View PDF

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

UL

TABLE O F ' C O N T E N T S .
'

Report by; Mr. Dallas on tlie Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr! Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr.'Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
.Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr-Crawford on the Finances ,
lieport by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Crawford on the Finances
Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush^ on the Finances Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances . Report by Mr. Rush on the Finances Eeport by Mr. Crawford on the state of the




•

Page.

December, 1815
5
D.ecember, 1816
73
-^
,r
December, :i817
88
•
November, . 1818
lo
i
- ..
. December, 1819, 144
December, 1820
167
,. - .
December,, 1821
198
.December,. 1822 .217
; December,^ 1823
247
•December, 1824276
-^
313
December, 1825
December, • 1826 ^ 353
- ,
-~
:
December, 1827
. .-< . .
388
December, 1828
->
- . 439
Currency of the United States, in 18*20
481 .

' ^ '^^ w'

8 31

312.

'• REPORTS-OF THE.

[1825."

• .REPOET ON THE'FmANCES,
,; '

.

'

;-'''DE.CEMBER,'l825. , ' ^ • ' ^

In obedience, to the directions of the act supplementary to the act entitled "An act to establish theTreasury Department," passed on the 10th
of May, 1800, the Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit tq
Congress the following report.
I. OF T H E P U B L I C R E V E N U E AND E X P E N D I T U R E

OP T H E Y E A R S

AND 1825.

1824

•

'. .

There being no direct taxes of any kind, duties of excise, or other internal duties, in operation urider the authority of the United States, the public
revenue,,by their existing laws, arises almost entirely from duties upon foreign merchandise imported, and upon ^tonnage, and from the sale of the
public lands. There are other brariches from which small and occasional
receipts, are derived: as dividends on bank stock^, the post office, arrearages
of taxes due under former laws, and other incidental payments ; the aggregate of which, whether from temporary or permanent sources, is inconsiderable, as will appear by statements annexed to this report, where allare recapitulated. The receipts from the .post office, indeed, have of late years
exceeded a million of dollars annually ; but this sum, exhausted foi;the most
part in defraying the expenses of that extensive and useful establishment,
performs in this, nianner the highest purposes of revenue, by contributingto
the intercourse, the trade,, and the prosperity of the country.
'
/
The nett revenue which accrued from duties on imports and tonnage,
during the year 1824, amounted (see statement A) to
$.20,385,430 42
The actual receipts into the Treasury from all .sources, during the yeai^
1824, amounted (including the loan of five millions at 4-J- per cent, interest,
to discharge Florida claims) to "-$24,381,212 79
' ,Viz. .•

Customs (statement A) $17,878,325
Public lands (statement D)
984,418
Dividends on stock in the Bank of the
United States, arrears of internal duties
and direct taxes, and incidental receipts
(statementE)
- ". 472,987
Repayments of advances made in the War Department for services and supplies
^
prior tothe 1st of July, 1816 -.
.45,481
Loan made nnder the act of the 24th of
May, 1824, "to provide for the awards
ofthe commissioners under the treaty
with Spain''
- • 5,000,000.

71
15

04 .
89

00

. '

,.

Making, with the balancein the Treasury on the 1st of .
January,. 1824, of
...
.9,463,922 81
An aggregate of



-

-

-

-

.-$33,845,135 60

1825.]-

^

• SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

313:

The regular and permanent expenditures of the United
States divide themselves into two principal branches—first,
the sums authori zed by law for defraying the whole expen ses
;
'
oftheGovernment, domestic and foreign, civil, mihtary, arid ^
naval; second, those provided for the payment of the interiest , ^
and principal of the public debt.
. '
_
The actual expenditures of the nation, ori all accounts, ' .- '
during the year 1824, amounted (statement F) to
. - $31,898,538 47
Viz.
Civil, diplomatic, and miscellaneojis
- $7,155,308 81 •
•
Military service, including fortifications,
. ^ ,
ordnance, Indian department, revolution'
'
•
ary and military pensions, arming the .
militia, and arrearages prior to the 1st of
' '
January, 1817
- 5,270,254 34
Naval service, including the gradual in-. «
^
crease of the navy
- 2,904.581 56
Public debt
r 16,568/393 76
Leaving a.balance in the Treasury, on the 1st ofJanuary, .
1825, of
-.
- .• - $1,946,597 13
The,difference between this balance and that stated" in the last annual
report from the Treiasury is reconciled by the facts—that the balance, last,
year, was given as an estimated balance, subject to correction by actual
settlement afterwards; and-that it included the moiety of the loan of five
millions, under the act of May, 26, 1824,' which was not paid into the
Treasury until after the 1st of January.
The actual receipts'into the Treasury, during the first three quarters ofthe year 1825, are estimated tO'have amounted to
- $21,681,444 56
Viz.

•

•

•

'

Customs
:
-$15,196,397
Publiciands, (statemerit G)^^ - .
976,902
Dividends on stock in the Eank of the
UnitedStates
-.
- . 367,500
Arrears of internal duties and direct taxes, /
•
and incidental receipts, (statement H) - . 98,886
Repayments of advances made in the War
•
Department, for services or supplies
priorto 1st of July, 1816
- .
41,758
Loan under the act of May 26,1824
5,000,000

00
67
'

'

.

00"
•
29
60
00

- ',
• '
:'
.: ;

And the actual receipts into the Treasury, during the fourth
quarter ofthe year, are estimated at
-

5,100,000 00

Making the total estimated receipts into the Treasury,
duringtheyear 1825 ;v
*. 26,781,444 56
And, with the balance in the Treasury on the 31st December, 1824, of , - •
- .
- .
- '
- . 1,946,59.7 13
An aggregate o r -




-

/

-

-

v-

.

28,728,041 W

314-

.^

REPORTS .OF T H E •

[1825.

The.^ expenditures, during the first three
'
. quarters of the year 1825, are estimated
to have amounted (statement I) to
$20,190,979 91
Viz.

•

/ ^

.

•

/

Civil, diplomatic, and mis- cellaneous
- $2,098,525
Jililitary service, including \ .'
fortifications, ordnance, ^
'
Indian department, revo.lutionary and military
,,
pensions, arming the mi- ^ ^ . '
litia, and arrearas^es prior
tothe 1st January, 1817 4,890,310
Naval service, including '^
the gradual increase of
.
the navy
- 2,127,156
Public debt ^
,11,074,987

Viz.

;

Civil, diplomatic, arid miscellaneous
-Military service, including
fortifications, ordnar^ce,
. Indian department, revolutionary and military
^ pensions, arming the,militia, and arrefarages prior
to the 1st January, 1817
Naval service, including
the gradual increase of
the navy
- .
Publicdebt
-

-

•

•

• ^
.

•

16

'

V

, ,

.,.

;.

•

.- .
.
•
59

,

37
79

And the .expenditures, during the fourth
quarter, are estimated at
• . , . • •

.- •

/

3,253,000 00

.V

'
. , .
$445,000 00
;
-

^
^

'

,

^-

"
960,000 00 v
820,000 00
1,028,000 G
O

Making the total estimated.expenditure of the year 1825 $23,443,979 91
And leaving in the Treasury, on the 1st of Jariuary, 1826,
an. estimated balance, of
-•
,. - $5,284,061 78
Should tlie expectations formed respecting the receipts in the fourtli
quarter be r^al ized, the amount ofreceipts for'the whole year will have,
exceeded the estimate presented by the Treasury at the last session of
Congress, by about $500,000.'^
" '
-.
It is to be remarked tfiat/of the above estimated balance of $5,284,061 78,
the sum of $3,500,000 is not subject to appropriation, being the estimated
amount that will remain, on the 31st of December next, unsatisfied, of appropriations heretofore made. These appropriations, being necessary for the
objects for which they were severally made, are still an existing charge
upon the means of the Treasury. Ofthe residuary balance of $1,784,061 '78,
it is proper distinctly to state that about o"^ne million cannot be counted upon
in any estimate of effective funds for the public service. It is made up of



• 1825.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

315

debts due from various banks, whose notes were received by the Government
during the suspension of specie payments, br which were heretofore used as
banks of deposite; debts of which the recovery must, in regard to a large
part, be doubtful, and in any case slow. It may be proper to add, that the
permanent deposites, generally made ih the State banks,'have recently been
withdrawn, or put in train tobe so; the pubhc exigencies which rendered it
necessary to make them, in common with those on which the losses above
mentioned are likely to occur, no longer existing. Such portioiispf the deposites as may still remain in any of these institutions will be further withdrawn, as circumstances may rerider just and expedient, until these operations are closed ; nor will they be renewed where it niay be avoidable.
It may be proper, also, to state that directions have lately been issued to
all the receivers and collectors ofthe public revenue not to receive, in any
payments made to them, bank notes of any of the State banks, of less amount
than five dollars. In discountenancing a species of paper circulation deemed to be objectionable, reference was had to the authority and exaniple of
Congress upon this point, as seen in the prohibition to the Bank of the
United States, and to the bariks, existing in the District of Columbia, against
issuing notes of a lower denoinination. To guard againstall inconvenience
to individuals fromthe adoption of this measure by the Treasury, especially
in the districts where the public lands are sold, an adequate* previous notice
was directed to precede its-enforcenierit.
,
,
II.

OF T H E P U B L I C

DEBT.

The total amount of fundeddebt due-on the' 1st of Oc- : \
tober, 1825, (statement No. 3,) was'
^
-.$80,985,537 72.
Of the above amount, the only portion remaining unpaid : / .
of the revolutionary debt, is the three per cents., aniounting •'• ..
to $13,296,231 45. This sum and the subscription of seven
millions in the Bank'of United States, at five per cent (the .
' ^
United States holding an equal amourit in the shares of that
institution) are redeemable at the pleasure of the Government ; making together . - $20,296,231 45
The residue of the public debt, contracted subsequently to the 1st of
January, 1812, and amounting to $60,689,306 27-, exists in the following
portions, and is redeemable at the following periods, viz:
In 1826, being the residue unpaid of loans made in 1813 $16,270,797 24
In 1827, being the residue unpaid of loans made in 1814 13,096,542 90
, In 1828, being the residue unpaid of loans made iri 1815 9,490,099 10
The stock ofthe foregoing portions of the debt, is all at
'6 per cerit.
'
In 1829: stock at 4i- per cent, being the moiety of 6 per
'
cent, stock of 1813, exchanged under the act of Congress
of March 3d, 1825 ' 792,569 44
In 1830, stock "^at A^ per cent., being the other moiety
exchanged as last above stated - . 792,569 44'
In 1831, stock at 5 per cent. This is one-third of the
"
sum of $56,704 77, issued in exchange for the 6 per cents
^ ,
of 1813, 1814, and 1815, subscribed under the act of the
20th of April, 1822
- / - •
. - ' ' 18,901 59
In 1832, stock at 5 per cent, being one other third part
of the sum subscribed, as last above stated
. 18,901 59



316,

REPORTS OF T H E

[18.25.

In 1832, stock at 4|^ per cent.j borrowed of the Bank of
the United States, o'ne half to pay the Flbrida claims, the
other half to pay off the 6 per cents of 1812. under the act
of Congress, of May 26, 1824
- •
- '
. $10,000,-000 00
In 1832, stock at 5 per cent., under the act of Congress
of May 15,^820
- .
. . . 999,999 13
In 1833, stock at 5 per cent, being, the remaining third
subscribedunder the act of April 20, 1822 '
18,90159
In 1833, stock at 4|- per cent., being one moiety of the .
amount subscribed in exchange for 6^ per cent, stock of
1813, under the act of May 26, 1824 • • - // 2,227,363 97
In 1834, stock at 4J per: cent, being the other moiety
- .
subscribed as last abo.ve stated 2,227,363 98
.'In 1835, stock at 5 per cent, being the amount issued
under-the act of Congress of March~"3d, 1821 - - . 4,735,296 30
' Total redeemable at the periods specified
- 60,689,306 27
^ Total redeemable at the pleasure ofthe Government - 20,296 231 45
"Total amount of funded debt on the 1st day of October,
1825-. - •
-/
-• .
../
-

80,985,537 72

The amount of Treasury notes outstanding on the 1st ""of October, 1825,
is estiinated'(No. 4): at $16,600.
•'
V;'
And the amount of Mississippi stock unreHeemed'on that day, including awards not applied for,.(No.-5,) at $7,850 17.
The foregoing recapitulation exhibits the precise amount of the public
debt riow'dLie,,as well as the different periods at which, by the terms of the
several loans under whicH it was ^contracted, the United States are at liberty
to pay it off. Of the sum of $11,074,987 79, mentioned, under the head of
expenditures for 1825, as having been paid off in that year, $7,727,052 19
were on account of principal of the debt, and the remainder on account of.
iriterqst during the first three quarters of the year. Nearly the whole of the
principal thus paid was outstanding at an interest of 6 per cent Looking
to the above recapitulation, it appears that^ in the years 1826 and 1827, a
larger amountof debt becomes redeemable than it will fall within the ordinary
surplus meansof the'Government to payin. the course of those, years, viz: a
sum exceeding sixteen milhons iri the former, and thirteen milhons in
,the latter year. Both these portions ofthe debt are also at an interest of six
per cent. In 1828, the amount redeemable is at appoint which it may be
hoped the stated means bf the Treasury for that year will reach ; the ability
to pay off increasing as the process of reduction advances, both by the increasing means of,the riation and rthe annual liberation of interest on the
amount of debt reduced. But in the year 1829 only a very small amount
becomes redeemable, viz: less thari orie millibn, and in the year 1830 a sum
nolarger. •
> .
,/ • '
,
.
.At'the period of thelast annual report from the Treasury, no portion of
the debt became redeemable iri either of those years; and with a" view to a
more equal diffusion of payments, as well as to effect a saving in interest, it
was recommended that the excess of debt, which could not by the ordinary
resources of the Treasury be discharged in-1826 and 1827, (the debt redeemable in the former year then-standing at $19j000,000,) should be^
thrown in-equal portions.upon theyears 1^29 and 1830. To carry this



1825.]

.

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY..

