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UL

TABLE O F ' C O N T E N T S .
'

Report by; Mr. Dallas on tlie Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr! Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr.'Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
.Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr-Crawford on the Finances ,
lieport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush^ on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances . Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the state of the




•

Page.

December, 1815
5
D.ecember, 1816
73
-^
,r
December, :i817
88
•
November, . 1818
lo
i
- ..
. December, 1819, 144
December, 1820
167
,. - .
December,, 1821
198
.December,. 1822 .217
; December,^ 1823
247
•December, 1824276
-^
313
December, 1825
December, • 1826 ^ 353
- ,
-~
:
December, 1827
. .-< . .
388
December, 1828
->
- . 439
Currency of the United States, in 18*20
481 .

' ^ '^^ w'

8 31

.1826.]

SECRETAEY OP T H E TREASURY.

353,

REPORT.ON THE FINANCliS.
DECEMBER, 1826.

;,

In submitting, to Congress the annual report required by law, on the
finances, the Secretary of the Treasury is happy^in being able to represent
them, for the present year, as in a. satisfactory condition. Whilst other
countries, and some with which the UnitedStates maintain .extensive deal^
ings, have beheld great branches of their industry,.;if not altogether prostrated, interrupted to an extent productive of a high degree of suffering, the '
United States have experienced within themselves no such calamitous occurrences, and have been freed from all other than a,slight recoil of the pecu•.niary evils which have been seen to press so heavily in other regions. When
adverting to the complicated connexions that bind together the pecuniary
interests of commercial States having large exchanges with each other, the
reaction from abroad has been less felt than might have been expected, and
has brought with it no results afflictive to the community, or inauspicious to
the regular operations of the Government." The pubhc obligations have all
been punctually fulfilled, without any increase of the public burdens ;,and the
national revenue, which derives no aid from the existence of direct taxes or
internal duties of any kind, but rests upon the customs almost exclusively,
has been unusually abundant in the sums reahzed for the year drawing tci a
close, and promises to be fully adequate tp meet every stated head of the
public expenditure, including the sum annually devoted to the extinguishment ofthe debt for the year that is to come. This substantial prosperity is
the result of the general' industry, fostered by good laws and a just econorny
in the public administration—laws which, by enlarging the home demand fo
the productions of the soil, have aided in supplying deficiencies in the for-^
eign demand, and which, by superadding to exports the results of manufacturing to those oif agricultural labor, have tended to open new avenues'to
external traffic. This state of the ^country, in its financial resources and
concerns for the year, will be seen iii the recapitulations that follow. They
will consist, first, of the amount of moneys paid into the Treasury, in 1826^
and in the year preceding ; and the expenditures of those twp years.' Next,
of the state of the public debt, arid the portions of it that have been paid off;,
which will be seen to exceed the sum regularly aippropriated by law for that
purpbse within the year. And lastly, of the estimates of the public revenue and expenditure for the year 1827.
1. OF THE PUBLIC REVENUE AND EXiPENDITURE OF THE YEARS 1 8 2 5
AND 1 8 2 6 .
• ^
• •
•'
' ,

T h e nett revenue which accrued from duties on imports
and tonnage, during the vear 1825, amounted (see state' '
'
ment A)Mo
. - . ;. - - .• • . $24,358,202 57
•Statements B and C, connected with this document; are reserved for a separiate communication. [See ;>05i, page 475.].
• '
;~
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•

VoL.u.—23



••35'4

•

REPORTS OF THE:

The actual receipts into, the Treasurv from all sources
daring the year 1825 amounted to ' - .- $26^840,858 02
Viz.
Gusloms (statement A)
'^ \-•
120,098,713^45
' Public land? (statement D)
- 1,216,090 56
Dividends on stock in the.Bank of the.
:
United States, arrears of internal duties^
and direct taxes, arid incidental receipts,
(statement E)
- ^ .- - . ' .
.482,134 .69
Repaynients of advances made in the '
\
Yfer Department for services or supplies
.prior tp the Ist of July, 1815
-'. ' 43,:919'32
'
Loanof five n^illions^ under, the act of
Gongressof the; 26th of May,. 1824:
- 5^000,000 00
.Making,, with the balarice in the Treasury on the 1st
of, January, 1,825^. of
,-'
' -"
, - ,

1,946,597 13

; Ari aggregate of
^^
-$28,787,455 15
The actual expenditures ofthe United States, on ^^^
a^^
'" ' • •
counts, during the- year 1825^ amounted (statement .P) to 23/585,804, 72
••'.«

• • . Y i z ,

\

.

v

•

• . • . - • _ • .

.:.

'

.Civil,.diplomatic, and miscellaneojiisr - $.2,748,544 89
- Military service,.inc
o>:i;dnanGej Indian^ (department, revohitionT
.
_
aiy and military pensions j arming t
Mtia, and arrearages prior tothe IstiofJan.iiary,1817 ' ^ . -^ .'. \ -.
• - 5^6.92,831 '1-9 \
'
N.aval service, including the gradual in^
creasepf the navy
- 3.049,083 86
.f:ubl.ic-:.debt, , -• . - 12,095.344 78
-

' •,

. Leaving a balance in the Treasury on the 1st of January;, lr826,.Af - .- '
- - " - • ' "
.- $5,2.01,650.43
The difference, amounting to 4^52,411,3.5j, between this balance and .that
^sMjted in thelast arinual repprt from the Treasuuy, which was $5,284,06178,
ifeovyingtp the balance last year .hay:ing beeii: giveri as an estimate only.
A(5tiiial^settb^^
The actual receipts into the Treasury, d^iu^
quarters; of
tiie-year 1826, are estiniated to have ?imounted to
^ - $19;585:932' 50
Viz.

,

•'

,

Customs
.-$18,031,426 86
' Pqi)Jiclands (statement G) .- Ij053,961 29
Dividends on stock in the Bank of the
IJr^ed States. ^.
402,500.00.
:4^rears of internaVduties and dii^ec^^
es,and inQidiBntal receipts (statement H) 80,492 72
ilepayrnierits of advances made in the
War Hiepart.rnent for services or supplies
prior to 1st of July, 1815
I7,55J 6^




".. •

: Sr]

1826.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,

"355

And the actual receipts into the Treasury, d^uring the
, fourth quartpr of the year, are estiniated at
-•
- $JB,300,Q0,0 .00
Making the total estimated receipts irito the Treasury during the year 1826
' -..
.-•
^ .25^885,93250
And, with the balance in the Treasury, on the 31st of De- . . cember, 1825, of .
- .
...
5j20i,650, 4B
.An aggregate of - '
• .- .
- .3il,087,5g,2 .93
The expenditures of the first three quar, ters of the year 1826, are estimated to ' '
have amounted (statement I) to
' ^ $18,714,226 :6.6•

_

Viz.'

•

..

/ ;

'• ••

:

Civil, diplomatic, arid mis- cellaneous
$2,029,33.1
Military service, including
fortifications, ordnance,
Indian department, revolutionary and mihtary
pensions, arming the mi- '
litia, and arrearages prior.
to January 1, 1817 ^ - 5,266,980
'
Naval service, includingthe
. gradual increase, of , the
navy
. 3,321^332
Publicdebt
-8,096,581

•

' V i z .

••

^^

. ;

^

'

•
5^

'

.

.

•. •

.. \ ^
.
93
,

;

.

'

. . .

79
39

And the expenditures'of the fourth quarter
are estimated at /•

'

;

Civil, diplomatic, and.mis- . .
cellaneous
.- $840,000 00
Military service, including
fortifications, ordnance,
' . Indian department, revolutionary and military
pensions, arming the militia, and arrearages prior
, .
to January 1, 1817
-1,293,000 00
Naval service,'including the
.
gradual increase of the
navy - 900,000 00
Publicdebt—
' .
'
Reimbusement of princi.
" pal
$2,002,306 7.1 " '
Paymentof
interest - 912,510 59
2,914,817 30

\.5,947,817 30
•

•^^••••••'

^•"'

'

•

^

;,
' . , ' . • - .
'

.

.

•

'>

,

'

' .

•.
.. >
'.

•

..

\.

•'.•'<-

.Making the. total estimated expenditure of the year 1826- ;'243662^043 96
Apd leaving in the Treasury, on the 1st pfj^^
an estimated balance of
-'
« "



:y

y^ ^^^' ' .
^ .:%^^k2^^3^:.^'^

356

^

REPORTS OF T H E

[1826.

Should the estimate of receipts for the.fourth quarter-prove to be correct,
'the total amount of receipts for the year 1826 will, have exceeded the total
estimates presented to Congress last year by a sum approaching four hundred thousand dollars..
•
Ofthe balance of $6,425,538 97. stated, by estimate, as that which will
be in the Treasury on the 1st of January, .1827, it is proper to remark that
it will besubject to the following charges : 1st. The balances of unapplied
appropriations,nvhich will remain to be satisfied afier the 1st of January,
/1827, amouriting, by estimate, to $3,425,000; 2d. About one million of dollars in funds not> at present effective, as particularly explained (pages 314 and
315) in the last annual report; 3d. The reservation of $2,000,000 under
the fourth section ofthe act of Congress of the 3d of March, 1817, entitled
" An act to prPvide for the redemption of the public debt:"
The directions issued last year'to the receivers and collectors of the public revenue in all parts ofthe United States not to receive, in any payments
made to them, bank notes of any ofthe State bariks of a less denomination
than five dollars, continue in fnll force, and are lending their aid in discountenancing the circulation of small notes, and substituting in their-stead
a greater proportion of the metallic rriedium.
; '
,

^

II. OF THE PUBLIC DEBT.

That, the precise nature and amount of the funded debt of the United
States, as it exists at the present time, may be seen, the several descriptions
ofdebt pf which it is icomposed, with the periods at which they were con'tracted and are redeemable, will be state'd. '
. The aggregate amountof the debt on the 1st of October last (see StatementNo. 3) was $75,923,151 47. This sum includes the remnant of the
debt ofthe revolution, amounting to $13,296,247 70, at an interest of three
per cent.-; and the sum of $7,000,000, subscribed to the Bank of the United
States--the'United States owning an equal amount in the shares of the
bank. These sums, making together $20,296,247 70, are both redeeipable
at the pleasure of the Government.
The.remainder ofthe debt has been contracted since the 1st of January,
1812, and consists of the sums that follow, redeemable at the dates that
follow :
1. The sum of $11,254,197 46, at six per cent., being the residue unpaid
ofthe loan under the act ofthe 8th of February, 1813, and redeemable in
1826.- -'
' • .:
2. The sum of $13,096,542 90, at six per cent., being the residue unpaid of loans made in 1814, and redeemable in 1827.
3. The sum of $9,490,099 10, at six per cent., being the residue unpaid
of loans made in 1815, and redeemable in 1828.
^
4. The sum of $769,668 08, at an interest of four and a half per cent.,
being one-half of the six per cent, stock of 1813, exchanged under the act
' of Congress ofthe 3d ofMarch, 1825, and redeemable in 1829.
5. The sum of $769,668 08, at an^ interest of four and a half per cent.,
being the oth^r half of the six per .cent, stock exchanged as above, and redeemable in 1830.. These two last enumerated sums were set down last
.year, by.estimate, at $792,569 44, respectively. The accounts of the commissioners of loans having since been adjusted, the true aniounts are ascertained.to be as now exhibited. ^
^ . :
'
'.



1826.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY..

357.

6., The sum of $18,901 59, at five per cent., being the one-third part of
the sum of $56,704 77, issued in exchange for the. six per cent, stocks of
1813, 1814, and 1815, under t h e a c t of.the 20th of April, 1822, and re-,
deemable in 1831./
-•
.'
'
7. The sum .of $18,901 59, at five per cent., being one'other third part:
ofthe sum subscrilDed as above stated, and redeemable in 1832. ". 8. The sum of $10,000,000, at 4^- per cent., being stock borrowed nnder
the acts of May the 24ih and 26th, 1824, ofthe Bank of the United States:
one half to pay the Florida claims, the other half to pay off the six per
cent, stock of 1812, and redeemable.in 1832.
,
• • ' i ^
.
•
'
9. The sum of $999,999 13, at 5 per cent, being the stock created bythe act of Congress of May the 15t.h, 1820,, and redeemableon 1832. \ «
10. The sum of $18,901 59, at 5 per cent, being, the remaining third
subscribed under the act of Aprii the,20th,. 1822, and redeemable in 1833.
11. Thesum of $2,227,363 97, at 4-i--per cent;, being one-half of the
amount subscribed in exchange for six per cent, stock of 1813,, under the
act of May the 2.6th, 1824, and redeemable in 1833.
12. The sum^ of $2,227,363 -98, at i \ per-cent., being the other half subscribed under theact last above stated, arid redeemable in 1834.
13. The sura of $4,735,296 30, at 5 per cent., being the amount of stock
issued under the act ofMarch the 3d, 1821, and redeemable in 1835.
' By the foregoing enumeration it appears that the amount ofdebt redeemable at the periods specified, is -, • , - $55,626,903 77
That the amount redeemable at thepleasure of the Government is
-.
-'
. . .
- 20,296,247 70
Makioor the total atnount of the funded debt, on the 1st
of October, 1826
- -• -^$75,923,15147
- This amount will be.reduced by a payment to be made on the 1st of January. 1827, so as to stand on that day at .
• . -$73,920,844 76
_
The amount of Treasury notes outstanding on the 1st of October, 1826,
is estimated (No. 4) at $15,040 ;. and the amount df Mississippi stock unre-'
deemed on that day, including awards not applied for, (No. 5,) at $.7,400 17.
It will next be proper to state the operatioris that have been had in relation to the debt since the last annual report from this department. In that
report it was stated that the unpaid loans of 1813, bearing an interest of six
per cent., amounted to the sum of $16,270,797 24, the wliole ofwhich was
redeemable, in 1826. It was thought to be incuriibent upon the department
to^recommend tothe consideration of Congress such provision for paying
off this sum duringthe year 1826 as, in the judgment of the departmerit,
gave promise of beingriiost advantageous. The exhibition in detail of the enfire public debt, as contained above, serves to show that considerable sav ngs
in interest had heretofore accrued to the nation, by exchanges effected under
the authority of Congress, of stock bearing an interest of six per cent., for stock
bearing a lower.interest; or by loans under the same authority, fo the purpose of paying off portions 'of the debt contracted at six per cent., when the
time for redemption had arrived, by the creation of new debt to the same
ampunt., subject id an interest of less than six per cent. Under.the sanction
of past legislative approbation of this economical process in relation to the
debt, it was recommended that a loan should be authorized, for 1826, to the



