption of foreign importations, less the domestic exportations, of Iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel; also the
foreign importations and exportations ; home consumption of foreign importations ; total home consumption of foreign iron and manufactures of
iron and iron and steel, and foreign cast, shear, German, and other steel;
the total home consumption of foreign iron and manufactures of iron and
ii'on and steel,, and foreign cast, shear, German, and other steel, less the
domestic exportations ; also the manufacture of pig iron, iron castings,
wrought iron, and the manufactures thereof in the United States ; total
manufacture of pig iron, iron castings, and wrought iron, and the manufactures thereof in, the United States ; consumption of domestic iron, and
,the manufactures thereof; total consumption of foreign and domestic
iron ; and the total consumption of foreign and domestic iron and manufactures of iron, also cast, shear, German, and other steel, in the United
States for the years 1840 and 1850, with an estimate thereof for 1855, on
the same ratio of increase as between the years 1840 and 1850

219

58. Statement No. 57 exhibits the population, production of pig iron, iron castings, and manufactures of wrought iron, with the allotment per capita
thereof; the consumption of domestic iron and the manufactures thereof,
with the allotment per capita ; the home consumption of foreign importations of iron and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, and cast,
shear, German, and other steel, with the allotment per capita ; and the
total consumption of foreign and domestic iron, and manufactures of iron
and iron and steel, cast, shear, German, and other steel, in the United
States, and the allotment per capita thereof, for the years 1840,1850, and
an estimate for 1855
_

220

59. Statement No. 58 exhibits comparative statement of the quarterly price
of refined bar iron at the ports of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and
Baltimore, with the quarteiiy and annual average price at the above four
ports, for the last seventeen years

221

!6.(>. Statement No. 59 exhibits prices of steel in New York, from 1851 to 1856,
inclusive - . _ - -

223

'61. Statement No. 60 exhibits a list pf unmanufactured articles of import, not
produced in the United States in sufficient quantities to constitute them
articles of trade
'

224




gtlaiiiSl^ia^iMIMSiia^emammi^tlmi^

...J
..,

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

55
Page,

62. Statement No. 61 exhibits the foreign importations and exports, and domestic
exports, together with the home consumption, of foreign importations of
leather and the manufactures thereof, and the home consumption of
foreign importations of leather and the manufactures thereof, less domestic.exports,, for the last seventeen years, and the yearly average thereof-- , 226
63. Statement No. 62 exhibits the^population, home consumption of foreign impor.tations of leather and manufactures of leather, and the allotment per
capita thereof, together with-the home consuinption of foreign importa- . .
tions of leather and the manufactures of leather, less domestic exports in
the United States, for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855.
226
64. Statement No. 63 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports, and home consumption .of foreign importations of hides and
skins ; also home cohsumption of foreign importations of hides and skins,
less domestic exports, and domestic exports, less home consumption, of
foreign importatipns of hides and skins in the United States for the last
seventeen years, and the yearly average thereof
227
65. Statement No..64 exhibits the population, hpme consumption of foreign importations of hides and skins, and the per capita thereof; also the home
consumption of foreign iniportations of hides and skins, less domestic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof, for the years 1840, 1850, and
1855
--_.227
66. Statement No. 65 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports, and home consumption of foreign importations of manufactures of glass, and the home corisumption of foreign importations of
manufactured glass, less the domestic exports thereof, in the United States
for the last seventeen years, and the annual average thereof
228
67. Statement No. 66 exhibits the population, home consumption of the foreign
importations of manufactured glass, and the allotment per capita thereof;
also the home consumption of the foreign importations of manufactured
glass, less domestic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof, in the
United States for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855--- —
228
68. Statement No. 67 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports, and home consumption of the foreign importations of China, ,
porcelain, earthen, and stone ware ; also the home consumption of foi eign
importations of China, porcelain, earthen, and stone ware, less domestic
exports, in %he United States for the last'seventeen years, and the annual
average thereof.
_
229
69. Statement No. 68 exhibits the populatiori, home consumption of the foreign
importations of manufactures of China, porcelain, earthen, and stone
ware, and the allotment per capita thereof; also the home consumption
of the foreign importations of manufactures of China, porcelain, earthen,
and stone ware, less the domestic exports, and the allotment per capita,
in the United States for theyears 1840, 1850, and 1855.229
70. Statement No. 69 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports and home consumption, less domestic exports of hemp; the
foreign importations and exportations and home consumption of Manilla,
sun, and other hemp of India, and the total home consumption of aU
kinds of imported hemp ; also the foreign importations and exportations,




56

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Page

home consumption, domestic exports, and home consuniption, less domestie exports, of manufactures of hemp, together with the total home consumption of all kinds of imported hemp, and the imported manufactures
thereof over the domestic exports in the United States- for the last seven. teen- years, and the' yearly average thereof ..-•
230
71. Statement No. 70 exhibits the foreign iniportations and exportations, arid
the: home consumption of iinported^ flax; also the foreigri importations
and exportations of linen and linen fabrics, and the home consumption .
thereof, together with the total home consumptiori of imports'of flax, and
the manufactures of flax in the United- States for the last- sevferiteeri years,
and the yearly average thereof--_--— 232
72. Statement No. 71 exhibits the population, consumption of imported=hemp in
the United States,.less domestic exports, and the per capita thereof, the
consumption of the imported manufactures of hemp, less domestic exports,
with the per capita thereof, and the total consumption of hemp, arid the
manufactures of hemp, less domestic exports, and- the per capita thereof,
in the United States for the years 1840, 1850, arid 1855'-. 233
73. Statement No. 72 exhibits the population, consumption of imported flax in
the United States, and the allotment per capita thereof; the consumption
of imported manufactures of flax, and the allotment per capita thereof; arid
the total consumption of imported flax, and imported manufactures of flax,
with the allotment per capita thereof, in the United States; for the years
1840, 1850, and 1855
>—
-.-..-.233
74. StatementNo. 73 exhibits the populatiori, product of' heriip arid flax" grown
in the United States, arid the allotment per capita thereof; total consumption of hemp arid flax- in the United States, less domestic exports, and the
allotment per capita thereof, arid the total consumption of foreign and
doriiestic hemp and flax', arid the fdreign nianufactures of hemp and flax,
less domestic exports, with the allotment per capita, for the years 1840
'and 1850
-...
-.

234

75. Statement No. 74 exhibits the foreign importations and exportations, domestic expbrts and home consumption of coal; also the home consumption of
the foreign importations of coal, less the domestic exports, and domestic
exports, less the home consumption of foreign importations of coal in the
United States for the last seventeen years, and the annual a"V6erage thereof

235

76. Statement No. 75 exhibits the population, home consumption of the foreign
importations of coal, and the per capita thereof, and the home consumption
ofthe foreign importations of coal, less the domestic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof in the'United-States, for the years- 1840, 1850,
and 1855
----...-.-—----...--....-.— --.

236

77. Statement No. 76 exhibits the foreign importations arid exportations, domestic exports and home consumption of foreign importatioris of lead, arid the
manufactures thereof; also home consumption of fdreigri importations',
less domestic exports, of lead and the manufactures of lead, and domestic
exports, less' home consumption of foreign importations, of lead arid the
manufactures" thereof, for the last seventeen years, and the' annual average
thereof
--

236




REPORT

ON T H E

FINAiNCES.

67
Page.

78. StatementNo. 77 exhibits the population.home consumption of foreign importations'of lead and manufactures of lead, and the allotment per capita
thereof; also the home consumption of foreign importations of lead, and
the manufactures of lead^, less the domestiP exports; and the aUotment
per capita thereof for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855 - -_
.236
79. Statement No. 78 exhibits the foreign importations, foreign and- domestic
exportations- and home consumption- of foreigri copper and the manufactures ^thereof,-together with the total home-consumption of foreign copper
and manufactures of copper, less doriiestic exports^ for the last seventeen years, and the - yearly average thereof- -•- - - - - - - - - — - -• 237
80. Statement No. 79 exhibits the population, home consumption of foreign
copper, and the- manufactures thereof^ with the allotnient per'capita, and
total home consumption of foreign copper and' manufactures of copper,
less domestic exports, and the ailotriient per capita-thereof, for the years
1840, 1850, and 1 8 5 5 . - w - . . - . - u . . . . w . _ . - - - . . — ^ . L . . . . - . - - = . - - . - - - . - . . . . 237
81. Statement No. 80 exhibits the' foreign- importations arid exportations andhome consumptiori of fbreign silk, the foreign importations, exportations,
and home consumption of manufactures'of silk-, a n d t h e total home- corisumption of importation of silks and manufactures-of silk in the United
States, for the last seventeen years, with the yearly aiverage thereof-_.238
^2: Statement No. 81 exhibits the population, consumption of imported silk,
and the allotment per capita= thereof ;• consumption of imported manufac, tures of silk, and the per capita thereof, and the total home consumption
of importatioris of silk- arid manufactures of silk in the- United States,
with the allotment per capita thereof, for the years 1840, 1850, and 1855 ;
also the-productions of silk'in the^ United States, and the allotment per
capita thereof, and the total consumption of foreign and domestic silk,
and fpreign manufactures of silk, in the United States, arid the allotment
per capita thereof, for the years 1840 and 1850 _.-------.-.-239
83. Statement No. 82.—Railroad statistics of the United Statesl - . _- _ - - _ - - - - - - -- 240
84; Statement No. 83.—United States stocks. State, city, county, town,
bank, &c., &c., stocks and bonds held at home and a/broad
^-----_
42-6
85i Statement No. 84.—Cost of coinage at. the mint and branches, includirig
buildings, machinery, &c
^—^---i^^--------42^'
86; Statement No. 85, amount of gold and silver supposed to be in circulation; amount supposed to be in banks; amount supposed to be' in thecountry, and the; amount of bank notes in circulation, at the different
p'^eriods therein named;
- _ __---•-.--_
- - _ - — - - - _ --- -.. - - - i. - 434''
87. Statement No. 86, number and amount of condemnations of imported
goods for frauds on the^ revenuein the^district;of' New York frPm 1842''to =
88. Statement No. 87 exhibits the number of entries' of mainufacturersJot^prodricers' goods-at the port of New York-, with their^ entered^ value,- appraised
value, and the number of entries' advanced by the- appraisers;^ arid- the
amount thereof, and the number advanced 10 per cent, or more, with the
amount of 20 per cent, additional duty, during the months of September,
October, and November, 1846, and an estimate for the three preceding
quarters, based upon theactual to tal'receipts-for fthe year; also asimilar
exhibit for the quarter ending June 30, 1856,' ajid the- three- preceding 


58

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

quarters; also the entries of merchandise paying a specific duty fpr the
months of September, October, and November, 1846, with the exhibits
aforesaid for the three preceding quarters ; also the purchased goods entered at the aforesaid port for the months of September, October, and November, 1846, and the aforesaid exhibits for the preceding three quarters,
and the like exhibits of the purchased goods at the aforesaid port for the
quarter ending June 30, 1856, and the three preceding quarters ; also the
number of annual entries of merchandise at the port of New York for the
last ten years, and the aggregate thereof
^
89. Statement No. 88 exhibits the amount of appropriations and expenditures of
every kind incurred by the goverriment, annually, since "June 30, 1825, in
the construction, repairs, rent, and preservation of custom-houses; the
cost, expense, and maintenance of revenue cutters and other vessels engaged in the revenue service ; and the amount of all other expenditures
incurred in the collection of the customs since the above date
90.. Statement A exhibits the report of the First Comptroller on the operations
of his office
•-_91. Statement B exhibits the report of the Second Comptroller on the operations
of his office
,92. Statement C exhibits the report of the Commissioner of Customs on the operations of his office
_
93. Statement D exhibits the report of the First Auditor on the operations of his
office -94. Statement E exhibits the report of the Second Auditor on the operations of
his office 95. Statement F exhibits the report of the Third Auditor on the operations of
his office - - - - _
-96. Statement G exhibits the report of the Fourth Auditor on the operations of
his office
97. Statement H exhibits the report of the Fifth Auditor on the operations of
his office
98. Statement I exhibits the report of the Sixth Auditor on the operations of
his office
_
99. Statement J exhibits the report of the Solicitor - on the operations of his
office
---..
100. Statement K exhibits the report of the,Treasurer on the operations of his
office.--^101. Statement L exhibits the report of the Register on the. operations of his
office.Jl:
1
!
102.. Statement M, letter of Solicitor, with accompanying tables, exhibit the
. names of certain-insolvent debtors to the amount of $6,213,34 5 69
103. Statement N exhibits the balances due from banks formerly depositories of
the public money, which are unavailable, and have been so reported by
the Secretary of the Treasury for a number of years
_
104- Statement No. 89 exhibits the number of disbursing officers having public
money to their credit with the depositories, and the amounts held by each
depository, according to the reports made for the dates therein specified-.
105; Statement No. 90 exhibits report of Captain A. H. Bowman, engineer in
charge, on construction of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, marine



439

446
462
453
457
459
460
462
472
473
474
479
482
484
511

5-37

448

REPORT

106.

107.
108.
109.

110.

111.

112.

113.

114.

115.

116.

ON T H E

FINANOES.

I
hospitals, and other public buildings confided to the charge of the Treasury
Department
I
Statement No. 91 exhibits the receipts and expenditures of the marine hospital fund for the relief of sick and disabled seamen in the ports of the
UnitedStates
1
|^
StatementNo. 92, report of Light-house Board--—j
StatementNo. 93, report of supervising inspectors of steamboats
.: — .
No. 94, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the chairman of the Committee on Commerce, House of Representatives, ;relative to construction.
of custom-houses.
|No. 95, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Speaker of the House
of Representatives, recommending additional legislation with a view of
more effectually preventing the undervaluation of merchandise
No. 96, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the chairman-of the Committee of Ways arid Means, of the House of Representatives, on the subject of home valuation— ^
L
No. 97, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Fourth Auditor, relative to the two per cent, commission claimed by Albert Greenleaf, navy
agent at Washingtpn, for sums disbursed by himj as pension agent
No. 98, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Commissioner of Customs, relative to extra compensation claimed by certain government employees for services rendered in other than office hours
No. 99, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Superintendent of
the United States Coast Survey,' relative to extra; compensation claimed
by certain employees in his office for services rendered in other than office
hours
,
.L-,
'
No. 100, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to the chairman of the
Committee on Retrenchment, United States Senate, on the subject of retrenchment in the expenses of the government and improvement in the
mode of doing the business of the Treasury Depai-tment
No. 101, letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, with accompanying papers,
addressed to the chairman of the Committee on jFinance, of the Senate,
relative to the mode of paying the salaries of foreign ministers, consuls,
commercial agents, &c
_
4..
_._




69
Page,
643

684
695
616

648

650

653

658

659

660

660

664

60

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 1.
Statement of duties, revenues, and puhlic expenditures, during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1856, agreeably to warrants issued-, exclusive of
tYust funds and treasury notes funded.
The-receipts into the treasury during the fiscal y.ear ending;June 30, 1856,.
were as follows:
From custoiiig, viz-:
Duiing the quarter
During the quarter
During the quarter
Duringthe quarter

ending
ending
eriding
ending

September 30, 1 8 5 5 . . - $17,085,238 28
December 31, 1855 . . . 13,424, 038 57"
March-31, 1856
^ 16, 737,114^ 01'
June-30j 1 8 6 6 . . . - . . . - . 16,776,472- 64
•
$64,022,863 60

From sales of public lands; vilz^
During: the quarter endings September 30, 1855 - . During the quarter ending December 31, 1855 .—
During'the quarter endirig March 31, 1856Duririg the quarter ending June 30, 1856_-..•- ^ --.;.-

2, 355,725 87
3, 273, 868 02
1,450,073 041, 837,978 008,917,644 93
977, 633 03

From miscellaneous and incidental sources
Total r e c e i p t s - - - . . . . ^----.-.-.---.^.-...^
Balance in the treasury July 1,1855
..
^
-

73,918,141 4618, 931, 976 01

TPtal nieans

92, 850,117 47

-

The experiditures for the fiscal year ending June 30; 1856; werea^follbw^ ":

Legislative, including books'---- $2; OGO, 362 22'
Executive-- — --.
- — -.--• 2,055,125 07
Judiciary
...-.
-..1,228,333 .93
Governments in the Territories of the United States . 272, 693 63
Surveyors" arid'their"clerks'^
139, 319 98
Officers of-.the mint and branohes, arid- assay office- in
NewYork-,---:.----.101,666 68
Assistant treasurers and. their clerks 40, 758 26
Supervising and local inspectors, &c
- —78,169 90
Totalcivil

,-

$5,916,429 67

rOREIGN INTERCOUBSE.

Salaries of ministers, charges des affaires, &c
Salaries of secretaries of legation
Oommissioner to the Sandwich Islands
«
Salaries of consuls
Dragoman to Turkey
Interpreter and secretary of mission to China
Office-rent of consul at Basle
Office-rent of consul at Zurich- Salary of consul at Beyrout, Syria
Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad
Coritingent expenses of foreign intercourse
--.
Intercourse with the- Barbary powers
Interpreters, guards, and other expenses of consulates
in the Turkish dominions. Relief and protection of American seamen
-.



110, 237 19
*18, 679 88
5,750 00
118,334 21
2,375 00 ,
2,500 00
50 00
100 00
500 00
73, 977 38
30,130 50
5, 677 %
Q
797 05
136,283 99

m

j R E P O R T ON - T H E -FINArNeiES.
Purchase of blank books, stationery, &fc., ipr epnsula of
the United States
--. —|
,.
To reimburse E. -Riddle money expended by- .him ;at
Industrial Exhibition, London
-.----I .-----'
Expenses of releasing from captivity among the Indians
of Queen Charlotte island the crew and-passengers of
the sloop Geprgiana----.
.-._.L.
To defray expenses in complying with the resolution.of
the House of Representatives of December ,141 185.3,
calling for a statement of the privileges and restrictions of foreign intercourse with the United States,:&c.
Expenses in acknowledging the services of masters,and
crews of foreign vessels in rescuing American citizens, &c., from shipwreck-_-.
I
Contingent expenses of the late board of commis'sioners
nnder treaty with .Mexico. .Awards under the 15th article of treaty between the
United States and Mexico, of February 2, 1848_
To fulfil the 3d article of treaty between the United
States and the Mexican republic, of December lp, 1853
Boats and other incidental expenses connected with the
duties of commissioner, under first article of reciprocity treaty with Great Britain-.
L
Carrying into effect the convention upon the subject of
clainis betweenthe "IJnited States and her Britannic
Majesty, of February 8, 1 8 5 3 - . - - — . . - .

.$20,000 00
11,871-05
8,-9:35.3.0

=•6,000 .00
'.5,995 62
60 GO

60,i22 09
.3,000,000:00
..9,777 .14
2,067 46
,3,619,211 62

Deduct repayment on account of appropriation '' 'to conclude a treaty of peace with Mexico," out of| which
there was no expenditure during the y e a r — .
Total foreign intercourse-

320 44
.$3,618,8.9.1 .18

,... -

MISCELLANEOUS

Mint establishment^.^^ - ^ -.--.-..-. ^... .,
Compensation to special agents to examine bopks, &c.,
in the several depositories
--r-.r
Contingent expenses^ under the act for the safe-lceeping
of the public revenue-^
^^
^-.
Expenses incident to loans and treasury notesExpenses incident:to the, issue of $10, 000, 000 oi stock
Texan indemnity.
^----.Survey of the coast of the United States - Survey of the western coast of the United State's
Survey of the Florida reefs and keys
Per-centage to messengers, &c., employed in th^ Coast
Survey --_
----------Fuel and quarters of officers of the army serving i n t h e
Coast Survey
-^.,
.Publishing observations made in the progress|(of the
survey of the coastof the United States.--.--.
Payment for horses and other property lost, &c.. in.the
military service of the United States--^--_-.-.Claims not otherwise .provided for ^ - - - ^ .
--_
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, per;aGt August 10, 1846.--.....L
Payment on account of Cherokee Iridians remaining in
North Carolina
.-.-.._.----.-._ L - . . . . Results and account of the exploring expeditionL-_,
Expenses incurred by .the provisional government of
Oregon in defending the-people of the Territory from
the Cayuse Indians .
L
For mail service performed for the sever.al departments
of government, per .section 12,.actMarch 3, 1847--


621,002 78
3,089 40
41,425 20
2,0.00.00
289-74
.250,004 89
130,000 00
.40,000 00
218 91
10, 000 .00
.15,000 00
2,257 46
2,-602,35
,30,, 910 14
3,000 00
10,^000.00
.9,375:40
200,000 00

62

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

For further compensation to the Post Office Department, for mail services performed for the two houses
of Congress, &c., per act March 3, 1851
To supply any deficiency in the revenues of the Post
Office Department, for the year ending June 30, 1856
For a tri-monthly mail, by steam-vessels, between New
Orleans and Vera Cruz
_
To continue the mail service between Chaiieston, Key
West, and Havana, during the months of August and
September
__
"
._
Furnishing post office at Bangor, Maine
Erection of public buildings in the Territories._
Payment of annuities and grants
Expenses of collecting the revenues from customs
Repayments to importers of excess of deposites for un, ^ascertained duties
Debentures or drawbacks, bounties or allowances
Debentures and other charges, per act October 16, 1837.
Refunding duties on fish and other articles, under reciprocity treaty with Great Biitain
Refunding duties under the act to extend the warehousing syste'm
Refunding duties on foreign merchandise imported
Proceeds of the sales of goods, wares, &c., per act of
April 2, 1844
.-.
J--,
Salaries of special examiners of drugs and medicines-.
Additional compensation to collectors, naval officers, &CSupport and maintenance of light-houses, &c
Building light-houses, and for buoys, beacons, &c
Life-boats and other means of rendering assistance to
wrecked mariners and others on the coast of the
UnitedStates
Purchase of metallic surf-boats, to rescue lives and
property
..-J
Fuel and quarters for officers of the army serving on
light-house duty
Four additional revenue cutters
Maiine hospital establishment.
Building, &c., marine hospitals
Building, &c., custom-houses
Appraiser's store, &c., at San Francisco
Expenses of collecting the revenue from the sales of
publiciands
_
Surveys of public lands
Continuing the survey of the islands on the coast of
California
Continuing the suivey of the keys of the coast of Florida
Surveying public lands and private land claims in California
—
Salaries and incidental expenses of commissioners to
settle land claims in CaliforniaPreparing unfinished records of public and private surveys
Amount required to graduate and reduce the price of
the public lands
Repayments for lands erroneously sold
Engraving maps, views, sections, natural history of survey of boundary between United States and Mexico.
Running and marking the boundary-line between the
United States and Mexico
Preservation of the collections of the exploring expedition
-.
Patentfund
----....Furnishing rooms in the new wing of the Patent Office
building
-.---.--East and west wings of the Patent Office building



$625,000 00
2, 294, 368 00
69,750 00
10,000
1,396
132,070
400
2, 849, 958

00
71
80
G
O
77

1,005,693 20
567, 359 96
19, 217 77
133,403 68
10,488 10
278,113 91
2,742
9, 057
7,202
901, 478
831,316

68
49
01
92
77

2,364 02
1,495 20
4,656
42,712
368, 520
329,759
1,415,040
65, 070

27
26
86
59
49
28

374,400 20
395,273 85
40,000 00
30, 000 G
O
203,666 87
72, 986 20
16,171 04
9,680 65
60,085 55
8, O O 00
O
'
26,172 21
3,430 00
185,887 09
3,000 00
138,815 67

R E P O R T ON T H E

63

FINANCES.

Continuation of the Treasury building
'--_
Alterations and repairs of public buildings in Washington, improving public grouncis, &c
Compensation of public gardener, laborers, gateivcepers,
&c
-Compensation and contingent expenses of Auxiliary
Guard
Collecting agricultural statistics
Support, &c., of transient paupers
Support, &c., of insane paupers of the Distiict of Columbia
Penitentiary in the Distiict of Columbia
Potomac and Eastern Branch bridges, compensation of
draw-keepers, &C-To complete and revise the grades in the city of Washington
Purchase bf site, and erection, &c., of an asylum for
the insane of the District of Columbia.
Erection of a lodge, for the colored insane, &c., of the
Districtof Columbia.--..-.
Furnishing building for use, &c,, of United States courts
at Marietta, Ga_-..^
Repairs made and furniture supplied for court-rooms in
northern district of New York- Building for the use of United States courts at Pontitoc,
MississippiFurnishing United States court-rooms at Bangor, Maine
Three per centum to Ohio
Three per centum to Indiana
Three per centum to Illinois-Three per centum to Missouri
-.
T^vo and three per centum to Mississippi
-1
Two and three per centum to Alabama
-—
Five per centum to Louisiana
Five per centum to Michigan
•.
'
Five per centum to Plorida- — -Five per centum to Iowa
-.--'-.-.
Relief of sundry individuals.Sundry miscellaneous items

$91, 353 01
102,249 58
20,330 50
23,889 44
45,000 G
O
3,750 00
20,173 13
20,129 32
13,524 39
2,250 00

' :^^^ ^

6,512 00
12,020 00
5,000 00
7,148 81
4,000 Q
O
1, 383 25
2,609 04
1, 346 80
46,210 86
35, 538 47
13, 530 38
27,158 97
7,661 02
52,982 68
5,811 64
226,873 86
113,059 10
10,130 65

Total miscellaneous--.'

$15,739,010 14

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TUB INTERIOR.

Indian department
Pensions, military
Pensions, naval.

-

2,593,483 85
1,179,213 07
100,129 69

Total under Department of the Interior

-

3,872, 826 64

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT.

Army proper, &c
Military Academy---.
Fortifications, and other works of defence
Armories, arsenals, &c
'
Harbors, rivers, roads, &c
.Arming and epuipping the militia
Pay of volunteers
_
Extension of the Capitol of the United States---Removing the dome of the Capitol
Continuation of the Post Office building
Continuing the Washington aqueduct
-Relief of sundry individuals, and miscellaneous
Total under Department of War



-..

12,488,128 42
149,822 36
1,209,305 40
939,608 83
444,791 70
142,839 09
25,494 22
770, 000 G
O
35,000 00
150,000 00
165, 000 00
428, 206 87
-

16,948,196 89

64

REPORT ON THE iFINAN:CES.
"UNDER TIIE -DIRECTION OF THE NAVY DEPARTBtENT.

Pay and subsistence, including medicines,.&c
Increase, repair, ordnance and equipments
Contingentexpenses
Navy yards
Hospitals
Magazines
Dry docks
Steam mail service
Six steam-frigates
^
Marinecorps
Relief of sundry individuals, and miscellaneous

$4, 296,600
2, 953, 481
815,831
1,848,316
40,142
117,028
33,584
1,399, 284
1,715,548
488,881
368, 347

Total under Navy Department

28
98
29
16
41
39
60
87
11
28
76

-

$14,077,047 12

PUBLIC DEBT.

Old public debt
.%
1,100 60
Interest on the public debt, including treasury notes. .
1, 953, 822 37
Redemption of stock, loan of 1842
..'.
385, 221 30
Do
do
1846
---'-943,500 G
O
Do
do
1847
1,021,600 00
Do
do
.1848
_
— '
798,700 00
Redemption of Texan indemnity stock
464, 000 00
Redemption of debt contracted by the cities of Washington, Georgetown and Alexandria
'2,459 68
Redemption of stock issued for 4th and 6th instalments
of the Mexican indemnity
242 90
Redemption of treasurynotes which were purloined
.
53 86
Premium on stock redeemed
.385,672 90
Payment of such creditors of Texas as are comprehended
m a c t of September 9, 1850
.—
6,820,016 77
Total public debt

-

- . . ^ . - . . . ' , . .^. . . , . ' 12,-776,390 M

Total expenditures-Balance in the treasury, July 1, 1856..TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Regkter' S'Office,




. —..-.-^-.^-

72,948,792 02
19,901,325 45

REPORT

ON

THE

65

FINANCES.

No. 2.
Statement of the receipts and expenditures ofi the United States for the
quarter ending^Septemher 30, 1856, exdusive ofi trustfiundsand
tQ^easury notes fiunded,
RECEIPTS.
Fromcustoms
From sales of public lands
From incidental and miscellaneous sources.

»

' $20,677,740 40
892,380 39
355, 310 57
21,925,431 36

EXPENDITURES.
Civil, miscellaneous, and foreign intercourse
Interior—pensions and Indian
War
--Navy
Old public debt.Redemption of loan of 1842
P^demption of loan of 1846
'
Redemption of loan of 1 8 4 7 - - . . . - - . Redemption of loan of 1848
Payment to creditors of Texas, per act Sept. 9, 1850.Redemption of bounty-land stock
Premium on stock redeemed
rInterest on public debt
Reimbursement of treasury notes paid in specie- - .

—

$3
81,130
91,913
106,200
208,100
354,437
100
58,685
1,476
60

$7, 094, 388
2,346,651
5,214,230
3,117,747

05
24
16
13

21
23,
26
00
00 '
89
00
80
24
00
902,096 63
18,675,113 21

F.

BIGGER, Reffisier.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE, Novembei- 1, 1856.

N o . 3.—Statement of the jmblic debt as fdllows: Stock issued of the lams of 1842, 1843, 1846,
1847, 1848, and Texan indemnity; the debt ofthe corporate cities of the District of Columbia; the
Texas debt, treasury noies, and funded and unfunded debt; the amowit redeemed before the Uh of
March, 1 8 5 3 ; redeemed since that time; the total ammint redeemed and theamount outstanding this
day, Noveniber 15, 1856.

L o a n s , &c.

j842....
1843
1846
1B47*
1848....
T e x a n indemnity
Texan indemnity not issued.
Debt of corporate cities
Treasury notes

Amounts issued. Redeemed u p Redeemed
to March 3 ,
1853.

Total a m o u n t
redeemed.

Amount outstanding.

$8,343,886 03 $150,200 00
7,004,231 35 3,026.300 00
3.009 74
4,999,149 45
28,200,650 00 2,867,100 00
16,000,000 00 . 315,750 00
5.000,000 00
5^000,000 00
780,000 00
1,500,000 00
114,118 54
120,861 64

$4,409,619 05
3,977,931 35
4,676,339 71
13,560,050 00
4,979,958 20
1,368,000 00
5.000,000 00
'720,000 00

$4,559,819 05 $3,784,066 98
7,004,231 35
4,679,349 45
319,800 OV
t
16,427,150 00 11,773,500 OO
5,295,708 20 10,704,291 80
1,368,000 00
3,632,000 00
5,000.000 00
1,500,000 00
114.118 .54
t l l 2 ; 6 6 1 64

7,142,359 74

38,691,898 31

45,8.34,258 05

30,440,438 9&

9,226,529 32

2,225,529 32

523 470 68

76,282,897 01
T b e increase of Texas debt
per act February 28,1855.

rfnce.

2,750,000 00
79,032,897 01

7,142,359 74

40,918,427 63

48,060 787 37 30,963,909 64

* Increased by funding treasury notes, $8,200. Stock erroneously redeemed and subsequently reissued, $2,400^,
t Eeduced by funding.
F.
TREASURY DEPARTJIENT, RiTOis-nrn's OFIICE. November 15, 186C).

5



BIGGER, RegL^.er.

66

R E P O R T ON T H E

-"

FINANCES.

No. 3—Continued.

Statement showing the amount ofi' United. States stock. redeemed ofi^ the
loans ofi 1842, 1843, 1846,1847:, 1848 ; Texan indemnity, and deht;
and the deht ofi the corporate cities ofi the District ofi Golumbia purchased and p a i d off firom March A, 18^^, to date inclusive ; the interest that would have heen paid, ifi payment had. not heen. anticipated,
and the saving to the United States by the present mode ofi purcJuise.
Novemher 15, 1856.
u .
When redeemable.

Loans, &G.

Interest to maturity.

Redeemed since
March 4, 1853.

(
-

1843

1846
1847
1848Texan indemnity
Texas debt (act February 28, 1855).
Debt of corporate cities

Dec. 31,
July 1,
Nov. 12,
Jan. 1,
July- 1,
Jan. • 1,
Jan.

1862.
1853
1856
1868
18681865

1, 1865

Total premium paid
Totalinterest paid

$4,409,619 05
3,977,931 35
4,676,339 71
13,560,050 00
4,979,958 20
1,368,000 G
O
7,226,529 32
720,000^00

$2,466, 996'7399,448 2ai
740,814 m
11,637,442-60:
4,303,444r 62i
696,860^00-

40,918,4-27 63

1842

20V160'; 657 84

215, 660^ 81.

$4,609,882 31
944,334 14
5,564,216 45

Saved

-

,

14,.606,441 39

F. BIGGER, Regisi^.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OITIGE, Novemb^ 15,




1866.

No. 4.
Statement exhiUting the.present liaUlities of. the United States to Indian tribes under stipulations of trectties, dc.—(Pr^«
^
'
'
'"
pared in the ofice of Indian Affairs.)
J 3

*^.

o o "^^

»5 ti"*^
•fi c3 S

Barnes, df tribes.

Description bf annuities, stipulations,

References to laws.

a ^ '^

Number Of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &.c.

SSS
C ^
3

O) " ^ '-P

2 2 .is S -s
tjj-C 3 3 B

'Q^ S > > 3 2
»

o

I ep S er s s
X
Blackfoot Nation .

'

Comanches, KioWas,
and Apaches of the
Arkansas river.
DOi**;

Chippevyas of
Superior.

Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do-

Lake

For purchase of goods, pro-V'isions, and
other Useful articles, &c.', 9th art i c l e o f the treaty October 17, 1855.
For purchase of goo.ds.j provisions, and
agricultural implements ; 6tli article
ofthe treaty July 27, 1853.
, . . . . *do
do
Money, goods, support of schools, pro.-^^isions, and t o b a c c o j compare.4th
article treaty October 4,' 1842, and
8th article treaty September 30,
1854.
T w e n t y instalments in coin^ goods,
implements, &c., andfor education;
4th article treaty Sept. 30, 1854.
T w e n t y instalments for six smiths
and assistants, and iron and steel j
5th and 2d articles treaty September 30, 1854.
T w e n t y Instalments for the 7th, smith,
Sec.
Five instalments for t h e Bois Forte
band ; 12th article tteaty September
30,1854.
Support o f a smith, assistant, and shop,
and pay of two farmers during the
pleasure of the Presidontj 12th article treaty.




1st session 34th Congress, page 41.
Vol. 10, page 1014

O

T e n instalments of $20,000 \ nine instalments to be appropriated
T e n Instalments of $18,000 provided ',
seven instalments of $18,000 each,
yet unappropriated
Transportation of goods and provisions
seven years, $7,000 per year
Twenty-five instalhaents; ten yet unappropriated ; two-thirds is $18,000,
and is payable to these Indians . . . . .

.... ....do
Vol. 7, page. 592, and
vol.. 10, page illi.

Vol. 10, page llll.
Vol. 10, pages 1109 and
llll.
do........
Vol. 10, page l l l l
Vol.10, page 1112

$180,000 00

126.000 00
49,000 00

180,000 QO
Cl

T w e n t y instalments of $19j000 each ;
eighteen unappropriated

342,000 00

T w e n t y instalments, estimated at
$6,360 each j eighteen unappropriated.......

114,480 00

T w e n t y instalments, estimated at
$1,060 e a c h } twenty unappropriated
Five instalments of $2,000 each ; three
unappropriated
Estimated at $2,260 per annum .

21,200 00
6,000 00
$2,260 00

STATEMENT—Conti.nued.

(35
>> ' > <u

Ul fl > o
w ., fl O

2 So « « o <
a

:-flJ3
^

§« g
Description of annuities, stipulations,

Names of tribes.

.

References to laws.

&.C.

O S fl
rt fl g^

Number of instalments yet unappropr
|ated, explanations, remarks, &c.

2 fl c ^ o
fl .rf TS ,r'. rrt

Chippewas of
Superior.

Lake

Transportation and expenses of delivering goods.

Vol. 10, page 1112.,

Chippewas of tbe Mississippi.

Money, goods, support of schools, provisions and t o b a c c o ; compare 4th
article treaty October 4, 1842, and
8th article treaty September 30,
1854.
T w o farmers, t w o carpenters, and
smiths and assistants, shops, ir/)n
and s t e e l ; 4th article treaty October
4, 1842, and Sth article treaty September 30,1854.
T w e n t y instalments in money, $20,000
each.
Money,-$10,666 67, goods $8,000, and
purposes of utility $4,000; 3d article
treaty February 22, 1855.
For purposes of education ; same article and treaty.
For support of smith s h o p s ; same article and treaty.

Vol. 7, page 592, and
vol. 10, page llll.

Do

Do
ChippeWas, Pillagers,
and L a k e VVinnebigosbish bands.
Do
Do
Do

Vol. 10, page 1168.,
.do.
.do.

For powder, shot, and lead &c

.do..

,.

For transportation and expenses ; see
article Sth of treaty.

,do..

htckasawa..,
Cliippewas, Menomonies, Winnebagoes,
and N e w York Indians.

Permanent annuity in goods
Education during the pleasure of Congress,

Vol. 1, page 619.
Vol. 7, page 304.

Bo..,..




4f

<D'fl«

-flx; s

-^5

r-'

2 > fl 2
fltflTS fl

=^^ S 5
2rt af.
3 "^TS §
-! ^ " 3 rt
2 ^ ' O rt

3>^S

$90,000 00

o

90,000 00

14,000 00

Third article treaty Fehruary 22,1855;
eighteen unappropriated
,
Thirty instalments $22,666 6 7 ; twentyeight unappropriated
T w e n t y instalments of $3,000 each ;
eighteen unappropriated
Fifteen instjilments, estimated^ at
$2,120 e a c h ; thirteen unappropriated
Five instalments $600 each ; two unappropriated
Expenses necessary to deliver annuities, say $5,000 per year for nine
years, $3,000 per year next teri
years, and $1,000 per year next niue
years
,
Act February 28, 1799, $3,000 per y e a r .
Fifth article of the treaty August 11,
1827
,
,....:........

fecC flflfl 'S-fl tl
""fl,crfl-^ X a. g

fl

••§•§

o

See l l t h article treaty September 30,
1854; transportation, &c., $5,000
per year, eighteen years
Twenty-five i n s t a l m e n t s ; ten yet unappropriated

Twenty-five instalments, ten unappropriated ; one-third pa5'^able to
these Indians, viz : $1,400 per year
for ten y e a r s .
Vol.10, page 1167.

6C.2 ^ .o 2 '^ 73 -^

' ^ ' ^ ' ^ fl *

360,000 00
634,666 67
54,000 00
27,580 00
1,800 00

84,000 00
$3,000 00
1,500 00

$60,000 QO

Chippewas df Sagin a w & Swan creek,
and
Black tiVer,
Michigan.
Do

Do..
Chippewas of
Ste. M a r i s .

Sault

Five ihsialm^hts for edticati'On, of
$4,000 each ; 2d article treaty 2d
August, 1855.
Five instalments for agricultural implements, tools, furniture, cattle,
&c.,of $5,000 e a c h ; same^article.
T e n instalments in coin, of $10,000
each, and for support of smithshops ten yearsj $1^240 per y e a r ;
same article, &c.
Compensation for right of fishery relinquished ; 1st and 2d articles
treaty 2d August, 1855.
P e r m a n e n t annuities, . . . . . . a n . n . .

Four liistaiinents yet tmappi^priated..

16,000 00

.do.

F o u r instalments yet to be appropriated . . . . . i i .
i.. . .
. .Hi ,

20,000 00

.do.

Nine instalments yet to be appropriated. H i ,

101,160 00

1st session 34th Ccihgress, page 32.

1st session 34th Congress, page 37.

Awarded by referee. *

Vol. 7, pages 9&, 213,
and 235.

17,475 00

2d article treaty November 16,
1805
$3,000
13th article treaty October 18,
1820
600
2d article treaty Janiiary 20,
1825
6,000
6th article treaty October 18,1820, and
9th article treaty J a n u a r y 20,1825—
sav .*920
Five per cent, for educational purposes.
. ..

9,600. 00

Do.

Previsions fbr smiths, & c . .

Vol. 7, pages 212 and
236.

Dd*

interesf Oil $.^00,000; articles 10 a,nd
13 treaty J u n e 22, 1855.

1st sess. 34th Congress,
Supplement, pages 23
and 24.
Vol. 7, pages 36,69, and
287.

Creeks . . .

Permanent a n n u i t i e s . . . < <

Do..

Smith-shops, &c

DO..

Smiths, &c., two for twenty-seven
y e a r s ; treaties 24th March, 1832,
and 7th August, 1856.
'Wheelwright, permanent

Vol. 7, page 388, & c . . .

Thirty-three instalments for education ; 13th article treaty March,
1832, and 4th article treaty J a n u a r y ,
1845.
T w e n t y instalments for e d u c a t i o n ;
4th article treaty J a n u a r y , 1845.
Allowance during the pleasure of the
President.
Interest on $200,000 held in t r u s t ; 6th
article treaty August 7, 1856.
Piyitieht to the Creek N a t i o n ; 6th article treaty August 7, 1856.
Payment to certain emigrant C r e e k s ;
same article treaty.

Vol. 7, page 368, and
vol. 9, page 822.

Do..
Do.

Do..
Do..
Do..
Do..
Do..




i ^ . . . . . . Vol. 7, page 287

Vol. 7, page 287

,

,

192,000 00

920 00

18,400 00

25,000 00

500,000 00

24,500 00

490,000 00

1,110 00

22,200 00

• ^

401 article treaty August, 1790, $1,500
2d article treaty J u n e 16,1802. 3,000
4th article treaty J a n u a r y 24,
1826
20,000

-

Sth article treaty J a n u a r y 24, 1826—
say $1,110
Seven of twenty-seven instalments
to be a p p r o p r i a t e d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

tej

15,540 00

Sth article treaty J a n u a r y . 1826—
$600
Thirty-three instalments, $3,000 each;
seven yet u n a p p r o p r i a t e d . . . . . . . . . .

O

21,000 00

Vol. 7, page 368, and T w e n t j ' instalments, of $3,000 e a c h ;
vol. 9, page 822.
Vol. 7, pages 287 and Sth ai'ticle treaty February 14, 1833,
419.
and Sth article treaty J a n . 24,1826.
(Treaty not p r i n t e d ) . . . , Five per cent, for e d u c a t i o n . . . . . . . . . .

o
500 00

12,000 00

lOjOOO 00

200,000 00

21,000 00
4,710 00

.do.

One'instalment^ payable aa a n n u i t y . . . 400,000 00-

.do.

Amount in one payvnent. . « . « • . . . . . . . . 120,000 00

CO

ST ATEMENT—Continued.

Payment to certain Creeks w h o r e ceived money in lieu of reservations of l a n d s ; same article treaty.
P a y m e n t of certain claims of individual Creeks ; same article treaty.

Do

Do
Florida Indians,
Seminoles.

^

Do. '
Do
Do
Do...
Do
Do
{

Do
Do

(Treaty"not p r i n t e d ) . . . . A m o u n t in one payment
..do

" .

. . . . d o , , . . . . . . . . . do

or

.........

ip

$10,000 00

O

70,000 00

Treaties of 1818, 1829, and 1832.
200 00
Resolution of the Senate, January 19,
Interest on $46,080, at 5 per cent
1832
Oth article treaty May 6, 1854; eight
Vol. 10, page 1050.
Eight instalments, of $1,250 each
instalments, of $1,250 e a c h ; five
yet to be appropriated".
Fifteen instalments in goods of $2,000, Vol. 7, page 369, and 4th article treaty May 9,1832, and 6th
article treaty January 4, 1845; t w o
vol. 9, page 822.
and fifteen in money of $3,000.
instalments yet to be appropriated..
T e n payments, of $3,000 each
T e n instalments for support of sch ools; (Treaty not p r i n t e d ) . . . .
Sth article treaty 7th August, 1856.
do . .
T e n payments, of $2,000 each
T e n instalments for agricultural a s sistance ; same article treaty.
do
T e n payments, of $2,200 each . . . . . , , ,
T e n instalments for support of smiths . . . .
and shops ; same article.
do
$12,500 as annuity
Interest, at 5 per cent., on $250,000;
same article and treaty.
One payment applicable to removal,
do
P a y m e n t in lieu of i m p r o v e m e n t s ;
90,000 00
Sec
same treaty, article Sth, and a m e n d ment.
Estimated cost of all the stipulations
Removal of Seminoles in Florida, and , , , , . . . . d o
of article 9 of this treaty, $143,000.. 143,000 00
for presents, and $20,000 for i m provements for emigrants.
Estimated cost of fulfiUing 10th artido
Expenses and compensation of dele50,000 00
cle, $50,000...
gations from Creek and Seminole
country West to Florida and back j
article 10th.
Estimated cost of fulfilling 21st artido
Expenses of surveying and marking
10,000 00
cle $10 000
boundaries; article 21st.
400 00
For services in the v/ar of 1812, $ 4 0 0 . .
do..,,..
Payment to Black Dirt; article l l t h , . . , , ,




.2 V

Amounts heid by the U.',
States, on which 5 per
cent, is imnually paid;
and amounts which, invested at 5 per cent.,
would produce the permanenit annuities.
i

NumUcr of Instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will bo requu-ed during a limited
number of years to pay
limited annuities till they
expire, amounts incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

References to laws.

©

Vol. 7, page 3 9 9 .
Vol. 7, page 327 . ,

Do

Do.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
-&c.

Annual amount necessary
toraeetstipulations, indefinite as to time, now
allowed, but liable to be
discontinued.

N a m e s of tribes.

o

$2,304 00

$46,080 00

•ffl
$6,250 00
10,000 00
30,000 00

t25

20,000 00

a

22,000 00
12,500 00

,,,,

950,000 00

Kaskaskias and others
Do
Kickapoos
Do
Menomonies

,

Do
Do
Do

Do

Vol. 7, page 568, ahd
vol. 10, page 1071.
Vol. 9, page 842
Vol. 10, page 1084

Vol. 10, page 1079.
do

Pay of a miller 15 years

Kansas

E x p e n s e s o f delegations that negotiated the treaty; article 23d.
Interest on $57,500, being the balance
of $157,000.
Interest on $200,000
*
Six instalments; three of $13,000, and
three of $9,000^ each.
Five instalments for smiths, &c
Interest on $100,000
Graduated payments on $200,000.

Do
owaB....i

Vol. 9, page 953, and
vol. 10, page 1065.
do
Vol. 9, page 953

Support of smith-shop 12 y e a r s . .
T e n instalments of $20,000 e a c h .
Fifl;een equal instalments to pay
$242,686; to c o m m e n c e in 1867.

.do.

.do.

V o l . 1 0 , page 1065.

Payment for two to\vnships of l a n d ;
3d article treaty May 12, 1854, and
1st and 2d articles treaty February
11,1856.
Permanent provisions for smith-shop,
&c., and miller.

Vol. 10, page 1065, and
1st session 34th Congress, page 45.

Do '.

T w e n t y instalments in m o n e y ; 2d article treaty of 1840, and 6th article
cle treaty 1854.

Vol. 10, page 1095, and
vol. 7, page 583.

Do

Six ins!alments of $31,739 11 each to
Miamies residing west.
Tnterest on $50,000, 5 per cent
Interest on $221,257 86, in trust
,

Vol. 10, page 1095.

Miamies

Do
Do.........

Vol. .7, pages 191 and
464, and vol. 10, page
1095.

Vol. 10, page 1094.
Vol. 10, page 1099.

Eel river Miamies

Permanent annuities.

Vol. 7, pages 51,91,114,
and 116.

Nava.ioes, Nisqually,
and other bands of
Puget's sound.
Do.....

Presents to the tribe..

Vol. 9, page 975.

Graduated payments, extending 20
years, for payment of $32,500.

Vol. 10, page 1133.

Pay of instructor, smith, physician,
carpenter, &c.,20 years.

Vol. 10, page 1134.




11,000 00
2d article treaty October 19,1838^ and
9th article treaty May 17, 1 8 5 4 . . . . . .
2d article treaty January 14, 1846
6th article treaty May 30, 1854; three
of $9,000 to be appropriated
;,
T w o yet to be appropriated, say $940
each
.2d article treaty May 18,1854
,
2d article treaty May 18,1854; $65,000
heretofore appropriated ; due
3d article treaty May 12,1854; $9,000;
heretofore- appropriated, $2,400
Eleven instalments of $916 6 6 ^ each,
4th article treaty of 1848; nine to be
paid
'
T h e payment of the $200,000 begins
in 1857, and ends in 1866; then paym e n t of $242,686 is to c o m m e n c e ;
the t w o sums to be paid in t w e n t y five years ensuing
;
T w o townships at 60 cents per a c r e ;
for settlement of Stockbridges
5th article treaty October 6 , 1 8 1 8 ; 5th
article treaty October 23, 1834; and
4th article treaty J u n e 5,1854; say
$940 tor shop, and $600 for m i l l e r . . .
$12,000 per y e a r ; four yet to be appropriated, total $50,000.
This
amount is subject to a reduction of
$4,663 89. (See act August 30,1852,
and treaiy J u n e 5, 1854, article
6th)
4th article treaty J u n e .5,1854; three
yet to be appropriated
3d article treaty J u n e 5, 1854
S e n a t e ' s a m e n d m e n t 4th article treaty
of 1854
4th article treaty 1795; 3d article treaty
1805; and 3d article treaty of September 1809; aggregate
10th article treaty of September 9,1849.
4th article treaty December 26, 1854;
the sum of $6,250 having been appropriated ; hereafter required
10th article treaty December 26,1854;
estimated at $4,500 per y e a r ; 18 inBtalhients yet to be appropriated . . .

2,875 00
10,000 00

57,500 00
200,000 00

5,000 00

100,000 00

27,000 00
1,880 00

6,600 00
10,083 33
180,000 00

hd

o

J3CI

242,686 00

o

27,648 00

1,540 00

30,800 00

45,336 11

O

95,217 33

CO

2,500 00

26,250 00
81,000 00

221,257 86

1,100 00
5,000 00

50,000 00

11,062 89

22,000 00

STATEMENT—Continued.
^

ajT3 fl *^ J^

pC o

Names of tribes.

Description of annuities, stipulations,

References to laws.

Number of instalinonts yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, §ic.

\m

3 -S.m g
• ^ • f l rt C

"-I

.'^•S-rtfl.
« 5 .._•

:^:2.§^

Do
Omahas
Do

T w e n t y instalments, s-econd article
treaty January 11, 1839.
Smith establishment fbr twenty years ;
same article.

Vol. 7, page 576
do

Forty instalm'ts, graduated, ($840,000,)
Vol. 10, page 1044
extending over forty years.
Support of smith-shopSj miller, and
fanner, ten years.

Vol. 10, page 1045

Ottoes and Missourias. Forty instalm'ts, graduated, ($385,000,)
Vol. 10, page 1 0 3 9 . . . . .
extending through forty ye'ars.
Do

Support of smith-shops, miller, and
farmer, ten years.

Vol. 10, page 1040

Ottawas of K a n s a s . . .

Permanent annuities, their proportion
of.

Vol. 7, pages 54, 106,
179, and 220.

Ottawas and Chippew a s of Michigan.
Do

Interest on $200,000, at 6 per c e n t . . . . . Vol. 7, page 497

Do

Do

Education, $5,000; missions, $3,000;
medicines, $300; during pleasure of
Congress.
T h r e e blacksmiths, S e c ; one gunsmith, & c . ; two farmers and assistants, and two mechanics and assistants, during the pleasure of Congress and the President.
T e n equal instalments for education,
8,000 e a c h ; second article treaty
-uly 31, 1855.




f

Vol. 7, page 492
Vol. 7, page 493

T r e a t y not published..

See seventh article of treaty o f M a r c h
28,1836, annually allowed since the
expiration of the n u m b e r of years
named in the treaty—aggregate,
^6,440
-..-..
Nine instalments due

fls^"^

S-2i5

O ri fl'fl

*^ 2 2
^95

T w e n t y instalments of ^20,000 e a c h ,
one to be appropriated
T w e n t y instalments of $2,000, one
to be appropriated
T w o instalments paid, (see fourth article treaty March 16, 1854,) to be
appropriated
Eighth article treaty, estimated at
$2,140 per year eight y e a r s ; to be
provided for
Fourth article treaty March 15, 1854,
t w o instalments p a i d ; to be appropriated hereafter
Seventh article treaty March 15, 1854,
estimated at $2,140 per y e a r ; two
paid, two to be appropriated
Fourth article treaty August 3, 1795;
second article treaty November 17,
1807; fourth article treaty September 17, 1818; fourth article treaty
August 29, 1821
Resolution of Senate of May 19,1836,
$12,000 per year
See fourth article of treaty of Mareh
28,1836

tc-S fl fl s
5f fl,crc::3

$20,000 00
^

o

2,000 00

O
760,000 00
17,120 00
345,000 00
17,120 00

$2,600 00

$8,300 00

6 , 4 4 0 00
7 9 , 0 0 0 00

$52,000 00

12,000 00

240,000

Five equalinstalments of$15,000 each;
.do.,
same article and tre-aty.
.do..
Support of four smith-shops for ten
y«!ars; same article treaty.
Dl part payment of $360,000; same
article and treaty.
$206,000, to be paid after ten years
.do.
Interest on $206,000 nine years, same
.do.
article, $92,700; and interest on
nine unpaid instalments of $10,000
each, $18,000.
T e n instalments of $3,500 each, to be
paid to Grand River O t t a w a s ; same
article and treaty.
Agricultural implements during the Vol. 7, page 4 8 8 . . . . \ . . ,
pleasure of the President.
Vol. 7, pages 51, 114,
Permanent annuities in money
185, 317, and 320; vol.
9, page 855.

Do
Do.
Do
Do
Do

Do
Pawnees . . . .
Pottawatomies

Do
Jl

Vol. 7, pages 379 and
433.

Life annuities to surviving chiefs
.

. . .

Do

Education during pleasure of Congress, Vol. 7, pages 296, 318,
and 401.

Do

P e r m a n e n t provision for three smiths
and assistants, shops, &c.

Vol. 7, pages 318, 296,
and 321.

Do

Permanent provision
salt.

Vol. 7, pages 75, 296,
and 320.

Do

Interest on $643,000 at 5 per c e n t .

Pottawatomies of Huron.
Quapaws

Rogue River

-..

Shasta, Scoton, and
U m p q u a Indians.

for furni.shing

Vol. 9, page 854.

For agricultural implements, tools.
Sec.; four instalments to be p a i d . . .
Nine of $4,250 each, to be paid

60,000 00
40,250 00

$10,000 per year for ten years, nine
years to be appropriated

90,000 00
206,000 00

Interest on unpaid consideration, to
be -paid as annuity

110,700 00

T o be paid as per capita, nine instalments yet to be paid—$3,500 each ,.

31,500 00

See fourth article treaty October 9,
1833
Fourth article treaty of 1795, $1,000;
third article treaty of 1809, $.500;
third article treaty of 1818, $2,.500;
second article treaty of 1828, $2,000;
second article treaty of July, 1829j
$16,000; tenth article treaty of J u n e ,
1846 ^.390
3d article treaty of October Ie," i83-2*,'
$200, and 3d article treaty September 26, 1833, $700 . . . . . . .
3d article treaty of October 16,1826 ;
2d article treaty of September 20,
1828; and 4th article treaty of Octo- ber 27, 1832, $5,000
2d article treaty of September 20,1828;
3d article of treaty October 16,18-26 ;
and 2d article treaty July 29, 1829;
three shops at $940 each per year,
$2,820
3d article treaty 1803; 3d article treaty
of October, 1826; and 2d article
treaty of July 29, 1829; estimated
$500
7th article treaty J u n e , 1846; annual
interest, $32,1.59
2d articletreaty of Noveniber 17,1807;

1,000 00

o
22,300 00

446,000 00

Pi

2,820.00

56,400 00
GO

500 00

,

Vol. 7, page 106.

Provision for education, $1,000 per Vol. 7, page 425.
year, and for smith and shop and
farmer during the pleasure of tlie
President.
Sixteen instalments of $2,500 each . . . Vol. 10, page 1019.
$2,000 annually, for fifteen y e a r s .




Vol. 10, page 1122.

3d article ofthe treaty of iVIay 13,1833,
$1,000 per year fbr education, and
$1,660 for smith, farmer, &c.; $2,660.
3d article
thirteen
priated
3d article
thirteen
for

32.150 00

643,000 00

400 00

Permanent annuities

o

8,000 00

2,660 00

treaty September 10, 1853;
instalments yet to be appro32,500 00
treaty November 18, 1854;
instalments to be provided
26,000 00

00

STATEMENT—Continued.
:5.S6

»0 rt,„ y aj
.fl >>•? u,"*^ rn

Narii6s of tribes.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c. .

References to laws.

Number of instalmeiits yet unappropriated, explanations, remark.?, &c.

fl
I t s -o ofl
O -Z3

2 c'c :
c '^ '

<
Shasta, Scoton, and
Umpqua Indians.

Support of schools and farmer fifteen
years.

Vol. 10, page 1 1 2 3 . . .

Do....

T w o smiths, &c., for five years

Do

Physicians, medicines, &c., for ten
years.
Interest on $157,400

V o l . l O , page 5 4 4 . .

Balance of $48,000

Vol. 10, page 1075.

Sacs and Foxes of Missouri.
Do
Sacs and Foxes of Mississippi.
Do

,

P e r m a n e n t annuity

do
do

Vol. 7, page 8 5 . . . .

rt _C '
'Cfl -s C 2 s
^ 3 o ;

sa

D-G fl fl !
pacTfl;;

'fl > fl w

3 3

rt O O ri > P S
Q

O

5th article same t r e a t y ; estimate for
schools, ,$1,200 peryear, and farmer,
$600 per year—$1,800 per year—
thirteen years.
S a m e article, three years, at $2,120
per year
,
Same article, eight years, at $1,060
per year
,
2d article treaty October 21,1837
,

$23,400 00

o

6,360 00
9,540 00
$7,870 00

2d article treaty May 18, 1854; to be
appropriated
,
3d article treaty November, 1804—
$1,000
,
2d article treaty October, 1837—
$10.000
,
2d article treaty October 11, 1842—
$40,000
3d article treaty September 2 1 , 1832;
five instalments yet to be provided
for
'
,
4th article treaty September 21,1832;
- five instalments yet to be provided
for, annually estimated at $ 2 , 8 8 0 . . . ,
4th article treaty September 29,
1817
$500
4th article treaty Sept. 17,1818. 500

$157,400 00

Do
Do
Senecas
Do
Senecas of N e w York
Do
Do

Interest on $800,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . . Vol. 7, page 5 9 6 . . .
Thii-ty instalments, of $20,000 e a c h , . . Vol. 7, page 3 7 5 . . .
Provisions for smitli and shop, gunsmith and shop, andfor tobacco and
salt.
Permanent annuities

Provisions for smitli and smith-shop,
and miller, during the pleasure of
the President.
Permanent annuity
Interest on $75,000
Interest on $43,050, transferred to the
treasury frora the Ontario Bank.




.do.
Vol. 7, pages 161 and
• 179.
Vol. 7, page 349..
Vol. 4, page 442.
Vol. 9, page 3 5 . .

4th article treaty February 28, 1831—
say $1,660
,
Act February 19, 1831
Act J u n e 27, 1845
Act J u n e 27, 1846

1,000 00

20,000 00

10,000 00

200,000 00

40,000 00

800,000 00

1,000 00

Do

Interest on $200,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . . Vol. 7, page 5 4 1 . . .

K

8,000 CO

20,000 00

11,902'50

238,050 00

100,000 00
14,400 00

$1,660 00

$6,000 00
3,750 00
2,152 50

a

4th article treaty September 17, 1818.
Vol. 7, page 179.
Permaneait annuity.
4th article treaty July 20, 1831
Provisions for support of smiths and Vol. 7, page 352.
shops, during the pleasure of the
President.
Shawnees
, P e r m a n e n t annuities for e d u c a t i o n . . . . Vol. 7, pages 51, 161, 4th article treaty August 3 , 1 7 9 5 ; 4th
and vol. 10, page 1056 article treaty September 29, 1817;
and 3d article treaty Mav 10,1854...
3d article treaty M a y 10, 1854
.do.,
I n t e r e s t o n $40,000
Do
3d art. treaty May 10, 1854; $300,000,
.do..
Do
Payments for l a n d s ; eight instalments
appropriated heretofore ; 5 remaining
6th article treaty November 11, 1794;
Vol. 7, page 46...
Six Nations of N e w
P e r m a n e n t annuity in clothing, & c . . . .
$4,500 per year
York.
2d article treaty September 29, 1837..
Vol. 7, page 539..
Sioux of the MissisInterest on $300,000
sippi.
Senate's amendment to 3d article;
Fifty instalments of interest on Vol. 10, page 951.
Do
forty-four instalments, of $5,600 to
$112,000, being 10 cents per acre for
be provided for
reservation.
4th article treaty July 23, 1851;
Fifty instalments of interest on Vol. 10, page 950."
Do
$68,000 per y e a r ; forty-four instal$1,360,000, at five per cent.
ments to be provided for
..........
4th article treaty August 5, 1851;
Do
Fifty instalments of interest on Vol. 10, page 955.
$58,000 per y e a r ; forty-four instal$1,160,000.
ments yet to be appropriated
Senate's araendment to 3d article
Fifty in.stalments of interest
on Vol. 10, page 957.
Do...
treaty August 5, 1851; forty-four
$69,000, being 10 cents per acre for
instalments of $3,450 to be provid ed
reservation.
Senecas & Shawnees.
Do
,

T e n instalments in goods . and provisions. Sec.

T r e a t y at Fort L a r a mie.
Do

Expenses of transportation, & c . . .
T w e n t y instalments of $550 e a c h .

U m p q u a s , Cow Creek
band^

Umpquas, Calapooias,. T w e n t y instalments, payments grad&c., Oregon. uated.
\
Do

Supjiort of teachers, &c., 20 y e a r s . . . .

Do...

Physician, 15 years

Do...

Smith and shop, and farmer, 10 y e a r s . .

Utahs
Willamette
bands.
Do
Winnebagoes
Do

Presents
T w e n t y instalments, graduated payments.
. . . , Physician, sraith, &c., five years

Valley

,

Interest on $1,100,000
Thirty instalments of
$85,000.




interest On

Treaty not published..
do
Vol. 10, page 1028.
Vol. 10, page 1126.
Vol. 10, page 1127.
:
do
,
do
Vol. 9, page 985 . .
Vol. 10, page 1144.
Vol. 10, page 1145.
Vol. 7, page 546.
V o l . 9 , page 879.

for

1,000 00

5,000 00
2,000 00

100,000 00
40,000 00

4,500 00
15,000 00

90,000 00
300,000 00

489,000 00

*246,400 00

o

2,992,000 00
2,552,000 00

*151,800 00

r—

7th article treaty September 17, 1851,
as a m e n d e d ; $50,000 per y e a r ;
four instalments unpaid
Same article ; estimated $20,000 per
year
3d article treaty September 19, 1853 ;
seventeen payments to be appropriated
3d article treaty November 29, 1854;
one instalment appropriated, eighteen to be provided
6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $700
per year
6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $1,000
per year
'.
6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $1,660
per year
Sth article treaty December 30, 1849...
2d article treaty January 10,1855 ; two
instalments, appropriated b a l a n c e . . .
3d article; estimated at $2,260 per year,
three years
;
4th article treaty November, 1837
4th article treaty October 13, 1836,
$4,250 per y e a r ; twenty instalments
to be appropriated

20,000 00

1,060 00

ffl

200,000 00
80,000 00
9,350 00

o
32,500 00
12,600 00
13,000 00
13,280 00
5,000 00
130,000 00
6,780 00
55,000 00
' 85,000 00

1,100,000 00
OK

Winnebasroes

Do
Do

T h r e e smiths and assistants, laborers,

Do

Education, agriculturist, &c., and physician.

twenty-seven

Vol.
Vol.
Vol.

&.C.

Wyandotts

Nuniber of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c_.

Vol.

T h r e e instalments to pay $ 3 8 0 , 0 0 0 . . . . Vol.

2d article treaty August, 1829; t w o
instal ments due
3d article treaty September 15,1832;
7, page 371
t w o instalments due
7, pages 323 & 372. 2d article treaty 1829, and 5th article
treaty 1832; two due; say
3d article treaty 18-29, say two years
7, page 324
to be provided for
7, page 372
.-. 4th and 5th articles treaty September
15, 18.32; $5,900 per year, two payments to be pro-vided
6th article treaty January 31, 1855;
10, page 1162:
one instalment yet to be paid

ci 2
fl rt

• gs

il'
2 S '^

Annuity of $18,000, thirty instalments. Vol. 7, page 323
Annuity of $10,000;
instalments.
Salt and tobacco

Do

References to l a w s .

1
1

Amounts.held by the U.
States, on which 5 per
cent, is annually paid;
and amomits which, invested at 5 per cent.,
would produce the perraanent annuities.

N a m e s of tribes.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Annual amount necessary
to meet stipulations, indefinite as to time, now
allowed, but liable to be
discontinued.
Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required during a limited
nuinber of years to pay
limited annuities till they
expire, amounts incidentally necessary to'' eftect
the payment.

STATEMENT—Continued.

$36,000 00

H

20,000 00

*

2,400 00

11,800 00
126,666 67
12,717,546 11

ffl

350,654 39

7,003,087 88

* The Indians having accepted and removed to the reservations which the Senate had determined they must relinquish, and Congress having recently authorized the President to
confirm tho.se reservations to them, after such confirmation is formally made and accepted, the question may arise whether the United States is longer bound to pay tliese items to the
Indians..




^^

O

6,370 00

995,213 00

OFFICE INDIAN AFFAIUS, November 13, 1858.

H
O

Cl

REPORT

ON T H E

77

FIT^ANCES.

No. 5.
Statement of stocks held hy the Secretary of the Treasury in trust for
Chickasaw national fund.
Amount.

Explanations in regard to Interest paypayment of interest.
able J u l y l ,
1856.

Six per cent, bonds of State
of Arkansas due 1868.
Six per cent, bonds of State
of Indiana due 1857.

$90,000 00

Coupons paid only to Jan.
1, 1842.
Coupons paid by 3 per cent,
fund to July 1, 1849, in
-fun.
Interest since is 59,220 00
3 per.cent, applied since in
part.
16,812 26

Six per cent, bonds of State
of Indiana due 185.6.
Six per cent, bonds of State
of IlUnois due 1860.

61,000 00

Six per cent, stock of State of
Maryland due 1870.
Six per cent, stock of State of
Maryland due 1890.
Six per cent, bonds bf Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad Company due 1881.
Six per cent, bonds Richmond
and Danville Railroad Gompany due 1876.
Six per cent, stock of State of
Ohio due 1856.
Six per cent, stock of State of
. Tennessee due 1890.
5^ per cent, bonds of State of
Tennessee due 1861."
Stocks of the United States,
as follows:
Six per cent, loan of 1842, redeemable in 1862.
Six per cent, loan of 1847, redeemable in 1867.
Six per cent, loan of 1848, redeemable in 1868.

6,149 57

Paid.

8,350 17

Paid.

512,000 00

Paid.

IOQ,000 00

Paid.

100,000 00

Paid.

104,000 00

Paid.

QQ,%QQ 6 6

Paid.

104,039 77

Paid.

135,250 00

Paia.

37,491 80

Paid.

Description of stocks.

141, 000'00

17,000 00

Total1,482,947 97
Amount of stocks held in trust
•for sundry Indiaa tribes by
Secretary of Interior, per
report.
- - - - - - - - 2,028,676 11

Coupons ofthese bonds are
regularly paid.
Since .1845 coupons paid
by applying 3 per cent.
f«nd.

Arrearages of interest due.

«$78,300 00

42,407 74
Paid.
Paid.

120,704 74

^Interest advanced to Indians under several acts to July 1, 1853, to be repaid the
treasury when collected from the State.




7&

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINAlNFeES.

No. 5—Continued.
SMITHSONIAN FUND;

Statement of stocks noiv held hy the Secretary ofi the Treasury ivhich
were p)urchased fior the Smithsonian fiund a n d held as security fior
moneys p a i d to that institution; shoiving also the amount ofi inte' rest due on the said stocks up to November 30, 1856, together with tlie
amount in the treasury at the credit ofi the fiund.
Amount.

Character of stocks.

State of Arkansas
State of Michigan
State of Illinois
State of Ohio
United States loan.

• $538,000 00
8,000 00
56,000 00
18,000 00
-66,76164

_.-

686,761 64-

Interest due on In the treas- Aggregate
, stocksupto
ury at the : on all
Nov. 30,
credit of the accounts;
1-856.
Smithsonian
fundi
$434,012
200
1,400
450
I,669

88
00
00
00
04

437,731 92 : $95,122= 13 1,219, 615 69

No. 6.
Balances of appropriations of trust or special funds on the books ofthe
Treasury for the fiscal year ending June- SO, 1856.
Smithsonian Institution-.
-_
•
$68,099 67
Unclaimed merchandise
93,458 47
Claims on Spain, (old)
_
2,427 31
Claims on France, (old)
11,731 02
Awards under first article of treaty of Ghent
4,112 89
Awards under the conveotion with Denmark
2,,453 53
Awards under the convention witli the Two Sicilies
=
,
166-67
' Awards under the convention with the Queen of Spain
,
•11
Awards under the convention with Peru
_
7,390 97
Awards under the convention with the Mexican Republic
-1
2, 250 47
Awards under tlie convention with Brazil
--__
-16,672 95
Carryinginto effect treaty with Chickasaws of October 20, 1832; per act of
April30, 1836
.-.-...-.
55,.581 52
Chickasaw orphans, under article eight of treaty of July 1, 1834
2,413 26
Incompetent Indians, undef article four of Chicksaaw treaty,
3, 703 56
Cherokee schools
.---._-.--__
12,782 46
Kansas schools
'--.- — 14,843 39Choctaw education
•2, 589 38
Navy hcspitalfund
1.-.
_
74,896 50
Navy pension fund.
_
:
3, 633 33
Privateer pension fund
_
2', 130 47
Prize fund—a fund arising from captures,- paid into the treasury-under actof March 3, 1849, but which is payal^le to" captors.
35', 147- 70
Chippewas of Swan creek
1,877 24
Cherokee treaty 1835-'36.
18,598 06
Chippewas and Ottawas
_
3,771 10
Chippewas, Ottawas, and Pottawatomies—education.
10,782 38



79

BEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 6—Continued.
Chippewas, Ottawas, and- Pottawatomies—mills.
Choctaw orphan reservations
l
Choctaws under convention with Chickasaws
Creek orphans
Cherokee orphans.'-^ 1
Delawares
-.
.'
Menomonies.
Ottawas of Blanchard's Forks
^
Osages—education
_
Ottawas of Roche de Bceuf
Senecas of New York
_
Senecas
-i
:
Senecas and Shawnees.
Shawnees-'
_
Stockbridges and Munsees-.
Wyandotts.

_
_
_---.

..--,
-

-

-

_ $14,138 0-1
30,142 31
13,897 70
11,10.6. 37
3, 015 00
824 79^
1,730 54
,1,612- 47
13,811 BO527 84
46'96'
125 0^0^46 48
1,459 07
156-125,345 68'
549,898 65

No. 7.
F o r the stock belonging to the United States^ in the fiollowing canals^
the sums specified were paid from the Treasury. .
Dismal Swamp canal
Chesapeake and Delaware canal
Chesapeake and Ohio canal

$200,000 00.
450, 000- 00999,990 00.

_
_

Besides^ the $1,500,000-assumed for the cities of the Districtof Golumbia, for which
their-stock was assigned-to the United States.
Louisville and Portland canal.

$233,.500. 00

The payment of dividends" on the stock of the United States in this canal ceased, in.
1842; from which date they were applied, under the amended charter of that year, to the
purchase of the stock of individuals, and have now (resulted in the ownership of the
whole canal;by the UnitedStates—all the private stock having been purchased.

No. 8'.
G'old\and silver coinage-at the Mint of the United States in the several,
yearsfrom its estahlishment, ^.1792, and including the coinage ofthe
hranch. mints and the assay ofiice, {Neiv York.,) from their organization
to Septemher 30, 1856.
Gold.

-Tears..
1793 to 1795
1796.
1797
1798.--1799.
1800.
1801.
1802.

....----.-




$71,485 00102,727 50.
103,422 50
205,610 00
213,285 00
317,760-00
422,570 00
423,310 00

Silver;
$370,683
79,077
12,591
.830,291
423,515
224,296
74,758
58, .343

Aggregate.
80
50
45
00
00
00
00
00

$442,168-80
181,805.00
116,013 95
535,901 00
636,800 00
542,056 00
4Q7 .^28 00
48,1,-653 GO

80

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 8—Continued.
Years.

1803,
1804,
1805,
1806,
1807,
1808,
1809,
1810.
1811
1812.
1813,
1814.
1815.
1816.
1817.
1818,
1819,
1820.
1821
1822.
1823,
1824.
1825.
1826,
1827.
1828,
1829,
1830
1831,
1832
1833
1834,
1835,
1836,
1837
1838.
1839,
1840,
1841,
1842,
1843,
1844,
1845,
1846,
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856 (to September 30).
, (to September 30) Total

-

Gold.

$258, 377 50
258, 642 50
170, 367 60
324, 505 00
437, 495 00
284, 665 00
169, 375 00
601, 435 00
497, 905 00290, 435 00
477, 140 00
77, 270 00
3, 175 00

242 , 940' 00
258 ,615 00
1,319 ,030 00
189 ,325 00
88 ,980 00
72 ,425 00
93 ,200 00
156 ,385 00
92,245 00
131 ,565 00
140 ,145 00
295 ,717 50
643 ,105 00
,270 00
714,
798 ,435-00
978 ,650 00
3,954,270 00
'2.186 ,175 00
4; 1 3 ,700 00
.5
1,148 ,305 00
1.809 ,595 00
i;.375,760 00
1,690 ,802 00
1,102,097 50
1,833 ,170 50
8,302,787 50
5,428,230 00
3,756,447 60
,177 60
4, 034,
20,221,385 00
3,775,512 50
9,007,761 50
31,981,738 60
,492 50
62, 614
,187 60
56,846
,906 94
55,213
,595 47
52,094,
,557 93
41,166
,893 41
58,936
I 444,442,438-75

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Register's Ojfice, Naveniher 10, 1856.




Silver.

Aggregate.

$87 ,118 00
100 ,,340 50
149 ,388 60
471 ,319 00
597 ,448 75
,300 00
684,
707 ,376 00
638,773 60
608 ,340 00
,029 60
814,
620 ,951 50
561 ,687 60
17,308 00
28 ,'675 75
607 ,783 60
1.070 ,464 60
1,140,000 00
601 ,680 70
825 ,762 45
805 ,806 50
895 ,660 00
,752,477 00
,564,683 00
,002,090 00
,869 ,200 00
,576 ,600 00
,994,678 00
,496 ,400 00
,176 ,600 00
,579 ,000 00
,769 ,000 00
,416 ,002 00
,443 ,003 00
,606 ,100 00
,096 ,010 00
,260 00
,316
,636 00
,098
,178 00
,712
,875 00
,116
760 00
,325
,260 00
,722
,550 00
,23
,200 00
,873
,580 00
,558
,450 00
,374,
,060 00
,040
,960 00
,114
,100 00
,866 ,397 00
774,410 00
999 ,571 00
9,.077,270 00
8,619 ,745 00
2,893 ,070-49
5, 347
104,899,475 39

$345. 495 50
358 ,983 00
319 ,766 00
795 ,824 00
1,034,943 75
>965 00
9h8>
876 ,751 00
1,140,208"5p
1,106 ,246 00
1,104,464 50
1,098,091 50
638 ,957 50
20,483 00
28 ,675 75
607 ,783 50
1,313 ,394 50
1,398 ,616 00
1,820,710 70
1,016 ,087 45
894,786 50
967 ,976 00
1 845 ,677 00
1 720 ,968 00
2 094,335 00
3 000 ,765 00
1 715 ,745 00
2 290,295 50
3 138 505 00
,870 00
3
3 377 ,435 00
3 737 ,560 00
7 369 ,272 00
5 629 ,178 00
7, 741 ,800 00
,315 00
3 244,
4 124,845 00
,396 00
3 474,
3 402 ,980 00
2 217 ,972 60
4 158 ,920 60
12 025 ,037 50
7 663 ,780 00
6 629 ,647 50
6 592 ,767 60
22 696,836 00
5 816 ,562 50
11 122 ,711 50
,33 847,838 50
63 388 ,889 50
•67 845 ,597 50
64 291 ,477 94
60 713 ,865 47
44 060 ,302 93
64 283,963 »0
649,341,914 14

F. BIGGER, Register.

No. 9.
Statement of deposites and coinage at the Mint of the United States, hranches, and assay office, during the fiscal year
'
ending June 30, 1856.
DEPOSITES.
Description.

Branch mint,
New Orleans."

Branch mint, San Branch mint, Branch mint, Assay office. New
York.
Dahlonega.
Charlotte..
Francisco.

00
OO,
00
16

$15,058 40
9,935 16

$39,329 26
237,363 50"

338,416 53

29,712,634 62 $106,463 59 $172,624 93

19,166,226 67

$76,654
398,762
1,880
59 608 609

10,286,650 16

363,410 08

29,714,838 71

172,624 93

19,441,919 43

60 085 906 90

2,659,196 52
13,338 61

2,290,903 12
- 2,162 92

168,893 06
136,343 69

224,058 10
143,637 33

5,343,060 80
294,472 55

2,672,535 13

2,293,056 04

304,236 75

367,695 43

5,637,523 35

12,959,185 29

2,666,466 12

30,019,075 46

19,809,614 86

65,723,430 25

Mint of the U. S.,
Philadelphia.

Total.

GOLD.

o

Foreign coin.-.
,
Foreign bullion
----United States coin, (0. S.)
United States bullion - .
Total

ffold

--

$22,267
149,160
1,880
10,113,343

$2,304 09

106,463' 59

66
74
00
50

o
H

SILVER.

Deposited, (includingpurchases.)
United States bullion, (parted.)Total silver- Total deposites
Less amount re-deposited at the
different institutions
-----

172,624 93

10,746,077 09

Actual deposites




106,463 59

64,977,353 16
. •

,

.

.

00

ST ATEMENT—Continued.

g

COINAGE.'
Mint of United Statesj.
Philadelphia.

Branch Mint, N e w
Orleans.

Branch Mint, San F r a n cisco.

Branch Mint,
Dahlonega.

Assay office, N e w
York.

Branch. Mint,
Oharlotte.

Total.

Denomination.
Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

GOLD.

Eagles .
Half eagles
T h r e e dollars

;.

Dollars
F i n e bars
Total gold
>

340,646 $6,812,920 00
604,900 00
60,490
959,910 00
191,982
26,010
78,030 00
^23,340
808,350 00
761,050 00
761,050
46
41,061 04

7,250
28,000
11,100

1,703,564 10,066,221 04

67,350

i6,666
5,000

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

^145,000 1,234,250 $24,685,000 00
19,000
190,000 00
280,000
107,100
535,500 00
55,500
31,100
93,300 00
92,800 00
40,000 ^ 37,120
24,600
24,600 00
5,000
73,583 47
23
1,065 3,746,136 52
525,500 1,454,258 29,440,919 99

Pieces.

Value.

21,277 $106,385
874
1,460

Pieces.

Value.

Pieces.

34,212 $171,060

2,185
1,460

23,611 110,030

34,212 171,060

•

Value.

Pieces.

Value.

1,582,146 $31,642,920 00
107,490 1,074,900 00
365,671 1,828,355 00
57,110
171.330 0(J
377,334
943,3.'?5 00
792,110
792,110 00
5,590 $21,841,682 65
5,659 21,956,327 16
1,065 3,746,136 52

o
o.

5,590 21,841,682 65 3,288,585 62,155,413 68

SILVER.

63,500
Dollars
892,000
Half dollars
6,064,000
.Quarter dollars
2,380,000
Dimes
3,180,000
Half dimes
722,000
Three-cent p i e c e s . . . . . . . . .
110
Fine bars

63,500 00
'446,000 00 4,944,000 2,472,000
520,000
130,000
1,516,000 00
500,000
50,000
238,000 00
66,000
159,000 00 1,320,000
21:: 660 00
23,758 41

13,301,610

2,467,918 41 7,284,000 2,718,000

Total silver

.

*52

180,566
288,400

468,900

63,500 00
3,008,250 00
1,718,100 00
288,000 00
225.000 00
21,660 00
30,551 04

52

6,792 63 21,054,562

5,355,061 04

1,745,584

17,455 84

1,-745,584

162,350 00

63,500
6,016,500
6,872,400
2,880,000
4,500,000
722,000
'l62
6,792 63

17,455 84

90,250 00
72,100 00

COPPER.

Cents
Half cents
Total copper

1,745,584

17,455 84

1,745,584

17,455 84
•

,

•

•.

RECAPITULATION.

Total g « I d . . . , . . Total silver
Total copper
Total coinage

67.350
525,500 1,454,258 29,440,919 99
1,703,564 10,066,221 04
162,350 00
13,301,610 2,467,918 41 7,284,000 2,718,000
468,900
17,455 84
1,745,584

23,611 110,030

34,213 171,060

5,590 21,841,682 65 3,268,585 62,155,413 68
6,792 63 21,054,562 5,355,061 04
52
1,745,584
17,455 84

16,750,758 12,551,595 29 7,351,350 3,243,500 1,923,158 29,603,269 99

23,611 110,030

34,212 171,060

5,642 .21,848,475 28 26,088,731 67,527,930 56

M I N T OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S , Philadelphia, J u n e 30,1856.




J A M E S R O S S S N O W D E N , Director.

o

R E P O R T ON TiHE

83

FINAN-CES.

No. 10.
'Statement exhibiting the arnount ofi coin dnd hullion imported and exported annually firom 1821 to 18oQ inclusive ; and also the amount of
importation over exportation, and of exportation over importation,
during the same years.
Coin and bullion.
Years ending—
Imported.

September 30..

1821
1822
1823

1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1«42
9 months to June 30,1843
Year end'g June 30, 1844
1846
1816
1847
1848
1849
1850
1861
1852
1863
1864
1865
1866

Total

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,836
, 6,160,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,156,964
7,305,945
6,907,604

7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131,44t
13,400,881
10,616,414
17,747,116
5,696,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016
22,390,559
5,830,429
4, 070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289
6,360,224
6,661,240
4,628,792
5,463,692
5,506,044
4,201,382
6,768,587
3,659,812
4,207,632
293,305,146

Exported.

$10,478,059
10,810,180
6,372,987
7,014,552
8,932,034
4, 704,633

8,014,880
8,243,476
4,924,020
2,178,773
9,014,931
5,966,340
2,611,701
2,076,758
6,477,775
4,324,336
6,976,249
3,508,046
8.776,743
8,417,014
10,034,332
4,813,639
1,620,791
6,464,214
8,606,496
3,905,268
1,907,024
16,841,616
6,404,648
7,622,994
29,472,762
42,674,135
27,486,875
41,197,300
^56, 247., 343
45,745,485
436,348,198

lExcess of im- Excess of exportation over portation over
exportation. [importation.
$2,413,169
7,440,334
1,275,091
$1,366,283
2,176,433
136,250
2,479,592
•5,977,191
251,164
4,458,667
16,834, 874
6,663,672
9,076,545
4, 540,165
14,239,070

2,781,269
753, 735
1,708,986

3,181,667
466,799
5,045,699
726,523
20,869,768
376,216
4,536,263
127,536
22,214,265
9,481,392
1,246,592
2,894,202
24,019,160
37,169,091
23,285,493
34,438,713
52,587,531
41,537,853
112,361,545

255,403,597

F. BIGGER, Registen
t>EASURy DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Noverr^^ 10, 1856.




84

R E P O R T ON. T H E

FINANCES.

No. 11.
Statement exhihiting the gross value ofi exports and imports firom the
heginning of the government to the 30th ofi June, 1856.
Exports.
Years ending—

Imports-total.
Domestic produce.

September 30, 1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1796
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808,
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1826
1826
1827
•
1828
1829
1830
1831
. >
1832
1833
1834
1836
1837
1838
1839
5.840




$19,666,000
18,600,000
19,000,000
24,000,000
26,600,000
39,600,000
40,764,097
29,850,206
28,627,097
33,142,522
31,840,903
47,473,204
36,708,189
.42,205,961
41,467,477
42,387,002
41,253,727
48,699,592
9,433,646
31,405,702
42,366,676
46,294,043
30,032,109
26,008,132
6,782,272
46,974,403
04,781,896
68,313,600
73,864,437
50,976,838
51,683,640
43,671,894
49,874,079
47,165,408
50,649,600"
66,944,746
53,055,710
68,921,691
60,669,669
56,700,193
69,462,029
61,277,067
63,137,470
70,317,698
81,024,162
101,189,082
106,916,680
95,564,414
96,033,821
103,633,891
113,895,634

Foreign merchandise.
$539,166
612,041
1,753,098
2,109,572
a, 626, 233
8,489,472
26,300,000
27,000,000
33,000,000
46,623,000
39,130.877
46,642,721
35,774,971
13,694,072
36,231,597
63,179,019
60,283,236
59,643,668
12,997,414
20,797,631
24,391,296
16,022,790
8,495,127
2,847,865
146,169
6,583,350
17,138,156
19,358,069
19,426,696
19,165,683
18,008,029
21,302,488
22,286,202
27,643,622
26,337,157
32,590,643
24,639,612
23,403,136
21,'595.017
16,658,478
14,387,'479
20,033,626
24,039,473
19,822,736
23,312,811
20,604,496
21,746,360
21.864,962
12,452,795
17,494,525
18,190,312

Total.

$20,206,166
19,012,041
20,753,098
26,109,672
• 33,026,233
47,989,472
67,064,097
56,850,206
61,527,097
78,665,522
70,971,780
94,115,926
72,483,160
65,800,033
77,699,074
95,666,021
i01,636,963
108,343,150
22,430,960
52,203,233
66,767,970
* 61,316,833
38,627,236
27,855,997
6,927,441
52,567,763
81,920,452
87,671,569
93,281,133
70,142,521
.69,691,669
64,974,382
72,160,281
74,699,030
76,986,667
99,635,388
77,595,322
82,324,827
72,264,686
72,358,671
73,849,608
81,310,683
87,176,943
90,140,443
104,336,973
121,693,677
128,663,040
117,419,376
108,486,616
121,028,416
132,085,946

$23,000,000
29,200,000
31,600,000
31,100,000
34,600,000
69,756,268
81,436,164
75,379,406
68,661,700
79,069,148
91,262,768
111,363,511
76,333,333
64,666,666
85,000,000
120,600,000
129,410,000
138,600,000
66,990,000
59,400,000
85,400,000
53,400,000
77,030,000
22,006,000
12,966,000
113,041,274
147,103,000
99,260,000
121,750,000
87,125,000
74,450,000
62,685,724
83,241,641
77,579,26780,549,007
96,340,076
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,600,824
74,492,527
70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
149,805,742
189,980,035
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132
107,141,519

86

R E P O R T ON T H E F I N A N C E S .

STATEMENT—Continued.
Exports.
Years endiu g—

Imports-total.
Domestic produce.

September 30, 1841
1842
9 m. to June 30 ,1843
June 30
-1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1860
1851
1852
1863
1854
1855
1856
Total—.-

Foreign merchandise.

$106,382,722
92,969,996
77,793,783
99,715,179
99,299,776
102,141,893
150,637,464
132,904,121
132,666,955
136,946,912
196,689,718
192,368,984
213,417,697
253,390,870
246,708,563
310,686,330

$121,861,803
$15,469,081
11,721,538
104,691,634
6,552,697
84,346,480
11,484,867 , 111,200,046
15,346,830
114,646,606
11,346,623
113,488,616
8,011,158
158,648,622
21,128,010
154,032,131
• 13,088,865
145,755,820
14,951,808
151,898,720
. 21,698,293 ' 218,388,011
17,209,382
209,658,366
17,558,460
230,976,167
24,860,194
278,241,064
28,448,293
276,156,846
16,378,578
326,964,908

5,131,008,950

1,366,030,702

Total.

$127,946,177
100,162,087
64,763,799
108,436,035
117,264,564
121,691,797
146,545,638
164,998,928
147,867,43<)
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
267,978,647
304,662,381
261,468,520
314,639,942

6,497,039,652 7,297,541,396
F. BIGGER, Register.

REGISTER'S OFFICE, November 10, 1856.'

No. 12.
Statement exhibiting the amount ofi the tonnage ofi the United States,
annually, firom 1789 to 1856, inclusive; also, the registered and enrolled and licensed tonnage employed in steam navigation each year.

Years ending—

Registered Enrolled and Enrolled and Total tonRegistered
nage.
sail tonnage. steam ton- licensed sail licensed steam
nage.
tonnage.
tonnage.

123,893
Dec 31 1789
346,254
1790
362,110
1791
411,438
1792
367,734
1793
438.863
1794
629,471
1795
676,733
1796. .
597,777
1797
603,376
1798-. 662,197
1799
669,921
1800
632,907
1801_ 560,380
1802
597,157
1803
672,530
1804
749,341
1805



Tons.

•-

77,669
132,123
139,036
153,019
153,030
189,755
218,494
265,166
279,136
294,962
277,212
.302,671
314,670
331,724
362,015
369,874
391,027

201,562
274,377
502,146
6€4,457
620,764
628,618
747, 965
831,899
876,913
898,328
939,409
972,492
947,577
892,104
949,172
1,042,404
1,140,368

86

R E P O R T ON

THE

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Years ending—

Registered
Registered Enrolled and Enrolled and Total ton-"
sail tonnage. steam ton- licensed sail licensed steam
nage.
nage.
tonnage.
tonnage.
Tons.

Dec. 31 1 8 0 6 . . . .
1807..-.
1808....
1809-.-1810
1811....
1812....
1813....
1814
1816....
1816.-..
1817....
1818.-..
1819...1820...1821
1822....
1823....
1824.-..
1826....
1826...1827....
1828....
1829....
1830....
1831....
1832....
1833....
1834.-.Sept. 30 , 1835---.
1836--..
1837....
1838--..
1839
1840-...
18411..1842.--June 30, 1 8 4 3 - . . .
1844....
1845--..
1846....
1847....
1848..-.
1849
1850
1861
1852....
1853...1854
1865....
1856.-..

808,266
848,307
769,064
910,069
984,269
768,852
760,624^
674,853:
674,633
854,295
800,760
800,726
606,089
612,930
619,048
619,896
628,150
639,921
669,973
700,788
737,978
747,170
812,619
650,143
676,056
619,575
686,809
749,482
857,098385,481
897,321
809,343
819,801
- 829,096
895,610
945,067
970,668
1,003,932
1,061,856
1,088,680
1,123,999
1,236,682
1,344,819
1,418,072
1,540,769
1,663,917
1,819 744
2,013,164
2,238,783
2,420,091
2,401,687

1,419
877
181
645
340
340
454
1,104 '
2,791
5,149
4,155
746
4,701
5,373
6,909
6,492
6,287
5,631
16,068
20,870
44,942
62,390
79,704
90,520.
95,036
115,046
89,715

400,461
420,241
473,542
440,222'
440,515
463,650' '^
509,373
491,776
484,677'
513,833
671,459
590,187
619,096
647-821
661,119
679,062
696,549
671,766
697,680
699,263
762,164
833,240
889,355
556,618
562,248
613,827
661,827'
764,819
'
778,995
816,645
839,226
932,676
982,416
1,062,445
1,082,815
1,010,599
892,072
. 917,804
946,060
1,002,303
1,090,192
1,198,523
1,381,332
1,453,549 .
1,468,738
1, 524,915
. 1,675,456
1,789,.238.
1,887,512.
2,021,625
.1,796,888

1,208,716
1,268,548
1,242,596
1,3^50,281
1,424,784
1,232,502
1,269,997
1,166,629
1,159,210
1,368,128
1,372,219
1,399,912
1,225,185
1,260,761
1,280,167
1,298,958
1,324,699
1,336,566
24,879
21,610
1,389,163
1,423,112
23,061
1,634,191
34,059
1,620,608
40,198
1,741,392
39,418
1,260,798
54,037
1,191,776
63,053
33,668
1,267,847
90, 633
1,439,450
101,305
1,60.6,151
122,474
1,758,907
122,474
1,824,940
145,102
1,822,103
153,661
1,896,684
190,632
1,995,640
199,789
2,096,479
198,184 . 2,180,764
174, 342"
2,130,744
224,960'
2,092,391
231,494
2,168,603
265,270
2,280,095
319,527
2,417,002
341,606
2,562,084
399,210
2,839,046
411,823 . 3,164,042
441,625
3,334,016
481,006 . 3,536,454
521,217
3,772,439
663,536
4,138,440
614,098.
4,407,010
581,571
4,802,902
665,240
5,212,001
683,362
4,871,652
F. BIGGER, Register.

TEEASUBY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, October 25, 1856.;



No. 13.
Statement of the registered tonnage for sail and steam-vessels, and enrolled and licensed tonnagefiof sail and steara-vessels in
the several districts and States ofi the United States; also, the numher ofi registers and enrolments issued in each district
and Stateof or the fiscalyear ending June 30, 18^^.
^

Registered tonnage.

"

••

•

•

•

Enrolled and licensed tonnage.

No. of regis- No. of enrolters issued ments issued
for the year. for the year.

Total.

STATE AND DISTJEHST. \

Sail.

Steam.

Sail.

Steam.

MAINE.

Tons and 95ths.

Tonsand95ths.

Tojis anddbths.

Tons and 95ths.

Passamaquoddy
Machias
"-'
Frenchman's Bay
Penobscot
..
Belfa,st - Bangor
.
.:
Waldoborough
_
Wiscasset - _ - . . - . i i - - . _ . l
Bath
Portland .
Saco Kennebunk _ _ - - - . York
-

19,129
7,684
4,093
12,362
33,991
17,360
85,456
10,779
162,677
109,573
3,790
16,642

315 73

02
09
92
38
71
74
74
08
82
30
48
77

^

8,452 72
17,54182
24,304 07
32,503 44
42.820 64
19,720 11
70,297 26
13.821 46
29,770 60
23,610' i s ;
3,188 35
2", 787 38
1,487 24

2,082 84

978 05
119 10
971 87
2,970 68

Tons and96ths.
29,980
25,225
28,398
44,865
76,812
38,048
166,873
24,600
193,320
13'6,154
6,978
19,430
1,487

315 73

O;

41
91
04
82
40
90
15
54
39
il
83
20
24

26.6
27
16
20
40
35
41
12
77.
160
4
5
692

290,305 52

7,122 64

781,176 24

6,792 83

483,432 35

407 29

34,690 04

*^
o,

262
91
230
208
166

loi
346
85
84
* 195
22
10
3

»,
i2{

a.

fej
cn

1,801

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Portsmouth

=




28,389 82
4

12"

3'9'

00

STATEMBNT—Oontinued.
Registered tonnage.

00
00

Enrolled and licensed tonnage.

No. of regis- No. of enrolters issued ments issued
for the year. for the year.

Total.

STATE AND DISTRICT.

Sail.

San.

Steam.

Tonsand95ihs.

VERMON-E

Steam.

Tons and 95th^.

Tons and 95ihs,

Tons and 95ths.

Burlington --•

2,956 66

4,491 94

Tons and 95ths.

7,448 65

18

MASSACHUSETTS.

Newburyport
Ipswich
Gloucester
Salem
Beverly
Marblehead
Boston
Plymouth
Fall River
New Bedford
Barnstable
Edgartown
Nantucket

25,596 33

5,357
418
25,950
10,326
6,798
5,609
'40,420
7,747
7,648
7,650
69,166
1,366
1,182

3,603 09
19,644 39
j
1
_
._.
.

.

1,306
472,802
1,774
1,703
144,028
3,997
5,573
14,713

33
03
89
40
62
63
36
76

694, 644 .08

'

59
58
8823
72
59
02
47
31
54
07
76
78

7,895 69
7,902 91
1,321 50
960 50

30,953
418
29,464
29,970
6,798
6,916
621,117
9,622
17,264
153,000
63,163
6,939
16,857

92
58
42
62
72
92
74.
41
67
71
70
17
14

20
32
31

25
1
182
62

6
547
.7
9
210
26
11
18

17
210
37
47
27
235
10
6

^

178,642 84

18,080 70

891,367 67

916

^849

.7,328 02
1,668 77
4,929 93

1,846 38
265. 67

19,385 87
16,961 40
11,646 32

20
20
18

37
5
23

13,926 77

2,101 10

47,983 64

68

65

R T T O D T S TsTi^NTi

Providence
Bristol
Newport




-_-

10,212 47
15,282 68
6,460 62
31,955 72

'

,

fej

o
o

o
fej

CONNECTIC DT.

Middletown
New London
Stoniniiton

--

Nf^w TTfi.vPTi

-

11,670
19,851
11,577
12,710
11,693

_--_
•

20,620 01
6,626 12
7,274 64

------

Fairfield
34,319 67

—.. — > —

64
55
44
23
92

2,550 32

67,503 88

5,780 47

3,230 16

14,221
40,371
18,102
23,214
11,693

01 .
66
66„
92
92

107,604 12

1
24
7 •

19
51

69
123
49
77
46
363

NEW YORK.

Champlain
- . - --_--_-_-_Sackett's Harbor
Oswego
Niagara
- Genesee
Oswegatchie ._: .:.
Buffalo Creek
Sag Harbor
Greenport
. -_
,
New York
Cold Spring
Cape Vincent

'

4,890
3,632
696,293
1,033

46
42
26
00

705,749 19

68,777 26

68,777 26

8,948
1,571
36,467
666
4,012
1,800
64,606
2,329
6,706
456,146
360
6,130

26
59
62
91
36
89
84
18
39
19 1
50
88

678,545 81

2,301 57
2,421 19
7,771 18
35,423 31 ,
107,820 ,67

155,738 02

11,249
1.671
38,888
666
4,012
9.672
89,929
7,219
10,238
1,328,036
1,393
6,130

83
59
71
91
36
12
20
64
81
43
60
88

1,608,810 33

14
2
956
5

13
5
82
4
418
175
14
34
962

-

1,322
Cl

fej

NEW JERSEY.

Perth Amboy
Bridgetown
Burlington
Camden
Newark
Little EggHarbor
Great Egg Harbor




o

11

/ 977

o

_

23,024
16,662
^ 9,322
6,256
6,632
8,321
14,212

8,924 36

93
16
10
60
80
60
03

3,169 24
4,546 24
1,867 02

83,421 37

^ 8 , 5 0 6 86

34
10
34
84
82
60
03

110
67
22
61
22
25
66

- 101,-928 28

363

31,949
16,662
12,941
9,801
8,499
8,321
, 14,212

00
CO

STATEMENT—Oontinued.
Registered tonnage.

CD
O

Enrolled and licensed tonnage.

No. of regis- No. of enrolters issued ments issued
for the year. for the year.

Total.

.STATE AND DISTRICT.

Sail. •

Steam.

Sail.

Steam.

PENNSYLVANIA.

Philadelphia
Presque Isle.Pittsburg

,

Tons and 95ths.

Tons and 95ths.

Tons and 95iJis.

Tons and 95ths.

Tons and ^5ths.
616
18
238

fej

105

772

o

13,665 55
6,614 17

5

50
34

20,279 72

5 '

84

119,423 86
6,619 08
5,90i 03

19,052 34
4,767 76
37,604 43

197,228 18
10,386 84
43,405 46

130,944 01

61,324 58

261,020 53

2,160 33

10,137 49
6,267 '28

1,367 68
1,346 84

2,160 33

15,404 77

2,714 57 -

68,662 72

68,662 72

89 17

89 17

105
•m

DELAWARE.

Wilmington
New Castle

©

a

fej
l-H

>

o

fej

MARYLAND.

Baltimore
Oxford
Vienna
Snow Hill
St. Mary's.
Town Creek.
Annapolis

110,167 31
1,690 07
-

-




GO

•

111,857 38
•

57,321
13,639
25,983
6,489
3,360
2,066
1,177

89
87
67
60
26
06
84

15,854 94

109,038 73

16,009 88

164 89

24
87
14
60
26
06
78

200

168
68
160
30
7
19
23

236,906 09

200

465

183,344
13,639
27,673
5,489
3,360
2,066
1,332

^DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

757 87

Geor2"ptown

1 6 , 0 6 7 89

4 , 1 6 0 45

2 0 , 9 6 6 31

6,208
11,243
2,650
6,221
6,251
2,102
7,236
1,950
3,167
1,421

328 91
1,994 16
287 86

7,221
27,757
2,938
6,831
6,251
3,336
7,236
1,950
3,157
1,421
9,366

7

82

10
51

37
83
6
15
47
14
61
21
28
20
47

VIRGINIA.

Alexandria
Norfolk
Petersburg
Richmond
Yorktown
TapT)ahannock .
Accomack C. H
E a s t River.
Yeocomico
Cherrystone
Wheelina:

1,684 48
1 4 , 6 2 0 36

^

1,610

03

_..
208 36
.

- -_

34
04
63
65
44
12
42
32
46
84

i
1,025 55

^ 3 5 5 03

N O R T H CAROLINA.

17

i'

fej

o
O.

"A
7 7 , 4 5 8 19

79

379

21,420
6,372
3,188
1,,223
5,970
1,991
4,083
726

70
43
85
89
49
91
09
87

26
10
9
4
10
2
13

21
34
• 22
10
58
18
44
13

• 4 , 1 2 2 58

4 3 , 9 7 8 51

74

220

. 4 6 , 4 4 3 26

1 2 , 9 9 1 61

5,183
3,937
2,131
1,139
5,003
1,762
2,662
726

03
13.
41
62
84
17
46
87

3 , 7 3 0 67

^ 2 2 , 5 4 6 68

1 8 , 0 2 3 27

78
56
44
68
44
07 '
42
32
46
84
03

'

fej
Wilmington.
Washington
Newbern
Edenton
Camden
Beaufort

12,607
1,435
929
84
966
229
1,166

.
^

Plymouth

00
30
66
27 .
"60
77
65

Ocracoke
1 7 , 3 0 9 20

127"83""

264 03

»^

>
o
•fel

SOUTH CAROLINA.

Charleston
Georgetown
Beaufort . - .,

.




3 4 , 8 1 1 82
145 34

1,809

74

1 6 , 1 7 6 81
2 , 3 9 1 03
110 63

6,330 11
249 16

5 9 , 1 2 8 58
2 , 7 8 5 52
110 63

61
10

46
9

3 4 , 9 5 7 21

1,809 74

1 8 , 6 7 8 42

6,679 26

6 2 , 0 2 4 68

61

55

CO

ST ATEMENT—Oontinued.
Registered t o n n a g e .

CD

to

E n r o l l e d . a n d licensed t o n n u g e .

Sail.

.. _

Steam.

Sail.

Steam.

Tms 'and 95ihs.

GEORGIA.

Savannah
Sunbur V
Brunswick
Hardwick
St. Mary's.

No. of regis- No. of enrolt e r s issued m e n t s issued
for t h e y e a r . for t h e year.

Total.

STATE AND DISTRICT.

ToTis and 9oihs.

Tons and 9bths.

Tons'and 9 5ths.

_.

3 , 9 3 6 67

2 1 , 7 2 6 40

6 , 9 2 4 70

To7isand95ihs.
3 1 , 6 8 6 82

29

25

o

754 10

754 10

1

9

pi

102 72

102 72

i

1

O

,.
2 1 , 7 2 6 40

4 , 7 9 2 54

6 , 9 2 4 70

3 2 , 4 4 3 69

31

35

^108 90

.

1,510 40

377 19

1,996 54

9

12

-

364 16
106 83

1,369
1,498
1,756
3,668
86

82
35
69
12
73

6
14
3
15

11
2
14
8

847 23

1 0 , 3 7 6 40

47

47

1 8 , 4 7 1 48

3 8 , 4 4 3 70

32

62

FLORIDA.

Pensacola
St. A u g u s t i n e
St. M a r k ' s .
St. J o h n ' s
Apalachicola
Key West
•
St. A n d r e w ' s Bay.

. . .

747
1,097
443
3,257

258
295
1,313
410
86

63
44
46
38

6 , 6 5 4 91

ALABAMA.

Mobile




,

03
03
23
69
73

3,874 21-

.
1 4 , 6 0 3 13

5 , 3 6 9 09

Ci

.

MISSISSIPPI.

2,081 45

761 58

2,843 08

22

2,081 45

761 68

2,843 08

22

•

'
LOUISIANA.

95,745 10

3,696 69

12,216 29

51,761 49
1,890 49

163,308 52
1,890 49

92

176
7

95,745 10

3,595 59

12,216 29

53,642 03

165,199 06

92

183

4,508 44
4,433 84
453 30

4,508 44
4,433 84
453 30

24
20

9,395 63

9,395 63

44

31,924 46
890 65

31,924 46
890 65

69
8

- 32,815 1.6

32,815 16

77

6,825 88

New Orleans
Teche

38,745 07

44,571 00

102

61,529 88

5,877 37
155 10
3,866 63

67,407 30
155 10
3,856 63

177

51,629 88

9,889 16

61,419 08

177

-

o

1'ENNESSEE.

N'a.sh ville
Memphis
Knoxville

.

O

KENTUCKY.

Louisville.
Paducah .

_;

.

..
.

MlJSSOURI.

St Louis
ILLINOIS.

Chicago
Alton
Galena

.




CO

.00

STATEMENT—Continued.
Registered t o n n a g e .

CO,

•Enrolled a n d licensed t o n n a g e .

No. of regis- N o . of e n r o l ters issued m e n t s issued
for t h e year. for t h e year.

Total.
STATE AND DISTRICT.

Sail

Sanduskv
.. Cuyahoga.._.
Cincinnati
Miami ^Toledo)

Sail.

Steam.

Tons and 95ths.

Tons a?id 95ths.

Tons and 95ths.

Tons and 95ths.

.

OHIO.

Steam.

12,225
46,437
6,362
3,021

.
-

„__

46
92
63
69

6 7 , 0 4 7 70

263
14,478
24,654
115

39
19
00
32

3 9 , 6 1 0 90

Tons and 95ths.
86
16
63
91

34
102
108
23

1 0 6 , 6 6 8 65

267

12,488
60,916
30,016
3,136

pi.
fei:

o
^.
o
W.

INDIANA.

fej

New Albany

216 26

216 26

10

•

a'

WISCONSIN.

fej
Milwaukie

03

1 8 , 4 9 1 49

70

2 5 , 6 3 9 70
2 , 4 2 9 16

3 3 , 1 4 8 92
1,507 67

5 8 , 6 8 8 67
3, 936 72

147
29

2 7 , 9 6 8 85

3 4 , 6 6 6 54

6 2 , 6 2 5 44

176

1 6 , 9 7 4 46

1,617

MICHIGAN.

Detroit _Michilimackinac




-

\
1
i

TEXAS.
6 , 9 9 6 23
966 48
1,058 08

4
7
4

43
19

833 68

3 , 2 4 4 85

2 , 4 7 7 22

9 , 0 1 9 79

15

62

39,274 41

1 4 , 2 9 4 16

1 2 , 8 2 1 32
2 , 8 8 8 33
42 48

1 4 , 3 6 9 63

8 0 , 7 5 9 57
2 , 8 8 8 3342 48

83

320
19
2

39,274 41

-

2 , 5 1 9 19
501 21
224 4 5

2,-464-09

--•

2,380.09
97 13

833 68

Saliii'ifL
Point Tsahpl

1 4 , 2 9 4 16

1 5 , 7 6 2 18

14,'369 63

8 3 , 6 9 0 43 '

83

341

2 , 0 9 6 90
367 14

-•'1

..

CALIFORNIA.
San Francisco
SPi,cramento
San P e d r o .

.i
- -«

.-

fel
O

o

OREGON (TLIO returns^
2 , 4 0 1 , 6 8 7 26

1 , 7 9 6 , 8 8 7 62

, 8 9 , 7 1 6 38

5 8 3 , 3 6 2 16

4 , 8 7 1 , 6 5 2 46

3,537

8,662
•^

fej

-

NOTE.

The difference in the tonnage of 1855 compared with the tonnage of 1866, of 340,348 69, arises from corrections made by striking from the balance
of outstanding tohnage such vessels as have been lost, sold to foreigners, and condemned in previous years, not heretofore reported to this office by the
collectors, viz:
I n t h e registered tonnage...
~
.:
196,982 05
In the enrolled tonnage
5.-:.
J
465, 382 93
In the licensed tonnage.
._18, 770 13

a
fel

681,135 16
From which deduct the amoimt of the tonnage of registered and enrolled vessels built this year over and above the tonnage
of vessels lost, sold to foreigners, and condemned during the year
^
_.
340,786 52
340,348 59
F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE, October 21,




1856.

CO

0\

No. U .

CO

Statement shoioing the revenue collected firom the heginning ofi tlic government to June 30, 185Q, under the several heads ofi
custoins, public lands, and miscellaneous sources, including loans and treasury notes ; also the expenditures during the
same period, and the particular tarifi, and theprice ofi lands, uncier ivhich the revenue firom those sources was collected.
Years.

From customs.

From March 4,
1789, to Dec.
31, 1791.

Date of tariff.

From pnblic
lands.

$4,399,473 09 July

4, 1789,
general ; Aug.
10,1790. gen'l;
Mar. 3, 1791,
general.
3,443, 070 85 May 2, general.

1792
1793
1794

5,688, 461 26 Jan.-29, general.
6,667, 987 94

1797

7,549,649 65 Mar. 3, general

$1, by act
of May 20,
1785.

$5,810,552 66 $5,791,112 56

Total receipts.

Total expenditures.
O

$10,210,025 75

$7,207,639 02

5.297,695 92
1,466,317 72
5,240,036 37

4,255. 306 56
4,801, 065 28 June 5, special

1795
1796

Price per From miscella- That portion of
neous sources, miscellavneous
acre.
includ'g loans arising from
and treasury loans & treasnotes. .
ury notes.

5,070,806 46
1,067,701 14
4,609,196 78

8,740,766 77
5,720,624 28
10,041,101 65

9,141,669 67
7,529,675 65
9,302,124 74

3,831,341 63
2,167, 505" 56

3,306,268 20
362,800 00

9,419,802 79
8,740,329 66

10,435,069 65
8,367,776 84

1,125,726 16

70,135 41

8,758,916 40

o
fel

June 7, general
$4,836 15 $2, by act
of May 18,
1796.
83,540 60

8,626,012 78

July 8, special.
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804




7,106,061
6,610,449
9,080,932
10,750,778
12,438,235
10,479,417
11,098,566

93
31
73 iMay 13, special.
93
74
61
33 Mar. 26, special;

Mar. 27, special

11,963 11
443 76
167,726 06
188,628 02
165,675 69
487,526.79

1,091,045
6,011,010
3,369,807
2,026,950
2,374,527
419,004
249,747

03
63
66
96
55
33
90

308,674 27

5,074,646
1,602.435
10,125
5,697

53
04
00
36

9.632 64

8,209,070
,12,621,459
12,451,184
•12,945,465
16,001,391
11,064,097
11,863,840

07
84
14
96
31
63
02

8,613,517
11,077,043
11,989,739
12,273,^376
13,276,084
11,258,983
12,624,646

68
60
92
94
67
67
36

Q
fei

1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816

12,936,487
14,667,698
15,845,521
16,363,550
7,296,020
8,583,309
13,313,222
8,958,777
13,224,623
5,998,772
7,282,942
36,306,874

1817
1818
1819
1820

26,283,348
17,176,385
20,283,608
15,005,612

1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828

13,004,447
17,589,761
19,088,433
17,878,325
20,098,713
23,341,331
19,712,283
23,205,523

1829
1830

22,681,965
21,922,391

1831
1832

24,224,441
28,465,237

1833
1834

July 1, special-,
July 29, special.

Feb. 5, special;
April 27, gen'l
April.20, special
March 3, special

May 22, general

May 19, general;
May 24, special
May 20, special
May 29, special

July 13, special;
July 14, gen'l,
29,032,5.08 91 Mar.2,spcl;Mar.
2, compromise.
16,214,957 15




540, 193 80
766, 245 73
466, 163 27
647, 939 06
442, 252 33
696, 548 82
1,040, 237 63
710, 427 78
835, 666 14
1,135, 971 09
1,287, 969 28
1,717, 985 03
1,991,226
2,606,564
3,274,422
1,635,871

06
77
78
61 April 24,
1820,.reduces the
minimum
t o $ l 26.
1,212,966 46
1,803,581.54
916,523 10
984,418.15
1,216,090 66
1,393,785 09
1,495,845 26
1,018,308 75

'

2 1 2 ,S27
175, 884
86, 334
61, 054
35, 200
2,864,^48
78. 377
12,969, 827
26,464, 566
27,424, 793
42,390, 336
19,146, 561

30
88
38
45
21
40
88
45
56
78
10
91

2,759,992
8,309
12,837,900
26,184,435
23,377,911
35,264,320
9,494,436

5,659,017
1,810,986
1,047,633
4,240,009

78
89
83
92

734,642
8,765
2,291
3,040,824

6,356,290 11
839,084 46
635,709 72
5,618,468 93
5,526,054 01
526,317 35
1,758,235 41
539,796 84

25
05
00
00
79
78
16

13,689,508 14
15,608;828 78
16,398,019 26
17,062,644 09
7,773,473 12
12,144,206 53
14,431,838 14
22,639^032 76
40,524,844 96
34,659,536 95
50,961,237 60
57,171,421 82

13,727,124 41
16,070,093 97
11,292,292 99
16, 764, 584 .20
13,867,226 30
13,319,986 7413,601,808 91
22,279,121 15
39,190,620 36
38,028,230 32
39,582,493 35
48,244,495 51

59
62
00
13

33,833.592
21,693,936
24,605,665
20,881,493

40,877,646
35,104,875
24,004,199
21,763,024

128,814 94
48,897 71
1,882 16

5, 000, 324 00

5,000,000 00
6,000,000 00

33
66
37
68

04
40
73
85

3i
S
t
^
O

fe3
19,573,703 72 . 19,090, 572 60
17,676,592 63
20,232,427 94
16,314,171 00
20,640,666 26
31,898,638 47
24,381,212 79
23,686,804 72
26^840,868 02
24,103,398 46
26,260,434 21
22,666,764 04
22,966,363 96
24, 763, 629 23
25,459,479 52

1,617,175 13
2,329,366 14

628,486 34
692,368 98

24,827,627 38
24,844,116 51

25,044, 368 40
24,586,281 65

3,210,815 48
2,623,381 03

1,091,563 57
776,942 89

28,526,820 82
31,865,561 16

30,038,446 12
34,366,698 06

3,967,682 55

948,234 79

4,857,600 69,

• 719,377 71

e

33,948,426 25 ^.24,257,298 49
21,791,935 55

24,601,982 44

*!
*
^
l>

I^

CO

STATEMENT—Continued.
Years.

From customs.

Date of tariff.

From public
lands.

To Dec. 3, 1835
$14,767,600
$19,391,310 59
1836
24,877,179
23,409,940 53 1837
6,776,236
11,169,290 39
1838'
3,081,939
16,168,800 36
1839
7,076,447
23,137,924 81
1840
3,292,286
13,499,502 17
1841 . 14,487,216 74 Sept. 11, general 1,365,627
1842
18,187,908 76 Aug. 30, general 1.336.797
To June 30 1843
897,818
7,046,843 91
1843-'44
2,059,939
26,183,570 94
1844-'46
2,077,-022
27,528,112 70
1845-'46
2,694,452
26,712,667 87
1846-'47
23,747,864,66 July30, '46, gen. 2,498,355
31,757,070 96 Mar. 29, 48, spe'l 3,328,642
1847-'48
28,346,738 82 Aug. 12,'48, sp'l 1,688,959
1848-'49
Jan. 26,'49,spe'l
1,869,894
1849-50
39,668,686 42
2,362,306
1850-61
49,017,567 92
2,043,239
47,339,326 62
1861-'52
1,667,084
68,931,866 52
1862-'63
64,224,190 27
8.470.798
1853-'54
63,026,794 21
11,497,049
1864-'66
64,022,863 60
8,917,644
1855-'56
Total

1,327,151,592 02

00

Price per From miscella- That portion of
neons sonrces, miscellaneous
acre.
includ'g loans arising from
and treasury loans & treasnry notes.
notes.

75
86
52
47
35
68
42
52
11
80
30
48
20
56
66

$1,281,176
2,539,676
9,938,326
19,778,642
5,125,663
8,240,405
14,666,633
15,250,038
12,837,748
2,956,044
336,718
292,847
29,091,948
21,906,765
29,761,194

76
69
93
77
66
84
49
61
43
99
90
39
66
69
61

26
30
68
99
39
07
93

6,120,808
1,392,831
610,649
901,152
1,107,302
828,631
1,116,391

21
03
40
30
74
40
81

164,068,856 16

$2,992,989
12,716,820
3,857,276
5,589,547
13,659,317
14,808,735
12,551,409
1,877,847

15
86
21
51
38
64
19
96

28,900,766 36
21,293,780 00
29,076,816 48
4,056,500
207,664
46,300
16,372
1,950
800
200

00
92
00
60
00
00
00

Total expendi»
tures.

Total receipts

$35,430,087
50,826,796
27,883,863
• 39,019,382
<:^33,881,242
26,032,193
30,619,477
34,773,744
20,782,410
31,198,566
29,941,853
29,699,967
66,338,168
66,992,479
69,796,892

10 $17,573,141 65
30,868,164 04
08
37,265,037 16
84
39,465,438 36
60
89 • 37,614,936 16
28,226,533 81
69
31,797,630 03
66
32,936,876 53
89
12,118,106 16
45
33,642,010 85
73
30,490,408 71
90
27,632,282 90
74
60,520,861 74
62
60,665,143 19
21
66,386,422 74
98

47,649,388 88
62,762,704.25
49,893,115 60
61,500,102 8.1
73,802,291 40
65,351,374 68
74,066,899 24

44,604,718
48,476,104
46,712,608
64,677,061
76,473,119
66,398,733
73,186,644

396,619T634 49 307,835,670 72 1,886,136,014 26 1,837,721,046 16

«' $ 1 , 4 5 8 , 782 93 d e d u c t e d from t h e a g g r e g a t e receipts, as per a c c o u n t of tlie Treasurer, N o . 76,922.
,TRE\fiVKY I>EJ^jLUTiiEwr, Register's Office, NovemberlO, 1856.




m m

26
31
83
74
08
78
46

F . BIGGER, Register.

fej

o
o
fej

Cl

fej

. No. 15.
Statement exhibiting the value ofi manufiactured articles ofi domestic produce exported to fioreign countries firom the 30th day
ofi June, 184:5, to June 30, 1856.
1847.

Articles.
Wax
Refined sugar
Chocolate
Spirits trom grain
Spirits from mola.sses
Spirits from other matGrial-s
Molasses
Vinegar
Beer, ale, porter, and cider
Linseed oil and spirits of turpentine
Lard oil
Household furniture
Coaches and other carriages
Hats.
Saddlery
Tallow candles and soap, and other candles
Snuff and tobacco
L e a t h e r , boots, and shoes
,
Cordage
Gunpowder.
Salt
Lead
Iron—pig, bar, and nails
castings
all manufactures of
Copper and brass, manufactures of...
Medicinal drugs
Colton p i e c e - g o o d s printed or colored
uncolored..
twist, yarn, and thread
other manufactures of
H e m p and flax—
cloth and thread
bags, and all manufactures of..
Wearing apparel
.
Earthen and stone ware.-.
Combs and buttons
Brushes

Billiard tables a n d app^tratu^i..,




1848.

1849.

1850.

1855.

1853.