317

recommendation into effect, so far as applied to the year 1826, a loan of
twelve millions was recommen ded,-at 5 per cent.; one half to be redeemable
in 1829, the other half in 1830 ;. the entire twelve millions- being intended
to constitute a fund with which, in conjunction wifh the arinual surplus
mean? of the Treasury, to pay off the nineteen millions redeemable in 1826.
The prin'ciple ofthe recommendation was adopted by Congress, but not.its
precise terms. An act was passed on the 3d of March,-1825, authorizing an
exchange of stock to the amount of twelve milhons-of dollars, at four and a"
half per cent, for a stock of hke amount at six per cent.; the latter being so
much of the stock of 1813 as was intended by the act to be redeemed. The
act also authorized a loan tothe same amount, and at thesame rate of interest, to accomplish'the same obje.ct; both modes not to be pursuedi, if either
succeeded. The new stock of four and a half per cent., whether proceeding,
from the exchange or the loan, was, by the terms of the act, to be subject
to' redemption in 1829 and 1830, in equal portioris. The proper measures
were taken tb execute this act, but have prevailed only to a limited extent . The operation of exchange, which was first resorted to, took effect to
the amount of $1,585,138 88; and.this sum, divided into equal parts, forms
the two sums that now stand in the general table of the debt as redeemable
in. the years 1829 and 1830, whilst they have also served to diminish, by so
much, the six per cent stock of .1813. . Prbposals for a loan for: the residue
of the sum wanted were next issued; but no offers were received.
The causes ofthe failure, it may be presumed, were the low rate of interest and short periods of redemption held out by the act, iri conjunction
with an activity in the commercial and manufacturing operations of the
country, affording higher induceriients to the investment of capital.. This
niode of dealing with the debt, whereby, through the instrumentality of new
loans, stock at a high interest is converted into stock at a reduced interest,
and whereby, also, the extinguishment of the principal is made to .fall in
payments as nearly equal as may be throiighout a given number bf years,.
is 'evidently advantageous to the public; since it not only lessens the national
expenditure,^ on account of its interest, but guards against the possible accumulation of money in the Treasury, in years, when it might remain inactive,
towards the progressive reduction of the debt. As it is a mode fully sanc^
tioned by Congress heretofore, it is respectfully recommended, on this occasion, that an act be passed, at an early day of the session, giving authority
to borrow nine milhons-of dollars, at an interest not exceeding 5 per cent,
redeemable in equal portions in 1829 and 1830, in order that the Treasury
. may be eriabled: to pay off, in 1826, the entire remaining amount of the 6 per
cent, stock of 1813 redeemable in that year. ' Nine million, with the disposable means which the Treasury will probably have at comrriand in 1826,
it is believed, will form a sum commensurate with this object Fiveper
cent: is named as the maximum of interest; and, considering the.short^periods
of redemption, it is not probable that the loan could be obtained'at a lower
rate. The contingencies of the money market might, indeed, produce more
favorable offers; but these are not to be counted upon, with any approach ta
that"certainty which'should form the basis of such a financial operation.
Shojild the act in question be passed, it is fur^ther respectfully recommended that, in the event of the loan being obtained under it, authbrity be given to
issue to the holders of the stock under the 3d of March last, exchanged stock
equal to the amount of the subscription before stated, viz: $1,585,138 88,
bearing the same rate of interest as that which may be issued under the act



•318 . ^ ^

REPORTS OF T H E

[1825-.

proposed. , The twp acts will have had precisely, the same object. The second, should it succeed, will pnly have consummated an operation wbich
will date its inception from the first. If is therefore considered that it
wih belong to a proper estimate of good faith to place the stockholders
under both acts iipon a footing of equality. Those who. were willing to accede to the terms of the Government at an early day in this transaction,
should not be left in a worse, situation than those who may have held back
in the hope of better offers. Let all be treated alike. It is thus that the
Government wih exalt itself before the nation. It is thus that, substituting
an expanded justice for the mere letter of^a bargain, it will be likely to invite still larger confidence in future. It is thus that it will 'ultimately be
the gainer, by that connexion invariably subsisting, bet ween the permanent
interest of every Government, and its standing of unimpeachable and spontaneous equity in the eyes ofthe public creditor.
Should an actfor the loan of nine millions be passed,a considerable surplus ofdebt, at.6 per cent, will still remain to be provided for, for the service of 1827; morethan thirteen millions of the stock of 1814 becoming
redeemable in 1827, the whole cannot be redeemed iri that year, but with
the aid of a loan. A loan of six niillions would be sufficient, in all probabilityi for this.purpose, and is, accordingly, recommended; the interest not
to exceedfive per cent., and the amount to be also subject to redemption in
1829 and 1830, in equal portions. The effect of the two loans recommended, which it would be most desirable to authorize in distinct act^, would, it
is believed, be to enable the Government to redeem the whole of the sixper -cent stock of 1813 and 1814, in the course of 1826 and 1827. It would
also throw upon each of the years 1829 and 1830 an amountof debt equal
to about eight miUions and a.half, instead of less than one million, according
.to the'distribution as at present" existing. T h e only ^remaining stock of six
per cent would then be that of 1815, in amount under nine millions, and
a half, redeemable in 1828. Should no unforeseen expenditur.es.arise, and a
proper economy be kept up in the public adniinistration, it may reasonably
be hoped; as before intimated, that the surplus revenue at thedisposal of the
Treasury, in 1828, will be equal to the reimbursement of that surii. After
1830, the whole amount of debt, on the results herein assurned, ^vollld stand.
-at about forty millions ; full one-half of whicli will be redeemable at the
pleasure of the Government.^ No portion of it will be at an interest exceeding five, per cent, whilst the principal part will be at a rate stih lower.
With these views of thepublic debt, so enbouraging in their bearing upon
•its speedy, certain, and regular extinguishment, it is not deemed necessary
to recommend, at present,, any other measures in relation to it than the two
loans described.
'
, ,
I I I . OF T H E ESTIMATE OF THE PUBLIC RJEVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR

1826.
The public revenue is derived in an amount so preponderating from foreign cbrifimerce, that the state ofthe latter is always to be chiefly looked to,
iri every prospective view ofthe national income. As the internal busiriess
ofthe country has worn a character of activity and increase during the present year, so has also its foreign trade, by that close cbnnexion which subsists between them: The exports for the year ending on the 30th Septem'ber last have exceeded ninety-two mihions of dollars. The iinports have
exceeded ninety-one milhons. Of the exports, upwards of sixty-six millions
were of domestic, and the remainder of foreign productions.
Of the imports, upwards bf eighty-six millions were in American vessels •



-1825.] /,

SECRETARY O F ' : T H E TREASURY.;-

-

..^19.

of the exports,, upwards: of eighty-one millions. Considering that the vessels of those fbreign nations .with^whieh the Uriited States have the most '
extensive commercialiritercourse are now placed upon a footing of equality^
as to duties arid charges-of whatever kind, in our ports, with the vessels of
the United States, this heavy excess of American tonnage is asignai proof
of the flourishing state of oiir navigation, > It may serve to show how the
efficient protection extended to it by the early laws of Congress succeeded
in estabhshing it in a marnner to meet and overcome ah competition. Be<fore the era of those Jaws, it Is l^nown how this great interest languished;
how little able it proved,, before the arixihary hand of Government was
stretched out, to support itself ^against the established superiority and overwhelming corapetition which it had tp face in the woil^
;
The foregoirig arnount ofexports exceeds, by about seventeen millions of
dollars, the average amourit for the three years preceding. The imports
exceed, by about eleven millions, the same,ayerage. Whilst this large' ex^cess of exports, during the pastyear; arises chiefly from the produce bf the
soil, it is satisfactory to know that domestic manufactures have lent their':
•contribution.. Of the latter, there have been expprteds to the value of between .five and six millions of dollars. This is -an excess of eight hundred
thousand dbllars over those exported in 1824, and of iriore than two mil: lions' of doll ars over: those exported in 1823. The :progressive increase in
thisbranch of industry is naturally ascribable to the new4ariff. , ,. The effects of the tariff lipori the cburse of ourforeigri trade, in other,re-^
spects, havOj as yet, been but very partially disclosed. More time must ,
elapse before^such a body of; successive facts can be presented under it, as.
-may lay a foundation for confident conclusions. T h s law itself,/by the
terms bf itseimctment, has not yet come into full operation in all its parts;
and the returns in possession of the Treasury are riot yet-complete, even
for'the short period during which its principai provisions have had any efficacy. t)ne thing seems apparent: that its eftect, up to the present period,,
has. not been to diminish the general aggregate of the foreign trade of the
country. In estima,ting the value ofthe importations for the last yeai/it is
probable'tbat even an increase will be found to have taken place in some articles on which the duties were raised ; as in fabrics of cotton, and in several articles composed of irori : whilst in other articles of this last material,
^as well as in some articles composed of wool, a decrease will be observable. But a fact challenges notice, that can scarcely have been without its
ojperation upori our importations during the commercial year just closed : I t is the extensive changes that were announced in Ma:rch last, iri the tariff of
Great Britain. The trade of that country exerts such an influence upon the'
trade of other cbuntries/ that any important alterations in the former must
ailways be likely to affect,Jo a greater or less exterit, the markets of Europe
arid of the commercial world. T h e larger admission into England, whicli
the. above changes authorized, of the commodities of otHer couritries, heretofore positively or virtually excluded for ages from her ports, must have affected the prices of a portion at least of those coriiriibdities, by the prospect
of a new vent thus suddenly opened to them. This is known to have beeri
the case in regard to sorne commodities!, the duties upon which were lowered by the British tariffr-which commodities are also amongst those imported from Europe into the United Stated. It is presumable that it may have
been the casie in regard to others less distinctly kriown. Hence the addi- ^
tional value of foreign merchandise impjorted into the United .States during^
the past year cannot, in all cases, be takeh as the true measure of an addi-.
tional quantity; the laws of the tlnited States requiring the value of for-




•••320„/ ,

.- ^..•.•V - REPORTS .•0FTHia/-,,v^^^^^^^^^^^

, • ..[1825.

eign articles to be fixed at the port of exportation, M d at t h | ^ t i ^
portation. These^ changes in the British la\vs pf trade,;;oper:atingsimulta-^
neously with the new tariff at its'comriien#ment,inerease;,^he difficulty^of
^ ascertaining, at this juncture, the exact effects of Ihe.latter^^
a single .
year,.upon the courseof the foreign trade of the Uriited States. . •;• '
I The importations for the year being so large, arid the provisioiis/of the
new tariff.mainly attaching to them, a corresponding amount of revenue
will arise from this source during the year. Accordingly, the gross amount
of duties accruing upon imports and tonnage, from the 1st of January to
the 30th of September last, is estimated at twenty-five million five hun-.
dred thousand dollars. The gross amount that will probably acprue for
the whole'year, is estimated at thirty-one millions. :Shpiild t^his amount,^
prove to be correct, it will exceed, by six millions of dollars, the ariiount
which has accrued during any one year since the excessive importations
that immediately followed the war, viz : those of 1815 andl816.
In estimating the clear revenue that may be expected., tb arise from the
duties of the year, the amount of them to be drawn back on exportations of,
a portion of the articles on which they have accrued, the losses that may
happen, arid the expenses of collection, are all to be taken into consideration.
The duties secured by bond during'pne^year, are chiefly payable in the year
that -follows. A portipn is payable in the same year ; but .this is generally
counterbalanced by the portion that also becornes payable in the next year,
on the importations of that year. It will be more than counterrialanccd if .
the importations prove.greater, and will>not be met if they prove less. ^Debenture certificates for Vpaymerit of drawback being demandable at any
tirne within a year after the importation of the articles intended to- be exported, the rimnber and amourit of theiii chargeable upon^he accruing duties of the year carinever be;.aceurately foreknown.
^ :' . ;
The debentures issued during the first three quarters of the present year
amounted to $4,489,710 29.. . Thisls^more, by $1,537,710'^99,-than- those .
issued during the corresponding period of the preceding year. The iimount
of those outstandirig on the 30th of September last, and chargeable upon the
revenue of 1826, was ,$1,858,315:64;: which 'is -m^ore," by $854,313 .64, .than
was chargeable on the same day in 1824.upon therevenue of 1825,, .
Theamountof duty borids iri suit o n t h e 30th of September last was
$2^987,347 32^which is $92,791 98 more than was iii suit on the same
day ill the year preceding.
.
' .
Deducing from the ioregoing statemen ts, the conclusipns arid prbbabili"
ties^Uhat may at present seem warrgintable, the receipts for 1826 are estimated as follows, viz:
. V
/
Fromcustoms
.
.
.
. $24,000,000 00 .
publiciands
- : -^
1,O0O,MO 00 ,
bank dividends' :^^
-:
« / 38^,000 00
iriiseellaiieous and incidental receipts
- / '115,0:0.0 00
; . / - • - ;Makirig. an aggregateof " ' ' - / ' . • / ^
:/•.; $253500^000 0 6 /
The :experiditures of the year are estiniated as follbws:
, ^
Civil, miscellaneoris, and diplomatic
- $2,032,454 ,66 . - ;
/
/ Military seryiicejincludingte
/
/
/
<ordn4rice, Indiari department, revolutiori-; ,
'
' „
•
ary and military pensions,: arming jthe \
- •
militia, and arrearages prior to the 1st bf
/ - r
:
•Jaiiuary5:iSir;. .: :-v.i» ,:-..• /-•••'•: ••^-. ^505fim:-^S , J.'^, V ^ ^ ./-'•., .•:




1825.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

-321

Naval service, iricludinggradual increase $3,026,612 81- .
Publicdebt - - --r 10,000,000 0 0 .
Making together
- '
- '^ . / .. -^ - $20,584:730 02
Which will leave in the Treasury on the 31st of December, 1826, after satisfying all the demands of that year, a
snrplus estimated at
» •. -^
• - ,
-^ $4,915,26,9' 98
If the remark be entitled to any attention, that the recent alteratiPns in the
British laws of trade have affected the iniportations into the United States •
during the existing year, by increasing their ad valorem arnount, it ought
not to create surpriseif thevalue of importations in 1826 should fall below
that of 1825; because, admitting that these laws served, on their first promulgation, to enhance the price of certain enumerated commodities in th.e markets of Europe, it is nbf probable,that this, effect af them will be either extensive or perrnanent. One of Iheir main provisions is known to consist in
a reduction ofthe duties upon a list of articles manufactured in the different
countries bf Europe, as well as in Britain. But the most impprtant article.s
of this list were already so thoroughly established in the manufactories of
Britain, as to be beyond the reach of. competition froni abroad. Hence the
privilege of introducing them there, and especially to any large, extent,
(meaning for consumption in Britain, without here alluding to her warehousing system,-) must prove, in the end, to be nominal rather than real.
Among the list are seen fabrics of woollen, of cotton, of linen, - of hardware; and the new scale of duties is to have added, to them, in every case,
the amount of any internal excise duty previously existing, or -which may
at any time afterwards be imposed upon the same articles, when manufactured in England. The forecast of thatcountry, in all that relates to the in- ,
terests pf her manufactures, justifies the belief that she will not fail to conciliate the continued protection of them, with whatever other abrogations
she may engraft upon her commercial code, either in relation to the other"
nations of the world,.or toiler own deperidencies in whatever part of it.
It has been seen how largely the exportatiorr of our own rriaiiufactures,
during the past year, has exceeded the .exportations ofthe twp years preceding, It may be added, that in no previous year since the foundation of the
Government has the. exportation of American manufactures reached an
amount at all approaching to that of 1825.- This is knowri from official
dpcuments as far back as 1803, and no doubt can be entertained of.its being
true for the remainder of the period. This fact, in conjunction with the
iriereasing consumption of these manufactures at home, and not less of their
improving quahty, gives gratifying assurance.of the progress of this most
important branch of the. national industry. It may be considered as marking '
the commencement of an epoch in thenational resources, since an intimate
connexion is believed to, exist between the full encouragement and success
of domestic manufactures, and the wealth, the power, and the happiness of
the country. The United States would, it is thought, overlook .what is due
to the essential iiiterests of their agriculture, which can never reach the full
point of prosperity but unde.r the constant and various, demand of the home
market; of their foreign cornmerce, which can never expand to its full limit
of activity, or reap its full measure of riches, but with the aids of an active
home trade, and of an export trade enhanced in its value by being diversified
in its pbjects; ofthe exuberance of their spil. yieldirig the best materials for
so many of the fabrics which conduce'to the wants, the comforts, and the
refinements ofthe social state; of the industrv, the enterprise, the frugality,
VOL.
II.—21


,322'

REPORTS)OF T H E '

'

,[1825.