358

•'

REPORTS OF T H E . ^

• ^'

[1826.•

amount of nine milhons of dollars, redeemable in 1829 and 1830. at a rate^
of interest not exceeding five per cent., to extinguish this debt of sixteen
milliorisand upwards, bearing an interest of six "per cent., which' the Government was thus at hberty to extinguish in 1826, provided it had the
means. Nine millions, ii: was believed, wquld have formed a sum adequate
to this operation, in conjunction with the other means which it was supposed
the Treasury would prpbably have had.at command for the service of
the debt in 1826. There is reason to thirik, frqm the prices which the pub, lie.stocks bore.in,the course of the last winter, and subsequently to the winter, that, had Congress sanctioned a loan tP that amount, the efforts to obtain
it would'not have proved unsuccessfiil, and the whole ofthe stock m question have consequently been paid off. But as no loan was authorized, it
becamie the duty ofthe department to proceed otherwise, iri its riieasures for
extinguishing as large a portion of this six per cent, stock, redeeniable within the year, as the means ofthe Treasury, without the aid of the loari, rendered practicable. This was accordingly done in the manrier rollowirig :
The stock consisted of the residue unpaid,'amounting to $5,064,732 65, of
the loan of seven million five hundred thousand dollars, under the act of
the 2d of August, 1813; and of the residue unpaid, ariiouriting to
$11,254,197 46, of the loan of sixteen millions, under the act of February
8th, 1813. The former of these halances was wholly paid/off, with the
moneys which theTreasury had at its disposal,on the 1st of last July. As
regards the latter, the conimissioners ofthe sinking fund, at a meeting held
on the 27th September, resolved that two millions pf dollars-should be opplied towards its reduction at the end of the present year. The holders of
thisstockj to an .amount representing two millions of dollars, have accordingly had notice that on the Isf January, 1827, they will receive payment
of the whole of the principal sum specified in their certificates. By the
terms under which thisloan ofthe 8th of February, 1813, was contracted,
it became redeeniable at the pleasure of the United States, after the 31st of
December, 1825, by the reimbursement ofthe whole sum vvhich stood credited to any proprietor of the stock at the time when the reimbursement took
place. . It followed, that in paying off any ponion of this loan, no partial
payments could be iiiade to the holder ofa certificate; hut-;th at lie was entitled to receive its full and absohite amount, without reduction, and also
the full amount of all other certificates of this particular stock ofwhich he
was at the same time owner. It therefore became necessary, as no preference
, could be shown to one public creditor over another, to determine by lot the
nurabers of the certificates to be. redeemed, until their aggregate amount,
should represent the sum intended to'be paid off; and such was the plan
':pursued. The precise niode in which it was carried into effect will be
seen by an explanatory paper (L,) among the documents transmitted. This
resort to chance terminated in giving a small excess pver the sum wanted ;
sp that fhe sum to be paid off on the 1st of January ambunts, in - exact
%iires; to $2,002,306 71.
It riiay be proper to rnention that the unpaid ^six per, cents of 1813 were
stated lastyear at $16,270,797 24,whenthetrueamountwas $16,316,599 96.
. The difference was included in thefour and a half per cent, stock, under
the act of March the 3d, 1825, since ascertained to have belonged to the
istock of 1813. It should be further mentioned.'that the three per cents
. were stated last year at $13,296,231 45; to which have been added, this
' year, $16 '25,since issued for iriterest on the old registered debt, under the
actofthe 12th of June, 1798.
•



1826.]

'

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

359-

After the proposed payment of $2,002,306.71 shall have been rnadeon the
1st of Jariuary, the funded debt will have been reduced from ,$80,985,537' 72,
its amou.nt last yfear, to $73,920,844 76, the amount at Which it will'stand
on the 1st of January, 1827. It .hence appears, tht^t the means;which the.
Treasury was found to possess for the reduction of the principalof the debt
within the year 1826, using those means as largely as qould be ju,stified, and
as the comraissiioners of the sinking fund thought proper to .sanction,"
amounted to $7,067,039 36 ; and'that this sum has served to extinguish, by
so much, the unpaid six per cent, loans of 1813; amounting, as by statement in the annual report of December last, to $16,270,797-24. The payment of interesf upon the whole debt within the year will have amounted,
by the close of the last quarter, to $3,944,359 33 ; making,'in the whole,, ,
principal and interest, applied to the debt in 1826, $11,011,398 69. ,
Of the foregoing ^\xm of $73,920,844 76, of. which the debt will consist
on ,the 1st ofJanuary, 1827, $31,838,532 75 will be at an interest of six
per cent.; $12,792,000 20 at an interest offi'Veper cent.; $15,994,064 11
at an interest of four and a half per cent.; and $13,296,247^ 70, the remnant of the revolutionary debt, at an intere^st of three per cent.
• Itremains to offer such suggestions,, connected with the debt for the, yearensuing, as a provident regard to the public.resources is thought to point out.
It is seen from the recitals'that have preceded, .that much the largt^st part of
the debt exists at present in stock of six per cent. This is the highest rate
of interest which is paid by the Governraent: it is conceived to be'higher
than it is proper should bepaid, unless where demanded, by thepublic faith.
The time and concomitant circumstances which characterized the creation
of this part of the debt, necessarily^ burdened it with so heavy a rate of interest; but that, with the ample resources, the un'quest^ioned security, and'
the exalted credit of the Government, it should continue to pay it, where
the option concurs with the presumed ability td shake it off, seems no longer
warrantable.
<
' - . . . Of the whole sum, approaching thirty-two milhons pf dollars, which
stands at this interest, nine millions have hee.w redeemable within the present year; thirteen milHGns will become redeemable.on the 1st of .Januaryj
1827; and nine millions on. the 1st of January;. 1828.. Fractions-are
dropped in the recapitulation.. The advantage to the nation of,converting
by loans, or by exchanges, as large a portion as possible pf this part of the
debt, into debt that shall be charged with a lower interest, appears to be so.
obvious, that the expediency of recomniendingto.Congress the proper measures to effect it again suggests itself as an incumbent oblio:ation upon the
department. It is not overlooke'd, that the probability of obtaining a loan
for this purpose diminishes^ other things remaining equal, as we are brought
nearer to the time proposed for its redemption. But the prospect of obtaining it is still believed to be sufficient to justify the endeavor. It is therefore respectfully recommended that authority -be given by law, and at an
early period ofthe session, to borrow the sum of sixteen, millions ofdollars,
at a rate of interest not to exceed five per cent., to be redeemable at the
pleasure ofthe United States, in equal portions, in 1829 and 1830. These .
years are fixed as the, periods of redemption, forthe reason that operated last
year;.namely, that under the present arrangement of the entire debt only a
very small portion of it (less than one million of dollars) becomes redeemable in. either ofthoSe years. Should s.uch a loan succeed, it would pay off
at once more than one-half of all the stock, at six per cent.,- t,hereby pro


380

'

REPORTS OF T H E '

'>.

[1826;..

ducing a clear saving to the nation of at least bne per cent, on a capital of
sixteen millions of dollars for two years, arid, for a longer period on apiart of that capital. The residue of the six per'cent. stock, amouriting tO'
$15,83,8,532 75, would await the application, of the disposable rneans of
the Treasury during the years 1827 and 1828. Whether those mearis would
prove sufiicient for its complete reduction within' those years, depends upon
events that cannot be accurately foreknown. ^ All that can' be remarked iSy.
theit, to the full exten't of the ability of. the Treasury, the means would be
appliedj and at the periods of time best adapted to the exigencies of the
.public service, urider the directions of the sinking fund act,- and the lightSv
of past experience at the Treasury. < If, nevertheless, a part of this residue-'
of the six per cent, stock should be found unextinguished on the arrival of
the year 1829, (as probably would be the case,) the obligationof paying it off'
then would constitute neither objection norinconvenience to the .measure
of a loan upon the terms proposed. It is consequently beheved that, under
all views of the subject, the measure would give promise of public advan-.
' tage. Such alaw'asisrecommended being passed, arid its execution confided
to the discretion of the Executive, that discretion would be exerted to insure the accomplishment of its object, regarding both the time of obtaining
the loan, and its conditions, in a rnanner the most satisfactory.
I I I . ESTIMATE OP THE PUBLIC REVENUE AN.D EXPENDITUR'E FOR 1 8 2 7 .

^ The importation of foreign articles into the United States, in 1825, waslarger than ^common, having amounted, as by the statements transmitted
to Congress on the 30th of last March, to more than ninety-six miliions
of doilars in value. This exceeded by about sixteen millions of dollars^
the average value'of importations.for the three'years preceding. The excess was larger than could be justified^by the mere gradually increasing demand of the country,' through its increasing populousness. for foreign supplies; ahd could only have proceeded from the influence of those accidental
and temporary causes which, in commercial countries, are always affecting
the operations of trade. A supply soredundant fPr one year might havebeen expected, by the natural reflux of these operations, to be follov/ed h j
supph'es more limited for the year succeeding. On this account, as Well as
through other causes that were adverted to in the annual report of last December, the probability of there being a falling oft' in the value of the importations of 1826, as compared with those of 1825, was intimated, and. has
been the fact. The whole' importations for 1S26 have amounted, frPm the
returns.and estimates at present before the Treasury, to about eighty-five
milhons of dollars in X^'alue. The whole of the exports for the same time ,
to about seventy-eight millions. Ofthe imports, about eighty millions have
been carried in American vessels; and ofthe exports, about seventy millipns.
Of the latter, about fifty-three milhons consisted of the productions of the
Uriited States, and.the reriiainder of foreign productions. The diminished .
value of importations fbr 1826 has obviously arisen, in some degree, from the
fall of prices in those countries of Europe from which the largest quantity
of manufactured articles are seritto the United States; and gives countenance ,
to the opinion that the decrease in quantity has not been in proportion to the
de'crease in value. If. indeed, the comparative amount and> value of exports
. be assumed as the measure ofa correct judgment upon this point, it would
even lead to the inference that, as regards some of the principal articles of
importation into the United States for 1826, there has been no decrease in



1826.}. '

SECRETxiRY OF T H E TREASURY.

• 36.1;

quantity, as compared with the importations of 1825; The value of exports"
from the United States for 1825, exhibits a greater excess over those of 1826-,
than is seen in the imports ; yet, in some ofthe chief articles of export, the;
records ofthe Treasury attest that the quantity, as far as yet known, was
greater in 1826. In 1825, the export bf cotton was one hundred and seventy-v
to.
six millions of pounds. In^ 1826, it was pne hundred and 'ninety-two
millions. The .value of the latter, or larger quantity, was twenty-four millions of dollars. The value of the former, or smaller quantity, was thirty-six millions. In like manner, the quantity pf flqur exported in 1826 was,
greater than in 1825 ; whilst the value was less, though riot in the same proportion as with cotton. The same is true of rice. The export qf flour in"1826,y
was in quantity 858.360 barrels, in value 4,139,063 dollars. In 1825, itwas
813,906 barrels, and in value 4,212,127 dollars. Theexportof rice in 1826
was 110,635 tierces in quantity, and 1,909,227 dollars in value. In 1825, it
\vas 97,015 tierces in quantity, and 1,925,243 dbllars in value. It may be
proper to subjoin, that of the export of cotton in 1825„between nine and ten
millions of pounds were of the Sea Island cotton; andof the export Jn 1826,
between six and seven millions. Of tobacco,,the quantity exported, as
well as its value, rose higher in 1825'thanin 1826. > But in 1826 the export
of tobacco, though considerably less than ^ that of 1824 in quantity, was
greater in value. The comparative amounts, iri quantity and.value, forthe
three years, stand thus: for 1825, 75:984,hogsheads, and $6,115,623;^ for
1826, 59,780 hogsheads, and $5,322,964; for 1824, 77,883 ^hogsheads, and
4,885,566 dollars. ' -Taking the three years, therefore, it appears that the
quantity exported was greatest in 1824. arid the value least.
It would be desirable,^ with a view to judge accurately ofthe effects ofthe
tarifi* upon the importations bf foreigri merchandise, to ascertain thfe fluctuations, from year to year, in the quantity, oi such im^oYteiiioxis. This cannot
. be done, at present; so far as any official or satisfactory standard at the Treasury is concerned. The returns of the collectors of the customs, in relation
to goods which pay duty ad valorem, have hitherto fixed nothing but their
value ; and.it is known that goods subject to duty under this form comprehend much the largest class bf foreign importations. - Measures have been
put in train for ascertaining, henceforth, as-ffir as practicaHe,. the entire.
quantity of goods subject to this description of duty, as well as the value. •
But even when time shall have matured these measures, and exhibited their •
results, they will furnish nostandardofcomparisPn as to the quantity of importations prior to their adoption. The infbrmation will, however, become
useful after the lapse of a few years, iri its bearing upon the course and developments of our home industry and foreign trade; showing how each, under
wise principles adapted to each, may advance co-'equally ; how the channels
and the objects of the latter may shift under the advance of the former, without any loss, but with gain, in effective national results—results operatirig
lipon the most extensive interests, and enriching to the greatest mass of numbers; or-how, under the growth ofthe one, the qther is at all destined to become disadvantageously and lastingly abridged. The benefieiaf parts of
these consequences are looked to with confidence and hope from the tariff^
as well from our own experience, thus far, as from that of other nations of
the world distinguished by high degrees of opulence and civihzation, and
where both have rested upon durable rather than transitory foundations-;foundations that have been carefully laid in applying the home industry to
the multiplied operations of manufacturing art, no less than to the tillage of



362^

•••.REPORTS OP T H E .