1851.

a69.905
5261463
2,771
384,144.
1,448,280
101,836
189,830
17,281
45,069
1,186,732
82,945
803,960
290,525
177,914
64,886
1.111,349
11500,113
1,052,406
315,267
356,051
156,879
14,298
288,437
306,439
3,158,596
690,766
788,114

^74,005
360,444
ll476
500,945
1,329,151
95,484
154,630
26,034
45^ 085
896,238
161,232
982,042
370,259
226.682
31,249
1,200;764
1,829.207
1.313^311
'367,182
644,974
311,495
27,512
286,980
• 288,316
3,585,712
534,846
1,066,294

1,147,788
4,130,149
49,315
423,085

2,613,655
2,907,276

1,966,845
4,616,264

336,250

384,200

24,455
55,261
234,388
34;525
37,684
9,501
3,204

2,506
34,002
223,801
32,119
32,049
10,856
4,916

802
25,233
278,832
66,696
32,653
8,385
2,778

^162,790
392.312
2^177
73,716
268,652

^161.527
124^ 824
1^653
67,781
293,609

^134,577
253,900
2,207
90,957
269,467

,<^121,720
129,001
1,941
67,129
288,452

^118,055
285,056
2,-260
48,314
268,290

^122,835
219,588
3,255
36,084
289,622

$91,499
149,921
3,267
48,737
323,941

^113.602
375,780
10,230
141,173
329,381

$87,140
370,488
12,257
282,919
809,965

1,581
17,489
67,735
159,915

20,959
9,526
68,114
498,110

5,563
13.920
78,071
331,404

7,442
14,036
.51.320
148,056

14,137
11.182
,52,251
229,741

16,830
16,915
57,975
145,410

13,163
12,220
48,052
152,837

17,582
20.443
641677
362,960

131,048
16,945
53,503
1,084,329

317,407
87,712
74,7^2
24,357
630,041
695,914
.346,516
62,775
140,879
30,520
614,518
122,225
107,905
921,652
62,088
200,505

225,700
75.369
59,536
13,102
606,798
658,950
243,816
27,054
88,397
42,333
124,981
168,817
68,889
929,778
64,980
165,793

297,358
89,963
55,493
27,435
670,223
568,435
194,095
29,911
125,263
73,274
84,278
154.036
83,188
1,022,408
61.468
210,581

237,342
95,923
64,967
37,276
627,280
613,044
151,774
41,636
131,297
82,972
30;198
149,358
60,175
886,639
66,203
220,894

278,025
95,722
68,671
20,893
664,963
648,832
193,598
51,357
190,352
75,103
12,797
154,210
79,318
1,677,792
105,060
334,789

362,830
199.421
103,' 768
30,100
609,732
1,143,547
458,838
52,054
154,257
61,424
11,774
215,652
164,425
1,875,621
91,871
351,585

430,182
172,445
80,453
47,937
660,054
1,316,622
428,708
62,903
121,580
89,316
32,725
118,624
191,.388
1,993.807
103,039
263,852

714,555
184,497
91,261
48,229
681,362
1,671,500
673,708
103,216
180.048
.119;729
5,540
181,998
220,420
2,097,234
108,205
327,073

763,197
244,638
176,404
53,311
891,566
1,551,471
896,555
194,076
212,700
159,028
26,874
308,127
459,775
3,472,467
92,108
454,789

1.229,538
1^978,331
81,813
255,799

290,114
3,345,902
108,132
. 338,375

353,534
4,866,559
170,633
327,479

469,777
3,955,117
92,555
415,680

608,631
3,774,407
17,405
335,981

1,006,561
5,571,576
37,260
625,808

926,404
6,139:391
34,718
571,638

1,086,167
6,926,485
22,594
733,648

1,3(54
10,765
45;140
6,521
35,945
3,110
1.583

477
5,305
47,101
4,758
17,026
2,967
615

495
6,218
574,834
8^5].2
16,461
2.160
' 12

1,009
4,549
75,945
10,632
38,136
2,924
701

1,183
10,593
207.632
15,644
23,987
2,827
2,295

1,647
61376
1,211,894
23.096
27,'334
8,2.57
1,798

5,468
8,154
250,228
18,310
28,833
4,385
1,088

2,924
13,860
239.733
53,685
31,395
6,612
1,673

hi
O
pi
•^

o

a

fej
h-i

Cl

fel

CO
CO

STATEMENT—Continued.
Articles.
Umbrellas, parasols, and sunshades
.Manufactures of India rubber
Leather.and.morocco (not sold per pound)
Fire-engines and apparatus
PrintingTpresses and types
Musicjd instruments
;]Books' and maps
,
fPaperand stationery
^-Paints and varnish
"Manufactures of glass
Manufactures ol tin
Manufactures of pewter and lead
.Manufactures of marble and stone
iManufactures of gold and silver, and gold
.leaf
,
Cluicksilver
Artificial flowers and jew^elry
,
Truriks.
Bricks and lime
'Articles not enumerated

1846.
$2,427

1849.

1847.

$2,150

^2,916
16,483
7,686
30,403
38, .508
75,193
78,307
.50,739
76,007
12,353
7,739
22,466

1850.

O
O
1853.

1851.

1854.

$5,800

$3,395

$12,260

$8,340

$6,183

$11,658

9,427
.548
28,031
23,713
94,427
86,827
55,145
101,419
13,143
13,196
20,282

9,800
3,140
39,242
21,634
119;475
99,696
67.597
136,682
13,590
22,682
34,510

13,309
9,488
71,401
55,700
153,912
155,664
109,834
185,436
27,823
16,426
41,449

18,617
16,784
47,781
67,733
?17,809
119,535
85,369
194,634
23,420
18,469
57,240

6,448
9,652
32,2.50
52,397
142,604
122,212
83.020
170l,561
22,988
14,064
47,628

17,018
6,597
3.3,012
• 126,128
187,3.35
192,339
121,823
229,476
30,7,50
16,478
88,327

$8,441
1,409,107
36,045
14,829
36,405
106,857
207,"218
185,637
163,096
204,679
14,279
5,233
168,546

$5,989 •
1,093,538
5,765
29,088
67,517
133,517
•202,502
203,013
217,179
216,439
13,610
5,628
162,376

1,311,513
442,383
50.471,
23,673
33,314
4,972,084

9,051
806,119
22,043
35,203
57,393
4,014,432

6,116
831,724
26,386
32,457
64,297
3,559,613

29,856
3,443
17,431
16,997
44,7.51
88,731
54,115
71,155
6,363
13,694
11,220

3,660

4,268

6,241

4,502

4,583

68,639

20,332

11,873

24,420
10,613
12,578
1,379,566

3,126
5,270
17,623
1,108,984

11,217
6,126
24,174
1,137,828

8,557
5,099
8,671
1,408,278

45,283
10, ,370
16,348
3,869,071

121,013
• 12,207
22,045
3,793,341

114,738
15,035
13,539
2,877,659

66,397
27,148
32,625
3,788,700

11,139,582
423,851

10,476,345
62,620

12,858,758
2,700,412

11,280,075
956,874

15,196,451
2,046,679

20,186,967
18,069,580

18.862,931
37^437,837

22,599,930
23,548,535

26,849,411
38,234,566

28,833,299
53,957,418

30,970,992
44,148,279

11,563,433

Total
Gold and silver coin and bullion..

26,667
9,802
43;792
25,375
63, ,567
124,597
52,182
90,860
8,902
10,278
14,234

10,538,965

15,559,170

12,236,949

17,243,130

38,256,547

56,300,768

46,148,465

65,063,977

82,790,717

75,119,271

TREAauRY D E P A R T M E N T , Register's Ojffice, November 10, ia56.




F . BIGGER, Register.

.fel

o
H

•pi

O

fel

ca

101

REiPOilT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 16.
Statement exhihiting the value of foreign merchandise imported, re-exported, and consumed, annually,firorn^1821 to 1856^ inclusive; a,nd
also the estimated population and rate ofi consumption per capita during the same period.
Value ol foreign merchandise.
Population.

Years ending—
Imported.

$62,585,724 $21,302,488
83,241,541 22,286,202
77,679,267 27,643,622
80,549,007 26,337,157
96,340,076 32,590,643
84,974,477 24, 539, 612
79,484,068 23,403,136
88,509,824 21,596,017
74,492,527 16,668,478
70,876,920 14,387,479
103,191,124 20,033,526
101,029,266 24,039,473
108,118,311 19,822,735
126,621,332 23,312,811
149,895,742 20,504,495
189,980,035 21,746,360
140,989,217 21,854,962
113,717,404, 12,452,795
162,092,132 17,494,526
107.141,619 18,190,312
127,946,177 16,469,081
100,162,087 11,721,638
64,763,799
6,552,697
108,436,035 11,484,867
117,264,564 16,346,830
121,691,797 11,346,623
146,545,638
8,011,158
154,998,928 21,128,010
147,867,439 13,088,866
• 178,138,318 14,961,808
216,224,932 21,698,293
212,946,442 17,289,382
267,978,647 17,558,460
304,662,381 24,850,194
261,468,520 28,448,293
314,639,942 16,378,678

September 30

1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
Smos. to June 30,1843
Year toJune 30, 1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1860
1851
186'2
1853
1864
1856
1856
Total

Re-exported. Consumed and
on hand.
$41,283,236
60,956,339
50,036,645
66,211,850
63,749,432
60,434,866
66,080,932
66,914,807
.57,834,049
66,489,441
83,157,598
76,989,793
88,295,576
103,208,521
129,391,247
168,233,675
119,134,265
101,264,609
144,697,607
88,951,207
112,477,096
88,440,649
58,201,102
96,950,168
101,907,734
110,345,174
138,634,480
133,870,918
134,768.574
163,186,510
194,626,639
196,666,060
250,420,187
279,712,187
233,020,227
298,261,364

9,960,974
10,283,767
10,606,640
10,929,323
11,252,106
11,574,889
11,897,672
12,220,455
12, 643,-238
12,866,020
13,286,364
13,706,707
14,127,060
14,647.393
14,967,736
16,388,079
16,808,422
16,228,765
16,649,108
17,069,463
17,612.507
18,155^561
18,698,615
19,241,670
19,784,726
20,327,780
20,780,836
21,413,890
21,956,946
23,246,301
24,250,000
24,600,000
26,000,000
26,760,000
26,500,000
27,400,000

U
af
o ^
$4
5
4
5
6
5
4
5
4
4
6

5 m.

6
7
8
10
7
0
8
6
6
4
3
6
6
5
6
6
6
7
8
8
10
10
8
9

4,946,913,158 684,420,606 4,262,494,663

TREASukY DEPARTMENT,

Register's O^ce, Noveniber 10, 1856.




14
92
71
05
66
22
71
47
61
39
25

F. BIGGER, Register,

25
09
64
93
63
23
-68
21
38
87
11
03
15
42
60
26
13
02
02
00
00
00
79
18

102

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 17.
Statement exhihiting the total value ofi imports', and the imports consumed in the United States, exclusive ofi specie, during each fiscal
, year, firom 1821 to 1856 ; showing, cdso, the value ofi fioreign and
domestic exports, egcclusive ofi specie, and the tonnage employed during the same periods,
S-2
T3 X

" -a
^

-^1

.Is

is

0) ^

co"

C
O

C ^
O

O

e-s^

1821 $62,685,724 $43,696,405 $43,671,894
83,241,541 68,367,425 49,874,079
1822
77,679,267 51,308,936 47,165,408
1823
80,649,007 63,846,667 50,649,500
1824
96,340,076 66,375,722 66,809,766
1825
84,974,477 , 57,652,577 62,499,855
1826
79,484,068 .64,901,108 57,878,117
1827
88,509,8241 66,975,476 49,976,632
1828
74,492,627' 64,741,571 55,087,307
1829
70,876,920 49,676,009 68,524,8781
1830
1831 103,191,124 82,808,110 59,218,583|
1832 101,029,266 75,327.688 61,726,629
1833 108,118,311 83,470,067 69,950,856
1834 126,621,332 86,973,147 80,623,662|
1835 149,895,742 122,007,974 100,459,481
1836 189,980,036| 158,811,392 106,570,942
1837 140,989,217 113,310,571 94,280,896
1838 113,717,404 86,552,698 96,660,880
1839 162,092,132 146,870,816 101,625,633
1840 107,141,519 86,250,335 111,660,561
1841 127,946,177 114,776.309 103,636,236
1842 100,162,087 87,996,318 91,799.242
64,753,799 37,294,129 77,686,354
1843
18^4 108,435,035 96,390,548 99,531,774
1845 117,254,664 105,599.541 98,455,330
1846 121,691,797 110,048,859 101,718,042
1847 146, 645,638 116,257,596 150,674,844|
1848 154,998,928 140,651,902 130j203,709
1849 147,857,439 132,666,168 131,710,081
1850 178,138,318 164,032,033 134,900,233
1851 216,224,932 200,476,219 178,620,138
1852 212,946,442 196,072,695 154,931,147
1863 267,978,647 261,071,368 189,869,162
1864 •304,662,381 275,9.56,893 215,166,304
1866 261,468,520 231,650,340 192,761.135
1856 314,639,942 295,650,938 266,438; 061

'111

^

S82i
$10,824,429 $64:,
11,604,270 72,160,/!
21,172,435 74,699,0301
18,322,605 75,986,657
23,793,688 99,636,388:
20,440,934 77,696,322
16,431,8301 82,324,827
14,044,608 72,264,68'6|
12,347,344 72,358,671'
13,145,857 73,849,608
13,077,069 81,310,5831
19,794,074 87,176,943
15,677,876 90.140,433
21,636,653 104,336,973
14,756,321 121,693,677
17.767,762 128,663,040
17,162,232 117,419,376
9,417,690| 108,486,616
10,626,140 121,028,416
12,008,371 132,086,946
8,181,236 121,861,803
8,078,753 104,691,634
6,139,335 . 84,346,480
6,214,058 111,206,046
7,584,781 114,646,606
7,866,206 113,488,516
6,166,764 '158,648,622
7,986,802 154,032,131
8,641,691 146,756,820
9,475,493 161,898,720|
10,295,121 218,388,011
12,037,043 209,641,625
13,096,213 230,452,250
21,648,304 278,241,064
26,158,368 275,166,846
14,781,372 326,964,908

1,298,958
1,324,699
1,336,666
1,389,163
1,423,112
1,634,191
1,620,608
1,741,392
1,260,798
1,191,776
1,267,847
1,439,450
1,606,161
1,758,907
1,824,940
1,882,103
1,896,686
1,994,640
2,096,380
2,180,764
2,130,744
2,092,391
2,168,603
2,280,095
2,417,002
2,562,086
2,839,046
3,154,042
3,334,015
3,635,454
3,772,439
4,138,441
4,407,010
4,802,903
5,212,001
4,871,652

T o t a l . 14,946,913,168' 4,164,313,338' 3.731,787,140 487,202,517 4,667,501,637 85,777,064

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Noveinber 10, 1856.




F. BIGGER, Register.

No. 18.
Stateinent exhihiting a sumraary view ofi the exports of domestic produce, &c., ofi the Vnited States during the years ending
on the 30th June, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1858, 1854, 1855, and 1856.
Product of--Raw produce. Specie and
bullion.

Years.
The sea.

The forest.

Agriculture;

Tobacco.

Cotton.

Total value.

Man'fa,ctures.
O

1847
184g
1849
1860

ia5i
1852
1863
lg64
1855
1856

$3,468,033
1,980,963
2,647,664
2,824,818
3,294,691
2,282,342
8,279,413
3,064,069
3,616,894
3,356,797

$5,996 073 $68,460,383
:
7,069,084 .37,781,446
6,917.994 38,858,204
7,442,503 26,547,158
7,847,022 24,369,210
7,864,220 26,378,872
7,916,259 33,463,573
11,761,185 67,104,592
12,603,837 42,567,476
10,694,184 77,686,455

$7,242,086
7,561,122
6,804,207
9,951,023
9,219,251
10,031,283
11,319,319
10,016,046
14,712,468
12,221,843

$53,415,848 $10,361,364
61,998,294 12,774,480
66,396,967 11,249,877
7l,984,.616 15,196,451
112,315,317 20,136,967
87,966,732 18,862,931
109,456,404 22,699,930
93,696,220 26,849,411
88,143.844 28,833,299

128,382,361

30,970,992

$2,102,838
Ij068,320
935,178
953,664
1,437,893
1,645,767
1,835,264
2,764,781
2,373,317
3,125,429

$2j620 $150,637,464
2,700,412 I32,904jl21
956,674 132,6665955
2,045,679 136.946,912
18,069,580 196,489,718
37,437,887 192,368,984
23,548,636 213,417,697
38.2345666 263,390.870
53,057,418 246,708,653
44,148,279 310,586,330
F. BIGGER, Register.

tOREASURY DBPART^^E^*T, REGISTER'S ORF.ICE, November 10. 1866.




pi

o

i2l

a
OQ

CO

m , i9o

o

Statement exhibiting the value of certain articles imported duringthe years ending June 30, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848^
1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854^ 1855, and.1856, (after deducting the re-exportations,) and the amount ofi duty
which accrued on each during the same periods, respectively.
1844.

1846.

1845.

1847.

1848. '

Articles.
Value,

t)

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

o
W o o l l e n s . , , , , . , , ^-^ $9,408,279 $3,313,496 $10,604,423 $3,731,014 $9,935,925 $3,480,797 $10,639,473 $3,192,^93 $16,061,'l02 $4,196,007
13,236,830 4,850,731 13,360,729 4,908,272 12,867,422 4,866,483 14,704,186 3,956,798 17,205,417 4,166,573
Cottons,., ,,»^,
696,888
138,394
801,661
625,871
198, 64g
Hempen goods..,
121,380
865,427
606,900
213,863
121,6as
Iron, and i^anufaetures o f - - , , , - - g - ^ 2,395,760 1,607,113 4,076,142 2,415,003 3,660,581 1,629,581 8,710,180 2,717,378 7,060,470 2,118,141
Sugar. ^ _ , , ^ , ^ ^ , . _ , . . 6,897,245 4,597,093 4,049,708 2,555,076 4,397,239 2,713,866 9,406,263 3,160,444 8,775,223 2,632,667
Hemp, nnmanufao180,221
63,282
261,913
19,452
101,388
tured.,,.
56,122
140,372
54,100
65,220
180,335
748,566
509,244
Salt.._,,,__,,_
654,881
§92,112
228,892 1,027,666
§83,369
205,631
878,871
678,069
336,691
254,149
133,845
187,962
CoaL_
203,681
128,099
162,008
330, 875
130,221
426,997
T o t a l . . . . . . . . 34,161,247 16,472,358 34,003,256 14,671,413 32,813,633 13,653,796 46,360,929 13,558,-863 50,344,100 13,622,398




Pi

©

m

a

STATEMENT—Continued.
1849.

1852.

1861.

1850.

Articles. .Value.

Duties.

Value.

Puties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

•

Woollens.
Cottons --__.
Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactures of
.._ _
Sugar.
Hemp, unmanufactured
Salt
Goal

$13,503,202
16,183,759
460,335

$3,723,768
3,769,565
92,067

$16,900,916
19,681,612
490,077

•$4,682,467
4,896,278
98,016

$19,239,930
21,486,602
615,239

$5,331,600
5,348,696
123,048

$17,348,184
18,716,741
343,777

$4,769,083
4,896,327
68,756

9,262,667
• 7,276,780

2,778,770
2,182,734

10,864,680
6,960,716

3,269,404
2,085,215

10,780,312
13,478,709

3,234,094
4,043,613

18,843,669
13,977,393

6,632,484
4, 193,218

143,470
284,906
114,676

674,783
1,227,618
361,866

172,435
245,504
108,567

212,811
1,025,300
478,096

63,843
206,060
143,429

13,089,956

57,052,167

15,647,866

67,316,898

18,493,382

Total




.478,232
1,424,529
382,254.
47,970,668

-

164,211
1,102,101
406, 662 <
:
70,901,628

49,263
220,420
121,695

pi

o
pi
O

19,960,245
^ i

>

O

O
Ox

STATEMENT—Continued.
1853.

1854.

O

1855.

1856.

Articles.
Value.

Value.

Dutics.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Woollens
Cottons..
Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactures of
Sugar. Hemp, unmanufactured-- -Salt
Coal

$27,061,934
26,412,243
433,604

$7,459,794
6,599,338
86,721

$31,119,654
32,477,106
69,824

$8,629,180
8,153,992
11,631

$22,076,448
15, 7:^2; 923
239,593

.$6,088,157
3,823,294
47,919

$30,706,161
24,337,504
233,735

$8,478,552 05
6,943,181 90
46,747 00

26,993,082
14,168,337

8, 074,017
4,260,501

28,288, 241
11,604,656

8,486.472
3,481,397

23,945,274
13,284,663

7, 163j602
3,985,399

21,618,718
21,296,154

6,461,615 00
6,388,546 20

326,812
1,041,677
488,491

98,044
208,316
146, 647

335,632
1,290,975
585,926

100,689
258,196
176,777

56,458
1,692,687
893,825

16,637
338,617
268,147

3,427
1,964,317
697,094

1,028 10
390,863 40
119,418 80

Total..

96,916,080

26,923,277

105,762,014

29,297,333

77,930,771

21,731,672

100,745,110

27,829,962 45

F. BIGGER, Regisie)\
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, REGISTER'S OFFICE, November 10,




1866.

pi

o
pi

O

>^
W

>
Cl

No. 20.
Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce, &c., exported annually from 1821 to 1856.
Value ,of exports exclusive of specie.
Years ending—

Specie and bullion.

Foreign merchandise.
Domestic produce.
Free of duty.

September 30

1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828..........
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834.
1835
1836-.
1837
1838-.
1839.
1840
1841
1842
9 mos. to June 3 0 . . 1843
Year to June 3 0 . . 1 8 4 4 . .



..

._

$286,698
374,716
1,323,762
1.100,530
1,088,786
1,036,430
813,844
877,239
919,943
1,078.696
642,686
1,346,217
6,165,907
10,757,033
7,012,666
8,634,896
7,756,189
4,951,306
5,618,442
6,202,562
3,963,064
3,194,299
1,682,763
2,251,650

Paying duty.
$10,537,731
11,101,306
19,846,873
17,222,075
22,704,803
19,404,504
15,417.986
13,167,339
11,427,401
12,067,162
12,434,483
18,448,857
12,411,969
10,879,520
7,743,665
9,232,867
9,406,043
4,466,384
6,007,698
6,805,809
4,228,181
4,884,454
3,466,672
3,962,608

Aggregate value
of exports.

pi

Total.
$10,824,429
11,476,022
21,170.636
18,322,606
. 23,793,588
20,440,934
16,231,830
14,044,578
12,347,344
13,145,867
13,077,969
19,794,074
17,677,876
21,636,553
14,766,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12, 0(f8,371
8,181,236
8,078,7536,139,336
6,214,068

$43,671,894
49,874,079
47,165,408
50,649,500
66,809,766
52,449,855
57,878,117
49,976,632
55,087,307
58,624,878
69,218,683
61,726,529
69,950.856
80,623,662
100,459.481
106,670,942
94,280,-895
95,560,880
101,625,533
111,660,661
103,636,236
91,799,242
77,686,354
99,631,774

$64,496,323
61,360.101
68,366,043
68,972,105
90,603,354
72,890,789
74,109,947
64,.021,210
- 67,434,651
71,670,735
72,295,662
81,620,603
87,628,732
102,260,216
115,215,802
124,338,704
111,443,127
104,978,570
112,261,673
123,668,932
111,817,471
99,877,995
82,825,689
106,746,832

$10 478 059
10,810 180
6 372 ^87
7 014 552
8,932 034
4,704,533
8 014 SSO
8 243 476
4 , 924 020
2,178 773
9 014 Q.Sl
5 656 .S40
2 611 701
2,076 758
6,477,775
^ -324 3.^6
5 976 249
3,608 046
8 776 74.*^
8 417 014
10 034 332
4 S13 5SQ
1,620,791
6,454,214

O
pi
H
•O

>^
ffl

>
o

O

STATEMENT—CoDtinued.

o
00

Value of exports exclusive of specie.
Years ending—

Foreign merchandise.
Domestic .produce.

•

Free of duty.

Year to June 30

1845
1846.
1847
1848
1849
1860
1861
1852
1853
1854
1855
1866
Total.

....^..

-

Taying diity.

Aggregate value
of exports.

Specie and bullion.

Total.

pi

*
^

$2,413,050
2,342,629
1,812,847
•1,410,307
2,015,816
2,099,132
1,742,164
2,538,159
1,894,046
3,210,907
6,516,650
3,144,604

$5,171,731
5,522,577
4,363,907
6,676,499
6,626,276
7,37*6,361
8,562,967
9,498,884
11,202,167
18,437,397
19,641,818
11,636,768

$7,684,781
7,865,206
6,166,754
7,986,806
8,641,091
9,475,493
10,296,121
12,037,043
13,096,213
21,648,304
26,168,368
14,781,372

$9.8,455,330
101,718,042
160,674,844
130,203,709
131,710,081
134,900,233
178,620,138
164,931,147
189,869,162
216,166,304
192,761,135
310,686,330

$106,040,111
109,683,248
156,741,598
138,190,515
140,351,172
144,375,726
188,916,269
166,968,190
202,966,375
236,804,608
218,909,603
326,367,702

$8, 606,496
3,905,268
1 907 024
15,841, 616
6,404, 648
7,522,994
29 472 752
42,674,136
27,486,876
41,436,466
66,247,343
45,745,486

109,109,311

379,862,632

488, 971,-843

3,776,886,419

4,264,867,262

436,687,354

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 10, 1856.




F. BIGGER, Register.

O
pi
H
O

ffl

a

R E P O R T ON T H E

109

FINANCES.

No. 21.
Statement exhihiting the quantity ofi wine, spirits, &c., imported annually, firom 1843 ^o 1856, inclusive.
No; 1.—WINE IN CASKS.
Madeira.

Sherry.

Sicily.

Period of importation.
Value.

Gallons.
9mos.end'gJnne30,1843
Year end'g June 30, 1844
Do.....
1845
Do
.1846
5mos.end'gNov.30,1846
7 mos. end'g June 30,1847
Year end'g June 30, 1848
Do.
1849
Do.
.1850
Do
1851
^ Do
'
....1852
Do
1863
Do
.1864
Do
1866
Do._
1866

$9,076
30,675
145,237
122,895
128,613
6,717
21,630
106,302
150,096
116,008
103,917
105,628
54,270
46,446
32,031

3, 949
.16,754
101,176
169,797
117.117
13,806
44,634
193,971
303,126
163,941
216,683
226,403
120,391
71,912
44,393

Gallons
4,685
18,665
23,616
26,538
14,643
77,621
216,935
170,794
212,092
250,277
168,610
313,048
416,298
383,398
398,392

Value.

Gallons.

$6,491
23,418
38,289
41,761
26,194
66,061
109,983
128,610
118,952
104, 668
97,680
155,819
244,028
208,414
270,317

14,679
31,180
110,690 .
209,131
21,281
•92,631
190,294
130,861
91,123
301,010
91,746
190,205
68,870
197,700
184,194

Value.
$6,6'17
16,000
46,033
74,000
8,933
24,230
67,364
32,231
24,933
98,976
22,663
45,794
23,191
65,359
61,954

No. 2.—WINE IN CASKS.
Claret.

. Port.

Other red wine.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 mos.end'g June 30,1843
Year end'g June 30, 1844
Do
1846
Do
1846 '
5mos.end'gNov.30,1845
7mos.end'.g June30,1847
Year end'g June 30, 1848
Do.
1849
Do
....1850
Do
1861
Do.
..1852
Do
•
.1863
Do.
1864
Do.
....1865
Do
.1856




38,693
223,616
260,693
372,628
80,991
8, 076
501,123
711,268
626,211
762,967
614,816
662,791
393,197
186,460
264,816

Value.
$25,714
166,878
162,358
148,895
62,851
3,791
170,134
272,700
306,464
349,849
240,238
268,006
177,935
97,987
168,729

Gallons.

Value.

873,896 $134,598
993,198 218,239
1,051,862 249,633
961,361 249,703
294,433 111,463
591,6:6 119,844
1,227,071 221,416
1,912,701 263,836
1.919,766 267,446
1,940,121 280,333
2,702,612 405,380
2,633,802 482,827
2,045,474 497,006
1,371,400 440,631
1,616.018 661,440

Gallons.

Value.

340,387
495,568
964,646
1,072,589
539,454
781,073
994,468
1,469,256
,1,245,201
1,172,316
1,374,416
1,854,885
1,519,605
697,334

$60,096
143,210
316,821
328,814
119,411
180,928
221,177
266,988
236,727
229,360
377,482
450,196
469,985
285,111

•

110

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 21—Continued.
No. 3.—WINE, BRANDY, AND GRAIN SPIRITS.
Other white wine.

Brandy.

Grain spirits:

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 mos. end'g June 30,1843
Year end'g June 30, 1844
Do.
1845
Do
1846
5 mos.end'gNov. 30,1846
7 mos. end'g June 30,1847
Yearend'g June 30, 1848
Do.
1849
Do._
.1850
Do.
.1861
Do
1852
Do...
1853
Do.
.1884
Do.
1855
I^o...
1866

123,832
268,414
591,735
705,808
618,267
278,482
840,687
971,895
1,088,801
1,085,374
935,379
1,276,290
1,379,888
939,364
617,135

Value.

Gallons.

Value.

Gallons.

Value.

$28,205 191,832 $106,267
269,129 $121-, 547
416,918 171,016
76,090 782,510 606,633
606,311 262,543
211,183 1,081,314 819,450
677,785 345,352
310,241 963.147 839,231
136,323 86,073
296,736 331,108 355,451
327,635 143,549
69.831 623,309 675,631
676,683 327,493
193,358 1,370,111 1,135,089
796,276 327,957
210,139 2,964,091 1,347,514
751,183 361,078
215,353 4,145,802 2,659,537
984,417 364,204
209,847 3,163,783 2,128,679
195,870 2,761,810 1,792,729
865,301 294,386
305,287 3,854,966 3,251,408 1,060,456 424,638
380,204 2,162,366 2,256,344 1,197,234 564,569
322,257 1,024,497 1,479,362 • 1,190,642 576,560
189,499 1,716,717 2,859,342 1,682,126 772,276

No. 4.—OTHER SPIRITS, BEER, ALE, AND PORTER.
Other spirits.
.Period of importation.
Gallons.

•
9 mos. end'g June 30,1843
Yearend'g June 30, 1844
Do
-1845
Do
1846
5mos.end.'gNov..30,1846
7 mos end'g June 30,1847
Year end'g June 30, 1848
Do
1849
Do
1850
Do...
1851
Do
.1852
Do...
1853
Do
1854
Do
_-1855
Do
1856

136,399
210,477
270,484
221,344
65,477
160,747
228,671
642,492
339,169
309,214
359,677
336,477
399,583
397,572
771,604

Value.
$32,095
78,027
78,957
81,713
28,862
57,806
75,943
145,784
113,779
100,850
98,940
106,501
128,308
151,378
288,494

Beer, ale, and porter, Beer, ale, and porter,
from, Scotland.
from England.
Gallons.
62,612
107,489
79,302
117,621
46,146
132,157
130,008
146,473
156,735
275,336
262,838
397,420
825,571
919,252
792,156

Value.
$57,098
102,157
73,729
110,397
42,987
67,306
101,171
118,233
129,957
18.9,010
186,964
284,347
424,875
569,900
504,146

Gallons.

Value.

7,423 $6,335
19,236 18,343
26,711 21,294
38,464 39,831
2,151
1,895
8, 657
16,375
39,282 21,533
52,297 SO,088
52,856 ^ 41,790
88,179 56, 736
110,762 67,804
131,367 77,414
270,064 128,667
345,016 188,457
369,486 193,600

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 10, 1856.




F. BIGGER, Register.

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

^

111

No. 22.
Statement exhihiting the value ofi imports, annually, firom 1821 to 1856.
Value of merchandise imported.
Years ending
Specie and bul- Free of duty.
lion.
Sep tember . . . 3 0 , 1821 • $8,064,890
18,22
3,369,846
1823
6,097,896
1824
8,379,836
1826
6,150,765
1826
6,880,966
1827
' 8,161,130
1828
7,489,741
1829
7,403,612
1830
8,166,964
1831
7,305,945
1832
6,907,604
1833
7,070,368
1834
17,911,632
'1835
13,131,447
1836
13,400,881
1837
10,516,414
17,747,116
1838
8,595,176
1839
8,882,813
1840
1841
4,988,633
1842
4,087,016
9 mo's to June 30,1843
22,390,659
Year to June 30 1844
6,830,429
1845
4,070,242
1846
3,777,732
1847 , 24,121,289
1848
6,360,224
1849
6,651,240
4,628,792
1850
1851
5,453,692
1852
5,505,044
1863
4,201,382
1854
6,958,184
1866
3,669,812
1856
4,207,632
Total,

293,505, 743

Paying duty.

Total.

»

$2,017,423
$62,503,411
3,928,862
76 942 833
3,960,392
68 630 979
4,183,938
67 986 2.34
4,796,745
86 392 566• 6,686,803
72 406 708
3,703,974
67 628 964
76 130 648
4,889,436
4,401,889
62 687 026
4,590,281
68 130 675
6,150,680
89 734 499
8,341,949
86 779 813
25,377,682
75 670 361
60,481,548
58 128 152
64,809,046
71 955 249
78,655,600
97 923 554
58,733,617 ' 71 739 186
43,112,889
62 867 399
70,806,616
85 690 340
48,313,391
49 946 316
61,031,098
61 926 446
26,640,470
69 534 601
13,184,026
29 179 216
18,936,462
83 668 154
18,077,598
96 106 724
20,990,007
96 924 058
17,661,347
104 773 002
16,356,379
132 282 326
15,726,425
126 479 774
18,081,590
155 427 936
19,652,995
191 118 345
24,187,890
183 262 608
27,182,152
236 695 113
26,327,637
271 276 560
36,430,624
221 378 184
62,748,074
267 684 236

$62,585,724
83,241.641
77,679,267
80,649.007
96,340,075
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,509,824
74,492,627
70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108,118,311
126,521,332
149,895,742
189,980,035
140,989,217
113,717.404
162,092^132
107,141,519
127,946,177
100,162,087
64,763,799
108,436.036
117,254,664
121,691,797
146,545,638
154,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
267,978,647
304,562,381
261,468,520
.314,639,942

910,037,323 3,743, .370. 092

4,946,913,158

F. BIGGER, Regkter,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Noveniber 10, 1856.




112

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 23.

Statement exhihiting the value ofi dutiable merchandise re-exported annually, firojn 1821 to 1856, inclusive; and showing, also, the value reexportedfiromwarehouses, under the act ofi August 6, 1846.
Dutiable yalue of Value re-exported
merchandise re from warehouses.
exported.

Years.

1821
1822
1823
--..
1824
. . . . * .
1825
'.
1826
1827..
1828
1829..
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839 - 1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846.
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854..l...
1855
1856
•

.
.

. . . .

„

_
_

_.
_
^

'.
..
:_. . .
...

_

•

Total,

$661,170
2,869,941
3,692,363
6,261,291
6,604,463
6,855,770
8,036,651
14,608,712
13,976,769
7,666,890

380,046,987

- .
. . .

$10,537,731
11,101,306
19,^46,873
17.222,076
22,704,803
19, 404-, 604
16,617,986
13,167,338
11,427,401
12,067,1(32
12,434,483
18,448,867
12,411,969
10,879,520
7,743,655
9,232,867
9,406,043
4,-466,884
5,007,698
• 5,805,809
4, 22a, 181
4,884,464
3,466,672
3,962,608
5,171,731
6,622,577
4,353,907
6,576,499
6,625,276
7,376,361
8,652,967
9,514,925
11,170,581
18,437,397
19,641,818
11,636,768

69,122,900

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

iter's




Novemhor 10, 1866.

REPORT O N . T H E

FINANCES.

113

No. 24.

Statement exhihiting the aggregate value ofi breadstuffs and provisions
exported annually, from 1821 to 1856.
Years ending-

Amount.

1821..
1822..
1823..
1824..
1826..
1826..
1827..
1828-.
1829..
1830-.
1831.;
1832..
1833.
1834.
1836.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
I f n months ending June 30,1843.
^ie
.1844.
Year ending Jime 30..
1845.
1846.
1847.
18-i81849.
1850.
1851.
1852.
1853.
18541855.
1856.

September 30.

$12,341,901
13,886,856
13,767,847
16,059,484
11,634,449
11,303,496
11,685,556
11,461,144
13,131,858
12,075,430
17,538,227
12,424,703
14,209,128
11,524,024
12,009,399
10,614,130
9,588,365
9,636,650
14,147,779
19,067,535
17,196,102
16,902,876
11,204,123
17,970,135
16,743,421
27,701,121
68,701,921
37,472,751
38,155,607
26,051,373
21,948,651
25„857,027
32,985,322
65,941,323
38,895,348
77,187,301

.TotaL

798,022, 26T,

Fa BimiSBi, Register,
TEEASURY DEPARTMENT,

•'« Office, Novemher 10,1866.




114

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES^

No. 25.
Statement exhihiting the quality and value of cotton exported annuaUy^
firom 1821 to 1856, inclusive, and the average price per pound.

Valne.
Years.

Bales.

Sea Island.

Other.

Total.

<^
Pounds.

1821
1822
1823.
1824.
1825
1826.
1827.
1^28
1829.
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840.
1841.
1842.
1843.
1844
1845.
1^4:6.
1847
1848,
1849
1860
1861
1852
1853
1864
1866 2,303,403
1856.. 2,991,175

11,344,066
11,250,636
12,136,688
9,526,722
9,665,278
5,972,852
15,140,798
11,288,419
12,833,307
8,147,165
8,311,762
8,743,373
11,142,987
8,086,937
7,762,736
7,849,597
6,286,9717,286,340
6,107,404
8,779,669
6,237,424
7,254,099
7,616,079
6,099,076
9,380,626
9,388,633
6,293,973
7,724,148
11,969,259
8,236,463
8,299,656
11,738,075
11,166,165
10,486,423
13,058,590
12,797,225

Total.. 6, 294,678 333,304,519

113, 549,339
133, 424,460
161, 586,582
132, 843,941
166, 784,629
198, 662,663
279, 169,317
199, 302,044
252, 003,879
290, 311,937
268, 66.8,022
313, 451,743
313, 635,617
376, 601,970
379, 686,266
415, 721,710
438; 964,666
588, 615,957
408, 5-66,808
735, 161,392
623, 966,676
677, 462,918
7.84,782,027
657, 534,379
863, 616,371
538, 169,622
520, 925,986
806, 650,283
1,014, 633,010
627, 146,141
918, 937,433
492,664
1,081,
406,206
1,100,
346,683
977,
366,011
996,
634,476
1,338,

Dollars.

124,893,406
144,676,095
173,723,270
142,369,663
176,449,907
204,636,415
294,310,116
210,690,463
264,837,186
298,459,102
276,979,784
322,215,122
324,698,604
384,717,907
387,358,992
423,631,307
444,211,637
595,952,297
413,624,212
743,941,061
6.30, 204,100
584,717,017
792,297,106
663,633,456
872,906,996
647,558,055
627,219,968
814,274,431
1,026,602,269
635,881,604
927,237,089
1,093,230,639
1,111,570,370
987,833,106
1,008,424,601
1,351,431,701

20,167,484
24,035.058
20,445,620
21,947.401
36,846,649
25,025,214
29,359,645
22,487,229
26,576,311
29,674,883
25,289,492
36,'l9l',106
49,448,402
64,961,302
71,284,926
63,240,102
61,666,811
61,238,982
63,870,307
54,330,341
47,593,464
49,119,806
64,063,501
51,739,643
42,767,341
63,415.848
61,998,294
66,396,967
71,984,616
112,316,317
87,966,732
109,456,404
93,696,220
88,143,844
128,382,851

Cents.

16.2
16.6
11.8
15.4
20.9
12.2
10
10.7
10
9.9
9.1
9.8
11.1
12.8
16.8
16.8
14.2 10.3
14.8
8.5
10.2
8.1
6.2
8.1
6.92
7.81
10.34
7.61
6.4
11.3
12.11
8.05
9. 86
9.47
8.74
9.49

19,493,391,422 19,826,696,941 1,958,630,093

F. BIGGER, Register,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 10,1856.




No. 26.
Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of tohacco and rice exported annually, from 1821 to 1856, inclusive.^
TOBACCO.

RICE.

Years.
. Bales.

1821
1822.. i . . . . . .
1823
1824.
. .....

. Cases.

Hogsheads.

j
"-

1^2:6'........•......T8'27.'
1828^V ' . . • . . . - . . . . ' .
1829
•
•'.
1830'
'-" -I.'-.".
1831.. . v . - : . _ . . . . .
1832'...'.'.......-".:'.
1833;-.V..-".--:i-.—
1834i
— . • -—:1835:.....--.:—,.11836
:
1837
1838
1839
1840....--.
1841_. 1842
1843
1844-——-.--^;.-^....
1846

Y-.-..-.--.-...-.

-...,

. „,

- .. . , , , . .
• . , .- ,-,

j..

.,

i

•

'

• ••

...--.--.-. i
• ..,... ...

!
r

-

::::::::::




»

.

:

.

.

.

•

:

.

.

-

.

_

'

66,868
83,169
99,009.
77,883
76; 984^
'64,098
i;00;026.
96,278'
77,131:
83; 810
86,718;
106,806
83;163
87,97994', 353:
109,042
100,232
100,593
78,995
119,484
147, 828158,710
94,454
163,042
147,168

Value.

Average cost
per hogshead.

Barrels.

.$6,648,962
$.84. 4,9
74 82
6,222,838' •
6, 282,.672.
63 45
4,856,666
.62 34
6; 116,623
80 48
5,347;208.
83 42 [..-..fifififi.
65:75:
6,677,123
54. 73.
6; 269; 960:
4, 982;'974.
64 60
6, 686,365:
66 6656: 41
4, 8:92; 388
&6- 17
6; 999; 769.
69: 20
6; 755;968
74 96
6i, 695; 305
8"7: 44.
8; 250, 577
92.24 . . . . .
.
10,068,640
57 82
6,795,647
7.3 48.
7,392,029
124 47
9,832,943
82 72
9,883,967
85" o r
12,576, 703"
60 11
9,540,756
49 24
4,660,979 :
• • 61 60 '
•••8,397,265
50 75
7,469,819

Tierces.

Value.

Average cost
per tierce.

$1,494,307
88,.221
1,563,482
87,089
1,820,986- ;
101,365
1,882,982
113,229
1,925,245
97,015
1,917,446
111,063
2,•343; 908
113,618
2; 620, 696176,019
2,614,370
132,923
1,986,824
130,697
2,016;267
116,617
2,162,631
120,327
2,744,418
144,163
2,122,272
121,886'
2,210;331
119;861
2,548,750.
212,983
2,309,279
106,084
1,721,819
71,048
2,4-60,198
. 93,320
1,942,076
101,660
2,010,107
101,617
1,907,387
114,617
1,626,726
106,766
• =134,715' ' • 2;i82,468'" " • —
2,160,456
118,621

$1.6. 94.
17 84
17 96
16 63
19 84
17 26
17 55
14- 97
IB 92
15 20
17 30
17 89
19 04'
17 41
19 94
11 97
21 76
24: 23
26 36
19 10
19 78
16 64
15 23
IT'20
18 21

pi
tei

o
©

»^.;
W'
tei:

Cl
tei.

OV

STATEMENT—Continued.
(^
RICE.

TOBACCO.

•

Years.
Bales.

Cases.

Value.

Hogsheads.

Average cost
per hogshead.

Barrels.

Tierces.

Value.

Average cost
per tierce.

•
1846
1847
1848
1849
I860
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1866

12,913
17,772

13,366
9,384

147,998
135,762
130,665
101,521
145,729
95,945
137,097
169,863
126,107
150,213
116,962

80,685

22,750

3,950,654

^..-....
-------.
•.--..
\.---.----

Total

$8,478,270
7,242,086
7,651,122
5,804,207
9,961,023
9,219,261
10,031,283
11,319,319
10,016,046
14,712,468
12,221,843
280,528, 943

$67
53
57
67
68
96
73
70
.79

28
34
78
17
28
09
17
81
42

19,774
81,038

124,007
144,427
100,403
128,861
127,069
106,590
119,733
67,707
106,121
62,620
68,668

$2,564,991
3,605,896
2,331,824
2,569,362
2,631,567
2,170,927
2,470,029
1,667,668
2,634,127
1,717,953
2,390,233

100,812

4,079,420

78,918,986

•

$20
24
23
19
20
20
20
24
26

F. BIGGER, Register.
TKEASURY DEPARTMENT, Registered Office, November 10, 1856.




68
97
23
94
71
56
63
48
05

Pi
©
©

No. 27.
Statement exhihiting the values of iron and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, steel, wool and manufactures of wool^
manufactures of cotton, silk and manufactures ofi silk, flax, linen and linen fabrics, hemp and manufactures of hemp,
manilla, sun, and other hemps of India, a n d silk and worsted goods imported from and exported to foreign countries'^
from 1840 to 1846, hoth years inclusive; and also showing the domestic exports of like articles for the same periods.

Articles.
Foreign imported.

1842.

1841.

1840.
Foreign ex- Domestic ex~^ Foreign imported.
ported.
ported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

©
pi
©

Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
$6,750,099
Cast, shear, German, and other
528,716
steel
-.-.
Wool, unmanufactured
846,076
9,071,184
manufacturers of
6,604,484
Cotton, manufactures of...
234,236
Silk, unmanufactured
.
9,601,622
manufactures of
*
Flax, unmanufactured
linen and linen fabrics. - . 4,614,466
Hemp, unmanufactured
686,777
1,688,166
manufactures of.
manilla, sun, and other,
of India-_
..
Silk and worsted goods

$166,115
33,961
26,246
418,399
1,103,489
200,239
1,016,632

$1,104,466

3,549,607

__._
426,466
226,347

8,242




.

40,425,714

$134,316

609,201
1,091,963
11,001,939
11,767,036
254,102
15,300,795

24,848
44.226
171,814
929,066
227,113
366,264

6,846,807
661,039
2,566,381

280,469
60
167,606

$1,045,264

3,606,794

4,662,304

68,903,678 2,351,464

$6,988,965

$177,381 $1,109,522

13,400

4,181,210

697,317
797,382
8,376,726
9,678,615
33,002
9, 444, 341

18,447
90,866
146,123
836,892
420
265,169

3,669,231
267,849
1,273,534

210,176
563
162,866

1,311,770

3,122,646

16,812

•

Total--„

$8,914,425

777

42,337,631 1,908,639

2,970 690

a
00

1, 038

4,081,260

STATEMENT—Continued.
GO

-, 1886.

1844.

1843.
Articles,
Foreign im- F o r e i g ex- Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
Iron, and manufactures of iron,
arid iron and steel.
.......^ $1,903,858
Cast, shear, German, and other
201,772
steel
248,679
IVoOl unmanufactuTf^d
2,472,164
nianufactures of
Cotton, manufactures of
^ , . 2,968,796
63,350
Silk unniaTiufacfciirpd
2,662,087
manufactures of
16,193
Flax unmanufactured
linpn anifi linpn faliTirci
1,484,921
.228,882
Hemp, unmanufactured
626,502
manufactures of
...
manilla, sun, andother,
42,149
of India.
318,685
Silk and worsted g o o d s . . . . . . .

Foreign Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
exported.
ported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.
pi

$50,802
69,733
34,661.
61,997
314,040
3,363
20.6,777
161,667
' 2,012
102,496

$532,693

3,223,660

326

$5,227,484

$107,956

487,462
861,460
9,476,782
13,6,41,478
172,953
8,310,711
67,738
4,492,826
- 262,365
1,003,420
209,386
1,292,488

472
4, 9.29

67,483
404,648
7,102
230,,838
626
129,726
462
138,002

.2,898,780

,.,...,..---

6, 274
190.

$8,294,878

$91,966

775,675
1,689,794
10,666,176
13,863,282
208,464
9,731,796
90,609
4,923,109
146,209
897,345

20,062
22,163
156,646
502,653
4,362
246,272
6,644
169,626
4,837
.95, 684

238,179
1,510,310

15,415

$716,332

1,446
16,916

$845,^017
O
pi
©

4,327,928
'W
tei
14,762
o
IS
02

T o t a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,117,028




1;002,.928

3,756,669

46,495,562 1,108,712

3,616,423

53,034,716 1,-328,067

5,187,707

STATEMENT—Continned.
1848.

1847.

1846.
Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures bf iron,
and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other
steel
--'
-_-Wool, unmanufactured
.
manufactures of .
Cotton, manufactures of
..
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures of
Flax, unmanufactured
linen and linen fabrics..
Hemp, unmanufactjired
_
manufactures of
manilla, sun, and other,
of India._
.
..
Silk and worsted goods
Total




Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign, ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
exported.
ported. Q
.
ported.
ported.
pi

$7,836,832

$122,587

1,234,408
1,134,226
10,083,819
13,630,626
216,647
10,667,649
16,337
5, 098,606
180,281
766,664

32,664
41,571
147,894
673,203
23,999
196,763

467,276
1,778,202
53,000,471

$1,151,782
203,996
3,546,481

126,^570
87,618
73,139
3, 641
1,527,439

12,129

-

$8,781,262

$63,596

1,126,458
656,822
10,998,933
16,192,875
250,086
11,733,371
28,365
5,164,837
66,377
684,880

19,218
37,302
316,894
486,136
8,386
334,173

278,675
1,965,096

$1,167,484 $12,626,854

27, 30.7
22,992

97,601
1,167
59,009

4,913,388 . 56,817,026 1,472,769

89,460
4,082,623

—"—
J...

6,782

$98,296 $1,259,632

41,397
1,284,937
1,840
857,034
179,781
15,240,883
18,421,589 1,216,172
19,868
354,973
340, 863
14,543,633
102,261
300,169
6,624,648
7,670
187,905
51,176
668,075
342,445
2,466,652

©
pi

6,718,206

©

27,667
6,713

1,833
2,614
CQ

6,345,249

73,601,889 2,261,647

7,012,207

CD

STATEMENT—Continaed.
1849.
Articles.

Foreign imported.

1860.

to
o

1851.

Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
/ ported..
ported.
ported.
exported.
•

Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
$13,831,823
Cast, shear, German, and other
steel - .
.
..
1,227,138
Wool, unmanufactured..
1,177, 347
13,704,606
manufactures of
Cotton, manufactures of
15,764,841
'384, 635
Silk, unmanufactured
13,791,232
manufactures of
Flax, unmanufactured
127,869
linen and linen fabrics.. 6,907,242
491,633
Hemp, unmanufactured
..
619,774
manufactures of
manilla, sun, and other,
196,634
of India . .
Silk and worsted goods
2,462,289
Total




69,566,953

pi

$109,439

$1,096,172 $16,333,145

$100,746

$1,911,320 $17,306,700

66,044
6,891
201,404
671,082
56,615
388,572

1,332,253
1,681,691
17,161,509
20,108,719
401,386
17,639,624
128,917
8,134, 674
679,814
688,446

40,193

1,570,063
3,833,157
19,507,309
22,164,442
466,449
25,777,246
176,197
8,796,740
223,984
661,768

38,371
7,966
267,379
677,940
43,866
500,168

608,709
1,783,076

8,688
5,307

187,948
13,401
69,439

4,933,129

8,458
5,668

659,362
1,653,809

29,161
27,537
1,705,433

6,043,317

174,934
427,107
7,408
362,637
129,878'
6,031
98,369
3,843
16,796

86,393,348 1,366,941

4,734,424

6,633
11,776

$100,290 $2,265,698

107,382
7,876
46,620

6,663,153 102,764,839 1,811,843

©

7,241,205

©
Hi

29,114
8,023

a
9,534,040

STATEMENT—Continued.
1852.
Articles.

Foreign imported.

Iron, and manufactures of iron,
$18,957,993
andiron and s t e e l . .
Cast, shear, German, and other
1,703,599
steel - . . . . .
1,930,711
Wool unmanufactured
manufactures of. - . _ . _ . 17,673,694
Cotton, manufactures of....;.. 19,689,496
378,747
Silk unmanufactured _. 21,651,752
manufactures of
176,342
Flax, unmanufactured ___.
8,615,709
linen and linen fabrics
164,588
Hemp, unmanufactured
391,608
manufactures of . .
manilla, sun, and other,
942,422
of India
Silk and worsted goods
. . . 1,667,613
Laces, insertings, braids, and
embroideries of wool,cotton,
silk, or linen
Total




. - 93, 743;174

1853. ^

.

Foreign exported.

$134,937
31,669
54,286
266.878
997,030
7,143
604,866
131,163
377
47,831
9,684
6,286

Domestic
exported.

Foreign im- Foreign exported.
ported.

$2,303,819 $27,266,425

7,672,151

18,649
13,622

$262,343

31,637
2,970,313
61,387
; 2,669,718
343,989
27,621,911
27,731,313 1, 254, 363.
282
722,931
607,294
30,434,886
135,684
149,-399
10,236,037
2,310
329,122
479,171 ^ 46,667
1,591,791
.1,880,918

4,572
3,981

1854.
Domestic
exported. .

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
exported.
ported.

$2,499,652 $29,341,775

8,768,894

18,196
16,784

$796,872' $4,210,350

2,477,709
63,247
2,822,186
41.668
32,382,694 1,262,897
33,949,603 1,468,179
7,966
1,099,389
843,164
34,696,831
260,391
10,863,536
179,698
378,246
42,614
62,318
598,251
1,628,329
1,694,038

pi
tei
©
pi

©

5,536,516

93,699
79,717

56,679
21,037

a

• <(»

2,281,927

10,008,241 134,069,220 2,757,124

11,303,526 161,982,777 4,825,229

9,919,282

fcO

STATEMENT-^Oontinned.
to

to
1856.

1856.

Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron, and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Wool, unmanufactured — .-_
manufactures of
Cotton, manufactures of
_
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures of
Flax, unmanufactured .- .
linen and linen fabrics .
^
Hemp, unmanufactured
,
manufactures of
•
._
. manilla, sun, and other, of India
Silk and worsted goods
^-Laces, insertings, braids, and embroideries of wool
cotton, silk, or linen
Total

Foreign exported.

$22,980,728
2,693,137
2,072,139
24,404,149
17,757,112
751,617
24,366,556
286,809
8,617,166
112,763
266,829
2, 045,-653
1,133,839

.$1,565,623
63,068
131,442
2,327,701
2,012,554
71,122
902,136

4,978,315

155,865

112,366,811

7,909,494

278,850
67,306
27,236
198,136
118,557

Domestic exported.
$3,753,472

Foreign imported.

Foreign exported.

6,-857,181

121,320
36,608

9,796,283

$423,221
25,598
14,997
1,266,632
1,680,495
4,256
676,513

6,265,963

27,802

$22,041,939
2,638,323
1,665,064
31,961,793
26,917,999
991,234
30,226,632
• 132,461
11,189,463
57,676
263,730
1,946,044
1,335,247

4, 240,237

•

27,455

^

P
pi

"6,'967,"309
©

179,666
64,249
19,635
12, 256?
14,963

28,698
26., 035

11,210,405

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 10, 1856.




pi

$4,161,008

77,757

136,622,468

Domestic exported.

F. BIGGEK, Register.

tei

No. 28.
Statement exhihiting the value ofi iron, manufiactures ofi iron, and iron and steel, steel, sugar, wines, and all fiahrics ofi
which wool, cotton, silk, flax or hemp, is a component p a r t , imported annually, firom 1847 to 1856, hoth inclusive, with
the duties which accrued thereon during eaeh year, respectively, and brandies for the year 1856.
1849.

1848.

' 1847.
Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, andiron and steel .
Cast, shear, German, andother steel
Manufactures of wool
._
cotton
1.
silk
flax
hemp.
__..
Wines
_Sugar
:
Articles of which wool, cotton; silk, flax or
hemp, is a component part, but which cannot, properly be classified with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods
Embroideries, of wool cotton silk and linen
Clothiug, ready-made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread and insertings
cotton insertings, trimmings, laces and
braids
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables..^
Twine and pack-thread
Seines
..-.
Total




Value.

Duties.

$13,831,823
1,227,138
13,704,606
16,754,841
13,791,232
5,907,242
619,774
1,821,157
8,048,900

2,466,652

614,163 00

2,462,289

653,222
263,859

196,966 60
52,771 80

.6.87,5.90
176,375

176., 277 00
36,276 00

60
18
50
60

716,652
239,526
46,575
602

179,138
69,881
12,479
160

00
60
60
60

663,991
146,410
34,378
182

165,997
36,602
10,313
54

19,256,016 77

84,690 334

22,473,478 16

- 78,667,928

1,965,095

635,656 26

676,404
370,028

228,488 30
67,900 60

68,884,667

©
pi

613,072 26

$12,526, 864
1,284,937
15,240,883
18,421,689
14,543,634
6,624,648
658,075
1,434,009
9,479,817

398,514
67,592
64,809
446

Duties.

20
00
30
70
05
20
00
60
10

66
40
94
01
75
65
88
22
63

$8,781,252
1,126,468
10,998,933
15,192,875
11,733,371
5,164,837
684,880
1,801,951
9,877,212

Value.

Duties.

$2,761,407
165,780
3,365,277
4,117,803
2,833,850
1,093,180
135,754
439,873
3,376,815

99,628
31,863
13,756
80

$3,736,223
203,909
4,247,170
4,658,687
3,739,660
1,327,231
131,615
570,695
2,843,945

$4,132,780
194,688
. 3,780,863
3,911,677
3,653,488
1,184,665
103,954
' 726,374
2,414,670

60
95
65
55
55
60
80
60
00

©

75
60
40
60

21,040,756 50

to
CO

STATEMENT—Continned.
1860.

to
1852.

185L

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufactures of wool
cotton
—
silk
flax — — . hemp.. Wines
_
Sugar
-_
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax or
hemp, is a component part, but which cannot properly be classified with either, viz :
Silk a,nd worsted goods.
. Embroideries, of wool, cotton, silk, and linen.
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear. ..
Laces, thread, and insertings
_.
cotton insertings, trimmings, laces and
braids.
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and pack-thread
Seines
To tal-




Value.

Duties.

$18,957,993
1,703,599
17,673,694
19,689,496
21,661,752
8,516,709
391,608
2,203,230
14,712,847

1,783,076

445,769 00

1,667 613

416,878 25

1,058,994
223,115

317,698 20
44,623 00

,368,812
160,386

410,643 60
32,077 00

$17,306,700
1,570,063
19,507,309
22,164,442
25,777.245
8,795,740
661,768
2,359,279
13,841,426

1,653,809

413,452 25

813,261
186,925

243,978 30
37,185 00

672,627
257,377
62,106
690

168,166
64,344
18,631
177

94,655 133

$4,876,811
211,106
4,752,782
6,002,633
4,518,423
1,630,900
117,689
823,608
2,266,543

Duties.

70
15
85
00
65
80
60
80
80

00
05
30
55
65
00
20
60
80

$16,333,145
1,332,253
17,151,509
20,108,719
17,639,624
8,134,674
688,446
2,065,922
7,665 146

Value.

Duties.

75
25
80
00

756,651
213,785
60,282
299

25,146,423 60

116,070,174

$5,170,213
260,706
5,407,688
5,616,962
6,674,792
1,766; 497
132,353
941,190
4,152,427

76
26
60
70

685,056
206,417
46,014
742

30,977,706 75

109,292,867

189,162
63,446
16,084
89

$5,666, 763
274, 332
4,831, 729
4,887, 638
6,629, 273
1,708, 919
78, 321
878, 604
4,413, 854

133,764
61,354
13,504
222

80
30
15
45
60
10
60
60
10

©
©

a

00
25
20
60

29,327,780 50

2
i^
• o

STATEMENT—Continued.
1853.

Articles.
Value.

Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron
and steel
, $27,255,426
Cast, shear, German, and other steel.. 2,970,313
Manufactures of wool
27,621,911
cotton
27,731,313
30,434,886
silk
10,236,037
flax
479,17l|
hemp
Brandies
Wines
.
i
2,995,631
Sugar
14,987,7761
Articles, of which wool, cotton, silk,
flax, or hemp, is a component part,
but which cannot properly be classified with either, viz :.
Silk and worsted goods.
,
1,880,918
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and
linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of
wear
2,307,135
Laces, thread, and insertings
252,170|
cotton insertiugs, trimmings,
laces, braids, &c
841,757
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables.
121,6601
.Twine and pack-thread
,
68,646
4041
Seines .
Total

1855.

1864.
Duties.

Value.

58,152,621
476,868
7,626,914
6,924,408
7,748,378
2,056,004
96,834

Value.

Duties.

|$29,341,775| &8,777,066
403,624
2,477,709
32,382,5941 8,986,161
33,949,603J 8,613,717
34,696,831 8,805,359
10,863,6361 2,178,895
179,475
698,261

$22,980,728
2,593,137
24,404,149
17,767,112
24,366,656
8,617,165
266,829

1,194,802 20i 3,370,802 1,198,614
4,496,332 80| 13,700,789 4,110,236

470,229 60

1,594,0381

Duties.

$6,873,058
431,767
6,756,006
4,319,033
6,129,583
1,723,573
53,366

3,114,824 1,098,304
14, 673, 647 4,402,064

398,509 60

1,123,839

283,459 75

Value.

^Duties.

$22,041, 939 $6, 587,975 70
2,638,

3231

31,961, 793
26,917, 999|
30,226, 632
11,189, 463
253, 730
2,869, 342
6,796, 068
22,638, 653

1,336,2471

422,746
835,366
333,740
604,846
238,384
60,746
869,342
718,423
761,696

85
40
05
15
70
00
00
20
90

692,140 60|
60,434 00
210,439
30,416
17,663
121

25
00 80
20i

3,927,141 1,178,142 30
368,399
73,679 801
863,5521
266,969
78,653
1,640

213,388
63,992
23,566
462

OOi
25
90 •
00

©
pi
©
H

383,811 75

3,892,749 1,167,824.70

4,664,353 1,999,306 90

1,976,662
318,511

592,698 60
63,702 20|

1,978,344
410,59l|

593,503 20
82,118 20

767, 0561
187,124

191,763 75
46,781 00
16,711 20

1,191,*019
132,172
53,82ll

297,754 75
33,043 00

«66,704]

16,146 30

|160,176, 063140, 242, 508 15|168,460,982145,104, 883 15|127,104, 691184,148, 687 70|l66, 089, 379147,168, 860 05

^ Twine and seines are under one head for the year 1865.
TREASURY DEPARTSIENT, Register*8 Office^ Novemher 10, 1856.



1856.

F. BIGGER, Register.

fe©

126

R E P O R T ON T H E

FIlSTAl^^CES.

No. 29. "
Stateinent exhihiting the exports to and the imports from Oanada and
other British possessionsin North America, firom the 1st day ofi July,
1851, to the 30th day ofi June, 1856.
Increase each successive
year over 1862.

Exports.
Years e n d i n g -

Imports.
Foreign.

Domestic.

. Total.

Exports.

imports.

June 30,1852.. $3,853,919 $6,655,097 $10,509,016 $6,110,299
1853-- 6,736,555 7,404,087 13,140,642 7,550,718 $2,631,626 $1,440,419
1854.. 9,362,716 15,204,144 24,566,860 8,927,560 14,057,844 2,817,261
1855-. 11,999,378 15,806,642 27,806,020 16,136,734 17,297,004 9; 026,435
1856__ 6,314,652 22,714,697 29,029,349 21,310,421 18,520, 333 15,200,122
Total

37,267,220 67,784,667 105,061,887 59,035,732 52,506,8^07 28,484,237
F. BIGGER, Register.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 10, 1856.

No. 30.
General result ofi all receipts and disposal ofi mercharidise within the
United States during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1856.
DURING THE MONTH OF JULY, 1865.
Duty on same.
1. Value ofmerchandise in warehouse on the Ist
of July, 1865 „
$22,627,806 002. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, during July, 1855
_
3,874,666 00
3'. Value of merchandise received in warehouse,
transported from other ports, in July, 1865:
815,622 00
4. Valueof dutiable merchandise entered for coii. sumption,' from foreign ports, in July, 1855•. 16,708,199 O
O
6. Value of free merchandise entered from foreign
ports, for consumption, during-July, 1855.-:
3,133,490 006. Value of merchandise entered for consumption , frOrri warehouse j during July, 1855. _. . ; 4, 540,122 00:
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during July, 1855y
851,663 00'
8. Valueof ruerchandise-entered for expoftation
from wart-hotise, during, July
.
.i.
610f686 oo'
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the close
ofthe month of J u l y . . .
...
--21,503,404 0010. Value of rnerchandise in transitu, at the close
of the month of July.i. ^
.
..
:.
475,122 00'




$6,838,306
1,081,040 36
305,507 19
4,040,628 88

1,378,860 33
249, 033. 48
116,722; 97
6,864,829:84
52, 073^ 88

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.^

127

No. 30—Gontinued.
DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST, 1855.
Duty on same.
1. Value of merchandise in warehouse, on the 1st
of August, 1865.
-. $21,603,404 00
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse,
from foreign ports, during August
2,767,756 00
3. Value of merchandise in warehouse, transported
911,937 00
from other ports, in August
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for con17,771,148 00sumption, from foreign ports, in August —
5. Value of free merchandise entered for con3,074,929 00
sumption, from foreign ports, during August
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption,,
6,161,116 00
•from Warehouse, during August
7. Value of merchandise entered for transporta. 772,628 00
tion to other ports, during August
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation
778,582 00
from warehouse, during August
,
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the close
18,176,176 00
of August
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close of
964,526 00
August
_

$6,864,829 84
849,719 74
277,696 58
4,607,188 44

1,546,249 60
266,025 70
195,908 28
5,900,176 26
68,613 94

DURING THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER, 1855.
1. Value ofmerchandise in warehouse^ on the 1st
of September, 1855
$18,176,176 00
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, during September
2,133,104 00
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
transported fromother ports, in September.
1,337,592 00
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, in September. _ 15,768,140 00
5. Value of free merchandise entered for con-.
sumption from foreign ports, in September..
3,741,174 00
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption
4,181,359 00
from warehouse, during September
7. Value of merchandise entered for tra.nsportation to other ports, during September
_..
868,240 00
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation
1,166,423 00
from.warebouse, during. September
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the close
15,836,002 00
ofthe month of September.
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close
1,367,210 00
pf the. month of September _.-.




$5,900,176 26
676,804 77
362,899 02
3,662,246^26

1,249,201 64
284,772 06
; 268,026 37
6,145,747 30
436,502 76

128

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 30—Oontinued.
DURING THE MONIH OF OCTOBER, 1855.
Duty on same.
1. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the 1st
of October, 1 8 6 5 . . . .
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, in October
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse,
transported from other ports, in October
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, in October
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, in October
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption
from warehouse, during October
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, in October
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation
from warehouse, in October
9. Value ofmerchandise in warehouse at the close
of the month of October
10. Value of merchandise in transitu, at the close
of the month of October

$16,836,002 00

$5,145,747 30

3,918,703 00

1,301,700 31

1,029,234 00

212,369 50

16,442,167 00

3,793,679 81

5,567,126 00
3,092,155 00

1,061,0.69 42

612,163 00

205,993 86

1,445,969 00

276,474 49

15,586,840 00

5,106,004 58

1,465,652 00

452,340 40

DURING THE MONTH OF NOVEi\IBER, 1856.
1. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the 1st
of November, 1856
$15,586,840 00
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, in November, 1865
3,953,896 00
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
transported from other poits, in November,
1855
1,157,056 00
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, in November,
1866.
11,655,702 00
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign port«, in November,
1865.---..-.
-.
7,763,092 00
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption
from warehouse, during November, 1856
2,469,052 00
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, in November, 1855
470,939 00
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation
from warehouse, in November, 1855
1,109,999 00
9 Yalue of misrchandise in warehouse at the
.
close of the month of November, 1 8 5 5 . . . . . . ' 16,647,802 00
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close
of the month of November, 1855
1,095,900 00




$5,100,004 58
1,159,897 46
342,394 92
2,699,694 23

824,658 06
139,871 03
306,805 29
6,330,962 58
S54,936 74

BEPORT OF THE

FIISTANCES.

129

No, 30—Continued,
IDURING THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1855,
Duty on same.
1. Vaiue of merchandise in warehouse oa the ist
of December, 1 8 5 5 - . . .
$16, 645, 802 %^
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, in December, 1856
4,940,642 00
3. Value of merchandise received in wareliouse
transported from other poirts, in December,
1855..
..,
...,
783,673 m
4. Value of dutiable me^'diandise entered for consumption from iforeign ports, in December,
1866
.\
i6,574, 628 00
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, in December,
1856.
,
3,825,585 00
^. Value of merchandise entered for Gonsum.ption
from warehouse, during December, 1855
2,563,3691)0
'^. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during December, 1856.,
, 375,770 m
8. Valu-e of merchandise -entered for exportation
from warehouse, in December, 1855
645,677 00
S. Value of merchandise in 'warehouse at the
close ofthe nionth of December, 1865
_, ,18,787,401 00
iO. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close
ofthe month of December, 1865..
765,924 00

$5,330,962 58
1,654,884 90
256,993 25
3,611,966 03

822,255 72
141,176 68
158,493 98
6,119,914 36
260,309 29

DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY, 1856.

I. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the ist
day of January, 1866
—
$18,787,401 00
3. Value of merehandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, during the month of
January, 1S66
.1
......
...-,
2,718,004 00
3. Value of merchandise^ transported from other
ports and s;^eeived in warehouse during
January, 1866...
.
.
..
449,973 00
4^ Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, during January,
16,536,830 00
1856
:..-.
5c Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, during Janu3,075,222 00
ary, 1 8 5 6 . . . . .
.---€. • Value of merchandise entered for consumption
from warehouse during the month of Janu,% 538, 439 00
ary, 1 8 6 6 . . - .
_
¥. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during the month of
580,416 00
January, 1856..,
-..
•S. Value of merchandise entered for exportation
from warehouse, during the month of Janu594,796 00
, ary,yl866.
1
"9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the
17,.241,727 00
close of the month of January, 1866 •
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close
967,908 00
of the month of January, 1866




$6,119,^14 35
817,801 12
143,725 40
3,964,056 39

1,072,216 ,1$
187,068 42
157,748 01
5,664,408 29
29^7,040 api

130

R E P O R T ON T H E

FIKANCES,

No. 30—Continued.
DURING THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY, 1856.
Duty on same.
Value of merchandise in warehouse on the 1st
day of February, 1866
_
$17,241,727 00
Value of merchandise received in warehouse
from foreign ports, during the month of
February, 1866
3,526,585 00
Value of merchandise transported from other
ports and received in warehouse in February,
1856...
_.--.
442,484 00
Valueof dutiable merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, during February, 1856..---.-.^
16,668,108 00
Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports, during February, 1856.
3,854,919 00
Value of merchandise entered for consumption
from warehouse, during the month of February, 1856
3,578,824 00
Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during February, 1856..
515,693 00
Value of merchandise entered for exportation
from warehouse during the month of February, 1856
614,780 00
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the
close of the month of February, 1856...'.'
16,601,649 00
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the close
' of the month of February, 1866.
1,122,933 00

$5,664,408 29
1,099,856 36
127,185 62
3,685,667 71

1,066,804 39
152,308 07
168,606 75
5,613,730 96
329,882 44

IDURING THE MONTH OF-MARCH, 1856.

1. Value of merchandise, in warehouse, on the 1st
d9,y of March, 1866
2. Value of merchandise received from foreign
ports, during March, 1866
3. Value of merchandise transported from other
ports, and received in warehouse March,
18'66.
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during March,
1856.
,
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during March, 1856
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption,
from warehouse, during March, 1856.
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during March, 1866
8.. Value of merchandise entered for exportation,
from warehouse, during March, 1866
9. Value of merchandise, in warehouse, at the
close ofthe month of March, 1856
10,, Value of merchandise, in transitu, at the close
of the month of March, 1856




$16,601,649 00
4,606,828 00

1,225,114 00

23,251,189 00

$5,613,730 96
1,842,639 62

353,109 99

5,474 939 77

6,078,878 00
3,497,373 00

1,066,316 43

1,095,693 00

329,064 88

• 1,293,722 00

330,871 66

16,346,803 00

6,484,228. 61

1,074,607 00

337,057 48

REPORT 01^ THE . FIKAI^CES.

131'

No. 30—Continued.
DURING THE MONTH OF APRIL, 1856.
Duty on same.
Value of merchandise, in warehouse, on the 1st
day of April, 1856.
•
_.__.. $16,346,803 00
2. Value of merchandise received from foreign"
ports, during the month of April, 1866
• 6,983,027 00
Value of merchandise transported from other
ports, and received in warehouse during the
month of April, 1866.•
736,835 00
4. Viiliie of dutiable merchandise-entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during the
month of April, 1856
J.
21,076,044 00
Value of free merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during the month
of April, 1856
4,991,399 00
Value of merchandise entered for consumption,
from warehouse, during the month of April,
1856.
•3,648,271 00
Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during the month of
April, 1856
_
1,615,942 00
Value of merchandise entered for exportation,
from warehouse, during the month of April,
1,642,585 00
1856.
"
..-...:
Value of merchandise, in warehouse, at the
17,169,867 00
close ofthe month of April, 1856
'
10. Value of merchandise, iu transitu, at the close
1,279,002 00
of themonth of April, 1856

$5,484,228 61
2,150,810 96
265,140 94
4,942,687 87

1,149,921 75
• 482,785 36
268,487 02
5,983,896 38
384,654 72

DURING THE MONTH OF MAY, 1856.

Value ofmerchandise, in warehouse, on the 1st
day of May, 1866..^
.
- . : . $17,159,867 00
Value of merchandise received from foreign
ports, during the month of May, 1866
6,678,116 00
Value of merchandise transported from other
ports, and received in warehouse during
1,840,562 00
May, 1836
'
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during the
month of May, 1856....
_--. 17,748,412 00
Value of free merchandise entered from foreign
ports, for consumption, during the month of
5,976,706' 00
May, 1856
Value of merchandise entered for consumption,
from warehouse, during the month of May,
3,296,107 00
1856
.-Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports, during the month of
2,078,605 00
May, 1856
!
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation,
from warehouse, during the month of May,
1,133,028 00
1856.
Value of merchandise, in warehouse, at the
19,070,895 00
close of the month of May, 1856 —
10. Value of merchandise, tn transitu, at the close
1,491,191 00
ofthe month of May, 1856




15,988,896 38
,2,088,019 09
484,309 81

1,117,601 m~
634,395 m
'266,509 40
6,542,719 1© .
462,:768 77

132

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES,

- No. 30—Continued.
DURING THE MONTH OF JUNE, 1866.
Duty on same.
1. Value of merchandise, in warehouse, on the 1st
dayof June, 1856.
$19,071,763 00
2. Value of merchandise received from foreign
ports, during the month of June, 1856
6,805,357 00
3. Value of merchandise transported from other
ports, and received in warehouse during
June, 1856
863,991 00
4 Value of dutiable merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign poits, during June,
1866.
17,400,215 00
6. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption, from foreign ports, during June, 1866..
6,224,033 00
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption,
from warehouse, during the month of June,
1856
,
3,232,040 00
7. Value of nierchandise entered for transportation to other ports,* from warehouse, during
, June, 1856
1,215,309 00
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation,
from warehouse, during the month of June,
1856
890,629 00
9. Value of merchandise, in warehouse, at the
close of the month of June, 1856
21,354,949 00
,iO. Value of merchandise, in transitu, at the close
of the month of June, 1866
1,668,771 00




$6,643,677 10
2,166,171 34
234,239 67
4,135,671 73

1,086,838 89
366,386 83
217,279 74
7,160,457 97
500,278 16

No. 31.—Synopsis ofi the returns of the banksin the different States, at the dates annexed.

Capital.
O j3

Maine.

Oct.,
Jan.,
June,
Dec.,
Dec,

1850
1854
1854
1854
1&55

32
•60
60
71
75

New Hampshire .

Dec,
Dec,
June,
Sept.,
Dec,
Dec,

1850
1853
1854
1854
1854
1855

22
35
35
35
36
46

Aug., 1850
Aug., 1853
Aug., 1854
July & August, 1855
Sept., 1850
Sept., 1853
Aug., 1854
Aug., 1855

Massachusetts. ,

Rhode I s l a n d .

Conneciicut.

New J e r s e y .

Sept., 1850
Sept,1853
Sept., 1854
Sept., 1855
April, 1850
April, 1853
April, 1854
April, 1855
Sept., 1850
D ^ . , 1853
J u n e , 1854
Sept., 1854
Sept., 1855
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,




1851
1854
1855
1856

Real estate.

Loans and
discounts.

Other in- Due by Notes of
vestm'ts. other b'ks. other b ' k s .

f 3,248,000 •$5,830,230
5,913,870 11,166,519
6,393,369 12,114,697
7,301,252 13,181,908
7,899,793 13,066,956

$111,905
116,842
123,011
112,694
.$8,850
113,789

$778,955
1,581,596
1,681,637
1,781,065
1,396,430

3,821,120
6,518,188
6,751,885
6,664,015
6,891,621
8,037;427

43,670
54,153
53;719
53,596
52,343
56,519

447,453
587,859
593,425
607,139
602,447
769,963

2,197,240
2,914,040
3,275,656
3,603.460

4,423,719
.6,840,93ii
6,572,951
6,710,928

94,497
104,768
136,115
123,237

1,001,789
$16,324 1,301,033
8^132 1,079,686
49;428 1,150,362

127,637
185,999
125,902
54,556

126
137
143
169
63
77
87
92

36,925,050
43,270,500
54,492,660
58,632,350

63,330,024
77,172,079
93,341,953
99,506,711

43
55
63
68
198
313
324
329
338
26
38
32
35

9,907,503
13,164,594
1.5,597,892
17,147,385
48,618,762
79,018,980
81,589,239
83,773,288
85,589,590
3,754,900
5^147,741
5,314,885
5,682,262

389,983
384,800
386,212
375,612
3,321,589
5,272,690
5,556,571
5,178,831
5,857,537

5,335,003
6,666,412
8,225,682
7,010,323
441,164
13,461
28,145 1,004,863
35,429
9.S2,619
70,285 1,242,362
396,035 1.657,411
713,414 1,'890,685
564,522 2,205.068
673^037 2,272,606
736,120 10,403.509
151,528 11,529,339
665,862 10,655.381
767,642 12,475,292
12,666,517

4,048,521
5,346,161
5,325,594
4,547,710

11,645,492
15,917,429
17,511,162
18,682,802

988,235
1,090,463
1,186,509
1,281,60-1
283,844
264,812
262,164
323,092

270,546
267.804
240^ 921
265,228

183,468 1,578,663
224,448 '432,378
1,58,396 1,810,707
71,587 1,639,249

40,500
117,125
140,864
151,875

15,492. .547 151,277
22,844,'911
121,414
25,233,304
111,988
26,385,458
131,072
15,607,315
24,601, 165
644,962
28,292, 321 1,298,677
23,704,458 1,391,218
13, 177,944
107,132,
153,118, 468 21 453,585
161,348,934^20;641,474
163,216. 392'2n,820,653
192,161; 111 20,590,150
7,158,977
10,663,627
9,177,334
10,999,919

974,895
821,964
•/3o;f"-

Due to
Other liaCiiculat'n. Deposites. other b ' k s . bilities.

$2,376
34,071
32,845

$1,223,671
2,446,470
3,816,104
2,914,601
2,011,028

129,399
180,239
182,319
172,502
176.434
236,411

91,444
157,667
103,183
111,684
124,860
241,383

27
33
40
42

Specie.

$475,589 $2,654,208
1,132,610 5,317,750
1,163, .522 4,623,906
1,025,208 5,691.815
753,085 5,077,248

$187,435
365,490
554,679
539,974
464,561

2,375,900
3,376,OuO
3,416,000
3,416,000
3,626,000
4,449,300

Spscie
funds.

1,897,111
3,021,579
3,031,596
2,999,762
3,079,548
3,589,482

566,634
868,357
880,071
977,252
775,410
958,474

127,325
188,173
196,680
201,548

2,856,027
4,764,439
3,986,709
3,704,341

5461703
734,216
745,170
801,039

297,661
,359,699
312,606
385,767
640,622
103,614
202,204 1,145,857
206,921 1,207,381
810,101
281,220
3.031,9.57 10,498,824 10,045,330
3,488,890 18,175,670, 14,149,769
10,792,429
3,591,907 20, .551,709;
3,665,954 16,453.329;13,661,.565
2,958,038 18,096,545 10,910,330

005,
172,
803,
116,
553.
895,
035,
•404,
253,
224,
219:
871,'
415,
573,
266,
507,
340,

622,855
805. .533
826,452
782,659

046,
917,
5.52,
285,

2,993,178
3,563,782
3.828,402
4^409,402

537,761
844,329
880,724
1,157,251
245,349
436,538
459,502
341,754

42,685
418,342
502,949

32,849

$48,006
136,879
161,592
172,628
118,975

.0

O
32,984
22,136
15,715
4,788

11,176,827 6,549,929
15,067,204 8,608,238
18,783.281 6,930,-098
21,478,717 5,947,835
650,560
1,488,586
2,238,856 1,062,615
2,772,367 1,046,658
2,914,596 1,192,449
2,395,311
468,768
3,542,935
716,770
3:910,160 1,008,655
945,844
3;433,081
50,774,193 21,873,928
75, .554,48120,227,967
83.917,411 21:938,504
84^ 970,84021,081,456
88,852,395 26,045,439
2,411,861
4.133,454
3;290,462
3,994,541

$38,285
99,202
164,625
19,5.59
104,173

373,453
486,561
483,875
616.321

979
7,647 .
442,084
474,051
563:313
494,542
133,773
362,729
329,425
357,539

.ffl

o

38,961
829,581
1,022,940
482,975
2,984,727
5,848,627
4,895,832
4,731,884
3,615,502

"CO
CO

No. 31—Continued.

6 ^

5i^
Pennsylvania

Nov., 1850
Nov., 1853,
Nov., 1854
Nov., 1855

Delaware.

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

CO

o
$17,926,222 $39,430,145 n,428,854 ,$1,134,413 $1,203,064 $4,266,916
19,768,864 48,656,884 1,141,649 1,007,843
652,T56 5,375,738
599,662 4,840,118
19,864,825 43,641,393 2.153,492 1,159,740
678,018 5,647,642
22,026,598 52,549,199 2,714,282 1,128,674

12,591,962 $2,864,944
3,804,410 3,879,120
8,769,420 3,927.
4,460,673
155,376
74,600
'81,511
39,'051
39,830

51,022
177,293
267,215
156,055

$4,327,894 $11,798,996 $18,484,779 $5,857,740 $156,8784,331,656 17,420,348 22,747,991 4,640,97r
86,647
3,944,002 16,739,069 21,076,064 3,930,665 2,716,872
25,340,814 4, 955,485
6,733,650 16,883,;
96,792

1851
1854
1855
• 1856

1,293,185
1,343,185
1,393,175
1,493,185

2,264,313
2,915,602
8,048,141
2,906,253

52,986
62,681
37,466
44,086

117,981
124,262
124,356
137,524

Maryland . . . . Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1851
1854
1855
1856

8,123,831
9,558,409
10,411,874
11,202,606

14,900,816
18,858,441
17;588,'718
20,616,005

760,417
825,339
618,295
644,600

405,245
321,007
833,930
318,896

7S, 552 2,709,699
965,796
1,173,200
1.58,827 1,595,092 3,40.5,090
23,256 l,68l,r~"
595,223 1,490,609 1,566,-361
96,51" 2,937,225
698,890 1,649,166 1,482,744
82,961 3,'398,101

Oct.,
Jan.,
Jan ,
Jan.,

1850
1854
1855
1856

9,824,545
12,796,466
14,033,838
13,600,188

269,914
19,646,777
24,913,789 2,259,812
23,331,939 3,127,800
25,319,948 2,647,366

764,282
756,551
786,952
807,981

240,498
26,259
75,309
114,433

North Carolina Nov., 1850
D e c , 1853
Nov., 1854
Nov. & Dec,
1855. •
1851
South Carolina Jan.,
March, 1854
.Tune, 1854
Sept, 1854
Sept., 1855

3,789,250
4,818,565
5,205,073
6,031,945

6,056,726
10,366,247
11,46^,527
11,558,430

150,000
64,175
123,275
123,985

127,806
137,154
145,033
171,037

13,218,031
16,073,580
16,598,196
16,608,253
17,516,600

23,312,330
24,365,090
24,873,688
23,149,098
22,238,900

963,611
2,775,059
1,657,930
1,670,305
8,483,011

13,482,198
12,957,600
18,413:100
11,508,717

Virginia .

Georgia ,

Alab'ama .

Dec,
1850
Dec,
1853
July, 1854, &
• Jan., 1855.
Aug,, 1855, &
Mar., 1856,
Jan.,
1851
Jan.,
1854
Jan.,
1855
Jan., 1866




2,000
29,140
8,814

306,545
852,286
402,179
387,0

1.59,773
133,367
90,149
180,051

502,755
• 860,947
859,010
852,164

170,873
107,075
127,51(
125,30S

" " 8,'66o

3,523,869 .5,838,766 1,923,206
4, 918, .381 .8,621,0.52 2,348,791
7;268,833 1,511,97(:
4,118,197
8,370,345 1,924,756
5,297,983

9,895
71,645
891,2.30
988,108

4,717,732
808,841
10,256,997
635,127
14,298,792 " 6,513,027
5,615,666
10,834,963
815,830
13,014,926
6,204,340 . 668,995

2,923,174
199,848 3,721,042
247,909 2,728,482
25,.999 3,151,109

18,735 1,074,794
1,842,569
672,991
12,769
785,852
4,067

438,947
643,821
409,764
378,690

1,645,028
73,824 1,857,043
39,238 1,291,436
1,360,995

4,249,883
7,320,667
6,667,762
5,750,092

942,098
1,808,537
1,130,329
1,101,113

60,682
186,993
112,047
234,832

4,825
.51,013
. 16,907
10,710

338,429
265,205 5-020.998
419,370 1,869,582 1,611,'709
977,607 1,620,879
472,483
571,049 1,198,421
510,565
951,832 1,057,476
600,880

810,895
645,639
583,573
441,864
424,135

S06,909 2,218,223
1,621,973
1,559,294
1,283,284
1,228,221

11,771,270
9,715,783
8,004,091
6,739,623
6,504,679

3,665,686
8,752,260
8,375,707
2,871,095
3,068,188

3,035,893
1,878,291
1,628,130
l,197,r"^
1,100,299

23,260
159,19
143,267
53,936
46,532

11,421,626 1,574,349 7,195,063 2,377,715 3,117,466
712,954 1,735,422
13,567,469 2,193,848 8,176,932
11,648,559 2,331,661 8,308,929
423,130 l,094,r""

535,5931
603,957
633,744

141,300 2,112,146
247,852 1,576,813
43,611 1,451,880

9,898,827
9,518,777
6,698,869

2,580,826
2,523,227
2,034,455

16,758,403 1,671,234 4,853,508

846,675

513,1

1,955,966

10,092,809

2,525,256

1,998,820
1,125,954
45,647 1,125,490
1,274,944

3,568,235
8,171,487
2,332,176
8,467,242

1,474,!
1,671,448
1,278,022
2,837,656

70,361
471.156
768,'650
713,026

125,697
65,321
53,588
80,648

135,293 1,285,624
81,000
81,500

960,884
362,084
271,801
1,421,445

63,865
111,296
57,061
561,482'

^

h^

1,925,652
552,153
2,710,180 1,271,453
1,596,434 1,125,106
2,186,725
999,764

4,670,458
1,800,580
5,865,142
2,100,000
2,296,400 • 4,397,298
2,297,800
6,117,427

W

5,495
51,546
. 86,602

833,960
1,286,933
1,380,991
1,192,204

433,422 1,452,121
722,035 1,089,935
462,091 1,199,309
623,918
196,911
663,164
181,558
481,289

15,000
10,000

0
pi

0
H
..ffl

Cl

-1851
1854
1855
1855

25
19
19
19

12,370,890
17,359,261
20,179,107
19,027,728

19,309,108
29,.320,582
27,142,907
27,500,348

April,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1851
1854
1855
1856

1
1
1
1

118,460
240,165
240,165
240,165

112.275
863,585
852,739
488,411

, 5,914
4,894

8,400
9,970
11,904
12,613

Tennessee...

Jan.,
Oct.,
Jan.,
Jan..

1851
1853
1855
1856

23
28
32
45

6,881,568
6,599,872
6,717,848
8,593,693

10,992,139
11,846,879
11,756,729
14,880,609

. 432,902
6.38,042
871,076
1,466,465

Kentucky

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1851
1854
1855
1856

26 7,536,927 12, .536,305
85 10,869,664" 21,398,896
84 10,369,717 17,307,667
88 10,454,572 21,132,619

Jan.,
Jan.,
Nov.,
Dec,

1851
1854
1854
1855

6
6
6
6

1,209,13L
1,215,405
1,216,398
1,215,405

3,533,463
3,958,055
3,441,643
4,893,029

Jan.,
April,
April,
Jan.,

1851
1853
1854
1856

23
29
86

None.
1,702,456
2,513,790
3,840,946

None.
586,404
816,841
387,675

None
1,780,617
2,671,903
3,777,676

14
44

2,082,950
5,664,552

4,395,099
7,247,366

3,257,064

59
46

7,281,934
4,045,825

9,305,6.51
6,996,992

57
68
64
66
65

8,718,366
8,013,1.54
7,882,'590
7,166,1531
6,491,421

17,059,593
17,380,255
14,649,297
13,r)78.339
14,921,998

6
7
6
4

764,922
1,084,718
980,416
7.30,433

1,319,305
2,199,093
1,900,942
1,988,087

None.
600,000

None.
1,163,066
1,897,555
1,861,043
3,906,079

Louisiana . . .

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Dec,

Mississippi

Missouri.

Illinois .

Indiana .

Ohio

Michigan .

Wisconsin . . .

Nov., 1850
Dec,
1853
July & Oct.,
1854
Oct., 1855, &
Jan. , 1856.
Nov., 1850
Feb,,
1854
1854
Aug..
Nov., 1854
Feb.,
1856
Jan ,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Dec,

1851
1854
1855
1855

Jan.,
Jan.,
^July,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1851
1854
1854
1855
1856




i
o
19 1,250,000
23 1,400,000
32 1,870,000

5,059,229
6,969,807
6,586,601
7,222,614

8,464,889
11,74.3,152
11,688,296
14,147,470

161,890
234,745
221,760
324,080

4,500
33,893
42;733
85,606

142,390

6,814,-8(6 . 1,917,767
2,200,922
6,821,836
2,413,418
5,850,562
8,618,545 .8,740,101

61,688
108,470
211,681
467,070

10,000
477,425
85,501
664,910

2,322,657
3,102,159
3,011,719
8,608,757

1,256,589
2,809,081
2..577,824
2,555,953

100,807

.pi

6,.605
2,000

hd
O
^Pi

802,641
84,049
60,710
81,152

18,309
6,450
7,740

6,669
8,063
7,744

662,520
616,980
486,456
541,711

1,569,418
67,322 1,443,721
166,395 1,057,140
143,696 2,617,686

729,186
451,.396
491,800
859,.956

1,456,778
126,890 1,982,790
68,209 1,473,040
16,037 2,231,418

419,070
416,192
416,920
488,504

440,127
807,368
216,605
535,730

650,879
2,451,16i
3,284,405 1,115,780
3,819,718
686,370
3', 731,468 965,878

123,928
116,151
111,185
104,622

273,317
121,372

66,028
152,781
49,960
^ 28,83i

.87,510
282,590

None
None.
18,202
880,541
81,158 1,368,203
878,612
79,940 1,108,148 2,354,571

None
233,576
335,339
617,066

364,233
289,67

845,062
108,485
127,238 1,985,114

6,148,837
1,705,070

249,298
231,929

2,200,891
2,808,337
2,537,678
2,466,247
2,476,751

694,962
802,124
743,038
678,r'"

2,794,851 7,643,075
548,978 4,696,249 13,573,510
4,162,r^" 8,628,946„.
4,611,766 12,634,533•
1,198,263
937,835
976,491
1,355,050

2,522,500
2,487,680
1,460,650
2,806,660

1,098,981
1,313,744
1,247,651
1,.331,126

76,280
228,945
234,776
172,426

None.
419,581
565,152
759,474

None.
1,851,788
2,283,526
3,420,985

None.
522,476
1,286,102
1,267,234

None.
815,441

224,842
715,3U5

1,197,880
128,860 1,820,760

3,422,446
7,116,827

630,326
1,764,747

112,175
446,359

100,622

3,087,827
132,946 1,274,^"'^

911,000
698,262

173,573 1,894,357
869,600 1,599,014

8,165,856
4,616,422

2,289,605
1,957,097

879,804

161,176

451, .593 460,692 3,373,272
748,401 3, .534,970
332,909
236, 7.^9 746,770 8,433,2.57
298,222 1,006,525 2,751,312
350,708 1,195,047 3,117,178

1,195,655
1,4.38,842
1,110,4.39
905,565
1,632,'969

93,460
171,855
1-36,359
158,310
106,559

2,750,637
2,319,064
1,849,260
1,690,105
2,096,809 •

1,059,700
9,839,008
8,163,687
8,074,132
9,080,539

5,310,555
7,623,610
6,287,069
6,450, .566
7,101,-326

1,806,
1,866,172
1,607,281
949,727
1,712,040

343,856
249,887
287,851
411,652
296,202

404,691
742,843
392,550
402,520

109,096
108,941
-118,784
97,265

195
4,282
6,162
6,433

125,722
357,672
148,123
152,080

897,364
1,270,939
'500,942
573,840

416,147
1,078,606
1,170,974
1,866,958

42,589
82,496
95,597
53,425

138,930
438^488
187,-522
128,216

None.
825,946
268,308
306,"""
863,161

None
151,1,54
-283.634
341,174
6(18,848

None
20,136
95,459
108,184
67,218

None.
182,482
240,909
834,333
581,718

None.
485,121
786,21.6
740,764
1,060,165

None.
654,423
1,211,111
1,482,053
2.806.841

420,.521 . 221,626
144,998
637,725
146,035
655,431
124,436
517,945
None.
578,721
974,"'"
1,044,021
1,200,08^3

4,742
50,000

1,384,2-32
2,002,636 2,348,859
1,154,533 2,282,973
1,687,632 2,301,747

1,200,000 5,716,001
7,468,460
6,570,568
8,191,625

2,255,169 2,042,149 2,225,896
842,000 1,954,164 2,163,055 2,416,620
4,187,180 3,317,422 1,985,373 3,154,437
2,591,400 2,341,335 2,233,412 6,099,850

None.
8,461
800
24,820
94,261

66,083
95,170
15,345
21,347
None.
8,791
1,501

83,870

63,892
37,166

O

14,116
294,034
241,908

None.
710,954
536,138
456,7-39
1,073,874

ffl

00

No. 32,

00

Comparative view of the condition ofi the hanhs in different sections ofi the Union in 1853-'545 1854-'55, and 1855-'56,
Capital paid in.

Banks a n d branches.

Jjoang ^ n 4 discounts.

Sections.
1854-'55.

1853^'54.

1853-'54.

185^'55.

1856-'56.

1854-'65.

1858-'54.

1853-'56.

188

492
486
129
'108
183

$84,556,4.33
114,8.34,179
46,646,211
38,384,868
16,954,880

$101,80^621
120,758,047
49,256,264
41,016,685
19,342,721

$110,415,090
125,994.239
48,657,450
41,829,368
18,978,130

$149,148,789
283,712,982
73,21-3,195
72,7.51,629
28,676,184

$178,513,958
241,671,978
69,598,123
64,897,883
26,962,816

$177,411,8.38
279,282,487
76,875,681
7.3,512,343
28,150,831

1,307

1,398

801,876,071

832,177,^88

843,874,272

557,397,779

576,144,758

440
464
124

Comparative view ofi the condition ofi the banks in different sections of the Z7mo?i—Continned.
,

o t h e r investments.

Real estate.

Stocks.

Due by other banks.

1853-^^54.

l§54-'55.

$2,136,0.37
7,037,778
9,751,'479
4,899,474
749,033

$757,883
$2,273,850
7,707,859 1,056,988
6,433,401 2,108,791
8, .569,4.33 2,695,359
970,809
881,324.

$685,083
2,150,063
1,032,257
2,418,273
2,898,864

$792,750 $13,032,448 •14,826,667
1,452,809 19,370,777 21,018,905
7,899,880
4,562,214
1,20.5,630
7,913,766
2,912,838 ^ 7,748,566
7,417,283
2,458,989 J , 469,414

$13,842,046
21,989,653
5,316,677
13,979,927
7,512,42§

24,073,801

§0,865,867

7,589,830

8,734,540

8,822,516

'62,639,725

1854-'55.

1855-'o6.

1858-'54.

1854-'55.

Eastern States
,
$888,501
Middle States
24,458,149
Southern States
7,292,394
Southwestern States
2,653,322
Western State.s , , , , , ' , . , , , , . . . 9,062,464

$1,560,879
24,451,870
7,252,541
6,575,858
12,888,489

$1,674,16-5
24,753,76.5
.7,925,596
5,4.54,164
9,677,525

$2,015,838
6,993,600
9,490,007
8,078,778
789,243

44,850,830

52,727,082

49,485,215

22,367,472




1855-'56.

' 1855-'56.

lS63-'54.

55,516,085

1854-'55.

56,788,785

O

ffl

Sections.
1853-'54.

Pi

634,183,280

897
451
116
92
152
1,208

Eastern States
Middle States
Southern States
,,..,,..
Southwestern S t a t e s , . . ,
Western States
,

1855-'56.

1855-'56.

Comparative vieiv of the condition ofi the hanks in different sections ofi the Union—Continued.
Specie funds.

Notes of other banks.

Specie.

Sections.
lS54-'55.

1853-'54.
Eastern States
Middle States ".
Southei-n States
Southwestern S t a t e s . .
Western States
'.

'.

$7,336,184
7,536,523
8,164,870
1,974,-371
2,647,318

$7,456,556
9,4.59,951
2,610,478
1,240,681
2,661,852

1855-'56.
$6,807,215
9,444,2-34
2,649,264
2,428.926
3,449,410

1853-'54.
$202,204
23,860,024
521,024
670,868
825,133

lS54-'54.

1853-'64.

1855-'56.

lS54-'55.

1855-'56.

$240,992
20,745,011
830,758
113,8,56
505,121

$314,065
18,490,9-37
"539,096
16,087
576,976

$6,570,360
22,845,551
8,776,876
16,117, 9.57
5,099,509

$6,746,711
21,509,993
6,755,082
14,305, 640
4,627,120

$6,796,314
. 22,009,791
7,696,291
17,672,577
5,139,090

21,935,738

19,9-37,710

59,410,253

53,944,546

59,814,063

•

22,659,066

23,429,518

24,779,049

25,579,253

O

Comparative view ofi the condition ofi the hanks in different sections ofi the Union—Contmued.
Circulation.

ffl

o t h e r liabilities.

Due to other banks.

Deposites.

1855-'56.

lS55-'56.

1853-'54.

1854-'55.

$49,.396,107 $53,816,469 $47,762,301 $24,898,038 $29,900,989 $31,.596,9-35 $10, .546,6-38 $9,173,754
61,116,263 57,293,622 58,998,468 116,917;925 117,465,664 127,410,259 27,811,364 27,1-3.5,476
40,8.54,139 30,941,217 35,362,506 14, .597,101 11,661,545 12,898,897
3,422,466 .2,587,917
33,258,965 25,130,695 34,972,674 20,064,818 19,702,844 26,800,616
5,832.246 4,410,377
20,063,733 19,765,220 18,652,001 11,710,862 11,679,800 14,498,955
2,709,468 1,849,173

$8,209,891
33,667,304
8,833,224
5,'364,268
2,145,269

$1,765,563
5,956,919
1,30.5,6-36
2,897,101
i;514,067

$1,9.57,913
8.3-39,986
1,821,698
2,630.079
1,349,947

$1,440,876
4,6-58,402
717 762
8.508,6,57
i;902,170

204,689,207 186,952,223 195,747,950 188,188,744 190,400,342 212,705,662

52,719,956

13,439,276

15,599,623

12,227,867

1853-'54.
Eastern States
Middle 8tate3
Southern States
Southwestern States
Western States

,,,,[

pi
W
hj
O
pi

1854-'55.

1855-'56.

1853-'54!

1854-'55.

1855-'66.

lS53-'54.

lS51-'55.

50,322,162 45,156,697

Eastern States.—Msiine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut.
Middle States.—New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland.
Southern States.—YirginiB., North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia.
Southwestern AStofes.—Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri.
Western States.—Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin.
I n the State of Texas there is one bank fat G-alveston,) doing, as is understood, a liraited business. I t h a s not sent any stateraent of its condition to th« Treasury Department.
There are no incorporated banks in the States of California, Florida, Arkansas, or Iowa, or in the Territories of Washington, Oregon, New Mexico, Minnesota, Utah, or K a n s a s . I n
Nebraska, the legislative assembly recently " p a s s e d , " the governor of that Territory s a y s , " s o m e five charters, conferring on private companies the privilege of banking under certain
restrictions." None of thesu companies have yet organized themselves as banking institutions.




00

138

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No.
A general statement of the condition of the hanlcs
i
States.

o

.

Dec. - , 1 8 5 5
Dec. .—, 1855
July Sc.August,

169
92
67
338
35
71
8 ""3'
31
19 " ' 3 8 '
12
16

South Carolina
Georgia.,

18
18

Alabama

4
9 "'io'
1
22 ' V 2 3
7
26
5
1
36
33 " " 1 3 '

Mississippi.
Kentucky
Missouri
Illinois
Indiana

....

2
6

65
4

Ohio

32
Total

1,255

Stocks.

Real estate.

0

......

.

Capital.

s

75
46
42

Maine
New Hampsliire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
N e w York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania..
Delaware
Maryland
Vir^^inia
North Carolina

Date.

0

s

=5

143

Aug. 25, 18.55
Sept. 8, 1855
Ap.dl 1, 1855
Sept. 29, 1855
Jan.
1, 1856
Nov. —, 1855
J a n . —, 1856
J a n . —, 1856
Jan.
1, 1856
Nov. and D e c ,
1855
Sept. 30, 1855
Aug., 18.55, and
Mar., 1856...
Jan. —, 1855
Dec. 29, 1855
Jan.
5, 1856
J a n . —, 1856
J a n . —, 1856
Dec. 31,1855
Jan.
7,1856
Oct., 1855, and
Jan., j856....
Feb. - , 1856
Dec. 24 and 36,
1855
Jan.
7, 1856

$113,789
56,519

$7,899,793
4,449,300

$1,3,066,956
8,037,427

3,603,460
58,632,350
18,682,802
17,147,385
85,589,590
5,682,262
22,026,596
1,493,]85
11,202.606
13,600;188

• 6,710.928
99,506;711
26,385,4.58
23,704,458
192,161,111
10,999,919
52,549,199
2,906,253
20,616,005
25,319,948

131,072
1,391,218
20,590, J 50
, 760,697
2,714,232
44,086
644,600
2,647,366

123,237.
1,281,601
323,092
375,612
5,857,537
265,228
1,128,674
137,524
318,896
807,981

6,031,945
17,516,600

11,558,430
22,238,900

123,985
3,483,011

171,037'
600,880

16,758,403
11,.508,717
5,117,427
2,297,800
27, .500,348
19,027,728
'488,411
240,165
14,880,609
8,593,693
10,454,572 , 21,132,519
4,393,029
1,215,405
337,675
3,840,946

1,671,234
713,026
2,591,400
4,894
1,466,455
678,389
3,777,676

4,853,503
80,648
2,341,335
12,613
541,711
488,504
104,622
79,940

4,045,325
6,491,421

6,996,992
14,921,998

1,705,070
2,476,751

231,929
350,708

7.30,438
1,870,000

'1,988,087
3,906,079

517,945
1,200,083.

124,486'
94,261

343,874,272

634,183,280

49,485,215

$151,875

20,865,867

The above table is believed to embrace all the banks in operation in the difFerent States at the dates annexed except the Trans-Alleghany Bank, in the State of Virginia, which seems to be still in existence, and
which returned a capital in 1854 of $400,000; the bank at Galveston, Texas, yet in operation, with a capital of
$100,000; and some eight or ten banks in Georgia and Tennessee, from which no returns could be obtained.
In the bank report for last year the Central Kailroad and Banking Company, Georgia, appears as owner of
$3,524,427 of real estate. No return has been received from that bank for the year 1855, which will account
for the apparent reduction of the real estate in the table. That bank returned also a capital of $3,500,000.




139

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

33.

according to returns dated nearest to January 1, 1856.

1
1
f

.2
6
o

OT

w

rQ

o
o

Specie.

1

B

1 Circulation. Deposites.
0

s
O)

• 1 •

a

.1
0

Q

.$1,396,430
769,963
$49,428

$464,561
241,383

$5,077,248 i $2,011,028
958,474
3,589,482

$118,975

$f04,173

3,704,341
23,116,024
5,404,104
6,871,102
31,340,003
4,285,079
16,883,199
1,192,204
5,297.983
13,014,926

801,039
21,478,717
2,914,596
3,433,081
88;852,395
3,994,541
25,340;814
852,164
8,370,345
6,204,340

4,788
5,947,835
1,192,449
945,844
26,045,439
616,321
4,955,485
125,303
1,924,756
663,995

7,647
494,542
351,539
482,975
3,615,502

5,7.50,092
6,504,679

1,101,113
3,068;188

234,832
1,100,299

10,710
46,532

1,955,966 10,092,809
3,467,242
1,274,944
8,191,625
7,222,614
7,774
324,080
2,231,418
8,518, .545
4,611,766- 12,634;533
1,355,050
2,805,660
759,474
3,420,985

2,525.256
2,837,556
14,747,470
35,606
3,740,101
3,608,757
1,331,126
1,267,234

1,334,098
481,289
1,687,531

623,918
10,000
2,301,747

467,070
2,555,653
172,425

664,910
532,000

$753,085
236,411

201,548
54,556
$32,845
4,547.710
4,409,402
1,157; 251
385,767
• 341,754
810,101
281,220
2,958,038 18,096,545 10,910,330
502,949
782,659
4,460,683
155,376 6,738,650
39,830
180,051
156,055
1,482,744
82,961 3,398,101
999,764
25,999 3,151,109

71,587
678,018
3,814
698,890
114,433

1,1.50,362
7,010,323
1,242,3622,272,606
12,666,517
1,639,249
5,647,642
387,079
1,649,166
2,186,725

4:067
951,832

785,852
1,057,476

378,690
424,135

135,298

846,675
561,482

1,108,148

1,285,624
1,421,445
6,099,850
, 81,152
2,617,686
3,731,463
28,331
. 2,354,571

7.740
859;956
965,878
33,270
517,066

37,ies

132,946
1,195,047

1,274,992
.3,117,178

598,262
1,632,969

369,600
106,559

1,599,014
2,096,809

4,516,422
9,080,589.

1,957,097
7,101,325

379,804
1,712,040

161,975
296,202

21,347
1,501

402,520
363,161

97,265
603,848

6,433
57,218

152,080
531,713

573,840
1,060,165

1,366,958
2,80.6,341

53,425

128,216
1,073,874

8,822,516

62,839,725

70,285
673,037

2,233,412
143,696
535,730

1,360.995
1,228;221
513,697

^
16,037

24,779,049 19,937,710 59,314,063 195,747,950 212,705,662

96,792
8,000
938,108
36,602

241,903

52,719,956 12,227,867

Since the bank returns were received'from New Hampshire two new chartered banks have gone into operation in that State—the Tennichuck Bank at Nashua, with a capital of $100,000, and the Sonhegan Bank at
? Milford, with a capital of $100,000.
Since the bank returns of the banks in New York included in this report, and dated September, 1855, were
received, some twenty new banks have been organized in that State. New banks have been organized in
other States also during the present year, but nothing is known at the Treasury Department with respect to
their amount ofcapital or their condition.




No. 34.—Comparative view of the condition of the hanks of the United States, according to returns nearest to January
1, 183T, 1843, 1851, 1854, 1855, and 1856.
1837.

1843.

1851.

1854.

o

1856.

1855.

Number of banks
Number of branches..

634
154

.577
114

791
148

1,059
149

,163
144

1,255
143

Number of banks and branches-

788

691

879

1,208

1,307

1,398

$290,772,091 $228,861,948 $227,807,553 $.301,367,071 $332,177,288 $343,874,272
Capital paid in
_
Eesources :
525, 115,702 254,544,937 413.756,799 557,397,779 576,144,758
634,183,280
Loans and discounts
44,350,330
22,388,989
28,380,050
52,727,082
49,485,215
Stocks
^
-12, 407,112
22,367,472
20,219,724
22,826,807
24,073.801
20,865,867
Beal estate
_
19, 064,451
7,589,830
8,935,972
13,343,599
8,734,540 .
8,822,516
Other investments
-.
10, 423,630
55,516,085
50,718,015
20,666,264
55,738,735
62,639,725
Due by other banks
59, 663,910
22,659,066
17,196,083
13,306,617
23,429,518
24,779,049
Notes of other banks.__
36, 533,527
25,579,253
15,341,196
6,578,375
21,935,738
19,937,710
Specie funds
,
5, 366,500
59,410,253
48,671,048
33,515, 806
53,944, 546
59,314,063
Specie
_
',
37, 915,340
Liabilities:
195,747,950
58,563,608 155,165,251 204,689,207 186,952,223
149, 185,890
Circulation
^
212,705,662
56,168,628 128,957,712 188,188,744 190,400,342
Deposites
_. 127, 397,185
52,719,956
45,156,697
50,322,162
46,416,928
21,456,523
421,118
Due to other banks
_
, • 62,
12,227,867
15,599,623
13,439,276
6,438,327
7,357,033
36, 560,289
Other liabilities
_
,
Aggregate of immediate liabilities, i. e., of circulation, de461,173,568
posites, and dues to other banks
339, 004,193 136,188,754 350,539,891 443,200,113 422,509,262
Aggregate of immediate means, i. e., of specie, specie funds,
166,670,547
74,067, 062 131,926,342 163,164,657 1-55,048,537
notesof other banks, and sums due from other banks
139, 479,277
22,706,431
25,136,252
11,164,727
27,188,889
Gold and silver in United States treasury depositories
82,020,494
81,133,435
84,546.505
59,835,775
Total specie in banks and treasury depositories
__,

NOTES—In January, 1837, the inflation of paper credits, consequent on the deposite bank system and other causes, had nearly reached its height. The revulsion tliat followed was
most severely felt in the latter part of 1842 and the beginning of 1843.
In 1^48 the first deposites of California gold were made at the United States mint.




pi
O
pi
O
!^

w

Cl

R E P O R T ON T H E

141

FINANCES.

No. 35.
Statement of the amount of capital employed hy hankers^banking without
charters, and hy money and exchange hrokers, in the different States.
Amount of
capital.

State.

Massachusetts-

Boston
Worcester
Northampton
Bridgewater .

Jan. 9,
Dec. 12,
Dec. 10,
Feb. 14,

1856 $20,000,000
1856
.
60,000
1856
6,000
10,000
1856
20,066,000

Connecticut

Norwich

Dec. 12, 1855

25,000

New York-

New York--Niagara Falls
Cape Vincent
Eochester
Oswego
Dansville
Palmyra
Plattsburg __
Dunkirk
Clinton
Corning
CanandaiguaBuffalo

Jan.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.
Dec.
Mar.

9, 1856

41,500,000

18, 1855
11, 1855
11, 1855
8, 1855
13, 1855
13, 1855
13, 1855
13, 1855
15, 1856
21, 1856
10, 1855

20,000
20,000
305,000
158,000
100,000
100,000
25,000
21,000
10,000
65,000
40,000
700,000

24, 1856

43,064,000
New Jersey-

Newark
Bordentown .

Dec. 15, 1855
Feb. 12, 1856

45,000
5,000
60,000

Pennsylvania .

Philadelphia..
Uniontown - _.
Pottsville
Allegheny _..
Carlisle
Wilksbarre - >.
Pittsburg
Meadville
West Chester .
Hollidaysburg
Lewistown _-.
Mauch Chunk.
Washington ..
Tamaqua
Erie
- - -.

Mar.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.

11, 1856

25,000,000

18, 1855
13, 1855

10,000
400,000
50,000
50,000
115,000
4,800,000
75,000
100,000
105,000
70,000
50,000
35,000
10,000
470,000

14:, 1855
14, 1855
14, 1855
12, 1855
13, 1855
25, 1856
15, 1856
12, 1856
9, 1856
8, 1856
11, 1856
10, 1856

31 340,000
Delaware.




Wilmington.

Dec. 24, 1855

3,000

142

R E P O R T QN T H E

FINANCES.

No. 35—Continued.
State.

Date.

Place.

Maryiand—Continued

' Annapolis
Baltimore
Frederick

Dec. 8, 1855
Dec. 13, 1855
Dec. 9, 1855

Amount of
capital.
$25,000
5,600,000
40,000
5,665,000

Petersburg
Alexandria
Fredericksburg
Norfolk
Eichmond
Portsmouth
Lynchburg -

Yirginia

''

1

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.

24,
8,
12,
11,
17,
9,
25,

1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855

65,000
340,000
21,000
90,000
200,000
20,000
100,000
826,000

South Carolina -_ «

Charleston

Dec. 13, 1855

100,000

Greorgia

Atlanta
Macon

Dec. 27, 1855
Dec. 31, 1855

25,000
30,000

-

55,000
Alabama..

-

Mobile . Montgomery
Talladega _ _._
Huntsville

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.

20,
17,
31,
18,

1855
1855
1855
1856

195,000
510,000
25,000
250,000
980,000

Florida

Dec. 24, 1855

Louisiana

»

New Orleans
Shreveport

250.000

Jan. 16, 1856
. Dec. 26, 1855

Apalachicola-

1,125,000
40,000
1,165,000

Texas . .
Mississippi

Austin

'

- . - - - - - „ . - - _- .. Dec. 23, 1855

.
«„-_-. Aberdeen
Natchez
<.-»« «Yazoo Citv
......
Port Gibson
,.
YicksbursT ----...l
..
Lexinc'ton
-_ -

---

Pec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.

—,
17,
18,
21,
19,
—,

1855
1855
1855
1855
1856
1856

25,000
200,000
200,000
100,000
100,000
380,000
30,000
1,010,000

Arkansas --..«-

...




..-- Little Eock
o

»

- - . Jan. 10, 1856

30,000

143

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 35-r-Continued.

Tennessee.

Winchester

Dec. 14, 1855

Kentucky .

Bowling Green
Lexington
Louisville .'
Maysville
Paducah
;.

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.

17,
14,
—,
24,
28,

1855
1855
1855
1855
1855

20,000

16,000
'355,000
280,500
60,000
100,000
• 811,500

Missouri.

Aannibal.
PalmyraSt. Louis.
Boonville
Glassgow

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.

19,
12,
27;
12,
21,

1855
1855
1^55
1856
1856

35,000
100,000
250,000
500,000
25,000
910,000

Illinois -

Galena
__
Peoria
Elgin
Aurora
La Salle
Henry
...,
Peru
I
_
Springfield.
Chicago
..Waukegan
Quincy
:
Decatur
_
Ottowa
Bloomington
Freeport
Princeton.
..'.
Belvidere
^
Jacksonville

9

Dec. 22
Dec. 18
Dec. 22
Dec. 20
Dec. 20
Dec. 19,
Dec. 20,
Dec. 19
Dec. 17
Dec. 24,
Dec. 22
Feb. —
Feb. 15
Feb. 11
Dec. 31
Feb. 22
Jan. — ,
Mar. 7

1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1856
1856
1856
1855
1856
1856
1856

550,000
550,000
10,000
50,000
20,000
15,000
48,000
300,000
273,100
10,000
130,000
45,000
200,000
50,000
70,000
10,000
110,000
5,000
2,446,100

Indiana,

Terre Haute
Lafayette-_'.
New Albany
Evansville.Indianapolis
.Shelbyville .
Eichmond _ _
South Bend.

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Fcb.

Feb.

22
—
13
15
14^
25
21,

1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1856
1856
1856

120,000
266,000
20,000
- 5,642
150,000
50,000
125,000
10,000
746,642

Ohio-




Marietta..
Bucyrus..
Scindusky.

Dec. 21, 1855
Dec. 15, 1855
Dec. 15, 1855

35,000
30,000
60,000

144

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 35—Continued.
state.

Ohio.

Amount of
capital.

Place. .

Portsmouth
Toledo
Circleville
Columbus
Xenia
Urbana
Akron
Springfield
Zanesville
Dayton
._,
Massillon-.;
Warren
Cleveland
IWn
Mount Vernon
Eavenna
Cincinnati
Chillicothe
Athens
Lebanon
Fremont
,
Salem _
Ir(^iton
Lancaster

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Dec.

1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855,
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1855
1856
1855
1856
1856
1856
1856
1856
1856
1856.
1855

170,000
240,000
110,000
265,000
43,000
50,000
50,000
86,000
100,000
500,000
10,000
10,000
351,000
28,500
70,000
^ 25,000
2,225,000
120,000
5,000
10,000
80,000
20,000
30,000
95,000
4,718,500

Michigan.

Ypsilanti
Battle Creek.
Pontiac
Lansing
Niles
Kalamazoo _ _.
Grand Eapids
Detroit
Flint.

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Apr.

21, 1855
15, 1855
17, 1855
19, 1855
1855

19, 1856
21, 1856
25, 1856
15, 1856

60,000
150,000
1,000
10,000
60,000
86,131
20,000
200,000
9,000
586,131

Wisconsin .

Whitewater
Milwaukie.
PlattevilleAppleton . .

Dec. 20, 1855
Dec. 17, 1855
Feb. 8, 1856
Mar.
1856

50,000
150,000
10 000
100,000
310,000

Iowa.




•Keokuk _.
Burlington...
Fort Madison.
Davenport
Muscatine
Des Moines . .

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Feb.
Mar.

15, 1855
13, 1855
24, 1855
20, 1855
20, 1856
15, 1856

95,000
. 90,000
35,000
250,000
190,000
113,00.0
773, 000

REPORT ON TrfE FINANCES,

145

No. 35—Continued.
state.

Date.

Date.

Stockton
Sacramento City
Shasta
Eough and Eeady
Sain Francisco

California

Downieville
Marysville- -

--

-

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.

—, 1856
—, 1856
7, 1856
17, 1856
19, 1856

Apr. 2, 1856
Apr. = 1, 1856

.
District of Columbia

Amount of
capital.

$50,000
290,000
100,000
30,000
1,200,000
1,670,000
165,000
470,000
2,305,000

G-eorgetown
-.
Washington^ ^--.^-

Dec. 11, 1855
-. - - . - . Mar. and Apr..
1856.. -. .

389,580
,905,258
-1,294,838

Minaiesota Territory. . . . . . . . St. A n t h o n y - i - - - - - - •

- Mar. —,1856

25,000

/

Total-

1

10




118,036.080

146

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 36.
Table showing the population of the different States and Territories, and
the value ofi the real and personal estate therein; it having been prepared in p a r t firom official enumerations and valuations, and in p a r t
upon estimates.
Value of property.

States.
Alabama...
Arkansas
California
.,.,.
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois , . . . • < . . . » • . .
Indiana
Iowa....
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
.<...
Maryland
Massachusetts . . . • • . .
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
,
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin
District ofColumbia

835,192
253,117
335,000
401,292
97,295
110,725
935,090
1,242,917
1,149,606
325,014
1,086,587
600,387
623,862
639,580
1,133,123
509,374
671,649
831,215
324,701
569,499
3,470,059
921,852
2,215,750
2,542,960
166,927
705,661
1,092,470
500,000
325,206
1,512,593
552,109
59,000

f279,233,027
64,240,726
165,000,000
203,759,831
30,466,924
49,461,461
500,000,000
333,237,474
301,858,474
110,000,000
411,000,198
270,425,000
131,128,186
261,243,660
597,936,995
116,593,580
251,525,000
223,948,731
103,804,326
179,750,000
1,364,154,625
239,603,372
860,877,354,
1,031,731,304
91,699,850
303,434,240
321,776,810
240,000,000
91,165,680
530,994,897
87,500,000
25,568,703

65,000
83,500
36,000
5,500
39,000
11,000
4,500

20,000,000
7,250,000
7,775,000
1,650,000
4,250,000
2,350,000
1,235,644

26,964,312

9,817,611,072

This sum to be.,added'for .property not valued, for undervaluations,
and for the-rise in the, value, of property since 1850.

1,500,000,000

TERRITORIES.

Minnesota ...
New Miexico .
Oregon...,.
Washington.,
Utah
,
Kansas
Nebraska...

Total.




11,317,611,072

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

147

NOTES TO TABLE.

In the construction of this table, when the enumerations and valuations are not given from official State returns, it has been assumed
that; the population and property.of the country have increased in fhe
.same ratio since the general census of 1850, in which they increased
during the decennial period from 1840 to 1850. Tlie increase has,
without doubt, been proportionally greater.
In some States, the latest official valuations have been given. These
are of various dates, and are, it is believed, much too low. The valuation for Massachusetts is for the year 1850; for Maryland and Michigan, for 1853; for Connecticut, New York, and Missouri, for 1854;
and for other States, for 1855.
With respect to some of the States, the official valuation is so very
low that it has been deemed necessary to add to it considerably in order to represent fairly the true value of the property in those States.
Thus, to Pennsylvania $500,000,000 have been added; to Virginia,
Tennessee, and Missouri, $100,000,000 each.
Texas and California are exceptional cases, and their population
and wealth have been estimated upon such data as could be obtained.
The comptroller of Texas is the authority for that State.
The governor of Georgia says, in a letter to the Secretary of the
Treasury, dated the 18th of April, 1856, that in that State ^ the to^
tal aiiiount of the taxable property of all lands is about $500,000,000..''
The governor of Minnesota says, in aletter dated January 29,1856^
that the returns he transmits of the value of the property in that Territory '^ are but approximations,'' the returns not being complete.
The official valuation of the property in the Territory of Nebraska,
for the year 1855, was so small—only $617,822—that it was thought
proper to double it in the table, and it is still too low, probably.
The auditor of State of the State of Indiana says, in his annual
report, (November 24,1855,) ^ ^ A new valuation of the real estate would
probably make the total taxables $380,000,000."
The Territories of Kansas, Nebraska, and Washington, do not appear at all in the census of 1850, except as component parts of other
States or Territories, and, with respect to them, the estimated numbers and values may be very inaccurate, as they may be indeed with
respect to the other Territories, and some ofthe new States.
The State valuations of property are for assessment purposes, and
are not only low, but the taxable property only' has been valued ; and
in all the States there are many kinds of property—some of it valuable—that are not taxed.
Supposing the whole population of the United States to be 27,000,000, then, taking the State of Maine as a criterion with respect to the
value of property, the amount for all the States and Territories will
be, in round numbers, about $5,760,000,000. '
Taking the State of New York as a criterion, the amount will be,
in round numbers, about $10,611,000,000.
Taking the Stateof Kentucky, then it will be about $10,006,000,000.
Taking the State of Illinois, it will be about $7,290,000,000.



