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[HO. OF RBPS.]

3 1 s t CONGRESS,

Ex. Doc.
No. 11.

2d Session.

FINANCE REPORT.

REPORT '
OF

T H E S E C R E T A R Y OF THE T R E A S U R Y ,
The receipts and expenditures, 4*c., for
•

the fiscal year ending June

3 0 .' 1 8 5 0 .

DECEMBE*

17,1850.

Referred to the Committee of W a y s and Means, and 10,000 extra copies ordered to be,printed
for the use of the House, and 1,000 extra copies for the use of the Treasury Departmenu

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

December 16, 18o0.
The Secretary of the Treasury reports:
IBSCEIPT'S ANI: EXPERIDITKIUES.

The receipts
expenditures far the fiscal year ending
30,1850,
were:
Receipts from customs - .
..
.
- -$39,668,686 42
Receipts from public lands
1,859,894 25
Receipts trom miscellaneous sources .
.
.
1,847,218 23
Receipts from avails of stock issued for specie deposited,
399,050 00
Receipts from avails of treasury notes funded
3,646,900 00
Add balance in treasury July 1, 1849 -

-

-

47,421,748
2,184,964 28
49,606,713 18

The expenditures for the same fiscal
year were, in cash
- $39,355,268 69
Treasury notes funded
3,646,900 00
.43,002,168 69
Leaving a balance in the treasury July 1, 1850, of
(as appears in detail by accompanying statement A.)



6,604,544 49
it

2

Doc. No. 11. I
ESTIMATES.

The estimated receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1851, are:
Receipts from customs—1st quarter,
by actual returns - $14,764,043 05
Receipts from customs—2d, 3d, and
4th quarters, as estimated
3d, 235,956 95
$45,000,000 00
Receipts from public lands
.
.
.
.
1,967,000 00
Receipts from miscellaneous sources 625,000 00
47,592,000 00
116,050 00

Receipts from avails of treasury notes funded -

-

Total receipts
Add balance in treasury July 1, 1850 -

-

-

47,708,050 00
6,604,544 49

. Total means, as estimated

-

54,312,594 49

EXPENDITURES, V I Z :

The actual expenditures for the quarter ending September 30, 1850,
were
.
(as appears by acccmii)&nyirtg statement B.)
The estimated expenditures during
the other three quarters, from 1st
October, j 850, to 30th June, 18-3?,
are:
Civil list, foreign intercourse, and
miscellaneous
•
Expenses of coliecdng the revenue
from customs
Expenses of collecting the revenue
from lands
Army proper, &c. Fortifications, ordance, arming militia, &c. Iaternal improvements, &c.
Indian department Pensions
.
.
.
.
Naval establishment
Interest on public debt
Purchase of stock of the loan of
1847
.
.
.
.

$6,9S3,432 99

13, "19.094 31
1,500,000 00
170,835 00
9,099,716 72
2,261,370
327,309
4,363,867
1,380,583
9,508,858
3,694,321

66
76
51
40
88
03

844,207 24
53,853,597 50

Leaving a balance in the treasury July 1, 1851, of



-

458,996 99 1

Doc. No. 11.

3

The estimated receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year commencing
July 1, 1851, and ending June 30, 1852, are:
Receipts from customs .
.
"
public lands
.
.
"
miscellaneous sources -

.
.

.
.
-

Total estimated receipts
Add estimated balance in the treasury July 1, 1851
Total means, as estimated

-

$45,000,000 00
1,600,000 00
200,000 00
-

-

46, S00,000 00
45S, 996 99
47,258,9% 99

The expenditures for the same period, as estimated by the several Departments of State, Treasury, Interior, War, and Navy, and the Postmaster
are:
The balances of former appropriations which will be
required to be expended this year Permanent and indefinite appropriations
Specific appropriations asked for this year
-

$4,929,224 97
9,528,279 17
33, 667,489 04
48,124,993 18

This sum-is composed of the following particulars, viz:
Civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous, including Mexican indemnity $12, 713,625
Expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
2,450,000
Expenses of collecting the revenue from lands
170, 200
Army proper, &c.
10,287,151
Fortifications, ordnance, arming militia. &c. 2,307,575
Internal improvements, &c.
1,330,778
Indian department
1.751,517
Pensions
.
.
.
.
.
.
2,645,900
Naval establishment, including dry-docks and ocean
steam mail contracts
10,159,375
Interest on the public debt
3,665,321
Purchase of stock of the loan of 1S47
340,156
Redemption of stock issued under act of 9th August,
1846 .
.
.
.
.
.
303,391

15
00
00
SO
46
89
76
00
09^
03
96
04

48,124,993 18
Estimated expenditures over estimated means July 1.
1852 -

$865,996 19

The foregoing does not include the interest to be paid on the Texas
boundary stock.
By the joint resolution of Hth.. February last, the sum of $2,450,000
was appropriated to d^fi^f'the annual expenses of collecting the revenue,
in addition to such aftims
may fte received from storage, cartage, drayage, and labor."
By the provisions of ffieactof 3d
1S49, in lieu of the net rev


4

Doc. No. 11. I

enue. "the gross amount of all duties received from customs, from the
sales of the public lands, and from all miscellaneous sources," were required to be paid into the treasury without "any abatement or deduction"
whatever. This devolved upon the department the necessity of transferring all coin received to the depositaries designated by the act ot 6th
August, 1846, and retransporting the sums necessary for the current and
incidental expenses of collecting the revenue, or the exercise of the implied discretionary powers conferred by the same act upon the Secretary
of the Treasury to designate such other depositaries as circumstances
might require. The collectors of customs and surveyors of interior ports
have, therefore, been made depositaries, and given bonds as such.
I concur in the view of my predecessor that the change was a salutary
one. The labors of the collectors and their clerks, though largely increased thereby, have been, in general, performed by the force authorized
at the date of my assuming the duties of this department. The law of
29th July last, directing all conveyances of vessels to be recorded at the
custom-houses, necessarily required some addition to the clerical force,
and consequently one clerk for that duty has been authorized at each of
the larger ports. The fees allowed, it is hoped, will equal the expenses
incurred thereby.
I transmit herewith a statement (C) showing "the amount of money
expended at each custom-house in the United States during the fiscal year
ending the 30th June last, the number of persons employed, and the occupation and salary of each person at each of said custom-houses during
the period aforesaid," as required by the 6th section of the act of 3d
March, 1S49.
The act of 30th September last authorized the employment of ten additional inspectors at New Orleans. The proviso to the section, in the
opinion of this deportment, nullifies the enacting clause; and the relief .-:o
much required awaits the further legislation of Congress.
By the act of 2Sth September last, six collection districts were created
on the Pacific, and two east of the Rocky mountains on our northern
frontier. These give occasion for a large increase in the personnel of the
department of customs, and a more than corresponding increase in the
expenditures. The maximum salaries of those officers attached to the
Pacific districts designated by that act, though in general reduced by the
department, are believed to be only commensurate with the expenses attendant upon a residence in that country. That basis, as fixed by Congress, has been the standard adopted by the department relatively for the
compensation of the subordinate officers; and, in the exercise of the discretion given by the first section of the joint resolution of 14th February
last, such salaries have been assigned as, in the opinion of the department, were required to insure to the government officers of ability and integrity, and full reliance is placed upon an honest and faithful discharge
of the onerous and responsible duties devolving upon them in that remote
section of our country.
The great reduction of the revenue marine made by my predecessor, in
consequence of the limited appropriations, has been represented as injuriou
in its effects. This branch of the service, intimately connected with and
necessary to the collection of the revenue, is, in the opinion of the department, a proper subject for distinct appropriations; and I have therefore submitted estimates for that service, upon a basis of twenty revenue vessels—a



Doc. No. 11.

5

less number by four than existed previous to that reduction.
ment CC.)
PUBLIC

(See state-

DEBT.

According to the last annual report from this department, the public
debt on the 1st December, 1849, including $18,821 48 in treasury notes
and stock* not then stated, was $64,723,515 16. Since that period, the
following reductions have been made, viz: On account of the debt of the
cities of the District of Columbia, assumed by the act of 20th May, 1836,
$60,000; on account of the old funded and unfunded debt, $3,149 12; of
treasury notes, $1,877 67; and of the stock of 1847, $430,250. The
above stock was purchased at market rates through the agency of Messrs.
Corcoran & Riggs, and which, but for the great demand for government
securities increasing their price beyond the limit fixed by the department
in its instructions to its agents, would have been somewhat increased.
The public debt on the 30th of November last was $64,228,238 37,
(as per statement D,) viz:
Old funded and unfunded debt, redeemable on 'presentation
$119,585 98
Debts of the District cities, assumed by Congress,
$60,000, payable annually
900,000 00
Five per cent, stock, per act of August, 1846, redeemable
August 9, 1851
303,573 92
Five per cent, loan of 3d March, 1843, redeemable July
1,1853
6,468,231 35
Six per cent, loan of 22d July, 1846, redeemable 12th
November, 1856
4,999,149 45
Six per cent, loan of 15th April, 1842, redeemable 31st
December, 1862
8,198,686 03
Six per cent, loan of 28th January, 1847, redeemable 1st
January, 1868
27,135,122 00
Six per cent, loan of 28th January, 1847, redeemable 1st
January, 1868 154,328 00
Six per cent, loan of 31st March, 1848, redeemable 1st
July, 1868
15,740,000 00
Treasury notes issued prior to 1846, payable on presentation, if converted into stock, under the act of January
28, 1847, will be redeemable 1st July, 1868 209,561 64
64,228,238 37
In obedience to the requirements of the 22d section of the act of 28th
January, 1847, I transmit a statement (E) showing the issue, reissue,
and redemption of treasury notes.
A statement annexed (P) shows the amount of treasury notes jwrid during the last fiscal year, under the act of 10th August, 1846.




6

Doc. No. 11. I
ESTIMATES.

The total actual cash receipts into the treasury from all
sources during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1850,
were -$43,774,848
The total cash expenditures for the same period were - 39,355,26S
The actual and estimated cash receipts from all sources
,
for the year ending 30th June, 1851, are
- 47,592,000
The actual and estimated cash expenditures for same
period amount to
- 53,737,547
The total estimated cash receipts for the year ending 30th
June, 1852, are
46,800,000
The total estimated cash expenditures for same period
amount to
48,124,993
(See statement G.)
= = = =

90
69
00
50
00
18
=

I am well aware that these actual and estimated expenditures may
justly be deemed large; and therefore, in submitting them, it is proper
that they be accompanied by such explanations and statements as will
distinguish the ordinary from the extraordinary demands upon the treasury, and show that the aggregate is no greater than is demanded by a due
regard to economy and the obligations of the government.
I annex a table (marked H) exhibiting the total expenditures, exclusive
of payments on account of trust funds and public debt, expenses of collecting the revenue from customs, lands, See., for three periods, viz :
1st. For the years ending 30th June, 1843,-'4-'5, or immediately preceding the Mexican war;
2d. For the years ending 30th June, 1846-'7-'S, embracing the period of the war; and
3d. Forthe years ending 30t.h June, 1849-'50-'51, actual and estimated,
or the three years subsequent to the treaty of peace.
It will be seen that, for the three years prior to the war, the aggregate
expenditures, exclusive of trust funds, public debt, and expenses of collecting the revenue from customs, lands, &c., were $63,833,704 93—
averaging annually $21,277,901 64; for the three years of the war,
$125,291,017 11—averaging $41,733,672 37; and for the three years
immediately subsequent thereto, $116,922,178 82—averaging annually
$38,974,059 61.
Including the expenses of collecting the revenue from customs, public
lands, duties returned, drawbacks, debentures, bounties, &c., none of
which have appeared in the expenditures heretofore exhibited prior to 30th
June, 1849, (as all- these items were, previously to that date, deducted
from the revenue before the latter was paid into the treasury, leaving"
only the net receipts to figure in the annual statements,) the aggregate expenditures for the first period, per statement H, will be seen to have
been $76,230,541 83—averaging $25,410,180 61; for the second period,
$137,189,666 97—averaging $45,729,888 99; and for the third period,
$125,106,754 18—averaging $41,702,251 39.
It thus appears that these largely increased expenditures commenced in
the year lS45-'6, and in consequence of the war with Mexico; and it
will be shown that, by reason of our new acquisitions of territory and the
fulfilment of the obligations of government resulting from that war, a



D » # .

N d .

7

l L

continuance of these expenditures will be required for an indefinite
period.
Annexed are statements (I and J) showing the total annual expenditures, exclusive of the public debt, as made and estimated to be made,
under the direction of the several heads of department^, for the years ending 30th June, 1846, 184T, 1848,1849,1850,1851, and 1850, or the seven
years subsequent to the declaration of the war with Mexico; also, a statement (K) showing the quantities ;«ind values of the public lands required to
satisfy warrants issued and to be issued under the several acts granting
lands, distinguishing, of such expenditures and values, those occasioned
by said war from those demanded by the otherwise ordinary requirement*
of the government upon the peace establishment prior to said war.
The actual and estimated expenditures for the seven
years ending 30th June, 1852, amount to (statement I)
The expenditures for the year ending 30th June,
1845, the year immediately preceding the war with
Mexico, having been $21,380,049 36, the aggregate expenditures for the seven succeeding years,
upon that basis, would have amounted to
Showing an excess over the peace establishment of
1845 of
--

$294, SOT, 407 95

149,650,345 52
145,147,062 43

And which excess of expenditures is to"be accounted for as follows:
The actual and estimated expenditures of the War
Department for seven years subsequent to the
declaration of war with Mexico are
- $117,876,495 31
L'nder peace establishment of 1845, as before stated,
35,643,749 54
they would have been
Excess occasioned by said war
(See statement L, and accompanying papers,"from
the bureaus of the War Department, numbered 1 to 7.)
The actual and estimated expenditures of the Nary,
Department amount to
$62,659,331 74
Would have been (as per statement 1) 43,600,473 63
Excess
[This excess, from the organization of the Navy
'Department, and the indefinite manner of making
appropriations, cannot be more specifically stated.]
Pensions, under acts of 1848, paid to 30th June,
1850, (statement M 1)
Pensions, under acts of 1848, estimated for 1851 and
1852, (statement M 2)
Indians in new territory, | p 30th June, 1852, (statemen! 1$)
.



82,232,745 77

19,058,858 U

fc
1,198?14l» 18
1,525,000 00
204,830 40

8

Doc. No.11.I

Instalments and interest under 12th article, treaty
with Mexico
$16,388,396 37
Payment of liquidated claims against Mexico, per act
29th July, 1848 2,089,578 84
Renewal of diplomatic intercourse with Mexico
37,560 61
Expenses of Board of Commissioners on Mexican
Claims
44,428 39
Survey of boundary line between the United States
and Mexico
335,000 00
Survey of the coast of California 200,000 00
Light-houses, dry-dock, custom-house, and marine
hospital in California
- .
640,003 00
Territorial governments in Utah and New Mexico 147,300 00
Expenses of war loans and treasury notes 150,879 41
Amount to 1852, occasioned by the war
And for objects not included in the sum as the expenditures for 1845, made, in pursuance of acts of
government, during a period subsequent to the 3d
of March, 1845, and prior to the 4th of March,
1849, including post office deficiencies and census,
as follows, (see statement O:)
Seventh census
Erection of Patent Office .
.
.
.
Supplying deficiencies in Post Office Department and
for department mail matter *
Expenses of collecting the revenue from customs,
lands, &c., never exhibited in the expenditures,
prior to the 30th of June, 1849 .
.
.
Expenditures on account of Smithsonian Institution,
Refunding duties, debentures, drawbacks, &c.
Building revenue cutters, before paid out of the accruing revenue
-

124,252,719 OS

To which sum of
may be added, for—
Building light-houses, beacons, buoys, &c.
Building marine hospitals, custom-houses, and support thereof
Increase of the expenditures in the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments, the sum of
And for miscellaneous items not enumerated
-

138,148,330 16

1,276,000 00
600,000 00
1,768,752 57
6,813,557 95
412,134 70
2,923,166 36
101,999 50

974, 795 26
1,288,741 87
4,205,751 50
529,443 64
145,147,062 43

Sum, as above, to 30th June, 1852, chargeable to the
war
To which may be added—
Interest on war debt to 30th June, 1852, (statement
PI)
Interest on war debt from 30th June, 1852, td" maturity, (statement 9 2)



$124,252,719 08
13,387,544 06
41,173,493 38

Doc. No. 11.

9

Ptiklic lands granted and to be granted, (per table K,)
as estimated
- .
^Claims pending, and estimated by the Third AudiP tor, (statement Q) ^exas boundary stock to be issued Interest on Texas boundary stock for fourteen years,
at 5 per cent.
Mexican claims, per treaty, stock to be issued
-

$17,346,750 00
765,069 37
* 10,000,000 00
7,000,000 00
3,250,000 00

Thus we have, of expenditures and liabilities charge-'
able directly to said war and the acquisitions of
territory consequent upon the treaty of peace, the
sum of

217,175,577 28

And which does not include many claims, presented and to be presented,
arising indirectly from the war, this great variety forbidding even an approximation, either as to number or amount.
Statement R gives the annual expenditures from
1828 to 1841, ranging from $12,530,846 43 in
1828 to $25,745,776 28 in 1841, the average annual increase being $943,923 56, exclusive of all
expenses of collecting the revenue, &c. The expenditures for the four succeeding years, from
1841 to 1845, are averaged in consequence of the
change in the fiscal year, the average being
A diminution in the average, as compared with the
four preceding years, of .
.
.
.
Amounting, in the aggregate, to
-

$22,987,411 78
3,481,158 95
13,924,635 80

The estimated expenditures for the year ending 30th
June, 1852, are
The expenditures under the peace establishment of
1845, exclusive of the public debt, were Excess for the year ending 30th June, 1852

21,380,049 36

-

By reference to statements S, I, M 2, and O, it will
be seen that, of these estimated expenditures for the
year ending 30th June, 1852, the excess over the
expenditures of 1845 required by the War Department in consequence of the war and our new
territories is
Navy Department
Pensions, acts of 1848
Mexican instalment and interest
Survey of boundary line
Light-houses, dry-dock, &c., California
Territorial governments, Utah, New Mexico
Interest on public debt
.
.
.
Indians in new territories Collection of the revenue from customs, bounties,

&c., not included in 1845


$48,124,993 18

26,744,943 82

$6,002,658 43
3,930,736 00
840,000 00
3,180,000 00
100, < 100 00
300,000 00
70,200 00
3,665,321 03
130,800 00
•
3,484,775 04

10

Doc. No. 11. I

Expenses of land §ales not included in 1845
Patent Office
Payment on account of principal of pubjic debt
Survey of coast of California
Smithsonian Institution
.
.
.
Deficiencies Post Office Department
-

-

$170,200 00
350,000 00
643,548 00
100,000 00
30,91014
200, OOfr 00

By deducting this aggregate of excess of
23,199,148 64
from the aggregate estimated expenditures for the year ending 30th
June, 1852, of"$48,124,993 18, there will remain, as the estimated
ordinary expenditures, the sum of $24,925,844 54.
Thus it will be seen that, of the aggregate expenditure?, actual and
estimated, for the seven years ending on the 30th June, 1852, amounting to
$294,807,407 95, the sum of $ 138,148,330 18, exclusive of $ 13,3S7,544 06,
interest on the war debt, is required to sustain the faith of the government, pledged or implied, or arising in consequence of its acts during a
period subsequent to 30th June, 1845, and prior to Lst July, 1849. Some
of the objects of these estimated expenditures, by reason of the extended
area of territory, have been made either permanent charges upon the
treasury or will continue for a long series of years, and may be stated as
follows:
Excess of expenditures of War Department, excess of expenditures of
Navy Department, pensions, interest on war debt, terrritorial governments, survey of boundary line, survey of coast of California, Indians,
judiciary, &c.
•
Further experience will undoubtedly result in compelling still greater
expenditures in the fulfilment of treaty stipulations, and in controlling
and subduing the Indians and other lawless bands with which our newly
acquired territories are infested, and before there will be that permanent
emigration to and settlement therein of that class of our citizens so
necessary to a full development of the resources and defence of that
country.
These charges upon the treasury, not found in our expenditures in
former years, arising from our greatly expanded territorial limits, will
doubtless, for the present, press heavily; but we may confidently expect
an ample compensation for these additional burdens in the immense mineral wealth of our new acquisitions and the rich commerce which our
commanding position on the Pacific ocean opens to the enterprise of our
countrymen.
FRAUDS UPON T H E REVENUE.

In obedience to the act of the 10th May, 1800, whereby it is made the
duty of the Secretary of the Treasury "to digest, prepare, and lay before
Congress, at the commencement of every session, a report on the subject
of finance, containing estimates of. the public revenue and public expenditures, and plans for improving or increasing the revenue, from time to
time," I feel it my duty, in view of our necessarily increased expenditures and maturing liabilities, to submit to the wisdom of Congress such
suggestions as the present state of our country and the revenues seem to
demand.



Doc. No. 11.

11

We cannot overlook the fact, in our estimates of future revenue, that
the last three or four years have been exceptional ones; that we are indebted for our large revenues in part to the famine, the revolutions, and
the broken-down markets of Europe. The ease with which the low
duties under the act of 1846 may be reduced still lower by successful
frauds and undervaluations, combined with the causes just stated, has
induced a large excess of importations. But the markets of Europe are
recovering their tone; the effects of the famine are passing away; our
country is filled, it is believed, to excess, with foreign goods; and it would
be contrary to all reasonable expectation to look for a continuance of these
large importations.
The provisions of the act of July, 1846, have been found insufficient
for the prevention of frauds and undervaluations. The extent to which
they have been carried, and the degree in which they have been rendered
systematic and complete, have been highly detrimental to the revenue.
The department has long given the subject of these frauds its most earnest
attention, and exhausted all its authority for their prevention and detection; but they are still of such magnitude, and so demoralizing in their
effect, as to demand the immediate interposition of Congress.
A special communication on this subject was made to the Senate'on the
26th September last, in answer to a resolution of that body; and as that
embraced much that would otherwise be incorporated in this report, a
copy thereof is annexed, (marked T.)
That numerous frauds by means of undervaluations have been and
continue to be systematically perpetrated, «and that they are confined
neither to one class of articles, one market, nor one port of the United
States, this department has an accumulation of the most un4eniable evidence. This proof, consisting of a great variety of details, will, with
great pleasure, be submitted to Congress, or any of its committees that
may be charged with the subject.
Through the vigilance of the appraisers, vast numbers of advances
upon invoices have been made. At Boston and New York, the number
so advanced, from January, 1849, to October 1, 1850, amounts to more
than four thousand, (table U,) ranging from 5 per cent, to upwards of 400
per cent.
Statement V is an importation of fruit, and is cited as exhibiting
not only the system of fraudulent undervaluations, but the inequality of
values at the different ports of the United States, under the present tariff
act. The fruit was shipped by the same house, about the same time—one
cargo arriving at Philadelphia, one at New York, and one at Boston, the
quality and invoice value being the same. At Philadelphia it passed at
the invoice value; at New York the appraisers advanced it 75 per cent.,
and at Boston 92 per cent., and no objection or appeal frem the decision
of the appraisers was made on the part of the importers.
I would respectfully and earnestly urge upon Congress to inquire fully
into the practical operation of our present system of imposing duties
upon the foreign cost or values of merchandise, being fully satisfied that
the longer it is continued the wfeaker will become the restraints upon, and
the stronger the inducements to, the commission of frauds, by misrepresenting the dutiable values.



12

Doc. No. 11. I
WAYS AND MEANS.

The estimated receipts from customs as presented for the remainder of
the current year, and for the year ending 30th of June, 1852, are based
upon a continuance of the present large amounts of imports. Aside from
our increased expenditures, and exclusive of estimated purchases of stock,
we have to provide for $7,220,952 89 of the public debt which matures
within the next two fiscal years.
The ordinary expenditures of the government, and the public debt,
originating chiefly in the recent war with Mexico, together with a variety
of demands arising out of that war, present the amount of liabilities for
which it becomes the duty of Congress to provide.
Our trade with foreign nations, and the moneys arising from the sales of
public lands, have constituted heretofore the resources from which the
annual expenses of the government have been procured; and they are at
this time the only means by which these necessary charges can be paid,
the public faith upheld, and a speedy liquidation of the public debt insured.
By the long and unbroken practice of the government, duties on imports have been regarded as the least objectionable mode of raising
revenue.
By the various acts of Congress appropriating the public lands to objects which withdraw them from ordinary revenue purposes, it is quite
certain that for several years to come the treasury must be mainly, if not
entirely, dependent for its receipts upon duties levied upon foreign merchandise.
The act of the 2Sth January, 1847, appropriates the entire proceeds of
the sales of the public lands to the payment of principal and interest of
the loan provided for by that law.
By reference to table D, it will be found that the loan for the redemption of which this fund is appropriated amounts to $27,135,122—the,interest upon which, at six per cent, per annum, is to be paid semi-annually, and the principal on the 1st January, 1868.
The law recently enacted giving lands to those who served in the
war with Mexico, and, at the last session, to such as had served in former
wars, in addition to grants to States for internal improvements, will undoubtedly supply the market with the greater portion of the lands that
will be required for occupation for many years to come. This source of
revenue, therefore—small, indeed, comparatively, but still in the ten years
preceding 1848 available for an annual average of $2,933,616 19, (statement W)—should not hereafter be relied upon with any certainty or to
any considerable amount in estimating the receipts of the treasury.
Statement K, appended to this report, shows the number of warrants located by the acts to which reference has been made, and the number yet to be located, as estimated from the pay-rolls and other evidences
on file, with the quantity of lands, in acres, required to satisfy them.
The quantity of lands sold and taken from market by virtue of these
warrants, for the years 1847, 1848, and 1849, is 14,727,742.40 acres,
(averaging 4,909,247.46 acres per annum,) valued at $18,911,134 76,
(averaging $6,303,711 58 per annum.)
The warrants yet to be presented under these acts will require
78,922,513 acres, valued at $98,653,140. At the above average of



Doc. No. 11.

IB

^,909,247.46 acres per annum, over sixteen years will be required to
(absorb and satisfy the warrants yet to be issued, as estimated, under the
i^everal bounty-land acts now in force.
r ' There will then be diverted from the treasury, from the sale of lands,
the sum of $113,245,896, not anticipated at the date when the revenue
(See statement K.)
(Jaw of 1846 was enacted.
This state of things imposes upon Congress the duty of determining
j
whether the laws now existing, with the rates of duties imposed by them
on foreign merchandise, will produce the amount necessary to defray the
;annual ordinary expenditures of the government, and meet punctually
the interest on the public debt. The ability of the country to discharge
every obligation upon it, if aided by wise and timely legislation, is Unquestionable. If ample provision shall be made for the prompt discharge
of annually accruing liabilities, the public faith, as it has been hitherto,
will be maintained, and the public credit continued on such a basis as to
insure an advantageous and speedy extinguishment of the pamw debt.
The system of ad valorem duties, however well adapted to many articles
of trade, when applied to all, without discrimination, restriction, or safeguard, has been proved by the experience of this department to be subject
to many and strong objections. Its tendency is to cherish a spirit of overtrading greatly injurious to the industry of our own country in all its departments, and, in its final results, fatal to the revenue. Considering this
system only in its operation upon revenue, it is believed that the experience of the most enlightened commercial nations of Europe has proved
it to be impolitic and unsafe. Under the operation of the British tariff,
revised in 1846, the whole revenue derived from articles paying ad valorem
duties has been only an average of ^38,000 ($182,000) per annum, in a
gross receipt from customs of J'22,0a0;000, ($105,000,000)—being less
than one-fifth of one per cent. of this immense income from imposts; and
the evident design of Parliament was to make specific duties the source of
revenue from imports, so far as it possibly could be effected. A like policy
has also always been pursued by the other commercial nations of Europe.
The primary object to be kept in view in levying duties upon imports
is admitted to be revenue. It is equally well established, as the policy and
duty of the government, so to discriminate in the levying of duties as, without falling below the necessary amount of revenue, to give the greatest
encouragement possible to all the industrial pursuits of our own people. One feature ot the law of 1S46, in the opinion of this department,
is opposed to both the controlling principles just stated. 1 have reference
to an equal or higher rate ot duty on the raw material than upon the
manufactured article of which it is composed. Such provisions certainly
take from the manufacturer and artisan that encouragement which the
present law, doubtless, to some extent, was intended to afford, and also
check the importation of the raw material to a degree detrimental to the
revenue.
The constant fluctuations in prices, and consequently in the duties,
under any unrestricted ad valorem tariff, give to the act of 1S46 that most
objectionable feature, instability. These variations, giving a high duty
when least required, and low duties when prices are ruinous, tend to an
excess of importations, and subject all the products of labor in our own
country to the frequent and enormous fluctuations in the markets abroad
arising from the disturbed condition of those nations with whom our
oreign commerce is chiefly carried on. Under the present system, duties



14

Doc. No. 11.

j
i

are highest when the article imported is highest, and when the purchaser i
and consumer can least afford to pay the duty; and lowest when the price
of the article wanted would allow a heavy additional duty to be levied on
it. Thus, if an article costs ten dollars, a duty of thirty per cent, would
compel an addition of three dollars; if that article falls in value to five
dollars, then is the duty reduced one-half.
That cannot be a wfyolsome system of taxation which follows the consumer in his purchases, increasing his burden when prices are high, and
taking it off as prices fall and his ability to bear it increases. If applied to articles of subsistence, it would operate as a heavy tax upon bread
m a year of famine, increasing with the intensity of the evil, and gradually disappearing with the return of abundance.
}
The objection to the present system from commercial fluctuations in the
prices inconstantly forced upon the attention of the department by instances
of extreme inequality and prejudicial operation. The European price of iron
was-, in 1846, greatly above that which has prevailed for the last two years.
(See statement X 1, 2, and 3.) If the duties upon bar iron had been
levied in strict accord with foreign cost, they would now be but little more
than one-half of what they were in 1846. By this process, besides the
immense injury inflicted upon domestic industry, our revenue is made to
fluctuate with the accidents and revulsions in foreign commerce, and
these accidents and fluctuations, which originate abroad, are imported,
with their attendant mischiefs.
'
Our revenue, as already stated, must be mainly dependent on duties on
imports. Those imports from abroad can only be paid for by exports
made up of the products of our labor in all its varieties, or in the precious
metals. If our imports shall exceed the value abroad of our exports in
any given year, to the extent of such excess do we create a foreign debt. "
If this operation be repeated for only a few years, it is obvious that it will
effect the withdrawal from us of a quantity of the precious metals equal,
or nearly so, to the amount of the accumulated debt, bringing with it
bankruptcy in all departments of business, consequent inability to purchase foreign goods, and thus, for the time, causing a ruinous depression
in the receipts into the treasury. It then becomes equally the duty of
Congress and the interest of the people, if possible, so to regulate imports
as to confine the importations into this country to an amount about equal
to such exports of our own as can find a market at remunerative prices
abroad.
The bare statement of the foregoing well-established laws of trade
would seem to furnish a safe guide in all legislation on the subject.
Whilst importations should be secured in amount sufficient, at practical
rates of duties, to supply the wants of the treasury, such duties should
be adjusted in a manner to affect favorably all industrial pursuits at home.
If duties on the necessary importations should have the effect to impair
the ability of the mass of the people to purchase and pay for foreign goods,
then importations to that extent must cease, and by consequence the
revenue to an equivalent amount would be diminished.
It is believed that our own experience has shown that our exports cannot be greatly extended, as some have supposed, by low duties upon
foreign goods in our ports. It isva fact within the observation of all, that
merchants and ship-owners are ever vigilant and alert, with all the knowledge which interest can impart, and all the skill which experience (*iri
supply, to send abroad any and every product of this country which can



Doc. No. 11.
i
'

15

anywhere find a profitable market. These agencies, which are always
active, extend our export traffic at all times to the utmost limit of advantage
to the producer or carrier. If at any time a given article of export should be
carried beyond the foreign demand, reduced prices, the invariable result of
over supply, bring loss upon all concerned. If a foreign article is in like manner forced upon our own market beyond the required supply, the effect
of reduced prices, while it inflicts often ruinous losses upon the importer
from abroad, is felt by those engaged in producing the like article at home
in consequences tenfold more injurious, as the reduction of price in our
own market extends to and affects the entire labor of the whole country
which maybe employed in such manufacture or production. Thus, while
the injury is temporary and limited in its effect upon the importer, it is
often lasting and widely extended upon the labor of our own people. We
see and feel it in the sudden breaking up of establishments not yet sustained by an amount of capital which can afford to encounter temporary
suspension of sales and reduced prices, or not yet worked with that skill and
economy which long experience alone can impart. In such instances,
labor is suddenly withdrawn from a diversity of pursuits and driven
to production in a limited sphere; this again brings an over supply of
whatever may be produced by the common employments, while in the end
it leaves the market of the article, whatever it may be, the production of
which has been abandoned at home, at the mercy of the foreign supply
alone.
The result in the end to the consumer is invariably a rise in the price
of such article, and, there being no competition with the foreign producer,
he has possession of the market, and of course supplies it at the highest
price which the demand will give him. His prices and profits, unchecked
by competition in such cases, continue to rise with the increasing demand
and diminishing home supply.
The operation and effect of these laws of labor and trade, it is believed,
have been frequently and palpably exhibited in the history of our country.
It is from such experience that the general principles upon which our
tariff laws are based have become the common opinions of the people.
Hence the almost universal impression in our country prevails, that, in
assessing duties en foreign merchandise, such discrimination should be
made as will have the effect of producing all articles which can be manufactured at home in such quantity, if possible, as to raise up two
markets for the purchaser and consumer—the home and the foreign—
each competing with the other, so that he may not be left to the mercy of
one, and that the foreign one, alone.
The happy indirect effect of such legislation upon the labor, and consequently on the permanent prosperity, of our own country, is not the greatest, by any means, of the blessings it confers. By giving diversity to the
occupations and industrial pursuits of the people, labor is rewarded, the
ability to consume foreign products is attained, and the wants of the national treasury, dependent entirely upon duties collected upon foreign imports, are amply supplied. While the great end, that of a competent revenue, is thus surely reached by this policy, a larger amount of exports is
at the same time obtained towards paying for the required importations.
Our exports, as the commercial statistics will show, are made up mainly
of cotton, rice, tobacco, breadstuffs, and provisions. These are the products of the soil, and are shipped to foreign ports without more labor, as




16

Doc. No. 11. I

an element of price, than is necessary to fit them for market in their first
and simplest condition. Our statistics disclose the fact also that breadstuffs and provisions, of which we can produce a larger surplus than any
other people, form comparatively a small addition to our exports, particularly in years of plenty abroad.
These articles, in the production of which so large and interesting a
portion of our people are engaged,^cannot find a market abroad at such
prices as the farmer can afford to receive, except when famine or war
creates a foreign and exceptional demand.
In 1847, a year of famine in Europe, we exported of breadstuff's and
provisions, without premonition of the calamity which created the demand,
$68,701,121. This extraordinary export, while our own market was fully
supplied, put beyond doubt our ability to supply of these articles a surplus
far exceeding the ability of any other country, provided a market were
found which did not exhaust the value in the expense of transportation.
The extraordinary demand of 1847 was not due to any legislation of our
own or of foreign nations. It was the result alone of the famine in Europe. Since that time, the operation of the British revenue act of 1846 has
wholly removed the duties upon such foreign agricultural products as are
used for food, and ours enter into competition there with those of other
nations. This free passage through British custom-houses has not, however, increased the British demand, for we find our exports diminishing in
proportion as the effect of the famine is overcome by the subsequent abundance; thus the export of breadstuffs and provisions in 1847 was $68,701,921; in 1848, .$37,472,751; in 1849, $38,155,507; and in 1850, $26,051,373,
(see statement Y.) Our exports in 1831 (see same statement) of these
articles were $17,538,227; in 1S41, $17,196,102; and, at the ratio of decreate exhibited since 1847, will, in 1851, but little exceed the latter amount.
The exports of rice, in 1827, amounted to $2,343,90S; in 1S37, to
$2,309,279; and in 184S, (the year after the famine,) to $2,331,824; in
1850, to $2,631,557, (statement Z.)
These dates embrace a period of high and low duties—of comparative
free trade at home, and in the principal market abroad: while the facts disclose the fallacy of the principle so frequently urged, that, by inducing
heavy importations under a system of low duties, we necessarily create a
large corresponding demand abroad for our own productions. Whatever
truth there may be in this principle as applied to the trade between other
nations of the world, in consequence of the relative nature of their productions and manufactures, it has not the same application to the United
States, from the simple fact that nearly all the supplies which the latter
furnish to foreign nations consist of articles of necessity, the consumption of which is limited to actual wants, and cannot be forced beyond
that demand by adventitious circumstances. When a high degree of
prosperity exists in the United States, we see a large increase in the consumption of most foreign productions, which may be generally classed
under the head of luxuries; but we have no such class of articles to tempt
foreign nations, in like manner, to extend their purchases from us, in reciprocation for extended supplies from them.
No nation will purchase from us, no matter how prosperous may be her
condition, a larger amount of breadstuffs than the deficiency in her own
ability to supply will require, even though we buy from her double or
treble the amount of her productions. So, in like manner, when her crops



.

Doc. No. 11.

17

fcil, she not only wHl, but must take from other countries what the wants
o f her population require, even though it be three or tenfold what they
take from her.
This principle was fully exemplified in the famine year of 1847, when
'Otir immense supplies of breadstuff's to Europe caused such a heavy
balance in our favor, *even though it did increase our imports from the very
cause already alluded to, of creating such a degree of prosperity in the
country as to extend our desire and ability for the consumption of such
articles of foreign luxuries.as we could not supply ourselves; and the opposite result is exhibited at the present time, when we are making excessive importations, not only without an equivalent extra demand, but, on
the contrary, with a diminished one from Europe, far below what she took
from us when our importations were so much less than they now are.
The foregoing statements show that the farming population of this
country, without any extraordinary stimulus, can produce a supply equal
to $68,701,121 to meetany urgent demand of a foreign market; an amount
more than equal to the average value of the export of cotton from this
country. But we find this sum of nearly sixty-nine millions, which regarded the toil of the farmer of the country in 1847, dwarfed down in
1850 to the comparatively insignificant amounj; of $26,051,373—a falling
off in the rewards of labor of the farmer alone, in two years, of $42,650,548.
When it is remembered that a very large proportion of the citizens of
this country are engaged in the business of farming, and hew much df
the permanent wealth and true glory of the republic depends on their
well-being and prosperity, it. would seem to be the dictate of enlightened
selfishness, as well as of a duty of patriotism, to so mould, if possible,
the laws regulating trade and revenue, as to furnish for them at home a
permanent market, with remunerating prices. As no such market can be
found abroad, it may well |uggest the inquiry whether legislation in providing, of necessity, for revenue, shall not, by encouraging a diversity of
employment in OUT own country, secure the only safe and sure market
for our farming productions which can be obtained.
The policy here suggested is strengthened by a comparison of the value
and amount of the home as compared with the foreign market. It has
been estimated that our consumption of food, raiment, furniture, &c., is
about one hundred dollars for each individual. Of this sum, from six to
seven dollars, as shown by statement No. 1, are of foreign productions,
"which, say at six dollars and fifty cents per head, would require an importation of about $150,000,000. It will at once appear how insignificant
this amount is, when compared with the amount of home products consumed. Upon the basis of one hundred dollars per head, the foreign production furnishes six dollars and fifty cents per head, or in the aggregate
$150,000,000: the residue, or ninety-three dollars and fifty cents each,
requires annually the sum of about 2,100 millions of dollars to be
supplied hy our own industry. By reference to statement No. 1, it will
be seen that our average consumption of imports per head, for thirty
years, has been five dollars and ninety-four cents. Any material excess
over that average, as in the years 1835, 1836, and 1839, has been surely
followed by the most disastrous results. The imports of the past year
have been exceeded in amount only by the year 1836; and if the official
figures could be made to represent the true cost of the imports of the former year, even 1836 would, it is believed, not be an exception. The
2




Doc. No. 11. I

18

imports of the first quarter of the present year show an increase of more
than eighteen millions over the corresponding quarter of last year, indicating an importation for the current year greater, by many millions, than
the imports of any previous one, and a consumption per head proportionably larger; whilst the markets abroad indicate no prospect for an increased
demand for our exports.
These exports, as already stated, consist principally of articles of necessity, and nearly all of them raw materials, in their crudest state; and if
we therefore wish to occupy the place among commercial nations that our
advantages of position and our vast resources warrant, we must greatly
increase the.amount of those exports: this can only be done by an increase
of manufactures.
During the past year our exports of cotton have amounted to $71,984,616,
while of domestic cotton manufactures we have exported only to the extent Qf $4,734,424; and during the same period the importations of cotton
manufactures entered for consumption have amounted, at the foreign valuation, to $19,685,936.
The exports of cotton from the United States exceed in importance
those of any raw material exported from any other country, and at the
present time it is our only export that is essential to any other nation; but
it is believed to be a mistaken policy for any nation to send its raw materials to distant countries to be manufactured into fabrics for its own use.
* Possessing this most useful staple in abundance, and of the best quality,
we ought greatly to increase its manufacture and secure to ourselves a
portion of the profits which other countries enjoy therefrom, in order to
impress our people with the value of this production of the United States,
and the means it aflords of extending our internal and foreign commerce.
I subjoin several tables, exhibiting, in some degree, its importance.
Table No. 3 shows the value of the exports of-raw cotton and cotton
manufactures from the United States for th^ast five years, and the countries to which the same were sent; from which it will be seen that we
exported as follows:
Years.