[1826.i

the soil, and in making the accumulated productions of hoth thebasis of a
grekf/oreign trade. But facts that may shed a distinct light upon the whole
subject should he sedulously collected, to serve, if need be, as the groundwork to us of-a'more perfect.system of legislation in relation to. a course of
pohcy so closely iriterwoven .with the interests and character of the social
•state, and with the national prosperity and power. The foreign trade ofthe
United States, to its inherent causes for progressive extension, superadds
another arid distinctive one, in the constant desire of the Government,
as riianifested hi their permanent laws, and emphatically in their recent
treaties, to ca;rry it on freed from all restrictions upon navigation, as well
as upon the most erilarged principles, and the most entire reciprocity in
all other respects. 'If these principles, of which the United States have
, largely set the example^ were practised upon raore universally by natioris,
arid to the extent uniformly proposed by this Government to their acceptance, the fact might be more irriportantin its influence upon general trade,arid upon that of ea'ch nation in pa;rticular, than abstract declarations illustratiye or commeridatory of them.
The value of cotton goods subject to ad valorem duty, imported intothe
United States in 1826, was, as far as at i:)resqnt ascertained, 8,905,316 dollars; the value of the same description of goods imported in 1825, was
12,509,51,6 dbllars. The value qf woollen goods subject to ad valorem
duty, iniported in 1:826, was 7,445,493 dollars. The value ofthe sarne-desbriptibn bf goods imported in 'l825, was 11,392,264 dollars. But, as already
intimated, this differerice in value cannbt be relied upon as a safe test ofthe difference in quantity. There are seasons when it would be-peculiarly mislead ing, and the present is beheved to be one of them, '^l-he dutieson each description of these mariufactures were calculated on the prices which each, respectively, boi'e at the plaices Pf exportation during the respective years; andthe,
great fall in:prices in 1826 will undoubtedly serve to account, in part, for.
the difference in the aggregate value of the two importations. Further
elucidation will be afforded to the point, when it,is added, that, although the,
valu^e of cotton manufactures imported in 1826 stands below those imported
iri 1825, in the proportion stated,.it exceeds the value of the same kind of
manufiictures imported during either of the two years preceding, viz: 1824
and^ 1823. The same is not true ofthe wpollen manufactures. The value
• of the latter payirig dUt.y ad valorem, imported in 1826, is found, from the
returns as ^yet before the Treasury, to be below the value of the same kind
of importatioris for 1824 and 1823, though the difference is far less considerable thaln .between their value in 1826 and 1825; rior is it known at this
departmerit what ma;y:have been the cdraparative value of woollen goods at
'the places ofexportaltion duririg the four consecutive years indicated. The
vailuation of merchandise, constituting the, total aggregage of our foreign
trade, is always made atthe port or.place of shipment; and the rule apphes,
GOrisequeritly, both ways—^that is, to all articles of export as well as import ;
thereby freeing it from objections to which it might otherwise be open. The
^riiode of valuing is. In effect^ as follow^: the party making the shipment
annexes the value to the riiariifest or list of articles, superadding his Oath
thrftitis thetrue value, according to their actual cost, or according to the
value which they'truly bear dt the port and time of shipment. This oath is
•takeri^Under the supervision of the collectors, as regards exports; and under
that of our consuls, br other commerciail or substituted agency abrocid, as
regards imports. . Some other formalities are observed under our laws, par


12..
86]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

33
6^

ticularly in relation to imports; but they are all in aid of the chief provision
here stated.
. ',
)
• '
'
. ^ . ^
'
The articles of American manufacture exported from the Unifed States
in 1826 will, it is believed, be found tb exceed six millions of dollars in
value. The particular kinds of manufacture which have-made up this
profitable and growing branch of the export trade will be presented in detail, and their total value ascertained with more ^precision, in.the general
statistical tables now in course of preparation, under the act of the IOth of
February, 1820, which will"be transmitted to •Congress'at as early a day as
their voluminous nature will allow. 'Ofthe amount of Americari manufactures produced for consumption within the'United Sttaes during the
year, itis impPssible to speak with exactriess,; but, from indications that
cannot deceive, it is evident that it is large; so large'that the amount exported would sink to a level below all cpmparisbn with it. The surest
guide to our belief under this head is, that in those^ branches whiph have'
at length been enabled, through a provident legislation, to stand up against
that overwhelming competition of pre-established excellerice and capital
from' abroad, which must otherwise have kept dovvn forever their first alttempts, the article can now be had cheaper in price, as well as better in
quaility. than the same article from abroad, as it was seen iri our markets
prior to the efficient protection afforded to our bwn. Hence the a.pprehensions of monopoly pass away. . Hence the certainty^ that competition at
home willhring down prices eventually, if not immediately, whilst it creates and diffuses new wealth at home; laibor being the foundaltiori of wealth',
^^rid producing-and disseminating it more universally, and in higher degrees, in propertiorras it exists under diversified forms-aind in full activity.
It is then that the farmer, the artisan, and the merchant give support to
' each other, each enlarging the occupations and the. gains ofeach; the State,
meanwhile,.reaping the fruits in fiscal prosperity and political power.
As regards the GOtton matiufadories of the country._ there are groiinds
for, supposing that they now make a call for full one-fourth patt of all the
raw cottori grown in the United States., Authentic information-as'to the
exact quantity I s not, indeed, possessed ait the Treasury; but, as an approximation, it is .believed that the above proportion may be taken, without the
hazard of essentiail error. , It is gratifying to add, that those parts of the
United States wherP mdnufaLCturing establishments of all kirids flourish
"most, exhibit aia ariimaited industry, an orderly aspect, and ari increasing
population. Towns sind villages are seen rapidly te -rise up in such .districts; in resorting to which, the rural population of the vicinity find ready
and profitable sales for the various productions qf fair mi rig enterprise and
labor, Itis believed, that as these.establishriients shall rear themselves" up,
under adequate encouragement in augrnent'ednuriibers and importance, a
cbrresponding activity in foreign trade will becoriie their eoncoraitant inthe
same portioris Of country; since, besides the trade in exports, to Avhich,'aftex siiipplying to their full share the horri'e demand, they operi the way, and
which will not fail tobringits proper returns bn the broad scale of exbhangeSj
the very existence of manufactures, as. they assume great variety and
reach perfection, supennduce.s the necessity of constantly bririging into the
country new varieties of ingredierits as subsidiaiy to them. So wide, so
full of dependance upon aU other kinds of labor, riot only of our own, but
ofbtherregions, is this great ^department of naitional industry. So certainly
doits mullifariousandberieficialopersLtioris in large, rpfined, and busy com


364

.

. REPORTS OF T H E '

[1826.

munities,.perpetually react upon all the other departments; so quick are the
aiternatiDiis of consumption and supply, and over so great a surface of
things do. both spread themselves, in such cpmmunities., It cannot escape
attention, th^t the portions of our cpuntry for the most part answering to
these remarks,, or, to. some of them, are not favored, or favored in but a
shght degree, with the capacity of producing those immense and exhaustless treasures of the soil spoken of in this, paper. For the absence of them,
their inhabitants in part seek compensation in pursuing artificial modes
and combinations of iridustry, which take these treasures as a s^ubstratiim;
by which the great scheme of riational advancement is to be seen in its
true component parts in our Union—parts naturally destined to make up one
systematic whble, where the plough, the loom, and the ship, will each haye
its appropriate sphere in raisirig to a proper elevation the entire fabric of
our social and public prosperity, in carrying to the highest attainable pitch
our riches, our happiness, our power. - A policy short of this belongs not
to a free and inteUigent people, surrounded by the hounty of Providence
with varieties of climate and territory, fostering inclinations and aptitudes
for variety in (uiman employmerits, by ah exuberance of mineral and fossil,
no less than of agricultural wealth; by vast waters flowing through this territory, that serve as natural highways, and supply the fund fbr artificial
ones; affording pre-eminently, in connexion with that mighty agent iri navigation as, in mechanics, the steam-power, the means and inducements for
a universal and, rapid transfer of, the products of labor from hand to hand^
whether they consist of commodities of useful and ingenious workmanship
from the repositories of art, or of harvests from the -fields of,nature; by all
the elements and attributes, in fine, geographical, political, ^and moral, of a
great empire.. The foundations of sbch a pplicy orice securely laid in that
?:?
legislative .assistance to'our manufactures, without which they must struggle in vain against those of other countries long and thoroughly estabhshed—an advantage not inherent but adventitious, yet an overpowering advantage, and as already proved jn some articles of national importance to
which we have afforded efficient protection—we shall have nothing to fear
fbr the future. Then, arid only then, shall, we be raised up to a level, in
thisrespect, with other countries.. Then, and only then, shall we stand i n a
position of equality to listen to dpctrines, right enough it may be in therriS.elves, but of which others have never accorded us the benefit^ or thought
of holding up as doctrines for reciprocal practice, even with numerous safeguards and reservations, until their ov/n manufactures, in all branches
that conduced to national resources and power, had acquired, through ages
of experience, of capital, and of skill, a stability not fo.be shaken.
A resolution passed the House of Representatives, in May, directing thie
Secretary of the Treasury to cause to be prepared a well-digested manual,
containing the best practical, information that could be collected on.the
growth and manufacture of silk, adapted to the different parts ofthe Union;
containing, also, such facts and .observations in relation to the growth and
manufacture of silkln other countries, as might be useful; and that thcisame
should be laid before Congress at the cpmraencement of their present session. Steps were taken, without loss of time,to obtain the infprmation coriternplated by the resolution, as well from all parts of this country as from
Europe. But,.frqm the scope which the subject was. found to assume, all
the information expected under inquiries that have been instituted, has not
yet got to hand; nor will it now be practicable to have'it digested aiiii
arranged; even should it all be received by the time designated. The rc


•1826.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

365

solution will continue tp command every attention, and be finally acted upori
as soon as" may be compatible with the accomplishment of its interesting.ob•jects;'- A branch o f industiy that may be turned to so many purposes, useful and ornamental, and which'ministers tp the wealth of natioris with so
little cost in the material on which it is originally founded, as well as in the
species of labor that is applied to it, naturally merited, as it has received,, ail
the attention which the terms and spirit of the above resolution bespeak."
The value of importations for the year giving the basisof the impost
revenue rather than their quantity, it follows"^that, as the value of those for
1826 has fallen belqw the value of those for 1825, so will also-the revenue
from this source be less. The amourit of duties secured by bonds on merchandise imported duringthe first three quarters bf thepresent year is estimated at 21,250,000 dollars : the amount that will probably acPrue during ,
the last quarter is estimated at about 4,250,000 dollars ; making fqr lhe
whole year $25,500,000. The languidstate of the tea trade for 1826—a trade
always so productive in revenue when it flourishes—has lent its aid, in conjunction with the fall of prices abroad, iri diminishing the accruing amount
froin the customs during the year. Some revival of this valuable trade—
valuable under fiscal and cornmercial views, and, from its tendency to encourage more largely the taste for an- innocent and wholesome d'ririk,'in
place of those that are neither, valuable even under moraLrviews—may perhaps be anticipated in 1827. It may also be presumed that the exterisive
depression of prices witnessed in Europe in 1826 will not have place upon
a similar scale in'1827. Nevertheless, with the causes, little likely in their
cornbinatiori eit least to be'marked by speedy repetition, that have operated
to lower the accruing revenue from the customs for the current year below
that of the year preceding, there is.every reason for supposing that it wilf
exceed the revenue arising from this source during any one of the four years
that immediately preceded 1825 ; and even go beyOnd the amount received'
in that year, though riot the amount that accrued in thatyear. This fact
will be entitled to its proper weight, in determining to what extent the.
regulations of fhe present tariff'are likely to bring injurious inroads upon
the commercial revenue of the nation. .
*
*
,
• The debenture bonds issued for drawbacks during the first three quarters
of the present year, amounted to the sum of $3,840,869 10. This is less by
$648,841 19 than those issued during the corresponding period of 1825.
The amount pf those outstanding on the 30th of September last, and chargeable upon the revenue of the next year, was $1,294,310 94, which is less
by $564,004 70 than was chargeable on the same day in 1825 upon^ the
revenue of 1826.' The deduction in the shape of drawbacks from the accruing revenue of 1826 will therefore, perhaps, exceed five millions of dollars.
The amount of duty borids in suit on the 30th of September was
$4,007,882 76. This is alarge sum; exceeding by $1,020,535 54 the
sum that was in suit on the same day in the year preceding; The excess
is in a great degree to be accounted for by the fraudulent trarisactioris in one
or two of the principal cities of the United States in relation to imported teas.
Whilst the impost revenue receivable next year willbe less'than that
which accrued in 1825, and has been received, or is still to bej'eceived in,
1826, the public lands promise to yield riext year more than' they have this."
The probability of increased productiveness in thisbranch of revenue n-ests
ori the fbllowing grounds: 1st. The act of the last-session making "provision for the extinguishment of the debt, to the United State? by.the pur


36.6

-REPORTS O F T H E

..