of their people;-of the unrivalled equality of their laws, which, interdicting
exclusive rights and monopolies, invites the most energetic exerdons of every
individual in the field of competition; and, finally, of the advantages flowing
from the absence of pecuniary exactions by the hand of Government upon
the internal products and labor of the country—if they db not vigorously
uphold the manufactures of the country, now for the first time appearing to
be upon the eve of striking root. It is. a commencement that deserves every
seasonable improvement. The territorial size and fertility of a cpuntry '
depend upon nature'or upon accident. .Both the one and the other may
exist upon the largest scale ; but in vain,'if a provident Government do not
second these gifts; whilst nations destitute of them, and struggling against
positive obstacles of nature, are seen to arrive, through the wisdom.of their
policy, atthe heights of prosperity and renown. To give perfection to.the
industry of a country rich in the gifts of nature, and blessed iri the beneficence of its Government; to draw out itsobvious resources, and seek'cqnstanfly for new ones, ever ready to unfold themselves to diligentinquir}?-urged on
by adequate motives; toaugment the number and variety of occupations for its
inhabitants; to hold out to every degree of lahor, and to every modific'atiori
of skill, its appropriate object and inducement: these rank amongst the highest ends'of legislation. To organize the whole labor of a icouritry; to entice
into the widest ranges its rnechanical and.intellectualcapabihties, instead of
suffering them to slumber; to call forth,\vherever hidden,, latent-ingenuity,
giving tp effort activity, and to emulation ardor.; to create em.plo3niient for
the greatestamoLint of numbers, by-adapting it to the diversified faculties, prPpensities, and situa-tions of men, so that.every particle of ability, every shadb
of genius,'may come into requisition, is, in pther words, to lift up the condition of a country,- to increase its fiscal energy,, to multiply the means and
sources of its opulence, to imbue it with the elements of general as well as.
lasting strength and prosperity. It is in the destiny of nations^ that-the
highest.points of advancement are not to be arrived at, but through the complicated yet harmonious action of these elements. That extensive and flourishing manufactures, with the' frain of useful arts allied'to them, tend to
propel nations in this onward course, is a maxim believed to be enforced by
the best lights of experience, and to be of peculiar application to the United
States, urider the present circumstances of their interior and external condition. By aflourishing state of manufactures, we shall see rising upa new class
of capitalists, rivalling in the extent and usefulness oTtheir operations, and in
the amount of their gains, the wealthiest of our merchants; spreading, too,
by the education and habits for whichtheir pursuits when largely conducted.
make acall, useful knowledge and science, whei'ever these pursuits concentre.
By a flourishing stateof manufactures, we shall see the gains of the merchant
augmented, even in his trade of imports; since, forevery foreign fabric ex- .
eluded from consumption by the ultimate use'of the rival fabric at home,
other fabrics will find their way to us; consumption having rio limits but the
a'bility to buy, and this ability invariably increa'sing as home manufactures
assume variety and attain perfection. It is then that they create and diffuse
wealth,,by Avhat is the only true foundation of it in a nation—the universal,
subdivided, and'successful industry of the people. It is then that,they make
a call for an abundant circulating medium, by quickening the operations of
purchase and sale. It is then that they attract the precious meta:ls to a country, and, beyond any other power of retention, keep them there. By nunierous manufactures, we shah see agricuhure, th(3 first pillar, in the State,
stand firm; for when they shall have raised up new capitalists, who so sure
to maintain profitable dealing with them as the owner of the soil ? For the



1823.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

323;

ta-easures that cover its surface, and that lie beneath it, he is then sure to
find a market, both regnhvr and growing, whatever the political .or mercantile vicissitudes at a distance; and as sure to buy at cheap rates the fabrics
that he wants—cheapness being the riecessary consequence of full competition among a powerful class of artisans at home. By numerous manufac-,
tures, in fine, we shall see reared up in the State that additional pillar, which.
standing in the middle, is indispensable to the stability ofthe other two; for
the State must be in a false position, lying'perpetually at the mercy of extrinsic events, when reposing only upbn foreigri commerce and agriculture.
The great intermediate interest, strengthening and upholding both the
others, is manufactures. When to the coriipleteestablishmeint of these the internal improvement ofthe country shall have been superadded, the farmer
of the United States cannot but perceive that the riieasure of his prosperity is
made potentially full. Discouraging distances between himself and his customers exist no longer. Through the wisdom of art, the obstacles of nature
disappear. He sees combined with the advantages ofa country of almost
boundless',extent and capacity of production, the facilities of quick intercpui'se, which compensate to small countries the want of these advantages.
He sees time anticipated I n the effective augmentation of our numbers:.for,
as-with machinery in manufactures, so with canals and good highways;
they change the relative weakness of a thin-and^scattered, intb the activity
and power of a condensed population ; thereby exemplifying the highest wisdom of legislation—the noblest works of government—guided by the intelligence and stimulated by the energy of freedom.. .
'
,
': In giving these opinions in favor of domestic manufactures, it is known
that other opinions exist.on this subject, claiming the support oif.distinguished names, both at home and abroad. For these opinions, as they have from
time to time been witnessed in the discussions of the legislative hall at
home, the utmost deference is felt. . Nevertheless, it is deemed proper -to
communicate \vith candor those contained/in this report, deliberately weigh-,
ed as they\hav,e been, and uttered, as they also are, under the obligations of
official duty. Inthe submission of plans for the improvement ofthe public
revenue, none occur more likely to prove salutary than those that"look to
the fostering of manufactures; under the truth, that in the multiphed productions of nature and art in a country, the result of industry and skitl every
where diffused,, he the best and only foundations of finance. When the
people ofa country are universally and profitably employed, the aggregate ^
of, indiyidual becomes the surest nieasure ofnational prosperity; and revenue for the public occasions will always be at hand, under whatever forms
the Goverriment may deeni it most expedient and least burdensome to call
it forth. The facts of the world are^on the side of these opinions; it being
incontestable that nations; which have reached the most imposing heights
of physical and intellectual power, are those in which manufactures have
been the most numerous, and arrived at the greatest perfection. It is more
applicable to add, that this perfection^ amongst the nations where it has been.
most conspicuous, has been achieved through the most comprehensive and
rigorous protection afforded to this kind of industry—a protection persevered in throughout ages, and never given up whilst its objects remained
.unaccomphshed. The speculative economists of Europe are in opposition
to the experience that surrounds them, and riot less frequently to each other
and tb themselves, when they would hold up to any.one nation the asserted
benefit of an. opposite system. " France," says one: of her most celebrated
writers of this class, (but who knows how to reconcile the enlightened ideas
of free trade with those first daties that every nation owes to itself,) "is



324

REPORTS OF THE.

•

[1825-»

probably indebted for the beauty of her silk and woollen manufactures ta
the wise encouragement of that administration which advanced to the manufacturers two thpusand francs' for every loom at work." The same writer,
(Say,) whilst describing the condition of some of the provinces, of that
country, and-which, as he says, \vanted nothing but towns to bring them
into high cultivation^, adds, that '-hopeless, indeed, would be their'situation,
were France to adopt the system which recommends the purchase of manufactures froni foreign couritries, with the raw produce bf domestic agriculture." France still adheres, in the midst of her riches and power, to the
practice on which these sentiments are founded. Nor is the example of
Britain, up to this very moment, less absolute br less instructive. - Theprohibitions, the bounties,-the high duties, the penalties, (by force of which,
throughout along tract of time; the manufactures of that couri'try have
gained so much excellence,) never iixanywise abated, until, by the recent
avowals of her statesmen, high in intelligence, as authority, British fabrics
were not rrierely certaimto continue the supply—immense as it is known to.
be—-of the home demand, but to firid their way, in a proportion far greater
.than those from any other country, into all the markets ofthe world. T h e
Uriited States, with a combination bf natural and political advantages, as
transcendent iri number as degree, have'before them these and other examples; the lights Pf'cb-existent nations; the amplest demonstrations, of experience for,building up their manufactures; and, by that vigilant legislative '
-assistance, without which they have never been known in any country to
establish themselves in large or durable pre-eminehce. Nbr has this policy,
been found.to interfere v/ith an abundant foreign commerce.in the wealthiest
and most industrious nations. It has, onthe contrary, carried its bounds:
still further; since every nation, by its habits arid position, will;always cbmniand superior fkcihties for excelling in certain branches of labor and art,
which it therefore chiefly cherishes; leaving to other riations the opportunity of excelling in other branches, or of'running the career of beneficial
rivalry in the same; by which system the artificial productions ofthe world •
are augmented and improved, and the fields of traffic, through the increasing desires and varying tastes, of mankind, as opulence and civilization
make new advances, more and more pxtended. and enriched. If the nations
of Europe, whose-industry and interchanges move in circles geograp hically*
proximate to each other, have not yet adopted this policy, or have fallen back
in their prosperity'by ^the. fact of its absence; if those nations that have
adopted if are. still seen ^ to keep to it, or have only swerved from it after its
ends have "been, attained; by stronger reasons should the United States act
upon'it., Their remoteness from all the. chief sources of supply of (manufactured articles, forms the additional motive; riot to invoke .that which
inight be drawn.from the burdens, and even exclusions, stiU in full existence
yin other cpuntries, against some'of their primary productions. That a populous'and indeperident nation, a nation civilized sirice the moment of its* existence, and whose institutions, by their essential principle, tend to accele-rate it in the career of intellectual and social, as already they have conferred
upon it'political-eminence, should have continued as long as the United
States have done, to derive fron> a distarice, to be corriputed only by the
space of oceans, so iri.any ofthe fcibrics which conduce to the necess£iry ortasteful accomriiodatioris of life, if riot without precedent,,has, perhaps, riot
before existed in the case of any other natibn upon the same extensive scale.
Without adverting to the contingencies which may diminish pi- cutoffthis
supply from remote hemispheres, the verydeterioration Jto which time,-aiid
more freqrieritly casualty, expose no inconsiderable portion of these fabrics:^



.1825.]

SECRETARY-OF T H E TREASURY.'

•'325

before the riatural and interided uses of them can.be exhausted, and where
the skill that rriade is too often alone competent to renovate or repair,, becomes, by so much, a dead.loss to the capital of the importer or consumer,
-and consequently to that of the riation. The amount of it would.go far, it is
believed, towards forming afund:for encouraging the equally perfect fabrication at home of most of lhe articles,of foreign origin consigned, by the cause
alluded to, to premature inutility br destruction. Besides the advantages pf
manufactures for home use, the present moment is deemed to be peculiarly
auspicious, (not to say urgent,,)forfosteririgthem,from the situation and circumstances ofthe rest of the world. An era-has arrived, upon which after
^ e s are to look back, as to a point in the commercial destinies of mankind.
The colonial system is fast falling to pieces.. Over irnnienseregions it is totally gone ; involving the certainty of changes, both^ in the channels and the
objects of trade, as vast as they will be various. ' The family of nations has
•been extended ; new continents, new oceans, are opened to independent intercourse, tp a just and equal parricipation in the benefits of which the United
States cannot but be alive. These benefits they can scarcely derive to the
full and.proper extent, but by giving tlSiemselves to the,.large fabrication of
sthose works of art for which their chmate, their productions, and the skill
and capital of which their citizens are already in possession, especially qualify them; , T h e course of their export-trade for the last two years, as stated
in this repbrt, is an encouraging omen of their ability and aptitude to enter
this new and great field of competition. Not to follow up.such beginnings
by timely and judicious measures, might be to let opportunities pass, nbt always to be reca.hed. Whilst nations, shut out by their hmited territory
from agricultural products as the basis of foreign trade, have yet pushed the
latter to its farthest hmits by manufactures alone as that basis, it is the favored lot ofthe United States to superadd'to theextent and riches of their soil
a state of social advancement, and an amount of town population, already
•equal to the most extensive arid varied operations of manufacturing industry.
Not to found establishments by which this species of profitable" industry
may take life, and spread over the land, would, it is believed, be to forget
alike what is due to the best interests of agriculture on the one hand, and to
the further enlargement of bur commercial power upon the other.
In expressing the convictions embraced in the foregoing remarks, it is not
intended to close them by recommending any general revision ofthe tariff, as
fixed by the act of Congress of the-22d of May. 1824. But it is deemed proper,
under cover of them, respectfuily to submit the expediency of effectively increasing the existing duties upon all mariufactures of cotton of a fine quality.
The facilities and inducements to the. fabrication Pf cottons of every description inthe United States are so great, that the most beneficial consequences may,be anticipated from the full establishmentof this manufacture
in all its finer branches, in like manner as, by the protection already afforded
to cotion fabrics in the coarser branches, we have, seen these latter establish. ed with advantages so manifold and decided. And should we establish,
completely, the- former also, siich is the quantity in which we produce the
iraw material of this prominent manufacture of modern times, and (what is
still more important,) such its quality, that there is no cause for apprehending
.that our - immense exportations of it abrpad wiU stop. On the contrary, it
friay be expected that they will go on progressively increasing. '
Concurrentry with this recommendation for an augmentation of duties
•on-all cotton manufactures of &ne quahty, it is deemed advisable to submit



•326

^ • • •:/ - R E P O R T S O F . T H E ,

' .. '.^

•.[1825,

also the expediency, of lowering, to a sniall extent, the duties at present
existing.upon teas, upon coffee, and uppn cocoa.
These; arricles, especially the two former,,are pf such large .cpnsumption^
in the United States; as to take rank, among \th^ necessaries pf life. / T h e y
go to make-up a part of the.daily beverage"of the poor as ; well as the rich,
and should therefpre not be pressed upon toO: heavily by the h a n d o f taxa-;
tion in any form ; the les.s, as they trench upon n o rival production at honie;
- ' Their iiiore enlarged consumption would tend to increase,in corresponding
proportions,' the demand for sugar ; thereby fostering a valuable .production
of some^ of our own States. T h e more widely, also, the habit of their use can
be extended, the greater, it is believed, would be the prospect of seeinglessened
the GOiisimipt/ibn bf ardent spiritSj so baneful in their, effects upon'the industry,
the health, and the m;orals of the .community i Under/these views alone, re;gardingnh.eir connexion \vith the public prosperity and individual happiness;
any temporary pr partial loss to the revenue that might result from an adoption of this last recommeridation, ought to be considered as comperisa:ted. It
is not, however, certain, that such loss, would" result from the increased demand that might be expected to grow -up for these articles by a reduction of
the present irripositions upon them. As regards teas, if may be added as an
additional nfotive tp.the recommendation^ that, urider the present.duties,:
there is reasonto apprehend some falling :o&^ ultimately, i n o u r Cliina t r a d ^
from the late laws and regulations of Britain bearing upon this important
article of merchandise.
- /
,
' T h e interests of a valuable portion of our foreign trade, therefore, andof our
shippiiig, appear to be at stake, in fixing the duties uppn teas of all kinds a t
rates somewhat lower than as at present established. .
'
" :. . ^
'All which is respectfully submitted.
•:^., • •:• :^ ' ,': •
;
, . ^ - :• ••/• ^RICH A R D : R U S H : ••
.TREASURY DEPA-RTMENT,

:

:•;

•••

"

: \/

-^.^ D^cer^ber22,A826.:^'.•..-




^. > ,

'

f,

'/

.'••'••

' ~.-

• ./ ' .

.

•';',:'•

' -

'•••

CD

A S T A T E M E N T exhibiiing the amount ofi duties ivhich accrued on merchandise^ tonnage, passports, and clearances ;
ofi debenf/ures issued on the exportation of fioreign merchandise; ofi payments fior drawback on dornxstic distilled
spirits and domestic refined/sugar, exported ; ofi bounties on salted fiish, exported ; ofi allowances to vessels employed in
the fisheries; ofi expenses ofi collection; and ofi payments made into the Treasury, during ihe year ending'on ihe
31si day ofi December, 1824:.
'
.
,•

<3^

Ul

Duties on

M
O

•
Debentures
^ issned. .

Year.
Merchandise.

Tonnage.

Passports ancl
clearances.

1824 ^25,494,628 55 il26,516 44 i l 0 , 9 8 6 0 0

Drawback ondor ^ Bounties Gross revenue. Expenses of Nett revenue.
mestic distilled and allow-^
collection.
ances.
spirits and domestic refined
sugar. ^

S4,^77,923 74

Payments
made into
the Treasury.

