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•StTH CONGRESS, } HOUSE OF EEPRESENTATIVES. ) Ex. Doc.
2d Session. ^
)

REPORT

\SECRETAM OF THE TREASURY,

STATE OF THE FINANCES,

THE YEAR ENDING- JUNE 30, 1861.




WAS.HIKGTON:
GOVEENMBNT PMNTING OTFIOE.

1861.

'^

I N THE HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES OF T J UNITED STATES,
HE

December 11, 1861.
Resolved, That fifteen thousand extra copies of the Annual Report of the Secretary of the^
Treasury on the State of the Finances be printed for the use of the House, and one thousand copies for the use of the Treasury Department.
EM. ETHEKIDGE, Clerk.




^5-0
0/

INDEX, TO REPORT ON THJ^: FIMNCES.

The Secretary's report
—
7
Statement No. 1, of the receipts and expenditures for the year ending June 30,1861.
30
Statement No. 2, of duties, revenues, and public expenditures during the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1861, agreeably to warrants issued, exclusive of trust funds37'
Statenient No. 3, of the receipts.and expenditures for the quarter of the fiscal year
1862 ending September 30, 1861
43'.
Statement No. 4, showing the amoimt of the public debt on December 1, 1861
44
Statement No. 5 exhibits the quantity and value of iron and steel, and manufactures
thereof, imported into the United States during the fiscal years ending June^
30, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, and 1861
. 45
Statement No. 6 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise imported into, and the
value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce exported from, the United .
States during the years ending June 30,-1859, 1860, and 1861
47
Statement No. 7 exhibits the imports and exports of specie and bullion; the imports
entered for consumption and specie and bullion; the domestic exports and
specie and bullion; the excess of specie and bullion exports over specie and
bullion imports, and the excess of specie and bullion imports over specie and
bullion exports
_
_50
Statement No. 8 exhibits the values of articles of foreign production imported into
the United States from, and the exports of foreign merchandise and domestic
produce to, certain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861
51
Statement No. 9. Annual report of the director of the mint for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861, and accompanying tables
59
Statement No. 10. Report of the acting engineer in charge on construction of
custom-houses, court-houses, post ofQces, marine hospitals, and other public
buildings confided to the charge of the Treasury Department; also, report
upon the result of the analysis of iron and iron ores
97
Statement No. 11 exhibits the receipts and expenditures of the marine hospital fund,
for the relief of sick and disabled seamen in the ports of the United States, for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861
126
Statement A. Report of the First Auditor on the operations of his office
136
Statement B. Report of the Second Auditor on the operations of his office
137
Statement C. Report of the Third Auditor on the operations of his office
:
139
Statement D. Report of the Fourth Auditor on the operations of his office
. 145
Statement E. Report of the Fifth Auditor on the operations of his office
146
Circular No. 1. Circular of the Secretary to collectors, surveyors, and other officers
of the customs, dated May 2, 1861
«.
-161

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INDEX!
Page.

Circular No. 2. The Secretary's circular of June 12, 1861, to collectors, surveyors,
and other officers of the customs
~.
162
Circular No 3. The Secretary's circular of August 22, 1861, to collectors, surveyors,
and other officers of the customs
163
Circular No. 4. The Secretary's circular of September 3,. 1861, to collectors and
other officers of the customs
167
Circular No. 5. The, Secretary's circular of September 21, 1861, to collectors and
other officers of the customs-..
168
Statement F. Report of the Sixth Auditor on the operations of his office
.-_
169
Statement Gr. Report of the First Comptroller on the operations of his office
__171'
Statement H. Report of the Second Comptroller on the operations of his office,--172
- Statement H^. Report of the Ti'easurer on the operations of his office
..I.-—
174
Statement I. Report of "the Solicitor on the operations of his office
_
' 175
^ Statement J. Report of the Register on the operations of his office
180
Statement K. Report of the Commissioner of Customs on the operations of his office.
202
Statement No. 12. Report of the Light-house Board
203
Statement No. 13. Amount due under treaties with various Indian tribes, payable
on time
,
207
Statement No. 14 exhibits the gold and silver coinage at the mint of the United
States, annually, from its establishment in 1792, and including the coinage
'
of the branch mints and the assay office (New York) from their organization
to June 30, 1861
219
Statement No. 15 exhibits the amount of coin and bullion imported and exported,
annually, from 1821 to 1861, inclusive; also, the amount of importation over
exportation and of exportation over importation during the same years
221
Statement No. 16 exhibits the gross value of exports and imports from the beginning of the government to Jime 30, 1861 . , J
„
222
Statement No. 17 exhibits the amount of the tonnage of the United States, annually,
from 1789 to June 30, 1861; also, the registered and enrolled and licensed
tonnage employed in steam navigation each year
224
Statement No. 18 exhibits the revenue collected from the beginning of the government to June 30, 1861, under the several heads of customs, publiciands, and
miscellaneous sources, including loans and treasury notes; also, the expenditures during the same period, and the particular tariff and price of lands
under which the revenue from those sources was collected.
226
Statement No. 19 exhibits the value of manufactured articles of domestic produce
exported to foreign countries from June 30, 1846, to June 30, 1861
.-.230.
Statement No. 20 exhibits th6 value of foreign merchandise imported, re-exported,
and consumed, annually, from 1821 to 1861, inclusive; and also the estimated
population and rate of consumption, ^er capita, during the same period
232
Statement No. 21 exhibits the total value of imports, and the imports consumed in
the United States, exclusive of specie, during each fiscal year, from 1821 to
1861; showing, also, the value of foreign and domestic exports, exclusive of
specie, and the tonnage employed during the same period
233
Statement No. 22 exhibits a summary view of the exports of domestic produce, &c ,
of the United States, annually, from 1847 to 1861,0-inclusive
.
235


INDEX.
,

*

5
Page.

Statement No. 23 exhibits the value of certain articles imported, annually, from
June 30, 1844, to June 30, 1861, (after deducting re-exportations,) and the
amount of duty which accrued on each during the same periods, respectively „
236
Statement No. 24 exhibits the value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce
, exported, annually, from 1821 to 1861, inclusive..."
241
Statement No. 25 exhibits the quantity of wme, spirits, &c., imported, annually,
from 1843 to 1861, inclusive
243
Statement No. 26 exhibits the value of imports, annually, from 1821 to 1861,
inclusive . . —
247
Statement No. 27 exhibits the value of dutiable merchandise re-exported, annually,
from 1821 to 1861, inclusive; and showing, also, the value re-exported from
warehouse under act of August, 1846
^
,
_._-248
Statement No. 28 exhibits the aggregate value of breadstuffs and provisions exported,
annually, from 1821 to 1861
249
Statement No. 29 exhibits the quantity and value of cotton exported, annually, from
1821 to 1861, inclusive, and the average price per pound
250
Statement No. 30 exhibits the quantity and value of tobacco and rice exported annually, from 1821 to 1861, inclusive
252
Statement No. 31 exhibits the value of iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and
steel, steel, wool, and manufactures of wool, manufactures of cotton, silk,
and manufactures of silk, flax, linen, and linen fabrics, hemp, and manufactures of hemp, manilla, sun, and other hemps of India, and silk and worsted
goods, imported from, and exported to, foreign countries, from 1840 to 1861,
inclusive ; and also shpmng the domestic exports of like articles for the same
periods
^
--254
Statement No. 32 exhibits the value of iron, manufactures of iron, and iron emd steel,
steel, sugar, wines, and all fabrics of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp,
is a component part, imported annually, from 1847. to 1861, inclusive ; with
the duties which accrued thereon during each year, respectively; and brandies,
for the years 1856,"1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, and 1861.^
262
Statement No. 33 exhibits the exports to, and the imports from, Canada and other
British possessions iri North America, from July 1, 1851, to June 30, 1861-.
267
Statement No. 34 exhibits the amount of goods in warehouse on July 1, 1859, and .
on the first of each succeeding month until June 30, 1861-*
268
Statement No. 35 exhibits a synopsis of the returns of the banks in the different
States at the dates annexed
»-.
272
Statement No. 36 exhibits a comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union in 1856-'57.,'1857-'58, 1858-'59, 1859-'60,
ia|0-'6l-^.-^^..-.
278
Statement No. 37 exhibits a general statement of the condition of the banks according to returns dated nearest to January 1, 1861
1
282
Statement No. 38 exhibits a general view of the condition of the banks in the
United States in various years, from 1851 to 1861, inclusive
285
Statement No. 39 exhibits the amount of moneys in the United States treasury,
amount of drafts outstanding, amount subject to draft, amount of receipts,
and amount of drafts paid as shown by the Treasurer's weekly exhibits rendered during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861
..-.
•.
286



6

INDEX.
Page.

Statement No. 40. Value of exports of the growth, produce, and manufacture of the
United States, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861
Statement No. 41 shows the value of imports into, and the exports of foreign merchandise and domestic produce from, the United States, during the quarter
- ending September 30, 1861
Statement No. 42 shows a list of parties to whom sixty days treasury notes were
issued for coin, and the amount thereof, under the act of March 2, 1861, authorizing an issue of ten millions of dollars, ($10, 000, 000.).--Statement No: 43 shows a list of subscribers to temporary loan for $2, 875, 350, (two
millions eight hundred and seventy-five thousand three hundred and fifty
dollars,) for sixty days, issued under authority of act of July 17, 1861--1
Statement No. 44. Of the public debt on the first day of January in each of the

287
i
291

292

295
^

. years from 1791 to 1842, inclusive ; and at various dates in subsequent years
to July 1, 1861
.297
Statement No. 45. Paj^ments annually on accoimt of the principal and interest of the
public debt from 1789 to 1861
, 299
sStatement No. 46. Showing the payments made annually on account of the interest
and reimbursements of the domestic debt, interest on the public debt, and redemption of the public debt, from the 4th March, 1789, to 1861
„
301




REPORT
or THE

SECRETAM OF THE TREASURY.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Decemher 9,

1861.

SIR: The Secretary of the Treasury, in obe'dience to law, sub^Lits
the following report to Congress: .•
, The general principles by which, as the Secretary conceives, the
administration of the public finances should be regulated, with a view
to insure the desirable results of efficiency, economy, and general
prosperity, were set forth, with as much clearness and plainness as
he is capable of, in his report made to Congress on the 4th day of
July last.
In that report, also, the Secretary submitted to the consideration
of the legislature the measures by which, in his opinion, the pecuniary means, necessary to the speedy and effectual suppression of the^
gigantic rebellion set on foot by criminal conspiracy against the government and the people of the United States, might be most cer-.
tainly and most economically obtained.
The estimates of the several departments then laid before Congress
by the Secretary contemplated an aggregate expenditure, during the
fiscal year to end on the 30th June, 1862, of $318,519,581 87.
To provide this sum the Secretary proposed such modifications of
the tariff and such internal taxes as would, in his judgment, produce
the sum of eighty millions of dollars, and such loans, in various
forms, not exceeding in their aggregate two hundred and fifty millions
of dollars, as would yield the required residue.
Without adopting all his recommendations in regard to customs
and internal taxes. Congress made such provision for. both as was
"deemed necessary to secure the sum proposed to be derived from
those sources, and authorized loans, in the mode and to the extent
proposed by .the Secretary, for obtaining the additional sum required'
by the estimates.
^
,
It now becomes his duty to give some account of the execution and
practical operation of these measures; and in the performance of it he
solicits, first, the attention of Congress to that part of them relating.;
* to loans.
' ''
The acts authorizing lodns pr.ovided—
First, For a National Loan of one hundred millions of dollars, or
any for FRASER
Digitized larger sum, not exceeding the whole amount authorized, in bonds


8

NATIONAL LOAN AND OTHER LOANS. .

or treasury notes, bearing 7.30 per cent interest, payable three years
after date, and convertible at or before maturity into twenty years
six per cent bonds.
'. •
Secondly, For a loan in'' Europe, or in the United States, at the discretion of the Secretary, of one hundred millions of dollars, payable
twenty years after date, and bearing interest not exceeding seven
per cent.
Thirdly^ For the issue, in payments to public creditors, or in exchange for coin, of treasury notes payable one year after date, bearing an interest of 3.65 per cent, and convertible into the three years
7.30 bonds of treasury notes.
Fourthly, For the issue of notes, payable on demand and receivable
for all public dues, to be used as coin in payments and exchanges.
The aggregate of notes of. the two last descriptions was limited to
fifty millions of dollars, in denominations less than fifty, but not less
than five dollars.
A further authority was conferred by the act to issue treasury
notes of any of the specified denominations, bearing six per cent
interest and payable not over twelve months from date, to an amount
not exceeding twenty millions of dollars.
To provide for immediate exigencies was the first duty of the Secretary, and he performed it by issuing, under authorities conferred
by various acts, for payment to public creditors or for advances of
cash, $14,019,034 66 iii treasury notes, payable in two years, and
bearing 6 per cent interest, and $12,877,750 in treasury notes, l3earing the same rate of interest, but payable sixty days after date.
His next care was to provide for the regular and continuous disbursements of the war, under the acts of the July session, and with this
view, he carefully examined the various powers conferred on him;
compared the probabilities of the American and European markets
for capital; and considered the relative advantages and disadvantages
of the several forms of loan authorized.
His reflections led him to the conclusion that the safest, surest, and
most beneficial plan would be to engage the banking institutions of
the three chief commercial cities of the seaboard to advance the
amounts needed for disbursement in the form of loans for three years
7.30 bonds, to be reimbursed, as fair as practicable, from the proceeds.,
of similar bonds, subscribed for by the people through^ the agencies
of the National Loan; using, meanwhile, himself, to a limited extent, in
aid of these advances, the power to issue notes of smaller denominations than fifty dollars, payable on demand.
Upon this plan he hoped that the capital of the banking institu:tions and the capital of the people might be so combined with the
credit-of the government, in a proper provision for necessary expenditures, as to give efficiency to administrative action, whether civil or
military, and competent support to public credit. The result thus,
far has fulfilled that hope.
Representatives from the banking institutions of the three cities,
Responding to his invitation, met him" for consultation in New York,
and, after full conference, agreed to unite as associates in moneyed

support to the government, and to subscribe at once a loan of fifty


LOANS NEGOTIATED.

9

millions of dollars, of which five millions were to be paid immediately to
' the Assistant Treasurers, in coin, and the residue, also in coin, as needed
for disbursement. The Secretary, on his part, agreed to issue three
years 7.30 bonds or treasury notes, bearing even date with the sub-,
scription, and of equal amount; to cause books of subscription to
the National Loan to be immediately opened; to reimburse the advances of the banks, as far as practicable from this national subscription;'and to deliver to them 7.30 bonds or treasury notes for the
amount not thus reimbursed. It was further understood that the
Secretary of the Treasury should issue a limited amount of United
States notes, payable on demand, in aid of the operations of the
treasury, and that the associated institutions, when the first advance
of fifty millions should be expended, would, if practicable, make
another, and when that should be exhausted, still another advance
to the government of the same amount, and on similar terms.
The^ objects of this arrangement were, (1st) to place at the, command of the government the large sums immediately needed for the
payment of maturing treasury notes, and for other d.isbursements,
ordinary and extraordinary; (2d) to secure to the people equal
opportunity, with the banks, for participation in the loan; (3d) to
avoid competition between the government and the associated institutions in the disposal of bonds; (4th) to facilitate and secure further advances to the government by the associates, if required; and,
(5th) to insure, if possible, the maintenance of payments in spiecie,
or its actual equivalents and representatives.
All these objects were, happily, accomplished. Fifty millions of
dollars were immediately advanced by the banks. The Secretary
caused books of subscription ,to be opened throughout the country,
and the people subscribed freely to the loan. The amounts thus subscribed were reimbursed to the banks, and the sum reimbursed,
though then covering but little more than half the amount, enabled
those institutions, when a second loan was required, to make a second
advance of $50,000,000.
' Thus two loans of $50,000,000 each have been negotiated for three
years 7.30 bonds, at par. T h e first of these loans was negotiated, and
the first issue of bonds bears date, on the 19th.of August; the second
on the 1st of October, 1861.
On the 16th of November a third loan was negotiated with the
associated institutions, under the authority given to the Secretary to
borrow a sum not exceeding one hundred millions, in Europe or the
United States, at a rate of interest not exceeding seven per cent. As
no reasonable prospect appeared of obtaining terms equally advantageous by advertisement, and as it was manifestly for the interest of the
government to negotiate at home rather than incur the expense and
hazard of negotiation abroad, the Secretary, under the authority of the
seventh section of the act of August 5, 1861, arranged this third loan,
also, with the associates, by agreeing to issue to them fifty millions
of dollars in six per cent bonds, at a rate equivalent to par for the
bonds bearing seven per cent interest, authorized by the act of July
17th. This negotiation, though less advantageous to the government,




10

LOANS—CUSTOMS REVENUE.

considered under the light of a simple money transaction, than the two
prior loans, was, in some respects at least, more so. It was coupled
with no arrangement for reimbursement, and entailed no immediate
expense on the treasury, beyond that of preparing and issuing the
bonds. It was coupled, also, with an understanding in the form of
an option to the associates, that on or after the first of January a fourth
advance ot fifty millions should be made, on the same terms with the
first and second, if practicable and required by the Secretary.
In addition to the loans thus made, the Secretary has issued United
States notes, payable on demand, in denominations of five, ten, and
twenty dollars, of which there were in circulation, according to the
last returns, on the 30th day of November, 1861, $21,165,220; and
there remained in the treasury at the same date, $3,385,105. The
amount thus issued, so far as it enters into the circulation of the
country, >may be regarded as a loan from the people, payable on demand, without interest.
A brief recapitulation will exhibit the general result:^
There were paid to creditors, or exchanged for coin
at par, at different dates in July and August, six
per cent two years^ notes, to the amount of....
$14,019,034 Q
Q
There was borrowed, at par, in the same months,
upon sixty days^ six per cent notes, the sum of.^.
12,877,750 00
There was borrowed, at par,on the 19th of August,
upon three years' 7.30 bonds,issued for the most
part to subscribers to the National Loan
••.
50,000,000 00
There was borrowed, on the 1st of October, upon
like securities • ••. . .-.
50,000,000 00
There was borrowed, at par for seven per cent,
on the 16th of November,' upon twenty years'
six per cent bonds, reduced to the equivalent
of sevens, including interest
45,795,478 48
There have been issued, and were in circulation and
on deposit with the Treasurer, on the 30th of
November, of United States notes, payable on
demand
^
24,550,325 00
Making an aggregate, realized from loans in
various forms, of

197,242,588 14

While success thus complete has so far attended the measures, relating to loans, the Secretary regrets to say that the receipts of revenue from duties have not, as yet, fulfilled the expectations indulged at
the date of his July report.
The act modifying the rates of duties which received the final
sanction of Congress, differed, in several respects, from the measure
which he had the honor of submitting to their consideration. In
most of these particulars, especially in the diminished duties on tea,
coffee, and sugar, and in the exemption, from the operations of the
act, of goods in warehouse and on shipboarcl, the difference, how-




CUSTOMS REVENUE—INCREASED APPROPRIATIONS.

II

ever warranted, by considerations of general policy, was certainly
disadvantageous to the revenue; while another, and perhaps more
potential cause of reduced^receipts,, may be found in the changed
circumstances of the country, which have proved, even beyond anticipation, unfavorable to foreign commerce.
At tixe date of,his report, the Secretary counted on a revenue from
customs, for the financial year 1862, of fifty-seven millions of dollars,
but the circumstances to which he has just adverted now constrain
him to reduce this estimate to $32,198,602 55.
The receipts from customs for the first quarter, ending on the
30th September, were $7,198,602 55; while the receipts for the
three remaining quarters cannot be safely estimated at more than
$25,000,000, making the aggregate for the year the sum just mentioned, of $32,198,602 55.
''
^ •
The estimates of receipts from lands and miscellaneous sources
must also be reduced from $3,000,000 to $2,354,062 89, of which
$354,062 89 were received cluring the quarter ending 30th September, 1861, and $2,000,000 are the estimated receipts of the three
remaining quarters.
The only other source of revenue which promises an addition to
the resources of the year is the direct tax authorized by Congress,
from which, if increased to the limit proposed by the Secretary, and
assumed by the States, the further sum of $20,000,000 may be
expected.
The aggregate of revenue from all sources may, therefore, be estimated at $54,552,665 44, which is less by $25,447,334 56 than the
estimate of July.
This reduction, however, though large, would not have compelled
the Secretary to ask any additional powers for the negotiation .of
loans, beyond those asked for in his July report, had appropriations
and expenditures been confined within the estimates then submitted.
Tliese estimates, it will be remembered, contemplated expenditures
in alldepartments,andfor*allobjects,to the amountof $318,519,581 87.
Of this sum $185,296,397 19 were for additional appropriations required
by the Department of War; and $17,652,105 09 for appropriatiori^s •
already made for that department. The basis of the estimates for
these additional appropriations was the understanding that it would
be necessary to bringanto the field, for the suppression of the rebellion, two hundred and fifty thousand volunteers in place of the
seventy-five thousand drafted militia originally called out, and to increase the regular army by the addition of eleven new regiments; making a total force, including the regular army already organized, of about
three hundred thousand men. After estimates for this force had
been furnished to the Secretary, in accordance with law, and his own
report, founded upon them, had been closed, the President thought
it expedient, in order to make the contest short and decisive, to ask
Congress to place at the control of the government at least four hundred thousand men, and four hundred millions of dollars. In the
numbeir thus called for the regulars were included. Congress, animated




12 INCREASED APPROPRIATIONS—RETRENCHMENT AND REFORM.

b y t h e same desire for a short and decisive contest, went beyond this
recommendation of the President, and authorized the acceptance of
volunteers in such numbers, not exceeding^ five hundred thousand, as
he might deem necessary. Congress also authorized the whole increase of the regiilar army estimated for by the department, and provided further for additional companies and for new officers in several
branches of the military service.
The action of Congress, therefore, contemplated the employment,,
if necessary, of a force, including the existing regular army, of about
five, hundred and fifty thousand men. To insure its efficiency, the
President was authorized to appoint any number of major generals
and brigadier generals he might think necessary, and to increase the
staff of major generals in the field by discretionary appointments of
aids-de-camp, with various rank, from captain to colonel.
This large increase of the army in men and officers, and the liberal
additions made by Congress to pay and rations, have augmented, and
must necessarily augment, expenditure far beyond the limit indicated
by the original estimates; and the limit must be still further extended
b y t h e additional sums required for the increase of the navy, and for
other objects.
To meet these increased demands, arising almost wholly from the
increase of the army and navy and the increase of pay and rations
beyond the original estimates, large additional appropriations have
been and will be necessary.
Of these additional appropriations $47,985,566 61 were authorized
by acts of the last session, and $143,130,927 76 are now asked for;
making an aggregate increase, including $22,787,933 31 for indefinite,
appropriations and redemption of temporary debt, beyond the estimates of July of $213,904,427 68.
"
•
To provide the large sums needed for the disbursements of the
current year, and the large sums which the exigencies of the succeeding year may require, will necessarily engage the most serious .attention of Senators and Representatives.
• Th^ first great object of reflection and endeavor, in the judgment
of the Secretary, should be the reduction of expenditure within the
narrowest practicable limits. Retrenchment and reform are among^
the indispensable duties of the hour. Contracts for supplies to the
army and navy, as well as for public Avork of all descriptions, should
be subjected to strict supervision, and the contractors to rigorous responsibility. All unnecessary offices should be abolished, and salaries
and -pay should be materially reduced. In these ways the burdens
of the people, imposed by the war, may be sensibly lightened ; and
the savings thus effected will be worth more in beneficial effect and
influence than the easiest acquisition of equal sums even without cost
or liability to repayment.
While thus recommending retrenchment and the prevention of
abuses, the Secretary feels himself constrained to renew the suggestion
heretofore submitted by him, that the property of rebels should h6 made

to pay, in part at least, the cost of rebellion. Property of great value


CONFISCATION OF REBEL PROPERTY—TAXATION AND LOANS.

13

in loyal States is held by proprietors who are actually or virtually
engaged, in that guilty attempt to break up the Union and overturn
its government, which has brought upon our country all the calamities we now endure. That property is justly forfeited to the people,
and should be subjected, with due regard for all rights and interests
concerned, to sequestration or confiscation, and the proceeds should
be applied to the satisfaction of claims arising from the war.
Property of rebels in rebel States should be treated in like manner.
Rights to services, under State laws, must, of necessity,' form an exception to any rule of confiscation. Persons held by rebels, under
such laws, to service as slaves, may, however, be justly liberated
from their constraint, and made more valuable in various employments, through voluntary ancl compensated service, than if confiscated as subjects of property.
Whatever may be saved by retrenchment, however, or exacted
from rebellion, large sums must remain to be provided for by taxation
and loans.
• Already in a former report the Secretary has had the honor of
stating the principles by which, as he conceives, the proportions of taxation and loans should be determined. Reflection has
only confirmed his opinion that adequate provision by taxation for
ordinary expenditures, for prompt payment of interest on the public
debt, existing and authorized, and for the gradual extinction of the
principal, is indispensable to a sound system of finance. The idea of
perpetual debt is not of American nativity, and should not be naturalized. If, at any time, the exacting emergencies of war constrain
to tem'porary departure from the principle of adequate taxation, the
first moments of returning tranquillity should be devoted to its reestablishment in full supremacy over the financial administration of
affairs.
It is now even more apparent than at the date of the July report
that duties on imports cannot'be relied upon as a source of revenue
sufficient for the proper objects of taxation. Some modification may,
perhaps, be judiciously made of the existing tariff, and some increase
of revenue may in this way be probably obtained:
But existing circumstances are not propitious to a wise /and permanent adjustment of imposts to the various demands of revenue,
commerce, and home industry. The most sacred duty of the American
people at this moment requires the consecration of all their energies,
and all their resources to the re-establishment of Union on the permanent foundations of justice and fre'edom; and while other nations
look with indifferent or unfriendly eyes upon this work, sound policy
would.seem to suggest not the extension of foreign trade, but a more
absolute reliance, under God, upon American labor, American skill,
and American soil. Freedom of commerce is, indeed, a wise arid
noble policy; but to be wise or noble, it must be the policy of concordant and fraternal nations.
In accordance with these views, the .Secretary begs leave to recommend that the duties 6n tea, coffee, and sugar be increased to the
 proposed; that is to say, to two and one-half cents
rates heretofore


14

INCREASE OF REVENUE—DIRECT TAXES.

per pound on brown sugar; to three cents on clayed sugar; to twenty
cents per pound on green tea, and. to five cents per pound on coffee;
and that no other alterations of the tariff be made during the present
session of Congress, unless further experience or changed circumstances shall demonstrate the necessity or expediency of them. All
considerations of prudence and patriotism seem to concur in favor of
giving to the existing tariff a full and fair trial, and of reserving the
York of revision, modification, and permanent settlement for more
propitious days.
It has been already remarked that the receipts of revenue from
duties, during the first two quarters of the current year, have not
equalled expectation. It is highly probable, ho weaver, that the
revenue of the two last will very considerably exceed that of the
two first quarters of the year. A considerable improvement in the
condition of trade and industry is clearly perceptible, and promises
to be permanent. An increase of the revenue from customs may
therefore be reasonably anticipated.
It is quite clear, however, that no anticipation of revenue from
imports, sufficient in amount for the various demands of ordinary and
extraordinary expenditure, can 'be wisely indulged, so long, at least,
as the existing contest shall be prolonged; nor is it probable, should
the debt created in the suppression of the rebellion reach very
large proportions, that the customs revenue will suffice for those
demands during the first years after the restoration of peace.
It becomes the duty of Congress, therefore, to direct its attention
to revenue from other sources, to consider the character and jgxtent
of the provision made at its last session, and the expediency of further
provision of a similar character.
The provision made at the last session was of two descriptions;
first, a direct tax of $20,000,000, of which $14,846,018 was apportioned
.to States and Territories acknowledging their obligations to the Union,
and $5,153,982 to States the citizens of which repudiate those obligations and are in open rebellion; and, secondly, an internal duty of
three .per centum on all annual incomes, with certain exceptions and
deductions.
As it is highly desirable to avoid, as long as practicable, introduction into the States of federal agencies for the assessment and collection of taxes, the Secretary, relying on assurances from governors of
various States that the amounts apportioned to them respectively
will be assumed, collected and paid, through existing State agencies,
has hitherto refrained from advising the appointment of the. officers
necessary for direct assessment and collection. He has been, the
more readily persuaded to this course because both the income and
the direct tax are required to be assessed with reference to valuations which can only be ascertained for the purposes of the income
tax, after the fir^t day of Januar}^, and .for the purposes of the direct
tax, after the first day of April next.




DIRECT AND INDIRECT TAXES ON PROPERTY.

15

The Secretary is acquainted with no statistics which aflbrd the
means of a satisfactory estimate of the amount likely to be realized
from the income tax. Considering, however, how large a proportion of incomes, after the deductions sanctioned by law, will fall within
the exemption limit of $800 a year; and considering also what numerous questions will certainly perplex its assessment and collection,
he respectfully submits to the consideration of Congress whether the
probable revenue affords a sufficient reason for putting in operation,
at great cost, the machinery of the act, with a view, should the States
assume the direct tax, to the collection of the income tax alone..
The prudent forecast which induced Congress to postpone to another
year the necessity of steps for the practical enforcement of the law,
affords, happil}^, the opportunity of revision and modification. It
affords, also, the opportunity of comparing the 'amount of needed
revenue with the probable income from taxes of every kind, and of
so shaping legislation as to secure, beyoi:id doubt, the sums essential
to the fulfilment of national obligations and the maintenance of the
national credit.
In the judgment of the Secretary, it will be necessary to increasethe direct tax so as to produce from the loyal States alone a revenue
of at least twenty millions of dollars, and to lay such duties on stills^
and distilled liquors, on tobacco, on bank notes, on carriages, on
legacies, on paper evidences of debt and instruments for conveyance
of property, and other like subjects of taxation, as will produce an
equal additional sum. The existing provision for an income tax, just
in its principle, inasmuch as it requires largest contributions from
largest means, may, possibly, and if somewhat modified will, probably, produce ten millions of dollars more. The aggregate taxation
will thus amount to fifty millions of dollars.
•
The Secretary is aware that the sum is large; but seeing, as hedoes, no probability that the revenue from ordinary sources will exceed
forty millions of dollars during the current year, ,and knowing, as h e
does, that to meet even economized disbursements, and pay the interest on the public debt, and provide a sinking fund for the gradual
reduction of its principal, the appropriation of ninety millions of dollars will be necessary, he feels that he must not shrink from a plain
statement of the'actual necessities of the situation. .
But if the sum is large the means of the people are also larger,
and the object to be attained by a consecration of a portion of them
to the public service is priceless. The real property of the loyal
States is valued, in round" numbers, at seven and a half thousands of
millions; the pergonal property at three and a half thousands of millions; and the annual surplus earnings of the loyal people at not less
than three hundred millions of dollars. Four mills on each dollar, or
two-fifths of one per cent on the real and personal property of t h e
loyal States, will produce forty-four millions of dollars; to which sum
the proposed income tax will probably add ten millions. The whole
sum will be little more than one-sixth of the surplus earnings of t h e



16

TAXES—LOANS—RATE OF INTEREST.

country.' Certainly such a tax cannot be paid without inconvenience;
doubtless the legislature which imposes such a tax must take care
that the money thus raised be used economically, prudently, and
honestly. But can any one hesitate about such or even greater
contributions when the Union and the popular institutions which it
guards are put in peril by rebellion, and the public faith pledged to
our own citizens, who, in many instances, have placed the whole
earnings of industrious lives in the hands of the government for its
suppression, asks support?
It will be seen at a glance that the amount to be derived from taxation forms but a small portion of the sums required for the expenses
of the war. For the rest, the reliance must be placed on loans.
Already, beyond,the expectations of the most sanguine, the country
has responded to the appeals of the Secretary. . The means adopted
for securing the concurrence of all classes of citizens in financialsupport to the government have been already explained.- It remains
only to be said here that, while the action of the banking institutions
in assuming the immediate responsibility of the whole advances hitherto required, as well as the final responsibility of much the largest
portion of them, merits high eulogium, the prompt patriotism with
which citizens of moderate means and working men and working
women have brought their individual offerings to the service of their
country, must command even warmer praise. It should be the constant care of the national legislature and of the national government
in all its departments tl/at the generous confidence reposed by the
poor, as well as by the rich, in the public faith, be never disappointed.
' It must not be concealed, however, that the condition of the national finances when the present Secretary entered upon the duties
of his office, though somewhat improved during the able and upright,
though brief, administration of his immediate predecessor, was such
as to make disadvantageous rates in the negotiation of loans inevi,table. It affords just occasion of gratulation that, under most embarrassing circumstances of shaken credit and immense demands,.
loans have been effected at home, without resort to any foreign
market, to the amount o.f one hundred and ninety-seven millions'^of
dollars, with a virtual engagement for fifty millions more, at an
average rate, considering the conversion of the three years 7.30
bonds into twent}^ years^ six per cent bonds as certain, of somewhat less
than six and a half per cent.
This rate of interest is, however, higher than the United States,
with their vast and constantly accumulating resources, ought to pay.
No doubt reasonably exists that after the re-establishment of union
and order, the five per cent bonds of the United States will command
a premium in the markets oP the world, unless the national debt be,
meantime, augmented beyond necessity or reason. The wealth and
power of the country, manifested in the suppressiqn of rebellion,
will demonstrate t h e absolute safety of investments in United. States
stocks; and foreign capitalists, restricted to the lower interests and




LOANS—CIRCULATION OF BANKS—CURRENCY.

17

the inferior security of public debt in other countries, will be attracted b y t h e superior advantages offered by the loans of the Union.
To,enable the government to obtain the necessary means for prosecuting the war to a successful issue, without unnecessary cost, is a
problem which must engage the most careful attention of the legislature.
The Secretary has given to this problem the best consideration in I
his power, and now begs leave to submit to Congress the result of
his reflections.
•
• '
'^,0
The circulation of the banks of the United States, on the' 1st day
of January, 1861, was,computed to be $202,000,767. Of this circu-(
lation $150,000,000, in round numbers, was in States now loyal, in- i /
eluding West Virginia, and $50,000,000 in the rebellious States. /
The whole of this circulationtconstitutes a loan without interest fromf ;
.the people to the banks, costing them nothing except the expense of\i:
issue and redemption and the interest on the specie kept on Hand for } \
the latter purpose; and i t deserves consideration whether sound pol-C 1
icy does not require that the advantages of this loan be transferred, /
in part at least, from the banks, representing only the interests of the / stockholders, to the government, representing the aggregate interests ^ ^
of the whole people.
I t has been well questioned b y t h e most eminentstatesmen whetbe^a currency of bank notes, issued by local institutions under State*
laws, is; not, in fact, prohibited by the vuational Constitution. SMch;
emissions certainly fall within the spirit, if not within the letter, ofl
the constitutional prohibition of the emission of bills of credit by the^
States, and of the making by thenl of anything except gol# andi
silver coin a legal tender in payment of debts.
Howeyer this may be, it is too clear to be reasonably disputed! thati
Congress, under its. constitutional powers to lay taxes, to^ regulate
commerce, and to regulate the value of coin, possesses ample autliority to control the credit circulation which enters so largely into th§
transactions of commerce and affects in so many ways the valuer of
coin.
'
_
In the judgment of the Secretary the time has arrived wheujGongress should exercise this authority. The value of the existing bank
note circulation depends on the laws of thirty-four States and
the character of some."sixteen hundred private corporations. I t is
usually furnished in greatest proportions by institutions of least
actual capital. Circulation, commonly, is in the inverse ratio of solvency. Well-founded institutions,, of large and solid capital, have, in
general, comparatively little circulation ; while weak corporations
almost invariably seek to sustain themselves by obtaining from the
people the largest possible credit in this form. Under such a system,
or rather lack qf system, great fluctuations, and heavy losses in discounts and exchanges, are inevitable; and not unfrequently, through
failures of the issuing institutions, considerable portions of the circulation become suddenly worthless in the hands of t h e people.
The recent experience of several States in the valley of the MissisEx.DoCe2—2



f

18

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 1863---LOANS.

\

sippi painfully illustrates the justice of these observations; and e n \
forces by the most cogent practical argunients the duty of protecting \
commerce a;nd industry against the recurrence of such disorders;
The,Secretary thinks it possible to combine with this protection a
provision for circulation, safe to the community and convenient for
the government. . '
/
• Two plans for effecting this object are suggested. The first contemplates the gradual withdrawal from circulation of the notes of
' private corporations^and for the issue, in their stead, of United States
notes, payable in coin oil demand, in amounts sufficient for the useful
ends of a representative currency. The second contemplates the
preparation and delivery, to institutions and associations, of notes prepared for circulation under national direction, and t o b e secured as.to .
prompt convertibility into coin b y t h e pledge of United States bonds
and Other needful regulations.
The first of these plans was partially adopted at the last session of
Congress in, the provision authorizing the Secretary to issue United
States notes, payable, in coin, to an amount not exceeding fifty mil- ,
lions of dollars. That provision may be so extended as to reach the
average circulation of the country, while a moderate tax, gradually '
augmented, on bank notes, will relieve the national from the competition of local circulation. It hais been already suggested that the
substitution of a national for a state currency, uponthis plan, would
be equivalent to .a loan to the government without interest, except
on the fund to be kept in coin, and without expense, except the cost
of preparatioti, issue, and redemption; while the people would gain the additional advantage of a uniform currency, and relief from a
considerable burden in the form of interest on debt. These advantages are, doubtless, considerable; and if a scheme can be devised
by which such a circulation will be certainly and strictly confined to
the real needs of the people, and kept constantly equivalent to specie ^ .
by prompt and certain redemption in coin, it will hardly fail of legislative sanction.
' ^
The plan, however, is not without serious inconveniences and hazards. The teinptation, especially great in times of pressure and danger,
to issue notes without adequate provision for redemption; the ever- ^
presentliability to be called on for redemption beyond means, however
carefully provided and managed; the hazard of panics, precipitating
demands for coin, concentrated on a few points and a single fund;
t h e risk of a &epreciated, depreciating, and finally worthless paper
money; the immeasurable evils of dishonored public faith and national
bankruptcy; all these are possible consequences of the adoption of a
system of government circulation. I t maybe said, and perhaps truly,
t h a t . t h e y are less deplorable than those of aii irredeemable bank
'Ci^rculation. Without entering into that comparison, the Secretary
-contents himself with observing that, in his judgment, these possible
disasters so far outweigh the probable benefits of the plan t h a t he
feels himself constrained to forbear recommending its adoption.




CIRCULATION BASED ON NATIONAL BONDS AND SPECIE.

19

The second plan suggested remains for examination. Its principal
features are, (1st) a circulation of notes bearing a common impression
and authenticated by a common authority;. (2d) the redemption of
'these notes by the associations and institutions to which they may be
delivered for issue; and (3d) the security of that redemption by the
• pledge of United States stocks, and an adequate provision of specie.'
In this plan the people, in their ordinary business, would find the
advantages of uniformity in currency; of uniformity in security; of
effectual safeguard, if effectual safeguard is possible, against depreciation; and of protection from losses in discounts and exchanges;
while in the operations of the government the people would find the
further advantage of a large demand for government securities,' of
increased facilities for obtaining the loahs required by the war, and
of some alleviation of the burdens on industry through a diminution
in the rate of interest, or a participation in the profit of circulation,
without risking the perils of a great money monopoly. *
A further and important advantage to the people may be reasonably expected in the increased security of the Union, springing from , ,
the common interest in its pres^ervation, created by the distribution of 'V^
its stocks to associations throughout the country, as the basis of their. /
circulation.
The Secretary entertains the opinion that if a credit circulation in
any form be desirable, it is most desirable in this. The notes thus
issued and secured would, in his judgment, form the safest currency
which this country has ever enjoyed; while their receivability for all
government dues, except customs,^ woul!d make them, wherever payable, of equal value, as a currency, in every part of the Union. The
large amount of specie now in the United States, reaching a total of
not less than two hundred and seventy-five millions of dollars, will
easily support payments of duties in coin, while these pa3mients and
. ordinary demands will.aid in retaining this specie in the country as a
solid basis both of circulation and loans.
The whole circulation of-the country, except.a limited amount of
foreign coin, would, after the lapse of two or three years, bear the
impress of the nation whether in coin or notes; while the amount
of the latter,. always easily ascertainable, and, of course, always
generally known, would not be likely to be increased beyond the real
wants of business.
He expresses an opinion in favor of this plan with the greater confi- *
dence,because it hasthe|idvantage of recommendation from experience.
It is not an untried theory. In the State of New York and in one or more
of the other States it^has been subjected, in its most essential parts,
to the test of experiment, andfhas been found practicable*and useful.
The probabilities of success will not be diminished but increased by
its adoption under national sanction and for the whole country.
It only remains to add that the plan is recommended by one other
consideration, which, in the judgment of the Secretary, is entitled to
much influence. It avoids almost, if not altogether, the evils of a
great and sudden change in the currency by offering inducements to
solvent existing institutions to withdraw the circulation issued under



20

RECEIPTS ANFD DISBURSEMENTS 1861 AND 1862.

State authority, and substitute that provided by the authority of
the Union. Thus, through the voluntary action of the existing institutions, aided by wise'legislation, the great transition from a currency
heterogeneous, unequal, and unsafe, to one uniform, equal, and safe,
. may be speedily and almost imperceptibly accomplished.
If the Secretary has omitted the discussion of the question of the
constitutional power of Congress to put this plan into operation, i t is
> because no argument is necessary to establish the proposition that
the power to regulate commerce and the value of coin includes the
power to regulate the currency of the country, or the collateral proposition that the power to effect the end includes the power to adopt
the necessary and expedient means.
The Secretary entertains the hope that the plan now submitted,
if adopted with the limitations and safeguards which the experience
and wisdom.of Senators and Representatives will, doubtless, suggest, may impart such value and stability to government securities
that it will not be difficult to obtain the additional loans required for
- ' ^ ^ the service of the current and the succeeding year at fair and reaI sonable rates; especially if the public credit be supported by sufficient and certain provision for the payment of interest and ultimate
redemption of the principal.
'
^
To obtain a clear understanding of the amount for which it will become necessary to resort to further loans, it is requisite to review
the financial movement of the treasury during the whole of the last,
and the first quarter of the current fiscal year, and compare, somewhat more closely than has already been done, the probable wants
and probable resources of the government for the remaining three
. quarters of the current, and the whole of the following year.
In the July report the Secretary submitted a detailed statement,
in part estimated, ^showing the receipts for the last fiscal year, ending on the 30th June, 1861, including the balance in the treasiiry at
its commencement, to have been $86,972,893 81; and the expenditures to have been $84,577,258 60; and the balance to have been
$2,355,635 21. Actual returns show that the receipts, including
balance, were $86,835,900 27; the expenditures, $84,578,834 4f; and
the balance, $2,257,065 80.
X For the first quarter of the current fiscal year, commencing 1st
.
July, 186i, the receipts and expenditures are ascertained, and for the
remaining three quarters, ending SOth June, 1862, are estimated as
follows:
"
For the 1st quarter, the actual receipts from customs, lands, and miscellaneous sources, including
the balance of $2,257,065 80, were
$9,809,731 24
J^or the 2d, 3d, and 4th quarters the estimated receipts a r e . . . .
........
27,000,000 00
/

Carried forward




36,809,731 24

RECEUPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 1862 AND 1863.

21

Brought forward
•
$36,8^09,731 24
To these sums must be added the amount realized
from loans in all forms prior to December 1, 1861,
as already stated
'.
197,242,588 14
And there must be added also the amount to be
realized from additional loans alreadv authorized
75,449,675 ,00
And there must be added also the amount anticipated from the direct tax
20,000,000 00
Making the total of receipts

329,501,994 38

On the other hand—
For the 1st quarter the actual expenditures were-. $98,239,733 09
For the 2d, 3d, and 4th, the estimated expenditures,
under appropriations already made for public service, including civil list. Interior, War, and Navy
Departments, and public debt and interest, are*. 302,035,761 21
And the estimated expenditures under the additional
appropriations now asked for are—
Por civil service and increased interest;...
•
$5,166,438 99
And for the War and Navy Depart,
ments
137,964,488 77
•— 143,130,927 76
Making a total of actual and estimated expenditures
. under existing and asked appropriations of «.'.. 543,406,422 06
From which deduct actual and estimated receipts, as
above stated
.^. . . . . . . 329,501,994 38
Making an apparent amount for which recourse must -"
\
>
be had to loans of
213,904,427 68
It is to be observed, however, that in the amount estimated for
expenditures, $22,870,398 50 is estimated for public debt, payment
of a considerable part of which will not probably be demanded, and
that some expenses are'estimated for which maj^ be. retrenched; so
that the whole amount of loans required, in addition to the amount
already authorized, will certainly not exceed $200,000,000.
• For the fiscal year 1863, commencing on the 1st July, 1862, and
ending on the SOth June, 1863, no reliable estimates can be made.
It is earnestly to be hoped, and, in the judgment of the Secretary,
not without sufficient grounds, that the present war may be.brought
to an auspicious termination before midsummer. In that event, the
.provision of revenue by taxation, which he has recommended, will
amply sufSce for all financial exigencies, without resort to additional
loans; and not only so, but will enable the government to begin at
once the reduction of the existing debt.



22

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 1863—SLOANS.

It is the part of wisdom, however, to be prepared for all eventualities, and the Secretary, therefore, submits the estimates of the sevqi-al
departments for the fiscal year 1863,based on the supposed continuance
of the war, as follows:
The estimated expenditures are—
For the civil list, including foreign intercourse and
miscellaneous expenses other than on account of
the public debt
$23,086,971 23
For the Interior Department, (Indians and Pensions)
4,102,962 96
For the War Department
360,159,986 61
For the Navy Department
45,164,994 18
For the public debt:
Redemption.
$2,883,364 11
Interest on debt contracted
before 1st July, 1 8 6 2 . . . . 29,932,696 42
Interest on debt to be contracted after 1st July, 1862 10,000,000 00
42,816,330 53
Making an aggregate of estimated expenditures of- • 475,331,245 51
On the other hand, the estimated receipts are—
From customs, lands, and
ordinary sources •
$45,800,000 00
From direct tax
„
20,000,000 00
From internal duties, including income tax- ..,.
30,000,000^00
Making an aggregate of estimated receipts of
And leaving a balance to be providedfor of

95,800,000 00
379,531,245 51

The whole amount required from loans may, therefore," be thus
stated:
For the fiscal year 1862, under existing laws
$7^5,449,675 00
For the fiscal year 1862, under law^ to be enacted - - 200,000,000 00
For the fiscal year 1863, also under laws to be enacted 379,531,245 51
Making an aggregate of

654,980,920 51

'^

The total may be stated in round numbers at six hundred and fifty-"
five millions of dollars;

*

A tabular statement will accompany this report, showing somewhat
more in detail the actual and estimated receipts and-expenditures of
the financial years 1861, 1862, and 1863.
It only remains, in order to complete the view of the financial
a statement of the public debt as it was on the

situation, to submit



PROGRESS OF DEBT—LOANS—RATE OF INTEREST. '

23

1st day of July, 1860 and 1861, and will be, according to the estimates now presented, at the same date in each of the years 1862 and
1863,
The statement, in brief, is as follows: .
'
On
On
On
On

the
the
the
the

1st
1st
1st
1st

day
day
day
day

of
of
of
of

July,
July,
July,
July,

1860,
1861,
1862,
1863,

the public debt was- - $64,769,703 08
the public debt was- • 90,867,828 68the public debt will be 517,372,802 93
the public debt will be 897,372,802 93

The particulars of which-the debt consists, and the portions which
have been or will be paid or contracted in each year, will appear
fully in a table, which will be submitted with this Report to Congress.
Another table will be submitted, showing the amount of the public
debt in,each year, from 1791 to 1861, inclusive. The Secretary, believing that the frankest is the wisest policy for
nations as well as individuals, has thought it his duty to submit to
Congress this plain statement of the financial condition of the country. That it imposes considerable burdens is not to be denied or
disguised. It is consoling to know that the energies and resources
of the people are not insufficient for them. The public debt on the
1st of July, 1863, if the war be protracted until that time, on the
scale of expenses contemplated by the estimates, will be, in round
numbers, nine hundred millions of dollars. The amount of the public
debt in the year 1816 was $127,334,933 74, a;nd in twenty years it
was paid off by the people. The country, even if the loyal States
only are regarded, can sustain and pay off in thirty years the debt
to which rebellion now exposes us with hardly greater proportional
contributions from increased and increasing resources than that debt
made necessary.
It will be for the wisdom of Congress, to determine how. far the
annual and the aggregate burdens of the people shall be diminished
by retrenchment, by economy, by prudent yet vigorous adjustment of
means to ends, and by just contributions from rebel property. No-.
thing more certainly enhances credit and improves resources than the
reduction of wants and wise energy in administration.
The Secretary forbears making any recommendation concerning
the authorities with which it may be expedient to invest him in respect to future loans. He begs leave to refer this matter altogether
to the better judgment of Congress, suggesting only that, whatever
discretion it may be thought prudent to give him in "other respects,
the rate of interest be limited by law.
Turning now from the more immediate consideration of the public
finances, the Secretary solicits the attention of Congress to soma other
topics connected with the administration of the Treasury Department.
. By the act of Congress of July 13, 1861, commercial intercourse,
with States declared to be in insurrection by the President, was pro


24

TRADE WITH STATES IN INSURRECTION—REFORMS.

hibited,. and the Secretary of the Treasury was authorized to estab'
lish such rules and regulations as he might deem expedient, in accordance with which, under license from the President, a restricted trade
might be conducted. Upon full consideration of the whole subject,
it has not been deemed advisable as yet to establish any general rules
and regulations for such a trade. In a few instances, special licenses
have beeii granted to convey particular articles of property into insurrectionary States, and to carry on a limited trade with parts of
eastern Virginia inhabited by loyal people; but, with these inconsiderable exceptions, it has been hitherto thought best to enforce the prohibition to the full extent of the act. As the act itself, however, does not
seem to contemplate the forfeiture of property, unless used for the
purposes of the rebellion, or found in transit to or from insurrectionary States, its execution has not been extended beyond that intent.
To avoid, as far as possible, the practical inconveniences of this
suspension of commerce, the Secretary, with the approbation of the
President, has established regulations, in accordance with which
cotton, rice, and other property will be collected and cared for by
agents of the department in insurrectionary districts occupied by
troops of the Union, and will be forwarded by sea fo New York.
All sales will be made for account of the government, and the proceeds paid into the national treasury, subject to any just claims of
loyal citizens. This arrangement is, of course, temporary in its
nature. As a general rule, in the judgment of the Secretary, commerce should follow the fiag; and whenever the authority of the Union
is fully restored in districts sufficiently extensive for the re-establishment of loyal State government, affording due security against abuses
of trade in furnishing aid and comfort to rebellion, the ports should
be opened, without restriction, and all commerce freely permitted.
,
With a view to reformation of ab\ises and reduction of expenses,
the Secretary has caused most of the collection districts in all the
States and Territories not under insurrectionary control to be visited
by an officer of his department. Their inquiries have led to the
abolition of some offices, and a reduction of the allowance and compensation to the incumbents of others, amounting to $75,095 annually.
This sum, with the temporary reduction of annual expenses, occasioned by the suspension of official duties in the rebellious; States,
amounting to $644,141 68, will more than suffice for all the expenses
arising under the act of July for the additional agents, inspectors,,
and aids, required for its due execution and the prevention of illegal
traffic.
^
In this connexion the Secretary asks permission to direct the attention of Congress to the fact that surveyors of ports at several points in
tbe Mississippi valley are almost exclusively occupied by their duties
under the act of July, and are subjected in consequence to'labors
and responsibilities for which the compensation now allowed by law'
is not an equivalent. It is, therefore, suggested that the Secretary
be authorized to make some additional allowances, to be paid from
the appropriation already made for such services
The Secretary, also recommends that a division be provided for




MDJT—COD? IN CIRCULATION-~GOLD AND SILVER MINES.

25

ef ^forfeitures, fines, and penalties, under this act, between the
officers, the informer, and the governnient, corresponding to that
now allowed by the revenue laws in other cases, and in order
to protect the interests both of citizens and of the government,
he further suggests that in all cases of fines, forfeitures, and penalties, under whatever law, when the amount in controversy does not
exceed one thousand dollars, the Secretary be authorized to prescribe whatever mode^'may seem most convenient and certain for ascertaining the facts involved, and to direct such settlement of the
matter in controversy by remitter or otherwise, as he may deem
just.
The interests of the government will also be promoted, in the
judgment of the Secretary, by the appointment of a solicitor of customs, to reside in the city of New York, who shall conduct all suits
and prosecutions, and collect all penalties, fines, forfeitures, and dues
to the government, under the revenue laws, within the collection
district of New York, and advise the collector in respect to all legal
questions connected with the customs which may be referred to him
by that officer.
The operations of the Mint during the last year were large beyond
precedent. The net amount of bullion received was $72,146,571 0 1 ;
the amount coined was: of gold coins, $60,693,237 ; of silver, coins,
$2,605,ft)0; of cent coins, $101,660; of gold bars, $20,015,163 6 4 ;
and of silver bars, $278,006 94 ; making the total coinage of the year
$83,693,767 58. Of the bullion deposited $54,149,865 32 were re. ceived at the assay office in New York; of the gold bars $19,948,728 88,
and of the silver bars $187,078 63, in value, were stamped at the
same office. Of $799,923,362 14, the entire coinage since the establishment of the mint, $520,000,000 have been coined from bullion
derived froin mines of the United States.
g
• Of the gold deposited during the last year $34,216,8^9 52, and of
the silver $610,011 29, were from the minq^ of the United States ;
the remainder formed part of the unusually large receipts during the
year from foreign countries.
The large and rapidly increasing production of gold in j:he Territory
cxf C'olorado suggests inquiry into the expediency of establishing an
assay office or a branch mint at Denver. A private mint for the-convenience of the people is now in operation at that place ; and obvious
considerations seem to require the substitution of national for private
agencies in coinage.
The silver mines of Nevada and Arizona have also yielded large
returns ; and the protection of the citizens, engaged in extracting
their treasures, frona insurrectionary and savage violence demands the
cai'nest consideration of Congress.
No means exist of ascertaining, with absolute certainty, the.quantity of coin now in the United States ; but the best accessible data
lead the Secretary to concur in the judgment of the Director of the
Mint, that the amount is between two hundred and seventy-five millions and three hundred millions of dollars.

The Secretary takes great pleasure in directing the attention of


26

^

CLAIMS OF STATES—OREGON WAR DEBT.

Congress to the able and instructive report of that officer, and to the
suggestions it contains.
Under the act of July 27, 1861, large claims have been presented,
by the authorized agents of the governors of several States,, for expenses incurred on account of troops raised by them respectively,
and employed for the suppression of the insurrection; but as the act
authorizing the settlement of these claims required proper vouchers
in support of them to be filed and passed u]5on by the accounting
officers, and as no such vouchers have, as yet, been furnished, it has
been hitherto impracticable to adjust and pay them.' Inasmuch, however, as these expenditures were incurred at a time when Congress^
was not in session, and when the public exigency was imperative,
-and were marked, so far ^s the statements submitted to him disclosed
their character, by discretion and patriotism, the Secretaiy thought
himself warranted in advancing to the several States, upon certificates
of the State officers to the general correctness of the accounts and
on condition that no further claim should be made on account of the
expenses contemplated by the act until after final settlement upon
vouchers, the sum of forty per centum of their respective demands;
and he has accordingl}^ paid'^to the States of Illinois, Indiana, loAva,
Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin the aggregate sum of
$4,514,078 51.
•
,
As the law did not seem to contemplate the continued action of
State officers for federal objects, but confined the appropriation
made by it to expenses incurred, leaving expenses to be incurred to
the action of federal officers within their respective spheres of duty,
the Secretary has not thought himself authorized to settle in the
unusual .mode provided by the act, except for advances actually
made, or at least contracted for prior to its passage. All other
claims are, and will be, referred to the War Department for sanction
and requisition, unless Congress shall be pleased to direct otherwise.
An act of the last Congress authorized the payment of claims, allowed for certain services and expenses in Oregon and Washington,
to be made by the issue of bonds of United States, bearing six per
cent, interest, and payable twenty years after date. The Secretary
most respectfully asks the attention of Congress to the injurious influences of authorizing such issues for such purposes. , Claims are
easily allowed when payment is to be made otherwise than in money,
and bonds issued for claims are apt to come into the market in competition with bonds issued for loans, to the serious prejudice of the
public credit. That no important injury has resulted from the act
just referred to is to be attributed to the faithful vigilance of tli;e
Third Auditor in the examination of the claims made upon the
treasury, and the comparatively small amount of bonds, not exceeding, probably, two millions eight hundred thousand dollars., in all,
issued or to be issued in payment of them. /
The attention of Congress is respectfully directed to the observaAuditor in respect to the abuses which have been


tions of the Fifth


LIGHT-HOUSES—MARL^E HOSPITALS—COAST SURVEY.

27

tolerated in the consular system, and the expediency of authorizing
the appointment of a consul general for the coast and islands of the
Pacific.
In disregard,of repeated warnings of impending dangej in December last, the Secretary of the Treasury, in office at the time, neglected
to take the necessary measures to secure the vessels and other movable property connected with the light-house establishments. This
property, therefore, became the easy prey of insurrectionary violence. Acts of rapine and plunder followed each other in quick succession as the rebellion spread,, until the -lights of commerce were
extinguished along the whole coast,—except at Key West and some
neighboring points protected by the power of the Union,—from the
capes of the Chesapeake round to the western limits of Texas. In
other parts of the country the light-house system has been extended
and improved, until it is surpassed in aids and benefits to navigation
and commerce by that of no other country. Under the direction of the
Secretary also, as the rebellion has, been suppressed in district after
district, the lights have been rekindled. Already from the coasts of
the Chesapeake, from the banks of Hatteras, from the islands of Port
<Royal entrance, and from Chandeleur island in the G-ulf, they shine
once more as the safeguards and' symbols of fraternal commerce and
peaceful civilization. May we not hope that the time is not far off
when every extinguished light shall be in like manner restored amid
^ the rejoicings of a reunited people ?
The Secretary respectfully invites legislative attention to the condition of the marine hospitals constructed or in process of construction. The number has been increased far beyond necessity or utility,
and to the serious.prejudice of the fund for sick and disabled seamen,
derived from the hard earnings of the meritorious class to which they
belong. At present, indeed, some of these hospitals are made available for the benefit of the troops, but this use must necessarily be
partial and temporary. Of these, therefore, as well as those not
thus used, the Secretary recommends that those least advantageously
situated and employed be disposed of on the most favorable terms,
and that no new structures be undertaken except in cases of the
clearest expediency or necessity.
The great value of the coast survey has been strikingly attested
by recent events. The knowledge gained by its operations during
past years, the experience and skill of naval and military officers
acquired in its service, and now available in the op orations^ of the
army and navy, and the ready aid now afforded by it, in examinations and surveys of harbors and inlets, to the forces of the Union
in their movements upon the coast, demonstrate, beyond question, the
wisdom of the policy which originated and* has sustained it. The
diminished appropriation required for its support during the fiscal
year 1863 will no doubt be cheerfully made.
The number of vessels in the revenue service of the departnient
was twenty-nine. Five had been pre-

 March, 1861,
on.the 4th of


.28

.

REVENUE SERVICE—WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

viousl}; seized by the insurgents, and one had been ordered to Norfolk for repairs, where, having been taken to pieces with'a view to
rebuilding, and therefore incapable of removal, she was involved in
the disasters attendant on the destruction of the navy yard.
Of the vessels connected with the revenue service not seized by
the rebels, four were . on the Pacific coast, six on the lakes, and
eighteen on the Atlantic coast. Of those on the lakes five have
be^n ordered to service on the Atlantic coast. Nearly half of these
vessels are unfit for the purposes of the revenue, and will be sold
under the provisions of the act of July 25.
Under the same act three steamers have been purchased and
equipped, and have been of essential service in the suppression of
unlawful commerce on the Chesapeake, and in aid of the expedition
by which the authority of the Union was recently, restored on the
eastern shore of Virginia. ,
^
.'
With a view to the increased efficiency of the service, the Secretary directed a thorough examination to be made by a competent
board of officers, of all candidates for appointment, as well as of all
officers, except captains, already in the service, and has made a certificate from that board of entire competency an indispensable condition of appointment.
Four revenue cutters are now engaged in Coast Survey duty,
in connexion with the naval and military expeditions on the coasts of,
the insurgent States; and the whole of the . remaining number a r e |
actively engaged in the enforcement of the revenue laws, and in the
protection of commerce.
Under advertisements for proposals for the construction of additional revenue steamers, under the act of July, a large number of
bids and models have been received, and contracts will be made for
five, which, when completed, will fully answer the existing demands
of the service.
The Secretary desires to avail himself of this opportunity to invite
the attention of Congress to the importance of a uniform system and
a uniform nomenclature of weights and measures and coins to the
commerce of the world, in which the United States already so largely
shares. The wisest of our statesmen have regarded the attainment
of this end, so desirable in itself, as by no means impossible. The
combination of the decimal system with appropriate denominations
in a scheme of weights, measures, and coins for the international
uses of commerce, leaving, if need be, the separate systems of nations
untouched, is certainly not beyond the reach of the daring genius
and patient endeavor which gave the steam engine and the telegraph
to the service of mankind. The Secretary respectfully suggests the
expediency of ^a small appropriation to be used in promoting interchange of opinions between intelligent persons of our own and foreign
countries on this subject.
In closing this report, the Secretary takes pleasure in asking the
consideration of Congress for the various suggestions of the heads of

the bureaus of the department, contained in their several reports,


REPORTS OF BUREAUS.

29

which are herewith transmitted. It has been his endeavor, since
assuniing the charge of the department, to infuse into its action the
greatest possible activity and vigor; and it is a source of very great
satisfaction to him that his efforts have been, in general, faithfully
and zealously supported b y t h e gentlemen with whom he has been
associated. The reports from the several bureaus will show how much
has been accomplished during the year, and how well. The Secretary
indulges the^ hope that continued endeavor, with larger experience,
will make the department, in all its working, what a department
charged with duties and responsibilities so | various and important
ought to be.
s
S. P . CHASE.
Hon.

G. A. GROW,

Speaker of the House of Bepresentatives.




30

~ REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. i :

.

.. ^

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.
Tcible shoiving the receipts and expenditures for the year ending June
30, 1861 ; the receipts and expenditures^ actual {1st quarter) and
estimated^ for the year ending Jtme'30,1862; the estimated receipts
OAid expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1863.
The receipts, including balance for the year ending June 30, 1861,
were—
Balance in the treasury on June 30, 1860
$3,629,206 71
The receipts for the year eliding June 30,. 1861, were—
From customs :
Istquarter
$16,119,83122
2d . . d o
8,174,167 69
3d . . d o
9,772,574 57
4th . . d o
,.
5,515,552 16
Aggregate
From public lands :
Istquarter
2d .-do
3d .-do
4th .-do

;,......
281,100
330,955
146,704
111,898

*...

Aggregate
.^
From miscellaneous sources :
Istquarter
2d . . d o
' ^
3d --do
4th ...do
Aggregate

39,582,125 64
84
02 '
68
00
870,658 54
318,857
148,037
269,989
155,314

98
09
90
67

'

Making a total of receipts from ordinary sources
From loans and treasury notes :
1st quarter
2d ..do
8,552,700
3d . . d o
15,723,475
4th .-do
17,585,534

892,199 64
of-*

Aggregate
Aggregate actual and estimated receipts from all
sources, including balance
•..'



^ 44,974,190 53

00
35
39
41,861,709 74
86,835,900 2T

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

31

The expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1861, were—
" For the civil list, (other than the public debt and the Interior Department:)
1st quarter
$6,44^003 77
2d --do
5,917,832 20
3d ..do
..,
7,359,151 34 >
4th --do
3,470,215 88
Aggregate ...•

--

$23,187,203 19

For Interior Department, (Indians and pensions :)
Istquarter
•
1,679,575 24
2d .-do
156,093 71
3d .-do
1,168,608 40
4th .-do . . ; . . . ' . . . .
- 7 5 5 , 7 4 5 37
Aggregate

3,760,022 72

Por the War Department:
Istquarter...
. ....
2d --do
3d ..do . . . . r
4th .-do

5,352,771-42
„ 2,395,849 51
5,123,744 92
10,108,784 59

Aggregate
For the Navy Department:
Istquarter
2d .-do
3d --do
4th .-do

.22,981,150 44
2,578,678
1,885,079
3,369,994
4,594,824

Aggregate
For payment of Texas creditors :
1st quarter
2d .-do
3d ..do
4th . . d o
;.

12,428,577 09
1,282
5,831
1,972
69,720

Aggregate
For redemption of loan of 1846
For the redemption of treasury notes :
1st quarter
375,400
2d . . d o . . . . '
6976,150
3d . . d o
8,087,450
4th . -do
2,702,900
Aggregate



*
.

88
17
52
52

81
51
35
60
78,807 27
1,000 00
00
00
00
00
18,141,900 00

32

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

For interest on the public debt:
1st quarter
$115,560 47
2d . . d o
1,712,286 08
3d . - d o
417,452 54
4th - . d o . .
1,754,874 67
Aggregate

-^

$4,000,173 76

Making an aggregate of expenditures for the year,of $84,578,834 47
The balance and aggregate of receipts already
- stated were
86,835,900 27
Leaving a balance in the treasury, at the
closeof the fiscal year, 1861, of
'.......

2,257,065 80

FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1862.
The receipts, actual (1st quarter) and estimated, for
the current fiscal year, are—
Balance in the treasury on the 1st of July, 1861.
From customs:
1st quarter (actual)
$7,198,602 55
2d, 3d, and 4th quarters (estimated) 25,000,000 00
Aggregate
From public lands:
1st quarter (actual)
2d, 3d, and 4th quarters (estimated)

32,198,602 55
35,96703
400,000 00

Aggregate
From miscellaneous sources:
1st quarter (actual)
•
2d, 3d, and 4th quarters (estimated)
Aggregate

$2,257,065 80

435,967 03
$318,095 86
1,600,000 00
.
^

1,918,095 86

Making a total of actual and estimated receipts from
the ordinary sources of revenue, of
$36,809,731 24
To which add—
From loans and treasury notes:
Sixty days' six per cent treasury
notes, under the act of March 2,
1861
$12,877,750 00
,
Froin two years'six per cent treasury notes, under the acts of June
22, 1860, and February 8, and '
March 2, 1861
14,019,034 66




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

33

From three years' bonds, 7.30, under the acts of July 17 ancl August 5
$100,000,000 00
From twenty years' six per cent
bonds, under the acts of Jul37'17
and August 5
45,795,478 48
From United States notes, payable
on demand, under acts of July 17
and August 5
24,550,325 00
Making an aggregate already realized from loans, of $197,242,588 14
To which add—
From balance of loan of July 17 and August 5, yet
to be realized
75,449,675 00
From direct tax
20,000,000 00
Making an aggregate of" actual and estimated receipts from all sources, for the year of "
329,501,994 38
The appropriations for the current fiscal year, including indefinite appropriations and the balances
of appropriations for previous years remaining undrawn, on the 30th of June last, after deducting
from the appropriations for this year the sum of
$6,298,859 96, expended prior to the 30th of June
last, amounted to
400,275,494 30
As follows:
For the civil service, other than for
the Interior Department and the
public d e b t . . .
$35,688,187 98
For the Interior Department, (Indians and Pensions)
•5,996,142 26
For the W^ar Department
245,286,055 47
For the Navy Department
51,287,933 58
From Texan creditors
112,092 59
For redemption of treasury notes
due and becoming due
45,498,050 00
For interest on the public debt- •.
16,407,032 42
Making an aggregate of appropriations already made for the current year, of
Ex. Doc. 2-




•^ ^
400,275,494 30

34

REPORT ON THE FINANCES

To which is to be added the deficiencies,
which estimates are submitted:
For the civil service
$166,438
For the War Department
• 121,434,488
For the Navy Department
16,530,000
For interest on amounts required
, for deficiencies
5,000,000

for
99
77
00
00

Aggregate of deficiencies submitted

$143,130,927 76

Making an aggregate to be provided for during the
year, of
543,406,422 06
The actual expenditures of the first quarter have
been—
For the civil hst
For the Interior Department
For the War Department
For the Navy Department
For the redemption of the principal .of the public
debt
For interest of the public debt

$6,140,774
1,124,825
58,345,125
9,799,303

05
92
68
33

22,627,651 50
202,052 61

Aggregate actual expenditures for the quarter.end,
ing September 30, 1861
98,239,733 09
The estimated expenditures for the three remaining
ing quarters of the present fiscal year are—
For the civil service
$29,547,413 93
For the Interior Department, (In-.
dians and pensions)
4,871,316 34
For the War Department
186,940,929 79 •
For the Navy Department
41,488,630 25
For the Texan debt
112,092 59
For redemption of treasury notes
due and becoming due
.
22,870,398 50
For interest on public debt
16,204,979 81
Aggregate
302,035,761 21
To which is to be added deficiencies for which estimates are submitted—
Por civil service.
$166,438 99
For War Department
121,434,488 77
For Navy Department
16,530,000 00 ^
For increased interest
5,000,000 00
Aggregate

143,130,927 76

Total liabilities for the year under existing and submitted appropriations
543,406,422 06



EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

•

35

Amount of actual and estimated receipts available
under existing laws
'. •.
$329,502,004 38
Amount to be provided for the current y e a r . . . . . . 213,904,417 68
Aggregate

543,406,422 06

For the year ending June 30, 1863.
The estimated receipts for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1863, are—
From customs
$40,000,000 00
From public lands
.
800,000 00
From miscellaneous sources
5,000,000 00
Aggregate from ordinary sources
And from the direct taxFrom internal duties
From income tax

45,800,000 00

$20,000,000 00
20,000,000 00
10,000,000 00

Aggregate
Making the estimated receipts for the year

50,000,000 00
95,800,000 00

The estimated expenditures for the year ending
June 30, 1863, are—
For the civil list, other than for the Interior Department and the public debt
$23,086,971 23
For Interior Department, (pensions and Indians)-•
4,102,962 96
For the War Department
'
360,159,986 61
For the Navy Department
45,164,994 18
On account of public debt:
Redemption of the loan of 1842 -.
$2,883,364 11
Interest on the loan of 1842,6 mos.
86,500 92
Interest on the loan of 1847
564,915 00
Interest on the loan of 1848
534,500 50
Interest on the loan of 1858
1,000,000 00
Interest on the loan of 1860
351,100 00
Interestontheloanofl861,8thFeb.
1,104,900 00
Interest on Texan i n d e m n i t y . . . .
173,050 00
Interest on the Oregon war debt.
168,000 00
Interest on loan of 1861, (acts of
July 17 and August 5)
3,000,000 00
Interest on three years 7.30 bonds 10,950,000 00
Interest on new loans for the year
ending June 30, 1862, to be negotiated . . . . :
12,000,000 00




36

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Interest on new loans to bo applied
to the service of the year ending
June 30, 1863$10,000,000 00
Aggregate on account of public debt- . . . . . .

$42,816,330 53

Agci;regate of expenditures for the 3^ear ending June
30, 1863
'
475,331,245 51
Amount of receipts from sources before specified. - $95,800,000 00
Amount to be provided from other sources
379,531,245 5i




475,331,245 51

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

37

No. 2
Statement o f duties, revemies, a n d p u b l i c expenditures d u r i n g the fiscal y e a r
ending J u n e 30, 1861, agreeably to w a r r a n t s issued, exclusive o f trust f u n d s .
The teceipts into the treasury during the fiscal year ending^ June 30,
1861, were as follows :
'
From customs, viz:
During the quarter ending September 30, 1860_.
,, During the quarter ending December 31, 1860_.
During the quarter ending March 31, 1861
During the quarter ending June 30, 1861

$16,119,831
8,174,167
9, 772, 574
5,515,552

22
69
67
16
$39,582,125 64

From sales Of public lands, viz :
During the quarter ending September 30, I860..
During the quarter ending December 31, I860..
During the quarter ending March 31, 1861
During the quarter ending June 30, 1861

281,100
330,955
146,704
I l l , 898
^

From miscellaneous and incidental sources
„..
From loan under act of June 22, I 8 6 0 . . . .
i.„.
From loan under actof February 8, 1861
From treasury notes issued under act of June 22, 1860,
as authorized by act of March 2, 1861
From treasury notes issued under act of December 17,
1860
o„
From treasury notes issued under act of February 8,
1861,as authorized by actof March 2, 1861

84
02'
68
00
^ 870,658 64
* 892,199 64

7,022,000 00
16,339,966 40
2, 274, 093 34
10,010,900 00
6,214,750 00
41,861,709 74

Total receipt
„
Balance in the treasury on July 1, 1860

„.„.,

Totalmeans..o

83, 206, 693 56
3,629,206 71
86,835,900 27

The expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30,1861, were as follows:
LEGISLATIVE, EXECUTITB, JUDICIAL, ETC.

For Congress, including books
Forexecutive
o
For judiciary
„
=- - - For government in the Territories
For officers of the mint and branches and assay office
in New York
Fdr assistant treasurers and their clerks ..-...»»
For supervising and local inspectors, &c
...»
For surveyors general and their clerks »
Total civil list

..„.,

$2,819,930 13
1,882,357 37
964, 824 70
171,112 60
93, 300
36, 286
81, 550
106,836

00
83
97
75

.„.„....o

6,156,199 25

FOREIGN INTERCOURSE.

For salaries of ministers
For salaries of secretaries and assistant secretaries of
legation
.•
„
For salaries of-consuls
„
For salaries.of secretaries of legation to China and
Turkey as interpreters
For salaries of interpreters to consuls in China
For interpreters, guards, and other expenses of. the
consulates
in the Turkish dominions


\

295,340 45
31, 721 71
255,133 69
8,000 00
5, 699 83
3,019 27

38

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

For intercourse with the Barbary powers
For contingent expenses of all the missions abroad..
Fbr contingent expenses of foreign intercourse
For loss, by exchange, on drafts of consuls and commercial agents.-.-.
For office reiit of those consuls who are not allowed
to t r a d e . . .
.1........
.-.
For purchase of blank books, stationery, &c., for
consuls
For relief and protection of American seamen
For expenses in acknowledging the services of masters
arid crews of foreign vessels in rescuing American
citizens from shipwreck
..-,..--.'
For compensation of commissioner to China and consuls at the five ports.--For contingent expenses of the commissioner in China.
For salary of the commissioner of claims in China...
For the cost of a prison-ship at Canton, in China
For bringing home from foreign countries persons
charged with crimes, &c
. —.
For bringing from Batavia 24 seamen of ship *' Staghound " charged with mutiny
„
.-..
For expenses relative to suitable acknowledgments
to be made to British naval authorities in JamaicaFor carrying into effect the convention between United
States and Paraguay
For prosecution of work, including pay of commissioner, per 1st article of reciprocity treaty with
Great Britain
For compensation of commissioner, &c., to adjust
claims of citizens of United States against New
Granada
Eor compensation of commissioner, &c., to run and
mark the boundary between United States and
British possessions bounding on Washington Territory
-.-...
For expenses attendant upon the execution of the
neutrality act
---For awards under the 15th article of treaty between
United States and Mexico
For settlement of accounts of Edward Ely, deceased,
late coiisul at Bombay
For expenses incurred by Charles J. Helm, consul
general at Havana

$2, 500 00
63, 510 93
70,710 39
10,139 .75
61,912 24
30,863 68
198,231 71

;

1,197 28
4,334
367
961
4,756

23
90
33
52

6,684 61
9,792 00
3,000 00
2,698 87
15,000 00
1,000 00

110,000 00
415 52
2,895 22
1,832 49
r '' "
7,146.33.
1,163,865 95

From which deduct excess of repayments above expenditures under sundry appropriations...

20,892 54

Total foreign intercourse
MISCELLANEOUS.

For mint establishment
For contingent expenses under the act for the safekeeping of the public reyenue
For compensation to persons designated to receive and
keep the public revenue
For compensation to special agents to examine books,
&c., in the several depositories
For building vaults as additional security to the public
funds in 66 depositories
For expenses of engraving, &c., treasury notes and
certificates of stock-.-..
For survey of the Gulf and Atlantic coast of the
United States...,



$1,142,973 41
'

476,111 35
32,952 87
3,486 73.
2,179 70
665 00
14,840 73
205,700 00

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
For survey of the Avestern coast of the United States.
For survey of the Florida reefs and keys
For fuel and quarters of the officers of the army serving
on the coast survey
For publishing observations made in the progress of
the survey of the coast of the United States
For pay and'rations of engineers of steamers used in
the coast survey
'For repairs of vessels used in the coast survey.
For completing the works of the exploring expeditionFor replacing the works of the exploring expedition
destroyed by
fire
For payment for horses and other property lost or
destroyed in the military service of the United
States
1.
For claims not otherwise provided for
„„For expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, per act
of August 10, 1846....
For mail services performed for the several departments
ofgovernment, per 12th section act of March 3,1847.
For further compensation to the Post Office Department for mail services performed for the two houses
of Congress, &c., p'er act March 3, 1851
For supplying deficiencies in the revenues of the Post'
Office Department.For transportation of mails between the United S.tates
and foreign countries..
For transportation of mails on Puget's Sound, W. T-For transportation of mails between San Francisco,
California, and Olympia
,
For semi-monthly mail, by sea, between Washington
and Oregon Territories and California
For carrying the mails from New York, via Panama^
to San Francisco
^.
For continuation of the Treasury building.
For building post of&ces, court-houses, &c., including
purchase of sites
"
For reimbursing the Territory of Utah for expenses
incurred in suppressing Indian hostilities in said
Territory in 1853
For expenses of messengers in bringing to the seat
of government the votes of the several States for
President and Vice-President
For expenses of collecting the revenue from customs.
For repayment to importers the excess of deposits for
unascertained duties
.--For debentures or drawbacks, bounties or allowances.
For refunding duties under act to extend the warehousing system
For debentures and other charges, per act of October
16, 1 8 3 7 . . . - For salaries of special examiners of drugs and medicines For additional compensation to collectors, naval
dfficers,&c
For support and maintenance of light-houses, & c . . . .
For building light-houses, &c., and for beacons,
buoys, &c
,...»
For life-boats, compensation of keepers of stations, &c.
For marine hospital establishments
For building marine hospitals, including repairs
For building custom-houses, including repairs.
For expenses of collecting the revenue from sales of
publiciands
For survey of the public lands
,
For survey of public and private land claims in California
,



39

$103, 000 00
38, 000 00
4,000 00
5, 000 00
9,000 00
10, 000 00
3, 677 62
576 88
29,515 39
2,188 63
30,910 14
200,000 00
250,000 00
4,064,234 44
357,620 04
7, 624 56
30,100 24
25, 065 76
236,249 99
315,711 96
445,310 85
53,512 20
18,214 00
2, 834,764 46
764,575 23
640,115 42
1,045 55
8,526 57
4,990 09
9,669 87
705,664 17
190,667
21, 317
308,918
12,447
364,-631

91
93
13
34
45

211,734 86
135,255 11
55,058 94

40

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

For resurvcy of lauds in States where" the offices are
closed..."
For repairing unfinished records of public and private
surveys
-.
For services of special counsel, &c., in defending the
title to public property in California
For rent of surveyors general's offices, &c
For repayment for lands erroneously sold
For indemnity for swamp lands sold to individuals _.
For t\\^o and three per centum to the State of Alabama
For two and three per centum to the State of Mississippi
For two and three per centum to the State of Missouri
L
For three per centum to the State of Illinois..'
For five per centum to the State of Louisiana
For five per centum to the State of Arkansas
For five per centum to the State of Michigan
For five per centum to the State of Minnesota
For running and marking boundary line between the
United States and Texas.-..
For survey of the eastern boundary of California
For removing to coast of Africa the captured AfricansFor suppression of the slave trade
For expenses of taking the eighth census
For rent of rooms for United States courts
For Patent Office building
For alteration and repairs of buildings in Washington,
improvement of grounds, &c
For compensation of public gardener, gate-keepers,
laborers, watchmen, &c
For compensation of auxiliary guard and 20 policemen
For lighting the Capitol, President's House, &c., with
gas
For fuel, &c., for President's House...^.
For refurnishing the President's House
For collection of agricultural statistics
For drawing to illustrate report of Commissioner of
Patents
•
For asylum for insane of District of Columbia, and
army and navy of United States
For Columbia Institute for deaf, dumb, and blind of
the District of Columbia
For penitentiary in the District of Columbia
For Potomac and Eastern Branch bridges, compensation of drawkeepers, &c
For patent fund
For works of art for the ornament of the Capitol , - . .
For analyses of 88 specimens of iron, difierent localities
of soils, and coal and ores
For expenses of packing and distributing the congressional journals and documents
For preservation of col lections of exploring expeditions.
For support, &c., of transient paupers in Washingtou
Infirmary...
.^
For support, &c., of insane paupers of the District
of Columbia and army and navy of the United
States-..
For relief of sundry individuals . - . . ,.....
For sundry items:..
Total miscellaneous



$2,000 00
3,616 81
28, 831
11, 229
38, 756
48, 376

04
17
09
48

7,^07 48
12,258 11
.

14,763 42
293 75
13,-382 09
65, 941 81
3,31688
3,555 17
6,000
37, 551
149, 500
171, 040
911, 614
15, 000
12, 600

00
19
67
67
00
00
00

72,782 34
24,821 74
49,185 10
47,067
.1,800
7,917
50, 000

60
00
70
00

6,000 00
63,843 00
6,685 20
19,501 75
17,389 89
277,861 69
6,050 00
^
6,984 60
12,000 00
4,000 00
6,000 00
30,000 00
374, 687 11
12,997 07
,

$15,888,030 53

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

41

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.

For
For
For
For

Indian department
pension—military...
«
pension—naval...relief of sundry individuals

1...
-

$2,699,927
876,493
161,401
22,199

Total under the Interior Department

73
91
G
Q
42
-.-

$3,760,022 72

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT.

For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For

army proper
Military Academy
...-•.
arming and equipping the militia
armories, arsenals, &c
fortifications and other works of defence
construction of roads, bridges, &c
improvement of river, harbors, &c
extension of the Capitol of the United States - . . .
dome of the Capitol
'
_-...
extension of the General Post Office building....
Washington aqueduct
»
relief of sundry individuals and miscellaneous...

17,979,006
178,157
189-, 586
1,662,311
1, 009, 882
76,377
167,159
434, 348
164,999
86, 000
251,470
842, 681

34
92
60
31
91
71
19 '
10
30
00
55
37

23,041,981 30
From which deduct repayments on account of pay of
militia and volunteers
.„

60,830 86

Total under the War Department

22,981,150 44

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE NAVY DEPARTMENT.

For payvand subsistence, including medicines, &c.-..
For increase, repairs, 'armament, and equipment
'For ordnance, &c..
....•
:
For fuel
--.
For h e m p . . .
For contingent expenses
For navy yards
-.
For magazines
.o
For hospitals
,
For Naval Academy
„
For six steam frigates
For five sloops-of-war....
For seven steam screw sloops and one side-wheel
steamer
For seven steam sloops-of-war, second class.For marine corps, including marine barracks
For relief of sundry individuals and miscellaneous
Total under the Navy Department

6,434,594
2, 559, 489
474.375
616,180
138,476
698,015
121,499
63,821
62,220
55,593
192,791
128,247

15
07
95
12
03
07
11
85
65
49
06
95

63,010
25, 681
640, 670
155, 111

24
00
16
29

„

12,428,577 09

PUBLIC DEBT.

For interest on public debt, including treasury notes..
For redemption of United States stock of 1846
For payment to creditors of Texas, per act of September 9, 1850
For reimbursement of treasury notes issued per acts
prior to December 23, 1857, paid in specie
For payment of treasury notes issued per act of December 23, 1857
...-.



4, 000,173 76
1, 000 00
\
78,807 27
450 00
17,487,050 00

42

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

For payment of treasury notes issued per act of December 17, 1860
For payment of treasury notes issued per act of March
2, 1861
Total public debt

$68, 350 00
686,050 00

,

Total expenditures
Balance in the Ti'casury July 1, 1861.^.

._.,
-

$22,221,881 03
"84,578,834 47
2, 257, 065 80

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30,1861.




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

43'

No. 3.
Statement of tlie receipts and expenditures of tlie United States for the quarter
eliding September 30, 1861, exclusive of trust funds.
EECEIPTS.

From customs
$7,198,602. 55
From sales of public lands
...
35,967 03
From incidental and miscellaneous sources.
.............
318,095 86
From loans and treasury notes, viz :
Tliree years bonds at 7 3-10 per cent
$50,125,385 87
United States notes payable on demand.." 15,620,000 00
Treasury notes issued under act of June "
22, 1860, as autborized by act of Marcli
2, 1861.
.. 14,019,034 ^Q.
Sixty days' treasury notes issued per act
of Marcb 2, 1861
, . . . 12,877,750 00.
Loan under act of February 8, 1861
55,257 50
Stock for tbe Wasbington and Oregon war
debt
21,850. 00
Treasury notes issued per acts of February
8 and Marcb 2, 1861
,
3,500 00
— 92,722,778 03
100,275,443 47

EXPENDITURES.

For civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous objects...
For interior, (pensions and Indian)
For war
,
Fornavy
For interest on public debt, including treasury
notes
$202,052 61
For redemption of treasury notes wbicb have
been purloined
—
51 50
For payment of treasury notes issued per act of
December 23, 1857
1,836,100 00
For payment of treasury notes issued per act of
December 17, 1860
400 00
For payment of treasury notes issued per act of
Marcb 2, 1861
10,541,100 00
For reimbursement of temporary loan, per acts
of July 17 and August 5, 1861
10,250,000 00

6,140,774
1,124,825
58,345,125
9,799,303

05
92
68
33

22,829,704 11
98,239,733 09
L. E. C H I T T E N D E N ,
Register.
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

Register's'^Office, December 4, 1861.



44

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 4.

Statement slwwing the amount of public debt of the United States on December
1, 1861. •
Loan
Loan
Loan
Loan
Loan

of 1842
of 1847
of 1848
of 1858
of 1860

.
'

$2,883,364
9,415,250
8,908,341
20,000,000
7,022,000

Loan of 1861
Texan indemnity
Texas debt
Oregon war debt

'

11
00
80
00
00

18,415,000
3,461,000
112,092
307,900

00
00
59
00
>,524,948 50

Treasury notes issued under acts prior to 1857
105,111 64
Treasury notes issued under act of December
23., 1857
664,200 00
Treasury notes issued under act of December
17, 1860
9,933,950 00
Treasury notes issued under acts of June 22,
1860, and February and Marcb, 1861—two '
years
,
7,767,600 00
Treasury notes issued under acts of Marcb 2,.
July 17, and August 5, 1861, for 60 days—
temporary loan
3,993,900 00
22,464,761 64
Three years' bonds, dated August 19, 1861,
issued under act of July 17, 1861
50,000,000 00
Three years' bonds, dated October 1, 1861,
issued under act of July 17, 1861
50,000,000 00
Twenty years' six per cent, bonds, dated J u l y
1, 1861
50,000,000 00
•
150,000,000 00
United States notes, issued under act of July 17, 1861
24,550,325 00
Total




,

267,540,035 14

^ No. 5.
'
Statement exhibiting the quantity a n d value o f iron eund steel, a n d manufactures thereof hnported into the United States d u r i n g the
f i s c a l y e a r s ending J u n e 30, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, a n d 1 8 6 1 .

1856.

1858.

1857.

Articles.
Quantity.
Bar iron
.
Rod iron
Hoop iron
Sheet iron
Pig iron
Old and scrap iron
Eailroad iron
Wire, cap and bonnet
Nails, spikes, and tacks
Chain cables....
Anchors and parts
„
Anvils and parts
,
Manufactures of iron and steel
Steel




•--.
„„
,

„
.-

...-.

cwt . . . 2,163, 449
do
193, 820
pounds . 13,223, 639
do
31,387, 353
c w t . . . 1,180, 239
do
247, 769
do
3,109, 916
pounds .
165, 376
do
2,292, 696
do
15,850, 788
- . . „ . . do
921, 123
do
960, 809
„
-cwt...
271,079

Value.

Quantity.

Value.

Quantity.

$5, 352,786

1,734,041
315,735
12,070,543
36,047,576
1,035,882
165,006
3,686,107
162,914.
3,550,329
9,874,762
842,828
1,173,877

$4,423,935
809,901
324,675
1,082,389
1,001,742
111,680
7,455,596
6,168
188,756
293,124
32,980
67,926
7,621,625
2,633,614

1,314,628
167,709
. 9,519,581
29,623,002
839,717
145,153
1,514,905
174,067
1,483,697

478,623

345,094
814,342
171,085
185,112
170,280
4,892
127,879
485,568
39,866
46,828
810,685
638,323

24,580,262

292,164

25,954,111

5,246,7,22
190.109
800,620

214,317

Value.
$3,318,913
'426,499
373,326
945,073
739,949
87,113
2,987,576
6,900
100,481
155,408
8,072
45,275
6,360,343
1,873,111
16,328,039

O
H
O

O
Ul

N o . 5.—Statement exhibiting the q u a n t i t y a n d value o f iron a n d steel, b^.—Continued.

1859.

1860.

1861.

Articles.
Quantity;

Value.

Bar iron
-...—
c w t . . . 1.904,534 $4,184,331
137,454
332,801
Rod iron.
.-.-_..-......--.do
387,198
Hoop iron „ . .
pounds.. 13,765,795
27,868,353
752,975
Sheet iron
- . ..^
do
1,049,200
Pig iron
-.--.......---.
cwt — 1,450,346
203,372
107,702
Old and scrap iron
do
1,399,312
2,274,032
Railroad iron
..--....*..--.-.--.
do
231,822
14,299
Wire, cap and bonnet.
pounds..
860,366
84,804
Nails, spikes, and t a c k s . - . - . . . . . ^ . - - — . . —. .v^..-do.—.
6,613,280
174,701
Chain cables
.'..-..,.... .......
...do
13,510
301,379
Anchors and parts
...^
-...-.-..do...i
836,750
50,806
Anvils and parts
.--.. - . . • . • - . . . . . . . - - . . ^ i . . - - - - . —..do
; 5,574,508
Manufactures of iron and steel . . . . . . . ; . - . . . - . .
2,047,730
Steel
.
..-...
. v . . . . . . . o . . . . ..•
cwt
284,108
17,048,696

Quantity.

Value.

Quantity.

2,116,575
837,220
19,222,984
30,173,670
T;429,956
182,782
2,443,491
236,144
1,349,846
4,932,904
286,860
740,331

$4,473,866
676,720
'618,087
839,065
1,005,865
108,227
3,709,376
11,556
122,936
130,580
9,804
47,894
7, 248,265
2,724,353

1)881; 900
242,289
18,437,633
23,317,030
1,480,526
128,229

409,966

21,526,594

1,489,811
171,958
623,597
5,592,206
167,028
816,879

384,819

Value.
$3,875,230
563,571
394,099
735,942
987,916
66,700
2,162,695
9,743
66,400
144,346
6,858
44,633
6,921,154
^2,519,708
17,477,995

O
H
O

O
c/2

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTNIENT, Register's Office, November SO, 1861.




N o . 6.
Statement exhihiting the value o f f o r e i g n merchandise imported into, a n d the value o f foreigri merchandise a n d domestic ^produce
exjwrtedfrom, the United States d u r i n g the y e a r ending on the ^Oth q f J u n e , 1859.

Countries.

Foreign merchandise.
Domestic proauce.
Dutiable.

Total.

Free.

$3,860,089
Great Britain—England
23,201
Scotland.--1,766
Ireland

$114,065,880
7,056,704
756,782

$117,915,969
7,079,905
758,647

$1,931,668
14,168

$775,850
33,281
35,100

$2,707,618
47,449
35,100

$166,078,734
2,704,596
3,372.456

3,875,056
Total Great Britain.. - 2,723,428
France
3,561,024
British East Indies
64,073
Philippine Islands
1,959,509
Cuba
30,210
Porto Rico
280,338
Two Sicilies
2,441,205
Hayti
820,221
New Granada
.
,-_-.
1,868,371
Venezuela
18,443,466
Brazil
7,963,028
China ._...
35,691,188
A.11 other countries -

121,879,366
38,677,719
6,136,205
2,802,681
32,094.915
4,790,115
1,900,291
225,041
2,027,920
2,362,660
3,996,376
2,828,353
40,425,372

125,754,421
41,301,147
8,697,229
2,866,754
34.064,424
4,820,325
2,180,629
2,666,246
2,848,141
4,231,031
22,439,842
10,791,381
76,116,560

1,945,836
1,088,619
119,303
63,302
674,335
285,068
33,110
5,908
33,969
2,826
199,561
2,724,672
4,633,618

844,231
179,526
12,419

172,155,786
43,031,473
1,231,893

376,599
60,808
19,451
223,201
144,801
73,402
128,411
169,611
6,857,590

2,790,067
1,268, 145
131,722
68,302
1,050,934
335,876
62,561
229,109
178,770
76,228
327,972
2,894,183
11,491,208

259,047,014

338,768,130

11,815,027

9,080,050

20,895,077

335,894,385

" Free.

Total




79,721,116

|

Dutiable.

Total foreign
and domestic.

Total.

11,217,268
1,699,326
623,210
2, 255,655
1,384,194
1,644,271
5,929,004
4,233,016
90,589,289

^$168,786,252
2,752,045
3,407,656
174,945,853
44,299,618
1,363,615
68,302
12,268,202
2,035,202
576,771
2,484,764
1,662,964
1,720,499
6,256,976
7,127,199
102,080,497 .

3
O

S
>
O
Ul

356,789,462

)^

No. 6—Continued.

CX)

Statement exhibiting the value of foreign rtiercliandise imported into, andj the value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce
exported from, the United States during the year ending June 30, 1860.
EXPORTS.

Foreign merchandise.

Countries.

Domestic produce.

Total foreign
and domestic.

Free.

Dutiable.

Total.

Free.

Dutiable.

Total.

$2,621,780
45,664
9,171

$130,442,933
4,561,523
914,555

$133,064,713
4,607,187
923,726

$3,906,368
5,176
12,490

$1,924,880
132,030
99,221

$5,831,248
137.206
111,711

$187,095,952
4,867,218
4,297,586

$192,927,200
5,004,424
4,409,297

Total Great Britain . - . >
2,676,615
France •
. . . . . . . . . 1,526,875
British East Indies
4,147,109
90,427
Philippine Islands
Cuba
1,963,403
47,438
Porto Rico -- - Two Sicilies . . . . . . -_._193,497
Hay ti
.__
- . _ . 1,968,067
Nejv G r a n a d a . - - . . - - - - - - - . 1,589,763
Venezuela
.
1,398,336
Brazil
- - . 17,127,121
China
9,867,946
All other countries > _
39,692,017

135,919,011
41,691,219
6,545,233
2,795,-739
32,065,874
4,484,750
2,191,080
94,656
2,253,805
1,485,128
4,087,682
3,698.641
42,579,509

138,595,626
43,218,094
10,692,342
2,886,166
34,032,277
4,512,188
2,384,577
2,062,723
3,843,568
2,883,464
21,214,803
13,566,587
82,271,526

3,924,034
2,561, 16'5
91,051
70,552
272,334
242,875
• 25,314
12,281
14,877
50,888
223,650
1,581,155
5,879,653

2,156,131
596,882
37,902
2,713
362,622
21,038
1,144
219,496
137,822
40,762
141,370
154,179
8,141,132

6,080,165
3,158,047
128,963
73,265
634,956
263,913
26,458
231,777
152,699
91,650
335,020
1,735,334
14,020,785

196,260,756
58,048,231
1,111,697
368,209
11,747,913
1,517,837
484,190
2,441,905
1,042,800
1,056,250
6,945,235
7,170,784
85,393,467

202,340,921
61,206,278
1,240,650
441,474
12,382,869
1 781 750
610 648
2", 673, 682
1,795.499
1,147,900
6,280,255
8,906, 11899,414,252

279,872,327 . ^362,163,941

14,949,829

11,983,193

26,933,022

373,189,274

400, 122,296

Great Britain—England
Scotland
Ireland

Total



82,291,614

—L

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No. 6—Continued.
Statement exhihiting the value of foreign merchandise imported into, and the value of foreign merchandise and domestic produce
exported from, the United States cluring the year ending June 30, 1861.
EXPORTS.

>4

Tiw-DrkPT<a

y
o

Foreign merchandise.

Countries.

^^

Free.

Great B r i t a i n — E n g l a n d
Scotland
Ireland
T o t a l Great B r i t a i n - . - France
......
British East Indies
.-.
Philippine I s L i n d s . - . . . . . . . .
Cuba
P o r t o Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
New Granadai
Venezuela
Bryzil
China
.
All o t h e r countries
To

Dutiable.

Total.

Free.

Dutiable.

Domestic produce.
Total.

Total foreign
and doTTif^tic.

$37,279,105
60,426
12,621

$98,752,904
2,933,098
178,213

$136,032,009
2,983,524
190,834

$1,300,044
47,375
389

$2,300,701
^8,487
204,972

$3,600,745
145,862
205,361.

37,342,152
3,906,756
3,965,918
213,562
3,202,319
41,675
333,543
1,656,142
2,461,402
1,843,224
15,804,735
7,999,065
37,400,494

101,864,215
30,338,793
4.779,850
3,317,960
30,334,038
3,353,758
1,570,167
60,031
2,009,924
1,128,291
2,127,, 242
3,388,735
33,906,562

139,206,367
34,245,549
8,745,768
3,531,522
33,536,357
3,395,433
1,903,710
1,716,173
4,471,326
2,971,515
17,931,977
11,387,800
71,307,056

1,347,808
760,176
10,200
794
3,110,261
68,949
62,092
17,418
28,535
14,063
126,949
930,005
4,440,710

2,604,160
711,627
15,190
320,734
25,326
9,681
164,084
86,824
42,578
108,566
177,698
7,685,224

3,951.968
1,471,803
25,390
794
3,430,995
94,275
71,773
181,502
115,359
56,641
235,515
1,107.703,
12,125,934

116,583,955
22,786,040
604,511
•29,761
9,461,082
1,286,789
260,204
2,246,124
1,471,633
1,164,145
4,787,702
6,809,724
61,474,499

120,535,923
24 257 843
629 901
30,555
12,892,077
1,381,064
331 977
2,427,626
1,686, 992
1,220,786
6,023,217
6,916,427
73, 600,'433

116,170,987

218, 179,566

334,350,653

10,917,960

11,951,692

22,869,652

227,966,169

250,835,821

$102,799,688 $106,400,433
6,336,169
6,482,031
7,448,098
7,653,459

L. E . C H I T T E N D E N , Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Regider'n Offiee, NovemberSO, 1861.




O
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No. 1 •

o

Statement showing the imports and exjDorts of specie and bullion, the imports entered for consicmption, and specie and, hullion, the d>omestic exports and specie. and bullion, the excess of specie and bullion exports over specie and bidlion imports, and the excess of
specie and bullion imports over specie and bullion exparts.
•
• .
Imports of specie
and bullion.

Imports for consumption, and
specie and bullion imports.

1848
1849
1850
1851
1852-.
1853
1854
1855---:...
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861.-

$6,360,224
6,661,240
4,628,792
5,453,692
6,505,044
4,201,382
• 6,958,184
3,659,812
4,207,632
12,461,799
19,274,496
7,434,789
8,650,135
46,339,611

$147, 012,126
139, 216,408
168, 660,625
205, 929,811
200, 677,739
255, 272,740
282, 914,077
235, 310,152
299, 858,670
345, 973,724
261, 952,909
324, 258,421
335, 230,919
313, 811,168

Total

141,686,732

3,'615,979,389

Exports of specie Domestic exports
and bullion.
and specie and
bullion exp'ts.

$16,841,616
5; 404, 648
7,622,994
29,472,252
42,674,135
27,486,875
41,436,456
56,247,343
45,745,485
69,136,922
52,633,147
63,887,411
66,546,239
29,791,080

653,826,603

$154,032,131
145.755,820
151,898,720
218,387,511
209,658,366
230,976,157
278,^241,064
"275,156,846
326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
342,279,491
382,788,662
233,957,379
3,637,702,158

Excess of specie
and bullion exports over specie and bullion
imports.
,481,392
2,894,202
24,018,660
37,169,091
23,285,493
34,478, 272
52,587,531
41,537,853
66,676,123
33,358,651
56,452,622
67,996,104

Excess of specie
and bullion imports over specie
and bullion exports.

"

$i,"246"592

_.._..._

• - •




w

t=j
.

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17,795,123

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1861.

O
H

__

16,548,631
429,934,994

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Ul

No. 8.
Statement exhibiting .the values of articles of foreign production imported into the United States from, and the exports of foreign
merchandise and domestic produce to, certain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1859.
- •
•
IMPORTS.

Free of duty.

Paying duty.

^

Countries.
Coffee.

Tea.

$271,662 .
22,148
13,077
25,652

$24,873

Linseed, not embracing flaxseed.

Fruits.

Indigo.

Jute, Sisal grass,
coir, &c.

Nuts.

>^
o
O

British East Indies
-.
-Philippine Islands
»
Cuba,...
Porto Rico
-.
--.Two Sicilies
-.
Hayti.. "
New Granada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Venezuela - .
.
..
Brazil
China
Total




$2,388,786

730
2,120,627
115,292
1,727,523
18,352,654
759

7,227,960

22,649,294

7,252,833

2,389,516

$1,982
124,950
8,094
829,355
1,191
549
226 •
1,216
10,788
978,350

$292,687
41,045
9,297
3,146

$1,859,539
$16,483
123
128,915
124

93,277
66,890
12,
606,354

18
25
1,866

13 657
1,840
44 354
1 131

1,861,571

i2!

206,503

o
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Ol

Ol

No. ^.—Statement exhibiting the values of articles of foreign production, 8fc.—Continued.
IMPORTS.

Paying duty.

Countries.
Molasses.

British East Indies
Philippine Islands .
Cuba
Porto Rico
-.
Two S i c i l i e s . . . . . . . Hayti
New Granada
Venezuela., .
Brazil .
China

Raw hides.

Saltpetre.

---..- --.-.
....

$30,253
' 36,193
36,376.

4,430
.....
...... .

• Total




I '

53'
4,767,241

j

1

83,044
663,893
2,048,796
1,668,953
4,357,'608

Spices.

Coffee.

761,861

Tea.

$18

$58,001

6,981
1,334

744

$148,074
627,425
23,119,474
3,865,891.

$294,927
14,593
1,905
^ 104

288
41
82,737
1,367,218
, 602,849

$761,861
$3,961,603
791,265

Sugar.

303
44
378
165-, 905

2,150

29,663,997

468,159

,16,96"B

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6,483
t-H

58,745

o

No. 8.—Statement exhibiting the values of articles of foreign production, S^c.—Continued.
IMPORTS.

•

EXPORTS.

=

Paying duty.

Countries.
•

Tobacco,
cigars, &c.

British East Indies - . . .
...-...»
Philinnine Islands
.-.-.. --.. -.-..--.......-.
Cuba
'
.-..
.-.-..
Porto Rico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - . . . - - - . . - . - - . . . . . . - - .
Two Sicilies . .
........
.
.--...
Havti
New Granada
Venezuela.............-......... ...............
Brazil....... . . . . . . .... - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - .
China
.-.,
.....
Total




All other articles imported.

$3,298
93,480
4,415,424
6,453

$4,451,060
278,271
2,348,393
81,997
1,221,629
454,193
1,400,731
348,173
1,104,834
2,752,868 .

$8,697,229
2,866,754
34,054,424
4,820,325
2,180,629
2,666,246.
2,848,141
4,231,031
22,439,842
10,791,381

14,442,149

95,596,002

2,046
664,218
4.784
211
35,041
6,224,955

Total imports. Foreign exports.

Domestic exports.

Total exports,
includ'g. specie.

$131,722
68,302
1,050,934
335,876
52,561
229,109
178,770
76,228
327,972
2,894,183

$1,231,89311,217,268
1,699,326
523,210
2,255,655
1,384,194 .
1,644,271
5,929,004
4,233,016

$1,363,.615
68,302
12.268,202
2,035,202
575,771
2,484,764
1,562,964
1,720,499
6,256,976
7,127,199

5,345,667

30,117,837

35,463,494

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No. 8—Continued.

Or

Statement exhibiting the values of articles of foreign production imported into the United States from, and the exports of foreign
merchandise and domestic produce to, certain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.
IMPORTS.

Free of duty.

Countries.
Coffee.

British East I n d i e s . - - . .
...--.
Philifinine Tslands
.-.. ........
Cuba
--...--.-.---Porto Rico
--°...............
Two Sicilies
......
-.
Hayti
---.
New Granada
.--.-• . - - . . . . . . .
Venezuela
Brazil
.........«..••...-.
China „ . . . . . . . . . . . . . o . . . . .
Total

i




-.

$245,654
49,134
11,491
44,958

Teas.

Linseed, not embracing flaxseed.

$400
11
.

Paying duty.

$2,753,194

8,799,141
8,799,643

$73
126,686
12,096
961,662
26
62
149
388
7,022

91

12,890
206,387
1,291,339
16,984,135
18,845,988

Fruits.

2,753,194

1,108,051

Indigo.

$621,449
167,092
4,896

Jute, Sisal grass,
coir, &c.
$138,157
1,631,984
43

253

Nuts.

$12 146

135

32,
10,435

170,978
747
16 555
16
36,385
934

984,644

1,780,771

236,761

120
181,754
9,066

hj

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No. 8.—Statement exhibiting the values of articles of foreign production, ^x.—Continned.
IMPORTS.

Paying duties.

Countries. -

Molasses.

Raw hides.

Sugar.

Tea.

Spices.

Coffee.

$126,810
781,676
23,279,100
3,656,841

$669,353
12,748
2,377
81

$30,301

113
921
28,621
1,104,206
630,930

Saltpetre.

396
16
246,830

4,843

679

29,609,217

831,801

37,090

103,435

O
British East Indies.Philippine Islands
Cuba. ^
- - - - - - -Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
,
Hayti .__
New Granada
Venezuela
Brazil
_
.^
China . . . . . . .
.
Total




.

$4,063,021
767,932
13
18
4,830,984

$1,288,482
44,318
615
8,354
289
22,690
697,136
1,218,508
1,066,689
3, 677

$999,897

4,260,758

999,897

1,946

. $102,736
20

,

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o\

No. S.—^Statement exMbiting the values of articles of foreign production, (^6*.-—Continued.

a:)

Paying duty.

Countries.
Tobacco,
cigars, &c.

All other arti
cles imported.

Total imports.

Foreign exports.

Domestic exports.

Total exports,
including specie.
O

British East Indies
Philippine Islands..
Cuba
_
Porto Rico
Two Sicilies
Hayti
,
New Granada- - . - -,
Venezuela
Brazil
China . . . ---,

$1,078
100,030
4,120,834
1,274

Total.

4,887,062




286
612,633
1,698
79
49,250

$2,666,897
57,871
456,157
18,173
1,057,998
70,266
842,892
227,071
,880,886
1,^
,743,906.
2,-

$6,545,233
2,795,739
32,065,874
4,464,750
• 2,191,080
94,656
2,253,805
1,485,128
4,087,682
3,698,641

$128,953
73.265
634,956
263,913
• 26,458
231,777
152,699.
91,650
335,020
1,735,334

$1,111,697
368,209
11,747,9131,517,837
484,190
2,441,905
1,642,800
1,056,250
6,945,235
7,170,784

10,022,117

69,682,588

3,674,025

33,486,820

$1,240,6-^0
441,474
12,382,?^G9
1,781,750
510,648
2,673.682
1,795,499
.1,147,900
6,280,255
8,906,118 '37,160,845

O

5^

a
Ul

No. 8—Continued.
Statement exhibiting the values of articles qf foreign production imported into the United States from, and. the exports of foreign merchandise and domestic produce to, certain countries during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
IMPORTS.

Paying duty.

Free of duty.
Countries.
Coffee.

British East Indies _$142,869
Philippine Islands - .
156,518
Cuba
406
Porto Rico
8,510
Two Sicilies Hayti
1,331.600
New Granada
-__
119,606
Venezuela _
•
1,781,272
Brazil
15,526,578
12,436
China
_ _----_

Teas.

' 1

Linseed, not
embracing
flaxseed.
$1,600,588

Fruits.

$24
51,716
11,242
759,155
201
536
342
1,025
3,669

2,609
6,861,736

Indigo.

Jute, Sisal
grass,
coir, &c.

$79,009
49,897
822

$90,866
875,956
698

Nuts.

$8,591

Molasses.

$3,205,061
678,202

19,079,795




6,864,352

1,-600,588

827,910

Saltpetre.

$1,005,867 $1,233,621
48,251
2,857
546

104,962

'223,667

65,146
368

972,944

190,912

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HH

6,600
10

11,845

371
4,992

90,953
2,986

34
27

•

Total

Raw hides.

1,303
339,333
1,949,901
653,827
5

Ul

^

3,889,873

3,101,890

1,233,621

-CI

Statement exhibiting the values of articles of foreign production, SfC.—Continued.

GO

IMPORTS.
EXPORTS.

Paying duty.
Countries.
Sugar.

Spices."

Coffee.

Tea.

Tobacco, cigars7 &c.

All other ar- Total imports. Foreign*exticles imports.
ported.

Domestic ex- Total exports,
including
ports.
specie.

o
$288,412British East Indies . .
Philippine Islands __ 1,639,671
Cuba
24,094,499
Porto Rico2,651,227
Two Sicilies
Hayti
New Granada
6,327
Venezuela .
Brazil - - - - - - - - - 488,416
615,607
China-----------

$441,418

$3,642 $64,051

817

137

63
617
176
464
167,333

21

•

$1,662
95,494
2,645,540
491
17
395,873
2,876
4,981
16,616

$3,793,844 $8,745,768
665,733
3,531,522
3,625,213 33,536,357
45,215 . 3,395,433
1,903,710
1,039,676
1,716,173
376,382
4^471,326
3,607,178
2,971,515
133,963
1,188,560 17,931,977
3,806,038 11,387,800

$26,390
794
3,430,995
94,275
71,773
181,502
115,359
56,641
235,615
.1,107,703

$604,611
29,761
9,461,082
1,286,789
260,204
2,246,124
1,471,633
1,164,145
4,787,702
6,809,724

$629,901
30 555
12 892 077
1 .^81 064
331 977
2 427 626
1,586,992
' 1,220,786'
5 023 217
6 917 427

18,081,702

6,319,947

27,121,676

32,441, 622

O

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Total

29,683,159

610,878

3,663

64,188

3,162,439

89,691,581

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,./2f^zs/gr's Office, November 30, 1861.




m

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 9

59

•

M I N T OF THE^UNITED STATES,

Philadelphia, October 10, 1861.
SIR : I have tlie honor to submit the following report of the operations of the
mint and its branches for the fiscal year ending June 30, 18G1.
The amount of bullion received and coined at the mint and branches during
that period has largely exceeded that of any former year. In addition to the
gold and silver received from the mines of the United States, the importation of
foreign Coin and bullion has been unprecedentedly large.
The ainount of bullion received at the mint and its branches during the year
was-as follows: Gold, $116,970,002 ^^\ silver, $4,624,961 57; total deposits,
$121,594,964 23. From this total must be deducted the re-deposits of bullion
or bars made at one institution and deposited at another for coinage. This deduction being made, the amount will be $72,146,571 01.
The coinage for the same period was as follows: Gold coins, $60,693,237;
fine gold bars, $20,015,163 64; silver coins, $2,605,700; silver bars, $278,006 94;
cent coins, $101,660; total coinage, $83,693,767 58; number of pieces of all
denominations of coin, 23,724,913.
The distribution of the bullion received and coined at' the mint and branches
• was as follows: At Philadelphia, gold deposits, $51,890,763 b^\ gold coined,
$47,896,711; fine gold bars, $66,434 76; silver deposits and purchases,
$1,726,309 07; silver coined, $1,598,700;' silver bars, $2,624 37; cents coined,
$101,660; total deposits of gold and silver, $53,617,072 63; total coinage,
$49,666,130 13; number of pieces 21,315,255. •
At the branch mint at San Francisco, the gold deposits were $12,258,981 84;
gold coined, $12,421,000; silver deposits and purchases, $197,844 08; silver
coined, $198,000; silver bars, $71,485 71; total coinage of gold and silver,
$12,690,485 6 1 ; number of pieces 1,144,300.
The assay ofHce in New York received during the year $52,358,095 14 in
gold bullion, and $1,791,770.18 in silver. Fine gold bars stamped at that office,
4,816; value, $19,948,728 88; silver bars, 1,089; value, $187,078 63; total
gold and silver bullion received, $54,149,865 32.
At the branch mint at New Orleans, the amount of deposits received up to the
31st day of January, A. D. 1861, was $1,243,449 0 1 ; of which the sum of
$334,410 77 was in gold, and $909,038 24 in silver; coined during the same
period, $244,000 in gold, and $809,000 in silver; silver bars "stamped, value,
$16,818 33; total coinage, $1,069,818 33; number of pieces, 1,237,800. Since
the 31st day of January, A. D. 1861, no rejDort has been received from this branch.
At the branch mint at Dahlonega, the deposits received, UJD to the 28th day of
February, A. D. 1861,-were $6,2,193 05; the coinage, $60,946; and the number
of pieces, 13,442. No report has been received from this branch since the day.
last named.
The deposits at the branch mint at Charlotte, up to the 31st day of March,
A. D. 1861, were %^^,bb'$> 30; coinage, $70,580; and number of jneces 14,116.
The deposits at this branch and Dahlonega are exclusively of gold. No report
has been received from this institution since the day last named.
Notwithstanding the defection of the branches at Nejv Orleans, Dahlonega,
and Charlotte, by reason of the disloyalty and treachery of the States in which
they are respectively located, the coinage of the past is greater than that of any
former year since the organization of the government. Whether the coinage at ^
these branches continues to conform to the laws and standard of the United States
mint cannot noAv be ascertained. Efforts have been made to procure specimens
of the gold and silver coins of the branch at New Orleans, since its defection, for
the purpose of determining whether any adulteration or reduction in value of the



60

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

issues of that branch had been attempted; but thus far no such specimens could
be obtained. The treason that can refuse to recognize the lawful authority of a
just government, would.]^t hesitate to adulterate the coin made in an institution
wrested from that government by lawless violence; nor would it blush to conceal
the wrong under the emblems and devices of an honored national coinage.
A large amount of the gold deposited at the mint and its branches was the
product of the mines of the United States. The sum of $34,216,889 52 in gold,
and $610,011 29 in silver, was received from this source. Much of the domestic
silver received was obtained by parting or separating it from the gold deposits
in which it was found. The mines of the Washoe region continue to yield an
increasing quantity; and the gold mines of Kansas amply repay the miner for
his toil. The places whence the deposits of gold and silver were obtained, and
the amount from each locality, are fully stated in the tabular statements attached
to this report.
The domestic supply of silver not only continues, but new and valuable mines
have been discovered and opened which promise a rich yield. These mines are
situated in the Territory of Arizona, near the town of Tubac, in latitude 31^ 22'
N., longitude 110° 57' W. They are about one hundred and sixty miles from
the Gulf of California, and only a few miles from the proposed line of the Southern
Pacific railroad. Many of the mines yield silver and lead; and others silver,
lead, and copper. Judging of the ore and its product in silver, as exhibited at
the mint, this region will soon rival, in the extent and value of its mineral
productions, the rich mines of Mexico, or the other silver-producing sections
of our own country. Arizona is too new a country, and its mines have been
too little worked, to furnish all the data necessary to the formation of such
rules as will determine the nature of any vein at a considerable depth. The
different '' lodes,''^ however, present a remarkable uniformity of character, have
nearly all the same direction, and possess generally the same combination of
minerals. Many of them have been prospected by small shafts, but many more,
equally good in appearance, remain unexamined. The efficient protection of the
government against Indian and Mexican depredations will be necessary to secure
the full development of the mineral wealth of that interesting portion of our
country.
The new cents still continue to be issued in exchange for the old copper cents.
These are, however, rapidly disappearing from circulation, and will soon be
entirely superseded by the nickel cent. The profits of the cent coinage have
heretofore been fully adequate to meet all the expenses of their production and
transmission to the different parts of the country.
The coinage of the past year consisted principally of double eagles. This
was in consequence of the unusually large amount of gold deposits, the demand
by depositors for that denomination of coin, and to prevent the delay inseparably
incident to the conversion of the bullion received into .the smaller denominations.
The gold dollar requires the same time and number of manipulations in the
process of coining as the double eagle; consequently, whilst the mint can coin
$20,000,000 in value of double eagles, it can coin only one million in gold dollars.
The same ratio obtains in the other fractional parts of the gold coin. Hence
the delay when the deposits of bullion are large and the returns are to be made
in the smaller coins. If any system could be devised or rule established by
which the necessity of adjusting each individual gold coin of the lesser denomination could be obviated, the delay in making returns to depositors would" not
occur, and the production of small gold coin be facilitated to an almost indefinite
extent. An increase in the deviation from the standard weight of the quarter
eagle and gold dollar would, with proper caution, the perfection of the mint machinery, and the skill of the Avorkmen, render the adjustment of each piece, as '
noAv practiced, unnecessary. By the act of Congress of March 3, 1849, the
deviation
 from the standard weight allowed for the quarter eagle and gold dollar


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

61

is one-fourth of a grain in a single piece;' and in one thousand quarter eagles
one pennyweight; and in one thousand gold dollars one half pennyweight.
The deviation allowed fpr the half eagle by the same act, in a single piece, is one
half grain, and in one thousand pieces one and a half pennyweight.
Now, it is believed that if the deviation alloAved for the half eagle was extended
by law to the quarter eagle and gold dollar, these coins could be produced rapidly
and accurately within that limit, and thus the present tedious mode of adjustment and consequent delay be avoided. The experience of the past in
silver coinage proves the practicability of these suggestions. The loss, however, in any event would be more than compensated by the increased production of the smaller coins, and the decrease of expenditures consequent on a
reduction of the force necessarily employed in the adjusting department of the
mint.
If authoiity could be given by law to the director of the mint, under the
direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, to test by experiment the practicability of these suggestions, this question would soon receive a speedy, and, it is
not doubted, a favorable solution. The subject is worthy of consideration.
The capacity of. the mint for coinage is fully equal to the wants of the government and people; and with a sufficient bullion fund no delay in making
returns to depositors would be experienced. Neither the mint nor its officers
should be made answerable for delay arising from the want of this fund, particularly when the necessities of the government require it to be withdrawn. In
su9h case patriotism will excuse delay, and capital must yield to governmental
necessity.
With a full force and working the regular hours, the capacity of the ri^int, in
double eagles exclusively, is equal to an annual coinage of
$150,000,000
Eagles, exclusively...,
,
I...
75,000,000
Half eagles, exclusively
, . 37,500,000
Quarter eagles, exclusively
:
1
18,750,000
Three-dollar pieces, exclusively
-.
22,500,000
• Gold dollars, exclusively
"...,
7,500,000
Coining an equal number qf pieces of all denominations of gold coin, its
capacity w^ould be equal to $51,875,000. This is exclusive of silver coinage.
Its capacity for silver coinage of all denominations, in addition, to the gold
coinage, as represented, is equal to $15,000,000 annually; rdaking the capacity
of the mint in gold and silver, with an equal number of pieces of all 'denominations, $66,875,000; an amount much beyond the coinage of any year since the
establishment of the mint. This calculation of capacity relates to the mint at
Philadelphia, and is exclusive of the branches. By changing the proportion of
pieces, and coining more of the larger denomination, the annual production
would be greatly enlarged, and by employing a double force and working double
time, the coinage before stated could be doubled without additional machinery
or impairing the efficiency of that now in use. The capacity of the mint 'anil
its branches is therefore clearly equal to any demand that may be made upon,
them for coinage, and this, too, without any delay, if the condition of the national treasury wdll permit the use of a sufficient bullion fund—a fund authorized
by law, and out of which depositors were promptly paid the ascertained value
of their deposits—the treasury being reimbursed by the coin produced from the
bullion deposited.
The coinage of the mint and its branches, from their respective organizations
to June 30, 1861, has been as follows :




62
Gold.
Silver
Copper

^
.-

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
l

$669,116,406 62
128,159,481 97
2,647,473 ^b
799,923,362 14

Of this coinage about $520,000,000 was from bullion derived from the mines
of the United States.
' The amount of coinage executed is very large for a government that is not
yet a century old, and is an evidence not only of the great mineral wealth of
the country, but the wonderful activity and extent of our commercial enterprise.
It would-be interesting to know what portion of this coinage still remains in
the country. We have no means, however, of determining this point with
accuracy. It can only be arrived at by estimation. From the most reliable
data attainable, I estimate the ainount of specie in the United States, at the^
date of this report, October, 1861, at from tAvo hundred and seventy-five to
three hundred million of dollars. Of this amount all but about twenty millioiis,
it is safe to assume, is held Avithin the loyal States of the Union. The recent
estimates of the amount of coin in the country haA^e been too high. Due alloAvance does not appear to have been made for the large exportation of specie,
which, commencing in the year 1855, continued AAdth but little interruption until
the latter part of the year 1860. During this period the expofts of specie
exceeded the imports and bullion derived from domestic sources nearly one
hundred millions of dollars. This heavy drain bn our specie ceased in October
of the year last named, and soon thereafter the floAv of specie to the United
States commenced and continued until a few Aveeks since. The bullion and
coin imported during this period, together with the bullion derived from domestic sources, has added about ninety millions to our stock of coin. The importance, in a financial point of vioAv, of this large- addition to our specie during a
peidod characterized by the most extraordinary interruptions to trade and commerce ever Avitnessed in this country, cannot well be overestimated.
In pursuance of instructions receiA^ed from the Treasury Department, and as
required by the act of Congress of February 22, 1857, an assay of all the foreign gold and silver coins heretofore knoAvn and received at the mint Avas
directed to be made to determine their average Aveight, fineness, and value—the
gold dollar of the United States being the standard. The result of the assay,
and the determination of value, are gwen in table — of the appendix to this
report. A comparison of the present Avith former assays of many of the same
or similar coins exhibits but little change in value—the standard value and the
•character and denomination of the coins of most foreign nations being unaltered.
The tables heretofore annexed to the annual report of the director, and the
present table, Avere constructed upon the basis, not of the alleged standards, but
of our OAvn assay, and of the actual weight of foreign coin at the mint, Avhich
often shoAvs a material loss by wear and a Avant of exact conformity in fineness
to the alleged standards. The average weight, fineness, and value of foreign
coins received since the last report will be found in the table to Avhich Ave have
refeiTed.
The gold dollar of the United States, conforming in standard value and decimal character to all the gold and silver coinage of the country, except the silver
dollar, has been properly selected, and should be retained, as the standard of
value for all foreign coins used or employed in commercial or governmental
: transactions Avith other nations. The silver dollar of the United xStates, differing as it does in commercial and decimal value from the other silver coins of our
country, cannot, Avithout disturbing our decinial system and producing confusion in the relative value of our gold and sUver coinage, be used as a standard.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

63

The legal weight of the silver dollar is 412^^^"^ grains; of tAvo half dollars, or
other component fractions of the dollar, 384 grains—a difference of 25-J^^^Q- grains.
The silver dollar, as> it now is, has actually three values: 1. It is, by law, a
dollar simply, or 100 units or cents. 2. By the mint price of silver it is 103y^^
cents, Avhich is its true commercial value as compared Avith gold. 3. It has an
interior or mint value, w^hich is determined by its relation to the silver contained
in the half dollar, which makes it 107-|J- cents; for Avhich reason single pieces
are paid out at the mint at the even price of 108 cents.
As the dollar, which is the unit of our money, is represented in gold coin, it
would seem desirable not to have another dollaj' in another metal; but if this is
inadmissible, and the silver dollar should be retained, then it should be reduced
to eight-tenths of an ounce to be in true relation to our other silver coins.
TAVO reasons seem to have influenced Congress in retaining the sih^er dollar
at its present anomalous terms: First, that it preserves the old dollar, known
from the beginning of our coinage, and often exactly stipulated for in deeds of
rent-charge, mortgages, and other moneyed securities. ^To this it may be successfully replied that such payments are now ahvays made in gold, because it is
the legal and usual tender for all sums exceeding five dollars, andbecause silver
dollars are no longer to be had, or are very rare.
In the second place, it Avas supposed to be needed for our China and^ East
India trade; but our.consular.advices are to the effect that our silver dollars are
very reluctantly taken at the ports, and not at all in the interior of China. They
are believed by the Chinese to be of less valu(^ than they really are.
The reasons for its retention having ceased, either Ave should cease to coin the
silver dollar, or it should be made to conform in weight and value to our lesser
silver coins.
The reduction of the standard value of all American coins, except the sih^er
dollar, Avas made to check the export of specie from the United States; but the
commercial character of specie, and the facility Avith which the coins of one
nation can be converted "into the peculiar and distinctive denominations of another, have prevented the realization of that expectation. The relatiA^e and
commercial value of the peculiar coinage of any country must and will' be determined by the standard of the nation to which it may be sent, and the laws
of trade also will control values despite all legislative enactments. Legislation, Avhilst it properly may regulate the currency and control the coinage of a
nation, cannot control its value as a medium of exchange or as an article of commerce AAdth other nations. I Avould, in this connexion, respectfully suggest that
the limit of legal tender for silver should be increased. It is iiOAvfiA^Sdollars;
it should not be so IOAV. This limitation unnecessarily discredits the currency,
and is productive of much inconvenience to individuals and banking institutions.
The limit might Avith great propriety and advantage to public and private interests be extended to fifty or one hundred dollars.
NATIONAL MEDALS.

The national and other American medals of historic interest, noAv in progress
of preparation at the mint, will be ready for sale and delivery about the 20th of
October. ^The medals have been prepared, Avith great care and skill, from the
original dies in the mint, and are exacty^c similes of the original medals. The
medals are of copper, bronzed, and Avill be furnished at prices that AAdll enable
all Avho feel an interest in numismatics to obtain them. The medal department
of the mint has assumed the position and. importance in this institution to Avhich,
by every consideration of a just national pride, it is fully entitled. Medals in
the highest style of art can be furnished A\dth great facility, and those soon to
be issued are highly creditable to the artists and Avorkmen by Avhom they liaA^^e
been prepared.




64

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The cabinet of the mint is increasing in interest and value by the frequent
addition of rare and A^aluable coins and medals. As a numismatic collection it
is deserAdng the attention and encouragement of the friends of that science.
LIST OF TABLES IN APPENDIX.

A.—Statement of bullion deposited at the mint of the United States and
branches during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861. ^
B.—Statement of the coinagje at the mint of the United States and branches
during the fiscal year enduig June 30, 1861.
C.—Statement of gold and silver,of' domestic production deposited at the mint
of the United States and branches during the fiscal year ending June .
30, 1861.
D.—Coinage of the mint and branches from their organization to the close of
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861, (eleven tables.)
E.—Gold of domestic production deposited at the mint of the United States
and branches to June 30, 1861, (seven tables.)
F.—Silver of domestic production deposited at the mint of the United States
and its branches from January, 1841, to June 30, 1861.
G.—Silver coined at the mint of the United States and the branches at' San
Francisco and New Orleans, under the act of February 21, 1853.
IT.—Amount and denomination of fractions of the Spanish and Mexican dollar
deposited at the mint of the United States, for exchange for the neAv
cent, to June 30, 1860.
I. — Amount of fractions of the. Spanish and Mexican dollar purchased at the
mint of the United States, the 'branch mint at NOAV Orleans, and the
assay office, NOAV York, and paid for in silver coins, to June 30, 1861..
J.— Cents of former issue deposited at the mint of the United States for exchange for cents of the ncAv issue.
K.—Statement of the AA^eight, fineness, and va,lue of foreign gold coins.
'
L.— Statement of the weight, fineness, and value of foreign sih^-er coins.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
J A M E S POLLOCK,
Director of the Mint.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE, •

Secretary of the Treasury^ Washington City.




A.
Statement of hulliooi deposited at the mint of the United States and branches during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
Mint U. States,
Philadelphia.

Description.

Branch mint.
N e w Orleans,
to J a n . 31,1861.

Branch mint,
San Francisco.

Branch mint,
Branch mint,
Dahlonega,
Charlotte,
to Feb. 28,1861. to Mar. 31,1861.

Assay office,
'R(i\v York.

Total.

GOLD.

M7,885,478
1,068,822
47,733
1,675
111,375
2,750,975
24,703

United States bullion
United States coin, ( 0 . S.)

92
48
05
00
47
12
52

$21,598 91

$12,206,382 64
52,599 20

$62,193 05

$65,558 30

291,011 14
21,800 72

$20,792,334
53,766
2,513
262,839
27. .582,517
3,664,126

14
00
00
CO
00
00

$47,885,478
34,216,889
154 098
4 188
374,214
30 624 503
3,710,630

92
52
25
00
47
26
24

O
O

51,890,763 56

T o t a l gold

334,410 77

12,258,981 84

62,193 05

65,558 30

52,358,095 14

116,970,002 66

H

w

SILVER.

1,487,279
23,572
190,754
24,702

Foreif'n bullion

..

10
72
64
61

121 49
163,878 51
745,038 24

197,844 08

388,.473 06
1,015,069 ]8
3b8,228 00

1,487,279
610,011
1,369,702
1,157,968

1,726,309 07

Bars
United States bullion

909,038 24

197,844 08

1,791,770 18

4,624,961 57

53,617,072 63

1,243,449 01

12,456,825 92

54,149,865 S2

121,594,964 23

10
29
33
85

ft!

Q
Total silver.
Total gold and silver .

•
......

Less redeposits at the different institutions : gold, $47,885,478 92;
silver, .'fil.562.914 10
Total deposits




62,193 05

65,558 30

49,448,393 02
72,146,571 01

Ul

B.
Statement of the coinage at the mint of the United States and branches during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
•

Mint of the United States, Branch mint. New Orleans, to Jan. 31,1861.
Philadelphia.

Denomination.

• GOLD.

Value.
Pieces.
2 , 3 U , 9 2 l $46,838,420
440:050
44,005
282;630
• 56.526
18.216
6,072
..
303:440
121,376
...
13,955
13,955
66,434

Eagles
T h r e e dollars
Uuarter eagles
Dollars...,
Bars

00
00
00
00
00
00
76

2,583,855 47,963,145 76

T o t a l gold

Pieces.
Value.
9,600 $192,000 00
5,200
52,000 00

Branch mint, San
Francisco.

Branch mint, Dahlon- Branch mint, Char- Assay otfice,
ega, to Feb. 28,1861. lotte, to Mar. 31,1861. N e w York.

Value.
Pieces.
Pieces.
614,300 $12,286,000 00
60-000 00
6, C O
O
40,000 00 11,876
8,000

Value.
$59,380 00

1,566
244,000 00

395,000
828,000

395,000 00
414,000 00

.14,116

35,000 00

14,000

14,800

Pieces.

642,300 12,421,000 00

1,566 00

13,442

60,946.00

14,116

Value,

Total.

Value.

Pieces,
Value.
2 955 8^1 .$59,316,420
552,050
55,205
A'Y) ^90
$70,580 00
90,518
18 216
6,072
3.*^? 440
135,376
15,521
15 5-^1
$19,948,728 88
20 015 163

00
00
nn
00
on
00
64

70,530 00 19,948,728 88 3,268,513 80 708 400 64

o
H
O

SILVER.

164,900
Dollars
741,.300
Half dollars
Quarter dollars . . . . . . . . 3,034,200
1,573,000
2,787,000
Halfdimes
265,000
Three- cent p i e c e s . . . . . .
Bars
Total s i l v e r . . . . . . . . 8,565,400

164,900
370.650
7.58:550
157,300
139,350
7.950
2,624

00
00
00
00
00
00
37

1,601,324 37 1,223,000

350,000
52,000
100,000

i 6 , 8 i 8 33
825,818 33

,

559,900
1,919,300
3:086,200
1,673,000
2,787,000
265,000

175,000 00
13,000 00
10,000 O
C
71,485 61

.

502,000

187,078 63

269,485 61

.559 900
959,650
771,550
167 300
139 350
7,950
278'006

00
00
00
00
00
00
94

187,078 63 10,290,400

2,883,706 94

10,166,000

101 660 00

10,166,000

101,660 00

COPPER.

101,660 00

10,166,000

T o t a l copper

101,660 00

,.,,.....

........

RECAPITULATION.

Total coinage

O
CQ

10,166,000

Cents

Total gold
Total silver
T o t a l copper

I—I

14,800
c . . . 2,583,855 47,963,145 76
8.565,400 1,601,324 37 1,223,000
101,660 00
lO;166,000

244.000 00
825^818 33

642,300 12,421,000 00
502,000
269,485 61

13,442

60,946 00

14,116

70,580 00 19,948,728 88 3,268,513 80,708,400 64
187,078 63 10,290,400 2,883,706 94
101,660 00
10,168,000

21,315,255 49,666,130 13 1,237,800 1,009,818 33 1,144,300 12,690,485 61

13,442

60,946 00

14,116

70,580 00 20,135,807 51 23,724,91.3 83,693,767 58




c.
Statement of gold and silver of do7nestic production deposited at the mint of the United States and branches during the fiscal year
endino: June 30, 1861.
iMint of the United Bran ell mint, San Branch mint, New Branch mint, DahBranch mint,
Assay ofllce, NewFrancico.
States, PhiladelYork.
Orleans, to J a n .
lonega, to Feb. Charlotte, to Mar.
phia.
31, 1861.
28, iS61.
31,.1861.

Description of bullion.

Total.

GOLD.

Cai i fornia . . .
VLr'^inia

\

81
08
29
80

$12,206,382 64

$19,932 10
^1,666 81

$4,213 79
32,772 28
812 79
2,066 91
22,182 14

15,049 41

Geor'^ia . .

$65,558 30

92 76

Alabama
Utah
Arizona

$426,g07
607,592
7,200
7,523

.......................................

1,507 96
3,048 37
1,068,822 48

Total

HS'H"

12,206,382 64

21,598 91

$19,227,6.58
1,449,166
3,869
2,7.53
670
6,900
3,181
818
6,714
73,734
16,871

14
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$31,884,994
2,091,197
11,069
11,089
68,295
44,131
3,181
910
• 6,714
75,387
19,919

48
17
29
59
21
53
00
76
00
10
37

6.5,558 30

20,792,334 14

56,666
308,058
213,420
13,372
12,260
6,233

SILVER.

California . .
Parted from gold
Utah, ( W a s h o e )
L a k e Superior . . . . ^ . < , .
Arizona
North Carolina
Total silver
Total gold and silver




O
H

34,216,889 52

56,656
232,172
76,499
4,643
12,260
6,233

62,193 05

o

o
13,043 65
1,799 35
8,729 72

62,721 59
135,122 49

23,572 72

197,844 08

1,092,395 20

12,404,226 72

121 49

,.,...
\
."^

'

00
73
84
72
00
00

388,473 00

121 49

21,720 40

00
00
00
00
00
00

62,193 05

65,558 30

610,011 29

21;180,807 14

34,826,900 81

Ul

D.

GO

Coinage of the mint and branches from their organization to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
3 MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA.
L.

GOLD COINAGE.

Period.

W
Double eagles.

Total




•
-.

Pieces.
132,592

Half eagles. Three dollars. Quarter eagles.

• 8,122,526
468,504
98,196
188,615
2,341,921

1,227,759
1,970,597
13,690
8,600
16,013
44,005

Pieces.
845,909
3,087,925~
3,269,921
2,260,390
. 32,633
20,718
19,724
56,526

11,219,762

3,413,256

9,593,7.46

Pieces.
1793 to 1817
1818 to 1 8 3 7 . . .
1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858..:
.1859
•1860
1861

Eagles.

Dollars.

Fine bars.

Pieces.

Value.

223,015
13,059
11,524
13,402
6,072

Pieces.
22,197
879,903
345,526
5,544,900
113,097
76,562
13,721
121,376

15,348,608
208,724
231,873
78,743
13,955

267,072

7,117,282

15,881,903

Pieces.

o
o

w
t^
=
$33,612,140
21,088
49,286
170,275
. 66,434

46
10
59
34
76

33,919,225 26

^
>
s
^

d

m

D.—Coinage of the mint and branches, fy:—Continued.
1. MINT OF THE TJNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA—Continued.
SILVER COINAGE.

Period.
Dollars.

Half dollars. Quarter dollars.

Dimes.

Half dimes.

Tliree cents.

Bars.

Pieces.
1,007,151
11,854,949
11,387,995
35,172,010
690,000
1,760,000
576,000
1,573,000

Pieces.
265,543
14,463,700
11,093,235
34,368,520
4,000,000
2,840,000
870,000
2,787,000

Pieces.

Value.

37,778,900
1,266,000
1,380,000
548,000
265,000

S32,355 55
843 37
9,341 08

64,021,105

70,687,998

41,237,900

66,820 67

o
1793 to
1818 to
1838 to
1848 to
1858
1859
I860
1861

Pieces.
1,439,517
1,000'
879,873
350,250

1817
1837
1847
1857

-...

73,500
315,530
164,900

Pieces.
13,104,433
74,793,560
20,203,333
10,691,088
4,028,000
2,636,000
349,800
741,300

Pieces.
650,280
5,041,749
4,952,073
41^072,280
10,600,000
4,996,000
909,800
3,034,200

21S5Q> 30

2,624 37

•

Total




3,224,570

126,547,514

71,256,382

H
O
W

'^
h-i
t^
o
ft
Ul

• D.—Coinage of the mint and branches, (^'c—Continued.

o

1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA—Continued.
COPPER COINAGE.

Period.

•
Cents.

Half cents.

TOTAL COINAGE.

Number of
pieces coined.

Value of gold.

Value of silver.

Value of
copper.

Total value
• coined.
O

1793 to
1818 to
1838 to
1848 to
1858
1859"
I860
1861

1817
1837
1847
1857.-

..

Pieces.
29,316,272
46,554,830
34,967,663
51,449,979
23,400,000
30,700,000
34,200,000
10,166,000

Pieces.
5,235,513
2,205,200

260,754,744

7,985,223

544,510

52,019,407
158,882,816,
88,327,378
244,908,562
44,833,766
44,833,111
38,099,348
21,315,255

$5,610,957
17,639,382
29,491,010
256,950,474
10,221,876
2,660,646
4,354,576
47,963,145

693,219,643

374,892,070 25

50
50
00
46
60
59
84
76

$8,268,295
40,566,897
13,913,019
22,365,413
4,971,823
3,009,241
.857,076
1,601,324

75 $319,340 28
476,574 30
15
349,676 63
00
517,222 34
55
234,000 00
37
307,000 00
08
342,000 00
30
101,660 00
37

$14,198,593
58,682,853
43,753,705
279,833,110
15,427,699
5,976.887

53
95
63
35
97
67

O.

ft

5,^5':^^,^5^ 14

49,666,130 13

O
Ul

Total




95,553,090 57 2,647,473 55

473,092,634 37

D.—Coinage of the mint and branches, ^c.—Continued.
2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO.

GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
Double eagles.

Eagles.

Half eagles. Three dols. Qr. eagles. Dollars.

Unparted bars.

Fine bar.s.

•
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861

»...

Total

:




Pieces.
141,468
859,175
1,181,750
604,500
885,940
689,140
579,975
614,300

Pieces.
123,8269,000
. 73,500
10,000
27,000
2,000
10,000
6,000

Pieces.
268
61,000
94,100
47,000
58,600
9,720
16,700
. 8,000

Pieces.

5,556,248

262,126

295,388

62,100

•

6,600
34,500
5,000
9,000
7,000

Pieces.
246

Pieces.
14,632

71,120
20,000
49,200
8,000
28,800
14,000

24,600

191,366

20,000
15,000
13,000

O

Yalue.
• Value.
$5,641,504 05 $5,863 16
3,270,594 93
88,782 50
3,047,001»29 122,136 55

O
I2J

816,295 ^5
J 9,871 68
• '

VH

o
87,232

12,775,395 92

236,653 89

Ul

ID.-—Coinage of the mint and branches, 8fc.—Continued.

isD

2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO—Contioued.

SILVER COINAGE.

TOTAL COINAGE.

Period.
Dollars. Half dolls. Qr. dollars.

Dimes.

Bars.

Number of
pieces. •

Gold value.

Silver value.

Total value.
hj

O

Pieces.
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861

Pieces.

Pieces.

Pieces.

Value.

61
87
52
61

282,712
1,471,272
1,977,559
800,500
1,362,028
1,463,893
1,417,475
1,144,300

355,729 06

9,919,739

.

15,000
5,OOo

Total . . 20,000

121,950
211,000
86,000
218,000
463,000
693,000
350,000

412,400
286,000
28,000
63,000
30,000
172,000
90,000
24,000 - 40,000
52,000 100,000

2,142,950

1,037,400 260,000




$23,609 45
19,752
29,469
211,411
71,485

$9,731,574
20,957,677
28,315,537
12,490,000
19,276,095
13,906,271
11,889,000
12,421,000

21
43
84
00
65
68
00
00

128,987,156 81

$164,075
200,609
50,000
147,502
327,969
572,911
269,485

00
45
0.0
61
87
52
61

1,732,554 06

$9,731,574
21,121,752
28,516,147
12,540,000
19,423 598
14,234,241
12,461,911
12,690,485

21
43
29
00
26
55
52
61

130,719,710 87

O

!25

Q

D.— Coinage of the mint and branches, ^'c.—Continued.
3. BRANCH MINT, NEW ORLEANS.

GOLD COINAGE.

Period.
Double eagles.

Eagles.

Half eagles. Three dollars.

Qr. eagles.

Dollars.
hj

730, 500
47, 500
24, 500
4,350
9,600

Pieces.
1, 026, 342
534, 250
.21,500
4,000
8,200
5,200

Pieces.
790, 925
108, 100
13, 000.

816, 450

1, 599, 492

831, 025

Pieces.
1838 to 1847-:
1848 to 1857
1858
1859
I860
1861, to fJanuarv 31)
Total




.'

--

Pieces.
24, 000

Pieces.
550, 528
546, 100
34, 000

Pieces.
1, 004, 000

O
H
O
H

^^

\--i

24,000

1, 130, 628

1, 004, 000

O
Ul

oo

D.— Coinage of the mint and branches, ^c.—Continued.

3. BRANCH MINT, NEW., ORLEANS—Continued.
SILVER COINAGE.

Period.
Dollars.

Pieces.
59,000
1838 to 1847
40, 000
1848 to 1857
1858 . .
1859
200, 000
1860
280, 000
1861, (to Januaiy 3 1 ) . . . , 395, 000
Total

1..




974, 000

Half dollar.

Quarter dollars.

Pieces.
13, 509, 000
21, 406, 000
4,614,000
4,912,000
2,.212, 000
828,000

Pieces.
3, 273, 600
4, 556, 000
1, 416, 000
544, 000
388, 000

47, 481, 000

10, 177, 600

Dimes.

Pieces.
6, 473, 500
. 5, 690, 000
1,540,000
440, 000
370, 000
14,513,500

Half dimes.

Pieces.
2, 789, 000
- 8,170,000
2,540,000
1, 060, 000
1, 060, 000
15,619,000

Tliree
cents.
Pieces.

Bars.

Value.

O
H
O

720, 000
$334, 996 47
25, 422 33
16,818 33
720, OOi)

377, 237 13

hj

1 1
—

>

^

•

o
CQ

D.— Coinage of the mint and brandies, 8fc—Continued.

3. BRANCH MINT, NEW ORLEANS—Continued.

TOTAL SILVER COINAGE.

Period.
Number of
pieces.

Value of gold.

Value of silver.

Total value
coined.

hj

O

1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
1859
1860
1861, (to Januaiy 31)
Total




28, 390,
43, 538,
10, 220,
7, 184,
4, 322,
1, 237,

895
950
000
500
550
800

$15,189,365 00
-22,934,250 00
1,315,000 00
530,000 00
169,000 00
244, 000 00

94, 900, 695

40,381,615 00

$8,418,700 00 ^23,60^,065 00
12, 881, 100 00 35,815,350 00
4,257,000 00
2, 942, 000 00
3,753,996 47
3,223,996 47
1,767,422 33
1,598,422 33
1,069,818 33
825,818 33
29,890,037 13

70,271,652 13

O

o
Ul

D.— Coinage of the mint and branches, ^c—Continued.

4. BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.

GOLD COINAGE.

Period

<
!
H a l f eagles.

1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
3 859
3 860 .
1861, (to 28th of F e b r u a r y )
Total




Quarter eagles.

T h r e e dollars.

Pieces.
576.553
478,392
19, 256
11,404
12, 800
11,876

Pieces.
134, 101
60,605
900
642
1,602

Pieces.

1,110,281

197, 850

1,120

1, 120

Dollars.

T o t a l pieces.

T o t a l value.

Pi

o

Pieces.
60, 897
1,637
6,957
1, 472
1,566

710,654
601,014
2 1 , 793
19,003
15, 844
13, 442

72,529

1,381,750

$3,218,017
2, 607, 729
100 167
65 582
69, 477
60 946

50
50
00
00
00
00

o
H

6, 121 919 00

O
w

Ul

J).-^Coinage of the mint and branches, 8fc.—Continued.
5. BRANCH MINT, CHARLOTTE.

GOLD COLNAGE.

Period
Half eagles.

1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
1859
1860.....
1861, (to 31st of March)
Total




[

:

QuaL'LcL" eagles.

Pieces.
269, 424
500, 872
31, 066
39, 500
23, 005
14, 116

Pieces.
123, 576
79, 736
9,056

877, 983

219, 837

Dollars.

Total pieces.

Total value.

o

Pieces.
103,899
'5, 235

7, 469
109, 134
•

393, 000
684, 507
40, 122
44,735
30, 474
14,116
1,206,954

$1, 656, 060
2, 807, 599
177,970
202, 735
133, 697
70, 580

00
00
00
00
50
00

H
O

5, 048, 641 50
O
Ul

D.— Coinage of the mint and branches, 8fc.—Continued.

—1
GO

6. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.

Period.

Fine gold
bars.
822
6,182
4, 727
• 2, 230
7,052
3, 295

Value.

4,816

1854.
18551856.
1857.
1858.
1859.
1860.
1861.

Total.




$2, 888,059 18
20, 441,813 63
19, 396, 046 89
9; 335, 414 00
21, 798, 691 04
13, 044, 718 43
6, 831,532 01
19, 948,728 88

20, 124

113, 685, 004 06

Silver bars.

52

Value

1,089

$6,792 63
123,317 00
171,961 79.
272, 424 05
222,226 11
187,078 63

4,-570

983, 800 21

• 550
894
1, 985

Total pieces.

822
6,182
• 4, 779
2,780
7,946
5, 280

Total value.

5,905

$2,888,059 18
20,441,813 63
19, 402, 839 52
9, 458, 731 00
21,970,652 83
13, 317, 142 48
7,053,75,8 12
20, 135,:807 51

33,694

114, 668, 804 27

o

n

o
H
§

d
"
m

D.—Coinage of the mint and branches, 8fc.—Continued.
7. SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF THE MINT TO THE CLOSE OF THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1861.

^ Mints.

Commencement of
coinage.

Philadelphia
San Francisco
New Orleans, (to Jan. 31,
1861)
Charlotte, (to March 31,
1861)
Dahlonega, (to Feb. 28,
1861)
-.
Assay office, New York.

1793
1854

Value.
$374, 892, 070 25
. 128, 987, 156 81

1838

40,381,615 00

1838

5,048,641 50

1838
•1854

6,121,919 00
113,685,004 06

Total




Cold coinage.

Silver coinage.

Copper coinage.

Entire coinage.

Pieces.
Value.
Value.
$95,553,090 57 $2,647,473 55 $693,219,643 00
1, 732, 554 06
9,919,739 00

Value.
$473, 092, 634 37
130, 719, 710 87

94,900,695 00

70, 271, 652 13

1, 206, 954 00

5, 048, 641 50

1,381,750 00
33,694 00

6, 121, 919 00
114, 668, 804 27

o
o

669,116, 406 62

29,890,037 13

983,800 21
128,159,481 97

2,647,473 55

800,662,475 00

799, 923, 362 14

K
i2^

>

o
Ul

CO

GO

E.

O

Statement of gold of domestic production deposited in the mint of the United States and branches, to the close of the year end. ing June 30, 1861.
1. MINT OF THE UNITED STi^TES, PHILADELPHIA.
Period.

North Carolina.

Vu^ginia.

Georgia.

South Carolina.

Tennessee.

Alabama.

o
1804
1828
1838
1848
1858
1859
1860
1861

to
to
to
to

1827
1837
1847
1857 . :

$427, 000
518,294
534,491
18,377
15, 720
17,402
7,200

.
Total




.-

00
00
50
00
00
62
29

1, 538, 485 41^^

$110,000
2,519,500
1,303, 636
467,237
15,175
9, 305
'8,450
7,523

00
00
00
00
00
00
11
80

4,440,826 91

$327,500
152,366
55,626
300
4,675

00
00
00
00
00
•

•

540,467 00

•

00
00
50
00
00
41
41

$12,400 00
16,499 00
6, 664 00

2, 435, 954 32

36,403 88

$1, 763, 900
566, 316
44, 577
18, 365
20, 190
7, 556
15, 049

$45,493 00
9,451 00

i

240 00
595 88
92 76
55, 036 76

o
Ul

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, b^c.—Continued.
1. MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA-—Continued.
g

New Mexico.

Period,

to

^ 1804
]828
1838
1848
1858
1859
I860
1861

to
to
to
to

1827..
1837
1847
1857..
......
:

Calif ornia.

: . $48,397 00 $226,839,521
1,372, 50B
•275 00
959,191
663,389
:.
426,807

• Oregonr

62 $54,285
073,600
79
2,960
02 ' 2, 78081

00
00
00
16

Kansas.

. Arizona.

Other
sources.

$13, 200- 00
21, 037 00
7,218 00
$145 00
346,604 05
607,592 08

$3,-048 37

1,402 01
1, 507 96

Total.

$110, 000
5,^063,500
2, 623, 641
228, 067, 473
1, 428, 323
1, 012, 701
1, 048, 180
1, 068, 822

00
00
00
-62
07
79
26
48

-O
H
O
H

•

Total....




48,672 00

230,261,416 31

63,625 16

954,341 13

3,048 37

*44, 364 97

240,422,642 22
h-<

»Includes $1,507 96 from Utah, and $1,402 01 from Nebraska.

Ul

GO

oo
to

'Ex.—Statement of gold of domestic prod/uction, t^re.—Contuiued.

-2. BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO.

• ~ Period.

1854
1855..
1856
1857
1858. •
1859
1860
1861.-.

-

•

...:..-.

; .
-

:
.

. . .

•

.

.
.

•

•
•

Total-.




Total.

California.

0

-

:.-.-•

^
•

$10, 842, 2 8 1
20, 860, 437
29, 209, 218
12, 526, 826
19, 104, 369
14, 098, 564
11,319,913
12, 206, 382

23
20
24
93
99
14
83
64

$10,842,281
20,860/437
29,209,218
12, 526, 826
19, 104, 369
14, 098, 564
11,319,913
12, 206, 382

23
20
24
93
99
14
83
64

V

130, 167, 994 20

1 3 0 , 1 6 7 , 9 9 4 20

^

W

hj

o
w

H
• O

H
M
W

>
^
1—(

o
Ul

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, S^c.—Continued..
3. BRANCH MINT, NEW ORLEANS.
Peitiod.

N. Carolina. S. Carolina.

Georgia.

Alabama.

Tennessee.

California.

Kansas.

Other sources.

Total.

•

1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857 ' .
1858
1869
I860 - . - '
.
1861, (to Jan. 31).
Total

$741 00

$14,306 00
1,911 00

$37,364 00
2,317 00
1,560 00

$1,772 00
947 00
164 12

$61,903 00
15,379 00
'

741 00




16,217 00

41,241 00

• 2,883 12

661 53

77,943 53

$21,606,461
448,439
93,272
87,135
19,932

$3,613 00
3,677 00

54
84
41
00
10

$1,770 39
1,666 81

22,255,240 89

3,437 20

7,290 00

$119,699
21 630 692
450 163
93 272
"89 566
21 589

00
54
96
41
92
91

22,404,993 74

hj

O
O
H

o
Ul

CO
Co

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, SfC.—Continued.

oo

4. BRANCH MINT, CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA.
Period.
1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
:
1859
1860
1861, (to 31stMarcli)..
Total




Nortli Carolina.
Jl, 529, 777 00
2,503,412 68
170;560 33
.182,489 61
. 134, 491 17

Soutli Carolina.
$143,942 00
222, 754 17
5,507 16
22,762 71

California.

,321 01

65,558 30
4,520,730 79

460,523 34

87,321 01

Total.
$1, 673, 718
2,813,487
176,067
205,252
134,491
65,558

00
86
49
32
17
Sa

5,068,575 14

O
H
O

w
>^
o

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, ^.-—Continued.

5. BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.

Period.
1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
1859
1860
1861, (to February 28)

Total

..




Utah.

,
1
•.-..:

Nortli Carolina. S.outli Carolina.
$64,351 00
28, 278 82

$145 14

...

.

2,656 88
3,485 70
812 79

145 14

99,585 19

$95,427
174,811
32, 322
4,610
2, 004
2,066

00
91
28
35
36
91

311,242 81

Tennessee.

Georgia.
00
98
45
12
92
14

$32,175 00
9, 837 42
107 33

4,310,459 61

42,119 75

$2,978,353
1, 159, 420
57,891
57,023
35,588
22, 182

hj

O
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O
i^
H

)—( >
O
Ul

00

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, 8fc.—Continued.

CO

5. BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA—Continued.
Period.

Alabama.

1838 to 1847
1848 to 1857
1858
1859..
I860
^
1861, Cto Februarv 28)

.•

$47,711 00
11,918 92

'...

Total
—

\ .
•...

59', 629, 92
, — . - :

•

u

. .

•

>




—

.,

Kansas.

California.

$1, 224, 712'
5,293
699
1,097
4,213

82 '
52
19
37
79

1,236,016 69

Other sources.

$951 00
$82 70
24,908 86
32,772 28
57, 763 84

' ^

951 00

Total.
$3, 218, 017
2, 609, 931
95,614
65, 072
67, 085
62.193

00
87
58
24
21
05

6, 117, 913 95

o
O

H

^

5
Ul

E.—State'inent of gold of domestic production, Sfc.—Continued.
6. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.

Period.
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858 ' .'
1859
I860
1861
Total....

Virginia.
$167
2, 370
6, 928
1,531
501
436
4,202
3, 869

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

20, 004 00




North Carolina. South Carolina. "
$3,916
3,750
805
1,689
' 7, 007
20, 122
9,755
2,753

00
00
07
00
00
00
00
00

49,797 07

$395
7,620
4, 052
2,663
6,354
700

00
00
29
00
00
00

670 00
22, 454 29

^Georgia.
$1,242
13, 100
41,101
10;451
12,951
14,756
19,368
6,900

00
00
28
00
00
00
00
00

119,869 28

Alabama.

New Mexico.

California.

. 8 1 8 00

$6, 714 00

$9, 221, 457
25, 025, 896
16,529,008
9, 899, 957
19, 660, 531
11, 694, 872
6, 023, 628
19,227, 658

5, 720 62

6,714 00

• 117,283,009 22

$350
233
1,545
2, 181
593

00
62
00
00
00

00
11
90
00
46
25
36
14

O
O

CO

YJ.—Statement of^gold of domestic production^ 4"^.—Continued.

CO

oo

6. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK—Continued.

Period.
1854
1855
.
1856
1 8 5 7 . . . .•
1858 ^
1859 .
I860-1861
"

Kansas.

Utah.

Arizona.

Oregon.

Other soui'ces.

$1,600 00
'^
'.
'..

Total




$5,581 00
2,866^00

$3, 944 00 .
248,981 00.
1, 449, 166 00

$4,680 00
73, 734 00

$1, 190 00
16:871 00

3, 181 00

1,702, 091- 00

78, 414 .00

18,061 00

11, 628 00

27; 523 00
405 00

29,528 00

Total.
$9, 227, 177 00
25 054 6(S6 11
16 582 129 16
9 917 836 00
10 799 690 AP,
11 738 694 25
6T 311, 804 36
20 792 334 14
119 347 290 48

o
H
O
W
Hrj
y-i

>
O
W
Ul

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, ^.—Continued.

7_SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE ENTIRE DEPOSITS OF DOMESTIC GOLD AT THE UNITED STATES MINT AND BRANCHES^TO JUNE 30,1861.

Virginia. .

Mint.

North Carolina.

South Carolina.

Georgia.

Alabama. *,

$540,467 00

$2,435,954 32

%55, 036 76

41,_241 00

77, 943- 53

4

Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . , •
San Francisco
New Orleans
Charlotte
Dahlonega
Assay office

$1,538,485 41 ^ $ 4 , 4 4 0 , 8 2 6 91

20, 004 00

741
4, 520, 730
99,585
'49, 797

00
79
19
07

16,217
460,523
311,242
22, 454

00
34
81
29

4,310,459 61
119,869 28

59, 629 92
5, 720 62

1,350,904 44

6, 907, 524 21

198, 330 83

o
H
O
H'

Total

»

1,558,489 41

9, 111, 680 96

w

rt
rt
'r-i

Mint.
Philadelphia
San Francisco
New Orleans
Charlotte
Dahlonega
Assay office

Tennessee.

.'....

Total




^
^.........

..

'...

California.

Kansas.

Utah.

Arizona.
o
rt

$36,403 88 $230,261,416
130,.167, 994
.2,883 12
22, 255, 240
87,321
42,119 75
1,236,016
117, 283, 009
81,406 75

31
20
89
01
69
22

$954,341 13

$1, 507 96

$3, 048 37

3, 437 20
f.

57,763 84
1,702,091 00

145 14
78, 414 00

18, 061 00

501,290,998 32, 2, 717, 633 17

80,067 10

21 109 37

Ul

CO

E.—Statement of gold of domestic production, ^x.—Continued.

O

7.—SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE ENTIRE DEPOSITS OF DOMESTIC GOLD AT THE UNITED STATES MINT AND BRANCHES TO JUNE 30, 1861.

Mmt.

Nebraska.

Philadelphia . . . . ^
San Francisco
New Orleans
Charlotte
Dahlonega

$1,402 01




$48,672 00

Oregon.
$63,625 16

Other sources.
$41, 455 00
7,290 00

6,714 00

""•^o""

Assay office.'.
Total

New Mexico.

11,628 00

' 951 00
29,528 00

55,386 00

75,253 16

79,224 00

Total.
$240,422, 642
130, 167. 994
22, 404, 993
5, 068, 575
6, 117,'913
- 119, 347, 290

22
20
74
14
95
48

rt
rt

o
H
O
H

'

1,402 01

523, 529, 409 73

rt

O

rt
m

F.—Statement of the amount of silver of domestic p>rodMction deposited at the mint of the United States and its branches, from January, 1841, to June 30, 1861.
•
Year.

1841 to 1851
1852
•
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858 ...•
1859
1860 . . . '
1861
Total

Parted from
gold.

\

$768,509
404, 494
417,279
328, 199
333,053
321,938
127,256
300,849
219,647
138,561
364,724

00
00
00
00
00
38
12
m
34*
70
73

3,724,511 63




Utah, (Washoe.)

Arizona.

Sonora.

North Carolina.

Lake Superior.

0-

$102,540 77
213,420 84

$13, 357 00
12,260 00

$1,220 00

315,961 61

25,617 00

1,220 00

$23,398 00
12,257 00
.6,233 00
41,888-00

$15, 623
30, 122
25,880
13,372

00
13
58
72

84, 998 43

Total.

$768, 509
404, 494
417, 279
328, 199
333,053
321, 938
127, 256
316,472
273,167
293, 797
610, Oil

00
00
00
00
00
38
12
36
47
05
29

rt
rt

o
O

rt

rt
y-i

4, 194, 176 67
O

rt

Ul

G.—Statement of the amount of silver coined at the mAnt of the United, States, and branches at San Prancisco a/nd New Orleans,
under the act of February 21, 18D'^S.
Mint of the United Branch mint, San Branch mint. New
Orieaiis.
Francisco.
States at Philadelphia.

Year.

1853
1854
1855
1856
1857'
1858
1859 ..-.
1860 ,
1861

$7,806,461
5, 340, 130
1, 393, 170
3, 150, 740
1,333,000
4,970,980
2,926,400
519,890
1,433,800

..
... -.

;
•

Total




.

.

.....

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

28,874,571 00

$164,075
177,000
. 50, 000
127,750
• 283,500
356,500
198,000

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1,356,825 00

$1,225,000
3,246,000
.,1,918,000
1,744,000

00
00
00
00

2,942,000
2,689,000
1,293,000
414, 000

00
00
00
00

15, 471, 00 00

CO
CO

Total.

$9,031,461
8, 586, 130
3,475,245
5,071,740
1, 383, 000
8,040,730
5,898,900
2, 169, 390
2, 045, 800

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
^00

45,702,396 00

rt •

rt
o
O

feJ

rt
h-i

•fej
fe!

o
rt

ui

93

EEPORT ON THE I^INANCES.
H.

Statement of the amount and denomination of fractions of the Spanish and
Mexican dollar deposited at the mint of the United States for exchange f o r
the new cent to June 30, 1860.
Quarters.

Year.
1857
1858 . .
1859
I860

$78, 295
68, 644
111, 589
182,330-

.'

Total

Eighths.

...

$33, 148
64, 472
100, 080
51,630

440, 858

249, 330

Sixteenths.

'.

$16, 602
32, 085
41,390
.24, 105
114, 182

Value by tale.
$128,
165,
263,
258,

045
201
059
065

814, 370

Statement of the amount of fractions of the Spanish and Mexican dollar purchased at the mint of the United States, the branch mint. New Orleans, 'and
the assay office. New York, a n d p a i d f o r in silver coins, to June 30, 1851.

Year.

1857......
1858
•
1859- . . . . ' i . - .
I860
1861
.
Total....

Mint of U. S.,
Philadelphia.
$174, 485
326,033
165,115
58, 353
3.6, 572

Branch mint. Assay office,
New Orleans. New York.
$1, 360
. 17, 355
19, 825
9, 075,
5, 680

00
00
00
74
05-

760,558 79

*

$112,502
^ 147, 453
110,564
62, 072
, 10,474

53,295

443, 065

Total.

$288,347
490,841
295, 504
129,500
52, 726

00
00
00
74
05

1,256,918 79

J.
Statement qf cents qf former issue deposited at the mint of the United States
for exchange for cents of the new issue to June 30, 1861.
Year.

1857
1858'
1859
1860
1861
- Total



Value by tale.
$16,602
31, 404
47, 235
37, 500
95, 245
227, 986

94

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.
t

A statement offoreign. goU and silver coins, prepared by the director of the mAnt
to accoTnpaiiy his annual report, in pursuance of the act of February 21,1857.
EXPLANATORY REMARKS.

The first column embraces the ^names of the countries where the coins are
issued; the second contains the names of coins, only the principal denominations being, given; the other sizes are proportional, and when this is not the
case the deviation is stated.
The third column expresses the weight of a single piece in fractions of the
Troy ounce, carried to the thousandth of an ounce. This method is preferable
to expressing the weight in grains, for commercial purposes, and corresponds
better with the terms of the mint. It may be readily transferred to weight in
grains by the following rule: Remove the decimal point; from one-half deduct
four per cent., and the remainder will be grains.
The fourtli column expresses the fineness ia thousandths; i. e., the number of
parts of pure gold or silver in one thousand parts of the coin.
The fifth and sixth columns of the first table express the valuation of gold.
In the fifth is shown the value as compared witlrthe legal content, or amount of
fine gold in our coin. In the sixth is shown the value as paid at the mint, after
the uniform deduction of one-half of one per cent. The former is the value fi)r
any other purposes than recoinage, and especially for the purpose of comparison; the latter is the value in exchange for our coins at the mint.
^.
For the silver there is no fixed legal valuation, the laAV providing for shifting
the price according to the condition of demand and supply. The present price
of standard silver is 121 cents per ounce,, at which rate the value in the fifth
column of the second table are calcuhated. In a few cases, where the coins
could not be procured, the data are assumed from'the legal rates, and so stated.




EEPOET

ON T H E

95

FINANCES.

GOLD COINS.

Country.

Denomination.

Australia
Do
Austria . . . . . .
Do
Do
Belgium
Bolivia...
Brazil
."
Ceutral America,
Chili....'.-..
Do...Denmark .
Ecuador
England
D0..i......
France
Do
Germany, north.
Do
Do
Do
south:
Greece
Hindoostan . . .
Italy
Japan
do
Mexico
Do
Naples
Netherlands . New Grenada .
Do
Do
Peru . . . . „ . - - Portugal
Prussia
..Eome
Russia
Spain
. Do
Sweden
Tunis
Turkey
Tuscany

P o u n d of 1 8 5 2 . . . . ' Pound of 1 8 5 5 . . . . .
Ducat
Sovereign
New union crown, (assumed)
Twenty-five francs
Doubloon
Twenty milreis
»
-.
Two escudos
Old doubloon
Ten pesos
J.
^Ten thaler
..:...
Four escudos
Pound or sovereign, new
.
T o u n d or sovereign, average
Twenty francs, new
Twenty francs, average
Ten t h a l e r
;
Ten thaler, Prussian
Krone, ( c r o w n ) . . . „ „
Ducat...
Twenty drachms . . .
-_..
Mohur
„.
Twenty lire
Old cobang.'
New cobang
Doubloon; average
Doubloon, new
Six ducati, new
Ten guilders
Old doubloon, Bogota
Old doubloon, Popayan
Ten pesos, new
Old doubloon
Gold crown
„
New union crown, (assumed)
2J s c u d i , n e w
F i r e roubles
....
100 reals
80 r e a l s . . .
.Ducat
25 piastres. L
100 piastres
Sequin
..„




Weight.

Fineness.

Oz. dec.
Thorn
0.281
916.5
0.256
916.5
0. 112
986
0.363
900
0. 357
900
0. 254
899
0.867
870
0.575
• 917.5
0.209
853. 5
0.867
870
0.492
900
0. 427
895
0.433
844
0.256.7
916.6
0.256
915.5
0. 207.
899.6
0. 207
899
0.427
895
0. 427
903
0.357
900
0.112
986
0.185
900
. 0.374
916
^0. 207
898
0.362
568
0.289
572
0.867.
866
0. 867. 5
870. 5
0.245
996
0. 215
899
0.868
870
0.867
858
0.525
891.5
0.867
868
0. 308
912
0.357
900
0. 140
900
'0.210
916
0. 268.
896
0.215
869
0.111
975
0. 161
900
0.231
915
0.112
999

Value fatw
delluetion.

$5 32.37 $5
4 85.01 4
2 28. 28 2
6 75.35 6
6 64. 19 6
4 72.03 4
15 59. 25 15
10 90. 57 10
3 68.75 3
15 59.26 15
9 15,35
7 90.01
. 7 55.46
4 86. 34
4 84.48
85.83
84.69
90,01
97. 07
64.20
28.28
44. 19
08. 18
84.26
44.
57.6
15 52.98 15
15 61.05 15
5 04.43 5
3 99.56 3
15 61.06 15
15 37.75 15
9 67.51 9
15 55.67 15
5 80.66 5
6 64. 19
2 60.47
3 97. 64
4 96.39
3 86.44
2 23.72
2 99.54
4 36. 93
2 31.29

29.71
82.69
27.04
71.98
60.87
69.67
51.46
85. 12
66.91
51.47
10.78
86.06
51.69
83.91
82.06
83.91
82.77
86.06
93. 09
60. 88
27.14
42. 47
04.64
82.34
41.8
65.8
45.22
53.25
01.91
97.57
53.26
30. 07
62.68
47.90
77.76
60. 87
59.^17
95.66
93.91
84. 51
22.61
98.05
34.75
30.14

96

REPORT ON THE FINA3SCES.

L.
.

Denomination.

Country.

Old rix dollar
Old scudo . .
Florin before 1858
' New florin
/
New union dollar
.
Five francs
...........
New d o l l a r . . . . . . . . . . . .
Half d o l l a r .
Double milreis
: ..,-.
T w e n t y cents
.
Dollar
.,
Old dollar
New dollar
Two riogsdaler
Shilling, new .
.„
Shilling, average
Pive francs, average"
Thaler before 1857
New thaler
Florin before 1857
New florin, (assumed)
Fi ve d r a c h m s
Rapee
Itzebu
New itzebu
.
.
Dollar, new,.
Dollar, average
...
...
Scudo
,/
2J guild
Specie daler
Dollar of 1857
Old dollar
'
Dollar of 1858
1
Half dollar 1835-'38
I
Thaler before 1857
.
]. N ew thaler
Scudo
..
...... .
Eouble
•
Five lire
New pistareen
:
L Rix dollar
Two francs
.........:.
Five piastres
_._.
. . Twenty piastres
Florin
*..-.

Austria
. .........
Do
Do
Do
Do
.Beb'^iuni.
Bolivia
. . .
Do
Brazil..
.
Canada
^
Central America
Chili
Do
Deumark
„.
•.^.
England
Do
France
i„„
Germany, nortli
/ Do
Germany, south
...
Do
Greece . . ' . . ,
Hindoostan . . . . . .
Japan
Do
Mexico.
Do
.'."
Naples . . . . . . .
Netherlands - .
Norv/ay . . . . . . . .
N»!W G r a n a d a . . .
Peru
Do
Do- ^
Prussia

Do
Eome
Eussia
Sardinia
Spain . . . . . .
Sweden
Switzerland
Tunis
TurkeyTuscan v

S I L V E E COINS.