1846
1847
1848
1849
1850




R a w cotton.

Cotton manufactures.

$42,767,341
53,415,848
61,998,294
66,396,967
71,984,616

$3,535,481
4,082,523
5,718,105
4,933,129
4,734,424

296,563,066

23,003,662

Doc. No, 11.
The countries which take the largest quantity of our raw cotton are Great
Britain and France; and, by reference to table No. 3, it will be seen that
our exports of cotton and cotton manufactures during those years, to these
countries, were as follows:
T o Great Britain.

T o France.

Cotton-woo!.

Cotton manufactures.

Cottonwool.

$27,707,717
35,841,265
41,925,258
47,444,899
48,884,453

$9,607
6.765
28
2,591
50

00
00
00
00
00

$10,080,465
10,381,318
11,428,850
10,185, 713
14,395,449

none.
$216 00
2,374 00
none.
539 00

201,803,592

19,041 00

56,471,795

3,129 00

Cptton manufac*
tares.

>

1846..
1847..
1848..
1849..
1850..

TVable No. 4 shows the value of the exports of cotton manufactures from
the United States and Great Britain in the year 1848, and the countries
to which the same were sent.
From this table it will be seen that the value of cotton
manufactures exported from the United States during
$5,718,205
that year, was 109,777,008
And that from Great Britain the value was
That of these amounts tht United States received from
Great Britain, per British reports for 1848, to the ex8,291,036
tent of
Our records for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1848,
show an importation of cotton manufacturesfromGreat
14,477,978
Britain amounting to
.
.
.
.
28
And that Great Britain received from the United States but
That Russia, Italy, Holland, and.the Hanseatic Towns
29,802,898
received from Great Britain (none.)
And from the United States
.
.
.
.
In 184S the exports of British products and manufactures amounted to
.
.
.
.
.
256,000,000
Of this amount the manufactures of cotton were valued
at
109,777,008
which shows how largely Great Britain is dependent upon this manufacture for her commercial prosperity.
The United States should share in the profits of manufacturing her own
great staple; and in proportion as we increase the manufacture of this and
other materials, of which we have an abundant supply, shall we be enabled to command the produce, manufactures, and coin of other nations.
Table No. 2 exhibits the exports of cotton from the United States and
Great Britain for five years, from 1S44 to 1848 inclusive.
By a reference to this table it will be seen that the exports of raw cotton
to several countries from Great Britain exceed those from the United




20

Doc. No. 11.

States to the same countries, and that the value of such exports of American raw cotton from Great Britain to the continent of Europe exceeds
the entire exports of American cotton manufactures to the whole world.
Our entire export of breadstuffs and provisions to all parts of the world
during the past year, will scarcely amount to the value of the cotton goods
imported and the duties thereon.
These tabular statements are intended to show how important an article in the commerce of the world is the cotton of the United States; and
if manufactured by our own citizens, how widely our commerce might
be extended. Instead of an importation of nearly $20,000,000 in value
of cotton manufactures in a single year, our annual exports of those
manufactures should be $100,060,000.
The warehouses of the United States will not be filled with the products and manufactures of other nations so long as we are content to export our cotton and other raw materials in their crude state, and import
the most common articles of clothing.
Our policy should be by every constitutional means to encourage the
manufacture of our own materials, and, so far as their product may be
necessary for other nations, exchange them in their most valuable form;
for, under the present system, the gold obtained from our mi^es will soon
be exhausted in paying for excessive importations.
With a profound fonviction of their truth, I repeat the opinio^ and
words of my predecessor on this vital subject, in his annual communication to Congress at the last session: "All history shows that where are
the work-shops of the world, there must be the marts of the world, and
the heart of wealth, commerce, and power."
It has been shown, by the experience of several years, that the average
rates of duties imposed by the present revenue laws is about twenty-th'ree
per cent, upon the foreign yalue of our impoij^, including free as well AS
dutiable goods.
During the last fiscal year we imported of foreign merchandise, including specie, (see tablp No. 5,) $178,136,31S; and we exported of domestic
products, foreign goods, and specie, $15l,H98,720; leaving a balance
against us of $26,247,598.
A large proportion of this balance has doubtless been paid by our
domestic stocks, which find a ready sale at this time in European markets.
These last, however, as they only postpone a present payment in coin,
cannot be expected to liquidate similar balances for coming years, even if
it were the wish of the government to create a large foreign debt of this
kind. The impolicy of such a measure will not be questioned, and it is
doubtless the true interest of the country to avoid it.
> In regulating our commerce with foreign nations, we are therefore compelled to take as the true basis of safe importation from all countries the
amount of our own products which we may reasonably calculate may
find a market abroad.
Jt is certain that the increased ability of tjtis country to consume
foreign goods will at this time safely admit a larger importation than in
former years; yet the experience of the last year has shown that our imports have been greatly beyond our exports, which last must be regarded
as the true measure of our ability to consume for any given number of
years.
If, upon the large importations of the past year, the increase should



I

Doc. No. 11.

21

continue at the same ratio as that of the first quarter, which, as already
statecf, is $18,009,000, the aggregate amount for the current fiscal year
ending 30th June, 1851, will not fall much short of $250,000,000. A
survey of the markets of the world, it is believed, furnishes no reason to
expect that our exportatioas will exceed those of the last year, which we
have seen were a fraction less than 152 millions. This would leave oi^
the trade of the current fiscal year with foreign countries an alarming
balance, which could not fail to be felt in results fatal to all branches of
business at home, and highly injurious to the revenue of succeeding years.
These considerations, forced by the existing state of things upon the
earnest attention of this department, are submitted to the wisdom of Congress in the belief that they present reasons of the most imperative
character for a modification of the present revenue laws. The larg'e prospective importations should be checked by a higher rate of duties, so as to
bring their aggregate amount within the limit of our capability to pay.
If the exports of the last year define that limit, than our imports for the
ensuing year should not greatly exceed $152,000,000. It is believed,
however, that we may calculate safely upon an export of gold for several
years to come of at least from ten to fifteen millions annually, exclusive
of what goes abroad direct from California, without any detrimental effect
upon the currency or business of our people. The supply of this metal
from our own mines may at present be estimated at $50,060,000 annually,
including that sent directly from California to other countries, and this
supply it is believed will not be likely to diminish in amount for the next
two or three years.
If, then, we can afford to spare the above amount of the precious metals
in payment of foreign merchandise, it may be fairly assumed that out
exports, including all articles, Will be equal to about one hundred and
sixty-five millions, supposing always the trade of the world to remain
unaffected by any disturbing causes. In the opinion of this department
it would be unsafe to assume an amount of imports as a basis upon which
to levy duties for revenue beyond this latter sum.
If the present rates of .duties be applied to that amount, we should
receive from customs only $37,950,000; and the amount of revenue
required for the present and succeeding years would fall short of the
estimates for the current year by a fraction over seven millions.
It cannot be doubted that a rate of duty higher on many articles than
that paid by the present law might be established without affecting
injuriously the revenue. The extraordinary influx of foreign merchandise for the last year and the first quarter of the present one, must be
regarded as conclusive proof that an increase of duties, so as to advance
the amount of revenue seven millions on the same amount of imports, is
entirely practicable.
That such increase will be found necessary to the demands of the treasury is believed to be beyond doubt, unless Congress shall discontinue
many of the objects of expenditure which originated in our recent territorial acquisitions; and this, in the opinion of the department, would be
equally impolitic and unjust.
From the foregoing considerations the department would submit the
following modifications of our present revenue laws:
I. A change in the present ad valorem system, which should impose
specific duties
upon all articles to which such duties may be safely applied,


22

No. 11. I

Doc.

with home valuations upon a-Il such as ale necessarily subject to ad valorem
rates.
II. If the principle of specific duties shall not be adopted, that the home
valuation, instead of the foreign, should then be applied to all imports subject to ad valorem duties.
* III. If neither of the foregoing changes shall be thought proper, then it is
deemed highly necessary that the present rates of duties should be increased on a great variety of articles which it will be found could bear
such increase with the most salutary effects upon both trade and revenue.
Either of the two first modifications suggested above would undoubtedly correct many of the inequalities of the present system; place all importers„whether purchasers or manufacturers, on equal grounds in respect
to valuations for duty; guard the revenue against the flagrant frauds
which are so easily perpetrated under existing laws, and insure stability •
and permanent increase of the revenue. They are therefore earnestly
commended to the favorable consideration of Congress.
In any system, it is believed that experience has settled the true policy
to be pursued in several particulars which enter into our system of
revenue laws. Among these are, that all raw material should be admitted
at a moderate rate of duty, when assessed at all; that all non-enumerated
articles should be assessed at higher rates of duty than the average of
manufactured articles; and that all articles composed of the same material
should pay in general the same rate of duty.
In order to insure uniformity in the business of the custom-houses,
and equality in the valuations under any system, I earnestly recommend
ttie Creation of a corps of appraisers at large, whose duty it shall be to
visit the principal ports of entry in the United States from time to time,
with power to correct improper valuations, and prescribe rules for the
local appraisers.
PUBLIC

WAREHOUSES.

By the joint resolution of the 14th February last, the Secretary of the
Treasury was ct authorized to dispose of the bonded warehouses now
leased by government, on or before the first of January next, on the feest
practicable terms for the government." The leases here referred to are of
warehouses in New York and Boston; the annual rents of which amount
to $105,415 in New York, $4S,199 88 in Boston.
Although the power conferred is not limited, it has been deemed best
to report to Congress that these warehouses have been offered at the rents
which the United States are bound to pay, without being able to dispose
of them at those rates. So far as offers have been made, they do not
amount to one-half the rent stipulated in the leases. This would leave so
large a loss that it is submitted to Congress to direct what course shall
be pursued; and in the event of a peremptory disposition of these warehouses being ordered, that an appropriation be made for any loss that
may result.
On the 17th February, 1849, Mr. Secretary. Walker issued new and
very full instructions concerning the warehousing of merchandise under
the act of 6th August, 1846. The 7th section of these instructions directed that, "at those ports where stores are owned or have been leased
by the United States, and the leases of which have not expired and been




I

Doc. No. II.

2f| *

cancelled in compliance with the instructions of this department, (said
stores being^ classified in these instructions as class 1,) the collectors
will, on entry for warehousing,firstJill said stores with such goods as are
•proper to b • stored therein—due regard being had to the descript
character nf the goods and place of deposite
Tho officers of the customs have* during the past year, enforced these
directions, to the manifest inconvenience and against the earnest remonstrances of merchants and the proprietors of private bonded warehouses.
It is e^|dent that to compel an importer to deposite his merchandise in
such warehouses as the United States may either own or tease, however
remote from his place o£ business or the discharging vessel, must in many
cases lead to so great an expanse as to work a virtual denial of the warehousing privilege. If the United States have entered into feases of ware- .
houses at extravagant rents, or at points that do not accommodate the importer, it would seem proper that the loss should be borne by the public, and
not thrown upon the importers of merchandise. These public warehouses
are not entitled to any preference beyond what their greater safety or
better management may deserve and secure.
*
The facilities of the warehousing system are now extensively enjoyed,
and may be greatly increased with advantage to the importer and^afety
to the government. To. effect these ends, I would respectfully recommend that tho time which goods may be kept in store, after the original importation and entry, be extended to three years, and with the
privilege of export to any foreign country without the payment of duties.
While the drawback system was in operation, merchandise was allowed
the benefit of drawback if exported with in* three years from the date of*
importation.
. v
x
As the warehousing system has superseded that of drawbacks, this
extension of time will be in accordance with the former practice of the
government, and may be granted without endangering the security of
the revenue.
I would also recommend that provision be made by law to relieve importers from the payment of duties upon merchandise destroyed by fire
in bonded warehouses.
In order to remove every unnecessary restriction upon commd^, and
to render the transaction of business at the custom-houses simjM and
economical, I would respectfully recommend that all custom-house fees
be abolished, as well those that are chargeable upon the registering^enrolling, and licensing of vessels, as those relating to the entry, warehousing, and transportation of merchandise. By the act of 2d March, 1831,
it was provided, "that in lieu of the fees, emoluments, salary,and commissions now allowed by law to any collector or surveyor of any district
on our northern, northeastern, and northwestern lakes and rivers, each
collector or surveyor as aforesaid shall receive annually, in full compensation
lor these services, an amount equal to the entire compensation received
by such officer (raring the past year. "
Under this provision, all custom-house fees were abolished in the collection districts embraced by this act; and it is now recommended that
similar provisions be extended to all the collection districts.
In view of the revenue derived from imports, the amount of these% s ,is comparatively small, being less than $300,000 per annttm, while
ttfteiY collection
 in small sums is a source of great annoyance to those


24

Doc. No. 11. I

who pay them. I would also direct the attention of Congress to the.
numerous custom-house oaths and bonds, consular certificates, and other
requirements with which our system is burdened, rendering it at once
complicated and vexatious.
If we would promote foreign commerce, and secure for our vessels
their full share of the freighting of our own products, and those of other
nations, we should be careful to remove every impediment and extend
every facility which affects this intercourse.
The changes in our laws which have been named will be of essential
benefit to all who are interested in the privileges granted by our "warehousing system; and if, in addition, we should dispense with the oaths,
bonds, and certificates that appertain to entries of merchandise at the
foreign cost or value, and adopt the value in the United States, we should
relieve the business of importing merchandise of its greatest embarrassment, and our own officers of investigations into the prices paid for goods,
or the value thereof in foreign countries, and likewise avoid the frequent
collisions between the appraisers and importers which the requirements
of our present system occasion.
A statement is herewith presented (No. 6) showing the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported from 1821 to 1850. The total value of
such exports during that period was $301,092,531, being an average of
$10,036,417 annually. From the 1st of December, 1S46, to the 30th
June, 1850, the total value of dutiable merchandise re-exported from
bonded warehouses under the act of the 6th of August, 1846, establishing a warehousing system, was $12,474,765, being an average of
$3,481,329 annually; from which it is apparent that the benefits anticipated from the warehousing act of the 6th of August, 1846, have not
been fully secured.
Statement No. 7 shows "the value of goods remaining in warehouses
at the close of each quarter from the 30th of September, 1847, to the
30th of June, 1850, as exhibited by the quarterly returns of the collectors
of the customs under the provisions of the act of the 6th of August, 1846;
and also the amoant of duties payable thereon/'
T H E MINT.

The tables accompanying this report, marked 12,13, and 14, exhibit
in detail the operations of the mint at Philadelphia, and the different
branches, from the time they were respectively established down to the
30th October, 1850.
The amount of coinage at the mint in Philadelphia during the month
just past has exceeded four millions of dollars; and, if the experiments
now progressing under the authority of Congress for testing a new
process of assaying should equal the expectations which have been
formed respecting it, the capabilities of that establishment will be extended to the coinage of eight millions monthly, and, with the branch mint
at New Orleans, will be fully able to furnish coin, without any unreasonable delay, for all the future probable receipts of gold dust and bullion.
In order, however, that the receivers of the precious metals from
abroad—and particularly at New York, where the greater portion of them
arrive—may the more promptly and without expense realize the amount, I
would recommend to Congress that this department should be authorized



Doc. No. 11.

25

to receive all gold or silver bullion intended for coinage, and so soon
as it could be assayed and the correct value of it ascertained, that mint
certificates should be issued for the same in convenient sums, at the option of the owners; which certificates -should be made receivable for all
dues to the United States, the government being at the expense of conveying such bullion to the mint for coinage. Under this system, the
holders of bullion would always realize the full value, without abatement
or discount, so soon as it was assayed, which generally would be in a
few days, and without waiting until it was actually coined. Such certificates would bg freely received on depQsite as specie by all' the banks
of the country, to be paid out to their customers who might have duties
or other dues to pay into the public treasufy, and would greatly facilitate
such payments by avoiding the constant counting and re-counting of large
amounts of coin for the purpose.
Statement No 15 exhibits the amount of coin and bullion imported and
exported annually from 1821 to 1850, inclusive, and also the amount of
importation over exportation, and of exportation over importation, during
the same years.
COAST SURVEY.

The coast survey was reorganized in 1S43, and placed upon its present
footing by legislative authority. By that organization the land operations,
constituting four-fifths of the whole, were assigned to civilians and officers of the army, and the hydrography to officers of the navy.
The distinguished and scientific gentleman who has so long and so
well superintended the work, with this temporary corps, were placed under
the supervision and control of the Treasury Department, to which all
works affecting commerce and navigation, it was believed, should be
properly committed. It was also thought that officers of the army and
navy could not be brought to act harmoniously together under the control
of either the War or Navy Department.
This organization was the result of the experience of the work up to
that time. It has proved eminently successful in its operations: the rapidity of its progress, as well as its accuracy and the magnitude of its results,
have commanded the applause of those most distinguished fer scientific
attainments in Europe and America.
This department has from time to time, as the work demanded, called
for as many officers of the army and navy as could be spared from their
appropriate duties.
An application for an additional number of officers of the army is now
pending before the War Department, and will, it is expected, receive a
favorable consideration.
When the recent war with Mexico was declared, there were five officers
of the corps of topographical engineers, and nine of the line of the army,
employed in the coast survey.
The survey thus became an admirable school of practice for such bf
the graduates of West Point and the officers of the navy as had a predilectio»for the science called into practice by the work, each being engaged in his appropriate sphere.
While the scientific character of the survey is such as to reflect lasting
credit upon our country, it is also eminently practical in its results: the



26

Doc. No. l L

highest branches of scientific knowledge are made subservient to the mos
useful purposes.
The economy of the work deserves commendation. It will be found
that as much useful work is done and advantage to the country and
mankind obtained, for the same amount of expenditure, as in any
other department of the government. In this respect the lost seven years
have shown a gain in economy of one and three-quarters to one over the expenditures before that time for the same work. This may be ascribed to
the enlargement of the scale on which the work proceeds, which also
greatly tends to hasten its final completion.
•
The trigonometrical portion of this survey now extends unbroken from
Portland, in Maine, to within fifty miles of the capes of the Chesapeake,
and, with an interval of about one hundred miles, which is rapidly
filling up, to a point beyond Cape Hatteras.
It has been commenced in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida; is
complete in Alabama, and nearly so in Mississippi; and has been commenced in Louisiana and Texas. The other operations follow closely in
their order, and the publication of the maps and charts keeps pace with
the field work. Nearly one-half of the coast of the Atlantic and the
Gulf of Mexico has been surveyed. Since our recent acquisitions of territory on*the Pacific, parties attached to the survey have been actively
employed on that coast, and have contributed important information to
this department in regard to the proper sites for light-houses and other
aids to navigation.
A detailed report of the progress of the work will be submitted to Congress at an early period of the session.
MISCELLANEOUS.

The necessary instructions in fulfilment of the provisions of the 6th
section of the act of 28th September last have been issued for the numbering and coloring of the buoys placed " along the coast, or in bays,
harbors, sounds, or channels."
Arrangements have been made for the manufacture, and delivery at a
convenient point for transportation, of the buoys intended to be placed in
the channel of Columbia river.
Measures have been taken promptly to execute the design of Congress
in providing for the security of life and property on the seacoast. Metallic
life-boats, with the usual fixtures, designed for five points on the coast of
Florida, and three for the coast of Texas, have been contracted for. Like
facilities, with the addition of mortars, shot-rockets, and station-houses,
have been authorized along the shores of Long Island, including a station
at Watch Hill, in Rhode Island.
In pursuance of the directions of Congress, preparations are being
made to test the use and economy of the calcium light; a detailed report
of which, and also of the general condition of the light-house establishment, will be submitted to Congress during the present session.
Engagements have been entered into for the construction of an iron
screw-pile beacon upon Romer Shoal, under the authority contained in
the act making appropriations for light-houses, (fee.
The preliminary surveys, as required by the 3d and 4th sections of the



Doc. No. 11.

27

light house act of 28th September last, have been directed with reference
to such new works as were authorized by that act.
The condition of the several marine hospitals in course of erection may
be ascertained by reference to the annexed report of the chief of the topographical bureau and others, numbered 17, 18, 19, and 20. It is proper
to remark that the insufficiency of the last appropriation for the hospital at
Natchez has delayed the completion of. that work. That the seamen on the
coast of the Pacific may derive immediate benefits from the hospital fund,
means have been taken for the conversion of a building at San Francisco,
known as the Presidio, into a hospital, to be used until a suitable structure
shall be erected for that purpose.
In addition to the several custom-houses in course of erection, Congress, at the last session, made appropriations for additional ones at Bath
and Bangor, in Maine; at Norfolk, Virginia; Cincinnati, Ohio; St. Louis,
Missouri; and San Francisco, California; also, for sites for marine hospitals at "Evansville, Indiana, and Vicksburg, Mississippi. The necessary
steps for the selection and procurement of proper sites for these edifices have
been taken by the department. The progress of those custom-houses ir
course of erection has been as rapid as circumstances would allow. Thu
at New Orleans is of the greatest magnitude, and the special attention <
the department has been given to it, with a view of securing its compl
tion at an early date.
The incumbrance upon the site selected for the custom-house*
Charleston, South Carolina, has been removed, and no further delay
the erection of the building is anticipated. That at Savannah hasf>i
gressed so far as to justify the expectation that it will be ready for occup
tion by August next, provided the additional appropriation submitted
Congress shall be made at an early day.
Respectfullv,
THO. CORWIN,
Secretary of the Treasury.
H o n . W M . R . KING,

President pro tempore of the Senate.




Doc. No. 11.
Last of tables and statements accompanying this report,
A and B.—Receipts and expenditures.
C.—Expenses of custom-houses.
CC.—Estimates for revenue-cutter establishment.
D — P u b l i c debt.
E.—Redemption of treasury notes.
F.—Redemption of treasury notes purloined.
G.—Actual and estimated expenditures for three years.
H.—Aggregate receipts and expenditures for three periods.
I
Showing expenditures of the gorernment for seven yeara prior to 1852.
J . — S h o v i n g expenditures of the government, including payments on account of public
debt.
K.—Land required to satisfy "warrants, &c.
L , and papers 1 to 7—Expenditures, actual and estimated, for W a r Department for
seven years prior to 1852.
M N o . 1.—Payments on account of pensions.
M N o . 2.—Estimates for pensions.
N.—Expenditures, appropriations, and estimates for Indians.
*
0.—Expenditures for certain objects for seven years prior to 1850.
P N o . 1.—Interest on loans and upon treasury notes to 1852.
P N o . 2.—Estimates for interest on loans reimbursable subsequent to 1852.
Q,.—Mexican war claims pending.
*
*

R.—Annual expenses of the government from 1828 to 1845.
S . — E x c e s s of expendituies in each bureau of the W a r Department from 1845 to 1852
T.—Letter from the department of September 25, 1850.

. XI.—Statement of advances made at N e w York and Boston.
V.—Showing inequalities of valuation at different ports.
W . — A m o u n t and value of land sold annually for 1847, 1848, and 1849.
X 1.—Quantity and value of iron imported from 1821 to 1850.
X 2.—Bar iron manufactured for same period.
X 3.—duantity of iron imported from 1840 to 1850, &c.
Y.—Aggregate value of breadstuffs exported from 1821 to 1850.
Z.—Cotton, rice, and tobacco, exported for same period.
N o . 1.—Foreign merchandise imported and exported, and consumption per head, from 1821
to 1850.
No.
No.
No.

2.—Cotton and cotton manufactures exported from the United States to Great Britain,&c.
3.—Value of exports of cotton from the United States for five years.
4.—Value of exports from Great Britain and United States for 1848.

N o . 5.—Total value of imports from 1821 to 1850.
N o . 6.—Value of dutiable merchandise re-exported for same period.
N o . 7.—Value of goods remaining in warehouse from 1847 to 1850,
N o . 8.—duantity and value of hemp and cordage from 1821 to 1850.
N o . 9.—Quantity and value of hempen goods for same period.
N o . 10.—Value of certain articles imported, &c., from 1844 to 1850.
N o . 11.—Cotton, from 1821 to 1850.
N o . 12.—Coinage of the mint and branches.
N o . 13.—Amount of gold deposited at the mint and branches, from mines in the UnitedStates, up to October 31, 1850.
N o . 14.—Expenses of the Philadelphia mint.
N o . 15
Coin and bullion-imported and exported from 1821 to 1850.
N o . 16.—Quantity and value of wines, &c., imported from 1843 to 1850.
N o s . 1 7 , 1 8 , 1 9 , and 20.—Reports on marine hospitals.




A.
Statement of duties, revenues, and public expenditures, during the fisoal year ending June
issued, exclusive of trust funds.

30,1850,

agreeably to warrants

T h e receipts into the treasury during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1850, were aa follows:
Prom customs—
During the quarter ending
During the quarter ending
During the quarter ending
During the quarter ending

September 3 0 , 1 8 4 9
December 31, 1849
March 31, 1850
June 30,1850

*.

-.

#11, 643,680
7,207,385
11.489,912
327,707

54
87
36
65
•

Prom eoles of public lands
From miscellaneous and incidental sources, including premiums on loans and military contributions
Total receipts, exclusive of loans and treasury notes

$39,668,686 42
J. 859,894 25
1 , 8 4 7 , 9 1 8 23
4 3 , 3 7 5 , 7 9 8 90

*

Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock

issued
issued
issued
issued

^
W
^
•

for specie deposited
in funding treasury
in funding treasury
in funding treasury

under act of March 31, 1848
notes under act of July 22, 1846
notes under act of January 28, 1847
notes under acts prior to July 2 2 , 1 8 4 6

•«
"
$83,500 00
3 , 6 5 7 , 7 0 0 00
5,700 00

399,050 00
*
©
3 , 6 4 6 900 00
4 , 0 4 5 , 9 5 0 00

**
**

4 7 , 4 2 1 , 7 4 8 90
Balance in the treasury July 1 , 1 8 4 9

2,184,964 28

Total means

4 9 , 6 0 6 , 7 1 3 18

T h e expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 3 0 , 1 8 5 0 , exclusive of trust funds, were—
CIVIL T I S T .

Legislative
;
Executive
Judiciary
Governments in the Territories of the United States
Surveyors and their clerks
Officers of the mint and branches
for FRASER

Digitized


-

H E ' S
8
^ J S ' S S S
63B 9 8
> ~ 3®
51,408 13
™0 57
JUU uu

<v

A—Continued
# 1 , 9 5 6 05
1 , 5 0 0 00

Commissioner of Public Buildings
Secretary to sign patents for public lands

# 3 , 0 4 2 , 7 7 0 07
Total civil list
FOREIGN

INTERCOURSE.

Salaries of ministers
Salary of minister resident to Turkey.
Salaries of charges des affaires
Salaries of secretaries of legation
Salary of dragoman to Turkey
Commissioner to reside in China
Secretary and Chinese interpreter
Commissioner to the Sandwich islands
Outfits of ministers and charged des affaires
Compensation for pertain diplomatic services
Contingent expenses of all the missions abroad
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse
,
Salary of the consul at London
Clerk' hire And office rent to consul at London
Salary of consul at Alexandria
Salary of consul at Beyrout
Salaries of consuls at Kwang, &c., China
Office rent of consul at Basle, Swiizerland
Relief and protection of American seamen
Intercourse with Barbaty Powers
Interpreters, guards, and other expenses of consulates in Turkish d o m i n i o n s . . . . . . .
Renewal of diplomatic intercourse with Mexico
Compensation and contingent expenses of commissioners under treaty with Mexico
Treaty of peace, limits, boundaries, &c., with M e x i c o
Instalment and interest due May 30, 1849, under 12th article of treaty with Mexico.,
Instalment and interest due M a y 30, 1850, under 12th article of treaty with Mexico.

8 1 , 9 3 4 73
7 , 5 0 0 00
70,146*02
18,481 09
2 , 7 5 0 00
7 , 5 0 0 00

3,000 00
2,016
128,500
2,295
31,852
40,44 1

67
00
92
28
03

2,000 00
2,800 00
3,000
500
1,500
382
89, 792

00
00
00
33
29

8,000 00
1,475
3,432
20,428
869,650
52,600
3,386,616

22
48
39
00
00
31

Total foreign intercourse

4 , 8 3 8 , 5 9 4 76
MISCELLANEOUS.

Mint establishment
Support and
FRASER maintenance of light-houses, &c.

Digitized for


©
p
?

126,190 0 0
6 7 4 , 6 5 1 84

Building light-houses, Ac
Marine hospital establishment
*
••
Buil' i'lg marine hospitals.
Building custom-houses end warehouses
.
Building and equipping six
Refunding du.ie.s on foreign merchandise, per act August 8, 1846
Refunding duties collected under act August 39, 1842
Refunding duties in certain cases where they are unascertained
Refunding duties per net May 8, 1846
Refunding duties collected in Mexico
Refunding duti<;s paid by colleges, academies, &c
Tonnage duties on Spanish vessels refunded
Payment of debentures, drnwUirks, bounties, and allowances
Repayment to importers of excess of deposites for unascertained duties
Debentures and other chm-ges (customs)
Compensation of ppecial examiners of drugs and medicines,
Surveys of public lands
Expenses of the mineral land service
Debentures and other charges (lends).
Repayments for lands erroneous^ sold
Refunding money for land s o l i in Gret rieburg land district
Payment of war bounty land warrants
Three p :r cent, to the State of Ohio
..
Three per cert. to the State of Indiana.
.
Three per cent, to the Stnte of Illinois
Three prr cent, to the State of Alabama.
Five p< r cent, to the State of Michigan
Five per cent, to the State of Arkansas
...
v
Five per cent, to the State of Wisconsin
Five per cent, to the State of Iowa
T w o per cent, to the State of Alabama
Correction of erroneous and defective surveys in southern Michigan
Survey of the coast of the United .States
Survey of reefs, &c., of south Florida
Public buildings in Washington,
/.
Historical painting for the rotundo of the Capitol
Support and maintenance of the penitentiary of District of Columbia
Support of incline paupers of District of Columbia
Support and medical treatment of twelve transient paupers..
Auxiliary watch for the city ot Washington
Cleaning out and deepening Washington city canal..
T o reimburse city of Washington the cost of erecting one-half of City Hall building




172,158
162,379
97,111
587,531
21,432
12,954
302
9,517
2,556
614
270
53, 716
538,248
564,175
60,056
5,972
221,942
13,803
9,322
23,185
4,401
2!), G75
13,246
47,699
15,987
58,905
2,559
3,009
10,513
9,105
45,006
3,639
220,000
24,000
94,626
2,000
8,850
7,752
1,700
5,689

20
67
67
07
45
72
93
76
6-2
73
10
28
30
33
41
20
36
55
34
24
35
00
57
53
78
90
03
71
29
52
U9
74
00
00
90
00
00
82
00
55

20,000 00
30,000 00

A—Continued.
Improvements in the city of Washington, 12th section act M a y 1 7 , 1 8 4 8
Relief of the several corporate cities of the District of Columbia
Reimbursement of debt contracted by corporate cities of District of Columbia
Expenses of running and marking boundary line between United States and Mexico.
Results and account of the Exploring expedition
Expenses incident to loans and treasury notes
(Salaries of assistant treasurers and clerks
Compensation of § per cent, to each designated depositary
Compensation to special agents to examine books, &c., of several depositories
.
Contingent expenses under act for collecting, &c., public revenue
Payment of horses, &c., lost in the military service of the United States
Expenses of preparing forms, &c., preparatory to taking 7th census
Expenses of taking 7th census
Purchase of manuscripts and papers of Alexander Hamilton
1,000 sets of the continuation of the Statutes at Large
T o pay for 12 copies of Congressional Globe and Appendix
Printing and publishing papers of A. Hamilton
Buildings ana library at seat of government of Oregon Territory
Library for Territory of Minnesota
Completing three rooms in capitol of Iowa for use of United States courts
Expenses that may be incurred for relief ef bona fide setilera under the uct for tho armed occupation of Florida
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, per act August 10, 1846
Patent fund
Consular receipts
Relief of sundry individuals
Claims not otherwise provided for
Expenses of collecting revenue from customs prior to January 1, 1850
Expenses of collecting revenue from customs subsequently to January 1, 1850
'.
Expenses of collecting revenue from sales of public, lands
Miscellaneous items

6.J2
50, 311
60,000
59,877
15,000
14,307
23,265
3,668
5,000
8,928
2,853
9,500
8,000
20,000
2,521
- 8,280
6,000
8,000
3,000
854
1,499
30,910
191,317
557
278,860
2,927
1,157,176
817,154
137,410
5,032

61
15
00
96
00
25
63
31
00
26
06
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
70
14
03
77
61
91
50
72
95
64

Total miscellaneous
UNDER DIRECTION OF T H E D E P A R T M E N T OF T H E

Indian department
Pensions, military
Pensions, naval
for Claims of the State of Virginia
FRASER

Digitized


_
O
©
*
H*

6,958,360 24
INTERIOR.

1,516,327
1,477,399
157,192
244,500

46
04
76
61

5 , 1 0 5 00

Relief of sundry individuals

3 , 4 0 0 , 5 2 4 87

Total under Department of the Interior.
UNDER DIRECTION OF T H E WAR

DEPARTMENT.

6,277,786
] 56, 550
660, 324
745,4JI
93,225
37,255
205,683
1,137,601
87,400

Army proper
Military Academy
Fortifications arid other works of defence
Armorica, arsenals, and munitions of war
Harbors, rivers, roads, &c
Surveys
Arming and equipping militia
Payment* to volunteers and militia of States and Territories.
Relief of individuals and miscellaneous

18
08
40
29
79
78
64
18
82
9 , 4 0 1 , 2 3 9 16

Total under W a r Department

%

UNDER DIRECTION OP T H E NAVY D E P A R T M E N T .

3,181,756
1,562,200
542, 506
1,209,184
9,621
78?,519
188,569
120,281
3-21,673

P a y and subsistence, including medicines, &c.
Increase, repairs, ordnance, and equipments..
Contingent expenses
Navy-yards
N a v y hospitals and asylums
Dry-docks
Steam mail service
Relief of individuals and miscellaneous
Marine corps

O

62
52
92
69
14
07
45
62
15
7 , 9 2 3 , 3 1 3 18

Total under N a v y Department.
PUBLIC D E B T .

Paying the old public debt
Interest on the public debt.
Interest on Mexican indemnity stocTf.
S S S i n W

....
J u l y 22,' 1846;'oif' which ^50 was'pai'd for in specie, $100 received

for lands, and 15,7110 funded
y,V„
' '.'.'2 '•
*"
V,',; " " • " ' ! V *
Reimbursement of treasury notes, per act July 22, 1846; of which ftloO was paid-for m specie, $ l , 6 J 0 received for
customs, $2,650 fo« lands, and $83,500 funded




2,291
3,535,670
15,178
231,482

69
18
74
35.

5 , 8 5 0 09
8 7 , 9 0 0 00

60
OS

A—Continued.
Reimbursement of treasury notes, per act January 2 8 , 1 8 4 7 , all of which was funded

JjJf
$ 3 , 5 5 7 , 7 0 0 00

Redemption of treasury notes purloined, including interest

1 , 2 9 3 45

Total public debt

.

Total expenditures

$7,437, 3G6 41
43,0H2,108 69

Balance in the treasury July 1, 1850
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

6 , 6 0 4 , 5 4 4 49
#

Register's Office, November 2 9 , 1 8 5 0 .




TOWNSENP HAINES,

Regkter.

g

Doc. No. 11;

35

B.
iStatement of duties, revenues, and public expenditures, for thefirst quarter of the fiscal year from July I to September 30, 1850, agreeably to
warrants issued, exclusive of trust funds.
RECEIPTS.

From customs...
From sales of public lands
From miscellaneous and incidental source', including military contributions
Mexico
Prom avails of stock issued in funding treasury notes, under acts
prior to July 2-2, 1346
#850
From avails of stock issued in funding treasury notes, under act
of July 23, 1846 . 4,650
From avails of stock issued in funding treasury notes, under act
o f January 28, 1847
110,550

$14,764,043 05
317,082 96
in
425,264 64
00
00
00
116,050 00
15,622,440 65

EXPENDITURES.

Civil list, miscellaneous, and foreign intercourse
Expenses of collecting revenue from customs
Expenses of collecting revenue from lands
Indian department
,
Pensions
A r m y proper, &c
Fortifications, ordnance, arming militia, &c.
Navy.
Paying the old public debt
Interest on public debt, treasury notes, and Mexican indemnity
Btock
Reimbursement of treasury notes, under acts prior to
July 22, 1846, funded
$850 00
Reimbursement of treasury notes, under act of July
22, 1848, funded
4 , 6 5 0 00
Reimbursement of treasury notes, under act of January 28, 1847, funded
110,550 00

1,477,309
400,152
34,353
148,521
1,007,694
1,578,541
306, 786
1,408,732

30
82
83
54
94
50
99
73

2 , 0 9 0 61
3 , 1 9 8 73

116,050 00
Redemption of stock of the loan of 1847, including premium and
commission

500,000 08
621,339 34
6 , 9 8 3 , 4 3 2 99

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Mctmber 29, 1850.




T O W N S E N D H A I N E S , Rector.

86

Doc. No. II.

Statement of the number of persons employed in each district of the
United States for the collection of customs, their occupation and compensation, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1850.

Pas?amaquoddy

Machlas,

Frenchman's B a y .

Penobscot.

Waldoborough

Wiscasset.

Bath




Weigher and measurer.
|
do
j Boatman
....do
••••do
J Collector
| Inspector
Appraisers
Boatmen
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
do.
do
do
.do
Inspector..
Boatman
...do
...do
...do...
Collector
Inspectors
Merchant appraisers.
Gauger, temporary..
Measurer, do
Collector
Inspectors.........\
,...do
...do
...do
...do
Collector
Inspector, weigher, and measurer.
do
do
Inspector
...do
, . . .dot
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Inspectors, weighers, &c
Revenue boat inspector
Inspector...,.

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

Bath—Continued

Portland and Falmouth

Saco
Kennebunk

York
Belfast

Bangor

Portsmouth, N . I L

Vermont.




V. .
a
<9 ®
. o.
e
XI SV
£
s
a

Occupation.

Inspector.
...do....
...do....
...do
Occasional weighers, gaugers, &c.
Boatmen
Collector..
Deputy collector, &c
Clerks
Inspectors
Occasional inspectors
Weighers, gaugers, (fee
Appraisers
Surveyor..
Boatmen
Collector
Inspectors
Collector
Inspector
..do..
...do
Collector
Inspector
.do.
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Occasional collector and inspector
Dep'y collectors, inspectors, weighers, &c.
Collector
Inspectors
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Naval officer
Occasional inspector and dep'y naval officer
Surveyor
....
Weigher and gauger
Inspectors and measurers
Inspector
I ••
Inspector and deputy collector
Inspectors
Occasional inspectors
do
do
'
Inspectors.
Collector
Deputy collector
do
do
,do.
Inspector.
,.. .do....
,...do....
Boatman.

38

Doc. No. 11.

*

STATEMENT- Continued.

Districts.

O O
U OQ> C
_ Q
D J

Vermont—Continued.
N e w bury port

Gloucester,

Salem and B e v e r l y . . .

3
12

2
Marblehead,

Boston and Chariestown.




1
3

Occupation.

Boatmen
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Inspectors
Occasional inspectors,
Weigher and ganger.,
Gauger
Boatman..
...do
Surveyor at Ipswich
Inspector
Collector
Surveyor
Inspectors
...do....:
...do
Boatman
Assistant boatman.
Weigher, gauger, and measurer.
do.
do
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyors
Deputy collector
Clerk
Weighers and gaugers.
Inspectors
Measurers
Collector
Inspectors
Measurer
Inspector
...do
Surveyor
Boatman
Collector
Assistant collector.
Deputy collectors..
Cashier
Clerks
..do
..do
..do
..do.
..do.
Superintendent and messenger
Assistant superintendent and messenger.
do
do
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer
Clerk
T
....do
,...do

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts*

o o
~

Boston & Charlestown—Gen,

55

Plymouth.

Pall River.

Barnstable.

N e w Bedford.




Occupation.