148

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Taking the State of Arkansas, it will be about $6,750,000,000.
Taking the State of Georgia, it will be about $14,430,000,000.
Taking the two extremes, the maximum and-the minimum, Georgia
and Maine united, it will be about $10,000,000,000.
Taking Ohio and Kentucky, which will make perhaps a very fair
mean, the amount will be $10,268,000,000.
Taking these seven States as a criterion, the amount will be about
$9,233,000,000. This is too low, however, for the official valuation is
too low in them all, unless it be Georgia.
The $1,500,000,000 added for under valuations for property not
valued, and for the increase in value since 1850, is not an excessive
allowance.
In the" calculations, inconsiderable fractions of numbers and values
have not been regarded.




No. 37.
Statement exhibiting the amount ofi moneys in the United States Treasury ; amount ofi drafits outstanding ; amount suhject
to drafit; amount ofi receipts and amount ofi drafits paid, as shown hy the Treasurer's weekly exhibits, rendered during
the yearending June-3Q, 18^^.
"
, .
Date.

Amount of deposits.

Amount of drafts :
outstanding.

$20, 807,854
21, 075,162
21, 282,614
21, 052,022
21, 592,694
22,, 376,336
22, 677,512
22, 939,101
23, 048,485
23, 718,730
24, 518,637
24, 811,315
24, 597,322
24, 556,610
24, 339,162
24, 538,594
24, 720,540
24, 915,031
25, 104,188
25, 123,389
25, 305,276
24, 960,254
24, 789,218
24, 704,535
24, 732,823
24, 246,982

$2,430,197
2,650,115
2,676,963
2,164,694
2,420,969
2,862,430.
3,641,685
3,022,482
2,737,505
2,687,808
2,826,094
3,042,074
2,552,229
2,160,282
2,250,202
2,524,874
2,619^563
2,556,060
2,444,558
1^,923,.715
2,230,407
1,764,817
1,679,748
1,898,723
1,979,032
2,038,054

Amount subject to Amount of receipts.
draft.

Amount of drafts
paid.

1855
July 7._
July 14
July 21
July 28
August 4
August 11
August 18
August 25
September 1
September 8
September 15
September 22
September 29
October 6October 13
October 20
October 27
, November 3
November 10
November 17
November 24
December 1
December 8
December 1 5 . - ,
December 22
December 29

,

,

"

_._




,

51
61
03
50
89
57
2797
66
03
09
75
55
13
08
71
13
36
49
34
27
94
65
68
01
80

9424
51
46
10
97
42
51
69
94
05
03
88
58
25
73
54
91
87
88
48
41
01
81
16
79

$18,377,656 57
18,426,-047 37:
18,606,650 62
•18,887,428 04
19,171,725 79
19,623,905 60
19,135,,826 85
19,916,619 46
20,310,979 97
21,030,921 09
21,692,543 04
21,769,241 72
22,045,092 67
22,396,327 55
22,088,959 83
22,013,719 98
22,100,976 59
22,368,970 45
22,659,629 62
23,199,673 46
23,074,868 79
23,183,695 42
23,109,470 64
22,805,811 77
22,753,790 85
22,208,928 01

$1,393,301 37
1,729,269 32
1,473,283 09
1,523,367 31
1,503,228 96
2,159,686 92
1,375,369 40
1,680,456 98
1,197,031 12
1,629,666 18
1,536,397 55
1,107,090 17
1,459,300 86
1,353,623 99
1,200,746 46
855,834 62
1,279,982 59
1,334,806 07
1,341,396 44
1,468,198 30
1,056,159 09
1,060,143 68
1,006,912 33
1,010,888 51
1,167,636 71
2,354,257 22

$1,778,782 33
1,461,961 22
1.265,831 67
1,763,948 84
962,566 57
1,376,045 24
1,075, 193 70
1,418,867 28
1,087,647 43
859,420 81
736,490 49
814,411 51
1,673,294 06
1,394,336 41
1,418,194 51
656,401 99
1,098,037 17
1,140,314 84
1,152,239 31
1,448,997 45
874,272 16
1,416,907 12
1,166,206 51
1,095,571 58
1,129,349 28
2,840,097 43

O
pi
O

>
Cl

CO

STATEMENT—Continued.

Ox

o
Date.

I Amount of deposites. Amount of drafts
outstanding.

Amount subject to
draft.

Amoimt of receipts.

$22,702, 939 99
22,980, 792 12
23,479, 665 58
24,081, 625 63
23,484, 725 92
22,154, 437 47
22,703, 461 96
22,714, 95'6 23
23,391, 246 35
23,562, 114 21
23,620, 096 87
23,372, 285 63
23,771, 270 97
23,787, 496 00
24,089, 020 74
24,885, 073 91
25,412, 462 39
25,683, 968 94
26,324, 107 20
27,336, 092 74
26,228, 880 98
26,343, 787 49
20,727, 604 66
20,271, 260 35
20,609, 244 37
19,534, 064 61

$31,030, 006 64
1,381, 392 85
1,433, 211 17
1,782, 188 06
750, 662 22
1,159, 952 56
1,156, 455 31
. 1,091,756 70
1,770, 958 44
1,393, Oil 25
1,348, 333 83
1,608, 344 13
2,455, 940 55
1,275,•780 80
1,362, 959 27
1,563, 485 12
1,516, 324 82
1,450, 920 03
1,331, 866 30
1,752, 056 89
1,234, 686 13
1,427, 518 75
1,217, 358 47
1,224, 589 22
1,494, 064 56
1,604, 056 18

Amount of drafts
paid.

1856.
. Jaauary 5
January 12
January 19
January 26
February 2
February 9_.February 16_.,
February 2 3 - . March 1
March 8 ._
March 15
March 22
_
March 29
April 5
April 12
April 19
April 26
May 3_
_
May 10-_
_
May 17
May 24
_
May 3 1 June 7*
June 14
.^__
June 21
June 30

--

_-_

1.

$24, 248.673
24, 962,693
25, 421,325
25, 888,079
25, 633,098
24, 983,252
24, 461,192
24, 477,460
25, 428,554
25, 702,642
25, 740,563
2^; 746,635
25, 957,200
^ 25, 793,534
25, 915,166
26, 291,660
26, 941,982
27, 571,279
27, 941,994
28, 901,878
28, 490.674
28, 552,798
24, 781,896
23, 197,225
22, 940,887
22, 769,481

38
69
68
70
15
94
52
40
25
93
41
00
15
88
66
31
26
10
65
89
29
36
94
87
77
64

$1,545, 733
1,981, 901
1,941, 760
1,806, 564
2,148, 372
2,828, 815
1,757, 730
1,762, 504
2,037, 307
2,140, 528
2,120, 456
2,374, 349
2,185, 929
2,006, 038
1,826, 145
1,406, 576
1,529, 519
1,887, 310
1,617, 887
1,565, 786
2,261, 793
2,209, 010
4, 054,292
2,925, 965
2,331, 643
3,235, 417

39
57
10
07
23
47
56
17
90
72
54
37
18
88
92
40
87
16
45
15
31
87
28
52
40
03

$1,028, 316 06
667, 372 54
974, 579 18
1,315, 434 04
1,005, 643 77
1,809, 797 77
1,678, 515 73
1,075, 488 82
819, 864 59
1,118, 922 57
1,310, 423 36
2,602, 262 54
1,249, 666 40
1,439, 446 07
1,241, 327 49
1,187, 001 47
865, 992 87
821, 623 18
961, 150 75
792, 172 65
1,645, 890 73
1,365, 394 68
4,988, 259 89
2,809, 260 29
1,750, 402 66
1,775, 462^ 31

SAM. CASEY, Treasurer United States.
TEEASUEY OP THE UNITED STATES, Novembcr 6, 1856.




Pi

O
pi
O

Cl

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

151

No.'38.
A No.l.
AUGUST 1,

1856.

On motion of Mr. L. D. Campbell,
Besolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury be requested to furnish a statement of the farming, planting and sugar crops' of the
United States for 1840 and 1850, as given by the census, with an estimate of the crops of 1855 in tabular form.
^ A No. 2.
Also a statement of the number of acres devoted to the various crops
in 1840 and 1850, with an estimate of the same for 1855, adding
thereto such columns in figures as may be necessary to exhibit the
increase and decrease in the number of acres employed in the principal crops of 1855, and the increased and decreased product per acre,
with additional columns showing the per C3ntage of increase and decrease in iacres, product per acre, and aggregate product of each crop;
together with such suggestions for the enlargement of the market at
home and abroad as he may deem expedient.
A No. 3.
Also to collect information on the wool growing interest of the
United States.
A No. 4.
Also on the wool manufacturing interests, with an estimate and
statement of the capital employed therein in 1840, 1842, 1846, and
1856, designating the number of mills producing broadcloth in the
respective periods named, with such suggestions in regard to the
revenue laws as he may deem expedient for permanent establishment
ofthe woolmanufacturing interests of the United States.
A No. 5.
Also to collect information on the present condition of the cotton
manufacturing interest, and to make such suggestions as he may deem
necessary to promote the manufacture of the finer fabrics in the United
States, and to enlarge the market for cotton, at home and abroad.
A No. 6.
" Also to collect information on the iron manufacture of the United
^
States; also on the manufacture of steel; also on the manufacture of
iron and steel.



152

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

A No. -7.
. Also to collect information on articles not grown and produced in
the United States, with reference to the enlargement of the free list.
Also, on the leather and the manufactures of leather in the United
States. Also on th^ sugar growing interest in the United States and
the manufactures thereof. Also on the manufacture of glass, porcelain and stone ware in the United Sfcates. Also on the growth and
manufacture of hemp, and flax in the United States. Also o n t h e
mineral coal^, lead and copper interests of the United States. A l ^
on the growth and manufacture of silk in the United States, with
reference to the gradual domestication of this interesting branch of
manufactures.
A No. 8.
Also on the shipping interest ofthe United States j witha statemeiit
of the tonnage empiloyed in the foreign, lake, coasting and river trade,
and railway and carriage tonnage.
A No. 9.
Further resolved. That the Secretary of the , Treasury be requested
to furnish a statement, as far as practicable, of the aggregate amount
of federal. State, city, county, railroad, canal, and other corporation
bonds, stocks and other evidences of debt held in Europe or other
foreign countries on the 30th June, 1856, specifying separately, as far
as the same can be ascertained, the amount of each of the above
description of bonds, stocks, &c.
A No. 10.
Also to furnish a statement, of the amount of gold and silver coined
at the United States inint and branches from 1793 to July 1, 1856-,
with a statement of the entire cost of coinage since the establishnient
of the mint, including buildings, machinery, &c.; also,- an estimate"
of the amount of gold and silver coins now remaining in the United:
States.
A No. 11.
Also a statement of the annual export and import of gold and silver
from 1793 to July 1, 1856, with such suggestions to prevent^and restrain the export thereof, as he may deem relevant to the establishment of a sound, stable and healthy hard money currency, and to'
retire the smaller denominations of bank bills as fast as gold and
silver coin can be obtained and substituted.
A No. 12.
Also to suggest the best method of stimulating and increasing tha
export of agricultural and other productions of the United States, with



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

153

a view of preventing the export of the precious metals, stocks and
bonds, by requiring and making it the interest of foreign nations to
take our surplus agricultural productions, instead of making it their
interest, as we now do, to take our gold to buy wheat, cotton, tobacco,
&c., from other nations.
A No. 13. :
Further resolved. That the Secretary of the Treasury be requested
to rejDort the frauds and under valuations in customs under the act
passed 30th August, 1842, and 30th July, 1846, designating the
number of cases and the amount of frauds and under valuations which
have occurred under the respective acts.
A No. 14.
Also to report the advantages and disadvantages of specific and
ad valorem duties in reference to the interests of the country, a n d t h e
frauds and under valuations incident to the two' classes or systems of
duties.
' ' >
A No. 15.
Also to report as near as practicable, the amount and proportion of
imports made by American born citizens on their own account, and
the amount imported by citizens of foreign birth, aliens and citizens
of other countries.
A No. 16.
Also to enquire into and report the advantages and disadvantages
of the home valuation /system in the collection of customs as adopted
and practised by the British government, with reference to its incorporation in the revenue laws of the United States.
A No. 17.
Mr. Quitman's Ojmendment.
Further resolved. That the Secretary of the: Treasury be directed to
report to this House, at its next session in December, under specific
heads, the amount of ajDpropriations and expenditures of every kind
incurred b y t h e government annually since the-30th June, 1825, in
the construction, repair, rent and preservation of custom-houses; the
cost, expense and maintenance of revenue cutters and other vessels
engaged permanently or temporarily in the revenue service; aiid the
amount of all other expenditures incurred in or resulting from the
collection of the customs or duties on imports since the above date.




B No. 1.

Ox

Statement showing the annual average export price of flour at New York from 1800 till June 30, 1855; also, the annual
average price of flour in the cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, and St. Louis, from
1800 till June 30, 1855.
[NOTE.—The price of flour for New Orleans and St. Louis could not be obtained for earlier years than those respectively given.]

1800.

Export price

$10 00

1801.

$13 00

1802.

$9 00

1803.

$7 00

1804.

$7 75

1805.

$13 00

1806.

1807.

1808.

$7 50

$8 25

1809.

1810.

1811.

$6 00

$7 50

$8 25

$10 50

$10 75

$13 00

6 25

7 63

9 42

10 42

10 90

14 67

1812.

1813.

11 00

12 10

8 17

7 65

8 97

11 25

8 25

7 73

New York

9 38

10 14

6 19

6 01

7 15

9 59

7 13

6 76

5 15

6 79

8 77

9 05

9 08

7 76

Philadelphia

9 75

10 85

6 94

6 75
^

7 81

10 15

7 15

7 10

5 59

6 43

9 87

10 40

9 95

11 42

7 00

6 50

7 33

12 08

7 33

7 60

5 75

6 50

9 40

10 67

10 12

O
pi

O

9 29

11 42

pi

" 10 17

Boston

Baltimore
New Orleans

>^
W

13 50
Cl

St. Louis- _>-_-_




B No. 1—Continued.
1814.

1815.

1816.

1817.

1818.

1819.

1820.

1821.

1822.

1823.

1824.

1825.

1826.

$14 50

$9 25

$7 37

$14 75

$10 25

$8 00

$5 37

$4 26

$7 00

$7 75

$6 62

$5 37

$5 25

14 67

95

9 40

12 27

10 50 .

7 70

6 25

4 42

6 94

7 34

6 07

6 57

5 24

New York

7 76

8 17

9 34

11 72

9 42

6 79

4 81

4 85

6 39

6 93

5 93

5 19

5 00

5 14

pi

Philadelphia

7 67

8 68

9 75

12 12

9 85

7 19

4 94

4 92

6 48

6 90

5 62

5 00

4 69

• 5 27

o

Baltimore

8 50

7 92

8 67

10 31

9 69

6 56

4 65

4 a4

6 36

6 89

5 54

4 88

4 78

5 15

New Orleans

9 00

9 00

9 30

12 50

10 83

9 62

6 20

6 28

5 75

6 68

6 25

^ 4 91

4 49

5 12

Export price
Boston

1827.

$8 00

^

5 64

pi

O
St Douis




W

W
m

Ox
Ox

B No. 1—Oontinued.

Ox

a:
1828.

1829.

1830.

1831.

1832.

1833.

1834.

1835.

1836.

1837.

1838.

1839.

1840.

$5 50

$5 00

$7 25

$5 62

$5 87

$5. 60

$5 50

$6 00

$7 60

$10 25

$9 50

$6 75

$5 37

$5 20

Boston

6 14

6 81

5 26

6 05

6 29

6 11

5 42

6 42

8 5.0

10 18

8 25

7 20

5 51

6 77

NewYork

6 50

6 54

6 03

5 84

6 87

6 70

5 07

6 00

7 78

9 69

8 02

7 40

6 17

6 39

Philadelphia _ - -

5 29

6 25

4 83

6 82

6 62

6 85

5 2r

6 75

7 44

9 75

7 81

6 89

6 22

5 34

Baltimore

5 48

6 37

4 86

6 61

6 79

6 69

4 99

5 84

7 92

9 43

7 84

6 65

5 00

6 31

New Orleans

5 36

7 20

"4 98

6 47

6 84

6 23

6 19

6 35

8 55

9 10

8 67

6 57

4 93

6 33

4 93

4 50

6 25

8 00

9 .12.

7 37

7 19

4 93

4 75

Export price _ _ _

St. Louis




1841.

pi
O
pi

*^
O

B No. 1—Continued.
1842.

1&43.

1844.

1845.

1846.

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1863.

1854.

1855.

$6 00

$4 60

$4 75

$4 61

$5 18

$5 95

$6 22

$5 35

$5 00

$4 77

$4 24

$5 60

$7 88

$10 10

6 67

4 87

6 13

5 32

6 53

• 7 17

6 43

6 00

6 00

5 25

5 20

6 27

9 25

10 25

5 67

6 07

. 4 61

5 00

6 19

6 80

5 71

4 96

4 86

4 19

4 96

5 51

8 02

9 06

Philadelphia - -

. 6 47

4 60

4 34

4 69

4 79

6 02

5 67

4 84

4 97

4 38

4 23

5-47

8 14

9 62

O

Baltimore

.5 20

4 36

4 31

4 63

4 53.

6 21

5 52

4 83

•4 89

4 18

4 26

5 39

8 13

9 57

pi

. N e w Orleans--

4 64

4 18

4 44

4 83

4 38

6 54

4.76

.4 61

5 31

4 00

4 10

5 48

7 60

9 36

o

St. Louis ---oo

4. 56

3 75

4 60

4 93

4 50

4 93

6 25

5 43

6 25

4 88

5 23

5 08

6 09

• 7 83

Export prico - .
Boaton »

„

. N e w York „ - - -




b=3

>^

^^

. QQ

Ox

B No. 2.

Ox
QO

0

Statement showing the population and manufiactures ofthe United States and Territories for the year 1810.

bD

^ o

O

o 5

^1
.

o ^

rt

States.

S p ii
=
S «i =3

^
Columbia, District of..
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Kentucky
Louisiana
._.
Maine, District of
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
New Jersey.. _
New York. _
,
North Carolina.
Ohio.
_
-.
Pennsylvania _
Rhode Island
South Carolina.
Tennessee- ,
Vermont
Virginia _>-




24,023
264,042
72,674
252,433
406,511
76,666
228,705
380,546
4,72, 040
214,360
245,555
959,049
655,500
230,760
810.091
77,031
415,115
261,727
217,713
974,622

$52,000
1,053,730
14.3, 880
2,129,023
564,134
105,544
580,027
1,013,320
2,123,176
880,208
910,233
2,153,613
747,285
887,053
3,060,772
844,591
1,619,068
1,329,066
1,233,699
4,203,221

^

fli

1^

c3.2^

S V S
i

3^

^J^

P
?3

^

i

O
pi'
o

PH

$73,000
$17, 400
1,731,472
811, 144
$46,180 $351,198
230,497
23. 096
195,420
473, 658
22,305
30,155
740, 242
1,815,909
44,260
1,000
157, 025
36,780
244,000
107, 200
743,242
21,929
639, 840
480,753
249,663
491,058
2,074,410
154,700 2, 078, 542 1,714, 776 $463,320
1,635,209
. 170,350
74, 460
851,582 ""861,"932
526,511
632, 354
6,332,819
497,875 2,026, 561
362.020
2,323,961
768, 005
554,950
135', 160
132,920
585, 892
109.090 ' 74,123
3,421,0i'5 1,301,343 4,492,478 4,365, 503
848, 240
740, 3(>9
53,770
3,970
297, 061
95,5^4
90,227
400, 900
412,522
263,327
98,097
129, 964
1,385,162
272,059
122,000
1,033,781
638,854 1,735, 577
171,312

PH

$2,050
324,870
6,110
3,769
92,896

3,800
24, 000
1,000
60O

704,000

&
$930,650
$788,250
5,858,682
1,864,958
2,004,912
1,409,969
2,768,904
113,763
1,826,965 . 5,307,380
2,143,266
1,592,807
2,113,104
660,706
8,879,861
6,101,468
-9, 630, 692 18,337,511
3,135,027
374,810
5,313,288
1,530,676
3,206,250 44,569,138
5,323,421
800,260
2,290,230
477,152
19,175,630 35,817,781
3,017,762
523,232
2,216,212
* 114,302
2,747,701
243,789
5,055,414
1,907,540
8,419,361 16,806,096

O

Cl

Illinois
Indiana.'
Michigan
Mis<sisRiDr)i
IVTissouri
Total.

---

12,282
24,520
4, 762
40,362
20,845

54,02^
129,985
1,098
257,248

29,067
6,172
10,267

4,000

8,670
22,230
14,172

65,160
79,608
31,076
46,790

V
• • " * " "

•!

7,239,814 26,07(1,997 25,608,78B 3, 616, 457 10.99?-086 16,483,960 463,320 1,163,094

853
890
518
.S05

60,975,2i)4 145,385, 906

Increase per cent, in population for this decade, 36.45.
The manufactures of cotton and wool W3re generally produced in families.
The value of dried and pickled fish exported in the year 1810 was $1,127, COO. (See Pitkin's Statistics, ed. 1835, page 40.)




117
264
52
314

P^

(^

O
pi.
O

t2j
Cl

Ox

B No. 3.

o

Statement showing the population and manufactures of the United States and Territories for the year 1820.
rrt

2a

1

g^

rt

O
pi

O

^'

^

^

O
Alabama „ , - o - „ - - «„„.
Columbia, District of »Connectictxt --„-,---„«Delaware .-»-.,
-»»
Georgia «„„„--« --,.,»-.
Indiana „„»„„„- -„-»«Kentucky .,-«-»„.«„ .,„
Lotiisiana „„„.,„„<.-„..Maine .,..,«„„«„« = .«.«„„
Maryland «,« = «.= « » „„.,„„
^
Mas.saclitisett.s : , „ , . „ « . „
Mississippi ».,»«=..:..-«««
Missoxin.„..„„„..-..„
New HampsMye „«<.„„.
New Jersey ««« = „o««««
New Y o r l k . „ . _ „ = . _ .
North CaTolina.,«»-««,«
Ohio . - « . . _ _ „ « _ „ „ .
Pennsylyama :,^««,««„„.
Bhode Islands._««„« =
Soutlii Oarolina. „«««««.
Tennejgaf© «„«.« « , , « , .



127,901j
33,039
275,202 $443,268
72,749'
161,266
340,987
101,232
147,178
6,400
564,317
197,926
153,407
298,335
35,7601
274,0311
407,350
736,512
623,287
•76,4481
66,686'
.244,161
154, 547
277,576!
190,915
,372,812
738,140
638,829
17,222
58.1,434
51,315
;049;468|
555,673
83,059
502,741
4,666|
125,256i
422;81S|

$15,620|
5,000

$5, 2921
289,083
106,300
19,500
3,750
523,149
6,200
22,425
210,300
294,850
6,700
51,672
177,409
956,147
,39,468
689,.292|
333,371
124,9091
127,062|

$30, 0001
130,000
93,000
77,600
40,600
76, S.QOl
.342,.4O0
413,.350
• 663,810
184,916

$4, 660]

296,260
30,000
69,036
3,000
138,800
10,000
66,200

297,136

449,080
423,610

$1,425|
46,039
69,736
112,000
63,800
163.700
267,040
101,871

47,537
18,421
43,250
18,^3401
143,057
188,.997
47-2,158 1,632,-543
62,980
63,510
479,511
491,707
476,516
,156,2661
302,500
19,032
2,200
42,000
313,609
-246,756j

188,8401

96,4361
58,000
•669,041
13,350
129,126
100,000
750
18,912

$75,645
699,620
1,087,282
999,900
371,9441
315,928
1,006,012
192,500
199,398
3,733,885
794,835

$101,207
704,620
2,413,029
1,318,891
607,761
397,814
2,296,726
272,500
486,473
5,027,336
2,523,614

166,785
439,650
398,461
4,981,643
258,868
3,036,126
3,709,583
181,873
119,800
1,335^727

297,443
747,959
1,175,139
9,792,072
.445,398
5,290,427
6,895,219
1,617,221
168,666
2,352,127

a

235,764
Vremont-» - - - - ----1,065,379
Virginia - - - - - - - - - - - -

49,882
14,000

198,659
198,020

85,400
193,100

33,340
393,417

63,314
162,737

890.353
6.686.699

:

TERRITORIES.

Arkansas
Illinois
Michi'^an

459,758
5,149,925

576,600

-

---

------

Total

14,273
55,211
8,896

900
9,120
19,500

120
18,700
2,160

1,873

66,388
71,285
77,800

56 408
100 983
100 460

;9,638,131 a4,834,157 a4,413,068 2,230,276 4, 640,669 4,876,486

1,852,268

29,919,621

52 766 5.S0

1,000

Increase in population for this decade 33,13 per cent.
aThe manufactures of cotton, wool, and flax for this decade were mostly in families,' and are not given in the Census of 1820.
The iron interests are only partially represented in the above table, the returns being imperfect.
The product of breweries and distilleries but partially given in the Census.
The value of dried and pickled fish exported in the year 1820 was $1,502,^000. (See Pitkin's Statistics, edition of 1835, page 40.)




O
pi
O

Cl

O

B. No. 4,

C5

to
-tJ

1

8
V o
CO

states.

s

1
g
O
Colnmliia

r)i«;t,rirti nf

Connecticut
Delaware i"
Greoro'ia
Illinois
Indiana
Kentuckv
Louisiana
Maine
Marvland
Massachusetts
MississiDni
l\Ti^^oiii*i

Now Hampshire
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Khode Island



O

-

•

o

Sg
5 ^
o

1
1

•

t
ii

02

1

^3

h

8

c3

1

rrt
QJ y,

pi

•SS.
-to ^-1

O

-g
o

s

CD

1

^rt

o

PH

309,527
39,834
$35,700 $108,149
297,675 $1,853,296 $1,676,975 $136,762 $500,000
160,000
120,000
76,748
310,000
516,823
157,445
343,031
687,917
215,739
399,455
608,500
229,985
481,856
54,500
612,636
447,040
610,408 7,754,803 7,312,836 1,437,147 8,360,102 3,068,523 3,532,609
136,621
140,455
269,328 2,447,634
364,284
842,375
80,300
52,891
320,823 1,879,180
642,238
728,000
412,941
751,807 1,989,790
1,918,608 2,706,920 1,297,003
737,987
937.903
1,348,233 2,099,715 1. .S23. 070 1,643,702 3,762,847
322,151 . 139,973
200,000
97,199 2,645,0Slj

CO

1

1
$'5,000

a
S3
o

3

Total value of manufactures.

Statement showing the population and manufactures ofi the United States and Territories for the year 1830.

pi
O
pi
O

M
$3,842,171
1,396,000

$8,053,053
1,991,000

>
240,625

4,815,671

7,043,773

206,776

31,071,828

62,743,624

750

1,890,265

5,678,499
3,662,359
7,048,327

302,807
180,215

•

^•2, 822, 398
+277,900

11,331,947
3,585,105

South Carolina
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia

681,186
681,904
280,652
1,211,406

•

225,550

523,900

127,680

149,490

460,869

20,300

TERRITORIES.

Arkansas
Florida
Michigan
Naval service

-

1,507,779

-

-_-_

Total

80,388
34,730
31,639
5,318

•

-

•

.

.

^
pi

^"

_ 12,866,020 22,534,815 14,528,166 4,757,403 16,737,251 3,434,808 3,640,758

^

935,173

•

46,077,092 112 645 466

Increase per cent, in population for this decade, 33.49.
" The manufacturers of leather, paper, glass and the maple sugar produced in the county of Somerset a:r:e included in the above amount. All
^
manufactures in families and those on a small scale are not given.
-j-In this State there are several hundred blacksmiths' and other shops where a variety of articles are manufactured forthe use of cotton and woolen
mills, the product of which is not given.
J In this State many of the manufacturers declined answering the queries, consequently the returns are defective.
, '
The above statistics are for the year 1831, except the census, and were taken in compliance with a resolution of Congress, passed January 19, 1832.
No manufacturing statistics being taken for the decade of 1830, the above is all the data that can be found of a reliable character bearing upon the
subject.
,




o
pi

O
i2{

ffl
»—)
Cl

00

B. No. 5,

1
. o
states.

'^

8

bp

2

1

"S

-•J

$17,547
129

43,712
309,978 2,715,964 2,494,313
104,700
332,272
78,085
304,342
3,000
691,39,2
9,640
470,183
58,867
135,400
685,866
151,246
329,380
779,828
18,900
362,411
601,793
970,397 ~ 412,366
235,900
470,019 1,150,580
737,699 16,553,423 7,082,898
9,734
212,267
1,744
375,651
13,750
383,702
Missonri
795,784
284,574 4,142,304
New Hampshire
440,710
373,306 2,086,104
New Jersey.-^2,428,921 3,640,237 3,537,337
New York
753,419
North Carolina.
3,900
438,900

co''^

1-

Columbia, Dis-




-^ .

J"

J3

Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia _ -,.
Illinois
Indiana __
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
MarylandMassachusetts-Michigan
Mississippi

cc

1

CCS

o

•Si

0 CO
c3 <l^

CC

590,756
97,574

s

o

00
r-i

Alabama.
Arkansas

rt"

Q;

$750 $27,700
1,240

1
°$4,875

O

0
P

(5
$34,382
7,132

-

O

Manufactures produced
in families.

Statemmt showing the population and mannfadiures ofi the United States and Ta^itories for the year 184D,
cc
U
•+3

1

i
a

0

I
rd

"o

O
pi
O

$1,656,119 $3,234,498 $4,975,871
489,750 2,114,898 2,614,889
$1, 740

68,000
$87,400
26,370
907,723 """"'300
236,495
162,375 1,733,044
58,291
232
29,185
181,285
425 * 10,700
5,925
. 5S4
34,221
5,360
12,350
""'4,"000
432,500
3,950 41,200
. 1,192
1,280
1,300
610,778
20,250 14,580
43,-939
236,405
508,381
730,160 164,080
77,430
88,790
36,000
54, 000 1,280,713 10,000
153,050 56,512
225,773
240
i?23, 096
613,500
221,900 312,900
390,260 1,461,736 6,483,996 75,319
233,300 1,798,758
137,500
15,025 57,900
870
36,900
2,630
7,'670
193,464
4,500 60,300
8,125
18,336
92,811
240
33,000 136,334
121,141
466,115
124,140
100
277,850 405,96b
727,200 2,512,792 3,490,045 4,141,798 1,316,072 573,577
286,649
899
251,792
24,200 16,060 . 62,596

1,600 1,416,660 1,599,930
226,162 12,623,856 21,057,623
62,116 1,982,228 2,709,068
1,467,630 3,496,830 5,324,307
993,567 6,536,825 8,021,582
1,289,802 7,346,137 9,379,686
2,622,462 8,435,915 13,221,968
65,190 11,093,053 11,378,383
804,397 10,783,782 14,525,217
176,050 10,449,697 13,509,636
231,942 39,466,205 73,777,837
113,955 3,564,562 3,898,676
682,945 2,839.911 3,562,370
1,149,644 4,514,901 5,946,759
638,303 4,758,076 10,523,313
201,625 15,447,756 19,571,496
4,636,547 71,264,689 95,840,194
1,413,242 4,736^340 7,234,56T

a

685,757 880,900 784,401
139,378
485,290 1,922,354
1,619,467
Ohio
Pennsylvania.-- 1,724,033 5,013,007 2,319,061 2,459,875 1,262,670 5,670,860 3,699,698
842, .172 103,150 147,550
^ 244,290
108,830 7,116,792
Rhode Island 359,000
1,000 31,250
27,618
594,398
75", 725
South Carolina«
TermpRRp'^
325,719
14,290 403,213 100,870
299,734
829,210
•628,745
113,000 1,331,953 168,575 24,900
Verm on t
2, 865
291,948
42,575
446,063
147,792 470;262 128,256
238,690
382,59.0
Virginia
- 1,239,797

10,525 59,470 1,853,937 24,636, 389 31,458,401
35,360 109,895 1,303,093 42,721,441 64,494^960
61,180 4,642,851 13,8'07,29T
659,312
1,275
930,703 4,211,802 5,638,823
450
2.886,661 3,858,162 8, 517,394.
• 674, 548 4,565,666 6,923,982
95,173 349,124 2, 441, 672 15,984,986 20,684,6pS

TERRITORIES.

•

Florida. - » Iowa
Wisconsin _ - _ - Naval service
Total

54,477
43,112
30,945
6,100

800

^213,219
75

4,000
3, 5.00

1,164
4,371

27,663

2,400

678,456
915,080
20,205
483,700'
25,966
452,570
12,'667 1,632,632 1,680,808
©•

pi

17,069,463 46,350,45^ 20,696,999 7,172,5,75 9,916,442 12,820,145 14, 674, 8.04 11,996,008 1,235,835 29,023,380 329,391,574 483,278,215




Increase per cent, in population for this decade, 32. 67.
Salt estimated at twenty^ cents per bushel.
Sugar estimated a t six cents per pound ; except Louisiana at four cents.
T.he product 'of mills and molasses has been included in the manufactures.

O

ffl:

Ot .

B No; 6,
Statement showing the population and manufactures ofi the United States and Territories fior tlie year 1850
o^
states.
^ to

2'^

-§"^1

•s a

eS'Or:

1^
Alabama
Arkansas
California
Columbia, District of
Connecticut
Delawai-e
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire,
New j e r s e y
NewYork
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island , . . . . . ,
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
,..
Vermont
".
Virginia
Wisconsin




771,623
209,897
92,59T
51,68T
370,792
91,532
87,445
906,185
851,470
988,416
192,214
982,405
517,762
583,169
583,034
994,514
897,654
606,526
682,044
317,976
489,555
3,097,394
869,039
1,980,329
2,311,786
147,545
668,50r
1,002,717
212,592
314,120
1,421,661
805,891

$22,500

$271,126

$7,500

20,740
41,696
981,400
267,462

847,196
38,200

$900

16,637
100,000
4,257,522
538,439
49,920
2.135,044
44,200
273,489
2,596,356
2,120,504
19,712,461
80,500
142,900
8,830,619
1,109,524
3,591.989
831,842
394,700
5,322,262
6,447,120
748,838
510,624
196,100

$2,400
;, 465,216
351,000

416,600

4,000
6,750
82,860

$1,784,483
18,676

88,750
206,572
205,802
13,000
818,819

604,037

753,300
295,140
12,770,565
90,242

• 36,616
1,066,400
295,123
21,000

56,000
2,127,745
1,164,446
7,030,604
23,750
1,111,027
5,321,866
2,381,825

814,600
6,000
560,544
597,920
12,500
1,255,850
6,071,518

6,310
15,000
1,579,161
841,013
87,993

676,100

57,300
70,200
58,000

68,000
521,924
27,000

46,200
441,185
• 149,430
8,500
744,816
312,500
265,000
685,000
3,235,635
279,697
117,400
336,495
871,710
686,430
5,921,980
12,867
8.069,850
5,354,881
728,705
87,683
264,325
55,000
460,831
674,416
216,195

15,112
718,375
"ii,"76o' 1,173,589
9,400
466,724
* 299," ioo"
23,750
68,000
828,750
771,431
1,294,800
3,908,952
230,390
12,884

68,700
20,400
1,079,676
8,758,547
881,914
127,849
9,224,256
223,650
670,618

569,876
1,606,849
72,775

476,600
59,281
486,382
6,278,065
38,258
3,461,008
2,585,567
19,600
10,975
43,731

484,846
350,025
27,565
64,430

$1,984,120
— 217
000
7,0
075
252
193,2
$5,600
131
75, 582
'*6*6o6'
1,838,
1,155,
6,000
1,631,
331,
2,459,
57,825
139,
513,
**9,'766"
111,
* 93,* 850*
305,
840,
1,164,
1,674,
893:
113.
1,380,
998,815
2,086.
1,712,
132,293
749,
206,796
26.
5,900

127,88,6
1,098,252

2,500
247,360
188,850

95,002
16,875

700,466

8,137,
266,
267
2,156,

$3,864,808
591,549
*12,887,782
2,342,162
80,874,421
8,554,205
774,317
4,808,838
15,815,334
17,549,630
, 3,527,790
31,865,031
18,310,994
20,373,408
27,224,583
104,383,491
10,481,938
3,838,133
22,369,410
11,854,619
84,627,051
.209,775,390
7,612,964
53,484,141
121,154,031
13,228,031
6,222,794
7,570,979
1,472,062
6^ 645,690
24,146,847
8,807,509

$6,483,214
1,246,403
*12,869,622
2,496,083
45,306,560
4,687,437
934,496
9,003,586
18,413,668
20,833,450
3,779,983
27,089,019
18,686,476
25,186,860
32,593,685
151,407,059
11,616,989
4,140,042
25,439,410
23,663,829
89,826,734
239,717,488
11,200,142
64,766,974
166,990,294
22,119,756
7,979,315
12,880,476
1,814,948
9,347,777
81,967,976
9,887,545

pi

O
O
ffl

>
o
fe
03

Territories.
6,077
61,647
13,294
11,880

Oregon
Utah
Total

28,191,876




1,892

16,500
1,500
61,869,184

43,207,545

12,748,727

25,108,155

22,628,771

18,213,681

57,736
239,357
2,236,645
289,732

57,786
266,890
2,236,645
292,624

27,493,644

832,108,265

1,055,595,899

6,033

10,000,182

2,222,745

Increase per cent, in population for this decade, 35.87.
* Including the product of the mines for 1850.
Sugar estimated at eight cents per pound, except Louisiana, at five cents.
The product of mills aud molasses has been included in the manufactures.
pi

fe
hd
O
pi
O

H
ffl
fe

o
fe

Gi

^

B. No. 7.

C5

.a
States and Territories.

1

o
ft.

o

1

1

1 1
6

1
a

i

3

3

a
a

Manufactures of iron
castings.

Recapitulation ofi tahles from B . No. 2 to B . No. 6.

1

3

i
.3

s

II

Si
§

•
fa

cS

J

i

a

3

1

sl

§

3

•

pi

B

1°

c

Twenty-seven. 1820 9,638,131 38.13

fe
H

o
the inhabitants
only are given for
this decadH.
Do
do

T w e n t y - o n e . . . 1800 5,305,925 35.02
Twenty-five... 1810 7,239,814 36.45

' Remarks.

3

3.2

1790 8,929,827

a^

$26,076,997
4,834,157

$26,608,788 $3,616,467 Includ'd in $10,998,086 $16,488,960
pig iron.
4,413,068 2,280,276 . . . . d o . . . .

4,640,669

Twenty-eight . 1830 12,866,020 33.49 22,534,815 14,528,166 4,757,403 . . . d o . . . . 16,737,251

4,876,486

$463,830 $1,163,094 Included in $60,975,204 $145,385,906 Statistics defective.
cotton and
wool.
29,919,631 53,766,535
1,853,258 . . . . d o
Dn.
do

3,434,808 8,640,758

935,173 . . . . d o

46,077,092

113,645,466 But ten States represented. ^
48-3,378,315 Full.

Thirty

1840 17,069,453 32.67 46,350,463 20,696,999 7,172,675 $9,916,442 11,820,145 14,674,804 11,996,008 1,235,835 $29,023,880 329,391,574

Thirty-six

1850 23,191,876 36.87 61,869,184 43,207,545 12,748,727 25,108,155 23,638,771 18,313,681 10,000,183 2,222,745 27,493,644 833,108,365 1,055,595,899 Full.

Average




34.44

O

ffl
fe
5^

a
fe

B. No. 8.
Statement of the population, manufiactures, and agricultural productions ofi the United States and Territories ; the allotment per capita of the manufacturing and agrictdtural productions per State and nation ;. value ofi imports paying duty,
less the value of fioreign paying exports ; value ofi imports paying duty, less the value ofi fioreign payirig exports to each
State, based upon its population ; ampunt p.aid per capita ofi the paying imports, less the fiortign paying exports ; amount
ofi paying imports, less ihe fioreign paying exports allotted to each State, based upon its productions, dnd allotment per
capita ofi the paying imports, less the fioreign paying exports as allotted to each State, based upon its productions fior the
^ear 1840.
V
.
.^_S_J_

^^-^1

3 T3

.»r P^J2

^ o

o
O "^

States.
o . ::i. bo
53 .O .
-l-i -3

bp
O

'OJ

= .2
«

.9.

d •

r-H >73
--J ft ;H +3

Alabama
Arkansas
Columbia, Dist. of_Connecticut _
_
Delaware.
Georgia.
Illinois
_
I n d i a n a _£^
Kentucky
Louisiana.?




590,756
97,574
43.712
309,978
78.085
691,392
476,183
685,866
779,828
352,411

$ 4 , 2 3 6 , 0 0 0 $23,83.3.470
4,973,655
1,473,71
138,425
1,431,020
11,201,618
19,971,228
2,877,350
2,563,218
4,63L, 191 2 9 , 6 1 2 , 4 3 6
li;577,281
5,956,327
14,484,610
8,138,274
12,182,786 - 26,233,968
17,976,017
8,641,439

$28,069,
6,447,
1,569,
31,172,
5,440,
34,243,
1.7,533,
22,622,
38,416,
26,617,

470 $47 51
370
66 08
445
35 90
846 100 56
568
69 68
627
49 53
608
36 82
884 32 98
754
49 26
456
75 53

^^^

S5

^

d o
<V PH

$1,528,168
252,404
113,074
801,851
201,990
1,788,493
1,231,790
1,774,199
2,017,260
911.617

o.
B

O

.S .

'^^f

O

cut, ^
o
Pn bo

^ p.d

fe
O
pi

bD 2 rd '-§ .
PH^O

2

-^ P
o ^ . 2 SS ^ ^ d<1
$1,231 .420
282 , 8 4 9
68 , 8 5 2
1,367 , 5 6 6
238 , 6 8 0
1,502 , 2 8 2
769 , 2 0 8
992 , 4 7 5
1,685 , 3 5 9
1,167 719

C^ PH

d ^ -

T^ o o
bO'Ti

%^

d^:

$2 08
2 90
58
41
06
17
62
45
16
31

ffl
fe

)fe(
—

>
o
fe-

CO

STATEMENT—Continued.
o
.d f ^ 1

-f.3 O

d
o

,

^

d o
d ^

d 'T^

Si d

^ *'^ ce

Ti d
bO-rH

bp
i i ce o

S 'ce

states.

d S
o

III

. d ?g g
(V ce

501,793 $13,792,150 $14,725,615
470,019
12,430,866 14,015,665
737,699
71,010,703 14,371,732
212,267
3,327,671
3,207,048
2,386,857 26,297,666
375,651
383,702
4,505,186
9,755,615
284,574
10,052,598 10,762,019
373,306
18,479,444 15,314,006
428,921
88,574.350 91,244,178
753,419
6,824,303 24,727,297
519,467
27,681,578 27,212,004
724,033
69,140,480 51,232,204
108,830
13,428,287
1,951,141
594,398
4,111,247 20,555,919
8,089,992 27,917.692
829,210,.
6,579,086 16,977,664
291,948
19,317,214 48,644,905
239,797

.§ .^5^ g
'-I

d

Maine.
Maryland.
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri.
_.
New Hampshire-.
New Jersey
New YorkNorth Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee^
Vermont
Virginia
,

o
^
&• d ce ^

P.S ^
•d ^ . P
g^.Pn
bD- 2 o
^ ? ^ . - ce d
S
3
.d d
o - o O PH
rH pp ce o
P -»J CJ PH
<H

co" &*

Ck f-l

"^

<i3
bD ;H ^

.pi
-}^

d ,o o 2

n::5 P . bo

•r" d

d ^-^ ^
p
1^ ^
H ^

^

PH

Ck^

<v o
f ^ PH

pi

d
a> bD

fe
o
P

Q^ -4-3

d :M le d

O

$28,617,765 $56 83
26,446,531 56 27
85,382,435 115 74
6,534,719 30 79
28,684,523 76 36
14,260,801 37 17
20,814,617 73 14
33,793,450 90 53
179,818,528 74 03
31,551,600 41 88
54,893,582 36 13
110,372,684 64 02
15,379,428 141 32
24,667,166 41 50
36,007,684 43 42
23,556,750 80 69
67,962,120 64 82

$1,298,039
1,215,846
1,908,281
549,092
971,734
992,572
736,136
965,668
6,283,136
1,948,945
3,930,559
4,459,731
281,521
1,537,589
2,145,001
755,211
3, 207,108

$1,251 ,086
1,160 ,220
3,745,764
286 ,681
1,258 402
625 ,627
913 ,146
1,482 ,533
7,888,715
1, 384 182
2,408 205
4,842,096
674,702
1,082 ,159
1.579 ,672
1,033 ,445
2,981 ,527

$2 49
2 47
08
35
35
63
21
97
25
84
58
81
20
82
90
54
40

44 14

140,921

105,603

1 94

Territories.
Florida

_:...




54, 477

687,167

1,817,718

2,404,885

pi

ffl
fe

fe

Iowa.
Wisconsin
Naval service

43,112
30,945
6,100
17,069,453

347,713
1,468,723

688,308
445,659

1,036,021
1,914,282

24 03
61 86

.

111,522
80,048

45,451
83,980

1 05
2 71

441,360, 814 564,772,785 1,006,133,599 , 58 96 $44,139,506 44,139,506 $258 68-10,0 44,139,506

o

REMARKS
The value of houses have been deducted from the manufactures.
Persons engaged in the naval service have not been included in the calculation.
The productions of wheat, sugar, and molasses, have been deducted from the agricultural products, because they have entered into the manufactures
mider the head of sugar and molasses, products of mills, and distilleries and breweries.




fe
O
pi

O

ffl
fe

Cl

fe
«2

B. No. 9.

.

•
to

Statement ofi the population, ma^nufiactures, and agricultural productions ofi the United States and Territories ; the cdlotment
per capita ofi the manufiacturing and agricultural pj^oductions per State and nation; value ofi imports paying duty, less the
value ofi fioreign paying exports; value ofi imports paying duty, less the value ofi foreign paying exports, to each State,
based upon its popidation ; amount per capita ofi the paying imports, less the fioreign paying exports ; amount ofi paying
imports, less the fioreign paying exports, allotted to each State, based upon its productions; and allotment-per capita ofi
the paying imports, less the fioreign paying exports, as allotted to each State, based upon its productions, fior the year 1850.

h
rl

03

•

'^

fe

>^ X
d ^
^ d

5 |p i

t+-< O 03
O -r -+>

o
<^
P,bD^

'-H

P,

sM
ce
o
^

O

>il 03
03 "'-'
^
CJj 02

O

rd

bD.^

pi:

bo a J

'S.'S.i-

Statea.

cc
f-t

P 03
ce Q,
bD

g^bD

3 ^ d
X (o Ti
<

O

^

^

p

o

S?bD^,
Ck% o

^

11
Alabama
_.
Arkansas __
,
California
_
Columbia, District of,
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
t...
Oeorgia
Illinois
Indiana
___
Iowa__.
Kentucky ___




771, 623i
209,897
92,597
51,687
370,792
91,532
87,445
906,185
851,470
988,416
192,214
982,405

H-=

P

d

rd

"4:3

d

men
ufac
prod
on.

-u -^3
0 5 ^

'rH

o
^
z: d ^ t
q ^ <^ ^
S. d

$6,483, 214 $44, 223,955! $50,707, 169 $55 72
10,922, 980
676,577
1,246, 403
52 04
984,3011
12,869, 522
13,853, 823 149 61
193,601
2,495, 083
52 02
2,688, 684
45,306, 550 12, 556,189
57,862, 739 156 05
4,687, 427 3, 117,565
85 27
7,804, 992
54 77
924, 495 3, 865,059
4,789, 554
9,002, '586 46, 686,151
61 45
55,688. 737
89 04
18,413, 558 57, 404,116
75,817', 674
20,823, 450 47, 498,467
69 12
68,321, 917
3,779, 982 8, 810,997
65 51
12,590, 979
27,089, 019 52, 477, 6801 70,566, 699
80 99

fl->

>!, fcD - ^

ce

bD

.f^^

PH

^

•S d

0 3 - * " ^

3Ja§^
$4,925,865
1,339,934|
591,118
329,958
2.,367,.050|
584,319
558,229
5,784,8761
5,435,588
6,309,819
•1,227,050
6,271,446,

PH
PH'

f>,bD

bD

c^

P.-S

§"^-^

|lal

S.a ^ 3 2
H-t -+J ^

d

;=:3

$3,730,285
803,552
1,019,160
197,794|
4,256,687
574, 176|
352,345'
4,096,756
5,557,5461
5,026,119
926,258
5,853,344

<

Ck

.2 ^ .-§

ffl
fe

3
t—4 .

>•
5^
O

$4 83
3 83
11
3
11 48
6 27
03
52
55
09
82
97

I
•

517,762
18, 6 8 6 , 4 7 6 1 5 , 2 1 0 , 2 9 9
583,169
2 5 , 185,850 1 6 , 2 8 2 , 3 4 7
583,034
32, 5 9 3 , 6 3 5 1 6 , 2 9 6 , 1 9 9
994,514 151, 4 0 7 , 0 5 9 1 4 , 2 7 7 , 5 9 5
397,654
11, 616,989 17,329,385
606,526
4, 1 4 0 , 0 4 2 3 6 . 8 0 2 , 1 4 1
682,044 . 25, 4 3 9 , 4 1 0 3 4 , 6 1 9 , 6 5 0
317,976
.23, 6 6 3 , 8 2 9 1 3 , 5 9 4 , 1 3 9
489,555
39, 8 2 6 , 7 3 4 1 9 , 3 2 2 , 8 9 4
,097,394 239, 7 1 7 , 4 8 8 | n 7 , 0 1 9 , 1 1 5
869,039
11, 200,142 31,712,146
,980,329
64, 7 6 5 , 9 7 4 8 4 , 7 9 3 , 3 8 7
,311,786 155, 9 9 0 , 2 9 4 7 3 , 5 7 6 , 837
2,168,332
147,545
22, 1 1 9 , 7 5 6
668,507
7, 9 7 9 , 3 1 5 30,068.1541
,002,717
12, 8 8 0 , 4 7 7 5 0 , 3 9 4 , 4 4 7
212,592
1. 814,946] 9,065,181
314,120
9. 3 4 7 , 7 7 8 20,813,564
,421,661
3 1 , 9 6 7 , 9 7 6 52,512,452
305,391
9, 3 8 7 , 5 4 5 11,503,371

Louisiana
Maine
' Maryland
Massachusetts - _ .
Michigan _
Mississippi
Missouri
..
New Hampshire .
New Jersey
New YorkNorth Carolina..
Ohio
.-..
PennsylTania - - .
Rhodelsland
S o u t h Carolina _.
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin

2,493,626
3,060,618
3,596,593
12,188,633
2,122,091
3,011,922
4,418,260
2,740,892
4,351,357
26,243,417
3,.156,863
11,002,372
16,888,163
1,786,759
2,798,971
4,654,8361
800,399
2,218,827
6,214,824
1,636,845

4
6
6
12
5
-4
6
8
' 8
8

12 11
19
64
76
06
37
03

O
pi

38,794
392,902
84,866
72,647

10,786
74,691
228,419
47,401

1
1
17
4

H-l

86 78 $148,061,575 1 4 8 , 0 6 1 , 5 7 5

38 37-100 1 4 8 , 0 5 1 , 5 7 5

33,896,775
41,468,197
48,889,834
165,684,654
28,846,374
40,942,183
60,05.9,060
37,257,968
59,149,628
356,736,603
42,912,288
149.559,361
229,567,131
24,288,088
38,047,469
63,274,924
10,880,127
30,161,342
84,480,428
20,890.916

66
71
83
166
72
67
88
117
120
111
49
75
99
164
56
63
51
96
69
68

47
11
85
60
54
60
Q6
17
82
94
38
52
30
61
91
10]
13
02
42
41

146,622
1,015,301
3,10.4, 985
644,334

24
16
233
56

13
50
56
62

3, 305, 273
3, 722, 816
3, 72h,. 954
6, 348, 747
2, 538, 531
3, 8 7 1 , 922
4, 354, O i l
2, 029, 885
3, 125,- 206
19, 773, 047
5, 547, 7441
12, 641, 9631
14, 757, 907
9 4 1 , 893
4, 267, 594
6, 4 0 1 , 113
1, 357, 138
2, 005, 269
9, 075, 555
1, 949, 646

82
23
17
26
34
96
48
62
89
47
pi

Territories.

fe
•^

O

^
ffl
fe
fe

Minnesota . N e w MexicoOregon
Utah

6,077
61,547
13,294
11,380

67,736
255,890
2,236,645
-292, 624

88,886
759,411
868,340
351,710

2 3 , 1 9 1 , 8 7 6 1,05'5,595, 899956,924,640 2 , 0 1 2 , 5 2 0 , 5 3 9

REMARKS.
Hops, flax, flaxseed, wine, a n d silk cocoons, e s t i m a t e d a t t h e Census Office a t $3,293,314.
Maple sugar, cane sugar, a n d molasses i n c l u d e d in t h e m a n u f a c t u r e s .
Milk a n d eggs, fodder, wood, a d d i t i o n of 3 p e r cent, t o live stock, p o u l t r y , a n d feathers, e s t i m a t e d a t $126,966,927, a n d n o t included.




77
21
18
17

o
fe

174

R E P O R T OJST T H E

FIJVANCES.

No. 39.
Statement exhibiting the popidation ofi the States and Territories, and
the agricultural productions ofi each, with the value thereofi; the total
value ofi all the products ofi each State and Territory fior the year 1840.
[NOTE.—The prices of the differeiit products adopted by Professor Tucker have been used
in the calculations, when-not given in the census for that decade.]

1
States.

rd

o
oo

'03

p

0)

'03'

•s

3

o
690,756
97,674
43,712
309,978
78,085
. 691,392
476,183
685,866
779,828
362,411
501,793
470,019
737,699
212,267
375,651
383,702
284,574
373,306
2,428,921
753,419
1,519,467
1,724,033
108,830
594,398
829,210
291,948
1,239,797

03

d

JUQ

Alabama
Arkansas
Columbia, Dist. of.
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine - _«_
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan >
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire - .
New Jersey
_
New York _
North Carolina
Ohio - _.
Pennsylvania
Rhodelsland
South Carolina _ - _
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia

"3

CO

r-i
05

d

d

828,052
105,878
12,147
87,009
315,165
1,801,830
3,335,393
4,049,375
4,803,152
60
848,166
3,345,783
157,923
2,157,108
196,626
1,037,386
422,124
774,203
12,286,418
1,960,855
16,571,661
13,213,077
3,098
968,364
4,569,692
495,800
10,109,716

$838,052
105,878
12,147
108,761
315,166
1,801,830
1,667,696
2,024,687'
2,401,576
60
1,060,207
3,346,783
197,404
1.078,554
196,626
^518,693
527,655
774.203
12,286,418
1,960,855
8,285,830
13,213,077
3,872
968,354
3,427,269
619,750
10,109,716

51,008
6,219
5,081
737,424
33,546
60,693
88,197 •
129,621
1,321.373
1,812
137,941
723,577
636,014
34,236
11,444
68,608
308,148
1,665,820
2,979,323
213,971
814.205
6,613', 873
34,521
44,738,
304,320
230,993
1,482,799

$25,504
2,488
3,811
553,068
^
20,128
30,347
22,049
32,405
440,458
906
103,466
434,146
402,011
10,271
5,722
34,304
231,111
999,492
1,787,594
106,986
244,262
3,968,324
25,891
22,369
152,160
173,245
741,400

412
154,693
212,116

412
77,346
106,058

305
3,792
1,966

153
948
491

84, 823, 272,

68,033,934

18,645,567

10,575,500

Territories.

Florida
Iowa
Wisconsin
Totals

54,477
43,112
30,945
. 17,063,353




,

R E P O R T oisr T H E

175

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

^ j

p

states.

cc 03
rd

d

W

Alabama
Arkansas
.-.
Columbia, Dist. of
Connecticut
Delaware
G-eorgia
Illinois
---.
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine __ —_
Maryland
Massachusetts _ . .
Michigan
Mississippi. _ - . . .
Missouri
New Hampshire..
New Jersey
New York.
North Carolina _.
Ohio.
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island . _..
South Carolina. _.
Tennessee..
Vermont _
Virginia

1,406,353
189,553
15,751
1,453,262
927,405
1,610,030
4,988,008
6,981,605
7,155,974
107,353
1,076,409
3,634,211
1,319,680
2,114,051
668, 624j
2,234,947
1,296,114
3,083,624
20,676,847
3,193,941
14,39.3,103
20,641,819
171,517
1,486,208
7,035,678
2,222,684
13,461,062

$562,641
79,612
6,300
508,642
370,962
644,012
423,981
609,226
1,788,993
53,677
376,743
1,413,684
527,872
179,694
334,312
336,242
453,640
1,233,410
7,753,443
1,277,576
2,168,965
7,740,682
60,031
694,483
1,768,920
889,034
5,380,426

^

^

947,004 $8,378, 802
846,632 2,423, 316
19, 743
39,485
900, 265
500,441
099,359 1,259, 615
905,122 10,452, 561
634,211 4,526, 842
155,887 5,631, 177
847,120 7,969, 4241
952,912 2,976, 456
712, 896
960,528
233,086 4,116, 543
809,192 1,356, 894|
,277,039
455, 408
161,237 5,264, 496
332,624 3,466, 505
162,572
796, 362
361,976 2,617, 185
972,286 6,857, 679
893,763 9,667, 505
668,144| 6,733, 629
240,022 8,544, 013
450,498
281, 661
722,805 7,361, 402
986,188| 11,246, 547
119,678
747, 385
577,691 17,288, 7951

70^,356
293,608
12,035
414,238
200,712
291,366
025,620
525,794
055,085
834,341
392,280
036,433
386,652
109,205
630,100
783,768
206,606
072,069
-123,614
609,239'
806,021
535,663
911,973
698,313
904,370
869,751
944,6601

1,346,413
316,381
407,525
117,565
1,241,321
618,017
7,630,903
452,309
870,753
2,383,916
227,993
467,750
476,092
1,773,950
736,165

264,617
'234, 063
419,608

66,154
35,109
62,941

$427,089
73,402
3,009 ^
853,560
50,178
. 322,841
303,828
228,869
168,263
208,585
2,078,456
259.108

- Territories.
Florida
Iowa
Wisconsin
Total.

13,829!
216,385
406,514

898,974|
5,532
18,393 1,406,241
34, 6541 379,359]

449,487
281,248

76,8721

123,071,341 37,474,681 377,531,8751132,749,6121 108,298,060 23,998,445




176

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued:

stales.

p
PQ

h^

Alabama _
"
7,692
$29
812,718 $127,180
$3,8461
581
Arkansas
760
44|
586
304
6,860
88
1,331
Columbia, Dist. of
294
220
163
13,310
272
Connecticut
_.
33,759
25,319
227,2821 426,704 3,840,336
303,043
22,483
Delaware _ _ J
3,156
5,260
6,779
11,299
.224,830
16,970
Georgia
70
12,979
6,490
141
169,700
164,932
Illinois
57,884
19,'295|
82,251
32,900
659,728
178,029
16,339
Indiana
7, 004
712,116
28,0151
49,019i
88,306
2,723
Kentucky __
17,491
5,&33
8,169
353,224
24,651
Louisiana
246,510
38,657
691,358 5,530,864
Maine
• 355,161
266,371
51,543
106,687 1,066,870
• 44,164
Maryland
3,594
73,606
2,156
569,395 5,124,655
65,250
Massachusetts
165,319
87,000
49,596
130,805
127,802
113,592
37,864
623,220
Michigan
._
38,341
171
1, 654
30
1,710
Mississippi
61
827
49,083
9,801
343,581
15,318
7, 659
Missouri
4,900
496,107 3,968,856
121,899
105,103| ^.78,827
New Hampshire.91,424
334,861 3,013,749
12,501
513,670
New Jersey
'_.
7,501 ', 856,117
2,520,068 1,512,041 2,287,885j 1,372,731 3,127,047 28,143,423
New York
101,369
3,574
810,952
15,391
7,695
North Carolina ._
1,787
212,440
633,139
211,046 1,022,037 4,088,148
Ohio
63,732
209,893
Pennsylvania
125,936 2,113,742| 1,268,245 1,311,643| 11,804,787
63,449
571,041
66,4901
2,979
2,234
Rhode Island
49,867
24,618
72
3,967
36
246,180
South Carolina-..
1,983
31,233
218,631
4,809
17,118
8,559
Tennessee
2,404|
836,739 5,857,173
64,781
171,312
Vermont
41,086 , 228,416
364,708 2,917,664
243,822
87,430
121,911
Virginia
43,715
Territories.
Florida . _ .
Iowa
Wisconsin.

Total.

30
728|
11,062

15
182)
2,766

6,2121
10,654

1,553
2,663

1,197
17,9531
30,938

11,970
71,812
123,752

4,161,5041 2,391,7,(f^| 7,291,7431 4,226,830 10,248,208 80,791,732




R E P O R T ON T H E

177

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

States.

' d

if

•J
^ d
o

d

^
Alabama
^_..
Arkansas
Columbia, Dist. of
Connecticut
"Delaware _ •.
Georgia.Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts . _.
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
NewHampshire..
NewJersey
New York _-..._i
North Carolina . .
Ohio
_
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina. __
Tennessee
_
Vermont
Virginia.

8261

$248j

28
4,573
746
773
17,742
38,591
742
115
36,940
2,357
254,795
11,381
^ 154
789
243,425
4,531
447, 2501
1,063
62,195
49,481
113
93
850
48,137
10,597

11
l,829i
298
232|
4,436
9, 6481
247
46
12,313
689
101,918
2,845
38
197
97,,370|
1,812
178,900
354
15,549
.19,-792|
45
31
212
19,255
3,632

$31,978
2,736
•52,895
61,936
4,035j
19,346
71,911
61,212
125,071
240,042
51,579
133,197
283,9041
4,051
42,896
37,181
18,085
249,613
499,126
28,475
97,606
232,912
67,741
.38,187
19,812
16,276
92,359

X

d

^

^

$650
5
1,039J 135,135

$370 $55,240
415 10,680
3, 507
850
18,114 296,232
1,120 28,211
1,853 166,122
22,990 126,756
17,231 110,055
6,226 434,935
32,415 11,769
4601 149,384
10,591 105,740
111,8141 389,177
6, 307 16,075
499 14,458
6,205| 90,878
35 239,979
26,167 464,006
75,980 1,701,935
48,581 386,006
19,707 475,271
60,127 618,179
12,604] 32,098|
2,139 52, 2751
71,100! 367,105
5,600 213, 9441
38,799 706,765

3, 344J 334,450
29J
3,836
25,594J |3,071,310

1, 03
50|
37

' 260
2
313J^, 25,060
160
2

6,427
41f
6,857
52f
1,397
lOf
1,976J 158,100
8, 605-J 688,440
9,992J 799,380^^
5, 240
63,440
293
2il
7551 60,420
2, 080
16
18,010f| 640,860
3,445
26J
2,165f 281,548
1,130| 146,981
9,879-J 1,284,313
9,OSOJ 726,420
2 , 6 4 9 | 344,467
33
38
488

Territories.
Florida
Iowa
Wisconsin
Total.

._

83
133

•21}

33

11,758|
2,170|
3,106

10
4,200l
1,025]

l,238,602i 471,801 2,601,196 593,534;7,256,904195,251-li 8,790,001

12




178

REPORT ON THE FINACNES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

i

States.

s

8

8

d

o

o

6

00

d

1

I.

1

o '
6
d

d
d

1

1

Alabama
$3,725
149,019
10,143
$609 117,138,823 $8,199,718
164
6,454
Arkansas
361,719
1,542
92 6,028,642
Columbia, Dist. of
Connecticut
51,764
3,106
e
334
Delaware
..
27
309,618
G:eorgia
329,744
19,786 163,392,396 11,437,468 12,384,732
13
Illinois
200,947
460
399,813
12,067
23,989
Indiana
180
11
3,727,796
223,668
491
Kentucky
16,376
1,377,835
691,466
41,487
82,670
108,136
Lomsiana
119,947,720 4,797,909 152,556,368 10,678,875 3,604,534
Maine
257,464
16,448
Maryland
36,266
5, 673
611
2,176
679,227
Massachusetts
34,754
Michigan.
1,329,784
79,787
23,316
777,195
Mississippi
77
6 193,401577 16,472,126
274,863
121,122
7,267
60
Missouri
2
16,491
New Hampshire.. 1,162,368
69,742
66
New Jeisey.
3
New York . .
10,048,109
602,886
70,610
North Garolina
7,163
430 51,926,190 3,634,833 2,820,388
6,363,386
Ohio -- 381,803
Pennsylvania
2,265,755
135,945
60
Rhode Island
3
30,000
South Carolina. - .
1,800 61,710,274 4,628,271 60,590,861 1,514,772
239
258,073
7,977
Tennessee
15,484 27,701,277 1,662,077
4,647,934
Vermont - . . .
278,876
89
Virginia
1,541,833
320, 328
2,956
92,610 3,4i)4,483
Territories.

Florida
Iowa -Wisconsiii
Tbtal

275,317
41,450
136,288

..

16,519 12,110,533
2,487
!
8,117

726, 635 , 481,420

14,448

'

155,100,809 6,907,094 790,479,276 57,183,410 80,841,422 2,045,518




R E P O R T ON

THE

If9

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

•p.

08

States.

o

d
d

c8

03

P-i

Alabama
Arkansas........
Columbia, Dist. of.
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana. «
Kentucky
_
Louisiana.
Maine
Maryland.
Massachusetts.. - .
Michigan
^Mississippi
Missomi.
New Hampshire..
New jersey— —
NewYork
..
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island.-South Carolina
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia

273,302
148,439
56,560
471,65;*7
272'
162,894564,32^
1,820,306
63,436,909
119,=824
30
24,816,012
64,965'
1,602
83,471
9,067,913
115
1,922'
744^
16,772,359
6,942,275
326,018
317
51,619
29,650,43^
585;
75,347,106

$13,665 25,226
7,079
7,422
44
3,8
3,897
33,016
1,088
. 19
8,145 19,799
28,216 29,173
91,015 30,647
2,137,476 38,446
1,012
7,189
3, 723
3
3, 674
1,737,121
1,196
5,196
4, 533
80
6,836
4,174
362,716 66,461
1,345
11
115 10,061
62 52,796
838,618 118,923
297,114 38,950
16,251 33,107
166
32
2,576 15,857
1,182,017 50,907
4, 660
68
3,767,365 65,020

$5,045 $266,200 $404,994
1,416
69,205
109,468
9
6, 666
3, 092
779 1,376,534
176, 62{)
218
113,828
47,266
3,9,60
605,172
'449,6.23^
5,835
428,175
309,204
6,129
742,269
357,694
7,689
931,363
536,439
202
163,069
283,669
745 1,496,902
123,171
735 ^ 457,466 218,765
239 2,373,299
178,1-57
907
301,052
82,730
1,367
359,585
369,482
11,292
100,432
270,647
269 1,638,543
107,092
2,012 1,328,032
336,953
10,659 10,496,021 1,153,413
23,786
674,349
•544,125
7,790 1,848,869
551,193
6,621 3,187,292
686,801
33
223,229
61,7,02
3,171
677,810
396,364
10,181
472,141
606,969
932 2,008,737
131,67,8
13,004 1,480,488
764,,698

Territories.

75,274
-8,076
115

Florida
Iowa.
Wisconsin. ,
Total

219,163, 31>si




3,764
404
6

75
2,132
1,474

16
426
295

23,094
23,609
36,677

61,007
16,52<)
16,167

10,547,715 628,303 125,660 33,787,008 9,344,410

180

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

states.

rBB
d
O

Alabama
]$4, 256, 390
Arkansas
1,230,401
Columbia, Dist. of
40,492
Connecticut
. 1,802,992
Delaware
.412, 300
"Georgia . . . .
4,962,720
3,743.109
Illinois
4,267,317
Indiana
Kentucky
- . 8,202,1651
Louisiana
- . 2,454,203|
2,298,819
Maine — Maryland
». 2,238,069
2,325,189
Massachusetts
Michigan
764,298
3,121,997
Mississippi
3,238,865]
Missouri
New Hampshire . 1,916,735
1,842,606
New Jersey
14,757,109'
New York
North Carolina . . 4,467,506
7,896,333
Ohio - .
Pennsylvania . . . 9,877,0131
342,041
Rhode Island
South Carolina . . 3,606,603]
7,612,352
Tennessee
3,006,110]
Vermont .
8,124,587
Virginia

n3
d
d

(2

(2:

d
d
o

;2

f2

PM

$66,106 1,692i $1,592
220,353
96|
95
64,943 ^ 19,483]
247
651
707
651
311,454 17,538 17.538
889,870
64,404
22,641 l,468i 1,459
371,303
111,391 2,992^1 2,992|
162,502 1,150 1,150
660,007
379
1,237,919
309,480]
379
1,786,847
446,712
737
737
49,283|
317
14,785
317
211
492,942
211
1,465,661
488,201
170,870 2,290. 2,291
941,906
329,667 1,741 1,741
163,3751
266
266
38,344
175,196
91
62,659
91
562,265|
70
140,564
70
419J1 420
1,260,617
441,181
397,2071
139,022 1,966 1,966
9,845,295 3,446,863 1,735 1,736
626, 044| 166,261 3,014 3,014
3,685,316!
921,329 4,317J 4,317
3,048,5641 1,066,997 7, 262-J 7,263
183,830
64,340
458
458
299,1701
89,721 2,080 2,080
1,060,332
265,083 1,217 1,217
3,699,235 1,294,732 4,286 4,286
761,612 3,191 3,191
2,638,374

177

$354

25]
50
2,666
5,332
322
,644
8,647 17.294
474]
948
10,265 20,630
2,209
4,418
2,8841 5,768
2,236|
4,472
7,585 16,170
193
386
12
24
22]
44
94
.188
9,416 18,832
6,799 13,598
28,752 67,604
11,524 23,048
14,328 28,656
803
1,606
643
1,286
663|
1,306
94
188
13,911 27,822

' Territories.
Florida 1. .
Iowa
Wisconsin
Total.

465,846
214,998]
131,816

7,285;
23,039
6,777

^2,185
5,760
1,694

124f

125

109,610,979|35, 802,114|ll, 345,317| 61, 652||61,663| 124,734 249,468




I

No. 40.

STATEMENT
EXHIBITING

THE

POPULATION
OF .

THE STATES AND TEMITOEIES,
AND

THE AGUICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS OF EACH
WITH THE VALUE THEREOF,




F O E T H E YEAE 1 8 5 0 .

°

No. 40,
to

Stdtement exhihiting the population of the States and Territories and the agricultural productions of each, with the value
thereofi, and the total value ofi all the products of each State and Territory, for the year 1850.
[NOTE.—The prices of the different products adopted by Professor Tucker have been used in the calculations.]

States.

Alabama
.
Arkansas
California
,
Columbia, District of.
Cofinecticut
._.,
Delaware
Florida.
Georgia
,
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana.
Maine
...
Maryland.
Massachusetts
Michigan . . ^
Mississippi
Missouri. ^
New Hampshire
New Jersey..
...
New York
North CarolinaOhio
Pennsylvania.




Census, 1860.

771,623
209,897
92,597
61,687
370,792
91,632
87,445
906,185
851,470
988,416
192,214
982,405
617,762
683,169
683,034
994,514
397,654
606,326
682,044
317,976
489,565
097,394
869,039
980,329
311,786

Bushels of
wheat.

294,044
199,639
17,228
17,370
41,762
482,611
1,027
1,088,534
9,414,675
6,214,458
1,530,581
2,142,822
417
296,259
4,494,680
31,211
4,925,889
137,990
2,981,652
185,658
1,601,190
13,121,498
2,1.30,102
14,487,351
15,367,691

Value.

Bushels of
rye.

17,261
$264,640
8,047
179,676
16,606
5,509
15,633
600,893
37,586
8,06.6
434,260
1,152
924
63,750
979,681
83,364
8,473,117
78,792
6,593,012
19,916
1,377,523
415,073
1,928,540
475
376
102,916
266,633
226,014
4,045.212
481,021
28,090
105,871
4,433,300
9,606
124,191
44,268
2,683,487
183,117
167,092
1,266,678
1,441,071
4,148,182
11,809,348
229,663
1,917,092
13,038,616
425,918.
13,830,922 I 4,805,160

Bushels of
oats.

Value.

$12,083
6,633

2,965,696
666,183

$1,037,994
« 229,664

3,856
420,625
5,646
806
37,625
68,366
5.6,164
13,941
290,551
333
72,041
168,210
336,716
74,110
6,724
30,988
128,182
878,905
2,903,727
160,694
298,143
3,363,612

8,134
1,268,738
604,618
66,686
3,820,044
10,087,241
6,666,014
1,624,345
8,201,311
89,637
2,181,037
2,242,151
1,166,146
2,866,056
1,503,288
6,278,079
973,381
3,378,063
26,662,814
4,052,078
13,472,742
21,638,156

.2,847
440,668
211,681
23,305
1,337,015
3,530,534
1,979,255
633,521
2,870,459
31,373
763,363
784,753
407,801
1,003,120
526,151
1,847,328
340,683
1,182,.322
9,293,485
1,418,227
4,716,460
7,538,355

Value.

Bushels of
Indian corn.

28,764,048
8,893,939
12,236
66,230
1,935,043
3,145,642
1,996,809
30, 080, 099.
57,646,984
52,964,363
8,666,799
68,672,591
10,266,373
1,750,056
10,749,858
2,345,490
5,641,420
22,446,662
36,214,537
1,573,670
8,769,704
17,868,400
27,941,051
59,078,695
19,835,214

Value.
Pi

$14,377,024
4,446,969
6,118
32,616
967,622
1,672,771
998,404
15,040,050
28,823,492
26,482,181
4,328,400
29,336,295
6,133,187
875,028
6,374,929
1,172,745
2,820,710
11,223,276
18,107,268
786,835
4,379,852
8,929,200
13,970,626
29,539,347
9,917,607

O
pi

o

o

Rhode Island . .
South CarolinaTennessee
..
Texas
rt
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin
.•-

147,545
668,607
1,002,717
212,592
314,120
1,421,661
305,391

.49
1,066,277
1,619,386
41,729
535,956
11,212,616
4,286,131

y
44
959,649
1,457,448
37,556
482,360
10,091,354
3,857,518

26,409
43,790
89,137
3,108
176,233
468,930
81,263

18,486
30,663
. 62,396
2,176
123,363
321,251
56,877

^15,232
2,322,155
7,703,086
199,017
2,307,734
10,179,144
3,414,672

75,331
812,754
2,696,080
69,656
807,707
3,562,700
1,195,136

639,201
16,271,464
62,276,223
6,028,876
2,032,396
35,264,319
1,988,979

6,077
61,547
13,294
,11,380

1,401
196,616
211,943
107,702

1,261
176,864
190,749
96,932

125

87

106
210

74
147

30,582
5
61,214
10,900

10,704
2
21,425
3,815

16*, 725
366,411
2,918
9,899

269,601
8,135,727
26,138,111.
3,014,438
1,016,198
17,627,160
994,489

Terntories,
Minnesota
New Mexico
Oregon
Utah
Total




8,363
182,705
1,459
4,960

Pi
>d

o
pi

23,191,876 100,485,844

90,437,260

14,188,813

9,932,169 146,584,179

51,304,463 692,071,104

296,035,562

O

GQ

OD

STATEMENT—Continued.
states.

Alabama
Arkansas
California
..
Columbia, District of:
Connecticut
Delaware _
Florida
Georgia
Illinois Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
..
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
-...
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
,
New Hampshire
New JerseyNew York
North Carolina
Ohio
•
Pennsylvania
,
Rhode Islarid
,
South Carolina
..
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont




Bushels of Irish
and sweet potatoes.

5,721,205
981,981
10,292
31,789
2,689,805
305,986
765,054
7,213.807
2,672,294
2,285,048
282,363
2,490,666
1,524,085
3,436,040
973,932
3,585,384
2,361,074
5,003,277
1,274,511
4,304,919
3,715,251
15,403,997
6,716,027
5,245,760
6,032,904
-651,029
4,473,963
3,845,660
1,426,803
4,951,014

Value.

$2,836,002
471,607
4,217
13, 065
1,075,930
128,939
381,744
3,584,165
1,084,661
934,190
113,570
,1,096,084
752,479
1,374,416
410,472
1, 434,154
944,547
2,476,490
543,355
1,721,968
1,536,902
6,162,162
2,795,982
2,117,103
2,418,379
260,412
2,223,332
1,815,996
703,937
1,980.406

Bushels of barley.

Value.

3,958
177
9,712
75
19.099
56

$2,968
133
7,284
56
14,324
42

11,601
110,795
45,483
25,093
96,343

8,626
83,096
34,112
18,820
71,507

151,731
745
112,385
75, 249
228
9,631
70,256
6,492
3,685,069
2,735
354,358
165,584
18,875'
4, 583
2,737
4,776
42,150

113,798
659
84,289
66,437
171
7,223
62,692
4,869
2,688,794
2,051
266,769
124,188
14,156
3,437
2,053
3,582
31,613

00

Bushels of buckwheat.

348
176
378
229,297
8,615
56
260
184,604
149,740
52,516
16,097
3
104,523
103,671
105,895
472,917
1,121
23,641
65,265
878,934
3,183,956
' 16,704
638,060
2,193,692
1,246
283
19,427
69
209,819

Value.

$209
106
227
137,678
6,169
33
150
110,702
89,844
31,510
9,658
2
62,714
62,203
63,537
283,750
673
14,185
39,159
627,360
1,910,373
10,022
382,836
1,316,215
747
170
11,656
35
125,891

Tons of hay.

32,685
3,976
2,038
2,279
616,131
30,169
2,510
23,449
601,952
403,230
89,055
113,747
25,752
755,889
157,966
661,807
404, 934.
12,504
116,925
598,854
435,960
3,728,797
145,653
1,443,142
1,842,970
74,418
20,925
74,091.
8,354
866,153

Value.

$326, 850
39, 760
20, 380
22, 790
5,161, 310
301, 690
25, 100
234, 490
6,019, 520
4,032, 300
890, 550
1,137, 470
257, 620
7,558, 890
1,679, 560
6,618, 070
4,049, 340
125, 040
1,169, 250
5,988, 540
4,359, 500
37,287, 970
1,456, 530
14,431, 420
18,429, 700
744, 180
209, 250
740, 910
83, 640
8,661, 530

pi.

o
pi

O

a

Cl

w

Virginia
Wisconsin

_.

3,130,567
1,402,956

1,433,590
661,270

26,437
209,692

19,078.
167,269

214,898
79,878

128,939
47,927

369,098
276,662

8,690,980
2,756,620

21,345
3
91,326
44,028

-'

8,558
1
36,530
17,617

1,216
5

912
4

615
100

.. 309
60

2,019

20,190

1,799

1, 349

332

199

373
4,805

3,730
48,050

104,066,043

45,453,232

5,167,015

3,876,261

8,956,912

5,374,147

13,838,242

138,382,420

Territories.
Minnesota _ . .
New Mexico
Oregon
Utah

•

Total

•




.,.

pi
hj

O
pi
O
H
W

a

00

STATEMENT—Continued.
states.

Alabama
Arkansas
California
Oolumbia, District pf.
Connecticut
Delaware.
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
..
Iowa
Kentucky
..
Louisiana
..
Maine
Maryland.
Massachusetts . . .
Michigan _ .
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
_
New Jersey
New York .
North Carolina
Ohio
_,
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina- .
.
Tennessee
Texas
_
Vermont




Pounds of hops.

276
167
16
654
348
14
261
3,661
92,796
8,242
4, 309
126
40,120
1,870
121,696
10,663
473
4, 130
257, 174
2, 133
,536,299
9,246
63,731
22,088
, 277
26
1,032
7
288,023

Value.

$44
26
2
89
66
2
42
568
o 14,847
1,319
689
20
6,419
299
19,466
1,706
76
661
41,148
341
405,808
1,479
10,197
3,634
44
4
165
1
46,084

Value of market Value of orchard] Bushels of peas
and beans.
products.
products.

$84,821
17,150
76,276
67,222
196,874
12,714
8.721
76,600
127,494
72,864
8,848
303,120
148,329
122,387
200,869
600,020
14,738
46,250
99,454
56,810
475,242
912,047
39,462
214,004
688,714
98,298
.47,286
97,183
12,354
18,863

$15,408
40,141
17,700
14,843
176,118
46,674
1,280
92,776
446,049
324,940
8,434
106,230
22,359
342,865
164,051
463,995
132,660
60,405
514,711
248,563
607,268
,761,960
34,348
695,921
723,389
63,994
36,108
62,894
12,605
315, 265

892,701
285,738
2,292
7,764
19,090
4,120
135,359
1,142,011
82,814
35,773
4,776
202,574
161,732
205,641
12,816
43,709
74,254
1,072,757
46,017
70,856
14,174
741,546
1,684,252
60,168
65,231
6,846
1,026.900
369^321
179,360
104, 649

Value,

$669, 526
214, 303
1,719
5, 816
14, 317
3, 090
101, 619
856, 608
62, 111
26, 830
3, 581
151, 931
121, 299
154, 156
9, 612
32, 782
66, 690
804, 668
34, 513
63, 142
10, 630
556, 159
1,188, 189
45, 126
41, 423
5, 135
770, 176
276, 991
134, 612
78> 487

Tons of dew
and waterrot'd hemp.

16

Value.

$1,800

pi
W
hj
O
pi

o
17,787

2,134,440

'63

7,560

i2{

7
16,028

840
1,923,360

Cl

4
39
150
44

480
4,680
18,000
5 280

695

71,400

Virginia..
-..-.
Wisconsin. .^e^^»^.e,^*---..-,r--

11,506 1
16,930

1,841
2,649

183,047 1
32,142

177,137
4,823

521,579
20,667

391,184
16,493

8,231
1,271

10,002
15,688
6,666
289
9,219,901

6,914,925

16,680

34,871

4,184,520

7,601
11,766
4,924
217

7.723,186

139

Tei'ritories.
MinuPKota
New Mexico
Oregon
XJtah

.
...
.-. ._._..
:_-...^.

a^taU-...-.,,,,,^^,^,,,..




8
60

2
9

160
6, 679
90,241
23,868

8,497,029

659,626

5,280,030

hj

O

. o

a

00

STATEMENT—Continued.

OD

00

States.

Alabama
--Arkansas
California _
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut
Delaware
.
Florida
Georgia
Illinois -_
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
_.
Maine
Maryland _
Massachusetts
Michigan
•-..
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania ..,
Rhode Island..
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont



Pounds of
' flax.

Value.

Pounds of ma- Pounds of cane
sugar.
ple sugar.

3,921
12,291

$314
983

643
9,330

17,928
11,174
50
6,387
160,063
584,469
62,660
,100,116

1,434
894
4
431
12,806
46,758
6,013
168,009

60,796

17,081
35,686
1,162
7,162
665
627,160
7,652
182,965
940,677
693,796
446,932
530,307
85
333
368,131
1,048
20,852

1,366
2,856
93
672
53
50,173
612
14,637
75,246
47,504
35,755
42,426
7
27
29,450
84
1,668

60
248,904
2,921,192
. 78,407
437,405
255
93,642
47, 740
796,526
2,439,79i

87,000

2,750,000
846,000

10.000
226,001,000

8,000
178,910
-1,298,863
2,197
10,357,484
27,932
4,588,209
2,326,525
28
200
158,557
6,349,357

77,000
3,000
7,361,000

Gallons of
molasses.

Value of maple Pounds of cotton.
& cane sugar,
and molasses.

83,428
18

$20,198
470

666
60
352, 893
216, 245
8, 354
180, 325
3, 162
30, 079
10,931, 177
3, 167
430
1,
693
4,
823
19,
318
18,
636
5,
811
9;
964
56, 539
704
197, 308
50, 652
4
15, 904
7, 223
441, 918
5, 997

2, 673
10
180,579
77,091
14,116
182,125
4,553
28,286
11,226,288
6,310
2,673
40,715
125,954
3,984
10,073
66,905
300
529,182
1.537
268,872
126,457
2
6,271
9,492
382,424
318,667

225,771,600
26,137,600

Value.

$18, 061", 728
2,091,008

pi
W
hj

O
pi
18,052,400
199,636,400

1,444,192
16,970, 912

6,600

448

303,200
71,494,800

24,266
6,719,584

O
^i

193,716,800

15,497,344

20,218,000

1,617,440

120,360,400
77,812,800
23,228,800

9,628,832
6,225,024
1,858,304

>
a

Virginia
Wisconsin

.

..
....

1,000,450
68,393

80,036
6,471

40,322
9,874

1,227,665
610,976

69,448
.32,524

4,236
24
58

147
847
5
12

12,700,991

13,738,190

1,578,800

126,304

978,317,200

78,265,376

Territories.

2,950

.
640
560

Oreo"on

Utah
Total,

-_.-,-...




51
44

7,809,676

624,774

\
34,263,436

237,133,000

pi
O

w

n

O)
G

STATEMENT—Continued,
O

Dairy products.
States.

Alabama
Arkansas
_ -California
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
.
New York
North Carolina
.
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Soiith Cai-olina
Tennessee . . . , J



Pounds of rough
rice.

63,179

Value.

$46,246
1,264

1,075,090
38,960,691

21,502
779,014

5,688
4,425,349

114
88,607

2,719,866
700

64, 397
14

6,465,868

109,317

159,930,613 3,198,612
6,177
25i8,g54

Pounds of tobacco.

Value.

164,990
218,936
1,000
7,800
1,267,624

$9,899
13,136
60
468
76,057

998,614
423,924
841,394
1,044,620
6,041
55,501,196
26,'878

59,917
25,436
60,484
62,677
362
,330,072
1,613

21,407,497
138,246
1,245
49,960
17,113,784
60
310
83,189
11,984,786
10,454,449
912,651

1,284,450
8,295
75
2,998
1,026,827
3
19
4,991
719,087
627,267
64,769

74,285
20,148,932

4, 457
1,20^,936

Pounds of
beeswax and
honey.

Value.

Value.
Pounds of butter.

897,021
192,338

$134,553
28,851

660
93,304
41,248
18,971
732,514
869,444
935,329
321,711
1,158,019
96,701
189,618
74,802
59,508
359,232
397,460
1,328,972
117,140
156,694
1,755,830
512,289
804,275
839,509
6,347
216,281
1,036,572

82
13,996
6,187
2,846
109,877
130,417
140,299
48,257
173,703
14,505
28,443
11,220
8, 926
63,885
69,619
199,346
17,571
23,504
•263,374
76,843
120,641
125,926
952
32,442
165,486

° 4,008,811
1,864,239
705
14,872
6,498,119
1,055,308
371,498
4,640,559
12,626,643
12,881,635
2,171,188
9,947,523
683,069
9,243,811
3,806,160
8,071,370
7,065,878
4,346,234
7,834,359
6,977,056
9,487,210
79,766,094
4,146,290
34,449,379
39,878,418
995,670
2,981,850
8,139,583

Pounds of
cheese.
31,412
$723,168
30,088
336,267
160
134
1,500
2,762
5,363,277 1,437,825
3,187
190,115
67,770
18,015
46,976
837,649
1,278,226 2,318,689
624,664 2,349,905
401,306
209,840
213,954 1,801,252
1,957
123,050
2,434,464 1,785,609
685,308
3,975
7,088,142 1,807,254
1,011,492 1,322,433
783,382
21,191
203,572 1,420,363
3,196,563 1,415,698
365,756 1,725,986
49,741,413 16,844,967
751,128
95,921
20,819,542 7,241,865
2,506,034 7,303,367
195,046
316,508
636,981
4, 970
' m , 6 8 1 1,474,009

pi
hj
O
pi

O

Cl

w

Texas - ' - - . - . . . - - . ; .
Vermont- - - - . _ . . . - Virginia . . . . . . . . . . .
Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .

1,764

66,897

4,014

17,164

343

56,803,227
1,268

3,408,194
76

8,467
325
70

508
19

199,762,666

11,985,159

880,825
249,422
880,767
131,005

67,124
37,413
132,115
19,651

2,344,900
12,137,980
11,089,359
3,633,750

80
2

12

10

88,203

2

1,100
111
211,464
83,309

14,853,790 2,228,068

313,345,306

95,299 1 42R.ft47
8,720,834 2,620.878
436,292 2,017,899
400,283
674,089

Territories.

Minnesota . . . . - - . . New Mexico . . . - . - . Oregon.r
......
Utah
--- .
-•
Total




215,313,497 4,306,270

5,848
36,980
30,998

198
312
39,913
16,546

105,635,893 61,678,960

pi
W
h3
O
pi

H
O

«

n

CD

STATEMENT—Continued.

CD

to
States.

Alabama
Arkansas
California.
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut
Delaware.
_
Florida.
Georgia
Illinois Indiana
Iowa .
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan.
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York-.
North Carolina
Ohio. -_
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont



One-fourth value
of live stock.

Pounds of wool.

$5,422,528

657,118
182,595
6,520
626
497,464
57,768
23,247
990,019
2,150,113
2,610,287
373,898
2,297,433
109,897
1,364,034
477,438
585,136
2,043,283
659,619
1,627,164
1,108,476
375,396
10,071,301
970,738
10,196,371
4,481,570
129,692
487,233
1,364,378
131,917
3,400,717

661,992
837,764
17,911
866,872
462,320
720,015
6,432,104
6,052,315
5,619,639
922,319
7,415,359
2,788,069
2,426,431
1,999,408
2,411,928
2,002,183
•4, 850,916
.4, 971,895
2, 217,975
2, 669,823
18, 392,625
4, 429,412
11, 030,435
10, 375,013
383,159
3,765,004
7, 494,504
2, 603,232
3, 160,807

Value.

$197,135
64,779
1,656
158
149,236
17,330
6,974
297,006
645,034
783,086
112,169
689,230
32,969
409,210
143,231
176,541
612,985
167,886
488,149
332,543
112,619
3,021,390
291,221
3,058,911
1,344,471
38,908
146,170
409,313
39,575
1,020,215

Pounds of
silk cocoons.

167,
38

Value.

Bushels of flax
seed.

Value.

$167
38

69
321

328

328

703
904

1,125
1,446

6
813
47
387
246
1,281
29
252
39
7
108
2
186
191
23
1,774
229
1,552
285

813
47
>387
246
1,281
29
252
39
7
108
2
186
191
23
1,774
229
1,652
. 285

622
10,787
36,888
1,959
75,801

995
17,259
59,021
3,134
121,282

580
2, 446
72
619
26
13,696
180
16,525
67,963
38,196
188,880
41,728

928
3,914
116
830
42
21.914
288
26,440
92,741
61,114
302,208
66,766

123
1,923
22
268

123
1,923
22
268

55
18,904
26
93^

30,246
41
1,497

$110
614

pi
W
hj

O
pi
H
O

Cl

w
CO

Virginia
.Wisconsin. _

._.-..

...

8,414,165
1,224,346

2,860,765
253,963

868,230
76,189

23,215
373,657
469,047
136,742

85
32,901
29,686
9,222

26
9,870
8,906
2,767

136,045,129

52,516,959

15,755,088

617

517

62,318
1,191

83,709
1 906

5'

8'

662,300

899 680

Territories.
Minnesota.
(, 1 New Mexico
C^ Oregon.
Utah

.
-

Total.




_.
__...-

...

10,843

10,843

PS
hj

o

pi.

>^o)

o
(/2

CD
CO

STATEMENT—Continued.

CD

4^

States.

Alabama
Arkansas .
CalifoVnia J
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida . . . ..^
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa _
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi —
Missouri
:
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
-,
Pennsyl v^ania
..
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont



Bushels of
clover seed.

[Bushels of other]
grass seeds.

Value.

138
90

$414
270

3
13,841
2,525

9
41,523
7,576

132
3,427
18,320
342
3,230i
2
9,097
15,217
1,002
16,989
84
619
829
28.280
88,222
576
103,197
125,030
1,328
376
5,096
10
760

396
10,281
54,960
1,026
9,690
6
27,291
45,661
3,006
60,967
262
1,867
2,487
84,840
264,666
1,728
309,691
376,090
3,984
1,128
15,288
30
2,280

647
436

Value.

$1,641
1,308

16,628
1,403
2
428
14,380
11,961
2,096
21,481
97
9,214
2,561
• 6,085
9,285
533
4,346
8,071
63,051
96,493
1,275
.37,310
63,913
3,708
30
9,118

49,884
4,209
6
1,284
43,140
36,863.
6,288
64,443
291
27,642
7,683
16,256
27,865
1,699
13,038
24,213
189,153
289,479
3,826
111,930
161,739
11,124
90
27,364

14,936

44,808

Gallons of wine.

220
36
68,056
863
4,269
145
10
796
2,997
14, 055^
420
8,093
16
724
1,431
4,688
1,654
407
10,563
344
1,811
9,172
11,058
48,207
26,590
1,013
6,880
92
99
659

Value.

$440
'70
116,110
1,726
8,538
290
20
1,692
6,994
28,110
840
16,186
30
1,448
2,862
9,376
3,308
814
21,126
688
3,622
18,344
22,116
96,414
61,180
2,026
11,760
184
198
1,318

pi
hi
O
pi
O

o

Virginia . Wisconsin-

S9,181
1,449

23,428
6,003

70,284
15,009

12
6

29,727
483

22

66

1,406,634

416,831

1,250,493

113

10,816
226

2,363

4,726

221,249

442,498

6,4J08.

Territories.
Minnesota . .
New MexicoOregon
Utah
To tal-




468,878

pi
hj

O
pi
O

W

Cl

CD

Vx

No. 41.

CD

Becapitulation ofi statements numbers 39 and 40, exhihiting the quantities and values ofi the agricultural productions ofi
the United States for the decades ofi 1840 and 1850, with an estimate thereofi fior 1855, and the total amount ofi the
productions fior all the States and territories fior 1840 and 1850.
Years.

Population.

Bushels of
wheat.

Bushels of
Rye.

Value of
wheat.

Value of
Rye.

Bushels of
Oats.

Value of
Oats.

Bushels of
Corn.

po,575,500
9,932,169

123,071,341
146,584,179
160,365,053

$37,474,581
51,304,463

377,531,875
592,071,104
717,812,546

Value of
Corn.
pi

1840
1850
1855

. .

^ 'l7,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

84,823,272
100,485,844
109,665,678

$68,033,934
90,431,260

18,645,567
14,188,813

$132,749,612
296,036,552

hj
O
pi
H3

O
Years.

1840
1850
1855..

Pcj>^alation.

17,069,4.53
23,191,876
27,185,517

Bushels Irish
and sweet
potatoes.

Value of Irish
and sweet
potatoes.

108,298,060
104,066,043

$23,998,445
45,453,232

Bushels of
barley.

4,161,504
5,167,015
5,755,759

Value of
barley.

$2,391,702
3,875,261

Bushels of
buckwheat.

7,291,743
8,956,912
9,932,868

Value of
buckwheat.

$4,226,830
5,374,147

Tons of hay.

Value of hay.

10,248,108
13,838,242
15,942,420

$80,791,732
138,382,420
Cl

?

Years.

1840.'.....•..
1850
1856..

Population.

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517




Pounds of hops. Value of hops.

1,238,502
3,497,029
4-, 820,752.

$471,801
559,525

Market
prpduce.

Orchard
produce.

$2^,601,196
5;, 280,030
6,850,095

$7,256,904
7,723,186
7,996,474

Tons of flax
and- hemp.

95,25lfi
38,357^

Value of-flax- Pounds-of ma-- Value of mapie and cane
ple and cane
and hemp'.
sugar.
sugar.
$8,790,001
4,809,294

....••...,...*

165,100,809
271,386,436
339,641,442

,

$6,907,094
13,738,190

Years.

1840
1850,...1855
...i

Years.

1840.......
1850
1855

Years.

1840
1850
1855

Population.

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,617

Population.

17,069,453
23,191,876
2,7,185,517

Population.

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

Pounds of
cotton.

Value of
cotton.

Pounds of
rice. .

Value of
.rice.

Pounds of
tobacco.

80,841,422 $2.,'045,5:18 • 219,163,319 $10,547,715
790,479,275 $ 5 7 , 1 8 3 , 4 1 0
•978,317,'200 7 8 , 2 6 5 , 3 7 6 *215,313,497 4 , 3 0 6 , 2 7 0 199,752,655 1 1 , 9 8 5 , 1 5 9
294,127,580
l,088,-409,-0U8'

One-fourth value of live
stock.

.$109,610,979
136,0.45,129
151,5.38,684

Pounds of
wool;

^Gallons of '
wine.

Pounds bees- Value beesw a x and
w a x and
honey.
honey.

1628,303
14,853,790

Value of i
wine.

$125,660
2,228,068

Valueof
poultry.

Dairy
products. .

$33,787,008
61,678,95,0
78,026., 417

V a l u e of.nursery products.

^.
o
pi

>^
o

35,802,114 $11,345,317
52,516,959 .15,756,088
61,560,379

Bushels of peas Value of peas
and beans.
and beans.

9,219,901

Valueof
wool.

Value Of
Pounds of
silk cocoons. silk cocoons.

$6,914,925

61,6521
10,843

Bushelsof =^Value of
flaxseed.
flaxseed.

562,300

$899,680

$61,663
10,8.43

124,734.
221,249
:27,7,816

$249., 468 •
442,498

$9,344.,410 ;

;

.$693,53:4

Bushels of Value
of T o t a l value of agBushels of
Value of
ricultural .proother grass
other grass
clover seed. clover seed.
ducts.
•seed.
seed.

468,878

* The census of 1840 gives the marketable rice; the census of 1850 gives the rough rice,
t The census of 1840 gives only the beeswax produced.



Value of
tobacco.

$1,406,634

416,831

$1,250,493

W'

Cl

$621,163,977
994,093,842

CO

- .

No. 42;

CD
00

Statement exhihiting the numher of acres employed in the production of the different crops in the States and Territories,
their total product and value, together with the product and volue per acrCyfor the year 1850.

Products.

Numberof acres. Product of each
crop.

Description.

Value of crop.

Product per
acre.

c^
O 00
3

fl

pi

>
Indian corn
»
Meadow or pasture lands—that proportion which is regarded
improved and exclusive of hay crops
Hay
Wheat
Oats.
Cotton
Rye
Peas and beans
Irish potatoes
Sweet potatoes
Buckwheat
,
Tobacco
Sugar
Barley
Rice . . . . • • .
,.
Hemp
Flax
Orchards...
Gardens
Vineyards
Other products
Improved but not in actual cultivation




31,000,000
20,000,000
13,000,000
11,000,000
7,500,000
5,000,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
760,000
600,000
400,000
400,000
300,000
175,000
110,000
100,000
500,000
500,000
250,000
1,000,000
17,247,614
113,032,614

592,071,104

bushels ,

$296,035,552

13,838,242
100,485,844
146,584,179
978,317,200
14,188,813
9,219,901
65,797,895
38,268,148
8,956,912
199,752,655
237,133,000
5,167,015
215,313,497
34,871
7,809,676

tons . , .
bushels ,
-...do.,
pounds ,
bushels ,
....do..
....do..
....do..
. . . .do..
pounds ,
....do.,
bushels ,
pounds ,
tons...
pounds .

221,249

gallons ,

138,382,420
90,437,260
51,304,463
78,265,376
9,932,169
6,914,926
26,319,158
19,134,074
5,374,147
11,985,159
9,485,320
3,875,261
4,306,270
4,184,620
624,774
7,723,186
5,280,030
442,498

191-10 bus

$9 55

I 1-16 tons,
9i b u s h . . .
19^ bush..
195^ lbs . . .
I I 4-5 bush.
9 1-6 bush..
65^ bush...
51 b u s h . . . .
15 b u s h . . . .
4991 lbs .'..
592 4-5 lbs
17 1-5 bush.
1,230 2-5 lbs.
634 lbs
78 lbs

10
8
6
15
8
6
26
25
9
29
23
12
24
38
6
15
10
1

3g quarts . .

62^
21
82i
64
26
90
30
50
00
96
71
99
61
04
25
45
56
77

O
pi
O
•^

W

i2|
Cl

IS
02

No. 43.
Statement exhihiting the numher offarms, ^plantations, &c., numher of acres of improved and unimproved land; average
number ofi acres to each f a r m ; cash value ofifiarms ; value ofifiarming implements dnd machinery; average value of
f a r m s ; average^ value offarming implements and machinery; average value offiarms, implements, and machinery to
each State and Territory, and the average in all the States and Territories in 1850, as taken firom the last census.

il
Plantations,
farms, cfec.

Acres of im- Acres of unimproved land.
proved l a n d .

S-fl
3 ^
fl flj

Cash value of
farms.

> o
Alabama
Arkansas
California .
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut.... ^....
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
^....
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire




771,623
209,897
92,597
51,687
370,792
91,532
87,446
90.6,185
851,470
988,416
192,214
982,405
517,762
583,169
683,034
994,514
397,654
606,526
682,044
317,976

41,946
17,758
872
267
22,445
6,063
4,304
51,759
76,208
93,896
14,805
74,777
13,422
46,760
21,860
34,069
34,089
33,960
54,458
29,229

4,435,614
781,530
32,454
16,267
1,768,178
580,862
349,049
6,378,479
5., 039,545
5,046,543
824,682
5,968,270
1,590,025
2,039,596
2,797,905
2,1,33,436
1,929,110
3,444,358
2,938,425
2,251,488

7,702,067
1,816,684
3,861,531
11,187
615,701
375,282
1,246,240
16,442,900
6,997,867
7,746,879
1,911,382
10,981,478
3,399,018
2,515,797
1,836,445
1,222,576
2,454,780
7,046,061
'6,794,245
1,140,926

289
146
4,466
103
106
158
371
441
158
136
185
. 227
372
97
212
99
129
309
176
116

CM

CM

O

$64,323,224
15,265,245
3,874,041
1,730,460
72,726,422
18,880,031
6,323,109
95,753,445
96,133,290
136,385,173
16,657,567
155,021,262
75,814,398
54,861,748
87,178,545
109,076,347
51,872,446
54,738,634
63,225,543
55,245,997

m

"1

o ^
fl
fl S
D..fl

C4- fl >»

$5,125,663
1,601,296
103,483
40,220
1,892,541
510,279
658,795
5,894,150
6,405,561
6,704,444
1,172,869
5,169,039
11,576,938
2,284,557
2,463,443
3,209,584
2,891,371
5,762,927
3,981,525
2,314,125

<Q bD c i

Averag
farmin
and m

Census 1850.

Value 0
pleme
chiner

States and Territories.

KS

ralue
plem
nery

, ,

fl

'bD

<
$1,533

860
4,443
6,481
3,240
3,114
1,469
1,850
1,261
1,453
1,125
2,073
5,648
1,173
3,988
3,202
1,521
1,612
1,161
1,890

$122-

fl i-rt

$1,655

90 ^ ' 9 5 0
4,561
118
6,632
151
3,324
84
3,198
84
1,622
153
1,964
114
1,345
84
1,524
71
1,204
79
2,142
69
6,511
863
1,222
49
4,101
113
3,296
94
1,606
86
1,782
170
1,234
73
1,969
79

pi

H

hJ.
O
pi

O

w

fej

Cl

CO
CO

to
o
o

Plantations,
farms, &c.

Acres of im- Acres of unimproved land. proved land.

Cash value of
farms.
53 o
>,o
<j a-

New J e r s e v . . . . . . . . . . . ' .
'New York
North Carolina
;
Ohio
Pennsylvania . . . . . . . • • • .
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin

489,555
3,097,394
869,039
1,980,329
2,311,786
147,545
668,507
1,002,717
212,592
314,120
1,421,661
305,391

O

•

. ©

3

> B

1

Average value of
farms, implements,
and machinery.

Census 150.

•CM

Average value of
farming implements
and machinery.

States and Terrritories.

Value of farmingim plenients and machinery.

STATEMENT—Continued.

23,905
170,621
66,963
143,807
127,577
5,385
29,697
72,735
12,198
29,763
77,013
20,177

1,767,991
12,408,964
5,463,975
9,851,493
8,623,619
356,487
4,072,551
5,175,173
643,976
2,601,409
10,360,135
1,045,499

984,955
6,710,120
15,643,008
8,146,000
6,294,728
197,451
12,145,059
13,808,849
10,8.52,363
1,'524,413
15,792,176
1,931,159

115
113
369
125
117
103
541
261
942
139
340
148

$120,237,611
554,546,642
67,891,766
358,758,603
407,876,099
17,070,802
82,431,684
97,851,212
16,550,008
63,367,227
216,401,543
28,628,563

$4,425,503
22,084,926
3,931,532
12,750,585
14,722,541
497,201
4,136,354
5,360,210
2,151,704
2,739,282
' 7,021,772
1,641,568

$5,030
3 250
1,192
2,495
3,197
3,170
.2,751
1,345
1,357
2,129
2,810
1,414

$185
129
69
:88
115
92
138
74
176
92
91
.81

$5,215
3 379
1,261
2,583
3,312
3 262
2^889
1 419
1,533
2,221
2,901
1,495

157
3,750
1,164
926

23,846
166,201
132,857
16,333

23,846
124,370
299,951
30,516

384
77
372
51

161,948
1,653,922
2,849,170
311,799

15,981
77,960
183,423
84,288

1,031
441
2,448
337

102
21
157
91

1,133
462
2 605
428

lj449,075

113,032,614

180,528,000

203 3,271,575,426

151,587,638

2,2,58

105

2,362

•pi

•W
hj
O
•pi
O

•w

Territories.

Minnesota
New Mexico
Oregon
Utah




,.

6,077
61,547
13,594'
11,380
23,191,876

QJ5

No. 44.—Statement exhihiting the numher ofi establishments, capital employed, raw material used, hands ernployed, average
wages per month, and product ofi the manufiactures ofi wool for 1850, as taken firom the census fior that decade; also the
product ofi the manufiactures ofi woolfior18iQ, the increase fior ten years, the decrease fior ten years, and an estimate fior 1855.
<Hands employed.

R a w material used.
States, & c .

Arkansas
Columbia, District of.
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa.
Kentucky
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Missouri
."
New Hampshire
Nevv .Jersey.
N e w York
N o r t h Garolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania . . . . . . . .
R h o d e Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin
Florida
Total.




Establishments.

Capital.
Pounds of wool. Tons of coal.

1
149
8
3
16
33
1
25
36
38
119
15
1
61
41
249
1
130
380
45

$700 00
3.773,9,50 00
148,500 00
68,000 00
154,500 00
171,545 00
10,000 00
249,820 00
467,600 00
244,000 00
9,089,342 00
94,000 00
20,000 00
2 , 4 3 7 , 7 0 0 00
494,274 00
4,459,570 00
18,000 00
870,220 00
3,005,064 00
1,0,13,0,00.00

4
1
72
121
9

10,900
8,000
886,300
392,640
31,225

5,000
9,414,100
393,000
153,816
396,964
413,350
14,500
673,900
1,438,434
430,300
22,229,952
• 162,250
80,000
3,604,103
1,510,289
,12,538,786
30,000
1,657,726
7,560,379
4,103,370

00
00
00
00
00

6,200
30,000
2,328,100
1,5.54,110
134,200

28,118,650 00

70^862,829

7,912
45
987
90

100
15,400
1,071
3,600
1,889
2,110
10,777
2,032

357

Value of raw
material.

Males.

$1,630
3,325,729
204,172
30,392
115,367
120,486
3,500
205,287
495,940
165,568
8,671,671
43,402
16,000
1,267,329
548,.367
3,838,292
13,950
578,423
3,282,718
1,463,900

00
00
00
00
00
GO
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2
.2,907
122
40
124
189
7
256
310
262
6,167
78
15
226
411
4,262
15
903
3,490
987

1,675
10,000
830,634
488,899
32,6.30

00
00
00
00
00

15
4
683
478
25

2 5 , 7 5 5 , 9 9 1 00

22,678

Female.

2,581
18
38
54'
57
62
314
100
4,963
51
10
1,201
487
2,412
15
298
2,236
771

hd
O
pi

O
W

o

710
190

to
1,559

46,370

16,574

2

STATEMENT—Continued.
Average wages per m o n t h .

1850.

o
to
1840.
Increase in ten' Decrease in
^ ten years.
years.

s t a t e s , &c.
Male.

Female.

Products.

Products.

$129 00

$129 00
Columbia. District of. . . . . . . . . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . .
Con necticut
Delaware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .
Georfia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Illinois
..o............. ......
Indiana . . . . . . . 9 ' . . . . . . . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Iowa . . . • . . • • • . . • . . . . . • . . . . . • . . * • . . . . . . • . . .
Kentucky
Maine
.%
....
Maryland
«.
Massachusetts
Michigan
Missouri
N e w Hampshire
N e w Jersey.
N e w York
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
...
S o u t h Carolina
1
.".
Tennessee
...J
...
Texas
Vermont
,,,
,
Virginia
Wisconsin
Florida
,,

Total



$30
24
18
27
22
21
11
15
22
18
22
21
32
22
25
19
18
20
19
20

00
12
79
47
00
81
14
30
57
60
95
65
00
86
22
97
00
14
23
70

17
20
24
18
22

66
00
46
17
48

$12
17
14
12
' 11

86
33
10
62
05

11
11
11
14
11
6
14
8
11
7
10
10
15

11
77
89
22
47
50
53
60
76
00
90
41
18

6
20
11
9

00
00
81
91

$2,400
6,465,216
251,000
88,750
206,572
205,802
13,000
318,819
753,300
295,140
12,770,565
90,242
56,000
2,127,745
1,164,446
7,030,604
23,750
1,111,027
5,321,866
2,381,825

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

6,310
15,000
1,579,161
841,013
87,992

00
00
00
00
00

•
2,494,313
104,700
3,000
9,540
58,867

00
00
00
00
00

151,246
412,366
235,900
7,082,898
9,734
13,750
795,784
440,710
3,537,337
3,900
685,757
2,319,061
842,172
1,000
14,290

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1,331,953 00
147,792 00

$2,400
3,970,903
146,300
85,750
197,032
146,935
13,000
167,573
340,934
59,240
5,687,667
80,508
42,250
1,331,961
723,736
3,493.267
19;850
425,270
3,002,805
1,539,653

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

20,696,999 00

Pi
hj

O
pi
1^.

O

ffl

a
1,000 00
7,980 00

15,000
247,208
693,221
87,992

00
00
00
00

800 00
43,207,645 00

E stimate
of woolen
manufactures for
1855.

800^00
22,520,455 00

9,909 00

$56,406,786

No. 45.—Statement exhihiting the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exportations and home consumption
of foreign wool, the foreign importations and exportations and home consumption ofi foreign woolen manufactures,
the estimate ofi the raw material contained in the fioreign manufiactures ofi wool consumed in the United States, the
numher ofi pounds ofi domestic wool consumed, and an estimate ofi the total consumption ofi ivool consumed in the
United States ofi domestic groioth, foreign importations, and one-third of the fioreign manufiactured articles.
WOOL, UNMANUFACTURED.

^3

CL,

Years.

s
o

1840
1841
1842.o
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848.
1849
1850
1851.;.
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856

$846,076
1,091,953
• 797,382
248,679
851,460
1,689,794
1,134,226
555,822
857,034
1,177,347
1,681,691
3,833,157
1,930,711
2,669,718
2,822,185
2,072,139
1,665,064

Yearly average. 1,524,967




WOOL,

fl
o •

•T3

o
X
(O

O
o

fl
bJD

*S

1
$26,246
44,226
90,865
34,651

1^

JO

fl bD

to
o

oc2

s

SCM

o
Q

22,153
41,571 $203,996
89,460
37,302
57,497
1,840
81,015
6,891
. 22,778
7,966
54,285
51,387
14,308
41,668
26,567
131,442
33,895
14,997
27,802
27,456
40,499
58, 477

o o

•T3

O

?

,1

cu
.

X
o
fl

fl

o

15,982,006 .

bJO

WOOL, DOMESTIC.

OF.

G

'T3

$819,830 $9,071,184
1,047,727 11,001,939
706,517
8,375,725
214,028 - 2,472,154
851,460
9,475,782
1,667,641 10,666,176
1,092,655 10,083,819
518,520 10,998,933
855,194 15,240,833
1,170,456 13,704,606
1,681,691 17,151,509
3,825,191 19,507,309
1,876,426 17,573,694
2,618,331 27,621,911
2,7^0,517 32,382,594
1,940,697 24,404;149
1,650,067 31,961,793
1,489,408

MANUFACTURES

.2

o
o .

§

^ 1

1
s

O
pi

H

O

3
ta

fl

o
o
o

OQ

a-

o
fe
$418,399
171,814
145,123
61,997
67,483
156,646
147,894
315,894
179,781
201,404
174,934
267,379
256,878
343,989
1,262,897
1,106,765
1,256,632.

o
18,652,785
10,830,125
8,230,602
2,410,157
9,408,299
10,509,530
9,935,925
10,683,039
15,061,052
13,503,202
16,976,,575
19,239,930
17,316,816
27,277,922
31,119,697
23,297,384
30,705,161

$2,884,262
3,610,042
2,743,534
803,386
3,136,100
3,503,176
3,311,975
3,561,013
6,020,351
4,501,067
5,658,858
6,413,310
5,772,272
9,092,641
10,373,2,32
7,765,795
10,235,054

384,465

16,597,541

5,199,180

pi

n3
fl
3
O
OH

6
fl

>

r-

ffl

35,802,114 $11,345,317 $15,049,409
t2j
Cl

<...••...••.

in

52,516,959

15,755,088

23,072,859

61,560,379

93,392,944

33 071 634

to

O
CO

fl ce o
g fl 5
CJ cu ^o
fl H^

1840...1850-._1855-...

.

$12,165,147
17,436,779
25,333,641




11,345,317
15,755,088
23,392,944

SO 66^^^jj
67,U
86,%

Total consumption
of foreign and domestic
woollen
manufactures in
the United States.

Years.

$ 1 2lT^ff,
1 86i4,%
2 07,^,

Allotment per capita
of woollen manufactures imiDorted
in United States.

PH-^

20,696,999
43,207.546
56,406,786

Manufactures of wool
imported and consumed in the U.
States.

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

Allotnient of the
total consumption
of foreign and doinestic wool.

1840
1850
1855

o
fi

$0 n ^ %

$8, 652,.785
16,976,675
23,297,384

$0 5 0 i ^ ^
'73^
85?A

$29,349,784
.60,184,120
79,704,:170

75,i,^-

•

Sl 71,^^
.2 5 9 ^ ^
2 931^0%

$819,830
1,681,691
1,940,697

Allotment per capita
of home consump-'
tion of foreign
wool.

fl fl

i
PH

S fl •

$0 a4,4.f^
07-^%
07-1^^^

Allotment per 'capita
of the estiinated
consumption , of
wool in the United
States.

•

.1

Total consumption of
foreign and domestic wool, and onethird the value of
the foreign woollen
imports, which is
estimated as the
value of thb raw
material therein.

d
.2

Years.

fl
2 • •
p. O

Allotment per capita
of domestic wool
produced.

1<^

Allotment per capita
of the total ^consumpti on of foreign and doinestic
manufactures in
the United States.

•

Allotment per capita
of the domestic
woolen ^ manufactures.

No. 46.
Stateraent exhihiting the population, manufiactures .ofi wool in the United States, with an allotment per capita thereof;~ the
domestic wool, and an allotment per capita; home consumption ofi fioreign wool, andthe allotment .per ccqjita; total home
consumption ofi fioreign and doinestic wool, and an allotment per capita; manufactures ofi wool imported and-consumed
in the United States, and an allotment per capita thereofi; total consumption ofi fioreign and domestic woollen mannfactures, and the allotment per capita ; and the total.consumption of fioreign and domestic wool, and one-third the value ofi
the fioreign woollen imports, (which represents the estimated value ofi the raw material therein,) together vjith an allot-^
ment per capita thereofi, fior the years 1840, 1850, and 1855.

$15,049,409
23,072,859
33,071,634

•-$0 8 8 ^ %
99i¥a
1 .21^V

to
o

pi
t*J
hj

O
pi

o
>a

ffl
l-H

Cl

No. 47.
Statement exhihiting the numher ofi pounds ofi wool produced and its value; the numher ofi pounds of domestic wool
exported and its value, and the home consumption. The numher ofi pounds ofi wool imported and its value ; the numher
ofi pounds ofi fioreign wool re-exported and its value., and the home consumption, with the value thereofi. The value ofi
imported woollen manufiactures and those re-exported, and the home consumption, together withthe totalnumber ofi pounds
ofi doraestic and imported wool consumed, and the total value ofi domestic and imported wool and imported woollen manufiactures consumed in the States and Territories fior the years 1840, 1850, and 1855.
pi

Pounds.

1855.

1850i

1840.^
Yalue.

Pounds.

fe^
>-^
o

Yalue.

Pounds.

pi
Hi

Yalue.

Q
t ^

ffl

35,802,114

52,616,959
35,898

$15,755,088
• 22,778

61,560,379
88,886

$23,392,944
27,802

11,345,317

52,481,061

15,732,310

61,471,493

23,365,142

t2|

9,898,740
85,528

.-

$11,345,317

35,802,114

^Vool produced
W^ool exported

846,076
26,246

18,669,794

1,681,691

18,634,415
728,904

2,072,139
131,442

w

1,681,691

17,806,511

1,940,697

-

Home consumption

Cl

M^ool imported
Wool re-exported
Home consumption

i

9,813,212

.




-

.

18,669,794

10,351,189
379,321

Woolen manufactures imported
Woolen manufactures re-exDorted
Home consumption

819,830

_

__

18,805,318
190,729

24,404,149
1 106 766

9,971,^868

18,614,589

23, 297,384

cc

bO

O
0\.

STATEMENT—Continued.
1855.

1850.

1840.
Pounds.

to
o

Yalue.

Pounds.

Yalue.

Pounds.

Yalue.

pi
Consumption of domestic wool
Consumption of imported wool
Consumption of imported woolen manufactures-

35,802,114
9,813,212

$11,345,317
819,830
9,971,868

52,481,061
18,669,794

22,137,°015

71,150,866

$15,732, 310
1,681,691
18,614,589

61,471,493
17,806,511

36,028,590

79,277,004

$23,365,142
1,940,697
23,297,384

o
pi

o
45,615,326

48,603,223

ffl
NOTES.
The„ total consumption of foreign wool in England i n . 1855, was 66,000,000 pounds. Total production of woollens, $180,000,000; andexports
of woollens, $48,000,000.
The total consumption of foreign wool in France in 1855, was 77,300,000 pounds. Total production of woollens, $200,000,000 ; and exports of
woollens, $38,000,000.
The total consumption of foreign wool in the United States in 1853-'54, was 20,000,000 pounds; in 1854-'55, was 18,500,000 pounds. Total
production of woollens in the United States in 1853-'54, was $50,000,000 ; in 1854-'65, $48,000,000. Total import of woollens in the United States in •
1863-'64, was $32,382,589 ; and in 1854-'56, $24,404,149.
Of the value of woollen imports for the year 1840, the sum of $1,729,792 was for silk and worsted goods.
Of the value of woollen imports for the year 1850, the sum of $1,653,809 was for silk and worsted.
Of the value of woollen goods re-exported in 1856, the sum of $118,557 was for silk and worsted.
The value of wool produced in 1865 is based upon the average price in New York—38 cents per pound—for that year.




a

No. 48.—Statement exhihiting the numher qf establishments, capital employed, raw material used, hands employed, average wages per month, and the product of the manufactures of cotton for 1850, as given hy the census for that decade;
also the product ofi the manufiactures ofi cotton for 1840, increase in ten years, decrease in ten years, and an estimate
ofi the manufiactures of cotton for 18^^.
R a w material used.
S t a t e s , &c.

Establishments.

Capital.

Bales of cotton,
Tons of coal.
400 .pounds.

H a n d s employed.

Value of raw
material.

Male.

Female.
pi

Alabama
Arkansas.Columbia, District
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts.
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
N e w Jersey
N ew York
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee..
Yermont
Yirginia

of.
,...

12
3
1
128
12
35
2

$651,900
16,500
85,000
4,219,100
460,100
80,000
1,736,156
43,000
239,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

5,208
170
960
39,483
4,730
600
20,230
675
3,760

2,866
1,920
1,000
300
720

^237,081
8,975
67,000
2,500,062
312,068
30,000
900,419
28,220
180,907

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

346
13
41
2,708
413
28
873
38
181

369
18
103
3,478
425
67
1,399
57
221

1,673,110
1,165,579
11,289,309
21,500
86,446
4,839,429
666,645
1,985,973
531,903
237,060
3,152,530
3,484,579
295,971
297,500
114,415
828,375

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

780
1,008
9,293
19
75
2,911
616
2,632
442
132
3,564
4,959
399
310
94
1,275

2,959
2,014
19,437
17
80
9,211
1,096
3,688
1,177
269
4,099
5,916
620
581
147
1,688

34,835,056 00

33,150

69,136

=..

,...

'...

Total..




12
24
213
2
2
44
21
86
28
8
208
168
18
33
9
27
1,094

3,329,700 00
2,236,000, 00
28,455,630 00
38,000 00
102 000 00
10,950 500 00
1,483 500 00
4,176 920 00
1,058,800 00
297,000 00
4,528,925 00
6,675,000 00
857,200 00
669,600 00
202 500 00
1,908,900 00

31,531
23,325
223,607
430
2,160
83,026
14,437
37,778
13,617
4,270
44,162
50,713
9,929
6,411
2,243
17,785

7 4 , 5 0 0 , 9 3 1 00

641,240

2,921
2,212
46,545
1,658
7,679
4,467
1,539
2,152
24,189
13,116
3,010
4,805
121,099

O
pi
Hi
O

ffl

Cl
cc

O

to
o

STATEMENT—Continued.