[.1826.

chasers bf public lands," has arrested, almost entirely, forthe present yearj
the payments for lands sold on credit. That law will, howe-ver, expire next
Jluly, and'the payments urider it will be thrown, upon the year 1827. 2d.
A considerable quantity of the lands relinquished to the United Sta.tes. will,
it is expected, be broughtinto market in the cburse of the next year ; arriongst
others, those atHuhtsyilie, which are valuable, being dispersed through a
fertile country, occupied by a thriving population. , It is beheved that'they
w;i;ll sell promptly, and at gobd pricps. 3d. A large portion of the best'of
the public^ lands in Florida will be offered for sale in 1827. It is understood
that these lands are in demand, and anticipated^that they will sell well. On
these and other grounds, it is thought, at present, thatthe revenue from the
sale of public lands in 1827 willnot be over-esti mated j when it is set.|down
at. two millions of dollars. The state of the land oflice, generally, will be
seen-by a report from the officer, at the head of that estabhshment, which
accompanied the President's message.to Congress atthe opening.of the session, and \yill, it is hoped, be found satisfactory.
From the foregoing facts and considerations affecting the customs andthe
public lands, it is believed that the whole revenue of the United States for
1827, from these and other less important sources, may be estimated at upwards of twenty-three milhons of dollars; andthat it will arise thus : i,
Fromcustoms'
-'
. ,
^ $20,400,000
From publiciands
.2,000,000
Prom bank dividends
^
420,000
Prom miscellaneous, and incidental receipts 330,000
$23,150,000
The experiditures for 1827 are estimated as follows, viz:
Civil, miscellaneous, and diplomatic
Mihtary service, including fortifications, .prdnance,^Indian
departrnentj revolutionary and military pensions, .ai;ming,the.
militia, and arrearages prior to the 1st of January, 1817,
Naval service - '
- .
>
PpMicdeht
- .
-,
- , -

$X;82G,549 54
5,646,144 36
3,230,260 23
1D,000,000.00

$20,702,954 13
Which wfll leave in the Treasury on the 31st oflDecember, 1827, after
isatisfying allthe demands pf that year, on the basis of the foregoing calculationSj.a.surplus.estimated a^ ^^ ^ ^
t^,^^
87. This surplus will be a dis,,pQsable surplus, over and above the sumbeforestated as not in effective funds,
and of the two mUlions pf dollars tp be rese^rved in the iVeasury under.the
ia^nkirig fund; acf of March
\
- In the estimate of expenditures for 1827, the annual appropijiatipn of
.500,00,0 dbllars for the .gr^idual iriGrease pf the.navy. upder the act .ofthe
3d of March;,,1821,,h^^^^^
be^n inserted,,that.appropriatipnexpiijirigwit^
the! present year. iWhatever renewed, siim. the wisdiOrii of Congress .may
settapart for this efiiectiye.arm pfthe public Idefen^^ wiil add ^n,other item.to
th^ list of expenditures for .the year, and l^sseu-tiy: so mucli thp, estimated
ibalarice at its expiration.
.
,
, All which Is; respectfully submitted'.
^
\
•.
'....••',;•
. ' - . " -'• '^ ^ •••• ..^ - lyiGHARD RUSII."
TR|:ASURY DEPARTMENT, December 12,18 26.



00

A S T A T E M E N T exhibiiing the amount ofi duties which aceriied on merchandise i tomiage, passports, and clear amces;
ofi debentures issued on the exportation ofi fioreign merchandise ; ofi payments fior drawback on dom estic distilled spirits,
dnd domestic refined sugar.> exported ; of bounty oil salted fish, exported ; of allowances to - vessels ernployed in the
fisheries] ofi expenses ofi collection, and ofi payments made into the Treasury, during ihe year ending on the 31st day
ofi December, 1826.
,
Drawback on doinestic distilled
Debentures spirits, and do- Bounties and Gross revenue. Expenses of Nett revenue. Payrnents into
issued.
collection.
the Treasury.
mestic refined allowances.
Merchandise. Tonnage and Passports and
sugar exported.
light ^inoney. clearances.
Dutieson

Year.

1824 S31,673,687 67 S138,847 83 S12,638 00 S6,391,778 69

TREASURY D^IPAB.'I^I^I^T,




^3,505^00

S209,285 57 ^25,220,544 24 S862,341 67 824,358,202 57 ^^20,098,713 45

Register's Office,^ December 12, 1826.
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.

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L A N D S sold, and moneys received fior lands, firom 1st Jamiary, 1825, to 31st December, 1826.
•

A r a o u n t ireceived.'
Liands sold from
1st J a n u a r y to 1
31st December, A m o u n t received Amount received Total amount refor lands sold in for lands sold. , ceived in 1825.
1825.
prior to 1st Julv,
'1825.
'
1820.

Offices.

Stetibenville
M a r i e t t a ^-' " Cincinnati^
Chillicothe
Zanesville ."Vyopster . Piqua
Delaware Jeffersonville
Vincennes In(^ianapolis
-Crawfordsville'
Fort W a y n e .
:Kaskaskia Shaw-neetown
Edwardsville
Vandalia. -r
Palestine . Springfield
Detroit
- .
Monroe
»
 .'» ^ :. St. .Louis
Palmyra http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Acres, '

Expenses.

• ''
Incidental exRepayments to
penses, in eludindividuals for
ing salary a n d - lands erronecommission.
ously sold.

Payments made
into t h e - T r e a .sury.

_

i

-

21,025.44
. S27,446 46
Jp^37,6]7 87
S i o , 1 7 1 41
S l , 8 5 1 97
15,890 67
. 3 , 1 3 5 00
12,700.97.
19,025 67 i
1,110 78
19,533 65
16,359.00
30,937 88
50,471 53
2 , 3 0 4 38
21,986 93
10,916 21 32,903 14
19,723.71
2,075 55
33,076 71
16,42] 20
25,790.32
49,497 91
2,119 10
13,974 28
'
36,467 70
17,994.76 1 ' 22,493 42
• • • 1^827 14;
6 , 6 5 2 31
6,652 31
5,325.79. !
1,150 06
. ^ 28,767 71 \ '
23,012.62
•28,767 71
1 ,.728 56
^—
7,429 03
.5,943.25 i
• 23,251 07
1,697 52
30,680 10
16,710 14
13,368.04 i
- 15,568 89
1,342 72
32,279 03 i
52,644.07 i • , -72,186" 90
72,486 90
2,706'31
108,660 39
86,912.17
108,660 39
3,217 i r
' _ "
I
3,403.18
5,261 79
1,332 22
5,261 79
-' 53 1
889 02 .
2,082 55
^ . 1,193
-.711.22
1,228 06
1,357.63
1,72904
2,353 36
' 4,082 40
1,530 68
7,188 03
5,748.43 - 1
" 1,153 .38
8,311 41
• 1,232 75
1,119 20
895.36 1
1,187 56
1,119 20
~
!'
10,323.76
12,899.66 '
• , 1 2 , 8 9 9 66
1,291 15
^
33,959 85
i
26,767.88
.33,959 85
• 1,716-18 •
— 73
.
5,163
92,332:55 1 .116,920 72
, . 2 , 5 8 5 43
122,089 45'
- 18,025 12
14,420.08
18,025 12
1,508 56
'6,392 96
—
23,149 33
K ^ ' - 18,519.50 1
- 29,542 29
' "• 2,917 93
22,926 12 1
18,333.90
22,92612 1
2 , 2 7 5 00
~ •
_

.-

'
.

^ -

-

-

^

-

_

•

'

'

P4,233
17,139
.52,126
. . /30,829
'49 ,'752
• 35,588
5,135
- 10,091
31,727
•
25,794
• 36,723
105,641
11
96
'2,442
212

'

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_

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:

'

.
.

•

'

_

-

'

57
10
47
19
60
54
20
08
69
84
28
89
87
97
00
23

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tn

'17,162 27
•30,871 02
i n , 3 1 6 76
' 27,000 00
18,818.86
14,QOO 00

as

Franklin - . Cape Girardeau - .
Lexington- •
Batesville .«s<L"itUe.Rock
O Ouachita F Opelousas •-( New Orleans
^ St. Helena court-house J Washington
gJackson court-house
. ^Choctaw district St.-Stephen's
Huntsville Tuscaloosa
Cahaba Sparta
^ I'allahassee
^

. 28,481.65
5,217.09
15,255.85
5,855.56
1,938.94
180.07
• _

..

400.00

_

.

10,661.02
703.80'
75,200.48
26,749.57
20,859.79
88,676.27
52,158.62
12,473.28
55,056.07
893,461.69

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,




35,634^38
. 6,521 32
19,069 85
_ . 7,319.42
2,423 67
208 00

_

50O 00

_

12,789 58,

-. ^ ^
_
_
_

'4,500 34

_
•_
_

36,587 65

. •. 17,'457^25 •
879 88.
94,000 11
33,448 00
27,046 78
164,305 66
65,206 99
15,591 23
90,553 63,

4,303 85
:40,280 25

1,205,068 37

330,89503

_

_
91,796
_

>

46

. 48,423 96
6;52t 32
19,069 85
..7,319'42
2,423 67
208 00
4,500 34
500 00
• 54,044 90
. 879 88
^•^ 94,000 11
• 37,751 85
67,^327 03.
164,305 66 '
157,003 45
. 15,591 23.
90,553 63

1,609 88
1,112 85
: 1,453 44
1,426 24
1,4.52 40
910 44
1,054 86
831 31
1,000 00
1,360-91
1,014 55
3,183 94
• 2,770 5 6 .
2,600 46
3,412.63
2,231 15
/ -1,108 74
2,421 04

i;535,964 40

72,892 72

_

•

•

38,430
3,375
13,229
5,079

_

50
00
56
42

00
CO

cr.

y

14,295 01

_
#350 11

^
•

- . 2,340 57

_
•

.

•

_

.

•

_

- ,
\ 2,690 68

80,444 21
107,820
41,469
2,901
•149,573.
16,112
• 5,860
80,724

45
19
40
84
25
00
30

Ul

o

1,216,090 56

General Land Office, October 30,-1826.
GEO. GRAHAM, Commissioner.

a

03

'370

'

REPORTS OF T H E

[1826.
•

'<

"

S T A T E M E N T ofi Quoneys received into the Treasury, firom all sources
other than customs and public larids, during the year A826.
-t'rom arrears of new internal revenue - ;
arrears of new direct tax •;fees on letters patent ,
~ ,. cents coined at the mint - ^
^
. postage of letters ,. ' fines, penalties, and forfeitures
sales of public lots in the city of Washington . surplus emoluments of ofiicers of the/customs
consular receipts, under the 2d section of the act of
,14th Aprilj 1792
- ., -, • ^
trading establishments with the Indians
nett proceeds of vessels and cargoes condemned under
the acts prohibiting the slave trade
, nett proceeds of vessiels captured from the pirates rent of the naval hospital farm, Chelsea
. interest on, balances due by banks to the .United
States - . Bank of Tennessee, for premiums on dra:fts for'
moneys belonging to the United States, and deposited with said, bank interest on notes given for the purchase of the
Northumberland house estate
-annuities to Christian Indians on the river Thames
moneys previously advanced on account of second
^census moneys previously advanced for ascertaining land
titles in Louisiana.
_
'.
dividendson stock in the Bank of the United States

$25,771 35
2,330 85
8,940 00
19,496 25
469 56
3,411 06
1,572 38
26,960 06
2,292 10

10,020 m.
- 4,473-.57
325 13
267 45
' 5,792 42 .
- 190 38
274 87
1,474 98
^

71 48
/
500 00
367,500 00

/,
_. .
^
.482,134'69
Balances of advances made in the War Department, repaid ,. <
.
under the 3d section of the act of the 1st May, 1820 ,43,919 32
Loan of five millions at 4A per cent, per act of 26th May,
1826 r
.
.
.
.
5,000,000 00
5,526,054 01
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, NovSmbe^^ 30,1826.
JOSEPH NOURSE, .i26|^i5^er.




1826,]

SECRETARYOFTHETREASURY,

-

371

S T A T E M E N T ofi tke expenditures ofi the United States, fior .the
year 1825.

^

CIVIL, MISCELLANEOUS, AND DIPLOMATIC, VIZ :

Legislature - • - ' - '
- $563,100 48
Executive . . .
: 478,330 58
Officers of the mint 9,600 00 Surveying department
- • -; , 20,795 34 .
Commissioner of the Public Buildings
- \ 1,500 00
Governments in the Territories of the United '
••
•, '
States
.•- , ..
- 33,421 71 '
Judiciary
- ,
. 223,999 13 11,330,747 24
<
Annuities and grants
- '
2,100 00^
Grant to General Lafkyette - 200,000 00
Mint establishment . 19,65i 64
Unclaimed mercbandise
-.
'369 05
Light-house establishment -°
- 183,864 64
Surveys ofpublic lands
- 133,928 83
Registers and receivers of land ofiices
1,375, 00
Western boundary line.pf Arkansas Territory
3,000 00
Boundary lines between Missonri and Arkansas
1,500 00
Preservation of the public archives va Florida
,7-^50 00
Land claims in Florida Territory
- ' 8,144 35
Land claims in St. lielena land district
- ' 3,5.62 50
Roads within the State of Ohio
- . 9,19,7 27
Roads within the State of Indiana —
10,798 09
Roads and canals within the State of Alabama
10,753 66 ^
Roads and canals within the State of Missouri . 4,99{) 55
*,..
Roads and canals within the State of Mississippi ' 15,780 26
Encouragement of learning within the.State
of Illinois
- . . -,
5,702 06
Repayment for lands erroneously sold by the
UnitedStates - "- •
1,635 93
Purchase of lands reserved to certain. Creek
Indians - • - ^
800 00
. Marine hospital establishment
- 54,938 51
Public buildings in Washington
- 82,000 00
Accommodation of the iPresident's household
14,000 00
Bringing the .votes for President and Vice
President of the United States
6,169 50
Consular receipts under the act of 14th Aprilj
1792
r
-.
2,292 10
Payment of certain certificates
- , . 83 01
Payment of balances'due to officers ofthe old
internal revenue and direct tax
2,184 64
Payment of balances to collectors of new internal duties
-'
1,746 99



372

. , • REPORTS OF T H E ' ,

,

[1826.