Clerks
Surveyor
Deputy surveyor
Clerk
Clerk
Messenger
Appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Clerks
....do
....do
. . . .do
Special examiner of drugs.
Public storekeeper
Assistant storekeepers
do
Clerk
....do
....do
...do
...do
Weighers
Gaugers
Measurers
inspectors
....do
...
...do
....do
Night inspectors
Boatmen
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
do
do
do
do
Measurer.
Collector
Inspectors, weighers, and measurers.
Weigher and measurer
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
do
Inspectors
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector
Inspector, weigher, and gauger, &c
Clerk
Boatmen
Appraisers
Inspector
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher, &c .

39

40

Doc. No. 11. I
STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

N e w Bedford—Continued.

Edgartown,

Nantucket.

Providence.

Bristol and Warren

Newport,

Aiiddletown.




Occupation.

Inspector
...do
...do
Inspector and weigher.
Collector
Inspector
.do.
Temporary inspector
Boatman
. . .do
Collector
Dtputy collector and inspector.
Inspector..
Superintendent revenue b o a t . . .
Collector
Clerk
Naval office/
Surveyor
..do...
Inspectors
....do
...do.
....do
Weigher
Gaugers
Measurer of coal, dbc.
Measurer of salt
Boatman
Collector....
Inspector
Assistant storekeeper.
Temporary inspectors.
Weigher
Gauger
•
Surveyor
Boatman
Surveyor
Inspector
Temporary inspectors,
Weigher and gauger..
Boatman . . .
Collector
Naval officer.
Surveyors
...do
Inspector
....do
...do
Temporary inspectors
Inspectors
Measurers
Weigher
Gauger
Boatmen
Collector

Doc. No. 11.

41

STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

o
e 05
o 5
•3 C
U
m&
-C
c

Occupation.

s.®
s

o
o
Bliddletown—Continued,

Jfew London ,

N e w Haven.

Fairfield

Stonington ,

Sackett's Harbor.




Surveyor.
...do....
...do....
Inspector
...do
...do
Public storekeeper
Weigher and measurer
Gauger
Inspector for proving, marking, &c., spirits
Collector
Surveyor
Inspector
...do
...do
. . . .do..
...do....
Weigher
Boatman
Collector
Surveyor and storekeeper
Deputy collector and inspector...
Inspector
...do
...do
..do
....:
. . do
.
Inspector, weigher, and measurer.
Inspector, weigher, and gauger . .
do
do
Inspector and boatman
Collector
Inspector
....do
....do
...do
Temporary inspector
Night inspector
Collector
Surveyor
Inspector
...do
Temporary inspector.
Boatman
do
Collector.
Deputy collectors and inspectors
Inspector.
...do
...do.
...do.
...do.
...do
...do.
...do.

$276
436
338
500
45(1
225
100
46
37
12
958
250
600
500
650
250

64
18
70
00
00
00
00
98
74
48
57
00
00
(10
00
00

100 00
940
31 >0
2,543
800
1,083
1,095
902
72
60
40
1,280
1,083
1,067
1,233
1,337
1, 493
418
165
12

00
00
^0
24
00
00
00
00
00
00
80
85
40
00
73
96
50
00
00

22 00

.

2-2
253
150
500
300
3
216
144
750
730
640
547
412
366
275
300
240

CO
40
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00,
50
50
IK)
00
00
(10

180 00

42

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.
s £

Sackett's Harbor—Continued.
Genesee

Niagara.

Buffalo.

Oswegatchie.

Sagr Harbor.

New

York.




Boatman
Collector
Inspectors
Temporary inspector
Collector
Deputy collector
Clerk
.do.
Assistant public storekeeper.
Inspectors
Inspector
Aids of the revenue
Boatman
Inspector.
...do
.do.
. . .do
Night watchmen
Secret night w a t c h m a n . . .
Secret travelling inspector.
Collector
Deputy collector
do.
do
Inspectors
Secret inspector..
Night watchmen.
Boatman
Collector
Deputy collector.
. . . . .do
Deputy collectors
1..
do
Inspector
....do
Inspectors
Inspector
Secret travelling i n s p e c t o r , . . . .
Night watchmen
Clerks
Boatmen
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
do.
do
.do
do
.do
, . .do
.do
do
.do
.do.
Boatmen and night watchmen.
Collector
Inspector
...do
...do
Collector
Assistant collector.

43

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

N e w York—Continued.

5

1
1
1
1

2
8
26
21
21
4
7

2
6

1

2
4

1

2

Deputy collectors.
Auditor
Assistant auditor.
Cashier
Assistant cashier.
Clerks
,..do
...do
. .do
..do
..do
...do
..do
Watchmen
Fireman
Porters and messengers.
. . .do
do
Porter and m e s s e n g e r . . .
Porters and messengers.
Naval office.

1
1
3
1

8
6
10
1
1

2
1

1
1
1

Keeper of custom-house.
Naval officer
Deputies
Clerk
Clerks
..do
..do
Clerk
..do
Clerks
Clerk
.do
Porter
Messenger
Surveyor's

1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
189

2

1

2
75
19

18



office.

Surveyor
Deputy.
Clerk
Clerks
Clerk
Porter and messenger
Surveyor at Albany
Surveyor at T r o y
Surveyor at Cold Spring..
Inspectors
Inspectors at Albany
Inspector at T r o y
Inspectors on L o n g Island.
Night inspectors*
Weiehers
Foremen.
•

42

Itoc. No, 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

DUtricta.

8.7

N e w York—Continued.

Occupation.

Gaugera . .
Assistants,
Measurers.
Markers..,
Assistants.
Appraisements.
3
5

1

15
2

1

2
3
3

1
1
1

3
4
52

2

1
1

Principal appraisers
Assistant appraisers
Assistant a p p r a i s e r . . . . . . .
Assistant appraisers
do
Assistant appraiser
Assistant appraisers
Clerks to storekeepers
. . . .do
do
Porter
Messenger
Cooper
Samplers
Watchmen.......... ....
Laborers
Messengers
Special examiner of drugs.
Clerk
Public

10
3
45

2

1
1
1

28
2

1

5
9
50

1

18
4

Champlain.




1
1
1

2

1
1
1

4

warehouses.

Storekeeper. ».
Assistants
Clerks
...do
...do
..do
CJerk
Register
Superintendent.
Watchmen....
do.
Porter.
Laborers (foremen)
Laborers
...do
Messenger
Bargemen
Measurers of passenger vessels
Watchman of assistant treasurer's office..
. do
.do
do.
Collector
Deputy collectors
Deputy collector.
do
do.
D e p u t y collectors

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Ch&mplain—Continued

Cape Vincent
i*erth A m b o y

Bridgetown
Burlington
liittle Egg Harbor
Great Egg Harbor
'Newark
'ttomden
Philadelphia




2
2
2
4
1
1
3
1
4
1
5
3
1
4

2
1
1
1

2
45

Inspectors.
Clerk.
Boatman.
....do.
Colkctor:
Deputy collector.
Insoectors.
Collector.
Deputy collector.
....do
Surveyor
Bargemen.
,
Collector
....do
...do
Inspectors
Collector
Inspector
Boatkeeper
Collector
Deputy collector and i n s p e c t o r . . . . .
Boatman
<
Surveyor
Collector..
Naval officer
<
Surveyor
Assistant collector
Deputies, naval officer and surveyor.
Deputy collector
....do
Appraisers
....do
Special examiner of drug*
Weigher
....do
...do
Gaugers
Measurers
Clerk
...do
...do
...do
...do
. . .do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
. .do
Superintendent of public stores
Assistant storekeeper
Examiners, appraisers' stores
inspectors

45

46

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Philadelphia—Continued.

1
16
4

2
24
4
3
3
4
1

2
1

6
2
Presqu'isle
Pittsburg..
Delaware..

1
1
1
1

3

2
2
Baltimore.

1
1
1

2
3

1

30

2
25

6

1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
4

2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Annapolis,




1

Inspector
Occasional inspectors
...do
Night inspectors
. . .do.Boatmen
...do
Messengers
Laborers.
...do
...do..
...do
...do
Watchmen
Collector
Deputy collector.
Surveyor
Collector
Inspectors
. . .do
Messengers
Collector
Deputy collector
Cashier
Clerks
...do
Messenger
Inspectors
Watchmen....,...,
...do
Boatmen
Weigher
Deputy weigher.
Gauger
Measurer
Deputy m e a s u r e r . . .
. . .do
,
Storekeeper
. . .do
,
...do
Clerks in stores
Porters in stores
Appraisers
Clerks to appraisers.,
...do
Porter to appraisers..
Keeper of lazaretto.,
Naval officer
.
Deputy naval officer.
Clerk to naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy s u r v e y o r . . . ,
Clerk to surveyor . . .
Collector

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

Annapolis—Con tinued

Oxford
Vienna
Havre de Grace
Georgetown, D. C . . . . .

Richmond, V a .

Norfolk and Portsmouth.

Tappahannock.

Cherrystone.
Yorktown...
Petersburg..

Alexandria.




Occupation.

Inspector
Surveyor at St. Mary's
Surveyor at Lewellensburg.
Surveyor at Nottingham . . ,
Collector
...do
Surveyor
...do
Collector
Deputy collector, weigher, and measurer
Gauger
Deputy collector, at Washington
Temporary inspector, at W a s h i n g t o n . . .
Collector
Deputy collectors, inspectors, weighers,
and measurers
Inspectors, weighers, and measurers.
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
....do
Inspector and storekeeper.... v
Inspectors
Inspector.
Temporary inspectors
Weigher and gauger
Measurers
Clerk, and deputy naval officer
Clerk in collector's office..
Watchman
Boatman
Boatmen
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Surveyor, at Fredericksburg
Surveyor, at Port Royal
Surveyor, at Carter's creek
Surveyor, at Urbanna
Surveyor, at Dumfries
Collector
Surveyor
Collector
Surveyor
*
Collector.....
Deputy collector
Inspectors
Surveyor
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Collector
Sarveyor..
Deputy collector and inspector.
Inspectors
Weigher and measurer
Gauger

47

48

Doc. No. 11.
STATEMEiNT—Continued.

c >>
£

Districts.

Occupation.

Boatman
Surveyor arid inspector
Surveyor
Collector.
Temporary inspector, weigher, gauger, &c.
. . .do
do
da
...do
do
do
Collector
Collector
Surveyor..
Temporary inspector, gauger, and weigher
do
do
Collector
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher,
ganger, measurer, and clerk.
Collector
'.

Alexandria—Continued,
Wheeling
Yeocomico
Camden, N . C .

Edenton
Plymouth, N . C

Washington, N . C . . . .
Newbern, N . C . . . . . . .

Inspector..

Ocracoke, N . C
*
Beaufort, N . C
Wilmington, N . C

Charleston, S. C




15

Gauger
Weigher
Measurer
Collector
Inspector
Boatmen
Collector
Inspector
Measurer
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Weigher and gauger
Permanent inspectors.
Temporary inspectors
Boarding officer
Messenger
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector
Assistant naval officer
Clerk
..do
..do.
Appraisers
C.
Measurer
Weigher...
Gauger
Inspectors
Boardirtg officers.
Storekeeper
Steamboat inspector..,
Examiner of d r u g s . . ,
Temporary inspector,
do
do

Doc. No. 11.

49

STATEMENT—Continued.

•Charleston, S. C.—Continued

•Georgetown, S. C . ,
Beaufort, S . C . . . , .
^Savannah, G a

10
S t . Mary's..

Brunswick..
M o b i l e , Ala,

P e a r l river
Natchez
"Vicksburg, M i s s
F e n s a c o l a , Flor..
•St. A u g u s t i n e . . .

K e y West.

St. M a r k ' s

•St. J o h n ' s .




T e m p o r a r y inspector.
do....
do
do
do....
Collector.D e p u t y collector
Collector
....do
D e p u t y collector
Clerk
N a v a l officer
Surveyor
Appraisers
Storekeeper.
Porter and night w a t c h . . .
Inspectors
W e i g h e r and gauger
Bargemen..
Collector
Inspector..
Boatmen
Collector
Inspector
Collector
Inspectors
....do
....do
W e i g h e r s and measurers.
Special a p p r a i s e r . . . . . . . .
Gauger
Clerks
Collector
....do
...do
Clerk
Collector
Inspector
Collector
Inspector
do
Boatmen
,...do
Collector
D e p u t y collector
Inspector
, ...do
Collector
Inspectors
Temporary i n s p e c t o r . . . .
Boatmer
Collector
Surveyor
Boatmen...

$999
966
969
1,020
963
252
125
250
3,016
1,200

00
00
00
t)0
00
27
00
00
82
00

800 00
942 38
919 73
1 , 5 0 0 00

800 00
362
.1,695
1,500
360
501

50
(W
00
00
40

200 00
30
252
250
6,018
1,095
720
360
1,500

00
30
00
49
00
00
00
00

606 00
1,500
405
250
506
500
300
525
1,095
542

0U
00
00
90
00
00
00
06
88

5 0 3 (30
7 3 0 00
180 00

180 00
1,583
1,095
1,095
550
551
1,095
90
300
504

46
00
00
00
08
00
00
00
80

300

00

105 0 0

Doc. No. 11.

50

STATEMENT—Continued.

Occupation.

Districts.

Co
P. o

Ss
43 «
£
Appalachicola

N e w Orleans..

1
1
2
76

1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
4

11
1
1
1
1
1
2
2

2

1
1
6

8
2

Teehg.
Texas..

Salaria.,

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

Brazos de Santiago.




1
1
1

2

Collector
Inspectors
Weigher and gauger.
Bargemen
Collector
Assistant collector...
Deputy collector
Clerks
do
.do.
do.
Porter
Surveyor
Deputies
Inspectors.
Gauger
Deputy gauger.
Weigher
Deputy weigher
Laborers
Treasurer.
Deputy treasurer.
Laborers
Boatmen
...do
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer
Clerk
..do
..do
Appraisers
Clerks
Porters
Storekeeper
Deputy storekeeper
Laborers
....do.....
Watchmen....
Collector..
Deputy collector and inspector
Collector
Deputy collector
Inspector
...do
Surveyor.
Clerk
Collector
Deputy coiiector
Surveyors
....do..
Bofimsn
Collector
Deputv collector and inspector.
C'trk.
'

4674
1,095
1,500
300
C, 400
2,200
1,500
1,500
1,200

90
00
00
00
00
09
00
60
00

1,000 00
900
730
4,500
1,500
1,095
1,500

00
00
00
00
00
00

1,200 00
1 , 5 0 0 00

1,200 00
360 0 0
1 , 5 0 0 00
1 , 0 9 5 00
360*00
540 CO
360 00
5,000 00
1 , 5 0 0 CO

1,200 00
1,050
730
1,500
1,095
360
1,500
1,095
480
420
730
727
192
1,850

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
eo
00
24
00
00

600 00
1,000 00
1,200 00
1 , 0 9 5 00

1,000 00
800 00
1 , 2 5 0 00
500 00

600 00
5C<»
300
1,750
700

00
Oil
00
00

1,000 00

Doc. No. 11.

51

STATEMENT—Continued.

Districts.

"So
u

Occupation.

<o £
X> «
s
•3
- — /

Brazos de Santiago—Conti'd.

Miami.

Sandusky.

Cuyahoga.

Cincinnati.
Detroit

Michilimackinac..

Chicago, Illinois.

Louisville.
Nashville .
St. L o u i s . .
Oregon.

TFTEA^cRT DEPAF.TKKWT,




Clerk
Inspector
--..do
Storekeeper
Teraporarj/inspector.
do
do...*w..
do
Boatmen
....do
Collector
,
Inspector
....do
....do
....do
Collector............
D e p u t y collector
Inspectors
....do
Collector
Deputy c o l l e c t o r . . . .
Inspectors
....do
Surveyor
Clerk..,
Collector
D e p u t j icollector
......do
do
do
do
Inspector
,...do
....do
....do
...do
...do
....do
Secret inspector
Collector
D e p u t y collector and inspector.
do.
do
Collector
D e p u t y collector and inspector.
do
do
Secret travelling inspector
Surveyor
. . . .do
—do
Aid to the customs
ooileutor
D e p u t y collector and inspector.
's OJICE,

Jfovev&tr 2 3 ,

1650.
T O W N S E N D

HAINES,

Register.

Doc. No. 11.

52

Statement of the advances from the treasury on account of the expenses
u
at each custom-house'in the United States" during the year ending
June 30, 1850.
District.

Passamaquoddy
Me.
Machias
do.
Frenchman's Bay,(Ellsworth.)
Maine
Penobscot
Me..
Waldoborough.w,
do..
Wiscasset
.do..
Bath
do..
Portland and F a l m o u t h . , . d o . .
Saco
do..
Kennebunk
do..
York
do..
Belfast.
do..
Bangor
do..
Portsmouth
. .N. H .
Vermont
Newburyport
Mass.
Gloucester
.
do..
S a l e m and Beverly
do..
Marblehead
do..
B o s t o n and Charlesto w n . . d o . .
Plymouth
.do..
Fall River
do..
Barnstable
do..
N e w Bedford
do..
Ecjgartown
-do..
Nintucket
do.
P r o v i d e n c e . . . . . . . . . . . . R . I..
Bristol and W a r r e n
do..
Newport
do..
Middletown
Conn.
N e w London. . . . . . . . . . . d o . .
N e w Haven
do..
Fairfield
do..
Stonington
do..
S a c k e t t ' s Harbor
N . Y.
G e n e s e e , (Rochester) . . . . d o . .
Oswego
.do..
Niagara
do. (
Buffalo Creek, ( B u f f a l o ) , . d o . .
Oswegatchie
do..
S a g Harbor
do..
N e w York
do..
Champlain, ( P l a t t s b u r g ) , . d o . .
C a p e Vincent
do..
Perth A m b o y
N . J..
Burlington
do..
G r e a t E g g Harbor
do..
l i t t l e E g g Harbor
do..
Newark.
do..
C a m d e n , {port)
do..
Philadelphia
Penn.
Presqu'isle, ( E r i e ) . . . . . . . d o . .
, Delaware, ( W i l m i n g t o n ) . , d o . .
Baltimore..'
Md..
Annapolis
do..
Oxford
do..

$ 1 7 , 7 3 4 00
2 , 2 8 9 79
3,593
6,285
4,491
3,422
7,300
14,721

00
00
00
52
00
00

729
570
4,082
5,395
8,784
8,608
5,634
3, 756
19,461
2,010
281,242

25
92
00
00
80
31
00
44
00
29
00

1,168 00

2,611 00
6,303
1,912
5,724
2,792
1,746
8,485
4,724
5,974
1,778
3,017
10,363
2,129
1,447
8,389
4,157
17,524
6,013
15,875
4,204
586
692,653
7,671
4,404
3,381
126
994
524
1,057
196
177,240
6,622
15,915
103,118

TREASITRT DEPARTMENT, Register's




District.

Amount.

00
86
00
41
00
46
66
69
00
00
CO
00
86
00
00
64
98
00
61
00
45
00
00
67
25
40
50
27
38
35
00
00
17

Vienna
Md..
Havre-ae G r a c e , ( p o r t ) , . d o . .
Georgetown
D. C.
Richmond
Va..
NorfolkandPortsmouth, d o . .
Tappahannock
do..
Cherrystone
do..
Yorktown
do..
Petersburg
do..
Y e o c o m i c o , (port)
do..
Alexandria
...do..
Camden
N- C .
Eden ion
do..
Plymouth
do..
Washington
do..
Newbern.
do..
Ocracoke
do..
Beaufort.:.
.. .do..
Wilmington .
do..
Charleston
..S. C.
Georgetown
do..
Beaufort
do..
Savannah
.Ga..
St. M a r y ' s
do.
Mobile
. . .Ala.
Pearl River
Miss
Natchez
do..
Pensacola
.Fla..
St. Augustine
do..
K e y West
do..
St. Mark's
do..
St. John's
do..
Appalachicola
do..
N e w Orleans
La..
Tcche
do..
Texas, (Galveston). . . T e x a s .
Saluria
do..
Brazos de Santiago
do..
Sandusky
Ohio.
Cuyahoga,(Cleveland), . d o . .
Detroit
Mich.
Michilimackinac
do..
Chicago
lil..
California
W e i g h t s and m e a s u r e s . . . . . .

Designated collectors at—
Louisville, K y . . . . $ 1 , 8 7 6
Nashville, T e n n . .
448
Pittsburg, P e n n . .
446
St Louis, M o
4,626
Wheeling, V a
59

64
14
72
10
00
7, 456 60

1 , 8 7 . 9 CO

2 0 3 43

Total

Office, J V I m m b e r 1 . 1 8 5 0 .
TOWNSEND

;.j

1,974,331 22

HAINES,

Register.

Doc. No. 11.
G

5a

C.

Estimate for revenue cutter establishment.
There are now eleven cutters in commission on the following stations,
embracing the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and northern lakes, viz: Eastport, Maine; Boston, Massachusetts; New York, New York; Delaware
bay; Norfolk, Virginia; Key West, Florida; New Orleans, Louisiana; two
on the coast of California, and one on Lakes Erie and Ontario each.
It is believed that six additional points should be supplied as follows:
The coast of Maine; Chesapeake bay; coast of North Carolina, South
Carolina and Georgia; the Gulf coast of Florida, Alabama and Mississippi;
the coast of Texas, and the Oregon coast.
Two of the above mentioned stations will be supplied by two cutters
belonging to the service, now inordinary and about being repaired. Four
new cutters will, therefore, be required to meet the wants of the other
points, and for the construction and equipping of which there will be required the sum of $60,000 00
For expenses in keeping in commission thirteen revenue
cutters for the year ending 30th June, 1852
- .
180,000 0®
For expenses in keeping in commission four additional cutters, to be for the year ending 30th June, 1852 65,000 00
i
..
.Total
- 305,000 0d




D.

2

Statement of the public debt on the 30th of November, 1850.
Denomination of debt.

Rate of interest.

Principal and interest of the old funded and unfunded debt, treasury notes of 1812, and Yazoo scrip.
Debt of the corporate cities of the District of Columbia, assumed per act of May 20, 183G
Outstanding treasury notes issued prior to July 26, 1846, payable or fundable
Outstanding treasury notes issued under the act of July 26, 1846, payable or fundable
Outstanding treasury notes issued under the act of January 28, 1847, payable or fundable
Stock issued for notes of 1837 to 1843, under the act of January 28, 1847
Loan of April 15,1S42
;
Loan of March 3, 1843
Loan of July 22, 1846
Loan of January 27,1847
Loan of March 31, 1848
Stock issued per act of August 9, 1846, in payment of the 4th and 5th instulments of the Mexican
indemnity

5£ per cent.

Amount.

W h e n payable.

6 per cent.
6...do...,
5...do...,
6...do,...
6...do.,..
6...do,...

$60}000 perannuln
On presentation..
.....do.........
do.........
January 1 , 1 S 6 8 . .
December 31,18C2
July 1, J853
NovsmbV 12,1856
January 1 , 1 8 6 8 . .
July 1 , 1 8 6 8 . . . ' . .

5 , . do.

$119,5?ri 98
1)00,000 GO
139,011 64
25,850 00
44,70!) 00
154,328 00

August 9, 1851...

8,19P, 686 03
6,468,2;>1
4, 999, 14!)
27,135, m
15,740,000

35
45
00
00

303,573 82
64,228,228 37

Amount of the debt, per statement, December 1, 1849.
;
Add amount of treasury notes and stock of 184(j-'47 omitted in said statement
On
On
On
On

Deduct
account of
account of
account of
account of

payments during the year ending November 31, 1850, viz :
the old debt
„
the debt of the cities
R
6 per cent, stock of 1847 purchased
treasury notes paid for in money or paid for customs and lands

6 4 , 7 0 4 , 6 9 3 71
18,821 45
i......

$3,149
60,000
430,250
1,877

12
00
00
67

€ 4 , 7 2 3 , 5 1 5 16

495,276 79
6 4 , 2 2 8 , 2 3 8 37
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Rtgisler.

©

O
n
$

Doe. No 11.

M

E.

Statement of the redemption of treasury notes during the fiscal year ending
on the SOth June, 1850.
Reimbursement of treasury notes issued under acts prior
to the 22d July, 1816, of which $50 were paid for in
specie, $100 received for lands, and $5,700 funded *per
"
act of the 28th January, 1S47 .
$5,850 00
Reimbursement of treasury notes issued per act of the 22d ,
.
July, 1846, of which $150 were paid for in specie,
$1,600 received for customs, $2,650 for lands, and
$>83,500 were funded - *
.
87,900 00
Reimbursement of treasury notes issued under the act of
the 28th January, 1847, all of which were funded
- 3,557,700 00
3,661,450 00
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office. October 31, 1850.
T O W N S E N D

HAINES,"

Register.

P.

Statement of the payments during the fiscal year ending on the 30<A of
June, 1850, under the act of the TOth August, 1846, on account of treasury notes which had been purloined.
Date of payment.

lugust 15,1849...
Deeember 1, 1849.
December 1 0 , 1 8 4 9
January 1 7 , 1 8 5 0 . .
M a y 11,1850

T o w h o m paid.

J. P.Parker
John Lowery
James Perrine
William H . McFarland
H . Saunders

Amount.

$111
540
535
52
53

S3
50
58
34.
81

45
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Register's Office, October 3 1 , 1 8 5 0 .




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Btgkter.

56

Doc. No. 11.
G.

Statement showing the actual and estimated receipts and expenditures for
the years ending June 30, 1850, 18513 and 1S52.
Receipts.

§43,774,848 90
47,592,600 00
46,800,000 00

Total actual for 1850
Total actual and estimated for 1851
Total estimated for 1852

TREASURY

Expenditures.

$ 3 9 , 3 5 5 , 2 6 8 69
53,737,547 50
4 8 , 1 2 4 , 9 9 3 18

DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, .Ycvcmber 29,1850.
T O W N 3 E N D H A I N E S , Rtgister.

H.

Statement of the aggregate annual expenses of the government, exclusive of trust funds, the expenses of the Post Office Department, and the
payment of the principal and interest of the public debt, and the debt
assumed per act of May 20, 1836, from July 1,1842, to June 30,1850,
and of the appropriations for the year ending June 30, 1851.
Aggregate expenses. Payments on account of the revenue from customs
and land sales.

Years.

Total.

$22,724,205 78
19,835,793 48
21,273,705 67

$4,034,643
79
3 , 8 2 2 , 3 1 3 04
4,53^,880 07

$26,758,849 5 7
23,658,106 52
25,813,585 74

63,833,704 93

12,39&, 836 90

76,230,541 83

21,277,901 64

4 , 1 3 2 , 2 7 8 97

25,410,180 61

26,690,774 40
5 5 , 8 1 1 , 6 2 3 66
42,698,619 05

4 , 6 9 3 , 9 5 4 76
4 , 0 5 3 , 2 9 0 97
3 , 2 4 1 , 4 0 4 13

3 1 , 3 8 4 , 7 2 9 16
59,864,914 6 3
4 5 , 9 4 0 , 0 2 3 18

125,201,017 11

11,98^,649 86

137,189, fi66 9 7

Average of 3 years

41,733,672 37

3 , 9 9 6 , 2 1 6 62

45,729,888 99

1849
1850
Estimates and appropriations
for
1851

38,048,819 08
32,804,500 66

3 , 0 1 5 , 9 1 4 08
2 , 6 4 9 , 9 9 0 47

4 1 , 0 6 4 , 7 3 3 16
35,454,491 13

46,068,85$ 08

2 , 5 1 8 , 6 7 0 81

48,587,529 89

116,922,178 82

8 , 1 8 4 , 5 7 5 36

125,106,754 18

38,974,059 61

2 , 7 2 9 , 1 9 1 78

41,702,251 39

Ending June 30

1843
1844
1845

Average of 3 years
1846
1847
1848

Average of 3 years.
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 29, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

Statement of the actual and estimated expenditures, exclusive of the public debt, for the seven fiscal years succeeding the
declaration of war with Mexico, showing the excess af expenditures for each year, and the aggregate, over what they
would have been upon the basis of the peace establishment of the fiscal year ending June 3d), 1845.
Expenditures for Expenditures for Expenditures for Expenditures for Expenditures for Expenditures for
the fiscal year
the fiscal year
the fiscal year
the fiscal year
tne fiscal year
the fiscal year
ending June 30,
ending June 30.
ending June 30,
ending June 30,
ending June 30,
ending June 30,
1845.
1846.
1849.
1847.
1850.
1848.

W a r Department, (including Indian department and pensions).
E x c e s s over 1845

$ 9 , 5 3 3 , 2 0 2 91
6 , 2 2 8 , 6 3 9 09

E x c e s s over 1845
399,668 54

$13,579,428
4,046,225
6,450,862
222,223
397,933

35
44
70
61
29

$41,281,606
31,748,403
7,931,633
1,702,994
391,113

62
71
68
59
95

$27,820,163
18,286,960
9,406,737
3,178,098
390,897

08
17
28
19
70

1,735
2,523,624
J 36,201
3,861,442

25
2)
15
35

8,554
2,562,008
174,585
3,762,732
931,616

59
99
94
04
27

8,770
2,647,955
260,532
2,546,216

84
92
87
05

E x c e s s over 1845
2 , 3 8 7 , 4 2 3 05
E x c e s s over 1845
2 , 8 3 1 , 1 1 5 77
E x c e s s over 1845
L e s s than 1 8 4 5 . .




)

$17,290,936
7,757,733
9,869,818
3,641,179
7,972,832
7,573,163

68
77
20
11
01
47

$12,801,764
3,268,561
7,923,313
1,694,674
4,838,594
4,438,926
%

03
12
18
09
76
22

2,865,615
478,192
3,179,192
348,076

88
83
66
89

3,042,770
655,347
6,958,360
4,127,244

07
02
24
47

284,'899* 72
/

I—Continued.
Actual and estimated Estimated expendi- Aggregate expendi- Aggregate accord- Aggregate of excess.
ing to the basis of
tures for 7 years
tures for the fiscal
expenditures for
the year ending
ending June 30,
year ending June
thefiscalyearendJune 30, 1845.
1852.
June 30, 1852.
i n g j u n e 30,1851.

War Department, (including Indian department and
$20,474,393
10,941,190
10,917,591
4,688,952
H
4,062,879
3,663,211

*

02
11
61
52
65
11

$18,322,923
8,789,721
10,159,375
3,930,736
3,622,400
3,222,731

3,635,486
1,248,063
9,603,379
6,772,263

56
51
05
28

3,640,251
1,252,828
8,071,173
5,240, <*58

E x e e g i o v e r 1845..
Lees than 1845...

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,




Register's Ofic*,

November

91
00'
09
00
00
46
23
18
92
15

$151,571,215 69

$66,732,420 37

6 2 , 6 5 9 , 3 3 1 74

4 3 , 6 0 0 , 4 7 3 63

2 1 , 6 7 6 , 6 5 1 36

2 , 7 9 7 , 6 7 9 78

2 0 , 9 1 7 , 7 1 2 85

16,711,961 35

3 7 , 9 8 2 , 4 9 6 31

19,817,810 39

" " $ 8 4 , " 838,"795* 32
1 9 , 0 5 8 , 8 5 8 11
j _ 1 8 , 6 7 8 , 9 7 1 53
4 , 2 0 5 , 7 5 1 50
J

18,164, GS5 99

30,1850.
T O W N S E N D

HAJNES,

Register,

j.
Statement of ike actual and estimated expenditures, exclusive of treasury notes funded, for the seven fiscal years succeeding
the declaration of war with Mexico, shouHng the aggregate and the excess over what they would htxve been upon the basis
of the fiscal year ending June SO, 1845, exclusive of and including public debt.
•
•—

* V •• , .

For the fiscal years War Department, N a v y Departending—
ment.
inotydingIndian
department and
pensions.

June 3 0 , 1 8 4 5

$ 9 , 5 3 3 , 2 0 2 91 $6,228,639

June 30, 1846
June 3 0 , 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . .
June 3 0 , 1 8 4 8 . . . . . . .
June 3 0 , 1 8 4 9
June SO, 1850..
*June$>, 1851
•Jorie 8 0 , 1 8 5 2 . . . . . .

13,579,428
41,281,606
27,820,163
17,290,936
1& SO 1,764
20,474,393
18,322,923

09

35 6 , 4 5 0 , 8 6 2 70
62 7 . 9 3 1 , 6 3 3 68
08 9 , 4 0 6 , 7 3 7 28
68 9 , 8 6 9 , 8 1 8 20
03 7 , 9 2 3 , 3 1 3 18
02 10,917,591 61
9 i 10,159,375 09

State Department.

Civil department.

Miscellaneous.

$399,668 54 $ 2 , 3 8 7 , 4 2 3 05 $2,831,115 77

397,933
391,113
390,897
7,972,832
4,838,594
4,062,879
3,622,400

29
95
70
01
76
65
00

2,523, 624
2,562,008
2, 647,955
2,865,615
3, 042,770
3,635,486
3,640,251

20
99
92
88
0756
23

3,861,412
3,762,732
2,546,216
3,179,192
6,958,360
9, 603,379
8,071,173

35
04
05
66
24
05
92

Total, exclusive
of public debt.

Public debt.

Total, including
public debt.

$21,380,049 36 $8,588,157 62 $29,968,206 98

26,813, 390
55,929,09;)
42,811,970
41,178,395
35,564,80 >
48,693,729
43,816, 124

89
28
03
43
28
15

1,217,823
1,011,082
8,348,8.9
5, (.2ii,272
3,790,466
5,043,817
4,308,869

31
37
21
39
41
61
03

28,031,114
56,940,177
51,160,789
46, 798,667
39,355,268
53,737,517
48, 124,993

20
65
24
82
69
50
18

151,571,215 69. 6 2 , 6 5 9 , 3 3 1 74 2 1 , 6 7 6 , 6 5 1 36 20,917,7^2 85 3 7 , 9 8 2 , 4 9 6 31 j 294,807,407 95 2 9 , 3 4 1 , 1 5 0 33 j . 3 2 4 , 1 4 8 , 5 5 8 28
V
* Estimated.
Total expenditure* for seven years succeeding the declaration of war with Mexico, including public d e l $
W h a t they would "have been for seven years on the basis of 1845 ( $ 2 9 , 9 6 8 , 2 0 6 98)
...,

Total excess
Total expenditures for the tame period, exolusjve of public debt
W h a t they would have been on the tiasis of 1845 ( $ 2 1 , 3 8 0 , 0 4 9 3 6 ) .




$324,148,558 23
209,777,448 86
114,371,109 42

*

:==

&29I, 807,407 95
149,660,345 52

O
O

K.
Exhibitit of the number of acres of public lands granted for various purposes, which have been selected, tye.yfrom January
345,
1, 1845 to September 30, 1850, inclusive; mid showing in the last two columns the estimated number of acres which
will be selected in subsequent years.
N o . of warrants
located.

Description of grant.

Area.

1,600,000

Act of September 4 , 1 8 4 1
Mexican war bounties
Internal improvements
Choctaw certificates
W a r of 1813
Revolutionary war.
Colleges, salines, &c
Bounties, act September 28, 1850 .
Swamp lands
Railroad from Chicago to Mobile,

52,269

2,228
529

7,840,440
1,478,220
415,458
86,560
146,647

106,880

Value at $1 25
per acre.

N o . of warrants
to be located.

$2,000,000
9,800,550
1,847,775
519,322

108,200

II, 2 2 2 , 1 5 5
7,546,200
83,107

30,086

37,607

25,981,671
3, 7 8 2 , 4 0 0

78,922,513

J188

977,724
6,036,960
66,486

98,653,140

183,309
133,600

•(II).
•I*)11,674,205

Value at $ 1 25
per acre.

48,000,000
20,785,337
3,025,920

*37,731

•(t).

Area.

14,592,756

60,000,000

* Estimated.
t There is no basis upon which to estimate these items.
J T h i s amount will be increased by the issue of warrants from the W a r Department; the number here given being now outstanding.
§ If authority be given to locate outstanding warrants issued b y Virginia, it will amount to about 201,000 acres, according to estimates heretofore made,
(j T h e number of warrants to be issued under the act of September 28, 1850, has been variously estimated from 250,000 to 500,000. I have here presented a medium number and estimated the area of each at 160 acres.
G E N E R A L L A N D O F F I C E , December

5,1850.
J.

{lojf.

SECKKTARY

or

THE TREASURY.




„ „
, " ^
BUTTERF1ELD,

„

»
. .
Commistioner.

5*
Q

Doc. No. 11.

>
WAR

61

DEPARTMENT,

Washington, November 13, 1850.
SIR: I have tlie honor to enclose herewith, in accordance with your request, verbally communicated, statements prepared by the heads of the
jureaus of* this department, showing the expenditures in their respective
branches of the military service during six fiscal years commencing July
I, 1844, and the estimated expenses of the two succeeding years, with
explanations of the causes of the increase in the expense of the military
establishment during these periods.
Yerv respectfully, vour obedient servant,
C. M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War
H o n . THOMAS

CORWIN,

Secretary of the Treasury.




Statement of the. actual ancl estimated annual expenditures in the different bureaus of the War Department from June 30,
1845, to June 30, 1852: also, the excess of expenditure for each fiscal year during that period over what it would have
been upon the baste of the peuce establishment of 1845.
Bureaus.

Expenditures in the Expenditures in the Expenditures in the Expenditures in the Expenditures in the
year 1845.
year 1849.
year 1846.
year 1847.
year 1848.

$377,794 G8
Excess over 1845
2 , 1 0 6 , 0 4 4 16
988, 723 74
2 1 , 1 5 6 06
E x c e s s over 1845
Q.uartemiat-ter Gentral's statement
E x c i c s over 1845
Adjutan' General's statement
E x c e s s over 1845
Engineer department
Excess over 1845
Loss than in 1845




!

9 8 5 , 7 0 8 50
3 9 , 7 6 8 08
5 7 2 , 7 6 9 00

$477,716
" 99,922
2,680,443
»
574,399
1,396,782
408,059
34,604
13,448
2,327,302
1,341,593
35,658

88
20
53
37
86
12
10
04
13
63
00

4 , 1 1 0 08
8 5 2 , 0 0 0 00
279,231 00

$1,989,398
1,611,603
7, 752,390
5,646,346
1,973,364
984,641
112,087
90,931
17,126,386
16, 140,677
81,019
41,250

$3,780,682
3,412,887
8,488,779"
6,382,735
1,363,120
374,395
170,335
149,179
17,214,382
16,228,673
' 437,575
397,806

14
46
34
18
95
21
91
85
24
74
00
92

1 , 1 7 7 , 0 0 0 00
604,231 00

14
46
53
37
43
69
67
61
85
85
00
92

2 3 5 , 0 0 0 00
3 3 7 , 7 6 9 00

5 , 0 9 1 , 9 6 4 22
3 5 , 6 4 3 , 7 4 9 54

J
1

$1,024,994
647,199
7,636,660
5,530,616
1,186,814
198,091
71,904
50,748
6,177,536
6,191,827
53,060
13,291

41
73
52
36
98
24
21
15
01
51
00
92

6 3 6 , 7 5 5 00
6 3 , 9 8 6 00

L—Continued.

Bureaus.

rray t '\ksistence.
.
r e c e s s over 1 8 4 5 . . . . . . . . . .
, < f the army
1 xccfis over 1845..,
O. dtiaiir j depar'ment
I xcees over 1845
Surge<\: General's s t a t e m e n t . . . . . . .
Excess over 1845
Quarter -naster Gcuaral's statement
£ xcess over 1845
AJjutan-. General's s t a t e m e n t . . . . .
Excess over 1 8 4 5 . . . . . . . . . . .
Less than in 1845
Engince. - department
Excess over 1845.
Less than in 1845
r«jr,




Expenditures in the : Estimated expendi- 'Estimated e.vpc/!?- j Total expenditures
from June 30, '45,
yepr 1850,
tures for tho year
lures for the year
to June HO, 1852.
1852.
1851.

159,277
780,482
642,092
536,048
1, 168,338
llJ9, 615
99,299
78,143
295,298
309,590
48,616
8,847
753,993
181,224

,235,631
857. £36
2,866,464
7f;0, 419
1,083,240
101,516
62,500
41,343
'3,915,954
2,930,245
66,616
26,847

G3
05
(JO
84
00
26
00
94
00
50
00
92

851,796 30
279,027 30

A 1,062.371
704, 576
2, 897,720
791,675
1,199,315
210,591
67,395
46,238
4,992,538
4,106,830
64,048
24,279

00
32
00
84
01)
26
00
04
65
IT.
00
92

791,235 00
218, 466 00

Totalexccseoverthe
basis of 1845.