00
Average wages per month

1840.

1850:

Increase in ten
years.

States, &c.
Products.

Male.

Alabama . . . «
Arkansas
Columbia, District of.,
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
, ....
Indiana...,
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland.
Massachusetts
• Mississippi
,
Missouri
N e w Hampshire
N e w Jersey
New York..
N o r t h Carolina
Ohio
,
Pennsylvania
R h o d e Island . . . . . . . . .
South Carolina
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia
Total .




Female.

$11
14
14
19
15
32
14
13
14

71
61
02
08
31
14
57
02
95

$7
5
8
11
11
5
7
6
9

98
88
00
80
58
00
39
77
36

$382,260
16,637
100,000
4,257,522
538,439
49,920
2,135,044
44,200
273,439

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

29
15
22
14
10
26
17
18
11
16
17
18
13
10
15
10

35
42
90
21
93
00
98
32
65
59
85
60
94
94
53
18

12
9
13
5
10
13
9
9
6
9
9
12
8
6
12
6

15
48
60
94
00
47
56
68
13
42
91
95
30
42
65
98

2 , 5 9 6 , 356
2 , 1 2 0 , 604
19,712, 461
30, 500
142, 900
8,830 619
1,109 524
3 , 5 9 i ; 989
8 3 1 , 342
394, 700
5 , 3 2 2 , 262
6,447 120
748 338
5 i o ; 624
196 100
1,486, 384

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

61,869,184 00

Decrease in ten
years.

Products.

$17,547 00
2 , 7 1 5 , 9 6 4 00
332,272 00
304,342
135,400
329,380
18,900
970,397
1,150,580
16,553,423
1,744

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

4,142,304
2,086,104
3,640,237
438,900
139,378
5,013,007
7,116,792
359,000
325,719
113,000
446,063

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

46,350,453 00

$364, 13
16,637
100,000
1,541,558
206, 167
49 920
1,830',702

Estimate of
cotton manufactures in 1855.

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

O
pi
O

$91,200 00
55,941 00
18,900 00
1,625,959
969 924
3,159,038
28, 756
142,900
4,688,315

00
00•
00
00
00
00

ffl

976,580 00
48,248 00
392 442 00
255 322 00
309,255 00
669,672 00
389 338
184-, 905
8 3 , 100
1,040, 321

00
00
00
00

17,379,272 00

1,860,641 00

$70,964,712 00

N o . 49.—Stateinent exhihiting ihe foreig7i importations ahd re-exportations^ domestic expo-rtations and home consumption oJ foreign cotton goods, together with ihe
consumption of foreign cotton goods over domestic exportations; also, the numher of pounds of Sea Island and other cotton annually exported, with the value
thereof, and average cost per pound, and the yearly average of the imports and exports, value in gross and per pound of cotton exported for the last seventeen years.

^__^

COTTOig-, MANUFACTURES OF.

'a
(U

t:
Years.

o
cu

.§
bD

I
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856...

1
o

OH

X

.1
o

1

<a
>-i

o
cx,
X
o
o

1
s
o

II

COTTON UNMANUFACTURED, EXPORTED.
^ ^

X

i-s
§.^

fl o a g

S
o
o ^ <>
=
hj.ObD

S 3 ^ S'
S1^
o

L <^ ^

o

Pounds.

Pi

CubDO

^ ^ C '^
o o fl
•5

w •

•

Bales.

Value.

Ti
fl

flo

fl c 1 f3

ngc^ O PH

O

1

$!5,504,484 $1,103,489 $3,549,607 $5,400,995 $1,851,388 8,779,669 735,161,392 743,941,061
ll,757,03f
929,056 3,122,546 10,827,980 7,705,434
6,237,424 523,966,676 530,204,100
9,578,515
836,892 2,970,690 8,741,623 5,770,933
7,254,099 577,462,918 584,717,017
2,958,796
314,040 3,223,550 2,644,756
7,516,079 784,782,0.27 792,297,106
$578,794
" i . . 13,641,478
404,648 2,898,780 13,236,830 10,338,050
6,099,076 657,534,379 663,633,455
13,863,282
502,553 4,327,928 13,360,729 8,862,151
9,389,625 863,616,371 872,905,996
13,530,625
673,203 3,545,481 12,857,422 9,311,941
9,388,.533 538,169,522 547,558,055
15,192,875
486,135 4,082,523 14,706,740 10,624,217
6,293,973 520,925,985 527,219,958
.18,421,689 1,216,172 5,718,205 17,205,417 11,487,212
7,724,148 806,550,283 814,274,431
15,754,841
571,082 4,933,129 15,183,759 10,250,630
11,969,259 1,014,633,010 1,026,602,269
20,108,719
427,107 4,734,424 19,681,612 14,947,188
8,236,463 627,145,141 635,381,604
22,164,442
677,940 7,241,205 21,486,502 14,245,297
8,299,656 918,937,433 927,237,089
16,689,496
997,030 7,672,151 15,692,466 8,020,315
11,738,075 1,081,492,564 1,093,230,639
27,731,313 1,254,363 8,768,894 9fi 476.9.^0 17,708,056
11,165,165 1,100,405,205 1,111,570,370
33,949,503 1,468,179 5,535,516:32.481.324 26,945,808
10,486,423 977,346,683 987,833,106
17,757,112 2,012,554 5,857,181 15,744,558 9,887,377
2,303,403 13,058,590 995,366,011 1,008,424,601
25,917,999 1,580,495 6,967;309 24,337,504 17,370,195
2,991,175 12,797,225 1,338,634,476 1,351,431,701

Yearly average. 16,795,418




909,114 5,008,772 15,886,304 11,582,887

9,201,911

827,178,239

836,380,150

c^ fl

o
pi

<
$63,870,307 $8.5
54,330,341 10 2
47,593,464 8.1
49,119,806 6.2
54,063,501 81
51,739,643 6 92
42,767,-341 7 81
53,415,848 10.34
61,998,294 7 61
66,396,967 64
71,984,616 113
112,315,317 12 11
87,965,732 8 05
109,456,404 9 85
93,596,220 9.47
88,143,844 8 74
128,382,351 9.5

O

ffl

02

72,772,941 8 7 17

to
o

210

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 50.
Statement exhihiting the foreign importations and exportations, domestic
exportations, home consumption offoreign cotton goods, home consumption of fioreign cotton goods, less domestic exportations ; the number ofi
pounds ofi Sea Island and other cotton exported; the value thereofi and
the average cost per pound; manufiactures ofi cotton in the United
States; home consumption ofi domestic cotton goods; total home consumption ofi fioreign and domestic cotton goods, and the total product
ofi manufiactures of cotton and exports of raw cotton, fior the years
1840, 1850, and 1855.
COTTON—MANUFACTURES OF.

Years.

1840,
1850
1855

Foreign impor- Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Home consumption of foreign
ported.
ported.
tations.
cotton goods.

$6,504,484
20,108.719
17,757,112

$lyl03,489
427,107
2,012,654

Home consumption of foreign
cotton goods,
less domestic
exportations.

$5,400,995
19,681,612
15,744,558

$3,549,607
4,734,424
6,857,181

$1,851,388
14,947,188
9,887,377

COTTON, UNMANUFACTURED—EXPORTED.
o

Pounds.
Years.
Sea Island.
1840
1850
1856-.:.-.

8,779,669
8,236,463
13,058,590

Years.

Manufactures of
cotton in the
UnitedStates.

1840
1850
1855

31
o fl

Yalue.

$46,350,453
61,869,184
70,964.712




Other.
736,161,392
627,145,141
995,366,011

bo PU
ce o

1^

Total.
743,941,061
635,381,604
1,008,424,601

$63,870,307
71,984,616
88,143,844

$0" 8. 6
11.3
8.74

Home consump- Total home con- Total products of
tion of domestic sumption of formanufactures
of
cotton goods.
eign and domescotton and exports
tic goods.
of raw cotton.
$42,800,846
67,134,760
66,107,531

$48,201,841
76,816.372
80,862,089'

$110,220,760
133,853,800
159,108,556

No. 51.
Statement exhihiting the population, total product of manufactures of cotton and exports of raw cotton, and the allotment '
p e r capita thereofi; manufiactures ofi cotton in the United States, and the allotment per capita; home consumption of
domestic goods, and the allotment per capita; home consumption of fioreign goods, and the allotment per capita; and
the total home consumption ofi fioreign and domestic cotton goods, and the allotment per capita, fior the years 1840, 1850,
and 1855 J
v
^
^^

O cu \

.t^ o

^ o
P^ o

t. o X

Population.

QC,

^

PH

pHfl s

<0

fl

A

p< fl ^

S

§ 3 fl M

S ^ "^ B
3 ^ ^ 1^

•+f e8 fl 5
O d O ce

r-H

fl

^J

H

g fl

1840 . 17,069,453 $110,220,760 $6 45. 72 $46,350,453
1850 . 23,191,876 133,853,800 5 17.16 61,869,184
1855 . . 27,185,517 169,108,656 5 86. 27 70,964,712




.t^ fl

fl

&^ S
Years.

C S
3

O rfl O H^

<1

fl o
fl^
O o

"a
o

O

fl O
O O
•.p bD

a , 02 S^
Se fl '-^S
o O
^
O
03

C
O
OJ
fl

P^S o

rri

pi

^

.•S fl
^ S fl ^
ce fl fcjDiS
O

O bD

O .rH " ^

03

aa

03 r f l

-S rfl .5:4 S
O S o O

O) O

?n

©
<'.'

o ^ .2 o

^j

W
$2 50. 74
2 46.36
2 39.49

O

$5,400,995
19,681,612
16,744,568

•o

^ "^ S S
^

fl 2 ^

ffl

$2 71.54 $42,800,846
2 66.77 57,134,760
2 6L04 65,107,631

Ul rj

o fl

•P^

^

flo^l
r H .+J .JJ

•^fl

^^

I

® S^ fl
ce S ce

"

^"
$0 31. 64 $48,201,841
84.86 76,816,372
57.91 80,852,089

S o
0.2 a

r-H ^ J + 3 "TS

$2 82.38
3 31. 22
2 97.40

>^
ffl

>
Cl

K)

No. 52.—Statemmt exhihiting the number of estabUshments, capitol employed, raw material used, hcmds einployed,
average wages per month, annual product, and total value of pig iron produced in the United States in 1850, as
taken firom the census fior that year, together with the value ofi the production ofi the sarae article fior 1840, the increase
in ten years, the decrease in ten years, and an estimate ofi the amount produced in 1855.
Hands employed.

Raw material used.

Average wages per
"
month.

Capital.

States,

Tons of ore.

Male.

Value.

Female.

Male.

Female.

H

Alabama........
Connecticut....,
Delaware . ^ . . . . ,
Georgia . . . . . . . .
Illinois
Indiana.........
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts...
Michigan
Missouri
New Hampshire .
New J e r s e y , . . . .
New York . . . . . .
North Carolina..
Ohio
Pennsylvania....
Rhode Island....
South Carolina..
Tennessee
Vermont
Virginia
Wisconsin
Total.



to
to

3
13

$11,000 00
•225,600 00

1,838
35, 450

^6,770 00
289,225 00

3
2
2
21

26,000
65,000
72,000
924,700

00
00
00
00

5,189
5,500
5,200
72,010

25,840
15,.500
24,400
260,152

00
00
00
00

135
150
88
1,845

1
18
6
I
5
' 1
10
18
2
35
180

214,000
1,420,000
469,000
15,000
- 619,000
2,000
967,000
605,000
25,000
1,503,000
8,670,425

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

2,907
99,866
27,909
2,700
37,000
600
61,266
46,385
900
140,610
'877,283

14,939
560,725
181,741
14,000
97,367
4,900
332,707
321,027
27,900
6.30,037
3,732,427

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

71
1,370
263
25
334
10
600
505
26
2,415
9,285

23
3
29
1

1,021,400
62,500
513,800
15,000

00
00
00
00

88,810
7,676
67,319
3,000

254,900
40,175
158,307
8,250

00
00
00
00

1,713
1001,115
^ 60

17,346,425 00

1,579,318

377

7,005,289 00

20,298

o

$17 60
26 80

40
148
3

44
06
00
23

22
20
27
35
24
18

*i6'

17
22
26
20

109

150

pi

$5 00

O

"4*76

ffl

00
14
62
00
28
00

21 20
26 00
8 00
24 48
21 65
12 81
22 08
12 76
30 00

pi

H

l—l

>
Cl
\A
4 40
'5*11
5 11
6 86

STATEMENT—Continued.
Annual product.'
States.

1850.
Total value.

1840.
Products.

Increase iii ten
years.

Decrease in ten
years.

Tons of pig iron, Other products.
Alabama
Connecticutr....
Delaware
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Kentucky . . . . . .
Louisiana
Maine.... i
Maryland
Massachusetts . . ,
Michigan
Missouri
New Harapshire.
New Jersey
New Y o r k . . . . ' . .
North Carolina..
Ohio
Pennsylvania . . . .
Rhode Island . . . ,
South Carolina..
Tennessee
,
Vermont
Virginia
,
Wisconsin
Total




522
13,420
900
2,700
. 1,850
24,245
1,484
43,641
12,287
660
19,250
200
24,031
23,022
400
52,658
285,702
30,420
3,200
22,163
1,000
563,755

$5,000 00
20,000 00
28,000 00
10,000 00
96,900 00

"e'ooo'66*
12,800 00
40,000 00

*4i,*966*66'

259,700 00

$22,500 00
415,600 00

00
00
00
00

$750 00
162,375 00
425 00
12,350 00
3,950 00
20,250 00
730,150 00
35,000 00
153,050 00
221,900 00
233;300 00
15,026 00
4,500 00
33,000 00
277,850 00
727,200 00
24,200 00
880,900 00
2,459,875 00
103,160 00
31,250 00
403,213 00
168,575 00
470,262 00
75 00

12,748,727 00

7,172,575 00

57,300
70,200
58,000
604,037

00
00
00
00

36,616
1,056,400
295,123
21,000
314,600
6,000
560,644
597,920
12,500
1,255,850
6,071,513

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

676,100
68,000
521,924
27,000

Estimate of the
production of
pig iron in
1855.

$21,750 00
253,225 00

pi

$425'00
hj

44,950 00
66,250 00
37,760 00

-O
pi

126,113 00
35,000 00
116,434 00
834,500
61,823
5,975
310,100

O

"^

00
00
00
00
27,000 00

ffl

282,694 00
129,280 00
11,700 00
374,950 00
3,611.638 00
103,150 00
31,250 00

Cl

272,887 00
100,575 00
51,662 00
26,925 00
6,257,079 00

680,927 00

$16,016,910 00

to
'00

214

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

No, 53.
Statement exhihiting the numher ofi establishments, capital employed,
raw material used, hands employ ed, average wages per month, and
total value ofi iron castings produced in the United States in 1850, as
taken firom the census for that year, together with the value of the production ofi the same article fior 1840, the increase in ten years, the deerease in ten years, and an estimate of the amount produced in 1855.
•

Raw material used.
States.

Hands empl'd.

Capitals.
Tons of Tons of Tons of Yalue of Male. Female.
pig iron. old metal ore. raw material, fuel, &c.

10 $216,625
Alahama
2,348
Arkansas 1
California
75
5,000
2
Columbia, Dis. of
645
14,000
60
Connecticut
680,800 11,396
13
Delaware .
4,440
373,600
4
Georgia-35,000
440
29
4,818
HUnois 260,400
14
1,968
Indiana
'
82,900
3
81
Iowa
5,500
20
502,200
9,731
Kentucky8
255,000
1,660
Louisiana .
25
3,591
150,100
Maine
16
Maryland _
7,220
359,100
68 1,499,050 31,134
Mas.sachusetts _.
' 63
,2,494
Michigan
195,450
8
1,197
100,000
Mississippi
6
6,100
Missouri
187-, 000
26
6,673
232,700
New Hampshire 45
New Jersey
593,250 10,666
323 4,622,482 108,945
New York
192
6
North Carolina
11,500
183 2,063,650 37,555
Ohio
Pennsylvania — 320 3,422,924 69,501
8,918
Rhode island
20
428,800
185,700
169
South Carolina-6
1,682
139,600
Tennessee
'
16
16,000
250
2
Texas
Vennont
5, 279
26
290,720
7,114
Yirginia
-_
64
471,160
1,371
Wisconsin
15
116,350

. Total
•

•

1,391 17,416,361 345,553

•%.




-

$102,086

212

8,53^0
18,100
351,369
337
153,852
11,950
172,330
50
66,918
5
2,524
296,533
75,300
112,570
245
259,190
1,057,904
3,361
91,865
50,370
133,114
200
177,060
500
301,048
350
2,393,768
3,212
8,341
1,843 2,000 1,199,700
2,372,467
819
268,267
29,128
2,800
90,035
5,050
8,400
160.603
274
297,014
205
86,930
15

3
27
942
250
29
332
143
17
558
347
'243
761
1,596
337
112
297
374
803
5,925
16
2,758
4,782
800
153
261
35
381
810
228

11,416 9,850ll0,346,265 23,641

7

20
1

1
2
8
9
48

215

REPORT ON' THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Average wages
per month.
:

1850.
Products.

states.
•

'

Male. Female.

Estimate of
1840.
Increase Decrease thevalue
in 10 of iron castProducts. in 10 years.
years.
ings for
1855.

i

A-labama
Arkansas .
California
Columbia,Dis. of
Connecticut
Delaware
^
Greorgia
Illinois
Indiana » _
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Vlassachuse tts
Mchigan--_.-Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New- York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania - .
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas.- . - - .
Yermont
Yirginia
Wisconsin .

$30 .05
23
27
27
23
27
28
'*25
32
24
35
29
27
30
28
37
19
33
24
27
23
27
27
29
13
17
43
28
19
26

33
06
02 $8 00
36
43
50
74
35
89 ""fiih
60
00 ""s'oo
60
90
68
91
63
05
00
49
46
32
55
6 00
63
59 "Too
96
4 50
43
27
91
73

Total




$271,126
20,740
41,696
981,400
267,462
46,200
441,185
149,430
8,600
744,316
312,500
265,000
685,000
2,236,636
279,697
117,400
336,496
371,710
686,430
6,921,980
12,867
3,069,350
6,354,881
728,705
87,683
264,326
56,000
460,831
674,416
216,195

$27,700
1,240

$243,426
$1,240
20,740

68,000
1,733,044
10,700
5,350
41,200
14,580
4,000
164,080

26,304
751,644
256,762
40,860
399,985
134,850
4,500
680,236
312,500
208,488
372,100
436,877
221,797
80,500
276,196
235,376
280,475
3,409,188

56,512
312,900
1,798,758
67,900
36,900
^60,^300
136,334
405,955
2,612,792
16,050
784,401 2,284,949
1,262,670 4,092,211
581,155
147,550
87,683
163,455
100,870
65,000
24,900
435,931
546,160
128,256
212,695
3,500

3,183

,

26,108,155 9,916,442 15,974,084 782,371 $34,012,021

•

No. 54.—Statement exhihiting the numher of establishments, capital employed, value ofi raw material, hands employed, average
wages per month, and total value ofi wrought iron manufiactures produced in the United States in 1850, as taken firom
the Census fior that year, together with the value of the production of the same article fior 1840; the increase in ten years,
the decrease in ten years, and an estimate ofi the amount produced in 1855.
fl

Capital.

Valueof raw
material.

Hands employed. Average wages
per month.

states, &c.

03

03

Alabama
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Indiana
Kentucky
Louisiana .
Marvland
Massachusetts
Missouri New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Yermont _
Yirginia _.
Total



6

S3
20
3
3
4
4
17
58

$7,000
601,000
76,000
9,200
17,000
176,000

$3,355
617,654
36,410
4,136
4,425
180,800

162
' 2

412,050
2,561,100
42,100
7,000
1,300,393
1,871,650
170,609
164,800
7,828,916
209,400

386,216
2,430,533
24,509
11,575
566,866
2,305,441
50,089
193,148
5,698,563
112,123

42
10
38

765,050
77,200
747,811

385,616
83,094
531,325

652 17,033,279

13,524,777

I
64
81

'I

34
394
47
26
22
183

1.

'eg

29
59
53
35 "$5'o6 ^
46 4 00
06

''I

'"fin

16,110

138

Increase in
ten years.

Decrease Estimate of
in ten wrought iron
years. manufactures
for 1865.

pi
O
pi

$15
31
25
11
2 27
32

55

, 1840.
Product.

r2
03

468
24 31
2,472 " " ' 5 2 ' 29 46 "i2"79
30 00
. . . . . 31 34
27 31
932
28 91
2,130
18 10 43
262
276 . . . . . . 29 58
28 31 6 67
6,591
27 85
222
731
79'
1,131

1850.
Product.

to

15 20
32 08
26 41

5 00

$7,500
847,196
38,200
12,384
11,760
299,700
771,431
3,908,962
68,700
20,400
1,079,676
3,758,547
331,914
127,849
9,224,256
223,650
. 670,618
127,886
1,098,252

22,628,771

$4,875
236,495
29,185
1,300
236,405
. 88,790
513,500
390,260
7,670
8,125
466,115
3,490,045
62,596
485,290
6,670,860

$2,625
611,701
9,015
12,384
10,460
63,296

H

ffl

$88,790
257,931
3,518,692
61,030
12,275
613,461
268,502
269,319

>
Cl

357,441
3,553,396
223,650

• 75,725
628,745 " " " 41,873
85,311
42, 575,
715,662
382,590
12,820,145

O

10,330,582

76,726

521,956 $28,377,607

No. 55. • .

^ | 2

«+_, ^

t4_l rJ - n

Years.

1
. a-

1

1
Cu
X
03

1
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
18481849
1850
1851

$6,750,099
8,914,-425
- _. . 6,988,966
- . . 1,903,868
- . . 5,227,484
.8,294,878
' 7,835,832
8,781,252
12,526,854
13,831,823
16,333,145
17,306,700




..03

ill

.2 3 S'^

C id
O
•
fl O « H o
+
.> fl «5

*03.

1

$156,115
134,316
177,381
50,802
107,956
91,966
122,587
63,596
98,295
109,439
100,746
100,290

$1,104,455
1,046,264
1,109,522
532,693
716,332
845,017
1,151,782
-1,167,484
1,259,632
1,096,172
1,911,320
2,255,698

'd
o

8-^ <^ J
=

03
• fl"

-r^ 03

B
03

a

^

§ 03 fl fl M

ffl
$6,593,984
8,780,109
6,811,584
1,853,056
5,119,628
8.202,912
7,713,246
8,717,656
12,428,559
13,722,384
16,232,399
17,206,410

o

fH -4^ ce 03

$5,489,529
7,734,845
5,702,062
1,320,363
4,403,196
7,357,895
6,561,463
7,550,172
11^168,927
12,626,212
14,321,079
14,950,712

o

Ck
X
03

Ck

S fl ^"^.2

^6
S
hi

l9 f fl
H

1
$528,716
609,201
597,317
201,772
487,462
775,675
1,234,408
1,126,458
1,284,937
1,227,138
1,332,253
1,670,063

8°§

of fo
ires of
ind foQ, and
exporars.

Cast, shear, German, and other steel.

Iron, and manufactures of iron and iron and steel.

Total home consumption of foreign iron, and manufactures of
iron and iron and steel, and foreign cast, shear, German, and
other steel.

Statement exhihiting the yearly value ofi iron, and manufiactures of iron and iron and steel, cast, shear^,German, andother
, steel, imported from and exported to foreign countries ; domestic exports of like articles ; home consumption of foreign
iron, and manufactures ofi iron and iron and steel; home consumption over tlie domestic exports ofi the same articles,
dnd the total consumption of foreign iron, manufactures ofi iron and iron and steel, cast, shear, German, and other steel
over domestic exportations, fior the last 17 years, and the yearly average fior the afioresaid period.

.2 ^ -3 S -^ ^^
g^fl ^O S ^
fl ^ T H

fl^

O

<« g
=
C o
O

^

S

Pi
O
pi

o

03

C O "*^
O

ffl

llllll
^.fl

§

O C C
O Q

52!
Cl

$33,961
24,848
18,447
59,733
15,415
20,062
32,564
19,218
41,397
55,044
40,193
38,371

$494,755
584,353
678,870
142,039
472,047
755,623
1,201,844
1,107,240
1,243,640
1,172,094
1,-292,060
1,531,692

$7,088,739
9,364,462
7,390,454
1.995,095
5,591,575
8,958,535
8,915,089
9,824,896
13.672,099
14,894.478
17,624,459
18,738,102

$5,984, 283
8,319, 198
6 280 932
1 462 402
4 875 243
8,113 518
7,763,307
8,657,412
12,412,467
13,798,306
15,613,139
16,482,404

to
I—•

No. 55—Continued.

Years.

i

•

a

03
U

•

a
03

1852
1853
1854
1865
1856

03

^1 ^




264,434

•111

Ck

X

.
03

%

$18,957,993 $134,937
27,255,425
262,343
29,341,776
795,872
22,980,728 1,565,523
22,041,939
423,221

Yearly average _- 13,839,598

•'-'

^6

X

1

rt

2 fl ^
fl o ^ o
fl .xP f ^
^

%

Cast, shear, German, andother steol.

'd

%^'^ 2

cf

§ ^1

a

%
9
o

"^

1

1,368,146

35,661

11,744,360

o

03

$31,569
31,637
63,247
63,068
25,698'

13,675,164

o ie «2

I

o
p
$2,303,819 $18,823,056 $16,519,237 $1,703,699
• 2,499.652 26,993,082 24,493,430 2,970,313
4,210,350 28,645,903 24,335,553 2,477,709
3,753,472 21,415,205 17,661,733 2,693,137
4,161,008 21,618,718 17,457,710 2,538,323
1,830,804

O
03
fl i ^ - ^

Total home consumption of foreign iron, and manufactiires of
iron and iron and steel, a ndforeign cast, shear, Germari, and
other steel over domestic exportations, for the last 17 ye xrs.

t+H

Home consumption of foreign iron, and manufactures of iron and iron
and steel, over domestic
exportations.

Iron, and manufactures of iron and iron and steel.

Total home consumption of foreign iron, and manufactures of
iron and iron and steel, and foreign cast, shear, German, and
other steel.

QO

o
pi
O

$1,672,030 $20,495,086
2,938,676 29,931,758
2,424,462 30,970,365
2,530,069 23,945,274
2,512,726 24,131,443

$18,191,267
27,432,106
26.760,015
20,191,802
19,970,435

14,907,759

13,076,955

1,332,695

ffl

Cl

CAST, SHEAR, GERMAN, AND OTHER STEEL.

1
ti

Years.

r

. o
d'43.

•

$6,750,099
16,333,145
22,980,728

1840
1850
1855

1
H

d-

0.2

F

f
$156,115
100,746
1,665,523

$1,104,455
1,911,320
8,753,472

$6,593,984
16,232,399
21,415,-205

Home consumption of foreign
importations less
domestic exportation^

IRON, AND MANUFACTURES OF IRON AND IRON AND STEEL.

Home consumption of foreign
importations.

,

$5,489,529
14,321,079
17,661,783.

1

1

ill

a ra
"^ fl

d

1

1

Jil.

$33,961
40,193
63,068

$494,755
1,292,060
2,530,069

$528,716:
1,332,253
2,593,137

o

--S

Total home consumption
of foreign iron, and
manufactures of iron
and iron and steel, and
foreign cast, shear, German, and other steel.

N o . 56.—Statement exhibiting the value of the foreign importations and exportations, dpmestic exportations, home consumption qf foreign importations, and home
consumption of foreign importations less the domestic exportations of iron and manufactures of iron and iron and steel; also the foreign importations and exportations, home consumption of foreign importations, total home consumption of foreign iron and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, and foreign cast, shear,
German, and other steel, the total home consumption of foreign iron and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, and foreign cast, shear, German, ancl other
steel, less the domestic exportations; also the manufacture of pig iron, iron castings, wrought iron, a n d t h e manufactures thereof in the United States, total
manufacture of p i g iron, iron castings, and wrought iron, and the manufactures thereof i n the United States, consumption of domestic iron and the manufactures
thereof, total consumption of foreign and domestic iron, and the total consumption of foreign and domestic iron arid manufactures of iron; also, cast, shear,
' German, and other steel, in the United States, for the years 1840 arid 1850, with an estimate thereof for 1855, on the same ratio of increase as hetween the years
1840 and 1850. ,

$7,088,739
17,524,459
23,945,274

pi
O

o
ffl

1840
1850......i..;....;.,
1855

$5,984,283'
15,613,139
20,191,802

$7,172,575
12,748,727
*16,016,910

$9,916,442
25,108,155
34,012,021

$12,820,145
22,628,771
28,377,607

$29,909,162
60,485,653
78,406,538

$28,504,707
58,574,333
74, 653,066

$85,398,691
74,806,732
96,068,271

Total consumption of foreign and domestic iron,
and raanufactures of
iron; also cast, shear,
. G-erman and other steel,
in the United States.

Total consumption of foreign and domestic iron,
and the manufactures
thereof, in the United
States.

1^

Consumption of dom.estic
iron, and the manufa.ctures thereof, in the
United States.

^ d

• II
i.2

Total manufacture of pig
iron, iron castings, and
. wrought iron, and manufactures of wrought
i)on, in the- United
States.
^

11

Manufacture of wrought
ii-on, and the manufactures thereof, in the
United States.

d
o .

Manufacture of iron castings in the United States.

Years.

Total home consumption
of foreign iron, and
manufactures of iron
and iron and steel, and
foreign cast, shear, Ger
man, and other steel,
less domestic exportations.

ST ATEMENT—Continued;

$35,893,446
76,098,792
98,598,340

•The production of iron in 1855, on the same ratio of increase as between 1840 and 1850, would be about 700,000 tons, whereas the actual prodtiction in 1855 was 1,000,000 tons, Seo
Messrs. Oooper and Hewitt's "Diagram showing the production, consumption, and prices.of iron."




Cl

fco
CO

fco
fcO

No. 57.

o

Statement exhibiting the population, production of pig iron, iron castings, and manufactures of wrought iron, with the
allotment per capita thereof; the consumption ofi domestic iron and the manufactures thereof, with the allotment per
capita; the home consumption of foreign importations of iron, and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, and cast,
shear, German, and other steel, with the allotment per capita; andthe total consumption of fioreign and domestic iron,
and manufactures of iron and iron and steel, cast, shear, German, ancl other steel, in the United States, and the
allotment per capita thereofi, fior the years 1840, 1850, and an estimate for 1855.




Allotment per capita ofthe
value of the consumption
of domestic iron, and the
manufactures thereof, in
the United States.

Consumption of domestic
iron, and the manufactures thereof, in the
United States.
$28,804,707
58,574,338
74,653,066

. $1 68.75
2 52.56
2 74.60

Allotment per capita of the
consumption of foreign
and domestic iron, and
manufactures of iron and
steel; also, cast, shear,
German, and other steel,
in the United States.
1

$1 75 22
2 60.80
2 88.45

Total consumption of foreign and domestic iron,
and manufactures of iron
and stetl; also, cast,
shear, German, and other
steel, in the United States.

$29,909,162
60,485,653
78,406,538

Allotment per capita of
home consumption of foreign importations of iron,
and manufa ctures of iron
and steel, and cast, shear,
German, and other steel.

:

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

Home consumption of foreign importations of iron,
and manufactures of iron
and steel, and
cast,
sheaf, German,
and
other steel.

1840
1850
1855

Allotment per capita of the
product of pig iron, iron
castings, wrought iron,
and manufactures of
wrought iron, in the
United States.

Population.

Years.

Total product of pig iron,
iron castings, wrought
iron, and manfactures of
wrought iron, in the
United States.

pi

$7,088,739
17,524,459
23,945,274

$0 43.58
75.56
88.08

$35,893,446
76,098,792
98,598,340

$2 10.28
8 28.12
8 62.68

O
pi

O

ffl

52!

o

No. 58. •

•

Comparative statement of the quarterly price of refined har iron at the ports of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and
Baltimore, ivith the quarterly and annual average price at the ahove fiour ports for the last seventeen years.
1841.

1840.

1
fl

fl
<^

»-5

1842.

1

i

d

d
d
*-i

1

ft

O

ci
fl
d
rt
>-i

=
2
Cu

<

1844.

1843.

>.
4

i
1 ^

Xi

d

2
o

"fl

>>

fl

o
"o
O

1

1845.

ft

Xi

ft

<

s

<1

"fl

1

o
O

$101 00 395 25 $89 75 ^84 00 $•81 25 $81 25 $78 50 $78 50 $71 25 $75 75 $67 25 $70 75 $69 25 $69 50 .t^64 50 $69 50 $67 50 $72 50 $70 75 $ 7 1 7 5 $78 25 $93 75 $ 8 1 5 0 $92 50
77 50 80 00 82 50

Boston
NPW York

pi

o
p^

o
J2|

Average of 4 ports.

101 00 95 25 89 75 84 00 8125 8125

78 50 78 50 7125 75 75 67 25 70 75 69 25 69 50 64 50 69 50 67 50 72 50 70 75 7175

78 25 85 62 80 75 87 50

70 62

88 08

1846.

6819

7125

79 87

•92 50

1850.

1849.

1848.

1847.

H
ffl

1851.
Cl

CS
3

d
ft

<5 .
Boston
New York
Philadelphia
Baltimore

....

Average of 4 ports.

o

8

"fl

$88 00 $89 50 $86
82 50 89 50 86
73
80

00 $89
00 82
97 75
00 75

85 25 89 50 8149

Yearly average . •.




ci
fl
fl
rt

75 $82
50 75
79 77
00 70

&

Xi

ft

75 $79
00 77
00 76
00 75

"fl
•-J

00
50
40
00

$79
75
76
72

• fl
ci

o
O

75 $82
00 75
40 77
50 72

ft
<5

00 $75 50 $68 50 $60
00 75 00 68 00 59
00 63 75 64 36 56
50 75 00 75 00 72

1
25 $60
00 60
24 56
50 70

76 45

o

»-5

25 $59"25 $62
00 60 00 60
84 55 43 58
00 70 00 62

80 76 76 19 76 98 75 90 76 62 72 31 68 96 62 00 6177
84 22

1

d

o

d

3

66 26

6117

u

fl
fl
rt

25 $49 00 $48
00 . 48 00 49
45 47 81 47
50 65 00 60

00 $60
00 47
17 48
00 60

•d

.1
25 $55
50 45
78 48
00 57

fl

d

o

t

>>

3

75 $54 50 $51 25 $5150 $51 00 $48
00 43 50 5100 47 00 40 00 40
38 46 81 46 57 44 96 4 7 1 7 46
50 57 50 57 00 57 50 55 00| 55

60 80 52 45 5 1 0 4 5 4 1 3 5166
56 86

a

>>

{/2

Xi

3
o
O

50 $47
00 42
57 46
00 55

75
00
57
00

50 38 5158

56 24 48 29 47 52 47 83

5194

48 47

to

fcO

STATEMENT—Contmued.

to
1:0

1853.

1852.

u
3
fl

'fH

ft

«1

New York
Philadelphia
Baltimore .




>>
^

$46 50 $46 00 $49
43 00 4150 47
45 56 4418 47
52 50 52 50 52

1856.

;H

Xi

a

3

a

fl
d

o
00 $60
75 60
97 62
50 60

1855.

1854.

Xi

o
ft

"3

3

O

1

50 $74 75 $72 00 $64 50 $74 50
50 81 00 80 00 63 00 7100
32 8123 8183 67 72 72 56
00 80 00 87 50 85 00 80 00

$82
80
76
77

ft

'3

<

hi

50 $80
00 82
68 77
50 82

50 $85
50 82
72 82
50 85

3
o

•(A

3
d

a

t-s

ft
<5

75 $85 50 $78 50 $64
50 8100 65 00 58
03 80 62 72 16 60
00 87 50 87 50 82

1
o
25 $64 50 §74
00 62 50 67
06 60 87 67
50 75 00 75

o

d
d

>-i

•ft

<

>»

s

50 $72 50 $72 00 $70 50
50 66 25 70 00 65 00
12
00 72 50 70 00 70 00

46 89 46 04 49 31 60 83 79 25 80 33 70 05 74 51 79 17 80 80 83 82 88 65 75 79 66 20 65 72 7103 70 42 70 67 68 50

• •••

50 77

76 08

8186

69 68

69 86

Xi

5^
O
pi
O
i2J

ffl
fej
M

o

No. 59.
Prices of steel in New Yorh from 1851 to 1856, inclusive.
Description.

D u t y paid.
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
Do...
In bond...
Do....

W h e n c e imported.

Best quality oast steel
Second quality cast steel
Third quality cast steel
F o u r t h quality cast steel, machinery
Best quality shear steel
Second quality shear steel
Best quality G e r m a n steel
. . . .do
do
Second quality G e r m a n steel
Third quality G e r m a n steel
do
do
F o u r t h quality G e r m a n steel, (spring s t e e l ) . . .
Best quality blister steel
Second quality blister steel
Third quality blister steel
F o u r t h quality blister steel
M i l a n steel
do
:.

England ..
....do
....do
. . . .do
....do
....do
Germany .
England ..
....do
....do
Sweden...
England . .
:...do
...do
. . .do
. . .do
Austria...
Sweden...

1851.

Cents.
14 a U I
12i a 13
I U a 12
9 | a 10
14 a U i
12i a 13
12 a 13
10 a 1 0 |
8 a 8k
7 a 7|
5 l a 7i
4i a 5i
1 2 | a 13
1 0 | a 11
8 a 81
T a Ik
51 a e"
6

1852.

Cents.
14 a 14i
13 a 13I
11 a l l l
10 a —
14 a 1 4 |
13 a l 3 i
12^ a 13
10 a i O |
8 a 8|
1 a 11
5k a 7 |
4] a 5
1 2 | a 13
lOi a l l
8 a 8|
7 a 7i
5^ a 6
no s a l e s . . . .

1853.

Cents.
14 a l 4 |
13 a l 3 |
11 a l i i
10 a 10^
14 a l 4 i
13 a 1 3 |
12i a 13
10 a 1 0 |
8 a 81
7 a 7|
5| a 8
41 a 5 |
12i a —
1 0 | a 11
8 a 8k
7 a ll
5 a 5^2
5k a —

1854.

1855.

Cents.
15 a 151
13 a 1 3 |
11 a 12
lOi a 11
15 a 15i
13 a 131
1 2 | a 13
10k a l l
8| a 9
7i a 8
5
5 a 6
12| a l 3
9 | a 10
8| a 9
7| a 8
5 | a 5i
5 a —

Cents.
15^ a 16
13^ a 14
11 a 12
l O h a 11
152 a 16
131 a 14
1 2 i a 13
10^ a 11
8ia 9
1^ a 8
5| a 8
43 a 5 i
13 a l 3 i
10 a 1 0 |
9 a 9|
53 a —
5| a 6

1856.

Cents.
4a 15
3al3|
111 a 12
10 a 101
1 4 | a 15
13 a 131
1 2 | a 13
10| a l l
8| a 9
6| a
5 a
12| a
101 a
8| a
7|a
7 a
no sales.

5|
13
11
9
8
—

t^
hj

O
pi
O
»=j

ffl

a-

T h e above are all six months prices.




to
CO

224

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 60.
List ofi unmanufiactured articles ofi import, not produced in the United
States in sufiicient quantities to constitute them articles ofi trade:
SCHEDULE

B.—Articles paying an ad valorem duty ofi 40 per cent.

Almonds.
Cassia.
Cloves.
Currants (Zante.)
Dates. ^
Figs.
Ginger-root, dried or green.
Mace.
Nutmegs.
Pimento.
Prunes.
Eaisins.
SCHEDULE C.—(30per cent,) '

Balsam Copaiva.
Cayenne pepper.
Cinnamon.
Feathers, ostrich, unmanufactured.
Gum, benzoin or Benjamin,
Olives.
Pepper.
Plums (prunes.)
SCHEDULE D.—(25

per cent.)

Jute, Sisal grass.
SCHEDULE

E.—{20 per ce7it,)

^

Aloes.
'
Amber.
Angora, Thibet and other goats' hair^'^or mohair un manufactured.
Anniseed.
Bananas.
Boucho leaves.
Cantharides.
Cassia buds.
Cobalt.
Cocoa nuts.
Coffee.
Divi-divi, vegetable used in tanning, &c,
Emery.
Gamboge.
Gutta-percha, unmanufactured.
Manna, a crude gum.



REPORT ON THE FINAN^lJfe^o

22'5

Oranges, lemi)ns and limes.
Pineapples.
Plantains.
Quassia wood, unmanufactured.
Sarsaparilla.
Shaddocks,
Peas.
Vanilla beans.
Woods—mahogany, ebony, grenadiila, rose ; satin unma.nufac»
tured, not provided for.
SCHEDULE

F,—(15 per cent.)

Bark—Peruvian^ Quilla, and Chincona.
Bark of the cork tree, unmanufactured.
Dragon's blood, (a resinous substance.)
SCHEDULE G.—(10

per cent,)

Annate, Eancon or Orleans.
Bamboos.
Barilla.
Catechu, extract from the Mimosa catechu tree.
Cochineal.
Cocoa,
Cocoa shells.
Gum-arabic and gum-senegal, Barbary,
Gum-tragacanth, East India, Jedda.
India-rubber, in slabs, sheets, &c., unmanufactured.
Natron, (a native sesquicarbonate of soda.)
Palm leaf, unmanufactured.
Eatans and reeds, unmanufactured.
Terra Japonica, or catechu.
Woad, or pastel.
SCHEDULE

H.—(5 p e r ce?i^.)

Berries, nuts and vegetables, used exclusively in dyeing or composing dyes, no article to be classed as such that has,undergone
any manufacture.
Brazil wood, and all other dye-wood in sticks.
Ivory, unmanufactured.
Ivory nuts, or vegetable ivory.
Madder root.
Nickel.
Nutgalls.
Tortoise shell, unmanufactured.
Turmeric, a root found in India.
Weed, herbaceous plant used in dyeing.
15



226

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 61.— Statement exhibiting the foreign imports and exports and domestic exports, together with
the home consumption of foreign importations of leather and the manufactures thereof; andthe
home consumption of foreign importations' of leather and the manufactures thereof, less domestic exports, for the last seventeen years, and the yearly average thereof.

LEATHER AND MANUFACTURES OF LEATHER.

.2 ^

;_, a>

_, CQ

03

O

O

P

o
cu

Years.

J-'
O

^

bD

O

O

m
53

o 53 S

ri'^ O
t5 O c3

t§

P

S o

3,661,204
3,069,860
4,535,122

$14,248
22,503
10,253
3,446
5,216
40,263
5,193
2,330
6,692
13,098
16,066
26,049
23,787
40,670
82,633
138,700
73,297

$233,917
232,272
191,427
142,137
243,197
344,454
373,183
273,672
210,578
161,201
193,598
472,147
447,325
680,156
909,605
324,912
1,319,076

$528,250
787,351
902,332
233,771
773.191
939,623
1,124,871
1,058,488
1,383,800
1,447,027
2,091,454
2,789,614
2,604,124
3,275,612
3,578,571
2,931,160
4,461,825

$294,333
555,079
710,905
91,634:
529,994
595,169
751,688
784,816
1,173,222
1,285,826
1,897,856
2,317,467
2,156,799
2,595,456
2,668,966
2,606,248
3,142,749

1, 849,148

30,850

397,227

1,818,298

; 1,421,071

1840.
1841.
1842.
1843.
18441845.
1846.
1847.
1848.
1849.
185018511852.
18531854.
1855.
1856.

$542,498
809,854
912,585
237,217
778,407
979,886
1,130,064
1,060,818
1,390,492
1.460,125
2^107,520
2,815,663
2,627,911

Yearly average...

3,316,282

The year 1843 represents but nine months, in consequence of a cliange in the fiscal
year.
No. 62.—Statement exhihiting the population, home consumption of foreign importations of leather
and manufactures of leather and the allotment per capita thereof, together luith the home consumption of foreign importations of leather and the manufactures of leather, less domestic exports in the United States for ihe years 1840, 1850, and 1855.
® S ^

o

S Cuh

o ^ ^

•a a-O Ul

Years.

P.^

w «

^

S C
O

o ^ ^

< X
p

o -^ ^ ^

o

'ri

s^ g 0 ^ o
^
rt -rM ^
O ^
O rt -J^ ^ C
Q

sail

^--

ffl
17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

$528,250
2,091,454
2,931,160

} 3 9-100
9 2-100
10 79-100

$294,333
1,897,856
2,606,248

The census of 1850 does not give the manufactures of leather.



c3 rt

<p

A

1840-..
1850.-1855---

"cu a •

Cu ^ ^

^

$0 I 72-100
8 18-100
9 59-100

REPORT

ON T H E

227

FINANCES.

No. 63.—Statement exhibiting the foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports and home consumption of foreign importations of hides and skins; also home consumption of foi-eign importations
of hides and skins,.less domesiic exports, and domestic exports, less home consumption of foreign impoiMions of hides and sJdns in the United Staies, for ihe last seventeen years, ami ihe gearly average
thereof.

HIDES

AND

SKINS.

.is

i

05

O

o
X
o

K
a

CIH

Years.

fl
fciO

'

Yearly average.

109,164

;_,

rt M § So
%J^^-o
Q

P12,500 $2,756,214
45,898. 3,393,276
58,187
4,003,164
50,340
2,612,287
62,658
111,636
143,323
181,394
1,529,948
36,145
4,262,069
23,390
3,379,684
71,940
4,720,209
86,624
5,861,200
,55,421
4,722,075
5,851,759
25,955
7,440,479
23,622
7,743,927
361,982
7,981,368
101,174

127,616
78,822
103,638
101,044
67,632
179,793
304,088
101,924

2

..III

S 'g i' O

o

#63,972
64,752
7,528

5^

(yd)

s

1840
$2,756,214
1841
3,457,248
1842
4,067,816
1843
2,619,815
1844
1845
.».
1846
1847
*i,529,948
1 8 4 8 . . . . . . . . . . . 4,262,069
1849
3,507,300
5850..
4,799,031
1851
. . . , . 5,964,838
4,823,119
1852.
5,919,391
1853....
1 8 5 4 . . . . . . . . . . . 7,620,272
8,048,015
1855
8,083,292
1856
4,818,455

I'll

fcin

{Q

'I
o

O "^

c

rt

DT

^ CJ ^ .§
§ 2
o

. fl

o

91,305

$2,643,714
3,347,.378
3,944,877
2,561,947
$62,658
111,636
143 323
1,348,554
4,225,924
3,356,294
4,648,269
5,774,576
.4,666,654
5,825,804
7,416,857
7,381,945
7,880,194

4,732,683

4,644,499

105,872

* For but six months.
T h e year 1843 is given for nine montlis only, in consequence of a change in the fiscal year

Ho. 64.—Statement exhibiting the population, home consumption of foreign importa.tions of hides and
skim and the per capita thereof ; also ihe home consumption of foreign importations of hides and skins,
less domestic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof, for ihe years 1840, 1850, and 1855.

.2
p

o"

fl-l

1840....
1850
1B55

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

^ S o^
Ot2 o

ffi

C
Q

03

« . ^i

X

mpt
port
ind
tice

•-

ocS o
t l fl t ^

-

^ o o a

o ^ rt . £ fl
O 02 r t rt

S '9 "" «
>
S <^ ^ , S •
o 3 o 4

<:

ffi

rt:

$2,756,214 $0 16 15-100
4,720,209
20 35-100
28 49-100
7,743,927

rr?

<

O

02

1

O

«J-I

UD

•

o^ o o B

Si^fl^.s

Q C ^ 5 fl-fl ^
— o ^ q d '".

<

$2,643,714 $0 15 49-100
4,648,269
20 04-100
7,381,945
27 15-100

T h e census of 1850 does not furnish any information on the subject of this table.




(H

apit
con
reigi
hide
) do

«+-! C
Q

on 0
tion
kins
port

«

apit
con
reigi
hide

.

ment \
tke h
nption
aortatio
d skins
Stic exp

fl

fl

e consumpt
eign import
hides and s!

Years.

M 1 r^

CQ

<=

ment p
the h
uption
portatio
d skins.

^

228

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

N o . 65.—Siatement exhibiting ihefm'dgn imporiaiions and exportations, domestic exports, and home consumption of foreign imporiaiions of manufactures of glass, and the home consumptibn of foreign importations of manufactured glass, less ihe domesiic expoo'ts thereof, in the Uniied Staies for the last
sevmteen years, andthe annual average ihei-eof.

M A N U F A C T U R E S OF G L A S S .

03

t.
Years.

Foreign importations.

.

o

Oi

X
o
fl

i -

.2 o

o

la

X
Q)

a
03
0)

!••§

o^.2
£^^

c be

S

o"^io

'S
;-<
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848:
1849
]850
1851
]852
1853
1854
1855
1856

.

;
•
:;
.

Yearly average..

B
o
O

$563,429
330,956
380,526
116,805
312,078
597,347
686,229
797.283
1,042;502
847,443
1,071,091
1,386,661
1,481,556
1,.664,422
2,193,452
1,954,287
1,745,052

$27,208
24,285
15,770
13,636
10,689
9,225
8,479
4,865
19,692
20,479
34,780
22,577
23,817
21,651
43,714
74,069
27,287

$56,688
43,095
36,748
25,348
77,860
98,760
90,860
71,155
76,007
101,419
136,682
185,436
194,634
170,561
229,382
204,679
216,439

$536,221
306,671
364,756
103,169
301,389
588,122
677,750
792,418
1,022,810
826,964
1,036,311
1,364,084
1,457,739
1,642,771
2,149,738.
1,880,218
1,717,765

$479,5.33
263,576
328,008
77,821
223 529
489 362
586 890
721 263
946,803
725 545
899 629
1 178 648
1,263,105
1,472 210
1,920 356
1 675 539
1,501 326

1,010,066

23,660

118,574

986,406

867,832

o

O +J

But nine months are represented in the year 1843, in consequence of a change in the fiscal
year.

Allotment per capita
of the home consumption of foreign importations
of manufactured
glass, less domestic exports.

$17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

Home consumption
of foreign importations .of manufactured glass, less
domestic exports.

1840
1850
1855...

Population.

Allotment per capita
of the home consumption of foreign importations
of manufactured
glass.

Years.

Home consumption
of foreign importations of manufactured glass.

No. 66.—Statement exhibiting the population, home consumption of the foreign importations of manufactured glass, and the allotment per capita thereof; also tJie home corisumption of the foreign importations of manufactured glass, less domestic expoi'ts, and ihe allotment per capita thereof in the United
States, fm' theyears 1840, 1850, and 1855.

$536,221
1,036,311
1,880,218

$0 03 14-100
04 47-100
06 92:100

$479,533
899,629
1,675,539

$0 02 81-100
03 88-100
06 16-100

The census of .1850 does not give the manufactures of glass in the United States




229

REPOET ON THE FINANCES.

No. 67.—Statement exhibiting the foreign importations and exportations, domesiic exports and home consumption of the foreign importations qf china, porcelain, earthen and stone ware ; also the home consuriiption of foreign imp.oiiations of china, porcelain, earthen and stone vjare, less domestic exports, in
ihe Uniied Staies for the last seventeen years, and ihe annual average thereof.

MANUFACTURES

OF

CHINA, PORCELAIN , EARTHEN

i

o
S'c/J

Years.

O

a,
X

o

•'-' fl

•

fl-2
'S
o

1840
1841
1842
1843.
1844
1845..o
1846..
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851.
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856

fl
fcJO

1

s

2,526,772

rt Q
J

P,i

w
(D

S63,754
$2,070,231
51,570'
1,536,450
37,000
1,557,961
26,338
588,036
27,269
1,633,482
22,701
2,439,515
63,403
2,525,349
32,690
2,242,241
2,332,996 ^ 36,148
39,948
2,261,331
42,261
2,601,393
41,109
3,340,622
23,834
3,444,095
15,133
3,178,182
55,925
4,137,691
73,092
3,717,670
40,091
3,347,884

Yearly average . . .

rt . 1 ^ ^ u

t:
o
X
o
o

03

;-i

AND STONE. W A R E .

©

o
2®
" c^ 'tJ .2
o B •^
>
© o «

o

•111

$10,9.59
6,737
7,618
2,907
4,884
7,393
,6,521
• 4,758
8,512
10,632
15,644
23,096
18,310
53,685
33,867
32,119
66,696

$1,995,518
1 478 143
1,513,343
558,791
1 601 309
2 409 421
2^455,425
2,204,793
2,288,.336
2,210,751
2 543 488
3,276,417
3,401,951
3,109,364
4,047,899
3,612,459
3,241,097

18,490

40,723

$2,006,477
1,484,880
1,520,961
561,698
1,6U6,193
2,416,814
2,461,946
2,209,551
2,296,848
2,221,383
2,559,132
3,299,513
3,420,261
3,163,049
4,081,766 ,
3,644,578
3,307,793
2,486,049

2,467,559

In consequence of a change in the fiscal year in 1843, but nine months are represented in
thatyear.
N o 68.—Statemmt exhibiiing ihe population,, home consumption of the foreign iinportations of manur
factures of china, porcelain, earthen and stone ware, and ihe alloimerd per capita thereof; also ihe
home consumption of the foreign impoi'tations of manufactures of china, porcelain, earthen and stoneware, less ihe domestic exjjoris, and the allotment per capita, in ihe United Staies for the years 1840,
-1850, and 1855.

fl j ^ CJ T 3
rt in C4_ C

Hom eco
eign im]
fact ires
eart len

fl S ° ^

1840
1850
1855.......

17,069,453
23', 1.91,876
27,185,517

$2,006,477
2,559,132
3,644,578

c

i'Z'oll:

's'sg.l

C 5 " - o
u
K .2
S
O - J ^ Oc d O
G rt

s

o

rt

M -H

2 ^ .S 2 S
B c:>

^ ^

$0 11 75-100
11 03-100
13 41-100

C

W

.. QJ

. .

-^^

of th
the for
manu
celain
re,Ies

M

he for
manu
celain
re, los

-

of th
Lhe for
manu
celain
re.

.

.

2 = c c i«
d
'^ .2 .= o t^

$1,995,518
2,543,488
3,612,459

.ll'Sog

fl. s ^ - ©^ .

c .2 c ce c H
od ^ O rt O > ^
t per
nsum
porta
of ch
and £
c exp

Population.

.

Hom eco
eign im
fact ures
eart len
dom esti

Years.

•- <^

O g c fl
d
'•§^.2.2 2

t per
nsum
porta
of ch
and s

Cm

.....

Allot
hom
eign
fact
eart

iie for
manu
celain
re.

. . ..

2

Q ^
^

fl^

S

$0 11 69-100
10 97-100
13 29-100

The census of 1850 does not give the manufactures of^china, porcelain, earthen and stone
ware.



No. 69.—Statemeiit exhibiting ihe foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports and home consumption, less domestic exports of hemp ; ihe foreign importations and exportations and home consumption of manilla, sun, and othei' hemp of India, and the toial home consimiption of all kinds of impcn-ied hemp ; also the foreign importations and
exportations, home consumption, domestic exports, and home consumption, less domesiic exports of manufactures of hemp, together ivith ihe total home consumption of all kinds
qf imported hemp, and the iinported manufactures thereof, over the domestic exports in ihe Uniied States for ihe last seventeen years, and the yearly average thereof.

to
o

CO

IMPORTATIONS OF HEMP, AND THE M/VNUFACTURES THEREOF.

^

Hemp, unmanufactured.

Manilla, sun, and other hemp of India.

Years.
Foreign im- Foreign ex- Home con- Domestic ex- Home consump- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Home contion, less domes- portations.
ports.
sumption.
portations.
sumption.
portations.
portations.
tic exports.

Total home
consumption
of imported
hemp, &c.

O

o
1840
1841.-1842
1843.
_.
1844
1845.
1846
1847.
1848.
1849.1850.1851.
1852
1853
1554
^
1855
1886

$686,777
561,039
267,849
228,882
262,365
145,209
180,281
66,377
187,905
491,633
579,814
223,984
164,588
329,122
378,246
112,763
57,676

Yearly average

289,677




1,157
7,670
13,401
6,031
7,876
377
2,310
42,614
57,305
54,249

$686,777
660,989
267,296
'226,870
261,913
140,372
180,281
65.220
180,335
478,232
574,783
216,108
164,211
326,812
335,632
66,458
3,427

$27,657
8,458
5, 633
29,114
18,649
18,195
93,699
121,320
28,598

13,320

277,92i

39,036

$50
553
2,012
452
4,837

$686,777
560,989
267,296
226,870
261,913
140,372
180,281
65,220
152,678
469,774
669,150
186,994
145,562
308,617
241,933

297,628

$42,149
209,385
238,179
,457,276
278,675
342,446
196,634
659,362
608,709
942,422
1,591,791
1,628,329
2,046,653
1,946,044

$472
6,274
1,446
73,139
27,307
1,833
29.161
3, 843
8,688
9,584
4,572
56, 6,79
. 198,136
12,256

$41,677
•203,111
236,733
. 384,137
251,368
340,612
167,473
666,519
600,021
932,8381,587,219
1,471,650
1,847,617
1,932,788

$686,777
660,989
267,296
268 647
465,024
377,106
564 418
316 688
493 290
637,247
1,164,669
687 015
1 078,400
1,895,836
1,713,683
1 847 617
1,932 788

784,718

30,956

753,762

879,829

W
t?j

t2{
Cl

STATEMENT—Continued.
Hemp, and the
, manufactures
^ thereof.

IMPORTATIONS OF HEMP, AND THE MANUFACTURES THEREOF.

Hemp, manufactures of.
Years.
Foreign importa- Foreign exporta- Home consump- Domestic exports. Home consump- Total home contion.
tion, less domes- sumption over dotions.
tions.
mestic exports.
tic exports.

5a
H.
>v

o
pi

1840-..
1841
1842
1843
1844-.-.
1845
1846
18471848
1849
I8601861
1862
1863
1854
1866
1856

_.-

..._.
'
-

Yearly average _




._

$1,588,155
2,566,381
1,273,534
626,502
1,003,420'
897,345
766,664
684,880
658,076
619,774
688,446
661,768
391,608
479,171
698,251
266,829
263,730

807,325

$226,347
167,606
162,866 •
102,495
138,002
96,684
87,618
69,009
61,175
69,439
98,369
46,620
47,831
45,667
62,318
27,236
19,635
87,507

$1,361,808
2,398,875
1,110,668
424,007
865,418801,661
679,146
626,871
606,900
460,335
490,077
616,148
343,777
433,604
645,933
239,593
234,095

719,818

$8,242
• 13,400
1,038
326
311
14,762
' 12,129
5,782
6,713
6,668
11,776
8,023.
13,622
16,784
79,717
36,608
26,035
15,337

$1,363,566
2,386,476
1,109,630
423,681
866,107
786,899
667,017
620,089
600,187
454,777
478,301
607,125
330,156
416,820
466,216
203,086
208,060
704,481

$2,040,343
'2,946,464
1,376,926
'692, 228
1,330,131
1,164,004
1,231,435
936,677
1,093,477
1,092,024
1,642,970
1,294,140
1,408,655
2,312,656
2,179,799
2,060,602
2,140,848

O

X

o

1,584,310
00

2.32

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINAINCES.

No. 70.
Statemeni exhibiting the fioreign importations and eoportations and the
home consumption ofi imported fiax, also the fioreign importations omd
exportations ofi linen and linen fiahrics and the home consumytiorh
thereofi, together tvith the total home eonsumption ofi impoyis ofi flax
and the manufactures ofi flax in the United States fior the last seventeen years and the yearly average thereofi.
IMPORTATIONS OF FLAX AND THE MANUFACTURES THEREOF.
a -t3 c

Linen and linen fabrics.

F l a x , unmanufactured.
Years.
o
Cu

B w

y
o
1840
,...
1 8 4 1 . . . . ....
1842
^,
1843
$15,193
1844
67,738
1845........
90,509
1846
16,337
1847
28,365
102,261
1 8 4 9 . . . . . . . . 127,859
128,917
1850..
1851.o
176,197
}852...
175,342
1 8 5 3 . . . . . . . . 135,684
1854
250,39)
1855
286,809
132,461
1856

im

Yearly av 'ge

123,861




(_

O
CU
W .A

o

ci

B
o a
o _o

X

5

1
\

$626
6,544

O

o

s

$15,193
67,112
83,965
16,337
28,365
102,261
127,859
128,917
176,197
175,342
135,684
250,391
286,809
132,461
123,349

•;:: —

Cu

O
CU

p

o

•X3 rt K

•

o 2

«l

*o
o

$4,614,466 $425,466
6,846,807 280,459
3 , 6 6 9 , 2 3 1 210,176
1,484,921 161,667
4,492,826
129,726
4,923,109
159,626
5,098,505 125,570
5,154,837
97,601
6,624,648 300,159
5,907,242 187,948
8,134,674 129,878
8,795,740 107,382
8,515,709 131,153
10,236.037 149,399
10,863^536 179,598
8,617,165 278,850
11,189,463 179,666
6,774,642

190,254

B
a
a .
o s

QJ t»

3

' ^

o
S
o
33
$4,189,000
6,566,348
3,459,(.t.55
1,323,254
4,363,100
4,763,483
4,972,935
5,057,236
6,324,489
5,719,294
8,004,796
8,688,358
8,384,556
10,086,638
10,683,938
8,3.38,315
11,009,797

$4,189,000
6,566,348
3,4.59,055
1,338,447
4,430,212
4,847,448
4,989,272
5,085,60]
6,426,750
5,847,153
8,133,713
8,864,555
8,.559,898
10,222,322
10,934,329
8"', 625,124
11,142,258

6,584,388

6,685,970




o

CO

rtl -CJ o>
IO rt O
4i^ 00 O

rt CO CD
Cn cn O

CO O
rt
Co O 0 0
0 0 fci^ ^ o

CO h-^ .
CO - J .

^^ •

cn 00 •

JO h-^ .
CD JO .

cn~bo 0^
rt - J cn
- ^ cn CO

Cr< H -

rt rt cr>
00 -^ cn

cn o

CO 0 0 0 0
c n c n fcf*.

Allotment per capita of the total consumption of imported flax and imported manufactures of flax in t h e
United States.

T o t a l consumption of imported flax
and imported manufactures of flax
in the United States.

Allotment per capita of the consumption of imported manufactures of
flax in the [Jnited States.

Consumption of imported manufactures of flax in the United States.

Allotment per capita of the consumption of imported flax in the United
States.

Consumption of imported flax in the
United States.

^

a

1

to

!i

5S

«s».

Cb

1

<s>.

i
^
f^
*^

^
^ '4
Cb
^ ^ a., c
(^ c4. i ' ^ ^
Cb
o
^
^ a ?i .?s
^ (Ts ^

M
-

<<>. ^^ ^

^ £- ?• o ^ S.

f a Kg S ?i s

>^ §

^•

S
9
a.
^
I ^

i

> ^ 1:4, c^*

00 > - C a
O

S

^

S

tzi

s'sb;

a

^

r S r i Cb

import
reofi; t

Cn 4 i - >Ji>.
O iO O

ocn o

- 3 O CO
Cn a ^ CO

ot:)-ji

Cn rt cn

O . CO C n
CO O c n

J O vP" CO
cr:) •<} c n
^
OC C J

Cn 0 0 *>•
(— ^ J c n
^.3 c n CO

00 00 00
Cn Cn hia.
Cn O
O

Allotment per capita of total consmnption of importations of h e m p and
manufactures of h e m p , less domestic
exports in the United States.

Total consumption of imported hemp
and imported manufactures of h e m p ,
less domestic exports in the United
States

Allotment per capita of the consumption of imported manufactures of
hemp in the United States, less doraestic exports.
^__^_^

Consumption of imported manufactures
of hemp m the United States, less
domestic exports.

Allotment per capita of imported hemp
- consumed in the United States.

Consumption of imported hemp in the
United.States, less domestic exports.

Ss-

Cb

Cb

1
Cb

il
Cb
Oo

Co

Cb

4

t2!
p

a

Cb

?s

Cb
Co

Co
Co

'^

S:U

i

UJ

^

Cb

1

> J

c^

c^

Oo*

O

5tJ

^.

«^+. Cb

Ci

Cb

1

5g

o

1
o

§-K§

a«
?5

?:"

Cb

^
^

I'

^ »

a.

tr^
Cb

1
s-

o x T^' o

CJl

1^

o

1

O

00

Ci
Cb

i .^

c^K

5S

1^

a. c!l

^

Cb

Co

59

?5^ <n*
§5

g.'^^

Cb

<s>.

1
§•

?5

?^

^

Ci

s
^
1
^ §•
Cb

5H

1 s >• ac>
^'1 s §^ c
S3
5^

:^§

Cb

Cb

Si

!^

^ ^

^ ^
<>i.

Cb

to

W
5

O

o

CO



"^

p

M

p

»

.

p-' C
D

CO CO

Cn o
G0»-cn CO

Allotment per capita of the total cohsumption of foreign and domestic
hemp and flax, and the foreign manufactures thereof, less domestic exports in the United States.

Total consumption of foreign and domestic hemp and flax, and the foreign manufactures of hemp and flax
in the United States, less domestic
exports.

Allotment per capita of the total consumption of hemp and flax in the
United States, less domestic exports.

T o t a l consumption of h e m p and flax
in the United States, less domestic
exports.

Allotment per capita o f t h e production
of hemp and flax in the United States.

Products of hemp and flax raised in
the United States.

00 H ^

Lgs-a^§?S

S- >• ^ C
b

^ - sr^ ^ g ,§ S^g
.
^ Cb

i^^^lt

^

^

Co C ^ ?S

S-.

g § Cb^
§

-i ^ ^

Cfc ^ ^

CH. ^

^ . ^

§

^

flax grow
total consu
c exports,
tion ofi fior
otures of h
capita fior

cr C
D
CD CU

S SLo
cu'-< o
' ' 3
cr

• ^ ct) p

n:*

<;

CO

CO

a
.

CD

00--3
00 - 5
0 0 0

00-1
CO CO
CO o

cn 00 4sI—' --1 cn
- 4 cn CO

§?

ation, product ofi hemp
llotment per capita tho
3 United States, less do
ereofi, and the total con
X, and the fioreign ma
orts, ivith the allotment

«H- ^

^ ^ ^
g ^ 3

p

-?§^

.

00
CLi-

p
S

5?-S

Ct>

P
5.^

C l T CD

53 ^
rt'-<i

_. P o

e -^ 00

ttJ -» rtl

rt

C
D

t-T' p

ODCOCO
Cn cn *>.
Cn O O

iting t he p)o
ates, a nd th
andfl ax in
per capita
hemp and
9 domi3stic
50.

•

ft)

O 3 S

CQ

3^
g o *

No. 73.
a

>

0

H

J^

0

^

00

to

235

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

42

*l3
--

Tears.

CO

s
u

H

a

o
ft

o

ft

bD

d1

o

.§
d

d ft

<V

X
o

CO

o

. 1

a2

i

Domestic exports, less
the home consumption, of foreign importations of coal in
the United States.

CO

Home consumption of
foreign importations,
less domestic exports.

N o . 74.—Statemeiit exhihiting the foi-eign importations and exportations, domesiic expm^is and home consumption of coal; also ihe home consumption of the foreign imporiaiions of coal, 2ess domesiic exports^
and domesiic exports, less ihe home consumption of foreign imporiaiions of coal, in ihe Uniied States
for the last seventeen years, and tke annual average thereof.

p
1840
$387,238
1841.
369,352
1842.
380,635
1843.
, 116,312
18^.
236,9.63
223,919
1845.
378,597
1846
370,985
1847. -..
461,140
1848. - .
409,282
1849. 1850.
„ 378,817
479,785
1851. 406,841
1852. _
490,010
1853.
593,543
1854..--_.
1855.
-_-. 903,067
.604,187
1856.

Yearly average.

422,981

$38,437
76,040
, 53,716
34,414
33,282
35,957
41,906
40,110
34,143
27,028
16,962
1,690
1,189
1,519
7,617
9,242
7,093

. 27,079

$47,112
40,396
167,090
163,977
188,906
336,003
443,506
637,006
677,420

$348,801
293,312
526,919
81,898
203,681
187,962
336,691
330,875
426,997
382,254
361,855
478,095
405,652
488,491
585,926
893,825
597,094

$348,801
293,312
326,919
81,898
203,681
187,962
336,691
330,875
379;885
341,858
194,765
314,118
216,746
152,488
142,420
256,819

300,157

395,902

256,827

$80,326

80,326

The year 1843 is given for nine months only, in consequence of a change in the fiscal
year.-

1840-..•
1850
1855

17,069,453
23,191,876
27,185,517

$348,801
361,855
893,825

$0 02.04
01.56
03.29

$348,801
194,765
256,819

Allotment-per capita
of the home conV sumption of the foreign importations of
coal, less domestic
exports.

Home consumption of
the foreign importations of coal, less domestic exports.

Population.

Allotment per capita
of the home consumption of the foreign importations of
. coal.

Years.

Home consumption of
foreign importations
of coal.

N o . 75.—Statement exhihiiing ihe population, home consumption of the foreign imporiaiions of coal, and
ihe per capita thereof; and ihe home consumption of ihe foreigii importation.^ of coal, less domesiic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof, in the United States for ihe years 1840, 1850, and 1855.

$0 02.04
00. 84
00.94

The census of 1850 is silent on the subject of the above table, consequently the manu-factures cannot be given.




236

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

N o . 76.—Statement exhihiting ihe foreign importations and exportations, domestic exports and home consumption of foreign importations of lead, and the manufactures thereof; also hom.e consumptionof
foreign importations, less domesiic exports, of lead, and ihe manufactures of lead, and domestic exports,
less home consumption of foreign importations of lead, and the manufactures thereof, for the last seventeen years, and the annual average ihei-eof.

oft
M

1

•

o
o

03

•a C^

CQ

o

o
i-(

1840.
1841.
1842.1843---.
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
1848.
1849.
1850.
1851
1852 1853
1854.
1855.
1856.

__.

$20,356
5,989
815
227
103

5,435
7,192
86,257
1,187,425
1,524,138
1,284,672
1.619,757
2,1.02,487
2,566,163
2,554,234

-_

Yearly average-

864,350

1
$34,090 .$39,687
117,294
540,217
525 492,735
47 605,256
192 357,050
624,796
138,675
121
92,017
11,501
43,394
61,876
35,479
154,246
28,200
132,644
51,194
60,657
19,604
28,117
43,352
90,638
19,531
139,578
33,140

54,941

Domestic exports
less home consumption of foreign impor t'ns.

ft

Years.

Home consumption
of foreign importations less domestic exports.

o

Home consumption
of foreign importations.

liEAD, AND THE MANUFACTUBES THEREOF.

$39,687
111,305
639,402
492,765
605,200
357,050
624,796
133, 24iO
84, 946

$5,989
815
56

5,435
7,071
74,756
1,125,549
1,369,892
1,152,028
1,559,100
2,074,370
2,475,525
2,414,656

$31,362
1,090,070
1,341,692
1,100,834
1,539,496
2,031,018
2,455,994
2,381,516

943,480

1,496,498

193,038

332,043

^ The year 1843 is given for nine months only, in consequence of a change in the fiscal
year.
N o . 77.—Statement exhihiting the popidation, home consumption qf forei.gn importations of lead, and
manufa.ctures of lead, and the allotment per capita thereof;' also the home consumption of foreign importations of lead, and ihe manufactures of lead, less ihe domesiic exports, and ihe aUotment per capita
thereof, f o r the years 1840, 1850, and 1855.
c3

d ^d

.'

•

c«

B.-B-ri

o

'^ d
^
< > d <4H
1

ft C O
-M ' ^ d

Years.

d

.2 a
B o

o Td.

O <prt

a ^

ft' d .

1^ B

O C
O

fifipa

'ft 8^^
d o -o

p ft C
O
5; pi '^

8 a^ ^

nc!
bD cS .

ft o o s
J£r0 a
^-^
a

d

«3 oo

n., '^

2 J'-^ „
a^

fto

I—I C^H p ,

17,069,453
23,191,876 $-1,125,549
27,185,517
2,475,525

1840.
18501855,

04^^
,

__

$1,090,070
2,455,994
cs

$0 0 4 T ^
09^^
—

The census of 1850 is silent upon the subject of the above table, consequently,the
manufactures cannot be given.
anufactures cannot be civen.




237

REPORT ON THE FINAlSrCES.

No. 78.—Statement exhibiting the foreign importations, foreign and doinestic exportations, and home consumption of foreign copper, and the manufactures thereof, together-loith the total home consumption of
foreign copper, and manuf cultures of copper, less domestic exports, for the last seventeen years, and the'
yearly average thereof.

Imports and exports of copper ore, plates, pig, bar, old, and manufactures of copper.

. ^ ft
^
ft ft

Years.

c o

§s
w d
d

CSi

"d
c c ft d
C
rd
^•2 8 P

ft

»H a
OJ d
CU
o

•-

-H P fl

1840
1841
1842
1843
.1844. o

1845
1846
1847
1848
1849.... o
1850
1851....
1852
1853.....
1854......
1855.. o
1856

:
.,
,

Yearly average

P,C63 ,515
1,780 ,357
1,365 ,701
750. ,862
1,450 ,557
2,075 ,448
2,239 ,373
2,691 ,929
1,847 ,114
2,445 ,315
2,417 ,680
2,753 ,747
2,501 ,929
3,411 496
3,430 ,623
4,022 ,363
2,702 603

$78,874
127,669
93,347
226,497
101,997
62,775
15,900
29,581
421,060
65,326
330,288
122,794
121,978
97,198
65,125
997,344
94,76^

5J86,954 $1,584,641
72,932
1,652,688
97,021
1,272,354
524,365
79,234
1,348,560
91^446
2,012,673
94;736
2,223,473
62,088
2,662,348
64,980
1,426,054
61,468
2,379,989
66,203
2,087,.392
105,060
2,630,953
91,871
103, 039 2,379,951
3,314,298
108,205
3,365,498
91,984
3,025,019
690,766
2,607,841
534,846

2,326,507

179,560

147,226

2,146,947

$1,497,687
1,579,756
1,175,333
445,131
1,257,114
1,917,937
2,161,385
2,597,368
1,364,586
2,313,786
1,982,332
2,539,082
2,276,912
3,206,093
3,273,514
2,334,253
2,072,995
1,999,721

NoTE.—^The domestic exports embrace the manufactures of copper and brass, andcannot be
separately given.
From a want of uniformity in the returns, the value of the raw material has been blended
with the manufactured article.

Allotment per capita of
the consumption of foreign copper and manufactures of copper in
the United States.

Total home consumption
of foreign copper and
manufactures of copper, less domestic exports.

Allotment per capita of
total home consumption of foreign copper
and manufactufes of
copper, less domestic
exports.

$17,069,453. $1,584,641 $0 09 28-100
9
2,087,392'
:23,191,876
11 13-100
; 27,185,5.17 3,025,019

$1,497,687
1,982,332
2,334,253

$0 08 77-100
8 55-100
8 59-100

Years.

o
ft
o
P- .

1840.
1850
1855

o
...•

tlome consumption of
foreigri copper and
m^anufactures of copper.

No. 79.—Siaiement exhihiting the popidation, home consumption of foreign cojyper, and the manufactures thereof, wiih ihe allotment per capita, and total home consumption of foreign copper, and manufactures of copper, less domesiic exports, and the allotment per capita thereof, for ihe years 1840, 1850,
mzc^ 1855.

The.census of 1850 does-not give the manufactures o^ copper



No. 80.

to

Statement exhibiting the fioreign importations and exportations and home consumption ofi fioreign silk ; the fioreign impo7^tations, exportations, and home consumption ofi manufiactures ofi silk, and the total home consumption ofi importations ofi
silk and manufiactures ofi silk in the Uiited States, fior the last seventeen years, tvith the yearly avera.ge thereofi.

00
00

IMPORTATIONS OF SILK AND MANUFACTTOES OF SILK.

Silk, manufactures of.

Silk, unmanufactured.

.
Years.
Foreign
' importations.
$234,235
254,102
33,002
53,350
172,953
208,454
216,647
250,086
354,973
384,535
401,385
456,499
378,747
722,931
1,099,389
751,617
991,234

1840
1841
1842
_._
1843
..__
1844--_.-----1845
1846
1847
1848
1849--1850 -1851
1852
1853
1854
1855_1856
Yearly average.

-




409,655

Foreign
exportations.
$200,239
227,113
420
3,353
7,102
4,362
23,999
8,385
. 19,858
55,515
7,408
43,856
7,143
282 .
7,966
71,122
4,255
40,728

Home
consumption.
$33,996
26,989
32,582
49,997
165,851
204,092
192,648
241,701
335,115
329,020
393,977
412,643
371,604
•722,649
1,091,423
680,495
986,979
368,927.

Foreign
importations.
$9,601,522
15,300,795 '
9,444,341
2,662,087
8,310,711
9,731,796
10,667,649
11,733,371
14,543,633
13,791.232
17,639,624
25,777,245
21,651,752
30,434,886
34,696,831
24,366,556 ^
30,226,532
17,092,974

Foreign
exportations.

Home
consumption.

$1,015,532
356,264
265,159
206,777
230,838
246,272
195,753
334,173
340,853
388,572
352,637
500,168
604,855
607,294
843,154
902,135
576,513

$8,585,990
14.944, 531
9,179,182
2,455,310
8,079,873
9,485,524
10,471,896
11,399,198
14,202,780
13,402,660
17,286,987
25,277,077
21,046,897
29,827,592
33,853,677
23,464,421
29,650,019

468,644

16,624,330

Total home consumption of importations
of silk and the manufactures of silk in
the United States.

^

$8,619,986
14,971,520
9,211,764
2,505,307
8,245,724
9,689,616
10,664,544
11,640,899
14,537,895
13,731,680
17,680,964
25,689,720
21,418,501
30,550,241
34,945, 100
24,144,916
30,636,998
16,993,257

o

l-H

No. 8 1 .
Statement exhiiiting the population, consumption ofi imported silk, and the allotment p e r capita thereofi; consumption ofi
imported manufiactures cfi silk, and the per capita thereofi, and the total home consumption ofi importations ofi silk and
manufiactures ofi silk in the United States, tvith the allotment per capita thereofi fior the years 1^4:^, 1850, and 1855 ;
also, the production ofi silk in the United Stcdes, and the cdlotment per capita thereofi, and the total consumption qf
foreign and domestic silk and fioreign manufiactures ofi silk in the United States, and the allotment p e r capita thereofi,
fior the years 1840 and 1850.

1840.-. 17,069,453
1850.-- 23,191,876
1855... 27,185,517




$33,996
393,977
680,495

o

<

H

<1

$0 00.20
1.69
2.50

$8,585,990
17,286,987
23,464,421

$0 50. 30
74.46
86.31

$8,619y986
17,680,964
24,144,916

d ' ^ -^^

«+-( o

d

o

o o

rd
-1-3

rd rd
-t-3 -M

•53 ^

o.a

cii d

.3

.1^
CQ

u
o

-d

p
P^

$0 50. 50 $61,653
76. 15 10,843
88.81
(-)

<
$0 00. 36
. 00. 05

^ LM
t^ o . w
^
0

0

'-Ti M

rd S d ^

-\ - ^ '•^ < m
A
.

^^z^ 0

llotm ent per capita
total con sum ption
eign Jind dom estic si
foreig n manufiictures
in thei United States.

<1

^-^^

^a.s

•+^

llotm ent per
produLction of
Unite d States,

O rt r ^ 0^
rd ^ d rd

B^

•^a- .

d ^ ^
o
d .
'S2M-^ ^

otal C(onsumpt ion of:
and d omestic silk, a:
eign manufac itures (
in the! United States

o

o^^

llotm ent per capita
total home CO nsump
imp 01•tations of sil
manu factures of silk
Unite d States

Population.

o "7:3 0)
r d c:- ^

otalllome CO]QSump
imp 01•tations of sil
manu factures of silk
Unite d States.

Years.

o rd

-p -u
o t
p , rd

llotm ent per capita
consu mption of im
manu factures of silk
Unite d States

ft^

'^' o

-*-t^1e

onsumption <
manufactures
United States.

onsumption of im
raw silk in the
States.

o3

O r^J W

,d o; ^

llotm ent per capita
consumption of im
raw si^Ik in the United

•73 " ^
O <D
-fJ - ( J

H

t=3O

<

$8,681,639
17,691,807

$0 50.86
76.20

O

a
Cfl

^ The census of 1850 does not furnish the manufactures of silk in the United States.

to
CO
CD

240

REPORT ON THE EINANCES.

Ko. 82.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Novemher 27, 1856.
SIR : According to your instructions, I herewith submit tables of
Kailroad Statistics. They have been compiled from the returns made
by their officers, in answer to interrogatories frora this department,
and from such other means of information as were at the time accessible. I t is to be regretted~that the tables are not more perfect; but
the indisposition on the part of many railroad companies to give
their statistics, their neglect to respond to your inquiries, and the
incompleteness of some of the statistics when furnished, have necessarily prevented as accurate a return as might reasonably have been
expected.
The details of the roads in the eastern, middle, and most of the
southern States, are much more exact, and have been more generally
furnished, than those in the west and northwest. In Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin, scarcely any returns have been made froin the
officers of working roads, while no information of any kind has been
received from Oalifornia, and but little from Texas, either as respects
the railroads worked or projected within their limits. It is believed,
liowever, that this compilation will be the basis of more complete and
satisfactory statements.
There can be no question as to the importance of such statistics,
exhibiting, as they do, not only the immense capital invested in and
represented by these works of internal improvement, but also the
enormous^development of our domestic resources which must necessarily attend upon their completion.
It is proper to observe that a large proportion of the details of
these tables is made up from the operations of theyear 1855. The
travel and business ofthe present year have been much greater than
that of the previous one—estimated on some lines as high as thirty
per cent., and exhibiting on all routes an increase of their financial
prosperity. Many new roads have been opened for passengers within
the last few months, and connexions established between important
routes, which have added largely to travel and business. I t w o u l d
be safe, therefore, to add twelve per cent, to the present statistics in
estimating the railroad operations ofthe year 1856.
All which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honor to be, most respectfully, &c.,
WM. HEMPHILL JONES.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.




liailroad Statistics of the Uhited StaieSi
MAINE.^^ Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
er:)
pany.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of main Length of the Cost of the road
track, complete, or esroad and of double
when expected to and of branches.
if any.
branches.
be.
timated cost, if
not completed.

Androscoggin and lienne- April 7, 1845.. June 1, 1847.. Nov. .29,1849,80 as to Danville junction and 54^ miles.-'
$2,262,249 87
Ko double track,
bec Railroad Company.
except sidings.
be put in operation. Waterville.
Bangor, Oldtown, and Mil- 1833, act addi- June 25, 1834.. Nov. 30, 1836, relaid Oldtown and Milford— 13^ miles.. ^-- No double track.
435,000 00
ford Railroad Company tional, 1847.
but sidings.
with iron, 1849.
no branches.
Buckfield Branch Railroad July 2.3, 1847..
None, (except ftjf 20, 000 per mile.
1849.
18 miles now com- Mechanics' Falls and 28^ miles, o
pleted— remainder Camden Point, on AnCompany.
turnouts.)
expected in 1857. droscoggin river.
Calais and Baring Railroad July 26, 1849..
6 miles..
None
6 ....
1850.
1851.
. Calais and Baring
225,000 00
Gompany,
(jrreat Falls and South BerIfone .-^«...1841.
August, 1853... Jauuary, 1855
Great Falls and South 6 miles.ie*
175^000 00
wick Branch Railroad
Berwick junction
Company.
Kennebec and Portland
1836. .
1836.
Augusta and Portland- 62^ miles main, None . . . . 1852,
2^753,877 68
Railroad Company.
9^ branch.
Bath branch.
Machiasport Railroad Com- February, 1842,
None . . - - . *.»-.-.
1841.
1842.
100, 000 00
Whitney ville and Ma- 71 miles
pany.
chiasport.
Oldtown and Lincoln Rail- March 6, 1852. November, 1843. Work suspended in Oldtown and Matta- About 50 iniles .None*.... c
Estimated about
1854
uncertain wamkeag.
road Company.
$1,000,000.
when to be resumed.
Penobscot Railroad Com- Aug. 21, 1850.. January, 1853.. Expected to be in Bangor and Milford... 13 miles.Estimated about
t'^one
pany.
1857.
$500,000.
Portland, Saco, and Ports- March 14, 1827.
1841.
$1, 359, 318 i l
1842.
Portland, Maine, "and 51^ m i l e s . - . - . . None, except sidmouth Railroad. Com-"
ing^.
Portsmouth, N. H.
^.pany.
Somerset and Kennebec Aug. 8, 1848..
1854.
Probaly in Becem- Augusta and Skowhe- 36 miles—-no None*, .a...
Estimated
Railroad Company*
ber, 1856.
$800,000.
gan.
branches.



O

o

Ct

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United /Sfa^es^—iUfame—Continued,

fcO
fc©

Corporate name of ipom- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if not, iTermini of main road Length of main| Length of the Cost of the road
road and of| double track, ifj complete, or esahd of branches.
when expected tQ
pany.
branches.
any.
be.
timated cost ifnot
completed.
no|[None .
completed-— Portland and South 45 miles
Estimated
York and Cumberland Rail- JulySO, 184q... Aug. 12,1848. Not
branches.
Berwick.
probably in 186.0
$1,700,000.
road Company.
Portland and Island 165 miles mairi None, except sid
1853.
$6,28^,172 71
1846.
Atlantic and St. Lawrence Feb.. 10, 1845..
Point,
Vt.—Berhn road — branch ings—^sidings 18
Railroad Company.
Falls is the branch 1^ miles.
miles.
terminus.




o
O

Hi

W
^
>
^
Q

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—Maine—Oontinued.

Corporate name of company.

Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amountof float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount, of the Annual rate and
of debt.
operating expen amount of intering debt.
issued.
in.
ses, including re- est paid.
pairs.

$1,526,700 00
$588, 042 64
Androscoggin and Kennebec
Railroad Company.
Bangor, Oldtown, and Mil- $135, 000 by the pre- No bonds
ford Railroad Company. sent stockholders,
and $300, 000 by the
original.
Buckfield Branch Railroad All capital paid in None .
and expended as far
Company.
as road extends.
112,000 00
$100,000 00
Calais and Baring Railroad
Company.
75,000 00
Great Falls and South Ber- $90, 000—$10,000
wick Branch Eailroad subscribed, but not
yet paid.
Company.
494,000 00
Kennebec &Portrd R.R Co.
745,198 58
o
Machiasport Railroad Co
75,000 00 None
Oldtown and Lincoln Rail35, 000. 00 None
road Company.
35, 300 00
174,560 09
Penobscot Railroad Co„.,.
1,500,000 00 None now outPortland, Saco, and Portsstanding.
mouth Railroad Comp'y.
262,462 00 No return
Som'rset&KennebecR.B.Co
379,500 00
York and Cumberland Rail294,194 27
(interest due, $72road Company.
00.0.)
Atlantic and St. Lawrence
Railroad Company.




2,494,900 00

3,494,000 00

$147,507 23
None

$1,674,207 23

-- 58,887 75 due on
construction.

None .

None.

12,000 00

124, 000 00

20,000 00

$210,000 00

$99,000 00

38,828 26

33,575 Q2

11,105 32

7,140 60

37,.000 00

16,900 00

80,090 00

No return —
None

Operations upon No return
the road have
been suspended
761,236 72
228,747 39
154,831 02
Nothing
9,000 00
6,000 00
None
No operations on None
road.
No return
No return
No return
270,214 48
None.
,
138,921 84

No return —
256,000 00

No return
747,500 00

No return
37,000 00

No return
26, 000 00

Nothing i.o»-.

3,494,000 00

572,620 12

452,261 57

267,236 72
None
None

6 percent—$100,000 paid.
None
o...

^
g
Q

None

t^j:

----o

6 per cent.—$9, 000 paid.
No return

®;
^
^j

6 per c e n t . . .
None
None.
-..•

t>
s;
O'
^•

No return
None.

-

No return
No interest paid
on mortgages for
3 years; other
debts 6 per cent.
6 per cent.—$.209,640:

b?
w

Bailroad Statistica of the United States.—Maine—Continued.
• Corporate name of company.

Net annual profits.

Androscoggin and Kennebec Railroad Company.
Bangor, Oldtown, and MLilford Railroad Company.

$110,000 00
5,252 74

Dividends.

None
None - . . . . . . . . . .

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
sengers per the through freight
by passenger by freight trains passengers per
year.
year.
trains per year. per year.
for the year.
.67,000
24,180

11,235
Buckfield Branch Railroad Income is expend- Same as proceeded in completing. ing.
Company.
20,000- 00 None declared; ap- No return
Calais and Baring Railroad
plied to the liquiCompany.
dation of debt.
No return
No return
Great Falls and South Ber- No return
wick Branch Railroad
Company.
130,772
Kpnnphen and P o r t l a n d None
-. - - None
Railroad Company.
$3,000 00 None . - - . . . - . - . .
3,000 00
Machiasport Railroad Com(3 per cent.)
pany.
Oldtown and Lincoln Rail- None . . . . - . . . None . - - - - . . . . . . None . . . . .
road Company.
No return
-.
No return
Penobscot Railroad Com- No return
pauy.
88,000
131,292 61 6 per cent
Portland, Saco, and Ports90,000 00
mouth Railroad Co.
No return
No return
Somerset and Kennebec No return
Railroad Company.
34,000
11,000 00 None
-.
Xork and Cumberland Railroad Company.
Atlantic and St. Lawrence
Railroad Company



120,358 55

6 per cent

to

170,125

79,716

Included in the
precedmg.

32,618

54,714^

41,000

16,073^ Freight by measurement; principally lumber.
1,442
2,443 24-100

3,125

11,232
No return.
No return

No return..

No return

No return

No return

239,389

No return

52,001

No return

O

No return

Ul

w
31,077 83-100
15,000

65, 384
4,000 miles

N o n e . . . . . . . . . . . None

None

None

None

None

No return

No return

No return

No r e t u r n . . .

44,000
No return

150,000
No return

134,000
No return

O

>*1

>
Cl
W

28,000
No r e t u r n . . . . . . .

Freight trains at- 100,000in a l l . . - . See preceding... 19,000 tons inaU
tached to passenger trains.
95,839 192,696 in all.
321,282
83,457

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Maine—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

No. of tons of Amount of mileage of No. of tons of freight car- Average speed Average speed of No. of fatal No. of cascasualties ualties not
way freight for
freight trains.
of passenger
passengers carried du- ried during the year,
duringthe fatal for
the year.
trains.
ring the year, or the or the equivalent numyear.
equivalent number of ber of tons of freight
the year.
carried for one mile.
passengers carried one
mile.

Androscoggin and KenneNot given .
25 miles per
6,133
Not given..-.
bec Railroad Company.
Bangor, Oldtown, and Mil20 miles per
801,225
6,000
do
-ford Railroad Company.
Buckfield Branch Railroad
49,327
1,'649.40
....do
37,463
Company.
Calais and Baring Railroad No return
15 miles per
No return.
No return
Company.
Great Falls and South Ber- . . . . d o
....do..
No return
....do .... ...
wick Branch Railroad
Company.
Kennebec and Portland
.do.
25 miles per
.do.
.do.
Railroad Company.
Machiasport Railroad C o . . None .
None.
None .
None .
Oldtown and Lincoln Rail- None ,
None .
None.
None .
road Company.
Penobscot Railroad Co*.-. No return...
No return
No return
No return
—
Portland, Saco, and Ports•22,000
25 miles per
1, 300,000
8,200,000
' mouth Railroad Co.
Somerset and Kennebec No return
No return.
No return.
No return
Railroad Company.
York and Gumberland Rail (See preceding)- - 3 passengers to each mile 19-34 of a ton for each 20 miles per
road Company.
run.
mile run.
Atlantic and St. Lawrence Included in pro- No return
- - - No return
25 miles per
Railroad Company.
ceding;




hour. 12 miles per hour. None

None

hour. Same as preceding None

None

....do

None

hour. . . . . . d o

. . . . . None

No return

None
None . . . . .

No return No return.
3

hour, 12 miles per hour,
10 miles per hour. None
None
. - None

o
ffl

None .

t2{

None ,
None .

>
a

No return
No retum No return.
None
hour. 15 miles per hour. None
No return

o

w.

No return.

hour. (See preceding)-. None

None .

hour. 12 miles per hour. 1, an em- 3 employes
slightly.
ploy^.

to
Or

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States.
:

'•fcO

NEW HAMPSHIEE,

Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed or, if not, Termini of main road Length of main Length of the Cost of the road
road and of
double track,
when expected to and of branches.
complete, or espany.
branches.
if any.
be.
timated cost if
not completed.
Concord to Wells' riv- 93 miles; no None except sier, yt.
dings.
branches.

$2,862,423 11

Dover and Meredith.. 28^ miles; no None. .branches.
Concord and Nashua. 34^ miles; no 34^ miles
branches.
Concord and Bradford 53 miles; no None . - . - . branches.
Concord and White Main 69^ miles; None except 9 |
miles sidings.
river, Franklin and branch 12|.
Bristol Branch.
None . . . . . . N. H. State line and 10 miles
Peterboro' ahd Shirley Rail- June, 1 8 4 6 . . . . April, 1848.... Mav 1852
Mason Village.
road Company.
Portsmouth and Concord July 1, 1845... April, 1847.... August, 1852 . . . . , - Portsmouth and Con- 4 6 | miles; no None
cord.
branch.
Railroad Company.
.--..
Sullivan Railroad Company July 10, 1846.. August, 1847.. February, 1849 . . . . Wdndsor,Vt., and Wal- Main 24.68 mis; None
pole, N. H., Bellows branch .52 of
Falls Branch.
a mile.
.-..---Nashua and Wilton.:... 15 miles; no None
1847. ,
1851.
Wilton Railroad Company. Dec. 28,1844..
branches.

801,410 15

August, 1846.. J.une 1, 1853...-...Boston,Concord, and Mon- Dec. 1844
treal Railroad Company.
Boston and Maine Railroad See return for
State of MasCompany.
sachusetts.
1851.
1848.
Cochecho Railroad Com- July. 2, 1847...
pany.
September, 1842...
1841.
Concord Railroad Corpora- June 27,1835..
tion.
Merrimac and Connecticut June 24,1848.. August, 1848.. June, 1849
River Railroad Company.
Northern Railroad Com- Dec. 27,1844.. August, 1845.. Mav, 1848
pany.




o
H
O

1,500,000 00
1 2fifi 6R1 .^1

•ffl
l-H

3, 068,400 00

o
214,000 00
1,108,898 89
1,333,212 12
227,000 00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—^New jSampsKre—Continued *
Corporate name of company.

Boston, Concord and Montreal Railioad Company.
Boston and Maine Railroad
Company.
Cochecho Railroad Company.
Concord Railroad Corporation.
Merrimac and Connecticut
River Railroad Company.

Capital stock
paid in.

$1,811,387 45

Aggregate
amount of debt.

Annual receipts. Amount of the Annual rate and
operating examount of inte*
penses, includ- rest paid.
ing repairs.

$850,000 00

$239,743 82

$1,089,743 82

$286,949 83

$163, 378 67

395,000 00

35,660 22

430, 660 22

52,318 86

27,766 09

335,948 88

199,494. 93

6 and 7 per cent.
$75,721 66
O

.

388,992 94
1,500, 000 00
595,587 07

Horthern Railroad Com3,068,400 00
pany.
Peterboro* and Shirley No return
Railroad Company.
535,077 78
Portsmouth and Concord
Railroad Company.
Sullivan Railroad Company.
500,000 00
213,000 00
Wilton Railroad Company.




Amount of
floating debt.

Amount of
bonds issued.

None ever issued. Nothing
359,600 00

355, 400 00

332, 370 04

None

Nothmg
691,970 04

. 355, 400 00

67,700 00

33, 300 00

101,000 00

350, 000 00

292,851 99

642,851 99

854,796 93
14,000 00

24,894 92
None

80,977 35

417,585 97
No return
80,000 00

59,411 68

239,977 22
No return
55,000 00

7 per cent
Nothing

.-

8 and 6 per cent.
interest only
paid on $250,000.
6 per cent, per
anuum.
No return

-

6 per cent

879,691 85
75,246 06
.do........
56,192 42
14,000 00 This road is leased No return
^- No return
o
to Nashua and
Lowei Railroad,
and worked by it.

o
ffl

1^

Bailroad Statistics of the United States-^-New S^ampsMre-^Continued,
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Boston, Concord, and Montreal Railroad Company.
Boston and Maine Railroad
Company.
Cocheco Railroad Company.
Concord Railroad Corporation.
Merrimac and Connecticut
River Railroad Company.
Northern
pany.

Railroad Com-

Dividends.

No. of ipjles run No. of miles ri^n J^o. of through No. of way pas- '^0. of tons of
sengers per the through freight
by passenger by freight trains passengers per
year.
year.
for the year
trains per year. per year.

$123,571 16

On preferred st'ok
6 per cent,

78,356

108,919

15,868

23,196

24,552 77
136,453 95

None...........
6 per cent

42,837
76,401

17,-528
141,693

7,949
150,403

28, 051
65,863

2,698
177,686

29,964

2,987

55,527

149,799

21,565 67

None . . , , ,

16,907

Passenger and fr't
trains together,
33,787.
188,080

6, 310^

5 per cent.; (re83,161
36,163
tained for last
two years to pay
off" debt.)
Peterboro' and Shirley Rail- No r e t u r n . . . , , . . No return. .1
No return
, - . NQ retura
No retiirn
road Company.
Portsmouth and Concord
30, 36^ No return
25,000 00 None
35, 882
,
Railroad Company.
Sullivan Railroad Company.
19, 050 64 None . , . . « . ,
21,000
40,000
31,000
Not deducting interest paid.
Wilton Railroad Company. No return
No return
No return
No return
^o. No r e t u r n . . .




to

177,608 75

No return

1

ffl

^-. No rettjrii...™...

No returi^ ..
16,678
No return

42,098, and 11,235
cords of wood.

No r e t u r n - . - , , . .
35,000

«"
Nfi r e t u r n . . . , , , .

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New Hampshire—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Amount of mile- No. of tons of Average speed
way freight for age of passen- freight carried of passenger
pany.
gers carried dur- during the year, trains.
the year.
ing the year, or or the equiva;
the equivalent lent number of
number of pas- tons of freight
sengers carried carried for one
one mile.
mile.

Average speed of No. of fatal casu- No. of casualties
alties during the not fatal for the
freight trains.
year.
year.

o
Boston, Concord, and Mon6, 371
treal Railroad Company.
Boston and Maine Railroad
Company.
Cochecho Railroad Com9,205
pany.
Concord Railroad Corpora104, 920
tion.
Merrimac and Connecticut
17, 026
River Railroad Company.
Northern Railroad Com36,739
pany.
Peterboro' and Shirley Rail- No return
road Company.
Portsmouth and Concord . - - . d o
Railroad Company.
Sullivan Railroad Company.
2,990 00
Wilton Railroad Company. No return




821,149

4,574,789

2

25 miles per hour. 11 miles per hour. None.

o
617,726 carried 539,911 tons car- 24 miles per
ried one mile.
one mile.
4, 653,164 car- 7,579,989 tons car- 25 miles per
ried one-mile.
ried on6 mile.
771,672 carried 281,732 tons car- 20 miles per
ried for 1 mile.
for one mile.
11,764,001 23 miles per
3,798,466

hour. 12 miles per hour. None.
hour. 12 miles per hour. None. . . . . . .

None.
. None.

hour. No
exclusive None. . . . . . . . . . . None
freight train.
hour. 12 miles per hour. None. - - - -

No return.

No return

No return. . .

.-..do

..-.do

22 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None. . . . . . .

No return

1,085,688 passen- 824, 799 tons car 26 miles per hour. . - . . d o
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.
No return
No return
No return
No return

No return

None
No return

....

ffl

..........
2

No return

O

None - . . . . . . . . . .
1
No return

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States^

to

VEEMONT.

o

Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if
not, wheu expany.
pected to be.

Connecticut and Passump- Nov. 10,1835.. 1846
sic River Railroad Company.

Termini of main road
and of branches.

ox

Leugth main road Length of the Cost of the road
double track, if complete, or estiand of branches.
any.
mated cost if not
completed.

Expected to be White River Junction of 61 miles finished None . . . . . . . . . . .
Oct., 1859.
Northern New Hamp- to St. Johnsbury;
shire and Vermont Cen- to Canada line,
tral, and runs to the Can- 50 miles in proada line.
gress.
Rutland and Burlington Nov. 1,1843.. April, 1 8 4 7 : . . . Dec, 1849 ..... Burlington and Bellows' 120 miles; no None.
Railroad Company.
Falls.
branch.
Rutland and Washington Nov., 1 8 4 7 . . . . Jul^, 1850. . . . . Feb., 1852 . . . . Rutland, Vermont, and 46 miles main, 63 5 miles of siding
Railroad Company.
and branches.
Salem, New York, with miles leased.
lease of Troy and Rutland railroad.
Western Vermont Rail- Nov. 5,1845.. October, 1850 . July 1,1852... Rutland and State line, 54 miles main, 10^ None
--.
road Company.
North Bennington and branch and sidBennington.
ing.
Vermont Central Railroad Oct. 31, 1843.. Soon after the April, 1850..-. Burlington and Windsor, 114^ miles main, None . . . . . . . . . . .
Company.
charter
was
branch into Montpelier. 1^ branch.
granted.
Vermont and Canada Rail- Oct. 31, 1845.. Soon after the Oct. 1850. . . . . Essex and Rouse's Point. 47^ miles
None . . . . . . . . . . .
road Company.
charter
was
granted.
Vermont aud Massachu- Returned
in
setts Railroad Company. Massachusetts
(See railroads in Massa- railroads.
chusetts.)
Vermont Valley Railroad Nov. 8,1848.. April, 1850.... June 23,1851.. Bellows' Falls and Brat- 24 miles
None . . . . . . . . . . .
Company.
tleboro'.



$3, 000,000 00

o
o

6,000,000 00
2,200,000 00
whole line.
1,084,561 63

ffl

>
CL

9, 000,000 00
1,300,000 00

1,301,455 09

td

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—-Verrnont—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Connecticut and Passunap- $1,800,000 00
sic River Railroad Com-;
pany.
Rutland and Burlington
2,233, 376 31
Railroad Company.

Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate am't
issued.
ing debt.
of debt.

None - - - . . . . - -

$800, 000 00

$174,308 21

$98,125 41 6 per cent

3,042,652 24

$1,106,990 33

4,149,642 57

$401,687 24

350,614 15 6 per cent, on floating debt; 7 per
cent, on bonds.
100,000 00 6 per cent

td
'

1,050,000 00

1,150,000 00

331 939 39

700,000 00

Vermont Central Railroad
Company.

5,000,000 00

3,500 000 00

Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad Company.
(See railroads in Massachusetts.)
Vermont Valley Railroad
Company.




1, 300,000 00

Amount of the Annual rate and
operating ex- amount of interpenses, includ- est paid.
ing repairs..

$800,000 00

Rutland and Washington
Railroad Company.
Western Vermont Railroad Company.

Vermont and Canada Railroad Company. .

Annual receipts.

None

None
No return

•

$200, 000 00

1,150,000 00
, No return

$132,512 99

500,000 00

104,233 21 7 per cent, on 1st
mortgage,
of
$400,000.
553, 074 42 7 per cent

4,000,000 00 (Having leased the
Vermont and Canada
Railroad, the returns
subsequently given
are for both roads,)
$765,945 54.
This road is leased to Included in Ver- Included in VerNone . - - - . - - - . Nothing
the Verniont Cen- mont Central. mont Central.
tral, which pays 8
.
per cent, semi-annually to this road.

O

O

ffl
td
>—I

.
513,705 00

793,200 00

None . -. „

$55,000

793,200 00

^

45,000 00 7 per cent, on $679,200; 6 per cent.
$114,000.

Ox

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—Vefmont—Continued.

to
ox

to

Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
through freight
by passenger by freight trains passengers per sengers per year.
for the year.
year.
trains per year. per year.

$76,183 80 For last two years
38, 308
37, 332
Through and way, See preceding . . . Through and way.
27,66G.
62,237.
no dividends paid;
part of earnings
used to pay interest, and $82,000
carried to contingent account.
85,873
115,323
57, 356
No return
146,901
216,610
Rutland and Burlington No return
Railroad Company.
56,277
85,813, in all. See preceding . . .
64, 322
33,098
Rutland and Washington Not returned - . . . No dividends yet
paid.
Railroad Company.
.....
Unknown . . . . . . . Unknown . . . . . . . Unknown
28,279 78 N o n e . . , - 85, 956
44,616
Western Vermont Railroad
Company.
83, 493
161,611
11,037
200,000 00
do
215,551
366,722
Vermont Central Railroad
Company.
Vermont and Canada Rail- Included in Ver- Included in Ver- Included in Ver- Included in Ver- Included in Ver- Included in Ver- Included in Vermont Central.
mont Central.
mont Central.
mont Central.
mont Central.
mont Central.
mont Central.
road Company.
Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad Company.
(See railroads in Massachusetts.)
Vermont Valley Railroad
24,444
11,558
23,484
10,000 00 None . . .
.
32,542
15,685
Company.

Connecticut and Passumpsic River Railroad Company.




^

•

in
td
O
pi

O
ffl
td

O
td

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.—Maine—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

No. of tons of Amount of mileage No. of tons of Average speed of Average speed of N o . of fatal No. of casualway freight of passengers car- freight carried passenger trains.
casualties dufreight trains.
ties not fatal
for the year. ried during the during the year,
ring the year.
for t h e year.
year, or the equi- or the equivavalent number of lent number of
passengers carried tons of freight
carried for one
one mile.
mile.

24 miles per hour.. 10 miles p e r h o u r . . None
Connecticut and Passump- See preceding.. $1,493,688 passen- No return
None
gers for one mile.
sic River Railroad Company.
$6,863, 090 passen- 7, 074,110 tons for 25 miles per hour.. 10 miles per h o u r . . One
14,379
Rutland and Burlington
None
gers one mile.
one mile.
Railroad Company.
including None
Rutland and Washington See preceding.. $1, 355, 641 passen- 1,008,255 tons for per hour, 27|, in- 12 1-5
One
cluding stops, 34 stops, 14 2-5 in
gers for one mile. one mile.
Railroad Company.
in motion,
motion.
Unknown
miles p hour.. 15 miles p e r h o u r . . One
Unknown
W^estern Verniont Railroad Unkown
None
Company.
$6,676,247 passen- 20,481, 354 car- 25 miles per hour. . 12 miles p e r h o u r . . Ten
- . Sixteen
Vermont Central Railroad
113,203
gers carried one ried for one mile.
• Company.
mile.
Vermont and Canada Rail- Included in Ver- Included in Vermont Included in Ver- Included in Vermont ncluded in V e r m o n t Included in Ver- Included in Vermont Central.
Central.
Central.
mont Central. mont C e n t r a l .
road Company.
mont Central.' Central.
Vermont and Massachusetts. Railroad Company.
(See railroads in Massachusetts.)
701, 047 passengers 596,000 tons car- ~>R milpH "nAr h n n r 12 miles p e r hour None . - 1, 359
None
Vermont Valley Railroad
carried for one ried for one mile, including stops. 1 including stops.
Company.
mile.




td

o
H
O
t2|

ffl
td

Cl

td

to
Ox
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the Uniied States.

Ox

MASSACHUSETTS.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed or, if not, Termini of main road Length of main road Length of the Cost of the road
when expected to
pany.
and of branches. double track, complete, or esand branches.
if any.
timated cost if
be.
not completed.
Amherst and Belchertown May, 1851
1851.
None . . . . . . .
Amherst and Palmer. 20 miles
1852.
Railroad Company.
Barre and North Brookfield May 2,1852... Not yet com.
Barre and N. Brook- 16 miles
Railroad Company
field. menced.
1842; heavy rail re- State line on the south 21 miles
Berkshire Railroad Com- April 13, 1837. May, 1844
.
, None except
pany.
turnouts.
and West Stockbridge
laid 1847.
on the north.
Boston, Barre, and Gard- April 26, 1847. Not yet com
South Gardner and 13^ miles.
.....
menced.
ner Railroad Company.
Worcester, and Nao
shua railroad.
Boston and Lowell Railroad June 5 , 1 8 3 0 - June, 1831 ---. June 24, 1835
Boston and Lowell. 26 miles, main; 2 Entire main
Branch.—Winchester miles, branch.
Company.
road double.
and Woburn Centre.
1835,
Boston and Maine Railroad Maine,
1836;
1842.
Boston and South Ber- Main, 74^ miles; 29 miles
Company.
N. Hamp. 1835;
wick. Branches.— Methuen branch 3^;
Medford, Methuen, Medford branch 1^;
Mass. 1833.
and Great Falls.
G. Falls branch 2 | .
1831.
Boston and Providence July 22, 1831..
1835.
Boston and Providence, 43^ miles main, 12 15| miles
R . I . Branches.—Bos- miles branches.
Railroad Company.
ton and Dedham, Pautucket and Attleboro.
Boston and New York Cen- Composed of Norfolk county Not yet completed; Boston and South- 74^ miles main, 7 None
—.
tral Railroad Company.
three compa- railroad, 1847; expect to bej fin- bridge. Branch to miles branch
nies, consoli- Southbridge & ished May, 1847.
Norwich and Wordated Decem- B l a c k s t o n e ,
cester railrpad at
ber 12, 1853. 1852; Midland,
Thompson.
1853.



$296, 000 00

td-

o

250,000 00
- 500,000 00

o

1,000,000 00

ffl
td

2,188,595 25
4,197,878 79

<34.

3,667,134 31

4,000,000 00

^
,

a

Boston and Worcester Railroad Corporation.

183L

1832.

1834.

Cape Cod Railroad Gom- April 8, 1846;September,1846 July 12,1854,
pany.
Extension, May
21, 1851.Cheshire Railroad Compa- Dec. 27, 1844.
1845.
1850.
ny.
January 1,1849..
Connecticut River Railroad March 1,1842; July, 1844.
renewed Feb.'
Company.
1844; extended April, 1846;
extended Jan.
1845.
Dorchester and Milton May, 1846
May, 1847.
December, 1847.
Branch Railroad Company.
1853.
Danvers Railroad Company
1852.
October, 1854 .
Dorchester and Milton Ex- May, 1854
tension Railroad Company

Surveyed and See preceding.
! estimated for.
I but not yet
commenced.
Railroad March 3, 1854. July 10, 1854.. May 16,1855.-

Easton Branch
Company.
The Eastern Railroad Com- April 14,1836 .
pany.

1836.

Dec. 31, 1840..

Boston and Worcester. 44f miles main, 24 441 m i l e s . . .
Branches to Brook miles branches.
line, Newlin, Lower
Falls,
Saxonville,
Milford,
Framingham, and Millsbury.
Middleboro' and Hyan- 46 miles.
None .

4,865,439 03

Bellows Falls & South 54 miles .
None.
Ashburnham.
Springfield and South 50 miles main, 2 None,
Vernon. Brariches.— miles branches.
Chicopee and Chicopee Falls.

3,179,686 76

Neponset Station to 3^ miles
Dorchester and Mil
ton Upper Mills.
North Danvers and 9 miles .
South Reading.
Dochester and Milton
Branch railroad and
Boston and NewYork
Central railroad.
Easton and Stoughton. 4 miles.

1,802,244 76

g
O

None..

136,789 42

^

None .

225,000 00

§

. . . . . . . . . .

None.

Boston & Portsmouth. 60-n7 miles main, 18 miles . . .
Branches.—Salem and 33-1% branches.
Marblehead, Lynn and
Maiden, Salem and
Gloucester, East Salisbury and Amesbury.
Salem and S. Reading.
Fairhaven Branch Railroad May 1,1849... Nov. 15,1852. Nearly completed. New Bedford and Cape 15TV{T miles-.
None.
Company.
Cod Railroad at Tremont Iron Works.
Wareham,




1,049,623 88

—

57,000 00

j ^

g

4,621,736 35

500,000 00
Ox

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Massachusetts—Continued*
Corporate name of Com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed; or if Termini of main road Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
road and branches. double track completed, or
not, when expectand branches.
estimated if not
if any.
ed to be.
completed.

Fitchburg Railroad Com- March 3, 1842. May 20, 1843.. March 5, 1845
pany.

Fitchburg and Worcester April 16, 1846. May, 1848.
Railroad Company.
1847.'
Grand Junction Railroad April 10, 1846.
and Depot Company.

Hampshire and Hampden
Railroad Corporation.

1852.

1853.

Horn Pond Branch Railroad May 7, 1852..
1853.
Company.
1844.
1844.
Lexington and West Cambridge Railroad Corporation.
1846.
1847.
Lowell and Lawrence Railroad Company.
1851.
Nov. 1853 Marlborough Branch Railroad Company.
Midway Branch Kailroad April 30, 1852. May, 1852.
Company.



Ox
C5

Feb., 1850 . .
1855.

July 1,1856.
1855.
1845.
1848.
Nov. 1 8 5 5 . . . . . .
December, 1852.

$3,765,998 19
Boston and Fitchburg. 50i% miles; 16-,%60^^.
Branches.
Water- branches.
town branch, Cambridge and Waltham,
Lancaster and Sterling, South Acton and
Marlboro'.
Sterling junction and 14 miles
None . .
333,884 69
Fitchburg.
5 miles.
563,166 79
East Boston and junc- 9 | miles.
and in addition the
tion with Boston and
sum of 1,288,237
Worcester Railroad
in Brookline, and con
laid out in wharves
nects with all the roads
and warehouses.
leading out of Boston.
None
Northampton and the 24T¥(jmiles .
530,000 00
Connecticut State line
at Southwick.
f of a mile.
f of a mile.
Horn Pond and 10,000 00
Lexington, and the
Fitchburg railroad in 7 m i l e s . . , - . .
Cambridge.
Lowell and Lawrence 12-nn7 miles
Marlboro' Centre and 3-1%- miles
Feltonville.
Medway and North 3-nr miles..-.
Wrentham,

none, except
turnouts.
None

24-2,000 00

None .

140,000 00

None.

37,908 75

363,658 12

td
O
pi

o
g
^
[^
t^^

>

^

a

td
CO

Middleborough and Taunton Railroad Company.
Millbury and Southbridge
Railroad Company.
Nashua and Lowell Railroad Corporation.
^^ New Bedford and Taunton
**^ Railroad Corporation.

Aprii 21,1848. April, 1 8 5 5 . . . . Angust ly 1856

Middleborough
and S-^Vmiieff
Similes...
1 3 0 , 0 0 0 00
Taunton.
1854.
1857.
May, 1856
Millbury and South- 25 miles
Noner
, Not given
o
bridge.
1839.
1837. •
June, 1 8 3 5 - . .
Nashua, N. H., and 15 miles
14 miles
600,000 00
Lowell, Mass.
F e b . 6, 1 8 3 9 . . . Julyl, 1840..-,..„» New Bedford
April 13, 1838 .
and 20T^,% miles; branch None- - . - - . .
553,245 44
Taunton. Branch.— 1^ miles.
Weir Village and
Acushnet.
Newburyport
Railroad
Danvers and Newbury- 27 m i l e s . . . . . . . . . None.
592,623 00
Company.
port.
1855.
• 1855.
Boston and New York RailIn some two or three Brookline, 4 miles from 32 miles
None.
Not given
road Company, (in Masyears.
Boston, and ultimately
sachusetts. )
ends at Middletown,
/
Conn.
Norwich and Worcester May, 1 8 3 2 . . . . .
March, 1840 . „ . - . . Norwich and Worces- 60 miles tnain;
1835.
None.
2,598,403 47
Railroad Company.
ter. Branch.—Nor- miles branch.
wich and Allyn's
Point.
Old Colony and Fall River March 25,1854. Sep. 10,1854.. Old Colony and Fall Boston and Plymouth 7 9 | miles; 7 | miles 11^-miles . . .
3,300,000 00
Railroad Company.
River united Sept. and Fall River.
branch.
10,1854; had then
been constructed
nme years.
1846o
Peterboro' and Shirley May 22, 1 8 4 5 . .
Groton Junction and 14 miles.
265. 000 00
None."
1850.
Railroad Company.
State Line of N. H.
pittsfield and North Adams March 3 , 1 8 4 2 August, 1845 . . November, 1846. . . Pittsfield and North
443,677 68
None. .
Railroad Company.
Adams.
^outh Sliore Railroad Com- March 26,1846. July, 1847
1850.
Old Colony Railroad 11^ miles.
500,569 26
None.
pany.
junction at North
Braintree and Cohasset.
Salem and Lowell Railrpad
1850.
1848.
1848.
South Danvers and 16xWu miles..
374, 065 79
None .
Company.
Tewksbury junction,
(Saugus Branch Railroad
Saugus and Lynn. - . . 8n) niiles.. . . .
184,452 97
None .
Conipany.
South
Reading Branch
Reading and 8i\?j) miles....
. . . . . . . o . ^ o o
o o o . . . South
293,683 65
None .
Danvers.




Q

CJ

ffl
td

td

bD
Ox

Bailroad Statistics qf the United States—Massachusetts—Continued.

to

Ox
00
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
pany.

South Shore Railroad Com
pany.
Stockbridge and Pittsfield
Railroad Company.
Stoneham Branch Railroad
Company.

1848.

1849.

•

ly 15, 1851.. March, 1852..

Stony Brook Railroad Com March 26,1845. June 1,1847...
pany.
Stoughton Branch Railroad March 16, 1844. July, 1844
Company.
Taunton Branch Railroad AprU 7,1835.. Aug. 27,1835..
Company.
Troy and Greenfield Rail- May 10,1858.. January, 1849..
road Company.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
when expected to
and of branches.
road and branches double track, completed, or esbe.
if any.
timated, if not
completed.
Braintree and Cohas- lli% miles.-,
set.
1849.
Pittsfield and Van Du 21xHn) nailes.
zenville.
Not completed,. and Somerville and Stone- 7^ miles
uncertain when it ham.
will be.
Julyl, 1848
Groton and Chelms 13(io'omle
ford.
Stoughton and Canton 4 ^ miles..April, 1845.
junction of Boston and
Providence Railroad.
Taunton and Mans- 111^ miles.,
July, 1836 .
field.
Not yet completed— Deerfield and Vermont 42 miles
estimated in 1862. State line.

^500,569^6

None .

448,700 00

None.

Estimated,
$120,000.

None.

266,782 20

§

None .

9 3 , 4 3 3 29

H
ffl
bd

None.

307,136 29

^

3 , 8 8 0 , 0 0 0 00

^

Double track
through Hoosac tunnel 4^
miles.
Main road, Fitchburg, Main road 69 miles, None
Mass., and Brattle- branch 8 miles.
boro', Vt.—Groat's
corner, Mass., and
Greenfield, branch.

1845.
April 15, 1849.
Vermont and Massachu- Main road, Mar.
15, 1844.
setts Railroad Company.
Greenfield Br'h,
May H, 1848.
Vermont portion, Oct. 31,
1843.
Western Railroad Corpo- State of Mass., Sept. 12,1842.. «ept. 12,1842. . . . Worcester, Mass., and 156 miles.
East Albany, N. Y.
Mar. 15,1833.
ration.
State of N. Y.,
May 5,1836.



None .

44 miles.,

S
O
p^
H

a
3,458,222 56

10,495,504 96

^

West Stockbridge
road Corporation.

Eail- April 5,1836-^
West Stockbridge and 2 | miles
1838.
1839.
* . . - . None. . . . . . .
revived Jan'ry
New York State line,
in Canaan.
27, 1838.
Williamstown and Hancock AprU 21,1852.. Not yet com- Cannot be estimated. It is part of projected 13 m i l e s . . . « « . « . . . . None 6 . - « - . .
menced.
road connectmg New
Railroad Company.
York city and Montreal—south terminus
New York State Hne,
north terminus Vermont and Massachusetts line.
Worcester and Nashua June, 1 8 4 5 . . . . D e c , 1846.'.-. Dec. 18,1848
Worcester, Massachu- 4 5 ^ miles
« . . . 1 ^ miles
Railroad Company.
setts, and Nashua,
New Hampshire.




•H*r «,w,A.*a.&x^ V I W 3 ' Vi/RJ \f.^M.LA%Al\J\J\JL»

42,000 00
500,000 00

1,351,271 21

td
O
pi
O

ffl

tei

td
«2

to
Or

liailroad Statistics of the United States—^ibssac/mse^^s—Continued,
o
Corporate nam,e of company.

Amherst and Belchertown
Railroad Company.
Barre and North Brookfield
Railroad Company.
Berkshire Railroad Company.
Boston, Barre, and Gardner Railroad Compaay.
Boston and Lowell Railroad
Company.
Boston and Maine Railroad
Company.
Boston and ProvidjCnce
. Railroad Company.
Boston and New York Central Railroad Company.
Boston and Worcester Railroad Corporation.
Cape Cod Railroad Company.
Cheshire Railroad Company.
Connecticut River Railroad
Company.
Dorchester and Milton
Branch Railroad Company.



Capital stock Amotint of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount
paid in.
of debt.
issued.
ing debt.

$194,050 21

-

$85,500 00

$4,564 87

600,000 00 None - 0 - . . . - . . - . N o n e . , .