Weight.
Oz. dec.
0. 902
0.836
0.451
0.397
0.596
0. 803
0.643
0.432
0. 820
0.150
0.866
0.864
0.891
0.927 .
0.182.5
0.178
0.800
0.712
0.595
0. 340
0.340
0.719
0. 374 .
0.279
0.27 9
0.867.5
0.866
0.844
0.804
0.927 "
0.803
0.866
0.766
0.433
0.712
0.595
0.864
0.667.
0. 800
0.166
1. 092
0.323
0.511
0. 770
0. 220

Fineness.

Value..

Thous:
833
$1 01 02
902
• 1 01. 38
833
50. 5 1
900
48. 04
72. 12
900'
,
897
96. 84
903.5
78. 12
667
38. 74
918.5
1 0 1 . 26
925
18! 65
85@
98.96
90S
1 05.47
900. 5
96.97
877
1 09.30
22. 68
924.5
22. 14
925
900
96,80
7 1 . 79
750"
900
• 72.00
4 1 . 14
900
4 1 . 14
900
86. 99
9'00
46. 06
916
37.17
991
33.38
890
1 05.32
903
901
1 04. 90
^ 830
04.18
• 944
••1 0 2 . 0 4
877
1 09.30
'
96.73
896
1 04.90
901
93.61
909
37.84
650
71.79
750
. 72.00
900
1 04. 54
900
78. 47
875
96. 80
900
899
20.06
750
1 10.11
899
39. 04
' 898.5
61.73
830
85.92
27. 3^6
925

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

97

No. 10.
R E P O E T O F T H E ACTING E N G I N E E R I N CHARGE.
T R E A S U R Y DEPARTJVffiNT,

^

Bureau of Construction, September 30, 1861.
S I R : I have the honor to submit the following report upon the various public
buildings constructed and constructing'under this bureau, showing in detail the
operations for the year ending September 30, 1861, with a tabulated statement
of the number of buildings, their location, the purposes for which they were
erected, their cost, and present condition. .
On the 30th of September, 1860, the aggregate balance of appropriation not
withdrawn from the treasury, with .the.balances .then in.the hands of disbursing
agents, was $2,270,631 32.
The last Congress appropriated, in addition to this amount, the sum of
$350,448 79 ; making, with disbursing agents' halances, an available aggregate
of $2,657,240 '89.
The appropriations - of the last Congress were for the continuance or completion of works already in progress—no appropriation having been made for any
new work.
Of the above aggregate amount $851^458 25 is for works authorized by
Congress at its former sessions, but not yet commenced. These works were:
Custom-houses at Ogdensburg, New York; Perth Amboy, New Jersey;. Knoxville, Tennessee; Nashville, Tennessee; and Cairo, Illinois; with one earlier
authorized at Astoria, Oregon; and court-houses ajid post offices at Boston,
Massachusetts; Columbia, South Carolina; Raleigh, North Carolina; Key West, ^
Florida; Memphis, Tennessee; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and
at Philadelphia.
The appropriations for many of these works were insufficient for the purposes
contemplated, and will not complete suitable structures, while many of them
were without any appropriation for sites, and all were without the customary
ten per centum for contingent expenses. These omissions it will be necessary
for Congress to supply before the works can be properly undertaken, unless
their size is largely reduced from that which the proposed accommodations
require.
At the period when you entered upon the discharge of the duties of the Secretary" of the Treasury I was under instructions from your 'predecessor to confine the disbursements of this bureau within the narrowest limits compatible
with existing contracts and a proper economy, and not to commence the construction of any of the new works authorized by Congress. No change having
been made in these instructions by you, I have continued to be governed by
them, and the expenditures of th6 past year have thus been only $850,138 65—
being nearly $50,000 less than the preceding year, and more than one million of
dollars less than the year preceding. A portion of the disbursements of the
present year have been upon the construction of the defences of the capital,
under your orders, which is to be hereafter reimbursed to this bureau from the
proper appropriations by the War Department.
The work upon the public buildings located in States whose citizens are in
insurrection against the United States was entirely stopped when the States^
became disloyal, and deliveries of materials under contracts for such works forbidden. The contractors have stopped all operations under their contracts, at
an alleged pecuniary sacrifice, which may hereafter be made a subject for your
consideration.
Ex.
7.
Doc. 2


98

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

The only works completed during the past year have been the post office and
court-house at Indianapolis, and the custom-houses at Galveston, Texas, and
Detroit, Michigan. That at Galveston was completed prior to the breaking out
of the rebellion.
No new sites fbr public buildings have been purchased during the past year.
The total number of buildings, and the uses for which they were designed,
or for which unexpended balances remain of former appropriations, is as follows:
Custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices
Marine hospitals .
:
Mints and branch mints and assay offices
Territorial public buildings
Extension of treasury
Ventilation of old treasury building
Warehouses
Fire-proof vaults
Total

"

,

The amount available for the prosecution of these works on the
30th of September, 1860, was
Amount repaid by disbursing agents and due^from them
Amount of appropriation last session
Amount available for the year 1860-'61
Amount expended from September 30, I860, to September
30, 1861
^.
Total amount available September 30, 1861

:.

"...

80
24
6
5
1
1
4
67
188

$2,270,631 32
36,160 78
350,448 79
S,657,240 89
850,138 65
1,807,102 24

The results of the experiments instituted under this bureau upon the various
samples of iron and iron ores were fully detailed in my last annual report, as far
as they had progressed. At that time any further action in reference to them
was suspended under your predecessor's orders. I now respectfully call your
attention to the importance of continuing these experiments, not only that the
time and labor already bestowed upon them may not be wasted or made comparatively valueless! but .that the best kinds, qualities, and deposits of this important staple may be elicited for the public service. The value of the object
sought to be obtained by these experiments, (viz: the combination in the ore
and the treatment of the metal which best resists oxidation,) can scarcely be
overestimated, as a successful solution of the problem will not only largely
enhance the value of the material, making it available in many cases where now
only copper can be used, and largely increasing its durability for every p.urpose,
but-will doubtless greatly stimulate its production in localities which are now
. but i feebly worked. I earnestly recommend the matter to your favorable consideration, and respectfully request that the experiments may be continued, for
which there is an adequate existing appropriation.
The continued experience of this office has tended more strongly to confirm the
reports hitherto made upon the present method of appropriating a portion of the
government revenue for public buildings, and. reference is now made to former
reports and their correctness respectfully reiterated.



REPOET ON THE FINANCES.

99

BRISTOL, RHODE ISLAND.

The grading, fencing, and paving of the grounds about the custom-house at
Bristol has been completed at the estimated cost.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount available to September 30

$31, -400 00
31, 396 25

• Balance available

•

3 75

BUFFALO, N E W YORK.

No action has been taken during the past year upon the appropriation for enlarging the custom-house and post office at Buffalo, New York. The citizens of
Buffalo petitioned Congress that the sum so appropriated might be used for the
construction of another building, for which it is sufficient, but Congress having
taken no action thereupon, and the presentv building being apparently ample for
the present;and prospective use^of'the government, I have not deemed it advisable to recommend any expenditure. Reference is respectfully made to the
report from this office of September 30, 1859, upon the matter.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30,1860
*
Balance available

$290, 800 00
195, 619 45
_____^_ _________
95,180 55

OGDENSBURG, N E W YORK.

Nothing has been done in reference to the construction of a building authorized
at Ogdensburg, New York, for the accommodation of a post office and courtroom. ,
' ^
Parties Jn interest have made application that the site purchased be abandoned,
and a new one more favorable to individual interests be purchased. As the necessity for such a change is not apparent, no action upon the apphcation has
been recommended.
Total amou.nt of appropriation
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
Balance available

$118, 000 00
9, 141 75,
'.

108, 858 25

PERTH AMBOY, NEW JERSEY.

Reference is respectfully made to the report of September, 1860, from this
bureau upon this work, no change having taken place, and no action had in
reference to its construction since the date of that report.
Total ariiount of appropriation
,
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1860
.Balance available

$24, 000 00
3, 374 61
' 20, 625 39

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

The repairs of the damage by fire to the custom-house building in Baltimore,
Maryland, have been satisfactorily completed, and the re-arrangement of-the



100 '

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

space devoted to the business of the customs, by which one-half the estimated,
cost of repairs have been saved, gives entire satisfaction to the occupants and to
the public doing business with them. The remainder of the appropriation has
been expended in fire-proofing other portions of the building.
WHEELING CUSTOM-HOUSE.

Seine necessary repairs-in the
with some desirable alterations in
authorized, which will not exceed
will be completed this winter.
Total amount of aj)propriation
Amount withdrawn to September

custom-house at Wlieeling, Virginia, together
the arrangement of the post office, have been
the available balance of the appropriation, and

30, 1860

Balance available

$118, 711 00
118, 535 91
175 09

For the custom-houses at Charleston, South Carolina; Mobile, Alabama; and
New Orleans, Louisiana, I am unable to present any specific report. The local
superintendents of each of these works joined the rebellion, and made no report
of the progress on the buildings. The superintendent at Charleston, Colonel
E . B. White, was aiding the rebels at their forts during a period for which he
claims pay from the general government, while the superintendents at Mobile
and New Orleans, Captain Leadbetter and Major Beauregard, are now prominent in an attack upon the government which has educated and supported them.
GALVESTON, TEXAS.

The new custom-house and post office at Galveston, Texas, was completed
(before that State passed an ordinance of secession) by the enterprising and energetic sub-contractors, who transported the entire building in parts from the north,
erecting them in place and completing the work in a'period of six months, while
the original contractors had kept it on hand over four years without getting the
first story completed. As soon as the work was completed the local authorities '
took forcible possession of it, and no further record exists in this bureau.
Total amount of appropriation
$116,000 00
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
114,359 82
Balance carried to surj^ius fund

1,640 18

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

At the last session of Congress an appropriation of $15,000 was made for
discharging the existing.liabilities against the new custom-house and post office
at St. Louis, and completing some unfinisned parts of the building. The liabilities have since been paid, but no definite action has been taken in reference to
the unfinished work.
.. In this connexion I respectfully ask your attention to my report of last year
in relation to certain encroachments upon the public property by citizens of St.
Louis who owned the adjoining premises. As the building has not been inspected
the present season, I do not know the present' condition of the encroachment.
Total amount of appropriation
$376,600 00
Amount expended to September 30,1861
63,804 85
Balance available



12,795 15

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

101

DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

The new court-house and post office at Detroit, Michigan, has been completed
the past season, and is now occupied by all the federal officers for whose use it
was designed.
This building was built by day's work, upon the contractor's alleged default,
and is thoroughly constructed in the most dm-able manner.
Total amount of appropriation
$217,071 17
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
214,020 61
Balance available

3,050 56
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

Your attention is respectfully invited to my last, annual report upon the new
custom-house at Chicago in reference to the approaches of the building, and the
necessity for more frontage on Monroe street. The latter, I think, deserves immediate attention to preserve the necessary light and air for one-half the building, and the .present is a favorable time for its accomplishment.
Total amount of appropriation
$447,733 88
Amount expended to September 30,1861
425,177 98
Amount available . ' . . ' . .

r

22,555 82

CAIRO, ILLINOIS.

Nothing has been done in reference to the building authorized to be erected
at Cairo, Illinois. A site has been gratuitously tendered by the Illinois Railroad
Company, but it has never been examined by an officer of this bureau.
Total amount of appropriation
$50,000 00
Amount withdrawn to September 30, 1861
Balance available

50,000 OO'
DUBTJCIUE, IOWA.

In my last annual report the belief was expressed that the new custom-house
and post office at Dubuque, Iowa, would be ready for occupancy by the close
of the then current fiscal year, '^"^his belief was founded upon the report of the
then local superintendent, who expressed entire confidence in thus completing
it Avithin the amount appropriated for 4he purpose. During the present year
that superintendent has been removed and a new one appointed. I regret the
necessity of reporting the work still incomplete. The appropriation will be entirely exhausted when the outstanding liabilities are paid, while the roof of the
building has not been put on, or its interior finished.
Finding this to be the case on a recent inspection, I directed a temporary roof
of wood to be placed upon the building, causing it to be otherwise protected from
the elements, and then stopped the work. It is now in the temporary custody
of the survey Qr of the port, in this unfinished condition, and will so remain until
a further appropriation is made by Congress to prosecute the work.
Total amount of appropriation.
$138,800 00
Amount expended.to September 30,1861
137,260 62
Balance available



1,539 38

102

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.
MILWAUKIE, WISCONSIN.

. The damage occasioned to the new custom-house at Mihvaukie by fire, noted
in the last report from this office, remains unrepaired, except some small matters
of pressing necessity, no appropriation having been made by Congress for the
purpose. The original appropriation for the work is withdrawn.

MARINE H O S P I T A L S .
It has been my frequent duty for several years .past to call the attention of
the Secretary of the Treasury and of Congress to the small necessity that exists
for many of the appropriations for marine hospitals. My VICAA^S upon the subiect have been annually presented, and the impolicy of the appropriations, as
well as then injustice to the seamen, earnestly argued. The matter cannot be
too often recommended to the attention of Congress. The present method of
appropriation is manifestly unjust and cruel to sick and disabled seamen. The
hard earned pittance of the sailor, from which a monthly tax is collected, forms
a common fund, Adiich is exhausted in the costly support of a fcAv organized
hospitals, leaving the care ^of many unfortunates to the chance legislation made
to cover the deficiency. Many hospitals receiving this costly support, with an
organized corjDS of physicians, stCAvards, nurses, ,&;c., are without patients, but
are supported from the common fund, although the port to which they belong
may not contribute a dollar towards maintaining the establishments. Some hos^
pitals are provided for in malarious localities, Avhere it is positive cruelty to
remoA^e a seaman .with a broken limb or other injury, to contract and probably
die of a miasmatic disease; thus, at a sacrifice of the common fund, and at a cost
iX) the goA^ernment, exposing him to results perhaps more fatal than.Avould be his
entire neglect. I cannot too earnestly call attention to the evils of this improvident and unjust system.
BURLINGTON, VERMONT.

-

The ncAv marine hospital at Burlington, Vermont, was completed under your
predecessor, but has never been furnished or occupied. It is an ornamental and
commodious structure, erected upon a site of great natural beauty, but is not a
necessity for that district.
The latest returns from this district show no patients under treatment. During
the present year sixteen sick or disabled seamen have been relieved by private
contract at a cost of $2 50 per Aveek, and an. aggregate cost for the year of
$307 29. This has been the total cost to the government. The hospital cost
nearly $37,000. To furnish it Avould probably cost $1,500, and to organize it
_would entail a heavy charge upon the marine hospital fund of about $2,000 more
annually. The patients are noAv Avell cared for by priA^ate contract, more to their
comfort and health than is too often the result in some organized hospitals, and
AAdiile this is the case it Avould be a manifest absurdity to incm- this greatly
increased expense. The actual cost of relieving sick and disabled 'seamen at
Burlington for a series of years has been from $250 to $300 per annum, and a
reasonable estimate for the future Avill not exceed $300 to $350.
At a recent inspection of this building I found it entirely neglected by the
collector, and in a very disgraceful condition. The work had been fully completed in a substantial and creditable manner, but'the outside doors Avere not
locked, not CA^en closed—Avere SAvinging Avith the wind, and had become so
SAvollen and strained that they could not be shut. Being thus open, not only
the elements, but idle boys and vicious men had free access, to the interior, and




EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

103

in consequence the AvindoAvs Avere broken, walls defaced, and ceilings displaced,
Avith other lil^e injury. The collector's neglect is inexcusable. I directed his
deputy (the collector being absent) to cause the Avindows to be glazed, the doors
repaired and locked, and to keep the keys thereafter at the custom-house.
The building is not required for- hospital use, and in all human probability
never Avill be. The commerce of the lake, from physical causes, cannot groAv to
an extent to make it a necessity for a century.
As no poAver exists to sell the property without the authority of Congress, no
present disposal of the premises can be made. They should not, hoAvever, be
permitted to go to ruin by neglect. ' I have therefore instructed the collector to
make inquiry for some careful and competent person Avho would occupy the
premises and keep them in condition in lieu of rent. Plis action under this instruction has not yet been reported.
^
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
Balance available

$43,650 00
36,973 22
......"

6,676 78

PORTLAND, MAINE.
Upon inspecting the marine hospital at Portland, Maine, the present season, I
found the general condition of the bmlding to be good, and the premises kept in
excellent order by its present officers., The roof of the building was badly constructed, being faulty both in plan and execution. • It is very flat, totally unsuited to the climate, and the floor beneath unfinished.
The heavy snows in this locality remain upon the flat surface of the roof, and
AA^hen Avet impose ah enormous Aveight upon it, straining open the joints of the
galvanized iron,.flattening the corrugation betAveen the struts, and converting
the Avhole surface into numerous dishes, which are cracked and rent by the superincumbent pressure. Through these rents the rain readily finds its Avay to
the uncoA^ered arches of the floor beneath, and from these to the walls and ceilings beloAv, throAving off and displacing the plastering, and interfering Avith the
sanitary usefulness of the hospital,
I Avas at some loss Avhat course to pursue in reference to this hospital. A true
economy Avould doubtless dictate the non-use of the building. It is a beautiful
and imposing structure, admirably located for its purpose, capable of accommodating Avith ease 150 patients at a time, and cOuld'be made to properly care for
200, Avith economy of room. This fine building, AAdth a full corps of officers, noAV
"ministers to the Avants of seven (7) patients. They could be well cared for by
contract at a tithe of the cost of organization.
But the department was poAverless AAdthont congressional action to make other
disposition of it than that designed by the act of appropriation authorizing its
construction. Yet the building should be protected. To remain as I found it,
it AA^ould soon be ruined. I saAv no better Avay than to construct a noAv roof.
No amount of repair on the present one could remedy its organic defects.
Under your instructions, 1 haA^e-therefore contracted for an entire new roof, to
be constructed of narrow boards, tongued and groved, securely nailed and covered
with slate, of a pitch not less than one foot in six, to be placed above the present
one, its eaves to terminate at the level of the'top of the base board of the present
blocking course, to alloAv the snoAv to slide off, and still have the Avater drop into
the present gutters for interior use; removing the baseboard and lattice work of
the blocking course, leaving only its piers and copings. I believe this AAdll be
effectual; I think nothing short of it would be.
The contractors are noAv at work upon the new roof, and expect to have it



104

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

completed before the AA^eather is too cold for out-door Avork; and its cost, with
other expenses, Avill not exceed the available amount of the appropriation.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to S'etember 30, 1861
Balance available

^

99,000 00
94,511 35 4,488 65

ST. LOUIS, xMFSSOURI.
No Avork has been performed during the past year upon the sewer of the
marine hospital at St. Louis. Its construction is, Avithout doubt, a necessity.
There is UOAV no outlet for the Avater of the hospital; and everything is required
to be carided from it by hand. The accumulated offal about the premises seriously affects the hospital's usefulness. Some repairs are also needed, but the
estimate for them and for the scAver, Avliich have been hitherto submitted to this
bureau by the resident officers, have been so excessive that I have not recommended them for your approval.
Application has been made by the owner of the adjoining property for an
exchange of a small triangular part of the front of the hospital grounds for an
' equal area of land upon the rear of the lot. From a personal inspection of the
premises I cannot recommend this exchange; the rear land that Avoiild be thus
acquired AA^ould not, for hospital uses, be AA^orth enclosing; AAdiile the triangular
front corner, though not needed for the hospital, has a A^alue Avhich may be made
available for its repair. I respectfully recommend that Congress be asked for
authority to sell this portion before it is enclosed, and apply the avails of the sale
to the much needed repairs upon the jDuilding.
Nothing has been done during the past year in reference to enclosing the
grounds. The appropriation for the Avork (represented by the available balance
herewith reported) AAdll probably be sufficient,'but it cannot be economically, or
judiciously expended until the city of St. Louis completes the grading of the street
on the rear of the hospital lot.
Total amount of appropriation
$118,574
Amount AvithdraAvn to September 30, 1860
93,633
Balance available

24,941

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY.
Upon an inspection of the marine hospital at Louisville I found the general
condition of the building to be good, but from neglect some of its couA^eniences
Avere rendered Averse than useless.
A special agent, under your instructions, examined the building, and recommended the construction of rooms out of filled areas on each side of the basement,
for a kitchen ancl a laundry. He also employed, an architect to make an examination, Avho recommended the construction of rooms in the centre of the basement for a like purpose.
Upon a personal examination of the premises I could not recommend the
adoption of either the plan of the special agent or of the architect employed, for
the folloAving reasons:
The rooms so created Avould, of necessity, be damp and unhealthful, and be
but indifferently lighted, Avith the best constructed areas. The building is on
IOAV, flat land, and Avithout a thorough and A'ery expensive system of drainage
the basement Avails Avould ahvays be damp. The change. Avould be a costly one,



EEPOET ON THE FINANCES;

105

Avliile more room is not a necessity. The hospital Avill accommodate one hundred
patients; Avith economy of space it can be made serAdceable for one hundred and
fifty. It has UOAA^ hut fifteen, and the physician reports that it Avill aA'^erage only
forty. I could not, therefore, see the necessity of thus virtually adding a story
to the building at a large cost. The present kitchen and laundry could be made
.all that is necessary by removing the old stove from the former (Avhich is now
burnt out and Avorthless) and substituting a range. This Avould not only give
more room, but better suit the operatiA^es. A ncAv stove was also a necessity in
the laundry, Avhich would make the room complete for its uses, and satisfy the
occupants.
The Avater closets and cesspools were a nuisance; their condition Avas entirely
the fault of the stCAvard. TAVICC Avithin the past fcAv years they have been put
in complete order at a large cost, in the same manner and by the same man as
those at Evansville; and AAdiile those have not been an expense of a shilling to
the government, these, though not as old, have been a ceaseless cost, and now
require almost entire refitting. There is no mechanical skill or ingenuity proof
against a careless stcAvard for these indispensable conveniences to a hospital.
Upon your instructions, these matters are UOAV being remedied at a minimum
cost, Avhich Avill be chargeable to the fund for annual repahs, the appropriation
for the work having been exhausted.
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
The marine hospital at Cincinnati has been temporarily transferred to the
War Department for the use of sick and Avounded soldiers. Some repairs and
alterations Avere of absolute necessity, Avhicli are being made under my charge,
by your instructions, after conferring Avith the Secretary of War, to be paid for
from the proper fund within the control of the War Department.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
Balance carried to surplus fund

$186,000 00
1S0;367 23
5,632 77

EVANSVILLE, INDIANA.

Reference is respectfully made to my previous annual reports upon the necessity
of protecting the river front of the site of the marine hospital at Evansville.
No opportunity has occurred for inspecting the premises the present season,
but upon examining them last year, and etirefully noticing the additional loss of
land since the previous report Avas rendered, the opinion then expressed was
confirmed, of the imperative necessity of the Avork, but that it Avould be of comparatively little use to slope and grade the bank until the OAvners of the adjoining
property should do the same. The Avork should be concurrent upon the Avhole
exposed portion Avithin the bend beloAv the city to be of permanent value.
The available balance of the appropriation for this Avork I do not deem sufficient for properly protecting the bank. It Avould probably require from $7,000
to $8,000 to perform the Avork thoroughly and make it permanent.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
Balance available




..... o

$62,500 00
57,830 52
4,669 48

106

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

, COURT-HOUSES, POST OFFICES, &c.
RUTLAND, VERMONT.
In my last annual report I called the attention of your predecessor to an
alleged imperfect construction of the Avork in fencing and grading the grounds
about the Rutland court-house and post office. Since rendering that report I
have inspected the Avork, and found that the reports Avhich had reached the department of its inferior character Avere not in the least exaggerated. The flagging Avas disreputably done, disgraceful alike to the contractor and the government. It Avas laid on an insufficient foundation, and had been throAA^i by the
frost, entirely out of place, Avhile it was originally placed below the curbing.
The attempted fittings about the posts, steps, &c., were AAa^etchedly executed;
the stones Avere mangled, not cut, and in some pla.ces were t V to three inches
AO
away from a joint.
The only remedy Avas entirely to relay^ the Avalk, and to do this properly
Avith the present stone Avould necessarily narrow the Avalk about three inches,
as the curbing Avould be required to be moved iuAvard thus much to take the
place of the flaggmg Avhich Avould be lost in redressing.
Under your instructions I notified the contractor that the stones must be taken
up and relaid, Avith extra ballasting, and the'' ground differently graded. This
is noAv being done under the superintendence of the Hon. Solomon Foot, AAdio
cheerfully and gratuitously complied Avith your request to supervise the Avork
Avhile it was in progress, as there Avas no local superintendent at the Avork. It
is expected to be completed before the coming session of Congress.
Some Avork of minor importance has been done Avithin the building, which
Avas made necessary by the* generous gift to" the government of a valuable library
(by the Hon. S. Foot) for the use of the courts. The large number of volumes
presented by this liberal gentleman made extra cases a necessity, AAdiich liaA^e
been authorized, and his munificent donation is noAV properly placed in the
rooms set apart for the purpose.
Total amount of appropriations
Amount AvithdraAA^n to September 30, 1861
Balance available

*

^$75,900 00
70,248 '74
5,651 26

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

A contract for a new court-house at Baltimore Avas executed by your predecessor, under the direction of the President of the United States, and the Avoidi
commenced. Under your instructions the Avork has been stopped and all operations suspended. The contractor felt aggrieved at this stoppage, and has repeatedly applied for permission to go on Avith the Avork, Avliich he had giA^en
bonds to complete Avitliin a specified time, but the exigencies of the public service have not yet permitted the resumption of the Avork. As soon as it can
consistently be done, it is desirable to push the Avork to completion, as the streets
adjacent ai-e cumbered Avith materials, Avhicli the local authorities have ordered
to be removed. The late superintendent of the Avork is UOAV an officer in the
rebel army.
Total amount of appropriation
$200,000 00
Amount expended to SejDtember 30, 1860
76,332 63
Balance available



123,667 37

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES. .

107

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.
The work under existing contracts for the Indianapolis court-house and post
office has been mainly finished, and the building only Avaits the completion of
some minor matters to be occupied. It Avill be occupied as a post office the
present season, and the United States courts AAdll be held Avithui its walls in
November.' The principal Avork under contract has not been as well executed
as is desirable, nor as well as is usually required under this bureau, the contractor having been sustained in his course by an influence AAdiich has operated
to the prejudice of the Avork and nullified the efforts of this bureau to obtain a
better class of Avork. It has, hoAvever, been accepted and paid for, and Avill be
turned over to the department Avhose officers are to occupy it.
The remainder of the appropriation Avill be insufficient to properly grade and
enclose the grounds, (so much of the original appropriation having been absorbed
by the extra alloAvance to a contractor,) and a further appropriation will be
required to complete the approaches to the building.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
Balance available

\

$163,700 00
148,032 07
" 15,667 93

TERRITORIAL BUILDINGS.
In my last annual report I submitted to your predecessor the condition of the
appropriations for the Territory of NCAV Mexico, the plans requiring the Secretary's approval before any portion of the appropriation could be expended.
These plans haA^e since been approved by you, but nothing has been done
upon the Avork." The existing liabilities against the government buildings in
the Territory have been paid.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount expended to September 30, 1861
Balance available

.'

$130,000 00
74,287 32
55,712 68

TREASURY EXTENSION.
The Avork upon the treasury extension the past year has been A^ery limited—
too much so for a proper economy. Under the general instructions of your
predecessor, I did not feel at liberty to push the Avest Aving to completion. A
representation of the true economy that Avould result, and the real, necessity
that existed for prosecuting the Avork, Avith an application for authority to pursue
it, Avas early made to you from this bureau. Your verbal instructions limited
me to the most economical expenditure. I have therefore been governed by the
instructions of your predecessor, except Avhen altered by your special order.
The necessity for the additional room of the west Aving is noAv a daily hindrance
to business, and the economy of an earlier construction is painfully apparent in
the injury accruing to the accumulated materials, Avliich are scattered through
the streets and aA^enues adjacent to the building.
I respectfully recommend that the construction of the remainder of the extension be authorized for the ensuing spring, and that the present Congress be
asked for an appropriation of $500,000 for the purpose. The A^astly increased
force of the various bureaus of your department, consequent upon the immense




108

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

expenditure in the present condition of the country, render additional room an
absolute necessity. The value of the records UOAV accumulating demands that
they should be kept in fire-proof buildings. In no other Avay can this desideratum be so soon attained as by the completion of the treasury extension.
The AVork upon the exterior of the building for the past year has been confined to the cleaning off of the granite and securing its joints, with the completion of the new roof, reported last season to be in progress. The roof is now
entirely completed, the old and faulty one having been remoA^ed, and the ncAV
one proving perfectly tight and satisfactory. The damage occasioned by the
leaking of the old roof has been repaired. The marble pavement for the south
portico A^estibule has been completed, and the approaches for the south wing are
nearly finished, after a design made in unison Avith the lamented DoAvning's
plan for the grounds about the Executive Mansion, and approved by the late
President of the United States. It Avill probably be entirely completed before
cold weather closes out-door operations.
In the interior of the building the balustrade "dnd rail to the principal staircases have been finished at a very moderate cost.
The Avork upon the interior Avas necessarily suspended during the summer upon
' its occupancy by the United States troops—at one time CA^ery room from attic
to basement being occupied. After the soldiers Avere removed, much time and
money was consumed in repairing the damage consequent upon such occupancy.
Since your removal from the old building to the extension, Avith the force of
clerks there employed, all the Avorkmen competent for such service, that could
be employed, have been engaged in preparing the fixtures for the ncAv rooms,
and will continue to be thus employed through the Avinter.
The AVork upon the west wing has been confined to only such matters as
Avould keep the present force organized, in connexion Avith a fcAv additions to
the employes, made under your orders. The progress thus made is so small as
not to require detailed report.
Since April last I have, under your order, (issued at the request of the War,
Department..) kept a steadily augmenting force of carpenters at work upon the
carpentry of the A^arious fortifications constructed and'constructing on both sides
of the Potomac—their line of Avork extending from below Fort Washington to
above the Chain Bridge, and for some miles on each side the Potomac. About
one hundred and fifty men are now thus daily employed. This has involved
the necessity of a pay-roll and overseer for each gang of men, and largely
increased the cl-rical l^bor of the bureau. The expenses thus incurred, I am
instructed, will be reimbursed from the proper appropriation by the Secretary of
War.
During the present year there has been been used upon the treasury extension 1,158 tons of granite, 499,338 bricks, and 274,076 pounds of Avrought and
cast iron.
The A^alue of materials, machinery, teams, tools, &c., on hand, amount to
$390,157 03. Of this there are about—
4,180 tons of granite, costing
$359,982 00
317,210 bricks, costing
3,690 30
And about 84,591 pounds of cast and Avrought iron, costing . ' . .
5,009 38.
Total amount of appropriation
Amount Avithdrawn to September 30, 1861
Balance aA^ailable




$2,445,000 00
2,106,993 59
338,006 41

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

109

The folloAving appropriations will be required for the fiscal year commencing
July 1, 1862.
Annual repairs of marine hospitals
^.
'.
$20,000
Annual repairs of custom-houses
20,000
Continuation of treasury extension
500,000
Appended to this report will be found seven tables, exhibiting in tabulated form
various details of the business of this office, viz:
Table 1. List of custom-houses and marine hospitals, built or purchased prior
to 1850.
Table 2. List of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, marine hospitals,
and miscellaneous works constructed since 1850, together Avith those now in
course of construction, and those for Avliich iapprOpriations have been made, but
the work not yet commenced. .
Table 3 shows the amount disbursed in each year since 1807 for the various
public Avorks under the Treasury Department.
Table 4 shows the cost of public buildings finished since 1850, and prior to September 30, 1857, Avith the amount of revenue collected at each, and the cost of
its collection.
^
Table 5 gives the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices
have'been asked for but not authorized, the amount of revenue collected at each
place, its cost of collection, and the probable cost of the buildings asked for.
Table 6 SIIOAVS the places Avhere custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices
have been authorized, but not commenced, with the amount of revenue collected
at each place, its cost of collection, and the probable cost of the buddings.
Table 7 shows the location and nature of each work purchased, constructed,
or constructing, the total appropriation for each, date of purchase, and cos| of
sites, amount expended, amount available, and amount required for completion
of each, date and amount of each contract, time of completion, and total cost.
All of Avliich is respectfully submitted.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
S. M. CLARK,
Acting Engineer in charge, Treasury Department.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.




no

EEPOET ON TPIE FINANCES.

T A B L E 1.
L i s t o f custom-houses a n d ma,rine hospitals p u r c h a s e d or built p r i o r to 1850, with
date of p u r c h a s e or completion, a n d cost of purchase or construction, to September 30, 1861. .
•
• .
Location.
Castine, Maine
-Eastport, Maine
^Kennebunk, Maine--.
Portland, Maine . . - . .
Wiscasset, Maine
Portsmouth, N. H- —.,
Salem, Mass
New Bedford, Mass
Newburyport, Mass
Boston, MassProvidence, R.. I
Nevvrport, E. I ^
•--.
New Haven, Conn __..
Middletown, Conn - . .
iSTew London, Conn
New York city, N. Y-.
Pliiladelphia, Fa
Erie, P a . . . .
-...
Baltimore, Md
Alexandria, Va
Norfolk, Va
Wilmington, N. C
Charleston, S. C
Savannah, Ga
Mobile, A l a . . - - - . . - - .
Key West, Fla
Monterey, Cal
Pittsburg, Pa_
Louisville, Ky
Cleveland, Ohio
Charleston, S. C
'Norfolk, V a . - .
NewOrleans, La
Mobile, Ala
Ocracoke, N. C
Key West, Fla
McDonoughjLa
Paducah, Ky
Napoleon, Ark
Natchez, Miss
Chicago, 111
Total.




Uses of baildings. How acquired.
Purchased.
Built
Purchased.
do
-do. (burned) . . . . d o
. ..do
-do
....do
.do.
.do....do
.do..
Built
.do-,
Purchased . .do..
Built.do.
Purchased..
-do.
.---do
.do.
-do.
.do.
-do.
-do.
.do.
-do.
Built
.do.
Purchased..
.do.
.--.do
.do.
Built
-do.
Purchased . .
-do.
.-l.do
.do.
,.-.do
.-..do
.do.
Built
.do.
.do.
Purchased.
,
do
---do
By conquest.
do
Marine hospital- Purchased . Built - - - - . .
-----do
...do:.,...
do
.do.
Purchased .
...do
.do.
...do
.do.
-do.
-do.
-do-do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
'...do.
Built .
.do.
...do.
-do.do.
.do-do.
-do.
Customdiouse
do......

Date.

Cost.

May 26,1849
$4,700 00
J u l y ' 3,1847
36,780 00
Nov. 19,1832
1,600 00
July 5,1849
150,400 00
Nov. 3,1848
2,200 00
Aug. 21,1817
8,000 00
June 23,1818
19,271 77
April 13,1833
31,745 00
Aug. 9,1833
23,200 00
Aug. 29,1837
106,658 00
Nov. 26,1817
13,395 00
Sept 16,1828
10,600 00
Jan. 2,1818
8,.381 88
Feb. 8,1833
15,800 00
Feb. 18,1833
20,337 37
Dec. 2,1816 1,105,313 57
Aug. 27,1844
256,,987 82
July 2,1849
54,000 00
June 10,1833
341,397 00
Nov. 25,1820
7;319. 26
1818
38,002 33
March 9,1819
57,039 75
- — 1818
70,000. 00
Dec. 16,1845
173,407 97
..•
183Q
30,775 07
1833
6,125 00
1847
1845 to 1850
.1817
.1834
.1836
.1837
-1838
.1845
.1845
.1849
.1849
.1849
.1849

82,513 64
38,735
9,060
65,077
64,540
8,927
27,100
58,003
48,625
69,250
52,250
57,712

77
01
03
00
07
00
97
00
00
00
00

4,155,141 34

S. M. CLAEK,
Actwg Engineer in charge, Treasury Department.

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

Ill

TABLE 2.
List of custom-houses, court-houses, post offices, marine hospitals, and, miscellaneous works constructed since 1850, together ivith those noio in the course oJ
construction and those for loliich appropriations have been 7nade, but work
not yet commenced.
Location.
Bath, Maine
Belfast, Maine
Bangor, Maine
EllsAvorth, M a i n e . . .
Portland, Maine
.
Waldoboro', Maine.
Portsmouth, N. H . .
Burlington, Vt
Barnstable, M a s s . . .
Gloucester, M a s s . . .
Bristol, R. I
Providence, R. I . . .
NCAV Haven, Conn..
Buffalo, N. Y
OsAvego, N . Y
Ogdensburg, N . Y . .
Plattsburg, N. Y . . .
Newark, N. J
Perth Amboy, N. J .
Wilmington, D e l . . .
Pittsburg, P a :
GeorgetoAvn, D. C.
Alexandria, Va —
Norfolk, Va
Petersburg, V a . . . . .
Richmond, Va
Wheeling, Va
Charleston, S. C - . .
Mobile, Ala
Pensacola, Fla . . . .
NCAV Orleans, L a . .

Galveston, T e x a s . .
St. Louis, Mo
LouisAdlle, K y . . . ' .
Knoxville, Tenn.'.
NasliAdlle, T e n n . . .
Cleveland, O h i o . . .
Cincinnati, Ohio..,
Sandusky, Ohio...
Toledo, Ohio
Detroit, Mich
Chicago, 111
Cairo, 111
Galena, 1 1 1 . . . . . . ,
Dubuque, loAva . .




Uses. •
Custom-house, &c.
-do
,.do
do
do
do
do
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.d.o.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
-do..
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.
.do.

Present condition.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Suspended.
Finished.
Finished.
Suspended.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Constructing.

112

EEPOET ^ON THE FINANCES.
TABLE 2.—List of custom-houses, court-houses, (^c.-r-Cdntinued.

Uses.

Location.

Milwaukie, Wis
San Francisco, C a l . . ' . . . .
Astoria, Oregon
NeAV Orleans, La
Rutland, Vt
Windsor, Vt
Boston, Mass
Baltimore, Md
Do
Columbia, S. C
Raleigh, N . C
Key West, Fla
Tallahassee, Fla
Memphis, Tenn
Springfield, 111
Indianapolis, Ind
Madison, Wis
Portland, M a i n e . . . . . .
Burlington, Vt
Chelsea, Mass
Wilmington^ N. C
Pensacola, Fla
S t Mark's, Fla
NCAV Orleans, La

Vicksburg, Miss
St.. Louis, Mo
Cincinnati, Ohio
Evansville, Ind
Detroit, Mich
Galena, 111..
Burlington', loAva
San Francisco, Cal
Philadelphia, Pa
' New Orleans, La . . . .
Charlotte, N. C .
. Dahlonega, Geo
. San Francisco, Cal
New York city
Pass a rOutre, La
San Francisco, Cal
Utah Territory
Minnesota
"
New Mexico
Washington. D. C




-

'..

Custom-house, &c
Warehouse
Court-house and post office..
do
Court-house
do
Post office
^
Court-house and post office..
do....
do.....
.......do
.......do
do.....
do
do
Marine hospital.
do.....
do
do:....
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
United States mint.
Branch mint
do
do
...•
do
Assay office
Boarding station —
Appraisers' s t o r e . . .
Penitentiary
Public buildings...
.do.
Treasury extension.

Present condition.

Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished. Not commenced.
Suspended.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Not commenced.
Finished.
Suspended.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Finished.
Suspended."
Finished.
Suspended.
Constructins:.

S. M. CLARK,
Acting Engineer in charge, Treasury Departmefnt.

113

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

TABLE 3.
Statement showing the amount disbursed in each year, from 1807 to ISGl, on
the various public buildings purchased, constructed, or constructing, under the
Treasury Department.
From 1843 to 1861 the disbursements in this table are for ih.Qfiscalyear ending June 30.]
Year.

Amount.

1 8 0 7 . - . . Disbursements.
1808....
do
1809
do
1810....
do...-.1811
do
1812
do
1813
do
1814...do
1515....
1816....
do
1817....
do
1818...do
1819.-...
do.1820....
do
1821.'..- - .
do
1822
do
1823
.*-. ^do-1824....
dO-1-..
1825_.-.
do
1826
do
1827.... . - . - . d o
1828....
do
1829....
do
1830....
do
1831....
do
1832....
do
1833....
do

$7,200 00
10,000 00
2,000 00
l^one.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
132,500 00
166,650 00
144,000 00
75,100 00
130,191 31
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
6,400 00
9,131 93
30,740 54
12,780 20
3,355 64
250,054 92

<
^

Year.
1834
1835 _
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1843 to
1844 to
1845 to
1846 to
1847 to
1848 to
1849 to
1850 to
1851 to
1852 to
1853 to
1854 to
1855 to
1856 to
1857 to
1858 to
1859 to
1860 to

1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861

Disbursements.
do
:
. do
do
do......
do
.„_.do
do.
do
do
do-....
do
do
-..---do
do.:....
do
-.-.-.do
-do
do
-do
.--...do
.do
do.-_.
do
do
do
......do
do......

Amount.
$119,853 32
328,208 44.
379,816 21
144,200 00
259,725 00
304,716 32
286 597 00
159,451 13
123,273 14
30,428 69 J
99,648 08
337,663 36198,815 31
68,587 22
72,319 28
273,402 27
707,300 09
453,365 64
572,124 67
650,929 20
1,293,907 71
2,044,402 09
2,213,396 87
3,250,429 93
2,902,014 71
1,871,316 87
894,003 98
850,138 65 .
21,871,139 72

S. M. CLAKK,
Acting Engineer in charge, Treasury Department.

Ex. Doc. 2

8




T A B L E 4.
Statement showing the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices have been finished since 1850, or in process of construction, the revenue collected at each, and cost of collection, f o r the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, <^r., with total cost of building.^
Custom-houses.

Post offices.

Court-houses.

)^

Aggregates.

S)
Location.

1

O

1

1

(3

11 ^

£ •
o
o

%

Belfast. Me
Bath, Me*
Portland, Me
Waldoboro', Me
Wiscussct, Me
Burlinpton, V t . . . . . . . . .
Barnstable, Mass
Gloucester, Mass
Bristol, R. T
Providence, R. 1 . . . . . . .
Plattsburg, N. Y
Wilmin«,'ton, Del
Pittsburg. Pa
Cincinnati, Ohiof
Sanduskv, O h i o . . . . . . . . .
Toledo, Ohiof
San Francisco, Cal
,
Ellsworth, Me.^
Portsmouth, N. H . . . . . . .
Ns'^w Haven, Conn . . . . .
Buffalo, N. y
Oswego, N. Y
N e w a r k , N. J
Getjrgetown, D. C . . , , . . .
Alexandria, Va
Norfolk, Va
DigitizedPetersburg, Va
for FRASER
Richmond, Va

$5,052 05
341094 08
11,131 36
288,967 28
1,368 02
130 93
8,581 70
1,462 75
58,461 61
17,901 74
54,750 36
17,792 52
2,004 95
3,599 68
81,380 34
567 84
103,773 28
1,581,926 96
954 96
5.530 54
252,259 31
10,140 53
6,149 09
384 30
25,527 90
• 7,297 17
61,370 68
53,262 47
101,781 21



$6,012 87
8,593 53
7,049 03
32,941 04
7,547 14
7.359 09
16,285 47
11,953 20
7,717 09
4,1.37 17
14,008 12
13,829 35
15,848 38
2.360 54
i;4-26 89
4,372 66
3,995 69
402,401 76
5,032 09
101984 49
20.425 14
16,896 51
18,214 58
1,595 ,55
4,077 89
5,211 91
49,070 98
6.365 81
8;273 44

$960 82
$25,500 55
4,082 33
256,026 24

'..
"*6.'i79*i2'
7,228 16
7,703 77
10,490 55

""56*744*52'
13,764 57
40.742 24
3,963 17
13,843 43
1,239 14
79,954 45
3,804 82
" " 9 9 ; 777'59
1,179,525 20
4,077 13
5,453 95
"'231*,'834'i?

" "2{,'456 61'
2,085
12.299
46,896
93,508

i

26
70
66
77

6,755 98
-12,065'49
1,211 25

$2,002
4,784
8,966
19,675
5f8
1,110
5,745
745
2,190
1,579
33,155
2,251
9,3.52
35,.575
87,719
5,722
8,631
134,821
1,156
4,999
22,334
46.827
9,120
18,902
5,268
9,209
10,089
11,068
• 32,859

0

S

c

s

a.

1

X

30
36
03
46
34
78
65
48
77
85
38
89
10
82
30
61
10
01
.39
53
42
67
29
71
51
14
83
76
60

$1,203
2,501
3,237
12,273
480
586
2,523
.394
1,086
842
9,037
1,141
3,181
13,480
2.5,249
2,670
8,060
31,205
631
2,075
5,271
23,118
3,074
4,925
2,585
3,629
4,259
3,900
11,938

li
11

G

s

c

CJ <i3

6

i
0

0

0

V- to
0 >

o

1

C J. ^

13
02
65
34
69
43
14
45
19
27
50
60
00
00
13
26
00
04
70
82
00
92
90
00
89
24
93
00
44

$799
2,283
5,728
7,402
107
524
3,222
351
1,104
737
24,117
1,110
6,171
22,095
62,470
3,052
571
103,615
524
2,923
17,063
23,708
6,045
13,977
2,684
5,579
5,830
7,168
20,921

17
34
38
12
65
35
51
03
58
58
88
29
10
82
17
35
10
97
69
71
42
75
39
71
62
90
30
76
16

0.2

E4 w

c

*5
0

c
0

1
0

$33,084 27
99^851 53
104,338 49
359,724 54
24.324 68
6,071 47
2,200 00
6,703 81
4,481 26
52, .556 14
10,139 42 ' 33,370 80
49,858 32
26,535 75
249,753 23
71,4-25 17
41,096 02
7,672 33
109,666 87
291,502 00
7.H,040 49
752*47"
76,533 11
757,4.56-68
23,107 83
3,552 44
159,532 94
2,530 24
183,643 50
195,426 91
125,943 92
6,020 10
159,907 05
.58,846 45
73,785 34
217.403 75
99.664 88
, . . . . ! 234;763 35

o
H
O

$161 65

138 d a y s . . . .

43 days
26 days
97 days
113 days

$27,783 80
9,810 71
. 263,428 36

51,849
14,502
64.860
5,073

10
15
12
46

23,3.34 96
142,424 62
100,348 69
1,283,141 17
248,897 59
16,952 77
. 12,766
24,134
7,665
18,130
54,065
114,429

46
63
19
00
42
93

w

20, 991 45
441, 035 88
86, 900 68

Wheeling, Ya*
22,125 97
510,578 16
Charleston, S. C
138,810 31
Mobile,Ala
478 73
Pensacola, Fla
.-|
3,601.259 36
N e w Orleans, La . . . .
50,081 99
Galveston, T«'.xas
365,703 78
St. Louis, Mof
15,514 51
Louirrville, Ky
79,812 42
Cleveland, Ohio
146,7i6 37
Detroit, Mich
145,662 49
Chicago, 111
763 32
Galena, 111
20,254 50
Dubuqut>, lovvaj
284,792 88
Milvvaukin, Wis§
Rutland, Vt., C. H
Windsor, Vt., C. H . . .
Indianapolis, Ind., C. H

1,134 52
69,542"28
51,909 63
3,012 62
263,985 05
17,187 77
10,857 93
689 41
6,565 81
19,556 07
14,349 29
625 59
761 10
5,962 86

3,337.274 31
^4
32;J 9 22
354,815.85
14,825 11
73, 246 61
127, 160 30
131,313 20
137 73
19,493 40
830 02
278,

5,907,212 95

612,287 32

5,327,023 33

2,533 69

32,097 69

* $18,594 60, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
X $18,492^ a m o u n t of revenue from railroad iron in bond.




10,552 98
43,006 89
31,341 95
898 96
108,905 35
7,610 82
72,6.50 87
33,685 95
40,249 74
27,292 77
81,380 09
6,304 31
18,872 95
26,436 46
1,852 87
1,246 64
14,639 05
698,665 50

9,990 00
10,587 00
7,673 79
546 22
26,520 45
4,856 66
19,798 . 0
3
11,683.33
15,066 22
15.033 00
45J22O 12
2,170 00
9,452 65
5,669 63
1,017 21
687 20
12,154 73
263,534 95

562
32,419
23,668
352
82,384
2,754
.52,852
22,002
25,183
12,259
36,159
4,134
9,420
20,766
835
559
2,484
435,230 55

117,239 02

21,554 43
473,455 77
110,568 84
2,181 15
3,419,659 21
35,648 38
407,698 42
36,827 73
98.430 13
139;420 07
167,473 17
4,271 72
28,913 70
. 299,596 85
4daysC.&D.
835 6G
5 days C S t D .
559 44
2,484 32
58 days C.&D.
5,744,439^3

393,009 43
49,177 43
359,987 08
202,640 75
168,236 30
77,872 44
173,351 36
65,775 22
80,427 36

14,283 93 5,724,689 59

t $75,292 20, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
§ $271,922 40j amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
S. M. CLARK,
•doting Engineer in charge. Treasury Oepartment.

o
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02

01

T A B L E 5.
Statement showing the places where custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices hav^ been asked for but not authorized, the revenue collected at each, and cost of collection, f o r the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, with the estimated cost of buildings.
Custom-houses.

Court-houses

.<^

Aggregates..

Location.

O

11
Machias, M e . ;
Plymouth, Mass
Boston, Mass., P. O
Hartford, Conn., P. O . . .
Bridgeport, Conn
Rochester, N. Y*
Sa^ Harbor, N. Y
S a c k e t t ' s Harbor, N. Yf.
N e w York, N. YI
Albany, N . Y . , C . H
Brooklyn, N. Y., C. H . . .
Camden, N. J., C. H . . . .
T r e n t o n , N. J., C. H
Jersey City, N. J., C. H .
Annapolis, M d . , C . H . . . ,
Harrisburg, Pa., C. H
Charleston, S. C . , C . H .,
Greenville, S. C , C. H . . ,
Macon, Ga., C. H . . . . . . .
Montgomery, Ala, C. H . . .
Vicksburg, Miss., C. H . . .
P a d u c a h , Ky., C. H t . . . ' . .
Tyler, Texas, C. H
Columbus, Ohio, U. H . . . .
Burlington, Iovva§
I o w a City, Iowa, C. H . . .
Keokuk, Iovva||
Sioux City, I o w a , C. H . . .
New Albany, Ind., C. H . .

$608 71
395 12
805 44
128,722 48
723 72
26,997 48
42,510,753 79

.$l;997 01
2^820 92

$2,605 72
3,216 04
1,766 24
6,549 23 $122,175 25
635 72
88 00
6,004 51
20,992 97
1,213,099 77 141,297,654 02
290 16

180 75
441,100 78

58,263 41

382,837 37

2,317 40
6,710 90

709 96
559 74

1,607 44
6,151 16

8,810 40

1,177 54

7,632 i

11,390 90

862 46

10,528 44

"iuiio"



"i,"758*57'

960 80

$321 40
$798 11
$476 71
990 92
1,099 44
2,090 36
158,468 17
56,963 75
215,431 92
15,929 07
7,675 39
23,604 46
4,910 79
2,957 57
7,868 36
20,406 25
6,449 75
26,856 00
728 15
720 12
1,448 27
333 20
381 47
714 67
691,389 96 159,459 69 531,9.30 27
26,340 06
19,074 79
45,414 85
17,520 49
4,735 00
22,255 49
496 00
1,368 53
1,864 53
2,800 00
5,783 53
8,583 . 3
5
4,9L7 01
2,S00 00
7,717 01
2,360 65
1,169 36
1,191 29
15,140 95
8,583 31
23,724 26
32,419 18
10,587 00
43,006 18
1,033 62
882 52
1,916 14
5,577 74
3,361 17
8,ii38 91
1,479 78
7,404 07
8,883 85
2,4.53 45
3,451 26
5,904 71
1,100 92
• 898 30
1,999 22
254 iS'i
253 75
518 38
4,224 65
10,446 53
14,671 18
3,699 10
3,155 85
6,854 95
4,9JO 33
2,000 00
6,930 33
3,817 39
3,470 24
•7,287 63
513 19
585 64
1,098 83
2,000 GO
4,837 94
2,837 94

$1,675 61
1,830 00
$158,46817
15,929 07
3,949 99
C3
142,579 50
816 15
21,326 17
459
41,829,584 29
17
26,340 06
17,520 49
615 24
5,783 53
. 4,917 01
420 91
15,140 95
113, including
415,256 55
Columbus.
1,033 62
5,577 74
1,479 78
4,060 89
7,252 08
264 63
4,224 65
10
11,331 98
4,930 33
10
14,345 83
513 19
4,596 51
256
52

W
$20,000
20,000
I,OCO,000
150,000
100,000
200,GOO
20,000
50,000
2,000,000
200,000
1,000,000
100,000
100,000
100,000
50,000
50,000
500,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
150,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000
50,000

i
HH

o
CQ

Quincy, I I I . . . . »
Alton, 111...-.
Peoria, 111
St. P a u l ' s Minn
Total

.

1,961 89
1,020 95
210 20

435 73
525 00
363 60

1,526 16
495 95

.....
. . . . . . . 43,145,261 41

1,298,376 56 41,853,565 43

"'153*46"

7,36-9
4,275
8,512
10,978

83
66
69
90

6,680 58 1,226,107 76

B,000
2,053
3, .585
3,278

00
71
26
75

336,150 86

5,869
2,221
4,927
7,700

83.
95
43
15

869,950 90

.^...

6,895
2,717
4,927
7,700

99
90
43
15

50.000
50,'000
50 000
50,000

42,740,500 76

3,505 61 6.560,000

t S26,883 90, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
* $122,033 40, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
§ $8,472 90, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
t $6,516 13, amount of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
f $10,323 50, amoimt of revenue from railroad iron in bond.
}
'' .
NOTE.—These estimates are such as would be asked for, judging by others for like places and purposes.
S. M. CLARK,
Acting Engineer in charge, Treasury Department.




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TABLE 6.

Statement showing the places lohere custom-houses, court-houses, and post offices have been authoi'ized but not commenced, the revenue
collected at each, and cost of collection, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1857, toith amount of appropriations.
Post offices.

Custom-houses.

Location.

•1
"o
o
o
a

Court-houses.

I
o

1

1

>

If

6

I

1

fl

o

•

1
$10,080 45
$7,932 31
$2,076 14
1,531 73
4,471 79
18,091 14
1,347 48
16,743 66
18;022 00
990 63
17,031 37
Nashville, T e n n
34,259 44
2,241 61
32,017 83
Cairo III +
4,173 64
21,254 51
Astoria, Oregon
7,240,308 72 414,660 63 *6,'825,'648'69'
Baltimore, Md., C. H.f. . . 1,,473,797 87 141,619 78 1,332,178 09
Columbia, S. C , C H
Raleigh N. C , C H . . . .
10,480 54
9,688 09
792 45
Key West, Fla., C. H
Tallahassee, Fla., C. H . . .
Memphi.=s, T e n n . , C H . § . . " * i 12,883'96 "'5,'i85*89' "i67,'698 6i
Springfield, III., C. H . . .
Madison Wis . C H. . . .

Ogdensburg, N . Y
Perth Amboy, N . J

$2,940 06

17,080 87

u

9

«.- a
>
o >

1

$2,452 76
476 28
1,734 18
8,457 36
2,000 00
160 17
56,963 75
28,064 47
2,724 91
3,462 70
572 56
974 36
6,644 18
3,917 97
3,919 96

$2,639 23
384 11
1,942 31
11,878 71
416 92
131 52
158,468 17
88,265 99
4,752 69
878 25
700 49
1,056 90
9,939 84
4,798 71
9,427 68

609,392 72

8,334,185 64

20,020 93

418,297 13

122,525 61

295,771 52

* $18,085 13, amount of revenue on railroad iron in bond,
t $33,999 90, amount of revenue on railroad iron in bond.




i
1
1

1

•

^
8,923,557 43

III

'6

Aggregates.

c 3 QJ

.s

99
39
49
07
92
69
92
46
60
95
05
26
02
68
64

$5,091
860
3,676
20,336
2,416
291
215,431
116,330
7,477
4,340
1,363
2,031
16,584
8,716
13,347

tn

1

Is
^ fl

o |
rt fl

1-

$4,715 37_
$2,556 15
40 days
50 days

* is,685 97
28,910 08
32,434 75
16,949 37

256 days
195 days
8 days
55 days
16 days
48 d a y s . . . . . .
17 days

6,984,116 26
1,562,063 86
4,752 69"
878 25
1,582 94
1,056 90
117,637 85
4,708 71
9,42-7 68
8,771,061 31

oo

19,505 52

1
a
1
O
$118,000
24.000
96,800
124,500
50,000
40,000
100,000
200,000
50,000
50,000
44.000
50,000
50,000
61,000
50,000

o
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

1,108 300 00

t $11,619 60, amount of revenue on railroad iron in bond.
) $110,065 90, amount of revenue on railroad in bond.
S. M. CLARK,
Jicting Engineer in charge, 2 reasury Departmenl.

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O
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TABLE No, 7.

TABULAR

STATEMENT'

CUSTOM-HOUSES, MAEINE HOSPITALS, &C.,
0
IN CHARGE OF THE

OFFICE OF CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT
EXHIBITINQ

The total amount of appropriations for each work; the date and cost of purchase of site; the amount available September 30, 1860; the amount expended
during the year ending September 30, 1861; the ainount available for the
current year; additional appropriations required during the current year;
date of contract; contract time of completion; actual time of completion; contract price for construction; total cost of the work, 6^x.




120

EEPORT ON TIIE FINANCES
TABLE

Tabular statement of custom-houses, marine hospitals, court-houses, post offices^
under the Treasury Department, exhibiting the total amount of appropiatioiis
September 30, 1860; the amount exjiended during the year ending September
required during the current year; date of contract; contract time of comthe work, ^c.

c-«

Name and location of the work.

iiii
Custom-houses.
Bath, Maine
Belliist, Maine
Bangor, Maine
Castine, Maine
Ellsworth, Maine . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eastport, Maine
Kennebunk, Maine
Portland, Maine
Wiscasset, Maine
Waldoboro',M'une
Portsmouth, iVeW.Hampshire.
Burlington, V e r m o n t . . .
Boston, Massachusetts.
Barnstable, M a s s a c h u s e t t s . . . .
Gloucester, Massachusetts . ..
New Bedford, Massachusetts.
Newburyport, Massachusetts.
Salem, Massachusetts
Bristol, Khode .island
Newport, Rhode .Island
Providence, Rhode I s l a n d . . . .
Middletown, Connecticut . . . .
New Haven, Connecticut . . . .
N e w London. C o n n e c t i c u t . . . ,
Butralo, New'York
,
N e w York, New York
Oswego, New York
Ogdensburg, New Y o r k . . . , , . . . . . ,
Plattsburg, New York
,
N e w a r k , New Jersey
Perth Amboy, New Jersey
. Wilmington, Delaware
Erie, Pennsylvania
«Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
.Baltimore, Maryland
Georgetown, Di.sti ict of Columbia,
Alexandria, Virginia
Norfolk, Virginia
Petersburg, Virginia
Richmond, Viriiinia
Wheeling, Virginia.;.
Wilmington, North Carolina.,
Charleston, South Carolina..,
Savannah, Georgia.
Mobile, A l a b a m a . . .
Key West, Florida .,
Pensacola, Florida.
New Orleans, Louisiana ,
Galveston, Texas . . . . ,
St. Louis, Missouri •,.,
Louisville, Kentucky ,




25
58
00
00
68
00
00
71
00
00
00

Feb. 7,1852
Feb. 24, 18.55
June 5, 1851
April 6, 1833
April 11. 1855
July 3,'1847
Nov. 19, 1832
July 5, 1849
Nov. 3, 1848
iVov. 9, 1852
June 20, 1857

$15,000
5,600
15,000
1,200
3,000
2,780
1,.575
149,000
2,000
2,000
19,500

56,350 00
1,106,658 00

Dec. 4,1854
Aug. 29, 1837

7,7.50 00
190,000 00

33,370 80
53,000 00
31,745 00
23,200 00
19,271 77
31,400 00
10.500 00
. 274,000.00
15,300 00
190,800 00
20,237 37
290,800 00
1,105,313 57

April 25, 1855
June 6, 1855
April 13, 1833
Aug. 9, 1833
June 23, 1818
Mar. 13, 1856
Sept. 29, 1828
Dec. 15, 1854
Feb. 8, 1833
.lune 1, 18.55
Feb. 18, 1833
Jan. 26, 1855
Jan. 9, 1833

1,.500
9,000
4,900
3,000
5,000
4,400
1,400
40,000
3,500
25,500
3,400
40,000
270,000

131.100 00
118,'000 00
79,900 00
162,000 00
24,000 00
'41,500 00
54,000 00
110,000 00
264,487 82
456,898 59
60,000 00
74,700 00
229,652 53

Dec. 1.'=:, 1854
Jan. 20, 1857
J u n e 10, 1856
May 30, 1855
Sept. 7, 18.57
Nov. 26, 18.52
July 2,1849
May 8,1851
Aug. 27, 1844
June 10.1833
Oct. 23, 1S56
May 13, 185o
Feb. 28, 1852

12,000 00
8,000 00
5,000 00
50,000 00
2,000 00
3,500 00
29,000 00
41,000 00
225,000 00
30,000 00
5,000 00
16,000 00
13,000 00

. 103,200 00
252,016 00
118,711 00
57,039 75
2,073,000 00

July 12,1855
Mar. 16, 1853
iMov. 29, 1854
Mar. 19, 1819
July 10, 1849

1.5,000 00
61,000 00
20,500 00
16,000 00
130,000 00

'43,*566'64

174,407 97
402,600 00

Dec. 16,1845
Oct. 13, 1851

20,725 00
12,500 00

10,545 06

6,125 00 July 26, 1833
51,000 00 Acquired by
cessioa from
Spain.
2,975,258 00 Gift from first
municipality.
136,000 00 Julv 23, 18.55
376,600 00 Oct. 31, 1851
262,645 00 Oct. 7,1851

1,000 00

$10.5, .391
37,347
112,800
4,700
24.809
36,'780
1,600
376,031
2,200
25,000
166,300

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$3,525 30
$448 79

"'8,'36b'66
""i,'427'40

48 88
2,415 89
53 23
113 22

1,368 70
27'
6,886 71
*95,'323'69
.5,683 05
108,8.58 25
47 66
20,645 34

1,314 22
*i,*i46'75
25 62
774 83

63,114 46
6,000 00
37,000 00
16,000 00

89,598 96
15,000 00

121

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 7.

branch mints, and other public buildings in charge of the office of construction
for each tvork; the date and cost of purchase of site; the amount available
30, 1861; the amouiit available for the current year; additional appropriations
pletion; actual time of completion; contract price for construction; total cost of

•il

llf
£.Sa2

<

^

<

$ 1 , 4 2 7 40

7 3 2 80

48 88
1 , 6 8 3 09

t
113 22

1,364 95

3 75
27

1,840 89

5 , 0 4 5 82

143 14

9 5 , 1 8 0 55

6 3 0 91

5 , 0 5 2 14
108,^58 25

t

.

19 9 5

20,625 39

«.
^ c
9
OJ o
•*^

I

cd
O

rt
c
o
O

1

July
9,1853
May 30,1855
M a r . 5 , 18.55
Purchased
O c t . 1 6 , 1855
Purchased ..
do
A p r i l 2 5 , 1855
Purchased ..
A p r i l 1 3 , 1855
April 2 4 , 1 8 5 7
S e p t . 3 0 , 1855
B u i l t by g o v ernment.
J u l y 1 9 , 1855
S e p t . 8 , 1855
Purchased ...
do . ..
do
A u g . 2 7 , 1856
Purchased .
M a y 2 8 , 1855
S e p t . 2 9 , 1855
Purchased
..
J u l v 2.5,1855
Built by government.
S e p t . 1, 1855
Not awarded
M a r . 18, 1857
A u g . 10, 1855
Not awarded.
A u g . 4 , 1853

ll

J u n e 30,1857
J u n e 3 0 , 18.36
O c t . 3 1 , 1855

Oct.
9 , 1 8 5 8 $ 4 7 , 5 9 4 30
Oct.
1,18.58 17,51J0 0(!
O c t . 3 1 , 1855 5 4 , 0 4 2 44

Dec.

1,1856

Aug.

Jan.

1 5 , 1857

N o v . 1, 1855
Assumed
by
governm'nt.
Feb.
1,1857

J u n e 3 0 , 1856
Mar. 1,1857

Jan.

2 , 1858

9 , 2 0 0 00

1 5 , 1 8 5 7 1 5 3 , 5 0 0 00

56 350 00
1 , 1 0 6 , 6 5 8 00

Dec.
Sept.

1,1856
2,1857

1 7 , 2 5 0 00
26,596 78

1 7 , 5 2 2 00

33,2.57
53 000
31'745
2 3 200
19,271
31 3Q6
10,500
2 7 3 949
15'POO
I H T 7^4
2 0 237
I Q T 619
1 105 3 l 3

July

25,1857

July

2 5 , 1 8 5 7 1 5 1 , 0 0 0 00

Mar.

1 , 1857

Feb. 14,1860

Mar.

1, 1857

J u l y 12, 18.58 1 1 3 , 8 9 2 95
F e b . 2 2 , 1842
Sept.

8 8 , 0 0 0 00

1,1858

7 7 , 2 5 5 00

1,1858 May 19, i 8 5 8
1,1857 M a y 12, 1859

48,755 43
7 5 , 9 4 8 71

'Apriri,*i85'6

29,'234'66

18, 1852

Feb.

6 , 1854

3 9 , 8 6 6 00

.
Dec.
Dec.
May

do
18,
13,
17,

Nov.
July
Oct.

9, 18.58
1, 1859
6,1858

t
t

5 9 9 74

775 09

3 9 136 7 3

4 , 4 2 9 91

1 509 99

.36 116 10

t

2 6 , 9 9 8 36

t

1 2 , 7 9 5 15




Mar. 29,1856 Sept. 30,1857
1, 1857
J u l y 1 1 , 1855 J u l y
J u n e 1 9 , 1856 J u n e 1, 1858
Purchased
..
Building
by
govern m'nt.'

Mur.
Oct.
April

4 1 , 5 8 2 bO
3 7 , 1 4 9 37
P r i c e s in
detail.
5 , 1 8 5 9 6 6 , 6 5 7 10
9, 1858 110,000 00
4 , 1 8 5 9 80,1.59 97

J u l y 2 3 , 1853

July

1,1856

June

2 , 1859

Purchased .
Feb. 27,1837

9 00

*1,295 48

June

1 , 1 8 5 8 J u n e 1 2 , 1858

Building
by
governm'nt.
J u n e 19, 1860 J u n e
D e c . 24, 1853 J u l y
1853 t o 1855 M a y

64
58
c\C\
on
fia
00
00
71
00
l'^
91

2 8 , 2 3 8 40

May

1 8 74

$102,082
37 '}>M
104 ^i\\\
4 700
94•pnq
.36 780
1 fioo
376 031
2 9(10
2 4 951
164 616

1,1857
1 , 1847

1,1857

. ..
1856 S e p t . 2 4 , 1858
18.56 M a y 1 , 1858
1853 D e c . 1, 1858

I

April
Aug.

4 , 1857

Oct*.*'i,'1855

O
O

"rt

1 5 , 8 0 0 00
8 2 , 7 2 8 96

Mar.

Mar.
Mar.

3

S3

D e c . 2 7 , 1855
J u l y 2 8 , 1860

Sept.

S e p t . 3 0 , 1857

CO

S -

- p .

O =3

t

S
o

,

il

o

<

$ 8 , 3 0 0 00

o

1

Hi
lii

•11

§

S
o
o

P r i c e s in
detail.
3 9 , 1 8 1 07

58
00
00
00
77
25
00
73
00
IR
37
A'\
57

126,-047 8 5
9 141 75
79 852 34
i n o 000 00
3 , 374 6 1
41.5(!0 00
54,000.00
1 1 0 , 0 0 0 00
OR 4 4>,7 82
4.56,898.59
5 8 704 52
7 4 . 7 0 0 00
2 2 8 , 5 0 5 78
103,183
252 016
11«''^"^5
57 039
2,068,57.'^

38
00
91
75
09

174.407 97
393 564 9 3
6 1 2 5 00
5 1 . 0 0 0 00

2 , 9 4 8 , 2 5 9 64
1, 1861
1, 1856
1,1857

9 0 , .509 07
M a r . 3 1 , 1859 3 3 6 , 3 0 9 07
M a r . 1 2 , 1859 1 4 8 , 1 5 8 00

1 1 4 , 3 5 9 82
363,804 85
2 6 2 , 6 4 5 00

122

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
TABLE No. 7
rt cs

o.>>

n
o

'-',

_CJ
CO

p
a,

N a m e and location of the work.
.J t; o

c S^ 5

Ciisio?n-/iowscs~Continued.
Kno.wille, Tennessee .

$96,800 00

Nashville, Tennessee .
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, O h i o . . . . . .

124, .500 00
166,900 00
292,083 90

Sandusky, O h i o . . .
Toledo, Ohio
Detroit, Michigan
Chicago, Illinois..
Cairo, Illinois

76,450
79,950
217,071
447,733
50,000

Galena, Illinois . . .
Dubuque, I o w a , ' . .

85,200 00
138,800 00

00
00
17
88
00

Not yet selected.
Oct. 7, 18.56
April 9, 1856
Sept. 24,1851

$96,568 19
$20,000 00
30,000 00
50,000 00"

Dec. 28,1854
Feb. 20,1855
Nov. 5, 1855
Jan. 10, 1855
Not yet selected.
J a n . 20, 1857
J a n . 20, 1857

11,000
12,000
24,000
59,433

104,215 69
7,787 86

00
00
00
88

1,385 05
3,411 89
13,765 29
%,.56S 35
50,000 00

16, .500 00
20,000 00

327 56
45,286 59

173,351
Acquired
conquest.
779,672
40,000

36
by

Feb. 16,1855

12,200 00

281 90

39
00

Sept. 5,1854
May 1,1856

150,000 00
Exchange of
lands.

191,432 51
39,938 43

75,900
76,000'
200,000
300,000

00
00
00
00

J a n . 20,1857
...do
May 30,18.59
May 30,1857

1,400
4,500
50,000
207,000

7,960 43
.560 38
14,5,729 17
273 89

Columbia, South Carolina

50,000 00

Raleigh, North (.^larolina.
Key We.^t, Florida
Tallahassee, F l o r i d a . . . . ,

50,000 00
44,000 00
50,000 00

Not yet purchased.
Sept.-22, I860
Ap'l 28,1858
Not yet purchased.
J u n e 6,1860
Jan. 20,18.57
Aug. 20,1850

Milwaukie, Wisconsin .
Monterey, California...
San Francisco, California.
Astoria, Oregon
Court-houses and post offices.
Rutland, Vermont
W^indror, Vermont
Baltimore, Maryland,court-house,
Baltimore, Maryland, post office

Memphis, Tennessee .
Springfield, Illinois....
Indianapolis, Indiana..
Madison, Wisconsin

50,000 00
61.000 00
163,700 00

00
00
00
00

49,933 12
7,700 00
3,000 00
15,000 00
6,000 00
17,160 00

50,000 00

42,079 52
40,908 26
49,915 90

$5,000 00

34.875 10
53,'8S6 60
33,802 74
49,895 75

Marine hospitals.
Portland, Maine
Builington, Vermont. . . .
Chelsea, Massachusetts .
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
Ocracoire, North Carolina ...
Wilmington, North Carolina.
Mobilc,"Alabama
Key West, Florida
Pensacola, Florida
'
,
St. Mark's Florida.
New Oiieans, Louisiana.
Vicksburg, iVHssissippi...
St. Louis'' Missouri
Napoleon, A r k a n s a s . . .
Louisville. Kentucky .
Paducah, K e n t u c k y . . .
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Evansvillr. Indiaria . . .
Detroit, Michigan
Chicago, Illinois
Galena, Illinois.




99,000 00
43,650 00
284,700 00
70,570 23

May 30,1855
Nov. 5,1855
From Navy
Depart'nt.
Sept. 7,18-12
1845 & 1840

Mar. 17,1857
June20,l848
Sept. 10,1833
Not yet purchased.
25,700 00 Government
property.,
521,4.59 20 Aug. 7,18,55
Oct. 15,1853
67,525 16
118,574 00 Ceded by War]
Depart'iit.
59,250 00 Sept. 15,1837
63,.500 33 Nov. 2,1H42
61,625 00 Dec. 25,1837
96,909 .38 Oct. 11,1837
186,000 00 Jan. 18,1856
62,.50O 00 Ap'l 29,18.53
113,000 00 Mar. 14,1855
57,712 00 Ceded by War]
Depart'nt.
48,800 G
O Mar. 14,1857
51,-324 00
54,.540 00
27,100 00
22,000 00

.11,000 00
1,750 00
10,253
No record
cost
6,500
4,000
1,500

4,951 05
6,676 78

00
of
00
00
00

9,188 81
'20,'947'04

12,000 00
4,500 00

16,210 52
"25," i 76 04

1,000 00
6,000 00
l.OUO 00
12,000 00
36,000 00
6.000 00
23^000 00
5,052 00

3. .304 23
3^403 21
5,632 77
4,609 48
10,330 79

123

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

-^ >»
"rt C
> di

i.rl

S

<

1

o
o .

Date of contract.

Additional appropriations required for the
current year.

—Continued.

27
20
10,714
74 012

54
00
73
53

66 50
43,747 21

o
o
fl
73

0) fl

zi

2^

o

B

c

o

0) o

iu

£-

c
o
O

<

8

Not awarded.

1C4,215 69
*7

o .2
•fl-l '

"rt

£.2

•^

$96,568 19
$7,787 79

»

fl

"a,
S
o
o

do . . . . .
Aug. 30, 18.56 J a n .
July 18, 1853 Dec.

1,357
*3.39l
*3,0.50
22,555
50iJ300

1, 1859 Jan. 1, 1859 $83,500 00
1, 1856 April 1, 1857 Prices in
detail.
J a n . 9, 1856 J u n e 1, 1857 Jan. 8, 1858 4.5,708 10
do . .
do
J a n . 1,1858 45,708 10
Oct. 1, 18i6 Undetermin'd
103,160 66
Oct. 25, 1855 Jan. 1,1860
84,450 00

•••••

51
89
56
82
00

261 06
1,539 38

281 90

$231 82

Mar. 25, 1857 Dec. 1,1858 Oct. 11, 1859
Not yet es- April 8, 1857
....do
...
timated.
Oct. 25, 1855 Nov. 30, 1858 J a n . 1, 1859

*17,410 14

^

t
2,309
457
22,061
59

17
70
80
00

5,651
102
123,667
214

26
68
37
69

41,879 47
40,908 26
•49,915 90

19 00

34,856 10
53,886 60
15,667 93

18,134 81

79,870 00

173,351 36

Dec. 22,1851 J u n e 30,1854 Oct. 15,1855 400,000 00

762 262 25
• 1,061 57

....do
....do
. do

Not yet estimated.

....do
....do........
Aug. 17,1857 Dec. 17,1858

98,983 79

Not awarded.

4,488 65
*6,676 78

April 16,18.55 Aug. 1,1856 Oct. 28,1856 66,200 00
June 17,1856 «ept. 30,1857 April 1,18.58 30,427 64
Aug. 9,1855 Mar. 3,1857 Dec. 25,1857 122,185 39

2 000 00

t
18,947 04

11,420 65

235 04

*24,941 00

1,807,60

4,669 48
8,529 19

1,0?3 81

1,966 31




94,511 35
36,973 22
284,700 00

28,968 25

1,1858 May 25,1858

16,444 00

25,700 00

July
1,18.59
429,395 79
July 31, 18.56 July "i',1*8136 57,021 02
Sept. 3,1853

510,038 55
67,525 16
93,633 00

Not awarded.

J a n . 14', 1857
April 18,1855
Built by government.
....do
;
...do
. . . do
J a n . 15,1855
Sept. 27,18.56
June 1,1853
July 18.1855
Built by government.
I Mar. 25,1857

15.143 90
7,113 40
148,032 07

1,1859 Nov. 23,1859

...•;do

Mar. 24,1857 S e p t .
4,789 87

66 88

70,570 23

J u n e 26,1857 J a n .
Purchased.

'

74
32
65
11

129 25

Purchased.
....do
1,742 25

70 248
75,897
• 76,3,32
299,785

8 120 53
3,091 74
84 10

49,870 75

462 40

49
11
61
06

84,9.38 94
137 260 62

Mar. 5,1857 July 1,1858 J a n . 31,1859 52,827 00
Mar. 19,1857 . . . . d o . . . : . , . . Mar. 25,1859 49,300 00
July 30,1860 Aug. 1,1862
112,808 04
Repairs comJuly i,1859
pleted.
Not awarded.

t
200 05

75,092
76 558
214,020
425 178

43,629 00
87,334 50

•
^
174,022 37

20,284 31'
166 8<jq o*?
292,083 90

Dec. 31,1855
April 1,1858
July 1,1855
Dec. 31,1856
Dec.

1,1868

July
Sept.
April
June
April
Sept.
Nov.
Mar.
Oct.

18,1854
11,1851
1,18.52
l,'lo56 20,000 00
31,18.59 106,^24 07
28, lt56 '5.0,000 00
13,1857 .54,637 12
15, 1852
4,1859

29,862 00

43 897 44
54,540 CO
27,100 00
3,052 96

59,250
63, .500
58,320
93,506
180,367
57,830
104, ^170
57 712

00
33
71
n
23
53
81
00

46,833 69

I 124

REPORT ON THE FINAJSFCES.

o

0
0)

&

G,

S

rt
Name and location of the work.

Q,rt

C.2
5.2

c

s

0
rt

«

o
EH

0
0

0

'

Marine hospitals—Continued.
$23,195 15
224,000 00

San Francisco, California

J a n . 16,1856
Sept. 0,1854

$4,500 00
150,000.00

$599 56

'

Miscellaneous.
United States mint at Philadelphia
Branch mint at New O r l e a n s . . . . .
Branch mint at Charlotte, N. C . . . .
Branch mint at Dahlonega, G a . . . ,
Brancli mint at San F r a n c i s c o . . . .
Vault for public funds at New
Mexico
N e w York assay office

il

Amount available September 30, 1880, wiih
additional appropriations.

TABLE No. 7

216,800 00

»

576,926
110,850
66,500
345.000
2; 000

40
00
00
00
00

913 12

2,262 23
May 2,1854

283,929 10

684,716 80

Aug. 19,1853

573,716.80

New York Atlantic Dock s t o r e s . . .
Boarding station at Pass k FOutre.

100,000 00
12,000 00

100,000 00

Boarding station at Southwest
Pass.
Appraisers stores, San Francisco.
Utah p e n i t e n t i a r y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Feb. 19,1857
Ceded by the
city of New
Orleans.
Nov. 6,1856

45,000 00
175 13

100,000 00
45,000 00

3,-500 00

Minnesota public b u i l d i n g s . . . . . . .

20,000 00
130.000 00
2,447,500 00

1,755 61
8,363 00

86,500 00

N e w Mexico penitentiary
New Mexico public buildings
Extension of the Treasury building.

3,500 00

Ventilating basement of Treasury
building.
Fire proof vaults for public stores.
"Warehouses at quarantine station, New Orleans.
Annual repairs of custom-houses.
Annual repairs of marine hospitals.
Repairs of Balimore custom-house.

39,640 00

$330,000 00

Government
property.
do

60,000 00
^649,668 47
4,511 13

66,000 00
50,000 00

55,751 34
16,293 06

183.001 59
75,000 00

46,641 69
40,479 3b

15,000 00
24,632,930 26

15,000 00
3,585,824 78

350,448 79

2,700,464 81

" Bepayments by, and balances due from, disbursing agents, and transfers from other works.




125

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

a

«^

c
rtco
<u a> I..

ll

O <!)•§

il

§

g£!fl

.2 " £
^

o

;5.o 3

OJ

<

•

t

Contract time of completion.

—Continued.

8

s

"3.
o

8

u

'iZ V
C fl

•;3
fl
o

<u
fl
fl

o .
0) o

o

p
fl
o

<

o

$27,595 59
224,000 00

Built by government; repairs finished.

215 886 88

$2,262 23
April 1.5,1853 Feb.
Built by T e r ritory.
Built by government.
Purcljased . . .
Dec. 23,1856 Sept.

45,000 00
175 13

1,1854 Mar. 31,1854 268,809 10
Oct.

9,1854

4,287 32
311,602 06
-

4,511 18

'734 96
8,?37 28
2,933 81
1,049 41

10,900 00

100,000 00
12,000 00

1,1856 April 1,1856

63,500 00

99 .598 14
30,637 00

3 500 00

86,500 00
20,000 00
74 287 32
2 109 493 59

Bv dav's labor.

35,128 82

43,707*88
39,429 94

Sept. 10,18.59 July 15,1860 May 31,1860

Sept. 21,1860

7,800 O
C

1,807,102 24 500,000 00




31,984 O
C

10,983 62
42j544 22
139,293 71
35,570 06

15,000 00
693,362 .57

40
00
00
00
87

1,1857 Aug. 21,1857

55,016 33

t

576,'926
110 850
661500
300,000
1,824

684,716 80

Purchased . . .
June 27,18.55 Mar.
8,363 00
Built by Territory.
Biiilt by government.
,...do
55,712 68
do
338,006 41 $500,000 00 . . . . d o

fl

"ri

^1

Mar. 12,1857 J a n . 1,1858 J a n . 14,1858 $15,978 00
Nov. 13,1851 Dndetermined. Oct. 16,1854 Prices in
detail.

, $913 12

1,.353 75

•

s

,

15,000 00
22,825,827 99

f Balancep carried to surplus fund.
S. M. CLARK,
•Acting Engineer in charge, Treasury Department.

126

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 11.—Statement of the expenditures and receipts of the marine hospital fund
for the fiscal year

Districts.

Mode of accommo- Rate per week.
dation.

Agents.

MAINE.

Passttmaquoddy
Machias
Frenchman's Bay
Penobscot
Waldoboro'
Wiscasset
Bath
Portland and Falmouth
Saco
Kennebunk
York
Belfast
Bangor

Robert Burns*
A. F . Parlin*
T h o m a s D. Jones*. . . .
John R.. Redmanf
John H. Kennedy*
Thomas Cunninghamf.
James H. Nichols*. . . .
Moses Macdonald
A. A. Hanscom*
John Cousens.
Lyther Jenkinsf
J. G. Dickerson*
D. F. Leavitt*

{ft3 00
2 00 to $ 3 50
2 50 to 3 00

119
26
19

119
31
19

Private board.

2 50 to

40
129
2
2

41
125
2
2

Private b o a r d . . .
Hospital
Private b o a r d . . .

2
2
3
3

53
92

48
106

Private board.
do

3 50
2 50 to

Private hospital.
Private b o a r d . . .
do

531
NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Augustus Jenkins*.

27

Private board.

3 25.,

William C l a p p * . . . .

Portsmouth

16

Private board.

2 50.

VERMONT.

Vermont
MASSACHUSETTS.

Newburyport
Gloucester
Salem and Beverly
Marblehead
Boston and Charlestown
Plymouth
Fall River
Barnstable
,
New Bedford
Edgartown
Nantucket

James Blood
Gorham Bab'^on.t
William B Plkef . . . .
William Bartlett} ' . . .
James S. Whitney*..
Wait W a d s w o r t h f . . .
Phineas W. Lelandf..
S. B. Phinney
C. B. H. Pessenden* .
Ira Darrow*
Eben W. Allenf

632

596

Hospital.

239
11
68

246
11
71

Private hospital.
Hospital
Private hospital.

3 50.
3 00,
3 50

110
10
15

Private board,
do
do

3 75
3 50
3 50

950
RHODE ISLAND.

Providence
Bristol and Warren . .
Newport

J a m e s A. Aborn* . . . .
George H. Reynolds*
Gilbert Chace*
,

135
CONNECTICUT.

Middletown
New London^
}^Q\N Haven \
Fairfield
Stonington

Patrick Fagan*
John P. C. M a t h e r * . .
Minott A. Osborn* . . . .
William S. Pomeroy*..
Ephraim Williams, jr.*

31
15
29
1

31
15
36
1

Private board
do
Hospital Society..,
Private board . . . .

3
3
3
3

00.
50.
50.,
00.

6
110
3
126

6
144
3
156

Private hospital...,
,
do.
Private b o a r d . . . , . ,
Sisters of Charity .,

3
5
3
2

50.
00.,
00..
50..

168

,14Q

Hospitals . . . . !

NEW YORK.

Sackett's Harbor.
Genesee
Oswego
,
Niagara
,
Bufialo C r e e k . . . . ,
Oswegatchie
Sag Harbor
New York city . .