$10,759,071 28
$8,114,508 52
' 31/JC4,'550'59'
20,'222,24i'47
'"'mom^'OS
*2 j 479,9 i o ' 8 7
618*126^6'
470,03 i
"56,049,'397*98'
'49,149,'438* 48
786,"592* 66"

P

508,215 44
o

5,297, 779 91
J
1X7,876,495 31

1,288,396 91
82,232,745 77

O

64

Dk>c. No. 11.
L—No. 1.
QUARTERMASTER GENERAL'S

OFFICE,

Washington, November 11,1850.
SIR: I have the honor to submit a statement of the aggregate expenditures of the several branches of the Quartermaster's department in each
of the last five fiscal years as compared with the aggregate expenditures
of the year ending on the 30th of June, 1844Reference to the statement will show that the aggregate expenditure of
the department for the year ending in Jnne, 1844, was less than a million
of dollars. Early' in the next fiscal year movements were made into
Texas, which accounts for the increased expenditures of that year. In
May of the following year war was declared against Mexico, which, with
the acts of Congress for increasing the army, employing large bodies of
volunteers and prosecuting the war, will account for the great increase of
expenditure in the two following years.
,
In the early part of the year ending the 30th of June, 1849, the war
expenditure was continued in consequence of many of the troops raised
for that year not arriving at their homes and being discharged until some
months,of the year had elapsed. Many of the disbursing officers were
retained in service to settle their accounts until the 3d of March, 1849,
when they were discharged by order of President Polk.
On the return of peace, the United States had an extensive additional
territory to occupy: iii many cases roads were to be opened, buildings to
be erected, and supplies to be taken by land from four hundred to a
thousand miles, and in the case of the mounted rifle regiment entirely
across the continent. The expenditures of the year ending the 30th
June, 1849, influenced by all these causes, were more than six times
greater than the aggregate expenses for the year ending June 30, 1844.
The aggregate expenditures in the last fiscal year, as far as accounts
have been received, as shown by the statement, amount to four million
two hundred and ninety-five thousand dollars; and it is estimated that
accounts yet to be received will increase that expenditure to four million seven hundred thousand dollars—over five times the amount of
the expenditure of the year ending June 30, 1845. The forces as increased by the legislation of Congress are now greater by one-half than
in 1844, and a greater proportion than one-half the increase are mounted.
At first view it may seem strange that an increase of the peace establishment of only one half should swell the expenditures to five times the
amount before the increase. But the statement of a few facts will, I have
no doubt, satisfactorily ex^l^iti the matter. In 1844 our extreme outposts
on the whole western line, from the Gulf of Mexico to Lake Superior, were
Fort Jesup, in Louisiana, within twenty-four miles of steam navigation,
on Red river; Fort Towson and Fort Washita, on Red river, above Fort
Jesup; Fort Smith, on the Arkansas river, and Fort Gibson, about fifty
miles in advance; Fort Scott, on the southwestern frontier of Missouri;
Fort Leavenworth, on the Missouri river, on the western frontier of the
State of Missouri; Fort Atkinson, twenty-four miles west of the Mississippi river, in Iowa: and Fort Snelling, at the mouth of the St. Peter's
river, on the Mississippi river. The Rio Grande^ the Gila, and the Pacific,
now form the exterior lines south and west, with long lines of posts extending from the former to the present exterior lines.
On the old exterior line, the aggregate cost per annum of foraging a



Doc. No. 11.

65

horse isfifty-fivedollars; while on the Rio Grande, and including the whole
of Texas, it is one hundred and eighty-nine dollars; in California, two
hundred and fifty-two dollars; and in Oregon, including the^posts on the.
Oregon route, it is three hundred and thirty-four dollars.
The cost of the army transportation in the year ending June 30, 1844,
amounted to $115,299 25; in the last fiscal year it is estimated to have
exceeded two millions of dollars. The difference arises almost entirely
from the extrenlely long lines of transportation, both by water and by
land, which have been kept up, and from the troops in Texas and New
Mexico having been almost constantly in the field. Indeed the cost of
maintaining the troops in all the new territories, including every branch
of expenditure under the administration of this department, has increased
beyond any former example. The cost to the Quartermaster's department of maintaining the small force now in California is more, byfiftyper
cent., than that of the whole army before the Mexican war. While the
present state of things continues in that country, and the people on the
frontiers of Texas and in New Mexico are prevented by the hostile Indians from cultivating their lands, the expense of maintaining the troops
may be increased, but cannot be diminished. The same causes that increased the expenses last year are now operating, and will, it is feared,
continue to operate for years to come.
I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,
T. S. JESUP,
Quartermaster General.
Hon.

C. M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War, Washington City.
Statement showing the increased annual expenditures on account of the
Quartermaster's department for each of the last six years, over and above
the regular authorized expenditures of the military establishment as it
existed on the 30th of June, 1844; also the supposed and estimated expenditures for the fiical years ending June 30,1851, and June 30,1852.
Fiscal years ending—

June 30, 1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
Estimated expenditure for fiscal
year ending June 30, 1851
Estimated expenditure for the year
ending June 30,1852 5



A m o u n t of expenditure. Increased expenditure
over fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$870,999
985,708
2,327,302
17,126,386
17,214,382
6,177,536
4,295,298

73
50
13
24
35
01
60

$114,708
1,456,302
16,255,386
16,343,382
5,306,536
3,424,298

77
40
51
62
28
87

3,915,954 00

3,044,954 27

4,992,538 65

4,121,538 92

Dk>c. No. 11.

66

REMARKS.—The increase of expenditures commences by the acquisition
of territory consequent on the annexation of Texas in 1845.
1845.—The cost of providing transportation, equipage, and supplies for
the "army of observation," and concentrating and maintaining the forces
at Corpus Christi.
March, 1846.—The increased cost of furnishing land transportation for
active operations in the field, and for the march of the arjpy from Corpus
Christi to the Rio Grande, and its support there.
May 13, 1846.—The act declaring war with Mexico, followed by the
immediate increase of the number of privates in each company in the
different regiments to one hundred men, and the accepting the services of
50,000 volunteers.
May 15, 1846.—The act creating a company of sappers, miners, and
pontoniers.
May 19, 1846.—The raising of the regiment of mounted riflemen.

June 17 and 26, 1846.—The increase of the general staff for the Avar,
and the enlisted ordnance men.

1847.—The maintenance of hostilities with Mexico.
February 11.—The transportation, equipage, supplies, (fee., for the 3d
dragoons, and. nine additional regiments of infantry.
March 3, 1847.—The increasing of the companies of the artillery regiments, two companies being added to each regiment, and the expense of
four additional companies of light or field artillery.
1848.—The continuance of the war with Mexico, the withdrawal of the
army, and subsequent transportation to Texas, New Mexico, and California.
1849.—The establishment of the frontier posts in Texas, New Mexico,
California, and Oregon, and the continuous expense of the transportation
of their necessary supplies; involving enormous cost of land transportation in Texas, New Mexico, and overland expeditions to California and
Oregon. Also the maintaining a force of Texas mounted volunteers in
the field.
1850.—The increased cost of maintaining the troops in California,
Oregon, and New Mexico, and the supplies, &c., for the Texas mounted
volunteers, and the temporary mounting of infantry in the 8th military
department, and the maintenance of the forces in the field in Florida for
the suppression of Indian hostilities.
June 17, 1850.—Increase, by law, of the number of privates in the
companies serving on the western frontier, and provision for the mounting:
of the same when necessary.
T. S. JESUP,
Quartermaster General.
QUARTERMASTER GENERAL'S

OFFICE,

Washington Oity, November 12, 1850.




Doc* No* 1 ]L.|

67-

L—No. 2.
ORDNANCE

DEPARTMENT,

Washington, November 1, 1850.
STR: In answer to your call of the 29th ultimo, I have the honor to.
report, that the expenditures of the Ordnance department of the military
establishment for the year whieh ended 30th June, 1844, amounted to
$864,059 96; and for 1845, amounted to $988,723 74. During the years
which ended
30th June, 1846
$1,396,782 86 Increase over 1844
$532,722 90
1847
1,973,364 95
do
1,109,304 99
1848
1,363,120 43
do
499,060 47
1849
1,186,814 98
do
322,755 02
1850
1,188,338 83
do
324,278 87
The increased expenditures during these years were provided for in
part by an increase of the annual appropriations for the Ordnance department, and in part by the appropriations made in an act of Congress,
passed May 13, 1846, for the prosecution of the war with Mexico; an
act of July 20, 1846, for the support of volunteers and other troops employed in the war with Mexico; and an act of March 27, 1848, further to
supply deficiencies.
The best estimate that can be made of the probable expenditures of this
department for the year ending 30th June, 1851, is $1,093,240; and for
the year ending 30th June, 1852, $1,199,315.
I have the honor to be, sir, with great respect,
G.

T A L C O T T ,

Brevet Brigadier General, Colonel of Ordnance.
Hon.

C. M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War.

L—No. 3.
PAYMASTER GENERAL'S

OFFICE,

November 1, 1850.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith the statement called for by
your letter of the 29th ultimo, showing the increased annual expenditures
on account of the pay of the army, for each of the last six years, over the
expenditures for the year 1844; and an estimate of the amounts that will
be expended in the present and next fiscal years.
The increase in the expenditures for the year ending 30th June, 1845,
"was caused by the payment of certain Florida volunteers, under the act
of 3d March, 1845, "providing payment for certain military services in
Florida.*'
The increase in the expenditures for the year ending 30th June, 1846,
was in consequence of the act of May 13, 1846, providing fir the prosecution of the war with Mexico, and act of the same date for the increase
of the rank and file of the army.
The increased expenditures for the years ending 30th June, 1847, 1848,
and 1849, were caused by the acts of the 13th May, 1846, and also by



68

Dk>c. No. 11.

the following acts, viz: act of the 15th May, 1846, for the organization of
a corps of sappers and miners; act of 19th May, 1846, for raising a regiment of mounted riflemen; act of 18th June, 1846, supplemental to the
act of 13th May, 1846, providing for the prosecution of the war with
Mexico; act of 26th June, 1846, providing for the organization of the
volunteer forces; act of 11th February, 1847, to raise for a limited time
an additional military force; act ef 3d March, 1847, making provision for
an additional number of general officers, <fcc.
The expenditures for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1849, are further
increased by the act of July 19, 1848, authorizing three months' extra
pay to the troops disbanded at the close of the war.
The increase in expenditures for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1850,
is owing to the payment of arrears of pay and three months' extra pay
due to the troops that served in Mexico.
The estimated increase in the expenditures for the current, apd next
fiscal years is caused by the act of 17th June, 1850, increasing the rank
and file of the army, and the army appropriation bill of 28th September,
1850, authorizing additional pay to officers and men serving in California and Oregon.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
BENJ. F. LARNED,
Acting Paymaster General.
Hon. C. M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War.




L—No. 3.
Statement showing the increased annual expenditures on account of the "pay, fyc., of the army," for each of the last six
years, over and above the regular authorized expenses of the military establishment as it existed on the 30th June, 1844 ;
also the supposed and estimated expenditure for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1851, and June 30, 1852.
Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1845.

$ 1 , 9 9 9 , 5 1 6 43

$ 2 , 1 0 6 , 0 4 4 16

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$106,527 73

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1846.

$ 2 , 6 8 0 , 4 4 3 53

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$680,927 10

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1847.

$7,752,390 34

Increase over the
fiseal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$5,752,873 91

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1848.

$8,488,779 53

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$6, 489,263 10

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1849.

$7,636,660 52

Expenditures in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1850.

$2,642,092 67

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$5,637,144 09

$642,576 24

Supposed and estimated expenditures for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1851, and June 30, 1852.
Supposed amount of
expenditures for the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1851.

$2,866,464 00

F4TMAITER GENERAL'* OFFICE, NWTMBER




1,1850.

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$866,947 57

Supposed amount of
expenditures for the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1852.

$2,897,720 00

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$898,203 57

BENJ, F. EARNED, deling PaymsUr Gent-rat,

L—No. 4.
Surgeon GeneraTs statement shaving the increased annual expenditures on account of Hie medical and hospital depart
mevt of the army for each of the last six years over and above the regular authorized expenses of the military establish
y
ment as it existed on the 3Qth June. 1844; also the supposed and estimated expenditures of the fiscal year ending June
30, 1851, and June 30, 1852.
Payments made Payments made Payments made
in the fiscal
in the fiscal year
in the fiscal
year
ending
ending June 30,
year ending
June 30, 1844.
1846.
June 30,1846.

$18,324 38

$21,156 06

$34,604 10

Payments made Payments made Payments made Payments made Supposed payin the fiscal year in the fiscal year in the fiscal year
in the fiscal
ments made
ending June 30,
ending June 30,
year ending
ending June 30,
in the fiscal
1848.
1847.
June 30,1850. ye&r toidiiig
1849.
June 30,1851.

$112,087 91

$170,335 67

$71,904 21

$99,299 61

Supposed payments made in
the fiscal year
ending
June
30, 1852.

$62,500 00

$67,395 00

Increase over Increase over the Increase over the Increase over the Increase over the Increase over Increase over Increase over
the fiscal year
fiscal year end
fiscal year endfiscal year end- the fiscal year the fiscid year
fiscal year endthe fiscal year
ending June
ing June 30,
ing June 30,
ending June
ing June 30,
ing June 30,
ending June
ending June
30, 1844.
1844.
1844.
30, 1844.
1844.
1844.
30, 1844.
30,1844.
$2,831 68

$16,279 72

$93,763 53

$152,011 29

$53,579 83

$80,975 23

$44, 175 62

$49,070 62

Svrgeon General's Office,
November 6, 1850.




TH. LAWSON,

Surgeon

General.

li—No. a.

5

Vol.

Page

Decrease.

Increase.

i
|
i
|

Date.

S

« S-S rS
w
" •a "c *
o ts ®*s o
5 W

Increase or decrease, as
compared with fiscal
year ending 30th June,
1844.

For the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1846

For the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1847




5
5
5

June 17, 1844
April 12,1844

5
5

June 17, 1844

For the. fiscal year ending
June 30,1845

Mar. 3, 1843
Mar. 1, 1843
Mar. 3, 1843
M a y 31, 1844

For the fiscal year ending J
June 30,1844
'

5

Mar. 3, 1845
Mar. 3, 1845

5
5

| Estimate of amount 1
j required for expendj iture during the next
1fiscalyear.
j

5 S

" P
O
* £ « t
r j 0
>- O.
«. hogJT <u
© v W
S « c '3d

Estimate of amount
required for expenditure during present
fiscal year.

<

Reference to laws authorizing the expenditures.

Total authorized to be
expended in each fiscal year ending on ,
the 30th June.

Statement showing the amount authorized to be expended by the Engineer department during the fiscal year ending on
the 30th of June, 1844; the amounts authorized to be expended'during each subsequent fiscal year; and an estimate of
the amount required for expenditure during the fiscal years ending on the 30 th of June, 1851, and on the 30 th of June,
1852, respectively.

| $568,500
$631,264 20

1*56,214 20
$6,550

Mar. 3, 1845

Pam.
Para.

Aug. 10, 184C

Pam.

579,319 00

28,769 00

$51,945 20
!

6,550
800,000
52,000 00

858,550 00 $227,285 80
6,550

5

May 15, 1846
Aug. 8 , 1 8 4 6

544,000

.

1,140,000

;

'37^666 00
1,183,200 00 551,935 80

6,200

i
i
i
1
i

—J

Date.

For the fiscal year ending)
June 30,1848
)

Vol.

Mar. 2 , 1 8 4 7
Mar. 2, 1847
Mar. 3, 1848

Pam.
Pam.
Pam-

May 3 1 , 1 8 4 8

$241,200 00

$35,000 00
|

$390,064 20
©
O

O
583, G O
643,405 00 $12,140 80

53,155 00

Pam.

o

6,650

Pam.

Mar. 3 , 1 8 4 9
Feb. 19, 1849
Mar. 3, 1849

Pam.
Pam.
Pam.

671,000

Pam.

739,800

Sept.* 16,'i 850
Sept. 28,1850

Enginekr Department, October 31,1850.

760,643 61 129,379 41

82,993 61
6,650

858,696 30 227,432 10

111,996 30
6,900

Sept. 30,1850
Amounts that will probably be required for expenditure
during the present fiscal year ending June 30, 1 8 5 1 . . . . . . . .
Amounts that will probably be required for expenditure'
during the next fiscal year ending June 30, 1852




Decrease.

$6,200

S e p t . 2 8 , i 850
For the fiscal year ending
June 30,1851

Increase.

$200,000

Aug. 12,1848
For the fiscal, year ending S
June 30,1850
i

s 5>
f

a v bp<

"5 B.s <

Page.

July "20",'1848' Pam.
For the fiscal year ending
June 30,1849

o 5>

Increase or decrease, as
compared with fiscal
year ending 30th June,
1844.

Estimate of amount
required for expenditure during the next
i fiscal year.

!§
i

5 " =-3

Estimate of amount
required for expenditure during present
fiscal year.

<

Reference to laws authorizing the expenditures.

Total authorized to be
expended in each fiscal year ending on
the 30th June.

h 5— Continued.

739,800 111,996 30

6,900

739,800 51,435 00

6,900

858,696 30
*798,135 00 166,870 80

1858,696 30
$798,135

* Estimate.

FRED. A. SMITH, Captain Engineers, (in charge.)

[rDoc. No. 11.

73

L 5—Continued.
RECAPITULATION,

Embracing expenditures for military purposes only.
For the years ending—

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,

1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852

Expended.

$624,714
572,769
852,000
1,177,000
235,000
636,755
753,993
851,796
(estimate).
791,235
(estimate).

20
00
00
00
00
00
61
30
00

6 , 4 9 5 , 2 6 3 11

Engineer Department, Novtmbtr 23, 1850.




Increase.

Decrease.

$51,945 20
$227,285 80
552,285 80
389,714 2 0
12,040
129,279
227,082
166,520

80
41
10
80

1 , 3 1 4 , 4 9 4 71

441,659 40

Dk>c. No. 11.

14

L—No. 6.
ADJUTANT

GENERAL'S

OFFICE,

Washington, November 6, 1850.
SIR: In compliance with your instructions of October 29, I respectfully
furnish the following statement, showing the expenditures on account of
the recruiting service in each of the fiscal years commencing July 1,
1845, &c.; with an estimate of the amount deemed necessary for the fiscal
year commencing July 1, 1851.
b
i
s
&

i
>.
a
«

-o
a
•H

V
"
u

« j=
a.—
•2 2
C O
3 V
o

Tear commencing
5 2 ®
2 - 3
1-.2
5 « >
B
<3
J u l y l , 1845 $14,827 92 $ 3 7 , 7 2 7
1846 16,897 0 0 1 1 6 , 8 0 2
1847 5 2 , 6 8 0 00 3 3 4 , 8 9 5
53,060
1848 None.
48,616
1849 None.
66,616
1850 None.

o S

s«

= r a
>
^ - ^
CO
08 $52,555
00 133,699
00 437,575
00 5 3 , 0 6 0
00 4 8 , 6 1 6
00 66,616

00 $ 9 5 , 6 5 8
00 8 1 , 0 1 9
00 437,575
00 5 3 , 0 6 0
00 48,616
00

a.

00 $16,897 00 $ 4 , 1 1 0 03
$41,250
00 5 2 , 6 8 0 00
397,806
00
None.
13,291
00
None.
8,847
00
None.

92
92
92
92

Expenditure for the year commencing July 1, 1844, $39,768 08.
The amount expended during the fiscal year commencing July 1,
1845, was $35,658, when the number of regiments in the army were
iwo of dragoons, four of artillery, and eight of infantry, with a total of
eDlisted men amounting to 7,590. The 29th section of the act of July
5,1838, authorizes a bounty of three months' extra pay to each non-cominissioned officer, musician or private soldier, who may re-enlist into his
company or regiment. To provide for this bounty requires an annual appropriation of about $10,000. The other appropriation is for expense of
recruiting, which varies according to the number of men to be enlisted in
each year, experience showing that the average cost per man is about $12.
The expenditure during the year commencing July 1, 1846, was
$81,019. This increased expenditure was rendered necessary by the
war with Mexico. The act of May 13, 1846, raised the several companies of the army to one hundred privates, adding thereby 7,960 men.
The act of May 15,1846, further added to the army a regiment ©f mounted riflemen, with a total of 765 enlisted men. The passage of these two
laws increased the rank and file to 16,315.
During the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1847, the expenditures
were the greatest, and came up to the full amount of the appropriations.
being $437,575. The first act which caused this large increase of expenditures was that of January 7,
to encourage enlistments in the
araiy, providing a bounty of $12 to each man who should enlist. Six
thousand recruits were then required; which, at $12 per man, amounted to
$72,000. The act of February 11, 1847, added to the army one regiment
of dragoons and nine regiments of infantry, giving a total of 10,051



[rDoc. No. 11.

75

men, to raise which force required an appropriation of $262,895. The
18th section of the act approved March 3, 1847, added two companies to
each regiment of artillery, making a further increase of 912 enlisted men.
The whole force then consisted of 27,278 enlisted men. Under the 3d
section of the act of March 3, 1847, authorizing the President to accept
the services of individual volunteers to fill vacancies, about $4(3,000 were
furnished to volunteer officers ordered on the recruiting service. This
amount was taken from the appropriation for "expense of recruiting,"
and no additi6nal appropriation was asked for. After the declaration of
peace and the reduction of the army by the 2d section of the act approved
August 14, 1848, making appropriations for the support of the army, the
regiments consisted of two of dragoons, one of mounted riflemen, four of
artillery of twelve companies each, and eight of infantry, with a total of
8,787 enlisted men. After the discharge of the ten additional regiments,
and the men in the old regiments enlisted for " during the war," the sum
of $53,060 was necessary to fill the vacancies in the army. The expenditures in the next year were somewhat less, being $48,616.
The act ©f June 17, 1850, to increase the rank and file of the army
and to .encourage enlistments, again rendered it necessary to increase the
expenditures. To raise the additional number of men thus authorized,
Congress appropriated $18,000, which, with the regular estimate submitted at the opening of the session, of $48,616, also appropriated, made
a total of $66,616. It is supposed that this entire amount will be expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1851.
It is estimated that during the next fiscal year the sum of $64,048 will
be necessary.
Respectfully submitted:
L. THOMAS,
Assistant Adjutant General.
Hon. C. M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War.

L—No. 7.
OFFICE

OF

COMMISSARY

GENERAL

OF

SUBSISTENCE,

Washington, November 1, 1850.
Sir: I have had the honor to receive your instructions of the 29th ultimo, and now enclose you a " statement showing the increased annual
expenditures, on account of 'army subsistence,' for each of the last six
years, over and above the regular authorized expenses of the military establishment as it existed on June 30, 1844; also the supposed and estimated expenditures for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1851, and June
30, 1S52.
The strength of the army at the commencement of the war with the
republic of Mexico in April, 1846, was only 7/244 men.
On the 13th May, 1846, Congress authorized the President to increase
the rank and file of each company of that army to one hundred men.
On the same day the President was authorized by Congress to call
into service volunteers not exceeding fifty thousand.



Dk>c. No. 11.

76

This volunteer force was divided into three months men, six-months
men, twelvemonths men, and volunteers for the war.
The strength of the first, when mustered into service, was 1,390.
The strength of the second, when mustered into service, was 11,211.
The strength of the third, when mustered into service, was 18,210.
The strength of the fourth, when mustered into service, was 33,956.
On the 15th May, 1846, one company of engineers (100 men) was
authorized.
On the 19th May, 1846, one regiment of riflemen (820 men) was authorized .
On the 11th February, 1847, ten additional regiments of regular troops
were authorized, amounting to 11,351 men.
All the troops here enumerated were not, as their terms of enlistment
show, in the service at one and-the same time, but the greater portion
of them were in service, particularly during the years 1847 and 1848,
and the large increased expenditures in those two years are thus accounted for.
The expenditures of the commissariat have also been greatly increased
during the whole time from June 30, 1845, to the termination of the war
with Mexico in 1848, by losses by wrecks of transports, and by large
wastage consequent upon a state of war.
Since the close of the war and the reduction of the army, it has been
found impossible to reduce the expenditures for the years 1849 and 1850
to that of 1845, because a very large part of the troops were stationed in
the distant regions of California, Oregon, and New Mexico; to which
places shipments of subsistence stores had to be made yearly in advance,
owing to the utter impracticability of procuring supplies in those regions,
and such will continue to be the case.
Most respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. GIBSON, C. G. S.
Hon.

C.

M.

CONRAD,

Secretary of War.




L—No. 3.
Statement showing the increased annual expenditures on account of " army subsistence" for each of the last six years over
and above the regular authorized expenses of the military establishment as it existed on June 30, 1844; also the supposed and estimated expenditures for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1851, and June 30, 1852.
Payments made in the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30,1845.

• 3 4 7 , 3 8 9 05

#377,794 68

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$30,405,63

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.

# 1 , 9 8 9 , 3 9 8 14

8477,716 88

Increase over the fiscal year ending June
30, 1844.

Increase over the fiscal year ending June
30, 1844.

$130,327 83

$1,642,009 09

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1848.

$3, 790,682 14

Increase over the fiscal year ending June
30,1844.

3,443,293 09

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30,1849.

$1,024,994 41

Increase over the fiscal year ending June
'30, 1844.

Payments made in
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1850.

$1,158,277 08

Increase over the
fiscal year ending
June 30, 1844.

$677,605 36

$810,888 03

Supposed and estimated expenditures for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1851, and June 30, 1852.
Supposed payments made
in the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1851.
11,235,631 63
Increase over the fiscal
year ending June 30,
1844.
$888,242 58

Supposed payments made
in the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1852.
$1,082,371 Op
Increase over the fiscal
year ending June 30,
1844.
$734,981 95

Office of Commissary General of Subsistence, Washington, November 1, 1850.



GEO. GIBSON, C. G. S.

^

Dk>c. No. 11.

78

M—No. 1.
Statement of the amount of payments on account of pensions, under the
several pension acts, for tfte years 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, and
1850.
•
Under acts from
J u l y 1,1844, to
June 3 0 , 1 8 4 9 .

Under acts prior
to July 1, 1844.

Years.

$2,434,424
1,877,139
1,352,085
946,493
995,186
874,410

1846
1847
1848
1849
1850

76
39
40
95
84
36

$118,650 00
434,024 51
645,466 67

Total payments.

$2,434,424
1,877,139
1,352,088
1,065,143
1, 429,211
1,519,877

76
39
40
95
35
03

j
9 , 6 6 7 , 8 8 4 88
:

Treasdrt Department,
Third Auditor's Office, November

15„1650.

JNO. S. GALLAHER, Auditor.

M—No. 2.
P E N S I O N O F F I C E , December 6 , 1 8 5 0 .
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a statement showing "how
much of the amounts estimated for pensions for each year ending 30th
June, 1851 and 1852, will be required under acts consequent upon the Mexican war, and the number of claims yet to be presented under those acts,
and the amount required for those estimated claims yet to be presented,"
in compliance with your request of the 2d instant.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAS. E. HEATH,
Commissioner of Pensions.
Hon.

THOMAS

CORWIN,

Secretary of the Treasury.




[rDoc. NO. 1 1 . 79
A statement showing "how much of the amounts estimated for pensiom
for each year ending 3Oth June, 1851, and ZOth June, 1852, will be required under acts consequent upon the Mexican war; and the number of
claims yet to be presented under those acts, and the amount required for
those estimated claims yet to be presented;'' prepared in compliance with
a request from the Secretary of the Treasury,
It is estimated that the amount required for the fiscal year
ending 30th June, 1851, for paying the invalid pensioners
who were wounded or disabled from disease contracted
while in the Service of the United States, during the Mexican war, will be - $300,000 00
For the fiscal 3'ear ending 30th June, 1852, for paying the
same class of pensioners, will be required
- 360,000 00
For paying pensioners under the first section of the act of
4th July, 1836, 21st July, 184S, and 22d February, 1849,
and joint resolution of September 28, 1850, giving five
years' half-pay to the widows and orphans of all officers
and soldiers who died of wounds or of disease contracted
while in the service of the United States, during the war
with Mexico, for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1851
250,000 0®
For the same class of pensioners for the fiscal year ending
30th June, 1852 . . .
- 300,000 00
There will probably be added to the rolls before the close of
the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1851, five hundred invalid pensioners, who were wounded or otherwise disabled while in the service of the United States, during
the war with Mexico, which to pay them will require,
at $'120 per annum for each pensioner .
.
.
60,000 00
For the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1852, there will in all
probability be added que thousand more, which, at an
average of $120 per annum for each pensioner, will require 120,000 00
For pensioners under the first section of the act of 4th July,
1836, and act of 21st July, 1848, act 22d February, 1849,
, and joint resolution of September, it is estimated that
twelve hundred and fifty will be added before the close of
the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1851, which, at an average of $60 for each pensioner, will require
75,000 00
For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1852, the additions to
the rolls will probably exceed those whose five years'
half-pay will expire by one thousand, which, at an average
of $60 per annum for each pensioner, will require
60,000 00
JAMES E. HEATH,
Commissioner of Pensions.
PENSION OFFICE,

December 6 ,




1850.

Dk>c. No. 11.

80

N.
DEPARTMENT OF T H E

INTERIOR,

Office Indian Affairs, December 6, 1850.
SIR: In compliance with your request of this date, I have the honor
respectfully to refer you to the accompanying statement, as containing the
information desired respecting the amounts expended and estimated for,
on account of the Indians in California, Utah, and New Mexico.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
L. LEA , Cqpimissioner.
H o n . THOMAS

CORWIN,

Secretary of the Treasury.

Statement of the amounts of expenditures made, appropriated, mnd estimated for, on account of the Indians in California, Utah, and New
Mexico.
Expended in—
Appropriated
for 1851.
1847.

1848.

California
Utah and N e w M e x i c o .

1849.

Estimated
for 1852.

1850.

$ 1 , 4 0 0 25
5, 413 12 $3,017 28

$ 2 5 , 0 0 0 00

$91,750 00

3 1 , 5 0 0 00

3 9 , 0 5 0 00

N o t e . — I n addition to the amounts expended as above stated, there were placed in the hands
of agents, which has not been accounted for, as f o l l o w s :
$1,449 75
3,500 00
2 , 7 5 0 00

In California ( A . Johnston sub-agent)
In Utah (J. Wilson agent)
In N e w M e x i c o ( E . Cooper agent)

7,699 75

Office of Indian Affairs,
December 6,1850.




L. LEA,

Commissioner.

Total.

Estimated expenditures
for the .fiscal year ending June 30, 1852.

Actual and estimated
expenditures for the
fiscal year ending June
30,1851.

Expenditures for the
fiscal year ending June
30, 1850.

Expenditures /or the
fiscal year ending June
30, 1849.

Expenditures for the
fiscal year ending June
30, 1848.

Objects.

Expenditures for the
fiscal year ending June
30, 1847.

Expenditures for the
fiscal year ending June
30, 1846.

O.—Statement shotting in part the actual and estimated civil expenditures for the seven years ending June 30, 1852,for
objects not appropriated for or mot included in the sum o/$21,380,049 36, exhibited as the expenditures of the year
ending June 30, 1845, exclusive ef the public debt.

1
Instalments and interest under
12th article of the treaty with

AS. 539.530 06 ^ 4 . 3 0 8 , 8 6 6 31 $3,360, 000 00 $3,180,000' 00 $16,388,396 37

Payment of liquidated claims
hgainst M e x i c o , per act of July
Renewal

«f

diplomatic

2 , 0 8 9 , 5 7 8 84

2 , 0 8 9 , 5 7 8 84

inter-

7,851 48
4 , 0 0 0 00

$21,776 65

$ 4 , 5 0 0 00
Expenees of board of commis-

20, 428 39
59,877 96

!

Territorial governments in Utah
Expenses of loans and treasury
# 2 , 4 0 0 00

Supply ins: a n y deficiency in the
regular revenues from postage,
650,000 00

26, 184 34 |

2 5 , 5 3 2 02

3 9 , 0 7 6 87
500 00
5 , 0 0 0 00

• 14,307 25
1 7 , 5 0 0 00
112,800 00

44,428 39

151,647 04
100,000 00

100,000 00
100,000 00

335,000 00
200,000 00

340,000 00

23, 475 00

2 0 , 0 0 0 00

300,000 00

640,000 00

77, 100 00

Survey of the boundary line between the U . Statea and Mexico
Survey of the coast of California
Light-houses, dry-dock, customhouse, and marine hospital in




8 7 , 5 6 0 61

• 3, 432 48

70,200 00

147,300 00

2 3 , 3 7 8 93
1 , 2 5 8 , 0 0 0 00
132,200 00

2 0 , 0 0 0 00

150,879 41
1 , 2 7 6 , 0 0 0 00
600,000 00

350,000 00

875,000 00

X 1—Continued.
TJ a w
>
JS O
•3 a
IT?
Object*.

v "it

is c
3 t) ,
. -3 0 lO
H 3 o
a £.ao
&-_> * SS

2 fi<*

1

-2
M 0 O
9

Postage charged to the executive
departments or bureaus there$160,231 62 $311,298 99
of, &c.
Compensation to the Post Office
Department for mail services
performed for the several departments of government, per
act March 3, 1847
Expenses of collecting the revenue from the saleB of public
lands
Expenses of collecting the revenue from customs
Payment of debentures, drawbacks, bounties, and allowances, per act March 3, 1849.
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, per act August 10,
1846
257,584 07
Building light-houses, beacons,
buoys, &c..
Refunding duties under various
acts passed since March 3,
1845, and in conformity with
decisions of courts
127,071 37




812,631 62

&S

-

111
a n
>
g-go

C < <<
S U —
a o.g „
t5 X V3 S5
« ®2

gf.

$22,221 96

$200,000 00
$137, 410 95

170,835 0 0 !

1,974,331 22 | 1,910,780 78

$200,000 00
170,200 00
2 , 4 5 0 , 0 0 0 00

538,248 30 }

437,055 03

509,000 00

30,910 07

$30,910 14

30,910 14

30,910 14

30,910 14

182,169 88

141,203 01

172,158 20

245,184 17

234,080 00

90,812 66

57,601 51

557, 176 07

534,775 04

951,638 77 I 373,423 24

7 , 9 3 8 , 7 2 6 91

7,470,697 58 I 9 , 0 1 4 , 2 6 7 16

8 , 2 4 0 , 1 6 5 18

80,426 38 j

83

Doc. No. 110—Continued.

/Note.—The various items included in the foregoing statement amount t o . . . .

$34,801,550 46

T o which add the following:
Aggregate increase in the civil list, v i z :
Legislative
Executive
Judiciary

#2,671,679 18
1,543,120 58
43,762 80
4 , 2 5 8 , 5 6 2 56
52,811 06

in other items included in the civil list

4,305,751 50
Aggregate increase of sundry items included in miscellaneous,
viz:
Building marine hospitals
Building custom-houses
Building revenue cutters
Support and maintenance of light-houses, & c . . . . . . . .
Marine hospital establishments

s

$249,635
448,403
101,999
515,310
75,392

53
61
50
23
50
—

1,390,741 37
40,398,043 33

TaiAioRY Department,
Register's Office, December 10, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES, Register,

P—No. 1,
S'atement of the amount of interest paid upon the loans of 1846, 1847, and lB4B,and upon treasury notes issued under
acts of July 22, 1846, and January 28, 1847, during the fiscal years ending June 30, 1847, 1848, 1849, and 1850, and
to be paid during the years 1851 and 1852.
Loan of 1847.
Fiscal years ending—

June 30, 1847
1848
184 9
1850
185 1
185 2

Loan of 1846.

$173,524
299,948
299,948
299,948
299,948
299,948

66
96
96
96
96
96

1,673,269 46

T r e a s u r y Department, Register's Office, November 21, 1850.




On stock.

$54,555
566, 035
1, 119,495
1,543,703
1,627,050
1,597,050

33
84
65
64
00
00

6,507,890 46

Loan of 1848.

On treasury notes,
act* of 1846 and
1847.

$45,935
731,817
672,664
239,558
1,730

25
13
89
77
73

1,691, 706 77

;

*680,91*3
944,963
914,400
944,400

62
75
00
00

3 , 5 1 4 , 6 7 7 37

Total.

$274,015
1,597,801
2,773,023
3,028,175
2,873,129
2,841,398

24
93
12
12
69
96

13,387,544 0C

TOWNS END HAINES, Register,

Doe. No. 11.
P—No.

2.

Estimate of the interest which will accrue on the loans of 1846, 1847, and
1848, from July 1, 1852, to the periods ichen each will become reimbursable.
T o July 1, 1853, on loan of 1846
184 7
1848

$299,948 96
1 , 5 9 7 , 0 5 0 00
944,400 00
2,841,398
"2,841,398
2,841,398
2,841,398

96
96'
96
96

2,650,472
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450
2,541,450

1854, on same
1855...do
1 8 5 6 . . . do
1857, on loan of 1846 to November 12,1856, when
reimbursable
1847
184 8

54
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

109,022 54
1 , 5 9 7 , 0 5 0 00
944,400 00

1858, on loans of 1847 and 1848
1859
do
do
1860
do
do
186 1
do
do
186 2
do
do
186 3
do
do
1864
do
do
186 5
do
do
186 6
do
do
186 7
do
do
1868, on loan of 1847 to January 1, 1868
1848 to July 1, 1868

798,525 00
944, 400 00
1,742,925 00
4 1 , 1 7 3 , 4 9 3 38

Treasury Department,
Register's Office, November 30, 1850.
T O W N S E N D HAINES,

Register.

Q.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, T H I R D AUDITOR'S

OFFICE,

December 9, 1850.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following statement of the cases
pending and anticipated, with the amount of each, growing out of the
Mexican war:
Cases pending 673, amounting to
$223,069 37
500,000 00
Cases anticipated 500,
"
7,000 Mexican horse claims, at $60 each
42,000 00
7§5,069 37
I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO.

S.

GALLAHER,

Auditor.
H o n . T H O M A S C O R WIN*,

Secretary of the Treasury.



W

Doc. Np. 11.
R.

Statement of the annual expenses of the government, exclusive of the payments on account of the public debt, of trust funds, and of the collection
of the revenue,from January 1, 1828, to December 31, 1845.
Expenditures.

Years.

From-January 1 to December 31,

Average annual increase of expenditure from 1828 to 1841,
$943,923 56.

1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837

$12,530,846
12,632,321
13,229,533
13,863,786
16,514,134
22,044,237
' 18,410,393
17,005,418
29,358,902
31,505,680

43
84
33
14
69
31
10
55
16
18

187,095,253 73
1838
1839
1840
11841

31,468,829
25,410,050
23,249,626
25,745,776

04
67
95
28

1 Average annual expenditure,.
>
$ 2 6 , 4 6 8 , 5 7 0 73.

105,874,282 94
From January 1 to June 30
July 1,1842, to June 30
July 1, 1 8 4 3 . . . . d o
July 1, 1 8 4 4 . . . . d o
July 1 to December 31

1842
1843
1814
1845
1845

12,888,228
22,724,205
19,835,793
21,273,705
15,227,713

63
78
48
67
58

Average annual expenditure,.
$ 2 2 , 9 8 7 , 4 1 1 78.

91,949,647 14

Treasury Department,
Register's Office, November 1, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

s.

A r m y s u b s i s t e n c e . . . $377,794 68 $ 9 9 , 9 2 2
P a y , &c., of the army
106,044 16 5 7 4 , 3 9 9
Ordnance department
988, 723 74 408,059
Surgeon
General's
statement
13,448
2 1 , 1 5 6 06
Quartermaster General'e s t a t e m e n t . . . .
9 8 5 , 7 0 8 50 1 , 3 4 1 , 5 9 3
Adjutant General's
statement
*4,110
3 9 , 7 6 8 08
Engineer department.
572,769 00 2 7 9 , 2 3 1




04

9 0 , 9 3 1 85

149, 179 61

63 1 6 , 1 4 0 , 6 7 7 74 1 6 , 2 2 8 , 6 7 3 85
08
00

i

4 1 , 2 5 0 92
604.231 00

2 , 7 1 6 , 6 5 3 36|
* 4 , 1 1 0 OB;

3 9 7 , 8 0 6 92
*337, 769 00

Total.

Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1852. t

1.

Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1851-1
I

Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1850.
j

t
20 $ 1 , 6 1 1 , 6 0 3 46 $ 3 , 4 1 2 , 8 8 7 46
37 5 , 6 4 6 , 3 4 6 18 6 , 3 8 2 , 7 3 5 37
3 7 4 , 3 9 6 69
12
984,641 21

j Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1849.

Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30t 1848.

Excess over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1847.

Exccss over 1845, in
the year ending
June 30, 1846.
i

Expenditures in the
year ending June
!
30, 1845.

Statement showi?ig the annual increase of expenditure in the different bureaus of the War Department from June 30,
1845, (the year immediately preceding the Mexican wary) to June 30, 1850; and the estimated excess for the fiscal
years ending June 30, 1851 and 1852.