1,830,000 00

145,500 00

4,076,974 52

180,135 00

$90,064 87

Nothing

Aimual receipts.

$27,415 47

Amount of operat- Annual rate and
ing expenses, in- amount of intercluding repairs. est paid.
$20,658 11 6 p e r c e n t . . .

Leased to the Housa- Expense borne by Nrt
tonic Railroad Com- the company leaspany, for $42,000.
ing the road..

o

intPTPRt

pi
©

325,635 00

489,754 85

^ 366,120 07 6 per c e n t . . . . . . .

150,000 00 Nothing.

150,000 00

854,425 00

524, 366 44 5 per c e n t . . . . . . .

3,160,000 00

183,000 00

176,131 76

359,131 76

558,671 25

363,186 08 6 per c e n t . . .

2,238,700 00

1,200,000 00

1,285,762 15

4,500,000 00

500,000 00

35,913 25

681,689 94

• 180,000 00

100,597 51

280,597 51

119,221 03
380,221 01

70,609 73 6.03 per cent. . . .
$16,916 13.
236,656 31 61 per cent..-o.o

286,562 55.

153,445 67 6 per cent

Road not yet in operation,
535,913 25
1,008,004 90

2,085,925 Co

769,500 00

129, 813 30

899, .313 30

1,591,110 00

235,000 00

38,240 75

273,240 75

73,340 00

30,000 00

6,000 00

ffl
td

o
603,542 89 6 per cent

«,

36,000 00 Rented and worked by See preceding . . . 6 per cent.-.oaao
the Old Colony and
Fall River Railroad,
for $7,530 per annum.

Danvers Rail-road Oompany

69,000 00

125,000 00

Dorchester and Milton Ex.
tension Railroad Company
49, 000 00 None .
Easton Branch Railroad
Company.
$1 835,000
The Eastern Railroad Com 2,853,400 00
And $500,000 debt
pany.
to State.
224,457 48
Fairhaven Branch Railroad
Company.
Fitchburg Railroad Com- 3,540, 000 00
pany.
237,220 70
Fitchburg and Worcester
Railroad Compauy.
779,791 6Q
Grand Junction. Railroad
and Depot Company.
292,000 00
Hampshire and Hampden
Railroad Corporation.
10,000 00
Horn Pond Branch Railroad
Company.
242,_0i)iLO0_
Lexington and West Cambridge Railroad Corporation.
200,000 00
Lowell and Lawrence Railroad Company.
. 56,466 00
Marlborough Branch Rail
road Company.

Midway Branch
Company.

Railroad




31,000 00

156,000 00 Rented and worked by|See preceding . . . 6 per cent.
Boston and Maine railroad, for $16,232 21.

6,061 95

6,061 95

5,586 35

2,931 01

424, 386 33

2,759,386 33

691,256 07

366,490 95

None . . . . . . . . -

197,795 44

197,795 44

60, 318 26

40,940 29

6.13 per cent, on
floating debt, 6
per ct. on $1,085000, 5 per cent,
on $1,150,000.
6 per cent

Nothing

153,700 00.

153,700 00

681,162 52

467, 324 71

....do...........

pi

61,200

15,066 07

76,266 07

39,597 00

19,403 88

-do...---...-

©

853, 000

362,839 29

1,115,839 29

63,263 54

19,345 76

200,000

235,000 00

None . . . - o o o.

35,000 00
About.
None

Nothing-

Nothing-.-.,—... [Nothing-.

[None
-..-.

100,000

40,000 00

140, 000 00

35,600

9,952 85

78,849 00

6,783 67

6,783 57

32,500 00 None.

\6 per cent.

7 i per cent

Only been inoperation See preceding . . . See preceding . . .
since July 1, 1856.
2,060 00
1,000 00
None
^22^000-00-60,234 71

td

o

>^
ffl
td

Worked—by—ano- Nothing .-v-^o--«-ither company on
contract.
28,272 62
6 per cent^

Road leased to and run Not known at pre- . . d o . - . .
by Fitchburg Rail- sent.
road Company for
half the gross receipts.
Operated by the Bos [See preceding. . . 6 per cent.
ton and N. Y. Central
Company.

to.

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Massachusetts-^Gontimied.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount
of debt.
ing debt.
issued.
paidin.

Middleborough and Taun- $111,100
ton Railroad Company.
300,000
Millbury and Southbridge
Railroad Company.
600,000
Nashua and Lowell Railroad
Corporation.
500,000
New Bedford and Taunton
Railroad Corporation.
218,950
Newburyport Railroad Company.
223,176
Boston and New York Railroad Company, (in Mas
sachusetts.
Norwich and Worcester 2,122, 300
Railroad Company.
Old Colony and Fall River 3, 015,000
Railroad Company.
265,000
Peterboro' and Shirley Railroad Company.
Pittsfield and North Adams
Railroad Company.
South Shore Railroad Company.
Salem and Lowell Railroad
Company.



00 None

$13,237 80

$13,237 60

00 None

Nothing

Nothing

00 None

None

None. ---

00 None

Annual receipt.

Amount of the Annual rates and
operating expen- amount of interses, including re- est paid.
pairs.

Opened for traffic on Not yet known... Not yet known...
July 7, 1856.
Road not yet opened.. Road not yet open- Road not yet opened.
ed.
$113,251 91
$163,340 26
None.

22,500 00

22,500 00

169,781 44

130,418 71

6 per cent..

02

$137,200 00

220,677 16

357,877 16

50,875 91

35,093 00

6^ per cent.

02

650,000 00

27,853 89

677,853 89

15,985 58

11,180 00

7 per cent..

00

622,800 00

174,721 26

807,824 26

310,113 00

180,319 40

00

276,700 00

276,700 00

653,499 32

377,133 62

Nothing

00 $40,000 by the N. $2,600 by N.H, Leased and work Lessees pay 7 pr. cent. No return
ed by the Fitchbranch.
H. branch.
burg Railroad Co,
29,230 80
None
.
54,842 39
450,000 G None.
O
None
259,685 00

184,470 00

5,184 42

189,654 42

65, 310 28

243, 305 00

81,500 00

60,757 62

142,257 62

m , 883 80

48,923 60

5i% per cent.$44,560 73.
6 per cent
6 per c e n t . . . . . .
None - - . - .
per bent.

This road is ope- iM^o per cent.
rated by the Lowell and Lawrence
E. R. Qoinpaay.

td
O
pi
©

ffl
teJ

Saugus Branch Railroadj
Company.
South Reading Branch Rail
road Company.
South Shore Railroad Company.
Stockbridge and Pittsfield!
Railroad Company.

126,550 00 !None .
209,532 73

.do.

259,685 00

184,470 00

448,700 00 None.

None .

None
84,150 82
5,184 42
None .

13,632 50

8,791 69 None . . . . .

84,150 32 This road is leased andlNo return
No retura.
worked by the East'n|
Railroad Company.
• 189, 654 42
65,310 28
48,923 60 6 per cent.
Nothing

Rented to, and worked I (See preceding.) None o
by the Housatonic
Railroad Company forj
7 per cent, on cost.
Nothing

.do.
.do.
Stoneham Branch Railroad| 100,000 00
.do.
Company.
.do.
267,300 00
Stony Brook Railroad Com
.do.
42,271 06
28,459 85 None .
-do.
pany.
-do85,400 00
.do.
33,554 27
Stoughton Branch Railroad|
25,160 38
do
-do.
Company.
.do.
84,022 69
.-..do.
Taunton Branch Railroad| 250, 000 00
58,808 12
....do
do...
Company.
No retum
- - - . No r e t u r n . . .
125,000 00
Troy and Greenfield Rail
57,000 00 No retum
6 per cent..
No retum
road Company.
Vermont and Massachusetts! 2,232,540 87
268,726 08
76,770 02
956,900 00
181,412 87 6 per cent., ($63,1,033,670 02
Railroad Company.
419 15 paid.)
Western Railroad Corpora- 5,150,000 00
1,869,673 05
5, 824,520 00
1,236,659 74 5i per ct., ($297,141,900 00
5,966,420 00
-tion
-860-48-paidr)
West Stockbridge Railroad|
1,800 00 Leased andworkec None
None .
None .
39,600 00 None .
Corporation.
by two companies,
who repair, &c.,
and pay 4^ pr. ct.
Williamstown and Hancock None
-do.
.do.
..do...
None .
Railroad Company.
201,143 19
.Worcester and Nashua Rail- 1,141,000 00
116,902 35 6 per cent., ($12,1,143 19
204,780 28
200,000 00
road Company.
:
118 02 p a i d )




pi
O
pi
©
ffl
td

o
td
Cfi

to
00

Bailroad Statistics of the United S.tateS'----Massachusetts—(3onimnedo
Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

$6,747 36 None
........
Amherst and Belchertown
Railroad Company.
Barre and North Brookfield
Railroad Company.
42,000 00 7 per cent., paid
Berkshire Railroad Comquarterly.
pany.
Boston, Barre, and Gardner Railroad Company.
123,634 78 6 per cent
Boston and Lowell R.R. Co.
Boston and Maine Railroad Av'ge 9 per cent. 6 per cont
for last 4 years.
Company.
195,435 17 6 per cont
Boston aud Providence
Railroad Company.
Boston and NewYork Central Railroad Company.
391,261 39 6^ per c e n t . . . . . .
Boston and Worcester Railroad Corporation.
48,611 30 None; profits apCape Cod Railroad Complied to reduce
pany.
the debts.
. 143,564 70 2 per cent
Cheshire Railroad Co
85,204 08 8 per • cent, on
Connecticut River Railroad
$307,500, an4 4
Company.
per. cent, on
$1,283,600.
7,530 00 None; the profits
Dorchester and Milton
being applied
Branch Railroad Comto extinguishing
pany.
the debt.



i

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
by
passenger by freight trains passengers per sengers peryear. through freight.
year.
trams per year. per year.
10,500

21,840 Included in preceding.
. . . . . .

. . . o

16,000

11,022

pi

. . . . . .

13,200 Same as preceding.

29, 811 in all.

45,407 in all. Included in preceding.

O
pi
©

157,668
398,142

250,721
134,224
127,867 1, 886,522 in all.

106,363
See preceding.

271,280
310,503 in all.

205, 346

104,347

1,202,790 in all.

See preceding.

213,908 in all.

349,791

187,243

283,584

1,306,874

237, 094

86,576

22,576

ffl

. . . o - o

80,754
95,140

124,758 in all. Included in preceding.

218,742
69,778

32,043
9,201

66,678
280,186

.

o

3.2,933 in all.
•

73,639
16,575

\
11,524 No return

No return

No return

-- Noreturn

.,

Danvers Railroad Company
Dorchester and Milton Extensio n Railroad Comp any
Easton Branch Railroad
Company.
The Eastern Railroad Company.

16,232 21 N o n e . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,655 24
324,765 12

20,000
2,744

5 per cent
No dividend since
1854—formerly 8
per cent.
None
....

276^, 079

6, 000 No retum
2,744

19, 377 97
39,870
Fairhaven Branch Railroad
Company.
213,837 81 Nonethe astyear
Fitchburg Railroad Com222,186
193,680
Average for 11
pany.
years, 6.86 per
cent.
26,172
20,402 88 4^ per cent
Fitchburg and Worcester
9,437
Railroad Company.
43, 917 78 None
Grand Junction Railroad
. . . . . . None; the road ex6,260
and Depot Company.
clusively used for
freight.
Hampshire and Hampden
Railroad Corporation.
1,000 00 6 per cent
Horn Pond Branch Railroad
None . .
. . . . . Not returned
Company.
Lexington and West Cam15, 000 00 5 | per cent
26,100
10,400
^bri^ge 'Railroad'Corpor a^
tion.
21,062 09
Lowell and Lawrence Railroad Company.
Marlborough Branch Rail- No return
road Conipany.
Mil way Branch Railroad
$2,330 97
Company.
Middleborough and Taunton Railroad Company.
Millbury and Southbridge
Railroad Company.
Nashua and Lowell Rail. 50,088 35
road Corporation.



4 per cent
None

.31,418

3,026

None

7,108

65,600

1,085,600

20,192

22, 838

50,868

8, 968

1, 049,757
See preceding...
449,804
Through and way.
Through and way.
48,940 .

No return

None

None

None

. . . . . . . . . . None

23, 898
J8,677
Througli and v.a^.

pi
td

o
pi

©

ffl
......

Being leased by No return
-another—rail ro ad
company, no returns.
12,355
78,950

15 000
No retum

26,597
Through and way.

td
Cfi

«... No return

None . . . . . . . . . . .

7 per cent

18,638

47,677
And by other
trains, 36,795
9,360

No return

. . . No return

6,739

2,246

51,598

65,450

Not known . . . . . .

1.29,054

3,500

47,706

184,457

to
Ox

Bailroad Statistics'of the United States-^Massachusetts—Continued.

^
Oi
C^

Corporate name of Company.

Net annual profits.

Dividends.

$39,362 73 6 p e r c e n t , M.--.New Bedford and Taunton
Railroad Corporation.
15,782 91 None . . . . . . . . . . .
Newburyport
Railroad
Company.
4,805 58 N o n e . . . . . . . . . . .
Boston and New York Railroad Company, (in Massachusetts.)
129,793 60 2^ percent
Norwich and Worcester
Railroad Company,
276.365 70 6 per cent
Old Colony and Fall River
Railroad Company.
Peterboro' and Shirley 7 per cent on cost 7 percent
of road.
Railroad Company.
Pittsfield and North Adams
Railroad Company.

25,611 59

6 per cent

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
sengers per
through freight
by passenger by freight trains passengers per
per year.
year.
year.
trains per year. per year.
50,120

13,146

63,584

12,480

through
127,555 way and See preceding . . . 41,334
and way.
through.
110, 036 in aU . . . See preceding . . . 17,529 m a n . . . .

20,552

768

106,975 in a l l . . - See preceding . . . 10,928 in aU . . . .

134,566

260, 993

289,274

118,733

17,528
31,510

24,106
16,387 68 None . . . . . . . . . . .
South Shore Railroad Company.
49,153
Salem and Lowell Railroad None. . . . . . . . . . . None. . . . . . . . . ; . .
Company.
$3,840 81
No retura
19,200
Saugus Branch Railroad
Company.
None. . . . . . . . . . .
25, 032
South Reading Branch Rail- No return
road Company.
16,386 68
South Shore Railroad Comdo
24,166
pany.
7 per oent
No retura
Stockbridge and Pittsfield . 31,409 00
Railroad Company.



25, 000

37,768

153,7^

n
©

1,194,190 in all-. See precedmg . . . 147, 824

Connected with No r e t u r n . . . . - - the passe ger
train.
Connected
with 57,744 in aU . . . . See preceding . . . 29, 514 in all
the passenger
train.
123,429
15,411 4,279 mall
Attached to the
passenger trains.
105,526 a l l . . . . Included in prece- 61,197 in all
16,252
ding.
do
No return
204,382 in all
No return.5,616

pi
td

46,533mall

......do.--

Attached to pas- 138,840 in a U . . . . .
..do
senger trains.
No return
No return
No return

7,487 in all
. . . . . 4,279 in all
No return

ffl
td

a
td
Cfi

Stoneham Branch Railroad
Company.
16,026
Stony Brook Railroad Company.
8,403
Stoughton Branch Railroad
Company.
25,194
Taunton Branch Railroad
Company.
Troy and Greenfield Rail- No retura
road Company.
Vermont and Massachusetts
87,313
Railroad Company.
633,013
Western Railroad Corporation.
West Stockbridge Railroad ^ per cent
Corporation.
Williamstown ahd Hancock
Railroad Company.
Worcester and Nashua Rail87,877
road Company.




00

6 percent

31,986

89

8 per cent

4,992
28,468

57

No return

No return
None. . . i . . . . . . . .

31

7 per cent
=

49,590

72,456
645,856

5,544

58,951

5,120

23,884

None. . . . . . . . . . .
Attached to pas21,990
80,266
senger trains.
9,570
161,785 in a l l . . . . Included in prece- 45,754 in aU
ding.
No return
No return
No return
No return

333,845

21

4^ per cent

10,642

119,481 way and Included in prece- 69,871 way and
through.
through.
dmg.
88,647
60,067
533, 310
12,429

Attached to passenger trakis.

None. . . . . . . . . . .

55,784

pi
©
©

93

5^ per cent

94,635

69,515

197,062 way and Included in prece- 78,880 way and
through.
through.
ding.

ffl
td
»d
=

__

>

a

td

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Massachusetts—Continued.

to
GO

Corporate name of company.

No. of tons of
way freight
per year.

Mileage of passengers
carried during the
year, or the equivalent number of passengers carried one
mile.

Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed bf No. of fatal No. of casfreight trains.
casualties ualties not
ried during the year, passenger trains.
for
the fatal for
or the equivalent
year.
the year.
number of tons carried one mile.

Amherst and Belchertown
495
296,988 passengers car- 252,970 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. Same as preceding. None
which includes this
Railroad Company.
ried one mile.
mile.
Barre and North Brookfield
Railroad Company.
Berkshire Railroad Com- Included in pre- 811,413 passengers car- ,229,411 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour .. None
pany.
ceding.
ried one mile.
mile.
.
Boston, Barre, and Gardner
Railroad Company.
-.-.--...-.
2
Boston and LowellRailroad
37,174
8,316,556 passengers car- 6,969,502 tons carried 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour . .
Company.
ried one*mile.
one mile.
10
Boston and Maine Railroad See preceding. 27,756,780 passengers 8,313,909 tons carried Accomm'n trains i l miles per hour . .
23 miles per hour;
Company.
carried one mile.
one mile.
express trains 34
miles per hour.
4
Boston and Providence . . . . d o
15,933,252 passengers 6,667,964 tons carried 26 miles per hour. 14 miles per hour . .
Railroad Company.
carried one mile.
one mile.
Boston and New York Central Railroad Company.
5
Boston and Worcester Rail91,712
25,736, 826 passengers 12, 066,959 tons carried 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour . .
road Corporation.
carried one milo.
one mile.
Cape Cod Railroad Com- Included in pre- 2,208,894 passengers car- 380,057 tons carried one 21^ miles per hour. 14 miles per hour . . N o n e . . . . .
pany.
ceding.
ried one mile.
mile.
Cheshire Railroad Com3,477,672 passengers car- 6,675,407 tons carried 25 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour . .
2
63,727
pany.
ried one mile.
one mile.
Connecticut River Railroad
106,639
3,990,422 passengers car- 2,468, 347 tons carried . o - . . . d o . o - . . . . . . .
3
do
Company.
ried one mile.
one mile.



pi
td

^

None

©•
pi
H
©

None

3

ffl
td

3

>

o
None

td
CQ

6
2
None
1

Dorchester and Milton No return.
Branch Railroad Company.
.do.
Danvers Railroad Company.
Dorchester and Milton Exiewsiow Railroad Company,
Easton Branch Railroad None.
Company.

No retura.

No return

.do.

.do.

21 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour . . None.

None .

25 miles per hour,

None .

do

None .

74,552 passengers car- 28,432 tons of freight 30 miles per hour. Attached to passen- None.
carried one mile.
ried one mile.
ger trains, 30 miles
per hour.
82,678
19,879,184 passengers 2^927,890 tons carried 22 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour... Four..
The Eastern Railroad Company.
oue mile.
carried one mile.
2,860
Fairhaven Branch Railroad
746,275 passengers car- 160, 048 tons carried one 28 miles per hour. 18 miles per hour... O n e . . .
Company.
mile.
ried one mile."
Fitchburg Railroad Com- See preceding.. 14,732,156 passengers 10,156, 909 tons carried 24 miles per hour. 12^ miles per hour.. Seven
one mile.
carried one mile.
pany.
Fitchburg and Worcester No r e t u r n . . . . 491,529 passengers car- 285,558 tons carried one 22 miles per hour. 10^ miles per hour.. O n e . . ,
mile.
ried one mile.
Railroad Company.
130,739 tons carried one None
Grand Junction Railroad See preceding.. None
11 miles per hour... One .o,
mile."
and Depot Company.
25 miles per hour, 12 miles per hour... None.
Hampshire and Hampden
Railroad Corporation.
9,375 tons carried ono None
Horu Pond Branch Railroad None
12 miles per hour... None .
None
mile.
Company.
No return
Lexington and West Cam- No retum..
18 miles per hour, 12 miles per hour... O n e . .
No return.
'bridge.Railroad Corporation.
passeugers 217, 462 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour... Four
Lowell and Lawrence Rail- See preceding. 1,216, 663
carried one mile.
mile.
road Company.
Marlborough Branch Railroad Company.
No retum.
Midway Branch Railway Not k n o w n . . . No return.
No return.
No return.
None. .Company.
Middleborough and Taunton Railroad Company.
Millbury and Southbridge
Railroad Company.
2,142,725 passengers car- 3,002,398 tons carried 25 miles per hour .12 miles per hour..
46,277
Nashua and Lowell Rail
road Corporation.
ried one mile.
one mile.




None.
Three.
Noue .
Two.

td
©
'pi

None .
©

None .
None .
None .

ffl
td

None.
None .

o.
td

None.

None.
CD

Bailroad Statistics of the United Staies—Massachusetts—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons way Mileage of passengers
freight
per carried during the year,
pany.
year.
or the equivalent number of passengers carried one mile.

to
o

Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casufreight trains.
casualties alties not
ried during the year, or passenger trains.
for
the fatal for
the equivalent number
year.
year.
of tons carried one
mile.

New Bedford and Taunton See preceding 2,184,384 passengers car- 559,105 tons carried one 27 miles per hour. 16 miles per hour . .
Railroad Corporation.
mile.
ried one mile.
Newburyport Railroad Com- . . . . d o
1,146,352 passengers car- 262,945 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. Attached to passen-^None.
pany.
ger trains.
mile.
ried one mile.
Boston and New York Rail
do
None .
582,967 passengers car- 67,998 tons carried one 20 miles per hour.
road Company, (in Masmile.
ried one mile.
sachusetts.)
33,186
Norwich and Worcester
miles per hour..
3,663,983 passengers car- 3,235,483 tons carried one 25 miles per hour.
Railroad Company.
mile.
ried one mile.
Old Colony and Fall River See preceding 17,013,717
passengers 4,904,349tons carried one 22 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour..
Railroad Company.
mile.
carried one mile.
Peterboro' and
Shirley
Railroad Company.
Pittsfield and North Adams See preceding. 1,003,527 passengers car- 465,755 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. Connected with pas None......
Railroad Company.
senger trains.
ried one mile.
mile.
South Shore RaUroad Corn- . . - . d o
893,185 passengers car- 21,194.55 tons carried 19 miles per hour, Attached to passen None
ger trains.
ried one mile.
one mile.
pany.
Salem and Lowell Railroad Included in pre- 907,612 passengers car 1,156,755 tons carried 25 miles per hour 12 miles per hour .. None
ceding.
ried one mile.
one mile.
Company.
None
20 miles per hour. No return
Saugus Branch Railroad No retum . . - 409,744 passengers car- No return
ried one mile.
Company.
South Reading Branch Rail Included in pre 316,969 passengers car- 30,313 tons carried one 21 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour . . N o n e . . . : .
ceding.
ried one mile.
mile.
^
road Company.
. 893,185 passengers car- 20,794 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. Attached to passen- No return.
South Shore Railroad com- . . . . d o
ried one mile.
mile.
ger train.
pany.
No retura.
No return
No return
No return
No r e t u m . . - . .
Stockbridge and PittsfieldJNo return,
Railroad Company.



pi
None.

td

None.

©
pi

None .

©

ffl
td
i2j

None
None
None
None
None
No returaNo return-

O
td

Stoneham Branch Redlroad
^ . . • . . . • • • . . . « . . . • •...
Company.
027 832,923 passengers car- 327,548 tons carried one 28 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour . . None
Stony Brook Railroad Company.
ried one mile.
mile.
Stoughton Branch Railroad None
236,155 passengers car- 47,496 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. Same as precedmg . None - - . - Company.
ried one mile.
mile.
Taunton Branch Railroad Included in pre- 1,717,424 passengers car- 483,867 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 14 miles per hour . .
1
Company.
cedmg.
ried one mile.
mile.
Troy and Greenfield Rail- No r e t u r a . . . . . No r e t u r n L . . . . - . . . . . . . No return
No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . No retura
. . . . . . . No return..
road company.
1
Vermont and Massachusetts Included in pre- 2,304,972 passengers car- 2,025,529 tons carried 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour . .
Railroad Company.
ceding.
ried one mile.
one mile.
4
Westera Railroad Corpora309,402 29,012,447 passengers 35,541,725 tons carried Express trains, 37 15 mDes per h o u r . .
miles an hour;
tion.
carried one mile.
one mile.
accommodation
trains, 25 miles
per hour.
West Stockbridge Railroad None . . o . . . . . . No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . No r e t u r a . . . . . . . o . - - . . No r e t u r n . . . . . . . No r e t u r a . . . . . . . No Tfitnrn
Corporation.
Williamstown and Hancock
Railroad Company.
1
Worcester and Nashua Rail- Included in pre- 3,272,068 passengers car- 2,171,724 tons carried 23 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour . .
road Company.
ceding.
ried one mile.
one mile.




None

.

None
None.....

None . . . . .
1

pi
td
©
pi
©

Nrt "TAtn rn

ffl
None

td

a

td

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
KHODE
Corporate name of company.

toto

ISLA:^D.

Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if Termini of main road Length of main road Length of the Cost of the road
double track, if complete, or estiand branches.
not, when exand of branches.
any.
pected to be.
mated cost if not
completed.
•

April, 1846....
Providence and Worcester May, 1844
Railroad Company.
1848
Hartford, Providence, and
Fishkill Railroad Com- 1847......
pany. .
New York, Providence- and
August, 1832 .Boston Railroad Com- June, 1 8 3 2 . . . .
pany.
Providence, Warren, and
October, 1853..
Bristol Railroad Com- October, 1850-.
pany.




pi
td

October, 1847.. Providence, R. I., and 43i miles
Worcester, Mass.
October, 1854.. Providence, R. I., and 122.365 miles
Waterbury, Conn.

6^ miles.

$1,806,696 37

5 miles.

4,060,868 95

©

November, 1837 Providence and Ston- 50 miles
ington.

None

2,158,000 00

©

1856--

None . .

-----

ffl

Providence and Bristol 13.610 miles

400,000 00

0
i2j

a

td
m

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Bhode Island—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of floatissued.
ing debt.
pany.

s^regate amount
of debt.

Annual receipts.

00

Providence and Worcester
Railroad Company.
Hanford, Providence, and
Fishkill Railroad Company.
Nevv York, Providence, and
Boston Railroad Company.
Providence, Warren, and
Bristol Raih-oad Company.




$1,510,200 00

$300,000 00

$38,461 00

$338,461 00

$311,429 82

2, 008,110 00

1,952,730 00

545,935 76

2,498,665 76

258,685 60

1, 508,000 00

446,700 00 None

446,700 00

250,627 92

Amount of operat- Annual rate and
ing expenses, in- amount of including repairs. terest paid.
$199,902 76 7 per cent
$26,529 76 paid.
139,074 12 Not returned . .
146,741 11 6 | per cent.--.

pi
td
©
pi
©

276,600 00

100,000 00

125,500 00

125,500 00 Road opened for travel No retura
July 12, 1855, and
these results are from
July 12,1855, to Nov.
30,1855, $14,233.

6 per cent.

ffl

5^

>
O
td
5»

to
CO

Jiailvoad Statistics qftjie United StateB-r^Bhode Js/!anc?^===rContinued,

Corporate name of company. .

Net annual promts.

$111,527
Providence and Worcester
Railroad Company.
119,611
Jlartford, Providepce and
Fishkill Railroad Com^
pany.
103,846
Hew Yorl^, Providence ai^d
Boston Railroad Company.
Providence, Warren and Not been in
Bristol Railroad Com- tion.
pany.




Dividends.

to

No. of miles run by No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
passenger train 8 per by freight trains passengers per sengers per year. through freight
year,
yea?.
per year.
per year.

06,

6 per c e n t . . . . . . .

113,666

82,168

48

No retuvn

164,^22

49,248

2g,497

516,848

51,511
Pi-

8^

2J per cent-^..-.

9B,900

62,600

No r e t u r n - . * , - . . No r e t u r n , . , - - - . No r e t u r n . , - , .
85,911

©
pi

No return-.»»-.. No r e t u r a , , , , O'

opera- None n a a d e . , , , - . 8,705 from July 12, No retura- ---- 3 6 , 1 2 0 i n a l l . . . . . Included in pre^ 757 in a l l . , , , , to November 30,
ceding.
1855.

ffl'

^.

O'

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United-States—Bhodelsland—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Amount of mileage of No. of tons of freight car- Average speed ofpas- Average speed of
way freight for passengers carried dur- ried during the year, or
freight trains.
senger trains.
pany.
the year.
ing the year, or the the equivalent number
equivalent number of of tons of freight carried
passengers carried one one mile,
mile.

No. of fatal No. of casucasualti e s alties not
during the fatal for
year.
the year.

Providence and Worcester
%1,440
5,977,721 passengers car- 3,488,743 tons carried 25 miles per hour . . 12 miles per hour. Three -- — One
Railroad Company.
ried one mile.
one mile.
Hartford, Providence and No return
None
6,109,636 passengers car- 2,349,264 tons carried Express 29.2 miles 8. 6 miles per hour Two
Fishkill Railroad Comried one mile.
per hour; accomone mile.
pany.
modation 25.1.
New York, Providence and No return
Six
No r e t u r n . . - .
No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 miles per hour . . 25 miles per hour. Vvio
Boston Railroad Company.
Providence, Warren and Included in pre- 333,831 passengers car- 8, 327 tons carried as in 32 miles per h o u r . . No return . . . . . . . None —^ -. None.
Bristol Railroad Com- ceding.
ried one mile from July preceding.
pany.
12, to Nov. 30, 1856.




pi
y^

O

ffl
td

>^
H-t

Cl

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

to

CONNECTICUT,
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
pany.

Completed; or if not^
when expected to be.

Termini of main road
and branches.

Length of the Length of Cost of the road
main road and the double completed, or
track, if estimated
if
branches.
any.
not completed.

Danbury and Norwalk.. •23i^- miles . . . . . . None . . . . .
Danbury and Norwalk Rail- 18-^5- rpphar- Sept., 1850.... March, 1852
tered in 1850.
road Company.
March, 1836. . . New Haven to Hartford, New Haven, Conn., to 61^ miles main; 55 miles...
Hartford and Ne^ Haven May, 1833
1839; Hartford to Springfield,
Mass. 9 | miles branch.
Railroad Company.
Springfield, 1844.
Branch. — Berlin to
Middletown.
1842.
Bridgeport and Canaan, 73.90 miles main; None
Housatonic Railroad Com- May, 1836.--.. July, 1837
main road. Branches.— 46 mis. branches.
pany.
W. Stockbridge and
State Line; W. Stockbridge and Canaan;
Pittsfield and Van Dusenville.
Snmmftrofl848 Fall of 1849
Winsted and Bridgeport 62 miles,
None . . . . .
May, 1845
Naugatuck Railroad Co
New Haven and New
Aprill, 1851 . . July 1, 1852
May, 1848
50 miles
. . . . None
London.
don Railroad Company.
New Haven and Granby,
January, 1848
1846.
New Haven and Northamp- June, 1846
main. Farmington to 46.35 miles main; None
ton Railroad Company.
TariflTville, branch..
8.81 mis. branch.
August, 1848 -. September, 1 8 5 0 . . . - - . . New London ani Palmer.
New London, Willimantic, May, 1847
None
65 miles.
and Palmer Railroad Corporation.
Spring of 1853. Not yet completed; un- New Haven and Boston.
New York and Boston Rail- May, 1846
o
133 m i l e s . . - , . . , . None
certain when it will be.
road Corporation.
New York and New Haven JunelO, 1844.. May 1,1847... First track April 1,1849; New Haven and junction
second track April 1, with the Harlem Rail- 62.30 miles
56.30 miles
Railroad Company.
road at Bronx river.
1853.



$376,126 11
3, 062,577 55

pi
td

©
pi
©

2,431,773 00

ffl
td

1,500,000 00
1,500,000 00
1,422,500 00
1,600,000 00
8,000, 000 00
5,070,979 73

Bailroad Statistics ^ the United States—Oonnecticut—Continued,
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rates and
tive expenses, in- amount of interofdebt.
issued,
ing debt.
in.
pany.
cluding repairs.
est paid.
Danbury and Norwalk Rail
road Company.
Hartfort .and New Haven
Railroad Company.
Housatonic Railroad Company.
Naugatuck Railroad Company.
New Haven and New London Railroad Company.
New Haven and Northainpton Railroad Company.
New London, Willimantic,
and Palmer Railroad Corporation.
New York and Boston Railroad Corporation.
New York and New Haven
Railroad Company.




$279,050 00

$77,000 00

$93,600 00

$57,274 19

$34,245 52 7 per cent

944,000 00

$16,000 00

730,794 67

383,191 44 6 per cent., $56,- . K
198 02 paid.
td
g
162,666 52 7 per cent
pi
124,503 92 7 per cent. ..<•....
©
57,000 00 7 per cent. . .
^

2, 350,000 00

944,000 00 None

2, 000, 000 00

300,000 00

114,240 72

414,240 72

339,196 50

1,031,800 00

472,550 00

51,694 60

524,244 60

220,459 66

750,000 00

100,000 00

738,538 00

750,000 00 None

922,500 00

500,000 00 None

509,200 00

1,052,000 00

, 530,568 74 None
2,992,450 00

2,215,000 00

148,680 12

None
21,672 47

1,073,672 47

165,929 35

165,929 35

73,010 06

2,288,010 06

71,767 14 7 per cent

124,043 69

57,712 75 6J^ per cent

15,781 13 No return
958,274 99

. . . 6 per cent., $10,U O paid.
O
619,397 14 6.2 per cent, average, $139,429 41
paid.

y
td
_
>
^
w
c«

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States-^Connecticut-^Goniixi^XQ^,

OD
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
passengers per gers per year.
through freight
by passenger by freight trains
per year.
year.
trains per year. per year.

Danbury and Norwalk Railroad Company.
Hartford and New Haven
Railroad Company.
Housatonic Railroad Company.
Naugatuck Railroad Company.
New Haven and New London Railroad Company.
New Haven and Northampton Railroad Company.

$23,028 35

5 percent

31,748

18,803

22,107

55,523

347,603 23

5 per cent

217,510

95,000

126,629

421,034

New London, W^illimantic,
and Palmer Railroad Cor-

66,630 94

t^
y^

176,529 98

None

91,751

95,955 74

None last y e a r . . .

75,674

43,000 00

None

95,000

76,912 98

5 per c e n t . . - , , . .

60,162

New York and Boston Rail- No return
road Company:
338,87X85,
New York and. New Haven
Railroad Company.




17,457 way and
through.
70,8ao

•

N o n e . . - - - - . BO--

86,763

.-

20,088

do-.-.

None, owing to the
Schuyler over-issue of stock, now
in suit.

387,793

99,753

No return

No r e t u r n . . - - - - . No return..

169,536 way and Included in prece- 69,751 way and
ding.
through.
through.
117,276
Attached to pas- No return...
No r e t u r n - . - - - - .
senger trains.
Road being oper6,403
29,597
ated by N. York
and New' Haven
90,012
Railroad Compa.ny—noreturn,
100,670 through
No return
34,356
and way.
^
No return
8,942.98-way and
49, 342
1,504
.do
through.
60,381
89,301
267,020
0 78.5,852
57,150

o
Pi

H

©

H
ffl
td

»^

Mi^H^^^iiWa

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—-^Connecticut—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons Ol jMileage of passengers
way freight per carried during theyear;
pany.
year.
or the equivalent number of tons carried for
one inile.

Mileage of freight car- Average
ried during the year;
of passenger
trains.
or the equivalent number of tons carried for
one mile.

Average speed of No. of fatal
freight trains^
casualties
for
the
year.

No. of casualties not
fatal foi*
the year.

None
Danbury and Norwalk Rail- Included in pre- 865,024 passengers car- 285,029 tons carried one 19 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. None»
ceding.
ried one mile.
road Company.
mile.
109,865 No retura. . . . . . o
Hartford and- New Haven
|7,248, Oil tons carried] Express 34 miles 19 miles per hour,
No return.
per hour; ac- without stops.
Railroad Company.
one mile.
comniodation 25
miles per hour.
4,378,316 passengers car- |4,980,795 tons carried 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour . .
Housatonic Railroad Com-| No return
3
2
ried orie mile./
pany.
one mile.
Naugatuck Railroad Com Included in pre- |2,787,d32 passengers car- No retura.
.do.do.
...--.
3
2"
ceding.
ried one mUe.
pany.
Noreturn
New Haven and New Lou No return
«««•
m « - • <• a a V • « • Attached to pas^sen- None.
.... do...,
None, .-o' don Railroad Company.
ger trains.
.do.
New Haven and Northamp.do.
19 miles per hour. 11^ miles per hour.
None. . . . .
....do...1
ton Railroad .Company.
.do.
.do.
New London, Willimantic
25 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour . .
....do....
1 . iNone. - . - and Palmer Railroad Corporation.- -None. ..«o
New York and Boston Rail Included in pre.do.
|59,620 tons carried one 20 miles per hour, 20 miles per hour . . None
road Company.
ceding.
mile.
New York and New Haven
20,261 39,912,575.60 passengers 4, 394,989 tons of freight|26 miles per hour. 12 rniles per hour . .
4
.
5
Railroad Company.
carried one mile.
carried one mile.




\A\J

©

ipi

o
ffl
id
;»5d

M
,o
td

to
to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

to

N E W YORK,
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany. .

Cpnamenced.

Completed; or, if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
when expected to
and branches.
main road and double track, completed ; or
be.
estimated, if
if any.
branches.
not completed.
pi
M

Albany Northern Rail- Articles of associaroad Company.
tion filed April
25, 1850.

1852.

1855.

Albany and Eagle— 31 miles, main ; 1 mile
$2,010,634
Bridge—main rail- 1 mile, branch.
road branch to
West Troy.
Albany and Susquehan- April 19, 1 8 5 1 . . . . August 1 8 5 3 . . . Not completed, and Albany and Bing- 140 miles
, None - . - - - 5,000,000
na Railroad Company.
uncertain when it hamton
will be
^Albany and West Stockbridge Railroad Company.
Attica and Allegheny
1853.
1852.
Not completed, nor Attica and Olean
Estimated
73 m i l e s . - - - - - - None
Valley Railroad Comexpected to be
1,000,000
pany.
soon.
Blossburg and Corning Articles of associa1839.
1840.
495,000
Corning, to the State 14.811 miles--- 1.66 miles
Railroad Company.
tion filed May
line of Pennsylva19, 1854.
nia.
Black River and Utica Not giveuu
Not given
974,322
January 1, 1855--.1 Utica and Trenton.. 16 miles
1.44 miles
Railroad Company.
No return
Buffalo and New York No return
No return - - . . _ _ - - Buffalo and Hornells- 91 miles
5.50 including 3,401,868
City Railroad Compa^ ville.
sidings.
ny.
Buffalo and Allegheny May 30, 1 8 5 3 . . . . August 1, 1853. Not completed, nor Buffalo and Arcade. . 30 miles
Estimated
None
Yalley Railroad Com550,000
is it known when
pany.
it wUl be.




64

00

»^

©
pi

©

>^
fflW
at
00
00
69.
16
at
00

BB

BB

Bufialo, Corning, and Organized July 23, March 1851
New York Railroad 1850.
Company..

Not completed; fin- Buffalo and Corning. 134.28 miles-.- None . . - Estimated
at
ished, and in ope3,319,096 57
ration from Corning to Batavia, 100
miles.
Buffalo and Pittsburg Organized October November 1853. Expected to be finish- Buffalo and Pennsyl- 75 miles - - None
Estimated
at
13, 1852.
ed in from two to vania State line at
Railroad Company.
2,000,000 00
tbree years.
Tunangwaut.
2,494,364 15
None
Buffolo and State Line Organized June 6, No r e t u r n . .
February 22, 1852.. Buffalo and west line 69 miles
Railroad Company.
1849.
of town of Ripley.
Brooklyn City Railroad Dec. 16, 1853
ApriU854
The four principal 3fain.—Fulton Ferry 30.04 miles, in No return - - , - . No estimate givroads are comple- and Green Point; aU: 17.16m's
en.
Company.
ted ;
uncertain Fulton Ferry and lai^d.
when the remain- Bedford; Fulton
'
der will be.
Ferry and Myrtle
street; Fulton Ferry and Greenwood
'
Cemetery.
Branches. -Greenwood
Cemetery and Bay
Ridge, Kent, and
corner Flushing3,495,832 08
Canandaigua and Niaga1852.
Canandaigua
and 9 8 j ? n i l ^ s - , , - - . None , .
1852.
July 1, 1853
ra Falls Railroad ComSuspension Bridge.
pany.
July 1, 1850--. September 15, 1851. Canandaigua and El- 69 miles
1845.
Canandaigua and Elmira
None
$1,725,796 69
Railroad Company.
mira.
Cayuga and Susquehanna AprU 18, 1843.-1848.
December 18, 1849. Owego and Ithaca-- 34. 61 miles----^ 3. 49) including 1,187,562 61
- Railroad Corapany.
sidings.
490,000 00
1848.
Chemung Railroad com- April 7, 1 8 4 7 . . . November 1849
Head of Seneca Lake 1 7 J m i l e s . . . < - . None...
and Erie railroad in
pany.
town of Horsehead.
None...,
^-.. No return
-^'
Corning and Olean Rail- No return
1854.
Not completed nor Corning and Olean.. 84 miles
road Company.
expected to be soon.
•

X

•

•

©
pi
©

ffl
t^

•

<*This road is a part of the Western Railroad, built and operated by the Western, and its cost and the details of its operations are included in the
Eeport of the Western Railroad Conipany. (See Massachusetts table.)




pi

to
00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New Yorh—Continued.
Corporate-name of company.

Date of charter.

Commenced.

a
to

Completed, or if Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Costof the road
double track, completed, or
main
road
not, when expectand branches.
estimated,
if
if any.
and branches
ed to be.
.not completed.

Erie and New York City March 15, 1852.. May, 1 8 5 3 . - - - - Expected to be com- New York and Erie 80. 8 7 m i l e s . . . . None
Railroad junction at
pleted in 1857.
Railroad Cpmpany.
Cattaraugus co. ,and
^Erie, Penn.
^Eighth Avenue Railroad No return
Company.

^ No return

... Transferred to the Main—Barclay street 4.36 miles,main; 3.64
present, company in and 59th street. 0.20, branch.
Branch—W. Broad;1855.
way to Broadway.

Flushing Railroad Com- February 24, 1852 May, 1 8 5 3 . . . . . June 24, 1854.
pany.
Harlem River and High October 20, 1853..
Bridge Railroad Company.

1853.

Not completed

J

Flushing and Hunt- 7.80 miles
None..
er's Point,, opposite
New York city.
Junction of Harlem 12 miles, main ; None
and East rivers to 3 miles, branch
Yonkers,
main;
Kingsbridge
to
Spuytendevil br' ch.
None,.'
Hudson & Chatham. 17. miles.

changed
1854.
1854.
Hudson and. Boston Rail- Name
from .Hudson and
road Company.
Berkshire, 1854.
October 1, 1847. October 3, 1 8 5 1 . - . . ^ew York city and 144 miles
Hudson River Railroad May 12, 1846
Easf Albany, oppoCompany.
*
site Albany.
- •

Estimated cost
of portion in
N. Y. State,
being 63 miles,
$1,540,000 00
Cost of road and
value of real estate,
801,924 00

©
H

ffl
t^

Estimated
300,000 00

525

a
175,000 00
12,737,898 03

* This company having refused to answer the interrogatories, the statistics are derived from the report to the railroad commissioners of the State
. of New York.
.
•
^



©
pi

310,962 84

•

111 miles.

pi
t^

jExpected to finish to |Chatham 4 Corners, 53J miles.
None.,
[Estimated, exLebanon Springs by to Bennington, Vt.
clusive
of
Jan. 1, 1857, and
equipment, ,at
to Bennington, Ver^
2,335,000 00
mont, by Jan .1,1859
26 miles opened in Brooklyn and Green- 95 miles, main 2 J miles
3,003,986 .00
Long Island Railroad AprU 24, 1834.-.
1835.
1837 ; completed to port, main; Hemp- 6J miles, br.
, Company.
Greenport in 1844, stead, branch ;. andl
and Syosset Branch Syosset,. branch.
1854.
None .
Bridge 13.15 miles
Not completed; im- Suspension
Niagara Falls and Lake
[Estimated
at
1853.
1853.
,possible ,to -say ^and Youngstown.
430,000 00
Ontario. Railroad Coniwhen it will be.
..pany.
!
Albany and Buffalo,
Miles. |A11 the main line 28,523,913 30
New York Central Rail- [Consolidation of See preceding. ISee preceding.'
Branches. ^ T r o y and|Mainr'.d,..297.75 from Albany,.to
the several roadsl
. road ^Company.
Schenectady ; Syra Br: road, 258.13 Syracuse, and
composing this
about half-way
cuse and Rochester;
road. Apr. 2,'53
Batavia and Attica; In an.-555.88 between Syracuse and BuffaRochester and Suslo; being2,2 2.25
pension Bridge; Romiles.
chester and Charlotte;, Lockport and
Tonawanda'; Bufalo
and Lewiston.
Lebanon Springs Railroad March 24, 1852.
Company.

New York and Erie Rail- April 24, 1832 .
road Company.

New York and Harlein April 25, 1831 . . .
Railroad Company.




IJune 1, 1853.

Nov., 1835.

1832.

Piermont to Goshen. Main.—Piermont and Main, 446 miles. 165JmilesSept. 1., 1,841.; Pier- Dunkirk. Branch.r- Branch, 18|.'*
mont to Bingham- Chester and New'
ton, ..Dec.,. 1.848; .bury
Piermont to Elmira.
Oct. ,^ ^-1849;- -Pier.
mont to Hornellsville, Sept., 1850;
Pierrhont to Dankirk, May, 1851,
^ 1852. •
Mzm.--New Yoi'k and|M'n 130.75miles 32,5 milesChatham. Branch. Bran., 2.125 '
Morrisania and Port|
<Moi:ris. ..

.5C

•fc

o

H
©

'ffl
t^
t2j

;>'
33,742,317 11

i2j
Cl

;^

10,000,000 00

.a
Oi

Bailroo id Statistics (of the United Stolies—New York--Continued.

g
• ^

Corporate name of company.

« New York and New Haven Railroad Comany.
Northern Railroad Com• pany.

Date of charter.

Commenced.

Completed, or if Termini of main Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
not, when expected road and branches. main road and double track, completed, or^
tobe.
branches.
if any.
estimated, if
not completed.

--- 3fain. —Rouse' s Poin t Main, 118 miles.
and
Ogdensburg. Branch, 3.75 "
Branch.- Champlain
& Champlain Landing.
Oswego and Syra- 35.17 miles
Sept., 6,1846-. Oct. 16, 1848
Oswego and Syracuse Not returned
0
cuse.
Railroad Company.
Troy and OswegO--. 160 miles
Oswego and Troy Rail- AprU 8, 1 8 5 4 . . . - Not commenced Not known when
road Company.
1847.

Dec, 1848

Oct., 1850

17f miles, (in- $5,470,714 33
clud'g sidings.)

©
pi
©

None - None

723,,683 71
Estimated
at
5,000,000 00

Potsdam and Watertown Organized January Sept., 1 8 5 2 . - . . During the year 1856 Watertown and Pots- 75} miles
None
Estimated
dam.
Railroad Company.
1852.
1,500,000
Troy and Ballston . . 25 miles
Rensselaer and Saratoga AprU 14, 1832 . - 1834.
1835.
None - - . - - . - .
896,423
Railroad Company.
1852.
Rochester and Genesee July 2, 1851
Completed to Avon, Rochester and Port- 49. 75, miles of None
$1,000,000
Valley Railroad ComAugust, 1863, resi- age.
which are finpany.
due not completed.
ished
18.45
miles.
Pierrepont Manor and 18 miles
1849.
Sackett's Harbor and El1850.
1852.
None
350,000
Sackett" s Harbor.
lisburg Railroad Company.
Sackett's Harbor and Sa- AprU 10, 1 8 4 8 . . - .
1854.
None.
Expected to be com- Saratoga and Sac- 182 miles
6,000,000
kett's Harbor.
ratoga Railroad Completed in 1859.
pany.
1832.
Schenectady and Sa- 22 miles-Saratoga and Schenec- February 16, 1831.
None.-1832.
480,020
toga Springs.
tady Railroad Company.



1^
t^

's

at
00
57
00

00
00
60

ffl

Saratoga and Whitehall Organized under Commenced
December, 1848.its present name Saratoga and
Railroad Company.
Washington R.
June 8, 1855.
R. Co. 1847.

Saratoga Springs and Main, 41.2 Smiles 4. 50 miles
No return
Whitehall,
main Branch,6.62
branch from Whitehall to Castleton,
Vt.
Peck Slip and 122d 8 miles
Second Avenue Railroad December 18, 1852 J u l y , 1 8 5 3 - . .
8 miles
1854.
1,000,000 00
street, N. Y. City.
Company.
Sixth Avenue Railroad September 6, 1851. AprU, 1852-. Completed to 45th Corner of Church and 3. 75 m i l e s - . . 3. 75 miles.
785,735 74
Company, in the city
street; to be carried Barclay steets, or
of New York.
to the Central park the South and the
Parkas soon as the ave Central
nue is graded.
branch from West
Broadway to Broadway through Canal
street.
Sodus Point and South- March 10, 1852.-. November, 1852 Not completed, and Sodus Bay, and junc- 34 miles
None .
500,000 00
ern Railroad Company.
tion of Canandaigua
work suspended.
and Elmira railroad,
3 miles west of Geneva.
2,274,394 33
Syracuse and Bingham- Organized 1850... September, 1852 October, 1864
None .
Syracuse and Bing- 80 miles
ton Railroad Company.
hamton.
Troy and Bennington
248,515 00
June, 1851
Junction of the Troy 5. 38 m i l e s . . . None .
1851.
August, 1852,
Railroad Company.
and Boston railroad
in Hoosac to the
State line.
51,109,826 07
Troy and Boston Rail- No return
No return
Troy & Hoosick FaUs 27. 23 miles-- 3.23 miles
No return
road Company.
294,731 43
Organized&com- June, 1845 .-,
Troy and GreenbusH Rail- May 14, 1845.
None
Adams st. in Troy, & 6 miles
road Company.
Albany and West
menced 1844.
Stockbridge rail
road in Greenbush,
731,432 64
East end of bridge Main 8, 615 feet, Whole length of
Troy Union Railroad Co, July 21, 1 8 6 1 - . . . January, 1863.. March, 1864.
across the Hudson branches 2,000 road.
river, and intersec- feet.
tion with Troy and
Greenbush R. R.
^ For statistics of this road, see the railroads in Connecticut, where this road is fully reported, it lying principally ih tha;t State.




pi
©
©

^

Ui
t>d

bO
00

Bailroad Statistics of the United. States—New York—Continued.

to
00

Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length, of the Cost of the road
when expected to
and branches.
main road and double track, completed, or
estimated, if
be.
branches.
if any.
not completed.

*Troy and Rutland Railroad Company.
fThird Avenue Railroad No return
No return
No return.
Corner of "Broadway 5 J miles
Company, of- the city
and Ann street, &
' of New York.
Harlem.
Utica and Binghamton June 17, 1 8 5 3 . - . . December, 1853 Not completed, all Utica and Bingham- 91 miles
Railroad Company.
operations since ton.
surveying, being!
. suspended.
Watertown and Rome April 17, 1832 ; re- November, 1848 June, 1852..
Cape Vincent and 97 miles.
Railroad Company.
vived May 14,
Rome.
1845.

. - - $1,170,000 00

5f miles

Estimated
1,000,000 00

None

©
©

None -

;

2,068,,063 20

"This road is leased and operated by the Rutland and Washington Railroad Company, and its statistics are included in the return of that company
See R. &W. R. R., Stateof Vermont.' '
.
•.
f The officers of the road having neglected to answer any interrogatories, the statistics, so far as laid down, are made up from the report to the railroad commissioners of the State of New York.




pi
t^;

ffl
t^-

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—-New York—Continued,
Corpo^te hahie of company.

Capital-stock
paid in.

Albany Northern Railroad $464,882 97
Cpmpany.
Albany and Susquehanna
251,157 18
Railroad Company.
Albany and West Stockbridge Railroad Company.
^Attica & Allegany Valley No retum
Railroad Compa.ny. .
Blossburg and Corning' Rail250,000 00
road Company.. .
Black River and Utica Rail643,330 31
road Company.
Buff'alp and' New York City
798,439 30
Railroad Company.
-j-Buftalo &" Allegany Valley
16,000 00
Railroad Company.
Buffalo, Corning and New 1,487,874,67
York Railroad Company.
t Buffalo & Pittsburg Rail100,000 00
road Company.
Buffalo and State Line Rail- 1,300,000 00
road-Company.
902,660 00
Brooklyn City Railroad
Company.

Aggregate
Annual receipts.
Amount of bonds Amount of floatamount ofdebt.
ing debt.
issued.

No return

$1,360,000 00 No return
None - ,

$9,000 00

-

$117,716 64

Amount of opera- Annual rates, and
ting expenses, in- amount of intercluding repairs.
est paid.
$107,812-49 None..

.:_--

$9,000 00 Not in operation. _ Not in operation. - 7 per cent.

td

o

'««-

pi
:

400,000 00

•

^'

•

O

220,000 00 Nothing - - 132,000 00

185,859 85

317,859 85

26,261 84

$6. 52 per cent
-($14,350paid.)
12,401 76 7 per cent

1,720,000 00

867,849 14

2,587,849 14

288,392 56

256,496 65 No r e t u r n s . , - — -

S; 000 00

S; 000 00

24,783 09

1,499,783 09

172,476 21

106,143 03 7per cent

1,000,000 00

679,750 63

323,987 34 7 per cent

.»-

322,116 90

253,176 47 None -

-_«

None .

-

-. -

1,475,000 00
None

38,000 00 No returns.

None

- - , - - None

o
td
m

*^'Company failed, and the fi-anchises of the road and real estate sold under foreclosure of mortgage % Thomas J. Powers, of New York, May, 1856.
6
t T h e amount of $16, 300 has been expended for graduation and masonry; Further operations suspended for the present.
X Construction progressing rapidly ; a portion expected to be completed and worked in June next.




H
ffl
t^
5^

None

1,000,000 00 None
None - - - - - - -

220,000 00

bO
bo

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—New York—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Canandaigua and Niagara $1,315,000 00
Falls Railroad Company.

Amount of bonds
Amount of
Aggregate
Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rates, and
ting expenses, in- amount of interissued.
floating debt. amount of debt.
cluding repairs.
est paid.
$2,170,000 00

$109,864 47 $2,279,854 47

Canandaigua and Elmira
Railroad Company.
Cayuga and Susquehanna
Kailroad Comj)any.
S^ Chemung Railroad Com'
pany.
t Corning and Olean Railroad Company.
% Erie and New York City
Railroad Company.
Eighth Avenue Railroad
Company.

809,111 32

800,000 00

122,393 31

687,000 00

500,000 00

6, 686 49

Flushing
pany.

133,131 99

Railroad

Com-

380,000 00

70,000 00 None -

8,500 00 None
236,639 74




--

$88,162 92

$69,834 77 6. 54 per cent

(July, August and (For same period.)
Sept. 1865.)
140,583 01 7 per cent. ($61,174,089 31
922,393 31
407 paid.)
66,706 75 7 per cent. ($37,606,686 49
135,433 38
711 44 paid.)
70,000 00

10,000 0 0 .
13,000 00

762,600 0.0 No return

12,610 89
No return
39,866 63

211,000 00

§ Harlem River and High
Bridge Railroad Company.
Hudson and Boston Railroad Company.

00
OD

.-*

None

216,683 82,
for 132,592 37, for 9 No returns
9 months only, months only.
1865.
39,763 72 38,902 60. (This On bonds, 7 per
260,866 63
floating
includes - the cost cent. ;
of running steam- debt, lOpercent.;
boat from Hun- $16,589 80 paid.
ter's Point to Fulton street. New
York City, four
milea.)

No return

None

©

ffl
td

25,610 89

30,000 00
175,000 00 None
None

td
©
pi

44,873 46

. 34,647 61

525
Cl

Hudson River Railroad 3,758,466 59
Company. -,
101,900 00
II Lebanon Springs Railroad
Company.

8,842,000 00

408,362 84

9,250,362 84

74,600 00

10,000 00

84, 600 0.0

^ L o n g Island Railroad Com- 1,875,148 28
638,533 01
30,416
pany. .
Niagara Falls and Lake
200,000 00
188,620 00
30,290
Ontario Railroad Com
. pany.
New York Central Railroad 24,164,860 69 14,462,742 32, in- None - - Company.
cluding 8,894,500
issued to stockholders to equalize
values of
stocks.)
New York and Erie Rail 10,023,958 84
24,891,000 00 1,211,768
road Company.
New York and Harlem | 5,717,100 00
3,853,304 71
440,664
Railroad Company.
New York and New Haven |
Railroad Company.
Northern Railroad Com- 1,611,527 22
4,173,900 00
230,374
pany.
Oswego and Syracuse Rail393,512 50
196,500 00
20,181
road Company.
<j[Oswego and Troy Railroad|
23,100 00
Company.

50

668,949 51

00

1,869,804 74

230,290 00
14,462,742 32

301,799 19

6,563,681 14

1,184,705 85 None

-- —-

6per cent, on funded debt, $581,092 5 0 ; 7 per
cent, on floating
debt, $30,761 40.
185,331 32 6 per cent. ($35,036 56 paid.)
7 per cent
.
3,401,455 65 6.228 per cent.,
($839,928 10
paid.)

td
©
pi

©

64 26,102,768 64

5,488,993 37

26

4,293,968 97

1,040,393 24

32

4,406,874 32

501,517 96

67

216,681 67

126,540 16

2,861,875, "21 6 | per cent. ($1, 793,698 29 paid.)
694,470 05 7 percent. ($307,641 62 paid.)

ffl
td

384,398 68 7 per cent. (106,963 10 paid.)
55,364 36 7 per cent

^ Leased to the Canandaigua and Elmira Railroad Company and statistics of all kinds embraced in the return of that road, and included in this
^
table under that head.
••No part of the road completed or in operation.
% No part yet in operation.
§ No part of the road complete or in operation.
|] Road not yet completed, and no part in operation.
^ Road not yet commenced, but expected goon to be in progress.
»




CD

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New Jorfc—Continued.

Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Potsdam and Watertown!
Railroad Company.Rensselaer and Saratogal
Railroad Company.

$467,200 00

Rochester and Genesee Val-|
ley Railroad Company.
-Sackett's Harbor and Ellisburg Railroad Company.
^'^Sackett' s Harbor and Saratoga Railroad Company.
Saratoga and Schenectady!
Railroad Company,
-[-Saratoga and Whitehall
Railroad Company.
Second Avenue Railroad|
Company.
Sixth Avenue Railroad in
the city of N. York.
JSodus Point and Southern|
Railroad Company.
Syracuse and Binghamton!
Railroad Company.



CO

o

Aggregate
Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rates, and
Amount of bonds Amount of float
ting expenses, in- amount of interamount of debt,
ing debt.
issued.
cluding repairs.
est paid.

$241,600 00

$52,689 53

7 per cent-

$294,189 53

564,270 00

150,000 00

26,118 58

140,000 00 !$245,000, including receipts ofl
Saratoga & Schenectady railroadl
leased by this|
road.
$42,048 52
176,118 58

175,000 00

250,000 00

66,800 00

306,800 00

264,000 00

400,000 00

29,974 50

>120,000,
(both||7 percent. ($9,800
roads,). as in all paid.)
subsequent returns.

429,974 50

140,000 00 None - -

610,000 00

500,000 00

395,000 00 None

426,000 00

190,000 00

None

750,000 00 None .
31,585 76 None
768,369 56

310,000 00

-

1,375,350 00

500,000 00

$4,450 00, beingl
mortgage on|
real estate.
1,860 00
1,850 00

228,034 97

1,603,384 97

hj
©
pi

©

$19,256 43 j7 per cent10,500 00 7 per cent.

ffl
td
M

104,000 00 Leased to the Rens Embraced in the 7
selaer Railroad report of Rensse- '
Co. for $30,160 laer and Sarato-j
ga Railroad Co. I
per annum.
49,822 63 7
395,000 00
71,909 70

104,000 00 None

300,000 00

10 600 00

pi

per cent.; debt
reduced about
$6,000 per annum.
per cent

210,000 00

119,000 00 7 per cent-

236,809 70

181,264 14 |7 per cent-

159,489 91

125,002 11 7 per cent-

>
"A
Cl
td
TJX

^OBl

mam
Troy and Bennington Railroad Company.

75,150 00

168,000 00

6,075 00

•
Troy and Boston Railroad
Company.
Troy and Greenbush Railroad Company.
Troy Union Railroad Company.

439,492 88
276,000 00 None
3,000 00

Troy and Rutland Railroad
Company.
Third Avenue Railroad Co., 1,170,000 OO
of the city of New York.
§Utica and Binghamton
Railroad Company.

497,000 00

236,079 18
. None

707,000 00

17,344 85

174,075 00 Leased to the Ti*oy See preceding
6 and 7 per cent-«
and Boston R. R.
Co. for $15,800
per annum.
101,178 94 7 per cent
166,363 00
733,079 19
Nothing

86,023 46

724,344 86 A sum sufficient to
pay all expenses
of operating, including repairs,
and also the interest on debt,
collected by tolls
from the companies using the
road.

9,506 24

6 per cent.,
($42, 690 paid.)
pi
©
pi
©
1

40,000 00 Nothing

40,000 00

292,475 80

16,500 00

Watertown and Rome Rail- 1,371,263 29
road Company.

81,664 61 Nothincr.

217,838 50 7 p e r c e n t

ffl
td

\
545,00000

265,979 03

800,979 03

401,043 66

231,899 33

7 per cent.,
$61,838 23 paid.

o

'"' Road not yet completed. No part yet in operation.
^,
.
_
^
•f The remainder of this road's statistics only embrace the period from June 8 to September 30, 1856.
j No part of this road is yet in operation. Further work suspended for the present.
§ No part of the road completed or in operation at this time.




to
CO

to
CO
to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New York—Continued.
Corporate name of company. Net annual profit.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No of tons of
sengers per thr'gh freight
by fre't trains passengers per
. by
passenger
year.
per year.
year.
per year.
trains per year.

106,667
18,525
$9,904 15 None
Albany Northern Railroad
Company.
Albany and Susquehanna No return, not being inoperation.
Railroad Company.
Albany and West Stockbridge
Railroad Company.
Attica and Allegheny Valley
Railroad Company.
12,600
6 per cent
9,390
Blossburg and Corning Rail- Not returned
road Company.
969
19,398
13,860 08 None
Black River and Utica Railroad Company.
76,894
237,328
31,995 91 No return
Buffalo and New York City
Railroad Company.
Buffalo and Allegheny Valley
Railroad Company.
61,668
113,892
Buffalo, Corning, and New
66,333 18 None . . .
York Railroad Compiany.
Buffalo and Pittsburg Railroad
Company.
161,309
204,642
356,773 19 5 per cent., (semiBuffalo and State Line Railannually.)
road Company.
1,691,462 None
68,941 43 3 per c e n t . .
Brooklyn City Railroad Company. •
T
N'one
1 33-, 487, (July, Au- 13,214,(forsame
Canandaigua and Niagara S o return
gust, and Sep- period.)
Falls Railroad Company.
tember, 1855.
92,032
52,058
Canandaigua and Elmira Rail33, 506^" 30 Sfo return
road Company.



• 1

242,151,way and Included in preceding.
through.

32,133
Pi
td

o
14,282

. 2,660

.

114,177

60,616, way and Included in pre- 7,403, way.and
through.
ceding.
through.
138,589,wayand Included in pre- 62,162, way and
through.
ceding.
through.

©

ffl
t25

932

164,773

26,048,610

o
td

177,663

147,868

162,764

6,324,569, way & Included in pre- N o n e - .
ceding.
through.
8,931,- (same pe- 20,475, (same pe- 948, (same period.)
riod. )
riod.)
34,299

108,782

17,485

^BBB
Cayuga and Susquehanna
68,726 63
Railroad Company.
Chemung Railroad Company.
Corning and Olean Railroad
Company.
Erie and New York City Railroad Company.
Eighth Avenue Railroad Com82,991 45
pany.
(For 9 months.)
Flushing Railroad Company. None
Harlem River and High Bridge
Railroad Company.
Hudson and Boston Railroad
10,225 75
Company.
Hudson River Railroad Com685,098 89
pany.

Lebanon Springs Railroad
Company.
Long Island Railroad Company.
*^'Niagara Falls and Lake Ontario Railroad Company.
New York Central Railroad
Company.
New York and Erie Railroad
Company.
New York and Harlem Railroad Company.
New York and New Haven
Railroad Company.
Northern Railroad Company.
Oswego and Syracuse Railroad
Company.




None

-

6 per cent
Nothing.

- 21,313

63,533

16,715

14,474

124 002

.656, 000 None.. _ . - - . . .
4,311,676 Included in pre- None
(9 months.)
(9 months.) ceding.
30,048
800 . ,
163,066
72,469

645
pi

6 per cent.
None,the net earnings, after paying
interest,
being
carried to surplus
fund.

16,400,
643,639

30,600

2,668

338,994

213,106

30,120

56,784
way & through.
1,327,766
95,400

td
©

©

•ffl
142,210

84,193

14,726

360,156

3,162,125 39 8 per cent

1,941,621

1,410,371

201,534

2,616,943

2,627,118 16 None.

1,464,839

1,676,500

66, 342

116,467 87 None..

346,923 19 None since 1854-.

6330,03

203,539 No return

117,119 38 None
71,175 80 ! 8 per cent

117,862
60,015

194,039
30,100

^ Road not yet completed : no part in operation.
^

23,762
-39,930

1,389

670,073
way & through.
924,109
156,468

Np return-

94,290
69,086

164,516
way & through.
120,280
40,848
way & through.
CO
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New York—Continued.

to
4^

Corporate name of company. Net annual profits.

Oswego and Troy Railroad
Company.
^'Potsdam and Watertown
Railroad Company.
$125,000
Rensselaer and Saratoga Railroad Company.
22,792
Rochester and Genesee Valley Railroad Company.
Sackett's T arbor and Ellis-None
T
''' burg Railroad Company.
Sackett's Harbor and Saratoga Railroad Company.
fSaratoga and Schenectady 5 per cent
Railroad Company.
22,087
Saratoga.and Whitehall Railroad Company.
91,000
JSecond Avenue Railr'd Company.
54,546
Sixth Avenue Railroad Company, in the city of New
York.
Sodus Point and Southern
Railroad Company.
34,487
Syracuse & Binghamton Railroad Company.
IITrov and Bennine^ton Railroad Company.
$55,184
Troy and Boston Railroad
Company.



Number of miles Number of miles No. of through Number of way No. of tons of
run by passenger run by freight passengers per passengers per through freight
trains yer year. trains per year. year.
year.
per year.

Dividends.

pi
td

00 8 per c e n t - - .

62,392

33,789

98,.867

14 None

22,012

10,170

69,276 None

None

22,196

10,648

6,808

88,257
_.
10,898

40,049

©
pi

18,022
4,886^

©
1^

ffl

td
07 Not given
00 8 per cent..

18,174

11,285

32,570

4,915
l>

.

66 5 per cent.. _

80 None

117,280

4,237,583 way Included in pre • None
and through. ceding.

871,255 None

06 None e.---..-«.-

24,481

53,248

62,600

23,374

12,194

86,192 41,518 way and
through.

^191,514, way Included in pre- 61,975, way and
and through. ceding.
through.

O
td

^gg

3,358 85 Leased and operated by Hudson
River Raikoad
Company, at 7
per cent, on
$275,000.
- - - - - - None; the object
§Troy. Union Railroad Com- None -being only to afpany.
ford the roads
using the road a
. transit through
the city.
Troy and Rutland Railroad
Company.
Tliird Avenue Railroad Com74,637 30 No return
pany, of .the city of New
--York. _
Utica and Binghamton Railroad Company.
Watertown and Rome Rail169,144 33 8J per cent
road Compa-ny.
Troy and Greenbush Railroad
Company.

47,706

11.772

209,921

6,272

79,951

td

5,770, 078, way Included in pre- None
and through. ceding.

923,176 None
/

•

©

M
161,276

99,268

186,763, way Included in pre- 132,676, way &
through.
and through. ceding.

* No part of this road completed or in operation.
f Embraced, as to the remainder of statistics, in the report of Rensselaer and Saratoga Railroad Company,
j No further statistics given ; the present ofi&cers having but recently assumed the management of the railroad.
II The remaining statistics of this road are included in. the report of the Troy and Boston Railroad Company, who are the lessors of this railroad.
§ This road being operated by, and leased by the Hudson River Railroad Company, the New York Central Railroad Company, the Rensselaer and
Saratoga Railroad Company, and the Troy and Boston Railroad Company, the statistics of the road are included in the returns of said companies.




©
pi

• \ ^

ffl

td

Cl
td

to
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New York—Continued.

to
CD

Corporate name of company. No of tons of way Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Average speed
gers carried du- cari'ied during
freight per year.
of passenger
ring the year, or the year, or the
trains.
the equivalent equivalent numnumber of pas- ber of tons carsengers carried ried one mile.
one mile.

Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casualfi-eight trains.
casualties for ties not fathe year.
tal for the
year.

55:1

td

Albany Northern
Company.

Railroad

13,156 3,400,000 passen- 1,200,623 tons car- 30 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. Two
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.

Albany and Susquehanna
Railroad Company.
Albany and West Stockbridge
Railroad Company.
Attica and Allegheny Valley
Railroad Company.
Blossburg and Corning Railroad Company.




©

.

Buffalo and New York City Included
Railroad Oompany.
ceding.

Buffalo and Pittsburg Railroad
Company.

©

•

Black River and Utica Rail- Included
road Company.
ceding,

Buffalo and Allegheny Valley
Railroad Company.
Buffalo, Corning, and New
York Railroad Company.

Two. —

ffl
td

12,300 242,207 passengers 1,824,055 tons of 15 miles per hour.< 12 miles per hour. None, -w
None
carried one mile. freight carried
one mile.
in pre- 828,669 passengers 105,110 tons bf 20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
One'
carried one mile. freight . carried
one mile.
in pre- 6,219,936 passen: No return
24 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. No return . . . No return
gers carried one
mile.

72,265,630 3,941,184 passen- 2,005,657,690 tons 25 miles per hour. 11J miles per hour None
gers carried one of freight carried
mile.
one mile.

„.- One-

o
td

».

B u M o and State Lin© Railroad Company. :

26,338 14,980,037 passen- 10,972,789 tons 29 miles per hour- 12 miles per hour. Four.
gers carried one carried one mile.
mile.
No return
No return
No retiurn
One
None

Two

Brooklyn City Railroad Com- None
- . - Two
pany.
Canandaigua and Niagara, 6,404, (same pe- 1,367,674 passen- 287,838 tons car- 27 miles per hour. 18 miles per hour. None
Twogers carried one ried one mile for
Falls Railroad Company.
riod.)
mile only, Aug. same period.
and Sept., 1865.
Canandaigua and Elmira Rail13,,651 4,717,339 passen- 1,634,303 to.ns.car- 30 miles, per hour. 13 miles per hour. Three
Two
gers carried one ried one mile.
road Company.
mile.
Cayuga & Susquehanna Rail3,514 699,273 passengers 4,190,445 tons car- 25.42 miles per 16 miles per hour. One.None..
carried one niile. ried one mile. • h o u r .
road Company.
Chemung Railroad Company.
Corning and Olean Railroad
Company.
Erie and NewYork City Rail_---__
.--_--.-----_..._
.
.:
.
road Company.
Eighth. Avenue Railroad None
- - - One
No return
None
6 miles per h o u r . . None - Company.
155 1,594,750 passen- 5,780 tons carried 24 miles per hour. Attached to pas- One.
None. Flushing Railroad Company .
senger train.
gers carried one one milemile.
Harlem River and High Bridge
«
Railroad Company.
One.
Hudson and Boston Railroad Included m pre- 351,966 passengers 929,874 tons car- 16 miles per hour 15 miks per hour. None
ceding.
- Company.
carried one mile. ried one mile.
44,668 70,041,746 passen- 15,221,966 tons Express trains 39 16 miles per hour. IVenty-six . . Nine.
Hudson River Railroad Comgers carried one carried one mile. miles per hour expany.
mile.
cluding stops; including stops 35
miles per hour.
Accom'n trains 28.
miles.
Lebanon Springs Railroad
.___
Company.
Long Island Railroad Com61,379 9,479,014 passen- 2,670,607 tons car- 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. Three
Two
pany.
gers carried 1 mile. ried one mile.




•

„ -

•

- . - . .

--

-

-

- _ -

-

-

-

.

_

-

.

-

-

pi
©

pi
H
©

^-M^^
ffl

!2|

>t^
O

Cfi

to
CO
• < !

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New York—Continued.

to
CO

00

Corporate name of company. No. of tons of Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casualway-freight per gers carried du- carried during passenger trains.
freight trains..
casualties for ties not fatal
year.
ring the year, or the year, or the
the year.
for the year.
the equivalent equivalent num-,
number of pas- ber of tons carsengers carried ried for one mile.
for one mile.

•

Niagara Falls and Lake Ontario Railroad Company.
New York and Central Rail- Included in prece- 169,052,341 pas- 99,605,836
tons Express, 29 miles 11 miles per hour. Twenty-four _ Twenty-six . road Company.
ding.
sengers carried carried one mile. per hour ; ordifor one mile.
nary 21 J.
New York and Erie Railroad
686,585 64,951,794 passen- 150,673,997 tons 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. Thirty-six - - . Twenty
Company.
gers one mile.
of freight carried
one mile.
New York and Harlem RailNo returns.^
29 miles per hour. 13 J miles per hour Four
- - Nine
No returns
road Company.
New York and New Haven Included in.preceRailroad Company.
. ding.
Northern Railroad Company.
3,769,388 passen- 14,690,910 tons 25 miles per hour. io miles per hour. Two
- - - . Two
gers carried 1 mile carried one mile.
Oswego and Syracuse Railroad
2,457,921 passen- 1,287,461
73,759
tons 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. Two
None.. - - - Company.
gers carried 1 mile carried one mile.
Oswego and Troy Railroad Co.
Potsdam and Watertown Railroad Company.
Rensselaer and Saratoga Rail12,646 4,383,496 passen- 1,322,697
tons 30 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. Three
None.
road Company.
gers carried 1 mile carried one mile.
Rochester and Genesee Vallev None
1,101,101 passen- 324,396 tons car- 20 miles per hour. 9 miles per h o u r - . None - - - - - - - One
Railroad Company.
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.
Sackett's Harbor and Ellis1,000 160,707 passengers 58,860 tons carried 20 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. jSTone
None
burg Railroad Company.
carried one mile. one mile.



pi
td
©
pi
©

ffl
td

5^

O
td •
Cfi

Sackett's Harbor and Saratoga Railroad Corapany.
Saratoga and ' Schenectady
Railroad Company.
Saratoga and Whitehall Rail
road Company.

13,104 1,599,244 passen 438,384 tons car- 20 miles per hour. 9 miles per h o u r . . None .
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.

Second Avenue Railroad Com-|
pany.
3f miles in forty None .
None .
None
No return .
Sixth Avenue Railroad Com- None .
minutes.
pany, in the city of New
York.jNone
Sodus Point and Southern
Railroad Company.
Syracuse and Binghamton Included in prece- 2,669,533 passen- 2;273,588 tons car- 24 miles per hour. 9 miles per hour- Two.
gers carried one ried one mile.
ding,
Railroad Company.
mile.
Troy and Bennington Railroad Company.
Troy and Boston Railroadj 61, 976, way and 2,406,970 passen 1,933,447 tons car- 25 miles per hour 10 miles per hour No return
gers carried one! ried one mile.
through.
Company.
mile. .
1,488,263 passen |478, 506 tons car- 28 miles per hour 12 miles per hour One.Troy and Greenbush Railroad None.
gers carried one ried one mile.
Company.
niile.
One..
Troy Union Railroad Com
pany.
Troy and Rutland Railroad
• Company.
Third Avenue Railroad Com- None.
No r e t u r n .
No r e t u r n .
iNo return.
None.
Two.
pany, of the city of New
York.
Utica and Binghamton Rail-|
road Company.
Watertown and Rome Rail-| 132, 676, way and 5,756,748 passen 8,360,432 tons car- 25 miles per hour 12 miles per hour Two.
road Company.
through.
gers carried onel ried one mile.
mile.




Three.

pi
td
None .

©
pi
©

No return-

ffl

None
None.

o
td

Four ...

None".

to
CD
CD

05
O
O

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
NEW JEESEY.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the dou- Cost of the road
main road and ble track, if any. completed,
and branches.
pany.
or
when expected to
branches.
estimated, if not
be.
completed.

pi
td

November 5, 1855. Trenton and Belvidere 64 miles.
Belvidere aud Delaware March 2, 1835. 1849
Railroad'Company. •
Camden ahd Amboy.. 62 miles
*Camden and Amboy Rail- Not returned . .
road Company,
Camden and Atlantic
f Camden and Atlantic Rail- Not known . - -.
City. .
road Company.
.Central Railroad Company Feb. 26, 1847. Sept. 18, 1850. July 2 , 1 8 5 2 . . . . . . . EastOH, Penn, and Eli- 63 miles
' of New Jersey.
zabethport, N. J .

None . . - - . . . . . . .

$1,650,000 00

. . None - . . . . . . . .

4,877,981 23

Burlington and Mount Holly No r e t u r n . . . . June 18, 1849
Burlington and Mount 7 miles
Railroad Company.
Holly.
Flemin^'ton Railroad and No return.
Lambertsville
and 12 miles . . . . . .
Flemington.
Transportation Co.
Freehold and Jamesburg 1851
Freehold and James- 11^ miles '.
1852
.-- -- No return
burg.
Railroad Company.
Millstone and New Bruns- 1836
1854. December, 1854... Millstone and New 6.63 miles
June,
Brunswick.
wick Railroad Company.
Morris and Essex Railroad Jan. .29,1835. Fall of 1835. To
Morristown, Newark and Hacketts- 52^ miles
Company.
1837; Dover, 1848; towh.
and to Hackettstown, Jan., 1854.
Jersey City ahd New 33.96 miles.-..
New Jersey Railroad and March 7, 1832. 1832
1839
-.
Brunswick..
Transportation Company.
Jersey City and Pater- 14miles
Paterson and Hudson River Jan. 21,1831. No return
No r e t u r n . . . . .
son.
Railroad Company.



©
pi

©

t..—'..

1,729,642 28

11 miles now, and
37 additional expected to be during this fall.
None . . . . . . . . . . .

3,712,722 26

None . . . . . . . . . . .

279,220 51

Noue . . . . . . . . . . .

219,062 73

None . . . . . . . . . . .

$111,000

None

114,551 20

2 miles

1,608,778 14

20 m i l e s . . :

3,357,355 18

14 milQS

ffl

630,000 00

a
td

Paterson and Ramapo]15^ miles
J^mction of Erie Railroad.
Raritan and Delaware Bay March 3, 1854. May 20, 1856. 'Not completed ; ex-! Port Monmouth,^ on 120 miles
pected to be in two] Raritan bay, and Cape
Railroad Company.
May.
years.

[None.

350,OQO 00

iNone .

1854.

Newton and Waterloo . 12 miles.

None .

Estimated
at
$2,400,000, exclusive of rolhng
stock.
352,000 00

1856.

River Delaware, five 18 miles.,
miles below Water
Gap, and New Hampton Junction of Central Railroad.
iTrenton and
New 26 miles
Brunswick.

None .

1,200, 000 00

Paterson and Ramapo Rail- iMarchl0,1841. jNo return
road Company.

1849
1850
Supplementary
iu 1853.
INo returnWarren Railroad Company. No return
Sussex Railroad Company.

Trenton and New Brunswick
Railroad Company^

No return.

None.

* This company refused to answer the interrogatories, and it is impossible to furnish its statistics; the more to be regretted, as it is one oi the principal
railroads in the United States.
t Company neglected to answer the interrogatories.




pi
td
©
pi
H
©

ffl
>=d

a

td

CO
O

co
o
to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New Jersey—Continued.Corporate name of company.

Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float-Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of the Annual rate, and
operating expen- araountof interof debt.
ing debt.
issued.
iu.
ses, including re- est paid.
pairs.

Belvidere aud Delaware
Railroad Compauy.
Camden • and Amboy Railroad Company.
Camden and Atlantic Railroad Company.
Central Railroad Company
of New Jersey.
Burlington and Mount Holly
Railroad Company.
Flemington Railroad and
Transportation Co.
Freehold and Jamesburg
Railroad Company.
Millstone and New Brunswick Railroad Company,
Morris and Essex Railroad
Company.
New Jersey Railroad and
Transportation Company.
*Patersonand Hudson River
'Railroad Company.

$1,400,000 00

Paterson and Ramapo Railroad Company.

248,225 00




1,500,000 00

$320,000 00

None

Not known

Not known

Not known

$1,720, 000 00

$155,000 00

$92 260 00

6 per c e n t . . .

1,501,787 57

870,557 89

....do..,

72,336 48

369,320 00

$867,600 00

654,530 89

1,572,130 89

122,415 36

2,000,000' 00

3,000,000 00

135,795 35

3,135,795 35

398,489 85

70,000 00

20,000 00

20,000 00

21,633 68

13,410 74

150,000 00

72,^800 00

129,220 51

8,832 11

8,800 00

130,341 52

70,000 00

70, 000 00

31,923 38

18,458 15

$10,086 00

$9,818 67

$5,661 56

$100,914 00

Nothing
$339,000 00

3,482,850 00

690,000 00
None

...

56,420 51
Nothing
$10,086 00

1,157,805 00

630, 000 00

None

72,577 41
Nothing

V- i - - None

100,000 00

Rate not given;
$63,129 55 paid.
217,424 83. 7 per cent.
6 per cent.; $1,200
paid.
No return
6 per cent.; $4,200
paid.
6 per cent

411,577 41

229,441 33

133,073 51

7 per cent.

690,OQO 00

861,514 36

360,766 77

6 per ct. and 7 per
ct.; $40,580 paid.

Nothing..-.^ --- Rented to Erie
Railroad Company for $53,400
per annum.
101,200 00 Rented to Erie Worked by N. Y. 7 per cent.
1,200 00
Railroad Com- and Erie Railpany for $26,500 road, and expenses returned by
per annum.
said company.

©
pi
©
H
ffl
td
HH

"^
>

•

o
td

tRarltan and Delaware Bay|
Railroad Company.
Sussex Railroad Company.

150,000 00

150,000 00

52,000 00

202,000 00

30, 000 00

28,000 00

6 per cent, on
bonds; 7 per cent,
on floating d e b t .

t Warren Railroad Company.]
llTrenton and N. Brunswick
Railroad Company.
* Leased and operated by the New York and Erie Railroad Company, and statistics embraced in the returns ofsaid company.
t No part ofthe road completed or in operation at this time ; further statistics not furnished by officers.
t No part of this road yet in operatioh; and, the officers having failed to answer the mterrogatories, no further statistics can be furnished.
II See remarks to Camden and Amboy railroad.
^




pi
td
©
pi

©
H

ffl
td

o
td
Cfi

CO

o

CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—New Jersey—Continued.

CO

o

4^

Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Belvidere and Delaware
$62,740
Railroad Company.
Camden and Amboy Rail631,229
road Company.
50,078
*Camden and Atlantic Railroad Company.
Central Railroad Company
181,065
of New Jersey.
8,222
Burlington and Mount Holly
Railroad Company.
tFlemington Railroad and None .
Transportation Co.
Freehold and Jamesburg
13,465
Railroad Company.
Millstone and New Brunswick Railroad Company.
Morris and Essex Railroad
Company.
New Jersey Railroad and
Transportation Company.
Paterson and Hudson River
Railroad Company.
;|;Paterson and Ramapo Railroad Company.
Raritan and Delaware Bay
Railroad Company.
Sussex Railroad Company.



Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
by passenger by freight trains
passengers per gers per year..
through, freight
trains per year. per year.
year.
per year.

00

None

68

12 per c e n t . . . - - .

pi

88

None....... ....

©
pi

02

7 per cent

33, 000

71,400

50,645

145,668

30,630

11,390

130,550

22,401

279,611

16,553

57,111

1,200

6,000

•

94

5 per cent
. . None

23

$4,157 11

96,367 82
426,715 90

No r e t u m . .

-.

......

No return
6 per cent, guarantied by the New
Jersey Railroad
Company.
7 per cent:
10 per cent

28, 049
8,311

Included in pas50,420 Included in precesenger train re- Way and through. dmg.
port.
4,150
13,035
4,293

19,449 00

None

ffl
td

8,076

o
87,879
382,563

46,129
None by exclusive
freight trains.

td
No return

7,305

403,750

257,610

2, 313,760

1,531

10,500

500

3,000

6 per c e n t . . - . - . .

2,000 00

©

13,800

9,400

Warren Railroad Company.
Trenton and NewBrunswick
Railroad Company.

O

°

* Statistics cannot be further ascertained.
f Interrogatories not answered; statistics of working road, i&c, not known
t Leased to and operated by the New York and Erie Railroad Company, and statistics of this road, &c., embraced in the returns of said New York and
Erie Railroad Company.




pi
©
pi
©

ffl

a

CAi>

o

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—New^ Jersey—Continued.

CO-

o

• •
ICorporate name of company.

No. of tons of Amount of mileage of No. of tons of freight Average speed Average sp«ed of No. of fatal No. of casuof passenger
casuaMes alties not
way freight for passengers carried dur- carried duringthe year,
freight trains.
trains.
during-the fatal for
ing the year, or the or the equivalent numthe year.
year..
the year..
equivalent number of ber of tons of freight
passengers carried one carried for one mile.
mile.

48, 346
Belvidere and Delaware
Railroad Company.
Camden and Amboy Railroad Company.
Camden and Atlantic Railroad Company.
66,934
Central Railroad Company
of New Jersey.
c
Burlingtou and Mount Holly N o n e . . . . . . . . . . .
Railroad Company.
Flemington Railroad and
Transportation Co.
3,798
Freehold and Jamesburg
Railroad Company.
Millstone and New Bruns- None
wick Railroad Company
Morris and Essex Railroad No return
Company.
New Jersey Railroad and
62, 518
Transportation Company.
P a t e r s o n and Hndfiftn T?ivf>r

Railroad Company.
Paterson and Ram a no Railroad Company.
Raritan and Delaware Bay
Raih'oad Company.



3,710,635 passengers car- 2,162,607 tons carried one 22^ miles per hour. 12 miles, per hour. Nonemile.
ried one mile.
28

None
43

3,491,733 passengers carried one mile.
No r e t u r n

>t
O
P^
©

hour.

. - - . - . . . . . . . 3,007,303 tons carried one 20 miles per hour.

mile.
No r e t u r n . . . . . # . . . . . . . No r e t u m . . . . . . . . . .

16 miles per hour. Attached to pas- Non©
senger trains.
No retum

No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . No return

2

No return

None

99,693 passengers carried 52,494 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. None
mile.
one mile.
3,530,865 passengers car- No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 mile per hour. 12 miles per hour. Five
ried one mile.
30,830,604 passengers 962,229.tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 20 miles pec hour. None
mile.
carried one mile.
Seven

•'

Noa©

-.

None

ffl

.

Noue.
One.
Ns^ne.
Five.

td

a

Sussex Railroad Company.
Warren Railroad Company
Trenton and New Brunswick
Railroad Company.




18, 000

113,500 passengers car- 159,000 tons carried one 20 miles per hpur. 10 tnileg per honr. None
ried one mile.
mile.

None.

-

m
©
©

ffl
td

Q

CO

o

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

o

PENNSYLVANIA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track, completed, or
when expected to be.
and branches.
branches.
if any.
estimated if not
eompleted.
pi
td

Alleghany Valley Railroad Jan. 10,1852.. April, 1853
Company.

Not yet finished; com- Pittsburg & New York 179mUes
pleted to Kittaning State Line near
Oleau.
1856.

1837

Towanda & coal mines 16^ miles.- — . . None
at Barclay.
Coal mines iu Carbon 21 miles
19 miles
county and Mauch
Chunk.

1853

Local-coal mine road. 2^ miles

Barclay Railroad Company. Sept. 20,1853 . April 29, 1 8 5 5 . . . October 1,1850
Rpavpr

M^eadow

Railroad April 7, 1830 . . 1833

and Coal Company.

Carbon Run Improvement March, 1851... 1852
Company.
Chester Valley Railroad April 22, 1850 . 1851
Company.

Catawissa,
Williamsport, March 31,^1831 July, 1836
and Erie Railroad Company.



None

First division of 44
mis. cost $1,600000, the whole
estimated at $5500,000.
$300,000 00

The capital stock
represents lands,
mines and appurtenances, as well
as railroad; the
latter cannot be
separated.
^ mile.......
$45, O O 00
O

None . . . . . . .
September 12,1853... Downingtown Junction 21 miles
of the Columbia rail
road and Bridgeport
Junction of Philadelphia and Norristown
railroad.
September, 1 8 5 4 . . . . . Foot^of Broad moun- 63f^ mis., branch N o n © . . . - - - .
tain, in Schuylkill co., 12 mis. graded
and Milton, in North- but imfinished
umberland county.

1,370,600 00

3,640,000 00

hd
©
id
©

ffl
td

td

Colnmbia and Philadelphia No cliarter, be- 182c5.e a AS 6
i O t } 4 . s a Aa a QSa.
ing owned by
Railroad.
State of Pennsylvania.
Cumberland Valley Railroad April 2,1831» April 1, i m ... April 1,1^38 .
Company.
Delaware and Hudson Canal March 13, 1823, 1828.
October, 1829
for canal, railCompany.
road authorized April 5j
1826.
Franklin Railroad Company, March 12,1832. April 1, 1837 .
December 1,1838
Hanover Branch Railroad March 16,1847. Mareh, 1851.
Company.
Harrisburg,
Portsmouth, June 9,1832... May 11, 1836...
Mount Joy, and Lancaster
Railroad Company.
Huntingdon and Broad Top May. 6, 1 8 5 2 . . . August) 1853 *..
Mountain Railroad and
Coal Company.
Lebanon Valley Railroad April 1,1836.. May, 1852
Company.
Lancaster, Lebanon, and March 28,1846. July, 1854
Pine Grove Railroad Company.
Lehigh Valley Railroad April 21, 1846 . December, 1852
Company.
Little Schuylkill Navigation, Feb. 28,1826.. 1 8 3 0 . .
Railroad, and Goal Company.




0-.

Columbia and West Similes*
Philadelphia.

Similes

Harrisburg and Cham- 52 miles..-«--. None . . - . - . - .
bersburg.
Parbondale and Hones- 17 miles main, 6 23 miles
miles branch.
dale.

5,000,doo Od

1/237,147 f6
854,823 dl

Chambersburg, Penn- 22 miles
None *
240,000 00
sylvania, and Hagers^
town, Maryland.
August 1,1852..**--.. Hanover junction of 13 m i l e s . . . . . . . None *
169,445 27
Northern
Central
Railroad and borough
of Planover.
1837.
Lancaster and Harris- 36 miles main, 19 10 miles
1,825,787 00
burg; branch from miles branch.
Columbia to Portsmouth.
July 1, 1856.
Huntingdon and Hope- 30^ miles main, No r e t u r n . . .
1,000,000 00
well, main, Stoners- lOmls.branch
town to Broad Top,
branch.
Not completed; ex- Harrisburg and Read- 53^ miles . . . . . 12 miles
2,700,000 00
pected to be in June ing.
(estimated.)
1857.- Not completed; esti Pine Grove to Lancas- 51 miles; 105 None
5,000,000 00
mated to be in 1859 ter, Philadelphia to miles branch.
(estimated.)
or 1860.
Harrisburg.
.
Opened to Mauch Easton and Mauch 46 mis. main; 17 10 miles . . . . 2,700,000 toMauch
Chunk, Oct., 1855.
Chunk, Branch to miles branch.
Chunk.
.Tamaqua.
To Tamaqua in 1832; Port Clinton, Tamaqua, 28 nailes main; 5 10 miles . . . .
1,373,270 68
to Catawissa Railr'd and Summit
miles branch.
Junction in 1864.

Pi
td

^

©
©

ffl
tei

^
>
^

Ct

td
Cfi

00

o

CO

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—Pennsylvania—QorsXmw^A..

00

o
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed, or, if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
when expected to
and branches.
main road and double track. completed, or
estimated if not
be.
if anv
branches.
conipleted.
••

Mine Hill and Schuylkill 1828
Haven Railroad Company.

1828

1831-.

Mine Hill and Schuyl- 13 mis. main 74 20 miles . . . .
kill Haven.
miles lateral.

$2,400,000 00

198,481 92
Mount Carbon and Main road 1^ 5 miles. . . . .
South side of Mine miles; branch
Hill.
6 miles.
Northera Central Railroad The sev'r'l roads Bait. & Susq. R. Bait. & Susquehanna, Baltimore and Sun- 142 miles main; None, except Estimated about
10,000,000.
1838.
^ bury, Northunaber- 14 mis. branch sidings.
composing this R. Co., 1829.
Company.
to Westminscompany were York & Md. Line York & Maryl'd Lme, land county, Pa.
R. R. Co., 1829. 1838.
consolidated
ter.
York & Cumbl'd York & Cumberland
1854.
R. R. Co., 1846. 1851.
Susquehanna R.R. Susquehanna; not yet
finished; whole line
Co., 1851.
expected to be in
1857.
3,500,000 G
O
Not finished; expected Blairsville and New 90 miles; (35 10 miles
Northwestern Railr'd Com- Feb. 9 , 1 8 5 3 . . . August, 1853
of which will
' to b e m 1858.
(estimated.)
Castle,
pany.
be opened by
May, 1857.
Not finished; expected Philadelphia and Beth- Main 55^ miles; Imile
3,469,096 00
North Pennsylvania Railroad April 8 , 1 8 5 2 . . May, 1853
to be opened in Dec, lehem, branehes to Shimersville
Company.
Shimersville
and br'ch 1 | mis.,
1856.
Doylestown.
Doylest'nb'ch
10^ miles.
.Tnnft 18.*S0
Port Griffith on Sus- 47 miles . . . . . . 47 miles . . . .
^Pennsylvania Coal Com- AprU 3 , 1 8 4 8 . . 1848
quehanna river and
pany.
Hawley ou Delaware
and Hudson canal.
Mt. Carbon Railroad Com- April 20, 1829 . 1830
pany.




1831

td •

©
pi

©

.ffl
td

O
td

16,830,000
Fennsylvania Railroad Com- April 13, 1846 , July 15, 1846... Single track completed Harrisbiirg to Pitts- 243 miles main. 136 miles..Feb. 1, 1854; double burg, main; branch, Altoona br'ch
pany.
track will be July 1, Altoona to HolUdays- 7 miles; In1857.
burg, Blairsville to diana branch
Indiana.
20 miles.
Pittsburg and Steubenville March 24,1849. Sept. 18, 1851.. Not finished, expected Pittsburg and Steuben- 42 miles
3,000,000
7mile8
to have road corapletRailroad Company.
ville.
ed early in 1857.
1835.
Philadelphia, Germantown Feb. 17, 1831..
Philadelphia, German- 17 miles
1,175.562
1832.
23miles tobe
and Morristown Railroad
town, and Norristown. miles branch-to laid by 1857.
Germantown.
Company.
Single track finished Port Richmond and 93 miles, main— 98 miles..-..
Philadelphia and Reading April 4,1833.- July, 1835
19,004,180
Jan. 1, 1842; double MountCarbon-branch road 5 miles
Railroad Company.
track October, 1844. from Richmond to city city branch.
of Philadelphia.
January 15,1838
Philadelphia,* Wilmington The
various
1835.
7,990,775
Philadelphia and Balti- Main, 98 miles- None, except
and Baltimore Railroad companies com
more, main
New branch 6 miles. sidings.
posing this road
Company,
• Castle and Wilmingwere consoliton branch.
dated Feb. 5,
1838.
Sunbury and Erie Railroad April 3, 1837. July, 1852.
40 miles completed to Sunbury and Erie
None finished. Estimated,
270 miles
$12,000,000
Company.
Williamsport
-100
more in progress.
500,000
Tyrone and Clearfield Rail No retum.
None
April 28, 1856... Not completed; exr Tyrone and Clearfield. 36 miles
road Company.
pected to be finished
April 1, 1858. .
165,000
West
Chester Railroad April 8,1831. May, 1 8 3 1 . . . . . . . September 13, 1832. West Chester and Phi- 9 miles.
None . . .
Company.
ladelphia and Columbia Railroad.
1835.
Fall of 1835.
433,53
Wrightsville and York. 12^ miles. . . . . None . , .
Wrightsville, York, and
April, 1840.
Gettysburg
Railroad
Company.
September 9,1854.... Williamsport, Pa., and 78 m i l e s . . . . . . . 4 miles.-.--.
1833.
3,157, t 7
Williamsport and Elmira June 9, 1832..
Railroad Company.
Elmira, N.Y> •

00

00
00
19

^

©
05
©

ffl
00

^
^

w
00
00

^
>.
^
td

*
79
58

^'fThe road being worked and owned by a local coal company, a n d t h e statistics of the road not being separated fromthe other operation of-the-eompany,
the financial portion could not be ascertained.




td

^

Bailroad Statistics of the United State^-^Pennsylvania—Contimued,
Corporate name of cona. Date of charter.
paiay.

Commenced.

Completed, or if not, Terniini of main road Length of the| Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double tr?tck,| completed, or eswhen expected to be
and branches.
if any.
branehes.
timated, if not
completed.

Philadelphia and Tren- 30 miles.
* Philadelphia and Trenton
ton,
Railroad Company.
Lackawanna and Blooms-| March 24,1853, April 1,1854.... Expected to bo finish- [Scranton, Lusjerne co., [57 miles.
and Rupert, Columed July L 1857.
burg Railroad Company
bia county.




00

Non© .

$1,500,000 00

Pi
td

>d

o

pi
Hi

©

Tk9 oSlcers ef tliis road ha?i r^fa^ed to furmsh its st^tisMsi*
H

ffl
bd

Bailroad Statistics o the United States—Pennsylvania—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock paid
in.

Alleghany Valley Railroad
Company.

$1,667,500 00

Barclay Railroad Company.*
300,000 00
Beaver Meadow Railroad See preceding
and Coal Company.
Carbon Run Improvement None .
Company.t
Chester Valley Railroad
870,600 00
Company.

Amount of bonds Amountof float Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operat- Annual rate and
ing expenses, in- amount of interissued. •
ing debt.
of debt.
cluding repairs. est paid.
$82,000 00

$.200,000 00

None .
None
See preceding... None .
None .
,500,000 00

Catawissa,
Williamsport,
1,700,000 00
1,740,000 00
and Erie Railroad Company.
Columbia and Philadelphia Owned by the State None
Railroad.
Cumberland Valley Railroad
1,209,050 00 None
Company. •
Delaware and Hudson Canal
7,488,.OO0 00
600,000 00
Company.t
Canal and railroad,
Franklin Railroad Company. $
Hanover Branch Railroad
117,000 00
41,000 00
Company.

None .
None .
200,000 00

$282, 000 00

Nothing
No return as to See preceding.
railroad alone.
None

6 per cent.

pi
td
©
pi
©

500,000 00

$22,779 18

$18,404 40

1,940,000 00

279,055 28

166,803 17

7 per cent, due on
debt, but nothing
paid for 2 years.
7 per cent

420,409 30

Nothing.

None.

Nothing.

857,048 69

None .

Nothing.

155,000 00

About $72, 000 00 Nothing.

ffl
td

a
td

None .

8,430 00

49, 430 00

* Road just completed and no part in operation long enough to furnish satisfactory statistics,
t Road just opened; not long enough to furnish satisfactory statistics.
t The railroad and canal being operated together, no railroad statistics per se can be furnished.
$ Road^not now in operation, having been sold by the original company to two private individuals.




Opened Jan'ry 1 From Jan'ry 1 to 7and7percent . .
1856; receipts to Octoberl, 1856,
October 1,1856, $38, 057 85.
$54, 505 08.-

24,694 00

11,159 75

6 per ct., ($3,016
40 paid.)

CO

00

00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Pennsylva/nia—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds AmoTiB.offloat- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operat- Annual rates and
issued.
in.
pany.
ing expenses, in- 1 amount of interng debtofdebt.
cluding repairs. est paid.
Harrisburg,
Portsmouth,
$843,100
Mount Joy, and Lancaster
Railroad Company.
Huntingdon and Broad Top
550,000
Mountain Railroad Company.*
1,100,000
tLebanon Valley Railroad
Company.
^Lancaster, Lebanon, and
Pine Grove Railroad Company. "
$ Lehigh Valley Eailroad
1,680,000
Company.
Little Schuylkill Naviga2,606,100
tion, Railroad, and Coal Roads, mines,
Company.
Mine Hill and Schuylkill
2,000,000
Haven Railroad Company.
Mount Carbon Railroad
200,000
Company.
Northern Central Railroad
2,260,000
Company.

00

$952,687 00

00

$10,000 00

$454,306 50

6 p e r c t , ($57,761
paid.)

1^
td
©
pi

00

1,500,000 00
©

00

1,143,000 00

200,000 00

00
&c.

500,000 00

Nothing

00

350,000 00

None

ffl

1, 343, 000 00

td

3,106,100 00

353,301 10

97,370 61

350,000 00

458,000 00

234,000 00

6per cent -521

6 per cent
O

00
00

None

--

2,639,600 00

N o t h i n g . . . . . . . Nothing
70,369 14

2,709,969.14

20,000 00
554,160 83

* Road just finished; not in operation long enough to furnish further statistics.
. tNot yet completed. No portion has been in operation long enough to furnish satisfactory working statistics.
tRoad not yet completed; no part of it in operation.
$ Has not yet been in operation for one year, and, therefore, annual statistics cannot, at this time, be furnished



$259,946 49

500,000 00

$962,687 00

4,000 00

Nothing

276,245.05. 6 per c e n t . . - - - - .
(158,376 paid.)

^Northwestern
Railroadj
Company;
tNorth Pennsylvania Rail
road Company.
Pennsylvania Coal Company.
Pennsylvania Railroad Com
pany.
tPittsburg and Steubenville|
Railroad Company.
Philadelphia, Germantown,
and Norristown Railroadl
Company.
Philadelphia aud Reading]
Railroad Company.
Philadelphia, Wilmington,]
and Baltimore Railroad
Company.
$Sunbury and ErieRailroad]
Company,
i Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad Company.
West Chester
Railroad
Company.
Wrightsville, York, and j
Gettysburg
Railroad
Company. "
ttW illiamsport and Elmira
Railroad Company.

1,400,000 00

250, 000 00

22,375 00

272,375 00

2,530,855 00

265,500 00

360,653 72

626,153 72

12,480,000 00-

7,050, O O 00
O

500,000 00

7,550,000 00

1,250,000 00

1,500.000 to be
issued.
374,800 00

350,000 00

9.29, 350 00
10,830,360 00

7,438,800 00

5,600,600 00

2,390,775 05

3,500. 000 00

326,000 00

165,000 00

100,000 00

1,500,000 00

1,700,000 00

1,709,055 73

6 per cent

287,261 00

119,073 00

6 per cent

274,150 C
O

Not returned in
full.

1,753,246 90
JVbfe.—An equal
amount due the
company.
238,060 12

7,438,800 00

4,321,793 86

1,510,881 68

6 percent.,
($504,027 paid.)

2,628,835 07

1.011,444 05

500,867 17

6 per cent.,
($167,703 paid.)

hj

©
pi

ffl
td
>l—l ' '
^

... Nothing.........

34,850 89

134,850 89

264.454 84

60,000 00

53,000 00

35,607 78

Nothing

. 17,585,73

"^

^
o

1,964,454 84

6 per cent.,
($8,091 05 paid.)

* Road not completed; no part in operation.
tRoad not completed, and no part in operation long enough to furnish annual statistics.
t Road not yet completed; no part in operation, so that no other statistics can be now furnished.
*$ Road not yet completed; and so much as is finished not operated long enough to furnish annual statistics.
II Road not completed; no part in operation; no further statistics than here afforded,
ft As an adequate amount of rolling stock has been but recently placed upon the road, no further statistics can at present be furnished.




pi
td

©

326,000 00

None .

None . . . . . . . . . . . None..

317. 050 00

3,538,333 27

td

00
©X

Bailroad Statistics of the United Stales—Pennsylvania—-Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Philadelphia and Trentson
Railroad Company.
* Lackawanna and Bloomsburg Railroad Company.




00

Capitol stock paid in. Am'ount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operat- A^nnual rates, and
ing expeuses, in- amount of inteof debt.
ing debt.
issued.
cluding repair.
rest paid.

$550,000 00

pi
td

$500,000 00

.
^ Road not yet completed; uo part in operation.

•

©
pi

©

ffl

t2|
Cl

td
CQ

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Pennsylvania—Continued.

Corporate name of company.

Net annual profits.

Dividends.

Alleghany Valley Railroad
Company.*
Barclay Railroad Company.
Beaver Meadow Railroad No return for rail- 10 per cent
road alone.
Company.
Carbon Run Improvement
Company.
Chester Valley Railroad
Company.t .
Catawissa,
Williamsport,
and Erie Railroad company.
Columbia and Philadelphia
Railroad.
Cumberland Valley Railroad
Company.
Delaware and Hudson Canal
Company.
Franklin Railroad Company
Hanover Branch Railroad
Company.
Harrisburg,
Portsmouth,
Mount Joy, and Lancaster
Railroad Company.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through
b y passenger by freight trains passengers per
year.
per year.
trains per year

No. of way passengers per
year.

No. of tons of
through freight
per year.

pi
td

10,080

No return

No return

No return

. . 438,092 tons coal
passed over road
in 8^ months of
1855.

^,
>^
O

•
$4, 374 78

None

112,252 11

None . . . . . . . . . . .

130,662

- 84,358

20,496

78,842

14,854

436,639 39

8 | per cent, on
$5,C00,000.
8 per cent

255,320

547,540

112,650

367,026

71,547

75,392

38,557

87,004

17,614

ffl
td

270,299

82,150 00

o

td
CA

13,534 31
194,460 00

None . .
11 per cent

....

17,576 in all.
96,944

Connected
with 17,411 way and Included in pre- 30,736 way and
passenger trains. through.
ceding.
through.
142,728
103, 065
48,087
334,696

* Road only completed for 44 miles; no part fully in operation long enough to give satisfactory statistics,
Road operated by the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Morristown Railroad Company, who only return the amount realized over expenses.




hd
.©

00

00

Bailroad Statistics ofthe TJnited States—Pennsylvania—Continued.
1

Corporate name of company.

Net annual profits.

Dividends.

r—'TT

:

r-r—•

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons •^ of
sengers per
through freight
by passenger
by freight trains passengers per
year.
per year.
year.
trains per year. per year.

Huntingdon and Broad Top
Mountain Railroad and
Coal Company. Lebanon Valley Railroad
Company.

pi
td
©
pi

Pine Grove Railroad Company.
Lehigh Valley Railroad
Company.

©

>^
ffl

*Little Schuylkill Navigation, Railroad, and Coal
Company.
Mine Hill and Schuylkill
Haven Railroad Company.

$255,930 49

R n e r rf»nt

. 224,000 00

Mrtnnf< Cflrhon RflilrVl Com-

16,000 00

233,286
12 per cent, on No regular passenger train owned
$1,700,000.
by company.
No return
About 6 per cent. None

pany.
Northem Central Railroad
Corapany.
Northwestern Railr'd Company.
North Pennsylvania Railroad Company.
Pennsylvania Coal Company
Pennsylvania Railroad C o . .



»—«
oo

277,935 06

None

...

td

183,465

218,384

680,464

1,183,566

No return

No retu

None . . . . . . . . . . None

1,516,952
.

...

200,000

195,153 way and [ncluded in pre- 375,179 75-100 way
ceeding.
and through.
through.

'
1,829,277 54

8 per cent

....
None . . . . . .
. None
1,144,914
173,793

* Trains are mn by the Catawissa, WilHamsport, and Erie Railroad Company.

550,000
171 972

12{

o
td

Pittsburg and Steubenville
Railroad Company.
Philadelphia, Germantown, $168,188, (exclud- 12 per cent
and Norristown Railroad ing interest paid.)
Philadelphia and Reading 2,810,912 18 8 per cent, cash,
and 4 per cent,
Railroad Company.
stock.
Philadelphia, Wilmington. $510,576 88, (ex- 4 per cent
and Baltimore Railrdad clusiveof interest
paid.
Company. Sunbury and Erie Railroad
Company.
Tyrone and Clearfield Rail
road Company
7,000 00 4 per cent
West Chester Railroad
Company.
18,022 05 IB per cent
Wrightsville, York, and
Gettysburg
Railroad
Company.
Williamsport and Elmira
Railroad Company.
Philadelphia and Trenton
Railroad Company.

90,910

30,959

817,963

172,107

No return

169,632
1,165,940

•277,617 way and Included in pre- 2,569,419 way and
through.
ceding.
through.

340,666
125,109

110,100

542,903

6,799

.

<p

pi
td

o
17,236
13 685

8,492
42,769
33,966
Attached to passenger trains.
25,882 way and Included in pre- 45,014 way and
13,810
through.
ceding.
through.
o

pi

©

ffl
td

.— —
•

burg Railroad Company.




>
n
td

00
CD

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Pennsylvania.—Continued.

CO

to

o
Corporate name of company.

No. of tons of
way freight per
year.
4»

Mileage of passengers
carried during the
year, or the equivalent number of passengers carried for
one mile.

Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal
casualties
ried during the year, passenger trains. freight trains.
for
the
or the equivttlent numyear.
ber of tons of freight
carried for one mile.

No. of casualties not
fatal, for
the year.

pi
Alleghany Valley Railroad
Company.
Barclay Railroad Company.
Beaver Meadow Railroad No return
and Coal Company.

20 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. None

td

©
pi

No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . No r e t u m . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 miles per hour, 9 miles per hour. T w o . - - - . . None . . . . .
being attached to
the freight trains.

Carbon Run Improvement
Company.
20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None. . . . .
Chester Valley Railroad
Company.
40,301 4,995,977 passengers car- 4,142,747 tons carried one 22f miles per hour. 9 1-5 miles per One
Catawissa,
WilHamsport,
hour.
ried one mile.
mile.
and Erie Railroad Company.
30,998,862 tons carried 26 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. Five
341,489 13,641,023 passengers
Columbia and Philadelphia
one mile.
carried one mile.
Railroad.
53,635 2,120,676 passengers car- 2,282,086 tons carried one 25 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. None
Cumberland Valley Railroad
Company.
mile.
ried one mile.
Delaware and Hudson Canal
"
^
Company.
Franklin Railroad Company.
Hanover Branch Railroad Included iu pre- No r e t u m . . . . . . . . . . . . . No r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 miles per hour Attached to pas- None . . . , .
senger trains.
ceding.
Company.
41,944 5,243,954 passengers car- 11,075,624 tons carried 22^ miles per hour. 10 miles per hour iNone
Harrisburg,
Portsmouth,
Mount Joy and Lancaster
one mile.
ried one mile.
Railroad Company,



Two

None

©

ffl

td

One
Twenty. . .
None

None
None . . . o .

a
td

Huntingdon and Broad Top
Railroad and Coal Company.
Lebanon Valley Railroad]
fcf Company.
Lancaster, Lebanon, andj
Pine Grove Railroad Company.
Lehigh Valley Railroad
Company.
Two
24 miles per hour.l 10 miles per hour. [None
Little Schuylkill Navigation, Railroad, and Coal
Company.
8 miles per horn- No return. No return.
Mine Hill and Schuylkill
18,418,512 tons carried
17,924 No return.
Haven Railroad Comone mile.
pany.
No return
Mount Carbon Railroadl None .
•600,000 tons one mile. None
None
Company.
None .
Northern Central Railroad Included in pre- No return.
21 miles per hour, 12 miles per hour. Two
No return..
Company.
ceding.
Northwestern Railr'd Company.
North Pennsylvania Rail
road Company.
None . - .
-. 10 miles per hour. None
[24,295,000 tons of freight|None
150,000 None .
P.ennsylvania Coal Comcarried per mile.
pany.
193,034 36,694, 983 .passengers||72,233,533 tons carriedj 25 miles per hour 10 miles per hour, No return. 128 in all.
Pennsylvania Railroad Comper mile.
carried one mile.
pany.
Pittsburg and Steubenville
Railroad Company.
20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour, No retura. No retum.
6,792,601 passengers car-|No return,
Philadelphia, Germantown, No return.
and Norristown Railroad
ried one mile.
Company.
Seven.
Philadelphia and Reading [Included in pre- 10,399,446
passengers|206,757,817 tons carried 25 miles per hour. Coal 10 miles per Twentyhour, freight 15 nine,
Railroad Company.
carried one mile.
one mile.
ceding.
miles per hour.
twelve.
Philadelphia, Wilmington^
121,890 f27,355,328
passengers 4,289,665 tons carried 25 miles per hour, 12 miles per hour.j^one
and Baltimore Railroad
express; 20 miles
carried one mile.
one mile.
Company.
accommodation.




td
©

©

ffl

td
CfH

00

to

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Pennsylva^iia^-ContinueA,

00
t?0

Corporate name of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed oflAverage speed oflNo. of fatal No. of casu
casualties alties not
freight per year. carried during the year, ried during the year, or passenger trains, freight trains.
pany.
for
the fatal for
or the equivalent num- the equivalent number
year.
the year.
ber of passengers car- of tons carried for one
mile.
ried for one year.
Sunbury and Erie Railroad
Company.
Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad Cornpany.
1,871,966 passengers car- 276,851 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. Attached to pas- One
1,511
West Chester
Railroad
senger trains.
ried one mile.
mile.
Company.
. . . . . . . No return
. , . . . , . . 25 nailes per hour. 15 miles per hour. None
Wrightsville, York, and Included ^m pre- No return...
Gettysburg RailroadC om- ceding.
pany.
... ..
Williamsport and Elmira
Railroad Company.
Philadelphia and Trenton
Railroad Company.
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg Railroad Company.




td
©

pi

None.
None.

>^
o

ffl
td

td

liailroad Statistics of the Vnited States—Oontinued.
DELAWARE.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
pany.

New Castle and Wilmington 1840
Railroad Company.
Delaware Railroad Coih- No retum
pany.
* New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad Company.




May, 1852
. 1852

Completed, or, if Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
and branches.
main road and double track, completed,
not, wheu expector
branches.
if any.
ed to be.
estimated if not
completed.
December, 1852 . . . New Castle aud Wil- 4.66 miles
None .--mington.
Not completed; will Junction on New Castle 71 miles main; 8 ..do
be finished January and Frenchtown R.R. miles branch.
to Seaford; branch to
1, 1857.
Milford.
New Castle and French- 16 miles . - . .
town.

-.

$93, 000 00
Estimated $1,000,000.

©
pi
O

* Statistics of the road could not be obtained.

a
td
02

CO

to

CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Delawa^re—^Contiimed.
Corporate name of company.

*^New Castle and Wilmington Railroad Company.
t Delaware Railroad Company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Amount of
bonds issued.

$136,000 00 None .
209,000 00

Amount of Aggregate amount
of debt.
floating debt.

INone o

$600,000 00 $15,000, with]
equal credits!
due company

Annual receipts.

CO

to

'Amount ofthe ope- Annual rate and
rating expenses, amount of interincluding repairs, est paid.

Nothing
$600,000 00

New Castle and Frenchtown
Railroad Company.

pi
©
pi
©

* Leased and operated by the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad Company, at seven per cent, interest on the cost of the road; statistica
cannot, therefore, be furnished.
t The road is now finished and in operation, except the Milford branch, but sufficient time has not yet elapsed to furnish the running statistics.




ffl

*^
a

td
CdH

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Delaware—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run by No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
passenger trains per by freight trains passengers per gers per year.
through freight
per year.
year.
year.
per year.

New Castle and Wilmington
Railroad Company.
Delaware Railroad Company.
New Castle and Frenchtown
Railroad Company.

td

^,
o
SKI
^^
©

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Delaivare—Continued.

ffl
td

Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casual ties
way freight per carried during the ried during the year, passenger trains. freight trains. casualties for not fatal for the
pany.
year.
year.
year, or the equiva- or the equivalent No.
the year.
lent No. of passen- of tons carried for
gers carried for one one mile.
mile.
New Castle and Wilmington
Railroad Company.
Delaware Railroad Company.
New Castle and Frenchtown
Railroad.




. . . .

. - - . . .

. m-C.

. . . - - .

21 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
do

do

..do..-

>
Cl
IS

None. . - . . . - . .
..do

CO

to

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States.

CO

to

MARYLAND.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
pany.

Completed, or, if Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track, completed, or
and branches.
not, when expectestimated if not
branches.
if any.
ed to be.
completed.
pi

$442,000 00
None •- . - . - . Dec. 26, 1 8 4 0 . . . . . . Annapolis city, and 20^ miles
junction on Washington branch R. R., 18
miles from Baltimore.
Metronolitan Railroad Com- May 5, 1 8 5 3 . . . April 10,1854.. Not completed; un- Georgetown, D. C , and 76 m i l e s . . . . .
None.....
.
3,715,000 00
pany.
certain when it will Hagerstown, Md.
be.
* Northern Central Railroad.
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Feb. 28,1827.. July 4, 1827... The main stem was Baltimore and Wheel- Main stem, 379 [00 miles, be- Main stem, $23,Company.
opened to Wheehng ing of main stem; the miles; Washing- sides 59 miles 304,726 08; W.
branch, $1,650,January, 1853; the branches to Washing- ton branch, 30 sidings.
000—$24,954,726
branch to Washing- ton, D. C , and Fred- miles; Frederick
08.
branch, 4 miles.
ton in July, 1835. erick, Md.
Maryland and Delaware March 10,1854. Dec.27, 1855.. Not completed; ex- Smyrna, Del., to Ox- Smjrna to Oxford, None ==.-.---. Smyrna to Oxford,
$830,000; to PoRailroad Company.
pected to be to Ox ford, Md., and Poto- 53^ miles; to Pomac river, at Hoo's tomac river, 20
tom'criv'r, $400,ford in 1857. .
Ferry; branch to Cen- mis.; fromBoons000; br'ch, $ 135,treville.
000—$1,365,000.
boro' to Centreville, 9 miles.
Annapolis and Elk Ridge March 21,1837. July, 1838
Railroad Company.




* The statistics of this road can be found under the same name in the Pennsylvania table.

td
©

pi
©

ffl

td
y-i

>
O
td

. Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Maryland—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Annapohs and Elk Ridge $353,000 00
Railroad Company.
50, 000 00
* Metropolitan
Railroad
Company.
Northern C^tral Railroad.
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 13,118,902 00
Company.

f Maryland and Delaware
Railroad Company.

Amount of
bonds issued.

Amount of Aggregate amount Annual receipts.
floating debt.
ofdebt.

$73,300 00

$73,300 00 None . . . . . . . . .

$13,992 30 No retum
pi

''
9,754,939 73 None

9,754,939 73 Main stem, $4,385,- Main stem, $2,384,- 6 per cent., ($765,951 87; Washington 779 54; Washington 296 40 paid, inbranch, $444,220 09 branch, $208,226 15 cluding interest ou
—$2,593,005 69.
—$4,830,171 96.
$3,000,000 preferred stock.)

44, 000 00

* Road is not finished, and proceedings suspended for the present as to completion.




$17,832 26

Amount of the ope- Annual rates and
rating expenses, in- amount of interest
cluding repairs.
paid.

©
pi
©

ffl
td

t Road now under construction.

o
td

00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States-—Maryland—Gontmued.

00

to

OD

Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Dividends,

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons
gers per year.
passenger trains freight trains per passengers per
of through
year.
year.
freight per
per year.
mile.

28, 000
$3,839 96 None . - . - .
14,000
Annapolis and Elk Ridge
Railroad Company.
Metronolitan Railroad Conipany.
Northern Central Railroad.
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Main stem, $2,001,- 6 per cent, on Main stem, 662,- Main stem, 3,130,172 33; Washing- main stem; 9 808 ; Washington 543; Washington
Company.
ton branch, $235,- per cent, on branch, 104,790— branch, 77,616—
3,208,159.
943 94<-$2,237,116 Wash, branch 767,598.
27.
. . . . . .

Maryland and Delaware
Railroad Company.




- 5 . . .

14,824

7,306

No return.

Pi
td

. . . .

©
pi
Main stem, 31,- Main stem, 275,642; Washington 072 ; Washingbranch, 201,861- ton branch, 120,^
233,503.
902—395,974.

205,766
O

ffl

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Maryland—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casualcarried during the ried during the year, passenger trains. freight trains. casualties for ties not fatal
way freight.
the year.
for the year.
year, or the equiva- or the equivalent
lent No. of passen- No. of tons carried
gers carried for one for one mile.
mile.

Annapolis and Elk Ridge No return
Railroad Company.
Metropolitan Railroad Company.