81,973 48. 1214,870 88 #21,137,362 89 ^751,9^2 47 #20,385,430 42 17,878,325 71

s

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

-

O

Register's Office, Decerhber 21, 1825. .'




JOSEPH-NOURSE, Register.

>
Ul

CO

D.

.

03

L A N D S sold, and moneys received f a r lands, from the 1st January, 1824, to the 2lst Decemher^ 1824 ; and of payments
made into the. Treasury, during the same period, on account of piiblic lands.
.
Aniount received.

Land sold in
.1824.
Offices,

Marietta
Zanesvilier
Steubenville
Chillicothe
Gincinnati •
Wooster
JRiqua Delaware
Jeffersonville Vincennes
Brookville
Crawfordsville Fort Wayne Kaskaskia
Shawneetown Edwardsville" -.
Vandalia
- Palestine
Sangamon
Detroit ° .. •
Monroe
St. Louis
Falniyra
. »
Franklin



Acres.

Expenses.

Am't received Am't received in Total amount re- Incidental ex-'
for lands sold • 1824. for lands ceived in 1824. .penses, includin 1824.
• sold prior to 1st
ing salaries and
July, 1820.
commissions,.

Repayments
made to individuals for lands erroneously sold.

Payments made
into the Treasury. -

^'
O

9,698.59
24,215'. 84
29,063.91
16,183.81
27,856.91
30,098.58
.2,415.06
27,219.31
11,313.34
12,283.52
60,683.23
69,203.40
1,075.02
1,278.28
2,278.66
5,541.30
614.00
11,936.63
.22,339.10
61,917.15
16,.329.53
18,363.45

-#12,209 06
30:, 357 72
36,628 67"
20,229-65
35,158 97
38,369 00
3,018 88
34,024 13
14,141 65
15,694 59
76,254 06
80,074 01
1,343 74
1,597 85
2,982 32
. 6,926 64
767 50
14,921-26 .
27,923 89
77,768'69
.20,436 89
22,954 45

82,001 32
8,607 71
5,575 61
4,718 58
18,465 39
^8,161 94

6,684 29

#14,210 38
38,965 43"
. 42,204 28
24,948 23
,53,624 36
46,530 94
3,018 88
>34,0.24 13
. 24,890 28
22,332 32
76,254,06
80,074 01
1,343 74
3,264 81
4,851 52
7,480 66
767 50
14,921 26
27,923 89
• 77 ,.884 37
.20,4.36'89
,29,638 74

34,400.58

45,331 28

5,330 19

50,661 47

10,748 63
6,637 7 3 .

1,666 96
1,869 20
554 02.

115 68

81,346
1,959
2,185
1,805
2,498
2,097
- 1,089
1,793
1,804
1,816
2,725
3,211
1,085
1,303
1,715
2,082
1,602
1,379
2,374
2,520
1,372
2,136

06
08
13'
36
30
26
37
67
70
92
93'
84
07
72
71
70
99
31
33
75
19
69

• 2,833 47 I

820 08

812,356
. 39,211
39,929
22,967
-42,260
43,207
2,308
32,087
17,117
23,490
77,515
77,558
• -7,400
. 37
. 2,960
15,950

54
9494
05
74
45
45
90
95
05
41
70
00
00
59
25

n

Ul

O

4,000 00
51,721 53
50,026 01
25,541 78
86,457 24

00
K)
OX

Cape Girardeau
Lexington
Batesville
Little Rack
- .
Ouachita
Opelousas
New Orleans - '
St. Helena court-house '
Washington
Jackson court-house Choctaw district
St. Stephen's Huntsville
Cahaba Tuscaloosa- .
,
Sparta - .
-

13,677.60
20,343.49
2,088.43
889.36

1

_

3,627.26
-

_

^

_
10,269.22
320.00
70,612.52
23,579.92
8,019.15 .
75,531.70
16,883.60
7,171.59 -

749,323 04

17,096
25,430
2,610
1,111

98
57
53
75

_

4,534 06

_
'. -

12,836
400
91,137
29,465
10,023
109,966
21,104
8,964

46
00
73
98
98
90
71 '
48

953,799 03

_
_
_ "
^
_
"_

17,096
25,430
2,610
1,111

795 74 •

_
_
7,716
_
_

98
57
53
75

:

_'

5,329 80

_
58

1,933 86
5,076 43
14,230 73

_
- •
110,890 59

20,553
400
91,137
31,399
15,100
124,197
21,104
8,964

04
00 .
73
84
41
63
71
48

1,064,689 62

'

2,193
1,247
1,804
945
1,029
1,088
1,000
1,000
3,295
682
1,949
3,571
2,610
4,669
1,507
1,286

90
59
91
15
02
92
00
00
53
63
44
68
86
53
13
72-.

74,621 56.,

14,319 00

_
_

3,000 00

. 4 6 2 44

^

00

202 33

_
_
^
1125,
_ -.
.493- 77

17,500 00
70,977
41,264
• 7,720
104,461
19,166
31,700

:

^

94
01
61
74'
00
00

984,418 15

Ul
Q

O

TREASURY D E P A R T M E N T ,

General Land Office, Noveniber 1, 1825.




G-EOo' GRAHAM,' Comriiissioner.

dn

>

Ul

Cl

s

CO

^^
CD

330

REPORTS OF T H E
•

[1825,

E.

S T A T E M E N T ofi the morieys received, into the Treasury firom all other
. sources than customs and public lands, during the year 1824. From dividends on stock ih the Bank of the United States
$350,000 00
arrears of old direct tax of 1798.
^
|5,203 50 '
new direct tax -;
998 46
new internal revenue ^. 34,663 37
fees on letters patent
. 6;270 00
'
cents coined at the mint
-15,475 00
^ passagemoneyof an American seamjin
returned '-' .
10 00
surplus emoluments of officers of the
<i^i!
customs - ' -• 31,490 56 '
/'
interest on balances diie by the Bank •
. of Elkton to the United States
2,085 33
Received under the act to abolish the United
States trading establishment
22,519 20
Moneys previously advanced on account of
,
prisoners of war
3,708, 62^ '
'
Moiieys previously advanced on.account of
.
military pensions
-,
563 00
122,987 04
Balances^of,advances made to the War Department, repaid
underthe 3d section of the act of 1st May, 1820
r
45,481 89
3_joan of five millions of dollars atfour and a half per cent.,
to provide for the awards iinder the Spanish treaty ^ 5,000,000 00
$5,518,468 93
T R E A'S URY. D E P A R T M E N T ,

_ . - • . •

' ,

Register's Office, Decemher 8, 1825.
. ,
• •
JOSEPH-^NOURSE, Register.




1825.]

.SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
F.

•

•.'•. -

'

33l

.

STA T E M E N T ofi the expenditures ofi the Uniied States fior the year
,1824.-

~

•

.

C I V I L , MISCELLANEOUS, AND DIPLOMATIC, VIZ :

$603,738 39
Legislature
'473,370 46
Executive department
9,310 00
Officers of the mint
12,272 30 •
Surveying department
- . ' •1,500 00Commissioner of the Pubhc Buildings
(provern ments in the Territories ofthe United
26,632 79
States . .
. - ,
209,442 30
Judiciary - . - .

,

$1,336,266 24
1,953 02
Annuities and grants
Mint establishment ,
29,469 76
Unclaimed merchandis^e
" '
:
' 769 99 •
Light-house establishment 153,419 96
Surveys of public lands . 108,891 00
Registers and receivers of land offices
1,206 00
Boundary lines between Missouri and Ar1,000 00
kansas .. 13,564 92
\
Land claims in Florida Territory ., 1,937 50
Land' claims in St. Helena land district
; •
Repairing the road from Cumberland to Ohio 47,000 00
Roads within the Indian territory, from Nash7,920 00
• •'
"
ville to New Orleans
~ 11,462 73
Roads within the State of Indiana - 32,969 01
Roads, canals, &c.within theState'of Alabaina
•
Roads and canals within the State of Missouri .^,; ' 3,282 79
Payment to Ohio of the nett proceeds of land
sold under the 3d section ofthe act of 28th
10,206 41
' ""
'
Qf February, 1823
• - • . - '
34,986 77
Marine hospital establishment
110,370 53
Public buildings in Washington
- '
'839-24 •
•••'-:.]
Accommpdation of the President's household
Payment of balances due to officers of olddn657 47
' ,•
ternal revenue and direct tax
Payment of balances to collectors of new in317 50
ternal revenue ..
425 73
Payment of certain certificates .
-<
136,294 41
Miscellaneous expenses
- .
—

678,942 74
. -

Diplonicitic department
108,898 47
Missions to the independent nations on .the
American continent
- •
• 28,669 72, •
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse - 20,145 73
Relief and protection of American seamen - • 38,056 96
,
Treaty with Spain 15,946 17
14,136 44
Treaty of Ghent, (6th and7th articles)
12,327 78
Treaty df Ghent, (1st article)



;'

332

REPORTS OF T H E

Treaties with Mediterranean powers
.Claims on Spain '-

'

'-[1825.

- $10,550 00
-4,891,368 56
$5,140,099 83
$7,15.5,308-81

MILITARY DEPARTMENT, VIZ .
*

Pay of the army
1,093,868 08
Subsistence
265,500 81
ForsLge
- ' 34,177 18
Purchasing department ^-,
148,73,8. 07
Medical and hospital department 23,674 19
Contingent expenses
- \
13,695 56
Ordnance . -,
50,514 09
(Quartermaster's department
- '293,154 72
Repairs and contingencies of fortifications - • 16,282 47
Fbrt Monroe
95.629 86
Fort Callioun
- - 89,702 09
Fort Washington . 9,275 14
Fort'Delaware
. 11,500 00
Fort at Mobile Point
. , , - 84.630 99
Port at the Rigolets
. -lO^OOO 00
Fort Jackson
'.-.•'
69,059 17
Fort at Brenton's Point
,- 39,500 00
Fort at-New Utrecht Point '15,510. 00
• Repairs/of PlymOLtth beach ^
-'
- 20,000 00
Harbor of Presque Isle
-'
„-:
3,000 00
Improving Ohio, arid Mississippi rivers, &c.
3,003 84
Surveys, (fee. of roads and canals . 19,344 60
' Relief of officers, &c., of Seminole campaign
11,835 82,
Military Academy, West Point
15,438 39
Medals, for officers 2,215 00
Arrearages . . . .
17,331 62
Balances due to certain States
5,510 27
Bounties and premiums
. 26,286 10
Gratuities *
12,400 04
Expenses of recruiting , \-8,279 65
. 386,357 38'
Armories :- .
2,538 92"
Arsenals - . - •
171,155 43
A.rming and equipping the militia 3,117 00
National armory,> western waters ' 10,000 00
Purchase of Gridley's farm20,000 00
Purchase of woollens for 1825
Ransom of American captives
767 75
Maps, plans, (fee, War Office
547 56
Road from Plattsburg to Sackett's Harbor 1,350 00
Road from Ohio to Detroit (1,337 55
15,000 00
Road from Pensacola to St. Augustine
Relief of sundry individuals
..
. 134,745 81
231,726 18
. Invalid and half-pay pensions
'Revolutionary pensions
1,267,600 41
Purchase; and reservation of Indian lands in
Georgia : .- ; 26,025 70



1825.]

SECRETARY OF THE, TREASURY.

Purchase of ftuapaw lands
. . - -.$7,000
Treaty with the Choctaws
' - •• 938
Treaty with the Creeks -23,000
Treaty with the Florida Indians - .
23,657
Mihtary escort, Florida Indians . 9,500
Civilization of Indians . .-'
-.
13,541
Pay of Indian agents^
- . 22,874
Pay of sub-agents - •'
, 10,548
Presents . -.. 14,412
Contingencies, Indian department 98,743
Indian annuities - .- .
-' 177,250
Treaties with Indians beyond the Mississippi
3,094

333.

00
;
37
00^
50
00
81
24
32
45 .
88
31
99 ,

' ,

.

•. '

'
; , :
5,275,889 31
From which deduct the.following repayments:
Fortifications ' - ' -'$4,667'30
.
. .
Fort opposite Fort St. Philip - 168 00
' Cannon, shot, shells, &c.
•- 200 00
Treaties with Indians, act 20th
^
April, 1818 - 599 67
. •
: 5,634 97
\$5,270,254 34
NAVAL DEPARTMENT, VIZ.:

Pay ofthe navy afloat • • .-' 898,415 50.'
Pay of the navy shore stations ' - - .
- 223,869 .24
Provisions
- 312^,404 56
Medicines
' - .
'31,698 47
Repairs of vessels ,- 404,151 00
Ordnance and ordnance stores
30,156 44
Navy yards, (fee. ^ .. 136,365 01
Contingent expenses prior to 1824 - 102,028 39
Contingent exp«enses for 1824
- - 149,889 97
Contingent expenses not enumerated
"680 94
Gradual increase - '
- '
- 286,977. 45
Inclined plane docks, (fee. 11,375 81
Ship-houses
-,
-.
15,114 63
Suppression of piracy
- ' 16,401 60
Prohibition of the slave-trade
- , 14,032 5S
Survey of the coast of Florida
, 1,412 82
Survey of Charleston harbor
2,962 37
Rewarding officers and crews of two gigs,
under the command of Lieut. Gregory - , 3,000 00
Captors of Algerine vessels
*56 59
Relief of sundry individuals
22,305 07
Pay and subsistence of the marine corps - 199,061 30
Clothing for the marine corps
31,334 83
Military stores for the marine corps
3,551 25
Fuel for the marine corps 4,659 80
Contingent expenses of the marine corps 9,000 00
Medicines for the marine corps
2,369 71
Barracks for the marine corps
• 9,631 8.1



2,922,907.14

334 .

REPORTS OF T H E

•

[1825,

From which deduct thefollowing repayments:
•
Building barges
-- ,
- $409 58
Superintendent, artificers, (fee. 11,529 22
Laborers, and fuel for engines '6,320 15
Rewarding officers and crew
'
of frigate Constitution
66 63.
- ,
_
-^
$18,325 58 '
• ^' . •
^ .
: $2,904,581 56
,

, .

PUBLIC DEBT, V I Z :

, ^

•

\

Interest, (fee. domestic debt'
-5,301,104 19
Redemption of 7 per cent.
stock of 1815 : for principal 8,598,309 35
Premium 49,302 19
—
—
. 8,647,611 54
''
'Redemption of exchanged 6 per cent, stock
of 1812 . ; • - ' - 2,612,435.69.
Reimbursement of Mississippi stock
- 7,242 34
-'
16,568,393 76
31,898,538 47
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

, .

- '

•

^ Register's Office, Decemher 8, 1826.
•
. ;
; JOSEPH NOURSE, Register:




G.

00

to

LANDS.sold, and moneys received fior lands, firom the 1st January, 1826, to 30th June, 1826, and payments made into
«
the Treasury, during the same period, on account ofi public lands. .

Offices.