$647,199 73 $780,482 40 $857,836 95 $704,576 32 $ 8 , 1 1 4 , 5 0 8 52
5 , 5 3 0 , 6 1 6 36 536,048 51 760,419 84 791,675 84 2 0 , 2 2 3 , 2 4 1 47
198,091 24 199,615 09 104,516 26 210,591 26 2 , 4 7 9 , 9 1 0 87
50, 748 15

78,143 55

41,343 94

4 6 , 2 3 8 94

470,034 08

5 , 1 9 1 , 8 2 7 51 3 , 3 0 9 , 5 9 0 10 2 , 9 3 0 , 2 4 5 50 4 , 0 0 6 , 8 3 0 15 4 9 , 1 4 9 , 4 3 8 48
13,291 92
6 3 , 9 8 6 0u

8 , 8 4 7 92
181,224 61

2 6 , 8 4 7 92
279,027 3«

2 4 , 2 7 9 92
218, 466 00

508,215 44
1 , 2 8 8 , 3 9 6 91

2 6 , 9 4 5 , 6 7 9 90
337,769 00

2 , 7 1 2 , 5 4 3 98j 2 5 , 1 1 9 , 6 8 2 36 2 6 , 6 0 7 , 9 1 0 90 1 1 , 6 9 5 , 7 6 0 91 5 , 0 9 3 , 9 5 2 18 5 , 0 0 0 , 2 3 7 71 6,002, 658 43 8 2 , 2 3 2 , 7 4 5 77

* Decrease.

f Estimated.

[rDoc. No. 11. 88
T .
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

September 26, 1850.
SIR: In compliance with the resolution of the Senate, "that the Secretary of the Treasury be requested to report what have been the measures
adopted to prevent frauds upon the revenue since the passage of the act of
1846, and what has been the result," I have the honor to state, that the
measures which have been adopted by this department to prevent frauds
upon the revenue, under the present tariff act, may be found in the circular instructions that were issued to collectors and other officers of the customs before the act went into operation, viz: November 11, 26 and 28,
J.846, and those issued since the 1st December, 1846. Upon reference to
these circulars, it will be perceived that unusual apprehension was felt
that under the change from specific duties to duties levied upon the foreign value of imported merchandise, there would ^>e great temptation to
the commission of frauds by undervaluation in invoices and entries; and
in the circular of the 28th November, 1846, the officers of the customs were
advised that it was " the determination of the department to exercise its
whole power, under the law, to guard the revenue of the government
against fraud and undervaluation in invoices and entries, and to maintain
the business of importing in the hands of the honest merchant and fair
trader." The officers were instructed to take the duties in the goods imported when there was reason to believe that there was fraud or undervaluation, to exact penalties, and to make seizures in cases authorized by
law; and in the circulars of the 11th and 26th November, 1846, their special attention was called to the provisions contained in the 2d section of the
civil and diplomatic appropriation act of the 10th August, 1846, requiring
that "in appraising all goods at any port of the United States, heretofore
subjected to specific duties, but upon which ad valorem duties are imposed by the act of 30th July , 1S46, reference shall be had to im'oices and
values of similar goods imported in the last fiscal year, under such general and uniform regulations for the prevention of fraud or undervaluation
as shall be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury."
Notwithstanding the instructions contained in these circulars, issued in
advance of the operation of the act which commenced 1st December,
1846, it became necessary to issue another "to collectors, appiaisers, and
other officers of the customs," on the 6th July, 1847, with rules and
regulations in regard to appraisements, in which Mr. Secretary Walker
stated that " this course was rendered necessary by recent attempts upon
the part of merchant appraisers, in a few of the ports of the United States,
to establish for themselves certain regulations in regard to appraisements
wholly inconsistent with law and instructions." It is stated "that in
some of the ports these appraisers estimate the value of the goods as at
the date of the purchase, however remote or distant, and in other ports
they take the value at the date of shipment to the United States. The
last is the true construction of the law, long since declared by this
department, and adopted generally throughout the Union. The proviso of the 16th section of the act of the 30th of August, 1842, is
clear and emphatic upon this subject, and prescribes the date, in reference to which the value is to be estimated, as 'the period of exportation to
the United S'.ates,* and air words preceding in that section, under the



[rDoc. No. 11.

89

settled rule of interpreting statutes, must be made to conform to the succeeding language of the proviso. This would be the rule, even if there
was an absolute conflict between the words of the proviso and of any
preceding part of the section; for the language of the proviso, being the
last expressed will of the legislature,must prevail. Were it otherwise,
the law would prescribe two kinds of market values—the one in the first
part of the 16th section, being the date of the purchase, and the other in
the proviso, being the date of shipment. The most enormous frauds, also,
would be the consequence of such construction. Simulated, fictitious
and ante dated purchases, to suit the period of lowest price, would prevail
extensively, to the great injury of the fair trader and of the revenue. In
truth, under such system the whole importing business would soon be
thrown into the hands of the dishonest and fraudulent, who would be
willing to produce ante-dated or fictitious foreign sales, and that most
useful and meritorious citizen, the honest and fair trader, would be
thrown entirely out of the market. It is known at present—at the commencement of the proposed system—that etan where the purchases are
not deemed ,by the parties fraudulent, the designing, to import into the
United States, goes to some prior purchaser, who has purchased,not for
importation into the United States at some prior date, when the goods were
much lower in value, and imports the goods in the name of thefirstpurchaser, consenting to give a certain profit or price on the delivery here,
and thus deprives the revenue of the difference in value, and obtains a
most unjust advantage over the fair trader, who will resort to no such artifices. It is the duty of tlfis department to declare that such a practice is
a fraud upon, the revenue, and subjects the goods to seizure and confiscation, and the parties committing the fraud to all the penalties * prescribed
bylaw; and the utmost vigilance is enjoined upon collectors, appraisers,
and all other officers of the customs, in taking all proper measures to detect
and punish all who are engaged in such fraudulent practiced."
Notwithstanding this emphatic and just condemnation of the fraudulent
practices here described, and the efforts made to protect the fair trader,
the result has shown that they have not been effectual. The temptation
proved too great, and fraudulent invoices continued to multiply.
On the Tth of August,.1848, Mr. Secretary Walker instructed the officers of the customs that " forced sales of goods in the foreign markets at
reduced prices, under extraordinary and peculiar circumstances, cannot
be taken as the true market value of such goods."
And on the 26th December, 1848, he found it necessary to repeat much
that he had previously said, and extend his instructions, in consequence
of "differences of practice existing in the several ports relative to the appraisement of merchandise." In this circular, Mr. Walker says that
•"the interests of the country, and of fair and hqnorable merchants, require
that this department should, by e\rery means in its power, secure not only
the revenue against loss, but should maintain such merchants, in their
Business, against sales of imported articles at diminished rates, arising
from fraud or undervaluation."
"Whenever it is found necessary by the regular appraisers, or merchant
appraisers, to guard against fraud or undervaluation, they will carry into
effect the provisions of the 2d section of the act of the 10th August, 1846,
i s enforced b y c i r c u l a r instructions of the 11th and 26th November, 1846.
The last fiscal year designated in this section was the last fiscal year pre


[rDoc. No. 11. 90
ceding the enactment of that law, which was the fiscal year ending the
3Qth June, 1S46, to whicty reference is required by the law to values and
invoices of similar goods, when necessary to prevent fraud or undervaluation."
In presenting to the Senate "what have been the measures adopted to
prevent frauds upon the revenue since the passage of the tariff act of the
30th July, 1840," it has been considered due to Mr. Secretary Walker
that the measures which originated with himself should be made prominent; all the instructions issued by him continue in fullforceat the present
time, and govern the officers of the customs in the execution of the revenue laws.
In this connexion the special notice of the Senate is invited to an important question, which is likely to call for the early interposition of Congress, as well to guard the revenue as to protect the honest importer.
Upon reference to the treasury circular dated 6th July, 1847, it will appear that by the 23d section of the act of 30th August, 1842, which
makes it "the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury, from time to time,
t6 establish such rules and regulations, not inconsistent with the laws of the
United .States, to secure a just, faithful and impartial appraisal of all goods
imported into the United States, andjust and proper entries of such actual
market value or wholesale price thereof," Mr. Secretary Walker decided
that the 16th section of the act of 30th August, 1842, prescribed that the
date in reference to which the value of foreign merchandise is to be estimated was the period of exportation to the United States, and very clearly exhibited the consequences of any other construction to the revenue
arid the importer. This matter was involved in a suit commenced by
Thompson & Forman, of London, extensive manufacturers of railroad
iron, against Philip Greely, jr., collector of the customs at Boston.
Thompson <fc Forman shipped a cargo of railroad iron from Newport,
in Wales, to Boston. The invoice and bills of lading for the same bear
date the 24th of February?- IS49, and the price per invoice was JSo per
ton, The United States appraisers appraised the value at
per ton.
On an appeal to merchant appraisers, it was appraised at J?5 155. per ton.
The duty was paid, and a penalty for undervaluation imposed and likewise paid. It was admitted that on the 24th of February, 1849, the date
of the invoice and bill of lading, S o 15s. per ton was the true market value
of such iron. Thompson & Forman, the manufacturers, claimed that
this iron was contracted for on the 24th of January, 1849, at which time
the market value thereof was only £ o per ton. On this point the charge
of Judge Woodbury, of the Supreme Court, as reported, was, "that the acts
of Congress expressly provide that the time to be selected for fixing the
value is the time when the article is purchased or procured abroad, unless
the article is one imported from a country where it was not grown or
manufactured. There, the provisions in the acts of 1823 and 1S42 provide that the value shall be fixed as at the time of exportation."
"I am aware that in practice at some custom-houses, the time of the
purchase and procurement is usually, as a general rule, considered the
date of the bill of sale. This would in most cases not differ from the
value at the time of the purchase, as it varies often but a few days or
weeks, and the price but a few farthings. But in cases where the difference in time and price is in truth considerable, and the importer requests
the true time of purchase to be taken, the custom-house and courts and



[rDoc. No. 11. 91
juries would not comply with their oaths to follow the law, unless all
were governed by the value at the time of purchase or procurement."
Upon a comparison of the opinions of Mr. Secretary Walker and those
of Judge Woodbury upon this point, it will be seen that if the judge be
correct, the foreign manufacturer can make his selection of the date at
which his merchandise was procured, and thereby be enabled to value his
commodity to suit his interest—whether at the time of shipment or time
of manufacture; whereas a purchaser is confined to the date of purchase..
If the law allows any distinction between the duties which shall be payable by manufacturers and purchasers of iron, an immediate correction
should be made.
Among the provisions of law for the prevention of frauds upon the
revenue, will be found the second section of the civil and diplomatic appropriation bill of the 10th August, 1846, which requires that4'in appraising all goods, at any port of the United States, heretofore subjected to
specific duties, but on which ad valorem duties are imposed by the act
of 30th July, 1S46, entitled 'An act reducing the duty on imports and for
other purposes,' reference shall be had to values and invoices of similar
goods imported during the last fiscal year, under such general and uniform regulations for the prevention of fraud or undervaluation as shall be
prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury."
Appeals have been made to this department to execute the power conferred upon the Secretary of the Treasury by this act. It is represented
by persons familiar with this subject, that it was the intention of Congressto provide against frauds by the undervaluation of articles that had previously paid specific duties, by requiring a reference to the values and
invoices of similar goods imported during the previous fiscal year, and
the adoption of those values in the assessment of duties. That frauds
and undervaluations have been perpetrated to a fearful extent in the
importation of articles that formerly paid specific duties is undeniable,
and that effectual means to prevent them should be applied all agree.
Hitherto the provisions of this act have been inoperative. If the power
which is contended for should be exercised to the extent and in the
manner desired, it would entirely change the operation of the act of 30th
July, 1846, by fixing the value of a great number of articles for the
assessment duty much above their present market value in foreigrrcountries. It has been questioned whether Congress intended to confer
powers of this kind upon the head of this department, and it is respectfully submitted to the Senate what construction should be placed upon,
this provision, or what means shall be adopted to accomplish the object
in view.
The circular issued by Mr. Secretary Walker, under date of December 26, 1648, was his last upon this subject. My immediate predecessor
found new modes of evading the revenue laws in practice; and, on the 12 th.
October, 1849, instructed the officers of the customs upon several important points, viz: that it had been '-'represented that importers were in the
practice of omitting to produce invoices of merchandise on the alleged
ground that none had been received, and asking entry to be allowed on
appraisement. The frequency of these occurrences forbid the idea that
the non-reception of an invoice usually proceeds from mistake or accident, but induces the belief of intention and design, probably with th&
view of evading the additional duty imposed by the 17th section of th&



m

Doc. No. 11,

tfct of August 30, 1842, and the 8th section of the existing tariff act o f
July 30, 1846.
" Where goods have been actually purchased, the law requires the invoice to state the true cost, and not the market value abroad. The privilege, therefore, given in the 8th section of the act-referred to, is to enable importers of any goods that have been actually purchased, on making
entry of the same, to add to the cost given in the invoice to bring it up to
the true market value abroad. Where goods have been obtained by the
owner in any other way than by actual purchase, the law requires the invoice to exhibit the fair market value abroad.
" Where the value declared in the entry shall, on due appraisement of
the goods, be found so for below the foreign cost, or market value, as to
raise a presumption of being fraudulently invoiced, seizure and confiscation of the goods should take place under the provisions of the act of 2d
March, 1799, and prosecution of the offending party under the 19th section of the tariff act of 30th August, 1842, instituted."
And on' the 5th of July, 1850, it became necessary to repeat, in substance, the rules and regulations prescribed by Mr. Secretary Walker, in
regard to the date in reference to which appraisements of the market
value of imports should be made:
" It has been represented that in many cases the appraisers have felt
restrained, in the discharge of their duties, by the result of frequent appeals from their decisions. In order, therefore, to s e c u r e a just, faithful,
aind iriapartial appraisal of all goods, wares, and merchandise imported
into the United States, the following rules and regulations are established:
"1. That the period of the exportation of merchandise is the time at
which the value or price of any article is to be fixed by the appraisers.
"2. That in ordinary cases the date of the bill of lading may be regarded as the period of exportation.
"3. That in all important cases the appraisers will pursue the course indicated in the 17th section of the act of 30th August, 1842, and the collector will preserve the evidence and papers in each such case, to be transmitted to the department when called for.
"4. That in all cases of appeal from the decision of the appraisers, the
result of such appeal, with all the papers connected therewith, and the
views of the collector thereon, are to be forwarded to the department immediately.
"5. That in order that the department may be informed, as far as may
be, of the appraised value of the principal articles imported, and with a
view to secure the greatest practical uniformity, a mouthly report shall be
forwarded according to the form herewith, (A.)
"6. That where merchandise shall be entered at ports where there are'
no appraisers appointed, the foreign value is to be ascertained, in the
itianner before prescribed, by the revenue officers to whom'is comiii£tted bv the laws the estimating ^nd collection of duties in such cases.'*
In order to ascertain the operation of the tariff act of the 30th July,
1846.,'the extent and the manner in which frauds upon the revenue were
committed, Mr, Secretary Meredith issued a circular, under date of the
6th bf August, 1849, as follows:
<4
Representations have been made to this department of the unequal
ojietation of the act of Congress of the 30th July, 1846, 'reducing the



Doc. No. I h

m

•duty on imports, and for other purposes,' and likewise of the increase of
frauds upon the revenue since this act went into effect.
" In order that information of a definite and reliable character upojri
these and other points may be in the possession of the department, r e quest that you will state such facts as are within your knowledge of tfye
practical operation of the act referred to—especially,
'
"1. In regard to the equality of its operation throughout the Union—
the agreement or variance of appraisements at the different ports.
" 2. In regard to fraudulent invoices.
"3. In regard to the undervaluation of merchandise.
"4. In regard to the effects of abolishing specific duties*
" 5. The practical operation of the third section of this act, under
which, on all merchandise 'not specially provided for, a duty of twenty
per cent, ad valorem' is levied; this rate of duty being less than the
rates imposed upon the manufactures of wool, worsted, cotton, silk,
leather, wood, paper, glass, bone, ivory, iron, copper, tin, lead, or other
metal, &c.
" 6. The effects of levying different rates of duty upon the manufactures of the same material, viz: wool, cotton, silk, hemp, glass, wood,
paper, copper, &c.
' ' " 7. The effect of levying different rates of duty upon the 'manufactures of wool' and the 'manufactures of worsted.'
" 8. The effect of levying the same rates of duty upon raw materials
as are imposed upon the manufactures thereof, as in the cases of wool,
iron,

&c.

"And also the effect in those cases where the rates of dtity upon tfye
manufacmres are less than the rates imposed upon the raw material, as in
the cases of wool, hemp, copper, &c.
"9. In regard to the effect upon the business of American merchants
engaged in the importation of foreign merchandise."
To this circular numerous replies were received, a portion of which
were presented in the last annual report to Congress from this department,
and to which the Senate is respectfully referred, as showing the results of
the measures which had been adopted to preventft-audsupon the revenue
so far as they were known to the parties.
In order that the Senate may appreciate some of the difficulties of securing a just, faithful and impartial appraisal of all goods, wares and merchandise imported into the United States, and just and proper entries of
the actual market value or wholesale price thereof, under our present system and laws, a single case of recent occurrence will be given:
Three shipments of pimento were made from the island of Jamaica at
about the same period—two of them to, New York by the same Ve^stjl,
the invoices of which bear the same date—the other to Baltimore,
all
for account of the shippers.
"',"<„
The New York invoices were both at 2fd. ger pound; but b§fote
making entry, one of the parties added \d. j^rpound, to make the . f e e
conform to the fair market value. The other entered his )dthoUt;fifing
any addition to'the value. The appraisers &dded|c£ per pourfd
value. The parties demanded a reappraisemenVfeymerchants, ^niph was
held, and the appraisers'valuation was stistained. The additionar duty
was accordingly assessed.
At Baltimore, entry was made without any addition to the value; the
appraisers added \d. to the value. A reappraisemen iby merchants was



94

Dk>c. No. 11.

demanded, and the appraisers' valuation was not sustained. Upon a report of all the facts to the Secretary of the Treasury, he decided that "as
these merchant appraisers had placed before them, at the time, evidence
furnished on appraisement at New York of importations of pimento from
Jamaica, shipped about the same time, going to show that the market
value of the article was higher than that stated in the invoice under review, the department is compelled to infer that their estimate of value
refers solely to the price or cost paid by the owner or shipper, and not the
actual market value or wholesale price, at the time of shipment, in the
principal markets of the country. This being the case, their appraisement is not in conformity with law, and cannot be treated or taken as valid
and effectual, and must consequently be disregarded."
From this review of some of "the measures adopted to prevent frauds
upon the revenue since the passage of the act of 30th July, 1846," it is
believed that all the authority conferred by law upon this department has
been executed, unless it should be decided that the construction of the 2d
section of the civil and diplomatic appropriation bill of 10th August, 1846,
contended for by those interested, is the true one.
Without extending this communication to an unreasonable length, the
answer to the inquiry contained in the resolution of the Senate, "what
has been the result of the measures adopted to prevent these frauds?"
may be briefly stated.
All the frauds which can be perpetrated, by double invoices and false
valuations, continue without abatement. Honest merchants and fair traders have been driven from the business of importing foreign merchandise,
being unable to compete with the dishonest practices that prevail, and
which our present system favors.
The business of importing merchandise has fallen rapidly and permanently into the hands of foreign manufacturers and merchants, and our
own citizens are deprived of a lucrative employment in consequence of
these systematic frauds.
In the last annual report from this department several tables were inserted, to illustrate the effect of the substitution of duties on the foreign
value of merchandise in place of specific duties. Tailing two as examples
of the operation of our present system, the attention of the Senate is invited
to the result, viz :
Madeira wine.
For five months ending 30th November, 1846, under specific
duties, average value per gallon
For seven months ending 30th June, 1847, under ad valorem
duties, average value per gallon
For the year ending 30th of June, 1848, under ad valorem duties, average value per gallon
Foj; the year ending 30th June, 1849, under ad valorem duties,
average value per gallon
.
.
.
.
.
For nine months ending 31st March, 1850, under ad valorem
duties, average value per gallon
-




$1 09
41
48
54
48

m Doc. No. 11,
Brandy.

*

Por five months ending 30th November. 1846, under specific
duties, average cost per gallon
- $1 .07
Por seven months ending 30th June, 1847, under ad valorem
duties, average cost per gallon
92
Por the year ending 30th June, 1848, under ad valorem duties,
average cost per gallon
, • 82
For the year ending 30th June, 1849, under ad valorem duties,
average cost per gallon
65
For nine months ending 31st March . 1850, under ad valorem
1
duties, average cost per gallon
64
From inquiries instituted by this department, it was clearly shown that
•
the value of these articles did not decline in the countries from which
they were imported to the extent which the above tables would indicate;
nor did the prices at which they were sold to consumers at all conform to
the declared values in the invoices and entries.
The particulars of many cases of the grossest fraud have been furnished
to the department, and the evidence is conclusive that, so long as the
present ad valorem system is continued, they will prevail.
The appraisers in the seven principal ports, where alone any appraisers are employed, have been excited to labor and vigilance in the highest
degree commendable, and have been sustained by the department in
their efforts.
There are, however, ninety five ports of entry where there are no appraisers. From these very few instances have been reported of the detection of frauds or undervaluations, while there is every reason to believe
that they are as frequent at these ports as at others. The increase, annually, of new collection districts, without appraisers, opens new avenues
for the introduction of foreign merchandise, without sufficient protection
to the revenue.
Many frauds have been detected, and the penalties imposed by law
have been inflicted; seizures have been made; and, recently, prosecutions of the offending parties have been commenced.
The facilities for ascertaining the true market value of the great variety
of foreign, merchandise in the principal markets of the countries of production or manufacture are very limited at best, and are lessening rapidly, as merchants of known character are forced to abandon their business
as importers.
The means at the disposal of this department are entirely inadequate to
such an examination of imports as will effectually suppress the systematic frauds known to be extensively perpetrated.
In conclusion, I take the liberty to suggest that adequate remedies for
these frauds can only be provided by acts of Congress; that mainly they
attach to the system of levying ad valorem duties upon the market value
of merchandise in foreign countries, which it is almost impossible for the
officers of the customs to ascertain under the most favorable circumstances; and that, practically, very few of them pretend to accurate knowledge concerning them; that the longer this system is continued, the
"weaker will become the restraints—the stronger the inducements to
defraud the revenue.
*
Our dependence for revenue is now upon the receipts from duties




levied upon the importation of foreign merchandise. The rates of dutyare fixed by law, but the values upon which they are imposed are left entirely to interested foreigners.
I would, therefore, respectfully submit that many of the inequalities
of our present system would, in my opinion, be remedied by the substitution of home for foreign valuation of dutiable merchandise. This
change would place all importers upon an equal footing in respect to the
.valuations for duty; it wquld both guard the revenue against most of
the fraudulent practices complained of, and tend to its increase.
Although the period of the adjournment of Congress has been fixed,
and is now at hand, I venture to recommend that the change be made at
the present session.
Most respectfully, your obedient servant,
THOS. CORWIN,
Secretary of the Treasury.
Hon. WM.

R.

KIN«,

President of the Senate.




Statement thoibing tke advances made at the offices ~ofthe United States appraisers, at New York and Boston, from
January 10, 1849, to October 1, 1850; compiledfrom official returns.
-v

.

t
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
. Number
Number

of Advances tfftder 10 per cent
o f tidvancen from 10 10 UQ ptr cent
o f ad vances frpm £0 to 30- per cent
of aflvatjewfrom .SO to i{) jper ocut
of advances from 50 to 100 ror ccnt
of advances from 100 to 200 per o n t
of advances from 200 per ccnt. and upward

-

N e w York.

1849.

793
- 126
86
51
30
9
4
• . »
1,099

••

••

•»

—




j

I860:

Total.
"
1,84*
1S8
157
94
55
15
4

1,053
62
71
43
25
6

Boston.

)
I
1
I
i

i
1849.
:.

i
i
•

629
143 *
59
«5
.25
20
2

1850.
'
'

,
*

Total.

598
84
34
46
24
.7
2

1,927
287
93
111
49
27
5

795

1,739

•

1,260

2,359

944

|

—

W h o l e i.umber of advances in N e w York . • > « . . . . . . . . f ,
W t t ^ e number of advanoes in Boston..
Total.....;

2,359 ],739 •
4,086

3

Doc, No. 11.

gS

y.
CUSTOM H O U S E ,

BOSTON,

Collector's Office, November IS, 1850.
S I B * I return to you herein the papers that were enclosed to me in
yo«v Ife't; c thj
instant, regarding an importation of oranges into
Ph-lsdcJjrhia in Feoruary last, and also a statement from our appraisers,
showing the value at which this article has entered in New York,
Philadelphia and Boston.
You cannot fail to observe that this case affords a fair illustration of the
inequality of the operation of the law of 1846, and the variance of
appraisements at different ports, about which I wrote to your predecessor
at length, under date of November 1, 1849.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
P. GREELY, JR.,
Collector.
H o n . T H O S . COR WIN,

Secretary of the Treasury,

Washington.

APPRAISER'S

OFFICE,

Boston, November 15, 1850.
,
SIR: Agreeably to your request, I have examined and compared the
invoices and entries of two cargoes of St. Michael's oranges, furnished
by the collectors of Philadelphia and New York.
I find they correspond with an importation at this port in March last.
The fruit is identically the same in mark, quality and value; one cargo
having been shipped by the St. Michael's .Fruit Company, from St.
Michael's, on the 11th January, consigned to George McHenry, of Philadelphia; another on the 14th of same month to J. B. Ketching, of New
York; and the third on the 23d February, to Dana
Company, of
Boston.
The invoices are all in the same handwriting, and uniform in value,
viz: 400 reis per box; equal, with commissions added, to 34 cents per box. At Philadelphia the oranges passed the custom-house at the invoice;
at New York the appraisers raised the value to 700 reis, equal to 60 cents
per box; this subjected the fruit to the penalty which was exacted and
paid by the importer, without a demand for a reappraisement by two merchants, according to law. At Boston, the importer added on entry
sufficient to raise the cargo to 700 reis, the value returned by the appraisers at New York.
But a still further advance was made by the appraisers here of 69 reis
jper box; making in all 769 reis, equal to 66 cents per box.
I enclose copies of the original invoices, with a statement showing the
irregularities of appraisements at the three ports.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
S A M . J.

BRIDGE,

Appraiser.
PHILIP GREELY, JR.,

Esq.,

Collector,



Boston.

Doc. No. 11.

3 9

Invoice of one thousand sis hundred and scveniij-six American boxes of
China oranges shipped on board the schooner Post Boy, Capt. Thomas
Poingdestre,for account of the St. Michael's Fruit Company.
C.—1,676 American boxes China oranges, at 400 reis
The directors:
V. L. VIEYRA.
Added by custom-house, Philadelphia—
Commission
per cent.
Milreas of the Azores At 83J- cents is
Equal to 34 cents per box.
S T . M I C H A E L ' S , January 1 1 ,

-

-

:

67O||4O0

\'
16||?6® .

-

687||160
$572 63

1850.

Invoice of one thousand seven hundred and ninety American boxes of
China oranges shipped on board the schooner King Alfred, Captain.
Michael Knia, for account of the St. MichaePs Fruit Company, bound
for New York.
«
—1,790 American boxes China oranges, at 400 reis - 716jj009
The directors of the company:
V. L. VIEYRA.
Added by custom-house, New York—
Commission 21 per cent. -

.

-

.

17|j900
733;i900

Added by appraisers at New York—
1,790 boxes oranges, at 300 reis per box Commission 2\ per cent. Milreas of the Azores
.
.
At 83£ cents, is Equal to 60 cents per box.
S T . M I C H A E L ' S , January 14,.1850.

.

537,000
13,425
.

-

-

550,1425
l,2S4j|325
$1,070 2T

Invoice of two thousand one hundred and fifteen American boxes of China
oranges shipped on board the brig Lavinia, Captain John Keller, for the
account of the St. MichaelFruit
Company, bmnd for Boston.
<3.—2,115 American boxes China oranges, at 400 reis The directors:



V.

L.

VIEYRA.

- 846^000

Dk>c. No. 11.

100

fAdded by custom-house, BostonCommission 2^ per cent. -

21j|l50
867||150

Added by importer before entry—
2,115 boxes oranges, at 300 reis per box
Commission 2A- per cent.

634,500
15,862
650)1362
l,517j|512

Added by appraisers at Boston—
2,115 boxes oranges, at 09 reis per box
Commission 2^ per cent. -

145,935
3,648
149j|583
1,667||095
$1,389 25

Milreas of Azores At 83£ cents, is Equal to 66 cents per box.
ST. MICHAEL'S,

April

23,

1850.

Statement of three cargoes St. Michael's oranges entered at Philadelphia
Aew York, and Boston.
IPort of entry.

Date of entry.

'

N a m e of vessel.

February 2T, 1850 ! Post Boy. ..
February 15, 1850 ! King Alfred.
March
30,1850 Lavina. . . .

Philadelphia
New York..
Boston;....

N o . of b o x e s .

1,676
1,790
2,115

Total..

5,581

Average

1,860
COMPARISON.

Philadelphia.,860

boxes oranges, at
400 reis
commission 2h per cent.

744^000
1-8,600

762,600 =
New York.—1,860 boxes ©ranges, at 700
reis
commission
per cent.




$635 5§

1,302,000
32,550
1,334,550=:

$1,112 1&

101

[ r Doc. No. 11.
Boston. —1,860 boxes oranges, at 769 reis
commission
percent.
-

1,430,340
35,758
1,466.098=

Difference between appraisement at New
York and appraisement at Philadelphia
-

$1,221 7^

$1,112 12
635 50
$476 62—75 p. ct

Difference between appraisement at Boston
and appraisement at Philadelphia
-

1,221 75
635 50
586 25—92 p. ct

Difference between appraisement at Boston
and appraisement at New York
-




1,221 75
1,112 12
109 63—10 p. ct

December 6 , 1 8 5 C .
SIR: I have the honor to fiirnish you the number of acres of public land sold annually, in the years 1847, 1848, and
1849, giving the amount received from sales; also, the number, as nearly as can now be ascertained, of acres selected by
the States for internal improvements, located by military land warrants, &c., for each of said years, with the value-thereof, at $1 25 per acre.
With great respect,
3. B U T T E R F I E L D , Commissioner.
GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

HON. SECRETARY

Years.

1847.
1848.
1849.

OF T H E

TREASURY.

Acres sold.

Receipts.

Acres selected, located, &c.

Valuation, at SI 25
pur acre.

2,521,305.59
1,887,553.04
1,329,902.77

Total.




$3, S96,404 08
2 , 6 2 1 , 6 1 5 26
1 , 7 5 6 , 8 9 0 42

1,162,180
3,158,867
4,667,934

7 , 6 7 4 , 9 0 9 76

8,988,981

11,236,225

•

Ag^re^ate, receipts
und valuation, at
$1 25.

3,683,485.59
5,046,420.04
5,997,836.77

$1,452,724
3,948,584
5,834,917

5,738,761.40

Aggregate sales,
die ; it ere.;.

$4,749,128 08
6,570,19.9 2 6
7,591,807 $2

14,727,7.42 40

1 8 , 9 1 1 , 1 3 4 76

X - N o .

I,

Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of bar iron, pig iron, and old and scrap iron, imported annually from 1821
to 1850.

Y e a n ending—

September 3 0 , 1 8 3 1 . . .
September 3 0 , 1 8 8 2 . . .
September 3 0 , 1 8 2 3 . . .
September 30, 1 8 2 4 . . .
. September 3 0 , 1 8 2 5 . . .
September 3 0 , 1 8 2 6 . . .
September 30, 1 8 2 7 . , .
September 30, 1 8 2 8 . . .
September 30, 1 8 2 9 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 0 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 1 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 2 . , .
September 30, 1 8 3 3 . . .
September 2 0 , 1 8 3 4 . . .
Sfptetrtber 30, 1835. . .
September 30, 1 8 3 6 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 7 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 8 . . .
September 30, 1 8 3 9 . . .
September 3fl, 1 8 4 0 . . .
September 30,
 1 8 4 1 .. .. ..
September 30, 1 8 4 2
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ 3 0 , 1 8 4 3
9 montha to June

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Bar, manufactured by
rolling.

Cwt.

386,778
634,139
698,013
115,809
85,0i0
88,741
162,152
205,897
66,408
138,981
<344,918
427,745
560,566
577,927
566,204
933,514
956, 792
723,486
1,205,697
656,-574
1,261,118
1,231,985
315,157

Value.

#1,213,041
1,864,868
1,891, 635
240,727
224,497
223,259
347,792
441,000
1J 9 , 3 2 6
5=226 , 336
544, 6G4
701,549
1,002, 750
J, 187, 236
1,050,152
9,131,828
2,573,267
1,825,121
3,181,180
1,707,6*9
2,172,278
2,053,453
511,283

Cwt.

425,966
492,998
467,515
440,200
C67,84')
589,638
613,865
466,359
763,002
722,486
635,698
6 JO, 584
658,752
626,512
426, 389
711,151
376,3*1
592,108
390,236
125,681

Value.

$1,205,856
1,563,146
1,590,350
1,323,749
2, 141,178
1,884,049
1,730,375
1,960, 166
1,929,493
1,837,473
1,742, 883
1,641,359
1,891,214
2,017,346
1,166, 196
2,054,094
1,689,831
1,614,619
1.04K4JW
337,550

Old and scrap iron.

Pig iron.

Bar, manufactured otherwise.

Cwt.

2,313
16,309
34,093
35,118
69,937
22,771
22, 499
'138,967
203,025
186,601
222,265
245,917
170,822.
-282,571
243,830
250, 154
1T0.31T
245,353
373,881
77,461

Value.

Cwt.

Value.

#3,444
36,513
67,004
46i 881
93,025

28.811
25,614
160,681
222,303
217, C68
270,325
289,779
272,978
422,929
319,099
285,300
TT4,5GJ
2-23,228
295,284
48,251

19,963
32,746
12,806
24,353
15,33 i
8, 739
11,783
IT,142
15,670
13,713
3,157

$24, 035
33, *43
11,609
S8 T 224
18,3911
7, 567
10,161 i
15,749
10,537
8,207
2,743

X 1—Continued.
- • r

•

,

.

•

IRON'

Years ending—

Bar, manufactured by
rolling.

Cwt.

June
June
June
June
June
June

30,
30,
30,
30,
30,
30,

1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850

Value.

757,824
1,023,772
482,176
803,676
1,611,786
3,469, 142
4,959,022

$1,065,582
1,691,748
1,127,418
2 ,1 2 9 ,4 8 9
3,679,598
6,060,068
7,397,166

Cwt.

236,451
363,530
436,569
308,223
403,127
211,964
294, 132

Treasury Department, Register's Offiot, December 10, 1850.




Pig iron.

Bar, manufactured otherwise.

Value.

$583,065
872,157
1,165, 429
854,708
975, 214
525,770
744,735

Cwt.

298,880
550,209
483,756
557,114
1,032,641
2,112,649
1,497, 487

Value.

$200,522
506,291
489,573
554,486
815,415
1,405,613
950, 660

Old and scrap iron.

Value.

Cwt.

42,663
116,950
47,247
37, 871
132, 6CT)
189,001
202,090

Total value.

.

$43,396
119,740
56, 534
40, 699
140,037
144,424
161,981

$1,892,565
3,189,936
2,838,954
3,57>, 383
5,610,264
8,135,875
9,254,542

TOWNSEND HAINES, -Register.

X—No.
abatement exhibiting the quantity and value of bar iron manufactured by rolling and otherwise, pig iron, and old and
scrap, imported annually from 1843 to 1850, inclusive, and also the average cost per ton and the estimated amount of
duties which accrued on each during the same period.
BAR IRON MANUFACTURED BY ROLLING.
T o n s and cwt.

During 9 month* to June 8 0 , 1 8 4 3
During year to June 30, 1845
During year to June 30, 1846
During 5 months to November 3 0 , 1 8 4 6
Dining year to June 30, 1848




15,757
37,891
51,188
24,108
8,098
32,085
81,589
173,457
247,951

I
1

17 j
04
12
16'
08
08
06
02 1
03 j

Value.

|511,282
1,065,582
1,691,748
1,127,418
431,316
1,695,173.
3, 679,598
6,060,068
7,397,166

Average cost. Rate of duty.

•

$33
28
33
46
53
52
45
34
29

45
12
05
76
63
83
10
93
83

$25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
30 per cent.
30
do
30
do
30
do

Duties.

$393,946
947,280
1,279,715
602,720
202, 460
508,551
1,103,679
1,81?, 020
2, 319,149

25
00
00
00
00
90
40
40
80

X 2—Continued.
B A R I R O N M A N U F A C T U R E D O T H E R W I S E T H A N BY R O L L I N G .

T o n s and cwt.

During 7 mon'lis to June 30,1847
Durirg year to Juue 30, 1849




t.

6,254
11,822
18,176
21,328
10,413
4,998
20,156
10,598
14,706

01
11
10
09
02
01
07
04
12

Value.

$327, 550
583,065
872,157
1, 16.>, 429
5^8,322
266,386
975,214
525,770
744,735

Average e s t

$52
49
47
54
56
53
48
49
50

37
32
99
63
50
30
38
61
64

Rate of duty.

$17 00
'
17 00
If OU
17 00
. 17 00
30 per cent.
30
do
30
do
30
do

Duties.

$106,318
200,983
209,000
362, 513
177,022
79,915
292,564
157,731
223,420

85
35
50
65
70
80
20
00
60

X 2—Continued.
P I G IRON.

T o n a and cwt.

During 9 months to June 30, 1843
During year to June 30, 1845
During year to June 30, 1846
During
During
During
During

7 months to June 30,1847
year to June 30, 1848
year to June 30, 1849
year to June 30, 1850




3,873
14,944
27,510
24,187
4,478
23,477
51,632
105,632
74,874

01
00
09
16
05
09
01
09
07

Value.

$48,251
200,522
506,291
489,573
82,398
472,088
815,415
1,405,613
950,660

Average cost.

$12
13
18
20
18
20
15
13
12

46
42
40
24
40
11
79
30
69

Rate of duty.

30
30
30
30

$9 00
9 00
9 00
9 00
9 00
per cent.
do
do
do

Duties.

$34,857
134,496
247,594
217,690
40,304
141,626
244,624
421,683
285,198

45
00
05
20
25
40
50
90
00

X 2—Continued*
OLD A N D S C R A P IRON.

T o n s and cwt.

Value.

Duties.

Average coat. Rate of duty.
V1.

During year to June 30, 1846
During year to June 3 0 , 1 8 4 8
During year to June 30, 1849




157
2,133
5,847
2,360
250
1,643
6,630
9,450
10,104

14
03
10
07
03
08
00
01
10

$2,743
43,396
119,748
66,534
5,831
34,868
140,037
144,424
161,981

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$17
20
20
23
23
21
21
15
16

43
34
48
95
32
22
12
28
03

30
30
30
30

#10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
per cent.
do
do
do

$1,578
21,331
58, 475
23,603
a , 501
10,460
42.011
43,327
48,594

50
50
00
50

to

40
10
20
30

Statement exhibiting the quantity of bar, pig, and old and scrap it.on,, reduced into pounds r>imported during the years
1840, 1842, 1844, 1846, 1848, 1 849, and 1850, and the quantity, per capita, of such importations during these y6ars
respectively.
Iron.

o

Year ending-.
Population.

17,069,453
18, 155,5(51
19,241,670
20,327,780
21,413.890
21,956,945
22,500,000

September 30, 1840.
September 30, 1842.
June 30, 1844
June 30, 1846
June 30, 1848
June 30, 1849
June 30, 1850

165.323,44^
241,711,213
161,440,768
178,776,943
397.897,096
714,327,913
840,334,285*

Sc
»- 9
1)
cu «
ts a

9.68
13.31
8.40
8.79
18.58
32.53
37.35

Treasury Department, .
Register'<




Offict, December 10,1850.

TOWNSEND RAINES, Register.

110

Dk>c. No. 11.
Y.

Statement exhibiting the aggregate value of breadstuff's and provisions
exported annually from 1821 to 1850, inclusive.
Breadstuffs

and provisions.

Year ending September 30, 1 6 2 1 .
Do
Ido
1822.
Do
do
1823.
Do
do
1824.
Do
do
1825.
Do
do
1826.
Do
do
1827..
Do
..do
1828..
Do
.do
1829..
Do
do
1830..
Do
do
1831..
Do
do
1833.
Do
do
1833.
Do
do
1834.
Do
do
1835.
Do
do
1836.
Do
do
1837.
Do
do
1838..
Do
do
1839..
Do
do
1840..
Do
.....do
1841..
Do
do
1842..
9 m o n t h s ending J a n e 30, 1 8 4 3 . . . . ,
Year ending J u n e 3 0 , 1 8 4 4
Do
do. . . 1 8 4 5
D o . . . . . . . d o . . , 1846.
D o . . . . ...do...1847.
D o . . . . . . . d o . . . 1848.,
D o . . . . . . . d o . . . 1849.
D o . . . . ...do...1850.