William Howlandf.
P. M. Bromley*
J. B. Iliggins
George P. Eddy
Warren Bryant* . . ,
Horace Moodyt
Jason M. Terbellt-..
Augustus Schell* . . .

* Reports of n e w agents included.




|

3 00

50 to 3 00
50 to 3 00
50
00

4 00.

f No report.

3 00

127

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

for the relief of sick and disabled seamen in the ports of the United States
ending June 30, 1861.
•
<u

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•

fl
DQ

fl

3
C

c

rt

t

ri

bb

o

o
O

975 96

27550

L333 50
4,843 89
20 00
72 00

675 55
1,000 00
5 75
32^5

858 30
1,262 46

a
. O
l
.l
f

.s

'•5

$1,367,14 $788 51
475 42 . 168 50
120 75
443 00

$421 00
152 00
114 90

i<
4>

"a
fl
fl

. 5
$25 76
8 13 •
6 83

$3 50

$ 1 8 00

a
-l
f
o

% ^

c
•

a;
"a •

s'

0

fl

3

$2,602 41
822 05
688 98

$642 85
451 24
692 54
472 67
1,040 21

125 30

13 86

6 00

1

1,396 62

is'00

229 07
1 50

20 26
60 88
27.
1 05

10 50

3
2

2.047 31
6 ' 150 34
,
27 52
105*80

14 53
19 15

6 00

1

1,468 38
1,936 21

71 88
32 60
332 10
517 28

170 72

58 50

10

17,245 62

6,772 12

6 00

1

l-,237 99

194 35

589 55
653 80

11,6.H 67, 4,3i0 66

\^

a

e

1,043 77

6 00

9 50

1 i 1 34
322 10
'2,050 08
105 23

831 19

180 10

50

180 00

12 30

76 50

47 65

3 04

307 29

138 15

7

7 57

116 23
519 75
839 70
16 00
13 244 31
31 43
628 07

'-208

"
7 50

17,419 90

1,028 00

191 93

4 419 50 1,337 35 1,313 15
49 25 '
43 10
'l62 86
347 25
504 15
1 681' 50

$i3"i2

'

103 00

70 94
2 55

641 99

34 34

299 83

28

19,384 82

24 00

4

12 00

2

7,164 94
257 76
2,542 35

. 1,1 :'0 08
724 62
373 21

139 00

34

29,357 45

17,724 88

81 48
23,683 76

2,761 85

2,502 39

7 50

13 12

2,784 49
232 50
569 UO

• 684 75
55 75
107 50

779 10
37 45
170 70

50

42 60

12 00

2

7 50

3 25
8 67

12 00

2

4,303 44
328 95
• 875 37

3,585 99

848 00

987 25

8 00

54 62

•24 00

4

5,507 76

363
119
729
9

89
50
50
00

171 65
69 50

1

1 50

""i2'6o

5 25

3 15

5 41
2 357 41
17

6 00

46 05

,546
237
750
17

1,221 89

246 40

49 20

~
,

1 50

15 34

,

18 00

3

862 42
82 93
326 31
1,271 66

95
40
41
57

758 51
641 93
891 50
606 47
293 23

1,552 33

3,191 70

'
211 50
6,699 87
48 HI
4,480 33

•

17 50

^

15 00

W , 462 23




2 11
67 18
81
45 52

18 00

3

.72 00

12

213 61
6,785 05
81
4,597 85

299 56

322 00

*°°46

30,083 79

49 51
84 92
1,097 91
32 57
2,624 79
334 93
388 40
"47,378 95

128

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 11.—-Statement of the expenditures and

g,

n3

<a

Districts.

.fl
.2
-a
fl'

S

Agents.

fl

i

Mode of accommo- Rate per w e e k . '
dation.

1

m

viCQ

Private board . . . . . . $ 3 0 0 . . . . . . . . . .
3 00..........
do

7
3

7
3

423

459

37

41

Private b o a r d . , . . . . .

3 00.

5.
1

5
1

Private b o a r d . . . . . .
do . . . . . .

3 00
3 50..,,.....'

43

47

332
11

444
11

City h o s p i t a l s . . . . . . .
Private b o a r d . . . . . .

3 50
2 50.i........

343

455

. 1

ea()e Vincent

1

NEW J E R S E Y .

Williams. Bowen,

Bridgetown.

Perth Amboy
» ....
Thomas D. W i n n e r . . . . . . .
Great Egg Harbor
Little Esg Har,bor
Rfl ward T . Hi l i v e r * . . . . . . .

PENNSYLVANIA.
•Plviladplnhia

C M Tibbals.

,

DELAWARE.

Jesse "Sharpe*
MARYLAND.

3 00

292

276 ' Baltimore Infirmary

,292

276

17

20

W a s h , Infirmary...

3 00

23
63
15

14
52
12

Private b o a r d . . . . . .

3 50

Wm. S. Jackson

^
D I S T R I C T OF COLUMBIA.

Georgetown

R f! Mathews*

......

VIRGINIA.

Norfolk and Portsmouth.
William F . Presson

" " 5 6 " . "**56'"

5 12

Hospital
Washington
City
Infirmary
Private h o s p i t a l . . . .

E d w a r d S. Hough* . . . . . . .

11

10

Andrew J. Pannell

12

12

174

150

37
12
20

36
12
20

Hospital
Private h o s p i t a l . . . .

20
2

16
2

-

Hospital

3 00
3 50

NOTH CAROLINA.

James Ramsay




4 00
Hospital...........

J a m e s T . Miller
91

"^^86

' Repoits of new agents included.

3 50....
2 00
3 50...

-

-_
.

1:29

' REPORT ON .THE FINANCES.

receipts o f t h e m a r i n e hospital f u n d , ^'c.—Continued.
' 0 •

.5

a;
- C

- c3 •

.5

fl
fl .

1

• -5

$ 4 5 00
C 04 •
2
38

$6 25
15 -60

•fcC

1'

'^

1^

. $2 50
17 15

40,985 78

39 35

179-70

2.
0

0

Q;

. fl .^

CC

76 60

-

.

0

$.54 28
71 49

• $4.^)8 yo
278 65
215 70

61 • 1 '41,806 88

416 4.1 \ $412 00

1

-

'a
' 8 •
-. tn • •

.52,944 56

$ 0 53
70

/•••••"•';

\

•

, 0

34 65

664 50

1

^

•

fl
fl,

'fl
c

•

Q;

5

X

K .i

• >?

18 00

9 36

. 3, ^

•948 16

1,153 79
1,49 07
1,213 30
• '746 To
, • • 528 09
33d 20
• 43700
'

116 14
' 3 5 00

38 75.
7 00

• 26 66

• i82' 76
45,81,

i 81
45-

: , 3 36.

•

8i5 64 •

I

225 45 . . 105 96

t91 95 ;

113 50
t20 30
1,000 op

222 99

15 00

1,033 80

.244 94

39 29

5 50

•2 75

i 65

•

644 88

.

91 57
1 45
72 59

$24 29 . ^ 4 1 88

8,':^6 41
126 48
5,928 99
14,431 88

.

il 62

'

.165 61

18.00

,3

87 Op

13

57 00 .

' 4,563 95

5,475.37
' 9 , 2 4 9 60
' 148 23
'250 40
^
7,295 87 " 1,469 .31

6
. 19

16,693 70

7,195 08

10 89

' ,144 00

918 08

. 99

47 85

*'

....
....'^ .......^.

47 85.

85' 00,

6 23 V .
.5 66 j
22 4812 00
1 "0

570^00
35 75-

146 25
21 40

°'ii4'75

'79 60

•4 59

1
2

1 68
8 2

'*96'25'

166 50

.3,339 84 1

816 75

413 74

176 00
t93 10
87 75

4,834 24.

6,371 04

397 80

629 57
• 2,372'80
; 171 85

448 92
4,60115
154 90
341 67
242 86
149 07

17

.4 57

. ..

t l 6 8 42
553 00

4,452
338
4T0
898
131
79

17

.

,"' 4,701 39

1456.40

4,,834 24

460 97

85 00

.......

266 00

1,176.^7

i

f.4,70i 39

t633 34
•1,629 08

[

153 90

,-

464 94
.,

170 10
822 87

89
18
00
93
82
29

362 70
410 5 3 .
33 20

44 80

. 17 00

3

4,632 13 1 6,745 00

8 49
2 50
3 45

6 00

1

es'oo*

857 39
• 252 60
348 20.

.630 00
i 370 12
8 75
. , 20 00 '
1,563 20 1 504 60

•

56 i 6• 5 25 .
400 .10

26 56
34
94 74 1

3,815 32 1 1,500 20

680 35

513 00
1.57 00
.192 00

.

'

j
t Charge for medical

Ex. I)oc.2
9


•

•

'

.11:1::

60 08

•""*6*66" '""i,"*!
'. 12 00 . . 2 - 1

•*2,676 78
34 34
2,498,bt.

337
60
300
• 99
135
.' 40
23
250

65
72
91
40
92
20
10
08

6,067 95 J 1,247 97

service and medicine included in board and nursing.

130

BEPOET ON THE FINANCES.
1^0.11.—Statement of the'expeiiditures and

Agents.

Districts.

,

Mode of accommodation.

•'5

rt
.• fl
a

fl
<a
fl

S
<!i

Rate per week.

%
m

' SOUTH CAROLINA,

Georgetovi^n
Rpaiifort*

124
6

118

$4 SO
.-...
City counsel
Private b o a r d . . . . . . 3 5 0 . . . . . . . . .

112
6

130

. . . • William F . Cnlcock
, . . . . . John N. M e r r i m a n . . . . . . .

(Charleston

.

.

GEORGIA.
8 9 ••

., . . .
'

•70

9

9

98

John J Dnfour*
Woodford Mabry

79

Private hospital....-

3 50

:.

FDORIDA.

Pensacola
St. Augustine*
Key West
tSt. Mark's

^ ..'.
Ho.'^ipital... i . . . . . . .
Alonizo B. Noyes

. . . . . .•.

iVathan Bak(.n- ..'

Apalachicola

'"'io'

. . . . . . . . ... do.
10'

6

*'3'.56 !!!.*.'!.'."

Private board
. . . . d o . .'

3 50.

A. J . Decatur* . . . . . . . . . . .
Paiatka* .

.......
16

.

18

^

ALABAMA:.

367

355

""77"

-'"ee"

77

66

1,542

1,460

1,542

Tbaddeus Sanford

Selma*

355

367

Mobile

1,460

178

'225

Hospital

,....

.

'

MISSISSIPPI. .

John Hunter
John Bobb

Vicksburg

Hospital. . . i
..

?

f
Francis H. Hatch
Robert N, McMillan . . . . .

Teche

/

Hospital

.TEXAS.

'

Galveston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hamilton S t u a r t . . . . . . . . .
Saluria
,^. . . . . . . . . . . Darwin M. S t a p p . . . . . . . . .
Brazos de S a n t i a g o . . . . . . Francis W. Latham

2"
180

Private hospital....
. . . do
Private board

7 00.... . . , . .

'3 56°.°..'.'..!.'!

„227;

OHIO.

..

.

\

15
10 •
1?3
254

15
13
169
248

4.58-

Emery D . P o t t e r f . . .
George S. Patterson f......
Robert T a r k s t ,
T. JeiTerson S h e r l o c k f . . . .

Sandusky

445

Private b o a r d . . . . . . 3 00
Hospital
•...;
City h o s p i t a l . . . . , . " 5 66'.'..'.".'..'.'..*

•

fUeports of nevt' agents included,
*N'o report.
X Charge formedical service and medicine included in accounts given.




131

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
receipts of the marine hospital fund, 5fc.—-Continued.

•

• 0 '
.0

bb
fl
"E

o

fl

p .

to
Jfl

X

<u

•fl

CO

o

1^

'i

$$1,188 00
44 50

$22 25

1 232 50

22 25

305 80

234 80

48 00

24 CO
329 80

249 20

1,389 95

250 00

223 70

750
270
22
58

00
65
75
00

162 15

5 045 52 1 1,351 40

•

482 28

1

0

12
45
00
00

-fl
0

il

«.-

0.
>i

•

5'"'

i

=3

$12 18
80

14 40

1,221 25

0
0

13 35

1,173 25

>
H

1

1

•S

$13 ,35

2 719
613
56
267

>>

><

CD

3

•fl
rt

rt

' $30 00

'a.

5

$1,230 18
80 90

$924 CO
8 06

$35 50

12 98

30 0 0 ' 1

5

1,311 08

9"52 06

17 67

1

18 00

3

1,785 02
87*26'

659 91
23 97
50 56

1,872 28

734 44

86
35 50

18 00

.3

47 00
78
00
07 ""12*60
04

7

18 53

18 6i3
36
• 884
1
4

16 83
79 60

1 ,882 28

2'

3,715
892
108
408

05
94
65
64

143 67
1,105
95
257
505
28
7

34
34
46
76
83
04

69 36

59 00

9

7,007 56

2,163 44

^
7,478 65

1,123 39

687 44

,94 42

153 00

17

9,536 90

1,273 28

7,478 65

1,123 39

687 44

94 42

153 00

17

9,536 90

1,273 35

t i , 6 6 8 24
2,564 08

250 66
500 00

'i67 48
'

12.58
32 96

66 00

' 11

"'i*276'82
3,330 52

3,573 32

750 00

" 167 48

45 54

66 00

11

4,601 34

177

17 318 64
t23 15

2,066 60

2,372 83

410 97
23

240 00

49

22,240 04
23 38

8 873 33
93 O'J

2,372 83

411 20

240 00

49

22,263 42

8,966 35

i i 4 25
3 00

50 70
7 63
13

66 00
6 00

11

162 52

5,093 83
771 56
13 13

837 88
259 96
24 18

5 468 29 j

102 52

117 25

58 46

72 00

12

5,878 52

1 122 02

t343
247
4,094
4.037

29
43
47
16

6 00

1

76 50
750 00

359 74

6'66

i"\

3.52
401
5,265
4,113

232
435
1,G54
2,155

8,122 35

826 50

433 24 1 _ 3 25 1

•

'. '

17,341 79 j 2,066 60
}4,977 13
481 16
^10 00

J

•
73 56




3"2.5'

3
3
.52
40

177 40

1

49
97
13
7
W
.

36 00

6

100 32

48 00

8

"
•

^

78
40
.59
89

10,133 66

4J0

93
.15
97
10

4,468 35

132

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 11.—Statement of the expenditures and
I

1
Agents,

Districts.

o •
-S
fl

S
c

1
m

Mode of accommodation.

Rate per week.

a
a-'

m

MICHIGAN.

333

^ 450

431

14

14

445

193

1.79

193

179

100

Robert W . Davis*
Jacob A. T. Wendell*

323
10

464

...,
•.

299
10
309

Detroit .;
Michilimackinac

130

Hospital
Private board

$ 3 00

ILLINOIS,

Bolton F . Strother*
Altonf

Hosoital

.,..•
Daniel W a n n

.........

$3 00 to ,$4.0C..

Private board

.Quincyf
Cairof
Peoriaf

.-

INDIANA.

Charles Denby
Madisonviilef.

i....

.....

IOWA.

William Stotts

Keokukf
JDubuquef

WISCONSIN.

George W . Clason*

Milwaukie

S t / M a r y ' s Hospital
and private board.

MINNESOTA,

Minnesota!

......

ARKANSAS.

Napoleon

A. A. Edington

Hospital

• ...

MISSOURI.

St. Louis
Hannibalf

•.

D.H.Donovan."

756

744

756

744

90

86

90

;

> 86

Hospital.......,;..

.

KENTUCKY.

Lonisviile
Paducah
Hickmanf
Col um busf

, ...T.,

W. N. Haldeman*
Wm. Nolen

TENNESSEE.

Nashvilief
Memphis
Knoxvillef
Chaitanoogaf

,

Jesse T h o m a s
Henry T . Hulbert . . . . . . . . .

* Reports of new agents included.




Private board

,..

fNo foil report.

$3 50

,..

133

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
•

r

receipts of the marine hospital fund, b^c.—Continuecl.

1

to

>

o

m

t»
bO

.5

s

03
•fl

<U
OD

•1

• ""o

c

o

>

1

1

o

i

>-(

a>

' '5,
o

s

c
3

O

ll

G
a>
C

o
a

bn

fl-

CQ

$5,114 48 $1,500 00"
57 45
69 42

$509 25

1,557 45

509 25

5,183 90

$71 82
1 33

.

$60 00
6 00

10
1

$7,255 55
134 20

$1,898 46
•
202 60

73 15

66 00

11

7,389 75

2 101 06

54 00

9

6,8G8 08

1,000 02

518 53

84 89

782 93

273 13

149 23

12 05

7,691 01

1,273 15

667 76

96 94

5, .316 54

666 66

260 26

62 49

260 26

62 49

8,565 5 2 ' . 2,137 32
1,217 34

54 00

9

994 99

* * * 86 • 3,132 31
9,782
' 6,305 95

163 05

6,305 95

...

163 05

'
5,316 54

660 66

.. .
42 00
42 00

2,286 52

907 00

109 40

$2 50

33 41

36 00

6

3,374 83
'

•

••••

1,142 22

/

•- 1,744 92

250 00

98 76

24 00

24 00

4

2,117 68

8,807 85

750 G
O

861 73

104 63

12 09

15

10,536 21

5.163 05

8,807 85

750 00

861 73

104 63

12 00

15

10,536 21

.5,163 05

128 00
83 50

16
10

l1,420 90
7,638 82

1,279 87
379 15

1,702 16

•

8,657 74
5,534 52

1,500 00
1,287 50

1,022 09
657 47

113 07
75 83
•

43 14
•14,192 26

2,787 50

1,679 56

188 90

211 50

26

19,059 72

1^222 50}

12 71

49 50

11

1,284 71

172 50
766 18

1,222 50

12 71

49 50

11 '

1,284 71

938 68

"
\ Charge for medical service and medicine included.




134

EEPORT OF THE FINANCES. . No. 11.—Statement of the expenditures and
•

"O

<u

W)

"s

Agents.

Districts.

•5
a;

1
WASHINGTON

ra
fl

o

• '5

i Modeof accommo1
dation.

Rate per week.

E

s
CQ

TER.

C3

M. H. F r o s t *

Puget's S o u n d . . . . . . . . .
OREGON,

~ ~
John Adair*
Barclay J . Burns
Benjamin Brattain*

Oregoiif
Cape Perpetua f
Port Orfordf

•

;.,
;.

CALIFORNIA.

San Fr.inciscd . . . . . . . .
Sacramenlof. . . . , , . . . .
Sail Diegof
i
Monterey t
San Pfcidrot .

111

Benjamin F, Washington*.
Timothy B, Storer* . . . . . . . .
L e w i s Satiders
,
Henry Hancock
.lames A. Watson
Patriok H. D o w n e y . . . . . . .

J.

• Reports of new agents included.




Hospital

,\

111
1

108

108

1

fNo full report.

135

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
receipts of the marine hospital fund, Sfc.—Continued.
bb

c
fl
c
•o

o
.

a

•>

a

"a

-fl

1

g

i

i

. i
'3

tp

>
rt

ca

be
rt
fl
t)

o
O

c3
fl
G

$335 50

$33,520 OOJ

"o
o

1

.1
X
• <y

re

1

o

c

.s

£

s

c
3

flu

2

fl

6

$30 00

$33,885 50

. >,
C

o

rt *••

"5,
o
K

$605 65

....
129 70
10 22
^ 37 41
177 33

$5,583 25 $3,631 95
30,810 73 •

402 38

602 00

30

4.1,030 32

''10,244 42
77 73

.. .^122 60
10 70
10 60
25 19

•
30,810 73

5,583.26

3,631 95

402 38

602 00 -

^0

41,030^32

10,391 24

\ Charge for medical service and medicine included.
L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPAJITIIIENT, Register's Office, November 23, 1861.




136

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
A.

.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

..

Fi/rst AudAtoi-'s Office, November 27, 1861.
SIR : I have tlie lionor to submit the following report of the operations of
this office for the fiscal year ending June 3 0 , 1 8 6 1 :
V

RECEIPTS.

Accounts adjusted.

Amount.

Aggregate of receipts

1,407
324

S39,994,70o 03
37,269 00

13

730 00

1,744

Collectors of customs
.^^.
Collectors, under steamboat act
Collectors, under act *' to regulate the carriage of
passengers"

40,032,704 03

698

:,537,012 48

1,200

697,801 19

13

4,446 3 ^

217

129,629 85

23
791
14

1,625 76
934,015 02
2,457,748 60

783

18,829,741 30

64

37,948 39

144
1

27,475 94
1,022 01

916

416,613 5 1 '

22
263
334

21,492 04
'406,911 08
311,658 40

3
171

14,019 13
• 242,927 80
28,182 16

DISBURSEMENTS.

Collectors and disbursing agents of the treasury..,
Official emoluments of collectors, naval officers,
and surveyors
•
Additional compensation of collectors, naval officers, and surveyors
Accounts for duties illegally exacted and in satisfaction of judgments rendered in United States
circuit courts
,.
'
Accounts for net proceeds of unclainied merchandise duties exacted on damaged merchandise,
and for storage and fees illegally exacted
The judiciary
Interest on public debt
Treasury notes for redemption, and received in
payment of duties and other public dues, (va,rious acts,).
Claims for property lost in the military, service of
the United States
Inspectors of steam-vessels, for travelling expenses, &c
Redemption of United States stock, loan of 1846..
Salaries of officers of the civil list paid directly
from the treasury
Superintendents of life-saving stations on the coast
of the United States
Superintendents of lights
'
Agents of marine hospitals..--.,.
Support, &c, of the. penitentiary of the District
. of Columbia
:
Commissioner of Public Buildings..'
,
Support
,..
 of insane asylum of Washington


No. of
accounts.

137

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
A—Continued^
No of
accounts.

Accounts adjusted.

Contingent expenses of the Senate and House of
Representatives, and of the departments of the
government
Coast survey
-— *
«
—
Treasurer of the United States for pay and mileage of the members of the Senate and the House
of Representatives
Designated depositaries for additional compensation . . . —
i
, Treasurer of the United States, for general receipts
and expenditures^
Construction and repairs of public buildings, &c...
Territorial accounts
Disbursing clerks for paying salaries
Mint accounts
..:..........
Payments for patents withdrawn.
Disbursing agent California land commission
Accounts for payments to creditors of the republic of Texas
Accounts of public printers and of contractors for
furnishing paper for public printing, and for
binding and engraving, &c
Miscellaneous accounts
— .

Amount.

309
25

$1,077,835 02
623,879 60

6

2,155,172 51

17

3,012 30

5
411
43
246
54
4
4

99,580,758 87
1,021,143 19
167,718 70
• 1,863,036 45
58,064,812 09
36,106 66
7,052 78

Number of reports and certificates recorded
Number of letters recorded
Acknowledgments of accounts written..'

9,086 67

133
524

770,117 65
7,380,749 80

7,461

Total.

15

201,860,753 25
7,249
...
727
^... 3,628
11,604

D . . W . MAHON,
Acting Auditor.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

B.
' ^

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,'

Second Auditor^s Office, November 19, 1861.
SIR : I have the honor to transmit the following statement of *the operations
of this office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861, showing the number of
money accounts settled, the expenditure embraced therein, the number of property accounts examined and adjusted, together with other duties pertaining to
the business of the office.




138

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The number of accounts settled is 2,002, embracing an expenditure
$10,201,282 80, under the following heads of appropriations, viz :
Pay department
$4,983,087
Indian afii'airs
1
3,169,429
Ordnance department
.«.
1,282,361
Medical department
:
.'... ^
66,507
Quartermaster's department
15,327
Recruiting service .."
— .
49,919
State and private claims
631,061
Printing book of field artillery
:
3,199
Contingent expenses,'of adjutant general's department'
389

of
38.
80
05
27
44
42
59
01
84

; 10,201,282 80
Property accounts examined and adjusted
Private claims suspended or rejected
Requisitions registered, recorded, and posted
.•
Dead and discharged soldiers registered
.
"
Letters, accounts, &c., received, briefed, and registered
Letters written, recorded, indexed, and mailed
Certificates of military .service issued to Pension Office

,
s
1

4,835
-374
1,791
3,895
1,791
7,149
365

In addition, the following statements and reports were prepared and transmitted .from this office, viz :
Annual statement of Indian disbursements, prepared for Congress, for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, comprised in 450 sheets foolscap.
Annual statement of the ''recruiting fund," prepared for the adjutant general
of the United States army.
Annual statement of the " contingencies of the army," prepared, in duplicate,
fo..r the Secretary of War.
.
/
Annual statement of the " contingent expenses" of this office, prepared and
transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
Annual reports of balances on books of this office remaining for more than one
and three years unaccounted, to,First Comptroller of the Treasury.
Quarterly reports of balances to the Second Comptroller.
Annual report of the clerks and others employecl in this office for the year
1860, transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury.
The bookkeeper's register shows the settlement of 1,278 ledger accounts
which have been journalized and posted in the ledgers, which, as well as those
for the appropriations, have been duly kept up.'
By reference to the monthly reports from this office made to your department
since the close of the fiscal yoar, it will appear that there has been a constant
and rapid increase of its business beyond the capacity of my present clerical
force to perform, and that in some of its divisions there is an accumulation of
unsettled claims. This has been unavoidable.
The present clerical force in this office was intended to be and is' only adequate to the prompt settlement of the current business arising under the peace
establishment of the army, demanding an annual expenditure of twelve or fourteen millions 6f dollars. It is limited by law to one chief clerk, eleven clerks of
the third class, seven of the second, and three of the first.
During the Mexican war and for several succeeding years the force was
increased to forty-nine clerks, and yet the business fell sadly in arrears, and the
delay attendant' upon the adjustment of claims and debts against the government was the occasion of great inconvenience and injustice to claimants and
creditors.




- ,

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

•

139

The true interest of the government, as well as justice to claimants, demand
that settlements should be made promptly and without delay. To accomplish
this object a sufficient force of competent accountants should be employed to
prevent an accumulation of claims in the office.
If the increase of the army and its expenses during the Mexican war created
a necessity for more than doubling the number of clerks in this office, it will be
apparent that the business growing out of the employment of an army of half a
million of men, and the disbursement of three or four hundred millions of dollars
per annum, will require a much larger clerical force in the offices auditing war
accounts and claims.
The business of this office in the settlement of paymasters' accounts, accounts
for recruiting, for ordnance and ordnance stores," property and clothing, the
claims for discharged and deceased soldiers, and in addition the accounts of Indian disbursements, the labor of examining the rolls and making report to the
Pension-Office in all applications for pensions, of both the regular and volunteer
force, also devolves upon this office.
• •
In view of the recent increase of the business, I believe that within the next
six months at least fifty additional clerks will be necessary to perform the cur" rent work of the office, and I hope that you may deem it proper to urge upon
Congress the necessity of authorizing such a temporary increase of the clerical
force as a prompt adjustment of claims may require.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
E . B. F R E N C H , Second Auditor.
Hon.

S. P. CPASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

•

•
Third Auditor's Office, November 29, 1861.
SIR :' I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of
this office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861:
BOOKKEEPER'S DIVISION..

The total amount of requisitions on the treasury registered during the year
was $18,619,622' 26.
.•
Of this sum the advances to disbursing officers, charged to their
personal accounts on the books-of this office, amounted to. .• $18,506,802 47
And on account of military contributions
18,210 60
In payment of claims, including acts for the relief of individuals,
and charged to the respective appropriations
94,609 19
18,619,622 26
REPAYMENTS.

Amount
Amount
Amount
Amount

of counter-requisitions by transfer.
of deposits in the tre.asury
of treasury drafts cancelled
of treasury warrants cancelled




.
^

$746,198
980,812
238,088
'8

25
63
93
87

1,965,108 68

140

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
SETTLEMENTS.

Amount of accounts settled out of advances made and charged
to disbursing officers and agents
"
$12,657,121 87
Of accounts appertaining to military contributions, act March
3, 1849
.^.
432 41
Of claims, including acts for the relief of individuals
94,609 19
'

.

12,752,163 47

A more detailed account. of the character and amount of busines^s transacted
will be found in the following brief statement of the operation of the various
subdivisions of the office:
QUARTERMASTER'S DIVISION.

During the year there were received and registered 731. quartermaster's
accounts, involving an expenditure of $5,837,378 26. During the same period
722 accounts were examined and adjusted, involving an expenditure of
$4,459,691 57; leaving unsettled on the SOth of June, 1861, "213 accounts, as
follows:
Remaining unsettled June 30, 1860
204
Received during the fiscal year
731
Number for settlement
Settled during the year

935
722

Total number unsettled

213

Nearly all of which are accounts of, officers who claimed balances due them
on rendering their accounts, and therefore were suspended for explanations, or.
for some other cause requiring explanation before a settlement could be made.
Five hundred and two property accounts have been received and settled during
the year. Thirty-five property accounts, remaining unsettled June 30, 1860,
have also been adjusted, leaving* none on hand at the close of the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1861.
SUBSISTENCE DIVISION.

In this division there were examined and adjusted 588 quarterly accounts of
officers disbursing in the commissary department, involving an expenditure of
$1,773,953 42.. On the 30th of June there remained on hand unsettled fortyseven accounts, involving the suin of $153,249 89.
ENGINEER DIVISION.

The number of accounts of officers of the army and of civil agents disbursing under the special direction of the War^. Department, and of
engineer, and topographical engineers, and civil agents disbursing
under the direction of the respective ^ bureaus,. received during the^
year was
.'
Number on hand at the beginning of the year
Total



'.

168
39.
207

REPORT OF THE FINANCES.
There were adjusted during the year
And submitted to the War Department

141
191
3
194

Leaving on hand unadjusted

'

13

The 191 accounts examined and adjusted during the yeair in-'
volved an expenditure of
$2,121,175. 91
Add amount involved in special settlements
1,373 43
2,122,539 39

PENSION DIVISION.

The number of accounts of pension agents received during the year w a s . .
On hand at the beginning of the year
Total for settlement

213

Of which there were examined and adjusted during the year.

^ 204

Leaving on hand unadjusted

9

Claims for arrearages due deceased pensioners, and for pensions due and
unclaimed for a period exceeding 14 months
Of these were settled
Suspended and disallowed
The amount of disbursements involved in the pension agents'
accounts settled was •
Amount of claims settled.

193
20

329
251
78

$994,957 28
14,261 83

BOUNTY LAND AND SOLDIERS' CLAIM DIVISION.

During the year 471 communications relating to pay, pension, and bounty
land claims w^re duly investigated and disposed of, including claims of widows
and orphans, under acts of March 16, 1802, April 16, 1806, and the first section
of act of March 3, 1853, (McRae's volunteers,) which are executed in this office.
Of the entire number of claims presented 19 were allowed, involving the sum of
$1,519 85.. Of bounty land claims 5,412 were examined and returned to the
Commissioner of Pensions; also 98 invalid and half-pay pension cases, all of
which were accompanied by the necessary certificates of service, or otherwise,
as the facts required.
'
MISCELLANEOUS DIVISION.

In this division 335 claims were received and registered, and of" these and
others previously filed 501 Avere reported on. Many of these claims were for
horses and other property lost or destroyed in the military service of the United
States, and which come to this office for adjustment agreeably to the provisions
of an act passed^3d March, 1849. Others were of a special character, arising




142

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

in various branches of the military service, and which, having received the administrative examination and approval of the proper bureau in the War Department, were sent to the accounting officers for settlement, whilst still others A\^ere
directed to be paid under special acts of Congress. In many of these cases investigations were necessary, requiring much time and labor. The claims re-"
ported on involved the sum of $445,757 12, of which $228,336 74 was'allowed
and paid.
COLLECTION DIVISION.

The duties of this branch are to prepare transcrips for suit, superintend the
collection of balances due from officers who have ceased to disburse, and conduct
the correspondence connected therewith. During the year various causes' transpired to some extent interrupting the business of the branch; some collections
were made, but owing to the interruption to legal proceedings in a number of
States but few cases have been put in suit. The branch has been reorganized,
and is progressing satisfactorily.
^,
- '
In addition to the 'miscellaneous business transacted, the total number of accounts settled during the year was 2,207, and the number remaining on hand
unsettled was 283. The number of letters written on the business of the office,
and recorded, was 3,884.
From the foregoing it will be seen that the regular, business of this office is in
a satisfactory condition. Very few arrearages exist,, and these are generally of
a character that required delay before final action.
On the 2d March, 1861, Congress passed an act directing the settlement and
payment of the expenses incurred by the authorities of Oregon and Washington
Territories in suppressing Indian hostilities therein during the years 1855-'56.
By this act the Third Auditor was directed to examine and audit the claims, and
they were directed "to be paid upon the principle, and agreeably to the rates for
services, supplies, transportation, and so'forth, allowed and reported by the
Third Auditor of the Treasury in his report of the 7th February, 1860." The
amount of the claims, as ascertained and reported by a commission appointed
by the Secretary of War under the authority of Congress, Avas $6,011,457 36,
but this was reduced to less than one-half, in the report of the Third Auditor,
as above—Congress, in the act providing for the settlement and payment, appropriating $2,800,000. Considerable progress has been made in the execution of
the act. Cliu'tns to the amount of about $3,000,0^0 have been filed to this date,
and final nction has been had on claims amounting to $1,093,465, on which
awards have been made for payment to the extent of $501,671.
In preparing these claims for an award it is necessary to verify the certificates
and scrip presented by the parties claimant, as evidences of their clainis, with
the original claims as acted on by the commissioners and the Third Auditor,
ascertaining the amounts allowed agreeably to the report of the Third Auditor
to,Congress, and which was adopted by that body, after which an award is made
in favor of each .claimant for the amount allowed. On the basis of this award
of the Third Auditor an account is stated, in the usual form, which is reported
*to the Second Comptroller in order that a requisition rbay issue by the Secretary
of War on the Secretary of the Treasury for the amount due and payable in
money or bonds, as authorized by the act. This scrutiny and preparation of
each claim involve much investigation and lab or,, but could not be dispensed
Avith, having regard to the interests of the government as well as the rights of
individual claimants. Six clerks are constantly employed on this business, and
it is confidently expected that in a short time they Anil be able to prepare the
claims for final action as fast as received.
A special act Avas also passed, on March 2, 1861, referring to the Third Auditor of the Treasury the claims of the State of California for reimbursement




REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

/

143

of certain expenses incurred by her in the suppression of Indian hostihtie?
therein, and an appropriation of $400,000 made to coA^er any aAvard that miglit
be made. The papers relating, to these claims were only filed in this office a
short time ago, and are now undergoing examination.
The regular business of this office the present fiscal year will be largely aiigmented by the great increase in the army and the expenditures connected thereAvith. As has been seen, the requisitions on the treasury, out of appropriations
entered on the books of this office, and the accounts for the disbursement of.
Avhich come here for settlement, amounted, in the aggregate, during the last
fiscal year, to the sum of $18,506,802 47. By an examination it appears that,
in five months of the present fiscal year, up to ' this date, requisitions to the
amount of $71,914,705 73 have already been registered here, being at the rate .
of $170,000,000 per annum. This ratio Avill probably be increased, rather than
diminished, during the remainder of the year. Some idea may thus be formed
0^ the incre'ased responsibilities, and duties thrown upon the office. In reflecting upon this, the suggestion arises whether application should not be made for
an increase of the clerical force. The number, of clerks now attached to this
office is sixty. This number has been considered ample for the discharge of the
duties by law committed to its charge; indeed, I am not prepared to say that
if additional duties had not been imposed the number might not have been
reduced. There are, hoAvever, several branches in Avhich there has been some
diminution of business. In the pension branch, having charge of the accounts
of pension agents, and -claims for arrearages of pensions, and unclaimed pensions, there has been a reduction, in consequence of the discontinuance of such
business in a portion of the United States. The same causes have operated, to
a'dess extent, hoAA^ever, in the engineer branch. In the bounty land branch the
number of cases received from the Pension Office, for examination of the rolls
for sel'vices rendered in the A ^r of .1812, has also been diminishing. To some
Aa
extent, 'therefore, clerks may be Avithdrawn from these branches and transferred
to duty in the quartermaster and subsistence branches, where the • heaviestincrease will occur. So far there has been no lack of force; but few of the
heavy accounts of quartermasters and commissaries of subsistence have yet
reached the office. These accounts are rendered quarterly to the proper bureaus
in the War Department, where they receive administrative examination and
approval before they are sent to this office for settlement. By law the disbursing officers are alloAved three months in which to prepare and render their
accounts for settlement, and more or less delay usually occurs in the bureaus of
the W^u* Department in the administrative examination aboVe referred to.
Hence, the accounts for the quarter ending 30 th June last are not required
to be rendered to this office before the 1st October; and oAving to the great
pressure of business in the military bureaus, it is probable that more than ordinai:y delay may occur in'transmitting the accounts to the tred^sury.
It is always desirable th^t accounts for the disbursement of public money
should be rendered and settled promptly, and with as little delay as possible.
Especially 'is this the case when so many officers come into the service without
previous experience and for a short period of time, as after their retirement it is
much more difficult to obtain explanations or further evidence when required, as
well as to collect any balances that may be found to be due to the United States
on final settlement, than while in the service. These considerations all weigh
in favor of precautionary measures being taken to prevent an undue accumulation of accounts. Although, as before stated, no emergency exists at present
requiring an increase of the clerical force, yet it is quite possible that the
exigencies of the service may require it before the close of the fiscal year or
during the next -year, the appropriations for Avhich will be made at the coming
session of Congress. I Avould therefore respectfully recommend that authority



144

/

REPORT O.N THE FINANCES.

be obtained fpr the employment of ten additional clerks, to be used or not, as
the wants of the office may require.
It is probable that, in a short time, some large claims of. States, for expenses
incurred by them on account of tlieir troops called into the service of the United .
States, will be presented for settlement and payment. It is knoAvn that large
expenditures have been incurred by the loyal States in organizing, arming,
equipping, &c., for the field their respective quotas of militia called into sei'Adce
•by proclamation of the President, as AA^CU. as A^olunteers raised under acts of
Congress. A large portion of these expenditures Avere incurred at a time Avhen
the general government Avas utterly unable, for want of appropriations or money, .
to meet them; and the State authorities ^ came forAvard to its relief, thereby
relieving the government of the pecuniary liability, for the time being, and
putting into the field, with unexampled rapidity, a force completely equipped
and armed, equal to the emergency. At the special session of Congress an act
was passed 'authorizing and directing the Secretary of the Treasury to pay*.to
the States, respectively, the costs, charges, and expenses properly incurred by
them in behalf of the government on account of their troops'called into the service of the United States to aid in suppressing the present insurrection, the
accounts and vouchers therefor to be "filed and passed upon by the proper
accounting officers of the treasury." Under this act a series of rules and regulations relative to the preparation and settlement of claims A ^s approved by
Aa
you, and has been transmitted to the governors of the States known to have
incurred expenditures of this description.
The States of Indiana, Illinois, Maine, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, New
Jersey, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, loAva, New Hampshire, and
Rhode Island hhve each receiA^ed an advance of .40 per centum on amounts expended by them, witliout a settlement of their accounts or the presentation" of
the vouchers; it being stipulated in each case, hoAvever, that vouchers shall be
furnished to the satisfaction of the accounting officers of the treasury, agreeably
to the rules and regulations prescribed in 'that behalf, before any further advance
or partial payment shall be apjDlied for from the government. These advances
amount to the sum of $4,514,078 51. Some difficulty has been apprehended
in'the settlement of these accounts, growing out of the peculiar circum-stances
in which they originated, the irregularity of proceeding in some cases, the Avant
of experience in the officers doing the business, and the complication naturally
resulting from.officers and agents acting on the part of the generah government,
as well as of individual States, making contracts and expenditures on account
of the same branches of the service and sometimes of the same troops.
On the 27th August I had the honor to submit to you some considerations
relative to difficulties Avhich might arise in the settlement of these accounts and •
claims, and I beg leave to repeat here, in this connexion, a part of the communication, as folloAvs:
" Prior to the meeting of Congress there was a necessity for such expenditures
being made by the States, in order to put their troops into the field with as
little, delay as possible, the general government being Avithout the appropriations
or means' to defray said expenses. At such a time, and under these circumstances, the several State authorities came forward and took upon themselves, in
a great degree, the burden of supplying, equipping, &c., their several quotas of
troops, trusting to Congress to make proAdsion for reimbursement of all such
expenditures as Avere necessary and proper a,nd for the benefit of the United
States. Accordingly, at the late special session of Congress an appropriation
of ten millions of dollars was made for that purpose, and aii act passed authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to pay to said States the amount" of expenditures made by them, on settlement and adjustment of their claims by the
proper accounting officers. Congress has also made ample appropriations for
every
branch of expenditure connected Avith the raising, arming, equipping,


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

145

subsisting, transporting, &c., all of the troops by law authorized to be called
into the service of the government; and it is• believed that the means to defray
said expenses are and will be ample and commensurate with every demand that
may properly arise. Under these circumstances it is respectfully submitted
. whether the State authorities, and all other authorities, municipal or otherwise,,
should not be apprised that hereafter, or as soon as practicable, the government
will, by its own officers, make provision for all such troops as may come into its
service; .^nd that it is not desired' any further contracts or liabilities should be
incurred on their behalf by the States, respectively, or by any agent or officers,,
except those duly authorized by the United States. ' In this way only can .
uniformity or system be obtained. The incurring liabilities and making expenditures indiscriminately, by agents or authorities not responsible to the government, .nor subject to its. control, opens the door to irregularities and confusion,
and precludes, in a great degree, that accountability and check which are essential to a proper economy and integrity. Moreover it is almost impossible to
avoid double payments Avlien bills are presented in such diversified forms and
mixed up in so many accounts, and it is very difficult for the accounting officers
to distinguish between expenditures made by United States and local officers
on account of arms, equipments, supplies, &c., for the various volunteers, and
thus detect duplicate claims, should any be presented.
The labors and responsibilities connected with the proper investigation and
settlement of these claims must necessarily be great. Some efforts have been
made to obtain a relaxation of the rules approved by you; and, indeed, it has
been suggested that the general government/ should refund Avhatever claims may
be presented, Avithout any restriction Avith i:egard to the character of the expen^ diture or the production of vouchers therefor. It is not at. all improbable that
this^ matter may engage the attention of Congress at the coming session.
Whilst the present legislation remains, hoAvever, and under the rules prescribed,
I shall deem it my duty to insist on the production of the original bills and
vouchers, as required by the rules, Avith a view to such examination as may be
considered necessary to a full understanding and verification of the claims, and
to the establishment of the fact that the expenses were '' properly incurred.'*
These claims involve, in the ^ aggregate, probably tAventy millions of dollars,
and if all these be added to the regular duties of this office, already shown to
haA^e been largely increased, it is obAdous that some delay must necessarily
occur in their investigation and adjustment.
-.
,
I take great pleasure in bearing testimony to the zeal, ability, and efficiency
manifested by the gentlemen attached to this office in their efforts to discharge,
with promptitude and accuracy, the duties by law imposed on this bureau.
L have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient' servant,
R. J . ATKINSON, Auditor.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

.

^

'

Secretary of the Treasury.

D.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Fourth Auditor's Office, November 2S,1S61.
SIR : I have the honor to submit the folloAving report of official operations of
this bureau during the fiscal year ending 30th June last:
First. The total.number of accounts audited during.the fiscal year ending on
the 30th day of June last is 649, embracing 291 reported and 358 certified, involving an expenditure of $11,366,623 under the following heads of appropriation:
E x . Doc. 2.-=—10



146

REPORT OF THE FINANCES.

Appropriations for pay of naA^y
Marine corps
Pensions
Total

"..
'
.'

$10,374,657
794,317
^ 197,649

-

11,366,623

Second. The number of requisitions for money issued during the same period
of time is 843, involving an aggregate amount of $14,276,061 56.
Third. The number of transfer and refunding requisitions is 160, involAdng
an aggregate of $1,240,510 26.
Fourth. The number of letters received and registered was 5,434. The number of letters written and recorded is 5,521. The number of official reports on
public business is forty-one.
, Fifth. The number of allotments for pay, granted and entered upon the b9oks
of this office, is 2,219.
Sixth. The number df bounty land cases reported is 357, besides a large number of return cases for re-examination, which Avere promptly revised.
At the close of each quarter of the year a report was made to the Second
Comptroller, exhibiting the names of those disbursing agents of the Navy Department who had failed to render their accounts within the period prescribed
by the act of January 31, 1823, showing also the nature and extent of the default in each case.
Quarter-annual reports are made to the honorable Secretary of the Navy,
showing the amount which had been passed to the credit of the navy hospital
fund, on the books of this,office.
A report has been made to the honorable Secretary of the Navy, showing in
detail the items of expenditure charged to the appropriation for the contingent
expenditures of the navy.
A statement is now in preparation, and AAdll shortly be transmitted to the
honorable Secretary of the Navy, of the amount received' during the year by
each officer of *the navy and marine corps on account of pay, rations, travelling
expenses, servants, forage, quarters, &:c.
.. A^^plications by seamen for admission into the naval asylum at Philadelphia
were numerous. As a service of twenty years is required as a qualification to
entitle an applicant to such priAdleges, and as the service is in many instances
performed .at interA^als of time, extending through a period of thirty-five or forty
years, much time has been occupied in the examination of such cases.
It may be. proper for me to add, at-the close of this report, that for a portion
of this time the clerical force of. the office, limited as it is, was far from complete.
Owing to resignations, some branches of business to a certain extent Avere thrown
into the present fiscal year.
It may not be inappropriate for' me to state that since the close of the last
fiscal year the duties of this office have more than doubled.
Every branch of the naval service having been greatly augmented, the additional labor imposed has been correspondingly great.
I have the honor to be, su', very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H O B A R T BEMAN.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

.

E.
TREASURY DEPARTMEXNT,

Fifth Auditor's Office, November 29, 1861.
SIR
 : In accordance with the direction contained in your letter of this date, I


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

147

have the honor to report that during the fiscal year ending J^ne 30, 1861, there
was adjusted in this office, and transmitted to the First Comptroller of the
Treasury for his revision," one thousand three hundred and ninety-five (1,395)
accounts of the various kinds by law referred to this office for adjustment, and
during the same year the number of letters written in relation to these accounts
and the business of the office amounted to three thousand one hundred and one, (3,101.)
Appended.to this report are four statements-, marked respectively A, B, C,
and D.
Statement A exhibits the amount of salaries paid to each of the consular officers mentioned in schedules Band C of the act of August 18,1856, "to regulate
the diplomatic and consular systems of the United States" for the year ending
December 31, 1860. Statement A also shoAvs the loss by exchange of' the
United States in paying consular salaries.
These several items sum up as follows:
Salaries of 125 consula,r offices
Loss in exchange in payment thereof
Total
Fees received by these officers

,

$250,714 19
8,809 08

,.

LeaAdng as a charge on the treasury

259,523 27
99,113 23
.^,

160,410 04

I regret to be obliged to state that some of our consulates seem to have been
' exposed to considerable peculation from our OAvn agents and officers.
Although these officers are required by law to report quarterly, I found on
entering upon the duties of this office that the last salary report of the consul
of so important a port as Liverpool, was made March 31, 1858, and that the
consul then acknowledged a balance in his hands of $2,929 83., Since then he
had. strangely been permitted to hold on without reporting, spending all the
funds he could reach, neglecting the payment of claims for food, clothing, and
medical attendance of our sick and destitute seamen; and by a course of plunder and profligacy unequalled in our consular history, contracting public and
private debts, Avhich I am informed by a neighboring consul probably exceed
two hundred thoiisand dollars. It is perhaps some consolation to know that
this plunderer no longer disgraces the government abroad; but like the late
minister to Spain, who, of all our foreign ministers, manifested the greatest
affection for extra allowances, has found a kindred and coiigenial association in
^the ranks of the rebel conspiracy. .Justice to my predecessor requires me to
add that reports were made to the proper authorities of the delinquencies of the
consul to Liverpool, without producing any decided action.
Some of the consulates on the Pacific coast and islands need investigation
and reform. In four of these consulates the disbursements for the relief of
seamen duping the year embraced in the last report from this office exceeded
$114,000, and Avere about $8,000 more than the disbfirsements of all our other
consulates reported during the same year.
In my judgment the appointment of an efficient consul general for the islands
and coast of the Pacific, with a salary of four or five thousand dollars, would,
.by stopping the Avholesale robbery practiced under cover of our humane provisions for sick and destitute seamen, save to the treasury ten times the amount it
would cost,
By the experience and. assistance of my efficient chief clerk, we have made
some diminution in this class of expenditures during the past year, reducing the
gross amount from $220,670 30 to $177,738 17; thus saAdng to the treasury



148

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

, $42,932 13 in the* year. But Ave haA^e been unable to effect a radjcal cure of
the chronic difficulty. I n these distant consulates there are both temptations
and facilities for procuring fictitious vouchers, and the correctness^of papers on
the face is generally in proportion to the enormity of the frauds they.cover.
Nothing short of the supervision of an officer of capacity and competent authority Avill be able to complete the necessary reform. When by proper safeguards
our consuls shall be relieved from all temptation to devise Avays and means to,
reach the treasury b y fraudulent vouchers, they Avill have more time to attend
to thei^' legitimate duties, and Ave shall have reason to expect that the real
wants of our seamen will be better supplied and the receipts for seamen's Avages
will be increased.
,
•
The other statements hereto appended are of the usual kind, and have no
peculiar characteristics.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
. J O H N C. UNDERWOOD,
'
. Auditor^
' Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

Statement of the amount of salaries and loss in exchange paid to and fees
received from the consular officers of the United Stajtes, mentioned in schedules
B and C, of the act of August 18, 1846, ^^to regulate the diplomatic and
consular systems of the United States," for the year ending December 31, 1860.

No.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Consulates—Avhere located.

Athens
Amsterdam . . 1.
Acapulco..'. —
AntAverp
Aix-la-Chapelle .
Amoy —
Apia.
Aux C a y e s . . . ' .
Amoor River..:.
AspiiiAvall
Alexandria

$1, 000 00
942 43
1, 495 00
2,500 00
2, 500 do
3, 000 00
495 28
500 00
1, 000 ^00
2,581 52
3, 500 00

Loss in exchange.

[2 40
53 87
58 85
369 35

Fees.

$9 00
384 07
454 .90
377 53
455 00
155 OQ
412
17
2,088
81

14
50
59
00

B.

12 Beirut
13 Basle
,
14 Bahia-.
15 Batavia
16 Bay of Islands.
17 Bordeaux . . . . .
IS Belfast
19 Buenos A y r e s . .

20 Bremen


Salaries.

2,000 00
2,000 00
1,000 00
997 25
1,335 15
2,000 00
2, 000 00
2,000 00
2, 000 00

115 91
61 70
25 21
95 35

60 96
1,033 25.
243 68
223 06
. 286 34
1, 853 78
2,559 46

1,731 6b
586 65

149

EEPOET ON THE FINANCES
A.—Statement of the amount of salaries, 8fc,—Continued.
* Consulates—where located.

Salaries.

Loss in exchange.

Fees.

C.
Cadiz
Candia
Carthagenia —
Cape Haytien..
Constantinople .
Calcutta
Cobija
Canton
Cape T o w n . . .
Cyprus
Cork
Callao

$721
3
277
209
150
772
44
526
246
4
721
2,115

30
00
89
22
31
34
94
73
42
00
40
26

$1,500 00
1, 000 00
500 00
1,000 00
3,583-84
1,250 00
500 00
4,000 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
2,141 00
.3, 634 61

$52 27

2, 164 83
2,000 00

42 07

245 61
1,438 00

1,500 00

293 07

.78 34

422 18

639 81

41 51
44 88
58 01

D.
Demarara.
Dundee . .
E.
Elsinore
F.
Frankfort-on-the-Main.
Funchal
...
Foo-Choo
Fayal
Falkland Islands

,3,000 00
375 00
5, 440- 22
750 00
1,000 00

37 14
2, 393 94

417
97
249
435
54

00
00
60
85
14

G.
Genoa . . .
GlasgoAv .
Geneva . .
Guyaquil.

1, 500 00
3,000 00
1,500 00
663 46

Halifax
.
HaAa-e
Hamburg . .'
Havana — .
Honolulu . .
Hong Kong

1,926
7, 186
2,000
6,000
4,326
3,500

Jerusalem.

1, 720 55

63
79
00
00
08
00

19 93
31 67

562 34
3,220 91
185 00

161 55

62 07
10 68

7 32

29 73

1,180 37
5, 119 97
1,135 07
7,224 87
1,924 17
5,618 01
32 10

K.
52

Kingston




2,000 00

596 60'

150

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

A.—Statement of the amount of salaries, &^.—Continued.

No. Consulates—where located.

Salaries.

Loss in' exchange.

L.
53
54
55
56

57
58
59
60
61
62

Leipsic
La Rochelle
Laguayra...
Leeds
Lyons
Lahaina.
Lanthala
Leghorn . . .
Liverpool . .
London
M.
Montreal...
Munich
Malaga
Marseilles ..

63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76

Manchester.
MonroAda*'..
Montevideo
Maranhan . .
Matanzas...
Mauritius...
Melbourne..
Messina
Mexico

77
78
79

Nassau.
Naples.
Ningpo.

MOSCOAV . . ' . ,

$1,500
1,500
1,500
2,000
1,500
3,000
.250
1,500'

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$28 73
176 74

8 01
5 02
40 92
152 02

7,500 00
4,000 00
1,000 00
1,500 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
2,000 00
1, 000 00
750 00
1,000 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
4,000 00
1,'361 26
1,000 00

39 33
66 07

49 84

70 66

120 13
227 12
165 42

N.
2, 000- 00
1, 500 00
3,725 54

615 44

0.
Oporto.
Omoa..
Odessa.

1,500 00
1,000 00

83 Panama
,
84 Ponce, P. R
,
85 Para.
86 Prince Edward's I s l a n d . . .
87 Paso del Norte
88 Palermo .. -•
89 Porto au Prince
90 Porto Praya
91 Paris
92 Pernambuco
.93 Paita
..i


3,.500 00
i;500 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
500 00
1,500 00
2,000 00
750 00
5,000 00
778 13

80
81
82



90 17

22 74
16 42
69 94
68 88
4 84
91 09

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

151

A.—Statement of tlie amount of salaries^ (^.—Continued.
Consulates—where located.

Salaries.

R.
Rotterdam
Revel.
Rio de Janeiro
Rio Grande de Sul.

1^2,000 00
2,000 00
6,000 00
1,000 00

' " S.
San Juan
Stettin
Spezia
Stuttgart. St. Thomas
Sail Juan del Norte
Singapore
— ..
Santiago de Cuba-.
St. Domingo C i t y . .
Shanghai..:
Smyrna
Sabanilla
St. Paul de Loando.
St. Croix
St. Petersburg
Southampton

000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
000 00
500 00
500 00
500 00
000 00
000 00
607 02
000 00
750 00
000 00
000 00

Loss in exchange. .

Fees.

$39 17
278 85
281 00
23 17

%1, 192 32
1 00
2,940 72
685 78

65 45

188 53
43 00

20 00
25 74
117 74
554' 38
70 96
101 70
247 57

321 00
1,510 22
141 98
701 98
669 08,
80 36
1,896 86
628 80
337 16
il46 00
107 41
. 189 00
104 87

T.
Trieste
Tampico
Tumbez
Trinidad
Talcahuano
Tabasco
Tangiers
Tripoli
Tunis
Tahiti

:.

2,219 16
1,000 00
. 500 00
2,500 00
i;ooo 00
500 00
3,000 0 0
.
3,000 00
3,000 00
1,000 00

12 06

469 20
650 11
444 99
499 65
849 16
164 61
21 50

16 59

23 00
327 96

1,500 00
4,278 85
2,695 05
747"96

21 36
57 69
5 84

1,707 00
613 28
1,829 14
35 39

791 22

161 36

123 94

V.
Vienna
Vera Cruz
Valparaiso
Venice
Z.
Zanzibar




152

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Recapitulation.

T o t a l amount of salaries paid to consuls dmdng t h e
year ending December 3 1 , 1 8 6 0
$250, 714 19
T o t a l amount of loss in exchange paid on consular
.drafts for salary during t h e same pciriod
...
8, 809 08
, 5 2 3 27
T o t a l amount of fees returned b y said consular officers for the year ending December 3 1 , 1861
99, 113 23
A m o u n t paid b y t h e Treasur^er of the U n i t e d States •
for balances of salary during said period
160, 410 04
2 5 9 , 5 2 3 27
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

F i f t h A u d i t o r ' s Office, November 19, 1 8 6 1 .
NOTES.
2. Consul absent without leave 21 days ; no salary paid.
3. Mr. Emory allowed 30 days in receiving instructions and 26 days in transit, leaving
vacancy from March 31 to August 27.
7; J. C. Dirickson from November 26,1859, to April-24,. 1860 ; Mr. Wolfe from November 2 to December 1, 1860. No other returns.
10. C. J. Fox 12 days' salary for return transit.
15. One day absent Avithout leave ; no salary paid.
16. 150 days' transit to the post.'
25. 26 days' salary in receiving instructions and 84 days' transit to the post.
26. Returns not complete for three quarters.
31. 2.6 days' salary for return transit.
32. 14 days' salary for transit from Valparaiso to Callao.
33. 30 days' s'alary for receiving instructions.
37. No returns for second, third, and fourth quarters.
38. 204 days' salary for transit to the post.
44. Consul absent without leave 42 days ; no salary paid.
45. Consul absent without leave 27 days ; one-half the salary paid to the \dce consul.
46. 13 days allowed Mr. Vesey for return transit; 59 days allowed Mr. Grund for
recei\dng instructions and transit to his post.
49. 30 days allowed Mr. Parker fox receiving instructions ; 63 days allowed Mr. Page
for receiving instructions and transit to his post.
69. The returnsfor the three last "quarters of 1860 incomplete.
61. No returns.
70. No returns for the last quarter.
74. No returns of fees for third and fourth quarters.
75. $138 74 disallowed by order of Department of State for extra transit.
79. 89 days' salary for return transit.
82. No returns.
92. 16 days for receiving instructions and 60 days for transit to his post to Mr. Edes.
The returns from January 1 to October 26, 1860, incomplete.
93. Returns incomplete.
109. 78 days' salary for transit to Mr. Magi 1; $363 24 fees charged to (Consul, (besides
the above,) being fees of steamers who refused to pay them, which have not been
remitted to the consul.
^.
.
114. 40 days' .salary for return transit.
125. 22 days' salary for receiving instructions and 16 days' salary for transit to the post
to.Mr. J. T. Pickett; 43 days' salary for return transit to Mr. Twyman.
126. 11 days' salary for receiving instructions ; 43 days' salary for transit, and 8 days
waiting his exequator to Mr. James B. Gordon.
127. T day's salary disallowed, the consul being absent without leave.
128. No returns from January 1 to March 17, 1860.



153

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
B.

.

Statement showing the amount of money reported to have been disbursed for the
relief and protection of destitute American seamen, and for loss in exchange,
together with the amount of extra wages and other monies received on accouut
of said destitute seamen.
Name of consulate.

Disbursements.

Acapulco . Alicante...
Amoy.....
Antigua . . .
Antwerp
Aspinwall .
Apia. — .'.
Aux Cayes

$59
142
84
991
313
,454
,099
112

00
25
28
76
78
25
65
33

Bangkok . . . . . . .
Bahia
.
Barbadoes . . . .
Bay of Islands .
Bathurst...
Bristol

201
56
27
,111
89
919

61
00
05
51
60
68

Cadiz
Calcutta...
Callao
'
Cape Haytien.
Cape T o w n . . .
Cork
Cm^aQoa

26 25
12,218 67
77 50
348 10
' 402 81
76 60

Loss in exchange.

Receipts.

$72 00
105 00
233 58$41 82
366 00
45 00
1, 084 87'

84 00
49 19

870 40

3 39

737 90
107
591
2,769
48
306

00
32
97
98
84

24 03
23 00

Demarara.
Dublin,..

178 62
16 32

254 62
48 00

Elsinore.

195 25

33 27

Falmouth..
Fayal

181 92
5,670 02

2,552 11

Galatz
-Genoa
Gibraltar..
, Glasgow . .
Gottenberg.
Guayaquil.
Guaymas -..

30
212
490
168
8
415
202

Hakodadi..
Halifax . . .
Hamburg.."

290 46
557 91
1,007 17




44
80
54
00
63
25
87

3
48
75
198

00
00
00
00

35 00

1,353 80

154

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

B.—Statement showing the amount of money disbursed, ^c.—-Continued.
Disbursements.

Name of consulate.

Havana
Havre
Hilo...
Hobart Town
Hong ILong

. $3, 207
1, 101
2, 625
518
2,099

r

Honolulu

Laguayra
Lahaina .
Leeds 'A
Leghorn
Lisbon
Liverpool
London
Lyons

•

^ 26 11
25, 386 45
29 68
4
/ . . . ' 4,608
633
9

.-

Madeira

'•
.-

..'....

Naples
Nassau, B
."
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
PaitaPanama
Palermo
Para
Paris
Pernambuco
Pictou
. . . . ' . ..-^"
Plymouth
Port Louis, (Mauritius)
Prince Edward's Island
Rio Grande de Sul
Rio de Janeiro
Rotterdam
Sabanilla




Receipts.

$1, 361
921
292
72
513

I....

-

404
275
463
1,039
1,840
628
39
1,300
13

35
42
99
0000
50
85
22
90
17
45
09
15

45 00
1, 500 00

1, 759 71

201
264
2,006
591

75
10
77
00
62
90
58
15
85
00

1,004 10
1,663 01
212 41
42 9.0

00
00
95
38

78
345
746
690
832
30
1, 474

00
00
55
00
51
00
30

54
14 87
24 78
18 43

69 96
1,397 80
110 00
8,343
1,623
430
70
6
557
. 273
456
1,235
90

87
75
00
00
16

7,200 00

$1,569 18

33 75

Malp o-'i

Marseilles
Matanzas
Mazatlan
Melbourne
Monrovia
Montevideo
Montreal

37
62
25
56
19

33,750 72

Kingston, Jamaica

Loss in exchange.

45 00
135 00
810 00
145 00
105 00

19 36

669' 69

<
55 07
2 57

654 00

11 37

324 00
612 00
162 80

3 23

REPORT ^ON THE FINANCES.

155'

B.—Statement showing the amount of money disbursed, ^.—Continued.
Disbursements.

Name of consulate.

San Juan. P. R. .
ShanP'hai
Sydney, N. S. W
c./
•^' ^^- ^- *' - binffanore
Smvrna
St. Dominffo Citv •
St. Plelena
Santiap'o de Cuba
St. John, N B
St. John, N. F
St. Paul de Loando
St. Thom.as, W. I

.

.

. . .

35
2,471
.12,815
1,763
560
10,369
636

Tampico . . . . "
Tahiti
:
Tfilcaliuano '
Teneriffe
Trieste
Tumbez, (premium %555 87)
Turk's Islands

75
65
90
33
57
75
84

Receipts.

$679
141
1,281
1, 007

$101 99
233 56
66 62
13.81

Amount paid D. IT. Joubert for the
passage and subsistence of the
crew of the wrecked American
ship ''William and Eliza," from
Fortune Islands to Sydney
•

Fivopss of disbursements
Add loss in exchange $5,551 19
Less premium in exchange
555 87

54 00
7 85

889 50

221 36

146 11
258 00
1, 454 00

223 59
1, 380 00
171 00
916 50

844. 80
177, 738 17
43,662 22

43,662 22

5,551 19

134,075 95

4,995 32
139,071 27
There was paid for relief of seamen, in addition to the above,
by act of Congress of June 8,
1860, '' out of monies not otherwise appropriated," to the own-'
ers of the British bark *' Jessie,"
for relief of the crew of the
wrecked American ship " North irmbpvl an rl" thfi sum of



00
00
60
42

624 00
871 14

6,518 15
116 00

Valparaiso
Ve^ra Cruz

Total disbursements
Less receints

$2, 285- 25
' 978 72
4,272 81
1,629 21
366 00
359 00
1,597 27
38 20
37 71
42 21
. 21 07
912 38

>
Loss in ex-'
change.

•V

7, 788 75

156

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

B.—Statement showing the amount of money disbursed, S^.—Continued,

RECAPITULATION.

Paid out,of "fund for relief and protection of destitute seamen"
in excess of amount received
Fund for contingent expenses of all missions abroad (loss in exchange) ,
Paid by authority of special act of Congress.

$134, 075 95
4, 995 32
7, 788 75
146,860 02

c.

.

;

U N I T E D S T A T E S CONSULATES.
Statement showing the number of ^ destitute American seamen" sent to the Uni^
ted States from the several consula;tes during the fiscal year ending 30th of
June, 1Q61, cmd cost of passage.
Consulate.

Antigua.

Remarks.

6 at $10, and 1 to Halifax, British vessel, at $20 ; total

No. of
seamen.

7

Amount.

57
3
4

$80 00
10 00
570 00
30 00'
40 00

2
6

Acapulco...
Aspinwall..
Aux Cayes.
AntAverp —

20 00
60 00

8'

110 00

ll

B.
Batavia, JavaBuenos Ayres .
Bristol
Bermuda.
Barbadoes
Black Bay, (coast of
Labrador).......
Bathurst, (west coast
of Africa)
Bombay
1..
Bahamas




5 at $10, 1 invalid at $15, 1 do.
• at $20, a n d l do. at $25; total
10, at $10, 6 at $72, and 14 at
$168; total

30
5

340 00
50 00

1

7 00

2
2
4

20 00
20 00
40 00

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

157

G.—-Statement showing number of destitute American seamen, S^c.—Continued.
Consulate.

Remarks.

No. of
seamen.

Amount.

C.
1
11
11
3
19
5
1
3
4
2
1
3
1

Constantinople . . ^...
Callao
Cienfuegos
Cape Town
Cardenas
CuraQoa
Canton
Campeachy
Cape St. Lucas
Cape Haytien
Cadiz
—
Cape deVerd Islands
Cape of Good Hope..

$10 00
110 00
110 00
30 00
190 00
50 00
10 00
30 00
40 00
20 00
10 00^
30 00
10 00

E.
10 00

Elsinore.
F.

40 0 0
.

Flores.
Fayal..

.30 at $10, 25 at $500, 13 at
$260,22 at $528,~11 at $200,
10 at $127, and 32 at
total

143
2

2,571 00
20 00

,2
17*
J
1

Fortune Islands.

20
170
10
10

G,
Geneva
Gibraltar
Genoa
Gergenti
Quysborough, ISTova
Scotia
Guaymas

00
00
00
00

7 00
10 00

H.

Halifax.
Havana
Honolulu...
Havre
Hong Kong.
Hakodadi..
Hayti

15 at $7, 7-at!
$ 8 ; to t a b . .

50, and 15 at

37
73
82
10
4'
1 at $10, and 9 at $245 ; total.. 10
2




277
730
820
100
40
255
20

50
00
00
00
00
00
00

158

. REPORT O N ' T H I ! FINANCES.

0.—Statement slwwing number of destitute American seamen, S^c.—Continued.
Remarks.

Consulate.

No. of
seamen.

J.
Jamaica.
Jeremie.
K.
Kingston..
L.
Liverpool.

57 at $10, and 1 at $42, British
vessel: total

London...
Loando. .
Lahaina..
Laguayra ,

58
4
1
3
6

M.
Mayaguez..
Marseilles..
Montevideo .
Matanzas.-.
Mazatlan...
Mansanileo.
Malaga . . . .
Montevideo.
Montenegro.
Mauritius...

14 at $10, and 5 at $90; total.

1
3
2
12
19
4
4
. 1
1
1

N.
New Zealand.
Nassau
Nuevitas
Nagasaki
Nova Scotia..

53 at $10, and 117 at $12 ; total

2
170
12

1
13 at $ 7 .

13

P.
Pernambuco .
Palermo
Para
Point-d-Petre, Guadaloupe
Panama
.'.,
Port-au-Prince..
Point-a-Petre.Port Elizabeth
Paramaribo




27
5
3

(One invalid).

1
11
4
2
21
1

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

159

C.—Statement showing numher of destitute American seamen, 5fc.—Continued.
Consulate.

Remarks.

No. of
seamen.

Amount.

3
1
3
1

$30
10
30
10

R.
Russell, New Zealand
Rio de Janeiro
Rio Grande de Sul Rotterdam

00
00
00
00

S.
Savannah : - - St. Helena
San Juan, P . R.. St. John, N . B . .Smyrna.
" Sabanilla
Singapore
Sisal
•
Southampton — .
St. Thomas
St. Christopher...
Shanghai
St. Domingo City.
Sierre Leone
Talcahuano
Trinidad de Cuba.
Turk's Islands . . .
Tampico
Trieste
Tahiti
•
.TenerifPe

19 at $10, and 10 at $15; total.
4 at $14.

1 at $10, and 18 at $359; total.

3
16
6
7
3
1
4
1
1
29
4
3
4
1

30 00
160 00
60 00
70 00
30 00
. 10 OQ
40 00
10 00
10 00
340 00
40 00
30 00
60 00
10 00

14
7
44
6
6
2
19

140
70
440
80
60
20
369

13
5

155 00
50 00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

V.
Vera Cruz
Valparaiso

'.

8 at $10, and 5 at $15; total. . .

Y.
' 4 00

Yarmouth, N. S .
MISCELLANEOUS.

6: Crew of'wrecked schooner "Velocity," from Honduras to Key West, on board British schooner "Exchange," for passage, $300; board while at Honduras, $28: total.
4": Partof crew of ship "Intrepid," wrecked in China
seas, board and subsistence 94 days, (total number
of days 376,) at 50 cents per day: total



328 00
188 0,0

.160

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

C.—Statement showing number of destitute American seamen, (^c—Ccfntinued.
No. of
seamen.
25: Persons, master and crew, of lost ship "Roscius,"
board and subsistence 6 days, (total number of days
150,) at 75 cents per day: total
,
4: Seamen of the brig " E l l a Reed," board and subsistence 20 days, at 50 cents per day: total.
7: Captain and crew of the American brig "Albatross,"
board and subsistence 7 days, (total number of days
49,) at 75 cents per day: total
38: Officers and crew of the American ship "Palestine," board and subsistence %3 days, (total nuniber
of days 874,) at 75 cents per.day: t o t a l . . . . . . . . . .
8: Captain and crew of the American brig "-^olus,"
picked up at sea. and brought to New York; board
and subsistence, 10 days, (total number of days 40,)
, at 75 cents per day: total
.'...
Total number of seamen .
' Total amount

Amount.

25

$112 50

4

40 00
36 75

_38

655 50

60 00
1,288
15,223 25

Respectfully subriiitted to Hon., John C. Underwood, Fifth Auditor of the
Treasury, November 16, 1861.
- ^
GEO. B. SIMPSON, Recording Clerk,




161

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
D.

Statement showing the amount expended, in arresting American seamen in foreign
countries charged with the commission of crime on American vessels, together
with the expenses attending the examination of the same by the consul, and
the expense of sending them home for trial, with the witnesses, during the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
Consulate where No. of seamen
arrested.
expense originated. ,
Batavia
Bermuda
Bordeaux
Callao

Amount expended.

25
1
2
1
1
2
15
6
1
2
3

$11,618 40
'12 92
• 129.38
75 00
144 63
34 68
750 19
402 04
754 74
59 49
1,293 75

Rio Janeiro
Rotterdam
Smyrna

1

868 50
50 00
332 75

Southampton
St. Helena
S vdnev.:'.

2
1
1

709 39
95.25
90 00

67

' Remarks.

17,481 31

Fayal.'
Genoa
Havana
Liverpool.
London
Nine'Do. . .
...
Patos I s l a n d . . . . . .

Total

No exammation by United
States consul.
$91 71 was paid for loss in
exchange; $236 79 was
paid out of relief fund.'

No. 1.
Circular to collectors, surveyors, and other officers of the customs.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May

2,

1861.

On the 19th of April, 1861, the President of the United States, by proclama;ion, declared the ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana,
Vlississippi, and Texas under blockade, and on the 27th of the same month, by
mother proclamation, declared the ports of Virginia and North Carolina also
inder blockade; since which proclamation this department has received reliable
nformation that attempts are freq-uently made to furnish arms, munitions of war,
DTOvisions, and other supplies to persons and parties in those States in open
iebellion against the constitutional authorities of the Union.
It becomes my duty, therefore, to instruct you to cause a careful examination
o be made of the manifests of all steam or other vessels departing from your
jort with cargoes whose ultimate destination you have satisfactory reason to
)elieve is for any port or place under the control of such insurrectionary parties,
Digitized for E x . Doc. 2—11
FRASER


162

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

and to compare the same with the cargo on board; and if any such manifest be
found to embrace any articles of the description before mentioned, or any such
articles be found to constitute part of the cargo, you Avill take all necessary and
proper measures to prevent the departure of the vessel, and to detain the same
in your custody until all such articles shall be removed therefrom, and for further-proceedings according to law.
'
•
'
You will also make a careful, exaniination of all flatboats and other watercraft without manifests, and of railroad cars and vehicles arriving at or le'aving
your port laden with merchandise;, the ultimate destination of which you have
good reason to believe is Tor 'any port or place under insurrectionary conti^ol,
and if arms, munitions of war, provisions, or other supplies are found having
such destination, you will seize and detain the same, to await the proper legal
proceedings for confiscation or forfeiture.
,
I n carrying out these instructions you will bear in mind . that all persons or
parties in armed insurrection against the Union, however such persons or parties
may be organized or named, are engaged in levying war against the United
States, and that all persons furnishing to such insurgents arms, munitions of
war, provisions, or other supplies, are giving them aid and comfort, and so guilty
of treason within the terms of the second section of the third article of the
Constitution; and you will therefore use. your utmost vigilance to prevent the
prohibited shipments and to detect and bring to punishment all who are in any
way engaged in furnishing to such' insurgents any of the articles above described.
You will, however, on the other hand, be careful not to interrupt vexatiously
or beyond necessity, by unwa^rranted or protracted detentions and examinations,
the regular and lawful commerce of your port.
You will report forthwith whether any, and. if any, what,, additional measures
may be necessa^ry, in your judgment, to carry into full effect the foregoing directions ; and you will report to this department, ^^from"?time to time, your action
under these instructions.
•. ,
• •
S.'P. CHASE, ••
^
^
.
Secretary qf the Treasury.
N. B.~—Among prohibited supplies are included coals, telegraphic instruments,
vfire, porous cups, platina, sulphuric acid, zinc, and all other telegraphic materials
S- P . C.

. ^

/ -

-

-No. 2.

'

•

•

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, J^^?^e 12, 186 L

SIR :' Referring to the circular instructions of the 2d ultimo, prohibiting the
transmission of munitions of war, provisions, or other supplies to parties in insurrection against the. United States, you are now further instructed to exercise
the utmost, vigilance in. arresting and detaining all merchandise, of whatever
character, the ultimate destination^ of which you have satisfactory reason to
believe is for insurgents againsf'l^he United States or for places under their
control.
If you are satisfied, either from the nature of the articles, or otherwise,' that
any merchandise, wherever destined in name, is in fact destined for persons or
combinations in actual insurrection against the government of the United States,
.you will cause the same to be seized and proceeded against for forfeiture.
If, however, you are satisfied that any merchandise, transmitted for States or
places under insurrectio,nary control, is not intended for actual insurgents, and
has been shipped or forwarded without intent to afford aid and comfort to such



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

163

insurgents, or otherwise to violate the law, you will simply detain such merchandise, and notify the shippers or forwarders, or their agents, of such detention,
and state the cause thereof. If such shipper or forwarder personally, or by
agent, shall satisfy you that tbe merchandise so arrested will not be sent to any
place under insurrectionary control, but will be either returned whence it came,
or be disposed of in good faith for consumption within loyal States, you will
restore possession of the same and allow such disposition thereof to be made as
the pa-rties in interest may desire..
You will regard all States in which the- authority of the United States is
temporarily subverted, as under insurrectionary control; but any portions of such
States in which the laws of the Union and the authority of the federal government are acknowledged and respected, Avill be considered as exempt from any
interruption of commerce or intercourse, beyond such as may be necessary in
order to prevent supplies going to insurgents or to places under their control.
It is the intention of the department to leave the owners of all property per-'
fectly free to control it in such manner as they see fit, without inteference oi
detention by officers of the federal government except for the purpose of preventing any use or disposal of such property for the aid and comfort of insurgents, or in commerce with States or places controlled by insurgents.
. S. P . CHASE,
Secretary of the Treasury.

No.,3.
Cixcular instructions to collectors and other officers of the customs.
TREASURY DEPATMENT,

August 22, 1861.
The attention of collectors and' other officers of the customs is called to tjie
act of Congress entitled "An act further to'provide for the collection of duties
OR imports, and for other purposes," approved July 13, 1861, and the proclamation of the President of the United States of August 16, 1861, made in pursuance thereof, both of which are annexed.
In view, therefore, of the act aforesaid, and the proclamation of the President
of the United States, made in pursuance thereof, I hereby direct and instruct
the officers of the customs to use all vigilance in preventing commercial intercourse with the inhabitants of States in insurrection, except in the special cases
in. which it may be allowed by license and permit as therein set forth. The instructions of May 2 and June 12, 1861, heretofore in force, will be regarded as
superseded by the more comprehensive provisions of the act and proclamation.
The collectors and other officers of the customs will rejDort all seizures made
under the proclamation to the proper district attorney for such proceedings as
the law and facts may justify in each case;, and they will also, as soon as practicable, and as frequently afterward as may be convenient, report their views in
relation to the commercial intercourse contemplated, .and the permits proper to
be granted or mthheld.
In the forms accompanying the weekly returns required by circular of the 5th
August, 1861, to be made to this department, collectors and other officers of the
c\istoms will be careful to state what permits are asked for the shipment of goods,
by whom asked, and the grounds on which the applications are based.
The attention of the collectors and other officers is especially directed to fifth
and subsequent sectio3;iS'"of the act.
S. P . CHASE,
Secretary of the Treasury,



164

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

BY THip P R E S I D E N T OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A Proclamation.
Whereas, on the 15th day of April, 1861, the President of the United States,
in view of an insjiirrection against the laws. Constitution, and government of the
United.States, which had broken out within the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, and in pursuance of
the provisions of the act entitled "An act to provide for calling forth the militia
to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions,
and to repeal the act noAV in force for that purpose," approved February 28,
1795, did call forth the militia to suppress said insurrection, and to cause ^the
law's of the Union to be duly executed, and the insurgents have failed to disperse by the time directed by the President; and whereas-such insurrection has
since broken out and yet exists within the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas; and whereas the insurgents in all the said States claim to
act under the authority thereof, and such claim is not disclaiined ^r repudiated by
the persons exercising the functions ^pf government in such State or States, or in
the part or parts thereof in Avhich such combinations exist, nor has such insurrection been suppressed by said States:
Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress approved July 13, 1861, do hereby declare that the
inhabitants of the said States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Florida
(except the inhabitants of that part 6f the State of Virginia lying west of the
Alleghany moinitains, and of su^h other parts of that State and the other States
hereinbefore named as may maintain a loyal adhesion to the Union and the Constitution, or may be, from time to time, occupied and controlled by forces of the
United States engaged in the dispersion of said insurgents) are in a state of insurrection against the United States; and that all commercial intercourse between the same and the inhabitants thereof, with tlie exceptions aforesaid, and
the citizens of other States and otherparts of the United States, is unlawfid, and
will.remain unlawful until such insurrection shall cease or has been suppressed;
that all goods and chatties, wares and merchandise, coming from any of said
States, with the exception aforesaid, into other parts of the United States, without the special license and permission of the President, through the 'Secretary of
the Treasury, or proceeding to any of said States, with the exceptions aforesaid,
by land or water, together with the vessel or vehicle conveying the same, or conveying persons to or from said States, with said exceptions, will be forfeited to
the United States; and that, from arid after fifteen days from the issuing of this
proclamation, all ships and vessels belonging in whole or in part to any citizen
or inhabitant of any of said State's, with said exceptions, found at sea or in any
•port of the United States, will be forfeited to the United States; and I hereby
enjoin upon all district attorneys, marshals, and officers of the revenue and of
the military and naval forces of the United States to be vigilant in the execution
of said act, and in the enforcement of the penalties and forfeitures imposed or
declared by it; leavmg aiiy party who may think himself aggrieved thereby to
his application to the Secretary of the Treasury for the remission of aiiy penalty
or forfeiture, which the said Secretary is authorized by law to grant, if, in his
judgment, the special circumstances of any case-shalLrequire such remission.
Iii witness whereof, I have hereunto set inyhand and caused the seal of the
United States to be affixed.



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

165

Done at the city of Washington, this 16th day of August, in the year of our
P
- Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the independen
J
one,
independence
•- ' 'J of the Uinited States of America the eighty-sixth.
•sixth.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
By the President:
WILLIAM H . SE.WARD, Secretary, of State.

AN ACT further to pl'ovide for the collection of duties on imports and for other purposes.
Be it enacted by. the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress assembled. That whenever it shall, in the judgment of the President, by reason of unlawful combinations of persons in opposition, to the laws of the United States, become' impracticable to execute the
revenue laws and collect the duties on imports by the ordinary means, in the
ordinary way, at any port of entry in any collection district, he is authorized '
to cause such duties to be collected at any port of delivery in said district until
such obstruction shall cease; and in such case the. surveyors at s.aid port of'
delivery shall be clothed with all the powers and be subjected to all the obliga-*
tions of collectors at ports of entry; and the Secretary of the Treasury, with
the approbation of the President, shall appoint such number of weighers, gangers,, measurers, inspectors, appraisers, and clerks as niay be necessary, in his
judgment,, for the faithful execution of the revenue laws at said pOrts of delivery, and shall fix and establish the limits within which such ports of delivery
are constituted ports of entry as aforesaid; and all the provisions of law regulating the issue of ma-rine papers, the coasting trade, the warehousing of imports,
and collection of duties shall apply to the. ports of entry so constituted in the
same rnanner as they do to ports, of entry established by the laws now in force.
SEC. 2. And be it further enacted. That if, from the cause mentioned in the
foregoing section, iri the judgment of the President, the revenue frpm duties on
imp.orts cannot be effectually collected at any port of entry in any collection
district in the ordinary way and by the ordinary means, or by the course provided in the foregoing section, then, and in that case, he may direct that the
custom-house for the district be established in any secure place within said district,'eith^er on land or on board, any vessel in said district or at sea ne.ar the
coast; and in such case the collector shall reside a;t such place, or on shipboard,
as the case may be, and there detain all vessels and cargoes arriving within or
approaching said district, until the duties imposed by law on said vessels and
their cargoes are jDaid in cash: Provided, That if the owner or consignee of
the cargo on board any vessel detained as aforesaid, or the master of said vessel,
shall desire to enter a port of entry jn any other district in the United States
where no such obstructions to the execution of the laws exisf, the master of
such vessel may be permitted so to change the destination of the vess.el and
cargo in his manifest, whereupon the collector shall deliver him a written permit
to proceed to the port so designated : And provided further. That the Secretary
of the Treasury shall, with the approbation of the President, make proper regulations for the enforcement on shipboard of such provisions of the laws regulating the assessment and collection of duties as in his judgment may be necessary and practicable.
SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That it shall be unlawful to take any
vessel or cargo, d.etained as^ aforesaid, from the custody of the proper officers
df the customs, unless by process of some court of the IJnited States'; and in
case of any attempt otherwise to take such vessel or cargo by any fprce or .