Steubenville Marietta
Cincinnati _
Chillicothe _
Zanesville _
"Wooster
- Piqua
" _,
Delaware
JeiFersonyille:
Vincennes _
Brookville ,_
Crawfordsville
Fort W a y n e - '
Kaskaskia _
-Shawneetown
Edwardsville
Vandalia
Palestine
Springlield _
Detroit
Monroe
St. Louis
Palmyra
Franklin - 


Amount received.
Lands sold from
1st January lo
SOth June, 1825. Amount receiv- Amount receiv Total amount
ed for land sold] ed for land sold received^in the
in the first two Iprior to 1st July, first two'^quarquarters of ' '
1820.
ters of 1825..
.
1825.
Acres.
' 9,272.44
7,483.32
9,840.08
8,536.79
10,440.48
9,742.71
2,215.55
.10,997.04
3,102.78
5,231.03
18,087.03
36,470.26
295.40
560.00
640.00
.2,244.56
320.00
3,366.89
7,057.20
59,388.04
7,633.32
8,869.92
10,961.12
8,713.37

. S12,085 87
9,366 64
11,385 00
10,670 87
13,050 58
12,178 38
2,764 48
13,.748 26
3,878 46
6,538 83
29,530 60
45,587 89
369 25
700 00.
800 00
2,805 69
400 00
4,208 61
8,821 51
75,739 96
• 9,54166^
11,087 37
13,710 15
.10,909 73

.S9,103
3,060
30,476
9,549
16,421
13,796

96
60
72
32
20
55

22,248 33
14,675 97

1,155 '53
2,326 18
1,153 38

5,168 73
6,265 93.
12,515 56

$^21,189 83
12,427 24
41,861 72
20,220 19
29,471 78
25,974 93
2,764 48
13,748 26
26,126 79
21,214^80
29,5.30-60
. '45,587 89
' 369 25
1,855 53
3', 126 18
3,959 07
400 00
.4,208 61
8,821 51
.80,908 69
9,541 66
17,353 30
13,710 15
23,425 29

Expenses.
Ul
Payments
Incidental ex- Repayments
penses, inclu- made to indi- made into the
ding salaries •'viduals, for'
Treasury.
and coniimis- lands^erronesions. '•
ously sold.
^ S991 49
446 15
1,383 84
1,258 28
1,166 75
1,100 16
543 68
800 97
1,271 40
^ 760 16
1,339 91
988 36
575 74
• 564 43
- 674 20
376 27
527 67
698 .36
880 77
1,603 75
692 13
1,123 33
1,460 16
1,018 93

$.18,717 29
11,887 76
46,005 28
18,963 50
26,566"29
25,808 05
2,135 20
10,09i 08
28,497 69
11,515 34
25,510 28
11
.58
2,192
145

87
97
00
93

12,.576 71
27.256 96
42;843 02

O

o
^^
,K

>
Ul

a

14,318 86
21,263 50

CO
CO

STATEMENT G—Gontinued:

Offices.

'

"

»

'

•

.

.

'

Cape Girardeau
_
Lexingtion _
_
iBatesville _
_
LittleRock ^.
_
Ouachita
_.
_
Opelousas -.
_
New Orleans
_
St. Helena court-house
Washington .^
_
Jackson court-house
Choctaw district
St. Stephen's
_
Huntsville _.
_
Tuscaloosa _
_
Sparta
_
_ Cahaba
_
_
Tallahassee-.
_

'

•

_ '
..
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

'

'

•;.
_
_

.

__
_

_

_

_
_.
_

i
_

CO

Amouni received.
Lands sold
.. .... • . -• •
from 1st Jan:
uary to 30th Amountreceiv- Amourit recei\^- Total amount
June, 1825. - ed for land sold ed for larid sold received in the
in the first two priorto ls.tJul3^ first tw'o "quarquarters of
1820ters of .1825.
1825. "^
• Acres.
1,916.06
5,495 38 •
3,103.54.
.400.0080.00
_

^
_
_

CA5

' #3,395
6,869
3,879
~ 500
100

05,
23
41
00
00

_
_
•

i3,098 78

•

'400.00
•

5,311.26
233.80
30,952.9^
11,214.50'
12,089.64
65,662.48
5,320.99

• ••

_

500 00
•

•-

/

10,770
291
38,691
.14,019
16,084
135,138
^6,651

-

$2,395
6,869
3.879
. '500
100
. 3,098
500

05
23 .
41
00'
00.
78
00 -

•

09
86 .
13
99
1^
23
24

35,900 83
3,247 13
39,586 15

._
- '

44,427.55

77,268 C
O

428,077.45

. 623,038 12

4-6,670 92
. 291 86
38,691 13
17,267 12
. .55,670 25
135,138 23
6,6.51-24

Es:penses.

.

Incidental ex- Ptepayments
Payraents
pensesj inclu- made to indi- made into the
ding salaries
viduals, for - Treasury.
and comm is- lands erronesions.
ously sold..
S533
,816
653
621
395
537
331
500
•398
500
1,800
931
1,857
2,386
.
409

43
27
49
62
44
18
31 ,
00
68
00
11.
74
05
5728

• •

O

S350 l i /

•

-

- •

•.

•

77,268 00-

^ • 1,756 66

852,788-97

36,675 72

14,295 01

_•

•

229,750 85

$1,060 00
8,229 56
4,704 15

_

•

.

v

_
—
•_.
_•

^

-

'•

' .

.

-

•

'

-

_

.

'

;'350 11

70;204 21
73,963
16,250
2,901
125,734
5,120
.*16,112
• - 40,500

28
09
40
84
00
25
00

O

M

. 725,440-17

* N. E.—The extensive operations at Cahaba, Alabama, under the relief law of .1824, have iinavoidably delayed the transmission of the returns from
that office up to the period of this statement. It is presumable that about one hundred thousand dollais was received at that office, during the six months
enibfaced in the above statement".
."
.>
'
,
^
• Amount paid into the Treasurv in the first two quarters of 1825 _
.- -_
_
.
_
, _
_
- _ $725,440 17
" in the third quarter of 1825
_
_'
«'
_
\
L.
. _
_
' r °-- 251,462 50
\ Tot^lk'mount paid into the Treasury in the three quarters of 1825
_
_
, _ • ,
-s
^
._
° _;• 976,902.67
:•

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, . G^^^zer^Z Land Office, November 1, 1825.
GEO. ORA.lE{AU,'Commissioiter.


GO

1825,]

.

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.
H .

- ;.

•

^".

337
- '

..

-

•

S T A T E M E N T ofi moneys receivedinto the Treasury, firom all sources
other than customs: and public lands, frorn the 1st January to the 30th
Septemher, 1826. •
'
.
..^
'
'
Prom dividends on stock in the Bank of the United States
|367,500 00
balances df advances made in War Department, re- '
paid under the 3d section of the act of the Ist M ^ y / ^ '
.'
••1820 . ^' , - /
- •• .> - '• ,'41,788'6()
arrears of new internal revenue
- $22,534 84'.
' new direct tax
-2,009 98
fees Oli letters patent 6,690 00
'"
cents coined at the mint . - ^ -. 12,726 25
postage of letters.
469 56
consular receipts under the 2d section
, ,"
v
of the act of the 14th of April, 1792
-2,292 10
,; ^ / .^
surplus emoluments of officers of the
'
customs
- ' 25,496 52
, ;
money received.iinder theact to abolish
, the United'States trading establish>
^
ments with the Tndians
9;698;: 57 '
fines, penalties, .and forfeitures .
3^298 06'
sales ofpublic lots in the city of Wash"
.
ington ^ - - . - ;
' t,572 3&
•
ilett proceedsof vessels condemned un'
der the acts. prohibiting ,the slave . ^
'
trade
- - —
•,A473;^7'
•trespass oh Indian lands
. 48^00
nett proceeds of vessels, &c.capfured of .. .
•
- . . ^
the pirates ..
. _
325 IS
moneys previously advanced on account of the second census
' -' ,
71^48
moneys previously advanced on ac,
countof.ascertaining land titles in
Louisiana. - ~ - ..500 00
, , .
, moneys previously advanced on ac-.
count of annuity to Christian Indians
on the river Thames .
- '
t,474 9 8 '
interest on balances due from the /
banks of Wilmington and Brandy- '
: wine to the UnitedStates- , ' 43937 42
V
rent ofthe naval hospital farm, Chelsea
267; 45
loan of five millions, at 4 | per cent-,
per act of 26th May, 1824 -

^ '

T

5,00D,0()0\C)0

.; 15,508,144 89,
TREASURYBiipARTMENT,

.•

Register's Office, December'8,. 1826:.

".

,

^

' '• /^

JOSEPH NmmM,-Registm

VOL. II.—22



REPORTS OF T H E

338

1. ,
- S T A T E M E N T o f i the expenditures ofi the, Uriited States, firorn the-1st
ofi January to'the 30ih September, 1826. '
CIVIL, MISCELLANEOUS, AND DIPLOMATIC.

Legislature
•-.
. . $316,367 08
Executive departments
;
- 369;767 44
7,200 00
Officers of the mint :
.
, -,
1,125 00
Commissioner of. the PnbHc Buildings /
17,551 •82
Surveying department V Governments in the Territories, of the United
States
^
.
- 27,596 71
Judiciary
,. 153,942 55
$893,550 60
1,300 00
Annuities and ^grants
'
- , . . - . ; Mint establishment - . ^
- -, . 14,651 64
Unclaimed merchandise " . '342 30
115,868 88
Light-house establishnient - . , Surveys ofpublic lands
-..''.425.456 33
Grant to General Lafayette .;, "
, " 200,000, 00
1,125 00
Registers and receivers of land offices .
Western boundary line of Arkansas Territory , ' 2,000 00
.
Boundary line between Missouri and, Arkansas
1,500 00
Preservation ofthe public archives in Florida
3,75 00
Land claims in Florida Territory
-.
.-.
6,682 69
Land claims in St. Helena laild district
3,250 00
Rojads within the Stateof Indiana- - .
10,798 09
.Roads within the Sta.te of Ohio
9,197 27
Roads, canals, &c., within the State of Alaba.ma
10,753 66
Roads and canals within the State of Missouri
,1,256 44
Roads and canals within the State of Mississippi
15,780 26
Encouragement of learning within the State of
Illinois
-\
. 5,702 06
Repayment for lands erroneously soldhy the
. United Stntes ;^ ' • 1,635 93
Purchase of lands reserved to certain Creek In800 00,
s dians
- ,
- . ' ^
•••'-'
Marine hospital establishment
- .
39,118 34
Public buildings, Washington
62,000 00
14,000 00
Accommodation of the President's household Bringing the votes of President and Vice President of the United States 6,169 50
Payment of claims for property lost, &c.
125 00
Stock in the Chesapeake and DeUiware Canal
192,500 00
Company - ^ .. - , Payment of balances to officers of old internal
2,184 64
reyenue and direct tax
Payment of balances to collectors of new inter1,723 45
nal revenue
Payment of certain certificates
83 01
Miscellaneous e-xpehses
.7],670' 84
Consular receipts, under the act of 14th April,
^ 1792
.
.
.
.
2,292 10




1825.;1

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

•339

Diplomatic department
-$127,017 29
Contingent expenses of foreign intercourse - - 25,2:M 95
Relief and protection of American seamen - 22.567 20
Treaty of Ghent (Oth and 7th articles)
- ' 12,583' 13
Treaty of Ghent (1st article)
,- .
8,000 00
Treaty with Spain
_ -. ,
'-.
1,125 00
Claims on Spain . - 66,335 02
Payments of claims under the 9th article, of
treaty with Spain
-^
16,270 87
Treaty with Mediterranean powers
3,508 67
Prize causes
- '
-.
2,000 0()
P,204,974 55
2,098,525 16
MILITARY ETABLISHMENT, VIZI

Pay of the army - •
. - 710,379 16
Subsistence
- • ..
.
- 271,326^69
Foraore
. - ' 28,289 31
Clothing
- 184,737.06
Purchase of woollens, for 1826
20,000 00
Medical and hospital department . - 20,041 87
Contingencies
-. 16,714 18
Ordnance
- •
.
- -41,065 27
Quartermaster's department
.
- 233,157 25 .
Repairs and contingencies of fortifications 4,155 31
Fort Monroe
', -"
-.- .
- - 86,025 58
Fort Calhoun
- 57,400 00
Fort Washington. -20?; 35
Fort Delaware
- .
- 36,506 14Fort at Mobile Point .
-'
- , 107,008 67
Fort at the Rigolets'-''
-,
- - > 80,000 00
Fort Jackson
-•
- 80,940 83
Fort at Brenton's Point
. .
44,134 60
Fortat New Utrecht Point'- ' 40,366 76
Fort at Beaufort
'^00 00
Fort at Cape Fear - . . 5,000 00
Armament of new fortifications
-.
IOOOO'
Plymouth beach, repairs of
5,712 00
Harbor of Presque Isle
10,371 37
Improving Ohio and Mississippi rivers
3,722 .59
Surveys, (fcc, of roads and canals 38.780 21
Re,lief of officers, (fee, of Seminole campaign
2,601 61
Military Academy, West Point
9,066 40'
Arrearages
- 32,3n4 47
Bounties and premiums
13,450 63
Expenses of recruiting
- *
5.275 22
Armories - "
- 26i!/i'^2 ^^0
Arsenals .
17,430 72
Preservation of islands in Boston harbor \Ki,v,\)I '^"d
Arming and equipping the militia - 133,724 91
Naional armory, western waters 2,479 88
Ransom of American captives
610 00
Arsenal lot on the Schuylldil
8,000/00



'REPORTS O F T H E

'sm

{&

Interestdue to the.. State of Virginia
- $.178,480 11
Fayment of claimsfor property lost, &c. 40 00^
Cannon, shot, shells, cfec.' ••
- ,
-•'••'
622 0
Continuation of the Cumberland road
13,850 00
Road from Ohio to Detroit
x.5,255 00
Road from Cape Sable to Suwanney
2,072 15
Road from Detroit to Chicago
- .. 3,000 00
Road from Memphis to Little Rock
- ' 1-880 00
Road from St. A.ugustine to Pensacola,
809 50
Road from Colerain to Tampa
6,000 O
O
Road froiTi Missouri to New Mexico
- . 15,000 OORelief of sundry individiials/
-' 140,144 63
Reyokitionary pensions
-1,307,251 12
Compensation to citizens of Georgia
- 23,000 OO
Claims against the Osages ' 25748 00Choctaw'cMms
-.
16,972 50
Treaty with Choctaws
3,748 72
Expenses of Choctaw treaty
• -.. - 9,723 44
Treaty with the Sioux, Chippewas, &c; 6,^00 00
Treaty with the "Florida Indians - 36,425 57
Military escort to Florida Indians - /
500 00.
Treaties with India;ns beyond the Mississippi .
3,216 21
Treaty with the Creeks - - '
- ^ 225.^853 12
CiviUzation of Indians
11,215 91
Pay of Indian agents
« 26,254 12
Pay of sub-agents ^ 12,104 15
Presents to Indians
- 16,963 18
Contingencies, Indian departmeht -'
- 82,0( )6 85
Annuities to Indians
- .
- 201.278 98
4,976,081 39
From which deduct the following repayments : ' ^ • '
Fortifications - $14,500 00
Invalid and half-j3ay pensions
70,351 70.
Gratuities
••
- .
.
205 37
Purchase of Cluapaw lands; 226 09
Fort opposite Fort St. Philip 487 64
85,770 80
$4,890,310:NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT.

Pay of the ri avy afloat
-Fay of the shore stations Provisions , Medicines - '
^
Repairs of vessels Navy\yardS; dock§, a^d wfearve^s,
Navy yard, Portsmouth
Navy yard, New York
Navy yard, Philadelphia Navy yard, Washington
Navy yard, Norfolk



511,913 27
219,801 93
274,487 98
36,583^ 73
249,720 71
21,064 58
1,145 08
25,^14 03.
7,50.9 04
8,809 ^912,398,44

m2b.l.

SECRETARY O F T H E TREASURY.