Value.
$12,341,901
13,886,858
13,767,847
1'>,059,484
11,634,449
11,303,496
11,685,556
11,461,144
13,131,858
12,075,430
17,538,227
12,424,703
14,209,128
11,524,024
12,009,399
10,614,130
9,588,359
9,636,650
14,147,779
19,067,53&
17,196,102
16,902,876
11,204,123
17,970,135
16,743,421
27,701,121
68,701,921
37.472,751
38,155,507
26,051,373

\

535,207,285

TAXASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 12, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

/Statement txhibiting the quantity and value of cotton, tobacco, and rice, exported annually, from 1821 to I860, inclusive.

Years.
Value.
Pounds.

1831.
1822,
1823,
1824.
1825
1836
1827,

1828
1829,
1830,
1831,
1833
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1639
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844




11, 344, 066 '
11, 250, 635
12, 136, 688
9, 525, 722
9, 665, 278
5, 972, 852
15, 140, 793
11, 2*-8, 419
12, 833, 307
8, 147, 165
311, 762
8, 743, 373
I t , 142, 987
085, 937
752, 7:j6
84!), 597
286,971
286, 340
107, 404
779, 669
237, 424
254, 099
515, 079
099, 076

Hogaheada.

Value.

Tierces.

Value.

Pounds.

113,549,339
133,424,460
161,586,582
132,843,941
166,784,629
198, 562,563
279,169,317
139,302,044
252,003,879
290,311,937
268,668,022
313,471, 749
3(3,555,617
376, 631,970
379,606,256
415,781,710
438,924,5G6
5-8,665,957
408,516,808
735,161,392
523, %f>, 676
577, 46:3,9ib
784,782,027
657,534,379

$20,157,484
24,035,058
20,445,520
21.947.401
36,846,649
25,025,214
29,359,545
22,487,229
26,575,311
2!), 674,883
25,289, 492
31,724, 682
36,191,105
49.448.402
64,961,302
71,284,925
63,240,102
61,556,811
61,238,982
63,870,307
54, 330, 341
47,593,4R4
49,119,806
54,063,501

66,858
83,169
99,009
77,883
75, 984
64,098
100, 025
96,278
77,131
83,810
86,718
106,806
83,153
87,979
94, 353
109, 042
100, 233
1(,0, 593
78,995
119,484
147,828
158, 710
94,454
163,042

$5, 648, 962
6,222,838
G, 232, 672
4, 85.), 566
6, 115, 633
5,347,208
(j, 5 7 7 , 1 2 3
5, 269, 960
4,982,974
5,586,365
4,892,388
5,999,769
5, 755,968
6, 595,305
8, 250, 577
10,058,640
5, 795, 647
7,592,029
9, 832,943
9,883,957
12, 576, 703
9. 540, 755
4,650,979
8,337,255

88,221
87,089
101,365
113,229
97,015
111,063
133,518
175,019
132,923
130, 697
116,517
J 20, 327
144,163
121,888
110, 851
213,983
106,084
71,018
93, 320
ioi,6(;o
101,617
114,617
106,766
134,715

4,1,494, 3i > 7
J, 553, 482
1,820, 985«
1.832, 932
1,925, 245
1,917, 445
2,343. 9;,<s
9.. G20, 6f!6
2. 514, 370
1, 98i!, 824
2, 016, S«7
2,152, e:-!i
2,74-3. US
2, 123;
2,210, 331
2, 548, 750
2, SOU, 279
1,721, 819
% 460, 193
1,94'?, 07'i
2 , 0 . 0 , 107
1,907. 2>-7
1,625, 7:?i;
2, 182; 4(k>

a
o

Z—Continued.
•

COTTON,

JUfcE.

TOBACCO.

|
!

Years.
Sea island.

Other.
»-

Value.
Pounds.

'

Hogsheads.

j

I 8 f 0 • • < t l l l l . M M I I t . i l '

9,389,625
9,388,5?3
6,293,973
7, 72-1,1 ;iH
11,969,2;!)
8,230, 4( 3

I

863,516,371
538,169,522
520,925, 985
806,550,283
1,4'J 4, 633,0J0
627,145,141

$51,739,643
42,767,341
53,415,848
61,998,294
Ii96,9f7
71,984,616

147,163
147,998 •
135,762
130, 665
101,5,1
143,729 ,

t7,469,819
8,478,270
.7,242,086
7,551,122
5,804,207
9,951,023

'

.,

»

!

Pounds.
-

1845«••«•••••••«•••»«•*•
1846••••••••»••«••••«•••
1847
1 8 4 8 « « • . • • . » • • « ,
1849.••••••.•««••••••*••

Value.

Tierces.

Valtie.

118,621
321,007
144,427 !
100,403 ;
•J28,661 !
:
127,069 :

160,456
2,564,901
3,605,"89 5
2,331,824
2,569,362
2,631,557

.• —»-•

T r e a i u k t Department, Register's Office, December 10.1850.
'




T O W N S E N D H A I N E S , Register.

©
O

o

J

L—No. 4.
Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merchandise imported, re-exported, and consumed annuqUy from 1821 to 1850,
inclusive; and also the estimated population, and rat- of consumption per capita, during the same penod.

Value of foreign merchandise.
CO
Yeara ending-

Population.
Imported.

Re-exported.

Consumption per
capita.

Consumed and on
hand.
O
O
p

September 30

.1821.

1822.
1823.
1824.
1825.

1826.
1827.

1828.

'

1829.
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834.
1835.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.




$65,585,724
83, 241,511
77,579,267
80,549,007
•
96,340,075
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,509,824
74, 492,227
70,876,920
103, 191, 1:24
101,029,266
108, U 8 , 3 l l
126.521,332
149,895,742
189, 980, o:ir.
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132
107,141,519
127,946, 177
100, 162,087

$21,302,488
22,286,202
27,543,622
25,337,157
32,590,643
24,539,612
23, 403,13C
' 21,595,017
16, 658,478
14,387,479
20,033,526
24,039,473
19,822, 735
23,312,811
20, 504, 495
21,746,360
21,854,962
12, 452, 795
17,494,525
18, 190,312
15.499.0W
l l ; 781,538

$41,283,236
60,955,309
50,035,645
55,211,850
63,749,432
60,434,665
56,080,932
66,914,807
57,834,049
56,489,441
83,157,598
76,989,793
88,295,576
103,208,521
129,391,247
168,233,675
119, 134,255
101,264,609
144,597, 607
88,951,207
112,447,096
88,440,549

9 , 9 GO, 974
10,283,757
10,606,540
10,929,323
11,252,106
ll,574f889
11,897, 672
12,220,455
12,543,238
12,866,020
13,286,364
13,706, 707
14,127,050
14,547,393
14,967, 736
15,388,079
15,808,422
16,228, 765
16, 649, 108
17,069,453
17,612,507
18,155,561

$4 14
5 92
4 71
5 05
5 66
5 22
4 71
5 47
4 61
4 39
6 25
5 61
6 25
7 09
8 64
10 93
7 53
6 23
8 68
5 21
6 38
4 87

©

CO

No. 1—Continued.

Value of foreign merchandise.
Population.

Years endingImported.

9 months to June 30, 1843.
18144.,
Year to June 30
1845.,
1846.,
isp.'.;

1S49.'

-1850.,

164, 753,799
108, 435,035
117, 254,564
121, 691,797
r
146, 54. », 638
154, 998,928
147, W>7, 4.TJ
178, 136,318

Treasury Department, Register'j Office, November 29, 1850«




Kc-exported.

$6,552,707
11,484,867
15,346,830
11,346,623
8,011,158
21,132,315
13,088,865
14,951,808

Consumption per
capita.

Consumed and on
hand.

$58,201,092
96,950,168
101,907,734
110,345,174
138,534,480
133, 860,613
134,768,574
16J, 184,010

18,698,615
19,241,670
19,784,725
20,327,780
20,870,83.5
31,413,890
21,956,945
22,500,000

TOWNSEND HAINES, Register.

L—No. 3.
Statemerit of the amount and value of American cotton-wool exported from, the United Stales to Great Britain, from 1844
to 1848, inclusive; also, the amount and value of cotton-woof and the value of cot ion manufactures, exported from Great
Britain during the same period, as appears from official statements.

Yeare.

Am't of cotton-wool Average Value of cotton • wool A.mH of cotton-wool Average Value of cotton-wool Value of cotton maexported from the price.
exported from the
exported from Gt.
price.
exported from Gt.
nufactures exportU. States to Great
U- States to Great
Britain.
Britain.
ed from G. Britain.
Britain.
Britain.

Pounds.

184 4
184 5
1846..
184 7
1848

4*6,729,222
605, 144,786
316,158, 667
351,268,7<J9
572,003, 127

Cents.

Dollars.

rounds.

Cents.

Dollars.

8.13
5.9
8
10.2
7.32

39,591,351
35, 675, 859
27,707,717
35,841,265
41,925,258

37,222, 560
42,916,384
65, 930, 704
74,954,336
74,019, 792

10.13
7.9
10
12.2
9.32

3, 770, 645
3, 390,394
6,593,070
9,144,428
(5,898, 644

Treasury Department,
OftictoJ Commissioner of Customs, December 6, 1850.




Dollars.

32
33
40
99
61

124,897,884
126,417,562
123,903,157
112,932,809
109,777,008

32
04
84
00
00

B
O

n
©

L—No. 4.
Oi

Value of exports of cotton-wool and cotton manufactures from the United Stales for five years.
1846.

1850.

1849.

1848.

1847.

Countries to which exported.

Russia
Prussia
Sweden and Norway
Swedish W e s t Indiea
Denmark
Danish Weat Indies
Hanse T o w n s
Hanover
Holland
Dutch East Indies
Dutch W e s t Indies
Dutch G u i a n a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Belgium
Great Britain
Gibraltar
Malta
British East Indies
Cape of Good Hope
Mauritius
Honduras
British Guiana
British West Indies.
British American c o l o n i e s . . . . . . . .
France
:
French W e s t Indies
French Guiana

Miquelon and French fisheries....



Cottonwool.

Cotton
manufactures.

Cottonwool.

Cotton
manufactures.

$523,616

|405,210
11,090
189,391

" ' 6 2 ,'609

j

557,276

45,981
371 l ] 069,'(>95

!

277,500

1,003,519
I
524,042!..,
j27,707,717j
"a'tioi 35,841,265
72,118
6,761
14,545
7,421
77,575
321

4,674!
10,080,465!

1i *963

7,739
7,996
10,381,318
248
6,815

'ih'.m

' i,348

1,331,525
765 41,925,258
7,865
11,07?-'
3,502
, 770
66,432
39,665
5,800
20,457
1,539
13,442
14,669
2,407
216 11,428,850
6,759
. 197
2,585

* 11 i 574*

102 431
• 9
607
1, 514
1,747,660
817
,801
413
.433
259
166
,804
,789
374
,865
4,041

35*603
" '46^831
140,933
26,534
1,206

228,399
24,329

28 47,444,899;
3
3
324
4

"'2|272
" 5 2 9 ] 096

"7681798

"389'l'i6

$1,253

302
''862^536

342,9471

6,046!
10,185,713|

Cotton
manufactures.

$540,422
4,917
412,132

$1,947

i [439,045
81,626
7,508
227

Cottonwool.

Cotton
manufactures.

$852,198
$342

7,944

"i95,'i08

Cottonwool.

"482*474

$1,224

$3,758
2,116

37,699
24
15,881
10,634

Cotton
manufactures.

$975,304
8,750
382,780

" 3 6 0 ,'277

474
27,108
11,238
163

Cottonwool.

1,356,899
2,591 48,884,453
3,223
14,163
1,981
124,267
580
58,562
9,444
13,275
248,316
"'5,876
30
1,143

50
2,169
6,026

310,265
3,428
43,671

4,441*
14,395,449

24,115
248,163
539
11,b74

«

©
O
A
o

rt » »•"» • ».
Jurt QflJirCaunrf<n. .
*md Pk»kppttie istaad*.

744,643
1,041
1,490

ibor Spanish We»t Indies
>rt«g«l
.
Udena
Fayal and other Apores.
CajWde Verds.

70,400
47,J

Tuscany
Trieste and other Austrian ports
Turkey, Levant, &c
Hayii
;
Mexico
Central Aoierica

"3*313

908,157
i
347,726

Nfcw Grenada....
Venezuela
Brazil
Cisplatine tepublid

Argentine republic.
,.r.
5,655

China

West Indies generally..... .
Europe generally
Asia generally
Africa generally
' South seat! and Pacific ocean.
South America generally.....
Texas

750,567
38,978
414,931

J773
14,588
390
645

800

1,117,159
27,37.6
52,274
73,816
44,783
1,057
54,187
457,861
9,480
9,666
981,984

Paru,




1,260
•

Sardinia

Total.

303,551

6,002

10,031

813,606
259,614
149,089
117,045
19,052
59,298

33 ,056
37 ,919
59 ,512
31 ,084
1 ,663
39 ,323
597 ,314
20 ,028
14 ,638
33,087 1,030 ,541
67 ,746
1,419 ,909
481

41,391

' 17^885

3.Q45
440
116,446
34,926
498
3,830

435,718

639,821

501
24,201
2,400

165,987

342,905

1,045

1,649,924
3,165

844,796

6,933
87,347
33,077
170,899

1,516,807
363
13,310
31,480
2,386

131
706,966
48,107
164,994

CWH

1,326,633

7,664

139,473
131,267
85,325
35,101

314,469
8,256

1,527,720
36,411
32,762
952
4,808

103,913

3,170,086
19,006

100
12,004
24,421
5,347
1,482

^5
9,913

39,365
39,558
943,878
10,430
6,087
21,032
611,054
9,147
32,709
1,076,261
61,852
850 1, 691,959
1,372
238,713
162,289
86,466
33,125

150,988
45,085

21,600

22,099
37,758
493,566
19,075
194,346
1,166,750
41,840
40,281 1,095,283
1,602
310,921
164,647
79,395
63,374

833,654
6,711
152,910

7,334
1,543
189
70

1,037,621
100,580
264,992
304,678
157,553
17,674
25,8/0
62,340
533,187
1,0^3
169,922
594,691
74,275
1,203,997
278,776
146,300
35,099
12,661

42,767,341 3,535,481 53,415,84®4,082,523 61,998,294 5,718,105 66,396,967 4,933,129 71,984,616 4,734,424

118

Doc. No. l i :

a

No. 4.— Value of the exports of cotton manufactures from Great Britain
and the United States irfthe year 1848.
•
Countries to which exported.

United States
Great Britain
British territories, East I n d i e s . . . . ,
British settlements in A u s t r a l i a . . . ,
British North American provinces.
British W e s t Indies.
Gibraltar
Hanse Towns
Turkey
Holland
Italy.
Brazil
China
Portugal, Madeira, and Azores.
Russia
Mexico
Buenos Ayres
Chili
Peru
Foreign W e s t Indies.
Egypt
France
Africa
Asia
Belgium
Kingdom of Greece.
Syria and Palestine.
Java
Malta
Ionian islands
Wallachia and Moldavia..
Cape of Good H o p e . . .
Channel islands
<
Hanover...
Sweden
Norway
Denmark
Prussia
Mecklenburg
Spain and the Balearic islands
Spain and the Canaries
Mauritius
Philippine i s l a n d s . . ,
South sea islands,
Central America
N e w Grenada
Venezuela
Ecuador
Oriental republic of U r u g u a y .
Dutch East I n d i e s . . . .
Cape Verd islands.
Ascension and St. Helena
.'
Morocco
Persia
Hayti
South America
Argentine Republic
Cisplatine Republic.
Honduras
Russian settlements, northwest coast of America.
Other countries
.':..:.




From Great
Britain.

From United
States.

$8,291,036

$28
14,703,295
679,957
1,911,015
1,941,972
2,668,403
12,089,313
10,701,467
7,547,166
6,775,840
5,123,261
4,604,025
3,889,365
3,390,579
2,337,448
1,110,610
2,506,829
2,271,339
1,640.271
1,871,265
372,568
1.154,949
1,281,331
1,092,954
1,144,756
1,113,262
827,838
608,784
743,554
614,989
429,593
580,833
312,702
180,962
360,449
47,490
145
39,847
148,016
308,608
514,516
lv7,272
263,813
. 841,317
153,592
9,922
339,012
11,693
9,234
68,045
15,846

324,403
.57,789
21,864
3,817
39,365

611,054
1,691,959
4,808
"*943,'878
1,076,261
61,852
60,084
162,289
238,713

3,801
4,433

30,411
86,466
10,430
<J,037
21,032
102,431
9,943

39,568
33,125
32,709
9,147
22,259
4,602
38

8,199

109,777,008

5,718,205

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Doc. TCo. l l .

120

No. 6.
Statement exhibiting the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported annually from 1821 to 1850, inclusive, and showing, also, the value reexported from warehouses under the act of August 6, 1846.
Dutiable value of
merchandise reexported.

Years.

1821.

$10,537,731
11,101,306
19,846,873
17,222,075
22,704,803
19,404,504
15,617,986
13,167,339
11,427,401
12,067,162
12,434, 483
18,448,857
12,411,969
10,879,520
7,743,655
9,832,867
9,406,043
4,466,384
5.007,698
5,805,809
4,228,181
4,884,454
3,456,572
3,362,508
5,171,731
5,522,577

1822.
1823.
1824.
1825.
1826.
1827.

182S.
1829.
1630.
1831.
1832.
1833.

im.

1835.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842
1843.
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847, 5 months, to November 30
1847, 7 monihs, to June 30

$2,333,527
2,020,380
4,353,907
6,576,499
6,625,276
7,376,361

1848,
1849,
1850,
Total in 30 years . . .

301,092,531

Average per annum.

10,036,417

* From warehouses in three years and seven months.

Treasury Department,
Register's Office, December 10, 1850.




.

.

#
M . N O U R S E , Acting

Register.

Doc. No.Ihm
No. 7.
Statement showing the value of goods remaining in warehouses at the
close of each quarter,from the 30th of September, 1847, to the 30th of
June, 1850, as exhibited by the quarterly returns of the collectors of the
customs, under the provisions of the act of the 6th of August, 1846j and
also the amount of duties payable thereon.
•
Goods remaining in warehouses.
Periods ending—
Value.

September 30, 1847
December 31, 1847
March 31,1848
June 3 0 , 1 8 4 8
September 30, 1848
December 31, 1848
March 31, 1849
June 30, 1849
September 30, 1849
December 31, 1849
March 31, J850
June 3 0 , 1 8 3 0 . . . . .
Total
Average quarterly value

Duties.

S3,618,758
4,863,591
5,291,179
6,272,275
5,419,676
7,201,246
5,450,593
7,830,010
6,021,627
6,163,151
5,600,318
8,247,055

$1,264,624
1,524,887
1,669,067
1,936,464
1,649,182
2,152,544
1,702,639
2,501,394
1,927,754
1,997,536
2,009,165
3,077,129

55
16
39
00
85
50
37
35
72
75
33
80

71,979,479

23,412,390 7 7

5,998,290

1,951,032 5 6

Treasurt Department,
December 10, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES-

Register.

L—No. 4.
Statement exhibiting the value of hempen goods imported annually, from 1821 to 1850, inclusive.
Manufactures of hemp.

Cotton bagging.
Years ending—
Sail duck.

September 30, 1821

1822
1823
182 4
182 5

..

182 6
182 7
1828
182 9
1830
1H31
1832
1833.
183 4
183 5
183 6
183 7
183 8
183 9
184 0
184 1

184 2
N i n e months to June 30, 1843



$894,276
1,524,486
1,024,180
990,017
677, 151
856,474
766,310
1,091,749
362,333
317,347
470,030
776,191
860,323
720,780

828,826
662,652
540,421
683,070
760,199
615,723
904,493
516,880
236,965

Sheeting, brown TiekJenburgs,
osijaburgs,
and white.
and burlaps.

$226,174
332,842
472,826
673,735
405, 739
470,705
336,124
352, 483
247,865
250,237
351, 499
346,027
327,518
400,000
426,942
555,141
541,771
325,345
535,789
261,173
325,167
110,782
83,503

$37* 338
381.063
411,667
353,826
604,674
531,709
563, 665
514,645
366,320
648,891
300,000
337,011
392,194
384,716
362,725
483,269
<.329,054
539,772
187,006
58,699

Square yards.

693,775
4,470,775
2,204,822
3,346,427
3,667,121
2,729,835
688,015
207,906
803, 489
1,421,185
1,962,920
7,054,789
13,203,095
3,431,675
1,670,337
2,093,693
2,986,075
6,786,889
4,855,255
1,410,628

Value

$111,436
637,023
274,973
366,913
408, 626
274,073
69, 126
18,966
87,966
158,681
217,260
924,036
1,701,451
429,251
173, 325
220,023
310,211
733, 678
4$1,824
105,493

Other m a n u f a o
tures of hemp.

*60,G18
33,408
48,909
60,293
43,052
52,505
133,103
122,009
84,114
40,«22
21,955
39,032
54,459
55,467
47, 292
97,436
71,994
73,271
37,042
41,849

Tgtal value.

$1,120,450
1,857,328
1,497,006
1,873,144
2,134,384
2,062,728
'1,883,466
2,500,584
1,468,485
1,333, 478
M'7,149
1,660,618
2,036,035
1,679,995
2,555,847
3,365,897
1,951,626
1,591,757
2,096,716
1,588,155
2,566,381
1,278,534
526,503

350,317
272,031
217,162

Trbasury Department,

200,215
106,730
64,010

380,518
125,783
68,386

Year to June 30, 1 8 4 4 . . . . 4 .
1845......
1846
1847......
184 8
184 9
1850

49,546
52,353
13,670

305,593

.

153,094
117,331
5,972
10,396
27,525
121,368
251,905

63,067
305,71-2
201,211
184,856
}05,329
101,053
187,121

.

Rrguter's Qgice, Dtctmber 10, 1850.




60,066

1,695,868
1,551,044
79,965
133,189
298,918
1,453,348
2,914,304

TOWNSEND RAINES, RegiiUr.

L—No. 4.
Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of hemp and cordage imported annually, from 1821 to 1850, inclusive.
hemp an1) cordage.
Years ending

Hemp, unmanufactured.

.Cwt.

September 30

1821
1822
1823
182 4
1825

«

1826
182 7
1828
1829
1830
183 1
183 2
1833
183 4
183 5
1836.
1837
1838..
183»
1840...........
1841...........
1842.....
9 months, to June 30, 1 8 4 3 . . . . . . . ; . . .
Year, to June 30,
1844....


•»«>


86,192
178,503
115,735
94,846
76,817
88,116
100,566
161,604
95,195
30,782
51,909
150,739
94,026
102,211
102,163
147,190
84,965
81,391
87,461
93,788
72,962
39,730
36,269
50,752
28,155

Value.

$510,489
1,054,764
674,454
485,075
431,787
551,757
635,854
1,075,243
655,935
200,338
295,706
866,865
470,973
514,743
528,981
815,558
483,792
512,506
607,766
686,777
561,039
267,849

228, h82
262,365
145,209

Cordage, tarred, and cables.

Pounds.

Value.

931,697
1,725,142
1, 424,900
489,877
858,438
1,505,167
1,127,109
2,164,096
1,848,254
1, 437,735
684,507
2,459,391
3,012,738
3,395,598
2,157,071
1,866,773
754,582
1,441,464
1,881,152
1,480*933
1,813,045
1, 019, 740
381,013
1,124,526
1,114,839

$107,867
147,321
122,277
19,170
42,646
77,186
56,162
109,454
97,436
71,291
33,522
116,389
142,538
147,805
81,594
82,561
34,108
75,142
106,902
89,504
112,995
66, 548
26,570
68,349
67,209

Cordage, untarrcd, and yarn.

Pounds.

49,230
105,086
119,107
85,236
81,629
109, 775
152,826
105,725
79,129
148,509
160,727
152,551
147,613
262,655
194,914
30,901
379,014
1,408,247
390,806
258,643
319,829
415,963

Total value.

Value.

$4,923
10,393
7,413
6,339
6,744
8,868
8,114
6,344
3,999
10,543
6,759
5,766
5,984
12,180
0,917
2,331
13,434
68,936
19,491

6,826
14,817
22,391

$618,356
1,202,085
796,731
509,168
484,826
636,356
698, 355
1,191,441
762,239
279,743
335,572
987,253
624,054
669,307
616,341
904,103
530,080
597,565
716,999
789,715
742,970
353,888.
262, $78
345,531
334,609

%
©

1846
1847
1848
1849
1850

31,131
9,545
27,157
86,892
85,394

180,281
56,377
187,905
491,633
579,814

805,509
763, 655
3,13H, 920
1.887,4*2
2,040,091

47,289
46,711
223,904
129, 120
139, 75 J

825,828
388,727
287,874
252, 271
1,884,400

38,618
20,881
15,622
17,290
117,626

266,188
123,969
427,431
638,043
837,191

T r e a s u r y Department, REGISTER'S Office, December JO, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

No. 10.
Statement exhibiting the value of certain articles imported, during the years ending on the 30th of June, 1844, 1845,
1846,1848,1849, and 1850, (after deducting the rc exportation;) and the amount of duty which accrued on each during
the same periods, respectively.
1845.

1844.

1846.

Articles.
Value.

Woollens
Cottons
Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactures of
Sugar
H e m p , unmanufactured..
Salt.
Coal
Total




Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$9,408,2*9
13,236,830
865,427
2,395,760
G,897,245
261,913
892,112
203,681

$3,313,495
4,850,731
213,862
1,607,113
4,597,093
101,338
654,881
133,845

810,504,423
13,360,729
801,661
4,075,142
4,049,708
140,372
883,359
187,962

$3,731,014
4,908,272
198,642
2,415,003
2,555,075
55,122
678,069
130,221

$9,935,925
12,857,422
696,888
3,660,581
4,397,239
180,221
748,566
336,691

$3,480,797
4,865,483
138,394
1,629,581
2,-713,866
62,282
509,244
254,149

34,161,217

15,472,358
-

34,003,356

14,671,418

3 2 , 8 1 3 £33

13,653,796

No. 10—Continued
1848.

1850.

1819.

Articles,
Value.

Woollens
Cottons
Hempen goods
Iron, and manufactuies o f .
Sugar
H e m p , unmanufactured...

Salt
Ccal
Total.

Value.

Duties.

$15,061,102
17,205,417
GOG,900
7,060,470
8,775,223
180,335
1,027,666
426,997

,196,007
,166,673
121,380
,118,141
,6.12,567
54,100
205,531
128,099

$13,505,720
15,182,518
460,335
9,189,743
7,576,303
478,232
1,424,529
387,370

$3,726,989
3,769,294
92,01,7
2,756,923
2,272,891
143,470
284,906

50,344,100

13,622,498

48,204,750

Treasury Department, Register's Office, December 2,1850.




Duties,

Value..

DGtiea.

116,211

$16,900,916
19,685,936
520,2&2
16,232,013
6,332,068
574,783
1,227,518
361,855

$4,682,457
4 898,475
104,046
4,896,604
1,899,620
172,435
245,504
108,557

13,163*751

61,835,321

16,980,698

TOWNSEND HAINES, Register.

Doc^JJokii.
No. 11.
COTTON.

Sea Island.

Other.

Tot»l.

Pounds.

Pounds.

Pounds.

11,344,066
11,250,635*
12,136,688
9,525,722
9,665,278
5,972,852"
15,140,798
11,288,419
12,833,307
8,147,165
8,311,762
8,743,373
11,142,987
8,085,937
7,752,736
7,849,597
5,286,971
7,286,340
5,107,404
8,779,669
6,237,424
7,254,699
7,515,079
6,099,076
9,389,695
9,388,533
6,293,973
7,724,148
11,969,259
8,236,463

113,549,339
133,424,460
161,586,582
132,843,94k
166,784,629
198,562,563
279,169,317
199,302,044
252,003,879
290,311,937

Value.

268,668,022
313,471,749
313,555,617
376,631,970
379,606,256
415,781,710
438,924,566
588,665,957
408,516,808
735,161,392
523,966,676
577,462,918
784,782,027
657,534,379
863,516,371
538,169,522
520,925,985
806,550,283
1,014,633,010
627,145; 141

124,893,405
144,675,095
173,723,270
142,369,663
176.449,907
204,535,415
294,310,115
210,590,463
264,837,186
298,459,102
276,979,784
322,215,122
324,698,604
3^4,717,907
3S7,358,992
423,631,307
444,211,537
595,952,297
413,624,212
743,941,061
530,204,100
584,717,017
792,297,106
663,633,455
£72,905,996
547,558,055
527,219,958
814,274,431
1,026,602,269
635,381,604

$20,157,484
24,035,058
20,445,520
21.947.401
36,846,649
25,025,214
29,359,545
22,487,229
26,575,311
29,674,883
25,289,492
31,724,682
36,191,105
49.448.402
64,961,302
71,284,925
63,240,102
61,556,811
61,238-, 982
63,870,307
54,330,341
47,593, 464
49,119,806
54,063,501
51,739,643
42,76Z, 341
53,415,843
61,998,294
66,396,967
71,984,616

Treasury Department,
Register's Office, December 10, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES, Register.

[rDoc. No. 11.

129

No. 12.
• Statement of the coinage of the mint and branch mints of the United
Stales, from the commencement of their operations until October 31,
1S50.
1 . M I N T OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S A T P H I L A D E L P H I A .

cold coinage.

Period?.

Pieces.
1793)
1794 >
1795 S
1796...
1797..
1798..,
1799..
1800...
1801..
1802...
1803 .
1804..,
1805..
1808...
1807..
1803..
1809...
1810..

1811...
1812..
1813...
1814 .
1815...
1816..,
1817...

1818 .
1819...
1820...

1821...
1822..,
1823...
1824...
1825...

1826...
1827...

1828...
1B29...
-1830...
1831...
1832...
1833...
W34...
1835...
1836...

1837...




Pieces.

Pieces. ,

"2,795
""6,934
8,323
7.974
17,483
25,965
29,254
15,090
8,979
9,795

' " 6,'i96
3,609
24,867
7,451
11,622

Pieces.

""8,101
963
859
614
480

26,006
53,176
33,506
30,475
33,183
64,093
84,093
55,578
33,875
100,287
99,581
58,087
95,428
15,454
635

48,588
51,723
263,806
34,641
17,796
14,485
17,340
29,060
18,069
24,913
28,029
57,442
126,351
140,594
157,487
193,630
732,169
371,534
553,147
2v7,121

2,612
423
3,327
1,781
1.616
6,'812
2,710

6,448

2,600
4,434
760

2,800
"*3,'403*
4,540
4,520
4,400
4,160
117,370
131,402
547,986
45,030

1 8 0

D o c .

N o .

11.

No. 12—Continued.
M I N T OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S A T P H I L A D E L P H I A — C o n t i n a e d .

GOLD COINAGE.

Periods..

a

184 3
184 4
1845.
1846
184 7
1848
1849
1850—to October 1.

784,270

Pieces.
7,200
38,248
47,338
63,131
81,507
75,462
6,361
26,153
20,095
862,264
145,484
653,618
291,451

Total.

784,279

2,450,904

Pieces.
1 8 38

1839
1 8 40

184 1
1 8 42




X
Piecff.
286,583
118,143
137,382
15,833
27,578
611,205
340,370
417,099
395,942
919, 781
260,775
133,070
64,491

7,662,091

Pieces.
i
47,030
27,021
18,859
2,823
100, 546
6, 784
91,051
21,598
29,814

8,886
23,294
180,603

1,460,409

[

Doc. No. 11.

r

131

No. 12—Continued.
M I X T OP T H E UNITED STATES AT PHILADELPHIA—Continued.
SILVER

Perots.

COINAGE.

1836
1837
1831+
1810
184 1
1842
1843
1844
...
1815
1846
1817
..
1843
1849...
1850—to Oct 31
Tetal

Half dollars.

Cluai tei- dollars

Dimes.

Pieces1793)
17;t4}
1795 )
17y (J
1?97
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
15)04 . . . .
18i>5
1806
1807
*..
18u8
1809
1810
1811
181 >
Ibt.i
1814 . . .
1815 .
1816
1817..
1818
1819
1820
1821.. .
1822.. . .
1823 .
1 8 >4
1825....
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833....
1834

Hollars.

Pieces.

Pieces.

Pieces.

204,791

,

72.9-20
7. 7"t>
.'i-7, o.'ili
4-2:1, 515
220,920
54, 454
41,650
6-i,t!«i
19, 570
321

30,589
29, SitO
31,715
156,519
211, m
839, 576
1,051,576
1,3«8, 6< '0
1, 405, H10
1, 278, 276
1,2< 3,64 4
1, (>28,059

5,894
252

6,738
121,394
205, 124
220,643

1,000
3(10
61.005
173,000
184,618
165, ICO
20,000
24,5'>0
110,600
140,750
15,000
6=!, 600
7,500
2,405,490

119,160,326




22,135
25,261
27, 550

10,230
44,527

21,760
34, 640
10,975
33,04' >
8,265
120,180

24,000
33,910
13,010
37,850
15,600

165,000
44,710
6,355
65,180

421,500

1,039,075
47,150
1,215,567
1,960.322
2,208,000
751,122
1, 305, 797
1,5 i9.573
1,6:14/200
3,504,954
2 , 9 4 3 , 166
4,004,180
5.193,400
3.075,200
3,712,156
4,761,800
5,873,660
4, 797. ('00
5,206.000
6.412,004
5,352,006
6,516,200
3. 629, H20
3,516,000
3,314,561
1,435,008
310,000
2,01-2,764
3,844,000
1,76«,000
589,000
2,210,000
I, 156,000
5b0,000
1,252,''(JO
227,000

Pices.
86,41S

323,144
3,918

Half diir.es.

69,232
20,003
361,174
144,000
127,444
216,851
64,080
17,800

942,597
1,186,512
100,000
440,000

168,000

510,000

4,000
102,000

1,215,000
125, OoO
770,000
510,000
771,350
522,500
485,000
635,000
1,410,0 0
1,190,000
1,042,000
1,992, 500
1,053,115
1,358.580
1,622, 5'•(»
1,887,500
1,370,000
72,500
1,755,000
31,300
245,00
451,500
8'<9.000
1,641,500

1,230,010
1,240, IM)0
1,242,700
9<;s. 0"0
1,370,0001,480, Oi'O
2,76r>, 000
1,90'>.000
2,276,000
2 , 2 5 i . 001 \
1,069,15*
1,344,085
1,150,000
815,00©
1, 165,000
430,000
1,561.000
27,000'
1,271,000
CG-,000
1,309,000
66 j, 000

27,182,085

28,464,473,

398,000
320,000
156,000
286,000
1,953.000
472,000
252,400
8*2,0(!0
49', 146
188,1*7
120,0'!0
8*,000'
645,600
421,200
922,000
510,000
734,000
146,000
340,000
124,000
11,254,102

132

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134

Dk>c. No. 11.
No. 12—Continued.
2. B R A N C H M I N T A T N E W O R L E A N S .

m

Double eagles.

e
0
«1

m
0
>

a

E

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c.
e>
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Ptriods.

97,500

Total

97,500

Pieces.

Pieces.

. Fleets.
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850—tc October 31

.

32,500
K 35(1
16,400
179,075
364,60'I
41,000
£8,000
12,000

4,500
27,300
1 7 5 ,( 6 2
118,700
47,501)
81,780
511,500
35,850
23,900
57,500

Pieces.

j Gold dollare.

gold c oik age.

Puces.

17,346
26,20')
7,180
19,800
290,002
66,000
124,000
215,001*
82,000

1,143,592

769,925

632,528

215,000

B R A N C H M I N T A T N E W ORLEANS—Continues;.

silver coinage.

of
Pieces.
1838
1839
1840
184 1
1842
184 3
184 4
184 5
1846
184 7
1848
1849
1850—to October 3 1 . . .

Total,




Pieces.
115,000
815,000
367,000
957,000

2,268,000

40,000

2 ,0 0 5 ,0 0 0
2,094,000
2,304,000
2,584,000
3,180,000
2 ,3 1 0 ,0 0 0
1,898,000

99,000

20,897,600

59,000

Pitces.
426,100
452,500
769,000
518,000
740,0U0

B
Pitces.
205,000
690,000
1,241,0110
2,007,500
1,950,000
150,000

Pieces.
35,000
460,000
909,000
815,000
350,000
* 220,000

" '23O!66O
368,000

606,000

3i2,66o

300,000
440,000

140,000
500,000

3,585,600

7,213,500

4,029,000

W

Doc. Np. 11.
No. 12—Continued;

T O T A L OF N E W O R L E A N S B R A N C H M I N T .

Periods.

1338

1839 . . . ,
1840 . . . / ;
184 1
1842
1843
1844
184 5
1846
184 7
1848
1840
1850—to October 31.

Total.




Number.
240,000
1,282,346
3,449,800
3,660,030
4,089,500
3,580,139
3,448,300
2,412.500
2,568,780
3,C5'),500
3,815,830
2.988,900
3,427,000

38,622,645

43,365
223,000
94,700
404,500
3,371,000
3,010,000
680,000
1,272,800
6,085,000
358,500
454,000
2,730,000

Dollars.
22,2'0
149,500
683,575
538,125
883,250
1,278,500
1,198,500
1,070,000
1,211,000
1,384,000
1.620,000
i;i92,000
1,136,000

18,731,865

12,366,700

Dollars.

Dk>c. No. 11.

136

No. 12—Continued.
3. B R A N C H M I N T A T C H A R L O T T E , N O R T H

CAROLINA.

Total.

G o l d coinage-

Period;).

8,642
26.036
11,622

Number.
20,760
41,640
31,e£8
31.748
36,122
70,449
35,553

Dollars.
84,165
162,767
127,055
133,037
159,(05
287,005
147,210

00
50
00
50
00
00
00

12,995
84,151
64, 472
64,823
46,905

4.603
23.226
16,788
10,220
9,148

11.634
6.9C6

17, 603
107,377
81,260
66,677
63,019

76,895
478,820
364,330
361,299
264,361

00
00
00
00
00

445,624

159,732

18,600

C23,95G

Pieces.
12, 886
23,467
18.994
21,467
27,4?0
44,353
23,631

3838...
1 8 39
1 8 40
1841

184 2
184 3
1844
1845".

184 6
184 7
184 8
1849

1850 to October 31
Total....

Pieces.
7,894
18,173
12,834

Pieces.

10,281

2 , 6 4 6 , 0 5 0 00

4. BRANCH M I N T AT DAHLGN'EGA, GEORGIA.
Total.

Gold coinage.

Periods.

Cf
1 8 38
1839
1 8 40
184 1
1 8 42
184 3
184 4
184 5
1 8 46
184 7
1848
184 9
1850 to October 31

Total....

Piece.*.
20,583
18,939
23,896
30,695
59,608
93, 450
89,054
90,629
80,294
64,405
47,465
39,036
37,334
700,388




Pieces.

Cu
Pieces.

13,674
3.532
4,164
4,643
36,209
17,332
19,460
19,303
15,784
13,771
10,945
9,175

21,588
7,158

Number.
20,583
32,613
27,428
34,859
64,251
134, 659
306,386
110,089
99,597
80,189
61,236
71,569
53.667

167, S92

28,746

897,126

Dollars.
102,915 00

3 , 9 5 0 , 6 6 6 00

128,880 00
1-28,310
163,885
309,647
582,772
488,600
501,795
449,727
361,485
271,752
244,130
216,765

00
00
50
50
00
00
50
00
50
50
50

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Doc. No. II.

148

No. 14.
Expenses of the mint and branches to October 31, 1S50.
PHILADELPHIA MINT.

Periods.

Expenditure.

$23,799 22
13,000 00
50.150 90
14,000 00
7.0O0 00
26,672 93
32,481 43
35.151 44
37,766 09
19*572 20
i{fi,874 42
9,335 08
9,104 48
31,721 85
14.234 00
25,614 00
12.158 36
28,999 96
17.975 80
16,804 62
11,988 17
23,644 44
45,379 85
38,500 00
42,60S 33
36,975 00
31,850 00
45,850 00
17,150 H)
14,139 12

Periods.

1824
1825.....'.
18-;6
1827
18*8
182 9
183 0
183 1
1-32
1833..
1834
183.")
18'iG
183 7
183 8
1839
1840,
184 1
184 2
1^43, to June 30.
1843-4
1844- 5
1845- 6
1846-7
1847-8
1848-9
1849-50, to October 31
Total

Expenses of the mints—Continued.
nktt orleans mint. charlotte hint. dahlonega mint.
Periods.
Expeftiture.