Payment of claims for property lost - '
$143 00 ,
Stock in the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal
.
•
- Conipany
.
- .,
- 192,500 00
Miscellaneousexpenses
- '
73,164-82
$L04G,131 40,
Diplomatic department
- 159,603 82
Coutingent'expenses of foreign intercourse - • 25;'i74 95
Relief and protection of. American seamen - 33,536 17
Treaty with Spain L125 00
Treaty of Ghent, (6th aild 7th articles)
12,583 13
Treaty of Ghent, (1st article)
12,000 00
Prize, causes
. . .
. _
8,000 00
Payment of clai ms .u nder the 9th art icle Qf the . , treaty with Spain
^- 19,358 37
Clahiis on Spain
- •
.. - 73,876 14
•Treaties with M(Eiditerranean powers.
- 26.108 67^
371,666-25
2,748,544 89
. M I L I T .\ l i \ ' E S T A. BL I S II M E N T . Y. 1Z':

Pay pfthe army
-.
^
- '
- $946,043 34
Subsistence "
^-. . ,• .' - 283,700 25
Q.uaftermastefs" department,- .268,709 34
Purchasing department.
•- /
_ • - ' . _ - 205,400 13
Bounties and premium.s
- "
, - 21.278 60
Forage'
- - _ - . / _ 36^,827 62
Expenses of recruiting
-,
.8,254 T 8
Medical department/" ' ••,,--^22,549 41
Purchase of woollens for.1826
- .
- 20,000 00>
Medals for officers - ' ; >
'
-,
: 805 00
Reliefof ofiicers, &c., Seminole campaign , -2.818 19
Ransom of American captives
-'^
-- . 540. 00
Balances due to.certain States,,on account of
' .militia
- . . ••
^
6,010 56
Payment of interestdue to the State of Yirginia 178,480 11
Payment for property lost. &'G.
- '" 40 00
Armories
' *1 \ .
. 359,134 52
National armory, western waters
-.
2^479 88
Arsenals
- '
- '
- 22^399 92
Arsenal on the Schuylkill - ,
8,000 00
Ordnance - ,
. _.
.
47,241 29
Powder, cannon, shot, shells, etc. 209 32
Arming and equipping the militia . - 167,338 77
Military Academy, West Point
12,763 56
Fortifications
- -.
, ..
4,886 70
Repairs and contingencies/offbrtificas;ions
- 20,727 91.
Armament of new fortifications
^ 4,800 00^
Fort. Mon roe '
-. . -99,848 48
FortCalhoui
. - .
-• '
.^
.
71,901 67
Fort Washington
-,
.1,992 95



1826.]

^

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

373

- $53,180 47
.Fort Delaware
Fort Jackson
._
-•
- 136,543 11
Fort.at Mobile Point
- - • 141,262 22.
Fort at New Utrecht Point . - '
- : 56,799 32
• Fort at Brenton?s Point
- 44,477 28
Fort at Rigolets and Chef Menteur - 105,472 18
1.000 00
Fort at Be'aufort. North Carolina - 17,000 00
. Fort at Cape Fear -^ . Materials for a fort opposite Fort St. Philip
307 38
- ir.420 19
Deepening the harbor of Presque Isle
- 10,907 29
Preservation of islands in .Boston harbor
5.712,00
Repairs of Plymouth beaph
Survey of Marblehead and Holmes's. Hole ^ . 400 00
Improving the Ohio and Mississippi rivers - 11,244 23
Survey, &c., of roads and, canals - 37,243 57
Continuation ofthe Cumberland.road
- 35,850,00
-. 5,255 00
.
Road from Ohio to Detroit - '
Road from Detroi^t to Chicago
3,000 00
Road from Memphis to Little Rock -.
3,325 82
Eoad from Cape Sable to Suwanee river
2,072 15Road from Pensacola to St. Augustine
- 10,931 00
6,000 00
.Road from Colerain to Tampa bay Road from Missouri to New Mexico
- 15,000 00
-1,308,810 57-Revolutionary pensions
- ,
-, 140,000 30
Relief of sundry individuals
Contingencies ' . - - 17i8l6-76
- 29,877 35
Arrearages ' Civilization of Indians
- / - 13.545 41
-' 37,690 16
'Pay of Indian agents
. - '
- 17,077 73
Pay of'sub^igents - 16.761 19
' Presents to Indians
- 76',058 42
Contingencies of Indian department
500 00
Military escort, per act of May 25, 1824
- . 23,000 00Compensation to citizens of Georgia
- 229,036 60
^ Creek treaty, per act of March 3, 1825
)6.900 43
Treaties with Indians beyond the Mississippii
- • 36,425 57
Treaty with Florida Indians
.- 10,400 00
Treaties with. Sioux, Chippewas, &c.
8.748 72
Choctaw treaty
9.723 44
Expenses of Choctaw treaty , .
- 16,972.50
' Chociaw claims' - - •
- ' 2,748 00
Claims against the Osages -"
- 218,744 36,
,
Annuities to Indians '
.
•
•
' ,
, ,
5,761,022 41
From which deduct >the folio w,ing repay--^
• . . . •'
ments: , '
,
' .
"
Invalid and half-pay pensions $67,879 76
' _•
•
Gratuities
- '
' 85 37
.
•
Purchase of Q,uapaw lands s - v . ' 226^09
'- •
•
- ."
• 68.191 22
., \ ,
/$5,692,831 19



374

[1826.

REPORTS OF-.:THE
NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT, VIZI

Pay of the navy afloat
- $836,052 48 ^
Pay of the navy shore stations
- . • - 285,671 26 ,
Provisions - ' • . - , ' • •
- . - . ,- 391.531 97
Medicines and hospital stores
36,511,51
Repairs of vessels -/
-.
- 388,164.78
Navy yards, docks, and wharves . 19,789 58
Navy yard, Portsmouth
1,783 84
Navy yard, CharlestOAvn '- '
. '
.- 20,000 00
Navy.yard, New York
^
- .
41,90142:
Navy 3^ard, Philadelphia -'
11,509 74
Navy vard, Washington
- /
- . • .- .22,497 09
Navy yard, Norfolk
-.,
- .15,936 12
Navy yard, Pensacola
; - . .2^000 00
Gradual increase of the navy
- '
- 33§,445 55 .
Building ten sloops ofwar - ..
- 138,802 29
Houses for ships in ordinary.
15,674 74
Inclined plane dock, (fcc. -. .
3,716 50
Prohibition ofthe slave trade ,
•- .
14,637 21
Suppression of piracy
-• .
- ^ 8,474 90
Siiryey of the coast of Florida
- .'
73 61
Survey ofCharleston and St.. Mary's
-. • 1,898 78
Captors of Algerine vessels /- . 182 38
Relief of sundry individuals
•- ' 12,917 00
Contingent expenses prior to 1824 - ^
-,
709 81
Gontingent expenses:for 1824
44,273.48
Contingent expenses, not enumerated, fbr
• 1824 • .-• •
- • -'
•.- . • ^
1,767 21.
Contingent expenses, not enumerated, for
.
'
1825^
^ ' • . - • . . : . >
J 199,765 43
Contingent >^expenses, iiot enumerated, for
,
1825 • - - ' " . . "
^ - . 3,780^50.
Pay and sabsistence ofthe marine corps - 149,295 84
Ciothing of the marine corps
. . .
28,286 26
Medicines for the marine corps
-' - 2,369 -71
Military stores for the marine corps
1,363 78
Fiiel for the marine corps [ - . 7,506 95
Repaiiing barracks of,the marine corps
368.19
Contingent expenses of the marine corps 13,356 41
Contingent arrearages of the marine corps 5,000 00
3,066,016 32
From which deduct the following repayments:
Ordnance and ordnance stores, $27 64
Laborers, and fuel for engine - 3,005 66
Superintendents, artificers, (fee. r 13,868 10
Tools burnt at the navy yard atv
Washington
. - .
31 06




16,932 46
. $3,049,083 86

1826.]

SECRETARY OP T H E TREASURY.
PUBLIC DKBT, VIZ :
»^J

r

• 375

.

Interest on the. funded debt • - - |4,366,757 40
, •'
Redemp.tio.nof6per cent, stockof 1812
6,187,006 84
Redemption of Treasury note 6 per cent.
stock - •
.1,479,374 ^2
Redemption of exchanged 6 per cent, stock
>' .
of 1812 . -•
- .
56,539 30
Reimbursement of Mississippi stock
-'
, 1,524 02
Principal and interest of Treasury notes
. 2,001 49
x
Paying certain parts of domestic debt^ 15 31. ^
Redemption of 7 per cent, stock of 1815
2,135 ,60
.
. . • . . '
. • .'
"12,095,344 78
'
TR,EASURY DEPARTMENT,

. \'>•'

- •'•
.'V

$23,585,804 72
••

',

;

• . •'

Register's Office. November 30, 1826. ; ' ' ,
,
• JOSEPK NOURSE, Register.




376

[1826.

REPORTS OF T H E
,'

•

-

•

•

G .

•

'

L A N D S spld, and moneys received, for lands, from 1st January, 1826,
to:-i{)th .Tune; 1826.
•

Offices.

Amount received. '
•Lands sold
from Jan. 1
to June 30, Amount re- Amount . Total
1826.
ceived for- received .• amount fe-.
^- , lands sold for larids ceived iil the
• in the first sold prior first two
two quarters " to July, quarters of
of 1826. '
1820.
Acres.
1826.
s^

1

Incidental Payments
expenses. made into
incfuding the Treassalaries '&
ury.
commissions.
.,

.

Steubenville
" 13,035.65 ^16,294-54 $530 37 J16,824 91 Sl,772 84 S3,704 85
Marietta
• - • • 7,577.84 ' 9,472 27
182 29
9/654 56
938 02
9,542 47
Cincinnati
6,290 35 2,584 90
5,032..28
8,875 25
717 93 12,364 80
Chillicothe
10,518 26 1,710 98
a, 173.58
12,229 24
.831 02 11,068 17
Zanesville
16,000.21' 19,966.33 ' 765 01 20,731 34 •1,001 44 2P,832 32
Wooster
8,234.67 •10,293 27 1,058 45- 11,351 72
729 24
9,920 46
Piqua - ^ . 367 13
293.71
367 13 . 608 75
Delaware '
1.1,289 40
9,031.53
11,289 40
540 G
O 9,860 70
.Teffersonville
5,178 60
4,142.88'
5,577 90
795 86 4,692.-00
399 30
Vincennes
8,"452 10
6,761.71
223 42
8,675 52
736 75
150 00
Brookville
28,299 96
22,640.02
28,299 96 1,074. 93 18,792.02
_
Crawfordsville 36,445.98- ' 45,557 5845-, 557 58 1,375 64 85,649 39
.Fort Wayne
1,292 65
1,034.15
- 1,292 65
632 76
3,630 04
Kaskaskia • 1,184 41
947.53
. 1,184 41
517'38
Shawneetown - v 1,397.77
1,747 22
1,774'63
522 97
27 41
Edwardsville 2,393-. 01 ' 2,991-27
.2,991 27
689 51
^
Vandalia
685 27
' .. , 548 22
685 27633 17
Palestine
. 7,089.97 • 8,862 45
8,862 45
791 01
9,629 15
Sprjn.s^iield
13,751 66
- 11,001.34
13,751 66 1,396 42 32,547 21
Detroit' 29,596 73
23,677.30
29,596^73 2,367 83 32,830 69
_,
Monroe - .
8,349 40
6,662.22
8,.349 40 ' 887 35- 11,143 23^
_
St. Louis
7,612 06
6,089.75
7,612 06
978 06 1^,859 49
Palmyra
5,101 64
, 4,081.31
5;i01 64
778 60 10,340 57,
..
Franklin
73 65
10,652.03 "13,315 03
13,388 68
571 68
1,2.34 09
Cape (Grirardeau
1,997.60
,2,497 21
. 2,497 21- 810 15
8 25.
_
.Lexing.ton
1
.500 00
_
_
"
.Batesville
1,291.66
1,614 56
1,614 56
776 15 •
350 00
_
.Little Rock , 516 78
. 413.43
516 78
.525 91
Ouachita^
399.97 • _ • 499 96
499 96
.899.95
Opelousas.
510 34
"510 34
510 06
4,500 CO
,.' - '
New Orleans
597.09
746 37•
746 37 ,. 505 97
1,768 44
St. Helena c h . . 500 00
Washington
3,545.52
4,431 88
563 41
4,995 29 2,097 00^ 3,000 00
.Tackson-c. h.
555.61
694 55
694 55
758 58
' _
Choctaw district . 33,296.86 51,971 60
_ . 51,971 60 1,805 81 69,055 74
St. Stephen's
13,330.12
16,662-86
57^68
16,7-20 54
784 81 8,000 00
Huntsville
5,8.39 22
4,671.40'
946 27
6,785 49 .1,601 14 73,011 04
Tuscaloosa
71,251.15 132,646 72
132,646 72 3,503 41 134,827 00
_
Sparta 882.28
1,102 85
1,102 85 • 376 26
6,414 00
_,
Cahaba*
15,990 91
12,792.42
.15,990 91
709 00 164,633 16
_
Tallahassee
7,950.00
9,94S 75
•9,948 75 1,466 86
v.;

'i

_i

-

.

>

'

-

•

:

365,1319.77

511,6.33 80

•

9,633 48

521,267 28 40,020 22 768,359 28

The amount of pa]/•ments made i nto the Treasury, on ace ount ofpublic lands,
in the quarter en din'g SOth Sep tember, 1826, is
As ,above, to the 3()th June, 1826
- .. - ' .

S285,602 01
768,3.59 28
• S i , 053,961 29

^>^"The Cahaba accounts have or ly been received to 31st March, 1826.
, TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

General Land Office, October 30, 1826.
" ' ' ..
GEO. GRAHAM, Commissioner.