Navy yard, Charleston •Contingent expenses prior to 1824
Contingent expenses for 1824 ; Contingent expenses not enumerated,
Contingent expenses for 1825 , Contingent expenses hot enumerated,
Gradual increase of the riavy
Tnchned plane docks, &c. '
-'
Ship-houses
- '\.
>
Suppression of piracy
Prohibition of the slave, trade
Survey of the coast of Florida^ Survey of Charleston arid St.'Mary's
Captors of Algerine vessels
^Eelief of sundry individuals
- ,
Building ten sloops, of war ,
Pay and subsistence of marine corps
Clothing for marine corps .Medicines for marine corps
Military stores for marine corps ' Fuel for marine cbrps.
«
Contingent'expenses of marine corps
Arrearages of coiitihgeht expenses

..-' $14,11190
311 98
^ - "•. 45,108 14
1824 /
1,767 21
192,632 94
1825
713 ,74
- 244,409 02
3,716 50
2,674 74
8,374 90
.8,838 85'
73 61
1,894 28.
161 53
~ ' 12,917 CO
78,594.22.
^ 118,492 f
%
.19,382 76.
1,266 49
. 1,313 78
5,'668 58
- ' 7,73193
4,683 78
2,143,588 70

From which deduct the following repayments: "
Ordnance and ordnance stores , $7,524 26
Repairs of sloops of war
1,502 97
Superintencients, artificers,'&c.
4,883 72
Laborers, and fuel for engines
2,490 32
Tools burrit;at the navy yard,
Washiiagtori
3106
16,432 3i3
.$2,127/156:'37
PUBLIC IDEBT, v i z :

Interest on- thefanded debt. ' - 3,347,923 .92
Redemption of 7 per ^ principal 2,113 92,.
" .
cent, stock of 1815, \ premium
11 68
' ; •r ' ..^. ' — ^
•
• %125'60 .;
. ..
'Redemptionof exchanged 6 per cent, stock
. , ,
of 1812
. . 56,53$! 30 :^
Redemption of Treasury note 6 per ct. stock 1,479,374 82
Redemption of 6 per cent, stock of 1812 - . 6,18?,0.06' 84
- .
Eeimbursement of Mississippi stock
- ,
1,524 02
Principal and interest of Treasury notes 493 29
^
,
— ^ 11,074,987 79
$20,190,979 91
T R E A S U R Y DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, December 8,1826.
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register


'•342

' REPORTS OF T H E ',
'•'

'

"

• [1825.

No.'l. . '

S T A T E M E N T ofi the debt ofi the United Statues, 1st October, 1824:.
Three per cent, stock - . , - ;
Exchanged s.x per cent, stock of 1812

$13,296,231 45
2,668,974 99

$15,966,206. m
Six per cent, stock of 1812
6,187,006 84 .
Six per cent, stock of 1813, (16 millions) 15.497,818 63
Six per cent. stock>of 1813, (7J millions) 6,812,845 44.
Six per cent, stock of 1814
> 13,096,542 90
Six per cent, stock of 1815
9,490,099 10
Treasury note six per cent..stock
1,479,374 82.
Treasury^note seven-per cent, stock
4,477,026 17.
Five per cent, stock, (s.ubscriptiori to
Bank of. the United States) - ^ 7,000,000 00
Five per cent, stock of 1820- 999,999 13:
Five per cent, stock of 1821 -^
4,735,296 30
Exchanged five per cent, of 1822
, , 56,704 77 v
Four and a half per cent, stock, (Florida loan)
-.
5,000,000 00
74,8.32,714.10
$90,797,920 -54
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, DecemBer 8, 1825. • • /
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.
, NOTE.—The amount of the debt on the 1st of October, 1.824, as per
statement No. 3, which accompanied the report of the Secretary of the
Treasury, ofthe 31st December, 1824, was
- , .$90,697,071 54
Add this sum, ascertained to have been issued
on account of the loan of $25,000,000, per
act of the 24th March, 1814, more than -the
sum which has. her^etofore been stated as the
aamouht ofthe said loan, and for which the
commissioners of loans have not made such
returns sis to enable the First Auditor to re.j
port thereon -.$95,105 27
Also, for a'variation in the amounts of Treasu^
^
ry note six per cent, and seven per cent.
. stocks, issued prior to tfie forming the said
- statement, but subsequently entered on the
'
Treasury books
- 5,743 73 .
100,849 00,




$90,797,920 54

1825.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY.

343

.No. 2.
S T A T E M E N T ofi the debt ofi the United States, 1st January, 1825.
Three per cent, stock
" , - . . '^13,296,23145
Exchanged SIX per cenf. stock of 1812 • ,
r
. 5 6 , 5 3 9 30.
Sixpercent. stock of 1812 ^
, ^
i
Six per cent, stock of 1813 (.16 millions) • - -•
Six per cent, stock of 1813 (7^ millions) , Sixpercent. stockof 1814
- .
Six per cent, stock of 1815
- '
Treasury note six per cent, stock
Treasury note seven per cent, stock
-^
Five per cent, stock (subscription to Bank of ""the United
States) - ^ •
^ -, .
- .
Five per cent, stock of 182iO
- .
.
Five per cent, stoc.k of 1821
,
Exchanged five per cent, stock of 1822
- '
Four and a half per cent, stock, per act of the 24th May,
1824 (Floridaloan) - ,
. Exchanged four and a half per cent, stock, per act.of the
26th May, 1824
. . . .
'
. • ;
,
'
,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

^

"

^

$13^352,770 75
6,187,006 84
12,403,051 66. .
5,452,884 46
> ^
^
13,096,542 90 .
9.,490,099 10'
.
,
1,479,374 82
.
2,113.92
"
•^•~. i ' • ^
7,000,000 00999,999 13
4,735,-296 30 ',
56,704 77
.
•
'5,000,000 00
•
u
4,^454,727 95 ^
•
——70,357,80185
•*

$83,710,57^ 60
. ,

Register's Office, Decemher 8, 1825.
v .
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register^




•344

'

RE-PORTS O F T H E

[1825.

.:Eo. 3.

•

•

•

.. -..iSTA-TEMMNT of the debt of the .United States, 1st October, 1825.
Three per cent, stock'- ^
. . .
.
.
. .
- ^ .'^13,296,23145
Six per cent, stock of 1813 (loanof 16 millions) ". - *12,422,051 66
Six per.cent. stock of 1813 (loan of 7^ millions) . - t5,433,384 46
Six per cent, stock of 1814
- 13,096,542 90
'
Sixper cent, stock of.l8l5
• -.
'9,490,099 10
Five per cent, stock (subscription to Bank United States) - 7,000,000 00 -^
Five per cent, stockof 18-20 •-•
- ,
.
'
;999,999 13
Five per cent, stock of 1821.
-- 4,735,296 30
•
•
Exchanged.five percent, stock of 1822 •
, 56,704 77 - Four and .a half per cent.- stock, per act of May 24, 1824,
' (Florida loan) ' , . ..
,
. 5,000,00^00 • .
Exchanged four'and a half per cent, stock, per act of May
26,1824'-'
- '
-• 4,4.54,727 95
•.'•
.Funded four aild-a halfp.er cent, stock, per act of May 24,1824 5,000,000 00
.
',
.'
; '
'
.67,<689v30'6 2T
80,985,537 72
.Amount .pf.the debt on the 1st October, 1824, per foregoing statement No. V 90,797;9'20 54r
Add Exchanged 4 | per cent., stock, issued under the act of May 26, 1824, in '
lieu of sixper cent, stocks of 1813
,
- ^
4,454,727 95'
95,25,2,648 4?^
' Deduct stock paid off in the fourth quarter of 1824, viz:.
Seven per cent, stock .,\
. ••. - ^4,474,912 25^
^
Ahd exchanged six per cent, stock .of 1812
r
- 2,612,4.35. 69
\ .
'
-., - ' " ^
7,087,347 94
And six per cent, stocks.of 1813, surrendered for exchanged
. 4^ per cent, stock, viz:
,
"
Ofthe loan, of 16 millions
$3,094,766 97
Oftheloanof 7s^ millions
. 1,359,96098
:
>
-^
- 4 , 4 5 4 , 7 2 7 95
11,542,075 89
Amounl ofthe debt on the 1st January, 1825, per statement No. 2
Add^ loan at. 4^ .per cent, per annum, per act of 26th May, 1824

•
-

83,710,572 60
5,000,000 00
88,710,572 60

Deduct stock paid off since 1st January, 1825, viz.:
In the first quarter of 1825, the residue,of 7 per cent.
In. thefirst,quarter of 1825, the residueof exchanged 6 per ct.
;0n the 1st April, the whole of the Treasury note 6 per cent.
•On the 1st October, the whole of the 6 per cent, of 1812
^

S2,113 92
56,539. 30
1,479,3.74 82
6,187,006 84
7,725,034 88

Amount of the debton the 1st October, 1825, as above stated

..-.

-

_80,985,537 72

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

.

Register's Office, December 8,1826. ^
~
JOSEPH NOURSE, Register.

•Sixpercent. of 1813 (S16,00d,000 loan)
tSixpercent. of 1813 (S7,500,000 loan). . -

-

.-

.
-

12,422,05166
5,433,884 46
17,855,936 12

Deduct amount subscribed under the act of 3d March, 1825, and for which
4 | per cent, stock is to be issued on the 1st January, 1826
Leaves the amount of 6 per cent, of 1813, reimbursable in 1826




-

1,585,138 S8'
016,270,797 24

1825.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,
No.4.

'

345
:

'

E S T I M A T E D A M O U N T ofi Treasury notes outstanding on the 1st
October, 1824.
Total amount issued (as -per statement No. 4 of the last
report)
' .
. ,.
- . . -$36,680,794 00
Ca.ncelled and reported on by the Fir§t Auditor - .
.Outstanding

-

-<

-

-

Consisting of small Treasury notes
Notes bearing interest
.

-

-

; - .

$2,370 00
14,230 00
___:—L

36,664,194 00
$16,600 00 ^

$16,600 00^

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, , -

-Register's Office, December 8, 1826.
. - ^
JOSEPH NOURSE, iJe^es^er.

No. 5.
S T A T E M E N T ofi the stock issiied^ under the act ofi Congress, entitled
^ An act supplementary to the act fior the indemnification ofi certain
^
claim^anis ofi public lands in the Mississippi Territory," passed the
3d March, 1815.
Amount of claims awarded per statement No. 5 of last .
'
year. - '
- '
. ' . i •.
.
- - ' -$4,282,151 12^
Whereof there was paid in/or lands, per said report . - $2,447,535 39
Payments at the Treasury to the 30th
Septembeiv 1824
- ,
\ - $1,820,599 20
Payments from October 1, 1824, to September 30, 1825
6,166 36
1,826,7^55 56
Balance outstanding October 1,1825, consisting of—
Certificates outstanding
$7,805 57
Awards not applied for
44 60|7,850 17i
4,282,151 12.^
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, December 8, 1825.
. ^
JOSEPH NOURSE, jRe^ri^^cr.




346

REPORTS OF T H E

•

^[1825.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

.
:
, ; '
March 15,1826.
S I R : I have the honor to transmit, herewith, statements marked B and
C, referred to in the annual report from this department, dated the 22d of
December,. 1825.
i have the honor to be,
^
- With the highest respect,
^
'
> ''
Your most obedient servant.
RICHARD RUSH.
'The

Hon. the PRESIDEJNT OF THE SENATE.




1825.]

SECRETARY OF T H E TREASURY,
•

- B.^

-

^'

347

-v' •.

A S T A T E M E N T exhibiting the value and quantities, respectively, ofi
inerchandise on which duties actually accriied dnring ihe year 1824;
{consisting ofi the difference' between articles paying duly, irnjioried,
and those eniiileid to drawback, re-exported ;) andy also, ofi the nett revenue which accrued that year firom duties on merchandise., tonnage,
pcissports, and clearances.
r
MERCHANDISE PAYING DUTIES AD* VALOREM.

• $419,526
•at % per ceht.
12 - do. ..
1,288
12^
do.
939,869
do.
10,670,528
15
do.
6,477,446'
20.
do.
17,024,335
25
do.
5,823,760
30
do.
1,647 '
35
do.'. '
33,298
^ 40
40.
•
167,627
50
^41,559 324

22

- .:

' -

-

••-

-

-

-

-

-

.. -

-

do. average

:
-

.

'.'

'

-

- ^ ' S31,464
154
117,483
1,600,5-9
1,295,489
4,256,083
1,747,128
576
- '
13,319
-. ,
83,813

45
56
62
20
20
75
00
45
20
50

-

9,146,091 93

S9,140,091 93

ARTICLES PAYING A SPECIFIC DUTY.

Wines,
1,527,978 gallons, at 30,5 cents, aver.age
Spirits,
5,285,047 gallons, at 44.4 cents, average
Molasses, "12,871,425 gallons, at 5.0 cents
Teas,
7,107,677 pounds, at 33.3 cents, average
Coffee,
20,368,450 pounds, at 5.6 cents
Sugar, • 78,486,658 pounds, at 30.7 cents, average
Salt, ^
3,092,092 bushels, at 20.0 cents .
All other articles . -

.

466,604 45
2,348,074 56
.643,571 25
2,368,306 15.
1,018,422 5)
2,408,688 I I
618,410 40
. 1,829,-508 70

11,701,586 IS
20;8i7,678 05

Deduct duties refunded, after deuucting therefrom duties on merchandise,
the particulars of which were not specified by the collectors, and difference in calculation - • - ' - , -

22,035 35
>20,825,642 70

Add 2^ per cent, retained on drawback
- S122,678 68
discount retained on re-exportations
• 933 56
discriminating duty on French vessels . 338 02
extra duty on merchandise imported ih foreign vessels . 21,592 35
• interest on custom-house bonds - :'' - ' • 26,844 08
storage received •»
:
3; 804 54

l M i o i , 8 3 3 93

Duties on merchandise
S109,243 16
• 17,273 28'

Duties on tonnage
Light money -

17.6,191 23

Passports and clearances

126,516 44
10,986 00
21,139,336 37

Deduct drawback on domestic distilled spirits exported
• . drawback on domestic refined sugar exported
Gross revenue
Expenses of cbllection
Nett revenue, per siatement A



934 92
1,038 56

1,973 48
21,137,362 89
751,932 47
$20,385,430 42

[1825.

REPORTS OF THE

348

Explanatory Statements and Notes.
i: Wines—.^
Madeira
.. . 'Champagne, &c. -^
. Sherry and St. Lucar, &c. Lisbon, Oporto, &c.
' Teneriffe, Fayal, &c..
Claret, &c., in bottles
All other, in casks -,

109,861 gallons, at 100 cents
• 4,852gairons, at 100 cents
. 11,794" gallons, at 60 cents
266,780 gallons, at 50 cents
136,802 gallons, at 40 cents / '
46,806 gallons, at 30 cents
951,083 gallons, at 15 cents

^

S109,861
4,852
7,076
,133,390
54,720
14,041
142,662

-

$466,604 45

1,, 527,978 gallons, at 30.5 cts., average
2. Spirits^
Grain: 1st proof . 2d do.
.-,
, 3d do.
• .
4th do.
- -' y 5th do. ^- -• .- Other, 2d do.
• >
3d do.. .
. 4th! do.
'5th do.

^ .'