166

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

combination, or assemblage of persons, too great to be overcome by the officers
of the customs, it shall and may be lawful for the President, or such person or
persons as he shall have empowered for that purpose, to employ such part of
the army and navy or militigi of the United States, or such force of citizen
volunteers a§ may be deen;ed necessary for the purpose of preventing the removal
of such vessel or cargo, and protecting the officers of the customs in retaining
the custody thereof. •
S E C , 4. And be it further enacted, That if, in the judgment of the President,
from the cause mentioned in the first section of this act, the duties npon imports
in any collection district cannot be effectually collected by the ordinary means
, and in the ordinary way, or in the mode and manner provided in the foregoing
sections of this act, then, and in that case, the President is hereby empowered.to
close the port or ports of entry in said district, and in such case- give notice
thereof by proclamation; and thereupon all right of importation, warehousing,
and other privileges incident to ports of entry shall cease and be discontinued
at such port so closed until opened by order of the President on the cessation
of such obstructions; and i£ while said ports are so closed, any ship or vessel
from beyond the United States, or having on board any articles subject todutie^,
shall enter or attempt to enter any such port, the same, together with its tackle,
apparel, furniture, and cargo, shall be forfeited to the United States.
SEC. 5. And be it further enacted. That whenever the President, in pursuance
of the provisions of the second section of the act entitled " An act to provide
for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions, and to repeal the act now in force for that purpose,"
approved February 28, 1795, shall have called forth the militia to suppress
combinations against the laws of the United States, and to cause the laws to be
duly executed, and the insurgents shall have failed to disperse by the time
directed by the President, and when said insurgents claim to act sunder the
authority of any State or States, and such claicn is not disclaimed or repudiated
by the persons exercising the functions of government in such State or States,
or in the pai't or parts thereof in which said combina1:ion exists, nor such insurrection suppressed by said State or States, then, and in such case, it may and
shall be lawful for the President, by proclamation, to declare that the inhabitants
of such State, or any section or part thereof, where such insurrection exists, are
in a state of insurrection against the United States; and thereupon all commercial intercourse by and between the same and the citizens thereof and the
citizens of the rest of the United States shall cease and be unlawful so long as
such condition of hostihty shall continue; and all goods and chattels, wares
and merchandise, coming from said State or section into the other parts of the
United States, and all proceedmg to such State or section, by land or water,
shall, together with the vessel or vehicle conveying the same, or conveying
persons to or from such State or section, be forfeited to the United States: Provided, however. That the President may, in his discretion, license and permit
commercial intercourse with any such part of said State or section, the inhabitants of which are so declared in a state of insurrection, in such articles and for
such time, and by such persons as-he, in his discretion, may think most conducive to the public interest; and such intercourse, so far as by him licensed,
shall be conducted and carried on only in pursuance of rules and regulations
prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. And the "Secretary of the Treasury
may appoint such officers at places where officers of the customs are not now
authorized by law as may be needed to carry into effect such licenses, rules,
and regulations; and pfficers of the customs and other officers shall receive, for
services under this section, and under said rules and regulations, sueh fees and
compensation as are now allowed for similar service under other provisions of
law.
SEC.
 6. And be itfurther enacted. That from and after fifteen days after the


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

167

issuing pf the said proclamation, as provided in the last foregoing section of this
act, any ship or vessel belonging in whole or in part to any citizen or inhabitant
of said State or part of a State whose inhabitants are so declared in a state of
insurrection, found at sea, or in any port df the rest of the Untied States, shall
be forfeited to the United States.
SEC. 7. And be it further enacted. That in the execution of the provisions of
tliis act, and of the other laws of the,,United States providing for the collection
of duties on imports and tonnage, it may and shall be lawful for the President,
in addition to the revenue cutters in service, to employ in aid thereof such other
suitable vessels as may, in his judgment, be required.
,
'
I SEC. 8. And be it further enacted. That the forfeitures and penalties incurred
by virtue of this act may be mitigated or remitted, in pursuance of the authority
vested in the Secretary of the Treasury by the act entitled " An act providing
for mitigating or remitting the forfeitures, penalties, and disabilities accruing in
certain cases therein mentioned," approved March third, seventeen hundred and
ninety-seven, or in cases where special circumstances may seem to require, it,
according to regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury.
SEC. •9. And be it further enacted. That proceedings on seizures for forfeitures
under this act may be pursued in the courts of the United States in any district
into which the property so seized may be taken and proceedings instituted; and
such courts shall have and entertain as full jurisdiction over the same as if the
seizure was made in that district.
xipproved July 13, 1861.

No. 4.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, September 3,

1861.

SIR : Instances of communication by land and water with the States controlled
by the insurrectionists are still frequently brought to the knowledge of this de-^
pai-tment.
It is to be distinctly understood that all communication, whether for commercial or other purposes, without special permit, is, and since the date of the
President's proclamation of the 16th ultimo, has been, in violation of law; but
it is also to be understood that no permit of any collector, or other officer connected with this department, is of any validity as a sanction to such intercourse,
except as expressly authorized by the license or permission of the President of
the United States, through the Secretary of the Treasury,
All goods and chattels, wares and pnerchandise, going to or coming from a
State under insurrectionary control, and every vessel or vehicle conveying property or persons to or from such States is forfeited to the United States, and must
be seized and proceeded against as so forfeited.
Any circumstances requiring or justifying the mitigation or remission of any
such forfeiture, will be duly considered on application to the Secretary of the
Treasury, in whom, by act of Congress, the sole power of such mitigation or
remission is vested.
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,
S. P . CHASE,
'
' Secretary of the Treasury,




168

REPORT ON THE I'mANCES.

No. 5.
Circular to collectors and other officers of the customs.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, September 21,

1861.

, I n order to prevent seizures of property belonging to citizens pf insurrectionary States not warranted by the acts pf Congress relating, to that subject,
it is thought advisable to direct the special attention of the officers of the customs to the provisions of these acts.
The 5th section of the act of J u l y 13 provides, thalt all goods and chattels,
wares and merchandise, coming from or proceeding to a State or place declared
by proclamation of the President to be in insurrection, together with the vessel
or vehicle ••.ponveying the same. Or conveying persons to pr from such State or
place, shall be, forfeited to the United States.
Thi^s section obviously applies to all property in transit, or purchased or provided with a view to transit, between loyal and disloyal States; and especially
to property forming the subject of commercial intercourse. .Such property,
wherever found, is liable to. seizure, and the only redress of parties who think
themselves aggrieved is by appea;l to the Secretary of the Treasury, who is.inve'sted by law with full power of mitigation and remission.
The 1st section of the act approved August 6 declares "that if any person or
persons, his, her, or their agent, attorney, or employ^, shall purchase or acquire,
sell or give, any property, of whatever kind or description, with intent to use or
employ the same, or sufi'er the same to be used or employed, in aiding, abetting,
or promoting such insurrection, * * * or any person or persons engaged
therein; or if any person or persons, being the owners of any such property,
shall knowingly use or employ, or copsent to the use or employment, of the.
same as aforesaid, all such property is hereby declared to be lawful subject of.
prize or capture wherever found."
No doubt can be entertained that this section was well considered, and that
its operation was in'tended to be limited to property used in furtherance of the
insurrection only.
'Seizures under the act of July 13 should be made by the officers, or under
the direction of officers, of the Treasury Department; and all district attorneys
and marshals of the United States should afford all practicable counsel and aid
in the execution of the law.
„
Seizures under the act of August 6 should be niade by the marshal of the
district in which such property may be found, under the general or particular
dnection of the district attorney, or other superior authority. For such seizures
there is no power of mitigation or remission in the Secretary of the Treasury;
but the district attorney, or other superior authority, may direct the discontinuance of any proceeding in relation thereto, and the restoration of the
property seized.
I t will be seen from an inspection of these provisions of the acts of Congress
that no property is confiscated or subjected to forfeiture except such as is in
transit, or provided for transit, to or from insurrectionary States, or used for the
promotion of the insurrection. The only exception 40 this rule of forfeiture is
that made by the 5th section, of ships belonging, in whole or in part, to citizens
of a State in insurrection, which a^re declared to be forfeited after fifteen days
from the date of proclamation, without reference to actual or intended use.
Real estate, bonds, promrnissory notes, moneys in deposit, and the like, are,
therefore, not subject to seizure, or confiscation in the absence of evidence of
such unlawful use. All officers, while vigilant in the prevention of the conveyance of property to or from insiu'rectionary States, or the use of it for insurrec


REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

169

tionary purpc>ses, are expected to be careful in avoiding unnecessary vexation
and cost by seizures not warranted by law.
S. P . CHASE,
Secretary of the Treasury,

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY
FoH^ THE P O S T O F F I C E DEPARTMENT,

November 26, 1861. •
S I R : I have, the honpr to inform you that on the 21st instant I laid before
the Postmaster General a detailed report of the financial affairs of the Post
Office Department, and of the operations of this bureau of the treasury, during
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861. I therefore beg leave to present in this
report only a brief outline of the principal duties discharged by the office.
In consequence of our international troubles many questions of a new, as well
'as of an extraprdinary, character were presented for consideration and determination, which not only seriously complicated, but greatly increased, the labors
of the office during a portion of the year.
Deeming it to be m j duty tp take care that no portion of the public funds
oyer which I had any control shpuld be disbursed to parties who wotdd be
likely to use the same, either directly or indirectly, in aid of the rebellion which
was designed to overthrow the government, I instituted an investigation into the
loyalty of mail contractors and others in the service of the Post Office Department ; and in all cases payments have been withheld from such as were not
faithful and loyal to the Constitution and the Union. In pursuance of this
policy scarcely any payments have been made, since my connexion with this
office, to parties residing in either of the eleven rebellious States, except in that
portion 'of western Virginia wherein mail service was restored; and numerous
sums, which are large in the aggregate, have been withheld from mail contractors
and others in the States of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, by reason of their
complicity with the rebellion.
The collection of the revenues of the departme];it being an object of primary
importance, vigorous efforts have been made to collect the balances due from
late postmasters. And, notAvithstanding the impossibility of recovering any
portion of the large amount due by' late postmasters in the rebellious States, it
affords me pleasure to state that the sum actually collected by the office during,
the year, a;mounting to $297,235 06, greatly exceeds that of any previous year
since the organization of the bureau in 183'6.
' .
One hundred and sixty-eight suits have been instituted during the year for
the recovery of sums due to the United States, amounting in the aggregate to
fe3,154 17.
' The extensive and complicated postal accounts between the United States
and foreigri governments have been regularly and promptly adjusted.
The compilafioii of that portion of the "Biennial Register" that pertains to
the Post Office Department, and Avhich constituted pearly three-fourths of the
last Register, requiring great labor, has been carefully completed.
The number of changes of postmasters reported by the Post Office De- partment, requiring the final adjustment of their accounts, was . . . .
9,677
Tlie number of late postmasters' accounts in charge of the office
31,083
The number of present postmasters' accounts in charge of the office..
28,586
The number of quarterly accounts of postmasters adjusted, audited,
• and registered
105,066



170

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

The number of accounts of mail contractors audited and reported to
the Postmaster General for payment
21,316
The number of accounts of special and route agents audited and reported for payment
2,432
The nuniber of accounts of special contractors and mail messengers
audited and reported for payment
^
19,116
The number of miscellaneous accounts audited and reported for payment
:
i
684
The number of accounts of United States attorneys, and marshals,
and of clerks of United States courts, adjusted and reported for payment .
121
The number of " collection orders" issued to contractors
83,551
The nuinber of " collection drafts " issued
4,526
The number of "department drafts" registered
13,460
The number of " department warrants " registered
8,51.7.
The number of letters received
. 135,372
The number of letters prepared, recorded, and mailed
68,4^64
The number of folio-post pages of correspondence recorded in the
"miscellaneous" letter book
964
The number of pages recorded in the "collection'^' letter book
2,401
The number of pages recorded in the " s u i t " letter book
205
The number of pages recorded in the "report" letter book
133
The number of accounts on the legers
i . . . .'
85,328
The number of corrected quarterly accounts of postmasters copied,
restated, and mailed
—
.- 18,2L6
The number of stamp and stamped envelope accounts examined, compared, and restated
105,066
But it is utterly impossible, in a report of this description, to present a just
view of the extensive and diversified labors performed in this bureau, embracing,
as they do, the functions of an auditor, comptroller, register, and solicitor. And
I am free to confess that m j experience, though comparatively limited, has fully
satisfied'me that a clerical force fully adequate to the prompt, efficient, and satisfactoiy discharge of these various duties, has not heretofore been employed
in the office.
^
, ^
. In conclusion, I beg leave to repeat the closing words of my report to the
Postmaster General:
" When I entered uppn the discharge of the duties of this bureau, on the
22d of April last, the business of nearly every division was much in arrears.
Since then, competent and efficient clerks have, by appointment of the Secretary
of the Treasury, taken the places of such as had proven to be derelict in duty
and unfaithful to the trust committed to them; strict and salutary disc^iplinary
lilies and regulations have been adopted and enforced; and the business of the
office, I am happy to state', is now in a most prosperous condition."
" To the zeal, fidelity, and capacity of the clerical corps now employed ^in
this bureau, I cheerfully acknowledge my indebtedness for the present satisfa'ctory condition of the entire business of the office."
I have the honor to be, very respectfully,
G. hDNM.^, Auditor.
Hon.

S. P , CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury,




REPORIF ON THE FINANCES.

-

171

G.
Statement exhibiting outline of current business in the office of the First Comptroller
of the Treasury during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
The following named warrants of fhe Secretary of the Treasury have been,
countersigned, entered' in blotters, and posted, to wit:
Stock warrants
Quarterly salary warrants
1
.Treasury (proper) warrants
».. ^
Treasury interior warrants
Treasury customs warrants — . r
War pay warrants
War repay warrants
Navy pay warrants
J^avy repay warrants
Interior pay warrants
Interior repay warrants
Treasury appropriation warrants
Interior and customs appropriation warrants
War and navy appropriation warrants
Texas debt warrants
Land covering warrants
,
!
Customs covering warrants
Miscellaneous covering warrants
Aggregate number of warrants

:

800
1,767
2,102
2,625
'
1,968
- '3,31-9
360
851^
158
941
52
38
'
26
28
10
384 756
1,002

.-

17,187

The accounts described as follows, reported to this office by the First and Fifth
Auditors, and the Commissioners of the General Land office, have been revised
and certified to the Register of the Treasury, to wit:
Judiciary.—Embracing the accounts of marshals for expenses of the
United States courts; of district attorne,ys, clerk.^^ of United States circuit and district courts, and United States commissioners, for per diem
and fees, rent of court-rooms, &c
Diplomatic and Consular.—Embracing accounts of foreign ministers for
salary and contingent expenses; of United States secretaries of legation for salary; of consuls general, of consuls and commercial agents,
for salary, and disbursements for relief of destitute American seamen;
for passage from foreign ports to the United States of destitute and
criminal American seamen and witnesses; of United States commissioners under reciprocity treaty, &c
Public Lands.—Embracing accounts of receivers of public money; of
receivers acting as disbursing agents; of surveyors general and deputy
surveyors; of lands erroneously sold; of the several States for percentage oh lands sold within their limits, &c
Salaries.—Embracing accounts for salaries of United States supreme,
district, and territorial judges, attorneys, marshals, local inspectors,
the clerks and other employes in the executive departments, &c
Public Debt.—Embracing accounts for redemption of United States
stock and treasury notes, interest on public debt, &c
Public Printing.—Embracing accounts for public printing, binding, and
paper




774
'

1,312

2,279
1,250
1,169
129

172

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Mint and Branches.—^Embracing accounts of gold, silver, and cent bullion ; of ordinary expenses, repairs, &c
64 °
Territorial.—Embracing accounts of the governors of Territories, for
contingent expenses, erection of public buildings and purchase, of
libraries; of secretaries of Territories, for legislative and contingent
expenses
:
49
Miscellaneous.—^Embracing accounts of the Coast Survey; of the Commissioner of Public Buildings, the Insane Asylum; of the United
States Treasurer, penitentiary, for horses lost in the service of the
United States,'Texas debt, suppression of• the slave ti-ade. Clerk of the
House of Representatives, and the Secretary of the Senate, & c — , . . . 972
Bonds entered, filed, and indexed
•....:....
250
Letters written pn all subjects connected with the business of the office. 3,572
•

< ?

,

'

.

•

•

'

.

.

There have been also regularly entered and filed the semi-annual emolr
uinent returns made by the United States marshals, attorneys, and clerks-of
courts, in pursuance of the third section of the act of February 26, 1853. Als.o
all requisitions made from,, time to time for advances to United States marshals,
territorial officers, treasurers of the mint and branches, to disbursing agents, &c.,
have been examined and reported upon.
Many other duties have been performed, arising from the necessary business
of the office, which need not be particularized,
ELISHA WHITTLESEY,
Comptroller.
DECEMBER 2 , 1 8 6 1 .

H.

^

^

TREASUY DEPARTMENT,

Second Comptroller's Office, November 29, 1861.
S I R : In compliance with directions from your department, I,have the honjr
to submit the following report of the operafions of this office during the fiscal
year ending the 30tli June last.
*
*
The number of accounts of disbursing officers, claimants, &c., received, acted
upon, passed, and recorded, during the year, was as follows, viz:
•

•

^

Reported by the Second Auditor ,..;
Reported by the Tlikd Auditor
Reported by the Fourth Auditor
Whole number

..........'.
.-.. -.
,

^

1,294
1,985
283
3,562'

These accounts are those connected with and embracing expenditures by the
pay department of the army, the Indian bureau, the recruiting branch of the
service, the medical and hospital and ordnance departments, reported by the
Second Auditor; those belonging to the quartermaster's, subsistence, and engineer departments, and'of the Pension bureau, reported by the Third Auditor;
and those of pursers or paymasters in the navy and in the marine corps, and of
navy agents and navy pension agents, reported by the Fourth Auditor; all of
which, after being received at this office, undergo a. critical examination with
reference to the legaHty and correctness pf the payments, as well as their appli.cability to-the specific appropriations to-which the amounts disbursed in those
accounts are chargeable. Many of them embrace large numbers of vouchers,'



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
$

173

X

and include heavy expenditures, and not only require :mucli time, but a high
degree of efficiency.and experience in their investigation. I have reason to
believe that the work thereon has been promptly and satisfactorily performed.
The total amount embraced in these settlements-was $34,320,068 27..
In addition to the above, there has been reported to and examined in this
office a number of " certificate" accounts, showing balances due officers and
soldiers who have resigned, been discharged, or deceased, and of seamen, their
heirs, administrators, &c. The amount ascertained to be due upon such certificates is made payable by disbursing officers of the army and navy, according to
theb^-anch of service to which the individual for whose services the claim is
allowed belonged. These claims-originate in the Second and Fourth Auditors'
offices respectively, and during the fiscal year there were reported and acted
upon in this office, as follows, viz,:
Accounts certified to be.drawn by Second Auditor
Accounts certified to be drawn by Fourth Auditor

.

.........
.........

Making a total of...

334
359
693

The number of requisitions upon the Secretary of the Treasury received,
examined, countersigned, and recorded upon the books of this office was as
follows':
'
.
Drawn by the Secretary of the Interior:
Pay or advance requisitions
Refunding requisitions
Drawn by the Secretary of W a r :
Pay or advance requisitions
Refunding requisitions
—
Drawn by the Secretary of the Navy:
Pay or advance requisitions
Refunding requisitions — ^
Whole number

'

^

" 946
55

.'

2,550
435

—

w

—
...,..„..
•

864
162
5,013

There were received and filed, during the year, 1,674 letters upon official
business, the ans.wers to which-cover 285 pages of folio-post of the letter book.
All the annual statements for Congress required by the law of May 1, 1820,
have been promptly transmitted in duplicate to the Secretaries of the Interior,
pf War, and of the Navy. These statements exhibited the balances of the
several appropriations remaining upon the books on the 1st of July, 1859; the
appropriations made for the service of the fiscal year 1859-'60; the repayments
and transfers in that year; the amount applicable under each appropriation, arid
the amomit drawn by requisitions during the same period; and, finally, the
balances remaining unexpended on June 30, 1860, with such appropriations as
were carried to the surplus fund.
'The revision of accounts required of this office, under the regulations of the
Executive, for carrying into effect the provisions of the treaties of October 26,
1852, and of May 24, 1854, with the Chickasaw tribe of Indians, has been
duly made, and the record kept up.
Other usual and prescribed duties of this office—embracing decisions on cases
specia;lly reported from. the Second, Third, and Fourth Auditors, and from the
bureaus and offices of the War, Navy, and Interior Departments; filing official



174 >

REPORT ON THE' FINANCES.

bonds and contracts received from those departments; the supervision of transcripts for suit, &c.—have promptly received attention, the business having been
kept up as usual, and none of it is as yet in arrears.
I would most respectfully and earnestly call your attei;itipn, to the necessity
of an increase of the clerical force in this office, in view of the largely increased
expenditures of the War and Navy Departments.
That a great influx of business will devolve on this office, commensurate with
the increased expenditures, is inevitable, though hitherto it has not been so
severely felt as that I have not been able, by great exertions., to keep pace with
its duties. This, however, has been mainly owing to the fact that the accounts
of many of the ncAvly-created disbursing officers have not yet reached this office
for revision.
In conclusion, I would most respectfully state that I do but follow out the
suggestions of my predecessors, as Avell as my own convictions, in recommending
that the clerical increase of this office should be in ratio of one revising clerk
here to three given to each of the Auditors of the War and Navy for the pilir
po>se of §ta<ting accounts; and I would further add that such increase as may be
awm*dfed to tlii^ office should be composed of original appointments, or of promotions from the' accounting offices of the Second, Third, or Fom-th Auditor's
offices, made for special aptitude.
I have- the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,
j . ]\IADISON C U T T S ;
Comptroller.
Hon.

SALMON P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

. H 2.
TREASURY OF THE U N I T E D STATES,

December 2, 1861.
SIR : The following summary of the business of this office during the fiscal
year ending the 30tli of June, 1861, is respectfully submitted:
Tlie amount covered into the treasury during the year by 2,682 warrants
was—.
',
From customs, lands, and miscellaneous sources
$84,104,642 2.4
From War Department
2,369,725 21
From Navy Department
1,996,520 ,93
From Interior Department:
^
' 223,683 65
•' Total

8^,694,572 03

Which includes repayments of advances, and amounts transferred from one appropriation to another i^ adjusting the balances of settled accounts.
-The payments during the same period on 13,654 drafts, dr^wn to pay 13,519
warrants, were—
For
For
For
For

civil, diplomatic, and miscellaneous public debt
War Department
Navy,Department
.Interior Department
Total'.

$46,143,059
25,350,875
.;...
14,417,408
»
•
4,101,105

90,012,449 79

Which also includes transfers from one account to another in their settlejnent.




83
65
82
99

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

175

The amount received for the use of the Post Office Department was
$6,970,719 35, and the amount paid' on 8,496 post office warrants was
$8,041,920 77. Available balance to the credit of the said department, subject
to draft at the close of the fiscal year, $57,68.4 03. The sum of $14,996,700
was transferred, by means of 786 drafts, from one depositoiy to another during
said fiscal year, for the purpose of being coined, and for making, more conveniently, disbursements for the public service, chiefly for the latter.
The practice of holding moneys at the credit and subject to tlie order of disbursing officers continues to work advantageously for the convenience of said
officers, at the expense, however, of very greatly increased labor and responsibility of the persons.employed in that branch of the business consequent upon
the immense disbursements for military and other purposes in this neighborhood.
The accommodations and the force employed are taxed to the utmost of tlieir^
capabilities to respond to the multitudinous applications, and to keep up the
numerous accounts.
s The receipts in the money branch of the office on treasury account proper,
from all sources during said year, amoimt to $11,927,236 42, of which
$3,934,984 74 was transferred to it by means of 1,484 checks, given in exchange
for coin, and saving to that extent the cost of actual transportation.
Treasury drafts amounting to $12,089,827 50 have been satisfied either with
coin or by being entered to the credit' of disbursing officers.
Accounts have been kept with eighty-seven disbursing officers, and at least
23,570 of their checks paid, amountirig to $7,575,720 97.
Jn addition to the ordinary business of the office there was issued during the
year 45,087 treasury notes, amounting to $18,469,050. '
The announcement of the fact that the payments on treasury drafts in the
month of November just closed>alone-exceed the average annual amount for the
last six years, and that .the payments for that month alone on the checks of disbursing officers amount to $13,116,172 ^ 07 against an average annual amount
for the last six years of only $7,784,853 60, showing the payments on the former
to have increased more than twelve and on the latter more than twenty fold.
And the further fact that this irnmense business has been conducted by the
ordinary force of the office with accuracy, promptness, and despatch, and to the
entire satisfaction of all persons having business transactions with the office^
makes it unnecessary to say that all the persons now employed have done their
duty, and that some have labored beyond the .endurance of most men.
With great respect, your obedient servant,
F . E. SPINNER,
Treasurer of the United States.
Hon.

SALMON P. CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Solicitor's Office, December 2, 1861,.
* SIR : I have the hpnor herewith to transmit a report ©f the operations of this
office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861, embraced in five tabular statements, numbered" 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
In these statements the suits brought are classified as far as it could be conveniently done, so as to present as distinctly as possible all that has been done
in each particular class of business in each of the judicial districts, and a general^ summary of the whole, as follows, viz:



176

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 1. Statement of suits on treasury transcripts of the official settlements of
the accounts of defaulting public officers, contractors, &c^ adjusted by the accounting officers of the Treasury. Department.
No. 2. Statement of suits brought during the year for the recovery of fines,
penalties, and forfeitures for violations of the revenue laws.
No. 3. .Statement of suits on warehouse transportation bonds for duties -on
goods imported.
'
No. 4. Statement of miscellaneous suits^ which includes alL suits brought
during the year which are not embraced in the three preceding tables.
No. .5 is a general summary, showing the aggregates of the above tables.
From this general sumniary it appears that the whole nuniber of suits of every
description brought during the year was 529, of which four were of class 1, for
the recovery of $16,764 94; 218 for the recovery of fines, penalties, and
forfeitures for violations of the revenue laws, (class No. 2,) the mass of which are
in rem, but which includes specific fines and penalties amounting to $323,882 77;
fifty-one were on warehouse transportation bonds, amounting to $53,796 45; and
256 miscellaneous suits for $49,835.
Of these suits 202 have been tried and disposed of during the year, as follows,
to wit: 112 decided in favoi; of the United States, 23 decided against the United
States, and 67 settled and discontuiued without trial, leaving 327 .still pending
undecided.
Of the old suits on the dockets of the office, which originated and were.instituted previous to the commencement of the fiscal year,422 have been tried and
'disposed of during the year, viz: 66 decided for the United States, 5 decided
against the United States, and 51 settled and dismissed without trial.
The aggregate, number of suits of all descriptions decided-and otherwise disposed of' during the year is 324. The gross-arnount of judgment Pbtained,
exclusive of cases in rem, is $136,818 35, and the amount collected from all
sources is $343,346 46..
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
E D W A R D JORDAN,
Solieitor,
Hon. S. P . C H A ^ ,
Secretary of the Treasury,
y




STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF BUSINESS
UNDER CHARGE OF

THE SOLICITOR OF THE TREASURY
DURING TIIE

FISCAL TEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1861.

Ex. Doc. 2

12




178

EEPOKT ON THE FINANCES.
Statistical summary of business under charge of the Solicitor
SUITS BROUGHT DURING T H E FISCAL YEAR ENDING THE T H I R T I E T H

Treasury tran- Fines, penal- Miscellaneous
ties, and lorsciipts.
feiiures. •

Judicial districts.

No

Amount No
sued lor.

,

2

Ainount No
sued for.

' " 7 ri,'284"84

\yiilllH*L.l(IV-Lll< • • • • • • • t • « • • •

'""2 ""soo'ob "**6
n n r t h ' n flist
New York, soutU'n dist.. "*"3 ii," 843*98 158 |-:i!y,240 93 147

l\r»-*\Ar V n r k

u \./i ^\y y

. . . . . . .

"ii

....

26;i77"6o ***7
1
3
3
10

TiiQtrin^t n f P n l n n i h i a

Virginia, eastern dist'ict ,
Virginia, western district.
North Carolina
ftniith

P,;irnlina

..

. . . . .

0 0
$540 00

"*"i66*6o

....

85 60

33,869 84

"".5*566*60
'*5,'66o'6o " 3 2 .$•20,866'56 318,891 41 *'"361'20
61,452 78

"i*566"6o

2i,'677*6i
50 00

50 00

3^3*18'70

86*66

""126*66

' " " 1 2 0 00 * " ' i 5 3 ' 9 5

.. . .. 1
.
.

Georgia . . . , ,
Florida, northern district.
Florida, southern district.
Alabama, north'n district.
Al:ih:irvi:)

l|
il

. . . . .

Delaware
Peunsylvania, east'n dist.
Pennsylvania, wesl'n dist
Maryland , . , . . . .

KJl^WLIl \^Cll\JIAl«*A

"*ii66"6o

23
1 32,585 00

Rhode T=5lan(l

i.K/W

1 ^fi

§540 00

....
....

Amount No Arnount
sued lor.
sued for!

f540 00

T\rpw l-TnTHn'i;nirft

Massachiis(^lts

Warehouse
transportation
bonds.

"4

miHiilp fli^fripf

y ""

Alabama, south'n district.
IjOuisiana, east'n district.
Louisiana west'n district.
Mississippi, noth'n d i s t . .

2
13

"i,'666* 60 * " l
3,110 00

"i* 666* 66

"*i,*666*66
**5 "7,'266'45 11,376 45

lVIiij'.;isi'5iniii s o i i T h ' n f ist

TexaS) eastern district-..
T e x a s , western district ..
Arkiinsas, eastern district.
Arkansas, westt'n district.
Missouri, eastern district.
Missouri, western district.
Tennessee, east'n district.
Tennessee, middle district.
Tennessee, west'n district.
Kentucky
Ohio, northern district. ..
Ohio, southern d i s t r i c t . . .
Indiana
•.. •
Illinois, northern district.
Illinois, southern distiict.
Michigan .
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota.
Kansas
California, north'n d i s t . . .
California, south'n d i s t . . .
Oregon
,. Washington T e r r i t o r y . . . .
Utah Territory
Nebraska Tenitoryr. . . . .
Dakota Territory
'...
Colorado Territory, L . . .
Nevada Territory
New Mexico Territory...




....

.....
""7

*'i,'636"6o

'"2
1

"3Joo6*6o

'3,606"60
1,030 00

" * 3 ""256*66

'"i

"'256'60 '*6,*740"6i

24
1
3 ""236*60
2 2,500 G
O

"4,'926*96 " * 2
4

"236*6(1

"2*844*92
9 68
50 00

7,420 96
'•'8

*2i*68i*66 24,* 081*66

'"3

****io6'co
. . . . .

"'2

'i6,'oo6*oo

""8

'*3J5o6*6o '"6 **i,*64i*84

15^141*84

. o>>

' 0°75

'"i
::;; : : ' : : : : : : : ' i

4 16,764 94 218 323,882 77 256 49,835 00

51 53,796 45 144,279 16 75,683 59

179

KEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

Total amount (reported) collected.
^540 00

1

SUITS BROUGHT PRIOR TO THE PRESENT
FISCAL YEAR.

3

6

if

c

il

o%

0

•d

§g.§

•a

S

o

0 "-•

n
1
4

... 1
..._. "'25
1

2
58

23

12,329 80 • 7

5

2

$400 00

1

1
30
1

6,422 44

5
3

10 00

1 • 9
1

18
1
3
3
10

3
" 3
7

3
" i

2

1
1 " 1

IP

2
6

2
8

'**7
1

3
9
.24
1
3
5
4
8
3

8

6

1
11

1

o Oco

C tflO)
— c c

8 1 ^

•

III
•^ 3 <
U

o o .^
1

O _^ ' ^

^400 00

2

2
1

7 2,206 45
5 15,079 79

5
7

6,432 44 2,206 45
85 61 15 079 79

2
A
11 **'2 *'*8

2
110 00
4 14,246 74
21 48,655 88

2
6

10 00 - 110 CO
.3-:) I 20 14,392 CO
75,069 74 139,997 25

'"i

1

3

100 00
8, .575 76

7

1

6

$•940 00

100 CO
33 '*'3,'318 70 20,905-56
4

180 00

5

i79ig

1
1

1
1 "**786*6t

1
1

500 00
400 00

25,251 00
1 00

5
5

5
251 00
5 10,819 64 .

5
6

780 08
251 00
25,251 00
1 00 10,819 64

... .^...

4

10

31.501 .56

1

25 24

1

$910 00

100 00
16, ,5.35 28
9,965 2.'

100 00

2

16

1

75,'J50 35

1

4

2
9

1

s.s-s
<

0

a
/2

6
8
30 224 340 13,616 96

1

il

•a

<

500 00
400 00

80 00

n io

If

c.2

11

5

C w «

.CO

1

145 86
91,341 37

•a

0

Whole a m o u n t o f judgments
rendered in favor of the
United States d u r i n g the
fiscal year ending June 30,
. 1861.

1
DAY OF JUNE, A. D. 1 8 6 1 .

Whole n u m b e r of judgments
rendered in favor of United
Slates duriiig the fiscal year.

of the Treasury during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.

180 00
16 535 28
9,965 22

1

2
1

1
7

1
12 23,951 21

"
1

1
1,167 23
9 68
50 00
566 70

I
1
1

6 75

11

13
1
1

8

113,787 74 112

2
5

....

3

....

23

32

1

792 00
172 i>0

2
3

1
5

3
8

792 00
1,736 33

126 00
150 00

1

1
2

3
3

4
5

126 00
150 00

972 00

1
1

....

1
1

332 26
1,874 60

5,892 00
6,084 05 " * 3
1
1
219 57

35 327 529 61,134 76




16
1

1
1

66

605, 00
16 66,072 81
4 6,092 67

5

1

2

51 122 229,558 72

0

792 00
172 50

792 00
1,736 33

2
1

128 00
J 50 00
6,740 01

126 00
150 00

13
2
2

2,844 92
' 9 (ie
1,022 00

1,167 23
311 94
1,924 60

3
]

1
1
4
1
1
8

605 00
5,892 00 66,639 51
6,184 Oo 6,092 67
•

219 57
6 75

6 75

178 136,818 35 343,346 46

180

REPOET ON THE FINANCES.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 30, 1S61.
SIR : I have the honor herewith to submit the various tabular statements and
reports from this office for the last fiscal year.
Not having been connected with the office during the whole time covered by
these reports, and its operations being extensive and somewhat complicated, I '
do not feel that degree of confidence in my own opinions in relation to it which
I hope a greater amount of experience will insure. I shall, for this reason, only
venture a few suggestions in relation to the past and prospective operations of
this department of the federal treasury.
The w^ar for the preservation of the government and the existence of the
Union, in which the nation is now engaged, has materially affected the business
of this office in common with all the other relations of the United States.
The extraordinary increase in the national expenditures, and the important
changes in the tariff, rendered necessary thereby, have imposed an amount of
additional labor upon several divisions in this office far greater than has ever
existed in its past history. In some of them this labor has been nearly if not
quite doubled. The large loans, represented by treasury notes, coupon bonds,
and registered stock, which have been made since the month of March last, with
the issue of bonds in payment of the " Oregon war debt," as it is called, have
had a similar effect upon the business of the loan office. But this large addition
to their ordinary duties has been cheerfully and promptly discharged by the
heads of these divisions and the clerks under their immediate direction, with but
little extra assistance, and the various reports bave been made up and furnished
to you within the time required by law, and at as early a period in the year as
has usually been the case. The resignations and removals of clerks in the
office, by reason of which vacancies have necessarily existed for a considerable
time, and the appointment of new clerks, Avho required time and experience to
familiarize them with the duties of the desks to which they have been assigned,
has also had the effect to increase the labors of the clerical force. These labors
have been discharged, however, by more faithful application and working beyond
office hours. I think the government has no reason to complain of the manner
in which the clerks in this office have, performed their duties.
It is not improbable, however, that if the present state of affairs continues an
augmentation of the clerical force in the register's office will become indispensably necessary. But it may be better to wait until the necessity assumes a
greater degree of permanence than it now possesses before asking for congressional action in this respect.
^
I was obliged, from severe indisposition, to ask leave of absence from the office
for a period of nearly two months, during which time the official duties of the
register were performed by Mr. John A. Graham, the chief clerk, in a very
faithful and efficient manner.
There is a large number of official books and papers belonging to this office
contained in two rooms in the basement, Avhich are in a condition discreditable
to the department, and personally annoying every time they come under my
notice. They have been during former years thrown indiscriminately together,
and are now practically useless for any purpose. These ought to be put in
order. Some of the ledgers also in one of the divisions have not been balanced
for some years. The services of two temporary clerks, for a period of from eight
to twelve months, might be profitably employed in performing this work; and
there is a sufficient amount of money, which has accrued in consequence of
vacancies in the clerkships, in this office to pay them. With the present force




EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

181

in the office this work cannot be done, and I do not feel authorized to employ
others to do it without special directions from you.
Although the forms in which the business of this office has been conducted in
former years are very good, I am not prepared to say that they are the very
best adapted to the increasing magnitude of the operations' of the government, or
unsusceptible of improvement. I do not propose to recommend material changes
in them until I am thoroughly familiar with all' the operations of the office.
I feel confident, however, that changes may and should be made which will
increase the value of the statements and reports emanating from the register's
office to the country, will suppress such parts of them as are not valuable, and
will have the effect in some degree to lessen the expenses of one department of
the government.
Verv respectfully, your obedient servant,
L. E. CHITTENDEN,-Pte^wy^cr.
Hon.

SALMON P. CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.




•182

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement showing the amount of moneys exiiended a t each custom-house in tht
United States d u r i n g the fiscal year ending. J u n e 30, 1861, p e r act of M a r c h
3, 1849.
Districts.

Present collectors.

Passamaqnoddy, Maine
Washington Long - . „ -.
William ^. Smith __>«.
Machias, Maine
Frenchman's Bay, Maine
Isaac H. Thomas
-.
Penobscot, Maine
Seth K. Devereaux
Waldoborongh, Maine
Davis Tillson
- -.
Wiscasset, Maine
Erastus Foote
Bath, Maine
Roland Fisher
Portland and Falmouth, Maine
I. Jewett
Saco, Maine (a)
0. B. Chadbourne
Kennebunk, Maine
„...._
Nathaniel K. Sargent ..
York, Maine (6)
„
„.
J. S. Putnam
-...
Belfast, Maine
_
Truman Harmon
Bangor, Maine
^
William P. Wingate ....
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
.
Joseph B. Upham
Vermont, Vermont
'
„..
William Clapp
Newburyport, Massachusetts
Enoch G. Currier
Gloucester, Massachusetts
John S. Webber
Salem and Beverly, Massachusetts.
Willard P. Phillips
Marblehead, Massachusetts (c)
._
William Standley -_.„..Boston and Charlestown, Massachusetts! John Y. Goodrich
Plymouth, Massachusetts {d)
Thomas Loring»
Fall River, Massachusetts
„.
Charles Almy
Barnstable, Massachusetts
Charles F. Swift
_
New Bedford, Massachusetts (c)
Laurence Grinnell
Edgartown, Massachusetts
,
John Vinson
Nantucket, Massachusetts
Alfred Macy . . Providence, Rhode Island
Charles Anthony
Bristol and Warren, Rhode Island..
William H. S. Bayley..
Newport, Rhode Island
Seth W. Macy
-Middletown, Connecticut
Origen Utley
New London, Connecticut
Edward Prentis
New Haven, Connecticut
James F. Babcock
Fairfield, Connecticut
Silas C. B o o t h . . - - .
Stonington, Connecticut
.
Franklin A. Palmer..„Sackett's Harbor, New York
Cornelius W. Inglehart.
Genesee, New York
P. M. Crandall
Oswego, New York
„
Charles A. Perkins
Niagara, New York
Franklin Spalding . . - „ Buftalo creek, New York
Christian Metz, jr
Oswegatchie, New York (e),
David M. Chapiu
,.
Sag Harbor, New York
John Sherry
'..
New York, New York
»_
Hiram Barney
'...
Champlain, New York _
Georg,e W. Goff
Cape Vincent, New York
John W. Ingalls. - - .
Dunkirk, New York (/)
George M. Abell
..,
Bridgetown, New Jersey
W. S. Bowen
.»,
Burlington, New Jersey
W. S. Ashmore
Perth Amboy, New Jersey {g)
John S. Boggs p
' Great Egg Harbor, New Jersey . . „.
J. S. Adams -1
Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey
Jar vis H. Bartlett
Newark, New Jersey -.o
Peter W. Martin . . .
Camden, New Jersey
Sylvester Birdsell
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
William B. Thomas
Presque Me, Pennsylvania
Thomas Wilkins
,.
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ___'_
C. W. Batchelor.
,.
Delaware, Delaware [k)
Th'omas M. Rodney



Amount.
$26,702 17
2,736 12
6,205 19
4,621 71
7,406 06
6,738 47
7,959 29
29,920 96
87 92
717 64
575 36
6,994 65
6,428 10
6,751 08
14,625 49
3,1,61 60
7.133 58
13,478 84
2,191 55
358,685 09
938 7 6
.
2.716 35
11,051 50
6,702 II
3,484 54
2.347 13
13,214 14
2,744 54
5,738 28
2,558 69
, 10,317 72
14,825 56
2,174 06
1,892 85
3.134 68
5,646 82
19,000 69
12,669 32
13,180 14
6,834 06
811 37
,146,843 75
11,209 40
6,009 00
950 27
369 39
152 34
3, 085 06
674 41
584 93
1,853 36
277 65
207,590 11
4,093 71
2,795 12
16,580 49

183

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement showing the amount of moneys expended, .^c.—Continued.
Districts.
Baltimore, Maryland
,
Annapolis, Maryland
Oxford, Maryland
Vienna, Maryland
Town Creek., Maryland
Havre de Grace, Maryland
-.
Georgetown, District of Columbia
Richmond, Virginia (^)
Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia^...
Tappahanock, Virginia (z)
Cherrystone, Virginia (z) — - Yorktown, Virginia [j)
•.
Petersburg, Virginia (i)
Alexandria, Virginia
Wheeling, Virginia
..
Yeocomico, Virginia (/)
_
Camden, North Carolina (/c)
E'denton, North Carolina (i)
Plymouth, North Carolina (i)
Washington, North Carolina {i)
Newbern, North Carolina { )
%
Ocracoke, North Carolina (i)
Beaufort, North Carolina (i).«
Wilmington, North Carolina { )
%
Charleston, South Carolina(Z)
Georgetown, South Carolina {a)...
Beaufort, South Carolina (y)
Savannah, Georgia (y).'
Saint Mary's, Georgia (y)
_.
Brunswick, Georgia (y)
Augusta, Georgia (y)
Pensacola, Florida (a)
-.
Saint Augustine, Florida (a) - -•
Key West, Florida
Saint Mark's, Florida (y) - - - Saint John's, Florida (y)
Apalachicola, Florida (y)
Fernandina, Florida (y)
Bayport, Florida;'(t?):^
Paiatka, FloridS {^j)--^ -Mobile, A1 abama. \rn>j. —
Selma, Alabama (y) - Tuscumbia, Alaibama (a)
--.
Pearl River, Mississippi (y)
Natchez, Mississippi («)--Vicksburg,;; Mississi ppi (.y)
New Orie'^nsi"- Louisiana in)
Teche, Louisiana (y)
Shreveport, liOuidaua (no returns)
Texas, Texas (y)
Brazos de Santiago, Texas (no returns).
Saluria, Texas {§)
Paso del Norte, New Mexico (y)
Nashville, 'J ennessee (c)
Memphis, Tennessee [j)
Knoxville,.Tennessee ^no returns)..
Chattanooga, Tennessee (c)
Louisville, Kentucky (o)
Paducah, Kentucky



Present collectors.
Henry W. Hoffman - John'E. Stalker
William H. Valliant.
D. J. Waddell
James Jones .
William B. Morgan..
Judson Mitchell

Andrew Jamiespn . . .
Thomas Hornbrook .

Amount.
$153,475 15
918 57
256 24
919 61
152 84
153 60
2, 360- 33
4,680 94
. 19,419 94
1,201 57
345 18
2()8 52
. 3,769 50
3,871 73
619 97
75 00
385 69
213 49
465 98
262 26685 68
1.877 03
390 93
4,917 28
29,98,2 61
131 78.
125 00
19,432 56
250 00
317 70
643 94
1,167 69
446 60

Charles Howe.

7,631
2,215
• 1,287
1,962
1,743
87
175
17,427
180
101
281
170
676
159,554
664

73
38
84
17
71
61
00
18
06
69
64
00
76
02
00

12,044 76
Samuel N. Wood.

C. B. Cotton...
William Nolen.

4,689
^3,307
437
2,216

18
80
29
20

430 09
2, 126 92
353 81

184

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement showing the amount of moneys expended, Sfc.—Continued.
Districts.

Hickman, Kentucky (p),
Columbus, Kentucky (c)
. Miami, Ohio
Sandusky, Ohio _
-.
Cuyahoga, Kentucky
Cincinnati; Ohio (q)
Detroit, Michigan
Michilimackinac, Michigan
Evansville, Indiana
Madison, Indiana (r)
New Albany, Indiana (no returns)
Chicago, Illinois
_.
Alton, Illinois
Galena, Illinois
Quincy, Illinois
_
Cairo, Illinois (5)
Peoria, Illinois
Saint Louis, Missouri
_
Hannibal, Missouri Burlington, Iowa (i)
Keokuk, Iowa
Dubuque, Iowa
Milwaukie, Wisconsin..
«.
Minnesota, Minnesota (e)..
Puget s Sound, Washington Territory.
Oregon, Oregon (t)
_.
Cape Perpetua, Oregon
Port Orford, Oregon
San Francisco, California
Sonoma, California (u)
San Joaquin, California
_
Sacramento, California (v)
San Diego, California.-....„
Monterey, California
San Pedro, California (i)

Present collectors.

Andrew Stephan
John Youngs .,..-_
Charles J. Ballard _
Enoch Y. Carson . „
"
Nelson G. Isbell...
John W. McMath-.
A. S. Robinson---Robert P. Jones
Jacob Anthony
Luther Haven..,
John H. Yager
Daniel Wann
Thomas Benneson .
Daniel Arter
Lysander R. Webb.
R. J. Howard
N. 0. Archer
»
Clark Dunham
John Stannus
John B. Henion
Edwin Palmer
Joseph Lemay
Victor Smith
-.
William L. Adams.
E. R. Drew
William Tichner
Ira P. Rankin
Seth M. Swain
S. W. Sperry
S. H. Forth
Joshua Sloane
J. T. Porter
—.
Oscar Macy

Total ,

Amount.
$31
918
3,097
4,210
6,394
4,108
20,575
8,457
851
25

12,221 32
440 82
413 63
632 24
827 88

635 88
7,546 68
1,000 00
262 60

561
649
9,,317
,545
1,
20,,105
19,340
3,919
2,764
225,831
1,162
3,540
2,620
3,000
4,717
4,020

35
87
75
00
90
31
94
00
63
8,1
00
7.5
00
50
00

2,906,270 91
L. E. CHITTENDEN,. Register.

TiiiiASVRY BETAViT-biENT, Register's Office, November 2 5 , I S 6 1 .




38
35
65
24
54
70
79
61
61
96

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

. _

NOTES.
a To the 30th September, 1860.
b From the 1st of Aprilto the 6th of June not received.
c April not received.
c^From the 1st of October, 1860, to the 1st of May, 1861, not received.
eFrom the 1st of January to the 10th of April not received.
/ F r o m the 1st of January to the 15th of April not received
g From the 1st to the 15th of April not received.
h June not received.
« To the 31st of March, 1861.
y To 31st of December, 1860.
kTo the 12th of April, 1861.
ZTo the 26th of December, 1860.
m To the 30th of November, 1860.
71 To the 1st 6f February, 1861.
0 From the 1st of April to the 15th of June, not received.
p From the 29th of August to the 30th of September, 1860.
5 From the 1st of January to the 16th of May, not received.
r From the 4th to the 30th of June.
5 From the 1st of April to the 31st of May, not received.
r r o the 17th of June, 1861.
wFrom the 8th of October, 1860, to the 19th of May, not received.
V April and May not received.




185

186

REPORT ON THE FINANCES..

Statement of the number of persons employed in each district of the United,
States for the collection cf customs during the fiscal year ending June 30,
1861, ivith their occupation and coinpensation, per act March 3, 1849.
OQ

ca
o
U

'

Compensation
to each person.

Districts.

Occupation.

Passamaquoddy, M e . . .

Collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Survevor .
......................... .
Inspectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
....do
o..„„. . - . . ' » . , o .
Deputy collector
..-»»....
Aid to t h e r e v e n u e . . . . i .
...
' .
do
Weigher and m e a s u r e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . „ . , .

10

..-.do

Machias, M e . - l . . . . o - .

F r e n c h m a n ' s Bay, M e . -

Penobscot, M e . - „ , .

Waldoborongh, Me

Wiscasset, Mo . , - . . . . , .
2
2
2
Bath, Me

„„„..




2

....

....O

0...0

. . 0 - ,

B o a t m a n . . „ . , , .„„.. o - - . , . . . = . . .
...
.do
,
....
Collector
„„..„..o.-......-..---^.
Inspector _ . . . . . . „ . « . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . „ .
do
,
,...do
„..„.
....do
Boatman........... ....... ............
Collector
..
.........
..„„
Deputy c o l l e c t o r s . - . .
....do
»-...-.-.....
Inspector
o...- ...o
Boatman _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o . . . . . . . . . .
....do
Aid to revenue
.....»...................
Collector
o.,...
.,
Deputy collector a n d inspector
....
do
..-.-.
.-..do
.do
.......
....do
Collector . „ . .
Inspectors
....,.„.
do
do
„
....do
„
„
do . . . . .
.„
..
..
do . . .
..
.
..jfc.
Weigher „.
Collector . . . . . . .
..
Inspectors
....do
..„,..
-...do
„
Collector . . . „ _ „ .
„
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and m e a s u r e r . .
do . . . » . . . „ , . . „ „ . _ . .
Inspector
..
. . . . . .•
....do . . . . . . _ - .
--..do...
„
....do...........

$3 000 00
1 349 52
1,095 00
730 00
730 00
1,095 00
730 00
974 43
1,891 27
300 00
240 00
1,853 10
730 00
547 50
600 00
250 00
300 00
1,283 75
1,095 00
300 00
730 00
360 00
240 00
365 C-0
1,500 00
750 00
750 00
730 00
600 00
1,000 00
1,721 48
1,095 00
936 00
850 00
730 00
350 00
300 00
47 43
200 00
$3 per day.
$2^ per day.
$2 per day.
1,3J7 16
1,364 54
1,500 001,095 00
650 00
600 00
600 00

187

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

C Ti
D

Districts.

u P.

Occupation.

Compensation,
to each person.

"A
Bath, Me—Continued.
Portland and
mouth, Me.

Fal-

Saco, Me

Kennebunk, Me
York, Me
Belfast, M e . . . - .

Bangor, Me.

Portsmouth, N. H .

Vermont-




Inspector
...do
Weighers, gangers, and measurers.

$350 00
250 00
1,500 00

Occasional weigher and acting deputy collector.
, '
In.spectors
-Superintendent of warehouse
Warehouse clerk
Boatmen
.-.,-„„
....do
-..
Collector . . . .
....
Inspector . . . . „ . - .
„.
....do
,
Aid to revenue
.
.
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector....
Inspectors
„....
Collector
„
Inspector
....do
Collector
,
Inspector
....do
Aid to revenue
.„,.„.
Inspector at Camden
„.
Inspector at Searsport.
Aid of the revenue at Vinal House
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
....do
....do
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors
Deputy collector, weigher, and ganger,...
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Aid to revenne
Collector
Naval officer
Surveyor
Deputy collector and inspector
....do
...
Inspector, weigher, measurer, &c
Inspectors
^
....do
Porter and watchman.
Collector
Deputy collectors and inspectors
....do
,
....do
....do
...do
Deputy collector
,
Deputy inspector

1,500 00
1,095
1,500
125
365
•^456
298

00
00
00
00
00
67

600 00

450 00
100 00
1 6 6 6ic>

600
56
250
200
120
1,355
1,095
720
1,095
1,095
1,000
200
126
373
46
2j301
1,095
1,334
, 983
200
410
393
373
1,000
200
1,200
1,095
'

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
93.
00"
64
14
00
65
36
83
00
00
00
00

600 00
460 00

1,090
l,^^^
912
600

00
00
60
00

600 00

360 00
750 00
360 00

188

REPORT ON TPIE FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

Districts.

Vermont—Continued
Newburyport, Mass

Gloucester, Mass.

Salem and Beverly,
• Mass.

Marblehead, Mass.

Boston and Charlestown, Mass.




Occupation.

Deputy inspector
Revenue Boatmen
»„...
.....
Collector
Surveyor
-.
Naval officer
Deputy collector and inspector....
Inspector . .1
.„
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer.
Surveyor at Ipswich
...
Collector
Surveyor.
„
Deputy collector
Inspectors
...do
...do
Weigher, gauger, and measurer
Boatman
-.
„
Keeper of custom-house
Collector
Surveyor
....do
Naval officer .
„
Weigher and gauger
...do
Clerk
Inspector and deputy collector.
Inspector and storekeeper.
.,
Inspector
..-.do
.do
.do
....do
-.
...do
,
Measurer
,
Aid to revenue
,
....do
,
Boatman
Messenger and porter
,
Collector
,
,
Surveyor
,
Deputy collector and inspector...
...do
do
Inspector
....do
Boatman
...do
Collector
Deputy collectors
,.
Cashier
,.
Assistant cashier
,,
Clerk
...„
....do
'......
....do

Compensation
to each person.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

189

Statement—Continued.

Districts.

Boston and Charlestown—Continued.

o

^

13
7
1
2
1
2
56
1
2
21
6
14
6
3
1
2
2
2
4
6
1
2
3
2
1
12

Plymouth, Mass .

Fall River, Mass.




Occupation.

Clerks
do
....do
„
....do
Messenger
,
Assistant messenger
Inspectors
....do
....do
Night inspectors
Night watchmen
Weighers and gangers
Revenue boatmen
Measurers
General appraiser
Appraisers
•.
Assistant appraisers
;
Clerks.
....do:
....do
Special examiner of drugs
Storekeepers
do
,
do
....do ..:
....do
Superintendent of warehouses
Clerk...-.
:
....do
....do
do
,.
....do
...do
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer
Clerks
....do
...do
Messenger
,
Surveyor
,
Deputy surveyor
Assistant deputy surveyor
,
Clerk....
,
Messenger
,
Collector
Deputy collector, inspector, &c
,
— do
do
..--do
do
,
do
do
Collector
,
Depnty collector, weigher, inspector, &c
Inspector, weigher, and measurer
do
do.-o.-..-

Compensation
to each person.

$1,200
1,100
1,000
900
760

00
00
00
00
00

640 00

1,095 00
800 00
700 00
600 00
600 00
1,4'85 00
600 00
1,485 00
2,500 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,400 00
1,200 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
1,095 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 00
939 00
800 00
782 50
5,000 00
1,500 00
1,200 00
1,250 00
• 1,050 00
750 00
4,900 00
2,000 00
2,000 00
1,500 00
700 00
322 90
1,095 00
400 00
300 00
200 00
1,021 38
764 72
626 00
622 00

190

'REPORT ON THE FINAIsTCES.
Statement—Continued.

Compensation
to each person.

Districts.

Occupation.

Fall River—Continued
Barnstable, M a s s . . . . . .

Revenue boatman
,
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
.do ,
.do
.do\
....do
.do .
..-.do
.do .
....do......
.do .
....do
Aids to revenue _ . . . . . . . . . -.
.... o.....
Inspector
„„
Boatmen
„,
Keeper of the custom-house
Collector
„
Inspectors
„
....
Inspector, weigher, gauger, and measurer. .
Inspector
„
Inspector and measurer
Inspector

New Bedford, Mass...

....do...:

Edgartown, Mass .

Nantucket, Mass.
Providence, R. I .

Bristol and Warren,
R.I.




»>„»..

...do
Clerk
Aid to revenue
....„,..
Boatman
....o
Collector
„
Deputy collector, w^eigher, gauger, &c-..„.
....do.«.
.....do
Inspector
Inspector, occasional
.^
Boatman _
..........--..„
Collector
':.......
Deputy collector
Inspector '.
Collector
Deputy collector
Clerk
Naval officer
Surveyor, Providence
„
Surveyor, East Greenwich...,.
..„.
Surveyor, Pawtuxet
Coastwise inspectors
.,-.
Foreign inspectors .*
Inspector, Pawtuxet
Inspector, East Greenwich
„„
Weigher
„
Gauger . . . . . . . ^
,
.,
Measurer
„
Boatman.-.,
.„.
...
Messenger
,.
Collector
Inspector
....do

....do......
..-.do.-

,-..-,-.

191

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

I Compensation
to each per-

Districts.

Occupation.

Bristol and Vv^arren,
R. I.—Continued.

Inspector
,
Weigher
Ganger
....do
Boatman
„
Surveyor...
-...,.
....do.........
Collector
Superintendent af lights
Agent of marine hospital
Naval officer
„
Surveyor
J...
-do
*.
....do......
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector
„
-...do..
Occasional inspectors
do
..do
Weigher
Gauger
Measurer.
Boatman, North Kingston
,-.
Boatman, Newport
Collector
Surveyor, Middletown
Surveyor, Hartford
Surveyor, Saybrook
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector, Ha^rtford
^.-.
Inspector, Saybrook.
,
Collector and superintendent of lights, &c.
Inspector, weigher, measurer, and ganger.
. . . . d o . . - . . . . . ....do
do
Inspector
....do..
Surveyor
,
Collector.-..
Deputy collector
^
...
Surveyor
„
Weigher and measurer . o a . „ . . . „
.....
Weigher aud gauger
-„.-,
..„
Inspectors
„. „
Day and- night inspector
Inspector
..l.do........
Aid to revenue
do
Watchman and porter
Messenger and porter
Aids to the revenue
Collector
.„

Newport, R. I .

Middletown, Conn ,

New London, Conn

New Haven, Conn-...

Fairfield, Conn .



Inspector and weigher^ &c

.„

.-.

$120 00
25 88
163 68
87 00
216 00
325 61
278 90
639 69
200 21
8 67
440 56
443 69
250 00
200 00
935 33
200 00
6 4 50
.7
294 75
199 79
121 27
279 24
154 23
218 63
450 00
875 63
.260 24
384 02
303 04
050 00
350 00
300 00
1,008 62
930 43
816 46
450 00 '
200 00
852 00
2,834 70
1,500 00
735 93
1,500 00
1,500 00
1,095 00
730 00
60 00
72 00

m o 00
48
460
500
30
1,147
1,500

00
00
00
68
do
00

192

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

Occupation.

.Districts.
U

CM

Ja

Fairfield, Conn.—Continued.
Stonington, Conn....

Sackett's Harbor, N. Y.

Genesee, N. Y .

Oswego, N. Y .

Niagara, N. Y-




Inspector and'weigher, &c
do
do
Collector..
„
Inspectors
.,
Boat keeper
Surveyor
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector .
do...,
do . - - . . - . . do
.do
do
^
do
Night watch
Collector
Deputy collector
.,..do
....do.
Aids to revenue ..-.o»
Inspector and clerk
Collector
Deputy collector
.do.....
...do
...do
...do
...do
Inspectors...Revenue aids.
...do..:
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
...do
'.
...do
Clerks
...do..
1
...do
...do
Night watchers...
-...do
...do
.
Collector
Deputy collectors
:......
...do......
Deputy collectors and aids
do
do
Deputy collector aud inspector.
...do
do „
...do
clo
Inspectors..
„

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

193

Statement—Continued.

g
Districts.

oo
^

Occupation.

U P4

^ a

Niagara, N. Y.—Continued.
Buffalo Creek, N . Y - - .

Oswega;tchie, N; Y . . . .

Sag Harbor, N. Y .
New York, N. Y .

Clerk
Watchmen....
—.,.
Night watch . - , Collector.
.-.-.
Deputy collector.......do...............JL
....da..-...,
Inspector
..---.
-...
.-...do...
....\
do
....do.--,
Clerk
..-.
.-..do
Night watchmen
Collector
.-.Deputy collector and inspector .
Aid of revenue
Deputy collector and inspector.
..-.-.do...--. . . . . . . d o —
..-.do
...do . - . . . - - - .
.o-;do
..--.-.do -----..-Inspector.._......-Night watch
Collector
Coastwise inspectors .1 - - - - - . 1 .
Inspector
Collector
-.--.. - . . .
Auditor
Cashier _-....
Assistant auditor
Assistant cashier
"Deputy collectors.
Clerk
2
22
20 .-„.do.
....
6 ....do.
:
-.-.
22 . . . - d o . . . . . . . .
-^.-.
46
do. -.-- -------22 . . - - d o
— — - .
6 - — d o . . . . - — -----i...
1 _. - -do. -4 ----do.--- — --..
2 ...-dd.-.w
1 - — -do.-^
---.
1 I Keeper of custom-hoiise--2
1 ii.-do.
7- - — d o . . .
11 . — d o . . .
1 . —do...
2 —do...
3
Porters .

.ri^dorir-i--™"-.'--'.!


Ex. Doc. 2- .13


Compensation
to each person.

$730 60
647 60
365 00
1,964 23
1,000 00
900 00
730 00
1,000 00 ^
625 00
600 00
822 00
912 60
836 00
730 00
1,460 00
900 00
900 00
350 00
460 00
463 75
300 00
730 60
240 00
639 46
190 35
78 00
6,340 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
3,000 00
2,600 00
2,500 00
2,000 00
1,60.0 00
1,600 00
1,400 00
1,300 00
1,200 Otf
1,100 00
1,000 00
800 00
760 00
700 00
660 00
600 00
1,200 00
800 00
700 00
650 oa
600 06
420 00
400 00
480 00

194

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

Statement-—Continued.

i
I'E
Districts.

"So-

Compensation
to each person.

Occupation.

a"
p
^25

New York—Continued.




3
1
4
2
15
1
1
4
67
1
19
6
8
193
76
4
2
11
1
3
1
1
1
63
6
1
18

Porters
Fireman
«- _.
Watchmen
.
do
Night watchmen
-.-------..,
Warehouse superintendent
-_..
Warehouse clerk
'_.
db_.^ ^-do
d o . - - - - -do
.
do.-----do
.Weighers
..^
Measurers
-.Gangers
--.--_--.
Inspectors
,
„.
Night inspectors
..Measurers of passenger vessels
Measurers of wood and marble
Debenture clerks
-_
Captain of night watch
Lieutenants of night watch
,
Superintendent marine hospital
-----Examiner of drugs
._
Marker - - do
"i-,-Laborers -..
....do... — -.
-—
Bargemen
.•
-..„

$420 00
647 60
647 60
626 50
144 00
2,000 00
1,200 00
1,100 00
1,095 00
780 00
1,485 00
1,485 00
1,485 00
1,095 00
730.00
1,096 00
1,000 00
1,000 00
800 00
650 00
1,000 00
2,000 00
780 00
650 00
650 00
468 G
O
600 00

Appraiser* 8 department.

1
3
6
1
10
6
2
•7
1
4
3
21
1
1
1
6
1
6
2

General appraiser
.
Appraisers
;
Assistant appraisers
Examiner of damages
-.
.
Clerks to appraisers
.-do.
do.
.—do.-.
.-.
do
-do.
do
do.
Messenger
.
Storekeeper appraiser's stores '„ Clerk appraiser's stores
„
Clerks „-- —
.--do.
..-...do
— — ---— .do
_
i

1
3

2,500
2 600
2,000
2,000
1,600
\1 400
1 300
1 200
1 1.50
1 000
800
650
600
1,400
1,300
1,100
1,000
800
/ 600

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Naval office.

Naval officer
Deputies

„„
-,-.,---..

......

4,950 00
2.000 00

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

195

Statement—Continued.

< Ti
D

Occupation.

Districts.

% a

New York—Continned.
6
25
3
1
3
2

Clerks-,
.-.do...
,...do...
,...do...
.-..do...
..-.do.-.
...do...
Porters .

Compensation
to each person.

$1,500
1,400
1,200
1,000
900
600

00
00
06
00
00
00

600 00

500 00
Surveyor's office.

Champlain, N. Y .

Cape Vincent, N. Y . -

Dunkirk, N. Y
Perth Amboy, N. J .

Bridgetown, N. J . .Burlington, N. J- .


Surveyor
Deputy surveyors-.
Clerk
....do
Clerk ($3 per day) .
Clerks
.-..do
Messengers -.
,
Porter _ „ - „ . Collector, . - - .
.o---..
Deputy collector and inspector:
Deputy collector, clerk and-inspector
>..
,..
do
do
do- ,„--„..do
do
doDeputy collectors and aids
Deputy collector, aid and clerk, Rouse's
Point
Deputy collector and inspector
,
do
do.
-.do.
..do
Deputy collector and aid
Boatman
„-*....do
Collector
.-.
Deputy collectors
Aid to revenue- ^-^Deputy collector and inspector .
Deputy collectors
do
-•-.Boatman _
--..
Collector
-----Deputy collectors
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector.
Surveyor
,
—
Inspectors
....do..
-..do.
..- — ..
....do.
Bargemen
__-Collector ..„
..,
.--.do
. . o--—-..-o
--

4,900 00
2,000 00
1,200 G
O
1,100 00
1,095 00
1,000 00
700 00
650 00
480 00
1,060 71
1,000 00
800 00
750 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
650 00
500 00
400 00
400 00
240 00
180 00
1,313 00
730 00
647 00
366 00
245 00
160 00
200 00
600 00
187 60
250 00
600 00
150 00
600 00
600 00
600 00
400 00
$1 per day
642 45
163 60

196

REPORT ON THE FINANCESo
Statement—C ontinued.

[Compensation
to each person.

Districts.

Gr.8at Egg Harbor, N. J,
Little Egg Harbor, N . J

Camden, N. J . . .
Newark, N. J . . .

Philadelphia, Pa




Collector
Inspector
Collector
Inspector
do
....do
-J
•Surveyor
'
Collector
1
Deputy collector and inspector
Inspector
.,.
Messenger
..,
Collector
„
Deputy collectors.
Cashier
Clerks
-..-.do
„,
....do
,
....do
Keeper of custom-house
'..
Messenger
Porter
*....
Watchmen
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer
.
Clerks
....do
Messenger
Surveyor
Deputy surveyor„
„
Clerk
....do
\.
,
Messenger
General' appraiser
Messenger to appraiser
Principal appraiser
Assistant apprasers
Examiners
.-...
Packers
Clerks
Messenger
„
Clerk of appraiser's stores
Foreman of appraiser's stores
Marker of. appraiser's stores...
.Watchmen
Storekeeper of the port
Superintendent of warehouses
Assistant storekeeper
.-.-.
do
...do...... ..
Markers
..--.
....do
::.
„.
Weigher...
.,
Assif?tant weighers
„,
Foreman to weighers
„,

$250
365
250
234
81
9
584

00
00
00
00
00
00
60

463 66
730 00

516 00
350. 00
6,122 88
'2,500 00
1,500 00
1,4,00 O
O
1,200 00

100
1,000
800
600
547
'547

00
00
00
00
50
50

6,000 00
2.000 00

1,200
1.000
600
4,900
2,000

00
00
00
00
00

1,200 00

1,100
600
2,500
547
2,500
2,000
1,095
730

00^
00
00
50'
00-00
00
00

1,000 00
600 00

1,000 00
638 75
640 00
647 00

1,500
1,200
-900
600
540
480
1,485
1.200
730

00
00
00
00
00 ,
00
00
00
00

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

197

Statement—Continued.

<u T i

Districts.

u

ft

Occupation.

,g a
a"
Philadelphia, Pa.Continued.

Presque Isle, Pa
Pittsburg, P a . . .

Delaware, Del..

Baltimore, Md.

6
2
2
2
45
9
1
3
1
1
26
6
1
4
1
1
1
1.
1
1
1
2
1
.1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
6'
2

1
1
27
2
2
24
6
4
1
1
1
2
1
6
1



Beamsmen
Gangers
..
Measurers
-....do:
Inspectors
,
Revenue agents
...do
...do
Captain of night inspectors
Lieutenant of night inspectors..
.
Night inspectors -.
Night watch on wharves
.1....
Messenger to inspector's office
Revenue boatmen
Collector
Deputy collector and inspector
Surveyor
Clerk
....do
Watchman
Collector
.-...
Inspectors
....do
....do
Messengers^..
Aids to inspectors
....do.,
....do...
Collector
Deputy collector.
Cashier
Clerks......
....do
: .--..
. . . . d o . . . . . . .....'.
...do
...do
....do
„
...do
,
Examiner of drugs
,
Inspectors
.--.
Captains of the watch
x...
Watchmen at vault
.•
Watchmen..
,
Boatmen
,
Messengers.... .<
Porter
Superintendent of public buildings.
Weigher
Deputy weighers
.-..do
Laborers
Gauger
c .,

Compensation
to each persons.

$640 00
1,485 CO
1,485'00
1, 200 00
1,095,00

912 50
730 00
647 50
800 00
650 00
647 50
647 50
647 50
60O 00
381 24
730 GO
1,869 92
750 00
600 00
456 25
• 600 00
1,095 00
800 00
600 00
365 00
16 29
12 10
16 40
6,000 00
2,500 00
1,500 00
1,500 00
1,400 00
1,200 00
1,10,0 00
1,000 00
900 00
850 00
1,000 00
1,095 00
730 00
730 00
547 50
600 00
600 00
547 50
700 00,
1,500 00
1,000 00
730 00
647 50
1,500 00

198

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement—Q ontinued'.

<^jxi

Districts.

o o^
<-* ft'
'

Occupation.

ja
a'"
Baltimore, Md.—Continned.

Annapolis, Md.

Oxford, Md ,
Vienna, Md ,
Havre de Grace, Md
Town Creek, Md
Georgetown, D. C ...

Richmond, Va
Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va.
Tappahannock, V a . . .
Cherrystone, Va
Yorktown ,v Va
Petersburg, Va
Alexandria, Va
-

Wheeling, Va Yeocomico, Va.



Measurer
.
«
Deputy measurer
do
do...
Superintendent of public store .
Assistant storekeepers
do
do
..-.„
Clerks
,-.do.-.-...
,„-„do.-..-Storekeeper at Lazaretto .
Porters,
»..
Naval officer
Deputy naval officer . . . . .
Clerks
....do
Messenger
Surveyor.
—,.
Clerk...General appriiiser
Local appraisers
Clerks..
,..,do
Porters
-.
Collector
Surveyor „
....do
....do
„
Collector..-».„
Deputy collector
Collector
Deputy collector
Surveyor
....do
. . . . . . ..
Collector
,
Deputy collector,. ....do...
Temporary inspector
No return
....do.. — .
,-..
.....do..
...do
,...do..
,.„.do
.
Collector
Surveyor
„
Gauger
Inspector
:
„
Deputy collector, inspector, weigher, &c.
Boatman and messenger
Collector
No return
„

Compensattoa
to each person.

$1,500 00
990 00
730 00
1,500 00
1,095 00
900 00
1,100 00
626 0 0 /
1,000 00
150 00
647 60
5,000 OO
2,000 00
1,200 do
1,000 00
600 00
4,500 00
1,500 00
• 2,600 00
2, 600-00
1,200 00
1,000 00
647 60
316 12
267 75
159 55
150 00
370 75
160 00
. 600 00
365 00
•
178 65
168 8 9
*
860 OO
800 00
8-21 00

'200 oa

- 709 26
468 93
96
1,095 00
1,500 00
340 00
600 OO

199

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

li
Districts.

r
^H

Camden. N. C - - - - . . - Edpnton N C
Plymouth, N . C
Washincfton. N . C
Newbern, N . C . . « . . . o ' .
Ocracoke. N. C . . . . . . .
Beaufort N . C . . . - - . .
Wilminsrton N . C . . . .
Charleston. S C . . . i . . .
Georaretown. S. C - - - - .
Beaufort S C S a v a n n a h Ga . - . . . - - .
St Marv. Ga .
--.
RrnviRwick Ga
. ' .
Ppnf^arola F l a
St Arii2rustine F l a . - - .
K e y West, F l a . . . . . . . .

St M a r k ' s F l a
Rt alohn'fi F l a
-.
Fernandina F l a . . - - - .
Analachicola F l a
-..
Ravnort F l a
.-P i l a t k a Fla
. . . ..
Mobile Ala "
......
Tuscumbia Ala
.....
Selma Ala
.. .
Pearl River M i s s . . . . . .
Vicksbure^ Miss . . . - .
Natchez Miss
....
Columbus Miss '. . . .
N e w Orleans La
Teche La
Shrevenort La
Texas l e x a s
Saluria Texas
Brazos de Santiago,
Texas.
Paso del Norte Texas
Nashville, T e n n . . .
Memphis, T e n n . . . . . . .
Knoxville, T e n n . . . . . .
Chattanooera. T e n n . . ; . .
Louisville, K y

Paducah Kv
Hickman Kv
Columbus K v
Miami, O h i o .

Occupation.
ft

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

.-..--.
----1




Compensation
to each person.

No r e t u r n . . . .
--.-do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I - . . . . . .
. . . . do . . . . ^ . . . _ . . . . . • . . - . . - - . - . « . . . . . . . .
....do
.-.
-..do
.-.do
»
..--do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...-....--.
....do..
....do
....i
...----.
.--.do,-.....do
-..do
--....do.
..-.
do
do
.....do
Collector
Deputy c o l l e c t o r - - - - . - - . . - - . _ - - - . . . . . - - - .
Inspector . - - - - . . - .-..-....--......
Inspector a t I n d i a n K e y . .
..--.......-.
Temporary inspector and n i g h t w a t c h . . . - 1 .
No returuw.-. ---- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
....do
o
-. —
..-.do.--.-. ...•-........-.:.-- ----.
....do
--.
do
.--.do.....
_..do
--.....do
.... do......---..--..--...o...
......
....do
...»
....do
....do
do
.--.
—..
....do.-—--,
....do
....do
....do
,
....do
.--.
---o
'---.do,-«»--«•«»«.*--.--...--- - . . . . - . . - .
do
a-.
....do.-.--.----do
....do
»
do.-o
Surveyor.............----.«....--.-..--.
Chief c l e r k . - - .
---.--.-.
Messen-^er . . . . . . - - - « - - . - . . . - . . . . . . . . —-.
No return - - - . . . . . . . . . ---- - - . - ---- --.--«
....do
.--.do...........................--..-..
Collector
,—
.'

$1,876
1.095
1.095
600
84

00
00
00
00
00

'

,'

2 , 0 0 0 00
1,000 00
400 00

1,618 40

200

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.

Statement—Continued.
o
CQ

< Ti
D
ft ^

Districts.

Occupation.
U

ft

p

Miami, Ohio—.Cont'd..
Cuyahoga, Ohio . - . - - .

Sandusky, Ohib.

Cincinnati, Ohip-

- Detroit, Mich

Michiltmackinac, Mich

Evansville, IndNew Albany, Ind-.
Jeffersonville,. Ind ,
Madison ville, Ind.
Chicago, 111.......




Deputy collector
rInspector . . •
Messenger - - . .
^
Coilector
Deputy colle.ctor
j..
Inspector
\
.-..do
Clerk.-...,.Deputy collectors and inspectors .
Collector
o-.
Deputy collector
.--.do-.
-...
....do
.-..do
.-..do
Clerk
-.
Surveyor
—-....
First clerk.---.....
Second clerk . - . .
,
Wareho.use clerk . . .<
Collector
Deputy collectors
....do .
Deputy collectors and inspectors.,
do
do
--..
Inspectors - - - .
do..---..--l
....do
I
do.-.-..do
...do
...do
Collector.--Deputy collector and inspector.
-..do
-.
do
....do
^
Assistant
.,
Surveyor
Aids to r,evenue
Surveyor
.-.
Collector
Deputy collector
do
....do
Clerk-.
....do
Inspector
Inspectors and aids.
.-..do — . . - .

....4o

REPORT ON THE FINANCES

201

StatemeTit^—Coniiaued,

Occupation.

Districts.
o o'

Surveyor . .
— do . - . - ....do ---.-

Alton, 1 1 1 . - Galena, 111...
Quincy, 111...
Cairo, 111.—.
Peoria, 111
St. Louis, Mo-

Port Orford, Oregon...
San Francisco, Cal

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
.7
10
" 2
.1
1
2
2
3




690
3,000
1,600
1,200
1,000
1,095
600
480
1,000
600
650

00
00
00
00
00^
00
00
00
00
00
00

Collector
,
Deputy collector ..
Inspectors
,
Deputy inspectors .
Watchman
Collector,
Deputy collector ..

Minnesota, Minn.

Cape Perpetua, Oregon.

$367 98
491 00
658 24

Surveyor of customs
Surveyor, acting collector.
Clerk
.,-..do
...do
Inspector
,-.
Warehouse man
--.
Janitor
Surveyor
,--.do
....do
—

Hannibal, Mo
Burlington, Iowa.
Keokuk, Iowa
Dubuque, Iowa...
Milwaukie, Iowa..

Puget's Sound, W, T .
Oregon, Oregon

Compensation,
to each person.

1,286
1,000
'900
300
480
1,200
800

00
00
00
00
00
00
00

Collector
Deputy collector, clerk and inspector ,
Surveyor
Inspector
. - . -•-.
Collector
,
Boat hand . . - - - . . - --...
Collector.....
--.
Deputy collector
.-.---.
Collector
Deputy collectors
'.
-. .,
Clerks..---..-.
do
...do ...1
-.-..
.-.do
--.
dp
1
---....,
Appraiser general
..,
o......-.
Appraisers
,
Assistant appraisers
Examiners .--„
.-.
Superintendent of warehouses . . . . . ^ .
Weigher and measurer , . - - - - . . - . . . „ .
Gauger
Boarding officer . . - - . - - : . .- -.Bargemen
.:. --...—..
Naval officer
—-.
•Deputy naval officer
--Clerk in naval office
Surveyor..... .....................

3,000 00
1,500 001,000 00
1,000 00
2,008 33
72.0 00
2,000 00
1,000 00
7,900 00
3,125 00
2,600 00
2,260 00
2,100-00
1,620 00
. 1,642 60
3,125 00
3,125 00
2,600 00
2,250 00
2,500 00
2,250 00
2,250 00
.1,642 50
900 00
6,250 OO
2,700 00
2,600 00,
6,625 OO

202

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES.
Statement—Continued.

Districts.

Occupation.

[Compensation
to each person.

Deputy surveyor
--..
„--,
Captain of watch
,--.-.--.-.
Watchmen
,
Messengers
---- ---..
....do
Watchman and superintendent of laborers
Laborers
.-. ,
....do
Inspectors
.-«.-.
Inspectors
-..--.-.
Examiner of drugs
.......
- ..».
Collector
.,
...do
....do
...do
-.—.,-.-.-Boatman
„
= .,.
Collector
Inspector
„
. . . . d o „,
Collector
Surveyor
^

$2,700
1,368
1,080
1,080
1,170
1,620
1„080
900
1,642
1,368
2,000
3,084
3,176
3,000
3,000
1,000
3,039
1,368
1,368
3,060
2,000

o

s
P

San Francisco, Cal.Continued.

Sonoma, Cal..--.
San Joaquin, Cal
Sacramento, Cal,
San,Diego, Cal...
Monterey, C a l . . .
San Pedro, C a l . .

1
1
4
4
3
1
4
12
2
23
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

00
75
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
75
00
64
00
00
00
00
25
75
75
00
00

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register'S-Office, November 25, 1861.

K.
TREASURY

DEPARTMENT,

Office o f Commissioner o f Customs, November 22, 1 8 6 1 .
S I R : I n transmitting t h e usual report of the business transactions.' of this
office for t h e past year, I avail myself of t h e occasion to renew t h e suggestions
heretofore made to your predecessors, in relation to t h e approval of t h e official
bonds of collectors, naval officers, a n d sui'veyors. T h e approval of these bonds
b y t h e Comptroller, instead of the Commissioner of Customs, under the construction given to the 12th section of t h e act of t h e 3d of March, 1849, occasions
inconvenience and delay in t h e business of the office, is unusual in analogous
cases, and, in m y opinion, u n n e c e s s a r y ; a n d I apprehend no good reason exists
for separating that, d u t y from all others connected with those bonds a n d t h e
transactions'under them. I entirely concur in the views presented on this subject b y t h e late Commissioner', in his report of t h e 20th of November, 1858, to
wliich I would respectfully invite y o u r attention, a n d hope y o u m a y find it consistent with your views of the l a w to direct t h a t d u t y to be performed hereafter
b y t h e Commissioner, or if not, t h a t y o u m a y deem it expedient to recommend to
Congress such a modification of the 1st section of t h e act of 2d of March, 1799,
a s m a y effeci; t h a t object.
.
'



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

203

The number of accounts of collectors of the customs, and of surveyors designated as collectors, received and finally settled in this office during the year,
amounts to two thousand and ninety-three.
Accounts relating to the superintendence and construction of light-houses,
beacons, buoys, marine hospitals, and custom-houses, and for other miscellaneous
purposes, amount to one thousand one hundred and twenty-one.
^
'
The number of bonds taken from collectors, naval officers, &c., and the notices
issued thereon, amount to two hundred and sixty-six.
In disposing pf this amount of business, with other matters referred by the
department, four thousand eiglit hundred and sixty-four letters have been sent
from, and three thousand two hundred and twenty received at this office.
The accounts of collectors and disbursing agents who have retired from office
since the 4th of M'arch, 1861, have, with few exceptions, been finally closed on
the books of the treasury, and every exertion is being made to effi^ct a saHsfactory adjustment of the remainder at an early day.
The business of the office is in a highly satisfactory condition, and it gives
me pleasure to say that the gentlemen employed in the execution of it have
performed their duties with ability, promptness, and fidelity.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
T. FEHAU, '
Acting Commissioner of Customs.
Hon.

S. P . CHASE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

No. 12.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Office Light-house Board, November 26,'1861.
SIR : I have the honor, respectfully, to submit for your information and for
that of Congress the report of the operations of the light-house establishment
for the last .fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.
At the date of the last annual report from this board for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 18(30, it appears that there were 425 light-houses and lighted bea,cons
on the entire coasts of the United States. .
The number of light-vessels had been reduced during the year from 53 to
47, six screw pile light-houses having been erected as substitiites, in conformity
to the act of Congress, making an aggregate of 472 light stations, some of whicli
are double lights, and one having three lights for' distinction.
The total number of buoys, beacons, and day-marks was upwards of 4,500,
On the 18th of December, 1860, the light-house inspector at Charleston,
South Carolina, (Commander T. T. Hunter, United States navy,)' addressed a
letter to this board stating that he had reason to believe, from a conversation he
had had with Mr. Colcock, the collector of the port, that he would tender his
resignation as soon as South Carolina passed her ordinance of secession, and
that if required to do so he would turn over all the public property in his possession to the State authorities. The inspector asked for orders in regard to the
public property in his charge within the limits of the State of South Carolina.
This letter was submitted to the then Secretary of the Treasury, who, on the
24th of the same month, replied that *' the law holds that officer (the lighU-house
inspector) accountable for all the public property and moneys under his charge
as inspector of the light-house district," and ''under the present condition of
things the department cannot issue instructions in regard to the matter." * * *
Oil the 2Sth of December the inspector reports by telegraph, followed by a




204

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

letter of the same date, that the contractors for furnishing provisions for the
• crews of the light-vessels in the vicinity of Charleston refused to deliver them,
and adds that he has the assurance of Governor Pickens that all government
property under his charge shiall be respected, and that he should be untrammelled
in the execution of his duties. On the 29th these assurances.were reiterated by
the governor; but a short time after the inspector found the light, at Castle
Pinckney in charge of a " State officer."
On the SOth Governor Pickens requested the inspector to leave the State,
authorizing him to take the tenders, but none of the light-house property in *
sto^'e.
^
.
.
On January 1, 1861, Governor Pickens directed that the inspector and the
light-house tenders should not- leave the port for thirty hours, and that he was a
prisoner. Subsequently, upon being informed by the inspector that it was not his
mtention to remove the tenders, the governor informed him that his order had
reference to the vessels only, and that he would be allowed to go from the State
of South Carolina free from all interruption "if he goes by any land route."
By the 8th of January, .1861, seizures had been made by the authority of the
governor of South Carolina of all the light-house proplerty, consistin.g of light'vessels, light-house tenders, buoys, and their equipments and supplies in store,,
and excludmg the light-houses at Charleston, Georgetown, Cape Remain, Bull's
Bay, and Hunting Island, in that State.
The lights were extinguished without notice to mariners, and in many, if not
^all, cases the Fresnel illuminating apparatus was destroyed or removed, .
The extinguishment of lights from light-houses, removal of light-vessels, and
the destruction or removal of all the other aids to navigation' existing from the
northern boundary of Virginia to the Rio Grande, excepting those on the peninsula of Florida (Jupiter inlet to Dry Tortugas,) was continued until about the
24th of April, when the whole was accomplished. In a few instances the persons seizing the property claimed to do so by authority, and gave receipts for it;
in others, the United States agents charged with its custody connived at the
seizures, and in some instances the property was burned in mere wantonness.
The supply vessel, with annual supplies of oil, wicks, chimneys, and cleaning
materials for all the lights between Amelia island, Georgia, and the Rio Grande
for the current year, 1861,.having been despatched at the usual time on her acr
nual voyage, and before the outbreak at the south, was not recalled,, the supplies
were delivered as usual and without obstruction until her arrival at Galveston.
After having; delivered to the light-house engineer of that district the necessary supplies for the lights between Galveston and the Rio Gande, the master
was prohibited from leaving the .port. He was, however, after a detention of
many weeks, allowed to leave with his vessel. Between the 19th and 24th
April, 1861, the two light-vessels in the Potomac were wantonly burned, and
four in the Chesapeake between the mouth of the Potomac and Hampton Roads
were removed and their apparatus carried off or destroyed. Two of these lightvessels were subsequently recaptured, but they had been stripped of everything
tliat could be removed.
In August last a band of lawless persons visited the Jupiter Inlet light-house,
on the coast of Florida, and removed therefrom the illuminating apparatus. A .
few days afterwards the same band visited the light at Cape Florida and destroyed the illuminating apparatus.
The lights at Tortugas, Key West, Sand Key, Dry Bank, and'Carysfort
Reef, on the Florida reefs, have thus far been protected.
The light at Chandeleur island has been relighted by the commanding naval
officer in that vicinity.
•
Immediately on the receipt of intelligence of the capture of Port 'Royal a
light-vessel was orderecl to be fitted and sent to that locality to take the place of



REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

205

the one removed by the rebels, and which was bm-ned so soon as Port Royal
was captured.
All the buoys, illuminating apparatus, and supplies deemed necessary for
temporary purposes by our naval forces liaxe been furnished; and as the light
stations are captured, and it is seen that there is a reasonable prospect of their
being protected by the naval and military forces," they will be re-established in
accordance with your instructions.
From the close of the last fiscal year to March of this year the alleged want'
of available funds in the treasury prevented the ordinary and necessary expenditures under the head of repairs, andofor replenishing the stock of supplies,
buoys, &c., &c., which hkd..been largely drawn upon.
During the 4tli quarter of the last fiscal year (March to July) the expenses
of the establishment were reduced to the lowest rates of expenditure. No new
works of construction or repairs were commenced, and all works of that character
which were not being constructed under contract Avere suspended.
Disbursmg officers were requh-ed to deposit in the treasury all the funds in
t3ieir hands on account of special appropriations, which were not necessary to
pay contracts or claims already due.
The removal of the illuminating apparatus in April last from the two important lights marking the approach" to the Chesapeake bay, (Capes Charles and
Henry,) rendered some temporary substitute necessary, and by your authority
a first class light-vessel was fitted with proper apparatus and moored near the
entrance between these two capes.
Three iron pile light-house structures contracted to be built last year were
completed, early in the spring, and have been erected at Detour j White Fish,
and at Manitou island, on the northwest lakes.
The two first class granite light-house towers at Cape Ann, (Thatcher's
island,) Massachusetts, contracted to be commenced two years ago, have just
been finished, and the lights from them exhibited. Hitherto the two lights
marking this important point were very inferior in power and range.
The two first class light-house towers authorized to be erected at Navesink,
New Jersey, entrance to New York bay, are near completion. The materials
for these two towers had been contracted for in 1860, and nearly all delivered
or ready for delivery early in the summer. There was a temporary suspension
of the work after June 30, and resumed again soon after by.authority. The old
towers at this light station are in a very bad condition, which made it of the
greatest importance to complete the ncAV ones without delay.
The light-house at Whidby island (Red Bluff,) at Admiralty Head, in Washington Territory, which was under construction at the date of tliQ last report,
has been completed and the light exhibited.
In conformity with the provisions of the third section of the act approved
March 3, 1859, the beacon-light known as the Nantucket beacon, on Nantucket
island, Massachusetts, was discontinued in May last, and the building has been
removed to a position in front of Nantucket main light, to serve as a range daymaxk.
There are no extensive repairs going on in any of the districts, and it is believed that but few will be required during the winter.
Winter gales and the consequent high tides always do more or less damage
to light-houses at exposed points; but the injury will ordinarily be small at all
stations where the structures have been built with proper engineering skill.
There are still remaining some of the old badly-constructed towers which
require constant attention and expenditure..
. Although the almost entire withdraAval of officers of the army and navy, as
engineers and inspectors of the several ligl^t-house districts, from that duty to
those in the regxdar line of their professions, rendered necessary by the demand



206

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

upon the naval and military arms of the service, has thrown upon this office
greatly increased duties, yet this additional labor has been cheerfully assumed,
and the general and routine duties of the service have been performed with the
usual zeal and promptitude.
It is believed that the lights and other aids to navigation now under the control of the government are entirely efficient, and are not surpassed by those of
any other country.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Very respectfully,
THORNTON A. J E N K I N S ,
Secretary Light-house Board,
Hon.