No return

. . . . . . No r e t u r n . . . - - . . . . . . 20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None

None . .

pi
td

©
pi

l^ort.hATTi dftnfcral 'R.a.ilrond

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Coal, 466,013; mis- Main stem, 28,184,cellaneous, 162,- 141; Wash, branch,
Company.
178—628,191.
8,172,933 — 36,357,073 passengers carried one mile.
Maryland and Delaware
Railroad Company.




194,019,210 23 miles per hour. lO^ miles per hour Nine.--

None

ffl
td

c^

CD

CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

00

o

YIRGINIA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced.
pany.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of main road Length of dou- Cost of the road
ble track, ii completed, or
when expected to
and branches.
and branches.
any.
be.
estimated if not
completed.

Alexandria, Loudoun, and March 15,1853. February, 1855. Not yet certified, ex- Alexandria and Pied- 170 miles.
None .
Hampshire Railroad ComHampshire
pected "to be fin- mont,
pany.
county.
ished in ISPO.
Man asses Gap Railroad March 11,1850. Sept. 1, 1850... 75 miles completed Alexandria and Harri- Main road, 139miles; . . . d o .
Company. .
and remainder.un sonburg; main. Har- Harper's Ferry, 43
der construction. per's Ferry, Front miles; Front Royal
Royal, branches.
1 mile.
Norfolk and Petersburg March 17,1851. 1854.
Expected to be in Norfolk city and Pe- 80 miles.-..-- —
.do.
tersburg.
Railroad Company.
1857.
Orange and Alexandria Rail- March 27,1848- March 4, 1850.. To Gordonsville in Alexandria and Lynch- 88^ miles finished, 80 . . . . d o
road Company.
1854, Lynchburg burg ; branch to War- miles in course of
is expected to be renton.
construction, 8 mile
in 1858.
branch finished.
iVTain road, Petersburg Main road, 64 miles; . . . . d o
Petersburg Railroad Com- Feb. 10,1830.. 1831.
1833.-..
and Weldon, N. C. branch road, 18
pany.
Branch from Hicks- miles.
ford to Gaston,N. C.
.do.
Richmond and Dan- 142 miles..
Richmond and Danville Rail- March 9,1847.. Jan. 31,1848., May 15,1856..
ville.
road Company.
Richmond, Fredericksburg, Feb. 25,1834.. Jan. 15,1835.., To Fredericksburg, Richmond and the Po- 7 5 | miles.
January 23, 1837; tomac river.
and Potomac Railroad
to Potomac river,
Sept. 30, 1842.



.do.

[Tj

Estimated at $8, 000,000
Estimated at $5, 000,000

i^
©
pi
©

• M

$1,600,000

-3

Estimated at $4, 528,066 20.

5^

$1,113,581 6 9 . . .

td

O

$3,341,362 4l,including cost of
rolling stock
$2,000,000
,

Richmond and Peters-i Main, 22 miles; Port!
burg, branch to Port| Walthal branch, 3|
Walthal.
miles.
February, 1855. Not completed; time Richmond city audi 38. 3.miles
West Point on York|
when, not known.
river.
Ootober, 1850.. November, 1 8 5 1 . . . . Portsmouth, Va., and[ 80 miles.
Weldon, N. C.
Petersburg and Lynch 123 miles, main; 10|
October, 1849.. November, 1854
burg; City Point| miles branch.
branch.
Jan. 16,1850.. Expected to be inl Lynchburg to Bristol,!Main, 204 miles; Salt
on Tennessee State work branch, 9^|
October, 1856.
line; branch from] miles.
Pushmataha to
point above Saltville.
Finished and open Richmond and Coving- 206 miles
1836.
180 miles; remain- ton.
der by July 1,1858. [
Winchester and Har- 32 miles ,
1836
1832.
per's Ferry.

Richmond and Petersburg March 14,1836. 1836
Railroad Company.
Richmond and York Rivei iJan. 31, 1853..
Railroad Company.
Seaboard and Roanoke Rail-| Feb. 27, 1846..
road Company.
Southside Railroad Compa- March 5,1846..
ny.
Virginia and Tennessee Railroad Company.
[March 6,1849..

Virginia Central Railroad
Company.
Feb. 18, 1836..
Winchester and Potomac| 1830.
Railroad Company.




ISeptember, 1838.

$1,167,000 82
1,056,528 00
1,301,527 00
3,700, 000 00
pi

6,000,000 00

td
©
pi

5, 000, 000 00
Estimated.

©

689,415 95

1^.

ffl

td

o

CO
CO

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States— Virginia—Continued.

CO
CO

to
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operat- Annual rates
ing expenses, in- amount of
in.
issued.
ing debt.
of debt.
pany.
cluding repairs.
terest paid.
^Alexandria, Loudoun, and
Hampshire Railroad Company.
Manasses Gap Railroad
Company.
tNorfolk and Petersburg
Railroad Company.
Orange and Alexandria Railroad Company.

Petersburg Railroad Company.
Richmond and Danville Railroad Company.
Richmond, Fredericksburg,
and Potomac Railroad
Company.
Richmond and Petersburg
Railroad Company.
tRichmond and York River
Railroad Company.
Seaboard and Roanoke Rail
road Company.




$310,000 00

None..

None..
pi

2,557,185 47

$98,500 00

oo-.do.-..—

$98,500 00

$100,112 25

$61,169 13

No return©

1,325,000 00
1,681,527 84

None..
698,558 44

--..do
$196,934 23

883,200 00

67,511 88

9(|, 989 98

1,975, 020 00

600,000 00

60,163 00

1,000,000 00

717,362 51

116,140 05

786,000 00

219 908 00

36,140 69

279,476 21
644,000 00

N'one
435,000 00

None .
82,621 00

Nothing..-.895, 542 67

158,501 86

276,639 02

263,874 18

137,816 69

167,575 96

1,260,163 93, in- No return..: — No retura
cluding debt due
State of Virginia.
250,000 00
333,502 56, (less
120, 000 00
238,288 assets.)
256,048 69

6 per ct. on funded
debt, 7^ per cent,
on floating debt,
($47, 084 paid,including that on
preferred stock.)
6perct. ($9,111 66
paid.)
6 per cenfc
..
6 per cent. ($35, 093 28 paid.)

153,896 38

78,713 03

6 per cent. ($15,025 25 paid.)

173,723 00

107, 475 00

' per ct. on bonds,
6 per cent, on
floating debt.

Nothing
517,6.21 00

©

ffl
td

5^

- 167,876 61

1,892,876 00

252,477 96

170,707 25

1,139,000 00

558,339 58

255,920 25

129,590 85

2,800,666 83

1,251,248 68

127,400 24

2,697,339 58, (including 1,000,000
loaned by State
of Virginia.)
1, 378,648 92

379,366 03

,206,974 99

6 per cent

300,000 00

120,000 00

16,000 00

$136,000, (with About $75,000
$5, 000 to be paid
yearly to the
State.)

About $45,000

7 per cent

Southside Railroad Company.

1,371,700 00

1,725,000 00

^Virginia and Tennessee
Railroad Company.

2,897,564 95 '

Virginia Central Railroad
Company.
Winchester and Potomac
Railroad Company.




.

6 per cent, and 7
per cent.; about
$120,000 paid.
6 per cent
-,

pi
©
pi

* Road not finished, and no part yet in operation; construction progressing.
+ Road not yet finished, and no part in operatipn, but is rapidly approaching completion.
X Road not completed; no° part thereof yet in operation.
$ The following statistics are given from the operations on 130 miles of road to September, 1855.

©

ffl
td

"^

O
td

CO
CO
CO

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United Stcdes—Virginia—Continued..
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Alexandria Loudoun, and
Hampshire Railroad Company.
Manasses Gap Railroad
Company.
Norfolk and Petersburg
Railroad Company.
Orange and Alexandria Railroad Company.

Petersburg Railroad Company.
^'Richmond and Danville
Railroad Company.
Richmond, Fredericksburg,
and Potomac Railroad
Company.
Richmond and Petersburg
Railroad Company.
Richmond and York River
Railroad Company.
Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad Company.




Dividends.

CO
CO

No. of miles run No. of miles run No., of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
by passenger
by freight train passengers per gers per year.
through freight
annum
train per year. per year.
per year.

pi
15,884

None; the earnings
applied 'to extending the road.

43,291

None; the net
earnings being applied to extending road to Lynchburg. .
3 per ct., balance
of profits applied
to reduction of
debt.

138,969

130,000 00

7 per cent

135,920

20,000

50,000

10,000

2,500

75,183 35

5 per cent

36,946

43,104

84,638

2,457

56,731

6^, 248 00

None, except 7 per
cent, on $225,000
guarantied stock.

53, 324

63,172

10,370

20,246

12,457

$38,943 12

138,822 33

96,298 22

49,015

9,034

.td

29,977

©

40,181

23,084

57,703

No return

©

ffl
td
99,924

75,120

59,370 way
through.

and Included in pre- No return
preceding.

. . . . ...

•.

td
GO

71,324
53,117
62,163, way and Included in prece- No r e t u r n . . . . . . .
81,770 71 None . . . - - - . . . . .
Southside Railroad Compathrough.
ding.
ny.
Virginia and Tennessee Rail126,330 40 . . . - . d o
82,777
76,787
2,569
• 58,419
28,836^, way and
Being net 3^ per
road Company.
through.
cent, upon cost
of road then in
operation.
'
Virginia Central Railroad
5,945
81,396
162,391 04 6 per cent, earned 258,102, passenger Included in prece61,119, way and
on cost of working and freight.
Company.
ding.
through.
portion of road,
but profits are applied to extending
the road.
20, 000
15,000
2.2,324, way aud Included in prece- 25,581, way and
Winchester and Potomac About $25,000 No return ; the
stockholders have
through.
ding.
Railroad Company.
through.
been paid back in
dividends half the
amount of their
stock.




Pi
©

o
ffl
td

* The road has not been completed and in operation long enough to furnish satisfactory working statistics.

5©

CO
CO

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Virginia-—Continued.

00
CO

-Corporate name of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fiita'lNo. of casufreight per year.
ried during the year, passenger trains. freight trains.
carried during the
casualties alties not
pany.
or the equivalent
for
the fatal for
year, or the equivayear.
number of tons carlent number of pasthe year.
ried for one mile.
sengers carried for
one mile.
Alexandria, Loudoun, and
Hampshire Railroad Company.
1,200
Manasses Gap Railroad
Company.
Norfolk and Petersburg
Railroad Conipany.
Orange and Alexandria Rail- No return
. road Company.
Petersburg Railroad Com- No r e t u r n . . - - - - .
pany.
Richmond and Danville Railroad Company.
Richmond, Fredericksburg,
10,000
and Potomac Railroad
Company.
Richmond and Petersburg
1,354
Railroad Company.
Richmond and York River
Railroad Company.
18,250
Seaboard and Roanoke Rail
road Company.
Southside Railroad Compa- No return
ny.




©
pi

686,551 passengers car- 1,128,335 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None
ried one mile.
mile.

None

3,382,445 passengers c^-r- No return. . . . . . . . . - - 25 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None
ried one mile.
No return..
do
No r e t u r n . . - . - - . . . . - - . 21 miles per hour. 8 miles per hour..

None

23 miles per hour. 14 miles per hour. . . . . d o . . . .
1,073,052 passengers car- 32,894 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. --.-do
ried one mile.
mile.
1,962,519
passengers 1,528,043 tons carried 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour.
carried one mile.
one mile.
1,344,919
passengers 1,726,560 tons carried 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
carried oue mile.
one mile.
No r e t u m . . .
. . . . . . No rei u r n . . . . . . . . . . _ . . 20 miles per hour.
do
....

2

©

ffl
td

do
do.

-

do
None

None
.... do....

passengers 12,125,894 tons carried
ft <• » • • a ULCJ • « • •
• « • •
dOooo
Virginia and Tennessee Rail- Included in prece- 2,627,000
carried one mile.
one mile.
ding,
road Company.
25 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour.
No r e t u r n . . . - No return.
do.
Virginia and Central Railroad Company.
336,642 passengers car16 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None
.do.
Winchester and Potomac
ried one mile.
Railroad Company.

2
No

..

....do.

to'




td

©
pi
0

M
•ffl

IS

>
a
02

00
CO

Bailroad

ofi the United States,

05
CO

NOETH CAEOLINA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed, or if Termini of main road Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
road and branches. double track completed, or
and branches.
not, when expectif any.
estimated if not
ed to be.
completed.
Pi

Estimated
March 16,1855. Not completed; ex- Beaufort Harbor and 95 miles; branches 5 miles
1853.
Atlantic and North Carolina
$1,800,000 00
pected to be finish- Goldsborough; branch one mile each.
Railroad Company.
ed in January 1858. to Newbern and Carolir-i City.
Not fully estiFayetteville and Western Dec. 24, 1852.. ISept. 1, 1855.. Expected to be Sep. Chatham and Fayette- 42 miles to Chat-'None
ville North Carolinal ham; 95 miles to
mated.
Railroad Company.
1857.
N. C. Railroad.
Railroad Company.
Main road 223 miles. None, except 4,350,000 00
Charlotte- and GoldS'
North Carolina Railroad Jan. 27, 1849.. July 11, 1851..
January 30, 1856... boro'.
sidings.
Company.
1,162,000 00
None
Raleifih and Weldon. . 97 miles.-October, 1851.
1851.
Raleigh and Gaston Railroad
October, 1852
Company.
Estimated
None.
Western North Carolina March 17, 1855. March, 1856... Not completed; not Salisbury and Morgan- 75 miles..' 1,800,000 00
known when will town.
Railroad Company.
be.
Estimated
Expected to be fin- Wilmington and Ruth- 270 miles.
None.
1856.
Wilmington, Charlotte, and Feb. 14, 1855..
erford.
4,500,000 00
ished in 1861.
Rutherford Railroad Company.
I Wilmington, N. C , and 171 miles.
1854.
None.
1848.
1846.
Wilmington and Manchester
2,280,000 00
Kingsville, N. C.
Railroad Company.
jNone, except
March 14,1836. March 7, 1840. . . . Wilmington and Wel 162 miles.
1835.
Wilminjj'ton and Weldon
don.
sidings.
Railroad Company.
2,500, 000 00




ts

hi
Q

'^

©

ffl
td

td

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—North Carolina—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amountof bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of ope- Annual rate and
rating expenses, amount of inter. of debt.
ing debt.
issued.
in.
pany.
including repairs. est paid.
$66,720 65
$709,212 94 None. .
Atlantic and North Carolina
,
Railroad company.*
Fayetteville and Western
None. . - . . . . - - - .
30,000 00 None. . - - - . . Railroad Conapany.t
200,000 00
North Carolina Railroad 4,000,000 00 None. . - - . . . - - - .
Comp any. t
Raleigh and Gaston Railroad
$100,000 00 None. . . . . . . . .
973,000 00
Company.
Western North Carolina First instalment
Railroad Company.$
paid; amount not
returned.
Wilmington, Charlotte, and
None . - - - . . . . .
225,000 00 None. . . . . .
Rutherford Railroad Com. pany.tl
993,000 00
Wilmington and Manchester 1,115,000 00
300,000 00
Railroad Company.
Wilmington and Weldon 1,340,213 21
916,222 23
121,817 81
Railroad Company.




IS

$200,000 00
100,OOO 00

To June 30, 1856,
230, 000 00
193,000 00

$108,000 00. No returns . . . . . .
92,000 00

6 per cent, ($6,000
paid.)

©

©

ffl
td
•S

1,293,000 00

419,075 22

211,089 64

1,038,040 04

475,893 64

273,895 70

6 and 7 per cent,
(86,621 70 paid.)
6 per cent($60,000
paid.)

>
CL

td
CMl

'•'* Road in progress of construction; no part yet in operation.
t Road not yet
finished.
°
X These statistics are only for five months, being the time the road was in operation to June 30^ 1856.
§ Road under construction; 25 miles expected to be finished to StatesviUe, July 1,1857.
li Road under construction; no portion finished or in operation.

00
CO.
CO

Bailroad. Statistics of the United States-^North (7(xroZi?2a-—Continued,
Corporate name of company.

Net annual profits.




o

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas No. of tons of
sengers per the through freight
by
passenger by freight trains passengers per
year.
year.
trains peryear. per year.
for the year.

Dividends.

—

Atlantic and North Carolina
Railroad Company.
Fayetteville and Westem
Railroad Company.
North Carolina Railroad
$122,000 00
Company..
Raleigh and Gaston Railroad . 101,000 00
Company.
Western North Carolina
Railroad Company.
Wilmington, Charlotte, and
Rutherford Railroad Company.
Wilmington and Manchester
207,985 58
Railroad Company.
Wilmington and Weldon
201,898 09
Railroad Company.

00

^

—

.

.

•

.,,

,.-

•

'
"""
.--.-....... ---.
None. .6 per cent

. ---.

'.td

163,000

65,000

73,000

92,000

51,190 way and Included in pre- 40,000 way and
ceding.
through.
through.
31,025 way and
420,000 way and
through.
through.

•Pi

^fih.

ffl
60,000
7 per 0 ent

246,520

800

45,716

^49,660
175,000

35,329

•a

32,819
72,970

No return

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—North Garolina—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal
ried during the year, passenger trains. freight trains.
carried during the
casualties
way
freight
pany.
Or the equivalent
year, or the equivafor
the
for the year.
number of tons carr
lent number of pasyear.
ried for one mile.
sengers carried for
the year.
Atlantic and North Carolina
Railroad Company.
Fayetteville and Western
Railroad Company.
North Carolina Railroad Included in pre- 2,000,000 passengers car- 3,200,000 tons freight 20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour.
2
ried one mile.
carried one mile.
ceding.
Company.
3,102,500 passengers car- 21,000,00 tons carried 25 miles per hour. . . . . d o . - .
do
Raleigh and Gaston Raili-oad
None
ried one mile.
Company.
one mile.
W^estern " North Carolina
Railroad Company.
__
Wilmington, Charlotte, and
Rutherford Railroad Company.
Wilmington and Manchester
20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour.
75,000 00 No return . . . . . i . - - ' No return, . - - i . . .
2
Railroad Cornpany.
Wilmington and . Weldon No return.". -1 - . . . . . . d o . . - . . . o . . .
,...do
30 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. Nbne
Railroad Company.




STo. of casualties not
fatal
for
the year.

4

©

None

ffl
td
1—<

>

None

OL.

6'

^

•

;

00

Bailroad Statistics of ihe United States.

CO

SOUTH CAEOLINA.
Corporate name of company.

Date of charter.

Commenced. Completed, or if Termini of main road Length of main road Length of the Cost of the, road
double track, completed, or
and of branches,
and of branches.
not, when expectif any.
estimated if not
ed to be.
completed.
pi
td

Blue Ridge Railroad Com- December, 1852..
pany.
Charleston and Savannah Dec. 20, 1853....
Railroad Company.
Charlotte and South Caro- Dec. 18,1846....
lina Railroad Company.
Cheraw and Darlington Rail- Dec. 19, 1849....
road Company.
Greenville and South Caro- December, 1846..
lina Railroad Company.

None .

November, 1853 Expected to be in Anderson, S. ,C., and 196 miles.
Knoxville, Tenn.
I860.
Jan. 25,1856.. Expected to be in Charleston and Savan 102 miles ,
nah.
July, 1858.
Oct. 22, 1852.... Columbia, S. C , and 110 miles .
1847
Charlotte, N. C
January, 1853.. Nov. 20, 1 8 5 5 . . . . Cheraw and Florence. 40 miles ...

.do..
.do.
.do.

.. Columbia and Green- 143 miles, Abbeville .do.
ville main, Abbeville branch 1 1 | miles
branch,
Anderson Anderson branch
9^ miles.
branch.
-.. . doKing's Mountain Railroad Dec. 19,1848.-.. February, 1851. Sept. 7, 1852 . . . . Yorkville and Chaster- 22^ miles
ville.
Company.
.do.
April, 1854...- Laurens and Newberry .32 miles .
Laurens Railroad Company. December, 1849.. 1850
.do.
Expected to be Charleston & Florence, 102 miles ,
Northeastern Railroad Com- Dec. 1 6 , 1 8 5 1 . . . . May, 1853
finished in 1857 on the Wilmington &
pany of South CaroUna.
Manchester railroad.
Hamburg Co. 1834 Charleston & Augusta Main road-- —-.136 . d o . . .
companies No return
South Carolina Railroad The
68
Columbia, 1842.. main, branches to Co- Columbia
composing .this
Company.
33
Camden, 1849.-.. lumbia and Camden. Camden. .road we^re consolidated in 1844.
1848

Dec. 9, 1853

$6,000,000 00
(estimated.)
1,500,000 00
(estimated.) ^
1,730,000 00
600,000 00
2,300,000 00




O

M
ffl

fed

196,230 47
Cl

213,476 34
1,700,000 00
7,298,977 20

242

Spartanburg and Union Rail- Dec. 17, 1847.-.. January, 1853.. Expected to be Spartanburg & Union, 67 miles ,
finished in ld57.
road Company.

O
pi

1,202,571 20

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—South Garolina—Continued.
Aggregate amount|Annual receipts. Amount of operating [Annual rate and
Corporate name of coni- Capital stock paidjAmount of bondsjI Amount of floatexpenses, including amount of inof debt.
issued.
ing debt.
in.
pany.
repairs.
terest paid.
Blue Ridge Railroad Company.*
Charleston and Savannah
Railroad Company.*
Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad Company.
Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company.
Greenville and South Carolina Railroad Company.
Kings' Mountain Railroad
Company.
Laurens Railroad Company
Northeastern Railroad Company of South Carolina.!
South Carolina Railroad
Company.
Spartanburg and Union Railroad Company.




$875,000 00

$158,000 00

$158,000 00 None.

. . d o . . - , - . , . - . . Nothing-..-.

96,910 00 jNone

380,000 00 . - d o . - . .

1,350,000 00
400,000 00

150,000 00
856,500 00

ts
$291,219 84

. 225, 0.00 00 No. return

75,000. 00

1,347,461 96

380,000 00

230, 000 00

$152,374 01' 7 per cent
($26,600 paid.)
. No return
- . . 7 per. cent
•

©
pi

©

iNone

203,200 00 INone
165,670 00
800,242 10

78,556 00
38,500 00
93,500 00 None
2,979,639 65

4,179,205 50

None
117,056 00
93,500 00

300,000 00

150,000 00 . . . . d o

21,955^49

1, 086,500 00

9,389 72 . . . - d o

23,233 00

12,000 00 . . . . d o . . — . .

3,400,941 17 1,585,991 54 Ordinary, 607,993 03 6 per cent.
Extraordi'y, 94,639 34
421,301 52 ($727,28157 assets.)
671,000 00 No return.

500,000 00

ffl
»S
h-i

702,592 37
650,733 00

>3

No return.

!^
>

O
•td

[7 per cent.

171,462 30

* Road now under construction, no part completed.
t Road has nOt been in operation long enough to furnish annual working statistics.

05

Bailroad Statistics of the UnitedStates—South Garolina—Gonimw^d,

CAd

4^

Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Dividends.

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through pas- No. of way passen- No. of tons of
gers per year.
passenger trains freight trains per sengers per year.
through freight
per year.
year.
per year.

Blue Ridge Railroad Company.
ChnrlAF^nn

nnd

pi
td-

Savannah

Railroad Company.
$138,845 75 6 per cent
Charlotte and South Carohna Railroad Company.
None. . - - . - • - - . .
Cheraw and Darlington-Rail- No return
road Company.
150,000 00 ..do
,....
Greenville and South Carolina Railroad Company.
12,565 77 5 per cent
Kings' Mountain Railroad
Company.
11,223 00 7 per cent
Laurens Railroad Company
Northeastern Railroad Company of South Carolina.
883,399 17 8^ per cent
South Carolina ' Railroad j
Company.
Spartanburg and Union Railroad Company.'^-




©
pi

101,190 33,966 way through. Included in pre- No return
ceding.
No retUii.
-.
r e t u r n . - . - - - . No6ieturn..o---. No return
66,700

©

120,000

200,000 42,000 way (trough. - - - . d o - - , ,

i....do...-----

15,000

15,500

6,346

4,284

9,934

5,000

3,500

1,926 No retura

183,820

530,846

35,88^

3,573

ffltd
5^,

* Road not in operation long enough to furnish statistics of operations.

116,137

236,000
O
td
C£l

Bailroad Statistics of the United States^-South Garolina—CJbiitinuied.
Corporaite nanie of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed Of No. of fatal cas- No. of casi^alties
ualties forthe not fatal for
wayt freight per carried during the ried during the year, • passenger trains; : freight trainsi
pany.
year.
year, or the equiva- or the equivalent
the year.
year.
lent number of pas- number of tons carsengers carried for ried for one mile..
one mile..
i

Blue Ridge Railroad Com.-..--..
pany.
Charleston and Savanuah
Railroad Company.
Charlotte and South Caro- No r e t u r n . , - . .
liha Railroad Company.
Cheraw and Darlington Rail- ' . - . d o . . .
road Company.
Greenville ahd South- Carodo
lina Railroad Compahy.
Kings' Mountain Raili-oad
2,000
Company.
Laurens Railroad Company No return
Northeastern Railroad Company of South Carolina.
South Carolina Railroad
47,200
Company.
Spartanburg and Union Railroad Company.




...--..---....--.

1^td":
©
pi'

!.

1,560,317 passengers No r e t u r n . - - - - . . - - . 18 miles peir hoiir. 10 miles per hour. One
carried one mile.
No'' return
-. . - . - — . . d O w . - - . - . . - - . ; ^ . 15 miles per hour. . . . . . . d o . - - . . . . . ..do
2,878,48'8- passengers — - . d o - . - - - - . . . - - - . ;.
do-.--—.
. . d o . . . . ....^ None
carried one mile.
185,515 passengers 100!392^ tons' carried 18 miles per niile. 16 miles per hour. ..do
one mile.
carried one mile.
No r e t u m . . . . . . . - - . No return
15 miles per hour - 12 miles per hour. ..do
do
....
d o . . . . . . . . One

Four........ .

©

None . - - .
ffltd.

Four
None

--5^

One
None

18,360,000 passengers 32,196,000 tons car- 20 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None . . . . . . . . . Seven . . . . . .
ried one mile.
carried one mile.
do.Five..--...--.
do
..do

Q
td

CO.
CJ?

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
GEOEGIA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

CO

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track,
completed, or
when expected to
and branches.
if any.
estimated, if
branches.
be.
not Gomple'd.

Atlanta and Chattanooga Not chartered, but
Atlanta and Chatta- 138 miles
1836.
$5,517,836 48
1850.
None
owned by the
nooga.
railroad.
State of Georgia,
and operated by
State.
Atlanta and West 8 6 | miles
Atlanta and LaGrange December, 1847 __ Aug., 1 8 4 9 . - - - May, 1854
None
1,200,000 00
Railroad Company.
Point.
Augusta and Savannah
1838.
^_- None
1,100,000 00
1850.
March, 1854
Augusta and Millen. 53 miles
Railroad Company.
Brunswick and Florida Dec. 24, 1836
Main road esti' d
Oct. 27, 1 8 5 5 . . Expected to be com- Brunswick and the Main road 110.5 None
junction^ of Flint miles; branc's
Railroad Company.
$3,000,000.
pleted in 1858.
and Ohatahoochee 128 miles.
rivers. Branch to
Florida line at Albany.
Central Railroad and December, 1835-. October, 1836 ._ November, 1843
3,694,210 00
Maeon and Savannah 192 miles .
None
'
Banking Company of
Georgia.
200,000 00
1837.
Milledgeville and Gordon
None
1850.
MiUedgeville & Gor- 17 miles
1852.
Railroad Company.
don.
1850.
Eatonton Branch Rail200,000 00
1851.
Milledgeville and Ea- 22 m i l e s . - - . - . . None - - - . 1853.
road Company.
tonton.
1835.
Georgia Railroad and No return-Augusta & Atlantic. Main road 171 None .;
4,174,491 941845.
Banking Company.
Athens, Washing- miles. Athens
ton, and Warring- br'h 39,Washton branches.
ington branch
17, Warrenton
bra'h 4 miles.



pi
td
©
pi

©

td

»—(

\>

a
td

October, 1846
. - Macon and Atlanta _ 103 m i l e s - - - - - None
1835.
1833. , •
Macon and Western Railyqad Company.
January, 1847-- December, 1848 .--_ Rome and Kingston- 20 m i l e s , ' - , , - - - None
1837.
Rome and Kingston Railroad Company.
Savannah, Albany, and Dec. ?5, 1847-.-- Jnne 15, 1854-. 20 miles completed Savannah & Albany. 191 miles main, None
and open; 52 will Bra'h is construct- 18J miles br.
Gulf Railroad Comr
.be open in 1857; ing to connect with
pany.
remainder of road the Atlantic and
not known when.
Gulf railroad.
1847.
Not completed. Ex- Macon and Americus 70 miles main, None
Southwestern
Railroad Deo. 27, 1 8 4 5 - . pected to be fin- Branch to Butler. 22 miles bra'h,
Company.
ished in 1859.
which' is now
completed.




; - . - - - » - . , 1,500,000 00
--,

-^

140,000 00

^ - - , , . - . - i Estimated at
$4,000,000 OQ.
.,

.,--

Estimated at
$3, 034., 539 52.

pi
©

-.. ^.^......... .... ,, ©
ffl
td

s

>
a
m

03

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Georgia—Oontinued.

CO'

GO

Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Amount of
bonds issued.

Amount of float- Aggregate amount of
debt.
ing debt.

Annual receipts.

$871,000 00
Atlanta and Chattanooga 55,517,836 48 None
None
None .
railroad.
^
278,123 74
$199,000 00
Atlanta and LaGrange 1,000,000 00
$199,000 00 None
Railroad Company.
110,000 00
298,500 00
Augusta and Savannah
298,500 00 None 731,600 00
Railroad' Company.
320,000 00 29 miles of track laid
$20,000 00
300,000 00
^^'Brunswick and Florida
500,000 00
out, but no busiRailroad Company.
ness yet done.
251,767 00 The 2 following roads
Central Railroad and 3,900,000 00
251,767 00 None
are leased by this
Banking Company of
road, and the reGeorgia.
ceipts of the whole
$1,428,682 99.
Milledgeville and Gordon
None.
175,000 00 None.
Railroad Company.
32,000 00
Eatonton Branch R. R. Co.
175,000 00
32,000 00 None ,
Nothing for building
Georgia Railroad and 4,000,000 00 None
None .
1,068,202 39
or furnishing road,
Banking Company.
129,000 00
Macon and Western Rail 1,371,000 00
129,000 00 None ^•
350,000 00
road Company.
140,000 00 None
Rome and Kingston RailNone .
- - . Nothing.
35,000 00
road Company.
10,200 00
731,949 73
JSava'nnah, Albany, and
10,200 00 None
Gulf Railroad Co.
Southwestern Railroad 1,120,000 00
414>000 00
414,000 00 None . . .
353, 092 56
Company.

Amo'tof operat- Annual rate and
ing expen's, in- amount of intercluding repairs est paid.
$420,302 32 No return

as ' to
rate. ($9,115p'd.)
104,343 00 7 per cent57,000 00 7 per ct. ($20,895

paid.)

-

©
pi
©

1689,028 71 7 per ct. ($17,700
paid.)

,,
MjH,.'

None

t2{

7p.c. ($2,240p'd.)

"^

^

517,852 24
155,000 00 7 per ct.
paid.)
17,500 00 None

:

•

CL
td

($9 030
-

150,827 31 7 per cent.

^ Road.but partially completed ; no business yet dbne.
f These statistics embrace the working of this road, and the two subsequent, which
are leased and run- by the Georgia Central.
% I^oad not finished ; no part yet-in operation.



S

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United -States—Georgia—OontiiBued;.
Corporate name of com. Net annual profits.
pany.

Atlanta and Chattanooga
railroad.

Atlanta and La Grange
Rail Road Company.
Augusta and Savannah
Railroad Compahy.
Brunswick and Florida
Railroad Company.
Central Railroad and
Banking Company of
Georgia.
Milledgeville and Gordon Railroad Company.
Eatonton Branch Railroad Compahy.
Georgia Railroad and
Banking Company.
Macon and Weston Railroad Company.
Rome and Kingston Railroad Company.
Savannah, Albany, and
Gulf Railroad Company
Southwestern Railroad
Company.




Dividend.

$490,697 68 None declared as
the surplus,
(near 9 per
cent.) is paid
into the treasury.
173,780 74 8 per cent
53,000 00 No return.

739,654 28 10 per cent-

No. of miles run by >.-o. of miles run by No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
passenger trains
sengers per through freight
freight trains per passengers per
year,
per year.
year.
year.
per year.
201,480

402,960

•28,092

68,387 No return.
pi
•td •
•*ii^

©
•pi

84,194

41,581

20,671 No ret

85,000 Connected to passen
ger train.

24,000

12,000 No return-

126,290

475,107

677,197

©

;-^
'ffl
11,195

75,834

170,680

.td

:^

7 per cent-.

>

7 per cent.-

;0
td

per c e n t . .

298,570

195,000 00 10 per cent.

75,000

per c e n t . .

13,140

6,570

101,776

70,523

550,350 15

17,500 00

202,265 15 8 per cent.

434,294 120, 646, way & Included in pre- No return
through.
ceding.
14,^200
. 34,664
149,285
,, 40,140
10,000 No return

33,096

37,709

No return

65,000

00
CD

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Georgia—Continued,

CO

o
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of pas- Mileage of freight
freight per year. sengers carried carried during the
pany.
duringtheyear, year, or the equiv•or the equiva- alent No. of tons
lent No. of pas- carried for one
sengers carried mile.
for one mile.

Average speed of Average speed of No. of total cas- No. of casualties
passenger trains.
freight trains. ualties for the not fatal for
year.
the year.

td

Atlanta and Chattanooga No return.
railroad.
Atlanta and La Grange No return
Railroad Company.

6,548,334 pas. No return
carried 1 mile.
3,708,240 pas- No return
sengers carried
one mile.
1,506,900 pas. No return
carried 1 mile.

20 miles per h o u r . . 12 miles per None
hour.
- - - - . 16J miles per h o u r . . 8 3-5 miles per One
per hour.

Augusta and Savannah No return
23
Railroad Company.
Brunswick and Florida
Railroad Company.
Gentral Rail'd and Bank38,690 Not returned— Not returned
. . 23
ing Co. of Georgia.
Milledgeville and Gordon
railroad Company.
_„:
.__
Eatonton Branch Railroad Company.
Georgia Railroad and No return
18, 832, 210 tons car- 22
No return
Banking Company.
ried one mile.
Macon and Weston Rail20,081- 3,199,654 pas- 5,138,720 tons car- 20
road Company.
sengers carried ried one mile.
one mile.
13
Rome and Kingston Rail- No return
-- No return
No return
road Company.
Savannah, Albany, and
Gulf Railroad Co.
No return
21
Sbuthwestern Railroad
12,000 No return
Company.



miles per h o u r - . 16 miles
hour.

per One

None
One
-

©

pi
©

None

•^

ffl
td

miles per h o u r . . 12 miles
hour.

per Two

h^

None

>
Q
td

•

per None

None

per None

None

miles per hour.- 10 miles
hour.

per None - - - -

None -__--__-«

miles per hour_- 12 miles
hour.

per Four

None . . - . - - - - o

miles per h o u r . . 12 miles
hour.
miles per h o u r . . 10 miles
hour.

-

-

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
FLOKIDA.
.

Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the main Length of thc Cost of the road
when expected to
and branches.
road & branches.
double track, completed; or
be.
estimated,
if
if any.
not completed.
pi

Alabama and Florida January 8, 1853 April 12, 1856 . Expected to be June Alabama and Florida 45 miles
.
None
Railroad Company.
boundary line and
1, 1858.
Pensacola.
Florida Railroad Compa- January 8, 1853 November 1855 Contracted to be fin- Fernandina, on At- 140 W i e s . None
. ished Oct. 1,1857. lantic ; and Cedar
., ny.
Key, on the Gulf
of Mexico.
Florida, Atlantic, and Jan. 24, 1 8 5 1 - - J u l y l , 1 8 5 5 - . - Expected to be com- Jacksonville and Pen- Part belonging to None
Gulf Railroad Oomthis company is
pleted early in sacola.
-pany.
1858.
• • the first 60 miles,
to Alligator.
^'^Pensacola and Georgia January 8, 1852 March 1 8 5 6 . - . . It is not known when Pensacola bay to Ala- 240 miles—main None Railroad Company.
the
completion pah a river, Ga.; Alligator branch
branches to Alliga- 30 mUes; White
. may be expected.
tor and to White Bluff branch 50
Bluff. .
miles.
'"' 50 miles will be graded this year, and the road rapidly pushed to completion.




Estimated
at
. $944,000 00

©
pi

3 000 000 00
©

Estimated
for
60 miles, .
1,000,000 00

ffl
td
i2{

a.

td
cn

No further statistics can be given.

00
Ox

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Florida—Oontinued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock
paid in.
pany.

^'"Alabama and Florida
Railroad Company.
fFlorida Railroad Company.
Florida, Atlantic, and
Gulf Railroad Company.

$52,300 00

Amount of
bonds issued.

None

Amount of Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operating Annual rate
and
of debt.
floating debt.
expenses, includ- amount of interest
ing repairs.
paid.
None

Nothing
pi
td

40,000 00

None

State guaranties 7 per
cent, on bonds for
• iron and equipment, when issued.

-

Pensacola and Georgia
Railroad Company.




.00
'Ox

-

©
pi
O
I^
H8

ffl
Road not completed. No part yet in operation.

f No further statistics furnished.

td

.td
m

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Florida-—Gontmued.
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through Nuniber of way pas- Number of tons of
through freight per
by
passenger by freight trains passengers per sengers per year.
year.
year.
trains per year. per year.

CO

Alabama and Florida
Railroad Company.
Florida Railroad Com. paiiy.
^^Florida, Atlantic, and
Gulf Railroad Company.
Pensacola and Georgia
Railroad Company.

•
"

-

pi
td

©
pi

©

No part of this road in operation yet.

1^

ffl

td.

Corporate name of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of ii-eight Average speed Average speed of No. of fatal ca- No. of casualties
tastrophes for not fatal for
pany.
freight per year. carried during the carried during the of .passenger freight trains.
the 3^ear.
the 3^ear.
year, or the equiva- year, or the equiva- trains.
lent No. of passen- lent No. of tons cargers carried for one ried for one mile.
mile.
Alabama and Florida
" Railroad Company.
Florida Railroad Uompany.
Florida, Atlantic, & Gulf
Railroad Company.
Pensacola and Georgia
Railroad Company.




•^

>
n

CO
©^
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

00

ALABAMA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed; or, if cot, Termini of main road Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
road & branches. double track, completed, or'
and branches.
when expected to be.
pany.
if any.
estimated, if
not completed.
pi
Not completed, and un- Selma, Alabama, and 88 miles.
None
certain when it will Mississippi State line.
be.
Alabama and Tennessee March 4, 1848.. Nov., 1850.. Expected to be com- Selma and Gadsden.-. 167-|- miles, (77 in None
operation.)
pleted in 1858.
River Railroad Co.
None
Mobile and New Orleans Dec. 24, 1 8 5 1 . . July, 1853.-- Not completed; expect- Mobile and N. Orleans 139 miles.
ed to be finished in
Railroad Company.
1861.
Mobile and Ohio Railroad February, 1848. October, 1849 Expected to be com- Mobile, Ala., and Cairo, Main 497 miles; None pleted in Jan., 1858; Ill's; branch to Co- branches 88 J ms.
Company.
198 miles completed. lumbus, Mi.; br. to
'
Tennessee river; br.
to Columbus, Ey.;
br. to Paducah, Ky.
Montgomery and West Main 87 J miles; None -,
Montgomery and West Jan 15 1834
May, 1851
1835.
Point, Ga.; Opelika branch 28 ms.
Point Railroad Co.
branch to Columbus.
None
Whole road surveyed, S. W. terminus is at a 295 miles.
Northeast and Southwest Dec. 12, 1853..
1856.
located, & 100 miles point on the Mobile
Alabama Railroad Co.
put in contract; the & Ohio railroad, 136
entire road will be miles above Mobile ;
pushed forward with the N. E. terminus is
atChattanooga.Tenn.
all despatch.
Alabama and Mississippi Febr'y 17, 1852
Eiver Railroad Co.




$1 400,000

1853

lii—..

_

Estimated
2,776,500
Estimated
3,836,360
12,000,000

td
©
pi
©

ffl
td

>
-

2,250,000
(relaid with
heavy rail.)
7,500,000

.

Cl
td
cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Alabama—Oontinued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock
paid in.
. pany.

Amount of
bonds issued.

Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operating Annual rates, and
Amount of
expenses, including
amount of interfloating debt.
ofdebt.^
est paid.
repairs.

$5,000 00
$155,000 00
Alabama and Mississippi $325,000 00^ $150,000 00
River Railroad Company.
700,000 00
875,343 63
90,000 00
Alabama and Tennessee
790,000 00
River Railroad Company.
^'*'Mobilp & New Orleans
- - - - - Nothiner - - - 35,600 00 None- - - . _ - -_ None Railroad Company.
JMobile & Ohio Railroad 2,700,000 00 1,000,000 00 1,650,000 00
2,650,000 00
Gompany.
617,782 64
Montgomery and West 1,247,533 00
791,551 28
174,768 64
Point Railroad Company.
fNortheast and Southwest Alabama Railroad
Company.

8 per cent
$75,228 80

$44,052 23 7 and 8 per cent.,
($51,000 paid.)

263,898 96

$90,696 72 8 per cent

400,000 00

200,000 00 7 per cent., ($60,400
paid.)

pi
td
©
pi

©

ffl
td

a
• td

^^ Road not completed ; no part flnished or in operation.
f T h e road just laid down ; no further statistics furnished.
J These statistics embrace the working of the road to Macon, Mississippi, 198 miles, completed and in operation at this time.




CO
Ox

Ot

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Alabama—Continued.
Corporate name of company

*-'Alabama and Mississippi River Railroad Company.
Alabama and Tennessee
River Railroad Company.
Mobile and New Orleans
Railroad Company.
Mobile and Ohio Railroad
Company.
Montgomery and West
Point Railroad Company.
Northeast and Southv>^est Alabama Railroad
Gompany.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

c;x
o

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- iNo. of tons of through
by [passenger hy freight trains passengers per
fieight per year.
gers per year.
trains per y'r. per year.
year.

"
pi
$31,176 57 None

49,579

45,072

4,200

9,330

1,840

hi
©
pi
©

162,781 62 None 200,000 00 7 per cent.

No r e t u r n . . - . . No return
168,630

126,290

7,974

24,633

21,825

No return

63,512

21,256

ffl

td

©
td

^ The work is not completed, and the portion finished has been worked for so short a period that no satisfactory statistics can be given,




Bailroad Statistics of the United Stdies-^^Alabania-^Gohtmned..
Corporate iiame of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed Average speed No. of fa tal ca- No. of casualcarried during the ried during the year, of passenger
freight per year.
sualties for ties not fatal
pany. ~
of
year^ or the equiva- or the equivalent trains.
the year.
freight trains.
for the year*.
lent number of pas- number of tons carsengers carrried for ried for one mile,
one mile.
Alabama and Mississippi
River Railroad Com=
pany.
Alabama and Tennessee
18,780 , 673, 221 passengers car- 136,090 tons CaMed 17 miles per
ried one mile.
hour.
Rivei' Railroad Com^
one mile.
pany.
Mobile and New Orleans
Railroad Company.
Mobile and Ohio Railroad No i^eturUi
1, 673j 533 passengers No return^^._.^^ii.. No return
Company.
carried one mile.
Montgomery and West
10,628 4j 450, 000 passengers 2, 660j 700 tons carried 20 miles per
Point Railroad Comhour.
carried one mile.
one mile.
pany.
Northeast and Southwest Alabama Railroad
'
Company.




5^
10 miles per None ..
hour.

^. None - - - ^ - « -

hj
©
pi

O

ffl
10 miles per None
houi*.

^ - None _ - -

td

a

td
cn

CO

Ol

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

00
Ox
00

MISSISSIPPIo
Corporate name of company. Date of char- ^Commenced. Completed; or, if not, Termini of main road Length of themain Length of the Cost of the road
when expected to
road and branches. double track. completed, or
ter.
and branches.
be.
estimated, if
not completed.
Mississippi Central Railroad March, 1852. Dec, 1 8 5 3 . . . Expected to be in Canton and Tennes- 183 m i l e s - - . . - . . - None1858, (25 miles see State line, near
Company.
completed.)
grand junction.
Mississippi & Tennessee Rail- October, 1852 June, 1854 - , To be completed in Memphis', Tenn., and 100 miles, (30 miles None1859.
road ^Company.
Grenada, Miss.
in operation.)
New Orleans, Jackson, and AprU 22,1852 Dec, 1 8 5 2 . . . Expected to be fin- NewOrleans, La.,and 410 miles, (100 None,
---.
ished to Canton in Chickasaw, Ala.
Great Northern Railroad
miles comple1858, and to Chickted.)
Company,
asaw, on the Tennessee river, in
1860.
Finished 14 miles, to Jackson & Alabama 114 miles
1846.
None . , - , - - - ^ - Southern-Railroad Company.
1837.
Brandon ; remain- State line.
der unfinished, and
no time known
when it will be
completed.
1851,
1850.
Bolton Depot, or 7 m i l e s - - - « « - , , , . None — , , - , . ,
Raj^mond Bailroad Oompany, Not incorpoJackson railroad,
rated,
and Raymond.
1836.
October 1, 1841 . . . . Vicksburg and Jack- 46 m i l e s - . - - 1835.
None - - , Vicksburg and Jackson Railson.
road Company.




$3,200,000
" 2,000,000
^
10,000.000
(estimated.)

pi
td
©
pi

©

ffl
td

1,600,000

o
td

cn

SO,000
2,235,000

Eailroad Statistics of the United States-^^dlississippi—Continued*
Corporate name of company

Capital stock
paid iu.

^''Mississippi Central Eailroad Sl,211,857
Company.
-j-Mississippi & Tennessee Rail*
618,000
road Conipany.
New Orleans, Jackson, and 3,987,781
Great Northern Railroad
Company.
§Southern Railroad Company
80,000
IIRaymond Railroad Oompany

Amount of Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of op era- Annual rate, and
rating expenses,
amount of inof debt.
ing debt.
bonds issued.
including repairs.
terest paid.
$183,067 70

00 None .-o--*.^..*

126,000 00

125,000 00

07 None -. - - .i - - - - -

769,936 26

769,935 26^

'

$183,067 70

86 None i ... -

pi
td
t l 2 3 , 0 4 3 58

$111,367 00 From 6 to 14 per
cent., ($79,162 86
paid.)

00

30,000 00 None i

©
pi
©

None - - - - - - . - Nothino".. -..-a- -

Vicksburg and Jackson Rail- 2,235,000 00 None .;.;«^^---- None - - - - - - - - Nothing
road Oompany.

..»*--

192,427 77

112,175 65 None

--

ffl
td
»^

^ There are 25 miles of this toad finished and in operation; but having been worked for six months only, no statistics of working, &c., furnished,
f Thirty miles of road finished and operated on ; but this being for the last few months only, no working statistics furnished.
% The road opened and Avorked to Osyka, 88 miles. Th^se statistics apply to that portion.
^ § Further operations upon this i-oad suspended:
II This road is owned and worked by a private individual. No statistics of operations have been furnished.




>
a
td

Crx

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—dlississippi-—Gontinued,

CO

o
Corporate name of company. Net- annual
profits.

No. of miles run by Nq, of miles run by No. of through No. of way i7assen No. of tons of thro'
passenger trains freight trains per pa.ssengers per gers per year.
freight per year.
year.
year.
per year.

Dividends.

Mississippi .Central Bailroad
er
Company.
Mississippi & Tennessee Railroad Company.
New Orieans, Jackson, and $U,67g 50 None ^
Great Northern Railroad
Gompany.
Southern Railroad Conipany.

e . ,.

td,

70,300

35,826

None „ . - .

33,391 None - . , , „ - -

pi
©

Raymorid Railroad Oompany.
Vi,cli:^burg ar*d Jackson Rail- '80,252 12 Noae ^
road Company.




o

-,

28,729

.36,645

12,496

30,324

15,280

ffl
td

>^
>
O
t^
cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Mississippi—Continued.
Corporate name of company. No. of tons of way Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Average speed of Average speed of No. of total No. of casualgers carried du- carried during passenger trains.
freight per year.
freight trains.
casualties for ties not faring the year, or the year, or the
tal for the
the year.
the equivalent equivalent numyear.
number of pas- ber of tons carsengers carried ried for one mile.
for one mile.
pi
Mississippi Central Railroad
Company.
Mississippi & Tennessee Railroad Company.
New Orleans, Jackson, and
Great Northern Railroad
Company.
Southern Railroad Company.

20 miles per hour. 15 miles per hour. None . . .

None

20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None

None

td
hd
©

19,533 1,440,425 passen- 1,289,345 tons car- 30 miles per hour. 20 miles per hour. None
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.
10 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None ,

One

15,489 1,117,582 passen- 1,281,352 tons car- 18 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour. None
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.

,---

pi

None

None

©

ffl
td

Rtiymond Riilroad Company.
Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad Company.




Cl
td

00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

eo
to

^ LOUISIANA.
Corporate name of com- Date of char- Commenced Completed; or, if not, when Termini of main road and
pany.
ter.
expected to be.
of branches.

Baton Rouge, Grosse Tete,
and Opelousas Railroad
Company.

1853.

1833.
Clinton and Port Hudson
Railroad Company.
New Orleans, Jackson, and
Great Northern Railroad
Company.*
New Orleans, Opelousas, May, 1852...
and Great Western Railroad Company.

Length of main Length of Cost of the road
road and of the double complete, or estrack, if timated cost, if
branches.
any.
not completed.

.Jan., 1855... Expected to be completed, Baton Rouge and Opelousas 52 miles
-.'. None
16 miles, to Grosse-Tete,
April, 1857; rest, not
known when.
1841.
1834.
Port Hudson and Clinton.. 22 miles . . . .
None

Estimated, at
$675,000 00
' 750, 000 00

©

ffl
td

Not completed, and time New Orleans and Texas. Mainline 325mis.; 11 miles.. Estimated at
when, very uncertain; dis- Branches.—N. Iberia to Raceland branch
8,000,000 00
tance finished, 73 miles ; Breaux bridge; Raceland 2 mis.; N. Iberia
new construction to Ber- to Bayou Lafourche.
13 mis.; 73 miles
'
wick's bay.
in operation.
Vicksburg, Shreveport, and July 4,1852- July, 1854... Contracted to be completed On Mississippi river, oppo- 190 miles
None
Estimated at
site to Vicksbuig, and
Texas Railroad Company.
by January 1, 1862.
5,000,000 00
Texas State line west of
Shreveport.




td
©
pi

1852.

- The statistics of this company have been already given in the Mississippi table.

>
Cl

td
cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Louisiana—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount , Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rates, and
tive expenses, in- amount of interof debt.
iu.
issued.
ing debt.
pany.
cluding repairs.
est paid.
Baton Rouge, Grosse Tete,
and Opelousas Railroad
Company.*
Clinton and Port Hudson
Railroad Company t
New Orleans .Tackson. and
' Great Northern Railroad
Company.
New Orleans, Opelousas,
and Great Western Railroad Company.
Vicksburg, Shreveport, and
Texas Railroad Conapauy.t




$141,824 00 None . - « . - -

None

- . - . . - . . NothinsT.........

$500,000 00

$300,000 00

3,000, 000 00 None . . - - . . . . . « •

33, 000 00

33,000 00

56, 965 00

77,000 00

417,663 00 None -.

.--

pi
td

.

$800, 000 00

200,000 00

h3
©
•pi

$200,000 00

$100,000 00 6 to 10 per cent.

©

ffl

* Road not completed—no part of it yet in operation; no statistics furnished,
t No further sta,tistics furnished; nothing known of working operations.

a

I Road not completed; no part in operation at this time.

td
CO

CO
©:>
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—-Louisiana—Oontinued.
0^

Corporate name of company.

Bafon RonofG Grosse Tete
and Opelousas Railroad
Company.
Clinton and Port Hudson
Railroad Company.
New Orleans, Jackson, and
Great Northern -Railroad
Company.
New Orleans, Opelousas,
and Great Western Railroad Company.
Vicksburg, Shreveport, aud
Texas Railroad Company.




Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
passenger trains freight trains per passengers per
gers per year.
through freight
year.
per year.
year.
per year.

-

(
^
-.

pi
td

hj

©
ffl
©

$100,000 00 None yet; earnings
expended in the
construction of
the road.

50,000

40,000

57,000
Included in pre40, 000
way and through. ceding.
way and through.
ffl
td

'

>
Cl

w
cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Louisiana—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casucasualties alties not
freight per year. carried during the year, ried during the year, or passenger trains. freight trains.
pany.
or the equivalent num- the equivalent number
for
the fatal fbr
ber of passengers car- of tons carried one
year.
the year.
ried one mile.
mile-

;^

Baton Rouge, Grosse Tete,
and Opelousas Railroad
Company.
Clinton and Port Hudson
Railroad Company.
New Orleans, Jackson, and
Great Northern Railroad
Company.
New Orleans, Opelousas, Included in pre- 1,-560,000 passengers car- 2,760,000 tons carried one 20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour.
and Great Western Rail- ceding.
ried one mile.
mile.
road Company.
Vicksburg, Shreveport, and
Texas Railroad Company.




Pi
hd
©

ffl

©

2

2

ffl
td

'

o

td
cn

CO
Ox

03

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
TEXAS.
Corporate name of com- Date of char- Commenced. Completed; or, if not, when Termini of main road and
pany.
ter.
of branches.
expected to be.

Length of main Length of Cost of the road
road and of the double complete, or estrack, if timated cost, if
branches.
not completed.
any.
ffl
td

Houston and Texas Central March 11, Jan. 1, 1853. 50 miles to be completed Red river, near Fulton and Main stem 385 mis. None .
May 1, 1857; remainder Houston. Branch to Aus- Austin branch 100
Railway Company.
1848.
uncertain when; 27 miles tin and one to Galveston. miles; Galveston
branch 56 miles.
in operation.

$11,580,000 00

^
o.
pi
>^
©

ffl
td

Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Anuual receipts. Amount of opera- Aunual rates, and
ing debt.
tive expenses, in- amountof interpany.
issued.
of debt.
in.
cluding repairs.
est paid. ^

M

^^
\>
a

td
cn

Houston and Texas Central Railway Company,




$250 000 00

$300, 000 00

$25,000 00

$325, 000 00

$62,000,00 No return.

7 per cent.

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Texas—Oontinued.
Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Houston and Texas Central No return
Railway Company,

Dividends.

None . . . . . . . - - . .

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
gers per year
through freight
passenger trains freight trains per passengers per
year.
per year.
year.
per year.
18, 250

Attached to passenger train.

15, 000

No return

--.

15,000

ffl
hj

©
ffl
©

Corporate name of com- iNo. of tons of way Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casucasualties alties not
pany.
freight per year. carried during the year, ried dunng the year, or passenger trains. freight trains.
for
th
fatal for
or the equivalent num- the equivalent number|
year,^
the year.
ber of passengers car- of tons carried o
mile.
ried one mile.
Houston and Texas Central No return..
Railway Company.




375,000 passengers car- 375,000 tons carried one 20 miles per hour Same as passenger None .
trains.
ried one mile.
mile.

ffl

>
O
td
cn

00

CO

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States.
ARKANSAS.
Corporate name of company.

Date of charter.

Expected to be complete Opposite mouth of 372 miles
None .
the Ohio and Ful
in 1861.
ton. Ark.
- - . Aug. 5,1855... 39 miles will be ready for Napoleon and Little 99^ main ; 40 None ,
branch
the iron January, 1857; 6U Rock.
miles by January, 1850;
40 (bifcEch) iinceriain

Cairo and Fulton Railroad Jan. 12, 1853.
Company.
Little Rock and Napoleon . . - - . . d o
Railroad Company.

Commenced. Completed; or, if not, when Termini of main Length of the Length ofthe Cost of the road
road and branches main road and double track, completed, or esexpected to be.
timated co8t,if not
if any.
branches.
completed.

1856.

Estiraated at
$7,528,341 00.
1,257, 402 00

ffl
td
©

ffl
©

>^
ffl
td

Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in.

Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of oper- Annual rates, and
ating expenses, amount of inissued.
of debt.
ing debt.
' including repairs. terest paid.

>

o
td

Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company.-*
Little Rock and Napoleon
Railroad Company.-




$580,000 00 None

'$6, 500 00

$6,500 00

310,000 00 None

8,161 80

8,161 80

* Road not completed ; no part yet in operation.

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United Stcdes—A7'Jcansas-^Continned.
Corporate name of company.
to

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
gers per year.
way freight per
passenger trains freight trains per passengers per
year.
year.
per year.
. year.

Cairn and Fulton Railroad
Company.
Little Rock and Napoleon
Railroad Company,

pi

>

©

ffl
©
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers
pany.
way freight per carried during the year,
year.
or the equivalent number of passengers carried for one mile.
Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company.
Little Rock and Napoleon
Raih-oad Company.




Mileage of freight car- Average speed Average speed No. of fatal casu- No. of casualties
ried during the year, of passenger of freight trains alties for the not fatal for the
year.
year.
or the equivalent num- trains.
ber of tons carried for
one mile.

'•

ffl
td

a
cn

'

CO

Railroad Statistics of the United States.
TENNESSEE.

CO

o

Corporate name of com- Dato of char- Commenced. Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
and branches.
road and branches. double track, ' completed; or ester.
when expected to
pany.
if any.
be.
timated cost,if not
eompleted.
CinGinnati,Cumberland Gap, Nov. 18, 1853 Nov. 15,1855 Not completed; ex- Cumberland Gap and 90 miles . . . - - : . = . . . . None . . . . . . .
Estimated at
pected to be fin- Paint Rock, on the
and Charleston Railroad
$2,200, 000 00
Broad river.
ished in 1861.
Company.
Knoxville, Tenn., and Main 110 miles, branch None . . .
June, 1855
2,500,000 00
1848,
East Tennessee and Georgia Feb. 4,1848
Dalton, Ga.; branch to 30 miles; now being
Railroad Company,.
750,000 for br'nch,
constructed.
Chattanooga.
None
.;.. McMinnville and Tulla- 35 miles .
McMinnville and Manches- Feb, 4,1850 May 1,1853 Nov., 1856
560, 000 00
honaa.
ter Railroad Company.
Memphis and Charleston Feb. 2,1846 Nov. 1,1851 Expected to be fin- Memphis, Tenn., and Main, 271^ miles ; None
5,215,962 45
ished by April 1, Stevenson, Ala.; branch branches, 15^ miles;
Railroad Company,
to Somerville, Tenn.; total, 286| miles; 88
1857,
branch to Tuscumbia, miles in operation.
Ala.




ffl
td
hi
©

ffl
©

ffl
i2j

Cl

td
m

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Tennessee—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock
paid in. ^

Amount of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount
issued.
of debt.
ing debt.

Cincinnati,Cumberland Gap, $1,325,000 00 None
and Charleston Railroad (including State
appropriation of
Company.*
$1,000,000.)
1,000,000 00
$1,370, 000 00
East Tennessee and Georgia
Railroad Company.
S24,000 00
McMinnville and Manchester Railroad Company.
118,825 00 ($300,000 issued
by the State iucluded. )
1,851,800 00
Memphis and Charleston
Railroad Company.
2,800,000 00

$.35, 000 00

$35,000 00

130, odo 00

1,500, 000 00

©

10,000 00

332,961 45

* Road not completed yet; no part in operatibn.




Annual receipts. Amount of oper- Annual rates, and
ating expenses, amount of inincluding repairs. terest paid.

$250, 000 00

$100,000 00 6 per cent

334,000 00 7 per ct. on $24,000, No r e t u r n . . . . . . . No r e t u r n . . „ _ - . .
6 p'rct. on $300,000;
am't paid, $19,680.
2,184,761 45

t.256, 836 51

tll5,972 82 6 per cent, and 7
per cent.t

ffl
Hi

©

ffl

t These statistics apply to 88 miles in operation=
cn

00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States

Tennessee—Continued.

CO

to
Corporate name of company.

Cincinnati^ Cumberland Gap
and Charleston Railroad
Company.
East Tennessee and Georgia
Railroad Company.*
McMinnville and Manchester Railroad Company.t
Memphis and Charleston
Railroad Company.




Net annual
profits.

$150,000 00

Dividends.

No. of miles run by No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
gers per year.
passenger trains freight trains per passengers per
way freight per
year.
year.
per year.
year.

ffl
td

./..

hj
©

ffl

n40, 863 69 None . . - - . .

No r e t u r n . . . . . . .

* Company has been operating so short a time that satisfactory working statistics cannot now be furnished,
t Road has been in operation so short a time that working statistics cannot now be furnished.
X These statistics apply to 88 miles in operation.

©

^
ffl
td

>
Cl

td

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Tennessee—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed oflAverage speed of No. of fatal No. of casualfreight trains. casualties for ties not fatal
way freight.per carried during the year, ried during the year, passenger trains
pany.
the year.
year
for the year.
or the equivalent num- or the equivalent number of passengers car- ber of tons carried for
'one mile.
ried for one mile.
Cincinn ati, Cumberland Gap,
and Charleston Railroad
Company.
East Tennessee and Georgia
Railroad Company.
McMinnville and Manches. ter Railroad Company.
Memphis and Charleston
Railroad Company.




ffl.
td
hj'

20 miles per hour 12 miles per hour None
16 miles per hour

do

None

20 miles per hour 15 miles per hoiir None

-.

1
None . . - - - . .

©

ffl
H

©,

None -. --

ffl

td.

©
td!
cn

OD.
<<?

00

Bailroadj Statistics ofi the United States,
4i^

KENTUCKY.
Corporate name of com- Pate of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of main road Length of Cost of the road
the double complete, or esand of branches.
and of branches.
when expected to be.
pany.
track, if timated cost, if
any. "
not completed.

ffl
Covington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad

Covington and Lexing- 100 miles . . „ . . - . . . None
1856.
and Lexington Feb. 29, 1849.. April 10, 1850 .
ton.
Company,
and Big Sandy March 7, 1852. April, 1854.... Expected to be finishedLexington and mouth 133 miles. - - - . „ . . .
None
in 1859; one third of Big Sandy river.
Company.
now finished.
and Danville March 5, 1850. Nov. 20, 1852.. Expected to be com- Lexington and Dan- Main line 35 miles;
pleted Jan. 1, 1.^^59; ville-^branch to Har- branch to Harrods- None.
Company.
burg 5 miles.
21 miles graded, &c. rodsburg.
.^.--,
Lexington and Frank- 29 miles
and Frankfort Feb. 28, 1848.. October, 1848 . March, 1849
None , - --.
fort.
Company.
and Frankfort March 1, 1847.
Louisville and Frank- 65 miles . . . . - - - - . None
September, 1851
1847,
fort.
Company.
Expected to be finish- Louisyille and Nash- 184^mis.main; Leb- None ,
and Nashville March, 1850... May, 1853
ed by 1859; Similes ville—branch to Leb- anon branch 37^;
Company.
anon and State line. Memphis br'ch 45.
now completed.




$4,000,000 00
4,000,000 00

td.

hj

©
ffl
O

1,400,000 00

ffl
637,071 93
1,543,651 07
Main, $5,500, 000;
branch to Lebanon, C$641, 0 0 0 ^
$6,141,000.

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States-—Kentucky—Continued.

Corporate name of company.

Capital stock paid
in.

Amount of bonds
issued.

Covington and Lexington
Railroad Company.
^Lexington and Big Sandy
Railroad Company.

$1,300,000 00

$2,000,000 00

$600,000 00

$2,600, 000 00

No bonds issued, but
some are now being
prepared for issue,
41,000 00

140,000 00

140,000 00

23,734 66

61,734 66

681,000 00

tLexington and Danville
694,444 69
Railroad'Compatiy.
Lexington and Frankfort
430jO55 55
Railroad Company,
Louisville and Frankfort
861,862 50
Railroad Company.
^Louisville and Nashville Main, $3, 500, 000
Railroad Company.
Branch, 350,000




Amount of float- Aggregate Annual receipts. Amount of the Annual rate and
ing debt.
operating ex- amount of interest
amount ofdebt.
penses, includ- paid.
ing repairs.
$406,000 00 .

$175,000 00

6 and 7 per cent.—
$170, 000 paid.

td
©

ffl

153, 804 00

None

678,616 37

Nothing

.

©

163,804 50

93,263 36

49,628 15

678,616 37

237, 047 81

145,089 61

6 per cent
•

None.----

.107,00 00

6 per cent.—$39,874 07 paid.

^

ffl

td

107,000 00

"^' Road not completed ; no part of it yet in operation.
t Road not completed; no part of it in operation.
t Road not fully completed, and the part operated on not worked long enough for reliable statistics.

t2|
Cl

td

CO
Ox

CO

Railroad Statistica ofi the United States^^rr-Kentucky^^^Qontixined,

Corporate name of com- Net aftuual profits.
papy.
"

Covington
Railroad
JiCxington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Jvexington
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad

and Le^^ingtop
Company.
and Big Sandy
Compapy.
and Danville
Company.
and Frankfort
Company.
and Frankfort
Company.
and Nashville
Compaiiy.




•

Dividends,

•

^"^

No.of miles rjin by No. of miles run No. of through No. of way pas- No. of tons of
passenger trains by freight trains passengers per sengers per year. freight through
year.
per year.
per year.
fpr the yeaj".

•

|231, 000 00

No return

1^6,300

83; 333

21), 580

9.2,630

34,809

ffl
©

43,63^ %l

6 per (jent..----.

37,620

9A^ 065

37, 467

180, 51

18, 000

91,958 ^0

|fone. . , . ^.. ^ . . .

100,643

46j 471

38,845

65,806

20, 386

•

©

ffl
ffl

o

td
cn

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Kentucky—Oontinued.

Corporate name of com- No. of toLS of way Amountof mileage of pas- No. of tons of freight car- A^p.rage speed of Average speed ofNo. of fatal No. of casufreight for the sengers carried during ried during the year, or passenger trains. freight trains,
casualties alties not
pany.
year.
during the fatal durthe year, or the equiva- the equivalent number
year.
lent number of passen- of tons of freight carried
ing
the
gers carried one mile. ' for one mile.
year.
Covington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Lexington
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad
Louisville
Railroad

and Lexington
Company.
and Big Sandy
Company.
and Danville
Company.
and Frankfort
Company.
and Frankfort
Company.
and Nashville
Company,




69, 600

5, 660,700
passengers 4,760,000 ton's carried 21 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. O n e . . . . . . Three - - . .
on^ mile, .
carried one mile
•

ffl
©
•ffl

'
©

6, 000
15,523

1, 381,496
carried one
4, 034, 045
carried one

passcHgers 612,000 tons carried one 19^ miles per hour. 10^ miles per hour. None
mile.
mile.
passengers 1,8.29,587 tons carried 19.2 miles per 7^ miles per hour. One
mile.
one mile.hour.

None
H3

None

ffl
ffl

CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

CO

00

MISSOUEI.
Corporate name =of com- Date of char ter. Commenced.
pany.

Completed, or if not,
when expected to be.

Termini of main road Length of the Length of
main road and the double
and branches.
branches.
track, if
any.

Estimated time of com- Hannibal and St. Joseph 206^% miles, (60 None
miles finished and
pletion May, 1858.
in operation.
North Missouri Railroad March 3, 1851. May 17, 1854.. Expected to be com- St. Louis and Iowa State 228miles,(20mls. None
pleted in 1859.
completed,
Line.
Company.
do
Nov. 16, 1853.. Estimated to be com- St. Louis and Pilot Knob, 84^ miles
None
St, Louis and Iron Mounpleted May 1, 1857.
Iron Mountain.
tain Railroad Company.
Pacific Railroad of Mis- March 12,1849 Aug.l, 1851... Road not yet completed; St. Louis and Kansas Mam 280 miles; None
opened to Jefferson City, main line. S. W. S. W. branch
souri,
City, 125 miles, March branch is from Frank- 282 miles.
6, 1856.
lin and the State Line,
15 miles west of Neosho.
Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company.^
Hannibal and St. Joseph Feb. 16, 1847.. May, 1853
Railroad Company.




Cost of the road
completed, or
estimated
if
not completed.
$3,000,000 00

ffl
td
hd
©

ffl

9,654,300 55
©

4,100,000 00
Both roads estimated $21,030,000.

ffl
td

>

"A
Cl

td
* The statistics of this road are given in the table for the State of Arkansas,

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Missouri—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Capital stock Amount of bonds issued. Amountof float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of operat- Annual rate and
paid in.
of debt.
ing expenses, in- amount of intering debt.
cluding repairs. est paid.

•

Hannibal and St. Joseph
$4,000,000 00
N o n e . . . . . . . . . $4, 000,000 00
$456,733 20
Railroad Company.* .
North Missouri Railroad 1,311,330 92 None issued by the com- Noue . . . . . . . . Have received of
Company.t
State
credit
pany. The State has
$1,050,000.
loaned the company
its credit for $4,000,000.
St. Louis and Iron Moun- 1, 319,277 93 None . . . . . « . - . . . . - - . . $67,215 00
67,215 00
tain Railroad Company.
Pacific Railroad of Mis- 2,825,943 02
3,170, 000 00
4,154,830 16
984,830 16
souri.
Being ends issued by
State of Missouri to
credit of road.
Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company,




ffl
td
>^
o
pi

^
6 per cent
$163,094 59

••' Road not completed; the part operated on has not been worked long enough for statistics,
t Road not completed; the finished part not worked long enough for reliable statistics.

$128,962 10 6 per cent, on
fundeddebt; 10
percent, on floating debt.

ffl
td

a

td
cn

CO

CO
GO
O

Bailroad Statistics ofi the United States—Missouri—Continued.
Corporate name of company.

Hannibal and St. Joseph
Railroad Company.
North Missoui'i Railroad
Company.
St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad Company.^"•
Pacific Railroad of Missouri.!
Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company.

Net annual profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through
by passenger by freight trains passeugers per
year.
trains per year. per year.

No. of way passengers
per
year.

No. of tons of
through freight
per year.

.

^

ffl
td
h3
©

ffl
$34,132 49

None - . . . . . . - - . .

75,214

56,918

None; road being
incomplete.

115,003

None; road not
completed.

* Road not completed; no part in operation.
t These working statistics only apply to the portion finished in 1855; the results in the portion of 1856 much more encouraging.




©

ffl

!2{

Cl

td

'Cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Missouri—Oontinued.
Corporate name of com- No of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight car- Average speed of
way freight carried during the year, ried during the year, or passenger trains.
pany.
per year.
or the equivalent num- the equivalent number
ber of passengers car- of tons of freight carried for one mile.
ried for one mile.
Hannibal and St. Joseph
Railroad Company.
North Missouri Railroad
' Company, :.
St, Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad Company.
Pacific Railroad of Missouri.
Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Company.




Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casucasualties alties not
freight trains.
for
the fatal for
year.
the year.

ffl
©

ffl

'

1^

o
45,464

3,115,428
passengers 1,409,294 tons carried 20 miles per hour . . 10 miles per hour . .
carried one mile.
one mile.

5

None

ffl
td

o

td

02

CO
QO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
OHIOo
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany. ,

Commenced.

to

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track, completed, or
when expected to
and branches.
if any.
branches.
be.
estimated,
if
not completed.

None
Ashtabula and New Lis- February 18, 1853. November, 1854 Expected to be com- Ashtabula Harbor, 84 miles
$1,302,000 00
pleted inSeptember, Lake Erie, and New
bon Railroad Company.
Lisbon.
1858.
1849. . July, 1852
_ G-alion and Union 118 miles
~ 1849.
None
Bellfontaine and Indiana
2,835,835 00
City, at Indiana St.
Railroad Company.
line.
Cleveland and Co- 135 mils, main ; 37 miles.
1852.
Cleveland, Columbus and March 14, 1836.-. March 12, 1846.
4,613,722 88
lumbus ; branch to 6 miles branch.
Cincinnati Railroad Co.
Delaware.
1853.
Expected to be in Cleveland, Ohio, and 85 miles, 67 un- None
Cleveland and Mahoning February 22, 1848.
2,500,000 00
1857.
Railroad Company.
Newcastle, Penn.
finished.
Estimated
Cleveland and St. Louis
1854.
1853.
Expected to be in Cleveland, Ohio, and 500 miles
None
9,000, 000 00
1858.
Railroad Company.
St. Louis, Missouri:
Estimated
1851,
Not yet completed— Hudson and Zanes- 114 miles, 70 None
Cleveland, Zanesville and February 19,1851.
2,500,000 00
Cincinnati Railroad Co.
not known when it ville.
iniles finished.
will be.
Cleveland, Madison and March 20, 1851. __ March, 1853..-- N. division 1857 ; re- Grafton and Bridge- 130 miles2,800,000 00
None
Tuscarawas Railroad Co.
mainder not known port.
when.
Cleveland, Painesville & February 18, 1848. March, 1851
November, 1852
Cleveland, Ohio, and 9.5 J miles
None—30 miles 3,159,216 00
Ashtabula Railroad Co.
Erie, Pennsylvania.
graded.
Cincmnati,Hamilton and Mareh 2,1846
Cincinnati and Day- 60 miles
1850,
Octoberl, 1851
2,987,757 88
- - . 15 miles.
Dayton Railroad Comton.
pany.




CO
0©

ffl
td

©
ffl
©

ffl
td

td
cn

Marietta, Cincinnati, and 1
MarchS, 1 8 4 5 , . . . May, 1851
Hillsboro' Branch Railroad Company.

Expected to be com- Cincinnati & Wheel- Main—255 miles ISTone
pleted in 1858,(198 ing, main ; Blanch- Branch—22 m's.
ester to Hillsboro',
miles finished.
branch.
Cincinnati and Mackinaw (
October 23, 1853.. Surveys made, Expected to be in Carlisle Station,War- 141f miles
None - .
but work not December, 1859.
ren county, Ohio, &
Railroad Company.
yet commehc'd
Michigan State line,
near Amboy.
Clinton Line Extension J
April 9, 1 8 5 3 - - . - September, 1853 Expected to be Sep- Hudson and Tiffin. 94T^ miles
None
Railroad Company.
tember, 1858.
Clinton Line Railroad i u l y S , 1852
J
July, 1863
Expected to be in Hudson and Kins- 65y^ miles
None
Company.
1867.
man on the Ohio
and Pennsylvania
State line.
Columbus and Xenia I
March 12, 1844... March 1, 1848.. February 25, 1850-. Columbus and Xenia. 54J miles
None
Railroad Company.
Dayton and Cincinnati ]
February 6, 1847. December, 1852 Expected to be com- Cincinnati and Day- 52 miles
None
Railroad Company.
pleted in 1857;
ton.
Dayton and Michigan 1
MarchS, 1 8 5 1 . - . . January, 1852.. Expected to be com- Dayton and Toledo. 140 miles, (28 None
Railroad Company.
pleted in January,
miles finished
and in opera1858.
tion.
Dayton and Western 1
Dayton and Ohio and 37. 28 miles
Februaryl4, 1846. Feb. 1, 1 8 4 9 . . . March 13, 1853
None - Railroad Company.
Indiana State line. 60 miles,- (16
Dayton, Xenia, and Bel16 miles completed Dayton and point on miles comple- ^Tone
1851.
1853.
pre Railroad Company.
between Dayton and the Cincinnati and ted.)
• Xenia —cannot say Maiietta railroad.
when remainder will
be finished.
Eaton and Hamilton Rail- February, 1847--_ June, 1 8 4 8 . - - . . May 1,1853.
Hamilton, Ohio, and 45 miles
None
road Company.
Richmond, Ind.
Four Mile Yalley Rail- March 11, 1849.-1852.
State line connecting 34 miles
None
road Company.
Expected to be com- with Cincinnati and
Fort Wayne railpleted 1857.
road and Hamilton.
OBVemont and Indiana Aprn25, 1853
i
Expect to have 88 Fremont and Union 120 miles
Sept., 1853
None
miles finished in City.
Railroad Company,
1857 and remainder in 1858.




10,867, 647 49

9,000,000 00

2,500,000 00
1,700,000 00

1,481,733 54
Estimated
2,500,000
Estimated'
4, soo; 000

at
00
at
00

996,904 57

ffl
td
©
ffl
©

ffl
td
»-H

1,800,000 00
©
td

1,370,000 00
1,600,000 00

2,400,000 00
0®
OD
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Ohio—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced.

00
00

Completed, or if not, Termini of main Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
double track, completed, or
1 when expected to road and branches. main road and
if any.
branches.
estimated, if
be.
not completed.

Iron Railroad Company. March 17, 1849.-. June, 1850._._'- Cannot say when it Ironton and Ohio 47 miles, (13 None .*
will be completed. River, and line of in operation.)
Cincinnati and Belpre railroad.
Cincinnati & Xenia, 65 mHes—18 20 miles
Little Miami and Xenia
1838.
1847.
1836.
branch to Spring- miles branch.
' Railroad Company,
field.
Sandusky and Day- 157 miles main ; None - - Mad River and Lake Erie January 5, 1832.. Sept., 1835--.1852.
ton, main ; Find- 16 miles br'ch.
Railroad Company,'
lay and Carey,
branch.
Marietta and Cincinnati March 8, 1845.--- May, 1851
About 200 miles com- Cincinnati & Wheel- Main, 255 miles None Railroad Company.
pleted—remainder .ing, Blan Chester to Branch, 21 '<
expected by Jan- Hillsboro' branch.
uary 1, 1858. •
276 "
Central Ohio Railroad February 8, 1847.
November 1, 1855-. Columbus and Bell 138 miles
1849.
None
Company.
Aire, on Ohio river.
Ohio and Mississippi Rail- February 14, 1848.
1851.
Estimated time for Eastern Division, Cin22mnes
road Company, eastern
completion Jan. 1, cinnati to Vincen- 192 miles.
nes, Indiana.
division.
1857.
Painesville and Hudson August 7, 1852.-- October, 1854-. Estimated to be com- Fairport, on Lake
None . - Railroad Company.
pleted in August, Erie, and Hudson, 4 2 J m i l e s . - - - - Summit county.
1857. •
Pittsburg, Maysville and March2, 1849..-- July 1, 1853..-. Expect 20 miles next Junction of SteubenNone
_
Cincinnati
Railroad
spring, 1857 ; re- ville and Indiana 225 miles
Company.
mainder uncertain Railroad, in Harrison county, and
when.
Aberdeen, opposite
Maysville, Ky.



$500,000, (actual cost of
completed part
$185,000.)
3,724,510 20
4,595,681 87

td
©

ffl
©

ffl
10,857,647 49
5^

• $6,500,000
15,000,000
Ij094,000
5,850,000

Cl
td
cn

1844.

Sandusky and New- 116 miles main. None
ark, main; branch 10 miles branch.
to Huron.
June, 1851
June, 1853, comple- Springfield and Co- 43 miles, (19J None
ted to London ; re- lumbus.
completed.)
mainder unknown
when.
1861.
49 miles now com- Springfield, Ohio, and 112 miles, (49 Nose
Springfield, Mount Vernon artd Pittsburg Rail- March 21, 1850.-pleted, remainder Lakeville station, miles compleroad Company,
expected to be in on Pittsburg, Fort ted.
Wayne', and Chica1857.
go Railroad.
Steubenville and Indiana February 24, 1848. November, 1851
1855.
Steubenville & New- 116 miles, 8 None
Railroad Company.
. ark brarich to Cadiz. '"• miles branch.
Tiffin and- Fort Wayne December 6, 1853. May 1, 1 8 5 4 . - - Expect to be Septem- Tiffin, Ohio, and Fort 102 miles
. None
Railroad Company.'
ber, 1857.
• Wayne, Indiana. ^
Toledo, Wabash &: West-.August 14, 1856 ; June, 1853.
None
November 1, 1856.- Toledo, Ohio, and 250 miles
em Railroad Company'.' consolidated from
Danville, Illinois."
two companies.
Sandusky, Mansfield and Reorganized
Newark Railroad Com- 25, 1846.
pany.
Springfield and Columbus Railroad Company.
1850.




July

-

1848.

---

2,400,00©
, - - Estimated at

945,ooq
'

3,000,000

ffl.
tdr

- -- - - -

4,600,000

-..-----.-

2, 652, 000'

©:
ffl:

--^

9,000,000

O

^'

td

O:

Bailroad Statistics of the United Statea—Ohio-^GoniinVi^do

00

Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Am't ofbonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rate and
of debt.
ting expenses, in- amount of inteing debt.
issued.
in.
pany.
cluding repairs.
rest paid.

ft ARVif,flhnlfl and N e w Ijis-

bon Railroad Company,
Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Columbus, &
Cincinnati Railroad Co.
6 Cleveland and Mahoning, Railroad Company.
c Cleveland and St. Louis
Railroad Company.
< Cleveland, Zanesville, &
f
Cincinnati Railroad Co.
«Cleveland Madison and
Tuscarawas Railroad Co.
Cleveland, Painesville, &
Ashtabula Railroad Co.
Cincinnati, Hamilton, &
Dayton Railroad Gompany.
/Marietta, Cincinnati, &
Hillsboro' Branch Railroad Company.
^Cincinnati & Mackinaw
Railroad Company:
^Clinton Line Extension
Railroad Company.
i Clinton Line Railroad
Company.



$30,279 00 Nothing..,

N o t h i n 2^

1,881,635 00 $1,246,500 00 None

$1,246,500 00

$298,293 67

$157,470 04

1,290,296 92

652,379 61

4,647,020 00

98,000 00

$14,018 00

112,018 00

962,174 82

780,000 00

178,778 30

958,778 30

370,000 00

1,200,000 00

65,071 00

1,265,071 00

48,000 00
600,000 00
mortgage bonds
2,207,200 00 1,367,000 00 None

©

648,000 00

2,153,900 00

ffl
6 | per cent.
$83,057 77 paid,
7 per cent.
6, 86 0 GOpaid.

ffl
©
Hi

160. 000 00

4,142,021 94

620,000 00

1,011,000 00
4,313,000 OO

1,250,000 00

422,656 55
None..

33,000 00

66,731 83

43,268 63

1,367,000 00

1,162,938 86

1,433,656 65

608,271 71

ffl
td

463,222 85

4,313,000 .00

1,283,000 00

7 per cent.

7 per cent.
64,310 12 paid.
230,258 84 Bonds 7 p. c,floating debt 10 per ct.
108, 216 61 paid.

Cl
td
cn

Columbus and Xenia
Railroad Company.

1,484,650 00

/ D a y t o n and Cincinnati
Railroad Company.
I; Dayton and Michigan
Railroad Company.
Dayton and Western
Railroad Company.
Z Dayton, Xenia and Belpre Railroad Company.
Eaton and Hamilton Railroad Company.

600,000 00

m Four Mile Valley Rail
road Company.
n Fremont and Indiana
Railroad Company.
0 Iron Railroad Company

f8,000 00

68,249 09

146,249 99

••

654,669 21

168,548 94 7Jpercent.,;)f5'^,^
715 l5 paid, iii^
eluding taxes.
23,500 00 7 per ct., $23,000
paid.
80, 993 12 7 per ct., $62,500
paid.
SO,000 00 7 per cent

46,000 00

46,000 00 None e-^--

1,488,000 00

3,000,000 00

40,000 00

340,000 00

60,000 00

2S4,48f 38

646,500 00

SO,1S6 62

726,656 32

164,338 79

400,000 00

600,000 00

120,0(5^0 00

. 620,000 00

60,000 00

454,690 00

757,734 00

192,254 00

949,988 00

171,929 00

212,000 00

21,000 00

7,760 00

28,750 00

281,749 77

21,000,00

46,213 42

67,213 42

117,965 16

60,000 00

3,086 87

55,086 8t

98,000 00 8 per ct. oh bonds,
12lif.c. oil floating
debt,($66,000pd.)

©

ffl

28,056 00

17,556 00 7 per cent., ($4,100 28 paid.)

aThis road isnot complete, but is making good progress.
6 Road not yet fully completed, the portion finished not having been operated long enough to furnish satisfactory statistics ofits businessv
cRoad not completed; no further statistics received.
dThese statistics are for the portion only furnished, and for part of a year.
eRoad not completed ; no further statistics given.
/ R o a d not yet complete ; no further statistics given.
^Road not commenced, but prospect fair for speedy construction, the State of Michigafi having granted 1,000, 000 acre^ of laiid to assist !n tlie completing of the portion of the road within her limits.
,
AThis road constitutes a link In a trunk denominated the "Union Central Railway," e^lteiiding frmn^^Qif YoiU and Hiiladetphia to Council Blutfs, a
distance of 1,200 miles.
"
'
^
I Road not completed ; no further statistics furnished.
; Road not yet completed—no statistics given further.
A The statistics refer to the 28 miles finished and in operation.
:
I The working statistics refer only to the 16 miles finished between Dayton asd ^eii*^..
wiRoad not completed—no further statistics given.
n Road not completed but fast progressing—^no further statistics furnished.
o Statistics only of the 16 miles in opetation.
.
, .
•




ffl

ffl
td

Cf

td

<l

Eailroad Statistics of the Uniied States^dhio—Continued,

o^
06

Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of Amount of float- [Aggregate amount| Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rate and
ting expenses, in- amount of inteof debt.
ing debt.
bonds issued.
• in.
pa;nyi
rest paid.
cluding repairs.
$338,000 00 6 per cent, to 8. per
cent.
36.0,000 00 j7 p. ct. to 10 p. ct.
$216,993 paid.)

Little Miami and Xenia]
' Railroad Company.
Mad River arid Lake Eriej
Railroad Company.
^ Marietta and Cincinnatil
Railroad Company.
Central Oh^o Railroadj
Company.

$2,981,327 19

$828,000 00

$26.6,706 01

$1,094,706 01

$66:3,000 00

2,697,090 00

2,440,600 00

2-34,973 60

2,676,473 60

58.7,236 67

4,142,021 '94

4,313,000 00

1,626,000 00

3,352, 000

4,852, 000 00

494,704 00 About

^Ohio aad Mississippi|
Railroad Cornpany, east
ern divisi,on.
^JPainesyiBe an^d Hudson|
Railroad Company,
{Pittsburg,Ma,ysville andl
Cincinnati
Railroadl
Company.
Sandusky, Mansfield and!
Newark Railroad Company.

5,000,000 00

§Springfield and Columbus Railroad Company.
Springfield, Mount Vernon and Pittsburg RaHroad Company.
Steubenville and Indianai
Railroad Company,
|Tiffinand Fort Wayne|
'|^ilyoa,d
 Company^


10,000, 000 No^e ^.,-.---,-.

^47, a5.2 1; per et. on bonds,
6 per ct. on iftpating debt.

i
H

Q

10,000,000 00

.....

aoo,000 00

31,000 00

44,000 00

1,110,000 00 1,290,000 mort- [None -,---.,-.,-.
gage, 100, OOOj
domesticbonds
totail,390,000
160, 000
15,000 00
185,000 00

i,a9o,ooo 00

600,000 None »

548,000 00

13,000

371,350 00

1,000,000 00

1,044,000

150, 000 00

1,497,947 as

2,400, 000

268,68a 79

X50, OOO 00 None -

Nothing

300,000. 00 About... 150,000 7 perct. on 1,290,000; 6 percent,
pn :|00,0(^Q.,

166,000 00
1,194,000 00

P,000 00

2,668,683 79 103,140 local receipts.
None-.,„»---.----

23,000 |T per cent,-66,000 7 per cent,

„
,,=,

©

td

fl^iedo,
Wabask and
Western Railroad Company. •

2,500,000 00

7,000,000 None

t,000,000 00 . . . .

&,.£.&£,&,&

m

:

jP Road iiot eompleted fully—no working statistics furnished.
'•^Road hot yet finished ; no part in operation so as to furnish forking statigtic^.
f Road not finished ; ho patt yet in operation.
J Road incomplete ; no part yet in operation.
I This road is furnished, equipped, and run by the Mad Rivet and Lake Erie Railroad CompahJ?*
II Work rapidly progressing ; no portion yet
finished.
^
^ Road just being opened ; no reliabl'e statistics can be fumish'edj




td

Cl

td

Bailroad Statistics of the Uiiited States—Ohio—Continuedo
o
Corporate name of company. Net annual profits.

Ashtabula and New Lisbon
Railroad Company.
Bellefontaine & Indiana Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Columbus & Cincinnati Railroad Company.
Cleveland & Mahoning Railroad Company.
Cleveland and St. Louis Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Zanesville, & Cincinnati Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Madison, & Tuscarawas Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Painesville, and
Ashtabula Railroad Co.
Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad Company.
Marietta, Cincinnati, & Hillsboro Branch Railroad Co.
Cincinnati & Mackinaw Railroad Company.
Clinton Line Extension Railroad Company^
Clinton Line Railroad Co
.
^ Columbus and Xenia Rail-i
road Company,
pay ton and Cincinnati Railroad Company,
'



Dividends,

No. of miles run [No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- Number of tons of
by passenger by fre't trains passengers per gers per year.
1 through freight
trains yer year. per year.
per year.
year.

ffl
$140,823 53 None - - - - - -

No return
298,690

739,916 31 15 per cent

No return.,--,v,^ No return..

No r e t u r n - . . - . . No return
304,138

65,145

407,126

td

152,637

Q

pi

>^
©

13,473 30 None

-

-

689,716 00 lOpercent. cash,&
10 per ct. stock.
278,012 87 5 per c e n t - - - - - - -

38,064

64,161 None . , - ^ , - - - - „ . -

38,064 None , - - ,

221,917

172,900

258,034

107,216

151,793

209,400

56,165

11,976

340,476

ffl

?4,503

td
«5

^
185,840 27 \ 10 per cent

. 317,655

187,800

119,285

190,260 No return

.
1

«

Dayton and Michigan Railroad Company.
Dayton and Western Railroad Company.
Dayton, Xenia and Belpre
Railroad Company.
Eaton and Hamilton Railroad Company.
Four Mile Valley Railroad
Company.
Fremont and Indiana Railroad Company.
Iron Railroad Company

37,600

2,806

17,086

39,027 No return

64,345 67 None - - .

67,364

18,522

45,042

22,106 No retum -- "
*

30,000 00 None -_-

28,800

13,000

60,000

12,000 No return

73,929 00 5 perct. (in stock.)

84,240

36,100

42,638

43,961

10,50'b 00 None , - - - - _ , - - _ -

15,600

22,600 None over whole
road.

26,600 00 None

---------

41,000

ffl

f Little Miami and Xenia Rail326,000 00
road Company.
Mad River and Lake Erie
227,236 67
Railroad Company.
Marrietta and Cincinnati Railroad Company.
Central Ohio Railroad Com- About^$247,352
pany.
Ohio and Mississippi Railroad
Company, eastern division.
Painesville and Hudson Railroad Company.
Pittsburg, Maysville and Cin.
cinnati Railroad Company.
Sandusky, Mansfield & New160,000 00
ark Railroad Company.
Springfield & Columbus Railroad Company.
JSpringfield, Mount Vernon None
and Pittsburg Railroad Co.

-

•td

10 per c e n t - - - - , -

ffl

Average 7 per cent.

©

14,464

211,666

38,603

©

250,000

45,020

124,796

10,796

ffl
ffl

151,446

"^^y^lQ

8,016

130, 248

6,639

35, 300

35^300

578,113 way Included in pre^
and througli. ceding.
171,624

None yet

16,623 No retum

---------.--.cn
None

T^nriA

--

^ Road worked Jn ceinnexion with Little Mianii railroad, whose vrorking statistics are here embraced also.
t Working statistics, a^e embrap^d in the r'stuM of thie Cplumbus and Xenia railroad, botl^ companies operati|ig togethe^:,,
J Road not completed j |£4" |^?t?^a finiSlietd not worked l o % enough to furnish statistics.



._»

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States-^OMo-^CoTiiinued,
Kl

C-orporate name of company. Net annual profits.

Pividejids,

Steubenville and Indiana Rail- $3t, 140 .applied None , , ^ , , - , , , . , road Company.
to coristruction

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- Number of tons of
by passenger by freight trains passengers per gers per year,
through freight
trains per year. per year.
per yea-r.
year.
93,934

.2,221
hO through connexion completed.

31,308

Tiffin,and Fort Wayne Rail. ro?id Company, . ,
Toledo, Wabash.-and Western
Railroad Company.




66,906 No t e t u r n , - ^ ^ ^,.«

ffl
td
©

ffl

o
•

fed

M

M
Cl

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—OMo—Oontinued.
• Corporate' name of company. No. of tons of way Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Avei^age speed of Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casualfreight per. year. gers , carried du- carried during passenger trains.
casualties for ties not. fa tal
freight trains.
ring the year, or the year, or the
the year.
for the year.
; the equivalent equivalent numnumber of pas- ber of tons carrisengers carried ed for one mile.
one mile.
ffl
td

Ashtabula and New Lisbon
Railroad Company.
Bellefontaine & Indiana Rail* No" return.,-.:;-_. No r e t u r n . . . . . — No return..
road Cornpany.
21,881,163 passen- 26,484,274Cleveland, Columbus, & Cin162,-924 gers carried 1 m. carried one
cinnati Railroad Company.
Cleveland & Mahoning Railroad Company.
Cleveland and St. Louis Rail, foad Company. .
Cleveland, Zanesville, & Cin415,188 1,060,684 passen- 8,303,770
gers carried 1 m. carried one
cinnati Railroad Company.
Cleveland, Madison, & Tuscarawas Railroad Compahy.
Cleveland, Painesville, and
26,334 27,391,587 passen- 15,471,111
Ashtabula Railroad Co.
gers carried 1 m. carried one
Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton Railroad Company. ^
Marietta, Cincinnati, & Hillsboro Branch Railroad Co.
Cincinnati & Mackinaw Railroad Company.
Clinton Line Extension Railroad Company.
Clinton Line Railroad Co




©

22 miles per hour. 10 miles per hour.

2

2

tons 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour.
mile.
20 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour.

6

2

2

2

tons 25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None __
mile.

ffl
©
M

\^
ffl
"td

•k.
None

tons Express, 29 mile's 12 miles per hour. None - - - - - - - None . . - . - . .
mile. perhour; way, 25,
including stops.
tons 30 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
119,673 8,602,477 passen- 7,389,918
STone
-gers carried 1 m. carried one mile.

>
O
-bd
' cn

•CO
Ti.---'------------

--*.--------

00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Ohio—Continued.
Corporate name of company. No. of tons of way Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Average speed of Average speed of
gers carried du- carried during the passenger trains. freight trains.
freight per year.
ring the year, year, or the equior the equivalent valent No. of tons
No. . .of passen- carried for one
gers carried one mile.
mile.
Columbus and Xenia Rail- No return
road Company.
Dayton and Cincinnati Railroad Compahy.
Dayton and Michigan Railroad Company.
Dayton and Westem Railroad
Company.
Dayton, Xenia and Belpre
Railroad Company.
Eaton and Hamilton Railroad Company.
Four Mile Yalley RaUroad Co.
Fremont and Indiana Railroad Company.
Iron Railroad Company
-Little Miami and Xenia Railroad Company.
Mad River an4 Lake Erie
Railroad Company.
Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad Company.



8,982,117 passen- No r e t u r n - gers carried one
mile. .

05.

No. of fatal No. of casualcasualties for ties not fatal
the year.
for theyear.

ffl
td

30 miles per hour. 14 miles per hour. None

None . - _ i - _ -

©

ffl
©

25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None

None

-

27 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None

None -

-

20 miles per hour. 10 miles---

None

None

tons 26 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
45,000 00 2,729,600 passen- 2,965,000
gers carried one carried one mile.
mile.

None

32,119 00 116,361 passengers 224,833 tons carri- 8 miles'per hour. . 8 miles per hour.-One
carried one mile. one mile.
26 miles per hour 13 miles per hour. None

None

1,215,006 passen- No return
gers carried one
mile.

76,609 00 j No retum ^

;

ffl
td

>
a

td
cn

None -

25 miles per hour 16 miles per hour Four.

Ten

26 miles per hour 16 miles per hour .jTwo

None

^
„--

Central Ohio EaHroad Company.
Ohio and Mississippi Railroad
Company, eastern division.
Painesville and Hudson Railroad Company.
Pittsburg, Maysville and Cincinnati Railroad Company.
Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark Railroad Company.
Springfield & Columbus Railroad Company.
Springfield, Mount Vernon
and Pittsburg Railroad
Company.
Steubenville and Indiana Railroad Company.
Tiffin and Fort Wayne Railroad Company.
Toledo, Wabash and Western
Railroad Company.




87,689 10,190,384 passen- 6,379,865 tons car- 22 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.

None . =

Ci

71,031 6,209,920 passn- 2,951,460 tons car- 26 miles per hour. 12 miles perhour. T w o .
gers carried one ried one mile.
mile.
20 miles per hour. Attached to pas- None
senger trains.

None

.ffl
td

None - - . . . . -

©
ffl
©

2,079,310 848,994 passengers 111,310,384 tons 25 miles per hour. 12 miles perhour. None
carried one mile.

None

---

ffl
td

>^
^
o
td
op

00
Ox

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

00
CD

INDIANA.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or, if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length ofthe dou- Cost of the road
main road and ble track, if any. completed, or espany.
and branches.
when expected to
branches.
timated, if not
be.
completed.
•

Cincinnati, Peru, and Chi- June
cago Railroad Company.

2,1853. March 1, 1854. Ist division, 30 miles Laporte, Ind., to Ma- 102 miles
None . . . . . . . . . . .
completed; balance, rion, Ind.
72 miles, to be finished Oct, 1, 1857.
Cincinnati, Union, and Fort Feb. 15,1853. July,
None . . . . . . . . . . .
1853. 19 miles ready for Union and Fort Wayne. 66 miles
Wayne Railroad Comthe iron, road expected to be company.
pleted in 1859.
Evansville and Crawfords- Consolidated of No rietur tt
None . . . - . - - . . . .
November 24, 1854. Evansville and Terre 109 miles
ville Railroad Company. two roads: 1st,
Haute.
1849: 2d, 1851.
Evansville, IndianapoUs, and April 14,1853. Feb. 15 1854. Expected to be com- Evansville and India 155 miles; only None . • • • • . . . . . .
5 miles longer
Cleveland Straight Line
pleted m 1860.
napolis.
than an air line.
Railroad Company.
54 miles will be comFort Wayne and Southern Jan. 15,1849. 1853 - . .
pleted in August, Fort Wayne to Jeffer- 200 miles . . . . , None . . . . . . . . . . .
1857, remainder not sonville.
Railroad Company.
known wJien.
Cincinnati and Fort Wayne Feb. 24,1853. Aug.,
None . . . . . . . . . . .
1853. Expected to be com- Fort Wayne, and Junc- 93 miles
pleted in 1857,
tion at State line with
Railroad Company.
Four Mile Valley
Ohio Railroad Company.
Indiana Central Railroad Jan. 20,1851. May,
1851. October 11, 1653... Indianapohs and Ohio 72 41 miles.... None . . . . . . . . . . .
Company,.
State line.
Indianapolis, Pittsburg, and 1846
1847
None...........
Indiananolis and Union, 84 miles
Julv. 1852
Cleveland Railroad ComCity, 6 .
pany.



Estimated
$2, 328,000 00

ffl
td
©

ffl

1,000,000 00

2,079,644 95
Estimated,
4,650,000 00
Estimated,
4,000,000 00
Estimated.
2,325,000 00

1,907,911 00
1,831,225 00

ffl
td

. *-<
^

>
Cl

td
cn

Contracted to be fin-Indianapolis and Ham-miles ocico None . , o,
ished Sept. 25,1848. ilton, O.
Indiana and Illinois Central Jan. 1,1853. Feb. 1,1854. Expected to be fin- Indianapolis and Deca- 150miles.o-- None —
ished Jan. 1,1857. tur, 111.
Railway Company.
Jeffersonville and Edin- 77 miles.
Jeffersonville Railroad Com Jan. 20,1846. Oct. 5,1848. February 1853
None
burg, on the Madison
pany.
and Indiana railroad.
1 6 4 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Madison and Indian- 86 miles...
Madison and Indianapolis June, 1842. 1842...20 milesapolis.
Railroad Company.
Martinsville and Frank 26 miles...
Martinsville and Franklin Jan, 20,1846. Mareh, 1850. May 15,1853
None - -.
lin.
Railroad Company.
Not completed; not Union and Logansport. 95 miles..Marion and Mississinnewa Jan. 13,1853. 1853
Nonet.;. known when it will
Valley Railroad Co.
be.
-.-. 1848...o...... July 1, 1854, main New Albany aad Mich- 288 miles main; None.
New Albany and Salem Rail- 1842
road; branch not igan City; Gosport and 45 mis. branch
road Company.
completed.
Indianapolis branch.
Junction Railroad Company. Feb. 15,1848.

1847
Kuightstown and Shelbyville 1846
Railroad Company.
1848
Rushville and Shelbyville N o retura
Railroad Company.
Terre Haute and Richmond Jan. 26, 1847.1847
Railroad Company.




October, 1850 . . . . Kuightstown and Shel- 26 miles.
byville.
--.. 1850
Rushville and Shelby- 20 miles.
ville.
February 16, 1852 Terre Haute and In- 73 miles.
dianapolis.

2,676,724 m
Estimated^
4,105,250 00
1,839,576 52
• 2,797,800 00
180,000 00
Estimated,
1,900,000 00'
Main, |7,029,494;
branch to Lebanon, 600,000—
7,629,497.

None.

120,000 00

None.

td

o
pi

O

188,000 00

None -

ffl

1,502,166 69

ffl
td

©

00
<5

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Indiana—Contiimed.

CO.

GO

Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid in. Amount of bonds Amount of float-Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annnal rates and
issued.
ing debt.
of debt.
ting expenses, in- amount of inter
pany.
cluding repairs. rest paid.
* Cincinnati, Peru, and Chi$450,000 00
cago Railroad Company,
172,000 00
t Cinciunati, Union, and Fort
Wayne Railroad Company,
985,388 95
Evansville and Crawfordsville Railroad Company.
i Evansville, Indianapolis, No money; the road
and Cleveland Straight is constructed payLine Railroad Company. able in bonds and
stock at par.
900,000 00
D Fort Wayne and Southern
Railroad Company.
234,616 09
$ Cincinnati and Fort Wayne
Railroad Company.
Indiana Central Railroad
612,350 00
Company.

$600,000 00

$25, 000 00

$625,000 00

80,000 00

1,700 00

81,700 00

1,103,800 00

139, 468 65

1,243,268 65

820, 000 00

15,000 00

835, 000 00

390,000 00

75,000 00 No r e t u m . . . . . . .

2,000 00

26,773 95

1,198, 000 00

53,000 00

1,251,000 00

212,000 00

1,096,400 00

IF JunctionR>iOroad Comp'ny
** Indiana and Illinois Central Railway Company.
Jeffersonville Railroad Com,^pany.
Madison and Indianapolis
Railroad Company.

2,000,000 00
1,908,850 00

204, 000, 00
None




$243,970 42

$107,908 52

6 per cent; 6,10
per cent.

ffl
©

ffl
IS

28,773 95

826,825 00

1,647,800 00

ffl
td
©

Indianapolis, Pittsburg, and
Cleveland Railroad Company.

1,014,973 72

Q

711,000 00 '
1,050,000 00

1,096,400 00
Floating debt provided for in 2d
mortgage bonds.
50,000 00
254,000 00
80,000 00
80,000 00

300,000 00

135,000 00

226,058 65

133,048 00

7 per cent, on
$600,000; 10 per
cent, on $598,000.
Rate not given;
$62,952 paid,
6

125,000 00

836,000 00

220,052 50

110,000 00

100,000 00

1,150,000 00

_ 286,146 82

192,254 62

7 per cent., $61,710 paid,
7 per cent., $87^
500 paid.

>
Cl
td
cn

Martinsville and Franklin
Railroad Company.
ttMarion and Mississinnewa
Valley Railroad Co.
New Albany and Salem Railroad Company.
ftKnightstown and Shelbyville Railroad Company.
Rushville and Shelbyville
Railroad Company.
Terre Haute and Richmond
Railroad Company.

100,000 00
333,000 00
2,511,824 31

60,000 00
$40,000; 33,000 in
dispute.
4,774,722 00

75, 000 00

113,000 00

50,000 00

40,000 00

974,800 00

675,400 00

20,000 00

80,000 00

5,000 00

45,000 00

343,498 85

5,118,220 85

None
10,000 00
None - - . - .

15,000 00

7,500 00

7 per cent., $4,900
paid.

730,407 13

340,949 03

7 per cent.,.$351,430 58.

118, 000 00
50,000 00

15,000 00

675,400 00

287,512 54

No return
97,809 28

7 per cent., $2,800
paid.
7 per cent

* Road only partially finished ; the part in operation not worked long enough to furnish statistics,
t Road not yet completed ; no part in operation.
t Road not completed ; no part yet in operation.
tl Road not completed ; no part yet in operation.
$ Road not completed; no part yet in operation.
ir Road not yet completed; but rapidly pushed on.
** Road not yet completed; no part iu operation,
11 Road has not been worked for nearly two years; efforts are now bemg madefcorelay the track with heavy T rail and operate thereon.




ffl
td

^
o
pi

>%
O

M
»^
ffl
td

Ct

bd
5fi

CO
CO

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Indiana—Oontinned,
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

CiTiPinnati Peru and Chicago Railroad Company,
Cincinnati, Union, and Fort
Wayne Railroad Company.
Evansville and Crawfordsville Railroad Company,
Evansville, Indianapolis, and
Cleveland Straight Line
Railroad Company.
Fort Wayne and Southern
Railroad Company.
Cincinnati and Fort Wayne
Railroad Company.
Indiana Central Railroad
Company.
Indianapolis, Pittsburg, and
Cleveland Railroad Company.
Junction Railroad Company.

Dividends.

o

Number of miles Nnmber of miles Number ofthrough Number of way Number of tons
run by passenger run by freight passengers per passengers per through freight
year.
per year.
trains per year. trains per year. year.

ffl
td

o
$136,061 90

None; earnings applied to pay debts.

104,542

68,234

5,981

85,556

pi

No retum

©

ffl
td

165,000 00
^ 93,510 65

6 per cent

134,728

37,043

34,388

12,000

td
c^

Indiana and Illinois Central

Railway Company.
Jeffersonville Railroad Company,
Madison and Indianapolis
Railroad Company.
Martinsville and Franklin
Railroad Company.



"4

.. .

No return...».-=

None

130,368

110,000 00
93,892 20
7..fsno 00

No r e t u r n . . . . . . .
None

,

None . o o o o . . . . . .

124,404

126,925

60,000

120,000

16,276

Attached to pasger trains.

28,454

68,574

78,000 way and
through.

6,260

6,57S

No return . . . . . .
3,130

Marion and Mississinnewa
Valley Railroad Co.'
389,458 10
New Albany and Salem Railroad Company.
Knightstown and Shelbyville
Railroad Company.
1^ Rushville and Shelbyville No return
<^ Railroad Company.
189,703 76
N Terre Haute and Kichmond
Railroad Company.




209,104 00

180j 308 00

No return

12,520 00

12,520 00

6,000 00

,5,000 00

No retum

10 per cent

95,211 00

55j 134 00.

55,332 00

65,141 00

.— do..........

None . . . - - . . . . . .

No return

No return..

No r e t u r n . . - ^ . . .

'ffl
td
©

ffl
©

•
-

ffl
td

>
o

o

Bailroad Stcdistics of the United Stcdes—Indiana—Continued,

O

to
Corporate name of com- Nuraber of tons of Mileage ci passengers Mileagf* of freight carried Average speed oflAverage speed oiiNumber ofiNumber of
fatal casu- casualties
way freight per carried during theyear, during the year, or the passenger trains, freight trains.
pauy.
alties for not fatal
or the equivalent num- equivalent number of
year.
the year, for
the
ber of passengers car- tons carried for one
year.
mile.
ried for one mile.
Cincimiati, Peru, and Chicago Railroad Company.
ninr*inri.'it,i TTnion and Fort^

Wayne Railroad Company. .
One
23 miles per hour. 13 miles per hour. Two
4,250,646 passengers car- No return
Evansville and Crawfords- No return
ville Railroad Company.
ried one mile.
Evansville, Indianapoli3,'and
Cleveland Straight Line
Railroad Company. Fort Wayne and Southern
Railroad Company.
'
Cincinnati and Fort Wayne
Railroad Company.
None
22 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. None
Indiana Central Railroad
Company.
,
25,000 6,930,330 passengers car. 230,690 tons carried ope 22 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour. One.oo.-. T w o . , , . , .
Indianapolis, Pittsburg, and
mile.
CleveiaQd Railroad Comried one mile.
pany.
Junction Railroad Companj^.
Indiana and Illinois Central
Raihvay Company.
Jeffersonville Railroad ComNo r e t u r n . . . . . . . . . . . . . No r e t u r n . . « - ^ , . , p . . . . 25 miles per hour 12 miles per hour. No return. No return.
pany.
One
Orie
o.
do
20 miles per hour.
Madison and Indianapolis Included in prece-^
ding,
Railroad Company.
6,573 488,280 passengers car- 438,200 tops carried o?ie 8 miles per hour - 8 miles per hour. - N o n e . . . . . None ,.oo«
Digitized forMartinsville a^d Franklin
FRASER
Railroad Company.
mile.
ried one m.U©.


ffl
td
©

ffl
©

ffl
td

td
cn

Maiion and Mississinnewa]
Railroad Valley Co.
New Albany and Salem Rail- No return.
road Company.
Knightatown and Shelbyville
Railroad Company.
Rushville and Shelbyville No return.
Railroad Company.
Terre Haute and Richmond^
Railroad Company.
|




.(.
13,276,767
passengersj No return.
carried one mile.

20 miles per hour. 11 miles per hour.!

[Two

No return.

10 miles perhour. 10 miles perhour None .

[Hone .

27 miles per hour. 13 miles per hour None .

None .

|6,072,609 passengers carried one mile.

No retura.

hd
©

ffl
©
y^

ffl

td.

>

o

td
cn

O
0^

Bailroad Statistics of the United States,

o

ILLINOIS,
Corporate name of oom' Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced. |Completed, or iflTerminlof main rQad| Length of the main Length of the Cost of the road
double track, completed, or esroad and branches.
and branches.
uot, when exif any.
timated if not
pected to bo,
completed.
td

Chicago, Burlington, and Feb. 12, 1849..i Dec., 1849
Quincy Railroad Com
pany.

D e c , 1854.

None , - , , - , , «

|Junction in Du Page| 138 miles.
.county and Galeg'
burg.

None ,
|Chicago and Wiscon-|45 miles.
sin Slate line.
46J None ,
Mm'n.^-Chioago and 181f m a i n ;
B'k Island. Branch.- branch.
Bureau and Peoria,
Miles. None , . ^.
Illinois Central Railroad Feb. 10, 1851. May, 1 8 5 1 . . _ Sept,, 1856„,- Main line —Cairo and
308
La Salle,—Galena Mainline.
Company,
Branch —La Salle & Galena branch ,..146
Dunleitt.
Chicago Chicago branch-250
hranch.—Chicago &
704
Centralia.
Chicago and Milwaukie| Feb. 17, 1851- April 1, 1854, May 1, 1855.
Railroad Company.
Chicago and Rock Island|Feb.,^ 1851 , . . April, 1852, _ Feb.,1854-.Railroad Company.

Oalena and Chicago Rail-,iJan. 16, 1836-.
road Company,




1S48.

Dec, 1 8 5 5 , . , . ,

'
Miles. 16 miles; 33 will
-Chicago and
121 be completed
Freeport ;
Beloit Main . ,
21 1st May, 1857.
Branch; Fulton and]Beloit branch
Fulton Branch,-106
Iowa branch.
• 248

I Cost of road, and
equipment
of
road, and 72
miles additionally
worked,
$6,042,370 47.
1,700,000 00
6,048,235 13

©

ffl

^^

25,000,000 00
Cl

ffl

9,000,000 00

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.-^IlUnois-^Continued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock
paid in.
pany.

Amount of Amount of float- Aggregate amount
bonds issued.
ing debt.
of debt.

Chicago, Burlington, and $2,911,810 00 $3,076,000 00 Nothing --*.^«
Quincy Railroad Company.
Chicago and Mihvaukie
Railroad Company.
Chicago and Rock Island
Railroad Company.
Illinois Central Bailroad
Company.
Galena and Chicago Railroad Company.

^ 800,000 00

800,000-00

4,029,000 00
O.^ \/A«t/^ \J \J \J VV/

1,971.A. J 000 00
.A. J • / •
\J \/ \J
W

2,571,050 00 16,762,765 00
5,441,500 00

2,834,333 00

$35^400 00

Annual feceipts.

Amount of ope- Annual rates, and
amount of inses, including
terest paid.
repair.

t rating expen-

$3,0755 000 00 $1,269,001 29, exclusive of amount
paid for use of other
roads operated.
835,400 00
253,164 00

$672,260 50 $2,000,000 at 7
per ct.; $1,074,000 at 8 per cent.
($225,990 paid.)
122,382 19 7 per c e n t - . - . . . . -

1,971,000 00

1,329,605 00

66.3,497 00 7 per cent. -,. ^. -« -

2,245,840 00

19,008,605 00

2,500,000 00

438,237 00

3,272,668- 00

2,315,786 00

1,500,000 00 Average 7f per ct.
on 125,000,000.
1,063,744 00 7 perct. on bonds;
6 to 10 per Cent.
on floating debt.

None

^_-.ft__.i.G

ffl
K

• ©

ffl
©

^

>
q
ffl'
td

1




\

m

CD

Ra'ilroad Statistics of the United States.—Illinois—Contimied.
05

Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run by No of through pas- No. of way pag- No. of tons of
sengers per
through freight
freight trains. , sengers per year.
by passenger
year.
per year.
trains per year.

^

Chicaga, Burlington, and $596,740 79 Average 16 per No return
Quincy Railroad Comcent.
pany.
156,928
23,476
Chicago and Milwaukie
133,272
28,170
78,250
131,781 81 10 per c e n t » . . .
Railroad Company.
186,410
77,339
70,616^
Chicago and Rock Island
1,048,681 No r e t u r n - - - - - - . - .
766,108 00 10 per c e n t - - . - Railroad Company. .
650,000 No r e t u r n - - - - - - - - - No r e t u r n . - - - - No r e t m n - - - Uiinois Central Railroad Ab't $1,000,000 5 per cent, on
775,000
Com'pany.
stock paid in.
414,651
385,851
137,387
456,621
Galena and Chicago RaiL 1,252,042 00 22 per c e n t . - . 388,212
road Company.




ffl

o
ffl
©

ffl
td

Ci

td
m

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States.—lUinois-^Continued,
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight Avei'age speed of Average speed of NOi of total cas- No* of casualcarried diiring the cari'ied during the passenger trains. freight trains*
ualties for the ties not fatal
way freight
pany.
year, or the equiv- year, or the equiv'year*
for the year.
per year.
alent number of alent numbei of
passengers carried tons carried for
. for one mile.
one year.

ffl
Ghicago, Burlington, and
Quincy Railroad Com' pany.
Chicago and Milwaukie
Railroad Company.
Chicago and Rock Island
Railroad Company^

25 miles per hour. 12 miles per hour- NotiC

a - - - N o n e -*i.«.-i..

17,475 9,528,120 passengers 1,449,607 tons car- 23 miles perhour^ 12 miles per hour. F o t i r - - - . . - . . . . Four - . . - . . ried one mile.
carried one mile.
127,922 For five months only No return B .«.-- _ 26 miles per hour- 13 miles per hour^ None ..-.,.-—*.-.. None - - . - , . . in 1856, 12,643,053
passengers carred 1
mile.
No r e t u r n - . - - - ^ - - ^ 25 miles.per ho.ur» 12 milesper hour., No r e t u r n - - - - . No return--Illinois Central Raihoad No r e t u r n . - - . . No return * .i. - .
Company.
No return. Galena and Chicago Rail329,959 30,791,207 passen- 40,913,166 tons car- 20 milesper hour. 12 miles per hour. Ten
.
gers carried 1 mile. ried one mile.
road Company,




'^
o

ffl

©
H

ffl
td

o
Cfl

O

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.

o
00

MICHIGAN.
Oorporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

Commenced. Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track," completed, or
when expected to
and branches.
if any.
branches.
be
estimated
if
not completed.

Michigan Central Rail- March 28, 1846 . . 1846, bought by
Detroit and Calumet, 169 miles
None , - - 1852,
road Company.
III,, and Chicago.
present comp.
Iron Mountain Railroad February 22, 1855. May 20, 1852_ Expected to be fin- Marquette and iron 25 miles, and 10 None _^mines in Lake Su- branches.
Company.
ished in 1857,
perior region.

$ft,106,473 42

^ffl
ffl

o

775,000 00
pi
Q

Corporate name of com
P.^ny.

Capital stock
paid in.

Michigan Central Rail-| $6,033,432 00
road Company.
^^Iron Mountain Railroadl
Company.




Am't of bonds Amount of float- |Aggregate amount| Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rate and
ting expenses, in- amount of inter. ing debt.
issued.
of debt.
cluding repairs. est paid.

$5,408,063 00

$1,098,759 72

$6,506,823 05

?5 Road unfinished ; no further statistics furnished.

$2,878,321 06

$1,571,817 99 8 per cent..($473,639 paid.)

ffl
td

Q
td

Bailroad Statistics of the United States—Michigan—Continued.
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Dividends.

Michigan Central Rail-| $1,306,503 07 10 per .cent
road Company.
Iron Mountain Railroadl
Company.

No. of miles run!No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- |NO. of tons of
by
passenger! by freight trains| passengers per gers per year.
through freight
per year.
year.
per year.
trains per year.
804,161

621,508

161,270

389,510 231,293 way and
and through.

ffl
td
©

ffl
Corporate name of com- No. of tons of Mileage of passen Mileage of freightjAverage speed of Aver'ge speed of|No. of fatal cas No. of casualties
way freight perl gers carried during! carried during the] passenger trains. freight trains. ualties for the not fatal for the
pany.
year.
year.
year.
the year, or the year, or the equivequivalent number alent number of
of passengers car tons carried for one
mile.
ried for one mile.
Michigan Central Rail Included in pre-|No return.
road Company.
ceding.
Ii'on Mountain Railroadl
Company.




No return.,

25 miles per hour, 10 miles p. hour No return..

No return.

©

ffl
td

©

cn

O

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
cp

WISCONSIN.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter.
pany.

-

Commenced.

Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track, completed, or
and branches.
when expected to
estimated
if
branches.
if any.
be.
not completed.
•

o

None..
70 miles
Kenosha and Beloit Rail- March 4, 1 8 5 3 - - . July, 1 8 5 6 . . . . . December, 1857
Not returned.
road Company.
'
- None
Mineral Point and 32 miles
January 1, 1857
Mineral Point Railroad April 17, 1 8 5 2 . . . May, 1853
Company.
Warren, III.
Milwaukie and Hancon April 17, 1 8 5 2 - . . August, 1854-- Expected to be com- Milwaukie and Supe- Mam—320 miles None
rior city, main; Ste- jgr.—300 miles;
pleted in 1864.
Railroad Conipany.
vens' Point and St. 30 miles comCroix river, Berlin pleted.
and Ontonagon, br.
October, 1852., 90 miles now finish- Racine, Wis., and 138 miles; 90 None,.--Racine and Mississippi April, 1852
ed; balance will be Savanna, on Missis- finished.
Railroad Company.
sippi riv., in Carroll
in October, 1857.
county, III.
Expected to be com- Hudson on St Croix 13 6J miles ; 90 None
St. Croix and Lake Su- February 24,1854. May, 1854
perior Railroad Comriver, and Superior; branches.
pleted in 1858.
Bayfield, La Pointe,
pany.
branches.
Wisconsin Central Rail- March 4, 1 8 5 3 . - - . February, 1854. Contr'ted to be com- Portage city and Ge- 95 miles; 10 m's None
pleted to Portland noa.
in operation.
road Company.
in January, 1858.
None
Milwaukie - and Superior March 4, 1 8 5 6 . . . : August 11, 1856 Win be finished 120 Milwaukie and head 380 miles.
miles to Green Bay of Lake Superior.
Railroad'Company.
o
by 1860 ; balance
uncertain.




_ :

.. . . . T

.

•»

ffl
$1,500,000 00
-.

1,040,000 00
13,640,000 00

td
©

ffl

©
>^
ffl
td

--

3,500,000 00

6,780,000 00

,

©
cn

1,900,000 00
10,000,000 00

.

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States—Wisconsin—Oontinued.
Corporate name of com- Capital stock
paid in
pany.

Am't of bonds Amount of float- Aggregate amount Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rate and
ting expenses, in- amount of interof debt.
issued.
ing debt.
cluding repairs. est paid.

^'-Renosha & Beloit RaU- $300,000 00
$35,000
road Company.
fMineral Point Railroad
365,834 26
640,000
Company.
JMilwaukie and Hancon
555,000 00
420,000
. Railroad Company.
||Racine and Mississippi 2,500,000 00
680,000
Railroad Company.
§St. Croix and Lake Su500,000 00 None..perior Railroad Company.
^Wisconsin Central Rail200,000 00 None,.
road Company. .
«-?''Milwaukie and Supe350,000 00
rior Railroad Company.




00
00 None .
00 None..

ffl
td

$640,000 00
420.000 00

00

$235,000 00

915,000 00

75,000 00

ffl

75,000 00

. 20,000 00

©

^
.