1826.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY. ^
• . '

H.

. •.

377
.

'/'

S I A I E M E N T ofi rnoneys received into the Treasury,fii^omall sourcesother than customs and public lands, firom the 1st Jamiary to the
30th Septemher, 1826. < . :
'Fromarrears of new internal revenue - .
r ^
"^hew directtax
-...
old direct tax fees on letters patent .,-,
- "
cents,coined at the mint . •fines, penalties, a.ndforfeitures
- " . surplus emoluments of officers of the customs
trading estalishments with the ludians - < ^ interest ori .balances due by banks to the United
States
/ inoneys previously advanced on account of treaty
with Spain - '
-

$20,534 -28
. 5,124 48
1,514 28. y,080 00
7,466 00
1,063 44
33,702 81
• 2,95-9 25
720 73
327''45
: 80,492- 72

From dividends on stock in the Bank of the United
States
- ^ - •
' From balances of advances made in the W_ar Department, repaid under the 3d section of the act of 1st May,
1820
- • . "•;. • ^ -

402,500 00
17.551 63
.$500,544^ 35

. TREASU'RY DEPARTMENT,

•

. ,'

Registei''s Office, November 30, 1826.
JOSEPH NOURSE, ./^e?^i9^er.




378

^

., .REPORTS OF T H E . .
I.-.

•-

. [1826.

,

S T A T E M E N T ofi expenditures ofi the Uniied States, fir orn the 1st ofi
.January to the 30ih ofi September, 1826.
CIVIL, MISCELLANEOUS,

AND DIPLGMATIC, V I Z :

Legislature'
.-$351,255''45
Executive departments
7
- ^ " -381,121 49
Officers of the mint
7,200 00
Commissioners of the Public Buildings
1,179:94
Surveying departmerit
- '
- 14,848 18
Governments in the Territories of the Uni
-ted States
- - 27,073 16>
Judiciary
-- 165,482 '67
•
, $9.49,060-89
Annuities and grants
- 1,750 00
.
Mint establishment
-'
-, 21,568 27
Unclaimed merchandise
, 108 07
Light-house establishment -'
- 159,.557 10 ,
Suryeys of public lands
- - 47,449 69
Registers and receivers of land offices
2,118 96
Preservation of the public archives, in Flo,
rida
.- , 625 00 •
Land claims in Florida Territory
9,723 48
Land claims in St. Helena land jlistrict
- 2,937 50
Roads within the Stat.e of Ohio
7,331 06
'
Roads within the State of Indiana
- , 7,176 97
Roads,, canals, &c. within the State of Alabama
• -'
- 12,958 28
Roads, canals, &c. within the State of Mis^
souri
- , 1,385 64 ^
Roads, canals, &c.. within the Stateof Missis-'
,—
sippi
'. -,
fi6,888 16
Repairing the mail.road between Jackson and
"
Columbus
. -.
- 15,000 00
Marine hospital estabhshment
-. 37,656 50
Public buildings in >Washington
- 62.271 97
Bringing votes for President and Vice Presi- '
,',• :
dent'of the UnitedStates
^4175
Appropriation of prize money - . 4,297 55
Stock in the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal
Company
- 107,500 00
Stock ih the Dismal Swamp Canal Company 150,000. 00
Stock in the Louisville and. Pdrtland Canal
-Company'
- ,
-'^
- 20,000 00
Payment of claims for property lost, ifcc. 258 50
;;
Payment of claims for buildings destroyed - 178,002 45
Payment of balances due to bfficers of old
,.
"'
internal revenue and direct tax /35 70 ,
Payment of balances'to collectors bf^new in\ -.
ternal revenue .
.
464 25
Miscellaneous expenses
- ..
- 104,744 69
'
•.
-—,
960,851 53



_

'

-

•

1826:],

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,

• 379

Diplomatic department
- _
- $74,138 17 '
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse - 10,134 38
, ^
Relief .and protection of American seamen 7,592 62
Treaty of Ghent, r6th and 7th articles) , 7,500 00
Treaty of Ghent, (1st article) , 7,,000 00
- .
Payment of clainis under the Oth . article of
the treaty with'Spain
9,967 88
Treaties with the Mediterranean powers
-, 3,086 08
• • • . . .
1_—J_ . $.119,41913
•2,029.331 55.
'

M I L I T A R Y ESTABLISHMENT, V I Z :

Pay of the army
.$715,762 95
Subsistence
-'
-.
- • - 203,348 88
Quartermaster's department
- 272,592 15
Purchasing department \
- ' -,
- 186,624 03
Bounties and premiums
5,996 70
Forage
, . - 27,803 90
Expenses of recruitinsr
9,157 90
Medical department - ^
- 18,901 28
Purchase of woollens, for 1827
- 10/^00. 00
Ransom of American captives
985 18
Balances due to certain States, on account of
militia
•
•
6,615,02
Payment for property lost, &c.
168 25'
Armories -.
- 275,117 06Arsenals
-.
- 43,166 20
Arsenal at Vergennes
- , -. 3,000 00
Ordnance . ' - •'• ' - / ' - . 52,280 91
Arming and equipping the militia - '
- 147,942 80
Military Academy, West Point
9,853.83
Repairs and contingencies of fortifications 3,976 86
Armament of new fortifications
1,600 00
Fort Monroe .
-^
- '
- 87,600 00
Fort Calhoun
-' - • 60,900:00
Fort Delaware
•-- , - 18,499 '03Fort Jackson
- - - 50,940.58
Fort at Mobile Point
. -j 89,666 45'
Fort at New. Utrecht Point - ,
-^
- .64,830 00>
Fort at Brenton's Point
-.
- 66,221 25
Fort at the Rigolets and Chef Menteur
-' 64,912 00
Fort at Beaufort, North Carohna
- '
- " 8,345 00
Fort at Cape Fear .- 26,800 00
Fort Constitution '2,500 00
Fort Bienvenue
. ' - 50,000 00
Deepening the harbor-of Presque.Isle
7,895 00
PreservatiiDn of the islands in Boston harbor 19,950 00
Repairs of Plymouth beach - '
8,500 G
O
Improving Ohio and Mississippi rivers
8,438 25
Surveys, &c., of roads and canals - "
- ,24,082 41
Continuation of the Cumberland road
- 70,749 00



380

RE,PORTS OF T H E

Road from Oliio to Detroit .- .
$14,107 45
Road from- Missouri to New Mexico
' -- 9,000 00
Road from Memphis to Little Rock •
'
904 CO
Road from Little Rock to Cantonment Gibson
2,441 7 4
Survey of a route for.a catial from the Atlantic to the Gulf o^f Mexico - , ' ' - . 9,316 00
Road from Pensacola to St. Augustine
2,069 00
Removing obstructions in Huron creek, Ohio>
1,500 00
-Removing obstructions in Cunningham creek,
1,000 00
Ohio " > T . / - ...
1,000 00
Removing obstructions in Qrand river, Ohio
Removing obstructions in Ashtabula creek,
Ohio ^ - ^ . . • . . 1,000 00
Surveying harborof Edgartown, Mass.
500 00
Surveying Sandusky bay, Ohio
400 00
Surveying Laplaisance bay, Michigan
200 00
Interest due the State of Marylancf 61,582 63
Interest due to Baltirnore' . - '
' - 21.710 25
Relief of sundry individuals
76,411 12
• 3,827 09
Relief of officers, ^&e., Seminole war
. 12,601 18
Contingencies
Arrearages - 21,816 97
• " '84 ^87
Maps, plans, books, &c.
304,702 -45
Invalid and half-pay pensions
. -,
1,305,564 23
Revolutionary pensions
- ,
Civilization of Indians
- 12,784 59
Pay of Indian agents
.
, .16,385 66
5,521 59
Pay of sub-agents , 16,578 40
Presents tolndians
, - , -140,401 44
Contingencies of. Indian departm.ent"
. 23,000 00Compensation to citizens of Georgia
20,813 88
Creek.treaty of 1825 . ^.' -. .
76,913 00
Creek treaty of 1826
' '18,306-18
"Treaties with Osages and Kanzas Treaties with Indians in Indiana - . " - 15,000 00
418 00
Treaties with Florida Indians
^
Effecting certain treaties, per act May 26,1826 80,262 29
2,204 51
Choctaw treaty ^ . 27,000-00
General councils' at Green Bay.
-2,407 71
Claims aga.ins't.Osages ' - ,'
237,841 88
Annuities to Indians
- /
- '
, ' V ,; • > ;! .
••;
5,273,300 98
From which deduct tlie following repay- ^ .
ments:
. '. - -V.. .
'•
Survey of the coast of the United
.
.
States- - • • . -•; , -$2,586 00 . ,.
Survey of Marblehead.and Holmes's
Hole -~
• : ' - • ' - . ' - • '54 7'6
Purchase of Indiari title to land in
.Michigan
. - 507 76
- Purchase of In'dian title'to laiid in
Tuscarawas
'- .
- 63 32 '




[1826.

1826.1
Gratuities
Fortifications
• •,

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
••'

-

..-$454:73-2.653 48
____^-'

• >

381

|6,320;05
$5,266,980.93

^' NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT,\VIZ:

Pay of the navy afloat
- $758,253 52.
Pay of the navy shore stations
- 142,545' 69
Provisions
- .
" .\ ^- 320,703 94
Medicines and hospital stores
21,841 54'
Repairs of vessels - ^
- . • .- '378,843 30
Navy yard, Portsmouth
4,112 24
Navy yard, Charlestown - • 37,77131
Navy yard. New York . T
49,295 51
Navy yard, Philadelphia - ^
13,539 26'
Navy yard, Washington - .
24,799 81
Navy yard, Norfolk
-.
40,253 78
Navy yard, Pensacola
- .
• . •13,000 00
Gradual increase ,of the nayy
- 663,522 10
Ordnance and ordnance stores
17,354 63
Building ten sloops of war
- 382,495 73
Houses for ships in ordinary
^
42,609 76
Inclined plane dock, Sec. ' ->
.' 3.16 50
Superintendents, artificers, &c.
-' 40,537 55
LalDorers, and fuel fbr engine " - ' 9,461 97
Prohibition of the slave trade
, - . 20,489- 36
Su-ppression of piracy
1.358 98
Contingent, not enumerate^l, for 18.24 .
- .
304 15
Contingent, for 1825; ' - • ; 2'42.74Contingent, not enumerated, for 1825
673 88
Contingent, for 1826
. - 219,78188
Contingent, not enumerated, for 1826 . . -:
^600 00
Pay anisubsistence of the marine corps 93,120 23
Clothing for the marine corps
21,983 40
Medicines for the marine corps ,248 47
Fuel for the marine corps 9,321 45
.Military stores.for the marine corps
- '
199" 83
Contingent for the marine corps ;
.^8,208 20
BarracliS for the marine corps
^- •
1,000 00
3,338,790 70
From which deduct the following repayments :
'
, ;.
Contingent, prior to 1824
" $8,715 55
Contingent, fbr 1824 - - 5,899 13
Navy yards, docks, and wharves 2,843 23
'
—

.
17,457 91
3,321,332- 79

PUBLIC D E B T :

Interest on the'-fuiided debt
-3,031,848 74
jRedemption of 6 per cent, stpck of 1813 - 5,063,922' '62
Paying certain parts of domestic debt
:
27 86



382

^

,

REPORTS O F T H E

Reimbursement of Treasury "notes
Reimbursement of Mississippi stock ,
.Redemption of 7 per cent, stock - . •

[1826.

$307 17
450 00
• 25 00
'0
$8,096,581 '.

18,714,226 66
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

•

•

• -

.

Register's Office, November 30, 1826.' , '
, JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.

.'

'

,

. -L.

The commissioners ofthe sinking fund having, on the 27th of September, 1826, resolved that two miUions of dollars of the six per cent, stock,
created by the act of Congress of the 8th of February, 1813, should be
redeemed on the 1st of January, 1827, the fbllowing was. the course adopted at'the Treasu.ry to carry the resolution into effect:
, 1 . All the loan offices were instructed to transmit tothe Treasury the
nuiiibers of the certificates of this stock, and the names of the holders, as
/they stood upon .the books df the offices,.'respectively; ori the 16th of September, 1826; the books being always closed against "transfers fourteen
days before the end of a quarter.
2. The.amount of the whole being $11,248,389 26, composed of"different and unequalsums on the books of the several offices, the two millions vv€;re*made up araong all ihe offices by taking a proportional suni;^for
each. For example: the entire sum standing upon the books of the New
York oflice being $2,225,533 49, the sum of $395,600. bore the same proportion.to4wo miliions that $2,225,533 49 did to $11,248,389 26. The
entire sum upon the books of the office in South Carolina being $555,149 39,
the sum of $98,684 bore the same proportion to two milliohs that $555,149 39
did to ,$11,248,389 26 ; and in" this manner the proportional sum was fixed
for all the o.ffices.
'
' •
3. All the certificates, or the numbers repiesenting them, returned by
each office,, were then formed into vis many parcels as there were offices,
and successively put into as many boxes. As many pf them were then
drawn out frpm each.box, by lot, as made up. the proportional amount ascertained as above to belong to each office.. The holder of any one number
or certificate thus drawn out was, by the terms of the notice under which
the contract for the loan >vas entered into,'to be paid off*, not only to the full
amdunt of that particular certificate, but of all other certificates of this same
stock, of which he was the owner.
The doctrine of chances rendering it neariy impossible to dr,aw out in
exact figures the sum wanted in the case of each office, the last drawn certificate or n'umber, in each case, was found to give an excess, in some instances greater, in others less.
4. This excess, the aggregate; of whiph amounted to $162,599 63, was
disposed of thus: The whole'of thp •numbers or, certificates already successively drawn out on account of. all theoffices, were put back again into one



1826.]

SECRETARY OF THE' TREASURY.