S. P . CHASE, '

•

Secretary of the Treasury,




No. 13.

n i a r k f o o t nation
Comanches, Kioways,
and Apaches of the
Arkansas river.
Do
Chippewas of
Superior.

Lake

Oo
Do , . ;

Do .
Do

Chippewas of the Mississippi.

Purchase of goods, provisions, and
other useful articles, &c.; 9th article treatv 17th October, 1855.
F o r purchase of goods, provisions, and
agricultural implements; 6th article
treaty July 27, 1853.

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large. •

Vol. 11, page 659




Vol. 7, page 592, and
vol. 10, page 1111.

' $80,000 00

T e n instalments of ^ 0 , 0 0 0 , four instalments to be appropriated.

Vol. 10, page 1 0 1 4 . . . . Ten instalments of ^18,000, two instalments unappropriated.
, , , . . do

Money, goods, support of schools,
provisions, two carpenters, and tob a c c o ; compare 4th article treaty
October 4,1842, and 8th article treaty September 30, 1854.
T w e n t y instalments in coin, goods,
implements, &c., and for education ;
4th article treaty September 30,1854.
T w e n t y instalments for six smiths and
assistants, and for iron and steel t 2d
and 5th articles treaty Septem'ber
30,1854.
Twenty instalments for the seventh
smith, &c.
Support of a smith, assistant, and
shop, and pay of t w o farmers during
the pleasure of the President; 12th
article treaty.
Money, goods, support of schools, provisions, and tobacco; compare 4th
article treaty October 4, 1842, and
8th article treaty September 30,1854.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

o

Ji
oS

I:s
•

<

Am't held in trust by the U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid ; and amounts
which; invested at five per
cent., would produce the
permanent annuitie,s.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

Names of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
' meet stipulations,indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

Statement showing the present liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes, under stipulations of treaties, 8^c.

SI
hj
O
Pi
H

O

36,000 00

'
14,000 00

Transportation for two years, at $7,000
per year.
Twenty-five instalments, five yet to
be appropriated.

m : ^ ' . 30

o
Vol. 10, page 1 1 1 1 . . . . T w e n t y instalments of $19,000" each,
thirteen yet unappropriated.

247,OGO 00

Twenty instalm'ts, estimated at $6,300
each, thirteen yet unexpended.

81,900 00

Vol. 10, pages 1109
and 1111.

Twenty instalm'ts, estimated at $1,060
do
each, fifteen yet unappropriated.
Vol.10, page 1 1 1 2 . . . . Estimated at $2,260 per a n n u m . . . : . . .

Vol. 7, page 592,.and
vol. 10, page 1111.

Twenty-five instalments, five u n e x pended.

Ul

15,900 00
$2,260 00

45,000 00

o

•<1

No. 13.—Statement shbiving the present liabilities of the United States to the Indian tribes, Sfo.—Continued.

o

Chippewas of the Mississippi.
Do
Chippewas, Pillagers,
and L a k e VVinnebigoshish.
Do
Do
Chickasaws .«
Chippewas, Menomon e e s , Winnebagoes,
and N e w York Indians.
Chippewas of Sagin a w , Swan creek,
and
Black river,
Michigan.
Choctaws • • • • t l * . >•..

Do

Two farmers, two carpenters, and
smiths . and assistants, iron and
s t e e l ; 4th article treaty October 4,
1842, and September 30, 1854.
T w e n t y instalments in money of
$200,000 each.

Vol. 7, page 592, and
vol. 10, page 1111.

Twenty-five instalments, five unexpended, one-third payable to these
Indians (-^1,400) for five years.

Education during the pleasure of Congress.
Ten instalm'ts in coin of $10,000each,
and for the support of smiths' shops
ten years, $1,240 per y e a r ; same
1 article, &c.
Permanent annuities

"rt '^

Is

$7,000 00

Vol. 10, page 1 1 6 7 . . . . 3d article treaty February 22, 1855;
thirteen unexpended.

Is
" i|
P

Am't held in trust by thp U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid, and amounts
which,invested at five per
cent., would profiuce the
permanent annuities.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &/\

260,000 00

O

Money, $10,666.67; goods, $8,000; and Vol. 10, page 1 1 6 8 . . . .
purposes of utility, $4,000; 3d article treaty February 22,1855.
.do
For purposes of education ; same arli1 cle and treaty.
For support of smiths' s h o p s ; same ar- . . . . . . d o
ticle and treaty.
Vol. 1, page 619
P e r m a n e n t annuity in goods

Thirty instalments, twenty-three u n appropriated.

521,333 41^

T w e n t y instalments of. $3,000 each,.^
thirteen unappropriated.
Fifteen jnstalm'rs, estimated at $2,120
each, eight unappropriated.
Act February 28, 1790, $3,000 per year.

39,000 00

l-H

16,960 00
$3,000 00

$60,COO 00

9,600 00

192,000 00

920 00

18,400 GO

25,000 00

500,000 00

Vol. 7, page 3 0 4 . . . . ' ; . 5th article treaty August 11,1827 . . . . . -$1,500 00

1

Four instalments yet to be appropriated, and two subsequent instalments of $18,000.

80,960 00

Vol. 7, pages 99, 213,
and 236.

2d article treaty November 16,1805,
$3,000; 13th article treaty October
18, 1820, .$600; 2d article treaty J a n 1 uary 20,1825, $6,000.
Vol. 7, pages 212 and 6th article treaty October 18,1820, and
Provisions for smith, &c.
236.
9th article treaty January 20,1825—
say $92U.
Interest on $500,000; articles 10 and Vol. 11, pages 613 and Five p e r c e n t , for educational purposes.
. . 614. _
1 3 t r e a t y J u n e 22, 1855. '

Digitized forDo
FRASER

•i

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a limited n u m b e r of
years to pay limited annuitiestill they expire,amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Names of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
meetstipulations,ihdefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

GO-

^

Q

Creeks

Vol. 7, pages 36, 69,
•and 287.

P e r m a n e n t annuities.

Do.
Do.

P

S m i t h s ' shops, &c

Smiths, &c., two for twenty-seven
years; treaties March 24, 1832, and
August 7,1856.
Wheelwright, permanent
Thirty-three instalments for education; 13th article treaty March, 1832,
and 4th article treaty J a n u a r y , 1845;
T w e n t y instalments for e d u c a t i o n ;
4ih article treaty J a n u a r y , 1845.
Allowance during tlie pleasure of the
PrGsidGiit*
Interest on $200,000 held in trust; 6th
, article treaty August 7,1856.
Life annuities, &c., two chiefs
Interest on $46,080, at 5 per c e n t u m .

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Delawares.
De

•

Vol. 7, page 287
Vol. 7, page 368, & c .
Vol. 7, page 287
Vol. 7, page 368, and
vol. 9, page 822.
Vol. 9, page 822

T w e n t y instalments, of $3,000 each;
t w o unappropriated.
5th article treaty February 14,1833, and
8th article treaty January 24, 1826.
Five per centum for education . . . . . . .

Do..
Do..
Do..
Miamies.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Eel River M i a m i e s .

Vol. 7, pages 287 and
419.
Vol. 11, pages 701 and
702.
Vol. 7, page 399
Vol. 7, page 327

Treaties of 1818,1829, and 1832
Resolution of the Senate, January 19,
1832.
Six payments of $3,000 e a c h . . . . . . . . .

490,0110 CO

22,200 00
4,400 00
600 00

12,000 00

10,000 00

200,000 00

6,000 00
-6,000 00
4,710 00

o

200 00
"46,* 080* bb
18,000 00

Six payments of $2,000 e a c h .
Six payments of $2,200 e a c h .

o

12,000 00
13,200 00

H

$25,000 annuities

2d article treaty October 19, 1838, and
9th article treaty May 17, 1854.
2d article treaty J a n u a r y 14, 1846
2d article treaty May 18, 1854
2d article treaty May 18,1854, $111,000
heretofore appropriated. Due
Vol. 9, page 953, and 3d article treaty May 12,1854, $9,000,
Pay of miller for fifteen years
vol. 10, page 1065.
$3,000 heretofore appropriated. Due
do
Support of smith's shop twelve y e a r s . .
Six instalments of $
each
Vol. 9, page 953
, 4th article treaty 1848, four to be vpaid..
T e n instalments of $20,000 each
Fifteen equal instalments, to pay Vol. 10, page 1065..., 4th article treaty May 12, 1854, and
$242,686; to commence in 1867.
Senate's amendment thereto.
P e r m a n e n t provision for smith's shop, Vol. 7, pages 191 and 5th article treaty October 6, 1818; 5th
464, and vol. 10, p. article treaty October 23, 1834, and
&c., and miller.
1095.
4th article treaty J u n e 5, 1854—say
$940 for shop and $600 for miller.
T w e n t y instalments upon $200,000.
Vol. 10, page 1094....
Vol. 10, page 1094.... 3d article treaty J u n e 5,1854. Sen- )
Interest on $50,000, at 5 per c e n t . . .
Vol. 10, page 1099....
Interest on $221,257 86 in t r u s t . . . .
ate's amendment 4th article treaty >
of 1854.
I
Vol. 7, pages 51, 91, 4th article treaty 1''795; 3d article treaty
Permanent a n n u i t i e s .
114, and 116. .
1805, and 3d article treaty September, 18 09. aggregate.




24,500 00

8th article treaty J a n u a r y , 1826, $600.
Thirty-three instalments, of $3,000
each; two yet unappropriated.

Seminoles, (Florida In- Ten instalments for support of schools; Vol. 11, page 702.
8th article treaty August 7,1856.
dians.)
.do .
T e n instalments for agricultural asDo
sistance; same article and treaty.
T e n instalments for support of smiths
Do.
and shops; same article and treaty.
Interest on $500,000, per 8th article
.do.
Do.
treaty August 7, 1856.
Interest on $57,000, being the balance Vol 7, page .568, and
Toways .
vol. 10, page 1071.
of $157,000.
Vol. 9, page 842
Interest on'$200,000
Kansas....
Vol. 10, page 1079...
Interest on $100,000
Kickapoos.
do
Graduated payments on $200,000 . . . . ,
Do....,
Menomonees .

4th article treaty August, 1790, $1,500;
2d article J u n e 16, 1802, $3,000;
4th article treaty J a n u a r y 24, 1826,
$20,000.
8th article treaty J a n u a r y 24, 1826—
say, $1,110.
Two of twenty-seven instalments to
be appropriated.

i

25,000 00

600,000 00

2,875-00
10,000 00
5,OOC 00

w

57,500 00
200,000 00
100,000 00

80,000 oa

o

4,800 00

CQ

5,499 98
80,000 00
242,686 00
1,540 00

2,500 00
11,062 89
^'

30,800 00

50,000 00
221,257 86

1,100 00

22,000 00

IN5

o

No, 13.—Statement showing the present liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes, (^.—<jontinued.

Wisqualty, Puyallup,
and other bands of
Puget's sound.
Omahas t . . . . . . . . .
Do.............

•

.

•

Reference to laws;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

Presents to Indians

Vol. 9, page 975

Pay of instructor, smith, physician,
, carpenter, &c., twenty years.
Forty instalm'ts graduated, ($840,000,)
extending over forty years.
Support of smiths' shops, miller, and
farmer, ten years.

10th article treaty September 9,1849...

OS

<

Vol. 10, page 1039.... 4th article treaty March 15,1854, seven
instalments paid, to be appropriated
hereafter.
Do
. . . Support of smiths' shops, miller, and Vol. 10, page 1040.... 7tli article treaty March 15,1854, estimated at _^$2,140 per year. Seven
farmer, ten years.
paid to be "appropriated.
Ottawas of Kansas.,.. Permanent annuities, their proportion Vol.7, pages 54,108, 4th article treaty August 13,1795; 4th
176, and 220.
and 5th articles freaty September
of.
' 17,1818; 4th article treaty'August
29, 1821, and 2d article treaty Novem.ber 17,1807. >
Resolution of Senate of May 19,1836,
Ottawas and Chippe- Interest on $240,000, at 5 per cent . . . . Vol. 7, page 497
$12,000 per year. .
was of Michigan.
8,300 00
D o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ed'ucation, $5,000; missions, $3,000; Vol. 7, page 492
See 4th article treaty of March 28,
medicines, $300, during the pleas1836.
ure of Congress.
6,440 00
Do , , ,
See 7th article treaty of March 28,
Three blacksmiths, &c., one gunsmith, Vol. 7, page 493
&c., two farmers and assistants, and
1836, annually allowed since the
two mechanics and assistants, durexpiration of the number of years

ing the pleasure.of the Pf eajxteflt.
iianieam txe^y?- 4^sre|§ie,.$6^,440.. 1

600,000 00
6,420 00
273,000 00
. 6,420 00
$2,600 00

,

$52,000 00

1,200 00

'

o
H
O

$58,500 00

Ottoes and Missonrias. Forty instalm'ts graduated, ($385,000,)
extending through forty years.



||

$5,000 00

Vol. 10, page 1134.... 10th article, treaty December 26,1854,
estimated at $4,500 per year; thirteen
instalments yet to be appropriated.
Vol. 10, page 1044.... Seven instalments paid, (see 4th article treaty March 16,1854,) to be appropriated.
Vol. 10, page 1045.... 8th article treaty, estimated $2,140 per
year; three years to be provided for.

o

Is
.2S

Am't held in trtist by the U. S.
on whichfiveper "cent. is.
annually paid; and amounts
which, invested at five per
' cent., would produce the
permanent annuities.

_ &c.

AggregEfte of future appropriaItions that will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

Names of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

o

240,000 00

DO
Do
Do
Do....^...
Do... ....

Do

Pawnees
Do
Do
Do........

T e n equat instalments ft)p edticattoii;, Treaty not published-.
$8,000 e a c h ; 2d article treaty, July
31, 1855.
.do. ,
Support of four smiths' shops for ten
years'; same article and treaty.
.do. ,
In part payment of $306,000; same
article and treaty.
^206,000, to be"paid after ten years. .. Vol. 11, page 624.
do
Interest on $176,000, five years, (same ,
article,) $35,200, and intericst bn five
unpaid instalments of $10,000,each,
$2,500.
.do.
T e n Instalments, of $3,.'>00 each, to be
paid to Grand River O t t a w a s ; same
article and treaty.
Agricultural implements,-during the
pleasure of the President.
Five instalments in goods^-and such
articles as may be necessary for
them.
For the support of t w o manual labor
schools.
For pay of two teachers

do
.do.

Do

,

F o r pay of two blacksmiths, one of
whom to be a gunsmith and tinsmith.
For compensation of two strikers and
apprentices in shop.
T e n instalments for farming utensils
^. and stock.

.do.

T e n instalments for pay of miller.

Do
Do

T e n instalments for pay of engineer..
For compensation to apprentices to
assist in vi^orking the mill.
Permanent annuities in money . . . . , ,

.do.

For pay of farmer

Do........

.do.

Pottawatomies

Do.

Life annuities to surAdving chiefs,,




.do.
.do.
Vol. 7, pages 51,114,
185.

Vol. 7, pagee 379 and
433.

206,000 00
37,700 60

14,000 00

T o be paid as per capita; four instalments yet to be paid, $3,500 each.
See 4th article treaty October 9,1853..

F o r purchase of iron and steel and
other necessaries for s a m e .

Do........

40,000 00

2d article treaty September 24, 1857 ;
four instalments appropriated, one
remaining.
3d article t r e a t y ; annually, during the
pleasure of the President.
3d article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation required.
4th article treaty; annual appropriations during the pleasure of the
President.
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriat i n n c required.
tions r p n i i i r o H do
.do.

,

Do........

17,000 00

$10,000 per year for ten y e a r s ; four
years to be appropriated.
Treaty July 31, 1855
Interest on unpaid consideration to be
paid as annuity.

Vol. 7, page 4 8 8 . . . . .

Do

Do

Four, of $4,250 each, to be paid

1st session 35th Congress, page 129.
do

33,000 00

Four instalments duo.

4th article treaty; four instalments
appropriated, six remaining, to be
appropriated at the pleasure of the
President.
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriations required.
4th article, t r e a t y ; four instalments
appropriated, six remaining at the
discretion of the President.
,
do
. . . . . do . . . . . . . .
4th article t r e a t y ; annual appropriation required.
4th article treaty 1795, $1,000 ; 3d art i d e treaty 1809; $500; 3d article
treaty 1818, $2,500 ; 2d article treaty
1828, $2,000; 2d article treaty July,
1829, $16,000; 10th article treaty
J u n e , 1846, $300.
3d article treaty October 16, 1832,
. $ 2 0 0 ; 3d article treaty September
26,1833, $700.

1,000 00
40,000 00

O

10,000 00

O

1,200 00
500 00
1,200 00

^
M
^

480 00

o
600 00
3,600 00
7,200 00
500 00
22,300 00

900 00

446,000 O
O

IO

No. 13.—statement showing the present liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes, <^c.—Continmed.
O < *± .
a

'i-jZQ

§2
0.0 c

rt"
c ^ fi o
N a m e s of tribes.

Description of annuities, stipulations
&c.

Reference to laws ;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

o T; .. <
U

D *^ '

.^ ^

ICS

5 ^'a,»

rt o - S i

os

Do

Permanent provision for three smiths.. Vol. 7, pages 318,296,
and 321.

Do

Permanent provisiorp^ for
salt.

Do

Rogue River
S h a s t a , Scoton, and
Umpqua Indians.

Do

Vol. 7, pages 75,296,
and 320.

Interest on $643,000, at 5 per c e n t . . . . Vol. 9, page 854

Pottawatomies of Huron.
Quapaws

Do

furnishing

i?,.....,

P e r m a n e n t annuities

,

V o l . 7 , page 1 0 6 . . . . . .

,
Provision 'for education $1,000 per Vol. 7, page 425
year, and for smith and shop and
farmer during the pleasure of the
President.
Sixteen instalments, of $2,500 e a c h . . . Vol. 10, page 1019...,
$2,000 annually for fifteen years .
Support of schools and farmer, fifteen
years.
Physicians, mediciiies, &c., for ten
years.




3d article treaty October 16, 1826 ; 2d
article treaty September ^0, 1826,
and 4th article treaty October 27,
1852, $5,000.
2d article treaty September 20, 1828;
3d article treaty October 16, 1826,
and 2d article treaty July 29, 1829,
three shops, at $940 each per year,
$2 820.
3d article treaty 1803; 3d article treaty
October, 1826, and 2d article treaty
July 29, 1829 ; estimated $500.
7th article treaty J u n e , 1846; annual
interest, $32,150.
2d article treaty November 17, 1807,
$400.
3d article treaty May 13, 1833, $1,000
per year for education, and $1,660
for smith, farmer, &c., $2,660.

3d article treaty September 10, 1853;
eight instalments yet to be appropriated.
Vol. lO;^page 1122..., 3d article treaty November 18, 1854;
, eight instalments yet to be appropriated.
Vol. 10,page 1 1 2 3 . . . . 5th article same treaty ; estimated for
s c h o o l s , $ l , 2 0 0 p e r y e a r , and farmer,
$ 6 0 0 ; $1,800 per year for eight
years.
Same article, three years, at ^1,060
.do.
per year.

.>
s'o >..; ^ 03
« f as:. ..0

.= ^

;F arts
Education during pleasure of Congress, Vol. 7, pages 296,318,
and 401.

B ,-5 p . =3

<£ 'E 's ^
tDtO C 2

Pottawatomies

^5

3 O *S C

£
< o rt ? o c

o

$5,000 00

o
$2,820 00

$56^400 00

500 00

10,000 00

^ , 1 5 0 00

2,660 00

643,000 00

400 00

. 8,000 00

o
CQ

$20,000 00
16,000 00
14,430 00

3,180 00

S^acs afid Poxes of Missouri.
Sacs and Foxes of Mississippi. '
Do
Do

Interest o n $157,400

Senecas.

Vol. 10, page 544

*

Permanent annuities

Permanent annuity

• •.

Interest on $200,000, at five per c e n t .
Interest on $800,000, at five per c e n t .
'..

2d article t r e a t y October 21,1837

7,870 00

Vol. 7, page 85

3d article treaty November, 1804.

1,000 00

20,000 00

10,000 00
40,000 00

200,000 00
800,000 00

1,000 00

20,000 00

11,902 50
1,000 00

238,050 00
20,000 00

Vol. 7, page 541
Vol. 7, page 595

2d article treaty October, 1837.
2d article treaty October 11, 1842,
$40,000.
Vol. 7, pages 161 and 4th article treaty September 29,1817,
179.
$500; 4th article treaty September
17, 1817, $500. ^
Vol. 7, page 349...."., 4th article treaty February 28,1831—
say $1,660. '

Provision for smith and smiths' shops
and miller during the pleasure of
the President.
Vol. 4, page 442.
Senecas of N e w York. P e r m a n e n t annuity
Vol. 9, page 3 5 . .
Interest on $75,000
.- Do
Interest on $43,050, transferred from
Do
the treasury to the Ontario Bank.
Vol. 7, page 179
Senecas and Shawnees Permanent annuity
Provisions for support of smiths and Vol. 7, page 352
Do
shops during the pleasure of the
President.
Permanent annuities for e d u c a t i o n . . . , Vol. 7, pages 51 and
Shawnees .
161, and vol. 10,
page 1056.
do
Interest on $40,000
«
Do
Six Nations of New^ Permanent annuity in clothing, & c . . . . Vol. 7, page 46
York.
Vol. 7, page 5 3 9 . .
Sioux of the Mississippi Interest on $300,000
Fifi;y instalments .of interest on Vol.10, page 951.
Do
$112,000, being ten cents per acre
for reservation.
Fifty instalments of interest on Vol.10, page 950.
Do
$1,360,000, at 5 per centum.
Fifty instalments
$1,100,000.

Do...

of

interest

on

Fifty instalments of interest on
$59,000, being ten cents per acre for
reservation.
Treaty of Fort Laramie, Five instalments, at the discretion of
the President, of $70,000 each.Do

\

Umpquas—Cow Creek
-band.
U m p q u a s , Calapooias,
& c . , Oregon.

T w e n t y instalments, of $550 each . . .
Twenty instalments; payments graduated. ,
Support of teachers, &c.,
years.




twenty

,Act February 19,1831
Act J u n e 27, 1846
Act J une 27, 1 8 4 6 . . .

157,400 09

1,660 00

$6,000 00
3,750 00
2,152 50

4th article treaty September 17, 1818.
4th article treaty July 20, 1831
,

4th article treaty August 3, 1795; 4th
article treaty September 29, 1817,
and 3d article treatv May 10,1854.
3d article treaty i^ay'lO, 1854
6th article treaty November 11, 1794,
$4,500 per a n n u m .
2d article treaty September 29, 1837...
Senate's amendment to 3d article; 39
instalments to be provided for, of
$5,600 each.
4th article treaty July 23,1851, $68,000
per a n n u m ; 39 instalments to be
provided for.
Vol. 10, page 955.
4th article treaty August 5, 1851,
$58,000 per a n n u m ; 39 instalments
yet to be appropriated.
Senate?s amendment to 3d article
Vol. 10, page 957.
treaty August 5, 1851; 39 instalments of $3,450 to be provided for.
Senate's amendment Five instalments, of $7,000 each, for
to treaty of Sept.
provisions and m e r c h a n d i s e ; for
17, 1851.
payment of annuities and transportation of the same, &c.
Vol. 10, page 1 0 2 8 . . . . 3d article treaty September 19,1853;
twelve instalments.
Vol. 10, page 1126.... 3d article treaty Nov. 29, 1854|; seven
instalments appropriated; thirteen
to be appropriated under direction
of the President.
Vol. 10, page 1 1 2 7 . . . . 6th article treaty; estimated.at $700
* per y e a r ; seven instalmerits appropriated; thirteen payable.

1,060 00

o
5,000 00

100,000 00

2,000 00
4,500 00

40,000 00
90,000 00

15,000 00

300,000 00

o
w

218,400 00
2,652,000 00
2,262,000 00

o
CQ

134,550 00
350,000 00

6,600 00
20,400 00

9,100 00
.CO

Reference to l a w s ;
Statutes at Large.

Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, remarks, &c.

o

is
rt w

if
o g

II

Am't held.in tr-ust by the U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid; and amounts
which, invested at five per
cent., would produce tbe
permanent annuities.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that-vvill be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

N a m e s of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now .illowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

No. 13.—Statement showing the p)resent liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes^ ^.—Continued

<
Umpquas, Calapooias,
&c., Oregon.
Do
Willamette
bands.

Valley

Winnebagoes..........
Do
Poncas...............
Do.
Do

allied tribes inWashington Territory.
Do
Do
Do

Physician, fifteen years

Vol. 10, page 1 1 2 7 . . . . 6th article t r e a t y ; estimated at $1,000
per y e a r ; seven instalments appropriated.
do
Smith and shop, and farmer, ten years.
6th article treaty; estimated at $1,660
per y e a r ; seven instalments appropriated.
^Twenty instalments; graduated pay- Vol. 10, page 1 1 4 4 . . . . 2d article treaty January 10, 1855;
ments.
seven instalments appropriated;
thirteen to be provided for, under
the direction of the President.
Interest on $1,100,000
Vol. 7, page 546
Thirty instalments of interest on Vol. 9, page 879
, 4th article treaty October 13, .1836,
$85,000.
$4,250 per y e a r ; fifteen instalments
to be provided for.
Five instalments for beneficial pur- Pamphlet copy Laws
poses, $12,000 each. .
1st session 36th
Congress, page 67.
do
T e n instalments for manual labor
Eight instalments, of $5,000 each, to
schools.
be provided.
Ten instalments, during the pleasure
do
Eight instalments, of $7,500 each, to
of the President, for aid in agriculbe provided.
tural and mechanical pursuits.
For $150,000 graduated payments, un- Pamphlet copy Laws 6th article treaty; twelve instalments
.1st session _ 36th
der tIie.dircction of the President.
yet to be provided for.
Congress, page 2.
Twenty instalments for an agricultural Pamphlet copy Laws 14th article; eighteen. instalments;
1st session 36th
school and teachers.
estimated amount.
Congress, page 3.
do #,
Twenty instalments for smith and carpenter shop aiad tools.
T w e n t y instalments, blacksmith, car- . . . . . . d o .
penter, farmer, and physician.




_

$8,000 00
4,980 00
84,000 00

$25,000 00

$1,100,000 00

63,750 00

• 36,000 00

o
CQ

40,000 00
60,000 00 ,
123,000 00

... . . . . n . . .

52,000 00
9,000 00
82,800 0 0 .

Makah tribe

Do.
Do.
Walla-Walla, Cayuses,
and Umatilla tribes.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Yakaina Nation.
Do

Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

, Fort30,000for beneficial objects j under
the direction of the President.
Twenty instalments for an agricultural
and industrial school and teachers.
Twenty instalments for smith and carpenter shop and tools.
Twenty instalments for blacksmith,
carpenter, farmer, and physician.
For $100,000 for beneficial objects,
under direction of the President.
For two millers, one farmer, one superintendent of farming operations,
two school teachers, one blacksmith, one wagon and plough maker,
and one carpenter .and joiner.
Twenty instalments for mill fixtures,
tools, medicines, books, stationery,
furniture, &c.
For $500 per annum for pay to each of
the head chiefs of these bands.
For salary of Pes-pes-mox
For $200,000 for beneficial objects, extending over a period of twenty-one
years.
For the support of two schools, one of
which to be an agricultural and industrial school, keeping them in repair, and providing furniture, book.s,
and stationery.
For one superintendent of teaching
and two teachers twenty years.
For one superintendent qf farming, and
two farmers, two millers, two blacksmiths, one tinner, one gunsmith,
one carpenter, and one wagon and
plough maker, twenty years.
Twenty instalments, keeping in repair
grist and saw mill, and furnishing
the necessary tools therefor.
For keeping in repair hospital and
furnishing medicines, &c.
For pay of physician for twenty years;
For keeping in repair buildings for
employes.
For salary of head chief twenty years.




Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 38th
Congress, page 14.
Pamphlet copy laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 15.
.do

i,..

Twenty instalments, graduated payments ; eighteen yet to be provided
for. •
Eighteen instalments to be provided
for, estimated at.
.do.

.do.

24,500 00
. 54,000 00
9,000 00

Eighteen instalments to be provided
for, estimated amount necessary.
Eighteen instalments to be provided
for, in graduated payments.

82,800 00

Eighteen instalments to be provided
for, estimated at.

201,600 00

Pamphlet copy Laws Eighteen instalments for these pur. 1st _ session 36th
poses, estimated at.
Congress, page 21.
do
, Twenty instalments ; eighteen unprovided for.
Eighteen instalments, of $100 each, to
.do.
• be provided for.
Pamphlet copy Laws Nineteen instalments, to be provided
1st session 36th
for.
Congress, page 27.
-TwentyInstalments; two appropri.....do.
ated ; eighteen to be provided, estimated at.

54,000 Q
O

.do. ,
Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 20.

.do. ,
.do. ,

Eighteen instalments to be provided
fbr, estimated, at.
Eighteen instalments yet to be. provided for, estimated at.

86,000 00

o

27,000 00
• 1,800 00
130,000 00

O
H

•9,000 00

.'>7,6O0 00
169,200 00

O
CO

.do.

Eighteen instalments, of $500 each, to
be provided for.

0,000 00

.do. ,

Eighteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at $300 per year.
Eighteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at.
do
do........

25,200 00

Eighteen instalments,of $500 each, to
be provided.

9,000 00

.do. ,
.do. ,
.do. ,

5,400 00
5,400 00

to

to

Nez Perc6s ..

Do

Do
Do

Do
Do
Do..
Do
Do
.
Flatheads and other
confederated tribes.
Do . . . .

For $200,000 for beneficial objects, ex- Pamphlet copy Laws
tending over a period of twenty-one
1st session 36th
years, under the direction of the
Congress, page 32.
President.
For the support of two schools, one of Pamphlet copy Laws
which to be an agricultural and in1st session 36th
dustrial school, keeping them in reCongress, page 33.
pair, and providing furniture, books,
and stationery.
For one superintendent of teaching
and two teachers twenty years.
For one superintendent of farming, Pamphlet copy Laws
and two farmers, two millers, two
1st' session 36th
blacksmiths, one tinner, one gunCongress, page 33.
smith, one. carpenter, and one wagon
and plough maker, twenty years.
Twenty instalments for keeping in repair grist and saw mill, and furnishing the necessary tools therefor.
For keeping in repair hospital and
furnishing necessary medicines, &c.
For pay of physician for twenty years.
For keeping in repair buildings for
employes. '
For salary of head chief twenty years.
For $120,000 for beneficial objects, Pamphlet copy Laws
extending over a period of twenty
1st session 36th
years, under the direciion of the
Congress, page 50.
Pre.=r-ident.
For the support of an agricultural and Pamphlet copy Laws
industrial school, providing neces1st session S6th
sary furniture, books, and stationery.
Congress, page 51.




Am't held in trust by the U. S.
' on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid; and amounts
which, invested at five per
cent., would produce the
pernianent annuities.

Amount of annual liabilities of
a permanent character. '

Description of annuities, stipulations, Reference to laws ; Number of instalments yet unappropriated, explanations, renuirks, &c.
• Statutes at Large.
&c.

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now allowed,but
liable to be discontinued.

Names of tribes.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

No. 13.—Statement showing the present liabilities of the United States to Indian tribes, (^.—-Continued.

O
H
O

$132,624 00

Eighteen instalments to be provided for.

9,000 00

Eighteen iiistalments to be appropriatedf estimated at.

H
W
.

Eighteen instalments required, estimated at.
Eighteen instalments to be appropriated, estimated at.

57,600 00
169,200 00

o
Eighteen instalments, of $500 each;, to
be appropriated.
Eighteen instalments, of $300 each, to
be provided for.
Eighteen instalments to be provided,
estimated at.
do
. . . . . . d o * . . . . ..
do
.
....-do.....
Eighteen instalments to be provided
for in graduated payments.

i^

....-•••«..•*..

9,000 00
5,400 00

«
.

25,200 00
5,400 00
9,000 00
78,000 00
5,400 00

-

Do

.,

F o r employment of suitable instructors therefor.
For keeping in repair blacksmith shop,
one carpenter's shop, one wagon
Do
and plough maker's shop, and furnishing tools therefor.
For t w o farmers, one blacksmith, one
farmer, one gunsmith, one carpenDo.......
,ter,two millers, and one wagon and
plough maker, twenty years.
For keeping in repair flouring and s a w
mill and supplying the necessary fixDo
tures.
For keeping in repair hospital, and furDo
:...
nishing the necessary rnedicines,&c.
Do.
, For pay of physician, twenty years . . .
Do
, For keeping in repair the buildings of
employes for twenty years.
For $500 per a n n u m for head Chief,
Do
nineteen years.
Confederated
tribes For 100,000 for beneficial objects, u n der the direction of the President,
and bands of Indians
graduated payments extending over
in Middle Oregon.
a period of twenty years.
For farmer, blacksmith, and wagon
Do.....
maker and plough maker, fifteen
years.
For physician, sawyer, miller, superDo
intendent of farming, and school
teacher, fifteen years.
For salary of the head chief of the
Do
confederated bands, twenty years.
For keeping in repair saw and flouring
Molel Indians
mill and furnishing suitable persons
to attend the same, ten years.
Do.
». For iron and steel and other materials
for the smith shop and the shop provided for in treaty of November 29,
1854, and for pay of the services of
necessary m<!chanics, for five years.
Do
For pay of teacher to m a n u a l labor
school, and tor subsistence of pupils,
necessary supplies, &c.
Do
For carpenter and joiner to aid in
erecting buildings, making" furniture, &c.
Do
For pay of one additional farmer, five
years. .
Qui-nal-elt and Quil- For $25,000 to be expended for beneleh-ute Indians.
ficial objects, under direction of the
President.




.do.

,do.

,.do.

32,400 00

.do.

.do.

.do.

5,400 00.

.do.

Eighteen instalments to be pFO\wded
for, estimated at.

133,200 00

.do .

9,500 00
Eighteen instalments, estimated a t .

...do .
...do .
.do .

.;.do.
...do.

5,400 00

.do.
.do.

25,200 00
5,400,00

.do

-9,000 00

Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 38.

Eighteen instalments to be provided
for.

76,000 00

Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36 th
Congress, page 39.
,
do

Thirteen instalments to be provided
for.

45,500 00

.do .

H
o

.do.

.do.

Eighteen instalments of $500 .

.do .

Amount necessary during pleasure of
President.

.do .

Eight instalments of $2,000 each

.do .

T h r e e instalments of $800 each
Eighteen instalments in graduated paym e n t s , to be provided for, amount
to.

O

72,800 00
9,000 CO

Parnphlet copy L a w s ' Estimated at
1st session 36th
Congress, page 55.
T h r e e instalments, at $1,,800 each .
do

Pamphlet copy L a w s
1st session 36th
Congress, page 46.

O

12,000 00
5,400 00

O

3,000 00
16,000 00
2,400 00
20,500 00

to

to

No. 13.—Statement showing the present liabilities of tlie United States to Indian trihes, 4^.—Continued

4iui-nai-elt and Quilleh-ule Indians.
Do
Do . . . . e

S'Klallams
Do
Do

For the support of an agricultural and
industrial school, and for th.e employment of suitable instruction,
twenty years.
For the support of a smith and carpenters' shop, and tools, twenty
years.
For the employment of blacksmith,
carpenter, farmer, and physician,
twenty years.
For $60,000, under direction of the
President.
For support of an agricultural and industrial school, and for teachers,
twenty years.
For employment of blacksmith, carpenter, farmer, and physician,
twenty years.




Reference to law^; Number of instalments yet unappropriStatutes at Large.
ated, explanations, remarks, &c.

do-

Eighteen instalments to be provided,
--estimated at.

rt >-

?«

.•si
§1
<11

•

$45,000 00

Eighteen instalments, of $500 each,
required.

Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 47.

o

Is

Am'f held in trust by the U. S.
on whichfiveper cent, is
annually paid; and amounts
V which, invested at five per
cent., would produce the
permanent annuities.

Description of annuities, stipulations,
&c.

Aggregate of future appropriations that will be required
during a limited number of
years to pay limited annuities till they expire, amounts
incidentally necessary to effect the payment.

Names of tribes.

Annual amount necessary to
meet stipulations, indefinite
as to time, now allowed, but
liable to be discontinued.

(!>0

o

9,000 00

1-9

82,800 00

do
Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 8.
Pamphlet copy Laws
1st session 36th
Congress, page 9.
do

49,000 00

Eighteen instalments, graduated payments.

45,000 00
82,800 00
$57,670 00

o
Ul

11,896,706 69 $3^,254 39 $7,051,087 86

•

^

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

219

No. 14.
Gold and silver coinage dt the mint of the United States in the several years
from its establishment, in 1792, and including the coinage of the branch mints
and the assay office, (New York,) from their organization to June 30, 1861.

Years.

Gold.

Silver.

1793 to 1795
„
$71,485 00
$370,683 80
102,727 50
79,077 50
1796---....i
. 103,422 50
1797 —
„.
-,
—.
12,591 45
205,610 00
1798
o
330,291 00
213,285 00
1799
i
423,515 00
317,760 00
224,296 00
1800 - -. . a-. .--.— . 422,570 00
1801
-„--.74,758 00
423,310 00
58,343 00
1802
c
.-—
268,377 50
87,118 00
1803
•-.. . - .
-.
258,642 50
100,340 50
1804
,:..
170,367 50
149,388 50
1805
<
..--;
324,505 00
471,319 00
1.806......
,.
„
437,495 00
597,448 75
1807 . -„
^. ^
284,665 00
684,300 00
1808 ---169,375 00
707,376 t)0
1809.—...o—
»...„ !
,601,435 00
638,773 50
1810^
,*,..e
497,905 00
608,340 00
1811
.—..o.
290,435 00
, 814,029 60
1812
477,140 00
620,951 50
1813
«
77,270 00
661,687 50
1814
«•
8,175 00
17,308 00
1815
28,575 76 1
1816
i
.
—.1
607,783 50
1817
«.,
i
1,070,454 50
1818
-.
.
J """'242°940'oo'
1,140,000 00
258,615 00
1819,501,680 70
1,319,030 00
1820...
,
825,762 45
189,325 00
1821
- 805,806 50
88,980 00
1822„...
- . ...J
.
895,550 00
72,425 00
1823.
,1,752,477 00
93,200 00
1824
--1,564,583 00
156,385 00
1825.-..
—o
92,245 00 1 2,002,090 00
1826
' . —..»,.,J
-—
2,869,200 00
131,565 00
1827
c
1,575,600 00
140,145 00
1828
..•.
flOOQ
1,994,578 00'
295,717 50
2,495,400 00
643,105 00
1830 — .
_.«........
3,176,600 00
. 714,270 00
1831
•
.
,
2,579,000 00• 798,435 00
1832
•,«,...-.
978,550 00 . 2,759,000 oa
1833
0
'
3.415.002 '00
3,954,270 00
1834..
.-,„«..;
3.443.003 00
2,186,175 00
1835
«,
.
3,606,100 00
4,135,700 00
1836
«.».--.o-.o. — o
2,096,010 00
1,148,305 00
1837
«-.
2,315,250 00
1,809,595 00
1838
.—
.
2,098,636 00
1,375,760 00
t839 - .„
....^-.„-.
1,712,178 00
1,690.802 00
J840
. - .-o
----1,115,875 00
1,102,-097 50
1841
...-..-«.-.--..
2,325,750 00
1,833,170 50
1842
— 3,722,250 00
8,302,787 50
1843
«„oi.-..-.
2,235,550 00
6,428,230 00
1844
.
1,873,200 00
8,756,447 50
im.\Z.,\\\\"
o




Aggregate.

$444,168 80
181,805 00
116,013 95
635,901 00
, 636,800 00
642,056 00
497,328 00
481,653 00
345,495 50
358,983 00
319,756 00
795,824 00
1,034,943 75
968,965 00
876,751 00
1,140,208 50
1,106,246 00
1,104,464 60
1,098,091 50
638,957 50
^,483 00
28,575 75
607,783 60
1,313,394 50
1,398,615 00
1,820,710 70
1,015,087 45
894,786 50
967,975 00
1,845,677 00
1,720,9.68 00
2,094,335 00
3,000,765 00
1,716,745 00
2,290,295 50
3,138,505 00
3,889,870 00
8,377,435 00
3,737,550 00
7,369,272 00
5,629,178 OQ
7,741,800 00
3,244,315 00
4,124,845 00
3,474,396.-00
3,402,980 00
2,217,972 50
4,158,920 60
12,025,037 50
7,663,780 00
5,629,647 60

220

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 14.—Gold and silver coinage at the mint, 8fc.—Continued.

Years.

Gold.

"^

Silver.

Aggregate.
•

1846
1847
1848.-.
1849
1850 -.1
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855 (to September
1856 (to September
1857 (to September
1858 (to September
1859 (to June 30)
1860 (to June 30)
1861 (to June 30)

Total




-.
--.
1
-.

30)
30)
30)
30)

.

i

$4,034,177
20,221,385
3,775,512
9,007,761
31,981,738
62,614,492
56,846,187
55,213,906
52,094,595
41,166,557
58,936,893
48,437,964
51,841,433
19,777,418
23,447,283
80,708,400

50
00
50
50
50
50
50
94
47
93
41
31
91
70
35
64

668,654,939 Q
Q

$2,558,580
2,374,450
2,040,050
2,114,950
1,866,100
774,397
999,410
9,077,571
8,619,270
2,893,745
5,347,070
3,375,608
9,028,531
4,699,223
3,250,636
2,883,706

00
$6,592,757 50
00
22,595,835,00
r 5,815,562 50
00
11,122,711 50
00
00
33,847,838 50
00
63,388,889 50
57,845,597 50
00
00
64,291,477 94
00
60,713,865 47
00
44,060,302 93
49
64,283,963 90
01
51,813,572 32
44.
60,869,965 35
95
24,476,642 65
26
26,697,919 61
94 • 83,592,107 58

128,137,181 99

796,792,121 65

221

REPORT ON THE FINANCfES.

N o . 15.
Statement exhibiting the amount of coin a n d bullion imported a n d exported
annually f r o m 1821 to 1S61, inclusive, a n d also the amount of importation
over exportation, a n d exportation,over importation d u r i n g t h e same years.
Coin and bullion.
Year ending—
Imported.

September 30

-.-1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 months, to June 30, 1843
Year ending June 30, 1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854'
1855
. 1856
1857
188^
'5'
^ 1859
1860
1861

Total.

$8,064,890
3,369,846
5,097,896
8,379,835
6,150,765
6,880,966
8,151,130
7,489,741
7,403,612
8,155,964
7,305,945
5,907,504
7,070,368
17,911,632
13,131,447
13,400,881
10,516,414
17,747,116
5,595,176
8,882,813
4,988,633
4,087,016
22,390,559
5,830,429
4,070,242
3,777,732
24,121,289
6,360,224
6,651,240
4.628,792
5;453,592
5,505,044
4,201,382
6,958,184
3,659,812
4,207,632
12,461,799
19,274,496
6,369,703
8,550,135
46,339,611
386,501,487

Excess of im- Excess of exportation over portation over
exportation.
importation.

Exported.

$10,477,969
10,810,180
6,372,987
7,014,552
8,787,659
4,704,533
8,014,880
8,243,476
4,924,020
2,178,773
9,014,931
5,656,340
2,611,701
2,076,7.58
6,477,775
4,324,336
5,976,249
3,508,046
8,776,743
8,417,014
10,034,332
4,813,539
1,520,791
5,454,214
8,606,495
3,905,268
1,907,024
15,841,616
5,404,648
7,522,994
29,472,752
42,674,135
27,486,875
41,436,456
56,247,343
45,745,485
69,136,922
52,633,147
63,887,411
.66,546,239
29,791,080
718,437,(

$2,413,079
7,440,334
1,275,091
$1,365,283
2,636,894
2,176,433
136,250
753,735
"2,"479i"592
5,977,191
"l,"708,"986
251,1^4
4,458,667
15,834,874
6,653,662
9,076,545
4,540,165
14,239,070
3,181,567
465,799
5,045,699
726,523
20,869,768
376,215
4,530,253
127,536
22,214,265
9,481,392
""i,'246,'592
2,894,202
24,019,160
37,169,091
23,285,493
34,478,272
52,587,531
41,537,853
56,675,123
33,358,651
57,517,708
57,996,104
16,648,531
128,910,076

460,846,277

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, Nofvemher 27,1861.



222

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 16.

Statement exhihiting the gross value qf exports and imports-from the beginning
( f the government to the 30th qf June, 1S61.
Exports.
Year ending

$19,666,000
September 30....1790
1791
18,500,000
1792
19,000,000
1793
24,000,000
1794
26,500,000
1795
39,500,000^ •
1796
40,764,097
1797
29,850,206
1798
28,527,097
1799
33,142,522
1800
31,840,903
1801
47,473,204
1802
36,708,189
1803
42,205,961
1804
41,467,477
1805
42,387,002 •
1806
41,263,727
1807
48,699,592
1808
9,433,546
1809.
31,405,702
1810
42,366,675 V
1811
45,294,043
1812
30,032,109.
1813 ' 25,»Q08,132
1814
6,782,272
1815
45,974,403
1816
64,781,896
1817
68,313,500
1818
73,854,437 '
1819
50,976,838
1820
51,683,640
1821
43,671,894
1822
49,874,079 .
47,155,408
\ 1823
1824
50,649,500
1825
66,944,745
1826
63,055,710
1827
68,'921,691
1828
50,669,669
1829
55,700,193
1830
59,462,029
'
1831
61,277,057
1832
63,137,470
\
1833
70,317,698
1834
81,024,162
1835
101,189,082
1836
106,916,680
1897
95,564,414
1838
96,033,821
1839
103,533,891




Imports—total.

•

Domestic pro- . Foreign merduce.
chandise.

Total.
•

$539,156
$23,000,000
$20,205,156
512,041
29,200,000
19,012,041
1,753,098
31,500,000
20,753,098
2,109,572
26,109,572
31,100,000
6,526,233
33,026,233
34,600,000
8,489,472
47,989,472
69,756,268
26,300,000
67,064,097
81,436,164
27,000,000
75,379,400
66,850,206
33,000,000
61,527,097
68,551,700
45,523,000
78,665,522
79,069,148
39,,130, 877
70,971,780
91,252,768
46,642,721
94,115,925
111,363,511
35,774,971
72,483,160
76,333,333
13,594,072
55,800,033
64,666,666
36,231,597
77,699,074
85,000,000
53,179,019
95,566,021
120,600,000
60,283,236. 101,536,963
129,410,000
59,643,558 ' 108,343,150
138,500, 000
12,997,414
22,430,960
56,990,000
20,797,531
52,203,233
• 59,400,000
24,391,295
66,657,970
85,400,000
16,022,790
61,316,833
53,400.000
8,495,127 . 38,527,236
77,030,000
2,847,865
* 27,855,997
22,005,000
145,169
6,927,441
12,965,000
6,683,350
52,657,753
113,041,274
17,138,156
81,920,452
147,103,000
19,358,069
87,671,560
99,250,000
19,426,696
98,281,133
121,750,000
19,165,683
70,142,521
87,125,900
18,008,029
69,691,669
74,450,000
21,302,488
64,974,382
62,585,724
22,286,202
72,160,281.
83,241,541
27,543,622 . 74,699,030
77,579,267
25,337,157
75,986,657
80,549,007
32,590,643
99,535,388
96,340,075
24,53^,612
77,595,322
84,974,477
23,403,136
82,324,727
79,484,068
21,595,017
72,264,686
8'8,509,824
16,658,478 " 227368,671
74,492,527
14,387,479
73,849,508
70,876,920
20,033,526
81,310,583
103,191,124
24,039,473
87,176,943
101,029,266
19,822,735
90,140,443
108,118,311
23,312,811, 104,336,973
126,521,332
20,504,495
121,693,577
149,895,742
21,746,360 ' 128,663,040
189,980,035
21,854,962
117,419,376
140,989,217
12,452,795
108,486,616
113,717,404
162,092.1^9.
17,494,626
121,028,416

•

REPORT ON T H E FINANCES,.

223

N o . 16 — S t a t e m e n t exhibiting the gross value q f exports^ S^.—Continued.
Exports.
Year ending—

Imports—totaL
Domestic produce.

&pt€!mber 30-.-.1840
1841
1842
SfbV. 9.toJune30, 1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
Total

Foreign merchandise.

$113,895,634
106,382,722
92,969,996
77,793,783
99,715,179
99,299,776
102,141,893
150,637,464
132,904,121
132,666,955
136,946,912
196,.689,718
192,368,984
213,417,697
253,390,870
246,708,553
310,586,330
338,985,065
293,758,279
335,894,385
373,189,274
227,966,169

$18,190,312
15,469,081
11,721,538
6,552,697
11,484,867
15,346,830
11,346,623
8,011,158
21,128,010
13,088,865
14,951,808
21,698,293
17,289,382
17,558,460
24,850,194
28,448,^93
16,378,578
23,975,617
30,886,142
20,895,077
26,933,022
20,539,285

Tot^L -

$132,085,936
121,851,803
104,691,534
84,346,480
111,200,046
114,646,606
113,488,516
158,648,622
154,032,131
145,755,820
151,898,720
218,388,011
209,658,366
230,976,157
278,241,064
275,156,846
326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
356,789,462
400,122,296
248,505,454

$107,141,519
127,946,177
100,162,087
64,753,799
108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797.
146,-545, 638
154,998,928
147,851,43^
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
167,978,647
304,562,381
261,-468,520
314, 63'9,942
360,890,141
282,613,150
338,765,130
362,163,941
334,350,453

6,700,802,122 1,489,259,845 8,190,061,967

8,976,327,211

JTOTE.—Prior to 1821 the treasury reports did not give the value of imports. To that
period their value, and also the value of domestic and foreign exports, have been estimated
from.sq^urces believed to be authentic. From 1821 to 1859, inclusive, their value has been
taken from of&cial documents.
L. B. CHITTENDEN, Register.
tooAsuRT DEPARTMENT,
Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




224

REPORT

ON T H E

FINANCES.

No. 17.
Statement exMbiting, the amount of the tonnage of the United States, annually^
from 1789 ^0 1861, inclusive; also the registered and enrolled and licensed
tonnage employed in steam navigation in each year.

Year ending-

Registered
Eeglstered
^ sail tonnage. steam tonnage.

Enrolled and Enrolled and
licensed sail licensed steam
tonnage.
tonnage.

Total ton-

Tons.

December 3 1 , 1 7 8 9 . .
1790.1791-1792-.
1793..
1794.1795-.
1796.1797-. 17981799-.
1800..
1801-1802.1803-1804..
1805..
1806-.
1807.1808-.
1809-1810..
1811-.
1812..
1813..
1814..
1815-.
1816-.
1817..
18181819-1820-.
18211822..
18231824-1825..
1826.:
1827..
1828-1829
1830-1831
1832-1833-.
1834.Sept.
30,1835-1836.




123, 893
346, 254
362, 110
411, 438
367, 734
438, 863
629, 471
576, 733
597, 777
603, 376
662, 197
559, 921
632, 907
560, 380
597, 157
672, 630
749, 341
808, 265
848, 307
769, 054)
910, 009
984, 269
768 852
760, 624
674, 863
674, 633
854, 295
800, 760
800, 725
606, 089
612, 930
619, 048
619, 896
628 150
639, 921
669 973
700 788
737, 978
747 170
812 619
650, 143
575 056
619 575
686 809
749 482
857 098
885 481
897 321

77 669
132 123
139 036
153 019
153 030
189 755
218 494
255 166 •
279 136
294 952
•277 212
302 571
314 670
331 724
352 015
369 874
391 027
400 451
420 241
473 542
440 222
'440 515
463 650
509 373
491 776
484 577
613 833
'
671 459
690 187
619 096
647 821
661 119
679 062
696 549
671 766
697 580
699 263
762 154
833 240
' 889 355
- 556 618
552 248
1,419
877
613 827
181
661 827
645
754 819
340
778 995
340.
816 645
454
839 226

24,879
21,610
23,061
34,059
40,198
39,418
64, 037
63,053
33,568
90,633
101,305
122,474
122,474
145,102

201,562
274,377
502,^46
564,457
520,764
628,618
747,965
831,899
876,913
898,328
939,409
972,492
947,577
892,104
949,172
,042,404
,140,363
,208,716
,'268,548
,242,596
,350., 281
,424,784
,232,502
,269,997
,166,629
,159,210
,368,128
,372,219
,399,912
,225,185
,260,751
,280,167
,298,958
,324,699
,336,566
,389,163
,423,112
,534,191
,620,608
,741,392
,260,798
,191,776
,267,847
,439,450
,606,151
,758,907
,824,940
,822,103

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

225

No. 17.—Statement exhibiting the amount of the tonnage, S^c.—Continued.
Pi-egistered Registered Enrolled and Enrolled and Total tonsail tonnage. steam ton- licensed sail icensed steam
nage.
tonnage.
tonnage.
nage.
Year ending—
Tons.
September 30,1837..
1838..
1839-.
1840.1841.1842..
June
80,1843..
1844..
1845..
1846.1847..
1848-1849.1850-.
1851..
' 1852.1853.1854-.
1855..
1856..
1857..
1858..
1859..
I860..
1861--

809,343
819,801
829,096
895,610
945,057
970,658
1,003,932
1,061,866
1,088,680
1,123,999
1,235,682
1,344,819
1,418,072
1,540,769
1,663,917
1,819,744
2,013,154
2,238,783
2,440,091
2,401,687
2,377,094
2,499,742
2,414,654.
2,448,941
2,540,020

932,576
1,104
2,791
982,416
5,149
1,062,445
4,155
1,082,815
746
1,010,599
4,701
892,072
5,373
917,804
6,909
946,060
6,492
1,002,303
6,287
1,090,192
5,631
1,198,523
16,068
1,381,332
20,870
1,453,459
44,429
1,468,738
62,390
1,524,915
79,704
1,675,456
90,520
1,789,238
95,036
1,887,512
115,045
2,021,625
89,715.
1,796,888
86,873
1,857,964
78,027 . 2,550,067
92,748
1,961,631
97,296
2,036,990
102,608
2,122,589

153,661
190,632
199,789
198,184
174,342
224,960
231,494
265,270
319,527
341,606
399,210
411,823
441,525
481,005
521,217
563,536
514,098
581,571
655,240
583,362
618,911
651,363
676,005
770,641
774,596

1,896,684
1,995,640
2,096,479
2,180,764
2,130,744
2,092,391
2,158,603
2,280,095
2,417,002
2,562,084
2,889,046
3,154,042
3,334,016
3,535,454
3,772,439
4,138,440
4,407,010
4,802,902
5,212,001
4,871,652
4,940,842
5,049,808
5,145,038
5,353,868
5,539,813

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, N&vember 27, 1861.

Ex. Doc. 2-

-15




No. 18.

to

.

CO

a:)
Statement showing the revenue collected from the beginning of the government to J u n e 30, 1861, under the several heads qf customs,
public lands, and miscellaneous sources, including loans and treasury notes; also the expenditures during the same period, and the
p)articular tariff, and the price qf lands, under ichich the revenue from those sources was collected.

Years.

Date of tariff.

From customs.

From public
lands.

Price per From miscella- That portion of
miscellaneous
neous sources,
acre.
arising from
includ'g loans
loixns & treasand treasury
ury notes.
notes.

Total receipts.

Total expenditures.

O

From March 4,
1789, to Dec.
31, 1791.

$1, by act
of May
20,1785

$4,399,473 09 jJuly 4, 1789, gen-

eral; Aug. 10,
1790, general;
March 3, 1791,
general.
3,443,070 85 May 2, general

1792
1793
1794

6,567,987 94]

1797

$7,207,539 .02

$4,836 13 'S2,byact
of May
18,1796
83,540 60

5,070,806 46
1,067,701 14
4,609,196 78

8,740,766 77
5,720,624 281
10,041,101 65

9,141,569 67
7,529,575 55
9,302,124 74

3,831,341 53|
=2,167,505 56

3,305,268 20
362,800 00

9,419,802 79
8,740,329 65

10,435,069 65
8,367,776 84

1,125,726 15

70,135 41

8,758,916 40

8,626,012 78

July 8, special.
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
18031
1804

7,106, 061
6,610,449
9,080,932
10,750,778
12,438,235
10,479,417
11,098,565




11,963 111
May 13, special ,

March 26, special;
Mar. 27, special.

O

W

5, special;
June 7, general.
5,588,461 26 Jan. 29, general..

7,549,649 65 March 3, general

$10,210,025 75

5,297,695 92
1,465,317 72
5,240,036 37

4,255,306 56
4,801,065 28 I June

17951
1796

$5,810,552 66 $5,791,112 56

443
167,726
188,628
165,675
487,526

75
06|
02
69
79

1,091, 045 03
6,011, 010 53
3,369, 807 66
2,026, 950 96
2, .374, 527 56
419, 004 33}
249, 747 90

308,574
5,074,646
1,602,435
10,125
5,597

27
531
04
00
36

9,532 64

8,209 ,070
12,621 ,459
12,451 ,184
12,945 ,455
15,001 391
11,064,,097
11,835 840

07
84]
14
95
31
63]
02

8,613, 517
11,077, 043
11,989, 739
12,273, 376
13,276, 084
11,258, 983
12,624, 646

68
50
92
94
67
67
36

a
Ul

1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
vl813
1814
1815
1816

12,936,487
14,667,698
15,845,521
16,363,550
7,296,020
8,583,309
13,313,222
8,958,777
13,224,623
5,998,772
7,282,942
36,306,874

04
17
61
58
58
31
73
53 July 1, special . .
25 July 29, special .,
08
22

1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828

26,283,348
17,176,385
20,283,608
15,005,612
13,004,447
17,589,761
19,088,433
17,878,325
20,098,713
23.341,331
19,712,283
23,205,523

49
00 April 20, special-,
76 March 3, special..
15
15
94
44
71 May 22, general.,
45
77
29
64
19, general

Feb., 6, special
April 27, gen'l.

540, 193
765, 245
4^)6, 163
647, 939
442, 252
696, 548
1,040, 237
710, 427
835, 655
1,135, 971
1,287, 959
1,717, 985

80
73
27
06
33
82
53
78
14
09
28
03

1,991,226
2,606,564
3,274,422
1,635,871
1,212,966
1,803,581
916,523
984,418
1,216,090
1,393,785
1,495,845
1,018,308

212, 827
175, 884
86, 334
51, 054
35, 200
2,864, 348
78, 377
12,969, 827
26.464, 566
27,424, 793
42,390, 336
19,146, 561

30
88
38
45
21
40
88
45
56
78
10
91

5,559,017
1,810,986
1,047,633
4,240,009
5,356,290
839,084
535,709
6,518,468
5,526,054
525,317
1,758,235
539,796

128,814 94
48,897 71
1,882 16
2,759,992
8,309
12,837,900
26,184,435
23,377,911
35,264,320
9,494,436

25
05
00
00
79
78
16

734,542
8,765
2,291
3,040,824
5,000,324

59
62
00
13
00

5,000,000 00
5,000,000 00

13,689,508
15,608,828
16,398,019
17,062,544
7,773,473
12,144,206
14,431,838
22,639,032
40,524,844
34,559,536
50,961,237
57,171,421

14
78
26
09
12
53
14
76
95
95
60
82

13,727,124
15,070,093
11,292,292
16,764,584
13,867,226
13,319,986
13,601,808
22,279,1-21
39,190,520
38,028,230
39,582,493
48,244,495

41
97
99
20
30
74
91
15
36
32
35
51

33,833,592 33

40,877,646
35,104,875
24,004,199
21,763,024
19,090,572
17,676,592
15,314,171
31,898,538
23.585,804
24,103,398
22,656,764
25,459,479

04
40
73
85
69
63
00
47
72
46
04
52

21,593,936 66
24,605.665
20,881,493
19,573,703
20,232,427
20,540,666
24,381,212
26,840,858
25,260,434
22,966,363
24,763,629

37
68
72
94
26
79
02
21
96
23

May 24, special
1829
1830

22,681,965 91
21,922,391 39 May

1,517,175 13
2,329,356 14

628,486 34
592,368 98

24,827,627 38
24,844,116 51

1831
1832

24,224,441 77
28,465,237 24 July

3,210,815 48
2,623,381 03

1,091,563 57
776,942

28,526,820 82
31,865,561 16

29,032,508

3,967,682 55

948,234 79

33,948,426 25 .

16,214,957
19,391,310
23,409,940

4,857,600 69
14,757,600 75
24,877,179 86

719,377 71
1,281,175 76
2,539,675 69

21,791,935 55
35,430,087 10
50,826,796 08

24,601,982 44
17,573,141 56
30,868,164 04

O
H
td

w
^

s

^

24,257,298 49

1834

O

30,038,446 12
34,356,698 06

1833

W
H
*j
i

To Dec.31,1835
1836

20, special
May 29, special




13, special
July 14, general
91 Mar. 2, sp'l;' Mar
2, compromise.
15
59
53

25,044,358 40
24,585,281 55

Ul

to

to
to

N o . 18.—Statement showing the revenue collected f r o m the beginning o f the government to J u n e 30, 1 8 6 1 , S^c.—Continued.

oo
From customs.

Years.

To Dec. 81,1837
1838
18391
1840|
1841
18421

To June 80,1843
1843-'44
1844-'45'
1845-'46
1846-47
1847-'48|
1848-'49
1849-'50
1850-'51
1851-'52|
1852-'5J

1853-'54
1854-'55!

1855-'56!

Date of tariff.

$6,776,236
3,081,939
7,076,447
8,292,285
jSeptember ll,gen-j 1,365,627
eral.
18,187,908 76 August 30, gen-| 1,335,797
eral.
897,818
7,046,843
2,059,939
26,183,570
2,077,022
27,528,112
2,694,452
26,712,667
23,747,864
July 80, 1846, 2,498,355
general.
March 29, 1848, 3,328,642
31,757,070
special.
1,688,959
August 12, 1848,
28,346,738
special; January
26,1849, special.
1,859,894
39,668,686
2,352,305
49,017,567
2,043,239
47,339,326
1,667,084
58,931,865
8,470,798
64.224,190
11,497,049
53,025,794
8,917,644
64,022,863

$11,169,290
16,158,800
23,137,924
13,499,502
14,487,216




Price per From miscella- That portion of
miscellaneous
neous sources,
acre.
includ'g loans arising from
aud treasury loans & treasury notes.
notes.

From public
lands.

52'
47
35
58
42

$9,938,326
19,778,642
6,125,653
8,240,405
14,666,633

Total expenditures.

Total receints.

98 $2,992,989 15 $27,883,853 84 $37,265,037 15
39,455,438 35
77 12,716,820 861 •39,019,382 60
83,881,242 89
87,614,936 15
661 3,857,276 21
25,032,193 691
28,226,533 81
84 6,589,547 51
80,519,477 65|
31,797,530 03
49 13,659,317 88

62

16,250,038 61 14,808,735 64

84,773,744 89

82,936,876 63

11
80
30
48
20

12,837,748 43 12,651,409 19
1,877,847 95
2,955,044
836,718 901
292,847 39
28,900,765 86

20,782,410
31,198,555
29,941,853
29,699,967
65,838,168

12,118,106
33,642,010
30,490,408
27,632,282
60,520,851

21,293,780 00

56,992,479 21

56
55

25
30
58
99
39
07
93

29,091,948 66
21,906,765 69
29,761,194 61
6,120,808
1,392,831
510,549
901,152
1,107,302
828,531
1,116,391

21
03|
40
30
74
40
81

29,075,815 48

4,056,600
207,664
46,300
16,372
1,950
800
200

00
92
00
50
00
00
00

45|
73
90
74
52

H
O

w

88
25
601
81
40|
68J
24

60,655,143 19

o

56,386,422 74

69,796,892
47,649,388
52,762,704
49,893,115
61,500,102
73.802,291
65,351,374
74,056,899

15
85
71
90
74

O

Ul

44,604,718
48,476,104
46,712,608
54,577,061
75,473,119
66,164,775
72,726,341

26
31
83
74
08
96
57

1866-'57
1857-'58
1858-'59
1869-'60
1860-'61
Total

63,876,905 05
41,789,620 96 March 3, 1857,
general.
49,565,824 38
53,187,511 87
89,582,125 64
1,576,152,579 92

3,829,486 64
3,513,715 87

1,263,820 88
3,900 00
25,069,329 13 23,717,300 00

68,969,212 57
70,372,665 96

71,274,587 37
82,062,186 74

1,756,687 30
1,778,557 71
870,658 54

30,451,453 96 28,287,500 00
21,875,338 25 20.776,800 00
83,206,693 56 82,314,493 92

81,773,965 64
76,841,407 83
86,835,900 27

83,678,642 92
77,055,125 65
84,578,834 47

175,817,961 20

-558,240,987 00 462,935,664 64 2,270,929,166 53 2,235,677,161 61

^ The aggregate receipts show a less sum than the total of customs, lands, and miscellaneous, which is accounted for by deductions at sundry times
; per account of the treasurer for unavailable funds.
L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1861




O
H
O
fe5

H

w

a
t?d

to

o

230

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 19.—Statement exhibiting the value of manufactured articles of domestic
1848.

1849.

$161,527 $134,577 1^121,720
Wax
253,900
129,001
124,824
Refined sugar
2,207
1,941
1,653
Chocolate
67,129
90,957
67,781
Spirits from grain
269,467
2<J3,609
288,452
Spirits from molasses
Spirits from other materials
7,442
5,563
20,959
Molasses
14,0o^6
9,526
13,920
Vinegar
51,320
78,071
68,114
Beer, ale, porter, and cider
148,056
331,404
498,110
Linseed oil and spirits of turpentine..
Lard oil
237,342
225,700
297,358
Household furniture
95,923
75,369
89,963
Coaches and other carriages
64,967
59,536
55,493
Hats
•
13j102
37,276
27,435
Saddlery
Tallow candles and soap, and other
627,280
606,798
670.223
candles
,
613,044
658,950
568,435
Snuft' and tobacco
243,816
151,774
194,095
Leather, boots, and shoes
,
27,054
29,911
41,636
Cordage
88,397
125,263
131,297
Gunpowder
42,333
73,.274
82,972
Salt
124,981
84,278
30,198
Lead
Iron108,817
149,358
Pig, bar, and nails
154,036
60,175
68,889
Castings
83,188
886,639
All manufactures of
929,778 1,022,408
Copper and brass, manufactures o f . . .
66,203
64,980
61,468
Medicinal drugs
220,894
165,793
210,581
Cotton piece g o o d s 469,777
Printed or colored
290,114
,353,534
Uncolored
3,345,902 4,866,559 3,955,117
' 92,555
T w i s t , yarn, and thread
108,132
170,633
Other manufactures of
415;680
338,375
327,479
Hemp and flax—
477
1,009
Cloth and thread
495
Bags and all manufactures of
5,305
4,549
6,218
Wearing apparel
47,101
75,945
574,834
4,758
10,632
Earthen and stone ware
8,512
17,026
38,136
Combs and buttons
16,461
2,967
2,924
Brushes and brooms
2,160
615
701
Billiard tables and apparatus
• 12
2,150
800
Umbrellas, parasols, and s u n s h a d e s . .
2,916
Manufactures of India-rubber
,
Leather and morocco, (not sold per
pound)
9,427
29,856
16,483
Fire-engines and apparatus
548
3,443
7,686
28,031
Printing presses and types
17,431
30,403
23;713
Musical instruments
16,997
38,508
94,427
Books and m a p s . ,
,
44,751
75,193
86.827
88,731
78,307
'Paper and stationery.
,
55^145
54,115
50,739
Paints and varnish
101,419
71,155
76,007
Manufactures of glass
13,143
6,363
12,353
Manufactures of tin
13,196
13,694
7,739
Manufactures of pewter and l e a d . . . . ,
20,282
11,220
22,466
Manufactures of marble and s t o n e . , . ,
Manufactures of gold and silver, and
gold leaf
4,21
4,502
6,241
Quicksilver
8,557
Artificial flowers and jewelry
3,126
11,217
5,099
T r u n k s and valises
5,270
6,126
Bricks and lime
17,623
8,671
24,174
Oil-cake
1,108,984 1,137,828 1,408,278
Articles not enumerated

1850.

1851.

1852.

$118,055
285,0.56
2,260
48,314
268,290

$122,835
219^588
3,255
36,084
289,622

14,137
11,182
52,521
229,741

16,830
16,915
57,975
145,410

13,163
12,220
48,052
152,837

278,025
95,722
68.671
20,893

362,830
199,421
103.768
30;i00

430,182
172,445
• 80,453
47,937

664,963
648,832
193,598
51,357
190,352
75,103
12,797

609,732
1,143,547
458;838
52,054
154,257
61,424
11,774

680.054
1,316,622
428,708
62,903
121,580
89,316
32,725

154,210
79,318
1,677,792
105,060
334,789

215,652
164,425
1,875,621
91,871
351,585

118,624
191,388
1,993,807
103,039
263,852

606,631
3,774,407
17,405
335,981

1,006,561
5,571,576
37,260
625,808

926,404
6,139, .391
34,718
571,638

1,183
10,593
207,632
15,644
23,987
2,827
2.295
3,395

1,647
6,376
1,211,894
23,096
27,334
8,257
1,798
12,260

5,468
8,154
250,228
18,31.0
28,833
4;3^5
1,088
8.340

. 9,800
3,140
39,242
21,634
119,475
99,696
67,-i87
136,^2
13,590
22,682
34,510

13:309
9,488
71,401
55,700
1.53,912
155,664
109,834
185,436
27,823
16,426
41,449

18,617
16,784
47,781
67,733
217,809
119,535
85.369
194,'634
23.420
18,460
57,240

$91,499 1
149,921 '
3,2t)7
48,737
323,941

4,583

68,639

20,332

45,283
10,370
16,348

121,013
12,207
22,045

114,738
1.5,035
13,539

3,869,071

3,793,341

-2,877,659

Total
10,476,345 12,858,758 11,280,075
956,874
62,620 2,700,412
Gold and silver coin and bulhon.

15,196,451
2,046,679

20,136,967
18,069,580

18,862,931
37,437,837

10,538,965 15,559,170 12,236,949

17,243,130

38,206,547

56,300,768

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November, 27, 1861.




231

KEPOKT ON THE TINAI^CES.

2?rod'uce exp^orted, to foreign countries from June 30, 1846, to June 30, 1861.
1853.

1854.

1855.

1856.

1857.

1858.

1859.

1860.

1861.'

" 714*,556 "763,197
244,638
184,497
176,404
91,261
53,311
48,229

$69,905
526,463
2,771
384,144
1,448,280
101,836
189,830
17,281
45,069
1,186,732
82,945
803,969
290. .525
177,914
64,886

$74,005
360:444
1,476
500,945
1,329,151
95,484
lfi4,030
26,034
45,086
896,238
161,232
982,042
370,259
226,682
31,249

$91,983
368,206
1,932
1,248,234
1,216,635
120,011
108,003
30.788
43,732
795,490
92,499
879,448
476,394
254,208
45,222

$85,926
200,724
2,304
476,722
1,267,691
249,432
115,893
24,336
59,532
1,137,507
60,958
932,499
777,921
126,525
55,280

$94,850
377,944
2,444
273,576
760,889
188,746
75:699
35,156
78,226
1,340,229
«
50,793
1,067,197
655-600
216,704
58,870

$131,803
301,674
2,593
311,595
930,644
219,199
35,292
41,368
53, .573
1,943,088
55,783
1,079,114
816,973
211.602
71,332

$94,495
287,881
2,157
867,954
850,546
593,185
39,138
38,262
39,480
1,220,769'
81,783
8.38,049
472,080
156,956
61,469

891,566
1,551,471
896,555
194,076
212,700
159,026
26,874

1,111,349
1,500,113
1,052,406
315,267
356.051
156,879
14,298

1,200,764
1,829,207
1,313,311
367,182
644,974
311,495
27,512

1,242,604
1,458,553'
1,311,709
286,163
398,244
190,699
58,624

934,303
2,410,224
1,259,494
212,840
365,173
162,650
48,119

1,137,965
3,402,491
1,319,893
320,435
371,603
212,710
28,575

1,203,104
3,383,428
1,458,834
246,572
467,772
129,717
50,446

1,138,696
2,760,531
1,335,078
. 255,274
347,103
144,046
6,241

288,437
308,127
181,998
306.439
459,775 .
220,420
3,158,596
2,097,234 3,472,467
690,766
92,108
108,205
788,114
454,789
327,073

286,980
288,316
3,585,712
534,846
1,066,294

397,313
289,967
4,197,687
607,054
885,909

205,9.31
464,415
4,059,5-28
1,985,223
681,278

257,662
128,659
5,117,346
1,048,246
796,008

246,154
285,848
5,174,050
1,664,122
1; 115,455

311,321
76,7.50
5,536,576
2.375,029
1;149,433

2,613,655
1,086,167 1,147,786
1,966,845
1,785,685
3,715,339
2,907,276
4,616,264
6,926,485 4,130,149
49,315
22.594
423,085 ""336," 256' " " 3 8 4 ^ 206" " " 6 1 4 ^ 1 5 3
7.33;648

2,069,194
1,782,025

2,320,890
1,518,236

3,356,449
1,785,595

2,215,032
1,377,627

'i,'866*285 "4J 477^096

$113,602
375,780
10 2;<0
141,173
329,381

$87,140
370,488
12,257
282,919
609,905

"l3 lV048
****17,,582
16,945
20,443
53,503
64;677
362,960 1,084,329

681,362
1,671,500
673,708
103,216
180,048
119,729
5,540

"5;792;752

•4,'384,*379

2,924
13,860
239,733
5 3,685
31,395
6,612
1,673
6,183

24,456
55,251
234,388
34,525
37,684
9,501
3,204
11,658

2,506
34,002
233,801
32,119
32,049
10,856
4,916
8,441
1,409,107

802
25,233
278,832
66,696
32,653
8,385
2,778
5,989
1,093,538

1,066
33,687
.333,442
34,256
39,799
7,324
733
6,846
643,512

1,.326
87,766
210,695
36,783
46,349
49,153
8,791
6,339
313,379

1,349
17,529
470,613
47,261
46,007
44,638
12,094
4,837
198,827

1,243
26,571
525,175
65.086
23,345
61,.377
15,979
4.862
240,841

80
39,490
462,554
40,524
32,792
62,360
8,910
1,271
193,691

6,448
9,652
32,250
.52,397
142,604 .
122,212
83,020
170,561
22,988
14,064
47,628

17,018
6,597
33,012
126,128
187,335
192,339
121.823
229;476
30,750
16,478
88,327

36,045
14,829
36,405
108,857
. 207,218
185,637
163,096
204,679
14,279
5,233.
168,546

5,765
29,088
67,517
133,517
202,.502
203,013
217,179
216,439
13,610
5,628
162,376

2,119
21,524
52,747
127,748
277,647
224,767
223,320
179,900
5,622
4,818
111,403

13,099
7,220
106.498
97;775
209,774
229,991
131,217
214,608
24,186
27,327
138,590

41,465
3,213
68,868
155,101
319,080
299,857
185.068
252.318
39,289
28,782
112,214

19,011
9,948
157,124
129,653
278,268
,285,798
223,809
277,948
39,064
46,081
176,239

7,507
7; 940
106. .562
150,974
2.50,365
347,915
240,923
394,731
30,229
30,534
185;267

11,873 1,311,513
442,383
50,471
23,673
33,314

9,051
806,119
22,043
35,203
57,393

6,116
831,724
26,386
.32,457
64,297

15,477
665,480
28,070
37,748
68,002

26,386
35,947
129,184
28,901 " " ' 5 8 , ' 5 7 6 '
59,441
42,153
103,821
160,611
1,198, ,581
1,435,861
2,601,788
2,274,652

140,187
258,682
24,866
50.184
1.54; 045
1,609,328
2,397,445

53,372
631,450
50,199
40,622
93,292
1,386.691.
2,530,689

""66,397
27,148
32,625
',3,788,700

4,972,084 "4*6i4J432 ".3," .559,'613 "3^292^722

22,599,930 26,849,411
23,548,535 38,234,566

28,833,299
53,957,418

30,970,992
44,148,279

29,653,257
60,078,352

30,372,180
42,407,246

33,853,660
57,502,305

39,803,080 36,418,254
56,946,851 23,799,670

46,148,465 65,083,977

82,790,717

75,119,271

89,731,619

72,779,426

91,355,965

96,749,931 60,218,124




L. E. CHITTENDEN, Regist&r.

232

E E P O R T ON T H E FINANCES.

No. 20.
Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merchandise imported, re-exported, and
consumed, annually, from 1821 to 1861, inclusive; and also the estimated
popidation and rate of consumption per capita during the same period.
Value of foreign merchandise.
Years endicg—

Population.

Re-exported,

Consumed and
on hand.

$62,585,724 $21,302,488
83,241,541 22,286,202
77,579,267 27,543,622
80,549,007 25,337,157
96,340,075 32,590,643
84,974, 477 24,539,6)2
79,484,068 23,403,136
88,509,824 21.595,017
74,492,527 16,658,478
70,876,920 14,387,479
103,191,124 20,033,526
101,029,266 24,039,473
108,118,311 19,822.735
126,521,332 23,312,811
149,895,742 20,504,495
189,980,035 21,746,360
140,989,217 21,854,962
113,717,404 12,452,795
162,092,132 17,494,525
107,141,519 18,190,312
127,946,177 15,469,081
100,162,087 11,721,538

$41,283,236
60,955,339
60,035,645
55,211,850
63,749,432
60,434,865
56,080,932
66,914,807
67,834,049
56,489,441
83,157,598
76,989,793
88,295,576
103,208,521
129,391,247
168,233,675
119,134,255
101,264,609
144,597,607"
88,951,207
112,477,096
, 88,440,549

9,960,974
10,283,757
10,606,540
10,929,323
11,252,106
11,574,889
11,897,672
12,220,455
12,243,238
12,566,020
13,286,364
13,706,707
14,127,050
14,547,393
14,967,736
15.388,079
15,808,422
16,228,765
16,649,108
17,069,453
17,612,507
18,155,561

$4 14
5 92
71
05
66
22
71
47
61
39
25
61
6 25
7 09
8 64
10 93
7 53
6 23
8 68
5 21

Imported.

September 30.. 1821
1822
1823.
1824
. 1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
• 1838
1839
1840
1841
. 1842
9 months to June
30, 1843
Year to June 30,
1^844

64,753,799

1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
. 1859
1860
1861

Total

6 38
4 87

6,552,697

68,201,102

18,698,615

4 15

108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797
146,545,638
154,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,945,442
267,978,647
304,562,381
261,468,520
314,639,942
360,890. 141
282,613,150
338,768,130
362,163,941
334,350,453

11,484,867
15,346,830
11,346,623
8,011,158
21,128,010
13,088,865
14,951,808
21,698,293
17,289,3^2
17,558,460
24.850,194
28,448,293
16,375,578
23,975,617
30,886,142
20,895,077
26,933,022
20,539,285

96,950,168
101,907,734
110,345,174
i;:!8,534,480
133,870,918
134,768,574
163,186,510
194,526,639
195,656,060
250,420,187
279,712,187
233,020,227
298,261,364
336,914,524
251,727,008317,873,053
335,230,919
313,811,168

19,241,670
19,784,725
20,327,780
20,780,835
21,413,890
21,956,945
23,246,301
24,250,000
24,500,000
25,000,000
25,750,000
26,500,000
27,400,000
28,500,000
29,500,000
30,385,000
31,000,000
31,620,000

03
15
42
60
25
13
02
8 02
8 00
10 00
10 00
8 79
10
11
8
10
10
9

6,625,698,973 807,649,648 5,818,049,325
L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register,

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 27, 1861




88
82
50
46
80
92

No. 21.
Statement exMbiting the total value of imports, and imports consumed in the United, States, exclusive qf specie, during each fiscal year
from 1821 to 1861, inclusive; showing also the value of foreign and domestic exjjorts, exclusive of specie; the aggregate exports,
including sp>ecie, and the tonnage employed during the same period.
Years.

1821
1822
1823
0
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
9 months to June 30. _...1843
Year ending June 30. _ ...1844
1845
1846



Total imports, including specie.

$62,585,724
83,241,541
77,579,267
80,549,007
96,340,075
84,974,477
79,484,068
88,509,824
74,492,527
70,876,920
103,191,124
101,029,266
108.118,311
126,521,332
149,895,742
189,980,035
140,989,217
113,717,404
162,092,132 •
; 107,141,519
127,946,177
100,162,087
64,753,799
108,435,035
117,254,564
121,691,797

Imports entered for
consumption, exclusive of specie.
$43,696,405
68,367,425
51,308,936
53,846,567
66,375,722
57,652,577
54,901,108
66,975,475
54,741,571
49,575,009
82,808,110 .
75,327,68883,470,067
86,973,147
122,007,974
158,811,392
113,310,571
86,552,598
145,870,816
86,250,335
114,776,309
87,996,318
37,294,129
96,390,548
105,699,541
11D,048,859

Domestic produce
exported, exclusive of specie.
$43,671,894
49,874,079
47,155,408
60,649,500
66,944,745
62,449,855
67,878,117
49,976,632
65,087,307
68,524,878
69,218,583
61.726,529
69,950,856
80,623,662
100,459,481
106,570,942
94,280,895
95,560,880
101,625,533
111,660,561
103,636,236
91,798,242
77,686,354
99,531,774
98,455,330
101,718,042 ^

Foreign merchandise exported, exclusive of specie.
$10,824,519
11,476,022
21,170,635
18,322,605
23,802,984
20,440,934
16,431,830
14,044,578
12,347,544
13,145,857
13,077,069
19,794,074
17,677,876
21,636,553
14,756,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,088,371
8,181,235
8,078,753
5,139,335
6,214,058
7,684,781
7,865,206

Total exports, including specie.