20,000 00

'-.No further statistics of the road have been furnished ; road not yet completed.
f No trains but construction trains running as yet; no further statistics can be furnished.
j Road not completed ; 30 miles finished, but not worked long enough to furnish statistics.
II Road not completed ; the part finished has' not been worked long enough to furnish statistics.
§ Road not yet finished ; no further statistics furnished.
^] Road npt finished ; and so far as it is comx3ieted, not worked long enough to furnish statistics.
«c- No further statistics furnished,
.
•

©

ffl.
td
<j

o

td
cn

*^

Bailroad Statistics of the United States— Wisconsin—Continued.
to
Corporate name of com- Net annual profits.
pany.

Kenosha and Beloit Railroad Company.
Mineral Point Railroad
Company.
Milwaukie and Hancon
Railroad Company.
Racine and Mississippi
Railroad Company,
Bt. Croix and Lake Su,. perior Railroad Company.
Wisconsin Central Railroad Company .
Milwaukie and Superior
Railroad Company.




Dividends.

No. of miles run No. of miles run No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
by
passenger by freight trains passengers per gers per year.
through freight
trains per year. per year.
year.
per year.

ffl
td
©

-

_

±

.:

ffl
©
>^
ffl
td
l-H

>
Cl

td
cn

Bailroad Statistics of the United States— Wisconsin—Continued.
Corporate name of com- No.^of tons of Mileage of passen- Mileage of freight Average speed of Average speed ofiNo. of fatal cas- No. of casualties
way freight per gers carried during carried during the passenger trains. freight trains, ualties for the not fatal for the
^ pany.
year.
year.
the year, or the year, or the eqiiivayear.
equivalent number lent number of tons
of passengers car- carried for one mile.
ried for one mile.

ffl
•

Kenosha and Beloit Railroad Company.
Mineral Point Railroad
Company.
Milwaukie and Hancon
Railroad Company.
Racine and Mississippi
Railroad Company.
St, Croix and Lake Superior Railroad Company,
Wisconsin Central Railroad Company.
Milwaukie and Superior
Railroad Company.




td
©

ffl
©

'
.
-------

ffl
td

>^

h-i

>
©

td

00

IOWA.
Bailroad Statistics of the United States.
Corporate name of com- Date of charter. Commenced. Completed, or if not, Termini of main road Length of the Length of the Cost of the road
main road and double track, completed, or esand branches.
when expected to
pany.
branches.
if any.
timated if not
be.
completed.

ffl.
Burlington and Missouri March 17, 1852. July, 1855--- 28 miles now in ope- Burlington and mouth 275 miles. (28 None
miles worked.)
ration. Balance to of Platte river.
River Railroad Go.
be compl'din 1864.
Dubuque and Pacific Rail- April 28, 1853 - July 1,1854,- Expected to be" com- Dubuque & Sioux City. 320 m i l e s - - - - - . None
pleted in 9 years.
road Company.
1853.
67 miles now worked. Davenport, on the Mis- 300 miles main, None
Mississippi and Missouri Dec 22,1852-Remainder of road sissippi, and Council 107 b r a n c h Railroad Company.
uncertain
when Bluffs, on the Missou- total 407. (67
ri. Oskaloosa branch. ms. worked.)
will be.
None
Expected to be com- From Mississippi river 330 miles
1856.
Iowa Central Air Line May2, 1 8 5 3 . - pleted in 1861.
Railroad Company.
across the State of
Iowa on the 32° parallel of latitude.
Iowa Southern Tier Rail- Sept. 16, 1853.- April 21, 1855 68 miles to be com- Fort Madison, on the 250 miles
- . None
road Company.
pleted in Decem'r, Mississippi,- to Ne1858. Not known braska City,' on the
when the remain- Missouri river.
der will be.
1855.
None -Philadelp'a, Fort Wayne, February, 1853.
42 miles contracted Tool's Landing; on the 273 miles
and Platte River Air
to be finished in Mississippi river, and
Line Railroad Com1857.
Uncertain Council Bluffs, on the
when
remainder Missouri river.
pany,
will be finished.




Est'd$5,000,000.

td
©

Est'd $10,000,000.

©

Estimate not yet
• comple'd. (About
$10,000,000.)

ffl
td

ffl

Est'd $10,000,000.

a
Esti'd $6,000,000,

$7,000,000

Bailroad Statistics of the United States.—lotvd—Continued,
Corporate name of com- Capital stock paid Amount of bonds Amount of float- ' Aggregate Annual receipts. Amount of opera- Annual rates and
ting expenses, in- amount of intering debt.
amount of debt.
issued.
in.
pany.
cluding repa-irs. est paid.
$100,000 00
$350,000 00
$500,000 00
River Railroad Co.
150,000 00 None 460,000 00
•[-Dubuque and Pacific Railroad Company.
1,000,000 00 None
1,250,000 00
JMississippi'and Missouri
Railroad Company.
glowa Central Air Line Not returned. The
road is the recipiliailroad Company.
ent of 1,000,000
acres of public
lands.
9,066 17
--i-50,946 23 None - Iowa Southern Tier Railroad Company.
35,000 00
115,000 00 None - . - . . - - „ . , - ||Philadelp'a, Fort Wayne
and Platte River Air Line
Railroad Company.

,

$450,000 00

ffl

150,000 00

td
+^
©

1,000,000 00

©

ffl
9,066 17
35,000 00

'

a

'-• Road not completed. The part finished not operated a sufficient length of time to furnish working statistics.
-|- Road not completed. No further statistics furnished.
J Road not completed. The part in operation (67 miles) has been worked but four months ; in that time the receipts were $135, 000, and working
expenses about 40 per cent.
.
§ Road not yet completed. No statistics yet furnished,
1 Road not completed. No part iu operation,
1




Ql

Bailroad Statistics ofthe United States.—Iowa—Continued.
C5

Corporate name of company.

Net annual
profits.

Dividends.

No. ofmilesrunby No. of miles run by No. of through No. of way passen- No. of tons of
^passenger trains freight trains per passengers per gers per year.
through freight
per year.
per year.
year.
year.

o
Burlington and Missouri River
Railroad Company.
Dubuque and Pacific Railroad
Company.
Mississippi and Missouri Railroad Company.
iowa Central Air Line Railroad Company.
Iowa Southern Tier Railroad
Company.
Philadelphia, Fort Wayne, &
Platte River Air Line Railroad Company.




,
ffl
td
©

ffl
©

ffl
td

•

Cl

td
cn

Bailroad Statisticsof the United States—Iowa—Continued.
Corporate name of company. No. of tons of Mileage of passengers Mileage of freight Average speed Average speed of No. of fatal No. of casualof passenger freight trains, casualties for ., ties not faway freight per carried during the carried during the
tal, for the
the year.
trains.
year, or the equiva- year, or the equivyear.
year.
lent number of pas- alent number of
sengers carried one tons carried for one
mile.
mile.
20 miles per h'r. 15 milesper h'r. None - -

.Burlington and Missouri River
Railroad Company.
Dubuque and Pacific Railroad
Company.
Mississippi and Missouri Railroad Company «
Iowa Central Air Line Railroad Company.
Iowa Southern Tier Railroad
Company.
Philadelphia, Fort Wayne,
and Platte River Air Line
Railroad Company.




None

--

ffl
td
©

ffl
©

ffl
td

•

o

td
cn

418

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

BaUroads from which no returns qf Statistics have heen received^
MAINE,

Androscoggin.
Penobscot and Kenebec.
• NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Manchester and Lawrence.
° Contoocook Valley.
Cheshire.
Ashuelott. •
Nashua and Lowell.
White Mountain.
VERMONT.

Eutland and Whitehall.
MASSACHUSETTS.

Agricultural Branch.
Essex.,
Milford and Woonsocket.
Newburyport.
NEW YORK.

Champlain and St. Lawrence.
Clifton and South Clifton.
Lake Ontario and New York.
Plattsburg and Montreal.
NEW JERSEY.

Trenton and New Brunswick.
Camden and Amboy, (partially.)
, , West Jersey.
PENNSYLVANIA.

No accurate list of railroads in this State could be obtained.
Philadelphia and Trenton Railroad Company refused to furnish any
information.
MARYLAND.

Baltimore and Philadelphia Central.
Western Maryland.
VIRGINIA.

Eoanoke Valley.



R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCESO

SOUTH CAROLINA.

Savannah Valley.
G-EORGIA.

Union Point and Athens.
Washington Branch.
Muscogee.
Western and Atlantic.
ALABAMA.

Montgomery and Pensacola.
Girard and Mobile.
Gainesville and Tuscaloosa.
FLORIDA,

Tallahassee.
TEXAS.

Harrisburg.'
Galveston, Houston and Henderson.
Houston and Harrisburg.
Mexican Gulf and San Antonio.
Mexican Gulf and Henderson.
Southern Pacific.
ARKANSAS.

Mississippi, Ouachita and Eed Eiver.
Little Eock and Memphis.
Little Eock and Fort Smith.
TENNESSEE.'

Mississippi and Tennessee,
MemphiSi,and Ohio.
Mississippi Central and Tennessee.
Northwestern.
Nashville and Chattanooga.
Tennessee and Alabaana.
East Tennessee and Virginia.
Knoxville and Charleston.
Knoxville and Kentucky.
Western and Charleston.
Cleveland and Chattanooga.
Edgefield and Kentucky.
Southwestern.
Winchester and Alabama.
Nashville and Northwestern.



419

420

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

KENTUCKY.

Henderson and Nashville.
Maysville and Big Sandy.
Maysville and Lexington.
OHIO.

Cincinnati and Chicago.
Cincinnati, Wilmington and Zanesville.
Cleveland and Pittsburg.
Columbus and Hocking Valley.
Greenville and Miami.
Ohio and Pennsylvania.
INDIANA.

Lafayette and
Edinburg and
Cleveland and
Colurabus and

Indianapolis.
Shelbyville.
St. Louis.
Shelbyville.
ILLINOIS.

No list of railroads in this State could be obtained.
MICHIGAN.

Michigan, Southern and Northern Indiana.
Erie and Kalamazoo.
Jackson Union.
Saginaw and Lansing.
Detroit and Milwaukie,
Port Huron and Milwaukie.
G-rand Eapids and Southern.
Schoolcraft and Three Eivers.
Detroit, Monroe and Toledo.
G-rand Eapids.
WISCONSIN.

Milwaukie and Mississippi.
Chicago, Fond du Lac and St. Paul.
Beloit anti Madison.
Milwaukie and Watertown.
Madison and Watertown.
La Crosse and Milwaukie.
Green Bay, Milwaukie and Chicago.
Fox Eiver Valley.
Beaver Dam and Baraboo.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

IOWA.

Des Moines Navigation and Eailroad Company.
Fort Madison, West Point and Bloomfield.
Keokuk, Fort Des Moines and Minnesota.
Keokuk, Mount Pleasant and Muscatine.
CALIFORNIA.

No returns.




421

GENERAL SUMMARY OF RAILROAD STATISTICS.

•

states.

I

^

!l

n-i^

o j

a

s
Maine
New HampshireVermont
Massachusetts . _ Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey . . - . .
Pennsylvania
Delaware
MarylandVirginia
North Carolina-_
South Carolina.Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Tennessee
Kentucky
Missouri
-_
Ohio




.to
to

586
388
542

l,754ii
241
659
3,226
445
2,100
116
433J
920
653
610J
904J
390}
222
95
25
233
269
205
2,233

38}

"168}

1,097
120
753
8
158}
790
590
467
499
565
1,000
638
509
360
511
319
375
876
1,992

$8,614,358
8,612,445
12,229,021
48,361,450
5,302,910
11,354,107
66,776,053
11,399,456
62,693,265
345,000
13,616,902
18,810,831
8,392,426
10,068,423
19,562,386
92,300
5,183,477
8,162,640
3,769,487
250,000
890,675
5,243,826
7,817,363
5,913,285
46,205,860

$7,776,500
3,246,497
9,986,862
16,403,860
2,799,430
6,310,550
72,606,430
6,309,400
32,443,476
600,000
9,828,239
7,071,590
2,009,222
6,156,140
1,634,467
2,466,783
600,000
300,000
3,646,800
2,873,421
11,170,000
62,016,234

$1,202,744
958,821
1,606,990
3,976,426
609,897
443,147
4,994,058
1,302,610
4,486,691
16,000
1,462,626
2,897,761
976,320
20,000
1,919,769
1,078,003
389,966
26,000
- 14,663
507,961
870,735
1,062,046
3,765,683

$18,152,619
12,402,026
29,098,267
71,111,323
8,425,666
23,463,966
164,649,016
22,586,293
116,687,190
1,093,000
26,811,726
44,497,482
18,392,000
22,740,226
27,761,078
4,944,000
29,762,860
19,066,000
14,426,000
11,580,000
8,786,743
11,225,963
17,721,723
42,784,301
143,221,656

^
$1,714, 512
1,329, 027
1,729, 464
9,688, 878
863, 442
2,694, 478
20,672, 205
3,460, 756
12,486, 286
4,848, 004
1,981, 009
1,317, 969
2,222, 400
4,494, 102
729,128
316,471
200,000
62,000
526,517
736,311
163,094
6,287,625

©

ffl
2

Cl

td

Indiana
Illinois
Michigan .
Wisconsin _ -_
Iowa.

«-

--

Total




.

911}
1,379
169
130
9.5
19,9361

976
33
36
1,431}
1,760
16,069

14,797,428
15,753,360
6,033,432
4,770,834
2,375,947

12,957,922
25,443,09.8
5,408,063
1,776,000
1,500,000

1,267,941
2,719,477
1,098,760
330,000
144,066

433,286,946

303,137,973

40,126,958

43,060,794
47,790,806
11,881,473
38,360,00048,000,000
1,090,381,114

2,324,148
7,667,656
2,878,331

91,182,693
pi
©
pi
©

H
t^

o
cn

to
CO

GENEEAL SUMMAEY—Continued.
<v) g
t o c3

bX) OJ

a ^

I?

states.

2'^'S)

^

Florida __-Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Tennessee
.Rentucky
Missouri
OhiV,._

_-

_




o , to

ii

03 <V

O ce

o

^
pi

^
Maine
^
New HampshireVermont
Massachusetts. - .
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
N e w Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
_Maryland
Yirginia
North Carolina-S o u t h Carolina _ _
Georgia _

to

^

^.

$1,000,000
801,721
1,251,047
5,912,944
485,718
1,500,484
11,044,694
1,820,760
6,608,861

$714,512
627,803
314,464
3,672,384
336,026
1,168,237
8,671,188
1,476,043
6,961,073

1,040,373
475,471
627,419
11,696,636
661,376
2,211,404
28,920,260
3,681,685
4,356,620

595,309
364,644'
683,680
3,427,798
396,903
1,066,489
10,427,455
737,670
2,084,187

9,040,552
11,745,866
17,089,713
194,203,601
13,088,860
47,942,947
37,8,651,201
44,777,030
109,015,964

470,866
698,764
406,684
3,434,266
116,222
247,673
101,604,223
266,696
7,463,803

1,337,464
26,665,221
29,169,719
112,266,918
5,862,988
16,928,444
,326,149,484
6,343,633
356,370,697

2,606,998
1,226,023
. 684,986
1,026,356
2,111,854

2,240,966
940,987
632,886
1,196,034
2,422,248

661,607
575,602
269,049
244,043
632,069

796,698
940,677
732,180
• 396,504
1,376,363

36,367,073
11,413,128
5,102,600
22,984,320
14,968,134

833,967
248,006
536,800
288,77-3
346,691

194,019,210
6,541,726
24,200,000
32,296,392
23,970,930

334,749
223,542
100,000

393,958
91,929
100,000

131,534
76,211
67,000
16,000

213,702
99,029
60,000
18,260

6,696,764
2,668,007
1,660,000
376,000

52,504
60,302
40,000
16,000

2,686,790
2,670,697
2,760,000
376,000

216,973
369,718
128,962
3,039,841

290,864
366,693
34,132
3,239,786

273,379
116,003
2,455,314

264,663
75,214
2,350,447

11,076,241
3,116,428
88,238,293

164,309
46,464
3,541,748

7,201,587
1,409,294
181,480,695

\^
©

©

W
t^
i2|
o
t^
cn

Indiana
Illinois

-

._a

;

^^---

Michififan

1,124,469
4,021,884
1,571,818

1,185,127
3,746,673
1,306,603

Wisconsin
Iowa
Total

494,614
1,099,164
650,780

31,018,632
62,962,370

128,146
962,020
231,293

668,890
42,362,773

30,826,460

1,113,871,493

121,990,998

3,401,626,462

^
_
--

48,712,381

4i;929,404

61,110,613

These statistics are chiefly compiled from the returns for the year 1856.
jgynoptfoal tables] of State returns.
-




756;785
2,270,143
804,161

For any appareat discrepancies in aggregates, refer to the general

£
^
©
pi
©

©
cn

to

426

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

No.'83.
Statement sliowing the United States, State, cities, counties, towns, bank,
&c., stocks and honds, held at home and abroad. ,
Held by foreigners.
United States stocks
State stocks
>
113 cities and towns (bonds)
347 counties (bonds)
^--_--986 banks (stocks)
76 insurance companies (stocks)
360 railroad companies (stocks)
Do
do
(bonds)
16 canal,and navigation companies (stocks)Do
do
do
(bonds)15 miscellaneous companies (stocks)
-Do
do. (bonds)
Total-




$30,737,129
190,718,221
79,352,149
13,928,369
266,724,955
12,829,730
433,286,946
303,137,973
35,888,918
22,130,569
16,426,612
2,368,323

$15,000,000
72,931,507
16,462,322
6,000,000
6,688,996
378,172
9,000,000
73,871,000
664,900
1,967,547
802,720
^265,773

1,407,618,894

202,922,937

427

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 84,
Statement exhibiting the cost of the Mint of the United States and its
several hranches, from the date ofi the establishment ofi each, to June
30, 1856 ; also, the cost ofi the assay office at New York, the value of
gold and silver coined during the same period, and the cost of coinage.

E
Years.

o o .

.a

ll

^ rt

. 'i =
^

1

Extending the Mint
establishment,machinery, and apparatus for the
same.

ce

Incidental and contingent expenses
and repairs, including waste of
, gold and silver.

MINT AT PHILADELPHIA.

Total.

From Jan. 1,1794
$990,280 67 $108,666 67 1,463,110 35
to Dec 31 18.S0 $364,163 11
29,420 00 41,308 13
94,928 13
9,600 00 $14,600 00
1831
111,246 00
44,126 00 37,600 00
9,760 00
19,870 00
1832
63,709 22
25,134 22 11,000 00
12,676 00
15,000 00
1833
113,940 00
10,600 00
20,820 00
77,620 00 ^ 6,000 00
1834
110,456 00
10, 600 00
23,000 00 ' 76,856 00
1835
13,900 00
21,000 00
144,100 00 20,000 00
199,000 00
1836
19,700 00
24,000 00
-30,000 00 10,000 00
83,700 00
1837^
8,100 00 10,000 00
18,100 00
1838
8,000 00
3,000 00
76,400 00
40,800 00
24,600 00
1839
18,300 00
36,000 00
3,000 00
77,700 00
20,400 00
1840
16,300 00
11,695 61
46,895 61
18,900 00
1841
31,700 00
61,400 00
10,500 00
19,200 00
1842
12,000 00
3,000 00
9,600 00
21,900 00
TO June 30 1843
24,000 0 0 '
9,800 00
19,200 00
53,000 00
1844
24,000 00
11,273 00
64,473 00
19,200 00
1845
24,000 00
47,600 00
4,300 00
19,200 00
1846
24,000 00
6,300 00
49,600 00
19,200 00
1847
24,000 00
1,200 00
19,200 00
44,400 00
1848
24,000 00
10,100 00
19,200 00
53,300 00
1849
24,000 00
23,490 00
7,000 00
72,890 00
18,400 00
1850
32, oo'o 00
26,534 75 13,600 00
93„134 76
21,000 00
1861
47,000 00
1,430 80
69,430 80
21,000 00
1852
19,050 00
15', 750 00 37,600 00
72,300 00
1853
84,600 00
48,050 00
160,000 00
27,450 00
1854
72,000 50
112,050 00 18,955 36
1856
27,900 00
230,905 36
50,000 00
70,404 39 106,670 60
27,900 00
263,974 89
1856
834,388 11

749,890 00 1,818,314 34 394,700 66 3,797,293 11

NOTE.—Per-centage of cost of coinage-




0.01 My%

428

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

o 13

3
From Jan. 1, 1794
to Dec. 31,1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837 .$10,466 66
1838
5,500 00
1839
7,500 00
1840
7,500 00
1841
4,500 00
1842
7,500 00
To June 30, 1843
1,500 00
1844
7,500 00
1845
4,666 66
1846
3,291 67
1847
6,750 00
1848
6,000 00
1849
6,000 00
1850
6,000 00
1851
6,000 00
1852
6,000 00
1853
6,000 00
1854
6,000 00
6,000 00
1865
1856
6,000 00




110,674 99

$1,600 00
3,600 00
3,600 00
3,600 00
2,400 00
4,460 00
'800 00
4,460 00
1,984 00
3,600 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
3.075 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
3,500 00
60,859 00

$5,500 00
4,400 00
6,100 00
2,500 00
1,100 00
2,500 00

Buildings and machinery, including
apparatus, tools,
and implements.

Years.

c^

Incidental and contingent expenses
and repairs, inclucling waste, of
gold and silver.

^ ^

Pay of laborers in
the branch Mint.

BRANCH MINT AT CHARLOTTE, N. C

$1,600 00
27,000 00
32,062 58
3,500 00
2,250 00
449' 62

1,500 00
1,000 00
2,000 00
2,100 00
2,100 00
2,100 00
1,125 00
1,160 00
1,250 00
2,700 00
1,600 00
40,626 00

6,000 00
17,500 00
9,072 97

1,140 40
99,575 57

Total,

$1, 600 00
27,000 00
49,529 24
17,000 OO
19,450 OO
13,949 62
8,000 OO
14,450 OO
2,300 OO
13,450 00
11,650 66
11,791 67
21,322 97
11, 600 00
11,600 00
11,600 00
9,076 00
10,625 00
10,660 00
10,760 00
12,200 00
12,040 40
311,734'66

429

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

• STATEMENT—Continued.

From Jan. 1,1794
to Dec. 31,1830
1831
' 1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
To June 30, 1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1856
1856

.

>
$3,954 16
8,750 00
4, 600 00
7,000 00
5,430 00
5,977 55
1,500 00
7,500 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
4,600 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
6,000 00
6,800 00
6,000 00
6,000 00

$1,500 00
3,000 00
2,900 00
3,036 00
2,160 00
2,880 00
1,200 00
3,600 00
2,880 00
3,420 00
3,600 00
2,700 00
3,600 00
3,600 00
3,600 00
3,600 00
3,600 OO
3,866 47
3,240 00
2,880 00

$1,600 00
21,500 00
22,630 00
45,450 00'
7,500 00
3,650 00
1,000 00 11,094 17
3,000 00 . 2,000 00
660 00
2,644 33 '
1,460 00
720 00
1,826 00
1,450 00
3,200 00
2,500 00
1,250 00
750' 00
400
1,200
1,600
1,604
1,880
940

00
00
00
78
00
00

116,911 71 ' 60,862 47 • 33,619 78




Building and machinery, including
apparatus.

.1

Pay of laborers.

Years.

Incidental and contingent expenses,
including waste of
gold and silver.

BRANCH MINT AT DAHLONEGA, GEORGIA.

69,588 50

Total.

$1,600 00
21,500 00
33,534 16
22,800 00
19,494 17
15,036 00
10,794 33
10,317 55
3,420 00
12,925 00
10,330 00
12,620 00
12,100 00
8,450 00
10,350 00
9,600 00
10,000 00
10,800 00
11,200 00
12,271 26
11,120 00
9,820 00
.279,982 46

430

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
•w

STATEMENT—Continued.

xh

5

O

•..

Years.
o
cn

Building and machinery, including
apparatus.

05

o
b ^

Incidental and contingent expenses,
including waste of
gold and silver.

BEANCH MINT AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA.

From Jan. 1,1794
to Dec. 31,1830
1831
1832
^
183:-J
1SH4
1835
$80,000 00
80,000 00
1836
73,500 00
1837 $10,455 22
$2,200 00 . $2,900 00
11,000 00
5,444 78
20,556 22
46,010 00
1838
35,275 00
19,225 00 • 17,000 00
13,500 00
1839
16,500 00 ' 21,163 68
11,700 00
17,580 00
1840
20,400 00
14,194 30 , 19,100 00
. 42 00
1841
17,300 00
12,900 00- .14,320 00
2,672 87
1842
8, 000° 00
6,450 00 . 10,000 00
To June 30 1843
15,000 00
12,900 00
18,700^00
1844
33,000 00
12,900 00
16,500 00
4,000 00
1845
23,000 00
12,691 21
16,351 50
1846
21,000 00
12,900 00
17,000 00
1,000 00
1847
19,100 00
12,900 00
19,500 00
3,500 00
1848
26,000 00
12,677 78 • 15,000 00
3,000 00
1849
42,800 00
12,900 00
18,200 00
1850
23,777 00
17,300 00
13,000 00
30,800 00
1851
48,647 22
17,300 00
33,500 00
1862
46,465 40
17,300 00
29,625 00
10,000 00
1853
68,000 00
17,300 00
34,000 00
1854
4-4,600 00
17,700 00
30,500 00
14,000 00
1865
32,000 00
17,700 00
30,000 00
33,000 00
1856




274,838 29

410,431 72

554,664 62

Total.

$80,000
80,000
89,055
83,010
85,000
66,943
63,736
47,192
24,450
46,600
66,400
62,042
61,900
65,000
56,677
73,900
84,877
99,447
103,390
119,300
106,700
112,700

00
00
22
00
00
68
30
87
00
00
00
71
00
00
78
00
00
22
40
00
00
00

398,388 66 1,638,323 18

431

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

02

L

1

Years.

JFrom Jan. 1, 1794
to Dec. 31,1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1836
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
^
1848
1849
1850
1851
1862
1853
1854
1855
1856

PH

Incidental and contingent' expenses,
including waste of
gold aiid silver.

BRANCH MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO
bo

.s

ii

Total.

n
aa

8

•

•

,

• •

~

$5,000
7,500
6,125
41,624
30,500

.

00
00
00
98
01.

$10,000 00
85,452-98
109,999:99

$26,129 10
95,070 90
20,000 00

90,749 99

205,452 97

140,200 00




$1,040 02
298,399 59
560 39

$5,000
8,540
339,653
222,709
160,600

00
02
69
25
00

300,000 00

73^402 96

•432.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Incidental and contingent expenses,
including waste of
gold and silver.

ASSAY OFFICE AT NEW YOBK.

Pay of laborers.

2
Years.
•21

3

•

•

FromJan. 1,1794
to Dec. 31, 1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
.
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843"
1844
18.45
1846
1847
cs
1848
1849
1850
1851
1862
1853
1854
1855 $28,500 00 $30,000 00
1856
14,400 00 „ ,30,000 00




bo

rt
*rrt .

J o
CO

{>^

Total.

. 2^

. 1'

i

$60,300 00
29,967 60

60,000 00

42,900 00
—

90,267 50
J

$80,736 53
619,520 12

$80,736 53
738,320 12
74,367 50

700,25.6 65

893,424 16

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

•

433

STATEMENT—Continued.
Years.

From January 1, 1794
to December 31, 1830___„
1831
1832
1833..
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
To June 30, 1843
1844
1845 ' . .
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850..
1851
1852..
1853
1864
1855
1856

Total cost of
coinage.

'

.

.-

$1,463,110
94,928
111,245
63.709
113,940
193,556
327,500
255,818
140,910
200,344
173,629
119,426
133,360
52,070
125,975
142,853
123,954
134,822
119,450
131,927
167,990
197,086
195,303
206,080
722,711
1,321,964
623,502

Coinage of gold and
silver.

35
13
00
22
00
00
00
62
00
17
30
24
42
00
00
66
38
97
00
78
00
76
02
42
47
73
79

7,657,160 42

$37,096,112
3 889 870
3 377 435
3. 737 550
7,369 272
6.629 178
7.741 800
3,244,315
4.124 845
3, 474 .396
3,402,980
2 217 972
4 1.58 920
12 025 037
7 663 780
5 629 647
6,592,757
22,595,835
6,815,562
11,122,711
33,847,838
63 388,889
67,845,597
64,291,477
60,713,865
44,060,302
62,479,116

537,537,066 64

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTIVIENT,

Register's Office, Novemb^ 25, 1856.

28




90
Ofl
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
.50
.50
60
00
50
50
00
50
50
50
50
50
94
47
93
40

434

REPORT 01^ THE FIKAl^CESS.

Ko. 85.
GOLD, SILVER, AND BANK NOTES. ,

Bank notes in
circulation.

Statement ofi the amount ofi gold and silver supposed to be in circulationj
ofi the ampunt supposed to be in the banlcs, ofi the whole amount supposed to be in the country, and ofi the amount ofi bank notes in circulation in different years, according to the authorities quoted in the
margin.
2

rt

•*2 b

-M

Years.

^ 1 1"
Millions.
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794 - - - 1795
1796 - . - .
1797
1T98
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803 '
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810 - -1811 ^ -1812
1813
1314
1815
1816
1817
1818 - - .
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830

Millions.

Authorities.

Millions.
MUlions.
Blodget......
9
9
16
do
do
18
Hi
....do
....i
20
11
21J
11.6 . . - - d o
do
19
1
11
1
16J
l ^ - .-.-do
do
16
10
do
-.
14
9 1
do
17
10
do
lOi
i^r
-...do
11
17
do
10
16J
11
16
do
14
17J
15
18
""""do""""".'I'"II
17
18i
do
18
20

.
28 to 30

17
19

H

26J

19.8

1

Gallatin

45 to 47
68 to 70

15.4

Gallatin
Gallatin

44.8

...-.

...
.-._

Gallatin

^

10




1

22. i 1

32. i

61

1 Gallatin

R E P O R T ON T H E

435

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
. 6

CJ

rrt

.si .
s

Years.
O

<!,

1^

CJ

cn
Millions.
1§31
1832
1833
1834
1835
25
1836.
35
1837
62^
1838
42*'
1839
50
1840.
1 8 4 1 . . . . . . 35 to 45
1842
1843
50
1844
52
1845
55
1846
85
1847
66
1848......
77
1849
109
1850
138
1851
1852
1863
191
1854
1855

r-H

Millions.

40
38
35
46
33
35
28.4
33J
60
44
42
35
46
43
45
48
59
54

Millions.

65
73
87^
87
83
70 to 80
100
96
97
120
112
120
164
186
204
236
250

Authorities.

li
PQ

Millions.

94
103
140
149
116
135
107
107
83.7
58.5
75
90
105J
105|
128|
114.7
131
155
204. 6
187

Congressional reports
Treasury report ._
Woodbury
..-.do.
..-.do
Hazard, Commercial Regist-er,
Woodbury
Gouge, Journal of Banking _
Hunt, Merchant's Magazine.
Estimates

fi.V.doV.WVfi.Vfi.'fififififififififi^
.-..do
..-.do
-...do
-...do
do
-...do
...-do
do

5...

-...,.

Mem^—The amounts of specie in the banks and of bank notes in circulation from 1836
to 1856, inclusive, have been taken from the annual treasury reports on the cohdition of
the banks. The amount of specie supposed to be in circulation in different years is aceording to the authorities quoted in the margin. The estimates are from Doc. 34, (page
280,) appended to the Report on Finances of December 4, 1854, except that for 1855,
which has been completed from data more lately received.




436

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

No. 86.
Stateraent ofi the number and amount ofi condemnations ofi iinported goods,,
fior firauds on the revenue, in the district ofi Neio York, for each fiscal
year, under the tariff act of 1842, and of those under the tariff act

0/1846.
No.of
cases.

Description of goods.
Watches, &c
Cigars
Cloths, & c . . - . Thread
Drills.
Jewelry, &c
Leather gloves .
Bonnet frames.,

Amount.

13,343
421
5,659
2,605
6,910
2,858
348
1,400

11

Period.

25
88
85
48
50
00
00
99

From August 30,
1842,. to June
30, 1843.

22,448 96

Watches
Cloths, &c
Worsted goods.
Cotton goods . .
Jewelry, &c
Hardware _ - . - .
Sugar, &c
.
Fancy goods.-11

1,683
17,608
10,619
1,053
816
1,927
335
63

88
94
85
16
00
44
08
25

Fiscal year ending June 30,
1844.

33,907 60

Cloths, &c
Embroideries
Silver plated ware.
Carpetiug
Sugar
Toys,&c_-..
Bronze powders....
Cotton yarn
Miscellaneous..-..
13

4,779
6.671
2.672
1,600
594
3,276
720
1,134
868

50
65
50
26
35
07
00
00
42

Year ending June
30, 1845.

22,315 75

Cloths, &c
Embroideries . Silk and cotton
Cotton yarn
Rags
Cigars

2,493
340
737
250
1,570
189

25
52
48
00
90
79

Year ending June
30, 1846.

6,581 94

Silk and cotton . _
Cashmere shawls.
Lead pencils, &c..

948 00
432.42
248 63

Year ending June
30, 1847.

1,629 05

Tariff of 1846.
Embroideries .
Silk shawls--.
Jewelry
Wine



1,162
298
272
269

50
32
64
50

Yearending
30, 1848

437

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ST ATEMENT-^Con tinued.
No. of
eases.

Description of goods.
Engravings

,

Amount.
$41 35

Period.
Year ending June
30, 1848.

2,044 31
Corsets .

Year ending June
30, 1849.
I, 327 97 Year ending June
668 80
SO, 1850.
416 36
608 00
944 81

Cigars
Brandy . Silk velvets
Diamonds

.
,

2,921 12
Embroideries . . . . .
Ginghams
Cigars
..,
Porter . _ - . . - Watches*

;3,890 75 Year ending June
987 67
SO, 1851.
: 872 88
: 42 55

I^IQQ

Engravings- j .
5,793 75
Embroideries
Manufa<3tures of cottonPaper, &c
Glassware, &c
Diamonds
Silver plated ware.Guns; pistols, &c
Port wine

1,380 19
2,687 80
8,074 00
8,057 60
2,000 00
293 60
416 49
466 95

Year ending June
30, 1852.

23,376 43

11
Cigars
Watohes
Beads, &c
Feathers, &c
Engravings
Hardware Porcelain figures
Embroideries
Diamonds and jewelry.
Violin strings
Hosiery, &c
Stationery, &c. . .

3,655 15
1,580 23
2,707 86
315 73
253 90
295 26
217 37
789 17
2,188 80
636 17
306 50
11,000 00

Year ending June
30, 1853.

23,746 13
Embroideries, &c_ .
Ribbons, &c
Jewelry, & c . . - Carpets
Hats, wool, &c
Goldbeaters' skins.
Silk velvets, &c-..
Perfumery, &c
Watches, &c
TeJescopes, &c

10,491 69
1,676 96
2,908 99
1,127 63
2,692 05
1,587 00
778 81
234 70
498 94
426 79

^ Remitted on payrnent of $50 and costs.



Year ending Juno
SO, 1854.

438

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
No.of
cases.

Description of goods.

Amount.

Cloth, &c
Wine, porter, &c.

$217 92
126 24

20

Period.
Yeay ending J-nne
30, 1364.

22,667 62

1,657
3,123
1,710
6,000

Embroideries
Jewelry, &c..
..
Watches, &c..
Diamonds
.._
Goldbeaters' skins
Cotton hose
Woolens, &c
Guns, rifles, &c
Cutlery, &c
Litharge
Perfumery, &CRaw silk
Leaf metal
Brandy
Cordials, & c . . .
Cigars
Ribbons, &c
Musical instrumentsLooking-glasses . ^ —
Human hair
Books, &c
Pipes, &c
--Bristles

Year ending Jnn®
30, i&55.

,335
1,461
645
934
250
491
232
1,349
450
350
•4,120
1,807
2,103
877
681
210
161
172
125
29,248 23

Embroideries _Remitted by Secretary of TreasuryEmbroideries
Diamonds and jewelry
Silks, &c
Woolens, &c
-"
Do
(compromise) Cotton goods
Cigars
Watches
Linen thread
Brushes and ribbons
Buttons and needles
Tobacc-o- -Corks, &c
Wine
..
Brandy
Steel bracelets
Leather gloves
Satchels
^
Guns
Miscellaneous.
38

7,162 12
3,681 06
5,943 89
11^502 49
1,509 35
1,191 31
4,0.00 00
1,007 00
1,920 00
378 55
341 95
635 92
412 01
941 22
' 530 00
613 76
lin 08
183 40
132 56
661 27
78 00
375 99

Year ending 3xm^
30, 1856.,

32,419 75
H E M A N J. 'REDFIM.D, Collectoi'

DISTRICT OF NEW YORK,
Colleotor's Qffice, N'ovemher ^1^ 1856*




Per A. CLINCH, Jr.

No. 87.
Statement exhibiting the number ofi entries ofi manufiacturers' or producers\goods at the port of New York, loith their
entered value.^ appraised value^ and the number of entries advanced by the appraisers, and the amount thereof, and
the number advanced 10 per cent, or more, tvith the amount ofi 20 per cent, additional duty, during the montlis of
September, October, and November, 1846, and OM estimate for the three preceding quoMers based upon the actual,
total receipts fior the year; also asimilar exhibit fior the quarter ending June 30, 1856, andthe three preceding
quoorters ; also the entries of merchandise paying a specific duty fior ihe months of September, October, and Novemher, 1846, loith the exhibits afioresaid fior the three preceding quarters ; also the purchased goods entered at the afioresaid port fior the months ofi September^ October, and Novemher, 1846, and the afioresond exhibits fior the preceding
three quarters, and the like exhibits ofi the purchased goods at the afioresaid port fior the quarter ending June 30, 1856,
and the three preceding quainters; also the number ofi annual entries ofi merchandise at the port ofi Neiv York fior the
lasit ten yeai^s, and the aggregate tliereof.

pi

o

pi

>^

O

w

DUTIES AD VALOREM.

Manufacturers' or producers' goods for September, Octoberj and November, 1846, and the three quarters preceding, &c.
Articles.

No. of
-entries.

Entered
value.

Appraised
valuiB.

Silk goods . . . • « . . . . .

88

$203,845

134

188,971

188,971

. 121

244,743

Total
for the year.

$203,845

Cotton f a b r i c s . . . . . .

Advanced Advanced Additional Third quarter. Second quarter. First quarter.
less than 10 p. ct.
duty.
10 p. ct. or more.

244,743

Cloths.....




CO
CO

STATEMENT—Continued,
o
DUTIEg AD VALOREM.

Manufacturers' or producers' goods for Septembeff, October, and November, 1846, and the three quarters preceding, &c.
Articles,
No. of
entries.

Iron.••••0.•••••...

Cigars •

26
1

Appraised
value.

Entered
value.

Advanced Advanced Additional Third quarter. Second quarter. First quarter.
duty.
less than 10 p. ct.
10 p. ct. or more.

Total
for the year.

^ $36,691

$36,070

•

Q
Pi
H

$621

•••
ij

-

"W^ines. . . . a a . . . . . . .

9

7,090

7,090

Brandies . . . . o . . . . ' . .

3

1,769

1,769

Miscellaneous • • • • • .

499
5
8

848,543

870,801

879

1,531,031

•

_




1,553,910

13,746
14,367

$8,512
8,512

O

•

$1,074^
1,0741

$2,200,460

$1,466,974

$2,200;460

$7,421,804
Cl

STATEMENT—Continued.
DUTIES AD YALOREM.

Manufacturers' or producers' goods for the quarter ending June 30, 1856, and the three quarters preceeding, and total for the year.
Articles.

No. of
entries.

Entered
value.

Appraised
value.

Advanced Advanced Additional Third quarter.. Second quarter. First quarter.
duty.
less than 10 pr. ct.
10 pr. ct. or more.

Total
for the yoar.

pi

>-^
Silk goods • • . . • • • • •
Cotton fabrics . • • • • •
Cloths
Iron

,,,

Cigars
Wines
Brandies
Miscellaneoijg . - - -




$957,664

161
2

352,360

352,392

217
•27
8
42
2

608,460
123,834

124,004

19
1

11,431

11,483

84
12

139,723

26
1

73,239

73,279

784
65
2

3,047,967

3,061,069

1,629

5,314,678

O
pi

$960,307

296
9

$2,643
O
32
616,038
4,860
$2,718

$2,586

170

..

52

cn

140,447
724
40
12,996
**
5,339,009

21,465

96

166

2,866

2,803

$5,399,297

. $3,599,531

$5,399,297

$19,737,134

4:^

STATEMENT—Continued.
D U T I E S AD

to

VALOREM.

Entries of merchandise paying a specific duty for the months of Septeniber, October, and November, 1846,
and the three quarters preceding, and the total for the y e a r .
Articles.
Number of
entries.

Entered value.

Third quarter.

Second quarter.

First quarter.

T o t a l for the^year.

pi

o
Silk oronds . . . . « > . . . . • . • . • • • . . . • . . . • • . . .

514

$800,895 00

C3<itton fjibrics. . « > > . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . .

146

126,858 00

O
W

Cloths

^

..................................

222

410,150 00

Cifirars . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . • . . . . . . * . • .

167

184,995 00

Wines

402

535,277 00

Brandies. . . . . . « • . • . . . • . . • . • . . . . . • . • • « • •

153

131,875 00

1,143

1,218,586 00

2,747

3,408,636 00

Iron

Miscellaneous




M

..................

. . • > • . . . > . > . . . • • • •

$6,533,608/00

$4,355,739 00

$ 6 , 5 3 3 , 6 0 8 00

.

$20,831,591 00

•

STATEMENT—Continued.
DUTIES

AD

VALOREM.

Purchased goods for the months of September, October, and November, 1846, and the three quarters immediately preceding, and the
total for the year.
Articles.
No. of
entries.

Silk o^oods. . • • • • . . . .

Entered
value.

Appraised
value.

Advanced Advanced
less than 10 per ct.
10 per ct. or more.

Additional
duty.

Third
quarter.

Second
quarter.

First quarter.

Total for the
year.

pi
hd
O

299

$406,256

$408,642

pi

$2,261
$25

Cotton fabrics . . . . . .

1
372

379,821

Cloths'..

188
1

224,307
640,002

644,567

177

177

8

22,613

22,613

Brandies . . . . . . . . . . .

26

39,423

39,423

INTiscellaneous . . . . . .

3,988
21
12

4,096,968

4,182,199

5,633

6,809,567

$5 00

225,449

748
4
2
4

.

379,821

O

•

Iran
Cigars . . ' • . . . . ^ . . . . .
"Wines

•

,

W
1,142

228 4G

450

. 9 0 00

""4", lis'

o
tt
cn

.




41,764
43,467
5,902,791

48,140

1,836 95

46,084

2,160 35

$8,358,823

$6,572,548.

$8,358,823

$28,192,985
CO

STATEMENT—Continued.
DUTIES AD VALOREM.

Purchased goods for the quarter ending J u n e 30, 1856, and the three quarters immediately preceding; also the total for the year.
Articles.
No.of
entries.

Entered
value.

Appraised
value.

Advanced Advanced Additional Third quarter. Second quarter. First quarter.
less t h a n 10 per ct.
duty.
lOperct.
or more.

•

2,117
51
2
3,000
32
4
992
64
8
2,493
52

$5,032,771

648
63
7
Whines . . . . . . . . . . . . .
687
52
6
Brandies...........
426
27
2
13,292
Miscellaneous
431
37

613,672

pi

w
o

-

617,447

724,172

Total for t h e
year. •

729,548

Silk P ^ o o d s . . . . . . . . . .
Cotton fabrics . • • • • •
Cloths
Iron...............
Cio^ars.............

23,655




$5,034,098

pi

$1,241

413
3,259

1,305

1,234

736

1,685

968

704

8,034

7,495

18,535

^ 14,868

•-

$78

6,625

2,107,412

\

4,456,526

$86*
781

4,454,707

2,119,794

O

1,038
5,757
3,986,454

,,,,,,

,,

tt

4,004,192
17,738
2,470
0

cn

4,640
942,593

945,315
1,754

24,817,930

24,903,429

.

77,465
42,679,711

42,810,349

112,103

'*'**
$43,293,760

,*^

$28,862,508

$43,293,700

$158,260,375

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

445,

Num'ber of entries of mercliandise at the port of Neiv York from July
•
1, 1846, to .^me 30, 1856.
For the year ending June 30—
1847
: 1848........
....i
1849
1850
1851
1852.....
1853
1854
1855..
1856
Total




,418
,949
,506
,752
,068
,967
470
;282
,44S
377
693,237

No. 88.
Q

.

Statement exhihiting the amount of ap>propriations and expenditures of every kind incurred by the government, annually,
since June 30, 1825, in the construction, repairs, rent, and preservation ofi custom-houses; the cost, expense, and
maintenance ofi revenue cutters and other vessels engaged in the revenue service; and the amount ofi all other expenditures incurred in the collection ofi the customs since the above date.

Years.

1825
1826
1827
1828
. 1829
1830
1831....
1832
1833
1834....
.
1835
1836
1837
:
1838
1839.....
1840
1841
1842
1843 (to J u n e 3 0 ) .
1844 (to J u n e 3 0 ) .
1845...
1846
1847......




Construction, repairs,
r e n t , and preservation
of
customhouses.

$6,400 00
9,131 93
30,740 54
3,185
250,595
103,881
363,639
377,109
144,200
259,725
267,701
260,976
146,801
108,413
29,724
96,054
298,606
147,927
62,062

84
23
64
44
39
00
00
32
59
34
98
51
78
00
82
36

Cost and maintenance
of revenue cutters
and other vessels engaged i n t h e reveime
service.

$139,175
116,312
107,773
121,899
145,076
168,138
191,739
203,795
253,795
213,140
208,173
180,695
276,644
257,611
285,189
197,383
245,787
207,435
94,222
444,299
546,126
500,813
510,809

17
44
09
31
45
52
14
13
65
30
59
54
49
23
69
31
79
02
63
44
68
78
69

All other expenditures
incurred in the collection of the customs.

$760,127
770,687
782,045
810,194
868,591
886,976
1,024,.271
1,112,180
1,097,568
1,051,405
1,076,824
1,216,773
1,216,303
1,257,022
1,439,402
1,344,935
1,238,172
1,269,550
570,177
1,363,201
1,519,906
1,5.58,804
1,587,242

76
04
18
32
13
85
03
23
32
07
10
56
35
11
20
93
29
61
54
37
94
08
81

Gross a m o u n t o f reven u e collected.

Expenses of collection
in the Pacific ports.

pi
O
pi

$31,903 ,875
26,350 269
28,190 883
30,187 701
22,5.33 ',290
28,636 ,124
36,771 ,288
29,511 ,171
24,353 ,004
19,140 052
26,091 ^829
31,129 1,276
18,282 ,145
20,127 ,958
25,879 ,745
15,332 ,036
20,104 ,474
16,801 ,802
7,'579 ,164
29,560 ,530
31,144 ,224
30,636 ,844
2 8 , 3 0 5 ,464

73
09
38
56
87
49
66
14
25
37
.07
71
31
06
24
47
51
32
38
98
02
51
65

O
'A

K
tt
tt

)>
Cl

)^
cn

48,408 35
235,837 47
588,633 60
244,969 47
521,491 23
580,080 25
679,408 28
1,836,240 92
1,415,040 49

272,096 18
274,931 88
164,908 30
199,289 61
216,024 30
215,182 40
228,794 82
234,353 74
248,426 37

1,731,368 69
1,764,630 39
2,025,022 58
1,186,658 12
1,760,214 97
2,073,565 29
2,244,235 67
2,395,134 10
2,566,996 50

33,228,111 36
31,205,956 50
40,429,457 59
49,365,278 05
49,174,379 70
58,785,919 41
65,147,455 82
53,912,547 98
63,314,393 37

$119,313 93
700,201 74
1,108,843 18
824,720 28
735,408 65
717,511 44
532,968 95

9,116,987 77

1^48.,
1849
1850..
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856.......

7,670,045 68

43,560,190 13

1,023,116,676 55

4,738,968 17
pi

F. BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office^ Mvemher 19, 1856.




o
pi

o

a
cn

No. 89.
00

Siatement shoioing the numher ofi disbursing officers liaving public money to their credit ivith the depositaries at the folloiving ptlaces., and the amount held by each depositary to the credit of such officers, according to the reports for the
dates specified, during the yea/r ending June 30, 1856.
N E W YORK.

BOSTON.

Date of
returns.

t

02

o
o

PHILADELPHIA.

Amount.

g
^
o

02

02

5r!

5r!

o

Amount.

o

Amount.

o

o

O

6
J25

CHARLESTON.

n

• 8

Amount.

o
o
d

i

pi

t

S

o

^

d

WASHINGTON.

BALTIMORE.

^

Amount.

o
o
d

O
pi

Amount.

^
O

q

1855.
July 7

14
21
28
Aug. 4
" 11

18
26
31
Sept. 8

16
22
29
Oct.

6

13
20
27
31
Nov. 10

11
13
13
13
12
13
14
14
14
12
13
14
16
15
15
14
15
16
17

$218,684
318,431
305,537
314,621
277,240
290,202
343,488
317,231
294,881
251,567
251,556
319,493
307,247
268,317
262,632
241,154
302,728
284,663
270,745




84
16
27
73
91
72
41
91
67
56
93
49
76
96
31
65
63
68
14

85
90
90
90
92
91
92
95
92
93
92
93
95
98
•98
98
97
100
102

$1,667,696
1,656,293
1,491,114
1,336,190
1,404,187
1,468,120
1,686,660
1,613,069
1,396,780
1,393,251
1,226,703
1,389,771
1,251,243
1,485,542
1,369,427
1,651,807
1,671,150
1,626,244
1,510,168

93
73
83
27
79
66
99
84
48
43
66
61
96
68
22
84
87
60
37

12
12

$133,232
129,900
79,939
175,563
134,909
125,636
125,328
204,259
139,638
226,026
165,223
227,518
, 206,648
263,428
156,342
151,080
168,972
142,679
164,535

11
13
68
13
60
14
67
14
56
14
81
14
69
12
29 • 12
32
12
16
11
11
41
67
12
87
11
60
11
27
12
67
11
60
12
12
73
86

$37,930
62,608
68,794
61,621
81,492
69,792
/ 70,796
74,694
64,215
62,809
70,412
76,360
70,961
104,400
101,230
90,619
68,829
88,253

52
12
48
43
02
71
88
60
44
16
44
13
65
61
42
20
67
95

51
49
.9
4
60
52
62
64
56
54
55
54
63
53
52
53
62
62
63
51

$306,590
333,613
463,990
473,306
417,313
458,317
485,667
448,744
398,683
380,454
413,167
399,250
396,585
350,232
421,142
380,886
475,269
342,979
326,523

77
12
26
m
24
14
20
09
19
13
67
85
56
67
90
02
75
62
94

14
17
15
14
17
14
16
17
17

"is"'
18
18
18
18
15

""is""
18

$36,371 25
71,356 79
72,264 96
38,686 97
96,282 94
93,557 73"
116,034 36
112,023 02
106,259 45
98,608
114,471
•98,886
68,641
66,265
48,382

08
29
63
65
63
94

63,924 44
40,512 80

>
o
cn

17
24
30

286,466
260,047
282,774
276,081
270,041
266,687
243,104

i 7 104
6
94 107
71 107
99 108
39 107
16 106
78 106

1,316,671 28
1,636,124 73
1,442,862 12
1,606,816 24
1,432,588 28
1,629,597 21
1,439,285 01

16
15
16
16
16

9

. 17

16
23
29

17
18
18
17
17
18
17
17
17
16
17
17
16
16
16
16
16
14
16
16

212,872
194,615
196,088
240,085
188,982
195,438
231,916
221,404
227,060
217,662
206,791
264,625
203,446
167,319
191,701
202,141
216,708
209,680
186,392
193,494
184,579
221,982
202,917
197,724
229,288
226,714

22

12
19
26
31

Dec.

17
17
17
17
17
17
16

106
106
50 108
91 107
99 108
49 110
28 • 110
95 ' 110
.•27 110
85 111
06 110
11 110
97 110
07 110
78 108
03 107
66 106
88 107
83 105
71 106
09 107
45 106
25 105
63 106
54 105
06 106

1,610,974
1,274,531
1,388,211
1,318,272
1,694,853
1,B22,087
1,500,663
1,377,992
1,363,623
1,234,662
1,284,602
1,368,610
1,293,901
1,300,517
1,460,309
1,322,161
1,307,791
1,363,414
1,171,619
1,066,668
1,382,220
1,370,189
1,312,168
1,523,675
1,473,826
1,665,609

8

15
22
feS)
31
«0 1866.
Jan.
6

Feb.

Mar.

8

15
22
31
April 6

12
19
26
30
M a y 10

17
24
31
June

7

14
21
30




72

12
12
12
11
12
12
12

171,735 42
173,605 47
194,376 13
219,378 17
204,027 42
215,191 30
149,419 26

12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14

109,415
126,964
179,508
145,794
148,669
151,739
186,449
157,716
200,142
156,662
204,666
145,932

14
14
14
14
16
16
14
14
13
13
14
14

92,317
190,305
153,708
114,282
140,743
132,688
139,699
133,309
104,685
122,133
171,249
162,673

12
12
12
11
10
10
10
10
10
10
1
1
I
1
1
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
16
16
16
16
16
16
15
15

67,204 51
61,179 20
60,649 28
63,761 97
91,466 58
93,777 40
.86,326 66
79,903
74,663
6.6,687
69,122
.68,449
68,691
49,272
46,894
•49,434
.63,936
61,871
58,187
60,012
.68,661
112,614
121,060
104,320
112,696
92,466
64,873
62,836
75,695
55,602
63,127
65,876
100,013

54
69
60
64
64
64
63

300,174 19
,391,481 65
440,773 80
445,490 67
421,606 29
6:08,,657 07
545,538 84

15
14
14
13
14
14
14

58,343 33
56,418 65
64,517 68
49,396 7 5
61,154 36
66,061 89
(65,210 00^

64
64
64
64
64
68
60
64
64
54
64^
54
64
68
58
56
56
56
66
64
64
62
62
52
62
52

473,772
496,442
505,130
410,929
448,966
612,446
566,762
,648,179
636,673
244,671
461,722
664,958
642,793
431,686
344,707
609,798
368,198
623,092
376,778
448,644
436,796
626,930
433,373
406,980
467,734
496,666

12
14
14

37,087 31
36,488 92
30,186 10

14

.64,670 29

14
15
16

5.3,617 39
81,843 2 1
77,796 50

16

81,561 26

pi
O

o

J . _-

14
14
14
14
15
15
14
12
13

.
_
69,333 67
65,664 33
63,439 99
66,087 20
60,478 29
47,816 46
61,631 67
64,686 65
63,696 07

O
cn

NOTE.—The blanks are occasioned by deficient returns.
CD

4^

STATEMENT—Continued.

D a t e of r e turns.

o

Amount

Amount

o
d

1855.
July
7
14
21
28
August 4
11
18
25
31
Sept.
8
16
22
29
Oct.
6
13
20
27
31
Nov.
10 1
17 1
24 •
30
Dec.
8
15 1

i
1

to

1

NORFOLK.

SAN FRANCISCO.

ST. LOUIS.

N E W ORLEANS.

O
AGGREGATE.

CO

!

1
o

Amount.

s
1

Amount

O

1

Amount.

O

d

pi

o

O
pi
29
30
30
31
33
33
34
34
34
36
34
34
34
36
36
36
36
36
37
36
38
36
37

1
1

86 1



$612,112
730,405
733,463
711,294
677,202
680,403
696,661
662,076
663,576
663,661
681,247
658,213
645,730
610,153
597,226
642,607
670,020
639,127
654,519
594,866
656,910
619,443
684,133
628,588

91
74
68
42
14
27
86
64
87
10
79
29
48
30
61
92
76
69
99
38
75
58
87
80

39
42

1
i
1

46
45
46
47
47
47
48
60
49
49
49
51
60
50
50

1

50
51
6263
50

1

49

$ 8 8 7 , 2 6 3 60
8 4 0 , 8 3 4 32
963,711
898,906
872,743
881,736
1,239,236
1,230,235
1,397,854
1,161,387
938,392
960,824
803,085
789,343
810,815
809,723
899,543
866,896
816,291
829,912
734,178
689,625
642,007

70
84
48
88
93
77
67
12
66
18
08
61
77
92
64
72
51
02
40
12
26

^

j

1

43
44
46
46
44
49
48
60
46
46
44
46
47
49
52
60
60
52
50
52
63
63
53

51

^

$690,271
606,672
672,113
699,613
674,206
605,042
833,381
680,830
786,011
768,200
809,442
903,398
871,839
1,112,161
987,784
1,041,873
1,008,881
942.607
848,617
928,663
919,037
963,629
1,006,482
1,061,720

94
36
73
23
79
94
86
04
30
14
12
97
96
13
96
71
49
94
86
64
10
44
60
47

• 7

i

87
6

$38,970
30,368
98,294
84,237

49
13
67
83

8
7

6 8 , 4 8 4 76
6 7 , 4 3 6 83

7

2 9 , 0 0 1 20

\""fi
7
6
6
6

3 3 , 3 1 7 62
3 3 , 1 7 7 62

6
6
6

3 2 , 6 6 4 47
3 1 , 3 4 0 35
2 7 , 6 4 6 19

6
6

1

4 0 , 7 2 2 00
3 9 , 6 4 4 00
3 3 , 9 0 6 13

6 6 , 7 0 3 94
3 2 , 9 3 5 74
2 6 , 5 2 1 87

6

I

303
317
276
278
322
327
331
332
336
316
337
335
336
336
'346
341
324
365
333
359
364
371
370
366

$3,948,645
4,779.799
3,883,302
4,839,918
4,661,841
4,724,702
6,296,783
6,343,166
6,108,282
6,133.611
4,817,461
6,066,444
6,043,734
4,982,773
4,780,822
4,992,766
6,076,468
4j961,429
4,621,863
4,660,731
4,882,717
4,859,609
4,967,102
4,828,702

36
63
68
61
19
21
96
46
69
23
22
66
66
67
16
64
11
06
03
92
41
08
02
81

O

W

t2j

a
cn

^
22
31

36
36

1856.
Jail.
5

36
12
36
19
35
26
36
31
36
Feb.
9
35
16
35
23
35
29
36
March
8
36
16
36
22
36
31
35
April
5
35
12
36
19
36
26
30 """35""
May
10
36
17
35
24
36
31
35
June
36
7
14
34
21
34
30
34




676,785 69
605,674 99

45
47

661,610
607,406
622,099
654,493
662,710
642,396
686,021
664,190
624,166
624,367
626,642
668,341
676,665
641,403
579,604
607,828

46
42
43

48
65
31
64
09
65
25
66
65
60
46
60
02
46
71
38

"'"44

43
43
43
43
47
47
47
45
44
44
46
46

627,721 78
630,809 12

66
56

997,346 60
919,922 20

6'
.
6

72,271 00
62,513 43

365
366

' 4,999,997 00
4,647,703 18

697,646 48
680,176 46
636,772 90

/

67
59
69
68
60
62
61
60
60
56
65
-64
64
63
66

988,226
910,164
860,266
830,678
772,615
797,738
722,993
697,422
691,467
688,032
879,748
766,182
806,994
773,614
761,676
786,613
754,839
710,429
748,766
736,685
820,846
759,876
778,828
760,378
849,233
798,167

6
5
6

26,716 64
30,919 18
29,204 49'

352
363
364
304

4,488,607 66
4,314,603 44
4,349,611 81
3-592 990 47
4,417,706 15
4,607,609 35
. 4,664,618 13
4,663,789 90
4,397,382 22
4,223,246 64
4,700,701 03
4,883,626 22
4,660,618 91
4,604,966 81
4,637,187 66
4,464,968 86
3 ^ t z ^ , rrUU A 5
4.4.2 4.nfi Ttt/
*J)
3,639,127 69
3,790,594 61
3,661,146 60
4,086,818 82
4,261,069 43
4,127,464 61
4,344,603 42
4,637,417 33
4,607,924 28

^

''*"'686"i74*28"
682,382 46
668,601 19
668,066 14
664,258 91
873,240 89
910,876 02
931,706 36
934,173 17
1,179,320 86
962,768 18
616,699 26
636,859 95

474,"582"97""
430,462 99 '""46°"" ""'548,"468"38"'
423,124 29
46
496,180 73
418,567 77
497,486 76
46
604,449 08
640,895 82
44
647,318 98
622,297 01
44
536,463 03
662,144 44
44
473,268 38
689,164 30
44
638,521 85
401,073 66
44

63 .

68
. 68

69
67
66
56
66
67
67
68

77
33
96
70
35
72
36
61
20
70
19
36
66
38
64
83
68
69
17
82
20
42
34
61
70
92

......
4
6
7
> 6

6
6
6
6
6
6
7
6
6
6
8
7
7
7
6
7

49,167
17,358
32,177
164,189
74,180
32,921
30,061
99,663
86,900
62,442
60,036
99,470

96
84
76
64
80
81
21
28
19
79
63
00

7l,"614 54"'
41,263 01
47,666 06
79,311 64
67,262 80
22,486 15
21,254 62
63,121 37
66,807 46

360.

363
370
351
362
367
366
364
346
334
364
360
362
317
368
364
366
360
367
356
356
358

^
pi

^
0

pi

0
ij
z

>
^

^

{
>

^
0

^
Op.

^

452

REPORT ON THE riNA;NrCES»
. A.
TREASURY BEPARTMENT,

.
Comfptrolkr'Si Office., October 28, 1856o
SIR : For the purpose of exhibiting the operations of this office
during the fiscal year last past, I respectfully report that the following accounts have been revised and certified to the Ee^gister, yiz :
3,908 accounts Tcported on by the First Auditor.
824 accounts reported on by the Fifth Auditor.
2,200 accounts reported on by theCommissioner of the General
Land Office.
.
That the following named warrants have been countersigned, entered in blotters, and posted, viz :
. 456 stock warrants,
66Y Texas debt warrants,
1,266 quarterly salary warrants,
1,600 treasury (proper) warrants,
2,284 treasury interior warrants,
4,492 customs warrants,
43 appropriation warrants,
743 navy pay warrants,
264 navy repayment warrants.,
1,340 customs covering warrants,
948 land covering warrants,
787 miscellaneous covering warrants,
2 treasury funding warrants,
2,847 army pay warrants,
940 army repay warrants,
1,174 army interior pay warrants,
233 army interior repay warrants ;
the whole making an aggregate of 20,086 warrants,
2,899 letters have been received, endorsed, registeredj and filed.
4,000 letters have been written, registered, recorded, and forwarded,
the records ofwhich cover 3,129 pages folio post.
There have been twenty-eight formal decisions made and recorded,
their records covering 187 pages folio post.
Fourteen reports have been made to the difi'erent departments, the
records of which cover 78 pages folio post. Besides various other duties have been done, which it is not deemed necessaryto particularize,
but which constitute no smair proportion of theiabors of the office.
Yours^ respectfully,
ELISHA WHITTLESEY,
Gomptroller 0
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary of the Treasury.




H^ElPCiRT ON THE ^ N A N C E S .

4SB

B.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second..Oomptroller-s Office, October 18, 1856.
SIR : The following report of the operations of this office for the
past fiscal year is respectfully submitted:
The accounts which have been examined, passed, and entered .oa
the books of this office during the year, are—
Eeported bv the Second Auditor
.,
1,093
Keported by the Third Auditor
3,326
Keported by th^e Fourth Auditor..
..451
Total.

4,870

being an increase of sixty-two upon the number of the preceding year.
The accounts from the Fourth Auditor's office, though comparatively few in number, are intricate and voluminous, and require severally
mubh time for examination i
In addition to the foregoing accounts, which were settled by report
and requisition, there were small accounts- adjusted by the accounting
officers, and paid by disbursing agents dn certificates originating in—
Second Auditor's office......
583
Fourth Auditor's office...
;..
t70
Total.....

1,353

being 253 more than in the preceding year.
The requisitions that have been examined, countersigned, and entered upon the books of this office were—
For Djepartment of War.
From Second Auditor's office :
Pay or advance requisitions
Transfer or refunding requisitions

1,242
178

,

From Third Auditor's office :
Pay or advance requisitions
Transfer or refunding requisitions........

—
.,,,

. 1,61B
765

. For Department of ihe Interior:,
From Second Auditor's office:
Pay or advance requisitions
..............i.......
Tran sfer or refunding requisitions
i......'
^ From Third Auditor's office:
Pay or advance requisitions:
Transfer OT refunding requisitions



370
45

*....

710
149

454

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

From Fourth Auditor's office :
Pay or advance requisitions..
Transfer or refunding requisitions

83
52

For Navy Department.
From Fourth Auditor's office :
, Pay or advance requisitions
Transfer or refunding requisitions
Total

'

749
271
6,227

The official letters cover 558 pages folio post.
The number of accounts reported for suit is 23.
Since the date of the last preceding report, a portion of the for,ce of
this office, formerly occupying rooms in a building opposite to the
Treasury, has been transferred to the department building, and is now
under the more immediate supervision of the head of the bureau.
The- work of the office is kept as nearly up as the nature of the business devolved upon it will permit, and none of it is in arrear.
The bonds of a large proportion of the disbursing officers of the
government are required by law to be deposited in this office, where
they are carefully filed and recorded in books kept for that purpose.
I n order to enable the auditors, to whom the accounts of such officers
are rendered, to comply promptly with the instructions heretofore
given to make immediate settlements under former bonds when new
ones are accepted or required, the date, penalty^ names, and residences of sureties, &c., of every bond received, is communicated to the
proper Auditor.
Upon examining the transactions of this office in relation to suits
brought against debtors ofthe government, it was found that some of
the provisions ofthe law of March 3, 1797, (1 Stat., ch. 20, p. 512,)
had never been enforced. The first section of that act declares ^' that
when any revenue officer or other person accountable for public money
shall neglect or refuse to pay into the treasury the sum or balance
reported to be due to the IJnited States upon the adjustment of his
account, it shall be the duty of the Comptroller, and he is hereby required, to institute suit for the recovery of the same, adding to the sum
stated to. be due on such account the commissions of the delinquent,
which shall be forfeited in every instance where suit is commenced
andjudgment obtained thereon, and an interest of six per cent, per
annum from the time of receiving the money until it shall be repaid
into the treasury." ^
On a careful investigation I could find no repeal or modification of
this enactment, nor any decision nor reason that would make it inapplicable to the accounts revised in this office. The tendency and object
of the law are so manifestly beneficial to the public interest by providing, in efiect, heavy pecuniary penalties for an unlawful retention
ofpublic money, either from negligence, or on frivolous pretexts of
claims in offset, that I considered it to be niy duty to direct the Auditors reporting to this office to add to the balance due, in accounts



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

455

prepared for suit, the commissions of delinquent officers or agentsof
the United States ; and also an interest of six per cent, per annum on
the balance from the time ol receiving the money. Circulars have
been issued apprizing officers and other parties holding public funds
of the requirements of the l a w ; and the notice that these requirements will be impartially enforced is already found to produce salutary effects.
In the settlement of accounts some other requirements, deemed important to protect the public interest, have been promulgated, and are
now enforced. It had become quite common for disbursing officers to
report, in their accounts, large balances as due to them for funds
' turned over to other officers, for advances on account of the government, or for disbursements from thfeir private moneys on public account. It was found, in some cases, that receipts had been given by
creditors of the government, when, in fact, no money had been paid;
in others, that duplicate receipts for money transferred had been filed,
and that there was reason to suppose that, in one case at least, a very
large amount had been erroneously allowed, not by the accounting
officers, but by Congress, for an alleged advance from one disbursing
officer to another, both of whom were dead.
In the opinion of this office, no disbursing officer of the government
has a right to borrow money, br advance his own funds for disbursements or to other officers, ostensibly for the public use, unless he has
been requested to do so by competent authority. If he chooses of his
own motion to make such advances, he must certainly show that the
money and the expenditure have inured to the benefit of the government before he can have even an equitable claim to be reimbursed by
the United States. It is not believed that a legal claira against the
United States can possibly arise from such unauthorized proceedings.
A point analogous in principle was long since judicially decided. It
was held by the court (Maryland district, Winchester, judge) in the
United States ^5. Barney, that no lien could be permitted to exist
against the government for advances, and that in such a case no other
remedy remained for a creditor than an application to Congress for
payment. (Hall's Law Journal, p. 130.) To prevent a recurrence
of difficulties arising from what I cannot but consider as an irregular,
dangerous, and most reprehensible practice, the most positive directions have been given that no credit shall be allowed for any balance,
great or small, on account of advances by a disbursing officer, whos^
accounts are subject to the revision of this office, until the necessity
of the advance and its application to the public service shall have
been fully explained and demonstrated. The officers have also been
reminded that it is their duty to estimate and make their requisitions
in season to be placed in public funds for the official expenditures that
may reasonably be expected to fall within the scope of the disbursements devolved upon them.
Another subject, which has been of late years frequently before the
accounting officers, has been investigated, and some disputed points
adjudicated, so far as this office has authority to do so. The compensation for travel performed under orders, by officers of the army, is
generally established by the regulations at a commutation of ten cents



456

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

a mile. Numerous and urgent claims have been presented, after the
settlement of transporfcation accounts, for additional allowances, on the
ground of ah uhder-estimate of the distance. In all such cases it has
been held that payment for travel was designed only as a reimbursetnent of expenses, and that no executive officer has authority to make
it simply as an emolument. It is only upon the theory that the commutation is a ready mode of reaching the probable actual expense that
the commutation itself is legal; for as an emolument it would be a
direct violation ofthe acts ofMarch 3, 1839, and August 23, 1842, by
increasing the compensation of the officer beyond the amount authorized by Congress. When, therefore, an account for transportation has
been settled, and, under the commutation principle or otherwise, a sum
has been paid equal to the neceissary actual expenses, as no equitable
claim could arise for more, it is held that such settlement must stand,
and cannot be disturbed for the purpose of making a larger allowance
under a commutation, or hypothetical amount of expenses.
In another matter of importance a misconception of some of the
provisions in the law of January 25, 1828, providing that no money
sh all be paid to any person for his compensation who is in arrears to
the United States, has heretofore created considerable embarrassment.
By the proviso in that act, it is declared that ^' in all cases where the
pay or salary of any person is withheld in pursuance of this act, it shall
be the duty of the accounting officers, if demanded by the party, his
agent or attorney, to report, forthwith, to tlie agent of the Treasury
Department, the balance due ; and it shall be the du'ty ofthe said agent
within sixty days thereafter to order suit to be commenced against
such delinquent and his sureties."
This proviso has been interpreted by parties whose pay has been,
stopped for indebtedness to the United States as imposing upon the
officers ofgovernment the absolute obligation to bring suit on demand
of the debtor, no matter how,petty the sum,.or under what circumstances of disadvantage to the public interest a suit must be conducted.
Such is not thought to be a fair construction of the law. Its main design seems to have been to prohibit to the accounting and other officers a discretion, which they had repeatedly exercised, of paying salaries
to persons in default, and not to hamper the government by taking
away a right it always held and exercised. The Supreme Court has
decided that 'Hhe United States possess the general right to apply all
sums due for such pay and emoluments to the extinguishment of any
balances due fo =them." (15 Peters, 370.) This right is absolute,
and exists independently of any statute upon the subject; and the
officers of government have therefore felt at liberty to decline bringing
suits when in their judgment it was unnecessary for, or would =tend to
defeat, the ends of justice. In this view ofthe subject, the accounting
officers are sustained by the head of the Treasury Department, who,
under date ofMarch 3, 1856, says, in an official letter: ^^I consider
the department has the election to stop officers' pay for any balances
due the United States, and is not compelled to resort to suit at the
instance of officers in arrears to the United States. Taking the whole
law into consideration and connexion, the election in this class of cases
is with the Treasury Department, and not with the officer."



.REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

.

457

The clerks employed in this office during the year have been punctual, diligent, and faithful, and the public business has never been
more promptly and satisfactorily performed.
I am, very respectfully, &c., &c.,
J . M. BEODHEAD, Gomptroller.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.

C.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Ofiiice ofi Gommissioner ofi Customs, November 8, 1856.
SIR : Presuming that your letter of November last, requesting a
report of the operations of this office during the preceding year, was
designed to establish a permanent system of annual reports, which,
should furnish, somewhat in detail, a statement ofits transactions for
each year, I respectfully ask leave to submit the following exhibit:
- The number of accounts of collectors of the customs, and surveyors acting as collectors, received from the First Auditor, revised
and finally adjusted in this office, since the first of November last,
aniounts to two thousand six hundred and forty-eight. There have
been received and settled accourits from superintendents of lighthouses, agents of marine hospitals, special accounts for the erection of
light-houses, beacons, and buoys, the constructibn of custom-houses
and marine hospitals, and for miscellaneous objects, to the number of
two thousand nine hundred and forty-two.
The number of requisitions issued upon estimates furnished by the
proper officers for the expenses of collecting the revenue fromcustoms,
for debentures and excess of deposites, building custom-houses lighthouses, and marine hospitals, the support of light-houses, and marine
hospitals, and for.miscellaneous purposes^ amoumts to two thousand
five hundred and forty-one.
In the execution of these duties, and in the disposal of the large
amount of miscellaneous business appertaining to the office, or referred
to it by the department, there have been written seven thousand ^ight
hundred and ninety-two letters, all of which have been copied and recorded in the office.
The great number of accounts now requidred from collectors and disbursiiig agents, owing to the frequency of the settlements, with the
correspondence incident thereto, has YQTJ much increased the labors
of the office, and will ciill for some additional force, to dispose of them
with the care and promptitude their importance demands.
"The rendition of these accounts ^punctually a-t the end ofeach moiith,
and their settlement here without unnecessary delay, have very essentially contributed to the security of the public revenue, and proved,
in every respect, a judicious and valuable reform.
It affords me great pleasure to state that these accounts continue to
be rendered with uniform punctuality, and that the more recent re


458

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

quirement subjecting disbursements and other accounts to the same
rule is rapidly attaining the same regularity.
The accounts of agents of marine hospitals at places where there are
large expenditures have occasioned much embarrassment, and given
occasion for voluminous correspondence. No labor or care has been
spared to keep down these expenditures to the proper limit; and all
charges that have not been satisfactorily explained have been rejected,
and repeated admonitions given to the superintendents in regard to
all unnecessary or unauthorized expenses. The circular about to be
promulgated in relation to this subject will furnish a complete system
for the government ofthese institutions, andfor the administration of
the fund in places where no government institutions exist; the directions contained in the circular are so minute and comprehensive in
their character, and all the duties of the superintendents are so clearly
pointed out, that it is believed their faithful observance will wholly
remedy the irregularities referred to.'
When this system shall have been fully established, it seems to me
that the regulations relating to the collection of the revenue from customs, the disbursements of agents for the expenses necessary thereto,
the settlement of accounts, both of collectors and disbursing agents,
the administration of the marine hospital fund, and the prompt collection of balances from officers who have gone out of office or ceased
to disburse the public moneys, will be as perfect as it is possible to
make them. Nothing can exceed the regularity, simplicity, and order
of all the accounts relating to the customs ; and it is gratifying to be
able" to state that, with one exception upon the Pacific coast, there
has been no instance of defalcation, or even of improper detention of
the public money, from any collector appointed since April, 1853 ;
and that, in the exceptional case, the prompt and energetic measures
adopted by you have probably secured the government against any
considerable loss.
Since the first establishment of the collection district at San Francisco, and until within the last fiscal year, the settlement ofthe accounts
has been attended with great embarassment, uncertainty, and delay;
the expenses were enormous, and the balances uniformly largely
against the collectors. Suits have been necessarily resorted to in
every instance, and large sums claimed by the United States still
remain due. Since the appointment of the present collector, under
new instructions issued by the deparfcment, the accounts have assumed
a new shape. They are now rendered as regularly and punctually as
those upon the Atlantic ; and what is still better, the expenses incident to the office have been so regulated, systematized, and reduced^,
as to compare favorably with those upon the Atlantic coast.
In obedience to instructions contained in your letter of November,
1853, particular care has been taken to enforce the prompt settlement
of the accounts of such collectors and disbursing agents as have gone
out of office or ceased to disburse the public moneys since April of
that year.
The number of those officers who have gone out of office, either by
death, resignation, or removal, since that period is thirty-seven. Of that
number, the accounts of twenty-three are finally closed, and the bal


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

459

ances paid to the United States. All the others are in course of
adjustment, and none will be debtors to any considerable amount,
with the exception of the late collector at San Francisco, whose
accounts are now in suit, but whose official bond may not prove
sufficient to cover the judgment which may be recovered against him.
The transfer of the bonds of collectors of the customs and other
officers from the office of the First Comptroller to this, will add something to the labor of the office, and, with the large increase of the
regular business, which goes on regularly from year to year, requires additional clerical aid. I would therefore recommend that
one additional clerk of the third class be added tp the force of the
office.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, &c.,
H. J . ANDEESON.
Gdmmissioner of Gustoms.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

D.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

First Auditor's Office, Novemher 7, 1856.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856 :
Accounts adjusted, viz:
Collectorsof the customs
.Collectors under the steamboat act
Collectors and disbursing agents of the Treasury
Official emoluments of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Additional compensation of collectors, naval officers, surveyors, claims for the refunding of duties illegally exacted, and claims for net proceeds of unclaimed merchandise
The judiciary.........
Interest on, the public debt.
Treasury notes presented for funding and redemption.:......,
Eedemption of United States war bounty scrip.........
Claims for property lost in the military service of the United
States
Inspectors of steam-vessels, for travelling expehses, &c.......
Salaries of officers of the civil list, paid directly from the
treasury
Claims for the redemption of United States stock
Superintendents of lights
Agents of marine hospitals
Commissioner of Public Buildings



1,569
266
908
261

1,691
681
52
3
23.
144
1,019
447
445
547
151

460

REPORT ON THE S^iNAiSTCES.

Contingent expenses ofthe Senate and House of Eepresentatives, and of the departments and bureaus of the government
537
Coast survey
29
The Treasurer of the United States, for general receipts and
expenditures
4
The Treasurer of the United States, for pay and mileage of
the members of the Ho use of Eepresentatives
2
The Secretary of the Senate, for pay and mileage of senators
1
Designated depositaries, for additional compensation.....
7
Construction and repairs of public buildings
65^5
The Territories
91
Disbursing clerks for paying salaries
296
The Mint...;
91
Disbursing agent of California land commissioners
3
Withdrawal of applications for patents, appeal cases, &c....
30
Accounts for the payment of the credit;ors of the late republic of Texas, under act of February 28, 1855
691.
Miscellaneous accounts
:
338
Number of accounts recorded
10,986
Number ofletters written
5,863
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
. T . L. SMITH, Auditor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

E.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Auditor's Office, Nov. 10, 1856.
SIR: In obedience to instructions heretofore received, I have the
honor to transmit herewith a statement showing an outline of the
operations.of this office for the fiscal year ending the 30th of June,
1856.
The character of the officers of this bureau continues to be satisfactory, being punctual and diligent in performing their respective dutieS;,
which have become laborious in consequence of the increase of the
army and the changes in the pay, &G., ofthe troops.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
P . CLAYTON,
Second Auditor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.




REPORT ON THE FINANCESo

461

Statement of the operations of the Second Auditor's office during the
fiiscal year ending June 30, 1856; showing the number ofi money accounts settled, the expenditure embraced therein, the number ofi proyperty accounts examined and adjusted, together with other duties perfiormed pertaining to the husiness ofi the office; prepared in pursuance
of iristructions of the Secretary ofi the Treasury,
The number of money accounts settled is 1,823, embracing .an expenditure of $7,861,389 75, under thefollowing heads, viz:
Pay department of the army
$2,399,019 36
Ordnance Department
1,314,650 66
Quartermaster'sDepartment of the army, disbursed on
accountof ^ ^clothing of the army," ^ ^contingen ciesi .
of the army," and the pursuit and apprehension of
deserters
1,101,995 84
Indian affairs..............
2,793,995 04
Medicaland Hospital Department;....
89,332 65
Expenses of recruiting
69,555 95
Contingencies of Adjutant General's Depa.rtment
174 31
Mexican hostilities
:
150 00
Private claims
42,586 79
Military Asylum
41,117 64
Military contributions in Mexico
8,811 51
$7,861,389 75
Property accounts examined and adjusted
'....,
2,178
Private claims examined and rejected or suspended
624
Eecruits ofthe army registered
11,389
Eequisitions registered, recorded, and posted
1,844
Certificates of military service issued to Pension Office
29,201
Letters, accounts and papers received, briefed and registered.. 8,831
Dead and discharged soldiers registered
2,017
Annual statement of Indian disbursements, in duplicate, for the
fiscal year ending June 30,1856, comprised in 1,220 sheets of foolscap.
Annual statement of the recruiting fund prepared for the .Adjutant
General of the army.
Annual statement of the contingencies of the army, transmitted in
duplicate to the Secretary of War.
Annual statement of contingencies of this office.
Annual reports of balances to First Comptroller.
Quarterly reports of balances and changes in the same, to Second
Comptroller, by direction of Secretary.
There are 1,100 cash accounts entered on the book-keeper's register,
and 800 of them journalized and posted.
The appropriation legers and journals of the War and Interior
Departments have been carefully and accurately kept.
P . CLAYTON, Secmd Auditor.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Auditor's Office, Nov. 10, 1856,



462

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

F.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Third Auditor's Office, November 12, 1856.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this branch of the Treasury Department, for the year'ending
30th June, 1856:
FIRST DIVISION—BOOK-KEEPERS.

This division has been kept actively employed. In the books here
kept are contained all the monetary transactions of the government
so far as connected with this office.
From the chief book-keeper's statement it appears that—
The aggregate amount of drafts on the Treasury, by requisition,
in the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1856, was $14,676,046 17.
Ohjects of Application.
Drafts by requisition charged to personal accounts
Drafts by requisition on account of military contributions charged to personal accounts
Drafts by requisition for payment of claims and
charged to the appropriation, including acts for
the relief of individuals....
,

$14,486,945 99
137,109 85
51,990 33
14,676,046 17

Repayments.
Amount of counter requisitions by transfers
Amount of counter requisitions by deposites

$2,577,673 97
53,111 26
2,630,785 23

The total amount of accounts settled out of advances
made and charged to disbursing agents and comprised in 3,326 reports
Amount of accounts settled appertaining to military
contributions, act 3d March, 1849
Amount of accounts settled appertaining to the civil
fund of California
Amount of accounts settled and charged to the
> appropriations, including acts for relief of individuals
Total



'....,

$16,440,186 26
331,300 21
627,716 79
51,990 33
$17,451,193 59

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

463

SECOND DIVISION—QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.

In this division there were received during the fiscal year 597 accounts of officers doing duty in the Quartermaster's Department of
the army, the aggregate disbursements involved therein amounting
to $6,766,230 24.
During the same period there have been settled 610 accounts,
(including 57 remaining on hand unsettled SOth June, 1855,) involving the sum of $5,701,664 86. During the first quarter of the
present fiscal year there have been received 229 accounts, involving
$1,423,464 30, and 166 accounts settled, involving $1,115,537 80.
There remained on hand on the 30th September 107 accounts; of
which number, 81 were received in the month of September, and many
of them during the latter part of the month. The number of letters
written in this division during the fiscal year was 1,958.
THIRD DIVISION—SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT.
/•

In this division there were audited, during the past fiscal year, 867
accounts of officers doing duty in the Commissary Department of the
army, involving an expenditure of $1,873,198 43.
The total amount of expenditures and transfers acted upon in this
division and certified by the Second Comptroller, for the same peijiod,
is $2,506,618 50.
Number ofletters written, same period, 953.
The number of accounts audited during the quarter ending 30th
September, 1856, is 219, involving an expenditure of $645,559 21.
The total amount of expenditures and transfers acted upon and certified by the Second Comptroller, for the sameperiod, is $847,148 35.
Number ofletters written, same period, 225.
There remained on file, unaudited, on the 30th September, 21
accounts of officers, involved in the sum of $51,415 23.
FOURTH DIVISION—PENSION BRANCH.

To this division is assigned the keeping and settlement of accounts
of pension agents ; the settlement of claims on account of arrearages of
pensions, and for due and unclaimed pensions for a period exceeding fourteen months, and therefore payable at the treasury ; and the
preparation of reports to Congress and the different departments
connected with the pension branch, involving the whole correspondence
pertaining thereto.
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856, there were received
and recorded by this branch ofthe office 1,804 letters.
' Of letters written there were 2,155.
Of calls for information from the Pension- Office, &c.—
Eeceived and answered there were..
411
Of pension agents' accounts received
^.
194
Of pension agents' accounts settled
179
Of peiision claims received and settled or otherwise disposed of
681



464

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

The agents' accounts involved the expenditure of...... $1,179,213 07
The pension claims an expenditure of
24,487 06
On the 30th September last there were of pension agents' accoumts
on hand and unsettled
14
Of peusion claims on hand
none
F I F T H DIVISION—ENGINEER DEPARTMENT.

To this division are assigned the accountsof officers and agents
disbursing under the direction of the Engineer and Topographical Engineer Bureaus of the W a r Department, as also the accounts of certain
officers and agents disbursing under the special direction of the W a r
Department, and which are sent to this office for settlement. These
embrace expenditures for military and geographical surveys ; for surveys of routes for a railroad from the Mississippi river to the Pacific
ocean; for all works of river and harbor improvement on the lakes
and on the Gulf of Mexico ; for the construction and repairs of fortifications ; for surveys of harbors on the Atlantic and of rivers emptying
into i t ; for the Washington aqueduct, the extension of the United
States Capitol, the continuation of the Post Office building, and other
miscellaneous accounts diversified in their character.
The number of quarter-yearly accounts that were on file in this
division, unadjusted at the commencement of the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1856, was..:
..,.
96
The number received during that year was
230
And the number for adjustment was therefore

326

Of this number, there were adjusted during the year

304

And the number remaining unadjusted at its close was

22

The three hundred and four accounts, adjusted within
the year, involved the sum of
.'
$5,813,586 20
In addition to the number of accounts unadjusted on the 1st
July last, namely
,
22
There had.been received up to the 1st October
44
Making an aggregateof
Of this number, there were adjusted between the 1st of July
and the 30th of September last,'(in which an amount of
$243,500 13 was involved,)

41

And there remained unadjusted on the 1st October

25

Of the twenty-five accounts on file and unadjusted on the 1st
October, nine were received during the month of September,
1856, and sixteen prior thereto. Letters written......




66

345

REPORTr ON THE FlNlANCHEJS^

46^

SIXTH DIVISION!.—MISCEI^LANEOUSi .

During the fiscal year 241 claims and accounts demanding investigation were received, involving an amount of $725,770 0 2 ; and up
to the SOth of September last there were received 342 of such claims
a n d accounts of the aggregate amount of $1,303,238 95.
I n the fiscal year 359 claims and accounts were reported and acted
upon, involving an amount of $278,164' 06, of which there was allowed
the sum of $133,446 24, andtheremainder, amountingto $144,717 79,
was disallowed and suspended for want of legal authority to allow, or
for defective and insufficient evidence. Within the same time, there
were also investigated and reports made upon 31 other claims and
accountsr-of the large aggregate amount of $2,820,692 18, some of
them very voluminous, and involving an unusual amount of labor arid
examination, all upon calls of Congress and the Court of Claims.
Up to the 30th September last 437 claims hadbeen reported and
'acted upon of the aggregate amountof $948,703 65, upon which there
was alloysred the sum of $794,254 75, and disallowed and saspended
the sum of $154,448 90 for the reasons above mentioried, including in
the amount allowed the sum of $574,389 26, on account on the wais
Irian bonds of the State of California.
I n the fiscal year the;t'e were 742 letters received, 1,076 other papers
received and filed, 873 letters written, copies made covering '430"ps^gm
of foolscap paper, and record books filled to the amount of 849 pageB^.
Up to the 30th September, 1856, there were 822 letters received, 1,40^
other papers received and filed, 1,044 letters written, copies- ma#e
covering 544 pages of foolscap, and record books filled to the' amount
of 926 pages.
SEVENTH DIVISON.—SOLDIERS' CLAIMS AND BOUNTY LAND DEPARTMENT.

During the past fiscal year 1,680 communications relating to pay,
pension and bounty land claims were duly investigated and disposed
of, including claims of widows and; orphans under acts of March 16",
1802, April 16, 1816, and the first section of the act of March 3,
1853, (McEae's volunteers,) which are executed in this office. Ofthe
entire number of claims presented 34 were allowed. The amount of
money involved in the payment of the claims allowed was $B,035 13.
40,746 bounty land claims, with 343 invalid and half-pay pension
cases,, were examined and certified to the Commissioner of Pensions.
Since the 1st July and.up to the30th September, embracing the firsi
quarter of the current fiscal year, 16,142 bounty land claims, with 63
invalid and half-pay pension cases, have been examined and certified
to the Commissioner of Pensions. 389 communications relative to
pay, pension and bounty land claims have also been received and registered at this office, all of which have been disposed of. The number
of letters written during the year in this division was 2,443.
EIGHTH DIVISION.—COLLECTIONS.

.

^

A t the commencement of the last fiscal year the balances oiiitMand30:



466

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ing on the books of this office, as stated in my last annual report under
date of November 9, 1855, were as follows:
On account of arrearages prior to 1820
Charged on the current books since 1820
Total

$2,856,453 77
3,127,176 80
5,983,630 57

Of the amount due on account of arrearages there was in suit and
in the course of prosecution, under the direction of the Solicitor ofthe
Treasury, the sum of $2,158,018 64, and of the amount charged on
the current books $1,475,906 62, leaving a balance of $2,349,705 31
for collection by suit or otherwise. ' During the last fiscal year and
the first quarter of the present fiscal year, ending 30th September,
1856, the balance on account of arrearages has been reduced in the
sum of $47,653 60, and of the amount on the current books in the
sum of $195;404 38. Twelve transcripts of accounts, exhibiting a
balance of $304,127 16, were prepared, with a brief of the facts in
each case, and transmitted to the Second Comptroller of the Treasury
for suit. Of this amount there has been a reduction in the sum of
$10,909 53, by payments and re-adjustments of the accounts. The
number of letters written in this division and recorded is 1,656, and
the number received and registered is 948. Quarterly reports have
also been made to your department, exhibiting the names of the
debtors, office or capacity in which disbursing, their residences as far
as known, the date to which their accounts were last settled, and
the.amount due at the end of the quarter.
The business of this division, from the 1st of July, 185&, to the
30th of September, 1856, may be thus briefly stated:
Total balance, June 30, 1855.....
$5,983,630 57
From which deduct amount closed by
settlement and payments into the treasury
$243,057 98
Amount in suit and in course of prosecution, under the direction of the Solicitor of the Treasury, on account of
arrearages
2,110,365 04
Of amount charged on current books.... 1,764,559 72
4,117,982 74
Balance.......
..,
To which add amount charged to officers during the
year, reported as having ceased to disburse, and
who have accounts and vouchers in process of adjustnient
:
Total balance outstanding
^ Of which occurred prior to 1820

1,865,647 83

79,500 55
1,945,148 38
698,434 13

Leaving of balances since 1820, and outstanding September 30, 1856
.1,246,714 25



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

467

The foregoing details of work done in the various divisions of this
office compare favorably with those of former years. I t will be seen
that, on the one hand, the amount of labor necessary to a discharge of
the duties of the office has been gradually on the increase, while, on
the other hand, the number of clerks employed has diminished'
During the month of June this office was removed from the lower
story of the treasury building to its present location. By this change
at least one month was lost in labor of removal, re-arrangement of
rooms, cases, books and papers, and the confusion inevitably resulting
therefrom. I t is gra'tifying, however, to be able to state that notwithstanding the increased business and diminished force, together
with the drawback attending the removal of the office, the summary
of business, on the 30th September, being the close of the first
quarter of the present fiscal year, shows that the labors of the clerks
have kept up with the exigencies, so that no material injury has
resulted to the public ser vice,, either by delay in the examination and
settlement of accounts, or in discharge of any of the duties by law
assigned to this office. The present working force, of the office consists of sixty-six clerks. A t t h e date of my last report there were
sixty-eight employed, and during the fiscal year previous thereto there
had been at one time as many as eighty-two employed.
These reductions have been made by transfers to other bureaus, at
various times, by the head of the department. In this connexion I beg
leave to invite your attention to the fact that notwithstanding there
are now only sixty-six clerks actually employed in this office, as above
stated, yet it is compelled to estimate for the salaries of twenty-four
clerks employed in other bureaus, whereby it is apparently charged
i n t h e appropriations with $32,800 of salaries of clerks doing duty
elsewhere. I t would seem but fair that each office should estimate
only for the salaries of the clerks actually employed in it.
During the pa^t year a number of instances have occurred/ more
especially in the Quartermaster's Department, of disbursing officers
rendering accounts claiming a balance to be due them by the government. This has necessarily caused mrire or less delay in their settlement, for in such cases the accounts are withheld until satisfactory
explanations are received showing how the balance accrued. The
withholding of the accounts from settlement and calling for explanations have, in several instances, I regret to say, produced bad feelings
on the part of the officers reiidering the accounts, it being considered
by them an implied impeachment, or" at least suspicion of the correctness of the account. The regulations provide that disbursing officers
shall make timely estimates .to their respective chiefs of the amounts
required for the public service during eaeh quarter, and thus keep
themselves supplied with funds. The accounting officers consider that
where circumstances render it impossible for the funds thus to be procured and, therefore, .the officer borrows, or advances from his own
means, money to defray accruing expenses, and renders his account
showing a balance due him, such'balance becomes a ^^claim" which
they have a right and are in duty bound to investigate before acting
upon it. The mere fact that the vouchers are presented, showing the
application of money to the public service is not of itself conclusive ;



468

REPORT ON THE

FJNA^CES>

bfut explanation should be. given of the reason why such aii; advance, was
i^ia.de on the credit of the. goverment and:then.ecessfty therefor. The.
practice, should, as far as possible, be avoided and; discouraged. With,
ample means in. the treasury, the actual necessity^ for: such advances^
will seldom occur, if officers.make use of a timely precaution ; where,
however, it is. impossible in the.; nature of the case, it. should not be
considered as .askin g too much., t h a t the: cir cumstances should be stated;
and explained fully.
A practice, at. onetime, it, is believed,, prevailed t o a considerable^
extent amongst^ disbursing officers;,, in varipus departments of the.
government, of taking receipts or vouchers from- persons to.whom
nioney was,due from the government, the payment to be, made; when
sufficient funds.,were on hand, and in, this, way balances would, accrue,,
by.the use of such vouchers., i n t h e rendition of accounts, although;
the money had not been paid and therefore: no advance actually,made.
But such instances cannot now occur without an express violation ofi
law, it being made a' penal offence for any officer charged with the;
disbursement of public inoneys .to ^ accept or receive, or transmit to;
^
the Treasury Department to be, allowed in his- favor, any receipt or*
voucher from a creditor of the.United States,: without having paid to
such creditor in such funds as the.said officer may have received for
disbursement, &c., the full ainount specified in such receiptor voucher.''
. I n my last annual report 1 alluded to the fact that between the, 8th
M^rch,. 1854., and the dateof the.report,.(9t.h.November, 1855,) fortyseven officers; of all grades.had.resignedtheir commissions in the army,
biaving.balances, standing charged against thena on thebooksof this;
office, amounting in the aggregate to $43,281 12. Since that time.•
there have been,forty-five, resignations of officers of all grades, with an;
aggregate balance against them of $33^068 54. I also alluded to the
fact that paragraph forty-two of the.armyregulations of^ 1847 seemed,
tohave in view some restrictions^with reference, to^ resignations .of
officers of thC: army, but w.hich was not.clearly defined*. It would not:,
seem unjust.to. make; paymeiit, or settlement of balancesidue the goterninent, as a condition precedent to the acceptance: of a resignation.
Many of these charges are,, oii.. personal account for over-pay ments ou,
a^cpount of transportation, commutation, or,: other allow ances, the
amounts in such cases.not being: large,; an.d iu many instances the.
officer resigning has no.fixed place of residence,, or if so, it is not...
known t o t h e accounting offic§rs>.and. cannot, be obtained fronii.thie=
office of theadjutant generaL, In.; such cases there is; a-,remedy<\whils.t:.
in the S|srvice, .viz : a stoppage.; of pay, and. which can. be: resorted tor
when other means fail; but after a resignation has been accepted;,
nothing remains but the personal responsibility of the individual in
a suit at law, which is always tedious and often unavailing. I t is but,,
just, however, t h a t i should say. that generally thosa officers, responds
to.the calls.made on them for settlement of their accounts promptly*
In many instances=the balances, arise from the suspension, of vouchers,
rendered in their accounts^ which may be passed to their: credit on
necessary corrections, explanations> or proof being made*
The claim of the State of California for expenses incurred in the.,
suppression of Indian hoatilitipS;^ withiu;: the St^^^^
to the Ist



^3E#ORT ON THE iFlNiA^icfeS.

.

469

'January, 1854, which has been on file in thi^'bffice -since Augiist 10,
M54, and to.which I referred in my report of 1854, is now being
paid, in pursuance of the provisions of an act of Congress passed at
'the laist session.
The principle adopted in the settlement of this claim, by direction
of Congress, being entirely at variance with the established usages rif
•the'executive departments and the action of Congress since the formation of the government, with respect to similar claims for advancei^
^itfade by States for the use and benefit of the ^United States, or for
expenses incurred by them in the suppression'of Indian hostilities
within their borders, together with the magiiitude of the amount involved, has seemed to me sufficient reason to call for ^special allusion
to it in my report. This principle, if once established and recognized
r^'s ^a precedent for future action, will effectually take away from the
gieneral government that right which it has heretofore claimed, withbut question or objection, so far as I know, to investigate and revise
'isuch claims, requiring full and satisfactory evidence, with vouchers,
"showing that the amount claimed was actually expeiided for the use arid
benefit o f t h e United States, or in the suppression of hostilities,-as
claimed. Such was the mode pursued in the-settlement of claims preferred by the States>of Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvainia, North Caroliiia, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Delaware, New
York, New Jersey, Ehode Island, South CaTbliria,'Georgia, and Vermont, for advances raade by them duririg the war of 1812 ; of Virginia,
Louisiaria, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Ohio,Ludiana, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Michigan, Texas, and
New York, for udvances made during the Mexican tvar ; and of South
Caroliria, Alabaraa, Georgia, and Florida, for expenses incurred by
them d u r i n g t h e Seminole Indiari hostilities.
I n the preserit case, ^Congress, in the 9th sectibn bf the act making
appropriations for the^ support o f t h e army for the year ending the
30th June, 1855, provided : ^^ That the Secretary of War be, aad he
is hereby, authorized and directed to examine into and ascertain the
amount of expenses incurred and now actually paid by the State 'of
Galifornia in the suppression bf Indian hostilities within the said
State prior to the first bf January, unno Dorriirii eighteen hundred
, and fifty-four, and that the amount of such expenses, when so ascfer
tained, be paid into the treasury of said State: Provided, That thesum so paid shall not exceed in ambunt the^iSurii of nirie hundred arid
twenty-four thousarid two hundred and fifty-nine dollars and sixtyfive cents ; which ariaount is hereby appropriated out of any moneys
in the treasury riot otherwise appropriated." Accordingly, the claim
of Jhe State was forwarded to the Hon. Secretary bf W a r , and by him
referred to this office i n t h e usual course, on the 10th of August, 1854,
but riot accompanied with vouchers or other ievidence going to shotv
how 'said claim accrued, or for what purpose the money was expended,
further than 'appeared by the legislation of the State authorizing the
issue of bonds by the ailthorities of sai 1^ fate, bearing interest a t t h e
fates of seven and twelve per cent, pei* annuria, "and certified schedules
ofthe dates, numbers and amounts of the bonds issued, in pursuarieb
of Said legislation.
The Secretary of War nbt 'cbrisidering the



470

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

evidence furnished sufficient, no further action was had' thereon until
the commissioners appointed by the State of California to superintend
the settlement ofthe claina with the general government filed in the
War Department an abstract of payments made on account of several
expeditions against the Indians, with vouchers, rolls, &c., and which
were transmitted to this office on the 15th of July, 1856, for investigation and report. It was my intention to have^the claim taken up
at an early period and examined, but further investigation was precluded by section 8 of the act ^making appropriations for certain civil
expenses of the government for the year ending the 30th June, 1857,
passed 18th August, 1856, which provided: ' ' T h a t the Secretary of
War is hereby authorized and directed to pay to the holders of the
war bonds of the State of California the amount of money appropriated
by act.of Congress approved May [August] fifth, eighteen hundred
and fifty-four, in payment of expenses incurred and now actually
paid by the State of California for the suppression of Indian hostilities within the said State, prior to the first day of January, anno
Domini eighteen hundred and fifty-four, under the following restrictions and regulations: Before any bonds shall be redeemed by the
Secretary of War, they shall be presented to the board of commissioners appointed by the legislature of said State by an act approved
April nineteenth, eighteen hundred and fifty-six, and the amount
due and payable upon each bond be endorsed thereon by said commissioners. Upon presentation to the Secretary of W a r of any bond
or bonds thus endorsed, it shall be his duty to draw his warrant in
favor of the holder or holders thereof for the amount certified to be
due upon the same'by the said commissioners upon the Secretary of
the Treasury, who is hereby directed to pay the sariie: Provided, That
said amounts in the aggregate sball not exceed the amount of money
appropriated by act of Congress approved August filth, eighteen hunpred and fifty-four," &c.
>
.
By this legislation, you will observe, the issue of the bonds was
made conclusive as to the fact of the ' ' expenses" having been ' ' incurred" and ''actually paid," and upon certificate of the board of
commissioners that the bonds were genuine, and the amount due and
payable thereon endorsed by them, payment was directed' to be made
at the treasury.
"^
In this connexion I beg leave to remark that large claims of a similar character are understood to have originated within the last year
in prosecution of Indian wars in Oregon and Washington Territories,
where the same course has been pursued of issuing " s c r i p , " to the
amount, as I am informed, of several millions of dollars. The extraordinary prices which are paid for services, supplies, &c., in the prosecution of such'hostilities, and the great facility with which immense
claims may be created when there is no check to'the imposed upon improvidence, so far as the general"governmei\t is concerned, not to say
the opportunities that oftentimes occur under such peculiar circumstances for practising direct Irauds upon the treasury, would seem
to require that such claims should in all cases be subjected to rigid
investigation, and the uniform practice of the government herefore be not departed from in that respect. It is, of course, impossible



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

471

for Congress to give claims of this description the close scrutiny and
thorough investigation which they require. But the substitution of
thisnew mode of determining the amount, viz: by the gross amount
of " b o n d s " issued, without reference to whether the amount actually
applied to the public service was twenty or fifty or more per cent, on
the principal sum, is calculated to stimulate extravagance and lead .to
alarming abuses, whilst the benefits go not into the pockets of those
who furnished the supplies or rendered the service, but of capitalists
and speculators, who are always ready, on such occasions, to take advantage of the necessities ofthe needy and the circumstances of the
time. I t is not intended in anything which I have said in this report
to impeach the correctness ofthe claim preferred by the State of California, my object being solely to invite attention to the fact that the
mode of settlement adopted in this case has been entirely differerit
from that uniforrialy observed heretofore. Up to this date bonds to
the amount of $765,870 have been filed and reported for paymentj of
which the sum of $97,370 is for interest accrued up to 1st January,
1854.
There is a class of claims for horses lost in the military service of
the United States, that have been recently coming into the office, under the act of March 3, 1849, to which I invite attention. They are
by volunteers engaged in the Eogue river Indian war in Oregon in
1853, and in the suppression of Indian hostilities in California subsequent to the termination of the Mexican war, and prior to the 1st of
January, 1854. The volunteers first named, besides the highest rate
of pay known to the law, received four dollars per day for the use and
risk of their horses until such period as the allowance reached double
the appraised value of the horse. The California volunteers were paid
five dbllars per day for the service of each private, and one dollar per
day for each horse, making the extravagant and hitherto unheard of
annual compensation of each private mounted volunteer two thousand
one hundred and ninety dollars, besides subsistence, forage, clothing,
and transportation. The pay of officers was equally enormous. Majors ten to fifteen dollars per day; quartermasters, commissaries, surgeons, adjutants, and captains, eight to twelve dollars per day ; lieutenants six to ten, and sergeants five to seven dollars per day, with
subsistence, forage, and all dther allowances. I can scarcely believe
that volunteers who havg. been paid these extraordinary rates are entitled to the beneficiary provisions of acts of Congress intended for
volunteers who received only ninety-six dollars per annum for their
persona] services, and one hundred-and forty-six dollars per annum
for the use and risk of their horses. None of the claims have yet been
allowed.
W i t h great respect, your obedient servant,
EOBEET J . ATKINSON, Auditor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

SecretaryoftheTreasury.




47^2

REPORT ON THE IFI^NANCES.

• G.
.TREASURY DEPARTBIENT,

Fourih Auditor's Office;, November ^, W>5&.
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the required report ofthe
operations and condition of this office during the fiscal year ending
on the 30th of June last.
The number of principal accounts settled was oue thousand and
fifty-one. Many ofthese were-rendered by disbursing officers, iand
included the accounts of officers' and .men, each of which had to be
separately examined-and calculated, to the mumber of jsixty^nine
thousand and sixty-three.
The;amount involved in the-accounts settled was $15,362,880 06.
The reduction made duririg, the year in the balances reported to the
department on the 18th of October, 1853, as standing on the books of
this office, was $969,302 82, Five thousand three huudred and
fifteen letters were received and registered in the course of the year,
and five thousand three hundred and seventy-two were written
and recorded. Eleven hundred and .thirtyrthree requisitions, and one
thousand and fifty allotments of pay were registered. A l l t h e accounts
stated and returned, after revision b y t h e Second Comptroller, were
journalized and posted.
Four thousand nine hundred arid riinety-three applications for
bounty land, under the act of March .3.5.1855,) were received from the
Gommissioner of Pensions, and after the requisite search were returned to him, with a certificate of the service performed by the applicants. As the names of these persons are scattered through the^^rolls
of many years, made up without regard to alphabetical order, some
of which contain the names of more than a thousand men each, and
as it is frequently necessary to trace the irien from roll to roll, in consequence of transfers from one ship to another, the examinatibn is
very arduous and unavoidably corisuriaes a great deal of time. By a
resolution of the House of Eepresentatives, passed in 1848, the: Secretary ofthe Navy is required to transmit to that House, annually, " a
transcript ofthe official navy lists, in such form as to affix, opposite
the name of each person contained therein, in -separate :Columais, the
annual pay of such officer or person.; the amount paid him for rations,
servants, and forage, and the gross amount paid or allowed him in all
respects, for and on his account, for and during the preceding year."
The statement thus called for is made out at this office, and beiug compiled from an immense number of rolls and accounts, the preparation
of it employs the whole time of one of the clerks for at least three
months.
The disbursing officers of the Iiavy,, resident in this country, have
been very punctual in the transmission of their accounts within the
time prescribed by law. There has always been some irregularity on
the part of those abroad ; but this is generally attributable to their
distance from home, and the apprehension of voucher's being lost.
The business of this officeis in good condition, and is not in arrear.
There are some accounts, which have been recently rendered, that have



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

473

not yet been taken up for examination ; but they can all be settled in
afew weeks.
I. have the^ honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
" '
•
A. 0 . DAYTON.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofthe Treasury.

H.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fifith Auditor's Ofiiice, November l ^ , l ^ h & .
SIR : In compliance with the request contained in your letter of the
16th October, 1855, I have the honor to submit the following report
as to the character and present condition of the business of this office
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856.
The accounts adjusted in this office are those of the United States
bankers in London, our foreign ministers and secretaries of legation,
consuls general, consuls, vice consuls and commercial agents ; of the
disbursing agent of the Department of State, General Post Office,
Census Bureau, and Commissioner of Patents ; of the various members of the commission for running and marking the boundary line
between the United States and Mexico; the awards of eommissibners
under treaties with foreign governments, and awards of commissioners
under special acts of Congress ; of the owners of vessels for the passage
of destitute or criminal seamen, and of the estates of citizens who have
died abroad. Of these accounts, with a force of seven clerks, one
thousand and seventy-two have been adjusted, and the ref)ort8
copied into a record-book, and to each minister a full copy of the
" s t a t e m e n t " of his account has been sent. There have also been
written, in relation to the business of the office, eleven hundred and
thirty-three letters. The accounts for consuls' salary and fees, growing out ofthe law for "remodeling the diplomaitic and consular syst e m , " has largely augmented the labor of this bffice. Some corifusibn
and delay have occurred in the settlement of consuls' accounts, and the
paiyment of their drafts, incident tb organizing a new system..
The instructibns for carrying ^out the law were not receiv-ed fey
many consuls in time to make up their accounts, according to the prescribed forms. The instructions, under the ariaended law, now being
prepared with great care in the State Department, will probably
remedy all the difficulties that have been experienced by the consuls
in the preparation of their accounts, and the adjustment of them in
this office. A further increase of the labor o f t h e office has arisen
from the more frequent settlement of accounts. It was the usage ^of
the office to adjust the accounts of miriisters jand •salaried eonsuls •annually.; they are now adjusted quarterly. Sometimes a minister iucurs contingent expenses which ;the Secretary of State does not deem
Iiecessary for the public interest; by a prompt -.adjustment ;of Ms
acount he is saved from a further loss. Not unfrequently .the consul
sends imperfect vouchers. Unless rhis accounts^are ^a;t lonee examined



474

^

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

and adjusted, he may be unable to perfect his vouchers, and he must
lose the amount, unless, to relieve him, the accounting officers relax
their well-considered rules. Experience shows that the more frequent
the settlement between the treasury and the distant agent of the
government the better for both parties. During the year the current work of the office has been kept up and many suspended accounts
finally closed ; and I am happy to state that every employe has performed the duties assigned to him in a prompt and creditable manner.
I have the honor to be, sir, naost respectfully, your obedient servant,
M. M.cCOl^'NEL, Auditor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.

'

I.

'

.

AUDITOR'S OFFFICE, POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,

November 15, 1856.
SIR : In compliance with your request of the 26th ult., I have the
honor to submit the following report, exhibiting the operations of this
office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856, together with a
general outline of its principal duties, the character and attendance
of its officer.s, and the present condition of its business.
EXAMINERS' DIVISION.

This division is first in the order of arrangement, as it receives
from the department the quarterly accounts of postmasters, examines
them, adjusts the commissions and emoluments, and ascertains the
true balance ; thus preparing the basis for the labors of the other
branches of the office. The following number of accounts was
examined during the fiscal year, viz :
.
For the quarter ending September 30, 1855.....
24,153
For the quarterending December 31, 1855
24,393
For t h e quarter ending March 31, 1856
24,389
For the quarter ending June 30, 1856..
25,100
98,035
In 13,824 of which errors were discovered, each increasing the
balance due to the United States more than fifty cents.
Accurate copies of these (13,824) accounts aS rendered by postmasters, and as audited by this office, have been prepared and
furnished to the postmasters by whom the errors were committed,
accompanied by such instructions as would enable them to guard
against errors in future.
Postal accounts with Great Britain, Prussia, Bremen, and other



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

475

foreign governments, are adjusted by a clerk in this diyision, who
also disburses the " salary and contingent funds" of the office.
With a view of testing the accuracy of postmasters in transcribing
on their " transcripts" rendered to the department, the entries of
postage from the " post hillis" accompanying the letters for delivery
and distribution, on which they collect postage or receive commission,
I have caused the " t r a n s c r i p t s " and " post bills" to be compared ;
and this plan; will doubtless protect t h e , depar tment from losses
arising from inaccuracy or fraud.
The examination *of the quarterly accounts of postmasters has
invariably been completed within ninety-five days subsequent to the
expiration of the quarter for which they were rendered.
EEGISTERS' DIVISION.

This division is next in order, as the registers receive daily, as
rapidly as they are examined, the accounts that have been adjusted by
the examiners ; analyze and enter in suitable books all the items
embraced in each account, under the proper head of appropriation,
and record the various incidental expenses of postmasters ; and the
fact that each account furnishes an average of fourteen items for
entry, that the aggregates of these entries are ascertained and the
results proved quarterly, and that 98,035 accounts have been thus
registered during the year, is a sufficient guarantee that the nine
clerks of the divisiori have labored faithfully and diligently in the
performance of their duties. •
BOOK-KEEPERS' DIVISION.

This division has received the registers, within twenty days after
the expiration of the quarter in which the accounts were rendered ;
and the balances ascertained have been entered in the legers within
the quarter.
^
The current legers are forty-one in number, o f " imperial" size,
and contain all the accounts pertaining to the department, about
46,551 in.number. The postings, embracing entries of balances,
warrants, drafts, collections, &c., have been completed and examined
within the period prescribed .by regulation.
PAY DIVISION.

This division has audited and paid, quarterly, 5,293 accounts of
contractors^ within the period fixed by their contracts, in all cases in
which the proper data for settlement could be obtained by this office..
The duties of this division are not simply wbat its title implies, as
it also collects a large portion of the revenues o f t h e department, by
means of " collection orders" sent by the pay clerks to contractors, in
time to enable them to present them' for payment at the close of each
fiscal quarter. These " o r d e r s " call for payment of all funds belonging
to the department in the hands of postmasters on whom they are
ssued ; 71,547 of these orders were sent out during the year,and the



476

.

REPORT ON THE fV[NAj^G^.s,

departmentrealized,*in the payment of its contractors, $1,014,054 80
of its revenues, three months in advance of the adjustment by this
by =this office of the accounts on which payments were made ; at the
same time relieving the postmasters of the custody of the funds, the
risk of loss by fire or robbery, or the inconvenience of transporting
them to some dista/xt depository ; and removing the temptation to
misapply the fgovernment money to their private uses. It is, also, a
great accommodation to the contractor, as he thus receives about 60
per cent, of his .compensation immediately after the termination of
his services for each fiscal quarter, some two months prior to t h e
period fixed.by his contract for .payment by rthis offiee.
COLLECTING DIVISION.

I t is the duty of this divisibn to collect by issuing drafts, or the
institution of suit, all sums due to the departmeut by delinquentpostmasters, late postmasters., contractors, failing bidders, and others;
to conduct the correspondence growing eut of efforts to collect, and to
furnish the necessary papers and instructions to United States district
attorneys and marshals. The following number and classes of accounts were in charge of the division during the last fiscal year, viz :
Of accounts prior to June 30, 1855...
11,547
Of -accounts of persons whose term of office expired within
the year
•....
6,423
Arid of present'postmasters......\...
25,565
Total

43,535

Statements of these accounts have been carefully transcribed from
the ledgers, properly endorsed, and arranged alphabetically, geographically, and chronologically; so that rio diffieulty can arise in
obtaining promptly, from the files of the office, any account or paper
that may be required.
4,90'5 "eoilection drafts" have been issued ; and =$58,974 94 collected of delinquerit postmasters, who had failed to pay the proceeds
of their offices, in accordance with the instructions of the department.
The correspondence of-the division covers 1,705 folio-post pages ; in
addition to which, 10,836 circular letters have been issued, the large
number of analogous cases enabling me to reduce thelabor materially
by the use of printed letters.
69 suits were instituted during the year, 26 judgments obtained
thereon ; $9,-609 59 collected, and 40 accounts closed.
The balance due to the United States by late postmasters, on June
30, 1855, notin suit, amounted to $113,655 44; of which there was
apparently due $33,495 09 by late postmasters in Caiifornia and
Oregon, which should be deducted, as the amount is eovered by
vouchers, under the provisions of the 4th and 5th sections of an' act
approved July 27, 1854;. leaving due to the United States, by late
postmasters in the Atlaritic States, $80,160 35. Of this suria there
has been collected #62,011 44 ; and of the surn $124,094 98, due by
late postm-asteTS of the last fiscal year, $55,887 64 has been collected.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES;

477

The method pursued fbr the collection of balances due to the department by late postmasters is both simple and effective, and may
not be uninteresting. As soon after a postmaster's term of office expires as the sum due to the United States can be ascertained, i. e.
within the ensuing quarter, drafts are issued in favor of the postmaster
at some convenient offices, (or at the same offices if the funds can be
used by the department,) for collection of all sums exceeding $10.
The parties are promptly furnished with statements of their accounts,
and explanations of any differences between them and this office ; and
in case of failure to pay the demand; or present adequate ground for
abatement, within 3.0 days, the nameS; of the sureties are furnished^,
with instructions to demand payment of them. The. balances, under
$10 are presented for collection,, after: all the p.ostings have been made
in the legers, for the quarter in which; the. persou indebted became
late postmaster ; and in all cases, the demand is urged upon the defaulting principal and his sureties, with, a prospect.of ciyil suit upon,
the bond, and, in extreme cases, criminal prosecution, under the provisions o f t h e . " independerit treasury act," ins.te.ad of resorting to
compulsory measures upon the first refusal to. pay-their indebtedness^
This course is also recommended by the:.fact- thati it is much less op^
pr^ssive to the sureties, as they are thereby enabled to pay the defalcation of their principal, when, necessary, witho.ut the. annoyance of suitand the payment of costs and interest. Its efficiericyas fully attested
by: the foregoing results.
MISCELLA-UEOUS DIVISION:^.

This division adjusts and enters all creditSc for sums paid to special
mail contractors and mail messengers •; examines and pays all balances
due to late postmasters, special agents, contractors for furnishing
blanks, &c. ; records all drafts ar^i warrants issued by.the.Postmaster
General; enters all sums deposited iri the treasury to the credit of the
department; and records, envelops, and directs-all official letters,
together with a variety of other duties sufficiently indicated by-its
title.
The principal labor of this division may be thus presented, viz:
The number of accounts of special contractors adjusted, quarterly, during the year, was
The number of accounts of mail messengers
The number of warrants entered during the year
The number of drafts entered during t h e y e a r
The number of folio-post pages recorded
The number of miscellaneous accounts paid
...,
The num ber of balances due late postmasters paid

3,134
1,302
6,840
10,080
2,661
660
1,679

It was the impression of the advocates of compulsory prepayment
of letter postage by "postage stamps" that it would simplify and
diminish the labors of this office very much ; b u t t h e experience of
two fiscal quarters has shown that, notwithstanding the peremptory
instructioris of the Postmaster General in'regard to affixing postage
stamps upon all domes'tic letters before mailing them, postage amount


478

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

ing to $511,717 89 has been '^paidin money," so that the original
number of columns i n t h e "transcript of mails sent and receiyed" is
still required, and the reduced labor in the addition of " postage unpaid" and " p a i d in money," is more than counterbalanced b y t h e
increased number and magnitude of the account presented for adjustment ; hence the necessity for an increase of five in the clerical force
of this office, indicated in my last annual report, is more urgent than
it was at that date.
The immense amount of labor performed by this office during the
last fiscal year is partially presented by the following summary, viz:
The number of quarterly accounts of postmasters adjusted
and audited was
The number of accounts o n t h e current legers
The number of quarterly accounts of contractors audited and
paid
The number of special contractors and mail messenger accounts settled
The number of payments made to special and route agents..
The number of miscellaneous accounts paid......
The number of "collection orders" issued
The number of "collection drafts" issued
The number.of department drafts registered
The number of department warrants registered
The number ofletters received....o
The number of letters sent
The number of folio-post'pages of manuscript letters sent...,

98,035
46,551
21,174
17,744
3,495
660
71,547
4,905
10,080
6,840
122,459
64,715
2,661

Accurate copies of 13,824 accounts current, as rendered by postmasters, and as audited, have been furnished in cases in which errors
were committed against the department, and a vast variety of bther
labor performed, which, if presented in detail, would greatly exceed
any estimate yet made, and fully establish, for the gentlemen employed in this office, a reputation for capacity and industry in the performance of their respective public duties rarely equalled, and never
excelled. ,
Eespectfully submitted,
WM. F . P H I L L I P S , Auditor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasury.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.:

479

J.
OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY,

November 8, 1856.
S I R : I have the honor to transmit you, herewith, a report o f t h e
operations of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856, consisting of tabular statements showing the suits brought in the several
judicial districts ; also, the suits decided, dismissed, or otherwise disposed of; the number and amount of judgments obtained, and the
amount collected on matters in suit, whether commenced during the
year or previous thereto. These tables are numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4.
No. 1 is a statement in detail of suits, judgments, and collections on
treasury transcripts.
No. 2 is a statement of suits for fines, penalties, and forfeitures.
No. 3 is a statement of miscellaneous, including all suits not embraced in the two preceding tables.
No. 4, a general statement, showing the aggregates ofthe preceding
tables, of which the following is a summary :




Swmmai^ statement.

00

o

Districts.

Maine
----New Hampshire
Massachusetts
Yermont
Connecticut _.___Rhode Island
---.---.»Northern New York
Southern New York - .
New Jersey
-Eastern Pennsylvania
Western Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
District of Columbia
Eastern Virginia
_ __
Western Virginia
. _
North Carolina
South Carolina
»Georgia
Florida
Northern Alabama
Southern Alabama
Eastern Louisiana
Texas



u
o
rQ

"8
1
104
1
1
2
11
393
29

Amount sued
for.

u

5

$2,000 00

4
3
2
6
5
6
8
2
18
4

$2,030 00

a

Amount of
judgments on
suits previously brought.

s

Collections during the year.

Total amount
On suits
of judgments brought duduring the ring theyear.
year.

On suits
previously
brought.