^ "383

, box, and a new drawing was had from amongst them all, for exemption, to
the amount ofthe forpgoing aggregate excess, so as to.bring back the result
to the two millions wanted. As the last drawn certificate- or number, in
performing this, operation^ proved tp be a large one, it led^ to the opposite
result, of lowering the amount below the level aimed at, by as much' as
$57,293 58,.
'
•
"
'
'
To absorb this deficit, a further drawing was reported to, frPni the entire
mass of the undrawn numbers, which were put into another box ; and this
operation terminated in reaching the sum required, with only a fractional
excess of $2,306 71. This was deemed-too small to make it necessary to
renew the drawing for exemption, and the whole operation was accordingly
' closed.
The principle of apportionment among the different offices was believed
to be the most proper mode of paying off the sum in question. It was alike
equal to the stpckholders, and tended to produce payments more equal
throughout the different States, than if the drawing had taken place from all
(the certificates representing the whole sum of $11,248,389 26 thrown intoa common mass.
.
. .
,
The drawing of the lottery commenced on the 29th qf September, and
was completed this day. The delay was owing to the Banks of the United
States at Philadelphia and Boston (acting as loan oflices) not having'made
return of the certificates standing on their books in due .time; those from
the fprrher not having been received until the 3d instant, and those from the
latter not until yesterday. It had, otherwise, been intended to cornplete the
drawing of the lottery on the 29th of September, and issue the notice to the
public creditors, to be paid off by its decision, on the last day of the quarter.

•RICHARD^RUSH.
' TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

~ ^




October 12,1826. '

.;

. .. ' .

" /.

384

REPORTS OF T H E
N0..I.

'STATEMENfpfi
•:;.;

;

;
.•-

[1826.

'-fififi^]:

ihe deht ofi the United States, on the 1st ofi October,
^ •1825.- V
•
••: _ ; . - . •

Three per cenf. stock
': • - ; - $13,295,231 45
Sixper cent, stockof 1813(loan of 16 mil,
/ • •/
lions)-^
- - - $12,403,051 66
Six per cent, stock of 1813 (loan of 7^ millions),-•
. - ."
- • 5,452,884, "46
Six per cent, stock of 1814
- 13,096,542 90
Six per cent, stock oY 1815
.9,490,099 10
Five, per cent, stock (subscription to
.,
'
Bank United States) - ' - ' 7,000.000 00 Five per cent: stock of 1820
- , ~999,999 13
•Five per cent, stock of ,1821 ] -.'
. - ' 4,735,296 30
Exchanged fiye per cent, stock of 1822 56,704 77
Funded'4|^ per cent, stock, per act ofthe
24th May, 1824, (Florida loan)
.5,000,000 00 . . \
Funded 4|^ per cent, stock, per act of the
2'6th Mc^y, 1824 • . -. '
- ,5,000,000 00
ExchangPd;4i per cent, stock of 1824 4,454,727 95'
67,689,3.061 27
...-..•••.."-.-.

^ '$.80,985,537 72

, TREASURY DEPARTMENT, .

'

Register's -Office, November 30, 1826.
' -^
. _. .
. JOSEPH ]N[OURSE, Register.




^i826.] ,
'

^
- • «•

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
. •'

'

-'385

^No. 2 .

,

.

.

:

S T A T E M E N T ofi tke debt ofi the Unifed States on the 1st Jamiary,
/
• ;.' ;
.
/
" : 1826. ;
, .
; .
Three per cent, stock •Six per cent, stock of 1813 (loan of 16
^ .millions),
- .
^
Six per cent, stock of 1813 (loan of 7 |
' millions)
... ''Sixper cent, stock of 1814
Six per cent, stock of 1815
Five per cent, stock (subscription to the
Bank of the United States) - "
Five-ppr cent, stock of 1820
Five per cent, stock of 1821
Exchanged 5 per cent, stock of 1822 - -'
Funded 4^ per cenf. stock-, per act of
24th May, 1824 (Florida loan) '
Funded'4^-per cent, stock, per act of 26th
.May, 1824
Exchanged 4 i per cent, stock of 1824 Exchanged4ipereent. stockof 1825 -

*

-

'.

-$13,296,23145

$11,254,197.46 .
-5,062,402 50 ^ ."
13,096,542 90 9,490^099'10 ^
7,000,000
• 999,999
4,735,296
56,704

00
13
30
77

_
' .

5,000,000 00
;5,000,000
4,454,727
1,539,336
~-

00
95
16'
— 67,689,306 27
80,985,537 72

T R E A S U R Y DEPAKTMENT','

.•:/

-

.

Register's Office, November 30,1826.
•. < \ •
m S E P R l^OURSE, Register.

VOL. -H.—23



386

REPORTS OF, T H E
•;.

,

Np.:3..

•, .

;
•

.[1826:
•

-

'

\-

S T A T E M E N T ofi.-the debt ofi the. United States'mi tke 1st Oci&ber,
" ' ' ' ' .
1826, aild on the 1st January, 1827.
Three per cent, stock • _ . . . • .
" ,$13.',296,247 •'^(>
Six per .cent, stock of 1813 (loan of 16 millions)
- $ n ,254,197 46
. - Six per cent, stock of 1814
. '.- 13,096,542 90 ,
Six per cent, stock of 1815
- . . . - ,
.
..
-.9,490,09910
Five per cent, stock (subscription to Bank of United States;) - 7,000,000 00
Five per cent, stock of 1820 -^
999,999 13
Five per cent, stock of 1821 - ^ - " -- '
-• 4.,735",296 30/- ' '"
Exchanged^5per cenX. stock of 1822,. ' - ,. - v ^56,704 77
<•
Funded 4^ per cent, stock, per act of 24th. May, 1824 (Florida
loan) - • - ' - - 5,000,000.00
' . ''
Funded 4§ per cent, stock, per act of 26th May, 1824 - '
- 5,000,000 00
Exchanged 4h per cent, stock,,per; act of 26th May, 1824
- 4,454,727 95
Exchanged 4i per cent; stock of 1825 - ' - .
- '1,',539,3^6 16
'
'• ,
:
62,626,903 77
75,923,151 47
'Amount of the debt of the United States,.per the foregoing, statement No. 1,
^
,
and per statement No. 3, which accompanied the report of the Secretary.of"
theTreasuryof22d December, 1825"
," - 80,985,537'72
Add stock issued in the first quartersof 1826,'viz:
•
,.
.
• Three per cent, stock . ' " ^16 25
,"
Exchanged 4i^,perc^nt. stock of the 3d March, 1825, in lieu
' .
.
of 6 per cent, stocks of 181:^ •
-.
- 1,539,336 IG
^
. \
.
.—: 1,539,352 41
'
• •
. 8S,524,890 K>
5p;(5doct stocks surrendered, and payments on account of the principal of the ,
"-'ikbt, viz;

•-.

,

•

•

Six per cent st6ck surrendered, and for which exchanged
^_
4^ per cent, stock was issued in lieu, under liie act of
-,
the 3d March, 1825, ofthe 16 million loan
-,; ^1,148,854 20
, Six per cent, stock surrendered,'and for W'hich exchanged '
_ ' .
•^4^ per cent, stock was.issued in lieu, under the act of'
'
the3dMarch, 1825, of the'7U^Tillion loan
-.
390,481 9&

.,
' •

1,539,336 16
Payment of the residue of the 7^ million loan on the 1st July,
. 1820 - .
- '
-.
- . - , . ".-

5,062,402 50

6,601,738 m

Amount of the debt, as above, on the 1st'October, 1826 '
r
-75,923,15147
From which deduct the amount proposed lo be paid off on the 1st January, 1827 2,002,306 71
Leaving the amount ofthe debt on the Isf January, 1837
TREASURY DEPARTMENT^

-

-

'

- 73,920,844 1&
'

Register's Office, N'ovemher 30, 1826.
- . .• '
.
' JOSEPH NOURSE,. i2^^2^^er/
Note.—The amount of tlie six per cent, stocks of 1813, exchanged under the act of the 3d
March, 1825, was stated, last year, by estimate, at f 1,585,138 88: the accountsof the commissioners of loans'have since been adjusted, and the true amount ascertained to be ^T,539,336 16j(^jajs'ifliQiety whereof, or S769,668 08,. is redeemable in 1829; the other in 1830.




1826.]

SECRETARY QF T H E TREASURY.

No. 4.

,

^

•387

• ,.. •

E S T I M A T E D A M O U N T ofi Treasurynotes outstanding on the \st
^
ofi October, 1826. :
Total amount issued, as per.No. 4,^of the Inst report
Cancelled and reported on by the First Auditor . Outstanding

-•

-

Consisting of small Treasury notes '
Notes bearing interest
•
•
• ,
TRE^LSURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

'

-

-

-

.;. ••

- $36,680,794 00.
- 36,665,754 00
-

' $15,040 00

| 2 , 2 4 0 00"
12,800 00
——,

^
. $15,040 GO,

_•

'

• '

Register's Office, November 30, 1826.
. J O S E F S B O U R S E , Register.

•

-,

,

. N o . 5.

-^ .•

S T A I E M E N l ' ofi ihe stcdc issued under the act of Congress entitled
^^ An act supplernentary to the act fior the indemnification ofi certairz
claimants of puhlic l a n d s in the Mississippi Territory,^ passed o n t h e
; M 31arch, 1816'. ' '
• .

Amount pf claims awarded, per statement Noi 5, Pf last
report'- ' - '
' -^
" ^- $4,282,151.12|Whereof there was paid iii for lands, per said report
-" $2,447;535 39 Payments at the Treastiry to th'e 30th September,* 1825,
•
pei' said statement
- '
- $1,826,765 56 '
Payments from 1st October, 1825, to 30th
^ "
September, 1826
450 00
—— L827,215 56
Bail ance outstanding on thelst Octobier, 1826 :
•
'
Gohsisting of certificates outstandihg
- 7,355 57
A\^ialrds nPt applied for
-^
44 6di
. . •
' - ~ ^ ~ - — — . . •7,400 1.7^>
' • ,

. • ^

•

••••'

. •-

$4:28-3,151 1 2 ^ •

••TEM'^URY"'nEl^AR^MENT,

.Regist'ej'^s j l ^ c e , N O M




'

"

' '.•'

INDEX
A.
Agriculture, promoted by domestic manufactures, 321, 405, 445.
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles i n foreign
markets in 1818, 4S6.
Appropriations for 1814, gross amount of, 29.
Army expenses from 1st January, 1812, to 30th September, 1815, 15, 29.
in 1816, 74.
1817, 89, 111.
1818, 111, 198.
1819', 145, 198.
1820,: 168, 198.
1821, 200, 2:17; 234,
1822, 218, 239. 264.
1823; 248, 269', 276, 2 9 4
1824, 277; 301, 313, 332.
1825, 314, 339, 354, 372.
1826, 355, 379, 393, 418.
1827, 394, 426, 461, 472.
1828, 466, 473.
B,
Balance in the Treasury, 1st January, 1815, 30,
.1816, 74.
1817, 88,
1818, 111.
1819, 114.
1820, 169.
1821, 199.
1822, 217.
1823, 247,
1824, 276,
1825, 313,
1826; 354.
1827, 393, 472,
1828, 448, 472.
1829, estimated, 448,
Batik capital authorized by law, itt 181445-16-17, 481, 483,. 520.-,
of sixteen banks, in 1813-15-19, 523.
Bank credits, advantages and,,disadvantages of, consideredijy 491,492.
Bank, national,; establishmentr of: a, .recommendedy ^i 1 ,
Bank of England, suspended specie payments,.remarks, on, .491i
excessive issues;of, reduced the- rate, GT inteiest, 503.
F
B a n k + o f U n i t e d . States, .subscription, to the. sfockUof.the; k:90., .
a modification) of the f charter., of?, recommended;, 177.
its beneficial effects on the: fiscal) operations of
Government, : 446.-,
condition iof, the,'on: the':30th ^iSeMenaber, 1819,
481, 514.



528

INDEX.

Bank dividends, in 1817, 117
1838, 110, 155, 198.
1819, .184, 198.
1821, 199, 232.
1822, 237, 260.
1823,^ 292.
1824, 330.
1825, 337, 370.
1826, 416.
1827, 424, 460, 472.
1828, 473.
Banknotes, duty on, cease in 1816, 9.
in circulation in 1819, 482, 483, 518, 523.
Banks benefit the community, under certain restrictions, 487
Banks increased since the termination of the war in 1.815, 493.
should be restrained from excessive issues, and from issuing small
notes, 494.
Banks in the several Stales and Territories, condition.of.the, in 1819, 521.
specie possessed by the, 522.
Bounties and allowances.—See Imports.
C
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, United States subscribe to the stock
of the, 447
Circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Cocoa, a reduction of the duty on, recommended, 325.
Coffee, a reduction of the duty on, recommended, 325.
Coinage of the United States compared with that of other nations, 494.
an.increase and alterations of the. recommended, 495.
Colonial trade, remarks on the, 410.
Commerce, how affected by the tariff of 1824, 280, 319, 397
state of the foreign, in 1828, 442.
how affected by substituting a paper for a metallic currency, 509.
Cotton, exported in 1825-26, 361.
Cotton fabrics^ further protection necessary for the manufacturers of, 149,
325, 400.
Crawford, Mr., report of, on currency, 481.
Currency, report of Mr. Crawford on, 481.
of what it consists, and its condition, 482.
causes of depreciation in the paper, 484.
of metal and paper in circulation in 1813-15-19, 485.
when purely metallic, its effects, 488, 493.
how affected by bank issues, 489.
Treasury notes became a component part of the, in the eastern
States, in 1815-16, 491.
paper circulation may be beneficially connected with metallic,
491,493.
metallic, value of, compared with that of other nations, 494.
the issue of Treasury notes for the improvement of the, considered, 496.



INDEX.