Tonnage.

.
$64,974,382
72,160,281
74,699,030
75,986,657
99,535,388
77,595,322
82,324,827
72,264,686
72,358.871
73,849,508
81,310,583
87,176,943
90, 140., 433
104,336,973
121,693,577
128,663,040
117,419,376
108,486,616
121,028.416
132,085,946
121,851,803
104,090,534
84,346,480
111,200,046
114,646,606
113,488,516

1,298,958
1,324,799
1,336,566
1,389,163
1,423,112
1,534,191
1,620,608
1,741,392
1,260,798
1,191,776
1,267,847
1,439,450
1,606; 151
.1,758,907
1,824,940
1,882,103
1,896,686
1,994,640
2,096,380
2,180,764
2,130,744
2,092,391
2,168,603
2,280,095
2,417,002
2,562,085

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No. 2 1 . — S t a t e m e n t exhihiting the total value o f imports, 4"^.—Continued.
Years.

Year ending June 30 -- ..1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
.1852
1863
1854
1866
1856
1857
1858
1869
1860
1861
Total

Total imports, including specie.

Imports entered for
consumption, excliisive of specie.

Domestic produce
exported, exclusive of specie.

$146,645,638
154,998,928
147,857,439
178,138,318
216,224,932
212,^945,442
267,978,647
304,662,381
261,468,520
314,639,942
360,890,141
282,613,150
338,768,130
362,163,941
334,350,453

$116,257,596
140,651,902
132,566,168
164,032,033
200,476,219
195,072,695
251,071,358
275,955,893
231,650,340
295,650,938
333,611,295
242,678,413
317,888,456
336,280,172
273,462,767

$150,674,844
130,203,709
131,710,081
134,900,233
178,620,138
154,931,147
189,869,162
216,156,304
192,751,135
266,438,051
278,906,713
261,351,033
278,-392,080
316,242,423
204,166,299

6,625,698,973

6,668,134,435

5,060,929,667

Foreign merchandise exported, exclusive of specie.
$6,166,754
7,986,806
8,641,091
9,475,493
10,295,121
12,053,084
13,620,120
21,648,304
26,158,368
14,781,372
14,917,047
20,660,241
14,509,97117,333,634
14,548,075
671,690,445

oo
Total exports, including specie.

$158,648,622
154,032,131
145,755,820
151,898,720
218,388,011
209,658,366
230,976,157
278,241,064 .
275,156,846
326,964,908
362,960,682
324,644,421
356,789,462
400,122,296
248,505,454

Tonnage.

2,839,046
3,154,042
3,334,016
3,535,454
3,772,439
4,138,441
4,407,010
4,802,903
6,212,001
4,871,652
4,940,843
6,049,808
6,145,037
6,353,868
6,539,813

6,351,057,800

i
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a
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L. E. CHITTENDEN, i^f^/s^er.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register'S Office, November 27, 1861.




No. 2 2 .
jrts of domestic produce, 8fc., of the United States during the years ending on June
. 1 , 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, and 1861.

Statement exhibiting a summary view of tlie
^ A
30, 1847, 1/848, 1849, 1850,

Product of—
R a w produce.

Years e n d i n g T h e sea.

J u n e 30 1847
1848
1849
1850
185L
1852
-^
1853
1854
18.55
1856
18.57
1858
1859
1860
1861

Total

T h e forest.

Agriculture.

Tobacco.

Cotton.

Specie and bullion.

Total value.

Manufactures.

1,980,963
2.547,654
2;824,818
3.294.691
2,282;342
3.279,413
3.064.059
3.516,894
3:356,797
3:704,523
3,5.50,295
4,482,974
4,156,480
4,451,515

$5,996,073
7,0.59,084
5,917,994
7,442,503
7,847,022
7,864,220
7.915,259
11,751,185
12,603,837
10.694,184
14:699.711
13;475:671
14,489,406
13,738,559
10,260,809

$68,450,383
37.781:446
38;cS58:204
26.547,158
24,369.210
26,378,872
33,463,573
37,104,592
42. .567,476
77,686,455
75,722,096
53;235.980
40,400;757
48;451,894
101,655,833

$7,242,086
7,551,122
5,804^207
9;951:023
9,219,251
10,031,283
11.319;319
10,016,046
14,712.468
12,221; 843
20:250,772
17:009:757
21;074,038
15,905,547
13,784,710

$53,415,848
61.998,294
66..396,967
71;984,615
112,315,317
87,965,732
109.456,404
93,596.220
88,143;844
I28,382.;j51
131,575,859
. 131,385,661
161,434,923
191,806,.555
34,051,4t3

$10,476,345
12,858; 7.58
11,280,075
15,196,451 1
20,136.967
18,862:931
22,599,930
'
26,849,411
28,833,299
30,970.992
29,653;257
30,372,180
33,853,660
39,803,080
36,418,254

$1,.525,075
974.042
904:980
953,564
1,437,080
1,545,767
1,735,264
2,754;781
2,373.317
3,125:429
3.290;485
2;320.479
2,676,322
2,279.308
3,543;695

$62,690
2-700,412
, 956.874
2,046;679
18,059.5b0
37,437,837
23,-548,5.35
38,234,556
53,9.57,418
. 44,148.279
60,078:352
42,407;246
57.502.305
- 56,945,851
23,799,870

$150,537,464
132,904,121
132,656,955
138,946,912
196,689,718
192,368,984
213,417,697
2.53,390,870
246,708,553
310,585.330
338,985;065
293.758,279
335,894,385
373,189,274
227,965,169

49,941,451

151,765,517

762,673,929

186,104,482

1,523,911,074

368,165,600

31,651,289

461,897,424

3,536,110,776

1

$3,458,033

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L. E. CHITTEiVDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




00

No. 23.

to
CO

Statement exhihiting the value of certain articles imported, during the years ending. June 30, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850,
1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1860, (after deducting the re-exportations,) and the ainount of duty
which accrued on each during the same periods, res2?ectively.
a

1844.

1846.

.1845.

1847.

Articles
Value.
Woolleos . . . . . . -_.--_ . $9,408,279
13,236,830
Cottons
865,427
Hempen goods
.
Iron, and manufactures of_- 2,395,760
Sugar
6,897,245
261,913
Hemp, unmanufactured
892,112
Salt
(5oal
.„ _
203,681
Total




34,161,247

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$3,413,495 $10,504,423
4,850,731 13,360,729
801,661
213,862
4,075,142
1,607,113
4,049,708
4,597,093
140,372
101,338
654,881
883,359
187,962
133,845

$3,731,014
4,908,272
198,642
2,415,003
2,555,075
55,122
678,069
130,221

$9,935,925
12,857,422
696,888
3,660,581
4,397,239
180,221
748,566
336,691

$3,480,797 $10,639,473
4,865,483 14,704,186
138,394
625,871
8,710,180
1,629,581
2,713,866
9,406,253
62,282
65,220
878,871
609,244
254,149
330,875

S3 102 293
3 956 798
121 588
2,717,378
3 160 444
19,452
228,892
162 008

34,003,256

14,671,413

32,813,533

13,653,796

13,558,853

15,472,358

45,360,929

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No. 23.-—Stqij't^ment exhihiting the value of certain articles imported, <^'.--^Contiinied.
1850.

' - , ' •] 1849.-,.•

1848.

'1851.

;

-

Articles.
Value.

Value.

Duties.

Duties.

Value. -

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

•

•

,

$15,061,102
Woollens
C o t t o n s . . . . _ - - - - - - - - - - . - - 17,205,417
606,900
Hempen goods,. . . - .
Iron,' and manufactures of ._ 7, 060'. 470
Sugar . . „ ^ . . . . _ - - . 8,775,223
180,335
Hemp, unmanufactured..-.
Salt
.
_ - - - - . 1,027,656
426,997
Coal...„--„........
.-

T o t a l . - . 1 - - . - - . . . - - - . 50,344,100




-

•

i

•

.
$4,196,007 $13,503,202
4,166,573 15,183,759
121,380
460,335
2,118,141
9,262,567
2,632.567 •7,275,780 _
54,100 - 478,232
205,531
1,424,629
128,099 - 382,254
13,622,398

47,970,658

$3,723,768 $16,900,916
3,769,565 19,681,612
92,067
490,077
2,778,770 ' 10,864,680
2,182,734" 6,950,716
- 143,470
• 574,783
284,906
1,227,518
114,676.
361,855
13,089;956

67,052,157

• $4,682,457 $19,239,930 •
4,896,278 . 21,486,502
615,239
98,015
3,259,404 10,780,312
2,085,215 13,478,709
212,811
172,435
1,025,300
245,504
478,095 .
108^557
15,547,865

67,316,898

$5,331,600
5,348,605
123,048
3,234,094
4,043,613
63,843
205,060
143,429
. 18,493,^382

fed
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«<1

No. 23.—Statement exhibiting the value of certain articles imported, ^o.—Continued.
1852.

1853.

CO
00

1854.

Articles.
Value.
Woollens - . .
Cottons
^
Hempen goods . ,
Iron, and manufactures of
Sugar
Hemp, unmanufactured...
Salt
Coal
Total




Duties.

Value.

$17,348,184
18,716,741
343,777
18,843,569
13,977,393
164,211
1,102,101
405,662

$4,769,083
4,895,327
68,755
6,632,484
4,193,218
49,263
220,420
121,695

$27,051,934

70,901,628

16,960,246

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

433,604
26,993,082
14,168,337
326,812
1,041,577
488,491

$7,459,794
6,699,338
86,721
8,074,017
4,260,501
98,044
208,315
146,647

$31,119,654
32,477,106
• 59,824
28,288,241
11,604,056
335,632
1,290,976
. 585,926

$8,629,180
8,163,992
11,631
8,486,472
3,481,307
100,689
258,105
175,777

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96,916,080

26,923,277

105,762,014

29,297,333

H

26,412,243

O
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No. 23.—Stc!itement exhibiting the value of certain articles imported, Sfc.—Continued.
1855.

1866.

1867.

Articles.
Value.

Woollens
».
.,
Cottons
Hempen goods - Iron, and manufactures of.
Sugar
-'
.,
Hemp, unmanufactured-.Salt
,..._
Coal
Total.-..




Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

$22, 076,448
15, 742,923
239,593
23, 946,274
13, 284,663
55,458
692,587
893,825

$6,088,157
3,823,294
47,919
7,163,602
3,985,399
16,637
338,617
268,147

$30,705,161 $8,478,552 05
24,337,604 5,943,181 90
233,735
46,747 00
21,618,718 6,461,615 00
21,295,154 6,388,646 20
3,427
1,028 10
1,954,317
390,863 40
597,094
119,418 80

$30,848,620
28,114,924
504,214
23,320,148
41,596,238
411,662
2,991,365
769,486

$8,504,131
6,845,102
100,843
6,829,279
12,478,871
123,499
598,273
230,846

77,930,771

21,731,672

100,745,110 27,829,962 45

128,556,667

35,710,844

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CD

No. 23.—Statement exhibiting the value of certain articles imported, 8fc.—Continued.
O

1858.

1860.

1859.

1861.

'

Articles.
Value:

Duties.

Value.

Duties.

Value.

Value.

Duties.

$26,288,189 $6,660,025 98 $33,301,509 $7,195,936 88 $37,^735,914 $8,155,518 56 $28,169,826
Woollens-_9,079,676 6,120,056 17 24,722,079
17,574,142 3,873,350 20 26,026,140 6,677,083 00
Cottons
....
726,916
582,146
60,134 26
594,323
Hempen goods
115,370 25
432,746
89,148 45
Iron, and manufactures of.. 14,453,617 3,407,81,8 2.) 14,749,066 3,616,878 07 18,464,346 4,395,784 48 14,837,062
Susrar
.
18,946,663 4,647,199 12 28,345,297 6,802,871 28 28,931,166 6,943,479 84 27,822,672
720,037
308,663
74,065 12
381,681
249,417
Hemp, unmanufactured . - . .
91,679 44
69,860 08
1,137,071
214,671 00
1,431,140
Salt.
*
1,273,098
1,102,202
190,964 70
165,330 30
1,064, .672.
839,334
223,615 20
931,730
769,926
Coal
\
201,440 16
184,782 24
Total

79,978,479 17,877,514 57 105,441,167 23,769,062 82

97,517,055 26,120,375 58

Duties.
$6,012,826
5,340,442
87,249
3,613,851
6,730, 124
65,964
193,896
272,505

90
72
55
14
86
96
68
48

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99,055,664 22,316,861 29

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30, 1861.




o
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N o .

24.

•

•

.

•

,

•

.

.

Statement exhibiting the value o f f o r e i g n merchandise a n d domestic p r o d u c e exported a n n u a l l y , f r 6m, 1821 to 1 8 6 1 .

VALUE OP EXPORTS, EXCLUSiyE OE SPECIE.

Year ending-r

Foreign merchandise.
Domestic produce
Free of duty.

September 30

..1821.
182-2^
1823.
1824..
1825.
1826.
1827.
' 1828.
1829.
'
.
1830.
1831.
18'32.
1833.
1834.,
1835.
1836.,
1837..
1838.,
1839..
1840..
1841..
• ' 1842..
9 months to June 30,1843,.



$286,788
374,716
1,323,762
1,100,530.
. 1,098,181
1,036,430
'813,844

877,239
919,943
1,078,695
642,586
1,345,217
5,165,907
10,757,033
. 7,012,666
8,534,895
7,756,189
4,951,303
6,618,442
6,202.562
3,953,054
3,194,299
- 1,682.763

Paying duty.
$10,537,731
11,101,306
19,846,873
17,222,075
22,70'4,803
19,404,504
15,617,986
13,167,339
^11,427,401
12,067,162
12,434,483
18,448,857
12,411,-969
lO; 879, 520
7,743,655
9,232,867
9,406,043
4,466,384
6,007,698
5,805,809
4,228,181
4,884,454
3,456,572

Total.
$10,824,5ia
11,476,022
21,170,635
18,322,605
23,802,984
20,440,934
16,431,830
14,044,578
12,347,344
13,145,857
= 13,077,069
19,794,074
r7,57.7,'876
21,636,563
14,756,321
17,767,762
17,162,232
9,417,690
10,626,140
12,008,,371
.8,181,235
8,078,753
-5,139,335

Aggregate value
of exports. -

Specie and bullion..
\A •
>d •

o

$43,671,894
49,874,079
47,155,408
50,649,500
66, 944,745
52,449,855
-57,878,117
49,976,632
55,087,307
.58,524,878
. 59,218,583
61,726,529
. 69,950,856
80,623,662
100,459,481
106,570,942
' 94,280,895
95,560,880
101,625,633
111,660,561
103,636,236
91,798,242
77,686,354

$54,4^96,413
-61,350,101
68,326,043
.68,972,105
90,747,729
72,890,789
74,309,947
64,021,210
67,434,651
. 71, 670,'^35
72,295,652
81,520,603
87,628,732
102,260,215
115,215,.802
124,338,704
111,443,127
104,978,570
112,251,673
123,668,932
111,817,471
99,876,995
82,825,689-

$10,477,969
10,810,180
6,372,987
7,014,552
8,787,659
4,704,533
8,014,880
,8,243,476
4,924,020
2,178,773
9,014,931
"5,656,340
2,611,701
2,076,758
6,477,775
4,324,336
5,976,249
3,608,046
8,776,743
8,417,034
10,034,332
4,813,639
1,620,791

%
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^

No. 24.^—Statement exhibiting the value of foreign merchandise, ^i-—Gontinued;
"to
VALUE OF EXPORTS, EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE.

' •

Year ending—

^

F o r e i g n merchandise.

/

\
Domestic produce.

F r e e of d u t y .

J u n e 30
.

'^

•"-

X

....1844...........
1845..-..-...-.
1846..;-..-....
1847..-..
1848
^ 1849......,„.-...
.
1 8 5 0 . . . w-.—.-... 1851
.'.:.:-.
'
-^
• 1852....;.........
. - • .
, ,,1&53............
i : . • 1854......
.
•^ - 1 8 5 5 ' . _ . . _
^
..
185'6......
1857..
1 8 5 8 . —— . . . . _ .
1859.-^-^.-..
: I860..
.....
1861
._..

Total- — — V . - . . — —

$2,251^550
2,413,050
.2,342,629
1,812,8~47
1,410,307
2,015,815
2,099,132
-1,742,154^
2,638,159
^
2,449,639
3,210,907
,
6,616,650
3,144,604
4,326,400
5,751,850
6,429,921
5,350,441
3,582,297
V

Total. '. .

: Paying duty.

'

134,114,199

$3,962,508
;5,171^731
5,522y57T
4,353,907
6,576,499.
6,625,276
7,376,361
8,652,967
9,.514,.925
11,170,581
18,437,397
19,641,818
11,636,768
^ 1 0 . 5 9 1 , 647
14,908,391
9,080,050
, 11,983,193
- 10,965,778
437,576,046

-

$'6, 214,'058
•7,5g4^781
.7,865,^206
6,166y754
T, 986,-806

8,64r^oai

'

9,475,.493
10,295,121
12,053,084
13, 6 2 0 ; i 2 0
21,648,304
26,168,368
14,781,372
.14,917,047
20,660,241
14,509,971
17,333,634
.14,548,075
571,690,245

Aggregate v a l u e
of exports., >^

5,632,619,912

•

....,

\

-

•
'

•

$5,454,-214
8,606,496
3,905,268
1,907,024
15,841,616
5,404,648
• 7,522,994
29,472,252
42,674,135,
27., 48-6,-8l5;
41,436,456
56,247,343
45,-745,485
69,136,922
62,633,147
63,'887,411
66,546;'^239
. 29,791,080
718,437,688

L. ^E. CHITTENDEN, Register,:.
TEEASURY T)id?h.mMmT, Register' 8 Office, Novemher 27, 1861.




y

' Specie a n d b u l l i o n : . •;
-

$105,-745, 832
$99,531,774
106,040,111
98,455,330
109,583,248
101,718,04:2'.
166,74l,-508
15-0,, 574,^844^ .
138,190,-516
' 130,'203y7;G9
140,351,172
131,5i0,081.
144, 375,'726
134,900,233
. 188,915,259
178,620,138^
166,984,231.
154,931,147 :
203,489,282
. 189,869,162
' 236,804,608'^ 1
2 1 5 , 1 5 6 , 304:
218;909,603
, 192,751,135
281,219.423
266,438,051
2-93,823,760
278,906,713
272,011,274
261,351,033
292,902,051
278,392,080
333,576,057
316,242,423
218,714,374
j
204,166,299 1
5,060,929,667 1

. i

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._^..^

,.

• ••

•

No. 25.

-^ •

Statement exhibifxng the quantity of luine, spirits, Sfc, imported annually, from 1843-^0^861, inclusive.
f

• /

'

y'

,^''-

-

•

' '.

. — — — — — — •

^ -:'

V"

—

,.

.'

:

— .

. . ; " • . ' — - — —

• - . No. 1.—WINE IN C A S K S / :

'.,

Madeira. -

'

.

\

,

— ^ - ^ : —

.

'.

. '

' ••

. Sicily.

Sherry.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 months ending June 30, 1 8 4 3 - - . - . „ . , — . .
Year ending
June 30, 1844
. . . . . . 1'.
Do.--.:.-..-..1845.-.-.-.
.
Do
-..1846 — - . - - . . . . . .
5 months ending Nov. '30, 1846
7 months ending June 30, 1847 .
Year ending
June 30, ,1848...
Do.................1849......-.--.
D o . . . . . . . ^ . . . ; . . ..^-1850. — .
.-Do-.„
...:. — 1 8 5 1 - - - . . . - . .
Do
-.
-..::i852..--...--_
Do —
-....1853&.....;^
Do..
1854....--..--.Do
w
-_-.--.1855.-..
- —
Do
_
.1856......
Do.:
..-.
.1857......
^
Do. — . ; . . . . —- — . . . 1 8 5 8 . .
-.
Do
-1859-..• Do
.I860.-.:.....-..
Do
1861
...-




3,949
16,754
101,176
169,797
117,-117
13,806
44,634
193,971
303,125
163,941
216,683
226,403
120,391
71,912
44,393
106,35986,805
87,237
131,481
80,887

Value.
$9,075
30,575
145,237
122,895
128,613
.:6;.717
21^630
105,302
150,0^6
116,008
103,917
105,628
54,270
46,445
32,031
65,880
72,420
62,902
76,613
60,859

Gallons.
4,685
18,665
23,616
' 26,538
14,543
77,521
215,^35
170;794^
212,092
250,277
168,610
313,648
415,298
383,398
, 398,, 392
544,649
418,319
318,467
564,705
423,570

Value.
$6,491
23,418
38,289
41,761
26,194
56,061
109,983
128,510
118,952
154,668
97,680
165,819
244,028
208,414
270,317
364,906
343,100
262,849
440,295
348,329

Gallons.
r4,:579
31,180
110,590
209,13l
21,281
.92,631
190,294
130,851
91,123
301,010.
91,746
190,205
68,870
197,700
184,194
280,346
123,619"
83,043
93,684
102,368

Value.
$6,617
15,000
46,033
74,000
'8,933
24,230
67,364
32,231
24,933
98,975
22,563
46,794
23,191
65,359
61,954
133,894
^66:612
, 37,099
3,6,395
42,562

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No. 25.—Statement exhibiting the quantity .of wine, spirits, (^c.—.Continued.
No. 2.—WINE IN CASKS.

Claret.

Port.

Other red wines.

Period of iniportation.
Gallons.
9 months ending Juiie 30, 1843.
Year ending
June 30, 1844.
Do
.....1845.
Do
...-1846.
5 months ending Nov. 30, 1846.
7 months ending June 30, 1847.
Year ending
June 30, 1848 .
Do............
-1849.
Do.
^
1850.
Do..i......
1851.
Do....../:
......1852.
Bb
.•-1853.
J)o....,
.......1854.
Do
.— - - . . . —-1855Bo...
1866.
Do——
....
1857.
Do,.....-.--......1858.
D o — . - — . — . : . . x:.. 1859.
"Do
.. — - - . . . . . - / . 1860Do. —

38,593
223,615
260,593
372,528
80,991
8,075
501,123
711,268
626,211
762,967
614,816
662,791
393,197
186,460 •
264,816
600,219
352,677
115,874
366,715
248,334

— ._.-....1§J51-




X,
.>-"-':-:

Value.

$26,7-14
156,878
, 162,358
148,895
.62,851
3,791
170,134
272,700305,354
,349,849
240,238
268,0'J5
177,935
97,987
168,729
407,664
226,781
88,217
229,997
165,026

Gallons.
.873,895
993,198
1,051,862
951,351
294,433
591,656
1,227,071
1,912,701
1,919,766
1,940,121
2,702,612
2,633,802
2,045,474
1,371,400
1,516,018
1,897,108
1,027,013,
2,126,065
3,513,083
982,040

Value.
$134,598
218,239
249,633
249,703
111,453
119,844
221,416
263,836
267,445.
280,333^
405, 38t)
482,827
497,005
440,631
561,440
669,403
385,750
'524,023
1,229,740322,306

Gallons.

Value.

o
340,387
495,658
954,646
1,072,589
539,464
781,073
994,468
1,469,256
1,245,201
1,172,316
1,374,416
1,854,885
1,619,505
'. 697,334
1,186,293
1,078,926
984,251
1,988,372
1,195,579

$60,096
143,210
316.821
328,814
119,411
180, 928.
221,177
'265,988
236,727
229,350
377., 482
450,195
459,985
285,111
500,627
442,641
306,547
838,233
398,189

O

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02.

No. 25.—Statement.exhibiting the quantity of loines, spirits, ^.—Continued.
No. 3.—WINE, BRANDY, AND GRAIN SPIRITS.
Other white wine.

Brandy.

Grain spiiits.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 months ending
Year ending
•Do , . . . Do
6 months ending
7 months ending
Year ending
Do ,
Do
Do
Do
Do ,
Do
Do ,
Do
Do .
Do
Do ,
Do
Do ,

June 30, 1843.June 30, 1844..
1846..
1846,..
Nov. 30, 1846..
June 30, 1847..
June 30, 1848 .
18491860.
1851.
1852.
1853.
1864.
1865.
1856.
1857.
1868.
1859.
1860.
1861.




123,832
' 268,414
591,736
705,808
618,267
278,482
840,687
971,896
1,088,801
1,086,374
935,379
1,275,290
1,379,888
939,364
617,135
721.417
853^283
1,307, 82'8
2,468,396'
1,383,709

Value.
$28,205
75,090
211,183
310,241
296,736
69,831
193,358
• 210,139
215,353
209,847
195,870
305,287
380,204
322,257
189,499
306,739
335,236
415,767
1,929,846
463,436

Gallons.

Value.

Gallons.

191,832
782,510
1,081,314
963,147
331,108
623,309
1,370,111
2,964,091
4,146,802
3,163,783
2,751,810
3,854,956
2,152,366
1,024,497
1,715,717
1,513,328
1,180,484
2,528,356
2,616,164
1,174,079

$106,267
606,633
819,450
'839,231
355,451
675,631
1,135,089
1,347,514
2,659,537
2,128,679
1,792,729
3,251,408
2,255,344
1,479,362
2,859,342
2,527,262

259,129
416,918
606,311
677,785
136,323
327,635
676,683
796,276
751,183
984,417
865,304
1,060,466
1,197,234
1,190,642
1,582,126
1,988,037
2,157,653
3,145,204
2,851,616
2,863,750

2,232,462

3,262,068
3,937,698
1,855,429

Value.
$121,547
171,015
262,543
345,352
. 86,073
143,549
327,493
' 327,957
361,078
364,204
294,386
424,638
664,569
675,560
772,276
1,125,160
1,158,617
1,465,243
1,211,335
1,236,872

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N o . 25.—Statement exhibiting the quantity o f wine, spyirits, (^6'.—-Continued.

<3^

No. 4.—OTHER SPIRITS, BEER, ALE, AND PORTER.
Other spirits.

Beer, ale, and porter, from
England.

Beer, ale, and porter, from
Scotland.

Period of importation.
Gallons.
9 months ending
Year ending
Do
Do
6 months ending
.7 months ending
Year ending
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do

June 30, 1843
June 30, 1844
18'45
1846
Nov. 30, 1846
June 30, 1847
June 30, 1848
1849
1850
1851
1862
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
- . 1860
'_. 1861

135,399
210,477
270, 484
221,344
65,477
160,747
228,671
642,492
339,169
309,214
359,677
336,477
399,583
397,672
771,604
443,495
645,830
,126,489
831,712
666,409

Value.
$32,095
78,027 .
78,967
81,713
28,862
57,806
75,943
146,784
113,779
100,850
98,940
106,601
128,308
151,378
288,494
218,907
324,905
444,207
350,209
277,432

Gallons.
62,612
107,489
79,302
117,621
46,146
132,157
130,008
146,473
166,735
275,336
262,838
397,420
825,571
919,252
792,155
1,048,903
872,969
1,057,633
677,501
575,698

Value.

Gallons.

$57,098
102,157
73,729
110,397
42,987
67,305
101,171
118,233
129,957
189,010
186,964
284,347
424,875
559,900
504,146
619,729
508,887
613,477
483,240
358,893

7,423
19,236
26,711
38,464
2,151
,15,375
39,282
52,297
52,856
88,179
110,752
131,357
270,064
345,016
369,486
375,706
183,572
257,034
253,624
96,754

Value.
$6,335
,18,343
, 21,294
. 39,831
: 1,'895
8,657
21,533
30,088
41,790
56,1^6

67,804
77,414
128,667
188,467
193,-.600
221,316
112,555
136,652
137,906
'55,555

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30, 1861.




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.KEPORT ON-THE: ..FINANCES,

'

'

.: - ^

,

•' • '

. ' N o . 26.;-

•;• • .

^247

^

Statement e x h i i i t i n g the value of imports, a n n u a l l y , f r o m 1^21 to 1 8 6 1 .
V a l u e of m e r c h a n d i s e i m p o r t e d
-Y^ar endings

•

Specie a n d
bullion.

F r e e of d u t y .

Paying duty.

Total.

•

September 3 0 . . . - . - 1 8 2 1 $ 8 , 0 6 4 , 8 9 0
.1822. , 3;369,846
5,097,896
182-3
1824 • 8 , 3 7 9 , 8 3 6
•1825 , 6 , 1 6 0 , 7 6 6
6,880,966
1826
8,151,130
1827
7,489,741
1828
1829 ^ 7 , 4 0 3 , 6 1 2
1830 " . 8 , 1 5 5 , 9 6 4
1831 " 7,305,945^
5,907,504
1832
7,070,368
18:33
• 1834 1 7 , 9 1 1 , 6 3 2
1835, ,13,131,4471836 . 1 3 , 4 0 0 , 8 8 1
• 1837 1 0 , 6 1 6 , 4 1 4
1838. 1 7 , 7 4 7 , 1 1 6
.^ - ' .
5,595,176
1839
1840 • 8 , 8 8 2 , 8 1 3
4,988,633
^1841
4,087,016
1842
9 m o u t h s t o J u n e 3() , J 8 4 3 .22,-390, 559
.5,830,429
.1844
Y e a r t o J u n e 30
4,070,242
1845
3,777,7321846
24,121,289
,1847
6,360,224
1848
6,651,240
1849
4,628,792
, 1850
5,453.592
1851
5,50,5,044
1852
•4,201,382
1853
6,958,184
1854
3,659,812
1856
4,207,632
1856
1857
12,,46r,799
1858 • 1 9 , 2 7 4 , 4 9 6
7,434„789'
1859
8,550,135
,1860
1861 4 6 , 3 3 9 , 6 1 1
'

;

A

'

.

'

•

•

Total..-^

-

387,566,573

$62,585,724
$2,017,423
$52,503,411
3,928,862
75,942,833
83,241,541
77,579,267.
3,950,392
' 68,530,979
80,549,007
67,985,234
4,183,938
'4,796,745,
96,340,075
85,392,565
6,686,803
84,974,477
72, 406, 708.
. 3,703,974
:• 6 7 , 6 2 8 , 9 6 4
79,484,068
4,889,435^
76,13'0,'648
88,509,824
%401',88,9 '
62,687,026
74,492,-527
4,590,281 , 58,130,675
70,876,920
6,150,680
89,734,499
103,191,124
86,779,813
8,,341,'949
101,029,266
26,377,582
75,670,361
108,118,'311
50,481', 648
,58,128,152
126,521,332
71,955,249'
149,895,742
64,809,046r
' 7 8 , 6-56, 600
189,980,035
97,923,554^
71,739,186
140,989,217
58,733,617
43;112,889 '
52,857,399
113,717,404
' 70,806,616
85,690,340
162,092,132
48,313,391
49,945,315
107,141,519
127,946,177
61,031,098
61,926,44626,540,470
69,534,601
100,162,087
• 13,184,025'
29,179,215
64,753,799
18; 9 3 6 , 4 5 2
83,668,154
108,435,035
95,106,724
• 18,077,598
' 117,254,564
20,990,007
' 96,924,058
.121,691,797
17,661,347
.104,773,002 '^' 1 4 6 , 5 4 5 , 6 3 8
16; 356, 3-79
,13,2,282,325
154-, 998, 928
- 15,726,425
125,479,774
147,867,439
18,081,590
155,427,936
178, 138,, 318
19,652,995
216,224,932
191^118,345
212,946,442
^ 24,187,890
183,,.252,608
.27,182,152
267,978,647
236,595,113• 26,327,637
371,276,560
304,^562,381
36,430,524
221,378,184 .
261,468,520
. • 52,-748,,074
257,684,236
314,639,942
54,267,507^
294,160,835
360,890,141
61,044,779'
-202,293,875
282,613,150
•338,768,130
72,286,327
259,047,614
362,163,941
279, 872', 327
82,291,614
116,170., 887
218,179,666
334,350,453
1,296,0[8,437

4 , 9 9 6 , 923, 70a

6,625,698,973

'• "L,. E. CHITTENDEN, Register,
'
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's < nee, November 27, 18.6h _




'2f48

KEPORT •ON T H E FINANCES..'

No:.27.
Statement exhibiting the value o f dutiable merclmndise re-exported, a n n u a l l y ,
^ f r o m 1821-^<9 1S61,; inclusive; a n d showing also the value re-exported fr^om
warehouses under t h e act of ^Aiigust 6,. I ^ i 6 .
. .
".Years.

Dutiable value of Value rcrcxported from ware- merchandise rehouses.
exported. ''
$16,037,731
11,101,306
.19,846, 873
17,222,075
22,704,803
19,404,504
15,617,986
- 13,167,339
11,427,401
^ 12,067,162
12,434,483
18,448,857
12,411,969
10,879,520
7,743,655
9,232,867
9,,406, 043
4,466,384
5,007,698
5,805,809
• 4,228,181
4,.884,'454
3,456', 572
3,962,508
5,171,731
5-, 622, 677
4, 353; 907
. 6,576,499
6,625,276
7,376,361
'8,652,967
9,614,925
11,170,581
18,437,3,97
'19,641,818
11,6^36,768
10,591,647
14,908,3,91
9,080,050
,11:983,193,
10,965,778

1821.---.---..-•-..1822.----..-»
1823—^•--..
1824-....--.---.
1825-.......-..-..1826.--...-..„....^w
1827.......•..-.-..1828- — - - . - . . - . . - .
1829..
.--..^1830...
--.--..1831--.- — - . . . . . - - .
1832.--.----'-...-1833...-.-...--....
1834.----'--.—...
1835..-^..-..-.-.—
1836-.---...
1837.----„
.•1838---.•
1839.----....----,
.1840.-.--.-»«----.-,
1841__-.-.-.,
1842--.-.2-.,
1843.—:
.--1.
1844....--....,»-o--.
•1845-...--..--..>.-.
1846..-......------.-.
.1847-.--.. — - 18^8....--...--..,-..-.
1849.-..------.-.V.
-1860-..-.--...
i85i:.-..--„
-.
1852.-:....-..-.-..
1853.......
.....
1854......-.--_--.
1855..----„,—-.-.
1 8 6 6 . . i . - . . - - - —J.
1857......------,.,.
1858
.--..-.,•..
1859.-l...
I860...--.
'j,.^...
1861--..---,---.---:

-437,576,046

Total.
'

99,528,033

. • , . ' , . L.-E. CHITTENDEN, i^e^ister.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,'i2e^2Ver's O^cc, xVoww&er 27, 1861.




$651,170
'2,869,, 941
^ 3,692,363
6,261,291
5,604,453
6,855,770
8,036,551
14,608,712
13,975,759
7,666,890
5,195,:960
7,747,930
4,385,870
6,414,036
6,661,337

249

KEPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 28.
"Statement exhibiting the a g g r e g a t e value o f breadstuffs a n d provisions exported
annually, f r o m 1821 to 1861.
Year ending—
September 30

-

1821..
• 1822..
1823..
1824-.
1825..
1826-.
1827..
1828..
1829..
1830.,
183118321833.
1834.,
1836.,
1836.
1837.,
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
Nine months ending June 30.. -1843Year ending June 30
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
18481849.
18501861.
185218531854.
1855.
1856.
1867.
18581869.
18601861.
Total

Amount.
$12,341,901
.13,886,856
13,767,847
15,059,484
11,634,449
11,303,496
I 11,686,556
11,461,144
13,131,868
12,075,430
17,538,227
12,424,703
14,209,128
11,524,024
12,009,399
10,614,130
9,688,369
9,636,650
14,147,779
19,067,535
17,196,102
16,902,876
11,204,123
17,970,135
16,743,421
27,701,921
68,701,121
37,472,761
38,155,i^07
26,051,373
21,948,651
25,857,027
32,985,322
66,941,323
38,895,348
77,187,301
74,667,852
,50,683,285
38,306,991
45,271,860
94,866,735
1,101,817,970

L. E. CHITTENDEN,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




.

No. 29.

-

-

to

Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of cotton exported annually, from 1821 ^o 1861, inclusive, and the average price per pound,.
COTTON.

Value.
Bales.

Years.

1821
1822
-. ...'
1823 . . ' .
1824
1825
.....--.
1826
1827--1828
1829
1830--.!.
1831
1832
1833..:
1834....
—
1835
1836
1837
1838
L.
1839
•
r840
-.
1841
1842
•
1843
 - . —
1844..... — ..


Sea Island.

Number of.

-

----'..

;
-..

/
_ -

'

Dollars. '

Pounds.
11,344,066
11,260,635
12,136,688
9,625,722
9,665,278
- 5,972,852
15,140,798
11,288,419
12,833,307
8,147,165
8,311^762
8,743,373
11,142,987
8,085,937
7,752,736.
7,849,597
6,286,971
7,286,340
5,107,404 '
8,779,669
6,237,424
•7,254,099.
7,615,079
6,099,076

•

113,649,339 :
133,424,460 •
1-61,586,582
132,843.941 .
166,784,629 .
198,562,563
279,169,317 .
199,302,044
252,003,879
290,311,937
268,668,022
313,451,749
313,535,617
376,601,970
379,686,256
415,721,710
438,964,566
588,615,957
408,566,808
735,161,392
523,966,676
677,462,918
784,782,027^
657,534,379

1^

Total.

Other.

!

124,893,405
144,675,096
. 173,723,270
142,369,663
176,449,907
204,535,416
294,310,115
210,590,463
264,837,186
298,459,102
276,979,784 •
322,215,122
324,698,604
384,717,907
387,358,992
423,631,307
444,211,537
595,952,297
413,624,212
743,941,061
530,204,100
684,717,017
792,297,106
663,633,455

Cents.

16.2
$20,157,484
16. 6
24,035,068
11.8
20,445,520
21,947,401
15.4
36,846,'649
20.9
25,026,214
12.2
29,359,545
10
22,487-229
10.7
26,575,311
10
29,674,883
9.9
26,289,492
9.1
31,724,682
9.8
36,191,106
11. 1
49,448,402 • 12.8
64,961,302
16.8
71,284,925
16.8
63,240,102
14.2
10.3
• 61,666,811
14.8
61,238,982
8.5
63,870,307
10.2
64,330,341
47,593,464
8.1
49,119,806
6.2
54,063,501.
8.1

o

2,303,403
2,991,175
2,265,588
2,454,529
3,005,536
3,812,345
671,403

1845.
1846.
1847.
18481849.
185018611862.
1853.
1864.
1865-.
1866.
18571868.
1869.
10601861.
Total-

9,380,625
9,388,533
6,293,973
7,724,148
11,969,259
8,236,463
8,299,656
11,738,075
11,165,165
10,486,423
13,058,690
12,797,225
12,940,726
12,101,058
13,713,556
15,698,698
6,170,321

863, 516,371
638, 169,522
620, 925,985
806, 550,283
1,014, 633,010
627, 145,141
918, 937,433
1,081, 492,564
1,100, 405,205
977, 346,683
995, 366,011
1,338, 634,476
1,035, 341,750
1.106, 522,954
1,372, 755,000
1,762, 087,640
301, 345,778

872,905,996
647,568,056
627,219,958
814,274,431
1.026,602,269
635,381,604
927,237,089
1,093,230,639
1,111,570,370
987,833,106
1,008,424,601
1,351; 431, 701
1.048,282; 475
1,118,624,012
1,386,468,556
-1,767,686,338
307,516,099

17,503,979

393,828,877

25,061,444,550

25,455,273,427

51,739,643
42.767,341
53,415,848
61,998,294
66,396,967
71,984,616
112,315,317
87,965,732
109,456,404
93,596,220
88,143,844
128,382,351
131,575, 859131,386,661
161,434,923191,806,555
34,051,483

5.92
7.81
10. 34
7.61
6.4
11.3
12. 11
8.05
9.85
9.47
8.74
9.49
12.55
11.72
12.72
10.85
11.07

O
O

2,608,886,574

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




o

to
Ox

No. 30.
to

Statement exhibiting the quantity and value of tobacco and rice exported annually, from 1821 to 1861.
TOBACCO.

RICE.

Years.
Bales.
1821
1822
1823
1824 1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1333
1834
1835
1836
1837
1838

Cases.

-.
,..--o.
„--./o
-

„--.
—..

-

--... .

•
o
;

--0..

1839
1840
o
1841
1842
1843
•
1844
1845
1846..
^ ,

1847


. ..
.

- - .

Hogsheads.
66,858
83,169
99,009
77,883
75,984
64,098
100,025
96,278
77,131
83,810
86,718
106,806
83,153
87,979
94,353
109,042
100,232
110,693
78,995
119,484
147,828
158,710
94,454
163,042
147,168
147,998
135,762

Barrels.

Value.
$5,648,962
6,222,838
6,282,672
4,856,566
6,115,623
5,347,208
6,577,123
5,269,960
4,982,9-74
5,686,365
4,892,388
6,999,769
6,755,968
6,595,305
8,250,577
10,058,640
5,795,647
7,392,029
9,832,943
9,883,957
12,576,703
9,640,755
4,660,979
8,397,255
7,469,819
8,478,270
7,242,086

:
•

Tierces.
88,221
87,089
101,365
113,229
97,015
111,063
113,628
175,019
132,923130,697
116,517
120,327
144,163
121,886
119,851
212,983
106,084
71,048
93,320
101,660
101,617
114,617
106,766
134,715
118,621
124,007
144,427

Value.
$1,494,307
1,553,482
1,820,985
1,882,982
1,925,245
1,917,445
2,343,908
2,620,696
2,514,370
1,986,824
2,016,267
2,152,631
2,744,418
2,122,272
2,210,331
2,548,760
• 2,309,279
1,721,819
2,460,198
1,942,076
2,010,107
1,907,387
1,625,726
2,182,468
2,160,456
. 2,664,991
3,606,896

O
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Ul

1848 .---1849--—
1850
1851,.1852;
1853
,
1854-.-1855
1856
1857
1858
1859, — 1860^
1861

12,913
' 17,772
14,432
12,640
19,651
17,817
19,450

13,366
9,384
6,631
4,841
7,188
15,035
18,815

130,6^5
101,621
145,729
95,945
137,097
1-59,853
126,107
150,213
116,962
156,848
127,670
198,846
167,274
160,816

114,675

74,260

4,762,108

.
*

-

-

Total

„

—

7,551,122
6,804,207
9,951,023
9,219,251
10,031,283
11,319,319
10,016,046
14,712,468
12,221,843
20,662,772
17,009,767
21,074.038
15,906,647
13,784,710
368,965,777

19,774
81,038
74,309
49,283
69,946
77,837
60,038

100,403
128,861
127,069
105,590
119,733
67,707
106,121
62,520
58,668
64,332
64,015
81,820
84,163
39,162

2 R^\ 824
2 569 362
2,631,557
2 170 927
2 470,029
1,657,658
2,634 127
1,717,963
2 390 233
2,290,400
1,870,678
2,207,148
2 567 399
1,382,178

422,225

4,412,912

89,236,689

TJ
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L. E. C H I T T E N D E N , Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




W
TJ
l-H

o

to
o\

No. 31.
Statement exhibiting the values of iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel, steel, wool and manufactures of wool, manufactures of cotton, silk and manufactures of silk, flax, linen and linen fabrics, hem^) and manufactures of hemp, manilla, sun, a n d other
hemps of India, and silk and worsted goods, imported from and exported to foreign countries, from IS4:0 to 1861, both years
inclusive; and also showing the domestic exports of like articles f o r the same pier iods.
.-

1840.

1841.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported. . ported. , exported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

•

Articles.

1842.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

TJ
O
H

Iron and manufactures of iron, and
iron and steel
manufactures of . _
Cotton, manufactures of
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures-of
. .
Flax, unnianfactured
linen and linen fahrics
H e m p nnmfi.n.nfjintnred

•• •

manufactures of
"-•_.-_
manilla^ sun, & other, of India
Silk and worsted goods - . . . . •
Total

-




O

$6,750,099 $156,115 $1,104,456
.33,961
528,716
26,246
846,076
418,399
9,071,184
6,604,484 1,103,489 3,549,607
200,239
234,235
9,601,622 1,015,532
4,614,-466
68.6 .;777
1,588,165

425,466
226, 347

•: 8,242

$8,914,426
609,201
1,091,953
11,001,939
11,757,036
254,102
15,300,795
6, 846., 80.7
. 661,039
2,566,381

$134,316 $1,045,264
24,848
44,226
171,814
929,056 3,122,546
227,113
356,264
280,459
50
167,506

13,400

15,812
40,425,714 3,605,794 4,662,304

58,903,678 2,361,464 4,181,210

$6,988,965 $177,301 $1,109,522
18,447
597,317
90,865
. 79:7,382,
145,123
8,375,725
836,892 2,970,690
9,578,515
420
33,002
265,159
9,444,341
3,669,231
; 267,849
1,273,534

210,176
553
162,866

1,311,770

O
TI

^777

42,337,631 1,908,639

w

Ul

1,038

4,081,250

N o . 31.—Statement exhibiting the values o f iro7i, Sfc.—Continued.
1843.

1844.

1845.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
ported.
exported.
ported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.

$5,227,484 $107,956 $716,332
15,416
487,462
851,460,
67,483
9,476,782
404,648 2,898,780
13,641,478
7,102
. 172,953
230,838
8,310,711
626
67,738
129,726
4,492,826
452
263,366
138,002
1,003,420
311
6,274
209,386
190
1,292,488

$8,294,878
775,675
1,689,794
10,666,176
13,863,282
•,. 208,454
9^7:31,796
- 90,50^
4,923,109
• 145,209
897,346
238,179
1,610,310

Articles.

Iron and manufactures of iron, and
$1,903,858
iron and steel
201,772
Cast, shear, German, and other steel248,679
Wool, unmanufactured . ,
-manufactures of - - . - 2,472,164
2,968,796
Cotton, manufactures of
63,350
Silk, unmanufactured
..
2,662,087
manufactures of
16,193
Flax, unmanufactured
1,484,921
linen and linen fabrics
228,882
Hemp, unmanufactured
.— —
526,502
manufactures of
_42,149
manilla, sun, & other, of India.
318,686
Silk and worsted goods
Total




\

$50,802 $532,693
59,733
34,651
61,997
314,040 3,223,660
3, 353
206,777
161,667
2,012
102,495
472
4,929

326

- . 13,117,028 l,d02,928 3, 766, 569 45,495,562 1,108,712 3,615,423

^
$91,966 '$846,017
TJ20,062
22,163
: O
, ^
166.646 - : • " — • ^ - • ^
602,553 4 , 327,'O^S • ' '
U,362.
24,6,272
6,544
159,626.
-TJ
• 4,837
'^
95,6^4 "."'l4,'762
1,440 •
—
S
^15,916
>

63,034,716 1,328,057

ff.f.

H

• ' - ' - - - - - -

i z j

5,187,707

TJ

Or

No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, ^.—Continued.
1848.

1847.

1846.
Articles.
Foreign imported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

Foreign imported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

Foreign imported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

•

Iron and manufactures of iron, and
iron and steel
Cast shear German and other steel
Wool unmanufactured
'"' manufactures of
Cotton, manufactures^of
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures of
Flax, unmanufactured
linen and linen fa^hric^?

Hemp, unmanufactured
manufactures of
manilla, sun, and other, of
India
Silk and worsted goods ,
Total.-




$7,836,832
1,2.34,408
1,134,226
10,083,819
13,530,625
216,647
10,667,649
.16,337
5,098,505
180,281
766,664
457,276
1,778,202

$122,587 $1,151,782
32,564
203,996
41,571
147,894
673,203 3,545,481
23,999
195,753
125,570
87,518
73,139
3,641

12,129

$8,781,252
1,126,458
555,822
10,998,933
16, 192,875
250,086
11,733,371
28,365
6,154,837
66,377.
. 684,880
278,675
1,965,095

$98,295 $1,259,632
$63,596 $1,167,484 . $12,526,854
41,397
1, 284,937
19,218
.1,840
857,034
• 89,460
37.302
179,781
16,240,883
315,894
486,135 4,082,523 15,421,689 1,216,172 5,718,205
19,858
354,973
8,385
340,853
14,543,633
3a4, 173
102,261
300,159
6,624,648
97,601
7,570^
27,657
187,905
1,157
51,176
6,713
658,075
6,782
69,009
27,307
22,992

53,000,471 1,527,439 4,913,388. 56,817,026 1,472,769 5,345,249

342,445
2,456,652

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>

1,833
2,614

73,601,889 2,261,647

TJ
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T, 012, 207

TJ
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No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, b^c.—Continuecl.
1851.

1850.

1849.^

t=J
^

Articles.
Foreign imported.

u •
o

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

Foreign imported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

Foreign imported.

Foreign
exported.

Domestic
exported.

p

Iron and manufuctures of iron, and
^
iron and steel
. - - $13,831,823
^ Cast, shear, German, and other steel. 1,227,138
Wool unm-inufactured.----- - - - - - 1,177,347
manufactures of
. . . . . . . 13,704,606
Cotton, manufactures of .
. . _ - . . . 15,764,841
384,635
Silk unmanufactured .
........
manufactures o f . . . . - ^ . . . . . . 13,791,232
127,869
Flax, unmanufactured --_- . . . .
5,907,242
linen and linen fahrics . .
491,633
Hemp unmanufactured. . - - . . . . - .
519,774
manufactures o f . . - _ - - . . . . .
manilla, sun, and other, of
196,634
India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,452,289
Silk and worsted goods
.
Total




$109,439 $1,096,172 $16,333,145 ^ $100,746. $1,911,320 $17,306,700
1,332,253
40,193
65,044
1,570,063
1,681,691
6,891
3,833,157
174, 934
17,151,509
201,404
19,507,309
427,107 4,734,424 22,164,442
.571,082 4,933,129 20,108,719
55,515
401,385
7,408
456,449
17,639,624
352,637
-388,572
25,777,245
128,917
176,197
8,134,674
187,948
129,878
8,796,740
579,814
13,401
5,031
5,633
8,458
223,984
59,439
588,446
98,369
11,776
• 6,558
661,768

$100,290 $2,255,698
38,371
7, 966
267,379
677,940 7,241,205
43,556
500,168

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107,382
7,876
46,620

29,114
8,023

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659,362
1,653,809

29,161
27,537

69,666,953 1,706,433

6,043,317

3,843
15,795

608,709
1,783,076

8,688
' 5,307

86,393,348 1,355,941 6,663,153 102,764,839 1,811,843

o
9,534,040

Tl
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to
0J\
-<1

to

No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, 8fC.—Continued.
1852.
Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
Cast, shear, German and other
steel
.
Wool, unmanufactured
manufactures of
.
Cotton, manufactures of
Silk, unmanufactured
manufactures of.
Max, unmanufactured
-linen and linen fahrics-Hemp, unmanufactured
manufactures of
. manilla,sun and other,
of India
Silk and worsted goods
'
Laces, insertings, braids, and
embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, or linen
Total




Foreign exported.

$18,957,993

$134,937

1,703,699
1,930,711
17,573,964
19,689,496
378,747
21,651,762
175,342
8,515,709
164,688
. 391,608

31,569
64,285
256,878
997,030
7,143
604,855

942,422
1,667,613

9,684
6,286

131,153
377
47,831

Ox
GD

1854.

1853.

Domestic ex- Foreign im- O'oreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
exported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.
ported.

$2,303,819 $27,255,425

7,672,151

18,649
13,622

$262,343

31,637
2,970,313
61,387
2,669,718
343,989
27,621,911
27,731,313 1,264,363
282
722,931
30,434,886
-607,294
136,684
149,399
10,236.037
329,122
2,310
479,171
45,567
1,691,791
1,880,918

4,572
3,981

$2,499,652 $29,341,775

8,768,894

18,195
16,784

$795,872 $4,210,350

2,477,709 ' 63,247
41,668
2,822,185
32,382,594 1,262,897
33,949,503 1,468,179
7,966
1,099,389
843,154
34,696,831
250,391
10,863,536
179,-698
42,614
378,246
62,318
698,251
1,528,329
1,594,038

6,535,616

2,281,927

10,008,241 134,069,220 2,757,124

w
93,699
79,717

56, 679
,21,037

11,303,525 151,982,777 4,826,229

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93,743,174

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9,919,282

>
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TJ
Ul

No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, S^c.—Continued.
1855.

1856.

•

1857.

Articles.
Foreign imported.
Iron and manufactures of iron,
and iron and steel
$22,980,728
Cast, shear, German and other
steel
.'
._ 2,693,137
Wool, unmanufactured
2,072,139
24,404,149
manufactures of
17,757,112
Cotton, manufactures of
751,617
Silk, unmanufactured . .
24,366,566
manufactures bf
Flax, unmanufactured . . . . o . .
^286,809
linen and linen fabrics.. 8,617,165
112,763
Hemp, unmanufactured
266,829
manufactures of
manilla, sun, and other,
of India
. - - 2,045,653
Silk and worsted goods
1,133,839
Laces, insertings, braids, and
• embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, or linen
4,978,316
Total




112,366,811

Foreign ex- Domestic ex- Foreign im- B'oreign ex- Domestic exported.
ported.
ported.
ported. ported.

$1,565,523

$3,753,472 $22,041,939

63,068
131,442
2,327,701
2,012,554
71,122
902,135

5,857,181

278,850
67,305
27,236

121,320
36,508

27,802

$423,221

25,698
2,538,323
14,997
1,665,064
31,961,793 1,266,632
25,917,999 1,580,495
4,255
991,234
676,513
30,226,532
132,461
179,666
11,189,463
54,249
57,676
19,635
253,730

Foreign im- Foreign ex- Domestic
. ported.
ported.
exported.

$4,161,008 $23,320,497
.27,465
6,967,309

28,598
26,036

$472,910 $4,884,967

2,633,614
2,125,744
31,286,118
28,685,726
953.734
27,800,319
220,738
11,441,642
423,533
619,682

27,703
920.
437,498
570,802
4,163
157,186

6,116,177

92,930
11,871
16,368

Pi
TJ
TJ
O

46,907
34,763

198,136
118,557

1,945,044
1,335,247

12,256
1,4,963

2,353,891
. 1,680,246

6,265,963

77,757

5,894,890

.H
O
H
W

TJ

86,182
1,169

155,865

19,007

9,532

7,909,494

9,796,283 136,622,468 4,240,237

O
TJ
Ul

11,210,405 139,240,174 1,888,234 11,100,811

to
Ox

No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, ^c-—Continued.

to
a:)
O
1869.

1858.
Articles.
Foreign imported.

Foreign exported.

Domestic exported.

Foreign imported. -

$14. 464,928
• Iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel—•
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
-1, 873,11b
Wool, unmanufactured
4, 022,635
manufactures of
^
26, 486,091
965,130
Cotton, "manufactures of
Silk, unmanufactured
„
..
1, 300,065
manufactures of
20. 222.103
197, 9.34
Flax, unmanufactured . .
.
557,323
linen and linen fabrics
_
331,307
Hemp, unmanufactured
614,666
manufactures of
-298,709
manilla, sun, and other, of India
249,385
Silk and worsted goods
Laces, insertings, braids, and embroideries of wool, cotton, silk,
or linen
--»
3,654,203

$183,366
13,154
824,898
197,902
390,988
94,092
250,959
5,590
63,770
81,890
20,343
482,223
4,000

$4,7-29,874 $15,000,866
2,047,730
4,444,954
211,861
33,521,966
6,661,604 26,355,081
1,330,890
26,745,527
146,707
10,340,605
405,173
47,875
432,746
89,092
2,157,895
1,623,106

$251,810
3,079
32,141
220,447
328,941
19,978
249,698
29,172
71,682
23,592
34,692
98,448
6,154

17,372

4,184,000

7,207

Foreign ex- Dome&iiic exported.
ported.
$5,603,667
355,563_
'8'316i'222

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fffffffff.

9,279

^

H
3

18,878
TJ

-----. ,_
_!
i^

o
Total.




101,227,590

2,627,647

10,730,206 128,737,236

1,375,841
14,203,609

Tl
^

No. 31.—Statement exhibiting the values of iron, ^.—Continued.
1860.

1861.

Articles.
Foreign imported.

Foreign exported.

Domestic ex- Foreign imported.
ported.

$18 ,726,657
Iron and manufactures of iron, and iron and steel
2 ,799,937
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
'
4 ,842,162
Wool, unmanufactured
manufactures of
...o-—
- 37 937,190
10 ,139,209
Cotton, manufactures of
1,341,676
Silk, unmanufactured
30 ,767,744
manufactures of
213,657
Flax, unmanufactui^ed
10 ,736,335
linen and linen fabrics
.371,317
Hemp, unmanufatured
769,135
manufactures of
,820,137
manilla, sun,, and other, of India
.,193,376
Silk and worsted goods'
Laces, insertings, braids, and' embroideries of wool, cotton, silk,
4,017,675
or linen
..—

$262,311
17,874
37,280
201,376
1,069,533
177,881
298,034

$.5,703,024 $14,958,283

Total

„

-

126,676,197

180,611
16,983
, 42,219
27,148

389,512
10,934,796

9,631
27,814

2,592,090
4,717,350
28,487,166
25,042,876
1,417,182
22,095,094
189,214
7,907,307
263,601
607,741
625,452
1,590,867

Foreign ex- Domestic exported.
ported.
$121,221
1,902
48,299
317,340
320,797
124,104
298,564
21,846
56,716
25.596
29,203
500

12,190

2,547,463

17,064,677 112,931,686

1,399,820

" "237,146

TJ
O
H
O

8,608
39,570

W
TJ
TJ
l-H

>

33,730

2,333,340

5,924,647

14,167,709

O
TJ
Ul

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 30, 1861.




to

bO

No. 32.

to
Statement exhibiting the value of iron, manufactures o f iron, a n d iron a n d steel, steel, sugar, wines, a n d a l l f a b r i c s of which wool, cotton,
silk, flax, or hemp is a component p a r t , impjorted annually, f r o m 1847 to 1861, both inclusive, with the duties which accrued thereon
d u r i n g each year, respectively, a n d brandies, f o r the years 1856, 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, a n d 1 8 6 1 .
1848.

1847.

1849.

Articles.
Value.

Duties.

Value.

Value.

Duties.

'Duties.
TJ
TJ
O

Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel-Cast, shear, German, and other steel
----..
Manufactures of wool
-cotton,..-„.
.--..
silk....
.........--.---..
flax_..l
---...hemp

.--.^

-.i..-i

Wines.
.........i...
..
Sugar
«
.
,
^-i--i.-._
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp is
a component part, but which cannot properly be
classified with either, viz:
Silk and worsted goods
=.
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread, and insertings
cotton, insertings,trimmings,laces,and braids
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
. - - ,"
Twine and packthread
Seines
.•_..
Total.



$8,781,252 $2,751,407 66
165,780 40
1,126,458
la, 998, 933 3,365,277 94
15,192,875 4,117,803 01
IL, 733, 371 2,833,850 75
5,154,837 1,093,180 65
135,754 88
684,880
439,873 22
1,801,951
9,877,212 3,376,815 53

$12,526,854 $3,736 ,223 20
1,284,937
203 909 00
15,240,883 4, 247 170 30
18,421,689 4,558 ,587 70
14,543,634 3,739 ,650 05
6,624,648 1,327 ,231 20
131 '615 00
658,075
670 595 60
1,434,009
9,479,817 2,843 945 10

$13,831,823
1,227,138
13,704,606
15,754,841
13,791,232
5,907,242
519,774
1,821,157
8,048,900

$4,132,780 .50
194,688 95
3,780,863 65
3,911,677 55
3,653,488 65
1,184,665 50
103,954 80
726,374 60
2,414,-670 00

2,452,289

613,072 25

60
80
00
60
60
60

587,690
176,375
663,991
146,410
34,378
182

176,277 00
35,275 00

84,590,334 22,473,478 15

78,667,928

21,040,756 50

H
O

TJ
TJ
t—t

O
1,965,096
676,404
370,028
398,514
67,592
64,809.
446

535,555 25
228,488
67,900
99,628
31,863
13,756
80

30
60
50
18
50
60

68,884,657 19,256,016 77

2,466,662

653.222
263,869
716,552
239,526
45,675
502

614,163 00
196,966
62,771
179,138
59,881
12,479
150

165,997 75
36,602

60

10,313 40
54 60

Ul

N o . 32.—Statement exhibiting the value of iron, ^x.—Continued.

1850.

1862.

1851.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other s t e e l . . .
Manufactures of wool
cotton..
—
silk
flax
hemp
^
Wines
.„.....,
Sugar
_
^
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, qr hemp is
a component part, but which cannot properly be
classified with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods.
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear
.
Laces, thread, and insertings
J
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, and braids
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
Seines
._
Total-




Duties.

Value.

$16,333,146 $4,876,811 00
1,332,263
211,106 05
17,l6i;509 4,752,782 30
20,108,719 5,002,633 66
17,639,624 4,618,423 65
8,134,674 1,630,900 00
688,446
117,689 20
2,065,922
823,608 60
7,565,146 2,266,543 80

1,653,809
813,261
185,925
672,627
257,377
62.106
590

Duties.

Val ue.

$17,306,700 $5,170,213 70
250,706 15
1,570,063
19,507,309 5,407,688 85
22,164,442 5,516,962 00
25,777,245 6,574,792 55
8,796,740 1,765,497 80
132,353 60
661,768
941,190 80
2, 35a, 279
13,841,426 4,152,427 80

$18,957,993
1,703,699
17,573,694
19,689,496
.21,661,752
8,515,709
391,608
2,203,230
14,712,847

Duties.
$6,666,763
274,332
4,831,729
4,887,638
5,629,273
1,708,919
78,321
878,604
4,413,854

80
30
15
45
50
10
60
60
10

413,452 25

1,783,076

445,769 00

1,667,613

416,878 25

243,978
37,185
168.166
64,344
18,631
177

1,058,994
223,116
756,651
213,785
50,282
299

317,698
44,623
189,162
53,446
15,084
89

20
00
75
25
60
70

1,368,812
. 160,385
535,056
205,417
^ 45,014
• 742

410,643
32,077
133,764
51,354
13,604
. 222

116,070,174 30,977,706 75'

109,292,867

30
00
76
25
80
00

94,655,133 25,146,423 50

60
00
00
25
20
60

TJ
TJ
TJ
O
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. H
O
i^
H

3
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TJ
Ul

29,327,780 50

to
Ct)

to

N o . 32.—Statement exhihiting the value o f iron, ^c.—Continued.

1854.

1853.

1855.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel.
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufactures of wool
cotton
Bilk

flax
hemp

.....

»
Brandies
Wines
Sugar
:
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp
is a component part, but which cannot properly
be classified with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods
,.-.„..
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen..
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear.
Laces, thread, and insertings
•...
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, braids, &c
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
Seines . . . . . . , . . - . . „
„
Total.




Value.

Duties.

$27,255,425 58,162,621 40
2,970,313
476,868 70
27,621,911 7,625,914 05
27,731,313 6,924,408 30
30,434,886 7,748,378 75
10,236,037 2,056,004 50
479,171
96,834 20
2,995,631
14,987,776

1,194-, 802 20
4,496,332 80

. Duties.

Value.

$29,341,775 |$8,777,066 80
403,624 95
2,477,709
32,382,594 8,986,161 85
33,949,503 8,513,717 85
34,696,831 8,805,359 65
10,863,536 2,178,895 90
598,251
179,475 30
3,370,802
13,700,789

1,198,614 40
4,110,236 70

$22,980,728
2,593,137
24,404,149
17,757,112
24, 366; 556
8,617,165
266,829
3,114,824
14,673,547

Duties.
$6,873,068
431,757
6,765,005
4,319,033
6,129,583
1,723,573
53,366

00
10
80
45
95
90
80

1,G98,3(D4 40
4,402,064 10

TJ
TJ
O
td
H

§
w
TJ

1,880,918
2,307,135
252,170
841,757
121,660
58,646
404

470,229 50
692,140
50,434
210,439
30,415
17,563
121

60
00
25
00
80
20

150,175,053 40,242,508 15

.1,594,038
3,927,141
368,399
863,652

255,969
78,553
1,540

398,509 50
1,178,142
73,679
, 213,388
63,992
23,565
462

30
80
00
25
90
00

168,460,982 45,104,883 15

* Twine and seines are under one head for the year 1S55.

1,123,839
3,892,749
1,975,662
' 318,511
767,056
187,124

«55,704
127,104,691

283.459 75
,167,824 7©

592,698
63,7G2
191,763
46,781
16,711

60
20
75
00
20

34,148,687 70

>
o
TJ
Ul

No. 32.—Statement exliibitmg the value of iron, ^.—Continued.
1857.

1856.

1868.

Articles.
Value.
Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and s t e e l . . . . . .
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufactures of w o o l . . . .
cotton
silk
flax
,
hemp
Brandies
-. --Wines
Sugar
Articles of which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp
is a component part, but which cannot properly
be classified with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods
.,
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear
Laces, thread, and insertings
cotton,"insertings, trimmings, laces, braids, &c
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
Seines »
^,
Total




. Duties.

Value.

$22,041,939 $6,587 ,976 70
422 746 85
2,538,323
31,961,793 8,835 ,366 40
25,917,999 6,333 ,740 05
30,226,532 7,604 ,846 15
11,189,463 2,238 ,384 70
50 746 00
^253,730
2,859,342 2,859 ,342 00
6,796,068 2,718 423 20
22,638,653 6,761 596 90

$23,520,497
2,633,614
31,286,118
28,686,726
27,800,319
11,441,542
519,582
2,527,262
4,274,205
42-, 776, 501

Duties.

Value.

$6,995, 619 70
437, 958 20
8,633, 566 60
8,035, 194 75
7,010, 190 45
3,288, 999 6Q
103, 916 40
2,527, 262 00
1,709, 612 00
12,832, 950 30

$14,464,928
1,873,111
26,486,091
17,965,130
20,222,103
6,557,323
614,666
2,232,452
3,246,388
23,436,713

Duties.
$3,450,988
246,533
6,653,019
3,954,099
3,867,023
984,076
92,199
669,735
973,916
5,840,811

05
46
47
16
87
85
90
60
40
12

W
TJ
T)
O
TJ
H
O

W

TJ
TJ

1,335,247
4,664,353
1,978,344'
410,591
1,191,019
132,172
^^53,821

333,811
1,399,305
693,503
82,118
297,764
33,043
16,146

75'
90
20
20
75
00
30

166,089,379 47,168,850 05

1,580,246
4,443,175
1,918,988
321^961
1,129,754
156,632
59,957

395,061
1,332,952
576,696
64,392
282,438
39,133
17.987

50
50
40
20
50
00
10

1,249,385
2,845,029
1,283,538
189,494
619,680
170,259
73,989

184,875,979 54,282,931 20

123,520,279

237.383
682,806
308,049
28,424
117.739
32,349
17,757

15
96
12
10
20
21
36

l-H

o
TJ
Ul

27,146,962 97

* Twine and seines are under one head for the years 1856, 1857, and 1858.

to
Ol

No. 32.—Statement exhihiting the value of iron, ^c.—Continued.
1859.

to

1860.

1861.

Articles.
Value.
.Iron, manufactures of iron, and iron and steel
Cast, shear, German, and other steel
Manufactures of wool
cotton ..'.^
- silk
flax
hemp
Brandies
.
.
Wines.»-o<-^
Sugar
.
Articles of. which wool, cotton, silk, flax, or hemp
is a component part, but which cannot properly
be classified with either, viz :
Silk and worsted goods
—
Embroideries of wool, cotton, silk, and linen.
Clothing, ready-made, and articles of wear . - . _
Laces, thread, and insertings
-.....
cotton, insertings, trimmings, laces, braids, &c
Cordage, untarred, tarred, and cables
Twine and packthread
--_
Seines
.:;
Total

.:...-...

-

Duties.

Value.

$16,000,866 $3,577, 276 38
2,047,730
272, 903 37
33,621,956 7,246, 780 65
26,355,081 5,749, 249 77
26,745,527 6,101, 292 14
10,340,605 1,553, 478 36
432,746
64, 911 90
3,262,058
^978, 617 40
3,608,148 1,082, 444 40
30,578,578 7,338, 868 72

Duties.

Value.

$18,726,657 $4,468, 606 37
362, 726 04
2,799,-937
37,937,190 8,165, 618 66
10,139,209 1,379, 518 49
30,767,744 5,889, 739 36
10,736,336 1,613, 647 59
115, 370 .25
769,135
3,937,698 1,091, 309 40
1,432, 535 70
4,775,119
31,082,005 7,459, 681 20

$14,958,283
2,619,708
28,487,166
25,042,876
- 22,096,094
7,988,553
607,741
1,859,429
3,137,804
30,639,216

Duties.
$3,656, 534 47.
400, 518 02
6,092, 518 90
6,421, 988 23
4,345, 214 63
1,222, 312 81
92, 555 29
615, 072 70
- 951, 665 90
7,371, 601 74

O

TJ

1,623,106
3,286,408
1,537,284
276,292
621,300
61,217
64,374

1,582

308,390
788.737
368,948
41,443
118,047
11,631
13,049
379

14
92
16
80
00
23
76
68

159,354,868 34,616,440 68

2,193,376
2,963,616
2,101,958
397,642
666,517
132,927
49,238
730

416,743 44
711,267 84
504,469 92
59,631 30
124, 738'23
25,256 13
11,817 12
175 20

-1,690,867
1,903,542
1,497,781
' 238,821
2,163,107
162,520
40,182
625

160,271,633 33,825,316 14

144,933,215

302,264
571,062
366,000
36,247
411,181
30,879
9,674
100

73
60
69
10
48
42
34
71

31,896,393 66

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30, 1861.




TJ
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No. 3 3 .
Statement exhibiting the exports to a n d the imports f r o m C a n a d a a n d other B r i t i s h possessions •
J u l y , 1851, to the ZOth d a y of June, 1861.
Exports.

^

Increase each successive year
over 1852.
Imports.

Year ending—

'
June 30 1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1868
1859
1860
1861

.»-

'

-.
-.

o...
-...1

Total

.

._--

..

. .

»
^
-

N o r t h America, f r o m the 1st d a y o f

For,eign.

Domestic.

Total.

Exports.

Imports.

TI
TJ
Tl
O
Tl

$3,853,919
5,736,556
9,362,716
11,999,378
6,314,652
4,326,369
4,012,768
6,384;547
2,918,524
2,505,736

$6,655,097
7,404,087
15,204,144
15,806,642
22,714,697
19,936,113
19,638,959
21,769,627
11,264,590
11,016,664

$10,509,016
13,140,642
24,566,860
27,806,020
29,029,340
24,262,482
23,651,727
28,154,174
14,183,114
13,522,399

$6,110,299
7,550,718
8,927,560
15,136,734
21,310,421
22,124,296
16,806,519
19,727,551
18,861,673
14,791,684

$2,631,626
14,057,844
17,297,004
18,520,333
13,753,466
13,142,711
17,645,158
3,674,098
3,013,383

$1,440,419
2,817,261
9,026,435
16,200,122
16,013,997
9,696,220
13,617,252
12,751,374
8,681,385

67,415,163

161,410,620

208,825,783

150,347,366

103,735,623

80,194,465

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Registei\

O
i^
W
TJ-

Tl
t—1

>
o
TJ
Ul

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, Novemher 27, 1861.




to
a:)

No. 34.—General result of all receipts and disposal of merchandise within the United States during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1861.

:,o
o":>
GO

1860!

•

-

Amount.

September.

August.

July.
Duty.

1. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the
$22,077,558 21 $5,639,115 75
. first of each month
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse from foreign ports during each
month
.
--.-«
.'
6,899,083 18 1,681,602 82
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse transported from other ports
during each month72,453 19
350,477 00
4: Value of dutiable-merchandise entered for
consumption from foreign ports during'
each month 22,698,115 52 4,564,676 35
6. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports during
each month
4,831,507 69
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption from warehouse during each
month
_
6,001,678 45 1,156,265 47
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports during each
month
....•120,964 77
648,218 00
8. Value of merchandise entered for exporta137,126 49
- • tion from warehouse during each month.
687,350 27
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the
close of each month
23,089,871 67 6,878,715 03
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the
close of each month
..
i. .
385,923 08
1,462,216 00



Amount.

Duty.

$23,089,871 67 $5,878,715 03

Amount.

Duty.

$24,072,275 74

$6,140,400 96

TJ
TJ

o

TJ

6,626,533 60

1,613,086 42

4,948,041 65

1,108,948 18

470,661 04

106,387 29

238,674 77

99,458 45

O

TJ

25,538,796 39

4,921,019 58

15,871,899 45

2,982,687 74

6,639,658 34

6,924,366 24

i^

o
Tl

4,824,263 66

1,079,597 42

5,699,601 65

1,299,471 67

613,685 96

18,866 51

656,883 61

150,440 38

776,840 ro

' 159,353 85

• 886,746 59

181,620 43

.24,072,275 74

6,140,400 96

22,215,760 42

5,717,275 21

1,583,615 00

408,774 17

1,682,252 50

420,685'49

Ul

• ; ^ o . 3 4 . — G e n e r a l result o f a l l receipts a n d disposal o f merchandise within the United States, 5fc.—Continued.
1860.

October.

'Amount.

1. Value of merchandise in warehouse on the
first of each month
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse from foreign ports during each
month
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse transported from other ports
during each month
^...
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for
consumption from foreign ports during
each month _.»
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports during
each month
.
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption from warehouse during each
month
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports during each
month
^
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation from warehouse during each month,
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse a t t h e
close of each m o n t h
10. Value of m e r c h a n d i s e in transitu a t t h e
close of each m o n t h
.




November.

Duty.

$ 2 2 , 2 1 5 , 7 6 0 42 $ 5 , 7 1 7 , 2 7 5 21

Amount.

December.

Duty.

$ 2 1 , 0 4 0 , 7 0 1 98 $ 5 , 4 7 0 , 9 2 0 02

Amount.

Duty.
TJ
TJ
TJ
•o

$ 2 3 , 0 6 6 , 3 4 3 32

Tl
4 , 6 1 0 , 7 8 2 60

9 8 5 , 9 3 6 00

6 1 0 , 7 8 2 50

1 2 3 , 4 8 8 01

1 5 , 8 4 5 , 7 9 0 52

2 , 8 3 4 , 2 2 2 86

5 , 5 6 5 , 9 2 2 24

1 , 1 4 4 , 1 3 7 63

1 0 , 2 5 1 , 8 4 0 14

2 , 0 3 4 , 6 2 5 52

O

^
3 9 5 , 3 2 9 00

7 4 , 0 9 3 30

3 4 5 , 0 3 4 00

7 0 , 8 7 1 84

H
W

1 , 4 2 3 , 3 6 2 09

TJ

TJ

8 , 6 3 8 , 9 3 7 44

1 3 , 9 4 0 , 1 7 1 10

2 , 0 9 4 , 8 2 7 84

7 , 1 2 8 , 7 6 9 98

8 , 1 2 4 , 9 5 4 79

1 3 , 3 7 5 , 8 6 6 65

)-H

a
TJ
Ul

4 , 8 6 1 , 9 9 0 17

1 , 0 6 7 , 9 1 2 42

2 , 6 1 8 , 8 7 6 53

5 8 3 , 9 2 9 49

2 , 0 9 6 , 0 4 1 94

4 6 6 , 1 9 5 15

6 2 3 , 0 0 4 00

142,935 60

4 5 3 , 4 2 6 00

9 8 , 4 5 9 19

4 5 1 , 6 7 4 38

8 9 , 4 6 6 63

9 1 1 , 3 2 8 00

1 5 4 , 9 3 1 18

8 4 9 , 1 9 6 37

1 4 2 , 1 6 3 48

1 , 3 7 1 , 1 5 6 84

2 9 7 , 2 5 5 32

2 1 , 0 4 0 , 7 0 1 98

6 , 4 7 0 , 9 2 0 02

2 3 , 0 6 6 , 3 4 2 32

5 , 8 6 4 , 6 9 8 69

2 9 , 7 4 4 , 3 4 3 30

, 7 , 1 1 7 , 0 7 8 95

1 , 5 4 4 , 8 3 6 00

3 8 7 , 7 0 3 57

1 , 4 7 5 , 7 3 4 00

3 8 1 , 4 0 7 71

1 , 1 3 5 , 9 1 8 00

3 0 2 , 0 6 9 79

to
CD

No. 34.—General result of all receipts and disposal of merchandise within the United States, Sfc-—Continued.

to

o
1861.
February.

January.
Amount.
i . Value of merchandise in warehouse on the
first of each month
^
$29,744,343 30
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse from foreign ports during each
month.
...
. . 11,170,312 01
3., Value of merchandise received in warehouse transported from other ports during each month . . - . .
...
1
536,254 00
4. Value of dutiable merchandise entered for
consumption from foreign ports during
each month
i
10,740,806 36
5. Value of free merchandise entered for consumption from foreign ports during
each month .
15,038,074 22
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption from warehouse during each
month
.
3,875,327 36
7. Value of merchandise entered for transportation to other ports during each
month
^
559,572 00
8. Value of merchandise entered for exportation from warehouse during each month.
803,369 98
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the
close of each month
36,212,639 97
10. Value of merchandise in transitu at the
close of each month
1,259,225 00-^



Amount.

Duty.

March.
Duty.

Amount.

$8,377,927 17

$24,083,791 61

$7,864,967 78

Tl
TJ
O

O

Duty.

•
$7,117,078 96

$36,212,639 97

H

2,258,-748 76

6,989,109 91

1,176,324 06

4,201,454 56

867,329 10

110,942 60

385,061 38

76,691 68

242,697 00

43,300 75

9,410,930 74

1,713,676 81

1,978,048 44

TJ

8,978,435 3 l

1,699,206 46

o

12,256,229 35

8,751,006 28

TJ
m

830,-092 22

7,462,223 .06

1,569,572 12

7,460,129 88

1,561,153 41

117,913 17

270,858 00

44,371 90

212,433 00

41,337 75

145,683 73

788,262 42

170,447 83

7,864,957 78

30,058,118 17

7,002,708 64-

240,534 67

824,406 00

226,930 04

160,837 75
8,377,927 17
324,185 46

752,095 30
34,083,791 61
892,267 00

H

N o . 3 4 . — G e n e r a l result o f a l l receipts a n d disposal o f merchandise within the United States, 8fc.—Continued.
1861.
April.
Amount.

May.'
Duty.

1. Value oi merchandise in warehouse on the
$30,058,118 17 $7,002,708 64
first of each month
2. Value of merchandise received in warehouse from foreign ports during each
5,687,319 25 1,250,832 87
month
3. Value of merchandise received in warehouse transported from other ports du276,601 27
.60,373 49
ring each month
4. Value of dutiable merchandise'entered for
consumption from foreign ports during
7,425,206' 92
436,876 11^
each month
5. Value of free merchandise eiitered for consumpjiion from foreign ports during
.9,681,156 26
each month
.,
6. Value of merchandise entered for consumption from warehouse during each
3,581,718 96
948,347 09
month
7. Value^of merchandise entered for transportation together ports during each
216,781 00
48,244 42
month
.
.-8. Value of merchandise entered for exporta240,275 94
tion from warehouse during each month.
1,211,031 42
9. Value of merchandise in warehouse at the
close of each rnonth
..-.
31,010,147 31 7,067,047 55
10. Value of merchandise in tramitu at the
246,100 38
close of each month
_
S24, 394 00




Amount.

June.
Duty.

Duty.

$36,224,812 57

$31,010,147 31

Amount.

$8,098,976 47

TI
O

o

8,177,998 Q
O

1,903,417 20

4,514,591 77

1,826,564 39

222,367 00

56,933 22

146,128 34

43,000 08

4,598,966 80

965,327 62

1,728,406 93

565,726 92

9,550,920 83

^
o

12,008,649 30

Ul

2,663,489 12

590,976 02

2^,7^1,882 77

617,386 69

141,670 00

35,181 62

103,960 60

25,740 70

1,338,502 37

294,574 98

689,257 00

132,819 34

'35,224,812 57

8,098,976 47

36,470,432 31

8,491,709 65

777,788. 00

233,659 55

736,230 00

224,406 44

•

to

No. 35.

to
to

Synopsis of the returns of the banks in the different States at the dates annexed.

Maine.

Dec,
1854
D(^c.,
1855
Jan.,
Ib57
Jan. 4,1858
Jan. 1, J659
Jan.,
1860
Jan.,
1861

^7,301,252 .<^13,181,9081
7,899,793 13,065,956'
8,135,735 J 3,277,620
7,614,200 11,210,245
7,408,945 11,815,127
7, 506,890 12,654,794
7,656,250 13,406,294|

$1,781,065 $539,974
464,561
1,396,430
1,158,2761 375,2101
24.5,121'
876,022'
273,303
»1,478,:
290,224
1,019,900
308,703
995,64y|

$8,850| $112,694
11.3,879
13.:^, 251
13.^), 263
145,56r
18l,igS|
235,531

.1854
N e w Hampshire ,. D e c ,
Dec,
18.55
Dec,
1856
Jan. 4,1858
D e c 6,18.58
—e c ,
D
' l 1 o=n
859
1860
Dec,

3,626,000
4,449, .300
4,831,000
5,041,000
5,041,000
5,016,000
4,981,000

6,891,621
8,037,427
8,846,421
7,3S9,813|
8,250; 754
8,591,688
8,794,948

Aug., 1854
July and August, J 855.
July and August, 185tj.
Julyaiid August, 1857.
Aug,
1858
July,
1859
Aug., 1860

3,275,656
3,603,460

6,572,951
6,710,928|

140,864
151,875

3,856,946

7,302,951

114,589

135,268

52,881 1,142., 104

4,028,740

7,905,711

39,991

136,582

17,185i

4,082,416
4,029,240
3,872,64^

6,392,992
6,946,523
6,748,500

106,500
176,400
190,372

Massachusetts . . . . Aug., 1854
Aug., 1855
Oct., 1855
Oct. 17,1857
Oct., 1858
Oct., 1859
Oct., I860

54,432,660
58,633,350
f8,598,800
60,319,720
61,819,825
64,519,200
64,519,200

93,341,9531
99,506,7U!
101,132,792
92,458,572
101,602,947
107,417,323
107,417,323

Vermont.




602,447
769, 963|
741,476
829,16S
889,330
772,173|
756,200|

124,860
241,383
136,504
158,132
170.994
18i;964
157,385

$85,132 1,079,686
49,428 1,150,362|

125,902
54,556

52, .343
56, SI 9
75,893
82,000
66,086
72,912
75,646
136,115
123,237

$1,025,208 $5,691,815 $2,914,601
753,085 5,077,248 2;011,02S
705,1431 4,641,646 1,994,782
615,441 2.954,327 1,743,939
663,754 3,886,5fl9 2,382,910
670,979 4,149,718 2,411,022
« 653,334 4,313,005 2,475,111
176,434
236.411
236,013
275,933
294,423
255,278
243,719

3,079,^548
3,589,482
3,677,689
2,289,939
3,115,643
3,271,183
3,332,010

$172,628 $19,559
118,975 104,173
145,083 121,743
139,304
76;009
89.271
90,082
• 102;392] 87,165
151,43-' 394,760

. 775,4101
938,474
1,058.803
875,789
1,069,920
1,187,991
1,234,627]

$34,071
' 32,845

196,680 3,986,709]
201,548 3,704,341'

745,17(
801,039

43,146

39,440

208,858 3,970,720|

797,535

926,326

122,923

36,351

188,588 4,275,517

746,557

222,560
190,565
174,736

73,954
701,545
176,412 1,167,602
168,662 1,299,595

41,780
69,435
58,558

232,6251
69,667|
103,5.37

178,556 3,024,141
198,409 3,882,983
185,670 3,784,673

61.5,874
787,834
814,623

1,186,509
1,281,601
1,426,392
1,608,613
1,584,884
1,601,072
1,601,072

8,225,682
7,010,323
7,574,791
5,522,08?
9,187,245
7,212,530
7,212,531

5,325,594
4,547,710
5,248,379
4,385,6.50
4,993,421
•5,183,459
5,138,549

3,828,402 124,803,758
4,409,402 23,116,024
4,555,571 26,544,315
3,611,097 18,104,827
11,112,715 20,839,438
7,532,647 22,086,920
7,532,647 122,066,920

18,783,281
21,^8,717
23,437,256
17,631,19(
,30,538,153
27,804,699
27,804,699

15,715
4,7881

979
7,647

7,348
1,639
5,441
19,1321
15,042

1,443
3,780

6,930,098 503,313
5,947,835 494.542
4,807,601 931,'868
4,106,694 1,343,948
7,654,234 1,537,853
6,937,042 1,444,338
6,937,042 1,444,388

Rhodelsland. .