.Total coUections during
the year.
pi

52;

©
pi

6

1

$2,030 00
2,316 66

$379 18

$379 18

21,069 77
903 06

41,147 18
903 06

J

8

2,316 66
909 56

39,181 84
415,445 40

1

12
2
1
1

39

351 96

67

351 96

136,513 52

....

915 95

10
1

1,065 25
3,826 22

2

377 25

1
1

902 92
250 00

8
1
1
5
1
3
1

1
2

100 00

5

10,706 27

65,426 00
3,083 79
6,770 14

1

2
JL

Amountof judgments on suits
brought during the year.

Suits brought during Suits decided, or otherwise disposed of, during the year.
the year.

38,350
10,922
3,485
1,465
3,889
1,500
6,813
2,055
1,500
11,484
6,119

47
44
77
74
30
00
73
94
00
08 .
80

$100 00

139 30
3,826 22
1,075
17,879
4,252
10,972

$20,077 41

100 00
9,09 56

1,452
17,879
5,155
11,222

97
37
09
84

ii
982 59
281,11.9 17

1,896 92
39,147 86

1,781 77

21,280 21

377 25

72
37
17
84

7
1
4
2

1
1
1
5

5 00
767 46

3
1
2
7

6 00
867 45

1,121 00

2

1,414 50

7

12,120 77

613 80
1,086 6.6

1,035 32

1,943.27
2,925 00
9,274 47
8,376 08

1,226 2.6
2

—«.

o

6,109
211
. 2,750
322

00
6,5
09
93

1,332 50

•

2,879 61
320,267 03
23,061 98
1 943
3,302
9,274
9,411

27
26
47
40

1,226
6 109
211
3,876
322

26
00
65
00
93

1,946 30
1,086 66

CL

cn

Mississinni
' Eastern Arkansas _:
Western Arkansas
Missouri
East Tennessee
Middle Tennessee
West Tennessee
^^ Kentucky
H I Northern Ohio
—
•
Southern Ohio
Indiana-r, Northern Illinois
Southern Illinois. Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
;
Northern California
Southern- California
New Mexico
Minnesota.
Washington
_
Total

-




6
6
18
,,._ 11
1
9
1
1
2
12
-- 6
6
2
6

3,100
"47,130
2,826
2,008
2,010

00
92
67
39
66

4,078
24,696
1,498
7,400
6,777
736

41
32
07
00
81
46

1
3
1
2
6

ISO
388
100
123

19
11
00
87

2
3

523 16

2
11
6

1,606 67

6
1

2,367 10
2,103 81

1
6

80 00
601 43

1
1
3

2,600 00
3,237 39
116 46

3

12,282 61
500 00

191,668 22

1
6

3
3
6
2
11
1
2
4
6

130
388
1,706
123
2,357
2,103
623
80
601

19
11
67
87
10
81
16
00
43

1
1
6

2,600 00
3,237 39
12,398 96

1
8

600 00
191,668 22

33,179
2,610
639
2,162

06
16
03
74

41 06
3,100 00
3,237 39
143 67

2,211
231
664
677
133
1,917

87
00
05
04
87
19

163 03
6,028 76
1,000 00
14,230 82

21
I
6
, 22
3
747

340,138 63
6,672 46
66,669 48

2
1
1

1,271,040 36 112

•
223,120 64

95

1
1

64,480 41 207

277,601 06

2 2ll
231
664
33,756
2,644
2,456
2,162
163
6,069

87
00
05
09
03
22
74
03
81

4,100
3 237
143
14,230

00
39
67
82

pi
pi

5,329 00
6,672 46
168 88

6,826 37

" 11,166 37
6 672 45
168 88

O

366,493 66

160,910 98

617,404 64

>
a
cn

00

482-

R E F O U T ON T H E

FINANGE-S.

From these statements it will appear that during the year 74*7 suits
were brought. Of these, 53 were on treasury transcripts (table No. 1)
for $791,128 45 ; 210 for fines, penalties, and forfeitures, (table No. 2,)
the mass of which are in rem, but include specific penalties amounting to $47,260 08; and 484 suits (table No. 3) of a miscellaneous character for $432,651 82. This class includes 209 suits on warehouse
transportation bonds; also suits brought by importers against collectors
of the customs to recover alleged excess of duties paid under protest,
and defended under instructions frqm the department; and 29 suits
given in charge of the office by heads of departments, under the orders
of the President of July 16, 1855—maldng up an aggregate of 747
suits brought to recover the sum of $1,271,040 35, in addition to th^
amount involved in cases in rem.
•
Of the suits thus brought, 335 have been decided, and finally disposed of, as follows, viz : 112 tried and decided in favor of the United
States, 24 tried and decided agaiiist the United States, and 199 settled
and dismissed before trial; leaving 412 still pending.
I t will also appear, from the tables, that 243 suits, brought previous
to the commencement ofthe fiscal year, have been finally disposed of,
as follows, viz: 95 tried and decided in favor ofthe United States, 75
decided against the United States, and 73 settled and dismissed before
t r i a l ; and there remain pending 393 suits brought previous to the
present fiscal year.
The aggregate number of suits tried and [finally disposed of during
the year is 578. The amount of judgments obtained is $277,601 05,
and the amount collected from all sources is $517,404 64. The whole
number of suits pending undecided, is 805.
I am, with great respect your most obedient servant,
F . B. STREETER, Solicitor.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary ofi the Treasufy.

TEEASURY OF THE UMTED STATES,

November—, 1856.
SIR: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following summary of the business of thic office during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1856:
The amount covered into the treasury during the year, on 4,466
warrants, was—
*
"Zfi^.
From customs, lands, and miscellaneous sources.... $74,505,095 84
From Interior Department
227,883 71
From War Departinent
;..
2,860,882 45
From Navy Department....
1,778,521 36




79,372,383 36

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

483

which includes repayments of former advances and amounts transferred from one appropriation to another in the settlement- of accounts.
. The payments during the same period on 15,522 warrant's, and
about an equal number of drafts, were—
For civil, miscellaneous, diplomatic, and public
debt.......
$38,526,217 68
For Interior Department.^
4,295,522 21
For War Department
19,809,079 34
For Navy Department
15,870,302 42
78,501,121 65
which also includes payments for the transfer of balances in the settlement of accounts.
The amount received at the several offices of the
Treasury, for the use of the Post Office Department, was...
$4,459,185 73
And the amount of 6,840 post office warrants drawn
thereon
,
4,396,513 11
Balance to the credit ofthe department at theclose
of the fiscal year.
..c............
577,158 79
For the purpose of facilitating disbursements, and for the greater
security ofpublic moneys collected at remote points, not provided with
ample securities for safe keeping, and also to promote the operation
of coining, the sum of $38,088,113 92, composed of coin and bullion,
has been moved during the year.
This operation has been efiected, as a matter of account, by 737
transfer drafts, issued singly, and 646 issued in duplicate; and, as a
matter of fact, in part by actual transportation, and in the other part
by using transfer drafts in sums suitable to and supplying the wants
of the business community, so far as they came, within the range oi
our own convenience or requirements.
The arrangemenjts introduced by you, as a legitimate consequence
ofthe independent treasury act, (though not specifically provided for
by it,) which require the treasurer and the other depositaries of public
moneys to open accounts with disbursing officers, and to receive and
pay out for them moneys advanced to them from the treasury, have
operated, so far, to the entire satisfaction of all parties concerned, and
have affbrded ample security and facility for carrying out these responsible duties.
This branch of business, however, being entirely an additiqn fo the
ordinary transactions of the treasury proper, involves a great deal of
labor and responsibility upon those treasury officers who are required
to carry it on.
In tbis office alone the receipts from all sources on treasury account
proper, during the year, amounted to $8,041,975 40.
One thousand two hundred and ninety-three drafts have been satisfied, either by payment in coin or by being entered to the credit of
disbursingofficers. Accounts have been kept with seventy-five dis-




484

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

bursing officers, whose credits have been drawn upon and paid to the
amount of $6,695,410 56 on 17,003 checks.
The sum of $4,544,129 44 has been transferred during the year
from the assistant treasurer at New York to this office, by means of
2,079 checks given in exchange for coin previously placed in my pos•session, and drawn on amounts placed to my credit by the assistant
treasurer in satisfaction of transfer drafts and of drafts in my favor as
•agent for paying the compensation of the members of the House of
Eepresentatives.
These operations, it is evident, have afforded favorable and very
acceptable accommodation to our business community, while, at the
same time, they have relieved the department from the onus of transr
porting that amount of specie which it would otherwise have been
compelled to encounter.
I am happy to add, in conclusion, that all branches-of business in
i h e office proper, and in the special money department, have been
oonducted with highly commendable promptness and accuracy, and,
.^s I believe, to the entire satisfaction of all persons who have had any
'business transactions with the office.
Respectfully,
SAMUEL CASEY,
Treasurer United States.
Hon.

JAMES G-UTHRIE, ^

Secretary ofi the Treasury.

L.
REGISTER'S OFFICE,

Novemher 22, 1856
SIR : In accordance with your request, I have the honor to submit
the following partial summary of the business operations of this office
during the fiscal year ending 30th June last, and its present condition.
The same order, as to the division of labor, indicated in my report
of November 22, 1855, has been continued, and may be enumerated
as follows :
,
First. That pertaining to the receipts and expenditures of the
United 'States;
Second. That to the public debt and loans ;
Third. To commerce and navigation ; and
Fourth. To the tonnage, registered and enrolled, ofthe United States.
As to the business in th^ first division, its details, &c., I respectfully refer the Secretary to my report of last year.
In this branch the business'has increased i n t h e year ending 30th
J u n e last considerably beyond that of the preceding year, as willbe
seen by the following comparative statement:
T h e number of treasury expenditure warrants issued during
the year ending June 30, 1856
10,784
I n the year ending June 30, 1855
,
8,625
I n the year ending June 30,1845
3,493



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

485

It will be perceived that the number of warrants issued in 1856
was 25 per cent, more than in 1855, and more than 300 per cent,
greater than in 1845.
The mode of paying consuls has added greatly to the labor of this
branch, and the increase of warrants has added much to the labor of
all the clerks connected with this division.
The delay in the completion of the printing of these statistics, for
last year, will greatly retard their compilatibn for this, as it is neces-,
sary to refer to the statistics of the former year. Being in the hands
of the printer, we cannot refer to them ; and to collate them from the
various sources from whence originally made up, would be to perform
the work of last year oyer again.
In the loan division there has been no material change since my
last report, though the business has in various ways considerably
increased:
The stock transactions have consisted chiefly iu the redemption of
the several loans, the aggregate amount of which has been reduced
over eleven and three-quarter millions within the year.
The recent plan of settling accounts throws much responsibility
upon this office, as the monthly abstracts of dividends paid by the
different government agents are referred to me by the First Auditor
for,comparison, and, upon my certificate of correctness, and that the
items had not been paid before, are audited and settled.
This process enables me to check, on the books of this office, the
dividends that are paid, and, after each monthly settlement, tell the
amount, to whom, and where dividends are still due.
The coupons paid during each month are regularly repoted, certified, cancelled, and numerically arranged.
I n the division pertaining to commerce and navigation, the business has largely increased, as will be indicated by the increased size of
the forthcoming volume pertaining to these statistics.
The general statements of exports and imports, by far the largest
portion of the work, have been doubled in order to show, in detail,
~not only the countries to which exports are sent, and from whence
imports are. received, but also , the several districts of the United
States into which these imports ^enter, and from whence the exports
depart.
Two additional tables have also been added to those showing the
arrival and departure of vessels—one exhibiting the, districts from
whence they clear, and the countries of their destination ; and the
other the countries from whence they arrive, and the districts into
which they enter.
The statement of indirect trade has also been essentially modified
and enlarged so as to embrace not only the states comprising the German Zoll-Terien, Austria, and Switzerland, but also all countries the
products and manufactures of which reach the United States througli
ports other than their own.
Notwithstanding this large addition to the duties of this division,
and the increase consequent upon the rapid growth and expansion of
the country, the whole labor has been performed by the same clerks
without aid or assistance, but not without compelling me to require



486

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

some of them to perform extra labor beyond the usual hours assigned
to official duty. The statistics for this report were sent up on the 7th
instant.
In the division having charge ofthe tonnage statistics, a large amount
of additional labor has devolved upon the clerks in an attempt to correct the tonnage of the United States so as to present something like
the true amount. In my report of last year, the amount as shown
from the returns was 5,212,001.15, This showed, evidently, too
great a tonnage, as it placed us far ahead of any other nation on the
globe. To correct it, and, if possible, give as near the true amount
as the data to be found at the various ports would furnish, I sent in. structions to the several collectors to forward lists of vessels belonging
to their respective districts, with their quarterly accounts, and to
credit aU vessels lost at sea, sold, &c., not heretofore credited. These
corrected lists reduce the tonnage to 4,871,652.46, which is very
nearly the true amount of the present tonnage. Should this plan be
followed up each succeeding year, these statistics will be of a more reliable character than heretofore. ^ These corrections cost much additional labor, and if continued, will throw an additional amount each
year upon this branch. In this as well as every other division of my
office, the business has been promptly and faithfully attended to by
the clerical force allotted me.
Frequent calls are made upon this bureau for transcripts of papers
on file, connected with transactions which have become the subject of
litigation or controversy, or required for other purposes by this and
other departments, members of Congress, committees of Congress, &c.,
&c., the copying of which frequently would require the labor of one
clerk for a month or six weeks ; but as they are often wanted in a few
days, I am compelled to take a number of the clerks away from their
regular duties. Thus is the routine of business interrupted and retarded ; and in order to bring it up toits proper point again, necessity
compels me to make unreasonable demands upon the clerks, requiring
them to return to the office and resume their labor after the usual_
time of arljournment.
An addition to my force of three clerks would enable me to obviate,
in a great degree, this difficulty.
By a systematic division of the labor, and an observance of office
hours only, the business of this office could not be kept up. The
fitst has been attempted ; but without going beyond the latter, would
fail most signally in accomplishing the end.
I would, therefore, most respectfully suggest, whether Congress
should, by disregarding^ your recommendation for additional clerks, as
was the case last year, make it necessary to continue the imposition
of greater 'burdens upon these agents of government than are consistent with a reasonable diligence or healthy application to duty.
In 1845 the business of this bureau required the service of twentythree clerks ; now there are twenty-nine. Since that time the labor
has increased at least two hundred per cent. This simple statement,
for the truth of which I beg leave to refer to my letter of November
2-2,1855, published in your report of that year on the finances, it se.ems
to me, should be argument sufficient in favor of granting an increase
to my clerical force.




^

RE-PORT ON THE FIN'AN.CEiS.,

487

The duties of the clerksin this bureau are as onerous, requiring as
much ability, and as intense application, as in any other department of
the government} yet, in the General Land Office there arefiveof class
four ; in the Pension, four of the same class ; in the Indian Bureau,
three; and in this, but one. If my first proposition be true, this state
of affairs cannot exist without manifest injustice.
Pernait me, therefore, to suggest that the classification of the clerks
be so changed as to allow two more of class four,,and four of class three.
Gongress, at its recent sitting, having provided no more than a fair
compensation for its members, it is to be hoped will not hesitate to
render simple justice to the poor clerk, whose onerous duties require a
constant and diligent. attention, scarcely allowing him, during the
whole course of the year, the respite of a single day. This can be effected by an increase of salary corresponding to that allowed to the
other departments, and an. augmentation of force sufficient to reduce
his labor to a reasonable standard.
In conclusion, allow me~ to state that the "business in each division
has been kept up to the extent of the abilities of my force, and that
there has been no lagging at any ofthe desks inthe discharge of duty;
but I am fearful that delays in other quarters, some of which have
been alluded to, will postpone the completion of the statistics on
finance.beyond. the time at which they were furnished by this office
last year. To expedite their completion every means in my power
shall be used.
I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
F. BIGGER.
Hon.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

/Secretary of the Treasiiry,




488

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

Statement showing the amount of moneys expended at each custom-house
inthe United States during thefiscal year ending June 30, 1856.
District.
Passamaquoddy, Maine
Machias., Maine
-.Frenchman's Bay, Maine - _
Penohscot, Maine
Waldohorough, Maine
Wiscasset, Maine
-.
Bath, Maine ,
Portland and Falmouth, Maine-Saco, Maine
Kennehunk, Maine-_-York, Maine
-_^_Belfast, Maine
Bangor, Maine
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Vermont, Vermont
Newhuryport, Massachusetts,
Gloucester, Massachusetts
Salem and Beverly, Massachusetts..
Marhlehead, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
,
Plymouth, Massachusetts
,
Fall River, Massachusetts
Barnstable, Massachusetts
New Bedford, Massachusetts
Edgartown, Massachusetts
Nantucket, Massachusetts
,
Providence, Rhodelsland
Bristol and Warren, Rhode Island
Newport, Rhode Island
Middletown, Connecticut
New London, Connecticut
New Haven, Connecticut
Fairfield, Connecticut
Stonington, Connecticut_.Sackett's Harhor, New York
Genesee, New York
Oswego, New York -Niagara, New York
BujBfalo Creek, New York
Oswegatchie, New York
Sag Haibor, New York
New York, New .York,
Champlain, New York
Cape Vincent, New YorkDunkirk, New York
Perth Amboy, New Jersey
Bridgetown, New Jersey
^. _ Burlington, New Jersey
S...
Great Egg Harbor, New Jersey - Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey-Newark, New Jersey
Camden, New Jersey
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Presque Isle, Pennsylvania
Pi ttsburg, Pennsylvania

Collector.
Bion Bradbury
D. W. Dorman.
T. D.. Jones-.R. H. Bridgham
^^'-E. Wilson
John Babson
C. N. Bodfish-.
E. Carter, jr.
Nathaniel M. Towle .
John CausensL. Junkins E. K. S m a r t - .
a. P. Sewall
1.
fZ. Clements
.-.
D. A. Smally
James Blood.
Wm. H. Manning --.
E. F. Miller - - Wm. BartaU
Charles H. Peaslee-.,
E. P. Little
P. W. Laland
S. B. Phinney
-.,
C. B. H. Fessenden-,
Constant Norton
E. W. Allen
,
G. Bradford
,
G. H. Reynolds
George Turner
Samuel Babcock
Henry Hobart
..
M. A. Osborn
Wm. S. Pomeroy
B. F. States
C. K. Loomis
J. C. Campbell
E. B. Talcott
A. V. E. Hotchkiss .
JohnT. Hudson
H. Moody--S. L. Gardiner - - . . .
H. J. Redfield
Henry B. Smith
Alfred Fox
H. P. WhaUon
F. W. Brmley
Wm. S. Bowen
.
John A. Sherrad --Thomas D. WinnerStephen Willits
E. T. Hillyer
J. W. Mickle
Charles Brown
James Lytle
John Hastings

^' To December 31, 1856.



Amount.
$26,780 26
2,540 27
4,796 18
4,799 92
3,397 96
6,648 20
9,742 98
32,946 01
1,187 73
766 10
629 62:
5,769 66
6,820 68
8,976 IS
16,261 65
4,938 91
6,472 11
21,362 66
2,196 64
366,797 91
3,265 04
2,339 47
11,040 90
8,766 68
4,232 63
2,276 69
12,664 00
4, 923 766,069 04
2,084 33:
13,203 42
20,267 87
1,690 87
1,762 13
7,633 99
10,914 55
19,868 09
10,940 48
16,684 96=
9,098 67
717 9&
1,082,178 55
13,402 78
7,105 96
1,350 oa>
4,016 29'
372 21
162 44
727 86.
983 80<
1,603 34

t To March 31,. 1856.

303 sa'
209,196 42.'
1,143 31
2,561 16;

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

48§

STATEMENT—Continued.
District.
Delaware —
—
Baltimore, Maryland
-.
Annapolis, Maryland
Oxford, Maryland
,
.
Vienna, Maryland ,
Havre-de-Grace, Maryland ...
- -.
Town Creek, Maryland
,
Georgetown, District of ColumbiaRichmond, Virginia
Norfolk, Virginia
Tappahannock, Virginia
Cherrystone, Virginia
Yorktown, Virginia
Petersburg, Virginia
Alexandria, Virginia Yeocomico, Virginia . Wheeling, Virginia
Camden, North Carolina
Edenton, North Carolina
Plymouth, North Carolina - - Washington, North Carolina
Newbern, North Carolina
-Ocracoke, North CarolinaBeaufort, North Carolina
Wilmington, North Carolina
Charleston, South Carolina
Georgetown, South Carolina
Beaufort, South Carolina
-Savannah, Georgia
St. Mary's, Georgia
Brunswick, Georgia
»- - .
Mobile, Mabama
^--Tuscumbia, Alabama
Pearl River, Mississippi
Natchez, Mississippi ^
Vicksburg, Mississippi
Columbus, Mississippi
Pensacola, Florida
.
St. Augustine, Florida
Key West, Florida
*.-St. Mark's, Florida
St. John's, Florida Apalachicola, Florida
Bay Port, Florida
Pilatka, Florida
New Orleans, Louisiana
Teche, Louisiana
Texas, Texas
Saluria, Texas
Brazos de Santiago, Texas
Paso del Norte, Texas - - --Miami, Ohio
Sandusky, Ohio
-Cuyahoga, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Detroit, Michigan
'» To March 31, 1866.



Collector.
Jesse SharpePhillip F. Thomas..
James Sands..
R. B. Willis
G. A. Z. Smith
C. Pennington
J. R. Thompson
Robert White
..
Wm. M. Harrison --S. T. Sawyer.
G. T. Wright
J. S. Parker
•*J. B. Brittingham .
A. D. Banks
E. S. HoughG. Forbes - - A. J. Pannel
L. D. Starke-Edmund Wright .__
Joseph Ramsey
H. F. Hancock
Wm. G. Singleton-0. S. Dewey
J. E. Gibble
J. T.Miller
W. F. Colcock
John N. Merriman B. R. Bythewood...
John Boston
...
J. A. Barratte
Woodford Mabry.-.
Thaddeus Sanford -.
"J, W. Rhea
.-.
Robert Eager
f J. W. McDonald--.
D. Walker
J. L. Parham
Joseph Sierra _
Paul Arnan - John P. Baldwin - -.
Hugh Archer
James G. Dell
George S. Hawkins .
^John E. Johnson--.
R. R. Reid
Thomas C. Porter -.
R. N. McMillan---.
H. Stuart - - .
D.,M. Stapp
J. H. Durst
-.
C. Sherman
J. Riley
J. A. Jones
Robert Parks
S. B. W. McLean--.
J. A. Harmon
f ToDecember 31, 1855.

Amount.
$16,378 20
119,776 86
897 97
269 73
939 63
163 48
153 46
3,696 94
6,084 36
23,866 00'
1, 607 10.
460 44
397 17
6,223 98
6,168 90^
161 42
486 23.
. 1 , 0 2 2 91
269 89'
589 04
362 43
1,287 03
2,296 97
1,979 66
13,986 05
71,773 62
492 24
260 32:
38,137 53
777 85»
618 77
60,519 461,712 01
437 90'
340 00
683 08^
116 69
2, 900 491,966 60^
9,363 586,416 99^
3,970 05
6,221 60'

353 oa
138
245,310
970
11,645
7,159
22,528
6,361
4,118
3,846
6,648
7,001
21,076

4^
41
60
89
44
16
57/
32
75
43;
05
60

490

R E P O R T ON T H E FIJN'-AiN.CE.S...

STATEMENT^ContiOTea,
District.

Cc>llector.

Amount.

..I,..
Michilimapkinac, Michigan.-.-^.- - - ,.- J. A. Wendell .............
€hicagp, Illinois^-.-,-.- ^..^.^ -._-.._._._-^- . . Philip Cauley
.-.--:.,.,.,...
Alton Illinois . - . . .
_ - . . - . John Teteh
-i3;alena, Hlinois;,.^-^.„._-.-,^_.,_.^..,^.^,.^.^. D. Warm,-..
Q,uincy, Illinois^.,..-.-.---.-. .-^-,-^-,.-„-.^.-. Thomas Be nneson
Cairo, Illinois - -,^_-.-.-..-.- ^ _-...- .^ ,,... - ^ _.
Thomas S. Hacker.
Louisyille, Kentucky,.. . . .-^-.-.-.-.. ..^- «-H. K Sands-.
Paducah, Kentucky^- -.- ^ -^-.-^-.-..,,-.- ^_-. Wm. N o l a n . - - . .
kicikmg-n, Kentucky.-.-.-.---.-.-.-...^^.; F. Roulhac - .
- . —. St. Louis, Missouri-.... ..^ ^_-.. ^.....- ^ Wm. A. Linn
----.-,-.-.
.
3:?'ashville, Tennessee ^. ^ - ..„.. J. Thomas
Memphis, TennessesQ .-.---,-,.-,....--.- ^S.. 0. Ballard---.
-^
. - --.-.--,Knoxville, Tennessee
- .^.-: John McMullen .
-.-...
Gha^ttanooga, Tenn.e.s§ee ^.,-,---.^-.^-,-, W. J. Crandall
. ..
.
Evansyrlle, Indiana_-,.-,.^..„..^.....^.._,, Isaac Hutchinson
.
. - -;
"Kew Albany, Indiana ..--..- - ^
- f John B. No.rman
F. R. Lewis......
-----Jeffersonville, Indiana
-Milwaukie, Iowa __-- - . . , . . . - . _ John White
Burlington, Iowa.... -.- -..-...^.. - . ^ .^ - - . Philip Harvey ------.--.-.-....--.- —
--.-—..-..
'
Dubuque, Iowa......-.-„-.-.-.-.-,- -.-..... -... D. A. Mahoney
Wm. StottsKeokuk, Iowa
..
Minneso.ta, Minnesota Territory,.... fJames McFetridge..-...^.....-..--O.regon, Oregon Territory... - - ^ -.-.-. John Adair
.-.
-.
Cape Perpetua - - -.- ^.-,-,-,-., ^ ,..-„-, ^ . - Addison C. G i b b s . - . - - - - . - . - . - . . . . .
San Francisco California - - . ^........ ^ „. M, S. Latham-..........-:
Sonoma
.--..--.,--....,...... -. L. B. Mi.zner
-._.--.--,:
^
i
Sacramento
.
Charles C. Sackett
. -L
•Sg<n Diego
.
0. S. Whiterby
San Pedro .---.^..-^.-.-...^,^....^.._ Is.aac Williarns
---.
.
rSan Joaquin.. - - -^- -.- .,^„.,........,..,. .James M. Scofield - - - -.-.-...
•
_
Monterey
James A. Watson. . .„. .^.......... ^ .>
Port Orford
........-,...........,.... R.. W. Dunbar .....................-.-.-"-

? $.3, 3.3.5,841 08

:
» To March 31, 1856.

$1,936 18
11,9.69 39
648 33
471 .99
2,244 27
1,592 30
875 87
465 14
93 27
10,.675 9.3
1,2.43 00
4,^58 47
1,611 04
245 QS
1,683 97
91 91
360 00
6,692 00
375 80
350 00
660 70
315 00
11,426 85
3,600 00
478,6:87 43
. 4,022 06
3,669 75
7,874 67
5,161 93
6,932 20
8,199 26
2,167 86

t To September 30, 1856.
F. BIGGER, Register'.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office,, Mp. 24, 1856.




REPORT ON THE FINAWCE-S.

491

Statement of the numher of persons employed in each district ofi the
United States for the collection of custoins during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1856, with their occupation and compensation, per act
March 3, 1849,
/

Districts.

Pd amaquoddy, Me.

MaoMas

Frenchman's Bay ,

PiDnobscofc.

Waldoborongh.

Wiscasset.

Bafeh

Portland and Fahnouth.



No. of persons employed.
1
1
10

1
1
1
1
t
1
1
1
1
1
1
J
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1'
11
1
1
2
2
1
1
11
1
2
2
2
1
2

1
1
1
1
2
• i
1
1
1

Occupation.

Collector
Surveyor
...---Inspectors
....do
.Weigher and measurer.
do
—
Deputy collector
Aid to the revenue . . . .
Boatman
.-.do......
Collector..
:
Inspector
-..,
...do
Deputy collector and inspector..
Inspector
Boatman
-....
Collector
.,
"
Deputy collectors and inspectors.
do
do
Inspector
,
Boatman
,
Measurer
Collector
,
Deputy collector
Deputy collector, and inspector
....do
do
....do.
,
.do.
Occasional inspector
Collector
,
,
Inspectors
»
»
...do
...do...
...do
....do
.1:
...do
,
Oollector
Inspectors—
...do
....-....do
,.-..,
Collector
Inspectors, weighers, gaugers ahd measurers..
,
Inspector
...Ido....-.,,..-...
...do
...do
...do
...do.......
...do
Collector
Deputy collector, weigher, &o-

Compensation
to each per-

$3,000 00
1,516 92
1,098 00
732 00
766 73.
150 70
732 00
732 00
360 00
240 00
928 16
730 00
459 00
500 00
250 00
225 00
1,284 56
1,095 00
300 00
730 00
600 00
114 97
1,400 00
730 00
1,095 00
895 00
800 00
150 G
O
2,300 10
1,095 00
936 00
850 00
443 O
P
350 00
300 00
898 97
1,098 00
915 00
500 00
2,538 21
1,500
095
650
645
600
500
350
250
3,000
1,500

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

492

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Contimied.
Districts.

No. of persons employed.

[Compensation
to each person.

Occupation.

Portland and FalmouthContinued.

Surveyor
Weighers, gaugers, and measurers .
Inspectors
Occasional inspectors
Aid to revenue
,
Aid to weighers, gaugers, &c
,
Night inspectors
;
Clerk
...do...........
Porter
^
Boatmen
-

Saco

Collector
Inspector
..:.do
Aid to revenue
CollectorDeputy collector and inspector
Inspectors
Collector
Deputy collector
Inspector
Collector
Inspector
Aid to the revenue
Inspector
...do
.;..do..
-.
Aid to the revenue
Gauger
Weigher
Measurer .^
.do.
Collectors
---.
Deputy collectors and inspectors
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher,
and gauger
Weigher and gauger
»..
Aid to the revenue
Collector
Naval officer
,
Surveyor..-..
Deputy collector and inspector
— do
do
Inspectors
....do
.do.
...do
...do.
Occasional inspector
Occasional inspectors
Night inspectors..--. ---.
Inspector and measurer
Weigher, gauger, and measurer..
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors.
— do
do

...do

Kennebunk
York

,

Belfast . . . .

Bangor .

Portsmouth, N. H .

Termont, Vt.




i

$1,252 44
1^500 00
1,098 00
1,098 00
198 00
521 00
549 00
800 00
600 00
350 00
360 00
457 50
384 77
500 00
403 50
96 GO
216 53
600 00
56 GO
^ 267 17
200 00
120 00
1,472 06
1,098 00
1,098 00
1.089 00
716 00
732 00
200 00
77 76
6 23
127 27
135 30
2,547 38
1,098 00
1,355 04
452 33
200 00
615 27
393 95
412 67
732 00
200 00
1,098 00
855 00
500 00
360 00
300 00
732 00
99 00
549 00
1,377 00
1,019 00
1.090 84
250 00
915 00

R E P O R T ON T H E F I N A N C E S .

493

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

Vermont—Cont nued. . . .

Newburyport,

Gloucester..

Salem and Beverly.




No.ofpersons employed.
2
1
1
5
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
3

Occupation.

Deputy collectors and inspectors.-...do.
do
— do
do
...do
do
--do....
do
Deputy collector....
Inspector, (1 month).
,
...do...
do...(11 months)
do
do...(3 months)
.:..do
Boatmen (10 months)
...do
do-..(2 months)..
do...(2 months)
Collector
Surveyor
...do..
Naval officer.Inspector
....do....
....do
Occasional inspector
d o . . . r - -do
-.
Gauger
Weigher
Inspector.'
Boatman
Collector.
Surveyor
Inspectors
Inspector
...do
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
do.
---.do..Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector
Clerk
Naval officer
,
Surveyor
....do.
Inspectors
....do
....do......
...do
...do...
....do
:
..:.do
....do
Weigher and gauger
do-.
do. ,
.do
-do
Measurer
...do
Laborer and assistant storekeeper.
Boatmen

Compensation
to each person.
$687 50
837 50
690 00
500 00
360 00
750 00
62 50
500 00
366 29
360 00 .
90 00
240 00
180 G
O
240 00
40 00
20 00
640 08
250 00
476 92
481 00
1,014 00

1,092 00
845 00
600 G
O
57 00
15 96
54 48
201 G
O
294 67
2,243 42
630 25
i,198 00
300 G
O
150 G
O
€18 16
781 30
240 00
2,187 87
1, 000 00
930 00
1,304 49
745 6Q
274 38
J,098 00
999 00
1,002 G
O

3,005
996
960
636
339

00
00
00
00
00

1,234 21

1,233
1,209
420
339
732
300

46
89
36
13
00
00

494

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continmed.
Districts.

No. of persons employed.

Marblehead.

Boston and Clkrlesto wn.




3
3
12
7
•

1

2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
5
56
1
21
6
1
2
2
2
3
5
1
1
2
2
1
5
1
1
1
1

Occupation.

Collector
Deputy collector and inspector..
do
--..do
Surveyor
Inspector, measurer, weigher, & gauger
Inspector
Boatmen
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collectors
Cashier
Assistant cashier.-Clerk
Clerks
...do
...do
.---..do
--...do
...do.....
Superintendent custom-house
Messenger
...do
Engineer
Navalofficer.---..
Deputy naval officer.
Clerk.-.-...„
...do...do
,
...do
...do
Surveyor
Deputy surveyor
Assistant deputy
Clerk
Messenger
Weighers and gaugers
Measurers
Inspectors
...do
Night inspectors
Night watchmen
Appraiser at large
Appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Clerks
. . . . do
...do
Special examiner of drugs
Superintendent of warehouses
Storekeepers
...-do.....
— do
^
....do
...-do
.-..do
Clerk
...do...
--.

Compensatioii
to each per-

$830
547
365
272
547
182
150

33
50
00
78
50
50
00

100 00

6,400 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
1,409 00

1,500 00
1,400 00

1,300 00
1,200 00
1,1 O 00
O
1,000 00

900 00
1,200 00
760 00
540 00
730'00
5,000 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
1,250 00
1,200 00
1,050 00
750 00
4,900 00
2,000 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
700 00
1,485 00
1,485 00
1,095 00
800 00
600 00
600 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,400 00
1,200 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00

1,100 C
O
1,095 00
1,003 75
730 00
1,400 00

1, 300 00

REPORT ON THE F I N A N C l S .

495

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts. ^

Boston and CharlestownCon tinned.
Plymouth .

FaiH River.

Barnstable.

Ne^Bedford.-

Edgartown ,

Nantucket




No. of per
sons employed.

Occupation.

Clerk,
.-..do.
....do...
....do.
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Inspector
...do
....do
...do...
Weigher
Collector.
Inspector
....do-...
....do
Measurer
Gauger
Boatman
Collector
'.
Deputy collector and inspector.
,
-do
..-.do.....
do
do
do
...,
.do.
,.
do
.do.
Inspector
..
— .do
..-.do
...do.
...-.
Clerk
Boatmen.
Collector
Inspectors
--.Clerk
Inspectors, weighers, gaugers, and
measurers
.--.-.
Inspector and measurer
Inspector
,
..,l.do
...do
...do
Aid to revenue
Boatman
. i . . --Collector
Deputy collector and inspeictor . .
,
do
do
Inspector
....do
Temporary inspector
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Inspector .-Measurer, (temporary).. Weigber (temporary)
Gauger, (temporary)
Appraisers, (temporgiry)
...
Night watch, (temporary)

Compensatioii
to each person.
$1,200 00
939 00
800 00
782 50
486 87
1,098 OO
800 00
600 00
300 00
160 00
66 .30
1,008 16
718 00
496 00
474 00
16 85
17 16
300 00
1,750 00
804 00
750 00
650 00
775 00
500 00
500 00
600 00
507 00
400 00
500 00
150 00
3, 000 00
1,095 OO
800 00
1,500
327
423
114
120
84
56
420
941
1,095
600
730
400
15
240
612
1,095
716
101
23
1
5
12

00
69
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
12
00
00
11
69
92
00
00

496

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

No. of persons employed.

Nantucket—Continued
Providence, R. I

Bristol and Warren.

Newport.

Middletown, Connecticut.




Occupation.

Night watch, (temporary)
Collector
e...
Deputy collector
Clerk
,
Navalofficer
Surveyor, Providence
do
East Greenwich
do
Pawtuxet
Inspectors, foreign
do
coastwise
d o . . . . .Pawtuxet
do
Pawtucket
do
East Greenwich . . - Weigher
Gauger
Measurer
do
Boatman, Providence
do
Pawtuxet
do
East Greenwich......
Collector
Inspectors
...do
.......
Temporary inspectors
do
,
do
do
Weighers
Gaugers
Assistant storekeeper
Boatman
...-do
Surveyor
.-..
..-.do
Collector
Superintendent lights
,
Agent marine hospital
Naval officer
,
Surveyor
do
...do
Deputy collector and inspectorInspector
...do
...do..'
Temporary inspector
...do
do
.do.
-do.
.do.
.do.
...do
do.
. . . d o . . . . . . . .do.
Gauger
Night watch.
Boatman
....do
Collector
Surveyor

Compensation
to each person.
$4 00
1,405 22
807 06
616 66
774 29
621 70
250 00
200 00
1,095 00
549 00
450 00
300 00
300 00
1,330 96
390 60
592 97
537 50
300 00
420 00
132 00
766 59
549 00
420 00
219 00
153 00
78 00
60 00
346 28
163 68
549 00
216 00
84 G
O
347 44
294 86
453 52
^ 344 89
4 73
515 65
424 13
250 00
200 00
546 00
552 00
546 GO
300 00
20^00
378 00
18 00

186 of
238 83
14 85
46 52
2 50
450 00
270 00
516 52
375 1^

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

497

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No. of persons employed.

Middletown—Continued .

New London.

New Haven.

Fairfield.

Stonington .

Sackett's Harbor, N. Y . . .

2
1
2
2
2
1
1
4
1
2

Genesee
t

\

Oswego.

32




• Occupation.

Compensation
to each per .
son.

Surveyor
$311 20
....do
272 51
Inspector
'.
650 00
....do
350 00
....do
300 00 «
Collector
.,
2,031 93
Surveyor
315 24
Inspector
650 00
....do
600 00
....do
250 00
....do.
..:
100 00
Inspector, weigher, guager, and measurer.
788 17
Collector
3, 000 00
Deputy collector and inspector
...
1,095 00
Surveyor
765 37
Storekeeper
.500 00
Inspector, weigher, and measurer
1,500 00
Inspectors,gaugers, and weighers-....
1,500 00
Inspectors
- 1,095 00
-...do
60 00
....do
54 00
....do
18 00
Day and night inspector
854 00
Aid to the revenue
48 00
--..do
do
386 00
Night watch
->...
198 00
....do
1,
162 00
....do
184 00
....do
...
210 00
Boatman
300 00
Collector
934 69
Inspector, measurer, gauger & weigher
1,098 00
do
do
175 00
do
do
108 00
Collector
'
250 00
Surveyor
150 00
Inspectors
500 00
Weigher and gauger
,
107 76
Boatman
216,00
Collector
,._„_....
717 80
Deputy coUectorand inspector
730 00
-do
do.-.
• 640 00
do... - do
365 .00
. . . . do
do
250 00
do
- . - do
300 00
180 00
.--do
do
o...
730 00
Aid to revenue
730 00
Temporary inspectors
-.
385 00
— do
do
275 00
Night watch
90 00
...do
225 00
Boatmen...
781 00
Collector
900 00
Deputy collector andinspector
730 00
Inspectors
9GI 84
Collector
o
1, 000 GO
Deputy collectors and iaspectcfrs.. - --

498

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

Oswego—Continued.

l^iagara. .

Buffalo Creek.

Oswegatchie I

;Sag Harbor
NewYork...




No. of persons employed.
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
4
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
7
1
1

I Compensation
to each per-

Occupation.

Inspectors
,
...do.
....do
....do.
....do
Clerks
...-do
Aids to revenue
--o
„„
Night watch
...do
Boatman
Collector.
Deputy collectors..-.,
Deputy collectors and inspectors....
Deputy collector and aid to revenueAids to revenue
Inspectors.
Deputy collectors and inspectors..-Deputy collector
....do
,
Warehouse inspector
Clerk
Night watch
Collector
Deputy collector
—
...do
:
...do
....do............
Inspector
...do
...do
...do..
Aid to revenue
...do
...-.Nighc watch
Clerks
Boatman . . .
Collecior.
Inspector
.-...
Aid to the revenue
Deputy collector and inspector
. . . do
do
-...do
do
...do
do
...do
.do...— do
do
-.
...do
do
Travelling inspector.
Watcbman
...-do

Collector
Coastwise inspector
Inspector
,.
Collector
Deputy collectors
Auditor .-..'
Asdstant auditor...0-. o-o. „

„

,
i....
,
^.,

$730 00
500 00
^300 00
365 00
410 62
730 00
600 00
458 00
343 50
365 00
3U0 00
1,359 14
996 77
732 00
732 00
671 00
732 00
335 50
3tJ6 00
400 00
287 00
732 00
366 00
1,954 23
900 00
1,000 00
537 51
730 00
1,000 00
900 00
600 00 .
769 50
540 00
5U0 00
726 00
912 50
300 00
1,460 00
760 00
732 00
9U0 00
500 00
450 00
463 76
454 41
400 00
333 33
885 00
732 00
240 00
693 71
138 00
42 00
6,340 00
2,500 00
4,000 00
2,500 od

HEPORT

ON T H E

riNANCES.

'

499

STATEMENT—Continued..
Districts.

, New York—Continued-.




No. of persons employed.
1
1
1
23
8
2
17
79
19
2
1
3
2
1
6
I
1
7
7
1
2
1

Occupation.

Compensation
to each person.

Cashier
Af«sistant cashier.
Clerk
'...
Clerks - . „ . . . . . . v
....do
-do,.-.do
do
*
.
do
„-.
,...do
do
^.-......
do
....do....
Keeper of cusuom-house.
Watchmen
....do
Fireman
Porters
Messengers
....do
....do..
....do

$3, 000 00
2, 500 00
1,800 00

1,500 00
1,400 00

1,300 00
1,200 00
1,100 00

1,000
900
750
700
600

00
00
00
00
00

1,000 00

547
156
547
480
650
600
400
300

50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

NAVAL OFFICE.

1
3
2
7
3
5
25
4
3
4
1

Naval officer
Deputy iiaval officers .
Clerks
...do
...do...-.
...do...:...-.i..-..
...do
...do
o
..-do
...do
Porter

4,950 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,200 00.
1,050 00'
1, 000 00*
900 00*
• 800 00:
- 400 00500 m^

SURVEYORS OFFICE.

Surveyor
D^^puty surveyors
Clerk
,...do
— do
:
....do
Porter
..

4,900
2,000
1,200
1,100
1,000
700
600

00
00
00
00
OO
0000

APPRAISEMENTS.

1
3
5
1
6
11
1
9

General appraiser.^.
Appraisers
Assistant appraisers .
Appraiser's clerk
Clerks
....do...
...do
do.

2, 500 OO
v=
2,500 0 ^
2, 000 CO1,500 OOA
1,300 00:^
1,200 001,150 OQ.
1, O O 00^
U

500

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No of persons employed.

New York—Continued...

4
1
1
7
6
1
1
15
119
5
1
2
6
62

Occupation.

iGompensation
to each per-

Clerks
,
Storekeeper
Clerk
.--.do
....do
,
....do...--.
,
Special examiner of drugs
Laborers
....do
....do
...-do
Watchmen
....do
do

$800 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
1,000 00
' 800 00
2,000 00
780 00
650 00
624 00
416 00
806 00
650 00
624 OO

PUBLIC WAREHOUSES.

1
1
1
4
52
1
1
3
40
1
40
1
10
19
18

Champlain




17
2
193
75
4
2
11
18
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
6

Warehouse, superintendent
Assistant storekeeper
do
do
.....
.
Warehouse clerks
do
do
. . . -do
do
Gaptain night watch
--Lieutenants night watch...".
Watchmen
.-.„..
Marker
....do
-.
Laborer
....do...
Weighers.--. - . . .
-..-.
Assistants
Guagers
Assistants
Measurers
Assistants to markers
Inspectors
Nigbt inspectors
Measurers of passenger vessels.
Measurers of wood and marble..
Debenture clerks
Bargemen
SupeiiLitendent marine hospitalDeputy collector at Albany
Inspectors at Albany
Surveyor at Albany
Deputy collector at Troy
Surveyor at Troy
Temporary aids to revenue
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector .
do
do
Deputy collector and clerk
Deputy collector and inspector do
do
do.-„-.
:.do
....do...

„„„.„

do

o-

; 000 00 •
,
,400 00
,200 00
,100 00
,095 00
780 00
800 00
650 00
547 50
780 00
650 00
780^00
650 00
,485 00
600 00
,485 00
600 00
,485 00
600 00
,095 00
547 53
,095 00
,000 00
,000 00
600 00
,000 00
095 00
, 095 00
150 00
,095 00
250 00
182 50
,050 71
,000 00
750 00
600 00^
600 00
550 00
500 00
400 00

R E P O R T ON T H E

501

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

Champlain—Continued .

Cape Viacent.

Dunkirk
Perth Amboy, N. J .

Bridgetown.-1.- .-Burlington ...
Oreat Egg Harbor
Little Egg Harbor.
Camden
Newark

...

FMladelpliis, Pena




No. of persons employed.

Occupation.

Compensation
to each person.

Deputy collector, aid and clerk
Deputy collector and aids
do
do
o
Boatman
-...do
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectore
. . . . do
,
do
do
".
do
— do.
do
Aids to revenue
Boatman
-.
Collector
,
— ...p-..
Deputy collectors
»
Collector
Deputy collector
„...-'.
Surveyor
^
o...
Inspectors
.-.'
o...
....do
-..-do
..-..-....
Collector
,..i
,
Collector
o...
Deputy colleetor
Collector-!.. . . . . ^ .
,
Inspector . . ,
..,.,..Collector
•--.
^
Inspectors
,
Surveyor
.,.
Collector
Deputy eoliector and inspector
,
Temporary inspector
Coilector.
Deputy collector
Deputy collector, 1 month and 16 days
Deputy collector, 10 months
Clerk, 2 montiis
....do...-o
....do
-..-....,
-.-..-..
....do....
«
...do
--...
....do
Clerk, 7 montiis and 12 days
...-do
»--..
Clerk, 10 months and 17 d^ys
...-do
Clerk, 11 months
..---.
Clerk, 1 month
- - . ----.
...do
Clerk, 1 month aud 15 days
-.Clerk, 19 days
..Clerk, 21 days
»-.
Keeper of custom-house
Messenger
Porter
-..
Watchmen^ 11 months..»-. -. --. —
..-

$600 00
600 01
400 00
240 00
180 00
1,014 00
730 00
547 50
365 00
160 00
547 50
300 00
527 50
250 00
h 056 35
600 00
150 00
600 00
540 00
400 00
250 00
256 44
32 00
426 95
365 00
421 22
132 00
435 39
479 19
732 00
462 00
6,111 61
2,500 00
319 29
2,078 80
269 56
1,466 30
3,183 16
1, 366 30
1, 083 15
1,200 00
738 46
1,100 00
967 03
1,000 00
915 76
84 24
J, 008 24
126 37
52 20
57 69
600 00
600 00
549 00
504 00

502

REPORT' ON THE' FINANCES^,.

STATEMENT—ContinuedDistricts.

No. of per
sons em«
ployed.

Occupation^

Compensation
to each person.

NAVAL O F F J O E .

Philadelphia—Continued'.




1
1
5
1
1
1.
1

Naval officer
Clerk.
...do....
Clerk, 9 months
Clerk, 4 months
Clerk, 2 months and 17 days.
Messenger
r

$5,000 00"
1,200 OO
1,000 OO
750 00

335 m
214 OS
600 OO

SURVEYOR'S O F F I C E .

Surveyor
Deputy surveyor.
Clerk
...do

4,500 0&
2,000 00
1,200 00
1, WO OO
600 00'

APPRAISEMENTS.

1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

Appraiser at large
-...—
Messenger to sippraiser.
^.
Appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Examiner
.-Examiner, 11 months.
Examiners, 8 months
Examiner, 7 months and ]6 days
Examiner, 3 months and 5 days
Examiner, 1 month
-..
Examiner, 14 d^ays
Packers
Fi:ieker, 11 months and 24 daysPacker, 7 months and 16 days
Packer, 7 months and 28 days
.,
Packer, 14 days
Sampler, 3 months
Assistant sampler, 4 months and 3 days
Clerks
Clerk, 4 months.
Messenger
,
Special examiner of drugs
,
Pttcker for ditto, 1 mOnth and 10 days.
Clerk of appraiser's stores
Foremen of ditto, 2 months
Marker of ditto, 2 months
,
Watchmen of appraiser's stores
Storekeeper
Superintendent of public stores
Assistant storekeepers
Warehouse clerk, 11 months
Warehouse clerk, 8 months
,
Warehouse clerk, 1 month
,
do
do
Warehouse clerk, 17 days
Marker, 9 months,...„„
-.-,

2,500 00
549 OO
2,500 OO
2,000 00
1,098 00
1,008 00
729 00
687 OO
291 00
93 00
42 00
732 00
720 00
458 00
482 00
28 00
276 00
252 00
1,000 00
33^33
600 00
1,000 00
80 00
900 00
106 75
91 50
549 CO
1,500 00
1,072 83
900 00
825 00
664 84
82 42
75 GO
42 50
350 00

R E P O R T ON T H E

503

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No. of per
sons employed.

Occupation.

Philadelphia—Continued..

1
1
1
4
1
4
1
4
1
2
1
.1
I
38
1
1
1
1
1
2
1.
I
1
,1
5
7
1
3
1
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
18
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1.
3
1
1
2

• Marker, 7 months
-.
Marker, 5 months and 24 days.-i
Marker, 2 months
Warehousemen, 2 months
Weigher
Assistant weighers
Foreman to vveigher
Laborers
Laborer, 10 months
Gaugers
Mnat^urer
Asssistant to measurer
do.
do
Inspectors .
Inspector
Inspector, 11 months and 16 days
Inspector, 8 months and 25 days
Insper-tor, 8 months -.
Inspector, 7 months and 24 days
Inspectors, 6 months
Inspector, 4 inonths and'26 days
Inspector, 4 months and 14 days
Inspector, 4 months
Inspector, 1 month and 8 days..
Temporary inspectors
Revenue agents
Revenue agent
..----.
Revenue agents
Rev«^nue agent, 8 months and 8 days...
Revenue agent, 6 months and 16 days..
Revenue agent, 3 months and 22 days..
Night watchmen on wharves
Bargeman, 11 months
Bargemen...
Capthin night watch, 6 months.
Lieutenant night watch
-'.
Night inspectors
Night inspectors, 11 months
Night inspector
....do...-.
./
Night inspector, 11 months and 16 days.
Night inspector, 7 months and 21 days .
Night inspector, 6 months
....do
do
Night inspector, 22 days
Night inspector, 21 days
Coilector
Deputy collector and inspector
--.
Surveyor
Clerk......
Watchmf'n...
Collector
Inspectors
,
....do
,...do
Messengesr

Presque Isle
Pittsburg --.
Delaware . . .




Compensation
to each person.

$315 00
309 75
90 00
108 50
1,485 00
1,200 00
732 00
540 00
450 00
1,478 33
1,485 00
1,485 00
1,200 00
1,098 00
1,095 00
1,053 00
807 00
729 00
711 00
546 00 .
447 00
411 00
369 00
117 00
357 00
915 00
732 00
549 00
627 50
500 00
285 00'
549 00
523 06
573 06
400 00
650 00
549 00
504 00
540 00.
531 00
523 50
354 00
276 00
273 00!
33 00
31 50
398 24
730 00
2,1'^O 0&

"600 00
456 25
997 93
1,095 00
800 00
500 00
365 00

504

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT-Continued.
Districts.

Baltimore, Md.

No. of persons employed.
1
1
4
1
2
4
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
27

A
26
6
1
2

Annapolis .

Oxford
Vienna
Town Creek
Havre-de-Grace..
Georgetown, D. C

Richmond, Va. ,



Occupation.

Collector,.
Deputy collector.
Clerks
...do
,...do
...do
....do
...-doNaval officer
Deputy naval officer;
Clerk
...-do
Surveyor
.
Clerk
Inspectors
Watchmen
...-do
Boatmen
Weigher
,
Deputy weighers
....do.:
Gauger
Measurer
Deputy measurer
...-do
Storekeeper
....do
Assistant storekeeper ,
Clerks
,
Porters
Appraiser general.
Appraisers
Clerk
....do
;
Poiter
Examiner of drugs
Storekeeper at Lazaretto
-.
Collector
Surveyor
....do
....do
Temporary inspector
:
Collector
....do
.-.
Deputy collector
Surveyor
1
....do
do.-Collector
Deputy collector and inspector .
do
do..
-. -.
Temporary inspector
—
Clerk
Weigher aud gauger
Collector

|Compeusation
to each person.
$6,000 00
2,500 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
900 00
850 00
600 00
547 50
5, 000 00
2, 000 00
1,200 00
800 00
600 00
4,500 00
1,500 00
1,095 00
730 00
547 50
600 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
720 00
1,500 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
626 00
1,150 00
1,095 00
626 00
1,000 00
547 50
2,500 00
2,500 00
1,400 00
1,000 00
547 50
1,000 00
150 00
447 79
200 00
180 56
150 00
94 00
250 00
759 00
365 00
250 00
182 75
189 23

1, 321 59
800 00
821 25
.200 00
500 00
375 27
2, 350 39

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

605

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No. of persons employed.

Richmond, Va.—Continued
Norfolk and Portsmouth . .

Tappahannock. .

Cherrystone.
Yorktown . . .
Petersburg..

Wheeling..
Yeocomico
Alexandria,

Camden, North Carolina..

Edenton
Plymouth
Washington

«. ».„-..

Newbern
Ocracoke

,

.--.




Occupation.

Deputy collectors andinspectors. —
Inspectors, weighers, and measurers ,
Gauger
Collector
Clerk
...do
Naval officer
..Deputy naval officer
Surveyor
Inspectors
Inspector
Weigher and gauger
.—.
»...
Measurer
Surveyors
Watchman and porter
Boatman
..... do
,
..-do-.,..-..
Collector
Deputy collector and inspectoF .
Surveyor
....do
..--do
....do...
...do
Collector
Surveyor
....do
Collector
Weigher, gauger and measurer..
Inspectors . . -'
Deputy collector
Surveyor
.,
Aid to the revenue
Surveyor
....do
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspectors
Surveyor
Weigher and measurer
Collector
Temporary inspectors
— do
appraisers
Watchmen
Collector
-do
•
Surveyor
Inspector, weigher and measurer
Collector... •.
•
Temporary inspector
Collector.-.
Inspector, weigher, gauger & measurer
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector........
Boatmen
— do
»«*-« . - - . . - - - = .
«.-.-.

Compensatioi&
to each per^^

$1,098 OO
1,098 00
69 00
2,. 170 5a
1,500 00
900 00
684 45
732 00
397 41
1, 093 00
759 00
1,500 00
736 39
250 00
549 00
360 00
* 192 OO
184 GO
393 44
300 00
284 78
269 50
184 50
283 24
155 85
318 G
O
417 65
200 00
1,233 39
1,442 30
1,098 00
732 00
750 OO
50 00
940 08
250 00
513 57
1,098 OO
1,098 00
300 00
1,500 00
704 16
438 62
103 00
183 00
358 74
782 96
150 00

171 oa
610
12
332
1,061
1,054
360
240
180

00
00
40
27
05
00
00
00

506

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued;
~ Districts;

;S''o.ofpersens employed.

Beaufort

Occupation.

Collector
Inspector, weigher, gauger & measurer
Aid to revenue
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector and inspector
Weigher and gauger
,
Temporary inspectors
,
Surveyor
Boarding officer^
Collector
Naval officer
'...
Assistant naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector
Collector's clerk
Clerk
...do
...do..^
Appraisers
Porter

Wilmington..

Charleston, South Carolina

. . . d o

28
Georgetown, S. C.
Beauforl
Savannah, G a . . - -

St. Mary's..
Brunswick .,
Mobile, Ala.

Tuscumbia
Pearl River, Miss Vicksburg.



Compensation
to each person.

...O.-O

Inspectors
Boatmen
Messenger. . - - '
(No returns.)
Collector
...do
Deputy collector
Naval officer.
Siirveyor
Appraisers
Weigher and gauger
Storekeeper
Clerk
,.-.do
Inspectors
Porter....
...do
Boatmen
Inspectors
Collector.
Inspector
Boatman.-o=
Collector
Inspector
Light-house keepers.
Collector
Inspectors and clerks.--o --»
Inspectors
.--.
Weighers and measurers
Aid to the revenue
Surveyor and inspector -Collector
Deputy collector
^Collector
------

<....

-»

^

$^87 0 0
1,071 88
3ei 88
1,400 00
582 70
560 97
850 00
310 78
250 00
250 00
480 00
6,198 52
2,857 38
1,000 00
2,201 07
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,000 00
900 00
1,500 00
240 00
216 00
1,095 00
270 00
547 50
362 45
2,791 85
1,500 00
867 25
802 31
1, 500 00
1,500 00
800 00
1,100 00
800 OO
1,098 00
600 00
360 00
360 00
250 OO
697 54
200 00
51 00
250 00
248 00
100 00
6,272 97
1,500 OO
1,095 00
1,500 00
945 00
1,3B5 00
338 41
250 00
518 00

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

507

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No.of per
sons employed.

Natchez
-.
Pensacola, Fla.

St. Augustine.
Key West

St. Mark's.

St. John's .

Apalachicola

New Orleans, La.




2
4
3
7
5
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
76
10
3
5
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
3
1
4
4
12

Occupation.

(No returns.)
Collector
_.
Inspector
Surveyor
Boatmen
(No returns.)
Collector.
Deputy collector
*.
Inspector
:
... d o . . . .
Tern porary inspector
Collector
peputy collectors and inspectors.
— do
do
Occasional inspector
Boatmen
Collector
:
Depu y collector
-.
Inspectors
Surveyor
Boatmen
....do
Collector
Inspector
„
.-do
Weigher and gauger
-.
Collector
Deputy collectors
Clerks
...do.....
...do....
. . . . do
...do...
Porter
,
Naval officer
1..
Deputy naval officer:
Clerk...
,..-do
...do
Surveyor
Deputy surveyors
Inspectors
River inspectors
1
Inspectors in aid of r e v e n u e . . . . .
Occasional inspectors
..-a»o
Weigher
^
Deputy weigher
Laborer
...do
Measurer
;
Deputy measurer
LaborersGangers
Laborer
Boatmen and messengers-.. — . .
Boatmen in aid of revenue
Boatmen

Compensation
to each person.

$1,236
1,098
300
300

95
00
00
00

1,586 14
1,095 00
1,095 00
500 O
O
90 00
1,028 45
1,095 00
500 O
O
176 00
300 00
1,200 00
730 00
730 00
300 00
180 OO
144 00
1,323 70
1,095 00
819 00
1,5110 00
6,400 00
2, 500 00
1,800 00
1,500 00
. 1,400 00
1,100 00
1,000 00
730 00
5,000 00
2, 000 OO
1,400 00
1,200 00
900 00
4,900 00
2,000 00
1,095 00
1,095 00730 00
730 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
600 00
420 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
600 00
1,500 00
600 00
720 00
720 00
540 00

608

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

No.ofper-|
sons em
ployed.

New Orleans—Continued..

1
1
7
15
7
2
2
4
2
1
6
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1

Teche
Galveston, Texas.

Saluria

Brazos de SantiagoMiami, Ohio

Sandusky .

Cuyahoga.

Cincinnati.

Storekeeper
,
Deputy storekeeper
Warehouse clerks
Laborers iu public warehouses — do




d o . .Si

Appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Examiners
Clerks
^..
Messenger
Laborers
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector..
Collector
Deputy collectors
Surveyor
Inspectors -^
Inspector, weigher and gauger ..
Clerk,
Porter
Collector
-. ..
Deputy collector andinspector..
do
do
do
do
Surveyors andinspectors
do
do.-..Mounted inspector
(No returns.)
Collector
.'
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
Inspector
,
Storekeeper
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
Collector
Deputy collector
....do
'...
....do
-.
Clerk
Collector
,
Deputy collector
Inspector
-.
....do
,
....do
Clerk
.--.
Surveyor
Clerk
do
....do

Detroit, Michigan.

I Compensation
to each person.

Occupation.

•

Collector
.,
Deputy collector
....do
....do
....do
....do
...do

$1,500 00
1,095 00
1,200 00
600 00
660 00
2,500 00
2, 000 00
1,400 00
1,095 00
900 00
600 00
902 61
348 00
,750 00
1,
1,000 00

1,000
1,095
1,200
1,000
420
1,250
750
1,095
1,000
600
500
98

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1,730
800
600
148
600
150
50
1,618
8i)0
300
200
365
1,988
1,000
800
600
240
600
3,400
1,200
1,000
600
1,618

22
00
00
66
00
00
00
42
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
42

1,000 00
730 00
480 00

-

.360 00
240 00
180 00

609

REPORT ON THE FINANCES,

: STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

Detroit, Mich.—Continued,

Michilimackinack .

^ • Chicago, Illinois.

Alton
-. .Galena.-..^
Quincy
Cairo
Milwaukie, Wisconsin

Oregon, Oregon Territory.

Cape Perpetua
Port Orford
San Francisco, California..




No. of persons employed.
1
1
1
2
2
8
5
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1 '
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
I
1
1
1
1
6
10
2
4
1
4
1

Occupation.

Compensation
to each person.

Deputy collectorInspector

Inspector and gauger
Inspectors
---.do
....do
....do
.\
....do
..:

.-.

Aid to revenue
Collector
Deputy collector
....do
....do...~.
Collector
Deputy collector
....do
....do
Inspector
Clerks
Inspector
....do....do
....do..
...-do....
-...do
,
....do
...do
Collector
....do
-...do
,
Surveyor..
Collector
Deputy collector
Aids to revenue •Inspector
.-..do
-"
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Inspector
Surveyor...-.
Collector-..,.--,Boatman
Collector
...-..
....do...
Deputy collectors
..-.do
Auditor
Cashier
Clerk
....do
....do
.--..
....do
....do
Messengers
Captain of watch
Watchmen
..
.Appraiser general...«... . - , . -

$120
095
1,095
600
480
36D
240
150

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

120 00

835 95
600 00
400 00
300 00
1,611 48
1,000 00
700 00
360 00
600 00
1,200 00
728 00
732 00
682 00
690 00
144 00
60 00
. 56 00
50 00
400 00
499 31
2,785 17
1,608 77
1,250 00
1,000 00
426 00
720 00
480 00
3, 000 00
1,500 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
2, 000 00
840 00
2,000 00
10,400 00
2,166 66
2,100 00
3,800 00
3,500 00
1,538 59
1,050 00
3,158 33
2,912 03
2,750 00
1,500 00
1,215 00
1,495 00
6,000 00

510

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts.

|NO. of persons employed.

San Francisco—Continuec.

3
2
32
3
1
4
Sonoma-

San Joaquin,.
Sacramento .
San Diego.. Monterey .
San Pedro
Minnesota, Min. Ter.,
Louisville, Ky..
Paducah
Nashville, Tenn.
Memphis
..
Knoxville . . - - - .



Occupation.

Compensation
to each per*son.

Appraisers
.-Assistant appraisers
Examiners
Clerks
1
Watchman and superintendent
Laborer
Messenger
Laborers -.
Superintendent warehouses and storekeeper
Clerk
....do....
....do
'.........
Messenger
Watchman
o...
-...do..
Laborers
....do.
-...do
...do...
....do...
Messenger
Surveyor
Deputy surveyor
Messenger
Weigher and measurer
---,.„..
do
do
.Ganger
....do...
Laborers
...do
Inspectors
-...do
-.
....do
...---.
Boarding officer.
Bargemen
Collector
Weigher and guager
...
Inspector
...,-„
...-do
(NO returns.)
Collector-..
=o« . . . . „
...do
Deputy collector
Special inspector
Collector
Inspector , „ - .--do
Collector
o---..-Surveyor
Collector
o- . . .
Deputy collector
-.--..
Collector
-—--.
(No returns.)
Surveyor
-.
----.----.
....do
..--.... . . . d o . . . . . . . o = . . » . - . - . . . . - - o » . = -o.

$6,000
2,975
3,000
2,160
2,160
1,800
1,560
1,516

00
96
00
00
00
00
00
80

3,100 00
1,250 00
2,900 00
2,564 00
1,320 00
1,529 36
592 34
1, 200 00
400 00
3,300 00
3, 000 .00
2,400 00
1,560 00
7,000 00
4,000 00
1,800 00
3,300 00
2,750 00
3, 150 00
2,600 00
1,288 69
208 08
2,188 50
1,818 50
1,503 00
2,928 00.
1,20C 00
3,133 12
1.199 95
594 00
168 00
3,000 00
3, 070 35
2,196 00
258 00
3, 056 25
2,190 00
2,099 00
3,037 10
2, 000 00
1.200 00
800 00
1,003 95
1,195 00
2,500 00
370 00

REPORT

ON T H E

511

EINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Districts,

No. of persons employed.

St Louis M o . . . . . . . . - - - . .

1
1
2
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
1

Evansville, Ind- . . i . . . < . . . .
New Albanv
•TpfffiVRon ville

...

.....

Burlington, l o f v a . . . . . . . . .
DubuQue................
Keokuk......-..-....--.

Occupation.

Collector
Clerk
....do
...do
..do - . .
Surveyor
...do
...do..
...do.-.
....do
....do

Compensation
to each person.
$3,000 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
936 22
451 70
350 00
352 10
350 00
375 80
350 00
373 20

-

.:
-

F . BIGGER, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register''s Office, Novemher 15, 1856.

M.
OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY,

October 25, 1856.
SIR: I have the honor to return herewith the report of ascertained
insolvents, and, with it, tables numbered 1 to 7, prepared in accordance with your instructions of the 13th instant^ showing the amounts
of said defaults under the following heads^ viz:
No. 1..Showing those which originated in the NavyDepartment
$1,405,631 55
No. 2. Showing those which originated in the War
Department
,
2,942,153 11
No. 3. Showing those which originated" on account of
customs
570,393 16
No. 4. Showing those which originated on account of
foreign intercourse.
24^360 84
No-. 5. Showing those which originated on account of
Indian intercourse
,
89,490 40
No. 6. Showing those which originated on account of
sales ofpublic lands
290,627 13
No. 7. Showing those which originated on miscella^ neous accounts
,.
80,688 90
Maldng together.
All of which IS "respectfully submitted.
F . B.
Hon.

J^s,

GUTHRIE,

Secretary of the Treasury„



6,213,345 69
STEEETER,

Solicitor.

sm

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES,

No. 1,
Statement of claims and debts ivhich originated in the Navy Department., and transmitted fior collection and sued, and ascertained to he
totally lost, the principals und sureties being eitlier all dead and insolvent or hopelessly insolverit, or not found; with the date on wliich
•suits were severally commenced.
Names of debtors saed.

Date of suit.
2,
Dec. 23,
Aug. 8,
Aug. 9,
Aug, 12,
March 23,
May 27,
Sept. 26,

1800
1806
1808
1808
1808
1809
1810
1810

Jan.
Jan.

11, 1811
15, 1811

Jan.

23, 18ii

Jan.

'30, 1811

July J29, 1812

Aug. 1, 1812
Aug. 19, 1812
Sept. 8, 1812
May

20, 1813

May

14, 1820

^mkQ 14, 1820

John Blagge., dead and insolvent.
Robert Lewis, hopelessly insolvent—:
Nicholas J. Roosevelt and sui^ety, dead and insolvent.
Caleb Lownes, dead and insolvent.
_
Caleb Lownes, dead and insolvent.
.._-. —
DegiJi, Purviance & Co., totally insolvent
_
•
Joseph Strong, dead and insolvent.
James Key, hopelessly iRSGlvent
George W. Leggett, dead and insolvent. _
Archibald Campbell, dead and insolvent
John Stuart, not found.
_--^_-.
Josiah Hazard, dead and insolvent
Thomas Williams, not found. ^ —
~
John Mullowney, not found
Habijah Savage, not found
'
_•
John Galloway, not found
Nathaniel Fanning, dead and insolvent—.
William Smith & Co., insolvent
Josiah M. Speak, dead and insolvent _.
John Spriggs, not found
George T. Ross, dead and insolvent.
John B. Henry, not found
'Robert R. Flina, not found.
Thomas D. Price, not found
_
George Dyson, not found
__
Robert Mercer, not found
„-«
Philip Craig, hopelessly .insolvent
A. A. W. W. Bayard, dead and insolvent
John Allen, not found
._
William Fleming, not found.
Benjamin Allen, not found
^.
_
Edward Hall, not found
—
_
Lemuel Morris, not found.
T. xVrmistead, hopelessly insolvent
Jol.n H. Fav/'S, hopelessly insolv^ent
John C. Gunn, not found
.George A. Marcellin, dead and insolvent _:
.
James Eakin, dead and insolvent
_
Samuel E. Willet, not found
-^
A. C. W. Love, dead and insolvent
—
William M. Barron, not found.-.
Edward Bennett, dead and insolvent
Philip A. Bush; not found
George S. Hackley, dead and insolvent
Richard Crump, dead and insolvent __
Williani Nicholson, hot found
_
^
Benjamin Bryan, not found
William Ballard, dead and insolvent.
John Brown, not found
B,obert C. Rossitter, not found
..»
.o..




Amount due.

$1,480
4,077
30,000
2,000
12,000
76,655

31
30
60
3,030

120
220
81
24

91
44
00
00
00
68
66
00
96
73
00
35
70
98

44 00

87
70
563
BO
9
12

86
57
56
03
45
00

78 45

164 84
60 00
• 94 93
73 33
10 00
49 52
398 98
24 80
218 08
120 00
2,282 79
242,981 46
151,636 58
106 17
257 19
237 72
144 29
664 45

382 47
174 59

137 33
258 74
519 00
55 65
91 20
155 75
99 60
77 85

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

613

STATEMENT—Continued.
.Date of suit.
June 14, 1820

June • 16, 1820
Jan.

8. 1821

May
8('pt.
Nov.

1821
1821
1821

Nov;
Dec.

1821
1821

Dec. 20, 1821

Dec. 21, 1821

Names of debtors sued.
John S. Blake, not found
_
,
Samuel G. Blodget, dead and insolvent.
_ _,
Joseph L. Biggs, dead and insolvent
William G. Stewart, not found
'
_-__
,
Jesse P. Lewis, not found.
1—
J. Morrison, jr., dead and insolvent
John Mott, dead and insolvent
.__
H.H. Carson, dead and insolvent.
Christopher Gadsden, dead aud insolvent
Robert Greenleaf, dead and insolvent
William Helms, dead and insolvent.
Thomas Hunt, not found. _
P. A. T. P. Jones, not found.
Jacob M. Jacobs, not found.
Benedict Higden, not found
B. G. M. Hopkins, dead and insolventl
Samuel G. Jerauld, not found.
_
- Thomas G.'Tillinghast, dead and insolvent. __.
John Brooks, dead and insolvent
James W. Forest, hopelessly insolvent
Frederick Baurys, dead and insolvent
—
Joseph Bradford, dead and insolvent
James Conner, not found.
John Clarke, not found
^.
Daniel Eldridge, dead and insolvent.
John M. Funk, dead and insolvent
Tho. B. Eyre, not found-..._
*
John Davis and sureties, not found.
John K.Smith," insolvent
Joseph H. Berryman, dead and insolvent
Leonard Hall, not found
James P. Hunt, dead and insolvent
James Frazier, dead and insolvent
_
D. Higginbotham, utterly insolvent.
Samuel J. Cox, dead and insolvent
William C. Jenks, dead and insolvent. _ _
William .R. Graham, not found.
George Carson, not found
William Ballard, dead and insolvent.
Moses Allen, dead and insolvent..?
,
Benjamin Smith, dead and insolvent..
P. A. Cartwright, not found
•
John Holcomb, not found
_
1
Philip Jarvis, not found'
Tho. W. Hooper, dead and insolvent
David Hall, not found
James Gibbon, dead and insolvent. _
A. W. Hayman, not found
Richard S. Heath, dead and insolvent
William Hall, dead and insolvent
-^
William Hartigun, not found
Joseph Field, not found
_
J. C. Kennicut, dead and insolvent
William B., Harris, not found.
James Greenlaw, not found
...^
Joseph Gamble, not found
^Henry H. Haskins, not found._
Edward C. Gardner, not found.
Lewis Garman, dead and insolvent
Benjamin Goodwin, dead and insolvent
A.^.

33



Amount due

$149 57
"223 94

114
57
131
73
104

28
70
62
49
72
1,072 43
2,179 12
13,262 97
371 01
66 31
802 34
61 15
216 79
2,005 23
2, 658 21
605 42
1,112 67
92 61
508 44
200 00
14 95
8D 75
1,908 30
538 71
50 00
1,.781 11
280,660 61
169 00
276 88
60 00
2, 645 90
198 61
10,378 08
75 94
88 TO

126 69
272 70
1,067 08
71 66
1,683 99
71 ^58
417 83
1,223 78

210 00
390 95
^ 80 00
74 90

174 31
57 Qo
162 l5
88 5^
27 76
60 Oo
130 Oo
120 Oo
100 Oo
1,196 69
533 Oo

514

REPOR*^ ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.
Dec.

21, 1821

April 1, 1822
Jan. 22, 1822

March 6, 1822
June
Sept.
Dec.
Aug.
July
June
June

6, 1822
22, 1822
26, 1822
13, 1824
2, 1823
22, 1822
27, 1822

Nov. 22, 1822
Jan.
2, 1823
Marcli 31 1823

June 18, 1823
July 12, 1823
Aug. 8, 1823
Aug. 29, 1823

Aug. 30, 1823
Sept.

8, 1823

Sept. 23, 1823

Names of debtors sued. '
Robert W. Goldsborough, dead and insolvent.
Hamlet Neale, dead and insolvent
Joseph Fisher, not found.
._
George Farragut, dead and insolvent
_
William Garrard, not found
,
George H. Gibbes, not found.
_°-Peter Gamble, dead and insolvent
Ch. F. Sherbourne, insolvent.
___
Christopher Gadsden, dead and insolvent
R. Greanleaf, dead and insolvent
__:
William Holrnes, dead and insolventTho. Hunt, not found
P. Y. P.Jones, hot found
Benedict Higden, not found
J. M. Jacobs, not found. ^
B. G. M. Hipkins, dead and insolvent.
_
Samuel Gerald, not found.
John Brookes, dead and insolvent
Henry Caldwell, not found.
Henry S. Langdon, insolvent
J. R. Shaw and sureties, not found.
Russel Basset, insolvent.
J. Middleton, dec'd, and sureties, dead and insolvent
Representatives of F. B. White, dead and insolvent..
Samuel Maffet and sureties, insolvent
Richard Gregory, dead and insolvent
.-.._
Edward F. Howell, dead and insolvent
-..
John W. Gibbes, dead and insolvent
Thomas C. Aliney, dead and insolvent.:
Benjamin D. Coakley, dead and insolvent
,
Charles Yeates, dead and insolvent
L.
Walter Winter, dead and insol vent
Job West, not found
John Young, dead and insolvent.
Henry Wilkinson, dead and insolvent
J. W. Wendell, dead and insolvent
_.
Benjamin S. Williams, dead and insolvent
John Williams, not found
...."
,
Lewis Debbis and sureties, utterly insolvent
,
E . Watkins, utterly insolvent „
,
Thomas Watts, not found
George Wade, not found
;
-.
__
Robert Swartwout, insolvent
_.
_
__,
Henry Few, jr., dead and insolvent.
John Warner, dead and insolvent
Joseph Taylor, dead and insolvent
J. Titus, dead and insolvent
,
William Van Ransellier, dead and insolvent
John Williams, dead and insolvent.
George Vandleare, not found
....
B. Wood, not found..:
John Parker, dead and iiisolvent
Benjainih Fi'y and sureties, insolvent
._.
Joshua B. Laiigdon and sureties, dead and insolvent..
John R. Shaw, dead and insolvent
George Beall, sen., dead and insolvent
William L. Travers, not found
^..
John Tui-hbull, not found
.
James Taylor, dead and insolvent




Amount due.
$9,585
200
201
150
114
1,600
20
23
2,179
13,262
371
66
862
• 216
61
2,005
2,558
1,112
100
8,078
2,782
44
309
445
6,038
108
120
660
1,000
1,000
113
489
452
226
245
140
35
,322
25,716
43
240
165
47,352
1,918
300
781
476
151
1,485
622
116
209
3,961
1,347
2,782
210
110
246
150

46
67
69
00
00
00
50
01
12
97
01
31
34
79
15
23
21
67
00
34
04
48
92
02
71
00
97
74
00
00
13
00
40
13
21
do
00
00
25
70
95
50
16
95
00
75
21
87
80
79
81
49
00
30
04
00
00
37
99

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

§15

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.

Names of debtors sued.

Sept. 23, 1823 George C. l\icker, not found
Dec. 26, 1823 P. H. Brooke, not found
Y. Baker, insolvent
H. Bowie, dead and insolvent
Samuel K. Briggs, not found
Piobert Armedle, dead and insolvent.
Benjamin Trevell, not found
L
Thomas Burrows and sureties, insolvent
Phillip L. Hoffman, insolvent,
E. Salmon, insolvent
— .
Aug. 13, 1824 Benjamin.Hyde, not found.
Daniel S. Dexter, dead and insolvent._^.
Alexander T. Hanton, dead and insolvent..
Robert M. Gamble, dead and insolvent ...-..-,;...
Oct.
2,1824^ Henry M. Kennedy, dead and insolvent..i.,...
Z. Kemp, not found
1.Oct. 26, 1824 Joseph Kerr and surel4es, insolvent
Nov. 3, 1824 N. W. Rothwell and sureties, dead and insolvent
i..
.-.
Feb. 28, 1825 John Killborne, not found _.
July
8, 1825 Bichard B'rashears, dead and insolvent
Henry Gray, dead and insolvent
Thomas W. Legge, dead and insolvent
Daniel Hazard, dead and insolvent
July 25,1825 Fr. J. Castigan, insolvent
William Jasper, insolvent
June 9, 1825 A. H. M. Conklin, dead and insolvent
William Fleetwood, dead and insolvent.
i°..
John Hudson, not found
.-.
James R. Lyman,.not found
—.
A. Hamilton, not found
Seth H. Lewis, not found
—
July 8, 1825 John Gault, not found . . . Samuel Blair, not found.-.
—
John S. Huttoii, not found
June 24, 1826 Benjamin F. Bonsai and sureties, insol vent.."... .
Oct. . 3, 1826 John B. Wilkinson, insolvent
'. .^^ —
Dec. 2, 1826 A. Dorgan, insolvent
.j. —
Thomas E. Fennimore, not found fi>
Dec.
8, 1826 Charles S. Hanna, insolvent
,z
John Light, not found
_
z.,
John L. Clarke, insolvent
J.....
...
Samuel Angus, insolvent
—
Edward Dowse, dead and insolvent
_ ..i
John D. Fish, dead and insolvent
.^_
Dec.
5, 1826 Thomas Hendry, not found
.;
John Hull, insolvent
Jacob Lewis, dead and insolvent fi
Theodore Hunt, dead and insolvent
March 29, 1827 John S. Beck, dead and insolvent—
Williani Cooper, not found.
-^
Richard Donimick, not found..
1
James H. Dobbins, not found
—
W. W. Edwards, dead ahd insolvent
Thomas Gordon, not found
'.-.
i.
A. Hassack, not found
A. S. Kuhn,,not found
...
Green Lynch, dead and insolvent
.-.
Charles L. Springer, dead and insolvent
1
George W. Hamiiiersley, not found
.



Amount due.

$132 00

66 80
4 V 00
:
658 7(::
83 50
50 00
241 00
1,368 4 7
2,227 OC)
1,08.0 7 1
(
{
1,000 0 «
4, 600 10
1,908 08
1,041 72

149 01
82 21
4,013 81
23,771 68
77 76
3,848 32
494 16
230 28
70 00
1,020 40
330 00
421 32
470 66
178 05
141 25
805 36
138 27
44 00
302 78
233 57
39,117 74
68,050 91
303 38
502 25>
562 23
147 62
406 00
833 14
63 62
397 19
308 59
4^431 00
384 76.

515 80
48^ 02
.
1, 094 3 2
15 00'^
73 .30'.'
95- 53^
35^ 2:6.^
47 m
27 8i)f
579. 16.
236 29^'
30 89^'

516

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.
Oct. 23, 1827
Nov. 2, 1833
March 21, 1835
Sept. 22, 1835
Feb. 20, 1839
March 8, 1839
AprU 10, 1839
May
2, 1839
May. 11, 1839
May
June
Feb.
June
July
Sept.

17,
10,
8,
21,
21,
28,

1839
1S40
1841
1841
1841
1847

Names of debtors sued.

Amount due^

D Taylor, dead and insolvent
John P. Decatur, insolvent
.
William Mosher, insolvent
.
Peter K. Wagner and sureties, insolvent
Edward S. Wheelan, not found..:
Edwin Turner and sureties, insolvent
Ormsburg & Done, dead and insolvent
William A. Poor, not found
...
.
Charles H. Goldsborough, dead and insolvent
George S. Wise and sureties insolvent . . . .
Thomas Shields and sureties, insolvent _. _
Robert Pottinger and sureties, insolvent . . '
H. M. Granger, not found
___.l
George A. Thomas, not found ..;
James Brookes, not found..
Thonias Eastin and sureties insolvent.
.
C. G. Price and sureties, insolvent .
Total

1

^

No. 2.

_

'*
_.

__

$969
300
64
5,805
455
489
286
74
866
25.775
98 471
6,610
126
160
58,296
20,496
5,607

05
00
85
72
10
15
69
20
20
15
30
43
64
20
91
17
17

1,405,631 65

.

.

Statement ofi claims and debts which originated in the War Department
and transmitted fior collection and suit, and ascertained to be totally
lost, the principals and sureties being either all dead a.nd insolvent,
or hopelessly insolvent, or notfiound—and with their date.
Amount due.

^ Date of suit.
April 7, 1800
Feb.
9, 1806
April 23, 1807
Dec. 20, 1808
Nov: 10, •1809
Nov. 15, 1809
Mar. 18, 1809
Nov. 18, 1809
Nov.
Dec.
Mar.
April
Mar.
Oct.
May
May
May
May

24,
6,
8,
13,
5,
20,
5,
21,
27,
31,

1809
1809
1810
1810
1806
1807
1810
1810
1810
1810

Thomas Mifflin, dead and insolvent
George Strother, not found.
_
.-.
William Richard, dead and insolvent:
:
Charles Wright, dead and insolvent
_
...
Ebenezer Masey, not found
'
:.
Joseph Brock, dead and insolvent
John Wade, dead and insolvent.
Benjamin Price, not found.
Thomas Carneal, dead and insolvent
John A. Davidson, dead and insolvent
-AVilliam Tharp,^ hopelessly insolvent.
_.
James Lanier, dead and insolvent
_
—
John Edwards, hopelessly insolvent
— :
_.
William P. Smith, dead and insolvent.
.'_
Solomon'Ellis and surety, insolvent and absconded
-George Blount, dead and insolvent
-W. W. Burrows, dead and insolvent.
• Archibald Crary, dead'and insolvent.
I
Buckner, Harris & Co., dead and insolvent.
Stephen Hillis, dead and insolvent
George Salraon, dead and insolvent
^—
j
Adrian Hunn, dead and insolvent
- William A. Rogers, not found.,
-.'




$636
180
1,000
13,706
671
320
6,908
3,192
. 327
197
413
212
528
454
31,495
660
8,773
10
400
243
286
346
77

16
00
00
18
41
81
88
53
00
47
88
31
07
86
49
00
13
57
00
45
90
44
8S

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

617

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date ofsuit.

William Hall, not found
William Nicholson, not found
:
Robert Parkinson, dead and insolvent—
1, 1810 Rufus Graves, dead and insolvent..
John Tillinghast, not found
Aaron Gregg, dead and insolvent
Jacob Melchar, dead and insolvent
—
4,^1810 James Wells, dead and insolvent
Howell Lewds, dead and insolvent
.
Samuel Tinsley, not found
5, 1810 Joseph Dickinson, dead and insolvent—
Samuel Seaton, dead and insolvent
27, 1810 Robert Ritchie, not found
George Baynton, dead and insolvent
11, 1811 Josiah Taylor, dead and insolvent.^
Josiah Taylor, dead and insolvent.
Josiah Taylor, dead and insolvent.
15, 1811 George Taylor, dead and insolvent
Archibald Grey, not found
Joseph Richmond, dead and insolvent
William Buchanan, hot found
16, 1811 L. J. Dickinson, dead and insolvent
George Salmon, dead and insolvent
William Cowper, insolvent.
Thomas Bodley, insolvent
John Guthrie, dead and insolyent_j.
William Lawton, not ifound
21, 1811 James McKellor, dead and insolvent
8, 1811 John Smith, not found
John Smith, not found
John Smith, not found
24, 1811 Presley Neville, dead and insolvent.
Samuel Allison, dead and insolvent
Samuel McClary, not found.
,—
9, 1811 John Paine, not found
31, 1811 John F. Hamtranck, dead and insolvent.
Jonathan Robinson, not found.
James Taylor, dead and insolvent
1, 1811 Thomas Pas turn, dead and insolvent
Ballard Smith, not found
Yelverton Peyton, dead and insolvent
William Yates, dead and insolvent
13, 1811 John Saunders, dead and Insolvent
27, 1811 Thomas Anderson, not found
—, 1811 Hugh Phelps, not found...-•.
28, 1811 Benjamin Williamson, dead and insolvent
Samuel Clinton, not found
N. N. Wright, dead and insolvent
2^9, 1811 Jeremiah Fisher, dead and insolvent
..
David Byers, dead and insolvent
27, 1812 Peter Freeman, dead and insolvent
...
Edward Miller, ndt found.
28, 1812 John Webb, jr., dead and insolvent
,
30, 1812 Joseph Williams, dead and insolvent
7, 1812 Arthur Morgan., dead and insolvent
James McDonald, not found
John Campbell, dead and insolvent.
Robert Peyton, dead and insolvent....
Elijah Craig, dead and insolvent

May 31, 1810
Sept.

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Jan.

Jan.

Jan

Jan.
Mar.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.

Nov.
Mar.
April
July
July
April
July
July
Aug.

Names of debtors sued.




Amount due.

$3,000 00
1,506 60

334 00
30 90
34 11
• • 47749
13S 92
293 60
180 03
13 00
360 19
26 33
3, 622 03
45 05
28,124 68
5,187 99
1,249 99
320 00
211 69
354 00

300 59
88 67
286 90
1, 094 32
600 00
91 89
301 00
569 93
21,869 38
224 86
1,766 00
46 81
^
96 ' S
623 94
1,013 15
430 69
54 64
341 50
661 22
107 38
45 39
555 00
3,877 66
1,600 •82
934 64
2,515 56
120 00
908 00
409 00
1,408' 38
350 92
10 97
1,539 99
17 56
600 00
SOO 00
566 00
50 00
476 00

518

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.

Aug.

Sept.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.

Feb.
Feb.'
May
June

June
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
July
July
Sept.

April

May
June
June
June

Dec.
July
Aug.
July
Aug.
Oct.
Nov.

Nov.
Nov.

Names bf debtors sued.

Thomas J. Van Dyke, dead and insolvent
William P. Bennet, dead and insolvent
Daniel -Newman, not found.
8, 1812 B. D. Armistead, not found
G. Lyman, utterly insolvent
6, 1813 Alexander J. Lyle, utterly insolvent..,
Lemuel Bent, utterly insolvent. _
•
11, 1815 Thomas Rippets, utterly insolvent
N, H. Moore, utterly insolvent
.
1
9t 1815
7, 1816 Frederick Marstella, utterly insolvent
27, 1818 John B. Armistead & J. G. Camp, utterly insolvent
a 1818 John Archer, dead and insolvent.
,
25, 1818 Henry Phillips and sureties, dead and insolvent.
Jonathan Carlton, and sureties, dead and insolvent
Joseph E Merritt and sureties, dead and insolvent
Augustus Belknap; not found
30, 1818 F. H. Lissenhoop, dead and insolvent
27, 1815 Samuel Annin, hopelessly insolvent
23, 1816 Williani Christy, hopelessly insolvent
I'i, 1818 George Keyser, hopelessly insolvent
17, 1818 John Gates, jr., and sureties, hopelessly insolvent
2, 1818 W. P. Greenup and sureties, hopelessly insolvent
20, 1818 Wiiliara D. Hayden and sureties, hopelessly insolvent.
29, 1818 R. C. Respass and sureties, hopelessly insolvent
,
Robert Grey, hopelessly insolvent—
_
Martin Strobel, hopelessly insolvent
,
1^, 1819 Samuel Brown, hopeles.sly insolvent
5, 1819 Lewis Dent, dead and insolvent
1, 1819 Wm. H. Littlejohn and sureties, dead and insolvent..
__
5, 1819 R. M. Forsyth, insolvent.
7, 1819 B. Labuxan and sureties, insolvent
Thomas Bodley and sureties, insolvent
i
H. S. Geyer, insolvent.
_
^
28, 1819 Robert McClelian, insolvent _.
28, 1819 Samuel Champlain, insolvent..
13, 1819 Samuel Champlain, insolvent
1
14, 1819 Addison Corrick, insolvent
_
25, 1819 Stoughton Soult, insolvent
Edwin Tyler, insolvent
_
J
31, 1819 Vv^illiam Ray, insolvent.
6 1819 Wil liam Butler, dead and insolvent.
John S. Brush, not found
George Cloud, not fourid
Thomas Bailey, hopelessly insolvent.
Gabriel Barbour, hopelessly insolvent
George W. Hight, not found
Fayette Roan, dead and insolvent
James McClosky, dead and insolvent
_
.John H. Mallory, insolvent.
9, 1819 William C. Wayne, not found
.Jobn Burnet, dead and insolvent.
10, 1819 Thomas P Baldwin, utterly insolvent—
Rxlph B Cuyler, dead and insolvent.
'A. Bigelow. dead and insolvent
—
Fred. Conkling, not found
.'
Samuel M. Dewey, dead and insolvent
L. Morgan, dead and insolvent.
George M. Burgess, dead and insolvent
John McCluney, utterly insolvent
..
7, 1812




Amount due.
$872 64
2,176 10
149 50
337 9i
312 75
960 00
3,172 52
2,427 3^
30,0T)8 00
36,156 76
2,444 25
1,932,74
11,459 54
51,127 88
12,781 43
425 27
3,048 60'
21,580 00
7,875 00
9.183 58
25,493 64
2,259 73
24,972 82
13,969 19
405 87
329 96
29,652 70
1.184 41
1,406 22
550 00
5,257 14
27,247 59
14, 771 ^75
8,990 57
55,927 20
52,986 97
4,420 64
14,578 56
3,251 58
1,300 00
1,178 00
800 00
883 47
1,261 37
1,770 00
3,706 85
,426 30
3.398 69
2,755 54
1,200 00
1,666 25
, 5,770 00
1,562 36
675 24
1,732 80
463 72
6,438 34
700 00

2,530 50

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

519

STATEMENT—Continued. .
Date of suit.
Nov. 10, 1819
I

Dec.
Dec.
Dec.

16, ^819
22, 1819
23, 1819

Dec.
Dec.

24, 1819
29, 1819

Dec.
Jan.

31, 1819
3, 1820

Feb. 12, 1820
March 9, 1820

•April 10, 1820
April 19, 1820
Mav' 23, 1820
May 25, 1820
May 26, 1820
June
6, 1820
June 14, 1820
Sept. 20, 1819
Sept. 21, 1819

Sept. 27, 1819

Sept. 29, 1819

Oct.

27, 1819

June 17, 1820
July 10, 1820

Names of debtors sued.
James Hackley, utterly insolvent
Phineas Williams, not found
_.
Robert J. Scott, insolvent
^__.
Edward^J. Roberts and sureties, insolvent
Joseph Bucklin, dead and insolvent.
Charles Follett, .dead and insolvent
Benjamin White, dead and insolvent
William J. Gordon, not found
Thomas Y. Sprogell, dead and insolvent
Amassa J. Bruce, not found
N. R. Packard, insolvent
Robert H. Craig, dead and insolvent
John V. H. Huych, insolvent...
'.
Thonias Vaile, not foun^d.
David V. Heyden, dead and insolvent
Moses Blackley, not found
J. Livingston, insolvent
William Triplett, insolvent
._
Philip P. Price, -insolvent
Benjamin S. Ogden, insolvent
Charles Inery, dead and insolvent.
Fielder Ridgway, dead and insolvent
White Youngs, dead and insolvent
Joseph B. Stuart and surety, insolvent
Richard H. Lee, insolvent
William D. Hopkins, not found
Hamlin Cook and surety, dead and insolvent
Francis Sniith, hopelessly insolvent
Peter W. Gra)^son, hopelessly insolvent..
Benjamin Wallace, hopelessly insolvent
Abner P. Spencer, not foiind
Richard M. Johnson, dead and insolvent
Isaac Aldridge, dead and insolventThomas Campbell, dead and insolvent
J. F. McElroy, insolvent.
1
C. Benjamin, insolvent
_
John Ballinger, not found
:
James Charlton, dead and insolvent
Littleton Johnson, insolvent
Joseph Clay, insolvent
George T. Ross, dead and insolvent
._
George Todd, insolvent
M. Houston, insolvent.
J. R. Munson, dead and insolvent
James W. Bryson and surety, dead and insolvent.
J. H. Plummer and surety, dead and insolvent..
Patterson B. Clark, not found
Charles B. Hopkins, dead and insolvent
Levi Cox, insolvent
_-_.
Moses J. Chase, insolvent
William Smith, not found
_—
H. Battle, insolvent
_
John H. Smith, insolvent
James Smith and sureties, insolvent
I
William Billings, dead and insolvent
George R. Bridges, dead and insolvent
John Larkin, not found
Charles Ketchlin. not found
J.
j Robert H. Morris, not found
. —.




Amount due.
$1,108 20
1,245 00
324 00
5,564 7^
1,217 00
3,248 00
4,630 50
2,222 00
1.049 97
^ 1,787 26
391 82
2,386 29
3,730 00
1,755 00
2,182 00
244 00
368 00
1,027 00
409 74
4,816 00
3.050 00
2,604 20
200 00
19,482 21
578 09
261.26
1,268 98
.427 85
300 00
3,010 21
5,738 80
3,374 57 '
2,714 24
5,683 50
304 521,998 54
3,151 50
. 1,638 45
1,440 56
957 52
10,128 77'
4,312 58
3,971 50
16,105 05
2,849 21
13,775 57
698 00
1,086 19
381 65
359 46
2,194 00
561 63
8,488 28
2,232 71
789 17
928 84
1,694 68
280 00
585 70

520

REPORT

ON

THE

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Names of debtors sued.

Date of suit.
July
July

10, 1820
19, 1820

Aug. 17, 1820
Oct.
6 1820
,
Oct. 20, 1820

Nov.

4, 1820

Nov.

6, 1820

Aaron Kay, not found
._.
John Lynch, dead and insolverit.
,
Edward L. Lomax, not found
Ai*"xander McRae, dead and insolvent.
James P. Prince, insolvent
_
Benjamin Nicholson, dead and insolvent
Edward Norton, dead and insolvent
Thomas A.-Helms, dead and insolvent
J.
Jacob Whistler, dead and. insolvent.
Peter Townsend and sureties, i n s o l v e n t . . . . _
William Davenport, not found
Robert W. Ewing, insolvent
David Scott, insolvent
i
._
Cornelius Gates, not found.
John G. Scholtz, dead and insolvent
'
Thomas W. Deaton, insolvent.
William Sumpter, insolvent
Moses M. Russell, not found
Stephen F. Donaldson and sureties, insolvent
F. McRae and sureties, dead and insolvent...
John Merrill, dead and insolvent
,
J. Bell and sureties, dead and insolvent
Wm. Watkins, insolvent
Walters Allen, dead and insolvent.
Freeman Nickerson, not found
•
Samuel Weston, not found.
,
John Sisk, insolvent
Thomas Lyon, insolvent
,
Martin Fishback, not found
George W. Ferguson, dead and insolvent
Isaac Carter, hopelessly insolvent
E. Thompson, not found
Edward White, not found
Seth -Bannister, insolyent.
Janies Davis, not found.
Anthony Dearing, not found
_
•
H. V. Melton, not found.,
Wm. Scott, insolvent
Wm. S. Weels, insolvent
,
John Mason,insolvent -.-.
Stephen Lee, insolvent
_
C. N. Lewis, not found
Wm. G. Hays, not found
James S. Simpson, not found
Alex. F. F. Bill, insolvent
Hugh W. Den eal, dead and insolvent
,
Robert S. Gardiner, dead and insolvent
White Your gs, not found
,
George W. Ten Brock j dead and insolvent
Francis T. Wheeler, not found
.
Win. B. Staats, not found
.^-.
Moses C. Cantine,not found
John Murphy, not found
_
John B. Trueax, insolvent
Wm. N. Earle, dead and insolvent
..
Benjamin Masley, dead and insolvent
Daniel Cushing, dead and insolvent
Robert Beall, insolvent
John Foster, dead and insolvent
..




Amount due.

$200 00

102
300
008
520
457
270
313
659
600

91
00
25
00
00
8
67
07
58
1
99
44
04
,164 00
29 23
345 73
111 51
5 592 96
914 64
742 08
814 00
16 442 87
542 11
519 71
5 875 43
15 054 78
15 B74 91
320 00
2 580 20
2 910 00
248 00
2 014 00
605 00
1 874 00
659 37
747 00
483 67
2. 322 00
1 500 00
1 907 62
186 25
512 .20
2 100 39
276 87
1 427 25
2 354 55
501 00
3 328 24
683 50
3 581 42
245 03
7 259 96
523 65
2 725 13
1 846 00
821 00
1 583 32
299 83
1 415 00
3,122 2i).
5,643 25
1,054 21

REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

621

, STATEMENT—Continued.

Nov. 10,' 1820
Nov. 12, 1820
Nov. 13, 1820

Nov. ,14, 1820

Dec.

15, 1820

Dec. 21, 1820
Dec. 24, 1820
Jan. 3, 1821
Jan. 10, 1821
Jan. 8, 1821
Jan. 22, 1821
Jan. 28, 1821
Feb.

2, 1821

Feb. 14, 1821
March 6, 1821
March 13, 1821
March 16, 1821
March 22, 1821
April 12, 1821
April 23, 1821
April 24, 1"821

May

12, 1821

Wm. Gale, dead and insolvent
Wm. McDonald, insolvent
Wm. H. Shung, insol vent
^,
John Butler, dead and insolvent
M. Smith, dead and insolvent
Sylvester Booth, hopelessly insolvent...
James M.-Anderson, dead and insolvent.
James Green, insolvent
Joel Milliken, insolvent
A. Fox, dead and insolvent. _
Thomas Winn, not found.
:
F. L. Amelung, dead and insolvent
C. H. Holder, dead and insolvent
Wm. White and sureties, insolvent
Henry Carbury, dead and insolvent
..
Christopher Keiser, dead and insolvent..
Wm. McDonald, insolvent
Samuel Turner,- insolvent.
_.
John Henderson and sureties, insolvent.
Nathan F. Adams, dead and insolvent. .
Otis Fisher, insolvent.
Wmi Prince and sureties, insolvent
Ralph Marlin, insolvent
George Templeman, insolvent
Wm. N. Irvine, insolvent
Paul Peckham, n o t found
Thomas'F. Smith, not found
Samuel G. Balch, not found
^
Philip S. Sharrer, dead and insolvent...
Elias Fossett, dead and insolvent.
Wilson Whatley, insolvent
i
Thomas P. Finlay, not found_
James Collins, not found
John Crabb, dead and insolvent _
Peter T. Janney, not found
Henry Caldwell, not found
John McKinney,- insolvent
F. LeBarron, insolvent
.'
Joseph P. Prince, insolvent
B. Schuyler, insolvent
_.
Jeremiah Edes, not found
E. B. Morse, insolvent
.'_
John Wood, insolvent..
Jacob Schener, insolvent
Pdchard C. Smith, dead and insolvent . .
Francis B. Murdock, not found
'... .
William Smith, not found . .
.
Williani Lancaster, insolvent.
George McChain; not found.
David Johnson, not found _
G. N. Bowne, n o t found

Matthew Jenkins, not found
Skmuel Burr, not found
David M.- Miller, not found
Charles Mitchell, insolvent
John McClintic, not found
John Johnson, not found
George My linger, uot found
J. Barnard, not found




•.-.

j...

$2,884 00
1,853 40
1,870 00
4,800 00
20,498 89
4,782 55
310 00
806 49
691 46
233 84
590 .00
224 00
1,987 09
5,000 00
. 2,961 72
10,763 10
. 1,031 08
46,749 77
809 78
14, .370 40
2,461 86
12,765 59
2^818 13
1,580 46
5,284 38
1,128 00
300 00
/300 00
200.00
4,604 82
104 09
8,390 07
1,600 00
60,761 80
^ 123 94
100 00
1,781 50
13,803 92
132 25
5,492 80
1,093 82
3,537 26
539 50
347 43
2,562 30
1,235 07
4,740 49
700 85
750 00
1,000 00
'420 00
1,080 00
500 00
900 00
1,145 00
794 00
1,600 00
272 83
300 00

622

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.
May

12, 1821

May

15, 1821

May

22, 1821

May

30, 1821

Jiine 15, 1821

June 29, 1821

July
July
July
July

12, 1821
13, 1821
14, 1821"
16. 2821

July
July
July

17, 1821
18, 1821
20, 1821

Names of debtors sued.
George Brent, not found.
Edward Bay teuton, not found
William Blanchard, not found
_
,
Josiah Brady, insolvent
Samuel Nie, insolvent
_
^
J. B. Mclntire, not found
..
A. Morgan, insolvent
_
George Nelson, not found
D. Morris, not found
Walter Bourke, dead aud insolverit
A. Neaving, dead and insolvent ^
^
George W. Gardner, not found
Moody Beedel, dead and insolvent
..-.-_-.
^rhomas H. Blackledge, dead and insolvent
Joseph L. Barton, dead and insolvent
i..
William P. S. Blair, dead and insolvent
R. W. Carr, not found
Robert R. Conrad, insolvent
W. W. Carr, dead and insolvent
Benjamin R. Bostwick, not found
John J. Cromwell, dead and insolvent
Peter Chadwick, dead and insolvent
David G. Cowan, insolvent
Joseph Clarke, dead and insolvent
Malachi Corning, insolvent
Mathew D. Danvers, insolvent
_
Jacob Myers, insolvent
_'
Thomas J. Overton, not found
Charles l:'rocter, dead and insolvent
William M. Loftin, not found _ . .
Charles Page, not found
Charles Smith, dead and Insolvent _
Joseph Henderson, not found
.'
..
Samuel Legate, not found . . .
^
"
---.-P. G. Voorhies, i n s o l v e n t . , . . .
Thompson Douglas and sureties, dead and insolvent.
Timothy Stewart and sureties, insolvent
P.^lisha D. Dick, insolvent
Edward King, not found
S. D. Kellogg, not found
_.Joseph Kerr, insolvent _.
_-"Janies Hackley, insolvent
John Gilbert, not found
—
...
James Piatt, dead and insolvent
Benjamin Y. Robb, not found
George P. Shelden, not found
John Roberts, not found
,.
Samuel Brown, insolvent
^^.
A. W. Simmonds, not found
R Breckenridge, not found
James Rhodes, dead and insolvent
Benjamin Strother, not found
Johnson McGowan, not found
Robert Means, not found .
William Sturgess, not found
Angus McDonald, not found
George McLaughlin, insolvent
_.
N(iil B. Rose, insolvent
Jolin Perkins, dead and insolvent




Amount due.
$165 63
500 00
600 00
532 35
454 75
170 00
448 00
850 00
262 89
800 00
1,104 58
151 40
12,232'21
320 40
1,676 00
1,300 00
833 00
542 66
739 11
5,649 60
173^75
2,150 48
105 24
500 00
805 87
5,437 03
769 93
1,146 01
561 32
2,228 78
1,209 36
3,992 70
1,454 70
1,731 93
27,765 35
28,080 58
1,468 82
2,^089 07
203 62
1,910 06
8;268 27
59 61
1,100 00
1,256 87
2,310 00
1,708 00
760 20
9,789 76
1,000 00
1,700 00
750 00
1,150 00
2,724 00
1,700 00
1,195 81
1,933 38
83 30
192 11
1,2.80 00

R E P O R T ON T H E

FINANCES.

623

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.

Names of debtors sued.

Henry New Antwerp, not found
John McClelland, insolvent
,
Samuel Delong, not found
Joseph G. Wall, not found
..
Alexander Parris, not found
Daniel M. McFarland, insolvent
Freeman Nickerson, not found
,
July 27, 1821 Daniel Adams and sureties, insolvent
V/iiliam Whitsell and sureties, insolvent
William Cogswell, not found
Aucc. 9, 1821 John Lytle, insolvent
Aug. 23. 1821 Joseph Coleman and sureties, utterly insolvent
Ang. 31, 1821 Daniel Elam, not found
Oct. 12, 1821 Joseph H. Atherton, dead and insolvent
Samuel E. Albro, dead and insolvent
William Alexander, not found
i
William Jordan, dead and insolvent
P. T. Richardson, dead and insolvent
Elliott Claflin, dead and insolvent
James Green, not found
James Aiken, not found _
Daniel Appling, dead and insolvent
Owen Clinton, not found
W. B. Carroll, dead and insolvent
James Gibson, dead and insolvent
John Robinson, not found _
John Simons, not found
.Edward H. Scott, dead and insolvent _
Oct. 22, 1821 Lemuel Bradford, dead and insolvent
h'eturn B. Brown, insolvent
Jonathan Brooks, not found
:._
Benjamin Brearly, not found
George Bryan, not found
James M. Burnside, dead and insolvent
Bailey Bruce, not found
j * . .
Peter Bryan, not found
Thomas S. Bailey, not found
1.
J. L. Dubois, not found
William P'wbank, dead and insolvent
•.
John Farwell, not found
_
William B. Ferris, not found
Daniel Forward, not found
Daniel Fleming, not found
Thoraas Fridley, insolvent
Orin Granger, dead and insolvent. _
David Holt, insolvent
Joseph Jenking, insolvent
J. E. Loudon, dead and insolvent
._
Henry Meyers, not found
Wm. H. Puthuff, dead and insolvent
Anthony Palmer, insolvent and insaiieu
....
John Putnam, insolvent
_
Joel Peebles,, not found
1
Robert P. Ross, not found
Edward Ross, not found
Richard Tavlor, not found.
2.
L. T. Whitlock, not found
Arch'd Dobbins and sureties, insolvent.
James Ward, insolvent
L
Julv
July

20, 1821
26,' 1821




Amount duc.
$829
939
76
544
1,050
1,117
320
495
3,413
3,6^62
1,408
79,907
27,079
201
649
845
1,000
523
627
1,250
570
796
878
4-48
4,485
1,524
640
500
1,083
203
863
1,372
•2,500
1,400
917
668
233
4,040
390
510
585
803
2,250
300
1,775
936
2,512
1,300
2,812
9,236
606
77
1.000
720
1,J00
1,039
1,070
6,782
355

78
21
00
00
00
46
00
21
51
04
94
09
47
40
78
72
00
40
07
00
00
95
98
00
96
50
80
00
01
31
50
00
00
00
25
85
38
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
63
19
00
00
36
00
82
00
00
00
00
00
13
33

524

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.
Oct.

Nov.

Nov.
Nov.

Nov.

Nov.

Nov.

Dec.
Dec.

Dec.

Names of debtors sued.

John W. Bryem, not found
^
C Sackrider, insolvent.
-...
,
Charles G. Jones, not found
1
Wm. Macomb, not found
^
David Waters, not found
Peter J. Nasbing, not found
James Sutle, not found
...
_
5, 1821 James Dorman, insolvent._
Samuel Dyson, not found
^
,
John Dothordy, not found
Samuel Duncan, not found
James Dunlap, insolvent
,
Peter Davis, dead and insolvent
Gaspard Dupey, insolvent
Thomas Daggett, insolvent
Wm. Aull, not found
..
H. M. Allen, not found
John A. Graham, not found
Morgan T. Heard, insolvent
Peter N. Ogden, dead and insolvent
8, 1821 James G. Chalmers and sureties, dead and insolvent
15, 1821 Wm. Hull, not found
Wm. W.' Hazard, not found
F. L. Claiborne, insolvent
.t..'.
Charles Kavanaugh, dead and insolvent
David Riddle, not found
17, 1821 John Tarrant, dead a,nd insolvent
Robert L. Comb, dead and insolvent
llmothy Burr and sureties, insolvent
^
Joseph Gleason, dead and insolvent
James Read; insolvent
Wm. H. Perthaff, dead and insolvent
Wm. Sumpter, insolvent
.^
20, 1821 Jos. C. Adams, insolvent
Thomas (Clarke, hot found
Wm. Chappell, dead and insolvent
John C. Avery, insolvent
Solomon Clarke, not found.
23, 1821 Geo. W. Melvin, insolvent
1...
.^
Samuel Borden, not found
John J. Lacey, not found
.,
Gilbert Ketchum, insolvent
-.—
Nathaniel Ewing, insolvent
T.
1, 1821 AVm. N. Irwind, insolvent
6, 1821- Caleb G. Forbes, not found
Levi Heath, not found
Jacob Dickerson, not found
John Campbell, not found
Joseph Duncan, not found.
John Davis, not found
Horatio Davis, not found
G. Dumbleton, dead and insolvent
,
F. F. Amelung, dead and insolvent
_.
John L. Knapp, not found
..:.
James T.. Romayn, dead and insolvent
Janies Pratt, not found
Francis Neale, dead and insolvent
11, 1821 D. Frisby, not found
•
,
Daniel Patch, not found.
,
22, 1821




Amount due.
$912 45
300 00
300 00
250 00
400 00
650 00
868 00
90 74
1,442 13
470 00
350 74
364 50
788 03
372 00
• 600 04)
231 36
619 21
300 00
98 29
350 00
17.127''25
400 00
700 00
3,476 00
3,868 42
4,857 75
2,329 00
2,395 88
10,91.7 02
714 U
656 24
17,455 50
300 00
183 98
585 00
632 00
163 25
1,075 00
4,027 55
975 50
500 00
74 77
11,318 IS
36,245 49
1,126 06
200 00
578 05
3,190 00
1,290 00
208 50
239 00
1,768 52
530 19
1,968 00
923 00
333 74
100 00
150 00
500 00

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

525

STATEMENT—Continued.
Names of debtors sued.

Date of suit.
Dec.

11, 1821

Dte.

13, 1821

Dee.

14, 1821

Dec.

15, 1821

Dfc<3. 17, 1S21

Dec.

19, 1S21

Dec.
Jan.

31, 1821
8, 1822

John Winters, not found
_
Silas Remington, not found
Josiah Bacon, not found
i
Joseph Marquard, dead and insolvent.
Wm. S. Everleth,dead and insolvent...
Thomas Grifiith, insolvent
..
A. Gales, not found
Andrew Madison, not found
H. H. Hickman, not found
Jared Ingersoll, insolvent
Phineas Read, not found
^
...
Stoughton F. Gantt, dead and insolvent..
Samuel Nail, not found.
Wm. Henry and sureties, dead and insolvent.
John Levake, not found
Aaron Sutphen, dead and insolvent
,
Josiah Shields, not found
_
Thomas Sangster, insolvent
A. B. Sizer, insolvent
Chas. Stewart, not found
Wm. Shotwell, dead and insolvent._
,
M. Sturgis, dead and insolvent
Ihomas C. WiUiight, not found
Wilson Whatley. insolvent
Haman Wadham, not found
v.
William Wai ker, dead and insolvent
James Wilkinson, dead and insolvent.
Chas. Kean, dead and insolvent
_
Daniel B. Wil cocks, not found
D. F. McRae, not found.
.•
John Kinkaid, dead and insolvent.
D. Neilson, dead and insolvent.'
M. D. Hall, dead and insolvent-.
E. Deflichier, insolvent..
Wm. Coffee, dead and insolvent
.'
German Center, not found.
J. E. A. iVJaiters, not found
A. L. Langham, insolvent
...
._.'
James Martin, dead arid insolvent. _.
_.
Zacquiliy Morgan, dead and-insolvent.
John Lucas, insolvent
__
Florant Meline, not found
,
Samuel M. Perkins, not found..«.
—
JohnB. Long, dead and insolvent..
Francis Woodward, not found
._
.....
Wm. Nelson, not found..
Daniel Booker, insolvent
_.^..
Winfield Jones, insolvent....
Edward Upham, not found..
Elisha Jones, not found
Wm. B. Jackson, not found
Stephen Proctor, not found
Jos. H. Russ and sureties, dead and insolvent
E. D. Baskerville, not found
C. H. Bradley, not found
1—
E. Benedict, not found
S. H. Bryant, dead and insolvent
Robert Brett, not found
A. F. Hull, dead and insolvent




Amount du(
^275 00
250 00
1 397 44
703 67
846 82
2 217 43
1 000 00
324 00
1 799 82
475 00
340 00
375 80
1 088 00
3 134 00
832 35
2,540 24
1 081 00
4 916 60
139 14
1 858 CO
3 088 00
1 583 63
726 38
1 126 00
695 00
565 30
11 684 66
1 409 •52
743 67
888 00
1 568 00
660 00
837 32
400 00
676 00
345 22
650 00
2,755 25
1 017 00
459 00
150 69
1 939 88
580 00
2 100 00
1 876 00
1 104 00
290 07
629 20
1 010 00
626 37
602 00
79 88
6 466 28
421 00
501 00
594 00
190 00
250 00
859 81

526

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued.
Date of suit.
Jan.

8, 1822

March 8,
March 20,
March 22,
March 26,
April 24,
May
3,

1822
1822
1822
1822
1822
1822

Jan.

8, 18,22

Jan.

23, 1822

Feb. 20, 1822
Feb. 21, 1822
April 6, 1822
May
6, 1822

May

18, 1822

May 22, 1822
June 1, 1822
Aug. 22, 1822

May

6, 1822

Names of debtors sued.
L. Van Buren, not found
Peter C. Johnson, not found
Chester Lyman, not found
Stephen Turner, not found.
A. Gaines, dead arid insolvent. _
Charles A. Norton, not found.
Robert Nevill, not found
•.
Edward White, dead and insolvent. John Stewart, not found
Presley J. Neville, insolvent
Philip B. Grenville, insolvent
Benjamin C. Head, riot found
Matthew Hughes, dead and insolverit
Wilson Elliott, deadand insolverit'
\
John Goode, not found
J. C. Livingston, insolvent.
Evans Humphrey, insolvent
John Farrant, dead and insolvent
.:._
Samuel H. Eakin, insolvent
.r--E. B. Billings, not found
—
W. H. Hazard; not found.
,
Samuel Wetherly, not found
Samuel McGuire, not fourid
Paul Peckham, not found J
Thos. F. Smith, not found
Samuel G. Balch, dead and insolvent
Thos. Stewart, irisolyerit
1
P. S. Sharer, not found
Nath' 1 Sherman, dead and insolvent
Elias Tasset, dead- and insolvent
—.-^
Wilson Whately, insolvent
James Collins, not found
^
John Crabbe, dead and insolvent
Wm. H. Winder, insolvent
.: —
G. D. Young, dead' and insolvent
Mason Ronolds, not found
Geo. H. Rogers, not found
'
^
John Ritchie, dead and insolvent
^
L. Robinson, not found.
Francis Walter, not found
Henry Ranscher, not found
John Mershon, dead and insolvent.
James Maxwell, insolvent
James Awl, insolvent—
James Atwood, not found
John Arrison, not found.
S. T. Spencer, insolvent
>
Henry M. Campbell, dead and insolvent
C. Croker, dead and insolvent.
Benjamin Woodman, insolvent
Charles Durant, not found
^
George Duncan; not found
Ira Drew, not found
E. M. Gillis, not found
J
Dan'l Dana, insolvent
,
Miles Greenwood, not found
S. Anderson, not found
Samuel G rantland, not found
Alexander J. Williams, not fourid




Amount due.
$364 71
927 33
1,868 12
460 00
135 00
200 00
560 00
747, 00
326 91
372 94
250 50
606 00
'735 00
976 00
821 37
2,224 53
3,108 34
4 00
9,067 43
575 77
85 00
680 00
1,819 50
1,128 00
300 00
300 00
422 91
200 00
450 00
4,604 82
104 09
1,600 00
60,761 80
1,958 752,000 00
408 00
336 24
1,453 40'
467 00
500 00
508 O
O
640 00
500 00
263 20
157 85
371 25
117 5,5
60 00
180 00
312 59
143 u:^

151 65
493 71
236 40
3.180 84
US 00
100 00
300 00
997 61

REPORT

ON

THE

527

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued. •
Names of debtors sued.

Date of suit.
June 8, 1822
Aug. 31, 1822
Nov. 22, 1822
Sept. 22, 1822
June 1, 1822
June

June

5, 1822

8, 1822

June 15; 1822
J u n e 21, 1322

June 22, 1822
July
3, 1822

July
June
April
April
Aug.

25,
20,
18,
24,
16,

1822
1822
1822
1822
1822

Aug. 22, 182'2

M. 0 Bloomfield, dead and insolvent.
...
John Gates, jr., and sureties, all insolvent
...
Rob't B. Hall, not found
J. H. Russ, dec'd, and sureties dead and insolvent
Jonathan Ruse, not found.'
.i..
John Noble, insolvent
:..
Isaac B. Barker, not found.
--- J o h n B . Bartlett, deadand insolvent
.'..
E. W. Bohanon, not found.
John Mcllhenny, insolvent
Benjamin Branch, dead and insolvent
_.
James H. Boyle, not found
..
Joseph Bryant, dead and insolvent
..
Thomas Berry, not found
Dan'l G. Brown, dead and irisol vent
---John G. Bostick, insolvent
Richard Arrell, dead and insolvent
^..^Samuel Bartlett, de^d and insolvent
Wm. Brown, not found
-_.
..
John Harris, insolvent
_
R. H. Branch, insolvent
..
Francis Carr, dead and insolvent-.._
..
Jeremiah Chapman, insolvent
..
Enoch Cooper, ndt found
Josiah S. Carty, not found
Mathias Chapman, insolvent
Wm. A. Covington, insolvent
„.
0. Crawford, not found
Samuel Colman, not found
Walters Clarke, dead and insolvent ._ . _
>.
Wyley Martin, not found
.
Timothy Dix, deadand insolvent..^
._._.
Geo. Eckelot, not found
Wm. H. Addison, dead and insolvent
A. B. Armstead, not found
_
P. Anspack, not found
W. Fairchild, not found _.
i..
W. 0. Aliens dead and insolvent
Alexander Grey, dead and insolvent
1
Otis Fisher, dead and insolvent
^
Henry Glenn, dead and insolvent
Stephen Maylon, dead and insolvent
Thomas Harris, not found
B. T. Goodwin, insolvent
Hobert Goode, insolvent
_
James Dearing, riot found.
Thos. H. Ferguson, not fourid
Joel Denton, insolvent _.
.
_
Nath'l Gregory, insolvents
John Gilbreath, insolvent
Andrew Greer, insolvent
J. P. Favrot, insolvent
Andrew Oilman,- not found
Lemuel Gresharii, insolvent
Andrew Dousset, dead and insolvent
John Hatch, insolvent
W. P. Anderson, insolvent.
_.
Samuel R. Hill, insolvent..
Samuel B. Hickox, not found....




Amount due.

'

$1,715 00
26,234 32

246 71
4,378 81
1, 680 00

250 00
213 98
1,121 93
400 00
1,369 10
100 00
. 100 00
519 61
362 94
861 79
374 99
1,715 00

380
400
875
858
348

00
00
20
21
49
1,004 18
252 00
300 00
218. 80
664 64
195 0 0
^
200 00
379 00
^ 868 24
2,036 33
540 00
426 63
1,333 06
166 00
320 83

172 91
60
66
30

1,923
1,113
3,350
4,404
587

192
846
294
500
344
427
507
797
976
303
260
690
373

57
44

63
50.
77
00
77
00
68
45
00
13
69
20
58
11,811 33
700 00
448 00

628

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

STATEMENT—Continued. .
Names of debtors sued.

Date of suit.
Aug. 22, 1822

Aug. 27, 1822
Dec.
6, 1822
Dec.
Jan.

27, 1822
2, 1823

Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
March
June

9,
1,
8,
13,
10,

1823
1823
1823
1823
1823

July 17, 1823
Aug. 8, 1824
Aug. 24, 1823
Nov. 18, 1823

June 15, 1824
July 10, 1824
July 29, 1824
Aug. 20, 1824

Sept. 25, 1824
Nov. 3, 1824

Thomas Hor rill, not found
Elijah Haynie, not found
Thos. C, Graves, dead and insolvent
...
Benjariiin W. Saunders,-dead and insolvent . .
Henry Glenn, not found
.1
Wm. G. Camp, dead and insol vent..\._^
John L. Hoppock, dead and insolvent
;.Spencer Hinton, insolvent
David T. Hopkins, dead and insolvent
N, N. Hall, inso