'

820,127 gallons, at
90,855 gallons, at
77,278 gallons, at
5,987 gallons, at
809 gallons, at
674,129 gallons, at
1,179,264 gallons, at
2,425,293 gallons, at.
11,305 gallons, at

42 cents45 cents .
,48 cents
52 cents
60 cents
38 cents .-,
42 cents
48 cents
57 cents

344,'453 34
.)40,884,75
37,093 44
3,113 24
485 40
256,169 02
•495,290 88
1,164,140 64
6,443 85

-

S2,348,074 56

5,285,047 gallons, at 44.4 cts., average
3. Teas—
Bohea
, . Souchong Hyson skin
Hyson and young hyson Imperi.al . - . - . -.
Extra duties on teas imported
from other places than China

42,114 pounds,
1,908,124 pounds,
1,776,356 poimds,
.3,023,'7l0 pounds,
357,373 p'omids,

at
at
at
at
at

,12 cents
25 cents
28 cents
40 cents
50 cents

-

: 2,367,634 86
•

7

• -

•

'

• ^-' 671- 39'

. '

S2,368,306 I D

^
^

2,192,334 63
216,353 48

73j'077,82l pounds, at 3 cents . , 5,408,837 pounds, at 4 cents' 78,486,658 po.unds, at 3.7 cents, ave rage

5. S a l t ,
Imported,
bushels
Exported, \
do.
Bounties -and 'all6wances
reduced into bushels, at
. 20,cents- ...




68
00
68
00
50

i

^ 7,107,677pounds, at 33.3 cts.^average
4. Sugars—^
^
Brown, &c'.
White, clayed, &c. '

5,053
477,031
497,379
1,209,484
178,6.86

,. -

.7,1,07,677
-

00
00
40
00
80
80
45

61,435

"4,227,841, at 20 cents
.
' -

,

•

•

^2,408,688 11
• 845,568 20

.

1,074,354
227,157 80

1,135,789, at 20 cents
3,092,052, at 20 cents

:

#618,410 40

1825.]

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

349

Explanatory Statements and Ahtes—Continued.
•

•

•

'Gtuantity.

6. A l l dther articles.

Duck, Holland
-Carpeting, Brussels .
Venetian
-•
other .
-'
Cotton:bagging
.
- :
Vinegar- - Beer, ale, and porter,.in bottles
in bottles
in casks
• in casks
Oil, olive, in casks , - \
whale, and other fish \
castor
linseed
'
Cocoa
- Chocolate
Chocolate
.'
Suorar, candy
. loaf
• other, refined and lump
Almonds
- .
Currants
. - .
P r u n e s and plums -, '
P r u n e s and plums - ^
Figs
'• .
Raisins, Muscatel, &c.
Muscatel, &c.
V other' .
^ .
other
VCandles, tallow'
.
- tallow . - .
Cheese Soap
Tallow -Beef and pork
' H a m s and other bacon
Butter
-•
,
Saltpetre,.refined - •
Vitriol, oil of
Camphor, crude
Salts, Epsom
Glauber
Spices—Cayenne pepper:
ginger
-r
mace
nutmegs
cloves
pepper, black .
pimento
cassia
Tobacco, manufactured, &c.
Snuff
Indigo
Cotton
- .
Gunpowder
,
B.ristles Glue
-' "
Paints—ochre, dry in oil •

, .

' -

,^

-

.

-.
,-

,

.'

'

-:
' -

-

' - .
-

.

.
-

-.

-

- .
- . •
. - . .

VOL. II.—44



.

'

Rate
' of
duty.

Duties.

.
Cents
^922 50
•
369 . 250
- pieces
- yards
29,312
50.
14,656 00
do. ^
230,054
25
57,513 50
. d o .
711
.:20.
142 20
80,900 13
..
do.
2,1.57,337
' -31
7,663
8
613 04
- gallons
do.
' 40,800
15
6,120 00
- . do.
29-, 493
205,898 60
do.
1,606
160 60
10
584 55'•
do.
3,897
15
49,283
do.
' 25. ' .' 12,320 75
• - '
do.
431
15
64- 65
-46 40
do.
116
40
3,610 00.
do.
14,440
.25
•898,573
. 2
17,971 46
- pounds
.
do.
1,014.
330 42
' 2 8 20
. • 705
4
, do.
86 76.
,
723
12
- ' do.
do.
311
12
^'37 32
15 10
151 - 10
do.
16,209 06
540,302.
.-3
: .-do.
4,008-51.
. do.
3
133,617'
do.
29,503
3
885 09
do.
4
6,134 00
153,350
. 548., 218
3
16,446 54
do.
•do.
646,023
3
19,380 69
37,251.6,0
do.
931,290
' 4
do.
1,134,110
2
22,682 20
do.
972,188
3
29,165 64
3
264 45
, do.
8,815
-.
do.
13,586
5
679 30
,2,666 52
do.
9
" 29,628
• 7 , 3 9 8 32
do..
4
184,958
do.
671,433
1
6,714 33
.do.
2
15 74^• 787
219 45
3
do. .
17,525
125 70
- ' do.
2,514
5
do.
3
,
1,845 51
61,517
do.
3
1,382 9 1
46,097
do.
8
: 3,974 IG
49,677
do.
159,402
4
. 6,376 08
, do.
186
2
• 3 72
do.
15
16,05
107
do.
' r,414
2
,
' .28,28
.7,132
do.
100
7,132:00
do.
60
23,655 60
39,426
- ' do.
25
2,180 00,
8,720
117,872.16do.
1,473,402
-8
6
65,691; 06
do.
1,094,851
do.
6
16,749,-60l
.279,160
'do.
16
639
63 ao
625:44
12
do.
5,212
56,748: 30
.do.
15
378,322
do.
3
15„.530 m
517,681
do.
V
3,922 80
49,035
do.
176:-,513,
>3.
5,295 39
do.
48,359 1 .' b:.
. •2,.,417 95''
•
-dO; t 50.1:,576. •
5i>015 76
1 \.
do. i
'
. 264 75:
17,650 \
H1

a

350

. [1825.

REPORTS OF THE
Explanatory Statemisnts and Notes—Continned.
; , . "
Gtuantity.

. 6 . All other articles.
•

«

•-;

• ,-

Oats
Potatoes
Paper, folio and 4to post . foolscap, drawing, &c.
• ' • /printing, copperplate, &c.
sheathing,.binder's, &c.
all other -




^

/

•

'

"

- pounds
do'..
do.
do. .
-'
do.
do.
do. - • • do.
- ^ do.
Vdo. •
do..
- . do.
do.
do.
do.
.do.
-. No.
do:
-. pounds
• do.
1000
M.
• do.
- pounds
. . - ' do.
do.
do.
•- ' do.
No.
- pounds
Ai).
- . do.
do.
do.
' do..
- . do.
do.
cwt.
do.
do.
. ^ dp.
do.
do.
do.
do. '
do.
do.
do; '
- • do.
dp.
- bushels
do.
dp.
do.
-do. .
- pounds
do.
,do.
'-. •
do..
- /
do.

Paints, white and red lead\ - '
. - •
white and red lead - . " ; whiting -.
Lead, bar, sheet, and pig > " . " -'
.bar, sheet, and pig • shot
, ' r'
• shot
•.- ^
Cables,'tarred
Cordage, tarred ,muai'red
. .•' • untarred .. Twine, packthread, &c.
-'
Twine,'packthread, &c., - .
-Corks
.
Copper, rods and bolts
. -.
.
„ nail's and spikes
Iron miiskets ' . '^ riiles
•wile, not above No. 18 .
above No. 18 / ' tacks, brads,..&c. not.above. 16 oz. per
above 16 oz.
nails
- '
nails '
- ^ .. - -,,,
'spikes
• - ]•
- •
- . .
' ^ vspikes
- "
•.
> '
chain cables - /
mil'lsaws , - .
anchors
" . anvils
-. .
-..- ,
hammers and sledges - ,
- ' '
., castings, vessels
- /
other
' round and brazier's rods
- '
nail rods, &c. ^
slit and hoop, &c.
- castings ' - . ^ - '
- '
sheet and hoop' " •
pig
• "
" v'
bar, rolled '
hammered.
- '
hammered
' Steel
' Heirip .
- .
Hemp
Aluni
Copperas
Copperas
, ^
Flour (wlieat)
Coal
, CoalWheat

.

Rate
of
duty.

Cents.
2,194,603
3
l,5p9,045
4
290,022
1
1,137,809
1
1,330,622
2
• '286,596
.- 2
79,007
3i
68,140'
4"
447,544
4
1,046
4
28,335
5
34,499 . 4
200,188
5
44,067
12
3,015
4
. 311
4
2,499
150
2
150
, 449,318
5
279,193
9
31,462
5
3,659
5
247,121
•4
157,(577
5
33,282
3
31,379
4
. 271,268^
3
.1,274-. 100
107,458
2
211,753
2
25,625
2|
428^369
U
404,859
1'
10,124
9,629
3
1,652,216
3
10,639 • 75
12,620
250
12,588
50
58,287
150
37,979
75
356,250 - 90
19,851
100
•78,830
175
' 219 ,150
55
200'
7,806
100'
1,410
200
418
50
398,342
5
422,461 ^ 6
570
'25
21.
10
. 7,223 , 10
5,710
20
109,863
17
•448
10
34,778
3.
9,201
15

a

Duties.

S65,838 09
60,361 80
2,900 22
11,378 09
26,612 64
5,73192
.
2,765 25
2,725 60
17,901 76
41 84
1,416 75
1,379 96
10,009 40
. •
5,288.04
.. , 120 60
12-44
3,748 50
3 0&
22,465 90
25,122 51
1,573 10
'
182 95
, .9,884 84
7 ,,883 85
•
. 998 .46
; - 1,255 16
8,138 04
1,274 C
O
2,025 20
• .4,235 06
' 640 62
6,425 52
4,048 59
303 72
288 87
49,566 48
7,979 25
31,550 00
6,294 00
87,430 50
28,484 25
320,625 00
19,85100
, 137,952 50
328 50
110 00
7,806 00
2,820 00
209 00
. 19,917 10
25,347 66
.' 142 50
2 10
• 722-30
1,142 00
18,676 71
, 115 85
1,043 34
1,390 15

1825..]

SECRETARY-OF T H E "TREASURY.

351

Explanatory Statemerits and iVb^e^—-Continued.

6. All other articles.

Gtuantity.

Books printed previous to 1775 . ^ vols.printed in.other languages than English, except Latin or Greek . - ' • do.
Latin or Gre;ek, bound
- ^ - ponnds
'
do. .
in boards
. ^ do.
all other,, bound
- , . do.
do.
in boards
- •
- , do;
Glass, cut. and npt specified 'do.
other articles -• ^ do.
apothecaries'vials, not above'4 oz.
gross
clo.
. not, above 8 oz.
dp;
bottles, not above Lquart
do.
do.
do. 1^ do. '^ - ' .^do.
' do.
do. 2' do.
.-,
-do.
do.
do; 4 do.
do.
demijohns
- . - , - number
window,not above 8 by 10 inches
. - lOOsq.ft.
do.
' do.
8 by 10 do. .
do.
do.
do. 10 by 12 do;
do.
do.
do. 10 by 12 do.
•do.
do;
abpve 10 by 12 do. "
-"
do. do. , do.
10 by 12 do.
do.
unciit, in plates, «&c.
- .
- d o .
Fish, dried or smoked - quintals
' . salmon, pickled - barrels
mackerel, do. . do.
., all other, do.
,^
. do.
Shoes and slippers, silk
- '
pairs
prunella -,.
do.
leather, men and women's, &c. - ' do.
^ children's
,- - do. •
Boots and bootees
".,do.
Segars - . . M.
Playing cards - .'
packs
Deduct exportations oyer importations, viz:
> . 2,602 pieces, at 200 cents
Duck, Russia
Raven's
7,456 pieces, at 125 cents
Sheetin'g, brown Russia • - 12,375 pieces, at ,160 cents
white Russia
' 1 7 0 pieces, at 250 cents
Candles, wax
2,270 poimds, at ,6 cents
' Spap 1 ' - "
145,121 pounds, at" 3 cents
Cinnamon -. . 6,165 pounds, at 25 cents
Cordage, tarred, and cables 299,961 pounds^ at, 3 cents

1,607
37,186
.2,441
1,560
6,968
19,580
-48,149
382,497
2,602
287'
4,637
5,376
228
35
10,630
.119
217
416
222
700
793
, 121
1,480
1,703
763
632
936
496
1,936
193
206
10,456
• 6,630

Rate
of
duty.,

Duties.

Cents.
S64 28

4
•15
. 13
30
26
3
' 2
100
125
144
200
250
300
25
250
300
275
350
325
400
400
100
200
150
100
30
25
25
15
150
250
30

'

1,487 44
366 15
202 80
2,090 40
'5,090 80
^ • 544 '47
7,649 94/
2,602 00
358 75.
'6,677 26
10,752 00
, 570 00
105, 00
2,657 50
297 50
651 00
1,444 00
. ,777 00 ,
2,275 00
3,172 00
484 00.'
1,480 00
3,406 00
1,144 50
. 632 00
• 280 80
124 G
O

484
28
309
26,140
1,989

00
95
00
00
00

1,879,287-21
S5,2.04 00
9,320 00
19,'799 60
425 00
136 20
4,353 63
1,541 25
8,998 83
49,7.78>51-

Carried to statement B
Spermaceti candle,s, imported•'
,
exported

-

111 pounds, at
111 pounds, at

1,829,508 70
8 cents
8 cents

8 83

8m
000

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, March'8, 1826.
JOSEPH NOURSE, i?e^?:5/cr;



'352
•

'

fi
•

'

'

-

^
;..'-

'

^

REPORTS OF TFIE
-

•

'.

-

-

A

'"

' . .

• ' • '

[1825:
,

"

•

S T A T E M E N T e'xhibiting the amount ofi American and fioreign tort^
. nage employed ih the fioreign trade ofi the United States during the
year ending on the 31st day ofi Decerriber, 182L
American toniiage in foreign trade ' ' Foreign tonnage in foreign trade
' -

. .-

.

:r Tons 845,758
- '
90,666

Tot£il tonnage employed in fhe foreign trade ofthe United States

936,424

Proportion of foreign tonnaige to the whole amount of tonnage
employed in the foreign trade ofthe United States. -'
, - 9.6 to 100
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

-

Register's Office, March %, 1826.
" • •:




"'

'

• J O S E P H N O U R S E , jRe^'/^ifer.

INDEX
A.
Agriculture, promoted by domestic manufactures, 321, 405, 445.
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles i n foreign
markets in 1818, 4S6.
Appropriations for 1814, gross amount of, 29.
Army expenses from 1st January, 1812, to 30th September, 1815, 15, 29.
in 1816, 74.
1817, 89, 111.
1818, 111, 198.
1819', 145, 198.
1820,: 168, 198.
1821, 200, 2:17; 234,
1822, 218, 239. 264.
1823; 248, 269', 276, 2 9 4
1824, 277; 301, 313, 332.
1825, 314, 339, 354, 372.
1826, 355, 379, 393, 418.
1827, 394, 426, 461, 472.
1828, 466, 473.
B,
Balance in the Treasury, 1st January, 1815, 30,
.1816, 74.
1817, 88,
1818, 111.
1819, 114.
1820, 169.
1821, 199.
1822, 217.
1823, 247,
1824, 276,
1825, 313,
1826; 354.
1827, 393, 472,
1828, 448, 472.
1829, estimated, 448,
Batik capital authorized by law, itt 181445-16-17, 481, 483,. 520.-,
of sixteen banks, in 1813-15-19, 523.
Bank credits, advantages and,,disadvantages of, consideredijy 491,492.
Bank, national,; establishmentr of: a, .recommendedy ^i 1 ,
Bank of England, suspended specie payments,.remarks, on, .491i
excessive issues;of, reduced the- rate, GT inteiest, 503.
F
B a n k + o f U n i t e d . States, .subscription, to the. sfockUof.the; k:90., .
a modification) of the f charter., of?, recommended;, 177.
its beneficial effects on the: fiscal) operations of
Government, : 446.-,
condition iof, the,'on: the':30th ^iSeMenaber, 1819,
481, 514.



528

INDEX.