*7,679 60
87,163 48
69,227 50
63,674 18
52,819 92
49,769 07
.52,319 10
58,541 04
54,380 46
52,129 69
50,946 82
54,027 90
61,691 57.
64,867 09
Total.



779,237 42

Expenditure.

916,836
14,590
13,875
11,525

30
28
17
95

11,070 86

11,221
10,471
3,767
7,839
11,358
11,238
11,529
8,638

41
95
50
53
46
56
02
16

143,963 15

Dk>c. No. 11.

144

No. 15.
Statement exhibiting the amount of coin and bullion imported and exported annually, from 1S21 to 1S50, inclusive; and also the amount of importation over exportation, and of exportation aver importation, during
the same years.
coin and bullion.
Excess of
Years ending
Imported.

Exported.

1829.
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
1834.
1835.
1836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
9 months to June 30,1843.
Year to June 3 0 . . . . 1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
18 48.
1849.
1850.

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,835
6,150,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,155,964
7,305,945
5,907,504
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131, 447
13,400,881
10,516,414
17,747,116
5,595,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016
22,320,335
5,830,429
4,070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289
6,360,224
6,651,240
4,6-28,792

$10,478,059
10,810,180
6,372,9H7
7,014,552
8,797,055
4,704,533
8,014,680
8,243,476
4,924,020
2,178,773
9,014,931
5,656,340
2,611,701
2,076,758
6,477,775
4,324,336
5,976,249
3,508,046
8,776,743
8,417,014
10,034,332
4,813,539
1,520,791
5,454,214
8,606,495
3,905,268
1,907,739
15,841,620
* 5,404,648
•
7,522,994

Total.

263,449,873

193,390,048

September 30

1821.

1822.
1823.
1824.
1825.
1826.
1627.

1828.

Exportation
over importa*
tion.

Importation
over exportation.

$2,413,
7,440,334
1,275,091
$1,365,283
"2," 646,'290

"2* 176*433'
, 136,250

"*753,735

"2,479,592'
5,977,191
251,164
4,458,667
15,834,874
6,653,672
9,076,545
4,540,165
14,239,070

j.
j.
J.
'.
j.
.
i.

' 1,* 70S, 956

3,181,567
465,799
5,045,699
726,523
20,799,544
376,215
4,536,253
127,536
22,213,550
9,481,396
"i,246,592
2*894,202
112,290,606

42,230,781

Treasury Department,
Register's Office, December 2, 1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

Doc. No. II.
No. 16.

'

Statements exhibiting the quantity and value of wines, spirits, tyc., import ul annually, from 1843 to 1850, inclusive; and also showing the
;
•
foreign cost pergallon under specific and ad valorem duties.
No. 1.—MADEIRA-WINE.

•

Period of importation.

Gallons.

9 months, ending Jane 30, 1843
Year end;ng June 30, 1844
Year ending June 30, 1845
Year ending June 30, 1846
5 months, ending November 30, 1846.
7 tnonihR, ending June 30. JS47
Year ending June 38, 1848
Yeat ending June 30, 1849
Year ending June 3 0 , 1 8 5 0

Value.

Average cost
per gallon.

Duty.

•

3,949
16, 754
101,176
109,797
117,117

13,606
44,634
193,971
303,125

§9,075
39,575
145,237
122, £95
128,613
5,717
2 L 630
lOo, 302
150,096

$2
1
1
1
1

23.8
82.5
43.5
11.9
09.8
41.4
48 4
54.3
49.51

Specific.

Ad valorem.

•

No. 2.—SHERRY

9 months, ei.ding June 30, 1 8 4 3 . . . . .
Ye^r ending: June 30, 1844
Year ending; June 30, 1845
Year ending June 30, 1846
5 months, ending November 30, 1846
7 months, ending June 30, 1847
Year ending June SO, 1848
Year ending June 30, 1849
Year ending June 30, 1850

4,685
18,665
23,616
26,538
14,543
77,521
215,935
170,794
212,092

WINE.

$6,491
23,418
38,289
41,761
26,194
56,061
109,983
128,510
118,952

§1
1
1
1
1

38.5
25,4
62.1
57.0
79.5
72.3
50.9
75.2
56.08

Specific.

SO 60 6
48.1
50.4
35.4
43
26.2
35.4
24 6
27.36

Specific.

Ad valorem.

No. 3.—SICILY W I N E .

9 months, ending June 30, 1843
Year ending June 30, 1844
Year ending June 30, 1845
Yfeur ending June 30, 1846
5 m in:hs, ending November 30, 1846.
7 mon'hs, ending June 30; 1847
Year ending June 30, 1848
Year ending June 3 1849
Year ending June 3'J, iS50

14,579
31,180
110,590
209,131
21,281
92,611
190,294
130,851
91,123

$6,617
15,000
46,033
74,000
8,933
24,230
67,364
32,231
24,933

Ad valorem^

No. 4.—PORT W I N E , I N CASKS.

9 month* ending June 30. 1 8 4 3 . . . . .
Year ending Tune 30, 1844 Ik
Year •mi ins June 30, 1 8 4 5 . . . ^
Year ending June 30, 1846
5 months ending No* ember 30, 1846
7 month* ending June 30. 1817 . . . .
Year « . d i n g June JO, 1848
Y«*»r vRdyng June 30, 1849
Year ettdktg June 30, 1&5D....-

1*




38,593
223,615
260,593
372,528
80,991
8,075
501,123
711,268
626,211

#25,714
156,878
162, 358
148,895
62,851
3,791
170,134
278,700
305,454

$0 66.C
70.2
62.3
40
77.6
47
34
3* 3
48.77

Specific.

Ad Yafereife

16

Doc. No. 11.
No. 16—Continued.
No. 5.—CLARET, IN CASKS.

Gallons.

tenths ending June 3 0 , 1 8 1 3

ur ending June 30, 1846
ionthe ending November 30, 1 8 4 6 . .
onths ending June 36, 1847
ir ending June 30, 1848
ir ending June 39, 1850

$134,598
218,239
249,633
249,703
111,453
119,844
221,416
263,836
267,445

Average cost
per gallon.

Value.

873,895
993,198
1,851,862
951,351
294,433
591,656
1,227,071
1,912,701
1,919,766

Period of importation.

'
I
!
1
j
«
i
;

i

Duty.

SO 1 5 . 4 0
21 97
23.73
26.24
37.85
20.26
18.04
13.79
13.93

Specifis.

$0 1 7 . 6 5
28.90
33.19
30.65
22.14
23.16
22.24
18.10

Specific.

$0 2 2 . 7 7
27.98
35.69
43.96'
48
25.08
23
21.62
19.79

Specific.

$8 5 5 . 4 0
77.52
75.79
87.13
1 07.30
92.35
82.84
65.28
64.14

Specific:

Ad valorem.

No. 6.—OTHER R E D WINKS.

Bnths ending June 30, 1843
r ending June 3 0 , 1 8 4 4

340,387
495, 588
954,646
1,072,589
539,454
781,078
994,458
1,469,256

r ending June 30, 1846
:
pnths ending November 3 0 , 1 8 4 6 . .
onths ending June 30, 1847
t ending June 30, 1849
r ending June 30, 1850

$60,696
143,210
316,821
328,814
119,411
i€Q, 928
221,177
265,988

No. 7.—OTHER W H I T E

B n t h s ending June 3 0 , 1 8 4 3
B ending Jane 30, 1814
B ending June 30, 1846
B n t h s ending November 3 0 , 1 8 4 6 . .
B n t h s ending June 30, 1847
B ending J une 30, 1848
B ending June 3U, 1849
B ending June 30, 1850

1

WINES.

$28,205
75,090
211,183
310,241
296,736
69,831
193,358
210,139
215,353

Ad valorem.

No. 8 — BRANDY.

H
•filths ending June 30, 1843. .
B e n d i n g June 30, 1844
I ending June 30, 1845
I ending June 3 0 , 1 8 4 6
I oths ending November 3 0 , 1 8 4 6 . .
1 nths ending June 3 0 , 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . .
I ending J u i e 30, 1848
1 ending Jans 30, 1849
I ending June 30, 1850.




123,832
268,414
591,735
705,808
618,267
278,482
840,687
971,895
1,088,801

A d valorem.

1 9 f , 832
782,510
1,081,314
963,147
331,108
623,309
1,370,111
2,064,091
4,145,802

$106,267
606,633
819,540
839,231
355,451
575,631
1,135,089
1,347.514
2,650/537

•
A d valorem.

[rDoc. No. 11.

147

No. 16—Continued. '
N o . 9 — G R A I N SPIRITS.
Period of importation.

Gallons.

9 months ending June 30,1343
Year ending June 30, 1844.
Year ending June 30, 1845
Year ending June 30, 1846
5 months ending November 30, 1846..
7 months ending June 30, 1847
Year ending June 30, 1848
Year ending June 30, 1849
Year ending June 30, 1850

259,129
416,918
606,311
677, 785
136,323
327,635
676,683
796,276
751,183

Valus.

S121,547
171,015
262,543
345,352
86,073
143,549
327,493
327,957
361,078

Average cost
per gallon.

Duty.

$0 46.91
41.02
43 30
58.95
63.14
43.81
43.40
41.19
48.07

Specific.

SO 23.7
37.07
29.12
36.92
44.08
35.96
33.21
26.87
33.57

Specific.

Ad valorem.

N o . 1 0 — O T H E R SPIRITS.
9 months ending June. 30,1843
Year ending June 30, 1844
Year ending June 30,1845
Year ending June 30,1846
5 months ending November 30,1846
7 months ending June 30,1847
Year ending June 30,1848
Year ending-June 30,1849
Year ending June 30,18E0

135,399
210,477
270,484
221,344
65,477
160,747
228,671
542, 492
339,169

$32, 095 j
78, 027 i
73, 957
81, 713 I
23, >•>62
57, 806 i
75,' 943 I
145, 784
113, 779

Ad va]or3m.

N o . 11.—BEER, A L E , A N D PORTER FROM E N G L A N D .

9 months ending June 30,1343
Year ending June 30,1844
Year ending June 30,1845
Year ending June 30,1346
5 months ending November 3 0 , 1 3 4 6 . .
7 months ending June 3 0 , 1 8 4 7 . . . . . . .
Year ending June 30,1848
Year ending June 30,1849
Y«ar ending June 30,1850

63,612
107,489
79,302
117,621
46,146
132,157
130,008
146,473
156,735

$57,098
102,157
73,729
110,397
42,987
67,305
101,171
118,233
129,957

$0 89.76
95.04
92.97
94.71
93.15
50.93
77.82
80.72
82.92

Specific.

Ad valorem-

N o . 12.—BEER, A L E , A N D PORTER FROM S C O T L A N D .

|i9 months ending June 30,1843
;Year ending June 30,1844
Year ending June 30,1845
Year ending June 30,1846
•j5 months ending November 30,1846..
'7 months ending June 30,1847
.Year ending June 30,1848
'JYear ending June 30,1849
IjYear ending June 30,1850




7,423
19,236
26,711
38,464
2,151
15,375
39,282
52,297
52,856

$6,335
18,343

21,294
39,831
1,895
8,657
21,533
30,088
41,790

$0 85.34
95.36
79.72
1 03.55
88.1
56.31
54.05
57.53
79.07

Specific.

Ad valorem.

gS

No. 11.

Doc,

No. 16—Continued.
e capitulat ion of the average cost of wines, spirits, and ale and porter.
Wines, &c.

2.—Sherry
3.—Sicily
6.—Other red wines
7.—Other white wines
10.—Other spirits
11.—Ale and porter from England.
12.—Ale and porter from Scotland.

Under specific Under ad vaduties.
lorem duties.

Difference.

Equal to—

Per gallon.
Per gallon.
$1 55.5
$0 4 8 . 4
63.62
1 52 5
47.3
28.4
63.3
41.8
16.5
25.3
27.6
21.41
35.68
22.37
80.63 .
76,15
45.37
49.06
32.4
34.18
73.1
93.13
61.74
90.41

Per gallon.
«1 07.1
'
88.88
18.9
21.5
8.8
6.19
13.31
4.48
3.69
1.78
20.03
28.67

Per eenU
63.9
58.3
39.9
33.9
34
21.6
37.3
5.5
7.5
4.6
21.5
31.7

reascry pltartmbmt,
Register's Office, December 10,1850.




TOWNSEND HAINES,

Register.

149

[rDoc. No. 11.
No., 17.
BVREAU OF TOPOGRAPHICAL

ENGINEERS,

Washington, November 4, 1850,
SIR: Having been engaged, under the Treasijy Department, in 1
construction of several marine hospitals, it is deemed advisable, in trai
mitting a report of the same, to famish a full and detailed narration,
order that the department may judge correctly of the course that has be
pursued.
I have therefore the honor of submitting to your consideration the i
lowing narrative of these several works, and estimates for their coi
pletiou.
<
1 beg leave to call your attention to the suggestion in the report in r
erence to furnishing hospitals, for which purpose there is an ample exi
ing appropriation. If it be the wish of the department that this bur©
should attend to that duty lor the four hospitals it has erected and is nc
erecting, your early directions in that respect are very desirable;.
With great respect, your obedient servant,
J. J. ABERT,
Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers.
Hon.

THOMAS

CORWIX,

Secretary of the Treasury.

MARINE

HOSPITALS,

Previously to the year 1848, the Treasury Department having to en
a marine hospital at Louisville, Kentucky, applied for the services of
officer of the, corps of topographical engineers, stationed at that place,
superintend the work. The application being approved by the War I
partment, Brevet Colonel S. H. Long was directed on the 8th May, 1&
to take the directions of the Treasury Department in reference to tl
work.
Afterwards, in October, 1848, the Treasury Department being desire
of availing itself in other cases of the services of the corps in the c<
struction of marine hospitals, it was decided, after due conference a
consideration of all effects and consequences, that officers of the coi
were not to be detached for such purposes, but the bureau could take t
directions of the Treasury Department in reference to them, and ca
them into effect. Leaving, therefore, the case of the Louisville hospi
as it had b«en already previously arranged, a letter was written to t
Treasury Department from this office, dated 14th October, IS48, in whi
it is said, "that under the approval ofthe course By the War Departme
this bureau is ready to take charge of the construction ofthe marine h
<
pitals named in your letter (of the 11th.) It is only necessary now tl
the Treasury Department should express its desire that this bureau shoi
go on with the work." This desire being subsequently expressed, tl
bureau took charge (being to that extent a bureau of the Treasury Depa
ment) of the construction of the marine hospitals at Chicago, Lake Mic
gan; at Paducah, on the Ohio; at Napoleon, on the Mississippi; and



150

Dk>c. No. 11.

Natchez, on the Mississippi; andhds continued since then, and to that extent, a bureau of the Treasury Department for these buildings.
The foregoing explanation is made in order to explain to you the reasons
of addressing to you this report.
I will now give a detailed account of each of these several works:
1. Marine hospital at Chicago.—The first appropriation for this work
is in a law of August 3, 1S48, appropriating ten thousand dollars in its
fevor, and requiring it to be located on the lands owned by the United
States at-Chicago. The only lands owned by the United States at that
place were certain lots reserved for the convenience of the light-house
establishment, and certain other lots reserved for the convenience of the
harbor works. These last were usually called the old Fort Dearborn
site, and upon these last the site for the marine hospital was selected,
which being approved, the plan of the building was digested and tlrawn.
In conversing with the Hon. Mr. Walker in reference to the plan, and
the probable cost of the Chicago hospital, it was conceded that its locality
made it proper that the plan should be made to accommodate a greater
number of patients than would probably be necessary at either of the
other hospitals which the bureau had /to build, and that its cost would
be proportionally greater; and in reference to those other hospitals, I assured him that, in my opinion, the sum ($30,000) which appeared to
occupy his mind as a limit of cost lor each, would not prove to be sufficient;
that I had not seen the estimates which had created this impression of
cost, but, according to some trial estimates which I had made, my impressions were that every one of the hospitals, when completed and fit
for use, would exceed that sum; that estimates should be closely examined
to be properly understood, ip order to see what was contemplated to be
done by the estimate. No doubt good and large buildings could be put
up and covered in for that sum; but inasmuch as these buildings could
not be used without numerous accessory structures, which could with,
propriety be considered fixtures to such buildings, the cost of such fixtures
became of necessity legitimate parts of a judicious estimate. I further
illustrated my notions by reference to the well-known subject of railroads,
in which the road-way could be made, bridges be put up, and therailbe laid
for a given sum; but in this condition the road was of no use whatever^
and all its cost would be a dead loss, unless the necessary locomotives,
passenger and train cars, watering places, station-houses, &c., were also
provided. These, therefore, became legitimate parts of such estimates.
There were similar accessories to marine hospitals,* independent of a mere
building of certain dimensions, which became also legitimate parts of estimates for such establishments. He admitted that in reference to the
greater size of the Chicago hospital, it was very probable its cost would
exceed that of either of the others; but he urged me tcvuse my best efforts
to keep the #ost of the others within the anticipated limit. With this understanding, the works were begun. The construction of the hospitals at
Paducah, Napoleon, and Natchez were placed under the superintendence
of Brevet Lieut. Col. Long, and the bureau engaged itself in preparing
the plan for the hospital at Chicago. This was not completed until after
Mr. Walker had left the office, and until the Treasury Department was
under the direction of Mr. Meredith. After the plan for Chicago had
been completed, my estimate so much exceeded the anticipated limit of
the Treasury Department, that I deemed it advisable to consult other au


151

Doc. No. Ilt

thorities. Without, therefore, saying a word of what in my judgmei
the building would cost, the plan as prepared was sent to Neirnsee & Nei
son, of Baltimore, with a desire that they would prepare an estimate i
accordance with the plan. These gentlemen, it is well known, are amon
the most accomplished architects of our country—of great experience a
builders, and highly celebrated for the accuracy of their estimates, whic
have been always found to accord with great nicety to actual expenditure!
They spent great labor upon the estimate, enumerating every item of coi
with singular care. This enumeration of items occupies thirteen pages <
foolscap, and the total amount is $45,SOI 22, viz:
Excavation and grading
Brick work .
Sheet roofing
.
.
.
Stone work Lumber and flowing
Carpenter's work
Plasterer's work and materials
.
Counter ceiling
Marble work
Hardware
Copper and tin roofing and spouting
Iron work of ail kinds
Plumbing
Painting and glazing
Slate roofing
-

.
-

.

.

-

-

-

- „
.
-

-

-

.

.

-

$493
- 13,616
440
1,357
S,4S7
- 9,850
2,167
412
- 1,200
- 1,276
- 1,312
1,159
- 1,046
2,030
954

0
5
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
8
5
0
0
0

45,801 2i
The plan of the Chicago hospital is 128 feet long by 90 wide; am
without interfering with the officers which such an establishment require?
with rooms for attending physician and nurses, kitchen, pantry, mesa
room, <fec., <fcc., it can readily accommodate 180 patients; and withou
inconvenient crowding, it can accommodate 240 patients.
\
The estimate of this office had made the probable cost much neare:
$50,006 than that of Neirnsee & Neilson, but it was deemed advisable t
<
assume the estimate of these gentlemen.
Having pow the plans and estimates which were not prepared at thi
time of the interview with the Honorable Mr. Walker, I waited with thesi
upon his successor, the Honorable Mr. Meredith, with whom 1 had i
similar conversation. He appeared also impressed with the opinion tha
although no limit^of cost had been fixed by law, yet there seemed to be «
general expectation that these buildings would not seriously differ in thei
cost from $30,000 each. He appeared, however, satisfied that the grea
and increasing wants of such a position at Chicago would necessarily
involve a more extensive plan, and a greater cost; but with much cour
tesy he added, that in these matters (to the extent of the number of hos
pitals which the bureau was desired to build) much reliance had to b
<
placed upon the experience of the bureau; that I could go on, beini
held rigidly responsible for the judiciousness of plans and the economy
of e x p e n d i t u r e . Tiie work was therefore commenced. The officer o
the corps stationed at Chicago was Lieutenant J. D. Webster. On th<



W Doc. Np. 11.
30th October, 1848, Lieutenant Webster was informed of the site which
had been selected for the position of the hospital; and on the 15th June,
1849, the plan for the building, which had been drawn with all its details
in this office, and which had been the subject, as just narrated, of the
interview with Mr. Meredith, was also sent. A copy of that letter is
hereto appended, (No. 1,) and on the 25th June another letter was written to Lieutenant Webster, of which a copy is appended, (No. 2.) On
the 10th July, further instructions were given, a copy of which will be
found as appendix No. 3. On the 14th August, 1849, he was further
instructed as exhibited in appendix No. 4. The letters exhibit the points
of the correspondence up to that day, and the instructions which had
been given. On the 9th of August, Lieutenant Webster reports:
"In conformity with your instructions of 10th July, to contract for the
masonry and carpentry of the marine hospital, I advertised for proposals
to execute the masonry of the basement; proposing to separate that from
the brick-work of the superstructure, because fevas apprehensive that I
should not get for the whole job any considerable number of bids from
respectable men. The time set in my notice has expired, and I have not
as yet received a single proposal even for that limited portion of the work.
I attribute this principally to the depression of business aiid enterprise,
caused by the prevalence of the cholera. I have been very often told by
intelligent men, well acquainted with business matters, that there is a
general indisposition to engage in anything beyond temporary jobs or employment. Many of the mechanics have left the city. I have strong
hopes that the epidemic has now passed its worst stage, and that we may
soon look for a revival of confidence and enterprise. In the mean time
I think we should save time by contracting for the stone, which could
be readily done, because there are many canal boats lying idle, and the
st.'ne are already quarried along the canal. There are many men who
could undertake to furnish some hundreds of cords of stone, who would
riot be disposed nor competent to contract for the execution of the masonry
complete. I am still of the opinion heretofore expressed to you, that I can
contract for the material and put it together by hired hands to great advantage, and I would, particularly under present circumstances, .recommend
that course in reference at least to the making of the foundations arid
basement."
And in a letter of the 11th of the same month, he further says: " I wish
to ad$ a few considerations to those mentioned in my letter of the 9th inst.,
relating to the method of executing the work on the marine hospital.
There have recently occurred in this city several large and destructive
fires. The buildings destroyed were mostly of wood; but, being within
the 1 fire-limits,' will have to be replaced with brick. This circumstance, together with the revival of business after the cessation of the
cholera, will produce great activity in the way of building, and the press
of business on the hands of contractors will raise prices of work, but will
-not materially affect the price of labor. Now, it is well known that mechanics and laborers would rather work for the government than for contractors, because their pay is more sure, and it is in cash instead of trade,
or 'store-pay,' as it is called; so that, notwithstanding any press of business in the city, I could always command the services of the best mechanics at fair wages; and the same would be true, to a considerable extent, of supplies of all kinds of materials, fhese causes, then, that will
Digitized for raise the price of the work if do^ie by contract, will not materially affect
FRASER


[

r

Doc. No. 11.

153

it if dont by hired hands; and beside this, I do not see but tint we must
do it in trie latter way, as hardly anybody seems disposed to bid. Since
•writing ny letter of the 9th, I have received owe bid) but at much too
high a rite, as I think.
"I mich regret the delay caused by these unfortunate circumstances;
but I think that it will not be of any ultimate disadvantage. My present
expecta:ions are limited to the execution of the stone-work of the basements this fall; and if 1 can be authorized to procure the lumber by contract, cr otherwise, before the close o'f navigation, it can be piled so as to
be seajoning, and very little if any time be lost. This I deem to be the
best arrangement that can be made."
On he 1st September, 1849, Lieutenant Webster reports: c: During the
past ironth the excavation for the basement of the marine hospital was
completed, and a contract made for the stone. During the present month
the stcne for the masonry of the basement is to be delivered, and the
work vill be vigorouMy prosecuted."
And in a report of the 14th September, he says: 11 The work upon the
marine hospital, also, at this city, has been retarded by an indisposition,
owing, probably, in some degree to the prevalence of the cholera during
the pas summer, on the part of builders and masons to contract for the
execution of the work. After advertising for two weeks for proposals, I got
no bids :or the mason-work of the basement story. A contract for the stone
for this part of the work was then made and approved, and the work is now
going oi well. The basement-walls will probably be finished this fall.
The stoae is of excellent quality, and I hope to make good work of it.
That paitof the wails below the surface of the ground, consisting of substantial nibble-masonry, will be laid in hydraulic mortar. The portion
above ground will be faced with hammered stone in eight-inch courses.
" The greatest difficulty in the matter of materials is to get the lumber
sufficiently seasoned. This will be obviated by procuring the greater
portion of it this fall, so that it can be dressed and seasoned during the
winter. The delay of this work, although it might at first seem unfortunate, will be of much ultimate benefit, by enabling me to go on with
a much fuLer understanding of the methods of business here, so that I
can economise the appropriation to the best advantage, and at the same
time secure the best quality of work."
In a letter of November 5, 1849, he reports as follows: "The work on
the marine hospital has gone on very satisfactorily, with but one or two
trifling detentions. The foundations all around the building have been
put in a substantial manner. .The mortar in which they" are laid is composed of two parts coarse sand, one part fine sand, one part common
(Chicago) lime slaked, one part hydraulic lime (Oswego, N. Y.) This
mortar sets well and is very tenacious. Great care has been taken to get
down to a good bottom before commencing to lay the foundation wall; and
as I found in the eastern end of the site a deposite of black mould, judged
to be quite unsafe, the greater depth to which it was necessary to carry
the trenches has somewhat increased the expense. Nearly enough stone
to face the walls of the basement in the areas and above ground has been
hammer-dressed, and a portion of it laid in the northern wall."
His monthly report of 1st December, 1819, contains the following
statement:
"The work on the marine hospital was suspended on the 9th of last



154

Dk>c. No. 11.

month. The stone-work of the basement was carrieo up all round
building to the level of the ground on its front; beinj on the rear wajf
twelve feet, and four inches in height from the bottom of the trencl*
and on the front five feet. I have contracted for the wmmon (Chicago!
brick, all hard, at four dollars a thousand, and for the piessed (MilwaukiJj
at eleven dollars and seventy-five cents—very favorable terms. The bas<#
ment walls are well covered in and prepared for winter.5'
His monthly report for 1st January, 1850, states: " During the montlfcl
of I )ecember last, the work on the marine hospital has consisted of gefcj|
ting out the material for the doors, door-dressings, blinds sash, window!
casings, and base-boards. This will insure the thorough seasoning o |
the interior finish of the building, in the particulars mentioned. Thl*
same work will be prosecuted during the present month."
-v
A letter from him, dated 30th March, 1850, says:
" The joiner work of the marine hospital, so far as inteided to be clones
before the putting tip of the walls, is nowtiomplete, and I have this dayf
discharged the men employed upon it. There are now ready the doorsfor the basersent and thefirstand second stories, with janbs for the same^
3,800 running feet of base; the window-frames and sash; shutters fox thai
basement and inside blinds for the first and second stores, with the rej
quisite mouldings for the finish. The lumber of whicl they are madfll
being pretty well seasoned in the fall, and these articles laving still some!
months to dry, they will be in the best order to put in i>laee early in the!
coming fall, thus obviating one of the greatest difScultiss in doing goods
work here."
On the l^t of June, 1850, he reports:
" The work on the marine hospital was resumed early in the last month.,
The exterior (stone) walls are up to the top of tV.e ba>ement windows,.;
and the foundations of the interior cross-walls are nearly completed. The;
brick-work will be commenced on the 3d instant on the party-walls. In
sinking the trenches for the cross-walls we came upon some old sinks, which
caused some extra trouble and expense. In one plate, the excavation
was carried twelve feet below the sills. Fifty men are now employed
upon the work, and it will' be pushed forward, during the month, with
all the despatch consistent with thoroughness of execution,"
And on the 1st August, 1850, he reports:
" During the month which has just closed, the work on the marine,
hospital has made good progress. The walls are up to the top of the en-j
'
1
trance story, and the joists laid upon them."
The last information in relation to this hospital is in a report of as late
a date as the 25th September, 1850. It says:
'' The walls of this building are now up, and a commencement has
been made of putting the roof-timbers in place. The quality of materials
used, procured by purchase in the market and by contract, is the best
which this region of country affords, and will compare favorably with
that of any structure in the northwest. I was also very successful, after
full inquiry, in my selection of master-mechanics, upon whose skill and
faithfulness so much depends in the execution of such a work. The
great items of material were procured by contract, and the work put together under my own supervision; and experience has satisfied me that
this was the most advantageous method. The walls, though of great



[rDoc. No. 11.

155

thickness and weight, and on a sloping site, show no cracks, and are a
good specimen of thorough and substantial masonry.
" The interior wood-work of the three lower stories was gotten out in
admirable condition, from seasoned lumber, last winter, so that by the'
time it can be put in we can be pretty well assured of avoiding that imperfection of seasoning which deforms, almost all the buildings executed
in this hurrying country.
"It would be highly desirable to have the appointment of superintending
surgeon made at an early day^so that I can consult with him as to many
of the details of the interior construction."
The other hospitals, the construction of which was placed, on the request of the Treasury Department, under the direction of this bureau,
are those of Paducah, Kentucky; of Natchez? Mississippi; and of Napoleon,
Arkansas. As the operations on these works are well condensed in the
reports of Brevet Lieutenant Colonel S. H. Long, I will limit myself in
extracting from his reports the parts which refer to each.
Hospital at Paducah.—From a report ot 1st September, 1849:
"The construction of the several hospitals at Paducah, Kentucky,
Natchez, Mississippi, and Napoleon, Arkansas, were confided to my
superintendence and direction by instructions from the Topographical
bureau, dated October 30, 1848, and January 20, 1849, and have occupied much of my attention from that to the present date.
"Full and complete drawings of these several hospitals, in plan, elevation, profile, and section, have been duly prepared and submitted. The
arrangements entered into for their construction will be exhibited in the
order just before observed, beginning with the hospital mentioned under
the present head.
"The receipts and expenditures on account of the hospital at Paducah
within the last fiscal year are as follows, viz:
Amount of receipts - $6,500 00
Amount expended for first quarter 1849
$169 40
Amount expended for second quarter 1849 174 93
jffmount of expenditures
344 33
Balance unexpended July 1, 1849 .

.

.

-

6,155 6T

"The arrangements made on account of this hospital embraced the
preparation of the requisite drawings, the construction of a fence surrounding the hospital lot, the demarcation of the site of the building, &c., the
excavation .of the cellar, foundations, &c.—all now m progress; the preparation and delivery of one million bricks, and for all the cut-stone
work required for the building, all of which are now in progress; the
procuring aiid delivery of ail the lumber required therefor, the execution
of all the masonry required for the foundations and superstructure, the
preparation and delivery of all the window and door-frames, casings,
<fcc., doors, windows, (exclusive of glazing,) shutter-blinds, &c., and
the employment of supervisors, carpenters, &c., to direct and execute the
work, &c., etc. These several operations were commenced within the
year, and are still going on with all practicable despatch.
"The expenditures on account of this hospital for the current quarter




Doc. No. 11-

156

are expected to exceed very considerably the amount hitherto estimatifgj
and required, and now applicable to the construction.
"Written agreements for various items of the work above designated ha^f
recently been concluded, and will be forwarded in due time as accoj^
paniments of my accounts covering the cost of the items alluded to."
" Construction of United States marine hospital at Natchez.—T1
measures adopted in reference to the construction of this hospital, aij]
the progress made towards their accomplishment, are similar in all respec
to those detailed under the preceding head."
"The receipts and expenditures on account of the hospital at Natchl
within the last fiscal year are as follows, viz:
1
• "

Amount of receipts • Amount expended for first quarter of 1849 Amount expended for second quarter of 1849
Amount of expenditures
.
.
.
Balance unexpended July 1, 1849

-

-

$167 50
1,380 60
-

1

$6,500 (7
" j
*
1,548 H
4
4,951 8

" Of the proposed hospital ai Napoleon, Arkansas.—On my examinations
of the site selected for this work, in the month of March last, at whidH
time the Mississippi was unusually high, the water overflowing its banlf?
in numerous places, sundry objections to its eligibility as a site for trap
hospital struck me very forcibly, and I regarded it as my duty to subrnf1
my views in relation thereto to the authorities at Washington, prior tf8
the adoption of any expensive measures for the prosecution of the world!®
The objections alluded to are contained in a report 1 had the honor M
*
forward to the bureau under date of March 30, 1849, to which I beg leav#
to refer for an expression of my opinions relating to this subject."
\
In answer to the representations made in that report, all operations ii£l
furtherence of the construction of the hospital were required to be sust?
pended till Congress should reassemble and have opportunity to reconp
sider the decision previously made by them in reference to the occupancjg
of the position as a site for the hospital.
I
Subsequently to the date of the report referred to, I made arrangements^
for a careful examination of Napoleon and the country in its vicinity, and|
employed a competent engineer for this purpose. The report made frjf
him, and the topographical sketch accompanying the same, are stronglwj
confirmatory of the opinions previously entertained and communicated bf|
'myself.
'i
A reduced drawing from the sketch above mentioned is herewith translj
mitted, and will exhibit with clearness the features of the country, e m |
bracing the confluence of the Arkansas and Mississippi, together witl^
considerable portions of both these rivers, and of the grounds adjacent-toi
them.
It
From the representations made as above, it appears that a neck or gorgi
of ground, thirteen hundred yards in width, intervenes between the
Mississippi and Arkansas, at the distance of about fifteen miles above Na*
poleon on the former, and about one mile above the same point on th#
latter river. The width of this neck of land is constantly diminishing,
hy the abrasions of the Mississippi on one side, and by those of the AM
Jtansas on the other side of the gorge. From the date at which th<i



[

r

Doc. No. 11.

157

«blie surveys in this neighborhood were made, to the present time, the
tdth of the gorge has been reduced from about one and a quarter mile to
& present width, as above stated, viz: thirteen hundred yards; thus
(viously showing a tendency»in both rivers to form a junction at this
tee.
iFrom^ the same representations, it also appears that another similar
irge,ofonly six liundredf yards in width,occurs between the same rivers
sthe distance of about three miles above their confluence on the Aransas, and two miles below the same jjoint on the Mississippi. At the
Itremities of this gorge, also, the abrasions of the two rivers are even
)re alarming than at the other gorge; the width of the former having
en already reduced from about two-thirds to less than one-third of a
:4ile, within the period above mentioned,
ftThe annual abrasions at each of the gorges are computed at a minimum
f one hundred feet per year; so that a junction at the gorge first uien>> e may be expected to take place about forty years hence, or at the
i nd
flforter gorge in less than half that time, on the supposition that the causes
$w operating will continue to operate in the same manner during the
Iriods just mentioned.
4The country, to the distance of some twenty to thirty nules westward
0m this part of the Mississippi, consists almost entirely of alluvial
Sounds, for the most part densely wcoded, and occasionally presenting
feoons, pools, and other depressions below the common surface level,
inch last nowhere rises beyond the reach of the highest floods of the
Jo rivers. The flood of 1844 is said to have attained an elevation suffient to inundate this entire region. The last vernal freshet, which was
•wer by about four inches than the flood just mentioned, is representD as having overflowed this entire district.
Under such circumstances, I cannot but regard the site selected for
lis hospital as objectionable, not only on account of the overflows to
hich it is exposed, and the deleterious effects occasioned thereby, but.
l account of the tendencies of the Mississippi and Arkansas to form a
iw junction, more or less remote from Napoleon, among the consequences
I which an effectual seclusion of the site in question from all the
f
Pnefits and conveniences of commerce and intercourse with other parts
f the western country must be anticipated.
In my report of March, before cited, I took the liberty to suggest the
ppriety of substituting Helena, within the State of Arkansas, about
fnety mites above Napoleon, as far more eligible in'many, if not in alt
ppects, for the contemplated hospital, than .any other position that eaa
^ found near the margin ofthe Mississippi, within the limits of that
late. This is in feet the only point on the westerly side of the Mississippi, from the mouth of the Ohio to the Gulf of Mexico, at which th*
hland borders of the Mississippi valley present themselves at the mart)f the river. Since the date of my report, I have Jearnt that a suifasite may there be had for this purpose, on terms quite moderate e:
IPorable in all respects.
.The receipts and expenditures incurred within the last fiscal year <3rs>
k*urrt of the hospital at Napoleon relate almost exclusively to the
Nation o? drawings, and to examinations and surveys deemed neces—




158

Doc. No. 11-

sary as preliminaries to the commencement of the work, and are as follows, viz:
Amount of receipts Amount expended for first quarter 1849
Amount expended for second quarter 1849
Amount of expenditures
Balance unexpended July 1, 1849

-

- $3,600 ©0
$195 T
O
295 84
491 54
2,508 46

Jg'rom the report of September 1, 1850:
"Hospital at Paducah.—My annual report of September 1,1849, shows
that very little had been done towards the construction of this hospital
prior to that date. The work then commenced has "been prosecuted with
all practicable despatch. It has been much retarded, however, by unfavorable weather, which has prevailed to an inordinate extent, in that
part of the country, during most of the last fiscal year. The rains were
so frequent during the summer and fall of 1S49, that the amount of bricks
prepared and ready for use, with all the efforts that could be applied by
the contractors, did not exceed one-third of the quantity required for the
completion of the hospital. The weather proved equally unfavorable during the months of March, April, and part of May, of the present year.
In consequence of these hindrances, the masonry of the superstructure
has been unavoidably delayed to the present time.
" The progress made in the work during the last fiscal year, and its
condition at the close of that year, are as follows:
" The hospital lot was enclosed by a substantial fence about six feet high
3n three sides of the lot; the end presented at the brow of the river bank
requiring no fence by reason of the abruptness of the bank. About half
:he fence thus formed was, unfortunately, swept away by the high freshet
>f last spring. Measures have been taken to reset the demolished portion
>f the fence, in a manner to prevent a similar misfortune, if practicable.
" A cellar has been formed under the entire building, thefloorof the fbrner being elevated one foot above the surface of extreme high water.
The cellar has been substantially walled with brick laid in cement mortar,
ind divided by partition walls, corresponding to the ground-plan of the
lospital; the walls and partitions having been raised to a level with the
looring of the lower story of the building. A well thirty-two feet deep
las been sunk and walled, in rear of the building, and a suitable pump
tas been procured and set therein. A work-shop, store room, and limetouse have been built on the lot, for the several purposes just intimated.
The dressed stone required for water-tables, door steps, window caps and
ills, &c., has been procured and delivered. The lumber required for the
fame-work of the building, together with the sheathing-boards, roofingin, copper, &c., required for tfhe roof, have also been procured. The flooring joists, roofing, belvidere, &c., have been framed. The door and
window frames, doors, sash, architrave-finish, shutter-blinds, &c., for
ic entire building, have been procured and delivered. Cantalivers,
mouldings, &c., for the cornices have also been prepared; and, besides
lese, various other items of wood-work, together with the makiag of



Doc. No. 11.

159

siicks lor the superstructure of the building, were in progress at the end
lithe year.
>" The receipts and eaoenditures on account ®f the Paducah hospital, for
last fiscal year, are s follows, viz:
mount of receipts for tie year
Mount of expendituresfor the year

-

-

-

$18,155 67
16,488 66

-

-

-

1,667 01

•
ijiexpended balance, Juyl, 1850 -

f'The works commencd and in progress at the close of the last fiscal
tjar, as previously represented, have been prosecuted with due diligence
the present time.
*l Agreeably to a report recently received, the bricks required for the
©erstructure are in readiiess for the mason work thereof, which is to be
jpi'.nenced in a very few ays, and to be prosecuted with all proper deiptch till completed. Tie entire superstructure of mason-work, career's work, roofing, &c. .is expected to be so far advanced as to admit
s tinning of the roof, and ecuring of the building against the storms of
e
f ensuing winter."
f Marine hospital at Nachcz.—At the beginning of the last fiscal
r very little had been doie towards the construction of this hospital,
e lot purchased for its sifchad been partially fenced, and the excava! is for the cellar and fouuditions nearly completed, prior to the close of
t preceding year. Moreovtr, contracts' had been entered into for the
^cutionand delivery of the irick masonry, dressed stone-work, lumber,
within the year last menioned.
In the month of July, 1S4>, the work "of construction was commenced
Ider favorable auspices, and ias been vigorously prosecuted throughout
f last fiscal year. A work-sfop, store room, and lime-house, of suitable
tensions, have been constricted. The foundations and entire superfccture of masonry, including the dressed stone-work, have been com^ted, which is also true of theentire framing and roofing of th*e whole
ping. TUe window-frames shutters, sash, glazing, sash-weights,
p-frames, doors, &c., architrare-finish for doors and windows, washMs and mouldings, mantels, ec., have all been prepared and partially
I The copper gutters at theeaves and gutter-rafters of the building,
Te been prepared and applied , and the work generally put in a conf°n to withstand the violence if ordinary storms,
r The receipts and expenditureson account of the Natchez hospital, for
{last fiscal year, are as follows, iiz:
iount of receipts for the year
.
.
.
- $23,951 87
Jount of expenditures for the yea- 27,659 18
^standing balance chargeable to tie United States, July 1,
0850
.
.
.
.
.
.
3,707 31
1'Sinee the date last mentioned, payments have been made on account of
items of the work, materials, <fcc., above designated, nearly to the
amount of the appropriation for tkis work, while at the same time an
' «Wed claim to the amount of $1,680 11, on account of the brick!
k, remains unliquidated. My refort of July 12, 1850, to which I
leayft to refer, shows the nature, extent, and ieasons for this deficiency.
5




160

Dk>c. No. 11.