Sept., 1854
Sept., 1855
Dec,
1856
Dec. 14,1857
May,
1858
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
Nov., 1860

17,511.162
18,682.; 802
20,275,899
20,334,777
20,070,741
20,321,069
20,865,569
21,070,619

25,233.304
26,385; 4.581
28,679,343
25,823,152
24,065,894
25,131,150
26,719,877
27,980,865

Connecticut.

•^pril, 1854
April, 1855
April, 1856
April 1,1857
April, 1858
iMay,
1859
April, 1860

15,597,891
17,147,385
18,913,372
19,923,553
20,917,16b
21,512,176
21,606,99-

23,292,321
23,704,458]
28,511,14!
33,108,5226,799,431
27,8.56,785
30,518,689

New Y o r k .

Sept., 1854
Sept., 185S
Sept., 1856
Dec. 26, 1857
March, 18^8
1858
June,
Sept., . 18.58
D e c 18, 1858
1859
Dec,
1830
Dec,

New J e r s e y .

Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,
Jan.,

1855
1856
18.57
1858
1859
1860
1861

Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,
.Nov.,
Nov.,
Nov.,

1854
1855
1855
1857
1858
1859
1860

5,314,885
9,177, .334
5,682,262 - 10,999.9iy
.
6,582,"13,380,085
7,494.912 11,:'64,319
7,359;122] 12.449,460
7.844,412 14;909,174
8,246,944 13,884,045

Maryland .

19,854,825
22,026,596
23,609,344'
25,691,439
24,565,805
25,565, .582
25,808,553

48,641,393
52,.549,19r
55,287,23^
'49,149,323
46,8:5,266
50:327,157
55; 357,472

1,393,175
• 1,493,185
1,428,185
1,355,010
1,638,185
1;640,775
1,640,78;"

3,048,14]
2,906,253
3,021,37b
2,544,212
3,009,285
3,150,215
3,014,653

Jan.,

10,411,674'

17,588,718

1855 !,29




35.429
70;285
70,133
50,760
93,365
93,365
100,223
140,548

821,964
760,697
581,773

.5,178,831
5,857,5.37
6,868,945
7,423;614
7,681.904
7,899,958
8,182,920
8,264,425
8,725,526
8,827,331

932.519
1.242,362
1;255,322
1,410,675
1,700,185
1,491,522
1,143,591
846,333

880,7241
1,157.251
1,281,754
860,778
755,049
802,66C|
974,62C'
966,079

564,522
673,037
488,138]
614,763
877,0001
799,244
832,228

386,212
1,298,677
3/5,612
1,391,218
453,1.32
1,216,630
820,241
946,749
938,755 1,085,173
1,267,408 1,915,047
922,817
1,104,343

83, * 73,288] 163,216,392 20,820,653
;
85, .589,590 19.2.161.111 20,590,150
96,381,301 205,892,499 24,027,533
107.449,143 162,807,37G 22,623,755
109;587,702 170,436,240 22,894,677
109,340,541 187,468,510 23,097,661
109,996,550 194,7.34,996 [25,031,416
110.258,480 200,577,198 25,268,884
i n ; 441.320 200,351,332 26,897,874
2^9,721,800 29,605,318
111,821,9;

Jan.,
1855
J a n . , - 1856
Jan.,
1857
Jan.,
1858
1859
Jan.,
1860
Jan.,
Jan.,1860-'6lj

Pennsylvania..

111,9881 252,1641
323,092]
131,072
128,539 - 478,65! •
527,787
145,129
.536,403
161,309
536,403
161,309
604,015
214,102
613,747
195,234

2,205,068
2,272,606
3,432,975
2,651,143
2,584,819
2,994.958
2,904;963

459,501
341,754
387,319
443,801
273.381
326; 617
373,855

767,642 12,475,292
12;666,517
12,179,169
467,855| 11,726,973
12,803,512
""331^6021 13, ,569,231
350,155 12,860,865
397,330 15,169,559
1,418 12, .524,249
430,449 13,962,096

785,523
962,911'
899,831

240,921
265,228
•224,711
344,045
421,793
446,202
469,724

158,396
71,587
288,296
288;802
391,19'
590;884
2,353,059

1,810,707
1,639,249
2,237,204
1,609,817
2,223,935
2,395,028
1,853,151

2;133,492
2,714,232
2,301,626
2,569,119
2,954,443
2,513,674
2,377,774

1,159,740
1,128,674
1,206,569
1,353,285
1,423,253
1,719,135
1,765,255

599,662
678,018
303,730
244,120
253,521
685,561
1,045,641

4,840,118
5,647,642
5,143,330
3,773,2L^7
4,418,436
3,073,210
4,548,839

29,140
3,814
. 1,065
234

402,179
38 r, 079
506,514
507,2.55
308,222
411,932
•336,767

124,356
37,-466
44,085 / 137,524
130,000
33,076
57,655
18,610
81,499
22,610
85,182
4,750
83,963
3,250

618,295

333,930

^

312,6061
385,767'
548,348
570.850
732;622
608,833
450,929
471,581

5,035,073
5,404,104
5,521,909
3,192;661
2,644,195
3,318,681
3,55'', 295
3,772,24!

206,921 1,207,381 11,219,566
281,220
810,101 6,871,102
246,248 1,005,493 9,197,76v
270,722 1,159,708 10,590,421
262,595
915,844 .5,380,247
255,844
989,920 7. .561,519
262,065
950,75S 7,702,436]

3,665,954 16,453.329 13,651,565 31,.507,78(J
2,958,038 18,095,545 10,910,330 [31,340,003
2,935,20.^, 22,678,628 12.898,771 34,019,633
1,857,658 14;130.673 29,313,421 23,899,964
1,705,037 16,152;746 135,071,074 22,710,158
1,914,031 15,019,241 .33,597,211 24,079,193
2,106,6.53 13,740,731 29,905,295 28,605,40?
2,044,765 18,435,957 28,335,984 28,507,990
2,261,723 17,376,750 20,921,545 29,959,506
2,287,843 16,044,322 26,427,3.34 28,239,950
418,342
502,949
710.072
494,197
578,006
662,196
533,699

828,452
782,659
849,925
1,^08,851
9.52,231
940.700
1,049,090

3,552,585
4,285,079
4,759,855
3,395,936
4,054,770
4,811,832
4,164,799

2,772,367]
2,914,596
3,141,657
2,510,108
2,624,226
3,130,475
.3, .553,104
2,986,956

1,046,658] 329,425
1.192,449 357,539
1,475,221 659,703
1,651,2041 381,402
1,1.50,667' 295,889
935,081 296,889
1,022,277]
1,396,184' "8i8,°7i4

3,910,160 1,008,655] 1,022,940
3,433,081
945,844 482,975
4,090;835
875,287 911,4.58
4,688,843 1,020,711 1,503,135
4,140,088
684,997 893,155
.5.574,g0C
926,30e
.5,808
5,505,507 1,166,778 153,916
84,970.840 21,081,456 4.731.884
83,852,395 26,045.439] 3:615,502
95,907.970 29,014;125 5,767,333
83,043;353 21,268,562 2,829:056
93;738,878 28,710,077 2,292;940 '
'00,762,909 34,290,766 2,442,812
103,481,745 [33,610,448 2, .539,629
110,465,798 35,134,049 2,824,618
104,070,273 28,807,429 3,059,277
114,845,372 29,492,678 9,572,786
3,290,462
483,875
3,994,541
616,321
4,891,970 1,438,658
3,698,600
507,077
4,239.235
770,935
5,741;465 1,141,664
5,117,817|
559,579

80,763

3,769,420 3,997,949 3,944,600 16,7.39,069 21,076,464 3,9.30,665
3,716,872
4,460,673
155,376 6,738,652 16,883,139 25,340,814
96,792
5,719,234 1,593,696 5,973,138 17,368,096 27,593,634 4,955.485
4,215;515 127,0.59
4,814,97!:
• 75,829 4,580,528 11,610,4.58 18,924,113 5,847,970
80,706
834,124 3,349,824 11,345,536 11,980,4SC 26,054,568 4,559.625
429,167
4,277,399
8,378,474 13,132.892 25,167,843 3,837,5.54 975,192
4,'912,"286 7,818,769 15,830;033 27,032,104 4,118,925 1,073,159
39,051
39,830
-4f),680
58,639
61,446
122,125
130,423

295,2231 1,490,609' l,566,3oll

237,215
156,055
195,601
108,516
114,8121
103,8521
104,005;

90,149
180,051
146,367
203.228
217,342
208,924
187,2631

1,380,991
1,192,204]
1,394,094
1,240, .370
980,846
1,13.5,772
1,080,822

859,0101
127,510
8.52,164'
125,303
868,414
147,2.50
609,1791
72,297
832,657' • 86,180
976,226
102,]66[
818,2011
105,948

96,518'2,987,225' 4,118,1971

7,268,888' 1,511,97o'

891,230

No. 35.—Synojjsis of the returns of the' banks, ^x.—Continued.

State.

to

Date.

5
o
Maryland—Cont'd. Jan.,
1856
Jan.,
1857
Jan., 1-858
Jan.,
1859
Jan., 1860
Jan. 1, 1851
Virginia,

Jan.,
1855 58
Jan.,
1856 ] 57
Jan.,
1857
J a n . 1,1858
Jan.,
1859'
Jan.,
1860
J a n , 1,1861

North Carolina.* . Nov., 1854
Nov. & D e c . ,
1855.
.
Nov., D e c ,
1856, Jan.,
1857.
Dec,
1857,
J a n . , 1858.
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1, 1861

$11,202,606 $20,616,005
12,297,276 22,293,554
12,451,545 21,804,111
12,560,635 21,854,9341
12,568,962 29,898,762
12,567,121 22,299,233 •

$544,6001 $318,896
402,217
^58;278
417,925
644,318
484,825
893,965
505,179
848,283
63.5,685] 539.329

786,952
3,127,300
807,981
2,647,355
872,368
3,184,966
910,394
3,591,564
951,629
3,569,4.37
3,584,078 1,019.0.32
3,685,135 1,070,669

75,309
114,433]
484.682
331,
41.3,6"5|
433,423
340,791

1,596,434
2,186,725]
2,405,211
2,085,424
2,557;182
2,755,047
1,893,416|

1,225,105
999,764
1,-509,089
1,674,733
814,060
1,294;093
2,003,703

145,033
171,037

12,769]
4,067'

672,9911
785,852

409,764
378,690

39,238 1,291,435 6,667,762
1,360,995 5,750,092

' 94,116|

192,475

7,913|

845,416

356,076

11,957,7331

180,270|

196,671

14,275]

709,830

'6,525,200
6,626,478
7,863,466

12,247,3001
12,213,272
14,080,746]

123,951
363,828
537,714

216,.347
188,568
239,456

45,6961 1,291,343
68,009 1,081,463
630, .355
28;912

1,670,3051
3,48.3,011
3,258,8761
3,223., 887
3,321.969
2,994; 688
2,969,872

14,033,83S|
13,600, U 8
13,863,000
14,651,600
14,685,370
16,005,156
16,486,210

.23,331,9-39
25,319,94S
24,899,575
23,y38,411
9-2,419,512
24,97.5,792
25,866,262

5,205,073
'6,031,945

11,468,527
11,558,430]

123,275
123,985]

6,425,250

12,635,521

6,.525,100]

South Carolina...,

Sept., 18.54
Sept., 1855
Jan.,
18.57
Dec. 31,1857
nee,
1858
Dec,
1859
Sept., 1860

16,603,253
17,516, COO
14,837,642
•14,885,631
14,883,451
14,962,062
14,932,486|

23,149,098
22,2.38. t/00
28,227; 3 •'0
22,058,561
24,444,044
27,801,912
22,230,759

Georgia

Aug., 1855, ] 24
Mar., 1856.

11,508,717

16,758,403 1,671,234 1,853,503




$82,961 $3,398,101 $5,297,983 $8,370,345 $1,924,7.56 $938,108
$698,890 '$1,649,155-f 1,482,744
9,168] 3,522,551 5,155,096 9,611,324[ 1,895,281| 679,701
23,528] 1,894,791 1,666,603
3,164 2,614,728] 4,041,021 7, .541,185 4,194,677 549,933
14,74 3,226,112] 1,473,4 3
67,574] .1,017,641
69,863 1,521,663 3,120,011 3,977,971 9,0'28,664 1,725,807 417,667
2,779,418 4,105,869] 8,874,180 1,324,740 357,195
41,500 1,657,016| 1,897,218
2,267,158 3,558,247 9,085,162 2,108,920 426,434
1,874,439| 1,524,228

510,
600,
631,
698,
677.
631,
684,

•571,049
951,832
698,662
1,005,448
2,964,540
1,45.5,488
2,388,994

1,198,421
1,057,476
1,180,938
1,331,109
2,200,450
1,592,644
587,645

135,298 1,285,624

247,909
25,999
13,402
6,287
496,663
29,838
32,939

2,72^8,482 10,834,963
3,151,109 13,014,925
3,092,741 12.685,627'
2,710,777 10,347,874
3,077,687 10,3411,342
2,943,652] 9,812,197
3,017,359 19,817,148

81.5.830
5,615,666
663,995
6,204,340
729,507
7,397,474
899,796
6,971,325
982,351
7,401,701
7,729,652 1,138,3271
7,157,270 1,310,068

51,546
36,602
98,235
87;210
.58,780
34,600
317,905

1,130,329
1,101,1x3

112,047
234,832|

1,170,026

224,821

. 6,645

333,018

1,035,869 5,699,427

1,037,457

82,347

66

317,362
601,1 5
513,183|

51,642 1,248, .525 6,202.626
54,251 1,617,687 5. .594; 057
45,820 1,059,715 5; 218,598

1,502,312
1,487,273
2,034,391

7,766
184,355
100,139 1,196,478
105,631 291,466

441,854
424,135]
539,49889,722]
600,290
443,4781
277,649

1,283,2841 6,7.39,623
1,228,221 6,504,679
1,197,774 10,6.54,652
1,104,128 6,185; 8-35
2,601,414 9,170,3.33
2,324,121 11,475,634
1,628,336 '6,089,036

2,871,0951
3,068,188
3,.502.733]
2,955,854
3,897,840]
4,165,615
3,334,037

1,197,949]
.53,936
1,100,299
46,.532
3.518,962 3,355,119
3; 074,740 1,700,612
3,746,604 3,214,920
1,499,218 1,417,837
1,312,659 2,868,100

O

16,907
10,710

1,156,993 6,301,262

hj

O

845,675

513,697 1,955,965 10,092,809

2,525,256 1,334,098

623,918

Ul

Oct., N o v . ,
D e c , 1856,
J a n . , 1857.
Sept. & Oct.,
1857.
Ap'l, 1858, to
Jcin., 1859.
Oct.,
1859
Oct.,
1859,
J a n . , 1861.
Florida . ,

Alabama.

15,428,690

18,649,201

16,015,256

12,677,863 2,358,584

8,470.709

549,639 1,194,

454,156

259,576 1,417,541

.5,518,425

2,215,853

533,819

12,479,111

17,929,066

1,605,127

4,791,022

678,274 4,073,555

720,692

402,451 3,751,988 11,687,582

5,317,923

1,727,995

552,254

16,6^9,560
16,555,460

16,776,282 2,583,158 8,424,463
16,680,261 2,629,706 8,565,261

101,939 3,211,974
100,447 2,358,555

8,798,100
8,3U,728

4,7.38,289
3,846,176

1,287,258
1,389,011

787,733
657,800

Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1, 1861

30?,OOC
425,000

464,630
424,262

100,02!
125,000

32,876
55,071

183,640
116,250

129,
108.

5,144

2,296,400
2,297.800
2,297:800
3,235,650
3,653,49c
4,901,000
4,976,000

4,397,298
5,117,427
6,.545,209
5,585,424
9,058,379
13,570,027
10,934,060

768,650
713.026
142,20
146,539
160,219
524,513
565,826

1,125,490 2,382,176
1,274,944 3,467,242
1,139,312 3,177.234
1,302,312 2,581,791
3,371,9-56 6,651,117
2,747,174 7,477,976
2,715,119 5,055,222

1,278,
2,837,
2,423,
1,403,
3,8.30,
4,851,
3,435,

181,558
481,289
703,443
571,556
1,006,832
874,800
2,250,855

Jan.,
1855.
Jan.,
1856
Jan.,
1857
J a n . 1,1858
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1, 1860,
and 1861.

2,248,083 8,368,280

2,005,76i 1,083,710
970,050
1,987,125

24,580
18,412

53,588
80,648
78,148
150,141
160,410
171,300
171,300

271,801
1,421,445
'66.5,302
1,252
24,506 1,162,972
2,192,019
*28,*295 1,208.506
28,835 1,131,530

57,061
561,48:504,287
151,726
872,745
643,657
684,60

1,985,373 3,154,437
2,233,412 6,099,850
1,493,905 6,416,728
1,147,287 3.951,205
873,471 9; 268,254
1,082,041 7,305,115
1,293,840

Jan.,
1855
Dec,
18.55
Dec:,
1856
D e c 25,1857
Dec,
'1858
Dec,
1859
J a n . Ij 1861

20,179,107
19,027,728
21,730,400
22.800^830
24,215,6r9
24,495.866
24,634,844

27,142,907
27,500,348
31,200:295
23,229,096
29,424,278
35,401,609
25,364,513

4,187,180
2,591,400
4.794,885
5,318,418
5,564,-590
5,842,096
5,783,687

3,317,422
2,341,335
2,470,683
2,493,494
2,395,500
2,141,881
2,128,413

Mississippi.

Jan.,
18.55
Jan.,
1856
Jan.,
1857
J a n . 1,1858

240,1
240,165
3.J6,000
1,110,600

352,739
488,411
6.57,020
393,216

5,914
4,894
519
1,007

11,904
12,613
11,413
780,767

Tennessee.

Jan.,
1855
Jan.,
1855
.!an.,
1857
J u l y 1,1857
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
Jan.,
1861

6,717,848
8,593,693
8,454,423
9.083,069
8:351,3;"
8:o57,o;
8,'465,543

11,755,729
14,880,609
16,893,390
13.124,292
•13;262,766
11,751,019
11,942,268

871,076
1,466,455
2,450,308
3,317,060
1,577.-578
1,233;432
464,372

Kentucky .

Jan.,
18.55
Jan:,
1856
Jan.,
1857
J a n . 1,J858
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1,1861

10,369,717
10,454,572
10,596;305
10,782,588
12:21-6,725
12.83.5,570
13,729,'




1,110,377
689,721

1,480,570

25,852
40,118

Louisiana..

17,307. .567
743,033
21,1.32,519
678, .389
23.404,.551
739,126
738,705
17:681,283
7S3,641
24;401,94?
851,562
25,284,869
22,455,175 • 467,357

534,619 1,368,971

50,000

30,209

486,455
165, .395
541,711
143,696
590,715
24,169
583,406
118,323
486,622
8,258
595,759
84,355
577,614 1,152,498

416,920
488,504
465,907
.500,202
5;J8.503

477.971
523,382

216,-505
.535,730
363,924
2.611
141; 075
188.391
308; 14:1

60,710
81,152
257,505
219,086

31,928 1,702,108! 9,147,011

774

20,8
10'5,7

6,570,568
8^191,625
6,811,162
10,370,701
1.6,218,027
12,115,431
6,073,419 13,556;058
5,450
7,740
26,503
975

47,254

8,063
7,744
7,912
59-

1.39
199
20,900
149,167

4,152,988
4,611,765
4,405,106
4.027,825
4,984,141
4,-502,250
4,465,996

1,663,429

872,644

15,000
10,000
5,000

* 2*131
*
196,049
160,982

6,586,601 11,688,296 1,154,538 ,232,973
7,222,614 14,747,470 1,687,531 2,301,747
9,191,139 13,478,729
965,555 2,207,583
4,336,624 11.638,120 1,340,619
9,094,009 21,822,538 2,198,982 ,781,058
11,579,313 19,777,812 1,165,675 2,201,138
6,181,374 17,056,860
753,359 1,012,115
221,760
324,080
555,345
169,400

1.057,140
. 68,209 1,473,040 5,859,562
491,800
2.617, "'^'•
15,037 2,231,418 8,518,545
859,9.56
2,380,700 1,069,408
62,767 2,094,632 8,401.948
2,670,751 6,036,982
3,327,335
998,917
2,-575:465
581,723 1,287,077 2,853,018 6,472,822
2,613;910
932,092 2,^267,710 5, .':J58.^?78
495, .'?62
855,676
422,959 1,021,420 1,341,289 4,S»5; .«'4

3,319,718
686,370
3,731.463
965,878
4,115,430
840,959
725,460
4,431,131
6,535,215 1,01.7, .580
779,555
5.099,678
763,683
4; 3.54,2.29

3,125,530

8,628,946
12,634,533
I3.682,'215
3; 8 ^'4,225
14,345.696
•3, ,520; 207
10,873,630

42,738
35,60[r
8.3,4.35
49,781

31,792

85,501
2,41-3,418
211,681
3,740,101
467,070 664,910
951,262
4,875.346
944,917
4,545;104 1,617,610 2,763,141
441,165
4,659,809 1,073,269
462,420
4,324,799
264,627
2,993,053
335,923 1,501,922

3,011,719
3,608,757
4,473,378
3,232,132
5,144,879
5,652,892
3,72"5,828

2,577,824
2,555,953
2.983,373
3,195,3.52
4,338,364
3,259,717
3,073,919

296,605
532,000
50,000
1,915

No. 35.—Synopsis of the returns of the banks, c^r.—Continusd.

State.

Date.'

$^^,441,643
4,393,029'
4,112,79
4,620,5341
9,83 :\ 426
1,5.461,192
17,373,469]

$49.
$33,870
28,331
195,910'
75,991
98,626]
324;705
597,679] 1,007,575] $348,658
1,090,506 1,016,015
1;281,748 1,531,816 '"'97,* 559

$111,185
104,622
98,254
$72,000
29,773
169,549
417,335
725.6701 226,609
321,754'
970,550

Missouri.

Nov., 1854
Dec,
18.55
Dec.
18.55
J . i n . ' 1, 1858
Jan.,
1859
Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1,1861

$1,215,398
1,215,40.'..
2,215.405
2,620:6r
5,798,78
9,082.951
11,133;899

Illinois ,

April, 1854
Jan.,
18-56
Oct.,
1856
J a n . 4,1858
Oct.,
1858
Jan.,
1860
Oct. 1, I860

2.513,
.3;840,940j
5,872.144
4,679,325
4,000,334
5,251,225
6,750,743

.316,841 2,671,903
.3.37,675] 3,777.676
1,740-671 e;129.613]
1.146.770] 6,164;01
i;298;6i6| 6,486,553]
387,229 9,826,691'
. 546,876 12,264,580

31,158|
79,940
52,832
59,567[
87,769
92,429
116,551

Dec,
18.53
July & Oct.,
1854.
Oct., 1^55, &
J a n . , 1856.
Julv & Oct.,
1856.
Nov., 1857,&.
J a n . . 1858.
No v.; 1858. &
J a n . , 1859.
Jan.,
1860
J a n . 1, 1801

5. .554,552!
7,28l,93<i

7,247,366 3,257,064
9,305,651 6,148,837

289.673
249,298

4,045,32;J • 6,985,993] 1,705,0701
4,123,089

7,039,691 1,694,357.

3,585,922

4,851,4451 1,416,737]

104,224j

3,617,629

6,468,308] 1,252,981

195,711

111,0891 1,177,4891

37
39

- 4,343,210
. 4,741,570

7,675,851 1,.349,465
8,158,0381 1,297,823

258,309
316,024

221,457
91)0,83G|
77,293 1,198,981

Nov., 18.54
Feb.,
18.56
Nov.,
1853
Feb. 1, 1858
Aug.,
18.58
NoV.,
1858
Feb.,
1860

66'
60
61
49
53
5J
52 1

Indiana.,

Ohio .




7,155,581
6,491,42:
6,742,421
6,.5fiO,77U
6,675,428
6,707,15!
6,890,839

13,-578,339
14,921,998]
15,223,241
9,558,927
10,549, .574,
11,171,34-3
11,100,4621

2,466,247
2,476;751'
2,749,6861
2,083,778
2,0i6,:-97
2,059;789]
1,153,55C

1,338,203
878,6121
1,108,148 2,354-.57l
3,90^450
4.75~ 2,813.57-^
1,837| 2,627,690
1,679,277 3,201,41"
2,03.5,735 3,793,7531

385, .339:
517,066
433,71255,034
271,526
343,289]
287,411'

63,892
37,165
19,297
6,433]
9,272]
39.397
37,9201

$975,491 $1,460,650 $1,247,651 $284,776
4,355,050] 2,805,050 1,331,126]
172.425]
1,245,184 2,780,380 i ; i 8 8 , ' ^ ' "
111,
1,424.004 1,718,750 1,482,412] 242,11~|
3,921,7891 6,069,120 3,123,632
579,830
4,160,912 7,884,888 3,357,176' 1,200,010
3,820,530 8,204,845] 3,360,384 1,247,335
555,152 2,283,-526
759,474 3,420,985
635,810] 5,534,945
333,239 5,238,930
269,585 5,707,""^
223,8!2 8,981,723
302,905 1 1 , 0 1 0 , —

1,286,102]
1,257,234
1,002,399
658,521'
640,058]
697,037
807,763

210,483
19,662
1-5,621
26,533
64,2C0]
445,3.59
803,849[

$294,034
241,903
157,981
131,764
5^5,344
552,338
422,220
100,622

127,238 1,985,114
3,087,827

715,305
911,000[

128,8601 1,820,760 7,116.827] 1,764,747
173,573 1,894,357 8,1555856 2,289,605

231,929

132,945| 1,274,992

598,262

389,600 1,599,014 4,516,4221

1,957,097

379,804

161,975

227,5991

380,911 1,3.38,418]

557,2.38

68,508| 1,420,076 4,731,705|

1,852,742

272,81

177,309

. 395,535

236,661 1,261,720| 3,303,976]

1,417,966

380,569|

505,685|

36,623| 1.839,000] 5,379,935

1,723,840

176,366|

68,215

418,991
355,025]

80,799 1,583,540! 5,390,246]
• 105,875 2,290,648 5,755,201

1,700,479
1,841,051

89,530,
117,868

140,895
152,650

10,891

920,441

905, .555
298,2221 1,006,5251 2,751^312
350,708 1,195,04" 3.117,178) 1,6.32,969
310,145]
687,3-37 2;749,558 1,199,SG3
522,041
910,4361 2,139,3641 788,243
604,000]
79o,.998
749,681 2,347,04
535,670
711,157 2,61-3,615] 1,152,433
718,913'
961,720 2,667,7631 898,337'

158,310
106,559
39,00'
121,354]
195,517
150,741
157,3781

1,690,105|
2,096,8091
2,016.814
1,"734,995
1,9.35,025
1,84-5,44
1,828,6401

8,07l,132|
9,080,589
9,153,629
6,201,286
7,588,291
8,040,304
7,983,8891

60,954

949,727; 411,652
5,450,.566
7,101,.335] 1,712,040 296,202
6,543,420| 1,202,951 392,758
280,786 282,071
3,91-5,781
306,793 195,464
3,780,214
488,878 206,235
4,389,831
790,5681 144,781
4,039,614i

10,913,007 2,089,819]

671,590

1,900,942
1,988,087
1,903,603
1,111,786

55.5,431
517,945
588, .389
322,466

145,035
124,486
60,110
.115,661

745,304
755,465
250;000

1,153,547
892,949
578,043

258,776
192,831
79,973

23
32
49
66
98
108
110

1,400,000
1,870,000
2^955,000
5,515,000
7,995.000
7,G20;000
6,782,000

1,861,043
3,906,079
5,280,634
6,230,861
9,252,457
7,592;351
7,723,387

1,044,021
1,200,083
2,025,160
3,626,468
5,114,415
5,031,504
4,949,686

8,791
24,320
94,261
1,501
150,315
1,892
229,235
45,266
304,142
326,461 1,329,668|
1,722,779'

2
3

50,000
155,000

5,185
123,163

50,000
71,967

1.250
1,8941

.30,806
18,285

4,223
9,802

Iowa....,

1859 12
Dec
Jan. 7, 186L 13

460,450
589,130

724,228
1,169,870

101,849

49, 308
222,453

248,81'
284,008

213.661
522,6951

Kansas...

Jan., • 1859
^
Jan. 1, 1861

1
2

52,000
_ 93,130

48,256
48,014

Nebraska..

Jan.,
1857
Jan. I, 1853
Nov.
1858.
^Tov. 2, 1850

4
6
2
i

205,000
15;000
56,000
60,000

418,097'
15,679
97,087
72,406

Feb. 4, 1861 55

7,151,0391

6
4
4
4

980,416
730,438
841,
851,804]

3
4
2

Jan., 1855
Jan.,
1858
1857
Jan.,
Jan. 4,1858
Jan., 1859
Jan., 1860
Jan. 7, 1861
1859
Jan.,
Jan. 1, 1861

Jan.
1855
Dec. , 1855
Dec. , 1856
Dec. 18.57, &
Jan., 1858.
Dec. ' 1858
Dec. , 1859
Dec. 1,1850

Wisconsin.

Minnesota

Michigan . .




40,000|

124,3.57]
130,861
39,200

842,325] 3,206,580|

841,6

410,'987| 2,377,468] 8,143,611

4,046,811 3,200,580

101,696

95,597
1,170,974
53,425
1,356,958 118,962
1,347,9-56
78,975
310,479

187,522
128,216
.52.646
124,198

35,165
13,969
4,777

126,011
76,206
139,878

15,345
21,347
11,145
15,727

392,550
402,520
245,081
77,034

118,784
97,265]
159,
31,411

6,162
6,433
9,141
10,043]

143,123
152,080
93,762
23,776

500,942
573:840
670;549
364,676

14,440
36,119

1.37,059
120,372
133,796

54,963
44,644
'52,372

22,579
23,871
1,879

42,018
24,175
28,389

331,978
222,197
47,510

555,693
375;397
436,837

306,982
341,174
36-3,161
603,848
453,77l|
701,161
498,794
467,411
8.52,283]
892,775]
92.5,110'
890,4.54
745,063] 1,162,936

103,184
57,21"
73,222
67,439
83,893
64,430

334,383
5.3J,713
542.938
576,543
706,009
419,947
372,518

740,764
1,060,105
1,702,570
2,913,071
4,695,170
4,429,855
4,310,175

1,482,053
2,806,341
3, .365,562
2,077,862
3,023,384
3,085,813
4,083,131

456,739
1,073.874
1,290:486
1,278,872
1,573,694
1,493, .529
1,632,201

512|
14,671

15,273
2,228

48,64
8,702]

13,131
54,065

16,202
- 25,C.56
16,1
92,898
5O,504|

2,295
6,533

4,068
6,696

3,975
3,850
1,155
7,885

129,804
35,60l'
3,172
4,443

1,341
404

255,545
378,030

28

527, .3..I
1,154,935|

8,268
4,350

4,414
15,059]
1,000
1,399
2,209

563,
689,600
8,895
5,443

2,69;.,
14,783|

136,325
5,683
6,629
5,627

353,796
41,641
,23,346
16,007

125,291
3,673
23,748
-10,717

O

24

o
w

1,749
2,576
'4,'4i8
'5*536

a

s
O
Ul

to
•<1

No. ^6.-^Comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union in 1856-'5'7, '18-57-'5S, i858-'o9, 1859'-60,
and 1860-'61, '
L o a n s and discounts.

Capital paid in.

Banks and brartches.

t>o
CO

Sections.
1856-'57. 1857'-58. 1858-'59. l859-'60. 1850'-61.

1856-'57.

1857-'58.

.

Western States

•507
470
128
105
206

498
4.59
140
115
210

501
477
139
116
243

505
485
146
1.38
288

506
488
147
141
319

$114,611,752
140,298,876
.50,.554,582
44,630,333
20,739,143

$117,261,990
154,442,049
52,077,587
49,633,352
21,207,821

1,416

Eastern States
Middle States

.1859-'60.

1858-'.59.

1,422

1,476

1,552

1,601

370,834,636

"394,622,799

$119,590,423 $123,449,075
1.56,382,227
1.59; 091,051
48,578,132
54,583,256
54,254,042
,59,383,524
23,171,418 • 25,373,189

1857-'58.

1860-'61.

1855^'57.

$123,708,708
160,085,360
56,282.622
62,941,011
26,577,013

$187,750,275
299,374;750
82,412,657
. 82,813,257
31,605,937

$177,896,020
247,669,31170,040, .568
64,633,845
22,925,468

429,593,713

684,456,887

583,165,242

o
401,976,242

421,880,095

H
O
H

No. 36.—Comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union, ^c.—Continued.

o
L o a n s and discounts.

Ul

Real estate.

Stocks.'

Sections.
]858-'59.
Eastern States
Middle States
Southern States . . • - > . . . .
Southwestern States
•Western States

1857-'58.

1858-'59.

1859- '60.

1860-'61.

l856-'57.

1857-'58.

$179,992,400
284,716,143
'77,039,922
85,980,791
,
29,454,543

.$190,185,990
289.6-35,640
83;231,888
101,468,715
28,421,346

$194;856,619
304,227,203
79,282,290
89,069,505
29,332,804

$1,459,7-58
27,702,286
8,798,041
7,127,039
13,187,205

$1,131,869
25,576,900
9, ,3.54,305
9,623,729
13,618,466

.$1,206,564 $1,6.57,908
29.924,425 31,227.493
8,625,484 - 9,625;777
8,51.3^,363 ^ 9,177,273
15,-232,613 18,655,893

$1,489,949
33,-521,8.58
9,947,427
8,251,792
20,793,853

$2,707,588 • .$3,310,486
9,596,524
8,832,442
10.064,396 10,276,462
4,537,783
3;715,120
1,034,579
804,976

$3,640,675
10,675,795
6,639,639
3,720,584
1,299,804

657,183,799

691,945,580

696,778,421

59,272,329

60,305,269

63,502,449

74,004,879

26,124,522

28,755,834

25,976,497

,
.




1858-'59.

1859-'60.

70,344,343

1860-'61.

1856-'57.

]sro. 36.— Comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union, ^c.—Continued.
Other investments.

Real estate.

Due by other banks.

Sections.
1859-'60.
Eastern States . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,844,810
11,481,225
Middle States
10,313,308
Southern States
3,613,520
Southwestern States
1,529,268
Western S t a t e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l857-.'58.

1858--59.

1839-'60.

$511,152
$3,623,549
616,619
11,685.602
10,559,530 " 1,725,876
1,883,250
3,722,463
1,083,439
1,157,783

$683,708
1,015,752
1,951,349
1,439,020
987,077

$1,044,319
1,309:619
4,102;185
1,025,804
841,114

$1,075,879
1,319,363
3,067,297
1;383,083
4,277,549

$1,141,438 §15,304,943 .^•12,215,423 $16,333,357 .$14,310,756
• 3,829,149 21,951,008 20,843,384 23,1.37,793 20,051,485
3,460,720
5,801,535
5,330,828 10,122,640
7,461,775
3,333,320 13,911,655 1.3,188; 355 21,168,632 17,317; 715
4,902,884
8,870,052
6,484,812
7,482,565
8,083,726

5,920,336

6,075,905

8,323,041

11,123,171

16,657,511

1860-'61.

1856-?57.

1860-'61.

1856-'57.

1857-'58.

185S'-59.

lS59-'60.

1860-'61.
.'314,015,271
22,625,292
5,138,6.59
7,623,183
9,391,585

td
hj

30,782,131

.30,748,927

65,849 205

58,052,802

78,244,987

67,235,457

58,793,990

o.
H
O

No. 36.— Comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union, S^c.—Continued.
Specie.

Cash items.

Notes of other banks.

1860-'61.

1£60-'61.

1850-'61.

1856-'57.
Eastern states
,.,
Middle States
Southern States
Southwestern States
Western States •. • • . . . . . .

o
Ul

Sections.
1857-'58.

1858-'59.

1859-'60.

1860-'61;

1856-'57.

1357-'53.

l858-'59.

$7,452,318
11,071,854
3,895,232
2,638,067
3,-066,537

$6,216, .504
8,698,885
3,401,629
2,201,783
' 1,928,635

$6,495,545
3,588.204
2,452;404
3,479,624
2,842,512

$7,020,319
9,220,661
3;446,976
2,984,599
2;844,012

$7,003,127
4,476,163
3,782,997
3,403,069
3,238,546

$285,688
24,477,093
45.708
62;767
209,335

$307,073
14,318,182
265,F63
47;393
• 441,930

$495,220
23,423,266'
950,756
1,635,943
303,645

$365,602
$335,511
17,430,612 21,060,613
179;980
186,031
973,792 7,420,351
271,332
^ 365,575

$7,260,426
2.3,390,763
^7,149,616
15,704,308
4,844,725

$5,391,617
38,020,756
6,268,319
19,796,184
3,935,955

28,124,008

22,447,436

18,858,289

25,502,567

21,903,902

25,081,641

15,380,441

25,80.8,822 , 19,331,521 29,297,878

53^349,838

74,412,832




1859-'60.

t>o
CO

No. 36.— Comparative view of the condition of the boMks in different sections of the Union,, ^c—Continued

to
GO

O

^

Specie.

Circulation.

Sections.
].858^'59.
$13,774,125
43,971.104
10,679:614
31,359;021
4,753,954

$10,098,162
33,229,061
10,130,310
25,79;j,477
4,343,527

104,537,818

Eastern States
...,
Bliddle States
c.....
Soaihern States ,.
.^.
Southwestern States . . . .
W e s t e r n States
.,.,«, ...<>................

1859-.'60.

83^,594,537

185e^'57.

1857-'58.

$10,037,304
37,749,614
8,119,,036
25,999,992
5,768,161

$53,554,041
62,696,774
38, 788,5.53
57,792,261
22,147,194

$41,417,692
44,137,749
27,751,551
23,727,772
18,123,580

87,674,507

214,778,822

155,208,344

1860-'51.

1859-'60.

1860-'61.

$39,564,689
49,482,057
37.400.883
' 42-632,'761
24,226,425

$44.-510,618
53,146,871
35,863,618
46,000,759
.27, .580,611

$44,991,285
52.873; 851
39,-552,760
34,600,785
29 98'7,086

193,308,818

207,102,477

^202,005,767

1858-'59.

o
O
W.

No. 36.—Comparative view of the condition of the banks in different sections of the Union, ^c.—Continued.
o

J)ue to other b a n k s .

Deposits.

Ul

Sections.
1855-'57.
Eastern States
Middle States
Souihern States
Southwestern States
•Western States

,
' . . . . -.
"




•
:

...

1857-'58.

1853-'59.

1859-'60.

$34,520,868
139,873,112
15,195,763
25,523,139
14,237,370

-$28,195,426
113,814,435
13,180,489
22,3.36,416
8,384,282

$41,877<420
150,620,922
18,119,776
38,531,455
10,368,705

$41,319,5.50.
145,829.987
18,250;347
37,97.^832
10,428,413

230,351,352

185,932,049

259,568,273

253,802,129

1858-'59.

1856-'57.

1857-'58.

$40,822,523
. 156,899,6.56
16,480,430
30,576,820
12,450,083

$7,310,-540
35,710,833
6,136,719
5,709,272
1,806,970

$6,929,^552
31,890,.583
4,590,702
6,999,046
'759,992

$9,370,024
42,285,596
6,641,306
9,197,277
720,448

257,229,582

57,674,333

51,169,875

68,215,651

1860-'61.

No. ^6.-^Comparative view of the condition of the banks in diff'erent sections of the Union, ^c.—Continued.
Due to other b inks.

x

i859-'60.

1860-'61.

Other liabilriies.
1856-'57.

1857-'58.

1858-'59.

1859-'60.

1860-'61.

..»

•

$8,987,151
35,213,5.53
4,030,096
6,764,829
'937,289

$9,686,483
36,386,050
4,117,369
7,661,391
3,443,963

$2,625,089
7,574.093
4,332;643
. 3,213,845
2,07i;080

$3,304,554
3,541,0.58
2,670,550
2,770,116
1,880,435

$2,819,422
3,731,452
3,833,720
2,224,354
2,499,499

$1,541,091
4,301,054
3,436,648
2,8.39,607
2,432,805

$2,811,728
11,072 379
4,1.35! 271
2,674,929
2,56.3.697

55.932,918

Middle States . . . . . . . ^ . . .
Southern States
Southwestern States
Westerli States

61,275,256

19,816,850

14,165,'713

15,048,427

14,661,815

23,253,004

Eastern States.—Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut.
Middle States.—New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland.
Sou'hern Slates.—Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina. Georgia, Florida.
Soutliwestern States.—Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri.
Westein States.—Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nebraska Territory, Minnesota, Kansas,




O
O

o
GQ

00

282

EEPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. ^1 .—General statement of the condition of the banks

Name of State or Territory.

Maine
New Hampshire..
Vermont
Massachusetts .o.
Rhode Island. . . .
Connecticut
N e w York
New Jeisey
Pennsylvania. . . .
Delaware*
Maryland
Virginia
,
North C a r o l i n a . . .
South Carolina...
Georgia*
Florida
,
Alabama*
Louisiana
Tennessee.......
Kentuci^y
,
Missouri
Illinois
.,...
Indiana
Ohio
,
Michigan
,
Wisconsin
',
Iowa
.,
Minnesota
Kansas.
Nebraska.

71
51
44
176
90
73
306
50
89
5
31
25
14
.18
14
2
5
12
IS
10
9
94
19
55
2
110
13
3
2

Total of returns nearest to
1,410
January 1, 1861
4
Delaware (additional)...
10
Georgia (additional)'.....
3
Alabama ( a d d i t i o n a l ) . . . .
Aggregate

1,427

J a n . 5,1861
Dec. 3,1860
August, 1850
Oct. 27,1860
Nov. 16,1860
April, 1860
Dec. 29,1860
Jan. 1,1861
Nov. 1,1850
Jan.,(&c.,1.851
J a n . 1,1861
Jan. 1,1361
J a n ' r v , 1851
Sept'er, 1850
Jan. 1,1861
•Jan'ry, 1861
Jan'ry, 1861
Dec. 28,1860
Jan.,&c., 1861
J a n . 1,1851
J a n . 1,1851
Oct. 1,1860
Jan.1-7,1861
Feb. 4, 1861
Dec. 1,1860
Jan. 7,1861
J a n . 7,1361
J a n . 1,1861
Jan. 1,1861
Nov. 2,1860

$7,656 250
4,981,000
3,873,642
64,519,200
21,070,619
21,606,997
111,821,957
8,246,944
25,808,553
1,088,175
12,567,121
16,486,210
7,863,4'J6
14,952,486
10,357,200
425,000
3,676,000
24,631,844
8,466,543
13,729,725
11,133,899
6,750,743
4,744,570
7,151,039
250,000
6,782,000
589,130
156,000
93,130
60,000

$1.3,406,294
8,794,948
6,748,500
107,417,323
27,980,865
30,518,689
209,721,800
13,851,045
5.5,327,472
1,970,305
22,299,233
25,356,262
14;080,746
22,230,759
12,046,173
424,262
7,248,058
26,364,513
11,942,238
22,455,175
17,373,469
.546,878
8,158,038
10,913,007
57.8,043
7,723,387
1.169,870
'123,163
48,014
72,406

Jan. l,l'86l
J a n ' r y , 1860
October,18-59
Jan. 1,1860

421,541,843
552,610
6,193,250
1,300,000

687,414,583
1,044,348
4,634,083
3,685,402

72,911,101
3,250
985,109
105,419

26,781,631
43,273
3,869,013
55,000

429,592,713

695,778,421

74,004,879

30,748,927

$190,372
195,234
1,104,343
29,60.5,318
899,831
2,377,774
635,685
3,685,135
537,714
2,969,872
1,644,597
125,000
460,407
5,783,687
464,372
467,357
970.550
12,264; 580
1,297,828
2,089,819
79,973
4,949,6t:6
71,967
40,000,

$235,531
75,645
174,736
1,601,072
013,747
922,817
8,827,331
469,724
1,76.5,255
40,685
539,329
1,070,669
239,456
684,144
4,696,243
116,300
1,128,413
577,614
.523,382
321,754
115,551
316,024
671, D90
39,200

6,533
7,885

* Not in full.
Repeated efforts were made to obtain returns from the banks (17 in number) embraced in the second division
cessary, in order to complete this tabular view, to take the returns showng their condition on or near January
1860, and January 1, 1861.
In the Statek and Territories not embraced in this table there were, it is believed, no banks of issue in opera




EEPOET ON THE FINANCES.

283

according to returns dated nearest to January 1, 1861.

$308,703
$653,334 $4,313,005 $2,475,111
$151,437
$995,649
157,385
243,719
3,332,010
756,200
1 234;627
.58,558 $103,537
185,670
3,784,673
15,042
1,299,595
814,623
7,-532,647 22,086,920 27,804,099 6,937,042
7,212,531 5,138,549
966,079
471,581
3,772,241
2,986,9.56 1,395,1.84
846,333
140,548
373,853
• 950,753
5,-505, .507 1,166,778
232,055
7,702,436
2.904.983
832,228
430,449 13,962,096 2,287,843 16,044,322 28,427,334 28,239,950 114,845,372 29,492,678
533,669
1,049,090
5,117,817
559,579
4,164,799
2,353,0.59
1,853,151
7,818,769 -15,830,033 27,032,104 4,118,925
4,912,286
1,045,641
4,548,839
"'43.'ois'
126,614
67,421
675,278
516,393
40,246
213,515
2,267,158
9,086,162 2,108,920
3,558,"247
1,874,439 1,524;228
3,017,359 19,817,148
7,157;270 l,310,0':-8
32,939
1,893,416 2,003,703
330,791
1,0.59,715
45,820
2,034,391
5,218,598
105,631
28,912
630, .355
'513,183
1,628,336
3,334,037 1,312,659
6,089,036
2,388,994
587,645
277,649
2,764,407
6,0.46,775
871,999
768,151 *"26;72i" 1,631,997
502,512
1,244,391
55,071
774
116,250
108.606
18,412
12,302
40,118
1,891,403
84,9h6
2,809 740 1.639„403
528,847
2,604,221
921,010
539
6,07-3,419 13,656,0-5.8
' 75"1,359
6,181,374 17,05! ,850
1,293,840
422,969 1,021,420
1,341,289
2,91-.:i, 063
335;923
855,676
4,285,714
1,692,498
4,466,996 10,873,630
3,7^5,828 3,073,919
763.633
149,167
4.354,229
^308,147
3,820,530
3,360,334 1,247,335
97.559
1,281,748 1,531,816
8,204,845
302,905 11,010,837
287,411
807,753
37; 920
'6 •1,200
*2,* 03-5," 736 3,793,753
2,296,648
355,025
1,841,0.51
105,875
117,888
5,755,201
77,293
i;198,961
841,682
2,377,466
4,046,811 3,206,580
110,987
8,143,611
.812,325
3,206,-580
28,389
•4-36,837 .
52,372
1,879
4;777
47,510
133,796
4,083,131
372,518
4,310.175
745,063 1,162,936
1,722,779
378,030
1,154,925 '"'50,'504
522,695
689,600
284,008
222,453
10
14,671
2,228
9,802
54,055
8,702
18,285
24
• 4,3.50
14,783
5,443
6,696 . 4,414
5,627
10,717
2,209
16,097
4,443
404

$394,700

$168,662

16,442,Ode
187,209
23,295

1,444,338
813,714
1.53,916
9,572,786
1,073,159

"426.* 43I
317,905
291,466
'J, 868,100
272,402
155,655
1,012,115
1,501,922
422,220
. 152,6.50
101,696
139,878
1,632,201
92,898
16,202
• 422
5,530

57,667,484 21,459,744 29,F6,768 86,063,584 196,878,269 255,220,040 160,072,095 22,867,369
36,584
60,649
•405,544
301,808 '
65,702
86,-505 '
173,2.527.3,726
2,270,9.53
1,081;769
517,012
726,.558
385,398
201,899
• 742,734
20,800
6.20,447
625,945
823,716 ' 2,451,001
5,237
210,520
155,754

16,657 511 I 58,793,990 121,903,920 |29,297,878 | 87,674,507 |202,005,767 |257,229,552 ]61,275,2.56 |23,258,004

of this table, showing their condition on or near January 1,1861. All those efforts having failed, it became ne1, 1860. It is believed t h a t no material change in the condition of those banks took place between January 1,
tion on or near J a n u a r y 1,1861, with the exception of one or two small ones in Mississippi.




284

o •

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 37.—General statement of the condition of the banks, Sfc.—-ContiEiuecL
LIST OF BANKS EMBRACED IN THE SECOND DIVISION OF THE TABLE.

Name of bank.

State.
Delaware
Do
Do
Do
G'Cor.f^'ia

Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Do
Alabama
Do
Do

Wilmington and Brandywine.
Mechanics'
Newcastle county
Smvrna
. .
Manufacturers'.- .•
Bank of Middle Georgia..
Bank of Athens
Bank of Commerce
•.. Timber Cutters'.. . ' . . . . , . .
Merchants' and Planters'..
Central Eailroad and Banking Company.

Place.

Wilmington
do..
Odessa
Smyrna.
Macon
do
Athens
Savannah
....do
....do....."....
....do

A u g u s t a . . . . .^...
City
. do.
•Planters'and Mechanics'.. Dalton
Eastern
Eufala
Central
" . . . . Montgomery
Bank of Montgomery — . . . . . d o
Uiiion




Capital.

I200-, 010
200 000
52, 600
100 000
134, 550
125, 000
100, 000
499,000
- 50, 000
521, 710
4, 000, 000
300,
400
68,
300,
900,
100,

000
000
000
000
000
000

No. 38.—General view of the condition of the banks in the United States in different years from 1851 to 1861, inclusioe.
1854.

1,163
144

1,255
143

1,283
133

1,284
138

1,329
147

1,392
170

1,307

731
148

N u m b e r of banks

1,059
149

1857.

1,398

1,416

1,422

1,476

1,562

N u m b e r of branches
N u m b e r of banks and branches
$227,807,553

.$301,376,071

$332,177,288

$343,874,272

$370,3345686

$394,622,799

$401,976,242

$421,880,095

$429,592,713

413,- '56,799
22, 38S:389
219^724
935;972
50, 718,015
17, 196,083
15, 341,196
48. 671,048

557,397,779
44,350,3-30
22.367,472
7,589,830
• 5.% 516,085
22,659,066
25,579,253
59,410,253

576,144,758
52,727,082
24,073,801
8,734,-540
55,7.38,735
23,429,518
21,9.35,738
• 53,944,546

634,183,280
49,485,215
20,86.5,867
8,882,516
62,639,725
24,779,049
19,937,710
59,314,063

684,4.56,887
59,272,329
26; 124,522
5,920,335
65,^49,205
28,124,008
25,081,641
58,349,838

583,165,242
60,305,250
28,755,834
6,075,906
53,052,802
22,447,438
15,380,441
74,412,832

657.183,799
63;502,449
25.976,497
8,323,041
78,244,937
18.85e,289
26;803,822
104,537,818

691,945,580
70,344,343
30,782,131
11;123,171
67,2-35,457
2-5,-50.2,567
19,331,521
83,594,537

696,778,421
74,004.879
30,748,927
16,657;5II
58,793,990
91,903;902
29,297,878
87,674,507

15-5,165,251
128,957,712
46,415,928
6,438,327

204,689,207
188,188,744
50,322,162
13,439,276

186,952,223
190,400,342
45,155,697
15,599,623

195,747,950
212,705,662
52,719,956
12,227,867

214,778,822
230,351,352
57,674,333
19,816,850

155,208,344
18.5,932,049
51,169,875
14,166,713

193, ,306,818
259,558,278
68,215,651
15,048,427

207,102,477
253,802,129
5.5,932,918
14,661,815

202,005,767
257,229,562
61,275,256
23,258,004

.330,539,891

443,200,113

422,509,262

461,173,558

502,804,507

392,310,268

521,090,747

516,837,524

520,510,585

131,926,342

163,164,657

158,048,537

165,670,547

177,404,692

170,293,511

228,449,916

195,664,082

197,-670,277

11,164,727
59,835,775

2.5,136,252
84,546,505

27,183,889
81,133,435

22,705,431
82,020,494

20,066,114
78,415,952

10,229,229
84,642,061

3,033,600
107,571,418

6,695,225
90,289,762

3,600,000
91,274;507

Capital paid in
RESOURCES.

L o a n s and discounts
Stocks
Real estate
(Jther investments
Due by other banks
Notes of other banks
Cash items
Specie

».

O
H
O

LIABILITIES.

Circulation
Deposits
Due to other bimks
Other liabilities

,

Aggregate of immediate liabilities,?, c , of circulation, deposits, and dues to other banks
Aggregate of ithrnediate means, i. c , of specie,
cash items, notes of other banks, and dues from
other banks
Gold and silver in United States treasury deposi^ tories
,
"
.... .
Total of specie in banks and treasury depositories

N O T E . — T h e amount of specie in the United States depositories does not include the amount to the credit of disburing officers.




to
CO

286

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 39.
Statement in relation to the deposit accounts, receipts and payments, and outstanding drafts, condensed from the Treasurer's weeldy exhibits rendered
during the year ending June 30, 1861.
Period.

1860.
July
16
23
31
Aug.
6
13
20
'27
Sept.
3
10
17
24
30
Oct.
8
15
22
29
Nov.
5
12
19
26
Dec.
3
10
17
31
186i.
Jan.
14
21
28
Feb.
4
18
25
March
4
11
18
25
31
April
8
15
May
6
13
20
27
3
June
10
17
24
30

A m ' t of deposits.

$6,114,484
6,261,716
5,809,719
.5,081,321
5,814,078
5,931,505
6,042,834
'
5,512,798
.5,493,332
5,609,732
5,798,300
5,671,359
5,316,147
•5,586,442
5,387,470
5,658,209
6,512,941
5,932,613
5,263,257
4,904,803
4,032,965
3,482,041
3,221,218
3,377,809

35
38
46
81
59
64
36
66
10
18
99
31
99
78
64
61 •
35
40
33
11
37
.55
54
49

3,524,972 25
3,140,838 16
6,449.528 15
4,632,582 92
3,786,842 69
3,987,641 20
9,361,427 38
6,338,871 09
5,668,320 28
5,170,069 99
5,239,393 47
8,122,682 52
9,864,056 39
7,501,556 55
7,904,833 57
7,097,317 96
5,432,692 40
10,637,441 54
11,498,839'47
11,459,417 54
9,243,442 05
5,505,415 78




Outstanding drafts. Subject to draft.

$1,792,096
2,268,086
2,132,838
1,809,593
1,905,176
1,810,315
1,-706,359
1,349;262
1,314,444
1,097,253
1,6.30,536
1,722,862
1,178,960
1,393,364
• 1,516,806
2,149,790
1,495,208
1,851,281
2,068,082
1,448,774
1,425,615
932,130
1,056,-594
1,144,588

65
95
11
58
24
30
15
24
70
95
04
65
78
33
70
04
61
75
88
94
02
75
26
62

1,261,368
1,051,540
2,053,927
1,485,855
1,.309,756
1,351,740
3,413,168
3,270,613
2,649,708
2,405,378
2,568,792
2,467,923
2,266,218
2,187,250
2,050,734
2,603,092
2,414,7.10
1,803,405
1,873,917
• 2,628,469
2,157,728
3,020,318

23 ,
69 '
64
70
45
65
52
61
39
95
23
26
54
93
92
70
89
54
40
55
75
92

A m ' t of receipts.

Drafts paid.

$4,.321,987
3,993,629
3,676,881
3,271,728
3,908,902
4,121,190
4,336,475
4,163,5-35
4,178,887
4,512,478
4,167,764
3,948,496
4,137,181
4,193,078
3,870,663
3,506,419
5,017,732
4,081,331
3,195,174
3,4-56,028
2,607,350
2,549,910
1,064,624
2,233,220

69
43
35
23
35
34
31
42
40
23
95
66
21
45
94
57
64
65
45
17
.35
80
28
87

$2,825,631
.1,536,911
1,256,396
1,810,228
1,382,435
1,540,-574
1.21-5,650
'=959,247
950,014
1,176,820
1,045,182
1,083,105
927,697
877,432
94.5; 279
•1,739,975
2,509,105
1,359,202
1,431,828
2,517,425
619,780
614,886
477,951
3,161,216

53
55
24
19
75
33
43
72
16
40
99
22
87
85
77
24
27
53
93
91
95
32
79
50

$2,275,006
1,389,279
1,708,393
2,538,625
649,679
1,423,147
1,104,331
1,498,923
969,480
1,060,420
856,614
1,210,045
1,282,909
607,138
1,144,251
1,471,236
1,652,373
1,939,530
2,101,185
2,875,879
1,491,618
1,165,810
738,775
3,004,625

62
53
16
84
97
33
71
42
72
32
18
90
09
06
91
27
63
38
00
13
69
14
60
55

2,263,604
2,089,297
4,395,600
2,876,727
2,477,086
2,625;900
5,945,255
3,058,257
3,018,611
2,764,691
2,670,605
5,654,7.59
7,597,837
5,314,295
5,854,098
4,494,225
3,017,981
8,834,036
9,624,922
8,830,947
7,085,713
2,485,096

02
47
51
22
24
55
86
48
89
04
24
26
85
62
65
28
51
00
07
99
30
86

4,25.5,620
502,877
5,287,894
664,514
1,046,487
589,292
'7,705,105
740,942
780,835
598,795
902,599
809,419
1,535,019
2,754,218
2,060,152
626,344
379,952
6,965,313
1,764,156
1,270,694
542,279
298,791

41
63
09
62
80
59
04
71
69
42
04
66
75
94
21
09
41
85
91
60
24
88

4,108,457
887,011
1,979,204
2,751,459
1,622,228
3(8,494
2, .331,318
3,763,499
1,451,387
1,097,046
833,270
708; .550
- 1,333,31.5
5,116,718
1,646,875
1,986,217
1,855,196
1,760,554
902,758
1,310.116
2, 758; 254
4.036;818

65
72
10
85
03
08
86
00
.50
71
56
69
03"
78
19
48
16
71
98
53
73
15

287

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
, No. 40.

,

•

•

•

Summary statement of the value of the exports of the. growth, produce, and
manufacture of the United States, during the year commencing July 1, 1860,
and ending June 30, 1861.

PRODUCT OF THE SEA.

Pisheries—r
Oil, spermaceti
Oil, whale and other fish
Whalebone
Spermaceti and sperm candles.
Pish, dried or smaked
Pish pickled

^2, 110,
581,
736,
143,
634,
244,

823
264
552
907
941
028
i, 451, 515

PRODUCT OF THE FOREST.

WoodStaves and headings
Shingles
Boards, plank, and scantling .
Hewn timber
—
Other lumber
Oak-bark and other dye
All manufactures of
Naval stores—
Tar and pitch
Eosin and turpentine
Ashes, pot and pearl
Ginseng
Skins and furs

gl, 959, 392
108, 6l0
.2, 092, 949
97, 875
441,979
189,476
2, 344, 079
143, 280
1,060,257
651,547
292,899
878, 466
10, 260, 809

PRODUCT OF AGRICULTURE.

Of animals—
Beef
'Tallow
Hides
Horned cattle
Butter
Cheese
Pork, pickled
Hams and bacon
Lard
Wool
Hogs
Plorses
Mules
Sheep

'.

.•

•.
•

1, 675, 773
2, 942, 370
673, 818
223,246
2, 355, 985
3,321,631
2, 609, 818
4, 848, 339
4, 729, 297
.237,846
3,267
193, 420
191, 873
28, 417
24,035,100

Vegetable food—
Wheat



38, 313, 624

288

.

.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

No. 40.—Summary statement of the value of the exports, ^c.—Continued.
PRODUCE OF A G R I C U L T U R E — C o n ' d

Plour
$24, 645, 849
Indian corn
6, 890, 865
Indian meal
1
692, 003
Eye meal
. 55,761
Rye, oats, and other small grain
and pulse
1, 124, 556
Biscuit or ship-bread
429, 708
Potatoes
285, 508
' Apples
269, 363
Onions
102, 578
Bice
'.
1, 382, 178
Cotton
•
• Tobacco
Hemp
Other agricultural productsClover seed
Flaxseed . . . '
Brown sugar

Hops

$74, 191, 993
34, 051, 483
13, 784, 710
' 8,608
1,063,141
49,609
301, 329
2,006,053
3, 420, 132
$149,492,026

MANUFACTURES.

Refined sugar
Wax
Chocolate
Spirits from grain
,.
Sph'its from molasses
Spirits from other materials
JMolasses
Vinegar
Beer, ale, porter, and cider, (in casks)
Beer,ale, porter,and cider, (in bottles)
Linseed oil
Spirits of turpentine
..'...
I-Iousehold furniture
Carriages and parts, and railroad
cars and parts
Hdts of fur or silk
Hats of palm leaf
Saddlery
: - -- Trunks and valises
Adamantine and other candles —
Soap
• Snuff
^
Tobacco,^ manufactured— .^
,
Gunpowder
,
Leather
'. .•
Leather, boots and shoes
Cables and cordage
,



287, 881
94, 495
2, 157
867, 954
850,546
' 593, 185
39, 138
38, 262

25, 876
13,604
27, 982
1, 192, 787
838, 049
472, 080
106, 512
50, 444
.61, 469
40, 622
683, 048
455, 648
17, 703
2, 742, 828
347,103

555, 202
. 779,876
255, 274

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

289

No. ^O.^^Summary statement of the value of exports, (^c.—-Continued.
MANUFACTURES—Continued.
Salt
Lead
.
^ . . ^. .
Iron—
Pig
Bar
Nails
Castings o f . . . .
All manufactures of
Copper and brass, and manufactures of
Drugs and medicines.,
Cotton piece goods:—
Printed or colored
White, other than duck.
Duck
All manufactures of . . .

$144, 046
6,241
. . 25, 826
15,411
270, 084
76,750
5, 536, 576
2, 375, 029
1,149, 433
12, 215, 032
1, 076, 959
300, 668
4, 364, 379
7, 957, 038

Hemp—
Thread
Bags
Other manufactures of
Wearing apparel
Earthen and stone ware
Combs
Buttons
Brooms and brushes of all kinds..
Billard tables and apparatus
Umbrellas, parasols, and sunshades,
Morocco and other leather not
sold by the pound
Pire-engines
Printing presses and type
Musical instruments —
Books and maps
Paper and stationery.'.
:
Paints and varnish
Jewelry, real and imitation
Other manufactures of gold and
silver, and gold leaf
Glass
Tin
Pewter and lead
Marble and stone
Bricks, lime, and cement
India-rubber shoes
India-rubber, other than shoes.
Lard oil
-Oil cake
--

Ex. Doc. 2- -19



80
406
39, 084
462, 554
40, 524
28, 960
3,832
62, 360
8,910
1,271
7,507
7,940
106, 562
150, 974
%50, 365

347,915
240, 923
48, 740
53, 372
394, 731
30, 229
30, 534
185, 267
• • 93, 292
33, 603
160, 088
81, 783
r, 386, 691

290

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 40.—Summary statement of the value of exports, h^c-—Continued.

MANUFACTURES-^'Gontinued.
Artificial flowers

$1, 459
$4, 259, 956
$33, 256, 115
577, 386
172,263

Coal
Ice
Gold and silver c o i n . . .
Gold and silver bullion.

10, 488, 590
13,311,280
23, 799, 870
631, 450

Quicksilver
Articles not enumeratedManufactured
Raw produce

2, 53t), 689
2,794,046

Total.

227, 966, 169

L. E. C H I T T E N D E N , Register,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Register's Office, November 27, 1861.




No.

41.

•

Statement exhibiting the value of imports into, and the exports offoreign merchandise and domestic produce from, the United States
during the quarter ending September 30> 1861.

IMPORTS.

EXPORTS.

Foreign merchandise.
Free.

Dutiable.

Domestic pro- Total foreign
duce.
and domestic.

Total.
Free.

Quarter ending September 30, l S 6 i . . . . . . . . $21,267,477

$19,080,883

Dutiable.

Total.

$40,348,360 $677,013 $1,339,610 $2,016,623

o
H
O

$38,151,251

$40,167,874

w

L. E . C H I T T E N D E N , Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, November 30, 1861.




o
Ul

INS
CD

292

REPORT ON THE FHSTANCES.
No. 42.

List of'partnes to whom sixty days treasury notes were issued f o r coin, and the
amounts thereof, under the act of March 2, 1861, authorizing an issue of
$10,000,000.
Names.
Mechanics' Bank, New York . . ,
National Bank, New York
D. Anderson
,
F . A. Palmer, president
Pacific Bank
North River Bank
Phenix Bank
A. Hemenway
Mercantile Bank
The Hanover Bank
'.
A. A. Robinson
The American Exchange Bank
I. A. Robertson
August Belmont & Co
Jacob Abrahams
. Edward J . King
Bank of the Commonwealth...
D. Thompson, president . . . ' . . .
R. V . D . W o o d . .
:.
Alexander H. Johnson
William L. Jenkins
,
George W. Duer, cashier
Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company
J . M. Morrison, president
"....
Richard Berry, cashier
Charles A. Macy, cashier
N. A. Murdock, president
N.Todd,jr
•
Do
Brooklyn Savings Bank
New York County Bank
Jos. Law,rence, president
Dry Dock Savings Bank
Do
do
G. S. Robbins & Son
York County Bank
.•..
Manhattan Company, J. M. Morrison, president.
Importers and Traders' Insurance Company
D. Anderson
Nassau Bank
,
American Exchange Bank
East River Savings Institution
•
Firemen's Insurance Company, New York
Marine Bank, New York
.1
Citizens' Bank, New York




Amount.

000
200, 000
200, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50, 000
200, 000
100, 000
150, 000
100, 000
100, 000
500, 000
40, 000
100, 000
10, 000
10, 000
50, 000
100, 000
250, 000
75, 000
500, 000
100, 000
200, 000
300, 000
50, 000
200, 000
200, 000
121, 000
79, 000
50, 000
50, 000
200, 000
50, 000
100, 000
115, 000
21, 000
200, 000
3, 000
70, 000
100, 000
515, 000
50, 000
10, 00.0
25, 000
30, 000

293

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 42.-—List of parties, 8^.—Continued.
Names.
William H. Smith & Son . .•
•
E. G. Arthur
John Thompson
.-."
F. W. Smith
N. Todd, jr
:
Jacob Harsen
John Bigelow
W. H. Eaxle
Jos. Lawrence, president
Fulton Bank
C. S. Henderson, cashier
^ ...
Cyrus Curtiss
Mechanics' Bank, New York
H. D. Brookman
David Erwin
G. W. Poillon
Alexander Knight, president
Phenix Bank, New York
Samuel C. Moore
Frederick Bronson
F . Bronson, agent A
Oliver Bronson
Thome, Watson & Company
Mutual Life Insurance Company
Columbian Bank, Boston.
W. A. Hall
Pacifi^c Bank, New York
John Q. Jones, president . . Walter Bowne
„
Ambrose K. Ely
James A. Trowbridge
Edward B. Cobb . . . .
Girard Bank, Philadelphia
'
\ Union Bank,
.do..."
Bank of Penn Township, Philadelphia
Rufus H. King
—
Commercial Bank of Pennsylvania
Manufacturers and Mechanics' Bank
'...
Charles Dutilp, president
Merchants' Bank, Boston
Massachusetts Bank
Shawmut Bank, Boston
E. S. Wheelen & Company
Suffolk Savings Bank, for Seaman and others, Boston
Merchants' Bank, Salem
:
Seventh Ward Bank, New York
East River Bank,
. . . do
,
Hamilton Bank, Boston
Union Dime Saving Institution, New York
James Barnes




Amount.

Rate.

$10,000 Par.
100,000 Par.
20,000 Par.
20,000 Par.
100,000 Par.
5, 000 Par.
5,000 Par.
200,000 Par.
150, .000 Par.
100,000 Par.
15,000 Par.
20,000 Par.
100, 000 Par.
10,000 Par.
5,000 Par.
6,000 Par.
10,000 Par.
100, 000 Par.
500, 000 Par.
27, 0.00 Par.
13,000 Par.
7,000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
150,000 Par.
- 50,000 Par.
30,000 Par.
25, 000 Par.
50,000 Par.
5,000 Par.
10, 000 Par.
20, 000 jPar.
3,300 1 Par,
50, 000 Par.
20, 000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
.125,000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
300,000 Par.
100, 000 Par.
50,000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
10, 000 Par.
50, 000 Par.
20, 000 Par.
25, 000 Par.
10,000 Par.
50,000 Par.
5,000 Par.
50, 000 Par

294

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 42.—List of parties, S^v.—Continued.
Names.

A. A. Robinson
'
George Field, cashier
j—
Drexel & Company
Delaware Mutual Safety Insurance Company, Philadelphia
Charles A. Peabody
Brigham & Parsons
J . S. McKenney, cashier

A. B. Hall
Riggs & Company
Robert S. Covill, c a s h i e r . . . . . . .
C. C. Barry, cashier
Howard Bank, Boston
P. C. Turner, president
Tremont Bank, Boston
J . White, cashier
New England Bank, Boston.
J. Amory Davis
North Bank, Boston
J . H. Beale, president
City Bank, Philadelphia
SouthvTark Bank, Philadelphia ..
Grinnell, Minturn & Company...
Alexander Benson
Jacob A. Robertson
Traders' Bank, Boston
Mount Vernon Bank, Boston
Revere Bank,
do
Frederic Bronson, executor, & c . .
Frederick Bronson
F . J . B. Crane
Mark McCouch & Company
Jeremy Drake, cashier . . :
Bank of Commerce, Phikxdelphia .
Market Bank, Boston
Thome, Watson & Company
Total.




Amount.
$2, 000
25, 000
50, 000
25, 000
3,000
15, 000
2,000
3,000
20, 200
50, 000
50, 000
25, 000
20, 000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
5,000
50, 000
50, 000
30, 000
50, 000
50, 000
20, 000
30, 000
50, 000
5,000
50, 000
10,000
4,000
500
10, 000
15, 000
25, 000
50, 000
50, 000
10,000,000

295

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 43.

List of subscribers to temporary loan of $2,S75,350, for sixty days, issued under
authority of act of July 17, 1861.
Names.
Suffolk Bank, Boston
Globe Bank, Boston
Continental Bank, Boston
Frederick Bronson, agent
^.
Jeremy Drake, cashier
Wm. Nelson & Sons
Henry Marks
Piscataq-ua Exchange Bank
Wm. Griswold
Insurance Company of North America
Tradesmens' Bank, Philadelphia
Chas. F.Blake
Henry C. Lea
Wm. A. Blanchard
Cashier Faneuil Hall Bank, Boston . . .
J.' S. McKenney, cashier
W. S. Camp, cashier
A. D. Hodges, president
•
Western Bank of Philadelphia
W. H. Newbold, Son & Aertsen
,
Isaac N. Phelps
Pacific Bank, New York
Bank of Comraerce, Philadelphia
Germantown and its vicinity
H. F . Sumner
Rudderow, Jones & Co
Winslow, Lanier & Co
James V. Watson, p r e s i d e n t . . . .
James V. Watson, president
Exchange Bank, Salem
Jas. M. Smith, cashier
John Bullard, jr
Richard Irvin & Co
James B. Warden
Bedford Commercial Baiik
Charles PJiind
Salem Bank, Salem, Massachusetts
Dr. Albert Smith
,
S. H. Carpenter
L. H. Meyer. president
A . D. Hodges, president
.'
John W. Thomas
-.
J . Tome, president
Geo. A. Bock
Piscataqua Exchange Bank
Bank of the Republic, Boston
,
Bullai'd&Co




Amount.

Rate

$100, 000
100,000
100, 000
11,000
35, 000
5,000
10, 000
25, 000
1,500
2^5, 000
50,000
3,000
8,000
20,000
50, 000
8, 400
30, 000
30, 000
47, 000
10, 000
20, 000
25, 000
25, 000
7,.500
10, 000
30,000
50, 000
10, 000
10,000
15, 000
25, 000
• 10,000.
50, 000
6,000
10,000
5,000
20, 000
3,000
10, 000
50,000
20, 000
10, 000
5, 000
• 3,000
25, 000,
25, 000
5., 000

Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.

296

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 43.—List of subscribers to temporary loan, ^c.—Continued.

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank, Philadelphia.
James Adams, cashier
Hide and Leather Bank, Boston
Presto tt Bank, Lowell
Columbia Bank, Columbia, P e n n s y l v a n i a . . . . .
James W. Cunningham
-----Blackstone Bank, Boston
Blackstone Bank, Boston
Tremont Bank, Boston
Tremont Bank, Boston
Thomas B. Gilford
,
, -...
Wood & Redmond —
Cashier Boston Bank, Boston.
Cashier Boston Baiilc, Boston
---- —
D. A. Dodge
,
J . S. McKenney, cashier
John G. Dietz
Riggs & Co
W. S. Camp, cashier
Mechanics' Bank, Philadelphia
Mechanics' Bank, Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . . .
George Field, cashier . —
— .
Mary Ann Andrus
-.--•.-.•
Charles Burrall
....... — ...
......
Philadelphia Bank, Philadelphia
,
Philadelphia Bank, Philadelphia.
Edward Bell
.,..,,,',.
Cyrus 0- Baker
---:--.
•
W. J . Symmes & Bro
T. P . Handy
..,
George A. Cooke.
-- -r•• George A. Cooke. - . , . - . .
----.John G. Dietz
James Nehan
,
John L. Biince, president
J . C. Douglass, cashier
Corn Exchange Bank, Philadelphia..
Joseph L. Hewlett
Bank of North America, Philadelphia.
' Jeremy Drake, cashier — .
.
.
Exchange Bank, Boston
:
H. P . Morgan & Co .
Gardner G. Yrelin
Riggs & Co
Importers and Traders' Bank, New York
Importers and Traders' Bank, New York . . . .
Merchants' Bank, Boston
Bank of the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia.
Bank of the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia.




$200,000
1,000

25, 000
2,000
20, 000
10, 000

25, 000
25, 000
30, 000
20, 000
2,000
10, 000
25, 000

25, 000
10, 000
1, 050
5,350
20, 200
20, 000
50, 000
25,000

25, 000
2,000
30, 000
75, 000
75, 000
2,000
500
10, 00.0
50,000
10,000
15, 000
5,000
250
50, 000

20, 000
25, 000
600
100, 000
20, 000
100, 000
12, 000
3,000
10, 000
50,000
50, 000
100, 000
50, 000
50, 000

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.

297

No. 43.-:—List of subscribers to temporary loan, (^.-^Continued.

Names.

Amount

H. Augustus Taylor
Samuel Carr, cashier
Winslow, Lanier & Co
Daniel Owen
Kensington Bank
Monument Bank, Charlesto^vn
C. R. Ransom, cashier
Mattapan Bank
]Market Bank

$10, 000
25, 000
60, 000
5, 000
10, 000
10, 000
50, 000
10,000
50, 000

Total

Rate.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.
Par.

2, 875, 350

No. 44.
Statement of the public debt on the 1st day of January in each of the years from
1791 to 1842, inclusive, and at various dates in subsequent years, to July 1,
1861.

On the 1st day of January. .1791.
1792.
1793.
1794.
1795.
1796.
1797.
1798.
1799.
1800.
1801.
1802,
1803
1804.
1805
1806.
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818



$75, 463,476 52
77, 227,924 66
80, 352,634 04
78, 427,404 77
80, 747,587 38
83, 762,172 07
82, 064,479 33
79, 228,529 12
78, 408,669 77
82, 976,294 35
83, 038,050 80
80, 712,632 25
77, 054,686 30
86, 427,120 88
82, 312,150 50
75, 723,270 66
69, 218,398 64
65, 196, 317 97
57, 023,192 09
53, 173,217 52
48, 005,587 76
45,209, 737 90
55, 962, 827 57
81,487, 846 24
99, 833,660 15
127, 334,933 74
123, 491,965 16
103, 466,633 83

298

'

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 44.—Statement of the public debt, 8fc.—Continued.

On the 1st day of J a n u a r y . . 1819.
1820.
1821.
1822.
1823.
1824.
• 1825.
18261827.
1828.
1829.
1830.
1831.
1832.
1833.
183418351836.
1837.
1838.
1839.
1840.
1841.
1842.
.1843.
On the 1st day of J u l y .
1844.
1845.
1846.
1847.
1848".
On the 1st day of December, 1849.
1850.
On the 20th day of N o v ' r . . ..1851.
On the 30th day of Dec'r. -1852.
On the 1st day of J u l y . . . -1853.
1854.
On the 17th day of N o v ' r . . ..1855.
On the 15th day of N o v ' r . . ,.1856.
.1857.
On the l,st day of J u l y .
1858.
1859.
1860.
1861.

529, 648 28
91, 0l5, 566 15
89, 987, 427 66
93, 546, 676 98
90, 875,^877 28
90, 269, 777 77
83, 788, 432 71
81, 054, 059 99
73, 987, 357 20
67, 475, 043 87
58, 421, 413 67
48, 565, 406 50
39, 123, 191 68
24, 322, 235 18
7, 001, 032 88
4, 760, 082 08
351, 289 05
291, 089 05
1, 878, 223 55
857, 660 46
, 4,
11, 983, 737 53
5, 125, 077 63
6, 737, 398 00
15, 028, 486 37
27, 203, 450 69
24, 748, 188 23
17, 093, 794 80
16, 750, 926 33
38, 956, 623 38
48, 526, 379 37
64, 704, 693 71
64, 228, 238 37
62, 560, 395 26
65, 131, 692 13
67, 340, 628 78
47, 242, 206 05
39, 969, 731 05
30, 963, 909 64
29, 060, 386 90
44, 910, 777 66
58, 754, 699 33
64, 769, 703 OS
90, 867, 828 68

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMET,
'
Registers Offce, December 4, 1861.




REPORT ON THE

FINANCES.

299

N o . 45.
Table o f p a y m e n t s m a d e a n n u a l l y on account o f the interest a n d p r i n c i p a l o f
the p u b l i c debt, f r o m M a r c h 4, 1789, to J u n e 30, 1861.
Years.
From March 4, 1789, to December 31, 179i_..
Year ending
..^.
„..,.„.-1792..1793-..
1794...
1795...
1796...
1797„..
1798-..
1799...
/
1800...
1801...
1802...,
1803...
1804...
1805...
1806...
1807...
1808...
1809...
1810...
1811...
1812...
1813...
1814...
1816...
- 1816...
1817...
^ 1818...
1819....
1820...
1821...
1822...
1823...
1824...
1825 . . .
1826...
1827...
1828...
1829...
1830...
1831..
1832..,
1833..
1834..
1835-.
1836..
1837..
1838..
1839..
1840-.
1841..
1842..
For the half year ending June 30. - . - 1 8 4 3 . .
For the fiscal year ending June 3 0 . . . . 1844..



$5,287,949 50
7,263,665 99
5,819,505 29
5,801,578 09
6,084,411 61
6,835,846 44
5,792,421 82
3,990,294 14
4,596,876 78
4,578,369 95
7,291,707 04
9,539,004 76
7,256,159 43
8,171,787 45
7,369,889 79
8,989,884 61
6,307,720 10
10,260,245 35
6,452,554 16
8,008,904 46
8,009,204 05
4,449,622 45
11,108,123 44
7,900,543 94
12,628,922 35
24,871,062 93
25,423,036 12
21,296,201 62
7,703,926 29
8,628,494 28
8,367,093 62
7,848,949 12
6.530,016 41
16,568,393 76
12,095,344 78
11,041,082 19
10,003,668 39
12,163,438 07
12,383,867 78
11,355,748 22
16,174,378 22
17,840.309 29
1,543,543 38
6,176,565 19
58,191 28
21,822
6,605,720
11,117,987
4,086,613
6,600,689
8,575,539
861,696
12,991,902

91
27
42
70
74
94
56
84

300

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. ^5.-^Table of payments made annually, 8^.—Continned.
Years.

Payments.

For the fiscal year ending June 30 . . . . 1 8 4 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
..
1862
1863
1854
.-.'-..1866
1866
1857
1858
1859....
I860-.-.
1861......
..._.

$8,595,039
1,213 823
6,722,021
15,427,688
16,452,880
7,438,728
4,426,154
6,322,654
10,498,905
24,330,980
9,852,678
12,392,505
6,242,027
9,771,067
17,351,237
17,045,013
22,221,881

10
31
39
42
13
17
83
27
39
66
24
12
61
04
20
07
03

661,036,662 28
L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Register's Office, December 2, 1861.




301

REPORT ON THE FINANCES.
No. 46.

Statement showing the payments made annually on account of the interest and
reimbursement of the domestic debt, interest on the public debt, and redemption
of the public debt, from the Uh of March, 1789, to 1861.

From Mar. 4, 1789, to Dec. 31, 1791
Year ending . . . . . . .
.1792
' 1793
1794
1796
1796
1797
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
..
1814
1816
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
• 1822
1823
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1836
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841



Interest and reim- Interest on the Redemption of
bursement of the public debt. the public debt.
domestic debt.
$1,140,177
2,373,611
2,079,106
2,456,856
2,727,959
2,914,847
2,879,976
2^,726,238
2,-599,251
3,186,201
4,213,430
4,077,147
3,949,462
3,977,206
3,318,141
6,572,018
4,183,890
7,701,288
3,852,896
4,835,241
2,010,656
1,098,488
1,948,639
1,712,897
3,343,263
4,527,779
6,442,603
6,606,814
7,355,167
6,465,995
6,623,321
6,739,760
6,524,034
6,301,104

20 ,
$37,686 83
$699,984
28
4,711,405
76
18,753 41
2,672,048
60
296,666 44
2,874,356
07
219,099 99 1 2,985,742
68 |
324,500 00
2,685,658
73 j
292,540 00
2,708,682
40
229,637 50 1 1,004,518
41 . 216,400 00
1,706,578
04
216,400 00
1,138,563
06
198,400 00
2,879,876
16
162,025 00
5,293,235
36
82,000 00
3,224,697
07
592,031 08
3,593,017
48
751,707 41
3,171,225
64
.485,216 12
2,883,752
40
609,098 74
1,614,730
96
600,633 28
1,956,440
27
688,923 42
1,910,734
12
844,674 36
2,318,996
49
654,802 94
5,334,540
49
627,051 64
2,724,082
73
806,740 74
8,352,742
50
216,835 31
5,970,811
09
793,366 18
8,492,293
77
699,730 83 19,643,552
62
344,019 86 19,636,612
60
190,743 82
2,006,367
52
46,720 04 13,894,314
95
188,133 87
2,974,364
38
36,560 88
2,707,211
62
2,109,188
37
5,982
19
11,267,289
7 728 578
4 366 757 40
3 975 542 95
7 065 5Sq
6 517 506
3,486,071 61
9 064 6.S7
3,098,800 60
2,642,843 23
9,841,024
1,912,574 93
9 443 175
1,373,748 74 14 800 629
772,661 50' 17,067,747
303,796 87
1,239,746
60 00
202,152 98
6,974,362
57,863 08
330
X^I.^ VJV/V/j

.27
2,000
3,000
2,000
2,261

\ J U %/

23
04
54
39
56
33
66
97
84
11
98
24
07
66
96
14
96
95
47
74
57
32
97
13
08
33
65
87
06
46
36
50
04
67
R8
24
80
4Q
56
01
48
79
61
21
37

\£.KJ

76
21,824 03
75 """'l4,'997"64" 6,588,711 98
00
399,834 23 10,715„153 19
do
174,635 77 1 3,909,977 93
13
288,063 45
6,310,365 16

302

REPORT ON THE FINANCES*

No. 46.-—Statement showing the payments made annually, b^.—•'Continued.
Interest and reim- Interest on the Redemption of
bursement of the public debt. the public debt.
domestic debt.
Year ending

#
•

Total

1842
1843
1844
1846
1846
1847
1848
1849
1860
1861
1852
1853
1854
1856
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861

$6,000 00
5,000 00
44,648 16
26,031 95
22,649 35
6,95674
4,767 38
4,600 00
2,000 00
2,338 49
1,359 78

•

^

$773,550
523,584
1,833,484
1,040,953
843,228
1,119,246
2,391,652
3,565,835
3,782,406
3,701,979
4,000,654
3,665,551
3,066,646
2,314,464
23 50 1,954,708
3 21 1,593,765
1,652,056
14,713,672
3,144,620
4,000,173

06
57
37
09
77
86
17
32
74
60
35
08
51
99
84
23
67
81
04
76

$7,896,989
333,011
11,113,870
7,609,822
347,945
5,593,078
13,031,268
12,799,679
3,654,321
652,123
2,150,576
6 412 855
18,269,718
6,666,165
10,052,099
4,2^4,686
7,544,-568
2, 638,664
13,900,392
18,221,708

88
98
31
63
19
77
87
00
43
55
72
67
49
86
88
78
29
39
13
03

131,498,893 21 94,023,479 18 424 616 447 67

L. E. CHITTENDEN, Register,
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Blister's Office,Wecemher 2, 1861..





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102