Bank dividends, in 1817, 117
1838, 110, 155, 198.
1819, .184, 198.
1821, 199, 232.
1822, 237, 260.
1823,^ 292.
1824, 330.
1825, 337, 370.
1826, 416.
1827, 424, 460, 472.
1828, 473.
Banknotes, duty on, cease in 1816, 9.
in circulation in 1819, 482, 483, 518, 523.
Banks benefit the community, under certain restrictions, 487
Banks increased since the termination of the war in 1.815, 493.
should be restrained from excessive issues, and from issuing small
notes, 494.
Banks in the several Stales and Territories, condition.of.the, in 1819, 521.
specie possessed by the, 522.
Bounties and allowances.—See Imports.
C
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, United States subscribe to the stock
of the, 447
Circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Cocoa, a reduction of the duty on, recommended, 325.
Coffee, a reduction of the duty on, recommended, 325.
Coinage of the United States compared with that of other nations, 494.
an.increase and alterations of the. recommended, 495.
Colonial trade, remarks on the, 410.
Commerce, how affected by the tariff of 1824, 280, 319, 397
state of the foreign, in 1828, 442.
how affected by substituting a paper for a metallic currency, 509.
Cotton, exported in 1825-26, 361.
Cotton fabrics^ further protection necessary for the manufacturers of, 149,
325, 400.
Crawford, Mr., report of, on currency, 481.
Currency, report of Mr. Crawford on, 481.
of what it consists, and its condition, 482.
causes of depreciation in the paper, 484.
of metal and paper in circulation in 1813-15-19, 485.
when purely metallic, its effects, 488, 493.
how affected by bank issues, 489.
Treasury notes became a component part of the, in the eastern
States, in 1815-16, 491.
paper circulation may be beneficially connected with metallic,
491,493.
metallic, value of, compared with that of other nations, 494.
the issue of Treasury notes for the improvement of the, considered, 496.



INDEX.

529

Currency, the practicability of adopting a paper for a -metallic, considered,
497, 511.
constitutionality of adopting a paper for a metallic, considered, 504
estimated amount required for Europe, of metallic, 501'.
D.
65.
Debentures, issued in 1,813-14,
1815,
82, 95, 150.
1816,
95, 150.
1817,
116, 150.
1818-19-20, 179, 205.
1821,
225.
1822,
253.
1823,
285.
1824,
327.
1825,
367,
1826,
413.
1827,
451,
Debt—See Public Debt.
Direct taxes increased in 1815, 12.
a.reduction of the, recommended, 36.—See Revenue,
Discriminating duties cease in 1816, 7,
Drawbacks—See Debentures issued.
Duties on domestic manufactures, a repeal of the, proposed, 36.
table of existing, 46.
additional, on imports and tonnage, cease in 1816, 7,
a continuance of the. recommended, 38.
on stamps and refin.ed sugar, cease in 1816, 35.
on other articles, a repeal or reduction of, recommended, 36.
on. imports, an increase of the, proposed for the protection of certain
articles of domestic manufacture, 149, 204, 223, 252, 400.;
on fine cotton fabrics imported, an increase of the, proposed, 325.
on teas, coffee, and cocoa, a diminution of the, proposed, 325.
on imports, remarks on the credit system, in the collection of the,
492.—See Imports; also, Merchandise.
E.
Estimate of receipts and expenditures for 1815-16, 24, 29, 33, 35, 73, 78.
1817,
78, 80, 88.
1818,
93, 110.
1819,
113, 145.
1820,
148, 167,
1821,
170, 199.
1822,
202,218,
1823,
220,247.
1824,
250,277.
1825,
281,314.
1826,
318, 354.
1827,
360, 393.
1828,
396,412.
1829,
449.
Exchange, (foreign and inland,) rale of, in 1813-14-15-16, 484, 524.
Exchange, (foreign) how' affected by the depreciation of paper currency, 48*4.
by substituting a paper for a metallic currency, 509„

VOL. II.—34


530

INDEX.

Expenditures^— See Receipts and expenditures.
Exports for the year ending 30th September, 1822, .220. 222.
1823, 250.
1824, 280.
1825, 318.
1826, 360.
for the years 1822 to 1827, 397
1821 to 1828:, 442.
F
Finances, a review of the. in reference to the late state of war, 5.
state of the, in 1815, 24.
1816, 73.
1817, 88;
1818, 110.
1819, 144.
1820, 167=
1821, 198.
1822, 217,
1823, 247,
1824, 276,
1825, 312.
1826, 353.
1827, 388.
1828, 439.
Flour exported in 1825-6, 361.
Foreign debt'extinguished'in 1810> 20;
H.
Hamilton's reports on finances referred to, 445.
Hemp,- an increase of the duty on, recommended, 400,
I.
Importations into several ports, a comparative statement of the value of, 305,
gross amount of, in 1821 to 1828, 442.
in 1816, increased the rate of exchange, 484.
Imports, statement of the amount of duties accrued on, in 1813-14. 65.
1815, 82,150'.
1815-16, 95, 150.
1817, 116, 150.
1815-16-17-18,150.
1817-18-19, 179.
1818-19-20, 205.
1821, 225.
1822, 253.
1823, 285.
1824, 327,
1825, 367.
1826, 413.
1827, 451.—See
Merchandise imported,
Indemnity by Great Britain fof slaves, &c., amount of, 393.
distribution of the, 394, 418, 425.
Internal duties increased in 1S15; 12.



INDEX.

531

Internal} duties, repeal of some, and reduction of other parts of the, proposed, 36.
repealed 31st December, 1817. 148.—See Revenue.
Internal improvements, surplus revenues may be applied to, 81.
Iron, an increase of the duty on, recommended, 400.
L.
Land claimants (Yazoo) in Mississippi, statements of the awards to, 126,
166, 190, 216, 246, 275, 311, 345, 387. 431, 474.,
Lands—See Public lands.
Laws creating and increasing the revenue, reviewed, 8, 34.
repeal or modification of certain, proposed, 38.
a revision of the, recommended, 445.
Loans, additional, recommended, 75/ 149, 178, 204, 282, 317, 359.
receipts from, in 1812-'13-'14, 15.
in 1815, 26, 30.
terms on which obtained, 26, 53 to 64. 283, 306, 307,
receipts from, in 1816, 74.
1820, 178.
1821,199, 204, 217,
1822, 223.
1823, 283.
1824, 312.
1825, 354, 370—See Revenue.
M:
Manufactures, a repeal of the laws injuriously affecting domestic, proposed, 36.
table of the existing duties on domestic, 46.
a modification of the tariff, proposed for the better protection
of, 149, 204, 223, 252, 325, 397. 400.
promote the interests of agriculture and commerce, 324, 445.
domestic, exported in 3.S24-'25, 319.
1826, 363.
1827, 397
182,1 to. 1828. 442.
how affected by the fall in price of domestic articles in
foreign ports in 1818, 486.
Mediterranean fund, discontinued in March, 1815, 6.
Merchandise imported, (the quantity re-exported deducted) in 1814, 66.
1815, 82, 95.
1816, 95.
1817, 116.
1818, 151.
1819, 180.
1820, 206.
1821, 226.
1822, 254.
1823, 286.
1824, 347,
1825, 476.
1826, 433.
1827, 452.



532

INDEX.
N.

National bank, establishment of-a, recommended, 44.
subscription to the stock of the, 76.
National circulating medium, plan for improving the, 40.
Navy expenses, from 1st January, 1812, to 30th September, 1815, 15, 29.
for 1816, 74.
1817, 89, 111.
1818, 111, 198.
1819, 145, 198.
1820, 168, 198.
1821, 200i 217, 234.
1822, 218, 241, 264.
1S23, 248, 270, 276, 295.
1824, 277, 302, 313, 333.
1825, 314, 340, 354. 374.
1826, 354, 381, 393^ 420.
1827, 394, 428/464, 472.
1828, 469, 473.
O.
Officers and soldiers—See Revolutionary

claims.

P.
Passports and clearances—See Merchandise imported ,- also, Imports.
Postage on letters, increased in 1815, 12.—See Revenue.
Public credit, during the late war, state of the, reviewed, 6.
plan for improving the, 38.
suite of, in 1.828, 441.
Public debt, amount paid from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,15,16,30,
amount unpaid on 30th September, 1815,19.
amount paid to 1st January, 1815, 22.
statement of the, from 1st January, 1791, to 1815. 47.
state of the. in 1816, 75, 82, 85, 90, 100.
1817. 90, 100 to 103, 111, 119, 135.
additions made to the, by funding Treasury notes, 104,146,160,
amount of the, on 1st January and 1st October, 1818,112, 120r
146, 160, 164.
in 1819, 147, 161 to 166, 185.
1820, 169, 186, 188, 200, 212.
1821, 201, 213 to 216, 219, 235, 243.
1822, 219, 244, 249, 265, 272.
1823, 249, 271, 273, 278, 296, 308.
1824, 278, 303, 30?, 334, 342.
when it may be redeemed, 283.
amount paid from 1st January, 1817. to 1st January, 1825,''284,
343.




INDEX.

533

Public debt, amount of the, on 1st October, 1825, 315, 341, 344, 375-, 384.
1826, 356,381,385 to 387,421.
1827, 390,429 to 431,465,472,
. 1828, 470, 473.
amount paid from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan., 1829, 440, 472.
amount unpaid on 1st January, 1829, 471.
Public lands sold prior to ihe establishment of land offices, 51.
from the opening of the land offices to 1814, 51.
from 1st October, 1814, to 30th Sept., 1815, 68 to 72,88,
receipts from, in 1816, 73, 88. 110.
sold from 1st Oct., 1816, to 1st Oct.,, 1817, 97 to, 99, 110.
sold in 1817-18,110, 118, 135 to 143.
1818-19, 145, 156 to 159, 191.
1819-20, 167, 191 to 198.
relief to purchasers of, recommended, 175.
sold in 1820-21, 199,<211, 230.
effects of the relief laws on the sale of, 202.
sold in 1823, 236, 247, 258.
1823, 248, 266, 276, 290.
1824, 277/297, 312, 328.
1825, 313, 335, 368.
1826, 376, 392,. 414.
1827, 393, 422, 457.
remarks on the credit system in the sale of, 492.
R.
Receipts and expenditures, from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,16, 29.
from 1791 to 1814, 45, 73.
in 1815-16, 73, 88, 110.
1816-17, 88, 110.
1817-18, 111, 144,
1818-19, 145, 167.
1819_20, 167, 198.
1820-21, 198, 217, 233.
1821-22, 217, 233, 238 to 244, 247,261.
1S22-23, 247, 261,.268, 293.
18^3-24, 276, 293, 300, 330-1.
from 1st Jan., 1817, to 1st Jan., 1825, 284.
in 1824-25, 312, 330 to 352, 354,371,476.
1825-26, 353, 371 to 382.
1826-27, 392, 413 to 438, 451, 457, 460,
472.
from 1821 to 1828, 442, 448, 451,, 465, 473.
Revenue, state of the, during the late war, reviewed, 5.
laws passed in 1815 for increasing the, 12.
from what sources derived, and the amount in 1815, 12, 23, 30.
received from all sources, from 1st Jan., 1812, to 30th Sept., 1815,
16, 30.
laws relating to the several branches of, reviewed, 8, 34.

laws, modifications of, proposed, 36, 38, Mo.
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/ improving the, 38.
plan for
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

534

INDEX.

Revenuej amount of. in 1814-15-16, 73, 88, 96, 110, 144.
1817, 89, 96, 110, 117, 144, 167,
1818, 111, 144, 150, 167, 198.
1819, 145, 155, 167: 184, 198.
an augmentation of the, recommended, 149, 204, 223.
amount of; in 1820, 167, 184, 198, 210.
1821, 199, 217, 226, 232.
1822, 218, 237, 254, 260.
1823,' 247, 266, 276, 286 to 292.
from 1st Jan. 1817, to 1st Jan. 1825, 284.
in 1824, 276, 299, 312, 328, 3.30.
1825, 313, 335 to 337, 354, 368 to 370, 476.
1826, 377, 392, 413 to 416, 432 to 438.
1827, 393, 422 to 424. 448, 451, 457 to 460.
from 1821 to 1828, 442, 448.
how affected by the issue of Treasury notes, 496.—See Merchandise.
Revolutionary claims paid under act of 15th May, 1828. 466.
Rice, amount of, exported in 1825-6. 361.
S.
Salt duty, ceases in 1816, 9, 34.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Silk, observations on the culture and manufacture of, 364.
Sinking fund, operations of the, to 30th September, 1815, 20.
rise and progress of the, 21, 39.
further powers necessary to the, 40, 77, ^
statement of the, in 1816, 83.
stock purchased by the, in 1817, 106 to 109.
1818,124.
1819, 164.
1826, 358, 382.
7 per cent, stock, to be purchased by the. 252.
operations of the, from January, 1818, to January, 1829, 440.
Slaves, <fcc., amount received from Great^ Britain for. 393, 460.
amount'paid, 461, 466, 472, .473.
Specie, effects of the suspension of the payment of, by banks, on the fiscal
.operations of Government, 12, 24, 40, 114.
payment-of, resumed by banks, 114, 490.
amount possessed by banks, and in circulation in 1819, 482.
causes of the suspension of the payment of, by banks, 484, 490.
an article of commerce, 494.
Spirits distilled in the United States, duties on, to be modified, 36,178.
importation of, to be prohibited, 178.
quantity imported.—See Merchandise.
Stamp duties, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the, recommended, 36.
Subscription to the Bank of the United States, 90.
Sugarj quantity imported.—See Merchandise.
refined, duties on, cease in 1816, 35.
a continuation of the duties on, recommended, 36.



INDEX.

535

Surplus fund, unexpended balances carried to the, in 1815, 29.
amount applied to the payment of the public debt since
January, 1817, 441.
Surplus revenues may be applied to internal improvements, 81, 252.

Tariff of duties on imports, a modification of the, proposed for the better
protection of domestic manufactures, 149.
a revision of the, recommended, 204, 223, 252.
325, 397,
present compared with former, 304,
of 1828, effect of, on the revenue, 445.
'Taxes, a view of the several descriptions of, in 1815.12.—See Direct taxes.
also. Internal duties.
Teas imported, a reduction of the duties on, recommended, 325, 409, 445.
—See Merchandise.
Tobacco exported in 1824-5-6, 361.
Tonnage, amount of American and foreign, 111 1814, 65.
1815, 82, 95,150.
1816, 95, 150.
1817, 116, 150, 179.
1818, 150, 179. 205,
1819, 179, 205.'
1820, 205.
1821, 225.
1822, 253.
1823, 285.
1824, 352.
1825, 367,
1826, 438.
1827, 456.
1828, 443.
Treasury notes authorized to.be issued! in 1815, 13.
amount received from, in 1812-13-14, 15.
issued prior to February, 1815, and outstanding, IS,
may be funded, 19.
for what purposes issued in 1815, 26.
amount received from, in 1815, 31.
re-issued prior to October, 1815, 52.
estimated amount of, unpaid in 1816, 64.
issued, 92.
funded and outstanding in 1817, 104.
1818, 112, 125.
stock issued on, to 31st December, 1817, 121.
outstanding in December, 1819, 165, 187,
October, 1820, 189.
November, 1821, 215.
October, 1822. 246.
1823, 275.
1824, 310, 345,



536

INDEX.

Treasury notes outstanding in October, 1825, 316.
1826, 387.
1827, 431.
1828, 474.
constituted an essential part of the circulating medium in
the Eastern States in 1815-16, 490.
expediency of issuing^ as a relief from the general • pecuniary distress (in 1820) considered, 496.
W,
Wines, a reduction of the duties on, recommended, 409.—See Merchandise;
Woollen fabrics, further protection necessary for manufacturers of, 149,400.
Y
Yazoo claimants, statement of, awards' in favor of the, 126, 166, 190, 216,
246, 275, 311, 345, 387, 431, 474.





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102