"On the 15th December last I forwarded a report, (the sane previously
referred to,) showing that the cost of the several hospitals comnitted to my
charge would very considerably exceed the amounts respetively appropriated therefor. The deficiency above mentioned was neithr anticipated
nor contemplated in that report, nor was it expected that the:ost of either
hospital would so greatly exceed the estimates of the arclitect and myself as have since proved to be true and unavoidable. The cot of materials
and labor of all sorts, and the quantities of both, have gratly exceeded,
those originally estimated; and it is now pretty certain thameiiher of the
hospitals can be made completely ready lor occupancy, tothe full extent
contemplated in former reports, but, by the aid of additional ippropriations,
very considerably greater than those called for.
"The appropriation for the Natchez hospital is nearly exiausted. The
outstanding claim of $1,680 11, above mentioned, must > for the most
e
part liquidated out of the additional appropriation of $1',250 called for
as necessary to the completion of the work; while it is feared that the
residue of this expected appropriation will prove inadequate to the accomplishment of the objects requiring additional expenditure.
"If we exclude the outstanding claim in question, th raeans now remaining in my possession, and applicable in defraying virions contingent,
expenses on account of the supervision, custody, &c.,olthe hospital, and
other public property pertaining thereto, amount to $795 69.
"In order to exhibit a clearer view of this subject, It&'eleave to subjoin
a brief statement of the receipts and^expenditures on acount of this hospital from July 1 to September 1, of the current yer, which is as follows, viz:
Amount of receipts, September 1, 1S50
Deduct outstanding balance for July 1, 1S50, viz: -

-

Unexpended balance, as before, now on hand

-

-

§4,500 00
3,707 31
792 69

' Marine hospital at Napoleon.—It will be remembred that in 1849 I
submitted a report, under date of March 30, in whih I advanced opinions decidedly adverse to the occupancy of any locaity at or near Napoleon as a suitable site for a marine hospital, and tlat, in consequence,
the construction of this work was temporarily suspeided till February of
the ensuing year. By an order from the topogrq)hical bureau, dated
February 6, 1850, issued agreeably to instruction? from the honorable
Secretary of the United States Treasury, I was dire ted to make arrangements for the construction of this work as early as practicable. Accordingly, sealed proposals were called for by public n»tices, and iu due time
were received. Contracts, based upon such as wsre deemed acceptable,
were concluded in the months of March, April, anl May following.
"By these contracts, stipulations were entered into for the making and
laying of the bricks, including all materials required for the brick masonry;
leir the delivery of all the lumber required for thi frame work of the hospital; and for the manufactory and delivery of the door and window
fraataa, doors, window-sash, glazing, hangings, architrave finishing df
doors, windows, <fcc., mantels, wash-boards «id mouldings; also jjfcij
the door and window-caps, door and window-sils, <fec., <fcc.; the whoj^



Doc. No. Ilt

161

to be done within the currentfiscalyear, if practicable. Moreover, arrangements have been made for fencing the hospital lot, for the construction of
a workshop, storehouse, lime house, &c., and for the sinking of a well
in the rear of the hospital, and walling the same to such depth as may, be
required, in order to insure a constant supply of purs water. Arrangements have also been made for digging a cellar under the entire building, and forming a terrace 20 feet wide surrounding the same, the terreplein of ithe latter to be raised at least one foot above the highest freshet
known.
"These several operations have been unavoidably delayed to a late date
in July last, and some of them even to the present time, by reason of the
inundations that have prevailed, occasionally overwhelming the entire
site, from an early date in the spring to the 25th of June of, the current
year. Of course, very little could be done towards the immediate construction of the hospital within the last fiscal year. Sundry expenses
were incurred, however, in the performance of journeys tor concluding
contracts, and for the examination and demarcation of the hospital site;
in the preparation of the requisite architectural drawings; in the purchase
of suitable timber for the water-tanks, and the construction of the same, &c.
"The receipts and expenditures on account of the Napoleon hospital for
the last fiscal year are as follows, viz:
Unexpended balance on hand, and applicable to this service,
July 1,1849
-$2,508 46
Remittance from United States treasury, March 25,1850
- 2, Q00 00
Amount of receipts for the year a
Amount of expenditures for 4th quarter 1849 Do
do
1st do 1850 Do
do
2d do 1850 Amount of expenditures for the year -

-

Unexpended balance July 1,1850

-

- 4,508 46
- S10 67
-165 41
1,136 49

-

1,312 fiT
-

- 3,195 89

"It should be remarked, in reference to the Napoleon hospital, that the
brick masonry, agreeably to the most favorable proposals received, in answer to public notice, is likely to cost at least $2 50 per m. more than
the brick work of the Natchez hospital, giving for the aggregate difference
in the cost of this item alone, in the two hospitals, more than $2,500; or,
the quantities in both hospitals being the same, the cost of the masonry
of the Natchez hospital was $1.1,483 11, and that of the Napoleon hospital will be £14,360 13, on the score of brick work only. It should,
moreover, be observed, that no .estimate for an additional appropriation »r
this hospital has as yet been presented. Accordingly, I now take leave
to present such an estimate, and to request that an additional appropriation of at least $10,250, the same as that called for on acconat of the
Natchez hospital, be made on account of the hospital at Napoleon.
L
"The furnishing of the several hospitals with iron bedsteads* bedding
of all kinds, tables, chairs, bureaus, garlor and kitchen furniture of aU
kinds, &o., &c., has never been committed to my charge, nor do 1 regard
it as mi appropriate service for me to perform; yet I may bs excusable in
11




162

Dor. No. II.

observing that all these things must be provided for before the hospitals
tan be regarded as fit for occupancy."
The last rejiort received from Lieutenant Colonel Long: is of as late a
date as the 25th October, 1850, and is as follows:
Agreeably to a late communication from the Treasury Department, it
appears that the appropriation recently-made by Congress for the "completion of the marine hospital at Natchez/' is only two thousand-two hundred and fifty dollars, (§2 250,) instead of ten thousand two hundred and
fifty dollars, ($10,250,) the latter being the sum called for, agreeably to
my report and estimate, dated December 15, 1840, to which I beg leave
to refer.
In the report just cited, the additional appropriations deemed requisite to the completion of the several hospitals then in progress under my
direction were as follows, viz:
For the hospital at Louisville $5,000
"
"
Paducah 7,625
"
"
Natchez 10,230
In a report subsequently submitted, die construction of the hospital
«t Napoleon having been reauthorized and resumed, an additional appropriation for the completion of this work was moreover called for, the surk
tkus required being $10,250—the same as that required for the completion
of the hospital at Natchez.
.
. These Several additional appropriations have all. been made ih the civil
and diplomatic bill recently passed by Congress, and approved under date
pf 30th ultimo, with the exception, as above stated, relating to the hospital at Natchez, the work of which, b/^he-by, cannot be resumed under
existing circuvnstanccs, the outstanding claims on account thereof requiring nearly the whole of the amount appropriated (viz: $'2,250] for their
liquidation.
With respect to the adequacy of the several sums estimated,, as above,
to complete the hospitals to which they respectively relate; doubts have
already been expressed in my last annual report of September 1,1850; and
in that document, sundry adverse circumstances, contingencies, and impediments were enumerated, all of which were of a character to baffle
any attempt to exhibit prospectively the actual co?t of either of the hospitals. These difficulties still remain unabated. It is belietfed, however,
that the estimated accounts called for will prove adequate, or nearly so,
to the completion of the hospital buildings, so far as to render them fit for
occupancy, although they may not, and probably will not, be sufficient
for the entire completion of the pavements, cisterns, privy-vaults, plumber's work, hot-air furnaces, lightning-rods, &c., &c„ for all of which
'provision ought to be made.
For the several purposes just mentioned, I deem it proper, needful/$tnd
advisable that the following appropriation be made, in addition to th'ose
already made for expenditures on the several hospitals above mentioned,
during the next succeeding fiscal year, ending June 30, 1852, viz:
For the completion of the pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns,
hot-air furnaces, plumber's work,
of thte hospital at
-$3,060 00
: Louisville
For tlie same in connexion with the hospital at Paducah
- 4,000 00
For the same in connexion with the hospital at Napoleon
5,000 00




[rDoc. No. 11.

163

For the same in connexion with the hospital at Natchez
000 00
Also for deficiency in the last appropriation for Natchez hospital
- 8,000 00
13,000

00

Agreeably to the recent action of Congress in reference to the marine
hospitals at Pittsburg and Cleveland, both of which were originally put
upon the same footing, and arranged in the same class as the hospitals at
Louisville, Paducah, Napoleon, and Natchez, it appears that, in addition
to the completion of the hospital buildings, the fencing, grading, and
draining of the hospital lots, and the protection of the same from injurious
washings, abrasions, &c., and the supplying the hospitals with water,
were deemed objects worthy of their attention, and that appropriations
were duly and properly made for the accomplishment of such purposes.
The lots and sites lor the four hospitals committed to my charge, undoubtedly, have equal claims on the attention and patronage of Congress,
and appropriations for similar purposes in connexion therewith are quite
as needful and proper as those made for such purposes on account of the
hospitals at Pittsburg and Cleveland.
A portion of the lot of the Louisville hospital is low and fiat, and ought
to be furnished with a covered drain or sewer of very considerable extent, as a means of draining off the water that remains stagnant upon it
during a jivet season. The surface of this portion should be considerably
raised by deposites of earth brought from more elevated portions of the
lot.
The grounds adjacent to the hospital building require much labor in
grading, in order to effect proper drainage, and adapt them to the terraces •
of the building.
The bluff earthen banks in front of the hospital require adjustment and
protection from washes and abrasions, the formation of deep gullies, &c.,
which prospectively threaten serious injury to the lot and site.
With respect to the lot and site of the Paducah hospital, more than onehalf of the lot is exposed to the overflows of the Ohio river, and in extreme high freshets is inundated to various depths, probably not exceeding
twenty feet. A portion of the grounds thus subject to inundations may
readily be reclaimed to advantage by the formation of levees of suitable
dimensions and consistencies, or by an embankment-wall of brick or stone
running across the lot at the foot of the slope, separating the bottom from
the upland grounds iu front of the hospital.
Immediately in the rear of the hospital site is a-ravine extending*nearly
across the lot, which ought to be furnished with a drain of mason-work,
and filled with earth removed from the higher portions of the lot, which
can supply all the requisite materials for this purpose, and for that just
before mentioned.
A substantial fence, with strong cedar posts set and anchored deeply in
the ground, had been built round the lot prior to the occurrence of the
annual freshet of last spring; but on that occasion about one-half of the
entire fence was demolished and swept away by the flood. A more efficient and durable enclosure, either of stone or earth-work, or of both
combined, ought to be provided for, in order to fence and circumscribe
Digitizedthis portion of the lot.
for FRASER


104

Doc. No.

11-

The site of the Napoleon hospital is exposed to overflow, rising from
S u e , to three or four feet above the natural surface in extreme high freshets.
l portion of the hcapifal lot, including the site §nd at least some throe .or
|3ur acres around it, ought to be protected from inundations by levees of
suitable dimensions, and thus rendered tenantable for a variety of pur^osas daring the prevalence of excessive floods. The portion thus
reclaimed should be furnished with sewers of mason-work and self-acting
gates, &c., of cast iron, for the double purposeof excluding flood-water,
and, on the subsidence of the latter, of draining off the water that may
have been received into the enclosure through leaks in the levee or btherwise. In case of • long continuance of high water and a superabundance of water in the enclosure, pumps and other means of discharging the
same should be in readiness for use.
The Natchez hospital stands on the summit of an enrthem eminfenccs,
and is surrounded by slopes and ravines spreading and radiating in every
direction from its site. The adjaccnt grounds are quite uneven, and wt
places much broken by deep ravines and gullies. A formidable gully
heads within about otic hundred yards of the front of the hospital, and
winds its deep andr precipitous way through the bluffs to the river. The
origin of this gulh is constantly receding from the river-hills, and
trstting in a direction towards the hospital. An abrupt, broad, and deep
ravine commences immediately in rear of the hospital, and threatens injury upon that side. The evils thus impending may be averted by carefully grading the ground contiguous to the site, and turning the wash and <
currents of rain-water through new and less abrupt channels, and in such
directions that no injury can result from its passage from the site.
*
All supplies of water for the Natchez hospital must be derived ftom cisterns filled with rain-water from the roof of the building. The reservoirs
for containing the water are to consist of four tanks containing 900 gallons each, and of four cisterns containing 12,500 each, making the entire
supply, when all the reservoirs are full, 53,600 gallons. The means of
furnishing a supply thus copious will cost, probably, a thousand dollars
more than has been contemplated in former estimates.
In conclusion, Flake leave to subjoin an estimate for the ensuing fiscal
year, based on the foregoing premises, which is as follows:
I. For the marine hospital at Louisville.
For the completion of pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns, hot air
furnaces and fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
S3,006
For grading and draining hospital site, and protecting the
. saraf from washings and abrasions; alsoNfor supjxlyipg hos-.
L
jHtal,with water, &c.
Aihoiiizt required 1 ' -




;

4,b0O
7,000

Doc.

Np.

11.

1 6 &

2. .Fbr marine, hospital at Paducah.

. .f

For pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns, hot-air furnaces and
1
fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
'.
For grading and draining hospital site, and protecting the
same from washings, overflows, &c.; also for supplying
hospital with water . .
Amount required

-

-

-

$4,006
7.000

-

11,OCO

3. Fbr marine hospital at Napoleon.
For pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns, hot-air furnaces and
fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
For grading and levees at hospital site, and protecting the
same against overflows 3 also for supplying hospital with
water, &c. Amount required

-

-

-

-

-

$5,000
' 7,000
12,000

4. For marine hospital at Natchez.
For pavements, cisterns, privy-vaults, hot air furnaces pnd
fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
For grading and draining hospital site,..and protecting thp
same from washings and abrasions; also for supplying hospital with water
For deficiency in the late appropriation on account of this hospital
Amount required

-

-

-

-

-

-

$5,000
7,000
8,000
20,000

The amounts drawn from the treasury in reference to these several
works are as follows:
Paducah, up to the 9th of September, 1850 - $24,500
Balance in the treasury on that day 5*, 600
29,000
Natchez, up to the 18th of July, 1850
Balance in the treasury on that day 1,000
Chicago, up to the 5th of August, 1850
23» 477
Balance in the treasury on that day 523
Napoleon, up to the 9th of August, 1850
Balance in the treasury on that day 19,000
The appropriation^ in favor of these several works have been as follows:
Marine hospital at Chicago.
In 1848
In 1849
In ISSO {September 30)
Total




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

W&80
20,009
15,000

-

-

45,000

Doc. No. II.

166

Marine hospital at Padueah.
In 1S48
In 1849
l a 1850 (September 30)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

$10,000
20,000
7,625
37,625

Marine hospital at Napoleon.
In 1848
In 1849
In 1S50 (September 30)
Total

- "

- -

-

-

-

- •

-

-

-

40,250
4

Marine /hospital at Natchez.
In 1848
In 1849
In 1850 (September 30)
Total

.

-

-

.

.
-

.
-

$10,000
20,000
10,250

.

-

$10,000
20,000
2,250
32,250

For the completion of these several buildings, the following estimates
are submitted:
For the marine hospital at Padueah $11,000
For the marine hospital at Napoleon 12,000
For the marine hospital at Natchez 20,000
For the marine hospital at Chicago .4,712
These estimates are not intended to cover any items which can with
propriety be classed under the head of furnishing the marine hospitals,
but relate exclusively to building, fencing, levelling the ground, &c.;that
is, to matters which do not belong to furnishing and furniture—all these matters being already amply provided for in an appropriation in the law of 30th
September, 1850. But, as the appropriation now referred to embraces the
supposed wants on these accounts of the five hospitals named in the appropriation law, it is respectfully recommended that the appropriation
should be divided and apportioned to each, so that each could know the
amount at its disposal, and make its arrangements accordingly. But the
expenditure of this appropriation requires medical knowledge and medical experience in hospitals, which we do not in this bureau pretend to
possess. Should, however, the Honorable Secretary desire this bureau to
furnish such hospitals as are building under its superintendence, I should
deem it a d«ty to call'upon the medical department of the army for the
aid of one of its officers. As it will take some time to procure the requisite furniture, the attention of the Honorable Secretary is respectfully
called to the subject.
Respectfully submitted.
J. J. ABERT,
Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers.
BUREAU TOPOGRAPHICAL




ENGINEERS,

November 4,1850.

[rDoc. No. 11.
BUREAU OF TOPOGRAPHICAL

107
ENGINEERS,

Washington, June 15, 1849.
SIR: I send herewith a plan for tho marine hospital at Chicago. I also
send you the estimate. This last is a confidential paper, to guide your
judgment of prices of workmanship and materials; and the estimate, being
made on Baltimore prices of workmanship and materials, will, no doubt,
much exceed prices for similar objects at Chicago. On these accounts, it
is proper that it should be considered a confidential paper, or it might
Create erroneous impressions.
In reference te the plan, I think it proper to apprize you that the draughtsman—a young man, who drew neatly, but was not sufficiently impressed
with the necessity of accuracy—has not placed the doors ofthe wards, a rid
•the fireplaces of the wards, in the middle of their respective sides, as
they should have been. Yon will correct this error in.tiie copy of the,
plan which should be made for your office.
The plan and the estimate, being originals, will be returned to this office
as soon as you have made copies. Your office copies can be inadp on
tracing-paper, of which several sheets of a good quality will be sent tp
you.
' The plot of the United States lots sent herewith will also be returned
2/5 soOn as you have made your office plot to conform to it.
In order that all due respect be paid to the city plan of the streets, the
building will be made to front upon Michigan avenue. You will find its
position drawn upon the plot ofthe lots herewith enclosed.
You will find that the southern extremity of the building is not made
to approach nearer than fifty feet to the southern boundary of the United
States lots. The object of this arrangement is to leave ample space for a
street on that side to the lake shore, and to the rear of the hospital building. This whole width of fifty feet is not intended to be given for a street;
about twenty feet of it will he wanted as a narrow enclosure on that £ide
between the hospital building and the street. You will find this more
clearly explained by referring to the lot plan herewith enclosed. The
blue line a b is the fence line to which 1 refer, in order to secure privacy
to the hospital building and lot, give access to the "timber yard," and
access from the avenue to the lake shore. This will give a street way
thirty feet wide, in the direction k c, and, if not wide enough for the taste
of those wh© own lots south of the boundary b d, and immediately adjacent thereto, those who own these lots can add to the width by taking a
few feet off their lots.
The front step-way and entrance at o will make it necessary to throw
the building a few feet back from the avenue, as indicated in the plan of
lots.
The building is ninety and a half feet front and one hundred and twenty-eight and a half feet deep. The sub-basement or cellar excavation
will have to extend under the piaza spaces as" well as under the main
building, and wilt embrace the entire space included in the letters a, b, c,
«, m, I, /i, g , f , e,d.
^
n
From your description of this locality, the cellar or sub-basement floor
can be made with safety four feet below the surface of the ground of
Michigan avenue. ' For this purpose, the excavation should be five feet
below that surface, that last foot of depth being filled up with sand and
the paving of the cellar floor.



168

Dk>c. No. 11.

Yoftt can commence upon the excavations Immediately. A small trench
. from its eastern side towards the lake will keep it dry while the building
i*goiug up,.and until it is covered in.
1,1 may be proper to go six feet deep for the foundations, and up to the
surface of the cellar floor—that is, for about two feet. This foundation
should be one foot wider than the walls, the walls rising from the centre
thereof, leaving half a feot on each side. It will be proper also to observe
this precaution in the foundations of the cross-walls, in order lo prevent
any irregular sinking of any of them. All the walls up to the surface before indicated (Michigan avenue surface) will be laid with cement lime;
the vise of common lime to that extent is positively forbidden. A very
energetic cement lime for this purpose is not necessary, and is perhaps objectionable. A cement lime ol which the mortar will certainly harden,
under damp of wet, in ten days or two weeks, will be sufficiently energetic.
On arriving at the surface of the soil, or about two inches above it, all
the walls in contact with the soil will be covered with a layer of slate,
properly imbedded in mortar; and upon this layer, on proper mortar beds,
the walls will be further raised.
The Miiwaukie brick is, I understand, the best brick of your lake; but
it is said to be no more than eight inches long. On this supposition, thfr
outside walls will be two and a half brick thick, and the inside walls one
and a half brick thick.
Stone should be used for the outside walls up to the slate layer, and for
the inside up tq,the cellar-floor surface.
All the floors must be counter-ceiled. This process is not only a great
protection against fire, but destroys those habitations for vermin which
the vacant spaces between joints generally become, and costs but little.
No slovenly or unsubstantial work is to be allowed, and all materials
should be inspected and approved before allowed to be used on the
building.
The building should not be carried up too rapidly. About a week should
be allowed for the settling of a story before another be raised upon it,
which time can be well occupied in the judicious laying and levelling of
floor joists. No wood-work should enter in the walls of a chimnay-staek,
nor a joist be laid about a fireplace, except with well-arranged hearthtrimmers.
All the joist work of the wards and rooms to be well bridged before
counter-ceiling.
All the windows should be in box frames, and hung with pulleys and
weights.
The character of the work will be better inferred from the detailed estimate sent herewith than by further remarks of mine.
There are several modes by which the building can be erected^ among
these are:
1st. To contract for the whole, subject to rigid and arbitrary inspectiott
while going on.
• '
2d. To contract for all the materials for the masonry, and put them together by employed workmen; and then to contract separately for all.carpenter's work complete, with ironmongery; and also to contract for all
painting and glazing, and also for all plastering.
n
.
3d. To contract for all the mason-work; to contract for all carpenter's,
work; to contract for all glazing and painting; to contract for all plastering—




[rDoc. No. 11.

169

under penalties, in all cases, of withholding 10 per cent..of the value of
work done, to be forfeited on failure or unnecessary delay; payments to
be made weekly, on an ascertained value of work done, deducting 10 per
cent, to be held as a forfeiture. No work to be considered done Or be
received which is not actually put in the building; that is, no payments
to be made for materials on hand or window-frames in the shops unr
til they can be put up.
/
All to be subject to rigid inspection, and all additional work or modification to be matter of positive and additional contract. Under such a
system, no bonds will be required: the bond will be in the per centage
withheld, and its forfeiture; nor any contract binding until approved by tne
Bureau.
,
Your views on these matters are required without delay; in the mean time,
the excavation can be going on.
The roof to be covered with slate.
Respectfully,
J.J. ABERT,
Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers•
Lieutenant J. D . W E B S T E R ,
•
Corps Topographical Engineers, Chicago, III.

BUREAU OF T O P O G R A P H I C A L E N G I N E E R S ,

Washington, June 25,1849.
SIR: I omitted to mention, in my letter of the 15th instant, that the
amount appropriated for the marine hospital at Chicago is thirty thousand
dollars.
It is extremely desirable to keep the expenditure within this limit, even
if it should be necessary in the first instance to avoid finishing the third apd
the attic stories. The estimate sent to you was made on Baltimore prices
of materials and workmanship, and upon a Baltimore taste of finish. On
all these the differences must be great in favor of thff locality of Chicago.
Respectfully, sir, vour obedient servant,
J.J. ABERT,
Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers.

BUREAU OF TOPOGRAPHICAL E N G I N E E R S ,

.

»

Washington, July 10,1849.
SIR: Your letter of the 30th June has been received.
The better course in reference to the marine hospital at Chiago is:
1st. To contract for all the masonry, door-sills, window-sills, and lintels, prescribing the kind of work and materials; materials to be inspected
before used. A blind arch to be thrown over every door and window
opening of an outside wall.
2d. To contract for all carpenter's work; materials to be inspected.
And as carpenter's work is so various under the same name, it will be
proper to have a window-frame, moulding, &c., and a door, made complete, ibr each story, as a pattern.
The contract for the roof can be delayed until you have further digested



170

Dk>c.

No. 11.

he q«estions in reference to it to which your letters refer. A tin roof
wouty probably be the. best.
"
The work to be subject to rigid i n s p e c t i o n while in progress. Contractors to give bond, and .also to be subject to deduction of 15 per cent., in
making payments for, work, on the value of work done, to be forfeited on
iailare, to De paid on fulfilment of contract.
It is doubted if the counter ceiling can be carried beyond the second
story without adding too much weight to the walls.
The "furring" or "battening" is one of those details to which, of course,
the superintending engineer will give proper attention. The remarks "in
pencil" upon the plates of the plan should not be allowed to embarrass
you: they were intended for consultation upon the plan before it was sent.
The contracts directed will cover the principal expenditures; that far
the painting can be delayed. Yet you will find much to be done by
hired mechanics under your particular direction.
If the paint to which you refer should prove to be a protection against
fire, it may be proper to use it on all the wood-work, stairways, &c., before giving the covering of common paint of the desired color.
Your suggestions will always receive the greatest attention. Express
them methodically, precisely, and in detail. Would it not be advisable
to have an experienced builder as an inspecting agent?
.
Respectfully, &c.,
J. J.

A B E R T ,

Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers.
Lieutenant J. D. W E B S T E R ,
Corps Topograghical Engineers, Chicago, Winois.

BUREAU OF TOPOGRAPHICAL

ENGINEERS,

Washington, August 14, 1849.
SIR: Your letter of the 9tli has been received. There is no objection
to trying the plan of procuring materials and erecting, by hired labor, to
the extent of the foundation-work of the hospital, which is probably as
much as can be put hp, under any plan, during the present season. You
can also contract for brick and other materials for the building, as these
can be used at cost by a contractor, or put up according to the plan of the
foundation, as experience and future circumstances shall justify.
Respectfully, <fcc.,
J. J. ABERT,
Colonel Corps Topographical Engineers,
Lieutenant J. D. W E B S T E R ,
Corps Topographical Engineers, Chicago, Illinois:

No. 18.
OFFICK

W.

R.

IMPROVEMENTS,

Louisville, November 7, 1850.
SIR: In answer to your inquiries contained in your instructions of the
2d instant, received this morning, I take leave to forward the accompany


Dcc. No. 11*

171

ing extracts from my reports of September 1 and October 23, 1859, which
contain- the information called for in your letter.
From these papers it appears that additional appropriations of the following import are required on account of the hospital at Louisville, to wit:
For completion of pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns, hot-air
furnaces aud fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
- $3,000 00
For grading and draining hospital site, and protecting same
from washings and abrasions; also for supplying hospital
with water, &c.
- 4,000 00
Amount required

-

-

-

-

-

- 7,000 00

Should the system of warming and ventilating the hospital, agreeably
to the plans most approved in eastern hospitals, be applied to the Louisville hospital, an additional appropriation of about $5,000 over and above
those just stated will be required, agreeably to an estimate by a gentleman
from Philadelphia, agent for works of this sort, now present. Hence the
-entire amount requisite to the completion of the Louisville hospital wilt
be $12,000.
With respect to the time of its completion, or of its readiness for occupancy, the lateness of the date at which the last appropriation was made
has rendered it impracticable to resume the work in season to have it
Completed within the current year. The plastering of the building, though
already contracted for, cannot be completed till about the middle of May
next. The painting of the same must be postponed till after the plastering shall have been done, and of course cannot be completed till about
the middle of June folloAving. These operations, together with sundry
others of less note, which will be carried on simultaneously with those
just before mentioned, may, without doubt, be so far advanced as to render the building fit for occupancy on or about the 1st July next, provided
the requisite means are supplied by reasonable appropriations.
Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,
S. H. LONG,
Lieut. Col. XI. S. A., Superintendent Marine Hospitals.
Hon.

TIIOMAS

COR WIN,

Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C.

Extract from annual report, submitted under date of September 1, 1850.
4. Marine hospital at Louisville.—The condition, progress, &c.,
of this work^ on the 15th Dfpembe'r, 1819, was fully explained in a report
to the Honorable Secretary of the Treasury of that date. To this
paper I take leave toreferforall details of information that may be required.
In this report, an estimate of the probable cost of completing the building and getting it in readiness for occupancy was included—agreeably
to which, an appropriation of five thousand dollars, in addition to the
amount previously S e apart, would be wanted for the completion of the
>t
hospital. This additional sum, on condition of its being seasmahly appropriated, was deemed sufficient to accomplish the work; But no such



172

Dk>c. No. 11.

appropriations having as yet been made, the work has been entirely suspended for nearly two months, and must remain so until the expected appropriation shall have been made. By reason of this interruption, and djt
the accidental omission of any estimate for outside shutter-blinds in the
report referred to, the construction of the hospital and its appendages cannot be carried to so full and complete a finish as was contemplated in that
repo.rt.
'The work done towards the completion of the hospital from the date
of the report above mentioned to the close of the last fiscal year embraces
the following items, viz: the preparation of inside doorframes, doors,
window-sash, &c., for the entire building; the framing and settling of
partitions; the laying of the floors, &c., of all parts of the building, except those of the piazzas and water-closets; the completion and hanging
of all shutter-blinds; the partial construction of water-tanks; the partial
construction of the main and wing hall stairs; the making and setting
of plaster grounds, mantel-pieces, architrave, finish of doors, windows,
<fec.; laying of all hearths, except those of the kitchen and wash-room;
the safe-keeping of the public property, &c.
•
The receipts and expenditures on account of the Louisville hospital for
the last fiscal year are as follows, viz:
Unexpended balance on hand and applicable to this service
July 1, 1849
.
- '
- $1,278 40
Remittance from United States treasury, Aug. 15, 1849
3,000 00
Do
do
do
Sept. 17, 1849
3,000 00
' Do
' d o
do
Oct. 29,1S49
3,000 00
Do
do
do
Dec. 19,1849
4,000 00
Do
do
do
Dec. 24, 1849
2,000 00
Do
do
do
Jan. 28,1850
2,000 00
Do
.do
do
April 30, 1850
667 00
Amount received on account of lumber transferred from
Louisville hospital to the Napoleon hospital
340 36
Amount of receipts for the year
Amount of expenditures for 3d quarter 1849
Do
do
4th quarter 1849
Do
do
1st quarter 1850
Do
do
2d quarter 1850 •

- $6,150
- 9,830
- 1,504
- 1,727

Amount expended for the year

.

.

Unexpended balance July 1, 1850

.
-m

19,285,76
50
29
59
37

.
-

19,212 75
.-

73 01

The work remaining to be done, and for the execution of which the
additional appropriation is required, embraces the following items,'viz:
The plastering of the interior of the entire building, materials, <fcc., included; the fitting, setting, and hanging of all- the doors, windows, <fec.,
of the hospital, inclusive of locks, hinges, fastenings, &c.; the painting
^nd glazing of the entire building, paint, glass, and other materials included} the laying of die piazza floors; the laying of all brick pavements
required for the cellar floor, side-walks, &c., of the building; the proour
ring and setting of grates,fire-fronts,&c., of the same; the finishing an«t



Doc. No. Ilt

173

setting of the water tanks, and the plumber's work pertaining thereto;
the flooring and finishing of the water-closets, including plumber's work
arid materials; the formation of rain-water cisterns, &c.; the procuring
and setting of the railings required for the piazzas; the purchase and application of furnaces and other apparatus for warming the hospital; tfie
construction of a neat and substantial fence in front of the hospital; the
procuring of iron beadsteads and of bedding and furniture of all kinds
requisite to the use and occupancy of the hospital; together with various
other apparatus and appliances of less importance, and too diversified for
particular designation. All of which remains to be provided for, at' an
outlay greatly exceeding the additional appropriation called for as above.
Extract from report submitted wider date of October 23, 1850,

(

In the report just cited, the additional appropriations deemed'requisite
for the completion of the several hospi&ls then in progress under my
directions were as follows, viz:
For the hospital at Ixwisville
.
.
.
.
$5,000 00
For the hospital at Paducah
.
.
.
.
7,625? 00
For the hospital at Natchez
10,250 UP
With respect to the adequacy of the several sums estimated as above
to complete the hospitals to which they respectively relate, doubts have
already been expressed in my last annual report of September 1,1850;
and in that document, sundry adverse circumstances, contingencies, and
impediments were enumerated, all of which were of a character to baffle
any attempt to exhibit prospectively the actual cost of either of the
hospitals. These difficulties still remain unabated. It is believed, however, that the estimated amounts called for will prove adequate, or nearly
so, to the completion of the hospital buildings so far as to render them fit
for occupany, although they may not, and probably will not, be.sufficient
•for the entire completion of the pavements, cisterns, privy vaults, plumber's work, hot air furnaces, lightning-rods, &c., <fec., for all of which
provision ought to be made.
For the several purposes just mentioned, I deem it proper, needful, and
advisable that the following appropriations be made, in addition to those
already made for expenditure on the several hospitals above mentioned
during the next succeeding^scal year, ending June 30, 1852:
For the completion of the pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns,
hot-air furnaces, plumber's work, &c., of the hospital
at Louisville
- $3, 000 00
Agreeably to the recent action ef Congress in reference to the marine hospitals atPiUsburg and Cleveland, both of which were originally putupon the
same footing and arranged in the same class as the hospitals at Loqiaville,
Paducah, Napoleon, and Natchez, it appears that, in addition to the completion of the hospital buildings, the fencing, grading, and'draining of the
hospital lots, and the protection of the same from injurious washings;
abrasions, <fcc., and the supplying the hospitals with water, were deemed
objects worthy of their attention, and that appropriations were daiy and
properly made for the accomplishment of such purposes.
. . The lots and Sites of the four hospitals, committed to my charge, undoubtedly, have equal claims on the attention and patronage of Congress,
and appropriations for similar purposes in connexion therewith are quite




174

Doc. No. 11-

as needful and proper as those made for such purposes on account ofthe
hospitals at Pittsburg and Cleveland.
A portion of the lot of the Louisville hospital is low and flat, and ought
to be furnished with a covered drain or sewer of very considerable extent^
as a means of draining off the water that remains stagnant upon it during
a wet season. The surface of this portion should be considerably raised
by deposites of earth brought from more elevated portions of the lot.
The grounds adjacent to the hospital building require much labor in
grading, in order to cflect proper drainage, and adapt them to the terraces
of the. building.
The bluff earthen banks in front of the hospital require adjustment
and protection from washes and abrasions, the formation of deep gullies,
&c., which prospectively threaten serious injury to the lot and site.
In conclusion, I take leave to subjoin an estimate for the ensuing fiscal
year, based 011 the foregoing premises, which is as follows:
1. Fflr the marine hospital at Louisville:
For completion of pavements, privy-vaults, cisterns, h©t-air
furnaces and fixtures, plumber's work, &c.
For grading and draining hospital site, and protecting same
from washings and abrasions; also for supplying hospital
with water, &.c. -

$3,000

00

4,000 eo
7,000 00

Amount required

No. 19.
November 1 1 , 1 8 5 8 .
Your instructions of the 2Sth of October, requesting me to report in
detail the cost of completing the United States marine hospital near this
city, reached me 011 the 9th instant, and, in compliance with said direction,
I beg leave to offer the following report:
The building is progressing in conformity with the plan furnished by
the department; the basement is built of stone, and the superstructure
will be of brick. Thd amount drawn from die treasury up to this date is
$15,206, which has been expended for latfor and materials supplied by
purchase. $14,794 will be required to complete the masonry and such
portions of the frame carpenter-work as are necessary to be executed while
thie walls are going up, together with the roofing of the building.
It will require $22,80fc, iu addition to the appropriation of $30,000 on
the 3d of March last, to complete the edifice and make the necessary improvement to the adjacent ground, as the following estimate shows:
Estimate of the cost of work under execution.
S T . LOUTS, M I S S O U R I ,

Stone-work (masonry)
Brick-work (masonry)
Timber for joists and roof
Iron columns and railing
Roof, slate



.
, -

.

.
-

.
-

.
-

-

$11,706
7,600
1,500
0,790
2,404
30,000

Doc. No. 11.

J75

Estimate of the cost of completing the building, after the expropriation
of the 3d of March, 1850, has been exhausted, which was $30,000.
For materials, carpenter'sand joiner's work, lathing and plastering the entire building, with a flag pavement in the basement
-

Iron mantel-pieces, copper gutters and spouts, laying pavement around the building, and making the necessary improvements on the adjacent ground
Amount

-

-

-

-

$14,

7, 855
22,80$

The enclosed printed specification describes particularly the manner
in which the work is executing.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
EDWARD WATTS,
Superintendent.
H o n . THOMAS COR WIN,

Secretary of the Treasury.

No. 20.
Extract from a letter of John Coon, supenntendent of marine hospital
at Cleveland, dated November 5, 1850.
*
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication
of the 22d ultimo. Having made full inquiry touching the matters presented , I have to state that the only contract, written or otherwise, relating
to the work 011 the marine hospital, and existing at the time I entered upon
the duties of my appointment, was one for the frame-work and boards
of the roof, which contract had been partially complied with.
This I learned from my predecessor in my first interview with him, on
the 12th ultimo, and have satisfied myself of its correctness by inquiry
eleswhere. So soon as I can obtain a copy of this contract, I will forward it to the daparUnent.
The work in the building was suspended by my predecessor about
the 1st of August ultimo, and the building left in a condition much exposed to the action of the weather. I found the structure entirely uncovered. The rafters were in place; but the covering was deferred until
arrangements could be made for the roofing tin. Regarding the necessiiies of the case as sufficient authority, without specific instructions, I did
not hesitate to make arrangements for the tin, and provide for the completion of the roof at the earliest possible moment. It became necessary
to «rder the tin from New York, there not being a sufficient amount in
tliis city; and we are daily awaiting its arrival.
The partition-walls of the edifice are completed, and the main walls
carried to the bed-moulding.
Theflooringjoists~are laid for the second and third stories.



176

Dk>c. No. 11.

The window-frames and sash are mads for the same stories.
The foundations are laid for the pillars and antas of the two main
recesses. Half of the frame-work for the cppola is erected. This comprises about all fhat is done; and with this, what remains to be done
may be ascertained from the original drawings and specifications on file
in the department. But I beg leave to'enumera$e> as nearly as is practicable, the several items of unfinished work.
1. The cornice and parapet-wall for the entire edifice.
2. The pillars and antas—four of the former and two of the latter for
each of the two main recesses, for which the stone are vet to be quarried.
3. The joiner-work for the entire building, save the small portion al
ready done and specified above.
4. The covering of tin for the roof, with gutters, conductors, and drains.
5. The topping-out of the chimneys, to be done in stone. •
6. The water-tanks—three to be placed in each of the quarter-circular
recesses.
7. The painting and glazing.
8. The flagging of the walks immediately surrounding the edifice.
Other items may be required which cannot now be enumerated. In regard to the "measures proper to be taken at this time to complete the
building," I have to state that its enclosure seems to be a matter of necessity. It would not do to leave the inner walls longer to the imminent
danger of dilapidation and ruin. I have, therefore, so far anticipated
the directions of the department as to provide for so much of the work
as is necessary for this purpose.
The building being enclosed, the joiner-work ought to proceed with all
possible despatch Abundant materials of suitable character are at hand,
•and competent mechanics may be had at fair rates. The remaining interior work should follow in its order.
I would also suggest that the residue of the exterior mason-work be
put in hand at an early day. The quarries will continue to be accessible, and it is believed that contracts for the stone-cutting may •be made
more favorably at this time of the year than at any other.
It is due to the department that I should state, in this connexion, that I
have found much dissatisfaction manifested by the community on account
of alleged unwarrantable delays in the prosecution of this work.
The protection of the lot from the encroachments of the lake is a matter requiring immediate attention. The fear is entertained by competent
judges that the work of protection has already been so far neglected that,
sooner or later, serious injury may, as a consequence, result to the odifice. The piling should, therefore, be commenced at once, and prosecuted to completion.. This being done, and the springs of water in the
bank properly taken up and secured, the grading may, if need be, be deferred until the close of the approaching inclement season. But the
necessity of protection for the safety of both the building and lot is regarded as pressing and immediate.
The work for the protection should be, for the present at least, simply
a line of piles parallel to the bank, so placed as to receive and break the
force of the waves, and (o. admit »f the formation of a wide beach behind it.




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