529

Currency, the practicability of adopting a paper for a -metallic, considered,
497, 511.
constitutionality of adopting a paper for a metallic, considered, 504
estimated amount required for Europe, of metallic, 501'.
D.
65.
Debentures, issued in 1,813-14,
1815,
82, 95, 150.
1816,
95, 150.
1817,
116, 150.
1818-19-20, 179, 205.
1821,
225.
1822,
253.
1823,
285.
1824,
327.
1825,
367,
1826,
413.
1827,
451,
Debt—See Public Debt.
Direct taxes increased in 1815, 12.
a.reduction of the, recommended, 36.—See Revenue,
Discriminating duties cease in 1816, 7,
Drawbacks—See Debentures issued.
Duties on domestic manufactures, a repeal of the, proposed, 36.
table of existing, 46.
additional, on imports and tonnage, cease in 1816, 7,
a continuance of the. recommended, 38.
on stamps and refin.ed sugar, cease in 1816, 35.
on other articles, a repeal or reduction of, recommended, 36.
on. imports, an increase of the, proposed for the protection of certain
articles of domestic manufacture, 149, 204, 223, 252, 400.;
on fine cotton fabrics imported, an increase of the, proposed, 325.
on teas, coffee, and cocoa, a diminution of the, proposed, 325.
on imports, remarks on the credit system, in the collection of the,
492.—See Imports; also, Merchandise.
E.
Estimate of receipts and expenditures for 1815-16, 24, 29, 33, 35, 73, 78.
1817,
78, 80, 88.
1818,
93, 110.
1819,
113, 145.
1820,
148, 167,
1821,
170, 199.
1822,
202,218,
1823,
220,247.
1824,
250,277.
1825,
281,314.
1826,
318, 354.
1827,
360, 393.
1828,
396,412.
1829,
449.
Exchange, (foreign and inland,) rale of, in 1813-14-15-16, 484, 524.
Exchange, (foreign) how' affected by the depreciation of paper currency, 48*4.
by substituting a paper for a metallic currency, 509„

VOL. II.—34


530

INDEX.

Expenditures^— See Receipts and expenditures.
Exports for the year ending 30th September, 1822, .220. 222.
1823, 250.
1824, 280.
1825, 318.
1826, 360.
for the years 1822 to 1827, 397
1821 to 1828:, 442.
F
Finances, a review of the. in reference to the late state of war, 5.
state of the, in 1815, 24.
1816, 73.
1817, 88;
1818, 110.
1819, 144.
1820, 167=
1821, 198.
1822, 217,
1823, 247,
1824, 276,
1825, 312.
1826, 353.
1827, 388.
1828, 439.
Flour exported in 1825-6, 361.
Foreign debt'extinguished'in 1810> 20;
H.
Hamilton's reports on finances referred to, 445.
Hemp,- an increase of the duty on, recommended, 400,
I.
Importations into several ports, a comparative statement of the value of, 305,
gross amount of, in 1821 to 1828, 442.
in 1816, increased the rate of exchange, 484.
Imports, statement of the amount of duties accrued on, in 1813-14. 65.
1815, 82,150'.
1815-16, 95, 150.
1817, 116, 150.
1815-16-17-18,150.
1817-18-19, 179.
1818-19-20, 205.
1821, 225.
1822, 253.
1823, 285.
1824, 327,
1825, 367.
1826, 413.
1827, 451.—See
Merchandise imported,
Indemnity by Great Britain fof slaves, &c., amount of, 393.
distribution of the, 394, 418, 425.
Internal duties increased in 1S15; 12.



INDEX.

531

Internal} duties, repeal of some, and reduction of other parts of the, proposed, 36.
repealed 31st December, 1817. 148.—See Revenue.
Internal improvements, surplus revenues may be applied to, 81.
Iron, an increase of the duty on, recommended, 400.
L.
Land claimants (Yazoo) in Mississippi, statements of the awards to, 126,
166, 190, 216, 246, 275, 311, 345, 387. 431, 474.,
Lands—See Public lands.
Laws creating and increasing the revenue, reviewed, 8, 34.
repeal or modification of certain, proposed, 38.
a revision of the, recommended, 445.
Loans, additional, recommended, 75/ 149, 178, 204, 282, 317, 359.
receipts from, in 1812-'13-'14, 15.
in 1815, 26, 30.
terms on which obtained, 26, 53 to 64. 283, 306, 307,
receipts from, in 1816, 74.
1820, 178.
1821,199, 204, 217,
1822, 223.
1823, 283.
1824, 312.
1825, 354, 370—See Revenue.
M:
Manufactures, a repeal of the laws injuriously affecting domestic, proposed, 36.
table of the existing duties on domestic, 46.
a modification of the tariff, proposed for the better protection
of, 149, 204, 223, 252, 325, 397. 400.
promote the interests of agriculture and commerce, 324, 445.
domestic, exported in 3.S24-'25, 319.
1826, 363.
1827, 397
182,1 to. 1828. 442.
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles in
foreign ports in 1818, 486.
Mediterranean fund, discontinued in March, 1815, 6.
Merchandise imported, (the quantity re-exported deducted) in 1814, 66.
1815, 82, 95.
1816, 95.
1817, 116.
1818, 151.
1819, 180.
1820, 206.
1821, 226.
1822, 254.
1823, 286.
1824, 347,
1825, 476.
1826, 433.
1827, 452.



532

INDEX.
N.

National bank, establishment of-a, recommended, 44.
subscription to the stock of the, 76.
National circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Navy expenses, from 1st January, 1812, to 30th September, 1815, 15, 29.
for 1816, 74.
1817, 89, 111.
1818, 111, 198.
1819, 145, 198.
1820, 168, 198.
1821, 200i 217, 234.
1822, 218, 241, 264.
1S23, 248, 270, 276, 295.
1824, 277, 302, 313, 333.
1825, 314, 340, 354. 374.
1826, 354, 381, 393^ 420.
1827, 394, 428/464, 472.
1828, 469, 473.
O.
Officers and soldiers—See Revolutionary

claims.

P.
Passports and clearances—See Merchandise imported ,- also, Imports.
Postage on letters, increased in 1815, 12.—See Revenue.
Public credit, during the late war, state of the, reviewed, 6.
plan for improving the, 38.
suite of, in 1.828, 441.
Public debt, amount paid from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,15,16,30,
amount unpaid on 30th September, 1815,19.
amount paid to 1st January, 1815, 22.
statement of the, from 1st January, 1791, to 1815. 47.
state of the. in 1816, 75, 82, 85, 90, 100.
1817. 90, 100 to 103, 111, 119, 135.
additions made to the, by funding Treasury notes, 104,146,160,
amount of the, on 1st January and 1st October, 1818,112, 120r
146, 160, 164.
in 1819, 147, 161 to 166, 185.
1820, 169, 186, 188, 200, 212.
1821, 201, 213 to 216, 219, 235, 243.
1822, 219, 244, 249, 265, 272.
1823, 249, 271, 273, 278, 296, 308.
1824, 278, 303, 30?, 334, 342.
when it may be redeemed, 283.
amount paid from 1st January, 1817. to 1st January, 1825,''284,
343.




INDEX.

533

Public debt, amount of the, on 1st October, 1825, 315, 341, 344, 375-, 384.
1826, 356,381,385 to 387,421.
1827, 390,429 to 431,465,472,
. 1828, 470, 473.
amount paid from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan., 1829, 440, 472.
amount unpaid on 1st January, 1829, 471.
Public lands sold prior to ihe establishment of land offices, 51.
from the opening of the land offices to 1814, 51.
from 1st October, 1814, to 30th Sept., 1815, 68 to 72,88,
receipts from, in 1816, 73, 88. 110.
sold from 1st Oct., 1816, to 1st Oct.,, 1817, 97 to, 99, 110.
sold in 1817-18,110, 118, 135 to 143.
1818-19, 145, 156 to 159, 191.
1819-20, 167, 191 to 198.
relief to purchasers of, recommended, 175.
sold in 1820-21, 199,<211, 230.
effects of the relief laws on the sale of, 202.
sold in 1823, 236, 247, 258.
1823, 248, 266, 276, 290.
1824, 277/297, 312, 328.
1825, 313, 335, 368.
1826, 376, 392,. 414.
1827, 393, 422, 457.
remarks on the credit system in the sale of, 492.
R.
Receipts and expenditures, from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,16, 29.
from 1791 to 1814, 45, 73.
in 1815-16, 73, 88, 110.
1816-17, 88, 110.
1817-18, 111, 144,
1818-19, 145, 167.
1819_20, 167, 198.
1820-21, 198, 217, 233.
1821-22, 217, 233, 238 to 244, 247,261.
1S22-23, 247, 261,.268, 293.
18^3-24, 276, 293, 300, 330-1.
from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan., 1825, 284.
in 1824-25, 312, 330 to 352, 354,371,476.
1825-26, 353, 371 to 382.
1826-27, 392, 413 to 438, 451, 457, 460,
472.
from 1821 to 1828, 442, 448, 451,, 465, 473.
Revenue, state of the, during the late war, reviewed, 5.
laws passed in 1815 for increasing the, 12.
from what sources derived, and the amount in 1815, 12, 23, 30.
received from all sources, from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,
16, 30.
laws relating to the several branches of, reviewed, 8, 34.

laws, modifications of, proposed, 36, 38, Mo.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ improving the, 38.
plan for
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

534

INDEX.

Revenuej amount of. in 1814-15-16, 73, 88, 96, 110, 144.
1817, 89, 96, 110, 117, 144, 167,
1818, 111, 144, 150, 167, 198.
1819, 145, 155, 167: 184, 198.
an augmentation of the, recommended, 149, 204, 223.
amount of; in 1820, 167, 184, 198, 210.
1821, 199, 217, 226, 232.
1822, 218, 237, 254, 260.
1823,' 247, 266, 276, 286 to 292.
from 1st Jan. 1817, to 1st Jan. 1825, 284.
in 1824, 276, 299, 312, 328, 3.30.
1825, 313, 335 to 337, 354, 368 to 370, 476.
1826, 377, 392, 413 to 416, 432 to 438.
1827, 393, 422 to 424. 448, 451, 457 to 460.
from 1821 to 1828, 442, 448.
how affected by the issue of Treasury notes, 496.—See Merchandise.
Revolutionary claims paid under act of 15th May, 1828. 466.
Rice, amount of, exported in 1825-6. 361.
S.
Salt duty, ceases in 1816, 9, 34.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Silk, observations on the culture and manufacture of, 364.
Sinking fund, operations of the, to 30th September, 1815, 20.
rise and progress of the, 21, 39.
further powers necessary to the, 40, 77, ^
statement of the, in 1816, 83.
stock purchased by the, in 1817, 106 to 109.
1818,124.
1819, 164.
1826, 358, 382.
7 per cent, stock, to be purchased by the. 252.
operations of the, from January, 1818, to January, 1829, 440.
Slaves, <fcc., amount received from Great^ Britain for. 393, 460.
amount'paid, 461, 466, 472, .473.
Specie, effects of the suspension of the payment of, by banks, on the fiscal
.operations of Government, 12, 24, 40, 114.
payment-of, resumed by banks, 114, 490.
amount possessed by banks, and in circulation in 1819, 482.
causes of the suspension of the payment of, by banks, 484, 490.
an article of commerce, 494.
Spirits distilled in the United States, duties on, to be modified, 36,178.
importation of, to be prohibited, 178.
quantity imported.—See Merchandise.
Stamp duties, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Subscription to the Bank of the United States, 90.
Sugarj quantity imported.—See Merchandise.
refined, duties on, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the duties on, recommended, 36.



INDEX.

535

Surplus fund, unexpended balances carried to the, in 1815, 29.
amount applied to the payment of the public debt since
January, 1817, 441.
Surplus revenues may be applied to internal improvements, 81, 252.

Tariff of duties on imports, a modification of the, proposed for the better
protection of domestic manufactures, 149.
a revision of the, recommended, 204, 223, 252.
325, 397,
present compared with former, 304,
of 1828, effect of, on the revenue, 445.
'Taxes, a view of the several descriptions of, in 1815.12.—See Direct taxes.
also. Internal duties.
Teas imported, a reduction of the duties on, recommended, 325, 409, 445.
—See Merchandise.
Tobacco exported in 1824-5-6, 361.
Tonnage, amount of American and foreign, 111 1814, 65.
1815, 82, 95,150.
1816, 95, 150.
1817, 116, 150, 179.
1818, 150, 179. 205,
1819, 179, 205.'
1820, 205.
1821, 225.
1822, 253.
1823, 285.
1824, 352.
1825, 367,
1826, 438.
1827, 456.
1828, 443.
Treasury notes authorized to.be issued! in 1815, 13.
amount received from, in 1812-13-14, 15.
issued prior to February, 1815, and outstanding, IS,
may be funded, 19.
for what purposes issued in 1815, 26.
amount received from, in 1815, 31.
re-issued prior to October, 1815, 52.
estimated amount of, unpaid in 1816, 64.
issued, 92.
funded and outstanding in 1817, 104.
1818, 112, 125.
stock issued on, to 31st December, 1817, 121.
outstanding in December, 1819, 165, 187,
October, 1820, 189.
November, 1821, 215.
October, 1822. 246.
1823, 275.
1824, 310, 345,



536

INDEX.

Treasury notes outstanding in October, 1825, 316.
1826, 387.
1827, 431.
1828, 474.
constituted an essential part of the circulating medium in
the Eastern States in 1815-16, 490.
expediency of issuing^ as a relief from the general • pecuniary distress (in 1820) considered, 496.
W,
Wines, a reduction of the duties on, recommended, 409.—See Merchandise;
Woollen fabrics, further protection necessary for manufacturers of, 149,400.
Y
Yazoo claimants, statement of, awards' in favor of the, 126, 166, 190, 216,
246, 275, 311, 345, 387, 431, 474.





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